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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

City of Manchester, N. H- 

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Forty-Eighth Annual Report 



Receipts and Expenditures 



City OF Manchester 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER ^i, 1893 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING 
TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




MANCHESTER: 

PRINTED BY THE JOHN B. CLARKE CO. 
1894. 



\^S3 



City of Manchester. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN ORDER to print the Forty-eighth Annual Report of the Receipts and 
Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Order i:n, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the joint 
standing committee on finance be, and they hereby are, authorized to procure, 
for the use of the inhabitants of said city, the printing of the Forty-eighth An- 
nual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, in- 
cluding the reports of the joint standing committee on finance, the city auditor, 
the school board, and superintendent of schools, superintendent of water-works, 
water commissioners, engineer of fire department, city marshal, overseers of the 
poor, trustees, librarian, and treasurer of the city library, committee on ceme- 
teries, joint standing committee on city farm, city physician, city solicitor", city 
engineer, street and park commissioners, and such other matters relating to city 
affairs as said finance committee may direct, the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for printing and stationery. 

In Board of Common Councii.. January 26, 1894. 
Passed. 

FRED T. DUNLAP, Presideiit. 

In Board or Mayor and Aldermen. January 26, 1894. 
Passed in concurrence. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 
1893- 



Mayor. 



EDGAR J. KNOWLTON . . . Office, City Hall 

Chosen at biennial election in November, 1890, and re-elected in November, 
1892. Salary, ;^i,8oo per annum, payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1848, 
section i. Chapter 223, Laws of 18S3. PubUc Statutes, chapter 47.) Resi- 
dence, 533 Lake avenue. Telephone at house and office. 



Aldermen. 



Act of June, 1848, section i. Pubhc Statutes, chapter 48. 

Ward I. Sam C. Lowell, 50 M. S. block, Mechanic street. 

Ward 2. Alfred D. Maxwell, Goffstown road near Front 
street, Amoskeag. 

Ward 3. George W. Reed, 483 Chestnut street. 

Ward 4- John P. Cronin, 260 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. Richard J. Barry, 232 Lake avenue. 

Ward 6. Byron Worthen, 524 Lake avenue. 

Ward 7. James Lightbody, 61 Amoskeag Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

Ward S. Christian L. Wolff, 36 Clinton street. 

Ward 9. William Marcotte, 506 Beauport street. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

President of the Common Council. 
Fred T. Dunlap, 107 Russell street. 



Members of the Common Council. 

Act of June, 1848, section i. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 
Ward i. 

Joseph Tait, 4 Boyden street. 

* John F. Reardon, 12 Arkvvright street. 

John G. Rylander, 6^ Stark Corporation, Canal street, 
t Frank X. Foster, 1382 Elm. 

Ward 2. 

Fred T. Dunlap, 107 Russell street. 

George E. Heath, River road north, at Hooksett line. 

Charles R. Holbrook, 1966 Elm street. 

Ward 3. 

* Harry E. Webster, 573 Maple street. . 
Joseph O. Tremblay, 18 Wilson road. 
Charles H, Harvey, 507 Maple street. 

t David H. Burbank, 77 Ash street. 

Ward 4. 

Howard C. Holt, 41 1 Amherst street. 
Bradley B. Aldrich, 337 Chestnut street. 
Ludger E. Desrochers, 359 Amherst street. 

Ward 5. 

Daniel A. Murphy, 105 East Spruce street. 
John J. Twomey, 91 Cedar street. 
Edward F. Murray, 194 Lake avenue. 

* Resigned, t Special election. 



LTST OF OFFICERS. 

Ward 6. 

Frank H. Libbey, 23 E^x\ street. 
George B. Rogers, 277 Laurel street. 
William G. Landry, 390 Cedar street. 

Ward 7. 

* Charles A. Niven, Pleasant street, corner Franklin. 
Willie D. Wheeler, 25 Grove street. 
Levi K. Snow, 86 Canal street, 
t J. Adam Graf, 10 Middle street. 

Ward 8. 

Edward F. Scheer, 135 Milford street. 
George E. Fellows, 316 Milford street. 
Alexander J. McDonnell, 56 Dover street. 

Ward 9. 

John Gildard, 646 Main street. 
Joseph Dana, 672 Main street. 
Oscar Knoettner, 326 Main street. 



Clerk of Common Council. 

George L. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 

Salary, $200. (General Laws, chapter 46, sections 7-9. City Laws and 
Ordinances, page 33, chapter 6, section 1 1 .) 



City Clerk. 

Nathan P. Kidder Office, City Hall 

Salary, $900. The city clerk, in addition to his salary, is in receipt of fees 
as registrar of births, marriages, and deaths, and as a recording officer for record 
* Resigned, t Special election. 



6 MANCIIESTEK CITY GOVERNMENT. 

of mortgages on personal property, of attachments of real estate, of paitnersbips 
and assignments, and for recording various other legal papers. He also receives 
fees for issuing dog licenses, billiard and bowling alley licenses, for certifying 
records, and for various other matters. 

These fees are established by the state legislature under various laws, and are 
estimated to be between $2,100 and $2,500 per annmii. Chosen in convention 
of City Councils in January, annually. (Charter, section 22. Public Statutes, 
chapter 50. Act of 1849. City Laws and Ordinances, pages 42, 43, 68, 72, 
73,84,86, 89, 114, 122, 123, 124, 166, 189.) Residence, 313 Manchester 
street. 



City Auditor. 



James B. Straw . . . . . . Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,000. Appointed by Mayor, and approved by Board of Aldermen, 
in January, annually. (Laws of 1889, chapter 287. City Ordinances, pages 
44, 71, 83-88, 173.) Residence, 593 Union street. 



Auditor's Clerk. 

Lizzie M. Cogswell . . . Auditor's Office, City Hall 

Salary, $600. Residence, 645 Union street. 



City Treasurer. 

Sylvanus B. Putnam Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Elected in convention of City Councils in January, annu- 
ally. (Charter, section 23. Act of 1856, section 4. General Laws, chapter 
48, sections 3, 4. Act of 1859, section 4. City Laws and Ordinances, pages 
36, 86-89, 170, 172.) Residence, 437 Amherst street. 



Treasurer's Clerk. 
Blanche E. Bullock . . . Treasurer's Office, City Hall 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 7 

Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salary, ^1,650 and fees. Elected by Mayor and Aldermen before May i, 
annually. (Act of July, 1851. Act of June, 1S59, section 6. Public Statutes, 
chapter 43. City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 23-) Residence, 740 Chestnut 
street. 



Deputy Collector of Taxes. 

Edwin C. Paul . . . . Collector's Office, City Hall 

Paid by collector. Appointed by tax collector with approval of Mayor and 
Aldermen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter Ti^, section 3.) Residence, 
416 Central street. 



City Solicitor. 

Edwin F. Jones . . Office, Patten's Block, 936 Elm street 

Salary, ^800. Elected in convention of City Councils in January, annually. 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6, pages 70, 72.) Residence, 15 High 
street. ' 



City Messenger. 

John A. Barker . . . ... . Office, City Hall 

Salary, $700. Elected in convention of City Councils in January, annually. 
(City Laws and 0/dinances, chapters 4, 6.) Residence, 49 Appleton street. 



Joint Standing Committees. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Lowell; Council- 
men Webster, Holbrook, Niven, Holt, and Roger';. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Lowell and Worthen ; Councilmen 
Fellows, Libbey, and Murray. (Meet Wednesday succeeding 



8 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

the 24th of each month. All bills must be left at the city audi- 
tor's office, properly approved, not later than the twentieth of 
each month.) 

On Claims. — Aldermen Reed and Maxwell; Councilmen 
Harvey, Twomey, and Gildard. (Meet third Friday in each 
month.) 

On Streets. — Aldermen Worthen and Lowell; Councilmen 
Holt, Harvey, and Heath. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Wolff and Cronin ; Coun- 
cilmen Heath, Landry, and Webster. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Marcotte and Wolff ; Coun- 
cilmen Snow, Libbey, and Holt. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Barry and Lightbody ; 
Councilmen Reardon, Aldrich, and Dana. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Cronin and Lowell ; Coun- 
cilmen Rogers, Tremblay, and Snow. 

On Coftwions and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Lightbody and Bar^ 
ry ; Councilmen Tait, Fellows, and Desrochers. 

On Public Lnstruction. — Aldermen Maxwell and Reed ; Coun- 
cilmen Wheeler, McDonnell, and Knoettner. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Lightbody and Marcotte; 
Councilmen Twomey, Dana, and Scheer. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Maxwell and Reed; Councilmen 
Rylander, Wheeler, and Murphy. 

On ILouse of Correction. — Aldermen Reed and Maxwell; 
Councilmen Desrochers, McDonnell, and Murphy. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Reed and Wolff; Council- 
men Murray, Knoettner, and Niven. 

On Public LLealth. — Aldermen Maxwell and Marcotte ; Coun- 
cilmen Ivibbev, Aldrich, and Gildard. 



Standing Committees. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Enrolhnent. — Aldermen Barry and Reed. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Wolff and Lowell. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 9 

On Market. — Aldermen Maxwell and Reed. 

On Marshars Accounts. — Aldermen Cronin and Barry. 

On Licenses.^ Aldermen Worthen and Marcotte. 

071 Setting Trees. — Aldermen Worthen and Lowell. 

On Special Police. — Aldermen Lightbody and Marcotte. 

COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Councilmen Tremblay, Rylander, and 
Scheer. 

On Bills on Second Reading.— Q,o\\\\c\\vi\tri Holbrook, Tait, 
and Rogers. 

On Enrollment. — Councilmen Reardon, Aldrich, and Murphy. 



City Physician. 

Frederick Perkins .... Office, S95 Elm street 

Salary, $200. Elected by City Councils in convention in January, annually. 
(Laws of 1870, chapter 99. City Ordinances, chapter 6, sections 29, ^o.) Res- 
idence, 490 Lake avenue. 



City Engineer. 
Winfred H. Bennett Office, City Hall 

Salary, $i,2CO. Chosen by City Councils in convention in January, annu- 
ally. (City Ordinances, chapter 6, sections 33, 34.) 



Water Commissioners. 

(Chapter 70, Laws of 1871. City Ordinances, chapter 36, and Laws of 189 1, 
chapter 26, page 319, act approved March 31, 1891. Chapter 183, Laws of 
1893.) One commissioner elected annually by Mayor and Aldermen, in the 
month of September, for a term of six years. Office at Court House, corner 
Franklin and West Merrimack streets. Telephone at office, and at pump- 
ing station. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, ex officio. 

Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1895. 



10 MA^^CHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1S94. 
Aljjheus Gay, term expires January, 1899. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1898. 
James A. Weston, term expires January, 1897. 
Charles T. Means, term expires January, 1896. 
Alpheus Gay, chairman. 

James A. Weston, clerk. Salary, $100. Chosen by the board 
of commissioners. 



Superintendent of Water- Works. 

Charles K. Walker . Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $1,600. Chosen by water commissioners annually. Residence, 68 
South .Main street, West Manchester. 

Clerk of the Water-Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns . . Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $1,200. Chosen by the water commissioners annually. Residence, 
421 Hanover street. 



Engineer at Pumping Station. 

Josiah Laselle. Salary, $700, rent, fuel, and use of land. 
Chosen by water commissioners annually. 



Justice of the Police Court. 

Nathan P. Hunt, court room at Police Station, corner Man- 
chester and Chestnut streets. 

Salary, $1,500. Appointed by Governor, with the advice of the Council. 
(General Laws, chapter 215 ; chapter 163, sections 17, 18, 19, of the Laws of 
1878, as amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1881. I'ublic .Statutes, chapter 
211.) Residence, 747 Union street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 11 

Associate Justice of tlie Police Court 

Isaac L. Heath .... Salary, $300 per annum 

Appointed by the Governor, with advice of the Council. (Chapter 215, 
General Laws, sections 2-14. Public Statutes, chapter 211. Chapter 29b, 
Laws of 1 89s-) 



Clerk of the Police Court. 

John C. Bickford Salary, $600 

Appointed by the justice of the police court. (Chapter 163, sections 17-19, 
General Laws, amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1881. Public Statutes, 
chapter 21 1.) Residence, 15 Ash street. 

Police. * 

The members of the police force are appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen, 
in January of alternate years, for a term of two years, unless sooner removed 
for cause. They are, by virtue of their appointment, constables and conserva- 
tors of the peace, and their jurisdiction extends throughout the city. The 
term of any officer elected to fill a vacancy, or to increase the number of offi- 
cers, expires at the time of the next regular election. (Chapter 253, section 5, 
General Laws; chapter 303, Laws of 1887; City Ordinances, pages 30, 34, 
35> 37> 53> 54) 76, 102, 103, 107, 164.) Pohce station at the corner of Chest- 
nut and Manchester streets. 



City Marshal. • 

Michael J. Healy . . . Office at Police Station 

Salary, ^900. Residence, 551 Granite street. West Manchester. Telephone 
at house and office. 



Assistant Marshal. 

John F. Cassidy .... Office at Police Station 

Salary, ;^8oo. Residence, 415 Manchester street. 

*See Chapter 202, Laws of 1893, appointing a police commission, to take effect Jan- 
uary I, 1894. 



12 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Captain of the Watch. 

Lafayette Tebbetts. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 222 
Laurel street. 



Day Police. 

SALARY, $2.25 PER DAY. 

Randall W. Bean, 77 Ash street. 

Edgar Farrar, 74 Pennacook street. 

Ira P. Fellows, 82 A street, West Manchester. 

Olaf Ring, 8 Dean street, room 18. 

Benjamin F. Lake, 732 Elm street. 

John T. O'Dowd, corner Pine and Laurel streets. 

Florence Sullivan, 213 Cedar street. 



Night Patrol. 

SALARY, $2.25 PER DAY. 

Henry McAllister, 852 Elm street, room 18. 

George E. Flanders, 31 Blodget street. 

Henry A. Burns, 50^ Maple street. 

Ira F. Davis, 38 Stark street. 

Norbert Decoteau, 302 Cartier street, West Manchester. 

James F. Dunn, 237 Elm street. 

Lowell O. Fowler, 141 7 Elm street. 

* John Hartnett, 206 Cedar street. 

John J. Hurley, 270 Auburn street. 

Theodore Flodin, 852 Elm street. 

George A. Lovejoy, 99 Orange street. 

Augustus C. Martin, 46 Parker street, West Manchester. 

Henry Masse, 332 Beauport street, West Manchester 

* Resigned. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 13 

Kenneth McDonald, 305 Chestnut street. 

Samuel L. Mitchell, 430 Manchester street. 

Frank P. Moore, 41 1 Belmont street. 

John F. O'Malley, 130 Merrimack street. 

William Steel. 

Francois Reinville, 410 Dubuque street, West Manchester. 

Philip Reischer, 292 Main street, West Manchester. 

Edwin A. Hutchins, 11 Mill street, Amoskeag. 

Lyman Roby, 403 Lake avenue. 

Gilbert A. Sackett, 589 North Main street, West Manchester. 

Timothy P. Shea, 213 Auburn street. 

John T. Welch, 1263 Elm street. 

* Charles W. Stevens, 9 Russell street. 



Janitor of Station. 

Frank P. Wiggin. ^1.75 per day. Residence, i Arkwright 
street. 



Matron. 



Miss A. B. Brown. ^415 per annum. Residence, 329 Chest- 
nut street. 



School Committee. 

Chosen at the biennial election in November, 1S92; Mayor and president 
of the Common Council members ex officio. The board of school committee 
choose the clerk of the board, the superintendent of public instruction, the 
truant officer, and the teachers in the public schools, and determine their 
salaries. They have charge of the repairs of schoolhouses, to a limited ex- 
tent, and the purchase of free text- books and other supplies, and are limited 
by the appropriations of the City Councils. The salary of the committee is 
$10 each. 



14 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Ward i. 

Charles D. Sumner, 22 Stark street. 
Walter H. Lewis, 32 Stark street. 

Ward 2. 

George H. Stearns, 1934 Elm street. 

* Charles S. Murkland, 906 Chestnut street. 

fAlvin T. Thoits, 63 Harrison street. 

Ward 3. 

George D. Tovvne, 1 70 Lowell street. 
Louis E. Phelps, 103 Walnut street. 

Ward 4. 

Stephen B. Stearns, 464 Amherst street. 
Edwin L. Richardson, 304 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. 

James P. Slattery, 217 Central street. 
William J. Sughrue, 61 Spruce street. 

Ward 6. 

Frank T. E. Richardson, 481 Lincoln street. 
George W. Dearborn, 131 Massabesic street. 

Ward 7. 

Marshall P. Hall, 26 Market street. 
Edward B. AVoodbury, i Pleasant street. 

Ward 8. 

Luther C. Baldwin, 157 Milford street. 
Josiah G. Dearborn, 157 Milford street. 



' Left the city, f Elected to fill vacancy. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 15 

Ward 9. 

Edward J. Doherty, 336 Beauport street. 
Scott E. Sanborn, 46 Sullivan street. 

Fred T. Dunlap, ex officio, 107 Russell street. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, chairman, 533 Lake avenue. Office, City 
Hall. 

Edward B. Woodbury, clerk, salary ^100, i Manchester Cor- 
poration, Pleasant street. 



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

William E. Buck Office, City Hall 

Salary, ^2,000 first six months , ^2,300 last six months. Residence, 324 
Myrtle street. 



Truant Officer. 

Samuel Brooks Office, City Hall 

Salary, $750. Residence, 413 Beech street. 



Assessors. 



One assessor from each ward chosen at the biennial election in November 
Paid ^2.50 each, for each day while employed in the assessment and abate- 
ment of taxes. Office, City Hall. (Charter, section 25. Public Statutes, 
chapter 48, section i; chapter 50, section 4; chapter 49, sections 10. 11, 12. 
City Ordinances, chapter 6, section 26.) Assistant assessors, not exceeding 
six, chosen by the City Councils. 

Ward I. Henry Lewis, 32 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Ward 2. John E. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 
Ward 3. David O. Furnald, 384 Lowell street. 
Ward 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 
Ward 5. George F. Sheehan, 85 Cedar street. 



16 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Ward 6. George H. Dudley, 159 Laurel street. 

Ward 7. William T. Rowell, 14 Manchester Corporation. 

Ward 8. Frank N. Daniels, 137 Milford street. 

Ward 9. Lawrence F. Bradley, 568 Main street. 

CHAIRiMAN OF ASSESSORS. 

David O. Furnald . . ... . Office, City Hall 

CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 

George H. Dudley Office, City Hall 



Inspectors of Check-Lists. 

One in each ward, chosen at the biennial election in November. Com 
pensation, $2.25 per day for each day actually employed. Office, City Hall. 
(Laws of 1878, chapter 163, sections 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 
and Chy Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) 

Ward I. George C. Kemp, 40 Machine Shop block. 

Ward 2. Charles B. Tucker, 777 Union street. 

Ward 3. David O. Furnald, 384 Lowell street. 

Ward 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. John F. Quinn, 190 Chestnut street. 

Ward 6. Albert J. Peaslee, Cohas avenue, near Water-Works. 

Ward 7. Joseph A. Foster, 42 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 8. Charles C. Tinkham, 9 Parker avenue. 

Ward 9. John B. Bourque, 22 Wayne street. 



Overseers of the Poor. 

One in each ward, chosen at biennial election in November. The Mayor is 
a member ex officio. Compensation, ^25 per annum, each; clerk of the board, 
$75 per annum, determined by City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 18, as 
amended by Ordinance of August 5, 1890. Meet third Wednesday of each 
month in City Hall building. 



LIST OF OFFICERS, 17 

Ward I. William H. Maxwell, clerk, 20 Amoskeag Corpora- 
tion, Stark street. 

Ward 2. Thomas L. Quimby, railroad station, foot West Sal- 
mon street. 

Ward 3. Benjamin F. Garland, 28 Linden street. 

Ward 4. George S. Holmes, 296 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. Patrick Costello, 106 East Spruce street. 

Ward 6. Charles Francis, Candia road, East Manchester. 

Ward 7. William Marshall, 72 Amoskeag Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. Charles S. McKean, 495 Granite street. 

Ward 9. Frank I. Lessard, 362 Dubuque street. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, ex officio, office, City Hall. 



Board of Health. 



(City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 1885, chap- 
ter 165; Laws of 1887, chapter 227; Public Statutes, chapters 108, 109, no.) 
One member appointed by the Mayor in January of each year, to hold office 
for a term of three years. Salary, ^200 each per annum. Office, Court House, 
West Merrimack, corner of Franklin street. 

* George C. Hoitt, M. D., 1179 Elm street. Term expires 
first Monday in February, 1897. 

Joseph B. Sawyer, clerk, civil engineer, 356 Hanover street. 
Term expires first Monday in February, 1895. 

Cornelius F. Starr, M. D., 49 Manchester street. Term ex- 
pires first Monday in February, 1894. 

Herbert S. Clough, sanitary inspector, Hanover-street road. 
Office, Court House, Merrimack, corner of Franklin street. 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector, 164 Auburn street. Office, 
Court House, Merrimack, corner of Franklin street. 



Fire Department. 

The chief engineer and four assistant engineers are chosen annually, in the 
pionth of January, by a majority of the City Councils in convention. The 
* Resigned. Clarence W. Downing appointed August i, 1893, for unexpired term. 



18 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

salary of the chief engineer is $1,300 per annum; the assistant engineers, 
each $125 per annum. They exercise the powers and perform the duties of 
firewards. The said engineers constitute the board of engineers, and elect a 
clerk whose compensation is $25 a year. The annual compensation of the 
call members of the several hook-and-ladder, hose, steam fire engine, and 
chemical engine companies is as follows: Foremen, each $115; assistant fore- 
men, each $110; clerks, each ^lio; engineers, each $135 ; assistant engineers, 
each $105 ; all other members, each $100; payable in equal semi-annual pay- 
ments, on the first of January and July. (Laws of 1870, chapter 99. General 
Laws, chapter 106. City Ordinances, chapters 6 and 12.) Five members are 
permanently employed as engineers at ^76.25 per month each, and nineteen as 
drivers at $68.33)/ P^"" month each, and receive no compensation as call mem- 
bers. Members of the companies are appointed by Board of Mayor and Al- 
dermen in the month of February, annually, on Hst presented by the board of 
enoineers. The officers of each company are appointed by the board of engi- 
neers. 



Chief Engineer. 

Thomas W-. Lane . . Office, Central Station, Vine street 
Residence, 1937 Elm street. Telephone at house and office. 

Fred S. Bean, clerk, 102 Orange street. 

Ruel G. Manning, 52 Douglas street, West Manchester. 

Eugene S. Whitney, River road north, corner West street. 

Clarence D. Palmer, 366 Lake avenue. 

For further information see chief engineer's report. 



Trustees of City Library. 

(Laws of 1854, chapter 1588. See contract with Manchester Atheneum, 
printed on pages 107, loS of City Report for fiscal year ending January 31, 
1855.) Board of seven trustees, one of whom is elected by Aldermen and 
board of trustees in joint convention in September, anrfually. Term of ser- 
vice, seven years; no salary. Two additional trustees. Mayor, and president of 
Common Council, ex officio. 

Lucien B. Clough, term expires October i, 1S95, 181 Walnut 
street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 19 

Nathan P. Hunt, term expires October i, 1894, 747 Union 
street. 

Herman F. Straw, term expires October i, 1899, 607 Chest- 
nut street. 

Walter M. Parker, term expires October i, 1899, West Web- 
ster street, corner Elm. 

Isaac W. Smith, term expires October i, 1898, 1855 Elm 
street. 

Moody Currier, term expires October i, 1897, Ash street, cor- 
ner Myrtle. 

C. D. McDuffie, term expires October i, 1896, Ash street, cor- 
ner Myrtle. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, ex officio, 533 Lake avenue. 

Fred T. Dunlap, ex officio, 107 Russell street. 



Highway Surveyors.* 

Elected annually in joint convention in City Councils in January. 

District No. i. Raymond P. Campbell, Union street north. 
Salary, %2 per day. 

District No. 2. William Sanborn, 89 Pennacook street. Sal- 
ary, ^1,200 per annum. 

District No. 3. Fred L. Jewell, Union street beyond Clark. 
Salary, $2 per day. 

District No. 4. Byron E. Moore, Goffe's Falls. Salary, $2 
per day. 

District No. 5. Mark E. Harvey, Nutt road south. Salary, 
$2 per day. 

District No. 6. Ignatius T. Webster, Island Pond road. Sal- 
ary, $2 per day. 

District No. 7. Charles Francis, Candia road, East Manches- 
ter. Salary, %2 per day. 

District No. 8. George H. Penniman, Hanover street, corner 
of Mammoth road. Salary, $2 per day. 

* Superseded by three Street and Park Commissioners, April i, 1S93, by virtue of an act 
of the legislature. See chapter 264, Laws of 1893. 



20 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

District No. 9. Lester C. Page, Derry road. Salar3s $2 per day. 

District No. 10. Charles O. Phelps, 341 South Main street. 
Salary, $2.50 per day. 

District No. 11. Frank D. Hanscom, Goffstown road. Sal- 
ary, $2 per day. 

District No. 12. Eugene G. Libby, Mammoth road, city 
farm. Salary, $2 per day. 

Telephone at house and office of superintendent in districts Nos. 2 and 12. 



Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 

The City Councils in joint convention, biennially, elect one member of said 
board for a term of six years. Not more than two members can be of the same 
political party. Said board, consisting of three members, has full charge, man- 
agement, and control of the building, constructing, repairing, and maintaining 
of all the streets, highways, 'lanes, sidewalks, bridges, and pubHc sewers and 
drains, and public parks and commons. (See Laws of 1893, chapter 264.) 
Office, City Hall building. Open from 8 to 12 A. M., 2 to 5 p. m. Regular 
meeting of the board at 2 o'clock v. u., each day. Salary of each member, 
5600 per year, payable quarterly. 

George H. Stearns, chairman, term expires 1898. 
Leonard P. Reynolds, term expires 1896. 
Horace P. Simpson, term expires 1894. 



Clerk. 



Appointed by commissioners. Salary, $75 monthly. 

Allen E. Herrick, 91 Russell street, corner of Prospect. 

Julia F. Stearns, assistant. 



City Weigher. 

Elected annually in convention of City Councils. Salary, jg400 per annum ; 
all fees for weighing returned mr)nthly to city treasurer with sworn statement. 
Stationed at city scales on Franklin street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 21 

William Bailey ...... Office, city scales 

Residence, 74 Main street, West Manchester. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Joseph B. Baril 99 Bridge street 

Elected annually in January by City Councils in convention. Paid by fees. 
(Section 25, chapter 43, Public Statutes, and chapter 125, Public Statutes.) 



Fish and Game Wardens. 

(Public Statutes, chapter 130.) Elected by City Councils in convention. 

John C. Higgins, 143 Orange street. 

George A. Clark, 304 Central street. 

Samuel S. James, 184 Laurel street. 

William C. Clarke, 711 Pine, corner North street. 

C. R. Hodge, 574 Hall street. 



Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39, sections i, 2, 3, 4.) Two trustees elected by 
City Councils in convention in January, annually, for the term of four years. 
Sub-trustees appointed by board of trustees. 

George W. Bacon, 65 Stark Corporation, Canal street, term 
expires January, 1895. 

William H. Huse, Mammoth road, term expires 1895. 

Nathan P. Hunt, Union street near Blodget, term expires 1894. 

Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street, term expires 1894. 

Stillman P. Cannon, 43 Elm street, term expires 1897. 

James E. Bailey, Goffstown road near Front street, term ex- 
pires 1897. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 25 High street, term expires January, 1896. 

John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street, term expires January, 
1896. 

S. B. Putnam, clerk and treasurer, 437 Amherst street. 



22 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Sub-Trustees of Cemeteries. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Alderman Richard J. Barry, 232 Lake avenue. 
Councilman Liidger E. Desrochers, 359 Amherst street. 
Nathan P. Hunt, 747 Union street. 
Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street. 
Stillman P. Cannon, 43 Elm street. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Alderman James Lightbody, 61 Amoskeag Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

Councilman Joseph Tait, 4 Boyden street. 

George W. Bacon, 66 Stark Corporation, Canal street. 

John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street. „ 

Charles H. Bartlett, 25 High street. 

AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

Councilman George E. Fellows, 316 Milford street, West Man- 
chester. 

James E. Bailey, Goffstown road near Front street. 
William H. Hiise, Mammoth road. East Manchester. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Byron A. Stearns. Office at the cemetery; residence, 254 
Taylor street. Telephone at house and cemetery. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Charles H. G. Foss. Office at the cemetery ; residence, 267 
Lake avenue. 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

James A. Weston, chairman, 621 Maple street. 
Person C. Cheney, Harrison street, corner Elm. 
Edgar J. Knowlton {ex officio), 533 Lake avenue. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 23 

Inspector of Milk. 

H. F. W. Little . . . Office, rear of 13 Lowell street 

Residence, 385 Lowell street. Term expires P'ebruaiy i, annually. (Public 
.Statutes, chapter 127.) Appointed by Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $300 
per annum. 



Inspector of Buildings. 

Thomas W. Lane ... Office at Central Fire Station' 

Residence, 1937 Elm street. Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
biennially, in February. Salary, ^100 per annum. (City Ordinances, chapter 
15. Laws of 1883, chapter 94. Public Statutes, page 170.) Telephone at 
house and office. 



Inspectors of Oil. 

William Bailey . . .74 Main street, West Manchester 
John Cayzer 38;^ Granite street 

(Public Statutes, chapter 126, sections 25-34. City Ordinances, chapter 25.) 
Paid by fees, ^ of i per cent per gallon. 



Moderators. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 31, sections 3, 9; chapter 36, 
section 9; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordina'-ces, page 18. See Public Stat- 
utes relating to towns and cities.) 

Ward I. Abial W. Eastman, 24 Amoskeag Corporation, Stark 
street. 

Ward 2. Scott W. Lane, 81 Sagamore street. 

Ward 3. E. R. Robinson, 517 Chestnut street, north. 

Ward 4- George H. Warren, 461 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. Emmett Duffie, 207 Central street. 

Ward 6. George W. Prescott, 350 Central street. 

Ward 7. Frank A. Dockham, 18 Pleasant street. 

Ward 8. Charles G. Ranno, 63 Parker street, West Manchester. 

Ward 9. Alexander Taggart, 478 Beauport street. 



24 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Ward Clerks. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 44, sections 10, I2. City Or- 
dinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Ward I. Frank X. Foster, 1382 Elm street. 

Ward 2. Wilson F. Higgins, 573 Pine street. 

Ward 3. Samuel C. Kennard, 609 Beech street. 

Ward 4. George H. Phinney, 133 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. John A. Whalen. 

Ward 6. Harry I. Dodge, Goffe's Falls. 

Ward 7. Charles A. Foster, 44 Amoskeag Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. Maurice S. Lamprey, Rockland avenue. 

Ward 9. Leander S. Boivin, 5 Monmouth street. 



Selectmen. 



Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter i, section 27 ; chapter 12, sec- 
tion 6; chapter 40, sections 2, 3; chapter 109, section 27; chapter 213, section 
I. City Ordinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Ward i. 

John H. Wales, Jr., 19 Machine Shop block. Water street. 
Henry S. Perry, 24 Stark Corporation, Mechanic street. 
Theophile G. Biron, 29 Arkwright street. 

Ward 2. 

Daniel G. Andrews, 777 Union street. 
William F. Danfortlf, 21 Liberty street. 
Nathaniel Doane, Jr., 103 Brook street. 

Ward 3. 

John Cronin, 284 Bridge street. 
Samuel C. Kennard, 609 Beech street. 
Joha A. Sargent, 69 Wilson road. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 25 

Ward 4. 

Fred A. Burke, 5 84 Belmont street. 
Lewis W. Crockett, 443 Amherst street. 
Charles F. Nallgey, 234 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. 

John F. Kelly, 14 Auburn street. 

Dennis A. F. Murphy, 105 East Spruce street. 

Jeremiah Teehan, 224 Lake avenue. 

Ward 6. 

Joseph N. Auger, Nutt road near Pine street. 
Edward P. Cogswell, 409 Cedar street. 
Harrison P. Heselton, 261 Laurel street. 

Ward 7. 

Hanson R. Armstrong, 58 Amoskeag Corporation, West Mer- 
rimack street. 

Robert Leggett, 50 Amoskeag Corporation, Canal street. 

Robert Morrow, 66 Amoskeag Corporation, West Merrimack 
street. 

Ward 8. 

George B. Barnes, 170 Walker street. 
Auguste Filion, 72 Second street. 
Benjamin J. Mack, 145 Boynton street. 

Ward 9. 

Gideon Beiisle, 335 Dubuque street. 
Eusebe Gingras, 605 Main street. 
Martin J. Rafferty, 450 Beauport street. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



Getitlemoi of the City Councils : 

In accordance with long approved usage and, I trust, with a 
realization of the responsibilities which we this day assume, we 
meet at this time to face the problems of municipal government 
for the ensuing two years. 

Before addressing you as to the needs of our city, I desire to 
say a word of commendation in recognition of the faithfulness 
and integrity of the retiring city government. It Avill go down 
to history as a business body. The two years of its administra- 
tion have been the most successful in the city's growth. We who 
are their successors should emulate their zeal and earnestness in 
laboring for the public good, and if we fail not to forget that 
public officials are but the agents of the people, if we are guided 
in our official conduct by honest convictions and a manly adher- 
ence to duty, preferring these recognized virtues to methods of 
expediency and time serving make-shifts, we shall merit and re- 
ceive the commendations of both the public and an approving 
conscience. 

Municipal government is a business matter, pure and simple, 
and to inject into it the virus of political bigotry and partisan- 
ship is to prove false to the obligations which we have this day 
assumed. I expect this city government to intrench itself upon 
higher ground. 

Manchester is to-day the most progressive city of the Merri- 
mack Valley. There is not a civilized country to which she is 
not sending the products of her mills and factories. The value 
of her manufactures aggregates millions of dollars per annum, 
and she takes rank among the first cities of this free land in the 
importance of her industries. 



30 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

As members of the city government, I believe that we should 
be ever mindful of the industrial interests of our city, encourage 
them in every legitimate way, and use all honorable means to 
induce others to make their prosperous homes among us, if this 
can be done without detriment to interests. already here. Every 
activity that provides honest employment for men and women 
adds not alone to the material wealth of the community, but to 
its moral and political life. By attaining to the highest standard 
of efficiency as a city government, we shall offer an incentive 
that will induce the settlement here of additional capital and 
labor, and thereby work in unison with the public spirit, thrift, 
and enterprise of the business men whose sterling, pushing quali- 
ties have earned for our city the proud and enviable distinction 
which she enjoys. 

FINANCIAL. 

The financial status of the city on the first day of January was 
as follows : 

Amount of bonded debt January I, 1892 ^953,850.00 

Amount of cemetery bonds issued in 1892 .... 1,150.00 

Accrued interest on bonded debt ...... 21,050.00 

^976,050.00 

AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Net cash on hand January i, 1893 $96,477.18 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1892 32,139.65 

Stock of Suncook Valley Railroad, estimated value . . . 14,500.00 

;gi43,ii6.83 

Total net indebtedness January i, 1892 ..... $873,791.65 
Total net indebtedness January I, 1893 832,933.17 

Decrease of net indebtedness during the year . . $40,858.48 

The showing is eminently satisfactory under the policy which 
has been pursued, but when we reflect that had the city, when it 
contracted its bonded indebtedness, provided the means for its 
payment by yearly contributions to a sinking fund, we can read- 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 31 

ily comprehend how much better its financial standing would 
have been. Had this plan been followed, more than one half 
of the present indebtedness would have been cancelled, and the 
interest account would have been but a shadow as compared with 
its present proportions. 

This leads me to, at this time, renew my recommendations of 
two years ago that the necessary authority be, requested from the 
legislature to enable the city to meet the expense of its perma- 
nent improvements by the issuance of bonds which shall, at their 
maturity, be paid from the annual accumulations of a sinking 
fund. This is the best financial system of municipal govern- 
ment yet devised. By it the tax-payers, each year, contribute 
their share towards what they are privileged to enjoy, and the 
burdens of a single year, under our present system, will be spread 
out through a series of years. Taxes will be reduced, if we make 
this change- of policy, and we shall at the same time witness the 
development of our city with a rapidity which is now not even 
dreamed of. 

To insure the adoption of this liberal and beneficent policy, 
and to bring about a wise and economical expenditure of the 
public funds, it seems to be necessary to create a department of 
public works, the commissioners in charge of the same to have 
the direction of work upon the streets, sewers, bridges, and pub- 
lic buildings of the city, as the water commissioners now manage 
their department. 

During our term of service, $120,000 of city bonds, reminders 
of the war period, will become due. Of this amount, $70,000 
will be payable November i of the current year, and $50,000, 
July I, 1S94. In refunding these bonds, I would recommend that 
we provide a plan for their liquidation when they again fall due. 

CITY TREASURY DEPOSITS. 

It has been the practice, since the incorporation of the city, 
for the money in the hands of the city treasurer and tax collector 
to be placed on deposit with the several banks, without any ben- 
efit accruing therefrom to the city. This money is the people's, 
and they have a right to its full benefit. I would, therefore, 



32 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

recommend that the necessary steps be taken to secure for the 
city a revenue from its deposits, and the banking institution offer- 
ing the best security and highest premium to receive the custody 
of the deposits, the award to be made annually. 

VALUATION. 

Since the incorporation of the city, the primitive methods of 
estimating the valuation of property and assessing taxes, which 
prevailed in the first half of the present century, have been fol- 
lowed. Other cities have inaugurated new methods, and the re- 
sult has been that thousands, and even millions, of dollars of ad- 
ditional valuation have been disclosed ; as, for example, take the 
city of Lowell. There is more property in Manchester than the 
assessors' returns indicate. The fault is largely with the system. 

As to the remedy, I would recommend that there be one 
assessor elected from each ward as now, they to be known as as- 
sistant assessors, and that a permanent, non-political board, con- 
sisting of three members, be appointed by the Mayor, confirmed 
by the aldermen, each to serve for three years, although when 
first selected one would be appointed for one year, another for 
two years, and the third for three years. It would be the duty of 
the assistant assessors to make the canvass of property, as now, 
and the permanent board would adjust the valuation, they being 
cognizant of sales and all influences calculated to increase 
the desirability of property in all sections of the city. One of 
the indispensable helps to the work of the assessors should be 
supplied in the shape of maps showing every street and the front- 
age and area of every plot of land upon the same, name of the 
owner, etc. 

The total valuation last year was placed at $25,932,044, and in 
addition to the natural increase to be expected this year, the ex- 
emption on the A. P. Olzendam hosiery mill property expires 
April I, which in itself will bring $60,000 of taxable property 
under the eye of the assessors. 

WATER-WORKS. 

The most important matter with which we shall have to deal 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 33 

in connection with this department will be that of a high water 
service on Oak hill. 

A large section of the city is at present unprovided with city- 
water and proper protection from fire, because we have not a high- 
pressure service. This is most needed, however, to supplement 
the present system of water-works and thereby provide means of 
continuing the water supply in the event of a break in the pres- 
ent system. The commissioners believe in a distinct and entirely 
separate plant for the high-pressure service as a precautionary 
measure, and there are many excellent reasons in support of their 
conclusions. 

Another need of the department is the necessity for more rap- 
idly substituting iron pipe in place of that which is cement 
lined. At present there are twenty-one miles of the latter yet in 
service, and forty-one of iron. 

STREETS. 

Our streets bear evidence of steady improvement. The prac- 
tice of laying stretches of concrete meets with general approval. 
The method adopted during the past season of putting in a 
foundation with the steam road roller promises the best results, 
and is vastly superior to any other plan yet tried, as the unsatis- 
factory work by other methods on Merrimack and Chestnut 
streets is in evidence. 

The appropriation for paving should be increased and an effort 
made to pave the gutters upon our hill streets. This should be 
done as a matter of economy, as the gutters would largely pro- 
tect the streets and prevent their washing in time of severe rain. 

Much of the paving on Elm and Granite streets needs to be 
replaced. No other material seems to be sufficiently strong to 
withstand heavy and constant travel. In this connection I raise 
the query if the time has not come when heed should be given 
as to the width of the tires of traffic wheels. Narrow tires on 
heavily laden vehicles are most destructive to the maintenance of 
good streets. 

For several years the city government has been overwhelmed 
with petitions for the laying out of new streets, the granting of 



34 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

which in many cases would result more largely in private gain 
than in convenience to the public. On general principles I be- 
lieve in street extensions, even into undeveloped localities if the 
public welfare is thereby to be served, but has not the time ar- 
rived when legislation should be secured which will enable 
cities and towns in laying out streets to adopt the betterment 
plan, so popular throughout the West, and assess the property 
benefited its proportionate share of the expense of building the 
streets ? 

I furthermore believe in a law which will enable the city to 
build sidewalks and assess one half of the expense to the abut- 
ting property. This is the only way by which good walks can 
be gained in localities where lot owners hold the traveling pub- 
lic in contempt and refuse to provide satisfactory walks. 

Attention is also directed to the fact that we are still at work 
under the old highway district system. The districts on the 
west bank of the river should be united into one, and those on 
the east bank into another. Consolidation in this case is the 
shortest road to the best results. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

The actual needs of the city in this department have for years 
been greatly in excess of the means at its disposal to meet them. 
This must continue to be the case unless the necessary authority 
be obtained to issue sewer bonds. The demand for additional 
sewers and for the extension of the sewerage system comes from 
all sections ; all are in need. Among the enterprises requiring 
prompt attention in this department is the rebuilding of the 
South Main-street sewer south of Conant street to the river, the 
rebuilding of the Spruce-street sewer west of Union street, and 
the building of the Auburn-street sewer. 

CITY ENGINEER. 

With our city expanding so rapidly in all directions there 
come innumerable demands upon the engineering department. 
The present force of an engineer and four assistants has not been 
sufficient to keep the work as well advanced as the public conven- 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 85 

ience requires. Competent and faithful service in this depart- 
ment is what is required, as on the good judgment and faithful- 
ness to the best interests of the city on the part of the engineer 
depends the saving or expenditure of large sums of money. 



The proposed bridge across the Piscataquog river at Second 
street should be built this year. It will be a great convenience 
and will largely increase the taxable property in that section, in 
proof of which the results accruing from the building of the Mc- 
Gregor bridge are cited. With the building of the bridge at 
Second street no time should be lost in replacing the present 
narrow and inadequate crossing on South Main street with a 
modern structure commensurate with the needs of the public. 

OVERHEAD WIRES. 

Many of the streets are filling up with poles which carry a net- 
work of wires representing the various telegraph and telephone 
companies, the fire-alarm, and the electric light service. The 
poles are an incumbrance and often unsightly, while the wires 
are a source of danger, and in time of fire are a positive hin- 
drance to the rapid work of the firemen. The advisability of 
causing these wires to be placed underground in the traffic-filled 
streets is a matter which should receive thoughtful consideration. 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

This department is accomplishing important and most salutary 
work, and in view of the threatened visitation of Asiatic cholera 
to this country, special efforts should be made to purge the city 
of every vestige of filth that might lead to the propagation of 
disease. The best means for keeping the city clean should be 
cheerfully supplied, as it is as much the business of the health 
board to adopt preventive measures as it is to fight an epidemic 
after it has shown its devastating presence. We enjoy, as a city, 
a remarkably low death rate, and this can be kept at the mini- 
mum by strict sanitary inspection. The board should be given 
control of that portion of the scavenger service pertaining to the 



36 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

collection of perishable matter, and a crematory provided for the 
consumption of the waste material. It should also adopt and 
enforce more stringent regulations as to plumbing, and the de- 
mand upon the time of the members is now such that their salary- 
should be increased. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

No better investment of the public funds can be made than to 
devote them liberally to promoting the efiiciency of the public 
schools. Good schools establish character, elevate the manhood 
and womanhood of the nation, and return dividends of never- 
ending good in increasing intelligence. 

I would emphasize my 'former recommendations as to the 
introduction of manual training. Manchester is not keeping 
step with the march of events in delaying this needful adjunct to 
her public schools. When so many of the youth are to devote 
their energies in the future to the means of acquiring a liveli- 
hood, it is essential for their well-being that they be given the 
advantages of manual instruction. While the hands of the boys 
are trained to expertness along industrial lines, the girls should 
be taught the art of cookery. 

There is need of another wing being added to the Webster- 
street grammar school building ; the finishing of two additional 
rooms in the Hallsville building, and the construction of a two- 
room schoolhouse in McGregorville. In the northeastern por- 
tion, a lot should be purchased, and a schoolhouse erected as 
soon as the season will admit, in order to relieve the overcrowded 
Ash-street building. 

PARKS AND COMMONS. 

The manner in which the five commons in the compact part 
of the city have been cared for during the past two years has met 
with the favor of all. These breathing places should be still fur- 
ther beautified and improved, as they can be made a never-end- 
ing delight throughout the summer months. They call forth the 
admiration of visitors, and enforce the generally favorable opin- 
ion which strangers form of our city. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 37 

Provisions need to be made this year for more rapidly develop- 
ing Derryfield and Stark parks. They have both been placed in 
readiness for being worked in accordance with i)lans adopted by 
the city councils. 

The city's system of parks needs to be extended, and we shall 
build wisely for the future if we give this subject the considera- 
tion which it deserves. The southeastern section of the city will 
need a common ; the Wilson Hill section will need a small com- 
mon, with an observatory as its principal attraction ; the land 
set aside in McGregorville for a common should be made attrac- 
tive, and Rock Rimmon and its adjacent territory should be 
included in the city's system of parks. The creation of these 
several parks will largely increase the valuation of surrounding 
property, and thereby aid materially in meeting the expenditures 
of the park system. 

Steps should be taken for the creation of a park commission. 

CITY HALL. 

I trust that this city government will be able to commence the 
building of a new city hall, or make such extensive alterations in 
the present structure as will convenience the public business. 
The city has no better facilities for the transaction of its business 
through its officials than it had forty-five years ago, and every 
department has outgrown the accommodations provided. 

The city clerk is compelled to do business for fifty thousand 
people in a room not much larger than a closet. He should 
have better accommodations, and be authorized to employ a 
clerk. The assessors and inspectors of checklists are overcrowded, 
and there are no provisions whatsoever for the accommodation 
of the representatives in these branches of the public service from 
ward nine. The health board is compelled to do business in an 
open hallway. The mayor's office performs the threefold mission 
of a reception room, consultation room, and aldermanic room, 
and a moment's reflection will be sufficient for one to appreciate 
the full force of so inconvenient an arrangement. The mayor 
should have a clerk who, in the absence of the executive, who is 
daily called away to the inspection of public works throughout 



38 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

the city, can give the public such information as they are entitled 
to receive. This clerk could also be made clerk of all commit- 
tees, and the system adopted of keeping an accurate record of 
the doings of the committee room. Much might be said as to 
the need of extensive changes in the present city hall building, 
or the construction of a new one, but I prefer that you familiarize 
yourselves with the situation if you have not already done so. I 
trust that early action will be taken by the appointment of a 
joint special committee for the consideration of this subject, the 
committee to report the result of their conclusions back to the 
city government. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

There is no department of the city government which is so 
closely allied to the every-day life of the community and which 
is so steadily under the eye of a critical public as the department 
of police. Upon the efficiency and integrity here manifested 
depend alike the protection of life and property and the reputa- 
tion of our city both at home and abroad. 

The suggestion of two years ago, that the city should be pa- 
trolled at a time when no guardianship whatever was then exer- 
cised, has been most happily carried out, so that now the police 
service is continuous. The department has been put on a more 
metropolitan basis in other ways, but there are still many appar- 
ent and pressing needs which should receive your early attention. 
The expansion of the city has been so rapid, the suburban dis- 
tricts filling up with a compact population, that there is a persis- 
tent demand for police protection which can only be provided 
by augmenting the force. The department at present is limited 
to thirty-six men, all told, which is one patrolman to every six- 
teen hundred of our population, while the rule is to have an offi- 
cer for every one thousand inhabitants. I would therefore rec- 
ommend a change in the ordinance so that there may be created 
the office of lieutenant or sergeant, and that five additional 
patrolmen be elected. This will enable some of the beats which 
are so large that they cannot be patrolled in a manner satisfac- 
tory to the public to be shortened and will admit of the police 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 39 

service being extended into quarters in need of its salutary in- 
fluence. 

The city marshal should be allowed by the rules to create a de- 
tective department, the work of which should be performed by 
one or more of the ofiicers detailed by him for this purpose. 

I would also urge steps to bring about the introduction of the 
police signal system. It would be a great aid to the efficiency of 
the department. In every city where it has been introduced it 
has proved satisfactory. The scenes of a struggling prisoner be- 
ing forced and fought through the crowded streets to the station, 
oftentimes urged to escape, and aided in doing so, by his friends, 
who have crowded about, would be entirely done away with. 

I would further recommend that a site for a stable be purchased 
near the police station, this to be the headquarters for the patrol 
and ambulance service of the department, and that emergency 
rooms and a room for the police matron be arranged for in the 
new buildings. 

The regulation by which the city and assistant marshals derive 
a revenue for every prisoner taken to the house of correction at 
the city farm should be done away with and the compensation of 
these officials fixed by their salary, which, if the change is made, 
ought to be increased. 

My former recommendation as to the creation of a police 
commission I would at this time renew. 

RAILROAD MATTERS. 

The movement to bring about the extension of the Manches- 
ter (S: North Weare Railroad to Henniker should receive our 
hearty approval, as the consummation of the end sought means 
a substantial gain to the commercial interests of the city. 

It is to be regretted that complications of long standing be- 
tween the two great railroad corporations centering here have 
thus far proven an insurmountable barrier in the way of our city 
being provided with a passenger depot befitting her present 
standing, rapid development, and high destiny. Assurances have 
recently been given, however, that the questions in dispute are 



40 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Hearing solution, and that it is reasonable to suppose that work 
upon a new depot will be commenced this year. 

With the building of a new depot a plan should be provided 
for doing away with the dangerous grade crossing on Granite 
street. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Not for a dozen years at least has the court docket been so 
free from cases against the city as at the present time. By settle- 
ments and trials at the March term of the supreme court in 1892, 
all cases were disposed of with the exception of a very few which 
had been of long standing, and which the plaintiffs did not bring 
forward for trial. The claims against the city at the present 
time for injuries received by falling on sidewalks are few, and it 
is considered that there are no very bad ones. 

The injustice of the application of the present law relative to 
individuals recovering from cities or towns for injuries, fancied 
or real, from falling upon sidewalks, receives demonstration at 
every session of our courts. All efforts to have this law modified 
have thus far been unavailing, but this should not prevent other 
attempts being made to bring about a just enactment. 

It is a pleasure to acknowledge the uniform courtesy of the 
present city solicitor, whose services, from his long occupancy of 
the position, have been of inestimable value to the city. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

It is with especial pleasure that we can contemplate the im- 
provements of the past year and others planned by the retiring 
city government. The number of permanent men has recently 
been increased, fire horses recalled from street department work 
and made subject to fire department service at all hours of the 
day and night, and orders have been placed for an aerial hook 
and ladder truck, a smaller truck for the Walter M. Fulton house, 
and a new steamer. All of these will be received early the pres- 
ent year, and should be followed by the construction of a hose 
house on the site recently purchased in South Manchester, and 
the building of an engine house in the northeastern section of 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 41 

the city. This section, rapidly growing, needs an engine house 
farther north and east of the Massabesic house, and I would rec- 
ommend the purchase of a lot and the erection of a house upon 
the same. When this is done, the Massabesic house and site can 
be sold. 

I believe the time has arrived when the city should be divided 
into three fire districts, each to be assigned as the territory of 
one of the assistant engineers. The rule should then be adopted 
that the chief engineer and his first assistant respond to all 
alarms, these two with the district engineer making three engi- 
neers at all fires, the remaining two members of the board re- 
porting at the central station, and there remaining in readiness 
for any emergency that may arise. 

The fire department should be placed in the hands of a com- 
mission and forever removed from the beck and call of political 
parties. 

BUILDING INSPECTOR. 

Something should be done to make the position of building 
inspector a reality, and put an end to the further construction of 
fire traps. Our city has attained such growth that the building 
inspector should devote his entire time to his duties as inspector, 
and to carrying out the provisions of the ordinance which passed 
the city councils in 1891. This would necessitate an increase in 
salary, providing an office for the inspector, etc., all of which 
•ought to be done. 

CITY FARM. 

You will early be made acquainted with the fact that the house 
of correction accommodations at the farm are by no means ade- 
quate to meet the demands that are made upon them. Various 
plans have been suggested as to remodeling the present buildings 
or building an addition to the prison. The latter seems prefer- 
able. The farm, because of the house of correction adjunct, is, 
necessarily, a source of heavy expense to the city, and the most 
that can be done is to keep the management in economical 
hands. 



42 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

STREET LIGHTING. 

Manchester's reputation, achieved since the adoption of the 
present system of electric lighting, of being one of the best lighted 
cities in New England, has been maintained. There are at pres- 
ent 289 electric, 62 gas, and 70 oil lights, and many additional 
electrics are needed in the suburban sections. The committee 
having this department in charge will find the need of painstak- 
ing care in the consideration of petitions. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

The usefulness of this beneficent institution should be extended 
by the addition of a wing to the north side of the building which 
will admit of an attractive and commodious reading-room, and, 
this secured, the library should then be kept open during a stated 
period on Sundays and on every week-day evening. 

The interior of the building requires considerable of an outlay 
in order to put it in suitable repair and make it more attractive. 

There are at present 36,000 volumes on the shelves, and the 
arduous task of recataloguing them has been faithfully and skil- 
fully accomplished. This must necessarily result in a large 
increase in the number of books circulated, as people will not be 
slow to improve the increased facilities for intellectual advance- 
ment such as are afforded by good reading. 

The salary paid the librarian, $800 per annum, is inadequate, 
as from this an assistant must be paid for evening work. Either 
the librarian's salary ought to be increased, or the services of an- 
other assistant secured at the expense of the library fund. 

The expenses of the institution during the year just i)assed 
aggregated $4,864.49. The amount expended for books and 
periodicals amounted to $632.56. Of the bequests which have 
been made the library, the accumulations of the Dean fund 
amount to $5,803.27, the accumulated interest of the Mary E. 
Elliot fund to $754.94, and the Eliza A. Eaton fund aggregates 
$2,897.35. 

HOSPITALS. 

The alleviation of distress is a duty incumbent upon us, and. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 43 

as the city grows, more attention must necessarily be given this 
subject. We have no city hospital, but are favored with excel- 
lent accommodations at the Elliot and Women's Aid hospitals at 
a cost to the city last year of ^1,400, which amount is but a frac- 
tional part of what would be necessary to maintain a city hospi- 
tal. During the past year the well-equipped Sacred Heart Hos- 
pital has been opened, and as it provides the same facilities for 
the reception of city patients as do the other hospitals, it should 
not be forgotten when the annual appropriation list is prepared. 
The hospital service provided by these three institutions will be 
ample for years to come, but the growth of the city will in time 
create a demand which cannot be satisfied short of a large city 
hospital. 

PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES. 

I renew my recommendation for the construction of free pub- 
lic bath-houses on the river banks. 

MILITARY. 

Our city has reason to feel proud of its volunteer militia, 
which reflects credit upon city and state alike. Several of the 
companies are, however, poorly quartered, and the long talked of 
state armory project is a growing need. 

CITY REPAIR SHOP. 

This is one of the necessities of the city. It should be in 
charge of a superintendent who should have the direction of all 
the repairs upon buildings owned by the city. 

The outlay necessary to construct and equip a building for this 
purpose would be saved the city during possibly a single admin- 
istration. 

PURCHASING AGENT. 

The office of purchasing agent might be created, and a great 
deal of money saved the city thereby. Instead of a half hundred 
or more persons doing the buying, as now, and paying different 
prices for the articles, the matter would be simplified by one per- 



44 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

son doing all the purchasing, and there would be a responsibility 
which is not now manifest. 

CEMETERIES. 

The two principal cemeteries, Valley and Pine Grove, are well 
cared for, and afford beautiful resting-places for the remains of 
those who have preceded us in knocking at the door of the great 
mystery. 

A plan, giving every plot and all the lots, is among the needs of 
Pine Grove cemetery. Further than this, an enlargement of its 
territory by the purchase of additional land is a matter ripe for 
consideration. 

It is gratifying to announce the beginning of a movement to 
place suburban cemeteries under more thoughtful care. 

During the past year authority was obtained from the city gov-, 
ernment to issue $50,000 of cemetery bonds, bearing interest at 
five per cent. 

THE LIQUOR TRAFFIC. 

This question is the skeleton in the municipal closet, the most 
vexatious, trying, and disturbing problem of local government. 

The experience and investigations of the last two years have 
but served to strengthen and more firmly fortify my heretofore 
expressed views that a judicious license law, with a local option 
clause, affords the best means of controlling the evil in large 
communities. It is admittedly true that, with the conditions of 
society existing as they do to-day, the liquor traffic cannot be 
stamped out. This being so, why not divest the subject of all 
sentimentality and treat it as a practical question ? A license 
law would be a reformatory measure. There would be no such 
profligacy and debauchery in rum drinking as are witnessed un- 
der our so-called prohibitory laws. Suppose that we had a law 
that made a saloon keeper's license ^1,500, limited the number 
of saloons to one for every fifteen hundred inhabitants, which 
placed the liquor dealer under iron-clad restrictions with refer- 
ence to selling to minors or to people who are already on the 
road to intoxication, and held them accountable for any violence 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 45 

resulting from their dispensation of the fluid, what would be the 
result ? There would be less than forty saloons in Manchester 
where there are now more than three hundred, and the city 
would derive a revenue of many thousands of dollars, which could 
be applied to wiping out the city's debt, or for building streets 
and sewers, or for any other purpose. Which is better, continue 
the present reign of sentimentalism with its free rum, and the 
entire community assessed to meet the experises of the pauperism 
and crime which follow in its train, or a license law which will 
reduce the traffic to close supervision and control, and which will 
exact a revenue to lessen the burdens of taxation ? Treat this 
subject as we would any business matter, and we can arrive at 
but one conclusion. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, I assure you that I shall endeavor to 
carry into our official relations the personal friendship and esteem 
which I feel for each one of you. 

The course of our city is onward to a grand destiny, and we 
should not consider her interests from a partisan or contracted 
point of view, but from the grander and broader range of her 
great possibilities, seeking to accomplish that which is for the 
good of the whole people, and planning and inaugurating public 
enterprises with the certainty always in view that we are to have 
a vast increase in our population within the next few years. Let 
us administer the public trust confided to our keeping as we 
would discharge an individual responsibility, remaining ever loyal 
and steadfast to the city of our home, our love, and our fondest 
desires. Let us, furthermore, be guided in our work by faith in 
an all-wise Providence, remembering the legend which adorns 
the city hall of the largest city washed by the waters of that 
great inland sea. Lake Ontario, " Except the Lord keep the city, 
the watchman waketh but in vain." 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



BOARD OF Water Commissioners. 

1893. 



E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor, ex officio. 
Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1899. 
Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1900. 
James A. Weston, term expires January, 1897. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1898. 
Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1895. 
Charles T. Means, term expires January, 1896. 



Officers. 



Alpheus Gay, President. 

James A. Weston, Cierk. 

Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

Josiah Laselle, Engineer at Pumping Station. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners have the 
honor to submit herewith their twenty-second annual report for 
the year ending December 31, 1893, together with the report of 
the superintendent covering the same period of time, to which 
reference is made for the details of the service connected with 
this department. 

The receipts and expenditures for the year have been as fol- 
lows : 



Balance unexpended December 31, 1892 . 
Receipts from water rentals and miscellaneous 
Received from bonds sold 
Received from premium on same 

Total .... 

Paid interest on water bonds . 
current expenses and repairs 
construction . 

hydrant rentals, set aside for 
sinking fund 

Total expenditures . 

Balance unexpended 
4 



• $57,920.91 

. 104,170.08 

. 200,000.00 

6,000.00 

^368,090.99 



$30,000.00 

33,618.10 

132,657.82 

12,750.00 



. $209,025.92 
. $159,065.07 



60 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Authority having been conferred upon the commissioners by 
the state legislature and the action of the city councils, they 
commenced as early as possible the construction of a high ser- 
vice system of water-works. In May last they engaged the ser- 
vices of Mr. George E. Evans, of the firm of George S. Rice & 
George E. Evans, of Boston, a gentleman of experience in the 
construction of similar works, as chief engineer. His report, 
which states fully and in detail what has been accomplished dur- 
ing the year, is appended hereto and is referred to, to save 
space and repetition, as a part of this report. 

The legislature at its last session authorized the city and water 
commissioners to issue water bonds to the amount of three hun- 
dred thousand dollars ($300,000) for the purpose of construct- 
ing the high-service system of water-works and for other pur- 
poses. Two hundred thousand dollars ($200,000) of these bonds 
have been negotiated and the proceeds placed in the city treas- 
ury. 

The amount expended on the high service system is as fol- 
lows : 



Force main .... 

Land 

Pumping machinery 

Reservoir .... 

Pumping station and grading . 

Total 



$68,696.45 

375-00 
6,000.00 

5.865.77 
13,908.28 

$94,845-50 



This work is so far advanced in its different departments that 
there is little doubt that it will be completed during the year 
1894. The arrangement of pipes is such that either or both 
systems can be supplied with water by the new pumps. When 
this \i accomplished, the fear that has been entertained of the 
possible failure of some parts of the old system, as pointed out 
in previous reports, will be relieved. 

Although the water in the lake has been the lowest, with one 
exception, within the history of the enterprise, no lack of water 
for legitimate uses has been experienced by any one during the 



BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 51 

past year. Unusual precaution has been exercised to guard 
against accidents that might impair the efficiency of the water 
service and to keep the works in every department in as reliable 
condition as the nature of the case would admit of. 
Respectfully submitted. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor, ex officio, 
ALPHEUS GAY, 
ANDREW C. WALLACE, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
HENRY CHANDLER, 
CHARLES H. MANNING, 
CHARLES T. MEANS, 

Water Commissioners. 
January i, 1S94. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Water CommissioJicrs of the City 

of Manchester : 

The following is the report of the superintendent for. the year 
1893, which is respectfully submitted : 

In this report the superintendent will confine himself to the 
old service, as the chief engineer, George E. Evans, will report 
progress on the new high-service system. The superintendent 
bought the pipe, gates, hydrants, and branches for the high ser- 
vice, had a road built from the highway to the location of the 
new pumping station, and the earth taken off the ledge at the 
site of the new reservoir, as was ordered by your honorable 
board. 

The city hired a piece of land at Fletcher's Crossing, built a 
side-track, and unloaded some of the pipe there. This was the 
most convenient place to be obtained, being a little less than one 
mile from the new pumping station, and there was plenty of 
room for unloading 20-inch pipe, which we did not have in the 
old yard at Wilson street. 

Nothing was gained by securing this place for unloading pipe 
alone, for seven to ten dollars "a car extra was charged to shift 
them out to Fletcher's Crossing, one and a half miles beyond the 
yard limit at Hallsville. It was a case of necessity, however, and 
probably the contractors considered it in their bids for hauling 
pipe, and also for hauling material to build the pumping station, 

MASSABESIC LAKE. 

The water in the lake has been lower than usual the past sea- 
son. The water began to go down the first of May, and kept on 
lowering until the 20th of November, when the measurements 



54 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

showed 26 inches below the darn, which was three inches higher 
than on January i, 1881, the lowest point reached in twenty 
years. The water to-day stands 20 inches below the dam. 

Slight repairs have been made on the dam, canal, and gate- 
house. The pumps at the station have done good work without 
many repairs. Most of the pumping, as the record shows, has 
been done by the Davidson pump. The following is the amount 
pumped : 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



55 




56 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Little work has been required on the force and supply main. 
We have enough pipe on hand now to lay the force main with 
2o-inch cast iron. When this is done, both pumps can run at the 
same time if necessary. 

RESERVOIR. 

The reservoir banks have been top-dressed, and the land 
around it has been manured, plowed, and cultivated. This land 
has not been plowed for seventeen years, and the grass crop was 
light and of a poor quality. The grounds will look enough bet- 
ter to pay for the cultivation, if we do not get all the money 
back that it cost. 

Pipes have been extended about six miles, making the distri- 
bution pipe sixty-nine miles in extent, or seventy-three miles 
including the high service. Pipes have been extended in Au- 
burn, Amory, Adams, Blaine, Bismark, Bartlett streets, Bedford 
road, B, Belmont, Canton, Cleveland streets, Coolidge avenue. 
Chestnut, Conant, Dearborn, Everett, Elm streets, Forest avenue, 
Harrison, Green, Hayward, Grove, Harvard, Hevey, Hiram, Han- 
cock, Hall, Jewett, Kelley, Montgomery, Myrtle streets. Mast 
road, Monroe, Morgan streets, Nutt road, North, Charlestown, 
Prescott, Prospect, Rimmon streets, -River road, Rockland, 
Summer, Silver, Somerville, Bell, Taylor, Union, Warren, Web- 
ster, Wilson, Walnut streets, making fifty-two different streets, 
at an expense of about $28,000. 

During the past year pipe was relaid in Amherst, Barr, Bed- 
ford, Clinton, Dover, Canal, Central, Douglas, Green, Granite, 
Hanover, Merrimack, Middle, Market, West, Water, and Quincy 
streets. The amount of iron pipe laid in place of the cement- 
lined was 9,946 feet, equal to 1.89 miles ; total cost, ^7,300. 
We now have nearly twenty miles of cement pipe in the city. 
The pipe for the new high service, also for the extensions and 
repairs, was bought of the Warren Foundry Co. for $26.60 per 
ton (2,240 pounds) delivered on the cars in the city. Last year 
the price was $26.65. 

The ground last winter froze to an unusual depth. The six and 
eight inch pipe froze in several places, and service pipes froze at 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



57 



the depth of six feet. We began to thaw out service pipes the 
loth day of January, and kept up the work until the middle of 
March. Hydrants had to have constant care after having once 
been opened, but no serious trouble resulted from frozen ones. 

Forty-five hydrants set the past year on the low service, and 
thirteen on the high service, fifty-eight in all. 

The following is the water pressure in pounds taken at some of 
the hydrants set in different parts of the city : 



Elm street, c 


:orner Baker .... 


60 jjounds 


" 


" Valley ... 


72 " 


" 


" Hanover 


63 " 


" 


" Pearl .... 


56 - 


" 


" Brook .... 


52 " 


'* 


" Webster 


44 " 


Canal street 


corner Granite 


75 " 


" " 


Brook. 


76 " 


North river 


road, corner Webster 


53 " 


H ii 


" Clark . 


49 " 


" 


" opposite Clark ledge 


42 


Chestnut street, corner Auburn . 


62 " 


u u 


Lowell . 


55 " 


a u 


" Brook . 


50 " 


u u 


Webster . 


44 " 


" " 


Clark . 


43 " 


Pine street, 


corner Nutt road 


60 " 


u a 


" Lake avenue . 


60 " 


" " 


" (Concord 


52 " 


(( i( 


" Webster 


45 " 


Union street 


, corner Silver 


50 " 


u a 


" Auburn 


64 " 


11 i( 


" Hanover 


55 " 


a u 


" Prospect 


44 . " 


a li 


" Pennacook . . . . 


43 " 


u u 


" Clark 


37 " 


Beech street 


corner Shasta . . . . 


54 " 


u 


" Valley . . . . 


61 " 



58 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS 



Beech street corner, Cedar 






52 pounds 


" " " Hanover 






51 " 


" Bridge 






45 " 


" " " Brook 






39 " 


Harvard street, corner Lincoln . 






51 " 


Maple street, corner Spruce 






53 " 


" " " Nashua 






46 - 


" Bridge 






43 " 


" " " Prospect 






28 " 


" Gore . 






33 " 


Wilson street, corner Somerville 






30 " 


" Valley . 






46 " 


" " " Spruce 






50 " 


" " " Hanover . 






^ ." 


Ashland street, corner Bridge 






30 " 


" Pearl 






22 " 


Russell street, corner Prospect 






25 


Belmont street, corner Somerville 






25 '' 


" Harvard . 






26 " 


" " " Auburn . 






44 " 


Milton street, corner Laurel 






18 '•- 


Belmont street, corner Concord . 






4 " 


" East High 






None. 


" Myrtle . 






20 pounds 


Massabesic street, corner Mammoth 


ind C 


^andii 


i 


road 






29 - 


Lake avenue, corner Canton 






26 " 


Auburn street, corner Canton 






18 " 


South Main street, corner Milford 






73 "■ 


Boyington road, by Huntress's . 






76 " 


Bedford Plains, on Boyington road 






45 " 


South Main street, corner Blaine 






82 " 


a Walker 






. 78 " 


" " " " Granite 






74 " 


Granite street, corner River 






83 " 


North Main street, corner Conant 






70 " 


" " " " Amory 






61 " 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



59 



McGregor street, corner Amory .... 64 pounds 

Amory street, corner Dubuque . . . . 41 " 

" " '' Morgan .... 33 " 

Bartlett street, corner Putnam . . . . 58 " 

Front street, Amoskeag, by the brick schoolhouse 61 " 

Front street, corner Dunbarton road . . . 64 " 

Last hydrant on Dunbarton road . . . 36 " 

On Goffstown road, last hydrant . . . 44 " 

Milford street, corner Bismark . . . . 60 " 

Old Mast road, corner Forest avenue . . . 41 " 

" '• " " Rockland avenue . . 40 " 

Wilkins street, corner Rockland avenue . . 37 " 

Wilkins street, last hydrant .... 28 " 

Respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 
January i, 1894. 



60 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



i 


At engine house and Proctor road. 

Blow-off at engine house. 

Hydrant at engine house. 

Lake Shore road. 

Bartlett meadow. 

Fletcher's Crossing to Mammoth road. 

Fletcher's Crossing. 

West of John Claflin's residence. 

Blow-off east of C. F. Francis's residence. 

Opposite James Colby residence. 

Corner Oakland avenue. 

Pipe laid in Orchard avenue. 

F.fist of T,. M. Strnpfpi-'s rr'sidenee. 


West of Mammoth road. 
Candia road to reservoir. 
Blow-off at Stevens' brook. 
Blow-off south of Nelson street. 
Blow-off south of Lake avenue. 
Pipe laid in Hanover sti-eet. 
Summit of hill soutli of city farm. 
Blow-off south of city farm. 
Opposite city farm. 
Pipe laid in Bridge street. 
Pipe laid in old Bridge street. 




■s^in3.ip^H 






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^^ 










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2 


i 


to 






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to 


i 

3 


o 




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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



61 



COST OF HIGH SERVICE TO JANUARY I, 


1894. 


Force main ....... 


. $68,696.45 


Land 


375-00 


Pumping machinery 


6,000.00 


Reservoir 


• 5,865.77 


Pumping station and grading .... 


. 13,908.28 



$94,845.50 



62 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



o 

c 


South of Clark. 

Corner Pine. 

Montgomery to P.artlelt. 

Belmont lo Hall. 

East of Canton. 

A to Prince. 

Amory to Sullivan. 

Corner Granite. 

Pine to Union. 

Southward to Somerville. 

Nortlnvard from Milford. 

To Hiram. 

Corner Merrimack. 

Lake to Auburn. 

West of old Amherst road. 

Webster to North. 

To Hiram. 

Corner West. 

Kelley street, northward. 

To Montgomery. 

OjDnosite shoe shoo. 


m 


Milford to Mast road. 
Corner Gi'anite. 
Pine to Union. 
Pine to Union. 
Summer to Auburn. 


S ^ 
o55 

III 


•sju-D.ipAH 


Mr' 


jiM '(SM [ '■ ■^- 


H i : ;-- ; 


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^- :'.::! 






• : : : 




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\ \ \ 




Mi^i 


- ;— : : : — -- 






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; — 


11 ^^IN 


h : ; 


\ \^ \ 


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:| :::::: : 


: : is : : 








C 
















c : : : : : 








:^i 










Adams 

Amherst 

Amory 

Auburn 

Auburn 




nismark 

Blaine 

Canal 

Canton 

Charlestown avenue 


iiif 




c • 




5 33§ 

all 



BOARD OF AVATER COMMI.SSIONERS. 



63 









gh -S'^'CO 



■^^^ °&nm- ^ 






• (M lO T-i 0-1 



OMo: to o 



5 5 S 5-^ 






piitlllilgsllls 



64 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Pipe laid in city 34.267 feet. 68 gates. 45 hydrants. 
High service i9?794 " 27 " 13 " 



Total S4,o6i feet. 95 gates. 58 hydrants. 

Equal to 10.239 miles. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



65 



The following places are where cement-lined pipe was taken 
up and relaid with cast iron : 



Streets. 


Length in Feet. 


Location. 




Sin. 


6 in. 


4 in. 








10 
600 


28 








Chestnut to Pine (S" laid). 
Granite to Douglas (bal.). 
Granite to Central. 






Bedford 




529 
12 
GO 

.518 


Canal 


1,314 


Market to Depot. 




Clinton 




Main to West 




, 382 


Brook to Harrison 




1,306 




Dover to Railroad. 






597 










Dover to Quincy (hal.). 
Douglas to Granite. 
Beech to Maple. 
East of Canal 








260 






600 
64 
744 
768 


Market 










Aliddle 












253 






"5 


Corner Canal. 
West of Elm. 
West of Elm. 
Douglas to Parker. 




36 

110 

210 1 482 


w, . ' 


, 




Size of pipe changed on 
Amherst street. 


' l,(i96 
600 


6,630 
600 


1,620 








2,296 


6,030 


1,620 





Total feet laid, 9,946. 

Six-inch gate on Amherst street, corner Pine, was taken out 
and eight-inch gate set. 

Six-inch gate was taken out on West street near Clinton, and 
set on Clinton, corner West. 

5 



66 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET, 1 893. 

Auburn, corner Belmont. 

Bartlett, corner Putnam ; Bartlett, corner Sullivan. 

Bell, corner Pine ; Bell, corner Union. 

Belmont, corner Harvard ; Belmont, corner Silver; Belmont, 
corner Somerville. 

Bridge, corner Mammoth ; Old Bridge, corner Mammoth. 

Canton, corner Auburn. 

Candia road, Fletcher's Crossing ; Candia road, west of John 
Claflin's residence ; Candia road, opposite James Colby's resi- 
dence; Candia road, corner Oakland avenue ; Candia road, east 
of L. M. Streeter's residence. 

Charlestown avenue, corner Old Amherst road. 

Coolidge avenue, corner Bremer. 

Conant, corner Montgomery. 

Elm, south of Baker. 

Forest, near Dickey residence. 

Green, corner Pine; Green, corner Union. 

Grove, corner Pine ; Grove, corner Union. 

Hanover, corner Mammoth road. 

Harvard, corner Wilson. 

Hiram, south of Blaine. 

Jewett, corner Old Young road. 

Kelley, corner Rimmon ; Kelley, corner Hevey. 

Mammoth road, south of City Farm; Mammoth road, opposite 
City Farm, 

Mast road (old), corner Warner ; Mast road (old), near L. M. 
Dickey's. 

Myrtle, corner Linden ; Myrtle, corner Hall ; Myrtle^ corner 
Belmont. 

North, corner River road. 

Nutt road, near J. N. Auger's residence. 

Old Amherst road, west of Milford. 

Orchard avenue, corner Candia road. 

Prescott, corner Wilson. 

Prospect, corner Belmont. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 67 

Somerville, corner Wilson ; Somerville, corner Hall. 

Spruce, corner Canton. 

Summer, corner Hall. 

Taylor, opposite Mr. Gilmore's residence. 

Thornton, corner Putnam ; Thornton, corner Sullivan. 

Union, opposite Dana & Provost's mill. 

Warner, corner Kingston. 

Webster, corner Beech. 

Young, corner Wilson ; Young, corner Taylor. 

At pumping station, near lake. 

Lake Shore road, near Latuch's land. 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 





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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



69 



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70 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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Elm avenue 

Everett 

Foster avenue .... 
Franklin 


Granite 

Grove, cor. Elm... 
Grove, M. Corp... 


Grove, E. aian.... 

Green 

Hall 

Hancock 

Hanover... 



BOARD OP WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



71 



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72 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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Myrtle 

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North 

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L 


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Prospect 

Prout avenue 

River road 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



73 







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74 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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WEST SIDE RIVEK. 

Idams 

I moskeag road... 
Vmory (north) ... 
^mory (south) .... 

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Bartlett 

Sath 

Soynton road .... 

Seauport 

Bennington 

Bismark 



BOARD OF WATER COMxMISSIONERS. 



75 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



77 



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78 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



79 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1893. 



Size. 


Feet cement-lined pipe. 


Feet cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20-inch diameter 


20,,'5GO.OO 


24,384 


16 


14- inch diameter 


.0,125.00 


8,298 


11 


12-inch diameter 


7,444.00 


15,883 


25 


10-inch diameter 


3,474.75 


14,432 


23 


8-inch diameter 


5,250.00 


39,177 


64 


6-inch diameter 


55,885.50 


165,177 


421 


4-inch diameter 


2,749.00 


16,592 


54 




101,488.25 


283,932 


014 



Cement-lined pipe 
Cast-iron pipe . 

Total pipe 

614 gates. 
568 hydrants. 
13 air valves. 



19.221 miles. 
53-775 " 



. 72.996 miles. 



SERVICE PIPES. 



Three hundred and ten service pipes have been laid this year 
as follows : 



301 I inch diameter . 

52" 

13" 

14" 

2 6 ." " 



7,248.6 feet. 
52.8 " 



for Valley cemetery, 
for fire sprinklers, 
for fire sprinklers. 



7,301.4 feet. 



80 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SERVICE PIPES RELAID. 



I y-z inch diameter 17.0 feet to i inch diameter 16.0 feet. 


32 yi " 


945-1 " to I " " 865.2 " 


I ^ " 


32.4 " to i>4 " " 32.4 " 


I ^ " 


36.5 " to 4 " " 36.5 " 


41" 


131. " to I " " 71.0 " 


11" " 


22.0 " to ii^ " " 22.0 " 


II" 


21.0 " to 2 " " 21.0 " 




1,205.0 feet. 1,064.1 feet. 


Forty-one hundred and sixty-nine (4,169) service pipes have 


been laid to date 


as follows : 


35 Yz inch diameter ..... 757-2 feet. 


1 719 Y^ " 


" ..... 45,006.6 '' 


2305 I '• 


58,358.8 " 


22II< " 


893.5 " 


20 \y. " 


" ..... 606.7 " 


54 2 " 


i>995-7 " 


. 1 23^ " 


57-0 " 


2 3 " 


16.8 " 


94" 


269.5 " 


2 6 " 


u 


Total len£ 


jth of service pipe . . . 107,961.8 feet. 


Number miles 


service pipe^ 20.444. 




METERS. 



The number of meters set during the year has been two hun- 
dred and eighty-seven (287). 

Total number of meters now in use, eighteen hundred and 
ninety-five (1895). 

The number of applications for water to date has been forty- 
three hundred and thirty-three (4,333). 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



81 



The income from the sale of water for 


1S93 h^^ t 


lows : 






Received for hydrant rent . 


^12 


,750.00 


for water by rate . 


31 


603-59 


for water by meter 


5S 


103.20 


for water, building purposes . 


I 


,033-75 


from fines .... 




159.60 


for labor and pipe sold . 




72.88 


for 6-inch pipe laid, Queen 






City Co 




35-00 


for 6-inch pipe laid, Elliott 






Manufacturing Co. . 




50.00 


for 6-inch pipe, Kimball Car- 






riage Co. 




51.00 


for 4-inch pipe, Dana & Pro- 






vost ..... 




32.00 


for repairing hydrant, E. C. 






Blanchard 




25.00 


of G. G. Griffin, lease . 




1. 00 


of Fletcher Brown, lease 




1. 00 


for grass on Smith land 




5.00 


for grass on Mills land . 




4.00 


for grass on Neal land . 




3.00 


for molasses, by Shannon 




16.56 


for use of hall by Grange at 






Auburn .... 




50.00 


of W. G. Brown, house rent 




30.00 


of S. G. Prescott, house rent 




60.00 


for old cement pipe 




73-50 


for cutting ice, Decourcy, 






Holland & Co. 




10.00 



been as fol- 



Total . 
Abatement, $178.51. 
Amount received from water rent 
Amount received for bonds sold . 



$91,420.08 
200,000.00 



;io4,i7o.o8 



$291,420.08 



82 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Current expenses and repairs for 1893 
Construction for 1S93 

Total .... 
Interest for 1893 



. $33,618.10 
. 132,657.82 

$166,275.92 
. 30.000.00 



$196,275.92 



Receipts over expenditures 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS 

Superintendence, repairs, and renewals 

Stationery and printing 

Office and incidental expenses . 

Pumping expenses 

Repairs to darn, canal, and reservoir 

Repair to buildings . 

Current expenses for 1893 

Service pipes .... 

Distribution pipes 

Fire hydrants and valves . 

Meters and fixtures . 

Pumping machinery and buildings 

Reservoir ..... 

Lands ..... 

Construction expenses for 189, 

Total .... 
Co7istruction expenses : 
Land and water rights 





$95,144.16 


NTS FOR 1893 




. $29,282.43 




268.22 




1,422.64 




• 1,885.17 




649.96 




109.68 






$33,618.10 


• ^3»937-26 




■ 94,443-46 




• 4,053.01 




4,075.04 




. 19,908.28 




• 5>865.77 




375-00 




3 


$132,657.82 



$166,275.92 



Dam, canal, penstock, and 
Pumping machinery, pumj 

buildings 
Distributing reservoirs 
Force and supply mains 
Distribution pipes 
Fire hvdrants and valves 



races 
house, and 



$63,174.14 
101,399.16 

127,812.81 
77,408.13 
89,769.02 

49i>95o-93 
50,198.98 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Tools and fixtures 


$10,649-35 




Boarding and store houses . 


919.36 




Roads and culverts . 


2,193.49 




Supplies 


550-39 




Engineering .... 


22,176.19 




Livery and traveling expenses 


2,856.64 




Legal expenses .... 


563-79 




Grading and fencing 


13,588.26 




Service pipes .... 


56,745-92 




Meters and fixtures . 


38.334-01 




Total construction account to 




Dec. 31, 1893 


$1 


150,290.57 


Current expenses : 






Superintendence, collecting, and re 


- 




pairs ..... 


$210,818.29 




Stationery and printing , . 


- 6,117.79 




Office and incidental expenses . 


. 20,812.48 




Pumping expenses and repairs 


. 4S>i24.79 




Repairs to buildings . 


• 2,367.95 





Repairs to dam, canal, races, and res- 
ervoir 



4, 606. So 



Current expenses to Dec. 31, 

1893 $289,848.10 

Interest $40,678.51 

Highway expenditures . . . 14,000.53 

$54,679.04 



Total amount of bills approved 

to date .... 

Interest, discount, and labor performed 

on highways, transfers, and tools and 

materials sold $63,312.08 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1893 - 289,848.1c 



Total cost, exclusive of interest 
and current expenses . 



$1,494,817.71 

$353,160.18 
$1,141,657.53 



84 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 1S93 $690,333.51 
Interest for 1893 .... 30,102.00 

Total interest and discount to 
Dec. 31, 1893 
Amount paid toward interest to Dec. 

31. 1892 $548,237.00 

Amount paid toward interest, 1893 . 30,000.00 



$720,435-51 



The following amounts have been paid over to 
urer, and credited to the water-works : 

1872, supplies and materials sold . 

1873, supplies and materials sold . 
accrued interest on water bonds sold . 
accrued interest on state bonds sold . 
water rents 

1 8 74, supplies and materials sold . 

March 12, highway expenditures, transferred 

from water account .... 
March 17, interest and discount transferred 

from water account 
September i, interest and discount trans 

ferred from water account 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 
December 29, interest transferred 
December 18, one anvil sold 
September 25, engine, crusher, and material 

sold 

water and hydrant rent, etc. 
May 20, derrick sold 
May 20, rent of derrick . 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1877, water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1878, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
old plow sold ..... 

1879, derrick sold ..... 
May 20, water and hydrant rent, etc. . 



i875> 



1875, 
1876, 



$578,237.00 
the city treas- 

$573-6i 
177.07 
193.26 
146.00 

1,920.53 
607.89 

14,000.53 

12,347.25 

22,361.74 

30=233.54 

4,566.25 

15.00 

2,089.45 

27>ii9-55 

125.00 

24.00 

38,879.47 
43)823.30 
48,873.26 
1. 00 
75.00 
53,068.17 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



85 



i8So 


water and hydrant rent, etc. 


• ^57,395-2.S 




sale of grass 


10.00 




level, transit, etc 


250.00 


1881 


water and hydrant rent, etc. 


60,154.62 




sale of grass ..... 


10.00 




derrick ...... 


50.00 




received of G. G. Griffin , 


i.oo 


1882, 


water and hydrant rent, etc. 


67,403.76 




received of G. G. Griffin . 


I.oo 




of James Baldwin & Co. 


175.00 




from the sale of grass . 


10.00 




from Goodhue & Birnie 


24.37 




for old plank 


I.oo 




for use of derrick . 


15.00 


1883, 


received of G. G. Griffin . 


1.00 




from sale of grass . 


20.00 




for water and hydrant rent, etc. 


73>437-2o 


18S4, 


received of G. G. Griffin . 


I.oo 




for stone .... 


5.00 




from sale of grass . 


10.00 




from pipe sold and labor 


616.20 




for water and hydrant rent . 


74,947.88 


1885, 


received from G. G. Griffin 


I.oo 




of B. P. Kimball, for grass . 


10.00 




for labor and pipe sold . 


13-45 




for water and hydrant rent . 


80,379.67 


1886, 


received from G. G. Griffin 


I.oo 




of B. P. Kimball, for grass . 


5.00 




for wood .... 


37.80 




for labor and pipe 


282.4.3 




for water and hydrant rent . 


74,803.76 


1887, 


received for labor and pipe 


768.86 




of G. G. Griffin . 


I.oo 




of C. C. Cole . . . . 


•50 




of B. P. Kimball, for grass . 


10.00 




of A. J. Crombie, for grass . 


5.00 




of A. Goodwin, for poles 


10.00 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1S87, received of W. G. Brown . . . . 

of T. H. Risdon & Co., for freight 
for water and hydrant rent 

188S, received for labor and pipe 
of G. G. Griffin . 
of George P. Clark 
of R. D. Wood & Co., (gear) 
for water and hydrant rent 

1889, received for labor and pipe • . 

of G. G. Griffin . 
of B. P. Kimball, for grass 
of W. G. Brown, for rent 
of James Baldwin, for pipe 
of Mr. Clement, for pipe 
for water and hydrant rent 

1890, received of G. G. Griffin (lease) 

of Fletcher Brown (lease) 
of George P. Clark (lease) 
of B. P. Kimball, for grass 
■ of W. G. Brown, for rent 
of N. W. Ellis & Co., for pipe 
of J. H. Dearborn, for pipe 
for water and hydrant rent 

1891, received for water and hydrant rent 

for labor and pipe sold . 
of G. G. Griffin (lease) 
of Fletcher Brown (lease) 
of W. G. Brown (rent) 
of Mr. Prescott (rent) . 
of William Bryant (rent) 
of B. P. Kimball (grass) 
of G. W. Reed (grass) . 
of C. H. Patten (grass) 

1892, received for water and hydrant rent 

for labor and pipe sold . 
of T. C. Pratt, for house 
for cement-lined pipe . 



$25.00 

15. II 

79,682.70 

227.33 

I. GO 

2,00 

16.29 

85>397-2o 

S9.77 

x.oo 

2.00 

50.00 

65.00 

•50 

86,492.19 

T.OO 
I. CO 
2.00 
2.00 
36.00 

153-00 

3540 

99,232.97 

76,3i3-24 

200.99 

1. 00 

1. 00 

21.00 

50.00 

8.00 

2.00 

5.00 

3.00 

83,067.99 

45-55 

100.00 

94.25 



BOARD OF WATER COiMMISSIONERS. 



87 



1S92, received of Grange, for rent 

of William Prescott, for barn 
for potatoes .... 
for cutting ice . 
of W. G. Brown (rent) 
of G. G. Griffin (lease), 
of F. Brown (lease) 
of H. N. Hall (use of pasture) 
of C. F. Whittemore (grass) . 
of Charles Reed (grass) 
of G. S. Patten (grass) . 
of G. G. Prescott (rent) 
1893, received from water rents . 

for labor and pipe sold . 

for old cement pipe 

from Queen City Co. (laying 6-inch 

pipe) .... 

from Elliott Mfg. Co. (laying 6 

inch pipe) .... 

from Kimball Carriage Co. (laying 

6-inch pipe 
from Dana & Provost (laying 

inch pipe) 
from E. C. Blanchard, repairing 

hydrant 
from G. G. Griffin, lease 
from F. Brown, lease 
for grass on Smith land 
for grass on Neal land . 
for grass on Mills land . 
for molasses .... 
for use of hall by Grange 
from W. G. Brown, house rent 
from S. G. Prescott, house rent 
for cutting ice on lane . 

Total received for water, etc., to date 



$50.00 

15.00 

4.00 

10.00 

21.00 

1. 00 

1. 00 

20.00 

4.00 

4.00 

7.00 

30.00 

90,900.14 

72.88 

73-50 

35-00 



51.00 



25.00 

1. 00 

1. 00 

1. 00 

5.00 

3.00 

4.00 

16.56 

50.00 

30.00 

60.00 

10.00 

$1,386,119.78 



88 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Amount appropriated to date 

Amount of bills approved to date 

Amount paid toward interest 
Amount on hand December 31, 1S93 



^840,000.00 

$2,226,119.78 
1,494,817.71 

$731,302.07 
578.237.00 

$153,065.07 



Uses for which Water is Supplied. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



I Jail. 
23 Churches. 

1 Court house, 

8 Hose companies. 
5 Fire-engines. 

2 Hook-and-ladder. 

2 Opera houses. 

1 Convent. 

3 City hospitals. 

2 Old Ladies' Homes. 
I Soldiers' monument. 

1 Turner Hall. 

4 Fountains. 

2 Trust companies. 



4 Cemeteries. 
I Orphanage. 
I Post-office. 
I City library. 
7 Banks. 
9 Hotels. 
I Masonic Hall. 
I Odd Fellows' Hall. 
I Holly Tree Inn. 
3 Halls. 
28 Schoolhouses. 
I Battery building. 
I Skating-rink. 



MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 



I Hosiery mill. 

1 Silver-plating. 

2 Iron foundries. 
2 Dyehouses. 

4 Machine-shops. 

6 Clothing manufactories. 

8 Harness-shops. 



3 Granite works. 

2 Electric light stations. 

4 Sash and blind shops. 
I Brewery. 

3 Shoe-shops. 
I Gas-works. 

4 Slaughter-houses. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



89 



I Brush-shop. 
9 Carriage-shops. 
12 Cigar factories. 
I Brass and copper foundry. 
I Locomotive works. 
I Grist-mill. 



I Soap factory. 

4 Needle manufactories. 

4 Beer-bottling. 

3 Book-binderies. 

1 Paper-mill. 

2 Box makers. 



6 Fish. 
12 Meat and fish. 



3 Meat (wholesale). 



21 Livery. 
I Horse railroad. 



901 Private. 



18 Dentists. 

1 Telephone. 

2 Telegraph. 

3 Express. 



14 Printing 
I Gas. 
9 Coal. 



50 Barber. 

9 Wheelright. 
18 Blacksmith. 

7 Carpenter. 

2 Tinsmith. 

I Copper. 



3 Currying. 

9 Plumber and gas and water 
pipe. 

4 Paint. 

2 Gunsmith. 



4 Auction. 
32 Drug. 
22 Jewelry. 

I Fur. 



99 Grocery. 

5 Meal. 

3 Hardware. 
38 Boot and shoe. 



90 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



3 House-furnishing goods. 
20 Fancy goods. 

I Wholesale paper. 

5 Wholesale produce. 
24 Dry goods. 
12 Candy. 

I Cloak. 
15 Millinery. 

3 Tea. 

9 Furniture. 

I Wholesale grocer. 



1 1 Stove. 

17 Gents' furnishing goods. 

7 Book. 

I Leather and shoe-finders. 

3 Music. 

3 Upholstery. 

8 Undertakers. 

5 Sewing-machine. 
I Feather-cleaner, 
I Rubber. 



[4 Dining. 
7 Billiard. 



6 Club-rooms. 

2 Bleacheries. 
23 Laundries. 

3 Icehouses. 

12 Photographers. 



SALOONS. 

104 Liquor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

8 Greenhouses. 
2 Band rooms. . 
20 Bakeries. 
2 Waste. 
I Business college. 



WATER FIXTURES, El 

9.555 Families. 

138 Boarding-houses. 
12,229 Faucets. 
2,367 Wash-bowls. 
5,705 Water-closets. 

387 Wash-tubs. 
1,466 Bath-tubs. 

182 Urinals. 



2,594 Sill-cocks. 
568 Fire-hydrants. 
39 Stand-pipes. 
26 Watering-troughs. 
5 Drinking-fountains. 
2,434 Horses. 
114 Cattle. 

I Public urinal. 



25^ inch 76 feet. 



Material on Hand. 

SERVICE PIPE. 

i}{ inch 292 feet. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



91 



2 inch S33 ^<^et. 
ij^ inch 145 feet. 



T inch 1,416 feet. 
^ inch 400 feet. 



8,400 feet 20 in. 
4,500 feet 14 in. 
3,480 feet 12 in. 
3,200 feet 10 in. 



I 20 in. 
I 14 in. 
I 12 in. 
4 10 in. 



3 double 6 on 20. 

1 double 6 on 10. 
15 double 6 on 8. 

2 double 8 on 8. 

3 double 4 on 8. 
2 double 4 on 6. 

4 double 6 on '6. 
4 double 4 on 4. 



I 10 inch 1-8. 

1 14 inch 1-8. 
6 6 inch 1-8. 

2 8 inch 1-8. 



4 20 inch. 

3 14 inch. 

112 inch. 

i:; 8 inch. 





7,000 feet 8 in. 




1,900 feet 6 in. 




600 feet 4 in. 


GATES. 






4 8 in. 




4 6 in. 




8 4 in- 


BRANCHES. 






I single 6 on 20. 




I. single 12 on 14. 




2 single 6 on 14. 




I single 8 on 10. 




II single 6 on 8. 




2 single 8 on 6. 




25 single 6 on 6. 




2 single 8 on 8. 




6 single 6 on 12. 


BENDS. 






5 6 inch 1-4. 




7 8 inch 1-4. 




112 inch 1-8. 


CLAMP SLEEVES. 




15 10 inch. 




50 6 inch. 




5 4 inch. 



92 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

WHOLE SLEEVES. 

3 20 inch. 10 8 inch. 

2 14 inch. 5 10 inch. 

3 12 inch. 21 4 inch. 
5 6 inch. 



HIGH SERVICE WATER-WORKS. 

To the Board of Water Commissioners of Manchester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — The following is a report of work done on the 
high service water-works to January first, eighteen hundred nine- 
ty-four. 

In accordance with your request of May 12, I commenced on 
the 15th to examine a location for the intake pipe and pumping- 
station at Lake Ivlassabesic. Two places on land owned by the 
city had been favorably considered, one north of and the other 
south of Slager brook, on the west shore of the lake. At these 
two places soundings were carefully taken to ascertain the depth 
of water and nature of the material. Floats varying from three 
to nine feet in length were used at each place to ascertain the 
direction of the current, which proved to be from north to south. 
Taking this fact into consideration, it was decided to locate as 
far north of Slager brook as possible, so as to prevent taking, 
directly, the water which is carried into the lake by the brook. 
Four other places north of the present location, and one in the 
east lake near the Massabesic House, were examined, but as these 
locations would have increased the length of the force main con- 
siderably, and not be on land owned by the city, it was consid- 
ered that any one of them did not possess sufficient advantages 
over the one selected, to incur the additional expense. As soon 
as the location of the pumping-station had been fixed, the loca- 
tion of the force main was commenced. Sometime previous to 
this Mr. Joseph B. Sawyer, civil engineer, had surveyed several 
routes, so that all the possible routes have been examined. 

force main. 
From the pumping-station a 20-inch cast-iron force main is 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 93 

laid in a southwesterly direction through land of the city, cross- 
ing the Borough road in the hollow west of C. B. Hall's house. 
From here the general direction is northwesterly and nearly 
straight to the Proctor road, near the junction of the Candia 
road, passing through land formerly owned by C. B. Hall and 
Amos Letuch, and through land of C. H. Bartlett. From the 
Proctor road to the Mammoth road the pipe is laid twenty-four 
feet southerly of and parallel to the northerly line of Candia 
road, as defined by the city council, December 2, 1890. In 
the Mammoth road it is laid twenty-four feet east of and parallel 
to the west line, excepting at one place on the city farm where a 
bank wall interfered, and it is only nineteen feet from the west 
line. From Bridge street it is laid in the old roadway about 
twelve feet east of the Derryfield park line to old Bridge street. 
From there the pipe is laid across the southwest corner of land 
owned by the heirs of John J. Bell and land of the city to a 
point near the proposed reservoir. In the Candia road the top 
of the pipe is laid five feet below the grade of the street as estab- 
lished by the city council, November i, 1892. Mammoth road 
has no established grade, and the pipe is laid about four and one 
half feet below the surface of the present traveled way. There 
are six 20-inch gates and thirteen hydrants set on this pipe. At 
each summit there is an automatic air-valve, making six in all, 
and at each depression a blow-off and well has been built, except- 
ing at the engine house, where the lo-inch blow-off pipe is ex- 
tended into the lake. The details and location are fully shown 
on plans in the water-works office. The work of laying the force 
main was divided into two sections : The first section extended 
from the engine house to a point in the Mammoth road opposite 
Massabesic street, and included the laying of one hundred 
ninety-nine feet of 20-inch pipe and connecting with the low 
service pipe in Massabesic street. 

For this section (No. i) seven bids were received August 7, and 
the contract was awarded to Messrs. Bartlett, Gay & Young, of 
this city. The amount of this contract is ^14,774.98. 

Section No. 2 extended from a point in Mammoth road oppo- 
site Massabesic street to a point near the reservoir site. 



94 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

September 5 three bids were received, and the contract was 
awarded to Moore & Co., of Boston. The amount of this con- 
tract is $10,304.04. 

The force main was laid to line and grade so as to reduce the 
friction as much as possible, and the work is believed to have 
been done in a thorough manner, and both sections were com- 
pleted the last of November. 

According to the terms of the contracts, fifteen percent of the 
above amounts is retained for six months after the water is let on, 
to make any necessary repairs. 

PUMPING-STATION. 

September 29 two bids were received for laying the intake 
pipe, and foundations for the pumping engines and buildings. 
The Head & Dowst Co., of Manchester, being the lower, the 
contract was awarded to it. The foundations for the buildings 
are laid in cement mortar, and were finished November 16 ; only 
the granite course of the engine foundations has been laid, be- 
cause the remainder is to be built of brick and cut stone laid in 
cement mortar, and to obtain a solid foundation it is not in- 
tended to start them until the engine-house is so far completed 
that a stove may be run to heat the room and prevent the ma- 
sonry from freezing. 

A 24-inch cast-iron intake pipe is laid into the lake three hun- 
dred and nine feet from the inside wall of the pump-well. It is 
provided with a sluice gate at the end in the pump-well, and a 
stop gate just outside the engine house. There is a 6-inch verti- 
cal pipe connected with it which may be useful to clear the 
screen at the outer end of the pipe of floating substances or an- 
chor ice. 

The outer end is a quarter turn with a bell-shaped mouth 
twenty-nine inches in diameter. This is covered with a heavy 
brass screen of three fourths inch mesh. The portion which is 
above the lake bottom is supported by round piles capped with 
eight-inch square timber. 

To lay this pipe a coffer dam was built and the water was 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 95 

pumped out, and each piece was laid to line and grade. The 
bottom of the trench was mostly quicksand. 

The mouthpiece is turned upward, and is at grade 139, or 
eight feet below the top of the dam. November 29 the last piece 
of pipe was laid. A 2-inch wrought-iron pipe was driven at the 
end of the intake pipe to give its location. 

At the end of the intake pipe, in the pump-well, there will be 
a screen chamber, having a double set of one fourth inch mesh 
copper screens. 

The buildings at the pumping station consist of an engine 
room, 36 feet 8 inches by 38 feet 8 inches; boiler room, 21 feet 
by '34 feet, and coal room, 27 feet 8 inches by 48 feet 4 inches. 
The exterior and interior is built of common brick laid in red 
mortar and granite trimmings. 

October 16 the contract for the engine buildings and chim- 
ney was awarded to The Head & Dowst Company, of Manches- 
ter, as it made the lowest bid of the three received. Consider- 
able delay has been caused by not receiving the cut stone for the 
underpinning. Work was commenced on the chimney October 
23, and all the bricks were laid ready for the cap, November 14. 
It is one hundred feet and nine inches high to the top of the 
cast-iron cap, and has a separate interior core or draft flue four 
feet inside diameter. The coal house is completed, the boiler 
house is nearly finished and the roof is partly laid, and the en- 
gine-house walls are built as high as the window sills. With 
suitable weather, the roof will be put on within two weeks, as the 
trusses are already framed. A bank wall, one hundred and sixty 
feet in length along the lake, is being laid, and when the grounds 
are graded will give ample room in the rear of the buildings. 
The architectural plans for the buildings were furnished by Wil- 
liam M. Butterfield, architect, of this city. 



There are to be two vertical Manning boilers six feet in diam- 
eter, each containing one hundred and eighty two and one half 
inch tubes, fifteen feet in length. Four bids were received for 



96 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

these boilers, September 13, and the contract was awarded to the 
Atlantic Works, East Boston, it being the lowest bidder. The 
boilers have been tested and are ready to be delivered. 

PUMPING ENGINES. 

A contract was made May 25, with Henry R. Worthington, of 
New York city, for two Worthington high-duty pumping engines, 
each having a capacity of three million gallons in twenty-four 
hours when pumping against a head of two hundred and fifty- 
four feet. The contractor has notified us that both engines are 
ready to be shipped. The work of erecting them will commence 
just as soon as the foundations are finished. 

RESERVOIR. 

The reservoir is located on Oak hill, just north of Derryfield 
park. The dimensions are one hundred fifty-five by two hun- 
dred thirty feet on the inside line of the coping and the depth 
nineteen feet, and will contain four million gallons. The inside 
is to be lined with cement concrete and masonry and the outside 
is to be made of earth. During the fall the city excavated about 
forty-five hundred cubic yards of earth and loose rock. The re- 
mainder of the excavation will be in ledge. The. material is a 
very poor quality of granite, having large veins of mica and 
others composed largely of feldspar and some quartz. There are 
many seams which will have to be filled with cement grout. So 
much of the material is unfit for use in the construction, it will 
add considerably to the cost, although it is hoped good building 
stone will be found in the north part as the excavation pro- 
gresses. After excavating the material to the ledge, it was 
thought advisable to contract the remainder of the work, and on 
November 15 six bids were received. The lowest bid was given 
by Trumbull & Ryan, of Boston, and the contract was awarded 
to them. It is intended to take out all the ledge this winter, 
and at this time more than two hundred yards have been taken 
out. By permission from the street and park commissioners the 
refuse matter is being dumped on to the park land. 
Respectfully submitted. 
GEO. S. RICE & GEO. E. EVANS, 

by Geo. E. Evans, 

January i, 1S94. Engineer in Charge. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



REPORT OF STREET AND PARK COMMIS- 
SION. 



To the City Councils of the City of Mancheste)- : 

The Street and Park Commission herewith submit their first 
annual report of the work completed under their supervision, 
according to the requirements of the act of the legislature 
establishing the Board. 

The department of street and park commission began -its 
work April i, 1893, by organizing with George H. Stearns, chair- 
man, and Allan E. Herrick, clerk. The gentlemen composing 
the board were G. H. Stearns, L. P. Reynolds, and H. P. Simp- 
son. 

The duties of this board of commissioners are set forth in the 
following act of legislature passed March 29, 1893. 
STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY- 
THREE. 

An Act establishing a Board of Street and Park Commissioners for the City of 
Manchester and authorizing said City to issue Bonds for certain Purposes. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 
Court convened : 

Section i. A board of street and park commissioners for the city of Man- 
chester is hereby established as follows : In the month of April, 1893, the city 
councils of said city, in joint convention, shall elect three citizens of said city 
to be members of said board, the first of whom shall serve five years, the sec- 
ond three years, and the third one year, and thereafter in the month of April 
biennially, beginning in April, 1894, said city councils of said city, in joint con- 
vention, shall elect one citizen to be a member of said board of street and park 
commissioners, to hold the office during the term of six years from the time of 
his election and until his successor is elected and qualified, unless sooner 
removed. 



100 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

If a vacancy occurs, the city councils of said city in joint convention shall 
fill it for the residue of the term; and said city councils may remove any mem- 
ber of said board at any time for cause, or when the public good may require; 
and the vacancy thus created shall be filled in the manner herein before pro- 
vided in case of vacancy. At no time shall more than two of said board of 
street and park commissioners be members of the same political party, and they 
shall receive such compensation for their services as the city councils shall de- 
termine, and they shall be furnished by said city with a suitable office. In the 
month of April biennially, said board shall organize with the choice of one of 
its members as chairman and shall also choose a clerk who may be one of said 
commissioners. Said board of street and park commissioners shall have full 
charge, management, and control of the building, constructing, repairing, 
and maintaining of all the streets, highways, lanes, sidewalks, and bridges, and 
public sewers and drains, and of the public parks and commons in said city of 
Manchester ; and shall have the expenditure of all appropriations which the 
city councils of said city shall fiom year to year vote for such purposes ; and all 
bills for expenditures from the appropriations voted from year to year by the city 
councils for such purposes, shall be approved by said board before the same are 
paid by the city treasurer. 

Said board shall for such purposes have all the powers now by law vested in 
the board of mayor and aldermen, the city councils, and the highway surveyors 
of the various highway districts of said city. They shall appoint such subordi- 
nate officers, agents, and other persons to carry out the provisions of this act as 
they shall deem expedient, and fix their compensation ; and they may make 
such rules and regulations for their own government and for the conduct of all 
such subordinate officers, agents, and other persons, and for the control and 
management of the horses, wagons, tools, buildings, and other property pro- 
vided by the city councils for performing any of the aforesaid, works as they 
shall deem expedient. 

They shall further have power to regulate the placing of encumbrances in, 
and the moving of buildings through, the streets and highways of said city, 
and the construction and maintenance in, over, and along the highways in said 
city of all wires, pipes, and other structures, belonging to private corporations 
or individuals, which now or hereafter may be permitted by vote of the mayor 
and aldermen to be placed in, over, and along said highways. They shall adopt 
plans for the development and improvement of the public parks and commons, 
and shall make such rules and regulations for the care thereof as they shall 
deem expedient. 

Said board is authorized to provide for the performance of any of said works 
by contract ; and in so doing, to call for proposals for doing such work, and to 
make a contract therefor, in the name and behalf of the city, with the lowest 
responsible bidder, who .shall furnish proper surety for the faithful performance 
of his contract. But no such contract shall provide for the expenditure of any 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 101 

sum of money greater than the amount appropriated for such purposes by the 
city councils. 

They shall annually in the month of December send to the city councils an 
estimate of the appropriations required for the maintenance of the public parks 
and commons for the ensuing year, and for the building, constructing, repairing, 
and maintaining of the streets, highways, lanes, sidewalks, and bridges, and 
public sewers and drains in said city for the ensuing year. And they shall 
make a detailed report to the city councils of the doings of said board for the 
year ending December 31 of each year. 

Sect. 2. The city of Manchester is hereby authorized and empowered by a 
vote of its city councils to borrow money for the purposes of the following per- 
manent municipal improvements, viz. : The construction of new streets, high- 
ways, and bridges ; the construction of new public drains and sewers ; the de- 
velopment and improvement of the public parks and commons, to an amount 
not exceeding five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000); and for such purpose 
to issue the bonds of said city in such amounts, not exceeding in all the amount 
above stated, and not exceeding in any one year the sum of one hundred thou- 
sand dollars ($100,000), and for such term of years, not exceeding in all twenty- 
five years, and reserving the right to redeem said bonds at any time after a 
shorter number of years if in the opinion of the city councils it shall be expedi- 
ent to redeem, and at a rate of interest not exceeding four per cent, as the city 
councils may determine ; and said bonds when so issued shall create a valid 
indebtedness and be binding on said city. The said money when so boiTowed 
shall be added to the proper appropriations and shall be expended in accord- 
ance with the terms of the preceding sections ; and at the time of the issue of 
said bonds said city councils shall, in their vote providing for said issue, further 
provide for a sinking fund for paying the same, to which sinking fund shall 
be annually paid at least five per cent of the amount of bonds at that time is- 
sued. 

Sect. 3. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent with the provisions of this 
act are hereby repealed so far as the city of Manchester is concerned, and this 
act shall take effect upon its passage. 

ROBERT N. CHAMBERLIN, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
JOHN McLANE, 
President of the Senate. 

Approved March 29, 1893. 

JOHN B. SMITH, 

Governor. 



102 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Rules and Regulations of the Street and Park 
Commission. 

The Board of Street and Park Commissioners have full charge 
and management and control of the building, constructing, re- 
pairing, and maintaining of the streets, highways, lanes, side- 
walks, bridges, public sewers and drains, and of the public parks 
and commons, in the city of Manchester. 

They have the expenditure of all the appropriations which the 
city councils vote for such purposes from year to year. All bills 
for expenditures from such appropriations are to be approved by 
said board before the same are paid by the city treasurer. The 
board has for such purposes all the powers now by law vested in 
the board of mayor and aldermen, city councils, and the high- 
way surveyors of the various districts of said city. They appoint 
all subordinate officers, agents, and other persons to carry out 
the provisions of the act by which the street commissioners are 
created, and to fix their compensation. 

They can make such rules and regulations for their own gov- 
ernment and for the conduct of all such subordinate officers, 
agents, and other persons, and for the control and management 
of the horses, wagons, tools, buildings, and other property pro- 
vided by the city of Manchester for tlie performing of the afore- 
said works as they may deem expedient. 

They also have the power to regulate the placing of encum- 
brances in the streets, and the moving of buildings through the 
streets and highways of the said city, and the construction and 
maintenance in, ever, and along the highways of said city of all 
wires, pipes, and other structures belonging to private corpora- 
tions or individuals, which now or hereafter may be permitted, 
by vote of the mayor and aldermen, to be placed in, over, and 
along said highways. 

They shall adopt plans for the development and improvement 
of the public parks and commons, and shall make such rules and 
regulations for the care thereof as they shall deem expedient. 

The board of commissioners is authorized to provide for the 
performance of any of said works by contract, and in so doing 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 103 

to call for proposals for doing such work, and to make a contract 
therefor, in the name and behalf of the city, with the lowest re- 
sponsible bidder who shall furnish proper surety for the faithful 
performance of his contract. But no such contract shall provide 
for the expenditure of any sum of money greater than the amount 
appropriated for such purposes by the city councils. 

The important duties conferred upon the board of street and 
park commissioners by law, the many persons to be affected, 
and the large expenditures thereby placed in their control and 
supervision, render it necessary that some specific rules should be 
issued for the guidance of the public and the employees of the 
city. 

The rules hereby formulated will be altered, amended, or add- 
ed to from time to time, as the board of commissioners may 
think it necessary. 

Rule i. No new highways can be built by the street commis- 
sioners until the same have been legally laid out by the board of 
mayor and aldermen and the construction of the same ordered 
by them, and a sum of money sufficient for their completion ap- 
propriated. 

Rule 2. No new sewers can be built until the same have been 
laid out and an appropriation for the expenditure and construc- 
tion thereof provided by the city. 

Rule 3. The ordinary care and repairing of sewers will be 
maintained by the commissioners to the extent of the appro- 
priations. 

Rule 4. The commissioners can enter into no contract with 
any member of either branch of the city councils to furnish sup- 
plies to or do any work for the city, or with any firm of which 
any member of the city councils is a partner. 

Rule 5. The board of commissioners can enter into no con- 
tract with any member of their own board, or with any firm in 
which a member of their own board is a partner. 

The following rules have been adopted by the board : 
I. Any person damaging any fence erected by the city for the 
protection of the highway or inclosing city lands under the 



104 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

charge of or in use by the city commission, or damaging any 
building in their charge, will be prosecuted to the full extent of 
the law, and city employees are required to be vigilant in bring- 
ing to the notice of the commission any injury so inflicted. 

2. All repairs inside of buildings will be made under the au- 
thority of the street commission ; outside repairs will be referred 
by the commission to the city councils. 

3. Before the commencement of any new sewers or new high- 
ways by order of the commission the city engineer will be re- 
quired to make a careful estimate of the cost of the work to be 
commenced, and all the grades must be established, and land 
damages, if any, to parties abutting thereon, awarded by the 
board of mayor and aldermen. 

4. Whenever the sum appropriated by the city councils is 
nearly exhausted and there remains more work to be done on 
jobs already commenced, the cost of which will exceed the bal- 
ance of the unexpended appropriation, application will be made 
to the city councils for more money, and the work suspended un- 
til said application is granted. 

5. All contracts and agreements made by the street commis- 
sioners shall be in writing and signed by the parties thereto, and 
a certified copy of the same furnished to the city solicitor and 
city clerk. 

6. A record of all bids made by contractors shall be kept by 
the clerk of the board and open to examination by any city of- 
ficial. 

7. No sale of public property in charge of the street commis- 
sion shall be made by any employee, unless so authorized by the 
street commission in writing, and a return of the articles sold, 
with the amount received, shall be made to the clerk of the 
board and by him paid to the city treasurer. Any violation of 
this rule will be the cause for immediate dismissal. 

8. In all contracts or agreements made by the street commis- 
sion there should be inserted an expressed condition that no 
member of the city councils, or officials, or employee of the city 
in any of its departments, shall be admitted to any share or part 
of such contract or agreement. The payments will be made 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 105 

weekly on rolls prepared and approved by the commission and 
the city auditor. 

9. No payment for the fraction of a week will be made in ad- 
vance of the regular payment. 

10. No employee shall leave his work without reporting to 
the foreman. 

11. All employees will be required to give strict attention to 
their work during the hours of labor. 

12. Any employee found intoxicated on the work or having 
liquor in his possession will be promptly discharged. 

13. No smoking will be allowed in the buildings or shops. 

14. Foremen of the different gangs will be held responsible 
for the tools and materials used under their charge, and neither 
materials nor tools shall be loaned or given away under any cir- 
cumstances. 

15. Positively no admittance, except on business, to the city 
yard, the city stables, or any other inclosures or buildings under 
the care of this commission. 

16. All employees under the street and park commission are 
absolutely prohibited from having any interest, direct or in- 
direct, in any contract for the supply of materials or labor, or in 
the hire of any vehicle or team, or in any moneyed ac- 
count whatsoever, other than their daily wages, in connection 
with the street, sewer, and park business of the city. 

17. A violation of any of the foregoing rules will be consid- 
ered sufficient cause for the discharge of any employee. 

18. The office of the street and park commission will be open 
from 8 to 12 a. m., and from 2 to 5 p. m. A daily meeting of 
the commissioners will be held at 2 o'clock p. m., except when 
otherwise employed. 

STREET AND PARK COMMISSION DEPARTMENT APPROPRIATIONS. 

Repair? of highways, new highways, watering streets, paving 
streets, macadamizing streets, grading for concrete, scavenger 
teams, street sweeping, bridges, city teams, sewers repaired, new 
sewers, commons, Stark park, Derryfield park, snow and ice. 



106 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The attention of all persons dealing with the street and park 
commission is called to the following : 

All orders for supplies purchased by the commission or their 
agents will be written by the clerk, and all persons furnishing said 
supplies are to fill in the official blank on back of written order, 
giving prices of supplies in detail. 

These order blanks are to be returned to the clerk by the per- 
son presenting the order. In addition, the person furnishing 
supplies is to make out a regular monthly bill on blanks supplied 
by the commissioners, and all persons are to send said monthly bills 
on or by the iSth of each month to the office of the commission. 
Per order of street and park commission. 

A. E. HERRICK, 

Clerk. 



Annual Statement. 

The street and park commission commenced their work on the 
first of April, 1893, and consequently the work accomplished 
does not cover the entire year. The duties of this board, set 
forth in the act of legislature, cover the construction and main- 
tenance of sewers ; construction and maintenance of streets and 
highways ; the care of all the parks and commons and improve- 
ments of the same ; the power of appointing and controlling all 
men and teams under the street, sewer, and park department ; 
the regulating of encumbrances in, and the moving of build- 
ings upon, all streets and highways; the construction and main- 
tenance of all wires, pipes, and other structures ; to provide for 
the performance of any of the said works by contract, etc., etc. 
(See act of legislature, passed March 29, 1893.) The duties 
assigned the commission cover some of the most important de- 
partments, and a faithful performance of these trusts is essential 
to the health and prosperity of our city. 

Realizing the importance of their task, the commissioners at 
once set about formulating a system of rules and regulations re- 
garding the supply to the city of materials necessary to cover 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



107 



the work to be done under their charge. Orders for supplies of 
all kinds are now issued from the commissioners' office, and 
every bill contracted by this department is checked by these 
orders, a careful list of all bills being kept for reference. 

The following list of contracts will show what has been done 
in this line, the results showing a great saving to the city. The 
contract for sewer pipe was arranged for by the street and sewer 
committee, before the commission was established. 



Contract, Material or Location. 



Norton cement 

Castings 

Brick 

Cesspool, corner and edge stone. 

Widening Elm street 

Lumber for sewers 

Lumber for sewers 

Bridge plank 

Adams-street culvert 

Lincoln-street culvert 



May 



July 



Concreting Merrimack street j Aug. 

Building approaches, Second-street 
bridge Oct. 

Building bank waU in Main back 
street Nov. 

Erecting railing, approacbes to Sec- 
ond-street bridge 

Building culvert on Candia road, East 
Manchester 



Changing front of James's stable. 



Contract awarded to 



Clarence Merrill. 
Manchester Loco. Works. 
W. F. Head & Son. 
Charles Bailey. 
F. S. Bodwell. 
Head & Dowst, >^. 
A. C. Wallace, Vi- 
S. C. Forsaith Co. 
Horace Holbrook. 
F. S. Bodwell. 
George F. Higgins. 
William H. Coburn. 
H. Haibert. 
John Larkin. 
John Proctor. 
Head & Dowst. 



About fifty orders have been issued to the C. H. Robie Com- 
pany and George F. Higgins to concrete street crossings, side- 
walks, driveways, and gutters ; over eight hundred orders given 
agents of the commission to purchase supplies. Duplicates of 
all orders have been filed. Bills corresponding to these orders 
have been received and checked, and submitted to the commis- 
sion for examination, stamped as approved, and delivered to the 
city auditor. 



108 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Forty-three permits to move buildings, to encumber while 
erecting buildings, etc., have been issued as follows: 



PERMITS TO ENCUMBEK.* 



F. P. Kimball . 

F. Smyth 

.J. J. Abbott ... 
S. T. Worth en. 
William Carr.. 
F. P. Leavitt. . 
A. L. Bixby . . . 
A. L. Bixby ... 
A. L. Bixbv ... 
L. M. Aldrich 



East side Chestnut street, near High 

177 Manchester street 

Block on Manchester street 

20 feet, Birch street 

20 ft., back street cor. Hanover and Maple 

20 feet, Front street, Amoskeag 

10 feet, Merrimack back street 

10 feet, Welch avenue 

112 Spruce street 

20 ft., Laurel, 10 ft. Lake ave., back street. 

J. D. Patterson j Amherst and Chestnut 

P. A. Devine i 112-114 Central street 

F. LaFlamme Bridge, between Ashland and Wilson — 

J. C. Ray Corner Elm and Kidder 

G. Blanchet Gore and Beech back street 

J. B.Chase & Co I 10 feet. Brook and Maple 

Head & Dowst 26 feet. Elm, near Concord 

T. Dame 20 feet, Jane street 

Head & Dowst Elm street, opposite Gov. Weston lot 

S. T. Worthen I Prospect and Russeil 

H. Leonard j 10 feet. Central street 

J. E. Warren & Co Myrtle and Russell 

Patrick Harrington ... Lake avenue and Elm back street 

Mr. Parker [ 12 feet, Merrimack street, above Belmont 

18 feet, East High street 

Elm street and Myrtle 

12 feet, Nashua, near Lowell 

Back street, 55 Prospect street 

6 feet, West Hancock street 

Chestnut, corner Appleton 

271-273 Chestnut street 

40-42-44 Granite street 

15 feet, Spruce corner Massabesic 

Prospect and Linden 

Cor. Spruce, Massabesic, and Hall streets. 
Massabesic, betw'n Belmont and E. Spruce 
120 feet. Grove street from Pine 



Apr. 
May 



S. T. Worthen 
Gordon Woodburj' . 

E.T.Hardy 

E.C. Jefts 

Dean & Westbrook . 

Mead & Mason 

Emma Mitchell 

Charles O'Connor. . . 

N. W. Paige 

S. T. Worthen 

Levi W. Page 

James Morrison 

John W.Hart 



July 



Aug. 



Dec. 
June 



PERMITS TO MOVE BUILDINGS. 



Given to 


Location. 


Date. 


A. E Gage 


From Lowell to between Pine and Chest- 






Apr. 29 
June 2S 

28 


James Morrison 


From Massabesic street to East Spruce. . . 




From Lincoln street to Belmont 


Sept. 16 


"The Gymnasium" ... 
Henry I. Faucher 


Back street, between Pine and Union — 


Nov. 27 
Dec. 8 







• A bond of fSOO being filed with the city clerk in each case, when permit is 
granted. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 109 

The work of the commission necessitates a large correspond- 
ence, and 375 letters have been written on various subjects relat- 
ing to the interests of the city. 

An important improvement was ordered by the commission at 
the commencement of their work, consisting in the return of the 
time of employment of all those under their direction and charge 
to the office where all pay-rolls are made out. This change has 
enabled the board to control the expenditures for labor and 
teams, and to keep the division of labor. During the month of 
June 132 men were employed in Division 10, West Manchester; 
July, 166; August, 174; average, 157. 

In Division 2, which includes the thickly settled portion on 
this side of the Merrimack river, during the month of June 256 
men were employed; July, 313; August, 303; average, 291. 

These months are taken to show the large force at work on the 
construction and maintenance of streets and sewers during the 
summer season under charge of the commission. The clerk of the 
board attended the payments through the busy season when im- 
portant work was being done, and every man's name was checked 
when paid, and all discrepancies were reported to the office, 
where adjustments were made. 

A record of 215 daily meetings of the board of commissioners 
has been made, and all petitions and complaints have been kept 
and presented at these meetings. At the beginning of the year 
there were 62 sewers voted to be built by the city councils ; at 
the end of the year 58 sewers had been completed in whole or in 
part ; 23 sewers repaired during the year. All orders, ordi- 
nances, and resolutions relating to the work of the commission, 
voted by the city councils, have been copied and placed on file. 

New highways laid out, 50, equaling 36,666 feet. General 
repairs on highways, 225 loads crushed stone; labor ^713.27; 
76,100 feet turnpiked, etc. Seventeen carloads of curbing stone 
received, costing by contract $1,433.69 ; 45 carloads brick, cost- 
ing $1,890.00; 16 carloads of Portland sewer pipe, at a cost of 
$2,529.19 ; 21 carloads of Akron sewer pipe, at a cost of $1,932. - 
80. Total sewer pipe laid, 21,476 feet, equalling 4.07 miles; 
total cement pipe removed and relaid with Akron, 3,160 feet. 



110 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

We would refer you to the tabulated form of the street and 
sewer work for further details. 

On account of a large number of petitions to remove soil, rub- 
bish, etc., the board established the following rule : 

No person shall encumber any street or lane of the city by 
throwing out sand, dirt, etc., from any cellar or excavation, or 
shall place any obstruction upon said streets and lanes, without 
a special permit from the office of the street commission. 

The commissioners have inspected all bridges under their care. 
About $1,500 was expended upon the repairs of Amoskeag 
bridge ; the old timbers were removed and new stringers put in, 
the entire roadway of the bridge was repTanked, and the sidewalk 
entirely replaced with new timber. Granite-street bridge has 
been repaired where necessary. This bridge, as well as the Am- 
oskeag, will need constant care, on account of the heavy travel, 
and will probably have to be replaced by iron or stone bridges 
within a few years. The McGregor bridge was examined early 
in the season by John Cheney, assistant city engineer, Boston, 
and pronounced safe for travel. The old bridge over the Piscata- 
quog river should be replaced by a stone bridge, and the road- 
way widened. All the bridges in the out districts have been 
examined, and repairs made when necessary. 

Two sprinklers were purchased during the season, one of which 
had previously been ordered by the committee on streets. The 
sprinkling of our streets is an important matter during the hot 
summer months, and the commissioners have insisted upon faith- 
ful service, and if some streets were not kept wet it was on ac- 
count of repairs on the sprinklers. The carts have been out every 
day, including Sundays, and during the hot months were run 
during the night. 

Three fountains have been purchased and placed at the loca- 
tions voted by the city councils ; one of these fountains was pre- 
viously ordered by the committee on streets. 

Extensive repairs have been made at the city scales and the 
city yard. A new blacksmith's shop has been built, and all the 
blacksmith repairs, shoeing, etc., will be done there. 

The city stable in West Manchester has been repaired and ex- 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. Ill 

tended, and a suitable office built for the agent in charge of 
Divisions 10 and ii, George W. Cheney. The former incum- 
bent, Charles O. Phelps, died July 26, 1893, having served the 
city faithfully for many years, and having won the esteem of those 
with whom he came in contact. 

The commissioners would also place on record their apprecia- 
tion of the kind consideration and thoughtfulness of the late 
James B. Straw, city auditor. Always ready to give wise counsel 
and to help others by his wide experience, his timely words were 
appreciated, and the estimable qualities of strict honesty and 
manly courage for the right will be remembered. 

To all who have aided them in their work the commissioners 
w:ould extend their grateful thanks. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE H. STEARNS, 
LEONARD P. REYNOLDS, 
HORACE P. SIMPSON, 

Street ajid Park Cotrwiission. 
A. E. Herrick, 

Clerk. 



Streets. 



" I find, however," says Capt. Orris A. Brown, in his address 
before the convention of the National League, for good roads, 
held at Washington, D. C, January 17, 1893, "that the great 
point in having good roads is the care of them after they are 
made : this is not expensive, but it is every day work. It is ab- 
solutely necessary in order to have good roads that some one 
should look after them after the roads are built, especially during 
and following a rain, that water may be kept off as far as possi- 
ble. Again, money collected to build roads should not be con- 
sidered as a tax, as it is buying what we need. A road (and the 
better it is the cheaper will transportation be on it) is as neces- 
sary to transportation as a horse, vehicle, or harness ; the latter 



112 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

three should be relieved as much as possible of wear and break- 
age, and the road (cheaper tlian vehicles and teams to keep in 
good order) should receive the least possible damage by making 
it so as to resist wear. ' ' 

Manchester has over 174 miles of streets and highways, and 
consequently there is great need of constant care to keep them in 
repair and suitable for travel. To obtain information respecting 
methods used in other places the commissioners sent to the prin- 
cipal cities requesting methods of street paving, etc. Many an- 
swers were returned and we give some of the points gained. 

In all large cities the systems of maintenance and construction 
of paving are divided into four methods, viz., turnpiking, macad- 
amizing, paving, and concreting. 

TURNPIKING. 

No better way has been found for the outlying highway com- 
mon dirt roads than turnpiking with the road machine. This 
method consists in turning up both sides of a road with the ma- 
chine and grading to the gutters, leaving considerable crown. 
Where the soil is stony the machine cannot be used to advan- 
tage. 

Manchester is fortunate in possessing a number of these ma- 
chines and during the last year they have been constantly in ser- 
vice under the direction of the commission. The streets treated 
in that way are given herewith in tabular form. 

MACADAMIZING. 

This method of treating streets takes its name from a noted 
builder of roadways in England, McAdam, and is a favorite 
method with all cities on account of its lasting qualities. 

There are various ways of macadamizing adopted according to 
the nature of the soil and climate, but the method found to be 
the best adapted to our city consists in removing the upper soil 
to the depth of a foot or more, replacing with sand, about six 
inches, well rolled down, and lastly applying crushed stone vary- 
ing in size from coarse to fine, rolled down with steam roller, 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 113 

each course being wet down before rolling ; the last being a coat 
of fine gravel or clay for a binder. Many of our streets have 
been treated in this way, and with general satisfaction. (See 
table.) 



Much is being said at the present time in favor of different 
methods of paving, and in an article appearing in the '* Cen- 
tury " for October, 1893, ^^'^ ^^'^ the following : 

" The different kinds of construction may be combined, re- 
cording to methods, under the general distinction of block and 
sheet pavements. If wearing quality is the chief requisite, as it 
is commonly believed to be for streets where there is nmch heavy 
drawing, no material which has yet been extensively tried is su- 
perior to granite or trap rocks, used in the form of small 
blocks." 

Nearly all our streets where very heavy travel occurs are paved 
with granite blocks, but many more need this mode of treatment, 
noticeably around and leading to the railroad station. 

" If solid foundations are laid, granite will stand severe and 
heavy travel for fifteen years, with a wear of perhaps two inches." 

" Specifications for granite pavements now usually require that 
the blocks shall be rectangular in shape, with dimensions of from 
3^ to 4^ inches in width, from 10 to 13 inches in length, and 
from 8 to 9 inches in depth. Wood paving is being discarded 
as not practical, though a few cities in the West still make use of 
some variety of wood block pavement. Much attention is being 
given at the present time to hard baked brick pavement, and va- 
rious plants have been established in the West for the manufac- 
ture of brick suitable for paving purposes. The ' Hallwood 
wood block,' as it is called, seems to be the favorite, and many 
cities have adopted it for their residence streets. Columbus, 
Ohio, has thirty miles of brick pavement, some of which has been 
laid for fifteen years, and it has stood moderate wear so well that 
it has been referred to as a model for other cities." 



114 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CONCRETING. 



Of late years the sheet pavement or roadway has been very 
popular, and our city has swung into line by concreting a num- 
ber of streets. 

This method has many advantages over others, but where there 
is steep grade is almost useless on account of slippery surface, es- 
pecially in winter. 

City engineers agree that asphalt pavements are among the 
best when carefully laid. The usual plan is to excavate to solid 
ground, then to lay successive layers of broken stone and fine 
pebbles, heated, for a last course before spreading the asphalt, 
which should be flowed upon the surface hot and brushed in with 
stiff brooms. A heavy roller should be used throughout the entire 
process. Asphalt is a different material from concrete, and is 
imported from the wonderful " Pitch lake," near the village of 
La Brea on the island of Trinidad. " The appearance of the 
lake is very odd. In color it is a dark chocolate brown. In the 
center of the lake is a space of several hundred square feet of 
soft fluid asphalt. The surface of the lake is sufficiently firm 
to support the weight of loaded carts. The asphalt is mined for 
commerce from different parts of the lake to a convenient depth 
of about three feet. It is easily excavated with picks, loaded into 
carts, and hauled to the shore ready for shipment. 

A marked peculiarity of the " Pitch lake" is that the pits or 
excavations made during the day fill up during the night and in 
a (gw days no trace of them can be found. 

During the last year the commissioners have laid 2,092.51 
square yards of concrete roadway, the locations being given un- 
der the head of " Concrete roadways." In general, this method 
of preparing a roadbed has met with universal satisfaction, and 
the outlook is that before many years the principal streets in the 
residence portion of our city will be concreted. 



Sewers. 

Through the wisdom of those who have preceded us Manches- 
ter has been well laid out, and this fact has had much to do with 



PliAl? OP 
IM P B OV£ D 

SEWERAGE System 

MANCHESTER N.H. 
IB8S 




HM 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 115 

the present effective sewer system. Most of our streets have an 
easy downward grade to the Merrimack river, and nature has thus 
provided us with a healthful drainage. 

The Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, in laying out their 
streets on which to build houses, were very careful to construct 
suitable drains and subways for the health of their employees. 
Thus a system of sewers was started, and the city has gradually 
enlarged upon this first system until in 1888 a committee of the 
city government, consisting of William S. Shannon, Leonard P. 
Reynolds, John A. Bartlett, Charles A. Carpenter, and John M. 
Kendall, was appointed to consult with City Engineer W. H. 
Bennett and Ernest W. Bowditch, C. E., regarding an improved 
sewerage system, the result of which was a complete and systematic 
plan for sewerage, said plan being adopted by vote of the city 
councils. 

This improved plan is now followed in laying out all new sew- 
ers, and a careful record is kept by the city engineer of the loca- 
tion of all manholes, cesspools, lanternholes, etc. 

Besides this record the commissioners during the last year have 
kept all returns of materials used in construction and mainte- 
nance of sewers, and at the beginning of their appointment con- 
tracted for all necessary materials to cover the season's work. 

In examining the outlay for sewers in other cities Manchester 
is found to be among the first in the proportion of money appro- 
priated for sewer extension, and if this outlay can be wisely sus- 
tained for a few years our city will be second to none in her pro- 
vision for the convenience and health of her citizens. 

An idea of the work of the commission may be obtained from 
the tables on the maintenance and construction of sewers. 



Summary. 



Average cost of granite paving per square yard, $2.50 to ^3.75 
of asphalt " " " 2.00 to 3.50 

of macadam " " " 2.00 to 3.00 

of wood " " " 1. 00 to 1.75 



116 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Manchester has 5.018 miles of Telford roadways, 4.363 miles 
of macadamized roadways, 1.677 miles of concrete roadways, 
19. II acres commons, 68 acres parks, 14.19 acres for high service 
reservoir. 



Commons. 



Manchester became a city in the year 1846 and the idea of 
setting apart special locations for " squares for the recreation, 
health, exercise, and enjoyment of its citizens" was early con- 
sidered, and through the liberality of the Amoskeag Manufactur- 
ing Company, five "squares," or lots of land were deeded to the 
city, with certain conditions, in brief as follows : 

"Merrimack" and " Tremont squares," deeded January 25, 
1848; " Concord square," deeded January 29, 1848 ; " Hanover 
square," October, 23, 1852, and "Park square," December 20, 
1884. The " squares " were deeded with the understanding that 
they were never to be sold or conveyed to any corporation. No 
railroad or public roads of any kind were to pass over. (Agree- 
ment was made with the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company to 
set aside this condition in case of Concord common, to allow pas- 
sage of Chestnut street across the center of the common.) They 
were to be kept free from dirt, rubbish, filth, etc., to be graded, 
and not to be dug up except for ornamental purposes. The city 
further agreed to plant trees, to maintain paths, erect fences, and 
keep all of said "squares" in good condition. These condi- 
tions have been conscientiously carried out and, in consequence, 
our city to-day is rejoicing in the possession of five beautiful 
parks or commons, where all may enjoy a well-earned rest from 
the busy toil of the mill, shop, or office. 

Great interest has always been manifested in the various plans 
adopted by the several city governments for the care, improve- 
ment, and adornment of these breathing places for the peo- 
ple, and the experience of the last few years has proved the 
advisability of caring for these open air resorts and of pro- 
viding means for the enjoyment and healthful recreation of all. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



117 



The rapid growth of our city calls for comprehensive meas- 
ures for the welfare of its citizens, and the commission believe 
that all that can be done to make our parks and commons attrac- 
tive should be accomplished. 

Some idea of the extent and valuation of our commons may 
be obtained by the following : 

Acres. Valuation, 1S92. 

Merrimack common .... 5.89 $200,000 

Concord common . . . . 4.48 200,000 

Park common . . . . . 3.49 60,000 

Hanover common .... 3.00 100,000 

Tremont common . . . _ . 2.25 40.000 



Totals 



19. II 



$600,000 



The care and maintenance of the commons became part of the 
duties of the street and park commission, and this board has 



faithfully carried out the conditions placed upon 


them. 


A summary of the year's work is here given : 




Flowers ....... 


• ^175.66 


Painting ....... 


36.10 


Paving stone 


43-75 


Grass seed and dressing . . . . 


536-36 


Repairs, tools, seats 


1,227.84 


Concrete ....... 


557-98 


Labor ......... 


1,960.74 


Total 


. $4,538-43 


The above items include care of skating, $ 


182.25, for the 



month of January, 1893 ; $462.96 for wood ashes and phosphate 
for dressing the lawns ; $700 paid board of water commission- 
ers ; $80 for a new one-horse lawn mower, etc. 

All commons have received the usual care under Agent Fuller- 
ton and all repairs have been promptly attended to. 



STARK PARK. 

Within the last few years Stark and Derryfield parks have re- 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 119 

ceived a large share of public attention and have become popular 
places of resort. 

The acquisition of land for Stark park was fortunate for the 
city through the patriotic generosity of the Stark heirs. We 
quote from the oration of Gen. Charles H. Bartlett, delivered at 
the dedication of Stark park, June 17, 1893: 

" The establishment of Stark park has long been a favorite 
project of many of our patriotic citizens, and the public senti- 
ment, long tending in this direction, first found expression in 
organized movement on the 30th day of May, 1889, upon this 
spot, when, on motion of Edwin P. Richardson, Esq., a commit- 
tee of five, consisting of ex-Governors Person C. Cheney and 
Frederick Smyth, Col. George C. Gilmore, Hon. Aretas Blood, 
and the venerable Joseph M. Rowell was appointed to co-operate 
with a like committee from Louis Bell Post, G. A. R., in pre- 
senting the subject for the action of the city government. 

" On the 2d day of May, 1890, Louis Bell Post, the commit- 
tee above referred to, and many other of our citizens, joined in 
a memorial to the city government praying for the purchase of 
this tract of land and its use as a public park, and not merely 
as a public park but emphatically as a Stark park. 

"The proposition received favorable consideration, and by a 
unanimous vote it was referred to the legal voters of the city to be 
acted upon at the city election in the following November. An 
overwhelming vote in favor of the proposition gave the city 
government full power to act in the premises, and on the 3d day 
of January, 1891, the city completed the purchase, and received 
the conveyance from Elizabeth B. Stark and Augustus H. Stark, 
lineal descendants of Gen. John Stark. 

"The lot of two acres, embracing the site of the monument 
and thefgrave of Stark, was conveyed by his heirs to the city on 
the 14th day of January, 1876." 

The work of preparing Stark park for the dedication was 
among the first undertakings of the board of commissioners, and 
much thought and time was spent in carrying out the details of 
the plan for the laying out of the park as adopted by vote of the 
city councils. 



120 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



A contract was made with the Massachusetts Broken Stone 
Company, of Boston, for the shipment of one hundred tons of 
the celebrated Salem stone dust, used on the paths and roadways 
of the Boston parks, and great pains were taken to prepare all 
roadbeds and walks by removing the soil and carefully spreading 
289 loads of crushed stone upon the sand foundation, adding as 
a binder course the Salem stone dust, the result amply paying 
for the expense and labor. The building of the approaches to 
the park and interior roadways and paths was proceeded with 
under the direction of the commission, and was completed as 
far as possible in time for the dedication. 

An account of the work accomplished is given herewith : 



I 



Length. 


Width. 


Square yards. 


Cost stone. 


Incident'ls. 


Labor. 


Total. 


700* 
05g 


19 
30 


1,497 
853 


$216.67 


$196.99 


$3,640.63 


$4,054.28 

















2,350 


$216.67 


$196.99 


$3,640.62 


$4,054.28 







* Upper part. 

One thousand and thirty-five feet of paved gutters were built 
at the edge of the roadways, with an average width of eighteen 
inches. 

Four thousand one hundred and thirty-six feet of loam were re- 
moved from roadways at a.h average width of nineteen feet, in 
order to prepare foundation for Salem stone. 

Three hundred and fifty feet of ditch have been cut for drain- 
age. A valuable spring on the grounds has been cleaned out, 
one hundred and fifty rhododendrons set out in the grove, one 
hundred plants of mountain laurel placed in suitable locations, 
lawns have been graded, rolled, and sowed down ; flower beds 
provided and stone removed ; fencing built and all repairs 
made. Agent Fullerton has carefully attended to the instruc- 
tions of the commissioners. 

It is hoped that the congress of the United States will soon 
pass a bill to establish a handsome equestrian statue of the heroic 
General John Stark at this place. 



122 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

DERRYFIELD PARK. 

The name of Derryfield has long been a familiar one to the 
citizens of Manchester, as we read in the City Ordinances that, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ten, 
an act was passed by the legislature to change the name of the 
town of Derryfield to that of Manchester. As it is fitting that 
the name should be perpetuated, a resolution was passed by the 
city government, February 12, 1890, whereby the land set apart 
from the city farm, by an order passed May 7, 1889, should be 
• called Derryfield park. The first section set aside contained 
about sixty-eight acres, and fourteen and nineteen hundredths 
acres have since been purchased for a high-service reservoir, 
which should be annexed and made a part of the grounds. 

The location of this beautiful park is all that could be desired, 
commanding a magnificent view of the mountains to the west 
and south ; it has already become a favorite resort on account of 
its accessibility, its opportunities for all out-door games, its 
quiet, shady groves, and its rustic beauty. To prove its popular- 
ity we have only to state that during the last summer from six 
hundred to one thousand people visited the park daily. 

A well-arranged plan for laying out the grounds was carefully 
prepared by the city engineer, and has been adopted by the vote 
of the city government, and its details are being carried out by 
the street and park commissioners. The plans call for a half- 
mile driveway on the high ground, to be built in a circle, which 
when completed will give a track that will be appreciated by all 
that enjoy a carriage drive. A ten-foot walk inside could be top- 
dressed with cinders and used by bicyclists. It is proposed to 
utilize the interior space of this circular roadway as a boys' play- 
ground, and arrangements will probably be made for a fine 
coasting way in one section of the park. Ponds of various 
sizes will be added, and it is hoped a boulevard one hundred feet 
wide can be built running the whole length of the western 
boundary of the park, which can be used as a speedway in the 
winter. 

There is a great demand for immediate outlay upon this park. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 123 

and in view of this the commission has expended the entire ap- 
propriation for the last year in building a road through the 
grove, and in cleaning out the underbrush, digging a well, 
arranging swings and seats, and in preparing the park for the 
comfort of visitors. 

The work done is represented in the following statement : 
' Gravel road built, 1,435 ^^^^ ^^^S ^.nd 25 feet 6 inches wide; 
twenty acres of brush cut ; a well was dug to the depth of 
twenty-five feet and a pump set up ; grading and other general 
work done ; one hundred and fifty rhododendrons set out, and 
one hundred mountain laurels have been added for adornment to 
the grounds. 

There has been expended for labor of men and teams $1,066 ; 
for stone, tools, hardware, and supplies $86.86, making a total of 
$1,152.86. 

The great growth of our city calls for a wise and generous out- 
lay for our parks, as the time is not far distant when rules and 
regulations will have to be enforced to a certain extent to pro- 
tect these resorts from various nuisances, and park police will 
have to be provided. 

It is hoped that our citizens will heartily support the plans of 
the commission for the permanent improvement of our parks and 
commons, and prevent a resort to the "keep off the grass" 
policy. 



Expenses of Office. 

The creation of the department of the street "and park com- 
mission necessarily called for some outlay for office fixtures and 
blank books of various kinds, in order to carry on the daily 
business connected with the work of the board. The point em- 
phasized has been efficiency. 

Economy in methods has been sought, and all plans were care- 
fully matured before action was taken. We submit the first 
annual report to our citizens with a desire for their hearty sup- 
port and kind consideration of the eff'orts of the commission. 



124 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



EXPENDITURES. 



Commissioners' salaries 

Clerical service 

Office supplies and blank books, including $ioo paid 

for typewriter . 
Carriage allowance 
Incidentals . 



Total 



$1,350.00 
772.90 

418.14 

720.00 
7.40 



$3,268.44 



The clerk has received the following from various sources 



Stark park 
Derryfield park 
Commons 
New se\vers . 
Division 5 
Bridges 
Macadamizing 
New highway 
Paving . 
Miscellaneous 



Deposited with city treasurer 



$50.00 

143-87 

1.50 

103.23 

5-50 

35-57 

8.00 

10.00 

53-50 

70.65 

$481.32 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



125 



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126 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Inventory of City Property. 



Commissioners' office, including type-writer, desks, 
blank books, etc 



Division No. 2, including 15 horses, dump 

sprinklers, road roller, snow plows, etc. 
City buildings, Franklin street 
Lot on Franklin street . 
Valuation of pipe on hand at city yard 
Division No. 3 . . . . 
Division No. 4 . . . . 
Division No. 5 . . . . 
Division No. 6 . . . . 
Division No. 7 . ^ . 
Division No. 8 . . . . 
Division No. 9 . . . . 

Division No. 10, including horses, carts. 
Stable and lot, Division No. 10 . 
Valuation of pipe on hand, Division No 
Division No. 11 . 
Division No. 12 . 
Commons, including horse lawn mower, etc 

Total 



etc. 



$364-30 

13,871.44 
12,300.00 
89,312.00 

1,434-67 

3.20 

2.50 

42.91 

16.15 

48.55 

34-47 

16.05 

1,848.68 

1,200.00 

91.32 

20.50 

4-74 
248.60 

^120,860.08 



Orders Received from City Government, with Date of 
Passage. 

To build certain highways (3). May 2, 1893. 
To build certain sewers (14). May 2, 1893. 
To build sewer in South Main street. May 2, 1893. 
To build sewer in Arlington street. May 2, 1893. 
To extend Central street. May 2, 1893. 
To macadamize Turner street. May 2, 1893. 
To macadamize Beauport street. May 2, 1893. 
To purchase watering cart for West Manchester. May 23, 
1893. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 127 

Authorizing arrangements for the dedication of Stark park, 
May 23, 1893. 

To erect a combination watering trough on Hanover street. 
May 23, 1893. 

To purchase combination watering trough and drinking foun- 
tain for south side city hall. May 23, 1893. 

To build certain sewers. June 6, 1893. 

To build sewer in Lake avenue. June 6, 1893. 

To build certain streets. June 19, 1893. 

Relative to building Walnut street from Salmon to Webster. 
June 19, 1893. 

In relation to building Adams street from south line Liver- 
more land to Clarke street. June 19, 1893. 

To build certain sewers. July 10, 1893. 

To concrete Chestnut street. July 10, 1893. 

To erect drinking fountain. August i, 1893. 

To build Second street. September 5, 1893. 

To build Beech street from Gore north. September 5, 1893. 

To build certain sewers. September 5, 1893. 

To build sewer from Lake avenue northerly to Merrimack. 
September 21, 1893. 

To build certain streets. September 21, 1893. 

To build Trenton street. November 7, 1893. 

To procure plans and build South Main-street bridge. No- 
vember 7, 1893. 

To build certain sewers. November 7, 1893. 

To concrete Elm east back street. November 7, 1893. 

To macadamize Spruce street. November 7, 1893. 

To build Concord-street sewer. November 7, 1893. 

The above orders in detail are on file at the commissioners' 
office. 



128 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



•;so3 iB^ox 


5 


4,548.20 
7,154.25 
14,178.14 
2,45.^.74 
1,040.62 
1.300.03 


s 

i 


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1t;i,150.92 

28-2.61 

6.3S 

259.82 

159.99 

266 79 

695.18 

1,195.54 

156.62 

1.50 

45.62 


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STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



129 



•^800 \noz 


$4,427.84 

4,297.50 

988.44 

1,276.89 

2,750.26 

45.50 

1,476.75 

877.07 

2,572.90 

333 162 

41.40 

25.00 

10,987.05 




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21.09 
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23.32 


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17.50 

92.62 

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299.00 
270.26 

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204.00 
151.03 
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19.50 




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130 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Concrete Work — G. F. Higgins. 

STREET CROSSINGS. 



Square Price 
yards, per yd 



Total 
cost. 



Bridge, at Ashland 

Hanover, at Hall (2) 

Lake avenue south back, at Maple 

Maple, at Spruce (2) 

Spruce south back, at Maple 

Elm west back, at Central 

McGregor, at Amory (4) 

Pine, at Lake avenue (3) 

Soruce, at Pine 

Cedar at Pine (3) 

Cheney Place, at Elm 

Belmont, at Auburn 

Concord, at Beech 

Concord, at Beech 

Elm east back, at Pearl 

Union, at Brook 

Nortli, at Pine east back 

North, at Chestnut 

North, at Elm 



$61.32 
64.87 
15.00 
57.44 
13.83 

9.19 
145.67 
62.11 
22.33 
66.72 
23.32 
22.65 
22.65 

4.95 
13.27 
14.40 
13.27 

9.99 
13.50 



;.4S 



SIDEWALKS. 



Square 
yards. 



Price 
per yd 



Total 
cost. 



Maple, at Central 

Concord square 

Chestnut, at Patterson's block 

McGregor, at Amory 

Pine, at P. Haley's 

Pine, at Lake avenue 

Park square 

Pine, Nos. 241-243-245 

Cedar, at Pine 

Laurel, at Maple 

Merrimack, at Lincoln 

Ceutral, at Maple 

Concord, at Beech 

Elm east back, at Pearl 

North, at Pine east back 

North, at Elm 

Amoskeag bridge, at west end 



128.77 

430.06 

141.33 

4.47 

19.60 

15.60 

24.04 

28.00 

16.. nO 

10.00 

4.00 

9.40 

11.00 

4.90 

1.80 



2.00 



$0.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 



$57.95 
193.53 
63.59 



7.02 
10.82 
12.60 
7.43 
4.50 
1.80 
4.23 
4.95 
2.20 
.81 
1.48 



$384.66 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



181 



ROADWAYS. 



Chestnut, at Patterson's block 
Merrimack, Beech to Maple... 

Pine, at Spruce 

Amoskeag bridge, at west end 



Square Price 
yards, per yd 



208.50 

1,713.33 

151.93 

18.75 



2.51 



Total 
cost. 



$156.38 

1,713.33 

113.95 

14.06 



$1,997.73 



Concrete Work — Charles H. Robie Co. 

STREET CROSSINGS. 



LOCATION. 


Square 
yards. 


Price 
per yd 


Total 
cost. 


Chestnut, at Brook 


52.80 

30.62 

58.22 

17.78 

19.64 

29.60 

33.78 

57.07 

32.98 

17.78 

27.46 

13.33 

17.78 

29.87 

16.80 

17 78 

67.38 

29.42 

30.. 58 

17.24 

34.00 

80.73 

29.77 

28.98 

17.78 

29.33 

30 22 

32.90 

56.00 

45.86 

27.55 

22.00 

17.77 

30.58 

16.62 

17.33 

10.67 

17.78 

IS 67 

16.22 

61.33 : 

61.33 

26.67 

17.05 

29.51 1 


$0.37 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 

' .75 
.75 
.75 
.75 

^75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.37 
.37 
.37 
.75 
.75 


$19.54 




Maple, at Spruce (2) 


43 67 






Franklin west back, at Central 


14 73 


Main, at Mast 


'>2 ''0 


West Webster, at railroad station 


25.34 


Adams, at Appleton (2) 


42 80 


Salmon, at Chestnut 

Bay east back, at Salmon ... 


24.74 
13 34 


Liberty, at Salmon 


OQ go 






Salmon south back, at Pine 


13 34 










Hanover south back, at Union 


13.34 


Laurel, at Chestnut 


10 89 






Central, at Chestnut east back 


1" 94 


Concord square .... 


"5 50 






Lowell, at Birch 


11 01 






Brook, at Union east back . 


13 33 


Chestnut, at Appleton 


22 00 






Bridge, at Russell 


94 g7 






Auburn, at Elm 


34 39 










North, at Elm east back 


13 33 






Lowell, east of Maple 


12 47 














Dubuque east back, at Amory 

Lowell north back, at Chestnut. . ... 


14.00 
6 00 


Pine, at Pearl (2) 




Orange, at Chestnut (2) 


22 69 


Prospect, at Chestnut. 


9 87 


Elm east back, at Pearl 


12 79 


High, at Chestnut 


22.13 



132 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
STREET CROSSINGS.— Continued. 



Location. 



High, at Pine east back 

Pine, at Pearl (2) 

Orange, at Cliestnut 

Myrtle, at Chestnut (2) 

Prospect, at Chestnut (4) 

Harrison, at Chestnut (2) 

Liberty east back, at Webster 

Union east back, at Gore 

Walnut, at Gore 

North, at Chestnut (2) 

Liberty, at North 



Square Price 
yards, per yd. 



16.20 
fiO.44 
30.67 
61.33 
115.70 
61.33 
17.78 
17.78 



$0.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 



Total 
cost. 



$12.15 
45.33 
23.00 
46.00 

109.28 
46.00 
13.33 
13.33 
22.66 
46.43 
18.67 



SIDEWALKS. 



Chestnut, at Brook 

Chestnut, at H. F. Straw's 

Harrison, at Chestnut 

Franklin west back, at Central ... 
West Webster, at railroad station 

Adams, at Appleton 

Cartier, No. 218 

Laurel, at Chestnut 

Lake avenue, at Union 

Beech, at St. Augustine church . . . 

Concord square 

Lowell, at Union 

Chestnut, near Webster 

Elm, at Welch avenue 

Lowell, between Pine and Union. 

Merrimack square 

Merrimack square 

Concord square 

Park square 

Valley, at Jewett 

Maple, at Merrimack 

Merrimack south back, at Maple. . 

Laurel, at Maple 

Laurel south back, at Maple 

Amherst, at Vine 

North, at Chestnut 

Liberty, at North 



Square 
yards. 



48.48 
39.11 
14.04 
2.18 
34.00 
12.83 
33.33 
85.53 
13.33 
116.53 
212.65 
11.02 
23.40 
18.70 
5.47 
329.27 
856.79 
344.14 
79.36 
3.67 
22.96 
4.40 
26.73 
2.01 
242.47 
12.70 
12.23 



2,607.33 



Price 
per yd, 



Total 
cost. 



$21.82 
29.33 
6.32 
98 
16.30 
5.77 
15.00 



4.96 
10.53 

8.41 

2.46 
148.17 
■214.20 
86.03 
19.84 

1.65 
10.33 

1.98 

12.03 

.90 

48.49 

5.72 

5.50 



$868.34 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 133 

ROADWAYS. 



Location. 



Maple, Central to Lake avenue 

Rimmon, at engine house 

Amherst, at Vine 



Square 
yards. 



3,669.75 



Price 
per yd 



$1.00 
.75 
.45 



Total 
cost. 



19-2.67 
1,112.83 



$2,245.40 



Summary. 

CONCRETE LAID BY CHARLES H. UOBIE CO. 



Square 
yards. 



Crossings 

Sidewalks .... 

Roadways 

Miscellaneous ' 



1,922.8 
2,607.33 
3,669.75 
2,048.41 



Total . 



10,246.29 



$1,336.70 

868.34 

2,245.40 

1,211.63 

$5,662.07 



CONCRETE LAID BY GEORGE P. HIGGINS. 



Crossings 

Sidewalks 

Roadways 

Miscellaneous^ 



Square 
yards. 



905.16 

854.77 

2,092.51 

140.20 



3,992.64 



$656.48 
384.66 



$3,101.95 



Total concrete laid by the city , 14,238.93 square yards ; cost, $8,764.02. 
* Work voted in hy committee on lands and buildings. 



From the monthly pay-roll the following shows how the cost 
for new sewers has been divided : 



134 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1 

1 


$1,805.23 
6,222.72 
9,460.96 
8,630.26 
7,3.52.05 
6,250.14 
3,041.22 
160.29 


i 


^2 


i : : iisSg^SSSS 




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4J ai 

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II 








3 


: : : :| jgSSSgS? 


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s 


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: : : : 3^555358 
: : : : ;|g5||S<» 


1 


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1 
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as 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



135 



From the monthly pay-roll the following table shows how the 
cost for repaired sewers has been divided : 



Month. 


Labor. 


Castings, 
repairs, 
black- 
smithing. 


Brick. 


Inciden- 
tals. 


Liimber. 


Hard- 
ware. 


Total. 




$383.52 
1,034.04 
1,121.35 

578.84 
2,497.49 






$20.39 
25.53 
12..52 
51.00 
41.34 




$1.33 
2.05 


$405.24 
1 189 50 


February 


$1.88 

32.15 

.76 

68.11 


$126.00 






1,166.02 
638 83 






8.23 
119.84 


May 


$51.60 








July. 


171.01 
524.73 
187.13 
306.88 
695.18 
132.94 












• 171 01 








09.12 








September 

October 

November 










187 13 






7.50 
4.50 
16.18 




■■'e.oo' 


314.38 
705 68 










139 12 














Total 


$7,623.11 


$102.90 


$126.00 


$248.08 


$51.60 


$137.45 


$8,289.14 



'Transferred to new sewers account. 

COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Streets. 



Sq. yds. 



No. loads. 



Cost per 
load. 



Cost of 
stone. 



Cost of 
labor. 



Maple 

Pine 

Monroe 

Elm, north Appleton 

Union, sundry places 

Lake avenue 

Smith i-oad 

Webster, west River road — 

Laurel, east Lincoln 

Belmont, south Manchester.. 

Amherst, near Vine 

Amherst, east Maple 

North and River road 

Russell and Orange • 

Walnut and Pearl 

Lowell and Maple 

Jane 

Elm back, south Manchester. 

Totals 



47 
34 
25 
40 
17 

5 
11 
49 
65 
12 

8 
155 
32 
45 
11 
78 
13 
25 



$1.70 



$79.90 
57.80 
42.50 
68.00 
28.90 
8.50 
18.70 
83.30 

110.50 
20.40 
13.60 

".54! 40 
76.50 
18.70 

132.60 
22.10 
42.50 



$1,142.40 



$65.38 
50.00 
40.00 
60.00 
35.00 
8.00 
24.00 

101.00 
80.00 
15.00 
11.00 

369.00 
68.00 
78.00 
24.00 

152.00 
25.00 
40.00 



Total cost of the foregoing work, ^2,387.78; an 
of $0,436 per square yard. 



iverage cost 



136 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PAVING RELAID. 

Street. Sq. yards. 

Lowell ......... 59 

Granite ......... 27 

Pearl .......... 11 

Franklin ......... 10 

Chestnut 358 

Pleasant 83 

Amherst ......... 30 

Hanover ......... 80 

Concord ......... 163 

Spruce ......... 10 

Laurel ......... 17 

Spring 8 

East High ....'..... 25 

Elm 5,175 

Canal 85 

Washington ........ 70 

6,211 

Total cost of foregoing work, ^1,232.20, an average cost of 
$0,198 per square yard. 

REPAIRED SEWEKS. 



LOCATION. 


Cost material. 


Cost labor. 


Amberst, corner Pine. ... 


$8.25 
13.50 
■ 10.40 
4.00 
1.95 
10.79 
8.92 


$4 00 














Chestnut back, between Lake avenue and Spruce 
Elm back, between Concord and Amherst 


8.00 
6.50 


East High and Jane 


23.00 


Elm, near Pearl ... 


9.36 
6.04 
4.88 
13.34 
25.49 


20 00 








7.50 






Salmon, near Amoskeag bridge 


12.00 




$115.98 


$152.00 





STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



137 



EDGE STONES SET. 



Myrtle and Russell 
Union and Bridge 
Union and Lowell 
Gore and Walnut . 
Chestnut and North 
Elm, north Concord 
Brook and Union . 
Brook and Pine . 
Malvern and East High 
Jane and East High 
Birch, near Lowell 
Pine back, near North 
Appleton and Chestnut 
Elm back, near Pearl 
Walnut and Webster 
Appleton and Adams 
Pearl, near Clarke avenue 
Auburn and Belmont 
Russell and Arlington 
Union and Appleton 
Beech and Gore . 
North and Elm 
Lake avenue and Beech 
Hall and Auburn . 
Lowell, east of Pine 
Pine, north of Brook 
Beech and Spruce 
Lake avenue and Spruce 
Beech, south of Spruce 
Maple and Brook . 
Walnut and Pearl . 
Hanover back, near Pine 
Laurel and Chestnut 
Bridge, near Chestnut 



Feet. 

i6 
i8 
26 
49 
54 
80 
16 
18 
17 
35 
80 
16 
142 
28 
18 
18 
20 

175 
16 
16 
38 
16 
20 
18 
20 
21 
38 
18 
20 
28 
24 

75 
100 

50 



138 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Hanover, near Pine 
Brook, near Union 
Elm and Kidder . 
Merrimack and Lincoln 
Welch avenue 
Nashua 
Webster 

Spruce and Pine . 
Manchester, near Elm 
Beech and Pearl . 
Elm, north of Amherst 
North and Liberty 
Union and Webster 
Sagamore and Pine 
Orange and Linden 
Orange and Russell 
Spruce and Maple 
Brook and Chestnut 
Harrison and Chestnut 
Salmon and Liberty- 
Pearl and Linden 
Pearl and Warren 
Back street near Union 
Blodget and Pine . 
Elm, north of Appleton 
Cedar and Maple . 
Lake avenue, east of Lincoln 
East High, east of Nashua 
Morrison 

Laurel, east of Lincoln . 
Elm, near Langdon 
Chestnut, south of Amherst 
Central, near Franklin . 

Total 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



139 



EDGE STONES RESET. 



Streets. 










Feet. 


Pine, south of Lake avenue 220 


Myrtle, near Elm . 










60 


Hanover, near Union . 










30 


Maple, north of Lake avenue 










170 


Chestnut, south of Brook 










150 


Pine, near Spruce 










40 


Central, near Pine 










125 


Cedar, near Chestnut . 










30 


Vine 










250 


Total 




i>o7S 



Total number of edge stones set or reset, 4,933 ^^^t. 
Total cost of the foregoing work, $563.50; an average cost of 
^0.114 per foot. 



140 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 







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STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



141 



i3 m 



H.=^ 



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■* eo ^ o eo 

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142 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
CONCRETE ROADWAYS. 



STREETS. 


Square 
yards. 


Price 
per yd. 


Total 
cost. 


Maple, from north line Central to Lake avenue 


939.9 
1,713.33 


$1.00 
1.00 


$939.90 
1,713.33 






$2,653.23 







SUMMARY. 



General Work. 



Macadamizing 

Top-dressing 

General repairs 

Concreting 

Crushed stone on hand . 



Totals 31,122. 



Square Loads 
yards, stone 



18,095 
10,374 



2,653.23 



2,205 

1,157 

225 



59,737.22 

2,476.62 

713.27 

2,653.23 

30.00 



1.34 



STREETS GRADED. 



Adams, north Appleton 

Auburn, we.st Maple 

Beech, south Gore 

Chestnut, soutb Amherst 

Everett, south Clarke 

Gore, east Beech 

Green, east Pine 

Harrison, east Russell 

Kennard road 

Liberty, south Salmon 

Lincoln, south Auburn 

Maple, north Auburn 

Maple, nortb Harrison 

Maple, at culvert 

Monroe, west Elm 

Orange, east Linden 

Pearl, east Linden 

Salmon, east Pine 

Sagamore back st.,west Union 

.Smyth road — 

Union, south Silver 

Union, south Webster 

Valley, west Beech 

Walnut, Webster to North 

Walnut, .south North 

Webster, west River road 



Cut or 
fill. 



Both. 
Cut.. 
Fill.. 

Both. 
Fill ... 

Both., 
Cut. . , 
Both.. 
Fill.... 
Both- 
Cut... 
Both , 



Fill... 
Cut.. 
Both 



Totals 44, 



Cubic 
yards . 



3,525 

34S 
110 



1,512 
283 

1,168 

1,167 

667 

744 

2,100 

907 

1,338 

16,118 

1,300 

1,717 

1,979 

1,222 

563 

855 

3,212 

1,082 

407 

377 

1,389 



$340.00 
61.25 
25.00 
177.00 
175.00 
39.25 
125.50 
184.00 
130.17 
150.00 
217.00 
124.00 
350.00 
1,665.50 
235.00 
275.00 
265.. 50 
200.25 
79.00 
85.00 
431.00 
210.00 
57.00 
200.00 
173.50 
295.00 



Inciden- 
tals. 



$60.87 

5.!i6 

1.88 

*100.00 

25.91 

4.45 

20.01 

19.95 

11.42 

12.74 

128.57 

15.54 

22.92 

t690.50 

22.28 

29.41 

33.91 

15.00 

9.65 

14.64 

55.03 

18.53 

t314.33 

6.45 

23.79 

15.23 



$1,678.97 



Entire 
cost. 



$400.87 
67.21 
26.88 
277.00 
200.91 
43.70 
145.51 
203.95 
141.59 
162.74 
345.57 
139 54 
372.92 
2,356.00 
257.28 
304.41 
299.41 
215.25 
88.65 
99.64 
486.03 
228.53 
371.33 
208.45 
197.29 
310.23 



$7,948.89 



♦Including $100 paid J. D. Patterson for moving building, 
t Including $685 paid Head & DoAvst Co. for filling. 
j Including $253.20 paid F. S. Bodwell for stone. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



143 



STREETS GRAVELED. 



















No. feet. 


Ashland, north Bridge 450 


Bridge, east Russell 




. 




630 


Arlington, west of Linden 




• 




ICO 


Orange, east of Russell 




. 




450 


Webster, from River road to 


Concord 6 


c Montreal 


Rail 




road 








400 


Union, north Bridge . 








450 


Maple, north of Harrison 








425 


Hancock . 








900 


Cheney place 








400 


Elm street, south 


. 






300 


Baker 








150 


Valley 








2,250 


Amherst, east of Beech 








220 


Pearl, east Union 








300 


Total 








7>425 


No. loads. 


Calef road 100 


Welch avenue 
















20 


Elm avenue 
















20 


Brown avenue 
















100 


Young street 
















20 


Cilley street 
















10 


Nutt road . 
















150 


Beech street 
















150 


Willow street 
















50 


Merrill street 
















30 


Total 




• 






650 


STREETS TURNPIKED WITH ROAD MACHINE. 


Feet. 


Appleton 1,500 


Adams 
















1,200 



144 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Feet. 

Amherst ......... 500 

Auburn 2,100 

Blodget ......... 1,400 

Brook IjSoo 

Belmont ......... 400 

Beech ......... 1,500 

Clark ......... 1,850 

Chestnut 2,400 

Concord ......... 500 

Central ......... 3,800 

Central back street ....... 300 

Cedar . . . 2,600 

Elm . 3>o5o 

East High ......... 2,000 

Hooksett road ........ 5,500 

Harrison ......... 1,750 

Hall .......... 2,200 

Liberty ......... 600 

Laurel ......... 450 

Lake avenue ........ 1,500 

Lincoln . . . . . . . . . 650 

Myrtle ......... 2,400 

Maple ......... 600 

North ......... 950 

New Bridge street ....... 3,000 

Old Bridge ........ 3,200 

Pine .......... 9,000 

Pennacook ......... 950 

Prospect ......... 2,250 

Sagamore ......... 800 

Salmon . 950 

Spruce ......... 3,400 

Union ......... 6,000 

Webster 2,850 

Walnut 500 

Total 76,100 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
GRADING FOR CONCRETE . 



145 



Location. 




Adams, south of Clark 

Arlington, west of Linden 

Ash, north of Brook 

Auburn, west of Maple 

Auburn, west of Maple 

Auburn, east of Beech 

Beech, south of Gore 

Beech, south of Webster 

Beech, near Sagamore 

Beech, south of Gore 

Beacon, north of Central 

Brook, east of Ash, south side. . . 
Brook, east of Ash, north side. . . 

Brook, west of Maple 

Brook, east of Union 

Belmont and Merrimack 

Chestnut, south of Clark 

Central, east of Beacon 

Cheney place 

Clark, east of Chestnut 

Chestnut, south of Webster 

Calef road, near Pine Grove cemet'y 

East High, east of Malvern 

Elm street, Bakersville 

Elm, south of Auburn 

Elm, north of Sagamore 

Elm, south of Webster , 

East High, east of Ashland 

Franklin, north of Depot 

Gore, east of Beech 

Gore, east of Beech 

Grove, east of Pine 

Harrison, east of Maple 

Harrison, east of Russell 

Hancock, west of Brown avenue. 

Hall, south of Central 

Liberty, south of Salmon 

Liberty, south of Salmon 

Lowell, east of Maple 

Linden, south of Orange 

Maple, south of Brook 

Maple, south of Brook 

Morrison, south of Peai-1 

Maple, north of Auburn 

Myrtle, east of Hall 

•Myrtle, east of Hall 

Maple, north of Orange 

Myrtle, east of Maple 

Monroe, west of Elm 

Monroe, west of Elm 

Monroe, west of Elm 

Maple and Spruce 

Myrtle, east of Elm 

Malvern, south of East High. — 

Merrimack, east of Hall 

Orange, east of Linden 

Orange, east of Linden 

Orange, east of Maple 

Oak, north of Orange 

Orange, east of Russell 

Orange, east of Russell — 

Pine, south of Webster 

Pearl, east of Morrison 

Pearl, west of Morrison 

Prospect, east of Russell 

Pii»«, south of Auburn 

10 



250 
100 

75 
200 
150 
100 

50 

75 

13 

75 
100 
220 
150 
100 
100 
120 

50 
400' 
800 
100 
100 
325 
250 
300 
100 
100 
100 
175 
100 
100 
100 
1.50 
200 

75 
100 
100 
150 
100 
100 
135 

50 
150 
100 
200 
150 
100 
225 
300 
200 
100 
100 
500 

50 
100 
100 
200 
200 
300 
225 
130 
180 

50 
150 

50 
100 
,100 



Width 
in 
feet. 



Feet 


Feet 


cut. 


fill. 


5.5 






2 




8 


2 






2.5 




1 




1 




1.5 




1 




1 


2 






8 




3 




1.5 




1 


3 






i 




2 




0.5 








1.5 




8 




1 




4 


1 






.75 




1 




1 




0.5 




0.5 




0.5 




2 




0.5 


1 






0.5 




1 








1 




1 


i 




3 






0.5 


5 




3 






1 


1 






0.5 




0.5 




4 




5 




1 




1.5 




.75 




1 




1 








3 




0.5 




0.5 




2.5 


2.5 






1.5 


6 




4 






3 




2 



$48.00 

16.00 

49.00 

25.00 

27.00 

9.00 

4.50 

8.25 

8.87 

4.75 

13.25 

100.50 

40.00 

10.75 

10.00 

27.00 

4.25 

54.50 

26.00 

13.25 

12.00 

290.00 

21.00 

1.57.00 

32.00 

7.50 

6.00 

11.40 

5.00 

6.75 

7.50 

19.50 

6.50 

5.00 

5.25 

10 00 

19.00 

19.50 

52 00 

9.25 

9.75 

60.00 

32 50 

41.00 

9.00 

9.75 

9.00 

11.25 

46.00 

35.00 

10.00 

48.75 

4.25 

7.00 

8.00 

32.00 

40.00 

11.25 

10.50 

23.00 

27.37 

4.75 

61.00 

13.00 

19.25 

143.00 



146 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
GRADING FOR CONCRETE.— Con«nMed. 



Location. 


Length 
in 
feet. 


Width 
in 
feet. 


Feet 
cut. 


Feet 
till. 


Cost. 




200 
120 
100 
300 
100 
100 
100 
850 
150 
200 
200 
400 
100 


3 

8 
S 
6 
8 
8 
8 
8 
4 
8 
8 
5 
S 


2 


0.75 
2 
3 

0.5 
........ 

1 

1.5 

1.5 


$9.75 


Salmon, east of Pine 


15.75 
19.50 




10.75 




15.00 




"^13.00 


Union, soutli of Webster 

Union south of Webster 


15.00 
132.00 




9.75 




20.00 




21.00 




52.00 


Webstfr east of Beecli 


17.00 






Totals 


14,180 








$2278.89 













a d Mary Hartshorn, 470 loads sand 
Benjamin Mack, 40 loads sand 
labor men and teams 



$47.00 

4.00 

1,705.81 



Total $1,756.81 

FENCING. 
Streets. Feet. 

Maple, south Auburn i?5oo 

Hanover, near Mammoth road 500 

Webster, east Union 250 

Hooksett road 200 

Sagamore . . . • • . • • '15° 
Central 5° 

Total 2,650 

The above was built at a cost of $135.64. 

STONE. 

Paid Warren Harvey, for stone .... $.36-96 

Frank S. Bodwell, for stone .... 16.00 

Charles A. Bailey, for stone .... 352-05 



Total 



$405.01 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



147 



Location. 



Amherst, between Elm and Vine 

Amberst and Vine 

Bay baclr, near Salmon 

Bircb and Lowell 

Calef road, near Pine Grove cemetery.... 

Chestnut and Concord 

Chestnut and North 

Chestnut and Appleton 

Chestnut and Amherst, southeast corner.. 

Chestnut and Amherst, northeast corner.. 

Chestnut and Amherst back 

Chestnut and Harrison 

Concord common, near Amherst 

Elm back, between Pearl and Orange 

Elm, near Baker 

Elm, near Baker, west side 

Elm, between Appleton and Clarke 

Elm, between Mechanic and Water 

Elm, between Amherst and Concord 

Gore and Walnut 

Hay ward and Cypress 

Harrison and Maple 

Jane, near East High 

Jane and Lowell 

Jane, north side 

Jewett 

Lincoln and Amherst 

Maple, between Hanover and Amherst. . . . 
Maple, between Central and Lake avenue. 
Maple, between Central and Lake avenue. 

Orange and Russell 

Salmon back, between Bay and Chestnut. . 
Union, between Lake avenue and Spruce. . 

Wilson and Laurel 

West jMerrimack, near Elm west back 

Webster, near railroad station 



No. 



Cost of 
material. 



$19.92 
20.45 
18.02 
26.42 
40.71 
18.92 
62.14 
27.68 
14.85 
21.65 
13.93 
54.42 
20.63 
12.73 
37.93 
10.23 
136.66 
52.59 
18.98 
27.96 
18.00 
23.19 
9.23 
26.42 
8.63 
24.83 
47.46 
26.42 
43.84 
14.98 
35.45 
21.02 
46.60 
39.36 
16.52 
15.43 



Cost of 
labor. 



45 $1,074.20 



$13.00 
12.00 

8.00 
11.00 
15.00 

8.00 
17.00 
12.00 
10.00 
11.00 
11.00 
28.00 
12.00 
14.00 
12.00 

7.00 
30.00 
20.00 

7.50 
10.00 
10.00 
30.00 

5.00 
11.00 

6.00 
20.00 
24.00 
22.00 
16.00 
10.00 
22.00 
S.OO 
25.00 
21.00 
14.00 
13.00 



$525.50 



148 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



No. 



Cost of 
materiaL 



Cost of 
labor. 



Back street, between Cedar and Pine 

Back street, between Spruce and Cedar 

Back street, near Maple 

Cedar, between Chestnut and Elm 

Central and Maple 

Chestnut, between Brook and Harrison 

Cedar and Spruce 

Button and Amherst 

Elm back, between Orange and Pearl 

Elm, near Stark park 

Elm back; between Hanover and Amherst .. . 
Elm back, between Lake avenue and Spruce. 

Franklin, near Cedar 

Granite and Elm 

Harrison and Maple 

Hall and Ashland 

Lake avenue and Beech 

Lake avenue and Elm 

Laui'el back, near Maple 

Lincoln, near Laurel 

Lincoln and Lavirel 

Maple and Amherst 

Merrimack and Wilson 

Merrimack, near Wilson 

Merrimack and Maple 

Manchester, between Elm and Chestnut 

Maple, between Central and Lake avenue — 

Orange back, between Pine and Union 

Orange and Union 

Park common 

Pine and Laurel 

Pine and Cedar 

Pine and Central 

Pearl and Morrison; Orange and Linden 

Spruce and Pine 

Spruce and Elm 

Spruce and Union 

Spring near Elm 

Valley and Elm 



#1.24 
10.05 
2.14 
1.54 
1.84 
12.96 
8.63 
2.20 
1.84 
3.06 
6.06 
.60 
.92 
1.60 
.90 
1.84 



.90 
1.84 
5. IS 
5.46 
.60 
3.64 
2..')7 
1.90 
3.66 
9.23 
7.58 
14.16 
5.44 
.60 
1.84 
2.14 
3.06 
16.50 
11.16 
16.67 
1.84 
1.84 



$2.50 
7.00 
2.50 
2.00 
2.00 
7.00 
4.00 
2.50 
2.50 
6.00 
3.00 
2.00 
1.50 

4. '66 
3.00 
3.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
4.00 
2.50 
5.25 
3.25 
5.50 
5.00 
7.00 
9.00 
7.00 
4.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 
4.00 
9.00 
11.16 
7.50 
1.00 
3.00 



46 



$175.23 



$156.16 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
PIPE CULVERTS (New). 



149 



Street. 


Size in 
inches. 


Length 
in feet. 


Cost of 
material. 


Cost of 
labor. 




10 
8 
8 
8 

15 
8 


18 
20 


$11.70 

9. Oft 




Amherst, north Maple 






"~" 


10 25 


Concoicl common 

Hall near Wilson ... 


16 
56 

18 


7.20 
71.26 
8.10 


2.50 
41 00 




12.50 




4.00 










4.50 




12 
10 


30 
52 


25., 50 
33.80 


7.00 


Union, near C. & P. R. R 


5.00 






254 


$189.96 ! !S95.75 











PIPE CULVERTS (Repaired). 



Street. 



Bridge and Walnut 

Brown avenue, old pipe 

Beech, near Valley 

Hanover and INUlton 

Linden and Pearl, old pipe. 

Malvern, near East High 

Silver, old pipe 



Size in 
Inches. 



Length 
in feet. 



Cost of 
Material. 



$4.50 



2.70 
8.10 



Cost of 
labor. 



$3.75 
10.00 
88.50 
9.50 
4.00 
6.00 
7.00 



150 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
STONE CULVERTS. 



Street. 



Amherst, Fairbanks's lot 

Kennavd road 

Union, near Concord & Portsmouth Railroad 

Baker, repaired 

Brown avenue, near Gerrish's tannery, wooden. 

Hooksett road, repaired 

River road, near Pine Grove cemetery, repaired. 

Totals 



Length 
in feet. 



Cost of 
labor. 



$82.25 
75.00 
25.00 
20.00 
5.00 
11.00 
17.00 

$235.25 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



151 



BRIDGES. 

The following table gives the dimensions, material, and num- 
ber of spans of the various bridges within the city limits. 



Location. 


Lengtl 

in 
feet. 


Width 

of 

roadway 


No. of 
walks. 


Width 

of 
walks. 


Material. 


Arch- 
es or 
spans 


Amoskeag 


765.S 


20 


1 


5.5 


! Wood. 


3 




57 


22.5 


2 


7 






Bridge st. , "McGregor and>pproaches 


1,085 


24 




6 




3 


Cohas avenue, at Great Cohas 


36 


30.5 






Stone. 


2 


38 


20 






Wood. 




Derry road, near Cohas avenue 


20 
21 


17 

20.5 






" 




Dunbarton road, Black brook 


25 


17.5 






" 




Elm street, at railroad 


89 


29.5 


1 


4.5 


" 




Front street, Black brook 


56.3 


37.3 


^ 


6 


Iron. 




Granite street, at river 


465.7 
32 


26 
21 


2 


' 


Wood. 




Island Pond road, outlet to lake 


41 


16.7 
















Main street, at Piscataquog river 

Mammoth road, at Great Cohas 

Mammoth road, near town line 


70.5 
38 


20.8 

18 


1 


5 


" 












„ 


















59 


20.5 






11 




Parker street, at railroad 


53 


24 


2 


6 


Iron. 






30 


30 






Wood. 






16 


20 










River road, below James Cheney's. . . 


6 


16 






., 




12 
100 


22 
17.5 






i 
« 














6 

62 


16 
32 5 






steel. 




Second -street bridge 


2 


8 75 




Second-street bridge 


127 


32.5 


2 


8.75 









Stone bridges, 1 ; iron, 4; wood, 20; steel, 2; total, 27. 






152 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
ON HAND AT CITY YARD. 



24-inch pipe 
20-inch pipe 
18-inch pipe 
15-inch pipe 
12-inch pipe 
lo-inch pipe 
8-inch pipe 

Total 

1 Y branch, 8 on 24 inches. 
II Y branches, 8 on 20 inches. 

4 Y branches, 8 on 18 inches. 

79 Y branches, 8 on 15 inches. 

72 Y branches, 6 on 15 inches. 

86 Y branches, 8 on 12 inches. 

198 Y branches, 6 on 12 inches. 

96 Y branches, 8 on 10 inches. 

200 Y branches, 6 on 10 inches. 

25 Y branches, 8 on 8 inches. 

3 Y branches, 6 on 8 inches. 

3 1 2-inch quarter turns. 

7 12-inch curves. 

8 1 5 -inch curves. 

2 traps. 

21 Niggerhead cesspool grates. 
8 flat cesspool grates. 
6,000 sewer brick. 
700 pounds manhole covers and 

60 pounds pipe grates. 

50 pounds lantern hole covers. 



Feet 

16 

236 

16 

1.523 
416 
440 

2,997 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 153 

REPORTS FROM HIGHWAY DISTRICTS. 
District No. 3. 

Fred Jewell, Agent. 

One hundred loads of gravel and stone chips have been used 
on two miles of road repaired. 

Macadamized 17 rods of roadway, i foot deep of stone, gravel, 
and chips, with a topdressing of 6 inches of gravel. 

From 18 to 20 rods have been filled, at an average of 3 feet, 
in front of residences of Mr. Fogg and E. Boynton. 

Two culverts cleaned out and relaid ; 40 rods of ditch cut 
about 2 feet deep. 

General repairs made when necessary throughout the district. 



District No. 4. 

Byron E. Moore, Agent. 

The amount of road turnpiked is about ^ of a mile. Clayed 
and graveled about 150 rods, repaired nearly ^ mile of road, 
and amount of road widened about J^^ of a mile. 

Cleared road of brush for about 4 miles. Made all necessary 
repairs throughout the district, and the highways have been kept 
clear of stones. 



District No. 5. 

Mark E. Harvey, Agent. 
Gejttlemen of the Street and Park Commission : 

In compliance with your orders I present to you a report of 
the work done in District No. 5 during the year 1893. Owing 
to the heavy fall of snow last February, and badly drifted condi- 
tion of the roads, there was expended about ^240 for breaking 
the roads, leaving when spring opened only about $560, with 
which the following work has been done : 



154 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ROADS GRAVELED. 






Feet. 


Weston road 


85 


Center road ...... 


105 


Goffe's Falls (south road) 


410 


Nutt road 


• . • 7^5 


Dickey road 


• ' ■ 925 


Londonderry (old road) 


• 1,425 


Londonderry (new road) 


■ 1,715 


Total 


• 5,390 



Average width of graveling, 14 feet; average depth, 6 inches. 

TURNPIKED. 



Nutt road 

Mill road 

Dickey road ..... 

Total 

Average width of turnpiking, 2 1 inches. 



Feet. 

130 

780 

875 
1,785 



By cut, Londonderry (new road) 
" " (old road) 

" Dickey road 

By fill, Londonderry (new road) 

Total 



Cu. Yds. 

118 

96 

26 

125 

365 



Dug up and rebuilt one stone culvert on Londonderry new 
road. 

Dug up and rebuilt one culvert on Nutt road. 

Dug up and rebuilt 12 feet in length of one stone culvert on 
Londonderry new road. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 155 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Built ^8^ feet of railing on the approaches to Cohas brook 
bridge, near R. W. Flanders. Replanked said bridge with three- 
inch hemlock plank. (Plank and labor charged to the appropri- 
ation for bridges.) 

Bushes have been cut on one mile of road. Removed loose 
stone from roads tnroughout the district twice a month from May 
until November. Blasted four and removed seven large boulders 
from Dickey road where turnpiked. 

Repaired all water-bars, dug out stones from roads, filled mud- 
holes, and made all general repairs throughout the district. 



District No. 6. 

I. T. Webster, Agent. 

Feet. 

Turnpiked . . . . . . . . .2,112 

Topdressed ......... 5,412 

Average width of turnpiking, 24 feet. 

Average width of topdressing, 12 feet. 

Repaired four culverts. Cut bushes from both sides of road 
fpr about 4,000 feet. Removed small stones from road several 
times during season. Dumped stones on beach of lake. 



District No. 7. 

Charles Francis, Agent. 

culverts. 

Built culvert on Young road, 40' X 2}4' X 2'. 
Built culvert on Haywood street, 50' X 3' X 3'. 
Built culvert on Page street, 30' X i' X i'- 
Built culvert on Taylor street, 40' X i' X i'- 
Lengthened culvert on Valley street, 15' X 3' X 3'- 
Lengthened culvert on Massabesic street, 6' X 4' X 4' 



156 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 





GUTTERS PAVED. 










Feet. 


Feet wide 


Massabesic street 





• 250 


3 


Valley street . 





. 100 


3 


Spruce street . 





. 100 


3 


Relaid . 





• 75 




Total . 


NEW CESSPOOLS. 


• 525 





One at corner of Massabesic and Jewett streets. 
One at corner of Spruce street and Old Falls road. 
One at corner of Massabesic street, near shoe shop. 
One on Mammoth road. 

Two 3-feet curbs and 29 feet edgestone set corner Valley and 
Jewett streets. 



Page street 
Grove street 



TURNPIKED. 



Feet. Feet wide. 

i>55o 34 
600 34 



NEW STREETS BUILT. 

Hay ward street, 1,200 feet long, 50 feet wide. By cut, 300' 
X 2^'. By fill, 300' X 2'. Balance turnpiked. 

Auburn street, 160 feet long, 50 feet wide. By cut, 31^'. 

Summer street, 650 feet long, 50 feet wide. By cut, 250' X 
7^2 ■ By fill) 250' X 2'. Balance cut i foot. 

Prescott street, 250 feet long, 34 feet wide. By cut, 3 feet. 

Graded Taylor street 500 feet. By cut, i>^ feet for 200 feet. 
Balance turnpiked. 



SIDEWALKS BUILT. 



ummer street (both sides 
Auburn street . 



Feet. Feet wide. 

1,300 8 
320 8 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



157 



Belmont street 
Taylor street . 
Hayvvard street 
Jewett street . 
Valley street . 
Canton street . 



throughout the distr 



Feet. Feet wide. 

150 8 

500 8 

600 8 

500 8 

300 8 

200 8 



Three fourths of a mile of bushes cut. Made general repairs 



ct where most needed. 



District No. 8. 

George H. Penniman, Agent. 

Turnpiked 25 rods in different sections of the district ; also 
turn piked Bridge street from Hanover street to the top of the 
hill, about one half mile. 

Cleaned out gutters, repaired culvert near residence of Luther 
Proctor, and filled mudholes with dirt. Grading has been done 
near residence of James Benson on Candia road, by filling with 
gravel. Built new culvert near residence of Sam Reed. Eighty- 
five feet of Akron pipe has been laid near Noah Reed's store. 
Widened road near Joseph Rand's, 15 rods long and 3 rods wide. 

About 4 miles of bushes have been cut, and small stone re- 
moved from the highways. Other general repairs made. 



District No. 9. 

Lester C. Paige, Agent. 

Turnpiked 

Graded 

Average width of turnpiking, 12 feet. 
Average width of grading, 8 feet. 
Two culverts repaired and cleaned out. 



Feet. 

433 

2,524 



158 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Cut bushes, removed stone, repaired water-bars, put up io8 feet 
of railing, and attended to other general repairs throughout the 
district. 



If the city could purchase one or two more gravel banks in 
different parts of the district, it would be of benefit. The only 
one we have now is nearly exhausted, besides, the expense of cart- 
ing grade from one side of the district to the other is great. 



District No. 10. 

COBBLE PAVING. 

Amory street, near Fulton engine house 

Coolidge avenue 

Sullivan street 

Beauport street . 

Cartier street 

Cartier street (gutter) 

West Bridge street 

Walker street 

Second street 

Second street, from Ferry back street south 

Totals 



"eet. 


Sq. yds 


420 


^63 


39 


13 


448 


174 


100 


27 


50 


10 


50 


22 


500 


194 


60 


18 


90 


24 


70 


23 



527 668 



COBBLE EDGING. 



Amory street, near Fulton engine house 
Coolidge avenue . . . . . 
West Bridge street . . . . 



Feet. 
320 

39 

407 



Total 



766 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
EDGE STONES SET. 



Amory, near Fulton engine house 

Cartier street 

Cartier street, front of No. 465 

West Bridge street 

Second street, Walker street south 

Second street, Ferry back south 

Total .... 



STREETS GRADED. 



159 



Feet. 
130 

SO 
93 

i5t 



3461 



Adams 

Amory 

Coolidge avenue 

Gates 

Kelley 

North Cartier . . . 

Putnam 

Rimmon 

Sullivan 

South Cartier.... 

Total 



Length 

in 

feet. 



145 

1,050 
250 

eo 

182 
1,250 
100 
450 
200 
650 



4,327 



Cubic 
feet. 



1,450 
19,600 
4,500 



20,8;« 
1,150 
4,950 
2,. 500 

10,833 



The work on South Cartier street was a cut, all the others were fills. 



160 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
STREETS GRAVELED. 



Streets. 


Length 

in 

feet. 


Widtli 

iu 

feet. 


Cubic 
yards. 




550 
200 
375 


25 
39 
33 




McGregor .... 


"40 


West Bridge 


382 






Total 


1,125 




1,360 







NEW CESSPOOLS. 



STREETS. 



Cost Of 
material. 



Cost of 
labor. 



Adams, southwest corner of Beauport 

Amoi-y and North Main 

Barr and Douglas 

Main and Mast road 

Main and School 

Near Fulton engine house 

North Main, near Sullivan 

Rimmon, near Fulton engine house.. . 

Totals 



$30.75 
37.49 
15.34 
13.65 

9.45 
24.52 

6.78 
55.62 



$183.00 



$36.62 
.37 25 

8.25 
13.50 

8.25 
34.44 
11.25 
34.44 



I 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
CESSPOOLS REPAIRED. 



161 



Streets. 



Arnory and Main , 

Amory and Main, northwest corner . 

Amory and Main, southwest corner , 

Amory and Main, southwest corner 

Adams, near Main hack 

Bath and River 

Douglas and Barr 

Ferry and River 

Granite and Quincy 

Granite and Quincy 

540 Granite 

McGregor, near West Bridge 

McGregor, near Bridge 

McGregor, near West Bridge 

Main and Wayne 

Main, near North Main street schoolhouse. 

McGregor and Amory 

McGregor and Wayne 

River, near Walker 

Sullivan and Beauport 

Winter, near Parker 

Winter 

Walker, near Second 

Winter and Parker 



No. 



Totals 



Cost of 
material. 



1.84 
.61 



Cost of 
lahor. 



$1.62 

1.62 

.75 



e-.-iO 
13.50 



.62 


1.62 


.62 


6.75 


.62 


6.75 


2.12 


1.31 


2.42 


3.38 


2.43 




2.43 




5.93 






3.38 


1.54 


6.. 50 


3.08 




.62 





16i 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



•»800 IB^OI 


$4,427.84 

4.297.50 

988.44 

1,276.89 

2,750.26 

45.50 

1,476.75 

877.67 

2 572.90 

286.07 

333.82 

41 40 

25.00 

10,987.05 


S 

J 




1 
1 

$378.95 
16.18 
3.13 


g :gS : : : 
t :^S : : 




1 
1 


•jaqtnaAoji 


$243.03 
108.69 
21.69 
88.62 
23.32 


163 91 

■■ '287^99 ' 
218.13 
124.56 
10.00 


g 

S 


•aaqoioo 


$34 00 
715.97 
17.50 
92.62 
4.25 


is !g i5 i 
is :| :S ;■ 


1 


i 


•jeqme^des 


pes : 


34 51 
232.00 

25 00 
790.05 


i 


i 

< 

J464.68 
113.50 
299.00 
270.26 

1,772.43 


26 50 
230.07 
293.50 

5.00 


o 

3 


i 


•Xinf 




i 


1 

i 


•9anf 


SC6.00 
948.00 
184.00 
277.25 


\°. ;s^ : i 

;i -gS : ; 


1 


J 


•Xbjc 


§§§s . 


■" 6i!88' 

"2()3!62' 
6.00 
44 00 


:§ 


i 


•ludv 


s 


§ : : 

d • • 


216 50 
125.13 
226.13 
16,25 
66.77 


. : 


o 


•qojBiv 


4© 


• \ \ 


204.78 
265.83 
122 00 




i 


•jCjBnjq9a 


55 

i 


lO • • 


iSSS ; : : 




5 

1 


•XjenuBf 


«& : : 


iggg '■ ■■ i 




!! 




51 


411 
Hi 


iis 

Ml 


1- 

•g-as. 

Jil 


|i 

ii 
Ii 







STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



163 



ON HAND AT YARD, DISTRICT NO. 

2o-inch pipe 
1 8-inch pipe 
15-inch pipe 
12-inch pipe 
lo-inch pipe 

8-inch pipe 

6-inch pipe 

4-inch pipe 

Total 

4 Y branches, 8 on 15 inches. 

9 Y branches, 6 on 15 inches. 
38 Y branches, 8 on 12 inches. 
10 Y branches, 6 on 15 inches. 

8 Y branches, 8 on 10 inches. 
16 Y branches, 6 on 10 inches. 

8 old cesspool grates. 

I Akron trap. 
55 18-inch Akron collars. 
67 1 5 -inch Akron collars. 

FENCING. 

Second street, near bridge, 272 feet, at a cost of $27.48. 



Feet. 
2 
2 

26 
90 

20 

40 
28 

10 

218 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

New drinking fountain on North Main street, near Amory, 
labor, $41.81 ; materials, $35.01 ; total, $76.82. 

Rubbling fill between the two bridges on Second street, at a 
cost of $160.48. 

Stone for sewers, etc., obtained from city yard on Franklin 
street. 



164 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

District No. 1 1. 

Frank S. Hanscom, Agent. 

Four miles liave been turnpiked, and large stones removed. 
Twenty-five rods of road graveled. Bushes cut on both sides of 
Goffstown, Straw, and Hooksett roads, and east side of Dunbar- 
ton road, fourteen miles in all. 

Relaid two stone culverts, each fifteen feet in length. Water- 
ing trough and pipe repaired. Seventy-nine rods of fencing 
built. Replanked and built new railing on Black brook bridge, 
and support underneath bridge replaced. Cut made on hill east 
side of bridge. 

Forty-two loads of cobble paving delivered at Amoskeag 
bridge for district 2. Forty tons of rough stone supplied dis- 
trict 10. 

The back streets in this district have been cleaned out once 
a week ; gutters and cesspools cleaned out twice during season. 

General repairs have been made throughout the district. 



District No. 12. 

Eugene G. Libbey, Agent. 

Nearly all the Bald Hill road has been turnpiked, and about a 
mile of the Mammoth road. Culverts and ditches cleaned out, 
and one stone culvert relaid. 

Bushes on both sides of the roads have been cut, and during 
the winter the different highways have been broken out, and the 
ice cut in the culverts, and trees cut where they were loaded with 
ice and encumbered the highway. 

The Mammoth road near city farm has been graded and put 
in good condition where it was left in a rough state by the lay- 
ing of the water pipe. It has also been widened by filling 420 
feet in length, 8 feet in width, and an average of 3 feet in depth. 

The general repairs throughout the district have been made. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 165 

Scavenger Service Report. 

Eugene G. Libbey. 

The removal of all perishable waste was contracted for by the 
committee on city farm, at the beginning of the season, and Mr. 
Libbey having general charge of the same, suggests that a fore- 
man be employed to separate the perishable matter from the rub- 
bish. Very few complaints have been made in regard to neglect. 

The perishable matter has been taken to the city farm and 
plowed into the land. From January 9 to December i, three 
teams have been constantly employed, drawing six loads a day ; 
and from December i to January i, two loads a day have been 
drawn. A larger territory has been covered than ever before, 
and the business portion of the city has been visited every fore- 
noon. 

Respectfully submitted. 

G. H. STEARNS, 
L. P. REYNOLDS 
H. P. SIMPSON, 

Commissioners. 

A. E. Herrick, 

Clerk. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY ENGINEER. 



City engineer's Department. 

1893. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT. 

FIRST ASSISTANT ENGINEER, FIELD AND OFFICE. 

HARRIE M. YOUNG. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ENGINEER, DRAUGHTING. 

GEORGE W. WALES. 

THIRD ASSISTANT ENGINEER, FIELD AND OFFICE. 

HARRY J. BRIGGS. 

ASSISTANTS. 

GEORGE M. CURRIER, HERBERT L. WATSON, 

Began April 21. June 29 to Sept. 9. 

EDGAR E. FARMER, EDWARD M. STONE, 

Jan. I to Sept. 9. May i to Sept 7. 

J. EDWARD BAKER, EDWARD H. DOHERTY, 

June 28 to June 30. Mar. 6 to Mar. 8. 

TYPEWRITER AND CLERK. 

A. GERTRUDE BENNETT, 
-June 14 to Dec. 31. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Hono7- the Mayor and Ge7itlemen of the City Councils : 
Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting my eighth annual re- 
port, being the fifteenth annual report of the work in the city 
engineer's department, for the year ending December 31, 1893. 
Expenses of the department for the year 1893, per monthly 
draft : 



January . 






. 


. 


^281.40 


February 










300.46 


March . 










516.23 


April . 










293.64 


May 










581.63 


June 










693.32 


July . 










781.10 


August . 










491.27 


September 










603.33 


October . 










245-50 


November 










274-45 


December 










586.51 


Total 










$5,648.84 


Appropriation 








4,300.00 


Amount overdrawn 


$1,348.84 


Average monthly draft .... 




$470.73 


Itemized account of expenses for the year : 


For salary of city engineer ^1,200.00 


salary of assistants 


• 3)io5-io 


supplies for office 


• • 357.43 


additions to office furniture 


28.44 


stakes and 


luml 


3er 


. 




79-13 



170 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



For horse shoeing and repairs o 


f wagon and harness 


$68.60 


street-car fares 


30-55 


printing reports . 
express and postage . 










25.00 
10.93 


repairing .... 










13-36 


expenses . 
books and folios 










12.99 
52.00 


printing 
telephone . 
incidentals 










9-15 

37-40 

1.50 


horse hire . 










66.25 


city maps, directory . 
new instruments 










17-50 
406.51 


typewriter . 










127.00 



Total $5,648.84 

The items for salaries may be divided as follows : 

For giving lines and grades for the extension and 

construction of streets and sidewalks . . $306.84 

plans and profiles relating to the construction of 

streets and sidewalks ..... 167.80 

surveys and levels for the construction of streets 

and sewers ....... 383.80 

giving lines and grades for, and superintending the 

construction of sewers . . . . . . 199.26 

plans and profiles relating to the construction of 

sewers ........ 120.81 

surveys, measurements, and plans for the assign- 
ment of street numbers ..... 291.94 

making plans for improvements other than those 

mentioned in this account .... i43'io 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 
given for improvements in Pine Grove ceme- 
fery, including new map .... 322.78 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 

given for improvements in Valley cemetery . 17.10 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



171 



For surveys, levels and plans, also lines and grades 

given for repairing and extending the street 

railw^ay ....... 

collecting data, classifying accounts, and othe 

work in relation to office report 
lines, grades, and superintendence given for th( 

construction of avenues in Stark park . 
lines, grades, and superintendence given for the 

construction of avenues in Derryfield park 
ward five ward-room, lines and grades 
N. S. Bean engine-house, plans, specifications,etc 
Excelsior hook-and-ladder house, plans, specifi 

cations, and measurements 
copying records of highways and of streets laid 

out 

indexing plans and notes .... 
checking notes, figures, etc. 
surveys, levels, etc., at Main -street bridge . 
surveys, levels, and superintendence at Second 

street bridge ..... 

new map of city ..... 
new sewer map of city ..... 
additions made to old map of city . 
lines given for water-works department 
measuring and figuring concrete laid for city 
attendance upon meetings of the street and park 

commission and data furnished them 
making plans of streets in city clerk's book of 

records ...... 

plotting sewers in sewer book and on map 
locating and putting up street signs and guide 

boards ....... 

locating and setting stone bounds 

office work, preparing notes, data, records, etc 

plotting sectional maps of city 

plans, lines, and grades for Elm street bank wal 



$18 


24 


113 


07 


^36 


26 


40 


22 


9 


II 


10 


10 



30.00 

16.25 

5341 

19.00 

23.41 
237.67 

102.01 
20.70 

24.50 

22.30 

39-96 

123.60 

56.50 
89-45 

110.28 

19.50 

208.62 

66.57 

15.00 



172 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



For procuring abutters' names .... $42.35 

lettering and finishing plans .... 58.11 

ofifice work, information given engineers and 

others regarding lines, grades, sewers, etc. . 256.95 
computing areas of land taken for new streets . 77-65 
researches of deeds for property lines and owner- 
ship 85.00 

plans for and attendance upon board of aldermen 

at street hearings ...... 48.00 

orders and petitions written for presentation to 

the city government ..... 26.88 

city contracts written and data furnished for same 16.00 

attendance upon meetings of the committee on 

streets, and plans pertaining thereto . . 75 -oo 

investigating and reporting cases to committee 

on claims ....... 10.00 

attendance upon meetings of the committee on 
sewers and drains, clerical work, including 
orders written ...... 50.00 

Total $4,305.10 

The following bills, charged to other appropriations, have 
been certified to by this department : 



LAND DAMAGES. 

Lucia A. Clough, Cypress, 24,433 ^q- ft. . 
Charles G. Hastings, Cypress, 11,000 sq. ft. 
E. E. Bullard, B, 4,325.33 sq. ft. . 
Mrs. Sydney A. Blood, Grove, 12,650 sq. ft. 
Mrs. Janette P. Bartlett, Harrison, 10,625 sq. 
Gen. R. N. Batchelder, Union, 32,087.50 sq. 
Alonzo Elliott, Monroe, 10,360 sq. ft. 
Upton, Harvey & Weston, Beech, 9,013 sq. 

Ash, 9,062 sq. 

Maple, 9,034 sq. 

Oak, 9,090 sq. 



36,199 sq. ft. 



$1,221.65 
1,100.00 

259-52 
1,012.00 

796.87 
1,604.37 

828.80 



1,809.95 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



173 



J. M. Stanton, Elm, 8,466 sq. ft ^507.96 

interest 15 months , . . 3^'75 

This amount was more than the land figured, but he claimed 
that his deed covered it and the bill was paid by vote of the 
board of aldermen. 

STREET SIGNS AND GUIDE BOARDS. 



George B. Cressey, painting 

Flint & Little, labor, etc. 

Head & Dowst, posts for guide-boards 

Whitten & Fifield, horse hire . 

C. W. Babbitt, horse hire 



$140.88 

6.85 

30.62 

7-5° 
10.00 



STONEWORK. 



F. S. Bodwell, west end McGregor bridge, 21.88 perch 

Valley street culvert, 84.4 perch 

ward 9 engine house, 137 ft. edge stone 

I 3-foot circle . 

base for drinking fountain, Main street 



$98.46 

253.20 

54.80 

4.50 
30.00 



SECOND STREET BRIDGE. 



John B. Clarke Co., printing 30 specifications . 

A. C. Wallace, lumber for batters .... 

William H. Colburn, making fill, 12,428.11 cubic 
yards ......... 

Charles A. Bailey, stonework, 2,300.23 cubic yards . 
piling, for foundation . 

Dean & Westbrook,. contractors for steel superstruc- 
ture 



$12.00 
8.48 

2,454-55 

20,127.01 

2,243.00 

26,687.36 



T. H. Tuson, postal cards ..... $0.65 

A. S. Campbell & Co., 500 postals, sewer returns . 6.85 



174 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CONCRETE. 



Charles H. Robie Co., 10,246.29 square yards . . ^5,662.07 

George F. Higgins, 3,992.64 square yards . . 3,101.95 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Head & Dowst, boards for batters . 

George W. Wales, Webster street schoolhouse plans 

Union Manufacturing Co., 1,000 street numbers 

G. L. Theobald, moving house on Amory street eX' 

tension 
G. L. Theobald, lowering Fulton engine house 

Total 



$0.49 
75.00 
45.00 

100.00 
700.00 



$71,034.09 

Amount of concrete laid for the city by the Charles H. Robie 
Company and George F. Higgins, as measured by this depart- 
ment, 14,238.93 square yards. 

Expenses for soldiers' monument : 

For water ........ $300.00 

For gas ......... 



Total 



$300.00 



The amount of work done by this department during the year 
is as follows : 



Number of orders for surveys, street lines, and grades 
for sewer grades . 
for paving grades 
for street railway grades 
for Pine Grove cemetery grades 
for profile levels . 

Total number of orders 



1,003 
107 

45 

2 

42 

72 

1,271 



Levels for profile for establishing grades, 82,318 feet, equal to 
15.59 miles. These profiles, having three lines of levels on each 
street, make a total distance actually leveled of 246,954 feet. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



175 



Levels for sewer profiles 

for other center profiles 

in Pine Grove cemetery 

in Valley cemetery 

in Stark park . 

in Derryfield park . 
Other levels 

Total levels taken . 
Equal to 54.65 miles. 

Levels for cross-section 

Surveys of streets and street lines 

in Pine Grove cemetery 

in Valley cemetery 

in Derryfield park 

for street numbers 
Other surveys . 

Total surveys made 
Equal to 35.28 miles. 

Street lines marked on ground . 

Lines of lots and avenues, Pine Grove cemetery 

of lots and avenues, Valley cemetery 

of avenues, Stark park 

of avenues, Derryfield park 

for street centers 

for gutters 

for curbs . 

for sewers 

for street railway 
Other lines 

Total length of lines marked on ground 
Equal to 17.96 miles. 



Feet. 
9,816 
3,162 

2,400 

So 
8,446 
2,620 
15,081 



288 


559 


Sq. 


Feet. 


131 


.517 




Feet. 


120 


.957 


22 


»930 




150 


I 


>33o 


29 


>497 


12 


)75i 



186,285 

Feet. 

22,912 

6,090 

150 
9,890 
4,000 

9,453 
13.504 

2,989 

19,071 

400 

6,466 

94,925 



176 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 











Feet 


Grades set for sidewalks ^5,426 


for centers 








1,250 


for gutters 








13.504 


for curbs , 








2,989 


for sewers 








19,071 


for water-pipe . 








2>7S5 


for street railway tracks 








400 


for building streets . 








3o>i75 


in Pine Grove cemetery 








8,998 


in Valley cemetery . 








160 


in Stark park . 








1,150 


in Derryfield park 








2,620 


Other grades .... 








2,142 



Total length of grades set 
Equal to 20.95 i^'iiles. 

Profile measurements made 
Equal to 1.84 miles. 

Lot owners looked up 
Equal to 9.22 miles, 



110,640 



Feet. 
9,716 



Feet. 
48,666 



BATTERS SET. 

Elm street, bank wall. 

Lake avenue, ward room. 

Main west back street, bank wall. 

Second street, bridge. 

Second street, for rubbling. 

Old lots restaked in Valley cemetery 

in Pine Grove cemetery 
New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery 

Total cemetery lots laid out . 



20 
100 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 177 

Street numbers assigned and put on . . . ,307 

replaced ....... 25 

assigned but not put on . . . -67 

Total . . . • 399 

GUIDE BOARDS PUT UP. 

Baker street and Calef road, old post, one sign. 

Baker street and Brown avenue, old post, one sign. 

Bald Hill road and Bridge-street extension, new post, two 
signs. 

Bald Hill road and Londonderry turnpike, post set over, two 
signs. 

Bedford road and Rockland avenue, old post, one sign. 

Brown avenue and Elm street, old post, one sign. 

Brown avenue and Calef road, old post, one sign. 

Brown avenue and J. P. Moore road, old post, one sign. 

Brown avenue and South road, old post, two signs. 

Candia road and Hanover street, old post, two signs. 

Candia road and Proctor road, new post, two signs. 

Candia road and Bridge-street extension, old post, two signs. 

Candia road and Lake Shore road, old post, two signs. 

Candia road and Londonderry turnpike, old post, two signs. 

Cohas avenue at reservoir, new post, one sign. 

Cohas avenue and Canal road, new post, one sign. 

Corning road and Conant road, new post, two signs. 

Derry road and Dickey road, rew post, one sign. 

Derry road, Cohas avenue, and Webster road, new post, three 
signs. 

Derry road and Corning road, new post, two signs. 

Dickey road and Island Pond road, new post, two signs. 

Dickey road and Cohas avenue, new post, two signs. 

Dow road and Goffstown road, new post, two signs. 

Front street and Amoskeag street, old post, two signs. 

Front street and Goffstown road, old post, two signs. 

Front street and Dunbarton road, old post, two signs. 
12 



178 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Front street and Hackett Hill road, post set over, two signs. 
Goffstown road and old road, new post, two signs. 
Hanover street and Proctor road, old post, one sign. 
Island Pond road and Webster road, new post, one sign. 
Lake avenue and Massabesic street, old post, two signs. 
Lake Shore road and Island Pond road, new post, two signs. 
Lake Shore road and Proctor road, new post, two signs. 
Mammoth road and Smyth road, new post, (wo signs. 
Mammoth road and Bridge street, new post, two signs. 
Mammoth road and Hanover street, new post, two signs. 
Mammoth road and Lake avenue, new post, two signs. 
Mammoth road and Candia road, new post, two signs. 
Mammoth road and Young road, old post, one sign. 
Mammoth road and Huse road, old post, one sign. 
Mammoth road and Island Pond road, new post, two signs. 
Mammoth road and Cohas avenue, new post, two signs. 
Mammoth road and Mooresville road, new post, two signs. 
Mammoth road and Derry road, new post, two signs. 
Mammoth, Corning, and South roads, new post, two signs. 
Mammoth road and Page road, post set over, one sign. 
Mammoth road and new road, new post, two signs. ^ 

Mast road and Rockland avenue, new post, two signs. 
Mast road and Amherst road, old post, one sign. 
Mast road and Gove street, post set over, two signs. 
Mill road and Harvey road, new post, one sign. 
Merrill, Huse, Weston, and Mooresville roads, new post, two 
signs. 

Nutt road and Elm street, old post, tivo signs. 

Nutt road and Beech street, old post, two signs. 

Nutt road and Weston road, old post, two signs. 

Nutt, Merrill, and Goffe's Falls roads, new post, two signs. 

Salmon street and Canal street, old post, one sign. 

Smyth road and Kennard road, new post, one sign. 

Smyth road and Webster street, new post, two signs. 

South road and road from Goffe's Falls, old post, two signs. 

South Main street and Mast street, old post, one sign. 



I 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 179 

South Main street and Milford street, old post, one sign. 
Straw road and Goffstown road, new post, two signs. 
Straw road and Dunbarton road, post set over, two signs. 
Webster street and Union street, old post, one sign. 
Webster street and Hooksett road, new post, one sign. 
Webster road, old post, one sign. 
Wilkins street and Mast road, new post, two signs. 



One hundred and five signs put up, 9 ready to put up, 35 new 
posts set, 5 old posts reset, 130 street signs put up, 135 ready to 
be put up. 

Arrows are to be put on guide boards and posts painted. 

Number sewer permits granted, 191. 

This year, as in previous years, the city engineer has investi- 
gated all cases where suits were liable to be brought against the 
city, and reported to the committee on claims. 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

Central, from James Hall road westerly. 
, Cypress, from Lake avenue to Massabesic 

East High, from Ashland to Belmont. 

Mast, from Riddle to Mast road. 

Page, from Candia road to Hanover. 

South Main, from Granite to Bedford line. Seven plans. 

Wilton, from Main to Cartier. 

• Young, from Hall to Cypress. 

Total plans and profiles, 14. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Ashland, Bridge, Harrison, and Belmont, sectional map, in- 
cluding Underhill's and Elliot's land. Equaling thirteen plans. 
Ash east back, from Harrison to Gore. 
Auburn, from Elm to Pine east back. 
Auburn south back, from Pine east back to east of Beech. 
B, from Prince to Milford. 



180 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Cartier, from Conant to foot of bluff. 
Cass, from Lake avenue to Laurel. 
Cheney place, from Brown avenue to Elm. 
Chestnut west back, from Lowell north back to Bridge. 
Central, from Beacon to Cass. 
Dubuque, from Conant to foot of bluff. 
Elm, from Elm avenue to Baker. 
Elm avenue, from Elm to Calef road. 
Elm east back, from Pearl to Orange. 
Gore, from Beech east back to Ash east back. 
Hanover south back, from Elm east back to Union. 
Hay ward, from Belmont to Jewett. 
Laurel, from Beacon to Cass. 

Laurel, Central, Chestnut, and Beech, sectional map. Equal- 
ing seven plans. 

Merrimack, from Beech to east of Maple. 

Merrimack, from Beacon easterly. 

Orange south back, from Elm east back to Pine. 

Pearl, from Elm to Elm east back. 

Pine cast back, from Auburn to Auburn south back. 

Rimmon, from Conant to foot of bluff. 

Rimmon east back, from Amory to Kelley. 

Salmon, from Pine to Walnut. 

Summer, from Belmont to Massabesic. 

Welch avenue, from Elm to Calef road. 

Walnut, from Gore to Salmon. 

Wilson Hill lots, from Lake avenue to Merrimack. 

Wilton, from Main to Cartier. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 50. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Amherst, Elm to Mammoth road. 
Arlington, Maple to Morrison. 
Auburn, Elm to Belmont. 
Bridge, Elm to Mammoth road. , 
Calef road. Baker to Webster. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 181 

Canal, Merrimack south back to West Salmon. 

Cedar, Elm to Belmont. 

Central, Elm to Highland. 

Derry, Amherst to Concord. 

Dutton, Amherst to north of Concord. 

Elm, Grove to Baker. 

Elm, Clarke to Rowell. 

Hanover, Elm to Mammoth road. 

Jane, Lowell to East High. 

Lake avenue, Elm to Mammoth road. 

Laurel, Chestnut to Highland. 

Linden, Bridge to Orange. 

Merrimack, Elm to Hanover. 

Myrtle, Elm to Belmont. 

Nashua, Concord to Bridge. 

Orange, Elm to Belmont. 

Pearl, Elm to Belmont. 

Pine, Auburn to Amherst. 

Porter, Amherst to Concord. 

River road. West Salmon to State Industrial School. 

Russell, Bridge to north of Myrtle. 

South, Lowell to East High. 

Spruce, Elm to Hall. 

Union, Nutt road to Merrill. 

Union, Auburn south back to North. 

Warren, Bridge to Pearl. 

Numbering sheets made for new book, 589. 

Total numbering plans made, 620. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Alsace, Kelley, and Morgan streets, land owned by Sullivan 
and Sheehan. Copy. 

Ainsworth avenue, Hayward to Young street, land of A. A. 
Ainsworth. Copy. • 

Beech, Maple, and Shasta streets, land of Lawrence Dowd. 
Copy. 



182 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Belmont, Cedar, and Auburn streets, land of F. S. and L. J. 
Sloan. Copy. 

Belmont street, Young to Hayward street, land of A. S. 
Lamb. Copy. 

Belmont and Massabesic streets, Old Falls road and Amoskeag 
Co.'s line, plan of Mentor estate. Copy. 

Belmont street, Young street to Concord & Portsmouth Rail- 
road, land of G. W. Adams, Copy. 

Calef road, Baker and Gilford streets, plan of Gilford land. 
Copy. 

Clay street and Ferry road, plan of Sophronia Young's lots. 
Copy. 

Cypress street, Auburn to Massabesic street, location of. 

Elm and Spruce streets, Cilley and Mammoth roads, sectional 
map. Equaling 56 plans. 

Erie street and River road, land of J. K. McQuesten. Copy. 

Foster avenue, Hayward street northerl^^, plan of Piatt's land. 
Copy. 

Hanover, Webster, Union, and Oak streets, including land of 
Johnson heirs. Copy. 

Jewett and Valley streets, land of J. L. Woodman. Copy. 

Lake avenue. Auburn and Canton streets, and James Hall 
road, land of Mead, Mason & Co., and Platts &: Sons. Copy. 

Lincoln, Belmont, and Young streets and Lake avenue, land 
of Elliott Manufacturing Co. Copy. 

Lincoln and Young streets, land of Batchelder and Clarke. 
Copy. 

Main street, Conant to West Hancock, plan showing original 
laying out. 

Mammoth road and Porter street, land of J. A. Sheehan & 
Co. Copy. 

Mammoth road and Porter street, land of F. P. Sargent. 
Copy. 

Mammoth road, Candia road to Plooksett line, location of. 

Maple and Silver streets, land of Albert Walker. Copy. 

Maple and Somerville streets, land of Elliott, Johnson, Flint, 
and Day. Copy. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 183 

Massabesic street and Mammoth road, land of Fred Hall. 

Massabesic street, Lake avenue to Belmont street, land of 
Perry and Gage. Copy. 

Massabesic street and Old Falls road, land of F. S. Sloan. 
Copy. 

Massabesic street and Chase avenue, land of John M. Hayes 
heirs, Charles C. Chase, and Mary E. Chamberlen. Copy. 

Nutt road and Shasta street, land of John 'Kennard. Copy. 

Nutt road. Pine and Clay streets, land of B. P. Cilley. Copy. 

Spruce street, Belmont street to Old Falls road, land of Perry 
and Gage. Copy. 

Taylor street, land of Stephen Williams. Copy. 

Union, Beech, Harvard, and Shasta streets, land of Weston, 
Shirley, and Bell. Copy. 

Wilson street, Hayward to Young street, plan of Elliott and 
Burpee's lots. Copy. 

Young street, Taylor street westerly, land of William G. Cot- 
ter. Copy. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 90. 

WORKING PLANS. 

Adams street culvert. Plan and section. 

Alsace, Amory to Sullivan and Sheehan's north line. Profile. 

Amherst, Union to Hall. Sewer profile. 

Ash, Gore to north of Sagamore. Profile. 

Ash east back, Gore to Brook. Sewer profile. 

Auburn street sewer. Template. 

Bell, Pine to Wilson. Profile. 

Boutwell, Amory to Sullivan and Sheehan's north line. Profile. 

Byron, Brown avenue to Josselyn. Profile. 

Calef road. Line at cemetery. 

Cass, Laurel to Central. Profile. 

Cheney Place, Elm to Brown avenue. Profile. 

Cilley road, Nutt to Mammoth road. Profile. 

Clay, Lincoln to Belmont. Profile. 

Clay, Taylor to Jewett. Profile. 



184 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

Columbus, Amory to top of bluff. Profile. 
Congress, Amory to top of bluff. Profile. 
Cumberland, Amory to top of bluff. Profile. 
Cypress, Auburn to Massabesic. Location of. 
Derryfield park. Profiles of avenues. 
District No. lo. Plan of stable. 
Dix, Lincoln to Belmont. Profile. 
East Manchester schoolhouse. Data for concrete. 
East Manchester schoolhouse. Profile for walks. 
Elm avenue. Elm to Calef road. Sewer profile. 
Elm, Brown avenue to Baker. Sewer profile. 
Elm west back. Market to Mechanic. Sewer profile. 
Essex, Amory to top of bluff. Profile. 
Everett, Clarke southerly. Profile. 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder house. Three plans of extension. 
Oilman, Second to Wentworth. Profile. 
Gordon Woodbury land, Myrtle to Prospect south back. 
Sewer profile. 

Gore, Beech east back to Ash east back. Sewer profile. 

Green, Pine to Wilson. Profile. 

Grove, Pine to Wilson. Profile. 

Hevey, Conant to foot of bluff. Profile. 

Hevey east back, Kelley to south of Wayne. Sewer profile. 

Hill, Frederick to Wolf and Wagner's south line. Profile. 

Howe, Lincoln to Belmont. Profile. 

Joliette, Amory to Sullivan & Sheehan's north line. Profile. 

Josselyn, Byron to south of Kennedy. Profile. 

Kearsarge, Amory to top of bluff. Profile. 

Kennedy, Brown avenue to Josselyn. Profile. 

Lafayette, Amory to Sullivan & Sheehan's north line. Profile. 

Laval, Amory to Sullivan & Sheehan's north line. Profile. 

Lincoln-street culvert. Plan and section, detail sheet. 

Liverraore land. Section for proposed sewer. 

Lowell, Belmont to Mammoth road. Profile. 

Mammoth road, Candia road to Hooksett line. Laying out. 

Manchester, east of Chestnut. Plan of Slavton lot. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 185 

Manchester at Wilson. Plan of turnout for street railway. 

Manhole casting. Drawing for pattern. 

Maple, Gore to north of Sagamore. Profile. 

Maple, Ashland, Lowell, and Bridge, Janesville section. 
Equaling nine plans. 

Maple and Lowell, location of E. T. Hardy's block. 

Morgan, Amory to Kelley. Profile. 

Myrtle, Elm to Elm east back. Sewer profile. 

N. S. Bean steamer house. Proposed changes. 

Oak, Pearl to north of Sagamore. Profile. 

Old Amherst road, Milford to Mast. Center profile. 

Passageway, Elm westerly. Profile. 

Pearl, Union to Maple. Profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Section showing Haselton lot. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Chestnut avenue. Profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Plan of C. C. Webster land. 

Prescott, Wilson to Belmont. Profile. 

Putnam, Amoskeag Company's line westerly. Profile. 

Rimmon east back, Kelley to Wayne. Sewer profile. 

River road, Webster to Rowell. Profile. 

Sagamore, Union to east of Oak. Profile. 

Second, West Hancock to South Main. Profile. 

Second, Cleveland to West Hancock. Showing amount of 
fill. 

Second-street bridge. Stone work. 

Shasta, Lincoln to Hall. Profile. 

Somerville, Maple to Belmont. Profile. 

South Main, Blaine to Log. Plan and profile, showing 
bridge. 

South Main, Manchester & North Weare Railroad to West 
Hancock. Profile. 

Stark park. Avenue grades. 

Taylor, Young to Vinton. Profile. 

Thornton, Wayne to bluff. Profile. 

Union, Merrimack to Amherst. Sewer profile. 

Valley cemetery. Plan of Gage lot. 



186 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Varney, Josselyn to west of railroad. Profile. 
Webster-street schoolhouse addition. Four plans. 
Welch avenue, Elm to Calef road. Sewer profile. 
Wentworth, West Hancock to Harvell's line. Profile. 
Wilson, Clay to Cilley road. Profile. 

, Amory to top of bluff. Profile. 

Total working plans, loi. 

TRACINGS. 

Adams-street culvert. Plan and section. 

Bartlett. For road hearing. 

Beech, Ash, Maple, and Oak, Johnson land. For register of 
deeds. 

Cass. Plan of a part of. 

City farm land. Part of, for B. F. Clark. 

City farm buildings. Three plans. 

Colby, Lfg to West Hancock. 

Dartmouth, Log to Wingate. Plan and profile. 

Dearborn. Section of. 

Dickey, Main to West Hancock. Plan and profile. 

East Manchester, part of, for locating lots. 

Elm. Bank wall at Henry Chandler's. 

Frederick, Main to Merrimack river. Plan and profile. 

Oilman, Second to Wentworth. Profile. 

Highland park. Location of streets. 

Hill, Frederick to Wolf & Wagner's south line. Profile. 

Hosley, Summer to Orove. 

Lincoln-street culvert. Plan and section. 

Lowell, Ashland to Mammoth road. Profile. 

Mammoth road, Candia road to Hooksett line. Laying out. 

Manchester, east of Chestnut. Slayton lot. 

Massabesic, Belmont, and Lake avenue. Showing Old Falls 
road. 

McGregorville, Land of Sullivan & Sheehan, McGovern, and 
others. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 187 

Merrimack, Pleasant, Franklin, Bedford, State, and Granite. 
Land of Manchester mills. 

Pearl-street schoolhouse lot. Land bought of W. H. Wliitney. 

Pine, Lake avenue to Cedar. Section of. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Cross section of Chapel lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Cross section north of Swede lot. 

Sagamore, Walnut easterly. Upton, Harvey & Weston land. 

Second, Piscataquog river to Harvell's north line. Plan and 
profile, 2. 

Second-street bridge. Stone work. 

Somerville, Hall to Belmont. 

Stark, Bridge, Canal, and Elm. Land of Stark Manufactur- 
ing Company. 

Stark park. Showing avenues. 

Thornton. For road hearing. 

Valley cemetery. Plan of Gage lot. 

Wheelock, West Hanccck to Belknap. Plan and profile. 

Woodbury, Second to Hill. Profilf. 

Woodbury, Hill to South Main. Profile. 
Total tracings, 42. 

BLUE PRINTS. 

Adams-Street culvert. 

Lincoln, Wilson, Valley, and Silver. Land of Kimball Car- 
riage Co. 

Lincoln, Hall, Harvard, and Shasta. Land of F. M. Hoyt & 
Greely Co. 

Lincoln-street culvert. 

Manchester Water-Works, high service. Eight plans. 

Second-street bridge. Profile. 

Second- street bridge. Twenty-one plans. 

Second-street bridge, for Dean & Westbrook. Four plans. 

Webster-street schoolhouse addition. Seven plans. 
Total blue prints, 45. 



188 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



City of Manchester, for licensing hack drivers. 

City of Manchester, showing scavenger district. Three maps. 

New map of city, showing streets. 

New map of city, showing sewers. 

Total maps, 6. 

Sixty-six plans of streets laid out have been copied in the city 
clerk's book of records. 

Total of all plans made, 1,034. 

Twelve plans are under way which will be completed durin g 
the year. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on laid-out streets, 
59,371 feet. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on streets not laid 
out, 24,568 feet. 

Total, 83,939 feet, equal to 15.90 miles. 

The following grades have been established during the year : 

Bartlett street, from Putnam to south of Sullivan. September 21. 

Byron, Josselyn, Varney, and Kennedy. October 20. 

Canton street, from Lake avenue to Auburn, plan 727. May 2. 

Central street, from Beacon to Cass, plan 704. July 10. 

Central street, from J. Hall road westerly 304 feet, plan 987. 
July 10. 

Green street, from Granite to Amoskeag Company's line, plan 
347. May 2. 

Grove street, from Pine to Beech. November 7. 

Harvard street, from Beech to Maple. September 21. 

Hevey street, from Kelley to Columbus avenue. July 26. 

Lowell street, from Ashland to Mammoth road. November 7. 

Maple street, from Lake avenue to Cilley road. June 19. 

Monroe street, from Elm to River road. June 6. 

Rimmon street, from Amory southerly 785 feet. October 3. 

South Main street, from Milford to Boynton. May 23. 

Walnut street, from Gore to Webster, plans 892 and 893. May 2 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 189 

The following grades have been changed during the year : 
Chestnut and Appleton streets, plans 54 and 154. November 7. 
Elm street, from Appleton to Clarke, plan 52. June 6. 
Maple street, from Harrison to Gore, plan 76. September 21. 
Myrtle street, from Russell to Linden, plan 67. November 7. 
Pine street, from Lake avenue to Young, plans 94, 95, and 96. 
July 10. 



190 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Streets. 


1 

Location. 


Material. 


Amherst south back . . . . 


West of Maple 


Akron 


Arlington 


From west of Ashland easterly 


" 


Arlington 


From west of Ashland easterly 


Portland.... 




Harrison to Brook 


Akron 


Auburn 


From Elm easterly 


Brick 




From Pine westerly 








Portland.... 










Pine east back to Union 


,. 


Auburn south back 


Union to Beech 


,. 


Auburn south back 


From Beech easterly 


,1 










Spruce to Old Falls road 




Belmont. 


Spruce to Old Falls road 


., 


Belmont 


Spruce to Old Falls road 


Iron 




Lake avenue to Central 


Akron .' 










„ 


Cheney place 


Brown avenue to Elm 


Portland ... 




Cheney place to Welch avenue 


Akron 










„ 


Elm 




„ 


Elm 






Chestnut west back. . . . 


Lowell north back to Bridge 


" 


Chestnut east back 


From North northerly 








„ 


Concord 


From Maple east back easterly 

From Summer southerly 


„ 


Dearborn 


<, 






Ash east back 


From Gore southerly 


Portland.... 


Hanover 




Akron 


Beacon 


From Hanover northerly 


„ 



REPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 



191 



IN 1893. — EAST SIDE. 



Size in Length in Length in Man- Lamp- Y Total cost Cost 

inches, feet, new. ft., relaid. holes, holes, branches. ' per ft. 



1S4 
117 
92 
2S5 
712 
125 
128 
375 
540 
346 
290 
124 
19 
24 
249 
103 
397 
72 
50 
305 
319 
402 
20S 



$113.65 

I 524.74 

87.44 

I 10,915.595 

325.17 
322.307 

j- 2,710.22 



362.56 
143.775 

1,200.85 

lis 6735 

383.64 

573.79 

787.356 

418 471 

531.57 

3.52.80 



388.25 


1.8313 


202.50 


2.0454 


498.36 


1.8457 


286.26 


1.3011 


318.97 


1.4699 


145.325 


1.4981 



7433 
9500 



.6013 
.5179 



4560 
4444 



3734 
2578 
7987 
9585 
0114 
7660 



192 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SEWERS BUILT IN 1893. 



Location. 



Material. 



Hanover south back. 
Hanover south back. 

Harrison.. 

Hay ward 

High, East 

South 

Laurel south back... 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Hall..... 

Hall 

Merrimack 

Myrtle 

Woodbury land , 

Pearl 

Elm east back 

Orange south back... 
Orange south back... 

Salmon 

Salmon 

Salmon 

Salmon south back 

Summer 

Summei' 

Walnut 

Wilson Hill 



Totals , 



Chestnut to west of Union. 



From Oak easterly . . . . 

Cypress to Jewett 

3Iaple to Jane 

At East High 

From Union easterly . . . 
Ashland to east of Hall. 



From Lowell northerly , 



Beech to Maple 

Elm to Elm east back 

Myrtle to Prospect south back. 

At Elm east back 

Peai-1 to Orange south back 

From Elm east back easterly.. 



Pine to Un ioii east back . . 



East of Liberty to e. of Union e. bad 
Belmont to Massabesic 



Gore to Sagamore 

Lake avenue to Central . 



Akron 

Portland . 
Akron 



Akron 

Portland 

Akron 

Portland 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 193 

• KAST SIDE.— CoTitinued, 



Size in 
inclies. 



Length in 
feet, new 



2SS 
31S 



C24 
102 
37 
101 



409 
105 
494 
256 



Length in 
ft. relaid. 



10 
164 
334 
356 



Man- 
holes. 



Lamp- 
holes. 



Y 

Branches. 



Total cost. 



635.19 
557.57 
512.45 
56.52 
244.18 



176.425 

654.12 
373.60 
260.84 
27.73 
533.21 



134.37 

920.47 

1,388.25 

557.68 



Cost 
per ft. 



$2.2728 

2.2055 
1.7531 
1.2908 
1.1534 
2 2401 

1.4814 

1.2784 

0.9278 
2.9187 
2.3289 
2.7730 
3.2,500 

1.6400 



'Average cost per foot. 



13 



194 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Conant south back.. 

Conaut 

Dubuque 

Dubuque 

Carroll 

Carroll 

Conant 

Conant 

Cartier 

Cartier 

Conant 

Conant 

Rimmon 

Kellej' 

Main west back — 

Riddle 

Rimmon east back. 

Scliuyler 

Third 

West Hancock 

Wilton 



From A northerly 

Douglas to Conant 

Main to city stable 

Barr to Dubuque 

ronant to north of Gates. 



From Milford northerly. 
Beauport to Cartier 



From Conant northerly, 



Barr to Rimmon . 



Totals. 



From Conant northerly 

Dubuque east back to Hevey east back 

From Sullivan northerly 

From Mast southerly 

Kelley to Amory 

Main to Beauport 

From Walker southerly 

Merrimack river to Dickey 

From Beauport westerly 



Akron 

Portland . 

Akron 

Portland. 
Akron — 



Portland . 
Akron... 



Akron... . 
Portland , 
Akron — 



Portland 
Akron... . 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 
IN 1893.— WEST SIDE. 



105 



Size in 
Indies. 



Length in 
feet, new, 



159 
250 
240 

48 
474 
107 
309 
186 
273 

58 
274 
377 

41 
183 
422 
540 
304 
794 
565 
224 

76 

1,002 

148 



Length In 
ft., relaid. 



Man 
holes. 



Lamp- 
holes. 



Y 

branches. 



$200.72 

2,338.63 

309.22 

264.70 

1,127.18 



Cost 
per ft. 



$1.262 3 
9.3545 

1.2884 
5.5145 

1.9400 



614.71 


1.4566 


3,141.42 


5.8176 


309.00 


1.0164 


1,264.03 


1.5919 


1,329.86 


2.3537 


431.75 


1.9274 


253.01 


3.3290 


2,868.65 


2.8629 


285.04 


1.9259 



$18,341.69 * $2.6001 



Average cost per foot. 



196 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

PIPE REMOVED WHERE NEW SEWERS HAVE BEEN BUILT. 



Street. 


Location. 


Material. 


Size in Length 
inches, in feet. 


Chestnut west back. . 

Elm east back 

Hanover south back. 
Hanover south back. 


Lowell north back to Bridge. 
Pearl to Orange south back. . 


Cement 

Akron 
Cement 
Akron 
Cement 

Akron 


9 
9 
12 
9 
10 
12 
9 
9 
15 
10 


301 
164 
507 


Pine to west of Union 

Nashua to Jane 


208 
397 


Laurel south back... 






Beech to Maple 


705 


Orange south back... 


From Elm east back easterly 


690 
10 




At East High 


49 








Total 


3,160 






I 



Total 60-inch 
50 X 75 
20-inch 
18-inch 
15-inch 
1 1:5 -inch 
12-inch 
12-inch 
lo-inch 
lo-inch 

8-inch 

• 8-inch 

15-inch 

12-inch 

lo-inch 

8-inch 



SUMMARY OF SEWERS BUILT IN 1S93. 

brick 

inches, brick 
Portland pipe 
Portland pipe 
Akron pipe . 
Portland pipe 
Akron pipe . 
Portland pipe 
Akron pipe . 
Portland pipe 
Akron pipe . 
iron pipe 

pipe, cesspools and connection?, 
pipe, cesspools and connections 
pipe, cesspools and connections 
cesspools and connections 



pipe, 



Total sewers built in 1893 
Equal to 4. 1 1 miles. 



Feet. 
285 
712 

395 

878 

2,602 

4,224 

1,059 

7,965 

1,344 

563 

24 

94 

10 

6 

724 

21,716 



i 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



197 



Following is the total amount of sewerage in the city, January 



I, 1S94: 



8-inch Akron pipe 




lo-inch Akron pipe 




12-inch Akron pipe 




1 5 -inch Akron pipe 




18-inch Akron pipe 




20-inch Akron pipe 




24-inch Akron pipe 




Total Akron pi 


pe 


Equal to 38.943 mil 


2S. 



8-inch Portland pipe, old . 
12-inch Portland pipe, old . 
18-inch Portland pipe, old . 

Total Portland pipe, old 
Equal to 0.919 miles. 

lo-inch Portland pipe, ne.w 
12-inch Portland pipe, new 
15-inch Portland pipe, new 
18-inch Portland pipe, new 
20-inch Portland pipe, new 
24-inch Portland pipe, new 

Total Portland pipe, new 
Equal to 4-137 miles. 

9-inch cement pipe 
12-inch cement pipe 
15-inch cement pipe 
18-inch cement pipe 
24-inch cement pipe 
16 X 24 inches cement pipe 

Total cement pipe . 
Equal to 7.404 miles. 



Feet. 

7,676 

51,462 

64,047 

16,430 

3^652 

6,007 

3,548 



Feet. 

90 

3,990 

770 

4,850 

Feet. 
7,387 
3,233 

4,433 
395 

3,264 
21,843 

Feet. 

I3'793 

21,520 

490 

860 

735 
1,697 

39,095 



198 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



lo-inch earthen pipe . 
1 2-inch earthen pipe . 

Total earthen pipe 
Equal to o. 704 miles. 

18-inch brick sewers 
24-inch brick sewers 
29-inch brick sewers 
36-inch brick sewers 
42-inch brick sewers 
44-inch brick sewers 
57-inch brick sewers 
60-inch brick sewers 
17 X 26 inches, brick sewers 
20 X 30 inches, brick sewers 
22x33 inches, brick sewers 
24 x 36 inches, brick sewers 
26 X 39 inches, brick sewers 
29^ X 44 inches, brick sewers 
30 X 46 inches, brick sewers 
32 X 48 inches, brick sewers 
40 X 44 inches, brick sewers 
50 X 75 inches, brick sewers 

Total brick sewers . 
Equal to 7.15 miles. 

8-inch iron pipe 
12-inch iron pipe 
14-inch iron pipe 
20-inch iron pipe 
24-inch iron pipe 
36-inch iron pipe 

Total iron pipe 
Equal to o.oSo miles. 



Feet. 
1,175 

2,545 
3>72o 

Fee . 

5,725 

3>i87 
1,600 

545 
446 

1,195 
1,400 

285 
1,506 

1,197 
387 

9,097 
514 

4,530 

1,360 

3,279 
790 
712 

37,755 

Feet. 
24 
24 
24 
62 
12 
277^ 



423 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 199 

Feet. 

48-inch Steel pipe 312 

Equal to 0.052 miles. 

Feet. 

Total in all sewers 260,820^ 

Equal to 49.398 miles. 

The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city 
in 1893 by the Charles H. Robie Company, under the direction 
of the street and park commission. The measurements relating 
thereto have been made by this department, and rendered as 
vouchers for the same : 



200 



ANNUAL, OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
STREET CROSSINGS. 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Price 
pr. yd 


Total 
cost. 


Aclams, at Appleton (2) 


57.07 
30.22 
22.00 
45. S6 
17. 7S 
17.33 
10.67 
17.78 
32.90 
17.78 
30.58 
17.24 
52.80 
29.33 
80.73 
34.00 
18.67 

m.oo 

17.05 
19.64 
17.78 
91.95 
29.51 
16.20 
67.38 
29.42 
16.80 
27.46 
24.89 
17.78 
29.77 
27.55 
28.98 
16.62 
16.22 
29.60 
58.22 
61.33 
17.77 
61.90 
61.33 
30.67 
61.33 
60.44 
13.33 
26.67 
145.70 
32.98 
17.78 
17.78 
29.87 
17.78 
30.58 
30.22 
33.78 


$0.75 

"75 
.75 

.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 

!75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
75 
.37 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 


$42.80 
22.67 




Arlington, at Russell 


16.50 


Auburn, at Elm 


34.39 


Bay east back, at Salmon 


13.34 


Beecb east back, at Gore 


13.00 


Blodget, at Pine 


8.00 


Bloclget south back, at Pine 


13.34 


Briilge, at Russell 


24.67 




13.33 


Central, at Chestnut 


22.94 




12.94 


Chestnut, at Brook 


19.54 




22.00 


Concord, at Chestnut 


60.65 


Concord square .. . 


25.50 


Dubuque east back, at Amory 


14.00 


Elm, at Welch avenue 


42.00 




12.79 


Franklin west back, at Central 

Hanover south back, at Union .... 


14.73 
13.34 




68.97 


High, at Chestnut 


22.13 


High, at Pine east back 


12.15 


Laurel, at Chestnut (2) 


50.53 




10.89 






Liberty, at Salmon 


20 60 






Liberty east back, at Webster 


13.33 


Lowell, at Birch 




Lowell, between Pine and Union 


20 66 










Lowell north back, at Chestnut 


6.00 


Main, at Mast 


22 20 


Maple, at Spruce (2) 


43 67 


Myrtle, at Chestnut (2) 




North, at Elm east back 


13 33 


North, at Chestnut (2) 


46 43 






Orange, at Chestnut 


23 00 


Pine, at Pearl (2) 




Pine, at Pearl (2) 


45 33 




10.00 






Prospect, at Chestnut (4) 


109 28 




24.74 


Salmon south back, at Pine . . . 


13.34 




13.34 






Union cast back, at Gore 


13 33 


Vallcv, at .lewett 


22.94 


Walnut, at Gore 


22.66 
25.34 






Totals 


1,922.80 





$1,336.70 





REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



201 



SIDEWALKS. 



Adams, at Appleton 

Amherst, at Vine 

Beech, at St. Augustine's church . 

Cartier, at No. 218 

Chestnut, at H. F. Straw's 

Chestnut, at Brook 

Chestnut, near Webster 

Concord square 

Concord square 

Elm, at Welch avenue 

iranklin west back, at Central 

Harrison, at Chestnut 

Lake avenue, at Union 

Laurel, at Chestnut 

Laurel, at Maple 

Laurel south back, at Maple 

Liberty, at North 

Lowell, between Pine and Union . 

Lowell, at Union 

Maple, at Merrimack 

Merrimack square 

Merrimack square 

Merrimack south back, at Maple.. 

North, at Chestnut 

Park square 

Valley, at Jewett 

West Webster, at railroad station . 



13 83 
242.47 
1H5..5S 

33.33 
39.11 
48.48 
23.40 
212.6.1 
344. J4 
18.70 
2 18 

14 04 
13 33 
85.. 53 
26.73 

3.01 

12.23 

.5.47 

11.02 

22.96 

329.27 

856 79 

4.40 

12.70 

79.36 

3.67 

34.00 



Price 
pr. yd 



$0.45 
.20 
.45 
.45 
.75 
45 
.45 
.4.5 

^45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.25 
.45 
.45 



Total 
cost. 



$5.77 
48.49 
52.44 
15.00 
29..33 
21.82 
10.53 
95.69 
86.03 
8.41 
fi.9S 
0.32 
6.00 
38.49 
12.03 
0.90 
5.50 
2.46 
4.96 
10.33 
148.17 
214.20 
1.98 
5.72 
19.84 
1.65 
15.30 



ROADWAYS. 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Price 
pr. yd. 


Total 
cost. 


Amherst, at Vine 


2,472.96 
9.'i9.90 
256.89 


$0.45 
1.00 
.75 


$1,112.83 
939.90 
192.67 




Rimmon, at engine house 




Totals 


3,669.75 




$2,245.40 





202 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city 
in 1893, by the Charles H. Robie Company, under the direction 
of the committee on lands and buildings and the cemetery 
trustees : 



Location. 



City Hall 

Rimmonstreet engine house 

Rimmon-street engine house 

Ripimon-street engine house basement 

Spring-street schoolhouse 

Webster-street engine house ■• — 

Pine Grove Cemetery, Chessom avenue walk.. 
Pine Grove Cemetery, Chestnut avenue gutte. 
Pine Grove Cemetery, Riverside avenue gutter 

Valley cemetei-y 

Valley cemetery 

Valley cemeterj- .. 

Totals 



Square 


Price 


Total 


yards. 


pr. yd. 


cost. 


33.78 


$0.25 


$8.44 


52.i.8S 


.75 


394.41 


349.60 


.45 


157.32 


(10.47 


.45 


4.71 


30.2-2 


.37 


11.18 


(42. 22 


.25 


10.56 


230.10 


.45 


103.55 


20.18 


.75 


15.14 


58 2.T 


.75 


43.69 


61.80 


.75 


46 35 


256.70 


..75 


192.59 


141.41 


.25 


35.35 


86.69 


.45 


39.01 


199.11 


.75 


149.33 


2,046.41 




Sl.211.63 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city 
in 1893, by George F. Higgins, under the direction of the street 
and park commission. The measurements relating thereto have 
been made by this department and rendered as vouchers for the 
same : 

STREET CROSSINGS. 



Belmont, at Auburn 

Bridge, at Ashland (2) 

Cedar, at Pine (3) 

Cheney phice, at Elm 

Concord, at Beech 

Concord, at Beech 

Elm east back, at Pearl 

Elm west back, at Central 

Hanover, at Hall (2) 

Lake avenue south back, at Maple. 

Maple, at Spruce (2) 

McGregor, at Amory (4) 

North, at Elm 

North, at Chestnut 

North, at Pine east back 

Pine, at Lake avenue (3) 

Spruce, at Pine 

Spruce south back, at Maple 

Union, at Brook 



Square 


Price 


Total 


yards. 


pr. yd. 


cost. 


30.20 


$0.75 


$22.65 


81.76 


.75 


61.32 


88.97 


.75 


66.72 


31.10 


.75 


23.32 


30.20 


.75 


22.65 


6.60 


.75 


4.95 


17.70 


.75 


13.27 


20 44 


.45 


9.19 


86.50 


.75 


64.87 


20.00 


.75 


15 00 


76.58 


.75 


57.44 


194.20 


.75 


145.67 


18.00 


.75 


13.50 


22.20 


.45 


9.99 


17.70 


.75 


• 13.27 


82.80 


.75 


62.11 


29.77 


.75 


22.38 


18.44 


.75 


13.83 


32 00 


.45 


14.40 


905.16 




$656.48 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 
SIDEWALKS. 



203 



Location. 



Square 


Price 


yards. 


pr. yd. 


2.00 


$0.45 


16.50 


.45 


9.40 


.45 


141.33 


.45 


4;W.06 


.45 


11.00 


.45 


4.90 


.45 


10.00 


.45 


128.77 


.45 


4.47 


.45 


4.00 


.45 


3.30 


.45 


1.80 


.45 


24 04 


.45 


1.5.60 


.45 


19.60 


.45 


28.00 


.45 


854.77 





Total 
cost. 



Amoskeag bridge, at west end. 

Cedar, at Pine 

Central, at Maple 

Chestnut, at Patterson's block. 

Concord square 

Concord, at Beech 

Elm east back, at Pearl 

Laurel, at Maple 

Maple, at Central 

3IcGregor, at Amory 

Merrimack, at Lincoln 

North, at Elm 

North, at Pine east back 

Park square 

Pine, at Lake avenue 

Pine, at P. Haley's 

Pine, at Nos. 241, 243, 245. 



$0.90 
7.43 
4.23 

63.59 
193.53 
4.95 
2.20 
4..')0 

57.95 
2.03 
1.80 
1.48 
0.81 

10.82 
7.02 
8.82 

12.60 



$384.66 



ROADWAYS. 



Amoskeag bridge, at west end 
Chestnut, at Patterson's block 
Merrimack, Beech to Maple. . . 
Pine, at Spruce 

Totals 




Price Total 
pr. yd. cost. 



$14.06 

156.38 

1,713.33 

113.95 



$1,997.72 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city 
in 1893, by George F. Higgins, under the direction of the com- 
mittee on lands and buildings : 



Square 
yards. 



Price j Total 
pr. yd.i cost. 



Varney schoolhouse. 



$0.45 



$63.09 



204 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Summary. 

CONCRETE LA.ID BY THE CHARLES H. ROBIE CO. 





Square 
yards. 


Total cost. 




1,922.80 
2,607.33 
3,669.75 
2,046.41 


$1,336.70 
S68 34 


Sidewalks 














Totals 


10,246.29 


$5,662.07 







CONCRETE LAID BY GEORGE F. HIGGINS. 



Square 
yards. 



Crossings 905.16 

Sidewalks 854.77 

Roadways j 2,092.51 

Miscellaneous 140.20 



$656.48 

384.66 

1,997.72 

63.09 



Total concrete laid by the city, 14,238.93 sq. yds., $8,764.02. 

SECOND-STREET BRIDGE. 

Stone-work, in foundation, 2,300.23 cu. yds. . . $20,127.01 
Piling, for foundation ...... 2,243.00 

Steel superstructure ...... 26,687.36 

Total $49>o57-37 

Amount of fill, 12,428.11 cu. yds., at 19^ cents, $2,454.55. 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



205 



The following table gives the dimensions, material, and num- 
ber of spans of the various bridges within the city limits : 



Location. 


Length 
in 
feet. 


Width 

of 
roadway 


1 
No. of 
walks. 


Width 

of 
walks. 


Material. 


i^ 


Amoskeag 


765.5 
57 
1,085 
36 
38 
20 
21 
25 

16.5 
56.3 
465.7 
32 
41 

70.5 
38 
14 
59 
53 
30 
16 

6 
62 
127 
12 
100 

6 


20 

22.5 

24 

30.5 

20 

17 

20.5 

17.5 

29.5 

33 

37.3 

26 

21 

16.7 

20.8 

18 

20 

20.5 

24 

30 

20 

16 

32.5 

32.5 

22 

17.5 

16 


1 
2 
2 


5.5 

7 

6 


Wood. 
Iron. 

Stone. 
Wood. 

Iron. 
Wood. 

Iron. 
Wood. 

Steel. 
Wood. 








Bridge st., McGregor and approaches. 


3 

2 










Derry road, near Cohas avenue 

Derry road, near town line 






















1 


4.5 




Front street, Black brook 






2 
2 


6 
5 




Granite street, at river 




Harvey road, at Great Cohas 

Island Pond road, outlet to lake. . . 













1 


5 








Mammoth road, near town line 
















Parker street, at railroad 


2 


6 




River road, at Goffe's Falls 




River road, at Little Cohas 








River road, below J. Cheney's 








Second street, at 'Squog river 

Second street, at 'Squog river 


2 
2 


8.7£ 
8.7E 




Webster road at water-works dam . . 






5 


Weston road, east of D. Connor's. . . 






1 











bridges, 1; steel, 2; iron, 4; wood, 20; total, 27. 



206 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
NEW HIGHWAYS LAID OUT IN 1893. 



Location. 



Ainsworth ave 

Alfred 

Alsace 

Ash 

Auburn 

Barry ave i 

Bartlett 

Beech ' 

Beech 

Benton 

Boutwell 

Byion 

Cass 

Clay 

Colby 

Conant 

C3T)ress 

Erie 



Hayward to Young 

Hanover to Amherst 

Aniory northerly 

Gore to Amosk'g Co.'s south line.. 

Cypress to Piatt's avenue 

Lake avenue to Cedar 

Putnam southerly 

No. of Gore to Amosk'gCo.'s So. line 

Webster to Clarke 

Jones to James Hall road 

Amory northerly 

Brown avenue to Josselyn 

Central to Laurel 

Jt'wett to Cypress 

West Hancock to Log 



When Width iLength 
laid out. in feet, in feet. 



Eyeretc 

Grant 

Green 

Grove 

Hall 

Hayward — 

Hosley 

Joliette 

Jones 

Josselyn 

Kennedy 

Lafayette — 

Lavsll 

Maple 

Mast 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Monroe 

Nelson 

Oak 

Passage-way . 

Prescott 

Piout ave — 
Somerville .. 

Taylor 

Varney 

Vinton 

Wayne 

Wentworth . . 

Willow 

Wilton 



Hevej' to Montgomery 

Auburn to Massabesic 

South Main westerly 

Amory southerly 

Clarke to passageway 

Hanover to Mammoth road 

Pine to Beech 

Pine to Beech 

Lake avenue to Spruce 

Aitis worth's land to Belmont 

Summer to Grove 

Amory northerly 

Nelson to R. I. Stevens's land 

Byron to Varney 

Brown avenue to Josselyn 

Amory northerly 

Amory northerly 

Gore to Amosk'g Co.'s south line.. 
Brigham's west line to Mast road. 

Conant northerly 

Amory to Kelley 

West of Elm to River road 

•1. Hall roa t to Mammoth road — 
Harrison to Amosk'g Go's So. line 

Elm to Everett . . 

Wilson to Hall 

Hayward southerly 

Jewett to Young 

Manning's south line to Vinton... 
Josselyn to west of C. & M. R. R. . . 

Taylor to Jewett 

Dubuque westerly 

West Hancock to Wolf and Wag- 
ner's south line 

Hayward to Nutt road 

Main to Cartier 



Aug. 31. 
July 19. 
May 26. 
June 9. 
June 9 
Nov. 29, 
Aug. 31, 
June 9, 
Nov. 29. 
Aug. 31, 
May 26, 
Oct. 3, 
Aug. 11 
Aug. 31 
Nov. 16 
June 26, 
July 19 
June 30 
Nov. 16 
Aug. 15 
Oct. 20, 
Aug. 31 
July 19 
June 26. 
Sept. 21, 
Nov. 16. 
May 26, 
Aug. 31, 
Oct. 3. 
Sept. 21, 
May 26, 
May 26, 
June 9. 
Aug. 11 
June 26 
May 26, 
INIay 26. 
Aug. 31, 
June 9. 
Aug. 15. 
June 26. 
June 6, 
Aug. 11. 
Aug. 31. 
Oct. 3. 
Aug. 31, 
June 26, 

Sept. 21. 
June 26, 
June 26, 



499 
212 

1,700 
590 
967 
490 
816 
220 

1,176 
240 

1,693 
998 
208 
387 
220 
270 
876 
470 
575 
351 



990 
270 

1,060 
4a0 

1,690 
562 
161 
922 

1,690 

1.698 
600 

1,250 
400 
650 
3.54 
509 

1,388 
200 
461 
500 
478 

1,058 
290 

1,256 
370 

l,54e 
292 
575 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 207 

STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT. 



Street. 



Length 
in feet. 



"When laid out. 



Adams, Appleton to Clarke 

Ainsworth avenue, Hayward to Young 

Alfred, Hanover to Amherst 

Allen, Main to Coynton 

Alsace, Aniory northerly , 

Amory to Kimball 

Amory extension lo Bartlett 

Ash, Gore northerly , 

Auburn, Maple to Lincoln 

Auburn, AVilson to Belmont , 

Auburn, Cypress to Piatt's avenue 

B, Prince to C 

Bartlett, Amory extension southerly 

Beech, north of Gore 

Beech. Webster to Clarke 

Bell, Wilson easterly 

Belmont. Young to Clay 

Benton, Jones to James Hall road 

Blaine, Second to Hiram 

Boutwell, Amory northerly 

Byron, Brown avenue to Josselyn 

Campbell, Union to Ash 

Canal, 82 feet north of Pleasant to Granite. . . 

Canton, Spruce to Auburn 

Cass, Central to Laurel 

Cedar, Wilson easterly 

Central, James Hall road westerly 

Central south back, Wilson to Hall 

Clay, Jewett to Cypress 

Cleveland, Blaine to Merrimack river 

Colby, West Hancock to Log 

Columbus avenue 

Conant, to ^Montgomery 

Cypress, Lake avenue to Massabesic 

Dartmouth, West Hancock to Frederick 

Dearborn, Summer to Taylor 

Dickey, Main to West Hancock 

Dubuque, Conant northerly 

Erie, South Main westerly 

Essex, Amory southerly. 

Everett, Clarke sontherij' 

Forest, :\Iilf ord to Old Mast road 

Glenwood avenue, Mammoth road to J.Crouin's 

Grant, Hanover to Mammoth road 

Green, Douglas northerly 

Green, Pine to Beech 

Green, Wilson to Belmont 

Grove, Pine to Beech 

Grove, Belmont to Wilson 

Grove, Taylor westerly 

Hall, Hayward to Y'oung 

Hall, Lake avenue to Bell 

Hall, Bridge to north side of Prospect 

Harrison, Russell to Belmont 

Harvard, Union to Maple 

Hayward, Beech to Mammoth road 

Hevey, Kelley to Columbus avenue 

Highland park ave., Candia rd. to Glenwood ave 

Hosley, Green to Summer , 

Huntress, Albert to north of Prince 

Jewett, Cilley to Weston road 

Joliette, Amory northerly 

Jones, Nelson to R. 1. Stevens's land 

Josselyn, Byron to Varney . . 

Kelley, to M. & N. W. R. R 



925 
499 
212 
700 
1,700 
2,800 
735 
590 
600 



2.58 
1,800 

220 
1,176 

636 
1,395 

240 

395 
1,693 



1,023 

550 

208 

665 

304 

471 

387 

1,487 

220 

3,110 

1,400 

1,300 

636 

574 

857 

600 

470 

575 

351 

1,460 

2,085 

1,008 

96 

990 

809 

990 

809 

757 

125 

1,890 

1,466 

1,518 

1,190 

6,000 

1,165 

1,007 

490 

648 

3,650 

1,690 

562 

161 

652 



( June 27, 1889. 
(July 26. 1S92. 
August 31, 1893. 
July 19, 1893. 
July 24, 1891. 
May 26, 1893. 
November 17, 1891. 
July 26, 1892. 
June 9, 1893. 
July 28, 1891. 
August 15, 1892. 
June 9, 1893. 
January I5, 1S92. 
July 26, 1892. 
June 9, 1893. 
November 29, 1893. 
August 15, 1892. 
September 1, 1891. 
August 31, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
May 26, 1893. 
October 3, 1893. 
September 26, 1892. 
January 15, 1892. 
August 2, 1892. 
August 11, 1893. 
August 15, 1892. 
July 6, 1892. 
June 7, 1891. 
August 31, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
November )6, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
I June 26, 1893. 
December 28, 1892. 
August 28, 1891. 
Mav 2u, 1892. 
August 28, 1891. 
Mav 20, 1892. 
Julie 20, 1893. 
November 16, 1893. 
August 15, 1893. 
December 16, 1890. 
December 28, 1892. 
October 20, 1893. 
July 28, 1891. 
Augu.st31, 1893. 
August 15, 1892. 
July 19, 1893. 
September 9, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 
July 6, 1892. 
June 23, 1893. 
June 12, 1891. 
October 25, 1892. 
November 18, 1892. 
September 21, 1893. 
July 6, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 
November 16, 1893. 
September 18, 1891. 
November 27, 1891. 
May 26, 1893. 
August 31, 1893. 
October 3, 1893. 
June 23, 1891. 



208 ANNUAL OFFICIAL RErORTS. 

STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT.— Continued. 



Length 
in feet. 



When hiid out. 



Kennedy, Brown avenue to Josselyn — 

Knowlton, Hay ward southerly 

Lafayette, Amory northerly 

Laval, Aniorv northerly 

Liberty, North southerly 

Lincoln, Cedar to Shasta 

Linden, Prospect to Harrison 

Longwood ave., Mammoth rd. to Woodbine t 

Maple, Auburn to Cilley road 

Maple. Gore northt-rly 

McDuffle, Boynton to Huntress 

McKinnon, Central to Pleasant 

McNeil, Second to West Hancock 

Merrimack, Beacon to Hanover 

Mil ford, Amherst road westerly 

Mitchell, Beech to Brown avenue 



Montgomery, Conaiit northerly 

Alorgan, Amory to Kelley 

Mystic avenue, Candia road northerly 

Nelson, James Hall road to Mammoth road — 

Oak, Gore northerly 

Oakland avenue, A. W. Palmer's to J. Cronin's 
Orchard avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R.. . 

Page, Hanover to Bridge 

Passageway, Elm to Everett 

Prince, Boynton to Huntress 

Prospect, Derry old line to Hall 

Prout avenue. Hay ward southerly 

Putnam, to Dubuque 

Quincy, Douglas northerly . . 

Revere avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

Rimmon, Conant to Gates 

Rimmon, to south of Wayne 

Sagamore, Union to Walnut 

Salmon, Pine to Walnut 

Second, Blaine to Main 

Silver, Union to Maple 

Somerville, Union to Hall 

Somerville, Jewett to Young 

Stevens, Baker southerly 

Summer, Wilson to Massabesic 

Tavlor, to Vinton 

Trenton, Elm to Union 

Union, Auburn to Nult road 

Varney, Josselyn to west of C. & M. R. R 

Vinton. Tavlor to Jewett 

Walnut, Gore to Webster ] 

Wayhind avenue. Mammoth road to Revere ave 

AVayne, Dubuque westerly 

Wentworlli. West Hancock southerly 

West Hancock, Merrimack river westerly 

Wilkins, Rockland ave. to Bedford line 

Willow, Hiiyward to Nutt road 

Wilson, North line of C. & P. R. K- to Clay 

Wilton, Main to Cartier 

Woodbine avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R-. 
Woodland ave., C. & P. R. R. to J as. Dearborn's. 



9-2-2 

4S7 

1.H90 

1,69S 

150 

4,3-21 

•245 

1,100 

4.400 

GOO 

4.55 

192 

299 

1,500 

517 

3,000 

400 

650 

1,200 

509 

600 

1,.500 

1,337 

2,500 

200 

.520 

400 

500 

3on 

96 
1,200 

4SS 



1,190 

2.925 

47S 

300 

1,480 

1,058 

1,348 

4,: 75 

290 

1,2,50 

2,100 

562 

370 

1,.546 

700 

595 

292 

1,800 

575 

1,290 

770 



September 21, 1S93. 
November 27, 1891. 
May 26, 1893. 
May 26, 1893. 
April 26, 1892. 
May 20, 1892. 
October 25, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 
November 27, 1891. 
June 9, 1893. 
September 18, 1891. 
June 7, 1892. 
August 28, 1891. 
July 28. 1891. 
December 16, 1890. 
( October 28, 1S90. 
I November 29, 1892. 
May 26, 1893. 
May 26, 1893. 
December 28, 1892. 
August 21, 1893. 
June 9, 1893. 
December 28, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 
June 19, 1889. 
August 15, 1898. 
September 18, 1891. 
May 29, 1889. 
June 6, 1893. 
June .5, 1888. 
July 28, 1891. 
December 28, 1892. 
October 27, 1891. 
September 26, 1892. 
August 28, 1891. 
June 12, 1891. 
September IS, 1S91. 
June 7, 1892. 
June 7, 1892. 
August 11, 1892. 
November 29, 1892. 
September 22, 1891, 
August 31. 1893. 
May 20, i892. 
October 2.5, 1892. 
Octobers, 1893. 
Augu.stSl, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 
June 23, 1893. 
September 21, 1893. 
November 28, 1890. 
July 6, 1892. 
June 23, 1893. 
July 26, 1892. 
June 26, 1893. 
December 28, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 



Equaling 25.196 miles. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



209 



The following summary, compiled from tables on file in this 
office, shows the extent of territory covered by the city in the 
various roads, streets, avenues, and parks, and gives a good idea 
of the amount of work necessary to care for them : 



Length of streets 

Length of walks on streets 

Length of roads 

Length of walks on roads 

Length of avenues. 

Length of walks on avenues 

Total length of streets, roads, and avenues. 

Total length of walks on same 

Length ot streets laid out but not huilt 

Length of cobble paving 

Length of block paving 

Length of coal tar concrete 

Length of macadam 

Length of Telford 

Total length of improved streets 



105.320 

127.080 

61.250 

0.897 

7.870 

6.280 

174.440 

134. 2B0 

25.196 

0.515 

1.873 

1.677 

4.363 

5.018 

13.446 



Area of city, 21,700 acres or 33.906 square miles. 



Area of Derryfield park 
Area of Stark park 
Area of Concord square 
Area of Hanover square 
Area of Merrimack square 
Area of Park square 
Area of Tremont square 
Total area of parks 
Total area of squares . 



Acres. 
68.00 
30.00 
4.48 
3.00 
5-89 

3-49 

2.25 
98.00 
19. II 



!10 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SUMMARY OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM SINCE 



YEAR. 


li 

II 


-a 

1 

s 

k 


.2-n 


S6 

11 
§1 

O fH 


i 

o 


1S80 


1.62 
2.18 
3.37 
2.54 
1.73 
1.56 
2.15 
1.44 
1.73 

l.Sl 
3.08 
3.13 
3.31 


18.66 
20.84 
24.21 
23.75 
28.48 
30 04 
32.19 
33.63 
35.36 
38.02 
39.83 
42.91 
46.04 
49.35 






$19,919.40 
23,895.12 
24,148.13 
21,452.05 
21,548.60 


18S1 . ... 





















X885 






28,122.84 
44,479.15 


1886 




















31,154.19 


1889 


64 
153 
214 
191 


2,003 
2,067 
2,220 
2,434 
2.625 


27,513.73 
39,297.97 
55,409.73 
39,724.65 


1890 






1893 


51,392.15 





Total cost of sewei's for 14 years, $447,951.63. 

In the year i888 a plan was made by the present city engineer 
for a system of sewerage embracing the entire city, this being 
the first comprehensive plan ever compiled for that purpose. 
Since its adoption the majority of the sewers constructed have 
followed this plan ; those that have not are only temporary, and 
will have to be relaid when the growth of the city demands it. 
Since i888 there have been 13.99 miles built, at a cost of 
^213,338.23. 



Orders. 

The following orders have been written by this department 
for the various committees : 

An Order relative to Sewer Pipe. 
Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 211 

the mayor and joint standing committee on sewers and drains 
be and they are hereby authorized to contract for such quanti- 
ties of sewer pipe as in their judgment the city may require for 
this year, and the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for sewers and drains. 

Passed February 7, 1893. 



An Order relative to Second-Street Bridge. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets be authorized 
to have specifications prepared, call for proposals, and award the 
contract for building a bridge over the Piscataquog river at Sec- 
ond street, and that the expense thereof be charged to the ap- 
propriation for Second-street bridge. 

Passed March 7, 1893. 



An Order to dispose of four Horses. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets be and are 
hereby authorized to dispose of the four old horses in use by the 
street department of district No. 2. 

Passed March 7, 1893. 



An Order to purchase Supplies for District No. 2. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets be and are 
hereby authorized to purchase for the use of district No. 2 four 
horses, a sprinkler, and a set of double harnesses, that the cost 
of said horses not to exceed $200 each, and the expense thereof 
to be charged to the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed March 7, 1893. 



212 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the mayor and joint standing committee on sewers and drains 
be and are hereby authorized to construct certain sewers as 
follows : 

From present sewer in Beauport and Conant streets, thence 
westerly in Conant to Cartier. 

From Conant and Dubuque-street sewer, thence northerly in 
Dubuque to the north line of Gates. 

From Conant street, thence northerly in Cartier to the foot of 
the bluff. 

From Main and Schuyler streets, thence westerly to Beauport 
through Schuyler. 

From Mast street, thence southerly through Riddle to Milford. 

All according to the city's plan of sewers, and the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for sewers and drains. 

Passed April 4, 1893. 



An Order to build Certain Streets. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets be and are 
hereby authorized to build certain streets, as follows : 

Dearborn street, from Sumner to Taylor. 

Chestnut street, from Amherst south back to Amherst, as laid 
out by the board of aldermen. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for new streets. 

Passed April 4, 1893. 



AN Order to build Certain Highways. 
Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 213 

the board of street commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build certain streets, as follows : 

Union street, from Auburn southerly to Nutt road. 

Auburn street, from Wilson easterly to Belmont. 

Trenton street, from Elm easterly to Union. 

Harrison street, from Russell easterly to Belmont. 

Cypress street, from Lake avenue southerly to Auburn street. 

The expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
new streets. 

Passed May 2, 1893. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and sewer commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build certain sewers, as follows : 

In Summer street, from Belmont easterly about 552 feet. 

In Arlington street, from Ashland easterly, about 200 feet. 

In Porter street, from Amherst northerly, about 250 feet. 

In Chestnut east back street, from North northerly, about 300 
feet. 

In Gore street, from the present sewer easterly, about 270 feet. 

In Ash east back street, from Gore southerly, about 270 feet. 

In Walnut east back street, from Gore northerly, about 300 
feet. 

In Ash east back street, from present sewer northerly, about 
100 feet. 

In Orange south back street, to relay, about 200 feet from east 
of Chestnut westerly. 

In Amherst street, from Union easterly to Ashland. 

To build a sewer from Spruce street near Belmont about 200 
feet north. 

In Kelley street, from present sewer westerly to Hevey east 
back. 

In Hevey east back street, from Kelley southerly to Amory. 



214 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

In Myrtle street at Belmont, thence westerly'to a point about 
200 feet west of Hall ; also from Myrtle street southerly through 
the ravine to the Bridge-street sewer. 

The expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
sewers and drains. 

Passed May 2, 1893. 



An Order to build a Sewer. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the mayor and joint standing committee on sewers and drains be 
and are hereby authorized to rebuild a sewer as follows : In South 
Main street from Piscataquog river to Conant street, according 
to the city's plan of sewers ; and the expense thereof be charged 
to the appropriation for sewers and drains. 

Passed May 2, 1893. 



An Order to macadamize Turner^Street. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street commissioners be and are hereby authorized to macad- 
amize Turner street, in West Manchester, fromTGranite street to 
Turne Hall, and the expense thereof be charged to the appropri- 
ation for macadamizing. 

Passed May 2, 1893. 



An Order to macadamize Ikauport Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and sewer commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to macadamize Beauport street from Adams street to Sullivan 
street, and the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation 
for macadamizing. 

Passed May 2, 1893. 



REPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 215 

An Order to establish Certain Grades. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grades as shown on the following plans be and are hereby es- 
tablished as the grades for said streets : 

Walnut street, from Gore to Webster, plans 892, 893. 

Green street, from Granite to the Amoskeag Company's line, 
plan 347. 

Canton street, from Lake avenue to Auburn street, plan 727. 

Passed May 2, 1893. 



An Order to erect a Combination Watering- trough on Hanover 
Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street commission be and are hereby authorized to erect 
a combination drinking fountain and watering-trough on Hano- 
ver street, between Ashland and Hall streets, and that the ex- 
pense thereof be charged to the appropriation for incidental ex- 
penses. 

Passed May 23, 1893. 



An Order to build a Sewer. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and sewer commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build a sewer in Lake avenue from a point opposite the old 
Park-street schoolhouse, thence westerly to the Elm-street sewer, 
a distance of about 200 feet, and the expense thereof be charged 
to the appropriation for sewers and drains. 

Passed June 6, 1893. 



An Order to establish Certain Grades. 
Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 



216 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the grades as shown on the plan of South Main street from Mil- 
ford street to Boynton street be established ; that the grade on 
Elrri street be changed from what was established in 1881 by the 
board of aldermen to the grade as shown on plan No. 52, said 
plans being on file in the city engineer's office, and therefore that 
said grades as shown be and are hereby established as the grades 
for said streets. 

Passed June 6, 1893. 



An Order to build Certain Streets. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build certain streets as follows : 

Shasta street, from Beech to Lincoln. 

Maple street, from Lake avenue to Cilley road. 

Canton street, from Lake avenue to Auburn street. 

The expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new 
highways. 

Passed June 19, 1893. 



An Order to establish Certain Grades. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade as shown on a plan of Maple street, from Lake avenue 
to Cilley road, the same being on file in the city engmeer's 
office, be and hereby is established as the grade for said street. 

Passed June 19, 1893. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build certain sewers as follows : 

In Jewett street, from terminus of present sewer to Young. 

In Dickey street, from West Hancock to South Main. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 217 

in Kelley street, from Hevey east back to Joliette. 

In Hevey east back street, from Amory to the boulevard. 

In Monroe street, from River road to Elm. 

In River road, from Webster northerly to Clarke. 

In Salmon south back, from present terminus easterly about 
ICO feet. 

The expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
sewers and drains. 

Passed July lo, 1893. 



An Order to establish Certain Grades. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grades as shown on the following plans, on file in the city 
engineer's office, be and are hereby established as the grades for 
said streets : 

Central street, from the Hall road westerly, 304 feet, plan 
987. 

Central street, from Beacon to Cass, plan 704. 

And for changing the grade as established on Pine street to 
the grade as shown on plans 94, 95, and 96, in said office. 

Passed July 10, 1893. 



An Order to concrete Chestnut Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized to 
concrete Chestnut street, from the south side of Merrimack to the 
south side of Auburn, and that the matter of macadamizing or 
concreting roadbed be left to street and park commissioners, and 
the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for mac- 
adamizing. 

Passed July 10, 1893. 



218 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An Order to purchase Horses. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department be 
and are hereby authorized to purchase a pair of horses for the use 
of the fire department, and the expense thereof be charged to 
the appropriation for the fire department. 

Passed August i, 1S93. 



An Order to estabhsh the grade of Hevey Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade as shown on a plan of Hevey, from Kelley street 
southerly to the boulevard, be and is hereby established as the 
grade for said street. 

Passed August i, 1893. 



An Order to build Second Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build Second street, from Cleveland to South Main, and the 
expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new streets. 

Passed September 5, 1893. 



An Order to build Beech Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and park commission be and are hereby authorized to 
build Beech street, from Gore northerly to the north line of the 
Tilton land, and the expense thereof be charged to the appro- 
priation for new streets. 

Passed September 5, 1893. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 219 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build certain sewers, as follows : 

In Dearborn street, from Summer to Taylor. 

In Mast street, from present sewer westerly about 200 feet. 

In Conant street, from Rimmon street west to Montgomery, 
thence north in Montgomery 200 feet. 

In Front street, from the hotel southerly to the eddy. 

The expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
sewers and drains. 

Passed September 5, 1893. 



An Order to establish Certain Grades. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grades as shown on plan No. 76 in city engineer's office, and 
established by vote, March 6, 1883, as the grade of said street, be 
changed to conform to the lines as shown on said plan and rec- 
ommended by the committee on streets by vote, September 20, 
1893, and said new lines shall be the established grade of said 
street. 

Also, that the grade, as shown on plan of Bartlett street on file 
in said office, be and is hereby made the established grade of 
said Bartlett street, from Putnam to south of Sullivan. 

Also, that the grade, as shown on the plan of Harvard street, 
from Beech to Maple, be and is hereby made the established 
grade of Harvard street. 

Passed September 21, 1893. 



An Order to build a Sewer. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 



220 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

to build a sewer from Lake avenue sewer northerly through the 
ravine to Merrimack street, as laid out by the Board of Mayor 
and Aldermen, and the expense thereof be charged to the appro- 
priation for sewers and drains. 

Passed September 21, 1893. 



An Order to build Certain Streets. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build Harvard street from Union easterly to Maple, and the 
expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new streets. 

Passed September 21, 1893. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Rimmon Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade as shown on plan No. 9 A in the city engineer's office 
of Rimmon street from Amory, and thence in a southerly direc- 
tion 785 feet, be and is hereby made the established grade of said 
street. 

Passed October 3, 1893. 



An Order to procure Plans, Specifications, and build South 
Main-street Bridge. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to procure plans, specifications, receive bids, and report back to 
the city councils for a new bridge at South Main street to replace 
the present bridge, the new structure to be fifty feet wide, and the 
expense thereof be charged to the permanent improvement loan. 

Passed November 7, 1893. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 221 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and park commission be and are hereby authorized to 
build certain sewers as follows : 

Laurel- street sewer from Hall to Beacon street. 

In Liberty east back street, from Webster southerly, 225 feet. 

A sewer from present sewer in Canal and Pennacook streets, 
thence easterly to Union east back and North streets. 

From Elm and Valley streets easterly to Belmont and Valley. 

For Cass-street sewer, from Lake avenue to Central, thence 
westerly in Central about 100 feet. 

Passed November 7, 1893. 



An Order to concrete Elm East Back Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to concrete Elm east back street, from Hanover southerly to Man- 
chester, and the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation 
for macadamizing. 

Passed November 7, 1893. 



An Order to establish Certain Grades. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade as shown on the following plans on file in the city engi- 
neer's office be and is hereby made the established grade of said 
streets. 

Of Grove street, from Pine to Beech. 

Of Lowell street, from Ashland to Mammoth road. 

That the grade as shown on plan No 67 of Myrtle street, and 
dated December 5, 1882, be changed as shown on said plan. 

Passed November 7, 1893. 



SZZ ANNUAL. OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An Order to macadamize Spruce Street, 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to macadamize Spruce street from Wilson to Massabesic, and the 
expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for macadamiz- 
ing. 

Passed November^;, 1893. 



An Order to establish Certain Grades. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur, that the 
grades as shown on plans Nos. 54 and 154 of Chestnut and Ap- 
pleton streets, and passed by the city councils August 4, 1885, 
be changed to conform to the new lines on said plans. 

Also that the grades as shown on the plans of Byron, Josselyn*, 
Varney, and Kennedy streets be and are hereby made the estab- 
lished grades of said streets, said plans being on file in the city 
engineer's department. 

Passed November 7, 1893. 



An Order to build the Concord-street Sewer. 

Ordered, If the Board'of Common Council concur, that the 
street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized to 
build an extension to the Concord-street sewer from its present 
terminus near Maple street easterly about 150 feet towards But- 
ton street, and the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for sewers and drains. 

Passed November 7, 1893. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 223 

The report of last year contained the following regarding sub- 
urban highways and city streets that will bear repeating : 

"SUBURBAN HIGHWAYS. 

" The matter of defining and establishing the boundary lines of 
the suburban highways still remains unsettled. Each succeeding 
year is making it more difficult to re-trace and re-locate old 
points, and it is but a question of time when they will be entirely 
destroyed, and the correct lines become a doubtful quantity. On 
many of the roads the abuttors are constantly encroaching upon 
city land, thoughtlessly, perhaps, but still with each successive 
improvement taking in more and more of the highway. It has 
been the aim of this department to secure what data could be 
had in relation to these roads, and mark the lines as fast as pos- 
sible, but regular work has prevented any systematic attempt to 
straighten matters out. This is a very important item, and should 
receive immediate attention by providing means for a complete 
survey of all the outlying roads while the points still remain. 

" It hardly seems good judgment, in view of the rapid growth of 
the city and the constantly increasing traffic, to narrow a four- 
rod road to a fifty-foot street whenever the bounds are estab- 
lished. This has been done in the past, but should not be the 
future policy. 



" The same may be said this year as has been said in previous 
reports in regard to laying out streets twenty-five, thirty, or thirty- 
five feet wide. This evil still exists, and will continue to exist so 
long as there are land owners who care for nothing but to sell 
every inch of land possible, regardless of whether the adjoining 
streets are of sufficient width to accommodate traffic or not. We 
have streets in the city, dignified by the name of avenues, where 
it is impossible to turn a truck team or dray without .running 
upon the sidewalks. This method of dividing land is advanta- 
geous to property owners, but scarcely in keeping with modern 
ideas. 



224 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

" There are those, however, who keep abreast of the times, and, 
recognizing the necessity of broad thoroughfares, have divided 
their property accordingly. It would be better for the appear- 
ance of the city if there were more of them, 

" There is an urgent need of some action being taken looking 
to regularity in setting apart land for streets, either by an ordi- 
nance or by the appointment of a commission for that purpose. 
As it is now, each land owner can put a street where he pleases, 
regardless of how it compares with those adjoining as to direc- 
tion or distance therefrom. By preparing a plan showing the 
location of proposed streets, and compelling land owners to ad- 
here to it, the city would be rid of the interminable jumble of 
streets, lanes, and alleys running in all directions, confusing to 
a stranger and detracting greatly from the beauty of the city and 
the efficiency of the highways as means of communication. 

" It is time this matter received serious attention, as each year 
sees a material growth of the city in the outlying districts, and 
a consequent addition of numerous narrow, crooked, and almost 
useless highways called by the high-sounding name of avenues, 
which are but monuments to some one's cupidity and avarice. 

" Building new streets that have been laid out is quite an im- 
portant matter, and one requiring the exercise of good judg- 
ment. The idea is not how many yards can be built, but how 
many can be built to last. It may not show up so well to an un- 
thinking person, but it is more than folly to half do the work 
and then have to go over it the next year and each succeeding 
year. Far better to build one yard that will stand than ten that 
it is impossible to haul a heavy load over. 

"The practice in many cities is for the property owner who de- 
sires a street through his land to build it to an established grade 
before the city will accept it. They also require the land to be 
given to, instead of being purchased by the city, sometimes at 
exorbitant rates. They argue that as the owner derives the bene- 
fit through the increased valuation of his land it is for his inter- 
est to do so. 

" Manchester is considerably behind the times in these two im- 
portant features of economical city administration." 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 225 



The sewers constructed thii- year have been under the direc- 
tion of the street and park commission. The methods followed 
have in the main been the same as in previous years, those 
whose needs were most pressing being accommodated first. 

As the plumbers and citizens in general become more familiar 
with the revised ordinances relating to sewer entering, less 
trouble is experienced. An improvement is also noted in the 
number of returns made by plumbers. Last year out of two 
hundred and fourteen permits issued, but eighty-nine returns 
were made. This year one hundred and ninety-one permits 
were granted and returns made of one hundred and forty-five 
connections. 

It would be good policy for the city to employ a competent 
sewer inspector, whose duty should be to examine all connections 
as they are made with the city sewers, and keep a record of the 
same. He should also require the owners to show their permit 
and license before allowing any work to be done. Many con- 
nections are now made without permission or without paying 
the entrance fee, and the city is a loser thereby. It is the inten- 
tion of this department the coming season to see that the ordi- 
nances are complied with in this respect. 

The most important sewer constructed during the year on the 
east side of the river has been the Auburn-street main. This 
sewer connects with the Elm-street sewer, and is of brick, sixty 
inches in diameter, to Willow street. From there it is of brick, 
fifty by seventy-five inches in diameter, to Pine street. From 
Pine street there is a 15-inch pipe to the back street. The re- 
mainder of the sewer in Pine east back and Auburn south back 
streets is of pipe, fifteen, twelve, and ten inches. 

The Auburn-street sewer will act as a mam for part of the 
southern section, and is designed to go as far east as Maple 
street. In order to be low enough to properly drain that section 
a cut of about twenty-seven feet was made between (Chestnut and 
Pine streets, bringing the cost of the sewer considerably above 
the average. 

15 



226 ANXUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

On the west side the Kelley-street main, a 20-inch pipe, has 
been completed as far as Hevey east back street, with laterals on 
the connecting back streets. This sewer is designed to extend 
to the bluff near the Manchester & North Weare Railroad track, 
a distance of about four thousand three hundred feet from Beau- 
port street, necessitating a cut of twenty-six feet a portion of 
the way. 

The Barr-street sewer was laid through a ledge, the continua- 
tion of that found last year, as was also a part of that on Conant 
street. The work was slow and expensive, but urgently de- 
manded by the residents of the section it drains. 

The average cost per foot in district No. 2 has been ^2.51, 
and that in district No. 10 has been ^2.60. 

The average cost per foot in 1892 was $2.01. 

In the twenty thousand eight hundred eighty-two feet of 
sewers there were built eighty-four manholes and six lampholes ; 
one hundred and eight cesspool connections were put in, besides 
the Y branches, for nine hundred and seventy-six house con- 
nections. 

The number of cesspools built and repaired, their cost, and 
the cost of repairs on sewers, together with other details regard- 
ing sewer work, will be found in the report of the street and 
park commission. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



227 



The following sewers have been ordered in by vote of the city 
councils, but have not been constructed : 



Street. 


Location. 


Date ordered 


Length 
in feet. 






May 2, 1893. 
Sept. .5, 1893. 
Sept. 6, 1887. 
July 10, 1893. 
Sept. 5, 1893. 
May 2, 1893. 
July 10,1893. 
July 10,1893. 
July 10, 1893. 
June 6, 1893. 
Nov. 7, 1893. 
Nov. 7, 1893. 
May 2, 1893. 
Sept. 5, 1893. 
Oct. 6, 1891 
July 10, 1893. 
Sept. 5,1893. 
May 2, 1893. 
Nov. 7, 1893. 
May 2, 1893. 
July 5, 1892. 
July 10,1893. 
July 5, 1892. 
Nov. 7, 1893. 
July 5, 1892. 
July 5, 1892. 
Sept. 21, 1893. 






Extension to Montgomery — 

Hall easterly 

West Hancock to South Main. 

Eddy to north of hotel 

Myrtle to Mead I 
Hall and Mead to Bridge ( •••■ 
Kellej- to Columbus avenue.. . 
Extension to Young.. 


600 






Dickey 


850 










Tbrough ravine 

Hevey east baclc 

Jewett. 


2,050 
1,500 
1,200 
1,.500 
150 


Kelley 








Hall to Beacon 


800 


Liberty east back 

Main 

Mast 






Granite to Piscataquog river. 
Extension westerly 


1,100 
200 


Monroe 

Montgomery 

Myrtle 

Pennacook 

Portei" .... 


River road to Elm 


500 


Hall east and west 


600 


Canal to Union east back 

Amherst northerly 


3,000 
250 


Prospect 

River road 


Russell to Hall 


1,250 

1,300 

400 


Webster to Clarke 




JbJlaine to Hiram .. 


Valley 

Webster 


Elm to Belmont 

Walnut to Beech .. 


4,900 
270 






1 000 


Wilson Hill 


Central to Merrimack 


550 


Total 


30,195 









REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Following is the report of the committee on sewers and 
drains, prepared by the city engineer as clerk of the committee : 

Manchester, N. H., December 30, 1S93. 
Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

The committee appointed by your honorable board to act as 
the joint standing committee on sewers and drains would submit 
the following report of the work done by them the present year: 

At the opening of the season there were twenty-six orders for 
sewers already voted in but not built; of these fourteen have 
been completed and three partly completed- During the year 
forty-one orders have received favorable action, and out of this 
number seventeen have been built. At the present time there 
are orders for thirty-four sewers which have passed your board 
but which have not been constructed, and three that have been 
partially constructed. 

The committee has held sixteen meetings, as follows : Febru- 
ary 10; March 3, 10, 11, 28; April 4, 19; May 18, 23; June 
14, July 7, August 8, September 20, October 20, 27; November 
I ; and considered thirty-one petitions. 

Contracts for sewer-pipe for the year were awarded as follows : 
Portland Stone Ware Company, by E. B. Winslow, twenty-two 
per cent of the regular list price per foot for all sizes up to 18- 
inch ; twenty-five per cent of the regular list price -per foot for 
20-inch and 24-inch. George D. Goodrich, twenty-two and one 
half of the regular list price per foot on all sizes, with an addi- 
tional two per cent from the net of bills for ten days' cash. 

Five reports were sent in to the city councils, recommending 
the passage of orders authorizing the building of sewers voted in 
during the year. These orders will be found in the list of orders 
written by the city engineer's department. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 229 

The following is a list of the petitions referred to the commit- 
tee and the action taken on them. The dates of the passage of 
the orders to build the same will be found in the engineer's re- 
port of orders written for presentation to the city councils : 

Cartier street, from Conant and Cartier, thence northerly in 
Cartier, to foot of bluff. Patrick Kean. Committee voted to 
submit an order to build, March 27. 

Conant street, from present sewer in Conant at Beauport, 
thence westerly toward Cartier, through Conant. Fred Leining. 
Committee voted to submit an order to build, March 27. 

Dubuque street, from Conant and Dubuque, thence northerly 
in Dubuque, to north line of Gates. Herman Poehlman. 
Committee voted to submit an order to build, March 27. 

Riddle street, from Mast and Riddle, thence southerly to Mil- 
ford, according to city's plan of sewers. Clinton H. Bixby. 
Committee voted to submit an order to build, March 27. 

Schuyler street, from the sewer in Main, thence westerly to 
Beauport, through a street known on Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company's plans as Schuyler street. J. A. Schricker. Commit- 
tee voted to submit an order to build, March 27. 

Arlington street, thence easterly to Morrison, 200 feet. J. F. 
Barrett. Committee voted to submit an order to build. May i. 

Chestnut east back street, from the end of the Chestnut east 
back sewer north of North, thence northerly in Chestnut east 
back. O. D. Knox. Committee voted to submit an order to 
build. May i. 

Gore and Ash east back streets, from present sewer in Gore, 
thence easterly in Gore, 270 feet, to Ash east back, thence south- 
erly in Ash east back, about 200 feet. Michael Lyons. Com- 
mittee voted to submit an order to build. May i. 

Myrtle and Hall streets, from Belmont at Myrtle, thence 
westerly in Myrtle to a point about 200 feet west of Hall, thence 
southerly through the same to the Bridge-street sewer. Mead, 



230 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Mason & Co. Committee voted to submit an order to build 
and the same to include to Harrison, May i. 

Porter street, from the intersection of Amherst and Porter, 
thence northeasterly in Porter for a distance of 250 feet. S. S. 
Piper. Committee voted to submit an order to build, May i. 

Summer street, from Belmont, thence easterly 552 feet in Sum- 
mer. A. N. Fosdick. Committee voted to submit an order to 
build, May i. 

Walnut street, from Gore and Walnut, thence northerly about 
300 feet, to drain the lots on the easterly side of Walnut. 
Charles L. Carpenter. Committee voted to submit an order to 
build, May i. 

A and B streets, commencing at the manhole at the intersec- 
tion of A and B, and thence in a northerly direction, 150 feet. 
Hannah Stevens. Committee voted to submit an order to build, 
June 29. 

Dickey street, commencing at West Hancock and Dickey, 
and thenre in a westerly direction in Dickey, to South Main, ac- 
cording to the city plan of sewers. Peter Kean. Committee 
voted to submit an order to build, June 29. 

Hevey east back street, commencing at Kelley, and thence in 

- a southerly direction in Hevey east back, to the boulevard near 

Wayne, being Hevey east back sewer as proposed. Xavier 

Roberge. Committee voted to submit an order to build, June 29. 

Jewett street, commencing at the sewer in Jewett, and thence 
in a southerly direction to Young. Frank A. Smith. Commit- 
tee voted to submit an order to build, June 29. 

Kelley street, commencing at present terminus in Kelley, near 
Dubuque, and thence in a westerly direction to Joliette, in Mc- 
Gregorville. The Rimmon Manufacturing Company, by Charles 
C. Hayes. Committee voted to submit an order to build, 
June 29. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 231 

Liberty east back street, from North northerly to Webster, in 
the back street between Liberty and Union. George L. Read. 
Committee voted to defer action, June 29. 

Monroe street, commencing at the western terminus of Mon- 
roe, and thence in an easterly direction to Elm. C. B. Little- 
field. Committee voted to submit an order to build, June 29. 

River road, commencing at the present sewer in River road, 
at Webster street, and thence in a northerly direction in River 
road to Clarke street, according to city plan of sewers. J. C. 
Ray. Committee voted to submit an order to build, June 29. 

Salmon south back street, commencing at the present terminus 
of the sewer in Salmon south back, and thence in an easterly 
direction about 100 feet. C. B. Sturtevant. Committee voted 
to submit an order to build, June 29. 

Adams street, commencing at Clarke and Adams and thence 
in a southerly direction in Adams to the south line of the Liver- 
more land. W. C. Wilson. Action deferred to secure right of 
way through Livermore land, August 30. 

Conant and Montgomery streets, commencing at Conant and 
Rimmon, thence westerly in Conant to Montgomery, and thence 
in a northerly direction in Montgomery about 200 feet. Brid- 
get Twohey. Committee voted to submit an order to build, 
August 30. 

Dearborn street, commencing at the proposed sewer in Sum- 
mer, through a highway called Dearborn, and thence in a south- 
erly direction to Taylor. G. W. Dearborn. Committee 
voted to submit an order to build, August 30. 

Elm west back street, commencing at Market and Elm west 
back, and thence in a northerly direction to Water, through Elm 
west back. New Hampshire Trust Co. Referred to street and 
park commissioners, August 30. 

Front street, Amoskeag, commencing at the old hotel in Am- 
oskeag, or beyond, and thence in a southerly direction to the 
eddy, with branches as required in the Amoskeag tenement side 



232 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Streets. Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, by H. F. Straw, 
agent. Committee voted to submit an order to build from the 
hotel to the eddy, August 30. 

Mast street, from the present terminus of the Mast-street 
sewer, thence westerly about 200 feet, according to the city's 
plan of sewers. E. Richards. Committee voted to submit an 
order to build, August 30. 

Union east back street, commencing at Sagamore in Union 
east back, and thence in a northerly direction to Salmon. J. E. 
Floyd. Referred to street and park commissioners, August 30. 
Pennacook street, commencing at the present sewer in Canal 
and Pennacook, and thence in an easterly direction to the inter- 
section of Union east back and North. Harrison H. Cole. 
Committee voted to submit an order to build, November 3. 

Liberty east back street, commencing at 225 feet from Web- 
ster, in Union and Liberty back streets, and thence in a northerly 
direction to the Webster-street sewer. C. H. Gile. Committee 
voted to submit an order to build, November 3. 

Valley street, commencing at the corner of Belmont and Val- 
ley, and thence in a westerly direction down Valley, towards 
Elm, to connect with the sewer already laid in Valley. Napo- 
leon Bournival. Committee voted to submit an order to build, 
November 3. 

This comprises all that has come within the province of the 
committee on sewers and drains and is respectfully submitted. 
Alderman CHRISTIAN L. WOLF, Chairman, 
Alderman JOHN P. CRONIN, 
Councilman GEORGE E. HEATH, 
Councilman HARRY E. WEBSTER,* 
Councilman DAVID H. BURBANK,* 
Councilman WILLIAM G. LANDRY, 

Comwittee ofi Sewers and Drains. 
W. H. Bennett, 

Clerk of Committee. 

♦Webster resigned and Burbank placed on cominittee November 7. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON STREETS. 



The first annual report of the committee on streets, prepared 
by the city engineer as clerk of the committee, is herewith pre- 
sented : 

Manchester, N. H., December 30, 1893. 
Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

The committee appointed by your honorable board to act as 
the joint standing committee on streets would submit the follow- 
ing report of the work done by them and under their direction 
the present year : 

The committee has held sixteen meetings, as follows : Febru- 
ary 10; March 3, 10, 11, 28; Apr^l 4, 19 ; May 18, 23; June 14, 
July 7, August 8, September 20, October 20, 27; November 1. 

Number of petitions received, 54 ; granted a hearing, 45 ; re- 
ferred to street and park commission, 5 ; deferred until grade 
was established, i ; given leave to withdraw, 2. Number of or- 
ders presented for building streets, 13 ; for macadamizing, 3 ; for 
concreting, 2. 

The only work the committee has had charge of, as superin- 
tendents, until its completion, was the Second-street bridge. 
This work is described in detail in the following specifications 
sent out March 11, 1893, ^o various bridge companies. These 
specifications also include the agreement and contract which 
were signed by the successful bidders after the work was let. 



Proposals for Second-street Bridges. 

Sealed proposals will be received by the city clerk, addressed 
I 

N. P. KIDDER, City Clerk, 

City Hall, Manchester, N. H. 



234 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

PROPOSALS FOR SECOND-STREET BRIDGES. 

Until 2 (two) o'clock p. m. of Tuesday, March 28, 1S93, for the 
sub and super structure of two bridges across the Piscataquog 
river at Second street, according to the accompanying drawings 
and specifications. 

Bids for the sub-structure and for the superstructure to be 
made separately. 

Proposals for superstructure must be accompanied by strain 
sheets, showing strains and proposed sections, also general detail 
drawings, showing method of construction. 

Proposals for the sub-structure shall be per yard and shall cover 
all foundation and other work. 

Each bid to be accompanied by certified check, payable to the 
city treasurer of Manchester, N. H., in the sum of twenty-five 
hundred dollars (^2,500) each for sub and super structure, as a 
guaranty that the successful bidder will enter upon the contract 
according to his proposal within five days from the time contract 
is awarded. 

Upon the execution of contract, bonds will be required in the 
sum often thousand dollars ($10,000) for each part of the work 
for the faithful performance of the contract. 
The right to reject any or all bids is reserved. 

EDGAR J. KNOWLTON, 

Mayor. 
Alderman Byron Worthen, Chairman, 
Alderman Sam C. Lowell, 
Councilman George E. Heath, 
Councilman Charles H. Harvey, 
Councilman Howard C. Holt, 

Joint Standing Committee on Streets. 
W. H. Bennett, 
Clerk of Committee on Streets. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 235 

Second-Street Bridge, Specifications for Sub- 
Structure. 

City Engineer's Office, 
Manchester, N. H., March ii, 1893. 

Specifications to build stone retaining walls and abutments at 
Second street across Piscataquog river according to the accom- 
panying plans, and as will be shown on the ground by grade 
stakes and measurements. 

These specifications are and intend to cover that the contrac- 
tor shall do all the work, furnish all materials and supplies, in- 
cluding the tools and forms, and complete the work, as shown on 
the plans, to the full acceptance of the committee, and the city 
engineer shall superintend the same to its completion. 

All excavating to be done by the contractor to such grades as 
are given on plans or on the ground to solid bottom, as required 
by the superintendent in charge, and do all back filling, no back 
filling to be done until the masonry has been inspected and pro- 
nounced ready for back filling by the engineer. 

All stone to be good solid ledge stone ; all stone in foundation 
or footing courses to be large size quarry stone laid close, and 
firmly, solidly, and carefully laid in courses of not less than 
twelve inches thick and of the same dimensions as for the abut- 
ment walls. 

No pinners are allowed in face of \vall, the footing course to 
be laid in good, strong hydraulic cement mortar. 

Walls to be laid upon footing courses to such dimensions and 
lines as indicated on the plans and shown on the ground. 

All walls of abutments or wing walls and footing courses shall 
be first-class masonry laid in courses, of good quarry stone laid in 
cement mortar and squared to joints, beds, and faces. 

The stone breaking joints at least twelve inches, and with at 
least one header for every three stretchers. 

No stone shall be used in the face of the wall less than twelve 
inches thick, nor less than twelve inches on its least horizontal 
dimensions. 



236 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

All headers to run clear through wall unless otherwise directed 
by the engineer. 

No pinners allowed on face of wall. 

The engineer may, upon the inspection of the work or the 
stock, require the contractor to discard and take out any work 
which may not be up to the quality called for or of the dimen- 
sions required, and replace the same by such stone or stones as 
shall be suitable and the same acceptable to the engineer. 

The accompanying plans are made a part of these specifica- 
tions, and the dimensions and distances on the same are drawn 
to scale, and are also a part of the specifications. 

The depths, as shown on these plans, are such that it is ex- 
pected to find suitable bottom for the foundation. 

The dimensions and cross sections are shown in plan for all 
distances. 

The bridge seat will be made of size and dimensions as shown 
on plans, and the top cut to receive the superstructure. 

The granite coping to be of the dimensions shown and laid to 
conform to the lines and grades given, and broken to line on 
back next to sidewalk, and on bottom, face, and top. 

Mortar to be best hydraulic cement mortar, made by mixing 
the best American hydraulic cement and clean sharp sand, in 
proportion of one part cement to two parts of sand, and only 
enough water for mixing the same to a thick paste. 

The utmost care will be required in this cement work that it 
shall not be mixed so as to allow of its setting before using upon 
the work, and every space shall be thoroughly filled with mortar. 

It is the intent of these specifications to insure a first-class sub- 
structure in every respect, and no omissions therefrom or inter- 
pretation thereof shall be construed to admit anything not up to 
this standard. 

Ail questions arising as to the interpretation of these specifica- 
tions, or regarding the execution of the work under them, shall 
be referred to the city engineer. 

The work to be begun within ten (lo) days after signing con- 
tract, and completed on or before Saturday, the fifteenth day of 
July- 1893. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 237 

General Specifications for a bridge over Piscataquog 
River, at Second Street, Manchester, N. H. 

The crossing will extend from station 4 on Cleveland street to 
station 10 plus 60, as per accompanying profile, and will consist 
of two iron spans over the river, upon masonry foundations, an 
earth fill across the island, and an earth fill approach on city side. 

The bridge to consist of two spans, one "through" span of 
122 feet clear between abutments, and one "deck" span of 57 
feet clear. The "through" span to be on a skew of 65 degrees 
(the face of the masonry making an angle of 65 degrees with the 
axis of the bridge), the " deck " span to be square. Each bridge 
to have a width of 50 feet over handrails, a roadway of 32 feet 
clear between guards, and two sidewalks of equal width. 

The floor system of the iron spans for both roadway and side- 
walks will be constructed of a permanent character, the use of 
wood being excluded. 

The roadway shall be cambered transversely four inches in 
center, and scuppers of cast iron put in at outer edge of roadway 
at intervals of not over 30 feet. These shall be long enough to 
project below the roadway floor and be flush with top surface. 

The sidewalks shall be arranged so that the outer edge will be 
one inch lower than the inner edge, to provide rapid drainage. 

The sidewalks shall, where they adjoin the roadway, have a 
greater elevation than that of roadway of at least four inches, 
and be edged with an efficient iron-shod guard rail. 

A substantial fence of an ornamental pattern, measuring 4 
feet above top of floor, shall be placed on outside of all side- 
walks, and at each end of spans the fence shall terminate in orna- 
mental cast-iron newel posts of appropriate pattern. 

METAL STRUCTURE. 

The bridges shall be proportioned to carry the following loads : 

I. The weight of metal in the bridge. 2. The weight of the 
flooring. 3. A moving load of 100 pounds per square foot of 
surface of both roadway and footvvalks. 



238 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Or on roadway an Aveling & Porter steam road roller of fifteen 
gross tons. All members to be proportioned for the maximum 
of the two kinds of moving load. 

To provide for wind strains and vibrations, the top lateral 
bracing in the deck span, and the bottom lateral bracing in the 
through span shall be proportioned to resist a lateral force of 300 
pounds for each foot of span, 150 pounds of this to be treated as 
a moving load. The bottom lateral bracing in the deck span, 
and the top lateral bracing in the through span shall be propor- 
tioned to resist a lateral force of 150 pounds for each foot of 
span. 

Variations in temperature to the extent of 150 degrees shall be 
provided for. 

PROPORTION OF PARTS. 

All parts shall be proportioned in tension by the following unit 
strains : 

On lateral bracing, 18,000 pounds per square inch. 

On bottom flange of riveted main or cross girders, net section, 
14,500 pounds per square inch. 

On solid rolled beams and stringers, 15,000 pounds per square 
inch. 

On bottom flange of riveted floor stringers, net section, 14,- 
500 pounds per square inch. 

On floorbeam hangers and other similar members liable to 
sudden loading, net section, 10,000 pounds per square inch. 

Bottom chords and main diagonals, 15,000 pounds per square 
inch. 

Counters and long verticals, 14,500 pounds per square inch. 

Single angles subject to direct tension must be connected by 
both legs, or the section of one leg only will be considered ag 
effective. 

In members subject to tensile strains, full allowance shall be 
made for reduction of section by rivet-holes, of a diameter one 
eighth inch larger than nominal size of rivet. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 239 

Members subject to alternate strains of tension and compres- 
sion shall have each strain increased by six tenths of the least 
strain, and the section proportioned to resist either strain thus 
obtained by units herein given. 

Compression members shall be proportioned so that the maxi- 
mum load shall in no case cause a greater strain per square inch 
than that determined by the following formula: 

12,000 11,500 

Chords, L- Web members, L= 

36,oooR'' 36,oooR- 

L=the length in inches between supports. 

R^the least radius of gyration in inches. 

No compression member, however, proportioned by the above 
formula, shall have a length exceeding forty-five times its least 
width. 

Members subject tQ lateral and vibration strains only, unit 
stresses allowed to be twenty per cent above those for main truss 
members. 

In beams and plate girders the compression flanges shall be 
made of same gross section as the tension flanges. 

The rivets and bolts connecting the parts of any member must 
be so spaced that the shearing strain shall not exceed 9,000 
pounds per square inch, nor the pressure upon the bearing sur- 
face per square inch of the projected semi-intrados of the rivet- 
hole exceed 15,000 pounds. 

In the case of field riveting the above limits of shearing strain 
and pressure shall be reduced one third part. 

All the connections and details shall be of such strength that, 
if tested, rupture would occur in the body of the member rather 
than in any detail or connection. The rivets shall generally be 
three fourths and seven eighths inches in diameter. 

In punching, the diameter of the die shall in no case exceed 
the diameter of the punch by more than one sixteenth inch. 

Wherever possible rivets must be machine driven. 



240 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

No metal shall be used less than one fourth inch thick except 
for lining or filling vacant spaces. 

All workmanship shall be first class in every particular._ 

The bridges to be of soft steel, having an ultimate strength of 
from 54,000 to 62,000 pounds per square inch ; elastic limit, 
one half the ultimate strength; minimum elongation of 26 per 
cent in eight inches. 

Wrought iron may be used for the webs of plate girders, and 
shall have an ultimate strength of 48,000 pounds per square inch, 
an elastic limit of 26,000 pounds per square inch, and an elon- 
gation of 15 per cent in eight inches. 

In case this is done the shearing and bearing values of rivets 
shall be taken as reduced 20 per cent. 

All work before leaving shop shall be given one good coat of 
raw linseed oil. 

In riveting, the surfaces coming together shall each be paint- 
ed with mineral paint before being riveted together. 

After the structure is erected it shall be thoroughly painted 
with two coats of paint, mixed with pure linseed oil, of such 
color as may be directed. 

The contractor shall furnish all staging and false work, and 
shall erect and put in place the entire work, ready for travel. 

All recesses which will retain water, or through which water 
can enter, must be filled with thick paint or some waterproof ce- 
ment before receiving the final painting. 

GENERAL CLAUSE. 

It is the intent of these specifications to insure a first-class 
structure in every respect, and no omissions therefrom or inter- 
pretation thereof shall be construed to admit anything not up to 
this standard. 

All questions arising as to the interpretation of these specifica- 
tions, or regarding the execution of the work under them, shall 
be referred to the city engineer. 

The work to be begun within ten days of signing the con- 
tract. 



I 



I 



i 



REPORT OF THF CITY ENGINEER. 241 

Contract. 

And it is hereby agreed, by and between the said parties : 

First. That the specifications and drawings are intended to co- 
operate, so that any works exhibited in the drawings and not 
mentioned in the specifications, or vice versa, are to be executed 
the same as if mentioned in the specifications and set forth by 
the drawings, to the true intent and meaning of the said draw- 
ings and specifications. 

Second. The contractor, at his own proper cost and charges, 
is to provide all manner of labor, materials, apparatus, scaf- 
folding, utensils, and cartage of every description needful 
for the due performance of the several works ; must produce, 
whenever required by the city, all vouchers showing the quality 
of goods and materials used ; and render all due and sufficient fa- 
cilities to the city or its agent for the proper inspection of the 
works and materials, and which are to be under their control ; 
and the city may require the contractor to dismiss any workman 
or workmen who they may think incompetent or improper to be 
employed. The contractor shall deliver up the works to the city 
in perfect repair and in good condition when complete. The 
contractor shall not sub-let any of the works without consent of 
the city. 

Third. Should the city at any time during the progress of the 
said works require any alterations of, additions to, or omissions 
in the specifications or plans, it shall have the right or power to 
make such change or changes and the same shall in no way in- 
juriously affect or make void the contract, but the difference for 
work omitted shall be deducted from the amount of the contract 
by a fair and reasonable valuation ; and for additional work re- 
quired in alterations the amount shall be agreed upon in writing 
and such agreement shall state also the extension of time, if any, 
which is to be granted by reason tlTereof. 

Fourth. Should the contractor, at any time during the progress 
of the said works, become bankrupt, refuse or neglect to supply 
a sufficiency of material or of workmen, or cause any unreasona- 



242 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Lie neglect or suspension of work, or fail or refuse to follow the 
drawings and specifications, or comply with any of the articles 
of agreement, the city or its agent shall have the right and pow- 
er to enter upon and take possession of the premises, and may at 
once terminate the contract, whereupon all claim of the con- 
tractor, his heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, shall 
cease ; and the city may provide materials and workmen suffi- 
cient to complete the said works, after giving forty-eight hours' 
notice in writing, directed and delivered to the contractor, or 
residence or his place of business ; and the expense of the notice 
and the completuig of the various works will be deducted from 
the amount of contract, or any part of it due or to become due, 
to the contractor ; and in such case no scaffolding or fixed tackle 
of any kind belonging to such contractor shall be removed so 
long as the same is wanted for the work. But if any balance on 
the amount of this contract remains after completion in respect 
of work done during the time of the defaulting contractor, the 
same shall belong to the persons legally representing him 
but the city shall not be liable or accountable to them in any 
way for the manner in which it may have gotten the work com- 
pleted. 

Fifth. Should any dispute arise respecting the true construc- 
tion or meaning of drawings or specifications, or as to what is ex- 
tra work outside of contract, the same shall be decided by the 
city engineer and his decision shall be final and conclusive ; but 
should any dispute arise respecting the true value of any works 
omitted by the contractor, the same shall be valued by two 
competent persons, one employed by the city and the other by 
the contractor, and these two shall have the power to name an 
umpire, whose decision shall be binding on all parties. 

Sixth. The city will not, in any manner, be answerable or ac- 
countable for any loss or darjiage that shall or may happen to the 
said works or any part or parts thereof respectively, or for any of 
the materials or other things used and employed in finishing and 
completing the said works, or for injury to any person or persons, 
either workman or the public, or damage to the adjoining prop- 
erty, from any cause which might have been prevented by the 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 243 

contractor or his workmen, or any one employed by him, against 
all which injuries and damages to persons and property the con- 
tractor having control over such work must properly guard 
against, and must make good all damage from whatever cause, 
being strictly responsible for the same. 

Seventh. The contractor will insure the building to cover his 
interest in the same from time to time, as required ; and for 
any loss of the contractor by fire the city will not under any 
circumstances be answerable or accountable ; but the city may 
protect itself by insurance to cover its interest when payments 
have been made to contractor. 

Eighth. All works and materials, as delivered on the premises 
to form a, part of the works, are to be considered the property of 
the city, and are not to be removed without its consent ; but 
the contractor shall have the right to remove all surplus materi- 
als after his completing the works. 

Ninth. Should the contractor fail to finish the work at or be- 
fore the time agreed upon, he shall pay to or allow the city, by 
way of liquidated damages, the sum of twenty-five dollars per 
diem for each and every day thereafter the said works shall re- 
main incomplete. 

This contract, made this 28th day of March, A. D. 1893, by and 
between Dean & Westbrook, of the city of New York, and state of 
New York, party of the first part, and the city of Manchester, a 
municipal corporation in the county of Hillsborough and state 
of New Hampshire, party of the second part, 

WITNESSETH, That the said party of the first part contracts 
and agrees to and with the party of the second part to furnish 
and erect by the i6th day of September, 1893, for the party of 
the second part, the superstructure for a steel bridge, at Second 
street, over the Piscataquog river in Manchester, in said county 
of Hillsborough, according to the accompanying specifications 
marked A which are hereby made a part of this contract. All 
the materials for the said bridge, except the abutments and piers, 
are to be furnished by the party of the first part, and are to be of 
good and suitable quality, and the work is to be done in a 



244 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

thorough and workmanlike manner. And the party of the sec- 
ond part contracts and agrees to furnish, ready for the super- 
structure, the abutments and piers for said bridge by the 15th 
day of July, 1893. And the party of the second part hereby 
contracts and agrees to pay the party of the first part the sum of 
twenty-six thousand six hundred and eighty-seven and ^W dol- 
lars, for the said bridge, as follows, viz. : 

Fifty per cent of the contract price upon the delivery of the 
steel material at Manchester and the balance upon the completion 
and acceptance of the work. And the party of the first part is 
not to be held responsible for unavoidable delays occasioned by 
the railroads, or the elements, or strikes. 

DEAN & WESTBROOK. 

THE CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

By E. J. Knowlton, Mayor, 

Byron Worthen, 

Sam C. Lowell, 

H. C. Holt, 

Charles H. Harvey, 

George E. Heath, 

Cotmnittee on Streets. 

March 28, the committee met and opened the bids received 
from the various companies, as follows : 

Dean & Westbrook, plan A . . . . . ^26,687.36 

plan B . . . . . 27,543.00 

plan C 28,176.00 

Boston Bridge Co., by R. H. Brown, agent . . 28,300.00 

R. F. Hawkins Co., by Mace Moulton, Agt., plan A 25,983.00 

plan B 26,076.00 

plan C 27,633.00 

plan D 26,090.00 

plan E 26,160.00 
Groton Bridge & Manufacturing Co., by F. H. 

Works, agent, Pratt Truss . . . . . 27,830.00 
Groton Bridge & Manufacturing Co., by F. H. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 245 

Works, agent, Camel Back Truss . . . ;j;2S, 360.00 

Berlin Iron Bridge Co., by George H. Sage, agent . 27,900.00 

Only one bid was received for the stone work, that being from 
Charles A. Bailey, of Suncook, who offered to do the work for 
$8.75 per cubic yard. 

The committee awarded the contract for the superstructure to 
Dean & Westbrook, as per plan A, and the contract for the sub- 
structure to Charles A. Bailey. Both firms gave bonds in the sum 
of $10,000 each for the faithful performance of the contract. 

The contract with Dean & Westbrook was signed March 28, 
and that with Charles A. Bailey, April 3. 

The digging was commenced April 13, and the first stone was 
laid May 15. Harry J. Briggs, of the city engineer's office, was 
placed in charge of the work as inspector, and saw that the terms 
of the contract were faithfully carried out. 

The final statement of Charles A. Bailey's bill as rendered 
September 6, 1893, ^^^^ ^s follows: 

To stone work on Second-street bridge, as per con- 
tract, 2,300.23 cubic yards at $8.75 . . . $20,127.01 
To expense of piling, 282 piles at $6 . . . 1,692.00 
3,500 ft. 3-inch plank, at $22 per M. 77.00 
7,OGo ft. io"xio" timbers, at $22 

per M. . . . . . . 154.00 

40 loads of grout and puddling, at 

$1 . . .... 40.00 

140 yards of rip-rap, at $2 . . 280.00 



Total cost of sub-structure .... $22,370.01 

Orders were given Mr. Bailey to draw on account as follows : 

June 10 ........ $3,000.00 

July 10 4,500.00 

August 9 3>349-93 



246 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



August 1 8 
August 28 
Balance, September 6 



$3,000.00 



5,520.08 



$22,370.01 

Orders were given Dean & Westbrook to draw on account as 
follows : 



50 per cent of amount as per contract, August 2 


. $13,343-68 


September 15 


1,500.00 


September 29 


2,000.00 


October 25 


160.00 


Balance, October 27 


9,684.68 


Total cost of superstructure . 


. $26,687.36 


Total cost of bridge .... 


• $49>o57-37 



The bridge was accepted by the committee October 27, 1S93. 

The fill across the island and the two approaches was made 
under the direction of the street and park commission. 

From the testimony of engineers and others who have exam- 
ined the bridge, the members of the committee feel confident 
that they have secured a first-class structure, one that will be 
practically indestructible and, all things considered, for durabil- 
ity one that has no superior in New England. 

The reason which prompted the committee to call for a per- 
manent structure was the experience of the past. A bridge with 
a wooden roadbed is a constant source of expense in the matter 
of repairs. With the examples that are continually presenting 
themselves, the committee felt justified in'calling for a bridge 
that would not simply last a decade, but stand as long as such in- 
destructible materials as stone, steel, brick and asphalt will hold 
together. 

There can be no doubt but that the building of this bridge 
will duplicate the splendid development and substantial results 
which are within easy remembrance as following the completion 
of the McGregor bridge, and five years hence will undoubtedly 
witness an increased valuation of property and investment of cap- 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 247 

ital on the south bank of the Piscataquog river, which will yield 
in a single year an accumulation of taxes sufficient to meet the 
entire cost of the construction of the bridge. 

The demand for the Second-street bridge was quite as urgent 
as was the call for McGregor bridge at the time of its construc- 
tion, and that it will bring a large quantity of desirable and as 
yet low-priced land into the market for building purposes is to 
the great benefit and advantage of the large industrial popula- 
tion of the city who are seeking homes, as well as to the owners 
of said land. 

All of the opposition as expressed by reputable citizens to this 
enterprise came from a misunderstanding of the situation and the 
position of the committee and misrepresentations to them as to 
what the bridge was to cost. Happily, those who at first op- 
posed it soon became its ardent supporters and heartily seconded 
the efforts of the committee. 



Petitions. 

The following is a list of the petitions referred to the commit- 
tee, and the action taken on them : 

Adams Street. An order to build Adams street from the 
south line of the Livermore land to Clarke street. 

January 14, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Walnut Street. An order to build Walnut street from Sal- 
mon to Webster street. 

January 14, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Alsace Street. For a new highway from the intersection of 
Amory street with Alsace, so called, on plan of lots for sale by J. 
McGovern and Sullivan & Sheehan, thence northerly to the in- 
tersection of Kelley with Alsace, so called, to be known as Alsace 
street, according to plan No. 1025, city engineer's otfice. 

John J. McGovern. 



248 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend tliat a hearing be 
granted. 

Alsace Street. For a new liighway from a stake on the 
north line of Amory street, in the center of Alsace, thence north- 
erly to a stake, about 1,700 feet to the south line of a proposed 
street, according to accompanying plans. 

Sullivan & Sheehan by John A. Sheehan. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Auburn Street. For a new highway from a stake on Cy- 
press street, as proposed, thence easterly to a stake on Platts 
avenue. 

F. M. Thurber. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Boutwell Street. For a new highway from a stake on the 
north line of Amory street, in the center of Boutwell street, 
thence northerly to a stake, about 1,693 ^^^^j ^o the south line of 
a proposed street, according to accompanying plans. 

Sullivan & Sheehan, by John A. Sheehan. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

CiLLEY Street. For the discontinuance of a portion of Cil- 
Jey street from a point in said Cilley street about 75 feet east 
from the east line of Wilson street, or said line extended, and 
the intersection of said Cilley street with the west line of Taylor 
street, or said west line extended. 

F. M. Hoyt. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Cilley Road. For a new highway from a point in the mid- 
dle of Cilley street, or road, about 75 feet east from the east line 
of Wilson street, or the same line extended, thence easterly par- 
allel to Shasta street, to a point in the west line of Taylor street, 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 249 

or said line extended, about 66 feet south from the south line of 
Cilley street, or road, as now laid out. 

F. M. Hoyt. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Cypress Street. For a new highway from the north side of 
Massabesic street and extending over the proposed Cypress street, 
thence northerly to the south side of Auburn street. 

F. A. Platts. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Foster Avenue. For a new highway from a stake on the 
south side of Valley street, in the center of Foster avenue as pro- 
posed, thence southerly to a stake on the north line of Young 
street. 

John A. Dunlap. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

To Purchase a Gravel Bank for the city of Manchester, of 
John H. Proctor, for the use of Highway District No. 8, two 
acres of land at a price not exceeding three hundred dollars, and 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for inci- 
dental expenses. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that the petition be 
referred to the street and park commission. 

Grove Street. For a new highway from the intersection of 
Pine stj-eet with Grove street, so called on the Amoskeag com- 
pany's plan of lots, thence easterly to the intersection of Beech 
street with Grove street, so called. 

James Glynn. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

JOLiETTE Street. For a new highway from a stake on the 
north line of Amory street, in the center of Joliette street, thence 



250 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

northerly to a stake about 1,699 f*^^^, to the south line of a pro- 
posed street, according to the accompanying plans. 

Sullivan & Sheehan, by John A. Sheehan. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. • 

Lafayette Street. For a new highway from a stake on the 
north line of Amory street, in the center of Lafayette street, 
thence northerly to a stake about 1,690 feet, to the south line of 
a proposed street, according to accompanying plans. 

Sullivan & Sheehan, by John A. Sheehan. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Laval Street. For a new highway from a stake on the west 
line of Amory street, in the center of Laval street, thence north- 
erly to a stake about 1,698 feet, to the south line of a proposed 
street, according to accompanying plans. 

Sullivan & Sheehan, by John A. Sheehan. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Monroe Street. For a new highway from the westerly ter- 
minus of Monroe street, thence to River road, said street to be a 
continuation of Monroe street. 

C. B. Littlefield. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearmg be 
granted. 

Morgan Street. For a new highway from a stake on north 
line of Amory street extension, and on the west line of a proposed 
street, shown as Morgan street, on a plan of said section known 
as Morgan's plan of lots in West Manchester, thence in a north- 
erly direction to a stake on the south line of Kelley street. 

William B. Morgan. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Prout Avenue. For a new highway from a stake on the 
south side of Hayward street, and 117^ feet easterly of the east 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 251 

line of Jewett street and in the- center of Prout avenue, thence 
southerly about 500 feet, according to a plan of said section 
known as No. 1012 in the city engineer's office. 

Walter W. Duncklee. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Watson Street. For a new highway from a stone bound on 
the north line of Hampton street, and 480 feet east of the east 
line of Belmont street, thence in a northerly direction about 380 
feet, to a stake on the westerly line of Dearborn street, the said 
line being the easterly line and parallel to Milton street, of a pro- 
posed 40-feet highway. 

George E. Watson. 

April 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

CoNANT AND MONTGOMERY STREETS. For a new highway 
from a stake in the center of Hevey and Conant streets, thence 
westerly in the center line of Conant street, about 270 feet, to a 
stake in the center of Montgomery street, thence northerly in 
Montgomery street, about 400 feet, according to Amoskeag Man- 
ufacturing Company's plan of lots. 

Bridget Twohey. 

May 18, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Erie Street. To accept and lay out a street, fifty feet wide, 
in West Manchester, said street beginning at a stake on the west 
side of South Main street, and proceeding in a westerly direc- 
tion four hundred and seventy (470) feet, to a maple tree stand- 
ing near the center of said street. 

John K. McQuesten. 

May 18, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Hall Street. For a new highway from a stake at the inter- 
section of the center lines of Hall street and Lake avenue, 



252 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

thence southerly to a stone bound at the intersection of the cen- 
ter lines of Hall and Spruce streets. 

L. W. Page. 

]May 1 8, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Mast Street. For a new highway from a stone bound on 
the southerly line of Mast street, on the line of land of E. W. 
Brigham, thence westerly to a stake in the center of Mast road 
near the junction of New Mast road. 

C. A. Brooks. 

May 1 8, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Wayne Street. For a new highway from the intersection of 
Dubuque and Wayne streets, the continuation of Wayne street, 
to be extended three hundred and seventy feet, in a westerly di- 
rection. 

M. Bessette. 

May 1 8, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Willow Street. For a new highway from a point in the 
center of Willow and Young streets, being the southerly termi- 
nus of Willow street, as laid out by the board of aldermen. May 
9, 1869, thence southerly in a straight line with Willow street as 
laid out, about 292 feet, to the center of Nutt road. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, by H. F. Straw. 

May 18, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Wilton Street. For a new highway from a stake at the 
intersection of Main street with Wilton street, thence westerly 
to a stake at the intersection of Cartier street with Wilton street. 

Andrew J. Edgerly. 

May 18, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Hayward Street. For a new highway from a stake in the 
westerly line of A. A. Ainsworth's land and in the center of 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 253 

Hayward street, as already laid out, and thence westerly to a 
stake on the east line of Belmont street, being a continuation of 
Hayward street westerly. 

A. A. Ainsvvorth. 

May 23, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Prescott Street. For a new highway from a stake on the 
easterly side of Wilson street, and in the center of Prescott 
street, as proposed, thence easterly to a stake on the westerly 
side of Hall street, as shown on a plan of said section on file in 
the city engineer's office. 

A. Elliott. 

May 23, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

For a new highway from a stake in the Candia road, so called, 
thence easterly to the Borough road, so called. 

Oilman Clough. 

May 23, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

AiNSwoRTH Avenue. For a new highway from Young street 
northerly to Hayward street. 

A. A. Ainsworth. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

BiSMARK Street. For a new highway from a stone bound at 
the intersection of Milford and Forest streets, and thence in a 
northerly direction a distance of six hundred and thirty-nine 
feet (639), to a stake at the intersection of a proposed new 
street, running at right angles, forty feet wide. 

Feit Tersa. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Canton Street. For narrowing a highway from a stone 
bound at the intersection of the east line of Canton street and 



254 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the south line of Lake avenue, thence southerly to a stake on the 
south line of Auburn street, said line being the easterly line of 
said street. 

M. E. Clough. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Cass Street. For a new highway beginning at the north 
line of Central street, and thence in a northerly direction to the 
south line of Laurel street. 

George S. Smith. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Christopher Street. For a new highway from a stake and 
stone on the east line of land of I). B. Eastman, and on the 
west line of land of J. H. Groux, and thence in a northeasterly 
direction about 750 feet, to the east line of the Groux land, 
thence in the same course to a stake on the west side of Railroad 
street. 

J. H. Groux. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Everett Street. For a new highway southerly from a stake 
on the south line of Clarke street, and 200 feet westerly of the 
west line of Elm street, said stake being on the east line of the 
street proposed, and thence in a southerly direction about 351 
feet, over land reserved for a street, as shown on plan No. 463, 
city engineer's office. 

J. C. Ray. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Foster Avenue. For a new highway from a stake on the 
southerly line of a highway two hundred and seventeen feet and 
seventy-five one hundredths of a foot westerly from the westerly 
line of a highv/ay called Jewett street, and in the center line of 
Foster avenue as proposed, thence in a southerly direction to a 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 255 

Stake on the northerly line of a highway called Hayward street, 
aiid two hundred and sixty-nine feet and two one hundredths of 
a foot westerly from a stone bound on the easterly line of said 
Jewett street. 

John A. Dunlap. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Main Street. For a new highway from a stone bound in 
the center of South Main and Mast streets, and thence in a 
northerly direction to a stone bound in the center of Main and 
Conant streets. 

Joseph B. Sawyer. 

W. H. Bennett. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Passageway, Elm to Everett Street. For a new highway 
from a stake on the west line of Elm street 321 feet south of the 
south line of Clarke street, and thence in a westerly direction 
about 200. feet to the proposed Everett street, as shown on plan 
No. 463, city engineer's office. 

J. C. Ray. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Putnam Street. For a new highway from a stone bound at 
the southwest corner of Putnam and Bartlett streets, as shown on 
plan of the D. C. Whittemore land, No. 1026, city engineer's 
office, and thence easterly to the corner of Putnam and "Whipple 
streets, the above line being the south line of the proposed 
street. 

P. Archambeault. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Sagamore North Back Street. For grading Sagamore 
north back street from Union street, thence westerly to Pine 
street. 



256 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Marquis D. Johnson. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that the petition be 
referred to the street and park commission. 

SoMERViLLE STREET. For a new highway from a stake on the 
southerly side of Young street, and thence in a westerly direc- 
tion to a stake on the easterly side of Jewett street. 

H. H. Young. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Thornton Street. For a new highway southerly from a 
stake on the east line of Thornton and on the south line of 
Wayne street, said stake being 200 feet west of the west line 
of Bartlett street, and thence in a southerly direction 1329.83 
feet to a stake, said line being the easterly line of Thornton 
street, as shown on plan No. 1026 in city engineer's office. 

E. C. Cartier. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Benton Street. For a new highway beginning at a stake 
on the east line of the Hall road about 700 feet northerly of the 
north line of the Concord & Portsmouth Railroad, and 
thence in an easterly direction about 240 feet to a stake on 
the westerly line of Jones street, proposed, being shown as Ben- 
ton street on a plan of said section. 

Oilman Clough. 

August 8, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Cartier Street. For an improvement from Wayne to Sul- 
livan street, the improvement being on Cartier street. 

Octave J. Lemerise. 

Committee voted to recommend that the petition be referred 
to the street and park commission. 

Jones Street. For a new highway beginning at a stake on 
the north line of Nelson street, proposed, 220.3 ^^^^ west of the 
west line of Mammoth road, being on the east line of Jones street, 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 257 

and thence in a northerly direction about 562 feet to a stake on 
the northerly line of the premises, being shown as Jones street 
on a plan of said section. 

Oilman Clough. 

August 8, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Nelson Street. For a new highway beginning at a stake on 
the west side of Mammoth road 74.47 feet north of the Concord 
& Portsmouth Railroad, being oh the south side of Nelson street, 
and thence in a westerly direction 509 feet to a stake on the east 
side of Hall road, shown as Nelson street on a plan of said sec- 
tion. 

Oilman Clough. 

August 8, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

For Relaying Paving, beginning at the canal bridge on Oran- 
ite street, on the north side of the horse railroad, and relay the 
paving from the canal bridge to the river bridge. 

John W. Wilson. 

August 8, committee voted to recommend that the petition be 
referred to the street and park commission. 

Turner Street. To macadamize, beginning at Granite 
street, on Turner street, thence southerly to Turner Hall. 
John W. Wilson. 

For a Watering Trough in said city, at or near the corner 
of Riddle street and Mast street in said city ; they therefore re- 
quest you to put in a watering-trough at the place described. 

James F. Wyman. 

August 8, committee voted to recommend that the petition be 
referred to the street and park commission. 

Auger Avenue. For a new highway from a stake on the west 
line of Nutt road, in South Manchester, and thence in a westerly 
direction to the easterly side of Calef road. 

J. N. Auger. 

17 



268 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

September 20, committee voted to recommend that a hearing 
be granted. 

Watson Street. For a new highway beginning at a stone 
bound on the north line of Hampton street, and 480 feet east of 
the east line of Belmont street, and thence in a northerly direc- 
tion about 380 feet to a stake on the westerly line of Dearborn 
street, the said line being the easterly line, and parallel to Mil- 
ton street, of a proposed 40-feet highway. 

George E. Watson. 

August 8, committee voted to defer action. 

September 20, committee voted to recommend that petitioners 
be given leave to withdraw. 

SoMERViLLE STREET. For a new highway beginning at the 
intersection of the center line of Somerville street and the 
center line of Hall street, and thence in an easterly direction to 
the intersection of the center line of Somerville and Belmont 
streets. 

C. K. Beadle. 

August 8, committee voted that the petition be laid over for 
the present. 

September 20, committee voted that the petition be laid over 
for the present. 

October 20, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

CiLLEY Road. For building to grade in said city, Cilley road 
from Beech street, and thence in an easterly direction to the top 
of the hill or about the line of Wilson street, produced. 

Thomas Chilcotte. 

October 20, committee voted to recommend that the petition 
be deferred until grade was established. 

For a new Highway beginning at a stake on the north line of 
Concord street two hundred and seven and one half (207^^) feet 
east from the passageway east of Maple street, and thence in a 
northerly direction one hundred and fifty (150) feet to a stake, 
said described line being the westerly line of said street. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 259 

Mrs. H. D. Corliss. 

August 8, committee voted to defer action. 

September 20, committee voted to defer action. 

October 20, committee voted to recommend that petitioners 
be given leave to withdraw. 

The following letter from the agent of the Amoskeag Manu- 
facturing Company was referred to the committee : 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, 
June 21, 1893. 
Hon. E. J. Knoivlton^ Mayor ^ Manchester, N. H. : 

Dear Sir, — When the streets were laid out through the prop- 
erty deeded to the Elliott Manufacturing Co. by the Amoskeag 
Co., the names of several of the streets were changed from the 
names given them on the plan, viz. : 

Green street was changed to Dudley street. 
Grove street was changed to Hampton street. 
Bell street was changed to Newton street. 
These changes were made without any notice to us. In the 
case of the first two streets, Green and Grove, these names have 
been used on our plan for nearly fifty years, and were referred to 
in many deeds and conveyances. Bell street was a more recent 
name, but that name we have used for several years, and have 
made many deeds by it. 

It seems to me very unfortunate that these changes should be 
made, as it is liable to lead to considerable confusion, and I 
would respectfully ask if possible that the original names of the 
streets.be restored. 

I understand, from Mr. Lane, that the reason given for making 
the changes was that some streets in West Manchester have been 
given the same names. Even if this be the case, it seems to me 
that the names as we have used them having been so long in use, 
should have given us a prior claim to their continuance. 
Yours truly, 

H. F. STRAW, 

Asrent. 



260 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Committee voted to recommend that the request be granted. 

This comprises all the work that has come within the province 
of the committee on streets, and is respectfully submitted. 

Alderman BYRON VVORTHEN, Chairman, 
Alderman SAM C. LOWELL, 
Councilman GEORGE E. HEATH, 
Councilman CHARLES H. HARVEY, 
Councilman HOWARD C. HOLT, 

Committee on Streets. 
W. H. Bennett, 
Clerk of Committee. 



Stark Park. 



At the beginning of the season it was decided to partially 
build the avenues and walks in this park in accordance with the 
plans prepared by Morton & Quimby, of Boston. Tracings were 
accordingly made of the plans, and the data prepared for staking 
out the same. The eastern part, or that portion east of the Stark 
burying ground, was in process of being laid out as the plans 
called for, when it was found that two of the main avenues would 
strike two of the largest and handsomest trees in the park. By 
permission of the street and park commission the plans were 
altered so as to allow these trees to remain. Why this state of 
things should have occurred is not known, as the designers had 
an accurate location of every tree or clump of trees in the park, 
furnished by this department. 

Only one avenue was built, that leading direct to the burying 
ground. Salem stone was used as a top-dressing over the Telford 
foundation, and thoroughly compacted with the steam roller, 
making an excellent roadway. The remainder was grassed over, 
the ground having previously been plowed and harrowed and 
the stones removed. 

The park was formally dedicated June 17. Though the rain 
fell copiously, thousands braved the elements and showed by 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 261 

their presence the loyalty and devotion they felt towards him 
whose remains lie buried in this park, — General John Stark, 
" the Hero of Bennington." 



Derryfield Park. 

Considerable work has been done in this park under the direc- 
tion of the street and park commission. The trees that were 
dead or dying have been removed, all unsightly boulders broken 
up, the bushes cut, and a blind drain constructed in the grove. 
Following out the plans prepared by this department, the main 
avenue twenty-five feet wide through the grove was staked out 
and grades given. The avenue was built, and a top-dressing of 
gravel put on. 

The cross-sectioning of the park commenced in December, 
1889, was only taken over about half the area, the westerly por- 
tion. This will have to be completed before grades can be estab- 
lished on the avenues in the easterly section, as in all probability 
work will be commenced on the general playground the coming 
season. 

Stone bounds, similar to those in Stark park, should be set at 
the corners and angles to preserve the lines, as the present marks 
are of wood and easily destroyed. 

This park is becoming a popular resort for all classes, being 
within easy reach of the street cars, and bids fair to become what 
its projectors intended, the people's park. 



Street Lines and Grades. 

The calls upon this department for street lines and grades have 
been numerous. As each year rolls by the city's growth extends, 
and our work instead of being confined within easy reach of the 
office, is now from one to three miles out in any direction. It 
has been the aim of this department to attend to the work as 
promptly as possible, and in the order received. Considerable 



2b2 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

trouble is occasioned by unreasonable persons who have an idea 
that they have but to give an order to have it attended to imme- 
diately. Oftentimes it is a week before it can be reached, and 
in the meantime they besiege the office, and even carry their 
complaints to the mayor that they cannot get the work done. 
His Honor has invariably explained the situation to them, and 
referred them back to this office. 

This brings up a point advocated in former reports, that a 
complete plan of a street should be prepared, showing the lines 
and grades, the same to be presented for consideration at the 
time the street is laid out. With this done the department could 
work to better advantage, and possibly silence those who make 
it a point to find fault because their wants are not attended to 
immediately, regardless of the fact that the department has no 
data for the work. To obviate this trouble as much as possible 
extra assistants have been employed during the summer season, 
and the work kept better in hand than ever before. 



Numbering Books. 

The growth of the city has been so extensive that the old 
numbering books were inadequate to contain plans of all the 
streets. Material enough was on hand, in loose sheets, to make 
two more books of the same size as those in use, but as they were 
on heavy mounted paper the volumes thus made would be en- 
tirely too cumbersome. 

It was deemed advisable to make a new set altogether, and 
this was accordingly done. The new set is in three volumes, 
one for streets running north and south, one for streets running 
east and west, and one for West Manchester. The three volumes 
contain in all one thousand three hundred and sixty-four pages, 
and embrace all streets within the city limits, with blank sheets 
for all probable additions for years. 

In comparing the numbers it was found that in many cases 
houses were bearing numbers that were incorrect. These will 
be changed as time will permit without confusion to occupants. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEtlR. 263 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Acting under orders received from the Pine Grove cemetery 
trustees, the survey and plan of the grounds, abandoned in 1889, 
was again taken up. The work was prosecuted with vigor and 
the entire cemetery surveyed with the exception of one section, 
the snow covering everthing before this was reached. A large 
plan, on a scale of twenty feet to an inch, was made from these 
notes. 

During the winter a tracing of this will be made for the use of 
the superintendent at his office. It is also proposed to make for 
the treasurer, a portfolio containing the plan in sections, one on 
a sheet, reserving the opposite sheet for the areas, owners' names, 
and such transfers as may be made. 

The remaining section will be surveyed early the coming spring 
and plotted on the plans. 



Committee Work. 

At the first meetings held by the committees on streets and on 
sewers and drains, the city engineer was elected clerk, as in pre- 
vious years, and in that capacity has attended each meeting, keep- 
ing a complete record of the proceedings, which are on file in 
this office. 

In addition meetings have been attended of the city govern- 
ment, committees on Valley cemetery, Pine Grove cemetery, city 
farm, lands and buildings, claims, commons, and parks, the street 
and park commission, and the board of aldermen. 

Besides the work before enumerated, many questions have been 
answered from engineers, boards of trade, and others in various 
cities throughout this country and Canada. 

I would respectfully tender my acknowledgments to his Honor 
the Mayor and the various committees of the city council for the 
support which they have given. 



264 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I also wish to acknowledge the courtesies shown by the vari- 
ous heads of departments, and the co-operation of the assistants 
of this department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT, 

City Engineer. 
January i, 1894. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Engineer's Office, No. 8 Vine Street, 

Manchester, N. H., Dec. 31, 1893. 

To His Honor the Mayor and Gentle77ien of the City Councils : 

In compliance with the laws and ordinances of the cit}'^, I 
herewith submit my fifteenth annual report (it being the forty- 
eighth of this department) giving a complete record of the op- 
erations of the department for the year ending December 31, 
1893, with a detailed statement of the fires and alarms that have 
been responded to by a portion or all of the force, together with 
the cause of such fires as far as the same have been ascertained, 
with the amount of insurance carried upon the property en- 
dangered, the amount of loss, and amount of insurance paid 
thereon. 

The report will also contain a complete list of the working 
force of the department, giving their rank, occupation, residence, 
etc., a list of the fire-alarm stations and location of keys to the 
same, location of hydrants, etc. 

There has been an unusual number of alarms during the year, 
but none of the fires proved to be of a very serious nature, that 
of the John Robbie Co. being the most severe one. 

There have been 59 bell alarms, two of which were second 
alarms for same fires, and 47 still alarms, making a total of 106, 
an excess over last year of 5, or 18 more bell alarms and 15 less 
still. 



268 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The property where fires have occurred has been insured to the 
amount of ^363,625 ; the losses as adjusted, or estimated, have 
been $88,447.90, and there has been paid $71,404.58 for insur- 
ance, leaving a net amount as uncovered of $17,043.32, a very 
commendable showing for the number of fires and the character 
of surroundings about said fires. 

THE FORCE 

consists of twenty-seven permanent and one hundred and eigh- 
teen call men, divided as follows : 

1 chief engineer. 

4 assistant engineers — call. 

4 steamer companies of 14 men each — 11 permanent and 45 
call — 56. 

2 steamer and truck companies, 20 men each — 8 permanent, 
32 call — 40. 

1 aerial truck company, 15 men — 3 permanent and 12 call — 

15- 

2 hose companies of 12 men each — 2 permanent and 22 call 
— 24. 

I chemical, 5 men — 2 permanent and 3 call — 5 — one of 
whom is detailed as driver of supply wagon. 
Making a total of 145 men. 

THE BUILDINGS 

of the department are in a fair condition, and, aside from the 
ordinary repairs (a few coats of paint and the like), vvill require 
but little outlay. 

I would recommend the sleeping quarters of Engine No. 3 on 
Lake avenue be changed by transferring them to the room now 
used as "company meeting-room," thus bringing the men in 
front of the horses, as well as making room for two more men 
that will soon have to be on permanent duty there. The change 
could be made at a slight expense and would give greatly im- 
proved service. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 269 

As a matter of economy as well as an improvement, the en- 
gine rooms of Engines Nos. 3 and 4 should be varnished and the 
one of Engine No. 5 painted a lighter color. 

The new station in McGregorville, after many " trials and 
tribulations," has finally got settled, and since it has been low- 
ered makes quite a convenient engine room, although the stable 
is rather crowded and cramped. 

THE APPARATUS 

as at present located consists of — 

2 steam fire-engines at Central station, with horse hose wagons. 

I steam fire-engine with two-horse hose wagon and hook-and- 
ladder combination, North Main street. 

I steam fire-engine and hose carriage, at corner of Lake ave- 
nue and Massabesic street. » 

I hook-and-ladder truck at same station (transferred from Cen- 
tral station). 

I steam fire-engine and two-horse hose carriage with hook- 
and-ladder combination, at corner of Webster and Chestnut 
streets. 

I steam fire-engine and one-horse hose carriage, on Rimmon 
street, corner of Amory street. 

I hook-and-ladder truck (new) at same station. 

I horse hose carriage at Central station. 

I horse hose carriage, corner Maple and East High streets. 

I aerial hook-and-ladder truck at Central station. 

I double tank (60 gallons each) chemical engine at Central 
station. 

I supply wagon at Central fire station. 

I steam fire-engine (reserve) at old engine house, Clinton 
street, of but little use for fire purposes, and hardly worth put- 
ting on the list. 

I hand hose carriage at junction of Old Falls road and Front 
street, Amoskeag. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, Devonshire mills, Goffe's Falls. 

2 exercise wagons (with pole, shafts, and three-horse hitch), 



270 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

one at Central station and one at station of Engine No. 2. 

Since my last report, the first size Amoskeag steamer, and the 
two ladder trucks therein mentioned, have been received and put 
into commission, the new steamer taking the name, number, and 
position of Engine No. 4, and that engine thoroughly overhauled 
and repaired at the Manchester Locomotive Works, and placed in 
station of Engine and Ladder No. 6, in McGregorville. 

THE HORSES. 

There are now thirty-five horses connected with this depart- 
ment, and two more will soon have to be bought for Truck No. 
3. A pair are at present on trial. 

The pair of horses transferred from Engine No. 4 to Ladder 
No. 6 are unfit for the duties required of them both on account 
of age and weight, and should be exchanged for a younger and 
heavier pair. 

The horses were all insured by a local live stock insurance 
company which closed up its business, and the policies were trans- 
ferred to the Security Live Stock Insurance Company, of Boston. 

Seven horses have been purchased during the year : One for 
Truck No. i, in place of gray horse transferred to hose for En- 
gine No. I, three for Engine No. 4, and three for Engine No. 6. 
The prices paid have been more reasonable than heretofore, with 
the quality of the horses equally good. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

During the past year we have added three boxes to this sys- 
tem, Nos. 39, 214, 215, one of which, however, (county jail) 
was purchased by the county commissioners at the expense of 
the county for the protection of the jail buildings. 

There has been a call for a tower striker on the East Manches- 
ter schoolhouse in Hallsville, but as it was asked for only on the 
ground of "striking out the schools," it was deemed best not 
to place one there at the expense of this department, as there is 
no necessity whatever for putting one there for fire purposes, as 
no members of the department reside in that vicinity. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 271 

The sleet storm of Sunday, January 29, loaded our wires so 
heavily as to break our main line on No. i circuit, and our tapper 
lines in four places, and the heavy storm of Sunday, December 
3, broke our No. i circuit in four places, No. 5 in one, and No. 
6 in one. During this storm and while the wires were being re- 
paired, an alarm came in from box 6, and as a result of the 
breaks only a few of the bells were struck and none of the tap- 
pers, as they are struck from No. 5, which was one of the cir- 
cuits down at the time. 

We have set fifteen new poles, taken out fifteen gongs, and 
put in seventeen during the year, painted all the boxes and the 
box poles. In changing over the wires, have taken down about 
five miles and put up six miles, have put up forty-one extensions 
and seventy-eight cross-arms. 

There are about thirty-three miles of main line wire, requiring 
one hundred and eighty jars of gravity battery, and thirty-two 
miles of tapper lines, requiring two hundred and forty jars. 

THE FOURTEENTH ANNUAL PARADE 

occurred earlier this year than usual, and was held in conjunction 
with the dedication of Stark park, on June 17. 

THE firemen's RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

Only one call has been made for relief on account of accident 
during the year, and the funds have been increased by donations 
as follows : 

Cash on hand, February 14, 1893 $3,246.63 

Received for menibership fees 17.00 

from Rev. J. J. Lyons 10.00 

Alonzo H. Weston 25.00 

Clarence R. Merrill 25.00 

Mrs. Thomas Morgan and sons ^.OO 

A. P. Olzendam Co 2.5.00 

Roger G. Sullivan 10.00 

Mrs. Hannah F. Straw 10.00 

Michael McCabe 5.00 

Ex-Chief John H. Maynard 10.00 

dividend on deposits 125.64 

$3,534.27 



272 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Paid Edwai-d Sargent, injury received at fire $14.00 

Joseph E.Merrill, secretary 25.00 

A. S. Campbell, printing ---5 

Leaving a balance in treasury ot $3,493.02 



RECOMMENDATIONS. 

First of all, I would strongly recommend to all citizens that 
they should acquaint themselves with the location of the nearest 
fire-alarm box to their residence or place of business, also where 
the keys are kept, which can be done by consulting the report of 
this department as published in each city report, and the manner 
of giving the alarm when the box is once opened, which is done 
by ^^ pulling down the hook once and let go ^ It often occurs 
that no thought is given to this matter until the fire starts, then 
all is confusion, and no one knows where to go to give an alarm 
or how to do it if they do know the locality of the box, and fre- 
quently much time is lost by the lack of this knowledge. 

I would recommend a double fifty-gallon tank chemical en- 
gine for the West Side. The same can be placed in the station 
of Engine No. 2, with little alteration in house and additional 
stable room. 

I would recommend exercise wagons for Engines Nos. 3, 5, 
and 6, also for Hose No. 2 ; alterations in the sheds of Engine 
No. 2 for the better convenience of the exercise wagon, and the 
arrangement for a repair shop in the same. An arrangement for 
a room for repairs at Central station, would, I think, be a great 
convenience as well as saving to the department. 

I would recommend the purchase of another truck at an early 
date, as the transfer of Truck No. i to Truck No. 3 affords, in 
many instances, the poorest ladder service we have had for years, 
and while our city has been fortunate in the past, it is no guar- 
antee for the future, and we should at least have sufficient appa- 
ratus for our protection ; and if one will but consider, it cannot 
fail to be seen that our city has extended its limits and increased 
its buildings and fire risks in a much larger proportion than this 
department has been increased. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 273 

The hose house at South Manchester, I think, should be a 
two-door house, suited for the reception of steamer, hose wagon, 
and truck, later on, with, perhaps, the organization of a new 
hose company at present with hose wagon, and without any re- 
duction or transfer of apparatus at Central station. 

While the times may not warrant the raising of salaries, I de- 
sire to call the attention of the councils to the salaries paid the 
assistant engineers, and the fact that their salary is less than 
that paid "call-engineers" of engines. While I do not con- 
sider the latter too large, I do say I think that paid the former 
too small. 

In concluding, I desire to extend my thanks to His Honor 
Mayor Knowlton, to the committee on fire department, and 
members of the City Councils for the aid and assistance they 
have rendered for making this department more efficient. To 
the assistant engineers and officers and men, of whom I desire to 
bear testimony of their willingness and efficiency, I tender my 
most sincere thanks, and shall ever feel grateful for the assist- 
ance they have rendered. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 
Chief of Fire Department. 



List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 1 893, 
with Losses and Insurance. 

Box 71. Wednesday, January 4, 11. 11 a. m. Cottage house 
at No. 151 Lake avenue, owned by Mary L. Sleeper. Cause, a 
lamp exploded or v/as tipped over. Damage to building, $\o. 
Insurance, ^1,000. Insurance paid, %\o. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Sunday, January 8, 5.05 p. m. Burning chimney at 
No. 379 Manchester street. No damage. Used pony extin- 
guisher from Steamer No. 3. 

Box 24. Sunday, January 15, 1 0.1 S A. M. Two-story wooden 
building in process of finishing, at corner of East Spruce and 

18 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Belmont streets, belonging to People's Laundry Co. Cause, de- 
fective chimney. Damage to building, $476. Insurance, $1,000. 
Insurance paid, $476. Box pulled by member of Engine No. 3. 

Box 7. Monday, January 16, 10.21 p. m. Burning chimney 
at No. 17 Washington street. Needless alarm. No damage. 
Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Tuesday, January 17, 3.35 a. m. Burning chimney at 
No. 33 Pearl street. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Box 21. Tuesday, January 17, 11.54 a. m. Three-story 
wooden block on Laurel avenue, owned by Mrs. E. W. Bartlett. 
Tenement occupied by John Garvey. Cause, three-years old 
child threw a lighted match in the woodbox. No damage. Box 
pulled by citizen. 

Box 7. Tuesday, January 17, 5.06 p. m. Three-story wooden 
block on Birch street, owned by Mrs. Mary Sweeney. Tene- 
ment occupied by Joanna Callahan, Cause, lamp fell into wood- 
box, broke, and ignited. Damage to building, $20. No insur- 
ance. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Thursday, January 19, 10.15 p. m. Manure piie in 
barn cellar, rear of Amherst street. Chemical responded and 
used pony extinguisher. No damage. 

Box 315. Saturday, January 21, 3.53 a. u. Three-story 
wooden building known as the Amoskeag Hotel, on Front street, 
'Skeag, owned by the heirs of Michael Linen, and occupied by 
Curtis D. Joyal. Supposed to have been caused by a hot stove. 
Damage to building, $4,000. Insurance, $2,000. Insurance 
paid, $1,613. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Monday, January 23, 8.55 p. m. Slight fire in shed 
of James F. Cavanaugh at 503 Lake avenue. Responded to by 
members of Steamer No. 3, with pony. No damage. 

Box 52. Friday, February 3, 12.40 p. m. Three-story brick 
block at corner of Granite and Main streets, occupied for stores 
and tenements, and owned by A. N. Clapp. Dr. Walter Mitch- 
ell, druggist, at 344 Granite street, was mixing chemicals; the 
gas aiising from the retort ignited, causing an explosion. Dam- 
age to building, $60. Insurance, $12,000. Insurance paid, $35. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 275 

Damage to contents, ^42.25. Insurance, $2,500. Insurance 
paid, ^42.25. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 8. Saturday, February 4, 6 p. m. One story wooden 
building Nos. 1258 to 1276 Elm street, owned by C. F. Morrill 
and George E. Gage, and occupied by Jones & Co., at No. 
1276, and Manchester Belting and Leather Supply Co., at Nos. 
1268 to 1272, and others. Cause, spontaneous combustion. 
Damage to building, ^346.25. Insurance, $2,500. Insurance 
paid, $346.25. Damage to Jones & Co. 's stock, $601.92. In- 
surance, $600. Insurance paid, $600. Damage to Leather Sup- 
ply Co., $3,195. Insurance $12,000. Insurance paid, $3,195. 
Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 82. Friday, February 10, 5.01 a. m. One-story wooden 
building, rear of 61 Hanover street, owned and occupied by 
S. A. Garland, as a bakery. Fire caught from the stove. Dam- 
age to building, $200. No insurance. Damage to contents, 
$400. Insurance $1,000. Insurance paid, $310. Box pulled by 
police. 

Box 7. Saturday, February 11,5.58 a. m. Three-story brick 
block Nos. 1 1 17 to 1 1 25 Elm street, owned by Kennard Bros, and 
Chadwick and occupied by H. I. Faucher, grocer. The fire caught 
from a kerosene stove. Damage to building, $590. Insurance, 
$9,000. Insurance paid, $590. Damage to contents, $300. No 
insurance. Box pulled by Officer O'Dowd. 

Box 82. Sunday, February 12, 10.39 ^- m. Three-story 
wooden block, rear of No. 150 Manchester street, owned by 
J. Trask Plumer, and occupied by several families. Probably 
caused by the carelessness of children with matches. Damage to 
building, $135. Insurance, $3,000. Insurance paid, $135. 
Damage to contents about $20, and no insurance. Box pulled 
by police. 

Still. Sunday, February 12, 11.05 ^- ^^- Burning chimney 
at No. 300 Pine street. Chemical Company responded and used 
pony. No damage. 

Box 71. Sunday, February 12, 11.28 p. m. Two-story house 
at No. 242 Union street, owned by Mrs. Emma L. Dustin, and 



276 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

had been occupied by Mrs. Maloney, who was buried that after- 
noon. Fire was caused by carelessness with pipe. Damage to 
building, $106.50. Insurance, $500. Insurance paid, $106. 
Damage to contents, $15. No insurance. Box pulled by Officer 
Robie. 

Box 3. Monday, February 13, 5.39 p. m. Barn on Nutt 
road owned and occupied by James W. Kimball. The fire orig- 
inated from some unexplained cause. Damage to building, ^100. 
No insurance. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 21. Wednesday, February 15, 2.42 p. m. Four-story 
wooden tenement house, at No. 121 Merrimack street, owned by 
Peter Rogers, and occupied by him as a grocery store, and Mrs. 
Lydia J. McGovern as a boarding-house. Cause unknown. 
Damage to building, ^120. Insurance, $300. Insurance paid, 
1 1 20. No damage to contents. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 213. Saturday, February 18, 2.15 a. ini. Three-story 
wooden building, sash and blind works, owned' by Austin, Flint 
& Day Co., and occupied by them and the B. H. Piper Co., 
manufacturers of spokes, handles, bats, etc. Cause unknown. 
Damage to building, $35. Insurance on building and contents 
(blanket policy), $35,000. Insurance paid, $35. Damage to 
stock, $318.71. Insurance paid, $318.71. B. H. Piper's stock: 
Damage, $1,507.47. Insurance, $4,500. Insurance paid, 
$1,414.29. Box pulled by watchman of works. 

Still. Saturday, February 25, 8.45 A. m. Burning chimney 
at No. 236 Amherst street. Used pony. No damage. 

Box 82. Sunday, March 5, 7.34 a. m. Three-story brick 
block at No. 79 Manchester street, owned by Mary O'Connor, 
and occupied by Francois God bout as a poolroom and saloon. 
The fire originated from a sawdust spit-box. Damage to build- 
ing, $31.35. Insurance, $3,000. Insurance paid, $31.35. Dam- 
age to contents, $50. Insurance, $1,000. Insurance paid, $50. 
Box pulled by Officer Lake. 

Still. Saturday, March 11, 1.05 p. m. Three-story brick 
block at No. 52 Stark street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Co., and occupied by Frank La Rose as a boarding-house. Slight 
fire in bed. Used pony. No damage. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 277 

Box 82. Saturday, March 11, 8.29 r. m. Four-story brick 
block at No. 75 Manchester street, owned by heirs of John Dealy 
and occupied by Daniel J. Thompson as liquor saloon. The fire 
was probably caused by careless use of matches. Damage to 
building, ^65. Insurance, |6, 000. Insurance paid, $65. Dam- 
age to contents, ^187. Insurance, ^1,500. Insurance paid, 
$18"]. Box pulled by captain of the watch. 

Box 81. Thursday, March 16, 11.35 ^- ^^- Four-story brick 
block at No. 978 Elm street, owned by E. K. Rowell, and occu- 
pied by Patrick H. Larkin as a fruit store. Cause is unknown. 
Damage ^130. No insurance. Damage to contents, ^250. In- 
surance, $700. Insurance paid, $250. Box pulled by Officer 
Burns. 

Still. Friday, March 17, 4.45 A. M. North Main street 
schoolhouse. Janitor was "cooling off" redhot poker in pile of 
papers. Used pony from Engine No. 2. No damage. 

Box 8. Wednesday, April 19, 6.58 a. m. Three-story brick 
tenement block at 17 Clark avenue, owned by heirs of Joseph 
B. Clark and occupied by several families. A bed in the tene- 
ment of Joseph Guimond caught fire from some unknown cause. 
Damage to bed about ^3. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Wednesday, April 19, 8.40 p. m. Burning chimney 
at 195 Hanover street. Used pony. No damage. 

Box 82. Thursday, April 20, 1.20 a. m. Four-story brick 
block at 21 Pearl street, owned by Daniel Ready and occupied 
by Dr. A. A. E. Brien as a drugstore and by several families. The 
fire originated in the air box connected with the furnace. Dam- 
age to building, $150. Insurance, ^15,000. Insurance paid, 
$150. Damage to Brien's stock, $800. Insurance, ^3,300, In- 
surance paid, $533-07. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Thursday, April 20, 5.25 p. m. Burning chimney at 
Joseph L. Smith's house, at 174 Concord street. Used pony. 
No damage. 

Still. Monday, April 24, 4.55 a. m. Three-story brick block 
owned by Manchester Corporation and occupied by Flora E. 
Corliss as a boarding-house. Caused by a foul chimney. Re- 
sponded with pony. No damage. 



278 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 27. Monday, April 24, 2.21 p. m. Hedge and grass fire 
on land of James Baldwin. Extinguished before arrival of de- 
partment. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Thursday, April 27, 12.10 p. m. Burning chimney at 
129 Manchester street. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Still. Friday, April 25, 1.50 p. m. Grass fire rear 528 Gran- 
ite street. Hose carriage of Steamer No. 2 responded. Used 
pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, April 28, 3.45 p. m. At 1077 Elm street. 
Slight fire. Extinguished by Chemical. 

Box 56. Saturday, April 29, 8.22 a. m. Dryhouse of the 
James Baldwin Co. on Mast road. Cause unknown. Damage 
to building, ^25. No insurance. Damage to stock, $175. No 
insurance. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Saturday, April 29, 1.05 p. u. Brush fire on McGregor 
hill. Engine No. 2 hose carriage responded. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, April 29, 6.15 p. m. Brush fire on Mast road. 
Engine No. 2 hose carriage responded. No damage. 

Box 8. Sunday, April 30, 10.40 p. M. Three-and-one-half 
story wooden block, 1273 Elm street, owned by David H. Young 
and occupied by Mrs. L. B. Perkins as a grocery and provision 
store. Cause unknown. Damage to building, $45. Insurance, 
$5,000. Insurance paid, $45. Damage to stock, $25. Insur- 
ance, $1,000. Insurance paid, $25. Box pulled by officer. 

Box 114. Thursday, May 11, ii.ioa. m. Three-story brick 
schoolhouse owned by the city, located on Ash, Bridge, Maple, 
and Pearl streets. Cause unknown. Damage to building, $45. 
No insurance. Contents not damaged. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Thursday, May 11, i.io p. m. Brush fire at south end 
of Beech street extension. Responded with Chemical and dele- 
gation of men. Chemical not used. 

Still. Thursday, May 11, 7.45 p. m. Burning chimney at 
590 Beech street. Responded with pony. No damage. 

Box 45. Friday, May 12, 3.58 p. m. Two alarms. Two one- 
story buildings at 72-90 Granite street, owned by Clarence R. 
Merrill and Mrs. Charles H. Hill and occupied by Clarence R. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 279 

Merrill as a hay and grain store. Cause unknown. Damage to 
buildings, $5,000. Insurance, $3,500. Insurance paid, $3,500. 
Damage to contents, $14,000. Insurance, $11,000. Insurance 
paid, $10,500. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 52. Sunday, May 21, 1.31 p. M. Storehouse and stable 
rear of 120 South Main street, owned by Pettee & Adams and oc- 
cupied by Adams & Tasker as a hay and grain storehouse. The 
cause is supposed to be the carelessness of a smoker. Damage 
to buildings, $625. Insurance, $800. Insurance paid, $596. 
Damage to contents, $319. Insurance, $500. Insurance paid, 
$319. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Wednesday, May 24, 12.05 p- ^^- One-story' wooden 
photograph gallery owned and occupied by Desclos Bros. 
Caused by explosion of gasoline. Damage, $25. No insurance. 
Chemical responded. 

Still. Thursday, May 25, 3 p. m. Brush fire in Kennard 
woods on Hooksett road. Responded with several men. 

Box 26. Thursday, May 25, 8.55 p. m. Cottage house, 267 
Lowell street, owned and occupied by William Mould. Break- 
ing a kerosene lamp caused the alarm. No damage. Box pulled 
by citizen. 

Box 4. Tuesday, May 30, 9 p. m. Wooden ten-footer, 506 
Elm street, owned by Michael Kearns and occupied by Mrs. 
Bridget Kearns as a second-hand clothing store. Fire caught 
among some old clothes from some unknown cause, but was ex- 
tinguished before arrival of department. No damage. Box 
pulled by citizen. 

Still. Friday, June 9, 7 a. m. Woodbox at 45 Dubuque 
street. Extinguished with pony from Engine No. 2. 

Box 14. Saturday, June 10, 2.49 a. m. Two-story dwelling 
at 128 Orange street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Celenda A. 
Morgan. The fire originated in a blind attic from some unknown 
cause. Damage to buildings, $1,078. Insurance, $3,800. In- 
surance paid, $1,078. Damage to contents, $520. Insurance, 
$2,000. Insurance paid, $520. Box pulled by officer. 

Still. Saturday, June 10, 1.50 p. m. Four-story brick block 



280 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

at 22 Concord street, owned by Chandler, Riddle (heirs) & Var- 
ney and occupied by Charles L. Fitzpatrick as a printing-office, 
and by several families. The fire originated from the ignition of 
benzine used in washing type. No damage to building. Dam- 
age to contents, ^25. Insurance, ^700. Insurance paid, $25. 

Box 82. Saturday, June 10, 11. 51 p. m. Three-story wooden 
block at 1 147 Elm street, owned by A. H. Weston and occupied 
by Augustine Halli. The fire was caused by one of the men 
breaking a lamp in a room in second story. Damage to build- 
ing' $95- Insurance, $500. Insurance paid, ^95. Damage to 
contents, ^50. Insurance, $800. Insurance paid, $50. Box 
pulled by citizen. 

Still. Tuesday, June 13, 10.12 p. m. Burning chimney at 
Old Hotel, in 'Skeag, corner of Front street and Old Falls road. 
Used pony. Damage slight. 

Still. Tuesday, June 20, 9.46 a. m. Burning paper in fur- 
nace under New Hampshire Trust Co. No damage. Chemi- 
cal responded. 

Still. Thursday, June 22, 11. 15 a. m. Burning chimney in 
Corcoran's block, 133 Central street. No damage. Used pony. 

Box 62. Sunday, July 2, 2.30 p. m. Brush fire near Josselyn 
Furniture Works. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Sunday, July 2, 8 p. m. Burning chimney at 18 Mer- 
rimack back street. Used pony. No damage. Chemical re- 
sponded. 

Still. Tuesday, July 4, 12.40 a. i\i. Fire in a pile of rub- 
bish in rear of Thomas Kelley's fruit store at 1073 Elm street. 
Chemical responded. No damage. 

Box 6. Tuesday, July 4, 5.03 a. u. Four-story brick block 
at 19 Hanover street, owned by N. S. Clark and occupied by 
Clark & Estey as a millinery and fancy goods store. Damage to 
contents, $2,675. Insurance, $13,250. Insurance paid, $2,675. 

Still. Tuesday, July 4, 5.10 a. m. Slight fire in fence of J. 
W. Fellows, corner Lowell and Beech streets. Hose No. 2 re- 
sponded. Damage slight. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 281 

Still. Sunday, July 9, 9.30 a. i\l Burning chimney at 180 
Lake avenue. Responded with pony. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, July 16, 12.14 i'- ^i- Kimball Bros.' shoe- 
shop, Hallsville. Unadjusted thermostat. Responded to by 
Engine No. 3. 

Box 15. Tuesday, July 18, i.iop. m. Three-story wooden 
block on Pearl street, owned by heirs of John M. Hayes. Fire 
started in woodbox from a spark from the stove. Damage slight. 
Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 21. Wednesday, July 19, 9.24 a. m. St. Anne's Cath- 
olic church at corner Merrimack and Union streets. A fire was 
discovered in the altar during the progress of a funeral, the cause 
unknown. Damage to contents, $140. Insurance, $20,000. In- 
surance paid, $140. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Thursday, July 20, 3.30 p. m. Grass fire on River 
road north. Responded to by members of Engine No. 5. No 
damage. 

Still, Friday, July 21, 9.55 a. m. Chemical called to brush 
fire east of reservoir. No damage. 

Still. Friday, July 21, 11.55 ^- ^^- Chemical called to same 
fire on Ledge road. 

Box 113. Friday, July 21, 3.18 p. m. Some excited person 
gave alarm for same fire. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Friday, July 21, 4.15 p. m. Grass fire on River road 
north caught from sparks from locomotive. No damage. Re- 
sponded to by members of Engine No. 5. 

Still. Saturday, July 22, 2 p. m. Grass fire on Mrs. J. A. 
Head's land near bobbin shop on Mast road. Engine No. 2 re- 
sponded with hose carriage. No damage. 

Box 4. Saturday, July 22, 12.55 p- ^- Tenement block at 
68 Lake avenue, owned by W. E. Prescott and occupied by Jo- 
seph Grenor. Tapers placed at the head of a dead child ignited 
sheet. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Friday, July 28, 12.55 p. M. Rear of Opera House, 
caused by painter's carelessness in leaving oily wast^ in waste 
pipe. No damage. 



282 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 53. Wednesday, August 9, 8.50 p. m. Burning chimney 
in Wallace block. No damage. Needless alarm. Box pulled 
by citizen. 

Box 71. Saturday, August 26, 12.55 ^- ^^- Barn situated at 
151 East Spruce street, owned and occupied by Thomas F. Glan- 
cy. The fire originated in the hayloft from some unknown 
cause. Damage to building, $429. Insurance, $800. Insur- 
ance paid, ^429. Damage to contents, $75.70. Insurance, $1,- 
400. Insurance paid, $75.70. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 82. Saturday, August 26, 9.46 p. m. Tenement block 
at 1 153 Elm street, owned by Riddle heirs and occupied by John 
St. Petre. Lamp exploded. No damage. Box pulled by cit- 
izen. 

Box 3. Saturday, September 2, 8.32 p. m. Wood yard ofDe 
Courcy, Holland & Marshall, corner of Elm street and Nutt road. 
Fire originated under a circular saw bench, probably from spon- 
taneous combustion. Damage slight. Damage to building, $7. 
Insurance, $1,500. Insurance paid, $7. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Wednesday, September 6, i p. m. Brush and peat in 
Stark's swamp. Engine No. 2 responded. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, September 12, 8.10 p. m. Slight blaze of 
burning rags used for cleaning in T. F. Fifield's grocery store at 
57 Hanover street. No damage. 

Box 71. Wednesday, September 13, 11.40 a.m. Dwelling- 
house at 165 Cedar street, owned by Michael Murry and occu- 
pied by Jere. J. Healy. The fire was confined to a closet in sec- 
ond story of Healy's tenement, })robably caused by a smoker's 
pipe. Damage to building, $24. Insurance, $1,200. Insurance 
paid, $24. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 321. Thursday, September 14, 6.56 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney in house owned by C. A. Wallace at 371 Cartier street. No 
damage. Needless alarm. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 313. Monday, September 18, i.io p. m. Two-story ten- 
ement house at 25 Marion street, owned by Frank C. Livingston 
and occupied by Frans Rousseault. Caused by smoking in bed. 
Damage slight. Box pulled by citizen. 



I 

I 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 283 

Box 54. Tuesday, September 19, 4.57 p. m. Hen-house in 
rear of 58 A street, 'Squog, owned by Edmund Y. Harwood. 
Caught from burning hay saturated with kerosene. Damage to 
buildings, $30. No insurance. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 4. Friday, September 22, 1.19 P. m.' Burning chimney 
at 569 Elm street (rear), owned by Michael Connor. No dam- 
age. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 4. Second alarm pulled immediately. Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 26, 2.08 P. M. Barn near corner of Elm and Auburn 
streets, owned by Thomas Hobbs. The fire originated from some 
unknown cause and damaged the block near by. Owing to the 
combustible material in that locality a second alarm was given. 
Damage to barn, $500. Insurance, $400. Insurance paid, $40°- 
Damage to block, ^48.50. Insurance, ^2,100. Insurance paid, 
^^48.50. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 21. Tuesday, September 26, 10.53 p. m. Barn in back 
street between Laurel and Central, Pine and Chestnut streets, 
owned by W. C. Blodgett and occupied by Charles Brooks and 
Mrs. Gauthier for storage. Cause unknown. Damage to barn, 
;^5o, fully covered by insurance. Damage to contents, ^25, fully 
insured. Box pulled by Officer O'Dowd. 

Still. Friday, September 29, 8.30 p. m. Burning chimney 
at 22 Concord street. Used pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, September 30, S.43 a. m. Burning chimney 
at rear of 189 Manchester street. Used pony. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, October 10, 6.10 p. m. City dump south of 
Beech street. Engine No. 3 responded with hose carriage. 

Still. Wednesday, October 11, 8. 40 a. m. City dump, south 
Beech street. Engine No. 3 responded with hose carriage. 

Box 51. Saturday, October 14, 9.32 a. m. Burning chimney 
corner Bath and Turner streets, West Manchester. No damage. 
Needless alarm. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Monday, October 16, 7.14 p. m. Burning chimney at 
47 Church street. Used pony. No damage. 

Box 82. Saturday, November 4, 12.58 p. m. Three-story 
tenement block at 38 Lowell street, owned by Michael McCabe 



284 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and occupied by P. D. Noel. Fire caught from defective chim- 
ney. Damage to building, $15. No insurance. Box pulled by 
citizen. 

Box 313. Wednesday, November 8, 4.28 a. m. Four-story 
tenement block, rear 25 Marion street, owned by F. C. Living- 
ston and occupied by Mrs. Jerome St. Lawrence and seven other 
families. The fire was probably caused by rats and matches. 
Damage to buildings, $105.50. Insurance, $4,500. Insurance 
paid, $105.50. Damage to contents, $25. No insurance. Box 
pulled by officer. 

Still. Wednesday, November 8, 7.45 a. m. Burning chim- 
ney at 51 Douglas street. Engine No. 2 responded. Used pony. 
No damage. 

Box 4. Saturday, November 11, 4.20 p. m. Tenement block 
at No. 220 Chestnut street, owned by Patrick J. Horan and oc- 
cupied by several families. Cause unknown. Damage to build- 
ing, $300. Insurance $2,000. Insurance paid, $300. Damage 
to contents, $100. No insurance. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Monday, November 13, 6.20 p. M. Burning chimney 
at corner of Elm and Lowell streets, in Martin's block. Used 
pony. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, November 14, 4.20 p. m. Tar kettle on 
Spring street boiled over and caught fire. Extinguished by 
chemical engine. 

Box 21. Wednesday, November 15, 8.10 p. m. Barn in rear 
of No. 158 Lake avenue, owned and occupied by Jeremiah Ha- 
ley. Cause unknown. Damage to building, $65. Insurance, 
$100. Insurance paid, $65. Damage to contents, $25. No in- 
surance. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 82. Friday, November 24, 6.17 p. m. Four-story brick 
block at No. 1094 Elm street, owned by Elliot and Means, and 
r.ccupied by Joel Daniels as a paint store, and others. The fire 
originated in the basement from spontaneous combustion. Dam- 
age to building, $60. Insurance, $25,000. Insurance paid, $53. 
Damage to stock. $400. Insurance, $4,500. Insurance paid, 
$380.98. Box pulled by citizen. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 285 

Still. Monday, November 27, 7.45 a. m. Burning chimney 
at No. 415 Granite street. Responded to by engine No. 2 and 
extinguishers. No damage. 

Box 6. Monday, December 4, 2.15 a. m. Switch-board of 
Western Union Telegraph Co. Caused by cross with electric 
light wires, owing to sleet storm. Damage slight. Box pulled 
by Officer Lovejoy. 

Box 6. Monday, December 4, 10.39 p. M. Three-story brick 
block at Nos. 864-884 Elm street, owned by Eben Ferren and 
New Hampshire Insurance Co., and occupied by John Robbie 
Co., Stephen Piper, and others. Fire originated in the basement 
from some unknown cause. Damage to Ferren building, $1,300. 
Insurance, $4,000. Insurance paid, $1,300. No damage to New 
Hampshire Insurance building. Damage to Robbie's stock, 
;^4i, 990.75. Insurance, $73,500. Insurance paid, $34,569.98. 
Damage to Piper's stock, $200. Insurance, $1,500. Insurance 
paid, $2oo. Box pulled by Officer Lovejoy. 

Still. Tuesday, December 5, 8.54 p. m. Burning chimney 
at No. 135 Amherst street, in block owned by Dr. Hiram Hill. 

Box 313. Friday, December 8, 8.57 a. m. Three-story wood- 
en block at Nos. 38-42 Marion street, owned by Mrs. W. I. Sar- 
gent and occupied by Moise Samore, Joseph Breaux, David 
Lestage, A. F. Beck, Peter Lemay, and Isia Demise. The fire 
originated in the ceiling of the tenement occupied by Moise 
Lamore. Damage to building, $1,400. Insurance, $3,000. In- 
surance paid, $1,400. Damage to contents, $500. No insur- 
ance. Box pulled by Officer Fellows. 

Box 21. Friday, December 29, 8.04 p. M. Burning chimney 
at No. 67 Central street, in block owned by Oliver B. Green. 
No damage. Needless alarm. Box pulled by officer. 

Number of bell alarms ....... 59 

Number of still alarms ....... 47 

Total 106 



286 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Amount of insurance on property endangered . $363,625.00 

Aggregate losses for 1S92 ..... $88,447.90 
Amount of insurance paid ..... 71,404.58 



Net loss not covered by insurance . . $17,043.32 



Number and Location of Alarm-Boxes and Keys. 

No. 3. Blood's lower shop. Keys at offices of gas-works, 
county jail, DeCourcy, Holland & Marshall, and Charles H. 
Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel 
Oxford, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, Horse Rail- 
road stables, and W. C. Blodgett's office. 

No. 5. Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at Teb- 
betts & Soule'sand Currier's drug-stores, and Manchester House. 

No. 6. City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Thurston's drug- 
stores, and J. A. Riddle's office. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of Manchester and Chestnut 
streets. Keys at city marshal's office, and with all police officers. 

No. 8. Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Smith & 
Co.'s and Colby's drug-stores. Partridge Bros.' grain store, and 
E. V. Rowe's residence, 1261 Elm street. 

No. 9. Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, J. B. Jones, 
and station of Engine No. 6. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at residences 
of William C. Clarke, George Emerson, and Walter A. Green. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Welcome Jencks and Lewis Simons, No. i Senter's 
block, and Chase & Gate's grocery store. 

No. 14. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. George W. Riddle, D. J. Ad- 
ams, E. L. Bryant, and A. H. Olzendam. 

No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. Willie H. Dodge and Ervin S. Lyford. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 287 

No. 1 6. Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. R. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. H. P. Watts and Michael Connor, 

No. 18. Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys at 
residences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Perkins. 

No. 21. Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys at 
A. D. Smith's drug-store, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. L. 
Walker's office, and residence of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys at resi 
dences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. Merrimack Steamer house, corner of Massabesic street 
and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. M. Goodwin and 
station of Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

No. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at 
residences of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, Horace Stearns, 
and the late Horace Gordon. 

No. 26. Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys at Mc- 
Crillis's carriage shop, George W. Bailey's stable, and residence 
of John N. Chase. 

No. 27. Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys at 
residences of H. M. Tarbell, A. G. Fairbanks, William B. Orrill, 
E. S. Fletcher, William Carr, and George H. Hubbard. 

No. 31. Corner of Canal and HoUis streets. Blood's shop. 
Keys at office, Amory Mills, Langdon Mills watch-rooms. 

No. 32. Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and Brook 
streets. Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Company's mill, Langdon 
watch-room, and Electric Light station. 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Keys at watch-room and pumping 
station. 

No. 35. Stark Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 36. Amory Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 39. Hillsborough county jail. Keys at office. 

No. 41. Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 



288 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 43. Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 45. The S. C. Forsaith Co.'s shops. Keys at freight 
depot and S. C. Forsaith Co.'s office. 

No. 51. Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys at stores 
of F. Riedel and William Weber. 

No. 52. Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Fradd & Co.'s 
and A. N. Clapp's store, Merrimack House, and Engine No. 2 
house. 

No. 53. Wallace's steam mill. Keys at Wallace's office, I. R. 
Dewey's tenement block, and Ranno Harness Co's. 

No. 54. Corner of A and Bowman streets. Keys at residences 
of Lord sisters and Neil Fullerton. 

No. 56. Baldwin's bobbin shop. Keys at Baldwin's office 
and residences of J. C. Smith, E. P. Littlefield, and with watch- 
man at works. 

No. 61. Corner of River road and Hancock street, Bakers- 
ville. Keys at Mary Stack's saloon, True W. Jones Co.'s brew- 
ery, residence of H. F. Dillingham, and store of John A. Kane. 

No. 62. Gerrish Wool and Leather Co.'s, River road. Keys 
at tannery and residence of Edwin Kennedy. 

No. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at the resi- 
dences of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, Thomas J. Smith, and 
store of J. J. Tooney. 

No. 72. Corner of Lake avenue and Lincoln street. Keys at 
residences of the late Austin Jenkins, James Briggs, and 
Clarence D. Palmer. 

No. 73. Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Rev. J. A. Chevalier and Timothy Carr. 

No. 81. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at all the 
engine-rooms. 

No. 82. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Elm east back 
streets. Keys at Syndicate Furniture Co.'s, Lowell-street stable, 
Nichols's stable, and Fames Bros.' drug store. 

No. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of W. T. Stevens, W. A. Clarkson, M. D. Johnson, 
and Charles F. Chase. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 289 

No. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of William B. Abbott, W. N. Johnson, and E. M. 
Topliff. 

No. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of A. P. Olzendam, G. A. Olzendam, W. S. Shannon, 
and John J. Bennett. 

No. 212. Shoeshop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of shoe 
factory and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn, 
Mrs. Milton A. Abbott, and M. V. B. Garland. 

No. 213. Sash and blind factory. South Beech street, junction 
of Portsmouth Railroad. Keys at oflBces of Austin, Flint & Day 
and Dana & Provost. 

No. 214. Elliott silk mill, corner of Wilson and Valley streets. 
Keys at office and watchroom of mill and at Truax & Truax's 
foundry. 

No. 215. Hoyt & Co.'s shoeshop, corner of Lincoln and Som- 
erville streets. Keys at offices of shoeshop and Kimball Car- 
riage Co. and residence of H. J. Robinson. 

No. 312. Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor streets. 
Keys at residences of James Spence (309 Main street), Thomas 
Bolton, and gate of No. 1 1 mill. 

No. 313. Corner of Amory and Main streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Bouthillier & 
Gingras's drug store, Miville & Co.'s drug store, and gate of No. 
II mill. 

No. 314. P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper mill. Keys at office, 
Randall & Co.'s store, and Independent Hose house. 

No. 315. Old Brick Store at 'Skeag. Keys at Flanders's store, 
Independent Hose house, and D. L. Robinson's residence. 

No. 321. Corner Beauport and Wayne streets. Keys at Holy 
Angels' Convent, the Brothers' School, and residences of E. H. 
Doherty and Rev. Father Hevey. 

No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at res- 
idences of Amelia Davis, William A. Tufts, and James Kearns. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Keys at 



290. 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



residences of J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Elizabeth 
Ward. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular police. 

The true time will be given at precisely 12.30 p. m. from 
Charles A. Trefethen's jewelry store, and will be denoted by one 
strike of the fire-bells. 



Telephone Calls. 

Chemical Engine and chief engineer's office 

Chief Engineer Lane's residence 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's residence 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's office 

Engine No. 2 . 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 . 

Engine No. 5 . 

Engine and Ladder No. 6 

Hose No. 2 . . . 



64-3 
64-4 

34-4 
39-3 
64-2 

64-5 
64-6 
64^7 
1 1 6-4 



Instructions to Key-holders and Citizens. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be immediately 
communicated to the nearest alarm-box, the keys to which are in 
the hands of all regular police, and generally of persons at the 
corner or nearest house. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive in- 
formation of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook once 
as far as it will go (without jerking), and then let go. Shut the 
door, but do not try to remove the key, as it is locked in by a 
trap-lock, and can only be removed with a release-key, which is 
carried by each of the engineers, who will, as soon as convenient, 
release and return it. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to remain by 
the box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 291 

again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box, 
procure another key, and give an alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never touch the 
box except to give an alarm of fire. Give an alarm for no cause 
other than actual fire. Don't give an alarm for a chimney 

FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless called 
for by the chief engineer. If you change your residence or place 
of business, where the keys are kept, return the keys to the same 
officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to inform 
themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near their property, 
also all places where the keys are kept Be sure the alarm is 
promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the city, 
and the number of the box will be given thus : Box 6, six blows, 
2}^ seconds apart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, 
pause of 6^ seconds, one blow, same pause, and two blows, 
2 — I — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the 
bells at any time ; and, in case of testing the boxes, each test 
will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



292 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST, SEC- 
OND. AND THIRD ALARMS. 



Engine. 



Ist R. 3 

l8t R. 2-3 

Ist R. 2-3 

Ist & 2d R. 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2d R. 5 

1st R. 5 

5 

Ist R. 5 

Ist R. 5 

15 lst&2dR.5 

16 IstR. 5 

17 lstR.3 

18 IstR. 3 

21 IstR. 3 

23 IstK. 3 

24 IstR. 3 

25 IstR. 3 

26 IstR. 3 

27 IstR 3 



Ist R. 6 

1st R. 5 

1st & 2d R. 5-6 

1st & 2d R. 5-6 

1st & 2d R. 5-6 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2d R. 2-3 

Ist & 2d R. 2-3 

1st R. 2-3 

2-3 



41. 
42. 
43. 

45 1 Ist &2d 

51 1 2-6 

52 ! 2-6 

53 2-6 

54 ' 2-6 

56 1 2-6 

61 1st R. 3 

62 IstR. 3 



71. 



82. 
112. 
113. 
114. 
212. 
213. 
214. 
215. 
312. 
313. 
314. 
315. 
321. 
511. 
513. 



1st R. 3 
IstR. 3 
1st R. 3 
1st & 2d R. 
Ist & 2d R. 
1st R. 5 
Ist R. 5 
1st R. 5 
Ist R. 3 
1st R. 3 
1st R. 3 
Ist R. 3 
1st R. 2-6 
Ist R. 2-6 
5-6 
5-6 
2-6 
2-6 
2-6 



Second Alarm. 



2dR.2 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2-3 

2dR. 

3 

2d R. 



2dR.3 

3 

2d R. 3 

2d R.5 

2dR. 

2d R. 2 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2d R.5 

2dR. 

2d R. 5 

2dR. 6 

2-3 

2-3 

2-3 

2dR.2 

5-6 

5-6 

2dR.6 

5 

1st R.3 

1st R.3 

1st R.3 

IstR. 

1ft R.3 

2dR.2 

2d R. 2 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2dR. 

5 

5-6 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2d R.3 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2dU. 



3 


2dR. 


6 


2d R.5 


6 


2d R.5 


6 


IstR 2 


6 


IstR. 


fi 


1st R.6 


6 


IstR. 


6 


IstR. 



Third Alabm. 



?, 


6 


2 


6 


2 


1 


9. 






3 




3 




3 




3 







5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2-3-6 

2d R.2-3-6 

2d R.2-3-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

2-3 

2-3 



5 

6 

2dR. 5 

2dR. 5 

2dR. 5 

2d R. 3-5 

2dR. 5 

5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2 

2-3-6 

2-3-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

3 

3 

2dR. 3 

2dR. 2-3 

2d R. 3 

2d R. 3-5 

2d R. 3-5 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 293 

Rules and Regulations in regard to Responding to 
Fires and Alarms. 

The following rules have been adopted by the board of engi- 
neers, and the fire department will strictly comply until other- 
wise ordered, and will attend alarms of fire as per running card. 

RUNNING RULES. 

Whenever an alarm is sounded, the members of all companies 
not called to that box will report to their respective company 
quarters, and there remain until dismissed by the signal on the 
bells or by an engineer in charge. 

In case companies on their first run have responded to an 
alarm, companies on their second run to the box from which the 
alarm has been sounded, will answer all first-run boxes of the 
absent companies ; and in case engines are out that would re- 
spond to another box, then third-alarm companies will respond. 
In case of an alarm from a box that does not call for a third 
alarm, companies on their second run will then answer to all 
other boxes. 

Whenever two trucks answer to first alarm, the other truck Avill 
answer to all other boxes. 

At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, hose 
carriage, or truck that leaves the house first will have the right to 
lead to the fire. Whenever a horse lags or gives out, drivers 
should then give others the right of way, so as not to delay the 
rest of the apparatus. No running by will be allowed, ex- 
cept IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDER PENALTY OF DISMISSAL OF THE 
DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

The drivers shall not permit persons not connected with the 
department to ride upon their apparatus, and in muddy weather 
or heavy wheeling they shall not permit any one to ride upon 
their apparatus when returning from fires. 

Engineers of steamers will not run over eighty (80) pounds 
water pressure, except when orders are received from a member 
of the board of engineers or of the officer in command of the 
company. 



294 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

WHISTLE SIGNALS. 

The following code of signals will be observed by members of 
the department : 

For captain, or officer in command of company, one long 
whistle. 

For coal, two long whistles followed by as many short whis- 
tles as indicate the number of the engine. 

To limber up, three long whistles. 

THIRD alarm. 
On THIRD alarm all apparatus will respond. 

GENERAL ALARM. 

In the event of a fire of such magnitude that second and third 
alarms are needed, a general alarm will be given by striking ten 
BLOWS, in which case all companies will respond. 

SPECIAL CALLS ON FIRE ALARM. 

When more apparatus is wanted without giving a second or 
third alarm, the following special calls will be given : 

2 — I for Engine i. i — i — i for Aerial Truck. 



2 2 


' " 2. 


3 — 3 for Truck 3 


2—3 


' " 3- 


3—6 " " 6 


2—4 


4- 


4 — I for Hose i. 


2—5 


' " 5- 


4—2 " '' 2. 


2—6 


' " 6. 


4—3 " " 3- 



Companies answering "special calls" will wait thirty sec- 
onds before leaving quarters to prevent mistakes. 



OUT OF TOWN CALLS. 



' For a fire out of the city 2 — 2 — 2, in which case all companies 
will assemble at their respective quarters and await orders. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 295 

ALL OUT SIGNAL. 

Two blows on the bells, which dismisses all members at com- 
pany quarters. 

TEST SIGNAL. 

One blow at 12.30 noon. 

SCHOOL SIGNALS. 

I — I with fifteen seconds between blows closes primary and 
middle schools. 

2 — 2 with fifteen seconds between the 2's closes all the schools. 
Time for giving same, 7.45 a. m., 11.30 a. m., or 1.15 p. m. 

Rules for Exercising Horses. 

It shall be the duty of the drivers of engines, hose carriages, 
hose wagons, hook and ladder trucks, and all other apparatus 
connected with this department, to exercise their horses every day, 
weather permitting, except Sunday, with the exception of engines 
having " first " and " second runs," and in such cases must ex- 
ercise on days of " second run," and the same to be done with- 
in the following limits : 

CENTRAL STATION. 

North to Pearl street. East to Union street. 

South to Merrimack street. West to Elm street. 

NORTH MAIN STREET STATION. 

North to Adams street. East to Main street. 

South to Granite street. West to Dubuque street. 

LAKE AVENUE STATION. 

North to Manchester street. East to Belmont street. 
South to Summer street. West to Maple street. 



296 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPOKTS. 



MAPLE-STREET STATION. 

North to Myrtle street. East to Linden street. 

South to Hanover street.' West to Union street. 

WEBSTER-STREET STATION. 

North to Clarke street. East to Union street. 

South to Pennacook street. West to Elm street. 

RIMMON-STREET STATION (mCGREGORVILLE). 

North to Amory street. East to Beauport street. 

South to Wayne street. West to Rimmon street. 

Drivers must confine themselves to the above, and in no case 
take their horses beyond the prescribed limits, except for shoeing 
or in case of fire, without permission from the chief or an assist- 
ant engineer. 

In exercising care must be taken to avoid colliding with other 
teams. In approaching corners, crossings, horsecar tracks, and 
in going down grades the speed of the horses must be checked. 

In case of an alarm use gong freely while returning to quarters. 

Any driver violating these rules will be liable to suspension or 
discharge. 



The Sleeping Apartments. 

The permanent men shall exercise a careful supervision over 
the sleeping apartments, see that the rooms are put in order and 
the beds made as early as ii o'clock a. m., and that the bedding 
is changed at suitable intervals. The occupants of each bed will 
be held responsible for the cleanliness of the same, and held 
strictly accountable for any damage to either bed or bed clothing 
through carelessness. After lo o'clock p. M. occupants shall re- 
frain from loud talking or in any manner disturbing the rest of 
any who have retired. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 297 

Absence from Station. 

No permanent member shall leave his station to visit any sec- 
tion of the city without permission of the chief or an assistant en- 
gineer, or leave the city, or be granted leave of absence, without 
notifying the chief engineer and procuring a substitute to his ac- 
ceptance, and the substitute shall be on duty before the applicant 
leaves his post. 

Any call member expecting to be absent from the city shall notify 
the captain of his company, and before leaving the city shall pro- 
cure a substitute satisfactory to said captai7i. 

Any member of the department not complying with the above 
rules shall be liable to suspension or expulsion from the depart- 
ment. 



Entering Buildings witii Line of Hose. 

All hose companies are instructed not to enter any building 
with a line of hose unless the stop nozzle is closed, except in cases 
where they can see the fire, and when their streams will reach it 
without damage to other property. 

Steamer companies are not to enter a building with a line of 
hose without orders unless fire can be seen. 

Captains of the several companies will be expected to report 
any violation of the foregoing rules to the board of engineers. 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 
Engine No. 1 . 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



I extra first-size Amoskeag steamer 
I one-horse hose-wagon . 

3 gray horses for steamer . 

I gray horse for hose-wagon 

4 swinging harnesses 



$4,000.00 
400.00 
685.00 
225.00 
200.00 



298 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS 



I pair double harnesses (for street 
I single harness (for street work) 
2,000 feet fabric hose 
100 feet three-inch leather hose 
Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 
Tools, furniture, and fixtures 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



.'ork) 



S50.00 

40.00 

1,200.00 

50.00 

60.00 

200.00 

200.00 

S7, 310.00 



Engine No. 2. 



LOCATED AT NORTH MAIN STREET, SQUOG 



I second-size Amoskeag steamer 


$4,000.00 


I combination hose-wagon 


600.00 


I exercise wagon, poles, shafts, and 3-horse hitcl 


340.00 


3 bay horses for steamer .... 


617.00 


I pair gray horses for combination . 


534.00 


3 street harnesses, 2 at ^40, i at $20 


100.00 


5 swinging harnesses .... 


250.00 


I single cart ...... 


75.00 


I two-horse cart ..... 


60.00 


I double sled 


60.00 


I single sled 


40.00 


00 feet fabric hose 


1,500.00 


Stable fixtures and blankets 


94.00 


Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc. 


466.00 


Firemen's suits and badges 


150.00 


Total amount 


$8,886.00 


Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3. 




LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CORNER MASSABESIC 


STREET. 


I second-size Amoskeag steamer 


$3,500.00 


I two-hq,rse truck and equipments 


1,700.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



299 



I three-horse hitch attachment (extra) 
I pair black horses .... 
I single horse ..... 
3 street harnesses, 2 at $50, i at $40 . 
5 swinging harnesses 
I four-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage 
I double cart ..... 
I single cart ..... 
I single sled ..... 
2,500 feet fabric hose .... 
Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 
Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc. 



3200.00 

417.00 

150.00 

140.00 

250.00 

600. 00 

125.00 

40.00 

40.00 

1,^00.00 

50.00 

575-00 



Total amount 

[Note.— Horses for truck on trial, not yet purchased.^ 



$9,287.00 



Engine No. 4. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



I first-size Amoskeag steamer . 






34,200.00 


I hose-wagon .... 






400.00 


3 horses for steamer . 






600.00 


I horse for hose-wagon 






133-00 


I pair street harnesses 






40.00 


4 swinging harnesses 






200.00 


2,100 feet fabric hose 






126.00 


Hall furniture, beds, bedding, etc. 






275.00 


Stable fixtures and blankets 






75.00 


Firemen's suits and badges 






150.00 


Total amount 






$7,333-00 



300 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Engine No. 5. 



LOCATED ON WEBSTER STREET, CORNER CHESTNUT. 



I third-size Amoskeag steamer 






. $3,600.00 


I combination hose reel and ladder . 




1,000.00 


I pair bay horses . . . . 




534.00 


I pair gray horses . 






400.00 


2 double carts . 






150.00 


2 double sleds .... 






100.00 


2 pairs swinging harnesses 






200.00 


2 pairs street harnesses 






150.00 


GO feet fabric hose 






1,500.00 


Furniture, fixtures, tools, etc. 






175.00 


Stable fixtures and blankets 






80.00 


Firemen's suits, badges, etc. 






150.00 


Total amount 






• ^8,039.00 



E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine. 

STORED AT CLINTON STREET ENGINE HOUSE. 

Old U tank Amoskeag engine (may be worth for ex- 
change) $500.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 6. 



LOCATED AT CORNER AMORY AND RIMMON STREETS. 

I second-size Amoskeag steamer . . . $3,500.00 

I hook and ladder truck (with Bangor extension) 1,680.00 

1 one-horse carriage 600.00 

2 gray horses for steamer ..... 400.00 

2 bay horses for truck 267.00 

I gray horse for hose-carriage .... 200.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



301 



5 swinging harnesses 
2,000 feet fabric hose 

Hall furniture, carpets, beds, bedding, etc 
Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$250.00 
1,200.00 

375-00 
85.00 

187.00 

;8, 744.00 



Hose No. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



I four-wheeled Amoskeag 


hose-carriage 




$600.00 


2 horses ...... 




534-00 


2 single harnesses 












70.00 


I single cart 












40.00 


I single sled . 












40.00 


I hose sled 












20,00 


2,500 feet fabric hose 












1,500.00 


1,000 feet leather hose 












500.00 


Furniture and fixtures 










200.00 


Stable fixtures and blankets 








50.00 


Firemen's suits and badges 








175.00 


Total amount 








$3,729.00 


1 


^ose 


No. 


2. 









LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 



I four-wheeled Amoskeag hose- carriage 


$600.00 


I bay horse ...... 


150.00 


I street harness 


30.00 


I swinging harness 


50.00 


I single cart 


50.00 


I single sled ...... 


30.00 



302 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



2,000 feet fabric hose 
2, 000 feet leather hose . 
Furniture and fixtures 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$1,200.00 
800.00 
100.00 
175.00 

$3,185.00 



Hook-and-Ladder No. 1 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



I aerial hook-and-ladder truck . 
3 horses ..... 

1 pair exercise harnesses . 
3 swinging harnesses 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 
7 rubber blanket covers . 
Furniture and fixtures 

Bed, bedding, and furniture . 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$4,200.00 

800.00 

30.00 

150.00 

360.00 

168.00 

200.00 

40.00 

60.00 

280.00 



$6,2 



.00 



Chemical Engine No. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

I double tank (60 gallons each) engine 

I pair black horses . 

I pair exercise harnesses . 

I pair swinging harnesses 

Furniture and fixtures 

Stable fixtures and blankets 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$2,250.00 
534-00 
50.00 
100.00 
75.00 
50.00 
35-00 

$3,094.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



303 



Supply Wagon. 

supply wagon, with boxes and engineers' lanterns . $250.00 



Spare Hose. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

800 feet leather hose ..... 
1,300 feet fabric hose ..... 

Total amount ..... 



$400.00 
780.00 

$1,180.00 



Exercise Wagon. 

CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

I four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole, shafts, three- 
horse hitch, and coal boxes ..... $350.00 



Engineers' Department. 



5 fire hats .... 
5 engineers' white rubber coats 
Furniture and fixtures 

Total amount 



$10.00 

37-50 

175.00 

$222.50 



Independent Hose Company No. 5. 

LOCATED AT CORNER OF OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET 

1 four-wheeled hose-carriage 
800 feet leather hose ..... 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc. .... 
Furniture and fixtures ..... 



$400.00 

300.00 

40.00 

10.00 



Total amount 



$750.00 



304 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose-carriage .... 
300 feet fabric hose ..... 

2 hose-pipes ...... 



Total amount 



Sleeping-Hall. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

7 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc. 



$30.00 

100.00 

10.00 

$140.00 



$275.00 



Extra Horse. 

I horse at Central station for spare duty . 



Fire-Alarm Telegraph. 



$200.00 



At cost, including additions previous to 


1885 




$21,625.00 


Remodeling in 1885. ..... 


6,000.00 


Additions in 1886 












775.00 


in 1887 












375-00 


in 1888 












S75-0O 


in 1889 












430.00 


in 1890 












300.00 


in 1891 












280.00 


in 1892 












150.00 


in 1893 












500.00 


" Individual Tapper " system 








3,000.00 


Wire, ladders, arms, brackets, etc. 








125.00 


Total 


• ^.34,135-00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



305 



Recapitulation. 



Engine No. i 

Engine No. 2 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 

Engine No. 4 

Engine No. 5 

Engine and Ladder No. 6 

Harrington Engine (old) 

Hose No. I . 

Hose No. 2 . 

Hook and Ladder No. i 

Chemical Engine No. i 

Supply wagon 

Spare hose . 

Exercise wagon (Central station) 

Engineers' department 

Independent Hose No. 5 

Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage 

Sleeping Hall (Central station) 

Extra horse .... 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 

Total .... 



^7,310.00 

8,886.00 

9,287.00 

7>333-oo 

8,039.00 

8,744.00 

500.00 

3,729.00 

3,185.00 

6,288.00 

3,094.00 

250.00 

1,180.00 

350.00 

222.50 

750.00 

140.00 

275.00 

200.00 

34,135.00 

^103,897.50 



Names and Residences of the Members of the Fire 
Department. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



Thomas W. Lane 

Fred S. Bean 

Ruel G. Manning. . . . 
Eugene S. Whitne.y.. 
Clarence D. Palmer 



Chief 

Asst. and clerk 
Assistant 



Occupation. 



Machinist 

Carpenter . . . 
Supt. Elec. Light 
Marble dealei 



1937 Elm. 
102 Orange. 
55 Douglas. 
N. River road 
366 Lake ave. 



306 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House, 2S Vine Street. 





Rank. 


Occupation. 


Resilience. 


7 Charles F. McCoy 


Captain 


Machinist 


50 M. S. B. 


8 


Frank E. Steams 


Lieutenant 


Paper hanger . . . 


389 Lake ave. 


14 
6 


Edgar A. Young 

CliarlesF. Hall 


Clerk 


Clerk. 




Engineer 


Machinist 


28 Vine. 


13 


Joseph H. GouUl 


Asst. Engineer 





1087 Elm. 


11 


Charles H. Rogers .... 


Driver engine.. 


Teamster 


28 Vine. 


12 


Artemas C. Barker — 


Driver hose.... 





28 Vine. 


43 


Frank B. Marston 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


14M. S. B. 


17 


Henry C. Parsons 





Auctioneer 


6 Prospect. 


15 


Thomas J. Wyatt 





Carpenter 


973 Elm. 


19 


Henry A. Boone 





Machinist.: 


2t M. S. B. 


18 


James L. Brock 





Tinsmith 


21 Market. 


9 


Lewis G. Bryant 





Carpenter 


31 M. S. B. 


10 1 Lucius M. Rollins .... 


" 


Holder. 


174 Concord. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on North Main Street, 'Squog. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


67 


David G.Mills 






607 Granite, 


71 


Charles G. Ranno 


Lieutenant: — 


Harness-maker . 


63 Parker. 


76 
120 


Jeremiah Lane 

Harry C. Morrill 


Clerk and dri- 
ver engine . : 
Engineer 


Teamster 

Machinist 


210 Main. 
226 Main. 


119 


Stephen Thomes 


Asst. engineer. 


Carpenter 


55 Douglas. 


69 


Arthur W. VVhitcomb. 


Driver of hose. 


Teamster 


151 Douglas. 


T>. 


Samuel A. Hill 


Hoseman 


Janitor 


86 School. 




Robert J.Hill 




Carpenter 

Machinist 




77 


Daniel B. Emery 





Williams. 


73 


Charles S. Cousins... 





Harness-maker.. 


323 Douglas. 


74 


Thomas C. Foote 





AVool sorter 


56 N. Main, 


66 


Joseph H. Alsop 


" 


Wool waste sort'r 


54 Douglas. 


70 


Chas. M. Tewksbury.. 





Freight handler. 


Engine-house. 


68 


George P. Ames 





Asst. Supt. Sts... 


226 Main. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



307 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 3. 

House on Lake Avenue, corner Massabesic. 



-d 6 


NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


86 


Frank F. Porter 


Captain 


Manufacturer . . . 


330 Spruce. 


S?. 


Lyman W. Piper 

Ernest E. Hubbell 








8S 


Clerk 


Carpenter 

Machinist 


417 C(intv<t\ 


121 


George B. Forsaith — 


Engineer 


Engine-house. 


122 


John P.Walker 


Asst. engineer 





352 Lake ave. 


87 


George H. Wheeler . . . 


Driver engine.. 


Teamster 


Engine-house. 


81 


William S. McLeod... 


Driver hose... 


„ 


Engine-house. 


88 








132Massabesic. 

■ 

366 Lake ave 


80 


Ernest L. George 

Charles H.Colburn.... 




Clerk 


H 


<' 


Carpenter 


294 Laurel. 


85 


WHIP. Emerson 








294 Laurel. 


89 


Parker R. Brown 


<i 


Clerk 


422Merrimack. 


78 


George Dunnington.. . 


" 


Harness-maker . 


510 Wilson. 


79 


Louis N. Duf rain 


" 


Plumber 


373 Hall. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House, No. 26 Vine street. 



Id 


NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


20 


Lucius B. Snelling 


Captain 


Pharmacist 


103 Walnut. 


28 


John H.Wales, Jr 


Lieutenant — 


Machinist 


19 M. S. B. 


33 


Thomas W. Lane, Jr. . 


Clerk 


Electrician . 


1937 Elm 


21 


Edgar G. Abbott 


Engineer 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 


33 


Benj.R. Richardson.. 


Asst. Engineer 





12 Mechanic. 


31 


Frank J. Dustin 


Driverengine.. 


Teamster 


20 Vine. 


29 


Ellsworth V. Rowe. . . . 


Driver of hose. 


Manufacturer. .. 


20 Vine. 


22 


Walter A. Clarkson. . . 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


98 Sagamore. 






„ 




86 Prospect. 
20 Vine. 


27 


Edward Sargent 


" 


Machinist 


?4 




« 


Clerk 


258 East High. 


26 


Irving S. Bryant 


" 


Second-hand .... 


112 Pearl. 


30 


Clarence R.Merrill... 


" 


Grain dealer.... 


414Merrimack. 


23 


George Thompson .... 


" 


Clerk 


63 Arlington. 





308 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
ENGINE COMPANY NO. 5. 
House, No. 44 Webster Street. 



¥ 


NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


49 
101 
46 
43 


Charles W. Brown.... 

Milo B.Wilson 

Woodbury Davison . . . 
Daniel W. Morse 


Captain 




16 Hazel. 




48 Blod^et. 


Clerk 




817 Union. 


Engineer 


Engineer 


1419 Elm. 


10-3 
135 


Walter Morse 


Asst. engineer. 
Driver engine. 


Machinist 

Teamster 


831 Union. 


ErailH. Smith 


44 Webster. 


134 


Henry S. Reed 


Driver hose . . . 




44 Webster. 


123 


George R. Simmons . . . 


Hoseman 


Machinist 


82 Pennacook. 


47 
95 
41 


Russell L. Cilley 

Edward H. Clough .... 
Arthur A. Smith 


,1 










859 Chestnut. 




Blacksmith 


11 W. Applet'n 


126 


Alvin McLane . . .... 


., 


Carpenter 


15 Liberty. 


99 


Joseph I. Risvold 


" 


Machinist 


130 Myrtle. 


108 


Edwin L. Towle 


" 


Clerk 


63 Webster. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



309 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY NO. ( 
House on Amory and Rimmon Streets. 



a. 

-o o 

1^ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


128 


George A. Whitney. .. 


Captain 


Manufacturer 


79 Conant. 


129 
130 




Lieutenant... 


Machinist 

Section hand ... 


624 Main. 
169 Cartier. 


Thomas E. Gorman... 


I'll 






239 Beauport. 
Rimmon. 


132 


Edwin E. Weeks 


Engineer 


Machinist 


133 


Alcide Provencher . . . 


Asst. engineer. 





1275 Elm. 


134 


Alphonso E. Foster... 


Driver engine. 


Carpenter 


Rimmon. 


^'\'^ 


George A. Cann 

Henry C. Crosby 








136 


Driver truck.. 


Teamster 


Rimmon. 


137 


Fred S.Morrill 


Hoseman 


Belt-maker 


58 Douglas. 


13S 


Thos F Fitzsimnaons 


,, 


Painter 


258 Beauport. 
114 School. 


139 


Arthur A. Lamoreaux 


« 


Grocer 


140 


Frank W.Tibbetts.... 




Section-hand . . . . 


312 Cartier. 


141 


Jobn J. Conroy 





Blacksmith 


268 Beauport. 


142 


Frank St. John 





Marble finisher.. 


5 Barr. 


143 


Henry Stein .. .... 




Blacksmith. . . . 


Hevey. 

516 Beauport. 


144 


Arthur Provost 


" 


Wool sorter 


145 


Bruno Beliveau 





Meat cutter 


596 Main. 


146 


HeberC. Sleeper " 


Machinist 


4 Monmouth. 


147 


James A. Parley " 


" 


385 Dubuque. 



310 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House, No. 26 Vine Street. 



52 



Name. 



Charles B. Frencli. 
Joseph E. Merrill. 
Frank D. Burleigh. 
Walter L. Blenus. . 
George H. Poiter.. 
Albert A. Puffer... 
John E. Sanborn.. 
Samuel W. Patten . 
George I. Ayer — 
Edwin W. Merrill . 

Henry Gray 

34 Charles J. Wiley .. 



Captain 

Lieutenant . 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman.... 



Occupation. 



Carpenter .... 

Currier 

Carpenter 

Teamster 

Carpenter ... 
Rallr'd employee 
Carpenter . . . 
Belt maker . . 
Electrician... 
Clerk 



39 M. S. B. 

21 Ash. 

1405 Elm. 

26 Vine. 

279 Laurel. 

499 Beech. 

274 Laurel. 

3M. S.B. 

28 M. S. B. 

21 Ash. 

Machinist [ 7 M. S. B. 

Mechanic 1 Elliot & Means 

1 block 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 
Rouse on Maple Street, corner East High, 



¥ 


NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


54 


JohnF. Seaward 


Captain 


Carpenter 


27 Warren. 


55 


Revilo G. Houghton . . 


Lieutenant — 


Gas fitter 


288 Bridge. 


58 


Henry G. Seaman — 
Walter Seaward 


Clerk 


Carpenter 

Teamster 


14 South. 


57 


Driver 


521 Maple. 


59 


Jos. W. Batchelder . . . 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


467 Maple. 


64 




,, 


Clerk 


211 Bridge. 


65 
63 








Julien B. Huntley 


" 




36 Dutton. 


60 


Charles W.Powell.... 





Carpenter 


540 Maple. 


61 


Addison Seaward 







2.50 East High 


56 
63 


Arthur B. Merrill 

James A. Rogers 


" 


" 


C02 Hall. 
761 Beech. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



311 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

Rouse, No. 8 Vine Street. 



-c 6 
1^ 


NASUE. 


Bank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


116 


George N. Burpee 


Captain 


Electrician 


19 Ash. 


117 


Warren F. Wlieeler. . . 


Clerk & driver 


Teamster 


8 Vine. 


lis 


Frank H. Harvey 


Pipeman 





546 Chestnut. 


116 


Edward A. Sears 


Fireman 


Electrician 


r. 247 Concord. 


44 


Benjamin C. Cann*. . . 


" 


Teamster 


542 Chestnut. 



■ Detailed as driver of supply wagon. 



HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. 

House, No. IS Vine Street. 



h 


NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence, 


91 


Jerome J. Lovering . . 


Captain 


Carpenter 


300 Pine. 










46 Stark. 


90 


Henry Johnson 


Clerk 


Steam-fitter 


508 Hall. 




Charles M. Denyou . . . 






18 Vine. 


96 




Barber 


100 Blodget. 


98 


John N. Chase 




Overseer 


268 Bridge. 






„ 










,, 


Carpenter 




i„ 


Harrison H. Cole 




45 M. S. B. 


109 


George M. Jones 




Gardener 


25 Prospect. 


97 
107 


Charles W. Bailey.... 




Carriage maker 
Manufacturer . . 


Linden corner 

Orange. 
38 Vine. 


113 


Charles H. Laxon 




Carpenter 


20 M. S. B. 


106 


Charles Edgar 







16 M. S. B. 


105 


JohnT.Gott 








93 


Charles H. Gile 




Carpenter 


56 Stark. 


100 


Fi'ank M Fi'isselle 




Reporter 


346 Manchestr. 












112 


Charles A. Butterfleld 




Carpenter 


1152 Elm. 


118 


Frank A. Pherson 




Machinist 


18 Vine. 



312 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Location of Hydrants. 

As per water commissioners' report up to January i, 

Amherst, northwest corner of Vine. 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut, 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Walnut. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincoln. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Belmont. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Elm. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Pine. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Union. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Warren. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 
Auburn, corner of Franklin. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Elm. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Adams. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Union. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Beech. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Maple. 
Baker, corner of Elm. 
Baker, corner of River road. 
Baker, corner of Calef road. 
Baker, corner of Nutt road. 
Bay, corner of Salmon. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Granite. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 313 

Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. corporation. 

Bedford, northwest corner of Central. 

Beech, northwest corner of Park. 

Beech, front of No. 584. 

Belmont, near No. 345. 

Belmont, corner Young. 

Belmont, near Coffin residence. 

Birch, northwest corner of Lowell. 

Birch, northwest corner of Washington. 

Blodget, front of primary school house. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Pine. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Union. 

Bridge, front of No. 26. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Union. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Walnut. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Beech. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Ash. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Maple. 

Bridge, near No. 242. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Russell. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Linden. 

Bridge, corner of Ashland. 

Bridge, corner of Hall. 

Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 

Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Brook, northwest corner of Pine. 

Brook, northwest corner of Union. 

Brook, northwest corner of Beech. 

Brook, northwest corner of Ash. 

Calef road, near Patrick Harrington's. 

Calef road, near D. T. Smith's house. 

Canal, near east corner of Depot. 

Canal, near office door M. L. W 

Cedar, corner of Elm. 

Cedar, front of No. 36. 



314 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Pine. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Union. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Beech. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Lincohi. 
Central, northwest corner of Chestnut. 
Central, northwest corner of Pine. 
Central, northwest corner of Union. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 
Central, northwest corner of Beech. 
Central, northwest corner of Maple. 

Central, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Central, front of No. 374. 

Central, northwest corner of Wilson, 

Central, northwest corner of Hall. 

Central, corner of Cass. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell. 

Chestnut, opposite High. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Salmon. 

Chestnut, opposite Henry Chandler's lot. 

Clarke, corner of Elm. 

Clarke, corner of Adams. 

Clarke, corner of Union. 

Concord, corner of Elm. 

Concord, opposite Vine. 

Concord, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Concord, northwest corner of Union. 
Concord, northwest corner of Walnut. 
Concord, northwest corner of Beech. 
Concord, northwest corner of Maple. 
Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 315 



Concord, northwest corner of Ashland. 

Concord, northwest corner of Hall, 

Concord, northwest corner of Belmont. 

Cypress, south end of street. 

Cypress, at Manchester shoeshop. 

Dean, northeast corner of Canal. 

Dean, northwest corner of Elm. 

Depot, northeast corner of Elm. 

Elm, opposite foot of Manchester. 

Elm, northwest corner of Salmon. 

Elm, northwest corner of Cove. 

Franklin, opposite Middle. 

George, corner of. 

Gore, corner of Beech. 

Gore, corner of Maple. 

Gore, corner of Ash. 

Granite, northwest corner of Elm. 

Granite, near Franklin. 

Granite, northeast corner of Canal. 

Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 

Grove, corner of Elm. 

Grove, in East Manchester, 

Hancock. 

Hancock, near shoeshop. 

Hancock, northwest corner River road. 

Hancock, near brewery. 

Hanover, corner of Elm. 

Hanover, front of Opera House. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Pine. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Union. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Beech. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Maple. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Hall. 



,316 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont. 

Harrison, opposite No. 15. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Pine. 

Harrison, corner of Union. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Beech. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Maple. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Oak. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Russell. 

Harvard, corner of Lincoln. 

High, corner of Ashland. 

High, corner of South. 

High, fifty feet east of Wilson road. 

High, corner of Hall. 

High, corner of Belmont. 

Hollis, northeast corner of Canal. 

Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs. 

Hollis, northwest corner of Elm. 

Jewett, corner of Massabesic. 

Kidder, northeast corner of Canal. 

Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs. 

Kidder, northwest corner of Elm. 

Kidder's court, northwest corner of Elm. 

Lake avenue, near No. 36. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Union. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Maple. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Wilson. 

Lake avenue, corner of Cass. 

Lake avenue, east end, near Hastings residence. 

Langdon, northwest corner of Elm. 

Langdon, northeast corner of Canal. 

Laurel, near corner of Chestnut. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Pine. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Union. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 317 

Laurel, northwest corner of Beech. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Maple. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Laurel, near No. 244. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson. 

Laurel, near Belmont. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Milton. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Beacon. 

Laurel, near Tierney residence. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Beech. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ash. 

Lowell, northwest corner of South. 

Lowell, front of No. 276. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland. 

Mammoth road. 

Manchester, corner of Elm. 

Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable, 

Manchester, northwest corner of Central. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Pine. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Union. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Beech. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Maple. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Hall. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont. 

Maple, northwest corner of Lowell. 

Maple, front of No. 350. 

Market, near Canal. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm. 

Market, northwest corner of Elm. 

Massabesic, northwest corner of Old Falls road. 

Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor. 

Massabesic avenue. 

Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 



818 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Mechanic, northeast corner of Canal. 

Mechanic, near second back street west of Ehn. 

Mechanic, northwest corner of Ehn. 

Merrimack, corner of Ehn. 

Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Union. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Merrimack, near No. 362. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall. 

Merrimack, near Belmont. 

Merrimack, northeast corner of Beacon. 

Middle, northeast corner of Canal. 

Middle, near No. 67 Amoskeag corporation. 

Monroe, northwest corner of Elm. 

Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Union. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Russell. 

North, northwest corner of Bay. 

North, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

North, northwest corner of Pine. 

North, corner of Liberty. 

Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 

Orange, northwest corner of Pine. 

Orange, northwest corner of Union. 

Orange, northwest corner of Walnut. 



REPORT OP THE FIRE ENGINEER. 319 

Orange, northwest corner of Beech. 

Orange, corner of Ash. 

Orange, corner of Maple. 

Orange, corner of Oak. 

Orange, corner of Russell. 

Orange, corner of Linden. 

Orange, corner of Hall. 

Pearl, northeast corner of Elm. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Pine. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Union. 

Pearl, corner of Beech. 

Pearl, corner of Walnut. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Ash. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Maple. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Oak. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Russell. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Linden. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Ashland. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Morrison. 

Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine. 

Pennacook, northwest corner of Union. 

Pine, near Road House. 

Pine, northwest corner of Lake avenue. 

Pine, northwest corner of Concord. 

Pine, northwest corner of Lowell. 

Pine, northwest corner of High. 

Pine, northwest corner of Bridge. 

Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal. 

Pleasant, near No. 35 Manchester corporation. 

Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin. 

Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm. 

Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Pine. 



320 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Union. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Wahiut. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Beech. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Oak. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Russell. 
Prospect, corner of Linden. 
Prospect, corner of Hall. 
Reservoir, on force main. 
River road (north), north of Webster. 
River road (north), corner of Clarke. 
River road (north), near Mrs. John Kelly's, 
River road (north), near J. Otis Clark's. 
River road (south), near gate of tannery. 
Sagamore, corner of Pine. 
Sagamore, corner of Union. 
Salmon, corner of Union. 
Shasta, corner of Elm. 
Shasta, corner of River road. 
Shasta, corner of Beech. 
Silver, corner of Union. 
Silver, corner of Beech. 
Silver, corner of Lincoln. 
Silver, corner of Wilson. 
Somerville, corner of Union. 
Somerville, corner of Beech. 
Somerville, corner of Maple. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm. 
Spring, corner of Elm. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union. 
Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 321 

Spruce, northwest corner of Beech. 

Spruce, northwest corner of Maple. 

Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Spruce, northwest corner of Wilson. 

Spruce, northwest corner of Belmont. 

Spruce, near T. J. Perry's house. 

Stark, northeast corner of Canal. 

Stark, near No. 13 Stark corporation. 

Stark, northwest corner of Elm. 

State, northwest corner of Granite. 

State, opposite No. 57 Manchester corporation. 

State, opposite No, 13 Manchester corporation. 

State, corner of West Central. 

Summer, corner of Elm. 

Summer. 

Taylor, corner of Young road. 

Union, northwest corner of Lowell. 

Union, northwest corner of High. 

Valley, northwest corner of Elm. 

Valley, northwest corner of Willow. 

Valley, northwest'corner of Beech. 

Valley, northwest corner of Wilson. 

Valley, northwest corner of Belmont. 

Valley, northwest corner of Taylor. 

Valley, northwest corner of Cypress. 

Valley, northwest corner of Jewett. 

Valley, 150 feet east of J. L. Woodman's. 

Vine, opposite Central station. 

Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell. 

Walnut, opposite No. 79. 

Walnut, northwest corner of Sagamore. 

Water, near No. 38 Amoskeag corporation. 

Water, northwest corner of Elm. 

Webster, at railway station. 

Webster, noi-theast corner of River road (north). 

Webster, northwest corner of Elm. 
•21 



322 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Webster, corner of Adams. 

Webster, northwest corner of Union. 

Webster, corner of Walnut. 

West Auburn, northeast corner of Canal. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs.^ 

West Bridge, northwest corner of Elm. 

West Brook, northeast corner of Canal. 

West Brook, northwest corner of Elm. 

West Cedar, northeast corner of Canal. 

West Cedar, northwest corner of Elm. 

West Central, northeast corner of Canal. 

West Central, corner of Franklin. 

West central, northwest corner of Elm. 

West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal. 

West Merrimack, near iii Amoskeag corporation. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm. 

West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm. 

Wilson, corner of Lake avenue. 

Young, corner of Elm. 

Young, northwest corner of Beech. 

Young, corner of Maple. 

Young, 96 feet east of R. N. Batchelder's. 

Young, corner of Jewett. 

Young road. 

PISCATAQUOG AND MCGREGORVILLE. 

A, corner of South Main. 
A, near No. 73. 
A, northwest corner of B. 
Adams, corner of Main. 
Adams, corner of Beauport. 
Amory, corner of Beauport. 
Amory, near Dubuque. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 323 

Amory, corner of Rimmon. 

Amory, corner of Hevey. 

Amory, corner of Montgomery. 

Amory, corner of Lafayette. 

Amory, corner of Morgan. 

Bath, corner of River. 

Bath, corner of Shirley. 

Bedford road, near Huntress's. 

Bennington, corner of Main. 

Blaine, corner of Wayne. 

Blaine, corner of Cleveland. 

Blaine, east end of street. 

Bowman, opposite cemetery. 

Boynton road, 300 feet south of Hartshorn's. 

Boynton road, east of Colley pond. 

Boynton road, corner of Grant. 

C, corner of Bedford road. 

Cartier, corner of Sullivan. 

Cartier, corner of Putnam. 

Carroll. 

Cleveland, northwest corner of Second. 

Clinton, corner of Dover. 

Clinton, corner of South Main. 

Conant, corner of Cartier. 

Conant, corner of Dubuque. 

Conant, corner of Rimmon. 

Dartmouth, corner of O'Neil. 

Douglas, corner of Quincy. 

Douglas, corner of Green. 

Douglas, corner of Barr. 

Douglas, corner of West. 

Douglas, corner of Main. 

Douglas, east of Main. 

Ferry, corner of Main. 

Granite, corner of Quincy. 

Granite, corner of Green. 



324 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Granite, corner of Barr. 

Granite, corner of West. 

Granite, corner of Dover. 

Granite, corner of Main. 

Granite, corner of Shirley. 

Granite, corner of River. 

Highland, between Wilkins and Mast. 

Kelley, corner of Beauport. 

Kelley, corner of Cartier. 

Kelley, corner of Dubuque. 

Main, near Milford. 

Marion, corner McGregor. 

Mast, corner of South Main. 

Mast, corner of Bowman. 

Mast, between Bowman and South Main. 

Mast, opposite J. C. Smith's house. 

Mast, 400 feet west of Charles Hoitt's house. 

Mast, near J. P. Brock's, 

Mast, near the J. N. Prescott house. 

McDuffie, corner of Boynton road. 

McDuffie, corner of B. 

McGregor, near Johnson block. 

McGregor, opposite " Reed " house. 

Milford, southwest corner of South Main. 

Milford, southeast corner of Bowman. 

Milford, corner of old Bedford road. 

Milford, corner of Bismark. 

Patten, corner of Ferry. 

Prince, corner of Boynton road. 

Prince, corner of B. 

Putnam, corner of Main. 

Putnam, corner of Beauport. 

Putnam, corner of Dubuque. 

Riddle, near Mast. 

School, corner of South Main. 

School, opposite schoolhouse. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 325 

School, corner of River. 

Shirley, northwest corner of Walker. 

Shirley, southwest corner of Ferry. 

Sullivan, corner of Main. 

Sullivan, corner of Beauport. 

Temple, corner of Main. 

Walker, corner of River. 

Walker, corner of Patten. 

Walker, corner of Parker. 

Walker, near corner of South Main. 

Wayne, near G. Belisle's house. 

Wayne, near corner of Beauport. 

Wayne, near corner of Main. 

Wilkins, northwest corner of Highland. 

Wilkins, northwest corner of Mast. 

Wilkins, opposite Tirrell residence. 

Wilkins, near Carswell residence. 

Winter, corner of South Main. 

AMOSKEAG. 

Dunbarton road, corner of Front. 

Dunbarton road, near L. D. Colby's. 

Goffstown road, four hydrants. 

Main, at Robinson's slaughter-works. 

Main, near brick schoolhouse. 

Main, corner of Goffstown road. 

Main, opposite the John E. Stearns house. 

Main, near the Hiram Stearns house. 

Mill, near paper-mill. 

Mill, corner of Main. 

Varnum, corner of Main. 

In addition to the above, there are four private hydrants that 
are available in case of need. 
Two at P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill. 
One at S. C. Forsaith Co.'s machine shop. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 

Total number, 508. 



REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



To the City Councils, the School Board, and Citizens : 

In accordance with a recent vote of the Board of School Com- 
mittee, it is expected that the Annual Report of the Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction for 1893 will be prepared with some 
reference to its fitness for adoption by the School Committee as 
its Report upon the Public Schools to the City Councils. 

The foregoing form of address is therefore deemed pertinent, 
and, in its fullness, especially because all boards of municipal 
control are servants of the people. 

SCHOOLHOUSES. 

The number of school buildings belonging to the city which 
have this year been occupied by day schools is 22, and their 
total value, including land and furniture, is estimated at ^475,000. 
These buildings contain 107* rooms, of which, during the fall 
term, 98 have been occupied by day schools. Of the remaining 
9 rooms, 2 in the Hallsville house have not been used ; 2 in the 
Spring-street house and i in the Lowell-street house have been 
used for evening schools; i in the Lowell-street house for the 
manual training school ; i in the Webster-street house for a reci- 
tation room ; and in the Merrimack-street house, occupied as a 
training school for teachers, 2 rooms are used by the sub-teach- 
ers' classes for library and recitation purposes. 



* Eight of these are temporary, necessitated by an overcrowding of the schools in the 
Webster, Lincoln, Bakersville, and Ash-street buildings, — where rooms have been divided by 
temporary partitions. 



330 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

]\Iuch-needed additional school room will soon be provided 
by the completion of a four-room building on Pearl street, and 
of a wing for two rooms on the south end of the Webster-street 
house. Use of one of the vacant rooms at Hallsville is imme- 
diately needed, and the other is likely to be needed before the 
close of 1S94. The growth in this part of the city has been 
wonderfully rapid, and, continuing two years longer, there may 
be occasion for again using the old schoolhouse in this section. 

In West Manchester the schools are all full, and the School- 
street lot may ere long be needed for day school purposes. The 
present house upon this lot does fairly well for evening school 
use, and it is much needed for this purpose, the old engine house 
on Clinton street being unfit for evening schools. There is 
pressing need in this section for schools upon the lot bought for 
a schoolhouse in ward nine. 

There is also as much need of more school room for the relief 
of the Lincoln-street and Wilson Hill schools as there has been 
for the relief of the Ash-street building, which will soon be 
largely provided by the completion of the new house on Pearl 
street. There have, throughout the year, been > two schools on 
the third floor of the Lincoln-street house, as likewise in the 
Ash-street house ; and the Wilson Hill house has again been over- 
crowded, the same as annually for several years past. The Train- 
ing School, in this vicinity, has this year also been somewhat 
overcrowded. For the relief, then, of the Lincoln-street, Wil- 
son Hill, and the Training School, I recommend the erection of 
a six-room schoolhouse in close proximity to the Lincoln-street 
building, in order that the primary pupils to be put in such a 
house may go to school with, and have the care of, their older 
brothers and sisters in the higher grades at the Lincoln-street 
school. The new building could house the two primaries now 
in the Lincoln-street building, the two primaries in the Wil- 
son Hill building, and the surplus of primary pupils in the 
Training School. Thus four, probably five, of the six rooms in a 
new house in this locality would be occupied at once, and the 
two rooms now occupied by primary schools in the Lincoln 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 331 

Street house would be available for the two schools now on the 
third floor of this house. Besides, the ninety pupils required to 
attend at Wilson Hill would be provided with much more whole- 
some quarters. 

Notwithstanding the provision made for the relief of the Ash- 
street school, by the erection of the Pearl-street house, it can be 
clearly shown that there is need, for the full relief of the Ash- 
street house, of at least one room for primary pupils upon the lot 
at the corner of Bridge and Union streets ; and, in the absence 
of it, either one school may have to be continued on the third 
floor of the Ash-street house or else pupils of lowest primary grade 
who live, as it were, under the eaves of the Ash-street house may 
be obliged to attend school in the new house on Pearl street. 
There will be over sixty pupils of primary grade to attend the 
latter house, as soon as ready, who live east of Russell street ; 
and it is by the removal of these, who now constitute the mass of 
two of the four primary schools in the Ash-street house., that it has 
been expected the two schools on the third floor of this house 
would be accommodated in the lower rooms. The expectation 
may yet be realized, especially if those who are sure to crowd the 
two primary schools which are to remain at the Ash-street house 
do not live so far west of Russell street that some of them can- 
not be sent to the new house on Pearl street. 

It will be seen from all that has been said upon the need of 
more school room, east of the river, that the greater need is in 
the vicinity of the Lincoln-street school, though further provi- 
sion near and west of the Ash- street house cannot long be de- 
layed. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The average number of schools for the entire year has been 
96, as follows: The equivalent of 8 in the high school build- 
ing; 26 grammar-school divisions (i more than last year); 18 
middle schools (one more than last year) ; 36 primary schools, 
also another for two terms, or 37 primaries in all (four more than 
last year) ; 2 partially graded ; and 5 ungraded, or suburban. 



332 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Four rooms in the Training School have been cared for by its 
principal, * and hence the average number of regular teachers 
having direct charge of the 96 schools during the year has been 
93. In addition to these, there have been employed 6 assistant 
teachers, — 5 of them in grammar masters' rooms, and i in the 
Training School for Teachers, — also 3 special teachers who have 
had direction of the work in all the schools in music, drawing, 
and manual training, — though only for one term in manual 
training. This is equivalent to the employment of loi teachers 
for the present year. Last year 86 regular teachers, the equiv- 
alent of I master's assistant for the year, and 2 special teachers 
of music and drawing were employed, a total of 89 teachers ; 
there has, therefore, been employed this year an excess of 12 
teachers over the number employed last year, 6 of the 12 for the 
direct charge of six new schools and the other 6 as principals' 
assistants. 

This year's additional grammar division is reckoned by calling 
the fourth division for two terms on the third floor of the Ash- 
street house and the one for one term at Hallsville equivalent to 
one division for the entire year. The additional middle school 
was organized, in January, in the Lincoln-street house, and the 
four additional primary schools as follows : One in the Webster- 
street building ; one in the Ash-street house ; one at Hallsville, 
each for one term, and therefore eqivalent to one school for the 
entire year; one in the Varney school house, and two other pri- 
mary schools are reckoned from the gains made over last year at 
Webster street and Goffe's Falls, — all of which are shown in the 
statistical table on pages E and F of the Appendix to this report. 

While the number of schools has increased by only 6 over the 
number of last year, the increase in the number of pupils has 
been 477, or an average of 79 pupils for each of the 6 new 
schools, — though, of course, they have not been so distributed. 
Last year the total enrollment of different pupils in all the (89) 
public day schools was 4,298, or 48 pupils per school. This year 



♦Assisted by a principal's assistant, and by the young ladies constituting the sub-teachers' 
classes. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 383 

the enrollment has been 4,745, or 50 pupils per school, the aver- 
age number of day schools for the year being 96. 

Though the average number of teachers employed for the pres- 
ent entire year has been but loi, there have been employed dur- 
ing the/rtt// term 104 teachers ; and, in order that the present 
organization of schools may be seen and fully understood, I pre- 
sent a list of the schools and of their teachers, — together with 
interesting data pertaining to teachers, — as follows : 

Explanation. — Classes A to H, inclusive, signify grammar 
grades ; I to L, middle-school grades ; and M to R, primary 
orades. 



334 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 339 

The number of schools will probably need to be increased 
early in 1894, by the opening of one or two new schools ; and, if 
the ratio of the last two years in the increase of pupils is main- 
tained, it is likely that the whole number of teachers employed 
will be one hundred and eight or ten before the close of 1894. 

EXPENSES. 

In addition to the increased appropriation that will be needed 
for the payment of teachers' salaries, there will doubtless be 
need of at least $5,000 for text-books and other free supplies ; 
because, first, the appropriation for this year has been insuffi- 
cient by many dollars, notwithstanding certain books and other 
much-needed appliances have not been procured ; because, sec- 
ond, many of the general supply of text-books, first obtained in 
1890, are in a dilapidated condition and any further use of a con- 
siderable number of them is impossible ; because, third, there is 
fair probability that there will be an increase of two or three 
hundred pupils over the enrollment of this year, which has been 
the largest in the history of the city. 

The cost of the schools for the present year has not, at this 
writing, been fully ascertained. It has, doubtless, been more 
than for any previous year, for the number of pupils, teachers, 
and schools has been greater than ever before; and there have 
been large expenses which are unusual, — the purchase of several 
new pianos, the exchange of fourth music readers, and the con- 
struction of an L (containing two much-needed rooms) at the 
rear of the training-school building, of which the last should not 
have been charged to the appropriation for the support of 
schools. A comparison of the cost of our schools with the ex- 
penditure for schools in other New England cities would show 
that, while ours is greater than in some of these, it is less than in 
most which are of the size, importance, and wealth of Manches- 
ter. Personally knowing, as I do, that those having control of 
the expenditure of our city's funds for school purposes are pains- 
taking in their efforts to have these funds economically, wisely, 
and only necessarily expended, I can but feel that the tax of less 
than three mills per dollar of the city's valuation will not be 



340 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

begrudged by any class of our citizens having at heart the good 
of the public schools. 

It is, indeed, much to be regretted that our teachers' salaries 
are not sufficient to enable us to retain all who are good. Five 
of those among our best have this year withdrawn from our corps 
of teachers to accept positions not far away at higher rates of sal- 
ary; and the corps has annually been depleted for several years, 
to a greater or less extent, for the same reason. 

The school committee should have at its disposal, annually, a 
sum of money sufficient to enable it to provide for an enrollment 
of all children in the city of school age. The assessors have not 
attempted it for two or three years, discouraged because (when 
most faithful) they could not find as many children as were en- 
rolled in the schools of the city. The assessors declare that many 
of the foreign and more ignorant families cannot be made to be- 
lieve otherwise than that the enrollment of their children is for 
the purpose of taxation, and that parents therefore refuse to re- 
port the names and number of their children. A complete list 
of all children of school age in the city is greatly needed. With- 
out such a list it cannot be ascertained whether all attend school 
as required by law. Other agents than those who assess the taxes 
could probably procure a census of the children of school age 
that would be practically full and correct. May not an appro- 
priation for this purpose be obtained ? 

TEACHERS. 

In addition to the teachers named in the list which has been 
presented to show the organization of the schools for the fall term, 
twelve others have taught in our schools within the year, as fol- 
lows : Mr. Willis B. Moore, assistant in the High School ; Mr. 
Fred C. Baldwin, Miss Jennie M. Chandler, and Miss Annie B. 
Goodwin, in the Ash-street school; Mrs. Cora M. Sanborn and 
Miss Rose Dearborn, in the Webster-street school ; Miss Maude 
L. Kent, in the Spring-street school ; Miss Amelia L. Graupner, 
in the Franklin-street school ; Miss Annie M. Sleeper, in the 
Lincoln-street school ; Miss Viola E. McClure, Miss Nettie C. 
Woodman, and Miss Ruth McClure, in the Varney school. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 841 

Mr. Moore withdrew to become principal of an academy in 
Maine. Mr. Baldwin, Mrs. Sanborn, and Misses Chandler, 
Goodwin, and Kent are the five previously alluded to as among 
the best of our teachers who were called elsewhere at higher sal- 
aries. Misses Graupner, Sleeper, and Woodman were also good 
or excellent teachers, and have been wisely selected upon their 
merit for personal companionship in the most sacred of life's re- 
lations. I am not definitely informed of the positions occupied 
by the others who have withdrawn from our corps of teachers 
within the year. Now, at the close of the year, has come the res- 
ignation of Miss C. Augusta Abbott, who for a generation has 
faithfully and earnestly taught hundreds that will recall with great 
pleasure their school days as spent with Miss Abbott. 

The items in the tabulated list of teachers which are calculated 
to indicate the general fitness of the corps for the work it is un- 
dertaking will, I trust, receive more than passing attention ; for 
in the list are the names of those who have faithfully devoted all 
their faculties and energies, during the better part of their lives, 
to the improvement of the youth of our city, while the prepara- 
tion for the teacher's duties which has been made by the mem- 
bers of the corps in general promises much for the future good of 
our schools. It gives me pleasure also to add that the true spirit 
of the ideal teacher has in no previous year so largely prevailed ; 
and, as a consequence, a good degree of progress has been made 
throughout the schools. 

It may be seen from the reports made to me by the principals 
of the larger schools in what particulars they have severally en- 
deavored to improve the work under their immediate charge. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The evening drawing school continues to meet the needs of 
the various classes of mechanics, and of young men looking for- 
ward to mechanical lines of work and study. The school is just- 
ly very popular, and its full classes are receiving useful and prof- 
itable instruction. 

The evening schools affording instruction in the common- 



342 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

school studies are also profitable. Their chief work consists in 
teaching large numbers of adults, mostly of foreign birth, how to 
speak and read the English language. 

When it is seen with what devotion many of these persist in 
the work, there can be no question of their intention to become 
permanent American citizens ; and, when it is considered how 
largely this element is entering the life of New England, and how 
important it is that its influence should have the right direction, 
there can be no doubt of the usefulness of the evening schools in 
affording their pupilage the means necessary to a proper under- 
standing of the duties they owe their adopted country. 

DRAWING AND MANUAL TRAINING. 

The work in drawing has been systematically, progressively, 
and efficiently carried forward during the year. Drawing and 
the work done supplementary to it, in paper-cutting, paper-fold- 
ing, and in clay-modeling, most largely in the lower grades, has 
constituted, together with penmanship, all the manual training 
done below the second grammar division. 

The boys of the first and second grammar divisions have, dur- 
ing the fall term, done shop work in a room fitted up for the pur- 
pose in the old high school building on Lowell street.. While 
the boys have been engaged in this work, the girls belonging to 
the same classes have at their schoolrooms, to a greater or less ex- 
tent, taken lessons in sewing, under the direction of one of the 
regular teachers selected for the purpose by the master of the 
school. 

The boys in their shop work have been taught by a competent 
and experienced instructor, Mr. Fred E. Browne, of Concord ; 
and they have attained suprisingly excellent results, considering 
they have had but one term's training. The work of the girls 
in sewing has been such as to signify they could rival the boys in 
exactness and excellence of results if they could have the work in 
sewing systematized and supervised by a skilled instructor. 

Believing in the wisdom of teaching sewing in the schools to 
other than the higher grammar grades, I recommend that a com- 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 343 

petent supervisor of sewing be employed to prepare and put into 
effect a course of study and work in sewing, for both boys 
and girls, in the higher primary and lower middle schools, and 
for girls in the higher middle and all grammar grades. The boys 
in the higher middle and third and fourth grammar divisions 
might at the same time (one hour a week) take lessons in Kil- 
born's course of knife work, preparatory to the shop work they 
will do as first and second division grammar pupils. In a few 
years, under such an arrangement, the girls would be well ad- 
vanced in sewing by the time they reach the second grammar 
division, and during the last two years of the grammar course 
they could take cooking. 

NEEDED IMPROVEMENTS. 

Education is a process of development, and schools are de- 
signed to be so organized as to afford the most favorable condi- 
tions for the wisest and highest development of their individual 
members. Primarily, the development depends upon the self- 
activity of the mind ; but the degree of this activity, as well as 
the direction of it, is largely determined by surrounding condi- 
tions. Hence the far greater and more important part of one's 
education is gained after school days are over. May it not there- 
fore be wise more closely to connect the environments of life 
with those of school by including studies which will throw the 
greatest amount of light on the environments of life .? 

There are certainly no environments in life that exert a great 
influence upon thought and character which are more interesting 
than our physical environments. "These include the mineral, 
vegetable, and animal kingdoms ; the physical features of land 
and water ; the physical heavens ; and the forces that underlie 
the phenomena of nature in general. These must be interpreted 
to the child by the school, else they will remain a mere enigma 
to him all through life and fail of exerting their educating influ- 
ences upon his mind and character." Hence the propriety and 
necessity of including in the course of study instruction in at least 
the elements of the natural sciences, and unless such instruction 



344 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

is given in the primary and middle schools two thirds of the 
whole number of pupils in all our schools will fail of receiving 
any part of it. Considerable instruction in elementary science 
can be adapted to the understanding of the pupils in these lower 
grade schools, but " the pedagogical value of such instruction is 
not to be measured by the knowledge acquired, nor so much by 
the amount of discipline gained as by the fact that it reveals and 
interprets nature in such a way that the process of development, 
which the teaching of the sciences merely begins in school, will 
be continued afterwards by nature herself all through life." 

How blindly are most of us going through life, merely for the 
lack of a little training in early years in learning how to observe ! 
All who examined the educational exhibits made by our schools 
last June must be convinced of the ability of even quite young 
children successfully to study nature, and all who directed the 
work of the children in such study know that nothing of more 
absorbing interest was ever before introduced in our .schools or 
taken with greater profit, the results and the little time devoted 
to such study being both considered. What has been done in this 
direction has been permissive, not required, consequently with 
varying degrees of extent and thoroughness. I therefore recom- 
mend a revision of the course of study which shall provide for a 
proper and systematic course of instruction in elementary science 
through all grades of our schools; and, likewise, for the intro- 
duction of books of history, biography, and classical literature, 
to be used as supplementary reading matter and for more critical 
study at certain stages, in connection with language work, in the 
higher grades. 

Children need other reading than that furnished by the school 
reader. It is well known to teachers, at least, that children have 
a taste for and ability to appreciate much higher grades of read- 
ing matter than is usually accredited them. Margaret Fuller, 
Harriet Martineau, Franklin, Lincoln, Faraday, and many other 
noted men and women have borne testimony to the belief that 
much of their eminence and success was due to sentiments and 
instruction which they derived from strong books read and rel- 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 345 

ished in childhood. Indeed, it is not an uncommon thing to find 
those in nearly every community, though belonging to the gen- 
eration fast passing away, who tell of the tone and character giv- 
en their lives by the virility of the matter which constituted their 
reading in childhood. Fortunately, in recent years there has 
been much attention given this matter ; and it is now easy to find 
abundant material selected from writings of the best standard au- 
thors, which has been arranged and bound with reference to its 
adaptability for use in the various grades of school. Failure to 
afford the children in our schools some acquaintance with the 
best literature would probably result in the failure of many of 
them ever to know even as much of it as that it exists. 

Likewise in the matter of history ; for it no longer exists even 
as a reader in our schools below the grammar grades. It was 
shown in last year's report that not more than one third of those 
who enter the primary schools ever reach the grammar grades. 
Hence the larger part of the pupilage of our schools goes out into 
life with no other knowledge of the history of their country than 
what is gained from the few simple stories told them by their 
teachers ; and the opportunity of familiarizing a large class with 
something of the literature of the history of the country which 
they will soon help to govern, as well as with many of the facts 
of that history, is forever lost. How great the loss when we 
think of what inspiration from records of noble lives and deeds, 
what love of home and country, and what loyalty might be in- 
culcated ! The means, too, for this is at hand, for historical sto- 
ries for children of the ages of those in our primary and middle 
schools abound in the market, well written in simple language 
and attractively illustrated. The supplies generously furnished 
for this work in former years are worn out, and therefore worth- 
less. 

There is need, then, of a large supply of books of history and 
literature, because all grades of our schools from high to primary 
are comparatively destitute. In such times as are now upon us 
I do not like to advise anything requiring additional expense, 
but of the many excellent things said by Rev. Dr. Murkland in 



346 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

his report to the City Councils, a year ago, he said nothing more 
true than this : "In educational matters, above all else, the wis- 
est expenditure is the truest economy." A thousand dollars now 
expended for histories and classical literature, to teach hundreds 
in our schools love of country and loyalty to her, also the noble 
and inspiring truths taught by foremost writers of prose and po- 
etry, may easily be believed to save us a million dollars a genera- 
tion hence by effecting the difference between those who, in case 
of internecine strife, would take up arms for the right or wrong 
side, or between those who in civil life would seek positions of 
trust for the purpose of saving the credit of the state or for the 
sake of an opportunity to rob her ! Let us ask for a reasonable 
appropriation for the subject in question.* 

* Since the foregoing was written, a good supply of the works in question has been 
furnished the schools. 



TEACHERS' REPORTS. 



In compliance with my request of certain teachers for a 
statement of the condition, progress, and needs of the schools 
under their charge, they have furnished reports, particularizing 
largely in accordance with suggestions made in the following 
form of request : 

Office of Superintendent of Schools, 
Manchester, N. H., November 25, 1893. 
To Masters of Granwiar Schools : 

Believing you can afford information in regard to the condi- 
tion and needs of the schools of which you have charge that would 
be interesting to the public, and that might also aid those in au- 
thority over the schools in their efforts to improve them, I cor- 
dially invite you soon to afford me such information as seems 
most pertinent to the occasion, in order that it may be inserted 
in the annual school report for the current year. 

Permit me to suggest to those of you who have been given su- 
pervisory powers over all the schools in your building, that some- 
where in the course of what you present you indicate somewhat 
particularly the number of hours you have', daily or weekly, this 
year personally devoted to the direct instruction of pupils and 
the distribution of your time in such work; also what portion of 
it has been put upon regular and what upon special work, as well 
as the nature of any special work, or of special efforts upon reg- 
ular work, and the grades of school in which chiefly done. 

You might also wisely mention, I think, the number of pupils 
in your building who have within the year been doubly promoted, 
or "skipped, a class," and state in which quarter of the higher 
class the majority of doubly promoted pupils have ranked. 



348 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I am not ignorant of the general influence which you have ex- 
erted, nor of the more pronounced particulars, whereby you have 
severally improved the schools in your charge since you were 
granted supervisory powers ; but you can more fully specify the 
essential particulars, and I am sure both the members of the 
school board and the public in general will be glad to learn from 
you the advantages that have accrued to your several schools in 
consequence of the additional opportunities and powers granted 
in making you supervisory i:)rincipals. 

Respectfully yours, 

WILLIAM E. BUCK, 

Superintetidetit. 



The following reports from grammar masters are presented in 
the order of seniority of said masters' services in our public 
schools. 



Report of Mr. Sutcliffe, Master of the Lincoln-street 
School. 

In accordance with your request for information in regard to 
the condition and needs of the Lincoln-street grammar school, I 
respectfully offer the following report : 

The relations of the principal to all the schools in the building 
having been materially modified by granting him supervisory 
powers, permit me to somewhat definitely outline the efforts 
made to effect a permanent improvement in them all. The fund- 
amental idea has been to employ the whole teaching power for 
the uplifting of all ; to cultivate the personal knowledge of the • 
individual pupil ; to incite the enthusiasm of teacher and pupil 
alike for more exact and therefore better work, and to establish 
those pleasant relations between teachers and pupils that enable 
the instruction given to be as cheerfully as profitably received. 
On this principle, the master has during the past term personally 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OP SCHOOLS. 349 

instructed in six different grades one hundred and twenty-five 
different pupils in those subjects known to be of practical im- 
portance. The same method of instruction in penmanship in 
all the grades is now in operation, and we confidently expect,' 
after one year's work, a marked improvement in style and 
rapidity. 

A graded course of selections for rhetorical purposes, from 
the works of those authors generally accepted as the best, has 
been prepared with the aid of the teachers, which we hope will 
direct the attention of the pupils to purer forms of literature. 
In t^e higher grades where the subject of United States history 
is taught a similarly graded course of supplementary reading has 
been arranged. This merely suggests good books to read on 
that subject without being able to provide them when the inter- 
est of the scholar is turned in that direction. In short, the ma- 
terial for supplementary reading in the higher grades is inade- 
quate. Our attention might well be directed to the formulation 
of some plan for the establishment and maintenance of a school 
library. 

The approximate number of different pupils belonging to the 
school throughout the year has been four hundred twenty-five, 
divided into nineteen grades. The average number of pupils 
who have failed of a promotion, in each grade, has been two. 
With our system of semi-annual promotions there would be a 
total of seventy-six for the year who, for various reasons, have 
been deprived of advance instruction for six months. Of this 
number, sixty to seventy-five per cent could have received this 
instruction if it had been possible to give them the neces- 
sary individual attention. A teacher employed for the sole pur- 
pose of giving this individual instruction to all those doubtful 
cases would, I believe, accomplish the indicated result, which 
would be equivalent to advancing a class of twenty-five pupils 
every semester. The work of the school in general, both in 
character and scholarship, has improved and, in conclusion, 
allow me to thank you for your many suggestions and helpful 
advice. 



350 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Report of Mr. Winch, Master of the Varney School. 

The past year's work has been such as to encourage many of 
those most directly concerned. It has been marked by a large 
growth in attendance, there having been registered 175 different 
boys and 206 different girls during the last term. 

Since being made supervising prmcipal, I have regularly 
taught three classes in the first division, one in the second divi- 
sion, and one or two in the lower grades, making about four 
hours' regular class instruction each day. The subject taught in 
the lower grades has been varied and taken up with the purpose 
to unify the work of the different rooms in instruction in the 
several studies, and also develop the work so that one study 
would be helpful to another and the proper correlation of the 
different branches understood by the teachers, and thus elevate 
the character of the work in all departments. To this end I 
have taken one subject each semester as a specialty and also 
developed the co-ordination of each teacher's work with the one 
in adjoining grades. One semester I worked upon arithmetic, 
another upon geography. In this the teacher adopted the fol- 
lowing outline and used it as the order of studying any political 
division, thereby seeking to form habits of study and recitation 
in the first of their study of the subject which would be used 
throughout ; and its helpful influence has been quite noticeable. 



1. Position, — On the earth, to others, boundary. 

2. Outline, — General shape, mountains bounding; rivers 
bounding ; coast, bays, gulfs, capes, etc. 

3. Surface, — First, general; second, particular, — mountain 
systems, ranges, slopes, peaks, plains, plateaus ; third, peculi- 
arities. 

4. Drainage, — Water- sheds, river systems, rivers, tributaries, 
lakes, usefulness. 

5. Climate, — Zone, seasons, winds, water, mountains. 

6. Natural products, — First, animal ; second, vegetable ; 
third, mineral. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 351 

7. Industries, — Agriculture, manufacture, mining, etc. ; give 
lists of each. 

8. Commerce, — First, kinds, — foreign, domestic, railroad, 
ocean ; second, extent ; third, imports ; fourth, exports. 

9. People, — Race, life, religion, habits. 

10. Government. 

11. Cities, — Locate definitely. 

12. Add special things of importance and interest, sometimes 
history. 

For states and groups, as above, except of Nos. 5 to 10, take 
what is of local application. 

In conducting this work I have occasionally found pupils who 
were better developed than others, and equal to more advanced 
work. Fifteen such have been advanced, or doubly promoted, 
at time of promotion, and all such now rank in the first third of 
their respective classes. This has had a helpful influence upon 
the general work and ambition of all the scholars. 

This year I have introduced elementary science into all the 
rooms, taking one half hour a week. The work in every case 
furnishes topics for oral and written language work, and some are 
supplementary to the geography. Common things, phenomena, 
and forces are chosen, and arranged so that geology is the principal 
one in the first division ; physics and chemistry in the second 
division ; zoology in the third ; botany in the fourth ; while the 
lower grades take the things around us, and may be from any of 
the above sciences. Much interest has been shown in this work, 
and it naturally contributed to increase the interest in all the 
other work. I have in all this had the most hearty co-operation 
of the teachers, and of late we have had a reading circle, where 
in reading the author we have found many questions to discuss 
which have been helpful. 

Sloyd and sewing have been in the last term's curriculum, and 
the interest they have created in school will more than compen- 
sate for the time weekly devoted to them, — one hour and a half. 

Leading educators now recognize the relationship of one study 
to another as of great importance; that school work is not many 



352 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Studies, but rather that all are a unit and the whole work is to 
produce a developed and intelligent citizen rather than a gram- 
marian or a mathematician. 

It is with such ideas and purposes that I have directed the 
work of the school. 



Report of Mr. Andrew, Master of the Webster- 
Street School, 

I submit the following in regard to Webster school, as re- 
quested by you. 

The temporary arrangement in two of the rooms affects the 
heating, lighting, and ventilation of four very materially, but 
with the addition in process of erection these faults will be re- 
moved, and with the intended perfecting of the sanitary part 
the Webster school will be one of the bett lighted and ventilated 
buildings in the city, above the basement. The basement on the 
east side is a cold, dreary place, and some arrangement should be 
made for heating it. There is no hall in this building, though 
one is very much needed, and I would suggest that some action 
be taken the coming year towards procuring one. 

The grounds about the school building have been very much 
improved by grading and planting of trees (the trees that have 
died will be replaced by others in the spring, as they were guar- 
anteed for one year), which are thoroughly appreciated by res- 
idents, teachers, and pupils. The educational value to the 
children more than repays the money expended. The sugges- 
tion recently made in one of the daily papers, of increasing the 
size of the playground, was very timely and some action should 
be taken before too late, as everything should be done to encour- 
age children to take vigorous exercise in the open air, — their 
physical, mental, and moral well being depend upon it. 

The past year has seen a number of changes in the corps of 
teachers. Two new rooms have been added and three teachers 
have taken other positions at increased salaries, making five new 
teachers that have been placed in this school. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 353 

The school has been very fortunate in the selection of these 
teachers, as they are progressive and ambitious, always loyal and 
willing to work for the best interests of the school, and parents 
and pupils are to be congratulated in the choice made by the su- 
perintendent and school board. 

Owing to the hearty co-operation of all the teachers, the school 
has not felt the detrimental effects usually attendant upon such a 
change but is upon a more prosperous basis than ever before. 

The supervisory power given the principal has had marked 
benefits in many ways, as it gives an opportunity to create a unity 
of purpose among the teachers and gives the principal a closer 
acquaintance with the child and a knowledge of its needs. This 
knowledge of the child is given to its teacher, as it progresses 
from room to room, often being the means of its advancement 
one to two terms, and sometimes a year, which has occurred this 
last term, when three were promoted from class D to class B. The 
rank taken by those promoted generally justifies the promotion, 
for their work is usually equal to if not above the average of the 
class into which they were promoted. 

Having fifty pupils and the same as three classes in his room, 
the principal's time has necessarily been limited in supervisory 
work, being able to devote only about one hour daily in the 
other rooms. 

Before closing I should like to call attention to one or two 
subjects that have been suggested to me in my work. I wish 
something might be done in simplifying questions in. arithmetic ; 
many of them are too complex, or beyond the comprehension 
of the pupil, and are no more educational than puzzles or conun- 
drums. The four fundamental operations should not be lost sight 
of, for they are in constant use throughout life. Simplicity in 
questions should be the rule, so that accuracy may never be sac- 
rificed, and the application of principles may be understandingly 
used. Some of my suggestions in regard to arithmetic might 
be applied to the subject of spelling. I have mentioned these 
two studies, as teachers are more likely to confine themselves to 
the text-book in these than others in the course. 



354 ANNUAL OFFJCIAL REPORTS. 

One of the chief duties of a teacher should be to create a de- 
sire for good reading. The subjects of history and geography- 
are admirably suited for this purpose. But unless the study is 
extended beyond the text-book it becomes dry and barren of good 
results, and this cannot be done unless the pupil devotes some 
part of every day, out of school hours, to these studies. I think 
it might be well if it were understood by the pupils that after 
reaching the grammar grade they would be expected to have a 
home lesson which should be either history or geography. 

The habit of devoting a part of each day at home to reading 
for a definite purpo:e will certainly have a marked influence upon 
the child all through life. 



Report of Mr. Bickford, Master of the Franklin-Street 
School. 

In accordance with your request you will find indicated below 
the work that I have attempted during the past year. 

An assistant was given to the school February i, 1893. 

That the class attempting to graduate should not be handi- 
capped to any extent I continued almost wholly to instruct it, 
and, in addition, introduced and taught a uniform system of 
gymnastics in the grammar grades. I have also devoted a por- 
tion of each day to teaching the full arm movement in writing. 

A change of assistants at the beginning of the fall term has 
rendered my presence necessary in the first division a good por- 
tion of the time. 

The following has been my program: 8.45, devotionals and 
singing; 9.05, ; 9-15? geography, class I; 9.40, arithme- 
tic, class B ; 10.15, recess ; 10.35, history, class B ; ^-3°' histo- 
ry, class C; 2.05, language, class I; 2.30, recess; 2.40, read- 
ing, class B; 3.10, penmanship, class B. (Unavoidable inter- 
ruptions excepted.) 

Practically an hour a day has been devoted to the higher 
middle school in an endeavor to make more progressive the 
course of study and to give the fourth grammar scholars a better 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 355 

Start. The test of this work will be their fitness for advanced 
work in February, 1894. 

The physical exercises have been continued durin<,f the past six 
months. 

The attempt at the full arm movement has been continued by 
the teachers and aided by special lessons by myself. I have also 
given special instruction in language in each grade above the 
lower middle, in description, story writing, and reproduction. 

This covers the work of a supervisory nature attempted by me 
during the past year. 



Report of Mr. Huse, Master of the Hallsville School. 

In reply to your invitation for a report I beg leave to make 
the following statements : 

All newly organized schools necessarily work at a disadvan- 
tage. There are certain regulations very necessary in graded 
schools that cannot be enforced in smaller ones. Scholars accus- 
tomed to the necessary freedom of a small building with no base- 
ment find it difficult to acquire that behavior in and respect for 
the school building that can be acquired in one with a basement 
and other necessary parts of a modern schoolhouse. We are 
further handicapped in our work by the changes in attendance 
and the constant accessions of new scholars. Dependent upon 
the new industries of East Manchester for its growth, our school 
has increased from seventy-nine two years ago to two hundred 
thirty-six pupils at the close of last term. 

This school has for years had more cases of tardiness than any 
other school in Manchester. A circular letter, printed and sent 
to every family at the beginning of last term, resulted in much 
improvement, especially in the higher grades. In response to an 
urgent invitation in the same letter more parents and friends of 
the school have visited it, I think, than during any other term of 
its history. 

But two pupils in the grammar grades have been doubly pro- 
moted the past year. One of these stands at the head of her 



356 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

present class, and the other was in the highest quarter when she 
moved to another school precinct. 

In the line of deportment I think I can truthfully say that on 
the whole the school has improved during the year that is past. 
My personal endeavor has always been to do all in my power to 
promote self-government on the part of the pupils, and I have no 
reason to be discouraged in the results. 

If there are good reasons for ringing out the other schools on 
stormy days they are doubly good for this school. The average 
distance that the pupils travel is greater than in any other gram- 
mar school, and not a pupil can walk from his home to the school 
on a good sidewalk. In storms he wades through mud or slush. 
Few can hear the bells on the other buildings. The rest come 
through the storm with wet feet and clothes, only to find no teach- 
ers present, and then are obliged to go home in the same condi- 
tion. 

Not being provided with an assistant in my own room it is im- 
possible for me to do much regular work or supervision in the 
other rooms. Ten minutes a day have been spent for one term 
in teaching music in the second division. This is the extent of 
it. I have formulated a number of plans by which I am confi- 
dent that the efficiency of the school can be increased, but I can- 
not at present put them into practice. 

I can but bear testimony to the earnest work of all teachers as- 
sociated with me. 



Report of Mr. King, Master of the Ash-street School. 

In accordance with the invitation of the superintendent of 
public instruction, I respectfully submit my report of the Ash- 
street school. It must necessarily be confined to the past fall 
term, which marks my connection with the school. 

The term opened with four hundred and thirty-four pupils in 
the ten rooms now occupied, including the two rooms on the 
third floor. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 357 

Teachers and scholars alike hail with joy the prospect of the 
opening of the Pearl-street house, which will relieve us of the 
compulsory resort to the third floor of the Ash-street school. 
We have at present eighty children about equally divided be- 
tween the lower primary and higher primary grades, who can be 
transferred to the Pearl-street school, and still leave the eight 
regular rooms of the Ash-street school full. It appears that both 
buildings will soon be fully occupied. 

Our building and yard are most excellently planned. In- 
doors we have the very best light, ample heat, as has been proved 
this month, and a system of ventilation quite satisfactory. Our 
yard is roomy, furnishing aft opportunity for open-air exercises, 
so valuable for school children. Indeed, it seems that the pupils' 
work during the last half of the session is greatly improved by 
the out-door recess. 

The efforts of the teachers are particularly marked by earnest- 
ness and faithfulness. I cannot speak too highly of their cheerful 
willingness to work. 

The interest of the scholars is continual. It has never been 
my pleasure to have children with such beautiful minds and pure 
characters. 

My time during school hours has been spent almost entirely in 
the class-room. I have spent a great deal of time in observing 
the work of scholars and teachers, in order that I might inti- 
mately know the purpose and capacity of the pupils, and the 
method and skill of the teachers. I have personally conducted 
regular recitations one and one half hours daily in the classes of 
the first grammar grade, about one hour a day in the other classes, 
and I have spent three quarters of an hour daily upon special 
work in some one or more of all classes. My special work has 
been confined, thus far, to minerals. I have conducted regular 
and special exercises in each class. My work has been, apart 
from that in the highest grade, more particularly in the lower 
rooms, where I have directed my efforts to reading, writing, and 
number. These and other subjects have received attention in 
other grades. 



358 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Double promotions have not been brought to my attention. 
This matter will be settled three weeks before the midwinter pro- 
motions. I feel quite sure of the desirability of this method of 
advancement, judging from past experience. 

The manual training lessons have been cheerfully and persist- 
ently attended by my boys, and I trust they have been of great 
good to them. Those of us who have taken similar courses can- 
not refrain from heartily indorsing this department of school 
work. It is hoped that we may have sewing or some form of 
manual training for girls, which will satisfy the present longing 
entertained by them for manual work, and at the same time ena- 
ble us to carry* on our work more systematically. 

I am asked to present any information pertinent to the occa- 
sion regarding the needs of the school over which I have charge, 
that might help those in authority over them in their efforts to 
improve them. My particular remarks are formulated from the 
more general. 

I think we should fully accept as the object of the grammar 
school the fitting of the boys and girls for life, and at the same 
time for the high school. The number of pupils who enter the 
high school varies, of course, with the purpose of the pupil and 
his financial environment, and the number of high school schol- 
ars who enter college varies accordingly. There are grammar 
schools in this city, as in almost every city, that send fewer schol- 
ars to the high school than the Ash-street school sends, and com- 
paratively none of the former ever go to college. From no 
grammar school do all go to the high school, and vastly fewer to 
college. Since this large number of children never go to school 
anywhere after graduating from the grammar school, and still 
others are not graduated, how important it is that our grammar 
schools furnish a broadly suggestive education. I would not leave 
out the idea of fitting for the high school, for that institution 
owes its success, quite largely, to the grammar school, and can 
blame the grammar scliool, in many cases without reproach, for 
failure to fill, more successfully, its important part in our public 
school system. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 359 

By a suggestive education, I mean the elements of science, his- 
tory, literature, etc. Not so much mere elementary knowledge, 
but the development of an interest and of right self-activity that 
will enable the child to delight in investigating the world's best 
literature, that university accessible to all, and thus furnish him 
the impetus to an honorable life and the key to its unbounded 
pleasures. 

We hope for the time when the necessary funds may be found 
for furnishing us a course in reading from our best literature, and 
from historical and geographical readers. 

We hope for a valuable school library and a small museum of 
natural history. Either of these could be greatly helped in their 
formation by pupils and, once started, easily perpetuated by 
them. 

Our pupils can become quite familiar with the elements of 
English history and standard literature, if furnished such reading 
matter for the time now devoted to the regular reading lesson. 
The high school would then have more time in which to fit its 
pupils for college. 

I am inclined to think that the requirement of preparing one 
lesson at home, by scholars of the first grammar grade, would 
prove of advantage. I know that children need a great deal of 
playtime and freedom from care, and that the girls especially are 
busy with their music and household duties ; yet I often debate 
upon the question, "Would it not be better to require home 
study to the amount of one half hour each day ? " 

There are some subjects that cannot be prepared at home. 
Supposing, however, that each child in the first grammar grade 
were provided with one more good text-book in history, making 
two books to each pupil, and he were required to study about 
thirty minutes each day at home. In school, he might devote 
his study period of thirty minutes to a delightful perusal of a 
number of more extensive writings, thus making the history les- 
son much more interesting and helpful. By following this 
method, what a beautiful mine of historical wealth could be 
brought before the class. At the same time a more gradual 



360 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

change from the grammar-school study period to that of the high 
school could be made. 



Report of Miss Wing, Principal of Training School 
for Teachers. 

The annual report of the Training School is herewith sub- 
mitted : 

The conditions for admission, times of entering, and general 
regulations remain unchanged. 

At present there are eleven sub-teachers in the training class. 
Those who entered in February, 1893, have devoted the year to 
the consideration of methods. The last six months of the course 
will be spent in the study of- theory and practice in teach- 
ing, and history of education, in the reading of educational 
papers and the discussion of the same. The results have been so 
satisfactory I deem it advisable to continue the work in this way. 

By vote of the school board there has been erected during the 
past year an addition to the school building. This consists of 
two rooms, one of which is used for a library or reading room, 
and the other as a recitation room for the normal class. The 
work of the school is greatly facilitated by this much needed im- 
provement. More work and better work can be done with suit- 
able accommodations, and the benefit derived in the short time 
these rooms have been in use, fully justifies the additional ex- 
pense. The work has been further aided by the employment, 
since September, of Miss Annie W. Cofran as assistant principal. 
Heretofore the entire responsibility of the normal work, the gen- 
eral care of the building, and the individual work with pupils 
has devolved upon the principal. No one person can satisfy so 
many demands in a thorough manner. The aims of the school 
can be much more satisfactorily attained by the employment of 
a second teacher, and the school board must be fully assured that 
an assistant is a necessity to the best conduct of the school. 

The calls upon the training school for substitutes to fill tempo- 
rary vacancies have been met in this, as in other years, by supply- 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 361 

ing teachers from either of the three classes. This necessity, 
although inevitable, is to be regretted, as the work of the school 
is considerably hindered thereby. 

A much greater inconvenience is suffered, however, if teachers 
who have not been in the school long enough to finish the course 
are elected to fill vacancies permanently more than a month be- 
fore the time for their graduation. 

The school library is already supplied with a good number of 
educational works and books of reference. Other books are 
needed, however, and an appropriation is desired for more sup- 
plies for the teachers in their regular work. Additional work 
in nature study demands not only additional books but appa- 
ratus as well. 

The, liberality of the committee in their readiness to supply all 
necessary aids for the work of the school, is thoroughly appreci- 
ated. It is hoped that the progress of the school may justify all 
appropriations for its maintenance. 



Report of Mr. Somes, Master of the High School. 

In compliance with your request I submit the following report 
of the condition of the High School : 

The different departments of the school are well organized, 
and are doing creditable work. 

The number of students who enter college from our High School 
is larger than public High Schools usually prepare, and the stand- 
ing maintained by our scholars in college does us credit. The 
colleges where our scholars enter express satisfaction with our 
preparatory work. 

We are well supplied with apparatus. We have an excellent 
chemical laboratory, and if we had a well-arranged physical lab- 
oratory, our facilities for science teaching would be excellent. 

Since the employment of a special teacher of drawing, the 
work in that department has been much improved, though our 
teacher labors under the great disadvantages of large classes and 



362 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

a small recitation room. Better results would be accomplished 
if the teacher of drawing could be at the school a longer time 
each day. 

More instruction should be given in English in this school 
than can be given with the present corps of teachers. One day 
in each week we omit all other recitations for an hour, and de- 
vote the time to work in composition. Instruction given in this 
way must be disconnected and fragmentary and of comparatively 
little value. No teacher would expect to accomplisli much in math- 
ematics, science, or languages if he could meet his class but once a 
week. Either we should have a teacher of English, or more teachers 
should be employed, so that the work in English may be divided 
among all the teachers, and that they may meet their classes more 
often than once a week. I think three exercises a \yeek during 
the entire course, to include instruction in grammar, composi- 
tion, rhetoric, and literature, is no more than a subject so im- 
portant as English should receive. To make our weekly exer- 
cises more profitable, I have arranged a short course in reading 
from American authors, and have asked the board for books 
enough to supply two classes. Though the committee to whom 
my request was referred approved of my plan, lack of funds pre- 
vented the purchase of the books at the time I asked for them, 
but I trust we may have them at the beginning of the next term. 

Each year the number of pupils in the High School has in- 
creased, till this year we have had two hundred and sixty-six. 
With this number the building is very much crowded, and every 
available room has to be used for a recitation room. With in- 
sufficient light in the study room, no system of ventilation, and 
a heating apparatus which does not heat the building on cold 
days, our schoolhouse is not only inconvenient but uncomfort- 
able. I earnestly call the attention of the school board to the 
condition of our building. 



Report of Mr. Kimball, Special Teacher of Music. 

In taking a retrospective view of the study of music in our 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 363 

schools the past year, I am pleased to state there has been uni- 
versal interest manifested. In the high school the practice has 
been from the most eminent composers, and the results have been 
most gratifying. The school is able to sing at sight any choral 
music. 

The grammar schools have made quite an advance in reading 
four part harmony. I have been highly delighted with the prog- 
ress and interest shown by both teachers and pupils in the work. 
In some grades I have given selections to sing at sight in four 
parts, and they have surprised me by reading it so rapidly. 

The middle schools have done well, considering the very short 
time allowed them each day. They have followed the course of 
study and been faithful in their work. I am sorry to add there 
are a few exceptions. 

The primary schools are doing their work very well, in scale 
and dictation exercises, in placing the pitch names upon the staff, 
and in reading the same. Their progress is quite up to the grade 
work. The number of schools having increased the past term, it 
has been impossible to give the lower primary grades their usual 
lessons, but the teachers of this grade have met me once a month 
at the high school building, where I have instructed them in the 
lessons to be given their pupils. They have been very punctual 
in attending these meetings and taken a great deal of interest in 
the lessons. I have inspected their work as far as my time would 
permit and find the teachers have been quite successful in impart- 
ing my instructions. 

I would advise holding a musical festival every four years. It 
is an incentive for more faithful work by both teachers and pu- 
pils, and also gives to the public the result of my work in the 
public schools. I wish to add here that it would please tne if the 
members of the school board, citizens, and parents of the schol- 
ars would oftener visit the schools while I am giving the usual 
instruction in music. I would also suggest that there might be 
a more thorough examination in music of the applicants as teach- 
ers in our public schools. 



364 AXNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Report of Miss Emmins, Special Teacher of Drawing. 

During the year ending December 31, 1893, steady advance 
has been made in the study of drawing. Drawing, as taught, is 
divided into three departments, construction, representation, and 
decoration. Construction and decoration, while not by any 
means neglected, have received far less attention than has repre- 
sentation. The aim has been to train the pupils in the quickest 
possible manner to accurate observation and free expression of 
what they have observed. Free-hand drawing is one of the most 
valuable educational means of thought expression, developing in- 
dividual power because it depends on trained observation, trained 
will, and trained hands. Drawing free-hand from objects, be- 
sides developing the powers of observation, has also awakened 
ideas of beauty and proportion, and, by taking advantage of the 
interest of children in real things, the creative powers are stimu- 
lated. 

As the aesthetic element could not be cultivated to any extent 
by the manufactured objects which the pupils had to draw from, 
the principal objects of study were flowers, single leaves, sprays 
and branches of leaves, growing plants, fruit, and vegetables. 
The type-forms and related objects were also drawn. 

Great advance has been made this year in freedom and spon- 
taneity of drawing. In all grades the quality of line has been 
much improved. In many classes the hard labored lines have 
. given way to the soft, gray lines drawn with one free stroke. This 
labored drawing with short strokes has been difficult for the old- 
er pupils to overcome. In all classes the majority of pupils now 
grasp pencils far from point and draw with a free movement 
from the shoulder and with long strokes. Artistic rendering has 
been attempted very successfully this year, whereas a year ago it 
was found to be impossible, thus proving to the pupils the advan- 
tage of free over labored movement. In the three upper grades 
lead pencil shading was a great stimulus to many pupils and 
helped more than any other means to promote free-arm move- 
ment, and the free-arm movement in turn helped the artistic ren- 
dering. Frequent drills in free-arm movement have been given 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 365 

for two years, but in the upper grades the relapses were many till 
about March, 1893. Since September less attention has been 
given to it, for it is gradually becoming a habit. 

This year more time than before has been given to appearance 
drawing in the primary grades, with better results in less time 
than in the middle grades two years ago. Children's observing 
powers are soon blunted with exclusive study of facts, so from the 
first, appearances are studied at the same time as facts. In the 
lower primary free-arm movement and pencil drill are taught 
from the second week of entering school, using blackboard and 
paper ; and objects circular in section are those studied for ap- 
pearances to be drawn on paper in this class. All twelve type- 
forms, and objects related to them, are drawn in the higher pri- 
mary, and simple groups also, as sphere on cube, ovoid on square 
prism, tumbler and apple, etc. 

Simple pencil measurements and blocking-in by straight lines 
from fruit, vegetables, and leaves are first practiced in lower mid- 
dle grade, advancing to groups in higher middle. In the latter 
grade manufactured objects and type-forms are used in groups at 
times. Objects are placed at a distance, proportional pencil 
measurement is first used, drawings are made by first blocking in 
the masses, from the whole to the parts. In the fourth division 
grammar, sprays of leaves are added to the objects of study in the 
grades preceding. So far the drawings are outlines, but in the 
three upper grades light and shade are represented to some ex- 
tent and laws of good composition in grouping are taught. From 
the single leaves and sprays of the lower grades we advance here 
to flowers, branches, and whole plants in flower, as well as the 
type-forms and related objects. 

Manual training is carried on by sewing, modeling in clay, 
and paper folding in the primary grades, and by cutting and past- 
ing in all the grades. From the lower middle grade up, patterns 
of type-forms and similar objects are thought out, cut from stiff 
paper and pasted. In the second division grammar geometry 
was applied, each pupil selecting several objects based on type- 
solids and originating patterns for them, afterwards making in 



366 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

cardboard, etc. The originality that was diaplayed and the 
thought and reasoning that were developed proved this to have 
been very valuable. 

Color has been taken up this year but Only started, as has his- 
toric ornament. Design has been taught to a limited extent in 
all grades, and colored paper has been used to show forth many 
of the designs. 

In the high school scholars take either free-hand or mechani- 
cal drawing, the latter comprising machine and architectural 
drawing. From January to the end of June the classes in free- 
hand worked almost wholly at light and shade from casts and ob- 
jects. The medium mostly used was charcoal point. Some 
drawing from casts and objects in lead pencil outline was done, 
and design, surface and balancing, was taught. The progress 
made was very satisfactory, especially in the study of values in 
light and shade. From. January through June the architectural 
classes copied mostly, but since September the majority of pupils 
in architecture have been at work on original plans for a cottage 
house. The classes in machine drawing draw from objects and 
copies. All pupils taking mechanical drawing first take a course 
in the necessary geometric problems. Inking-in is taught from 
the first. T squares, angles, boards, etc., are used. The sopho- 
more and junior classes in free-hand, after a year's study of light 
and shade by medium, charcoal, have since September been 
working in water color from casts and objects. The freshmen 
work in charcoal in the free-hand division. The work in the 
high school is quite as g®od as it can be under the present con- 
ditions which necessitate individual instruction, sometimes to a 
class of forty in a fifty-minute lesson, comprising pupils from all 
three grades and in all four subjects, charcoal, water color, archi- 
tectural and machine drawing. 

On the whole, drawing at the present time may be said to be 
in a healthy, growing state. The advance to the full course 
would be still more rapid if drawing was used more to help the 
other studies and be in turn helped. Only in a few schools is 
drawing yet so used, and in those schools the regular drawing is 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 367 

also the best. I have urged this earnestly, knowing that but to 
try it was to be convinced ; and I am glad to say that the belief 
in the educational value of this graphic mode of expression is 
gradually gaining ground. It has been hard to dispel the im- 
pression that because faulty, this free mode of expressing ideas 
should be rejected. Time would mend that. Another hopeful 
sign is the beginning of a systematic adornment of the school- 
rooms wdth reproductions of good works of art, — that is, with 
casts and photographs of famous masterpieces, etc. The children 
of the Hallsville school have subscribed a sum towards the adorn- 
ing of their own room, the master's, and, doubtless, other 
schools will join the movement which is spreading through the 
country under the name of the Public School Art League. Much 
interest has been taken by the Manchester teachers in this move- 
ment. 

The needs for the coming year are : First, more direct super- 
vision ; second, a larger drawing-room for the high school ; and 
third, additional time in all the grades for the manual training 
which is pursued in connection with drawing. 

If from each of the larger buildings, where there is a master's 
assistant, and therefore one more teacher than rooms in the 
building, one teacher having a predilection for drawing could be 
dismissed one afternoon every fortnight, to meet and draw with 
the special teacher, at the drawing-room of the high school, and 
so receive a broader training, and thus be especially helpful to 
his or her building, being always present to give advice, show 
other teachers, and conduct drawing lessons with the teachers 
after school at stated times, the regular teachers to give the les- 
sons to their respective classes, the arrangement would leave the 
special teacher more time at the high school, • which is much 
needed under present conditions, and permit more time to be 
given other schools where there is not an extra teacher, besides 
affording a training in drawing to teachers which under present 
arrangements is not possible. Turns could be taken (in the 
buildings having supervisors), so that no extra strain should come 



368 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

on one, and others could receive extended instruction by this 
method. 

As to extra time for the manual training, twenty minutes in 
primary, twenty-five minutes in middle, and thirty minutes in 
grammar grades weekly, would suffice. 



Report of Mr. Brown, Master of the Maniaai Training 
School. 

In compliance with your request, I make you a brief report on 
the equipment and work of the manual training school for the 
only term of its existence. 

The equipment of the school is as follows: Twenty-three 
benches, fourteen of which are in the Lowell-street schoolhouse, 
five in the Varney school, and four in the Hallsville school. 
Each bench is supplied with a 20" jointer, 15" fore-plane, 8" 
smoothing-plane, 7" block-plane; 24" splitting-saw, 22" panel- 
saw, 10" back-saw; 6 chisels (sizes }^" , yk" , y^," , %", 1" , T-}i"); 
a marking gauge; a No. 12 hammer; a 6" tri-square ; a 6" T 
bevel-square; a No. no Spofford bit-brace; an oil stone and 
can; a screw driver, mallet, and rule. There is also a sufficient 
number of drawing boards and T squares for the accommodation 
of the school. Blue prints are made and mounted on cardboard 
for each piece of work to be executed, as fast as needed. 

The interest of the pupils in my department is very gratifying ; 
also the interest and attention of the masters of the several 
schools from which pupils come to my school. The attention of 
the grammar masters acts as a stimulus to pupils, and enables the 
masters more effectively to connect the work of my department 
with the studies taught in the common schools. 

On account of delay in securing the equipment of the manual 
training school, about three weeks of valuable time were lost ; 
but, notwithstanding this loss, the amount and quality of the 
work done afford great encouragement. I have never had better 
classes in my department than I have had here, not even when 
the classes have had a liberal sprinkling of second-year pupils. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 369 

The Lowell-Street room has fifteen electric lights, one at each 
bench, and one for use of the instructor. The school will very- 
soon require a small outlay for further equipment. Its present 
quarters are far too crowded, and, if I am not mistaken, the 
school will soon need more extended and better facilities. 



Conclusion. 



In conclusion I may properly remark that what I wrote in an 
earlier part of this report, under the head of " Needed Improve- 
ments," was written several days before any of the masters for- 
warded me a report. Therefore it is because of common beliefs 
that the masters and myself are so largely in accord in regard to 
the advisability of teaching the elements of science in the schools, 
and of providing pupils quite freely with books of standard liter- 
ature and of historical research. 

To pay such attention in the High School to instruction in the 
use of the English language as is outlined in the report of the 
master, would properly supplement and round out the improve- 
ments made during the last year or two in teaching this branch 
in the lower grade schools, and I again unite with the master in 
earnestly urging that means for practically working out the plan 
may be soon procured. 

In regard to excessive difficulties in arithmetic, to which refer- 
ence has been made in one of the grammar masters' reports, it 
may be said that when the course of study was last revised the 
teachers of the various grades were consulted in this matter, and 
the relief that then appeared necessary was granted. However, 
greater attention to teaching the more important branch of lan- 
guage, and the instruction afforded in natural science and in 
manual training, require time; and it will be wise to find it for 
the latter subjects, to the exclusion from the course of study of 
the impractical problems in the arithmetic and of the lesser im- 
portant details in the geography. 

With many thanks to the teachers for their cordial co-opera- 



370 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

tion, to the members of the school board for wise counsels and 
unanimous support, and to many citizens for encouraging words 
and kindly suggestions, I submit the foregoing as my report of 
the public schools of this city for the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-three. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 

I. Population, etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 
V. Pupils. 

VI. Truancy. 

VII. Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1893. 

IX. High School Graduating Class. 

X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

XI. Organization of Committees, 1894. 

XII. List of Teachers, 1894. 

XIII. School Year, 1894. 



APPENDIX. 

STATISTICS. 

I.— Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1S90 . . 43,983 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 



II.— Schoolhouses. 

Nuiiiber of schoolhouses in use . . . . . .22 

Number of schoolhouses not in use ..... i 

(Old house in Hallsville.) 
Number of school rooms used for day schools * . . .98 

(Three of the same, and six others, used for evening schools. Rooms un- 
occupied by city for day schools are two at Spring-street house, and three at 
the Lowell-street house.) 

Number of rooms used for High-school classes . 
Number of rooms used for Grammar schools * . 
Number of rooms used for Middle schools . 
Number of rooms used for Primary schools * 
Number of rooms used for Partially Graded school 
Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools 



III. -Schools. 



(All for both sexes.) 
Number of High schools (Buildings) 
(None exclusively Grammar.) 

* Some of them for a single term, only. 

(A) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



373 



Number of combined Grammar and lower grade (Middle 
and Primary) schools . . . . . . .10 

Number of combined Middle and Primary schools . . 2 

Number of schools all Primary grade .... 4 

Number of Ungraded schools ...... 5 



IV.— Teachers. 



Male teachers in the High school ..... 3 

Female teachers in the High school ..... 5 

Male teachers in the Grammar schools .... 6 

Female teachers in the Grammar schools*. . . 25 

Female teachers in the Middle schools * ... . 19 

Female teachers in the Primary schools f . . . -34 

Female teachers in the Partially Graded schools . . 2 

Female teachers in the Ungraded schools .... 5 

Special teachers | ........ 2 

Average number of male teachers § . . . . -9 

Average number of female teachers § .... 90 

Male teachers in the evening schools ..... 8 

Female teachers in the evening schools . . . .12 

Average number of male teachers in the evening schools . 6 
Average number of female teachers in the evening schools . 7 
Male teachers in the evening Drawing schools ... 2 
Average number of male teachers in the evening Drawing 
schools ......... 2 

* Five of the 25 are masters' assistants, and i of the 19 is assistant to the principal of the 
training school. 

t Three of the 37 primaries were in the training school. They had no regular teachers, be- 
ing taught by sub-teachers under the direction of the principal, who, for convenience, is 
reckoned among the middle-school teachers. 

+ Another, also, for one term. 

§ Exclusive of special teachers. 

CB) 



374 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL HEPOKTS. 




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94.3 
92.3 

91 8 


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93 
95.3 
92.6 
90.0 
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(C) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



375 






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376 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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(E) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 377 



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87.1 
92.5 
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88.6 
88.1 
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84^4 
70 3 
84.4 

87.5 




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B78 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



''-'^it 3 6^410, 



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KEPORT OP THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 379 



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380 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DAY SCHOOLS. 



Summary of the attendance upon the several grades of public 
day schools for the year 1893 • 



Grades. 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Partially graded.. 
Ungraded 

Totals, 1893 
Totals, 1892 



Boys. Girls. 



422 
1,131 



2,445 [ 2,330 
2,181 1 2,117 



678 
1,470 

ea 

77 



3,425 
3,130 



CS 0) 



618 

1,311 

54 



3,111 

2,837 



92.2 
91.2 

90.0 
88.3 



90 8 
90.6 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Summary of the attendance upon the several grades of public 
evening schools for the year 1893 : 



Schools. 


Whole number 
different pupils. 


gof 

•< 


li 

< 


Pi 




Boys. Girls. 




Lowell street 

Spring street 


3.9 


273 
3 


76 
50 
54 
38 
23 


59 

38 
44 
33 
20 


77.3 
76 




216 

85 
60 






86.8 


Drawing schools < 

f Architectural .... 


86 9 








690 




241 
213 


194 
174 


80.5 


Totals 189'' 


574 194 


81.8 







(I) 



REPORT OP THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 881 

Evening School Teachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal of Lowell-street school, for 
I)oys. 

Assistants — David Eckvall, Arthur W. Morgan, William J. 
Mooar, Fannie L. Sanborn, Gertrude A. Burns, Honorie J. 
Crough, and Mary A. Walker. 

Louis H. Bailey (Winter), and Etta F. Boardman (Fall), prin- 
cipals of Spring-street school, for girls. 

Assistants — Lizzie D. Hartford, Maggie Linen, Minnie E. 
Ellinwood, and Cora M. Farmer. 

L. H. Carpenter, principal of School-street school, for both 
sexes. 

Assistants — Mary A. Clement, Isabel Esty, and Lottie M. 
Clement. 

Evening Drawitig-School Teachers. 
John M. Kendall and Henry W. Allen. 
(J) 



382 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 

The following table presents the main features of interest per- 
taining to the attendance upon the public schools for the last ten 
years. 



.3,918 
3,806 



3,712 

3,787 
3,814 
4,071 

4,775 



Whole No. 
belonging.'* 



Boys. Girls 



1,924 
1,891 
1,812 
1,817 
1,806 



2,003 
2,181 
2,445 



1,994 
1,915 
1,820 
1,853 
1,906 
1,925 
1,933 
2,068 
2,117 
2,330 



i 
1 

s 


1 




1*. 
< 


2,872 


2,645 


2,725 


2,430 


2,698 


2,475 


2,711 


2,468 


2,768 


2,500 


2,801 


3,581 


2,795 


2,536 


2,940 


2,689 


3,130 


2,837 


3,425 


3,111 



^S 



a 
2 


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Q 












ii 


i-S 




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2 9 


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85 


71 


49 


98 


89 


71 


78 


71 


53 


98 


95 


61 


88 


80 


58 


101 


96 


73 


121 


114 


83 


120 


101 


69 


116 


103 


67 


i.;9 


127 


78 






*In comparing the pupilage and cost of the schools for any year since 1877 with any 
year prior to 1878, the following facts should receive full consideration : In the reports issued 
prior to 1869, so also in the report for 1876, no care was taken to exclude duplicate enrollments ; 
and, as a consequence, the number of different pupils represented in the schools for each of the 
years prior to 1S69, as well as fo' the year 1876, is very erroneous. From certain data at hand, 
It is likely that the number given for each of the years in question is about 1,000 too large. It is 
perfectly evident, from the statistical tables in the reports for the years named, that duplicate 
enrollments were not excluded. As a result of the failure to exclude such enrollments, all 
pupils enrolled in any grade of school at the opening of the year and passing by promotion 
to a higher grade before the close of the year would be doubly reported. And as whole 
classes, substantially, from every grade in every part of the city become doubly enrolled at the 
time of the mid-year promotions, likewise most pupils who change their residence, it is readily 
seen how largely erroneous the reports must be that do not provide for the exclusion of all 
re-enrollments. 

For many years this matter, and the importance of it, has been well understood; and its 
failure to receive attention in 1876 was doubtless accidental. See footnotes on page 51 of 
the Report for 1S73, prepared by Superintendent Edgerly ; likewise page 45 of the Report for 
1S75, prepared by Superintendent Dearborn; and, also, pages i;o and 51 of the Report for 
1877. In consequence of the change mentioned in the last-named report, the only item of 
attendance records reported for the years prior to 1S78 which can with reliability be com- 
pared with those reported since 1877 is the "Average Daily Attendance," and this item is 
evidently far from right (as given in the report) for 18O6. Since 1877, all of the several 
items of attendance record have been based upon uniform data. 

t Including grammar classes in suburban schools. 

I Usually some pupils have annually entered from other schools. This year eight have so 
entered. 



§ Exclusive of special teachers. 



(K) 



REPORT OF TEE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



383 



CHANGES IN CORPS OF TEACHERS. 



The whole number of different teachers employed one term or 
more in the day schools, within the year, has been 113. Their 
respective positions may be learned from the attendance table on 
pages C, D, E, F, G, and H of the Appendix, but the various 
changes made within the year can be more readily understood by 
an inspection of the following : 





Date of effect of 


Date of begin- 


Teachers. 


resignation. 


Teachers. 


ning service. 


Ruth McClure. 


June 2. 


Josephine L. Riddle 


April 10. 


Fred C. Baldwin. 


" 23. 


Guy F. Cox. 


Sept. II. 


Jennie M. Chandler 




Albert F. King, Jr. 




Annie B. Goodwin. 


" " 


Louis H. Bailey. 




Amelia L, Graupner 


iC ii 


Abbie E. Wilson. 




Cora F. Sanborn. 


" '' 


Helen E. Frost. 




Rose Dearborn. 


" " 


Mary E. Murphy. 




Willis B. Moore. 


Sept. I. 


Edith L. Turner. 
Bessie E. Dodge. 
Annie R. Corson. 
Lottie M. Clement. 








M. Minnie Sturtevant. " " 






Nellie M. Smith. 


" 15. 






Jean Gillan. 


Oct. 2. 






Florence M. Griffin. 


" " 




TRAINING 


SCHOOL. 




Sub-teachers. 


Graduated. 


Sub-teachers. 


Entered. 


Mabel R. Brown. J 


m. 27, '93. 


Cora M. Farmer. Jan. 30, '93. 


Lucy M. Choate. 


" " 


Mary F. Fay. 


U (( 


Mary J. Corcoran. 


" 


Clydie M. Flanders. 


" 


Annie R. Corson. 


" 


Emma B.Abbott. Sept. ii,'93. 


Alfreda Hall. 


" 


Lenora J. Clough. 


" « 


Mertie C. Hawks. 


" " 


Dora M. Martin.* 


u 


Carrie E. Head. 




Marcia M, Moore. 


" " 


* Deceased. 





(L) 



384 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Sub-teachers. Graduated. 

Mary S. Richardson. Jan. 27/93. 
Josie L. Riddle. " " 

M. Min. Sturtevant. " " 
Annie R. Corson. June 23, '93. 
Bessie E. Dodge. " " 

Bertha L. Kemp. Jan. 26, '94. 
Nellie C. Parker. 
Nellie M. Smith. 



Sub-teachers. Entered 

Hellen Morison. Sept. 11, 
Maud L. Smith. " 

Mabel L. Howe. Jan. 29, 
Amy K. Northrup. " 
Lizabell Savory . " 
Helen E. True. 
Hattie S. Tuttle. 
Hattie O. Willand. " 



VI —Work of Truant Officer. 



January. . . 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June . .. . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December . 

Totals 



Absentees 

reported 

from 


No. volun- 
tarily re- 
turned to 


No. reported 

caused to 

attend 


3 


.2 " 


•2^ 


i 


11 




3^ 

1"^ 


i 

1^^ 




iz; 


^1 

ll 

2 


m 

si 


13 


23 


i 


1 


9 


14 




8 


3 


6 


16 






6 


73 




3 




7 


16 






6 


11 


1 


4 


1 


19 


23 


1 




11 


19 


2 


5 


4 


24 


38 


6 


5 


15 


27 


1 


6 


2 


23 


37 


3 


6 


16 


24 


2 


5 


3 


15 


18 


6 




9 


9 




4 


5 


24 


34 


3 


« 


16 


20 


1 


7 


3 


18 


20 


2 


1 


12 


17 


1 


3 


1 


13 

162 


8 


2 


2 
23 


8 


.5 




3 


' 


233 


24 


108 


159 


8 


48 


23 



(M) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



385 



January . . 
February . 
March . . . 
April 



June 

September. 
October . . . 
November . 
December 



Totals 54 



No. truants 
caused 
to attend 






•2S 



VII.— Finance.— 1893. 



Items of Account. 



Resources from 

appropriations and 

transfers. 



Expenditures, 1S93. 



Salaries of teachers 

Books and stationery 

Free text-books and supplies 

Furniture and supplies 

Repairs 

Care of rooms 

Fuel 

Printing and advertising 

Contingent expenses , 

Evening common schools 

Evening drawing schools 

Manual Training 

Totals 

25 

(N) 



§59,437.65 

71.93 

4,456 68 

925.27 
5,263.08 
4,135.69 
5,180.15 

411.80 
2,137 21 
1,257.20 

532.37 
1,091.56 



$59,437.65 

71.93 

4,456.68 

925 27 
5,263 08 
4,135 09 
5,180.15 

411.80 
2,137.21 
1,257.20 

532.37 
1,091.56 



$84,900.59 



$84,900.59 



386 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
COST OF CITY SCHOOLS.* 



Expenditures, as above specified 

Salaries. 



Members of the school board 
Clerk of the board 
Superintendent of schools 
Truant officer 



Total 



Receipts on Account of Schools 



Literary fund ..... 

Non-resident tuition f . . . 

Sale of text-books ..... 

Total 

Net amount raised by taxation 

The city valuation for 1893 is ^27,377,366 
rate of school tax for the year is 80,408.07 - 
.00220 -f. Last year the rate was .00276 -j-- 



$84,900.59 



$200.00 
100.00 

2,150.00 
750.00 

$88,100.59 



. $6,940.42 
518.87 

233.23 

• $7,692.52 

. $80,408.07 

and hence the 
27>.377. 366, or 



Vlll.-School Year. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened January 2 ; closed March 
24. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 10 ; closed June 23. 
Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 11 ; closed De- 
cember 15. Vacation of two weeks. 

* See foot-note marked • on page (K) of this appendix. 

t Including $76.12 (school taxes for '92 and '93) received from Londonderry. 

(O) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 387 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above by the 
school board, 185. 

Average number of days the schools were taught, 175. 

(Being closed several holidays, days of "Teachers' Institutes," and half days on account 
of bad weather or insufficient heat. ) 



IX.— High School Graduation. 

Program. 



Salutatory, with Essay, " The Age of Progress." — 

Annie Riddle Flint 
" Huntsman's Chorus " Weber 



Class History . . . . . 

Class Prophecy . . . . 

Chorus, "Who will o'er the Downs? 
Class Oration, " Nature and Man " . 
Piano Trio, " Tancredi " 



Class Poem 

Valedictory, with Essay, 
" Bridal Chorus" 
Award of Diplomas . 
Chorus — Class Ode. 



Agnes Hunt 

. Austin Stearns 

Be Pearsall 

Walter French Buck 

Rossini 

Misses Goggin, Burnham, and Boutwell 

Mertie Alice Emerson 

■'A Purpose in Life " . Hellen Morison 

F. H. Cowen 

. Rev. Charles S. Murkland 



Graduates. 



FOUR YEARS CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Florence Lund Abbott. 
David Burns Bartlett. 
Moodybell S. Bennett. 
Walter French Buck. 
Blanche Ethelynde Bullock. 
Gertrude Wells Clarke. 



Austin Waldo Flint. 
Annie Frances Goggin. 
Alice Maud Lamprey. 
Winona Matilda Martin. 
May Euphemia Maynard. 
Hellen Morison. 



(P) 



388 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Mertie Alice Emerson. Fred Alvin Phelps. 

Annie Riddle Flint. Arthur Perry Senter. 

William Arthur Stevens. 

THREE years' ENGLISH COURSE. 

Lenora Jennie Clough. Dora May Martin. 

Maude Francis. George Edward Putnam. 

Harlin Blake Heath. Maud Leona Smith. 

Blanche Estelle Hicken. Henry Butler Stearns. 

Charles Ephraim Lamper. George Walter Whitford. 

COLLEGE COURSE. 

Henry W. N. Bennett. David P. Eckvall." 

Edith Gerrish Boutwell. Agnes Hunt. 

Gertrude Elizabeth Burnham. Gracie Maria Page. 
Herman Christophe. Harriet Houghton Richardson. 

Austin Stearns. 

FOUR years' ENGLISH COURSE. 

Lula Ethelyn Hatch. Amy King Northrup. 

Marcia Mae Moore. 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Israel Aubey. Herman Wellington Colby. 

TWO years' CERTIFICATE. 

Emma Blanche Abbott. Maud Alma Bailey. 

SPECIAL COURSE. 

Louise Corinne Gazaille. Marion Edna Josselyn. 

(Q) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



389 



HONOR SCHOLARS. 



Classical Course 

College Course 

Four Years' English Course 

Three Years' English Course 

Scientific Course 



. Hellen Morison 
Edith Gerrish Boutwell 
. Lula Ethelyn Hatch 

Dora May Martin 
Israel Aubey 



X.— Winners of Clarke Prizes 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, JANUARY 28, 



[893. 



Euphemia J. Durgin, $i6. 
Anson G. Osgood, ^12. 
S. Grace Crosby, $10. 
Louise C. Gazaille, $S. 



Harry G. Annan, $6. 
J. Etta Doherty, ^4. 
Goldie M. Martin, ^2.^ 
Lizzie M. Grant, ^2.* 



XI.— Organization, 1894. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



EDGAR J. KNOWLTON, Mayor, ex officio, Chairman. 
FRED T. DUNLAP, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 



Ward I. 


Charles D. Summer. 




Walter H. Lewis. 


Ward 2. 


George H. Stearns. 




Alvin T. Thoits. 


Ward 3. 


George D. Towne. 




Louis E. Phelps. 


Ward 4. 


Stephen B. Stearns. 




Edwin L. Richardson 


Ward 5. 


James P. Slattery. 



* A school prize, awarded the better of the two from each school not winning one of the six 
prizes offered those most meritorious. 

(R) 



390 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

William J. Sughrue. 
Ward 6. Frank T. E. Richardson. 

George W. Dearborn. 
Ward 7. Marshall P. Hall. 

Edward B. Woodbury. 
Ward 8. Luther C. Baldwin. 

Josiah G. Dearborn. 
Ward 9. Edward J. Doherty. 

Scott E. Sanborn. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

MARSHALL P. HALL. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

EDWARD B. WOODBURY. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

superintendent's CLERK. 

FANNIE L. SANBORN. 

truant officer. 
SAMUEL BROOKS. 

standing committees. 

Finance. The Mayor, Messrs. Dunlap, Hall, Woodbury, F. T. 
E. Richardson. 

Salaries. Messrs. Woodbury, Slattery, Sumner. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. Messrs. S. B. Stearns, Sum- 
ner, Baldwin. 

Text-Books, Apparatus, and Studies. Messrs. Hall, Baldwin, 
G. H. Stearns. 

(S) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 391 

Drawing. Messrs. Baldwin, Hall, J. G. Dearborn. 

Music. Messrs. F. T. E. Richardson, Phelps, Lewis. 

Fuel and Heating. Mr. G. H, Stearns, the Mayor, Messrs. 
Dunlap, G. W. Dearborn, Phelps. 

Examination of Teachers. Messrs. Towne, Thoits, J. G. Dear- 
born. 

Attendance. Messrs. E. L. Richardson, Doherty, Sughrue. 

Health. Messrs. Towne, Slattery, Sanborn. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. Messrs. Thoits, Hall, S. B. Stearns, Towne, 
Phelps, Slattery, J. G. Dearborn. 

Franklin-street School. Messrs. Woodbury, Sumner, Baldwin. 

Spring-street and Lowell-street Schools. Messrs. Towne, Slat- 
tery, Sughrue. 

Lincoln-street School. Messrs. S. B. Stearns, F. T. E. Richard- 
son, E. L. Richardson. 

Ash-street School.* Messrs. Phelps, Towne, Hall. 

Webster-street and Blodget-street Schools. Messrs. G. H. 
Stearns, Thoits, Slattery. 

Bakersville School. Messrs. Sumner, F. T. E. Richardson, 
Lewis. 

Varney School. Messrs. Baldwin, J. G. Dearborn, Thoits. 

Training School. Messrs. Hall, Phelps, G. H. Stearns. 

Wilso7i Hill School. Messrs. Lewis, Sanborn, E. L. Richard- 
son. 

Main-street and South Main-street Schools. Messrs. J. G. Dear- 
born, Baldwin, Sanborn. 

Amoskeag and Stark Schools. Messrs. Slattery, G. W. Dear- 
born, Doherty. 

Hallsville and Youngsville Schools. Messrs. G. W. Dearborn, 
E. L. Richardson, Sughrue. 

Goffe's Falls and Harvey Schools. Messrs. Sughrue, Lewis, 
Doherty. 

♦Also of any others that may be organized on Bridge street. 

(T) 



392 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Webster's Mills and Mosquito Pond Schools. Messrs. E. L. 
Richardson, Sughrue, Woodbury. 

Evening Schools. Messrs. F. T. E. Richardson, G. H. Stearns, 
Sumner. 



XII.— List of Teachers. 



HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 



Master. Albert Somes. 
Sub-Master. George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. Guy Wilbur Cox. 

Mary Stanton. 

Nellie Pickering. 

Mary H. Cutler. 

Camille Benson. 

Mary A. Hawley. 



FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 



Master. Charles W. Bickford. 
Master's Assistant. Nellie M. Smith. 
Assistants. Carrie E. Hoit. 

L. May Choate. 

Carrie E. Head. 



First Floor. — Lower Grades. 



Higher Middle. Nellie C. Parker. 
Lower Middle. Hattie G. Flanders. 
Higher Primary. Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. Susie L. Dodge. 

ru) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 393 
SPRING-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie P. Gove. 

Higher Middle. Emma L. McLaren. 

First Floor. — Lotver Grades. 

Lower Middle. Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. Nellie L Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. Lucia E. Esty. 
Lower Primary. Florence M. Griffin. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Frank S. Sutcliffe. 

Master's Assistant. Annie W. Patten. 

Assistants. Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Mabel J. Brickett.* 

Mary J. Corcoran. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

Josephine A. Mitchell.* 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Nettie B. Fogg. 
Lower Middle. Susie G. Woodman. 
Higher Primary. Cora B. Gilford. 
Mixed Primary. Theodora Richardson. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Graaes. 

Master, Albert F. King, Jr. 
Master's Assistant. Mary E. Bunton. 

* Third floor. 

(V) 



394 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Assistants. Mary Hickey Dowd. 
Mabel Ruth Brown. 
Edith S. Dole. 

First Floor. — Lotuer Grades. 

Higher Middle. Emma J. Cooper. 
Lower Middle. Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. B. S. Andrew. 
Master's Assistant. Abbie E. Wilson. 
Assistants. Helen E. Frost. 
Alta C. Willand. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Eva F. Tuson. 
Lower Middle. Edith L. Hammond. 
Higher Primary. Jean Gillan. 
Lower Primary, Mary E. Murphy. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns. 
Assistant. Lelia A. Brooks.* 
Higher Middle. Issa May Tuttle. 
Lower Middle. Augusta S. Downs. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Primary. S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. Annie Brigham. 



(W) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 395 
VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. George Winch. 

Master's Assistant. Barbara B. Joy. 

Assistant. Lillian Little. 

First Floor. — Mixed Grades. 



Assistants. E. Maria Dickey. 

Ellen E. McKean. 

Millie S. Morse. 
Higher Middle. Mary E. Moulton. 
Lower Middle. Mary A. Seavey. 
Higher Primary. Mary J. Walsh. 



HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 



Master. William H. Huse. 
Assistant. Ella F. Barker. 
Higher Middle. Olive A. Rowe. 



First Floor. — Lower Grades. 



Lower Middle. Mary G. Worthen. 
Higher Primary. Bertha L. Kemp. 
Lower Primary. E. Alfreda Hall. 
Lower Primary. Annie R. Corson. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

(Merrimack street, corner Union.) 

Principal. Caroline E. Wing. 
Head Assistant. Annie W. Cofran. 

The principal is also assisted by the sub-teachers, /. e., mem- 
bers of the training class. The school embraces the first four 

(X) 



396 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

years of school work, in the following grades : Lower Primary, 
Higher Primary, and Lower Middle. There are four rooms, 
two of lower-primary grade. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Mary W. Mitchell. 
Lower Middle. Mary E. Brophy. 
Higher Primary. Gertrude A. Burns. 
Mixed Primary. Lottie M. Clement. 

First Floor. — Primary Grades. 

Mixed Primary. Mary A. Clement. 

Lower Primary. M. Minnie Sturtevant. 

Lower Primary. Kate T. Clarke. 

Lower Primary. Gertrude L. Southard. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary. Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary, Edith M. Stebbins. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 
Lower Primary. Mary S. Richardson. 
First Floor. 
Higher Primary. Helen M. Morrill. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OP SCHOOLS, 397 



PEARL-STREET SCHOOL. 



Higher Primary. Mary G. Tynan. 
Lower Primary. M. Clara Hawks. 



WILSON HILL SCHOOL. 



Lower Primary. Huldah C. Graupner. 
Lower Primary. Ella Hope. 



SOUTH MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 



Higher Primary. Delle E. Haines. 
Lower Primary. Georgia M. Cheney. 



PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. Lettie M. Smith. 

Mixed Primary. Edith L. Turner. 
Goffe's Falls.* Georgie Kendrick. 

Mixed Primary. Bessie E. Dodge. 

ungraded schools. 

No. I. Stark. Inez M. Warren. 

2. Harvey. Emma J. Ela. 

3. Youngsville. Louis H. Bailey. 

4. Webster's Mills. Josephine L. Riddle. 

5. Mosquito Pond. Nellie M. Atwood. 

special teachers. 

Music. J. J. Kimball. 
Drawing. Charlotte J. Emmins. 
Manual Training. Fred E. Browne. 



(Z) 



398 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

(Open from October to March, five evenings each week.) 
Low ell- Street Building. 
Three schools for boys. 
Spring-Street Building. 
Two schools for girls. 
School-Street Building. 
Two schools, one for each sex 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

(Open from October to March.) 
Spring-Street Building. 

Machine-drawing classes meet on Monday and Thursday even 
ings. 

Architectural-drawing classes meet on Tuesday and Friday 
evenings. 

JANITORS. 

High School and Ash-street School, 

John S. Avery. 

Lincoln-street and Wilson Hill Schools. 

William Stevens. 

Webster-street and Blodget-street Schools. 

C. M. Whitney, 

(AA) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 399 

Spring-street and Lotuell-street Schools. 

William H. Morrill. 

Training School and Franklin-street School. 

Edwar^ P. Cogswell. 

Varney and South Main-street Schools. 

H. G. Batchelder. 

Main-street School. 

William F. Connor. 

Bakersville School. 

H. C. Dickey. 

Hallsville School. 

William H. Newry. 

Anwskeag School. 

James E. Bailey. 



XIII.- School Year, 1894, 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January i, closes March 
23. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 9, closes June 22. 
Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opens September 10, closes De- 
cember 14. 

(BB) 



400 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



h 

•^ a 

fa J 




1. 

H 

5 




1 

C . 

2 
5 




.1 

II 

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i 

«3 




5 
5 




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or 

5 

O 




1 

11 

or 





23 
.2.2-= 

S- 2 
.n.2fcl 


COLL. PIIEPARATOUY. 

5 rears. IT 

English, Latin, Greek, 

AND French. 


1 

< 

;" 


1 




"3 

L 

OS 


1 


1 . 
<0 


H 
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5 

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hJ 

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6 
= . • 


CLASSICAL DIVISION. 

4 Years. 

english and latin, with 

French if desired. 




l^§ 


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5 


III 

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5s 
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III 




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111 

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05 




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1 8 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



401 







i 

iii 

Mi 

m 

1 


"^8 


IB 

2 




2 i 

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•3 . >- 

■2fe „ 

si '5 




English Aiitliors. 

French. 
Latin and Greek. 


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2 

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111 
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o . B§-8.»^.c |So5 



REPORTS 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES 

AND 

CEMETERY FUNDS. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUNDS. 



To the City Cmiticils of the City of Mancheste?- : 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund have the 
honor to present herewith their fourteenth annual report, embrac- 
ing the report of their treasurer, which shows in detail the finan- ' 
cial operations for the year ending December 31, 1893, as well as 
the condition of the fund at the present time. 

Very little work has been attempted the past year beyond the 
usual care of the lots endowed in perpetuity. The income has 
been sufficient to do this and leave a handsome surplus which it 
is the policy of the trustees to allow to accumulate to a moder- 
ate extent, in order that they may be prepared to meet any emer- 
gency that may suddenly arise, and also to undertake improve- 
ments of a more permanent nature as well as to beautify the 
grounds in a special way to such a degree as the funds will allow. 

The wisdom of the creation of this trust and the conditions 
provided therefor by the city councils at its inception, appears to 
have been vindicated by the ready response given by lot owners 
in availing themselves of its provisions. As time rolls on, the 
funds will naturally increase in amount and it is hoped to such 
an extent that the trustees will not lack for means to keep the lots 
in a condition that will be most gratifying to their owners and 
representatives. 

Respectfully submitted. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor, ex officio, 
P. C. CHENEY, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 

Trustees of Cetnetery Fund. 

January i, 1894. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the eleventh annual 
report of the funds received and expenses paid to December 31, 
1893, embracing also the year 1892, which by mistake was omit- 
ted in the printed report of 1892. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Amount of permanent fund on hand J; 
ary i, 1892 .... 



$i3>774-97 $13)774-97 



Received during the year 1892 : 




From J. I. Whittemore and I. W. Darrah 


^180.00 


John A. Bartlett . 


97.46 


George H. True . 


83.72 


Daniel Farmer estate 


134-36 


Andrew Mungall . 


97.46 


Emily D. Norris . 


83.72 


Elizabeth Philbrick 


200.00 


N. S. Bean .... 


83-73 


Charles H. Stearns 


83.72 


Eliza A. Kimball . 


149.56 


Henry N. Hall . 


83.72 


Thomas B. Spencer 


149.47 


Frances B. Pettee . 


83.72 


Leonard French estate . 


120.64 


George Byron Chandler 


276.60 


Henry Chandler . 


276.60 


Alonzo Elliott 


149-47 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 407 



From Clark M. Bailey . 
Horace Pettee 
James A. Weston . 
Person C. Cheney 

Received during the year 1893 
From Mrs. Levi Houston 
Andrew Burton 
George W. Haselton 
Eva F. Tuson 
Mrs. Persis L. Wilkins 
Alma E. Jackson . 
Joseph T. Ward 
A. L. Walker 
Clara A. Walker 
John Kennard 
Samuel Kennard 
Mrs. Dimond Kennard 
Joseph F. Kennard estate 
Mrs. Ellen C. Clark 
Mary S. Ann is 
Sarah S. Reynolds 
William Perkins estate . 
Mary D. Perkins 
J. Frank Perkins 
Ida H. Towle 
Robert E. McKean 



Total permanent fund . 

Income on hand January i, 1892 . 
Income received during the year 1892 
Income received during the year 1893 



$180.00 

83.72 

100.69 

160.00 



$104.30 

97.46 

312.00 

225.00 

,55^-25 
144.00 

391-41 



500.00 



$2,858.36 



171.25 
131-25 

150.00 








100.00 








50.00 








89.76 


$3 


017 


.68 




$19 


651 


.01 


$616.75 

676.11 
834.41 


$2 


127 


.27 



408 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Expenses paid in 1892 : 








C. C. Webster .... 


$18.12 






Daniel Callahan .... 


7-5° 






Manchester S. & R. Co. 


20.00 






S. A. Blood 


32-50 






E. T. James 


36.56 






J. B. Varick Co 


49-75 






B. A. Stearns, superintendent 


352-50 






Mrs. C. H. Robie . . . ' . 


18.57 






Expenses paid in 1893 • 








J. B. Varick Co. - . 


1S.17 






E. T. James ..... 


51.98 






S. A. Blood 


34-05 






B. A. Stearns, superintendent 


402.15 






C. C. Webster .... 


4.00 






William E. Moore .... 


2-75 






Total expense for 1S92 and 1893 


$1,048.59 






Cash on hand December 31, 1893 . 


. 1,078.68 










$2 


127.27 



Valley Cemetery. 



Amount of permanent fund on hand January i, 1892 $4,600.00 
Received during the year 1892 : 

From Samantha R. Kelley . $200.00 

Sophronia L. Stark estate . . 200.00 
Imogene Wyman estate . . . 300.00 

Abbie E. Piper estate . . . 150.00 
James W. Pettigrevv estate . . 200.00 

George F. Spaulding . . . 50.00 

Olive P. Noyes estate . . . 175.00 
Calvin and Elizabeth Bates estate . 90.00 

$1,365.00 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 409 



Received during the year 1S93 : 








From Jennie E. French estate 




$213.75 




Mrs. Harriett James 




289.50 




Mrs. John Houston 


. 


213.00 




Benjamin S. Gray 




262.9S 


$979-23 


Total permanent fund . 




. 


$6,944.23 


Income on hand January i, 1892 




$398-36 




Income received during the year 


1892 . 


224.37 




Income received during the year 


1893 . 


280.52 





Total income ...... $903.25 

Expenses paid in 1892 : 
R. P. Stevens &: Co. .... 5175.00 

C. H. G. Foss, superintendent . . 129.32 

Palmer & Garrnon . . . . 2.25 

Expenses paid in 1893 '• 
C. H. G. Foss, superintendent . . 133-66 

Total expenses for 1892 and 1893 $440-23 
Cash on hand December 31, 1893 . . 463.02 

$903-25 



Piscataquog Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January i, 1892 $300.00 
Total amount of permanent fund on hand December 

3i> 1893 300.00 

Income on hand January i, 1892 . . $22.08 

Income received during the year 1892 . 15.00 

Income received during the year 1893 . 15-00 

Total income ...... $52.08 



410 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Expenses paid as follows : 

C. A. Rowell ^6.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1893 . . 46.08 



$52.08 



Merrill Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand Jan- 
uary I, 1892 ..... 5200.00 



Total amount of permanent fund on hand December 

31, 1893 $200.00 

Income on hand January i, 1892 . . $4.00 

Income received in the year 1892 . . 10.00 

Income received in the year 1893 . . 10.00 

Total uicome on hand December 31, 1S93 . . $24.00 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer of the Cemetery Fmid. 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts 
of Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees of the cemetery 
fund, embracing the receipts and expenditures for the years 1892 
and 1893, ending December 31, 1893, ^"^^ I ^^^^ ^^^ same cor- 
rect and properly vouched. I have also examined the secu- 
rities in which said fund is invested, and find as follows : 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

5 per cent, 1913 ..... $14,700.00 

1943 5,000.00 

Cash on hand . ' . . . . 151-01 



$19,851.01 
Total amount of permanent fund .... $19,851.01 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 411 
VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

5 per cent, 1913 ..... $4,800.00 

1943 ..... 1,000.00 

Cash on hand ..... 944-23 



$6,744.23 
Total amount of permanent fund .... $6,744.23 

PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 
5 per cent, 1913 ..... $300.00 

Total permanent fund .... . . $300.00 

MERRILL CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 
5 per cent, 1913 ..... $200.00 



Total permanent fund .... . . $200.00 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the Pine Grove Cemetery have the honor 
to submit the following report : 

The past year has been no exception to the previous history of 
this cemetery in the matter of rapid development and improve- 
ment, and it has already become in its general outlines and ap- 
pearance a noble and beautiful tribute to our beloved and hon- 
ored dead. 

The multiplication of beautiful and elaborate monuments con- 
tinues not only upon our perpetual care lawns but upon other 
lots in all parts of the grounds. The fact, however, that the 
purchasers of perpetual care lots have the assurance that their 
surroundings will always be in harmony and keeping with their 
own gives to these lots a preference that will always secure to 
them a ready market, notwithstanding their increased cost. 

The future wants of the city in cemetery accommodations have 
been constantly kept in view, and the purchase during the past 
year of the Webster place has made an addition to our former 
facilities of a most important and desirable character. This 
purchase exhausts our opportunities for expansion to the south- 
ward, and while the wants of the city for the immediate future 
are provided for, an extension to the northward will ultimately 
become a necessity and provision should be made for it whenever 
a favorable opportunity occurs. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



413 



During the year about i,ooo feet of border on the east side of 
the cemetery have been graded and converted into an attractive 
lawn. 

Riverside avenue has been regraded and a concrete gutter put 
in its entire length. Two hundred and fifty feet have also been 
put in on the east side of the cemetery. 

JAMES LIGHTBODY, 
GEORGE VV. BACON, 
JOSEPH TAIT, 
C. H. BARTLETT, 

Committee. 

Superintendent's Account. 

Manchester, N. H., December 29, 1893. 

To the Trustees of Fine Grove Cemetery : 

In obedience to your requirements I herewith submit a report 
of all money received by me, from January i to December 29, 
1893, from the following sources : 



RECEIPTS. 




Deposit on lots 


$590.00 


Interments 


516.00 


Removals 


36.00 


Water-rents 


610.00 


Labor on lots ...... 


704.50 


Logs and wood 


116.37 




$2,572.87 


MISCELLANEOUS. 




Number of restricted lots sold . . . . 


52 


restricted lots unsold . . . . 


190 


ordinary lots sold . . . . 


4 


ordinary lots unsold . . . . 


9 



414 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Number of interments 


. 264 


removals ..... 


10 


loads of loam used 


• 325 


loads of clay used 


• 175 


yards of concrete 


. . 376f 


feet of iron fence put in 


204 



All money received by me has been paid to the city treasurer, 
for which I hold his receipts. 

Respectfully submitted. 

B. A. STEARNS, 

Superintendent. 



Valley Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the Valley cemetery respectfully submit the 
following report for the year 1893 '• 

Superintendent's Account. 



Appropriation 


. $3,000.00 


Tomb fees 


350-25 


Interments and removals .... 


221.00 


Care and water 


875.00 


Labor and materials ..... 


554.11 


Amount transferred from reserved fund . 


79-50 




$5,079.86 


EXPENDITURES. 




Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll . 


. $1,902.24 


Wadleigh Hardware Co., hardware 


18.35 


Joseph Brown, loam . . . . 


22.80 


B. F. Bascomb, team . . . . 


103.50 


M. N. Badger, manure . . . . 


12.66 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



415 



Paid F. G. Riddle, printing 


$1-75 


S. S. Piper, postage .... 


4-36 


L. M, Aldrich, lumber and labor . 


2.76 


DeCourcy, Holland & Marshall, loam 


6.00 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 


29.63 


P. 0. Woodman, turf and loam 


30-05 


Charles Reds, bulbs .... 


2.08 


Peter Harris . . . . ' . 


.40 


Adams & Tasker, Portland cement 


2.90 


Pike & Heald, pipe and hose . 


357-93 


Head & Dowst, land .... 


62.75 


F. M. Shaw, loam ..... 


4.00 


William Carr, loam .... 


7-50 


M. S. & R. Co., phosphate . 


10.00 


Palmer & Garmon, stonework 


36.80 


J. D. Patterson, loam .... 


3-5° 


H. H. Huntress, plants 


11.95 


B. W. Robinson, chimney 


8.29 


J. Francis, plants 


42.20 


J. Choate & Co 


3-OI 


A. G. Hood, plants .... 


14.00 


C. H. Robie Co., concrete 


223.69 


S. C. Dwinnells, rake .... 


-75 


Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 


1. 00 


Manchester Water-works 


64.65 


S. L. Bixby, repairing buildings . 


58.91 


Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 


2.74 


Syndicate Publishing Co., printing 


2-75 


- J. B. Clarke Co 


8.00 


Ray Brook Garden Co., plants 


15.60 




$3^°79-5° 


Paid S. B. Putnam, city treasurer . 


2,000.36 



^5,079.86 

During the year much has been done for the general improve- 
ment of the cemetery. The valley near the Elliott and Gillis 



416 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

tombs has been graded. The east bank has been graded and 
turfed. 

The walk leading from the valley to Pine path has been con- 
creted. 

The grading of the south bank of the valley has been contin- 
ued and about five hundred loads of sand have been used. We 
expect the completion of the bank this year. The avenue in 
front of the receiving tomb has been concreted, an iron fence 
erected in front, giving a finished look around the tomb. 

The building on the east side of Chestnut entrance has been 
repaired and a chimney erected. 

A change in water supply has been made, water being now 
taken from Pine-street main in a three-inch pipe to the cellar 
under the office, where the meter is located, and from there in a 
two-inch pipe to each avenue. When completed it will give bet- 
ter pressure and will be a decided improvement. 

There have been several monuments erected, the most notice- 
able that of Mrs. Joseph H. Haynes. The lot owners and the 
public generally take a larger interest each year in this cemetery. 

There have been 73 interments and 99 bodies have been 
placed in the tomb. 

The cemetery has been under the charge of C. H. G. Foss. 

The sub-trustees have inspected the work and believe it has 
been faithfully and well performed, and they especially commend 
Mr. Foss for his fidelity, his courtesy, and his ability. 
Respectfully submitted. 
RICHARD J. BARRY, 
BUSHROD W. HILL, 
LUDGER E. DESROCHERS, 
S. P. CANNON, 

Slid- Trustees of Valley Cemetery. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you my annual report of 
the money received by me during the year ending December 31, 
1893: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Number of deeds delivered during the year, forty-nine. 

To cash received for the samp . . $1,785.73 

interest ...... 10.92 

cash received from superintendent . 1,982.87 



Cr. 

By treasurer's receipts .... $1,796.65 
superintendent's receipts . . . 1,082.87 



$3>779-52 



$3>779-52 



Valley Cemetery. 

To cash received from superintendent . . . $2,000.36 

Cr. 
By treasurer's receipts . . • . . . . $2,000.36 

All money received by me has been turned into the city treas- 
ury, for which I have the proper vouchers from the city clerk. 

I have in my hands ready for delivery thirty-eight deeds, 
which, with a few exceptions, will be taken very soon. On No- 



418 , ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

vember 21.. 1S90, a vote was passed revoking the contract for a 
lot purchased by John Nelson Corey, he having failed to com- 
plete the payment for the same. The lot has been sold to Jen- 
nie F. Holmes, but the deed has not been delivered. There are 
a few of such cases that will have to be disposed ot in the same 
manner and perhaps it would be well to attend to them very 
soon. 

Most respectfully submitted. 
SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of Sylva- 
nus B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees^'of cemeteries, and find 
the same correctly cast and properly vouched for. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 

Manchester : 

In compliance with the ordinance of said city, the Overseers 
of the Poor herewith present their annual report for the year 1893. 
The whole number of families that have received more or less as- 
sistance off the farm during the year has been eighty, consisting 
of two hundred and forty-four persons, all of whom have a settle- 
ment in this city. Seven of this number died during the year. 
The whole number of paupers supported at the city farm during 
the year has been three more or less of the whole time. The 
whole number of paupers supported at the county farm during 
the year has been five, at a cost of two dollars per week for each 
person. The whole number of persons supported at the state 
Industrial School during the year has been one, at a cost of one 
dollar and fifty cents per week. The whole number of paupers 
supported at the Manchester Children's Home during the year 
has been two more or less of the whole time, at a cost of one dol- 
lar per week for each person. This amount doesn't include 
clothing. The whole number of paupers supported at the St. 
Patrick's Orphans' Home has been two, at a cost of one dollar 
per week for each person. The whole number of persons sup- 
ported at the St. Patrick's Old Ladies' Home has been one, at a 
cost of two dollars per week. The whole number of paupers sup- 
ported at the Orphans' Home, Franklin, N. H., has been one, at 
a cost of one dollar per week, clothing included. There has 



422 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



been only one case of destitution come to the knowledge of the 
overseers of the poor during the year, namely, William McKel- 
vie, who was found dead on Park common last August. Sup- 
posed to have starved to death. The criticism of the case'at the 
time by the city press was uncalled for, as the overseers of the 
poor were not aware that said McKelvie was in need of assist- 
ance. 

The overseers of the poor have given and allowed eight hun- 
dred and four orders to the paupers off the farm during the year, 
chiefly for groceries, fuel, medicine, board,[clothing, and emer- 
gencies. 

The amounts allowed to the several persons who applied for 
assistance from time to time from the several wards during the 
year, were as follows : 



vvaiu 1 

Ward 2 










250.24 


Ward 3 










441.19 


Ward 4 










1,000.84 


Wards 










2,254.34 


Ward 6 










582.63 


Ward 7 










135-03 


Ward 8 










S25.ll 


Ward 9 










265.61 



$5,790.46 



MISCELLANEOUS BILLS ALLOWED. 



State Industrial School, board of inmates $1,639.49 
Board and care of Jesse Langley and 

family ...... 50.41 

Board and care of Arthur Punt and family 7.00 

Books, stationery, and printing . . 36.44 

Total cost for the year .... 



$1^33-34 
$7,523-80 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 423 

Cash received as follows : 
From county of Hillsborough, board of 

inmates of Industrial School . $1,631.78 
county of Hillsborough, board of 

Jesse Langley and family . . 50"4i 

town of Walpole, board of Arthur 

Punt and family . . 7.00 

— $1,689.19 

Total expenses ...... $5,834.61 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Wm. H. Maxwell, 
i. l. quimby, 
Frank I. Lessard, 

B. F. Garland, 

C. S. McKean, 
Wm. Marshall, 
Patrick Costello, 
Charles Francis, 
G. S. Holmes, 

Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 
A true copy. Attest : 

William H. Maxwell, 

Clerk. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
Manchester : 

In compliance with chapter 81, sections i and 2, Laws of the 
state of New Hampshire, passed at the June session, 1889, the 
overseers of the poor herewith present their annual report under 
the head of "x\id to Soldiers and Sailors and their dependent 
Families." 

The whole number of indigent soldiers and sailors who have 
had more or less aid during the year has been seven, consisting 



424 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

of seven families, all of whom have a settlement in this city, at a 
total cost of two hundred and forty-six dollars and twenty-five 
cents. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WiM. H. Maxwell, 

I. L. QUIMBY, 

B. F. Garland, 
G. S. Holmes, 
Patrick Costello, 
Charles Francis, 
Wm. Marshall, 

C. S. McKean, 
Frank I. Lessard, 

Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 
*A true copy. Attest : 

WiLLiAiNi H. Maxwell, 

Clerk. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON 
. CITY FARM. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY 
FARM. 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of Man- 
chester : 

Gentlemen, — The Joint Standing Committee on City Farm 
hereby submit to you their annual report for the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1893. 

Having fairly and impartially appraised all personal property 
at the farm, we find the summary as follows : 

Live stock 

Wagons, carts, and team furnishings 

Farming implements 

Hay, grain, and produce . 

Household furniture 

Provisions and fuel .... 







$2,230.00 






i'3i5-3o 






763-50 






4,372.30 






2,227,,82 






611.96 



Cr. 



By cash receipts of the farm 
permanent improvements 
bills receivable . 
increase in stock 



Total expense, $8,969.85. 

Total number weeks' board, 2,990. 



11,520.88 



$2,865.54 

1.529.60 

44-25 

4,978-20 

$9,417-59 



42^ 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1,500 


bushels. 


700 


Cl 


34,095 pounds. 


12,310 


" 


4,580 


" 


175 


bushels 


13 


tons. 


19 


bushels. 


15 


u 


50 


" 


125 


u 


406 


l( 


250 


u 



Following is a list of crops harvested the past season, not in- 
cluding the amount used during the summer and fall : 

Field corn 
Potatoes . 
Red mangolds 
Yellow mangolds 
White mangolds 
Carrots . 
Cabbage 
Pop corn 
Beans 
Sweet corn 
Blood Beets . 
Oats 
Turnips . 

This account begins February 11, 1893, when the new super- 
intendent, Eugene G. Libbey, took charge of the farm. At 
this time the stock was run down and hence a large increase in 
stock which appears in the report from that time until December 
31 of the same year. 

We have made some very much needed improvements in the 
prisoners' quarters this year. There have been built large prison 
rooms, one for sleeping apartment and one for them to sit around 
in, for noticeably there is not much for them to do especially in 
the winter months. The sanitary arrangements have been 
greatly improved ; water-closets have been put in and connected 
with the sewer; and, also, quite a large bath-room for the pris- 
oners, with three separate bath tubs. The tool house has been 
moved fifty feet south, and a good vegetable cellar put under the 
same. The city swill and garbage has been all carted to the 
farm and spread on the land, and some of the best of the swill 
has been fed to the hogs, which will give quite a good profit 
when the time comes to see the results. The committee are very 



REPORT OP COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 429 

well satisfied with the management of Superintendent Libbey, 
and indorse his methods in carrying on the farm. 
Respectfully submitted. 

A. D. MAXWELL, 
GEORGE W. REED, 
JOHN G. RYLANDER, 
W. D. WHEELER, 
D. A. MURPHY, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the City Councils : 

Gentlemen, — The City Solicitor submits the following report 
for 1893 : 

Of the cases in court to which the city was a party pending at 
the beginning of the year, several were disposed of without trial 
in a manner believed to be beneficial to the city's interests. No 
jury trials were had during the past year. 

The following cases, previously reported, were pending in 
court December 31, 1893, viz. : Campbell &= Maxwell n. Man- 
chester^ Manchester v. M. J. Jenkins and bondsmen, Augusta 
Cjtrrier v. Manchester, Mary Dickey v. Manchester, D. H. 
Dickey v. Manchester, C. H. Bodwell v. Manchester, T. E. Mc- 
Derby v. Manchester, fanet B. White v. Manchester, S. Wood- 
mati V. Manchester, Manchester v. Warren ^ Beede, The matters 
arising from controversy over new passenger station, Batchelder 
6^ Clark y. Manchester, Executrix of John S. Woodman v. 
Manchester, Petition of D. C. Whittemore and others. 

The appeal of Kimball Carriage Co. from taxation was de- 
cided by the supreme court at the law term in favor of the city. 

The petition of P. C. Cheney Co. and others for a new high- 
way was abandoned by petitioners. 

During the year the following suits were begun and are now 
pending : Elvira Severance v. Ma?ichester, Mary E. Reed v. 
Manchester, Charles Williams v. Manchester, in the supreme 
court for Rockingham county ; Charles Willia?ns v. Manchester, 

D. W. Perkins v. Manchester, G. H. Dunbar v. Manchester, W. 

E. Du7ibar V. Manchester, Rebecca Gannon v. Manchester, Gam- 
ble V. Manchester, in the supreme court for Hillsborough county, 
— all for damages to real estate caused either by alleged flowage or 
diversion of water by the city water- works system. 



434 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Alice Chamberland \ . Manchester, James A. Nealv. Manches- 
ter, and Carl C. Koehler v. Manchester^ in supreme court for Hills- 
borough county, for injuries occasioned by alleged defective 
highways. In these three actions the city has summoned in. third 
parties to defend, they being ultimately responsible for the 
damages. 

Executrix of H. C. Canney v. Manchester^ 

A suit for damages for personal injuries to Dr. Canney, owing to 
alleged defective highway, from which injuries it is claimed he 
died. 

Aretas Blood and others v. Manchester, 

A petition to set aside the contract with the Manchester Elec- 
tric Light Company for electric lighting. 

J. T. Do7iahite v. Manchester, 

A suit to recover interest on the purchase price of land bought 
for a schoolhouse lot in McGregorville. 

S. H. Dunbar v. Mafichester, 

A suit in trespass for laying a highway, Belmont street, through 
plaintiff's land without notice. 

Hannah E. Welch and otJiers v. Ma7ichester, 

For damages caused by changing grade of Front street, in Am- 
oskeag. 

The following appeals from awards of damages by the mayor 
and aldermen in laying out or changing grade of highways : 
Ediuidge Eno v. Manchester, Louis St. John v. Manchester, 
Joseph Trudeau v. Manchester, George F. Vance v. Manchester, 
Charles P. Still v. Manchester, Flora A. Woodman, executrix, v. 
Manchester, A. Sevigny v. Manchester, William E. Moore v. 
Manchester, Lucie A. Clough v. Manchester, and 6". S. James and 
others v. Manchester. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 435 

The solicitor would report that the number of cases for per- 
sonal injuries owing to defective highways has not been so small 
for many years, but two bad or dangerous cases being now on 
the docket. This class of cases will be rendered still smaller by 
the change in the highway damage law effected at the last session 
of the legislature. It will, however, be for the interest of the 
city to take as thorough care of its streets as before the change 
in the law or the old law is liable to be re-enacted by the next 
legislature. 

There is a new field of litigation now opening up before the 
city, which in the number of actions and amounts involved will 
be as great as has ever yet been developed. I refer to the mat- 
ter of claims for damage by flowage and other diversions of the 
water of Lake Massabesic and Cohas brook by the water-works 
system of the city. I would suggest that more care ought to be 
exercised by boards of mayor and aldermen in the laying out of 
new highways, in the matters of giving proper notice to owners 
and of awarding damages for land taken, than has been the case 
in the past. Many cases are taken to the court, and in most of 
them the city has no defense, on account of defective notice to 
interested parties, and is subjected to both damages and costs, 
which might be avoided by more careful attention to the things 
suggested above. These two causes, the water-works and appeals 
from land damages, it will be seen are at the bottom of most of 
the suits now pending, and under existing law would seem to be 
the main source of immediate future litigation. 

The solicitor has attended, to the best of his ability, to all the 
various duties of his office. He would return his thanks to 
your body for the confidence which a re-election has shown, and 
would express his acknowledgments for the courteous treatment 
received by him at the hands of all the city officials with whom 
his duties have brought him into contact. 

Respectfully submitted. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To His Ho7ior the Mayor atid Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

I herewith submit my report of such of the city poor as came 
under my care for the year ending December 31, 1893 : 

Number of calls made, 1,530 ; number of cases treated, 94. 

Diseases treated : Alcoholism, i ; bronchitis, acute, 3 ; bron- 
chitis, chronic, 4; confinement, 2; constipation, chronic, 3; 
cystitis, i; delirium tremens, 13; epilepsy, 2; erysipelas, 3; 
heart disease, 3 ; insane, 3 ; la grippe, i ; marasmus, i ; phthi- 
sis pulmonalis, 4 ; pneumonia, 6 ; pleuritis, 2 ; prolapsus recti, 
2 ; rheumatism, i ; retention of urine, i ; senile debility, 2 ; 
scarlatina, 5 ; tonsilitis, 2. 

Cases requiring surgical treatment, 29 : Fracture of both bones 
of leg, 2 ; fracture of ribs, i ; fracture of femur, i ; colles frac- 
ture of wrist, I ; dislocated shoulder, 3 ; sprained ankle, i ; lac- 
erated wounds of face, 5 ; lacerated wounds of scalp, 8 ; incised 
wound of arm, 4; strain of ligamentum nuchje, i ; crushed fin- 
ger, I ; palmer abscess, i. 

Number of deaths, 6 : Pneumonia, 4 ; delirium tremens, i ; 
phthisis pulmonalis, i. 

FREDERICK PERKINS, M. D., 

City Physician. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Alderjuen of the City 

of Manchester : 

I herewith submit a report for the year 1893 : 

The samples taken during the year have proved of good qual- 
ity, and the method of obtaining the samples has been the same 
as pursued during the previous three years, and entails a large 
amount of night work, as the hours from midnight to daylight 
prove the most feasible for this work, and the samples which are 
gathered in this way are all tested in the early part of the day, 
while the milk is in the best condition. Each sample is tested 
for the purpose of ascertaining the amount of butter fat, the spe- 
cific gravity, and total solids it may contain, and to prove the 
test to which these samples are submitted, a cream test is made 
by using a testing jar scaled for this purpose, which should always 
correspond to the reading of the lactoscope. 

The men engaged in furnishing the supply of milk which 
comes to this city are found to be taking more pains to ascer- 
tain the quality received by them, and this method faithfully fol- 
lowed will insure a better quality of milk, and consequently give 
better satisfaction to the consumer. The arrangements for 
obtaining a supply have tended to counteract any considerable 
shortage that might occasionally occur. During the fall and ear- 
lier portion of the winter the supply was short, owing partially to 
the fact, perhaps, that the low price paid to the farmers discour- 
aged a few, who sold their cows and devoted their time and at- 
tention to other farm products ; but the shortage has, in a meas- 
ure, been met by some of the milkmen, who have availed them 



444 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

selves of the opportunity of having milk set off for them at the 
railroad station from the milkcars of Hood & Sons, of Derry, and 
Whiting & Sons, of Wilton, whose cars, as usual, have passed 
through the city each day ; but in this there was a disadvantage 
shown at times, as the amount that could be spared from the cars 
was somewhat limited when there was a shortage in Boston, to 
which city these cars were sent. 

There has been a decrease in the number of routes during the 
past year, owing partially, perhaps, to the depression in business, 
and to the fact that the owners found the trouble of putting out 
a few cans of milk unprofitable. The price has thus far remained 
at five cents a quart, although a few endeavored to get six cents 
during the winter months. 

There are now 103 routes which come into the city from all 
directions, but principally from four towns, Bedford and Goffs- 
town furnishing the larger part, Hooksett and Londonderry com- 
ing next, and considerable being brought from Auburn and Can- 
dia. These routes distribute daily 19,720 quarts of new milk and 
3,556 quarts of skimmed milk. The estimated number of cows 
to produce this quantity of milk is 2,897. 

The number of licenses issued during the year ending January 
31, 1894, was 127, which amounted to ^63.50. There have 
been fewer changes among the routes than usual during the year 
and more than the usual number of changes among the stores 
handling milk. 

No cases of tuberculosis within the city limits or from the herds 
in the adjoining towns from which our milk supply is largely ob- 
tained have been reported to this oflSce, and it is presumable that 
a much stricter watch has been kept by the farmers over the herds 
in their possession, as they have no doubt learned from past ex- 
perience that a prompt detection of the prevalence of this dis- 
ease, and its removal as quickly as possible, is by far the safest 
method to pursue. The disease has been reported from sections 
of the country farther away, but nothing very near us. 

The following facts from a noted veterinary surgeon on the 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 445 

subject of" Tuberculosis in Cows," and published in the " Yan- 
kee Blade," are well worth preserving. He says : 

" The danger of milk from tuberculous cows increases with the 
hot weather, and there is no way of spreading this disease so gen- 
erally in a city in summer time as through the consumption of 
milk from emaciated and diseased cows. No other animal is ca- 
pable of bearing the disease so long without exhibiting evidences 
of it as the domesticated bovine, and for this reason it is difficult 
to ascertain the source of tuberculosis in many cases. The nor- 
mal temperature of the cow is 102 degrees, and this high temper- 
ature makes it possible for her to endure the processes without suf- 
fering to any great extent. It is rarely that the human tempera 
ture rises much above this during the stage of active tuberculiza- 
tion. 

" Dairymen therefore often see their cows performing their 
functions properly and yet tuberculosis is present without their 
knowledge. The disease is only ascertained by them when the 
animal is sick and grows thin, and yields small quantities of milk. 
The fact is, when tuberculosis develops so far as to make the cow 
emaciated there is no danger from the milk for it is entirely dried 
up and none is given. The danger is from the animals when 
they are in apparent good health." 

But few complaints have been made by customers to this office 
during the year, and those were at once attended to and the cause 
explained to the satisfaction of each party. 

The sum of $55 due the city from the supreme court as a milk 
fine, and which had been apparently lost, was looked up by the 
milk inspector, who found upon examination of the court rec- 
ords that the sum had been paid to the county commissioners of 
Hillsborough county, who, upon learning the facts, paid the 
amount over to the city. 

Under section 23, chapter 127, Revised Statutes, it becomes 
the duty of the milk inspector to prosecute all cases where com- 
plaints are made regarding the unlawful sale of adulterated but- 
ter, oleomargarine, or imitation cheese, whenever any one fur- 
nishes to him satisfactory evidence thereof. Consequently, upon 



446 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

satisfactory information being furnished that oleomargarine was 
being sold in a condition contrary to chapter 127 of the Revised 
Statutes, I purchased a ten-pound tub of the article of Swift & 
Co. June 8, 1893, and June 14, in company with Inspector 
O'Dowd, of the police department, I visited Swift & Co.'s store- 
house, where was found a large lot, composed of packages of dif- 
ferent sizes, which was kept for sale, and a sample of this lot was 
examined, and a record of the visit made, and on June 15 the 
driver of one of the wagons of Swift & Co. was found taking 
orders for oleomargarine, and at the September term of the 
supreme court three indictments were found by the grand jury 
against Swift & Co., and upon coming to trial the jury rendered 
a verdict of guilty. Exceptions were taken by the representative 
of Swift & Co., on the ground of the unconstitutionality of the 
law of New Hampshire as conflicting with the United States law, 
and one of the cases was carried. up to the law term as a test case, 
the question of the unconstitutionality to be decided by the full 
bench of the judges of the supreme court ; and upon their deci- 
sion, which is now pending, and which may not be rendered 
before June, 1894, the remaining cases will be decided. The 
indictments in each case were upon the ground that the article 
sold was not of a pink color, as the law of New Hampshire re- 
quires. Pending this decision further action is by advice de- 
ferred. By direction of his honor the mayor, Marshal Healy, of 
the police department, was requested to render me any assistance 
that I might require; and through the courtesy of the marshal, 
Inspector O'Dowd was detailed to assist me in visiting the store- 
house and gaining access to the article in question, and to the 
marshal and Inspector O'Dowd I am under obligations for the 
courtesies extended and services rendered. 

Very respectfully, 

H. F. W. LITTLE, 

Milk Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL, 



Manchester, N. H., January i, 1894. 
To His Honor the Mayor, and Getitlemen of the City Coufici/s : 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit my second annual 
report of the police department for the year ending December 
31, 1893, and a synopsis of the work performed. 

Twenty-one hundred and fifty-nine (2,159) arrests have been 
made and arraigned before the poHce court during the year, as 
follows : 

Assault, 120; aggravated assault, 2; assault on officer, 9; 
abortion, i ; adultery, 5 ; common seller of spirituous liquor, i ; 
animals running at large, i ; breaking and entering, 27 ; bigamy, 
I ; bastardy, i ; bathiijg and swimming, 7 ; begging, 2 ; carry- 
ing concealed weapons, 2 ; cruelty to animals, i ; distributing 
cards in streets, 2; drunk, 1,500; disorderly conduct, 18; de- 
facing buildings, 3 ; disorderly house, 2; cleaning privy vault 
without a license, i ; disturbing religious meetings 4 ; idle per- 
son, 2; evading carfare, 2 ; injuring personal property, i ; com- 
mon street walker, 3 ; embezzlement, 3 ; breaking glass, 2 ; 
fornication, 10 ; fast driving, 9 ; driving on sidewalk, 2 ; gam- 
bling, 5 ; selling malt liquor, 3 ; keeping malt liquor for sale, 
107 ; keeping spirituous liquor for sale, 22 ; keeping malt liquor 
for sale, 2d offense, 11 ; keeping spirituous liquor for sale, 2d 
offense, 2; keeping open Sunday, 32; obtaining money under 
false pretense, i ; over-driving, i ; larceny from the person, 8 ; 
larceny, 125 ; peddling without a license, 7 ; bound over to keep 
the peace, i ; maintaining a lottery, i ; maiming, i ; lascivious 
behavior, i; malicious injury, 2; noise and brawl, 30; obscene 
and profane language, i ; obtaining goods by false pretenses, i ; 



450 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

obstructing officer, 2 ; passing counterfeit coin, 2 ; keeping a 
gambling house, i ; having counterfeit coin in possession, i ; 
offering to pass counterfeit coin, i ; permitting minors in saloon, 
I ; rape, i ; attempt at rape, i ; putting salt on horse railroad 
track, 3 ; receiving stolen goods, i ; running away from house 
of correction, 9 ; present when gambling, i ; stealing a ride, i ; 
selling liquor, 9 ; stubborn child, 3 ; truants, 5 ; tramps, 2 ; per- 
mitting gambling, i ; uttering a forged check, i ; uttering a 
forged order, i. Total, 2,159. 

The foregoing cases were disposed of as follows : 
Paid costs, 6; paid fine imposed, 684; committed to the 
house of correction for non-payment of fines, 859 ; committed 
to the house of correction on sentence, 93 ; committed to jail for 
non-payment of fine, 62 ; committed to jail on a sentence, i ; 
committed to the State Industrial School, 18; bound over for 
their appearance at the supreme court, 67 ; committed to jail, 
bail not furnished, 90 ; committed to the county house of cor- 
rection, at Wilton, 52 ; continued for sentence, 52 ; sentence sus- 
pended, 85; appealed, 16; nol pressed, 24; discharged, 2>^ ; 
nol pressed on payment of costs, i ; on file, 13. Total 2,159. 

Whole number of arrests, 2,671 ; whole number of females, 
265; whole number of males, 2,406; whole number admitted 
for lodging, 1,988. 

The miscellaneous work performed by the department during 
the year is as follows : 

■ Accidents reported, 26 ; assisted out of town officers, 63 ; 
buildings found open and secured, 582 ; cases investigated, 
1,010; cases cruelty to animals investigated, 26; defective streets 
and sidewalks reported, 137; disturbances suppressed, 1,040; 
dogs killed, 36; dogs lost, and found, 37 ; dangerous dogs, no- 
tice served to owners, 34 ; fires discovered and alarms given, 24 ; 
fires extinguished without an alarm, 31 ; injured and sick persons 
assisted, 146; intoxicated persons taken home, 377; lights ex- 
tinguished in buildings, 107; lights furnished for dangerous 
places, 322; lost children restored to their parents, 138; money 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 451 

or other stolen property recovered, ^7,290.89; money or other 
lost property recovered, ^4,473.24; nuisances abated, 73; search 
warrants for liquor served, none found, 12; search warrants for 
stolen goods served, 103 ; stray teams put up, 431. 

The sum of six thousand nine hundred forty-one dollars and 
thirty cents (^6,941.30) has been received for fines and costs 
imposed by the police court for the past year, and the same has 
been paid by me to the city treasurer, whose receipts I hold for 
the sanie. 

With the present number of men we have given the city what 
I am pleased to term the best possible protection. The men 
have been vigilant and energetic. They have patroled a great 
deal of territory, and have done invaluable good in preventing 
burglaries, serious disorders, and in arresting violators of the law. 

There was recovered during the year $11,764.13 worth of lost 
and stolen goods, which was turned over to the proper owners. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion I desire to state that during the year it has been 
my sole aim to increase the efficiency and discipline of the force, 
to enforce the ordinances of the city and state laws coming under 
the jurisdiction of the police, and to carry out the orders and 
instructions of the board of mayor and aldermen. I thank each 
member of the board of mayor and aldermen for the advice and 
support I have received from their hands. 

Respectfully submitted. 

M. J. HEALY, 

City Marshal. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 



To His Honor the Mayor : 

The Board of Health submits the following as its report for 
the year 1893 : 

The personnel of the board at the beginning of the year was 
as follows : George C. Hoitt, M. D., chairman, Joseph B. Saw- 
yer, clerk, and Neil F. Starr. The term of Dr. Hoitt expired on 
the first Monday in February. He was reappointed, and on that 
date the board held its annual meeting and re-elected the old of- 
ficers. Dr. Hoitt resigned August i and Clarence M. Downing, 
M. D., was appointed to fill the vacancy. August 8 the board 
met and elected Dr. Starr chairman. He accepted, and served 
in that capacity for the remainder of the year. The board also 
adopted the following resolution : 

Resolved, That we notice with regret the resignation of Dr. George C. Hoitt, 
late president of this board, and we hereby extend to him our heartfelt thanks 
for his services during the past eight and one half years in promoting the work 
of the board, and our best wishes for his future welfare. 



EXPENDITURES. 




Salaries, members of the board 


^700.00 


Pay of inspectors, patrolmen, etc. . 


2,029.88 


Printing, stationery, etc 


65.14 


Legal expenses 


25-77 


Street-car fares . . . ... 


38.10 


Postage and envelopes 


53-3<^ 


Furniture and tools 


70.85 


Carriage hire 


40.00 


Board and care of persons committed to city hospi 




tal 


68.31 



456 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



City hospital, furniture . 






$18.68 


Analysis of water . 






54-3° 


Traveling expenses 






28.06 


Boat and care of same . 






30-50 


Disinfectants, etc. . 






1346 


Burying dead animals . 






.4.00 


Office, care and expense of 






9.82 


Sundries 






3.20 




^3.253.43 


INSPECTORS. 





Herbert S. Clough and John F. Looney have been retained as 
inspectors during the past year and their work has shown that 
improvement which would be expected from a year's added 
experience. We believe they conduct the affairs under 
their control with efficiency and good judgment. Benjamin 
Freeman and Dennis Connor were secured as extra inspectors, 
and assisted in the house to house inspection which was made of 
the city in the spring and early summer. They served from 
April 26 to July i, and received $2 per day, each. Charles Lang- 
maid was employed as sanitary inspector at Lake Massabesic from 
the 23d of June until October i. He also received $2 per day. 
From personal observation and such information as came from 
people stopping at the Lake, we are satisfied that he worked faith- 
fully and intelligently and accomplished much good with but lit- 
tle friction. He was assisted at times by Inspectors Looney and 
Clough. The work of all the inspectors is given in detail in 
their report. 

The board has been obliged to supplement the inspectors' ef- 
forts with written orders but 126 times as against 259 times in 
1892. This seems to show, that the offenders have a greater re- 
spect for their authority and also a gain in the sanitary condition 
of the city. Only two prosecutions were found necessary in the 
police court. The board was successful in both. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 457 

HOUSE TO HOUSE INSPECTION. 

The house to house inspection was commenced as early as 
practicable in the spring, and all the yards, alleys, barns, out- 
houses, cellars, and water-closets in the thickly settled part of the 
city were examined, and in all cases where it was deemed neces- 
sary the owners or agents were ordered to place them in proper 
condition. While the general condition of the city was nothing 
nearly as bad as in 1892, yet enough bad places were found to 
prove that "eternal vigilance is the price of safety." The same 
ground will be gone over again this season. The fact that the 
inspectors are expected acts as a spur upon many people who 
would otherwise be negligent. 

VAULTS AND VAULT CLEANING. 

John T. Gott and Timothy McKenna were licensed as vault 
cleaners. Taken as a whole the work was better done than dur- 
ing the preceding years. They responded with alacrity to any 
suggestions made by the inspectors, and the complaints made 
against them were less than heretofore. The work we believe to 
be done with as little annoyance to the public as is possible con- 
sidering its nature. Mr. Gott cleaned 987 vaults and Mr. Mc- 
Kenna 540 during the year. Twenty-one vaults were cleaned by 
the owners after having secured a special permit from the board 
for that purpose. 

The barbarous idea that it is only necessary to clean a vault 
when it has become too full to longer hold its contents seems to 
be deep-seated in the minds of many people. The inspectors, 
by keeping a record of the time of cleaning the year before, dis- 
covered that several owners were in the habit of allowing their 
vaults to run two or more years without cleaning, and they con- 
sidered it quite a hardship when the rule that all vaults should 
be cleaned at least once each year was enforced. Their protests 
were unheeded, however, and nearly every vault in the thickly 
settled part of the city was cleaned last year. The rule as to the 
time and manner of cleaning a vault has also been disregarded 



458 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

somewhat by people who preferred to do the work themselves in 
their own way. One man paid almost $20 fine and costs in po- 
lice court for breaking this rule last season, and since then the 
rule has been obeyed to a greater extent. 

DISCONTINUANCE OF PRIVY-VAULTS. 

The substitution of water-closets for privy-vaults has been 
pushed as fast as circumstances would permit. The immense 
number of new buildings erected last season caused plumbers and 
carpenters to be in demand, and it was not always possible to 
have the work done as promptly as the board intended. The 
financial stringency also affected the work to some extent. It is 
not the desire of this board to be unreasonable or unjust, and in 
such times as came upon us last summer, the board considered it 
best to be lenient where such action would not be a positive dis- 
advantage to the general health. In all cases where such leni- 
ency was shown, the inspectors were ordered to see that the 
vaults were cleaned often and kept in as good condition as pos- 
sible. The list of places where changes were made is given in 
the inspectors' report. The work will be pushed again the com- 
ing season. 



Much time has been spent by the board in an endeavor to for- 
mulate a set of plumbing regulations, and before this is printed 
such a set will probably have been adopted. Such rules to be of 
any benefit must be quite a radical departure from the standard 
in use in many houses and blocks in this city. The safety and 
health of the people have of course been the first consideration. 
The expense that such rules make necessary was also considered 
and they were made as simple and free from expensive require- 
ments as was possible. The test of time and use may show some 
minor defects, but we think in the main they will be found 
correct. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH, 459 



The unsewered streets have continued to make some trouble, 
although to a less extent than in former years. Peoi)le are be- 
ginning to realize that sewage is fully as dangerous as night soil 
and that if left on the surface of the ground it is quite as sure to 
cause sickness. They are also better informed as to the duty the 
law imposes upon them in regard to its care. To a great extent 
when there is no sewer, property owners make an honest effort to 
" convey it away under ground or in some other way that will 
not be offensive." 

Cemetery brook, at the beginning of the year, was polluted by 
sewage from houses on the south side of Auburn street. The 
building of a sewer in the back street relieved this difficulty, as 
all who were polluting the brook promptly entered the sewer. 
A branch of the brook coming from east of the siljc mill was also 
polluted with sewage from the mill and several blocks in the 
vicinity. Cesspools have been provided in most cases, and within 
a short time Cemetery brook will be free from sewage. This 
brook was, so far as we know, the only one which was polluted by 
sewage, and the city is to be congratulated that the brook nui- 
sances are abated. That section of the city which is growing up 
about the Hoyt shoeshop is calling for sewers, and it is to be 
hoped that the city government will at no distant day provide 
some way for the disposal of the sewage in that vicinity. 

THE GARBAGE QUESTION. 

The back streets have been kept in better condition since be- 
ing placed in charge of the street and park commission and those 
gentlemen deserve credit for the energy they have shown in their 
efforts to handle this serious municipal problem. The swill con- 
tract was let at a living price to the city farm and the service has 
been much better, fewer complaints having come to the office 
and many of those being such that the householder was shown 
to be the party at fault. The city dumps have been complained 
of only a few times and then the complaints were due to odors 
caused by fire. These fires seem to be one of the evils attend- 



460 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ant on the piling up of great masses of refuse. Spontaneous 
combustion will sometimes occur, even with the most careful 
handling. From several inspections we are satisfied that the 
dumps are cared for with as little annoyance to the public as the 
nature of the material composing them will permit. The board 
reaffirms its previous opinion that the only proper way to dispose 
of these wastes is cremation. The furnaces now in use in other 
cities are costly both in construction and operation. Great heat 
and quick combustion are the working principles of all furnaces 
that have come to our notice, and the destruction of the largest 
amount of material in the shortest space of time seems to be the 
only consideration. A great deal of the waste matter which is 
deposited at the dump is fuel. Paper, grass and weeds, boxes, 
barrels, and unburnt coal in coal ashes will all burn. It seems 
as though some furnace might be constructed which, with this 
material as fuel, would destroy the swill and perishable matter. 
There might not be so great a degree of heat generated, but so 
long as the stuff was destroyed the result would be attained and 
the wear of the furnace and the cost of operating would be small. 
In a few years more the gullies in the southeastern section of the 
city will be entirely filled and the question of the disposal of 
waste will become most serious. It is to be hoped that a furnace 
which can be operated at a reasonable expense will have been 
invented by that time. 

THE WATER SUPPLY. 

The citizens of Manchester are justly proud of the pure water 
with which the city is supplied, and they should be truly thank- 
ful that nature has so placed the city that this great necessity 
comes to it pure and sparkling instead of being contaminated 
with filth and disease. It is incumbent on the board of health 
to see that this supply remains unpolluted, and pursuant to that 
purpose the board last summer elected an inspector to act as 
patrol at Lake Massabesic. From personal observation and re- 
port we are satisfied that the cottagers as a rule do not pollute 
the lake. Many of them use the water taken from the lake in 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 461 

front of their houses for domestic purposes. It is a poor sort of 
a man that will foul his own well, and most of the cottagers are 
people of intelligence who respect the laws of sanitation and dis- 
pose of all wastes in such a way that the lake remains unpolluted. 
Sometimes, however, a person is found so low down in the scale 
of decency that he uses the lake as a wash or bath-tub and feeds 
the fishes with his swill. It is these people who make an inspec- 
tor a necessity. They are few in numbers but they are there and 
need looking after. 

By the inspector's report it will be seen that several of the 
cottages are so located that they either touch the water or are 
close to it. While we think that as a rule the cottages do no 
harm, yet we do feel that all houses should set back a reasonable 
distance from the water so as to remove any possible chance of 
contamination by a careless or ignorant occupant. 

There are sections about the lake that never should have 
been occupied by cottages, and having been so occupied it would 
be well to have them vacated as soon as possible. The hotel 
business ought not to be conducted on land so close to the water 
as that occupied by the Lake View House. The landlord un- 
doubtedly endeavors to prevent any pollution, but he caters to 
many people and it would be much safer if his hostelry was back 
a few hundred feet instead of being close to the shore. There is 
a section of land west of this hotel about the mouth of the Neil 
brook which should also be condemned, and the buildings torn 
down. Two of these buildings are built over the brook. The 
land is low in the immediate vicinity, and any drainage from the 
buildings must in time of high water find its way into the lake. 
The stables of the Lake View House are much too near the 
brook in question. If any land is to be condemned, the board 
would be pleased to see this place one of the first to be seized 
upon. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The threatened cholera visitation did not materialize. Its 
failure to produce disastrous results in this country was due, how- 



462 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ever, to the sanitary principle that " an ounce of prevention is 
worth a pound of cure." This law was most ably executed by 
the United States Marine Hospital service, and ihe boards of 
health of our seaport towns and cities. While this board took 
no part in the actual fight, it has a right to rejoice that the work 
for which it stands achieved so notable a victory. The agitation 
of the subject was of immense benefit to us from the increased 
interest it created in sanitation, and the general cleaning up it 
induced among our citizens. Had it come here we are satisfied 
the city was in good sanitary condition, and it would probably 
have been confined to a very few cases. 

The following table shows the number of cases of contagious 
diseases reported during each month in the year, together with 
the total number of deaths resulting therefrom. 



Diseases. 


S3 

•-I 




1 




§• 

S 


a 


*-5 


p 

< 


s 

® 
p. 


s 

o 


s 

1 


1 
1 


i 

I 












Diphtheria 


1 
11 

1 

15 


4 
1 
3 

8 


1 

24 

3 

2S 


2 
23 
2 
2 

29 








3 
6 
6 

17 


2 
21 
4 

27 


11 

13 






no 

79 
212 

408 


1 


Scarlet fever 


18 
6 
12 

36 


11 

69 

80 


5 
3 
22 

30 


3 

14 
13 

30 


5 
11 

79 

95 


F> 


Typhoid fever 

Measles 

Total 


15 
2 

0^ 







From this table it will be seen that the city was again fortu- 
nate in having no severe epidemic. The number of deaths, 
twenty-three, is less than one for each* two thousand of popula- 
tion. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH, 



463 



For the purpose of comparison the following table, which gives 
the number of contagious diseases reported for the last seven 
years, and the number of deaths from those diseases during the 
past nine years, will be found useful. 



1S85 
18S6, 
1887, 
1888, 
1889. 
1890 
1891, 
1892 



Diphtheria. 



Scarlet 
fever. 



Typhoid 
fever 



* No returns. 

By this table it is shown that diphtheria and measles decreased, 
the deaths from each being less than in any year since the organ- 
ization of the board. Scarlet fever and typhoid fever show a 
decided increase. Just why this should be so in the case of scar- 
let fever it is hard to say. The usual precautions were taken in 
all cases, and in those cases where it was impossible to secure 
isolation the sick ones were removed to the city hospital for con- 
tagious diseases. 

The increase in the number of cases of typhoid fever is, we 
think, more apparent than real, due probably to the better re- 
porting of the physicians. An economy which disregards the 
simplest of sanitary laws is, we think, responsible for part of our 
typhoid. There is a class of people who for the sake of saving 
fuel live almost wholly in the kitchen and adjacent rooms. They 
batten the windows, and such doors as are not almost constantly 



464 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

used, with rags, and thus close every avenue by which pure air 
could enter. Rooms up stairs or not convenient to the kitchen 
fire, are deserted. Crowded into one half the space they should 
occupy, the family live, and the smells generated in such a place 
are something awful. They don't mind that, however, but 
breathe the same air over and over again, keep warm, and Save 
wood. Some member of the family, who is perhaps already in an 
enfeebled condition, falls sick. He isn't moved to an apartment 
where he can get pure air, because he might take cold. Under 
such conditions it is only a question of a short time when typhoid 
develops. Then what Prof. Sedgwick calls secondary infection 
gets in its work. The nurse is generally the cook, and cleanli- 
ness is not a strong point with her. She oftentimes attends to 
the patient's wants and, without washing her hands, prepares 
food. In this way the excreta of the patient find their way into 
the victuals, and the whole family become infected. These con- 
ditions have existed in three families during the past year, where 
the total number of cases of typhoid fever reported was fourteen, 
and six deaths resulted therefrom. In all these cases the tene- 
ments were provided with fair sanitary arrangements, and had 
the families occupied the rooms at their disposal it is probable 
there would have been no sickness among them. This over- 
crowding is hard to discover, as the inspector when he calls finds 
the number of rooms sufficient for the number in fanlily. As the 
younger members of the family sleep on the floor the number of 
beds is not large in the rooms in question, so that the indications 
tally with the story told. The only remedy seems to be educa- 
tion, and a bitter experience with sickness and death has more 
effect than the admonitions of the inspectors. So far the families 
seem to be the only sufferers, and we are hopeful that all cases 
will be discovered before outsiders become infected. 

THE HOSPITAL FOR CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The experience of the past year has demonstrated more strongly 
than ever the need of some suitable building for a contagious dis- 
ease hospital. It is almost impossible to secure complete isola- 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OP HEALTH. 465 

tion of a patient in some places, and when secured it is equally 
impossible to enforce it unless officers are set to watch, a proceed- 
ing which would be expensive and unsatisfactory. Cases which 
occur in such localities should be moved to some suitable place. 
The present house was not built for any disease but small-pox, 
and therefore is not properly arranged for a general hospital for 
such cases. Last year it was necessary to occupy it for diseases 
other than small-pox four times. The patients are not put into 
any rooms which have been occupied by small-pox patients, but 
should a case of small-pox occur while patients sick with other 
diseases are confined there, the board would feel that its duty lay 
in securing some other house for the small-pox. The present 
house, standing as it does in Derryfield park, will at no distant 
day have to be moved, and the board would recommend that a 
building be erected with a wing for each contagious disease, so 
that each could be isolated from the others. Such a building 
need not be ornamental, elaborate, or expensive. The ventila- 
tion, drainage, light, and all things which tend to make it com- 
fortable, convenient, and healthy should receive the greatest 
attention, but the plainer it is, both inside and out, the better is 
it adapted to the uses for which it is designed. It should be 
located as near the thickly settled part of the city as is consistent 
with safety to our citizens. Its cost for construction and main- 
tenance need not be large, and such buildings wherever they have 
been erected have paid for themselves many times over by the 
prevention of sickness and death. Miss Judith Shearer, the ma- 
tron at the present house, has cared for those in her charge faith- 
fully and kindly, and fulfilled all her duties to the satisfaction of 
this board. 

The mortality table given with this report is as full and accu- 
rate as the returns from which it was compiled will allow. What 
we have said heretofore about the death returns we reaffirm now. 
Out of the 1,041 deaths reported last year 199 were returned with 
no cause. Nearly one in five of all the people who died last 
year were unattended by a physician. This is 23 more than last 

30 



466 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

year, which seems to indicate that in this respect, at least, we 
are traveling towards barbarism rather than civilization. Al- 
though these returns are not in charge of the board, and they are 
in no way responsible in the matter, yet they have prepared an 
ordinance and presented it to the city government, which is in- 
tended to remedy tliis difficulty. We believe it will accomplish 
the end for which it is intended. 

Some of our physicians have grown careless in their statements 
as to the cause of death and are not always careful to make them 
full and accurate. For example, one return signed by an M. D. 
gave the cause as " mort subite " (sudden death)! We would 
ask all physicians to be as careful and correct as possible, so that 
next year we may be able to present a table which will be a 
credit instead of a disgrace to the report in which it is printed. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 467 

TABLE 

SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES AND BY 

MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1893, COMPILED FROM 

THE RECORDS OF THE CITY REGISTRAR. 



Causes of Death. 


5 

§ 


s 

p 


9 

1 




& 
g 


6 
5 

1-5 


1-5 


i 

B 
< 


S 

s. 

a 

CO 


1 


1 
c 
o 
> 



1 

s 




Accident 




1 


.... 


i 
1 






1 


.... 


1 




1 


\ 

2 
2 
5 


<t fall 
















.... 












j 










1 










' 












I 




4 

1 








" killed by cars... 










1 


:."i:":. 
















1 




















1 






















" pneumonia, and 
peritonitis .... 


























1 
1 
























1 


1 


























1 
1 


1 










































I 






1 














1 




















Apoplexy 




1 


2 5 




1 




1 


1 


1 
1 

"i 




12 


Asphyxia 

Brain disease of 


1 




















1 


1 


....j . 








Brain, disease of, and gen- 


' 




Brain abscess of 






1 




























2 
















" embolism of 








1 






















1 




1 


1 






















1 














































1 
















' 










1 


1 

1 
4 


2 


1 






2 


1 

3 

1 


3 


2 




13 


Bright's disease, pneumo- 








Broncliitis 


3 


4 


1 
1 


3 


1 
1 


"i' 


2 

1 


.... 


1 


3 


?=) 






" " & old age.. 






1 




























1 


1 
1 














1 


1 








1 




Broncliiti.s, capillary, and 




1 














Bronchitis, chronic 




1 

1 


1 


J, 






































Bowels, obstruction of 








1 


1 


2 














Cancer . . 


2 


1 


' 


1 


1 


1 






1 


^f, 






" of liver ' 














1 






" " " & stomach 
























1 


1 
1 








] 


.... 


'.'..'. 




1 

1 
1 


1 1 
1 .... 








" of womb i. 












Calculus, obstruc'n bowels 
Cardiac malformation 






















1 

1 










.... 



















468 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE. — Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


i 

K 
•-5 






ft 

< 




6 

c 

3 




i 

3 
< 


1 

s 


J 

O 


1 

s 

> 




1 














1 


















Cerebral atrophy 4& I'heu- 
matic fever 










1 














\ 


Childbirth 




















1 






Cholera morbus 










1 
1 










1 
6 


2 


" infantum .... 






2 


2 


2 


14 


35 


26 

1 








Cholera infantum and in- 
flammation of brain 






1 








1 


2 


1 
1 
1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


1 












Cough, whooping 








1 
















2 








1 
















" membranous 


1 
1 






1 








2 


Cystitis, chronic 

Debility 










1 

7 
1 


1 
2 

1 


3 












2 


3 


2 


5 


"2* 


4 
2 

1 


2 




Dentition 


7 










1 


.... 


1 




" and shock 












1 


Diarrhea . 














2 










2 


Diarrhea, chronic, and in- 
flammation of bowels. 




















^ 




1 


Diarrhea and dropsy 

" dyspeptic 


l' 






























1 










1 


















1 








Dislocation of cervical 
vertebrae (accident) 
















1 




1 


Dropsy 

" and bronchitis. .. . 


1 








1 
1 
1 


























1 


Drow ed . . . . . . 










i 


1 












2 










1 


2 




^ 








Dyspepsia 








1 














1 














Encephalitis 










1 
1 














1 








1 


















■^ 


















1 






" chronic 












1 








1 












1 














1 










1 




1 






1 


... 


1 
1 




Epilepsy, hystero- .. . 












1 




2 




1 




1 


1 
















Exhaustion .... 










1 








2 


Exhaustion following in- 
testinal obstruction 


























Fever, cerebro-spinal 








1 
2 


























1 


1 
















& meningi's 

" typhoid 

Fistula & blood poisoning. 
Gangrene 






1 












1 








3 




1 


2 


2 


3 


3 






1 


























1 
1 




Gastritis 


1 




1 














1 
.... 

1 
1 






" & nervous exha'n 








1 


... 






Gastro-enteritis 




































Grippe 


. 








1 










.■•■ 


2 
1 

2 
























Heart, disease of 

Heart disease, aortic ste- 
nosis and regurgitation. 


1 


2 


5 

1 


2 


:.. 


1 


7 


..'. 


1 




4 


29 
1 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 469 

TABLE.— Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


ci 

D 

a 

1-5 


>> 
S 


3 


< 


1 


S3 

3 


-5 


6c 

s 

< 


u 

a 

1 

CO 


1 



1 
a 
« 

% 


% 

s 


^ 
















1 
1 


1 


.... 






% 












1 


1 




" hypertliophy of 




1 






















1 












. . . . 


1 




















" trouble . 








1 
















" rheumatism of 


1 






















Heart, valvular disease of, 






















1 




Heart, valvular disease of, 
and congestion of lung's 












1 


1 
"2 












Heart, valvular disease of, 
and rheumatism 


.... 






1 












1 














? 








T 


1 










1 










1 




R 


Hemorrhage, cerebral,aQd 
exposure 




1 






1 






























1 


< 


" of lungs 








1 














Hepatitis, acute, and ex- 




1 






















Hj'drocephalus 












1 
1 




1 






















1 


1 














1 


























1 
















1 
1 










2 


1 




I 




Inflammation of bowels. . . 


1 
















Influenza and chronic ca- 






1 






















1 






















Lacli proper care & food, 










1 




















1 
1 






















Liver, disease of 


i 










2 




1 


1 


1 


1 




" " " & dropsy 






























1 








" cirrhosis of 


1 




1 


1 
































1 


i' 












1 






1 




1 

1 






Lungs, congestion of and 








Lungs, inflammation of .. 










1 


.... 




1 






1 




































1 

1 












Malarial poisoning ... 
















.... 










" " & grippe 
Malnutrition 


1 


















2 












1 
1 


"3' 




'2' 








1 


1 




1 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1 




" senile 


1 


















" and dentition.. . 


























Measles 
















1 






1' 
"i" 


































1 




1 


2 


2 
















1 














1 






1' 


1 






" cerebro-spinal. 


1 






1 








3 



470 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE. — Continued. 



Causes OF Death. 


2 

i 

•-5 






P. 
< 




i 


1-5 


1 


1 

s 


1 



O 


1 

s 

o 
"A 


o 




■^ 
1 


Meningitis, tubercular 


1 




















2 


' 








1 
















Myelitis 


















1 




.... 










1 
7 
2 


















1 


19 


13 

2 


9 

1 


7 
4 


26 
4 


24 
4 


29 
2 


20 
3 


11 
2 


11 




Old age 


27 


" and moist gangrene 










1 






































1 








1 
1 
























1 


.... 


1 


.... 


1 






1 

1 






2 












" intestinal 








1 












& cerebral hem- 










1 
















" and tubercular 




1 
























1 






1 
1 








.1. 


1 




















1 








Pernicious anaemia and 








1 
6 

1 








Plitlu^is, pulmonary 

Pbthisis, pulmonary, and 


10 


5 


10 


4 


4 


10 


3 


5 


9 

1 


6 


" 


79 








2 












2 










1 
4 
















1 
41 


Pneumonia . 


4 


.... 


3 


4 


2 


3 


1 


3 




5 


12 


" & fractured thigh 
" and heart failure 
" and bilious fever 


1 
1 

1 











































1 
1 




























1 












1 

1 

.... 






1 


















1 




.... 
1 












1 










1 




1 


"i' 








2 


3 


.... 










2 










1 
1 












1 


1 










1 




4 






1 










Stomach, inflammation of 










1 


































1 




1 
4 
1 
70 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 










2 




1 


"l 

4 
















Still-born 


2 


8 


7 


13 


1 4 


9 


4 


2 


9 


7 




1 
1 










1 






1 




1 








" acute 


1 


















1 
















and peritonitis 










































1 






1 




















1 

12 
3 
1 

1 

1041 


Unknown 


1 


2 








2 


1 




2 


1 


3 
2 




1 


Violence 




1 
1 

75 












































75 


70 


85 


69 




;; 


1O0 




7'» 




90 

















REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



471 



g SiS tt 



M »0 O 



S cocoes -.jH o oi lo CO in 00 1- »o so •* CO 
-S 05 CC t- C< <M K) CO •* i-H 



:;?§ 



t-005"0-*I:-COr-( 



-*05e^r^ff<co-* —I 



Scot 



,^^ ^ o 



g?l 2 



:±i;q :;,'^„ 



^ssss§5;s'"§§s"§§s 









= 2 



.2°S^§ 



7) CO 2 

3 Si ?, 

2S* 



I N o- 



^SS^£.2 



ag<2 



i§i. 



s^o-^^^^p.Spa9oC^_2 2'|cs2 2.g 



IhS^SmSs 



472 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The failure to give the children proper care is again shown by 
the fact that 527 of the deaths were of children under 5 years of 
age, and this bad showing is responsible for the fact that our 
death rate still continues in the neighborhood of 20 to each 
1,000 of population. Carelessness and neglect are the causes of 
much of this, and until parents can be roused to a realization of 
their responsibility in the matter the slaughter of the innocents 
will continue. This board with its limited resources cannot pro- 
vide such means for the enlightenment and instruction of mothers 
as would be necessary to remedy the difficulty. Education and 
civilization will in time come to our aid, but until they do we 
can only continue to deplore the sad fact that such a state of 
affairs exists. 

The fact that the rate for zymotic diseases shows a steady de- 
crease since the organization of the board in 1885 is good ground 
for believing that we are accomplishing the work which we have 
been set to do, and while we know that much yet remains we 
also remember that many things which were once allowed would 
not now be tolerated for a day in our city. Many bad places 
have been made good and all have been made better, and we are 
satisfied that a steady and rapid gain in sanitation has followed 
our efforts. We thank Your Honor and the heads of the differ- 
ent departments who have been uniformly attentive and courte- 
ous in aiding our efforts and granting our requests. 

CORNELIUS F. STARR, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 
C. W. DOWNING, 
Board of Health of Manchester. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Health : 

We submit the following as our report for the year 1893. 
Benjamin Freeman and Dennis Connor were employed fifty- 
seven days each and their work is reported with ours. 

Vaults and privies inspected ...... 2,996 

Vaults and privies inspected after cleaning . . . 1,1-77 

Water-closets inspected 2,425 

Yards and alleys inspected ...... 1,781 

Cellars inspected ........ 3,429 

Sheds and outbuildings inspected 288 

Tenements inspected ....... 235 

Barns and barn cellars inspected . . . . .321 

The following were ordered cleaned and repaired : 

Vaults cleaned 409 

Yards and alleys cleaned . . . . . .196 

Cellars cleaned 584 

Barn cellars cleaned • loi 

Sheds cleaned ........ 6 

Tenements cleaned 40 

Water-closets cleaned and repaired . . . . .252 

Vault covers repaired 79 

Privies cleaned 66 

Four hundred and thirty-two complaints were investigated, 
and in 257 cases a remedy was provided. In the other 175 cases 
there was no cause, or the cause was of such a nature as to be be- 
yond our control. 

Sinks or sink pipes were found leaking or defective to the 



474 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

number of 28S, and were ordered repaired. In 8 cases the own- 
ers were ordered to provide traps. 

Drain pipes were found open at the end where the sink pipes 
enter them to the number of 235. These openings were ordered 
closed, and in most cases the orders were obeyed. Sink water 
was found running on the surface of the ground in 54 places, and 
the owner was made to enter the sewer or provide a cesspool. 

Three thousand three hundred calls were made and 905 letters 
written in pushing the work of the department. 

Fifty-seven swine were discovered being kept in such a place 
or condition as to make a nuisance, and they were removed. 

The tenants in 92 blocks were warned against throwing swill 
into the streets. 

Latrines were inspected 27 times, and 2 were ordered cleaned. 

Forty-four nuisances not otherwise classified were found and 
abated. 

The teams and rigging of the vault-cleaners were inspected 43 
times. 

Eighty-eight dead animals were buried or disposed of so as not 
to be offensive. 

Twenty-eight complaints against the scavenger service were 
received, the proper parties notified, and relief given. 

Fourteen inspections were made of slaughter houses, etc. 

Seven cesspools were complained of, and the superintendent of 
streets was ordered to flush or repair them. 

Hens were found in the cellar at four places, and were ordered 
removed. 

Samples of water from 16 wells were sent away for analysis, 
and in 7 cases the water was found bad, and the use of it discon- 
tinued. 
'•• Special permits were given to clean 21 vaults. 

Weekly reports were sent to the State Board of Health at Con- 
cord, and also to the U. S. Marine Hospital Service at Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

A statement of mortality was compiled each month, and copies 
sent to 209 different boards of health, physicians, etc. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 475 

One hundred and twenty-six legal notices have been made out 
and served, and the proper returns made. 

A census of the section in McGregorville bounded by Mc- 
Gregor, Main, and Amory streets, was taken. Twenty-nine 
blocks were found containing by night, 2,160 persons; by day, 
1,147. Two hundred and eighty-nine children \vere found under 
5, and 269 that attended school. 

Contagious or infectious diseases reported : 

Measles cases . . . . . . . . .212 

Scarlet fever cases no 

Typhoid fever cases 79 

Diphtheria 8 

408 

Sanitary inspections made, 235. 

Houses placarded, 224. 

At 72 places disinfectants were not being used, and they were 
ordered. 

Sixty people who were living or boarding in infected houses 
were required to live elsewhere or cease employment until all 
danger from contagion had passed. Twenty-seven children who 
were attending school under the same circumstances were kept at 
home. Fifteen rooms or tenements were fumigated. Three 
funerals were attended to see that the remains were not exposed. 
Seven persons suffering from contagious diseases were conveyed 
to the city hospital for contagious diseases. Over 1,400 pam- 
phlets issued by the State Board of Health have been distributed 
in the localities where contagious diseases existed. 

"One hundred copies of report of the State Board of Health 
were received and distributed. 

Water-closets have been substituted for vaults or barn cellar as 
follows : 

Amherst ......... 24 

Amory ......... 3 

Appleton . . 5 

Ash 3 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Ashland 

Auburn 

B 

Bath . 

Beauport 

Beech . 

Behiiont 

Birch . 

Blaine . 

Blodget 

Bowman 

Bridge . 

Cartier 

Central 

Chestnut 

Cleveland 

Conant 

Concord 

Douglas 

Dubuque 

Elm . 

Fourth . 

Granite 

Harrison 

Hanover 

High . 

Jane 

Lake avenue 

Laurel . 

Lowell . 

Main . 

Manchester 

Maple . 

Marion 

Massabesic 

Mast . 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



477 



McGregor 

Merrimack 

Milford 

Morrison 

Myrtle . 

Nashua 

Orange 

Parker . 

Pearl . 

Pennacook 

Pine . 

Prospect 

Riddle 

Rimmon 

Sagamore 

Salmon 

School . 

Schuyler 

Second 

Spruce . 

Summer 

Third . 

Union . 

Valley . 

Walker 

Walnut 

Washington 

Wayne 

West . 

Wilson 

Wilson road 

Winter 



99 

31 

6 

3 

2 
8 

7 
I 
4 
3 
12 
2 
I 

2 
I 

2 

9 
12 

7 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 



847 
Charles Langmaid was employed 123 days as sanitary patrol- 
man at Lake Massabesic. On Sundays and such days as large 



478 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



crowds were expected he was aided by the sanitary inspectors, 
they serving fifteen days in all. 

The work done was as follows : 
Houses, buildings, and surroundings inspected . . 157 

They were distant from the lake as follows : 
Touching water or shore at high-water mark 
Ten feet or less back . 
Between 10 and 20 feet back 



20 " 50 
" 50 " 100 " 
Over 100 feet back 

Privies connected with them were located as follows : 
Touching the water 
18 feet from shore 
25 " " " 
50 - " " 



Between 50 and 100 feet 
100 feet from shore 
Over 100 feet- from shore 
No privy 

The sink water was cared for as follows : 
10 feet or less back 
Between 10 and 25 feet back 
" 25 " 50 " " 
50 " lOO " 
Over 100 feet back 
No sink or dry sink 

In cases where there is no sink the people said they threw the 
slops more than 100 feet from the water. 

* Well water was used at 37 cottages. Lake water was used by 
the others. 

The yards at 16 places were found to contain some rubbish 
and dirt, and in a few places the swill was thrown from the win- 
dows or doors. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH, 



479 



Forty-three 


stables 


were 


found 


3 feet from 


water 






75 " " 


" 






ICG " 


" 






150 " " 


" 






200 " " 









I 

4 

17 

12 

9 

Eight boat houses were found standing over or in the 

A brook running into the lake runs under two houses. 

Sink water was found on the surface of the ground in 1 1 places 
and the nuisance was abated. 

Six hundred and two dead fish were removed from the lake or 
the shore, and i dead bird. 

One dead dog and 3 dead snakes were cared for. 

Swill and garbage, including old clothes, tin cans, etc., were 
removed at 105 places. 

Tvventy-one picnics were attended. 

Three privies were moved which had been built too near the 
water. 

Quite a large pile of sawdust was also cared for. 

Two privies were ordered cleaned. 

Fifteen persons who were in bathing were driven out and sev- 
eral were stopped before entering the water. 

People were warned 45 times as to polluting water. 

Seven people were caught washing clothes in the lake. 

The privy spoken of as touching the water is provided with a 
water-tight tank for a vault. 

A building which stood near the water and was being used as 
a privy was torn down with the consent of its owner. 

We desire to express our thanks to the honorable board for the 
kindness and courtesy extended to us, as well as the promptness 
with which they have supplemented our efforts, also to all 
others who have aided us in the discharge of our duties. "' 
HERBERT S. CLOUGH. 
JOHN F. LOONEY. 



^REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Coimci/s of the City of Manchester : 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith present their forti- 
eth annual report of the affairs of theiibrary, and, accompany- 
ing the same, the report made to them by the treasurer of the 
board, containing a statement of the amounts received and the 
expenditures made by him in behalf of the board of the funds in 
their possession and under their control ; and also the report of 
the librarian made to the board, giving in detail the operation 
and statistics of the library for the year, and the condition of the 
property under her charge at the close of the year. 

The report of the treasurer shows that during the year the sum 
of eleven hundred and forty-five dollars and sixty-five cents has 
been expended for the purchase of books and the sum of two 
hundred and fifteen dollars and thirty-four cents for the purchase 
of periodicals, making a total expenditure for both these pur- 
poses of thirteen hundred and sixty dollars and ninety-nine cents. 
Of the amount expended for the purchase of books the sum of 
one hundred and thirty-six dollars and forty-seven cents was ex- 
pended in the purchase of books to replace those worn out and 
withdrawn from circulation. The balance in the hands of the 
treasurer at the close of the year of the amount appropriated by 
the city councils for the purchase of books was eight hundred 
and ninety dollars and thirty-nine cents. 

The balance of the accumulated income of the Dean fund at 
the end of the year was six thousand three hundred and fourteen 



484 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

dollars and fifty-seven cents. No purchase of books "has been 
made from the income of this fund during the year. 

The accumulated income of the Mary E. Elliot fund at the 
close of the year was eight hundred and sixty-five dollars and ten 
cents. 

The amount of the legacy of Mrs. Eliza Eaton paid to the 
trustees during the year 1892 was twenty-eight hundred and 
eighty-seven dollars and eighty cents. There was received as in- 
terest on this amount during the year 1892 the sum of nine dol- 
lars and fifty-five cents, and during the last year the sum of sev- 
enty-seven dollars and twenty-four cents, making the total amount 
of this fund twenty-nine hundred and seventy-four dollars and 
fifty-nine cents. By vote of the trustees the mterest of the fund 
is to be added to the principal received till principal and inter- 
est shall amount to three thousand dollars, which sum is then to 
be considered as principal of the fund and the income thereafter 
to be expended for the purchase of books. 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the library for 
the past year were four thousand one hundred and forty-nine dol- 
lars and sixty-two cents, which amount includes the sum of thir- 
teen hundred and fifty-nine dollars and eight cents expended for 
the preparation of the new catalogue. Of this latter amount the 
sum of six hundred and fifty-nine dollars and sixty-three cents 
was paid for materials and work for the card catalogue. 

From the report of the librarian it appears that the library has 
been open for the delivery of books three hundred and six days, 
during which period the number of books delivered for home use 
was fifty-five thousand two hundred and ninety-five, being an av- 
erage of about one hundred and eighty per day. In addition to 
this number delivered for general circulation, eight thousand two 
hundred and three volumes were delivered for use in the reading 
room, an average of about twenty-seven per day. The total 
number of books delivered during the year for both these pur- 
poses was sixty-three thousand four hundred and ninety-eight, an 
average of about two hundred and seven a day. As compared 
with the preceding year the circulation for home use shows a de- 



KEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 485 

crease of five hundred and seventy-nine volumes, while the num- 
ber delivered for use at the library shows an increase of three 
hundred and fifty-seven. The total circulation is two hundred 
and twenty-two less than the year preceding. 

Seventy-six different periodicals have been regularly received 
at the library during the year, — fifty-seven by purchase and nine- 
teen by donation, — and as the respective volumes have been com- 
pleted they have been bound and placed upon the shelves for cir- 
culation. 

During the year eighty-seven volumes have been taken from 
the shelves and withdrawn from circulation, having become so 
worn as to be unfit for further service. Of this number and of 
others retired from circulation in previous years one hundred and 
seventy-three volumes have been replaced at a cost of one hun- 
dred and thirty-six dollars and forty-seven cents. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the last 
report, including maps and pamphlets, was thirty-six thousand 
and sixty-eight. There have been added during the year by pur- 
chase eight hundred and twenty-six volumes, by donation two 
hundred and eight volumes, and one hundred and two volumes 
of periodicals have been bound, makmg the number of bound 
volumes in the library at the end of the year thirty-six thousand, 
four hundred and eighty-six, and the total number, including six- 
teen maps and seven hundred and two pamphlets unbound, thir- 
ty-seven thousand two hundred and four. 

A large number of pamphlets have been received at the library 
during the year which do not appear in the accessions reported, 
as they have not yet been classified preparatory to binding in 
volumes of convenient size. 

Accompanying the report of the librarian is a list of books pre- 
sented to the library during the year, with the names of the per- 
son presenting them so far as known. The trustees have caused 
due acknowledgment to be made in behalf of the city to all who 
have in this manner manifested their interest in the increase and 
prosperity of the library. 

In September last Mrs. M. J. Buncher, who for fifteen and a 



486 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

half years had acceptably filled the position of librarian, tendered 
her resignation, to take effect upon the election of her successor. 

The trustees regret that ill health and advancing years have 
compelled Mrs. Buncher to relinquish the position the has so 
long and so faithfully filled, and they desire in this report to 
place on record their appreciation of the fidelity to duty and con- 
scientious endeavor for the accommodation of the patrons of the 
library she has always manifested during her long term of service 
as librarian. 

The position made vacant by the retirement of Mrs. Buncher 
was filled by the election of Miss Kate E. Sanborn, of Franklin. 
Miss Sanborn was highly recommended by some of the best li- 
brarians in the country as being peculiarly qualified by education 
and experience to fill the position of librarian. She was em- 
ployed for eight years as assistant librarian in the Boston Athe- 
neum, under C. A. Cutter, the efficient librarian of that institu- 
tion. For the past three years she has been assistant librarian 
in the Mercantile Library Association at St. Louis, going to the 
latter place upon the recommendation of Mr. Cutter. In both 
of these places she has displayed marked ability in the discharge 
of the duties of the positions held and earned the warm commen- 
dation of the officials in charge of the institutions with which 
she was connected. The trustees entertain no doubt but Miss 
Sanborn will prove a competent and progressive librarian, and 
will bring the affairs of the library to the highest state of effi- 
ciency practicable. 

The trustees greatly regret that the publication of the new 
catalogue has been so long postponed, but considering the cir- 
cumstances of the compilation of the manuscript the delay could 
not well be avoided. As soon as the compiler reported that he 
had finished the compilation of the manuscript, an agreement 
was made with him that this manuscript should be submitted to 
the examination of an expert, familiar with the preparation of 
catalogues of libraries, to determine whether the manuscript was 
properly compiled and ready for printing, and that any revision 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 487 

recommended should be made by the compiler at his own ex- 
pense. 

The manuscript was subsequently examined by an expert cat- 
aloguer under this agreement, and a critical report thereon was 
made to the trustees. The report was of such a character as to 
cause grave doubts in the minds of the trustees as to the expedi- 
ency of printing the catalogue in its present condition, and after 
consideration it was finally determined to postpone its publica- 
tion until the new librarian, who has had a large experience in 
compiling catalogues, should have an opportnnity to examine 
the work and superintend its publication. Miss Sanborn on as- 
suming her duties as librarian at once gave this matter her atten- 
tion, and is now engaged in putting the manuscript into proper 
shape preparatory to its printing. 

The card catalogue, which was being prepared in connection 
with the new catalogue, has been completed during the year and 
placed in cases in the library rooms for the use of the patrons of 
the library. 

The trustees desire to express their acknowledgments to the 
members of the city councils for their cordial co-operation in 
matters relating to the library and the courtesy and consideration 
with which all suggestions of the trustees for its improvement 
have been received and carried out. 

April i6, 1894. 

In board of trustees read and approved and ordered to be 
signed by the chairman and clerk of the board and transmitted 
to the city councils. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, 

Mayor^ 
N. P. Hunt, 

Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The treasurer of the board presents the following account oi 
the receipts and expenditures by the board of the funds received 
on account of the library : 



1893. 






Dr. 


Jan. 


I. 


To balance of appropriation, 










etc 


$1 


,168.40 


Feb. 


9- 


Mrs. M. J. Buncher, fines, 
catalogues, etc. 




82.98 


Sept. 


6. 


appropriation for books for 
1893 . ■ . . 


I 


,000.00 


Jan. 




To balance of income of Dean 










fund .... 


^5,803.27 






income of Dean fund 




108.00 


April 




income of Dean fund 
interest on accumulation of 
income .... 
income of Dean fund 




60.00 

.64 
108.00 


July 




interest on accumulation of 
income 




234.66 


Jan. 




To Mary E. Elliot fund . 

balance of interest on Mary 
E. Elliot fund 


$2 


,000.00 
754-94 


April 




interest on Mary E. Elliot 
fund .... 

interest on accumulation of 
fund .... 




80.00 
30.16 



$2,251.38 



$6,314.57 



$2,865.10 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 489 



Jan. I. To Eliza A. Eaton fund . $2,887.80 

balance of interest on Eliza 

A. Eaton fund . . 9.55 

April I. interest on Eliza A. Eaton 

fund . . . . 77.00 

interest on accumulation of 

income .... .24 



1893. 
Jan. 6 



Feb. 



13 
March 3 

7 



31 

April 8 
May 3 

June 3 

14 
17 

July 5 
II 

13 
15 

18 



Paid New England News Co., periodicals 
Boston Book Co., periodicals . 
G. G. Furnel, books 
George H. Polley & Co., periodicals 
Frank B. Webster Co., periodicals . 
Sampson, Murdock & Co., books 
Microscopical Publishing Co., peri- 
odicals 

New England News Co., periodicals 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
Central Law Journal Co., periodicals 
New England News Co., periodicals 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
New England News Co., periodicals 
New England News Co., periodicals 
D. Appleton & Co., books 
Lawyers' Co-operative Publishing 

Co., books .... 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
George E. Littlefield, books 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
Little, Brown & Co., books 



$2,974-59 

;i4,4o5.64 
Cr. 
$14.90 
5.00 
1.08 
6.00 
1. 00 
2.00 

1.50 
10.21 

375-71 

5.00 

13.62 

8.71 

32.18 

10.79 

14.65 

5.00 

5.00 
2.00 

13-52 
2.00 

II. 01 
6.30 
3-75 
5-5° 



490 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Aug. 
Sept. 

Oct. 



Nov. 



27. 
27. 
27. 
Dec. II. 
12. 
12. 

ir 

I 

19. 

20. 
21 

3°- 



Paid New England News Co., periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
H. L. Robinson, books . 
New England News Co., periodicals 
S. F. Claflin, books . 
W. J. Campbell, replaced books 
Hessling & Spielmeyer, books . 
George E. Littlefield, books 
S. C. Gould, books . 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., replaced books 
Boston Society of Natural History, 

periodicals .... 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., replaced books 
George E. Littlefield, books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
James H. Lamb, books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., replaced books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
Boston Book Co., periodicals . 
D. C. Heath & Co., books 
Boston Book Co., periodicals . 
By balance of appropriation 

balance of Dean fund . 

Mary E. Elliot fund and interest . 

Eliza A. Eaton fund and interest 



3-5° 
9-33 
2.00 

1-25 

9.91 

1. 00 

26.00 

2.70 

2.25 

2.00 

14-57 

4-25 

414.22 

100.79 

3.00 

2.00 

68.63 

4.44 

22.46 

12.26 

14.00 

5-24 

18.47 

43.00 

1.22' 

1. 00 

890.39 

6,314-57 
2,865.10 

2,974-59 



$14,405.64 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 491 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the library for 
the year ending December 31, 1893, the bills for which have 
been paid by the city treasurer upon the approval of the commit- 
tee on accounts of the board of trustees, the items of which may 
be found in the annual report of the city, are as follows : 

Services of librarian $800.00 

Services of assistants to librarian 

Fuel 

Gas . 



Insurance 
Binding . 
Re-binding 
Supplies . 
Printing . 
Newspapers 
Water 
Incidentals 
Catalogue 
Card catalogue 



604.25 

478.47 

228.48 

125.00 

145-65 

175-36 

192.26 

11.00 

6.00 

16.00 

8.07 

699.45 

659-63 

$4,149.62 



RECAPITULATION. 

Balance December 31, 1892 
Appropriation for 1893 . 

Paid trustees for purchase of books . 

Paid incidental expenses . 

Balance of appropriation Dec. 30, 1893 



$4,293-45 
4,500.00 



$8,793.45 



$1,000.00 
4,149-62 

3,643-83 

$8,793.45 



Respectfully submitted. 

NATHAN P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of the Trustees of the City Library. 



492 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

December 30, 1893. 

We have examined the foregoing report, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, 
L. B. CLOUGH. 

Committee on Accounts of City Library. 

December 30, 1893. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of receipts and 
expenditures embraced in the foregoing report of the treasurer of 
the trustees of the City Library, and find the same correctly cast 
and properly vouched. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

I respectfully submit to you the fortieth annual report 
city library : 

Whole number of accessions December 31, 1892 

Added during the year : 

By purchase ..... 826 

By gift 208 

Periodicals and papers bound . . 102 



Whole number at present 

Maps . 
Pamphlets . 
Bound volumes . 



16 

702 

36,486 



Number of periodicals and papers regularly received 
by purchase ..... 

Number by gift ..... 

Number of days open to the public for reading and 
distribution of books .... 

Number of volumes delivered for home use 

Average per day ..... 

Largest number any one day, — March 25 

Largest number any one month, — March 

Smallest number any one month, — June . 

Number delivered in the reading-room 

Average per day . 

Number of cards used on deposit 



of the 
36,068 

1,136 

37,204 

57 
19 

306 

55,295 
180 

454 

5,652 

4,116 

8,203 

27 

6 



494 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS 



Number of cards issued during the year . 

Whole number issued since new registration 

Number of cards relinquished during the year 

Postals sent to delinquents 

Worn-out books removed from circulation 

Number of volumes replaced . 

Missing volumes returned during the year 

Volumes lost and paid for . . . 

Volumes missing, not yet accounted for . 

Number of books repaired at the bindery 

Number repaired and covered at the library 

Balance of cash on hand December 31, 1892 

Amount received from Jan. i to Dec. 31, 1893: 

For fines ...... gi 10.73 

For finding lists, 46 at loc. . . 4.60 

One book lost and paid for . . . .67 



9,084 

74 

373 

87 

173 

3 

4 

549 

7.302 



Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer 



$116.00 

$198.98 
82.98 



Paid for expressage and incidentals 
Total cash on hand 



$116.00 
55-80 

$60.20 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY. 
,893. 



Heirs of John B. Clarke, Manchester. 

Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. 16 

vols. 8vo. 
Atlases accompanying Official Records. Nos. i to 16. 

James B. Straw, City Auditor, Manchester. 

Ten Municipal Reports from various cities in the United 

States. 8vo. 
Manchester Annual Reports for the year 1892. i2mo. 

Right Rev. Bishop Bradley, Manchester. 

History of the Catholic Church in the United States. Vol. 
4. 1844-66. 8vo. 

Dr. Albert Pick, Manchester. 

Medical News. Vols. 60 and 61. 1892. 4to. 
American Journal of Science. Vol. 103. 1892. 8vo. 

Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases. Vols. 17 and 18. 
And 17 medical pamphlets. 

William E. Moore, Manchester. 

The Genealogy of the Tuck Family of Hampton. 1638- 
1877. By Joseph Dow. 8vo. 

Hon. John C. Linehan, Commissioner. 

Annual Report of the New Hampshire Insurance Commis- 
sion for 1893. Svo. 



496 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

State Board of Health, New Hampshire. 

Annual report for the year 1892. 8vo. 

George C. Gilmore, Esq., Manchester. 

Library Journal. Vol. 17. 1893. 8vo. 
National Society of the Sons of the Revolution, Special Con- 
gress, February, 1893. 

H. W. Eastman, Secretary. 

Manchester Board of Trade Journal. Vols. 2 and 3. 4to. 

Rev. Thomas A. Dorion, Manchester. 

Petite Histoire de la Vie des Papes. 1890. i6mo. 

Mon Voyage a Tracadie. Par Louis Martin. 1891. 

Le Naufrage de 1' Annie Jane. L' Histoire des Missions 

Franco-Canadiennes. Par Marc Ami. 1892. 
Le Reveil. Vol. i, pts. i to 5. 1893. 
Catechisme ou Lecons sur I'Histoire et les Doctrines de 

I'Eglise Methodiste Episcopale. Pt. i. 9 pamphlets. 

Denis A. Holland, President, Manchester. 

Second and Fourth Annual Reports of the Society of St. 
Vincent de Paul. 2 pamphlets. 

S. C. Gould, Manchester. 

Notes and Queries for the year 1893. Vol. 9. 
Annual Report of the Grand Lodge, Knights of Honor. 
1893. Pamphlet. 

S. D. NiCKERSON, R. G. Sec, Boston. 

Proceedings of the M. W. Grand Lodge of Masons of Mass. 
1892-93. 4 pamphlets. 

George P. Cleves, Concord, N. H. 

In Memoriam. John James Bell. By Judge J. W. Fellows, 
Manchester. Pamphlet. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 497 

Frank W. Hackett, Portsmouth. 

Memorial Address delivered before the Storer Post No. i, 
G. A. R., May, 1892. Pamphlet. 

D. Eldridge, Boston. 

History of the Growth of the Co-operative Banks and Build- 
ing Associations from 1S77 to 1893. Pamphlet. 

Judge N. P. Hunt, Manchester. 

Dartmouth College Catalogues for the years 1S20, 1832, 
and 1834. 3 pamphlets. 

M. R. Hamilton, State Librarian, N. J. 

New Jersey Archives. Vol. 17. 1756-68. 8vo. 
William A. Pulle, Jr., Chief of Bureau of Statistics. 

Fourth Biennial Report. 1891-92. 8vo. 

PrES. J. G. SCHUMAN. 

Proceedings, Addresses, etc., at the Inauguration of J. G. 
Schuman to the Presidency of Cornell University, Ithaca, 
N. Y. 1892. 8vo. 

Col. Daniel Hall, Dover, N. H. 

Commemorative Addresses on the Life of Abraham Lincoln, 
John P. Hale, and others. 1892. 8vo. 

Hon. Joseph Kidder, Manchester. 

Nineteen pamphlets. Proceedings of the R. W. Grand 
Lodge of the New Hampshire I. O. O. F. 

Herbert E. Messinger, Manchester. 

Six volumes of Juvenile Books. i6mo. 
Ladies.' Review Club, Manchester. 

Review of Reviews, for the year 1892. 2 vols. 8vo. 



498 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

James E. Dodge, Auditor. 

Municipal report of the city of Boston for the year 1892- 
93- 
City Council, Chicago. 

Seventeen annual reports of the Department of Public Works 
of the city of Chicago. 8vo. 

Royal Commission, Chicago Exposition. 

Official Catalogue of the British Section. 1893. i2mo. 

William J. Campbell, Philadelphia. 

The Bench and the Bar of Philadelphia. A Legal Directo- 
ry. 1893. 8vo. 

Board of Trade, New Bedford. 

New Bedford of Today. Statistics of its General History. 
1893. 

E. M. Bo\vman, City Clerk, Nashua. 

Annual Report of the Municipal Government for the year 
1892. i2mo. 

Children's Aid Society, New York. 

Annual reports for the years 1892 and 1893. 2 pamphlets. 

Children's Hospital, Boston. 

Twenty-fourth Annual Report. December, 1892. Pam- 
phlet. 

Home for the Aged, New Hampshire. 

Report of the New Hampshire Centennial Home for the 
Aged. Concord, N. H. 1892. Pamphlet. 

Soldiers' Home, Tilton, N. H. 

Second Report of the Board of Managers for the years 1891 
and '92. 2 pamphlets. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 499 

Sacred Heart Hospital, Manchester. 

First Annual Report. September, 1893. Pamphlet, 
W. C. T. U., Manchester. 

Twentieth Annual Report, for the year 1893. Pamphlet. 
Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 

Report of the Manchester Fire Department, for the year 
1 89 2. Pamphlet. 

H. W. Russell, Manchester. 

Tribal Directory of the Improved Order of Red Men, for 
the Reservation of New Hampshire. 1893. 

Herbert Walsh, Corresponding Secretary. 

Indian Rights Association, " Civilizaton among the Sioux 
Indians. ' ' Pamphlet. 

Charles F. Livingston, Manchester. 

Easter Sermon, Delivered by Rev. C. W. Heizer, April 17, 
1892. Pamphlet. 

Reports from Librarians and Boards of Trustees. 

Brookline, Mass. Thirty-sixth Annual Report of the Free 
Public Library. 1892. Pamphlet. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Thirty-fifth Annual Report of the Brook- 
lyn Library. March, 1893. Pamphlet. 

Baltimore, Md. Peabody Institute. Annual Report for the 
year. June i, 1893. Pamphlet. 

Birmingham, Eng. Thirty-first Annual Report of the Free 
Public Libraries. 1892. Pamphlet. 

Boston, Mass. Forty-first Annual Report of the Public 
Library. 1892. Pamphlet. 

Bromwich (West), Eng. Hansworth Public Library Re- 
port. March, 1893. Pamphlet. 

Bridgeport, Conn. Twelfth Annual Report of Free Library 
and Reading-room. 1892. Pamphlet. 



500 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Burlington, Vt. Fletcher Free Library. Report for the 

year 1892. Pamphlet. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. Annual Report of Public Library. 

June 30, 1892-93. Pamphlet. 
Clinton, Mass. Annual Report of the Bigelow Free Library. 

1892. Pamphlet. 
Cleveland, Ohio. Twenty-fourth Annual Report, for 1892. 

Pamphlet. 
Chicago, 111. Twenty-first Annual Report for June, 1893. 

Pamphlet. 
Detroit, Mich. Twelfth i\nnual Report of the Library 

Commission. 1892. Pamphlet. 
Dover, N. H. Annual Report for 1892. Pamphlet. 
East Rochester, N. H. First Report of the Board of Li- 
brary Commissioners of New Hampshire. December, 

1892. Pamphlet. 
Fairhaven, Mass. Dedication of Millicent Library, and 

Finding List. 1893. ^ pamphlets. 
Fall River, Mass. Annual Report for 1892. Pamphlet. 
Grand Rapids. Complete Catalogue of the Public School 

Library. Published October, 1892. 8vo. 
Germantown, Phil. Report of the Friends' Free Library 

and Reading-room for 1892. Pamphlet. 
Jersey City, N. J. Second Annual Report of the Free 

Library. 1892. Pamphlet. Library Record for the 

year 1893 and Supplement No 2 to Finding List. 
Lawrence, Mass. Annual Reports of the Free Library for 

the years 1891 and 1892. Bulletins for the year, 11, 12, 

13, and 14. 6 pamphlets. 
Lynn, Mass. Thirteenth Annual Report, for the year 

1892. Pamphlet. 
Maiden, Mass. Fifteenth Annual Report of Public Li- 
brary. 1892. Pamphlet. 
Melrose, Mass. Report of Trustees of Public Library for 

1892. Pamphlet. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 501 

Minneapolis, Minn. Annual Report of Free Library for 
the year 1892. Pamphlet. 

Natick, Mass. Twentieth Annual Report of the Morse In- 
stitute. 1892. Pamphlet. 

New Haven, Conn. Sixth Annual Report of the Public 
Library. History of Founding the Library and Rules 
Governing its Use, etc. 2 Pamphlets. 

Newark, N. J. Fourth Annual Report of Free Public Li- 
brary. 1892. Pamphlet. 

Newton, Mass. Annual Report of Newton Free Library, 
for the year 1892. Pamphlet. 

New York. Report of the Maimonides Library and Read- 
ing-room, for the year 1892. Pamphlet. 

Peabody, Mass. Forty-first Annual Report of Peabody In- 
stitute. 1892. Pamphlet. 

Philadelphia. Library Company Bulletin No. 31. Sep- 
tember, 1893. Pamphlet. Apprentices' Library Com- 
pany, Annual Report for 1892-93. Bulletin No. i, 1893. 
2 pamphlets. 

Providence, R. I. Fifteenth Annual Report of the Free 
Library. 1892. Pamphlet. 

San Francisco, Cal. Report of the Mercantile Library As- 
sociation for 1892. Pamphlet. 

Scranton, Conn. Second Annual Report of the Public 
Library. 1892. Pamphlet. 

Springfield, Mass. Report of the City Library Association. 
May, 1893. Bulletins Nos. i to 12. Vol. 6. 1893. 

St. Louis, Mo. Annual Report of Public Library. 1892. 
Pamphlet. 

Salem, Mass. Report of Salem Public Library for the year 
1892. Pamphlet. 

Swansea, Wales. Annual Reports of the Public Library 
and Gallery of Art Committee, for the years 1891-92 
and 1892-93. 2 pamphlets. 

Waterbury, Conn. Report of the Board of Agents of the 
Silas Bronson Library, for 1891 and 1892. 2 pamphlets. 



502 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Worcester, Mass. Thirty-third Annual Report of the Free 

Pubhc Library. 1S92. Pamphlet. 
Windham, N. H. Reports of the Town of Windham, iir- 

cluding the Reports of the Nesmith Library, for 1S87 ^.nd 

1892. 2 pamphlets. 

Universities and Colleges. 

Amherst College : Catalogue for 1892-93. Pamphlet. 

Cornell University : Register for 1892-93. Pamphlet. 

Dartmouth College : Catalogue for 1892-93. Pamphlet. 

Harvard University: Report for the years 1S91-92 and 
1893-94. 2 vols. i2mo. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology : Annual Catalogue 
for 1892-93. Pamphlet. Courses in Electrical Engi- 
neering and Physics. Pamphlet. 

Pennsylvania University: Catalogue Announcement, 1892 
-93. Report of the Provost for three years ending Octo- 
ber I, 1892. 8vo. 

University of California: Register for the year 1892-93. 
Berkeley, Cal. Pamphlet. 

Wilmington Institute : Thirty-sixth Annual Report. 1893. 
Pamphlet. 

Unknown. 

Party and Patronage. Address by George William Curtis 
before the National Civil Service Reform League, Balti- 
more, April, 1892. Pamphlet. 

Objections, Legal and Practical, to our National Currency 
System. By Francis A. Brooks, Boston. 1893. Paii}- 
phlet. 

The Scholar and the State. Oration delivered before the 
Phi Beta Kappa chapter of Harvard University. Pam- 
phlet. 

From the Several Publishers. 

" Weirs Times." M. W. Calvert, publisher, Weirs, N. H. 



KEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 503 

For the tourist season of 1893. Folio. 

"The Worcester Council" (The Board of Trade). F. S. 
Blanchard & Co., publishers, Worcester, Mass. For 1893. 
4to. 

" Plymouth Record." Record Publishing Co., Plymouth, 
N. H. For 1893. Folio. 

"Travelers' Record." Travelers' Insurance Co., Hartford, 
Conn. For the year 1893. 4'^o- 

"Le National" (French Daily). Benjamin Lenthier, pub- 
lisher, Manchester, N. H. For 1893. Folio. 

"The Recorder." Michael R. Sullivan, publisher, Man- 
chester, N. H. For the year 1893. Folio. 

" Saturday Telegram." William M. Kendall, publisher, 
Manchester, N. H. 1893. Folio. 

" Massabesic Gem." Wallace Stone, publisher. For the 
tourist season at the Lake. 1893. 4to. 

"The Northwest." Illustrated Monthly. E. V. Smalley, 
publisher, St. Paul, Minn. For the year 1893. 

"Home Market Bulletin." Boston, Mass. For the year 
1893. Vol. 5. 4to. 

"Echo." Published by the senior class of the Manchester 
High School. Vol. 4. 1893. 4to. 

" Daily Union." 

• united st.4tes government. 
State Department. 

Commissioners' Reports of the Universal Exposition in 
Paris in 1889. 6 vols. 

Foreign Relations of the United States, 1891-92. 2 vols. 

Consular Reports from November, 1892, to July, 1893. 9 
numbers, completing Vols. 40 and 41. 

Special Consular Reports. 3 numbers, completing Vol. 8. 
1893. 

United States Commission, Centennial Exposition. Mel- 
bourne. 1888. 8vo. 



504 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

International American Conference. 4 vols. 8vo. 
Report of Postmaster General for 1891-92. 4V0. 

Interior Department. 

Official Gazette of the Patent Office for the year 1893. 
Register of the Department of the Interior. 1893. 8vo. 
Report of the Transportation Business in the United States. 

3 numbers. 4to. 

Statistics of the Six Nations of Indians of New York and 

the Moqui Pueblo Indians of Arizona and Mexico. By 

Thomas Donaldson, Special Agent. Two bulletins. 4to. 

Report of the Rivers of the Mississippi Valley and the Great 

Lakes. By Henry Adams, Special Agent. 4to. 
Report of the Secretary of the Interior, accompanied by 
nine miscellaneous pamphlets, viz., Reports of Superin- 
tendent of Hot Springs Reservation, United States In- 
spector of Coal Mines of Utah, Director of the Union 
Pacific Railroad, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, etc., 
etc. 
Bureau of Education, Descriptive Catalogue of various ex- 
hibits at the Columbian Exposition at Chicago. 1893. 
Bureau of Commerce and Industry. 2 vols, and 6 pam- 
phlets. 
Report of Columbia Institution for the Deaf and Dumb. 

1892. Pamphlet. 
Report of the Commissioner of Education for 1884-85 and 
1889-90. 3 vols. Circulars of Information. 3 numbers. 
1892-93. 
Statistics of Public Libraries in the United States and Can- 
ada. By William Flint. 1893. 8vo. 
Handbook of University Extension. By George F. James, 

General Secretary. 8vo. 
Education in Alaska, 18S9-90, and Introduction of Rein- 
deer into Alaska. By Sheldon Jackson, Agent. 2 pam- 
phlets. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 505 

Report of Commissioner of Patents. 1892. 8vo. 
Receipts and Distribution of Documents. 1891-92. Pam- 
phlet. 
Official Congressional Directory for 1893. ^vo. 

War Department. 

Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. 
Vols. 40 to 42 inclusive, with parts. 9 vols. 8vo. 

Atlases accompanying Official Records, parts 11 to 23, in- 
clusive. 

Alphabetical list of additions to the War Department Library 
from 1884. 8vo. 

Report of Maj. Richard Dalafield on the Art of War in 
Europe in i8.'54-55-56. 4to. 

Report of Maj. Alfred Mordecai on the Ordnance Depart- 
ment, 1855-56. 4to. 

Treasury Department. 

Report of the Operations of the Life-Saving Service for the 
year, June, 1891. 8vo. 

Department of Agriculture. % 

Weather Bureau. Bulletins Nos. 6 to 10 inclusive. 1892 

-93- 
Division of Ornithology and Mammalogy. The Hawks and 

Owls of the United States in relation to Agriculture, i 

vol. 8vo. 
Bulletin No. 2. Bird Migration in the Mississippi Valley. 

By W. W. Cook. 8vo. 
Report of the United States Fish Commissioner for the year 

1888-89. Bulletin No. 10. 1890. 2 vols. 8vo. 
Report of the Statistician, Nos. 92 to 100 inclusive. 1892. 

8vo. 

Department of Labor. 

Report of the Commissioner of Labor. Vol. 7, parts i, 2, 
and 3. 3 vols. 8vo. 



506 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Special reports. Vols, i to 6 inclusive. 1892-93. 8vo. 
Viz.: On Labor Laws ; Wages, Time, and Earnings ; Tex- 
tiles and Glass ; Cost of Productions ; The Phosphate In- 
dustry ; The Gothenburg System of Liquor Traffic; etc. 

Smithsonian Institution. 

Reports of the Board of Regents for the years 1890 and 1891. 

2 vols. 8vo. 
Proceedings of the United States National Museum. Vol. 

14, parts I and 2. 2 vols. 1891. 8vo. 
Smithsonian Collections. Vols. 34 and 36. 8vo. 
Bulletins Nos. 39 and 40. 

United States Congress. 

Public Documents of regular set, loi vols., of the Fifty- 
first, Fifty-second, and Fifty-third Congresses, including 
two Atlases, viz., The Growth of Industrial Art, and Ge- 
ology of the Eureka District, Nevada. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Mrs. M. J. BUNCHER. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, ETC. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL 
LAMPS. 



No. 



Electric Lights in Use. 




I. Cypress and Massabesic, 


arm. 


2. Massabesic-street watering-trough, 


pole. 


3. Park and Beacon, 


arm, 


4. Central and Hall, 




5. Lake avenue and Massabesic, 




6. Wilson and Laurel, 




7. Merrimack and Hall, 




8. Manchester and Hall, 




9. Manchester and Wilson, 




10. Hanover and Ashland, 




II. Hanover and Hall, 




12. Hanover and Beacon, 




13. Concord and Ashland, 




14. Bridge and Hall, 




15. Myrtle and Russell, 





16. Pearl and Linden, 

17. Pearl and Russell, 

18. Bridge and Nashua, 

19. Nashua and High, 

20. Concord and Button, 

21. Amherst and Porter, 

22. Hanover and Lincoln, 

23. Manchester and Lincoln, 

24. Merrimack and Lincoln, 

25. Laurel and Lincoln, 



510 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 26. Central and Lincoln, 

27. Lake avenue and Lincoln, 

28. Spruce and Lincoln, 

29. Spruce and Maple, 

30. Lake avenue and Maple, 

31. Central and Maple, 

32. Merrimack and Maple, 

33. Manchester and Maple, 

34. Hanover and Maple, 

35. Amherst and Maple, 

36. Concord and Maple, 

37. Lowell and Nashua, 

38. Bridge and Maple, 

39. Myrtle and Maple, 

40. Orange and Ash, 

41. Harrison and Beech, 

42. Myrtle and Beech, 

43. Pearl and Beech, 

44. Bridge and Beech, 

45. Lowell and Ash, 

46. Amherst and Ash, 

47. Lowell and Beech, 

48. Concord and Walnut, 

49. Amherst and Beech, 

50. Hanover and Beech, 

51. Hanover square, pole. 

52. Manchester and Beech, arm. 

53. Merrimack and Beech, 

54. Laurel and Beech, 

55. Central and Beech, 

56. Lake avenue and Beech, 

57. Spruce and Beech, 

58. Cedar ai\d Union, 

59. Lake avenue and Union, 

60. Central and Union, 

61. Laurel and Union, 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 511 



No. 62. 

63- 
64. 

65- 
66. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 

71- 

72. 

73- 

74- 
75- 
76. 

77- 
78. 

79- 
80. 
81. 
82. 

83- 
84. 
85. 
86. 
87. 



Merrimack and Union, 
Manchester and Union, 
Hanover and Union, 
Amherst and Union, 
Concord and Union, 
Lowell and Walnut, 
Lowell and Union, 
High and Union, 
Bridge and Union, 
Bridge and Walnut, 
Orange and Union, 
Prospect and Union, 
Brook and Union, 
Pennacook and Union, 
Webster and Pine, 
North and Pine, 
Sagamore and Pine, 
Blodget and Pine, 
Harrison and Hazel, 
Prospect and Pine, 
Myrtle and Pine, 
Orange and Pine, 
Pearl and Pine, 
Bridge and Pine, 
Tremont square, 
High and Pine, 
Lowell and Pine, 
Concord and Pine, 
Amherst and Pine, 
Hanover and Pine, 
Manchester and Pine, 
Merrimack and Pine, 
Laurel and Pine, 
Central and Pine, 
Lake avenue and Pine, 
Cedar and Pine, 



pole, 
arm. 



pole, 
arm. 



512 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 98. Auburn and Pine, arm. 

99. Cedar and Chestnut, " 

100. Park Square, pole. 

1 01. Lake avenue and Chestnut, arm. 

102. Central and Chestnut, " 

103. Merrimack square, pole. 

104. Merrimack and Chestnut, arm. 

105. Manchester and Chestnut, " 

106. Hanover and Chestnut, " 

107. Concord square, east, pole. 

108. Concord square, west, " 

109. Chestnut and Concord back, arm. 
no. Chestnut and High, " 

111. Chestnut and Bridge, " 

112. Chestnut and Pearl, " 

113. Chestnut and Myrtle, " 

114. Chestnut and Harrison, " 

115. Chestnut and Brook, " 

116. Pennacook and Chestnut, pole. 

117. Salmon and Chestnut, " 

118. Webster and Chestnut, arm. 

119. Clarke and Elm, " 

120. Webster and Elm, ■ " 

121. North and Elm, " 

122. Salmon and Elm, " 

123. Pennacook and. Elm, " 

124. Brook and Elm, " 

125. Harrison and Elm, " 

126. Langdon, pole. 

127. Dean and Elm, arm. 

128. Prospect and Chestnut, 

129. Orange and Elm, 

130. Kidder and Elm, 

131. Elm east back, on Pearl, 

132. Bridge and Elm, 

133. Washington and Church, 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 513 

No. 134. Birch and Lowell, arm. 

135. Lowell and Elm, 

136. Elm east back, between Lowell and Concord, 

137. Water and Elm, 

138. Vine and Concord, 

139. Vine and Amherst, 

140. Amherst and Elm, 

141. Spring and Elm west back, 

142. Stark, 

143. Market and Franklin, 

144. Market and Elm, 

145. Hanover and Elm east back, 

146. Elm and Manchester, 

147. Dean avenue and Elm west back, 

148. Elm and Merrimack, 

149. Merrimack and Franklin, 

150. Middle, 

151. Merrimack square, west, pole 

152. Elm and Central, arm 

153. Elm and Lake avenue, " 

154. Elm and Spruce, " 

155. Beech and Cedar, pole. 

156. Elm and Cedar, arm, 

157. Franklin and Granite, 

158. Elm and Auburn, 

159. Elm and Green, 

160. Elm and Valley, 

161. Bakersville watering-trough, 

162. Summer and State, pole 

163. Granite and State, arm 

164. Granite bridge, east, pole 

165. Bedford and Granite, " 

166. Canal and Granite, " 

167. Depot and Canal, " 

168. Central, between Franklin and Canal, " 

169. Bedford and Central, arm, 



514 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 1 70. Canal and Merrimack, arm. 

171. Canal and Middle, " 

172. Canal and Stark, " 

173. Canal and Mechanic, 

174. Canal and Spring, " 

175. Canal and Bridge, " 

176. McGregor bridge, east, pole. 

177. Canal and Hollis, " 

178. Canal and Dean, " 

179. Canal and Langdon, arm. 

180. River road and North, " 

181. Amoskeag bridge, east, ^ " 

1 82. Amoskeag bridge, west, " 

183. Amoskeag watering-trough, pole. 

184. Amoskeag brick store, " 

185. McGregor and Main, " 

186. McGregor and Bridge, " 

187. McGregor bridge, west, " 

188. Amory and Main, " 

189. Amory and Beauport, " 

190. Wayne and Beauport, " 

191. Marion and Main, " 

192. McGregor and Wayne, " 

193. McGregor and Putnam, arm. 

194. Sullivan and Main, pole. 

195. Beauport and Sullivan, " 

196. Main anil Schuyler, " 

197. Wilton and Main, " 

198. Douglas and Main, arm. 

199. Douglas and Barr, " 

200. Granite and Green, " 

201. West and Granite, '' 

202. Granite and Main, " 

203. Granite and Second, " 

204. Granite bridge, west, pole. 

205. School and Turner, arm. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 515 



No. 



206. School and Third, 


arm. 


207. Second and Bath, 


pole. 


208. Ferry and Turner, 


arm. 


209. Ferry and Third, 


" 


210. Walker and Second, 


" 


211. Blaine and Third, 


" 


212. Clinton and Main, 


" 


213. Walker and Main, 


it 


214. Parker and West, 


t( 


215. Winter and Parker, 


a 


216. Main and Mast, 


pole. 


217. Main and Milford, 


arm. 


21S. Main and A, 


" 


219. Carroll and Milford, 


" 


220. Old Mast road and Mast, 


(( 


221. Hall and Amherst, 


" 


222. Laurel and Maple, 


" 


223. Central and Wilson, 


" 


224. Harrison and Pine, 


" 


225. Massabesic and Belmont, 


pole. 


226. Union and Appleton, 


arm. 


227. Elm and railroad crossing, 


pole. 


228. Franklin and Pleasant, 


arm. 


229. Elm and Appleton, 


(( 


230. Milford and Riddle, 


(t 


231. Nutt road and Portsmouth railroad. 


pole. 


232. Lake avenue and Canton, 


" 


233. Laurel and Hall, 


arm. 


234. Beech and Brook, 


(( 


235. Kidder and Boyden, 


pole. 


236. Myrtle and Walnut, 


arm. 


237. Bridge and Linden, 


" 


238. Lowell and Ashland, 


(( 


239. Lowell and Belmont, 


" 


240. Pearl and Union, 


(( 


241. Salmon and Union, 


pole. 



516 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 



242. Water, 


arm. 


243. Arlington and Ashland, 


" 


244. Orange and Oak, 


u 


245. Prospect and Oak, 


" 


246. Arlington and Russell, 


" 


247. Gore and Walnut, 


" 


248. Laurel and Milton, 


" 


249. Massabesic — Hospital, 


pole. 


250. Lake avenue and Wilson, 


arm. 


251. Bridge and Ash, 


" 


252. Hanover and Highland, 


pole. 


253. Franklin and Depot, 


arm. 


254. Spruce and Union, 


" 


255. East High and Malvern, 


" 


256. Beech and Auburn, 


pole. 


257. Kidder and Whitney, 


" 


258. Valley and Jewett, 


iS 


259. Concord and Derry, 


li 


260. Auburn and Union, 


" 


261. Harrison and Walnut, 


arm. 


262. West Hancock and Second, 


pole. 


263. Douglas and West, 


" 


264. Hooksett road, Amoskeag, 


" 


265. Prospect and Ash, 


arm. 


266. Salmon and Canal, 


pole. 


267. Harrison and Russell, 


" 


268. Gates and Dubuque, 


" 


269. Parker and Elm, 


" 


270. Auburn and Maple, 


" 


271. Salmon and Pine, 


" 


272. Appleton and Adams, 


" 


273. Clark and River road, 


arm, 


274. Amoskeag eddy, south. 


pole. 


275. Elm east back, between Spruce and Cedar, 


" 


276. Cass and Lake avenue, 


K 


277. Riddle and Mast, 


" 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 517 

No. 278. Brown avenue and Baker, arm. 

279. Brown avenue and Hancock, pole. 

280. Clark and Union, arm. 

281. Prospect and Linden, pole. 

282. Brook and Maple, " 

283. Brook and Hazel, " 

284. Webster and Walnut, " 

285. Chestnut and Ray brook, , " 

286. Webster and River road, " 

287. Market and Canal, arm. 

288. Concord and Beech, " 

289. Pearl and Morrison, pole. 

290. Concord and Hall, arm. 

291. Merrimack and Belmont, " 

292. Spruce and Beacon, " 

293. Belmont and Grove, " 

294. Bowman, " 

295. Amory and Rimmon, pole. 

296. Manchester and Milton, " 

297. Valley and Pine, " 

298. Mammoth and Candia roads, " 

299. Cypress and Hay ward, " 

300. Conant and Rimmon, " 

301. Cartier and Kelley, " 

302. Monmouth and McGregor back, " 

303. Calef road and Welch avenue, " 

304. Valley and Taylor, arm. 

305. Pine and Brook, " 

306. Conant and Beauport, " 

307. Douglas and North Weare Railroad, pole. 

308. Orange and Hall, " 

309. Wayne and Dubuque, arm. 

310. Putnam and Cartier, " 

311. Hall road and Lake avenue, pole. 

312. Walker and Fourth, arm. 

313. Winter, near Main, " 

314. Walker and Turner, pole. 



518 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 315. Ainsworth avenue and Young street, arm. 

316. Valley and Belmont, " 

317. Pine and Grove, " 

318. Blaine and Second, " 

319. Amory and Morgan, " 

320. Amory and Alsace, " 

321. East High and South, " 

322. Blaine and Main, " 

323. Dover and Clinton, " 

324. Elm back street on Blodget, " 

325. B and C, pole. 

326. Milford and Bismarck, " 

327. Merrimack and Wilson, arm. 

328. Pennacook and Canal, pole. 



Gas-Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Chestnut. 

Clarke and River road. 

Elm, near Ray brook. 

Monroe. 

Appleton, west end. 

Salmon, between Elm and Canal. 

Canal, near paper mill. 

Blodget and Chestnut. 

Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut. 

Myrtle, between Elm and Chestnut. 

Orange and Chestnut. 

Orange, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Bridge, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Pearl and Walnut. 

Orange and Walnut. 

Orange and Beech. 

Pearl and Maple. 

Arlington and Maple. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 519 

East High and Maple. 

Lowell and South. 

Lowell and Jane. 

Amherst and Ashland. 

Lowell and Hall. 

Concord and Belmont. 

Amherst and Belmont. 

Amherst and Beacon. 

Lowell and Beacon. 

East High and Belmont. 

Harrison and Oak. 

Harrison and Maple. 

Harrison and Ash. 

Belmont and Central. 

Maple and Cedar. 

Willow and Merrill. 

Two lights on South Elm. 

Auburn and Franklin. 

Three lights on State. 

River, near Turner Hall. 

Milford and Bowman. 

Milford and B. 

River and Douglas. 

Mast and Bowman. 

Dover and Clinton. 

Dover and Granite. 

Two lights on Hancock, west of River road. 

Dover and Douglas. 

Douglas, half way between Main and River streets. 

Two lights on Pleasant, between Franklin and Canal. 

Two lights on Mechanic. 

Spring. 

Manchester and Belmont. 

Hanover and Milton. 

One light on River road, corner Shasta. 

Hanover and Belmont. 



520 • ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Oil Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Adams. 

Concord and Beacon. 

East High and Hall. 

Pearl and Linden. 

Canal, near Amoskeag bridge. 

Merrimack and Beacon. 

Hanover and Mammoth road. 

Lake avenue and Hall road. 

Elm and Shasta. 

Elm and Baker. 

One light on Baker. 

Douglas and West. 

Douglas and Quincy. 

Granite and Quincy. 

Mast road and Riddle. 

Carroll. 

Bowman. 

A and B streets. 

Light near the Huntress gardens. 

Mammoth road and Cohas avenue. 

" " and Island Pond road. 

" " and Cilley. 

" " and Young. 

Massabesic and Hall road. 
Massabesic and Taylor. 
Belmont and Green. 
Valley and Taylor. 
Valley and Cypress. 
Cypress and Prout avenue. 
Jewett and Young. 
Young and Taylor. 

Three lights on River road, south of Blue store. 
Ten lights in Goffe's Falls. 
Three lights in Youngsville. 
One light on Candia road, near Noah Reed's. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 521 

One light on Candia road, near Walter Cody's house. 

One light at junction of Lake avenue and Hanover. 

One light on Island Pond road, Mill-Dam House. 

One light at junction Ainsworth avenue and Young road. 

One light at junction Ainsworth avenue and Young street. 

One light on Taylor, near Byron Stearns's house. 

One light on Taylor, near Gilmore's house. 

One light on Valley, near Eastman's store. 

One light on Candia road, at P. Rogers's. 

One light on Candia road, at Dan Cronin's. 

One light on Candia road, at G. Bean's. 

One light on Candia road, at C. Francis's. 

One light on Candia road, at S. Mead's. 

One light on Candia road, at Claflin's. 

One light on Hanover, at Sam Page's. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Page. 

One light at Brown's. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Proctor. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Candia road. 

One light at junction of Proctor and Candia roads. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF CITY AUDITOR. 



To the City Councils : 

Gentlemen, — The Auditor herewith submits to your honora- 
ble body his fourth annual report. 

WORK OF THE OFFICE. 

There have been made during the year the usual examinations 
of the treasurer's accounts, examinations of the city clerk's 
accounts, annual examination and settlement with the tax col- 
lector, annual examination of water-works accounts, annual 
examination of accounts of superintendents of Pine Grove 
and Valley cemeteries, and of the treasurer of the cemeteries, 
annual examination of the accounts of the superintendent of 
the city farm, monthly examination of the accounts of the 
weigher at the city scales, quarterly examinations of the accounts 
of city marshal, semi-annual exammation of the account of the 
clerk of the police court. 

Six thousand sixty-nine bills against the city have been exam- 
ined and certified as correct. All the pay-rolls for the twelve 
highway districts, for the schools, for the fire department, the 
water-works, the police department, the cemeteries, and the city 
officials have been examined and certified to. 

Twelve monthly drafts, amounting in the aggregate to ^1,257,- 
560.68, have been drawn on the city treasury. 

Accounts have been kept with all the appropriations, with the 
treasurer, and the tax collector. 

There have been type written in this office 234 letters, etc., 
for the mayor ; 433 letters and other documents for city auditor ; 
78 letters, etc., for use of committees. Four hundred and thirty- 
seven circulars were also sent to bankers concerning the city's 
bonds. 



526 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

EXPENDITURES. 

The amount of the appropriation for auditor's depart- 
ment was ........ §2,000.00 

There was expended for salary of auditor . g 1,000.00 
There was expended for salary of clerks . 636.00 
There was expended for supplies . . 318.50 

Balance 45-50 

$2,000.00 

The auditor returns his thanks to the mayor and the city coun- 
cils and heads of departments for their uniform courtesy and 
kindness. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

Auditor. 



REPORT OF CITY TREASURER. 

To the City Councils of the City of Manchester, N. H. .• 

Gentlemen, — I have examined the accounts of Sylvanus B. 
Putnam, city treasurer, for the year ending December 31, 1893, 
and find proper vouchers for all payments, and all receipts are 
duly accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January i, 1893, was . . $96,477.18 
Receipts during the year 1,277,858.91 



$1,374,336-09 

Amount of drafts during the year . . . $1,257,560.68 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1893 . . . 116,775.41 

^1,374,336-09 



REPORT OF CITY TREASURER. 527 

The cash balance taken December 31, 1893, ^ ^"d ^o ^^ as 
follows : 

Deposited in Suffolk National Bank . . -. ^19,032.00 

First National Bank .... 13,066.22 

Manchester National Bank . 11,329.40 

Amoskeag National Bank . . 18,243.66 

Merchants' National Bank . . 14,913.46 

National Bank of the Commonwealth 7,033.94 

Granite State Trust Company . . 6,511.24 

ofifice safe 60,443.83 



Gross amount of cash on hand . . . ^150,573.75 
Deduct amount of bills unpaid .... 33i798-34 



Net cash on hand December 31, 1893 ■ $1^6,775.41 

The accounts for the year ending December 31, 1893, of the 
city clerk, of the superintendent of schools, of the tax collector, 
of the water-works, of the city marshal, of the clerk of the police 
court, of the superintendent of the Pine Grove cemetery, of the 
superintendent of the Valley cemetery, of the treasurer of the 
cemetery trustees, of the superintendent of the city farm, and of 
the weigher at the city scales, have each and all been carefully 
examined, and the income from these sources, as shown by the 
said books, has been deposited with the city treasurer, and ap- 
pears in his accounts. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



Dr. 

To water bonds, high service, A .... $100,000.00 

water bonds, high service, B . . . . 100,000.00 

premium on water bonds .... 6,090.00 

improvement bonds loo^ooo.oo 



528 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To temporary loan 

city hall, rents 

B. A. Stearns, superintendent of Pine Grove 
cemetery ...... 

S. B. Putnam, lots sold, Pine Grove cemetery 
sewers and drains, on account Pine Grove cem 
etery ....... 

water rents ...... 

C. H. G. Foss, Valley cemetery 

E. G. Libbey, city farm .... 
L. M. Streeter, city farm .... 

C. M. Floyd & Co., overdraft, city farm 
Dodge & Laing, overdraft, city farm 
Manchester Slaughtering and Rendering Co. 

overdraft, city farm .... 
Security Live Stock Insurance Co., city farm 

horse 

J. S. Bodkins, overdraft, paupers off the farm 
Wadleigh Hardware Co., goods returned 
County of Hillsborough, board of inmates at 

the Industrial School .... 
District No. 3 pay-roll, overdraft, draft No. 7 

1892 

. J. L. Hosmer, labor, sewers and drains . 
C. R. Crossett, overdraft 
George E. Morrill, two chairs sold . 
dog licenses for 189 1 

dog licenses for 1893 .... 
billiard table licenses .... 
Michael Connor, cost in suit against the city 
American Live Stock Insurance Co., fire de 

partment horse ..... 
George E. Morrill, money received for the re 

demption of land sold for taxes in 1890 

1 89 1, and 1892 . 
M. J. Healy, police 'department 



$225,000.00 
2,240.00 

1,982.87 
1,796.65 

6.77 

104,170.08 

2,000.36 

2,628.31 

87.23 

15-25 

18.75 

27.52 



150.00 


8.00 


6.30 


1,457-36 


3.00 


20.50 


.20 


•75 


3.88 


1,870.91 


50.00 


18.00 


100.00 


1,998.41 


6,967.92 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 



529 



To J. C. Bickford, police department . 
William E. Buck, free text-books sold 
William E. Buck, tuition 
town of Londonderry, school tax, 1892 . 
town of Londonderry, school tax, 1893 . 
Thomas Welch, old wheels sold, city farm 
Mead, Mason & Co., sewer pipe 
Abbie M. Sawtelle, overdraft, land damages 
show licenses ..... 

Charles S. Bailey, peddler's license 
Israel Saidel, peddler's license 
Wolf Segal, peddler's license . 
Solomon Kaflan, peddler's license . 
H. B. Fairbanks, two lawn mowers sold . 
Mark E. Harvey, old plank sold 
A. E. Herrick, money received from sundry 

persons .... 
County of Hillsborough, one half costs and 

fines in Shirley milk suit 
H. D. Lord, rents on E. M. Slayton property 
District No. 10, overdraft. November pay-roll, 

1893, Nos. 24 and 26 . 
Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, insurance tax 

" " " " " railroad tax 

" " " " " savings bank tax 

" " " " " literary fund 
James Nolan, overdraft, district No. 7, draft 

No. 7, 1890 .... 
Arthur Marvel, overdraft, commons 
Fred Bourassa, overdraft, commons 
sewer licenses 
milk licenses 

city scales .... 
trustees cemetery fund, bonds sold 
rent of tenements . 
taxes for the year 1888 . 



$1,364.82 

233-23 

442.75 

33-15 

42.87 

15.00 

3-04 

167.18 

77-50 

20.00 

20.00 

20.00 

20.00 

1.50 

•75 

399-95 

55-00 
50.00 

9-75 
4,900.50 

25>743-o5 

82,644.77 

6,940.42 

6.00 

4-50 

6.00 

1,700.00 

62.00 

506.35 

6,000.00 

406.23 

2.50 



530 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To taxes for the year 


1889 .... 


$5-70 


•' " 




1890 .... 


26.59 


a 


" 


1891 .... 


161. 51 


u 


" 


1892, cash . 


27,636.96 


" 


" 


1892, abatement 


2,197.81 


" 


" 


1893, cash . 


455.636.94 


'• 


" 


1893, abatement . 


947.29 


interest o 


1 taxes 
receipts 




628.33 


Total 


$1,277,858.96 


Cash on hand January i, 1893 . 


124,575-53 


Unpaid bills 


January 


I, 1894 . 


33>798-29 







$1 


,436,232.78 
Cr. 


By unpaid bills, January i, 1893 




$28,098.35 


January draft, 


1893, No. I 


$40,401.82 




February ' ' 


" 2 


31,529.21 




March 


3 


40,336-87 




April " 


4 


44,391-90 




May " 


5 


71,754.22 




June 


6 


75,629.12 




July 


7 


72,911.69 




August " 


8 


103,559.19 




September ' ' 


9 


89,185.23 




October 


" 10 


79,771.10 




November ' ' 


" II 


140,778.72 




December " 


" 12 


467,311.61 




Total drafts 


. I 


,257,560.68 


Total drafts and unpaid b 


lis . . . $1 


,285,659.03 


Cash on hand Janu 


ary i, 1S94 . 


$1 


^50,573-75 




,436,232.78 




SYLVi^ 


lNUS B. PUTNAM, 

67/)' Treasurer. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 531 

STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDI- 
TURES OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER 
FOR THE YEAR 1893. 

Receipts. 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Received from : 

Direct city taxes . . . .$425,538-75 

Cost and interest on taxes . . 628.33 



$426,167.08 



Licenses to enter sewer . . $1,700.00 

Licenses to keep dog . . . 1,874.79 

Licenses to sell milk . . . 62.00 

Licenses to keep billiard table . 50.00 

Licenses to shows and exhibitions 77-5o 

Licenses to peddle . . 80.00 



3,844.29 
Rents ...... . . 2,696.23 



$432,707.60 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Received from : 

City scales $506.35 

Miscellaneous sources . . . 583.06 



$1,089.41 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Received from text-books and tuition . . . $752.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Received from court fines and costs . . . $8,350.74 



532 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Received from : 

Pine Grove cemetery . . . $3,779.52 

Valley cemetery .... 2,000.36 

$5»779-88 

WATER-WORKS. 

Gross receipts ....... $104,170.03 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Received from: 

City farm ..... $2,927.06 
Hillsborough county, boarding pau- 
pers ...... 1,512.36 



$4,439.42 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Received from : 

Premium on water bonds sold . $6,090.00 

Land redeemed from tax sale . . 1,998.41 

Other miscellaneous sources . . 176.13 



,264.54 



Total ordinary receipts during the year 1893 $665,553.62 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Received from : 

Loans in anticipation of tax of 1893 $200,000.00 
Loans in anticipation of tax of 1894 25,000.00 

$225,000.00 

STATE. 

Received from : 

Insurance taxes .... $4,900.50 
Railroad taxes .... 25,743.05 
Savings bank taxes . . . 82,644.77 

Literary fund .... 6,940.42 

$120,228.74 



EXPENDITURES. 



533 



COUNTY. 

Received from direct tax on city property 

BONDED DEBT. 

Received from : 



Improvement bonds sold 
Water bonds sold 
Cemetery bonds sold . 



Gross receipts 
Net cash on hand 



$100,000.00 

200,000.00 

6,000.00 



$61,076.55 



$306,000.00 

$1,277,858.91 
96,477.18 

$i;374,336-o9 



Expenditures. 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 



Interest. 



Paid interest on water bonds . 
interest on city bonds 
interest on cemetery bonds 
interest on temporary loan, 

ticipation tax, 1893 
interest on temporary loan, 
ticipation tax, 1894 



$30,102.00 

15,826.00 

1,041.66 

5,961.42 

1,611.80 



Paid city hall .... 


$2,164.08 


printing and stationery . 


1,96048 


incidental expenses . 


20,124.60 


mayor's incidentals . 


144-90 


city officers' salaries 


• i3>849-93 


city auditor's department 


1,954-50 


sinking fund trustees 


5,000.00 



^54,542. 



45,198.49 



534 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Paid highway district No. i 


$399.81 


highway district No. 2 


i3>io7-65 


highway district No. 3 


299.36 


highway district No. 4 


499.05 


highway district No. 5 


804.63 


highway district No. 6 


583-76 


highway district No. 7 


1,776.21 


highway district No. 8 


976.62 


highway district No. 9 


486.53 


highway district No. 10 . 


5,302.22 


highway district No. 11 . 


1.259-75 


highway district No. 12 . 


308.71 


Paid incidental expenses . 


$514.39 


new highways . 


17,149-71 


land taken for highways . 


16,182.41 


watering streets 


5,338.14 


paving streets . 


9,847-87 


macadamizing streets 


21,265.13 


grading for concrete 


6,440.52 


scavenger service 


19,000.88 


street sweeping 


1,430.76 


lighting streets 


40,517-97 


bridges .... 


4,453-73 


city teams 


9,733-48 


* repairs and maintenance of sew 




ers . 


8,294.15 


new sewers 


43,097.86 


widening Elm street 


3,274-33 


Second-street bridge 


52,036.06 



$25,804.30 



258,577-39 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 



Paid engineer's department 



$5,648.84 



EXPENDITUKE6. 



535 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT, 



Paid health department 



$3)253-13 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



Paid repairs of schoolhouses 


^5,263.08 


fuel 


5,180.15 


furniture and supplies 


925.27 


books and stationery 


71-93 


printing and advertising . 


411.80 


contingent expenses 


2,137.21 


care of rooms .... 


4,135-69 


evening schools 


1,257.20 


teachers' salaries 


59,437-65 


salaries school committee, clerk, 




truant officer 


1,050.00 


salary of superintendent . 


2,150.00 


evening school of mechanical 




drawing .... 


532.37 


free text-books 


4,456.68 


manual training 


1,091.56 


CITY LIBRARY. 





Paid city library 



100.59 



^5,149.62 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Paid fire department 

fire-alarm telegraph 
firemen's parade 
hydrant service 
aerial truck 



$46,501.31 

1,813.25 

500.00 

12,750.00 

3,634-10 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid police department . . . , 



$65,198.66 



$42,643.74 



536 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Paid repairs of buildings . . . ^3,996.62 
addition, city farm buildings 2,598.83 
ward-room, ward five . . 725-37 
Pearl-street schoolhouse . . 8,879.05 
new schoolhouse, ward nine 100.00 
new schoolhouse, Hallsville . 3,796.84 
addition Webster-street school- 
house ..... 2,575.00 
Fulton engine-house, ward nine 21,755.23 
repairs, Vine-street hook-and- 

ladder .... 1,860.12 

stable, highway district No. 10 1,163.69 



WATER-WORKS. 


P4/,^5^-/5 


Paid water-works .... $166,275.92 




water-works, sinking fund . 12,750.00 






$179,025.92 


PUBLIC PLACES. 




Paid commons .... $4)53S-43 




Stark park .... 4,054-28 




Derryfield park . . . 1,152.86 




Pine Grove cemetery . . 8,883.45 




Valley cemetery . . . 3,079.50 




Amoskeag cemetery . . . 502.97 


(too or t An 



PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 



Paid paupers off the farm . . $7,545-63 

city farm .... 9,023.37 

indigent soldiers . . . 246.25 

Women's Aid & Relief Hospital 600.00 

free beds, Elliot Hospital . 600.00 



INTEREST. 537 



Paid decoration of soldiers' graves . $342.98 

militia ..... 900.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital . . 260.00 



gi9;5i8.23 



ABATEMENTS. 



Paid abatement of taxes ... . . $3,145.10 



Total of ordinary municipal expenditures . $865,469.13 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Paid loan made in anticipation of tax for 1893 . $200,000.00 

BONDED DEBT. 

Paid city bonds issued November i, 1863 . . $65,400.00 

STATE AND COUNTY TAXES. 

Paid state tax . . . . . $65,615.00 
county tax ... . 61,076.55 



$126,691.55 



Grand total of expenditures during the year $1,257,560.68 
Cash on hand Dec. 31, 1893 . . $150,573-75 
Less unpaid bills .... 33)798-34 

Net cash on hand ... . . 116,775.41 



$15374,336-09 



Interest. 



Appropriation . . . . $24,500.00 

Transferred from water-works . . 30,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . 42.88 

554,542. 



538 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 

Paid National Bank of the Common- 
wealth, discount on two notes 

of $25,000 each, six months 

ten days, at 4. 7 per cent . $1,240.21 
National Bank of the Common- 
wealth, discount on three 

notes of $50,000 each, seven 

months three days, at 4^ per 

cent 1,294.20 

Alonzo Elliott, discount on eight 

notes of $10,000 each, four 

notes of $5,000 each ; in all, 

$100,000, due Dec. i, 1893 . 3,427.01 
R. L. Day & Co., discount on 

four notes of $5,000 each, five 

notes of $1,000 each ; in all, 

$25,000, dated Oct. 2, 1893, 

and payable Dec. i, 1894, at 

53^ per cent . . . 1,611.80 

coupons on water bonds , 30,102.00 

coupons on city bonds . . 15,82600 

coupons on cemetery bonds . 1,041.66 



Payment of Funded Debt. 

Receipts. 

Appropriation .... $5,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . 70,000.00 



$54,542. 



$75,000.00 




To enter 


To keen 
■log. 


«:■ 


S 


$1,013.40 


$1,361.16 


$49.50 


$.37.50 


2,10:i..50 


2,155.58 


66.50 


315.00 


3,126.05 


2,060.97 


66.50 


400.00 


1,700.00 


1,874.79 


62.00 


50.00 






Hillsboi'o 



266.00 
1.57.50 



P2,871.63 


$2,462.32 


2,887.29 


i;783.72 


3,130.97 


2,468.11 


2,696.23 


2,927.06 



$2,201.57 : $1,747.50 ■ $5,670.00 $678.95 I $2,500.00 

1,789.10 1,926.96 ' 

1,192.93 4,410.15 2,178.00 1 950.00 



.,512.S 



1.00 



Iti-idgG-s. I City scales 



$434,09 1 $4«7.45 

4.45 I 415.67 

' 521.12 

I 606.35 



$4,699.47 $2,/ 
4,920.60 I .3,n 







































EXPEND 


™th..bsx. 


P 


li 


1. 

it 




1 


1 


Police (lepart- 


8THBET AND 8EWEB DEPARTMENT. 


YEAR. 

: "Kondsl"^ 


On city 
bonds: 


On 
cemetery 


"Virn"- 


Repairs ot 
highways. 


big^siys. iErs.s. 


Land 
damages. 


Spvinkling 


Paving. 


Macadamiz. 
ing. 


0™\f"B Scavenger Street 


"-- 3% '"-^r" 


CI 


in:«i..' .$34,177.00 
i-H . 32,093.00 
l-ii'.. :ll,0i;9.00 
l^'.i.:.. 30,102.00 


$15,771.00 
15,.584.00 
15,929.00 
15,826.00 


$567.50 
729.35 
925.48 

1,041.06 


$11,820.82 
4,659.34 
3,772.14 
7,573.22 


$2,058.18 
2,304.62 
2,239.62 
1,960.48 


$17,380.91* 
15,639.62 
25,129.05 
20,638.99 


$188.00 
234.25 
221.80 
144 90 


$13,489.41t 
11,768.45 
14,124.18 
13,849.93 


$2,741.79 
1,380.37 
2,193.60 
2,164.08 


$1,699.51 
1,930.07 
1,954.50 


$37,096.16 
37,937.07 
40,406.28 
42,643.74 


$21,045.45 
22,850.29 
24,647.25 
25,804.30 


.$9,075.61 ' 

14,448.09 

24,038.08 

17,149.71 $3,274.33 


$858.16 
5,704.45 
11,601.73 
16,182.41 


$7,693.00 
6,364.26 
4,.5.52.29 
5,338.14 


$6,633.75 
6,511.80 
7,540.11 
9,847.87 


$20,925.52 
19,616.23 
16,083.83 
21,265.13 


$5,089.86 $15,958.46 $1,237.08 
5,532.84 j 18,892.25 1,198.31 
5,564.90 1 15,555.31 1,293.79 
6,440.62 19,000.88 ! 1,430.76 


$41,099.64 I $3,879.68 

42,908.78 1 2,672.26 

38,746.31 3,133 68 

40.517.97 4.453.73 $52,036.06 


$6 

« 

9 



cxpensea and carried t 



1 to school depai-I n 







FliaS DEPJ 


UTMENT. 















LDIHGS. 












WATER-WOn,<». 






PUBLIC PLACES. 






V 

i 


at 

!i 

E 


i 


1 
|l 

$755.32 

441.55 
500.00 


j 


\ 


|-^ 


PI 


1 
S3 

i- 


2a 

m 


Ill 

ill 


It 




% 


II 
ll 


II 


li 


Sinking fund. 


1 
1 


aXAEKP^HK. 


1 


i 




i 




Mainto. 


.XL. 


a' 
j 


\K'.«> 


$41,409.53 
40,641.04 
42,202.88 
60,135.41 


$1,586.43 
1,154.06 
1,209.02 
1,813.25 


$18,080.00 
6,000.00 


$4,443.87 
2,466.96 
2,892.75 
6,8.i6.74 


$5,994.02 


$43,704.11 
1,128.70 

100.00 


$5,138.80 
2,676.00 


$20,759.26 
8,845.61 
3,796.84 









1 






$33,403.09 
49,625.66 
49,945.35 

160,275.82 




$4,214.03 
2,400.76 
3,726.64 
4,638.43 


.$00.75 

371.81 

1,.500.25 

4,054.28 


$8,000.00 


$6.017..54 
6.941.34 
6,840.97 
8,883.45 


$620.29 


$2,789.86 
2,794.79 
2.982.85 
3,079.50 




1«91 




$520.(; 


1WI2 


1,163.69 


$2,598.83 


$2,000.00 


$870.00 
21,756.23 


$2,490.00 




$084.48 






$12,750.00 




295. 


1893 


.... 

12,750.00 


$8,879.05 


$725.37 







RECEIPTS. 



= 


$4,699.47 
4,920.60 








cemetery. 


celSlJy. 


1 


LOANS. 1 TAXES RECEIVED FBOM THE STATE. 






«- B.ldgcs. City scales. 


street <le- 
partment 


■"--■" 


Comt lines 
and costs. 


works. easli on hand. 


Temporary. 


county 
Bonded. ■ 


Insurance 


1 

Railroad ; Savings 

tax. banktSi. 


^a^ 


coim"y tS, 


receipts dur- 

SEd 


80! $484,09 1 $487.46 
74 1 4.45 415.67 

521 ' 521.12 

19 506.35 


$2,700.69 
3,047.58 


$428.75 
459.45 
576.76 
752.00 


.$6,939.57 
7,962.04 
9,716.57 
8,350.74 


$4,423.37 
4,593.77 
4,708.58 
3,779.52 


$1,300.00 $90,463.37 ; $542,987.95 
1,.W0.00 76,605.23 506,095.11 
1,800.00 ; 83.474.79 558.073.68 


$100,000.00 
210,000.00 
160,000.00 
225,000.00 


$102,900.00 $46,0.32.47 

6,000.00 46,032.47 

101,150.00 61,076.55 

306,000.00 61,076.55 


$3,752.25 
3,920.26 
4.199.26 
4,900.50 


8121,443.72 
22,059.03 
25,849.65 
25,743.05 


$68,392.94 
73,275.55 
78,101.94 
82,644.77 


$4,604.70 
5,287.50 
6,010.88 


$347,026.08 
365,674.80 
426,388.27 
712,305.29 


$969,863.36 

951,221.93 

1,077,651.99 

1.374,336.14 






2,000.36 


104,170.08 665,553.67 


6,940.42 



EXPENDITURES. 



Lighting I "^"o^"!' 

* ""^^ ■*■ I tenance. 

$41,099.64 i $3,879.68 . 

42,908.78 ( 2,672.25 

.S8,746.31 ' 3,133 68 

40,517.97 1 4,4.53.73 



Secc^d^reet 


City teams. 




$5,246.19 




5,290.73 




6,129.08 


$52,036.06 


9,733.48 



Repairs of 


drains. 


$39,297.97t 


55,409.7.3t 


39,724.65t 


8,294.15 



$3,221.89 $1,5.57.38 $4,119.76 
3,499.90 I 1,964.00 I 4,044.86 



4,160.61 2,424.01 
5,648.84 1 3,253.13 



4,995.01 
5,263.08 



Knel. 



$3,703.32 
4,673..54 
4,297.40 
5,180.15 



$675.15 $141.85 



Printinfi: i Contin' 
ind adver 
tlslng. 



ex" Carcot 



$389.05 : $8.30.10 
396.10 931.92 



$3,376.75 $1,254.81 
3,715.75 ' 1,064.63 
1,229.99 j 4,0.50.77 \ 973.93 
2,137.21 4,136.69 I 1,267.20 



salaiies. 






$46,404.87 $l,020.00t «2,000.00t 

49,398.52 1,030.00 1 2,000.00 

54,660.36 1,030.00 ; 2,000.00 

59,437.65 1 1,050.00 ; 2,150.00 



J9,005.11 
3,210.73 



$3,239.88 $1,000.01 

3,525.73 1,000.01 

3,868.44 j 1,000.01 

4,149.63 1, 000.01 



EXPENDITURE:S.-coNTiNtjED. 



. 


UBLIC PLACES. 












1 









lOTISM.PH. 


ANTHBOr, 









.axahate. 


Total of ordi. 
nary iiiuiiiclpa 
expenditures. 


funded debt. 


TcTiipornry 


— • 


county tax. 


Total ot loan 

IS""" 


Grand total ot 
expenditures. 




- 


if 

r 


i 
5 


>. 1 

J 

■a 


1 


1* 

1 


i 


If 


i 


1 


■f 


o'" 


1 


III 


si 

i 


1 


i 


cash on 
hand. 


n 


$5,017.54 
5,941.34 
6,840.97 
8,888.45 


$520.29 


$2,789.86 
2,794.79 
2,982,85 
3,079..50 


$.520.00 

295.22 




$409.07 

600.05 

1,152.86 


$60.35' 

178.09 
502.97 


$99.:S5 


$4,336.46 
4,928.24 
5.726.94 
7,545.63 


$7,467.-30 
6,512.89 
8,269.17 
9,023.37 


$737.82 
906.40 
261 .46 
246.25 


$374.27 
333.54 
321.75 
342.98 




$400.00 
400.00 
600.00 
600.00 


$600.00 
600.00 
900.00 
600.00 


$260.00 


$500.00 



$2,999.39 
2,557.24 
2,794.53 
3,145.10 


$580,943.87 
.568,464.32 
574,683.26 
865,469.13 


$99,900.00 

100.00 

99,900.00 

65,400.00 


1 i i 1 


$63,435.00 
63,435.00 
65,616.00 
65,615.00 


$40,032.47 
46,032.47 
61,070.55 
61,07055 


$309,367.47 
289,567.47 
406,.591.65 
392,091.55 


$890,311.34 
8.58.031.79 
981,174.81 

1,257,560.68 


$79,552.02 




$875.00 
900.00 i 
900.00 j 


93.190.14 
96,477.18 
116,775.46 



RESERVED FUND. 

Expenditures. 



539 



Paid city bonds, issued Oct. 31, 1863, 

and due Nov. i, 1893 . 
Transferred to sinking fund 
Balance to new account . 



$65,400.00 
5,000.00 
4,600.00 



Sinking Fund. 

Transferred from payment of funded debt 

Expenditures. 
Paid trustees of sinking fund 



ReservedFund- 



Receipts 



$75,000.00 



$5,000.00 



$5,000.00 



Appropriation . 


$20,000.00 


Transfers from the following accounts : 


Printing and stationery 


^239.52 


Mayor's incidentals 


155-^0 


Auditor's department . 


45-50 


Highway district No. i 


.19 


" " " 3 


.64 


4 


•95 


6 


16.24 


" - - 7 


23-79 


8 


23.38 


9 


13-47 


Lighting streets . 


1,482.03 


Widening Elm street . 


425.67 


Care of rooms 


164.31 



540 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Teachers' salaries 




$562.35 


Evening school of mechanical draw- 




ing 


67.63 


Manual training . 




108.44 


Pine Grove cemetery 




116.55 


Goffe's Falls cemetery 




100.00 


Amoskeag cemetery 




47-03 


Indigent soldiers . 




53-75 


Stable, district No. lo 




.21 


Engine house, ward 3 




1,200.00 


Balance of rents received from water 


- 


works prior to Jan. i, 1893(^40, 


- 


209.40) and other free cash in 


treasury . 




. 92,032.23 



$96,878.98 



$116,878. 



Expenditures. 

By transfers to the following accounts : 
Interest . 

Payment of funded debt 
City hall . 

Incidental expenses . 
City officers' salaries 
Highway District No. 2 

" 5 

" " 10 

\< " " II 

" " " 12 



New highways . 
Damage for land taken for 
Watering streets 
Paving streets . 
Macadamizing streets 
Grading for concrete . 
Scavenger service 



highways 



$42.88 

70,000.00 

64.08 

51638-99 
1,049.93 
1,107.65 

4-63 

302.22 

48.04 

100.50 

1,264.59 

4,182.41 

60.95 

166.15 

15.00 

34.86 

2,586.65 



RESERVED FUND, 




541 


Street sweeping .... 


$32.00 




Bridges 


180.44 




City teams 


939.02 




Repairs of sewers . . . . 


3'755-83 




New sewers 


3,097.86 




Second-street bridge . . . . 


2,906.21 




Engineer's department 


860.96 




Health department . . . . 


253-13 




Repairs of schoolhouses 


475-S3 




Fuel 


4.50 




Furniture and supplies 


100.85 




Printing and advertising . 


29-35 




Contingent expenses . . . . 


232.05 




Evening schools 


57.20 




Free text- books .... 


153-54 




Fire department 


1,501-31 




Fire alarm telegraph . 


413-25 




Aerial truck .... 


134.10 




Police department 


2,643.74 




Repairs of buildings . 


796.62 




Addition, city farm buildings 


598.83 




Fulton engine-house . 


3>i25.23 




Repairs, Vine-street hook-and-laddei 






house 


60.12 




Stable, District No. lo 


1,163.90 




Widening Elm street 


1,700.00 




Commons ..... 


302.10 




Valley cemetery 


79-5° 




Paupers off the farm . 


^ 2,545.63 




City farm 


2,023.37 




Decoration of soldiers' graves . 


42.98 






$ 


116,878.98 



542 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Temporary Loan. 

Receipts. 
Received from Alonzo Elliott, on eight 
notes of $10,000 each, and 
four notes of $5,000 each, 
dated June 28, 1 893, and due 
December i, 1893, at Inter- 
national Trust Co., Boston, 
Mass. .... $100,000.00 

from National Bank of the 
Commonwealth, on two notes 
of $20,000 each, and one 
note of $10,000 ; all dated 
May I, 1893, and payable 
December i, 1893, ^^ Mar- 
ket National Bank, Boston, 
Ma-ss. .... 50,000.00 

from National Bank of the 
Commonwealth,on two notes 
of $25,000 each, dated May 
24, 1893, and payable De- 
cember I, 1893 . . . 50,000.00 

from R. L. Day & Co., Bos- 
ton, Mass., on four notes of 
$5,000 each and five notes 
of $1,000 each, all dated Oc- 
tober 2, 1893, and payable 
December i, 1894 . . 25,000.00 

$225,000.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Alonzo Elliott or order, at the In- 
ternational Trust Co., Boston, 
Mass., eight notes of $10,000 
each, and four notes of $5,000 
each, notes dated June 28, 1893, 
and due December i, 1893 . $100,000.00 



CITY HALL. 543 

Paid Market National Bank, Boston, 

Mass., two notes of ^20,000 

each, and one note of $10,000; 

all dated May i, 1893 • • $50,000.00 
Third National Bank, Boston, 

Mass., two notes of $25,000 

each, dated May 24, 1893, and 

payable December i, 1893 . 50,000.00 
Balance to new account . . . 25,000.00 



-$225,000.00 



City Hall. 



Appropriation ..... $2,100.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 64.08 

Expenditures, 
public comfort. 

Paid J. R. Carr & Co., paint and labor . $16.20 

Pike & Heald, labor . . . 5.25 
J. B. Varick Co., toilet paper, snow 
shovels, brooms, 25 feet rubber 

hose, etc. ..... 15-39 

L. M. Aldnch, labor and lumber . 1.88 



FUEL AND LIGHTS. 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for gas . $289.28 
Manchester Electric Light Co., elec- 
tric lights ..... 25.60 
The Electric Company, electric 

lights ..... 112. 10 



$2,164.08 



$38.72 



544 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

59,980 pounds egg coal . ... $209.93 

2 cords pine slabs .... 5.00 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 90,230 

pounds egg coal .... 293.25 



$935-i6 



WATER AND TELEPHONE. 



Paid New England Telegraph and Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephones . $75-96 
Water-works, use of water to Octo- 
ber I, 1893 .... 629.20 



$705.16 



Paid H. Giebel, decorating city hall 
building ..... 

Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co. : 

10 feet 3^ inch rubber hose and coup 

ling 

Packing and labor on steam valve 
Labor on sewer under drug store 
Labor and stock, treasurer's office 

Paid M. J. Coleman, repairing water 
closet ..... 

Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 
Bracket, burner, and labor . 
Plumbing materials and labor 
Repairing boiler, radiator, etc. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 
Labor and lumber 
Labor and lumber, changing windows 

Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co. : 
Repairing chair, assessors' room . 



$50.00 



1.40 
1.20 
1.25 
3-83 

9-3° 

2.20 
56.98 

5-25 

.19.62 
22.13 

•50 



CITY HALL. 



545 



4 desks, assessors' room 
2 office chairs, assessors' room 
I hassock, assessors' room . 
I walnut chair, aldermen's room . 
6 cuspidors, mayor's office . 
Paid John B. Varick Co., ostrich duster, 
yarn, packing needles, glass and 
setting, rope, bolts, etc. 
Mary Shiney, labor, cleaning offices 
Clark M. Bailey, i case toilet paper 
J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 
F. H. Thurston, soap 
Paid Charles H. Wood : 

Painting sign, street commissioner's 
office ...... 

Painting sign, city treasurer's office 
Paid J. J. Holland, brush broom, soap, 
city clerk's office 
A. M. Finney, cleaning carpets, etc. 
Paid John A.. Barker : 

Extra night service, January 27 . 
Extra help, July 4 . . . 

Paid George Holbrook, clearing snow 
from building 
D. J. Adams, keys 
Baker & O'Brien, paints and paint 

ing, engineer's office . 
Peter Harris, 3 Yale keys, city 

clerk's office 
A. M. Eastman, broom and soap 
L. M. Aldrich, 9 feet wire cloth 
L. M. Aldrich, 33^ hours' labor 
Charles H. Robie Co., 33.78 square 
yards concrete .... 



$40.00 

10.00 

•45 

7-5° 

10.50 



18.23 
94.40 

lO.CO 

2-75 
•25 



2.00 
4.00 

•75 
18.53 

2.00 
1. 00 

34-25 
1. 00 

40.03 

2.25 

•75 
.27 



•44 



546 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid John Robbie Co., i pair towels . $0-50 

J. R. Carr, i light glass and setting .65 

Total expenditures 



Appropriation 



Printing and Stationery. 



Expenditures. 



ASSESSORS. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 
27 tax books, 3 canvas covers 
2 blank books, 2 canvas covers . 
Pencils, pens, other stationery . 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Advertising assessors' notice, i^ inches, 
2 weeks ...... 

Printing 30 ruled blanks (taxes) . 

Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising 
assessors' notice, 2 inches, 1 2 times 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid W. P. Goodman, 2 gross pens 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 
I Carter's ink set . . . 

1 blank book No. 3788 
Stationer)' ..... 

2 blank books, Nos. 3792, 3870 . 
Index and six blocks . 
1 bottle ink .... 
100 sheets money bands 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 
20,000 blank receipts .... 



$485.04 
$2,164.08 

$2,200.00 



$100.50 
18.50 
10.37 



12.25 
16.00 



12.30 



1. 00 
10.50 
.40 
3- 40 
.76 
•75 
•75 



$169.92 



$38.86 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



547 



CITY CLERK. 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

I blank book, No. 3790 . . . $8.92 

I canvas cover ..... 1.25 

I blank book, No. 3800 . . . 15-00 

I blank book, No. 3801 . . . 12,00 

1 blank book, No. 3802 . . . 10.50 

2 canvas covers ..... 2.75 
I leather cover ..... 3.00 
Ink and rubber bands . . . 1.39 
Envelopes, seals, rubber bands, blocks, 

and other stationery . . . 32.55 
Paid T- Arthur Williams : 

Printing 600 blanks .... 4.25 

920 postals, 13 lots . . 11-25 

300 rosters . . . . 15-00 

1,300 burial permits, blank 

petitions, orders, etc. . 20.25 
1,950 blanks of all kinds . 13-60 
400 cards, carriage and job- 
team licenses . . . 5.50 
3,200 blanks, burial permits, 

etc. . . . . . 13-10 

Paid Sampson, Murdock & Co. : 

I New England business directory . 6.00 

25 city directories for 1894 . . 50.00 
Paid Thomas H. Tuson, printing 500 

blanks for city messenger . . . 2.30 



;228.6t 



CITY TREASURER. 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co. 
I blank book, No. 3589 
I canvas cover . 



|;7-75 

I. GO 



548 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Penholders, erasers, rubber bands, etc. $8.38 

Binding pay-rolls .... .81 

I blank book, No. 3836 . 9.00 

10,000 pay envelopes .... 7.50 
I receipt book and canvas cover, No. 

3885 11.25 

Paid J. Arthur Williams, 500 postal cards 

and printing 5.75 



$51-44 



CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Manchester postoffice, postage stamps $ 1 7.00 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Binding pay-rolls .... 3.00 

Paste and paper ..... 1.20 

2 blank books, No. 3825 . . . 5.00 

I canvas cover ..... 1.25 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Binding 17 volumes city report, full 

sheep ...... 19-79 

Printing 1,000 slips .... 1.50 

300 bonded debt statements . 9.00 

300 circulars, notes, law, etc. 4.50 

100 circulars . . . 1.25 

10,000 blank bills . . 40.00 

300 bill heads . . 4.50 

1,500 bill heads . . . 14-25 

1,000 bill heads, both sides 7.00 

Typewriter paper .... .40 

I pound man ilia paper . . . .10 

Paid J. B. Straw, expense to Boston and 

return, bond business . . 3.95 

Kilburn & Cross, 4 electro cuts 4.15 



$137-84 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY, 549 

CITY ENGINEER. 

Paid Thomas H. Tuson, printing 25 pos- 
tals and cards .... $0.65 
A. S. Campbell & Co., 500 postals 

and printing .... 6.85 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Printing 300 inaugural addresses, riiay- 
or's office ..... 

Printing 200 envelopes, mayor's office 
Printing 500 water-works act 
Printing 200 circulars, bonded debt . 
Printing 200 statements, bonded debt 
Printing 1,400 annual reports 
50 annual reports lettered 
100 annual reports stamped with seal 
Binding 150 annual reports, full sheep 
Advertising notice, improvement bonds 
for sale ...... 

Advertising notice, hack licenses 
I pound manilla paper 
Paid William E. Moore : 
Printing 750 letter heads . 
Printing 500 envelopes, mayor's office 
Paid Manchester post-office, postage 

stamps ...... 9.00 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

I record book ..... .75 

I Shannon file, index, etc. . . . 1.33 

Paid "Wall Street Daily News," adver- 
tising notice, improvement bonds 
for sale ..... 8.00 

Thomas H. Tuson, printing 1,000 

notices for city messenger . . 4.60 



$26.50 


•50 


5-5° 


2-75 


7-50 


,067.98 


5.00 


1. 00 


150.00 


8.50 


5-25 


.10 


7-5° 


2.25 



^7-5° 



550 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid A. S. Campbell & Co.: 

Printing 40 postals .... 
Printing 500 letter heads on bond paper 

Paid R. Bechard : 

500 envelopes and printing 

1,000 letter heads .... 

Paid W. P. Goodman, i gross pens, may- 
or's offtce ...... 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



S0.90 
4-75 



2.25 
3-50 



.90 

— 51,326.31 

. $1,960.48 
239.52 



Incidental Expenses. 



$2,200.00 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 

Transferred from reserved fund 



:i5, 000.00 

3,876.13 
1,762.86 



$20,638.99 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in dis- 



trict No. 
January . 
February 
March 
Ai)ril 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 



$28.06 
61.04 
22.75 

65-63 

89.88 

136.02 

169.38 

144.55 
260.25 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



551 



October . 

November 

December 



$249-35 
45.62 

33-5° 



$1,306-03 



BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, AND DEATHS. 



Paid N. A. Avery . 


. 






$4-5° 


D. S. Adams 








6.00 


0. D. Abbott 








10.25 


E. Bernier . 








15-25 


John L. Burnham 








1.50 


A. A. E. Brian 








1.25 


I. L. Carpenter 








2.50 


C. R. Crossett 








3-45 


N. L. Colby 








13-25 


Henry E. Cooke 








4.25 


Clarence M. Dodg 








4.00 


Mary S. Dan forth 








6-75 


C. W. Downing 








3-75 


Charles E. Dodge 








7-75 


E. B. Dunbar 








5-50 


George M. Davis 








•50 


C. F. Flanders 








39-50 


L. M. French 








8.25 


E. N. Fugere 








29.00 


George Frechette 








11.00 


J. E. Fortier 








33-00 


John Ferguson 








31-75 


Moise Guerin 








1375 


Pierre Hevey 








29.50 


J. A. Jackson 








13.00 


N. P. Kidder 








425.40 


M. E. Kean . 








8.75 


Urban Lamy 








20.00 



55*2 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



id P. G. Laberge 






$15.00 


A. Lessard ..... 4.00 


J. E. Lemaitre 






19-75 


J. E. A. Lanouette 






23.75 


John J. Lyon 






23-25 


J. W. D. McDonald 






18.75 


J. W. Mooar . 






1. 00 


E. D. Mackey 






21.00 


W. H. Morrison 






10.25 


Frederick Perkins . 






21.25 


Albert Pick . 






11-75 


J. E. E. Roy 






4-50 


Florence Robinson 






9-25 


C. B. Sturtevant . 






6.50 


Zatie L. Straw 






1.25 


A. G. Straw . 






3-25 


E. Sylvain 






24.50 


Gillis Stark . 






21.25 


George D. Towne . 






5-75 


E. C. Tremblay . 






9-50 


Thomas Wheat 






2.50 



$1,011.35 



DAMAGES AND JUDGMENTS. 



Paid J. Oscar Burbank, on execution, per- 
sonal damages .... 
Francois Couteau, injury to property 
I. L. Carpenter, case of John Lang- 

ley 

Walter R. Cox, damage to land 
from culvert .... 

Martin Connor, damage to person, 
per agreement .... 

F. & L. Desmoulins, injury to prop- 
erty ...... 



$87.17 
15.00 

6.00 

82.70 

525.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 553 

Paid Emerance Desilets, injury to person 

on Central street . . . ^200.00 

George Doherty, injury to person 

on Cedar street .... 50. co 

Harold E, Fife, damage to person, 

per agreement . . . . 51.00 

Wm. T. Gadbois, settlement of suit 800.00 

Hospital of the Sacred Heart, board 

of John Langley . . . 3.00 

Amanda M. Hall, injury to person, 
corner of Webster and Chestnut 
streets ..... 144.00 

Margaret Harrington, labor fur- 
nished Mary Stanton . . . 2.60 

Joseph Janelle, personal injury on 

Amory street . . . . 40.00 

M. E. Kean, medical services, cases 
of G. W. Doherty and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Stanton .... 123.00 

M. Kelley, milk furnished Mary 

Stanton . . . . . 6.20 

Bridget Murray, personal injury . 50.00 

Catherine McCarthy, settlement of 

suit ...... 525.00 

Paid Frederick Perkins : 

Services, case of John Langley . . 10.00 

Medical services, John Bohan . . 6.00 

Paid S. Quinlan, personal injury on Pine 

street ..... 240.00 

J. P. Russell, fuel furnished Mary 
Stanton . . . . . 3.75 

J. Franklin Robinson, services, case 

of William Linnehan . . . 16.00 

C. F. Starr, damage to horse and 

sleigh 100.00 



554 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Mary Stanton, injury to person on 

Central street .... $243.21 

Patrick Williams, settlement of suit 200.00 

Thomas Wheat, medical services . iS.oo 



LEGAL EXPENSES. 

Paid O. E. Branch, retainer and services 
to August 16, 1893, in suit, City v. 
Warren & Beede . . . $25.00 

Paid county commissioners : 

Hearing on highway in Goffstown and 

Manchester ..... 58.20 

Discontinuance of highway . . 38.20 

Hearing for new highway . . . 202.90 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printing and 

stationery for city solicitor . . 7.40 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising dis- 
continuance of road .• - . 8.54 
Paid F. H. Chailis : 

Printing brief, Kimball Carriage Co. 

V. City ...... 9.50 

30 copies brief, Beede & Warren 8.00 

Paid James T. Donahoe, interest and 

costs of suit, paid into court . 39-39 

W. J. Freeman, horse hire . . 5.00 

T. J. Howard, services in sundry cases 60.00 

D. F. Healy, sheriff fees in sundry 

cases ...... 7.00 

Paid C. H. Hodgman : 

Service of writ, City z;. Beede . 1.86 

Services in road hearing . . . 17-84 

Paid E. T. James : 

Use of team. White z;. City . . 1.50 

Use of team, City v. Griffin . . 9.50 



$3>567-63 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



555 



Paid Little, Brown & Co.: 

Dillon on Municipal Corporations 
Jones on Negligence of Municipal Cor- )■ $17.00 
porations .... 

Paid Thomas D. Luce, clerk fees in sun 

dry cases ..... 9.20 

Sulloway & Topliff, services in sun 
dry cases from August i, 1S87, to 
April 16, 1893 .... 1,463-75 



$1,989.78 



CITY COUNCIL AND COMMITTEES. 



Paid John B. Clarke Co. : 
Printing 150 note circulars 
Advertising proposals, city farm build 

ing 

Advertising proposals, wood and coal 
Advertising dog licenses 
Advertising ordinances 
Advertising proposals, Pearl-street 

schoolhouse . ... 

Advertising bonds ... 
Paid John A. Barker, cash paid for car 
fares ..... 
C. W. Babbitt & Co., use of hacks 
W. J. Freeman, use of hacks for 
committees . . . . 

Paid Frank H. Challis : 

i\dvertising notice, dog licenses . 
Advertising proposals, wood and coal . 
Advertising proposals. Pearl-street 
schoolhouse . . . . . 

Paid Edwin F. Jones, services and ex- 
penses at Concord, as per instructions 
of committee ..... 



$4.00 

17-43 
15-50 
20.06 
48.00 

15.16 
15.62 

7.10 
90.00 

125.50 

3-9° 
4.68 

4.68 



400.00 



556 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid James B. Straw, expense to Concord 

and return five times . . . $7.98 

E. T. James, use of hacks 32.50 

William E. Moore, printing 7,500 

circulars and postal cards . . 30.50 

Thomas F. Doyle, use of hack . 5.00 

Paid Manchester postoffice : 

6,000 postal cards and envelopes (city 

hall question) .... 63.00 

200 stamps ..... 4.00 

Postage, mayor's office . . . 15-00 

Paid A. R. Ingham, 12 suppers, 4 horses 

fed, laying out road . . . 11.00 

J. C. Nichols & Son, use of hacks . 30.00 

Paid David Perkins : 

Services and expenses at Concord . 200.00 

Expenses to Concord, Nashua, and 

Portsmouth ..... 10.00 

Paid Kean & Doyle, u.se of hacks . . 36.00 

C. H. Simpson, use of hacks . . 88.50 

E. J. Knovvlton, expen.ses incurred, 

legislative session of 1893 • • ^5^ 20 

Paid Union Publishing Co. : 

Advertising notices, licensing carriages 5.67 

proposals for sewer pipe . 9.22 

ordinance, amendment to 

section 24, chapter 6 . 35-37 

ordinance, amendment to 

section 7, chapter 14 . 32.29 

proposals, building Pearl- 
street schoolhouse . 12.48 
dog licenses . . 28.71 
proposals, addition city 

farm buildings 9.18 

proposals, wood and coal . i3-95 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 557 

Advertising proposals, improvement 

loan . . . . $6.iS 

local, city bonds for sale . 3,50 

Paid Saturday Telegram Co., advertising 

dog licenses .... 3.00 

George E. Wheeler, use of hacks, 

city farm ..... 75-oo 
A. B. Whittier, iSj^ hours' labor, 
sending notices on city hall ques- 
tion 3.70 

Whitten & Fifield, use of hacks, etc. 98.00 

Paid Dick Barker : 

5 hours' labor on circulars, question of 

city hall ..... i.oo 

10 days' services as city messenger . 20.00 

Paid " Boston Daily Advertiser," adver- 
tising improvement bonds . . 38.00 
G. W. Bailey, use of carriages, etc. 29.75 
Pierre Lemieux, use of hack . . 5.00 
Globe Newspaper, advertising im- 

. provement bonds , . . 23.62 

Journal Newspaper Co., advertising 

improvement bonds . . 36.00 

E. J. Knowlton, expenses to Boston, 

July 6 and 14, on bond business 6.20 

American Bank Note Co., printing 

bonds ..... 385.00 

A. J. Lane, services of typewriter . 1.25 

Paid James B. Straw : 

Expense to Boston, bond business . 3.95 

Cash paid for express, typewriter, etc. .35 

Cash paid for express, bonds . . .15 

Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising 

bonds for sale . . . . 18.50 



558 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Storey &: Thorndike, time and opin- 
ion as to borrowing below par . . $10.00 



CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid John A. Barker, care of boiler, etc. $123.00 
Robert Clarke, work done in and 
around city library building, cut- 
ting lawn, cleaning sidewalk^-, 
washing windows, etc. . . 56.35 

Pike & Heald Co., i coal hod .45 

CITY SCALES. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

2 feet mixed wood .... $2.00 
1,000 pounds stove coal . . . 3.75 
2,500 pounds stove coal . . . 10.87 
Paid Head & Dowst Co., labor and mate- 
rials 7-75 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 
1,000 gummed labels for use of 
sealer of weights and measures . 1.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper 

and envelopes . . . . .21 

The Fairbanks Co., repairing, ad- 
justing, and re-setting scales . 41-47 
American Express Co., expressage 

on scales 3.35 



MILK INSPECTOR. 

Paid H. F. W. Little, postage and sundries $5-03 
The John B. Clarke Co., advertis- 
ing notice of appointment . . 3.00 
Paid J. Arthur Williams : 

250 postal cards and printing . 3.15 

750 licenses, 10 books . . . 4-75 



$2,376-33 



179.80 



$70.65 



^5-93 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



559 



RELATING TO STREETS. 

Paid Sargent & Harden : 

70 maple trees, school yards 
58 spruce trees, for school yards 
Paid Flint & Little, nails and labor on 
street signs 
Union Manufacturing Co., 1,5 2 2 

inch house numbers . 
Frank Cummings, painting 475 

street signs at 16 cents 
F. W. Elliott, dinners for city gov- 
ernment, laying out highway, De 
cember 28,1892 . 
Joel Daniels & Co., repairing glass 
Wells block 
Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 
120 pounds barbed wire 
8 staples ...... 

Paid John Morse, labor on Bald Hill road 
as per award of board of mayor and 
aldermen, May 23, 1893 
Paid George P. Cressey : 
28 street signs at 16 cents . 
103 guide boards 
150 pounds white lead 
6 gallons oil 
Paint .... 

30 days' labor at $2.50 
Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

1,134 feet chestnut, 6x6, planed four 

sides, for street signs 
336 feet 61x 6 chestnut posts, street signs 
Working ...... 

Chestnut posts and labor . 



$70.00 
87.00 

6.85 
68.49 
76.00 

13.00 

2.50 



4.20 
.08 



4.48 

46.35 
10.50 

3-3° 

1.25 

75.00 



3062 
8.40 

1-57 
1.50 



560 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., lo pounds 12- 

penny wire nails . . $0-30 

D. C. Whittemore, right of way, 

use of land for 1892 . 20.00 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co., time 
books, postal cards, printmg ink, 
penholders, etc. . . . $6.75 

H. D. Lord, transfers of real estate 

one year, to April i, 1893 . . 12.00 

John B. Varick Co., 1 turkey duster .45 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid Novelty Advertising Co., die for 

lever self-inker .... ^0.75 

George E. Morrill, cash paid sundry 

persons, discount on tax-bills . 83.87 

Republican Press Association, ad- 
vertising list of non-resident taxes 7.50 
Manchester postoffice, 1,000 2-cent 

stamped envelopes 22.20 

James Ledwich, duplicate poll tax 

for 189 1 . . . . 1.78 

Paid Joseph A. Jackson : 

Taxes refunded, error in assessment list 

of 1890, H. H. Moore . . 6.14 

List of 1890, Bridget Doherty . . 8. 11 

Paid John H. Colburn, Watjen's tax sold 

and refunded . . . 8.31 

Ann A. Morrison, tax for 1891, er- 
roneously assessed and sold by 
collector ..... 4.48 



$541-39 



$19.20 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 561 

Paid George E. Morrill, taxes of 1892 ^ 

sold April 3, 1893, and purchased 
by the city .... $3,076.87 

$3,220.01 

ELECTION EXPENSES. 

Paid H. B. Fairbanks, 2 tables . . $6.00 

J. P. Russell & Co., wood for ward 

5 ward room . . . . 1.20 

James Reid, moving apparatus from 
ward 4 to United States govern- 
ment building .... i.oo 

George B. Rogers, election return 
(chapter 46, section 10, Public 
Statutes) ..... I.oo 

William B. Cobb, agent, use of Me- 
chanics hall, special election, 
ward 3 .... . 25.00 

$34.20 

CITY CLERK. 

Paid H. Eunice Kidder, clerical services $150.00 

Florence M. Kidder, clerical services 150.00 

Paid Ezra S. Stearns : 

Certified copy, street and park bill . 3.50 

Certified copy, water-works bill . . 3.00 

Paid Dana W. King, recording deeds, etc. 7.01 



CITY TREASURER. 

Paid S. B. Putnam : 

Cash paid, expenses to Concord and 

return ...... $i-44 

Cash paid, express on coupons from 

Suffolk Bank 

36 



.13-55 



•15 



562 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid S. J. Putnam, services as clerk . $108.00 

George E. Putnam, services as clerk 72.00 

Blanche Bullock, services as clerk . 140.00 
Paid Manchester postoffice : 

500 stamped envelopes . . . ii-5o 

Postage stamps ..... 10.00 

Paid T. S. Buck, rubber stamps . . 6.60 
Manchester Hardware Co., i cork- 
screw ..... .20 

American Express Co., express on 

coupons . . . . . .15 

RELATING TO SCHOOLS. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., labor and furni- 
ture, Varney school . . . $170.71 
Kirby Floral Co., trees, etc., Web- 
ster-street school yard . . 77.00 



RELATING TO PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



$350.04 



$247.71 



Paid Edward M. Slayton, land east of police station, 

deed dated May 24, 1893 $5,000.00 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co., gas at sol- 
diers' monument . . . $0.14 
Temple & Farrington Co., one U. S. 

flag, 6x 10, for Stark park . . 5.50 

Dana W. King, recording deed . .83 

Town of Goffstown, taxes on gravel 

lot 1.40 

American Express Co., express on 

packages . . . . • . 26.15 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



563 



Paid First Light Battery, powder, primers, 

cartridges, and firing national sa- 
lute July 4, 1893 
First Regiment Band, three public 

concerts ..... 
Rand McNally & Co., one Atlas of 

the World 

William E. Moore, printing lot of 

blank notes, etc. 
David B. Varney, two days' service, 

laying out Cypress street 
Western Union Telegraph Co., tele- 
grams ..... 
Jones's City and Baggage Express, 

delivering city reports, etc. 
Christie W. Brown, bounty on hawk 

killed 

Jeremiah Collity, bounty on hawk 

killed 

Leander Decormier, bounty on hawk 

killed 

Eddie Foster, bounty on hawk killed 
James Perkins,bounty on hawk killed 
Alice Roby, bounty on two hawks 

killed 

Willard Wason, bounty on two hawks 

killed 

Frank Roby, bounty on hawk killed 
Manchester City Band, three public 

concerts .... 
J. W. Truell, use of hack in 1892 
Manchester postoffice, postage, may 

or's office .... 
E. J. Knowlton, cash paid for rub 

ber stamp for mayor's office 



I39.88 



30.00 



6.00 



5.00 



.58 



1.80 



•25 



•25 
•25 

•25 

•50 

.40 
•25 

100.00 
5.00 

14.00 



564 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid A. T. Barr, testing weights and 

measures of city sealer . . $o-75 

Hill & Co., express on bonds . 35 -oo 

Morgan, Grossman & Co., one seal 
press. No. 20 Bay State, special 
design ..... 9.50 

$395-43 

Total expenditures . . . ' . . ^20,638.99 



Mayor's Incidentals. 

Appropriation . $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid E. H. Stowe, supper provided may- 
or and aldermen at road hearings . $6.00 

Paid E. J. Knowlton : 

Allowance for hire of teams . 133-00 

Expenses to Portsmouth, Dover, and 

Nashua on city business . . . 5.90 



Total expenditures ..... $144.90 
Transferred to reserved fund . . . . . i55-io 

$300.00 



City Officers' Salaries. 

Appropriation ..... $16,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund 1,049.93 



$17,049-93 



CITY OFFICERS SALARIES. 

Expenditures. 



565 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT, 

Paid E. J. Knowlton, mayor . 

Nathan P. Kidder, city clerk . 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, city treasurer 
Edwin F. Jones, city solicitor 
George L. Stearns, clerk of com 

mon council 
Thomas W. Lane, inspector of build 

ings 

H. F. W. Little, inspector of milk 
William Bailey, weigher at city 

scales .... 

John A. Barker, city messenger 
George H. Stearns, street and park 

commissioner 
Leonard P. Reynolds, street and park 

commissioner .... 
Horace P. Simpson, street and park 

commissioner 



$1,800.00 

900.00 

1,200.00 

800.00 



100.00 
300.00 



388.89 
700.00 

450.00 

450.00 

450.00 



$7,73^- 



CITY PHYSICIAN AND OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Paid Frederick Perkins, city physician 
William H. Maxwell, ward i . 
Thomas L. Quimby, ward 2 . 
Benjamin F. Garland, ward 3 
George S. Holmes, ward 4 
Patrick Costello, ward 5 
Charles Francis, ward 6 . 
William Marshall, ward 7 
Charles S. McKean, ward 8 . 



^200.00 
25.00 

25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 



566 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Frank I. Lessard, ward 9 . . $25.00 

William H. Maxwell, clerk of board 75-oo 

Judith Sherer, matron at pest house 360.00 



$860.00 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Paid William E. Buck, superintendent of 
schools ..... 
Samuel Brooks, truant officer 

E. J. Knowlton, chairman, ex officio 
Edward B. Woodbury, clerk of board 
Fred T. Dunlap, president of com- 
mon council 

Charles D. Sumner, ward i 
Walter H. Lewis, ward i 
George H. Stearns, ward 2 
Charles S. Murkland, ward 2 
George D. Towne, ward 3 
Louis E. Phelps, ward 3 
Stephen B. Stearns, ward 4 
Edwin L. Richardson, ward . 
James P. Slattery, ward 5 
William J. Sughrue, ward 5 

F. T. E. Richardson, ward 6 
George W. Dearborn, ward 6 
Marshall P. Hall, ward 7 
Edward B. Woodbury, ward 
Luther C. Baldwin, ward 8 
Josiah G. Dearborn, ward 8 
Edward J. Doherty, ward 9 
Scott E. Sanborn, ward 9 



$2,150.00 

750.00 

10.00 



10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



$3,200.00 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

Paid Henry Lewis, assessor, ward i . $150.00 

John E. Stearns, assessor, ward 2 . 175.00 



CITY OFFICERS' SALARIES. 



567 



Paid David O. Fernald, assessor, ward 3 
Harrison D. Lord, assessor, ward 4 
George F. Sheehan, assessor, ward 5 
George H. Dudley, assessor, ward 6 
William T. Rowell, assessor, ward 7 
Frank N. Daniels, assessor, ward 8 . 
Lawrence F. Bradley, assessor, ward 

9 

Nicholas Nichols, assistant assessor 
Hiram Forsaith, assistant assessor 
Eugene Brigham, assistant assessor 
John Cayzer, assistant assessor 
Henry F. Stone, assistant assessor 
Isaac Whittemore, assistant assessor 
W. G. Fernald, clerk . 
J. A. Z. Adams, interpreter 
Louis Comeau, interpreter 
J. P. Morin, interpreter 
A. G. Monette, interpreter 



522.50 
250.00 
137-50 
445.00 
152-50 
101.25 

145.00 

287.50 

60.00 

240.00 

57-5° 
50.00 

103-75 
212.50 
22.50 
50.00 
19.00 
23-75 



S3>5o5-25 



CITY TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid George E. Morrill : 

Salary, quarter ending Feb. 28, 1893 . $200.00 

Salary, quarter ending June i, 1893 . 200.00 

Salary, balance due for 1892-93 . . S50.00 

Commission on old taxes . . . ii-55 

Salary, quarter ending Aug. 31, 1893 • 200.00 

Salary, quarter ending Nov. 30, 1893 . 200.00 



$i>66i.55 



ELECTION EXPENSES. 



Paid George C. Kemp, inspector, ward i, 

II days' services at $2.25 . . $24.75 
Arthur W. Patch, supervisor, ward i, 

iy2 days' services at $1.75 . . 2.62 



568 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid John J. Splane, supervisor, ward i, 

i^ days' services at $1.75 . . $2.62 

(The above expenses on special 
election, held May 25, 1S93.) 

John W. Davis, supervisor, ward 7, 

I day's services . . . . 1.75 

Joseph A. Foster, inspector, ward 7, 

16 days' services at $2.25 . . 36.00 

W. F. Payne, inspector, ward 7, i 

day at $1.75 .... 1.75 

(The above at special election, Sep- 
tember 28, 1893.) 

Hiram Forsaith, inspector, ward 3, 

5 days at ^2.25 .... 11.25 

D. H. Young, supervisor, ward 3, i 

day at $1.75 .... 1.75 

H. F. W. Little, supervisor, ward 3, 

I day at $1.75 .... 1.75 



^84.24 



Total expenditures . . " . . . ^17,049.93 



Auditor's Department. 

Appropriation ....... $2,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid James B. Straw, auditor, salary for 

the year 1893 .... $1,000.00 
Lizzie M. Cogswell, services as clerk 

for the year 1893 . . . 600.00 



auditor's department. 569 

Paid Hattie M. Annis, services as clerk 

one week . . . . . $9.00 

Grace Berry, services as clerk three 

weeks ..... 27.00 



SUPPLIES, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid James B. Straw : 

Cash paid for express . . . 1 2.05 

Expenses to Nashua and return, exami- 
nation of records .... .88 

Paid Lizzie M. Cogswell : 

Cash paid for express .... .90 

Cash paid for postage stamps . . i.oo 

Paid Manchester postofifice, postage 

stamps ...... 5.00 

Paid George P. Wallace, agent : 
I Smith Premier typewriter, base- 
board and cover, No. 26933 ^97'5o 
Less I National typewriter 22.50 

75-00 

I ribbon ...... i.oo 

Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son : 

I No. 5 Remington typewriter. No. 

17098 ...... 100.00 

1 8-drawer cabinet .... 30.00 

2 typewriter ribbons .... 2.00 
Paid National Typewriter Co., 3 copying 

ribbons ...... 2.25 

Paid The Hammond Typewriter Co. : 

I No. 2 type wheel .... 5.00 

Repairs on typewriter . . . 4.35 
Paid Manchester Hardware Co., i pair 

Plyers .35 



;i,636.oo 



570 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Daniels & Downs : 

1 ream No. 8 legal ruled paper . . $2.10 

2 reams No. 8 legal paper . . . 4.10 
I box carbon paper .... 3.00 

Paid A. J. Smith : 

I ream No. i paper .... 1.65 

I ream No. 20 paper .... 1.60 

100 sheets manuscript covers . . .50 

12 sheets blue carbon paper, 8x21 . i.oo 

I dozen No. i erasers .... i.oo 

I box blue carbon paper . . . 3.00 

Paid John Robbie Co., 2 window screens .50 
J. G. Jones, freight and cartage of 

desk ...... .92 

Novelty Advertising Co., boxes, ink, 

stamps ..... 1.50 

Walter G. Jones, repairs on type- 
writer ..... .50 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

I package scale ..... 6.40 

I brush . . . . . . • -12 

I sash pull ..... .20 

Paid J. J. Abbott, staining and finishing 

shelf -25 

Clark & Estey, 3 chamois skins . .65 
H. C. Whitcomb & Co., 4 electro- 
types of high school, etc. . . 1.90 
Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

15 blocks 1-50 

Printing 500 half-letter heads . . i-ob 

Paid T. S. Buck, rubber stamps . . 12.80 
Paid Morgan, Grossman & Co. : 

31 dies for stamps .... 4.65 

50 pads for stamps .... 5.00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 



m 



Paid W. P. Goodman, envelopes, blotting 
paper, etc. .... 

Dana W. King, copy of deed 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

1 blank book ..... 
Letter file, erasers, ink, paste, pen- 
holders ..... 

2 blank books, Nos. 3620 and 3621 
I blank book, No. 3789 
I scrap book .... 
Inkstand and McGill's fasteners . 
Paste, envelopes, rubber bands, etc 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



•56 
.62 



5-41 




6.00 




3-7° 




1.50 




2.80 




7-25 






$318.50 






$1,954-50 




45-5° 




$2,000.00 



Highway District No. 1 



Appropriation 



$400.00 



Expenditures. 






Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay- 


roll 




February .... 




$19.00 


March ..... 




142.39 


April ..... 




20.00 


May ..... 




23.00 


June 




167.00 


October 




5.00 


MATERIALS. 






Paid Edward Dodge : 






140 loads gravel 




$14.00 


21 loads stone chips . 




4.20 



$37639 



572 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., i street 






hoe 


$0.40 




Paid John B. Varick Co. : 






2 30-inch sledge hammer handles 


•30 




2 sledge hammers .... 


1.20 




Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co. : 






2 No. 2 scoop shovels 


1.50 




2 square-point shovels 


1.20 




I round-point shovel .... 


.60 








$5-22 


Total expenditures 


$399.81 


Amount transferred to reserved fund 




.19 



$400.00 



Highway District No. 2. 



Appropriation .... 
Transferred from reserved fund 




$12,000.00 
1,107.65 
$i3'^o7-65 


Expenditures. 




Paid labor as per p 
January . 
February 
March . 


ay-rol 


Is: 






$631.29 
700.93 
890.22 


April 
May 
June 
July . 
August . 
September 










1,091.97 

1,100.00 

752.60 

638.50 

903-47 
1,001.17 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 573 

October $884.71 

November ..... 1,150.92 
December ..... 1,341.88 

^11,087.66 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 

I casting for forge, 10 pounds . . $0.35 

8 hours' labor on same . . . 3.20 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., lantern 
globe, cast steel, pick and sledge han- 
dles, shovels, all kinds, brooms, and 
other hardware ..... 54.98 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Axes, bolts, sheaves, files, screws, rope, 

harness hooks . . . . . 6.18 

Rim locks, knobs, steel, wire nails, 

shovels, other hardware . . . 79.00 

Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., screw-driv- 
er, rope, 2 bits, pick handles, ma- 
chinery steel, shovels, and other 
hardware . . . . . 22.22 

R. M. West, 73 feet ladders . . 8.76 



GENERAL EXPENSE, COMMISSIONER S OFFICE. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber and labor 

repairing lock, window screens, etc. . $7.40 

Paid A. E. Herrick : 

Services as clerk at $75 per month . 649.86 
Cash paid for express and telegrams, 

car-fare, and magazine . . . 1.55 



$174.69 



574 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co. : 




1 No. 4 desk 

2 typewriter chairs .... 


^32.00 
8.00 


Paid George H. Richter & Co.: 




I enameled bath .... 

Cases, files, etc 

Copy holder, etc 


5-25 
5-90 
2.15 


Paid Julia F. Stearns, services as clerk 


18.00 


Paid George P. Wallace : 




I Smith Premier typewriter, No. 27,- 




401 

I stand for same .... 
Oak cabinet 


97-50 

2.50 

30.00 


Paper 

I ribbon 


10.82 
1. 00 


Paid A. J. Smith : 




Carbon and typewriter paper 


5-35 


1 2 erasers 


1. 00 


I punch, 12 pencils .... 


•75 


Paid Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on desk ..... 

Daniels & Downs, i ream -No. 8 paper 


.46 
2.00 


Paid John B. Varick Co. : 




1 letter press and stand 

2 brushes and i bowl .... 


23-50 

1.45 


Paid Manchester postoffice : 




1,000 envelopes with stamp 


22.00 


250 2-cent stamps .... 


5.00 


Paid William E. Moore, printing letter 
heads 


4.00 


Paid J. Arthur Williams : 




100 cards, rules 

150 cards, rules and regulations . 


I.OO 

3-25 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 575 

28 self-inking stamps .... $15.00 

100 circulars ..... 3.25 

10 self-inking stamps .... 6.00 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co., blank 
books, ink, envelopes, blank bills, 

and other stationery ... 80.18 
A. S. Campbell & Co., blank book 

to order ..... 4.25 
Novelty Advertising Co., 3 rubber 

stamps, ink pad . . . 1.70 

H. P. Simpson, use of team . . 150.00 

George H. Stearns, use of team . 150.00 

L. P. Reynolds, use of team . . 150.00 

W. P. Goodman, 2 gross pens . i.oo 

John W. Wilson, trucking i cabinet ♦ 

desk .50 

^i>503-57 

TELEPHONE. 

Paid New England Telegraph & Telephone Co., use 

of telephone ....... $36.33 

BLACKSMITHING AND REPAIRS. 

Paid Peoples Gas-light Co., i chaldron of 

coke $4.50 

L. M. Aldrich, filing saws . . io-55 

George Cheney, cash paid for ex- 
press, 2 cutters .... .85 
Paid Head & Dowst Co.: 

78 feet 2-inch chestnut . . . 1.95 

Tacks, screws, lumber .... .53 

Paid A. & D. M. Poore, >4 ton Cumber- 
land coal ...... 3.50 



$1, 


.62 




•75 


II 


.01 


4^ 


.10 


II 


.20 


i6 


.00 


6, 


,00 


2 


•75 




.70 



576 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 

Pipe and labor repairing rail, Elm street 
Repairing lantern, etc. 
Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 
688 feet spruce fence boards 
256 feet spruce fence boards 
70 chestnut posts .... 
1,000 feet spruce fence boards 
100 spruce slats ..... 
Paid Nate Kellogg, 50 placards, " no 
smoking" .... 

Joseph Nichols, sharpening tools . 
Thomas A. Lane Co., labor testing 

steam gauge .... .30 

MATERIALS. 

Paid Adams & Tasker : 

I barrel lime . . . . . $1.00 

I bag salt ...... .65 

Salt and lime ..... 3.30 

Paid James Briggs : 

6 pails and 6 water dippers . . 2.90 

Mica ....... .20 

Paid Eager & Rand, 40 bushels salt . 24.00 
H. H. Freeman, 3 bags rock salt . 2.40 
Thomas A. Lane Co., plugs and caps 2.42 
Manchester Hardware Co., i side- 
walk grate ..... 13-50 

John B. Varick Co., wire nails, rope 5.87 
Thomas A. Lane Co., hose bands, 

pipe, etc 3.54 

Addison Gray, 150 loads gravel 15-00 

William F. Hubbard, i load loam . i.oo 



$76.31 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. • 577 



lid Hardy & Co.: 




Matches 


$0.09 


I match safe 


.12 


2 bars soap ...... 


.10 


lid Mary Hartshorn : 




ii6 loads sand 


11.60 


75 loads gravel 


7-5° 


lid Clarence R. Merrill, 2 barrels lime 


1.90 


Allen N. Clapp, 53)4 gallons oil . 


3-75 


Ida Libbey, 46 loads gravel . 


4.60 



95 



$105-44 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Advertising proposals for paving . $6.67 

Printing 1,500 blanks ... 16.50 

Paid W. P. Goodman, pencils and blank 
book ...... 

Manchester Street Railway Co., i 
book tickets .... 

William Sanborn, i heating stove 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

35 time books ..... 

Ink, pens, envelopes, etc. . 
Paid Union Publishing Co.: 

Advertising proposals for bank wall and 

culvert, Ray brook 
Advertising proposals for cobble paving 
Paid Whitten & Fifield, team 

George H. Holbrook, cutting trees, 
Pearl street .... 

John T. Gott, cleaning one vault . 

^123.65 

Total expenditures $13,107.65 



5 


.00 


15- 


00 


36 


.00 


8, 


.91 


10, 


•25 


4. 


.62 


4 


.00 


II 


•25 


3-5° 



578 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Highway District No. 3. 

Appropriation ....... $300.00 

Expenditures. 



Paid labor of 


men and teams, as per pay-rolls 




January . 






^7-38 


March . 






84.25 


April 






19.25 


June 




MATERIALS. 


154.25 


Paid William 


Campbell, 


5 7 loads gravel . 


$13.20 


John H. 


Campbell, 


109 loads stone 




and gravel 




1S.53 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 



$265.13 



>3i-73 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 






3 round-point shovels 


|i-5o 




I sewer shovel 


•50 




I long-handled shovel 


•50 








$2.50 


Total expenditures 


$299.36 


Amount transferred to reserved fund 




.64 



$300.00 



Highway District No. 4. 

Appropriation . . • $500.00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 579 

Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls : 

March ...... $102.55 

May ...... 21.00 

June 195-75 

October 130.00 



MATERIALS. 



$449-3° 



Paid Byron E. Moore, 240 loads clay and 

gravel 

Paid R. N. Whittemore : 


$14.40 




70 loads gravel ...... 

Use of roller 


4.20 
1.50 




Paid Head & Dowst Co., 80 chestnut posts 


12.00 




Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co.: 






489 pounds galvanized wire 

15 pounds staples .... 


17.12 

•53 


^49-75 


Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 




^499-05 
•95 



$500.00 



Highway District No. 5. 

Appropriation $800.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 4.63 

— — — $804.63 



580 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 






LABOR. 






lid labor of men and teams, as per pay- 


rolls : 




February .... 


$102.56 




March 








113.87 




April 








23-99 




May 








28.62 




June 








131-25 




July . . 








8.75 




August 








5.68 




September 








170.12 




October . 








92.00 




November 








47-87 




December 








11.00 








$735-71 






MATERIALS. 






lid John Parmenter, 159 loads gravel 


$15-90 




Head «& Dowst Co., 520 feet 4 x ^ 


. 




spruce .... 


8.32 




John Lovering, 127 loads gravel 


11.70 




Boyce & Merrill, 63 loads gravel 


6.30 




Ida Libbey, 158 loads gravel . 


15.80 




Ephraim S. Harvey, 20 loads grave 


1 2.00 









$60.02 


BLACKSMITHING. 






lid R. W. Flanders, sharpening tools 


$4.55 




John Welcome, sharpening 6 picks 


.60 








$5-15 


TOOLS. 






lid John B. Varick Co.: 






3 picks 


$3.00 




I brush scythe .... 


.60 




6 pounds wire nails . 


-15 














$3-75 



Total expenditures 



$804.63 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 

Highway District No. 6. 



Appropriation . 










• 






Expenditures. 








LABOR. 








Paid labor of men 
March . 


and teams, as pe 


'pay- 


rolls : 


13 


June 
July . 
September 
December 










197 

55 
169 

19 


22 
00 
25 
36 



TOOLS AND BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., 3 iron picks 
and handles .... 

James Morrison, sharpening tools . 

Welcome & Son, sharpening six 
picks ..... 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid George Moore, care of danger lantern 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



^2.70 
5-50 

.60 



581 



$600.00 



1573-96 



$8.80 



$1.00 

$583-76 
16.24 

$600.00 



Highway District No. 7. 



Appropriation 



$1,800.00 



582 



REPORT- OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay 
January 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 
October . 
November 
December 



rolls 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid Welcome & Son : 

Sharpening and repairing tools from 

October 27, 1892, to August 19, 1893 

Sharpening tools to November 17, 1893 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$110.87 

203.12 

263.75 

63-37 

187.68 

409.87 

90.50 

162.60 

78.00 

49-75 

58-50 

56.00 



HARDWARE. 




Paid John B. Varick Co.: 




I mason's level . . . . 


^3.00 


2 plow points .... 


1.50 


1 2 square-point shovels 


8.00 


12 pick handles .... 


2.00 


8 lbs. shims and wedges 


1.28 


I mattock 


•65 



; 1 6.40 
9-37 



$i>734'Oi 



$16.43 



$25.77 

$1,776.21 
23-79 



$1,800.00 



Appropriation 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 

Highway District No. 8. 

Expenditures. 



583 



$1,000.00 



Paid labor of men and teams, 


as pe 


r pay- 


rolls : 


February .... 


$77-75 


March . 








165.34 


April 








7.88 


May . 








118.29 


June 








348.70 


July . . 








180.75 


August . 








63.00 


December 








10.50 



5972.21 



HARDWARE. 



Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

1 ax and handle . 

2 plow points 

I plow beam and 4 bolts 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



50.90 
1.50 
2.01 



$4-41 
$976.62 



$1,000.00 



684 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Highway District No. 9. 



Appropriation 


















Expenditures. 








LABOR. 




Paid labor of men a 


nd 


teams, as per pay- 


rolls : 


March . 

April 

June 

July 

October . 

November 












$119.85 
15-70 
157-75 
63-50 
76.87 
43-50 




HARDWARE. 





Paid John B. Varick Co. 
2 picks and handles 
2 round-point shovels 
I steel bar, 14 lbs. 



$1.80 
1-33 



$500.00 



$477-17 



$4.11 



MATERIALS. 

Paid Merrill & Boyce, 36 loads gravel 



$3.60 



BLACKSMITHING. 



Paid James Morrison, sharpening tools 
Welcome & Son, sharpening tools 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$0.55 
1. 10 



$1-65 

$486.53 
13-47 



$500.00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 

Highway District No. 10. 



585 



Appropriation .... 

Amount transferred from reserved fund 



Expenditures. 



$5,000.00 
.^02.12 



$5,302.12 



labor of men and teams, 


as per pay- 


rolls : 


January $36351 


February 










822.21 


March 
April 




; 






527-49 
454.02 


May 










570.68 


June 










66.00 


July 
August . 










171-39 
464.68 


September 








331-88 


October . 








34.00 


November 








243-03 


December 


• 






378-95 



$4,427.84 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 



Paid Allen N. Clapp : 






4 ax handles 




$1.00 


10 lbs. wire nails 




•35 


5 gallons kerosene oil 




.60 


Tacks, spikes, and broom . 




3-27 


Pearline .... 


• 


•25 


Paid C. H. Hutchinson, i cast-iron stamp 


.10 


Manchester Hardware Co., 


shovels, 




hoes, snow shovels, steel 


scoops, 




and other hardware . 




17.40 



586 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid John B. Varick Co. 
I dozen shovels 
6 canal barrows 
4 steel rakes 
6 scoops 
6 shovels . 
Other hardware 
Paid J. McCrillis & Son, i water cart 
Albert Moulton, i water band 
•Ranno Harness Co., soap, spon^ 
ring, and pad 



es. 



$S.oo 

I2.00 
2.17 

5-25 

3-50 

20.46 

425.00 
•50 

2.00 



$501-85 



MATERIALS. 

Paid Adams & Tasker, i cask lime . . $0.90 

Paid James Baldwin Co. : 

172 feet hardwood plank . . . 6.88 

50 feet maple ..... 2.00 

Paid J. Hodge : 

24 feet 6x6 birch . . . . .96 

i^ hours' labor .... .70 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., i pack for di- 
aphragm pump . . . . 1.75 

People's Gas-Light Co., i chaldron 

coke ...... 4-00 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . . . 5.77 

F. S. Bodwell, stone base for drink- 
ing fountain on Main and Amory 
streets ..... 30.00 

John F. Larkin, materials and labor 
for fence railing on Putnam, B, 
and C streets, and painting same 97-55 



$150-5^ 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 



587 



Paid H. B. Fairbanks, i stove 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 
1 8 time books .... 

12 pass books and i gross pens . 
7 blocks ..... 

Blotters, pencils, ink bottle 
Paid H. Fradd, i barrel 

George Holbrook, labor on trees 
Frank I. Lessard, piping material 

and labor on hydrants 
Mrs. C. O. Phelps, use of driving 
horse from January i, 1893, to 
October i, 1893 
C. J. Shanessy, filing cross-cut saw 
James Briggs, stove, zinc, and pipe 
H. Leibing, paint . . . . 

Paid J. Y. McQueston : 

I desk ...... 

3 wood seat chairs . . . . 

Total expenditures 



^4.00 

18.76 

1.8s 

.40 

1.30 

•75 
2.75 

39.S2 



17.00 


•50 


12.00 


2.54 


18.00 


2.25 



Highway District No. 1 1. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



. ^1,000.00 
259-75 



$221.92 

$5'302.I2 



$i>259.75 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls : 

January $58.50 

February ..... 108.50 



588 



REPORT 


OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 


March . . . . . . $99.25 


April 










102.75 


May 










218.00 


June 










286.25 


August . 










92.50 


September 










89.00 


October . 










41.50 


November 










77-5° 


December 










42.75 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid N. Decoteau, sharpening tools 



$1,216.50 



$3-95 



MATERIALS. 






Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 






96 feet spruce 


$1-54 




1,000 feet spruce boards 


16.00 




Paid Manchester Heating & Lighting Co., 






work on watering-trough 


3-72 




David Wells, 90 chestnut posts 


12.75 




Paid S. L. Flanders : 






I keg spikes 


3.00 




2 lanterns . . . . . 


1. 00 




45 pounds nails 


1.29 


$39-3° 






Total expenditures 




$1,259-75 



Highway District No. 12. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



$200.00 
108.71 



$308.71 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid city farm, labor of men and teams 

HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 2^ 
pounds steel bar .... 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 
6 round-point shovels 
6 hoes ..... 

Total expenditures 



;i.68 



4.00 
1.63 



589 



$301.40 



$7-31 

$308.71 



New Highways. 

Appropriation . . . . . 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 

Expenditures. 



$15,885.12 
1,264.59 



117,149.71 



Paid men, as per pay-roll 


, in district No. 


2 : 


January $i5-oo 


February 










54.50 


March 










63.00 


April 










383-12 


May 










753-29 


June 










855-07 


July 










889.59 


August . 










945-15 


September 










765.06 


October . 










1,263.53 


November 










282.61 



5,269.92 



590 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 


Paid men, as per pay-roll, in district No. 7 : 




May 


$100.00 


August . 




290.75 


September 




388.62 


October 




359-24 


November 




234-14 


Paid men, as per pay-roll, in district No. 8 : 




August 


$40.80 


October 


27-75 


Paid men, as per pay roll, in district No. 10 




January 


$25.50 


May . . . 






907.89 


June 






948.00 


July . . 






820.19 


August . 






113-50 


September 






581.58 


October . 






715-97 


November 






168.69 


December 






16.18 



Paid John D. Patterson, cash paid George 
L. Theobald for moving building 
at corner of Amherst and Chestnut 
streets ..... $100.00 

N. S. Hoitt, labor of men and teams 
grading south end of Lincoln street 1 13-5 7 

F. S. Bodwell, building culvert on 

Lincoln street .... 473-87 

C. A. Brooks, labor on Milford street 
from August, 1892, to November 
8, 1892 112.25 



$1,372.75 



$68.55 



$4,297.50 



NEW I1IGHAVAY6. 



591 



Paid Hiram S. Hoyt, labor building 

streets at East Manchester, near 

shoeshop ..... 

Alpheus Bodwell, building retaining 

wall on Belmont street 

Paid John H. Proctor, building culvert in 
East Manchester, as per agreement 
with street and park commission- 
ers ..... . 

Alfred Dugrenier, 4 days' work on 
Forest street .... 

Paid Head & Dowst Co.: 

Repairs and building James Brothers' 
stable ...... 

I steel beam, i channel iron, bbl. bolts 



.r.13 



$40.00 



9.00 



1,200.00 
26.91 



$1,960.82 



$1,275.91 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 



Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., 21 lbs. cast 
steel wedges ..... 
Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 

5 Wakefield wrenches 

6 mattocks .... 
6 handles ..... 
12 plow points .... 
Mattocks, picks, and other hardware 

Paid John B. Varick Co., handles, snow 
shovels, steel, cable chains, Norway iron, 
plows, bolts, I Doe plow, and other 
hardware ...... 



$2.10 

18.79 

4-50 

1.20 

12.00 

38.25 



73.26 



$150.10 



STONE, LUMBER, AND OTHER MATERIAL. 

Paid Clarence R. Merrill, i barrel lime . $1.00 



592 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid F. S. Bodwell : 

84.40 perch stone culvert on Valley 

street, near Beech street . 

40 feet covering stone in district No. 7 

Paid Joseph A. Brown, 22 loads grade for 

Maple street .... 

Clough & Hall, 153 loads filling, 

used last year .... 

Paid Head & Dowst Co.: 

2,740 loads filling. Maple street . 
2,000 feet 1x6 spruce 
68 chestnut posts .... 
103 feet drag plank .... 
200 feet 3-inch oak .... 
Paid Allen N. Clapp, oil and wicks 

Horace Holbrook, stonework on 
Adams street .... 
E. O. Dodge, 203 loads gravel 
Warren Harvey, dimension stone, 
district No. 7 . . . . 
Paid S. C. Forsaith Co.: 
552 feet spruce boards 
100 chestnut posts .... 
Paid Edward Hodgkinson : 

564 feet sod ..... 

3 loads loam ..... 

6yi days' labor ..... 

(Work done at Hodge's and Patten's 

on Amherst street.) 



$253.20 
16.00 



5-50 

45'Qo 

685.00 

31.00 

10.20 

4.12 

6.00 

5.10 

374.00 
20.30 

36.96 

8.83 
16.00 

16.92 

4-50 
12.70 



^i»553-23 



BLACKSMITHING AND REPAIRS. 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Machine Co.: 
10)^ hours repairing pump . . $4-2o 



Rubber, screws, bolt, etc. 



•99 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 593 

3 hours' labor on piston ring . . gi.20 

13 lbs. cast steel .... 2.60 
Paid J. Hadlock : 

1 casting ...... i.oo 

2 N. M. edges . . . . . 16.00 
10 bolts, I front axle .... 5.50 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co. : 

Labor, pipe, and other materials on new 

fence, Ashland, near Bridge street . 42.82 

Labor and material, Massabesic and 

Belmont streets .... 4.60 

Labor and material, Hayward street . 3.24 

Labor and material. Young street . 4.43 

Paid William H. Sutcliffe, sharpening 

tools 1.35 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs on 

carriages and tools . . . 14- 2 5 

$102.18 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid C. H. Simpson, use of team . . $9-75 
E. T. James, use of team . . 22.25 
A. & D. M. Poore, i ton Cumber- 
land coal ..... 6.75 
Bates Manufacturing Co., automatic 

numbering machine . . . 16.00 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising . 7.50 

Union Publishing Co., advertising . 7.50 

Whitten & Fifield, use of team . 14.00 
Bartholomew Bresnehan, damage to 
wagon and harness, caused by 

ridge on Pine street . . i5-oo 



$98-75 



Total expenditures g 17, 149. 71 



594 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Damage of Land Taken for Highways. 



Appropriation ..... $12,000.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 4,182.41 



$16,182.41 



Expenditures. 



DAMAGES AWARDED BY MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

Paid Elmer E. Bullard, land damage, B 

street ..... $259.52 

Jenette P. Bartlett, land damage, ex- 
tension of Harrison street . 796.87 

R. N. Batchelder, land damage. 

Union street .... 1,604.37 

M. Bessett, moving, etc, house of 

J. N. Lacourse .... 80.00 

Sidney A. Blood, land damage, 

Grove street .... 1,012.00- 

Lucia A. Clough, land damage, Cy- 
press street . . . . 1,221.65 

Alonzo Elliott, land damage, Mon- 
roe street ..... 828.80 

Alonzo E. Gage, moving and rais- 
ing house of Frank P. Proctor, 
Central street .... 100.00 

Austin Goings, land damage. Dear- 
born street .... 20S.80 

Martha A. Hemphill, land damage, 

Amherst, corner Chestnut street 1,800.00 

James McKinzie, land damage, Elm 

street ..... 500.00 

B. F. Norton, land damage, Front 
street ..... 100.00 

F. A. Platts, balance land damage. 

Young street .... 73.55 



WATERING STREETS. 



595 



Paid John D. Patterson, land damage, 
corner Amherst and Chestnut 
streets ..... $4,700.00 

Abbie M. Sawtelle, land damage. 
Brown avenue .... 

Martha E. Stearns, land damage. 
Front street .... 

John M. Stanton, land damage, Elm 
street, south .... 

Sullivan & Sheehan, land damage, 
Morgan street .... 

George L. Theobald, moving house 
on Amory street 

Upton, Harvey & Weston, land 
damage, Beech, Ash, Maple, and 
Oak streets .... 

Augustus Wagner, damage, lowering 



400.00 



292.90 



1,809.95 



grade on (J 


range street 


100.00 


$16,182.41 








Watering Streets. 




Appropriation 
Amount transferred 


from reserved fund 


^5i277-i9 
60.95 


$5»338.i4 








Expenditures. 








LABOR. 






Paid labor of men. 


as per pay-roll, in district No. 2 : 




January . 
February 
March . 








$79.56 
86.63 
14.62 




April 
May 
June 








46.24 
423.64 
514.78 





596 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



July . . 








^847.12 


August . 






516.62 


September 






278.50 


October 






132.37 


November 






6.38 


December 






21.88 


Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, 


in district No. lo 


January .... 


$2.25 


February . 








4-75 


April 








6.90 


May 








67.00 


June 








184.00 


July 








204.00 


August 








299.(50 


September 








178.22 


October . 








17.50 


November 








21.69 


December 








3-'^3 


REPAIRS. 





$2, 



■34 



$988.44 



Paid John B. Varick Co., paints, sand- 
paper, chain, 2 seat springs, 5^ 
pounds oakum .... 
Pike & Heald, dippers, chain, pip- 
ing material, and labor on water- 
ing-troughs, fountains, etc. . 
Thomas A. Lane Co., material and 
labor on stand-pipes, watering- 
troughs, fountains, etc. 
A. Filion, setting tire on watering 
cart and repairs on cart 
Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son : 

I water cart 

Painting and repairing other carts 



;i2.59 



206.78 



218.71 



9.70 



425.00 
64.30 



PAVING STREETS. 



597 



Paid John F. Larkin : 

Repairs on fountains on Walker, Beau 

port, and Granite streets . 
Material and labor on stand-pipes 
Repairing trough corner Main and Mil 
ford streets .... 
Paid A. H. Stark, painting cart 

Manchester Hardware Co., 5 feet 

safety chain .... 

C. H. Hutchinson Machine Co., 

rubber packing, coupling, and 

labor on watering-troughs . 

Kimball Carriage Co., axle oil 

John Bryson, painting street foun 

tains ..... 
Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on fountains 
Concord Foundry Co., 2 fountains 
J. W. Fiske, i No. 342 drinking 

fountain .... 
Joseph Gazaille, lumber, nails, and 

labor ..... 
Frank I. Lessard, material and labor 

on fountains 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 
drinking fountains 

Total expenditures 



^4.62 
38.75 

4.20 
25.00 



.80 
2.25 

15-36 

1.80 
190.00 

81.25 

26.00 

52.50 



1.6s 



$1,381.36 

$5^338-14 



Paving Streets. 



Appropriation .... 

Amount transferred from reserved fund 



,681.72 
166.15 



$9,847.87 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 



trict No. 2 : 












April $210.17 


May 










240.62 


June 










282.85 


July 










368.23 


August . 










373-98 


September 










407.73 


October . 










334-18 


November 










259.82 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 
trict No. 7 : 
May ...... $12.00 

June ...... 40.00 

November ..... 10.00 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 
trict No. 10 



May 


$176.63 


June 


277.25 


July 


151-63 


August ..... 


270.26 


September .... 


219.88 


October 


92.62 


November .... 


88.62 


id labor of men and teams, as per pay 


-roll, in dis- 


trict No. II : 


July ...... 





$2,477-58 



$62.00 



$1,276.89 



;ii4.5o 



PAVING STREETS. 



599 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., steel bar, 
tape line, square, spades, forks, picks, 
globes, lanterns, and other hardware . $i4-94 

Paid J. B. Varick Co.: 

Tape measures . . . 1.85 

I mattock and handle . . . i.oo 



$17-79 



PAVING STONE AND GRAVEL. 

Paid L. H. & E. D. Colburn, paving 
stones .... 

W. H. Coburn, paving stones 
W. H. Carpenter, paving stones 
George F. Higgins, paving stones 
Charles E. Stevens, paving stones 
John Morse, paving stones 
Leander Pope, paving stones . 
Florence McCarthy, 3 loads paving 
stone ..... 

Paid W. H. Carpenter : 

22 loads cobble paving at ^1.60 . 
3 loads cobble paving at ^1.25 . 
Paid E. Dodge, 5 loads cobble paving at 

$1-25 

John Morse, 2 loads cobble paving 
at ^1.70 ..... 



$2.98 

289.80 

1.78 

95-70 
360.78 

1.43 
2.48 

4.95 

35-20 
3-75 

6.25 

3-40 



$808.50 



CONCRETE CROSSINGS AND OTHER WORK. 

Paid George F. Higgins, concrete in sun- 
dry places ...... $1,788.08 

Paid C. H. Robie Co.: 

Patching Merrimack and Chestnut 

streets ...... 30.00 



600 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Concrete at ward 9 engine house 


^296.70 


Concrete on Amherst and Vine streets 


1,161.32 


Concrete, roadway corner Amory and 




Rimmon ..... 


192.67 


Concrete, sundry places 


1,131.02 


Paid F. S. Bodvvell : 




39 feet underpinning .... 


33- 1. S 


40 perch stone, Smith road 


90.00 


Paid C. A. Bailey : 




46 cesspool stone at ^3 


138.00 


8 circles, 3-foot radius 


30.00 


5 circles, 4-foot radius 


22.50 


359 feet curb . . . 


161.55 




$5»o74-99 


SUNDRIES. 





Paid Head & Dowst Co., 35 feet spruce 
boards ..... 
E. T. James, damage to horse, har- 
ness, and hack .... 
Frank H. Challis, advertising pro- 
posals for cobble paving 
A. S. Campbell & Co., i book, 150- 
pages, ruled and printed to order 
W. P. Goodman, 500 envelopes 

Total expenditures 



$0.49 



2-75 
•38 



^15.62 
• $9>847-87 



Macadamizing. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



$21,250.13 
15.00 



$21,265.13 



macadamizing. 

Expenditures. 



601 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, district No. 2 : 

April $107.59 

May 1,762.37 

June 



July . 
August . 
September 
October . 
November 



Paid labor of men, as per pay 
July . . . 

August . 
October 
November 



1,565-27 
2,776-95 
3,268.98 

2,275.44 

1,010.52 

159-99 



roll, district No. 10 : 

^950.26 

• 1,772.43 
4.25 

23-32 



112,927.1 1 



$2,750.26 



Paid William Coburn, 14,100 lbs. stone 
P. C. Cheney Co., 44 loads stone 
F. M. Barnard, 11 loads stone 
L. Bartlett, 5 loads stone 
William Boynton, 23 loads stone 
Adam Dickey, 16 loads stone 
J. Fullerton, 38 loads stone . 
Head & Dowst Co., 94,380 lbs 

stone .... 

Horace Holbrook, 8 loads stone 
Charles Hoyt, 18 loads gravel 
Hadley F. Higgins, 15 loads stone 
Mass. Broken Stone Co., 951,450 

lbs. stone . . . . . 



$3-53 
44.00 
11.00 
5.00 
23.00 
16.00 
38.00 

23-59 
8.00 
1.80 

15.00 

666.02 



602 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Benjamin Mack, 5 loads stone 
Leander Pope, 14,335 lt)s. stone 
Joseph Tirrell, 3 loads stone . 
J. W. Tirrell, 10 loads stone . 
C. H. Tirrell, 22 loads stone . 
Fred Worthley, 29 loads stone 
Horace Willey, 216 loads stone chips 
R. P. Stevens, 142 loads stone chips 
F. S. Bodwell, 21.88 perch stone- 
work, west end McGregor bridge 



$5.00 
3-58 
3.00 
10.00 
22.00 
29.00 
54.00 
35-50 

98.46 



$1,115. 



FUEL, FREIGHT, AND WATER. 



Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 35,900 
lbs. Cumberland coal . 
People's Gas-light Co., 17 chaldrons 
coke ..... 

J. A. Brown, 37 feet wood 
A. Bodwell, 50^ cords wood 
Paid Concord & Montreal Railroad : 
Freight on castings .... 
Freight on oil . 
Paid Water-works, use of water to Janu- 
ary I, 1894 ..... 



$120.00 

68.00 

16.18 

225.56 

3-36 

•44 

30.00 



$463.54 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 

Rubber packing, washers, gallon can, 

steel, shims and wedges . 
Sperm oil, tallow, ax, picks, hammers, 

etc. 

1 2 canal barrows and steel stamp 

48 lbs. plug drills, 20 lbs. shims and 

wedges 



$28.20 



91-95 

24.00 



[0.80 



MACADAMIZING. 



603 



28 lbs. shims and wedges 
25 lbs. tallow and 2 cant dogs 
Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co.: 

12 coal scoops, paint, staples, bolts, 

shims, drills, and other hardware 
Forcite, platinum fuse, powder, cannon 
wire ...... 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Steel, augur bit, glass, hammers, black- 
smith bellows, iron, drills 
Plow beams, sledge handles, shovels . 
Plow points and other hardware . 
50 lbs. Hecla dynamite 
50 4-foot electric exploders 



$3.60 
4-5° 



119.62 



340.99 



9-85 
34-29 
84.77 
16.00 

1.50 



$770.07 



LUMBER, CASTINGS, AND REPAIRS. 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., castings, babbitt metal, oth- 
er material, and labor . . . $8i 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 
30 feet rock maple 

1 iron for No. i forge . 
21 lbs. Norway iron for steam drill 
33 hours' labor on steam drill 
199^ hours' labor, 428 lbs. steel 
18 lbs. iron for brace . 
2^ hours' labor .... 
Material and labor on crusher engine 
20 lbs. babbitt, 31^ hours' labor . 

2 oil cups, 4 hours' labor 
7^ lbs. rubber packing 

Paid Farrel Foundry & Machine'Co.: 
2 pair 15 X 9 plates 
Planing plates .... 



•36 



1.50 
2.50 
1.26 
13.20 
105.48 
1.58 
1.24 

107-57 
7.40 

3-45 
2.25 

45-85 
6.00 



604 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Eager & Rand, i hogshead . . $i.oo 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co.: 

Material and labor on crusher . 39'07 

Hose bands and coupling on crusher . 3.60 

Paid John DriscoU, galvanized iron and 

labor ..... I. GO 

Head & Dowst Co., spruce, chestnut, 

and pine lumber . . 35-54 

Weston & Hill Co., 3 yards cotton 

flannel ..... .45 

Thomas L. Thorpe, 105 lbs. waste . 10.50 

John T. Beach, material and labor 

repairing road machine . . 2.40 

L. M. Aldrich, filing saws . . 4.35 

James Briggs, oil can and repairing 

can .65 

Vacuum Oil Co., 50 gals, cylinder 

oil 34-31 

Irving L. Stickney, belting, lacing, 

and repairs ..... 9.46 



Paid Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & 
Insurance Co., insurance for one 
year, to May 21, 1894 . . $22.50 

VVhitten & Fifield, use of team . 22.00 

H. P. Simpson, expenses to Salem . 10.97 

George F. Higgins, 1,713.33 yards 

concrete on Merrimack street . 1,713-33 
C. H. Robie Co., concreting road- 
way on Maple street from north 
line of Central street to Lake ave- 
nue 939-9° 



$529-97 



12,708.70 



Total expenditures $21,265.13 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE, 

Grading for Concrete. 



Appropriation 










$6,405.66 


Transferred from reserved fund 


34.86 


Expenditures. 


LABOR. 




Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, i 


n district No. 2 : 


January 


• $317-70 


February 










1,007.81 


March 










963.49 


April 










196.92 


May 










298.94 


June 










311-99 


July . . 










220.50 


August . 










244.50 


September 










230.29 


October . 










489.27 


November 










266.79 


Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, 


in dij 


trict No. 7 : 


May .... 


$150.00 


June .... 


150.00 


November 


17.10 


Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, i 


1 district No. 10 : 


January .... 


$214.00 


February 








296.69 


March . 








204.78 


April 








216.50 


May 








61.88 


June 






200.01 


August . 










26.50 



605 



$6,440.52 



$4,548.20 



$317.10 



606 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



October . 

November 
December 



$57-62 

163.91 

34.86 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in district No. 11 



$i>476-75 
$12.00 



MATERIALS. 

Paid Michael Lyons, 20 loads sand 
Mary Hartshorn, 216 loads sand 
Benjamin Mack, 40 loads sand 
C. D. Taffe, 146 loads filling . 

TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 



$5.00 

21.60 

4.00 

36.50 



$67.10 



Steel and scoops 


$11.70 




6 steel bars .... 


4.92 




I oil can 


•75 




Paid John B. Varick Co.: 






2^ pounds shims and wedges 


•44 




12 plug drills .... 


1.56 


^19-37 


Total expenditures 




$6,440.52 



Scavenger Service, 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



$16,414.23 
2,586.65 



$19,000. 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in district No. 2 : 

January $1,044.53 

February 1,297.92 



SCAVENGER SERVICE. 



607 



March . 

April 

May 








. $1,298.66 

■ 1,637-82 

1,600.92 


June 
July 
August 








• 1,074.13 

988.69 

1,268.67 


September 
October . 
November 
December 








• 1,014-23 

902.70 

• 1,195-54 

854-33 



$14,178.14 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in district No. 10 : 
January $123.50 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October . 

November 

December 



140.89 
122.00 
226.13 
203.02 
257-50 
239-25 
293-50 
232.00 
229.50 
287.99 
217.62 
$2,572.90 



ON CONTRACT. 

Paid W. H. Carpenter : 

As per contract to June 9, 1893 . . $706.70 
2 days' work for scavenger. . . 24.00 

Paid city farm : 

Scavenger service from June 24 to July 

2, as per contract .... 42.63 

To August I, as per contract . . 208.33 
To September i, as per contract . . 208.33 



608 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

To October i, as per contract . . $208.33 

To November 30, as per contract 416.66 

To December, as per contract . 208.34 
Paid F. X. Chenette, labor with teams 12 

days ...... 108.00 

John T. Gott, cleaning i vault, 

city yard ..... 5.00 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., 12 street hoes . $5-4o 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 

24 shovels ...... 20.50 

6 pounds American steel ... .30 

Shoes and nails ..... 2.26 

Steel, rakes, etc. . . ■ . 5.76 



12,136.32 



$34.22 



BLACKSMITHING, HARNESSES, ETC. 

Paid D. F. Cressey, shoeing horse . . $1.95 

Ranno Harness Co., repairing har- 
nesses ..... 8.85 
Frederick Allen, i heavy harness 

and collar ..... 48.50 

Merrimack Steam Fire Engine Co., 

labor at Lincoln-street dump . 20.00 

$79-30 

Total expenditures ..... $19,000.88 



Street Sweeping. 

Appropriation ..... $1,398.76 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 32.00 

$1,430.76 



STREET 


SWEEPING 


. 


Expenditures. 




LABOR. 




Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in district No. 2 : 


April 


$84.25 


May 






196.18 


June . . . 






105-55 


July . . 






116.28 


August . 






96.25 


September 






192.85 


October . ' . 






145-39 


November 






42.57 


Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in district No. 10 


April ..... 


$66.77 


May 


44.00 


July 


46,00 


October 


52.49 


November .... 


124.56 


HARDWARE. 




Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., 9 stree 




brooms 


$5-25 


Manchester Hardware Co., 23 stree 


t 


brooms .... 


9-59 


John B. Varick Co., street brooms 




etc. . 






6.78 



609 



REPAIRS. 

Paid S. A. Felton & Son, 3 street sweepers refilled 
Total expenditures .... 
39 



$979-32 



$333-82 



$21.62 



$1,430-76 



610 REPORT 


OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 


Lighting Streets. 




Appropriation 


Expenditures, 
electric lights. 


. $42,000.00 


Paid Manchester Electric Light Co. : 






Charges. 


Discounts. 


January 


• $3,3^3-8^ 


$7.00 


February 




3>4o5-2i 


15-33 


March . 




3i073-48 


2301 


April . 




3,405.88 


8.25 


May . 


. 


• 3-297-30 


4-95 


June 




2,969.68 


8.03 


July . . 




3,000.67 . 


5-51 


August . 




3,008.05 


3-47 


September 




3>o53-59 


3-47 


October 




3)095-42 


3-78 


November 




3>o95-42 


6.62 


December 




3,098.88 


11.65 



$37,867.46 

Total discounts de- 
ducted . . . 101.07 



;ioi.o7 



$37,766.39 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co. 
January . 
February 
March 
A]m\ 
May 
June 
July 
August 



$81.90 
7336 
69.72 
66.50 
58.80 
54-04 
49.14 
50-54 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



611 



September 
October 
November 
December 



^54-46 

59-36 

69.86 

74.20 
$761. 



CARE OF GAS AND OIL LAMPS. 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for lighting, extin- 
guishing, and care of gas and oil street lights ; 
January $i58-4S 



February- 










134-75 


March . 










125.00 


April 










139.00 


May 










133-75 


June 










138.62 


July . 










145-87 


August . 










133.60 


September 










142.35 


October . 










135-50 


November 










140.25 


December 










137.27 


SUNDRIES. 




Paid People's Gas-Light Co. : 




27 barrels kerosene oil 


$99-56 


4 gallons whiskey 






9. CO 


i^ gallons sperm oil 








2.03 


2 boxes glass, lox 12 








10.75 


6 boxes glass, i2x 14 


. 






17.40 


I box glass, 12 X 16 


. 






2.70 


8 glass cutters 








1.05 


Freight on glass to Goffe's Falls 




-25 


Cash paid Eager 


&R£ 


ind fc 


r mat 


ches 


12.85 



— $1,664.41 



612 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 



Paid Clark M. Bailey, fountains, chim- 
neys, burners, etc. .... 
Paid F. W. Elliott : 

Oil and lighting street lamp prior to 

December 19, 1892 
Oil and lighting street lamp from De- 
cember I, 1892, to July 19, 1893 
Paid Mary E. Reed : 

Lighting oil lamp at Massabesic from 

December i, 1892, to June i, 1893 • 

From June i, 1893, ^'^ December i, 1893 

Paid J. W. Robinson, services in testing 

arc lights ..... 

Patrick Dobbins, i oil can 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$121.00 



5.20 



9.00 



4-50 
4-50 

25.00 
•50 



^325-29 



^0,517.97 
1,482.03 

$42,000.00 



Bridges. 



Appropriation .... 

Amount transferred from reserved fund 



Expenditures. 



;^4,273.29 
180.44 



$4,453-73 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in district No. 2 : 

January $83.04 

February 202.96 

March 83.44 

April ...... 67.00 



613 



May- 
June 
July 
August 
September 
October . 
November 
December 



^3-50 
71.40 

30-25 

74-05 

311.48 

314.96 

359-71 
26.49 



Paid labor of men, 


as per pay-roll, 


in district No. 5 : 


July 






Paid labor of men, 


as per pay-roll, 


in district No. 9 : 


November 






Paid labor of men, 


as per pay-roll, 


in district No. 10 : 


April 




$26.00 


July 




19.50 



$1,628.2^ 



^4-75 



$24.25 



$45-50 



LUMBER. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., lumber 
Paid A. C. Wallace : 

Lumber, South Main-street bridge 

Lumber, Amoskeag bridge . 

Lumber ...... 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 

Lumber ...... 

95,650 feet 3-inch hemlock plank, at 

$11-75 

16,559 feet, all sizes and kinds . 

6^ hours' sawing .... 

Paid Rowe & Lang, 20,443 f^^t bridge 

plank ..... 

John Kenney, 12,438 feet lumber, 



$256.17 

57-76 

44.21 
102.20 

30-99 

1,123.88 

382.34 

2.60 

255-53 
149.25 



$2,404.93 



614 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



HARDWARI 



Paid A. N. Clapp, oil, spikes, and nails . 


^5-39 


Wadleigh Hardware Co., wire, nails, 




etc 


1-45 


Paid John B. Varick Co.: 




I keg 6-inch spikes .... 


2.50 


20 lbs. wire nails .... 


.40 


I ax and other hardware 


4.68 


13 kegs wire spikes .... 


31.20 


65 lbs. cart nails .... 


1.63 


Other hardware 


19-53 


Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 




48 lbs. i2-penny nails 


1.92 


9 kegs nails 


19.80 


Nails, spikes, and other hardware 


9.84 



$98-34 



Paid C. J. Shannessy, filing cross-cut saw 
George Holbrook, material and la- 
bor, west end McGregor bridge . 
Concord & Montreal Railroad, freight 
on plank ..... 
J. A. V. Smith, labor, etc., on iron 
work for bridge .... 
Paid John E. Cheney : 

Inspection and report on McGregor 

bridge, services .... 

Traveling expenses .... 



$1.00 



6.25 



17.07 



69.41 



140.00 
13-95 



$247.68 



Total expenditures 



$4,453-73 



CITY TEAxMS. 

City Teams. 

Appropriation $8,794.46 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 939-02 



615 



$9>733'48 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll 



January . 


$242.43 


February 


270.68 


March . 


224.08 


April . 


281.64 


May 


269.17 


June 


123.20 


July . . . 


127.33 


August . 


185.05 


September 


135-99 


October 


166.87 


November 


156.62 


December 


272.68 



$2,455.74 



OATS, CORN, FEED, HAY, AND STRAW. 



Paid 



Adams & Tasker . 






$429.49 


J. A. Brown . 






III. 85 


H. H. Freeman 






265-37 


Merrill & Freeman 






122.66 


Gage & McDougall 






174.16 


Clarence R. Merrill 






249-03 


Partridge Brothers . 






1,125.37 


Henry W. Parker . 






140.71 


Gage & Perry 






38.22 


Isaac Whittemore . 






40.50 


C. D. Welch . 






104.35 



616 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Peter Parker . 
Fred Plummer 
H. A. Horton 



^107,00 

132.15 
9.92 



$3>o5o.78 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid E. C. Briggs, horseshoeing 

D. F. Cressey, horseshoeing . 
J. M. Brouillette, horseshoeing 
Connor & Grossman, horseshoeing 
Thomas Hickey, horseshoeing 
Mahaney & McSweeney, horseshoe 

ing . . . • . 

John B. Varick Co., shoes, horse 

nails, and other material 



;i29.6o 
6.42 

38-50 

137.00 

44-25 

46.85 
68.33 



HARNESSES AND 


REPAIRS. 




Paid Ran no Harness Co.: 






I pair heavy team harnesses with collars 


$59.00 


I seat cushion .... 




3-50 


Axle grease, bandages, brushes, 


cards. 




etc 




25.36 


Paid Thomas P. Riley, repairing 


har- 




nesses, etc. .... 




122.05 


Paid N. J. Whalen : 






New whip socket 




.40 


4 rubber horse covers . 




16.00 


4 duck horse covers . 




14.00 


Paid Ivory S. York : 






10 whips .... 




8.00 


I heavy breastplate and tug 




18.00 


Paid Kimball Carriage Co. : 






I whip and brush 




1.50 


Farm blanket, surcingles, etc. 


. 


15-75 



^470-95 



CITY TEAMS. 




5 blankets 


$30.00 


2 harnesses with collars 


80.00 


Leathering 5 blankets 


9-5° 


Repairing collars 


•50 


I sheepskin .... 


1.25 



617 



$404.81 



REPAIRS ON CARRIAGES AND NEW CARRIAGES. 



Paid John T. Beach : 

I new cart body ..... 

Repairs 

Paid Sanborn Carriage Co., welding band 

and bolt 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs, etc. 
A. H. Stark, painting wagon . 
A. Filion, new shafts for night cart . 
James M. Nutt, i dump-cart, whif- 
fle-tree, and neck yokes 



$28.00 
180.05 

•35 

2-47.63 

30.00 

2.00 

65.00 



5553-03 



HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 

Norway iron, whetstones, stake chains, 
cattle cards, paint and brush, screws, 
hooks, knobs, keys, match-box . $23.71 

Sandpaper, 3 whips, spring steel, and 
other hardware . . . . 75-84 

Paid John B. Varick Co., Norway iron, 
bolts, band, iron screws, ice chisel, 
stable brooms, paints, seat spring, 
sponges, and other hardware . 70.82 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., oil, cable 
chain, paint, glue, castile soap, 
and other hardware . . . . 10.56 



$180.93 



618 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



MEDICAL SERVICES AND INSURANCE. 



Paid A. W. Baker, dentistry work on 
horses' teeth .... 

S. F. Burnham, medical services 
Paid Edward H. Currier : 

Medicines ...... 

Syringes and extra tube 
Paid Eager &: Rand, soda, vinegar, sul- 
phur, soap powder, and soap 
J. L. Golden, medical services and 
medicine ..... 

McQuade Brothers, gin, salt, mus- 
tard, alcohol, etc. 
Smith & Gould, 24 bottles lotion . 
Z. Foster Campbell, medicines, etc. 
Peel's Food Co., i bag Peel's food . 
A. L. Dodge, tonic 
American Live Stock Insurance Co., 
insurance on horses 
Paid Security Live Stock Insurance Co.: 
First quarterly assessment on policies 
No. 8712 to 8728 inclusive . ; 
Second quarterly assessment 



Paid Cavanaugh Bros., 4 horses 
James M. Nutt, i pair horses 



$16.00 
4-50 

. 3-IO 

3-25 

2.50 
57.00 

14-34 
12.00 

16.55 
1. 00 

2.50 

190.86 



56.75 




51-75 


$432.10 




$800.60 




400.00 






$1,200.00 



WATER, GAS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid Water-works, use of water to January 

I, 1894 $44-oo 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas at sta- 
bles and office .... i3i'32 



CITY TEAMS. 619 

Paid New England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephone . . $36.00 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co.: ^ 

10,115 pounds egg coal . . . 35«4o 

4,140 pounds egg coal . . . i4'49 

Paid Joseph Masse, 15,780 pounds coal . 51-28 

$312.49 



Paid James Briggs : 




Pails, tunnels, and soldering can . 


$0.70 


Stove, pipe, elbows, etc., for black- 




smith's shop 


19.85 


Paid A. N. Clapp : 




52 gallons kerosene oil . . . 


4.16 


Salt and rope 


•35 


Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., lumber 


25-59 


Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 




Lumber 


160.98 


Blacksmith shop contract . 


225.00 


Tools and extras 


35-28 


Lumber, etc., for stable 


90.64 


Paid Pike & Heald, plumbing material. 




labor, etc. ..... 


12.85 


George W. Rief, lumber and labor . 


11.83 


William Smith, use of sled 


1.50 


Paid Thomas A. Lane Co. : 




Packing faucet and cutting pipe . 


•35 


Piping stable ..... 


2.47 


Paid Manchester Street Railway, i book 




car tickets ..... 


5.00 


Hartley E. Vaughan, burying two 




horses 


9.00 


E. T. James, use of teams 


20.50 



620 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Clarence R. Merrill, i barrel lime . $0.90 
George W. Bailey, board of 2 horses 

2 days . ... 4.00 

Frank L. Way, castile soap . . .10 

George W. Demick, express on box .30 

C. H. Simpson, use of team . . 8.00 

A. Filion, use of cart tongue . . 4.00 
Mrs. E. G. McKean, rent of stable 

to September i, 1893 • • 20.00 
Irving L. Stickney, 24 feet belt 

leather ..... 4.80 

Whitten & Fifield, use of teams . 4.50 

Total expenditures ..... 



$672.65 

$9,733-48 



Repairs and Maintenance of Sewers and Drains. 

Appropriation $4,538.32 

3^755-83 

$8,294.15 



Amount transferred from reserved fund 





Expenditures. 




LABOR. 


id labor of men, 


as pe 


r pay-roll, in district No. 2 : 


January . 






$280.52 


February 










914.91 


March . 










855-52 


April 










453-71 


May 










1,098.40 


July 










171. 01 


August 










294.66 


September 










152.62 


October . 










306.88 


November 










695.18 


December 










122.94 



$5,346.35 



KEPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE OF SEWERS AND DRAINS. 621 



January . 




$103.00 


February 




119.13 


March . 




265.83 


April 




125-13 


May 




1,399.09 


August 




230.07 


September 


HARDWARE. 


34-51 







Paid A. N. Clapp, kerosene oil, pails, 
nails, rope ..... 
Manchester Hardware Co., steel, 
files, iron rivets, bolts, bit-stock, 
scoop handles, padlocks, wood 
saw, and other hardware 
John B. Varick Co., wire, tape, 
steel, bolts, iron, cable chains, 
scoop handles, mortar pails, canal 
barrows, and other hardware 

Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co. : 

24 pick handles 

18 round-point shovels 

MATERIALS, LABOR, E^ 

Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 

2,733 pounds castings . 

9 hours' labor .... 

12 hooks, 16 pounds refined iron 

12 rivets, 4 pounds brass castings 
Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., piping mate 

rial and labor .... 
Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 

6 vault scoops .... 

4 feet 6 inches Akron pipe . 



$7-91 



80.2J 



37.12 



5.00 
[6.20 



$64.91 

3.60 

.48 

1. 00 

79.81 
6.96 



$2,276.76 



$146.51 



622 REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Warren Harvey, extension of West 
Elm back-street sewer, between 
Bridge street and Kidder court . $13.76 
Lessard & Moreau, ^g}4 feet pipe, 

etc .87 

H. H. Freeman, 20 bushels rock salt 9.00 

W. P. Farmer, i pair rubber boots 2.75 

George L. Robinson, 5 pairs rubber 

boots ..... 17.00 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co. : 

3 tons Cumberland coal . . . 21.00 

I barrel Cumberland coal . . . i.oo 

Paid Thomas L. Thorpe, 20 pounds waste 2.00 

B. W. Hill, digging sewer in Bay 
back street, in November, 1891, 
one-half cost of same . . 44-27 

Palmer & Garmon, labor cutting 

stone ..... 15-03 

Portland Stone Ware Co., pipe . 5.01 



CEMENT, BRICK, STONE, LUMBER. 

Paid Adams & Tasker, 5 barrels cement $7-oo 

W. F. Head & Son, 21,000 brick . 126.00 
Heirs of Waterman Smith, 55 feet 

covering stone .... 22.00 
Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

3,000 feet spruce .... 47.00 

100 feet drag plank .... 4.00 

20 feet 3-inch oak .... .60 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co., advertis- 
ing proposals for sewer pipe . $11-50 



1288.93 



$206.60 



NEW SEWERS. 



623 



Paid E. T. James, use of teams 

Irving L. Stickney, 2 oil suits 

Total expenditures 



$13.00 
4-5° 



$29.00 



$8,294.15 



New Sewers. 

Appropriation ..... $40,000.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 3,097.86 



$43,097.86 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in district No. 2 : 
June ...... $1,807.90 



July . 
August . 
September 
October . 
November 



3699-33 
4,751.66 
3^897.91 

3>i74-79 
1,857.67 



Paid labor jof men, as per pay-roll, in district No. 7 : 
• June ........ 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in district No. 10 : 
June ...... $2,448.61 



July . 

August . 
September 
October . 
November 



2,854.76 
2,010.17 

790.05 
1,152-55 

331-82 



119, 089. 26 

$20.00 



$9,587.96 



624 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



HARDWARE. 



Paid John B. Varick Co., sledge handles, 
hammers, steel bars, shovels, hand 
ax, barrows, tape measure, twine, 
padlock, stable pails, wire nails, 
hooks and staples, whetstone, lan- 
terns, rope, pick handles, and 
other hardware .... $137-87 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., twine, red 
chalk, wire nails, forcite, plati- 
num fuse, and other hardware . 170.31 

Sanborn Carriage Co., 4 bands on 

mallets . . . . .75 

Manchester Hardware Co., spikes, 
water pails, shovels, trowels, axes, 
wire nails, pinch bar, and other 
hardware ..... 214.68 



$523-61 



SEWER PIPE. 



Paid George D. Goodrich, pipe, all sizes $1,952.82 
Portland Stoneware Co.,pipe,all sizes 2,516.68 



$4,469.50 



MATERIALS, LABOR, ETC. 



Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 




50,519 lbs. castings . 


$1,073-50 


8 lbs. brass pins . . . . . 


2.00 


Paid Pike & Heald Co.: 




6 ladles 


.60 


Stovepipe and i T . 


.60 


8 and 10 inch Akron pipe . 


1.65 


Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., Akron pipe 




suction hose, labor, etc. 


232.21 



NEW SEWERS. 625 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., iTiak- 

ing cesspool pattern . . . $18.46 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber, labor, filing 
saws, etc. ..... 10.82 

William P. Farmer, 32 pairs rubber 

boots ..... 92.33 

James W. Merrill, 3 pairs rubber 

boots ..... 9.00 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 3^ tons 

Cumberland coal . . . 22.63 

James Briggs, oil cans, etc. . . 6.50 

Paid J. Hodge : 

I sand screen ..... 3.26 

Lumber and labor .... 24.29 

Paid Palmer & Garmon : * 

Labor and use of tools on cesspools . 9.27 

9 loads stone chips .... 4.50 

Paid L. & W. T. Seiberlich, i quart pure 

lard .30 

C. J. Shannessy, filing cross-cut saw .50 

C. W. Cheney, i hoisting jack . 32.50 

Peter Duval, filing saws . . . 7.00 

^1,551-92 



BLACKSMITHING. 




Paid Connor & Grossman, sharpening 




tools 


$0-25 


John T. Beach, sharpening drills. 




picks, etc 


2.80 


William Sutcliffe, drills and other 




tools 


2.79 


Joseph Nichols, mending tools 


4-75 



510.59 



626 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CEMENT, BRICK, STONE, LUMBER. 



Paid Adams & Tasker : 

31 barrels C. cement .... $89.90 
10 lbs. string ..... 1.20 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 

300 feet hemlock boards . . . 4.20 

Spruce joist ..... 1.30 

Castings, steel, labor .... 3.50 

Norway iron and labor . . . 10.98 

Paid W. F. Head & Son, 441,000 brick, 

at §6 ..... 2,646.00 

Clarence R. Merrill, 1,248 barrels 
N. cement ..... 1,580.14 

Paid A. C. Wallace : 

24,630 feet 2-inch spruce plank . . 369.45 

5,140 feet 4x6 spruce plank . . 77-io 

6,514 feet 2-inch spruce plank $97.71 
Less wood bought . . 79-12 



3,534 feet I and 2 inch chestnut 

Labor on above . . . , 

Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

36,701 feet spruce 

500 feet spruce boards 

200 feet barn boards . 

16,900 U. D. brick 

3 brick hods 

4,200 feet spruce 

1,000 feet 2-inch spruce plank 
Paid O. Hardy & Co., 4 sugar barrels 



$5,663.80 



NEW SEWERS. 



627 



Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 

pipe 

Paid Concord & Montreal R. R.: 



$945-1^ 



Freight on pipe 


446.16 


Freight on brick .... 


352.80 


SUNDRIES. 




Paid A. N. Clapp, wicks, pails, kerosene 




oil, spikes 


$20.93 


Union Publishing Co., advertising 




proposals for plank 


7.08 


Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 




2 blank books, Nos. 3810 and 381 1 


IO-75 


6 sheets cardboard and cutting . 


.40 


6 blank books, No. 3934 


13-50 


12 blank books, No. 3935 . 


4-5° 


6 blank books. No. 3933 


13-50 


Paid Whitten & Fifield, use of team 


9.00 


C. H. Simpson, use of team . 


26.25 


Paid H. H. Scott : 




Rent of stable 


4.00 


Labor 


3.00 


Paid The John B. Clarke Co.: 




Advertising proposals for lumber 


9-56 


Printing three order books . 


11.00 


Paid Manchester Horse Railway, i book 




car tickets 


5.00 


W. P. Goodman, 6 blank books 


•15 


E. R. Coburn Co., 2 blank books 




made to order .... 


12.00 


John Britton, damage to window 




caused by blasting 


2.00 



11,744.14 



628 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid E. T. James, use of team . . $12.00 
L. P. Reynolds, use of team . 60.00 
H. P. Simpson, use of team . 60.00 
G. H. Stearns, use of team . 60.00 
Charles Geisel, damage from blast- 
ing on Walnut street . . 29.81 
George Holbrook, repairing damage 

from blasting on Walnut street . 62.65 

Total expenditures ..... 



$437-o8 
$43,097.86 



Second-Street Bridge. 



Balance from old account 


$6,000.00 


Appropriation 


43,129.85 


Transferred from reserved fund 


2,906.21 


Expenditures. 




ON CONTRACT. 




Paid Charles A. Bailey : 




For stone work .... 


$20,127.01 


282 piles, at $6 


1,692.00 


3,500 feet 3-inch plank, at $22 . 


77.00 


7,000 feet 10 X 10 timber, at $22 


154.00 


40 loads gravel, etc. . 


40.00 


140 yards rip. rap, at $2 per yard 


280.00 


Paid Dean & Westbrook, superstructure 


26,687.36 


William H. Colburn, 12,428.11 cu 




bic feet filling, at 19^0. . 


• 2,454.55 



$52,036.06 



l5i>Sii-92 



SECOND-STREET BRIDGE. 



629 



LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in district No. lo : 
April ...... ^16.25 

May 



June 

November 

December 



6.00 

29-75 
218.13 

15-94 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid A. C. Wallace : 
1,074 feet spruce 

126 chestnut posts .... 
Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 30 

bridge specifications . 
Neil E. Fullerton, 19 loads stone, at 

90c. ...... 

Frank Taylor, 15 loads stone, at 90c. 
John B. Varick Co., 6 pounds 20- 

penny nails .... 

Thomas J. Welch, 21 loads cobble 

stones, at 90c. .... 
William H. Boynton, 28 loads cob- 
ble stones, at 90c. 
A. N. Clapp, 6 pounds nails . 
Mrs. E. E. Emerson, 5 loads cobble 

stones ..... 

James Fullerton, 31 loads cobble 

stones ..... 

Head & Dowst Co., 18 loads stone . 
C. H. Tirrell, 24 loads cobble stones 
Joseph Tirrell, 7 loads cobble stones 
Fred B. Worthley, 41 loads cobble 

stones ..... 



$16.91 
18.90 



17.10 
13-50 



18.90 



25.20 
.18 



4-5° 

27.90 

18.00 

21.60 

6.30 

36.90 



$286.07 



$238.07 



Total expenditures 



. $52,036.06 



630 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Widening Elm Street. 



Appropriation 


$2,000.00 


Amount transferred from reserved fund . 


1,700.00 


Expenditures. 




Paid Tliomas A. Lane Co.: 




Gasoline ...... 


50-15 


Labor taking down fence . 


11.03 


Material and labor putting up fence 


106.90 


Paid C. D. Taffe, 1,200 loads filling 


300.00 



13,700.00 



Gordon Woodbury, 1,000 loads fill- 
ing ...... 250.00 

Frank S. Bodwell, building culvert 

and retaining wall, as per contract 2,387.00 

V. A. Hovey, lighting and care of 

lanterns ..... 4.60 

The John B. Clarke Co., advertising 16.00 

Frank H. Challis, advertising . 2.00 

$3'077-68 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in district No. 2 196.65 

Total expenditures ..... ^3,274.33 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . . 425.67 



$3>7^ 



Engineer's Department 

Appropriation ..... $4,300.00 
Appropriation (resolution September 13, 

1893) 487-88 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 860.96 



$5,648.84 



engineer's department. 631 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid W. H. Bennett, services as engineer 51,200.00 - 

Mrs. A. G. Bennett, 150 days' labor 

in engineer's office . . . 160.00 

Harry J. Briggs, 312 days' labor, 

assisting engineer . . . 729.00 

George M. Currier, 212 days' labor, 

assisting engineer . . . 212.00 

Edward J. Doherty, 3 days' labor 

in office ..... 6.00 

Edgar E. Farmer, services assisting 

engineer 252.75 

E. M. Stone, 112 days' labor, assist- 
ing engineer .... 224.00 

Herbert L. Watson, 62 days' labor, 

assisting engineer . . . 62.00 

George W. Wales, services, assisting 

engineer ..... 657.00 

Harrie M. Young, services, assisting 

engineer ..... 793-50 

J. E. Baker, 3 days' services in engi- 
neer's office .... 6.00 



$4-302 



TEAM AND TEAM EXPENSES. 

Paid Frederick Allen, rope, whip, blanket $2.90 

E. C. Briggs, shoeing horse . . 14.00 

Connor & Grossman, shoeing horse io-55 
Paid Kimball Carriage Co. : 

Painting express wagon . . . 12.00 

Repairing wagons . . . . 7.50 
Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, springs, bolt, 

whiffletree ..... 1.35 

John T. Beach, carriage repairs . 6.15 



632 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Manchester Horse Railway, car tick- 
ets $25.00 

I. L. Stickney, rubber blanket, etc. 9.00 

Whitten & Fifield, use of teams . 66.25 

E. E. Farmer, horse-car fares . . .60 

G. W. Wales, horse-car fares . . .20 

Harry J. Briggs, horse-car fares 3.20 

J. L. Golden, visits and medicines . 7.50 
A. H. Stark, varnishing Concord 

wagon ..... 800 



TELEPHONE. 



Paid George W. Wales : 




Expense to Boston with transit . 


^•15 


Express ...... 


•15 


Paid Harrie M. Young, rash paid for ex- 




press, soap, car fares . 


2.30 


Paid Harry J. Briggs : 




Cash paid for key to office 


•25 


Express on street signs 


2.25 


Paid W. H. Bennett : 




Expenses to Boston twice with instru- 




ments 


7.20 


Cash paid for telegram 


•50 


Cash paid for express .... 


•75 


Cash paid for postage stamps 


4.00 


Expenses to Nashua, looking up records 


1.64 


Paid J. J. Abbott, painting poles . 


•75 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber and labor . 


5-47 



$174.20 



Paid New England Telegraph & Telephone Co., use 

of telephone $36.90 

SUPPLIES AND OFFICE EXPENSES. 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 



633 



Paid T. Hodge : 






i,ooo chestnut hubs . 


$20.00 


i,ooo pine stakes .... 


9.00 


Lumber, etc., for tables 


31-46 


i,ooo pine stakes 


9.00 


215 stakes, 4 feet X 2 X 2 


9.67 


Paid Peter Harris, 3 Yale keys 


•75 


Manchester iron foundry, 58 pounds 




castings .... 


2.32 


Thomas A. Lane Co., material and 




labor on electric lights 


13-34 


George W. Rief, lumber and laboi 




on patterns 


.98 


Charles H. Wood, painting rod 


> 


and weights 


5-9° 


Concord & Montreal Railroad 


, 


freight on i cabinet desk . 


-53 


John W. Wilson, cartage, i desk 


•35 


The John B. Clarke Co., printing 


150 reports, with covers 


25.00 


Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 




13 blank books .... 


1.70 


Binding 3 volumes street numbers 


15.00 


3 canvas covers .... 


4-5° 


2 indexes .... 




.76 


2 scrap books and paste 




1-75 


12 document envelopes 




.72 


I folio for drawings . 




3.00 


Work on plan . 




-50 


13 blank books. No. 3866 . 




7-15 


Ink, shipping tags, paste, etc. 




1-55 


Cutting paper . 




-50 


2 blank books, Nos, 3945, 3946 




18.00 


McGill's fasteners 


1. 10 


Paid Thomas H. Tuson, printing cards 




slips, etc. . 




1.65 



634 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Nate Kellogg, printing 1,500 letter- 
heads ..... $7-50 
Irving Stickney, i pound rubber 
bands ..... 2.50 
Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son : 

I No. 5 Remington typewriter $100.00 
I 8-drawer oak cabinet . 30.00 

Paper and carbon . . 9.50 



$139-50 
Less I second-hand typewriter 12.50 



127.00 

Typewriter ribbon .... i.oo 

Typewriter oil . . . . . .20 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Screw clamps, artists' brushes, wire nails, 

twine, etc. ..... 2.96 

2 100-foot steel tapes .... 19-75 
6 No. 8 long brass plumb bobs . . 4.50 
I 50-foot tape ..... 5.75 
Wrench, butts, sledge handles, wire nails 2.44 

Paid A. V. Benoit : 

3 rolls drawing paper . . . . 93- 15 
Triangles and ink .... 9.45 

Paid Bennett Manufacturing Co., i small 

beam compass ..... 8.00 

Paid Buff & Berger : 

Cleaning and adjusting transit 

I Philadelphia rod 

I transit with accessories 

I level, etc. 

Bags, oil, and packing boxes 
Paid E. R. Coburn Co.: 

Pens, penholders, ink, pencils, paper, 

and other stationery . . . 33-69 



4 


20 


16 


00 


241 


00 


140 


00 


3 


10 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



635 



8 dozen pencils .... 


$1.20 




Water colors .... 


7.20 




Paid William H. Day & Co., ink pad and 






rubber stamp .... 


3.00 




Paid Frost & Adams : 






I roll tracing cloth, 3 ink cases . 


13-44 




I set curves . . . 


35-00 




Rubber, paper, etc. 


7-5° 




2 sponge rubbers 


3-40 




Paid Keuffel & Esser Co., i roll paper 


iS.oo 




E. G. Soltman, cloth binders . 


3.20 




Paid E. E. Taylor : 






Ink, drafting instruments, etc. 


57-43 




2 rolls blue paper 


3-94 




Paid Manchester post-office, 250 2-cent 






stamps 


5.00 




Charles A. Hoitt & Co., office chair 


6.00 




T. S. Buck, rubber stamps 


11.30 




John Holland, i sponge 


•35 




Morgan, Crossman & Co., 2 rubber 






stamps .... 


4-25 




Sampson, Murdock & Co., 50 Man- 






chester maps 


17-50 


$1,135-49 




— 


Total expenditures 


$5,648.84 



Health Department. 



Appropriation .... 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 



$3,000.00 
253-13 



$3,253.13 



636 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid George C. Hoitt : 

Salary as health officer for year ending 

February i, 1893 .... $200.00 

Salary for 6 months ending July 31, 

1893 ...... 100.00 

Paid Joseph B. Sawyer, salary as health 
officer for year ending February i, 
1893 ...... 200.00 

Neil F. Starr, salary as health officer 

for year ending February i, 1893 200.00 
Herbert S. Clough, 324 days' labor 

as inspector . . . . 972.00 

John F. Looney, 311 days' labor as 

inspector ..... 622.00 

Dennis Connor, 57 days' labor . 114.00 

Benjamin Freeman, 57 days' labor . 114.00 

Charles Ltingmaid, 100 days' labor 200.00 
Patrick Wells, 4^ days' labor . 7.88 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co.: 




Printing 300 reports, 32 pages and cover 


$15.00 


bulletins for March, April, 




May, and June . 


16.75 


pamphlets, statutes, and tables 


5-50 


1,500 envelopes . 


25.00 


bulletins .... 


16.75 


Paid A. S. Campbell & Co.: 




Printing placards .... 


1 .90 


1,000 note heads in tablets . 


3-40 


1,000 I -cent stamped envelopes 


12.50 



$2,729. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



637 



Paid E. R. Coburn Co.: 

200 envelopes 

Blank books and other stationery 
Paid Edson C. Eastman, i volume Public 
Statutes of New Hampshire 
Temple & Farrington Co , i record 
book ..... 



$1.20 
2.71 



3.00 
1.25 



$104.96 



Paid Fred S. Bodwell, use of team . . ;^3.oo 

F. X. Chenette, use of team . . 17.50 

W. J. Freeman, use of teams . . 5.00 

J. C. Nichols & Son, use of team . i.oo 

Whitten & Fifield, use of team . 13-50 
Paid Fred H. Partelow : 

I row boat and oars .... 25.00 

Use of steamer seven hours ; . 10.50 

Painting boat ..... 5.00 
Paid Charles Langmaid : 

Fare to Auburn and return . . .20 

Labor moving sawdust . . . 1.50 

Paid John F. Looney, horsecar fares . 14.75 
Paid H. S. Clough : 

Fares to Massabesic and return . . 1.20 

Fares to Derry and return ... .60 

Horse-car fares . . . . . 22.95 

HOUSE OF ISOLATION. 

Paid Pike & Heald, stovepipe, elbows, 

damper, etc ^3-65 

Darwin A. Simons, 12 chairs and 

other furniture .... 11.20 

Judith Sherer, 18 weeks' board of 

patients . . . . . 54.01 



^121.70 



638 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid C. F. Starr : 

Carfare to Concord and expenses . ^1.47 

Attendance on Ouillette family . . 12.00 

Medicine ...... 2.00 

Paid D. P. Hadley, repairing clock . i.oo 

l(. K. Home, crockery . . . 2.63 

OFFICE EXPENSES. 

Paid J. Y. McQueston : 

6 office chairs ..... $25.00 

I oak table ..... 8.50 

Paid H. B. Fairbanks, bookcase . . 21.00 

Head & Dowst Co., 6 hours' labor . 1.42 

Manchester Art Association, stove 

and wood ..... 8.00 

Paid Joseph B. Sawyer : 

Expense of Board of Health to Lowell 

and return . . . . . 4.65 

Fare of self and Dr. Starr to Concord 

and return ..... 1.44 

Paid H. S. Clough, postage and postal 

cards . . . . . 13- 16 

DeCourcy, Holland & Marshall, 2 

feet hard wood .... 2.44 

J. J. Abbott, I light glass 20 x 28, 

and setting .... 1.50 

People's Gas-Light Co., 300 feet gas .51 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid F. W. Elliott, dinners for 8 persons 
at inspection of lake .... 

Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

I case for shipping water 
Lumber, hardware, and labor 



^6.00 



1. 25 

1.20 



$87.96 



$87.62 



REPAIRS OF SCIIOOLHOUSES. 639 

Paid'E. R. Angell, analysis of water . $S4-3° 

John B. Varick Co., 22 lbs. sulphur .88 

Pike & Heald Co., i fumigating pot 3.60 

F. X. Chenette, burying dead animal 3.00 
John F. Looney, disinfectants, tacks, 

oil, etc. ..... 1.22 

H. S. Clough, disinfectants, etc. . 28.56 
Burnham, Brown & Warren, legal 
services in sundry cases from Jan- 
uary 16 to August 19, 1893 . 22.00 

$121.01 

Total expenditures ..... $3,253.13 



Repairs of Schoolhouses. 

Appropriation ..... $5,500.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 475-83 



Expenditures, 
mason work. 

Paid B. W. Robinson : 

Plastering at Ash-street schoolhouse . $9' 73 
Paving water-closet at Franklin-street 

schoolhouse . . . . . 1.25 

Kalsomining, etc., sundry schoolhouses 366.83 

PAINTING AND GLAZING. 

Paid John A. Sargent : 

Painting and glazing. Webster-street . $23.69 
Numbering clothes-hooks, Spring-street 5.40 

Painting and glazing at sundry school- 
houses ...... 243.09 



$5)975-83 



$377-8i 



640 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. J. Abbott : 

Painting and glazing at sundry school- 
houses $543-30 

Lining blackboards .... 7.00 

Paid Samuel N. Boyce, glass, window 

cords, flag-pole .... 2.50 

C. B. Hall, glazing and repairing 

windows at Youngsville . . 3.00 

J. S. Avery, glazing at High and 

Ash street ..... 4.80 

William F. Conner, 2 lights glass 

and putty ..... .30 

H. G. Batchelder, setting glass, Var- 

ney schoolhouse . . . 3.00 



CONCRETING. 

Paid George F. Higgins : 

Concreting, Main-street . . . $61.47 

Concreting, Franklin street . . 93-56 

Concreting, Bakersville . . . 31-21 

Concreting, Varney .... 63.09 

Paid C. H. Robie Co., concreting, Spring 

street 103.55 



WOODWORK. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, butts, glass, putty, 

2)^ hours' labor .... $1.09 

Williams & Co., blackboards . . 86.96 
Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

5 hours' labor, Varney school . . 1.20 

Lumber and labor, training school . 271.63 

10 hours' stone cutting, training school 4.25 



$836.08 



$352- 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 641 

Paid George H. Dudley, labor, lumber, 

and hardware .... ^932.33 
George S. Perry & Co., blackboards 18.72 
George Holbrook, material and la- 
bor, water-closets . . . 19- 75 
J. Hodge, windows, sash, etc. . 55-62 



PLUMBING AND IRONWORK. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.: 

Castings, desk legs .... $12.50 

Labor on boiler ..... 5.80 

Cement and fire brick 1.50 

Pattern and castings for boiler . . 2.50 
Paid S. C. Austin & Bro.: 

65 feet new lightning rod, Spring street 26.00 

I point ...... 2.00 

Material and labor repairing rods on 

sundry schoolhouses . . . 46.20 
27 feet rod, Lincoln street . . 38.80 
Lightning rods, Varney schoolhouse . 180.86 
Lightning rods, Hallsville . . . 13499 
Paid Warren Harvey, stonework, train- 
ing school ..... 150.00 

Peter Harris, 6 keys for schoolhouses .65 
Thomas A. Lane Co., material and 
labor, plumbing, piping, etc., sun- 
dry schoolhouses . . 1,261.40 
Manchester Hardware Co., 2 dozen 

locks ...... 6.50 

Paid Manchester Heating & Lighting Co.: 

Electric gongs, .'\sh street . . . 54-50 

Electric labor, Varney . . . .80 

4 pounds sal ammoniac . . . .32 

Paid Pike & Heald, stoves, grates, pipe, 

ventilator, drinking cups, labor, etc. 179-45 



;^,39i-55 



642 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid G. R. Vance : 

96 boxes at IOC 

Labor on roof, high school 

Paid Ashley A. Amlaw, repairing water' 

pipe 

D. J. Adams, keys, etc. . 

Paid George Whitford : 

5 loads stone chips, Lincoln street 
12 loads filling, Lincoln street 
Paid W. M. Darrah & Co., 619 square feet 
gravel roofing 
Manchester Locomotive Works, ( 

grates, 307 lbs. . 
J. H. Proctor, pump and fixtures 
Youngsville 



$9.60 

•75 



2,25 
1.60 



7-5° 
9.00 

45-24 
9.21 
4.00 



$2,193.92 



Paid Robert Clark, labor on lawn, Web- 
ster street 

Samuel Boyce, cleaning funnel, etc. 

Joseph C. Blaine, lamp chimneys, 
kerosene oil, making ladder, etc. 

E. T. James, use of hacks, school 
board ...... 

Mary W. Mitchell, cash paid E. R. 
Coburn for repairing school flags 

Robert Clarke, labor on lawn, Web- 
ster street ..... 

F. S. Bodwell, 3 men i^ days' la- 
bor, training school 

Edward Sears, putting flag rope 
through sheave of flag mast, Web- 
ster street, Franklin street, and 
training school .... 



S59-55 
3.00 

4-54 
7-50 



9.00 



8.75 



4.50 



FUEL. 



643 



Paid C. A. Trefethen, repairing clock, 
Amoskeag 

H. G. Batchelder, putting up rope 
and pulley for flag pole, Varney 
school 

John T. Gott, cleaning vaults, Web- 
ster's Mills, Youngsville, and Mos- 
quito Pond .... 



;^i.oo 



3.00 



8.00 



Total expenditures ..... 
Amount transferred to fuel account .... 
Amount transferred to printing and advertising ac- 
count 

Amount transferred to contingent expenses account 
Amount transferred to free text-books account . 
Amount transferred to furniture and supplies account 



^110.84 



;, 263.08 


375-65 


32-45 


105.16 


75-07 


124.42 



^5>975-83 



Fuel. 

Appropriation ..... ^4,800.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 4.50 
Amount transferred from repairs of school- 
houses account 375-65 



$5>i8o.i5 



Expenditures. 



COAL. 




Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 




366,827 lbs. coal at ^7 


. §1,466.38 


317,760 lbs. coal at $6.50 . 


• 1,032.72 


Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co.: 




20,000 lbs. coal at ^7 . 


70.00 


135,420 lbs. coal at $6.50 . 


440.12 



644 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Moore & Preston, 311,825 lbs. coal 

at $6.50 $1,013.41 

E. V. Turcotte, 215,485 lbs. coal at 

$6.50 700.32 

A. & D. M. Poore, 2,000 lbs. stove 

coal ...... 7.50 



$4,730-45 



Paid L. B. Bod well & Co.: 

2 cords pine wood, sawed and split 
y2, cord mixed wood, sawed and split . 
Paid The James Baldwin Co. : 

5 barrels wood ..... 

Sawdust 

Paid Henry P. Dobbins, piling wood 

J. Hodge, 2 loads kindling wood, 
Bakersville . . . . 

Mary A. Seavey, cash paid for pil- 
ing wood, Youngsville schoolhouse 
William Stevens, cash paid Blood & 
Co., labor on stove 
Paid Luther S. Proctor : 

195^ cords of hard wood and pine wood 

delivered at sundry schoolhouses 
47 cords hard wood 
11^ cords pine wood 
Paid S. A. Blood, y^ cord wood, Halls 
ville ...... 



i^I2.25 
4.00 

1. 00 

3-5° 
1.25 



•35 



100.50 

277.30 

46.00 

2-75 



$449-7° 



Total expenditures 



$5>iSo.i5 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 645 

Furniture and Supplies. 

Appropriation ..... $700.00 

Transferred from repairs of schoolhouses 

account ...... 124.42 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 100.85 



Expenditures, 
chemical apparatus, supplies, etc. 

Paid Tebbetts & Soule, chemical supplies, 

all kinds ..... $98.32 

D. C. Heath & Co., i astral lantern 10.00 
Paid Ward's Natural Science Establish- 
ment : 

I model ear .... . 15.00 

I model eye 12.00 

Paid Albert Somes, express paid on models .90 

E. M. Bryant, sal ammoniac, labor, 

etc 1.60 

J. J. Holland, Platts' chlorides . > i.oo 



HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., curtain 
rings, floor brushes, padlocks, scrub 
brush, putty, glass, snow shovel, call 
bells, brooms, etc $38.28 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Transom catches, sash cord, waste bas- 
kets 5.43 

175 feet hose ..... 17-50 

60 half-pints liquid glue . . . 11.25 

6 18 X 30 wire mats .... 9.00 



$925-27 



$138.82 



646 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



2 No. lo ash barrels . 




$6.50 


60 half-pints liquid glue 




11.25 


Dusters, screws, hinges, other hard 


ware 


82.04 


Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., ax, shovel, 




floor brushes 




8-55 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 2 


^gal- 




vanized waste cans 




4.S0 


R. McQuarry, 48 wash basins 




3-48 


Paid Charles A. Austin & Co. : 






6 floor brushes . . . . 


. 


9.00 


3 dusters 




2.25 



$209.33 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Paid J. P. Ankarloo, coloring pegs . . $2.50 

Boston School Supply Co., sundry 

books ..... 24.31 

Paid D. C. Heath & Co. : 
Progressive outline maps . . . 4.10 

Outline maps for training school . 1.03 

Paid J. L. Hammett : 

12 poundsjfoolscap, etc. . $47-53 
Less 12 pounds foolscap re- 
turned .... 25.92 



I Johnston's map, etc. 


21.61 
2.50 


I set Reed's objects, etc. 


3-87 


I American globe .... 


9.00 


4 Stanford's'maps .... 


15.00 


Kindergarten supplies, Webster-street 




school ...... 


3.82 


Paid George^S. Perry & Co. : 




10 gallons ink ..... 


6.40 


72 ink wells and glasses 


8.30 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



647 



Paid Prang Educational Co., envelopes, 

specimen charts, etc. .... $53-68 

Paid Silver, Burdett & Co. : 

Stanford's map of Europe . . . 4-oo 
Historical Chart, map of North Amer- 
ica and United States . . . 20. So 
Map of Asia, map of Africa . . 8.25 

3 Stanford's maps .... 12.45 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co., curtain 

fixtures, paper and all kinds of sta- 
tionery ..... 47.08 

Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, 2 

black typewriter ribbons . . 2.00 

Mead, Dodge & Co., 100 sheets 

paper 2.50 

The American Book Co., i Webster's 

dictionary .... 8.65 

Ginn & Co., i music chart and 

easel "8.63 

Daniels & Downs, i ream paper . 1.55 

FURNITURE. 

Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co. : 

1 table, Ash-street school . . . $3-oo 

2 wood chairs, Varney school . . i.oo 
I teacher's chair, Varney school . . 2.00 

4 teachers' chairs, Lincoln-street school 7.25 
I oak desk, Webster-street school . i5-oo 
4 chestnut chairs, Lincoln-street school 2.00 
6 chairs, training school . . . lo-S^ 
I 5-foot table, training school . . 8.00 

1 desk, 3 chairs, high school . . 33-oo 

2 chairs, Hallsville school . . . 3.70 
12 chestnut chairs, Webster-street 

school ...... 5.50 

I table, Webster-street school . . 2.50 



$272.03 



648 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Higgins Bros. Co. : 

I table, Lowell-street school . . $2.50 

I roll-top desk, Ash-street school 26.50 

I ofifice chair, Ash-street school . . 3.50 
Paid J. Y. McQueston, i table, 5x2^ 

feet, Hallsville school . . 2.75 
Manchester Heating & Lighting Co., 

I electric bell and wire . . 1.45 
Paid George S. Perry & Co. : 

4 teachers' desks . . . . 89.72 

48nik-wells 8.15 

Paid Weston & Hill Co., 2 mats . . 4.50 

James P. Slattery, repairing clocks 14.75 



Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., lumber 
used at Ash-street school in mak- 
ing drawing exhibit . . . $6.00 
Barton & Co., 40 yards cambric. 
Franklin-street and Varney 
* schools ..... 2.00 
Emma J. Ela, cash paid Willie Ca- 
hill for carrying water, at Harvey 
school, II weeks at 50 cents . 5.50 
Paid T. F. Fifield : 

Soap and oil .... . 1.38 

5 gallons oil and can, Hallsville . . 1.50 
Paid The American Book Co., 25 pack- 
ages oak tags ..... 10.40 

Paid Weston & Hill Co. : 

40 papers needles . . . 2.50 

6 yards silkiline ..... .75 

4 rods ...... .40 



^247.27 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 649 

Paid F. E. Nelson, 6 dozen scissors, 
paper cutting in primary and middle 
schools ...... $3-oo 

Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 

I set tin measures, Blodget-street school 
Drinking cups, mop handles, etc. 
Paid A. M. Eastman : 

3 gallons oil .... . 

Soap . . . . . . * . 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., blotters, card- 
board, etc. .... 

P. C. Cheney Co., book and paper 
Clark & Estey, i^ yards oilcloth 
Joseph Lewis, repairing and re-seat- 
ing chair ..... 

A. J. Smith, 3 dozen sheets carbon 
paper ..... 

A. N. Clapp, I gallon kerosene oil, 
1 lamp chimney 

Total expenditures 



I.IO 




13-31 




•45 
•72 




4.19 

1.50 

■33 




•75 




1.80 




.24 


$57-82 
$925-27 



Books and Stationery. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures, 
sundries. 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co. : 

1 2 sheets cardboard .... $0.60 

I ream drawing paper .... 18.00 



650 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid W. p. Goodman, drawing paper, mu- 
cilage, rubber bands, blotting 
paper, and other stationery . $1498 

S, S. Piper, postmaster, postage 

stamps, superintendent's ofitice . 25.00 

E. B. Woodbury, cash paid for post- 
age 3.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 6 quires 

paper 2.10 

University Publishing Co., i Lippin- 

cott's Gazetteer .... 8.25 



$71-93 



Total expenditures $7i-93 

Amount transferred to free text-books account . 228.07 



§300.00 



Printing and Advertising. 

Appropriation ..... $350.00 

Transferred from repairs of schoolhouses 

account ...... 32.45 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 29.35 



$411.80 



Expenditures. 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid A. S. Campbell & Co.: 

Printing 150 yea and nay blanks for use 

of school board .... ^1-35 

600 postals and printing same . . 7.70 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Printing 500 reports, 60 pages and cover 38.00 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 651 



Printing application blanks, circulars 
examination papers, cards, orders 
and blanks of all kinds . 

200 blank books, chemistry 

3,880 blanks, circulars, etc. 



$264.25 
75.00 

25-50 



$411.80 



Total expenditures ..... $411.80 



Contingent Expenses, 

Appropriation ..... $1,800.00 

Transferred from repairs of schoolhouses 

account ...... 105.16 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 232.05 



Expenditures, 
freight and cartage. 

Paid Wm. E. Buck, cash paid for freight 
on text-books and other school sup- 
plies, telegrams, etc., from April, 1891, 
to March, 1893 ..... $44-23 
Paid F. P. Colby : 

Moving and unpacking 3 grand pianos x5.oo 

Freight paid on same . . . . 6. 1 7 

Moving piano from training school to 

Webster's Mills school . . . 3.00 

Paid J. G. Jones, freight and trucking 
school furniture, text-books, etc., 
from December 26, 1892, to De- 
cember 19, 1893 • • • 53-69 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 

slates 8.80 



$2,137.21 



652 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WATER AND GAS. 



Paid Water-works, use of water . $499.80 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas . . 220.08 
The Electric Company, electric 

lights, North Main street . . 3.50 

• $723-38 

ANNUAL GRADUATION. 

Paid John Robbie Co., ribbon for di- 
plomas ..... 

D. A. Simons, use of chairs . 

Manchester Opera House, rent of 
house, June 24, 1893 . 

Wm. Heron, Jr., writing diplomas . 

Ginn & Co., 210 coda . 

Frank P. Colby, moving piano to 
Opera House .... 

Frank W. Fitts, 16 yards ribbon 

Charles A, Hoitt & Co., use of chairs 

^123.17 

OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT AND SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Paid F. T. E. Richardson, expenses of 
committee on music to Boston to 
examine pi^no . . . . $7-24 

Temple «&: Farrington Co., i canvas 

cover ..... 1. 00 

W. P. Goodman, erasers, rubber 
bands, envelopes, and other sta- 
tionery ..... 8.10 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clock i.oo 

W. E. Buck, for carriage hire . . 105.00 

$122.34 



$12.03 


13.10 


50.00 


32.7s 


5-04 


6.00 


1.44 


2.81 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 653 



Paid Peter Harris, 4 keys . . . ^^0.65 

Joseph Lewis, repairing two chairs . 1.30 
Manchester Hardware Co., floor 

brush, 20-inch ostrich duster . 3.25 

T. F. Fifield, i package Gold Dust .25 
Timothy McKenna, cleaning 11 

schoolhouse vaults . . . 41-25 
Ginn & Co., i Mason's chart and 

easel 8.53 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos . . 28.75 
E. M. Cundall, 3 felt grand piano 

covers ..... 24.00 
E. D. Castelow & Sons, 3 tabourets, 

ebony in maroon silk plush . 16.50 

Chickering & Sons, 3 grand pianos 825.00 
Paid James P. Slattery : 

Clock, Lincoln-street school . . 3.75 

Clock, Webster-street school . . 3.75 

Clock, Varney school . . . . 3.75 

Repairing clocks, sundry schools . 11-25 

Paid labor as per pay-roll, in district No. 2 : 

February . . . . . 26.00 

March . . . . . . 18.90 

December ..... 8.75 

Paid Oliver Ditson, music . . . 4.20 

Paid Emma J. Ela : 

Cash paid for carrying water 14 weeks - 7.00 

Cash paid for putting in wood . . .60 



$1,037-43 

Total expenditures ..... ^2, 137. 21 



654 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 


Care of Rooms. 




Appropriation 




Expenditures. 




JANITORS. 




Paid John L. Avery, High and Ashstreet 




schoolhouses .... 


$600.00 


E. P. Cogswell, Franklin-street and 




training school houses 


475-00 


William Stevens, Lincoln-street and 




Wilson Hill schoolhouses . 


450.00 


H. G. Batchelder, Varney and South 




Main-street schoolhouses 


450.00 


Wm. H. Morrill, Spring-street and 




Lowell-street schoolhouses . 


350-04 


Joseph C. Blaine, Main-street school- 




house 


175.02 


Wm. H. Newry, Hallsville school- 




house ..... 


337-50 


H. C. Dickey, Bakersville school- 




house 


300.00 


J. E. Bailey, Amoskeag schoolhouse 


170.04 


C. M. Whiting, Webster-street and 




Blodget-street schoolhouses 


437-49 


Henry P. Dobbins, Goffe's Falls 




schoolhouse .... 


41.50 


Inez M. Warren, Stark district school- 




house 


40.25 


Samuel N. Boyce, Harvey district 




schoolhouse .... 


24.00 


Etta B. Proctor, Youngsville school- 




house ..... 


20.25 


Allie F. Proctor, Youngsville school- 




house 


10.50 



$4,300.00 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 655 



lid Merton Coleman, Webster's Mills 




schoolhouse .... 


$38-00 


D. S. Dunbar, Mosquito Pond school- 




house 


27-75 


Emma J. Ela, Harvey district school- 




house ..... 


26.75 


Wm. F. Conner, Main-street school- 




house ..... 


145.85 



,119.94 



Paid M. C. Hawks, cash paid Mary Pritz- 
kan for cleaning schoolhouse at 
Goffe's Falls .... $3-00 

Dora Dunbar, cleaning schoolhouse 

at Mosquito Pond . . . 2.50 

Mrs. Bertha Schultz, cleaning school- 
house at Goffe's Falls . . 5.00 

William H. Conner, cleaning, re- 
setting glass, etc., School-street 
schoolhouse .... 5.25 



^^5-75 



Total expenditures ..... ^4,135,69 
Transferred to reserved fund ..... 164.31 

$4,300.00 



Evening Schools. 

Appropriation ..... $1,200.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 57-2o 



Expenditures, 
salaries. 
Paid L. H. Bailey, 22 evenings . . $48.40 



$1,257.20 



656 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Honorie J. Crough, 75 evenings 
L. H. Carpenter, 90 evenings 
Charles E. Cochran, go evenings 
Mary A. Clement, 45 evenings 
Minnie E. Ellinwood, 16 evenings 
David P. Eckvall, 22 evenings 
Lizzie D. Hartford. 75 evenings 
Maggie G. Linen, 75 evenings 
William J. Mooar, 90 evenings 
Arthur W. Morgan, 75 evenings 
Gertrude A. Burns, 28 evenings 
Lottie M. Clement, 35 evenings 
Isabel Esty, 40 evenings 
Cora M. Farmer, 26 evenings 
Fannie L. Sanborn, 14 evenings 
Mary A. Walker, 27 evenings 
Etta L. Boardman, 40 evenings 

JANITORS. 

Paid J. C. Blaine, services as janitor 

Wm. H. Morrill, services as janitor 

Wm. F. Conner, services as janitor 

J. G. Jones, moving furniture to city 

hall 



Total expenditures 



198.00 
198.00 
40.50 
14.40 
19.80 
75.00 
68.80 
85.00 
105.00 
25.20 

31-50 
40.00 
23.40 
12.60 
24.30 
80.00 



$16.60 
62.20 
16.00 



$1,161.40 



— $95.80 

• $1,257.20 



Teachers' Salaries. 



Appropriation ....... $60,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid teachers, as per pay-rolls : 

January $5>566.58 

February ..... 6,048.15 



EVENING SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL DRAWING 



657 



March .... 


• $5)982.05 


April .... 


• 5>8o7.95 


May .... 


6,087.01 


June .... 


6,120.96 


September 


5,767.09 


October 


• 5>978-52 


November 


• 5,979-45 


December 


6,099.89 




^59>437-65 


Total expenditures 


• $59A37-^S 


Transferred to reserved fund . 


562.35 



;^6o,ooo.oo 



Evening School of Mechanical Drawing. 



Appropriation 



Expenditures. 



Paid John M. Kendall, for services $209.00 

Henry W. Allen, for services 209.00 



5600.00 



5418.00 



JANITOR. 

Paid Wm. H. Morrill, services as janitor . 

SUPPLIES. * 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., 2^ reams draw- 
ing paper 545 -oo 

John B. Varick Co., 3 dozen rubber 

triangles ..... 14.00 



$33-6o 



658 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Head »Sc Dowst Co., drawing tables 

Temple & Farrington Co., 800 sheets 

paper, No. 4,328, ruled to order 



$16.02 



5-75 



50.77 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



^532-37 
67-63 

$6oo.co 



Free Text-Books. 

Appropriation ...... $4,000.00 

Transferred from repairs of schoolhouses 

account ...... 75-o7 

Transferred from books and stationery 

account ...... 228.07 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 153-54 

Expenditures. 



$4,456.68 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 



Paid Allyn & Bacon 

American Book Co. 

Boston School Supply Co 

A. S. Barnes & Co. 

W. G. Colesvvorthy 

E. R. Coburn Co. 

De Wolfe, Fiske & Co. 

Estes & Lauriat 

Effingham, Maynard & Co. 

W. P. Goodman . 

Ginn & Co. . 

Greenough, Adams & Gushing 

Harper & Brothers 

Houghton, Mifflm & Co. 



^72-05 

700.03 

19.64 

2.62 

19.40 

.60 

5-65 
10. 84 
46.15 

•94 

822.86 

104.22 

3-40 

364 



MANUAL TRAINING. 



659 



Paid Holden Patent Book Cover Co. 


^203.50 


J. L. Hammett 


155-39 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


27.66 


William R. Jenkins 


4.18 


, C. H. Kimball . 


-'5 


C. F. King & Merrill . 


401.17 


Lee & Shepard 


34-44 


Leach, Shewell & Sanborn 


7-5° 


Porter & Coates . 


14.70 


Prang Educational Co. . 


403.79 


George S. Perry & Co. . 


397-52 


Silver, Burdett & Co. . 


52.90 


Charles Scribner's Sons . 


3-92 


Charles Schoenhof 


29-53 


Temple & Farrington Co. 


10.57 


Tebbetts & Soule . 


79-47 


Thomson, Brown & Co. 


17-75 


University Publishing Co. 


15.60 


William Ware & Co. . 


429.22 


Wadsvvorth, Rowland & Co. . 


2.58 



34,103.68 



Paid Fannie L. Sanborn, services as clerk in superin- 
tendent's office ....... ;^353.oo 



Total expenditures 



^4,456.68 



Manual Training. 



Appropriation 



$1,200.00 



Expenditures. 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co. 
75 sheets white cardboard . 



$3.00 



$9-51 


I.50 


1-75 


377-35 


1-75 


•5° 


3 22 


lO.OO 



bbO REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Stationery of all kinds 
Cutting 1,500 pieces paper . 
I roll blue print 
Paid Fred E. Brown : 
Services as teacher 
I roll of blue print 
Express to Hallsville . 
Expenses to meet committee 
Paid James P. Brown & Co., 36 aprons 
Bixby & Wilson, 26 draughting 

boards 7.28 

Concord Foundry Co., equalizing 
levers, cap screws, iron castings, 
etc. ...... 12.27 

John B. Varick Co., tools of all 

kinds 348.59 

Paid E. L. Pack : 

26 rubber type and i pad . . 3.37 

I set pig rubber ...... 1.20 

Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

23 benches, to order . . . . 230.00 

Other lumber and labor . . . 77-33 

Paid Barton & Co., 3 yards cotton flannel .24 

Manchester Heating & Lighting 

Co., 2 gas stoves . . . 1.50 

Irving Stickney, rubber tubing . 1.20 



^1,091,56 



Total expenditures ..... $1,091.56 

Transferred to reserved fund ..... 108.44 

$1,200.00 



City Library. 

Balance from last year unexpended . . $4,094.00 

Appropriation .... 4,300.00 



$8,394.00 



CITY JJBRARY. 

Expenditures. 



661 



LIBRARIAN AND ASSISTANTS. 



Paid Mrs. M. J. Buncher, librarian 
A. F. Payne, assistant librarian 
James A. Buncher, assistant librarian 
George R. Fletcher, assistant libra- 
rian ...... 



CATALOGUE. 

Paid Augusta Appleton, services, exami- 
nation of catalogue . 
Edith O. Simmons, services as copy- 
ist 

C. A. Cutler, services and expenses, 
examination of catalogue . 
Paid Charles A. Durfee : 

Services, including balance retained by 

city 

Cataloguing i68 volumes, at 5 cents . 
Paid Louise E. Newell, services as copyist 
Paid Emma A. H. Piper : 

Expenses to and from Boston, January 

31 and February i, 1893 
Services on catalogue and card cata- 
logues ...... 

Paid Library Bureau, 55,000 index cards 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

8-^ pounds slips .... 

124,000 slips ..... 



$800.00 

66.25 

315-00 

223.00 



$9-65 
88.59 
30.60 



591.00 
8.40 

133-24 



3-75 



357-00 
120.60 



1.25 
19.80 



1,404-25 



— $1,363- 



BINDING, REBINDING, AND RESEWING. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co 



$333-oi 



bbZ REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

NEW BOOKS. 

Paid trustees of city library $1,000.00 

WATER, GAS, FUEL, INSURANCE. 

Paid Water-works, use of water for 1893 • $16.00 
Peoples Gas-light Co., for gas . 228.48 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

I cord slabs . . . . . 5.00 • 
144,915 lbs. coal .... 470.97 
^ cord slabs ..... 2.50 
10 lbs. ice daily from June 7 to Septem- 
ber 22, 1893 4.45 

PaidI L. B. Clough, agent, premium on 
$10,000 insurance on contents of libra- 
ry, ^tna and N. H. Insurance Co. . 125.00 



NEWSPAPERS. 



$852.40 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co., for " Daily Mirror 

and American " to April i, 1893 . . . $6.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

200 reports, 28 pages and cover . . $11.00 

Paid Charles F. Livingston : 

Printing 3,000 book covers . . 3.00 

2,500 lbs. book cover paper . . 141.08 

Printing 7,500 covers . . . 7.50 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., repairing leak 

in water pipe ..... 1.30 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

500 postal cards and printing . . 6.75 

Interleaving and binding i book . 2.75 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



663 



12 sheets, ruled 

I blank book, No. 3550 . 
I blank book, No. 3964 

Canvas cover 

Paid N. P. Hunt, cash paid for postage . 


$0.38 
5-5° 
7-5° 

I. GO 
2.32 


5190.08 
$5,149.62 

3>244.38 


Total expenditures 
Balance transferred to new account 





$8,394.00 



Fire Department. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



$45,000.00 
1,501-31 



$46,501.31 



Expenditures. 



Paid Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer 
Fred S. Bean, assistant engineer 
Ruel G. Manning, assistant engineer 
Eugene S. Whitney, assistant en 

gineer .... 
Clarence D. Palmer, assistant en 

gineer .... 
Fred S. Bean, clerk 

Paid teamsters and engineers, as per pay 
January ..... 
February .... 

March ..... 
April ..... 



$1,300.00 
125.00 
125.00 

125.00 

125.00 
25.00 

rolls : 

$1,172.50 

1,205.00 

1,205.75 

1,179.25 



$1,825.00 



664 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



May 










$1,500.28 


June 










1,511.28 


July 










1,419-34 


August . 










1,511-03 


September 
October 










1,515-78 
1,497.94 


November 










1,812.90 


December 










1,730.02 






CALL 


MEMBERS. 





;i7, 261.07 



Paid Araoskeag Steam Fire Engine Co.: 
For year 1893 ..... 
Extra labor, 714 days, account of storm 
Extra labor July 4 . . . . 

Paid Fire King Steam Fire Engine Co.: 
For year 1893 ..... 
7^ days extra labor, account of storm 
Extra labor July 4 . . . . 

Paid N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Co.: 
For year 1893 • • . . . 

7^ days extra labor, account of storm 
Extra labor July 4 . . . . 

Paid Merrimack Steam Fire Engine Co.: 
For year 1893 ..... 
7)^ days extra labor, account of storm 
Extra labor July 4 . . . . 

Paid General Stark Steam Fire Engine Co. 
For the year 1893 .... 
lYn days extra labor, account of storm 
Extra labor July 4 . . . . 

Paid Chemical Engine Co., for year 1893 



^1,261.66 



15 


00 


8 


00 


,261 


.66 


19 


00 


8 


00 


,261 


67 


15 


00 


8 


00 


,261 


66 


15 


00 



[,351.66 

15.00 

8.00 

401.66 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 665 

Paid Massabesic Hose Co.: , 

For year 1893 $1,178.33 

4 days extra labor, account of storm . 8.00 

Extra labor July 4 . . . . 8.00 

Paid Pennacook Hose Co.: 

For year 1S93 i,i7S-33 

7^ days extra labor, account of storm 15-00 

Extra labor July 4 . . . . 8.00 

Paid Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co.: 

For year 1893 • • • . . 1,896.65 

12 days extra labor, account of storm . 2400 

Extra labor July 4 . . . . 8.00 

Paid Fulton Engine Co., 2 months of the 

year 1893 ...... 279.91 

$iT>523-i9 

OTHER LABOR. 

Paid W. B. Abbott, use of horse 28 days 

at Massabesic Hose Co. . . $28.00 
J. Newell Brown, 85 days services as 

engineer Steamer No. 3 . . 191.26 

Auguste Blanchetle, carrying men to 

brush fire ..... 1.50 

George W. Bailey, use of horse, 

Massabesic Hose No. 2 . . 2.00 

W. B. Corey & Co., use of sleigh 

2i}i days. Steamer No. i, during 

storm and bad traveling . . 16.12 

John T. Gott, 24^ days' services 

with team, during bad traveling, 

Steamer No. 3 ■. . . . 98.00 

Ernest L. George, use of cart 2}^ 

weeks ..... 6.00 

Joseph H. Gould, i day's labor, 

Steamer No. i . . . , 2.0c 



666 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Ralph C. Mitchell : 

40 days, extra driver Steamer No. 3 . $60.00 
2^ days' labor on aerial truck . . 3.75 

20 days' labor, driver Steamer No. 3 . 30.00 

Paid T. McKenna, services 3 horses assist- 
ing in drawing apparatus from 
" Kimball fire " . . . 5.00 

Frank O. Moulton, 63 days' services 

as driver Hose No. 2 . . . 94-50 

W. C. Richardson, drawing coal to 

steamer at " Merrill fire " . . 1.25 

Jesse W. Truell, 39 days, extra driver 

Chemical ..... 58.50 

E. E. Weeks, i day's services engi- 
neer Steamer No. i . . . 2.25 
Benjamin R. Richardson, 9 days' 

services, engineer Chemical . 13-50 

H. W. Smith, 6 days' services, Hook 

and Ladder .... 9.00 

Charles J. Wiley, 31 days, driver 

back street team . . . 46.50 

Walter Morse, 2 days' services, engi- 
neer Steamer No. 3 . . . 4.50 
Paid E. V. Rowe : 

43 days, driver back street team . . 75-25 

14 days, permanent driver Hose No. 4 30.85 

Paid Edward Sargent, i day, driver . 1.50 

Paid labor, as per pay-roll, district No. 2: 

February . . . . $11-25 

March 45.50 

Ai)ril 4-88 

May ...... 4.00 

June 12.75 

July 4-87 



$781.23 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 667 

September . . . . . $1.62 

October ...... 36.00 

November ..... 3.00 

December ..... 9.00 



Paid labor, as per pay-roll, district No. 10 : 

July . . ' . . . . $20.00 

August ...... 5.00 

September ..... 6.40 

November ..... 10.00 



50.40 
11-59 



LAUNDRY. 

Paid Mrs. F. J. Dustin, laundry work, etc^ $8.00 

JVIrs. G. M. Goodwin, laundry 

work, etc. ..... 36.30 

Mrs. M. H. Hulme, laundry work, 

etc. ...... 

Mrs. C. C. Tinkham, laundry work, 

etc 

Mrs. W. F. Wheeler, laundry work, 

etc 9.75 

Mrs. Richard Galway, laundry work, 

etc 4.S0 



FaRNITURE, ETC. 

Paid A. E. Eaton & Co., 2 32-inch square 

Salem tables ..... $S'2o 

Paid Darwin A. Simons: 

12 arm office chairs . . . . 21.00 

I sham-holder ..... .75 

4 iron cuspidors ..... 3.00 

4 gas globes ..... i.oo 



;i32.87 



$41.40 



;i2o.84 



668 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Hale & Whittemore : 
Frames for fire-alarm cards . 
Frames for cards, rules, etc. 
Frames for commission 
Paid Weston &: Hill Co.: 

i^ yards matting and iron ends, Fire 

King 

io}i yards matting and iron ends, chief 

engineer's office . 

iij4 yards matting and • iron ends. 

Chemical ..... 

1314 yards matting and iron ends, N 

S. Bean ..... 
3}4 yards matting and iron ends. Vine 

street ..... 

50 yards crash, Central station . 

I carpet-sweeper, Fire King 

I pair shams. Fire King 

Material and labor, Fire King 

I mat. Lake avenue . 

3 sash curtains .... 

44^ yards cotton 

6 sheets. Lake avenue 

12 pillow slips, Lake avenue 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., window 

curtains, fixtures, and hanging same 

John K. Wilson, i window screen 

and fitting ..... 



;io.4o 

3-5° 
1. 10 



2.67 

5-58 

10,16 



3-24 
6.25 

3-5° 
.92 
1.50 
1.42 

2.25 
5-59 
5-.S2 
2.50 

16.19 

2-75 



$125.09 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing 400 reports, 60 pages and cover $37.00 
Printing 500 alarm cards . . . 6.25 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



669 



Paid Nate Kellogg : 

Printing postals and blanks 

Postal cards ..... 

Printing i,ooo letter heads , 

Paid C. P. Trickey, blank books and sta- 
tionery ...... 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 
525 catalogue envelopes 
Blotting paper, etc. . • . 



^32-75 
#18.00 

3-5° 

7. So 



2.25 
•36 



^107.91 



WATER, GAS, AND TELEPHONE. 



Paid Water-works, use of water 

People's Gas-Light Co., for gas 
The Electric Company, electric 
lighting from November 20 to De 
cember 20, Fulton engine-house 
New England Telegraph & Tele 
phone Co., use of telephones 



^649-82 
961.66 



15.00 



225.96 



$1,852.44 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

40,000 pounds cannel coal, at $16 
30,000 pounds coal, at ^7 . 
4,000 pounds coal, at $7.25 
3 cords pine wood 
6 cords slabs 
ij/i cords pine wood . 
20,000 pounds coal at $6.50 
Paid Joseph Masse, 54,170 pounds coal 
Decourcy, Holland & Marshall 

164,575 pounds coal . 
Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 199, 
040 pounds coal 



$320.00 
105.00 
14.50 
19.00 
39.00 
11.69 
65.00 
176.05 

536-04 
646.89 



670 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Moore & Preston, 5 cords slabs 

Stephen Gardner, splitting pine 
kindling wood .... 



$27-50 



3.00 
$i;963-67 



FREIGHT AND TRUCKAGE. 

Paid Concord & Montreal Railroad, 

freight on vitriol, soda, etc. . $9-i8 

John W. Wilson, truckage . . 16.19 



$25.3^ 



Paid Clark M. Bailey 



10 reams tissue paper . 


$5-oo 


I case toilet paper 


10.00 


Paid Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co. 




5 feet 23/^ -inch hose . . 


31.00 


71^ feet 3-inch suction hose 


14.50 


I flexible pipe .... 


14.00 


6 Boston lanterns 


12.00 


Paid Cornelius Callahan Co. : 




I life net 


60.00 


I 12-inch gong bell . 


7-5° 


100 rubber washers, 5^ pounds . 


4.40 


I shut-off nozzle 


15.00 


I tip 


1.50 


I 9-inch gong .... 


15.00 


I gong screw .... 


1.25 


Repairing extinguisher 


1.25 


I New Departure gong 


15.00 


Paid Crosby Steam Gauge & Valve Co. 




I 5-inch gauge .... 


5.60 


Paid Cavanaugh Brothers : 




Bay horse, Hook-and-Ladder 


350.00 


Gray horse, Amoskeag 


300.00 


3 horses 


600.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



;7i 



Paid The Daniels-Cornell Co. : 

5 boxes Welcome soap 

lo boxes Soapine 
Paid T. F. Fifield : 

3 gross matches .... 

4 pounds powdered sui^ar . 
Paid S. A. Felton & Son, 4 brushes 

D. M. Goodwin, 2 dozen extr 

heavy brooms . 
S. F. Hay ward & Co., 100 feet y^ 
inch red chemical hose, coupled 
Paid A. W. Harris Oil Co. : 
10 gallons valve oil . 
lo-gallon can .... 

Paid Merrimack Chemical Co., 6 carboys 
oil vitriol .... 

B. H. Piper Co., 2 dozen 33-inch 
ax handles 
Paid Pike & Heald : 
Water pot and tin pail 
Repairing oil can and i lantern globe 
Paid Plumer & Holton : 

26 reefers ...... 

34 pairs overalls .... 

Paid Talbot Dyewood & Chemical Co., 
4 kegs bicarbonate soda, 448 pounds . 
Paid J. H. Wiggin & Co. : 
I gallon vinegar and matches 
24 bottles ammonia .... 

Paid I. L. Stickney, i bottle rubber lustre 

J. A. &L W. Bird & Co., 448 pounds 

soda ...... 



$20.00 
33-25 



5.00 


9-5° 


40.00 


6.80 


1.25 


14.23 


4-5° 



1. 18 



227.50 
51.00 

16.80 

3-85 

5-24 
■50 

i7'05 



672 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid A. S. Jackson : 



I 12-inch gong 


$5-oo 


12 rim snaps 


11.00 


Trace snaps, etc 


11.50 


Paid Electric Gas-Lighting Co., 50 pounds 




sal ammoniac .... 


4-25 


Scollay & Rich, 12 quarts polish . 


6.25 


Paid People's Gas- Light Co. : 




I stove 


4.00 


Tubing ...... 


1.44 


Paid Kimball Carriage Co. : 




I mat 


2.50 


2 collars ...... 


Q.OO 



PLUMBING, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber, labor, etc. $10.18 
Paid J. J. Abbott : 

Stock and labor painting and paptring 

tenements . . . . 16.27 

2 lights glass and setting . . . 3.13 
Paid James R. Carr & Co., glass and set- 
ting ...... 30.66 

A. M. Finney, cleaning and laying 

carpets ..... 15-71 

Paid Flint & Little : 

Repairing 2 screens, wire, etc. . . -i.io 

Repairing ladders .... .60 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Machine Co.: 

381 pounds castings .... 13-33 

Welding rod, etc. .... .48 

8 pounds castings .... .32 



$1,978.26 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



673 



Paid J. Hodge : 

Repairing sash, N. S. Bean Co. . 

I window, 9X 13, 12 lights . 

Labor and material .... 
Paid Head & Dowst Co.: 

Labor, lumber, etc., N. S. Bean house 

Lumber, labor, etc., Amoskeag house . 

Lumber, labor, etc., Lake avenue-house 

Lumber, labor, etc., sundry places 
Paid William F. Hubbard : 

Putting glass panels in door 

I sash, 6 lights, 9X 13 
Paid Thos. A. Lane Co., material, labor 
Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 

I Amoskeag 3-horse hitch, attached 

I new crossbar .... 

Repairs of rear drawbar 

1 ash grate, third size 

2 ash grates, second size 
Repairs of axle, hook and ladder truck 
7 pieces brass castings for stall doors 
Labor on engine 

I gate handle ..... 
5^0 days' labor .... 
^^ pieces brass castings, 8J lbs. . 
Repairing whiffletree, Pennacook hose 
Repairing wheel, Pennacook hose 
Nickel plating 24 pieces 
18 pieces iron castings, 999 lbs. track 

for N. S. Bean No. 4 
Tire setting 

14 pieces castings, 674 lbs. 
I single pressure gauge stand 
I ash grate 
I suction hose bracket and 2 straps 



^0.85 
1-45 
3-77 

464.80 
2.25 
4.89 

106.50 

3-25 

•75 

I93-33 

160.00 

25.00 

6.40 

3-5° 
3.00 
2.40 

•75 

.60 

1.50 

22.80 

4-25 

3-5° 
5.00 

2.45 

29.97 

10.00 

20.22 

1.50 

4-50 
8.00 



674 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



I crowbar ...... 

Nickel plating 4 snap-hooks 

Repairing axle for hose wagon . 

I ash grate ..... 

Express on gauge returned from Concord 
I center piece of grate . $1.25 

I steel gong bell . . 5.50 



Less 28 lbs. brass scraps 



$6.75 
2.24 



3 hours' labor .... 

I piece track, engine-house floor 

Evener bearing, i nut 

Repairing wheel, Amoskeag No. i 

Repairing wheel, hose carriage . 
Paid Pike& HealdCo.: 

Making and putting up boiler pipe at 
Lake avenue engine-house. 

Repairs at sundry engine-houses 
Paid C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks . 
John Bryson, glass, putty, and labor, 

Lake avenue engine-house . 
Charles Thompson, repairing clock 
Paid Fairiield & Truax : 

I door weight, 384 lbs. 

I pattern ...... 

Paid Peter Harris, repairs on hose carriage 
Paid Mills & Sturtevant : 

388 feet oak plank .... 

10 lbs. spikes . . . . . 

I day's labor . 

Trucking ...... 



•50 
.70 

•50 
.00 

•35 



4-51 
1.20 

1-75 
2-75 

4.00 
3.00 



12.96 

13-49 
2.00 

1-51 
1-75 

11.52 

•75 
1. 00 



14.14 

•30 

2.50 

•50 



$1,285.64 
i 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



675 



HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., hard- 
ware, etc $165.22 

John B. Varick Co., hardware, etc. 32.23 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., hardware, 

etc 168.61 



MEDICAL, SURGICAL, INSURANCE. 



$366.06 



Paid A. L. Dodge, visits and medicine , $9-75 
A. W. Baker, dentistry work on 15 

horses ..... 30.00 
E. H. Currier, 12 large boxes Wil- 
liams's Sure Cure . . . 7.00 
J. H. Wiggin & Co., 12 bottles am- 
monia ..... 2.62 
N. Chandler, 6 cans hoof ointment 4.50 
Z. Foster Campbell, medicines . 7.35 
J. A. Charest .... 89.00 
E. B. Dunbar, aconite and condi- 
tion powders . . . . 1.58 
J. S. Golden, visits and medicine . 5.25 
Snelling & Woods, medicine . . 25.70 
A. D. Smith, medicines from Au- 
gust 26, 1892, to August 16, 1893 1 7-92 
John F. Kerwin, 200 lbs. Peel's 

Condition Food .... 12.00 
Paid American Live Stock Insurance Co.: 

Entrance fees ..... 217.25 

Policy fees ..... 16.00 

First quarterly payment . . . 104.65 

Second quarterly payment . . . 117.64 
Paid Security Live Stock Insurance Co.: 

Membership fee 18.00 



676 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



First quarterly assessment, policies No. 

8729 to 7862, inclusive 
Second quarterly assessment, policies 

No. 8729 to 8762 
First quarterly assessment, policies No. 

9752 to 9754 . . . . 



$135-64 



124.14 



9-75 



$955-74 



CARRIAGE WORK AND REPAIRS. 



Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son : 




Painting dump cart .... 


$10.00 


Varnishing express wagon . 


20.00 


I Excelsior wagon .... 


325.00 


I pair wheels, ironed, painted, and or- 




namented for hook and ladder truck 


65-25 


Other work ..... 


294.12 


4 new steel tires, 24 x J 


16.00 


I bolt 


.10 


Setting 2 heavy axles 


3-5° 


Setting 2 cart tires .... 


4.00 


2 felloes 


1.50 



Paid Sanborn Carriage Co., labor and 
material on carts, engines, etc. 



76.05 



!i5-52 



Paid 





BLACKSMITHING. 




E. C. Briggs .... 


$5-5° 


Welcome & Son 




5-25 


D. F. Cressey 




27.20 


J. M. Brouillette 




159.20 


Thomas Hickey 




7.00 


James Morrison 




4.60 


John E. Davis 




18.25 


Mahaney & McSweeney 


427.85 



$654.85 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



677 



HAY, GRAIN, 


ETC. 


Paid Adams & Tasker . 


$57-81 


Daniel Butterfield . 


58-59 


William Clark 


177.62 


H. H. Freeman . 


91.38 


Gage & McDougall 


930.05 


James Kelleher 


16.87 


Clarence R. Merrill 


• i>793-52 


Partridge Brothers . 


428.68 


Perry & Gage 


62.09 


Henry W. Parker . 


229.10 


Paid Melvin Hall : 




29 weeks pasturing horses . 


29,00 


Hay 


93-57 


Paid Lester Hall . 


49.62 


George K. Eaton . 


16.20 


Charles G. McQueston . 


31.81 


E. C. Grant . 


36-57 


'H. A. Horton, carrots . 


35-04 


J. S.-Lovering, carrots . 


7-36 



S4,i44-' 



HARNESSES AND HARNESS REPAIRS. 



Paid W. H. Adams, harnesses and repairs 


$253-65 


Paid Charles E. Berry : 




I pair harnesses ..... 


20.00 


I collar 


6.00 


Paid Ranno Harness Co. : 




Repairing and altering set of 3-horse 




swing harnesses .... 


49.60 


Repairing and altering hai^ess . 


49-5° 


2 blankets 


17.00 


2 hoods ...... 


11.00 


3 Burlington blankets 


11.25 



678 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



6 whips 


$12.00 




2 whalebone whips 


3.00 




Collars 


11.00 




2 fawn hoods .... 


11.00 




Repairing harness 


1. 10 




Other articles .... 


66.70 




Paid Kimball Carriage Co., repairing col 






lar and bit .... 


3-50 


$526.30 






SUNDRIES. 






Paid Thomas W. Lane : 






Cash paid for 125 stamped envelopes 


$1.48 




Cash paid for carting ladders 


i.oo 




Cash paid for express . 


9.50 




Paid E. T. James, for hacks . 


2.00 


$13-98 







Total expenditures 



$46,501.31 



Fire-Alarm Telegraph. 



Appropriation ..... $1,400.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 413-25 



$1,813.25 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men, 


as per pay-rolls : 




January . 


\ . 


$49.00 


February . 


. 


47-25 


March . 




49.00 


April 




45-50 


May 


. 


49.00 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



679 



June .... 


^64.00 


July .... 


69.25 


August .... 


64.00 


September 


48.25 


October 


73.00 


November 


61.50 


December . . . . 


54-25 



Paid George N. Burpee, labor 
Paid W. B. Corey & Co. : 

Labor on wires and poles . 

Labor on wires and poles, 1892 . 
Paid Nate M. Kellogg, labor on breaks 
Edward Sears, labor on wires 



gi.50 



64 


25 


24 


25 


I 


50 


3 


00 



$674.00 



$94-5° 



Paid American Electrical Works : 

49 pounds office wire .... $11.27 

540 feet rubber covered wire . . 8.64 

534 feet annunciator wire . . . 10.68 

Paid James Baldwin Co. : 

420 pins 4.20 

1 10 brackets ..... 1.98 

Paid J. H. Bunnell & Co. : 

200 rubber hooks .... 16.00 

300 No. 12 B. and L. Mclntyre con- 
nectors . . . . . . 21.00 

3 auxiliary bells ..... 6.75 

1 galvanized gauge . . . ; 6.00 
60 feet i-inch speaking tube . . .90 

2 No. 159 whistles, japanned body . .50 
I 2-foot flexible tube and N. P. whistle 1.60 
12 elbows ...... .24 



680 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



I pound speaking tube staples 


^0.20 


I pair rubber shields .... 


•15 


I Standard magnet bell 


6.50 


Express charges . . . . 


.40 


50 6 X 8 jars 


8.33 


I 3 14^ -inch dome bell 


1.25 


I 2 1^ -inch Mikado bell 


1. 10 


I 2 1^ -inch Swiss bell .... 


I. GO 


2 large magnet bells .... 


12.00 


300 insulators ..... 


7-5° 


300 No. 12 Mclntyre connectors 


18.90 


I hand magnet winder 


3.00 


Paid James R. Carr, painting and glazing 


22.20 


The John B. Clarke Co., printing 




400 location of boxes 


6.25 


Paid New England Gamewell Co. : 




Automatic signal box .... 


125.00 


2 lightning arresters (boxes) 


6.00 


2 lightning arresters (gongs) 


3- 40 


3 hard rubber bases for arresters . 


1.25 


I signal box 


125.00 


Paid J. Hodge : 




871 feet 3-inch spruce 


15-70 


12^ hours' labor .... 


5-07 


Paid Peter Harris, set screws and copper 


.90 


Mason, Chapin & (^lo., 3,010 pounds 




blue vitriol .... 


97-83 


Electric Gas-Lighting Co., speaking 




tubes, burners, lamp cord, brass 




pulls, whistle, carbon connector, 




and other electrical supplies 


39-15 


John B. Varick Co., hardware 


7-93 


VVadleigh Hardware Co., orange 




shellac and brush 


.72 



FIRE ALARM TELE(iRAPII. 681 

Paid Washburn & Moen Manufacturing 
Co., 727 pounds hand drawn copper 

wire $97-28 

Paid Pike & Heald : 

I (juart acid .25 

5 pounds solder i.oo 

43^ pounds copper . . . . .95 

Paid D. B. Varney, 506^4 pounds zinc 

castings 176.75 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 

y^ pound copper wire . . . .13 

I strap vise ..... 1.50 

Paid Paige & Myrick, stencil plate " post 

no bills " . . . . . .60 

The Electric Company, 4 30-foot 

poles . . . . . 14.00 

The Talbot Dyewood & Chemical 
Co., 7 barrels blue vitrol, 3,785 
pounds 137-21 



FREIGHT AND TRUCKAGE. 

Paid Boston & Montreal R. R., freight 

on wire ..... ^0.45 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on sundry articles . . . 3.37 

John W. Wilson, truckage and 

freight on wire . . . . 2.77 

George W, Bailey, use of horse and 

sleigh ..... 2.00 

$8.59 

Total expenditures ..... $1,813.25 



682 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Hydrant Service. 
Appropriation ....... ^12,750.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Water-works, rent for 510 h3^drants . . $12,750.00 



Firemen's Parade. 

Appropriation . . . . . . . $500.00 

Expenditures, 
printing. 

Paid the following, approved by the Chief Engineer : 

Nate M. Kellogg, invitations, etc. . $6.00 

J. Arthur Williams, invitations . . 3.50 

Thomas W. Lane, postage . . . 2.50 

«SI2.00 

TEAMS. 

Paid F. X. Chenette, 2 barges and 2 hacks. . . $22.00 

ENTERTAINMENT. 

Paid W. D. Ladd & Co., rations . . $140.00 
Thomas W. Lane, cash for collation 12.60 

John A. Barker, lemonade . . 3.00 

^155-60 



Paid Manchester City Band . . $50.00 

First Regiment Band . . 79-69 

$129.69 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



ARTILLERY. 



Paid Mollie Stark Co., use of cannon . $25.00 
First Light Battery, use of 10 horses 20.00 



Paid Head &"Dowst Co., lumber and labor $75-oo 
L. H. Josselyn Co., use and cartage 

of chairs . . . . 24.11 
John B. Varick Co., hammer and 

tacks ...... .90 

J. P. Kelley, badges . . . 35.70 



$45.00 



$135-71 



Total expenditures $500.00 



Aerial Truck. 



Appropriation ..... $3,500.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 134-10 



$3,634.10 



Expenditures. 

Paid S. F. Hay ward & Co.: 

1 aerial truck, as per contract . . $3,500.00 

2 Pompier ladders .... 40.50 
Freight on Bangor ladders to Chicago 93-6o 



$3'634-io 



Total expenditures ..... $3,634.10 



Police Department. 

Appropriation ..... $40,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 2,643.74 



$42,643.74 



684 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 



SERVICES. 

Paid N. P. Hunt, police justice 

Isaac L. Heath, associate justice 

J. B. Pattee, associate justice 

J. C. Bickford, clerk . 

Michael J. Healy, marshal 

J. F. Cassidy, assistant marshal 

night patrol . 

day patrol 

extra time of regular patrol 

Special patrol 

Peter Larrabee, as janitor 

Frank Wiggin, as janitor 

Miss A. B. Brown, as matron 

C. B. Hildreth, services . 



$1,500.00 

156.00 

4.2-4 

600.00 

900.00 

800.00 

21,435-89 

5>736.o3 

1,923.92 

2,556.81 

78.75 

565-25 

422.00 

159.00 



$36,837. 



WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, FUEL. 

Paid Water-works, use of water at station, 
Clinton-street station, and Slay- 
ton house $197-32 

People's Gas-light Co., for gas . 172-34 
The Electric Company, electric 

lights 312.84 

Paid DeCourcy, Holland & Marshall : 

137,740 pounds coal .... 454-54 

5)4 cords wood . . . ■ 36.73 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co.: 

119,345 lbs. coal at $7 . . . 522.71 

3.] cords wood 25.50 



$1,721. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



685 



TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH. 



Paid New England Telegraph and Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephones 

J. Dana & Son, use of telephone . 

G. Trudeau, use of telephone . 

Western Union Telegraph Co., for 
telegrams ..... 



$166.90 
6.00 



$200.2^ 



Paid George W. Bailey, use of hacks 

F. X. Chenette, use of express team 
and two men .... 
J. C. Nichols & Son, use of team 
W. J. Freeman, use of teams . 
E. T. James, use of teams 



$2.25 



2 


.00 


1. 


.00 


167 


.00 


152 


■75 



$325-00 



FEEDING AND CONVEYING PRISONERS. 

Paid Daniel Davis, rations furnished from 

Dec. 14, 1892, to Dec. 21, 1893 $294.85 

Healy & Cassidy, conveyance of 

prisoners ..... 958.00 

W. D. Ladd & Co., 690 lbs. com- 
mon crackers .... 34-50 

J. B. Varick Co., 1,500 3-pound pa- 
per bags ..... 1.04 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co.: 

Advertising "found," 3 lines 3 times . $0.23 

Fourth of July, ij inches 2 

times .... 3. 38 

notice, 5 lines 3 times . .;^S 



$1,288.39 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Printing blank book, record of arrests 
200 labels for photographs . 
blanks, postals, letter headings, 

and notices of all kinds 
blank book, record of arrests 
Paid A. S. Campbell & Co.: 

Printing civil dockets 

3,000 trustee writs 
3,000 drunk warrants 
1,000 warrants 
200 slips for blanks 
250 No. 10 envelopes 
2,000 mittimuses . 
300 orders of notice 
200 summons 
500 assault and battery writs 
Paid W. P. Goodman : 

I scrap book ..... 

42 diaries, No. 191 . 

Pens, blotters, and paper . 

Envelopes, rubber bands, etc. 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co., ink, pens, 

envelopes, blocks, paper, and other sta- 

tionerv .... 



512.50 

1-75 

22.75 
15.00 

55-00 
18.50 
24.50 
10.00 

•75 
1.50 

12.25 

2-75 
1.25 

7-5° 

1.25 

24.50 

2.25 

2.08 



16.59 



^237.56 



MEDICAL, SURGICAL, AND SANITARY. 



Paid D. S. Adams, M. D., examination 

of suicide, James Collins . 
Paid M. J. Healy : 

Cash paid for carrying Mary Cannon 

to insane asylum ... 

Cash paid for hack hire 

Cash paid Officers O'Malley and Hart- 

nett 



$3.00 



4.25 
1. 00 

4-50 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 687 

Cash paid for conveying Mary Butler 

to insane asylum .... $305 

Cash paid Officers O'Malley and Sulli- 
van ...... 4.50 

Paid F. H. Thurston, medicines . . 6.45 

Paid F. S. Burnham, M. D.: 

Certificate of insanity, Dennis Manna- 

han ...... 3.00 

Consultation and assistance, case of Mi- 
chael Heenan . . . . 5.00 

Autopsy on body of infant . . . 25.00 

Paid I. L. Carpenter, M. D.: 

Certificate of insanity, Paul Swatz . 3.00 

Certificate of insanity, Mary Connor . 3.00 

Paid Frederick Perkins, M. D.: 

Certificate of insanity, Dennis Manna- 

han ...... 3.00 

Certificate of insanity, Mary Cannon . 3.00 

Surgical treatment of sundry persons 

from Jan. 14 to Aug. 19, 1893 . 99.00 

Autopsy on body of infant . . 25.00 

Paid E. M. James, use of steamer search- 
ing for body of Philip Deschenes, 

2 days at |5 . . . . 10.00 

John T. Beach, ambulance and ex- 
tra fixtures .... 525.00 

J. J. Holland, 2 carboys, 172 lbs., 

aqua ammonia .... 20.64 

Geo. W. Bailey, use of horse and 

man for ambulance . . . 25.25 

J. B. Varick Co., cotton rope, fish 
hook, twine, 50 feet fuse, 5^ lbs. 
dynamite, 50 blasting caps, search- 
ing for drowned man in the city's 
drinking water . . . . 9.56 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Fred H. Partelow : 

Boat hire, 3 boats 5 days 

I oar, broken .... 

Towing barge .... 

Steamer hire . 

(Searching for Harry Dadman's body.) 

Paid George A. Farvvell, use of steamer 

dragging for body of H. Dadman 

E. H. Holmes, use of team to take 

diver and outfit to the pond 



$15.00 

I. GO 
3.00 

5.00 



5.00 



5.00 



LAUNDRY, ETC. 



Paid Mrs. Fillibert, washing blankets, 


vin- 




dows, floors, and cleaning at 


po- 




lice station 




^103-75 


Mrs. J. F. Wiggin, washing towels, 




blankets, sheets, etc. . 




39.01 


A. N. Clapp, soapine 




.24 


A. M. Finney, cleaning and laying 




carpets in police court rooms 


. 


2.64 


Paid Daniels-Cornell Co.: 






6 boxes soapine .... 




19.85 


I box toilet soap .... 




4.00 


Paid J. B. Varick Co.: 






2^ pounds sponge 




1.45 


I whitewash brush and handle 




1.20 


Mop heads, yarn, etc. . 




4.14 


I dozen Gem brooms . 




2.25 


Paid Clark M. Bailey : 






6 mops 




1.25 


2 cases toilet paper 




20.00 



$199.78 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



689 



ROGUES GALLERY. 



Paid Thomas F. Adams : 

I oak photograph cabinet . 
I criminal record book 

Paid L. W. Colby, photographing 
nals .... 



$45.00 
6.75 

33-50 



$85.25 



REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paint and painting 

court rooms, etc. . . 

Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

Lumber and labor .... 

9 outside windows .... 

Painting, etc. ..... 

Paid Baker & O'Brien, paint, brush, 

ground glass, etc. 

John W. Wilson, truckage to station 

Concord & Montreal R. R,, freight 

M. J. Coleman, repairs on pipes, 

water-clo3ets, etc. 
Peter Harris, keys, repairing locks, 
etc. ...... 

Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co.: 

I mirror ...... 

2 J yards enamel cloth- 
Paid D. A. Simons : 
12 mattresses 
12 pillows . 
40 yards duck 
40 pounds excelsior 
6 days' labor 
Paint and painting 
44 



$46.11 



IO-35 


41.10 


6.96 


5-53 


•25 


.98 


51.60 


4-15 



•50 







23.00 






7-56 






10.00 






.80 






18.00 






2.00 



690 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co.: 

24 feet ^^-inch pipe . . . . $0.96 

1 ^-inch chandelier loop . . . .20 

2 gauge glasses .50 

Valve packing and labor ... .50 

Paid E. C. Morris & Co., new lock on 

vault doors, teaming, etc. . . 26.50 

J. A. Pigeon, repairing bunks, chains, 

etc 12.75 

Paid Pike & Heald : 

Stock and labor repairing steam pipe . 21.91 

12 tin dippers ..... 6.00 

Hose nozzle, repairing hose, etc. . 2.75 

6 opal globes ..... 1.50 

50 feet hose ..... 4.50 

Paid John Robbie Co., 2 pieces fly netting .86 

Fred A. Russell, cleaning and repair- 
ing clocks ..... 4.50 
John B. Varick Co., i ^-inch lever 

bibb .50 

Paid Charles E. Lord : 

ij{ hours' mason work ... .50 

Cement and mortar . . . . .15 

Paid J. G. Jones, moving rope twice, to 

and from Merrimack common . .75 

E. H. McQuade, repairing electric 

bell 1.50 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and 

labor, Clinton-street station . i.ii 

L. Pope, repairs on bunks, etc. . 2.50 



$322.5; 



Paid Clark M. Bailey, i case Portland 

matches ..... $7-oo 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 



691 



Paid M. J. Healy, cash paid witness fees 

and other expenses 
Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

I ostrich duster . 

5 dozen brass screws . 

4 snow shovels . 

I iron shovel 

1 hammer . 

2 screw drivers 
Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 20 pounds ice 

daily, June i to November 15, 1893 . 
Paid F. F. Shaw : 

I badge for sergeant . . . . 

I badge for inspector . . . . 

Paid J. B. Pattee, services defending minor 

Miss A. B. Brown, rent of matron's 



$476-87 

1-75 

.24 

1.40 

•75 

•55 

•75 

9.62 
2.50 



room 


75.00 


Mrs. Francoeur, board and care of 




lost children .... 


10.25 


Charles A. Hoitt & Co., i rubber 




blanket and mattress for ambu- 




lance 


6.50 


J. J. Holland, 4 combs . 


•85 


aid John Robbie Co. : 




50 yards crash 


6.25 


6 yards cheese cloth .... 


•30 



Total expenditures 



$604.83 
$42,643.74 



Repairs of Buildings. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



$3,500.00 
796.62 



$4,296.62 



692 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men and teams, 


IS per pay-rolls, in dis- 


trict No. 2 : 


January $21.00 


February 








25.50 


March . 








67.88 


April 








26.25 


May 








27.00 


June 








22.50 


July . 








30-13 


August . 








109.19 


September 








34-5° 


November 








85.12 


December 








36.00 



Paid Lovejoy & Stratton, labor and care of clocks 
on schoolhouses and other public buildings, from 
January 4, 1892, to December 22, 1892 



$485-07 



$388.70 



CITY HALL. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., repairs on boiler and vault 
in treasurer's office ...... 



$36.67 



CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber and labor on 
fence ..... 

J. J. Abbott, paint and labor 
Paid Thomas A. Lane Co. : 

Labor on water-closet .... 

Labor on sink pipe . . 

Paid George Holbrook, clearing off snow 

Shirley & Stewart, stock and labor, 

mason work .... 



$28.94 
23-35 

1. 10 
3-30 

8.50 

27.46 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., sash cord, labor, 

etc. $5.56 



POLICE STATION. 



Paid Pike & Heald, plumbing material 

and labor ..... $6.33 

Baker & O'Brien, painting and 

hanging signs .... 9.25 



$15-58 



ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

Lumber and labor, Massabesic hose- 
house ...... $39.04 

Lumber and labor, Vine-street house . 629.53 

Lumber and labor, Fire King house . 1.16 

Lumber and labor, Chemical house . 23.61 

Lumber and labor, Merrimack house . 72.42 

Lumber and labor, Lake-avenue house 270.48 

Lumber and labor, Clinton-street house 5.19 

Paid C. H. Robie Co., concrete work at 
General Stark engine-house, 20.18 yds. 

at 75 cents 15.14 

Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

Lumber and labor on water-closet at 

Merrimack hosehouse . . . 13.20 

5 hours' labor, Independent hosehouse 1.50 

Putting rope on flag pole . . . 6.50 

Lumber and labor on shed at new stable 88.11 

Lumber and labor, Vine-street house . 30.09 

Lumber and labor, General Stark house 3.81 

Paid Baker & O'Brien : 

Stock and labor painting at Vine-street 

house ...... 30.89 

Hanging paper, Vine-street house . 10.15 



694 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid M. J. Coleman, labor and plumbing 
materials at Vine-street engine- 
house $323-60 

James P. Finn, stock and labor. 

Vine-street engine-house . . 5S.90 

George Holbrook, lumber and labor, 

Webster-street house . . . 121.03 
Lessard & Moreau, material and la- 
bor on roof, Fire King house . 5.88 
Temple & Farrington Co., paper- 
hanging at Vine-street house . 15-56 
Paid William E. Williams : 

Repairing slate roof, Fire King house 5.30 

Repairing gravel roof, Amoskeag house 2.24 

Paid Pike & Heald, plumbing material 
and labor : 
Lake avenue engine-house . . . 129.23 

Vine-street engine-house . . . 162.73 

General Stark engine-house . . 2.00 

Amoskeag engine-house . . . 2.40 

Chemical engine-house . . . 1.35 

Massabesic hosehouse . . . . 7.80 

Clinton engine-house .... 4.00 

Fire King engine-house . . . ii-3S 

Pennacook hosehouse .... 10. S3 

Sundry engine-houses . . . 139-65 

Paid John Bryson, paint and labor, Mas- 
sabesic hosehouse and cottage . 124.05 
Joel Daniels & Co., paint and paper- 
hanging . • . . . 62.83 
Charles O'Neil, lumber and labor, 

General Stark engine-house . S°-^4 

Paid John Robbie Co. : 

1 1 yards tapestry carpet . . . 5.39 

•j}4 yards lining .... .53 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 695 

Laying carpet . . . - . $iio 

Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

32 fire brick . . . . . 2.24 

Lumber and labor . . . . 35 -04 

.$2,526.72 

WARD FIVE WARD ROOM. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber, labor, and hardware . $2.82 

BATTERY BUILDING. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, wire netting, staples, 

and labor ..... 13-39 

Pike & Heald, repairing closet . 2.90 

$6.29 



COURT HOUSE. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

Fence around court-house lot . . ^94-35 
Sash cord, labor, and lumber . . 12.28 

Paid Baker & O'Brien, paint and labor, 

health office . . . ... 18.06 

Paid Pike & Heald : 

Plumbing material and labor 
Plumbing material and labor, health 
office ...... 

Paid J. J. Abbott : 

Paint and labor on fence . 

I light glass, 16 X 20, and setting 
Paid Charles H. Wood, painting 4 signs 

for fence . . . ■ . . . 1.25 

Paid Shirley & Stewart: 

16 hours' mason work . . . 7.12 

Stock, etc. ..... 4.50 



103.03 


91.76 


23-95 


•50 



696 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., lumber and la- 
bor, health office .... $79-76 

$43656 

Total expenditures ..... $3,996.62 
Amount transferred to Vine-street Hook-and-Ladder 

account ........ 300.00 



$4,296.62 



Addition to City Farm Buildings 

Appropriation ..... $2,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 598.83 



$2,598.83 



EXPENDITTTRES. 



BUILDING. 

Paid Anson Minard, as per contract . . . $2,585.00 

EXTRAS. 

Paid Anson Minard : 

Jambs, casings, and putting in door . $i-4o 

Door jambs, casings, and trimmings on 

first floor .... 
Grating on outside door 
16 feet pine .... 
Labor on doors and sink . 

Total expenditures 



3-5° 
•95 
.48 

7-5° 


$13-83 
$2,598.83 





PEARL-STREET SCIIOOLHOUSE. 

Ward Five Ward Room. 



Appropriation 



697 



$3,000.00 



Expenditures. 



ARCHITECTS. 

Paid Chickering & O'Connell, plans and 

specifications for basement and 

underpinning . . . . 

John F. Larkin, taking out gas pipe 

from old building 
L. M. Aldrich, labor and material 
building fence about yard . 
Paid Charles O'Neil : 
Labor of self 30 hours 
Labor of John Ferrie 30 hours' . 
Trucking ..... 
Paid Francis Galipeau, on account, con 

tract of foundation 
Paid Pike & Heald : 

10 feet I -inch galvanized pipe 

11 hours' labor .... 
I day's labor digging . 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to new account 



$33-25 
1.25 
6.29 

6.00 
6.00 
1. 00 

665,00 

.98 

3-85 
1-75 



$725-37 

$725-37 
2,274.63 

$3,000.00 



Pearl-street Schoolhouse. 



Appropriation 



$10,000.00 



698 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 

LAND. 

Paid Wm. H. Whitney, consideration for land, deed 

dated February 28, 1893 ..... $3,172.80 

BUILDING. 

Paid W. M. Butterfield : 

Plans of building .... $200.00 



Part commission on account . . 100.00 



$300.00 



CONTRACT. 



Paid Mead, Mason & Co., on account . $5,000.00 
Smead Warming & Ventilating Co., 

first payment on heating apparatus 406.25 



$5'4o6.25 



Total expenditures $8,879.05 

Amount transferred to new account .... 1,120.95 



$10,000.00 



New Schoolhouse, Ward 9. 

Appropriation ....... $5,000.00 

Expenditures. 

architect. 
Paid W. M. Butterfield, on account . . . $100.00 



Total expenditures $100.00 

Amount transferred to new account . . . 4,900.00 

$5,000.00 



ADDITION TO WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLHOUSE. 699 

New Schoolhouse, Hallsville. 



Appropriation 

Expenditures, 
extras on building. 

Paid Palmer & Garmon : 

Marble tablet, lettered 

Lumber, making frame 

8 nickel bolts at 30 cents . 

Putting up tablet 
Paid Head & Dowst Co., lumber, labor 



CONCRETE. 

Paid Geo. F. Higgins, 623 sq. yds. concrete 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid E. H. Holmes, trucking desks and 

chairs ..... 

Manitowoc Seating Co., furniture . 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to new account 



$4,5< 



$26.00 


1.79 


2.40 


1.50 


• 3-224-36 



$3.00 

262.79 



$3>256-o5 



$275.00 



$265.79 

$3,796.84 
703.16 



$4,500.00 



Addition to Webster-street Schoolhouse. 

Appropriation ....... $5,000.00 



700 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures, 
architect. 

Paid George W. Wales, 30 days' labor in 

engineer's department . . $75-oo 

Head & Dowst Co., on contract 2,500.00 



$2,575.00 



Total expenditures ..... $2,575.00 
Amount transferred to new account . . . . 2,425.00 



$5,000.00 



Fulton Engine-House. 

Balance from old account . . . $9,130.00 

Appropriation ..... 9,500.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 3,125.23 

$21,755.23 

Expenditures. 

building. 

Paid Mead, Mason & Co., on account of contract . $10,000.00 



Paid Frank S. Bodwell : 

137 feet edgestone at 40c. . . . $54-8o 
I 3-foot circular corner . . . 4.50 

Paid Manchester Heating & Lighting Co., 
I T., I R. and L. coupling, 7 
hours' labor .... 3.80 

Chas. H. Robie Co., concrete work 281.48 • 

2.344.58 



FULTON ENGINE-HOUSE. 



701 



LOWERING HOUSE. 



Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

134 feet spruce .... 
5 -^ days' labor .... 
Labor and lumber 
Paid George D. Theobald, lowering en 

gine-house ..... 
Paid Samuel Adams : 

Services as watchman ... 
10 gallons oil and i can 
Paid Pike & Heald, materials and labor 
on pipes, sewer pipes, etc. . 
Dana & Provost, team work, etc. 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 25 1 

hours' labor on iron posts . 
Head 8z Dowst Co., lumber and labor 
district No. 10 pay-roll . 
Baker & O'Brien, paint stock and 
labor .... 



$2.14 

1475 
190.24 

700.00 

99-75 

2-45 

95-72 
22.10 

10.20 

797.46 

25.00 

18.53 



$1,978.34 



EQUIPMENT. 

Paid New England Gamewell Co.: 

I fire-alarm gong ... . . $125.00 

I fire-alarm indicator . . . . 125.00 

Paid Eureka Hose Co., 2,000 feet hose . 1,260.00 

Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 
I first-size Amoskeag steam fire engine 

called N. S. Bean, No. 692 . . 4,200.00 

14 days' labor, Fulton Steamer No. 6 . 56.00 

I suction cap, Fulton Steamer No. 6 . 5.00 

I ash grate, Fulton Steamer No. 6 . 4.00 

Painters' stock, Fulton Steamer No. 6 1.75 

21 days' labor, hose-carriage . . 84.00 



702 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



I gong bell, hose-carriage . 


510.00 


Painting and other material 


177.04 


Paid John W. Wilson, carting four cases 




hose 


2.00 


Paid Ranno Harness Co.; 




I pair swing harnesses 


100.00 


I single swing harness 


50.00 


I stable blanket 


3-40 


3 bristle brushes ..... 


6.00 


5 96 X 100 fawn blankets . 


40.00 


5 fawn hoods 


27.50 


2 fire halters 


7.00 


5 stall ropes 


10.00 


Other horse furnishings 


10.64 


Paid Cornelius Callahan Co.: 




3 Hale collars and hames 


75.00 


I shut-off nozzle .... 


15.00 


4 Boston pipes 


60.00 


3 Hale collars and hames . 


82.50 


Paid Frederick Allen : 




I pair engine harnesses 


100.00 


Reins, snaps, etc 


3.10 


Paid Abbott-Downing Co., i hook-and- 




ladder truck 


1,500.00 


Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 




6 keys 


.60 


I 8-foot step-ladder 


2.25 


4 manure forks ..... 


2.30 


Paid Weston & Hill Co., 30 shades, 86 




yards carpet made and laid, sheets, 




pillow-cases, spreads, crash, etc. . 


159-47 


C. A. Trefethen, i drop octagon 




clock 


3-75 


Plumer & Holton, 20 firemen's reef- 




ers 


175.00 



FULTON ENGINE-HOUSE. 



703 



Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co 


, hardware 


, 


all kinds .... 


$27.85 


Paid Pike &z Heald : 




2 agate wash basins ... 


I. GO 


4 cuspidors 






3.00 


2 galvanized manure cans 






11.00 


I set fire tools . 






3-5° 


6 dust-pans 






2.40 


Other articles 






3-51 


Paid J. Y. McQueston : 




4 Daisy sham-holders . 


3.00 


I table . . . 






3.00 


4 beds and bureaus 






52.00 


4 springs . 






10.00 


4 mattresses 






13.00 


4 wardrobes 






40.00 


1 2 chamber chairs . . 






12.00 


8 quilts 






18.00 


4 pairs pillows . 






10.00 


4 sham-holders . 






3.00 


12 wooden office chairs 






16.00 


6 arm chairs 






12.50 


1 8 chairs . 






15-75 


I oak desk 






15.00 


2 towel bars 






.70 


I glass 






5-50 


Paid Manchester Hardware Co., Yal 


2 


locks, oil, etc. . 


9.20 


Thomas A. Lane Co., brass pipe an 


i 


flanges, etc. 


28.10 


S. F. Hayward & Co., i N. P. pon. 




extra and changes 


30.00 


Cavanaugh Brothers, 3 gray horse 


s 600.00 




$9'432-3i 


Total expenditures 






• $21,755.23 



704 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Repairs Vine-Street Hook-and-Ladder House. 

Appropriation ..... 1^1,500.00 

Transferred from repairs of buildings ac- 
count ...... 300.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . 60.12 

$1,860.12 

Expenditures. 



Paid Head & Dowst Co., lumber and la- 
bor $1,792.23 

Baker & O'Brien, paint stock and 

labor ..... 64.40 

Pike & Heald, plumbing material 

and labor ..... 3.49 

$1,860.12 



Total expenditures ..... $1,860.12 



Stable, District No. 10. 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . $1,163.90 

Expenditures. 

contract. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, building stable as per contract $1,100.00 

EXTRAS. 

Paid Pike & Heald, stock and labor . . . $63.69 



Total expenditures ... . . $1,163.69 

Transferred to reserved fund ... . . .21 

$1,163.90 



WATER-WORKS. 705 

Engine-House, Ward 3. 

Appropriation ....... ;gi, 200.00 

Expenditures. 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . S 1,200.00 



Hosehouse, South Manchester. 
Appropriation ....... $2,500.00 

Expenditures. 
Amount transferred to new account .... §2, 500. 00 



Water-Works. 

Cash received for water rents, etc. . $104,170.08 
Amount received from bonds issued . 200,000.00 



$304,170.08 



Expenditures. 



Paid men, as per pay-roll 
January 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 



$1,217.64 

1,345-65 
1,126.69 
1,214.51 
1,991.22 
1,906.38 
1,948.91 
4,718.44 
4,738.61 



706 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



,600.00 


22.82 


24.00 


16.70 


1.40 


1.45 


24.84 


5-50 



October ^3,206.32 

November 2,384.96 

December 1,659.70 

GENERAL EXPENSE. 

Paid Charles K. Walker : 
Salary as superintendent 

Gas 

Postage stamps . 
Carfare, etc., 
Express, recording deed 
Repairing spring, matches . 
Toilet paper, cloth, repairing tape 
nails, etc. ..... 

Mrs. Downs, for typewriting 
Paid A. R. Ingham, entertainment of 
water commissioners one day, 
while examining land about Lake 22.50 

F. W. Elliott, entertainment of com- 
missioners and lawyers, while on 
tour of inspection . . . i7'25 

Henry Chandler, 26 meetings of 

board ..... 104.00 

Alpheus Gay, 43 meetings of board 172.00 
E. J. Knowlton, 28 meetings of 

board . . . . . 11 2.00 

<J. H. Manning, 26 meetings of 

board ..... 104.00 

Charles T. Means, 26 meetings of 
board ..... 104.00 

A. C. Wallace, 29 meetings of 

board ..... 116.00 

Paid James A. Weston : 

Clerk of water board .... 100.00 

22 meetings of board . . . 88.00 



$27,459-03 



$2,636.46 



WATER-WORKS. 707 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

6 time books $4-5o 

Ink and pens i.oo 

Drawing paper, etc. . . . . 1.32 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Blotting paper ..... .25 

Printing 500 reports, 36 pages, i cover 33-00 

75 contracts and specifications SS-oo 

600 half-letter heads . . 3.50 

16,350 bill heads, both sides 36.50 

1,000 postal headings . . 12.00 

4 meter books . . 7.50 

Advertising water notices . . . 5.00 

proposals for engine-house 5.65 

Paid Union Publishing Co.: 

Advertising water bills . . . 7.27 

proposals for engine-house 6.93 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., stationery of all 

kinds ..... 14.98 

Geo. R. Leavitt, engrossing 4 pages 

of house bill No. 73 . • • 3-00 

Wadsworth, Rowland & Co., i roll 

30-inch blue print paper . . 1.45 

James A. Fracker, typewriting six 
copies of boiler specifications and 
three letters .... 3.00 

" Engineering Record," advertising 

proposals for laying water pipe . 13-60 

Engineering News Publishing Co., 
advertising proposals for laying 
water pipe ..... 20.40 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co.: 

Printing 14,400 water bill notices . 20.80 

500 service pipe blanks . 2.00 



708 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Printing 500 postals and furnishing pos- 
tals ..... $6.00 
1,000 exchange slips . . .85 
1,000 blanks . . . 2.00 



$267.50 



ENGINEERING SERVICES. 

Paid Geo. S. Rice and Geo. E. Evans, 

1593^ days' services .... $1,914.00 
Paid Joseph B. Sawyer : 

Services of self and men surveying for 
line of pipe for new map of lake ; 

other plans 473-53 

Recording deeds from Nov. 28, 1892, 

to Nov. IS, 1893 • . • • 54-75 



$2,442.28 



TEAMS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid F. H. Partelow, use of steamer five 
hours, June 19, 1893, by water 
commissioners .... $7-5o 

VVhitten & Fifield, use of teams . 205.00 

Geo. W. Bailey, use of teams . 69.25 

E. T. James, use of teams . 339-oo 

New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., use of telephones . 10S.95 
Paid A. & D. M. Poore : 

6 barrels Cumberland coal . . . 6.00 

2,060 lbs. coal 7.02 

Yz cord hard wood .... 3.75 

Paid Moore & Preston, 3 tons Lehigh egg 

coal ....... 22.50 

Paid L. B. Bod well & Co.: 

89,920 lbs. egg coal to pumping station 3i4'72 
700 lbs. Cumberland coal . . . 2.28 



WATER-WORKS. 




6 feet hard wood 




$6.75 


Sawing and splitting same . 


. 


2.00 


lid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., ^ 


load 




cut wood .... 




•75 


E. V. Turcotte, lo cords wood 




40.00 


■ Mills & Sturtevant, wpod, etc. 




162.66 


lid Charles M. Ordway : 






Cutting 40}^ cords wood . 




40.50 


Cutting 43 posts .... 




2.T5 


lid Albert Cross : 






Drawing 40^ cords wood . 




40.50 


Drawing 43 posts 


. 


•50 



709 



$1,381.78 



Paid Amos Latuch, land, as per deed . $300.00 
Clark B. Hall, land, as per deed . 75-oo 



$375-oo 



LEGAL SERVICES. 

Paid Frink & Batchelder, retainer in saw- 
dust cases against Griffin, as per 
agreement .... 

E. G. Eastman, retainer in civil cases 
arising against city water-works 
in Rockingham county 



$100.00 



$200.00 



Paid Michael Lyons, damage to land and 

building by leak in water main . 

Daniel T. Daley, damage to house, 

land, and goods in cellar by leak 

in water main .... 



$3.00 



710 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Chas. H. Bohan, damage to goods 

in cellar by leak in water main . $5-oo 

H. Leibing, i square of glass, 29^ 
x6S^, putty, and labor, Wagner 
block, Douglas street . . . 7. 86 

John T. Foley, damage to wagon on 

Nutt road ..... 20.00 



$55- 



FURNITURE. 




lid Charles A. Hoitt & Co.: 




3 lamps ..... 


$10.50 


60-foot chain 




1.25 


Hooks, chimney, wicks 




1. 00 


Labor hanging lamps . 




2.00 


Reseating chair . 




1.50 


2 36-inch stools . 




2.00 


Curtain .... 


• 


•30 


I office chair 




• 4-5° 


CONTRAC 


rs. 





Paid Head & Dowst Co.: 

On account, contract No. 3, engine- 
house, foundation, and intake pipe . $6,575.64 
On account, contract No. 4, engine- 
house and chimney . . 4,800 00 
Paid Moore & Co. : 

Contract No. 2, 20-inch force main, on 

account 8,758.43 

Laying 218 feet 12-inch pipe, at 45c. . 98.10 

Paid Bartlett, Gay & Young : 

Contract No. i, 20- inch force main, on 

account 12,558.73 

116 lbs. lead used on lo-inch pipe at 

Fletcher's crossing .... 5.80 



$23.05 



WATER-WORKS. 711 

Labor 4 men ..... 56 00 

4 extra 20-inch joints on cut pipe, 16 

lbs. lead . . . . . ■ 8.00 

Paid Trumbull & Ryan, contract No. 5, 

reservoir, on account .... 229.50 



,040.20 



HARDWARE, ELACKSMITHING, FREIGHT. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., shovels, 
picks, pick handles, hoes, steel 
bars, manilla rope, and other hard- 
ware ...... $229.28 

John B. Varick Co., tallow, glass, 
screws, butts, oil, lantern globes, 
brass wire, drills, hammers, twine, 
washers, toilet paper, screwdriver, 
wrench, lanterns, nails, paint, 
forks, wicks, drawer pulls, and 
other hardware .... 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., fuse and 
powder ..... 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, wedges and 
mending chain .... 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening tools and 
other work .... 

James Morrison, sharpening tools, 
etc. ...... 

John W.Wilson, trucking pipe 

Boston & Maine R. R,, freight on 

pipe, hydrants, etc. . . . 123.41 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 
on meters, lead pipe, and other 
articles . . . . . ii4-57 



288.16 


77.92 


•50 


258.71 


6-45 


4.00 



$1 ,103.00 



712 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid J. Hodge : 

450 boxes $135-00 

339 feet I -inch pine .... 9.36 

83 feet 7x7 pine .... 3.32 

968 feet spruce 15-97 

1,400 pine stakes .... 17-45 

100 chestnut hubs .... 2.00 

21 i hours' labor .... 8.60 

Lumber and labor, 10 lbs. nails . . i3-54 
Paid E. A. G. Holmes : 

Work on canal and reservoir : 

14 days' labor .... 36.50 

Lumber ...... 37-46 

• Repairing fence at reservoir : 

24 days' labor .... 64.50 

Lumber ...... 8.22 

Teaming ..... 1.50 

Building shanty over pump : 

115 days' labor . . . . 30-75 

1,600 feet lumber .... 25.66 

4 days' labor in pipe yard , . 12.00 

2 days' labor at dam . . . 5.00 
Paid C. H. Hutchinson Foundry and Ma- 
chine Works : 
172 hours' labor, repairing old rods 

and making new .... 7.00 

10 lbs. nuts ..... .80 

186 lbs. iron 6.58 

6 hours' labor ..... 2.40 
I load shavings . . . . .50 
Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., plumbing ma- 
terial and labor .... 300.42 
Pike & Heald, plumbing material 

and labor 16.58 



WATER-WORKS. 




Paid Adams & Tasker : 






19 barrels Norton cement . 




$28.85 


25 barrels lime 




22.50 


210 lbs. rye straw 




1.85 


Paid A. N. Clapp : 






6 barrels kerosene oil . 


$15.29 




Oil tank .... 


5.00 
$20.29 




Less 5 barrels returned 


5 -40 









14.89 


Kerosene oil . . . 




•57 


Paid A. M. Eastman, 79 gallons 


oil 


12.45 


Paid G. R. Vance : 






6 galvanized iron pails 




6.00 


20 lbs. smoke stack 




2.00 


Blasting tubes, etc. 




1.70 


Paid P. C. Cheney Co., 103 lbs. No. i 




waste .... 




10.30 


D. B. Varney, 103 gate curb covers 


- 21.45 


Hayes Manufacturing Co., 


103 stop- 




cocks .... 




77.16 


E. H. Gowing, i 6-inch, i 


lo-inch. 




I 20-inch clip 




22.40 


National Tube Works, i 


,927 8-12 




feet 2-inch pipe . 




163.16 


Rensselaer Manufacturing 


Co., 2 8- 




inch iron valves . 




39.00 


Paid Sumner & Goodwin : 






270 Jarecki service boxes 




243.00 


28 Jarecki service boxes 




18.00 


Cartage .... 




1.88 


Paid Sewall & Day Cordage Co. 


, 941 lbs. 




jute packing 




51-76 



713 



714 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Walworth Manufacturing Co.: 

6 3-12 dozen 5-inch cocks . . . $30.00 

10 6-inch water gates .... 130.00 

6 sets rollers and springs ... .35 

Cartage .^8 

Paid Edson Manufacturing Co., 15 feet 

suction hose .... 22.80 

C. W. Cheney, i hoisting jack . 25.00 
Paid American Steam Gauge Co.: 

1 6 inch N. P. comb .... 8.60 
Repairing i 12-inch gauge . . . 2.50 

Paid American Supply Co., 103 lbs. tarred 

packing . . . • . . . 6.18 

Paid Chadwick Lead Works : 

250 lbs. solder 37-5c 

42,468 lbs. lead 1,671.50 

2 reels J-inch 3-pound lead pipe . 65.62 
Paid Chapman Valve Manufacturing Co. : 

4 6-inch water-gates . . . . 5 4' 48 

5 lo-inch water-gates . . . 156.38 
5 20-inch water-gates .... 663.60 
5 5-inch post hydrants, etc. . . 171.80 

Paid Leonard & Ellis: 

156 half-gallons valvoline machine oil 93-90 

I 60-gallon oil tank .... 5.00 

I 60-gallon machine tank . . . 5.00 

I barrel . . . ' . . . 1.50 

52 gallons Lenox burning oil . . 4.16 

Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 
Plugs, domes, covers, sleeves, 

16,772 lbs., at 3 cents . $503.16 
Less 13,880 lbs old iron . 76.34 



426.82 
5 hours' labor on boiler . . . 2.00 



WATER-WORKS. 



715 



yi hour's labor repairing coupling 
8 liours' labor at pumping station 
lo hours' labor on cocks 

2 days' labor on steam pump 
42 hours' labor on hydrant spindle 
\\ pounds brass castings . 

1 melting pot . 
Team .... 
Pressure gauge on steam pump 
8 lag screws on steam pump 
73 hours' labor, steam pump 
12 plates steel, 3,084 lbs. . 
Boiler rivets, 52 lbs. . . . 
Refined iron, 68 lbs. . 
Repairing 6 hydrant wrenches 

hours' labor . 
10 brass castings 
Cutting hole in pipe, 45 hours 
6 brass shoes, 2 clamps and valves, 49 

pounds .... 
12 hours' labor on same 
Sundries .... 
Plugs, domes, covers, sleeves, collars, 

etc., 7,897 lbs. . . . . 
Paid National Meter Co. : 
Repairing meters 
116 5-inch Crown meters . 
30 i-inch Crown meters 
5 J-inch Crown meters 

3 J-inch Crown meters 
45 f-inch Crown meters 

2 I -inch Crown meters 
Paid Pratt & Cady Co., 35 5x52 hydrants 

Union Water Meter Co., repairing 
meters . . • . 



$0.20 
3.20 
4.00 
8. 00 
I. So 
•44 
4.00 

1-25 

10.00 

.40 

29.20 

107.94 

2.60 

2.04 

6.20 

2.50 
1.80 

12.37 

4.80 
103.17 

236.91 

82.20 
,740.25 

453-00 
125.00 

73-80 
682.50 

68.80 
,600.00 

356.84 



716 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid George Woodman & Co., 322 nip- 
ples, all sizes. 

Paid Henry R. Worthington : 
Repairing | inch meter 

1 6x4x6 second-hand pump 

First engine, No. 834, lined up as per 
agreement, May 25, 1893 

Second engine, No. 835 
Paid Warren Foundry & Machine Co., 

cast iron pipe, curves, branches, etc. . 
Paid Union Brass Co. : 

290 f-inch cocks 

102 cocks . 

109 I -inch curb cocks 

100 F. G. nipples 

149 curb stops . 
Paid Thomson Meter Co. : 

57 J-inch meters . . . . 

25 1-inch meters . . . . 

Couplings ...... 

Paid Peet Valve Co. : 

45 6-inch water gates .... 

2 lo-inch water gates . . . . 
Paid New England Water-pipe Co., 8,663^ 

feet pipe ...... 

Paid Ludlow Valve Manufacturing Co. : 
I 24-inch hub flume valve . 
I 24-inch sluice gate with extension 
and nut ...... 

I 24-inch spigot pipe .... 

I standard, less freight 
Paid Holyoke Hydrant & Iron-Works : 
10 5-inch 5^-feet double steamer hy- 
drants ...... 



$20.11 

6.16 

72.93 

3,000.00 
3,000.00 

74,743-5° 

157.08 
48.88 
95-38 
10.42 

130-38 

684.00 

200.00 

48.30 

540.00 
52.00 

1,299.51 

86.45 

61.00 
28.00 
11.58 



325.00 



WATER-WORKS. 717 

3 heads and posts for 4-inch 5^ foot 
hydrants ..... $42.00 

Paid Builders' Iron Foundry, branches, 

bends, sleeves, etc., of all sizes . 700.40 

Manchester Slaughtering and Ren- 
dering Co.. I ton fertilizer 25.00 
J. Henry Dearborn, 21 cords manure 63.00 
I. T. Webster, 14 cords manure . 52.78 
W. J. Freeman, 182 cords manure 74.00 
John DriscoU, dipper, cans, galvan- 
ized pan, tin, sheet lead, fibre 
pails, wicks, etc. . . . 5.45 
James Briggs, 6 galvanized iron pails 3.00 
Paid Coffin Valve Co. : ^ 
2 1 5-inch automatic air valves . . 20.00 
2 1 2-inch brass screw-end valves . 5.00 

4 1 2-inch air valves .... 40.00 
4 1 2-inch brass valves . . . 10.00 
12 brass nipples, 8 brass elbows, and 

fitting same ..... 7.50 

$96,479.12 



Paid Shirley & Stuart : 

10 hours' mason work . . . $4-45 
Stock ...... 1.25 

Paid C. B. Sturtevant, labor on service- 
pipe trench ..... 27.31 

Paid John T. Gott : 

Teaming one day at pond . . . 4.00 

Drawing wood to mill . . . 40.00 

11 days drawing iron pipe . . . 44.00 
Paid W. H. Griffin : 

Labor repairing roof .... 2.50 

500 shingles ..... i.oo 



718 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid James P. Finn, paint and painting . $39-3 1 
F. N. Smith, rent of land and build- 
ings, June I, 1893, to December 
I, 1893 ..... 60.00 

Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

99 feet spruce and planing ... 1.88 

5 hours' labor ..... 1.50 

Ironwork for derrick . . . 4.00 

18 feet 2-inch oak .... .45 

Paid A. Filion : 

Repairing 2-horse truck . 11,00 

Pole to steamer for pair horses . 10.50 

Paid town of Auburn, taxes on land . 59-56 

Paid John Proctor : 

Labor, clearing out brook . . . 10.00 

Putting sleepers in bottom of brook . 6.00 

Paid S. C. Austin & Bro. : 

Lightning rods at pumping station, 182 

feet at 40 cents .... 72.80 

2 points ...... 4.00 

2 braces 2.00 

Paid W. S. Haselton : 

Laying 20^ M. shingles . . 25.62 

70 lbs. nails 2.30 

Saddle boards 1.50 

Paid C. H. Robie Concrete Co.: 

195.2 square yards concrete on Canal 

street 97.60 

1 61. 7 square yards concrete at pump- 
ing station 64.68 

Paid Concord & Montreal R. R,, mate- 
rial and labor used on side track at 
Youngsville during July, 1893 ■ 
200 third-class chestnut ties . . 46.00 



COMMONS. 




35 second-class white oak ties 




$13-30 


2,177 feet long ties 




39.18 


600 lbs. track spikes . 




18.00 


6 days' labor at $1.70 . 




10.20 


5 days' labor at ^2.50 




12.50 


31 days' labor at ^1.35 




41.85 


operty of Concord & Montreal 


R. R., 




for which an annual rental 


f 10 per 




cent on cost is charged : 






1,032 feet iron rails at 22c. 


$189.20 




180 feet new steel rails 


63.64 




84 short iron fish bars 


6.30 




14 pair angle fish joints 


3-92 




I split switch 


34.00 


. 


I 8-foot frog 


23-50 




92 joint bolts and nuts 


2-53 




I switch lock 


1. 00 





719 



$324.09 

Rental to Aug. i, 1894 at 10 per cent . 

Paid treasurer of sinking fund, amount of 

hydrant tax for 1893, being a part of 

receipts for water rents 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to interest account 
Amount transferred to new account . 



32.40 



12,750.00 



- $13,562.64 

$179,025.92 

30,000.00 

■ 95'i44-i6 

$304,170.08 



Commons. 



Appropriation .... 

Amount transferred from reserved fund 



$4,236.33 
302.10 



$4,538-43 



720 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 

January . . . . . . $182.25 

118.75 



February 

March . 

April 

May 

June 

July . 

August . 

September 

October . 

November 

December 



108.75 
210.25 

192.75 
190.00 
129.87 
234-50 
21563 
172.62 
203.87 
135-75 

dis- 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per payroll, in 
trict No. 2 : 
July ...... $26.00 

November . . . * . . 1.50 



$2,094.99 



$27.50 



REPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 



Paid Adams & Tasker, 2 casks Norton ce- 




ment 


$3.00 


Paid L. M. Aldrich : 




Spruce plank, etc 

I frame for casting .... 
16 hours' labor, repairs on wheelbarrows 


7-52 
1.05 

5-21 


Paid J. J. Abbott : 




102 lbs. green paint .... 

i^ gallon turpentine .... 

Paid L. B. Bodwell&Co., J^ cord chunks 


18.37 
•30 

3-75 



COMMONS. 721 

Paid Glines & Fairfield : 

24 chairs, 480 lbs., at 5 cents . . $24.00 

2 patterns, 40 lbs., at 5 cents . 2.00 

Finishing and drilling . . . 4.00 

Paid Pike& Heald, 2^ hours' labor clean- 
ing waste pipe, urinal, Merrimack 
square ..... 1.50 

Leander Pope, sharpening tools and 

other blacksmithing 8.30 

Paid George W. Rief: 

188 feet ash 8.46 

II hours' labor on settees . . . 4.40 

9^ hours' labor on mauls . . . 3.90 

Paid John B. Varick Co., tools, hardware, 

etc 58.89 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co.: 

Labor on fountains .... 
Labor on lanterns and tops 
Labor on pump, caps, electric lights, etc. 
Paid C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Works : 
Grinding knives for lawn mowers . 
Sharpening and repairing . 
Sharpening lawn mowers . 
Paid John Bryson, paint stock and labor 
John Fullerton, cash paid for freight 

on lawn mower . . . .55 

Joseph Buck & Sons, i horse mower 

with seat shaft and side draft rod 80.00 

Flint & Little, i box . . .50 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 375 

lbs. castings .... 7.97 

Merrill & Laird, ^^ day's labor of 

mason ..... 2.00 



71.02 


5-30 


14.07 


6.45 


5-40 


4.20 


1 7-43 



722 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Charles H. Robie Co.: 

Concrete work, Merrimack square 
Concrete work in Concord square 
Concrete work in Park square 
25 loads paving stones 
Paid H. Vaughan, teaming i load lumber 
The Electric Co., electric light on 
Merrimack square from Oct. 10 to 
Dec. 20, 1893 .... 
John T. Beach, repairs on snow- 



$362.37 

175-77 
19.84 

43-75 
1.50 



7.00 



plows, etc. ..... 


5-3° 


York Market Co., 6 barrels . 


3.00 


FLOWERS, LOAM, TREES, 


ETC. 


Paid J. N. Auger, 558 bushels ashes 


$66.96 


James M. Crombie, 19 rock maple 




trees 


19.00 


Paid J. S. Holt : 




1,120 bushels ashes, bought November, 




1892 


140.00 


1,784 bushels ashes . . . . 


223.00 


Paid John B. Varick Co.: 




I ton Coe's phosphate 


34.00 


10 bushels R. I. bent seed . 


20.00 


150 pounds redtop .... 


12.00 


100 pounds white clover 


22.00 


Paid Ray Brook Garden Co., plants for 




Hanover square 


20.00 


Paid D. H. Young : 




2i cords manure .... 


10.00 


I lot dressing for flower garden . 


1.25 


Paid H. H. Huntress, plants . 


75.66 


A. G. Hood, plants for Tremont 




square 


60.00 


Kirby Floral Co , plants 


20.00 



$988.07 



$723-87 



STARK PARK. 



723 



Paid William J. Freeman, horse hire 
Paid Water-works, use of water : 

Fountain, Tremont square 

Fountain, Park square 

Fountain, Concord square 

Soldiers' monument 

Urinal 

Total expenditures 



$4.00 

100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
300.00 
100.00 



$704.00 
$4,538-43 



Stark Park. 



Appropriation ..... $31197-89 
-Amount transferred from Derryfield park 

account ...... 856.39 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, com- 
mons : 



April 


$87.50 


May ... 


1,018.25 


June 


• 1,346.50 


August 


27.00 


September 


114.50 


October . 


18.50 


November 


9.25 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 
trict No. 2 : 
June 



$4,054.2^ 



$2,621.50 



$1,019.12 



724 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



HARDWARE. 




Paid John B. Varick Co.: 




I harrow ..... 


$14.50 


lo round-point shovels 




6.67 


30 pounds hammers 




3.60 


4 hammer handles ^ 




.80 


37 pounds ^-inch cast steel 




2.96 


Dynamite cartridges, fuse, etc. 




5.26 


^ bushel salt 




•30 


6 round-point shovels . 




4.00 


2 12-pound steel bars . 




1.20 


I colter for plough 




2.50 


IMPROVEMENTS. 




Paid John B. Varick Co.: 




Tools 


$9-34 


Dynamite, fuse, etc. . 


16.00 


245 lbs. fence wire at 4fc. . 


11.64 


16 lbs. steel wedges . 


1.92 


Glass for two lanterns 


2.00 


10 staples 


•35 


Paid E. Martelle, sharpening drills and 




picks 


12.95 


People's Gas-light Co., 3 chaldrons 


of coke .... 


13-50 


Massachusetts Broken Stone Co., J 


I 


carloads, 201,950 lbs., size i 


141-37 


E. 0. & J. E. Dodge, 100 loads stone 


I 25.00 


W. J. Freeman, horse hire 


16.50 


estate J. 0. Clark, 40 loads stone 


and weighing 


24.30 


A. J. Sawyer, 50 chestnut posts 


7-50 


Adams & Tasker, 5 bags oats . 


4-75 


McQuade Brothers, i barrel and i 




hogshead . 




•75 



$41-79 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



725 



Paid C. H. Robie Co., 13 loads paving 
stones ...... 



;26.oo 



FLOWERS, LOAM, 


ETC. 




>^>5M-"/ 


lid John B. Varick Co.: 








30 bushels oats .... 




$30.00 




15 bags 




3.00 




5 bushels rye grass 




10.50 




5 bushels redtop 




2.50 




lid Ray Brook Garden Co., plants 




12.00 


$58.00 


Total expenditures 






$4,054.28 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Appropriation 










$9,000.00 


Expenditures. 




LABOR. 




Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 




January ...... $112.00 




February 








171.60 




March . 








126.80 




April 








233.19 




May . 








618.92 




June 








600.94 




July . 








648.80 




August . 








705-56 




September 








526.22 




October 








436.77 




November 








336-25 




December 








234.55 


$4,751-60 



726 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid C. C. Webster, part payment of land 



jsi, 300.00 



PLANTS, TREES, LOAM, CLAY, ETC. 



Paid A. G. Hood, plants 

H. H. Huntress, plants, etc. . 
Manchester Slaughtering and Ren 

dering Co., i ton fertilizer . 
John Holland, 120 loads loam 
Adams & Tasker, 4 bushels rye 
Dennis H. Morgan, drawing 45 loads 

loam ..... 
John B. Varick Co., grass seed 
C. C. Webster, 1 25 loads clay 
Crafts & Green, 259 loads loam 
Sidney A. Blood, drawing 143 loads 

loam ...... 

M. M. Little, drawing 39 loads loam 
Willis Scheer, drawing 10 loads loam 
C. M. Sterey, drawing 20 loads loam 
Edward Emerson, drawing 16 loads 

loam ...... 

Frank Chenette, drawing 12 loads 

loam 

C. H. Robie Co., drawing 43 loads 

loam 



$48.56 
44-15 

25.00 

30.00 

4.00 

56.40 
17-38 

125.00 
129.50 

143.00 
41.25 
10.00 
20.00 

16.00 



43.00 



I765-24 



WATER, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid Water-works, 478,600 cubic feet wa- 
ter, to October i, 1893 . . $717.90 

New England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephone, cem- 
etery and house of superintendent 84.00 

Dunlap& Wason Coal Co., 3^ tons 

stove coal 27.00 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



727 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 3 tons stove 

coal ...•••• $23.5c 



$852.40 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 




and postage 


$6.59 


Paid W. E. Moore : 




Printing blank water rent bills, with stub 


1-75 


and binding blank receipts . 


4.00 


card blanks, government en- 




velopes, etc. 


5-25 


blank water receipts 


1-75 


binding and lettering 4 books 


8.50 



$27.84 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



Paid Head & Dowst Co.: 






Desk railing, ventilators, etc. 




$111.39 


I night latch .... 




•75 


Paid Pike & Heald : 






I lantern 




•50 


I mop stick and mop 




•35 


Stove board, blacking, etc. 




2.85 


Stock and labor, plumbing . 




8-54 


Paid J. B. Varick Co.: 






Shovels, hoes, bit braces, padlocks, 


ax 




handles, steel rakes, 




27.00 


Mattocks, pails, and other hardware 


34-51 


Paid J. Choate & Co., paint and painting 


14.93 


J. Hodge, grade stakes . 




12.89 


Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 






32 feet 2-inch oak, sawing, etc. . 




1-75 


Lumber and labor 




12.38 



728 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Austin, Flint & Day, 3 doors, glazed 
white figured rolled glass 
John Driscoll, 2 brooms 
Adams & Tasker, i barrel cement . 
C. H. Robie Co., concrete, gutters 
and walk ..... 
Paid for new sewers : 

1,000 brick ..... 
I barrel cement .... 

100 feet 8-inch Akron pipe 
3 feet 1 5 -inch Akron pipe . 
Paid Thomas J. Cavanaugh, plumbing ma- 
terial and labor .... 
Glines & Fairfield, 4 iron posts 
F. B. Potter, i 18-inch sewer grate 
Paid Fairfield & Truax : 

I iron fence, 204 feet at $2.25 
Labor on foundation stone . 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Whitten & Fifield, use of teams by 
committee . . . . . 

T. McKenna, cleaning vaults 
Paid B. A. Stearns : 

Cash paid for screen cloth . 
Cash paid for 2 pairs of rubber boots 
Cash paid for postage stamps 
Paid John T. Gott, cleaning vault . 

Joseph Ward, i lot in cemetery, No 
217, on Woodside avenue . 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$5-25 

.70 

2.90 



281 



•57 



6.00 


1.26 


36-74 


•85 


8.67 


8.00 


4.80 


459.00 


30.00 



^45-5° 
4.00 



3.20 
6.00 



1.09 
3.00 



50.00 



$1,073.58 



S112.79 

8,883.45 
116.55 



$9,000.00 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



729 



Valley Cemetery. 

Appropriation ..... $3,000.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 79-5o 

Expenditures. 



$3)079-5o 



LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll 



January . 








$63.38 




February 








74^50 




March 








56T00 




April 








127.32 




May 








284.90 




June 








225.28 




July 








219. GO 




August . 








248.51 




September 








207.40 




October . 








170.60 




November 








164.85 




December 








60.50 









$1,902.24 


Paid Joseph Brown, 2y\ days' labor 


I9.80 




Paid B. F. Bascomb : 






igi days' team labor . 


77.00 




Breaking roads . 








19.25 





$106.05 



Paid Water-works, use of water .... 

TURF, LOAM, PLANTS, ETC. 

Paid Peter O. Woodman, 2,005 ^^^^ ^^rf $20.05 
Joseph Brown, 10 loads loam . . T3.00 
Marshall N. Badger, 2}^ cords ma- 
nure ...... 12.66 



$64.65 



730 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid DeCourcy, Holland & Marshall, 8 
loads loam 
Peter O. Woodman, 20 loads loam 
William Carr, 6 loads loam 
J. D. Patterson, 7 loads loam 
F. M. Shaw, 4 loads loam 
B. F. Bascomb, 2 loads loam 
Charles Rea, 24 bulbs . 
J. Francis, plants and flowers 

A. G. Hood, filling 2 flower beds 
H. H. Huntress, plants, etc. . 

Paid Ray Brook Garden Co. : 
Care of plants through winter 
12 rose bushes . . . . . 

20 plants ...... 

Paid John B. Varick Co., grass seed 

Manchester Slaughtering & Render- 
ing Co., fertilizer 

B. F. Bascomb, manure . 



§6.00 

10.00 

7-50 

3-5° 

4.00 

2.00 

2.08 

42.20 

14.00 

11-95 

7.00 
6.00 
2.60 
7.98 

10.00 
5-25 



.$187.77 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid Freeman Riddle, printing 200 blank 

receipts . . . . . $i-75 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

blank book and binding same . 8.00 

Manchester postoffice, 200 2-cent 

stamped envelopes . . . 4.36 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., ink, pen- 
cils, mucilage, envelopes, and 
other stationery .... 2.74 

Syndicate Publishing Co., i book of 

receipts ..... 2.75 



$19.60 



VALLEY CEMETEKY. 



731 



REPAIRS, TOOLS, AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

72 feet pine plank, sawed to order 
Filing saw ...... 

Paid Adams & Tasker, i cask cement 

Head & Dowst Co., 251 loads filling 
Peter Harris, repairing lock and fit- 
ting key . . . . . 

Pike & Heald, piping stock and la- 
bor ...... 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

2 14-inch G. A. lawn mowers 

3 snaths and scythes .... 
Other hardware ..... 

Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co. 

4 wheelbarrows ..... 

4 lawn rakes ..... 
3 shovels and other tools 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 2 lawn 
rakes ...... 

Paid Palmer & Garmon : 

Cutting over 7 posts and teaming 

5 new posts ..... 
Setting up 11 posts, 22 hours' labor 
Drilling holes, 28 hours' labor . 

Paid J. Choate & Co., paint stock and 
labor ...... 

Paid C. H. Robie Co.: 

1 99. 1 1 sq. yds. concrete at 75 cents 
1 41. 4 sq. yds, concrete at 25 cents 
86.69 sq. yds. concrete at 45 cents 

Paid B. W. Robinson, building chimney 
S. C. Dwinnels, i lawn rake . 



$2.16 

.60 

2.90 

62.75 

.40 
357-93 



12.50 


1-95 


7.20 


8.50 


1.60 



•25 



6.00 

[3.00 
6.60 



3.01 

149-33 

35-35 
39.01 

8.29 

•75 



732 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid A. L. Bixby, lumber, hardware, and 
labor ...... 



Total expenditures 



$58.91 



$799-19 
$3>o79-5o 



Derryfield Park. 



Appropriation .... 

Amount transferred from reserved fund 



;2,ooo.oo 
9-25 



$2,009.25 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 



June .... 


$40.00 


July . . . . 


808.00 


August .... 


185.50 


September 


. . 6.75 


October .... 


16.50 


November 


9.25 



REPAIRS, TOOLS, IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, filiiig saws 
W.^J. Freeman, horse hire 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, sawing boards 

and repairing chains . 
John Perham, use of plow 
L. Pope, blacksmithing . 
Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Dynamite, etc. ..... 

Tools 



$1 


35 


3 


00 


3 


80 


I 


00 


10 


40 


32 


49 


19 


82 



$1,066.00 



AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 733 

Paid F. S. Bodwell, 30 feet covering stone :^ 15.00 

;^86.86 

Total expenditures $1,152.86 

Transferred to Stark park account . . . . 856.39 

$2,009.25 



Goffe's Falls Cemetery. 

Appropriation ....... $100.00 

Expenditures. 
Transferred to reserved fund . ... . . $100.00 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 

Appropriation $550.00 

Expenditures. 

LAND. 

Paid Maxwell & Taggart, consideration for land, 
deed dated April 29, 1893 ..... $340.00 

LABOR. 

Paid James E. Bailey, 62^ days' labor at $1.75 . $109.37 

HARDWARE. 

Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co.: 

Hinges, screws, and staples . . . $1.48 



100 pounds lead . 
25 pounds whiting 
Raw oil, paint, brushes 



7.00 
•75 

:7-75 



126.98 



734 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 



Paid Palmer & Garmon, setting over grave- 
stones ...... 

Water -works, use of water from Oc- 
tober I, 1893, to January i, 1894 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund . 



$14.62 



$26.62 

$502.97 

47-03 

$550.00 



Paupers Off the Farm. 



Appropriation 






$5,000.00 


Transferred from reserved fund . . 2,545.63 


Expenditures. 


GROCERIES. 


Paid Bartlett & Thompson . . . $93-90 


John Cashman 






139.00 


A. N. Clapp . 






7.00 


Eager & Rand 






65.00 


H. Fradd . 






41.00 


Tilton F. Fifield . 






498.99 


Griffin Brothers 






1,033.62 


A. G. Grenier 






14.00 


Gamache Brothers 






10.00 


Patrick Harrington 






10.00 


Joseph Huard 






15.00 


Daniel Jameson 






20.00 


0. D. Knox & Co. 






110.00 


G. C. Lord . 






10.00 


McQuade Brothers 






80.00 



$7>545-63 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



735 



Paid T. H. Mahoney . 


$270.82 


Edward Marchand & Co. 


197.62 


D. M. Poore & Son 


173-71 


Edmund Pinard 


20.00 


E. W. Perkins 


40.00 


Joseph Quirin 


199.76 


D. Shannahan 


144.00 


Schricker Brothers 


19.07 


Henry Weber 


92.00 


J. H. Wiggin & Co. . 


46.00 


S. M. Worthley . 


4.00 


Carl York .... 


29.98 


" York Market Co. . 


8.00 

$3>392.47 



Paid Clement Beaudette 




$10.50 


Sidney A. Blood . 


2.75 


John J. Cushing 


2.75 


DeCourcy, Holland & M 


arshall . 26.75 


Dunlap & Wason Coal C 


0. . . 48.89 


S. L. Flanders 


37.00 


Moore & Preston 




21.75 


A. & D. M. Poore 




19-75 


John Perham . 




2.50 


J. P. Russell & Co 




75.20 


August Schink 




1. 00 


E. V. Turcotte 




104.23 


J. F. Wyman 




28.50 



$381-57 



BOARD AND CARE, AND RENT. 



Paid John S. Bodkin 
Mary Bouchard 
county of Hillsborough 



$24.00 

2.00 

395-00 



736 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



id Children's Home . 


$43-11 




Elliot Hospital 


3.00 




C. H. Giles .... 


42.50 




W. H. Gilmore 


126.87 




A. D. Hatch 


110.00 




Carrie E. Jackson . 


125.60 




Charles E. Lowe 


99.98 




Lamoureux Brothers 


2.00 




Agnes Masse .... 


88.00 




Bridget Melene 


18.00 




Christina Maycook 


122.88 




N. H. Asylum for Insane 


60.31 




W. E. Prescott 


8.00 




John Reynolds 


6.00 




D. L. Robinson 


32.00 




Daniel Stevens 


56.00 




St. Patrick's Orphans' Home . 


138.00 




State Industrial School . 


1,639.49 




St. Patrick's Old Ladies' Home 


8.00 




William Whelpley . 


120.00 


$3,270.74 






CLOTHING. 






id Napoleon Chamberland . 


$3-oo 




Beauchemin & Beaumier 


4-25 




Dodge & Straw 


4.10 




G. S. Holmes 


4.29 




Frank P. Kimball . 


15-25 




Lightbody & Burbank . 


8-95 




M. A. McDonough 


8.55 




MiviUe & Co. 


9.00 




M. F. O'Toole 


I 2.50 




G. W. Pierce & Co. 


3-75 




John Robbie Co. . 


3.00 




Patrick Toole 


4.00 




Weston & Martin . 


19.97 




Wingate & Gould . 


1.25 





$101.86 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



737 



MEDICINES, MEDICAL SERVICES, FUNERAL EXPENSES. 



Paid F. H. Thurston, medicines 

Moise Potvin & Co., medicines 
John B. Hall, medicines 
J. F. Dignam, medicines 
Frederick Perkins, M. D., certifi- 
cate of insanity, Gustave Voight . 
Paid E. V. Turcotte, burial expenses : 
Wife of Israel Girouard 
Child of D. Vadeboncceur . 
Child of D. Vadeboncoeur . 
Josephine Chagnon .... 
Paid F. L. Wallace & Co.: 

Use of ambulance, case of Jas. Smith . 
Burial expenses, Mrs. Emily McKelvey 
William McKelvey 
Mrs. Mary Plumpton . 
Otis H. Whitten 
Paid F. X. Chenette, burial expenses, 
Rene Tousignant 
T. F. Collins, burial expenses, child 
of O'Dovvd 



i.75-24 
18.20 

34-53 
3-25 



25.00 
10.00 
10.00 
25.00 

3.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 



$342.22 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing 100 blanks . 

2,000 bill heads . 

200 envelopes, etc. 

Paid Henry N. Moore, serving notice 

Geo. S. Holmes, team and expenses 

to Candia in the Langdell case 

Paid W. P. Goodman : 

9 city directories 
47 



$2.25 
7.00 
«-75 
3-48 



18.00 



738 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



2 boxes rubber bands .... 
Paid Whitten & Fifield, conveying Bur- 
bank children to Children's Home 
E. T. James, conveying Geo. Fletch- 
er, insane, to depot . 
James Briggs, stove, etc. 

Total expenditures ... 



$0.44 



2.50 



1. 00 
3-35 



$56.77 
$7>54.S-63 



City Farm. 




Appropriation $7,000.00 


Transferred from reserved fund 

Expenditures. 


2,023.37 




HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 


Paid John Bowen . . . . . $33-36 


T. Beausejour 






7.00 


Mary Bernard 






14.50 


Bridget Bagley 






1.29 


Ann Cunningham . 






1.50 


Sarah Cahill . 






135-43 


Thomas J. Estes . 






31-19 


Charles Fuller 






142.97 


Daniel Grant 






233-83 


Chauncy Hazen . 






117.32 


Mrs. D. B. Hutchins 






118.21 


D. B. Hutchins 






167.17 


Hannah Hackett . 






61.00 


John Kelley . 






132.71 


Bessie Laughlin 






10.50 


E. G. Libbey 






449-31 


Annie Libbey 






269.66 



$9-023.37 



CITY 


FARM. 




739 


Paid Fannie Mead .... $1.72 




Christina McDonald 




67.00 




John McEvoy 






9-53 




L. J. Proctor . 






351-00 




Porter Palmer 






68.35 




Kate Rogers . 






3.00 




Nellie M. Stockwell 






22.29 




Fred A. Stockwell . 






38.14 




Mrs. Fred Sanborn 






8.50 




Fred Sanborn 






125-31 




L. M. Streeter 






50.69 




Mary E. Streeter . 






30-34 




Emma M. Streeter . 






25-14 




Frank Thompson . 






46.23 


$2,774.19 




Paid V. B. Martin, threshing ^ 


'rain, 


400 bush., at 6c. 


$24.00 



Paid A. & D. M. Poore, 36,215 lbs. egg 

coal at $6.75 5S117.67 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co.: 

2,500 lbs. stove coal .... 9.38 

9,000 lbs. egg coal .... 31-50 

Paid Moore & Preston. 60,505 lbs. coal . 194.20 



5352-75 



CLOTHING AND DRY GOODS. 



Paid Barton & Co., flannel, print, cottons, 

etc. ...... $10.96 

Burke Bros., boots and shoes . . 46.35 

Geo. Blanchet, cotton, gloves, shirt- 
ing, buttons, thread, gingham, etc. 18.97 
Cushman & Hardy Co., pants, vests, 

hose, mittens . . . . 11-95 



740 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Clark & Estey : 

Cotton, elastic, suspenders, combs 
Needles, yarn, towels, pins, etc. 
Paid G. W. Dodge, boots and shoes 
F. C. Dow, boots an-d shoes . 
C. M. Floyd & Co., pants, vest 

hat, etc. .... 
W. P. Farmer, boots and shoes 
P. O. Gallup & Co., clothing 
Frank P. Kimball, clothing . 
H. M. Moody, shirts, gloves, caps, 

umbrella, pants, overalls, etc. 
John Robbie Co., buttons, napkins, 

print, thread, gingham, etc. 
Wingate & Gould, boots and shoes 
Paid Weston & Hill Co.: 

Thread, hose, buttons, needles . 
Flannel, cotton, combs, print 
Crash, gingham, etc. . . . . 

Paid L. P. Labonte, combs, hat, print, 
cotton batting . . . . . 



$7-S8 

38-34 

60.12 

8.71 

30-50 
3135 

3.00 
4.00 

83-77 

18.46 

5-15 

44.48 

19-53 
23.19 

5-27 



$471-98 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Paid Annis Flour & Grain Co., sugar, oil, 
flour, crackers, etc. 

F. J. Bixby, fish, sausages, yeast, etc. 

Charles H. Clark, soda, beef, cur- 
rants, etc. ..... 

C. E. Cox, meats .... 

Albert F. Davis, 5 bushels potatoes 

Dodge & Laing, beef, potatoes, etc. 

Daniels-Cornell Co., potash, soap, 
pearline, etc 

Doane & Welch, beans . 



$287.98 


43-67 


11.23 


10.57 


5.00 


121.94 


65-83 


39- 1 7 



CITY FARM. 




id T. F. Fifield, chimneys, matches, 




veal 


$2.55 


A. G. Grenier, meats and groceries 


137-49 



741 



A. L. Gadbois, rice, starch, vanilla 

extract, etc. 
Gage & McDougall, 30 bushels po 

tatoes 

George H. Hubbard, 19 pounds 

tobacco 
J. S. Holt & Co., I box soap 
Hardy & Co., tobacco . 

D. Johnson, sausage 
W. D. Ladd & Co., 44 lbs. crackers 
Horace Marshall, 2? bushels beans 
Manchester Provision Co., meats all 

kinds 

McQuade Brothers, sugar, beef, rai 

sins, etc 

Manchester Beef Co., beef, etc. 
T. E. McDerby, meats, etc. 

E. S. Newton, fish, etc. . . * 
New York Market, sausage, beef, 

etc. .... 
Nelson Morris Co., meats 
Henry W. Parker, flour, etc 
Parnell Brothers, sugar, tea, crackers 
E. W. Perkins, 228 lbs. sugar . 
D. M. Poore & Son, groceries 
Public Market Co., beef, vegetables 

etc 

Joseph Quirin, groceries 
Queen City Market, meats 
Tom W. Robinson, hams 
Sawyer & Clay, meats 
R. G. Sullivan, 12 lbs. tobacco 



33-64 

30-75 

5-32 
4.00 

4.77 

17-50 

2.20 

5-25 
174.03 

103.27 

8.53 

17-73 

43-93 

17.36 

36-44 

148.00 

34-49 
11.25 
25.26 

40.56 
100.27 

54.36 
6.34 
3-48 



742 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Manchester Slaughtering & Render- 
ing Co. : 

45 lbs. grease . . . . . $i.So 

84 lbs. tallow ..... 5.04 

Paid E. M. Slayton, beans, peas, potatoes 14-52 
Paid J. O. Turcotte : 

40 lbs. tobacco ..... 8.40 

Meats, soap ..... .86 

Paid John E. Towle & Co., tripe, etc. . 19.69 

M. Verrette, Jr., 525 gals, molasses 14.18 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., groceries . 81. 11 

Carl E. York, groceries . . . 7.01 

York Market Co., groceries . . 2.73 



FURNITURE AND KITCHEN UTENSILS. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey : 

18 whisk brooms, etc. . . . $1.82 

Brooms, pails, globes, twine . . 7.03 

Mops, scrub brushes, etc. . . . 5.88 

Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co. : 

Excelsior, mats, jute, ticking, webbing. 

twine, tacks, quart cans . . . 8.89 

10 iron beds ..... 60.00 

Paid F. E. Nelson, tacks, brush, basket, 

chimney, stove polish, etc. . . . 10,42 

Paid I. L. Stickney : 

Repairing wringer .... i.oo 

Wringer ...... 6.00 

Paid Slattery the Jeweler, 3 butter knives 1.50 

The Kitchen, steamer, cuspidor, 
pans, shelf paper, dippers, tins, 
etc. ...... 10.64 



$1,825.83 



CITY FARM. 



743 



Paid John Driscoll : 
2 milk cans 
Large galvanized scoop 



$i.6o 
1.25 



$116.03 



MEDICAL SERVICES, MEDICINES, AND LIVE STOCK INSURANCE. 



Paid Blackstone & Fisher, i tooth ex- 
tracted 

A. L. Dodge, services as veterinary 
surgeon . . . . . 

J. G. EUinwood, dentistry work on 
horse ...... 

Hospital of the Sacred Heart, board 
and attendance for Michael Kane 
C. W. Babbitt, carrying M. Kane 
to hospital and farm . 
Paid Frederick Perkins : 

Attendance on Mary Ellen Dowd 
Attendance on Bridget Sullivan . 
Paid E. B. Dunbar, 2 boxes ointment 
A. L. Dodge, medicines . 
J. J. Holland, medicines 

E. G. Libbey, cash paid for i bottle 
wart killer . . . . . 

F. H. Thurston, prescriptions, med- 
icines, etc. . . . . . 

Tebbetts & Soule, rat exterminator 

Peel's Food Co., i bag Peel's food 

Paid American Live Stock Insurance Co 

Entrance fees .... 

Policy fees 

First quarterly assessment . 

Second quarterly assessment 



$1.00 



3.00 

10.00 
10.00 

•50 

2.50 

11.65 



32.08 

■75 
1. 00 

53-00 
4.00 

18.95 
23.28 



744 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Security Live Stock Insurance Co. : 
First quarterly assessment, policies Nos. 



8704 to 871 1, inclusive 


$38-45 


Second quarterly assessment 


25-45 


LIVE STOCK. 




Paid Cavanaugh Brothers : 




I roan mare ..... 


$150.00 


I pair brown horses .... 


350.00 


Paid L. S. Proctor, i bull 


17-50 


Paid Welch & Hall : 




I chestnut mare 


181.00 


I chestnut horse 


150.00 


Paid H. Holbrook, i cow 


10.00 


Paid 0. & 0. G. Bailey : 




I pair beef oxen .... 


iiS.oo 


I 2-year-old bull 


22.50 


Paid Curtis W. Davis, 2 sows and lot of 




pigs 


55-00 


Concord & Montreal Railroad, 




freight on horses 


8.25 


FERTILIZERS, SEEDS, ETC 




Paid J. J. H. Gregory, seeds of all kinds 


$12.50 


W. H. Kidder, 7 cords manure 


15.00 


Manchester Slaughtering & Render- 




ing Co., fertilizers 


50.00 


Aretas Blood, manure . 


3-75 


S. Mullen, 10 bushels seed potatoes 


12.50 


Wadleigh Hardware Co., seeds 


10.28 



H.'^RDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., lantern, 
can opener, files, knife, brushes, 
rope, hinges, nails, glass, etc. 



$265.11 



$1,062.25 



;io4.o3 



$7-42 



CITY FARM. 



745 



Paid John B. Varick Co., locks, bit, cas- 
ters, globes, tacks, varnish, brush 
paint, files, etc. ... 
Wadleigh Hardware Co., sponges 
staples, paint, glue, nails, scoops 
etc. ..... 



SI53.I8 



9-99 



$180.59 



HAY, GRAIN, AND OTHER FEED. 

Paid Adams & Tasker, bran, oats, etc. 
Clarence R. Merrill, oats, etc. 
Partridge Brothers 
Annis Floifr & Grain Co., oats, corn 
etc. ..... 

Stark park, standing oats 
Derryfield park, standing grass 



$73-45 


1S8.23 


37-50 


84.S8 


50.00 


40.00 



$474.06 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, filing saws . . $0.70 

D. E. Guiney, material and labor, 
piping, etc., fi-om Oct. 26 to Nov. 

30, 1892 203.46 

Peter Harris, repairs and fitting 

keys, etc. . . . . 1.25 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, labor . 17.28 

J.Hodge, lumber and labor . . 23.71 

Thomas A. Lane Co., plumbing ma- 
terial and labor .... 4.50 
Manchester Heating & Lighting Co., 

rubber plugs and grate for baker 2.15 

Pike & Heald, plumbing material 

and labor ..... 47-58 

A. (Sc E. Reed Bros., mason labor . 16.40 

Paid Clarence R. Merrill : 

2 barrels cement . . . . 2 60 



746 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

3 barrels lime ..... S3-oo 

Paid I. L. Stickney, leather, material for 

cobbling S3-74 



BLACKSMITHING, HARNESSES, ETC. 

Paid Frederick Allen, i heavy harness . $45-oo 

John T. Beach, new spring shackle .50 

E. C. Briggs, shoes and shoeing . 31-52 

Thomas P. Riley, repairing halter . .20 

Paid Ranno Harness Co.: 

I new express harness . . . 45 -oo 

3 horse brushes ..... 3.00 

3 currycombs ..... .90 

Paid H. T. Thompson, shoeing oxen 2.00 

J. O. Tremblay, shoeing horses, etc. 35-5° 
Paid N. J. Whalen : 

I harness ...... 45.00 

Other articles and repairs . . . 45-5° 

Paid J. M. Brouillette, shoeing horses 28.23 

H. A. Green, shoeing oxen . . 5.00 



CARRIAGES AND CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 



Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairing 




sleigh, dumpcart, etc. 


§12.95 


Paid A. Filion : 




3 scavenger wagons .... 


285.00 


Repairing 2-horse wagon . 


57-50 


Paid Kimball Carriage Co.: 




Difference in wagon .... 


60.00 


Carriage pole 


5.00 


Soap, dressing, traces, snaps, pads 


8.60 



$326.37 



§287.35 



§429.05 



CITY FARM. 

INSURANCE. 

Paid John Dowst, agent Capitol Fire In- 
surance Co., policy No. 2,^,562, on 
buildings ..... $20.00 

Clarence M. Edgerly, policy No. 

138,086, Peoples . . . 40.C0 

Paid A. Elliott & Co.: 

Policy No. 80,097, Granite State Insur- 
ance Co. ..... 40.00 

Policy No. 10,204, Northern Insurance 

Co. ...... 40.00 

Paid E. P. Richardson, agent, policy No. 

38,685, N. H. Fire Insurance Co. 60.00 

Edgerly & Sheehan, policy No. 90,- 

124, Granite State Insurance Co. 40.00 



747 



$240.00 



TELEPHONE AND STATIONERY. 

Paid New England Telegraph and Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephone . $42.00 
Temple & Farrington Co., blank 



books, paper, etc. 


5.22 


E. R. Coburn Co., stationery 


3.16 


SUNDRIES. 




Paid J. E. Buerk, 1,000 dials for watch 




clock 


$3-6o 


Paid L. M; Streeter : 




" Daily Union " from Jan. i, 1892, to 




Feb. 4, 1893 


6.58 


Box rent at postofifice .... 


•75 


Paid E. G. Libbey : 




Cash paid for express and postage 


1. 00 



- $50-38 



748 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Box rent at postoffice to Jan. i, 1894 ^2.67 

Daily paper to Jan. i, 1894 . . 5.25 
Paid for " New England Homestead " to 

March i, 1894 .... 1.50 

Manchester postoffice, stamps . .55 

W. H. Maxwell, cutting ice . . 14.00 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., directory 2.00 

Rev. N. A. Avery, damage to sleigh 1.50 



$39-40 



Total expenditures 



,023.37 



Indigent Soldiers. 



Appropriation . . ... 




Expenditures. 




GROCERIES. 




Paid Eager & Rand 


$12.00 


S. L. Flanders 


4.00 


Griffin Brothers 


60.00 


0. D. Knox & Co. 


40.00 


D. M. Poore & Son 


26.00 


FUEL. 




Paid Decourcy, Holland & Marshall 


$6.00 


J. P. Russell & Co. 


3.00 


Joseph Masse .... 


8.00 



$300.00 



$142.00 



— $17.00 



HOARD AND CARE. 



Paid Bridget Melene 
Ellen McGrath 



$52.00 
34.00 



SACRED HEART HOSPITAL. 749 

MEDICINE. 

Paid F. H. Thurston ...... ^1-25 

Total expenditures ..... $246.25 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 53-75 

$300.00 



Women's Aid and Relief Hospital. 

Appropriation . $600.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Women's Aid and Relief Hospital, amount ap- 
propriated for hospital purposes .... $600.00 

Free Beds, Elliot Hospital. 

Appropriation . . . . . * . . $600.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Elliot Hospital, amount appropriated for free 

beds ......... $600.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital. 

Appropriation $260.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Sister M. Ursula, superior of Sacred Heart Hos- 
pital ......... $260.00 



750 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



$300.00 
42.98 



Paid Henry S. Perry, commander of Louis Bell Post 
No. 3, G. A. R., for bills paid sundry persons for 
expenditures incurred on Memorial Day, May 30, 
1S93: 



$342.98 



Paid Frank H. Challis, 800 programs 
Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

425 postals ..... 

1,000 programs ..... 
Paid H. S. Perry, postal cards and postage 

CARRIAGE HIRE. 

Paid Whitten & Fifield, use of hack 
George E. Wheeler, use of hack 
F. X. Chenette, use of hack and 
barge . . 
Paid George W. Bailey : 
Use of landau ... 
Use of horse 
Paid W. J. Freeman, use of hack 

Manchester Street Railway, use of 

special car . 
George W. Reed, use of hack 
E. V. Turcotte, use of hack . 
C. W. Babbitt & Co., use of hack 
Paid C. H. Simpson : 

Use of hack .... 
Use of horse and buggy 



1-75 
4.00 

4-75 



$4.00 
6.50 



4 


00 


2 


50 


4 


00 


•I 


25 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


.00 


I 


•5° 



$12.30 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 



751 



Paid C. C. Webster, use of barge . 
Paid E. T. James; 

Use of landau ..... 

Use of horse and wagon 
Paid Kean & Doyle, use of hack 

MUSIC AND SINGING. 

Paid Manchester Drum Corps 
Manchester Military Band 
E. Parker French, services of quartet 
Manchester War Veterans, drum 

corps of Freschl Post 
H. K. Slayton Drum Corps . 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Hotel Windsor, board of orator i 

day ..... 
W. E. Cobb, use of 20 settees 
L. H. Josselyn, use and cartage of 

chairs .... 

H. E. Vaughan, moving settees 
Freschl Post, openiAg South Main 

street Congregational church 
First Light Battery, powder, prim 

ers, etc. .... 
W. H. Richmond, painting flag-pole 
H. S. Perry, bit stock and bit 
John B. Varick Co., rope and tacks 
Weston & Hill Co., 263} yards bunt 

ing 

H. S. Perry, 560 flags 

Head & Dowst Co., labor and lum 

ber on grand stand . 



$5-5° 

4.00 
2.00 

4.00 



$10.00 

75.00 

8.00 



15.00 
S.oo 



$2.50 
3.00 



5.10 



1.50 



10 


25 


3 


00 


I 


.00 




47 


13 


16 


.S6 


00 



$65.25 



;ii6.oo 



33-45 



$149-43 



Total expenditures 



$342.98 



752 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Militia. 



Appropriation 



3900.00 



Expenditures. 



Paid the following parties for maintenance of armo- 
ries from February 12, 1893, to February 12, 
1894: 

Amoskeag Veterans . . . $100.00 

City Guards 100.00 

First Regiment, N. H. N. G. (band) 100.00 
First Regiment Headquarters, N. H. 

N. G. . . • ■ . 100.00 

Lafayette Guards .... 100.00 

Manchester Cadets . . . 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans . . loo.co 

Sheridan Guards .... 100.00 

Upton Light Infantry . . 100.00 



$900.00 



Total expenditures 



$900.00 



Abatement of Taxes. 



Appropriation 

Balance from old account 



$3,000.00 
648.23 



$3'648.23 



Expenditures. 



Paid sundry persons on taxes abated 
Balance transferred to new account 



$3>M5-io 
503-13 



$3>648.23 



State Tax. 



Appropriation 



$65,615. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 753 

Expenditures. 
Paid Solon A. Carter, state treasurer . . $65,615.00 

County Tax. 

Appropriation 561,076.55 

Expenditures. 
Paid Edwin F. Jones, county treasurer . . $61,076.55 



Resolution Raising Money and Making Appropria- 
tions for the Year 1893. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the sum of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) be 
borrowed for the use of the city for the following permanent mu- 
nicipal improvements : 

Forty thousand dollars for building new public drains and 
sewers; fifteen thousand dollars for building new streets and 
highways ; five thousand dollars for the development and im- 
provement of Derryfield and Stark parks ; and forty thousand 
dollars for building Second-street bridge ; and that the joint 
standing committee on finance are hereby authorized to issue the 
bonds of the city for said amount of one hundred thousand dol- 
lars, payable January i, 19 13, with interest coupons attached, for 
the payment of interest semi-annually at four per cent. Said 
bonds to be signed by the city treasurer and countersigned by 
the mayor. Said bonds to be sold to the highest responsible 
bidder upon a call issued by the joint standing committee on 
finance for bids. 

Eesolved, further. That for the purpose of providing for the 
redemption of said bonds and of any additional bonds which 



754 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



may hereafter be issued by the city of Manchester under author- 
ity from the legislature of the state of New Hampshire, in an act 
passed January session, 1893, entitled "An act establishing a 
board of street and park commissioners for the city of Manches- 
ter, and authorizing said city to issue bonds for certain pur- 
poses," a fund is hereby established to be called the City of 
Manchester Municipal Improvement Loan and Sinking Fund, 
to which there shall annually be paid at least five per cent of the 
amount of bonds at that time issued, which five per cent shall 
annually be raised by taxation in like manner as ordinary taxes. 
Said sinking fund to be held inviolate for the redemption of said 
loan, and to be invested and reinvested in such manner as the 
city councils shall from time to time determine. 

Resolved, further, That the sum of five hundred and two thou- 
sand, seven hundred and fifty-one and fifty-five hundredths dol- 
lars ($502,751.55) be raised for the use of the city for the year 
1893 by tax on the polls and estates liable to be taxed thereon, 
which sum, together with the one hundred thousand dollars to be 
borrowed as above provided, and with such unappropriated 
money as may be now in the city treasury or may hereafter come 
into it, shall be appropriated as follows: 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 



Interest 

Payment df funded debt 

Reserved fund 

City hall . . . 

Printing and stationery 

Incidental expenses 

Mayor's incidentals 

City officers' salaries 

Auditor's department . 



524,500.00 
5,000.00 

20,000.00 
2,100.00 
2,200.00 

15,000.00 
300.00 

16,000.00 
2,000.00 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Highway District No. 



$400.00 
12,000.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



755 



Highway District No. 3 








$300.00 


" 4 








500.00 


" 5 








Soo.oo 


- << 6 








600.00 


" 7 








1,800.00 


" 8 








1,000.00 


" 9 








500.00 


" " " 10 








5,000.00 


" " II 








1,000.00 


" " "12 








200.00 


New highways 








15,000.00 


Land taken for highways 








12,000.00 


Watering streets . 








3,500.00 


Paving streets 








7,500.00 


Macadamizing streets . 








18,000.00 


Grading for concrete . 








5,500.00 


Scavenger teams . 








14,000.00 


Street sweeping 








1,200.00 


Lighting streets . 








42,000.00 


Bridges 








3,000.00 


City teams . 








6,000.00 


Sewers and drains 








40,000.00 


Widening Ehii street 








2,000.00 


Second-street bridge 








40,000.00 


Engineer's Department 








$4,300.00 


Health Department . 








$3,000.00 


SCHOOL department. 


Repairs of schoolhouses $5,500.00 


Fuel 




4,800.00 


Furniture and supplies .... 




700.00 


Books and stationery . 








300.00 


Printing and advertising 








350.00 


Contingent expenses . 








1,800.00 


Care of rooms 








4,300.00 



756 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Evening schools 


$1,200.00 


Teachers' salaries 


60,000.00 


Manual training 


1,200.00 


Evening school mechanical drawing 


600.00 


Free text-books ...... 


4,000.00 


City Library 


$4,300.00 


fireI 




Fire department 


. $45,000.00 


Fire-alarm telegraph 


1,400.00 


Hydrant service 


12,750.00 


Firemen's parade ...... 


500.00 


Aerial truck ...... 


3,500.00 


Police Department 


$40,000.00 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 




Repairs of buildings 


$3,500.00 


Addition to city farm buildings 


2,000.00 


Ward room, ward 5 


3,000.00 


Schoolhouse and lot, ward 3 . 


10,000.00 


New schoolhouse, ward 9 . . . . 


5,000,00 


Hallsville schoolhouse 


4,500.00 


Addition Webster street .... 


5,000,00 


W. M. Fulton engine-house .... 


9,500.00 


Repairs Vine-street hook-and-ladder house 


1,500.00 


Land for engine-house, ward 3 . . . 


1,200.00 


Hosehouse, South Manchester 


2,500.00 


PUBLIC PLACES. 




Commons ....... 


$3,500.00 


Stark and Derryfield parks .... 


5,000.00 


Amoskeag cemetery ..... 


550.00 


Goffe's Falls cemetery 


100.00 


Pine Grove cemetery 


9,000.00 


Valley cemetery 


3,000.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



757 



PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 



Paupers off the farm 










$5,000.00 


City farm . 










7,000.00 


Indigent soldiers . 










300.00 


Women's Aid Hospital 










600.00 


Free beds, Elliot Hospital 










600.00 


Sacred Heart Hospital . 










260.00 


Decoration of soldiers' graves 








300.00 


Militia .... 








900.00 


TAXES. 


Abatement of taxes '. $3,000.00 


State taxes ........ 65,615.00 


County taxes 61,076.55 


^733>9oi-55 


ESTIMATED RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR. 


Amount to be raised by tax ..... $502,751.55 


Insurance tax 










4,000.00 


Railroad tax 










25,000.00 


Savings bank tax . 










76,000.00 


Literary fund 










5,000.00 


City hall 










3,000.00 


Tuition 










400.00 


Police department 










8,500.00 


Pine Grove cemetery . 










4,500.00 


Valley cemetery . 










1,200.00 


County of Hillsborough 










1,500.00 


City farm 










1,700.00 


Interest on taxes . 










350.00 


$633,901.55 


Bonds .... 










$100,000.00 



758 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 







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VALUATION AND TAXES. 

Assessors' Oath. 



759 



We, the Assessors of the City of Manchester, do solemnly 
swear that in making the invoice for the purpose of assessing the 
foregoing taxes, we appraised all taxable property at its full 
value, and as we would appraise the same in payment of a just 
debt due from a solvent debtor.' So help us Gad. 



Valuation and Taxes. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on 
personal estate, within the city of Manchester, N. 
year 1893, was as follows : 

Valuation. Rate per $1,000. 
Real estate . . $22,671,276 ^18.50 

Personal property . 3,584,966 

Overlay ........ 



$26,256,242 
No. of polls, 11,835 i)iS3,5oo $18.50 

Totals . . $27,439,742 

The share distributed to Manchester of the 
amount of the tax assessed, as per returns made 
by the corporations to state treasurer : 

On railroads . 

On savings banks . 

On insurance companies . 

On literary fund 

Grand tax total 
Appropriated and assessed in 1S93 for city ap- 
propriation ...... 

Appropriated and assessed in 1893, fo"" ^'^^'^^ tax 

Appropriated and assessed in 1893, for county 

tax ....... . 



the real and 
H., for the 

Tax. 
$419,418.60 
66,321.87 
5-50 

$485-745-97 
21,894.71 

$507,640.68 



$25,743-05 

82,644.77 

4,900.50 

6.940.42 

$627,869.42 

$486,060.00 
65,615.00 

61,076.55 



760 
Overlay * 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



$i5'ii7-87 



Grand tax total $627,869.42 

For further information in relation to taxes collected by the 
state, see State Treasurer's Report. 

TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



YEAR. 


Due June 1, 1893, 
assessed in 1893. 


11 

li 


1 
1 


■ s 
s 

Q 


T'.i-vwiii nf Ift.S'i 


$1,205.71 

1,264.85 

1,163.94 

1,582.63 

1,402.73 

1,719.40 

2,236.83 

i 32,139.65 ( 
] 727.94 i 

507,640.68 






$1,205.71 


Taxes Of 1SS6 










1,163.94 
1 580 13 


^a-ma r\f l>ifi«s . 




$2.50 

5.70 

26.. 59 

161.51 

26,613.58 

455,636.94 






1,397.03 
1,692.81 
" 075 'i'^ 






Taxes of 1891 

Taxes of 1892 




$3,221.19 
947.29 


3,032 82 
51,056.45 




Totals 


$551,084.36 


$4,168.48 


$462,446.82 


$64,469.06 





TAX VALUATIONS, ETC., FROM 1890 TO 1893, INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. polls. 


Poll tax. 


VaLofpoll 




$24,207,740 
24,872,492 
25,932,044 
27,439,742 


$462,869.17 
443,541.76 
.506,465.17 
507,640.68 


9,723 

10,367 
10,673 
11,835 


$1.91 
1.78 
1.95 
1.85 


$100 


1891 


lOO 


1892 


100 




100 







For years prior to 1890, see reports of 1890 and 1891. 

* This ovei'lay consists of $4,889.13, assessed by the local assessors under 
the provisions of General Laws, chapter 57, section 4; and the sum of $10,- 
228.74, in the amount received from railroads, banks, insurance companies, 
and literary fund above the amount estimated by the city councils. 



ACCOUNT OF GEORGE E. MORRILL, COLLECTOR. 



761 



Settlement of Account of George E. Morrill, Tax Col- 
lector for City of Manchester, N. H., June 1 , 1 893. 



Amount out- Balance out- 

standing June Collected, standing June 







1, 1892. 




1, 1893. 


Tax list, 1S85 




$1,205.71 




$1,205.71 


1886 




1,264.85 




1,264.85 


1887 




1,163.94 




1,163.94 


1S88 




1,582.63 


§2.50 


1,580.13 


1889 




1,402.73 


5-7° 


1,397-03 


1890 




1,719.40 


26.59 


1,692.81 


1891 




2,236.83 


161.51 


2,075.32 




§196.30 




Credited by cash, 


as pel 


treasurer's re- 






ceipt No. 61 . 


1889 




196.30 




Interest collected, 


$1.92 






1890 




536 






1891 




13.60 






1892 




550-93 




Granite State Tru 


st Co., interest on 






deposit . 






56-52 






$628.33 




Credited by cash, 


as per 


treasurer's re- 






ceipt No. 62 . 






628.33 





Dr. 



1892. To resident list, including 

dog tax . . . $505,310.55 

non-resident list . . 1,154.62 

voluntary taxes . . 727.94 



$507,193.11 



762 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Cr. 

1892. By cash paid city treasurer, 

as per receipts . $439,862.55 
cash paid, as per county 

treasurer's receipt . 61,076.55 

abatements . . . 3,221.19 

unpaid taxes, June i, '93 3,032.82 



$507,193-11 



City of Manchester to George E. Morrill. 

Dr. 

To salary for year ending June i, '93 $1,650.00 
commission on old taxes . . ii-55 



;i, 661.55 



Cr. 



By cash paid by treasurer, on ac- 
count of salary . . . $800.00 
balance paid by treasurer, as per 

bill 861.55 



— $1,661.55 

Manchester, N. H., June 3, 1893. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George 
E. Morrill, tax collector of said Manchester, and find the same 
correct, as above stated. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



EXEMPTIONS FROM TAXATION. 763 

Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions 
from Taxation. 

Constitution of New Hampshire, Article 82, Page 38, 
Public Statutes. 

encouragement of literature, etc. 

Article 82. "Knowledge and learning generally diffused 
through a community being essential to the preservation of a free 
government, and spreading the opportunities and advantages of 
education through the various parts of the country being highly 
conducive to promote this end, it shall be the duty of the legisla- 
tors and magistrates, in all future periods of this government, to 
cherish the interest of literature and the sciences, and all semina- 
ries and public schools ; to encourage private and public institu- 
tions, rewards, and immunities for the promotion of agriculture, 
arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures, and natural his- 
tory of the country ; to countenance and inculcate the principles 
of humanity and general benevolence, public and private charity, 
industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, sincerity, sobri- 
ety, and all social affections and generous sentiments among the 
people ; provided, nevertheless, that no money raised by taxation 
shall ever be granted or applied for the use of the schools or 
instituti^s of any religious sect or denomination." 

Public Statutes, chapter 55, section 2. 

Section 2. " Real estate, whether improved or unimproved, 
and whether owned by residents or others, is liable to be taxed, 
except houses of public worship, twenty-five hundred dollars of 
the value of parsonages owned by religious societies and occupied 
by their pastors, schoolhouses, seminaries of learning, real estate 
of the United States, state, or town used for public purposes, and 
almshouses on county farms." 

Section ii. "Towns may by vote exempt from taxation for 
a term not exceeding ten years any manufacturing establishment 
proposed to be erected or put in operation therein, and the capi- 



764 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

tal to be used in operating the same, unless such establishment 
has been previously exempted from taxation by some tovvni" 

OPINION OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

58 N. H. Rep. page 623. "The exemption in each case is 
limited to ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole power 
of taxation would be the destruction of government ; and the 
dangerous tendency of legislation suspending any part of that 
power, for any period, is manifest. P. Bank v. Billings^ 4 Pet. 
514, 561. So long as the existing laws remain unrepealed, and 
the constitutional construction heretofore adopted remains un- 
changed, contracts hereafter made under those laws and that 
construction will be valid. If the legislature for any reason wish 
to prevent the making of any more such contracts, their object 
can be accomplished by a repeal of the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective 
charters as " being of the nature of a public charity," as follows : 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute Women, N. H. Laws of 
1889, chapter 199. 

Elliot Hospital, N. H. Laws of 1881, chapter 178. 

Manchester Women's Aid and Relief Society, organized in 
January, 1875 J N- H. Laws, 1891, chapter 283. 

Orphanage and Home for Old Ladies (Catholic) on Hanover 
street, N. H. Laws, 1883, chapter 56. 



Schedule of Property used for Religious, Charitable 
and Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Tax- 
ation by Law, not including that Owned by the City 
of Manchester. 

98. Convent, Sisters Jesus Mary, French Catholic ; 
East Spruce street, near Beech : 

Building gio.000.00 

13,000 square feet of land . . 2,600.00 

?;i2,6oo.oo 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 765 

io8. Convent, Sisters of Mercy, Catholic ; 415 Un- 
ion street, corner Laurel : 

Building ..... $30,000.00 
12,600 square feet of land . . 6,300.00 

$36,300.00 

96. Mount St. Mary's Academy, Catholic ; from 
convent lot east to Beech street : 

Building ..... $25,000.00 
31,500 square feet of land . . 9,450.00 

$34,450-00 

Lot south side Laurel street, corner Union street. 
Catholic ; McDonald school : 

Building . . . . . $35,000.00 

10,800 square feet of land . . 5,000.00 

?4o,ooc.oo 

107. Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' 
Home, Catholic ; Amherst and Hanover streets : 
Building ..... $8,000.00 
40,500 square feet of land . . 30,375.00 

$38,375-00 

106. St. Patrick's Orphan Asylums, Catholic ; 184 
Hanover street : 

Building ..... $35,000.00 
40,500 square feet of land . . 40,500.00 

$75,500.00 

105. St. Joseph's High School, Catholic ; Lowell 
street, corner of Birch : 

Building ..... $12,000.00 
8,000 square feet of land . . 8,000.00 

$20,000.00 

97. Union-street school. Catholic ; corner Union 
and Laurel streets : 

Building ..... $4,000.00 
5,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 

$6,500.00 



766 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

109. St. Agnes' school, Catholic ; corner Cedar and 
Pine streets : 

Building ... . . $12,000.00 

20,000 square feet of land . . 3,200.00 

$15,200.00 

103. St. Joseph's school for girls, Catholic ; corner 
Pine and Lowell streets : 

Building ..... $io,oco.oo 

Land included in cathedral lot . $10,000.00 

99. Convent of the Holy Angels, French Catholic ; 
Beauport street, corner Wayne, West Manchester : 

Building ..... «5i5,ooo.oo 
22,500 square feet of land . . 4,500.00 

$19,500.00 

Orphanage school, Beauport, Wayne, and Putnam 
streets ; French Catholic : 

Building ..... $5,000.00 
30,000 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 

$11,000.00 

100. St. Augustine's academy, French Catholic ; 
corner Beech and Spruce streets : 

Building ..... $8,000.00 
15,000 square feet of land . . 4,500.00 

$12,500.00 

loi. St. Mary's parochial school, French Catholic ; 
corner Wayne and Cartier streets : 

Building ..... $12,000.00 
25,000 square feet of land . . 2,000.00 

$14,000.00 

114. Residence priest St. Augustine's church, French 
Catholic ; No. 383 Beech street : 

Building ..... $6,000.00 
7,500 square feet of land . . 1,875.00 

$7,875.00 $2,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 767 

113. Residence priest St. Anne's church, Catholic; 
No. 231 Merrimack street : 

Building $5,000.00 

8,820 square feet of land . . 2,646.00 

$7,646.00 $2,500.00 

III. Residence Catholic bishop; No. 145 Lowell 
street : 

Building $40,000.00 

24,000 square feet of land . . 12,000.00 

$52,000.00 $2,500.00 

115. Residence priest St. George's church, French 
Catholic ; Orange street, corner Pine : 

Building $2,500.00 

10,000 square feet of land . 4,000.00 



$6,500.00 $2,500.00 

112. Residence priest St. Mary's church, French 
Catholic ; 376 Beauport street, West Manchester : 

Building $2,500.00 

5,000 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 

$3,500.00 $2,500.00 

92. St. Anne's church, Catholic ; Union street, cor- 
ner Merrimack : 

Building ..... $30,000.00 
10,180 square feet of land . . 5,090.00 

$35'09o-oo 

no. St. Augustine's church, French Catholic ; Beech 
street, corner East Spruce : 

Building .... $28,000.00 
13,000 square feet of land . 3,250.00 

$31,250.00 



768 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

91. St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel, Catholic; 
Pine street, corner Lowell ; 

Building ..... $70,000.00 
40,000 square feet of land 30,375.00 

$100,375.00 

93. St. Mary's church, Freich Catholic ; Beauport 
street, corner Wayne, West Manchester : 

Building ..... $25,000.00 
70,000 square feet of land . 14,000.00 

$39,000.00 

102. St. Raphael's church and school, German Cath- 
olic ; Third street, corner Ferry, West Manchester: 
Building ..... $35,000.00 
8,000 square feet of land . . 3,400.00 

$38,400.00 

94. St. George's church, French Catholic ; Pine 
street, corner Orange : 

Building ..... $75,000.00 
18,690 square feet of land . . 7,614.00 

$82;6i4.oo 

95. St. Patrick's church and school. Catholic ; Kel- 
ley street, Cartier street, and Cooledge avenue : 

School building .... $20,000.00 
56,281 square feet of land . 4,502.00 

$24,502.00 

60. First Baptist church ; Union street, corner Con- 
cord : 

Building ..... $28,000.00 
11,250 square feet of land . 6,750.00 

$34750.00 

62. First Freewill Baptist church ; Merrimack street, 
corner Chestnut : 

Building ..... $12,400.00 
12,600 square feet of land . . 12,600.00 

$25,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 769 

6i. Second Baptist church ; Merrimack street, near 
Pine : 

Building ..... 59,000.00 
9,450 square feet of land . . 3,780.00 

— $12,780.00 

63. People's Baptist church ; Chestnut street, cor- 
ner Concord : 

Building ..... $8,000.00 
3,200 square feet of land . . 2,000.00 

$10,000.00 

67. First Congregational church ; Hanover street, 
corner Union : 

Building ..... $30,000.00 
43,200 square feet of land . 34,560.00 

$64,560.00 

68. Second Congregational church ; Market street, 
corner Franklin : 

Building ..... $25,000.00 
19,000 square feet of land . 19,000.00 

$44,000.00 

66. Third Congregational church; South Main street, 
corner Milford, West Manchester : 

Building . ... $8,000.00 

23,000 square feet of land . 3,000 00 

$11,000.00 

74. First M. E. church ; Valley street, corner Jew- 
ett : 

Building . . • . . . $8,000.00 

11,400 square feet of land . 1,000.00 

$9,00000 

72. St. Paul's M. E. church ; Union street, corner 
Amherst : 

Building ..... $25,000.00 
10,010 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 

$31,000.00 



770 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

73. St. James's M. E. church ; Pennacook street, 
corner Pine : 

Building ..... $9,000.00 
11,000 square feet of land . . 2,200.00 

$11,200.00 

86. Grace church, Episcopal ; Lowell street, corner 
Pine: 

Building ..... $20,000.00 
9,300 square feet of land . . 6,975.00 

$26,975.00 

85. First Unitarian church ; Concord street, corner 
Beech : 

Building ..... $24,000.00 
13,500 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 

$30,000.00 

87. First Universalist church ; Lowell street, near 
Elm: 

Building ..... $17,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 15,000.00 

$32,000.00 

64. Christian church, Protestant ; Pine street, cor- 
ner Merrimack : 

Building ..... $6,000.00 
9,000 square feet of land . . 6,700.00 

$12,700.00 

81. First Presbyterian church, German; Second 
street, corner Bath, West Manchester : 

Building ..... $3,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 

$5,500.00 

79. Swedish Lutheran church, Protestant ; Sagamore 
street, corner Pine : 

Building ..... $7,500.00 
10,950 square feet of land . . 2,000.00 

$9,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 771 

82. Swedish Baptist church ; Arlington street, near 
Maple : 

Building $5,000.00 

4,432 square feet of land . . 1,100.00 

$6,100.00 

Second Advent church ; Amherst street, between 
Pine and Union : 

Building $5,100.00 

4,500 square feet of land . . 3,375-oo 



65. City Mission chapel, Protestant; Merrimack 
street, corner of Beech : 

Building $7,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 



,4;5.oo 



;i3,ooo.oo 



80. Westminster Presbyterian church ; Brook street, 
corner Hazel : 

Building ..... $15,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 

$17,500.00 

70. South Manchester Union chapel, Protestant ; 
Elm street, south : 

Building ..... $2,500.00 
10,747 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 

$3,500,00 

Episcopal Mission church ; North Main street, cor- 
ner School, West Manchester : 

Building ..... $3,500.00 
19,412 square feet of land . . 4,000.00 

$7,500.00 

76. Residence pastor St. Paul's M. E. church ; Un- 
ion street, ftear Amherst : 

Building ..... $3,000.00 

$2,500.00 



772 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

71. Residence pastor First Congregational church ; 
No. 590 Beech street, near Bridge : 

Building ..... $5,000.00 
8,100 square feet of land . . 2,400.00 

$2,500.00 

$7,400.00 

88. Residence pastor Grace Episcopal church ; cor- 
ner Harrison and Union streets : 

Building ..... $6,000.00 
15,000 square feet of land . . 3,750.00 

$2,500.00 

$9,750.00 

German School Society ; Third, Bath, and Ferry 
streets : 

Building ..... $4,500.00 
10,187 square feet of land . . 2,500,00 

$7,000.00 

89. Elliot Hospital, Protestant ; East Manchester : 
Building ..... $23,000.00 
Land ...... 7,000.00 

$30,000.00 

Elliot Hospital lot ; Hanover street, corner Chestnut : 

Building $3,000.00 

Land ...... 13,000.00 

$16,000.00 

Elliot Hospital : 

Land and buildings. Main street . $4,000.00 
Land and building, Quincy street 2,500.00 

$6,500.00 

90. Women's Aid and Relief Hospital ; Pearl street, 
corner Beech : 

Building ..... $15,000.00 
57,530 square feet of land . . 10,000.00 

$25,000.00 



RECAPITULATION. 773 

T i6. Manchester Children's Home ; Webster street : 
Building ..... $20,000.00 
55,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 



117. Residence pastor Swedish Lutheran church; 
Sagamore street, corner Pine : 

Building ..... $3,000.00 
10,200 square feet of land . . 1,020.00 

$4,020.00 
Gale Home : 

One half Manchester Bank block. 

Elm street .... $38,000.00 

One half Martin's block, Elm street 25,000.00 
Land and building. Pearl street, 

corner Ash .... 25,000.00 



522,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$88,000.00 
Recapitulation. 

EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 

Church property, Catholic . . $356,729.00 
Convent property, Catholic . . 68,400.00 
Parochial residences, Catholic . 12,500.00 
Parochial schools, Catholic . . 158,152.00 
Hospitals and other charitable insti- 
tutions ..... 113,875.00 

$709,656.00 

Church property, Protestant . . $426,040.00 
Parochial residences, Protestant . 10,000.00 
Private school property, Protestant . 7,000.00 
Hospitals and other charitable insti- 
tutions ..... 188,000.00 

$631,040.00 

TAXABLE. 

Land and buildings. Catholic . $65,021.00 

Land and buildings, Protestant . 14,170.00 



$79,191.00 
11,419,887.00 



774 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



§ § §; 



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RECAPITULATION. 



775 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT, CITY OF MAN- 
CHESTER, N. H., FROM JAN. 1 TO DEC. 31, 1893.* 





cent to 
w a t e r- 


a-H. 


So 


1 . 

©0 


§1 


ued Oct. 
$.50 000 
July 1, 
percent, 
lobts. 


if-i 


< 












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1, 18G3. 
ssued 
804. Six 
o fund c 


1 Sss 




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1S90. . 


$400 000 


$200,000 
200,000 
300,000 
300,000 






$13,850 
18,850 
20,000 
26,000 


$120,000 


$60,00(1 










1892 


300 000 






120,000 
120,000 


60,000 
60,000 


1893 


300,000 


$100,000 


$100,000 



ii! 


II 


s 


fl 3 a 


P: 


III 


Amount of 6 per 
cent city bonds 
on which inter- 
est has ceased, 
not yet present- 
ed for payment. 


Amount of 6 per 
cent water bonds 
on which inter- 
est has ceased, 
not yet present- 
ed for payment. 


$155,000 
155,000 
155,000 
155,000 




$948,850 
953,850 
955,000 

1,261,100 


$99,900t 

100 

99,900 

65,500 


$100,000 


$948,850 
953,850 
955,000 

1,195,600 




$100 








100,000 




100 


$100,000 


$4,500 


100 



Remarks. — The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in 
the cemeteries of the city to parties who pay $ioo and upward. 
There are ^20,000 in cemetery bonds, so called, not negotiable, 
in the hands of the city treasurer, which are included in the 
$1,191,000.. 

* $70,000, issued October 31, 1863, are paid; $100,000 issued July 1, 1893, im- 
provement bonds, 4 per cent; $100,000 issued August 1, 1893, water bonds, 5 
per cent; $100,000 issued November 1, 1S93, water bonds, 4J^ per cent. 

t $400,000 water bonds, issued January 1, 1872; $100,000 of these bonds refund- 
ed January 1, 1887; $100,000 re-funded January 1, 1892. 

X $200,000 water bonds, issued July 1, 1874; $100,000 of these bonds re-funded 
July 1, 1890 

§ $2,200 cemetery bonds, issued in 1884, and other additional bonds each year. 

The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the cemeteries. Bonds 
payable July 1, 1913. 



776 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Total amount of bonded debt, includins^ ceme- 
tery bonds ....... $1,191,000.00 

Net indebtedness for water purposes . . 800,000.00 



Net debt after deducting water debt . $391,000.00 
As shown in the assessors' books for the year 1S93 : 
The assessed vakie of personal property, inchid- 

ing poll tax. $4,827,142.00 

The assessed value of real estate . . . 22,612,600.00 

Total value for taxation . . . $27,439,742.00 

Tax rate, 1.85 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for 

water purposes) to assessed valuation . . 1-429 

Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt for 

water purposes) to assessed valuation . . 4-344 

Population, census of 1890 .... 43>983 

Population, census of 1880 . . . . 32,458 

Increase of population in ten years . ii,c^2^ 

Increase of population in 1891 (estimated at) . IjSoo 

Increase of population in 1892 (estimated at) . 2,517 

Increase of population in 1893 (estimated at) . 2,000 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has alw,ays been promptly paid at 
maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being payable in 
gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

A sinking fund was established in 1893. 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the 
water-works is limited to the sum of $600,000 by section 6, chap- 
ter 70, New Hampshire Laws of 1871, entitled " An act to ena- 
ble the city of Manchester to establish water-works," except as 
further extended by 



LAWS RELATING TO WATER SUPPLY. 777 

Laws of New Hampshire, 1 89 1 . 

CHAPTER 26. 

An Act to Preserve the Purity of the Water Supply of the City 
of Manchester. 

Section 2. The board of water commissioners of the city of 
Manchester is hereby authorized to purchase for and in the name 
of said city of Manchester, such land surrounding Lake Massabe- 
sic, and along any stream tributary thereto, as said board shall 
deem necessary for the preservation of the purity of the water of 
said Lake Massabesic, from which the water supply of said city 
of Manchester for domestic purposes is taken ; and the action of 
said board in making any such purchase shall be binding upon 
said city of Manchester ; and in case said board shall not be 
able to secure, on satisfactory terms, by purchase, such land as 
said board deems necessary for the purpose aforesaid, said board 
may, in the name of said city of Manchester, apply to the county 
commissioners of the county in which such land is situated, to 
assess the damages to the owner of such land as said board de- 
sires to acquire for the purpose aforesaid ; and said county com- 
missioners shall proceed in the same manner as in the assessment 
of damages for lands taken for public highways, and upon pay- 
ment or tender to the owner of the sum assessed by said county 
commissioners, the title to said land shall vest in said city of 
Manchester ; and the same right of appeal from such award of 
the county commissioners shall exist as in the case of lands taken 
for highways by the action of said commissioners. 

And still further by chapter 183, Laws of 1893 : 

An Act in amendment of the Act passed June session, 1871, 
entitled "An Act to enable the City of Manchester to Estab- 
lish Water-works," and in amendment of all acts passed subse- 
quently thereto, relating to said Water-works. 



778 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in Gen- 
eral Court convened : 

Section i. The city of Manchester is hereby authorized to 
levy taxes or borrow money, not exceeding in the whole the sum 
of three hundred thousand dollars in addition to the amount it is 
now authorized to raise or borrow, for the construction of water- 
works, for the purpose of constructing a high-service system of 
water-works, and o^ maintaining and extending the present sys- 
tem of water-works in said city, and to issue the notes, bonds, or 
obligations of the city therefor, payable at such times and at such 
rate of interest as the city councils of said city shall determine, 
and such notes, bonds, and obligations shall be legal and bind- 
ing on said city. 

Sect. 2. The board of water commissioners of the city of 
Manchester is hereby authorized to construct a high-service sys- 
tem of water-works, and to purchase for and in the name of said 
city, such lands and water rights as they shall deem necessary for 
such high-service system and the extension of the present system 
of water-works in said city, including the right to lay and main- 
tain pipes where required, and for increasing the supply of water 
for said systems, and for preserving the purity of the water there- 
for, and the action of said board in doing said work and making 
such purchases shall be binding on said city ; and in case said 
board shall not be able to secure on satisfactory terms, by pur- 
chase, such lands or water rights as the board may deem neces- 
sary for the purposes aforesaid, said board may, in the name of 
said city, apply to the county commissioners of the county in 
which such property is situated, to assess the damages to the owner 
of such property as said water commissioners desire to acquire for 
the purposes aforesaid ; and the county commissioners shall pro- 
ceed in the same manner as in the assessment of damages for 
lands taken for public highways, and upon payment or tender to 
the owner of the sum so assessed the title to such property shall 
vest in said city. The same right of appeal from such award 
shall exist as in the case of lands taken for highways by the ac- 
tion of the county commissioners. 

Sect. 3, All money received on account of the water-works 



LAWS RELATING TO WATER SUPPLY. 779 

shall be paid weekly, or oftener, into the city treasury, and a 
receipt taken therefor, and shall be placed to the credit of the 
water-works, and shall not be paid out except under the provi- 
sions of the following section : 

Sect. 4. All bills for expenditures for the water-works shall 
be approved by the board of water commissioners, or by some 
person designated by them, examined by the city auditor, and 
allowed by the committee on accounts before they are paid by 
the treasurer. But this provision shall not apply to the payment 
of the interest coupons of the water-loan bonds, and the said 
coupons shall be orders on the treasurer for the payment of the 
interest on the days on which the same shall become due. 

Sect. 5. The sums paid by the city for water, for fire and 
other purposes, shall be charged to the proper appropriation and 
credited to the water-works, and the said city shall annually pay 
the sum of twenty-five dollars for each fire hydrant which it 
maintains, and this sum shall be credited to the water-works ; 
and the money so credited annually shall be held inviolate as a 
sinking fund for the liquidation of the water-loan bonds from 
time to time, under such regulations as the board of water com- 
missioners and the city councils shall deem to be for the interest 
of the city. 

Sect. 6. The board of water commissioners is authorized to 
determine and establish from time to time, a tariff of water rates ; 
and when the receipts therefrom shall exceed the expenditures 
for maintenance, extensions, and current expenses of the water- 
works (including expenditures for lands or water rights taken or 
purchased by the commissioners), and the interest on the water- 
loan bonds, the commissioners shall readjust the water rates so 
that the receipts shall be equal, as nearly as practicable, to the 
expenditures enumerated above. 

Sect. 7. The board of water commissioners shall receive a 
reasonable compensation for their services, payable annually. 

Sect. 8. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent with this act 
are hereby repealed, and this act shall take effect upon its pas- 



780 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 





























































































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BONDED DEBT. 



781 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE BONDED 
DEBT. 



YEAR. 


*Six per 
cent 
water 
bonds. 


t Four 

per cent 

water 

bonds. 


Five per 
cent 
ceme- 
tery 
bonds. 


Six per 
cent 

to fund 
debt. 


Four per 
cent to 
build 
Mc- 
Gregor 
bridge. 


Fonr per 

cent 

to fund 

debt. 


Total 

of 
annual 
inteiest. 


1890 


$27,000 
24,000 
18,000 
18,000 


$6,000 
8,000 
12,000 
12,000 


$623.75 

813.92 

1,000.00 

1,041.66 


$7,200 
7,200 
7,200 
7,200 


$2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 


$6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 


$49,423.75 








1893 


46,841.66 





SUMMARY OF CITY DEBT. 



Amount of bonded debt January i, 1893 
Amount of cemetery bonds issued in 1893 • 
Amount of water bonds issued in 1893 
Amount of improvement bonds issued in 1893 
Accrued interest on bonded debt 



Amount of bonds paid in 1893 . 

Total irdebtedness January i, 1894 



$955,100.00 

6,000.00 

200,000.00 

100,000.00 

18,750.00 



$1,279,850.00 
65,500.00 

^1,214,350.00 



* $400,000 water bonds, issued January 1, 1872; $100,000 re-funded at 4 per 
cent, January 1, 1887; and $100,000 re-funded at 4 per cent, January 1, 1892. 

t $200,000, water bonds, issued July 1, 1874; $100,000 re-funded at 4 per cent, 
July 1, 1890. 

$60,000, bridge bonds, issued July 1, 1881, at 4 per cent. 

$155,000, bonds issued April 1, 1885, at 4 per cent. 

$70,000, bonds to fund debts, issued October 1, 1863, and are due November 1. 
1893, and have been paid in part. 

$50,000, bonds to fund debts, issued July 1, 1864, and are due July 1, 1894. 

$2,200, cemetery bonds, issued in 1884, and other additional bonds, each suc- 
ceeding year. The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the ceme- 
teries. 

Bonds payable July, 1913, to the trustees of cemetery funds; not negotiable, 
Amount that can be issued limited to the sum of $70,000. 



782 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



AVAILABLE ASSETS. 



Net cash on hand January i, 1894 . . §116,775.46 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1893 .... 51,056.45 
Stock of Suncook Valley Railroad, estimated value 14,500.00 



$182,331.91 

BONDED DEBT, 

Total net indebtedness January i, 1894 . . $1,032,018.09 
Total net indebtedness January I, 1893 . 832,933.17 



Increase ....... $199,084.92 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



783 



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784 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 



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Druggist. 

Real-estate office, etc. 
Banking. 

Banking. 
Untenantable. 


■3 


Occupant. 
City. 


it 

3 


City. 




Store and 
basement. 
Office. 
Office 

(bank). 
Office 

(bank)- 

Hall. 


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a 
1 

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John J. Holland. 

A. J. Lane. 

N. H. Trust Company. 

Second National Bank. 
Sundry persons. 


a 
o 

s 


904 Elm street. 

918 
908 

914 

City Hall on third story 


si 


$360.00 

800.00 
550.00 

700.00 

Uncer- 
tain. 



i 


Battery occupies flVst and sec- 
ond floor and basement. 
Guards occupy third floor. 
Ward meetings are held in bat- 
tery room on second floor. 


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First N. H.L. Battery. 
Emmet Guards. 


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VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 785 

Valuation of Real Estate Owned by the City. 

High School, Beech street, corner Lowell : 

Building ..... $40,000.00 
59,400 square feet of land . . 17,820.00 

$57,820.00 



Franklin-street school, Franklin street, corner 
Pleasant : 

Building ..... $16,000.00 
19,200 square feet of land . . 19,200.00 

Spring-street school. Spring street : 

Building ..... $13,000.00 
13,600 square feet of land . 13,600.00 

Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, corner Merri- 
mack : 

Building ..... $45,000.00 
40,000 square feet of land . . 8,000.00 

Ash-street school. Ash street, corner Bridge : 

Building ..... $50,000.00 
57,537 square feet of land . . 17,262.00 



$35,200.00 



$26,600.00 



$53,000.00 



$67,262.00 



Main-street school, North Main street, West Man- 
chester : 

Building ..... $6,00000 
40,293.4 square feet of land . . 10,073.00 



;i6,o 



Webster-street school, Webster street : 

Building $32,500.00 

55,714^ square feet of land . 13,928.00 



73.00 



$46,428. 



Blodget-street school, Blodget street : 

Building .'.... $1,500.00 
9,000 square feet of land . . 3,600.00 



786 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Schoolhouse lot, Bridge street, corner Union : 

10,000 square feet of land .... $5,000.00 

Lowell-street school, Lowell street, corner Chest- 
nut : 

Building ..... $1,000.00 
9,000 square feet of land . . 9,000.00 



SIO.OOO.OO 



Merri mack-street school, Merrimack street, corner 
Union : 

Building ..... $15,000.00 
12,600 square feet of land . . 6,300.00 

$21,300.00 

Wilson Hill school, Manchester street, corner Wil- 
son : 

Building ..... $500.00 
15,850 square feet of land . . 1,902.00 

$2,402.00 

School-street school. School street, West Manchester : 
Building ..... $1,000.00 
12,176 square feet of land . . 3.044.00 

$4,044.00 

South Main-street school, South Main street, West 
Manchester : 

Building ..... $500.00 
13,650 square feet of land . . 2,047.00 

^2,547.00 

Bakersville school, Elm street, south : 

Building ..... $10,000.00 
24, 184 square feet of land . . 3,628.00 

$13,628.00 

Stark District school, River road, north : 

Building ..... $1,000.00 
43,560 square feet of land . . 100.00 

$1,100.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 787 

Amoskeag school, Front street, Amoskeag : 

Building $1,500.00 

6,000 square feet of land . . i. 000.00 

$2,500.00 

Lot, corner Amory and Dubuque streets, for school 
purposes : 

16,600 square feet of land .... $2,490.00 
Goffe's Falls school, Goffe's Falls : 

Building $4,000.00 

47,916 square feet of land . . 250.00 

$4,250.00 



$2,100.00 



Harvey District school, Nutt road : 

Building _ 

21,780 square feet of land . 


$2,000.00 
100.00 


Webster Mills school, Webster Mills : 
Building ..... 
5,445 square feet of land 


$400.00 
100.00 


Old Hallsville school, East Manchester : 

Building 

30,075 square feet of land . 


$500.00 
3,008.00 


Youngsville school, Youngsville : 

Building 

51,228 square feet of land . 


$500.00 
100.00 


Mosquito Pond school. Mosquito Pond : 

Building 

10,890 square feet of land . 


$400.00 
100.00 



$500.00 



$3,508.00 



$600.00 



$500.00 



Pearl-Street school : 

Building (m process of erection.) 

Land ...... . . $3,200.00 



788 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Varney school, Bowman street, corner Mast, West 
Manchester : 

Building $43,750.00 

Land ...... 6,700.00 

55o>45o-oo 

New Hallsville school, Jewett street, corner Young, 
East Manchester : 

Building ..... $29,800.00 
44,000 square feet of land . . 3,300.00 



$470,702.00 

ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Engine-house and stable, Central station. Vine 
street : 

Building ..... $31,800.00 
21,718.86 square feet of land . 25,438.00 

$57,238.00 

Clinton-street engine-house, Clinton street, West 
Manchester : 

Building ..... $1,000.00 
3,790 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 

$2,000.00 

North Main street engine-house, North Main street, 
West Manchester : 

Building ..... $18,000.00 
11,819 square feet of land . 2,955.00 

$20,955.00 

Webster-street engine-house, Webster street, corner 
Chestnut : 

Building ..... $12,000.00 
8,510 square feet of land . 2,180.00 

$14,180.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 789 

Merrimack engine-house, Lake avenue : 

Building ..... $15,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 3,000.00 



Hosehouse and cottage, Maple street, corner East 
High : 

Building ..... $3,000.00 
18,330 square feet of land . . 3,666.00 



$18,000.00 



$6,666.00 



Engine-house and ward room, ward 9, Rimmonand 
Amory streets, West Manchester : 

Building ..... $21,755.00 
6,000 square feet of land . . 870.00 

$22,625.00 

Lot for hosehouse, South Manchester : 

4,278 square feet of land .... $684.48 



$142,348.48 

OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City library, Dean avenue, corner Franklin street : 
Building ..... $35,000.00 
15,000 square feet of land . . 30,000.00 



City Hall, Elm street, corner Market : 

Building ..... $10,000.00 
100,000 square feet of land . . 150,000.00 



$65,000.00 



[60,000.00 



City farm, Mammoth road : 

Buildings . . ... . $5,000.00 

46.66 acres, west Mammoth road 70,000.00 
81.55 acres, east Mammoth road . 65,240.00 

$140,240.00 



' 790 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Court house, Franklin street, corner West Merri- 
mack : 

Building ..... $20,000.00 
19,000 square feet of land . . 57,000.00 

$77,000.00 

Battery building, Manchester street : 

Building ..... $13,000.00 
3,400 square feet of land . 5,100.00 

$18,100.00 

Police station, Manchester street, corner Chestnut : 
Building ..... $40,000.00 
7,500 square feet of land . . 15,000.00 

$55,000.00 

Slayton lot, Manchester street : 

Building ..... $300.00 
2,908 square feet of land . . 4,700.00 

$5,000.00 

City stable and other buildings, Franklin street : 
Building ..... $12,300.00 
44,656 square feet of land . . 89,312.00 

$101,612.00 

City stable, district No. 10. . . . . . $1,000.00 

City scales, Franklin street : 

Building ...... . $300.00 

Gravel lots, Goffstown : 

2 acres ...... . $400.00 

, Gravel lot, Bakersville, South Manchester . . $700.00 

Gravel lot, district No. 10, bought of Brooks & 
Brock (city has right to remove gravel until Au- 
gust 25, 1903) : 

li acres . $500.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 791 

Land bought of A. D. Gooden : 

28,750 square feet of land .... $1,351.00 

Ward 5 ward room, land ..... ^i.ooo-oo 

$627,203.00 

PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 

Property in care city engineer .... $1,149.00 

in care chief engineer fire department 103,897.50 

in care street and park commission 17.705.00 

in care superintendent of schools . 3^,755-°o^ 

in care city messenger .... 2,759.00 

in care city marshal and janitor . 1,971.00 

in care superintendent of city farm 11,889.61 

in care trustees city library . 29,333.00 
in care superintendent of Pine Grove 

cemetery ...... 248.35 

in care superintendent Valley cemetery . ro6.oo 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad, in care of city 

treasurer ....... 50,000.00 

Personal property in care city weigher . . i, 000. 00 

$256,813.46 

Uncollected taxes in 1892 ..... $3,032.82 

Uncollected taxes in 1893 ..... 51,056.45 

Net cash in the treasury, December 31, 1893 . 116,775.46 



$170,864.73 

OTHER REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 



Soldiers' monument 

Permanent inclosure of commons 
Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 
Fountains and water-troughs on streets and com 

mons 

Two city tombs ...... 



,^,25,000.00 
10,200.00 
25,000.00 

3,500.00 
10,000.00 



792 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



McGregor bridge ...... $90,000.00 

Granite bridge ....... 25,000.00 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river . 10,000.00 

Second-street bridge, over Piscataquog river . 52,036.06 

Print-Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 5,000.00 

Two bridges in highway district No. 9 . . 2,000.00 

One bridge at Goffe's Falls .... 1,000.00 

Expended on construction of sewers . . . 385,586.15 

$644,322.21 



PARKS AND CEMETERIES. 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres 
Pine Grove cemetery, about 86 acres 
Amoskeag cemetery, 1.23 acres . 
Stark park, 28 acres ... 
Derryfield park, 76 acres 
Concord common, 4.48 acres 
Tremont common, 2.25 acres 
Hanover common, 3 acres . 
Park common, 3.49 acres . 
Merrimack common, 5.89 acres . 



$200,000.00 

42,300.00 

4,340.00 

9,000.00 

25,000.00 

200,000.00 

40,000.00 

100,000.00 

60,000.00 

200,000.00 

$880,640.00 



WATER- WORKS. 

Real estate and personal property of water-works, 
at cost price ....... 



$1,141,657.53 



RECAPITULATION. 

Real estate owned by the city, schoolhouses 
Real estate owned by the city 
Real estate owned by the city, engine-houses 
Water-works at cost price .... 
Personal property owned by the city . 
Uncollected taxes and cash 



$470,702.00 
627,203.00 
142,348.48 

1,141,657.53 
256,813.46 
170,864.73 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 793 



Other real and personal property 
Parks and cemeteries . 



$644,322.21 
880,640.00 

^4,334-55i-4i 



PROPERTY ACCOUNT. 



Inventory of assets, December 31 
Inventory of assets, December 31, 1892 



1893 



Gain in valuation 



The increase in valuation as above stated 
amount expended in 1893 °^^ • 
Sewers and drains 
Hallsville schoolhouse 
Second-street bridge . 
Land purchased for cemeteries 
Pearl-street schoolhouse 
Blacksmith shop, city stable 
Engine-house and ward room, ward 9 
Water-works, construction . 
Webster-street schoolhouse . 
Central station, engine-house 
Slayton lot, Manchester street 
City stable, district No, 10 
Land, ward 5 ward room 
Personal property, fire department 
Increase in uncollected taxes 
Increase in net cash in treasury 



• $4,334,551-41 
* 4,013,051-75 

$321,499.66 

results from the 



»5i>392.i5 

3,500.00 

52,036.06 

2,640.00 

3,200.00 

300.00 

21,755.00 

132,137.88 

2,500.00 

1,800.00 

5,000 00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

14,887.50 

19,712.79 

20,298.28 



$333,159-66 
Deduct loss of personal property \n charge of street 

and park commission by reappraisement . 11,660.00 



Total net gain ..... $321,499.66 

Details of inventory are on file in the auditor's office. The 
water-works would sell readily for $2,000,000, and are growing 

*Error of .81,000 in last year's computation. 



794 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

yearly more valuable to the city. The large increase in the re- 
valuation of the public buildings and lands owned by the city is 
fully warranted by the opening and improvement of Derryfield 
park in the vicinity of the city farm lands, the high pressure ser- 
vice now being introduced under the management of the water- 
works, the facilities for travel furnished by the street railway, 
and the rapid increase in our population and industries. 

J. B. S. 



Auditor's Office. 

City Hall building. Open from 8 to 12 a. m., 2 to 5 p. m.; 
7 to 9 p. M. on Thursday. 

In every bill presented to the city auditor for his approval, the 
following points will be considered and passed upon : 

1. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination within 
the scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on the city 
government ? " 

2. Is the bill certified by the party legally authorized to make 
the contract, or cause the expenditure to be made ? 

3. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, 
and is there a balance unexpended sufficient to pay this bill? 

4. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measurements 
either of dimensions, quantities, or weights correctly and fully 
stated, and is the proof of the delivery to the city of the whole 
amount charged sufficient ? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely 
in excess as to require the attention of the city councils to be 
called to the same ? 

6. Is the bill written in a fair, legible hand, correctly cast, 
and on paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its 
proper backing and filing ? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and 
the total amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the 



auditor's office, 795 

amount of the work not yet completed, and the per cent re- 
tained, if any, should be stated on the bill. 

8. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which affect 
the question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for further information 
or correction as the circumstances of each case may require. 

COURT DECISIONS, LEGAL POINTS AND RULES, RELATING TO THE 
APPROVAL OR DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

No bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until the 
auditor has approved it as correct. 

Public trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the city 
councils cannot be delegated to others. Dillon s Municipal Cor- 
porations^ section 96, volume i. 

No member of either branch [of the city councils], except the 
mayor, shall receive any compensation for his services, or shall 
hold any office or agency created during his continuance in of- 
fice. General Laws, chapter 46, section 13. 

The executive powers of the city, except where vested in- the 
mayor, shall be exercised by the mayor and aldermen. General 
Laws, chapter 46, section 14. 

The mayor and aldermen have all the powers and authority of 
selectmen of towns unless it is otherwise provided by law. Gen- 
eral Laws, chapter 46, section 14. 

Joint standing committees have advisory powers only ; they 
cannot legally be endowed with executive or legislative powers 
by ordinance or resolution of the city councils, as no by-law or 
ordinance shall be repugnant to the constitution or laws of the 
state. 

No member of either branch of the city councils can enter 
into any verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to, or do 
any work for the city. Any firm of which a member is also a 
member of the city councils is included in this prohibition. 

No city official, or department, or board of officials having 
legal power to expend money for the benefit of the city, can pur- 
chase of or contract with themselves, with any one of the board. 



796 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

or with any firm of which one of said officials is a member. 
Dillon' s Municipal Corporations, volume i, page 436, section 444. 

Every bill against the city shall specify the particular appro- 
priation to which the same should be charged, and the moneys 
paid will be charged to such appropriations only. 

He who is entrusted with the business of others cannot be al- 
lowed to make such business a source of profit to himself. 

All orders passed by the city councils authorizing a ministerial 
act to be performed by its agent or agents must be strictly con- 
strued, and the act to be done must be specifically stated. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. {Gen- 
eral, laws, chapter 106, section 11.) They haveno power con- 
ferred upon them by law or ordinance to purchase new apparatus 
of any kind. 

The joint standing committee on fire department have advis- 
ory powers only. 

The laws and ordinances require the city auditor to withhold 
his signature from all bills against any appropriation where the 
amount of the appropriation is expended, until the city council 
shall have provided the means of paying the same. Section 4, 
chapter 3 of the City Ordinances, and section 4, ordinances relat- 
ing to duties of the city auditor, approved January 7, 1890. 

The power of towns to raise and appropriate money is derived 
solely from staturory provisions, which restrict the power to cer- 
tain specified objects and other necessary charges. 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those pre- 
scribed by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, and 
generally will not be permitted, to carry such votes into effect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discretion of 
towns to vote gifts or to select donees; their charity is a duty 
defined, commanded, enforced, and regulated, and the objects 
of it are designated by law. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a minority in an 
unlimited manner. Gove v. Eppitig, 41 N. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to 
make expenditures, within the scope of their powers, for their 
respective departments : For fire department and fire-alarm tele- 



auditor's office. 797 

graph, the chief engineer, to be submitted monthly to the ap- 
proval of the board of engineers ; for police department, city 
marshal ; for police court, police judge ; for water-works depart- 
ment, superintendent, subject to the rules of the board of com- 
missioners and the ordinances relating thereto ; for city farm, 
superintendent ; for overseers of the poor, each overseer, subject 
to the rules of the board of overseers, and their monthly review 
and approval ; for schools, superintendent, or such person as the 
board of school committee may designate, bills to be approved 
by the board monthly ; for streets, sewers, and other work under 
these departments, street and park commissioners ; for city 
clerk's office, treasurer's office, tax collector's office, assessors' 
office, auditor's office, incidental expenditures, city physician, 
city messenger, city solicitor, city engineer, — mayor ; for cem- 
eteries, superintendents, subject to board of trustees (to consist 
of citizens not members of the city councils) ; for health depart- 
ment, board of health, subject to approval of mayor ; city 
library, board of trustees or person designated by them. It may 
be stated as a general rule, that all subordinate officials are under 
the supervision and control of the mayor, subject to such limita- 
tions and restrictions as the board of aldermen, acting as a 
board, may require. 



798 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



The following form of blank is used in payment of ordinary- 
bills for supplies or services, and can be obtained at the city au- 
ditor's office. 




THE CITY OF MANCHESTER, N. H. 

To Dt 



Date. 


Description of purchase. 




Amount. 


























































1 
















































1 











Received of the city treasurer 189 . the sum of 

$ in full payment of the above account. 

Signed 



Appropriation for 



I hereby certify that the articles 
herein mentioned have been re- 
ceived and services performed, that 
they were necessary for, and have 
been, or will be, applied to the 
work covered by the appropriation 
above mentioned, and the prices 
charged are just and reasonable. 



o 
6 o 



Approved. 



Approved. 



Mai/or. 



Chairman Committee on- 



« ;£ G 



» o S 
III 



SINKING FUND. 



SINKING FUND. 



Appropriation for the payment of improvement 

bonds, due 1913 ...... $5,000.00 

Receipts from hydrant service for the payment of 

water-works bonded debt ..... 12,750.00 

Total ........ $17,750.00 



Treasurer's Report. 

To the Trustees of the Sinking Fimd : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the first annual re- 
port of the receipts of this board for the year ending December 
31. 1893: 

From the appropriation for the payment of the im- 
provement bonds, due January i, 1913 . $5,000.00 
From the water-works receipts, for the payment of 

water bonds ....... 12,750.00 

Total receipts ...... $17,750.00 

Most respectfully submitted, 
SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer. 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts 
of Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees of the sinking 
fund, embracing the receipts of the year ending December 31, 
1893, ^i^d find the same correct and properly vouched. I have 



802 



SINKING FUND. 



also examined the securities in which said fund is invested and 
find as follows : 

FOR THE PAYMENT OF IMPROVEMENT BONDS. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H., 4 per cent, 

January i, 1913 ....... $5,000.00 

FOR THE PAYMENT OF WATER BONDS. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H., 4 per cent, 



1913 .... 
Cash on hand 

Total bonds and casl 
Grand total 
Total sinking fund 



$8,000.00 
4,750.00 



. $12,750.00 

• $i7,75o-oo 
■ $i7>75o-oo 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



ORDINANCES AND ORDERS. 



ORDINANCES AND ORDERS 

PASSED IN 1893. 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three. 
An Ordinance changing the Names of certain Streets. 

That the names of certain streets in said city be changed as 
follows : That the streets in East Manchester known as the 
Young road or the Old Ferry road shall be called and known as 
Young street ; also that the street which is at present known as 
Haywood street, and the highway known as Bennett boulevard 
in West Manchester shall be called and known as Columbus 
avenue. 

This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained February 7, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-THREE. 

An Ordinance amending section 24, chapter 6 of the Laws and 
Ordinances, relating to the pay of Members of the Fire De- 
partment. 

Section i. Section 24 of chapter 6 of the Ordinances of the 
City of Manchester is hereby amended by striking out the whole 
of said section and inserting in place thereof the following: 



806 ORDINANCES AND ORDERS. 

" Section 24. The annual compensation of the members of 
the several hook-and-ladder, hose, steam fire-engine, and chemi- 
cal engine companies who shall personally perform all the duties 
required by law shall be as follows : Drivers, each, sixty-eight and 
one third dollars per month ; permanent engineers of fire steam- 
ers, each, seventy-six and one quarter dollars per month ; other 
permanent men, each, sixty-five dollars per month, all payable 
monthly. Foremen, each, one hundred and fifteen dollars ; as- 
sistant foremen, each, one hundred and ten dollars ; clerks, each, 
one hundred and ten dollars ; call engineers of steamers, each, 
one hundred and thirty-five dollars ; call assistant engineers, each, 
one hundred and five dollars ; all other members, each, one hun- 
dred dollars, all payable in equal semi-annual payments on the 
first of January and July." 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained May 2, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

IN the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three. 

An Ordinance in amendment of section 7, chapter 14, of the 
Laws and Ordinances. 

That section 7 of chapter 14 of the Ordinances relating to 
hazardous buildings be amended by striking out the word " Mer- 
rimack " and inserting the word "Auburn," and by striking out 
the word " Chestnut " and inserting the word " Pine," so that 
the section as amended shall read as follows : 

" Section 7. No person shall erect or cause to be erected any 
building exceeding ten feet in height, nor shall any building now 
or hereafter erected be raised or enlarged unless the walls of the 
same shall be built of iron, brick, or stone, with the roof of slate, 
iron, or other incombustible material, within the following lim- 
its, viz.: Bounded on the south by Auburn street, on the east by 



ORDINANCES AND ORDERS. 807 

Pine street, on the north by Harrison street, and on the west by 
Elm street." 

Any person violating the provisions of this section shall be 
punished by a fine of twenty dollars, and shall incur a penalty of 
ten dollars for each day he shall maintain any building so erect- 
ed, raised, or enlarged. 

Passed to be ordained May 2, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

in the vear one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three. 

An Ordinance in amendment of section 18, chapter 6, of the 
Laws and Ordinances. 

Amend section 18, chapter 6, by striking out the words "one 
hundred " and inserting instead thereof " one hundred and fifty," 
so that the section shall read : 

" The board of school committee shall elect one of their num- 
ber clerk of the board, whose duty it shall be to record the pro- 
ceedings of the board, and to perform such other duties as shall 
be required of him by the board, and who shall receive in full 
for his services one hundred and fifty dollars per annum, to be 
paid at the end of his term of office." 

The amendment to take effect January i, 1893. 

Passed to be ordained April 4, 1893. 

City of Manchester. 

IN THE year one THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-THREE. 

An Ordinance in amendment of section 2, chapter ;^^, of the 
Laws and Ordinances. 

That section 2, chapter 33, be amended by striking out the 



808 ORDINANCES AND ORDERS. 

words "and Saturday" in the sixth line thereof, so that said 
section shall read as follows : 

"Section 2. He shall keep his office in the city hall build- 
ing, and shall devote the usual hours of business to the duties of 
his office : he shall keep regular office hours, of which public no- 
tice shall be given, and shall keep his office open for the receipt 
of taxes on Thursday evening, from seven to nine o'clock." 

Passed to be ordained July 19, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

IN the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three. 

An Ordinance establishing Salaries of Members of the Board of 
Street and Park Commissioners. 

The members of the board of street and park commissioners 
shall receive in full for all service by them performed, an annual 
salary, payable quarterly, as follows: Six hundred dollars each. 

Passed to be ordained July 19, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 



IN the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three. 
An Ordinance changing the Names of Certain Streets. 

That the names of certain streets in said city be changed as 
follows : Dudley street from Pine to Belmont changed to Green 
street, Hampton street from Pine to Belmont changed to Grove 
street, Newton street from Pine to Belmont changed to Bell 
street. 

This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained September 5, 1893. 



ORDINANCES AND ORDERS. 809 

City of Manchester. 

IN THE YEAR ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-THREE. 

An Ordinance providing for a Board of Sinking Fund Com- 
missioners, 

That for tlie purpose of managing and investing the sinking 
funds required by the Session Laws of New Hampshire, passed at 
January session, 1893, by which acts the city is authorized to 
borrow money and issue bonds for certain purposes, the chair- 
man of the board of water commissioners, the chairman of the 
board of street and park commissioners, and the city treasurer 
for the time being, shall by virtue of their several offices consti- 
tute a board of sinking fund commissioners, and it shall be a 
part of the duties of said several officers to perform the duties 
prescribed by this ordinance. The city treasurer shall be treas- 
.urer of said board, and keep in his possession all moneys, bonds, 
or other securities in which said sinking fund shall be invested, 
and on no pretext shall permit or allow any other person to take 
control of the same, and his bond as now or hereafter furnished 
shall cover and apply to the duties herein imposed. The other 
two members of said board shall furnish each a bond for five 
thousand dollars, with sureties, to be approved by the mayor and 
aldermen, for the faithful performance of their duties. 

It shall be the duty of said board of sinking fund commission- 
ers to receive all sums which shall be contributed to the sinking 
fund, and invest and re-invest the same in the name of the said 
board as trustees for the city, and said sinking fund shall be held 
by said board inviolate for the purposes required by the aforesaid 
session laws, and shall be used for no other purpose. 

Said board shall annually in the month of January make a full 
and explicit report to the city councils, of all moneys in such 
sinking fund on the thirty-first day of December of the preced- 
ing year, how and where invested, and at what rate of interest. 
The moneys contributed to said sinking fund to pay the bonds 
issued for water-works purposes shall be kept and invested sepa- 



810 ORDINANCES AND ORDERS. 

rately from those contributed to pay the bonds issued for perma- 
nent municipal improvements. 

Section 2, chapter 37, of the Ordinances of the City of Man- 
chester, is hereby repealed. 

Passed to be ordained November 7, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to print Mayor's Inaugural Address. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur : That the 
committee on finance cause to be printed 300 copies of Mayor 
Knowlton's inaugural address, the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for printing and stationery. 

Passed January 3, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase Horse for Fire Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on fire department purchase one 
horse for use on Amoskeag hose carriage, the expense thereof to 
be charged to the appropriation for fire department. 



Passed January 17, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the purchase of Land for an Engine- 
House in the northeastern section of the City. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur • That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be empowered to purchase land for an engine-house in the north- 



ORDINANCES AND ORDERS. 811 

eastern section of the city, and that the expense thereof be 
charged to the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed January 17, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the building of a Hose House in South 
Manchester. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be empowered to contract for the building of a hosehouse in 
South Manchester on the city lot purchased for this purpose, and 
that the expense thereof be charged to an appropriation which 
the joint standing committee on finance are hereby authorized to 
report in the annual list of appropriations. 

Passed January 17, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to Suits to which the City is a Party. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and city solicitor be authorized to make such disposi- 
tion, by trial or otherwise, as they shall deem expedient of all suits 
to which the city is a party which are now pending in court or 
which shall be entered in court during the ensuing two years. 

Passed January 17, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to make an Addition to the Webster-street School- 
House. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on finance be authorized to report 



812 ORDINANCES AND ORDERS. 

an appropriation of five thousand ($5,000) dollars for the pur- 
pose of building a two-room addition to the Webster-street 
schoolhouse. 

Passed January 17, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing an Appropriation of Two Thousand Dol- 
lars for the purpose of Widening Elm Street at or near Ray 
Brook. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the committee on finance be and are hereby instructed to return 
in their lists of appropriations one appropriating the sum of two 
thousand dollars for the purpose of widening Elm street at or 
near Ray brook. 

Passed January 17, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the finishing of Additional Rooms at the 
Hallsville Schoolhouse. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be empowered to contract for the finishing and furnishings of 
the second story in the Hallsville schoolhouse for school pur- 
poses ; and that the expense thereof be charged to an appropria- 
tion which the joint standing committee on finance are herewith 
authorized to report in the annual list of appropriations. 

Passed January 17, 1893. 



ORDINANCES AND ORDERS. 813 

City ok Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the purchase of Land for a Schoolhouse 
in the northeastern section of the City. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be empowered to purchase land for a schoolhouse in the north- 
eastern section of the city, superintend the construction of a 
building upon the same, and that the expense thereof be charged 
to an appropriation for this purpose which the joint standing 
committee on finance are hereoy authorized to report in the an- 
nual list of appropriations. 

Passed January 17, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for a Ward Room Building in Ward Five. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on finance be authorized to report 
an appropriation not exceeding six thousand ($6,000) dollars in 
the annual appropriations for 1893 ^o^ ^ ward room building in 
ward five. 

Passed January 17, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the building of a Schoolhouse in Mc- 
Gregorville. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be empowered to contract for the construction of a two-room 
wooden school building on the city's lot in McGregorville, and 
that the expense thereof be charged to an appropriation which 



814 ORDINANCES AND ORDERS. 

the joint standing committee on finance are hereby authorized to 
report for this purpose in the annual list of appropriations. 

Passed January 17, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the payment of the January pay-roll of the 
Fire Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city auditor be and hereby is authorized to pay the same 
rates per day or month to the permanent employees on the Jan- 
uary pay-roll as has heretofore been allowed. 

Passed February 7, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order placing care of City Pest House in the hands of the 
Board of Health. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the management of the city pest house, and the care of the in- 
mates therein, be placed in the control and direction of the 
Board of Health. 

Passed February 7, 1893. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to Joint Standing Committee on Public 
Health. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
a joint standing committee pf five, consisting of two aldermen 
and three members of the board of common council, be appointed 



ORDINANCES AND ORDERS. 815 

by the mayor and president of the common council, said com- 
mittee to be known as Joint Standing Committee on PubHc 
Health. It shall be the duty of this committee to labor to bring 
about the best possible sanitary condition of affairs, to make sug- 
gestions to the board of health, and to confer with the health 
board whenever requested so to do, and to be the medium of 
communication between the board of health and the city councils. 

Passed February 7, 1893. 



City of