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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

City of Manchester, N. H 




TO 



N. H. Historical Society. 



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Forty-Ninth Annual Report 



Receipts and Expenditures 



City OF Manchester 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1894 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING 
TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




MANCHESTER, N. H. 

PRINTED BY THE JOHN B. CLARKE COMPANY. 
1895. 



35c 



City of Manchester. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN ORDER to print the Forty-ninth Annual Report of the Receipts and 
Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the joint stand- 
ing committee on finance be, and they hereby are, authorized to procure, for the 
use of the inhabitants of said city, the printing of the Forty-ninth Annual Re- 
port of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, including the 
reports of the joint standing committee on finance, the city auditor, the school 
board, and superintendent of schools, superintendent of water-works, water . 
commissioners, engineer of fire department, police commissioners, overseers of 
the poor, trustees, librarian, and treasurer of the city library, committee on cem- 
eteries, joint standing committee on city farm, city physician, city solicitor, city 
engineer, street and park commissioners, and such other matters relating to city 
affairs as said finance committee may direct, the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for printing and stationei-y. 

In Board of Common Council. March 5, 1895. 
Passed. 

JOHN T. GOTT, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. March 5, 1S95. 
Passed in concurrence. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, Mayor. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 
1894. 



Mayor. 



EDGAR J. KNOWLTON* . . . Office, City Hall 
DAVID B. VARNEY j . . . . Office, City Hall 
BYRON WORTHEN + . . . . Office, City Hall 

Chosen at biennial election in November, 1890, and re-elected in November, 
1892. Salary, ^1,800 per annum, payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1848, sec- 
tion i. Chapter 223, Laws of 1883. PubHc Statutes, chapter 47.) Telephone 
at house and office. 



Aldermen. 

Act of June, 1848, section i. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 

Ward I. Sam C. Lowell, 50 M. S. block, Mechanic street. 

Ward 2. Alfred D. Maxwell, Goffstown road near Front street, 
Amoskeag. 

Ward 3. George W. Reed, 483 Chestnut street. 

Ward 4. John P. Cronin, 260 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. Richard J. Barry, 232 Lake avenue. 

Ward 6. Byron Worthen, 524 Lake avenue. 

* Resigned May 10, 1894. 

t Elected by board of aldermen May 10, iSg4, and election declared illegal by court, July 
10, 1894. 
t Elected chairman board of aldermen May 10, 1894 ; qualified as mayor July 10, 1894. 



4 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Ward 7. James Lightbody, 61 Amoskeag Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. Christian L. Wolff, 36 Clinton street. 
.• Ward 9. William Marcotte, 506 Beauport street. 



President of the Common Council. 
Fred T. Dunlap, 107 Russell street. 



Members of the Common Council. 

Act of June, 1848, section i. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 

Ward i. 

Joseph Tait, 4 Boyden street. 

John G. Rylander, 63 Stark Corporation, Canal street. 

Frank X. Foster, 1382 Elm street. 

Ward 2. 

Fred T. Dunlap, 107 Russell street. 

George E. Heath, River road north, at Hooksett litie. 

Charles R. Holbrook, 1966 Elm street. 

Ward 3. 

Joseph O. Tremblay, 18 Wilson road. 
Charles H. Harvey, 507 Maple street. 
David H. Burbank, 77 Ash street. 

Ward 4. 

Howard C. Holt, 411 Amherst street. 
Bradley B. Aldrich, 337 Chestnut street. 
Ludger E. Desrochers, 359 Amherst street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 

Ward 5. 

Daniel A. Murphy, 105 East Spruce street. 
John J. Twomey, 91 Cedar street. 
Edward F. Murray, 194 Lake avenue. 

Ward 6. 

Frank H. Libbey, 23 Elm street. 
George B. Rogers, 277 Laurel street. 
William G. Landry, 390 Cedar street. 

Ward 7. 

Willie D. Wheeler, 25 Grove street. 
Levi K. Snow, 86 Canal street. 
J. Adam Graf, 10 Middle street. 

Ward 8. 

Edward F. Scheer, 135 Milford street. 
Alexander J. McDonnell, 56 Dover street. 

Ward 9. 

John Gildard, 646 Main street. 
Joseph Dana, 672 Main street. 
Oscar Knoettner, 326 Main street. 



Clerk of Common Council. 

George L. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 

Salary, $200. (General Laws, chapter 46, sections 7-9. City Laws and 
Ordinances, page 33, chapter 6, section 11.) 



City Clerl<. 

Nathan P. Kidder Office, City Hall 

Salary, $900. The city clerk, in addition to his salary, is in receipt of fees as 
registrar of births, marriages, and deaths, and as a recording officer for record 



6 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

of mortgages on personal property, of attachments of real estate, of partnerships 
and assignments, and for recording various other legal papers. He also receives 
fees for issuing dog licenses, billiard and bowling alley licenses, for certifying 
records, and for various other matters. 

These fees are established by the state legislature under various laws, and 
are estimated to be between ;^2,ioo and $2,500 per annum. Chosen in con- 
vention of City Councils in January, annually. (Charter, section 22. Public 
Statutes, chapter 50. Act of 184^. City Laws and Ordinances, pages 42, 
43, 68, 72, 73, 84, 86, 89, 114, 122, 123, 124, 166, 189.) Residence, 313 
Manchester street. 



City Auditor. 

James E. Dodge ..... Ofifice, City Hall 

Salary, ;$ 1,000. Appointed by Mayor, and approved by Board of Aldermen, 
in January, annually. (Laws of 18S9, chapter 287. City Ordinances, pages 
44, 71, 83-8S, 173.) Residence, River road north. 



Auditor's Clerk. 

Lizzie M. Cogswell . . . Auditor's Office, City Hall 

Salary, ^600. Residence, 1589 Elm street. 



City Treasurer. 

Sylvanus B. Putnam Office, City Hall 

Salary, ;^i,200. Elected in convention of City Councils in January, annu- 
ally. (Charter, section 23. Act of 1856, section 4. General Lavi^s, chapter 
48, sections 3, 4. Act of 1859, section 4. City Laws and Ordinances, pages 
36, 86-89, 170, 172.) Residence, 437 Amherst street. 



Treasurer's Clerk. 

Blanche E. Bullock . . . Treasurer's Office, City Hall 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 7 

Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,650 and fees. Elected by Mayor and Aldermen before May i, 
annually. (Act of July, 1851. Act of June, 1859, section 6. Public Statutes, 
chapter 43. City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 33.) Residence, 740 Chest- 
nut street. 



Deputy Collector of Taxes. 
Edwin C. Paul .... Collector's Office, City Hall 

Paid by collector. Appointed by tax collector with approval of Mayor and 
Aldermen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 23> section 3.) Residence, 
416 Central street.. 



City Solicitor. 

Edwin F. Jones . . Office, Patten's Block. 936 Elm street 

Salary, $800. Elected in convention of City Councils, in January, annually. 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6, pages 70, 72.) Residence, 15 High 
street. 



City Messenger. 
John A. Barker Office, City Hall 

Salary, $700. Elected in convention of City Councils in January, annually. 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6.) Residence, 49 Appleton street. 



Joint Standing Committees. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Lowell; Council- 
men Holbrook, Holt, and Rogers. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Lowell and Worthen ; Councilmen 
Graf, Libbey, and Murray. (Meet Wednesday succeeding the 
24th of each month. All bills must be left at the city auditor's 
office, properly approved, not later than the 20th of each month.) 



8 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Reed and Maxwell ; Councilmen 
Harvey, Twomey, and Gildard. (Meet third Friday in each 
month.) 

On Sfreets. — Aldermen Worthen and Lowell ; Councilmen 
Holt, Harvey, and Heath. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Wolff and Cronin ; Coun- 
cilmen Heath, Landry, and Burbank. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Marcotte and "Wolff; Coun- 
cilmen Snow, Libbey, and Holt. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Barry and Lightbody ; 
Councilmen Foster, Aldrich, and Dana. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Cronin and Lowell ; Coun- 
cilmen Rogers, Tremblay, and Snow. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Lightbody and 
Barry; Councilmen Tait, Fellows, and Desrochers. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Maxwell and Reed ; Coun- 
cilmen Wheeler, McDonnell, and Knoettner. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Lightbody and Marcotte; 
Councilmen Twomey, Dana, and Scheer. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Maxwell and Reed; Councilmen 
Rylander, Wheeler, and Murphy. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Reed and Maxwell ; 
Councilmen Desrochers, McDonnell, and Murphy. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Reed and Wolff: Council- 
men Murray, Knoettner, and Burbank. 

On Public Health. — Aldermen Maxwell and Marcotte ; Coun- 
cilmen Libbev, Aldrich, and Gildard. 



Standing Committees. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Barry and Reed. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Wolff and Lowell. 

On Market. — Aldermen Maxwell and Reed. 

On Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Cronin and Barrv. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 9 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Worthen and Marcotte. 
On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Worthen and Lowell. 
On Special Police. — Aldermen Lightbody and Marcotte. 

COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Councilmen Tremblay, Rylander, 
and Scheer. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Councilmen Holbrook, Tait, 
and Rogers. 

On Enrollment. — Councilmen Foster, Aldrich, and Murphy. 



City Physician. 
Frederick Perkins .... Office, 895 Elm street 

Salary, $200. Elected by City Councils in convention in January, annually. 
(Laws of 1870, chapter 99. City Ordinances, chapter 6, sections 29, 30.) 
Residence, 490 Lake avenue. 



» City Engineer. 
Winfred H. Bennett Office, City Hall 

Salary, ^1,200. Chosen by City Councils in convention in January, annu- 
ally. (City Ordinances, chapter 6, sections 33. 34.) 



Water Commissioners. 

(Chapter 70, Laws of 1S71. City Ordinances, chapter 36, and Laws of 
1 89 1, chapter 26, page 319, act approved March 31, 1891. Chapter 183, Laws 
of 1893.") One commissioner elected annually by Mayor and, Aldermen, in 
the month of September, for a term of six years. Office at Court House, cor- 
ner Franklin and West Merrimack streets. Telephone at office, and at pump- 
ing station. 

The Mayor, ex officio. 

Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1895. 

Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1900. 



10 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1899. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1898. 
James A, Weston, term expires January, 1897. 
Charles T. Means, term expires January, 1896. 
Alpheus Gay, chairman. 

James A. Weston, clerk. Salary, $100. Chosen by the board 
of commissioners. 



Superintendent of Water-Works. 

Charles K. Walker . Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $2,000. Chosen by water commissioners annually. Residence, 68 
South Main street, West Manchester. 

Clerk of the Water-Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns . Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $1,500. Chosen by water commissioners annually. Residence, 421 
■Hanover street. 



Engineer at Old Pumping Station. 
Josiah Laselle. Salary, $700, rent, fuel, and use of land. 
Chosen by water commissioners annually. 



Engineer at New Pumping Station. 
Henry A. Donaway. Salary, $2.50 per day, rent, and fuel. 



Justice of the Police Court. 

Nathan P. Hunt, court room at Police Station, corner Man- 
chester and Chestnut streets. 

.Salary, $1,500. Appointed by the Governor, with the advice of the Council. 
(General Laws, chapter 215; chapter 163, sections 17, 18, 19, of the Laws of 
1878, as amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1881. Public Statutes, chapter 
211.) Residence, 747 Union street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 11 

Associate Justice of the Police Court. 
Isaac L. Heath .... Salary, $300 per annum 

Appointed by the Governor, with advice of the Council. (Chapter 215, 
General Laws, sections 2-14. Public Statutes, chapter 211. Chapter 296, 
Laws of 1893.) 



Clerk of the Police Court. 
John C. Bickford ...... Salary, $600 

Appointed by the justice of the police court. (Chapter 163, sections I7-I9> 
General Laws, amended by chapter 236, Laws of 18S1. PubHc Statutes, 
chapter 211.) Residence, 15 Ash street. 



Police. 

The members of the police force are appointed by the Police Commission- 
ers, and hold their commission during good behavior. They are, by virtue of 
their appointment, coiistables and conservators of the peace, and their jurisdic- 
tion extends throughout the city. (Chapter 253, section 5, General Laws; 
chapter 303, Laws of 1887; chapter 202, Laws of 1893.) Police station, at 
the corner of Chestnut and Manchester streets. 



Police Commissioners.* 

Isaac L. Heath, f term expires January, 1900. 
Noah S. Clark, I term expires January, 1898. 
Frank P. Carpenter, term expires January, 1896. 



Chief of Police. 

Michael J. Healy .... Office at Police Station 

Salary, $900. Residence, 304 Central street. Telephone at house and 
office. 



■ See chapter 202, Laws 1893. t Chairman. t Clerk. 



12 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT, 

Deputy Chief of Police. 

John F. Cassidy .... Office at Police Station 
Salary, ^Soo. Residence, 415 Manchester street. 



Captain of the Watch. 

Lafayette Tebbetts. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 222 
Laurel street. 



Sergeant. 



Henry McAllister. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 852 
Elm street, room 18. 



Day Police. 

SALARY, $2.25 PER DAY. 

Randall W. Bean, 77 Ash street. 

Frank E. Bourassa, 552 Lincoln street. 

Levi J. Proctor, Candia road, corner Massabesic street. 

Lucius M. Rollins, 437 Laurel street. 

Olaf Ring, 29 Upton's block, Elm street. 

Benjamin F. Lake, 496 Chestnut street. 

John T. O'Dowd, Laurel street. 

Florence Sullivan, 213 Cedar street. 



Night Patrol. 

SALARY, $2.25 PER DAY. 

Henry A. Burns, 451 Manchester street. 
Theodore Flodin, 232 East High street. 
George A. Lovejoy, 99 Orange street. 
John D. Healy, 129 East Spruce street. 
Frank W. Warden, 400 Belmont street. 



LIST OP OFFICERS. 13 

Oscar R. Poehlman, 386 Dubuque street. 

Horace L. Robbins, 539 Chestnut street. 

Albert Russell, ;^6 School street. 

Thomas E. Steele, 116 Pearl street. 

Fred A. Stockwell, 300 Lowell street. 

Leon E. Magoon, 355 East Spruce street. 

Edgar A. Young, 371 Merrimack street. 

Joseph Archambeault, 38 2 Cedar, corner Maple street. 

James S. Butler, 41 Cedar street. 

John C. Badger, 325 Amherst street. 

Peter Callaghan, 122 Jewett street. 

John J. Connor, 155 Pine street. 

John T. Foley, 224 Shasta street. 

Elmer A. Gibbs, 300 Lowell street. 

Kenneth McDonald, 305 Chestnut street. 

Frank P. Moore, 47 Elm street. 

William Steel, 116 Pearl street. 

Francois Reinville, 140 Kelley street. West Manchester. 

Edwin A. Hutchins, 11 Mill street, Amoskeag. 

Gilbert A. Sackett, 784 Chestnut street. 

John T. Welch, 1263 Elm street. 



Janitor of Station, 

Frank P. Wiggin. $1.75 per day. Residence, 21 Laurel 
avenue. 



Matron. 



Miss A. B. Brown. ^415 per annum. Residence, 329 Chest- 
nut street. 



School Committee. 

Chosen at the biennial election in November, 1892; Mayor and president of 
the Common Council members ex officio. The board of school committee 



14 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

choose the clerk of the board, the superhitendent of pubUc instruction, the 
truant officer, and the teachers in the public schools, and determine their 
salaries. They have charge of the repairs of schoolhouses, to a limited ex- 
tent, and the purchase of free text-books, and other supplies, and are limited 
by the appropriation of the City Councils. The salary of the committee is $io 
each. 

Ward i. 

Charles D. Sumner, 22 Stark street. 
Walter H. Lewis, 32 Stark street. 

Ward 2. 

George H. Stearns, 1934 Elm street. 
Alvin T. Thoits, 63 Harrison street. 

Ward 3. 

George D. Towne, 170 Lowell street. 
Louis E. Phelps, 103 Walnut street. 

Ward 4. 

Stephen B. Stearns, 464 Amherst street. 
Edwin L. Richardson,* 304 Manchester street. 
John W. Mears. f 

Ward 5. 

James P. Slattery, 217 Central street. 
William J. Sughrue, 5 1 Spruce street. 

Ward 6. 

Frank T. E. Richardson, 481 Lincoln street. 
George W. Dearborn, 131 Massabesic street. 

Ward 7. 

Marshall P. Hall, 26 Market street. 
* Edward B. Woodbury, i Pleasant street. 

* Died, t Elected to fill vacancy. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 1,5 

Ward 8. 

Luther C. Baldwin, 157 Milford street. 
Josiah G. Dearborn, 157 Milford street. 

Ward 9. 

Edward J. Doherty, 336 Beauport street. 
Scott E. Sanborn, 46 Sullivan street. 

Fred T. Dunlap, ex officio, 107 Russell street. 

Edgar J. Knowlton,-'- chairman, 533 Lake avenue. Office, 
City Hall. 

David B. Varney. 

Byron Worthen. 

Edward B.Woodbury, clerk ; salary, ;^i5o ; i Manchester Cor- 
poration, Pleasant street. 



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

William E. Buck Office, City Hall 

Salary, ^2,300. Residence, 324 Myrtle street. 



Superintendent's Clerk. 

Fannie L. Sanborn . . . Residence, 161 Hanover street 

Salary, $500. 



Truant Officer. 

Samuel Brooks f ..... Office, City Hall 
Curtis W. Davis Office, City Hall 

Salary, $750. Residence, 849 Cliestnut street. 



* Resigned, t Died. 



16 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Assessors. 

One assessor from each ward chosen at the biennial election in November. 
Paid $2.50 each, for each day while employed in the assessment and abate- 
ment of taxes. Office, City Hall. (Charter, section 25. Public Statutes, 
chapter 48, section i; chapter 50, section 4; chapter 49, sections 10, li, 12. 
City Ordinances, chapter 6, section 26.) Assistant assessors, not exceeding 
six, chosen by the City Councils. 

Ward I. Henry Lewis, 32 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 2. John E. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 

Ward 3. David O. Furnald, 384 Lowell street. 

Ward 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. George F. Sheehan, 85 Cedar street. 

Ward 6. George H. Dudley, 159 Laurel street. 

Ward 7. V/illiam T. Rowell, 14 Manchester Corporation. 

Ward 8. Frank N. Daniels, 137 Milford street. 

Ward 9. Lawrence F. Bradley, 568 Main street. 

CHAIRMAN OF ASSESSORS. 

David O. Furnald Office, City Hall 

CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 

, George H. Dudley ..... Office, City Hall 
Inspectors of Check-Lists. 

One in each ward, chosen at the biennial election in November. Compen- 
sation, ^^2.25 per day for each day actually employed. Office, City Hall. 
(Laws of 1878, chapter 163, sections 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, and 
City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) 

Ward I. George C. Kemp, 40 Machine Shop block. 

Ward 2. Charles B. Tucker, 777 Union street. 

Ward 3. David O. Furnald, 384 Lowell street. 

Ward 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. John F. Quinn, 190 Chestnut street. 

Ward 6. Albert J. Peaslee, Cohas avenue, near Water- Works. 

Ward 7. Joseph A. Foster, 42 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 8. Charles C. Tinkham, 9 Parker avenue. 

Ward 9. John B. Bourque, 22 Wayne street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 17 

Overseers of the Poor. 

One in each ward, chosen at biennial election in November. The Mayor is 
a member ex officio. Compensation, $25 per annum, each ; clerk of the 
board, $100 per annum, determined by City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 18, 
as amended by Ordinance of August 5, iSgo. Meet third Wednesday of each 
month in City Hall building. 

Ward I. William H. Maxwell, clerk, 20 Anioskeag Corpora- 
tion, Stark street. 

Ward 2. Thoiiias L. Quimby, railroad station, foot^West Sal- 
mon street. 

Ward 3. Benjamin F. Garland, 28 Linden street. 

Ward 4. George S. Holmes, 296 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. Patrick Costello, 106 East Spruce street. 

Ward 6. Charles Francis, Candia road, East Manchester. 

Ward 7. William Marshall, 72 Amoskeag Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. Charles S. McKean, 495 Granite street. 

Ward 9. Frank I. Lessard, 362 Dubuque street. 

Ed^^ar J. Knowlton, ex officio^ office, City Hall. 

David B. Varney, ex officio^ office. City Hall. 

Byron Worthen, ex officio, office, City Hall. 



Board of Health. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 1885, chap- 
ter 165; Laws of 18S7, chapter 227; Public Statutes, chapters 108, 109, 
no.) One member appointed by the Mayor in January of each year, to hold 
office for a term of three years. Salary, $200 each per annum. Office, Couit 
House, West Merrimack, corner of Franklin street. 

Clarence W. Downing, M. D. Term expires first Monday in 
February, 1896. 

Joseph B. Sawyer, clerk, civil engineer, 356 Hanover street. 
Term expires first Monday in February, 1895. 

Cornelius F. Starr, M. D., 49 Manchester street. Term ex- 
pires first Monday in February, 1897. 

2 



18 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Herbert S. Clough, sanitary inspector, Hanover-street road. 
Office, Court House, Merrimack, corner of Franklin street. 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector, 164 Auburn street. Office, 
Court House, Merrimack, corner of Franklin street. 

Richard J. Barry, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, 
Merrimack, corner Franklin street. 



Fire Department. 

The chief engineer and four assistant engineers are chosen annually, in the 
month of January, by a majority of the City Councils in convention. The 
salary of the chief engineer is $1,300 per annum; the assistant engineers, 
each $125 per annum. They exercise the powers and perform the duties of 
firewards. The said engineers constitute the board of engineers, and elect a 
clerk whose compensation is $25 a year. The annual compensation of the 
call members of the several hook-and-Iadder, hose, steam fire engine, and 
chemical engine companies is as follows : Foremen, each ;5Si 15 ; assistant fore- 
men, each $110 ; clerks, each $110; engineers, each $135; assistant engi- 
neers, each $105; all other members, each $100; payable in equal semi- 
annual payments, on the first of January and July. (Laws of 1870, chapter 
99. General Laws, chapter 106. City Ordinances, chapters 6 and 12.) 
Five members are permanently employed as engineers at $76.25 per month 
each, and nineteen as drivers at $68.33^ per month each, and receive no 
compensation as call members. Members of the companies are appointed by 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen in the month of February, annually, on list 
presented by the board of engineers. The officers of each company are ap- 
pointed by the board of engineers. 



Chief Engineer. 

Thomas W. Lane . . Office, Central Station, Vine street 

Residence, 1937 Elm street Telephone at house and office. 

Fred S. Bean, clerk, 102 Orange street. 
Ruel G. Manning, 52 Douglas street, West Manchester. 
Eugene S. Whitney, River road north, corner West street. 
Clarence D. Palmer, 366 Lake avenue. 

For further information see chief engineer's report. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 19 

Trustees of City Library. 

(Laws of 1854, chapter 1588. See contract with Manchester Atheneum, 
printed on pages 107 and 108 of City Report for fiscal year ending January 31, 
1855.) Board of seven trustees, one of whom is elected by Aldermen and 
board of trustees in joint convention in September, annually. Term of service, 
seven years ; no salary. Two additional trustees. Mayor, and president of Com- 
mon Council, c'x officio. 

Lucien B. Clough, term expires October i, 1895, ^^^ Walnut 
street. 

Nathan P. Hunt,* term expires October i, 1894. 774 Union 
street. 

- Herman F. Straw, term expires October i, 1900, 607 Chestnut 
street. 

Walter M. Parker, term expires October i, 1899, West Web- 
ster street, corner Elm. 

Isaac W. Smith, term expires October i, 1898, 1855 Elm 
street. 

Moody Currier, term expires October i, 1897, Ash street, cor- 
ner Myrtle. 

C. D. McDuffie, term expires October i, 1896, Ash street, cor- 
ner Myrtle. 

Edgar J. Knovvlton, ex officio, 533 Lake avenue. 

David B. Varney, ex officio. 

Byron Worthen, ex officio. 

Fred T. Dunlap, ex officio., 107 Russell street. 



Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 

The City Councils in joint convention, biennially, elect one member of said 
board for a term of six years. Not more than two members can be of the 
same political party. Said board, consisting of three members, has full charge, 
management, and control of the building, constructing, repairing, and main- 
taining of all the streets, highways, lanes, sidewalks, bridges, and public sewers 
ard drains, and public parks and commons. (See Laws of 1893, chapter 264.) 
Office, City Hall building. Open from 8 to 12 A. M., 2 to 5 P. M. Regular 

* Re-elected for seven years. 



20 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

meeting of the board at 2 o'clock r. m., each day. Salary of each member, 
$600 per year, payable quarterly, and each are allowed ;?l5o annually for horse 
hire. 

George H. Stearns, chairman, term expires 1898. 
Leonard P. Reynolds, term expires 1896. 
Horace P. Simpson, "-J^ term expires 1894. 



Clerk. 

Appointed by commissioners. Salary, ^75 monthly. 

Allan E. Herrick, 91 Russell street, corner of Prospect. 
Assistant Clerk, Julia F. Stearns. 



CityjWeigher. 

Elected annually in convention of City Councils'. Salary, I400 per annum ; 
all fees for weighing returned monthly to city treasurer with sworn statement. 
Stationed at city scales on Franklin street. 

William Bailey Ofifice,"city scales 

Residence, 74 Main street, West Manchester. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 
Albert T. Barr. 

Elected annually in January by City Councils in convention. Paid by fees. 
(Section 25, chapter 43, Public Statutes, and chapter 125, Public Statutes.) 



Fish and Game Wardens. 

(Public Statutes, chapter 130.) Elected by City Councils in convention. 

John C. Higgins, 143 Orange street. 
George A. Clark, 304 Central street. 



* Re-elected for six years. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 21 

Samuel S. James, 1S4 Laurel street. 

William C. Clarke, 711 Pine, corner North street. 

C. R. Hodge, 574 Hall street. 



Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39, sections i, 2, 3, 4.) Two trustees elected by 
City Councils in convention in January, annually, for the term of four years. 
Sub-trustees appointed by board of trustees. 

George W. Bacon, 65 Stark Corporation, Canal street, term 
expires January, 1895. 

William H. Huse, Mammoth road, term expires 1895. 

John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street, term expires 1898. 

Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street, term expires 1898. 

Stillman P. Cannon, 43 Elm street, term expires 1897. 

James E. Bailey, Goffstown road near Front street, term ex- 
pires 1897. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 25 High street, term expires January, 
1896. 

John P. Young, 346 Merrirnack street, term expires January, 
1896. 

S. B. Putnam, clerk and treasurer, 437 Amherst street. 



Sub-Trustees of Cemeteries. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Alderman Richard J. Barry, 232 Lake avenue. 
Councilman Ludger E. Desrochers, 359 Amherst street. 
John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street. 
Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street. 
Stillman P. Cannon, 43 Elm street. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Alderman James Lightbody, 61 Amoskeag Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 



22 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Councilman Joseph Tait, 4 Boyden street. 

George W. Bacon, 66 Stark Corporation, Canal street. 

John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 25 High street. 

AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

Councilman J, Adam Graf, 10 Middle street. 
James E. Bailey, Goffstown road near Front street. 
William H. Huse, Mammoth road; East Manchester. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Byron A. Stearns. Office and residence at the 'cemetery. 
Telephone. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Charles H. G. Foss. Office at the cemetery; residence, 267 
Lake avenue. 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

James A. Weston, chairman, 621 Maple street. 
Person C. Cheney, Harrison street, corner Elm. 
Edgar J. Knowlton, ex officio, 533 Lake avenue. 
Byron Worthen, ex officio, 424 Lake avenue. 



Inspector of Milk. 

H. F. W. Little . . . Office, rear of 13 Lowell street 

Residence, 385 Lowell street. Term expires February i, annually. (Pub- 
lic Statutes, chapter 127.) Appointed by Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, ^300 
per annum. 



Inspector of Buildings. 

Thomas W. Lane . . . Office at Central Fire Station 

Residence, 1937 Elm street. Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
biennially, in February. Salary, ;^ioo per annum. (City Ordinances, chapter 
15. Laws of 1883, chapter 94. Public Statutes, page 170.) Telephone at 
house and office. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



23 



Inspectors of Oil. 



Joseph B. Baril 
John Cayzer 



99 Bridge street 
383 Granite street 



(Public Statutes, chapter 126, sections 25-34. City Ordinances, chapter 25.) 
Paid by fees, j{ of i per cent per gallon. 



Moderators. 



Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 31, sections 3,9; chapter 36, 
section 9; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordinances, page 18. See Public Stat- 
utes relating to towns and cities.). 

Ward I. Abial W. Eastman, 24 Amoskeag Corporation, Stark 
Street. 

Ward 2. William M. Butterfield, 142 Sagamore street. 
Ward 3. Charles L. Harmon, 312 Pearl street. 

George H. Warren, 461 Hanover street. 

Emmett DufEe, 207 Central street. 

Herbert S. Clough, 45 Middle street. 

Frank A. Dockham, iS Pleasant street. 
Ward 8. Charles G. Ranno, 63 Parker street, West Manches- 
ter. 

Ward 9. John T. Hanigan, 159 Cartier street. 



Ward 4. 

Ward 5. 

Ward 6. 

Ward 7. 



Ward Clerks. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 44, sections 10, 12. 
dinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 



City Or- 



Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 



Frank X. Foster, 1382 Elm street. 

Wilson F. Higgins, 573 Pine street. 

Frank O. Moulton, 211 Bridge street. 

George H. Phinney, 133 Hanover street. 

John A. Whalen. 

Harry I. Dodge, Goffe's Falls. 

Charles E. Bartlett, 68 West Merrimack street. 
Ward 8. Maurice S. Lamprey, Rockland avenue. 
Ward 9. Jean B. B. Beliveau, 5 Monmouth street. 



24 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Selectmen. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter i, section 27 ; chapter 12, sec- 
tion 6; chapter 40, sections 2,3; chapter 109, section 27; chapter 213, sec- 
tion I. City Ordinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns and 
cities.) 

Ward i . 

John H. Wales, Jr., 19 Machine Shop block, Water street. 
Henry S. Perry, 24 Stark Corporation, Mechanic street. 
Theophile G. Biron, 29 Arkvvright street. 

Ward 2. 

Daniel G. Andrews, 777 Union street. 

Jesse B. Nourse, 868 Union street. 

Nathaniel Doane, Jr., 103 Brook street. I 

Ward 3. 

John Cronin, 284 Bridge street. 
.Samuel C. Kennard, 609 Beech street. 
John A. Sargent, 69 Wilson road. 

Ward 4. 

Charles H. Uhlig, 94 Laurel street. 
Frank E. Farrell, 550 Lincoln street. 
Charles F. Nallgey, 234 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. 

Arthur Allen, 74 Auburn street. 
Charles J. Woods, 217 Central street. 
Jeremiah Teehan, 224 Lake avenue. 

Ward 6. 

John N. Auger, Nutt road near Pine street. 
Edward P. Cogswell, 409 Cedar street. 
Harrison P. Heselton, 261 Laurel street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 25 

Ward 7. 

Hanson R. Armstrong, 58 Amoskeag Corporation, West Mer- 
rimack street. 

Robert Leggett, 50 Amoskeag Corporation, Canal street. 

Robert Morrow, 66 Amoskeag Corporation, West Merrimack 
street. % 

Ward 8. 

George B. Barnes, 170 Walker street. 
Auguste Filion, 72 Second street. 
Benjamin J. Mack, 145 Boynton street. 

Ward 9. 

Gideon Belisle, 335 Dubuque street. 
Oswald Paris, Amory, corner Morgan street. 
Martin J. Rafferty, 450 Beauport street. 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESSES. 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESSES. 



MAYOR KNOWLTON'S ADDRESS. 

Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

Having been named for a high position within the gift of the 
national government, it becomes my duty at this hour to take 
leave from you who have been my companions in a long and 
arduous labor. I will say as one other has said before me, that 
''the one who is bidden away from such a fellowship of dutiful 
toil goes forth companionless, and whether the days darken 
around him or brighten, and whether the first or last 'well done ' 
is sounding in his ears from those whom, with his uttermost 
strength, he has labored to serve, he goes forth companionless, 
among new men, strange faces, other minds." 

Whatever fortune betides me in the years to come, I shall never 
permit myself to forget your fidelity in our joint and common 
toil for the public weal, and shall ever hold in high regard my 
association with you in municipal government. 

The fourth year of my administration is now well advanced, 
and I feel that I shall be pardoned if I at this time briefly touch 
upon some of the most important events and accomplishments 
which have taken place during ray term as mayor. If my memory 
serves me correctly, there are eight members here in convention 
who have been continually associated with me since I began my 
connection with the city government four years ago, viz.: Alder- 
men Worthen, Maxwell, Reed, Cronin, Barry, and Wolff, and 
Councilmen Dunlap and Snow. The first-named has served con- 
tinuously in the board of mayor and aldermen, Councilmen Dun- 
lap and Snow continuously in the more popular branch of the 



30 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

city government, and Aldermen Cronin, Reed, Barry, Maxwell, 
and Wolff served first in the council and won their promotion to 
the upper branch. But whether members of the past or the pres- 
ent city government, I desire at this time to bear pleasing testi- 
mony to the order, business methods, and close attention which 
have characterized all of our deliberations, and to publicly 
acknowledge the never-failing courtesy, kindness, and hearty 
support which have ever been accorded me by both past and 
present associates. 

The duties of mayor are oftentimes peculiarly perplexing and 
annoying, and in such measure as his co-laborers in the city 
government sympathize and share with him the burdens of mu- 
nicipal management is he enabled to serve the people. 

Ours has been an active and progressive administration, and 
the years of 1891, 1892, and 1893, stand as the high water mark 
in the progress and prosperous development of our queenly city. 
Numerous changes have taken place during the years of our stew- 
ardship. We have seen the streets, sewers, and parks placed in 
the hands of a competent board of commissioners elected by the 
city councils ; and the police department has been made perma- 
nent, and its government lodged under the control of three com- 
missioners appointed by the governor and council. Land has 
been purchased for the enlargement of the central police station, 
and to provide facilities for the introduction of the police signal 
system. The city has also had a serviceable and well-equipped 
ambulance constructed and placed in commission, which has 
already demonstrated its usefulness. 

FINANCIAL. 

Manchester's valuation has increased from $24,207,740 in 1890 
to ^27,439,742 in 1893, ^^d *^^ work of the assessors, to be made 
public this month, will show a still further gratifying increase in 
valuation, and a reduction in the tax rate. 

Financially the city was never stronger than today. We have 
refunded $100,000 of water bonds at 4 per cent, which were 
bearing 6 per cent interest, liquidated $70,000 of city bonds of 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESSES. 31 

the war period, have the money on hand to wipe out ^50,000 
more of these bonds which fall due July i, 1894; also the money 
on hand to cancel the ^25,000 loan which becomes due in De- 
cember, and which was made to carry on city work late in the 
fall of 1893, in order to give employment to the many, worthy 
laboring people who were then out of work. We have, further- 
more, a balance of ^25,000 to assist in liquidating ^100,000 of 
bonded indebtedness, which falls due July i, 1895. The money 
for these purposes was obtained at the low rate of 2^ per cent, 
and by making the bank negotiating the loan the depository of 
the city's money. 

We have issued ^100,000 of permanent improvement bonds 
bearing interest at 4 per cent, and ^200,000 of water bonds, 
$100,000 of which bear interest at 4^ per cent, and the remain- 
ing $100,000 are a 5 per cent issue ; but in assuming this indebt- 
edness we have provided a way for its payment by annually 
setting aside a sum of money as a sinking fund, which sum will, 
at the maturity of the bonds, be sufficient to cancel them. 

Never was the splendid credit of our city shown to better ad- 
vantage than during the severe financial panic in the summer of 
1893. In the midst of those days and weeks of financial fear, 
when other municipalities were stopping work because of their 
inability to procure the money necessary to meet the pay-roll of 
their laborers, our city not only made a satisfactory loan of $100,- 
000, but floated two sets of bonds of $roo,ooo each. 

SCHOOLS. 

This is a department to which we can invite public attention 
with feelings of genuine satisfaction and pride. New school- 
houses have been erected at Hallsville and on Pearl street ; the 
latter school building is being duplicated in McGregorville ; two 
large wings have been added to the Webster-street schoolhouse, 
one wing to the Trainmg school, and another to the Goffe's Falls 
school building, and the preliminary steps are under way for 
another large schoolhouse in the southeastern section of the city. 
Without reference to the latter, building accommodations have 



32 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

.been provided for more than i,ooo pupils in the public schools, 
a record so luminous with good as to call forth many commend- 
atory congratulations. 

WATER-WORKS. 

This magnificent plant, owned by the city, has been made in- 
trinsically more valuable by the introduction of the high pres- 
sure service, which not only re-inforces the older system but car- 
ries our unrivaled water supply to heights of land which formerly 
could not be reached. The new service, with all of its benefi- 
cent advantages, will be in operation within a few months. 

During my term as mayor, twenty-two miles of iron water 
pipe have been laid, five miles of cement water pipe replaced by 
iron, and today we have fifty-five miles of iron pipe in ser- 
vice and nineteen miles of cement pipe. There has been an in- 
crease of 760 meters, 790 fixed rate additions, and 107 fire 
hydrants. Water' rates to consumers have been reduced and yet 
the annual income from the works exceeds $100,000 per annum. 
The commissioners are making progress towards securing the 
ownership of all the land along the shores of Lake Massabesic. 

STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

There have been laid out 26^^ miles of new streets, macada- 
mizing to the extent of 2 miles has been put in, an area of 9^ 
miles of streets has received a topdressing of stone, 27^ miles 
of streets have been graveled, and 39 miles of highways have 
been turnpiked. ' In concreting, 44,301 yards have been laid in 
street crossings, sidewalks, and roadways, 14,798 feet of new edge 
stone set, 3,367 feet of edge stone reset. 16,650 square yards of 
cobble gutter paving laid, and 20,476 feet of paving relaid. 
Grading for concrete to the extent of 43^955 feet has been put 
in, 7,256 feet of cobble edging set, more than gjA miles of new 
sewers built, 558 Y's for house connections put in, 266 cesspools 
built, and 200 cesspools repaired. Elm street at Ray brook has 
been widened and its appearance thereby greatly improved. 
Chestnut street, from a point north of the government building 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESSES. 33 

to Amherst street, has also been broadened and the improvement 
is a most noticeable one. Large stone culverts have been put in 
on Maple, Lincoln, Walnut, Wilson, and Sagamore streets. 

ELECTRIC LIGHTING. 

One of the most important and satisfactory measures in the 
interest of the city which it has been our privilege to consum- 
mate was the abrogation of the contract between the munici- 
pality and the Manchester Electric Light Company, under which 
the streets were lighted from dark to daylight, and the making of 
a new one, which, on the basis of the number of lights in use 
during the last six months, makes an annual saving to the city of 
57,282. By the new contract the cost of each light was reduced 
$22. Nor was this all. In the contract was inserted a clause 
which read as follows : " If there is during the term of this con- 
tract any radical change in the manner of generating electricity, 
whereby the cost of producing the current is materially lessened, 
then an adequate reduction in the price of the electric lighting 
service shall be made." 

With an annual saving to the city of more than $7,000, and 
the interests of the municipality protected for the future by the 
terms of the contract, the members of the city government can 
point to their action on this matter with pride and congratula- 
tion, assured that the verdict of the taxpayers is overwhelmingly 
in accord with them. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

This branch of the municipal service will compare favorably 
with any city of equal size in the country, and is justly the 
pride of our citizens. It contains a membership of 145 experi- 
enced fire fighters. Its facilities have been increased by the ad- 
dition of the Walter M. Fulton engine house and its equipment, 
'the first-class steam fire engine N. S. Bean, an aerial truck of a 
high grade of manufacture, one new hose wagon, 8,000 feet of 

the best knit jacket hose, one new exercise wagon, and the con- 
3 



34 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

tract has been awarded for the building of two others, and four 
three-horse hitches have been substituted for double ones. An 
important change for the good of the department was the di- 
vorcement of fire teams from subserviency to the street depart- 
ment, so that the fire department is now in readiness at the first 
note of an alarm to put forth its utmost strength for the suppres- 
sion of a fire. The most apparent need of the department is in 
the line of ladder service, it being almost a necessity for addi- 
tional men to be permanently attached to both of the hook-and- 
ladder trucks. 

A new hosehouse is being built in South Manchester, which, 
when equipped, will afford the protection needed in the southern 
section of the city. 

BRIDGES. 

Among the permanent improvements which we have accom- 
plished none are superior to the bridge constructed over the Pis- 
cataquog river in two spans at Second street last year. It cost 
^49,057.37, and in beauty, substantiality, and skill in construc- 
tion it is without a rival in the state. It affords the only avenue 
of reaching the south bank of the river without crossing a rail- 
road track at grade, and will stand for scores of years as a testi- 
monial to the business ability, wisdom, and foresight of the pres- 
ent city government. 

Arrangements have already been perfected for the construc- 
tion of a handsome, double-arch stone bridge at South Main 
street, which will cost $28,000. Both the Second street and 
South Main street bridges are of a most durable and permanent 
character, and if properly cared for should be serviceable and in 
every way sufficient to meet the wants of the city a century 
hence. We can safely trust the verdict of the future in these 
enterprises. 

PARKS, COMMONS, AND CEMETERIES. 

A systematic effort has been inaugurated for the development 
of both Stark and Derryfield parks in accordance with plans 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESSES. 35 

which have met with the approval of the city councils, and by 
means of the appropriations that are annually made these parks 
will soon be fashioned into resorts of great attractiveness and 
beauty. Stark park was dedicated on the 17th of June, 1893, 
and the time is believed to be not far distant when an equestrian 
statue will be erected thereon to the memory of him who is 
Manchester's most illustrious hero. 

The commons have been well cared for and have afforded an 
attractive resting place to thousands of weary toilers throughout 
the summer evenings. In winter they have been converted into 
skating places for the use of the youth of the city, thereby 
affording recreation and enjoyment without the risk incident to 
river and lake. 

Both the Valley and Pine Grove cemeteries have been greatly 
beautified and improved, and the territory of the latter largely 
increased by the purchase of adjoining land. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

The city almshouse and house of correction buildings have 
been enlarged and greatly improved, thereby providing better 
facilities and many additional conveniences, which were sorely 
needed for the care of the inmates. The Elliot and Sacred 
Heart hospitals have been opened, and the Women's Aid Hos- 
pital has taken a more commodious home. In all of these in- 
stitutions the city has an interest and it is an annual contributor 
to their maintenance. The poor have been well cared for by the- 
interested and capable board of overseers of the poor. 

The health of the city has been excellent. The Manchester 
board of health has been unwearying in its efforts to this end, 
and the cleanliness of the city last season was a source of favora- 
ble comment. Through the efforts of the health board the shores 
of Lake Massabesic were faithfully patrolled last summer as a 
precautionary measure, and this patrol should be continued when- 
ever there are any number of people gathered about the lake. 

The foundation has been put in for a brick ward room build- 
ing oh Lake avenue for the accommodation of the voters of ward 



36 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

five, and there is an unexpended balance of ^4,000 towards the 
completion of the structure. 

The city library building has undergone extensive improve- 
ments, and the number of books upon the shelves has been 
largely increased. 

The doing away with discount on taxes has resulted in an 
annual saving to the city of from ^5,000 to ^6,000. 

The capacity of the city stable building has been increased, 
and the street department has created a repair shop which makes 
a substantial saving in expense. 

CONCLUSION. 

Surrounded by desirable physical advantages, possessing excel- 
lent sanitary conditions, an unsurpassed supply of pure drinking 
water, and many other blessings, together with both the oppor- 
tunity and tendency to grow, the future of our city is radiant 
with promise. The ownership of homes, an unfailing criterion 
of individual prosperity, is as well established as in any other city 
of equal population in New England, and there is nothing, I 
earnestly believe, better calculated to insure good government, 
aside from public educational advantages, than the encourage- 
ment of home building on the part of the people. Our city is 
strong mentally and morally, and holds out equal advantages to 
rich and poor alike. I believe that it is right and proper that we 
should enthuse over the blessings which we are privileged to en- 
joy, and I think it our duty to magnify and emphasize the fair 
name and fame of our city, and as loyal citizens ever consider 
her interests as first, and give to the claims of corporate interests 
and individuals a secondary place. You, fellow associates in the 
city government, can do no more than to continue in your stead- 
fast fidelity to the trust which has been confided to your keeping, 
and in the performance of this duty I now bid you God-speed 
and farewell. 

Gentlemen, I, at this time, tender you my resignation as mayor. 

Respectfully, 

E. J. KNOWLTON, 

Mayor. 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESSES. 37 

MAYOR WORTHEN'S ADDRESS. 

Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen : 

In closing my official duties it seems proper to make a brief 
statement concerning the business which has been transacted 
during the short time I have been mayor, and give the public a 
summary of receipts and expenditures, so far as is practicable, 
during the year 1894. 

I assumed the duties of this office July 10, 1894 ; but very lit- 
tle business having been transacted in the ten days previous, my 
administration practically covers the last half of the year. 

The following statement shows substantially the condition of 
affairs July i, 1894 : 

The reserve fund appropriation made January i, 1894, was 
^20,000 ; the balance unexpended July i, was 1^3,780. The ap- 
propriation for incidental expenses was $12,000; there had been 
transferred May 18, from the reserved fund appropriation to the 
incidental expense fund, ;^io,ooo, making a total of $22,000; 
the balance unexpended July i was $2,022.63. The appropria- 
tion for printing and stationery was $2,000, the amount left 
unexpended July i was $16.13. The appropriation for city hall 
expenses was $2,700; the amount unexpended July i was $1,- 
244.78. The appropriation for repairs of buildings was $4,000 ; 
this sum had all been expended, and there was an overdraft on 
that account of $65.58. Contracts had been made relating to 
the Pearl-street schoolhouse which gave an overdraft of $2,835.- 
25 ; similar contracts relating to the Webster-street schoolhouse, 
which gave an overdraft of $845.13, and relating to the Rinimon 
schoolhouse which gave an overdraft of $88.24. No provision 
had been made for furnishing the rooms, or grading and fencing 
the last-named school building lot. There was also an overdraft 
of about $200 in the South Manchester hosehouse ; contract for 
this had been made before July i. 

A temporary loan of $25,000 was made, date 1893, in antici- 
pation of the taxes of 1894, which fell due and was paid Decem- 
ber I, 1894. No appropriation, however, was made from the 



38 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

ordinary receipts for the payment of this loan ; but it was, in 
fact, extended by another loan in the following manner : 

In January, 1894, a vote was passed providing for a loan of 
^100,000 to be applied : ^50,000 to pay so much of the funded 
debt falling due July i, 1894,; ^25,000 to pay the temporary 
loan of 1893, December i ; and $25,000 to pay so much of the 
funded debt which falls due July i, 1895. 

One of the provisions of the vote referred to was that the bank 
which took this loan should have the deposits of the moneys col- 
lected by the treasurer and collector, and it was to be taken by 
the lowest bidder. The rate, as I am informed, was two and one 
half per cent. This loan began to draw interest March i, 1894, 
but the city received its first instalment of $50,000 July i, its 
second of $25,000 December i, and will receive its last of $25,- 
000 next July. It will thus be seen that the indebtedness of the 
city is not lessened, but only extended by changing its form, 
and that the bank making this loan really receives a greater rate 
of interest than the contract specifies, besides having the benefit 
of all the deposits carried by the city. 

If the temporary loan of $25,000 had not been effected, a de- 
ficit would have come over from 1893, as will be seen by the 
following statement which I have received from the auditor : 

Net cash in hands of treasurer January i, 1893 . $96,477.18 
Total ordinary receipts during the year 1893 . . 516,370.09 
Received from the state 120,228.74 



Improvement bonds sold $100,000.00 

Temporary loan in anticipation of tax of 1894 . 25,000.00 
Premium on bonds ...... 6,090.00 

Cemetery bonds sold 6,000.00 

$870,166.01 
The annual appropriation for 1893 was . . . $733)9°i-55 

Total expenditure 848,432.76 

Cash December 31, 1893 21,733.25 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESSES. 



39 



This statement of the receipts and expenditures is independent 
of the water-works account, which is kept separate and under the 
control of the board of water commissioners. Besides this the 
auditor informs me that bills amounting to several thousand dol- 
lars were kept back and brought into this year's accounts. 



Cash on hand January i, 1894 . 
Total ordinary receipts during year 
Improvement bonds sold 
Cemetery bonds sold . 
Premium on bonds sold 
P^eceived from the state 
Security note or bond 



Annual appropriations for 1S94 
Total expenditures for year 
Cash, December 31, 1894 . 



. $21,733.25 
556,101.75 
100,000.00 
5,000.00 
7,576.00 
1^^,532.59 
100,000.00 

$900,943.59 

$735>935-37 

843,221.90 

57>72i.69 



This statement is also independent of the water-works ac- 
count. There was no appropriation for election expenses. 

The Howlett place has been bought for the Pine Grove ceme- 
tery, price, $4,400; $1,000 to be paid down and the rest in 
April, 1895, but as a matter of fact all bills that were due have 
been paid, and this has been done without making any loan. 

The following is a statement of the city debt : 



Water bonds 
City bonds 
Cemetery bonds 
Security loan 



State receipts, 1893 
State receipts, 1S94 



$850,000.00 

415,000.00 

32,000.00 

100,000.00 

$1,397,000.00 

$120,228.74 
110,532.59 



Deficit 



$9,696.15 



40 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

The high pressure water supply which was projected in 1890 
has been completed and is now in full operation. The work was 
delayed by lack of authority on the part of the city. The leg- 
islature of 1892 passed the necessary act and since then the 
undertaking has been carried forward as rapidly as was judicious. 
It makes our water supply one of the best in the country. 

There is always opportunity for improvement in the means of 
prosperity in any town or city, and of course there are many 
things to be done in Manchester for the public benefit. I will 
only mention such as seem particularly important. 

It is apparent that a new high school building should be pro- 
vided at an early day. Just what is the best plan in this respect 
I am not prepared to say, but the subject should receive the care- 
ful and earnest consideration of the city government. The 
health and comfort, as well as reasonable facilities for school 
purposes, of pupils of the High school demand attention to the 
matter. Its importance can hardly be appreciated, and I com- 
mend it to the government and the people of the city. 

The subject of the city hall has received some attention and 
various suggestions have been made. It is evident that some re- 
pairs and alterations in the present building should be made. 
The roof is in bad condition, but a new one of a different char- 
acter can take its place and the interior be remodeled for a com- 
paratively smill sum. Those portions now occupied by tenants 
should be appropriated to public use, and thus the building 
serve every needed purpose for many years. The city would in 
that way save expending a very large sum and would for the 
present, at least, avoid the schemes and jobs of speculators 
which, according to experience of most places similarly situated, 
are pretty sure to fasten themselves upon important public 
undertakings. 

In closing this review of the city's fiscal year, I tender to each 
and every one my sincere thanks for their uniform courtesy and 
cordial support. 

Very respectfully, 

BYRON WORTHEN, 

Mayor. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



BOARD OF Water Commissioners. 

1894. 



BYRON WORTHEN,* Mayor, ex officio. 
Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1899. 
Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1900. 
James A. Weston, term expires January, 1897. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1898. 
Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1901. 
Charles T. Means, term expires January, 1896. 



Officers. 



Alpheus Gay, President. 

James A. Weston, Clerk. 

Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 
Josiah Laselle. Engineer at Low Service Pumping Station. 
H. A. Donaway, Engineer at High Sei'vice Pumping Station. 

* Hon. Edgar J. Knowlton and Hon. David B. Varney each served a portion of the year. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER .COMMISSIONERS, 



To the City Councils of tlic City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners have the 
honor to submit herewith their twenty-third annual report for 
the year ending December 31, 1894, together with the report of 
the superintendent covering the same period of time, to which 
reference is made for the details of the service connected with 
this department. The final report of the engineers of the high 
service system, and also their report and estimates for laying pipes 
in the thickly settled portions of the city, to be connected with 
the high service reservoir, for fire protection, are appended 
hereto, to which attention is directed for the details relating to 
those subjects. 

The receipts and expenditures for the year have been as fol- 
lows : 



Balance unexpended December 31, 1893 
Receipts from water rentals and miscellaneous 
Received for bonds sold .... 
Received for premium on same 

Total receipts ..... 



595,144.16 
110,210.29 

50,000.00 

S255>354-45 



44 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Paid interest on water bonds . ;^38, 399.00 

current expenses and repairs 24,909.86 

construction ." . . 159,289.07 
hydrant rentals set aside for 

sinking fund . . . 13,925.00 



Total expenditures ..... $236,522.93 



Balance unexpended . . . . . $18,831.52 

Early in the year 1891 the city councils passed an ordinance 
by the terms of which all moneys received by the water depart- 
ment, together with the balance then on hand, were turned into 
the city treasury for general city purposes, and the funds neces- 
sary for the maintenance of the water-works were appropriated 
by the city councils. This law was in force for two years, when 
the original plan of keeping the earnings, expenses, and funds of 
this department separate and distinct from the other departments 
of the city was returned to by an act of the legislature. During 
these two years, the sum of $57,920.91 was taken from the net 
earnings of the water-works and applied to the general purposes 
of the city. In adjusting this matter so as to make the accounts 
of the commissioners agree with the statements made by the city 
auditor, the amount claimed as standing to the credit of the 
water-works has been reduced the above amount. The balance 
unexpended one year ago was given as $153,065.07. The bal- 
ance brought forward to the account of 1894 is stated to be $95,- 
144.16, showing a loss to the water-works account of $57,920.91, 
as above stated. 

By an oversight, or some unexplained cause, the premium re- 
ceived by the city on the $250,000 water bonds sold the past 
two years, amounting to $8,845, has not been credited to the 
water-works account. When this is done, the balance unex- 
pended December 31, 1894, will be $27,316.52 instead of $18,- 
831.52, as shown in the above statement. 

The high service system of water-works, commenced in 1893, 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 45 

is now practically completed, a few minor matters of incon- 
siderable amount only remaining for attention the coming year. 
The cost of this important undertaking has not exceeded the ex- 
pectations of the commissioners as foreshadowed in former re- 
ports, while the value to the city in having virtually a double 
system, one operated by water power and the other by steam 
power, is beyond any possible comparison that can be made, 
based on the money required to acquire it. It is doubtful if any 
city in the country has a more complete system of water-works, 
when the elementary advantages and the possibilities of further 
improvements are considered. 

The elevated lands of the eastern section of the city, so long 
deprived of the advantages of water-works, are now well supplied 
and a petition is now before the board asking for an extension 
of the high service pipes to the high lands in the northern por- 
tion of the city. It is a part of the plan to furnish water to the 
inhabitants living on the territory last named, and it will be car- 
ried out as rapidly as circumstances shall reasonably demand. 
The cost of the high service system, to the present time, is 
^195,110.39, the details of which will be found in the accom- 
panying report of the superintendent. 

In addition to the final report of the engineers on the high 
service water-works, appended hereto, will be found a supple- 
m.entary report of a plan and probable cost of an independent 
system of water pipes, designed especially for fire protection, 
which it is proposed to connect with the high service reservoir. 
The territory embraced in the report is bounded on the west by 
Elm street, on the east by Union street, on the north by Orange 
street, and on the south by Auburn street ; the pipe in Elm street 
extending as far north as Brook street. The engineer proposes 
to set four way-post hydrants every 300 feet on Elm street, and 
every 400 feet on the other streets, and estimates a pressure rang- 
ing from no to 130 pounds per square inch. 

The system outlined could be put in in sections and increased 
at pleasure, as might be deemed advisable or desirable. To 
carry out the plan suggested would require an outlay of about 



46 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

^100,000. This subject is introduced at this time to show the 
feasibility of the project and the approxuiiate cost. Whether 
the advantages that would be derived are such as would warrant 
the expenditure of so large a sum of money is a question that 
has not been considered by the board sufficiently to enable 
it to make an intelligent recommendation on the subject. 

Your commissioners have been purchasing land bordering on 
Massabesic lake, from time to time, until the city now owns 
nearly one half the shore line, which has been paid for out of 
the net earnings of the water-works. In this matter the commis- 
sioners have long been of the opinion that it was only a question 
of time when it would be necessary to acquire the entire lake 
front in order to enable the city to exercise such reasonable con- 
trol over the waters of the lake as a due regard for the lives, 
health, and comfort of the citizens demanded. With this object 
in view they have proceeded as fast as a proper regard to econ- 
omy and the public sentiment on the subject would warrant. 

Recently, however, a feeling has developed in the public mind 
that the welfare of the people demanded more active measures to 
bring about this result. This feeling being in accord with the 
views of the commissioners, proceedings have been commenced 
to take the remaining land in Hillsborough county by condem- 
nation under the authority conferred by the legislature. It is 
expected that the proceedings will be concluded and the matter 
adjusted during the coming year. 

About a year ago the Devonshire Mills, located at Goffe's 
Falls, brought a suit in the United States court against the city, 
alleging damages by reason of diverting the water from Cohas 
brook, the outlet of Massabesic lake, on which their mills arf' 
situated. As the termination of this suit would only settle past 
claims, leaving the future open to further litigation, it was deemed 
desirable by both parties in interest to have a final adjustment 
of all questions that might arise, at the present time. Arrange- 
ments have accordingly been made to submit the matter to im- 
partial referees, who are to fix the sum to be paid by the city for 
all past, present, and future damages, which sum the city is to 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 47 

pay upon receiving a deed from the Mills relinquishing all its 
claims against the city. It is expected that a settlement can be 
effected early the coming summer. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Alpheus Gay, 
Andrew C. Wallace, 
James A. Weston, 
Henry Chandler, 
Charles T. Means, 
Charles H. Manning, 
Byron Worth en. 

Water Commissioners. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Commissioners of the City of 
Manchester : 

The following is the report of the superintendent for the year 
1894, which is respectfully submitted : 

MASSABESIC LAKE. 

Very low water will describe the condition of Lake Massabesic 
the past season. The lake froze over lower than last year, and 
if the channel had not been lowered we should have been with- 
out water power at the old pumping station a portion of the time 
last year and this. The water stands today thirty inches below 
the dam, one inch lower than the year 1880, when the channel 
was lowered. No repairs of any account were made from the 
lake to the city of anything connected with the pumps, pipe line, 
or reservoir. Repairs were made on the outside and inside of 
the pumping station to the amount of about $450. The follow- 
ing is the amount pumped : 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



49 



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50 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



STATEMENT OF WORK DONE BY WORTHINGTON PUMPS, HIGH SER- 
VICE, TO DECEMBER 31, 1S94. 



MONTHS. 


Time. 


No. of 


Gallons 


Pounds of 

coal 

used in 

pumping. 


Bank- 
ing and 
heating. 




Hrs. 


Min. 


strokes. 


pumped. 


0! 


June ) 








10,000,000 

18,645,552 
11,878,164 
8,669,484 
5,482,666 


35,000 

61,792 
40,998 
28,612 
17,285 




264 ft. 


July ) 

Sept.lOtoOct. 11 

Oct. 11 to 31 

November 

December 


153 
93 
08 
43 


30 
2.5 
30 
35 


345,288 

219,966 

160,546 

99,679 




264 " 




264 " 


4,382 
9,303 


269" 
273" 


Total 


825,479 


44,675,866 


183,687 13,685 

















Work was commenced in the month of April to lay the pipe 
for distributing the water over Wilson Hill from the high service 
reservoir. A twelve-inch pipe was laid from the Mammoth road 
to Ashland street, and the old cement pipe was taken out from 
Lowell street south on Ashland and Wilson streets to Lake ave- 
nue, and the low and high service separated on these two streets. 

The people take water at the present time off the high service 
system from Spruce street to Pearl, east of Wilson street, except- 
ing Lake avenue, which has high service from Hall street 
east to Canton street. Water was let into the high service sys- 
tem September 21, and the water takers who live east of Wilson 
and Ashland streets have been supplied from the new reservoir 
most of the time since. 

The contractors who laid the pipe and built the new reservoir 
have done their work in a good, substantial manner. The chief 
engineer and his assistant, Carleton E. Davis, have looked care- 
fully after the work, and the result is we have one of the best high- 
service systems in the country. It is connected with the low 
service, and so constructed that the water can be pumped into 
the old reservoir direct, or the city can be supplied from the 
reservoir by opening the twenty-inch gate at Hallsville fourteen 



BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 51 

to eighteen turns, the old one acting as a relief valve. Cost of 
high service to date, ^195,110.39. 

The high service will eventually run down Bridge street to 
Maple street, up Maple street to Brook street, down Brook street 
to Elm street, and north from Brook street up onto the hill. 
That will put all north of Bridge and east of Maple to Brook, 
also north of Brook street on the east side of Elm street, onto 
the high service, and on the west side from Clark street north. 
This will require a new line of pipe on Maple street, but for the 
present the pipe could be connected on Belmont street from 
Pearl to Prospect streets, and should be at any rate to make circu- 
lation ; and then the water from the high service could run down 
Myrtle and Prospect streets to Beech street, up Beech street to 
Brook street, and up onto the hill. 

The report of Dean & Main, mechanical engineers, of Boston, 
who tested the pumping machinery and boilers, will be annexed 
to this report. 

The new pumping station having been built in the woods, it 
required a great deal of work to clear up the land and do the 
little grading done about the pump house and the other build- 
ings. This work will be continued next year, as there is quite 
an amount to be done to get the grounds in proper shape. 

A road has been built from old Bridge street up the hill as far 
as the new reservoir. Two thirds of the way it has been graveled 
and finished, makmg a good roadbed. It was culculated to build 
the road up to the summit north of the reservoir, but the ground 
being frozen it was thought best to stop work till next spring. 

We have laid about seven miles of distribution pipe the past 
year, and the largest portion has been in hard digging. Ledge 
has been encountered in Lowell and Hanover streets, and Can- 
dia road at Youngsville. Ten men have worked at blasting every 
day since the first of April. Good digging for laying new pipe 
has gone by in Manchester, and as the city spreads out we find 
more rocks and ledge cutting, and a harder soil to lay pipe in. 

Pipes have been extended in Ash, Amory, Byron, Belmont, 
Bridge, Bismarck, Boynton, Concord, Charleston, Conant, Cass, 



52 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Dearborn, Elm, East High, Frederick streets, Glenwood avenue, 
Green, Hayward, Hanover, Hall streets. Highland avenue, 
Hevey, Jewett, Joliette, Kelley, Kearsarge, Lowell, Laval, 
Laurel, Mead streets, Mast road. Mammoth road, Merrimack, 
Marion, McGregor, Main, Orange, Page, Pearl streets, Rockland 
avenue, Sullivan street, Shirley Hill road, Somerville, Second, 
Taylor, Walnut streets, Wilson road, Woodland avenue. Union 
street, Candia road, and Young street, making fifty-two streets, 
at an expense of about $33,200. We have now eighty miles of 
distribution pipe; about seventeen and three fourths is cement 
lined. 

During the past year pipe was relaid in Amherst, Ashland, 
Hanover, Central, Laurel, Mechanic, Milford, Merrimack, Man- 
chester, Main streets, Mast road. Market, Walnut, Washington, 
Water streets, and Wilson road, — 7,664^ feet, at an expense of 
$8,000. The contract price for pipe delivered in May and June 
about was $23 per ton ; 2,240 pounds furnished by McNiel Pipe 
Co. 

There have been about the same number of leaks as usual. 
The ground did not freeze very deep last winter and the hy- 
drants did not trouble us much. Service pipes did not have to 
be thawed out, but some had to be dug up on account of eels 
getting in and stopping the water. This is something new. We 
have never been troubled with eels in service pipes before, but 
have had some trouble with small fish. For these things there is 
no remedy for they grow in the pipes and, as a rule, we have to 
dig down to the main, whether there is four feet of frost or not 
any, in order to get them out. 

There have been about 291 new services put in this year, and 
65 new hydrants set, making 632 public hydrants in the city. 
It is the unanimous opinion of the New England Water-Works 
Association that hydrants should not be opened in cold weather 
unless for fire purposes. Now it seems to the superintendent if 
we are going to continue to pump water for skating on the com- 
mons that they should be piped and not use the hydrants for 
flooding the grounds to make ice. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



53 



The following table shows the rainfall at high service pump- 
ing station to December 31, 1894. 



DAT. 


S 

i 


s 




< 




6 

3 
1^ 


1^ 


CO 

si 

< 

.80 


s 

.a 
S 

® 

CO 


0) 

$ 



<o 

g 
a> 
> 



s 



Q 


1 
























9 














.61 










3 












.26 






.83 


* r;o 


4 












.05 


.10 




.71 
.IS 




5 


















6 












.05 












7 
























8 


















.39 








9 














.13 




.05 


*.23 
*.34 


* 16 


10 
















1.63 




11 
















.15 




12 














.04 




81 


13 




















*.12 




14 . . 1 . 












.04 
.01 
.21 






.21 




15 












.11 


.10 






16 : 














17 














.38 








18 






















19 




















*.09 




20 










.10 






.95 
.00 






21 












.12 




.42 




22 












.11 


.33 




23 






















24 














.55 












25 












.03 






.06 

.28 


.11 


* 0", 


26 












.04 








27 




















* 93 


28 














1.20 












29 










1.18 
.01 
.39 


.07 










30 










.03 








*.06 




31 
















.51 


































1.58 


..58 


3.11 


1.35 


3.51 


2.86 


2.20 


9, 44 















*Snow melted. 
Commenced to keep the rainfall Ma)^ 29, 1894. 



54 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following streets are where cement-lined pipe was taken 
up and cast iron laid. 



Streets. 



Amherst 

Amherst 

Ashland 

Central 

Central 

Central 

Chestnut 

Hanover 

Hanover 

Laurel 

Main, South. 
Manchester.. 

Market 

Mast road 

Mechanic. . . . 
Merrimack.., 

Milford 

Walnut 

Washington. 

Water 

Wilson 



Length in FEEt. 



10 in. 8 in. 6 in. 4 in 



334i 



102i 



246 



Size of pipe changed on 
Central street, 6 to 8 in 



1284 



19661 



953 



19661 953 



50 
896 



953 
506 

38 
257 

24 
450 

39 



42 
172 
407 
740 

40 
509 



570 



5693 
953 



4740 



105 



Location. 



Ashland. 

Pine to Beecli. 

Hanover to Amherst. 

Elm to Pine. 

Pine to Union . 

Wilson. 

Brook to Blodget. 

Wilson to Ashland. 

Pine to Union. 

Wilson. 

Winter to south of Log. 

Wilson. 

West of Elm. 

West of Main. 

Canal to Elm. 

Wilson. 

East of Tilton. 

North of Amherst. 

On Elm. 

Canal to Kennard block. 

Hanover to Lake avenue. 



Total feetrelaid, 7,764!. 

One 4-inch gate on Washington, corner Elm, was taken out. 



BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 



55 





Location. 


Corner Beech. 
Opposite No. 21. 
Corner Jvearsarge. 
North of Brook. 
Corner Amherst. 
Corner Conant. 
Bridi'e to Pearl. 


South Of East High. 

North to Charleston. 

To Glenwood. 

To Belmont. 

Old Mammoth to new Mamm'th 

Brown avenue to Marshall. 

Fletcher Crossing to Proctor's. 

Central to Laurel. 

Corner Elm. 

To Bismarck. 

Corner Myrtle. 

Oniinsiti' ^r^. Bird's. 


Main to Beauport. 

Belmont to Beacon. 

East to Taylor. 

Belmont to Beacon. 

Clark to Thayer. 

East of Second. 

West of Woodland. 

East of Union. 

North of Bridge. 

Beacon to Highland. 

S. M. Page's to G. S. Smith's. 

Belmont to Taylor. 

North of Conant. 


•^utSJp^H 1 


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- 


^ —1 i-l • <M -* 


„ : ■r.^r.^^^^^ ■^r.^O.r. j 


015 

H 


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^ 






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■ui8 
















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HI 01 
















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■nin 






























"* '. 








"I OS 












































































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H 


c 


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Bismarck 

Boynton 

Bridge 

" (Old) 

Byron 


: 04. 

3 win '5 


1 
> 

t 

c 

5 


5 


c 
c 

S 






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p 
s 

a 


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OJ 



56 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 






.-: > 



OS'S 
O 03 



S OS 



2s; 






P.C- 

; o p- 



O j;^.^ <U|0 






O 



5c 5 



^ CO 



055 



■ - ^ o ~ -^ rt 



tn r" ^ a^ " x ^ '"' C'"' - 



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o <o 



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>S O 

3 tea 




BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



57 





5 


Corner Laurel, Lake, Hanover. 
Sagamore to Webster. 
Corner Amlierst. 
Candia road to Glenwood. 
Eastward to Jewett. 




•sinB.ipXH 




«, :«^ ( g 


H 

a 

35 

H 
■< 

C5 


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•lit 02 




'■'.'. "^^ 


a 


•nif 






: ; ; o 
: : : « 


•UI9 
■Ills 




1,575 
' 1,212 


to 

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5 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET, 1 894. 

Amory, opposite No. 21. 

Amory, corner Kearsarge. 

Belmont, corner Mead. 

Bismarck, corner Charleston. 

Boynton, corner Glenwood, 

Bridge, corner Belmont. 

Byron, opposite Varney's house. 

Byron, corner Marshall. 

Candia road, opposite Cram's residence. 

Candia road, opposite Farmer's residence. 

Candia road, opposite Proctor's residence. 

Candia Coad, 35 feet east of C lough's. 

Central, corner Elm. 

Cohas, opposite Mr. Bird's residence. 

Conant, corner Hevey. 

Concord, corner Beacon. 

Dearborn, 150 feet west of Taylor. 

Elm, near Thayer. 

Frederick, corner Second. 

Glenwood, corner Highland. 

Hall, corner Mead. 

Hanover, corner Hubbard. 

Hanover, corner Highland. 

Hanover road, opposite S. T. Page's residence. 

Hanover road, opposite Mrs. Brown's residence. 

Hayward, near No. 746. 

High, corner Beacon. 

Highland, corner Oakland. 

High service reservoir, 100 feet from gate house. 

Jewett, corner Clay. 

Joliette, corner Amory. 

Kelley, corner Joliette. 

Kelley, corner Kearsarge. 

Lowell, corner Belmont. 

Lowell, corner Beacon. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 59 

Lowell, corner Hall. 

Lowell, corner Highland. 

Lowell, corner Weston. 

Mammoth road, corner Old Bridge. 

Marion, corner North Main. 

Mast, Shirley Hill road. 

Mast, near Mr. Blackstock's. 

Mast, corner Highland. 

McGregor, opposite No. 44. 

North Main, opposite No. 428. 

Orange, corner Belmont. 

Page, corner Candia road. 

Page, corner Hanover. 

Page, opposite shoe shop. 

Page, 200 feet south of railroad. 

Pearl, corner Belmont. 

Rockland avenue, corner Grove. 

Rockland avenue, corner Shirley Hill road. 

Second, corner Schiller. 

Somerville, corner Jewett. 

Sullivan, corner North Main. 

Valley, corner Pine. 

Valley, corner Union. 

Walnut, corner North. 

Walnut, corner Salmon. 

Woodland, corner Candia road. 

Woodland, corner Oakland. 

Woodland, corner Glenwood. 

Young road, corner Cypress. 



60 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 



61 



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63 



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BOARD OF WATEK COMMISSIONERS. 



65 



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590 

275 

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26 

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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



67 



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BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 



69 





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70 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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967 

3087 

215 

654 

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422 

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12 

80 

1299 

950 

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517 

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STREETS. 




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Rockland 

School 

Second 

Schuyler 

Shirley Hill road.. 


3 

3 


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3 I 




3 « 
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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



71 



■ M M 


1 2 


; ; ; 1 CO 




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1 t-t 


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72 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1S94. 



Size. 


Cemen t-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20-incli diameter 


20,500.00 feet. 


24,480 feet. 


IS 


14-mcli diameter 


6,125.00 " 


8,710 " 


12 


12-ineh diameter 


7,444.00 " 


19,775 " 


28 


10-incli diameter.. .. 


1,508.00 " 


21,251 " 


32 


S-incli diameter 


5,250.00 " 


44,175 " 


7(1 


6-inch diameter 


50,192.50 " 


19.3,051 " 


475 


4-incli diameter 


2,644.00 " 


17,277 " 


56 




93,723.50 feet. 


328,725 feet. 


691 



Cement-lined pipe in use 
Cast-iron pipe in use . 

Total pipe 
632 hydrants. 
691 gates. 
13 air valves. 



17.750 miles. 
62.259 " 



80.009 miles. 



METERS. 



The number ofmieters set during the year has been three hun- 
dred and five (305). 

Total number of meters now in use, twenty-one hundred and 
eighty- two (2,182). 

The number of applications for water has been two hundred 
and ninety-seven (297). 

Total number of applications to date, 4,630. 

SERVICE PIPES. 

Twol hundred and ninety-one service pipes have been laid 
this year, as follows : 
288 I inch diameter ...... 7,334.7 feet. 

11^ inch diameter . . . . . 45.0 " 

I 4 inch diameter . . for fire sprinklers. 

I 6 inch diameter . . for fire sprinklers. 



7,379.7 feet. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



73 



SERVICE PIPES RELAID. 



I 

^% 

I % 

I I 

2 I 



14 inch diameter 18.8 feet to i 



15.8 
255-4 

33-7 

59-3 
50.0 
17.0 
48.8 



to 3 
to I 

to*- 



^% 



to 
to 
to 
to 



inch diameter 18.0 feet. 

17.0 " 

" 221.0 " 

'• 19.0 " • 

20.5 " 

56.0 - 

50-5 '■■ 

17.0 " 

32.8 " 



451.8 



498.8 feet 

Forty-four hundred and sixty (4,460) service pipes have 
laid to date, as follows : 

722.6 

44,628.7 

65,918-5 

893-5 

719.2 

i>995-7 

57-0 

89.8 

269.5 



2>3 y2 


inch diameter 


1,706 3^ 


'• " 


2,603 1 




22 ii^ 


ll u 


231^2 


(i 11 


54 2 


'•• 


I 2>^ 


u u 


5 3 


u u 


10 4 


t. 


36 


u I.: 



Total length of service pipe 
Number of miles of service pipe, 21.836. 



feet, 
been 

feet. 



115,294.5 



feet. 



COST OF HIGH SERVICE TO DECEMBER 31, 1 894. 



Reservoir 
Gatehouse 
I>and . 
Fence 
Road. 



j3,o9i.87 
2,442.60 
9,112.86 

301-75 
1,245.12 



$56,194.20 



74 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Force main .... 


. 


$73^203.56 


Land 


. 


375-00 


Pumping station ..." 


^24,174.69 




Pumping machinery and boilers 


32,626.07 




Traveling crane 


643.40 




Grading ..... 


878.15 




Stone masonry, bank wall . 


706.50 




Engineer and team . 


1,256.96 




Testing pumps .... 


600.00 




Dwelling and barn . . . . 


4,451.86 


^65,337.63 







$195,110.39 

The income from sale of water for 1894 has been as follows : 



. for hydrant rent . 


$13,925.00 


for water by rate . 


32,176.28 


for water by meter 


62,501.35 


for building purposes . 


697.80 


from fines .... 


227.40 


for labor and pipe sold 


35-86 


for 4 inch pipe laid to Ken- 




nard block 


30.00 


for 3 inch pipe laid to Cil- 




ley block 


22.90 


for pipe and castings, J. A. 




Weston .... 


109.90 


for pipe and castings, Amos- 




keag corporation 


46.16 


of G. G. Griffin, lease . 


1. 00 


of F. Brown, lease 


1. 00 


for old house, S. G. Prescott 


100.00 


from rent of store, S. G. Pres- 




cott .... 


90.00 


from rent of hall. Grange . 


50.00 


from rent of Cochran build- 




ing, W. G. Brown . 


36.00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 75 



ceived for rent from E. C. Camfield 


^36.00 


of Charles Reed for grass 


3-39 


of C. F. Whittemore, for 




grass on Mills land . 


4.00 


of A. D. Savory for grass on 




Smith land 


5.00 


of Bartholomew for grass on 




Reed and Neal land 


7.00 


of J. T. Gott for grass at res- 




ervoir .... 


8.00 


for apples .... 


3.00 


of Sarah Gilbert for grass on 




Brown land 


3-25 


for old cement pipe 


90.00 
$110,210.29 



Abatements, $477.66. 
Amount on hand Dec. 31, 1893 . . $95,144.16 
received for water bonds, 1894 50,000.00 
received for water rents, etc., 

1894 .... 96,285.29 

received for hydrant rentals, 

1894 .... 13,925.00 



Total receipts, 1894 .... $255,354.45 

Amount paid for current expenses . $24,909.86 
construction expenses 159,289.07 
liydrant rentals set aside for sinking 

fund ...... 13,925.00 

Interest on bonds, 1894 . . . 38,399.00 



Total expenditures, 1894 . . . $236,522.9- 



Balance on hand December 31, 1894 . $18,831.52 
The premium on water bonds sold in 

1893, amount $200,000, was ..... $6,090.00 

1894, amount 50,000, was ..... 2.395.00 

Total $8,485.00 



76 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



These amounts have not been credited to the water-works ac- 
counts as they should have been. 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1 894. 

Superintendence, repairs, renewals . $16,945.61 

Stationery and printing . . . 293.69 

Ofiface and incidental expenses . . 2,589.20 

Pumping expenses, low service . . 1,831.89 

Pumping expenses, high service . . 2,595.37 

Repairs to dam, canal, and reservoir . 202.69 

Repairs to buildings .... 451-41 

Total current expenses for 1894 

Service pipes .... 
Distribution pipes 
Fire hydrants and valves . 
Meters and fixtures . . . 

Lands ..... 

Pumping machinery and buildings 
Reservoir and fence . 
Road to reservoir 



$3,997.88 

33'25i-43 

3,809.31 

3,922.67 

27,662.86 

45,429-35 

39,970-45 

1,245.12 



$24,909.86 



Total construction expenses for 1894 



Sinking fund 



Total 



$159,289.07 

$184,198.93 
13,925.00 

$198,123.93 



Co?istruciion Expenses. 

Land and water rights . . . $90,837.00 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races . 101,399.16 
Pumping machinery, pump houses and 

buildings . . . . '. 173,242.16 

Distribution reservoirs . . . 117,378.58 

Force and supply main . . . 88,769.02 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



77 



Distribution pipes 

Fire hydrants and valves 

Meters and fixtures . 

Service pipes 

Grading and fencing 

Tools and fixtures 

Boarding and store houses 

Roads and culverts . 

Supplies . 

Engineering 

Livery and traveling expenses 

Legal expenses . 



;25, 202.36 
54,008 29 
42,256.68 
60,743.80 
13,588.26 
10,649.35 
919.36 

550-39 

22,176.19 

2,856.64 

56379 



Total construction to December 31, 1894 . $1,309,579.64 
Current Expenses. 
Superintendence, collecting, repairs $227,763.90 



Stationery and printing 

Office and incidental expenses . 

Pumping expenses at low service 

Pumping expenses at high service 

Repair of buildings . 

Repair of dam, canal, races, reservoir 



6,411.48 
23,401.68 
46,956.68 

2.595-37 
2,819.36 
4,809.49 



Total current expenses to December 31, '94 

Interest .• . . . . . $40,678.51 
Highway expenditures . . . 14,000.53 



114,757-96 



$54,679.04 



Total amount of bills approved to date 

Interest, discount, and labor performed 
on highways, transfers, and tools and 
materials sold .... $63,994.54 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1894 . 314,757.96 



$1,679,016.64 



Total cost, exclusive of interest 
and current expenses 



^378,752.50 



51,300,264.14 



78 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 1893 $720,435.51 
Interest for 1894 . . . . 38,399.00 



Total interest and discount to 
Dec. 31, 1894 

Amount paid toward interest to Dec. 

31, 1893 .... $578,237.00 

Amount paid toward interest in 1894 . 38,399.00 



^758-834-Si 



$616,636.00 



AMOUNT OF WATER BONDS ISSUED TO DECEMBER 3 1, 1 894. 

Issued July i, 1872, rate 6 per cent, principal due 

July I, 1895 ....... $100,000 

Issued January i, 1872, rate 6 per cent, principal due 

January 1,1897 ....... 100,000 

Issued January i, 1872, rate 6 per cent, principal due 

January i, 1902 ....... 100,000 

Issued January i, 1887, rate 4 per cent, principal due 

January i, 1907 ....... 100,000 

Issued July i. 1890, rate 4 per cent, principal due 

July I, 1910 ....... 100,000 

Issued January i, 1892, rate 4 per cent, principal due 

January i, 1910 ....... 100,000 

Issued August i, 1893, rate 5 per cent, principal due 

August 1,1913. . . . . . . 100,000 

Issued November i, 1893, rate 4! per cent, principal 

due November i, 1913 . . . . . 100.000 
Issued October i, 1894, rate 4 per cent, principal 

due October i, 1914 ...... 50,000 



Total 



$850,000 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



79 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 





'5 
o 


Hydrant 

rent. 


i Water by 

rate. 


Water by 

meter. 


oj-d c 
•i-i .M iT* 

© r- S 


•J2 


• rH W '-' 
03 

c3 c; rH 

1^ 


So 


CD 

s 

3 
25 


1S72 


$573.61 
2,097.60 
32,154.07 
27,119.15 
38,879.47 
43,823.30 
48,874.26 
53,143.17 
57,655.25 
60,215.62 
67,630.13 
73,458.20 
75,580.08 
80,404.12 
75,129.99 
S0,.518.17 
85,643.82 
86,700.46 
90,463.37 
76,605.23 
83,474.79 
104,170.08 
110,210.29 










$573.61 
200.07 






1S73 




$1,692.69 
7,987.27 
10,292.13 
16,192.03 
18,064.51 
20,255.97 
21,610.13 
23,795.96 
25,336.18 
26,803.06 
28,838.24 
31,724.07 
33,597.02 
33,062.11 
33,497.21 
33,864.78 
34,140.99 
32,431.10 
30,588.79 
31,344.24 
32,603.59 
32,176.28 


$190.84 
1,436.56 
3,348.11 
6,305.81 
7,783.09 
10.090.25 
12,732.93 
14,794.34 
15,554.98 
19,898.69 
23,431.20 
21,329.75 
27,425.35 
21,573.45 
25,277.09 
29,838.82 
33,,596.05 
37,009.80 
40,479.25 
46,139.35 
58,103.20 
62,501.35 


"$11 9.10 

122.13 

72.32 

136.10 

83.60 

81.60 

79..50 

105.60 

146.65 

314.65 

195.10 

102.50 

287.40 

351.70 

543 80 

361.95 

649.90 

494.80 

416.00 

1,033.75 

697.80 


$14.00 
104.18 
120.59 
180.16 
233.04 
232.82 
240.64 
210.39 
223.99 
197.49 
208.04 
231.96 
186.80 
130.80 
119.20 
149.80 
153.20 
151.80 
160.40 
168.40 
159.60 
227.40 




8 


1874 
1875 
1876 

1877 
1878 
187it 
ISSO 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 


$22,425.00 
13,095.00 
1(;.3'20.00 
17,475.00 
17,970.00 
18,165.00 
18,300.00 
18,780.00 
20,130.00 
20,520.00 
21,350.00 
18,900.00 
19,750.00 
20,437.50 
21,000.00 
18,240.00 
19,880.00 
4,590.00 
5,000.00 
12,750.00 
13,925.00 


699.85 
2,245.64 
249.55 
131.56 
241.62 
303.87 
465.06 
203.87 
443.24 
125.07 
738.20 
181.45 
320.23 
819.47 
243.62 
205.27 
298.77 
200.99 
139. SO 
339.38 
334.82 




$10.66 

11.00 

11.00 

21.00 

11.00 

11.00 

6.00 

16.00 

3.00 

53.00 

42.00 

91.00 

267.00 

180.56 

347.64 


98 

160 

166 

202 

226 

251 

280 

310 

371 

404 

446 

486 

613 

739 

842 

9.51 

1,135 

1,313 

1,608 

1,895 

2,182 



1878, meter rate was changed. 1884, hydrant rates reduced. 1886, meter 
and other rates reduced. 1889, hydrant rates reduced. 1891 and 1892, re- 
ceived only p.irt of hydrant rent, and nothing from water-troughs or street 
sprinklers. 1893, hydrant rent and water-closets rate reduced. 

The following amounts have been paid over to the city treas- 
urer, and credited to the water-works : 

1872, supplies and materials sold . . . $S73-6i 

1873, supplies and materials sold • • • i77'07 
accrued interest on water bonds sold . . i93'26 
accrued interest on state bonds sold . . 146.00 
water rents ...... 1,920.53 

1874, supplies and materials sold . 607.89 
March 12, highway expenditures, transferred 

from water account .... 14,000.53 

March 17, interest and discount transferred 

from water account .... 12,347.25 

September i, interest and discount trans- 
ferred from water account , . . 22.361.74 



80 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1874, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
December 29, interest transferred 

1875, December 18, one anvil sold 
September 25, engine, crusher, and material 

sold- .... 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1876, May 20, derrick sold 
May 20, rent of derrick 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1877, water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1878, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
old plow sold . 

1879, derrick sold 
May 20, water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1880, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
sale of grass 
level, transit, etc. 

1881, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
sale of grass 

derrick .... 
received of G. G. Griffin , 

1882, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
received of G. G. Griffin . 

of James Baldwin & Co 
from the sale of grass 
from Goodhue & Birnie 
for old plank 
for use of derrick 

1883, received of G. G. Griffin . 

from sale of grass 

for water and hydrant rent, etc 

1884, received of G. G. Griffin . 

for stone 

from sale of grass 

from pipe sold and labor 

for water and hydrant rent 



5305233-54 

4.566.25 

15.00 

2,089.45 

27,119-55 

125.00 

24.00 

38,879.47 
435823.30 
48,873.26 
1. 00 
75.00 
53,068.17 

57-395-25 
10.00 

250.00 

60,154.62 

10.00 

50.00 

1. 00 

67=403-76 

1. 00 

175.00 

10.00 

24-37 

1.00 

15.00 

1. 00 

20.00 

73'437-2o 

1. 00 

5.00 

10.00 

616.20 

74,947.88 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



81 



1885, received 4^rom G. G. Grififin 

of B. P. Kimball, for grass 
for labor and pipe sold 
for water and hydrant rent 

1886, received from G. G. Griffin 

of B. P. Kimball, for grass 

for wood 

for labor and pipe 

for water and hydrant rent 

1887, received for labor and pipe 

of G. G. Grififin . 

of C. C. Cole 

of B. P. Kimball, for grass 

of A. J. Crombie, for grass 

of A. Goodwin, for poles 

1887, received of W. G.Brown . 

of T. H. Risdon & Co., for freight 
for water and hydrant rent 

1 888, received for labor and pipe 

of G. G. Grififin . 
of George P. Clark 
ofR. D. Wood & Co., gear 
for water and hydrant rent 

1889, received for labor and pipe 

ofG.G. Grififin . 
of B. P. Kimball, for grass 
of W. G. Brown, for rent 
of James Baldwm, for pipe 
of Mr. Clement, for pipe 
for water and hydrant rent 

1890, received of G. G. Grififin, lease . 

of Fletcher Brown, lease 
of George P. Clark, lease 
of B. P. Kimball, for grass 
of W. G. Brown, for rent 
of N. W. Ellis & Co., for pipe 



$1.00 
10.00 

^3-45 

80,379.67 

1. 00 

5.00 

37.80 

282.43 

74,803.76 

768.86 

1. 00 

•50 

10.00 

5.00 

10.00 

25.00 

15. II 

79,682.70 

227.33 

1. 00 

2.00 

16.29 

85,397-20 

89.77 

1. 00 

2.00 

50.00 

65.00 

•50 
86,492.19 

1. 00 

1. 00 

2.00 

2.00 

36.00 

153-00 



82 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1890, received of J. H. Dearborn, for pipe . . $35-4o 

for water and hydrant rent . . 99,232.97 

1891, received for water and hydrant rent . . 76,313.24 

for labor and pipe sold . . 200.99 

of G. G. Griffin, lease . . . J. 00 

of Fletcher Brown, lease . . i.oo 

of W. G. Brown, rent . . . 21.00 

of Mr. Prescott, rent . . . 50.00 

William Bryant, rent . . . 8.00 

of B. P. Kimball, grass . . 2.00 

of G. W. Reed, grass . . . 5.00 

of C. H. Patten, grass . . . 3.00 

1892, received for water and hydrant rent . . 83,067.99 

for labor and pipe sold . . 45-55 

of T. C. Pratt, for house . . 100.00 

for cement-lined pipe . . . 94-25 

of Grange, for rent . . . 50.00 

of William Prescott, for barn . i5-oo 

for potatoes .... - 4.00 

for cutting ice . . . . 10.00 

of W. G. Brown, rent . . . 21.00 

of G. G. Griffin, lease . . . i.oo 

of F. Brown, lease . . . i.oo 

of H. N. Hall, use of pasture . 20.00 

of C. F. Whittemore, grass . . 4.00 

of Charles Reed, grass . . . 4.00 

of G. S. Patten, grass ... " 7.00 

of G. G. Prescott, rent . . 30.00 

1893, received from water rents . . . 90,900.14 

for labor and pipe sold . . 72.88 

for old cement pipe . . . 73-5° 
from Queen City Co., laying 6-inch 

pipe 35-°° 

from Elliott Mfg. Co., laying 6inch 

pipe ..... 50.00 
from Kimball Carriage Co., laying 

6-inch pipe .... 51-00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



83 



1893, received from Dana & Provost, laying 4- 

inch pipe .... 

from E. C. Blanchard, repairing 

hydrant .... 
from G. G. Griffin, lease 
. from F. Brown, lease . 
for grass on Smith land 
for grass on Neal land . 
for grass on Mills land 
for molasses .... 
for use of hall by Grange 
from W. G. Brown, house rent 
from S. G. Prescott, house rent 
for cutting ice on lane . 

1894, received from water rents . 

for labor and pipe sold 

for old cement pipe 

for laying 4-inch main to Ken 

nard block 
for laying 3-inch main to Cilley 

block .... 

for pipe and castings from J. A 

Weston .... 
for pipe and castings from Amos 

keag corporation 
of G. G. Griffin, lease . 
of F. Brown, lease 
of S. G. Prescott, for old house 
of S. G. Prescott, rent of store 
of Grange, for hall 
of W. G. Brown, rent of Cochran 

residence .... 
of E. C. Camfield, rent 
of Charles Read, for grass 
of C. F. Whittemore, for grass on 

Mills land .... 



25.00 

1. 00 

1. 00 

5.00 

3.00 

4.00 

16.56 

50.00 

30.00 

60.00 

10.00 

95,602.83 

35-86 

90.00 

30.00 

22.90 

109.90 

46.16 

1. 00 

1. 00 

100.00 

90.00 

50.00 

36.00 

36.00 

3-39 

4.00 



84 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1S94, received of A. D. Savory, for grass on Smith 

land ^5-°° 

of Bartholomew, for grass on Neal 

land 7'Oo 

of J. T. Gott, for grass at reservoir 8.00 

for apples ...... 3.00 

of Sarah Gilbert, for grass on Brown 

land 3-25 



Total received for water to date . . ^1,482,405.07 
Amount appropriated to date .... 890,000.00 

$2,372,405.07 
Amount of bills approved to date . . . 1.679,016.64 



$693,388.43 
Amount paid toward interest .... 616,636.00 



Amount on hand December 31, 1894 . $76,75243 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



Uses for which Water is Supplied. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

I Jail. 4 Cemeteries. 

26 Churches. i Orphanage. 

1 Court house. , i Postoffice. 

9 Hose companies. i City library. 

5 Fire engines. 6 Banks. 

2 Hook-and-ladder. 9 Hotels. 

2 Opera houses. i Masonic Hall. 

3 Convents. i Odd Fellows' Hall. 

4 City hospitals. 3 Halls. 

2 Old Ladies' Homes. 30 Schoolhouses. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



85 



I Soldiers' monument. 

1 Turner Hall. 
4 Fountains. 

2 Trust companies. 
I City farm. 

3 Depots. 



I Battery building. 
I Skating-rink. 
I Kitchen. 
I Wardroom. 
I Gymnasium. 



MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS, 



I Hosiery mill. 

1 Silver-plating. 

2 Iron foundries. 
2 Dyehouses. 

5 Machine shops. 

6 Clothing manufactories. 

8 Harness shops. 
I Cornice works. 
I Brush shop. 

9 Carriage shops. 
1 2 Cigar factories. 

I Brass and copper foundry. 
I Locomotive works. 
I Gristmill. 
I Silk-mill. 



3 Granite works. 

2 Electric light stations. 

4 Sash and blind shops. 
I Brewery. 

4 Shoeshops. 

I Gas-works. 

4 Slaughter houses. 

I Soap factory. 

4 Needle manufactories. 

6 Beer-bottling. 

3 Book-binderies. 

1 Paper-mill. 

2 Box makers. 

I Paper box manufactory, 



6 Fish. 
1 2 Meat and fish. 



21 Livery. 
I Horse railroad. 



1 8 Dentists. 
I Telephone. 

1 Telegraph. 

2 Express. 



]\IARK.ETS. 

3 Meat (wholesale). 

STABLES. 

98S Private. 



OFFICES. 



14 Printing. 
I Gas. 
17 Coal. 



86 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SHOPS. 



50 Barber. 

9 Wheelwright. 
18 Blacksmith. 

8 Carpenter. 

2 Tinsmith. 

I Copper. 



4 Auction. 
32 Drug. 
22 Jewelry. 

I Fur. 

3 House-furnishing goods. 
20 Fancy goods. 
I Wholesale paper. 

5 Wholesale produce. 
24 Dry goods. 

12 Candy. 

I Cloak. 
16 Millinery. 

3 Tea. 

9 Furniture. 

I Wholesale grocer. 



3 Currying. 
19 Plumber and gas and water 

pipe. 
14 Paint. 

3 Gunsmith. 



STORES. 



97 Grocery. 

6 Meal. 

3 Hardware. 
34 Boot and shoe. 
II Stove. 
1 7 Gents' furnishing goods. 

7 Book. 

I Leather and Shoe-finders. 

3 Music. 

3 Upholstery. 

9 Undertakers. 

5 Sewing-machine. 

I Feather-cleaner. 

I Rubber. 



16 Dining. 
7 Billiard. 



6 ClulDrooms. 

2 Bleacheries. 
23 Laundries. 

4 Icehouses. 
12 Photographers. 



SALOONS. 

98 Liquor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



9 Greenhouses. 
2 Band rooms. 
21 Bakeries. 
2 Waste. 
I Business college. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 



87 



WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 



10,311 Families. 

141 Boarding-houses. 
13,108 Faucets. 
2,871 Wasli-bowls. 
7,118 Water-closets. 

447 Wash-tubs. 
1,878 Bath-tubs. 
194 Urinals. 



2,701 Sill-cocks. 
632 Fire-hydrants. 
39 Stand-pipes. 
27 Watering- troughs. 
5 Drinking-fountains. 
2,361 Horses. 
94 Cattle. 
I Public urinal. 



6 hydrants. 



8,300 feet 20 inch. 
3,500 feet 14 inch. 
1,176 feet 12 inch. 
2,820 feet 10 inch. 



Materials on Hand. 



PIPE. 



4,1 16 feet 8 inch. 
1,000 feet 6 inch. 
1,140 feet 4 inch. 



WHOLE SLEEVES. 



2 20 inch. 
I 14 inch. 
512 inch. 
4 10 inch. 



3 double 6 on 20. 

4 double 6 on 12. 
2 double 8 on 12. 

12 double 6 on 10. 
7 double 8 on 8. 

13 double 6 on 8. 
2 double 4 on 8. 
9 double 6 on 6. 



BRANCHES. 



128 inch. 
276 inch. 
22 4 inch. 



1 single 6 on 20. 

2 single 10 on 20. 
I single 12 on 14. 
I single 6 on 14. 

12 single 6 on 10. 
I single 8 on 8. 
1 1 single 6 on 8. 
20 single 6 on 6. 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



4 double 4 on 6. i single 10 on 10. 

2 single 4 on 6. 
I lo-inch Y. 
■ 3 20-inch Y's. 



TURNS. 



I 20 inch 1-16. 2 8 inch 1-4. 

3 10 inch 1-4. 4 6 inch 1-4. 



GATES. 



112 inch. 15 6 inch. 

2 10 inch. 5 4 inch. 

4 8 inch. 



HIGH SERVICE WATER-WORKS. 

To the Board of Water CojiiDiissioners^ Manchester^ N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — The following is a descriptive report of the 
High Service System of Water- Works for your city. 

DATUM. 

All the elevations are referred to city base, which is 16 feet 
below low water of Merrimack river at Granite bridge, or 
10S.363 feet below the granite step at the City hall. The city 
base is 110.83 ^^^^ above tide water at Portsmouth, N. H. 

SOURCE OF SUPPLY. 

The pumping station is located on the west shore of the west- 
erly part of Lake Massabesic and near the northerly end of the 
lake, and is a little less than two miles north of the outlet 
which supplies water to the low service pumping station. The 
intake pipe is cast iron, twenty-four inches in diameter, and ex- 
tends into the lake 255 feet from the shore wall. The end is 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 89 

covered with a heavy brass screen of three quarter inch mesh, 
and is eight feet below the top of the dam. The elevation of 
top of dam is 147 feet. (For details see Water Board Report 
of 1893.) 

PUMPING STATION. 

The building consists of engine, boiler, and coal houses, all 
connected, and the walls are built of common bricks laid in 
red lime mortar, having granite underpinning, window and 
door sills. 

The underpinning is laid in horizontal courses and the height 
varies from four to five and one half feet. The brick masonry 
was finished about the middle of January, 18.94. The roofs over 
the engine and coal houses are supported by wooden trusses and 
covered with slate. The roof over the boiler house is flat and 
constructed of large southern pine beams and two-inch spruce 
plank covered with tarred paper and gravel. The flat portion of 
the engine house also has a graveled roof. The cornices are 
made of galvanized iron, and the finials, hip and ridge rolls are 
copper. The engine room floor is made of two-inch spruce 
plank covered with southern pine one and one fourth inches 
thick. 

The floor in the boiler room is tar concrete and brick, and in 
the coal room is tar concrete. The elevation of the engine house 
floor is 158.5 feet and the boiler room floor is two feet and eight 
inches lower. The chimney is circular in plan and 100 feet and 
9 inches in height above the foundation, and built of common 
bricks laid in red lime mortar, with an addition of about one 
third cement. The first seven feet were laid in cement mortar. 

The base of the chimney is eleven feet in diameter and at the 
smaller section near the top it is seven feet three inches in diam- 
eter. The cap is cast iron, made in eight sections and bolted 
togetljer with composition bolts, and weighs three and four tenths 
tons. 

The chimney has an inner shaft four feet inside diameter which 
extends to the top, and the smoke flue enters the chimney eigh- 
teen feet above the boiler room floor. The foundation is nine- 



90 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

teen feet square and starts on a layer of compact gravel seven 
feet below the surface of the ground. There is an opening at 
the base of the chimney for taking out the soot. 

The pump well is located at the east side of the engine room 
cellar and the east wall is also a portion of the engine house foun- 
dation. The well is ten feet eight inches wide by twenty-one 
feet eight inches long, and the elevation of the bottom is 136.5 
feet. The sides are built of cement rubble masonry, and the in- 
side of the well is lined with bricks four and eight inches in 
thickness, and the bottom is cement concrete and bricks, and is 
water tight. The screen chamber is located at the southeast cor- 
ner of the well, and there are two sets of copper wire screens of 
one fourth inch me3h. At the end of the 24-inch intake pipe 
there is a sluice gate to shut off the water from the well when 
necessary. Scales have been built into the floor of the boiler 
house for weighing all the coal used in the boilers. 

At the rear of the pumping station a retaining wall 17S feet in 
length has been built of dry rubble along the lake and the 
grounds graded and sown with grass seed. 

During the fall a dwelling house and stable have been built 
near the pumping station for the use of the engineer. All the 
work was done under contract by the Head & Dowst Co. of this 
city. 

ENGINES AND BOILERS. 

As soon as the engine room was covered, work was commenced 
on the foundations for the engines (Jan. 24, 1894) and finished 
February 2. The bottom is built of granite about one foot thick, 
and the upper part of the foundations is built of bricks laid in 
cement mortar, excepting the top, which is finished with fine cut 
granite. 

There are two Worthington high duty pumping engines, each 
having two high pressure cylinders 30 inches diameter, and two 
double-acting water plungers is^^^ inches diameter. The en- 
gines will deliver 51.62 gallons per revolution when making the 
stipulated stroke of 18 inches, after making a deduction of 5 per 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 91 

cent for slip. Each engine was guaranteed to deliver into tlie 
reservoir 3,000,000 gallons in twenty-four hours against a dy- 
namic head of 254 feet. The static head is about 250 feet. 

On June 26 the engines commenced to deliver water into the 
low service reservoir and pumped for seven days, and the pumps 
at the old pumping station were idle four days. Pumping into 
the high service reservoir was commenced September 19. 

There are two vertical Manning boilers six feet in diameter, 
each containing iSo tubes 2}^ inches in diameter and 15 feet in 
length. There is room in the boiler house for two additional 
boilers. 

FORCE MAIN. 

The force main is cast iron and 20 inches in diameter and was 
laid during the fall of 1893, excepting a short piece at the reser- 
voir which is 24 inches in diameter. There are two classes of 
pipe : Class B varies in weight from 2,400 to 2,464 pounds, and 
class A from 1,980 to 2,080 pounds per lengths of 12.46 feet. 
Class B is laid from the engine house to Mr. C. H. Bartlett's 
meadow, and from this point to the reservoir is of class A. 

There are 7 gates, 13 hydrants, 6 air valves, 2 lo-inch and 5 
6-inch blow-offs located along the force main. From the engine 
room cellar to the gate chamber at the reservoir there are 19,076 
feet of 20-inch and 80 feet of 24-inch pipe, making a total dis- 
tance of 3.63 miles. 

Water was let into the force main from the low service reser- 
voir April 10. 

RESERVOIR. 

Work of excavating the ledge was continued during the win- 
ter and was practically finished April 23. On April 19 the con- 
tractors commenced to lay cement on the bottom, and the wall 
was started at the northeast corner on the 24th. Many of the 
depressions in the bottom were filled to subgrade with the best 
puddling material found on the work, which was thoroughly 
wetted and afterwards- made compact by constant teaming over 
the bottom. There were several fissures in the ledge along the 



92 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

south side which were filled with cement grout. The bottom is 
covered with cement concrete, having an average thickness of 
ten inches, including a layer of cement mortar about three fourths 
of an inch thick. The face of the ledge on the north, east, and 
west sides is covered with concrete to the top, which varies in 
thickness from six inches to three feet, and the average thick- 
ness is about one foot. The excavation did not furnish suitable 
stone for the face of the wall. The face stone and coping came 
from Bodwell's quarry and the back of the wall came from the 
excavation. The wall is laid in cement mortar having a batter 
on the face of three inches to the foot and is thirty inches 
wide at the top under the coping. The coping is the full width 
of the wall, one foot thick, and the end joints are filled with 
Portland cement. 

All the corners of the reservoir are circular in shape excepting 
the one at the southeast which is cut off at an angle of forty -five 
degrees, so as to form the front wall of the gate chamber and to 
give more embankment, thus strengthening the reservoir at this 
place. 

The bottom of the reservoir is not a uniform plane, as the sur- 
face was governed largely by the way in which the excavation 
could be made. The wall at the northeast corner is nineteen 
feet and at the southwest corner twenty-two feet high. 

The bottom has a slope towards the drainpipe at the gate 
chamber, excepting a small portion at the southwest corner, which 
is nearly two feet below the drainpipe. At this place the rock 
was very rotten, being mostly composed of mica, and it was con- 
sidered advisable to take out this objectionable material even if 
there was a small portion below the grade originally intended. 
To have filled it to grade with concrete would have incurred 
quite a large expense without giving sufficient benefit, but the 
depression will form a place for the deposit of mud, which is de- 
sirable. 

Six springs were found along the north side and three near the 
southwest corner. Small iron pipes were built into the masonry 
at these places. At the time the reservoir was filled only two 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 93 

were draining a very small (quantity of water into the reservoir. 
The top of the embankment is lo feet wide, including the ma- 
sonry, and has an outward slope of two to one, and was made 
in horizontal layers of the excavated earth, thoroughly wetted 
and made solid by constantly teaming over it and by ramming 
the portions nearest the wall. The outside was covered with 
loam found on the work and sown with rye and grass seed. The 
elevation of the top of the embankment is 401 feet and high 
water is 3 feet lower. 

The inside of the gate chamber is 15 feet wide by 15 feet 6 
inches long and 20 feet deep. It is divided into two compart- 
ments, one for the weir and the other for the screens. There 
are four 20-inch sluice gates ; two of them are located 8 feet 
apart vertically, so that water can be drawn from two levels. 
When the reservoir is full it would be better to draw through the 
upper gate, for should an accident happen to the force main, 
there would be less liability of a large quantity of water being 
drawn off. A permanent weir of southern pine, having its edges 
of steel, is built into the masonry. The elevation of the crest 
is 397.29 feet. 

The inside of the reservoir was finished August 21. On 
September 19 water was pumped into the reservoir by the Worth- 
ington engine, and on the 21st water was let into a portion of 
the low service pipe system. Since filling the reservoir the gates 
have been closed and tests have been made. No leakage was 
discovered and the reservoir is believed to be tight. The reser- 
voir contains 4,000,000 gallons above the bottom of the outlet 
pipe. The work was done under contract by Trumbull & 
Ryan, contractors, of Boston, Mass. The cement used was 
from F, O. Norton Cement Co., New York. 

GATE HOUSE. 

The exterior walls are composed of stone having quarry faces, 
which came from the reservoir excavation, care being taken to 
select those having the most color, and the trimmings are granite 



94 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

from Bodwell's quarry. The interior walls were built of the best 
face-brick laid in red lime and cement mortar. 

The floor is supported by brick arches and the top will be cov- 
ered with Portland cement mortar. Care should be taken not 
to have the floor come in contact with the channel beams which 
support the sluice-gate standards so as to prevent the floor from 
being cracked. 

The ceiling is Georgia pine, nailed to the rafters, and will 
have two coats of hard oil finish. 

The gate house is nineteen feet ten inches square and has a 
hip roof covered with red slates and terra cotta hip rolls. The 
work remaining to be done is cementing the floor, painting the 
woodwork, and pointing the joints of the exterior walls with 
Portland cement, colored red. In time it is probable that the 
reservoir grounds will form an addition to the Derry field park, 
of which the gate house will be a prominent feature. This work 
was done by the city, and Mr. Edward House was the foreman 
in charge. A circuitous driveway has been nearly completed 
from Old Bridge street to a point north of the reservoir. This 
affords an easy way of reaching the summit and obtaining an 
excellent view of the city and surrounding country. 

DISTRIBUTION. 

The low service has been connected to the high service force 
main by laying a 12-inch cast-iron pipe in Lowell street, from 
Mammoth road to Ashland street. This work was done by the 
superintendent, Charles K. Walker. The upper portion of the 
low service is now supplied from Oak Hill reservoir and the 
northerly portion of the city can be supplied with water by lay- 
ing a lo-inch cast-iron pipe from Ashland street, in Pearl west 
to Maple street, in Maple to Brook street, and in Brook street to 
Union street. From Brook street the pipes can be extended 
into this northerly district, giving it the advantages of the high 
pressure. 

At your request we have made an approximate estimate of the 
cost of a high pressure water-supply for fire service in the cen- 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 95 

tral portion of the city, which will give pressures varying from 
no to 130 pounds per square inch, and hydrant streams varying 
in distance from 170 to 200 feet. 

It is proposed to locate four-way post hydrants with indepen- 
dent valves for each line of hose, not over 300 feet apart on 
Elm street and 400 feet on the streets between Elm and Union 
streets. The hydrants on the low service pipes generally have 
steamer connections and would furnish an additional supply of 
nearly the same pressure by attaching the steamers to them if 
necessary. 

It is proposed to lay a 16-inch cast-iron pipe from the 20-inch 
pipe in Mammoth road, in Massabesic street to Valley, and in 
Valley street to Elm street, and in Elm street to Brook street ; 
and also to lay a 12-inch pipe in Union street from Auburn to 
Orange street. 

There would be 8-inch pipes laid in Auburn and Cedar 
streets, Lake avenue. Central, Merrimack, Manchester, Hanover, 
Amherst, Concord, Lowell, Bridge, Pearl, and Orange streets, 
connecting the 16 and 12-inch pipes in Elm and Union streets. 

The upper portion of the system at Brook street would be sup- 
plied by the 12-inch pipe in Lowell street, thus giving two lines 
of supply pipes, which is necessary to prevent the supply from be- 
ing cut off in case an accident should happen to the Valley- 
street pipe, if only one connection was made with the high ser- 
vice system. 

The hydrants are to be connected to the mains with 6-inch 
pipe, each having a gate to shut off the hydrant, if necessary, 
for repairs. 

The following is the approximate estimate of the above sys- 
tem : 
8,570 feet 16-inch iron pipe. Valley and Massabesic 

streets, at ^2.75 $23,567.50 

6,700 feet 16-inch iron pipe, Elm street, from Val- 
ley to Brook, at ^3.00 ..... 20,100.00 
4,380 feet 12-inch iron pipe, Union, from Orange 

to Auburn, at $1.90 . . . . . . 8.3 2 2. 00 



96 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

19,500 feet 8-inch iron pipe, from Elm to Union 
street, in Orange, Pearl, Bridge, Lowell, Concord, 
Amherst, Hanover, Manchester, Merrimack, Cen- 
tral streets. Lake avenue, Cedar, and Auburn 

streets, at ^1.30 $25,350.00 

7 16-inch gates, including brick wells, at ^145.00 . 1,015.00 
2 12-inch gates, including gate boxes, at $44.50 . 89.00 

26 8-inch gates, including gate boxes, at $23.50 . 611.00 

84 4-nozzle hydrants with independent valves, in- 
cluding 6-inch pipe and gates from. main, at $107 8,988.00 

Connection with 20-inch pipe, Massabesic street and 

Mammoth road, at $100 ..... 100.00 



$88,142.50 
Contingencies ....... 8,817.50 



$96,960.00 
In closing, we wish to express our thanks to the board, super- 
intendent, and water registrar for their constant co-operation 
and many acts of kindness. 

Respectfully submitted. 
GEORGE S. RICE & GEORGE E. EVANS, 

Civil Engineers. 
Boston, Mass., Janua:ry i, 1895. 



REPORT ON TEST OF BOILERS AND PUMPS. 

office of 

Dean & Main, Mechanical and Mill Engineers, 

Exchange Building, 

53 State Street, Rooms 1027 and 1028. 

Boston, December 14, 1894. 
To the Water Board, Manchester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — On October 11, 1894, I made a duty trial and 
capacity test of the Worthington High Duty Pumping Engine 
No. 834, at your water-works, and on November 2, 1894, a sim- 
ilar trial of the engine No. 835 at the same place. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 97 

The following extract from the contract shows the guarantees 
and determinations to be made : 

" The party of the first part guarantees that when properly 
supplied with steam, and the water free from air, each of these 
engines will be capable of delivering three million (3,000,000) 
United States gallons of water in twenty-four (24) hours, when 
running at a piston speed of one hundred and twenty (120J feet 
per minute, when furnished with an effective steam pressure of 
not less than one hundred and fifty (150) pounds per square inch 
at the engine, and will deliver this qua;ntity against a total head 
of two hundred and fifty-four (254) feet, including friction ir^ 
twenty thousand (20,000) feet of twenty (20) inch main, or a 
total load on the plungers (including suction) not exceeding one 
hundred and twenty (120) pounds per square inch. 

" The party of the first part further agrees that when the en- 
gines are running at the above-mentioned piston speed, against 
the above-mentioned load, and supplied with dry steam at not 
less than the above-mentioned effective pressure, they will be 
capable of developing a duty of one hundred and five million 
(105,000,000) foot-pounds with each one hundred (100) pounds 
of coal consumed, based upon a boiler evaporation of ten (10) 
pounds of water per pound of coal from the temperature of the 
water of the air pump delivery." 

" The duration of the tests shall not exceed twelve (12) hours 
and they may be waived altogether by mutual agreement." 

The wording of this contract is somewhat ambiguous, but I 
have interpreted it to mean that the engine is to receive benefit 
from the steam exhausted by the various auxiliary pumps, of 
which there are four, and that the duty is to be computed on 
plunger displacement. 

In accordance with this interpretation a preliminary trial was 
run with each engine, in order to determine the temperature at 
which the feed water would enter the boiler when utilizing the 
exhaust steam referred to and also the jacket and separator drains, 
as it is impracticable to utilize hot fluids when weighing the feed 

7 



98 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

water. In computing the various items herewith given, allow- 
ance was made for any difterences that existed between the tem- 
perature of the air pump discharge during the preliminary and 
final trials. Furthermore, the effect of returning the jacket water, 
on feed temperature, was computed from the jacket condensation 
as actually weighed by special means during the final trials, and 
from its temperature as taken at its discharge. 

The temperatures and items dependent thereon, as given in 
this report, are therefore those that would have been realized if 
the engines had been run during the duty trials under the every- 
day conditions of operation. 

The results of the boiler trials are, however, reported as actu- 
ally obtained, as the efficiency of the boiler is not affected by 
temperatures different from those generally existing, to any im- 
portant extent. 

DESCRIPTION OF THE PLANT. 

There are two vertical Manning boilers, each of which is of 
sufficient capacity to run one pumping engine. These boilers 
were built by the Atlantic Works of East Boston, Mass. The 
boiler farthest from the engines was used on both trials. 

The engines are of the Duplex Wofthington High Duty type, 
having, as usual, two high and two low pressure cylinders, the 
high duty compensating cylinders being at the outboard ends of 
the pumps. 

There are two direct acting feed pumps in the boiler room, 
two direct acting pumps for charging the air vessels and accum- 
ulators of the engines, and a jacket return pump for each engine. 
Each engine requires the use of four of these pumps when in op- 
eration. 

METHOD OF CONDUCTING THE TRIALS. 

The boiler and engine in each trial were operated some two 
hours before the boiler trial began, and while in their regular 
working condition, with steam at full pressure and the engine 
making the proper speed, the engine was stopped. The fire was 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 99 

then drawn and a new one started with a weighed quantity of 
wood. As soon as steam was being freely made, the engine was 
started and run one half hour before the engine trial was consid- 
ered to have begun. The feed water used by the engine from 
this time on until the engine trial stopped, which was some time 
before the boiler trial ended, was obtained. The engine was 
kept running until the coal in the boiler was burned out as much 
as possible, consistent with ending the boiler trial with the same 
pressure and height of water as those existing at the beginning. 

It is apparent from this that the boiler trial was of longer du- 
ration than the engine trial. 

The coal, feed water, and jacket and separator drains were 
weighed on correct scales. The strokes of the water plungers 
were obtained by observations taken every five minutes, and in- 
dicator diagrams were taken every half hour. The head of water 
against which the plungers worked was obtained by reading a re- 
fined pressure gauge attached to the discharge pipe of each en- 
gine, and the distance of this gauge above the water in the suc- 
tion well, as shown by a graduated float rod. 

The steam pressures at the engine and boiler, the temperatures 
of the feed water, steam at boiler and engine, and of the air 
pump and jacket discharges were taken at regular intervals. 

During the trial of Engine No. 834 the temperatures were such 
that the duty, according to the contract conditions, was com- 
puted with an actual evaporation of 10.90 lbs. of water per pound 
of coal, and of Engine No. 835 an actual evaporation of 10.87 
lbs. of water per pound of coal. 

The pressures, heads, and plunger speeds differ somewhat from 
those specified in the contract, but were accepted by the con- 
tractor's representative present. 

The indicator springs were tested under steam by the writer. 

The following are the leading dimensions of the boiler and 
engines, and the results of the trials .-, 

BOILERS. 

1. Type, Manning Vertical. 

2, Inside diameter of shell, 60 inches. 



100 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

3. Inside diameter of fire-box, 72 inches. 

4. Outside diameter of fire-box, 79^ inches. 

5. Distance from grate to crown sheet, 42 inches. 

6. Clear length of tubes, 14 feet 11 inches. 

7. Outside diameter of tubes, 2)^ inches. 

8. Number of tubes, 182. 

9. Grate surface, 28.27 square feet. 

10. Water-heating surface, 1,387.65 square feet. 

11. Superheating surface, 481.72 square feet. 

12. Ratio of grate to water-heating surface, i to 49.08. 

13. Ratio of grate to total heating surface, i to 66.11. 

14. Number of boilers in use^ i. 

ENGINES. 

15. Type, Worthington horizontal high duty duplex compound. 

16. Diameter of high pressure cylinders, 15 inches. 

17. Diameter of low pressure cylinders, 30 inches. 

18. Diameter of high pressure piston rods, 3^ inches. 

19. Diameter of low pressure piston rods, 3? inches. 

20. Diameter of plunger rods, 3 inches and 35 inches. 

21. Diameter of plungers, 15^ inches. 

22. Nominal stroke of pistons and plungers, 18 inches. 



Results of Boiler Trials Oct. ii and Nov. 2, i 

Oct. II. Nov. 2. 

23. Duration of trial, hours . . i3'i5 ^S-i? 

AVERAGE PRESSURES. 

24. Steam pressure in boiler by gauge, 

pounds ..... 140.00 142-30 

25. Atmospheric pressure by barom- 

eter, pounds .... 14.61 14*79 

26. Absolute steam pressure^ pounds . 154-61 157-09 

27. Force of draught of water, inches . 1-4 5-16 



BOARD OF WATKR COMMISSIONERS. 101 

AVERAGE TEMPERATURES. 

Oct. II. Nov. 2. 

28. Of external air, degrees ... 54 54 

29. Of fire room, degrees .... 66 72 

30. Of steam, degrees ..... 393 392 

31. Of escaping gases, degrees . . • * 397 * 380 

32. Of feed water on entering boiler, degrees 60 54 

FUEL. 

;^^. Total moist coal consumed, pounds 4,747.0 4,089.0 

34. Moisture in coal, per cent . . 2.1 2.5 

35. Wood consumed, pounds . . 162.0 286.0 

36. Dry coal consumed, plus coal equiv- 

alent of wood, pounds . . 4,712.0 4,101.0 

37. Total weight of refuse, pounds . 502.0 354-° 

38. Total percentage of refuse . . 10.7 8.6 

39. Total combustible, pounds . . 4,210.0 3,747.0 

40. Dry coal consumed per hour, 

pounds ..... 358.0 3ii'0 

41. Heat value of i pound of coal by calorimeter, 

British thermal units ..... ^3,4^3 

42. Heat value of i pound of coal by analysis, 

British thermal units ..... i4)24i 

42-A Heat value of i pound of combustible, by 

analysis, British thermal units . .. . 15,260 

QUALITY OF STEAM. 

43. Number of degrees superheated • • 33 30 

WATER. 

44. Total water pumped into boiler, 

pounds 38,296 36,392 

45. Water evaporated, corrected for 

quality of steam, pounds . . 38,818 36.841 



•These temperatures are too low on account of air leakage into the flue. 



102 ANNUAL OFFICIAL. REPORTS. 

Oct. II. Nov. 2. 

46. Equivalent water evaporated into • 

dry steam from and at 212° Faren- 

heit, pounds . . . . 46,775 445651 

47. Equivalent water evaporated into 

dry steam from and at 212°, per 

hour, pounds . . . . 3,558 ^^^^3 

ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE. 

48. Water evaporated per pound of dry 

coal, including superheating, 

pounds ..... 8.24 8.98 

49. Equivalent water evaporated per 

pound of dry coal from and at 

212°, pounds .... 9.92 10.89 

50. Equivalent per pound of combusti- 

ble from and at 212°, pounds . 11. 11 11.92 

51. Total heat derived from a pound of 

dry coal, British thermal units . 9,590.00 10,517.00 

52. Total heat derived from a pound of 

combustible, British thermal units 10,731.00 11,482.00 

53. Efficiency of boiler based on coal by item 42, 

per cent ....... 73-8o 

54. Efficiency of boiler based on combustible, per 

cent ........ 75-24 

RATE OF COMBUSTION. 

55. Dry coal actually burnt per square 

foot of grate, per hour, pounds 12.64 11.00 

RATE OF EVAPORATION. 

56. Water evaporated from and at 212° 

per square foot of heating surface, 

per hour, pounds . . . 2.56 2.44 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 103 

COMMERCIAL HORSE POWER. 

Oct. II. Nov. 2. 

57. On basis of 34^ pounds of water 

evaporated per hour from and at 

212°, H. P 103 98 

ANALYSIS OF COAL USED ON NOV. 2, GEORGES CREEK CUMBERLAND. 

Moisture, .60 per cent; carbon, 80.15 per cent; hydrogen, 
4.94 percent; nitrogen, i per cent; oxygen, 5.76 percent; 
ash, 6.68 per cent; volatile sulphur, .87 per cent. Total, 100 
per cent. 

Results of Engine Trials Oct. ii and Nov. 2. 

58. Number of engine 

59. Duration of trial, hours 

60. Total number of double strokes 

61. Average length of stroke, right 

plunger, feet .... 

62. Average length of stroke, left plun- 

ger, feet ..... 

63. Piston and plunger speed per min- 

ute, right, feet .... 

64. Piston and plunger speed per min- 

ute, left, feet .... 

average temperatures 

65. Of engine room, degrees 

66. Of external air, degrees 

67. Of main feed water (air pump dis- 

charge), degrees .... 76.9 79.4 

68. Of main feed water, after passing 

heater, degrees .... i47-o i47'3 

69. Of jacket, etc., drain, degrees . 346.3 348.0 

70. Of mixture of feed waters at boiler, 

degrees . . . . . 171.0 171.1 



Oct. II. 


Nov. 2. 


834 


835 


12 


I I 


27)925 


26,537 


1-578 


1-556 


1-575 


1.568 


122.400 


125.120 


122.170 


126.090 


76.9 


77.0 


55-0 


57-0 



Oct. II. 


Nov. 2. 


60.0 


54-0 




384.0 




23-4 


14.61 


14.79 


140.00 


142.30 


154.61 


157-09 


139.40 


139.80 


154.01 


154-59 


26.75 


27.40 


116.92 


117-37 


270.08 


271.14 



104 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

71. Of water in pump well, degrees 

72. Of steam near engine, degrees 

73. Superheat of steam near engine 

AVERAGE PRESSURES. 

74. Of atmosphere by barometer, pounds 

75. Of steam at boiler by gauge, pounds 

76. Of steam at boiler, absolute, pounds 

77. Of steam at engine by gauge, 

pounds ..... 

78. Of steam at engine, absolute, pounds 

79. Vacuum by gauge, inches 

80. Total water pressure, pounds . 

81. Equivalent head, feet 

STEAM USED BY ENGINE AND AUXILIARIES. 

82. Dry steam (cor. for superheat) 

charged to cylinders, pounds . 31,579.00 29,677.00 
8^. Dry steam used by jackets, etc., 

pounds ..... 4,357.00 4,029.00 

84. Dry steam used by plant, pounds . 35,936100 33,706.00 

85. Percentage of dry steam used by 

jackets, etc. . . . . 12.12 ii-93 

86. Dry steam used per hour per I. H. 

P., pounds ..... 18.86 18.30 

S7. Dry steam used per hour per pump, 

H. P 19.84 19.68 

BRITISH THERMAL UNITS USED BY ENGINE AND AUXILIARIES. 

88. Per pound of dry steam used by 

cylinders and pumps, B. T. U. 1,076.50 1,076.31 

89. Per pound of dry steam used by 

jackets, etc., B. T. U. . . 874.30 872.61 

90. Heat passing through cylinders 

and pumps, B. T. U. . .33,994,795.0031,941,639.00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 105 

Oct. II. Nov. 2. 

91. Heat passing through jackets, 

etc., B. T. U 3,809,325.00 3,515,746.30 

92. Total used by plant during 

trial, B.T.U. . . .37,804,120.0035,457,381.00 

93. Used by plant per minute per 

I. H. P 330.00 321.00 

94. Thermodynamic efficiency of 

plant, per cent . . . 12.85 13-21 

AVERAGE POWERS, ETC. 

Average number of " revolutions " per 

minute ...... 

Average piston speed, feet per minute 
Average mean effective pressure, high 

pressure cylinder, pounds . 
Average mean effective pressure, low 

pressure cylinder, pounds . 
Horse power developed by high pressure 

cylinders ...... 

Horse power developed by low pressure 

cylinders ...... 

Horse power developed by both cylin- 
ders ....... 

Percentage of power developed by high 

pressure cylinder .... 
Percentage of power developed by low 

pressure cylinder 
Horse power of plungers 
Friction horse power .... 
Friction of mechanism, per cent . 
Efficiency of mechanism, per cent 

COAL. 

Coal used, per indicated horse power, 

per hour, pounds .... 2.070 1.840 



38.785 


40.208 


122.290 


125.120 


5I450 


■ 50-950 


18.290 


19.180 


63.720 


64.800 


95.180 


102.540 


158.900 


167.340 


40.100 


38-730 


59.900 


61.280 


151.050 


155-720 


7.850 


11.620 


4.940 


6.930 


95.060 


93-070 



106 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CAPACITIES. 



Oct. II. Nov. 2. 



Water displaced by plungers in 24 

hours, gallons 3>i89>io5 Z^^1S6^S 

Water delivered over weir in 24 hours, 

galloi'is 3,029,650 3,097,320 

Slip of plungers, percent ... 5 5.44 

DUTIES. 

On contract basis by plunger displace- 
ment, foot-pounds .... 108,852,782 109,381,000 

On contract basis by weir measure- 
ment, foot-pounds .... 103,490,857 103,517,500 

Per 1,000,000 heat units by plunger 

displacement, foot-pounds . . 94)933)739 95,665,111 

Per 1,000,000 heat units by weir meas- 
urement, foot-pound^ . . . 90,257,458 90,537,666 

Per 100 pounds of coal by plunger dis- 
placement, foot-pounds . . . 89,409,000 100,088,456 

Per 100 pounds of coal by weir meas- 
urement, foot-pounds . . . 86,272,882 94,725,391 

Per 1,000 pounds of dry steam by 

plunger displacement, foot-pounds 99,868,535 100,634,849 

Per 1,000 pounds of dry steam by weir 

measurement, foot-pounds . . 94,949,000 95,240,622 

Excess of capacity over contract re- 
quirement, per cent . . . 6.30 9.20 

Excess of duty over contract require- 
ment, per cent .... 8.48 8.93 

The amount of the friction of the mechanism will decrease as 
the engines are subjected to more service. The large amount of 
the friction of engine No. 835 is partly attributable to a dry and 
hot trunnion bearing, and to having been used less than engine 
No. 834. 

Respectfully submitted. 

F. W. DEAN. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



REPORT OF THE STREET AND PARK 

COMMISSION 

For the year 1894. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

According to instruction, last clause of section i, ''Act estab- 
lishing a Board of Street and Park Commissioners for the City of 
Manchester," the commissioners have the honor to make a de- 
tailed report to the city councils of the doings of said board for 
the year ending December 31, 1894. 

Rules and Regulations. 

The Board of Street and Park Commissioners have full charge 
and management and control of the building, constructing, 
repairing, and maintaining of the streets, highways, lanes, side- 
walks, bridges, public sewers and drains, and of the public parks 
and commons, in the city of Manchester. 

They have the expenditure of all the appropriations which the 
city councils vote for such purposes from year to year. All bills 
for expenditures from such appropriations are to be approved by 
said board before the same are paid by the city treasurer. The 
board has for such yjurposes all the powers now by law vested in 
the board of mayor and aldermen, city councils, and the high- 
way surveyors of the various districts of said city. They appoint 
all subordinate officers, agents, and other persons to carry out 
the provisions of the act by which the street commissioners are 
created, and to fix their compensation. 



110 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

They can make such rules and regulations for their own gov- 
ernment and for the conduct of all such subordinate officers, 
agents, and other persons, and for the control and management 
of the horses, wagons, tools, buildings, and other property pro- 
vided by the city of Manchester for the performing of the afore- 
said works as they may deem expedient. 

They also have the power to regulate the placing of encum- 
brances in the streets, and the moving of buildings through the 
streets and highways of the said city, and the construction and 
maintenance in, over, and along the highways of said city of all 
wires, pipes, and other structures belonging to private corpora- 
tions or individuals, which now or hereafter may be permitted, 
by vote of the mayor and aldermen, to be placed in, over, and 
along said highways. 

They shall adopt plans for the development and improvement 
of the public parks and commons, and shall make such rules and 
regulations for the care thereof as they shall deem expedient. 

The board of commissioners is authorized to provide for the 
performance of any of said works by contract, and in so doing 
to call for proposals for doing such work, and to make a contract 
therefor, in the name and behalf of the city, with the lowest re- 
sponsible bidder who shall furnish proper security for the faith- 
ful performance of his contract. But no such contract shall pro- 
vide for the expenditure of any sum of money greater than the 
amount appropriated for such purposes by the city councils. 

The important duties conferred upon the board of street and 
park commissioners by law, the many persons to be affected, 
and the large expenditures thereby placed in their control and 
supervision, render it necessary that some specific rules should be 
issued for the guidance of the public and the employees of the 
city. 

The rules hereby formulated will be altered, amended, or 
added to from time to time, as the board of commissioners may 
think it necessary. 

Rule i. No new highways can be built by the street commis- 
sioners until the same have been legally laid out by the board of 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. Ill 

mayor and aldermen and the construction of the same ordered 
by them, and a sum of money sufficient for their completion ap- 
propriated. 

Rule 2. No new sewers can be built until the same have been 
laid out and an appropriation for the construction thereof pro- 
vided by the city. 

Rule 3. The ordinary care and repairing of sewers will be 
maintained by the commissioners to the extent of the appro- 
priations. 

Rule 4. The commissioners can enter into no contract with 
any member of either branch of the city councils to furnish sup- 
plies to or do any work for the city, or with any firm of which 
any member of the city councils is a partner. 

Rule 5. The board of commissioners can enter into no con- 
tract with any member of their own board, or with any firm in 
which a member of their own board is a partner. 

The following rules have been adopted by the board : 

1. Any person damaging any fence erected by the city for the 
protection of the highway or inclosing city lands under the 
charge of or in use by the city commission, or damaging any 
building in their charge, will be prosecuted to the full extent of 
the law, and city employees are required to be vigilant in bring- 
ing to the notice of the commission any injury so inflicted. 

2. All repairs inside of buildings will be made under the au- 
thority of the street commission ; outside repairs will be referred 
by the commission to the city councils. 

3. Before the commencement of any new sewers or new high- 
ways, by order of the commission, the city engineer will be re- 
quired to make a careful estimate of the cost of the work to be 
commenced, and all the grades must be established, and land 
damages, if any, to parties abutting thereon, awarded by the 
board of mayor and aldermen. 

4. Whenever the sum appropriated by the city councils is 
nearly exhausted and there remains more work to be done on 
jobs already commenced, the cost of which will exceed the bal- 



112 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

ance of the unexpended appropriation, application will be made 
to the city councils for more money, and the work suspended un- 
til said application is granted. 

5. All contracts and agreements made by the street commis- 
sioners shall be in writing and signed by the parties thereto, and 
a certified copy of the same furnished to the city auditor and 
city clerk, if requested. 

6. A record of all bids made by contractors shall be kept by 
the clerk of the board and open to examination by any city of- 
ficial. 

7. No sale of public property in charge of the street commis- 
sion shall be made by any employee, unless so authorized by the 
street commission in writing, and a return of the articles sold, 
with the amount received, shall be made to the clerk of the 
board and by him paid to the city treasurer. Any violation of 
this rule will be the cause for immediate dismissal. 

8. In all contracts or agreements made by the street commis- 
sion there should be inserted an expressed condition that no 
member of the city councils, or officials, or employee of the city 
in any of its departments, shall be admitted to any share or part 
of such contract or agreement. The payments will be made 
weekly on rolls prepared and approved by the commission and 
the city auditor. 

9. No payment for the fraction of a week will be made in ad- 
vance of the regular payment. 

10. No employee shall leave his work without reporting to 
the foreman. 

11. All employees will be required to give strict attention to 
their work during the hours of labor. 

12. Any employee found intoxicated on the work or having 
liquor in his possession will be promptly discharged. 

13. No smoking will be allowed in the buildings or shops. 

14. Foremen of the different gangs will be held responsible 
for the tools and materials used under their charge, and neither 
materials nor tools shall be loaned or given away under any cir- 
cumstances. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 113 

15. Positively no admittance, except on business, to the city- 
yard, the city stables, or any other inclosures or buildings under 
the care of this commission. 

16. All employees under the street and park commission are 
absolutely prohibited from having any interest, direct or in- 
direct, in any contract for the supply of materials or labor, or in 
the hire of any vehicle or team, or in any moneyed account 
whatsoever, other than their daily wages, in connection with the 
street, sewer, and park business of the city. 

17. A violation of any of the foregoing rules will be consid- 
ered sufhcient cause for the discharge of any employee. 

18. The office of the street and park commission will be open 
from 8 to 12 A. m., and from 2 to 5 p. m. A daily meeting of 
the commissioners will be held at 2 o'clock p. m. , except when 
otherwise employed. 

STREET AND PARK COIMMISSION DEPARTMENT APPROPRIATIONS. 

Repairs of highways, new highways, watering streets, paving 
streets, macadamizing streets, grading for concrete, scavenger 
teams, street sweeping, bridges, city teams, sewers repaired, new 
sewers, commons, Stark and Derryfield parks, snow and ice. 

The attention of all persons dealing with the street and park 
commission is called to the following : 

All orders for supplies purchased by the commission or their 
agents will be written by the clerk, and all persons furnishing 
said supplies are to fill in the official blank on back of written 
order, giving prices of supplies in detail. 

These order blanks are to be returned to the clerk by the' per- 
son presenting the order. In addition, the person furnishing 
supplies is to make out a regular monthly bill on blanks supplied 
by the commissioners, and all persons are to send said monthly 
bills on or by the i8th of each month to the office of the com- 
mission. 

Per order of street and park commission. 

ANNUAL STATEMENT. 

The duties of the street and park commission, set forth in the 
s 



114 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

act of legislature passed March 29, 1893, cover a very important 
department of municipal government, and one in which our 
citizens justly take pride and interest. Each year brings a 
greater demand for extension of streets and building of new 
highways, a greater outlay of materials for the construction of 
sewers and drains, a careful consideration of ways and means for 
enlarging and improving our parks and commons, and a general 
oversight of methods adopted by other cities in caring for the 
welfare of their citizens, and an economical expenditure of 
funds allotted for this department. The commissioners, aware 
of the importance of their trust,- have thoroughly planned the 
work and conscientiously carried it out during the last year, and 
they submit their report herewith with the feeling that much has 
been accomplished, but still there remains much to be done, and 
it is certain that the best class of our community will be willing 
and ready to uphold all honestly directed efforts for a better 
order of things, and a more business-like method of conducting 
this branch of municipal affairs. 

Very early in the season the board began preparations for the 
season's work by asking for bids for sewer pipe and brick. Bids 
for furnishing sewer pipe were received from the following : 
George D. Goodrich, Boston, Mass. ; Waldo Bros., Boston, 
Mass. ; Portland Stoneware Co., Boston, Mass. ; Pike & Heald 
Co., and Thos. A. Lane Co., Manchester. The contract was 
awarded to George D. Goodrich for Akron pipe, he being the 
lowest bidder. 

Bids to furnish brick for the sewers were received from the fol- 
lowing : W. F. Head & Son, Hooksett, N. H. ; H. T. Simpson, 
Suncook, N. H. ; F. C. Towle, Hooksett, N. H. ; Granite State 
Co., Epping, N. H. ; Mead & Mason Co. and S. C. Forsaith 
Co., Manchester. The contract was awarded to W. F. Head & 
Son, they being the lowest bidders. 

The commissioners next called for bids for castings, cement, 
corner, cesspool, and curb stone, and lumber. Bids to furnish cast- 
ings were sent in by the Manchester Iron Foundry, Manchester 
Locomotive works, C. H. Hutchinson Co., S. C. Forsaith Ma- 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 115 

chine Co. The C. H. Hutchinson Co. were awarded the con- 
tract, their terms being more favorable to the city. 

Bids on cement were made by Freeman & Merrill, Adams & 
Tasker, Henry W. Parker, Dunlap & Wason Co., Clarence R. 
Merrill, DeCourcy, Holland & Marshall, all of Manchester. 
Contract awarded Dunlap & Wason Co., lowest bidders. 

On corner, cesspool, and curb stone, the following bid : War- 
ren Harvey, Manchester, and Charles A. Bailey, Suncook, N. H. 
The bids were divided and Warren Harvey was given contract to 
furnish curbing and Charles A. Bailey contract to furnish circles. 
In nearly all cases rates were obtained lower than the preceding 
year. 

Favorable rates were obtained on bids to furnish bridge plank 
and sewer plank from A. C. Wallace and S. C Forsaith Machine 
Co., both of Manchester. Contract awarded A. C. Wallace. 

The contracts made during the year show the increased 
amount of work, notwithstanding a general business depres- 
sion, and are given herewith in tabular form, in the order in 
which they were made. 



116 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Date. 


Contract, Material, or Location. 


Awarded to or agree- 
ment with. 


Jan. 


27. 




George D. Goodrich. 


Mar. 


20. 






24. 




Dunlap & Wason Co. 
Charles A. Bailey. 


April 


6. 


To furnish culvert stone, Wilson St.. . 




16, 


To furnish material and move crusher 


S. C. Forsaith Co. 




23. 


To furnish culvert stone, Cohas Ave. 


D. H. Dickey. 




24. 


To furnish culvert stone, Sagamore St 


Charles A. Bailey. 




27. 




Charles A. Bailey. 
Warren Harvey. 
Kittredge & Son. 




27. 




May 


10. 


To build South Main-street bridge .... 




12. 


To remove old and build new wall.. . . 


A. C. Wallace. 




14. 




W. F. Head & Son. 




28. 


To furnish steel tubing for sewers.... 


Amoskeag Mfg. Co. 


.June 


9. 


To furnish 50,000 feet bridge plank .... 


A. C. Wallace. 




11. 


To funish 40,420 feet sewer plank 


Bartlett & Gay. 


Aug. 


31. 


To lay underground wires 


N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co. 


Sept. 


21. 


To furnish carload lumber 


A. C. Wallace. 




29. 


To furnish iron fence for bridge 


Pike & Heald Co. 


Oct. 


18. 


To furnish sewer trench cableway 


Carson Trench Co. 




20. 


To build Page street 


John H. Proctor. 



In nearly all cases bids were called for and contract awarded 
lowest bidders. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
PERMITS TO ENCUMBElt.* 



117 



Given to 


Location. 


Date. 


Head & Dowst Co 

Mead & Mason Co 


Elm and Manchester streets 

Elm and Washington streets 


Feb. 


14 
1 


S. T. Wortlieu 








10 
10 


John Fullerton 


23 Rnssell street 




George Holbrook 


67-71 Hanover street 




"4 


D. H. Young 


Elm east back, between Orange 


and Pearl 


26 



E. J. Hardy 
Head & Dowst Co. . 

John J. Bennett 

Head & Dowst Co . . 

L.M. Aldrich 

J. D. Donovan 

John McCormick 

S. T. Worthen 

S.T. Worthen 

George S. Clough. . 

C. A. &M. L.Hoitt. 

J. D. Donovan 

A. L. Bixby 

D. A. Sliannahan 

James A. Brigham. 

J. Eaton 

Frank N. Daniels 

A. C. Flanders 

Patrick Harrington 

Clark B. Hall 

Joseph A. Jackson. 
Charles T. Whedon. 

S. T. Worthen 

A. G. Stevens 

W. H. Carpenter. . . 

D. B. Sanborn 

Theodore Miller. .. 

M. J. Sullivan 

Mead & iNIason Co.. . 
J. F. Seaward 

F. M. Hoyt 

Dana & Provost 

James Kandlett 

Andrew G. Hood 

E. P. Desrocher 



Bean & Carpenter i Elm and Dean streets. 

H. I. Faucher j Pearl, between Orange and Pine 

L. B. Bodwell & Co — Union and Manchester back 

Ash and Bridge . . 

Between Elm and Elm west back 

Ash and Bridge 

Amherst, opposite hospital 

South Elm and Shasta 

Pine and Hanover, to Central back. . . . 

Pine and Hanover, Summer, south 

Belmont and Concord 

Prospect and Union 

Appleton and Union 

Chester street 

Central back sti'eet 

Belmont and Valley 

40 Lake avenue 

Hanover back 

6G.5 Pine street 

Schiller, between Second and Turner. 

Lake avenue and Lake avenue back. . 

l>ake avenue, near Elm 

Chester street 

North Main street 

Spruce and Wilson 

Pearl, near Russell 

Beech, near Merrimack 

Bald Hill 

Laurel street 

Walker street 

Laurel street 

Towne's block, Amherst street 

Chestnut and Lowell 

Elm east back street 

189 Lake avenue 

5S4 Maple and 211 Bridge 

Oak and Pearl 

12.5 Orange street 



April 



A. D. Richards j Ash and Lowell. 

Peter Rogers ' IMerrimack south back. 

E. V. Turcotte I Hanover south back. . . 

William Carr ] Concord and Hall 

F. N. Daniels & Co ' Auburn and Pine 

J. H. Mendell Ash, near Lowell 



May 



June 

July 
Aug. 



Sept. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



10 

11 

l.i 

16 

21 

4 

S 

14 

11 

17 

1 

2 

17 

30 

31 

7 

8 

12 

21 

27 

5 

11 

11 

16 

15 

15 



* A bond of $500 being filed with the city clerk in each case, when permit is 
granted. t 



118 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



OFFICE. 



The work of the office has been an important one. The time 
of all working under the charge of the commissioners is now 
kept here, and this change from the old method of timekeepers 
has many advantages. The pay of two men is saved, the men 
are under the immediate charge of the commissioners, all weekly 
pay-rolls and monthly division of labor sheets are made up in the 
office, and all orders for supplies used at the city stables, for tools, 
etc., necessary to the work on streets, sewers, and city ledge, are 
procured from the office. This method has proved most satisfac- 
tory, and is certainly more economic in a business point of view. 

Over 1,040 orders have been given the last year for supplies, 
an average of twenty per week ; 168 pay-rolls and 24 division of 
labor sheets made out ; a record of over 300 daily business meet- 
ings kept; 323 letters, notices, etc., typewritten and sent out. 
Monthly returns of all sewers, streets, cesspools completed, edge 
stone set and re-set; brick, stone, castings, pipe, etc., deliv- 
ered, received, and tabulated ; 50 permits to encumber while 
building, with bonds made out ; a record of the receipts and 
expenditures kept, and balance sheet giving amount on hand of 
each appropriation submitted each month ; all bills approved 
by the commissioners each month, typewritten and filed ; all 
orders, resolutions, ordinances, etc., relating to the street and 
park commission copied on typewriter and filed ; 90 orders to 
concrete crossings, roadways, etc., made out ; requests and ci -m- 
plaints kept and submitted daily. 

The following is a list of receipts and expenditures for the last 
year : 



RECEIPTS. 



Pipe 
Stone 

Chopping blocks 
Old plank 
Castings . 
Loam 



$45-1° 
44.00 

7-79 

15-07 

6.60 

6.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSJON. 



119 



Health department . 


^33-37 


Underground wires 


18.33 


Derry field Park 


. . . 4.50 


Sundries .... 


12.5s 


Cash on hand . 


1. 00 




^194-31 


Less cash paid for express 


.... 2.62 



Deposited with city treasurer . 

EXPENDITURES. 

Commissioners' salaries 
Clerical services 
Ofifice supplies . 
Blank books 
Stationery 
Carriage hire . 
Incidentals 

Total . 



$191.69 



UjSoo.oo 

1,363-50 
18.25 

43-15 

12.05 

502.50 

44.20 

53,783-65 



120 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 



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STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 121 

CITY STABLES. 

Many persons in going to the railroad station pass a brick 
building just west of the city scales, and perhaps wonder what it 
is used for. They may catch a glimpse through the gate of sewer 
pipe in orderly stacks, or piles of cobble stone dumped on the 
ground. Well, this is the city stables and yard, where the city 
teams and horses, sprinklers, etc., are kept, and where the shoe- 
ing and general blacksmithing is done. It is always a busy place, 
for here the supply teams come to deliver orders, and to take 
away sharpened drills and picks, to carry away pipe, brick, and 
cement to the various sewers and cesspools, to deliver and carry 
away traps and grates and castings of many kinds. Here, also, 
the brick, pipe, Salem stone, castings, and supplies of all kinds 
are stored, filling over nineteen sheds. 

A visit to the city yard is interesting, as everything is kept in 
good order. As one steps into the brick stable he is struck with 
the neatness displayed, from the carefully swept floor, which is 
washed out once a week in summer, to the clean windows and 
the handsome well-groomed horses standing in their ample stalls, 
contentedly considering their morning's meal. There are fifteen 
draft horses, two driving horses; average weight of draft horses, 
1,510 pounds; average age, la.years; one horse, 24 years old. 
There are eighteen stalls, but no box stalls. In case of a sick 
horse, a box stall is needed. There is also need of cribs for feed- 
ing, and a larger water tank. Hay loft will hold about ten tons 
loose hay, fifteen tons baled. 

Since the removal of the crusher and boiler to the city ledge, 
the engine house has been used as a repair shop, and this place 
is a busy one, as the wear and tear on the carts and tools call for 
frequent repairs. Tool boxes, snow plows, etc., are made here, 
and all the painting necessary on dump-carts, sleds, sprinklers, 
snow plows, etc., is done here. 

The blacksmith shop has proved to be a valuable acquisition 
to the street department. All repairs calling for iron work on 
wagons, dumpcarts, sleds, and snow plows, all sharpening neces- 
sary for tools used on the street and ledge, all sharpening and 



122 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

shoeing of horses, all tools to be made, bolts, braces, iron bars, 
etc., are furnished from this shop, resulting in a great saving of 
money for the city. 

The city owns 8 one-horse scavenger sleds, 5 two-horse scav- 
enger sleds, over 20 snowplows, 2 two-horse snowplows, calling 
for continual repair by the blacksmith. During the last year a 
Sampson upsetter has been purchased for the blacksmith shop. 
This machine is an ingenious contrivance for contracting an iron 
tire to fit a loose wheel. Also a drilling machine has been pro- 
cured and screw plates. There is need of a power lathe for mak- 
ing drills, and turning iron and wood, and for making bolts, 
etc., for the road roller and crusher. 

CITY YARD, WEST MANCHESTER. 

Within the last year much has been done to improve the fa- 
cilities for storage and accommodation of teams and horses at 
the yard in the rear of the Fire King engine house. An office 
and stable are now provided, two horses are kept in the stable 
and used on scavenger work. Here also are kept all tools, carts, 
and sleds for scavenger service, one road machine, horse scrapers, 
pumps, one sprinkler, etc. Sheds are provided for storage of 
brick, cement, sand, etc. One sj^rinkler is kept at the Clinton- 
street engine house. 

The hay, shorts, cracked corn, and oats necessary for feed for 
both stables has been bought by the carload or in bulk at a very 
reasonable rate. Liniments, axle grease, and repairs of harnesses, 
blankets, new harnesses, disinfectants, and other sundries have 
all been carefully purchased, and at an advantage to the city, 
all such supplies being ordered by application to the office of the 
commission, and subject to their approval. 

NEW SOUTH MAIN-STREET BRIDGE. 

Early in the year 1893 a proposal was made to erect a bridge 
over the Piscataquog river at South Main street. West Manches- 
ter, to replace the wooden structure then standing, and the mat- 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 123 

ter took definite shape in the form of " an order to procure plans 
and specifications and build South Main-street bridge," which 
was presented to the city councils for action. Upon the passage 
of this order active measures were taken by the commissioners 
to gain information regarding the best methods of obtaining 
plans and specifications. Plans of location, estimates of material, 
sewer, gas, and water connections were considered with the city 
engineer. Twenty different bridge building firms were sent type- 
written letters, stating that blue prints giving profile of location 
of the proposed bridge would be forwarded and information re- 
garding method of bidding furnished to those desiring to bid, all 
designs to be submitted at the expense of the parties making pro- 
posals on or by the first of April. According to agreement, on 
Monday, April 2, at 2 o'clock p. m., the following bridge com- 
panies submitted designs and estimates: 

Wrought Iron Bridge Co., Canton, Ohio. 

R. F. Hawkins Co., Springfield, Mass. 

Trumbull & Ryan, Boston, Mass. 

Groton Bridge Co., Groton, New York. 

L. F. Kittredge & Son, Lowell, Mass. 

Dean & Westbrook, New York. 

Martin Fitzgerald, Manchester, N. H. 

Winfred H. Bennett, city engineer,. 

Toledo Bridge Co., Toledo, Ohio. 

Columbus Bridge Co., Columbus, Ohio. 

Massillon Bridge Co., Kane, Penn. 

Berlin Bridge Co., East Berlin, Conn. 

Boston Bridge Co., Boston, Mass. 

Vermont Construction Co., St. Albans, Vermont. 

No action was taken at this conference, as it was necessary to 
thoroughly consider each design and estimate before agreeing 
upon choice of design. After careful consideration of each de- 
sign and estimate, and understanding the desire for a stone 
bridge, the commissioners decided to send notice to all bridge 
companies that proposals for a stone bridge would be considered 



124 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

by the board. On April i6, designs and bids for a stone bridge 
to be erected at South Main street were received from the follow- 
ing parties: 

L. F. Kittredge & Son, Lowell, Mass. 
Trumbull & Ryan, Boston, Mass. 
'Dean & Westbrook, New York. 
Martin Fitzgerald, Manchester. 
Winfred H. Bennett, city engineer. 

April 17, the commissioners met and voted to award contract, 
if approved by city councils, to L. F. Kittredge & Son, Lowell, 
Mass., to build a double arched cut-stone bridge over the Piscat- 
aquog river at South Main street, according to plans and specifi- 
cations submitted by them, for the sum of $27,975. 

In accordance with this vote a report was drawn up of the pro- 
ceedings of the board and a copy forwarded to His Honor the 
Mayor to be presented to the city councils at a special meeting 
to be held Thursday evening, April 19, at which time the city 
councils passed the following order : 

Ordered, That the city clerk be and is hereby authorized to 
make a transfer of seven thousand and nine hundred and seventy- 
five dollars ($7,975) from the reserve fund to the appropriation 
for South Main street bridge. 

Upon the passage of this order Messrs. Kittredge were notified 
to proceed to the erection of the bridge. A contract was made 
by the commissioners and signed by Kittredge & Son, with a 
bond attached of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) for the princi- 
pal and two thousand five hundred ($2,500) for each of the sure- 
ties. All preliminaries being settled, work was commenced on 
or about May 25. Two large steam derricks were set up, and the 
stone in old abutments removed, the granite for the new bridge 
being furnished by Charles A. Bailey., of Suncook, N. H. 

The work on the bridge progressed rapidly through June, 
July, August, and September. October 1 7, the bridge was de- 
clared finished by the contractors, and was formally accepted by 
the commissioners in behalf of the city, and opened for public 
travel. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 125 

ITEMS. 

Under this head are collected short notes on various subjects 
or departments of work connected with the street and park com- 
mission. We think this departure from the regular tabulated 
annual report will be appreciated. A scrap-book has been kept 
during the last year and all items of interest or of valuable, sug- 
gestion have been filed for reference. We submit the following : 

The first sewer opened up was the Elm west back, running 
from West Merrimack to Spring street, April ii. It was relaid 
and deepened. The Prospect sewer, North River road, Hall 
street, North Main street, and Hancock street ran through ledges. 
The cost of the steel riveted sewer pipe, 48 inches by 6;^ inches, 
furnished by the Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. for sewer at 
South Main street, was ^408.81 ; this included painting and 
paint stock. The average weight of grates, season of 1894, for 
cesspools was 103 lbs., for traps 76 lbs., manhole castings 350 
lbs. each. Ten lengths of 2^-inch standard hose were pur- 
chased of the Samuel Eastman Co., Concord, N. H., to supply a 
long-felt need in flushing out sewers, cesspools, etc. Seventy- 
four carloads of brick have been purchased of William F. Head 
& Son, Hooksett, N. H., containing 516,469 brick, cost of 
freight ^414.40, cost of brick ^2,901.50, total cost of freight and 
brick $3,315.90 ; 42 cars were unloaded in West Manchester and 
32 cars were unloaded at city yard. 

Thirty-nine cars loaded with 18,861 feet of Akron pipe and 
Y branches have been used, at a net cost of $3,313.58. 

Bought Carson trench machine, cableway, engine, frame, and 
eight tubs, 4^ cubic yards each and 4}^. cubic yards each, sav- 
ing to the city 50 per cent in item of labor; cost of machine 
complete, $3,45°- 

Damages in case of Patrick Kendrigan, $186.60, for injuries 
received while working on sewer. Damages in case of A. Nou- 
lette, injury to arm while working on sewer, $46 ; recovered. 
Damages, F. E. Webster, injury to wagon caused by road roller 
frightening horse, $19.50. 



126 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The curbstone furnished this year was seven feet long, eight 
inches top, and circles three feet radius, for streets and cesspools. 
Twenty-five loads of good paving stone were taken from South 
Main street old bridge abutments and used on the streets, 50 
loads of gravel put on the streets in West Manchester, and 160 
loads of gravel in Amoskeag during the month of June, and 
1,200 loads of gravel put on as topdressing on the principal 
streets in Division 2, in the same month. Average of 30 loads 
of sand distributed each day in business portion of the city in 
January. 

Hanover street was widened from Elm to Elm east back, 195 
feet, by setting in the edge stone one foot on the south side. Im- 
portant improvements were made at the corner of Elm and Han- 
over streets by repaving the street with new granite block paving, 
with pitched joints, concreting the north crossing on Elm street, 
building three new cesspools, setting back the letter box, etc.; 
curved edge stones were put in at the corners. 

The first of the summer the S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. was 
given contract to erect crusher plant ; amount of contract, ^i,- 
642, ^475 for changes to screen, etc.; 3,882 loads of stone were 
crushed at the city ledge during the season, equal to 5,176 cubic 
yards. Of this number of loads 2,190 were used in general re- 
pairing of roads and streets in Divisions 2 and 10 ; 1,692 loads 
were used on new macadamizing. 

Sixty-five carloads of fine and medium Salem stone, equal to 
1,288 tons, at a cost of ^1,803.20, were purchased of the Massa- 
chusetts Broken Stone Co. The steam road roller weighs 18 tons 
and costs $8 per day to run with four men and fuel. 

Cost of whitewashing tree boxes this year was, supplies and in- 
cidentals, $51.17; cost of labor, $96.87; total, $148.04. This 
covered full length of Elm street and part of Franklin. 

Capacity of street sprinklers is about 600 gallons each ; cost, 
$450 each; repairs on sprinklers during the year, $113.90 ; 6 
sprinklers used in Division 2 ; 76 miles per day sprinkled. Each 
team covers 13 miles each day; territory covered, about ij^ 
miles north, east, south, and west. Two nights per week sprink- 
ler is used during warm season. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 127 

During Merchants' week the city engineer showed attractive 
designs in his window reading as follows : " Manchester contains 
4^:4 miles of macadam, 134 miles of walks, 175 miles of streets 
and roads, 8 miles of avenues, 50 miles of sewers." 

A 50-foot street takes an 8-foot sidewalk. 

A 45-foot street takes a 7-foot sidewalk. 

A 40-foot street takes a 6-foot sidewalk. 

Manchester contains over 21,700 acres and over 90 miles of 
shade trees ; 42 elm trees were set out on Park common this sea- 
son by Superintendent Fullerton. 

Return cards have been printed by order of the commission for 
all employees unloading pipe, stone, brick, etc., to return to of- 
fice amount received of said materials ; also cards giving differ- 
ent routes of scavenger teams, and time of visiting the several lo- 
calities. 

A substantial foot bridge was built by A. C. Wallace across 
the Piscataquog river at Log street to accommodate pedestrians, 
at a cost of $31.87 for labor, while the new South Main street 
bridge was in progress. 

Average number of men employed in Division 2 during sum- 
mer months, 250; Division 10, 85 ; commons, 35. 

Pay-day for Division 2, Wednesday each week. 

Pay-day for Division 10, Tuesday each week. 

Pay-day for commons, Tuesday each week. 

The assistant clerk has gone out with Mr. Maxfield, second 
hand under Street Superintendent Cheney, and pay clerk, or city 
treasurer, each payment, and every name was checked when pay 
envelope was taken. Thus a complete record is kept of amounts 
paid each man at the office of the commission. The pay-rolls 
for all employed under the street and park commission deparf- 
ment are made out at the office, and handed the city treasurer, 
who copies the total of each pay-roll in his cash book and puts 
the money in the pay envelopes, numbering each to correspond 
with a number opposite each name on the pay-roll. During the 
winter months payments are made at the treasurer's office ; 168 
pay-rolls have been made out and 24 division of labor sheets. 



128 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Inventory of City Property. 

Commissioners' office, including typewriter, desks, 

blank books, etc. ...... $372.40 

Division No. 2, including 16 horses, dumpcarts, 
sprinklers, snowplows, road machine, stone 

crusher, Carson trench machine, etc. . . 17,263.17 

City buildings, Franklin street .... 12,300.00 

Lot of land, Franklin street .... 89,312.00 

Valuation of pipe on hand, city yard . . . 924.49 

Division No. 5 ...... . 20.70 

Division No. 6 . . . . . . . 13-10 

Division No. 7 ...... . 68.30 

Division No. 8 ...... . 28.90 

Division No. 9 . . . . . . . 18.30 

Division No. 10, including horses, dumpcarts, 

sprinklers, road machine, etc. .... 2,112.45 

Stable and lot, Division No. 10 . . . . 1,200.00 

Valuation of pipe on hand, Division No. 10 . 124.71 

Division No. 11 . . . . . . 9.60 

Commons, including horse lawn mowers, swings, 

seals, etc. ....... 882.10 

Total . . . . . . . $124,650.22 



Orders Received from City Government, with Date of 
Passage. 1 894. 

ORDERS TO BUILD CERTAIN STREETS. 



Chestnut to Union street through Livermore land, 810 feet. 

Adams street from above sewer north to Clark, 240 feet. 

Rimmon east back, 750 feet. 

Pine street from Auburn southerly, 1,066 feet. 

Green street, 300 feet ; Grove street, 300 feet. 

Belmont, present sewer south to culvert, 230 feet. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 129 

Wilson, Spruce to Valley, i,8oo feet. 

Pine east back from Amherst northerly, 150 feet. 

Mast to Amherst road, thence south to Milford, 1,840 feet. 

Passed April 3. 

Union from line of proposed sewer across Livermore land 
northerly to Clark. 

Union east back, Webster southerly, 100 feet. 

Hale street and northerly and easterly to Merrimack river, 
1,200 feet. 

Malvern street, present sewer southerly, 100 feet. 

Elm west back, from north of Dean, 185 feet. 

Passed May i. 

Bridge, Hall to Belmont, 350 feet. 

Pearl, Russell easterly, 125 feet. 

Wilson, Valley to Somerville, 1,800 feet. 

Passed August 7. 

Plevey east back, Kelley southerly to Wayne, 1,200 feet. 

Manchester, Milton to Beacon, 300 feet. 

Clinton, Main to West street, 520 feet. 

Dover, Clinton northerly, 160 feet. 

West, Clinton northerly, 250 feet. 

Passed September 4. 

Prospect street, from Russell westerly, 125 feet. 

Passed October 2. 

Grove street, present sewer easterly, 150 feet. 

Spruce street, present sewer easterly, 8co feet. 

Canton, Spruce easterly, 500 feet. 

Auburn, Canton easterly, 600 feet. 

Pearl, Hall westerly, 130 feet. 

Hall, Mead southerly, 200 feet. 

Liberty east back, Salmon southerly, 150 feet. 

Hall, Schiller southerly, 450 feet. 

Harvell, Hale westerly, 700 feet. 

Passed November 9. 



130 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

An order to erect watering-trough, corner Valley and Union 
streets. 

Passed September 4. 

ORDERS TO BUILD CERTAIN STREETS. 

Harrison, Russell easterly to Belmont. 
Kennedy, Brown avenue westerly to Josselyn. 

Passed June 5. 

Wentworth, from West Hancock southerly about 1,500 feet. 

Salmon, Walnut to Beech. 

Bartlett, Putnam southerly about 400 feet. 

Beech, Salmon to Gore. 

Passed July 3. 

Mystic avenue, Oakland avenue to Glenwood avenue. 
Bartlett, Putnam to Sullivan. 

Passed August 7. 

Somerville, Pine to Union. 
Sagamore, Walnut to Oak. 

Passed November 9. 

The above orders in detail are on file at the commissioners' 
office. 



Scavenger Service. 

Statement for i 893-1 894. 

CARE perishable WASTES. 

The contract to remove all perishable waste throughout the 
city was made by the board of street and park commissioners 
with the joint standing committee on city farm, on June 9, 

1893, for one year. This brings part of the year's service into 

1894. The amount to be allowed the commiteee on city farm 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



131 



for the year's service was $2,500. On account of the necessity 
of building suitable wagons the actual service was not com- 
menced until the 23d of June, and W. H. Carpenter and F. X. 
Chenette were hired to remove the perishable waste during this 
time. 

The following amounts were allowed for this service during 
the year, 

1893. 



Balance due in June 



Draft for July, W. H. Carpenter . 


^24.00 


F. X. Chenette 


108.00 


city farm 


42.63 


August, city farm 


208.33 


September, city farm 


208.33 


October, city farm . 


208.33 


November, city farm 


416.66 


December, city farm 


208.34 


1894. 




Draft for January, city farm . 


$208.33 


February, city farm , 


208.33 


March, city farm 


208.33 


April, city farm 


208.33 


May, city farm 


208.33 



$1,424.62 



- 11,041.65 

$2,466.27 
33-73 

$2,500.00 



CARE IMPERISHABLE WASTES. 



"The ashes, earth, brick, lime, rubbish, and other innoxious 
and imperishable wastes shall be collected, and when so collected 
may be used for filling new streets or low ground." Chapter 9, 
section 3, Laws and Ordinances. 



132 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The regular scavenger teams attend to the removal of the 
foregoing imperishable wastes, while the city farm teams remove 
the perishable wastes only. 

Section 4 of this same chapter provides that, " Every person 
owning, occupying, or having the care of any building or prem- 
ises, or business located in the compact part of the city in which 
any perishable or burnable waste, whether of vegetable or ani- 
mal origin, is produced shall provide and keep a suitable vessel 
in which all such wastes shall be deposited, and no water, earth, 
ashes, stones^ or brick shall be mingled therewith." 

It still further provides that, "All ashes and other imperish- 
. able wastes, which may properly be removed by the scavenger 
department, shall be placed in a separate receptacle, and no per- 
ishable or burnable wastes shall be deposited therewith." 

And lastly, '' Each of said receptacles with its contents shall 
be set out upon the back street or upon the edge of the side- 
walk in the morning of the day on which the scavenger teams 
are to pass through the street for the removal of that kind of 
wastes. ' ' 

If the above is strictly complied with there can be very little 
cause of complaint. 

The commissioners, early in the season, issued cards for dis- 
tribution giving the days on which the scavenger teams passed, 
and very few complaints have been made since that time. 

Let it be distinctly understood that the city farm teams re- 
move the perishable and burnable wastes only ; the city teams 
the ashes, earth, stones, and brick. 

The commissioners voted, however, that " No person shall 
encumber the streets and lanes by throwing out any dirt or sand 
from cellars and excavations, or by placing other obstructions of 
any kind upon said streets and lanes, without a special permit 
from the said board." 

It goes without saying that all should assist in the preservation 
of the good health and cleanliness of our city by heartily com- 
plying with the foregoing ordinance. 

The following give the section of the city and time of collec- 
tion of both perishable and imperishable wastes. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 133 



TEAM NO. I. 

Elm west side front and back streets. — Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday : From Langdon street to city Viall. Tuesday, Thurs- 
day, and Saturday : From city hall to Auburn street, passenger 
and freight depots, and Franklin street. 

TEAM NO. 2. 

Monday : From Bridge to Orange and east side of Union. 
Elm back and front from Concord to Orange. 

Tuesday and Friday : From Bridge to Orange, and from Elm 
to Union. 

Wednesday and Saturday : From Bridge to Concord, and 
from Elm to Union. 

Thursday : From Bridge to Concord, and east of Maple. 

TEAM NO. 3. 

Monday and Friday : From corner of Hanover and Wilson 
streets south, to south side of Lake avenue, up Lake avenue to top 
of Wilson hill, north to Hanover, down south side of Hanover 
to Lincoln. 

Tuesday : Manchester south back, Laurel, Central, Merrimack, 
Lake avenue, Spruce, Cedar, and Auburn back streets, between 
Wilson and Beech streets. 

Wednesday : South of Spruce and east of Wilson, known as 
East Manchester. 

Thursday : Manchester House and Pembroke block and the 
four back streets running north and south between Concord and 
Bridge, Union and Ash. 

Saturday : All south of Auburn street, known as south Man- 
chester. 

TEAM NO. 4. 

Monday and Thursday : Elm street both sides from Blodget 
to Clark ; Chestnut and Pme the same ; Webster and Appleton 
streets from Elm to Hooksett road ; Liberty, Clark, Ray, Adams, 



134 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

and Monroe the entire length ; River road from Amoskeag 
bridge to north side of Clark ; Brook and Blodget from Elm to 
Union ; also Hazel street. 

Tuesday and Friday : Elm back street Harrison to Orange ; 
Orange, Myrtle, and Blodget back streets from Elm to Walnut, 
the Dow and Abbott blocks included. 

Wednesday and Saturday : Pennacook, Sagamore, and Salmon 
streets from Pine to Union ; Union, Walnut, Beech, and Ash 
from Harrison to North ; Orange, Myrtle, Prospect, and Harri- 
son from Walnut to Hall. 

TEAM NO. 5. 

Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday : Elm street, east side, from Con- 
cord to Manchester. 

Monday and Thursday : Beacon street to Union from north 
side of Hanover to south side of Concord. 

Tuesday and Friday : From Concord to Manchester, from Elm 
back street to Pine street. 

Wednesday and Saturday : From Union to Elm back street, 
and from Concord to Manchester. 

TEAM NO. 6. 

Monday and Thursday : From Lake avenue to Auburn, from 
Elm to Beech street. 

Tuesday and Friday : From south side of Manchester to south 
side of Laurel from Elm to Beech. 

Wednesday and Saturday : From north side of Lake avenue to 
south side of Laurel, from Elm to Beech. 



Scavenger. 

COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL OF GARBAGE. 

The subject of the disposal of garbage is one that is being dis- 
cussed by the large cities, and various methods are being tried 
with greater or less success. The rapid growth of our city calls 
for a consideration of this subject. To sum up the different 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 135 

methods, we may say that one of three ways of disposal seems to 
be adopted, viz.: The common method of conveying to the 
dump and contract to dispose of unburnable wastes ; cremation 
of everything ; or reduction by different methods to two products, 
i. e., grease and dry fertilizer. The latter method seems to have 
some advantages, and is said to pay a fair margin over and above 
expenses. A brief description of this method will be of interest 
to our citizens. This system is known as the Merz process. 

■' The garbage is delivered at the plant in wagon loads as fast 
as collected, and immediately goes to a draining machine, where, 
with the aid of steam, a great deal of moisture is drained off. 
At this point a separation of extraneous substances, such as tin 
cans, bottles, shoes, baskets, and all non-vegetable and non-ani- 
mal matter, from the garbage or kitchen refuse must be made. 
This separation is necessary, and should be made at the houses 
before the garbage is collected. The public is gradually coming 
to understand this new departure in city life, and as time goes 
on the amount of separation at the works will be smaller. The 
extraneous matter is at the disposal of any one who cares to use 
it for filling or other purposes. After the separation the garbage 
is. fed into a long boiler-shaped tank which has an inner and 
outer shell, between which are .coils of pipe filled with steam. 
The center of this double tank contains a revolving, rakelike 
apparatus, which has the appearance of a long shaft with iron 
prods or spokes inserted into it. The garbage is fed into the hot 
tank, and is constantly kept moving about by the revolving rake, 
and very soon all the moisture is evaporated, the garbage torn to 
pieces and reduced to a dark-colored substance something simi- 
lar to dry corn silks, or dirty sawdust. There is little or no 
odor, for in addition to evaporation by drainage and application 
of heat, the matter is treated while in the drying tanks to a con- 
stant supply of fresh air driven in by fans. 

"Mixed in with garbage in the summer time there will be 
found, when it leaves the drying tank, a quantity of corn cobs. 
These are removed and sent to the boiler room as fuel. The 
dried garbage is then placed in another tank, treated to a bath 



136 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

of naphtha, hermetically sealed up in this bath-tub in which steam 
is used to heat the naphtha. The heat thus applied dissolves the 
grease, which, being attractable to naphtha, is separated from 
the garbage, or, as it is technically termed, tankage. Thus is the 
garbage divided into two separate products, viz.: grease and 
tankage. 

" By simple mechanical means the grease and naphtha are carried 
off to be afterward separated, and the tankage is further manipu- 
lated. It is milled and screened, and in a very short time takes 
the form of a marketable fertilizer. In this shape it is unobjec- 
tionable to the senses, and is an easily handled commodity. The 
grease is sent to the refineries, and there transformed uito glycer- 
ine, stearic acid, red oil, and other lye-products. And so what 
was originally an unsightly, unmanageable white elephant, goes 
through a process of cleansing and purification which effects a 
complete regeneration. The application of this process to any 
city is possible, but its availability or desirability as compared 
to other systems, can be determined only when considered in 
connection with local conditions and requirements. That it is a 
logical and economical disposition of garbage seems to be evi- 
dent." (Copied from "The Municipality and County.") 



Streets. 

CRUSHER PLANT. 

Early in the month of April the commissioners considered the 
advisability of removing the stone crushing plant from the city 
yard to the ledge on Wilson Hill, near Lowell street, and called 
for bids to erect a suitable plant at said location. S. C. Forsaith 
Co. being the lowest bidders were awarded the contract to erect 
the plant ; the plant consisting of an elevator building 50 feet 
high, with elevator and buckets ; screen for three sizes stone, 3- 
inch, I ^ -inch, and i4-inch; suitable bins to hold 25 tons stone, 
with driveway underneath ; also an engine house with connec- 
tions for water supply, etc. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 137 

The excavating was done by the city and the foundation 
erected ready for the superstructure, the city engineer looking 
after all surveys necessary, under direction of the commission. 
On or about the last of June the plant was put in running order, 
and the stone was used as fast as crushed for filling low places in 
the streets and for macadamizing. Work was kept up to the last 
of October. About 50 loads, or 100 tons, of stone were crushed 
per day, the average haul being a mile, 

STREETS WHERE LEDGESTONE HAS BEEN USED. 

Hanover, Chestnut to Union ; Pine, Hanover to Merrimack ; 
Pine, Merrimack to Lake avenue ; Granite, Franklin to Elm ; 
Franklin, Depot to Merrimack ; Franklin, Merrimack to Mar- 
ket ; Chestnut, Concord to Lowell ; Concord, Vine to Pine ; 
Stark, Elm to Elm west back ; Mechanic, Elm to Elm west back ; 
AVater, Elm to Elm west back ; Chestnut, Merrimack to Central ; 
Hanover, Beech to Maple ; Amherst, Chestnut to Vine ; Merri- 
mack, Union to Beech ; Chestnut, Brook to Blodget. 

MACADAMIZING. 

This method of preparing street surface has always been a prac- 
tical and favorite one, our streets treated in this way showing 
great durability, and when well topdressed with fine crushed 
stone almost a perfect roadway results. 

Since the removal of the crusher to the ledge this season, and 
the erection of the elevator and screens with bins for holding the 
various sizes of stone, many of our streets have been improved 
by a topdressing of crushed stone, and in some cases by a thor- 
ough treatment, by removal of old roadbed and then building a 
new bed from foundation up of layers of different sizes of ledge- 
stone, with binder course of fine Salem stone. We give herewith 
a detailed account of this department of work : 



138 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Location. 


Length 

in 

feet. 


Square 
yards. 


Crushed 
stone. 


Salem 
stone. 


Labor. 




900 
600 
850 
300 
300 
300 
325 
700 
110 
110 
110 
450 
650 
300 
550 
300 


3,400 
2,400 
3,212 
2,000 
1,200 
1,200 
1,084 
2,800 
612 
612 
612 
1,800 
2,600 
1,267 
2,139 
1,356 




60 
30 
60 
52 

30 

20 
55 
35 
54 
41 


$152.49 


Pine, Hanover to Merrimack 

Pine, Merrimack to Lake avenue. . 


50 

200 

150 

15 

15 

75 

90 

50 

55 

40 

110 

210 

240 

220 

200 

1,720 


247.40 
349.50 
300.25 


Franklin, Depot to Merrimack. — 
Franklin, Merrimack to Market — 
Chestnut, Concord to Lowell 


40.00 
50.00 
208.00 
212.50 


Stark, Elm to Elm west back 

Mechanic, Elm to Elm west back.. 

Water, Elm to Elm west back 

Chestnut, Merrimack to Central 


102.00 
106.00 
86.25 
253.00 
.596.70 




703.40 


Merrimack, Union to Beech 

Chestnut,* Brook to Blodget 


670.96 
626.50 




6,855 


28,294 


437 


$4,704.95 



* Eleven carloads granite chips used. 
Average width, 39 feet. 

SUMMARY. 



Cost of Salem stone 
Cost of granite chips 
Cost of lumber 
Incidentals . 
Crushing plant 
Labor on streets . 
Labor at ledge 
Concrete 

Total 



^^,432.85 

85.68 

41.98 

1,158.07 

2,117.00 

4>7o4-95 
2,379-95 
1,441-53 

$13,362.01 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



139 



EDGE STONES SET. 



There has been a great call for edge stones the last season. 
Our citizens are learning that a well-laid concrete walk, with 
stone curbing, makes a neat permanent finish in front of a resi- 
dence, a comfort to all pedestrians and a source of pride to the 
real estate owner. The city encourages all efforts in this direc- 
tion and, therefore, all property owners who will purchase edge 
stones can have them set in front of their property free of charge. 
Concrete crossings and corner stones or circles are laid and fur- 
nished by the city where there seems to be a demand for the 
same by the traveling public. All of these improvements are 
controlled by the appropriations, however. The following list 
of locations where edge stones have been set will give an idea of 
the extent of this department of work. 



Union and Sagamore 
Webster and Bay . 
North and Bay 
Pine and High 
Elm and Appleton 
Merrimack and Belmont 
Concord and Belmont 
Elm and Sagamore 
Pearl and Linden . 
Brook and Ash 
Pearl and Linden . 
Chestnut near Ray brook 
Liberty and Webster 
Massabesic and Summer 
Webster, Children's Home 
Salmon and Union 
Warren and Arlington . 
Pearl and Linden . 
Spruce and Hall . 



Feet. 

48 

7 

28 

100 

29 

47 

16 

28 

36 

233 

116 

100 

33 

129 

66 

38 
20 

20 

56 



140 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Streets. 
Pine and Cedar 
Union and Appleton 
Kidder 

Pine and Central . 
Elm back 
Laurel . 

Webster and Adams 
Elm and West Appleton 
Elm and Pearl 
Elm and East Appleton 
Pine between Central and Laurel 
Pine between Hanover and Amherst 
Chestnut, between Bridge and Pearl 
Amherst and Ashland 
Prescott and Wilson 
Merrimack^ between Union and Beech 
Pearl and Russell . 
Concord and Belmont . 
Spruce and Massabesic . 
Lake avenue and Maple 
Elm and Webster . 
Elm and Myrtle . 
Union and Salmon 
Cedar and Chestnut 
Chestnut, between Brook and Blodget 
Amherst and Porter 
Massabesic and Hall 
Arlington and Linden . 
Bridge and Ashland 
Lincoln and Manchester 
Arlington and Maple 
Beech and Lake avenue 
Central and Hall . 
Pennacook and Pine 
Prospect and Linden 



Feet. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



141 



Spruce and Chestnut 

Chestnut, south of Spruce 

Lake avenue, near Elm . 

Prospect and Linden 

Myrtle and Linden 

Pearl and Arlington 

Central and Wilson 

Cedar and Chestnut 

Lake avenue and Chestnut 

Pine and North 

Liberty and North 

Gore and Walnut 

Pearl and Nashua . 

Nashua and Arlington . 

Brook and Chestnut 

Cedar and Maple . 

Union, north of Valley 

Amherst, between Pine and Union 

Amherst and Ashland . 



Total 



EDGE STONES RESET. 



Streets. 
Elm, front Thayer's store 
Church . . . . . 

Chestnut, north of Appleton . 
Elm back, between Amherst and Hanover 
Hanover, between Elm and Chestnut 
Spruce and Chestnut .... 
Hanover and Elm .... 

Total ..... 



Feet. 
i6 

ICO 

390 
16 

32 
16 

32 
32 
16 
16 

66 

16 

16 

16 

170 

225 

16 

400 

16 

5>549 



Feet. 

50 

26 

100 

40 

50 
1 10 



Total number of feet of edge stones set or reset, 6, 1 20. 
Total cost of foregoing work, $758.94; an average cost of 
$0,124 per foot. 



142 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



NEW STONE CULVERTS. 



Streets. 


Length 
in feet. 


Width 
in feet. 


Cost 
stone. 


Cost 
labor. 


Inciden- 
tals. 


Total 
cost. 




112 
180 
462 


18 
12 


$339.00 
136.27 
32.37 


$889.90 
574.09 
16.74 


$23.97 
17.75 


$1,252.87 
728.11 




Colias avenue t 


49 11 









*This culvert was 6 feet cleep; walls, 5 feet thick; covering stone, 10 feet 
long. 

t This culvert was 4 feet deep; walls, 4 feet thick; covering stone, 5% feet 
long. 

X This culvert was 1 foot deep; walls, 11/2 feet thick. 

The commissioners heretofore contracted large stone culverts, 
but this year they bought the stone for Wilson and Sagamore 
streets and Cohas avenue, and the city help laid the culverts, ex- 
cept on Cohas avenue, the city engineer furnishing all necessary 
plans. 

CULVERTS REPAIRED. 



South Manchester, near Patrick Harrington's, cost of labor 
^2.75 ; old pipe used. 

Beech street, south of Young street, length 14 feet, cost of 
labor ^14. 

Wilson street, near Bodwell's, cost of labor $15.50; this cul- 
vert raised i foot ; cost of lumber $7.75, total cost $23.25. 

River road north, 100 perch of stone used, cost of labor $94. 

Chestnut street at Ray brook, cost of labor $35. 

Falls road, below Pine Grove cemetery, cost of labor $11.50. 

Pearl street, east end near Hall, two culverts repaired and 
raised ; length 338 feet, cost of labor $560.37. 

Harrison street, east end, two culverts repaired and raised ; 
length 55 feet, cost material $72, labor $49.25, total cost 
$121.25. 

Myrtle street, length of culvert 55 feet, cost of labor $57. 

In case of Harrison-street culvert the stone was bought of 



STREEr AND PARK COMMISSION. 



143 



Warren Harvey. All the other culverts were built of stone 
taken from the sewers and streets. 



STREETS GRAVELED. 

The following streets have been topdressed with stone, gravel, 
or cinders. In most cases the streets have been turnpiked with 
the road machine and then stone put on with gravel or cinders 
as a binder course. This gives a good crown and throws the 
water into the gutters. Our citizens have expressed themselves 
as well pleased with this work, as the principal streets have been 
treated this way to the great improvement of public travel. 



streets. 

Central, Wilson to Maple 
Cedar, Lincoln to Pine 
Beech, Cedar to Auburn 
Union, Cedar to Auburn 
Hanover, from top of hill to Hall 
Lake avenue, Elm to Wilson 
Orange, Elm to Ash . 
Myrtle, Elm to Ash 
Prospect, Elm to Union 
Beech, Hanover to Bridge 
Bridge, Ash to Hall . 
Malvern, Concord to Bridge 
Lowell, Maple to Hall 
Brook, Elm to Pine 
Webster, Union to Beech 
Concord, Pine to Ashland 
Pearl, Chestnut to Union 
Pearl, Russell to Ashland 
Pine, Harrison to North 
Union, Bridge to North 
Cedar, Chestnut to Pine 
Smith road . 
East High, Malvern to Ashland 



road 



Feet. 

1,200 
2,400 
300 
300 
2,400 
3,800 
2,200 
2,200 
1,400 

2,200 
1,050 
1,800 
1,400 

450 

2,900 

800 

700 

2,400 

5,000 

1,500 

500 



144 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Streets. 

Maple, Cedar to Lowell 
Lincoln, Spruce to Merrimack 
Amherst, Beech to Maple . 
Russell, Harrison to Orange 
Chestnut, Blodget to Pennacook 
Pine, Cedar to Clay 
Linden, Arlington to Orange 
Cass, Lake avenue to Central 
Concord, east of Hall . 
Harrison, Walnut to Beech . 
Wilson, Hanover to Manchester 
Merrimack, Pine to Union . 
Laurel, Chestnut to Union . 
Laurel, Hall to Beacon 
Manchester, Hall to Milton 
Jane, Nashua to Lowell 
Arlington, Cross to Ashland 
Appleton, Elm east 
River road, North street north 
East Spruce, Maple to Lincoln 
Union, Auburn to Valley 



Total 



MATERIAL USED. 



Loads of gravel 

Loads of stone ....... 

Loads of cinders ....... 

Total number of loads .... 

STREETS TURNPIKED WITH ROAD MACHINE. 

Streets. 

Elm, south end . . . . • 

Elm, north end 

Nutt road from Elm 



Feet. 

2,800 

1,000 

600 

800 

220 

3,600 

600 

220 

150 
250 
250 
450 
800 

850 
650 
800 

900 

1,500 

700 

650 

1,400 
57;99o 



5.520 
210 
100 

5.830 



Feet. 

1,100 
1,308 
1,700 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



145 



streets. 

East Spruce, Pine 

Valley 

Auburn 

Cedar . 

Central 

Lake avenue 

Cass . 

Laurel . 

Merrimack 

Manchester 

Amherst 

Hanover 

Concord 

Lowell 

Bridge 

Pearl . 

East High 

Orange 

Myrtle 

Prospect 

Harrison 

Brook . 

Blodget 

Gore . 

Pennacook 

Sagamore 

Salmon 

North . 

Webster 

River road 

Clark . 

Appleton 

Bay . 

Chestnut 

Pine . 

10 



east 



Feet. 

2,393 
■ 957 
2,596 
2.563 
4,983 

858 
1,016 
4,576 
3)630 
2,024 
3>i63 

308 

3»774 
6,380 

4,675 
4,996 
2,830 
3,300 
3^740 
2,838 

2,915 
1,947 
1,408 

308 
1,408 

638 
2,120 

2,541 
i,.S97 
1,614 

440 

1)353 

440 
3)044 
5)945 



146 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Streets. 
Adams 
Ray . 
Union 
Walnut 
Beech . 
Ash . 
Maple 
Nashua 
Oak . 
Russell 
Warren 
Linden 
Ashland 
Lincoln 
Button 
Derry 
Malvern 
Jane . 
Arlington 
Burnside 
Old Bridge 
Beacon 
Milton 
Belmont 
Hall. 
Wilson 



Feet. 

55° 
500 

5.291 

3>597 
1.859 

3>234 

3.377 

396 

792 

1,430 

495 

495 

2,245 

2,013 

385 
100 
726 

495 
1,100 

262 
2,685 
2,871 
1,243 
2,871 
2,871 
1,487 



Total 



136,594 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
NEW STREETS GRADED. 



147 



Street. 


J2 *^ 

bus; 

<o C 
-3"-' 


Cut or 
fill. 


Inciden- 
tals. 


Labor. 


Entire 
cost. 


Walnut, Salmon to Webster *. 


1,134 


Both.. 


$38.69 


$1,286.49 


$1,325.18 


Union, Auburn to Silver 


3,000 


Cut... 


26.09 


1,146.13 


1,172.22 


Cass, Central to Laurel 


250 
100 


Both.. 


5.07) 
2.03 


150.88 


157.98 




300 


Cut. . . 


16.09 


283 50 


299.59 




130 


Both . 


2.64 


135 00 


137 64 




75 




1 69 


45 00 


46.69 


Linden, Prospect to Harrisonf 


245 


Fill... 


4.97 


89.25 


94.22 


Harrison, Hall to Linden t • • • ■ 


300 


Both.. 


16.10 


41.50 


57.60 


Beacon, from Lake avenue*.. 


150 


Cut... 


27.99 


128.00 


155.99 




450 


,, 


9 15 


194.00 


203 15 


Belmont, Old Bridge north t • • 


484 


Both.. 


10.83 


101.00 


111.83 


Merrimack, Beacon east * 


500 


" 


45.67 


535.00 


580.67 




200 
500 


" 


4.06 
20.15 


117.00 
326.00 


121 06 


Silver street 


346.15 




300 


„ 


16 10 


41 50 


57 60 


Dump, Pine, Green north 

Dump, Auburn, Maple west... 


50 
50 


Fill... 


















60 


,, 








Dump, Lincoln, south Auburn 


100 

100 

60 


'■ 














Dump, Liberty, north Salmon 
Highland, Bridge south 








390 


Cut... 


17.91 


310.00 


327.91 


Bridge, Highland east & west. 


550 


" 


20.00 


543.75 


563.75 


Hal], Bridge north 


750 


Both . 


25.25 


590.00 


615.25 




1 3.50 






183 00 


183 00 




2,145 


" 




380.00 


380 00 








Totals 


13,723 




$310.48 


$6,627.00 


$6,937.48 





Average width of street, 50 feet. 

* These streets were blasted through rock. f These streets not built 

up to grade. 

Labor charged to scavenger service in all cases where its cost is not 
given. 



148 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Location. 



Wilson, Spruce to Valley / 

Wilson, Spruce to Valley 

Sagamore and Union 

Pine, North of North 

Amherst, near Ashland 

Elm and Appleton 

Walnut, near Webster 

Union, north of Sagamore 

Ashland and Arlington 

East High 

Belmont and Merrimack 

Pearl, Women's Aid Home 

Elm, between Myrtle and Prospect.. . . 

Elm, front Weston block 

Near North End Railway Station 

Lowell, near Belmont 

Central, east of Hall 

Elm and Appleton 

Beacon, south of Laurel 

Central, east of Beacon 

Laurel, east of Beacon 

Laurel, east of Beacon 

Amherst, Pine to Union * 

Salmon and Union 

Salmon and Union 

Everett, Clark south 

Pearl and Mori'ison 

Ash, between Brook and Gore 

Prospect and Linden 

Russell and Prospect 

Elm and Myrtle .. 

Hall, near Lowell 

Salmon, Liberty to VValnut 

Gore, Walnut easterly 

Myrtle and Russell 

Spruce and Beacon 

North River road 

North and Pine 

Pine and Salmon 

Between Salmon and Sagamore 

Beacon and Lake avenue t 

Union and Salmon 

Shasta 

Calef road 

Merrimack, east Beacon 



Totals. 



Length 

In 

feet. 



400 

450 

300 

85 

350 

160 

60 

50 

150 

100 

225 

725 



75 
100 
225 

75 
100 
200 
250 
185 
100 
100 
300 
200 

50 
200 

50 
300 
120 



150 

75 

50 

400 

150 

125 

50 

100 

300 

300 

500 

400 



Width 

in 

feet. 



Cut or [ Labor, 
fill. 



Cut.. 
Fill.. 
Cut.. 
Fill.. 
Cut.. 
Both. 
Cut.. 



Both. 
Fill.. 



Cut.. 
Fill.. 



Cut. 



Fill.. 
Cut . . 

Fill!! 

Both! 
Fill.. 
Cut.. 
Fill.. 



Cut.. 
Fill.. 



Cut. 
Fill! 



$86.56 



38.25 
20.50 
20.75 

4.50 
17.25 
10.06 
22.80 

7.00 
20.63 
58.00 

8.25 
17.75 

5.50 
20.75 

5.75 
19.50 
10.50 

8.00 
35.75 



103.50 
45.00 



27.00 

23.75 

11.75 

25.00 

9.75 

34.00 

25.25 

31.75 

19.75 

14.75 

8.15 

16.00 

5.50 

6.50 

4.75 

170.50 

19.50 

15.50 

35.50 

16.50 



$1,107.70 



♦Sidewalk cut down about three feet in front of the Gymnasium and 
Towne property. 

t Cut through solid ledge. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



149 



Streets. 



Merrimack, Belmont east . . . 
Belmont, Merrimack north... 

Arlington, east of Warren 

Water and Mechanic, Elm to 

back street 

Pearl, Linden to Russell 

Sagamore 

Arlington, Linden to Ashland 
Hall, Manchester to Hanover 

Elm, corner Webster 

Lincoln 

Around standpipes 

Amherst, Vine to Union 

Merrimack, Union to Beech . 
Chestnut, Brook to Blodget.. 
Webster, at Children's Home 

Brook, corner Ash 

Spruce, Wilson to Hall 

Elm, between Myrtle and 

Prospect 

Arlington and Linden 

Hall, Spruce, and Massabesic 

Maple and Brook 

Concord, Ashland to Belmont 

North, Pine to Bay 

Hanover back* 

Elm, corner Hanover t 

East High 

Laurel and Belmont 

Central, between Pine and 

Union 

Maple, Bridge and East High 
North and Union 



Totals. 



Sq. yds. 



144 

102 

72 

114 
516 

200 

78 

39 

55 

11 

147 

856 

389 

171 

78 

40 

466 

66 
312 
122 
112 
505 
448 
200 
200 
185 

29 



5,685 



No. loads, 



115 
50 
22 
10 

8 
65 

4 
40 
23 
11 

85 
59 



19 



673 



Cost per 
load. 



$1.75 



Cost of 
stone. 



$24.50 
22.75 
10.50 

22.75 
91.00 
61.25 
17.50 
8.75 
8.75 
1.75 



201.25 
87.50 
38.50 
17.50 
14.00 

113.75 

7.00 

70.00 

40.25 

19.25 

148.75 

103.25 



115.75 
33.25 

8.75 

1.75 
1.75 
1.75 



Cost of 
labor. 



$30.24 
21.44 
13.00 

28.25 

113.40 

48.60 

20.25 

19.20 

12 80 

2.00 

24.40 

214.00 

83.50 

34.50 

19.20 

8.25 

71.72 

12.96 
45.36 
29.16 
35.50 
108.30 
69.50 
39.50 
59.75 
41.12 
8.75 

2.50 
2.50 
4.25 



$1,293.50 $1,223.90 



* Old paving taken up from Elm, corner Hanover. 
t Three carloads of granite block paving. 

Total cost of the foregoing work, ^2,517.40 ; an average cost 
of $0,442 per square yard. 



150 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PAVING RELAID. 
Streets. 

Canal, near station 

Elm, sundry places . 

Elm, from Weston block 

Hanover, Beech to Maple 

Elm back, near Vine 

Webster, west of Elm 

Lake avenue, between Elm and Chestnut 

Central and Franklin 

Merrimack, between Pine and Union 

Manchester, between Elm and Chestnut 

Elm, between Pearl and Orange 

Spruce, between Elm and Chestnut 

Granite, near station 



Sq. yds. 

1 60 

2,075 
60 

533 
240 

66 
100 

16 

33 
89 

20 

7 

54 



Total 3,453 

Total cost of the foregoing work, ^400.30 ; an average cost of 
$0,115 per square yard. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



351 



LOCATION. 



MeiTimack and Belmont 

Pearl and RusseH 

Linden and Prospect 

Linden and Pearl 

Water and Elm west back 

Mechanic and Elm west back 

Brown avenue 'and Elm west back 

Webster and Union 

Chestnut and Ray brook 

Arlington and Warren 

Webster and Beech 

Appleton and Adams 

Union and Salmon 

Amherst and Union 

Appleton and Union 

Appleton and Elm 

River road and North 

North and Chandler 

Union and Merrimack 

Monroe... 

Brook and Chestnut 

Webster and River road 

Walnut and Webster 

Wilson and Concord 

Myrtle and Elm 

Prospect and Elm 

Concord and A shland 

Bridge and A shland 

Spruce, east of Lincoln. 

Spruce and Hall 

Linden and Arlington 

Warren and Arlington 

Pine and Sagamore 

Elm and Hanover 

Back street between Sagamore and Salmon. 

Back street between Ash and Beech 

Bay and North 

Pine and North 

Chestnut and North 

Malvern and High 

Malvern and Bridge 

Liberty back 

Bridge and Warren 

Spioice and Chestnut 

Russell and Prospect 

Malvern and East High 

River road near A. Elliott's 

Pine between Brook and Blodget 

Manchester, near Battery building 

Auburn and Pine 

Gore and Union 

Prospect, near Linden 

Hall and Lowell 

Hanover back, between Union and Beech — 

Hall and Spruce 

Elm east back, Ijetween Pearl and Orange — 
Lake ave., back st. bet. Spruce & Lake ave. 

Central, near Cass 

Gore, near Pine 



Cost of 
material. 



Totals 



$35.72 
16.26 
16.26 

77.25 

57.46 



Cost of 
labor. 



$30.78 

9.75 

9.75 

53.75 

48.05 



31. a5 


1 16.00 


14.30 


' 8.75 


16.03 


8.75 


17.83 


10.25 


14.80 


10.00 


14.61 


7.50 


14.04 


10.25 


14.34 


8.75 


13.37 


10.25 


15 85 


8.00 


20.53 


17.25 


26.18 


12.96 


32.32 


13.75 


29.45 


17.20 


15.44 


7.20 


15.44 


7.20 


16.28 


8.00 


14.84 


10.50 


15.26 


8.00 


33 97 


14.25 


16.07 


7.25 


18.08 


7.25 


68.04 


15.50 


48.55 


27.80 


17.49 


8.00 


18. .50 


12.00 


51 . 52 


24.00 


17.20 


7.75 


12.44 


7.50 


51.93 


30.50 


60.15 


33.50 


17.27 


8.00 


17.56 


9.75 


18.75 


10.50 


21.88 


8.00 


16.66 


9.50 


72.95 


35.50 


32.21 


24.00 


16.28 


9.50 


6.40 


7.00 


15.47 


7.50 


16.09 


8.75 


105.28 


81.00 


66.67 


37.50 


32.19 


17.25 


16.50 


7.50 


18.00 


6.5a 


13.11 


7.00 


18.80 


6.50 


17.82 


6.50 


12.65 


6.50 


17.09 


6.50 



$1,539.88 



$868.6» 



152 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



West Cedar, below Franklin 

Canal and Depot 

Elm and Hanover 

Elm and Amherst 

Depot and Canal. 

Hanover back, near F. X. Cheuette's 

Auburn and Franklin 

Elm, south of Bridge 

East High and South 

Pine, between Lake avenue and Central . . . 

Myrtle and Elm 

Amherst, near Lincoln 

Wilson, between Lake avenue and Central 

Elm and Hanover 

Central and Pine 

Lake avenue, between Pine and Union — 

Totals 



No. 



Cost of 
material. 



Cost of 
labor. 



$1.53 


$6.00 


1.22 


2.00 


2.65 


2.25 


3.. 56 


3.7S 


1.55 


3.00 


.1.55 


2.50 


. 14.00 


7.50 


.21 


3.. 50 


.92 


2.00 


1.85 


3.00 


6.32 


9.00 


8.43 


3.50 


9.06 


4.50 


2.16 


2.00 


.63 


1.50 


10.41 


3.75 


$66.05 


$59.78 



Cleaned out cesspools three times from December 28, 1893, 
to December 28, 1894, at a cost of $635.70. 



REPAIRED SEWERS. 



Location. 



Spruce back, Elm to Chestnut 

Elm back, between Merrimack and Dean Ave. 

Laurel, east of Beacon 

Chestnut and Pennacook 

Chestnut and Central 

Maple, near Lowell 

Back street between Lake avenue and Central 

Spruce back, east of Union 

Derry and Concord 

Malvern and Concord 

Manchester back, between Pine and Chestnut. 
Birch, near Bridge 



Totals 



Cost material. 



$4.66 



1.36 

.16 

6.66 



6.78 
15.68 
15.68 
16.94 
19.32 



$87.24 



Cost labor. 



$25 00 

33. .50 

3.50 

5.50 

11.00 

. 40.25 

30.75 

17..50 

6.50 

6.75 

10.25 

7.50 



199.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



153 



STONE. 

Paid Charles A. Bailey, for covering stone, etc 
Warren Harvey, for covering stone, etc. 
William H. Coburn, cobble stone . 
D. H. Dickey, for covering stone . 
F. S. Bodwell, for cesspool stone . 



Total 



i2, 401.00 

953-73 
686.00 

32-39 
167.25 

14,240.37 



SNOW AND ICE. 



At the beginning of the year an especial appropriation to 
cover the expenses incidental to the removal of snow and ice 
from the streets and walks, and sanding the sidewalks, was made, 
and ^4,000 was set aside for this purpose. The following will 
give an idea of the expenditures under this appropriation : 

Pay-roll, January draft .... $1,238.82 



February draft 
March draft , 
Bills for sand, etc. 

Total 

Appropriation for snow and ice 
Transferred from repairs of highways 

FENCING. ■ 



3'i34-95 
907.61 

53-64 



• ^5.335-o2 



54,000.00 
1^335-02 



;5335-o2 



400 feet 

80 " 

100 " 

600 " 



North River road ...... 

Green street ....... 

Union street north ..... 

Union street south ..... 

Total 1,180 feet 

Forty-nine orders have been given Charles H. Robie Co., and 
forty-one orders to J. T. Underbill Co., for concreting street 
crossings, sidewalks, roadways, and driveways, measurements of 
the same being taken by the city engineer. All bills have been 
certified by said measurements. 



154 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CONCRETE WORK. CHARLES H. ROBIE CO. 

STREET CROSSINGS. 



Location. 



Amory and Beanport 

Cartier east back and Amory 

Dubuque and south side Aniory. . 

Kelley an<l Beaupoi't 

Webster and Bay 

North and Bay east back 

Adams an<l Appleton (2) 

Union and WelSster . . 

Webster and Liberty east back. . 

Beech and Gore (2) 

Union and Sagamore 

Nashua and East High 

Wayne and Dubuque (3) 

Wayne and Dnbuque east back . . 
Wayne and Rimmon east back (2 

Wayne and Rimmon 

Chestnut and Pearl soutli back.. 

Union and Sagamore 

Union and Sagamore noi'tli back. 

Pine and Central south back 

Pine and Central 

Pine and Laurel (2) 

Dean avenue 

Blaine, Winter and Main 

Valley and Jewett (2) 

Arlington and Maple 

Myrtle and Russell 

Prospect and Russell 

Sagamore and Union 

Liberty east back and Salmon.. . . 

Blodget and Cliestnut 

Brook and Chestnut 

Hanover and Elm 

Sagamore, west of Union 

Totals 



Square 


Price 


yards. 


pr. yd. 


30.13 


$0.75 


18. S9 


.75 


29.78 


.75 


29 60 


.75 


.30.22 


.75 


13.33 


.75 


ns.ii 


.75 


30.22 


•"^^r 


17.77 


.if 


G1.77 


.75 


30.58 


.75 


11. U 


.75 


90.53 


.75 


17.78 


.75 


26.67 


.75 


30.13 


.75 


20.. W 


.75 


33 42 


.75 


17.78 


.75 


17.66 


.75 


31.11 


.75 


45.15 


.75 


28.37 


.75 


48.27 


.75 


49.15 


.75 


30.94 


.75 


28. SO 


.75 


55.38 


.75 


59.73 


.75 


13.33 


.75 


67.73 


.75 


27.38 


.75 


47.78 


.75 


30.67 


.35 


1,180.40 





Total 
cost. 



$22.60 
14.16 
22.34 
22.20 
22.67 
10.00 
44.06 
22.67 
13.33 
46.33 
22.93 
8 33 
67.90 
13.34 
20.00 
22 60 
15.37 
25.06 
13.34 
13.24 
23.33 
33.86 
21.27 
36.20 
36.86 
23.20 
21.60 
41.53 
44.80 
10.00 
50.80 
20.54 
35.84 
10.73 



$873.03 



SIDEWALKS. 



Location. 



Amherst and Pine east back 

Amherst and Pine east back, near Union 
South Main-street bridge 

Totals — .' 



Square 
yards. 



43.27 
253.00 
133.70 



429.97 



Price 
pr. yd, 



$0.30 
.30 
.45 



Total 
cost. 



$12.93 
75.90 
60.16 



$149.04 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
ROADWAYS. 



155 



Location. 


Amount 
material 


Price. 


Total 
cost. 


Cliestnut street, Concord common, recovered 


1,271.99 
sq. yds. 
22 J loads 

412 gals, 
pitch 


$0.45 

15.00 

.15 


$572.39 




337 50 


Union, Lowell to Concord, repaired ) 


61 SO 






Total 






$971.69 









CROSSINGS AND WALKS REPAIRED. 



Location. 



Chestnut and Orange . 
31errimack and Union 

Dean avenue 

Arlington and Maple.. 
Prospect and Russell. . 
Blodget and Chestnut. 

Totals 



Square 
yards. 



Price 
pr. yd, 



35.49 
20.72 
12.34 
24.47 
27.73 
15.06 



$135.81 



$0.37 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.37 
.45 



Total 
cost. 



$13.13 
9 32 
5.55 
11.01 
10.26 
6.77 



$56.04 



156 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CONCRETE WORK. — J. T. UNDERHILL & CO. 
STREET CROSSINGS. 



Location. 



Walnut and Webster 

Beech and Lowell (2) 

Linden and Pearl 

Belmont and Merrimack (2) 

Union and Appleton 

Elm and Webster 

West Appleton and Elm (3) 

Dubuque and Wayne 

Pearl and Linden (3) 

Lake avenue south back and Hall . 

Spruce and Hall 

Lake avenue and Pine 

Merrimack and Pine 

Concord and Belmont 

Elm and "\^'ebster 

Main and Aniory (4) 

Merrimack and Beech 

Monroe street, at Willand's 

Kimmon east back, at Kellej' 

Chestnut and Cedar 

Chestnut south back and Wilson (2) 

Union and Lowell 

Pearl and Ashland 

Linden and Myrtle 

Linden and Prospect (2) 

Linden and Arlington (4) 

Totals 



Square 
yards. 



30. 
66 
25. 
52^ 
29. 
19 

127 
30. 
79 
17 
30 
28 
31 
20 
45 

123 
19 
11 
15 
37 
53 
27 
29 
'-'9 
58 

107 



Price 
pr. yd, 



1,147.55 



$0.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 



Total 
cost. 



$22.67 
49.66 
19.33 
39.19 
22.13 
14.33 
95.33 
22.80 
59.94 
13.13 
22.66 
21.67 
23.55 
15.60 
33.82 
92.81 
14.46 
8.70 
11.83 
27.86 
40.46 
20.33 
22.33 
22.00 
43.66 
80.35 



$860.60 



SIDEWALKS. 



Location. 



Dubuque and Wayne 

Beauport at Thomas Bolton's 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



6.57 
34.67 



Price 
per yd, 



$0.45 
.45 



Total 
cost. 



$2.96 
15.00 

$18.58 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



157 



ROADWAYS. 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Price 
per yd. 


Total 
cost. 


Bridge st. at east end McGregor bi-idge, recovered 
Elm, at T. W. Lane's 


390.45 
15.32 


S0.37 
.75 


#144.47 
11.49 






Total 


405.77 




$155.96 





CROSSINGS AND WALKS REPAIRED. 



Location. 



Walnut and Webster 

Pearl and Warren 

Beech and Lowell (3) 

Linden and Pearl 

Belmont and Merrimack 

Union and Appleton 

McGregor and Bridge 

McGregor and Amorj'^ . . . 

Monroe at Bartlett's 

Linden and Myrtle 

Main and Amory 



Total 263 . 06 



Square 
yards. 



2.52 

7.87 
82.34 
13.78 

3.08 
10.30 
17.17 
20.85 
68.61 

4.56 
31.98 



Price 
per yd. 



Total 
Cost. 



$0.45 
.37 
.37 
.37 
.37 
.45 
.45 
.37 
.35 
.45 
.45 



$1.13 
2.91 

30.46 
5.10 
1.40 
4.63 
7.72 
7.71 

24.01 
2.05 

14.39 



$101.51 



SUMMARY. 

Concrete Laid hy Charles H. Rohie Co., Street and Parh Commission Department. 



New crossings 

Recovered crossings. 
Recovered roadways. 
New sidewalks 



Total. 



Square 
yards. 



1,149.73 
135.81 



429.97 



1,715.51 



Total cost. 



$873.03 
56.04 
971.69 
149.04 



$2,049.80 



Concrete Laid by .J. T. UnderJiill Co., Street and Parle Commission Department. 



New crossings 

Recovered crossings. 

Roadways 

New sidewalks 

Recovered sidewalks 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



1,857.62 



Total cost. 



1,147.55 


$860.60 


175.07 


69.87 


405.77 


155.96 


41.24 


18.56 


87.99 


31.64 



f 1,136. 63 



158 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

UNDERGROUND WIRES. 

The New England Telegraph and Telephone Company, having 
a branch office in Manchester, appeared before the board of 
mayor and aldermen July 3, and obtained a permit to lay and 
maintain underground conduits, cables, wires, and manholes under 
the surface of the streets of Manchester. On September 20 the 
company petitioned the street and park commissioners for a lay- 
out of streets in which they desired to place their conduits. The 
petition was granted, and the city engineer instructed to furnish 
said lay-out, the commission approving the same. A bond of 
^10,000 was required of the company, with American Surety 
Company, of New York, as surety, in order to indemnify and 
save the city of Manchester harmless from all loss, costs, damage, 
or expense in any way arising from or growing out of the work 
to be undertaken. Work was commenced at once, after the 
necessary legal documents were passed, and conduits put in along 
west side of Elm street^ ten feet north of the south line of Bridge 
street, ten feet away from the west curbstone of Elm street, to a 
point five feet northerly of the south curb line of Granite street 
produced into Elm street, and also on Hanover street, from Elm 
to Chestnut and the back streets adjoining. Other streets will 
be entered, as per the lay-out granted, as business demands. 

SALEM STONE. 

Many inquiries having been made about the Salem stone .used 
extensively this last season, we give a few items concerning the 
nature of the stone, and method of obtaining it for macadamiz- 
ing purposes. It is a bluish trap rock, having a fine, close for- 
mation which gives an excellent wearing quality under the fric- 
tion of travel; while having no "rift" or grain, its irregular 
form of fracture renders it most desirable for packing into a com- 
pact mass. The Salem stone was not used to any great extent 
until i8go, being first utilized by the city of Salem, with excel- 
lent results as to wear on their streets. The stone is taken 
from Castle Hill quarry, Salem, Mass. About 12,000 tons a 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 159 

month are turned out of the quarry during the summer months. 
The stone is broken into four sizes ; No. i size passed a yi inch 
circular hole in the screen, and is used for binding the surfaces 
of roads and sidewalks ; No. 2 size passed a i-inch hole, No. 3 a 
2-inch hole, and No. 4 a 4-inch hole. The second size is used 
for patching roads and filling holes or ruts. The dust or tailings 
are valuable for binding, or for finish, having remarkable cement- 
ing qualities. This stone weighs after screening about 1]^ tons 
to the cubic yard, that is, 27 cubic feet will weigh 2,500 pounds. 
This gives 4 square yards of street surface, 3 inches thick, to 2,500 
pounds. Or, the amount of street surface i ton of each size will 
cover is as follows: No. 3, or 2-inch stone, measures 2 if cubic 
feet to each ton, and will cover to the depth of i inch yyyf square 
feet. The No. 2, or i-inch size, measures 22)^ cubic feet, and 
will cover to a depth of i inch 810 square feet; while the No. i, 
or dust, measures 20 10-13 cubic feet per ton, and will cover 748 
square feet of road surface to the depth of i inch. About 20 per 
cent should be allowed for rolling. The commissioners have 
used large quantities of this stone on some of the streets where 
there is heavy travel, with satisfactory results, notably Hanover 
street from Chestnut to Union, Pine from Beech to Maple, Mer- 
rimack to Hanover; Merrimack, Union to Beech; Granite, 
Franklin to Elm ; and Chestnut, Brook to Blodget ; Stark park 
driveways were also top-dressed with Salem stone; 1,288 tons 
were used on the streets and Stark park at a cost of $1,803.20. 



Sewers. 



No subject is of greater importance to a large and growing 
city with extensive manufacturing and commercial interests than 
that of sewerage. In our city the demand for drainage is imper- 
ative, and during the last few years much has been done to relieve 
this demand. The last year a large amount of work has been 
accomplished, though many ledges have been found that have 
increased the expense and retarded progress-. Many sewers need 
relaying where cement pipe has been used in past years. Some 



160 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

sewers need deepening, and some larger pipe. Then there is the 
constant, ever-increasing demand for new sewers, as new streets 
are built, and houses or blocks erected. 

To many the process of the construction of a sewer is but partly- 
understood, and as all are interested in the health of the city, 
and the means used to provide for effective sanitary conditions, 
we give a detailed account of the building of one of the sewers 
that was blasted nearly all the way through a ledge of rock. We 
refer to the sewer running from manhole, corner Russell and 
Prospect streets, to corner of Prospect and Hall streets, about 
1,250 feet. Upon petition of property-holders at said location, 
the mayor and joint standing committee on sewers recommended 
the passage of an order to build this sewer, said order being 
passed by the city councils, December 6, 1892, expense of same 
to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. After the 
passage of this order no active measures were taken until May 
5, 1894, when the city engineer laid out the center of sewer 
and grade, and drove stakes for the batters, which were about 
50 feet apart, and marked to excavate about 14 feet on an av- 
erage, allowing for a gradual pitch towards the Russell-street 
sewer. Forty-five men were at once set to work along tlie south 
side of Prospect street, commencing at Russell, under, the di- 
rection of the commissioners, with George M. Hobbs as fore- 
man. 

It was soon found that a ledge extended along the route, 
and the steam drill and portable engine and boiler were called 
into use. 

The steam drill is a wonderful contrivance and does its work 
rapidly by means of steam generated by the boiler, and conveyed 
to the drill by flexible steel tubes. Holes to the depth of one to 
seven feet are drilled in the ledge and filled \<fith a dynamite 
cartridge to which a connecting wire with platinum fuse is at- 
tached, and then fired by an electric battery by the following 
method : The dynamite cartridges, composed of nitro-glycer- 
ine, sawdust, etc., covered with oiled paper, are opened on one 
side by the foreman, with a knife, and the cap inserted, then a 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 161 

half hitch of connecting wire is made about the cartridge, leav- 
ing two ends up to connect with the battery wires. The car- 
tridges are then lowered into the holes and carefully covered with 
earth well tamped down, and then with heavy sleepers or large 
beams of wood, on top of which is placed brush, then large and 
heavy rope mats come next, weighing five or six hundred pounds 
each ; finally, more railroad sleepers are piled on, connection is 
made with the battery wire, and the battery wire connected with 
the battery. When all is ready and the men at a safe distance, 
the foreman gives the word to fire, and a handle in the battery is 
pulled up and immediately pushed down, thus producing a cur- 
rent of electricity which heats the platinum fuse red hot and ex- 
plodes the cap in the dynamite. About five holes are drilled for 
a blast. There were about five blasts a day while constructing 
this sewer. 

To give a correct idea of the stock of tools necessary to build 
a sewer the following list, actually taken at the time, will shovv 
the labor involved . 1 2 pair rubber boots, 2 saws, 49 shovels, all 
kinds, 6 striking hammers, 44 picks, 8 iron bars, 3 handled axes, 
2 sets of hand drills, 36 plug drills, 5 plug drill hammers, 3 chains, 
used for pulling up large stone from the ditch, 6 stone hammers 
for breaking stone,. 2 sets of falls for laying pipe, 6 grub hoes, 3 
water pails, ineck yoke, 4 tug ropes for lowering pipe, 7 wedges, 
2 Edison pumps, i steam drill, battery, coils of wire, dynamite 
cartridges, i plumb bob, pipe of various sizes, hand dippers, suc- 
tion hose, and tool boxes, iron pipe and pipe for steam drill, 
portable engine and boiler, 14 lanterns. All this stock is in 
charge of one man, who serves out the tools, etc., and collects 
them at night and locks them up. The portable boiler requires 
one man permanently, and at night a watchman cares for the 
same. 

The explosives used for the sewer cost ^230.44, the incidentals, 
supplies, repairs, etc., amounted to ^445.30; the labor of men 
and teams, ^3,834.31. The watchman was on duty 23 nights, 
and the engineer 30 days. One and one half gallons of kero- 
sene oil were used every week to keep the red lanterns burning 
11 



162 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

all night. Steam drill was run 26}^ days. Two Edison pumps 
were kept running most of the time to pump out water through 
suction hose from the sewer in order to lay pipe. The matter of 
laying the pipe is interesting. Each length of pipe (24-inch in 
this case) is rolled to the edge of the ditch, the tag rope attached 
and the pipe swung over the trench by means of the falls and 
carefully lowered to the bottom, where it is connected to the pre- 
ceding piece, gently tamped until true to grade, then earth is 
placed around the bottom and joints cemented. A grade pole 
is constantly used to test the accuracy of the grade or depth ; 
the correct centers are obtained by the plumb bob. Norton ce- 
ment is used and the sand is screened on the spot and mixed with 
the cement. To show the amount of this large pipe laid each 
day we give the following, a correct record kept at the time. May 
15 commenced to lay 24-inch pipe ; laid 12-foot length iron pipe 
across culvert, and 22 feet of Akron pipe. May 16, laid 50 feet ; 
May 17, laid 44 feet ; May 22, 44 feet ; May 23, 26 feet ; May 
24, 46 feet ; May 25, 68 feet. This gives 312 feet laid in 7 days, 
or an average of about 44 feet in a day. When it is taken into 
account that an average of five blasts was made each day, this 
average seems to be good. 

This sewer was commenced May 5 and completed August i. 
Daily visits were made by the commission, and the city engineer 
and his assistants gave their careful attention to the progress of 
the work. A manhole at the junction of Linden and Prospect 
streets was put in at a depth of 17 feet. Connections were made 
with this sewer, and great satisfaction was felt at the successful 
completion of this long desired work. This sewer is only a sam- 
ple of other sewers put in, notably at North River road, Hall 
street, and Hancock street, all of which were blasted through 
ledges; 29 sewers were voted in but not built at the beginning 
of the year, and 7 asked for but not voted, or a to^al of 43,265 
feet or 8.18 miles, at an estimated cost of ^198,230. 

The following table shows how th^ cost for new sewers has 
been divided : 



STREET AND PAKK COMMISSION. 



163 



k ''1 



MSB 



(i< O 



•?5'3 



as t-"^o ci i^ -^co :o 

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164 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



o c 
02 



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STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



165 



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166 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Length of sewers, West side 
Length of sewers, East side 



Length of brick sewers . 
Length of steel pipe sewers 
Length of iron pipe 
Length of Akron pipe 
Length of Portland pipe 



Cost of sewers. West side 
Cost of sewers, East side 

Total .... 

Average cost per foot, West side 
Average cost per foot, East side 

Average total cost per foot 



6,172 


feet 


i3>44o 


a 


19,612 


feet 


1,850 


feet 


88 


it 


36 


i( 


15.817 


< i 


1,821 


li 


19,612 


feet 


$14,096.71 


32,01 


3-30 


$46,iU 


3.01 


$2 


283 


2 


382 



52.351 



BRIDGES. 



The following table gives the dimensions, material, and num- 
ber of spans of the various bridges within the city limits. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



167 



Location. 



Amoskeag 

Bridge street, at canal 

Bridge St., McGregor and approaches 

Cohas avenue, at Great Cohas 

Derry road, at Great Cohas 

Derry road, near Cohas avenue 

Derry road, near town line 

Dunbarton road. Black brook 

Elm street, at railroad 

Front street, Black brook 

Granite street, at canal 

Granite street, at river . . 

Harvey road, at Great Cohas 

Island Pond road, outlet to lake 

Mammoth road, at Great Cohas 

Mammoth road, near town line 

Mill road, at Harvey's mill 

Parker street, at railroad 

River road, at Goffe's Falls 

River road, at Little Cohas 

River road, below James Cheney's. .. 

South road 

Webster road, at water-works dam.. . 

Weston road, east of D. Connor's 

Second-street bridge 

Second-street bridge 

South Main street 



Length 

in 
feet, 



765.5 

57 
1,085 

36 

38 

20 

21 

25 

89 

16.5 

56.3 
465.7 

32 

41 

38 

14 

59 

53 

30 

16 
6 

12 

100 

6 

62 
127 
180 



Width 

of 

roadway 



20 

22.5 

24 

30.5 

20 

17 

20.5 

17.5 

29.5 

33 

37.3 

26 

21 

16.7 

18 

20 

20.5 

24 

30 

20 

16 

22 

17.5 

16 

32.5 

32.5 

34 



No. of 
walks. 



Width I Arch- 

of Material, es or 

walks, i spans. 



5.5 

7 



Wood. 
Iron. 



Stone. 
Wood. 



Iron. 
Wood. 



Iron. 
Wood. 



Steel. 



Stone bridges, 2 ; iron, 4; wood, 19; steel, 2; total, 27. 



168 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

West Manchester. 

GENERAL REPAIRS, DIVISIONS lO AND II. 

Graveled A to McDuffie street, 290 feet in length. 

Graveled Cleveland street, 50 feet in length. 
" Parker " 75 " 

" Second " 700 " 

Patched North Main street with 30 loads gravel from South 
Main street sewer. 

Patched Parker street with 20 loads gravel from South Main 
street sewer. 

Patched Sullivan street with 10 loads gravel from South Main 
street sewer. 

Patched Granite street with 25 loads gravel from South Main 
street sewer. 

Patched Front street with 25 loads gravel from South Main 
street sewer. 

Patched South Main street with 20 loads gravel from South 
Main street sewer. 

Patched North Main street with 10 loads crushed stone. 

North Main street filled to a depth of one foot 35c feet in 
length. 

Graded Third street 200 feet in length at a cost of ^20. 

Dunbarton road filled and graveled 500 feet in length ; labor, 
^160.54. 

Filled sidewalk in Amoskeag 800 feet in length. 
" " Front street, 300 " " 

" " Farmer road, too " " 

Jones hill repaired with 35 loads gravel ; 700 feet sidewalk 
built ; labor, ^66.50. 

Bushes cut on Railroad street, Hooksett road, Farmer road, 
Hackett hill road, Dunbarton road. 

Crossings scraped, gutters cleaned out, stones picked up, streets 
patched, etc., through both divisions ; labor, ^646.24, charged 
to the appropriation for the repairs of highways. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



169 



FENCING. 

Douglas, Cleveland, Parker, and Second streets, gravel bank 
near Emerson's, Dunbarton road, corner Milford and Bowman, 
corner Granite and Turner, head of Sullivan, Bedford road. Mast 
road, and Hooksett road. Division ii. 

Total number of feet, 1,814; labor, etc., $56.33. 

STREETS TOPDRESSED. 



Streets. 



Amory 

South Main, Log to Hancock 
South Main, Log to Hancock 

Blaine 

Winter . 

Amoi'y 

Riddle, sidewalks 

Riddle 

Milford 

Milford 

School 

Bartlett 

Granite 

Totals 



Length 

in 

feet. 



320 
300 
300 
300 
75 
320 

1,100 
S.W 
850 
850 

1,900 
200 
250 



7,115 



Width 

in 

feet. 



26 
26 
10 
34 
12 
10 
27 
25 
26 
26 
26 
10 
24 



Material 
used. 



Clay. 

Ashes. 

Gravel. 

Ashes. 

Clay. 

Ashes. 

Gravel. 

Clay. 

Ashes. 

Gravel. 

Stone. 

Gravel. 

Clay. 



Total cost of foregoing work, $647. 



170 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
GRADING FOR CONCRETE, DIVISION 10. 



Location. 



Bath, east of Second 

Beauport, north of Amory. .. 
Beaupoi't, nortli of Amory. .. 

Amorj', west of Cartier 

Kelley, west of Beauport — 

B, west of A 

Cartier, north of Putnam 

Beauport, north of Schuyler. 
Beaupoi't, north of Schuyler. 

B, south of ftlilf ord 

C 

Conant 

Cartier 

Douglas 

Third, Walker south 

Third, Walker south 

Adams 

Rimmon 

Wayne 

Dubuque 

Riddle 

Riddle 

Mast I'oad 

North Main 

Blaine .-- 

Parker 

Riddle 

Riddle 

North Main 

Beauport 

School 

Main-street extension 

Rimmon 

Wilton 

Cartier 

Dartmouth 

Dartmouth 

Rimmon 

Blaine 



Length | Width 



feet. 



Totals. 



100 
375 
375 
600 
250 
250 
250 
250 
250 
300 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
275 
200 
420 
100 
150 
150 
290 

60 
450 
120 
300 

88 
400 
110 
100 
650 
200 

50 
600 
400 
400 
]50 

50 



9,413 



feet. 



Feet 
cut. 



3 
1 

1 
3 



Feet 

mi. 



IVz 



1 
5-6 
5-6 



1 

% 



Labor. 



$8.00 

30.00 

25.00 
13.00 
10.00 
10.00 

15.00 

10.00 
5.00 

15.00 
9.00 
8.00 

17.00 

15.00 

35.00 

,20.00 

15.00 

10.00 

30.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 
10.00 

5.00 
20.00 
10.00 

5.00 
20.00 

20.00 
15.00 



$445.00 



BRIDGES AND CULVERTS. 

Bridges Repaired. — Parker-street bridge replanked ; cost of 
material $5, labor ^9.50. Black brook bridge repaired. 

New Culverts. — Mast road, one wooden culvert at a cost of 
$4. Bedford road, one wooden culvert at a cost of ^4. Front 
street, Amoskeag, one wooden culvert 34 feet long at a cost for 
material of ^5 ; labor, $5. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



171 



Culverts Relaid. — Bartlett street, one pipe culvert 50 feet in 
length, using 15-inch pipe; cost of pipe, $14.07; labor, ;^i3. 
Mast road, one wooden culvert relaid at a cost of $4. Division 
II, one pipe culvert 9 feet long, using 20-inch pipe; old pipe 
and labor, $5. At Jones hill, Amoskeag, one wooden culvert 
at a cost of $6. Pipe culvert, Goffstown road, 30 feet of old 
lo-inch pipe, at a cost of $5.90. Pipe culvert on Railroad 
street, 20 feet old lo-inch water pipe, at a cost of $5. 

COBBLE GUTTER PAVING, DIVISION 10. 



Streets. 



Beauport and Amoiy 

Marion 

B, southerly 

An: cry 

Kelley 

Standpipe on Amory street. . 

Green 

Walker, northerly 

B, northerly 

Second, northerly 

Winter, driveway 

Granite, driveway 

Wayne 

Cartier 

Dubuque 

Riddle 

Milford, driveway 

South Main, driveway 

Bowman, driveways (2) 

North Main, south of Amory. 

A and B 

Winter and Main 

Dover, driveway 



Totals 



Length 

in 

feet. 



660 

88 

425 

1,000 

225 

8 

120 

550 

425 

125 

12 

13 

566 

53 

300 

800 

20 

10 

16 

220 

20 

84 

12 



5,751 



Cost of 
stone. 



$57.04 
10.26 
15.86 
94. 50 
24.70 
5.00 
S.OO 
40.00 
39.00 
25.00 
S.40 
2.22 
43.50 



10.50 



1^380.98 



Labor. 



$50.00 

9.00 
15.00 
77.04 
21.22 

6.55 

16.00 

100.00 

54.00 

25.00 

7.00 

2.00 

100.00 

10.00 

75.00 

125.00 

10 00 

5.00 
10.00 
39.63 

5.00 
15.00 

7.00 



$784.44 



In all cases where there is no cost of stone given, stone was taken 
from city bank. 

Total cost of foregoing work, $1,168.42; average cost per 
foot, $0,203. 



172 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PAVING RELAID. 








Beauport, south of Putnam 


25 fee 


Clinton ...... 




8 " 


Dover .... 










8 " 


B street .... 










100 " 


South Main 










25 " 


Forrest .... 










20 " 


Main, driveway 










10 " 


North Main 










185 " 


North Main, at J. D. Dana's . 










10 " 


Amory, driveway 










20 " 


Amory ..... 










30 " 


Wayne, two driveways 










40 " 


School, driveway 










20 " 


Amory, driveway 










15 " 


Kelley back 










16 '' 



532 feet 
Labor, ^110.38. 

South Main-street bridge, 227 yards block paving, 759 yards 
cobble paving. Labor for same, ^200. 



REPAIRS OF SEWERS, DIVISION ID. 

South end Cartier street, flushed out sewer. 

North Main street, flushed out sewer. 

Baldwin's yard, flushed out sewer. 

End McGregor bridge, flushed out sewer. 

North Main street, flushed out sewer. 

A. C. Wallace's yard, flushed out sewer. 

West street, flushed out sewer. 

Douglas street, flushed out sewer. 

Turner street, flushed out sewer. 

South of Granite street, flushed out sewer. 

A and B streets, flushed out sewer. 

North end of Cartier street, flushed out sewer. 

Beauport street, flushed out sewer. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



173 



Conant and Rimmon streets, lowered manhole. 

Conant, between Barr and Montgomery streets, lowered three 
man-holes. 

Rimmon street, raised manhole. 

Dubuque street, raised two manholes. 

Division lo, July, August, September, October, cleaned out 
cesspools. 

Cost of material for foregoing work, ^17.67; cost of labor, 
$230.68; total cost, $248.35. 

STREETS GRADED. 



* These streets not built up to grade. 
t Labor charged to scavenger service. 

Average width of street, 50 feet. 



Location. 


Length 
in feet. 


Cut or 
fill. 


Inciden- 
tals. 


Labor. 


cEntire 
cost. 


Joliette, north of Amory 

Dubuque, nortli of Wayne — 

Cartier, north of Kelley* 

Alsace, north of Amory 

Wayne, Dubuque to Rimmon. 
Rimmon. nortli of Conant — 
Conant, Barr to Rimmon 


540 
575 
325 
540 
320 
330 
250 
325 
325 
350 
350 
675 
140 
140 
50 
550 
150 


Cut... 

Cut... 

Fill.. 

Cut... 

Cut.. 

Fill... 

Cut... 

Cut... 

Cut... 

Fill... 

Cut... 

Cut... 

Cut... 

Cut... 

Cut... 

Fill... 

Fill... 


$11.83 

11.53 
6.53 

11.83 
4.41 
6.62 
5.01 
6.53 
4.53 
5.01 
7.03 

13.54 
3.80 
3.80 
1.00 

13.08 


$334.75 
793.00 
75.00 
680.52 
165 60 
100.00 


$346.58 
804.53 
81.53 
692.35 
170.01 
106.62 


Conant, Barr to Cartier 

Bai-r, Douglas to Conant 

Gates, Dubuque west* 


125.00 
71.00 
50.00 

346.48 

3.50.00 
30.00 
33.00 
15.00 

227.00 


136.. 53 
75.53 
55.01 

353.. 50 

363.54 
33.80 
35.80 
16 00 

239.08 


Dubuque, north of Amory — 
Dubuque, nortli of Amory b'k 

Kelley north 

Rimmon, south Kelley 

Dubuque, Conant northerly.. 
Colby street dump f 













Totals 


5,635 




$113.05 


$3,396.35 


$13,509.40 





MACADAMIZING, DIVISION ID. 



Square, corner Amory and Main, 2,007 square yards. 

Labor crushing stone ...... 

Salem stone ........ 

Concrete ....... 



$388.80 
295-58 



174 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Labor on street 
Cost of stone chips 
Incidentals 

Total . 



^853-55 

168.75 

16.00 

$1,803.98 



KEW CESSPOOLS, DIVISION 10. 



Location. 



Amory and Beauport 

Kelley and Beauport 

Clinton and Dover 

Wayne and Dubuque 

Second street 

Blaine street 

Marion and Main 

Mear North Weare Railroad track 

Winter and Main 

Schiller and Hill 

Ends of South Main street bridge 

Totals 



No. 



Cost of 
material. 



$20.51 
20.53 
25.80 
19.92 
13.21 
16.03 
15.47 
10.20 
14.81 
10.97 
69.47 



$236.92 



Cost of 
labor. 



$13.00 
14.00 
17.00 
18 50 
18.00 
15.00 
18.00 
20.00 
18.00 
18.00 

125.00 



$294.50 



REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



Amory and Beauport. 
Kelley and Cartier — 

B street, west of A 

Granite and Barr 

South end Turner 

South of Blue Store . . . 

B and A 

Putnam and Dubuque 

Winter 

South Main street 

Main and Wayne 

Barr and Douglas 

Wayne and Marion 

Granite and West 

South Main 

Mast road 

Totals 



No. 



Cost of 
material. 



$1.85 
1.85 
1.85 
7.11 
2.92 



1.24 

6.71 

.21 

3.04 
2.98 
1.24 
2.98 
2.44 
2.06 
.21 



$38.69 



Cost of 
labor. 



$2.00 
2.00 
4.00 

10.00 
5.00 
3.00 
2.00 

25.00 
3.50 



2 00 
2.00 
2.00 
5.00 
1.00 
2.00 



$70.50 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. ■ 175 

REPORTS FROM HIGHWAY DIVISIONS. 

Division No. 1 . 

John C. Ray, Agent. 

The entire length of the River road, commencing at Clark 
street and running to the Hooksett line, has been repaired by 
the road machine ; several culverts have been built, and stones 
removed. 

North Union street, from Clark street to Hooksett line, and 
Elm street, from Clark to north line of Elm street, have been 
turnpiked and topdressed with gravel the entire length, more 
than loo rods. Average width of topdressing, 25 feet. 

Sidewalk on Elm street, near Clark street, built. The roads 
have been broken out after snowstorms, and general repairs 
throughout the district attended to. 



Division No. 4. 

Byron E. Moore, Agent. 

Clayed and graveled on River road, north of Gofife's Falls 
village, about 100 rods, and south of the village about 10 rods. 
Turnpiked and graveled what is known as Webster's Hill, at the 
north end of the district. Average width of turnpiking, 14 feet. 

Built 1,980 feet of fencing on the River road east of Clough's 
farm, and widened said road about 10 feet for a length of about 2,- 
000 feet ; cost of widening road and putting up railing, ^i 70. The 
timber having been cut off along the road, it became necessary 
to put a fence up, and this highway being the principal carriage 
route to Nashua, widening has greatly improved the road for 
travel. 

Lengthened culvert opposite the Clough place, 10 feet. The 
road was widened 6 feet and about 200 feet of fencing put up. 

Bridge over Cohas brook taken up and relaid, using same tim- 
ber and plank. Bushes have been cut throughout the district, 



176 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



stones removed from the surface of the roads, large stone dug 
out, water bars repaired, mud holes filled, and general repairs 
looked after from May to November. All roads broken out after 
snowstorms. 



Division No. 5. 

Mark E. Harvey,' Agent. 



ROADS GRAVELED. 









Feet in length. 


Londonderry, 


new road 




• 1.535 


Londonderry, 


old road 




• 1,175 


Nutt road 






. 1,450 


Weston road 






• • • 835 


South road . 






650 


Center road 






370 


Total 


. 6,015 


Average width, 15 feet. 


Aven-age depth. 


6 inches. 






TURNPIKED. 


Feet. 


Londonderry, 


new road 




200 


Londonderry, 


old road 


. 


225 


South road . 




'. 


265 


Weston road 




. 


300 


Center road 


• 


■. 


490 


Total 


. 1,480 



Average width of turnpiking, 25^feet. 

New railing built, Weston road, 75 feet ; Mill road, 125 feet. 
Graded by cut on Londonderry new road, 44 cubic yards, and 
on Dickey road 195 cubic yards. The hill near William C. Blodg- 
ett's has been cut i^ feet, or 168 cubic yards, which has been 
used as a fill at the foot of the hill, making the grade much easier ; 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



177 



the road at this place has been widened 3 feet, for a distance of 
225 feet. 

Five large stones have been blasted and twelve boulders have 
been removed from Londonderry new road. Bushes have been 
cut along the principal roads (6,335 ^^^0 ; no repairs on bridges 
have been made. Loose stones have been removed twice a month 
from all the roads from April to November, water bars repaired, 
etc. 

Snow has been removed and the roads broken out after all 
storms. 



Division No. 6. 

I. T. Webster, Agent. 

The principal roads in this division are much traveled on ac- 
count of the beautiful drives about Massabesic lake, and con- 
sequently great care is needed to keep them in suitable condi- 
tion. The Lake Shore road, the Island Pond road, and Cohas 
avenue have all been topdressed, low places filled, and culverts 
rebuilt. 





graveled. 


Feet. 


Lake Shore road . 




462 


Dickey road 




. 1,188 


Island Pond road 




• 5.032 


Cohas avenue 




• 3.135 


Total 


• 9,817 



Island Pond road : Corey hill cut, 420 feet long, ;^;^ feet wide, 
2 feet deep. Fencing, 112 feet; stonework, wing or retaining 
walls to hold fills, 12 perch. This road is very ledgy and is dif- 
ficult to keep in good condition. The bridge near the Mill Dam 
House will soon need to be replanked and the fencing near the 
bridge should be repaired another season. The cut on Corey 



178 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



hill was mostly through stone, and the material taken out was 
used to widen the road. 

Cohas avenue roadbed was underlaid with stone 136 feet, 10 
feet wide, railing 264 feet in length. Retaining walls to hold 
fills, 38 perch. A good clay bed on this avenue has been util- 
ized for topdressing. Three culverts have been built on this av- 
enue and two driveways put in. 

Bushes have been cut all over the district, both sides of the 
road, about six miles. General repairs have been attended to, 
and the roads have been plowed out during the winter. 



Division No. 7. 

Charles Francis, Agent. 

This district is rapidly becoming thickly settled, and the call 
for new streets and sewers has become pressing. During the last 
year a number of new highways have been built, and three sewers 
have been put in ; edge stones set, culverts and cesspools built, 
and the road machine used on the outside roads. The following 
will give the wor-k in detail : 

NEW STREETS GRADED. 



Location. 

Hayward, Cypress to Belmont * 
Hayward, Porter to Mammoth road 
Dearborn street 

Auburn street .... 
Taylor, Cilley road to Vinton f 
Somerville, Jewett to Young f . 
Lake avenue, at Old Falls road . 



Totals . 
* Including two culverts. 



Length in, feet. 

1,250 
500 
575 



525 



4,050 



Labor. 

$55o-oo 
250.00 
200.00 
45.00 
61.00 
20.00 
85.00 

;i,2i 1. 00 



t Turnpiked. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



179 



STREETS GRAVELED. 

Massabesic, Candia road to railroad 
Spruce, Wilson to Massabesic 
Hall, Spruce to Massabesic . 
Auburn, Belmont west . 
Taylor, Young road south 

Total 
Average, 28 feet in width. 



Feet. 

2,300 

625 

150 
160 
500 



3J35 



CULVERTS. 



Hay ward street, near Taylor, 100 feet x 2 feet x 2 feet. 
Hay ward street between Taylor and Cypress, 50 feet x i foot 
X 6 inches. 



GUTTERS PAVED. 



Auburn street, 300 feet x 3 feet. 
Cypress street, 50 feet by 3 feet. 

Stone for East Spruce street, 40 loads. 
Stone for Hall street, 10 loads. 



CESSPOOL. 

Corner Massabesic and Spruce, materials, $11.11 ; labor, $1^; 
total cost, ^24.11. 

SEWERS. 

Cypress street, 130 feet lo-inch pipe, 22 feet 8-inch pipe. 
Cost of material, ^22.44 ; cost of labor, ^59. 

Dearborn street, 116 feet lo-inch pipe. Cost of material, 
$18.16 ; cost of labor, $63. 

Grove street, 49 feet lo-inch pipe, 10 feet 8-inch pipe. Cost 
of material, $8.19 ; cost of labor, $30. 

(See Sewer table.) 



180 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

CURB AND EDGE STONE SET. 

Jewett and Valley streets, one 4-foot curb, 1 6 feet edge stone. 
Belmont and Hayward streets, one 3-foot curb, 12 feet edge 
stone. 

Cypress and Valley streets, one 4- foot curb, 16 feet edge stone. 
Massabesic and Spruce streets, 72 feet edge stone. 

GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 

Jewett street, 200 feet, cut and fill; labor, ^20. 
Prescott and Wilson, 350 feet, cut and fill ; labor, ^40. 
Wilson street, 625 feet, cut and fill; labor, $6;^. 

ROAD MACHINE USED. 

On Candia road, division line to Mammoth road. 

On Mammoth road, Candia road to Hanover street. 

On Hall, Massabesic to Hanover street. 

On Mammoth road, from the reservoir to the division line. 

On Jewett street, from Young to Cilley road. 

Over 5,500 feet of sidewalks have been built ; Auburn, East 
Spruce, and Belmont streets have been greatly improved by grad- 
ing. This division is fortunate in having a good gravel bank of 
about an acre. The lot has been leased by the city for twenty 
years. During the summer eighteen teams have been employed 
hauling gravel to different sections. 

There is need of a sprinkler for this part of the city, as the 
streets are very sandy ; there is also a call for more watering- 
troughs. There should be gates at the junction of Massabesic 
street and the Portsmouth Railroad. 

The general work in the district has been covered, bushes cut, 
and stone removed from the roads leading to the city. The 
highways have been made suitable for travel after snowstorms. 



Division No. 8. 

John H. Proctor, Agent. 
There has always been a call for good roads, carefully kept, in 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



181 



this district, for through it runs the direct route to Lake Massa- 
besic, Auburn, Candia, Raymond, and other towns, and conse- 
quently the travel is heavy, especially during the summer. For 
the better accommodation of the public, these highways have 
been widened, topdressed, and kept in repair during the last sea- 
son, in detail as follows : 



ROADS TURNPIKED. 



Hanover street 
Candia road 
Proctor road 
Old turnpike road 
Lake Shore road . 
Lake avenue 

Total 



9,900 


feet 


7.590 


( I 


1,650 


(( 


825 


I ( 


4,950 


a 


825 


a 



25,740 feet 



ROADS WIDENED. 



Hanover, between Mammoth road and junction of Lake ave- 
nue, 150 feet in length, width 12 feet, cut 4 feet. 

The same, at same place, length 500 feet, width 10 feet, cut 
2^ feet. 

Candia road, length 600 feet, width 11 feet^ cut 2 feet. 

Lake Shore road, length 700 feet, width 9 feet, cut i}^ feet. 

Bridge street, length 200 feet, width 1 2 feet, cut i foot. 



ROADS GRAVELED. 



Hanover street 
Lake avenue 
Candia road 
Lake Shore . 
Bridge street 
Proctor road 



500 feet 
200 " 
400 " 
300 " 
200 " 
100 '' 



Total 1,700 feet 

Average width of graveling, 24 feet ; average depth, 6 inches. 



182 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Widened out three culverts on Hanover street, each 12 feet; 
two culverts on Bridge street, 8 feet each ; one culvert on Can- 
dia road, 12 feet ; two culverts on Lake shore road, 8 feet each; 
two culverts on Candia road were relaid ; 200 feet of railing was 
put up on Hanover street, between Mammoth road and Lake 
avenue; sidewalk filled 150 feet in front of Robert Stevens's 
place, 7 feet wide and 1% feet deep; ten large stones were 
blasted out on Lake Shore road and Bridge street ; bushes cut 
throughout the district for a distance of eight miles ; all roads 
broken out after snowstorms, and all necessary repairs made. 



Division No. 9. 

Lester C. Paige, Agent. 

Number of feet of road turnpiked, 825. . 

Number of feet of road graveled, 5,247. 

Loads of gravel used, 401. 

Took up, cleaned, and relaid one culvert; put up 174 feet of 
railing, and cut bushes throughout the entire district. During 
the winter months the roads were broken out. Repaired water- 
bars, removed stone from the roads, and attended to all general 
repairs. 



Division No. 12. 

Eugene G. Libbey, Agent. 

The road machine has been used to great advantage through- 
out the division ; 200 loads of gravel have been drawn to the 
different hills, and all washouts and water-bars repaired; 1,000 
feet of substantial railing has been put up near embankments ; 
Mammoth road has been widened between John Gott's and J. L. 
Fogg's residences, and culverts built over. 

A culvert 80 feet long has been built over Old Bridge street 
near the Mammoth road ; the bushes have been cut throughout 



STREET AND PAKE COMMISSION. 183 

the district where they interfered with travel ; the roads have 
been broken out during the winter, and all general repairs made. 

SCAVENGER SERVICE. 

This department of work has been faithfully done. From Jan- 
uary I, 1894, to January i, 1895, 1,800 loads of perishable gar- 
bage were collected and carried to the city farm and utilized for 
fertilizing purposes. Three single teams have been employed all 
the time collecting. Very few complaints have been made. In 
most cases it has been found that the complaints arise from the 
practice of permitting farmers to take the garbage away, and 
when, for any reason, this service ceased, the garbage would ac- 
cumulate and complaint would be made. Suitable cards have 
been provided whereby all can ascertain the time of removal of 
perishable matter, so there can be no excuse for want of infor- 
mation. All complaints have been attended to promptly. 



Commons. 



All the commons have received their usual care during the last 
season, under the direction of the commissioners and superin- 
tendence of Mr. John FuUerton. 

Early in the year the commons were drained and the walks 
cleaned of sand as soon as skating was finished, and then all the 
grass surface was raked over, the trees trimmed, forty-two elms 
set out on Park common, the covers removed from the fountains 
and the same examined for repairs, cleaned, and painted. A 
dressing of ashes was next put on. All flower beds were pre- 
pared for flowers, suitable fences erected for their protection, the 
walks kept carefully swept, the seats repaired, painted, and set 
upon the commons. All this labor conspired to make these 
public squares what they have been rightly termed by our appre- 
ciative citizens, bits of country in the heart of the city. 

Manchester is waking up to the necessity and the beauty of 
these breathing places, and many good suggestions have been 



184 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

made for their improvement. To keep these commons neat and 
attractive in appearance has been the aim of the commissioners, 
and to introduce improvements as far as possible with the means 
at hand. 

Much faithful work has been done. Twice a week the walks 
have been swept on each common ; all paper and refuse picked 
up each morning. All seats have been examined and repaired 
when necessary. Every other day the beds of flowers and dry 
places on the lawns have been wet down during the dry season. 
The grass on all the squares has been cut eight times. In Octo- 
ber the leaves were raked up. 

In November the fountains were covered for winter and seats 
taken up and housed. Early in December the grounds were 
flowed for skating, and this sport was indulged in until some 
time in March. 

Thus it will be seen that this department under the care of the 
commissioners is an important one, and brings an ample return 
for the money expended in the moral and physical wellbeing of 
our citizens. More money is needed to facilitate the placing of 
flowering shrubs and suitable trees upon our commons. There 
should be a special appropriation to cover skating and water 
privileges. 

The public appreciate and enjoy the band concerts, and it 
seems certainly wise to set apart a suitable sum for this purpose. 

All electric lighting should be charged to lighting streets. 
The city ought to own a two-horse scraper to remove the snow 
from the overflowed places so the skaters may constantly enjoy 
themselves. No heavy teams should be allowed upon the lawns, 
and if these suggestions could be followed during the coming 
year our citizens would then take even greater pride than they do 
now in these healthful and beautiful resorts. 

A summary of the work done on commons is given herewith, 
and the cost of the same : 

Tools and supplies ...... $84.84 

Repairs, fountains, etc. ...... 76.40 

Water 700.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



185 



Flowers 

Grass seed and dressing 

Trees and shrubbery 

Light . 

Skating 

Seats . 

Painting 

Carriage hire 

Labor, per pay-roll 

Total . 



^202.17 

232.09 

61.80 

36.00 

454.33 
39.82 

15-79 

44.00 

1,556.22 



The above items include ^196 for wood ashes for dressing; 
;^7oo paid the board of water commissioners; $186 paid local 
florists for flowers ; expenses of skating from December to 
March. 

STARK PARK. 

This park is a favorite resort of our best citizens ; the views 
to be obtained up and down the Merrimack are truly most 
charming. This park will always have a place in the hearts of 
our patriotic citizens on account of its being the burial place of 
the Revolutionary hero, John Stark, and much has been done to 
beautify this riverside resting place during the last year. 

The first work was commenced in January, when a stone wall 
was removed that separated the park land from that of the State 
Industrial School. This was accomplished by the means of drags 
on the snow, and the stone piled up along the route of the drive- 
way to be built. In April the cemetery grounds were cleaned, 
and also in May before Decoration Day. In June, sixty trees 
were removed from the Industrial School land, mostly spruces, 
having an average of thirty-five feet in height, and a diameter of 
trunk of six inches to a foot. These trees were set out on the 
north and south sides of the park, and all lived but four. These 
trees added much to the beauty of the landscape. In July 
twenty acres of brush and weeds were mowed and cleaned up, 
and grading commenced for roadbed of southern driveway. 



186 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

During July and August grading was finished and the founda- 
tion of stone put in. One hundred forty feet of drain was also 
completed and cesspools built. Gutters were paved on both 
sides of the driveway eighteen inches wide, extending the entire 
length of 656 feet. The foundation of driveway was composed 
of large stone which was broken with stone hammers, the stone 
coming from the wall, eighty-five loads from North River road 
sewer, and over 100 loads from Dodge's ledge close by the park 
grounds. After the foundation was prepared a heavy horse road- 
roller was hauled over it until the stone was thoroughly bedded. 
Over sixty loads of crushed stone were next put on, and finally 
the roadbed was served with a binder course of fine Salem stone 
and the eighteen-ton road roller used, producing a road that will 
last and is a pleasure to drive or walk over, consequently one 
that well repays the expense and labor put upon it. 

After the driveway was finished, the west slope bordering on 
the same was graded with loam taken from the excavated road- 
bed, making a very short haul. Ninety dollars worth of ashes 
was used on this slope ; it was also seeded down, brushed and 
rolled by horse roller. Six iron seats were placed where the 
view was best. Ten acres of woodland were cleared and trees 
trimmed, all drains cleaned out and fences repaired. 

The appropriation should be larger for Stark and Derryfield 
parks to enable the commissioners to carry out the plan for im- 
proving these locations. Stark park needs more shrubbery ; more 
fertilizer is also required. A low stone wall on the east side, 
running along the River road, with entrance gates and shelters 
for people built out of the same material as the wall,, with tile 
roof, about thirty feet long and eight feet wide, similar to those 
in Franklin park in Boston, would be a great addition. These 
shelters should face the west and be furnished with abundant 
seating capacity, thus giving the spectator one of the finest river 
views in Manchester. 

Much can be done with a little money, and there can be no 
doubt that within a few years, if a wise expenditure of the means 
appropriated is followed, Stark park will be the pride of our citi- 
zens and an ornament to the city. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 187 
SUMMARY. 

Tools and supplies ....... ^35.00 

Stone ......... 204.09 

Explosives ........ 25.80 

Labor 1,567.84 



Total $1,832.73 

DERRYFIELD PARK. 

Within the past three years the section of land north of Bridge 
street, west of Mammoth road, east of Belmont street, and run- 
ning north to the Amoskeag Company's land, known as Derry- 
field park, has become a very popular resort on account of its ac- 
cessibility, its rustic beauty, its high and commanding situation, 
and the recent improvements completed under the direction of 
the street and park commissioners. 

Nowhere has the work of the board been better appreciated 
than at Derryfield park. The rapid advance of real estate in the 
neighborhood and the erection of many houses has proved the 
wisdom of securing this land for park purposes, and more espe- 
cially since the building of the high service reservoir, this section 
has attracted the attention of our citizens, and the beauties of 
the park have become well known and acknowledged. 

Work began in February, when the trees that had been blown 
down during the winter were removed and cut up and carried to 
the city ledge, where they were used in firing up the crusher en- 
gine. In April the trees were cut in the grove where it was pro- 
posed to build a large circular driveway. Twelve thousand feet 
of lumber was sawed from the trees and used for park purposes, 
the refuse being hauled to the city ledge. In May the grove was 
cleaned up, seats erected, four swings set up, and grading for the 
half-mile circular track commenced ; thirty-six men and four 
teams were employed. A cut of five feet average was made at 
the entrance at Bridge street, and gravel of first quality was taken 
out and used to fill the low places and for topdressing. One 



188 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

thousand loads of stone from the dump of the high service reser- 
voir were used as a foundation course on the east side of the cir- 
cle where the land was heavy, this section being filled with stone 
to a depth of four feet and to a length of 700 feet. A ditch was 
also run under a portion of the roadbed, to drain low places, 500 
feet in length. Two cesspools were built where the circle joined 
the east road through the grove. 

The width of this circle is 34-feet center track, with an 8-foot 
width of turfed space, and inside all a lo-foot track for bicycles. 
The center is well topdressed with fine white gravel, the bicycle 
track topdressed with stone dust from the ledge. The banks on 
both sides the circle were turfed, seeded down, and topdressed 
with ashes from the city ledge near by. Twenty acres of weeds 
and brush were cut and four more swings set up, making eight 
swings in all in the park aside from the rope swings. These 
wooden swings have been filled every day and added much to 
the enjoyment of the children. It can be truthfully affirmed that 
during the last summer hundreds have visited this park each day, 
and our citizens who know a good horse and love to handle the 
reins, and who desire a chance to enjoy a fine drive, can be seen 
driving slowly around the circle at this park, while the number 
that used the bicycle track cannot be estimated. 

Improvements are necessarily the order of the day when there 
is such a demand, and much can be done the next season if 
the appropriation will allow. A wide speedway has been sug- 
gested on Belmont street on the western side of the park, which 
should be one hundred feet wide at least, and immediate steps 
should be taken to secure this. A drain is needed from Pearl 
street to the park land to remove standing water, as the water is 
killing out the trees. 

A pavilion or large shelter would be a great improvement in 
the southern part of the large grove to accommodate the people 
in case of rain ; also in case of outdoor meetings, several of 
which have been held the past season. Very few of our citizens 
are aware of the extensive view of Manchester and the surround- 
ing country at the elevation of the high service reservoir, and we 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION, 



189 



can announce with great satisfaction that a fine macadamized 
road is being built by the water commissioners up the hill to the 
reservoir, and it is intended to build this road to the extension 
of Myrtle or Prospect street, so that a beautiful drive can be 
taken over the hill that will overlook the reservoir and the entire 
city. An outlook near the reservoir would add still more to the 
charm of this locality, and we expect to see one of the finest 
parks in New Hampshire within a few years if wise and generous 
city governments take this view of the possibilities of Derryfield 
park. 

The following gives a summary of the cost of work done : 

Tools and supplies 



Explosives 
Signs 
Swings . 
Labor 

Total 



33-65 

9-75 

55-95 
3>i27.63 

53,326.00 



Respectfully submitted. 

G. H. STEARNS, 
L. P. REYNOLDS, 
H. P. SIMPSON, 

Street and Park Commission, 



REPORT 

OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



To the City Councils, the School Board, and Citizens : 

Being required in my official capacity as Superintendent of 
Public Instruction to report upon public school affairs in the city 
of Manchester for the year 1894, I respectfully present the fol- 
lowing for such consideration as you may deem the subject and 
my treatment of it worthy. 

PROSPERITY OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

It gives me pleasure to call your attention to the prosperity of 
the public schools. They have been steadily increasing their 
pupilage since 1886; and this year, notwithstanding that an un- 
usual number of tenements have been vacated on account of the 
universal business depression, there has been a larger enrollment 
than ever before. The whole number of different pupils in the 
public schools of Manchester for 1894 has been 4,975, a gain of 
200 pupils over the number enrolled last year. In no previous 
year have so' many pupils been entitled to admission to the High 
school from the grammar schools. The number was 162 ; and 
112 of these entered the High school at the opening of the fall 
term, which is a larger number by 29 than ever before entered 
this school during any one year. 

The phenomenal increase in the enrollment of all the schools 
last year, the gain being 477, necessitated the erection of more 
schoolhouses ; and the city government provided a substantial 



194 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and commodious, as well as a tasty and unique, schoolhouse,* 
containing four rooms, on Pearl street near the corner of Linden 
street. This house was first occupied last April, by two primary 
schools which were then transferred from the Ash-street house. 
The latter house, however, has had its eight rooms completely 
filled throughout the rest of the year; and its primary schools, 
as well as the lower primary school in the Pearl-street house, 
have been so crowded that it is evident there will be need of 
opening another school in the Pearl-street house early in 1895, 
both to relieve the Ash-street house and to meet the needs of its 
own rapidly growing district. 

A duplicate of the Pearl-street schoolhouse has also been built 
this year by the city government for the benefit of the people in 
ward nine. This house is on Rimmon street, at its junction with 
Amory street. Two schools were opened in the Rimmon house 
at the beginning of the fall term. About 50 pupils were then 
transferred to this house from the Main-street school, which was 
itself immediately refilled by necessary transfers from the Varney 
school and by beginners from its own district ; and the Rimmon 
schools were also increased by over 30 other pupils. Some of 
these were beginners awaiting the establishment of this school, 
while the others came from the parochial schools. Another 
school will be opened in the Rimmon schoolhouse at the begin- 
ning of next term, and there may be need of still another school 
in this same house early in 1895. 

HOUSING THE SCHOOLS. 

One of the most important matters with which those in author- 
ity over the schools have to do, is to secure proper locations and 
suitable buildings for housing the schools. To require children 
to go an unreasonable distance to school, and then to oblige them 
for nine months in the year to occupy buildings which are ill 
constructed in respect to light, heat, ventilation, and other sani- 
tary arrangements, is substantially to render null and void nearly 
all the essentials for which children are schooled ; because a pri- 



* Floor plans designed by Supt. Wm. E. Buck. Architect, Wm. M. Butterfield. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 195 

mary condition to one's attainment of a noble character, and 
even moderate success in life, is that he shall be physically unim- 
paired, have good health ; in brief, have " a sound mind in a 
sound body." 

In order to secure the most desirable locations for schoolhouses, 
lots should be purchased in advance of their needs, and as soon 
as it is reasonably well settled that a given section of the city is 
about to take on a much larger growth. In case any lot should 
prove not to be needed, such could doubtless be sold later 
for more than enough to cancel its cost and all loss of inter- 
est. Recent experience proves the utility of the policy advo- 
cated. Call to mind the fine lot, and the desirable location of 
it, secured for the Pearl-street school ; then think of the diffi- 
culty, the expense, and fruitless efforts made this year to relieve 
the overcrowded condition of the Lincoln-street, Wilson Hill, 
and Training schools, the failure being chiefly due to the impos- 
sibility of finding a lot so suitable that all concerned could 
agree upon one. 

THE SCHOOL BOARD AN INDEPENDENT BODY. 

By these considerations, I am reminded that a large majority 
of the members of every one of our school boards for at least the 
past fifteen years has felt the propriety and desirability of having 
such matters as the selection and purchase of schoolhouse lots, 
the adoption of plans for schoolhouses, as well as the construc- 
tion of them, and the selection and purchase of furniture for the 
schools, as well as of all other school appliances, left wholly to 
the school board. And w^hy not .'' If there is propriety in hav- 
ing those persons who may be selected as water commissioners 
given full control of the city water department, is there not equal 
propriety in having all affairs pertaining to the school depart- 
ment wholly in the hands of those selected for its special care? 
Are not those men selected on account of their fitness to care for 
the moral and intellectual interests of children at school equally 
competent to care for their physical environments ? And is 
there consistency or reasonableness in holding a school board 



196 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

responsible for the condition of such environments when the 
board has no power to command the funds necessary to make 
them right ? 

In short, ought not all things pertaining to the management 
of the schools to be entirely under the control of the board chosen 
to give them special care ? Have not the fifteen or twenty men 
upon the school boards in past years shown themselves as compe- 
tent and worthy to be wholly entrusted with the care of their one 
department as have the thirty-five or forty men who have for the 
same years been elected to membership in the city councils and 
therein exercised absolute control over many, great, and diversi- 
fied interests? It will be readily conceded by all, I think, that 
the school board would manage the schools as wisely, economi- 
cally, more opportunely, and with greater efficiency, if wholly 
responsible for all the affairs of the department and given full 
powers for its proper conduct. May it not, therefore, be expected 
that every city official, as well as all good citizens, will be suffi- 
ciently interested to make' an effort to have the school board 
given exclusive authority over all matters pertaining to the man- 
agement of the public schools ? 

It gives me pleasure in this connection to testify to the hearty 
interest and efficient action of Mayors Knowlton and Worthen, 
as chairmen of the school board for the periods during which 
they have respectively served, in materially aiding the board to 
promote the general efficiency of the schools ; particularly in 
securing the two new and much needed schoolhouses on Pearl 
and Rimmon streets. 

His Honor, the incoming mayor, will also have ample oppor- 
tunity to exercise his ability in aiding the board to solve even 
more complex problems now confronting the city for the relief 
of overcrowded schools ; and it may be well here to set forth 
somewhat at length the need of a new high school building, and 
of other school accommodations. 

There has for several years been need of better High school ac- 
commodations ; and now, it seems to me, the need is both im- 
perative and immediate. I quote upon this subject from the 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 197 

School Report of 1S90 as follows : " The High school needs an 
addition of four recitation rooms, which would allow the two on 
the west of the assembly room to be added to that room, making 
it a fairly well lighted one and of sufficient size for the present 
needs of the school. As at present arranged, the assembly room 
is dark, gloomy, and poorly ventilated. Under the new recita- 
tion rooms should be a gymnasium and a drill hall for the use of 
both boys and girls. A much better scheme would be to build 
a new High school house on a suitable lot nearer the center of 
the city and use the present High school house instead of erect- 
ing a new building on the Bridge-street lot." * 

Only about a month ago I received the following note from 
the principal of the High school : 

High School, November 23, 1894. 
IVm. E. Buck, Superintendent of Schools : 

Dear Sir, — Our study room has been so dark today that at 
the end of the fourth period I dismissed those who had no more 
recitations. 

We shall have some new gas burners soon and then we shall be 
able to study by gaslight when necessary. 

Respectfully, 

ALBERT SOMES. 

Comment upon this note hardly seems necessary, when it is 
borne in mind that the High school closes all its exercises daily 
at one o'clock in the afternoon. But it is an unpleasant fact, of 
which I am personally cognizant, that many pupils who were not 
aware they had any eye trouble before their attendance upon the 
High school have been obliged to make permanent use of glasses 
not long after entering this school ; and I am of the opinion that 
any competent board of oculists, called upon to examine and re- 
port the conditions for study in the assembly room of our High 
school house, would declare the lack of sufficient light there 
highly injurious to the eyesight of pupils, and promptly condemn 
the use of the room for the purpose to which it is put. 



* By Charles H. Manning, for the School Board. 



198 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The High school has been so crowded for the past four years, at 
least, that its efficiency has been impaired for lack of the two ad- 
ditional recitation rooms that were needed in 1890, when the 
matter of the quotation above given from the report for that year 
was presented to the city councils. At the present time the needs 
of the High school are much greater ; and I here present its case 
and the needed relief that might be, afforded the Lincoln-street, 
Wilson Hill, Training, Ash-street, and Lowell-street schools, by 
using the present High school building for grammar and lower 
grade schools and constructing a new building for the High 
school. The following is a copy of my report upon this subject 
as presented to the school board at its regular meeting in Novem- 
ber : 

" The High school has 266 pupils. The assembly room seats 
but 187 pupils. The freshman class is so large (112) that it 
should be divided for recitation purposes into five divisions, in- 
stead of four as at present. This would necessitate the employ- 
ment of another teacher, for whom no recitation room is availa- 
ble. Indeed, under existing conditions, the room fitted up for 
the exclusive use of instruction in drawing, as well as a small 
room fit only for a library or a supply room, have now to be 
used at great inconvenience for recitation purposes. 

" For the good of the schools and the credit of the city alike, 
there should be procured at the earliest possible moment far su- 
perior accommodations for the use of our city High school ; so 
also for the manual training school and the evening drawing 
school. The needed accommodations could all be provided in 
one building, erected especially for the purposes named. 

" Moreover, the rooms now occupied by the manual training and 
the evening drawing schools are greatly needed for other school 
purposes. The room on Lowell street, occupied by the manual 
training school, is sorely needed f<:>r another day school, to re- 
lieve the already overcrowded primary schools in the same build- 
ing ; and the rooms on Spring street, occupied by the evening 
drawing schools, are needed for the use of the girls' evening 
schools for instruction in the common English branches. The 



REPORT OP THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 199 

young ladies attending these schools are obliged, under present 
arrangements, to occupy, much to their discomfort, school desks 
designed for the use of lower grammar and middle school pupils. 

" Again, the unfitness of accommodations for school purposes at 
the Wilson Hill schoolhouse, as well as the unfitness of the two 
rooms occupied by schools on the third floor of the Lincoln- 
street schoolhouse, the overcrowded condition of the Training 
school, and another threatened overcrowded condition of some 
rooms in the Ash-street schoolhouse, all conspire to suggest a 
suitable and economical use of the present High school build- 
ing for schools below the High school grade. If the present 
High school building were now available for the use of other 
schools, there could doubtless be made such a selection -of pupils 
from the Wilson Hill and Lincoln-street schools as would per- 
mit of the organization of four or more schools, whose pupils 
would be well accommodated in the present High school build- 
ing, with opportunity for the transfer of the remaining Wilson 
Hill pupils to the Lincoln-street house, thus doing entirely away 
with the need of the Wilson Hill house. Another school could 
also now be organized in the present High school building from 
the surplus of pupils in the Training and Ash-street schools. 
These changes might postpone (perhaps, indeed, for many years) 
the otherwise needed early supply of two schoolhouses whose erec- 
tion has recently been urged, one in the Lincoln-street district 
and one at the corner of Bridge and Union streets, because of 
failure to secure from the city government, when attempted a few 
years since, the action necessary for the early materialization of 
a new and suitable building for the High school, so sadly needed 
today. 

'• I call the attention of the board to these matters at this time 
because, first, they need early and prompt attention ; second, 
due consideration given this matter now may in the end save the 
city many dollars ; and, third, the people want, and can now 
best co-operate to secure, those arrangements for the housing of 
their children at school which are wisest and most economical. 
The time, too, has now come when it should be decided whether 



200 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the present High school building shall be made over or a new 
one built ; for it must be evident to all who will examine the 
facts of increased attendance upon every grade of our schools, 
and the unfitness of many rooms for school purposes, that greatly 
improved accommodations are absolutely and immediately needed 
for the use of the High and other schools ; and that unless they 
are furnished by the erection of a new house for the High school, 
other school houses for other grades will need to be erected be- 
fore next September, and the needs of the High school would 
still remain unsupplied. 

" Permit me to advi:e the reference of the foregoing suggestions 
and the whole matter of better school accommodations, to the 
High school sub-committee for report at the next meeting of the 
board, in order that the board may, at the opening of the year, 
ask the new city government for such additional and improved 
arrangements for the housing of the schools as may after careful 
consideration be deemed necessary and best ; for the city gov- 
ernment can early in the year most conveniently arrange for suf- 
ficient appropriations and other necessities for speedily building 
new schoolhouses.*" 

Since the foregoing was presented, I have investigated the 
number of pupils who have their residences in such places as 
would enable them conveniently to attend school in the present 
High-school building, including only those pupils who belong 
to the fourth division grammar, the middle, and the primary 
grades in the Ash-street, Lincoln-street, Wilson Hill, and Train- 
ing-school buildings. The results of this investigation make it 
evident that, if the proposed plan of using the present High- 
school building for lower grade schools were made effective, the 
schoolhouse lot at the corner of Bridge and Union streets would 
not be needed for many years, perhaps never; and it also ap- 
pears without doubt that the Wilson Hill school could be dis- 
continued and its pupils all transferred to either the Lincoln- 
street or the present High school building, and that theLincoln- 



* This matter lias since been referred to the city councils, with request for a supply 
of needed accommodations. 



REPORT or THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 201 

Street school could have so many of its pupils transferred to the 
present High school building and to the Training school as 
would relieve it of the two small schools now upon its third 
floor, and also be relieved of enough pupils in its other rooms to 
enable it to receive its quota from the Wilson Hill house. 

Another section of the city that will soon be demanding more 
and better schoolroom accommodations is that known as the 
South Main-street district. The present schoolhouse (like that 
at Wilson Hill) is old, narrow, lacking proper ventilation, and 
insufficient in floor space. The two rooms in this house cannot 
each well accommodate more than 42 pupils, and during the 
spring term there were 62 pupils in the lower primary room. 
An extra teacher was then hired to take charge of 15 to 20 
pupils in an entry way hardly large enough to contain them, be- 
cause there was no other place available for their care. Notwith- 
standing an entire class was promoted from this lower primary 
room at the close of the spring term, 65 pupils sought admission 
to it at the opening of the fall term. To relieve this room, 20 
pupils were transfen-ed to the Varney house, from which 20 were 
forced to the North Main-street house, and from there 50 to the 
new Rimmon school, — all of those whose residence would rea- 
sonably permit of such transfer. The rooms of the Varney 
schoolhouse are full, the South Main-street section is becoming 
more and more densely populated, and a new schoolhouse in this 
locality as large as the Rimmon house would not be greater by 
more than one room (to provide for future growth) than the 
needs of the South Main-street district would demand by the 
time a suitable house could be provided, even though prepara- 
tions for it should be commenced at once. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The average number of schools for the entire year has been 
100, as follows : The equivalent of 8 in the High school build- 
ing; 26 grammar-school divisions; 20 middle schools, another 
also for one term (two more than last year) ; 39 primary schools 
(two more than last year) ; 2 partially graded schools, and 5 un- 
graded or suburban. 



202 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This shows a gain of four schools over the number of last 
year. The new ones are a primary at Hallsville,* another (one 
of the two transferred from the Ash-street house in April) at the 
Pearl-street house, one at the Lowell-street house for two terms 
and another at the new Rimmon house for one term (the two 
last named being equivalent to one school for the entire year) ; 
also a middle school at Hallsville, another in the new Rimmon 
house (for one term), and one at the Webster-street house which 
was a primary last year. Hence the primaries are increased by 
two schools instead of three as might at first appear. 

The four additional schools for the entire year, and another 
for one term, have been necessitated by the annual increase in 
the pupilage of the schools. The gain for the year in the ele- 
mentary schools has been i8i, or an average of 42 pupils for 
each one of the new schools during the time of its existence. 

Four rooms in the Training school for teachers have been cared 
for by the principal and her assistant f; and hence the 100 
schools have had for the entire year 98 teachers plus the number 
of masters' assistants, or 6, | and 3 special teachers, — i each in 
music, drawing, and manual training. There have, therefore, 
been employed the equivalent of 107 teachers for the year. 

THIS year's improvements. 

The salaries of the lady teachers in the grammar grades have 
this year been justly increased, and it is therefore hoped that 
our more worthy teachers of this class, at least, will not hence- 
forth be so readily hired to go elsewhere. 

It gives me pleasure also to note that, by a pending amend- 
ment to the rules of the board, it is proposed to make alike the 
salaries of all lady teachers below the grade of master's assistant. 
This is right, for the responsibilities, duties, anxieties, and labors 

* In existence but one term last year, as was another at Webster street, and also the one 
transferred from the Ash street to Pearl street. The three were therefore then reckoned as 
equivalent to but one school for the entire year. 

t Assisted by the youi:g ladies constituting the sub-teachers' classes. 

t The one at Hallsville for only one term, with the middle-school teacher for one term at 
the Rimmon schoolhouse, makes the equivalent of one teacher for two terms. 



KEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 203 

of the lower primary grade teachers are not second even to those 
of a master's assistant. Nor could it be expected that teachers 
of the lower grades, though perhaps conscious of their ability to 
do their best work in those grades, would therein long remain 
content when equally conscious of ability properly to teach a 
grammar grade, and the importance of the latter is magnified by 
a discrimination in the amount of the salary thereto affixed. 

The work of our schools during the past year has been im- 
proved all along the line of their studies, under the direction of 
both regular and special teachers, particularly by an effort so to 
correlate all studies that whatever might be done for each study 
should result, to a greater or less degree, in promoting a better 
understanding of every one of all the other studies; as, for in- 
stance, the mutually reciprocal relations of geography and his- 
tory would be properly treated while either subject might be the 
main topic of recitation, and at the same time instruction in 
language would be incidentally given by insistence upon a proper 
use of it in every recitation. 

Greatest improvement has perhaps been made manifest in the 
extent and character of the instruction given in nature studies, 
plant life predominating. The exhibits made in the schools last 
June of what the pupils had learned and done in this matter 
were surprising revelations of what can be accomplished in odd 
moments, as it were, when children are given a subject that in- 
tensely interests them. The improved treatment of nature 
studies and their voluntary consideration in all the schools were 
doubtless largely due to the supply of helpful text-books fur- 
nished teachers early in the year, as follows : 

Pratt's Fairyland of Flowers. — One copy for the two primary 
teachers in each building ; one for the two middle-school teach- 
ers ; one for the third and fourth division grammar-school 
teachers. 

Spalding's Introduction to Botany. — One copy for the first 
and second division grammar-school teachers. 

Newell's Seed to Leaf. — One copy for the two middle-school 
teachers ; one for the third and fourth division grammar-school 



204 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

teachers ; one for the first and second division grammar-school 
teachers. 

Newell's Flower and Fruit. — Assignment the same as for 
" Seed to Leaf." 

Newell's Botany Reader, Part I. — Three copies for second 
division grammar grade. 

Newell's Botany Reader, Part II. — Three copies for the first 
division grammar grade. 

All of Newell's books, in any building, are understood to be 
accessible to every teacher for purposes of consultation or refer- 
ence ; and three of a kind may occasionally be borrowed for a 
reading lesson, by the class, of matter found adapted and desir- 
able for such use. 

The relation of language to the observations made and the facts 
discovered in the pursuit of nature studies causes so frequent and 
necessary exercises in language, by way of definitions, descrip- 
tions, etc, that the perfect naturalness and the great utility of the 
correlation of studies is here highly manifest. It may be also 
said that because teachers have come to realize that no Slovenish 
work should be allowed in the use of language, whatever be the 
occasion of its use, the schools have for this reason made great 
advances the past two years in the character and efficiency of the 
instruction afforded in the study of language. 

The board has this year also enlarged the supply of another 
means of training and culture that will forever prove a great 
blessing to all the children in our public schools. I refer to the 
books purchased as supplementary readers. These consist of 
geographical and historical readers, and still more valuable works 
containing in part the writings of such eminent authors as Hans 
Andersen, Scudder, Hawthorne, Irving, Scott, Dickens, Lowell, 
Longfellow, Whittier, Holmes, Emerson, Webster, Everett, and 
others of our more eminent statesmen. This supply, compared 
to the field it is designed to cover, is quite limited ; and we nat- 
urally recur for help to the source availed of for several years by 
many other cities, to find the more extended aid felt necessary 
for the formation of right habits in reading among the members 
of the rising generation. This involves a consideration of the 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 205 
RELATIONS OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY TO THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Remembering that some men have appeared to become emi- 
nent as a consequence of reading a meager amount of choice 
books, many times over, there may be those who would say that 
children of the present day read too much, that we should curb 
rather than encourage extensive reading upon the part of chil- 
dren. In reply, it must be said that conditions have so changed 
that the extent of children's reading is beyond the control not 
only of school boards but also of parents, in general. It is well 
known, too, that nearly all children who can read at all fluently 
do read quite extendedly. It is not, therefore, a question whether 
children shall read much, or not, but whether we should in this 
very important matter try to train them, as in other matters of 
importance, for their highest good. 

There is a difference in the general intelligence of pupils in 
similar grades of school not farther apart than dissimilar locali- 
ties of the same city, so manifest that even a casual visitor might 
discern it, which intellectual difference, if investigated for its 
cause, would be found to lie most largely in the different quality 
of, the private reading matter of pupils. It has become a matter 
of common recognition that most youthful criminals have become 
such through the influence of vicious reading, and it is equally 
well known that in general those old in crime began their down- 
ward careers early in life. Is it not then quite probable that by 
the training of children to right habits in reading some would be 
saved from prison, or the gallows, and nearly all be led to a high 
appreciation of the communion that may be had through the 
silent page with the best thoughts of the best minds that the 
world has produced ? Experience has shown that even children 
whose taste for good reading has been properly cultivated will 
eschew that which is unworthy of their time and attention. Be- 
cause of this, leading educators have sought means for the gen- 
eral establishment of right reading habits in children. The 
school reader being insufficient, supplementary reading matter 
containing more extended selections from best authors was 
brought into the schools. This proved the utility of what was 



206 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

being attempted ; children were delighted, but their needs de- 
manded so much more similar material that the thousands in the 
schools could not be furnished through the school department 
alone, and hence extensive use has been made of the public 
library in all parts of the country. In 1886, and once previ- 
ously, an attempt was here made sufficiently to supply the public 
schools with books from the public library ; but failure was the 
result, chiefly because of the lack of a modern system of handling 
the books at the library. 

The vice-chairman of the school board, a gentleman always 
deeply interested in this subject and quick to recognize the recent 
highly improved facilities for the distribution of books at the 
public library, a few weeks since called attention to the import- 
ance of this matter and urged a renewed attempt to secure the 
co-operation of the authorities over our public library in behalf 
of our schools, assuring us of the cordial and enthusiastic aid of 
the librarian. Miss Kate E. Sanborn. 

Acting under your instructions, the vice-chairman, greatly 
aided by the librarian, has nearly perfected a plan for a proper 
utilization of the public library by the older pupils in our schools. 
The object is two-fold ; for it contemplates both the establish- 
ment of an intellectual relish, or taste, for reading matter of the 
right character and likewise such training as will cause pupils to 
appreciate the value of a good library, as well as such instruction 
as will enable them to know how to use it. It is expected that 
the plan for a distribution of public-library books through the 
aid of the public school teachers to their pupils will be put in 
active operation early in 1895. 

CONCLUSION. 

Thanking the members of the school board and of the city 
councils, as well as many citizens and all teachers of our pub- 
lic schools, for encouraging words, good advice, efficient aid, 
and kindly consideration, I submit the foregoing as my report 
upon the public schools of the city for the last twelve months. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 207 

Report of Miss Caroline E. Wing, Principal of City 
Training School for Teachers. 

In accordance with the request of William E. Buck, superin- 
tendent of schools, I respectfully submit the following report : 

It is now generally recognized that the profession of teaching 
requires for its pursuit, proper and adequate training. We are 
working with boys and girls who are to be the men and women 
of the future. Through the teacher the general culture and 
knowledge of the present is transmitted to the future. If we are 
performing the work in its highest sense, it must necessarily mean 
a constant growth on the part of the teacher, as well as of the 
child. Education does not mean pouring so much knowledge 
into a child, or covering the ground laid down by the course of 
study. It is to so develop and train the child that he may be 
able to do the most for himself and for others in the best way. 
These results are better obtained if the teacher has had some pre- 
vious preparation for the work. 

The object of the Training school is not to furnish employment 
to all those who may desire. It is to select from the applicants 
those who after a trial of six months have best proved to us that 
they have the ability to teach others. By so doing we insure for 
the schools of the city those who have been trained and are able 
to make progress for themselves and direct and control others in 
acquiring knowledge. 

Although it is not possible to warrant the success of each indi- 
vidual as the vender does his wares upon the street, at the same 
time we may feel reasonably sure of the success of each. As a 
general thing after leaving the school the growth of the young 
teachers has been continuous. 

The general conditions and regulations of the school remain 
unchanged. Since January i, 1894, substitutes have been fur- 
nished for two hundred and eighty-one sessions of school. 

The greater amount of work accomplished the past year I deem 
due to the help given me by the assistant principal, Miss Annie 
W. Cofran, and to the more suitable accommodations fur- 



208 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

nished by the board. The young ladies generally have been 
willing, faithful, and enthusiastic, securing for themselves good 
results and seeking to raise the standard of the school. 

Fully appreciating the kindness of the committee and superin- 
tendent in granting my many requests, I still think that the work 
of the school is very much hampered by the lack of room for the 
Training class, as well as more apparatus and additional grades 
of school. 

It is not reasonable or just to expect a young teacher to at- 
tain as good results in teaching a grammar or middle school, 
when she has never had training in those grades, as one who has 
had such training. I strongly advise that the Training school 
be put into a building where there are middle as well as primary 
grades. More room for the special use of the Training class 
and more apparatus are also needed. 

CAROLINE E. WING, 
Principal of the Training School. 



Report of Mr. Fred E. Browne, Principal of the Man- 
ual Training School. 

In compliance with your request I submit the following report 
of the manual training school for the past year : 

The interest in this line of our school work is still very mani- 
fest, and, as one might say, " at high tide." 

I have had under my instruction in this department the past 
year 259 different pupils. The work as a whole has been very 
good, some excellent ; but we are still aiming for something 
higher. 

We are laboring under difficulties to some extent, owing to 
lack of room and equipment. 

The course of study for the year has been the same as for last 
year with the addition of advanced study for the second year's 
course, consisting in part of dovetailing, making small boxes 
(dovetailed together), and making working drawings from models. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 209 

The second year's course is very much crippled from lack of 
power and lathes. The variety and attractiveness of the work 
under more favorable conditions could be very much increased. 
The desire which is expressed by pupils to make something use- 
ful or ornamental should be encouraged, but from lack of room 
and equipment we can not do this as we would like. Brackets, 
book cabinets, corner cabinets, wall pockets, and many other ar- 
ticles would be more attractive and beneficial, thereby putting 
into practice features which have been impressed on the mind 
and the application of certain features to actual work. 

If not out of place, I would like to give a few points open for 
improvement as seen from the standpoint of an instructor. 

First, a location as nearly central as can be, that pupils from 
the several schools may all receive instruction at the same place, 
by which means far better results can be reached. This is true 
to a larger extent than an outside party would at first suppose. 
The school at present is divided into three sections, and suffers 
in consequence for many reasons I will not lake space to men- 
tion. The fact remains that better results can be reached if all 
classes attend the same place. 

Secondly, let the room be fitted up with about twenty-two 
benches, two or three ten or twelve inch lathes, and a small jig or 
band saw, with power. This provides for classes of about twenty- 
five pupils each. Each class should have at least two hours for 
each lesson, the time to be divided between drawing, lathes, and 
bench work, at discretion of the instructor. 

The time now given each class is too short in which to reach 
the best results. The pupil gets thoroughly interested in his 
work and is called upon to stop. One half hour now is worth 
more to the pupil than three fourths or even an hour in some 
cases in the beginning of the lesson. This has been proven to 
be true repeatedly when I have allowed pupils to remain after 
school hours, or time of closing. The requests for permission to 
remain after school are numerous; and I have granted them as 
far as I have been able, though not as much as I should like, be- 
cause of other work which has required my attention. 

14 



210 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The arguments in favor of a two hour session are many. I 
only mention one or two. The sessions of the several classes 
should be of equal duration. At present a portion of the classes 
get only one and one half hours, while others get one and three 
fourths and two hours. If the length of sessions be equalized the 
number of sessions would have to be decreased from fourteen or 
fifteen per week to ten per week, members in each class necessa- 
rily increased. The only drawback I can see to the above plan 
is the probable call for an assistant teacher on account of large 
numbers in classes, and the variety of work being done ; but 
would not the plain results justify the outlay in this instance ^ 
Let us look to it that this school be made a success and no back- 
ward steps be taken. 

A few words from others who are interested : 

From Minneapolis : " Manual training helps to hold pupils in 
school. It has already had its effect with us. . . . The manual 
training has reacted upon the intellectual training. The mind 
once aroused to take an intelligent interest in one thing quickly 
extends that interest to other things." 

From Philadelphia : "Judging from the experience of the past 
three years we have no doubt that in June next two hundred or 
more properly qualified applicants will be turned away for the 
lack of accommodations." The above was written in 1888 or 
1889. 

From New York : '' Manual training does not mean merely the 
training of the hand ; it means the training of every faculty. . . . 
We aim at no specialty of any kind ; no carpentry, no particu- 
lar art in designing or modeling, cooking, sewing, geometry, or 
mechanical drawing as such ; they aim simply at a rational means 
to obtain and transmit useful knowledge." 

From " Self Help," by Samuel Smiles : " The use of early la- 
bor in self-imposed mechanical employments is curiously illus- 
trated by the boyhood of Sir Isaac Newton, Though a compar- 
atively dull scholar, he was most assiduous in the use of his saw, 
hammer, and hatchet — knocking and hammering in his lodging 
room, — making models of windmills, carriages, and machines of 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 211 

all sorts. Smeaton, Watt, and Stephenson were equally handy 
with tools when mere boys, and but for such kind of self-culture 
in their youth it is doubtful whether they would have accom- 
plished so much in their manhood." 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all with whom 
I have had to do for all kind words and co-operation ; also to ask 
parents and citizens to come in and see what "our boys " are 
doing. 

Respectfully submitted. 

FRED E. BROWNE. 



Report of Miss C. J. Emmins, Special Teacher of 

Drawing. 

Looking backward at the year's work in drawing, I take pleas- 
ure in reporting a thoroughly satisfactory rate of progress. 
Never before in the many years of my supervising and teaching 
drawing have I been so delighted with the work of pupils as 
during the opening months of the fall term. The long summer 
vacation seemed as if it had never been ; if anything the pupils 
seemed to do even better when school began than toward the 
close in June. No better test could be given of the lasting 
effects of the principles taught and that the proper free handling 
of pencil was indeed a habit. The quality of line, soft and 
gray, was general, and some very beautiful Avork was done. 

In one school, the experiment was tried of allowing the pupils 
of the highest grammar class to make drawings of some difficult 
casts which were loaned from the High school. The experiment 
was highly successful. I hoped to introduce casts in all the 
higher grades but there came a temporary interruption to all 
school work and this advance was deferred till next year. 

Drawing in general is taught as outlined in last year's work. 
The work in the High school is especially good in water-color. 
The September entering class has worked in crayon light and 
shade instead of charcoal. But one lesson a week has been 



212 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

given each class since September, instead of two as heretofore. 
Many classes and limited time necessitated. A number of pupils 
in the higher classes have taken up drawing this year who are 
looking forward to being teachers. In the near future, this will 
probably lessen the time which now has to be given to the prac- 
tice, in the training school, and allow more for theory of teach- 
ing. 

Drawing was introduced into the suburban schools the past 
year. The teachers met me at the High school, one afternoon 
each month, for instruction and brought the work of pupils for 
inspection. Although this has been a part of the regular course 
in these schools for so short a time, the work done will compare 
very favorably with that of the city schools. Great interest in 
the study is reported by the teachers. 

The masters' assistants in five buildings were dismissed for 
several Friday afternoons in the early part of the year, to meet 
me at the High school drawing room, for instruction in advanced 
drawing and practice in light and shade (charcoal). This has 
been very helpful to the work not only of the highest grammar 
classes but to others in the respective buildings. I hope more 
such opportunities will be given to increase the capacity for ad- 
vanced work. Teachers' meetings held between 4.30 and 6 
p. M., when there are no facilities for actual practice in drawing 
and when the energies are jaded from the day's exhaustive effort, 
however willing the spirit, limit the advance to a certain point. 
Two hours of daylight would be worth much more. 

The use of drawing as an aid to other studies is gaining, but 
not yet carried as far as its value as a means of expressing 
thought would warrant. Perhaps if teachers in general had a 
little more themselves of the confidence that would come from 
practice in sketching and so could offer suggestions to pupils, 
the advance would be more rapid. A small class of teachers has 
met me once a week for this purpose for the last few months. 
In one building time is set apart for sketching, and two teachers 
give lessons in other rooms than their own. This is a movement 
in the right direction that I wish might spread. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 213 

The decoration of schoolrooms with reproductions of works of 
art goes steadily onward. This movement seems to me the most 
important of all in the school of today. That the thousands of 
children in the public schools should sit, for the forming years of 
their lives, in rooms where there hang around them reproduc- 
tions of the noble works of art of the centuries — this in itself 
is a great thing. It is also a great thing that the small number 
of pupils who have been gifted with the divine power which 
makes a great artist should be encouraged in the development 
of this power. But to reach the ideal and give the children 
surroundings that shall lead them to a better understanding and 
enjoyment of their environment — both in Nature and in Art — 
and awaken in them the slumbering consciousness that they, too, 
may learn to create things of use and beauty for the help and 
happiness of their fellows, this is most of all a great thing. 

This question comes to us all at some time or other, ' ' What 
does today's civilization amount to and what are we all working 
for? " For the large majority there seems to be little in life ex- 
cept to earn a bare subsistence, and this labor is directed almost 
exclusively to the mere satisfaction of the animal needs of the 
race, — food, shelter, and clothing. A glutted labor market and 
starvation in the midst of earth's plentiful material resources 
periodically results. 

The trouble is that the capacity for productive work is not be- 
ing half exercised. There is need for work broader in scope 
and appealing to the best in man, to the instinctive desire for 
unselfish production and to do something which shall be the ex- 
pression of some spiritual need or desire. 

" The public schools do not exist to make specialists in any 
branches of labor. But they should exist to reveal to the child 
the powers of his being, opening the doors of earth's treasure- 
house, showing him the ways, that at least he may choose which 
path he will." 

Let us teach the children a love for the beautiful as seen in 
picture, building, statue, and book — the "infinite riches in a 
little room." Let us make a concerted effort to have our school- 



214 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

room walls decorated with reproductions of the wealth of the , J 
world in the form of beautiful temples, paintings and statues 1 
which are so easily obtained and so inexpensive. 

In the words of Morris, "What I want to do is to put defi- 
nitely before you a cause for which to strive. That cause is the 
democracy of art, the ennobling of daily and common work, 
which will one day put hope and pleasure in the place of fear 
and pain as the forces which move men to labor and keep the 
world a-going." 

In conclusion I wish to give thanks to the teachers for their 
most earnest co-operation, and to the superintendent for uplift- 
ing counsel, and to the members of the school board for their 
kind support. 

Respectfully submitted. 

CHARLOTTE J. EMMINS. 



APPENDIX. 

I. Population, etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 
V. Pupils. 

VI. Truancy. 

VII. Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1894. 

IX. High School Graduating Class. 

X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

XI. Organization of Committees, 1895. 

XII. List of Teachers, 1895. 

XIII. School Year, 1895. 



APPENDIX. 

STATISTICS. 

I.— Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1S90 . . 43)98: 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 



II.— Schoolhouses. 

Number of schoolhouses in use ...... 24 

Number of schoolhouses not in use .._.,. i 

(Old house in Hallsville.) 
Number of schoolrooms used for day schools* . . . 102 

(Five of the same, and two others, used for evening schools. Rooms unoc- 
cupied by city for day schools are two at Spring-street hotise, and four at the 
School-street house.) 

Number of rooms used for High-school classes . ■ . .8 
Number of rooms used for Grammar schools . . .26 
Number of rooms used for Middle schools "^^ . . .21 
Number of rooms used for Primary schools * . . .40 

Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools . .2 
Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools ... 5 



III.— Schools. 



(All for both sexes.) 
Number of High schools (buildings) . 
)None exclusively Grammar.) 

* Some of them for a single term, only. 

(A) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 217 

Number of combined Grammar and lower grade (Middle 
and Primary) schools . . . . . . .10 

Number of combined Middle and Primary schools . .■ 3 
Number of schools all Primary grade ..... 5 

Number of Ungraded schools ...... 5 



IV.— Teachers. 

Male teachers in the High school 
Female teachers in the High school . 
Male teachers in the Grammar schools 
Female teachers in the Grammar schools * . 
Female teachers in the Middle schools* 
Female teachers in the Primary schools f . 
Female teachers in the partially graded schools 
Female teachers in the Ungraded schools . 
Special teachers ..... 
Average number of male teachers X . 
Average number of female teachers J § 
Male teachers in the evening schools . 
Female teachers in the evening schools 
Averag^e number of male teachers in the evening schools 
Average number of female teachers in the evening schools 
Male teachers in the evening Drawing schools . 
Average number of male teachers in the evening Drawing 
schools ......... 2 

* Six of the 26 are masters' assistants, and i of the 22 is assistant to the principal of the 
Training school. 

t Three of the 39 primaries were in the Training school. They had no regular teachers, 
being taught by sub-teachers under the direction of the principal, who, for convenience, is 
reckoned among the middle-school teachers. 

t Exclusive of special teachers. 

§<)ne of the masters' assistants and one of the middle-school teachers were employed for 
only one term each. 



3 

5 

6 

26 

22 

36 

2 

5 
3 
9 

95 
4 
9 

3 

5 
2 



(B) 



218 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPOKTS. 



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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



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(D) 



220 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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(E) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



221 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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' gs " 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



223 



QAY SCHOOLS. 



Summary of attendance upon the several grades of public day- 
schools for the year 1894 : 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Partially graded.. 
Ungraded 

Totals, 1894 
Totals, 1893 



Whole number 
different pupils. 


6 W) 


-§§ 

Mg 

> « 
< 


Bo 


Boys. 


Girls. 




127 


136 


251 


240 


95.6 


533 


575 


947 


886 


93.6 


472 


447 


772 


704 


91.2 


1,303 


1,206 


1,556 


1,388 


89.2 


42 


30 


63 


55 


87.3 


56 


48 


73 


63 


86.3 


2,533 2,442 


3,662 


3,336 


91.1 


2,445 2,330 


3,425 


3,111 


90.8 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Summary of attendance upon the several grades of public 
evening schools for the year 1894: 



City hall 

Spring street. 
School street. 



Drawing schools 



r Mechanical .. . 
( Architectural . 



Totals, 1894. 
Totals, 1893.. 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



Boys. Girls. 



484 
690 



(H) 



125 
51 



154 

56 

51 I 1 



177 
345 



s * 



153 
194 



'3 ^ 



76.3 

78.8 
83.3 

86.7 

85.7 



81.4 
80.5 



224 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Evening School I'eachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal of City Hall school, for boys. 

Assistants — Arthur W, Morgan, William J. Mooar, Honorie 
J. Crough, Gertrude A. Burns, and Mary A. Walker. 

Etta F. Boardman, principal of Spring-street school, for girls. 

Assistants — Lizzie D. Hartford, Maggie Linen, and Hattie S. 
Tuttle. 

L. H. Carpenter, principal of School-street school, for both 
sexes. 

Assistants — Isabel Esty and Lottie M. Clement. 

Evening Drawing-School Teachers. 
John M. Kendall and Henry W. Allen. 

(I) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



225 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



The following table presents the main features of interest per- 
taining to the attendance upon the public schools for the last ten 
years. 



Date. 


1 

p< 

.5 

° S 

1" 


Whole No. 
belonging.* 


XI 

g 

s 
a 

to 
» a 


a 
S 
"S 
>. 

!«• 

< 

2,430 
2,475 
2,468 
2,500 
2,581 
2,536 
2,689 
2,837 
3,111 
3,336 


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. 

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Oh 


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< 


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n 




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i 

3.2 

a 0. 

e a 




Boys. 


Girls. 


■«1 


1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 


3,806 
3,632 
3,670 
3,712 
3,787 
3,814 
4,071 
4,298 
4,775 
4,975 


1,891 
1,812 
1,817 
1,806 
1,862 
1,881 
2,003 
2,181 
2,445 
2,533 


1,915 
1,820 
1,853 
1,906 
1,925 
1,933 
2,068 
2,117 
2,330 
2,442 


2,725 
2,698 
2,711 
2,768 
2,801 
2,795 
2,940 
3,130 
3,425 
3,662 


90.6 
91.9 
90.8 
90.3 
92.2 
90.7 
91.5 
90.6 
90.8 
91.1 


96 
79 
98 
116 
177 
141 
166 
174 
194 
153 


98 
78 
98 
88 
101 
121 
120 
116 
l'^9 
175 


89 
71 
95 
80 
96 
114 
101 
103 
127 
162 


71 
53 
61 
58 
73 
83 
69 
67 
78 
112 


35 

42 
42 
45 
55 
33 
26 
42 
41 
63 


72 
74 
76 
76 
75 
75 
82 
87 
99 
104 



*In comparing the pupilage and cost of the schools for any year since 1877 with any 
year prior to 1S78, the following facts should receive full consideration : In the reports issued 
prior to i86g, so also in the report for 187(1, no care was taken to exclude duplicate enrollments; 
and, as a consequence, the number of different pupils represented in the schools for each of the 
years prior to 1S69, as well as for the year 1876, is very erroneous. From certain data at hand, 
it is likely that the number given for each of the years in question is about i ,000 too large. It is 
perfectly evident, from the statistical tables in the reports for the years named, that duplicate 
enrollments were not excluded. As a result of the failure to exclude such enrollments, all 
pupils enrolled in any grade of school at the opening of the year and p'assing by promotion 
to a higher grade before the close of the year would be doubly reported. And as whole 
classes, substantially, from every grade in every part of the city become doubly enrolled at the 
time of the mid-year promotions, likewise most pupils who change their residence, it is readily 
seen how largely erroneous the reports must be that do not provide for the exclusion of all 
re-enrollments. 

For many years this matter, and the importance of it, has been well understood; and its 
failure to receive attention in 1S76 was doubtless accidental. See footnotes on page 51 of 
the Report for 1S73, prepared by Superintendent Edgerly ; likewise page 45 of the Report for 
1875, prepared by Superintendent Dearborn; and, also, pages so and 51 of the Report for 
1877. In consequence of the change mentioned in the last-named report, the only item of 
attendance records reported for the years prior to 187S which can with reliability be com- 
pared with those reported since 1S77 is the " Average Daily Attendance," and this item is 
evidently far from right (as given in the report) for 1866. Since 1877, all of the several 
items of attendance record have been based upon uniform data. 

t Including grammar classes in suburban schools. 

+ Exclusive of special teachers. 

(J) 



226 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CHANGES IN CORPS OF TEACHERS. 

The whole number of different teachers employed one term or 
more in the day schools, within the year, has been 112. Their 
respective positions may be learned from the attendance tables on 
pages C, D, E, F, G, and H of the Appendix, but the various 
changes made within the year can be more readily understood by 
an inspection of the following: 



Teachers. 

Mary E. Bunton. 
Lillian Little. 
Guy W. Cox. 
Edith L. Turner. 
At Lowell-street school 
At Lowell-street school 
At Bakersville school 
At Main-street school 
At Rimmon school 



Date of effect of 
resignation. 

Mar 



Date of begin- 
ning service. 



Teachers. 

23. Eliza P. Dougherty. April 

Aug. I. Rosabelle M. Franklin. Sept. 10. 

" Harry N. McLaren. " '< 

" '^ Clydie M. Flanders. " " 

Mary A. Fay. April 9. 

Mabel M. Stevens. Sept. 10. 

Cora M. Farmer. " " 

Hellen Morison. " " 

Marcia M. Moore. " " 



'94. 



Sub-teachers. 

Mary A. Fay. Jan. 26 
Bertha L. Kemp. " " 
Nellie C. Parker. " 
Nellie M. Smith. 
Cora M. Farmer. June 22, '94. 
Clydie M. Flanders. " 
Emma B. Abbott. Jan. 25, '95. 
Lenora J. Clough. " •' 

Marcia M. Moore. " " 
Hellen Morison. " " 
Maud L. Smith. " " 
Hattie S. Tuttle. " 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 
Graduated. Sub-teachers. Entered. 

Mabel L. Howe,* Jan. 29, '94. 
Amy K. Northrup. " " 
Lizabell Savory. " " 
Helen E. True. 
Hattie S. Tuttle. 
Hattie O. Willand. 
Florence L. Abbott. Sept. 10, '94. 
Blanche L. Bachelder. " '' 
Maude L. Lamprey. " " 
Margaret C. Lane. " " 
Harriet H. Richardson. " " 

Katie E. Bacheller. Dec. 31, '94. 

Blanche E. Hicken. " " 

Minnie M. Phillips. " " 

Dora B. Tuson. " " 



* Withdrew, on account of poor health. 



(K) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 227 



VI — Work of Truant Officer. 



January.. . 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June . . . . . 
September 
October . . . 
November 
December . 

Totals 



Absentees 

reported 

from 



37 
28 
34 
50 
63 
19 
T4 
57 
81 
25 



158 



Mo 



33 

24 

15 

25 

27 

17 

6 

7 

31 

8 



No. volun- 
tarily re- 
turned to 



46 



Jlo 



32 



No. reported 

caused to 

attend 



203 



139 



75 






o S c 
. >■ " 
6 =«■ 
iz; 



^v. 



■ ^"3 



10 
13 

7 
24 
14 

2 
10 

4 
19 

7 



100 



22 



Date. 



January... 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

September 
October . . . 
November.. 
December . 

Totals.. 



40 
23 

3 
4 
3 

59 

47 

21 

7 

207 



No. truants 

caused 
to attend 



92 116 



(L) 



109 
81 
69 
52 
54 
21 
156 
153 
184 
72 

951 



85 
62 
48 
94 
70 
39 
94 
117 
136 
45 

790 



•2 aj'5 
P S 



38 
26 
47 

16 

110 
26 
43 
49 

365 



228 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

VII.— Finances.— 1 894. 



Items of Account. 



Salaries of teachers 

Books and stationery 

Free text-books and supplies 

Furniture and supplies 

Repairs 

Care of rooms 

Fuel 

Printing and advertising . . . 

Contingent expenses . . 

Evening common schools.. . 
Evening drawing schools . . . 
Manual Training 

Totals 



Resources from 

appropriations and 

transfers. 


Expenditures, 1894 . 


$63,151.03 


$63,151.03 


55.92 


55.92 


4,484.36 


4,484.36 


58.69 


58.69 


4,964.67 


4,964.67 


4,449.15 


4,449.15 


5,224.27 


5,224.27 


312.08 


312.08 


1,530.40 


1,530.40 


935.61 


935.61 


442.40 


442.40 


1,447.54 


1,447.54 


$87,056.12 


$87,056.12 



COST OF CITY SCHOOLS.* 

Expenditures, as above specified 

Salaries. 
Members of the school board . 
Clerk of the board ..... 
Superintendent of schools 
Truant officer ..... 

Total 

Receipts on Account of Schools 

Literary fund ...... 

Non-resident tuition .... 

Sale of text-books ..... 

Total 

Net amount raised by taxation 

* See foot-note marked * on page J of this appendix. 

(M) 



!87,o56.i2 

$200.00 

200.00 

2,300.00 

625.00 

^90,381. 12 

^7,252.97 
483.65 
229.79 

^7,966.41 

582,414.71 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 229 

The city valuation for 1894 is $28,391,710; and hence the 
rate of school tax for the year is ^82,414.71 ^- $28,391,710, or 
.00290 +. Last year the rate was .00220 -\-. 



VIII.— School Year. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened January i ; closed March 
23. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April g; closed June 22. 
Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 10; closed De- 
cember 14. Vacation of two weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above by the 
school board, 185. 

Average number of days the schools were taught, 175. 

(Being closed several holidays, days o£ " Teachers' Institutes," and half days on account 
of bad weather or insufficient heat.) 



IX.— High School Graduation. 

Program. 

"Gipsy Chorus," from "Bohemian Girl" . . Ba/fe 

The Class of '94. 
Salutatory, with Essay, "Economy of Time" 

Bertha Mae Pattee 
"Graduation Galop ". . . . Charles G. Dunnington 
'94 Banjo Club. 
Ralph W. Fracker. Fred Addison Foster. 

Charles G. Dunnington. Frederick Erskine McLaren. 

Argyle Thomas Johnson. Walter Taylor Sumner. 
Class History .... Theodosia Grant Sargeant 

Fantasie for Violin H. Leonara 

George Albert Fracker. 
Accompaniment by Miss Mamie Fitts, class pianist. 
Class Poem, " The Rivalry of Ajax and Ulysses " 

Anson G. Osgood 
(N). 



230 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Chorus, "Anchored" M. Watson 

Class of '94. 

With solos by Mr. Foster and Miss Bertha Pearl Palmer. 

Class Prophecy .... Robert Philbrick Johnston 

Pianoforte Solo, Caprice, " Recollections of Home " . Mills 

Walter Taylor Sumner. 
Class Oration, "The Progress of Education " 

William Alfred Phinney 

Duet for Banjos Klange 

Messrs. Dunnington and Johnson. 
Valedictory, with Essay, " Self Reliance " 

Clinton Harvey Currier 
Chorus, ' ' The Red Scarf " . . . . Theo. Bonheur 

The Class, with solo by Mr. Sumner. 
Award of Diplomas .... Rev. T. Eaton Clapp 
Class Ode. 

Graduates. 



CLASS 

Arthur Jackson^Abbott. 
Florence Abbott. 
Katie E. Batchelder. 
Irving Bodwell. 
Eugene Freeman Clough. 
Bessie Allan Cochran. 
Clinton Harvey Currier. 
Grace Evangeline Downer. 
Ella Mabel Dowst. 
Charles G. Dunnington. 
Helen Maud Eddy. 
Raymond L. Everett. 
E. Irving Farrington. 
Isaac Byron Fellows. 
James Briggs Fitch. 
Mamie Fitts. 



OF 94. 

Harry B. Marshall. 
Oriola Eleanor Martin. 
Belle McCrillis. 
Fred Erskine McLaren. 
Myra Moore. 
Anson G. Osgood. 
Bertha Pearl Palmer. 
Bertha Mae Pattee. 
Grace Mabel Perkins. 
Grace Alice Phillips. 
William Alfred Phinney. 
Franklin Pierce Plummer. 
Benjamin Price. 
Florence Richardson. 
Charles Augustus Robie. 
Mabel Florence Robinson. 
(O) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 231 



Bernice Neil Fletcher. 
Blanche May Folsoni. 
Mae Belle Ford. 
Fred Addison Foster. 
George Albert Fracker. 
Ralph W. Fracker. 
Maude Margaret Greaney. 
Amy Florence Heath. 
Mary Lydia Heath. 
Etta Blanche Holt. 
Eva Ellen Jackson. 
Argyle Thomas Johnson. 
Robert Philbrick Johnston. 
Lena Marston Josselyn. 
Edwin Scott Lane. 
Alice Gertrude Lovering. 



Ernest Clinton Rowell. 
Theodosia Grant Sargeant. 
Clinton Homer Scovell. 
Woodbury John Scribner. 
Maggie Shay. 
Frank Herman Shilvock. 
Mark Herbert Simpkins. 
Natt Head Smith. 
Walter Taylor Sumner. 
Dora Belle Tuson. 
Lula Agnes Wasley. 
Herbert Leslie Watson. 
George Clarence Wilkins. 
Almond DeForest Woodman. 
Annie Morrill Vose. 



HONOR SCHOLARS. 



Classical Course 

(^ollege Course 

Four Years' English Course 

Three Years' English Course 

Scientific Course 



Clinton Harvey Currier 

Theodosia Grant Sargeant 

Maggie Shay 

Bertha Mae Pattee 

. E. Irving Farrington 



X. — Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, JANUARY 26, 1 894. 



Maud M. Davis, ^16. 
Lynn B. Hammond, ^14. 
Mamie A. Murphy, $10. 
Gladys M. Baker, ^8. 



Anson G. Osgood, $t 
Grace L. Morrison, $ 
Emily M. Corey, $2. 



(P) 



232 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

XI. — Organization, 1895. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, Mayor, 711 Pine street, 

Chairman ex officio. 
JOHN T. GOTT, Mammoth road, 

President of Common Council, ex officio. 

Ward I. Waher H. Lewis, 32 Stark. 

Walter B. Heath, 1 7 Stark. 
Ward 2. Charles H. Manning, 1838 Elm. 

Augustus P. Home, 62 Liberty. 
Ward 3. George D. Towne, 170 Lowell. 

Louis E. Phelps, 103 Walnut. 
Ward 4. Nathaniel L. Colby, 348 Manchester. 

Charles M. Floyd, 324 Hanover. 
Ward 5. James P. Slattery, 217 Central. 

William J. Sughrue, 61 Spruce. 
Ward 6. Harry I. Dodge, Goffe's Falls. 

Herbert E. Richardson, 382 Central. 
Ward 7. Marshall P. Hall, 26 Market. 

Edward B. Woodbury, i Pleasant. 
Ward 8. Luther C. Baldwin, 157 Milford. 

Josiah G. Dearborn, 157 Milford. 
Ward 9. R. Emmet Walsh, 166 Main. 

Jeremiah J. Sullivan, 35 Amory. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

MARSHATX P. HALL. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

EDWARD B. WOODBURY. 

• SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 
(Q) 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 233 

superintendent's clerk. 
FANNIE L. SANBORN. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

CURTIS W. DAVIS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Fina7ice. Mayor Clarke and Messrs. Gott, Hall, Woodbury, 
and Richardson. 

Salaries. Messrs. Woodbury, Slattery, Heath. 

Text-Books. Messrs. Hall, Baldwin, and Dearborn. 

Music. Messrs. Lewis, Phelps, Walsh. 

Draiving. Messrs. Baldwin, Hall, Slattery. 

Manual Training. Messrs. Hall, Baldwin, Floyd. 

Examitiation of Teachers. Messrs. Towne, Dearborn, Colby. 

Fuel and JIeati?ig. Mr. Phelps, Mayor Clarke, Messrs. Gott, 
Manning, Home. 

Repaii's. Messrs. Manning, Baldwin, Phelps. 

Attendance. Messrs. Sughrue, Lewis, Richardson. 

Health. Messrs. Towne, Dodge, Sullivan. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. Messrs. Manning, Hall, Towne, Phelps, Slattery, 
Dearborn, Baldwin. 

Franklin-street. Messrs. Woodbury, Lewis, Richardson. 

Spring-street and Lowell-street. Messrs. Lewis, - Slattery, 
Home. 

Lincoln-street. Messrs. Floyd, Colby, Woodbury, 

Ash-street and Pearl-street. Messrs. Phelps, Towne, Hall. 

Webster-street and Blodget-street. Messrs. Towne, Manning, 
Home. 

Bakersville. ISEessrs. Slattery, Richardson, Dodge. 

Varney School. Messrs. Baldwin, Dearborn, Colby. 

(R) 



234 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Training School. Messrs. Hall, Phelps, Baldwin. 

Wilson Hill School. Messrs. Sughrue, Floyd, Sullivan. 

Main-street and South 'Main-street. Messrs. Dearborn, Sulli- 
van, Lewis. 

Rimmon School. Messrs. Home, Walsh, Heath. 

Amoskeag and Stark District. Messrs. Heath, Slattery, 
Walsh. 

Hallsville and Youngsville. Messrs. Richardson, Sughrue, 
Floyd. 

Gaffe's Falls and Harvey District. Messrs. Dodge, Sughrue, 
Heath. 

Webster's Mills and Mosquito Fond. Messrs. Walsh, Dodge, 
Sullivan. 

Evening Schools. Messrs. Colby, Manning, Woodbury. 



XII.— List of Teachers. 

HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 

Master. Albert Somes. 
Sub-Master. George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. Harry N. McLaren. 

Mary Stanton. 

Nellie Pickering. 

Mary H. Cutler. 

Camille Benson. 

Theresa B. Stanton. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Charles W. Bickford. 
Master's Assistant, Nellie M. Smith. 
Assistants. Carrie E. Hoit. 

L. May Choate. 

Carrie E. Head. 

(S) 



REPORT OP THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 235 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Nellie C. Parker. 
Lower Middle. Hattie G. Flanders. 
Higher Primary. Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. Susie L. Dodge. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie P. Gove. (Fourth Division.) 
Higher Middle. Emma L. McLaren. 

First Floor. — Lozver Grades. 

Lower Middle. Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. Nellie I. Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. Maud L. Smith. 
Lower Primary. Florence M. Grififin. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Frank S. Sutcliffe. 

Master's Assistant. Annie W. Patten. 

Assistants. Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Mabel J. Brickett. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

Mary J. Corcoran.* 

Josephine A. Mitchell.* 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Nettie B. Fogg. 
Lower Middle. Issa May Tuttle. 
Higher Primary. Cora B. Gilford. 
Mixed Primary. Theodora Richardson. 



♦Third floor. 



(T) 



236 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Albert F. King. 

Master's Assistant. Mary Hickey Dowd. 

Assistants. Eliza P. Dougherty. 

Mabel Ruth Brown. 

Edith S. Dole. 

First Floor. — Lower Graaes. 

Higher Middle. Emma J. Cooper. 
Lower Middle. Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Gra?fitnar Grades. 

Master. B. S. Andrew. 
Master's Assistant. Abbie E. Wilson. 
Assistants. Helen E. Frost. 
Alta C. Willand. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Eva F. Tuson. 
Lower Middle. Edith L. Hammond. 
Higher Primary. Jean Gillan. 
Lower Primary. Mary E. Murphy. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns. (Grammar Grades.) 
Assistant.* Lelia A. Brooks. 
Mixed Middle.* Cora M. Farmer. 
Higher Primary. Augusta S. Downs. 



* Third floor. 

(U) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 237 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Primary. S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. Annie Brigham. 

VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grai?imar Grades. 

Master. George Winch. 

Master's Assistant. Barbara B. Joy. 

Assistant. Rosabelle M. Franklin. 

First Floor. — Mixed Grades. 



Assistants. E. Maria Dickey. 

Ellen E. McKean. 

Millie S. Morse. 
Higher Middle. Mary E. Moulton. 
Lower Middle. Mary A. Seavey. 
Higher Primary. Mary J. Walsh. 

HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Master. William H. Huse. 
Master's Assistant. Ella F. Barker. 
Assistant. Olive A. Rowe. 
Higher Middle. Susie G. Woodman. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. Mary L. Ayer. 
Higher Primary. Bertha L. Kemp. 
Lower Primary. E. Alfreda Hall. 
Lower Primary. Annie R. Corson. 



238 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

RIMMON SCHOOL. 

Seco7id Floor. 

Principal. Mary E. Brophy. (Grammar Grades.) 
Mixed Middle. Marcia M. Moore. 

First Floor. 
Higher Primary. Lenora J. Clough. 
Lower Primary. Emma B. Abbott. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

(Merrimack street, corner Union.) 

Principal. Caroline E. Wing. 
Head Assistant. Annie W. Cofran. 

The principal is also assisted by the sub-teachers, i. e., mem- 
bers of the training class. The school embraces the first four 
years of school work, in the following grades : Lower Primary, 
Higher Primary, and Lower Middle. There are four rooms, two 
of lower-primary grade. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Mary W. Mitchell. 
Lower Middle. Gertrude A. Burns. 
Higher Primary. Hellen Morison. 
Higher Primary. • Lottie M. Clement. 

First Floor. — Primary Grades. 

Higher Primary. Mary A. Clement. 

Lower Primary, M. Minnie Sturtevant. 

Lower Primary. Kate T. Clarke. 

Lower Primary. Gertrude L. Southard. 

(W) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 239 
BLODGET-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary. Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. Edith M. Stebbins. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 

Lower Primary. Mary S. Richardson. 
Lower Primary. Mabel M. Stevens. 

First Floor. 

Higher Primary. Helen M. Morrill. 

PEARL- STREET SCHOOL. 

Higher Primary. Mary G. Tynan. 
Lower Primary. M. Clara Hawks. 

WILSON HILL SCHOOL. 

Lower Primary. Huldah C. Graupner. 
Lower Pqmary. Ella Hope. 

SOUTH MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Lower Primary. Delle E. Haines. 
Lower Primary. Georgia M. Cheney. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. Lettie M. Smith. 

Mixed Primary. Clydie M. Flanders. 
Goffe's Falls.* Georgia Kendrick. 

Mixed Primary. Bessie E. Dodge. 

* Suburban. 

(X) 



240 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



No. I 
2 

3 
4 

5 



UNGRADED SCHOOLS.* 

Stark. Inez M. Warren. 
Harvey. Emma J. Ela. 
Youngsville. Louis H. Bailey. 
Webster's Mills. Josephine L. Riddle. 
Mosquito Pond. Nellie M. Atwood. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 



Music. J. J. Kimball. 
Drawing. Charlotte J. Emmins, 
Manual Training. Fred E. Browne. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

(Open from October to March, five evenings each week.) 
City Hall Building. 
One school for boys. 

Spring-Street Building. 

Two schools for girls. 

School- Street Building. 

Two schools, one for each sex. 

Rinimon School. 
Two schools, one for each sex. 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

(Open from October to March.) 
Spring- Street Building. 

Machine-drawing classes meet on Monday and Thursday even- 
ings. 

Architectural-drawing classes meet on Tuesday and Friday 
evenings. 

• Suburban. 

(Y) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 241 
JANITORS. 

High School and Ash-Street School. 

John S. Avery. 

Lincoln-Street and Wilson Hill Schools. 

William Stevens. 
Webster- Street and Blodget-Street Schools. 

Charles F. Jack. 

Spring-Street and Lowell-Street Schools. 

William H. Morrill. 

Training School and Franklin-Street School. 

Edward P. Cogswell. 

Varney and South Main-Street School. 

H. G. Batchelder. 

Main-Street and Rimmon Schools. 

William F. Conner. 

Bakersville School. 

H. C. Dickey. 

Hallsville and Pearl-Street Schools, 

William H. Newry. 

Amoskeag School. 

James E. Bailey. 



Xlll.— School Year, 1895. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens December 31, 1894, closes 
March 22, 1895. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 8, closes June 21. 
Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opens September 9, closes Decem- 
ber 13. 

16 (Z) 



242 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 



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REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Engineer's Office, No. 8 Vine Street, 

Manchester, N. H., Dec. 31, 1894. 

To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils : 
In compliance with section 5, chapter 12 of the Laws and 
Ordinances of the city, I herewith submit my sixteenth annual 
report (it being the forty-ninth of this department) for the year 
ending December 31, 1894, together with a statement of the 
alarms and fires that have been attended to by portions of the 
department and cause of the fires as far as could be ascertained, 
with the value of property endangered, the amount of insurance 
carried, the loss, and the amount of insurance paid. 

It has been diflBcult in some cases to get the value of property 
endangered, the owners refusing to give such information as will 
enable me to make the returns to the insurance commissioner 
of the state as he desires. 

The report will also contain a complete list of the working 
force of the department, giving their rank, occupation, residence, 
etc., a list of the fire-alarm stations and location of keys to the 
same, etc., and right here let me urge upon the property holders 
and residents the necessity of informing themselves of the loca- 
tion of the fire-alarm box nearest their residence or pl^ce of busi- 
ness, and where the keys are kept, — all of which can be learned 
by consulting this report on some of the following pages. 



248 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No fire has occurred during the year that has required the 
entire force of the department to extinguish, and the second 
alarm has been pulled only twice. 

There have been 65 bell alarms, two of which were second 
alarms for same fires, and 71 "stills," making a total of 136, the 
largest number recorded in any year. 

The property endangered (not including the alarms where no 
damage has been done), as far as could be ascertained, is valued 
at ^390,673.52 ; insurance has been carried on same to the 
amount of ^213,511.25 ; the losses, as adjusted, have been 542,- 
581.15, and there has been paid insurance ^32,312.71, leaving a 
net loss, uncovered by insurance, of ^11,268.44. 

THE MANUAL FORCE 

consists of one hundred and forty-five men, of whom twenty- 
eight are on permanent duty and one hundred and seventeen are 
'■'■ on call," divided into companies, as follows: 

1 chief engineer. 

4 assistant engineers — call. 

4 steamer companies of 14 men each — 11 permanent and 45 
call — 56. 

2 steamer and truck companies, 20 men each — 9 permanent, 
31 call — 40. 

1 aerial truck company, 15 men — 3 permanent and 12 call — 

2 hose companies of 12 men each — 2 permanent and 22 call 
— 24. 

I chemical, 5 men — 2 permanent and 3 call — 5 — one of 
whom is detailed as driver of supply wagon. 
Making a total of 145 men. 

THE BUILDINGS. 

The new liosehouse in Bakersville is said to be completed, at 
least it has been accepted as such, and yet before it can be used 
to any advantage, and without risk of injury to horses, the stalls 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 249 

should be set over and the entire stable be remodeled. The lat- 
tice-work in the hose tower should be removed and closed up so 
that in cold weather heat can be let into it to dry the hose and 
prevent its freezing while hanging there to dry. The cellar 
should also be cemented or concreted. 

1 would recommend the putting in of double doors in place of 
single ones in front of the horses at Engine No. 6 station in Mc- 
Gregorville ; also the building of some shelter for the exercise 
wagon, which has been out doors, exposed to all kinds of 
weather, so that the cost of repairs necessitated by such exposure 
would more than compensate for the shed asked for after the 
wagon went into service. 

A suitable shed ought to be built at station of Engine No. 5, 
on Webster street, for housing of carts and sleds. 

The station of Engine No. 2 should be painted outside and 
eavespouts put on to prevent the water from the roof running 
into the cellar, thus causing a dampness to the house nearly the 
entire season. A coat of varnish and some papering at this sta- 
tion would be beneficial. 

The roof of the Central station ought to have a thorough ren- 
ovation. It leaks in many places and has been continually 
"patched" for years, and I think it economy to relay the 
gravel. 

The station of Engine-and-Ladder No. 3 ought to be var- 
nished in the apparatus room and some of the rooms upstairs 
papered. 

THE APPARATUS 

In actual service consists of 6 Amoskeag steam fire-engines, 3 
hose wagons, 3 hose carriages, i aerial truck (with ladders), 2 
ladder trucks, i Chemical engine, i old steam fire-engine, out of 
service, 2 hose carriages in the outlying districts (without com- 
panies), I supply wagon and 4 exercise wagons, which are located 
as follows : 

2 steam fire-engines, with three-horse hitch, at Central station, 
each with one-horse hose wagon attached. 



250 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I Steam fire-engine, three-horse hitch, with i two-horse hose 
wagon, North Main street. 

I steam fire-engine and i one-horse hose carriage, at corner 
Lake avenue and Massabesic street. 

I two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

I steam fire-engine and two-horse hose carriage (with hook- 
and-ladder combination) at corner of Webster and Chestnut 
streets. 

I steam fire-engine and one-horse hose carriage^ on Rimmon 
street, corner of Amory street. 

I two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

I one-horse hose carriage at Central station. 

I one-horse hose carriage, corner Maple and East High streets. 

I aerial hook-and-ladder truck at Central station (three-horse 
hitch). 

I double tank (60 gallons each) chemical engine at Central 
station. 

I supply wagon at Central fire station. 

I steam fire-engine (reserve) at old engine-house, Clinton 
street, of but little use for fire purposes. 

4 exercise wagons, one at Central fire station, one at Engine 
No. 2, one at Engine and Ladder No. 3, one at Engine and 
Ladder No. 6. 

I hand hose carriage at junction of Old Falls road and Front 
street, Amoskeag. 

I two-wheeled hose carriage, Devonshire Mills, Goffe's Falls. 

THE HORSES. 

There are at present thirty-eight horses owned by this depart- 
ment, two of which, although condemned as unfit for service, 
have been on duty most of the time during the fall and winter, 
owing to the inability of some of the recently purchased ones 
to perform the duty required of them. • 

During the past two years it has h&tn pretended that all horses 
purchased were on trial before a sale was made, which in a meas- 
ure was a perfect farce, for whenever the " dictator of the com- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 251 

mittee " saw fit, he approved the bills, and in two or three 
instances the horses were paid for before he took the trouble to 
find out whether they were in any way suited for the positions 
required, and the last pair was paid for before they ever saw a 
day of fire duty, and even after one of them was reported wholly 
unfit, being incapacitated by a weakness on account of which 
he will never be able to fill the requirements of afire department. 
With such methods of doing business we have paid pretty good 
prices for some pretty /(?^r horses during the past year. 

The excitement of a three-horse-hitch seemed too much for the 
gray horse " Prince " of Ladder Truck No. i, and we are trying 
him singly on the hose wagon of Engine No. 4, and he appears 
to do better in this position. This necessitates the purchase of 
another horse for Ladder No. i. 

Two horses have died during the year, — " Stub," for a num- 
ber of years attacjied to Engine No. 4, but recently of Truck No. 
6, died of inflammation March 2. There was an insurance of 
;^ioo. April 27 the black horse "Frank," of Engine No. 3, 
died. He was insured for ^200. The insurance has been re- 
ceived by the city, and the amount should be credited to the 
account of this department. 

April 21 a pair of bay horses was purchased for Truck No. 6 
for ;^4oo, and September 5 a pair of blacks was purchased for the 
Chemical engine. This pair was purchased under protest of the 
chief engineer, as being unfit for fire service, and the oft-repeated 
trials of them has fully verified the fact that they were. ' 

This is another evidence of where the department has to take 
the blame of the cranky whims of committees. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH 

has rendered efficient service during the past year, and has been 
increased by the addition of two fire-alarm boxes, — No. 261 at 
the new grammar school on Pearl street, and No. 323 at the cor- 
ner of Putnam and Bartlett streets. We have set 26 poles, 2 box 
poles, reset 16 old poles, put up 105 two-pin arms, 5 four-pin 
arms, 27 single extensions. 25 two-pin extensions, 2 four-pin ex- 



252 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

tensions, changed i8 tappers and put in 21 tappers, mended 18 
breaks on main line, and 12 on tapper lines. There are about 
thirty-five miles of main line wire and thirty-two miles of tapper 
lines, requiring four hundred and twenty jars of gravity battery. 

THE FIFTEENTH ANNUAL PARADE. 

No appropriation having been made by the city councils for 
an annual parade, the fifteenth was held during '• Merchants' 
Week," Tuesday, October 9, the expenses being defrayed mostly 
by Acting Mayor Worthen and the Board of Trade, and partly 
by individual contributions from members of the department. 

THE firemen's RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

More calls have been made upon this association during the 
past year than during any year of its existence, owing to an un- 
usual number of accidents ; but by the liberality of our citizens 
the amount in the treasury has not been reduced from last year's 
balance. The following is the financial standing : 



Receipts. 




Balance in treasuryFebruary 13, 1894 


$3'493-02 


Received for membership 


21.00 


from dividends on deposits 


209.21 


donations, William F. Hubbard 


25.00 


Peter Riley 


20.00 


« J.B.McCrillis&Son 


25.00 


Brown, Straw &; 




Brown 


25.00 


Major Lewis Simons 


5.00 


N. H. Insurance Co. 


50.00 


Chandler Bros. 


10.00 


Rt. Rev. Bishop 




Bradley 


10.00 


A. P. Olzendam & 




Sons . 


25.00 


Frank W. Leeman . 


15.00 



5»933-23 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



253 



Expenditures. 



id Julian B. Huntley, injuries at fire 


I7.00 


Thomas J. Wyatt 


44.00 


George Dunnington 






21.50 


Artemas C. Barker . 






14.00 


Alphonzo E. Foster 






46.00 


Walter L. Blenus . 






61.00 


Charles Edgar 






65-50 


Samuel W. Patten . 






36.00 


Clarence R. Merrill 






61.00 


Joseph R. Merrill, secrete 


iry's 


salary 


25.00 



Leaving a balance in the treasury of 



5.552-23 



CONCLUSION. 

We have had no extensive conflagrations during the past year, 
although the fire at Nos. 37-43 Manchester street, October 2, 
came near proving serious to some of our firemen and police offi- 
cers. In the early stages of the fire a hot-air explosion occurred, 
throwing three firemen and one police officer down a flight of 
stairs, burning them severely about the hands and face, although 
all have recovered without any serious results. 

This demonstrates the fact that something ought to be done 
by our city councils for the relief of our "call members" who 
are injured in the performance of their duties. 

I would renew my recommendation of last year for a double- 
tank Chemical engine to be placed in the station of Engine No. 
2 on the West Side. Of the four exercise wagons asked for last 
year, two were furnished and placed with Engine and Ladder 
companies Nos. 3 and 6. I would recommend that two more be 
purchased for the use of Engine No. 5 and Hose No. 2. 

I desire again to present the needs of more ladder service, par- 
ticularly in the northern and northeastern sections of the city, 
and urgently recommend the purchase of a light truck similar to 
Ladder No. 6 of McGregorville, 



25i ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS; 

I hope the incoming city government will favorably consider 
my recommendation of last year to increase the salary paid the 
assistant engineers. 

In closing, I wish to express my thanks to His Honor Mayor 
Knowlton, Acting Mayor Worthen, members of the city coun- 
cils, Chief of Police Healy and his officers for their co-operation 
at fires, to the assistant engineers, and last but not least to "the 
backbone" of the department, the officers and men each and 
every one, for their faithful performance of their duties. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 

Chief of Fire Department. 



List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 1 894, 
with Losses and Insurance. 

Still. Wednesday. January 3, 8 a. m. Burning chimney in 
house of ex-Gov. James A. Weston, 621 Maple street. Re- 
sponded with pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, January 6, 7 A. m. Burning chimney in 
house of Michael Lane, 23 Washington street. Responded with 
pony. No damage. 

Box 321. Wednesday, January 10, 9.57 A. m. St. Mary's 
School, Wayne street, McGregorville. Gasoline stove explosion. 
Extinguished by Brothers in charge of school, before the arrival 
of the department. Damage slight. Companies responding : En- 
gines 2, 4, and 6, Hose i, Trucks i and 6. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. 

Still. Friday, January 12, 6.45 p. m. Burning chimney at 
44 Church street. Responded with pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, January 12, 8.27 p. M. Burning chimney at 
61 Amherst street. No damage. 

Still. Friday, January 12, 11.30 p. m. A telephone message 
received that a chimney was burning in room 29, Webster block. 
No fire was discovered. 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 255 

Still. Saturday, January 13, 5.30 p. m. Burning chimney at 
13 Pearl street. Responded with pony. No damage. 

Box 4. Saturday, January 20, 11,18 p. m. Three-story wood- 
en building at 671 Elm street, owned by Aimer D. Gooden, and 
occupied by William Goldman as a clothing store. The fire 
originated on a table from some unknown cause and was ex- 
tinguished by Chemical engine. Damage to building, $1.25 ; 
insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $1.25. Damage to contents, 
$525; insurance, $6,250 ; insurance paid, $525. Companies re- 
sponding : Engines 3 and 4, Hose i, Truck i, and Chemical i. 
Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Monday, January 22, 7.30 P. m. Burning chimney at 
246 Douglas street. Block owned by Frank P. Johnson, and oc- 
cupied by several families. Members of Engine 2 responded. No 
damage. 

Still. Tuesday, January 23, 5.15 p. m. Two-story tenement 
at 73 Amherst street, owned by Michael McCabe, and occupied 
by William Valle'. The fire originated in a closet from some un- 
known cause. Responded with Chemical and pony. Damage 
to building, $25 ; no insurance. Damage to contents, $35 ; no 
insurance. 

Box 82. Thursday, January 25, 4.27 a m. Three-story brick 
house at 78 Lowell street, owned by A. H. Weston, and occupied 
by Mrs. Phineas Sears, as a boarding house. The fire originated 
in a closet on the first floor, from some unknown cause. Dam- 
age to building, $100 ; insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $100. 
Damage to contents, $62 ; insurance, $600 ; insurance paid, $50. 
Companies responding: Engines i, 4, and 5, Hose i and 2, 
Truck I, and Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 4. Thursday, January 25, 6. 11 a. m. Burning chimney 
at corner of Elm and Auburn streets. No damage. Companies 
responding: Engines 3and 4, Hose i, Truck i, and Chemical i. 
Needless alarm. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Saturday, January 27, 9.15 p. m. Two-and-one-half- 
story four-tenement block at 211 Pine street. Overturning of 
kerosene lamp caused slight damage. Chemical engine called. 
Extinguished before arrival of engine. 



256 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Sunday, January 28, 4.10 p. m. Too much smoke 
from a well-filled stove caused an alarm among the Salvation 
Army from under their barracks on Spring street. Chemical re- 
sponded, but services not needed. 

Still. Monday, January 29, 11.15 P- ^- Burning chimney 
at 24 Whitney street. Responded with pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, February 10, 10.27 a. ^^- Two-and-one-half- 
story house, 85 Amherst street, owned by Lawrence Dowd, and 
occupied by John Fitzgerald. The fire originated from defec- 
tive flue. Responded with pony. 

Still. Wednesday, February 14, 8.05 a. m. Burning chim- 
ney in Towne's block, corner Elm and Amherst streets. Re- 
sponded with pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, February 24, 4.17 p. M. Burning chimney 
at 129 Manchester street. Responded with pony. No damage. 

Box 71. Saturday, February 24, 4.43 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney at 112 Auburn street. No damage. Companies respond- 
ing : Engines i and 3, Hose i. Truck 3, and Chemical. Box 
pulled by citizen. 

Still. Tuesday, February 27, 5.25 a. m. Burning chimney 
at rear of 22 Wayne street. No damage. Responded to by de- 
tail from Engine 6. Used pony. 

Box 4. Sunday, March 4, 4.52 a. m. Four-story brick block, 
621 Elm street, owned by Daniel Connor, and occupied by Wm. 
McPherson as a saloon and cafe. The fire originated in a 
wooden spittoon filled with sawdust. It burned through the floor 
into the cellar, doing no damage to cellar but burning the bar 
and fixtures. Damage to building, ^50; no insurance. Damage 
tocontents, $175; insurance, ^300; insurance paid, $125. Com- 
panies responding : Engines 3 and 4, Hose i. Trucks i and 3, 
and Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 212. Monday, March 5, 11.53 p. m. Cottage house in 
process of erection on Jewett street, belonging to John McTier- 
nan. The fire started from some unknown cause near a pile of 
finish boards on first floor. There was a builders' insurance of 
;^5oo. Damage, ^132. 75 ; insurance paid, $132.75. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 257 

Still. Thursday, March 15, 9.10 p. m. Burning chimney at 
5 1 Hanover street in brick block owned by Johnson heirs. ■ No 
damage. Responded with pony. 

Box 213. Tuesday, March 20, 2.10 p. m. A story-and-half 
L on Silver street, owned by J. V. Kelley of Derry, and occupied 
by Gustave Billett. The fire originated from burning grass in 
rear of the house. The shed was nearly consumed and the upper 
story of the house badly used up. Damage to building, $100 ;^ 
insurance, $200; insurance paid, ^100. Damage to contents, 
;^2o j no insurance. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Wednesday, March 21, 11.30 a. m. Fire on roof of 
city farm dwelling. Caught from sparks from chimney and small 
hole burned through the boards and shingles. Damage to build- 
ings, ^4.50 ; insurance, ^900. No damage to contents. Chemical 
engine responded, but fire was extinguished before its arrival. 

Still. Monday, March 26, 11.20 a. m. Three-story wooden 
tenement block at 102 McGregor street, owned by Ed. M. James, 
and occupied by Mr. Frank Parrott as a saloon. The fire was 
caused by a defective chimney. Damage to building, ^25 ; in- 
surance, $6,000 ; insurance paid, $25. No damage to contents. 
Members of Engine 6 responded with hose carriage. Extin- 
guished with pony. 

Still. Tuesday, March 27, 9.15 a. m. Burning chimney at 
123 Hanover street. No damage. Used pony. 

Box 5. Wednesday, March 28, 9.54 a. m. Three-story 
wooden block, 9, 11, and 13 Central street, owned by John 
Sweeney, and occupied by William McLaughlin in No. 9 for a 
cobbler's shop, in whose place it started from a defective flue. 
Most of the damage was in the second story. Damage to build- 
ing, $300; insurance, $1,800; insurance paid, $300. Damage 
to contents, $20; no insurance. Companies responding: En- 
gines I, 2, 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i and 3. Box 
pulled by Officer Bourassau. 

Still. Wednesday, March 28, 6.35 p. m. Two-story house 
on Turner street, owned by Merrill Farmer, and occupied by 
several families. Caused by an overheated chimney. Slight 
damage to woodwork. Engine 2 responded with pony. 



258 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 45. Friday, March 30, 12.30 a.m. Three-story brick 
block, owned by the S. C. Forsaith Co. as a machine shop. The 
fire originated in the boiler room. Damage to building, ^252,20 ; 
insurance, ^20,000; insurance paid, ^252.50. Loss on contents 
covered by " blanket " policy. Companies responding : Engines 
I, 2, 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i and 3. Box pulled 
by citizen. 

Still. Monday, April 2, 11.24 a. m. Grass fire at Alonzo 
Elliott's, Ray brook. Engine No. 5 responded with hose car- 
riage. 

Still. Tuesday, April 4, 12.24 p- m. Brush fire on Dow's 
Hill, Hooksett road. Responded with detail of men. Out four 
hours. 

Box 114. Tuesday, April 4, 3.02 p. m. Burning leaves in 
barn cellar of D. B. Varney. No damage. Companies respond- 
ing, Engines i, 5, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Truck 3. Ex- 
tinguished before arrival of department. Box pulled by cit- 
izen. 

Still. Tuesday, April 4, 8.40 p. m. Rekindling of brush 
fire in Dow's woods. Took delegation of men. Out five 
hours. 

Still. Saturday, April 7, 11 a. m. Burning chimney at 528 
Chestnut street. Responded with pony. No damage. 

Still. Monday, April 8, 12.25 p* ^^- Two-story wooden 
block, 510 Chestnut street, owned by heirs of Joseph A. Haines. 
Fire in partition caught from defective chimney. Damage 
slight. Chemical responded. Extinguished before their arrival. 

Box 26. Saturday, April 14, 3.17 p. m. Barn rear of 18 
South street, owned by James Barnes and occupied by Girardin 
Bros., dealers in hay and straw. The fire originated in the hay 
loft, probably caused by carelessness in smoking. The L attached 
to the barn was slightly damaged. Damage to building, $500 ; 
insurance, ^2,500; insurance paid, $375. Damage to contents, 
$100 ; no insurance. 

Still. Sunday, April 15, 12.55 p- ^- Brush fire near John 
McQuesten's on river road, near Bedford line. Engine 2 re- 
sponded with hose wagon. No damage. 



REPOKT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 259 

Still. Sunday. April 15, 8.20 p. m. Brush fire on Bedford 
road near Robie's tar sheds. Land owned by Hartshorn heirs. 
Engine 2 responded with hose wagon, but could find no fire 
near sheds on their arrival. 

Box 213. Monday, April 16, 12.55 ^- ^- One-story cottage 
on Maple street, near Shasta, owned and occupied by Frank 
Rankin. Fire originated from defective chimney, and burned 
through the roof. Damage to building, $87; insurance, ^300; 
insurance paid, $87. Damage to contents, $43 ; insurance, ^100 ; 
insurance paid, $43. Companies responding : Engines i, 3, and 
Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. Box pulled by night watchman 
at Austin, Flint & Day's works. 

Box 27. Monday, April 16, 9.46 a. m. Cottage house 471 
Manchester street, owned by Mrs. Margaret E. Amsden and oc- 
cupied by her and Charles A. Williams. The fire was in a 
lounge near stove. Cause unknown. Damage to building $20; 
insurance, ^1,500; insurance paid, $20. Damage to contents, 
;^2o; insurance, ^200; insurance paid, ^20. Companies re- 
sponding : Engines 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose 2, and Truck 3. 
Box pulled by Assistant Chief of Police Cassidy. 

Box 54. Tuesday, April 17, 2.27 p. m. Brush fire on Bed- 
ford road, near Bedford line. No damage. Needless alarm. 
Companies responding : Engines 2, 6, and Chemical, Truck 3. 
Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Wednesday, April 18, 6.35 p. m. Burning chimney 
in rear of 178 Manchester street. Chemical responded. Used 
pony. No damage. 

Box 4. Friday, April 20, 4.34 p. m. Three-and-one-half- 
story wooden block, 66 Lake avenue, owned by W. E. Prescott and 
occupied by Joseph Dufrain and others. The fire originated in a 
bed from some unknown cause, but was extinguished by Chemical 
engine. Damage to building, $10; insurance, $1,500; insur- 
ance paid, $10. Damage to contents, $10; no insurance. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 2,3, 4, and Chemical, Hose i, 
Trucks I and 3. Box pulled by Assistant Engineer Palmer. 

Box 313. Sunday, April 22, 10.32 a. m. Two-story wooden 



260 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

building on Joliette street, owned by Frank I. Lessard and oc- 
cupied by Alsace Demers as dwelling and bake shop. The fire 
caught from coals from the oven and burned a little loose wood 
in the room. Damage to building, ^6 ; covered by insurance. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, 4, and 6, Hose i, Truck 6, 
and Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 6. Sunday, April 22, 8.06 p. m. Room 23, Smyth's 
block, occupied by Charles H. Gilbert. A lace curtain caught 
from a kerosene lamp but was pulled down and extinguished with- 
out further damage. Companies responding: Engines i, 4, and 
Chemical, Hose i and 2, Trucks i and 3. Box pulled by Officer 
William Steele. 

Still. Wednesday, April 25, 11.45 ^- ^^- Burning chimney 
in Martin's block, corner Elm and Lowell streets. Used pony. 
No damage. 

Box 21. Monday, April 30, 12.55 ^- ^^- Four-story brick 
block, 177 Manchester street, owned by Frederick Smyth, and 
occupied on first floor by Joseph Belmore & Son, where the fire 
started from some unknown cause, and extended by the partitions 
to the second story. Several of the inmates of the tenements 
above the store were rescued by the members of the department 
by ladders from the truck. Cause of the fire unknown. No 
damage to building. Damage to contents, $350; insurance, 
^750; insurance paid, ^350. Companies responding: Engines 
I, 3, and Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i and 3. Box pulled by 
Officer O'Malley. 

Box 15. Friday, May 4, 12.19 p. m. Three-and-one-half- 
story wooden tenement block, 63 Pearl street, owned by Mary 
Platts's heirs, and occupied by several families. Sparks from 
chimney ignited the shingles. Damage to building ^10; insur- 
ance, ; insurance paid, $10. No damage to contents. Com- 
panies responding: Engines i, 4, 5, 6, and Chemical, Hose i 
and 2, Truck i. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 4. Tuesday, May 8, 11.02 a. m. Three-story wooden 
building, 53 Lake avenue, owned by Thomas Stewart and occu- 
pied by Mrs. Hannah McQuade as a saloon. The fire started 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 261 

from some unknown cause in the basement. Damage to build- 
ing, ^50; insurance, ^2,000; insurance paid^ ^50. No damage 
to contents. Companies responding: Engines i, 2, 3, and 
Chemical, Hose i, and Truck i. Truck 3, meeting with acci- 
dent that broke the pole, could not respond. Box pulled by cit- 
izen. 

Still. Wednesday, May 9, 9.35 p. m. Burning chimney at 
213 Cedar street, in house owned by John Morrison and occu- 
pied by Florence Sullivan. Used pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, May 11, 12.25 ^- ^^' Burning chimney at 53 
Amherst street. Chemical responded with pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, May 12, 7.50 p. m. Smoking stove caused 
a little excitement at 35 Market street, Amoskeag Corporation. 
Chemical responded. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, May 13, 9 a. ini. A candle burning at the 
casket of a dead child tipped over and ignited drapery. The 
Chemical responded but the fire was extinguished before it 
arrived. 

Out of town call, 2-2-2. Tuesday, May 15, 2.35 p. m. A 
telephone message was received of a forest fire between the Mas- 
sabesic and Bald Hill roads. Detail of men responded, but, as 
there was no danger from the fire, returned without performing 
any work. 

Still. Tuesday, May 15, 3.40 p. M. Burning chimney at 65 
Amherst street. Chemical responded. Used pony. No dam- 
age. 

Still. Monday, May 21, 9.40 a. m. An oil stove in store 
occupied by Mrs. J. D. Lafond, at 1015 Elm street, set fire to 
some paper, and the Chemical was called, but the fire was extin- 
guished before the arrival of the engine. No damage. 

Box 52. Thursday, June 7, 6.16 p. m. Burning chimney at 
415 Main street. No damage. 

Box 6. Thursday, June 7, 11.57 p.m. One-story brick block 
on Elm street, owned by The Head & Dowst Co., and occupied 
by Charles Noll as a box factory, was well under way when the 
fire was seen from City Hall square, and the box was pulled by 



262 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Ofificer William Steele. The cause of the fire was evidently 
an overheated flue about the boiler. Damage to building, ^i,- 
450; insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, $1,450. Damage to 
contents, $9,476.57; insurance, $5,000; insurance paid, $4,300, 
Companies responding : Engines i, 4, and Chemical, Hose i and 
2, Truck I and 3. 

Box 4. Friday, June 8, 12.05 p. m. Three-story tenement 
house, 64 Cedar street, owned and occupied by Hugh Keiley. 
Sparks from the chimney caused a lively blaze on the roof. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical. Damage to building, $28 ; insurance, 
$1,100; insurance paid, $28. No damage to contents. Com- 
panies responding : Engines i, 2, 3, and Chemical, Hose i, 
Trucks I and 3. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 71. Sunday, June 17, 7.55 a. m. Burning chimney in 
rear of 71 Cedar street. Needless alarm. Extinguished with 
pony. Companies responding • Engines 3, 4, and Chemical, 
Hose I, Truck 3. Box pulled by Officer Sullivan. 

Still. Sunday, June 17, 3.03 p. m. Unadjusted thermostat 
in fourth story of Crafts & Green's shoe shop, West Hancock 
street. Hose from Engine 2 responded. No damage. 

Box 8. Tuesday, July 3, 12.56 p. m. Four story brick block, 
9 Hollis street, owned by Charles F. Morrill and occupied by 
several families. The fire originated from some unknown cause 
in a closet in the tenement occupied by Homer Cote. Damage 
to building, $100; insurance, $6,000; insurance paid, $100. 
Damage to contents, $10 ; no insurance. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines I, 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose I and 2, Truck I. Box 
pulled by citizen. 

Box 15. Wednesday, July 4, 9.32 p. m. Three-story block, 
2 Pearl street, owned by Hoyt and Simonds, and occupied by 
several families. Sparks from fire-works ignited a bed in the 
room occupied by Archibald Boulanger. The bed was thrown 
from the window, and the services of the department were not 
needed. Damage to contents, $6 ; no insurance. Companies 
responding : Engines i, 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Truck 
1. Box pulled by citizen. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 263 

Still. Monday, July 9, 10.58 p. i\l Three-story wooden 
block, 243 East High street, owned by Sanborn T. Worthen, 
and occupied by several families. Caused by lamp explosion. 
Damage slight. Hose 2 responded. 

Still. Tuesday, July 10, 1.25 p. m. Tenement house owned 
by John T. Moore, 221 Hanover street, and occupied by John Mc- 
Elroy. The fire started in a closet from some unknown cause. 
Damage slight. Chemical engine responded and extinguished 
the fire with pony. 

Still. Wednesday, July 11, 4.40 p. m. Peat fire in bog on 
Whittemore flats. Engine 6 responded with engine. No dam- 
age. 

Box 26. Thursday, July 12, 4.08 a. m. Three-story wooden 
carriage-house at the corner of Bridge and Malvern streets, owned 
and occupied by J. B. McCrillis & Son, carriage manufacturers. 
The cause is unknown. Companies responding : Engines 3 and 
4, Hose I and 2, Truck 3, and Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 26. Thursday, July 12, 7.28 p. m. Same as above. Saw- 
dust and shaft hanger. No damage, and extinguished without 
the aid of the department. Companies responding : Engines 
I, 3, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Truck 3. Box pulled by 
citizen. 

Box 26. Saturday, July 14, 6.25 A. M. Same as above. 
Sawdust packing between sheathing. Companies responding : 
Engines i, 3, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Truck 3. Damage 
to building, ^2,000; insurance, $1,400; insurance paid, $1,400. 
Damage to contents, $6,134.37; insurance, $4,350; insurance 
paid, $4,350. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Sunday, July 15, 1.38 p. m. Brush and stump fire at 
Derryfield park, near pest-house. Chemical engine was called, 
and stayed until the danger was over. Services not required. 

Still. Tuesday, July 17, 6.42 p. m. Burning chimney at 174 
Chestnut street in Chestnut block, owned by Griffin Bros., and 
occupied by Rhoda Carroll. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Box 82. Thursday, July 19, 4.22 p. M. Night lunch cart sta- 
tioned in wood-yard at the corner of Lowell and Chestnut streets. 



264 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Owned and occupied by R. Wood. Fire caught from an oil 
stove and destroyed the "body " and a portion of the fixtures. 
Damage, $275 ; insurance, ^250; insurance paid, ^100. Com- 
panies responding: Engines i, 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose i and 
2, Truck I. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 52. Friday, July 27, 12,20 a. m. A small barn situated 
in the rear of 29 Winter street, owned and occupied by J. C. 
Starr. The fire was undoubtedly caused by tramps. Damage to 
building, $200 ; insurance, $200 ; insurance paid, $200. Dam- 
age to contents, ^30 ; no insurance. 

Still. Saturday, July 28, 2.50 p. m. Unadjusted thermostat 
causes a false alarm from Crafts & Green's shoe shop, West Han- 
cock street. Responded to by hose wagon of Engine 2. No 
damage. 

Box 32. Sunday, July 29, 3.38 p. m. One-story brick build- 
ing owned and occupied by Langdon Manufacturing Co. as a 
waste store-room. Spontaneous combustion among the waste 
was the cause. Damage to contents, $30. Companies respond- 
ing : Engines 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose i, Truck i. Box pulled 
by citizen. 

Box 212. Sunday, July 29, 4.30 p. m. Woodpile in grove of 
Elliot Hospital grounds. Set by boys. No damage. Compa- 
nies responding : Engines 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. 

Box 13. Sunday, July 29, 4.45 p. m. Two-story-and-a-half 
dwelling, corner of Brook and Chestnut streets, owned and occu- 
pied by Lewis Simons. Caused by lightning. This alarm came 
in before all of the apparatus answering to Box 212 had returned 
to quarters. Damage to building, ^19.50; insurance, $2,500; 
insurance paid, $19.50. Damage to contents, $27 ; insurance, 
$2,700; insurance paid, $27. Companies responding: Engines 
I, 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Truck i. Box pulled by 
citizen. 

Box 8. Friday, August 3, 10.18 p. m. Three-story wooden 
building situated on Winter Place, owned and occupied by W. 
F. Hubbard as a sash and blind factory. The fire caught in the 
boiler-room from a defective flue, and soon spread through each 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 265 

story to the roof. Damage to building, ^400 ; no insurance. 
Damage to contents, $400 ; no insurance. Companies respond- 
ing : Engines i, 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Truck i. 
Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 21. Saturday, August 4, 9.02 a. m. Three-story tene- 
ment block, 142 Merrimack street, owned by A. L. and F. G. 
Walker, and occupied by several families. Fire started in the 
tenement occupied by George Marsh by up-setting an oil stove. 
Damage to building, ^140; insurance, ^2,000; insurance paid, 
^140. Damage to contents, ^100; no insurance. Companies 
responding; Engines 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i and 
3. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 8. Saturday, August 4, 11.20 p. m. Three-story brick 
block, corner of Elm and Spring streets, known as Wells block, 
owned by heirs of Dr. A. B. Story, and occupied as stores and 
tenements. The fire started in rear part of store, 1062 Elm street, 
occupied by Andrew C. Brember as a bakery, and extended to 
I. L. Stickney's leather store. Cause unknown. Damage to 
building, $562 ; insurance, $6,000; insurance paid, $562. Dam- 
age to Brember's contents, $850; insurance, $2,000; insurance 
paid, $850. Damage to Stickney's contents, $184.40; insur- 
ance, $16,450; insurance paid, $184.40. Companies respond- 
ing : Engines i, 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Truck i. 
Box pulled by officer. 

Box 82. Sunday, August 6, 1.03 a. m. Rekindling of the 
Brember fire. Extinguished by Chemical without additional 
loss. Companies responding : Engines i, 4, 5, Hose i and 2, 
Truck I. Box pulled by citizen! 

Still. Friday, August 17, 7.40 p, m. Brush fire on land 
owned by John C. Ray near Pine Grove cemetery. Chemical 
responded, but rendered no service. Fire out before their ar- 
rival. 

Still. Saturday, August 18, 8.50 p. m. A pile of sleepers on 
railroad track above electric light station. Chemical responded. 
Extinguished with hydrant stream. 

Box 4. Monday, August 20, 7.17 p. m. Burning chimney at 



266 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

corner of Chestnut and Cedar streets. Needless alarm. Com 
panies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i 
and 3. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 212. Friday, August 24, 4.02 p. m. One-story wooden 
building at corner of Grove and Taylor streets, owned by W. G. 
Westover, and occupied by Westover & Gould for the manufac- 
ture of stair rails, etc. The cause of the fire was probably 
sparks from the boiler. Damage to building, ;^i,ooo; insurance, 
;^i,ooo; insurance paid, $1,000. Damage to contents, $2,500 ; 
insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $1,500. Companies respond- 
ing : Engines 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose 2, and Truck 3. Box 
pulled by citizen. 

Still. Monday, August 27, 7.20 a. m. Burning chimney at 
31 Bridge street. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Box 71. Friday, August 31, 8.55 p. m. Four-story tenement 
block, 180 Chestnut street, owned by Griffin Brothers, and occu- 
pied by several families. In the tenement occupied by Richard 
M. Cann a person lighting paper from a gas jet to light a pipe 
dropped a spark in a child's crib. Extinguished before arrival 
of department. No damage. Companies responding : Engines 
I, 3, and Chemical, Hose i, Truck 3. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 21. Tuesday, September 4, 2.07 p. m. Loose paper in 
an unoccupied shed at rear of 88 Merrimack street. Extin- 
guished with two pails of water before arrival of the department. 
No damage. Companies responding: Engines i, 3, and Chemical, 
Hose I, Trucks i and 3. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Tuesday, September 4, 5.03 p. m. Brush fire on Mam- 
moth road near V. W. Fairbanks's. Took two-horse team and 
men, but services not needed. 

Box 21. Saturday, September 8, 7.56 a. m. Tar kettle in 
rear of J. N. Foss's stable, 148 Merrimack street, boiled over. 
Damage to building, $26; insurance, $3,700; insurance paid, 
$26. No damage to contents. Companies responding : Engines 
I, 3, and Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i and 3. Box pulled by 
citizen. 

Box 5. Monday, September 10, 10.10 A. M. Four-story brick 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 267 

block, corner of Elm and Central streets, owned by Brown, Straw 
& Brown, and occupied by George R. Taftas a hotel. The fire 
originated in a dark storeroom from filling lamps on the third 
floor, and communicated to the roof through a light shaft. Most 
of the damage was confined to the third story. Damage to build- 
ing, ^480.50 ; insurance, $20,000 ; insurance paid, $480.50. Dam- 
age to contents, $300; insurance, $2,100 ; insurance paid, $191. 
Companies responding: Engines i, 2, 3, and Chemical, Hose i. 
Trucks I and 3. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Monday, September 24, 2.25 p. m. Burning chimney 
in block owned by Adolph Becker, no West street, and occu- 
pied by Charles Lange. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, September 29, 12 m. Slight fire at 58 
Spring street, in a mattress. Extinguished with a pail of water. 

Box 6. Tuesday, October 2, 1.18 a. m. Four-story brick 
block, 37 and 43 Manchester street, owned by Edward Wagner, 
and occupied by George Connor (37) and W. H. Hurd (43) as 
saloons, and by Albina Kneifel as a boarding house. The fire 
originated from some unknown cause in an arched partition over 
Connor's saloon- and extended to the tenement upstairs. In the 
early part of the fire an explosion of hot air or gas occurred, burn- 
ing Driver Blenus and Hoseman Patten of Hose i and Ladder- 
man Edgar of Truck i quite seriously about the face and hands ; 
also Officer Hutchins of the police force. Damage to building, 
$500; insurance, $6,000; insurance paid, $395. Damage to 
Connor's contents, $800; insurance, $1,300; insurance paid, 
$800. Damage to Kurd's contents, $100 ; insurance, $2,000; 
insurance paid, $55. Damage to Kneifel's contents, $50; no in- 
surance. Companies responding : Engines i, 4, and Chemical, 
Hose I and 2, Trucks i and 3. Box pulled by Officer Hutchins. 

Still. Tuesday, October 2, 5.10 p. m. Burning chimney at 
30 Clark avenue. Pearl street, in tenement block owned by heirs 
of Joseph B. Clark. Sheathing about the chimney burned a lit- 
tle. Damage to building, $4.73 ; insurance, $2,000; insurance 
paid, $4.73. No damage to contents. Chemical responded. 

Still. Friday, October 12, 3.15 p. m. A smoking chimney 



268 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

in a room in second story of Ray's block, corner of Elm and 
Kidder streets. Called the Chemical. No damage. 

Box 214, 6.40 p. M. Box 215, 6.50 p. M. Sunday, October 
14. A barn and hen-pen attached, corner Wilson and Young 
streets, owned by Alvina Chabotte, and occupied by Albert 
Lamy. Cause unknown. Damage to building, ^150 ; insurance, 
^150 ; insurance paid, ^150. Damage to contents, ^100; insur- 
ance, ^100; insurance paid, ;^ I GO. Companies responding : En- 
gines I, 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Trucks i and 3. 

Box 7. Tuesday, October 16,9.55 p. m. One-story wooden 
building,. 370 Chestnut street, owned by Mrs. Natt. Head, and 
occupied by W. H. Adams as a harness shop. The fire was 
caused by spontaneous combustion and did but little damage to 
building. Extinguished by Chemical. Damage to contents, 
;^i6o ; insurance, $400 ; insurance paid, $160. Companies re- 
sponding : Engines i, 3, and Chemical, Hose i. Trucks i and 3. 
Box pulled by Officer Burns. 

Box 212. Wednesday, October 17, 2.49 a. m. Three-story 
tenement block, Oakland and Highland Park avenues, owned 
and occupied by Ernest Boisvert. The cause of the fire is unex- 
plained. It started in the center of the building, and on account 
of the distance from a box and delay in communicating informa- 
tion of the fire, it gained considerable headway before the arri- 
val of the department. Damage to building, ^1,200 ; insurance, 
;^2,8oo; insurance paid, ^1,200. Damage to contents, $500; 
insurance, ^600 ; insurance paid, $500. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines i, 3, and Chemical, Hose 2, 
Truck 3. Box pulled by member of Engine Co. 3. 

Still. Thursday, October 18, 11.26 A. m. Brush fire on 
Kelley street, McGregorville. Members of Engine 6 responded 
with ponies. No damage. 

Box 321. Friday, October 19, 8.46 A. m. Cottage house at 
294 Dubuque street, owned and occupied by Joseph Huard. 
Clothes in a closet discovered on fire, presumably from matches. 
Damage to contents, $10; no insurance. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 2, 6, and Chemical, Hose i, Truck 6. Box pulled 
by citizen. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 269 

Box 45. Monday, November 5, 3.04 a. m. Freight car of 
Boston & Maine with thirteen bales of cotton for Amory Mills. 
Three other cars damaged. Damage to cars, $275; damage to 
cotton, ^355.65 ; insured in " blanket " insurance for $461.25 ; 
insurance paid, $355.65. Companies responding: Engines i, 
2, 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i and 3. 

Still. Tuesday, November 6, 8.45 a. m. Cottage house, 
236 Amherst street, owned and occupied by Mrs. B. P. Cilley. 
Burning chimney ignited the woodwork, and Chemical engine 
responded. Damage to building, $20.43; insurance, $2,500; 
insurance paid, $20.43. ^^ damage to contents. 

Box 6. Wednesday, November 7, 9.53 a. m. Four-story 
brick building, 22-24 Hanover street, owned by Harrington 
heirs and occupied by E. C. Wescott as dry and fancy goods 
store. One of the clerks with lighted match accidentally set fire 
to cotton batting. Damage to contents, $114; insurance, 
$10,000; insurance paid, $114. Companies responding: En- 
gines I, 4, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Trucks i and 3. Box 
pulled by citizen. 

Still. Friday, November 9, 8.20 p. m. Four-story brick 
block, Prout's block, 696 Elm street. Broken lamp. No dam- 
age. Chemical responded. 

Box 315. Wednesday, November 14, 4.47 a. m. Two-story 
wooden building, 156 Front street, 'Skeag, owned by Tom ,W. 
Robinson and occupied by Edward Diipont as blacksmith shop. 
The fire caught from the forge. Damage to building, $100 ; in- 
surance, $400 ; insurance paid, $100. Damage to contents, $10; 
• insurance, $100 ; insurance paid, $10. Companies responding: 
Engines 5, 6, and Chemical, Ladder 6. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Wednesday, November 14, 11.30 p. m. Burning 
chimney at 43 Winter street, owned by L. H. Loughlin and oc- 
cupied by three families. Members of Engine 2 responded. 
Used pony. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, November 15, 2.10 p. m. Rubbish in cel- 
lar of Thomas Sullivan's cigar store, 984 Elm street. Members 
of Chemical responded. No damage. 



270 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Sunday, November i8, 9.50 p. m. Burning chimney 
in Smyth's block. Members of Chemical responded. Used 
pony. No damage. 

Box 18. Tuesday, November 20, 6.39 p. m. Three-story 
wooden block at 515 Lincoln street, owned by Mrs. Mary A. 
Whittier and occupied by several families. The fire originated in 
the tenement occupied by H. F. Hunt. Caused by sparks from 
stove catching on a rug and communicating to the partition. 
Damage to building, $35 ; insurance, ^3,000 ; insurance paid, 
$^^. Damage to Hunt's contents, $100; insurance, S500 ; in- 
surance paid, $100. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, and 
Chemical, Hose i and 2, Truck 3. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 52. Thursday, November 22, 10.49 ^' ^^' ^ small horse- 
shed in rear of 472 Granite street, ' owned and occupied by 
Joseph Gare, caught fire from some unknown cause. A horse 
inside was so badly burned that it was shot. Damage to build- 
ing, $5 ; to contents, $50 ; no insurance. Companies respond- 
ing : Engines 2, 6, and Chemical, Hose i. Ladder 6. Box 
pulled by citizen. 

Box 7. Monday, November 26, 9.33 a. m. Tar kettle boiled 
over in rear of 196 Manchester street, E. Turcotte's stable. 
Companies responding : Engines 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose i. 
Ladders i and 3. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Monday, November 26, 6.50 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney at 51 Cedar street. Responded to by members of Chem- 
ical Engine Co. Used pony. 

Still. Wednesday, November 28, 9.10 A. m. Brush fire on 
North Weare Railroad, on land owned by Manchester Beef Co. 
Members of Engine 2 responded with hose wagon. No damage. 

Still. Monday, November 26, 10.10 A. m. Grass fire on 
Taylor street, near Westover and Gould's. Engine 3 responded 
with apparatus. No damage. 

Still. Monday, November 26, 6.05 p. m. Burning chimney 
at 1235 Elm street. Members of Chemical responded. Used 
pony. 

Still. Monday, November 26, 7.15 p. m. Burning chimney 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 271 

at 133 Central street. Members of Chemical responded. Used 
pony. 

Still. Monday, November 26, 7.40 p. m. Burning chimney 
at 180 Chestnut street. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Box 21. Thursday, November 29, 1.43 a. m. Second alarm 
pulled immediately. Four-and-one-half-story wooden tenement 
building at 195 Hanover street, owned by Frederick Smyth, Ken- 
dall heirs, and Ambrose Pairie, and occupied by several families 
The fire was caused by a defective flue in the rear tenement, and 
gained considerable headway in the partition before it was dis- 
covered. Damage to building, $1,075 ; insurance, $4,150; in- 
surance paid, $1,075. Damage to contents, $155 ; insurance, 
$500; insurance paid, $155. Companies responding: Engines 
I, 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose i and 2, Trucks i and 3. Box pulled 
by officer. 

Box 17. Monday, December 3, 7.21 a. m. Three-story 
double tenement, corner Maple and Concord streets. Loose ex- 
celsior in basement ignited from some unknown cause and was 
extinguished before the arrival of the department. No damage. 
Companies responding : Engines i, 3, and Chemical, Hose i 
and 2, Truck 3. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 5. Thursday, December 6, 5.31 p. m. Breaking a kero- 
sene lamp in Palmer House, corner of Elm and Pleasant streets, 
caused an alarm. No damage. Companies responding : En- 
gines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i and 3. Box pulled 
by citizen. 

Box 8. Monday, December 10, 11.55 P- ^^- Four- story 
brick block, 11 48 Elm street, owned by Hiram D. Upton and 
occupied for stores, tenements, and offices. The fire started from 
some unknown cause in the basement of millinery store of 
Archambeault & Co., destroying nearly all their stock and dam- 
aging others by smoke. Damage to building, $1,550; insur- 
ance, $40,000 ; insurance paid, $1,550. Damage to Archam- 
beault's contents, $1,300 ; insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, 
$1,300. Damage to F. H. Auger's contents, $100 ; insurance, 
$2,300; insurance paid, $100. Damage to Brault Medicine Co., 



272 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

$23 ; insurance, ^200 ; insurance paid, ;^23. Damage to A. G. 
Grenier's contents, $100; insurance, |2,ooo ; insurance paid, 
$100. Damage to Hub Clothing Co., ^125; insurance, $5,000; 
insurance paid, ^125. Damage to O. C. McColley's contents, 
^325; insurance, ^500; insurance paid, $325. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines i, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose i, 2, Truck i. Box 
pulled by Officer Badger. 

Still. Tuesday, December 11, 10.45 ^- ^^' Slight fire in 
the rubbish in cellar of Amoskeag Clothing Co., at 1045 Elm 
street. Members of Chemical responded. No damage. 

Still. Friday, December 14, 7.55 p. m. Burning chimney 
in house owned and occupied by Adolph Becker, 115 West 
street. West Manchester. Members of Engine 2 responded with 
pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, December 15, 1.54 p. m. Tar kettle on 
Spring street tipped over and tar caught fire. Chemical re- 
sponded. Used pony. 

Box 9. Tuesday, December 18, 1.05 a. m. Sparks from a 
locomotive on Concord & Montreal Railroad set fire to grass in 
field of George E. Hall, corner of Webster street and North 
River road. No damage. Companies responding : Engines 
1,5, and Chemical, Hose i, Truck i. Box pulled by Officer 
Burns. 

Still. Tuesday, December 18,7.35 A- ^^- Burning chimney 
at 350 Chestnut street. No damage. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. Used pony. 

Still. Saturday, December 22, 4.05 p. m. Burning chimney 
at 388 Cartier street, owned by Dr. Sturtevant, and occupied by 
Frank Daniel. Members of Engine 6 responded with pony. No 
damage. 

Box 212. Sunday, December 23, 1.05 p. m. Two-and-a-half- 
story brick house on Mooresville road, three and a half miles 
from Central station, owned and occupied by Mrs. Susan C. 
Blodgett. The fire originated from the same defective flue as the 
one of March 16, 1889, and destoyed the most of the inside of 
the main house, particularly the west end, but was kept entirely 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



273 



from the L adjoining the east end. Most of the furniture .was 
removed. Water was taken from Cohas brook by Engine i, 
pumped through 1,050 feet of hose, into Engine 3, which pumped 
through 1,300 feet of hose to fire. Damage to building, $3,000 ; 
insurance, $3,500 ; insurance paid, $2,675. Damage to con^ 
tents, $400; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $310. Compa- 
nies responding: Engines i, 3, and Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. 
Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Sunday, December 23, 7.10 p. m. Burning chimney 
at 133 Amherst street. No damage. Chemical Company re- 
sponded. Used pony. 

Still. Monday, December 24, 6.05 p. m. Smyth's block. 
Slight fire in floor timbers over the Opera House. Cause un- 
known. No damage. Chemical Company responded. 

Still. Saturday, December 29, 7.30 p. m. Burning chimney 
in Washington block, Pearl street. Members of Chemical Com- 
pany responded. Used pony. No damage. 

Still. Monday, December 31, 6.55 p. m. Cottage house 78 
West street, West Manchester, owned by Mrs. E. B. Freschl, and 
occupied by George W. Pierce. A child's crib caught fire from 
a stove. Members of Engine 2 responded with hose carriage 
and ponies. Used ponies. Damage to contents, $25 ; no insur- 
ance. 



Number of bell alarms . 
Number of still alarms . 

Total .... 

Valuation of property endangered 
Insurance on property endangered 

Aggregate losses for 1893 
Amount of insurance paid 



65 
71 

136 

$390,673-52 

2i3'5ii-25 

$42,581.15 

3i>3i2.7i 

$11,268.44 



Net loss not covered by insurance 

The several companies have responded to alarms as follows : 

Engine Co. No. i — 36 times. 
Engine Co. No. 2 — 29 times. 

18 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3 — 37 times. 

Engine Co. No. 4 — 35 times. 

Engine Co. No. 5 — 15 times. 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 6 — 12 times. 

Hose Co. No. i — 50 times. 

Hose Co. No. 2 — 30 times. 

Ladder Truck No. i — 37 times. 

Chemical — 93 times. 



Number and Location of Alarm-Boxes and Keys. 

No. 3. Blood's lower shop. Keys at offices of gas-works, 
county jail, DeCourcy & Holland, and Charles H. Hutchinson's 
shop. 

No. 4. Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel Ox- 
ford, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, Horse Rail- 
road stables, and W. C. Blodgett's office. 

No. 5. 'Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at Teb- 
betts & Soule's and Currier's drugstores, and Manchester House. 

No. 6. City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Thurston's drug- 
stores, J. A. Riddle's office, and residence of J. L. Brock, 21 
Amoskeag Corporation. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of Manchester and Chestnut 
streets. Keys at chief of police's office, and with all police 
officers. 

No. 8. Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Smith & Co.'s 
and Colby's drugstores. Partridge Bros.' grain store, and E. V. 
Rowe's residence, 1261 Elm street. 

No. 9. Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, Dr. E. Fritz, 
and station of Engine No. 6. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at residences 
of John Mooar, George Emerson, Walter A. Green, and O. D. 
Knox. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at resi- 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 275 

dences of Welcome Jencks and Lewis Simons, No. i Senter's 
block, and Chase & Gate's grocery store. 

No. 14. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. George W. Riddle, D. J. Adams, 
E. L. Bryant, A. H. Olzendam, and Mrs. Thomas Morgan. 

No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of William B. Corey, Henry W. Shannon, and J. Fred 
Chalker. 

No. 16. Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. R. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys at 
residences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and Mrs. 
William Perkins. 

No. 21. Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys at A. D. 
Smith's drugstore, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. L. Walker's 
office, and residence of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3 house, corner of Mas- 
sabesic street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. M. 
Goodwin and station of Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

No. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at 
residences of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, Horace Stearns, 
the late Horace Gordon, and James R. Straw. 

No. 26. Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys at Mc- 
Crillis's carriage shop, John N. Foss's stable, and residence of 
John N. Chase. 

No. 27. Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys at 
residences of H. M. Tarbell, A. G. Fairbanks, E. S. Fletcher, 
William Carr, and George H. Hubbard. 

No. 31. Corner of Canal and Hollis streets, Blood's shop. 
Keys at office, Amory Mills, Langdon Mills watchrooms. 

No. 32. Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and Brook 
streets. Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Company's mill, Langdon 
watchroom, and Electric Light station. 



276 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Keys at watchrooin and pumping 
station. 

No. 35. Stark Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. ^6. Amory Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 39. Hillsborough county jail. Keys at office. 

No. 41. Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 42. Manchester Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 43. Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 45. The S. C. Forsaith Co. 's shops. Keys at freight depot 
and S. C- Forsaith Co.'s office. 

No. 51. Corner ofWalker and Second streets. Keys at stores 
of F. Riedel and William Weber. 

No. 52. Barr's brick block, West Manchester. Keys at Fradd 
& Co.'s and A. N. Clapp's stores, Merrimack House, and Engine 
No. 2 house. 

No. 53. Wallace's steam mill. Keys at Wallace's office, I. R. 
Dewey's tenement block, and Ranno Harness Co.'s store. 

No. 54. Corner of A and Bowman streets. Keys at residences 
of Lord sisters, Neil Fullerton, and ''George W. Davis's store. 

No. 56. Baldwin's bobbin shop. Keys at Baldwin's office 
and residences of J. C. Smith, E. P. Littlefield, and with watch- 
man at works. 

No. 61. Corner of River road and Hancock street, Bakersville. 
Keys at Mary Stack's saloon, True W. Jones Co.'s brewery, resi- 
dence of H. F. Dillingham, and store of John A. Kane. 

No.. 62. Gerrish Wool and Leather Co.'s, River road. Keys 
at tannery and Edwin Kennedy house. 

No. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at residences 
of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, Thomas J. Smith, Simon Mc- 
Carthy, and store of J. J. Toomey. 

No 72. Corner of Lake avenue and Lincoln street. Keys at 
residences of the late Austin Jenkins, James Briggs, and Clar- 
ence D. Palmer. 

No. 73. Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Rev. J. A. Chevalier and Timothy Carr. 

No. 81. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at all the 
engine rooms. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 277 

No. 82. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Church streets. 
Keys at Syndicate Furniture Co.'s, Lowell-street stable, Nichols's 
stable, and Eames Bros.' drugstore. 

No. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of W. T. Stevens, W. A. Clarkson, M. D. Johnson, 
Charles F. Chase, and William H. Drury. 

No. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. William B. Abbott, W. N. Johnson, and E. M. 
Topliff. 

No. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at residences 
of i\.. P. Olzendam, G. A. Olzendam, W. S. Shannon, and John 
J. Bennett. 

No. 212. Shoeshop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of the shoe 
factory and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn, 
Mrs. Milton A. Abbott, M. V. B. Garland, and Walter Cody's 
block. 

No. 2 13. Sash and blind factory, South Beech street, junction 
of Portsmouth Railroad. Keys at offices of Austin, Fint & Day 
and Dana & Provost. 

No. 214. Elliott silk mill, corner of Wilson and Valley streets. 
Keys at office and watchroom of mill and at foundry opposite. 

No. 215. Hoyt & Co.'s shoeshop, corner of Lincoln and Som- 
erville streets. Keys at offices of shoeshop and Kimball Car- 
riage Co. and residence of Mrs. A. B. Johnson. 

No. 261. Pearl-street grammar school. Keys at schoolroom 
and residences of Henry H. Everett, C. E. Rose, S. W. Bascom, 
and Charles W. Cheney, Jr. 

No. 312. Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor streets. 
Keys at residences of James Spence (309 Main street), Thomas 
Bolton, gate of No. 11 mill, and station of Engine and Ladder 
No. 6. 

No. 313. Corner of Amory and Main streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Bouthillier & 
Gingras's drugstore, Miville & Go's drugstore, gate of No. 11 
mill, and station of Engine and Ladder No. 6. 

No. 314. P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper mill. Keys at office, 
Annis's branch grain store, and Independent Hose house. 



278 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



No. 315. Old Brick Store at 'Skeag. Keys at Flanders's store, 
Independent Hose house, and D. L. Robinson's residence. 

No. 321. Corner Beauport and Wayne streets. Keys at Holy 
Angels' Convent, the Brothers' School, and residences of E. H. 
Doherty and Rev. Father Hevey. 

No. 323. Corner of Putnam and Bartlett streets. Keys at Al- 
bert Oliver's store, P. J. Archambeault's bakery, and residence 
of Officer Lewis Clement. 

No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Amelia Davis, William A. Tufts, and James Kearns. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Keys at res- 
idences of J. W, Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Elizabeth Ward. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular police. 

The true time will be given at precisely 12.30 p. m. from 
Charles A. Trefethen's jewelry store, and will be denoted by one 
strike of the fire bells. 



Telephone Calls. 

Chemical Engine, Central station 

Chief Engineer's office 

Chief Engineer's residence 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's residence 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's office . 

Assistant Engineer Merrill's residence 

Assistant Engineer Merrill's store 

Engine No. 2 . 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 

Engine No. 5 

Engine and Ladder No. 6 

Hose No. 2 



64-3 
64-3 
64-4 

34-4 

73-3 
206-3 

55-4 
64-2 

64-5 

64-6 

64-7 

1 16-4 



Instructions to Key-holders and Citizens. 

I. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be immediately 
communicated to the nearest alarm-box, the keys to which are in 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 279 

the hands of all regular police, and generally of persons at the 
corner or nearest house. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive in- 
formation of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook once 
as far as it will go (without jerking), and then let go. Shut the 
door, but do not try to remove the key, as it is locked in by a 
trap-lock, and can only be removed with a release-key, which is 
carried by each of the engineers, who will, as soon as convenient, 
release and return it. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to remain by 
the box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull 
again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box, 
procure another key, and give an alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never touch the 
box except to give an alarm of fire. Give an alarm for no cause 
other than actual fire. Don't give an alarm for a chimney 

FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless called 
for by the chief engineer. If you change your residence or place 
of business, where the keys are kept^ return the keys to the same 
officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to inform 
themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near their property, 
also all places where the keys are kept. Be sure the alarm is 
promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the city, 
and the number of the box will be given thus : Box 6, six blows, 
2^ seconds apart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, 
pause of 6}l seconds, one blow, same pause, and two blows, 
2 — I — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the 
bells at any time ; and in case of testing the boxes, each test 
will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



280 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST, SEC- 
OND, AND THIRD ALARMS. 



Boxes. 



3 

4 

5 

6.... 

7 

8 

9 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17.... 

18 

21 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

31.... 

32 

34 

35 

36 

39 

41 

42 

43 

45 

51 

52 

53 

54 

56 

61 

62 

71 

72 

73 

81 

82 

112 

113 

114 

212 

213 

214 

215 

261 .... 

312 

313 

314 

315.... 

321 

323 

511 

513 



FiEST Alarm. 



Engine. 



1st R. 3 

Ist R. 2-3 

1st R. 2-3 

Ist & 2d R. 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2d R. 5 

1st R. 5 

5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st & 2d R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

IstR. 3 

1st K. 3 

Ist R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 6 

1st R. 5 

1st & 2d R. 5-6 

1st &2dR. 5-6 

1st & 2d R. 5-6 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2d R. 2-3 

1st & 2d R. 2-3 

1st R. 2-3 

Ist & 2d R. 2-3 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2d R. 

1st & 2d R. 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

Ist R. 3 

1st R. 2-6 

1st R. 2-6 

5-6 

5-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 



C. 1 



1-3 

1-3 

1-3 

1-3 

1-3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

3 

3 

1-3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 



-3 
-3 
-3 

3 

1-3 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

1 

1 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

6 

6 



Second Alabm. 



2dR.2 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2-3 

2dR. 

3 

2dR. 

IstR. 

2d R 

2dR. 3 

3 

2dR. 3 

2d R.5 

2dR. 

2d R. 2 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2d R. 5 

2dR. 

2d R. 5 

2dR. 6 

2-3 

2-3 

2-3 

2dR. 2 

5-6 

5-6 

2dR. 6 

5 

1st R.3 

1st R.3 

1st R.3 

IstR. 

Ift R.3 

2dR.2 

2d R. 2 

2d R. 

2dR. 

2dR. 

5 

5-6 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2d R.3 

2dR. 

2d R. 

2d R. 

2dR. 

2d R.5 

2d R.5 

2d R.5 

1st R.2 

IstR. 

1st R.5 

1st R.5 

IstR. 

IstR. 



w 


w 




2 




2 




2 






3 


2 




2 





1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

6 

6 

3-6 

3-6 

3-6 



Third Alarm. 



1 






1 




1 


1 


3 


1 





5-6 

5-6 

5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2-3-6 

2d R.2-3-6 

2d R.2-3-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

2-3 

2-3 



5 

6 

2d R. 5 

2d R. 5 

2dR. 5 

2d R. 3-5 

2dR. 5 

5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2 

2-3-6 

2-3-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

3 

3 

2dR. 3 

2d R. 2-3 

2d R. 3 

2dR. 3 

2d R. 3-5 

2d R. 3-5 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 281 

Rules and Regulations in Regard to Responding to 
Fires and Alarms. 

The following rules have been adopted by the board of engi- 
neers, and the fire department will strictly comply until other- 
wise ordered„and will attend alarms of fire as per running card. 

RUNNING RULES. 

Whenever an alarm is sounded, the members of all companies 
not called to that box will report to their respective company 
quarters, and there remain until dismissed by the signal on the 
bells or by an engineer in charge. 

In case companies on their first run have responded to an 
alarm, companies on their second run to the box from which the 
alarm has been sounded will answer all first-run boxes of the 
absent companies ; and in case engines are out that would re- 
spond to another box, then third-alarm companies will respond. 
In case of an alarm from a box that does not call for a third 
alarm, companies on their second run will then answer to all 
other boxes. 

Whenever two trucks answer to first alarm, the other truck 
will answer to all other boxes. 

At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, hose 
carriage, or truck that leaves the house first will have the right to 
lead to the fire. Whenever a horse lags or gives out, drivers 
should then give others the right of way, so as not to delay the 
rest of the apparatus. No running by will be allowed, ex- 
cept IN CASE OF accident, UNDER PENALTY OF DISMISSAL OF 
THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

The drivers shall not permit persons not connected with the 
department to ride upon their apparatus, and in muddy weather 
or heavy wheeling they shall not permit any one to ride upon 
their apparatus when returning from fires. 

Engineers of steamers will not run over eighty (So) pounds 
water pressure, except when orders are received from a member 
of the board of engineers or of the officer in command of the 
company. 



282 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



WHISTLE SIGNALS. 

The following code of signals will be observed by members of 
the department : 

For CAPTAIN, or officer in command of company, one long 
whistle. 

For coal, two long whistles followed by as many short whis- 
tles as indicate the number of the engine. 

To LIMBER UP, three long whistles. 

THIRD alarm. 

On THIRD ALARM all apparatus will respond. 

GENERAL ALARM. 

In the event of a fire of such magnitude that second and third 
alarms are needed, a general alarm will be given by striking ten 
BLOWS, in which case all companies will respond. 

SPECIAL CALLS ON FIRE ALARM. 

When more apjDaratus is wanted without giving a second or 
third alarm, the following special calls will be given : 

2 — I for Engine i. i — i — i for Aerial Truck. 



2 — 2 

2—3 

2—4 

2—5 



3 — 3 for Truck 3. 
2,-6 " " 6. 
4 — I for Hose i. 

4 — 2 " " 2. 



4—3 " " 3- 
Companies answering "special calls" will wait thirty seconds 
before leaving quarters to prevent mistakes. 



OUT OF TOWN CALLS. 

For a fire out of the city 2 — 2 — 2, in which case all companies 
will assemble at their respective quarters and await orders. 

ALL OUT SIGNAL. 

Two blows on the bells, which dismisses all members at com- 
pany quarters. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 283 

TEST SIGNAL, 

One blow at 12.30 noon. 

SCHOOL SIGNALS. 

I — I with fifteen seconds between blows closes primary and 
middle schools. 

2 — 2 with fifteen seconds between the 2's closes all the schools. 
Time for giving same, 7.45 a. m., 11.30 a. m., or 1.15 p. m. 

MILITARY CALL. 

1 2 blows twice. 



Rules for Exercising Horses. 

It shall be the duty of the drivers of engines, hose carriages, 
hose wagons, hook-and-ladder trucks, and all other apparatus 
connected with this department, to exercise their horses every 
day, weather permitting, except Sunday, with the exception of 
engines having "first" and "second runs," and in such cases 
must exercise on days of "second run," the same to be done 
within the following limits : 

CENTRAL STATION. 

North to Pearl street. East to Union street. 

South to Merrimack street. West to Elm street. 

NORTH MAIN STREET STATION. 

North to Adams street. East to Main street. 

South to Granite street. West to Dubuque street. 

LAKE AVENUE STATION. 

North to Manchester street. East to Belmont street. 
South to Summer street. West to Maple street. 

MAPLE-STREET STATION. 

North to Myrtle street. East to Linden street. 

South to Hanover street. West to Union street. 



284 ANNUAL OFFICIAL "REPORTS. 

WEBSTER-STREET STATION. 

North to Clarke street. East to Union street. 

South to Pennacook street. West to Beauport street. 

RIMMON- STREET STATION (mCGREGORVILLE). 

North to Kelley street. East to Beauport street. 

South to Wayne street. West to Rimmon street. 

Drivers must confine themselves to the above, and in no case 
take their horses beyond the prescribed limits, except for shoeing 
and in case of fire, without permission from the (?hief or an as- 
sistant engineer. 

In exercising, care must be taken to avoid colliding with other 
teams. In approaching corners, crossings, horsecar tracks, and 
in going down grades the speed of the horses must be checked. 

In case of an alarm use gong freely while returning to quar- 
ters. 

Any driver violating these rules will be liable to suspension or 
discharge. 



The Sleeping Apartments. 

The permanent men shall exercise a careful supervision over 
the sleeping apartments, see that the rooms are put in order and 
the beds made as early as ii o'clock a. m., and that the bedding 
is changed at suitable intervals. The occupants of each bed will 
be held responsible for the cleanliness of the same, and held 
strictly accountable for any damage to either bed or bed clothing 
through carelessness. After lo o'clock p. m. occupants shall re- 
frain from loud talking or in any manner disturbing the rest of 
any who have retired. 



Absence from Station. 

No permanent member shall leave his station to visit any sec- 
tion of the city without permission of the chief or an assistant 
engineer, or leave the city, or be granted leave of absence, with- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



285 



out notifying the chief engineer and procuring a substitute to his 
acceptance, and the substitute shall be on duty before the appli- 
cant leaves his post. 

Atiy call member' expecting to be absent from the city shall 
notify the captain of his co7Jipany, and before leaving the city shall 
procure a substitute satisfactory to said captain. 

Any member of the department not complying with the above 
rules shall be liable to suspension or expulsion from the depart- 
ment. 



Entering Buildings with Line of Hose. 

All hose companies are instructed not to enter any building 
with a line of hose unless the stop nozzle is closed, except in 
cases where they can see the fire, and when their streams will 
reach it without damage to other property. 

Steamer companies are not to enter a building with a line of 
hose without orders unless fire can be seen. 

Captains of the several companies will be expected to report 
any violation of the foregoing rules to the board of engineers. 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 

Engine No. 1 . 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



I first-size Amoskeag steamer 
I one-horse hose wagon 

3 gray horses for steamer . 
I gray horse for hose wagon 

4 swinging harnesses . 

I pair double exercise harnesses 
I single exercise harness . 
2,250 feet fabric hose 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 



,4,000.00 

400.00 

685.00 

225.00 

200.00 

50.00 

40.00 

1,320.00 

60.00 



286 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Tools, furniture, and fixtures 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



Engine No. 2. 

LOCATED AT NORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQUOG. 



I second size Amoskeag steamer 
I hose wagon .... 
I exercise wagon, poles, shafts, and 3 
3 bay horses for steamer . 
I pair gray horses for hose wagon 
3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $40, i at ^2 
5 swinging harnesses . 
I double sled .... 
3,300 feet fabric hose 

Stable fixtures and blankets 
Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc. 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



horse 



hitch 



$200.00 
200.00 

7,410.00 



$4,000.00 
600.00 
340.00 
617,00 
450.00 
100.00 
250.00 

60.00 
1,980.00 

94.00 
466.00 
150.00 

$9,107.00 



Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3. 



LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CORNER MASSABESIC STREET. 



I second-size Amoskeag steamer 

I two-horse truck and equipments 

I three-horse hitch attachment (extra) 

I i)air black horses for steamer . 

I pair bay horses for truck 

I single horse for hose carriage . 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $50, i at $40 

5 swinging harnesses 

I four-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage 



13,500.00 
1,700.00 
200.00 
417.00 
400.00 
150.00 
140.00 
250.00 
600.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



287 



I double cart ..... 
I single sled ..... 
2,700 feet fabric hose .... 
Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 
Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc. 
I exercise wagon . . 

Total amount .... 



$125.00 

40.00 

1,620.00 

50.00 

575-00 

292.50 

;io, 101.50 



Engine No. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

I first-size Amoskeag steamer . 
I hose wagon .... 
3 horses for steamer . 
I horse for hose wagon 

3 exercise harnesses . 

4 swinging harnesses . 
2,300 feet fabric hose 

Hall furniture, beds, bedding, etc. 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



4,200.00 
400.00 
600.00 
200.00 

60.00 

200.00 

1,380.00 

275.00 

75.00 
150.00 

;7,54o.oo 



Engine No. 5. 



LOCATED ON WEBSTER STREET, CORNER CHESTNUT 



I third-size Amoskeag steamer . 


^3,600.00 


I combination hose reel and ladder . 


1,000.00 


I pair bay horses 


534-00 


I pair gray horses 


400.00 


I double cart 


75.00 


I double sled 


50.00 


2 pairs swinging harnesses 


200.00 



288 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS 



2 pairs exercise harnesses . 
2,500 feet fabric ho.se 

Furniture, fixtures, tools, etc. 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits, badges, etc. 

Total amount 



$150.00 
1,500.00 

175.00 
80.00 

150.00 

$7,914.00 



E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine. 

STORED AT CLINTON-STREET ENGINE HOUSE. 

Old U tank Amoskeag engine (may be worth for ex- 
change) ........ 



Engine and Ladder No. 6. 



LOCATED AT CORNER AMORY AND RIMMON STREETS. 



I second-size Amoskeag steamer 

I hook-and-ladder truck (with Bangor extension) 

1 one-horse carriage .... 

2 gray horses for steamer . 
2 bay horses for truck 
I gray horse for hose carriage . 
5 swinging harnesses .... 

2,000 feet fabric hose .... 

Hall furniture, carpets, beds, bedding, etc. 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 

Firemen's suits and badges 

I exercise wagon .... 

Total amount .... 



$3,500.00 
1,680.00 
600.00 
400.00 
267.00 
200.00 
250.00 
1,200.00 

375-00 

85.00 

187.00 

290.50 



Hose No. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage 

2 horses ...... 



5600.00 
534-00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



289 



2 single harnesses 
I single cart 
I single sled 
I hose sled 
2,150 feet fabric hose 
500 feet leather hose 
Furniture and fixtures 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



gyo.oo 

40.00 

40.00 

20.00 

1,290.00 

250.00 

200.00 
50.00 

175.00 

^3,269.00 



Hose No. 2. 



LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 



I four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage 

I bay horse 

I exercise harness 

I swinging harness 

I single cart 
2,000 feet fabric hose 
2.000 feet leather hose 

Furniture and fixtures 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



Hook-and-Ladder No. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



I aerial hook-and-ladder truck 
3 horses ..... 

1 pair exercise harnesses . 
3 swinging harnesses 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 

19 



$000.00 

100.00 

30.00 

50.00 

50.00 

1,200.00 

800.00 

100.00 

175.00 

53,105.00 



,200.00 

Soo.oo 

30.00 

150.00 

•?6o.oo 



290 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



7 rubber blanket covers . 
Furniture and fixtures 
Bed, bedding, and furniture 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



Chemical Engine No. 1 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

I double tank (6o gallons each) engine . 

I pair black horses . 

I pair exercise harnesses . 

I pair swinging harnesses . 

Furniture and fixtures 

Stable fixtures and blankets 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



Supply Wagon. 

I supply wagon, with boxes and engineers' lanterns 



Spare Hose. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

8oo feet leather hose ..... 

650 feet fabric hose .... . . 

Total amount ..... 



Exercise Wagon. 

CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

I four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole, shafts, three- 
horse hitch, and coal boxes . . . . . 



$168.00 

200.00 

40.00 

60.00 

280.00 

6,288.00 



$2,250.00 
400.00 
50.00 
100.00 
75.00 
50.00 
35-00 

$2,960.00 



)250.00 



S400.00 
390.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 

Engineers' Department. 



5 fire hats . . . . 

5 engineers' white rubber coats 
Furniture and fixtures 

Total amount 



291 



^lO.OO 

37-5° 
175.00 

^222. 50 



Independent Hose Company No. 5. 

LOCATED AT CORNER OF OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage ..... ^400.00 
800 feet leather hose 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc. .. 
Furniture and fixtures 



Total amount 



Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose-carriage .... 
300 feet fabric hose ...... 

2 hose pipes ....... 

Total amount ..... 



Sleeping-Hall. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

7 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc. 



Extra Horses. 

I horse at Central station for spare duty 
I black horse off duty ... 
I bay horse off duty 

Total amount 



300.00 
40.00 
10.00 

Svqo.oo 



I30.00 

100.00 

10.00 

^140.00 



S275.00 



5200.00 
100.00 
100.00 

.00 



292 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Fire Alarm Telegraph. 

At cost, including additions previous to 1885 
Remodeling in 1885 
Additions in 1886 

in 1887 

in 1888 

in 1889 

in 1890 

in 1891 

in 1892 

in 1893 

in 1894 
''Individual Tapper" system 
Wire, ladders, arms, brackets, etc. 

Total .... 



^21,625.00 
6,000.00 
775.00 
375-00 
S75-00 
430.00 
300.00 
280.00 
150.00 
500.00 
250.00 
3,000.00 
125.00 



Recapitulation. 



Engine No. i ... 








. ^7,410.00 


Engine No. 2 ... 








9,107.00 


Engine and Ladder No. 3 








10,101.50 


Engine No. 4 . . . 








7,540.00 


Engine No. 5 ... 








7,914.00 


Engine and Ladder No. 6 








9,035-50 


Harrington Engine fold) 








500.00 


Hose No. I . . . . 








3,269.00 


Hose No. 2 . . . . 








3,105.00 


Hook-and-Ladder No. i . 








6,288.00 


Chemical Engine No. i . 








2,960.00 


Supply wagon .... 








250.00 


Spare hose .... 








790.00 


Exercise wagon (Central station) 








350.00 


Engineers' department 








222.50 


Independent Hose No. 5 








750.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



293 



Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage 
Sleeping Hall (Central station) 
Extra horses .... 
Fire-Alarm Telegraph 

Total .... 



^140.00 

275.00 

400.00 

34,385.00 

iio4,795-5o 



Names and Residences of the Members of the Fire 
Department. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



■o o 



Name. 



Thomas W. Lane . . 

Fred S. Bean 

Ruel G. Manning . . 
Eugene S. Whitney 
Clarence R. Merrill 



Rank. 



Chief 

Asst. and clerk 
Assistant 



Occupation. 



Machinist 

Carpenter 

Supt. Elec. Light 
Grain dealer — 



Residence. 



1937 Elm. 
102 Orange. 
55 Douglas. 
N. River road. 
414 MeiTimack 



294 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House, 28 Vine Street. 



to 

bo . 

-c o 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


7 


Charles P. McCoy 


Captain 


Machinist 


50 M. S. B. 


8 


Frank E. Stearns 


Lieutenant 


Paper hanger . . . 


389 Lake ave. 


18 


James L. Brock 


Clerk 


Tinsmith 


21 Market. 


6 


Charles F. Hall 


Engineer 


Engineer 


28 Vine. 


13 


Joseph H. GouUl....... 


Asst. Engineer 


Machinist 


8 Prospect. 


11 


Charles H. Rogers — 


Driver engine,. 


Teamster 


28 Vine. 


12 


Artemas C. Barker.... 


Driver hose 





28 Vine. 


43 


Frank B. Marston 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


14M. S. B. 


17 


Henry C. Parsons 





Auctioneer 


6 Prospect. 


15 


Thomas J. Wyatt 





Carpenter 


973 Elm. 


19 


George E. Badger 





Steam -fitter 


Upper Canal. 


9 


Lewis G. Bi-yant 





Carpenter ^. 


1451 Elm. 


10 


Fred A. Lang.... 





Machinist 


28 Vine. 


14 


Nelson C. Whitney ... 




Gas-fitter 


1269 Elm. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 
House on North Main Street, 'Squog. 



Mo 

C3 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


67 


David G. Mills 

Charles G. Ranno 




Contractor 

Harness-maker.. 


607 Granite. 


71 


Lieutenant — 


63 Parker. 


76 
120 


Jeremiah Lane 

Harry C. Morrill 


Clerk and dri- 
ver engine . . 
Engineer 


Teamster 

Engineer 


210 No. Main. 
226 No. Main. 


119 


Stephen Thomes 


Asst. engineer. 


Carpenter 


55 Douglas. 


69 


A.rthur W. Whitcomb. 


Driver of hose. 


Teamster 


151 Douglas. 


72 


Samuel A. Hill 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


86 School. 


75 


Robert J. Hill 




Carpenter 


86 School. 


77 


Daniel B. Emery 


" 


Machinist 


Williams. 


73 


Charles S. Cousins — 





Harness-maker.. 


323 Douglas. 


74 


Thomas C. Foote 





Wool sorter 


56 No. Main. 


66 


Joseph H. Alsop 





Wool waste sort'r 


54 Douglas. 


70 


Chas. M. Tewksbury . . 





Asst.YardMast'r. 


113 Parker. 


68 


George P. Ames 


" 


Supt. Streets — 


226 No. Main. 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEKR. 



295 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 3. 
House on Lake Avenue, corner Massabesic. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


86 


Frank F. Porter 


Captain 


Manufacturer . . . 


330 Spruce. 


82 


Lvmnn "W. Piner 


Lieut, engine . 


Dresser 




9S .Tnhn TSr r!lin«f> 






268 Bridge. 
417 Ceutrai. 
Engine house. 


83 


Ernest E. Hubbell 


Clerk 


Clerk 


121 


George B. Forsaitb 


Engineer 


Engineer 


122 John P.Walker 


Asst. engineer 


Machinist 


352 Lake ave. 


87 


George H. Wheeler . . . 


Driver engine.. 


Teamster 


Engine house. 


81 


William S. McLeod... 


Driver hose... 





" 


80 


Ernest L. George 


Driver truck... 




" 


79 


Louis N. Duf rain 


Fireman 




173 Hall. 


H9 


Clerk 




78 


George Dunnington.. . 





Harness-maker . 


510 Wilson. 


88 


Fred S. Sloan 


,, 




132Massabesic. 
19 Wairen. 
532 Lincoln 


114 




^j 


Carpenter 

Cldrk 


no 


Albert W. Smith 

Orriu S . Coburn 

Carl K. Beadle 


" 


148 




383 Central. 


105 


■' 


380 Spruce. 


97 


Edwin C.Paul ' 


<i 


Collector 


372 Lake ave. 


S.-) 


John W.Finn 


,, 


Painter 


317 Cedar. 


S4 


Walter M. Moulton . . . 


" 




307 Amherst. 









296 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House, No. 20 Vine street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


20 


Lucius B. Snelling 


Captain 


Pharmacist 


103 Walnut. 


28 


John H. Wales, Jr 


Lieutenant 


Brick mason 


19 M. S. B. 


33 


Thomas W. Lane, Jr.. 


Clerk 


Electrician 


1937 Elm. 


21 


Edgar G. Abbott 


Engineer 


Engineer 


20 Vine. 


32 


Benj. R, Richardson.. 


Asst. Engineer 


Machinist 


12 M. S. B. 


31 


Frank J. Dustin 


Driver engine.. 


Teamster 


20 Vine. 


29 


Ellsworth V. Howe. . . . 


Driver of hose. 


Manufacturer . . . 


20 Vine. 


22 


Walter A. Clarkson. . . 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


98 Sagamore. 


25 


Frank B. Stevens 


„ 


Clerk 


20 Gore. 


27 


Edward Sargent 


<' 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 


04 


Edward C. Gould 


,1 


Clerk 


258 East High 


26 


Irving S. Bryant 


" 


Manufacturer . . . 


582 Chestnut. 


"3 


George Thompson — 
Frank Sargent 


,, 


Clerk 


85 Walnut. 


30 


" 


Steam fitter 


56 Water. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 5. 
House, No. 44 Webster Street. 



11 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


49 


Charles W. Brown 


Captain 


Clerk 


16 Hazel. 


101 


Milo B. Wilson 

Woodbury Davison . . . 
Daniel W. Morse 


Lieutenant — 
Clerk 




48 Blodget. 


46 


Carpenter 

Engineer 


817 Union. 


42 


Engineer 


1419 Elm. 


103 




Asst. engineer. 
Driver engine. 




831 Union. 


125 


EmilH. Smith 


Teamster 


44 Webster. 


124 


Henry S. Reed 




It 


44 Webster. 


47 


Russell L. Cilley 

Edward H. Clough .... 
Arthur A . Smith 




Clerk 


863 Chestnut. 


95 






859 Chestnut. 


41 




Blacksmith 


llW.Applet'n 


126 


Alvin McLane 


,< 


Carpenter 


15 Liberty. 


108 


Edwin L. Towle 


" 


Clerk 


62 Webster. 


123 


Charles H. Gile 





Carpenter 


896 Union. 


W 


Will G. Eraser 





Lithographer . . . 


54 Pennacook. 









REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



297 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY NO. G. 
House on Amory and Riminon Streets. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


128 


George A. Wliitney. . . 


Captain 


Manufacturer — 


79 Conant. 


129 
130 








624 Main. 


Thomas E. Gorman... 


Lieut, truck... 


Section hand — 


169 Cartier. 


131 




Clerlr 


Clerk 


239 Beauport. 
Rimmon, 


132 


Edwin E. Weeks 


Engineer 


Engineer 


133 


Alciae Provencher . . . 


Asst. engineer. 


Machinist 


1275 Elm. 


134 


Alphonso E. Foster.. . 


Driver engine. 


Carpenter 


Rimmon. 


135 










136 


Henry C. Crosby 


Driver truck.. 


Teamster 


Rimmon. 


137 


Fred S.Morrill 


Hoseman 


Belt-maker 


58 Douglas. 


138 




,1 


Painter 


258 Beauport. 
114 School. 


139 


Artliur A. Lamoreaux 





Grocer 


140 


Frank W.Tibbetts.... 





Section-hand 


312 Cartier. 


141 


John J. Conroy 





Blacksmith 


2G8 Beauport. 


142 


Frank St. John 





Marble finisher.. 


5 Bail-. 


M^ 




,, 




Hevey. 

516 Beauport. 


144 


Arthur Provost 





Wool sorter 


146 


Heber C. Sleeper 





Machinist 


4 Monmouth. 


147 


James A. Parley 








385 Dubuque. 


145 


John E. Herring 


" 


Mechanic 


164 Beauport. 



298 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House, No. 26 Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


52 


Charles B. French 


Captain 


Carpenter 


39 M. S. B. 


3fi 


Joseph E. Merrill 

Frank D. Burleigh 

Walter L. Blenus 


Lieutenant 

Clerk 




21 Ash. 


50 


Carpenter 


1405 Elm 


V 


Driver 


26 Vine 


38 


George H. Porter 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


279 Laurel. 


48 


Albert A. Puflfer 




Railr'd employee 


499 Beech. 


53 


JohnE. Sanborn 




Carpenter 


274 Laurel. 


35 


Samuel W. Patten 




Belt maker 


3M. S.B. 


45 


George I. Ayer 




Electrician 


28 M. S. B. 


51 


Edwin W. Merrill 




Clerk 


21 Ash. 


34 

39 


Charles J.Wiley 

Asa W. Gape 


'• 


Mechanic 

Electrician 


Elliot & Means 
block. 
239 Beauport. 







HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 
House on Maple Street, corner East High. 



1^ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


54 


JohnF. Seaward 


Captain 


Carpenter 


27 Warren. 


55 


Revilo G. Houghton.. 


Lieutenant 


Gas fitter; 


288 Bridge. 


5S 


Henry G. Seaman .... 
Walter Seaward 


Clerk 


Carpenter 

Teamster 


14 South. 


57 


Driver 


521 Maple. 


59 


Jos. W. Batchelder . . . 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


521 Maple. 


64 


Frank 0. Moulton 




Clerk 


211 Bridge. 


6-? 


Julien B. Huntley 




Plumber 


35 Dutton. 


60 


Charles W. Powell .... 




Carpenter 


540 Maple. 


61 


Addison Seaward 







255 Bridge. 


56 


Arthur B. Merrill 







62 Lake ave. 


63 


James A. Rogers 







761 Beech. 


65 


John M. Emerson. 




Plumber. 


29 Dutton. 



KEPORT OP THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



299 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House, No. 8 Vine Street. 



CQ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


116 


George N. Burpee 


Captain 


Electrician 


19 Ash. 


117 


Warren F. Wheeler. . . 


Clerk & driver 


Teamster 


8 Vine. 


lis 


Frank H. Harvey 


Pipeman 





546 Chestnut. 


116 


Edward A. Sears 


Fireman 


Electrician 


r. 247 Concord. 


44 


Benjamin C. Cann*. . . 





Teamster 


542 Chestnut. 



HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 
House, iVo. IS Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation . 


Residence. 


91 


Jerome J. Loverlng . . 


Captain 


Carpenter 


300 Pine. 


111 

90 








46 Stark. 


Henry Johnson 


Clerk 


Steam-fitter 


298 Hanover. 




Driver 




18 Vine. 


% 


James Orrill 


Fireman 


Barber 


100 Blodget. 


op 


Oscar P. Stone 




Clerk 


312 Manchest'r 


104 


Harrison H. Cole 




Carpenter 


45 M. S. B. 


109 


George M. Jones 





Gardener 


25 Prospect. 


107 






Manuf actui'er . . . 


38 Vine. 


113 


Charles H. Laxon 


" 


Carpenter 


20 M. S. B. 


106 


Charles Edgar 







16 M. S. B. 


100 


Frank M. Frisselle 






478 Beech. 


112 


Charles A. Buttei-fleld 




Carpenter 


951 Elm, R. 18. 


118 


Frank A. Pherson 




Machinist 


18 Vine. 


9*? 


Fred W. Bond 




Loom fixer 


54 Stark. 









* Detailed as driver of supply wagon. 



REPORTS 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUND. 



To the City Cotcncih of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund have the 
honor to present their fifteenth annual report, embracing there- 
port of their treasurer, which shows in detail the financial oper- 
ations for the year ending December 31, 1894, as well as the 
condition of the fund at present. There has been very little 
work done the past year beyond the care of the lots endowed in 
perpetuity. The income has been sufficient to do this and leave 
some in the hands of the treasurer, which will be seen by his 
report. It has been the policy of the trustees to allow this to 
accumulate in order that they may be prepared to meet any 
emergency that may suddenly arise, and to improve and beautify 
the grounds to such a degree as the funds will allow, and as 
time moves on the funds will naturally increase in amount and it 
is hoped to such an extent that the trustees will not lack for 
means to keep the lots in a condition that will be most gratify- 
ing to their owners and representatives. 

Respectfully submitted. 

BYRON WORTH EN, Mayor, ex officio, 
P. C. CHENEY, 

Trustees of Cemetery Fund. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the twelfth annual 
report of the funds received and expenses paid to December 31, 
1894. 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January i, 1894 $19,651.01 
Received during the year : 



From Edward Wagner . 


^391.00 


Horace Pettee 


9.00 


Mrs. Frances B. Pettee . 


9.00 


Moses N. Smith . 


141.25 


Henry W. Boutwell 


187.50 


George A. Hackett 


104.75 


Marcellus Gould . 


180.00 


Lucien B. Clough 


97.46 


Henry W. Boutwell 


75.00 


J. H. Parmerton . 


162.00 


Mary A. Smith estate . 


200.00 


Hattie A. Corey . 


82.95 


Thorndike P. Heath 


146.20 


Ephraim K. Rowell 


499-88 


H. H. Dustin 


180.00 


Mrs. George P. and Frank A. 


James 150.00 


Edwin P. Richardson 


161.77 


Samuel H. Mead . 


180.00 


Erastus M. Kellog 


94.50 


George Bisco 


300.00 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS, 305 



From Samuel Brooks estate 


^150.00 




Samuel S. Raymond 


150.00 




Mary J. James 


99-95 




Eliza A. Schofield 


82.13 




J. A. Rogers .... 


332.81 




Betsey M. Harmaford estate . 


230.84 




T. Frank Dickey . 


180.00 


^4,577-99 




iber 31, 1894 . 


Total permanent fund Decern 


^24,229.00 


Income on hand January i, 1894 . 


. ^1,078.68 




Income received during the year . 


1,006.45 


$2,085.13 






Expenses paid during the year : 






E. T. James 


^8.13 




S. A. Blood 


4-75 




J. B. Varick Co 


10.00 




B. A. Stearns, superintendent 


521.50 




Cash on hand .... 


• 1,540.75 


$2,085.13 







Valley Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January i, 1894 

Received during the year: 
From Harriet M. A. Foster estate . 
Charles Hutchinson estate 
John P. Ankarloo estate 



,944-23 



;3oo.oo 
180.00 
225.00 



$705.00 



Total permanent fund December 31, 1894. $7,649.23 
Income on hand January i, 1894 . . $463.02 



Income received during the year 

Total income December 31, 189^ 



377-83 



$840.85 



20 



306 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Expenses paid during the year : 

C. H. G. Foss, superintendent . . ^193-96 

Cash on hand ..... 646.89 



^840.85 



Piscataquog Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January i, 1894 ^300.00 
Amount of permanent fund on hand December 31, 

1894 300.00 

Income on hand January i, 1894 . . ^46.08 
Income received during the year . . 15-00 

Total income on hand December 31, 1894 . $61.08 



Merrill Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January i, 1894 ^200.00 
Amount of permanent fund on hand December 31, 

1894 ........ . 200.00 

Income on hand January i, 1S94 . . ^24.00 . 
Income received during the year . . 10.00 

Total income on hand December 31, 1894 . $34-oo 

Expenses paid during the year: 
B. A. Stearns, superintendent, for grading 

lots ^13-25 

Cash on hand . . . . • . 20.75 

$34.00 



SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer of the Cemetery Fund. 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts 
of Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees of the cemetery 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 307 

fund, embracing the receipts and expenditures for the year 1894, 
and I find the same correct and properly vouched. I have also 
examined the securities in which said fund is invested, and find 
as follows : 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

5 per cent, 1913 . . . . . $14,700.00 

5 per cent, 1943 ..... 9,000.00 
Cash on hand ..... 529.00 ' 

Total amount of bonds and cash . ^24,229.00 
Total amount of permanent fund .... $24,229.00 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

5 per cent, 1913 ..... $4,800 00 
5 per cent, 1943 ..... 2,000.00 
Cash on hand ..... 849.23 

Total amount of bonds and cash . $7,649.23 
Total amount of permanent fund .... $7,649.23 

PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY, 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 
5 per cent, 1913 ..... $300.00 



Total amount of permanent fund .... 

MERRILL CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

5 per cent, 1913 ..... $200.00 



Total amount of permanent fund .... $200.00 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

The sub-committee of the trustees of the Pine Grove ceme- 
tery submit the following report : 

During the past year the cemetery grounds have been enlarged 
by the addition of the Hewlett lot on the north, containing ten 
acres, purchased at the cost of ^4,400. The buildings have been 
repaired at an expense of ^645, and are occupied by the superin- 
tendent of the grounds at a rental of ^11 per month. Iron- 
frame settees have been placed upon the grounds, costing about 
^100. Two hundred feet of fence have been built upon the east 
side of the grounds, and no less amount should be constructed 
each year until the whole is inclosed. 

Substantial progress has been made in the development of 
Chapel Tawn, on which eight lots have been graded and sold. 
Landscape Lawn having been entirely sold, a rapid sale of the 
lots upon this beautiful elevation may be expected until this new 
source of supply is exhausted. Riverside Lawn and Pine Lawn, 
also under perpetual care, will supply the demand in the south- 
erly section of the grounds for a considerable time to come. 

The extensions of the Pine Grove cemetery north and north 
by the purchase of the Webster and Howlett places, while not 
affording all the area that may some day be needed, yet will sup- 
ply the demand for many years to come. 

There is still due upon the Howlett purchase ^3,400, which 
should be provided for by a special appropriation. 

C. H. BARTLETT, 

For the Committee. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



309 



Valley Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the Valley cemetery respectfully submit the 
following report for the year 1894: 



RECEIPTS. 



Appropriation 
Tomb fees 
Interments . 
Removals 
Care and water 
Labor and materia 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid labor of men as per pay-roll .... 

B. B. Bascomb, team, loam, sand, and manure 
S. S. Piper, postage 
E. J. Knowlton, postage 
Temple & Farrington Co., book and stationery 
Manchester Hardware Co. 

C. E. Forbes, ladder 
H. M. Hall, loam .... 
Pike & Heald Co., piping, etc. 
S. Lovejoy ..... 
A. L. Aldrich .... 
M. S. & R. Co., phosphate . 
P. O. Woodman, loam and turf 
J. Hodge, lumber .... 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 
telephone ..... 
Neil Fullerton, team and loam 
A. L. Bixby, labor and lumber 
W. H. Tibbetts, painting 
J. Francis, plants .... 
H. H. Huntress, plants . 



13,000.00 

213.00 

159.00 

21.00 

1,061.65 
359-99 

4,814.64 



Si,947.i6 

191.03 

1.09 

2.43 
11.50 

12-35 

2.00 

15-50 
87.04 

1. 00 
.20 

7-5° 
11-45 

1.46 

23-44 
26.60 
12.52 
60.17 
127.71 
53-So 
14-95 



310 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Paid Manchester Water-Works 

A. G. Hood, plants and loam 
T. Foley, labor on tomb 
William Berwick, team . 
Wadleigh Hardware Co., hardware 
A. E. Osgood, manure . 
J. T. Underhill, concrete 
J. E. Larkin, piping 
F. X. Chenette, team 
J. J. Abbott, glass 



Amount transferred to reserved fund 



Paid S. B. Putnam, city treasurer 



^125.70 
32.28 
12.00 
12.30 

7-35 
12.00 
64.49 

93-35 
2.00 

•95 

^2,973.02 
26.98 

^3,000.00 
1,814.64 

$4,814.64 

At a meeting of the trustees in the spring, the superintendent 
was instructed to have the buildings and bridges painted, which 
was done early in the season. The tomb has-been whitewashed 
inside and the racks, doors, and fence in front have been 
painted. 

On examination it was found that one of the foot-bridges was 
so far decayed that it could not be repaired, and a new one was 
erected to take its place. 

About 350 feet of 2-inch and 50 feet of i i^-inch pipe have 
been laid and water has been carried to six lots. Meadow path 
from the Valley to Pine avenue, and Dell path from Valley to Pine 
path have been concreted. Grading has been continued on the 
south bank of the valley west of the Gillis tomb — 325 loads of 
sand, 102 loads of loam used. It will require about 50 loads 
more to complete the bank. 

On account of the springs in the bank, we had to lay 75 feet 
of 6-inch pipe to drain the water. The old 8-inch pipe running 
down past the tombs became filled with willow roots so that no 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OP CEMETERIES. 311 

water would go through. Forty feet have been taken up and re- 
laid with 1 2-inch pipe. 

The grass has been cut twice, which adds somewhat to the ex- 
pense but is a decided improvement to the looks of the ceme- 
tery. 

There have been 62 interments, 12 removals, and 52 placed in 
the tomb. Several beautiful and costly monuments have been 
erected. 

The grounds have been kept in the usual good condition 
under the care of C. H. G. Foss, who this year completes his 
tenth year as superintendent. 

R. J. BARRY, 
BUSHROD W. HILL, 
Sub-Tritstees of Valley Cemetery. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you my annual report of 
the money received by me during the year ending December 31, 
1894: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Number of deeds delivered during the year, eighty. 
To cash received for the same . . ^3,461.00 



interest ...... 24.01 

cash received from superintendent . 2,396.97 



$5,881.98 



Cr. 

By treasurer's receipts .... $3,485.01 
superintendent's receipts . . . 2,396.97 



Valley Cemetery. 
To cash received from superintendent . . . $1,814.64 

Cr. 

By treasurer's receipts ...... $1,814.64 

All money received by me has been turned into the city 
treasury, and a detailed account of the expenditure of the same 
will be found elsewhere. 

I have in my possession thirty-six deeds ready for delivery, all 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 313 

of which will soon be taken with a few rare exceptions, and 
these cases will undoubtedly have to receive the especial action 
of your successors next year or at some future time, for occasion- 
ally one is not able to complete the contract, or will not, as 
sometimes is the case. 

Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer. 



I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of Sylvanus 
B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees of cemeteries, and find the 
same correctly cast and properly vouched for. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 

OF THE 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



1 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
Manchester : 

In compliance with the ordinance of said city, the Overseers 
of the Poor herewith present their annual report for the year 
1894. The whole number of families that has received more 
or less assistance off the farm during the year has been ninety, 
consisting of four hundred and fifty persons, all of whom have 
a settlement in this city. Six of this number died during the 
year. The whole number of paupers supported at the city farm 
during the year has been three more or less of the time. The 
whole number of paupers supported at the county farm during 
the year has been five, at a cost of two dollars per week for each 
person. 

The whole number of persons supported at the State Industrial 
School during the year has been six, at a cost of one dollar and 
fifty cents per week for each person. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the St. Patrick's 
Orphans' Home has been two, at a cost of one dollar and twenty- 
five cents per week for each person. 



318 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The whole number of paupers supported at the St. Patrick's 
Old Ladies' Home has been one, at a cost of two dollars per 
week. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the Orphans' Home, 
Franklin, has been one, at a cost of one dollar per week, cloth- 
ing included. 

The Overseers of the Poor have given and allowed nine hun- 
dred and four orders to the paupers off the farm during the year, 
the largest number in the history of the city. Said orders con- 
sisted chiefly of orders for groceries, fuel, medicine, board and 
care, clothing, and emergencies. 

The whole amount allowed to the several persons who applied 
for assistance from time to time from the several wards of the 
city during the year was as follows : 



Ward I 

Ward 2 
Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Ward 5 
Ward 6 
Ward 7 
Ward 8 
Ward 9 



^142.75 
252.63 

478.29 
985.41 
2,454.66 
606.52 
229.58 

i)057-39 
690.40 



^6,897.63 



MISCELLANEOUS BILLS ALLOWED. 



State Industrial School, board of inmates ^2,964.44 
Books and stationery .... 29.46 



$2,993.90 



Total cost 



11-53 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 319 

Cash received from the county of Hillsborough for 
board of inmates of State Industrial School and 
paid to the city treasurer $2,730.44 



Total expense to the city .... $7,161.09 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

William H . Maxwell, Ward i , Clerk of Board, 
Thomas L. Quimby, Ward 2, 
Benj. F. Garland, Ward 3, 
G. S. Holmes, Ward 4, 
Patrick Costello, Ward 5, 
(Charles Francis, Ward ,6, 
William Marshall, Ward 7, 
Charles S. McKean, Ward S, 

Overseers of the Poor for the City of Mandiester. 

A true copy. Attest : 

William H. Maxwell, 

Clerk of the Board. 



To the Mayor, Aldei-inen, and Cojumou Comicil of the city of 
Manchester : 

In compliance with chapter 81, sections i and 2, Laws of the 
state of New Hampshire, passed at the June session, 1881, the 
Overseers of the Poor herewith present their annual report under 
the head of '' Aid to soldiers and sailors and their dependent 
families," for the year 1894. 

The whole number of indigent soldiers and sailors who have 
had more or less aid during the year has been ten, consisting of 



320 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

four families, all of whom have a settlement in this city, at a to- 
tal cost of ^274. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 
William H. Maxwell, Ward i, Clerk of Board, 
Thomas L. Quimby, Ward 2, 
Benj. F. Garland, Ward 3, 
George S. Holmes, Ward 4, 
Patrick Costello, Ward 5, 
Charles Francis, Ward 6, 
William Marshall, Ward 7, 
Charles S. McKean, Ward 8, 
Frank I. Lessard, Ward 9, 

Overseers of tlie Poor. 

A true copy. Attest : 

William H. Maxwell, 

Clerk. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE 
ON CITY FARM. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY 

FARM. 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of 
Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Joint Standing Committee on City Farm 
hereby submit to you their annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1894. 

Having fairly and impartially appraised all personal property 
at the farm, we find the summary as follows : 

Live stock $2,627.00 

Wagons, carts, and team furnishings 
Farming implements 
Hay, grain, and produce 
Household furniture 
Provisions and fuel 

^12,072.37 

Following is a list of the crops the past season, not including 
the amount used through the summer and fall 

Second crop hay 
No. I English hay 
Meadow hay 
Cow fodder 
Oat straw 
Celery . 
Corn 



1,381.00 


817.00 


4,174-30 


2,414.72 


658.35 



I ton. 
62 tons. 
10 " 
25 - 
16 " 
600 bunches. 
1,025 bushels. 



324 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Oats . 












200 bushels. 


Blood beets . 












80 " 


Mangold beets 

Cabbage 

Carrots 












1,000 " 
10 tons. 
175 bushels. 


Turnips 
Onions . 












156 " 

30 " 


Potatoes 












500 " 


Parsnips 
Squashes 
Popcorn 
Sweet corn . 












5 " 
I ton. 

19 bushels. 

20 " 


Seed potatoes 
Apples . 












10 " 
50 barrels. 



Among the permanent improvements at the farm we have put 
city water in the house for use when the well gives out. We 
have built a large shed, 20 x 40 feet, for wagons, and also a house 
for a hose carriage, with 500 feet of new hose and a reel from 
the Central Fire Station placed there in case of fire. In the 
house we have placed the Emergency Fire Extinguisher, and we 
are now well equipped in case of fire. 

We have got 2^2, acres of pasture into grass this fall, and 
worked about 4 acres more of the pasture, pulled the stumps and 
blasted the large stone, which will be put in good shape another 
year. 

Another ditch has been put in the field west of Mammoth 
road, from Bridge to Lowell streets. 

The lumber on the Young road, which was decaying from the 
effects of fire running through it, has been cut off. This was 
sawed on the lot and sold, to be paid for in 1895. 

The garbage collected is fed, the best of it, as last year, and 
the remainder is used for dressing the land. We have collected 
nearly 1,800 loads the last year, which requires three teams. 

With the high pressure water service, and a hydrant within 
150 feet of the buildings, the committee thinks that the rate of 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 325 

insurance should be reduced. We are thankful to Mrs. Dunlap, 
Mrs. Kinsley, and others of the W. C. T. U., for the large 
amount of reading matter furnished the prisoners. They have 
also held two Sunday services and furnished each prisoner with 
flowers. 

Alfred D. Maxwell, 
George W. Reed, 
D. A, Murphy, 
W. D Wheeler, 
John J. Rylander, 

Joint Standing Committee on City Farm* 



I 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

The following is the report of the doings of the city solicitor's 
office for '189 4: 

The actions Aliee Chamberla7id v. Manchester and Carl C. 
Koehler v. Manchester were tried by jury, and verdicts rendered 
in favor of the city. In /a?nes A. Neal v. Manchester the plain- 
tiff withdrew after the trial of the foregoing cases. 

The cases Executrix of H. C. Canney v. Manchester, S. H. 
Dunbar v. Ma7tchester, Augusta Currifi v. Manchester, C. H. 
Bodwell v. Manchester, T. E. Mc Derby v. Manchester^ Janet B. 
H'hite V. Manchester, S. S. James and others v. Manchester, 
Hannah E. Welch and others v. Manchester, and D. W. Perkins 
v. Manchester^ were disposed of out of court by agreement with 
the plaintiffs. 

The cases of Sarah B. Woodman v. Manchester and J. T. 
Donahoe v. Manchester were decided in favor of the plaintiffs by 
the court upon agreed statements of facts, there being no dispute 
as to amount due, in either case, if anything could be recovered. 

The appeals from awards of damages by the mayor and alder- . 
men made by Edwidge Eno, Louis St. John, Joseph Trudeau, 
Qeorge R. Vance, Charles P. Still, and Flora A. Woodman, execu- 
trix, were tried by the county commissioners and the amounts of 
their a\vards paid. William E. Moore withdrew his appeal. The 
appeal of A. Sevigny was tried by the commissioners, but their 
decision has not yet been filed. 



330 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The following cases previously reported are still pending in 
court : 

Campbell e^ Maxwell v. Manchester, A. Blood and others v. 
Manchester and the Manchester Electric Light Co., Manchester v. 
Jenkins and bondsmen, D. H. Dickey v. Manchester, Mary 
Dickey v. Manchester, Manchester v. Warren &^ Beede, Elvira 
Severance v. Manchester, Mary E. Reed v. Manchester, Charles 
Williams v. Manchester, W. E. Dunbar v. Manchester, G. H. 
Dunbar v. Manchester, Mary G. Carvelle v. Manchester, Re- 
becca Gartnon v. Manchester, Lucie A. Clough v. Manchester, 
Batchelder 6^ Clarks v. Manchester, Matters arising from contro- 
versy over new passenger railroad station, and D. C. Whittemore 
and others v. Manchester. With the exception of the first two 
cases, all these in which city is defendant are for damages by the 
water-works or by land taken for new highways. 

The following new cases were begun during the year: 

Seth T. Hill v. Manchester, to recover balance claimed to be 
due on settlement of account as collector of taxes. 

• W. W. Owen v. Manchester and Sarah E. Biitterfield v. Man- 
chester, for damages occasioned to property of plaintiffs by the 
alleged overflowing or backing up of city sewers. 

Patrick Kendrigan v. Manchester, for damages for injuries 
received by caving in of a sewer trench in which plaintiff was 
employed. 

The petition of George A. Farwell aiid others for a new high- 
way in Manchester and Auburn. 

And Devotishire Mills v. Manchester, for damages for diverting 
water of Cohas brook by the city water- works. 

Samuel T. Page, The Elliot Hospital, and Lucie A. Clough 
have also filed appeals from awards of damages by the mayor and 
aldermen for land taken for new highways. 

The city, through its board of water commissioners, have begun 
proceedings to condemn all the land bordering Lake Massabesic 
in Hillsborough county, not already owned by the city, and 
these proceedings are pending before the county commissioners. 

As stated in my last report, the two principal causes of all 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 331 

existing litigation are claims for damage by flowage and other 
diversions of the water of Lake Massabesic and Cohas brook by 
the water-works system of the city, and appeals from awards for 
damages to land by the laying out of new streets or the changing 
of grades of existing highways. The matter of damages by the 
water-works system must be faced, and while the amount of 
money involved may be large, the matter in controversy is of so 
great importance, involving the control of the water of the lake 
and brook, and the preservation of the purity of the water for 
the uses of our whole population, that few, if any, will complain 
of the money expended ; and the other class of cases simply 
shows the need of greater care by boards of mayor and alder- 
men in laying out and changing highways. 

Respectfully submitted. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

City Solicitor. 



i 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

I herewith submit my report of such of the city poor as came 
under my care for the year ending December 31, 1894 : 

Number of cases treated, 121; number of calls made, 1,511. 

Diseases treated : Alcoholism, i ; blood poisoning, i ; bron- 
chitis, acute, 2 ; bronchitis, chronic, 2 ; cerebral hemorrhage, 

1 ; croup, 2 ; cholera morbus, 4 ; concussion of brain, i ; delir- 
ium tremens, 15; diphtheria, i; heart disease, 2 ; housemaid's 
knee, i ; insane, i ; neuralgia, i ; laryngitis, i ; measles, i ; 
marasmus, 2 ; la grippe, 12; miscarriage, i ; pneumonia, croup- 
ous, I ; pneumonia, broncho, i; pneumonia, hypostatic, i ; 
phthisis pulmonalis, 7 ; pleuritis, 3 ; pertussis, 2 ; poisoning, 
morphine, i ; poisoning, arsenic, i ; paraphimosis, i ; rheuma- 
tism, acute articular, 3 ; rheumatism, muscular, i ; stoppage, 3 ; 
syphilis, 2 ; sciatica, i ; tonsilitis, i ; typhoid, i ; urethral stric- 
ture, 2 ; varicose ulcers, i. 

Cases requiring surgical treatment, 36 : Fracture of jaw, i ; 
fracture of arm, i ; fracture of both bones of leg, 2 ; fracture of 
toe, I ; fracture of elbow, i ; fracture of thigh, i ; fracture of ribs, 

2 3 dislocated shoulder, 2 ; dislocated thumb, i ; sprained ankle, 
I ; incised wound of wrist, i ; incised wound of foot, i ; lacer- 
ated wound of wrist, i ; lacerated wounds of face, 7 ; lacerated 
wounds of scalp, 7, lacerated wound of nose, i ; lacerated wound 
of finger, 2 : gunshot wound, i ; amputation of finger, i ; pow- 
der in face, i. 

Number of deaths, 17: Cerebral hemorrhage, i; diphtheria, 



336 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I ; phthisis pulmonalis, 5 ; poisoning by arsenic, i ; bronchitis, 
acute, I ; broncho-pneumonia, i ; death by drowning, 2 ; maras- 
mus, I ; found dead, 4, cause unknown, autopsy not thought 
necessary by city officials. 

I would recommend that a stretcher be substituted for the bas- 
ket now in use in the city ambulance, the basket not answering 
at all the object for which it is intended, being too large, un- 
wieldy, and heavy to be carried up and down stairs; in fact, 
when the ambulance is used, the basket has to be left on the 
street, and the patient, with much unnecessary suffering, brought 
down in some one's arms. 

FREDERICK PERKINS, M. D. 

City Physician. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City 
of Manchester. 

I herewith submit a report for the year ending January 31, 
1895. 

The method of obtaining samples of milk has been the same 
as that pursued during previous years, each sample being tested 
for the pupose of ascertaining its average quality, and in some 
cases being chemically tested for the purpose of discovering the 
presence of coloring matter, which would necessarily be added 
where milk had been " extended.'' 

In testing for butter fat, in addition to the usual method here- 
tofore used, the Babcock method was largely used where the sam- 
ples appeared at all doubtful, and the instrument proved satisfac- 
torily correct in all cases. 

The supply was found to be short during most of the year, not 
owing to a larger consumption, but due largely to an extended 
drouth and the consequent drying up of the pasture feed, and to 
general "running out" of the land devoted to pasturage in 
the towns where the milk is raised for supplying the city. These 
pastures are generally the poorer part of the farming lands, and 
are often so rough and rocky that it is impossible to plow them 
and seed them down, and as they are nearly always overstocked 
with cattle, the feed is found to be insufficient even in years 
when no drouth exists, and nearly every farmer who keeps a herd 
of cows is obliged to feed from other sources each day, and each 
year the pasture lands seem poorer, and are fast becoming only 



340 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

large yards where the cows can procure drinking water from 
the springs or brooks that are found in them, and places for ex- 
ercise. If there was any way in which these old, worn-out pas- 
tures could be renovated, it would undoubtedly make a differ- 
ence in the quality of milk during the summer months and would 
perceptibly increase the quantity. One great difficulty in try- 
ing to obtain a supply at such times from the milk cars which 
run through the city to Boston, Mass., is that at just those times 
there is always the same proportionate shortage in that city, and 
the milk cannot be sold at that time unless at an advanced price. 

There has been a gradual decrease in the number of routes 
during the year, some of the smaller routes being bought and 
merged with the larger ones, as the drivers of the very small 
routes find it unprofitable at the present prices. 

Very few complaints have been made by customers during the 
year, and these were promptly attended to and the cause at once 
remedied ; and there was a general tendency among all milk- 
men to pay more attention to their supply from raisers, especially 
regarding quality. 

No cases of tuberculosis were reported within the limits of the 
territory from which the city is supplied, but in towns farther 
away, and in that portion of the state of Massachusetts bordering 
upon New Hampshire, many cases were reported and much 
trouble was experienced on that account. 

The number of licenses issued during the year has been 126, 
which amounted to ^63, and the tendency will be to reduce the 
number somewhat during the next few years, especially as regards 
routes. 

The number of quarts of milk distributed daily by dealers dur- 
ing the year has averaged 20,115, and 3,785 quarts of skimmed 
milk, and the estimated number of cows to produce this quantity 
of milk is 3,352. 

The state law regulating the sale of milk should be changed or 
amended, making it the same standard as that in the state of 
Massachusetts, and the penalties should be the same, for what is 
good law for those engaged in this traffic in the cities of that 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 341 

state, or for the people who are consumers, is good law for the 
people of our state of New Hampshire. 

No final decision having been rendered in the oleomargarine 
test case, which, as I am informed, has been carried to the United 
States Supreme Court, no change has been made in that traffic, 
and oleomargarine has been sold and will continue to be sold in 
our city, as has heretofore been done, pending the above de- 
cision. 

Very respectfully, 

H. F. W. LITTLE, 

Milk Inspector. 



REPORT 

OP THE 

BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen for the City of Man- 
chester ; 

The report of the Board of Police Commissioners for Man- 
chester for the quarter ending December 31, 1894, is hereby sub- 
mitted. As the present board of mayor and aldermen has been 
elected since any report has been made, the commissioners have 
thought best to give in this report a general review of the year 
during which they have had charge of the police department. 

As the term of office of the board did not commence until Jan- 
uary I, 1894, and the warrants of the entire police force expired 
on the 2d, a large amount of preliminary work was done before 
the commission was in existence. Application blanks were pre- 
pared and furnished to any person applying for a position upon 
the force ; more than one hundred applications were filed and 
on Monday, January i, the board met and organized by choos- 
ing a clerk, and examined every applicant personally and by 
himself alone, in addition to the sworn statements contained in 
the applications. Thirty-eight appointments were made, twenty 
being from the old officers and eighteen, with one exception, 
being from inexperienced men. In selecting from the old offi- 
cers fifty years was made the age limit, and thirty-five years the 
limit for new men. Before the issuing of the warrants to the 



346 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

men appointed, on January 2, evidence was presented to the 
board of misstatements in the applications of two men and their 
appointments were at once revoked. One man appointed de- 
clined to accept and the three vacancies thus created were after- 
wards filled. Some changes have been made during the year ; 
one officer has been dismissed and four have resigned, their res- 
ignations being handed to the board prior to investigations about 
to be entered upon. These vacancies have been filled and the 
force now consists of the chief of police, deputy chief, captain, 
sergeant, and thirty-four patrolmen ; in addition, there are 
eighteen special officers, some of whom are occasionally em- 
ployed during the absence or sickness of a regular officer, or 
when extra services are required, receiving pay only when on 
duty. In discipline the force has greatly improved and we be- 
lieve that its efficiency is also greater than in the past, but in 
both respects a perfectly satisfactory standard has not been 
reached. The board will not rest satisfied until further improve- 
ment is shown. Complaints against officers have been filed by 
citizens in only three cases, all for violence in making arrests or 
after the arrest was made. In one case the officer was repri- 
manded, in one suspended for a short term, and in the other the 
charge was dismissed. The board has held thirty-two meetings 
during the year in addition to the several meetings required be- 
fore January i, 1894. 

Great interest was manifested by the public in the beginning 
of the year to see how the commission would treat the liquor 
question. The subject was carefully considered and what has 
been done is in brief as follows : 

On the first of January, 1894, there were in Manchester over 
three hundred and fifty places where intoxicating liquors were 
sold, in many of them at all hours of the day and night, and for 
seven days m the week. There was a regulation or understand- 
ing established by some former board of mayor and aldermen 
that all should close at 10 o'clock at night and should be closed 
on Sunday, but it was more honored in the breach than in the 
observance. We believe that for a long time no places have 



REPORT OF THE POLICE COMMISSIONERS. 347 

been open after lo o'clock or on Sunday for the sale of intoxi- 
cating liquors, with the exception of some so-called drugstores. 
No new places have been allowed to open, and of the three hun- 
dred and fifty places above mentioned one hundred and fifty- 
five have been closed and are out of the business. Every known 
dealer in intoxicating liquors has been before the court and paid 
a fine for violating the law. The number of arrests for drunken- 
ness has slightly decreased and the police report the condition of 
the streets after lo o'clock to be greatly improved as to quiet- 
ness and good order. In 1893 the city received for fines and 
costs, $6,88;^. 06. In 1894 the amount was $12,802.54. The 
pay-roll for 1893, for pay of officers, not including marshal and 
assistant marshal, was ;^3i, 652. 65 ; for 1894 it was $29,413.72, 
more than $2,200 less than the previous year. 

Many of the beats now covered by the officers are of great 
extent and far removed from the police station, the city having 
largely extended in three or four directions during the last few 
years. In the northeast, Derryfield park and vicinity require 
some attention, particularly in the summer; in the southeast, 
shoeshops and other industries have greatly increased the neces- 
sity for police protection ; on the west side of the river, in the 
vicinity of the Rimmon shoeshop, and farther south, there is a 
demand for the services of an officer. These demands will un- 
doubtedly require the appointment of two or three additional 
officers during the year. With so large a territory to cover, a 
signal system will soon be a necessity. 

ISAAC L. HEATH, 
N. S. CLARK, 
FRANK P. CARPENTER, 
Board of Police Commissioners. 



i 



REPORT 

OF THE 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the 3 fay or : 

The Board of Health submits the following report for the year 
1894: 

Neil F, Starr, M. D. was reappointed to the board, and at its 
meeting in February was re-elected chairman. Mr. Joseph B. 
Sawyer was re-elected clerk, the personnel of the board remain- 
ing the same as during 1893. 



EXPENDITURES. 

Salaries . 

Labor 

Street-car fares 

Teams 

Legal expenses 

Postage and envelopes 

Sundries 

Stationery and printing 

Disinfectants . 

Pest house, board, fuel, etc 

Advertising 

Analysis of water 

Furniture and tools 

Railroad fares 

Street department, cleaning cellars 



^500.00 

2,399-38 
70.65 

67-35 
18.77 

65-05 

24.04 

144.86 

2.23 

30.72 

■ 41-53 

22.70 

45.00 

3-40 

33-25 



$3,468.93 



352 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The account should be credited with the ^33.25 which is 
charged as expended in cleaning cellars, as the amount was col- 
lected from the parties for whom the work was done, and was 
given to the street commission, and we have their receipt for the 
same. 

INSPECTORS. 

The same inspectors were retained as last season, with the ad- 
dition of Richard J. Barry, who commenced his labors May i. 
Their work is given in detail in their report and we believe they 
have been active and efficient in the discharge of their duties. 
The positions call for the exercise of considerable discretion and 
patience, and we are satisfied that they have got along with as 
little friction as could be expected considering the people and 
conditions with which they have to contend. 

PRIVY VAULTS. 

The fact that 663 water closets have replaced vaults in various 
parts of the city during the past year is conclusive evidence that 
the board has not changed its opinion as to the desirability of 
abolishing the privy vault. Work will continue on that line as 
fast as conditions and circumstances will permit. The excavator 
process of cleaning privy vaults has been continued during the 
year. We know it is far from being perfect, but we believe it to 
be the best in use, and as such will be used until something bet- 
ter is found, or until that happy time arrives when there will be 
no privy vault left to clean. 

SEWERS. 

The board has nothing new to add to what has been said in 
previous reports as to the sewers, or lack of them, which prevails 
in many of the newer parts of our city. We hope to see all 
streets provided as soon as possible. Until that time comes, 
sink-water nuisances will occur and be abated by this depart- 
ment with a great deal of regularity. The board has been in- 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 353 

strumental during the past season in causing quite a number of 
people to enter sewers on streets in which sewers were already 
constructed. 

DISPOSAL OF WASTES. 

Very few complaints have come to this office during the past 
year as to the collection of the swill by the city farm teams, and 
no complaint at all as to the way it is disposed of at that institu- 
tion. It is of little consequence how such matter is destroyed so 
long as its destruction is efficiently accomplished without mak- 
ing a nuisance or endangering the health of the public. The 
earth into which it is plowed at the city farm seems to be as ef- 
fectual in rendering it harmless as cremation by a furnace, al- 
though of course it takes much longer to accomplish the same 
end. The disposal of the matter taken to the dumps is, how- 
ever, a much more serious question just at present. Years of ex- 
perience have demonstrated that it is impossible to collect the 
imperishable waste without getting more or less swill and other 
undesirable matter mixed with it, and with the best of care the 
city dumps are very near, if not quite, a nuisance at all times. 
We are pleased to note that the street and park commission is 
considering the necessity of some means of its disposal. Some 
progress has been made by this department towards a more care- 
ful handling of swill by private parties who collect it to feed to 
swine, and it is probable that such parties will, within a short 
time, have to be licensed by and do their work under regulations 
formulated by the board. 

PLUMBING. 

The plumbing regulations have been in force since May i. 
Their framing and adoption by the board took much time. 
While they were being considered the board met a delegation or 
committee from the journeymen plumbers and the master 
plumbers in a body. At each of these meetings the regulations 
were considered one by one, and thoroughly discussed. The 
science of sanitary plumbing is comparatively new, but there 

23 



354 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

are old principles of ventilation and traps which time and expe- 
rience have proved to be correct. The board endeavored to 
embrace in its rules only such things as seemed absolutely neces- 
sary, and rejected much that was brought to its notice with an 
idea of "making a dollar for somebody." Any suggestion 
which was necessary for the safety of the public was adopted. 
With these ideas in view a set of regulations was produced which 
was published by, and met the approval of, some of the best san- 
itary papers in the country. They have worked to the satisfac- 
tion of all parties concerned who care to be honest and work- 
manlike in their dealings. Circumstances and conditions, un- 
foreseen when the rules were adopted, have arisen and it will be 
necessary to make some slight changes, but we believe the city is 
to be congratulated on having so plain, business-like, and safe a 
set of regulations. Their need has been amply proved since 
their adoption. At least fifty per cent of the lines of main pipe 
have shown leaks when submitted to the water test, and the 
plumbers have been obliged to make the joints tight in the pres- 
ence of the inspector. If work which was put together with the 
understanding it must stand test fails to do so, what can be ex- 
pected of that which has been thrown together with a knowl- 
edge that it never would be tested ? There is no doubt that 
much of the work done before the plumbing regulations were 
adopted is faulty in the extreme. Men may be honest but care- 
less. Some are dishonest as well as careless, and when either of 
these conditions occur, or when cheapness has been the only end 
sought by the landlord, the result must be deplorable to the 
tenant or occupant of a building so plumbed. Some old blocks 
have been examined by this board and measures taken towards 
the improvement of the plumbing. We are in hopes in time to 
remedy the careless or criminal work which was put in before 
the rules were adopted. The board would advise that in all 
buildings being erected, whether on sewered streets or not, pro- 
visions be made for the plumbing which must in time be put in, 
as it is much cheaper and better to have such arrangements made 
when the house is erected, and often prevents much costly tearing 
out and rebuilding. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 355 

WATER SUPPLY. 

The shore of Lake Massabesic was watched by an inspector 
during the summer and early fall. That such a measure is a wise 
one the inspector's report amply shows. The amount of matter 
removed from the lake and its shores was not probably enough 
to so pollute the water as to cause sickness, but it is certainly a 
source of satisfaction to most of us to know that the water is be- 
ing kept clean as well as free from actual disease germs. The 
board caused a sample of water to be taken from the fountain 
near the railroad, on Canal street, and sent to a chemist for 
analysis. The statement was as follows : 

SANITARY ANALYSIS OF WATER. SAMPLE NO. 2. 

To the Board of Health, Manchester^ N. H. : 
Odorless. 
Color, yellowish. 
Evaporation, some foamy. 
Residue, yellowish and some circles. 
Ignition of residue, it blackens. 
Solids, grains per gallon, 2.4. 
Loss, grains per gallon, i. 
Hardness, degree, i. 
Alkalinity, degree, 0.5. 
Chlorine, grains per gallon, o.i. 
Free ammonia, parts per million, trace. 
Albuminoid ammonia, parts per million, 0.095. 
Nitric acid, none. 
Nitrous afid, none. 
Poisonous metals, none. 
Iron, trace. 
Sediment, little. 

Microscopic examination shows a few infusoria. 
Oxygen for oxidation, grains per gallon, 0.3. 

This is good water. 

EDMUND R. ANGELL. 

Derry, N. H., August 9, 1894. 



356 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

March 21, 1888, the Board of Health then in office caused a 
sample of water to be taken from the fountain situated at the cor- 
ner of Elm and Myrtle streets and sent to the same chemist. 
The statement he then made follows : 

Odor, slight. 

Color, marked yellowish brown. 

Evaporation, somewhat foamy. 

Residue, in circles and patches brownish. 

Total solids, grains per gallon, 2.8. 

Residue darkens decidedly on ignition. 

Volatile and combustible matter, .5. 

Hardness, equivalent to grains of CaCOa, 2. 

Alkalinity, equivalent to grains of CaCOg, i. 

Chlorine, grains per gallon, i. 

Free ammonia, parts per million, .025. 

Albuminoid ammonia, parts per million, .13. 

Nitric acid, slight trace. 

Nitrous acid, none. 

Lead, none. 

Iron, grains per gallon, about .01. 

Sediment, none. 

Microscopic examination shows nothing significant. 

The first portion of condensed steam from this water has a 
slight odor, which reminds one of decayed wood. The color ap- 
pears to be due to dissolved organic matter, because the residue 
becomes colorless on ignition, but it would remain brown if the 
color was owing to iron. The total solids are very small in 
amount and the hardness shows that the larger part of them con- 
sists of earthy salts. 

The amount of albuminoid ammonia shows that the quantity 
of dissolved organic matter is rather more than desirable though 
it is low for river or pond water. 

EDMUND R. ANGELL. 

Derry, N. H., March 23, 1S88. 

By a comparison of these two statements it will be seen that 
the sample taken last year is a trifle better than the sample taken 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 357 

in 1 888. This may be due to the fact that the sample of that 
year was taken in the spring when the water was liable to be high 
from the rains and melted snow of the preceding winter. It is 
safe to say, however, that the water has not deteriorated, and the 
citizens can be assured that the source of our water supply still 
remains one of the best in the world. 

The movement of the water commissioners to take the land a 
reasonable distance from the shores of the lake should be com- 
mended by every good citizen. Money used to protect and keep 
pure our water supply must be a profitable investment. 

At the same time the sample of Massabesic water was sent, a 
sample of the water which comes from the spring in Hanover 
square and supplies so many of the drinking fountains in our 
streets, was also sent. The statement is given below : 

SANITARY ANALYSIS OF WATER. SAMPLE NO. I. 

Board of Health, Manchester, N. H. : 
Odorless. 
Colorless. 

Evaporation, quiet. 
Residue, uniform and white. 
Ignition of residue, it does not darken. 
Solids, grains per gallon, 17.8. 
Loss on ignition, grains per gallon, Tf^. 
Hardness, degrees, 4.5. 
Alkalinity, degrees, .5. 
Chlorine, grains per gallon, 2.6. 
Free ammonia, part per million, .01. 
Albuminoid ammonia, part per million, .02. 
Nitric acid, considerable. 
Nitrous acid, none. 
Lead, none. 
Iron, trace. 

Sediment, scarcely any. 

Microscopic examination shows a few mineral particles. 
Oxygen for oxidation, grains per gallon, .029. 



358 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The unfavorable features of this water are excess of chlorine 
and excess of nitric acid. The water contains filtered sewage. 
Although it is very free from organic matter, the surroundings 
are somewhat unfavorable and the water is not above suspicion. 

EDMUND R. ANGELL. 
Derry, August 9, 1894. 

This water was also analyzed in 18S8. At that time the total 
solids, grains per gallon, was given as 12.2 ; chlorine, grains per 
gallon, 1.7 ; free ammonia, parts per million, none ; albuminoid 
ammonia, parts per million, .03 ; nitric acid, some ; nitrous acid, 
none. 

The professor also said : 

Chlorine and nitric acid are in excess. They have filtered 
through the soil, while the organic matter with which they are 
associated was retained. There is an unusually small amount of 
ammonia. This fact in connection with the slight darkening of 
the residue during ignition shows that there is no appreciable 
amount of organic matter in the water at present. How long it 
may remain so can best be estimated by examination of the sur- 
roundings, but the fact that so much chlorine is present shows 
some unfavorable connection with the water, and if organic 
matter itself, in dangerous amount, is not brought into it there 
would, nevertheless, be liability of disease germs entering should 
they be present in sources of pollution about the premises. Al- 
though the present condition of the water does not appear to be 
prejudicial to health, for reasons given above it must be denomi- 
nated suspicious water, unless the excess of chlorine and nitric 
acid can be satisfactorily accounted for in a way other than to 
attribute them to some sources of filth. The earthy salts are sul- 
phates mostly. 

EDMUND R. ANGELL. 

Derry, N. H., March 19, 188S. 

By a comparison O'f the two statements it will be seen that the 
chlorine has increased over fifty per cent, and the nitric acid has 
also increased. This is in line with the professor's prediction. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



359 



While he does not actually say the water is bad, he does give the 
idea that it is very near being dangerous. The board proposes to 
have tests made often hereafter, and if at any time the analysis 
shows the water to be unfit for domestic purposes, measures will 
be at once taken to have the supply cut off. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The following table shows the number of contagious diseases 
reported during each month of the year and the deaths resulting 
therefrom : 



January — 
February .. 

March 

April 

May ' 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October — 
Xovember . 
December . 

Total 



Membra- 
nous 
croup. 



43 



Diph- 


Typhoid 


theria. 


fever. 




m 




33 




a 




fl 


<B 


t 


« 


"S 


(£ 




03 




o 


P 


O 


M 



Measles. 



73 



<o 

e3 
O 

55 
65 
65 
26 
9 



21 223 



Scarlet 
fever. 



Total. 



63 
91 
95 
31 

20 

9 

6 
11 
20 
38 
28 
16 



55 



360 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The table following, which contains the number of cases of 
contagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom during the 
past ten years, is put in for the purpose of comparison. 





Mem- 

branous 

croup. 


Diphthe- 
ria. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Measles. 


Totals. 


Years. 


00 
HI 

c3 

o 


o5 

Q 


o5 

o> 

eS 
O 


a 

0) 




o5 




0} 


CO 
01 

Q 


o5 


in 

2 

01 

fi 

36 


IB 

<D 

m 
OS 

* 


0) 

p 


1885 


* 


* 


* 


18 


* 


20 


* 


5 


* 


79 


1886 


# 


* 


* 


9 


* 


12 


* 




* 


5 


* 


26 


1887 


« 


* 


73 


17 


28 


18 


94 


4 


« 


9 


* 


48 


1888 


* 


* 


126 


30 


35 


12 


44 


1 


187 


9 


392 


52 


1889 


* 


* 


79 


23 


30 


16 


259 


5 


54 


4 


428 


48 


1890 


* 


* 


41 


9 


36 


17 


63 


3 


298 


6 


438 


35 


1891 


* 


# 


21 


2 


76 


18 


25 




89 


2 


211 


22 


1892 


* 


* 


26 


5 


33 


11 


44 


2 


451 


11 


554 


29 


1893 


* 


» 


7 


1 


79 


15 


110 


5 


212 


2 


408 


23 


1894 


12 


12 


42 


11 


74 


21 


67 


3 


223 


8 


418 


55 



* No returas made during this year. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



361 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE MORTALITV OP THE CITY BY DISEASES AND BY 

MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1894, COMPILED FROM 

THE RECORDS OF THE CITY REGISTRAR. 



Causes of Death. 


1-5 


Pi 

a 
s 
u 






eS 


6 

5 


1-1 


3 


• S 

CO 


u 

.0 





g 

> 



a 






3 







1 


























1 
1 


































1 




"2" 


1 

1 






































1 


















1 


1 






" fall 






2 
















" fract're of skull 








1 
















11 


" gunshot wound 
" sepsis 






























1 
















" injury to head 






















1 
1 


" railroad 
















1 


1 






" run over by 
















1 




" scald :. 




■■ 






1 














" suffocation 
























Anaemia 








1 
















" and debility . 
" and rheum'tism 
of heart 


















1 






1 






















Aortic stenosis 














1 

2 










Apoplexy 


1 




2 




"l" 




2 


1 


1 












" meningeal 






1 


















App'ndicitis sup'urative 








1 
















Asphyxia 






















Asthenia 


















1 






Astfcma 














1 










Blood poisoning 


"i' 


] 












Bowels, inflamination of 


















" inflammation of 
and jaundice.. 
























" obstruction of . . 






1 
2 


















Brain, congestion of 








1 




1 

2 
2 

"i 


1 




1 






" congestion of and 
dentition 












" disease of 








1 

1 
4 
1 


1 

"5' 

1 




1 






"V 


"3 
1 
1 


6 
6 

28 
6 

1 

1 
13 

1 
1 
1 

1 


Bright's disease 








2 




1 
2 




3 

1 








2 


" acute 


" " & asthma 












" acute & men- 
ingitis 


1 

3 






















" capillary 






2 


2 








2 


1 


1 


1 


" capillary and 
whoop ing. 
cough 






" chronic 






1 


















" " & old age 
" and broncho- 
pneumonia. 














1 






















1 











362 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE. — Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


S 


p 








3 


s 

*-5 


M 

3 

3 


s 


o 
o 
O 


O 
>5 


3 

S 

0) 

R 





Bronchitis and grip 












1 




























1 


























1 

1 
















2 




1 






1 






















1 












































































1 




"i' 








2 






























1 



































1 






















1 


















































1 




1 








2 


Childbirth. . 






1 
1 


1 
















Cholera infantum 

** ** and ange- 






1 


6 


58 


43 


21 10 








1 








1 


'* *' and men- 
















1 

1 




























































1 
9 


Complication of diseases. . 










1 




1 


"i' 
"i' 












1 
16 




2 


3 
2 


1 

1 


2 




2 
1 

1 


.. 


1 
4 
2 

1 


2 

i 

3 


"5" 

1 
1 






*' membranous 


1 


































1 


2 
2 


2 








** '* and men- 
ingitis. 
Debility 














1 
G 






3 
1 


1 






1 


3 




2 


4 


3 


31 


" old age, and bron- 
chitis — 


1 

1 

13 








1 
















Dentition 


2 








8 

1 


2 




1 
1 








•■J 




2 










g 










1 

1 
11 










1 












2 


1 




















5 

1 
















1 


2 






















1 
5 










1 










1 
























2 










1 














X 


'* & rheumat'm 














1 

2 

1 




"i 

1 
1 






1 








1 








4 




















2 






















1 














1 
2 








1 


























3 












1 
1 

1 












1 




) 






















2 


" grip, & oid age 






















1 


1 






















1 


" from cerebral 
tumor 




■ »■• • 






] 














1 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 363 

TABLE.— Co7iii?med. 



Causes of Death. 


s 

1-5 


a 


5 
3 


ft 
< 




0) 

CI 

s 

1-5 


9 
1^ 


i 

a 
< 


s 

ft 
d 


o 

o 
O 


s 

s 

% 


0) 

s 

o 

a) 



t 
o 


Exhaustion following cer- 






1 










"i 






















1 


























2 


1 






















" typhoid 


3 




2 


1 


2 


1 


6 
1 

2 


2 


1 


3 


21 




I 
1 


1 




1 






3 














































r 








1 










1 












Grip .... .... 


3 
























1 




































1 










" and pneumonia 


1 


"l 


















































1 
5 






















1 


1 


2 


5 


3 


2 


1 


1 


3 


1 


4 

1 


29 


" " and bron- 
























1 


























1 






" " and disease 


















1 
1 
































" " and pneu- 


















1 
1 








" aortic regurgitation 






























1 






















1 
























" mitral insufficiency, 














1 




1 








" mitral regurgita- 






















" neuralgia and paral- 
















1 
1 

1 
1 


























































... . 








.. 




2 


2 








1 


2 


"i' 


8 


" valvular disease of, 
and exhaustion. . . 








1 




















1 


1 


2 






1 


1 
1 












1 


S 














1 


Hepatitis 








1 














1 


2 






1 




1 
1 














o 












I 


1 








8 


Hyperasmia, passive cere- 
bra], and exhaustion. .. 






1 














1 






1 










5 


2 




1 




9 


Influenza and pneumonia. 


1 
1 












1 


Influenza and passive con- 
gestion of liver, and hy- 
postatic pneumonia 














1 










1 


Jaundice 


1 






















1 


Laryngitis 








1 
















\ 


" tubercular 






















1 


1 


Laryngismus stridulus . . . 



















1 


. .. . 




1 



364 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE. — Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


>> 

CJ 

a 
a 

1-5 







1 

P. 
< 


(A 




3 

•-5 


>> 

1-5 


m 
P 
bD 

3 
< 


S 

P. 

03 









,0 

s 

> 


!2i 


QJ 

£ 

V 

p 


a 
C 

b 


Liver, chronic inflamma 






1 
















1 






Liver, clrrliosis of. 


















2 
1 




" disease of 


2 




1 
3 








2 










Lungs, congestion of 


1 


2 


1 












1 


































1 


.... 




Mastoiditis 


1 
1 
3 

2 






















Marasmus 


"3' 
3 


2 
1 
5 


1 

"3' 
1 


1 
1 
3 

1 




4 


2 


1 


1 




1 


Ji 


Measles 




Meningitis 




5 


5 


3 
1 


1 

i 


2 

1 


1 


34 


































1 


2 


1 


1 








1 














] 






1 








1 
1 


1 








1 




" and hereditarj' 














J 


Myocarditis 












1 

1 












J 






1 














1 




1 


g 


" " and preg- 
nancy. 
















1 






1 








1 










2 


" " intersti- 
tial 




















1 


























1 




Nervous prostration and 


1 
14 
1 
























11 

1 


5 


3 
3 


















33 


Old age 


1 


1 






3 


2 


"i' 
3 


2 


14 










Paralysis ... 


1 


1 


2 


2 


"i' 

1 


2 


1 


1 






13 










" of spine, and de- 
bility 
























1 

1 

1 
12 

1 
1 
1 
76 
1 
2 

1 
59 


" and Inflamma- 


1 






































1 










1 


4 






1 




"i' 
1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


























" 






















1 
6 








Phtbisis, pulmonary 

Pleurisy 


7 

1 


2 


9 


3 


10 


7 


8 


8 


6 


5 


5 












1 




1 










" and blood poison- 












1 
5 










13 

1 


11 


3 


4 
1 


8 


3 


1 


1 


3 


2 


5 






3 








1 




] 




5 
2 
1 
4 
2 

1 

1 

1 




1 
1 
1 




1 










" hypostatic 




















1 
1 


2 

1 








































" and blood poi- 




1 
























1 
1 


















" and malignant 
jaundice 












1 











REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 365 

TABLE.-!- ConLiniicd, 



Causes of Death. 


a 


u 

CS 


p 

s 

1*5 


ft 
<1 




s 

1-5 


1-5 


c» 

3 

be 

< 


■rH 
O 

a 

ft 

v 
CO 


o 
o 
O 


4) 

3 
? 
o 
;2i 


C 


"3 


Pneumonia and injury lo 

spine and side 

" bronclio, and 

asthma 

" and lieart dis- 










1 
















1 










1 
















1 
















1 
1 








1 






3 


1 




•2 


2 




1 


1 






12 




1 










1 


1 


1 












2 


Rlieumatism and pericar- 
ditis 

" & heart disease 

Septicaemia, puerperal — 

Scrofula and exhaustion . . 

Spine disease and debility 

" Potts's disease of . . . 




















1 














1 










1 
















\ 


1 
1 






















1 
























1 




1 
1 

5 




















2 




















1 


Still-born 


3 


3 


9 


6 


4 


7 


! 


3 


7 






6i 


Stomach, disease of 

" inflammation of. 


1 






1 


















1 








1 






.::;.:;. 








1 


Strangulated hernia 
























1 










1.... 












1 






















1 




t> 








1 

1 






1 






2 
























1 


























1 


" hereditary'. 














2 






1 

1 




1 














2 








8 










'i 


2 


" of bowels 

" intestinal 

" of lungs and 

brain 

" mesenteric... 
" pulmonary & 

renal 


















1 
1 












1 


















1 
















1 


1 
















1 


















1 

1 






1 






[ 
















1 




3 




' 


2 




1 


3 






4 

70 


13 










1 
90 


98 


1 

58 


■> 




99 


76 


83 


70 


86 


67 


137 


112 


1046 



366 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CO 

H 
H 



o 

CO 

o 

I— ( 
H 

H 
<! 
H 
:c 

hJ 
<5 
H 



O 

o 

CO 
hH 

D3 

O 
O 

O 
CO 



-t^ to irt) a a 



^ t^ (M tH iC 00 40 



O r-t C5 t- 



I— ICC GCL-' -^lO-^a^ I— I 



OCOOO rH OM coccc:coicc;ciXoi^Hr^ 

O^IMO O i-("0 OCO MCO"* i-lrH 



OS — I CO <M •* l^ (M CO ei 00 



^ O -* C» 05 C-1 »0 r 



CTJ-^l-^CO CO CCd H^COC:»CCOW5COl^»CO-*CD 
rr-i ^^ 11^ «M Oi rr. r^ fM rj r*^ Prt -^H .— ( 



OSC- CO 



0Ct~(M(NCOCO-<* T-H 



cdoocomt-02C:m-"*t~cDrH 
■* OS <M i-H ffi eo ■<* — < 



<iccc'Co CO oom "^"'Sri'^'^SE/; 



CO C-l l-H ^H 



I— ( o t-> 



C-l 1-' r-l 



CO »o Ol -^ ^ 

-^COCjffl 1^1 OOr-i c005C0953002(M0100t0^eOCOa3'>* 



S-^ S ^ o 

O ^ r^ ^4^ 05 

oj oi Of" « 

3 a ^5 i .S 
ft . cj ci w 
C O * 03 oj 



C3r^ 



C3 CO 



^ 



■•2 op 

t^5^r5§i^5 5^Sa 

43 cj O 5j ci^ O C o ftO 

'3a3M<i3a)'W^oi'-'^' 



3 o 



S3 



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C a 03^ 



5iC(«j 









REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 367 

Our city has again been fortunate in the matter of contagious 
diseases. In many of our sister cities it has been necessary to 
close public and private schools, and prevent any public gather- 
ing of children. No such comprehensive measures have been 
necessary to prevent the spread of disease in our city. We be- 
lieve that this is due, in part at least, to the prompt and effective 
measures that have been taken to isolate every case as soon as it 
was reported to this office. It has been necessary twice during 
the. year to move people to the city hospital for contagious dis- 
eases. An attempt was made by the board during the past year 
to secure money enough to erect a suitable hospital in place of 
the pest house. It was not successful. We are hopeful that in 
time a community which is liberal enough to spend nearly 
^100,000 per year to save property and human life from fire, will 
be led to see the necessity that exists for some proper hospital, 
which we believe would save many more lives, and as much in 
the value of time lost to those who are sick, as any fire depart- 
ment in the world. 

The cause of a disease is one of the things which the inspec- 
tors endeavor to discover, but which, owing to various reasons, 
they are not always able to trace. It was noticed once this year 
that several cases of typhoid fever occurred among the customers 
of a certain milkman. An examination of the premises of the man 
and the people who sold him milk, showed a well dangerously 
near a sink pipe, and an analysis of the water showed pollution. 
The well was cleaned, and during the process it was said the 
stones in the well showed discoloration from the sink water. 
The board would not say that the milk was watered, but in some 
way, perhaps from the washing of cans, it seems- reasonable to 
suppose the milk became contaminated. As the germs will mul- 
tiply at an almost^incredible rate in milk, it seems also reasonable 
to suppose that the cause of several cases of typhoid fever was 
that polluted well situated in another town. 

A case of membranous croup was reported. The inspector 
could not in any way by questions to the members of the family 
find any connection with any previous case. He finally noticed 



368 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

that the paper on the wall of one of the rooms looked new, and 
on inquiry found that the old paper had been removed and new 
paper put on two days before the sick child began to show symp- 
toms of the disease. He also found there had been a case of 
malignant diphtheria in the tenement five years before, and that 
the place had not been fumigated after the death of the patient 
sick at that time. The walls had been repapered some time after 
this first case occurred, but when it was done the old paper had 
not all been removed. It seems probable that when the paper 
was taken off the last time preparatory to repapering, that some 
of the germs of the first case of diphtheria that had been confined 
on the walls were released, and the little one being already sick 
with tonsilitis, was in such a condition physically that some of 
the germs propagated the disease in her system. It is needless 
to state that after the termination of the last sickness the place 
was thoroughly fumigated. By these two cases it will be readily 
seen that the cause is sometimes so far removed from the time or 
place of the sickness itself, that it is small wonder it is not dis- 
covered. 

There are some physicians who have considered that the board 
has gone too far in its attempts to isolate cases of contagious 
diseases, and have seemed to take oifense at the measures adopted. 
The board does not intend to interfere in the conduct of any 
case which it becomes its duty to isolate. It prefers to work in 
harmony with the physicians. It must, however, do its duty, 
and when some inconvenience is caused to the individual it is 
done only that the great public as a whole may be protected. 

DEATH RETURNS. 

In the table included in this report the total number of deaths 
and their causes are given. It will be seen that it is an improve- 
ment on those issued in former years, from the fact that the num- . 
ber that died without the cause being given has been very much 
reduced. During the latter part of the year no such returns were 
rendered. This is due to an ordinance passed by the city gov- 
ernment, and for which this board tenders its thanks. There are 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 369 

Still many imperfections due to the carelessness of physicians. If 
each one who reports a death would only use a little care this 
table might be of much use instead of being, as it sometimes is, 
an object of ridicule to the very men who have by their careless- 
ness or willfulness made it what it is. 

It will be seen that in the table of comparisons the population 
is fixed at 55,000. The board arrives at this conclusion in the 
following manner : The total number of taxable polls returned 
by the assessors for the year 1894 was 12,103. It is a good rule 
of statistics that the ratio of the taxable polls is to the population 
as I is to 4.54. Allowing that to be true, we have in this city a 
population of 54,949, or near enough to call it 55,000 for all 
practical purposes. 

The board thanks Your Honor and all officials and citizens 
who have aided it in the work it is frying to do. 

CORNELIUS F. STARR, M. D., 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 
C. W. DOWNING, M. D., 

Board of Health of Manchester. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Health : 

We beg leave to submit the following as the report of the in- 
spectors for the year 1893 : 

Vaults and privies inspected ..... 3,988 

Vaults inspected after cleaning ..... 1,029 

Water-closets inspected ...... 1,255 

Yards and alleys inspected ...... 2,421 

Cellars inspected ....... 1,677 

Barns and outbuildings inspected .... 909 

Tenements inspected ....... 861 

Barn cellars inspected . . . . . 1,535 

Latrines inspected ....... 30 

Teams and riggings of excavators inspected ... 41 

Soaperies, slaughter-houses, etc., inspected . . . 22 

Cleaning or repairs were ordered as follows : 

Vaults cleaned 389 

Yards and alleys cleaned . . . . , . 170 

Cellars cleaned 359 

Barn cellars cleaned ....... %t^ 

Barns, etc., cleaned 6 

Tenements cleaned ....... 44 

Privies cleaned ........ 42 

Latrines cleaned . 8 

Water-closets cleaned or repaired .... 205 

Vault covers repaired 76 

Leaky drainpipes repaired ...... 59 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 371 

Three hundred and sixty-four complaints have been investi- 
gated and in 254 cases a remedy was provided. In no cases 
there was no cause or the cause was of such a nature as to be be- 
yond our control 

Openings other than leaks in the drainage system were found 
at 95 places, and three openings were ordered closed. Seventy- 
seven sinks were provided with traps. 

Sewage was found running on the surface of the ground in 58 
places. The owners of the premises were made to care for the 
same either by entering the sewer or providing proper cesspools. 

It has been necessary to write 825 letters and make 2,894 calls 
in doing the work of the department. 

Twenty-four dead animals were buried or otherwise disposed 
of. 

One hundred and eight hens and small animals that were being 
kept in the cellars of dwellings were ordered removed. 

The people living in 61 tenement blocks were warned to stop 
throwing swill and slops into the yard or street. 

Three cases of overcrowding were discovered and the people 
were made to live in a more sanitary manner. 

The city dumps were inspected twenty times, and once the 
street department was asked to discontinue using one place on 
account of sickness near by. This request was immediately com- 
plied with. 

An attempt was made to make the people who collect swill be 
neater and more careful in their work, and twenty notices and 
several warnings were given them. 

Thirty-three permits were granted to householders for the clean- 
ing of their own privy vaults. 

By direction of the board samples of water from seven sus- 
pected wells were sent away for analysis. In four cases the water 
was pronounced bad and other water was provided. 

One hundred and fifty-nine legal notices were served and the 
proper returns made. By order of the board two cases were pros- 
ecuted in the police court. 

Ten complaints against the scavenger service have been re- 



372 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ceived. In each case the proper parties were notified and relief 
was given. 

Twenty catch-basins were complained of and were repaired or 
flushed by the street department at the request of the inspectors. 

Nuisances to the number of seventy-one, not classified in the 
above, have been abated. 

One hundred and forty-four swine and eight cows were discov- 
ered being kept within the sanitary limits and were ordered re- 
moved. 

A statement of mortality was compiled each month and sent to 
215 different boards of health, physicians, etc. 

Weekly reports of contagious and infectious diseases have been 
sent to the State Board of Health at Concord and to the Marine 
Hospital Service at Washington, D. C. 

Contagious or infectious diseases have been reported as follows : 
Measles, 223 ; scarlet fever, 67 ; typhoid fever, 73; diphtheria, 
43; membranous croup, 12; total, 418. Of these cases 363 
were reported by physicians, 22 by householders, and ^^ were dis- 
covered by the inspectors. 

The inspectors were unable to find the cause of the disease in 
247 cases. In 155 cases the connection with some previous case 
was clearly traceable. Ten people contracted the disease outside 
the city limits, and bad drainage was the probable cause in six 
cases. 

At 86 dwellings it was necessary to order isolation and disin- 
fection, and in nearly all these cases the inspectors were obliged 
to give instructions as to the steps to be taken. 

Sixty children who were attending school and 56 people who 
were working and resided in houses where contagious diseases ex- 
isted were restrained from further attendance at school or employ- 
ment until all danger from contagion had passed. 

Twenty-four rooms or tenements were fumigated, and ten 
funerals were attended to see that the remains were not exposed. 

Two people sick with scarlet fever were removed to the city 
hospital for contagious diseases. 

Two hundred and forty-five houses have been placarded, and 
the placards removed at the termination of the sickness. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



373 



About 1,300 pamphlets issued by the State Board of HeaUh 
have been distributed in localities where contagious diseases 
existed. 

Water-closets have been substituted for vaults, or barn cellars, 
used as vaults, on the following streets : 



A . 

Alfred . 

Amherst 

Amory . 

Appleton 

Ash 

Ashland 

Auburn . 

Beauport 

Beech 

Belmont 

Blaine . 

Blodget . 

Bowman 

Bridge . 

Brook . 

Brown avenue 

Cartier . 

Cedar . 

Central . 

Chestnut 

Concord 

Douglas . 

Dubuque 

Dutton . 

Elm 

Elm avenue 

Frederick 

Granite . 

Hanover 

Hancock 



3 

16 

3 
2 

6 

3 
12 

4 
3 
4 
2 
I 
4 
9 
4 
3 
5 

19 

44 

13 

3 

2 

5 
2 

7 
I 
2 
I 

9 
2 



374 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Howard . 
Harrison 
Hayward 
High . 
Lake avenue 
Laurel . 
Lowell . 
Main 

Manchester 
Market . 
Mast 

Merrimack 
Mil ford . 
Morrison 
Munroe . 
Myrtle . 
Nashua . 
Orange . 
Parker . 
Pearl 

Pennacook 
Pine 
Prospect 
Riddle . 
Rimmon 
Second . 
Spruce . 
Third . 
Turner . 
Union . 
Valley . 
Walker . 
Walnut . 
Webster 
West 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



375 



Willow 
Winter 



663 

Charles Langmaid was employed loi days as sanitary patrol- 
man at Lake Massabesic. On Sundays and such days as large 
crowds were expected he was aided by the sanitary inspectors, 
they serving sixteen days in all. 

The work done was as follows : 



Houses, buildings, and surroundings inspected 
They were distant from the lake as follows : 



159 



Touchmg water or shore at high-water mark 


• 57 


Ten feet or less back ...... 


. 46 


Between 10 and 20 feet back ..... 


• 32 


" 20 " 50 " 


15 


50 '•' 100 " 


7 


Over 100 feet back ....... 


2 


Privies connected with them were located as follows : 




Touching the water 


I 


18 feet from shore 


2 


25 " " 


3 


50 " " ' 


6 


Between 50 and 100 feet 


6 


100 feet from shore ...... 


• 29 


Over 100 feet from shore ..... 


. 92 


No privy 


20 


The sink water was cared for as follows : 




10 feet or less back ....... 


2 


Between 10 and 25 feet back ..... 


6 


'' 25 " 50 " 


. 6S 


" 50 " 100 " 


. 16 


Over 100 feet back . 


29 


No sink or dry sink ...... 


• 38 



376 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Ill cases where there is no sink the people said they threw the 
slops more than loo feet from the water. 

Well water was used at 37 cottages. Lake water was used by 
the others. 

The yards at ten places were found to contain some rubbish 
and dirt, and in a few places the swill was thrown from the win- 
dows or doors. 

Forty-four stables were found situated as follows. 

3 feet from the water . . . . . . .1 

75 " " " 5 

100 """....... 17 

150 i. a a ^ j2 

200 u 4; II ....... 9 

Eight boat-houses are standing over or in the water. A brook 
emptying into the lake runs under two houses. 

Sink water was found on the surface of the ground in four 
places, and the nuisance abated. 

Three hundred and fourteen dead fish were removed from the 
lake or shore. 

A dead bird and one dead snake were cared for. 

Swill and garbage, including old clothes, etc., were removed 
at 191 places. 

Thirty-one picnics were attended. 

A privy was ordered cleaned. 

Twenty-six persons who were bathing were driven out and sev- 
eral were stopped before entering the water. 

People were warned not to pollute the water of the lake seventy- 
five times. 

The privy spoken of as touching the water is provided with a 
water-tight vault. It is not used, being owned by the water-works 
department. 

Mr. Richard J. Barry has been employed since May i and has 
been specially detailed to attend to the enforcement of the 
plumbing rules. The work done in that direction is as follows : 
Number of jobs reported . . . . • • 511 



REPORT OF The board of health. 



3-77 



Number of water tests made ..... 
smoke tests made .... 
inspections ..... 

old blocks inspected .... 

Work was found defective at sixty-one places. In all such 
cases the defective work was removed and proper work substituted 
therefor. 



375 

13 

i>3i5 

20 



The fixtures put in since May i are as follows 
Water-closets with tanks 
Water-closets, pressure direct 
Sinks . 
Bath-tubs 
Wash-bowls 
Wash-trays . 
Urinals 
Slop hoppers 
Shower baths 



735 
230 

557 
240 
192 

34 
22 

7 
4 



2,021 



Four hundred and fifty-one stacks were tested. 
There were twenty-seven rain-water leaders put in and ten 
fresh-air inlets. 

There are twenty-three firms doing business as plumbers in this 
city at the present time. 

The inspectors thank the board and each and every one to 
whom it is indebted for many favors granted during the year. 

HERBERT S. CLOUGH. 
JOHN F. LOONEY. 
R. J. BARRY. 



REPORT 

OF THE 



CITY ENGINEER. 



CITY ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 
1894. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT. 

FIRST ASSISTANT ENGINEER, FIELD AND OFFICE. 

HARRIE M. YOUNG. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ENGINEER, DRAUGHTING. 

GEORGE W. WALES. 

THIRD ASSISTANT ENGINEER, FIELD AND OFFICE. 

HARRY J. BRIGGS. 

ASSISTANT DRAUGHTSMAN. 

A. H. SANBORN, Jan. 29 to Mar. 14. 

ASSISTANTS. 

GEORGE M. CURRIER, To Aug. 4. 
HERBERT L. WATSON, Mar. 16 to Apr. 7, July 5 to Aug. 4. 
J. EDWARD BAKER, Apr. 6 to Aug. 4- 

TYPEWRITER AND CLERK. 

ANNA GERTRUDE BENNETT. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Coitncils : 

Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting my ninth annual report, 
being the sixteenth annual report of the work in the city engi- 
neer's department, for the year ending December 31, 1894. 

Expenses of the department for the year 1894, per monthly 
draft : 



January . 














^414.34 


February 














361.48 


March . 














747-91 


April 














397.22 


May 














512.69 


June 














692.48 


July . 














329-55 


August . 














322.75 


September 














507.48 


October . 














293.88 


November 














239-75 


December 














553-44 


Total 


^5.372.97 


Appropriation 








. 4,300.00 


Amount overdrawn 


$1,072.97 


Average month 


ly draft 












^447-75 



882 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Itemized account of expenses for the year : 

For salary of city engineer . , . 

salary of assistants ..... 

supplies for office ..... 

additions to office furniture 

stakes and lumber ....'. 

horse shoeing and repairs of wagon and harness 
street-car fares ...... 

express and postage ..... 

repairing ....... 

books and folios ..... 

printing . 

telephone ...... 

horse hire ...... 

new instruments ..... 

typewriter supplies ..... 

typewriter clerk ..... 

street numbers ...... 

photographs . . . ... 

painting rods, signs, etc. .... 



The items for salaries may be divided as follows : 

For giving lines and grades for the extension and 

construction of streets and sidewalks 
plans and profiles relating to the construction of 

streets and sidewalks ..... 
surveys and levels for the construction of streets 

and sewers ....... 

giving lines and grades for, and superintending 

the construction of, sewers .... 
plans and profiles relating to the construction 

of sewers ....... 



U, 200.00 

3.035-25 

276.32 

25.81 

75-11 

79-75 
20.00 

6.45 
24-57 
63.60 

2.75 
36.20 
42.25 
70.81 

2.00 

355-5° 
45.00 

-50 
11.00 

?5j372-97 

;^543-89 
180.56 

331-38 
258.05 
192.69 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 383 

For surveys, measurements, and plans for the assign- 
ment of street numbers .... ^231.22 
making plans for improvements other than those 

mentioned in this account .... 210.98 
surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 
given for improvements in Pine Grove ceme- 
tery . 135-32 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 

given for improvements in Valley cemetery i5-oo 
making plans and new maps of Pine Grove cem- 
etery 115-53 

making map of Pine Grove cemetery for city 

treasurer ....... 184.55 

making map for superintendent of cemetery . 82.67 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 
given for repairing and extending the street 
railway ....... 16.39 

collecting data, classifying accounts, and other 

work in relation to office report . . . 131-92 

lines, grades, and superintendence given for the 

construction of avenues in Stark park . . 29.83 

lines, grades, and superintendence given for the 

construction of avenues in Derryfield park . 87.36 

Excelsior hook-and-ladder house, plans, specifi- 
cations, and measurements .... 16.50 

Fire King engine house, change in storehouses, 

plan and specifications .... 18.50 

indexing plans and notes .... 38-15 

checking notes, figures, etc. .... 24.03 

surveys, levels, etc., at Main-street bridge . 66.66 

map of city . ...... 29.75 

new sewer map of city, and sewer book . . 58.85 

measuring and figuring concrete laid for the city 3^-^3 

attendance upon meetings of the street and park 

commission, and data furnished them . . 155-23 



384 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



For locating and putting up street signs and guide 
boards ........ 

locating and setting stone bounds . 

office work, preparing notes, data, records, etc. 

Pine Grove cemetery book, list of owners 

new sewer license book ..... 

procuring abutters' names .... 

lettering and finishing plans .... 

information given engineers and others regard- 
ing lines, grades, sewers, etc. 

computing areas of land taken for new streets . 

researches of deeds for property lines and own- 
ership ....... 

plans for and attendance upon board of alder- 
men at street hearings .... 

attendance upon meetings of the committee on 
streets, and plans pertaining thereto 

attendance upon meetings of the committee on 
sewers and drains, clerical work, including 
orders written ..... 

inventory of office ..... 

list of streets laid out, for tables 

list of sewers, for tables .... 

street petitions ..... 

sewer petitions ..... 

additions to contour maps 

new sewer book ..... 

tracing of sewer maps for street commissioners 

sewer sheet tables ..... 

sewer licenses and permits 

Total 



$23.63 
63.65 

190.13 
10.25 
56.00 
42.13 
47-25 

221.13 
2-33 

69.18 
•;6.oo 



30.00 
19.25 
36.08 

6-57 
23-50 
15-56 

7-50 
11.00 
46.50 

8-35 
54-62 



,235-25 



The following bills, charged to other appropriations, have 
been certified to by this department : 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 385 

LAND DAMAGES. 

A. S. Lamb, Hayward, 30,132 square feet, at 4 cts. ^1,205.28 

Susan Prescott, Cass, 141.37 square feet, at 7 cts. . 9.89 

Emma F. Brown, Cass, 1,478.52 square feet, at 7 cts. io3-49 

John Mulligan, Cass, 1,298.5 square feet, at 7 cts. . 90.89 
Sydney A. Blood, Dearborn, award by board of 

aldermen ........ 20.00 

Sydney A. Blood, Dearborn, additional award . 80.00 

M. Prout, Hayward, 23,732.54 square feet, at 4 cts. 949-30 

STREET SIGNS AND GUIDE BOARDS. 

vV. B. Abbott (heirs of), to painting and lettering 
635 street signs, at 16 cts. ..... $101.60 

STONEWORK. 

F. S. Bodwell, to 81 stone bounds for new streets, at 

$1.25 ........ $101.25 

PRINTING. 

W. E. Moore, to printing copies of chapter 18, City 

Ordinances . . . . . . . $5-75 

F. H. Challis, to printing 1,000 blank sewer permits 6.85 

" " to printing 400 card records . . 4.25 

STREET NUMBERS. 

Union Manufacturing Co., 1,000 street numbers . $45.00 

CONCRETE. 

Charles H. Robie Co., 3,109.62 square yards. . $1,691.63 
Contract for repairing certain streets . . . 337-50 

$2,029.13 
John T. Underbill & Co., 3,353.91 square yards . $1,838.97 

25 



386 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The amount of work done by this department during the year 
is as follows : 



Number of orders for surveys, street lines, and grades 
for sewer grades 
for paving grades 
for street railway grades 
for Pine Grove cemetery grades 
for Valley cemetery grades 
for profile levels 

Total number of orders 



1,044 
120 

59 
I 

31 
3 

47 

i>30S 

Levels for profiles for establishing grades, 39,657 feet, equal to 
7.51 miles. These profiles, having three lines of levels on each 
street, make a total distance actually leveled of 118,971 feet. 

Feet. 

13,683 
3^460 



Levels for sewer profiles 

for other center profiles 
in Pine Grove cemetery 
in Valley cemetery . 
in Derryfield park . 

Other levels 

Total levels taken . 
Equal to 7.51 miles. 

Levels for cross-section 

Surveys of streets and street lines 
in Pine Grove cemetery 
in Valley cemetery 
in Derryfield park . 
for street numbers . 

Other surveys . 

Total surveys made 
Equal to 33.97 miles. 



^5° 

245 

4,643 

17,478 



39,659 

Sq. Feet. 

315,000 

Feet. 

95,680 

11,700 

150 

5,280 

38,190 

18,400 

179,400 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



387 









Feet 


Street lines marked on ground . . . . . 


47,606 


Lines of lots and avenues, Pine Grove cemetery . 


15.580 


of lots and avenues, Valley cemetery . 


150 


of avenues, Stark park 




2,220 


of avenues, Derryfield park 






11,000 


for gutters 






20,108 


for curbs .... 






5>545 


for sewers .... 






20,534 


for street railway 






6,000 


Other lines .... 






15,800 


Total length of lines marked on ground . 


144,543 


Equal to 27.86 miles. 






Feet. 


Grades set for sidewalks 


26,603 


for gutters 






20,108 


for curbs . 






5>S45 


for sewers 






20,534 


for street railway tracks 






^50 


for building streets . 






36,724 


in Pine Grove cemetery 






3.477 


in Valley cemetery . 






228 


in Stark park 






1.950 


in Derryfield park 






6,076 


Other grades 


2,089 


Total length of grades set . . . 


123,484 


Equal to 23.39 miles. 






Feet. 


Lot owners looked up 




. 


. 37.863 



Equal to 7.17 miles. 



BATTERS SET. 



Calef road, cemetery fence. 
Hall street, culvert. 
Harrison street, two culverts. 



388 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Myrtle street, culvert. 
River road, bank wall. 
City ledge, crusher plant. 

Old lots restaked in Pine Grove cemetery 
New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemeterv 
Public ranges laid out in Pine Grove cemetery 

Total cemetery lots laid out . 

Street numbers assigned and put on 
replaced . 

assigned but not put on 
changed . 

Total 



30 

156 

13- 



199 

422 
61 
37 
15 



535 



PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 



Amherst, Elm to Maple. Two plans. 

Amherst, Ashland to Beacon. 

Chase avenue, Hospital road to brook. 

Chestnut, Merrimack to Pearl. Three plans. 

Glenwood avenue, Mammoth road to Woodland avenue. Two 
plans. 

Harrison, Maple to Belmont. Two plans. 

Hayes avenue. Old Falls road to Chase avenue. 

Hayward, Wilson to Taylor. Two plans. 

Highland Park avenue, Candia road to Concord & Portsmouth 
Railroad. 

Lake avenue, Hall road to Hanover. 

Longwood avenue. Mammoth road to Woodbine avenue. 

Mystic avenue, Candia road to Concord & Portsmouth Rail- 
road. 

Oakland avenue, Woodland avenue to Revere avenue. 

Orchard avenue, Candia road to Concord & Portsmouth Rail- 
road. 

Prospect, Russell to Belmont. Two plans. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENaiNEER. 389 

Revere avenue, Candia road to Concord & Portsmouth Rail- 
road. 

Union, Auburn to Webster. Six plans. 

Wayland avenue, Mammoth road to Revere avenue. 

Woodbine avenue, Candia road to Concord & Portsmouth 
Railroad. 

Woodland avenue, Candia road to Concord & Portsmouth 
Railroad. 

Total plans and profiles, 32. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Elm west back, Auburn to Spring. Three plans. 

Hanover south back, Union to east of Maple. 

Hanover, Lincoln to Wilson. 

Hanover, Wilson to Beacon. 

Manchester south back, Union to Maple. 

Monroe, Elm to River road. 

Prospect, Russell to Hall. 

Ray, Adams, Union, and Ray brook section. Four plans. 

River road, Webster to Clarke. 

Russell, Myrtle to Gore. 

Schuyler, Main to Cartier east back. 

South Main, Granite to Milford. Two plans. 

Total sewer plans, 18. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Coolidge avenue, Amory to Goffstown road. Seven plans. 

Hancock, Brown avenue to Concord & Montreal Railroad. 

Hiram, Blaine to Cleveland. 

Nutt road, Elm to Beech. Five plans. 

Plummer, Pine to Union. Two plans. 

Total numbering plans, 16. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Beech and Cilley road, lots owned by Weston, Shirley & Bell. 
Copy. 



390 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Cilley road, Union and Shasta streets, land owned by Water- 
man Smith. Copy. 

East Manchester schoolhouse, showing walks. 

Elm, South Manchester hose house. Plan of land taking. 

Hayward, land of S. G. Fletcher. Copy. 

Jewett, Mason, and Young, land of H. H. Young. Copy. 

Main to Merrimack river, land of Wolf & Wagner. Copy. 

Nutt road, Union and Shasta, land of Waterman Smith. Copy. 

Nutt road, plan of Brown heirs' land. Copy. 

Porter, Huse, Cilley, and Mammoth roads, and Maynard 
avenue. Plan of Maynard land. 

Vinton street, Taylor to Jewett, land of Brown and Stevens. 
Copy. 

Total miscellaneous plans, ii. 

WORKING PLANS. 

Beech, Gore to Clark. Profile. 

Bridge, Hall to Mammoth road. Profile. 

Bridge street extension. Mammoth road to Candia road. Lo- 
cation of. 

Derryfield park. Profile of circle. 

East Manchester schoolhouse, showing walks. 

Elm, Elm east back, and Elm west back, from Bridge to Au- 
burn. 

Front, eddy to Black brook. Center profile. 

Hanover, Beech to Maple. Gutter profile. 

Liberty east back. North to Webster. Sewer profile. 

Lowell and Bridge. Location of stone bounds. 

Pearl street, schoolhouse. Location and plan of lot. 

Pennacook, North, Walnut, and Canal. Section plan. 

Pine Grove cemetery extension. Land of C. C. Webster. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Chapel lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Swedish lawn. 

Plummer, Nutt road to Union. Plummer land. South Man- 
chester. 

Sagamore, sketch of culvert. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 391 

Shasta, Beech to Lincoln. Profile. 

Spruce south back, Elm east back to Chestnut west back. 
Sewer profile. 

Wilson street. Plan of culvert. 
Total working plans, 20. 

TRACINGS. 

Beech, Salmon to Amoskeag Co.'s line. 

Belmont, Pearl to Old Bridge street. 

Cilley road, Beech to Maple. Land of James A. Weston. 
Profile. 

Derryfield park, cross section of a part of. 

Elm, South Manchester hose house. Plan of land taking. 

Hayward, Hall to Belmont. 

Mason, Hayward to Somerville. 

Mead, Belmont to Hall. 

New Hampshire Improvement Co.'s and Wolf & Wagner's 
land. 

Pearl street, schoolhouse lot. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Chapel lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Chapel lawn. Lots for treasurer. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Part of Chapel lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Riverside lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Swedish lawn. Two plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Lots between Oxel and Locust avenues, 

Plummer, Nutt road to Union. 

Sagamore. Sketch of culvert. 

Salmon, Walnut to Beech. 

Second street extension, to Bedford line. 

Webster, schoolhouse addition. Two plans. 

Winter, land of Baldwin and Wallace. 

Total tracings, 24. 

BLUE PRINTS. 

City of Manchester, showing east side sewers. Two plans. 
City of Manchester, showing west side sewers. Four plans. 



392 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Pearl street, schoolhouse fence. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Chapel lawn. Seven plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Part of Chapel lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Riverside lawn. Four plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Swedish lawn. Four plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Section east of Pine lawn. Two plans. 

Plummer. Plan of Plummer land. 

Second street extension, to Bedford line. 

South Main. Profile for bridge. Eighteen plans. 

Total blue prints, 45. 

MAPS. 

City of Manchester, east side, showing sewers. Tracing. 
City of Manchester, west side, showing sewers. Two tracings. 
Pine Grove cemetery. Lots and avenues. 
Pine Grove cemetery. Lots and avenues. Two tracings. 
Total maps, 7. 

Fifty-seven plans of lots in Pine Grove cemetery have been 
made in the new book for the city treasurer ; and 10 sheets of 
plans in the sewer book. 

Total of all plans made, 240. 

Seven plans are under way which will be completed during 
the year. 

Plans made over in sewer book, 10. 

Sewer plans brought up to date, 65.- 

Numbering sheets brought up to date, 67. 

Plans lettered and finished, 15. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on laid-out streets, 
40,051 feet. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on streets not laid 
out, 3,301 feet. 

Total, 43,352 feet, equal to 8.21 miles. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



393 



STREET GRADES ESTABLISHED IN 1894. 



No. 




of 
Plan 


Street. 


9 


Amherst — 


9S4 


B 


129 


Beauport — 


40S3 


Beech 


7S4 


earlier 


SS7 


Cartier 


413.T 


Cilley road.. 


4047 


Dubuque .... 


1071 J 
1072 j 


Harrison 


40S9 


Kelley 


963 


Merrimack . 


988 


Page 


4008 


Rimmon — 


4130 


Sagamoi-e... 


Roll 


Union 


62 


Valley 


64 


Valley 



Location. 



Pine to Union 

Milford to south of A . 

Kelley southerly 

Cedar to Valley 

Kelley to Amory 

Sullivan southerly 

Beech to Wilson 

Amory to Kelley 



Maple to Belmont 



Cartier to Lorraine 

Beacon to Hanover 

Hanover to Candia road 

Amory to Kelley 

Walnut to Oak 

Clarke to 300 feet north of Trenlon . 

Belmont easterly 

Jewett easterly 



Length 
in ft. 



457 
455 
350 

1,620 
6.50 
335 

1,900 
650 

2,382 

1,600 

1,492 

1,640 

650 

1,105 

2,045 

647 

570 



*18,548 



Order 
passed. 



May 
June 
May 
July 
June 
Sept. 
May 



Sept. 26 

Sept. 10 

Sept. 26 
July 3 
Sept. 10 
Sept. 26 
Nov. 9 
Oct. 2 
June 5 
Sept. 4 



* Equal to 3.512 miles. 

As both sides of the street are shown by the plans, this makes 
37,096 feet of grade established, or 7.025 miles. 



394 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Street. 



Location. 



Amherst 

Belmont 

Belmont 

Bridge 

Bridge 

Bridge 

Bridge 

Bridge 

Bridge 

Canton 

Chestnut west back. 

Cypress 

Dearborn 

Elm west back 

Elm west back 

Elm west back 

Elm west back 

Elm west back 

Green 

Green south back... 
Green south back . . . 

Grove 

Grove south back . . . 
Grove south back . . . 

Gore 

Hall 

Hall 

Hall 

Hall 



Chestnut to Pine. 
From Valley northerly. 
From Lake avenue northerly 
Russell to Warren . 
Russell to Warren 
Warren to Ashland. 
Warren to Ashland. 
Hall to Belmont . 
At Hall. 

From Spruce southerly 

From Spruce northerly 

From Hay ward southerly 

From south of Summer southerly. 

Merrimack to Market 

Menlmack to Market 

Market to Stark 

Stark to Spring 

From Dean northerly 

Pine to Pine east back 

From Pine east back easterly 

From Pine east back easterly 

From Watson easterly 

From Pine east back easterly 

From Pine east back easterly 

Ash east back to Maple 

Mead to Pearl 

Pearl to Orange 

Orange to M j'rtle 

From Mead southerly 



Akron . 



Portland 
Akron .. 
Portland 
Akron 



Portland 

Akron &| 
Portland 
Akron . . 



Portland 
Akron . . 



Portland 



Akron ..I 



3fl 



12 
10 
8 
24 
24 
20 
20 
12 
10 
12 
12 
10 
10 
12 
12 
15 
15 
12 
20 
12 
12 
10 
12 
12 
12 
24 
18 
15 
10 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



395 



IN 1894.— EAST SIDE. 



CI '3 
a o 

® V 
Hi*- 


to 

o 

a 
a 


in 
O 

.a 
p. 
S 

oi 

h:i 


CO 

« 

CO 

3 
O 

W 


m j 

o 
o 
P< 


317 


2 




11 


2 






1 


4 


4 






1 


4 

8 


2 


1891 
20) 


1 


3631 
42) 


1 




18 


3 


16 


I 




14 


6 


8 














5 


1 








3 


It 








5 
4 


31 






306 


1 




18 


3) 


248 


1 




11 


M 


657 


4 




28 
3 
4 


8i 




1 








1 


12 








1 
1 
1 


1 

12 

9 
10 














2 




1 




13 






1 




10 


2 






1 


7 


2 



$293.82 
87.76 
44.19 

530.84 

928.90 

471.99 
10.40 

213.79 
13.84 
93.47 
93.59 

423.88 

1,315.38 

107.15 
616.31 

890.05 

42.11 

922.76 

195.66 

899.07 

1,313.12 

1,119.24 

191 15 



$0,927 
.344 
.237 

2.540 

2.293 

1.300 
1.300 
1.438 
1.537 
.708 
.793 

1.258 

1.453 

1.530 
4.891 

3.244 

.859 

3.107 

1.428 
3.293 
4.209 
4.145 






Sept. 18 
July 25 
July 25 

Sept. 10 

Sept. 14 

Aug. 14 
Aug. 14 
Dec. 19 

Sept. 27 
Oct. 17 
Nov. 7 

April 11 

April 11 

June 8 
Nov. 

Nov. 5 

Nov. 20 

Dec. 1 

May 10 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 13 
Aug. 28 



Sept. 22 
July 28 
July 25 

Sept. 14 
Sept. 26 



Foreman. 



Pat Murphy. 
Tim Clifford.* 



George M. Hobbs. 



John Kelley. 



Aug. 20 " " 

Aug. 20 " " 

Dec. 22' " " 

Oct. 1 " " 

Oct. 2O1 Charles Francis. 
Nov. 13 



1.006 Nov. 



April 16 

April 26 

June 9 
Nov. 13 

Nov. 26 

Nov. 22 

Dec. 7 

May 16 

Aug. 13 

Aug. 28 

Oct. 11 

Nov. 13 



John Kelley. 



Charles Fi ancis. 
George M. Hobbs. 



John Kelley. 



* Excavating done by private individuals, 
t Connected with private drain. 



396 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SEWERS BUILT IN 1894. 



Street. 



Hall. 



Location. 



Spruce to Spruce south back 



Lake avenue From Elm easterly 



Lake avenue 

Liberty east back 

Liberty east back 

Malvern . . 

Mile brook 

Munroe 

Munroe 

Munroe 

Myrtle 

North 

Orange 

Pearl 

Pine 

Pine 

Pine , 

Pine east back 

Pine east back , 

Prospect 

Prospect 

Prospect 

Prospect 

Prospect 

Prospect 

Kiver road 

Russell 

Sagamore south back. . 

Salmon 

Spruce 



From Elm easterly 

From Salmon soutlierl j- 

From Webster southerly 

From south of Lowell southerly. 

Bridge to Hall 

From River road easterly 

From River road easterly 

From River road easterly 

From Hall easterly 

Bay to Bay east back 

From Hall westerly 

From Russell easterly 

From Amherst northerly 

Auburn to Green 

Auburn to Green 

Green to Grove south back 

From Amherst noi-therly 

From Russell westerly 

From Russell westerly 

Russell to Linden 

Russell to Linden 

Linden to west of Hall 

From Hall westerly 

Webster to Munroe 

From Harrison southerly 

From Union westerly 

Union east back to Walnut 

From Chestnut westerly 



Akron 



Portland 
Akron 



Portland 
Akron 



Portland 

Akron 

Iron... 

Akron 

Portland 

Brick . 

Akron 



c» 



10 
15 
12 
10 
10 
10 
24 
12 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
12 
20 
20 
15 
10 
10 
10 
24 
24 
12 
12 
24x36 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



397 



■ EAST SIDE.— Continued. 



a o 



44 



174 



9 
1 10 

1 3 

18 



$76j49 

261.883 

202.23 

164.78 

84.22 

2,692.94 

552.73 



587.09 

159.181 

515.91 

105.21 

1 41.38 

],587.86 

1,465.85 
188.07 

169.79 



2,058.96 

3,092.44 

3,863.76 

90.40 

398.12 

246.78 

181.65 



:i 



1.271 June 4 

1.532 Nov. 28 
.713 April 30 
.915| May 21 

3.3371 July 18 

1.083J July 11 

3.621 Oct. 11 

.829 Sept. 8 

1.969 Sept. 1 

.762 Aug. 10 

.947 Sept. 22 

Oct. 12 



3.646 
1.074 



Nov. 5 
July 14 



1.369 Oct. 15 



4.565i May 5 



3.994 

6.272 
1.370 

2.288 
1.990 
1.651 



May 

July 11 
Oct. 17 
Aug. 24 
Aug. 21 

Sept. 27 



C.S 



Aug. 27 

June 8 

Dec. 3 
May 5 
May 22 
Aug. 7 

Aug. 2 

Oct. 26 

Sept. 12 

Sept. 10 

Aug. 14 

Sept. 22 

Nov. 1 

Dec. 5 
July 17 

Oct. IS 
Aug. 1 

Aug. 1 

Aug. 2 

Oct. IS 

Sept. 3 

Aug. 27 

Oct. 1 



Foreman. 



John Connor. 
John Kelley. 

George M. Hobbs. 
John Kelley. 



Jolin Connor. 
John Kelley. 

Pat Murphy. 
George M. Hobbs. 



John Kelley. 



George M. Hobbs. 

( Burton Elliott. 
John Kelley. 



398 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SEWERS BUILT IN 1894. 




Spruce 

Spruce 

Spruce 

Spruce 

Spruce 

Spruce south back 
Spruce south back 
Union east back... 

Webster 

Webster 



Weston to Canton 

Weston to Canton 

Weston to Canton 

Weston to Canton 

Weston to Canton 

Elm east back to Chestnut west back 
Elm east back to Chestnut west back 

From Webster southei'ly 

Walnut to Beech 

Walnut to Beech 



Akron .. 


20 


Iron 


20 


Akron .. 


15 


" .. 


12 


Portland 


12 


Akron .. 


12 


•' .. 


10 


Portland 


10 


Akron . . 


15 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



399 



— EAST SIDE.— Concluded. 





si's 


CO 

o 


95 



& 
S 

d 
1-5 


>^ 

CO 




1 

P. 
a) 

CO 

<S 


4-3 




"s 


H 




a 

5 

m 






When fin- 
ished. 


Foreman. 


46 




2 

4 

18 

2 

17 

14 

4 

7 

5 

377 


••■ 

.. . 

3 

••. 
1 
1 


$1,191.62 

455.16 
125.93 
640.40 


$1,508 

1.300 
1.259 
2.521 


Dec. 7 

Sept. 27 
May 3 
April 25 


Dec. 19 

Oct. 5 
May 5 
May 5 




12 

77 

567 

88 

100 
195 
59 


200 
150 


1 
2 

1 
1 

1 

40 


1 
1 

19 


.John Kelley. 
George M. Hobbs. 




82 


$31858.144 






- 




10,667 








2,773 













400 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT IN 



Street. 



Clinton 

Clinton 

Conant 

Dubuque 

Ferry 

Hill 

Main 

Main 

Main 

Main 

Montgomery 

Rimmon 

Schiller. .'. , 

Schiller 

South of Schiller 

Wayne... 

West 

West Hancock... 
West Hancock .. 



Location. 



From Main westerly 

From west of Main lo West 

Rimmon to Montgomery 

Wayne to Putnam 

From Main easterly 

From Schiller southerly 

Piscataquog river to Winter 

Winter to Granite 

Piscataquog river to Mast 

Piscataquog river to Mast 

From Conant northerly 

Amory to south of Wayne 

Merrimack river to west of Hill 
Merrimack river to west of Hill 

From Hill easterly 

From Dubuque easterly 

From Clinton northerly 

Dickey to Wheelock 

From Wheelock westerly 



Akron .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


15 


" .. 


12 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


Steel 


48 


Brick.... 


36x54 


Steel.... 


24 


Brick.... 


24x36 


Portland 


12 


Akron .. 


10 


Ir3n 


20 


Akron .. 


15 




10 




12 




10 




12 




10 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



401 



1894.— WEST SIDE. 



r. <=> 


MI'S 
G V 


® 



a 


m 

O 

a 
S 

03 
Hi 


S 

o 


CO 

O 
O 
ft 
m 
m 
(0 


to 
O 
o 

1 


o 

a 

05 
P. 

o 


OJ 

tn 

a 


13 

a' 

S3 


Foreman. 




50 
473 


2 
2 
4 


$86.29 
858.89 
634.18 
458.03 
90.70 
112.12 
673.28 
7,586.53 

743.49 

509.12 

387.48 

386.764 

29.43 

73.985 

43.58 

1,422.85 


$1,725 

1.816 

1.165 

.859 

.672 

.3407 

11.221 

7.112 

3.812 

1.129 
.573 

.611 

.403 
1.042 
1.816 

1.647 


Aug. 24 
Dec. 6 
June 1 
May 16 
June 28 
Aug. 13 
June 28 
July 2 

Aug. 24 

June 1 
June 18 

Aug. 13 

Sept. 9 
May 16 
Dec. 20 

Oct. 8 


Aug. 25 
Dec. 22 
June 16 
May 26 
June 30 
Sept. 10 
July 2 
Oct. 6 




544 
533 
135 


3 
2 
2 




19 
15 
19 




329 


60 

1,067 

28 

167 


1 
1 
5 
1 

1 
1 
2 




11 




JolinLabonta.t 






42 


12 
1 






1 
1 


4 

18 

28 


si 

2 


IC (1 


451 

676 
12 


June 16 
June 22 

Sept. 10 

Sept. 10 
May 26 
Dec. 22 

Nov. 21 


.. 


621 
73 
71 


8 


2 

*1 

1 




14 

1 


J 


John Labouta.f 


16 








K « 


678 
180 


3 

1 

27 


2 


19 

7 


.1 


U 1( 


4,319 


1,853 


197 


34 


$13992.339 



















* Cesspool manhole. 

t Excavating done by private individuals. 



26 



402 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

DETAIL COST OF SEWERS 



Street. 



Amherst. 
Belmont . 



Bridge . 



Canton 

Cbestn't W. B. 

Cypress 

Dearborn 

Elm westb'ck 



Green , 
Grove . 



s'th b'k 



Gore 
Hall . 



s'th b'k 



Lake avenue.. 
Liberty E. b'k 



Malvern . . . 
Mile brook. 

Monroe 

Myrtle 

North 

Orange 

Pearl , 

Pine 



" east b'ck 
Prospect 



River road . 

Russell 

Sagamore S. B 
Salmon .... 
Spruce 



Location. 



" s'th b'k 
Union east b'k 
Webster 



Totals 



Chestnut to Piiie 

From Valley northerly 

" Lake avenue northerly 

Russell to Warren 

Warren to Ashland 

Hall to Belmont 

At Hall 

From Spruce southerly 

" " northerly 

" Hayward southerly 

" south of Summer southerly 

Merrimack to Market 

Market to Spring 

From Dean northerly 

Pine to Pine east back 

From Pine east back easterly 

" Watson easterly 

Pine east back easterly 

A sh east back to Maple 

Mead to Pearl 

Pearl to Orange 

Orange to Myrtle 

From Mead "southerly 

Spruce to Spruce south back 

From Elm easterly 

" Salmon southerly 

" Webster southerly 

" south of Lowell southerly.. 

Bridge to Hall 

From River road easterly 

" Hall easterly 

Bf»y to Bay east back 

From Hali westerly 

" Russell easterly 

" Amherst northerly 

Auburn to Green 

Green to Grove south back 

From Amherst northerly 

" Russell westerly 

Russell to Linden 

Linden to Hall 

Webster to Monroe 

Fi-om Harrison southerly 

" Union westerly 

Union east back to Walnut 

From Chestnut westerly 

Weston to Canton 

Elm east b'ck to Chestnut w'st bk 

From Webster southerly 

Walnut to Beech 



Began. 



317Sept. 
255 July 
186 " 
209 Sept. 
405 " 
363 Aug. 

8' " 
148 Dec. 
9'Sept. 
1320ct. 
llSNov. 
337' April 
905; " 

70 June 
12C,Nov. 
2741 •' 

491 » 

2071 Dec. 
137|May 
273 Aug. 
312i " 
270 " 
190 Nov. 
162! Aug. 
206|June 
132 Nov. 
231 April 
92 May 
807July 
510: " 
224iOct. 



192 
262 
138 

44 
540 
402 
175 
124 
451 
774 
616 

66 
174 
124 
110 
790 
350 
100 
254 



Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

July 

Oct. 

May 

July 
Oct. 
Aug. 

Sept. 
Dec. 
Sept. 
May 
April 



13,440 



Sept. 
July 

Sept. 



Dec. 
Oct. 



Nov. 
April 



June 

9 Nov. 
5 " 



Dec. 
May 
Aug. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

June 

Dec. 

May 



Oct. 
Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

July 

Oct. 

Ang. 



Oct. 

: Sept. 

Aug. 

27 Oct. 

7Dec. 

27 Oct. 

31 May 

25 " 



$3,798.68 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



403 



IN 1894.— EAST SIDE. 



Cost of Stock. 



Cement Brick. § c 



Inci- Inci- 
d'ntals Id'iitals 
applied] Prop. 



Total. 



$5.95 

2.38 

1.19 

9.52 

9.52 

5.95 

.10 

1.19 

.30 

1.19 

1.19 

14.28 

34.58 

1.19| 

22.61| 

2.38 

.50! 

2.38 

1.19 

7.14 

7.141 

5.95 

2.38i 

1.19' 

5.951 

4.76: 

5.951 

1.19' 

17.85 

11.90 

3.57 

1.19 

3.54 

1.19 

.60' 

23.801 

26.18 

3.57 

1.19 

13.09 

11.90 

185.64 

1.19 

7.14 

5.95 

4.76 

22.61 

11.90 

3.571 

2.38 



$17.95 



13.29 
13.29 
8.19 



$14.20 
.20! , 

.20| 
7.00! 
7.00 
7.20 



.33 
9.70 
9.45 
9.45 



.20j 

14.00 

7.OOI 

7.00! 

.20. 



8.37i 

6.93 

8.45 

.32 

29.10 

11.34 



9.45 
5.67 



9.06 
7.20 
7.00 

.20 
21.00 
14.20! 

.201 
7.00 
7.00! 

.20 



14.80 

34.65 

5.67 



6.30 
22.68; 
409.94 



13.. 54 

8.19 

5.67 

37.80 

13.86 

8.45 



7.00 
14.00 

7.20 
.20 

7.20 

7.20 

14.40 

.20! 

14.00; 

7.001 

7.00 
21.00| 
14.00' 

7.20 
.20 



$13.00 
26.00 
13.24 





.20 


5.46 








3.46 
3.75 

28.10 

158.11 

.50 

70.07 

18.00 






ii. 70 

57.52 


7.00 
35.00 




21.10 


7.00 
.20 
.20 
.20 






7.47 



28.91 
33.04 
28.59 



23 

1.45 

25.00 



73.04 
12.70 
3.15 



248.05 

428.14 

310.89 

.63 

16.13 



190.85 



$523.95 $833.15 $314.86 $1,834.68 



$21 .30 

17.13 

12.50 

14.04 

27.20 

24.39 

.53 

9.93 

.60 

8.87 

7.!i3 

22.58 

60.60 

4.70 

8.46 

18.41 

3.29 

19.96 

9.10 

18.34 

20.97 

18.14 

12.76 

10.89 

13.84 

8.87 

15.42 

6.18 

54.23 

34.27 

15.05 

6.18 

17.61 

9.2' 

2.96 

36.28 

27.01 

11.76 

8.33 

30.30 

.52.01 

41.39 

4.43 

11.69 

8.33 

7.39 

53.09 

23.52 

6.72 

13.10 



$891.85 



$123.54 

60.26 

32.19 

213.41 

294.03 

112.49 

1.70 

46.55 

2.4 

34.47 

30.59 

162.45 

618.58 

19.90 

193.81 

95.18 

12.11 

88.01 

40.66 

276.63 

200 48 

147.59 

44.35 

34.99 

78.49 

48.23 

71.16 

22.72 

741! 95 

125.24 

75.79 

52.18 

99.26 

30.71 

11.66 

414.36 

229.75 

59.07 

31.29 

643.43 

673.66 

969.64 

13.15 

74.12 

55.78 

42.62 

301.62 

136.66 

40.93 

267.26 



Cost of Labor. 



Men. Teams. Total 



$158.28 

20.50 

9.00 

310.43 

620.87 

339.00 

8.00 

162.74 

11.00 

56.00 

60.00 

251.43 

675.30 

80.25 

405.00 

778.50 

28.00 

811.50 

151.50 

600.44 

1,102.14 

965.65 

133.80 

38 00 

179.89 

147.00 

90.62 

58.00 

1,912.99 

408.24 

500.80 

93.00 

392.15 

71.00 

27.72 

1,135.00 

1,210.60 

115.00 

135.00 

1,384.73 

2,365.88 

2,785.62 

75.75 

310.00 

178.50 

132.03 

870.00 

301.00 

81.50 

355.64 



$12.00 

7.00 

3.00 

7.00 

.14.00 

20.50 

.10 

4.50 

.37 

3.00 

3.00 

10.00 

21.50 

7.00 

17.50 

16.3 

2.00 

23.25 

3.50 

22.00 

10.50 

6.00 

13.00 

3.50 

3.50 

7.00! 

3.00 

3.50 

38.00 

19.25 

10.50 

14.00 

24.50 

3 501 

2.00! 

38.501 

25.501 

14.00 

3.50 

30.80, 

52.90 

108.50 

I.50I 

14.00' 

r2.50| 

7.00 

20.00 

17.50 

3.50 

17.50 



$170.28 

27.50 

12.00 

317.43 

634.87 

359.50 

8.10 

167.24 

11.37 

59 00 

63.00 

261.43 

696.80 

87.25 

422.50 

794-87 

30.0V. 

834.75 

155.00, 

622.44' 

1,112,641 

971.65 

146.80 

41.50 

183 39 

154.00 

93.62 

61.50 

1,950.99 

427.49 

511.30 

107.00 

416.65 

74.. 50 

29.72 

1,173.50 

1,236.10 

129.00 

138.50 

1,415. .53 

2,418.78 

2,894.12 

77.25 

324.00 

191.00 

139.03 

890.00 

.318.50 

85.00 

373.14 



$8,197.17 $23,094.99 $727.14 $23,822.13 



$293.82 

87.76 

44.19 

530.84, 

928.90; 

471.99 

10.40 

213.79 

13.84 

93.47 

93.59 

423.88 

1,315.38 

107.15 

616.31 

890.05 

42.11 

922 76 

195.66 

899.07 

1,313.12 

1,119.24 

191.15 

76.491 

261.88 

202.23 

164.78 

84.22 

2,692.94 

552.73 

587.09 

159.18 

515.91 

105.21 

41.38 

1,587.86 

1,465 85 

188.07 

169.79 

2,058.96 

3,092.44 

3,863.76 

90.40 

398.12 

246.78 

181.65 

1,191.62 

455.16 

125.93 

640.40 



$32,019.30 



$0,927 
0.344 
0.237 
2.540 
2.293 
1.300 
1.300 
1.438 
1.537 
0.708 
0.793 
1.258 
1.453 
1.530 
4.891 
3.244 
0.859 
3.107 
1.428 
3.293 
4.209 
4.145 
1.006 
0.472 
1.271 
1.532 
0.713 
0.915 
3.337 
1.083 
2.620 
0.829 
1.969 
0.762 
0.940 
2.944 
3.646 
1.074 
1.359 
4.565 
3.994 
6-272 
1-370 
2-288 
1-990 
1-651 
1-508 
1-300 
1-259 
2.521 



404 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DETAIL COST OF SEWERS IN 



Street. 



Clinton 



Conant . 
Dubuque . 

Ferry 

Hill 

Main 



Montgomery.. 

Kimmon 

Schiller 

So. of Scbiller 

Wayne 

West 

West Hancock 



Location. 



From Main westerly 

From west of Main to West 

Rimmon to Montgomery 

Wayne to Putnam 

From Main easterly 

From Schiller southerly 

Piscataquog river to Winter 

Winter to Granite 

Piscataquog river to Mast 

From Conant northerly 

Amory to south of Wayne 

Merrimack river to west of Hill. 

From Hill easterly 

From Dubuque easterly 

From Clinton nortlierly 

Dickey to west of Wheelock 



Total length 

Total cost of sewers, East Side. . 
Total cost of sewers, West Side. 



Total cost cf all sewers 



50 Aug. 
473 Dec. 
544 June 
533 May 
135June 
329 Aug. 

60'june 
l,067IJuly 
195Aug. 
451 'June 
676 " 
633Aug. 

73 Sept. 



25 



Aug. 
Dec. 
June 16 

May 
28 .June 30 
13 Sept. 10 

July 

Oct. 



26| 



28 



71 

24 

858 



6,172 



May 
Dec. 

Oct. 



June 16 

" 22 
Sept. 10 



May 
Dec. 



Nov. 21 



$7.33 

74.63 
150.39 
101.19 

19.18 

47., 50 
408.81 

51.43 
128.81 

86.90 
100.40 
169.54 
. 10.06 

12.37 

2.13 

154.54 



$3,798.68 
1,525.21 



$5,323.89 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



405 



1894.— WEST SIDE. 



Cost of Stock. 


Cost of Labor. 


o 
o 


C 


Cement! Brick. 


^ CD 


Inci- 
d'ntals 
applied 


Inci- 
d'ntals 
Prop. 

$3.. 36 

31.79 

36.56 

35.82 

9.07 

22.11 

4.03 

71.70 

13.10 

16.33 

51.00 

42.54 

4.90 

4.77 

1.62 

57.66 


Total. 


Men. 


Teams. 


Total. 


P. 





$0.60 






$11.29 

2.38.30 

234.18 

180.90 

30.70 

90.12 

445.88 

2,134.83 

316.83 

130.48 

187.48 

264.44 

19.93 

33.73 

4.25 

358.01 


$71.50 

570.59 

370.00 

2.52.13 

58.00 

22.00 

227.40 

5,251.70 

416.66 

358.64 

190.00 

122.32 

7.50 

36.75 

37.75 

1,014.84 


$3.50 
50.00 
30.00 
25.00 
2.00 


$75.00 

620.59 

400.00 

277.13 

60.00 

22.00 

227.40 

5,451.70 

426.66 

378.64 

200.00 

122.32 

9.50 

40.25 

39.33 

1,064.84 


$86.29 
858.89 
634.18 
458.03 

90.70 
112.12 
673.28 
7,586.53 
743.49 
509.12 
387.48 
.386.76 

29 43 


$1,725 
1.816 
1.165 

859 


17.85' $26.46 
11.90 20.48 
13.09 16.80 


$21.00 
14.00 
14.00 


$66.57 
.85 


1.19 1.26 




0.672 


5.95 7.56 


7.00 
7.00 
14.00 
14.00 
10.00 
17.60 
14.00 


' 


0.340 


7.14 18.90 






11.221 


392. 70; 1,419.77 
39.27' 121.65 


185.23 


200.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 


7.112 

3.812 


6.54 10.71 




1 129 


7.14 11.34 




573 


11.90' 26.46 




611 


1.19 3.78 




2.00 

3.50 

1.58 

50.00 

$407.58 
727.14 


n ^ns 


1.19 8.40 


7.00 




73.98 1.042 


.50 




43 58' 1-Slfi 


21.42 30.24 


28.00 


66.15 


1,422.85 


1.647 


$539.57 $1,723.81 
523.95 833.15 


$167.60 
314.86 


$318.80 
1,&34.68 


$406.36 
891.85 


$4,681.35 
8,197.17 


$9,007.78 
23,094.99 


$9,415.36 
23,822.13 


$14,096.71 
32,019.30 




$1,063.52 $2,556.96 


$482.46 $2,153.48 


$1,298.21 


$12,878.52 


$32,102.77 


$1,134.72 


$33,237.49 


$46,116.01 





406 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PIPE REMOVED WHERE NEW SEWERS HAVE BEEN BUILT. 



Street. 



Amberst . 
Bridare ... 



Clinton 

Elm west back. 



Lake avenue . 
Main 



Pine 

Sagamore south b'ck 
Spruce soutli back. . 
West 



Total , 



Chestnut to Pine 

Russell to Ashland 

At Hall 

Main to West 

Merrimack to Market 

Market to Spring 

East of Elm east back 

Granite to Piscataquog river. 
Piscataquog river to Mast 



Amherst northerly 

From Union westerly 

Elm east back to Chestnut west b'k 
At Clinton 



Material . 



ajo 



Cement 
Akron .. 



Cement 



Akron 



Brick . . 



Cement 
Akron . 
Cement 



317 

614 

24 

52.^ 

337 

905 

8 

1,127 

150 

43 

44 

174 

330 

S 

4,604 



REPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



407 



SUMMARY OF SEWERS BUILT IN 1 894. 

Total 36 X 54 inches, brick . 
24x36 inches, brick . 
48-inch steel pipe 
24-inch steel pipe 
24-inch Akron pipe . 
24-inch Portland pipe 
24-inch iron pipe 
20-inch Akron pipe . 
20-inch Portland pipe 
20-in'ch iron pipe 
18-inch Akron pipe . 
15-inch Akron pipe . 
15-inch Portland pipe 
12-inch Akron pipe . 
12-inch Portland pipe 
lo-inch Akron pipe . 
lo-inch Portland pipe 
8-inch Akron pipe . 



Feet. 
1,067 

783 
60 
28 
1,708 
20 
12 

903 
214 
24 
312 
2,912 
124 

4,795 

1,245 

4,876 

218 

311 



Following 
I, 1895 



19,612 
ing is the total amount of sewerage in the city, January 

Feet. 
8,062 

55,700 

67,763 

19,342 

3,964 

6,910 

5,256 



8-inch Akron pipe . 

lo-inch Akron pipe . 

12-inch Akron pipe . 

15-inch Akron pipe . 

18-inch Akron pipe . 

20-inch Akron pipe . 

24-inch Akron pipe .- 

Total Akron pipe 
Equal to 31.628 miles. 



166,997 



408 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



8-inch Portland pipe, old . 
1 2-inch Portland pipe, old . 
1 8-inch Portland pipe, old. 

Total Portland pipe, old . 
Equal to 0.919 miles. 

1 0-inch Portland pipe, new 
12-inch Portland pipe, new 
1 5 -inch Portland pipe, new 
18-inch Portland pipe, new 
20-inch Portland pipe, new 
24-inch Portland pipe, new 

Total Portland pipe, new 
Equal to 4.482 miles. 

9-inch cement pipe . 
12-inch cement pipe . 
1 5 -inch cement pipe . 
18-inch cement pipe . 
24-inch cement pipe . 
16 X 24 inches cement pipe 

Total cement pipe 
Equal to 7. 11 miles. 

lo-inch earthen pipe . 
12-inch earthen pipe . 

Total earthen pipe 
Equal to 0.704 miles. 

18-inch brick sewers . 
24-inch brick sewers . 
29-inch brick sewers . 
^6-inch brick sewers . 



Feet. 
90 

3>99o 

770 
4,850 

Feet. 
7,605 

4,478 
4,557 
395 
3,345 
3,284 

23,664 

Feet. 

12,579 

21,175 

490 

860 

735 
1,697 

37,536 

Feet. 
1,175 
2,545 

3,720 

Feet. 

5,532 

2,060 

1,600 

545 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



409 



42 -inch brick sewers . 
44-inch brick sewers . 
57-inch brick sewers . 
60-inch brick sewers . 
17 X 26 inches, brick sewers 
20 X 30 inches, brick sewers 
22 X 33 inches, brick sewers 
24 X ^6 inches, brick sewers 
26 X 39 inches, brick sewers 
29^ X 44 inches, brick sewers 
30 X 46 inches, brick sewers 
32 X 48 inches, brick sewers 
36x54 inches, brick sewers 
40 X 44 inches, brick sewers 
50 x 75 inches, brick sewers 

Total brick sewers . 
Equal to 7.25 miles. 

8-inch iron pipe 
12-inch iron pipe 
14-inch iron pipe 
20-inch iron pipe 
24-inch iron pipe 
36-inch iron pipe 

Total iron pipe 

Equal to 0.087 niiles. 

24-inch steel pipe 
48-inch steel pipe 

Total .... 
Equal to 0.076 miles. 
Total in all sewers, 275,911^ feet. 
Equal to 52.256 miles. 



Feet. 

446 

i>i95 
1,400 

285 
1,506 
i>i97 

387 
9,880 

514 

4,530 
1,360 

3,279 

1,067 

790 

712 

38,285 

Feet. 
24 
24 
24 
86 
24 
277^ 

459>^ 

Feet. 

28 

372 

400 



410 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city 
in 1894, by the Charles H. Robie Company, under the direction 
of the street and park commission. The measurements relating 
thereto have been made by this department, and rendered as 
vouchers for the same. 

STREET CROSSINGS. 



Location. 



Adams at Appleton 

Adams at Appleton 

Amory at Beauport 

Arlington at Maple 

Beech at Gore 

Beech at Gore 

Blaine and Winter at Main 

Blodget at Chestnut 

Brook at Chestnut 

Cartier east back at Amorj' 

Dean avenue 

Dubuque at Amory 

Hanover at Elm 

Kellej' at Beauport 

Liberty ea«t back at Salmon 

Myrtle at Russell 

Nashua at East High 

Noi'th at Bay east back 

Orange south back at Chestnut .. 
Pearl south back at Chestnut... 

Pine at Central south back 

Pine at Central 

Pine at Laurel 

Pine at Laurel south back 

Prospect at Russell 

Prospect at Russell . . .' 

Salmon at Union 

Union at Webster . . 

Union at Sagamore 

Union at Sagamore.. .. 

Union at Salmon south back 

Valley at Je wett 

Valley at Jewett east .back 

Wayne at Dubuque (3) 

Wayne at Dubuque east back . . 
Wayne at Rinimon east back (2) 

Wayne at Rimmon 

Webster at Bay 

Webster at Liberty east back. . . 

Totals 



Square 


Price i 


yards. 


pr. yd.t 


29.50 


$0.75 


29.24 


.75 


30.13 


.75 


30.94 


.75 


30.93 


.75 


30.84 


.75 


48.27 


.75 


67.73 


.75 


27.38 


.75 


18.89 


.75 


28.37 


.75 1 


29.78 


.75 


47.78 


.75 1 


29 60 


.75 


13.33 


.75 i 


28.80 


.75 : 


11.11 


.75 


13.33 


.75 


35.41 


.37 1 


20.50 


.75 1 


17.66 


.75 


31.11 


.75 


28.62 


.75 


16.58 


.75 


55.38 


.75 


27.73 


.37 


59.73 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


33.42 


.75 


30.58 


.75 


17.78 


.75 


29.95 


.75 


19 20 


.75 


90.53 


.75 


17.78 


.75 


26.67 


.75 


30.13 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


17.77 


.75 


1,213.00 



Total 
cost. 



$42.80 
21.93 
22,60 
23.20 
23.20 
23.13 
.36.20 
50.80 
20.54 
14.16 
21.27 
22.34 
35.84 
22,20 
10.00 
21.60 
8 33 
10.00 
13.13 
15.37 
13.24 
23.33 
21.46 
12.40 
41.53 
10.26 
44.80 
22.67 
25.06 
22.93 
13.34 
22.46 
14.40 
67.90 
13,34 
20.00 
22.60 
22.67 
13.33 



$885.69 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 
SIDEWALKS. 



Location. 



Amherst street, Pine to Pine east back 

Amherst, from Pine east back to near Union. 

Arlington, at Maple 

Blodget, at Chestnut 

Dean avenue, at Elm west back 

Main, at Briilge 

Merrimack, at Union 

Sagamore, west of Union (Bradbui-y's) 



Totals . 



Square 
yards. 



43.27 
253.00 

24.47 
151.06 

12.34 
133.70 

20.72 

30.67 



533.23 



411 



Price 


Total 


pr. yd. 


cost. 


$0.30 


$12.93 


.30 


75.90 


.45 


11.01 


.45 


6.77 


.45 


5.55 


.45 


00.16 


.45 


9 32 


.35 


10.73 




$192.42 



ROADWAYS. 



Location. 



Chestnut, Amherst to Concord, recovered . 

To patching and repairing : 

Chestnut, Meriimack to Amherst 

Merrimack, Elm to Chestnut , 

Union, Lowell to Concord 



Amount 
materia) 



Total $909.89 • 



1,271.99 
sq. yds. 



22 J loails 



Price. 



$0.45 



Total 
cost. 



$572.39 



337.50 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city 
in 1894 by the Charles H. Robie Co., under the direction of the 
cemetery trustees : 



LOC.\.TION. 


Square 
yards. 


Price 
per yd. 


Total 
cost. 


Pine Grove cemetery, at superintendent's house.. 


91.40 


50.45 


$41.13 



412 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city 
in 1894 by Johii T. Underhill & Co., under the direction of the 
street and park commission. The measurements relating thereto 
have been made by this department and rendered as vouchers for 
the same : 

STREET CROSSINGS. 



Location. 



Appleton at Elm (3) 

Beech at Lowell 

Beech at Lowell 

Beech east back at Lowell 

Belmont at Merrimack 

Central south back at Wilson 

Central south back at Wilson 

Cliestnut at Cedar 

Concord at Belmont 

Dubuque at Wayne.. 

Elm at Webster north back 

Elm at T. W. Lane's, gutters and driveways 

Elm at Webster 

Lake avenue south back at Hall 

Lake avenue at Pine 

Linden at Arlington (4) 

Linden at Myrtle 

Linden at Prospect (2) 

Linden at Pearl 

Linden at Pearl 

Main at Amory (4) 

McGregor Bridge east end 

McGregor west back at Amory 

Merrimack at Beech 

Merrimack at Pine 

Monroe, at Bartlett's and Willand's 

Pearl at Linden (3) 

Pearl at Ashhmd 

Pearl at Warren 

Rimmon east back at Kelley 

Spruce at Hall 

Union at Appleton 

Union at Lowell 

Walnut at Webster 

Totals 



Square 


Price 


yards. 


pr. yd. 


127.11 


$0.75 


66.22 


.75 


66.40 


.37 


15.94 


.37 


52.28 


.75 


17.78 


.75 


36.18 


.75 


37.15 


.75 


20.08 


.75 


30.04 


.75 


19.11 


.75 


15.32 


.75 


45.09 


.75 


17.51 


.75 


28.89 


.75 


107.13 


.75 


'.i9.33 


.75 


58.22 


.75 


13.78 


.37 


25.78 


.75 


123.75 


.75 


390.45 


.37 


20.85 


.37 


19.28 


.75 


31.40 


.75 


11.61 


.75 


79.91 


.75 


29.78 


.75 


7.87 


.37 


15.78 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


29.51 


.75 


37.11 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


1,677.08 





Total 
cost. 



$95.33 
49.66 
24.57 

5.89 
39.19 
13.33 
27.13 
27.86 
15.60 
22.80 
14.33 
11.49 
33.82 
13.13 
21.67 
80.35 
22.00 
43.66 

5.10 
11.33 
92.81 
144.47 

7.71 
14.46 
23.55 

8.70 
59.94 
22.33 

2.91 
11.83 
22.66 
22.13 
20.33 
22.67 



$1,054.74 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 
SIDEWALKS. 



413 



Location. 



Beauport, at Thomas Bolton's 

Belmont, at Merrimack. 

Dubuque, at Wayne 

Linden, at Myrtle 

Main, at Amory 

McGregor, at Bridge 

Monroe, at Bartlett's and Willand's 

Union, at Appleton 

Walnut, at Webster 

Totals 



Square 


Price 


yards. 


per yd. 


34.67 


$0.45 


3.80 


.37 


6.57 


.45 


4.56 


.45 


31.98 


.45 


17.17 


.45 


68.61 


.35 


10.30 


.45 


2.52 


.45 


180.18 





Total 
cost. 



$15.60 
1.40 
2.96 
2.05 

14.39 
7.72 

25.01 
4.63 
1.13 



$74.89 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city 
in 1894 by John T. Underhill & Co., under the direction of the 
committee on lands and buildings and the cemetery trustees : 



Location. 



Harvey District scboolhouse sidewallcs. 

Main-street sclioolhouse walks. 

Main 

Main 

Pearl 

Pearl 



street sclioolhouse driveways 

street schoolhouse basements 

street schoolhouse ciriveways 

street schoolhouse sidewalks 

Webster-sti'eet schoolhouse driveways. , 
Webster-street schoolhouse sidewalks., 
Webster-street schooUiouse driveways , 
Valley cemetery walks 



Totals 



Square 


Price 


yards. 


per yd. 


99.58 


$0.50 


160.31 


.45 


66.98 


.37 


59.20 


.45 


277.76 


.43 


262.05 


.34 J 


43.28 


.37 


147.35 


.45 


238.92 


.75 


143.22 


.45 


1,498.65 





Total 
Cost. 



$49.79 
72.14 
24.78 
26.64 

119.44 
90.58 
16.01 
66.30 

179.19 
64.49 



S 709.34 



414 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 



SUMMARY. 

Concrete Laid by the Charles H. Bobie Co. 



Crossings 

Sidewalks 

Roadways 

Miscellaneous 



Totals. 



Square 
yards. 



1,213.00 

533.23 

1,271.99 

91.40 



3,109.62 



Total cost. 



192.42 
909.89 * 
41.13 



$2,029.13 



* Includes contract price for patching. 

Concrete Laid by John T. Underhill <& Co. 



Square 
yards. 



Total cost. 



Crossings 

Sidewalks 

Miscellaneous. 



1,677.08 

180.18 

1,498.65 



$1,054.74 

74.89 

709.34 



Totals 



3,355.81 



$1,838.97 



Total concrete laid by the city, 6,465.43 square yards, at a 
cost of $3,868.10. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



415 



BRIDGES, 



The following table gives the dimensions, material, and num- 
ber of spans of the various bridges within the city limits : 



Location, 


Length 

in 
feet. 


Width 

of 

roadway 


No. of 
walks. 


Width 

of 
walks. 


Material. 


Arch. 

es or 
spang 




765.5 


20 


1 


5.5 


Wood. 


3 


Bridge street, at canal 


57 


22.5 


2 


7 


Iron. 


1 


Bridge st., INIcGregor and approaches 


1,085 


24 


2 


6 1 


" 


3 


Cohas avenue, at Great Cohas 


36 


30.5 






Stone. 


2 


38 


20 






Wood. 




Derry road, near Cohas avenue 


20 
21 


17 
20.5 











Dunbarton road, Black brook 

Elm street, at railro.ad 


25 
89 


17.5 
29.5 


1 


4.5 


" 




Front street at Black br ok 

Granite street, at canal 


16.5 
56.3 


33 
37.3 


2 


6 


Iron. 




Granite street, at river 


465.7 
32 


26 
21 


2 


5 


Wood. 




Island Pond road, outlet to lake 


41 


16.7 










90 


34 


2 


6.5 


Stone. 




Mammoth road, at Great Cohas 

Mammoth road, near town line 


38 


18 










14 


20 










59 


20.5 






„ 






53 


24 


2 


6 


Iron. 




River road, at Little Cohas 


16 


20 






Wood. 




River road, below James Cheney's. . . 


6 


16 










30 


30 






., 




Second street, at 'Squog river 


62 


32.5 


2 


8.75 


Steel. 




Second street, at 'Squog river 


127 


32 5 


2 


8.75 


" 






12 

100 

6 


22 

17.5 

16 






Wood. 










5 


Weston road, east of D. Connor's 






1 











Stone bridges, 2 ; steel, 2; iron, 4; wood, 19; total, 27. 



416 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
NEW HIGHWxlYS LAID OUT IN 1894. 



Streets. 



Beech 

Belmont 

Candia road*... 
Carpenter . . . 
Glenwood ave.. 

Hale 

Harrison 

Harvell 

Hayes avenue.. 

Hevey 

Lake avenue*.. 

Massabesic 

Mead 

Platts avenue.. 

Ray 

Sagamore 

Salmon 

Schiller 

Schiller 

Titus avenue... 

Wallace 

Wayland ave. .. 
Woodland ave.. 



Location. 



Salmon southerly 

Bridge to Pearl 

At Mammoth road 

Elm to Union 

Bedel to Griffin 

Across Wolf & Wagner land 

Belmont to Hall 

Main to Second 

Massabesic to Chase avenue 

Conant northerly 

Hall to Belmont 

Lake avenue to Spruce 

Hall to Belmont 

Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

Ray brook to Clarke 

Walnut to Oak 

Walnut to Beech 

Wentworth to Merrimack river. . . 

Hale to Wentworth 

Union to Beech 

Winter southwesterly 

Mammoth road to Massabesic 

S. of Oakland ave. to Candia road 



When 
laid out. 



June 27. 
June 27. 
Sept. 21. 
Dec. 19. 
July 25. 
July 25. 
May 21. 
July 25. 
Oct. 19. 
July 25. 
May 21. 
Dec. 19. 
June 27. 
Aug. 24. 
May 21. 
Oct. IJ. 
June 27. 
July 25. 
July 25. 
May 21.! 
Nov. 23. 
Aug. 24. 
Nov. 23. 



Width 
in feet. 



50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
30 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
30 
50 
50 
30 
50 
40 



Length 
in feet. 



287 
717 
134 

1,350 

1,450 
800 
365 

1,060 
471 
300 
257 
384 
312 

1,052 
666 

1,112 
270 
218 
855 
540 
165 
134 
426 



13,325 



* Widening. 
Equaling 2.334 miles. 



REPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



417 



The following streets have been laid out by the city, the date 
of the same, with the length, being given in the following table. 
Some of them are passable to drive upon, but they are not built 
to grade, and will necessitate a large amount of money to build 
them properly. Those marked thus * in most cases have not 
been even opened, and are impassable with few exceptions, al- 
though some are passable for a short distance. 

STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT. 



Streets. 



Adams, Appleton to Clarke 

Ainsworth avenue, Hay ward to Young 

Alfred, Hanover to Aniherst 

Allen, Main to Boynton 

Alsace, south of Kelley northerly * 

Amory, to Kimball 

Amory extension to Bartlett 

Ash, Gore northerly* 

Auburn, Maple to Lincoln* 

Auburn, Wilson to Belmont. .. 

Auburn, Cypress to Platts avenue * 

B, Prince to C 

Bartlett, Amory extension southerly 

Beech, north of Gore.. . 

Beech, Salmon southerly * 

Beech, Webster to Clarke * 

Bell, Wilson easterly 

Belmont, Young to Clay 

Belmont, Bridge to Pearl 

Benton, Jones to James Hall road 

Blaine, Second to Hiram 

Bout well, Amory northerly* 

Byron, Brown avenue to Josselyn 

Campbell, Union to Ash* 

Canal, 82 feet north of Pleasant to Granite 

Canton, Spruce to Auburn 

Carpenter, Elm to Union * 

Cedar, Wilsoii easterly 

Central, James Hall road westerly * 

Central south back, Wilson to Hall 

Clay, Jewett to Cypress 

Cleveland, Blaine to IMei-rimack river 

Colby, West Hancock to Log 

Columbus avenue, Cartier to Amory * 

Conant, to Montgomerj- 

Cypress, Lake avenue to Massabesic 

Dartmouth, West Hancock to Frederick 

Dickey, Main to West Hancock 

Dubuque, north of Conant northerly 

Erie, South Main westerly 

Esses, Amory southerly 

Forest, Milford to Old Mast road 

Glenwood avenue.Mammoth road to J.Cronin's* 

Grant, Hanover to ^Mammoth road * 

Green, Douglas northerly 

Green, Pine to Beech 

Green, Wilson to Belmont * '. " ' 

Grove, Pine to Beech 



Length 
in feet. 



925 

499 
212 
700 

1,160 

2,800 
735 
590 
600 
809 
967 
258 

1,800 
220 
287 

1,176 
636 

1,395 
717 
240 
395 

1,693 
998 
860 

1,023 
550 

1,350 
665 
304 
471 
387 

1,487 
220 

3,110 
470 

1,300 
636 
857 
50 
470 
575 

1,460 

2,085 

1,008 

96 

990 

809 

990 



When laid out. 



( June 27, 1889. 
I July 26, 1S9Q. 
August 31, 1S93. 
July 19, 1893. 
Julv 24, 1891. 
May 26, 1893. 
November 17, 1891. 
July -26, 1892. 
June 9, 1893. 
July 28, 1891. 
August 15, 1892. 
June 9, 1893. 
January 15, 1892. 
July 26, 1892. 
June 9, 1893. 
June 27, 1894. 
November 29. 1893. 
August 15, 1S92. 
September 1, 1891. 
June 27, 1894. 
August 31, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
May 26, 1893. 
October 3, 1893. 
September 26, 1892. 
January 15, 1892. 
August 2, 1892. 
December 19, 1894. 
August 15, 1892. 
July 6, 1892. 
June 7, 1891. 
August 31, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
November 16, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
June 26, 1893. 
December 28, 1892. 
August 28, 1891. 
August 28, 1891. 
May 20, 1892. 
J une 20, 1893. 
November 20, 1893. 
December 16, 1890. 
December 28, 1892. 
October 20, 1893. 
July 28, 1891. 
August 31, 1893. 
August 15, 1892. 
July 19, 1893. 



418 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT.— Continued. 



Streets. 



Length I 
in feet 



When laid out. 



Grove, Wilson to Belmont * 

Gi-ove, Taylor westerly 

Hale, across Wolf and Wagner land 

Hall, Hay ward to Young 

Hall, Lake avenue to Bell 

Hall, Pearl to north side of Prospect * 

Hai'rison, Hussell to Hall 

Harrison, Hall to Belmont 

Harvard, Union to Maple 

HarveU, Main to Second 

Hayes avenue, Massabesic to Chase avenue 

Hay ward, Beech to Mammoth roaiL 

Hevey, Conant northerly 

Hevey, Kelley to Columbus avenue 

Highland Park avenue, Candia road to Glen- 
wood avenue 

Hosley, Green to Summer 

Huntress, Albert to north of Prince 

Je wett, Cilley road to Weston road * 

Joliette, south of Kelley northerly 

Jones, Nelson to 11. 1. Stevens' land 

Josselyn, Byron to Varney 

Kelley, to M. &N.W.R. R 

Kennedy, Brown avenue to Josselyn 

Knowlton, Hayward southerly 

Lafayette, Amory northerly * 

Laval, Amory northerly* 

Liberty, North southerly 

Lincoln, Cedar to Shasta * 

Longwood ave.. Mammoth rd. to Woodbine ave 

Maple. Gore northerly* 

Massabesic, Lake avenue to Spruce 

Mc Duffle, Boynton to Huntress 

McKinnon, Central to Pleasant* 

McNeil, Second to West Hancock 

Mead, Hall to Belmont 

Merrimack, east of Beacon to Hanover 

Milford, Amherst road westerly 

Mitchell, Beech to Brown avenue * 



Montgomery, Conant northerly 

Morgan, Amory to Kelley 

Mystic avenue, Candia road northerly 

Nelson, James Hall road to Mammoth road 

Oak, Gore northerly * 

Oakland avenue, A. W. Palmer's to J. Cronin's. 
Orchard avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R — 

Page, Hanover to Bridge 

Passageway, Elm to Everett 

Platts avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

Prince, Boynton to Huntress 

Prospect, Derry old line to Hall 

Prout avenue, Hayward southerly 

PutnAm, to Dubuque — 

Quincy, Douglas northerly . . 

Ray, Ray bi ook to Clarke * 

Revere avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

Rimmon, north of Conant to Gates 

Rimmon, to south of Wayne 

Sagamore, Union to Walnut 

Sagamore, Walnut to Oak * 

Salmon, Pine to AValnut 

Salmon, Walnut to Beech * 



S09 
757 
800 
1-25 

1,890 
716 

1,218 
365 

1,190 

1,060 
471 

6,000 
300 

1,165 

1,007 

490 

648 

3,6.50 

1,150 

563 

161 

65-2 

922 

487 

1,690 

1,698 

150 

4,321 

1,100 

600 

384 

455 

192 

299 

312 

1,000 

517 

3,000 

400 
650 

1,200 
509 
600 

1,.500 

1,337 

2,.500 
200 

1,0.52 
520 
325 
500 
300 
96 
666 

1,200 
158 
735 
270 

1,112 
764 
270 



September 9, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 
July 25, 1894. 
July 6, 1892. 
June 23, 1893. 
June 12, 1891. 
October 25, 1892. 
May 21, 1894. 
xNovember 18, 1892. 
July 25, 1894. 
October 19, 1894. 
September 21, 1893. 
July 25, 1894. 
July 6, 1892. 

December 28, 1892. 
November 16, 1893. 
September 18, 1891. 
November 27, 1891. 
May 26, 1893. 
August 31, 1893. 
October 3, 1893. 
June 23, 1891. 
September 21, 1891. 
November 27, 1S91. 
May 26, 1893. 
May 26, 1893. 
April 26, 1892. 
May 20, 1892. 
December. 28, 1892. 
June 9, 1893. 
December 19, 1894. 
September 18, 1891. 
June 7, 1892. 
August 28, 1891. 
June 27, 1894. 
Julv 28. 1891. 
December 16, 1890. 
( October 28, 1890. 
1 November 29, 1892. 
May 26, 1893. 
May 26, 1893. 
December 28, 1893. 
August 21, 1893. 
June 9, 1893. 
December 28, 1892. 
December 28,1892. 
June 19, 1889. 
August 15, 1893. 
August 24, 1894. 
September 18, 1891. 
May 29, 1889. 
June ^, 1893. 
June 5, 1888. 
July 28, 1891. 
May 21, 1894. 
December 28, 1892. 
October 27, 1891. 
September 26, 1892. 
August 28, 1891. 
October 19, 1894. 
June 12, 1891. 
June 27, 1894. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 419 

STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT.— Concluded. 



Streets. 



Length 
in feet. 



Schiller, Hale to Wentworth 

Schiller, Wenfworth to Merrimack river 

Second, Blaine to Main* 

Silver, Union to Maple 

Somerville, Union to Hall 

Stevens, Baker southerlj'* 

Summer, Wilson to Massabesic 

Titus avenue. Union to Beech 

Union, Auburn to Nutt road 

Varney, Josselyn to west of C. & M. R. R * 

Vinton, Taylor to Jewett * 

Wallace, Winter southwesterly * 

Wayland avenue, Massabesic to Mammoth road 

Wayne, West of Dubuque westerly 

Wentworth, West Hancock southerly* 

West ifancock, Merrimack river westerly* 

Wilkins, Rockland ave. to Bedford line 

Willow, Hay wai'd to Nutt road * 

Wilson, North line of C. & P. R. R. to Clay 

Wilton, Main to Cartier 

Woodbine avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R.. 
Woodland ave., C. & P. R. R. to Jas. Dearborn's. 
Woodland ave., Jas. Dearborn's to Candia road. 



855 
318 

5,528 
690 

2,925 
300 

1,480 
540 

4,175 
290 

1,256 
165 
1.34 
150 

1,546 
700 
595 
292 

1,800 
575 

1,290 
770 
42C 



134,224 



When laid out. 



July 25, 1894. 
July 25, 1894. 
September 18,1891. 
June 7, 1892. 
June 7, 1892. 
November 29, 1892. 
September 22, 1891. 
May 21, 1894. 
October 25, 1892. 
October 3, 1893. 
August 31, 1893. 
November 23, 1894. 
August 24, 1894. . 
June 23, 1893. 
September 21, 1893. 
November 28, 1890. 
July 6, 1892. 
June 23, 1893. 
July 26, 1892. 
June 26, 1893. 
December 28, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 
November 23, 1894. 



Equaling 25.42 miles. 



420 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Tabulated Statement of Work Done and Present 
Standing Relative to Streets and Sewers, Janu- 
ary 1, 1895. 

New streets laid out in 1893 36,666.00 ft., equal to 6.940 miles 

2.330 " 



New streets built in 1893 
" 1894 



Sewers built in 1893 
" " 1894 



Sewers voted in 1893 
1894 



1894 i3'325-oo " 

Total 
15,840.00 ft., equal 



18,513.00" 

Total 
21,716.00 ft., equal 
19,612.00 " ' 



9.270 miles 
to 3.000 miles 
3.506 " 



6.506 miles 
to 4.110 miles 
3-714 " 



Total . 7.824 miles 
34,007.00 ft., equal to 6.440 miles 
18,366.00 " " 3.480 " 



Total . 9.920 miles 
Streets laid out but not 

built to January i, 1895 134,224.00 ft., equal to 25.420 miles 
Sewers ordered in but not 

built to January i, 1895 32,858 00 " " 6.223 " 

Total amount of sewers January i, 1894, equal to 49-350 miles 

Actual increase in 1894 equal to . . . 2.910 " 



Total amount of sewers January i, 1895 . 52.260 miles 
Length of streets open for 

travel .... 564,154.28 ft., equal to 106.847 iiiiles 
Length of streets planned 

for on ground . . 82,805.00 " " 15.682 " 

Length of roads opened 

for travel . . . 323,400.00 " " 61.250 " 

Length of avenues opened 

for travel . . . 44,142.00 " " 8.360 " 

Length of avenues planned 

for on ground . . 16,234.00" " 3-o74 " 



1,030,735.28 ft., equal to 195.213 mile 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



421 



Length of walks on streets 642,978.00 ft., equal to 121.776 miles 
Length of walks on roads 4,740.00 " '' 0.897 " 

Length of walks on avenues 33,158.00" " 6.280 " 



680,876.00 ft., equal to i 
( Cobblestone paving 2,720.00 ft., equal to 



Road- 
ways. 



Block " 
' Coal tar concrete 



I McAdam 
t Telford . 



9,890.00 " 

8,856.00 " 

24,837.00 " 

26,497.00 " 



28.953 miles 
0.515 miles 
1.873 '•' 
1.676 " 
4.703 " 
5.018 " 



Total length of improved 

streets . . . 72,800.00 ft., equal to 

Streets, roads, and ave- 
nues open for travel 
January i, 1895 . . 931,696.28 ft., equal to i 

Streets and avenues planned 
for on ground and not 

opened January i, 1895 99>039-oo " " 

Area of city, 21,700 acres, or 33.906 square miles. 

Area of Derryfield park 

Stark park 

Concord square 

Hanover square 

Merrimack square 

Park square 

Tremont square 
Total areas of parks . 
squares 



13.784 miles 



76.457 miles 



18.756 " 











68.00 acres 










30.00 " 










4.48 " 










3.00 " 










5-89 " 










3-49 " 










2.25 " 










98.00 " 










19.11 " 



422 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SUMMARY OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM SINCE 18S0. 



Year. 



1880 . 

1881 . 

1882 , 
18S3 . 

1884 . 

1885 . 
1886 
18S7 , 
1888 
1889 , 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 



o oi 

1* 


o 

3 

4.9 • 
7J CD 

O ^ 
CO 

1® 


1.62 


18.66 


2.18 
3.37 


20.84 
24.21 


2.54 


26.75 


1.73 


28.48 


1.56 


30.04 


2.15 


32.19 


1.44 


33.63 


1.73 


35.36 


2.66 


38.02 


1.81 


39.83 


3.08 


42.91 


3.13 


46.04 


3.31 


49.35 


2.91 


52.26 



6'° 

g o ee 
o o a> 






64 
153 
214 
191 

258 



2,003 
2,067 
2,220 
2,434 

2,625 

2,883 



$19,919.40 
23,895.12 
24,148.13 
21,452.05 
21,548.60 
28,122.84 
44,479.15 
19,893.92 
31,154.19 
27,513.73 
39,297.97 
55,409.73 
39,724.65 
51.392.15 
46,116.01 



Total cost of sewers for 15 years, $494,067.64. 

In the year i888 a plan was made by the present city engineer 
for a system of sewerage embracing the entire city, this being the 
first comprehensive plan ever compiled for that purpose. Since 
its adoption the majority of the sewers constructed have followed 
this plan ; those that have not are only temporary, and will have 
to be relaid when the growth of the city demands it. Since i888 
there have been 16.90 miles built, at a cost of $259,454.24; at 
an average cost of $15,322.14 per mile. 



Orders. 

The following orders have been written by this department for 
the various committees. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 423 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the 
street commissioners be and are hereby authorized to build cer- 
tain sewers, as follows : 

From Chestnut to Union street through the Livermore land as 
follows : Beginning at the public sewer in Chestnut street about 
1 6 feet west of the east line of Chestnut street, and about 2)^ 
feet south of the north line of lot No. 13 on the Livermore plan 
of land ; thence easterly to Union street over the right^of way 
deeded to the city by T. L. Livermore, by deed dated January 
31, 1894, a distance of about 810 feet. In Adams street 
from the above sewer northerly to Clarke street, a distance 
of about 240 feet. In Rimmon east back street, from Amory 
street sewer southerly to a point in Rimmon east back 200 
feet south of Wayne street, a distance of 750 feet. In Pine 
street from Auburn street southerly, 540 feet to Green street ; 
thence easterly in Green street 126 feet to Pine east back; 
thence southerly in Pine east back, 400 feet to Grove south 
back. In Green south back, from Pine east back to Union 
street, about 300 feet. In Grove south back, from Pine east 
back to Union street, about 300 feet. In Belmont street from 
present sewer southerly to the culvert at Belmont and Valley 
streets, a distance of about 230 feet. In Wilson street from 
Spruce southerly to Valley street, a distance of about 1,800 feet. 
In Pine east back street from Amherst street northerly, a distance 
of 150 feet. In Mast street from present sewer westerly, 6io feet 
to the Amherst road, thence southerly in the Amherst road about 
1,230 feet to Milford street. And the expense thereof be charged 
to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains March 
30, 1894. 



An Order to establish Certain Grades. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the 
grade, as shown on plan No. 4,135, of Cilley road from Beech 



424 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Street to Wilson street, a distance of about 1,900 feet; on Beau- 
port street, as shown on plan No. 129, from Kelley street south- 
■erly about 350 feet ; on Amherst street to fix the grade as shown 
on plan No 9, from Pine street to Union street ; and the same, as 
shown on said plans, be and hereby is made the established 
grades of said streets. 

Recommended by the committee on streets April 10, 1894. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be 
and are authorized to build certain sewers, as follows : 

In Union street from the line of the proposed sewer across the 
Livermore land near Ray brook, and thence northerly to Clarke 
street. 

In Union east back street from Webster street southerly about 
100 feet. 

In Hill street and thence northerly and easterly to the Merri- 
mack river, a distance of about 1,200 feet. 

In Malvern street, to extend the present sewer southerly about 
100 feet between Lowell and Concord streets. 

In Elm west back street from north of Dean street northerly 
about 70 feet. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for 
new sewers. 

Submitted by the committee on sewers and drains April 27, 
1894. 



An Order to build Certain Streets. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park conimissioners be 
and are hereby authorized to build certain streets as follows : 
Harrison street, from Russell street easterly to Belmont street. 
Kennedy street, from Brown avenue westerly to Josselyn street. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 425 

And the expense be charged to the appropriation for new high- 
ways. 

Recommended by the committee on streets June 4, 1894. 



An Order to establish Certain Grades. 

Ordered, That the grade as shown on plan 7, of B street from 
A street southerly, as established September 6, 1 881, be changed 
by raising the grade twelve inches at the north line of the Ord- 
way lot, and three inches at the south line of said Ordway lot ; 
and the grade, as shown on plan 62, of Valley street from Bel- 
mont street east be changed as shown by blue lines on said plan. 
The grade of this plan was established December 5, 1892. Signed 
by George H. Allen as city engineer. And the grade of Cartier 
street from Kelley southerly, as shown on plan No. 784. 

And that the new grades, as shown on said plans, be and are 
hereby made the established grades of said streets. 

Recommenced by the committee on streets June 4, 1894. 



An Order to build Wentworth Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be 
and are hereby authorized to build Wentworth street from West 
Hancock street southerly to the south end of said street, as laid 
out, a distance of about 1,500 feet, and the expense thereof be 
charged to the appropriation for new streets. 



An Order to establish Certain Grades. 

Ordered, That the grade, as shown on plan 4,083, of Beech 
street from Cedar to Valley street, and on plan 963, of Merri- 
mack street from Beacon to Hanover street, be and are hereby 
made the established grade of said streets, said plans being on 
file in the city engineer's department. 

Recommended by the committee on streets July 2, 1894. 



426 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An Order to build Certain Streets. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be 
and are hereby authorized to build Wentworth street from West 
Hancock street southerly to south end of said street, as laid out, 
a distance of about 1,500 feet ; Salmon street, as laid out, from 
Walnut to Beech, a distance of about 220 feet; Bartlett street 
from Putnam street southerly a distance of about 400 feet ; and 
the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new 
, streets. 

Recommended by the committee on streets July 2, 1894. 



An Order to build Certain Streets. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be 
and are hereby authorized to build Mystic avenue from Oakland 
avenue to Glen wood avenue, a distance of about 320 feet ; also 
to build Bartlett street from Putnam to Sullivan street, a dis- 
tance of about 415^ feet ; and the expense be charged to the 
appropriation for new streets. 

Recommended by the committee on streets August 3, 1894. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be 
and are hereby authorized to build certain sewers, as follows : 

In Bridge street from Hall to Belmont, a distance of 350 feet, 
to the east side of Belmont street. 

In Pearl street from Russell street easterly about 125 feet. 

In Wilson street from Valley to Somerville street, a distance of 
about 1,800 feet. 

And the expense be charged to the appropriation for sewers 
and drains. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains, August 
3, 1894. 



EEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 427 

An Order to change the Grade of Cartier Street. 

Ordered, That the grade, as shown on plan 887 and established 
November 28, 1890, by the board of aldermen, be changed to 
conform to the new lines on said plan, and the new lines be and 
are hereby made the established grade of said street. 

Recommended by the committee on streets August 3, 1894. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be 
and are hereby authorized to build certain sewers, as follows : 

In Hevey east back street from Kelley street southerly to 
Wayne street, a distance of about 1,200 feet. 

In Manchester street from present sewer near Milton street, 
thence easterly 300 feet to Beacon street. 

In Clinton street, from Main to West, a distance of 520 feet. 

In Dover street from Clinton northerly, a distance of 160 feet. 

In West street from Clinton northerly, a distance of 250 feet. 

And the expense be charged to the appropriation for sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers August 28, 1894. 



An Order to change Grade of Valley Street. 

Ordered, That the grade as shown on plan 64 by red lines, and 
dated December 5, 1882, signed by George H. Allen, be changed 
to conform to the blue lines as shown on said plans and dated 
September 4, 1894. 

Recommended by Mayor Worthen September 4, 1894. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Harrison Street. 

Ordered, That the grade, as shown on plans No. 1,071 and 
1,072 of Harrison street from Maple to Belmont street, and 



428 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

marked on said plans by red lines and figures, and dated Sep- 
tember lo, 1894^ be and is hereby made the established grade of 
said street, said plans being on file in the city engineer's office. 

Recommended by the city engineer September 10, 1894. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Page Street. 

Ordered^ That the grade as shown on plan No. 988 of Page 
street from Hanover street road to Candia road, and marked on 
said plans by red lines and figures, and dated September 10, 
1894, be and is hereby made the established grade of said street, 
said plan being on file in the city engineer's department. 

Recommended by the city engineer September 10, 1894. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Kelley, Rimmon, and 
Dubuque Streets. 

Ordered, That the grade, as shown on plan No. 4,089 of Kel- 
ley street from Cartier to Lorraine street, also on plan No. 4,015 
of Dubuque street, and plan 4,008 of Rimmon street, be and is 
hereby made the established grades of said streets. 

Recommended by the city engineer September 26, 1894. 



An Order to build a Sewer in Prospect Street. 

Ordered^ That the board of street and park commissioners be 
and are hereby authorized to build a sewer in Prospect street from 
the present sewer in Russell street, thence westerly about 125 feet 
in Prospect street, and the expense thereof be charged to the ap- 
propriation for new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains Octo- 
ber 2, 1894. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 429 

An. Order to establish the Grade of Union Street. 

Ordered, That the grade, as shown on a plan of Union street, 
from Clarke street northerly to a point 300 feet northerly of the 
north line of Trenton street, and the grade as shown on said 
plan is hereby made the established grade of said Union street. 

Recommended by the committee on streets October 2, 1894. 



An Order to build Certain Streets. 

Ordered^ That the board of street and park commissioners be 
and are hereby authorized to build Somerville street from Pine 
to Union street, also Sagamore street from Walnut to Oak street, 
as laid out by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen, and the ex- 
pense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new streets. 

Recommended by the committee on streets November i, 1894. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Sagamore Street. 

Ordered^ That the grade as shown on the plan of Sagamore 
street, known as No. 4,130, in the city engineer's office, be and is 
hereby made the established grade of said street from Walnut 
street to the west line of Oak street, as laid out by the Board of 
Mayor and Aldermen. 

Recommended by the committee on streets November i, 1894. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be 
and are hereby authorized to build certain sewers, as follows : 
In Grove street from present sewer easterly 150 feet. 
In Spruce street to Canton about 800 feet. 
In Canton strfeet from Spruce southerly about 500 feet. 



430 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

In Auburn street from Canton easterly about 600 feet. 

In Pearl street from Hall westerly about 130 feet. 

In Hall street from Mead southerly about 200 feet. 

In Liberty east back street from Salmon southerly about 150 
feet. 

In Hill street from Schiller southerly 450 feet. 

In Harvell street from Hale westerly 700 feet. 

The expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains Novem- 
ber 2, 1894. 



SUBURBAN HIGHWAYS. 

The matter of defining and establishing the boundary lines of 
the suburban highways still remains unsettled. Each succeeding 
year is making it more difficult to re-trace and re-locate old 
points, and it is but a question of time when they will be entirely 
destroyed and the correct lines become a doubtful quantity. On 
many of the roads the abuttors are constantly encroaching upon 
city land, thoughtlessly, perhaps, but still with each successive 
improvement taking in more and more of the highway. It has 
been the aim of this department to secure what data could be 
had in relation to these roads, and mark the lines as fast as pos- 
sible, but regular work has prevented any systematic attempt to 
straighten matters out. This is a very important item, and should 
receive immediate attention by providing means for a complete 
survey of all the outlying roads while the points still remain. 

It hardly seems good judgment, in view of the rapid growth of 
the city and the constantly increasing traffic, to narrow a four- 
rod road to a fifty-foot street whenever the bounds are estab- 
lished. This has been done in the past, but should not be the 
future policy. 

STREETS. 

The same may be said this year as has been said in previous 
reports in regard to laying out streets twenty-five, thirty, or 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 431 

thirty-five feet wide. This evil still exists, and will continue to 
exist so long as there are land owners who care for nothing but 
to sell every inch of land possible, regardless of whether the ad- 
joining streets are of sufificient width to accommodate trafiic or 
not. We have streets in the city, dignified by the name of ave- 
nues, where it is impossible to turn a truck team or dray without 
running upon the sidewalks. This method of dividing land is 
advantageous to the owners, but scarcely in keeping with mod- 
ern ideas. 

There are those, however, who keep abreast of the times, and, 
recognizing the necessity of broad thoroughfares, have divided 
their property accordingly. It would be better for the appear- 
ance of the city if there were more of them. 

There is an urgent need of some action being taken looking 
to regularity in setting apart land for streets, either by ordinance 
or by the appointment of a commission for that purpose. As it 
is now, each land owner can put a street where he pleases, re- 
gardless of how it compares with those adjoining as to direction 
or distance therefrom. By preparing a plan showing the loca- 
tion of proposed streets, and compelling land owners to adhere 
to it, the city would be rid of the interminable jumble of streets, 
lanes, and alleys running in all directions, confusing to a stranger 
and detracting greatly from the beauty of the city and the effi- 
ciency of the highways as means of communication. 

It is time this matter received serious attention, as each year 
sees a material growth of the city in the outlying districts, and 
a consequent addition of numerous narrow, crooked, and almost 
useless highways called by the high-sounding name of avenues, 
which are but monuments to some one's cupidity and avarice. 

Building new streets that have been laid out is quite an im- 
portant matter, and one requiring the exercise of good judg- 
ment. The idea is not how many yards can be built, but how 
many can be built to last. It may not show up so well to an un- 
thinking person, but it is more than folly to half do the work 
and then have to go over it the next year and every succeeding 
year. Far better to build one yard that will stand than ten that 
it is impossible to haul a heavy load over. 



432 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The practice in many cities is for the property owner who de- 
sires a street through his land to build it to an established grade 
before the city will accept it. They also require the land to be 
given to, instead of being purchased by, the city, sometimes at 
exorbitant rates. They argue that as the owner derives the ben- 
efit through the increased valuation of his land it is for his in- 
terest to do so. 

Manchester is considerably behind the times in these two im- 
portant features of economical city administration. 

SEWERS. 

The sewers constructed this year have been under the direc- 
tion of the street and park commission. The methods followed 
have in the main been the same as in previous years, those whose 
needs were most pressing being accommodated first. 

As the plumbers and citizens in general become more familiar 
with the revised ordinances relating to sewer entering, less 
trouble is experienced. An improvement is also noted in the 
number of returns made by plumbers. Last year out of 191 
permits issued, 145 returns were made. This year 257 per- 
mits were granted and returns made of 185 connections. 

It would be good policy for the city to employ a competent 
sewer inspector, whose duty should be to examine all connec- 
tions as they are made with the city sewers, and keep a record of 
the same. He should also require the owners to show their per- 
mit and license before allowing any work to be done. Many 
connections are now made without permission or without paying 
the entrance fee, and the city is a loser thereby. It is the inten- 
tion of this department the coming season to see that the ordi- 
nances are complied with in this respect. 

The average cost per foot in district No. 2 has been ^2.37, 
and that in district No. 10 has been ^2.26. 

In the 19,612 feet of sewers there were built 69 manholes and 
21 lampholes; 116 cesspool connections were put in, besides the 
Y branches, for 574 house connections. 

The number of cesspools built and repaired, their cost, and 



REPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 



43a 



the cost of repairs on sewers, together with other details regard- 
ing sewer work, will be found in the report of the street and 
park commission. 

The following sewers have been ordered in by vote of the city- 
councils, but have not been constructed : 



Street. 



Adams — 

Amherst 

Amherst road — 

Auburn 

Canton 

Concord 

Dearborn 

Dickey 

Dover 

Front 

Grove 

Harvell 

Hale 

Hevey east back. 

Jewett 

Kelley 

Laurel 

Livermore land.. 

Mast 

Merrimack 

Manchester 

Myrtle 

Pennacook 

Porter 

Pearl 

River road 

Second 

Schiller 

Union 

Valley 

West 

Wilson 

Wilson 

"Wilson Hill 



Total . 



Location. 



Clarke southerly 

Union to Ashland 

Mast southerly 

Canton easterly 

Spruce to Auburn 

Hall easterly 

Extension to Taylor 

West Hancock to South Main. 

Clinton northei'ly 

Eddy to north of hotel 

Present sewer easterly 

Hale to South Main 

Schiller southerly 

Kelley to Columbus avenue. . 

Extension to Young 

Extension to Joliette 

Hall to Beacon 

Chestnut to Union 

Extension westerly 

Belmont to Milton 

Extension to Beacon 

Hall westerly 

Canal to Union east back 

Amherst northerly 

Hall westerly.. .." 

Monroe to Clarke 

Blaine to Hiram 

Hill to Hale 

Ray brook to Clarke 

Elm to Belmont 

Clinton northerly 

Spruce to Valley 

Valley to Somerville 

Central to Merrimack 



Length 
in feet. 



540 

2,600 

1,2.30 

600 

352 

200 

250 

850 

160 

2,800 

101 

700 

450 

1,500 

1,200 

1,500 

800 

810 

610 

200 

300 

200 

3,000 

250 

130 

684 

400 

565 

600 

4,900 

226 

1,800 

1,800 

550 



32,858 



Date ordered- 



April 3, 1894. 
May 2, 1893. 
April 3, 1894. 
Nov. 9, 1894. 
Nov. 9, 1894. 
Sept. 6, 1887. 
July 10, 1893, 
July 10, 1893. 
Sept. 4, 1894, 
Sept. 5, 1893. 
Nov. 9, 1894. 
Nov. 9, 1894. 
Nov. 9, 1894. 
Julv 10, 1893, 
July 10, 1893. 
July 10, 1893. 
Nov. 7, 1893. 
April 3, 1894. 
April 3, 1894. 
Oct. 6, 1891. 
Sept. 4, 1894, 
May 2, 1893. 
Nov. 7, 1893. 
May 2, 189i. 
Nov. 9, 1894. 
July 10, 1893, 
July 5, 1892. 
Nov. 9, 1894. 
May 1, 1894. 
Nov. 7, 1893. 
Sept. 4, 1894. 
April 3, 1894. 
Aug. 7, 1894, 
Sept. 21, 1893. 



Equaling 6.223 miles. 



434 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Following is the report of the committee on sewers and 
drains, prepared by the city engineer as clerk of the committee : 

Manchester, N. H., December 30, 1894. 

Gentlemefi of the City Councils : 

The committee appointed by your honorable board to act as 
the joint standing committee on sewers and drains would sub- 
mit the following report of the work done by them the present 
year, and the second in their term of office. 

At the opening of the season there were twenty-eight orders 
for sewers voted in but not built. The following list gives the 
street, location, date of order, and length : 



Street. 


Location. 


Date ordered. 


Length 
in feet. 






May 2, 1893. 
July 5, 18!I2. 
Sept. 5,1893. 
Sept. 6. 1887. 
July 10, 1893. 
Sept. 5, 1893. 

May 2, 1893. 

July 10, 1893. 
July 10, 1893. 
July 10, 1893. 
June 6, 18P3. 
Nov. 7, 1893. 
Nov. 7, 1893. 
May. 2, 1893. 
Sept. 5, 1893. 
Oct. 6, 1891. 
July 10, 1893. 
Sept. 5, 1893. 
May 2, 1893. 
Nov. 7, 1893. 
May 2,1893. 
July 5, 1892. 
July 10, 1893. 
Nov. 7, 1893. 
July 5, 1892. 
July 0, 1892. 
Sept. 21, 1893. 


2,600 


Blaine. . . 




400 




E.xtension to Montgomery 


600 




200 




West Hancock to South Main. . 


850 


Front 


2,800 


HaU 

Through ravine 

Hevey east back 


Myrtle to Mead ) 
Hall and Mead to Bridge ( — 
Kelley to Columbus avenue 


2,050 

1,500 
1,200 






1,500 




Elm easterly 


150 




800 


Liberty east back .... 
Main 




225 


Granite to Piscataquog river.. 


1,100 


Mast 


200 






200 


Monroe 


River road to Elm 


500 


Montgomery 

Myrtle 


200 




600 




Canal to Union east back 


3,000 


Porter 


250 


Prospect 


Russell to Hall 


1,2.50 




1,300 


Valley 




4,900 




270 






1,000 


Wilson Hill 


Central to Merrimack 


550 






Total 


30,195 









442 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Of these, eleven have been completed, as follow : 

Conant, Hall, through ravine, Lake avenue, Liberty east back, 
Main, Monroe, Montgomery, Prospect, Webster, and West Han- 
cock. 

Two, Myrtle and River road, have been partially completed. 

The total length of the above was 8,185 feet, leaving 22,010 
feet of sewers voted in previous to 1894, not completed. 

During the year thirty-two orders for sewers have received 
favorable action, and of these twenty-one have been built. At 
the present time there are orders for thirty-four sewers which 
have passed your honorable board but which have not been con- 
structed and four which have been partially built. 

The committee have held seven meetings, as follows : March 
30, April 27, June 30, August 3, August 28, October 2, Novem- 
ber 2. 

The total number of petitions presented to the committee 
has been twenty-five. Seven reports were sent in to the city 
councils, recommending the passage of orders authorizing the 
building of certain sewers. These orders will be found in the 
list of orders written by the city engineer's department. 

The following is a list of the petitions referred to the commit- 
tee and the action taken on them. The dates of the passage of 
the orders to build the same will be found in the engineer's re- 
port of orders written for presentation to the city councils : 

Adams street, commencing at the proposed sewer through the 
Livermore land, and thence northerly in Adams to Clarke. W. 
C. Wilson. Committee voted to submit an order to build, 
March 30. 

Auburn street, commencing at the easterly end of Auburn, as 
lately laid out, thence in a westerly direction to Canton, and 
thence to connect with the city sewers. Eugene E. Mann. 
Committee voted to submit an order to build, November 2. 

Hevey east back street, commencing at a point 200 feet south 
of Wayne. M. Bessette. Committee voted to submit an order 
to build, August 28. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 443 

Rimmon east back street, commencing at a point 200 feet 
south of Wayne, and thence in a northerly direction to connect 
with the present sewer in Amory. Gazaille & Call. Commit- 
tee voted to submit on order to build, March 30. 

Pine, Grove, Green south back, and Grove south back streets, 
commencing at Pine and Auburn, thence southerly in Pine to 
Grove, thence easterly in Grove to Pine east back, and thence 
southerly in Pine east back to connect with laterals in Green south 
back and Grove south back. T. F. Glancy. Committee voted 
to submit an order to build, March 30. 

Auburn south back street, commencing at the easterly end of 
Auburn south back near Belmont, and thence in a westerly 
direction to connect with a proposed sewer in Wilson. A. H. 
Merrill. Committee voted to recommend that it be laid over 
until the Wilson-street sewer is built, June 30. 

Union street, commencing at the intersection of the projected 
sewer across the Livermore land and the sewer line of Union, 
and thence in a northerly direction to Clarke, according to the 
city's plan of sewers. James H. Harrington. Committee voted 
to submit an order to build, April 27. 

Cedar south back street, commencing at the intersection of 
the east line of the Elliott Manufacturing Company's land and 
Cedar south back about 151 feet east of Hall, and thence west- 
erly to the projected sewer in Wilson, according to the city's 
plan of sewers. J. L. T. Brown. Committee voted to recom- 
mend that it be laid over until the Wilson-street sewer is built, 
June 30. 

Union east back street, commencing at Webster, thence in a 
southerly direction about 100 feet. E. W. Perkins. Committee 
voted to submit an order to build, April 27. 

Elm west back street, commencing at the northerly terminus 
of the Elm west back sewer, and thence in a northerly direction 
about 70 feet. N. S. Bean. Committee voted to submit an 
order to build, April 27. 



444 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Old Bridge street road, commencing at the east line of Hall 
at Bridge, and thence northeasterly in Old Bridge about 140 feet. 
W. H. Emerson. Committee voted to recommend that the peti- 
tioners be given leave to withdraw. 

Joliette street, commencing at Kelley, and thence in a south- 
erly direction to Amory through Joliette. A. T. Beaumier. 
Committee voted to recommend that it be laid over for the 
present, June 30. 

Hayward street, commencing at a point in Hayward near 
Cypress, thence westerly in Hayward to Taylor, thence northerly 
in Taylor to Valley, thence to connect with the city sewers when 
built. S. G. Fletcher. Committee voted to recommend that 
the petitioners be given leave to withdraw until the Valley-street 
sewer is built, June 30. 

Kelley street, commencing at the terminus of the sewer as 
now built, and thence westerly to Joliette. The Rimmon Man- 
ufacturing Company. Committee voted that no action be taken 
as the sewer had already been voted in, June 30. 

Bridge street, commencing at Hall, and thence easterly to the 
east line of Belmont. C. H. Tarbell. Committee voted to sub- 
mit an order to build, August 3. 

Bartlett street, commencing at Wayne, and thence southerly 
to the south end of Bartlett. Albert Oliver. Committee voted 
to recommend that petitioners be given leave to withdraw until a 
suitable outlet is provided through a highway, November 2. 

Wilson street, commencing at the terminus of the present 
sewer in Wilson, and thence in a southerly direction to Somer- 
ville. William B. Burpee. Committee voted to submit an order 
to build from Valley to Somerville, August 3. 

Pearl street, commencing at the sewer in Russell, and thence 
in an easterly direction about 125 feet. John A. Bartlett. Com- 
mittee voted to submit an order to build, August 3. 

Manchester street, commencing at the present terminus of the 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 445 

sewer near Milton, and thence in an easterly direction to Bea- 
con. George A. Clark. Committee voted to submit an order 
to build, August 28. 

Prospect street, commencing at the present sewer in Russell, 
and thence in a westerly direction about 125 feet. Sarah C. 
Branch. Committee voted to submit an order to build, Octo- 
ber 2. 

Liberty east back street, commencing at the present sewer in 
Salmon, and thence in a southerly direction about 150 feet. 
Silas R. Wallace. Committee voted to submit an order to build, 
November 2. 

Hale and Harvell streets, commencing at Main and Harvell, 
thence in an easterly direction to Hale, and thence in a north- 
erly direction 450 feet to connect with the city sewers. George 
H. Wilson. Committee voted to submit an order to build, No- 
vember 2. 

Pearl street, commencing at the present sewer in Hall, and 
thence in a westerly direction about 130 feet. W. E. Drew. 
Committee voted to submit an order to build, November 2. 

Grove street, commencing at the terminus of the present sewer 
east of Belmont, and thence in an easterly direction about 150 
feet. William G. Westover. Committee voted to submit an 
order to build, November 2. 



446 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
SEWERS VOTED IN DURING THE YEAR. 



Street. 



Adams 

Amherst road 

Auburn 

Belmont 

Bridge 

Canton 

Clinton 

Dover 

Elm west back — 
Green 

" south back. 
Grove 

" south back. 

Hale 

Hall 

Harvell 

Hevey east back . . 

Hill 

Schiller 

Liberty east back. 
Liveriiiore land ... 

Malvern 

Manchester 

.Mast 

Pearl 



Pine east back . 



Prospect 

Rimmon east back 

Spruce 

Union 

" east back — 

West 

Wilson 



Location. 



Chestnut to Union 

Mast to Milf ord 

Canton easterly 

Valley northerly 

Hall to Belmont 

Spruce to Auburn 

Main to West 

Clinton northerly 

Extension near Dean 

Pine to Pine east back 

Pine east back to Union 

Extension easterly 

Pine east back to Union , 

Schiller southerly 

Mead southerly 

Hale to South Main 

Kellev southerly 

To Schiller | 

Hill to Merrimack river ) 

Salmon southerly 

Chestnut to Union 

Extension sotitlierly 

Near Milton to Beacon 

Extension westerly 

Russell eastei'ly 

Hall westerly 

Green southerly 

Auburn southerly 

Amherst northerly 

Russell westerly 

Amory southerly 

To Canton . 

Ray brook to Clarke 

Webster southerly 

Clinton northerly 

Spruce to Valley 

Valley to Somerville 



Total 18,366 



Feet. 



540 
1,2.30 
600 
230 
350 
500 
520 
160 
70 
126 
300 
150 
300 

200 

700 

1,200 

1,200 

150 
810 
100 
300 
610 
610 
130 
400 
540 
150 
125 
750 
800 
600 
100 
250 
1,800 
1,800 



Of the above sewers 6,733 feet have been constructed. 
This comprises all that has come within the province of the 
committee on sewers and drains, and is respectfully submitted. 

Alderman Christian L. Wolf, Chairman, 
Alderman John P. Cronin, 
Councilman George E. Heath, 
Councilman David H. Burbank, 
Councilman William G. Landry, 

Committee on Sewers and Drains. 
W. H. Bennett, 
Clerk of Committee. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON STREETS. 



The second annual report of the committee on streets, pre- 
pared by the city engineer as clerk of the committee, is herewith 
presented : 

Manchester, N. PL, December 30, 1894. 
Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

The committee appointed by your honorable board to act as 
the joint standing committee on streets would submit the follow- 
ing report of the work done by them and under their direction 
the present year : 

The committee has held eight meetings, as follows: April 10, 
June 4, July 2, August 3, September 26, October 2, November i. 

Number of petitions received, 32 ; granted a hearing, 25 ; 
given leave to withdraw, 6. 



Petitions. 

The following is a list of the petitions referred to the commit- 
tee, and the action taken on them : 

CiLLEY Road. For building to grade Cilley road from Beech 
street, and thence in an easterly direction to top of hill or about 
the line of Wilson street produced. 

Thomas Chilcott. 

April 10, committee voted to recommend grade as shown by 
city engineer on plan of Cilley road from Beech to Wilson street. 

Auger Avenue. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake on the west line of Nutt road in South Manchester, 



448 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and thence in a westerly direction to the easterly line of Calef 
road. 

Daniel Connor. 

April lo, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Plummer Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at the east line of Pine street, and thence in an easterly direction 
to the westerly line of Union street, known as Plummer street. 

Thomas Stewart. 

April lo, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Shasta Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a point on the easterly side of Elm street, where the center 
line of Shasta street, produced easterly, intersects the easterly line 
of Elm street, and thence in an easterly direction to the Calef 
road. 

F. E. Gilford. 

April lo, committee voted to recommend that the petitioners 
be given leave to withdraw. 

Ray Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning at 
a stake at Ray brook, said stake being at the terminus of Ray 
street, as laid out by the board of aldermen August i8, 1892, 
thence in a northerly direction to a stake on the south line of 
Clarke street, according to a plan of said section known as the 
Livermore plan of the Adams land. 

Thomas L. Livermore. 

April 10, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Foster Avenue. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake on the southerly line of a highway called Valley street, 
217.25 feet from the westerly line of a highway called Jewett 
street, and on the center line of Foster avenue, as proposed, and 
thence in a southerly direction to a stake on the northerly line 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 449 

of a highway called Hayward street, 269.02 feet westerly from 
a stone bound on the easterly line of said Jewett street. 

John A. Dunlap. 

April 10, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Titus Avenue. For a new highway in said city, beginning at 
a stake on the west line of Beech street ; said stake is about 343.- 
25 feet northerly of a stone bound which is the division line be- 
tween the J. B. Titus land and the northerly line of the Young 
land, known as Titus avenue, and thence in a westerly direction 
about 540 feet to a stake on the westerly line of Union street, as 
staked out and shown on a plan of said land known as the J. B. 
Titus plan, 

Luther E. Carswell. 

April 10, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Second Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake on the River road near the northwest corner of Warren 
G. Currier's house, and thence in a northerly direction to a stake 
at the Manchester line in said city. 

R. M. Rollins. 

April 10, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Wallace Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake standing on the southerly side of Winter street, and 
about no feet westerly from the angle in said street, and running 
thence in a southerly direction 52^^ feet to a stake, thence wes- 
terly about 290 feet to a stake standing 15 feet southerly from 
the southerly corner of a lot now or formerly owned by Emma 
E. Hatch. 

The James Baldwin Company. 

June 4, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Hayward Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake on the west line of Belmont street, and on the 

29 



450 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

line of Hayward street projected, and thence in a westerly direc- 
tion to a stake on the easterly line of Hall street, being an ex- 
tension of Hayward street, from Hall to Belmont. 

J. K. Mitchell. 

June 4, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
-granted. 

Mason Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake on the south side of Hayward street, being the west 
side of the proposed Mason street, and thence in a southerly di- 
rection to a stake on the north side of Young street, or Young 
road, being the extension of Mason street. 

Isaac Huse. 

June 4, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
•granted. 

Dickey Street. That the name of Dickey street be changed 
to Goffe street. 

Fred G. Stark, for New Hampshire Improvement Company. 
No action taken. 

Belmont Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake on the north line of Old Bridge street road, and in the 
center line of Belmont street, and thence in a northerly direc- 
tion to a stake standing in the center of Belmont and Pearl 
streets, being an extension of Belmont street, as shown on the 
plan of said section made for Mead, Mason & Co. 

Mead, Mason & Co. 

June 4, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Mead Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning at 
a stake on the east line of Hall street and on the south line of 
Mead street, and thence in an easterly direction to a stake on 
the west line of Belmont street, the above line being the south 
line of Mead street, as shown on a plan known as the Mead, 
Mason & Co.'s plan of land in said section. 

Mead, Mason & Co. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 451 

June 4, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, 

Salmon Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at the westerly line of Walnut street and in the center of Salmon 
street, and thence in an easterly direction to Beech street, said 
street to be the continuation of Salmon street. 

Charles W. Eager. 

June 4, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Glenwood Avenue. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at Bedel street, shown on the plan of Glenwood avenue, 
West Manchester, and thence in a southerly direction to the 
south line of Griffin street, as shown on said plan of Glenwood 
avenue. 

Augustine Denis. 

July 2, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

( There is no claim for damages to be made in this case. I 
hereby waive all notices and forms and ask an early considera- 
tion. R. D. W. McKay.) 

Cody Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning at 
a stake standing on the private way known as Cody street, at a 
point on the south side of the Concord & Montreal Railroad 
known as the Portsmouth branch, and thence in a southerly di- 
rection to a stake standing on the southerly line of the old range- 
way. 

M. V. B. Garland. 

July 2, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Button Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake on the north line of Amherst street, in the center of 
Button street, thence in a northeasterly direction to a stake on 
the south side of Lowell street, in the center line of Button 
street. 

Mrs. Elizabeth S. Jackson. 



452 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

July 2, committee voted to recommend that petitioners be 
given leave to withdraw. 

Welch Avenue. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at the easterly terminus of Welch avenue, thence in a northeas- 
terly direction to Nutt road. 

George H. Dunbar. 

July 2, committee voted to recommend that petitioners be 
given leave to withdraw. 

Clay Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning at 
a stone monument on the easterly side of Taylor street, thence 
in a westerly direction to a stone monument on the westerly side 
of Cypress street ; the line above described to be the northerly 
side of the highway, being a part of Clay street, shown on a plan 
of the southern portion of the city of Manchester adopted by res- 
olution of the city councils July 15, 1873. 

Mrs. Celia Cotter. 

July 2, committee voted to recommend that petitioners be 
given leave to withdraw. 

Mystic Avenue. For building Mystic avenue from Oakland 
avenue to Glenwood avenue, a distance of about 200 feet. 

Freeman G. Riddle. 

August 3, committee voted to recommend an order to build 
the same. 

Putnam Street. For a new 'highway from the intersection 
of Dubuque and Putnam streets, thence in a westerly direction 
to the intersection of Putnam and Bartlett streets, being an ex- 
tension of Putnam street. 

Albert Oliver. 

November i, committee voted to recommend that the peti- 
tioners be given leave to withdraw. 

Oakland Avenue. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake in the center line of Oakland avenue, on the eas- 
terly end of said Oakland avenue as now laid out, thence in an 
easterly direction to the west side of Paige street, a continuance 
or extension of Oakland avenue. 

F. A. Platts. 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 453 

August 3, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Bartlett Street. For building Bartlett street southerly to 
Sullivan street, according to the grade as established by the city. 
Johann Hammer. 
August 3, committee voted to recommend an order to build. 

Wayland Avenue. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at the junction of Mammoth road and Wayland avenue, 
and thence in a westerly direction to Massabesic street, so called, 
the above lay-out to be an extension of Wayland avenue. 

Charles D. Gadbois. 

August 3, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Platts Avenue. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake on the southerly side of the Portsmouth branch 
of the Concord & Montreal Railroad, standing in the center of 
Platts avenue, so called ; (said street being already built, there 
are to be no land damages ;) and thence in a southerly direction 
to a stake on the northerly side of the Candia road. 

F. A. Platts. 

August 3, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Oakland Avenue. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake on the westerly side of Revere avenue, in the cen- 
ter line of Oakland avenue, and thence in a westerly direction 
to a stake on the east side of the Mammoth road, said street be- 
ing a continuance of Oakland avenue. 

F. A. Platts. 

August 3, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Glenwood Avenue. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake in the center line of Glenwood avenue, as already 
laid out, and thence in an easterly direction to a stake standing 



454 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

on the westerly line of the land of James A. Colby, said street 
to be an extension of Glenvvood avenue. 

F. A. Platts. 

August 8, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Welch Avenue. For a new highway from the intersection 
of Welch avenue and Calef road, thence in a northeasterly direc- 
tion to Nutt road, being an extension of Welch avenue. 

George H. Dunbar. 

November i, committee voted to recommend that the peti- 
tioners be given leave to withdraw. 

Woodland Avenue. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake in the center line of Woodland avenue, and thence 
in a southerly direction about 425^ feet, to the north line of 
the Candia road in said city. 

(We hereby acknowledge due and sufficient notice of the within 
petition and this order thereon, and agree to take no exception 
as to time or manner of calling hearing upon the same, and 
waive all claims for damages. Alfred J. Sanborn.) 

November i, committee voted to recommend that a hearing 
be granted. 

Sagamore Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake on the east side of Walnut street and on the south 
line of Sagamore street; said stake is 441.4 feet north of the 
north line of Gore street ; thence in an easterly direction about 
1,112.26 feet to a stake on the west line of Oak street and 481.14 
feet north of the north line of Gore street, said line being the 
south line of Sagamore street, as shown on plan 1,042 in the city 
engineer's department. 

(We hereby acknowledge due and sufficient notice of the within 
petition and this order thereon, and agree to take no exception 
as to time or manner of calling hearing upon the same, and 
waive all claims for damages, provided the street is laid out in 
accordance with the plan of said street. W. M. Butterfield.) 

October 4, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 455 

SoMERviLLE STREET. For building the highway known as 
Somerville street from Union street to Beech street. 

Alexis Leclerc. 

November i, committee voted to recommend an order to 
build. 

This comprises all the work that has come within the province 
of the committee on streets, and is respectfully submitted. 

Alderman Byron Worthen, Chairman, 
Alderman Sam C. Lowell, 
Councilman George E. Heath, 
Councilman Charles H. Harvey, 
Councilman Howard C. Holt, 

Committee oti Streets. 
W. H. Bennett, 

Clerk of Committee. 



streets. 



Manchester is lamentably behind in one point of municipal 
administration in comparison with other places, that of allowing 
lot owners to occupy the highways with fences and buildings. 
The city has an ordinance which is rigorously enforced enjoining 
abuttors from building beyond their street line, but thus far lit- 
tle has been done toward compelling the removal of those fences 
and buildings which were constructed years ago and which pro- 
ject from a foot to several feet into the street. 

A notable example of this occurs on Derry street. On the 
north side of this thoroughfare every fence projects from six to 
fifteen feet into the street, the bay window of one house is over 
the line and eight feet of another house will have to be removed. 
Recent builders have conformed in a measure to the correct line. 

On portions of the Candia road the same state of affairs exists, 
the stone walls being from two to twenty feet into the street. 



456 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 

As this road has been marked by stone bounds nearly its entire 
distance, no excuse can be given by the abutters for not con- 
forming to the lines. 

Throughout the city there is noticed a tendency to occupy 
city land, oftentimes to the detriment of the appearance of the 
streets. The lukewarm policy pursued by the city in the past 
ought to give way to a policy that would compel a proper observ- 
ance of the laws in this respect. 

LAYING OUT STREETS. 

One of the most important things to be considered in street 
extensions is the cost of constructing them when laid out. It is 
a very simple matter to go through the formalities required by 
law and declare the street legally laid out. Then comes the 
question of building. If the route is rough and uneven, ledgy 
or swampy, the city must be put to considerable expense to 
build what will for years be a subject for outlay rather than a 
source of revenue. If the city refuses to or delays in building 
the street, then the abuttors petition the court, and the city is 
compelled to build. 

If the custom in vogue in other cities could be followed here 
it would result in saving thousands of dollars in this direction. 
It is the law or custom in those places to compel the persons de- 
siring a street to build it to the established grade before the city 
will lay it out ; as the land owners are the ones directly benefitted 
by the street it would seem but fair that they do the building. 
At any rate it would have a tendency to keep down the too rapid 
growth of the city beyond its ability to properly provide sewers, 
water, and lights. 

BUILDING STREETS. 

It has always been a question whether or not it was policy to 
build outlying roads to their full width, and the arguments have 
nearly always been against such a practice. In discussing this 
question one important factor, as far as Manchester roads are 
concerned, has been overlooked. The supply of good gravel for 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 457 

use on the streets is somewhat limited unless hauled for a long 
distance. This is one of the principal causes that has operated 
against building and keeping in repair the suburban roads. 
These thoroughfares, besides being used by residents, are in a 
great measure frequented by pleasure drivers, and the city owes 
to them the duty of providing a highway in at least semi-decent 
repair. It may not be generally known, but on each side of the 
numerous highways a good quality of gravel can be obtained 
suitable for top-dressing the roads, at the same time improving 
the appearance of them by removing the unsightly bushes, rocks, 
and hillocks that line either side. 

One of the most pronounced cases of this kind occurs on the 
Bridge-street extension, where for nearly the whole distance the 
road is scarcely wide enough for two teams to pass. This is one 
of the most frequented routes to the lake and would be a good 
place to make a beginning in this direction. Mammoth road. 
Proctor road, and the Lake Shore road are notable instances in 
this line. 

STREET LINES AND GRADES. 

The calls upon this department for street lines arid grades have 
been numerous. As each year rolls by the city's growth extends, 
and our work, instead of being confined within easy reach of the 
office, is now from one to three miles out in any direction. It 
has been the aim of this department to attend to the work as 
promptly as possible, and in the order received. Considerable 
trouble is occasioned by unreasonable persons who have an idea 
that they have but to give an order to have it attended to imme- 
diately. Oftentimes it is a week before it can be reached, and 
in the meantime they besiege the office, and even carry their 
complaints to the mayor that they cannot get their work done. 
His Honor has invariably explained the situation to them and 
referred them back to this office. 

This brings up a point advocated in former reports, that a 
complete plan of a street should be prepared, showing the lines 
and grades, the same to be presented for consideration at the 



458 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

time the street is laid out. With this done the department could 
work to better advantage, and possibly silence those who make it 
a point to find fault becaase their wants are not attended to im- 
mediately, regardless of the fact that the department has no data 
for the work. To obviate this trouble as much as possible, extra 
assistants have been employed during the summer season, and 
the work kept better in hand than ever before. 

PARKS. 

In Stark park lines and grades were given for the construction 
of an avenue at the southern end of the park. 

In Derry field park lines and grades were given for the con- 
struction of the circular driveway. 

In addition to this, sketches have been made from time to 
time and instructions given the superintendent regarding the 
work in hand. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

During the early spring the remaining section left from the 
previous year was surveyed and plotted on the plans, completing 
the work in this direction. A tracing of the large office plan 
has been made for the use of the superintendent. 

There has been made for the treasurer a portfolio containing 
the plan in sections, one on a sheet, reserving the opposite sheet 
for the areas, owners' names, and such transfers as may be made. 

The section south of the cemetery, purchased of C. C. Web- 
ster, has been surveyed, the lines established and marked by stone 
bounds, and a plan made showing a partial lotting. 

Several new sections in the cemetery have been staked out 
into lots as called for, and the regular work kept well in hand. 

MAIN-STREET BRIDGE. 

This department has had general oversight over the lines and 
grades during the construction of this bridge, and in this capac- 
ity made daily visits during the progress of the work. Plans 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 459 

were made for the street commissioners, showing the surround- 
ings, also a design for the bridge which, with some modifications, 
was used as the basis of the present structure. 

STONE BOUNDS. 

It has been the policy of this department to mark with sub- 
stantial stone bounds, as far as possible, all new lines established. 
The past year has seen a considerable advance in this direction, 
notably in the Pine Grove cemetery extension and on Candia 
road, the former having every angle but one so marked, and the 
latter being marked from the Mammoth road to the three-mile 
post. Numerous other points, both in the city and the suburbs, 
have been definitely located and secured by this means from 
loss. It is the intention of this department to continue the 
work as fast as time will allow. 

SEWER BOOK. 

The rapid growth of the city in the suburbs and the conse- 
quent addition of new streets and sewers has rendered the 
bound volume of sewer sheets in the office inadequate to provide 
for the additions. To remedy this defect, and at the same time 
allow for future additions, a new book is in process of construc- 
tion on a larger scale than the former, and designed to show in 
addition to the sewers, the water and gas mains, house numbers, 
lot numbers, numbers of sev/er licenses, and frontage of lots. 

When the book is completed it will be possible to tell at a 
glance the exact status of any lot in reference to its sewerage 
facilities, and it will more than pay for itself in the saving of time. 

COMMITTEE WORK. 

The city engineer, as clerk of the committees on streets and on 
sewers and drains, has attended each meeting, keeping a com- 
plete record of the proceedings, which are on file in this office. 

In addition meetings have been attended of the city govern- 
ment, committees on Valley cemetery, Pine Grove cemetery, 



460 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

city farm, lands and buildings, claims, commons and parks, the 
street and park commission, and the board of aldermen. 

Besides the work before enumerated, many questions have been 
answered from engineers, boards of trade, and others in various 
cities throughout this country and Canada. 

I would respectfully tender my acknowledgments to his Honor 
the Mayor and the various committees of the city council for the 
support which they have given. 

I also wish to acknowledge the courtesies shown by the various 
heads of departments, and the co-operation of the assistants of 
this department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT, 

City Engineer. 
January i, 1895. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

William C. Clarke, Mayor, ) ,^.^_^,,-^, 

John T. Gott, Pres. Com. Council, J 

Isaac W. Smith. 

Nathan P. Hunt. 

Moody Currier. 

LuciEN B. Clough. 

Herman F. Straw. 

Walter M. Parker. 

Charles D. McDuffie. 



Officers. 

President, ex-officio. 
William C. Clarke. 

Clerk and Treasurer. 

Nathan P. Hunt. 

Librarian. 

Kate E. Sanborn. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Alatichester : 

The Trustees of the City Library respectfully submit their 
forty-first annual report of the affairs of the library, and with the 
same the report made to them by the treasurer of the board, con- 
taining an account of the sums received and the expenditures 
made by him in behalf of the board from the funds in their pos- 
session and under their control ; and also the report of the libra- 
rian made to the board, giving in detail the statistics of the 
operation of the library during the past year, and its condition at 
the close of the year. 

From the treasurer's report it appears that during the year the 
sum of one thousand and twenty-six dollars and eighty-one cents 
has been expended for the purchase of books, and the sum of one 
hundred and seventy-nine dollars and seventy-four cents for the 
purchase of periodicals, making a total expenditure for both these 
purposes of twelve hundred and six dollars and fifty-five cents. 

Of the amount expended for the purchase of books the sum of 
one hundred and ten dollars and thirty-seven cents was used for 
the purchase of books to replace those worn out and withdrawn 
from circulation ; and the sum of twelve dollars and sixty-two 
cents was taken from the income of the Dean fund and used for 
the purchase of books for that department of the library. Ex- 
cluding these two amounts the sum expended for the purchase of 



464 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

new books was nine hundred and three dollars and eighty-two 
cents, leaving a balance in the hands of the treasurer at the close 
of the year of seven hundred and fifty-six dollars and sixty-six 
cents. 

The balance of the accumulated income of the Dean fund at 
the end of the year was six thousand eight hundred and three 
dollars and twenty-four cents. Only the sum of twelve dollars 
and sixty-two cents was expended from the income of this fund 
during the year. 

The accumulated income of the Mary E. Elliot fund at the 
close of the year was one thousand and thirty-nine dollars and 
twenty-eight cents. 

The amount of the Eliza Eaton fund, with interest, December 
31, 1893, was twenty-nine hundred and seventy-four dollars and 
fifty-nine cents. During the year 1 894 there was received for inter- 
est on this fund and its accumulations the sum of one hundred and 
eighty dollars and seventy-six cents. In accordance with a vote 
of the trustees, one hundred and twelve dollars and twenty cents 
of the amount received for interest has been added to the prin- 
cipal of fund ($2,887.80). making the same three thousand dol- 
lars, leaving a balance of interest of one hundred and fifty-five 
dollars and thirty-five cents to be used hereafter for the pur- 
chase of books. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the past year have 
been three thousand two hundred and seventy-four dollars and 
six cents, which amount includes the sum of four hundred and 
thirty dollars and three cents expended for reclassification of the 
library and preparation of card catalogue, and the sum of four 
hundred and twenty-four dollars and seventy-three cents paid for 
printing the new fiction catalogue compiled during the year by 
the librarian. The items of these expenditures may be found in 
detail in the annual report of the city, the bills for the same hav- 
ing been paid by the city treasurer upon their approval by the 
trustees, from the sum appropriated by the city councils for the 
library. 

The librarian reports that the library has been open for the 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 465 

delivery of books three hundred and six days, during which 
period the number of books delivered for home use was fifty-five 
thousand and fifty-four, an average of about one hundred and 
seventy-nine per day. In addition to this number delivered for 
general circulation nine thousand eight hundred and seventy- 
three books were delivered for use at the reading-room at the 
library, an average of about thirty-two per day. The total num- 
ber of books delivered during the year for both these purposes 
was sixty-four thousand nine hundred and twenty-seven, an aver- 
age of about two hundred and twelve per day. As compared 
with the year preceding, the circulation for home use shows a de- 
crease of two hundred and forty-one volumes, while the number 
delivered for use at the library shows an increase of sixteen 
hundred and seventy. The total circulation is fourteen hundred 
and twenty-nine greater than the year preceding. 

Seventy-four different periodicals have been regularly received 
at the library ^uring the year, — fifty-seven by purchase and sev- 
enteen by donation, — and at the completion of the several vol- 
umes they have been bound and placed upon the shelves for 
general circulation. 

The number of volumes withdrawn from circulation during the 
year on account of their worn and defaced condition was one 
hundred and fifty-six. Of this number and of others retired 
from circulation in previous years for like reason, seventy-eight 
volumes have been replaced at a cost of one hundred and ten 
dollars and thirty-seven cents. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the last 
report, including maps and pamphlets, was thirty-seven thousand 
two hundred and four. 

During the year there have been added by purchase seven hun- 
dred and forty-seven volumes; by donation, three hundred and 
twenty-six volumes ; and seventy-four volumes of periodicals 
have been bound, — a total of eleven hundred and forty-seven vol- 
umes, making the number of bound volumes in the library at the 
end of the year thirty-seven thousand six hundred and thirty- 
three, and the total number, including sixteen maps and seven 

30 



466 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

hundred and two pamphlets, thirty-eight thousand three hundred 
and fifty-one. 

Following the report of the librarian will be found the names 
of persons donating books to the library during the year, with 
the number presented by each person. It has been thought best 
to omit the titles of the books presented on account of the 
expense attending the printing of the same in connection with 
the report of the trustees. To all who have in this manner con- 
tributed to the increase of the library, the trustees have caused 
due acknowledgment to be made. 

Doubts were expressed in the last report of the trustees regard- 
ing the advisability of printing the new catalogue from the man- 
uscript as then arranged, and its publication was postponed until 
the new librarian could have an opportunity to examine the work. 
Further examination of the manuscript in the early part of the 
year by a committee of the trustees, acting with the librarian, 
convinced the board that the manuscript should not be printed 
until radically revised and reclassified. 

Under the circumstances it was thought best to still further 
postpone the publication of a complete catalogue and to have 
prepared and published as soon as possible a catalogue of the fic- 
tion contained in the library, which seemed most needed. This 
work was undertaken at once by Miss Sanborn, and in addition 
to her duties as librarian she has during the year prepared and 
published a catalogue of all the fiction in the library at the close 
of the year. Great credit is due Miss Sanborn for her conscien- 
tious work upon this catalogue and her efforts for the better ac- 
commodation of the patrons of the library. Since the publica- 
tion of the catalogue many flattering and appreciative notices of 
its merits have been received from librarians in different parts of 
the country. The whole library is now being reclassified under 
the direction of Miss Sanborn according to the Cutter expansive 
system, and a new card catalogue is being made at the same time. 
When this work is finished it will be possible to publish a com- 
plete catalogue of the library if thought desirable. 

The duties of librarian have been discharged by Miss Sanborn 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 467 

with fidelity and earnest effort to make the library of the most 
possible advantage to the public. The trustees consider the city 
fortunate to be able to secure the services of so competent and 
progressive a librarian. 

In closing, the trustees desire to renew their acknowledgments 
to the members of the city councils for the courtesy and con- 
sideration with which their suggestions relating to the library 
have been received and carried out. 

April 8, 1895. 

In board of trustees read , and approved and ordered to be 

signed by the chairman and clerk of the board and transmitted 

to the city councils. 

N. P. HUNT, 

Clerk. 
Wm. C. Clarke, 

Mayor. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The treasurer of the board submits the following account of 
the receipts and expenditures by the board of the funds received 
on account of the library : 



1894. 






Dr. 


Jan. I. 


To 


balance of appropriation, 








etc. .... 


$890.39 


Feb. 6. 




Mrs. M. J. Buncher, fines, 








catalogues, etc. 


60.20 


Oct 12. 




appropriation for books for 






To 


1894 .... 
balance of income of Dean 


1,000.00 


Jan, I. 








fund .... 


$6,314.57 






income of Dean fund 


108.00 


April 2. 




income of Dean fund 
interest on accumulation of 


60.00 






income 


3-04 


July I. 




income of Dean fund 
interest on accumulation of 


108.00 






income 


189.45 


Oct. 18. 




income of Dean fund 
interest on accumulation of 


30.06 






income 


2.80 



$1,950.59 



),8i5.86 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY, 469 

Jan. I. To Mary E. Elliot fund . ^2,000.00 

balance of interest on Mary 

E. Elliot fund . . 865.10 

April 2. interest on Mary E. Elliot 

fund .... 80.00 

interest on accumulation of 

income . . . 34-60 

Oct. 18. interest on Mary E. Elliot 

fund .... 40.00 

interest on accumulation of 

income . . . 19-58 



Jan. I. To Eliza A. Eaton fund . . ;^2,887.8o 
balance of interest on Eliza 

A. Eaton fund . . 86.79 

April 2. interest on Eliza A. Eaton 

fund .... 115.48 

interest on accumulation of 

income . . . 3.44 

Oct. 18. interest on Eliza A. Eaton 

fund .... 57.74 

interest on accumulation of 

income ... 4.10 



5,039.28 



$3>i55-35 

5814,961.08 

1894. Cr. 

Jan. 6. Paid New England News Co., periodicals ;gi4.82 

10. Little, Brown & Co., books . . ii.75 
10. Little, Brown & Co. (Dean fund), 

books ..... 5.87 

16. George H. Polley & Co., periodicals 6.00 

24. Boston Book Co., periodicals , 5.00 

Feb. 3. New England News Co., periodicals 9.77 

6. Houghton, Mifflin & Co., books . 6.00 



470 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Feb. 6. 

6. 

6. 

March 2. 

12. 

April 3. 

5- 
6. 



May 



June 



24. 

7- 

15- 

16. 

22. 

22. 
9- 
9- 

12. 

12. 

14. 

July 7- 
18. 

18. 
21. 
21. 

26. 

Aug. 6. 

6. 

7- 
I. 
I. 
I. 

7- 
24. 



Sept. 



Paid Little, Brown & Co. (Dean fund), 
books ..... 

Frank B. Webster Co., periodicals . 
Sampson, Murdock & Co., books . 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Central Law Journal Co., periodicals 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
Lawyers' Co-operative Publishing 

Co., books .... 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
George E. Littlefield, books . 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
James H. Lamb, books . 
Houghton, Miflflin & Co., books 
Publishers' Weekly, periodicals 
Publishers' Weekly, books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
Boston Book Co., books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Catholic Publishing Society Co 

books .... 
Granite Monthly Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
D. Appleton & Co., books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Edwin J. Bartlett, books 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
Boston Book Co., books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., replaced books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Granite Monthly Co., books . 



$6-75 
1. 00 
2.00 

1 3. 1 1 
5.00 

15-25 

2.00 

5.00 
181.63 

4-50 

I I. ID 

3-5° 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
29.16 
12.01 

53-04 

9.00 

13.61 

67.30 

1.25 

28.76 

10.00 

17.41 
12.91 

2.70 
2.00 
2.58 

5-59 
48.05 

17-37 
2.00 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 471 



Sept 


25- 


Oct. 


6. 




6. 




12. 




12. 




IS- 




IS- 




22. 




22. 




24. 


Nov. 


5- 




5- 




10. 




10. 




10. 




14. 




IS- 




IS- 




24. 




28. 


Dec. 


6. 




8. 




13- 




31- 



Paid Library Bureau, books . 

W. B. Clarke & Co., replaced books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
Charles L. Woodward, books . 
New England News Co., periodical 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., replaced books 

.Boston Athenaeum, books 
George E. Littlefield, books 
Lawyers' Co-operative Publishing 

Co., books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., replaced book 
David Cross, books 
Little, Brown & Co 
W. B. Clarke & Co . 
L. A. Morrison, books . 
Sampson, Murdock & Co., books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Hubbard Publishing Co., books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
By balance of appropriation . 

balance of Dean fund 

Mary E. Elliot fund, and interest 

Eliza A. Eaton fund, and interest 



$1.00 

16.54 

102.23 

2.22 

13-23 
8.19 
2.62 

20.00 

1-35 

5.00 
11.07 
60.98 

4-25 
17-52 
43-i6 

6.00 

3-75 

60.65 

2.25 

2.00 

10.91 

20.00 

131.84 

756.66 

6,803.24 

3,309.28 

3,155-35 

$14,961.08 
The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the library, 
for the year ending December 31, 1893, the bills for which have 
been paid by the city treasurer upon the approval of the com- 
mittee on accounts of the board of trustees, the items of which 
may be found in the annual report of the city, are as follows : 
Services of librarian ...... $912.48 

Services of assistants to librarian .... 596.75 



books 
books 



472 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Fuel 










$17-50 


Gas .... 










230.30 


Insurance 










125.00 


Binding .... 










142.77 


Rebinding .... 










153-27 


Supplies .... 










195.08 


Newspapers 










6.00 


Water .... 










16.00 


Catalogue and card catalogue 










430.03 


Printing catalogue . 










424.73 


Printing trustees' report . 










11.00 


Incidentals 










13-15 






$3,274.06 


RECAPITULATION. 






Balance December 31, 1893 • 


$3y^43-^3 


Appropriation for 1894 . 






4,500.00 



Paid trustees for purchase of books . $1,000.00 
Paid incidental expenses . . . 3,274.06 
Balance of appropriation Dec. 31, 1894 3,869.77 



$8,143.83 

Respectfully submitted. 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 



December 31, 1894. 

We have examined the foregoing report, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

BYRON WORTHEN, 
L. B. CLOUGH, 

Coniinittee on Accounts of City Libraty. 



report of the trustees of the city library. 473 

December 31, 1894. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of receipts 
and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report of the treas- 
urer of the trustees of the city library, and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Manchester City Library : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit the forty-first annual report 
of the city library : 

Whole number of accessions December 31, 1893 . 37,204 

Added during the year 1894: 

By purchase ...... 747 

By gift 326 

Periodicals bound .... 74 

1,147 



Whole number at present ..... 38,35 1 

Including : 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets ..... 702 

Bound volumes .... 37,633 



38,351 
Number of periodicals regularly received : 

By purchase ....... 57 

By gift 17 

Number of days the library was open for reading 

and distribution of books ..... 306 

Number of volumes delivered for home use . . 555054 

Average per day ....... 179 

Largest number any one day, February 17 . . 540 

Largest number any one month, March . . . 6,618 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 475 



Smallest number any one month, September . 
Number of volumes delivered in the reading room 
Average per day ..... 
Number of cards used on deposit 
Number of cards issued duriqg the year . 
Whole number issued since new registration 
Number of cards relinquished during the year 
Postals sent to delinquents 
Worn-out books removed from circulation 
Number of volumes replaced . 
Number of books lost and paid for . 
Number of volumes repaired at the bindery 
Number repaired and covered at the library 

Balance of cash in hands of Mrs. Buncher, the former 
librarian, December 31, 1893 

Paid by Mrs. Buncher to N. P. Hunt, treasurer, Feb- 
ruary 6, 1894 ....... 



3-520 

9^873 

32 

4 

576 

9,660 

73 
283 

156 

78 

4 

448 
6,700 

$60.20 
60.20 



Amount received from Jan. i to Dec. 31, 1894 : 

For fines ...... ^143.63 

finding lists, 23 at loc. . . . 2.30 

fiction catalogues, 23 at 30c. . . 6.90 

books lost and paid for . . . 3.34 



I156.17 
78.56 



Paid for expressage and incidentals . 

Total cash on hand ..... l77-6i 

While the circulation of books for home use shows a very 
slight decrease from the preceding year, it is gratifying to note 
that eighty-eight more cards were issued to borrowers, and that 
the number of books used in the library shows an increase of over 
sixteen hundred volumes. The statistics of this use in the library 
do not give us an accurate record. As we have no reference 
room and no quiet room for study, persons who are investigating 
a subject for which they need many books are invited to make 



476 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

use of the tables in the book room, and are allowed free access 
to the shelves. Of the books consulted in this way no account 
can be kept, but the most valuable work of the library in aiding 
study and research is done in this manner. 

The new and popular books of tke year have been added to 
the library as soon as published ; many books of reference, es- 
pecially in the departments of bibliography, history, and gen- 
ealogy have been bought ; and an effort has been made to assist 
people connected with various clubs in the city by purchasing 
occasional books for which they had immediate need. The 
daily "Mirror" and "Union" have kindly published for us 
each month the lists of new books received, and these have 
been greatly appreciated by the people. A copy of the last list 
is kept upon the bulletin board at the desk, and a scrap-book 
containing all the lists is often consulted by those who wish to 
see at a glance what books have been purchased during the past 
few months. 

Perhaps the most noteworthy achievement of the year has been 
the publication of the fiction catalogue, — a complete list of all 
English prose fiction contained in the library to December i, 
1894. The committee appointed by the trustees to consider the 
advisability of printing the catalogue which had been in course 
of preparation during the past few years, met early in the year, 
and decided that since the compilation proved to be not entirely 
satisfactory, it would be best to delay still longer the printing of 
a complete catalogue, and to publish as soon as possible a fiction 
list, which was much needed. This was prepared during the 
year, and was ready for the public December 27. 

A new card catalogue is being gradually made. Each book in 
the library will be recatalogued, the new cards being inserted in 
the drawers and the old ones withdrawn, without causing any 
confusion to the consulter. When this is finished the library 
will possess a carefully prepared dictionary catalogue, which may 
be printed at any time the trustees so direct. 

Simultaneously with the cataloguing another important work 
is being carried on, — that of classifying, or rearranging the books 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 477 

upon the shelves. The placing together of books treating of the 
same subject is of the greatest aid to people using the library as 
well as to the librarian and assistants. To quote the words of 
Mr. Cutter : "If the library tries to supply, not merely entertain- 
ment, but instruction ; if the librarian gives out, not merely 
books over a counter, but advice in reading and assistance in 
investigation, he must have his library so arranged that he can 
lay his hand on his materials at once. It is not enough that, with 
the aid of the catalogue, he can get any one book, but he must 
know where to go for each subject ; he must (so far as possible) 
find there whatever the library has on that subject. And he 
wants to do this quickly. When inquiries are pouring in upon 
him he must not be obliged to waste time in searching. The 
quicker he can get together the books that will answer one ques- 
tion, the quicker he can turn to the next applicant." With the 
rapid growth of the library the old S3'stem of shelving has become 
unwieldy and inadequate to our needs. The system now being 
put into operation is the Cutter Expansive Classification. The 
books relating to one subject are shelved together, arranged 
alphabetically by the authors' names. The numbers given to 
them are permanent, and would require no change were the en- 
tire library to be moved to another building ; they serve to keep 
the books in their proper order on the shelves; and to keep the 
record of the books in circulation. They admit of infinite inter- 
polation, new books added to the library falling naturally into 
their places in the classes to which they belong. All English 
fiction has been changed to the new system, and biography is 
nearly finished. The assistants in the issue department find the 
method very helpful and time-saving. The classifying and cata- 
loguing are being done with no withdrawal of books from circu- 
lation, and with no inconvenience to the users of the library. 
That this work will require two or three years for completion, 
can be readily understood by one who considers for a moment 
the magnitude of the labor involved ; but that the time is well 
spent will be proved by the greater facilities for serving our read- 
ers with quickness and thoroughness. 



478 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Preparations are made for trying the experiment of issuing to 
teachers in the public schools an extra number of books for the 
use of the pupils. Believing it to be the function of the public 
library not only to provide books for those who have already a 
taste for reading, but also to create and nourish such taste, the 
library aims to begin at the fountain head by interesting the chil- 
dren in good books. This can best be done with the co-opera- 
tion of the teachers. The plan as at present outlined is to per- 
mit the teachers in the grammar grades to take out six books 
at one time, to be retained one month. These will be usually 
of such character as to aid the teacher, supplementing the school 
text-books in such studies as science, geography, history, and 
literature. The board of education has purchased for each gram- 
mar school in the city a copy of Sargent's "Reading for the 
Young," an excellent classified and annotated list of books 
adapted to youthful readers. In each copy have been written 
the call-numbers of those books which are contained in the 
library ; thus the teachers will be enabled to send for the 
books they wish to use without the necessity of coming to the 
library to consult the catalogue. If the scheme works well it 
may be extended to the lower grades. So great has been the 
success achieved in other cities where efforts have been made to 
bring into closer relation the public library and the public schools, 
that we are justified in looking for good results from our first 
attempts here. 

In closing this record of my first year's work, I desire to ex- 
press my appreciation of the ready courtesy with which the trus- 
tees have assented to the several changes I have wished to make, 
and to note my satisfaction in the quality of the work done by 
my assistants, without whose faithful and efficient service the 
results of the year could not have been attained. 
Respectfully submitted. 

KATE E. SANBORN, 

Librarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY. 



Aguilar Free Library, New York City 
Amherst College Library . 
Ankarloo, Mrs. John P. 

Bell, Mrs. J. J 

Bigelow Free Public Library, Clinton, Mass. 

Birmingham, Eng. — Free Libraries Committee 

Boston, Mass. — Public Library . 

Boylston, Edward D. . 

Bridgeport, Conn. — Public Library 

Brookline, Mass. — Public Library 

Brooklyn, N. Y. — Brooklyn Library 

Carvelle, Dr. H. D. W. . 

Chandler, William E. 

Chicago, 111. — Public Library . 

Chicago, University of 

Christophe, Miss 

Cincinnati, Ohio. — Public Library 

Clarke, The John B. Co. . 

Cleaves, George P. . . . 

Clough, Albert L. . . . 

Cobden Club .... 

Concord, N. H. — Public Library 

Daniels, Miss Isabelle R. . 

Detroit, Mich. — Public Library . 

Dodge, J. E,, City Auditor 

Dodge, Thomas E. . 

Dover, N. H. — Public Library . 



Books. Pamph's 
I 



480 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Ewing, T. . 

Fall River, Mass. — Public Library . 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt. 

Gould, S. C 

Grand Rapids, Mich. — Public Library 
Hapgood, Warren ..... 

Harvard University ..... 

Helena, Montana. — Public Library . 
Holland, Denis A. .... . 

Home Market Club, Boston 

Huse, I. . . . . . . 

Indian Rights Association 

Indiana. — Department of Statistics . 

Jones, Edwin F. . . . . . 

Kidder, N. P., City Clerk 

Lawrence, Mass. — Public Library 

Lenox Library, New York City 

Leyton, Eng. — Public Library . 

Livermore, C. W. . 

Lynn, Mass. — Public Library . 

Maimonides Library, New York City 

Maiden, Mass. — Public Library 

Manchester, Eng. — Public Free Libraries . 

Manchester, N. H. — Chief Engineer Fire Depart 

ment ....... 

Manchester, N. H. — Mayor's Office . 
Massachusetts. — Bureau of Statistics of Labor 
Melrose, Mass. — Public Library 
Minneapolis, Minn. — Public Library 
Morse Institute, Natick, Mass. . 

Nashua, N. H 

Nashua, N. H. — Public Library 

New England Conference Educational Workers 

New Hampshire. — Department Public Instruction 

" " Insurance Commission . 

" " Railroad Commission 



Books. Pamph's 
2 
I 
I 

I 

3 



15 

I 
2 



13 



30 
2 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 481 



New Hampshire. — Secretary of State . 
" " .State Board of Health . 

New Haven, Conn. — Free Public Library . 

New Jersey. — State Library 

Newton, Mass. — Public Library . 

Nickerson, S. D. 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. 

Philadelphia, Pa. — Apprentices' Library . 
" " Free Library 

" " Friends' Library . 

" " Library Company 

Providence, R. I. — Public Library . 

Pullman Palace Car Co. .... 

Ramsay, Rev. W. H. . 

St. Louis, Mo. — Mercantile Library Association 

Salem, Mass. — Public Library . 

San Francisco, Cal. — Mercantile Library Associ 
ation ....... 

Scranton, Pa. — Public Library . 

Southampton, Eng. — Library Committee . 

Spofford, C. B. . 

United States. — Agricultural Department . 
" " Bureau of American Republics 

" " Bureau of Education 

" " Civil Service Commission 

" " Fish Commission 

" " Interior Department 

" " Labor Department . 

*' Senate .... 

" " Smithsonian Institution 

" " State Department 

" " Treasury Department 

" " War Department 

Webster, Prentiss ..... 

Woburn, Mass. — Public Library 

Worcester, Mass. — Public Library 

31 



Books. Pamph's 

9 I 

I 



I 

3 
134 

2 



3 

355 
5 
4 



71 

3 

7 
2 

3 

7 

I 
I 



482 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Periodicals Presented by the Publisliers. 

Advertiser, Manchester. 

Catholic Recorder, Manchester. 

Echo (High School), Manchester. 

Emerald, Manchester. 

Le Rdveil, Manchester. 

Massabesic Gem, Manchester. 

Notes and Queries, Manchester. 

Telegram, Manchester. 

Union, Manchester. 

Home Market Bulletin, Boston, Mass. 

Jersey City Library Record. 

Manifesto, Canterbury, N, H. 

Official Gazette of the Patent Office, U. S. Government. 

Plymouth Record, Plymouth, N. H. 

Springfield Library Bulletin. 

Travellers' Record, Hartford, Conn. 

Veterans' Advocate, Concord, N. H. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, ETC. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL 

LAMPS. 



Electric Lights in Use. 

No. I. Cypress and Massabesic, arm. 

2. Massabesic-street watering-trough, pole. 

3. Park and Beacon, arm. 

4. Central and Hall, 

5. Lake avenue and Massabesic, 

6. Wilson and Laurel, 

7. Merrimack and Hall, 

8. Manchester and Hall, 

9. Manchester and Wilson, 
ID. Hanover and Ashland, 

11. Hanover and Hall, 

12. Hanover and Beacon, 

13. Concord and Ashland, 

14. Bridge and Hall, » 

15. Myrtle and Russell, 
91. Pearl and Linden, 

17. Pearl and Russell, 

18. Bridge and Nashua, 

19. Nashua and High, 

20. Concord and Button, 

21. Amherst and Porter, 

22. Hanover and Lincoln, 

23. Manchester and Lincoln, 

24. Merrimack and Lincoln, 



486 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 25. Laurel and Lincoln, arm. 

26. Central and Lincoln, " 

27. Lake avenue and Lincoln, ** 

28. Spruce and Lincoln, " 
" 29. Spruce and Maple, " 

30. Lake avenue and Maple, *' 

31. Central and Maple, " 

32. Merrimack and Maple, " 

33. Manchester and Maple, " 

34. Hanover and Maple, " 

35. Amherst and Maple, " 
^6. Concord and Maple, " 

37. Lowell and Nashua, ** 

38. Bridge and Maple, " 

39. Myrtle and Maple, '* 

40. Orange and Ash, '* 

41. Harrison and Beech, '* 

42. Myrtle and Beech, " 

43. Pearl and Beech, " 

44. Bridge and Beech, *' 

45. Lowell and Ash, ** 

46. Amherst and Ash, ** 

47. Lowell and Beech, " 

48. Concord and Walnut, ** 

49. Amherst and Beech, ** 

50. Hanover and Beech, " 

51. Hanover square, pole. 

52. Manchester and Beech, arm. 

53. Merrimack and Beech, ** 

54. Laurel and Beech, " 

55. Central and Beech, ** 

56. Lake avenue and Beech, " 

57. Spruce and Beech, " 

58. Cedar and Union, " 

59. Lake avenue and Union, " 

60. Central and Union, " 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 487 

No. 6i. Laurel and Union, arm. 

62. Merrimack and Union, " 

6^. Manchester and Union, . '< 

64. Hanover and Union, " 

65. Amherst and Union, <« 

66. Concord and Union, <« 

67. Lowell and Walnut, " 

68. Lowell and Union, '< 

69. High and Union, " 

70. Bridge and Union, «« 

71. Bridge and Walnut, «< 

72. Orange and Union, << 

73. Prospect and Union, '< 

74. Brook and Union, <« 

75. Pennacook and Union, '« 

76. Webster and Pine, " 

77. North and Pine, pole. 

78. Sagamore and Pine, arm. 

79. Blodget and Pine, " 

80. Harrison and Hazel, " 

81. Prospect and Pine, " 

82. Myrtle and Pine, '< 

83. Orange and Pine, " 

84. Pearl and Pine, " 

85. Bridge and Pine, " 

86. Tremont square, ■ pole. 

87. Pine and High, arm. 

88. Lowell and Pine, " 

89. Concord and Pine, " 

90. Amherst and Pine, " 

91. Hanover and Pine, '< 

92. Manchester and Pine, " 

93. Merrimack and Pine, '< 

94. Laurel and Pine, " 

95. Central and Pine, " 

96. Lake avenue and Pine, " 



488 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 97. Cedar and Pine, arm. 

98. Auburn and Pine, *' 

99. Cedar and Chestnut, " 

[oo. Park square, pole. 

[oi. Lake avenue and Chestnut, arm. 

[02. Central and Chestnut, " 

[03. Merrimack square, ■ pole. 

[04. Merrimack and Chestnut, arm. 

[05. Manchester and Chestnut, " 

[06. Hanover and Chestnut, *' 

[07. Concord square, east, pole. 

[08. Concord square, west, " 

[09. Chestnut and Concord back, arm. 

:io. Chestnut and High, " 

;ii. Chestnut and Bridge, ' " 

:i2. Chestnut and Pearl, " 

13. Chestnut and Myrtle, <« 

:i4. Chestnut and Harrison, " 

15. Chestnut and Brook, " 

:i6. Pennacook and Chestnut, pole. 

ij. Salmon and Chestnut, " 

18. Webster and Chestnut, arm. 

ig. Clarke and Elm, *' 

:2o. Webster and Elm, " 

:2i. North and Elm, " 

:22. Salmon and Elm, " 

23. Pennacook and Elm, " 

:24. Brook and Elm, " 

:25. Harrison and Elm, " 

.26. Langdon, pole. 

:2 7. Dean and Elm, arm. 

:28. Prospect and Chestnut, . " 

:29. Orange and Elm, " 

[30. Kidder and Elm, " 

[31. Elm east back, on Pearl, " 

[32. Bridge and Elm, " 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 489 



No. 133. Washington and Church, • arm. 

134. Birch and Lowell, " 

135. Lowell and Elm, " 

136. Elm east back, between Lowell and Concord, " 

137. Water and Elm, '< 

138. Vine and Concord, '* 

139. Vine and Amherst, " 

140. Amherst and Elm, '< 

141. Spring and Elm west back, *•' 

142. Stark, " 

143. Market and Franklin, " 

144. Market and Elm, " 

145. Hanover and Elm east back, " 

146. Elm and Manchester, " 

147. Dean avenue and Elm west back, " 

148. Elm and Merrimack, " 

149. Merrimack and Franklin, " 

150. Middle, " 

151. Merrimack square, west, pole. 

152. Elm and Central, arm. 

153. Elm and Lake avenue, " 

154. Elm and Spruce, " 

155. Beech and Cedar, pole. 

156. Elm and Cedar, arm. 

157. Franklin and Granite, " 

158. Elm and Auburn, " 

159. Elm and Green, <' 

160. Elm and Valley, " 

161. Bakersville watering-trough, " 

162. Summer and State, pole. 

163. Granite and State, arm. 

164. Granite bridge, east, pole. 

165. Bedford and Granite, " 

166. Canal and Granite, " 

167. Depot and Canal, " 

168. Central, between Franklin and Canal, " 



490 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 169. Bedford and Central, arm. 

170. Canal and Merrimack, " 

171. Canal and Middle, " 

172. Canal and Stark, " 

173. Canal and Mechanic, " 

174. Canal and Spring, " 

175. Canal and Bridge, " 

176. McGregor bridge, east, pole. 

177. Canal and Hollis, " 

178. Canal and Dean, " 

179. Canal and Langdon, arm. 

180. River road and North, " 

181. Amoskeag bridge, east, ** 

182. Amoskeag bridge, west, " 

183. Amoskeag watering-trough, pole. 

184. Amoskeag brick store, " 

185. McGregor and Main, ** 

186. McGregor and Bridge, " 

187. McGregor bridge, west, ** 

188. Amory and Main, " 

189. Amory and Beauport, ** 

190. Wayne and Beauport, ** 

191. Marion and Main, *.* 

192. McGregor and Wayne, " 

193. McGregor and Putnam, arm. 

194. Sullivan and Main, pole. 

195. Beauport and Sullivan, " 

196. Main and Schuyler, " 

197. Wilton and Main, " 

198. Douglas and Main, arm. 

199. Douglas and Barr, " 

200. Granite and Green, " 

201. West and Granite, " 

202. Granite and Main, " 

203. Granite and Second, " 

204. Granite bridge, west, pole. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 491 

No. 205. School and Turner, arm. 

206. School and Third, " 

207. Second and Bath, pole. 

208. Ferry and Turner, arm. 

209. Ferry and Third, " 

210. Walker and Second, " 

211. Blaine and Third, " 

212. Clinton and Main, " 

213. Walker and Main, " 

214. Parker and West, " 

215. Winter and Parker, " 

216. Main and Mast, pole. 

217. Main and Milford, arm. 
2i8. Main and A, " 

219. Carroll and Milford, '' 

220. Old Mast road and Mast, " 

221. Hall and Amherst, " 

222. Laurel and Maple, " 

223. Central and Wilson, " 

224. Harrison and Pine, *' 

225. Massabesic and Belmont, pole. 

226. Union and Appleton, arm. 

227. Elm and railroad crossing, pole. 

228. Franklin and Pleasant, arm. 

229. Elm and Appleton, " 

230. Milford and Riddle, " " 

231. Nutt road and Portsmouth railroad, pole. 

232. Lake avenue and Canton, " 

233. Laurel and Hall, arm. 

234. Beech and Brook, " 

235. Kidder and Boyden, pole. 

236. Myrtle and Walnut, arm. 

237. Bridge and Linden, " 

238. Lowell and Ashland, " 

239. Lowell and Belmont, " 

240. Pearl and Union, " 



492 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 



241. 


Salmon and Union, 


pole 


242. 


Water, 


arm. 


243- 


Arlington and Ashland, 


cc 


244. 


Orange and Oak, 


(( 


245- 


Prospect and Oak, 


11 


246. 


Arlington and Russell, 


(( 


247. 


Gore and Walnut, 


CI 


248. 


Laurel and Milton, 


t( 


249. 


Massabesic — Hospital, 


pole. 


250. 


Lake avenue and Wilson, 


arm. 


251. 


Bridge and Ash, 


cc 


252. 


Hanover and Highland, 


pole. 


253- 


Franklin and Depot, 


arm. 


254. 


Spruce and Union, 


(( 


255- 


East High and Malvern, 


(( 


256. 


Beech and Auburn, 


pole. 


257- 


Kidder and Whitney, 


(( 


258. 


Valley and Jewett, 


'C 


259- 


Concord and Derry, 


K 


260. 


Auburn and Union, 


(C 


261. 


Harrison and Walnut, 


arm. 


262. 


West Hancock and Second, 


pole, 


263. 


Douglas and West, 


(( 


264. 


Hooksett road, Amoskeag, 


(( 


265. 


Prospect and Ash, 


arm, 


266. 


Salmon and Canal, 


pole. 


267. 


Harrison and Russell, 


(( 


268. 


Gates and Dubuque, 


(C 


269. 


Parker and Elm, 


(( 


270. 


Auburn and Maple, 


(( 


271. 


Salmon and Pine, 


ec 


272. 


Appleton and Adams, 


cc 


2 73- 


Clark and River road. 


arm 


274. 


Amoskeag eddy, south. 


pole 


275- 


Elm east back, between Spruce and Cedar, 


cc 


276. 


Cass and Lake avenue, 


cc 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 493 



No. 



277. 


Riddle and Mast, 


pole. 


27S. 


Brown avenue and Baker, 


arm. 


279. 


Brown avenue and Hancock, 


pole. 


280. 


Clark and Union, 


arm. 


281. 


Prospect and Linden, 


pole. 


282. 


Brook and Maple, 


(( 


283. 


Brook and Hazel, 


u 


284. 


Webster and Walnut^ 


(( 


285. 


Chestnut and Ray brook, 


u 


286. 


Webster and River road, 


a 


287. 


Market and Canal, 


arm. 


288. 


Concord and Beech, 


a 


289. 


Pearl and Morrison, 


pole. 


290. 


Concord and Hall, 


arm. 


291. 


Merrimack and Belmont, 


u 


292. 


Spruce and Beacon, 


(C 


293- 


Belmont and Grove, 


(C 


294. 


Bowman, 


(( 


295- 


Amory and Rimmon, 


pole. 


296. 


Manchester and Milton, 


(( 


297. 


Valley and Pine, 


(( 


298. 


Mammoth and Candia roads, 


i( 


299. 


Cypress and Hayward, 


a 


300. 


Conant and Rimmon, 


u 


301. 


Cartier and Kelley, 


i( 


302. 


Monmouth and McGregor back. 


u 


303- 


Calef road and Welch avenue. 


([ 


304- 


Valley and Taylor, 


arm. 


305- 


Pine and Brook, 


(C 


306. 


Conant and Beauport, 


u 


307- 


Douglas and North Weare Railroad, 


pole. 


308. 


Orange and Hall, 


a 


309- 


Wayne and Dubuque, 


arm. 


310. 


Putnam and Cartier, 


u 


311- 


Hall road and Lake avenue, 


pole. 


312. 


Walker and Fourth, 


arm. 



494 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 



313- 


Winter, near Main, 


arm, 


314- 


Walker and Turner, 


pole. 


315- 


Ainsworth avenue and Young street, 


arm. 


316. 


Valley and Belmont, 


a 


317- 


Pine and Grove, 


(( 


318. 


Blaine and Second, 


(( 


319- 


Amory and Morgan, 


u 


320. 


Amory and Alsace, 


(f 


321. 


East High and South, 


(( 


322. 


Blaine and Main, 


u 


323- 


Dover and Clinton, 


l( 


324- 


Elm back street on Blodget, 


(( 


325- 


B and C, 


pole, 


326. 


Milford and Bismarck, 


u 


327- 


Merrimack and Wilson, 


arm. 


328. 


Pennacook and Canal, 


pole. 


329- 


Adams and Cartier, 


ii 


330- 


Amherst and Ashland, 


arm. 


331- 


Putnam and Bartlett, 


pole, 


332. 


Auburn and Chestnut, 


arm. 


333- 


Laurel avenue and Laurel, 


u 


334- 


Hanover and Belmont, 


(( 


335- 


Lowell and Malvern, 


i( 


336- 


Adams and Wilson, 


l( 


337- 


Lincoln and Silver, 


a 


338. 


Somerville and Jewett, 


11 


339- 


Elm and Ray brook, 


11 


340- 


Amory and Bartlett, 


C( 


341- 


West Hancock and Dartmouth, 


(C 


342. 


Monroe and River road, 


(( 


343- 


Marion and McGregor, 


(( 


344- 


South Main and Harvell, 


(C 


345- 


South Main and Hancock, 


« 


346. 


Boynton, 


11 


347- 


Mast road and Forest, 


it 



348. North and Union, 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 495 

No. 349. Kelley and Rimmon, arm. 

350. Coolidge avenue, near Keliey, " 

351. Buzzell and East High, " 

352. Mechanic and Elm back, " 

353. Harrison and Maple, " 

354. North and Bay, " 

355. Front and Dunbarton, " 

356. Orange and Linden, " 

357. Myrtle near Belmont, " 

358. Taylor and Young road, " 

359. Nutt road and Auger avenue, " 

360. Union and Grove, " 

361. Kelley and Alsace, " 

362. Main and Wayne, " 

363. East Spruce and Barry avenue, " 

364. Lowell and Hall, " 



Gas Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Chestnut. 

Clarke and River road. 

Appleton, west end. 

Salmon, between Elm and Canal. 

Canal, near paper-mill. 

Blodget and Chestnut. 

Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut. 

Myrtle, between Elm and Chestnut 

Orange and Chestnut. 

Orange, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Bridge, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Pearl and Walnut. 

Orange and Walnut. 

Orange and Beech. 

Pearl and Maple. 

Arlington and Maple. 

East High and Maple. 



496 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Lowell and South. 

Lowell and Jane. 

Concord and Belmont. 

Amherst and Belmont. 

Amherst and Beacon. 

Lowell and Beacon, 

East High and Belmont. 

Harrison and Oak. 

Harrison and Ash. 

Belmont and Central. 

Maple and Cedar. 

Willow and Merrill. 

Two lights on South Elm. 

Auburn and Franklin. 

Three lights on State. 

River, near Turner Hall. 

Milford and Bowman. 

Milford and B. 

River and Douglas. 

Mast and Bowman. 

Dover and Clinton. 

Dover and Granite. 

Two lights on Hancock, west of River road. 

Dover and Douglas. 

Douglas, half way between Main and River streets. 

Two lights on Pleasant between Franklin and Canal. 

Two lights on Mechanic. 

Spring. 

Manchester and Belmont. 

Hanover and Milton. 

One light on River road, corner Shasta. 



Oil Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Adams. 
Concord and Beacon. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 497 

East High and Hall. 

Pearl and Linden. 

Canal, near Amoskeag bridge. 

Merrimack and Beacon. 

Hanover and Mammoth road. 

Lake avenue and Hall road. 

Elm and Shasta. 

Elm and Baker. 

One light on Baker. 

Douglas and West. 

Douglas and Quincy. 

Granite and Quincy. 

Mast road and Riddle. 

Carroll. 

Bowman. 

A and B streets. 

Light near the Huntress gardens. 

Mammoth road and Cohas avenue. 

" " and Island Pond road. 
" " and Cilley. 
" " and Young. 
Massabesic and Hall road. 
Massabesic and Taylor. 
Belmont and Green. 
Valley and Taylor. 
Valley and Cypress. 
Cypress and Prout avenue. 
Jewett and Young. 
Young and Taylor. 

Three lights on River road, south of Blue store. 
Ten lights in Gofife's Falls. 
Three lights in Youngsville. 
One light on Candia road, near Noah Reed's. 
One light on Candia road, near Walter Cody's house. 
One light at junction of Lake avenue and Hanover. 
One light on Island Pond road, Mill-Dam House. 

32 



498 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



One 1 
One 1 
One 1 
One 1 
One 1 
One 1 
Onel 
One 1 
One 1 
Onel 
One 1 
One 1 
One 1 
One 1 
Onel 
Onel 
One 1 



ght at junction Ainsworth avenue and Young road. 

ght at junction Ainsworth avenue and Young street. 

ght on Taylor, near Byron Stearns's house. 

ght on Taylor, near Gilmore's house. 

ght on Valley, near Eastman's store. 

ght on Candia road, at P. Rogers's. 

ght on Candia road, at Dan Cronin's. 

ght on Candia road, at G. Bean's. 

ght on Candia road, at C. Francis's. 

ght on Candia road, at S. Mead's. 

ght on Candia road, at Claflin's. 

ght on Hanover, at Sam Page's. 

ght at junction of Hanover and Page. 

ght at Brown's. 

ght at junction of Hanover and Proctor. 

ght at junction of Hanover and Candia road. 

ght at junction of Proctor and Candia roads. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF CITY AUDITOR. 



To the City Councils: 

Gentlemen, — The Auditor herewith submits ' to your honor- 
able body his annual report. 

WORK OF THE OFFICE. 

There have been made during the year the usual examinations 
of the treasurer's accounts, examinations of the city clerk's ac- 
counts, annual examination and settlement with the tax col- 
lector, annual examination of water-works 'accounts, annual ex- 
amination of accounts of superintendents of Pine Grove and 
Valley cemeteries and of the treasurer of the cemeteries, annual 
examination of the accounts of the superintendent of the city 
farm, monthly examination of the accounts of the weigher at 
the city scales, quarterly examinations of the accounts of city 
marshal, semi-annual examination of the account of the clerk of 
the police court, annual examination of the accounts of the 
superintendent of public instruction ; completed the annual ex- 
aminations of accounts for the year 1893 for the late auditor, 
and compiled and superintended the publication of the annual 
report for the same year. 

Six thousand four hundred six bills against the city have been 
examined and certified as correct. All the pay-rolls for the 
street and park commission, for the schools, for the fire depart- 
ment, the water-works, the police department, the cemeteries, 
and the city officials have been examined and certified to. 

Twelve monthly drafts, amounting in the aggregate to $1,329,- 
683.19, have been drawn on the city treasury. 



502 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Accounts have been kept with all the appropriations, with the 
treasurer, and the tax collector. 

A large number of circulars concerning the city's debt and 
bonds were sent to bankers and brokers, besides the general 
correspondence of the office, and reports, orders, and resolutions 
typewritten for various joint standing committees. 

At the request of the joint standing committee on finance, 
the auditor has procured the printing of the bonds sold during 
the year and furnished certified copies of orders, resolutions, and 
laws showing the legality of the issue of said bonds to the bank- 
ers, brokers, and firms bidding for the purchase of the same. 

EXPENDITURES. 

The amount of the appropriation for auditor's de- 
partment was ....... ^2,000.00 

Expended for salary of auditor, James B. 

Straw $83.33 

Expended for salary of auditor, James E. 

Dodge 927-77 

Expended for salary of clerks . . . 621.15 

Expended for supplies .... 135-81 

Balance 231.94 



The auditor returns his thanks to Mayors Knowlton, Varney, 
and Worthen, the city councils, the committee on accounts, and 
the heads of departments for their uniform courtesy and kind- 
ness. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT OF CITY TREASURER. 



To improvement bonds 

premium on improvement bonds 



Dr. 

^100,000.00 
5,170.00 



REPORT OF CITY TREASURER. 



503 



To accrued interest from June i 
security bonds 
water bonds . 
premium on water bonds 
accrued interest 
temporary loan 
premium on temporary loan 
city hall, rents 
M. J. Healy, police department 
J. C. Bickford, police department . 
water-works, receipts .... 

B. A. Stearns, Pine Grove cemetery, receipts 
S. B. Putnam, treasurer, lots sold . 

C. H. G. Foss, Valley cemetery, receipts 
board of paupers off the farm . 

E. G. Libbey, city farm .... 

milk licenses ...... 

city scales, receipts .... 

cemetery fund, bonds sold 

William E. Buck, tuition 

William E. Buck, free text-books sold 

rent of tenements ..... 

show licenses ...... 

sewer licenses ...... 

town of Walpole, paupers off the farm . 

A. C. Wallace, Second-street bridge, overdraft 

S. Levanson, peddler's license 

Solomon Levenstain, peddler's license 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, bounty on 

hawks, 1893 ..... 

N. P. Kidder, billiard table licenses, 1893 
Security Live Stock Insurance Co., loss o 

horse, "Stub" 

Maurice Custen, peddler's license . 

C. R. Crossett, incidental expenses, overdraft 

J. Schwartz, peddler's license 



$77-78 

100,000.00 

50,000.00 

2,395.00 

22.22 

250,000.00 

11.00 

2,072.50 

12,802.54 

2,294.84 

110,210.29 

2,396.97 

3)485.oi 

1,814.64 

3,252.70 

3,977.08: 

69.5a 

459.46 

5,000.00 

483-65 

229.79 

889.52 

583.00 

4,120.55 

7.00 

13.80 

20. OO' 

20.00 

2.50 
520.00 

100.00 
20. oo. 

•75 
20.0QJ 



604 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To P. Gravilon, fire department, dump-cart sold . $75-oo 

Herbert S. Clough, cost in Higgins suit . . 3.00 

Dunbar, land damage, overdraft . . 5.57 

A. N. Clapp, city teams, overdraft ... 3.75 

Ralph C. Mitchell^ fire department, overdraft 9.00 
H. E. Loveren, attorney, labor done on 

Knowles property . . . . . 33-37 

M. Rosenblum, peddler's license . . . 20.00 

J. G. Jones, contingent expenses, overdraft . .42 

Charles S. Bailey, peddler's license . . 20.00 

S. Harrison, peddler's license . . . 20.00 
J. B. Varick, Derryfield park and commons, 

overdraft ....... 36.00 

Israel Saidel, peddler's license . . . 20.00 

Barrett Custen, peddler's license . . . 20.00 

M. Kortz, peddler's license .... 20.00 

Samuel Lishtensztain, peddler's license . . 20.00 

Solon A. Carter, insurance tax ■ . . . 2,598.75 

" " railroad tax .... 28,301.40 

" " savings bank tax . . . 72,379.38 

" " literary fund . . . 7,252.97 

" " bounty on hawks . . . 1.50 

Bernard Taffe, peddler's license . . . 20.00 

C. F. Garland, city officers' salaries, overdraft 5.00 

street and park commissioners, money received 

from sundry persons . . . . . 158.32 

George E, Morrill, collector, redemption of 

land sold for taxes . . . . . 2,541.70 

N. P. Kidder, dog licenses . . . . 1,721.29 

Security Live-Stock Insurance Co. . . . 200.00 

George E. Morrill, interest on taxes . . 954-36 

" " taxes for the year 1890 . 5.73 

" " " " 1S91 . 103.35 

" " " " 1892 . 412.67 

• " " 1893 . 43-668.13 

" " " " 1894 . 466,447.79 

Total receipts . ..... ^1,289,620.63 



REPORT OF CITY TREASURER. 



Cash on hand January i, 1894 
Unpaid bills January i, 1895 



505 

$i5o>573-75 
45)524-40 









$1,485,718.78 








Cr. 


By unpaid bills 


January 


I, 1894 


l33i798-29 


January draft, 1894, No. i 


$72,614.38 


February 


11 a 


2 


41,229.06 


March 




3 


52,671.96 


April 




4 


61,983.24 


May 




5 


77>955-o9 


June 




6 


92,359-04 


July 




7 • 


112,741.24 


August 




8 


86,378.95 


September 




9 


68,431.86 


October 




10 


69,149.29 


November 




II 


49,946.71 


December 


ifts 


12 


544,222.37 


Total dr 


• $1,329,683.19 


Total drafts and unpaid bi 


lis . . . $1,363,481.48 


Cash on hand January i, 


1895 


122,237.30 



$1,485, 7r8.78 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Ci/y Treasurer. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester., N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — I have examined the accounts of Sylvanus B. 
Putnam, city treasurer, for the year ending December 31, 1894, 
and find proper vouchers for all payments, and all receipts duly 
accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January i, 1894, was . . $116,775.46 

Receipts during the year . . . . . 1,289,620.63 

Total ....... $1,406,396.09 



506 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Amount of drafts during the year . . .^1,329,683.19 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1894 . . . 76,712.90 



Total ....... ^1,406,396.09 

The cash balance taken December 31, 1894, I find to be as 



follows : 

Deposited in Suffolk National Bank 
Second National Bank 



$16,675.00 

67,S93-S9 

National Bank of the Commonwealth 2,344.68 

office safe ..... 351623.73 

$122,237.30 
45»5 24-40 

$76,712.90 



Gross amount of cash on hand . 
Deduct amount of bills unpaid . 



Net cash on hand December 31, 1894 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDI- 
TURES OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER 
FOR THE YEAR 1894. 

Receipts. 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 



Received from : 
Direct city taxes . 
Cost and interest on taxes . 

Licenses to enter sewer 
Licenses to keep dog . 
Licenses to sell milk 
Licenses to keep billiard table 



$510,637.67 


1,930.82 


^4,120.55 


1,721.29 


69.50 


520.00 



; 1 2,568.49 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 5 07 

Licenses to shows and exhibitions ^583.00 

Licenses to peddle . . . 240.00 



S7'254-34 
Rents ...... . . 2,962.02 



122,784.85 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Received from : 

City scales ..... ^459.46 

Miscellaneous sources . . . 347-9S 



507.44 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Received from text-books and tuition . . ^713.44 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Received from court lines and costs . . . $15,097.38 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Received from : 

Pine Grove cemetery . . . $5,881.98 
Valley cemetery .... 1,814.64 

$7,696.62 

WATER-WORKS. 

Gross receipts . .... . . $110,210.29 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Received from : 

City farm ..... $3,977-o8 
Hillsborough county, boarding pau- 
pers and Industrial School in- 
mates ..... 3,259.70 

$7,236.78 



508 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 
MISCELLANEOUS. 



Received from : 

Premium on water bonds sold . ^2,395.00 
Premium on improvement bonds 

sold ..... 5,170.00 

Land redeemed from tax sale . 1,565.24 

Other miscellaneous sources . . 411.00 



,541-24 



Total ordinary receipts during the year 1894 ^674,088.04 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Received from loans in anticipation of tax of 1894 $250,000.00 

STATE. 



Received from : 
Insurance taxes . 
Railroad taxes 
Savings bank taxes 
Literary fund 



$2,598.75 
28,301.49 

72,379-38 

7,252.97 



^110,532.59 



BONDED DEBT. 



Received from : 

Improvement bonds sold 
Water bonds sold 
Cemetery bonds sold . 
Security bonds sold 



Gross receipts 
Net cash on hand . 



5100,000.00 

50,000.00 

5,000.00 

100,000.00 



- $255,000.00 

. $1,289,620.63 
116,775.46 

$1,406,396.09 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



509 



Expenditures. 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Paid interest on water bonds . . ^38,399.00 
interest on city bonds . . 16,815.00 
interest on cemetery bonds . 1,295.83 
interest on temporary loan, an- 
ticipation tax, 1894 . . 3,312.72 

Paid city hall ..... ^2,548.84 

printing and stationery . . 2,012.61 

incidental expenses . . . 24,065.75 

mayor's incidentals . . . 163.30 

city officers' salaries . . . 15)438.37 

city auditor's department . . 1,768.06 

sinking fund trustees . . 5,000.00 



,822.5s 



^50,996.93 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Paid Street and park commission 
repairs of highways 
incidental expenses 
new highways . 
land taken for highways 
watering streets 
paving streets . 
macadamizing streets 
grading for concrete 
scavenger service 
street sweeping 
lighting streets 
bridges . 
city teams 
repairs of sewers 
new sewers 



^3>783-65 

22,435-31 
549.82 

i9>892.35 
16,430.71 

3,984.08 
5,966.02 

i5>i65.99 
3,960.23 

14,880.56 
1,122.75 

41,223.92 
2,900.32 
6,998.40 
5,201.61 

52,970.91 



510 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid South Main-street bridge . . ^28,450.00 
snow and ice . . . . 55 335-°2 



engineer's department. 
Paid engineer's department 

health department. ^ 
Paid health department . ' . 

SCHOOL department. 



^251,251.65 
^5,016.72 
^3>468.93 



Paid repairs of schoolhouses 

fuel 

furniture and supplies 

books and stationery 

printing and advertising . 

contingent expenses 

care of rooms . 

evening schools 

teachers' salaries 

salaries school committee, clerk 

truant officer 
salary of superintendent . 
evening school of mechanical 

drawing 
free text-books 
manual training 



^4,964.67 

5,224.27 

873.21 

55-92 

312.08 

i,53o-4o 

4,449-15 

935-61 

63»i5i-o3 

1,025.00 
2,300.00 

442.40 
4,484.36 
1,447-54 



CITY LIBRARY. 



Paid city library 



FIRE department. 



Paid fire department 

fire-alarm telegraph 
hydrant service 



^53,539-72 

1,933-88 

13,925.00 



^91,195.64 

$4,283.31 



$69,398.60 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



511 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Paid police department 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



Paid repairs of buildings . 
ward-room, ward 5 . 
Pearl-street schoolhouse . 
new schoolhouse, ward 9 . 
new schoolhouse, Hallsville 
addition Webster-street school- 
house .... 
Fulton engine-house 
repairs, Vine-street hook-and 

ladder .... 
South Manchester hosehouse 



WATER-WORKS. 

Paid water-works 

water-works, sinking fund . 



15,085.04 
1,622.05 
2,666.20 

;7,oo2.99 
382.83 

6,270.13 

1,002.71 

445.00 
4,203.24 



^184,198.93 
13,925.00 



PUBLIC PLACES. 



Paid commons .... 
Stark and Derrylield parks 
Pine Grove cemetery 
Valley cemetery 
Amoskeag cemetery 



$48,680.19 



)i23.93 



5)158-73 
9'73o-93 

2,973.02 
154.24 

$21,520.38 



PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Paid paupers off the farm . . $9,866.88 
city farm ..... 8,486.35 
indigent soldiers . . . 292.00 
Women's Aid and Relief Hos- 
pital ..... 600.00 



512 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid free beds, Elliot Hospital . . ^600.00 

decoration of soldiers' graves . 350.00 

militia ..... 900.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital . . 600.00 

^21,695.23 

ABATEMENTS. 

Paid abatement of taxes .... . ;^4,9i8.76 

Total of ordinary municipal expenditures . $870,572.82 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Paid loan made in anticipation of tax for 1894 . $275,000.00 

BONDED DEBT. 

Paid city and water bonds . . . • . $54,600.00 

STATE AND COUNTY TAXES. 

Paid state tax $65,615.00 

county tax ... . 63,895.37 

$129,510.37 

Grand total.of expenditures during the year $1,329,683.19 

Cash on hand December 31, 1894 . $122,237.30 
Less unpaid bills .... 45,524.40 

Net cash on hand . .... 76,712.90 



$1,406,396.09 



Interest. 



Appropriation . . . . . ;?24,5oo.oo 

Transferred from water-works . . 38,399.00 

$62,899.00 







































RECEIPTS. 










January 1. 
Kalaiicfl 
ou band. 


Direct city 


Costs and 






LICENSES. 






aents. 


City farm. 


Hillsboro' 
county, 
board of 
paupers 
and Indus- 
trial soliool 
inmates. 


Land sold. 




Unclaimed 

bills 

covered 

into the 

treasury. 


Judg. 

covered. 


Land 
redeemed. 


Miscclln- 


Uridges. 


City ncales. 


Fire de- 
partment 


Street de- 
partment 

$2,700.69 
3,047.58 




YEAB. 


To enter 


To keep 
dog. 


To sell 
milk. 


To keep 
table. 


peddlers, 
exbibltions 


T 
1 


1890 

1891 

1S92 


$79,849.33 
79,552.02 
93,190.14 
96,477.18 

116.776.46 


$409,601.92 
391,652.45 
435,947.43 
425,538.75 
510,037.67 


$342.44 
411.96 
514.13 
628.33 
1,930.82 


$1,013.40 
2,103.50 
3,126.05 
1,700.00 
4,120.55 


$1,361.16 
2,155.58 
2,060.97 
1,874.79 
1,721.29 


$49.60 
66.50 
66.50 
112.00 
69.50 


$37.50 
315.00 
400.00 
60.00 
620.00 


$190.60 
169.00 
266.00 
157.50 
823.00 


$2,871.63 
2,887.29 
3,130.97 
2,696.23 
2,962.02 


$2,462.32 
1,783.72 
2,458.11 
2,927.06 
3,977.08 


$2,201.57 
1,789.10 
1,192.93 
1,612.36 
3,269.70 


$1,747.50 
1,926.96 
4,410.15 


$5,670.00 

2,178.00 
6,090.00 
7,676.00 


S678.95 


$2,600.00 
950.00 ; 


$374.60 

1,998.41 
1,664.24 


S383..S0 
961.74 
.575..'i2 
7511.19 
747.98 


fHUM 
4.46 


$487.46 
415.67 
621.12 
606.35 
459.46 


$4,699.47 
4.920.60 


i 


























1 











EXPENDITURES. 





,»TEnK.T. 


ss 


P 


1 

r 




1 


If 


i STEEET A»I, SEWEK DEfARTMEKT. 


vm. 


On water 
bond!. 


On city 
bonds. 


On 

cemetery 

bonds. 


On tempora- 
ry loan. 


S . 1 

a) a Street and 
.s| parkcom- 
o 2 mission. 


Repairs of 
snoi^aiuric; 


Now 
liigbwuys. 


rain^iuS. 


Land 
damages. 


Sprinkling. 


Paving. 


Macadnmiz. 
ing. 


Giading 
for 


Scavenger 


street 
sweeping. 


Llgbtiug 


Bridges, 
tunance. 


Second.street 

and South 

Main-street 

bridges. 


City 


1890. . 
1891.. 

mi.. 

1893.. 

1894.. 


»34,177.0D 
32,093.00 
31,069.00 
30,102.00 
88,399.00 


$15,771.00 
15,584.00 
16,929.00 
16,826.00 
16,816.00 


$667.60 

729.36 

926.48 

1,041.66 

1,295.83 


$11,820.82 
4.659.34 
3,772.14 
7,.573.22 
3.312.72 


$2,068.18 
2,.304.62 
2,239.62 
1,960.48 
2,012.61 


$17,380.91» 
16,639.62 
26,129.05 
20,638.99 
24,616..57 


$188.00 
234.46 
221.80 
144.90 
163.30 


$13,489.41t 
11,708.45 
14,124.18 
13,849.93 
16,438.37 


$2,741.79 
1,380.37 
2,193.60 
2,164.08 
2,548.84 


$1,699.61 
1,9.30.07 
1,954.60 
1.708.06 


$37,096.16 ! 

37,937.07 

40,406.28 

42,643.74 i 

40,200.00 $3,783.66 


$21,046 45 
22,850.29 
24,647.26 
25,804.30 
27,770.33§ 


$9,076.61 
14,448.09 
24,038.08 
17,149.71 
19,892.36 


$3,274.33 


88.58.16 
6,704.45 
11.601.73 
16,182.41 
16,430.71 


$7,693.00 
5,364,26 
4,652.29 
5,3,98.14 
3,984.08 


$6,633.76 
6,611,80 
7,640,11 
9,847,87 
6,966,02 


$20,926,62 
19,616.23 
16,083.83 
21,205.13 
15,106.09 


$6,089.86 
6,632.84 
5, .66 4, 90 
6,-440.90 
3,960,23 


$16,958.46 
18,892.25 
16,.5a6.3I 
19,000.88 
14,880.56 


$1,237.08 
1,198.31 
1 ,293.79 
1,430,76 
1,123,75 


$41,099,64 
42,908.78 
38,746.31 
40,517,97 
41,223,92 


$3,879.68 
2,672.25 
3,133.68 
4,463.73 
2,900.32 


$52,036.06 
28,460.44 


$5, 
6, 
6. 
9,' 
6,8 



■960^iftkoD from incidental oxjigiiscs iind cnrrieil to AmoHkcftgccmetory. 



1(1 superintcnUent taken from city officers' salaries and carried to school department. J Includoa coiistruotlon. 











































EXPENDITURES. -c 


,NT,NUED, 








„eedepah™ek.. 




WATEE-WOEKS, 


PtlELIOP^OE,. 


YEAB, 


in 
-1 


it 
E2 


I's 


il 


i 


11 


2g-5 


lii 
nil 


III 

n 


ill 

?2l 


ft 


■3S_ 

|||s 




1=1 
|l| 


|!ll 


1 


lltif 


|l 


1 


EAEES. 


Il 


3 


i 






Stark. 


Dei'iyfiold. 




1890 


141.409.53 
40,641.04 
42,262.88 
60,135.41 
63,639.72 


$1,686.43 
1,154,66 
1,269.62 
1,813.26 
1,933.88 


$18,080.00 
6.000.00 




$4,443,87 
2.456,96 
2,892.76 
6.850.74 
5.086.04 


$6,994.02 




















$33,403.69 
49,625.65 
49,945.35 
166,276,82 
184,198.93 




$4,214.03 
2,406.76 
3.726,64 
4,638.43 
3,603.06 


$8,060.76 




$5,017.54 
6,941..34 
6,840.97 
7,883.45 
7,730.93 


$620.29 
1,000.00 
2,000.00 


$2,789.86 
2.794.79 
2,982.85 
3,079.50 
2.973.02 




1891 


$768,32 
441,66 
500,00 




$6,138.80 


$20,769.25 

8.845.61 

3.796.84 

382.83 




















1892 








$2,000.00 


$870.00 
21.755.23 
1,002,71 


$2,490,00t 

100.00 

17,002.99 


$684.48 
4,203.24 














1893 


12,760.00 
13.926.00 


1.163.69 


$445.00 


2,676.00 
0,270.13 


$2,598.83 


,$8,879,06 
12,666.20 


$726,37 
1,622.05 


$12,760,00 
13,925.00 


4.0.54,28 1 1.162.86 




1894 










1.832.73 







• 180.35 taken from Uicldontal expenses and caiTlt 



) Amoskeag oemetery 



T Taken from 1: 



RECEIPTS. 



•38S.80 
951.71 

S7S.S2 

T.iii.r.i 



11484.09 t4S7.4f. 
41.'j.G7 
:)21.12 



600.: 



pnvtnioDt I purl 



*4,G0!I.47 ' $2,700.60 
4,1120,60 3.047.SS 



$428.76 
4,W.4o 
i7G.7G 
7.'i2.O0 
713.44 



I 



, . ruoulpta Ou 



$G,!l.'i'J.67 $4.42,1.37 «1 .300.00 

7,9G2.04 4,.593.77 L.'iOO.Od 

0,715.67 ' 4,708.68 l.SOO.OO 

i 
8,360.74 I 3,779.62 ' 2,000..16 

15,007.38 6,881.98 | 1,814.64 



$90,4G3.37 I $642,987.96 
7G,G05.23 ] 606.095.11 
83,474.70 558,073.68 



104,170.08 
110,210.29 



665,653.67 
674,088.04 



$100,000.00 
210,000.00 
160,000.00 



$102,000.00 $46,032.47 $3,762.25 $21,443.7: 



6,000.00 46,032.47 3,920.25 
101,160.00 61,076.56 4,109.26 



226,000.00 1 306.000.00 61,076.55 I 4,900.50 



22,059.03 
26,849.66 
26,743.06 



250,000.00 265,000.00 



2,598.76 28,301.49 



$68,392.94 
73,275.65 
78,101,94 
82,644.77 
72,370,38 



ftina. 



$4,504,70 
6,287.60 
6,010.88 
6,940.42 
7,252.07 



$347,026.08 
365,674.80 
426,388.27 
712,306.29 
615,632.89 



Gmiul tolal 



cuali on hand. 



$969,863.36 
961,221.93 
1,077,651.99 
1,374,336.14 
1,406,396.09 



EXPENDITURES. 



K,.*„™«,T. 


Englnoor'a 
UcpMvl- 


nonlth 
dopiirt- 


.CU0OLBKr*KTMB«T. 


CVUBK^HT. 


ngor 


street 
awoepInK. 

$1,237.08 
1,198.31 
1,293.70 
1,430.76 
1,122.75 


Llsliling 
atioeU. 

$41,090.64 
42,908.78 
38,746.31 
40,517.97 
41,223.92 


Bi-iases, 
tunanoo. 


Socon(l.i)treot 

tlnd SoiUll 

Mntn-stroot 

IjrIilKes. 


City tcainu. 


Uepali's of 

Bewei-a tind 

dniina. 


Now sowers. 


Eiinking 


Itepairs of 
sidiool. 
lioiisos. 


Pool. 


Fitrnlturo 

and 
supplioa. 


Books 
and sta. 
Uonory. 


I'l-iutlng 

mid ailvor. 

tising. 


Contin. 
gont ex. 
pcnsos. 


Care of 


Evening 
schools. 


Teachers' 


Salai'lQS ot 

school eom. 

and trnant 

ofltcor. 

$l,020.00t 
1,0.30.00 
1,030.00 
1,050.00 
1,026.00 


Salary of su- 
perintendent 
of schools. 


Evening 
schools, 
lueohanloal 
drawing. 


Free text- 
books. 


Manual 
training. 


Malnle- 


Books. 


D8.-1C 
92.25 
56.31 
00.88 
80.5G 


$3,879.68 
2,672.25 
3,133.68 
4,453.73 
2,900.32 


$52,030.06 
28,460.44 


$6,240.10 
5,290.73 
0,120.08 
9,733.48 
6,908.40 


$39,297.97t 
66.400.73t 
30,724.06t 
8,294.16 
6,201.01 


$43,097,80 
62,970,91 


$5,000.00 
5,000.09 


$3,221.89 
3,499.90 
4,160.61 
6,048.84 
6,01G.72 


$1,657.38 
1,964.00 
2,424.01 
3,263.13 
3,468.93 


$4,119.70 
4,044.86 
4,996.01 
5,263.08 
4,964.07 


$3,703.32 
4,073.64 
4,297.40 
6,180.15 
5,224.27 


$576.16 
746.4G 
806.77 
026.27 
873.21 


$141.35 
62.60 
299.73 
71.93 
.56.92 


$389.06 
396.10 
333.75 
411.80 
312.08 


$830.10 
931.92 
1,299,99 
2,137.21 
1,. 530.40 


$3,376.76 
3,715.76 
4,050.77 
4,136.69 
4,449.16 


$1,264.81 

1,064.53 

973.93 

1,267.20 

935.01 


$45,404.87 
49,398..52 
54,660.30 
,'59,437.05 
03,161.03 


$2,000.00t 
2,000.00 
2,000.00 
2,160.00 
2,300.00 


$694.89 
662.71 
406.15 
632.37 
442.40 


$9,005.11 
3,210.73 
3,489.31 
4,456.68 
4,484.36 


$1,091.66 
1,447.64 


$3,239.88 
3,626.73 
3,868.44 
4,149.62 
3,283.31 


$1,000.00 
1.000.00 
1,000.00 
1.000.00 
1.000.00 



EXPENDITURES.-coNTiNtraD. 



ritBLtCPLAOB,. 1 CAmTV, P.™OT„>,, ..,„t..NT„..OfV. 


Tax ubatc- 


Total of ordi- 
nary niuulelpal 
expenditures. 


Funded deljt. 


Temporary 


Statetax. 


County tax. 


Total of loon 

debt and 

state and ooun- 

tj' tax ex. 

pendlture. 


Grand total of 
expenditures. 




PABtU,. 


I 


1 


ll 


II 


1 


.|ls |5 


g 
S 


Indigent 
soldiers. 

Decoration 
of soldiers' 
graves. 


3 


C<KK 


III 


111 


III 


Cash on 
haml. 


Stark. 


Deri-yflold. 




$8,060.76 


$5,017.54 
6,041,34 
6,840.07 
7.883.45 
7,730.93 


$620.29 
1,000,00 
2,000.00 


$2,789.86 
2,794.79 
2.982.85 
3,079..W 
2.973.02 


$620.00 
295.22 


$G0,3.i» 

178.09 
602.97 
154.24 


1 $4,330.46 

4,928.24 

$09.36 , 5,726.94 
; 7,545.03 

1 9,866.88 

1 


$7,467.30 
6,612.89 
8,2.i9 17 
9,023.37 
8,486.36 


$737.82 
906.40 
201.40 
24G.26 
292.00 


$374.27 
3.')3..54 
321.76 
342.08 
360.00 


$876.00 
900.00 
900.00 
000.00 


$400.00 
400.00 
600.00 
000.00 
000.00 


$600.00 
000.00 

ooo.oo 

600.00 
000.00 




$500.00 


$2,090.39 
2,567.24 
2,794.53 
3,146.10 
4,918.70 


$580,943.87 
568,464.32 
674,683.26 
866,400.13 
870,672.82 


$'.■0,900.00 

100.00 

99,900.00 

65.400.00 

54,000.00 


$100,000.00 
180.000.00 
180.000.00 
200.000.00 
275.000.00 


$03,436.00 
63,438.00 
65,616.00 
66,616.00 
66,615.00 


$46,032.47 
46,032.47 
61,076.55 
61,076.66 
63,896.37 


$309,307.47 
289,567.47 
406,691.65 
392,091.65 
459.110.37 


$890,311.34 

868,031.79 

981,174.81 

1,267,660.68 

1,329.683.19 


$79,652.02 


.371.81 




$200.00 
600.00 


93.190.14 


1.500.26 
4.0.')4.28 
1,832.73 


500.05 
1,162.86 
3.326.00 


96,477.18 
116.775.46 
76.712.90 



.Tror.of? 



fO«l 



PAYMENT OF FUNDED DEBT. 513 



Expenditures. 



Paid Brewster, Cobb & Estabrook, 

discount on one note, tempo- 
rary loan, of ^50,000, six 

months ten days, at 2^ per 

cent 1659.75 

R. L. Day & Co., discount on 

one note of ^50,000, two 

months, at 2 5-8 per cent . 218.75 

A. J. Lane Co., discount on two 

notes of $25,000 each, four 

months ten days, at 2^^ per 
" cent . . . . . 451-40 

Second National Bank, discount 

on one note of $100,000, eight 

months three days, at 2 15-16 

per cent .... 1,982.82 

coupons on water bonds . . 38.399.00 

coupons on improvement bonds 3,960.00 
coupons on city bonds . •. 11,605.00 
coupons on security bonds . 1,250.00 

coupons on cemetery bonds . 1,295.83 



Total expenditures . . $59,822.55 

Transferred to reserved fund . . 3,076.45 



Payment of Funded Debt. 

Balance from old account . . $4,600.00 

Amount provided by resolution, Jan- 
uary 26, 1894 .... 50,000.00 



Expenditures. 

Paid city bonds, issued Oct. 31, 1863, and 

payable Oct. 31, 1893 . . $4,500.00 
33 



)2,899.oo 



$54,600.00 



514 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid water bond, issued Jan i, 1872, 

and payable Jan. i, 1892 . $100.00 

city bonds, issued July i, 1864, 

and payable July i, 1894 . 50,000.00 



Sinking Fund. 




Appropriation ..... 




Expenditures. 




Paid treasurer of sinking fund. 




Reserved Fund 




Appropriation . . . . . $: 


20,000.00 


Premium on improvement bonds (Res- 




olution June 5, 1894) . 


2,370.00 


Transferred from the following accounts : 




Interest ..... 


.35076-45 


City hall 


151. 16 


Mayor's incidentals 


136.70 


Auditor's department . 


231.94 


Repairs of highways 


70.94 


Watering streets .... 


15.92 


Paving streets .... 


33-98 


Grading for concrete 


39-77 


Scavenger service .... 


1,119.44 


Street sweeping .... 


77-25 


Lighting streets .... 


1,776.08 


Bridges ..... 


99.68 


Repairs of sewers .... 


798.39 


Health department 


31.07 


Fuel 


275-73 


Books and stationery . 


144.08 


Printing and advertising 


37-92 



$54,600.00 



;,ooo.oo 



5,000.00 



RESERVED FUND. 515 



Contingent expenses 


^69.60 


Evening schools .... 


264.39 


Evening school, mechanical draw- 




ing 


107.60 


Free text-books .... 


15.64 


Manual training .... 


52.46 


Police department 


200.00 


Addition Webster-street schoolhouse 


152.16 


Valley cemetery .... 


26.98 


Free cash in treasury not otherwise 




appropriated .... 


38'304-97 


Expenditures. 





By transfers to the following accounts : 
Repairs Vine-street Hook-and-Lad- 

der house ..... ^445.00 

South Main-street bridge . . 7,975.00 

Incidental expenses . . . 11,615.57 

Fulton engine house . . . 2.71 

Land taken for highways . . 8,430.71 

Repairs of buildings . . . 764.71 

Addition Webster-street schoolhouse 997-29 

Printing and stationery . . 12.61 

City officers' salaries . . . 2,125.01 

Street and park commission . . 33'^5 

New highways . . . . 367-35 

Macadamizing streets . . . 165.99 

City teams ..... 698.40 

Engineer's department . . . 716.72 

Repairs of schoolhouses . . . 464.67 

Furniture and supplies . . . i73-2i 

Care of rooms .... 49-15 

Teachers' salaries .... 151-03 

Fire department .... 3j539-72 

Fire-alarm telegraph . . • 533-S8 



50.30 



516 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Schoolhouse, ward 9 
Pearl-street schoolhouse 
South Manchester hosehouse 
Commons 

Pine Grove cemetery 
Amoskeag cemetery 
Paupers off the farm 
City farm 

Indigent soldiers . 
Abatement of taxes 
Applied to deficit between cash and 
balance in appropriation for 1893 
Balance to new account 



$419-79 

562.05 

203.24 

3-46 

730-93 
4.24 

2,866.88 

486.35 

42.00 

1,415-63 

639-95 
23,043-40 



Temporary Loan. 

Receipts. 

Balance from old account . . . $25,000.00 

Received from Brewster, Cobb & Esta- 
brook, on one note of $50,- 
000, dated June i, 1894, and 
payable December 7, 1894, 
at Suffolk National Bank, 
Boston, Mass. . . . 50,000.00 
from R. L. Day & Co., on 
one note of $50,000, dated 
October 10, 1894, and pay- 
able December 7, 1894, at 
Suffolk National Bank, Bos- 
ton, Mass. . . . 50,000.00 
from A. J. Lane Co., on two 
notes of $25, 000 each, dated 
August I, 1894, and payable 
December 7, 1894, at Suf- 
folk National Bank, Boston, 
Mass 50,000.00 



^,680.30 



CITY HALL. 517 

Received from Second National Bank, 
on one note of $100,000, 
dated April 2, 1894, and 
payable December 2, 1894, 
at Second National Bank . $100,000.00 



-1275,000.00 



Expenditures. 

Paid Brewster, Cobb & Estabrook, one 
note of $50,000, dated June i, 
1894, and payable December 7, 
1894 ..... $50,000.00 

R. L. Day & Co., two notes of 
$25,000 each, dated August i, 
1894, and payable December 7, 
1894; four notes of $5,000 each, 
and five notes of $1,000 each, all 
dated October 2, 1893, and pay- 
able December i, 1894; and one 
note of $50,000, dated October 
10, 1894, and payable Decem- 
ber 7, 1894 .... 125,000.00 

Second National Bank, one note of 
$100,000, dated April 2, 1894, 
and payable December 2, 1894 100,000.00 



-$275,000.00 



City Hall. 

Appropriation .... . . . $2,700.00 

Expenditures. 

fuel and lights. 

Paid Manchester Electric Light Co., 

electric lights .... $76.80 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas . 260.26 

The Electric Co., electric lights . 89. 80 



518 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Union Electric Co., electric lights $113.50 

Paid L. B. Bodvvell & Co.: 

12 tons coal ..... 78.00 
^ cord pine slabs .... 3.00 
Hardwood ..... 4.00 
25 lbs. ice daily from May 7 to Sep- 
tember 29 .... . I3'20 

Paid DeCourcy, Holland & Marshall, i 

cord slabs .... 6.00 
Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 76 

tons and 1,010 lbs. coal . . 441.02 



WATER AND TELEPHONE, 



Paid New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., use of telephones . $78.52 
Water-works, use of water to Oc- 
tober I, 1894 .... 634.35 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

Labor repairing lock, etc. . . $2.82 

Fixing screens, etc. .... ii'33 

Labor on desk . . . . 2.48 

Sash cord ..... .60 

Paid Dana & Provost, lumber and labor 9.62 
A. M. Eastman, soap, brooms, 

matches ..... 4.50 

J. S. Holt, 42 gallons soap . . 5.25 
Manchester Heating & Lighting 

Co., 25 yards mop waste . . 5.00 
Pike & Heald Co., plumbing ma- 
terial and labor . . . 39-72 
C. H. Robie Concrete Co., patch- 
ing concrete rear city hall . .50 



$1,085.58 



$712.87 



CITY HALL. 



519 



Paid Mary Shiney, labor cleaning of- 
fices .... 

Ann Fox, labor cleaning offices 
Mary Higgins, labor cleaning of 
fices .... 

W. P. Goodman, i quart ink 
Peter Harris, keys 
India Alkali Works, 2 kegs Savo 
gran .... 

Paid T. A. Lane Co.: 

Electric supplies, shades, holders, etc. 

mayor's office 
Electric supplies, shades, holders, etc. 

engineer's department . 
Electric supplies, shade, holder, etc 

messenger's office . 
Electric supplies, shade, holder, etc 

city clerk's office . 
Electric fan, etc. 
Labor wiring boiler room 
Rubber hose, self-closing bibb, and 

labor putting on same . 
Hose bands, splicers, globes 
tapers, etc. . 
Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Floor brush, rope, sponges, potash, 
soap ...... 

Wire, twine, ostrich dusters . 
Carpet sweeper, clothes line, wire, 
rings, etc. ..... 

I water cooler ..... 

Keys . . . • . 

Paid James R. Carr & Co., 7 lights of 
glass, and setting same 
Lovejoy & Stratton, i clock 



511.20 
60.00 

44.20 
•65 

3-5° 

8.45 



IO-35 
30.18 

5-3° 

5.20 
26.08 
12.83 

7-65 
2.83 

6.16 
4.10 

3-53 

6.00 

.90 

1.60 

5.00 



520 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Mrs. John A. Barker, making 3 

awnings ..... ^24.00 

Sanborn Carriage Co., mending fire 

rake . . . . . . .15 

James P. Finn, labor and paint . 1,63 

A. Render & Co., cleansing carpets, 
auditor's, street commission, su- 
perintendent schools, and may- 
or's offices, 216 yards at 8c. . 17.28 
The Kitchen, mops, mop waste, 

mirror, etc. .... 3.35 

Paid Weston & Hill Co.: 

Soap and crash . . . . . 1.78 

3 awnings, auditor's office . . 14-55 

3 awnings, mayor's office . . . 14-55 

Paid C. H.Wood, painting i water-tank i.oo 

J. G. Jones, 2 barrels sawdust . .65 

D. A. Simons, 3 chair seats . . 1.25 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

2 placards .... .30 

I. L. Stickney, rubber tubing, en- 
amel cloth, etc. . . . 1.87 

John H. Cole, services as city mes- 
• senger two weeks . . . 24.00 

Union Oil Co.,i gallon naptholeum 1.50 

J. J. Holland, borax ... .25 

Garrett W. Cotter, labor on water- 

pipe 78.49 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor . .50 

Clark M. Bailey, toilet paper . 4.50 

W. M. Darrah & Co., repairing 

slate roof . . . ... 40.27 

Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

Labor and material changing win- 
dows in assessors' office . . 50-55 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 
Labor and material on drug-store, 1892 $ 1 30.44 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund . 



Printing and Stationery. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



Expenditures. 



ASSESSORS. 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

12 rubber penholders . 

Yz ream letter paper . 

Ink, paper, pens, erasers 

27 blank books . 

Other stationery 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., advertising 

notice, i}^ inches, 10 times 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

assessors' notice, i^ inches, 11 

times . . . , . . 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid Novelty Advertising Co., rubber 
stamp pad and ink 
Temple & Farrington Co., blank 
books, etc. .... 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co.: 

Advertising tax sale, 62 lines, 3 times . 



;2,ooo.oo 
12.61 



$2.00 

1-75 
4.68 

100.00 
14.23 

9-25 
9-85 



$0.90 

6.84 

39-33 



521 



S750-39 

$2,548.84 
151. 16 

$2,700.00 



12, 012. 61 



$141.76 



522 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Printing 4,000 receipts . . . ^5-oo 
5,000 half-note heads . . 8.50 
25,000 blank bills . . . 25.00 
Paid Republican Press Association, adver- 
tising tax list, 5 inches, 3 times . 7.50 
Manchester post-office, 1,500 2-cent 

envelopes ..... 33-oo 

CITY CLERK. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

Blank book and canvas cover . . ^13.10 

Rubber bands, blank books . . 33-75 

Paper, envelopes, pens, etc. . . ii-93 

Leather and canvas covers . . . 3.25 

Paid T, Lyle, 4 boxes stub pens . . 3.00 
Paid J. Arthur Williams : 

Printing 100 hackney carriage licenses 1.75 

1,000 marriage certificates . 6.50 

2,800 burial permits . . 9.90 

640 postals .... 8.40 

1,000 dog licenses . . 6.50 

300 ordinance blanks . .. 4.25 

300 rosters .... 19-50 

2,000 return of death blanks . 5.75 

500 notices of hearing . . 3.00 
300 2-cent envelopes . . ^ 7.50 

1,000 blanks .... 9.50 

1,000 letter heads, receipts,etc. 6.25 

CITY TREASURER. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

86 police pay-rolls. No. 4373 . . ^9-5o 

Blank books and covers . . . 21.00 

Stationery ...... 1.60 

Paid J. Arthur Williams, printing 200 

pay-roll blanks . . . . . 2,25 



$126.07 



^i53-S3 



$34-35 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 523 



CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing 800 billheads . . . $9.00 

400 statements of bonded debt 9.60 

200 blanks .... 6,00 

1,000 slips .... 1.50 

1,000 annual reports . . 1,244.94 

Binding 150 annual reports, full sheep 150.00 

50 annual reports lettered . . . 5.00 

100 annual reports stamped with seal . i.oo 

CITY ENGINEER. 

Paid W. E. Moore, printing sewer regu- 
lations $5.75 

Paid Frank H. Challis : 

Printing 1,000 blanks . . . 6.85 

400 card records . . . 4.25 



^1,427.04 



CITY COUNCIL AND COMMITTEES. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co.: 

Publishing ordinances . . . |4o-3o 

Printing 25 briefs .... 8.00 

150 certificates of lots . . . 4.00 

Paid Union Publishing Co., publishing 

ordinances . . . . . 29.14 

Paid Thomas H. Tuson : 

Printing 500 blanks .... 2.30 

Printing 500 notices .... 2.30 

Paid W. E. Moore : 

Printing 75 cards .... 2.00 

Printing 1,000 circulars . . . 3.00 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., blank 

books, pens, paper, mucilage, etc. . 3.37 



$16.85 



;?94-4i 



624 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Frank H. Challis : 

Printing 300 4-page circulars 

Printing 5,000 receipts 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 2;ibs. paper 

W. P. Goodman, i box McGill's 

fasteners ..... 

Hopkins & Holbrook, printing 1,000 

letter headings .... 

W. E. Moore, printing 1,000 letter 

headings ..... 

Temple & Farrington Co., 8 sheets 

carbon paper .... 

Total expenditures 



53-50 
6.00 



2.00 

6.00 

.40 



$18.30 

S2,OI2.6l 



Incidental Expenses. 

Appropriation ..... $12, 000. 00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 11,615.57 

Transferred from appropriation for Lin- 
coln school curbing .... 1,000.00 



^24,615.57 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in di- 
vision No. 2 : 



January .... 


$30.00 


February 


26.00 


March .... 


24.00 


April .... 


24.00 


May .... 


30.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



525 



June 

July . • 

August . 

September 

October 

November 

December 



$24.00 

102.00 

7650 

64.38 

74.19 

50-75 
24.00 



VACCINATION. 




id H. J. Achard .... $25.90 


J. L. Burnham 






62.30 


I. L. Carpenter 






22.40 


E. Fortier 






54T.IO 


E. N. Fugere 






440.65 


P. G. Laberge 






133-70 


J. E. A. Lanouette 






535-50 


W. H. Lyons 






22.05 


Frederick Perkins . 






344-75 


Gillis Stark . 






9-45 


C. F. Starr . 






273.00 



$549-82 



$2,410.80 



BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, AND DEATHS. 



Paid 0. D. Abbott 








59-25 


H. J. Achard 








18.25 


D. S. Adams . 








6-75 


N. A. Avery . 








2.50 


A. A. E. Brien 








12.25 


E. Bernier 








1.50 


John L. Burnham 








9.00 


L. D. Bragg . 








1.25 


J. A. Chevalier 








21.00 


N. L. Colby . 








11.00 


C. R. Crossett 








1.50 


Mary S. Danforth 








7.00 



526 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid C. E. Dodge 






$12.00 


C. M. Dodge 






3-75 


C. W. Downing . 






6.00 


E. B. Dunbar 






7.00 


J. E. Emerson 






18.75 


John Ferguson 






37.00 


George Frechette . 






21-75 


L. M. French 






10.50 


E. N. Fugere 






38.00 


Charles F. Flanders 






41.00 


J. E. Fortier 






41.25 


F. M. Garland . 






2-75 


C. D. Hills . 






12.00 


C. Houle 






1.50 


J. A. Jackson 






18.00 


N. P. Kidder 






583-15 


M. E. Kean . 






14.50 


A. Lessard 






11-75 


J. J. Lyons . 






11.25 


P. G. Laberge 






23-75 


J. E. Lemaitre 






12.50 


J. D. Lemay . 






20.25 


J. E. A. Lanouette 






27.75 


W. C. McAllester . 






5-25 


J. W. D. McDonald 






S.oo 


Jacob W. Mooar . 






1. 00 


Frederick Perkins . 






15.00 


J. F. Robinson 






8.50 


J. E. E. Roy 






5-5° 


W. H. Ramsay 






2.50 


C. B. Sturtevant . 






9.25 


E. Sylvain . 






22.75 


C. F. Starr . 






3,00 


Z. L. Straw . 






3.00 


A. G. Straw . 






3-25 


F. C. Stoekle 






7-25 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 527 

Paid R. S. True ^5.75 

Thomas Wheat . . . . 2.25 

Florian Widman .... 2.00 

N. G. Johnson .... 3.25 



^1,184.90 



DAMAGES AND JUDGMENTS. 

Paid Ellen M. Canney, executrix, on ex- 
ecution, personal damages, H. C. 
Canney ..... ^4,900.00 
Curtis A. Chamberlain, damage to 

chickens by dogs . . . 12.00 

Loren E. Charles, settlement of claim 

for damages to milk wagon . . 37-5o 

James T. Donahoe, settlement of 

suit 79.5s 

Samuel W. Dunbar, settlement of 

suit for trespass to real estate . 47-44 

Michael Heaney, settlement of suit 20.95 

Mary J. James, settlement of suit, 

widening Manchester street . 450.17 

Frank Moreau, injury to person on 

Amoskeag bridge . . . 125.00 

Paid Frederick Perkins : 

Reducing compound fracture of leg 
and subsequent dressings, Abra- 
ham Parent ..... 72.00 

Dressings by Dr. C. F. Starr . . 48.00 

Paid Abraham Parent, settlement for dam- 
age, injury to person on Bald Hill 
road ...... 85.00 

Tom W. Robinson, damages for 
death of horse, killed by falling 
off embankment on " Eddy " road 1 10.00 
Joseph Simard, personal injuries, fall- 
ing on McGregor bridge . . 225.00 



528 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. Shea, damages to sleigh . . 1 21.00 
Janet B. White, personal damages, 
falling on sidewalk on South 
Main street .... 2,200.00 

Rufus Wilkinson, damage to sleigh, 

harness, etc. .... 25.75 



LEGAL EXPENSES. 

Paid O. E. Branch : 

Costs agreed upon in action Currin v. 

Manchester ..... $35.00 
Services, Kennard v. Assessors . . 100.00 
Paid Burnham, Brown & Warren, costs 
agreed upon in action of Bodwell v. 

City 35.00 

Charles E. Cochran, services Cham- 
berlain V. City .... 15-00 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 

brief, Attorney General v. Mayor 9.00 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

25 briefs, Kennard v. City . . 3.50 

Paid C. B. Hildreth : 

Services investigating Dr. Canney case i.S-oo 

Services investigating sawdust case, 

Auburn ...... 20.00 

Paid Herrick, Brown & Ramsdell, ser- 
vices in case of Woodman and six 
others v. City . . . . 73-20 

T. J. Howard, services in claim of 

Parent v. City .... 10.00 

Paid Edwin F. Jones : 

Expenses attending supreme court, 

Portsmouth and Exeter . . . 8.60 

Quo warranto cases, etc. . . . 3502 

Paid John Kennard, costs in suit for 

abatement of taxes . . . 41. n 



^8,459-36 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 529 

Paid Thomas D. Luce, certifying Horan 
appeal ...... ^§0.50 

Paid Arthur W. Morgan : 
Cash paid witnesses and for team for 

solicitor ..... 3.37 

Services looking up witnesses, Koehler 
V. City ..... 5.00 

Cash paid witnesses and summoning 

same, Chamberland v. Manchester . 10.36 

Services summoning witnesses . . 6.43 

Paid F. T. E. Richardson, summoning 
witnesses and fees, case J. A. Neal 
V. City ...... 1.74 

$427.83 



CITY COUNCIL AND COMMITTEES. 

Paid American Bank Note Co., printing 

100 $1,000 improvement bonds . $75-oo 
George W. Bailey, hacks . . 33 '75 

C. W. Babbitt & Co., hacks . . 10.00 

Boyd Brothers, hack . . . 5.00 

Boston Bank Note & Lithographing 

Co., printing 50 bonds . . 80.00 

John A. Barker, cash paid for car- 
fares ...... 3.65 

Frank Chenette, 2 barouches , . 10.00 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Publishing dog licenses, 2^ inches, 6 

weeks ...... 30.00 

Advertising proposals for school build- 
ing 11.25 

Paid James E. Dodge : 

Expenses to Boston to negotiate for 

and deliver bonds . . . . 6.10 

Expenses to and at Boston, with city 
seal, putting same on improvement 

bonds ...... 2.65 

34 



530 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenses of self and mayor to Boston 

making contract to print water bonds $5-95 

Paid W. J. Freeman, hacks . . . 197-50 

E. T. James, hacks . . . 19.00 

Kean & Doyle, hacks . . 100.00 

J. C. Nichols & Son, hacks . . 20.00 

Paid S. B. Putnam : 

Expenses to Boston to deliver improve- 
ment bonds ..... 3.10 
Expenses to Boston twice to deliver 

bonds and notes . . . . 7.10 

Paid C. H. Simpson, hacks . . . 97.00 

A. W. & E. Spanhoofd, printing 

dog licenses .... 3.00 

Paid Union Publishing Co. : 

Publishing dog licenses, 2^^ inches, 

36 times 43-50 

Publishing proposals for fuel, 2j^ 

inches, 7 times . . . . 9.20 

Publishing proposals for school build- 
ing ...... 16.91 

Paid George E. Wheeler, hacks . . 30.00 

Paid Byron Worthen : 

Expenses to Boston .... 2.60 

Cash paid for express . . . . .35 

Paid Western Union Telegraph Co., tele- 
grams . . . . . 1.97 

Whitten & Fifield, use of team . 3.00 



CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid John A. Barker, care of boiler, etc. ^127.00 
Henry E. Shea, work done in and 

around building . . . . 18.75 



!27.58 



^145-75 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 531 

CITY SCALES. 



Paid A. T. Barr, testing weights, 


meas- 




ures, etc. .... 




$3.80 


Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 






Yz ton stove coal 




3-50 


3,005 pounds stove coal 


• 


9.02 



MILK INSPECTOR. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., advertising 

notice 2 inches 2 times . . . ^4-5o 

Paid H. F. W. Little, cash paid for : 

Postage ...... .54 

I lactoscope ....". 3.50 

Acids, rings, jars, etc. ... .80 



RELATING TO STREETS. 

Paid W. B. Abbott, painting and letter- 
ing 635 street signs at i6c . . $101.60 
Sargent & Harden, 60 maple trees . 60.00 

D. C. Whittemore, right of way from 

April I, 1893, to April i, 1S94 . 20.00 

MAYOR. 

Paid R. Bechard : 

Printing letter heads .... $3-75 

Envelopes and printing . . . 2.75 

Paid Bessie P. Conner, services as clerk . 303.00 

Paid Daniels & Downs : 

I Bar-Lock typewriter . . . 100.00 

I roll-top desk ..... 50.00 

I typewriter ribbon .... .75 

Paid W. P. Goodman • 

I diary .65 



$16. 



•34 



$181.60 



532 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Typewriter paper, etc. . . . ^o-95 

I Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, 

indexed ...... 10.50 

Paid Chas. A. Hoitt & Co.: 

I office chair ..... 6.00 

I No. 2 oak desk . . . . 45 -oo 

Paid E. J. Knowlton, postmaster, 1,525 

2-cent stamped envelopes . . 34-58 
Manchester Postoffice, 250 2-cent 

stamps ..... 5.00 

E. E. Sealer Co., i sealer . . .50 

Weston & Hill Co., i}{ yds. carpet .Si 
George P. Wallace, i ream No. i 

wove paper . • . . . .80 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

I bottle paste ..... .25 

250 envelopes . . . . . 1.37 

Paid John B. Varick Co., 2 key rings . .15 

Ella Barker, services as typewriter . 7.50 

ASSESSORS. 

Paid H. D. Lord, transfers of real estate 

one year, to April i, 1894 . . $12.00 
B. W, Robinson, horse-hire deliver- 
ing inventory blanks . . . 2.00 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid John H. Colburn, James O. Web- 
ster's tax sold and refunded . $10.82 
A. B. Campbell, 2 fountain ink stop- 
pers . . .... .60 

E. R. Coburn Co., i frame . . 1.60 

Paid Daniels & Downs : 
Typewriting list of tax sale . . . 3.50 



;74-3i 



$14.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 533 

5 ink erasers ..... ^0.25 

Paid Peter Harris, grinding shears . . .10 
Chas. A. Hoitt & Co., repairing 

chair ...... .50 

J. A. Jackson, Mary Burke's and 
Wm. Currier's tax sold and re- 
funded ..... 30.41 

Paid George E. Morrill . 

Taxes of 1893 sold May 2, 1894, and 

purchased by city .... 5,942.74 

Distributing tax notices, 1894 . . 87.63 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., ball twine .10 

Francis Pratt, Jr., pens . . . 3.00 

F. H. Thurston, soap and sponges . .50 

^6,081.75 



CITY CLERK. 



Paid Florence M. Kidder, services as clerk $384.00 
J. Arthur Williams, printing 1,500 

blanks ..... 4.50 



$388.50 



CITY TREASURER. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, repairing chair . $0.75 

Blanche E. Bullock, services as clerk 432.00 
A. A. & E. W. Bunton, cane-seating 

office chair . ' . . . i.oo 

E. R. Coburn Co., i quart ink . .65 

T. Lyons, 4 gross pens . . . 5.50 

Lyons & Patterson, pens . . 3.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., sponges .30 
Francis Pratt, Jr., 2 gross pens and 

penholders .... 4.00 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

20 M pay envelopes . . . . i.S-oo 

2 gross rubber bands .... .60 



534 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

49 blank books ..... $24.25 
Canvas cover ..... i.oo 
Other stationery .... 5.50 
Paid John B. Varick Co., toilet paper . .50 
Western Union Telegraph Co., tele- 
gram, Boston, bond business . .29 



COURT HOUSE. 

Paid DcCourcy, Holland & Marshall, 31,- 

365 lbs. egg coal .... $101.94 

Paid county of Hillsborough : 

One 'half expense running boiler to 

January 20, 1894 .... 24.00 

One half expense of coal, 78.1 tons . 234.77 
Paid Manchester Hardware Co., i 16- 
inch lawn mower . . . 5.50 
Pike & Heaid Co., i ash hod . 3.00 
Timothy P. Shea, services as janitor 479-27 
Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Brooms, sponges, mops, pails, dustpan, 

etc. 11.87 

200 lbs. Coe's fertilizer . . . 3.50 

Lawn rake, rubber hose . . . 5.40 



ELECTION EXPENSES. 

Paid Daniel G. Andrews : 

Labor and supplies for wardroom No. 2 $9- 7° 

I table, damaged .... i.oo 

Paid George W. Bailey, use of hack . 10.00 

Aretas Blood, use of Mechanics hall 100.00 

Edward P. Cogswell, cartitig sawdust 1.50 

Frank H. Challis,printing 250 blanks 4.25 



$494-34 



$869.25 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 535 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing 632 check-lists . . . ^314.95 
30 additional check-lists . 27.50 

Paid George H. Dudley, 2 days' labor, 

ward 2 .... . 5.00 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., i ton egg 

coal, ward 5 . . . . 5.75 

M. Dana, removal and storing ward 

3 voting booths .... 2.50 

Flint & Little, 2 desk tops for check- 
lists . . . . . . 2.15 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 10 bar- 
rels sawdust, wards 2 and 5 . 1.45 
Peter Harris, repairing ballot-box . i.oo 
The Head & Dowst Co., niaterial 

and labor in different wards . 40.26 

C. F. Jack, cleaning Blodget-street 

schoolhouse after election . . 2.00 

Pike & Heald Co., use of stove, 

ward 5 .... . 2.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas, ward 

5 wardroom .... 5.04 

Thomas Stewart, trucking tables, 
chairs, and voting apparatus from 
West Manchester to ward 5 ward- 
room and return . . . 1.50 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

25 sheets linen folio .... .50 

Pencils ...... 7.04 

Paid Charles H. Simpson, hacks . . 10.00 

Paid J. Arthur Williams : 

Printing 125 ballot inspector certificates 1.75 

] 00 supervisor certificates . 1.50 

Paid York Market Co., oil, oil-can, chim- 
neys, etc., ward 4 . . . . 1.22 

^559-56 



536 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid George W. Bailey : 

Storage and care of ambulance . . $6.00 

Use of horse and driver . . . 7.00 

Use of team ..... i.oo 

Paid Concord & Montreal R. R., tickets 

to Concord and Boston . . 4. 11 

Anne Fox, 98^ hours cleaning 

offices ..... 19-65 

George Holbrook, clearing snow off 

roof of city hall and library . 39-50 

Dana W. King, examining records 

and certifying deed . . . 5.72 

David Lamprey, bounty on hawk . .25 

Frank Roby, bounty on 5 hawks . 1.25 

Saturday Telegram Co., postage 

stamps ..... 100.00 

C. H. Simpson, use of hack to Elliot 

Hospital . . . . . 2.50 

American Express Co., express on 

city reports . . . . 5.07 

town of Goffstown, taxes on gravel 

lot 1.38 

H. W. Herrick, portrait of ex-Mayor 

Knowlton . . . . . 8.00 

J. G. Jones, delivering city reports .50 

Charles F. Lambert, 3 lambs killed 

by dogs . . . . . 15-00 

First Light Battery, powder, etc., and 

firing national salute July 4, 1894 42.00 

Paid Nate Kellogg : 

Printing 500 blank bills . . . 6.75 

106 letter circulars . . 3.75 

Reprinting bond statements . . 1.75 

Paid W. E. Moore, postal cards and print- 
ing ...... 2.00 



mayor's incidentals. 537 

Paid C. T. & R. D. McFarland, for plans 
and specifications for new school- 
house, in full for all plans, advice, 
and services for work against the 
city to Oct. I, 1894, in accord- 
ance with resolution passed by- 
city councils Oct. 2, 1894 . . $600.00 
Manchester City Band, 3 concerts . 150.00 

Concord Foundry Co., i drinking 

fountain ..... 95-oo 

First Regiment Band, concerts . 150.00 

Manchester Water-works, use of 

water, ward 5 wardroom . . 2.63 

Paid A, J. Lane Co.: 

Drawing bonds ..... 3.00 

Services securing options of land of 

Briggs, Rowe, and Eastman . . 50.00 

Paid Henry C. Dickey, work on pipes at 

hosehouse . . . . . i-75 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., 25 direc- 
tories ..... 50.00 
Union Manufacturing Co., 1,000 

house numbers .... 45.00 

$1,420.56 

Total expenditures ..... $24,615.57 



Mayor's Incidentals. 

Appropriation ...... 

Expenditures. 

Paid W. J. Freeman, horse hire . . $12.50 
E. J. Knowlton, allowance for hire 

of teams, to May 10 inclusive . 48.00 

E. H. Stowe, 16 dinners, and horses 

fed ...... 12.00 



538 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Hotel Windsor, board, Mayor 
Knowlton and party (visiting fire- 
men) . . . . ^ . 
Paid Byron Worthen : 

Cash paid for expenses to Providence . 
Dinners at Mill-Dam house, board of 

aldermen 
Firemen's dinners 
Cash paid for teams . 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



20.60 

16.70 
34.00 
15.00 



$163.30 
136.70 



City Officers' Salaries. 



Appropriation 


116,700.00 


Transferred from reserved fund 


2,125.01 


Expenditures. 




CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 




Paid E. J. Knowlton, Mayor . 


$650.00 


David B. Varney, mayor 


300.00 


Byron Worthen, mayor . 


850.00 


Nathan P. Kidder, city cler'K . 


900.00 


Sylvanus B. Putnam, city treasurer . 


1,200.00 


Edwin F. Jones, city solicitor 


800.00 


George L. Stearns, clerk common 




council . . . . . 


200.00 


Thomas W. Lane, inspector of build- 




ings 


100.00 


H. F. W. Little, milk inspector 


300.00 


William Bailey, city weigher . 


400.00 


John A. Barker, city messenger 


700.00 



$18,825.01 



,400.00 



CITY OFFICERS SALARIES. 



539 



CITV PHYSICIAN AND OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Paid Frederick Perkins, city physician 
William H. Maxwell, ward i . 
Thomas L. Quimby, ward 2 . 
Benjamin F. Garland, ward 3 . 
George S. Holmes, ward 4 
Patrick Costello, ward 5 . 
Charles Francis, ward 6 . 
William Marshall, ward 7 
Charles S. McKean, ward 8 . 
Frank I. Lessard, ward 9 
Paid Edgar J. Knowlton : 

Chairman ex officio, overseers poor, 1893 

To May 10, 1894 . . . . 

Paid David B. Varney, chairman ex officio, 

overseers poor, to July 10, 1894 . 

Byron Worthen, chairman ex officio, 

overseers poor, balance of year . 

William H. Maxwell, clerk of board 

Judith Sherer, matron of pest-house 



>200.00 

25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 

25.00 
8.32 

4.86 

11.82 

100.00 
360.00 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Paid William E. Buck, superintendent of 

schools ^2,300.00 

Samuel Brooks, truant officer . . 375-oo 
Curtis W. Davis, truant officer . 250.00 
E. J. Knowlton, chairman ex officio 3.32 
David B. Varney, chairman ex offi- 
cio ....- . 1.68 
Byron Worthen, chairman ex officio 5.00 
Paid Edward B. Woodbury : 

Clerk of board, balance salary, 1893 . 50.00 

Salary, 1894 ..... 150.00 
Paid Fred T. Dunlap, president common 

council, ex officio . . . 10.00 



640 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Charles D. Sumner, ward i 
Walter H. Lewis, ward i 
George H. Stearns, ward 2 
Alvin T. Thoits, ward 2 . 
George D. Towne, ward 3 
Louis E. Phelps, ward 3 . 
Stephen B. Stearns, ward 4 
Edwin L. Richardson, ward 4 
John W. Mears, ward 4 . 
James P. Slattery, ward 5 
William J. Sughrue, ward 5 
Frank T. E. Richardson, ward 6 
George W. Dearborn, ward 6 
Marshall P. Hall, ward 7 
Edward B. Woodbury, ward 7 
Luther C. Baldwin, ward 8 
Josiah G. Dearborn, ward 8 
Edward J. Doherty, ward 9 
Scott E. Sanborn, ward 9 



iio.oo 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



5,325-00 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 



Paid Henry Lewis, ward i 

John E. Stearns, ward 2 
David O. Fernald, ward 3 
Harrison D. Lord, ward 4 
George F. Sheehan, ward 5 
George H. Dudley, ward 6 
William T. Rowell, ward 7 
Frank N. Daniels, ward 8 
Lawrence F. Bradley, ward 9 
E. W. Brigham, assistant 
Harvey L. Currier, assistant 
John Cayzer, assistant 
Hiram Forsaith, assistant 
N. Nichols, assistant 



$150.00 
165.00 
822.50 
225.63 
142.50 
465.00 

152-50 

95.00 

162.50 

295.00 

227.50 
70.00 
72.50 

300.00 



CITY OFFICERS SALARIES. 



541 



"Paid Henry F. Stone, assistant 
Isaac Whittemore, assistant 
J. H. Collette, interpreter 
Louis Comeau, interpreter 
A. G. Monette, interpreter 
Jean B. Rejimbal, interpreter 
H. D. Lord, clerical services 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid George E. Morrill : 

Salary, quarter ending February 28, 

1894 

Salary, quarter ending May 31, 1894 . 
Salary, balance due for 1893-94 . 
Commission on old taxes . 
Salary, quarter ending August 31, 1894 
Salary, quarter ending November 30, 

1894 



570.00 
86.25 

17-50 

65-50 
25.00 
40.00 
22.50 



5200.00 

200.00 

850.00 

29.85 

200.00 



MODERATORS, 1 893 AND 1 894. 



Paid Abial W. Eastman, ward i 

William M. Butterfieid, ward 2 
Charles L. Harmon, ward 3 
George H. Warren, ward 4 
Emmett Duffee, ward 5 . 
Herbert S. Clough, ward 6 
Frank A. Dockham, ward 7 
Charles G. Ranno, ward 8 
John T. Hannigan, ward 9 



§15. 00 
15.00 
23.00 
15.00 
17-50 
25.00 
15.00 
12.50 
17-50 



WARD CLERKS, 1 893 AND 1 894. 



Paid Frank X. Foster, ward i 
Wilson F. Higgins, ward 2 



^26.00 
25.00 



^3)672.38 



^1,679.85 



$155-50 



542 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Frank O. Moulton, ward 3 
George H. Phinney, ward 4 
John A. Whalen, ward 5 
Harry I. Dodge, ward 6 
Cha.rles E. Bartlett, ward 7 
Maurice Lamprey, ward 8 
Jean B. B. Beliveau, ward 9 
Alfred Eaton, ward 3, special 
tion .... 



elec- 



i25.00 

25.00 
28.50 
36.00 
26.00 

23-50 
28.50 

5.00 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LIST, 1 893 AND 1 894. 



Paid George C. Kemp, ward i, 41^ days 

Charles B. Tucker, ward 2, 49^ 

days ...... 

David O. Fernald, ward 3, 35 days 
Harrison D. Lord, ward 4, 60 days 
John F. Quinn, ward '5, 44 days 
Albert J. Peaslee, ward 6, 46 days . 
Joseph A. Foster, ward 7, 38^ days 
Charles C. Tinkham, ward 8, 62 days 
John B. Bourque, ward 9, 45 days . 
Samuel J. Lord, assistant, 12 days . 
Isaac Whitteniore, assistant, 28 days 
George H. Dudley, assistant, 20 days 
Albert J. Peaslee, use of team 

SELECTMEN, 1 893 AND 1 894. 

Paid J. H. Wales, Jr., ward i . 
Theophile G. Biron, ward i 
Henry S. Perry, ward i . 
Jesse B. Nourse, ward 2 . 
William Danforth, ward 2 
Daniel G. Andrews, ward 2 
Nathaniel Doane, Jr., ward 2 
John A. Sargent, ward 3 



^93-37 

lit. 38 

78.75 
135-00 

99.00 
103.50 

86.63 

139-50 

101.25 

27.00 

63.00 

45.00 

8.75 



515-50 
^5-50 
15-50 
11.50 
1.50 
15-50 
15-50 
19.00 



$248.50 



;i,o92.i3 



CITY OFFICERS SALARIES. 



543 



Paid John Cronin, ward 3 

Samuel C. Kennard, ward 3 
Charles F. Nallgey, ward 4 
Charles H. Uhlig, ward 4 
Frank E. Farrell, ward 4 
Arthur Allen, ward 5 
Charles J. Woods, ward 5 
Jeremiah F. Tehan, ward 5 
Edward P. Cogswell, ward 6 
Harrison M. Heselton, ward 
Joseph N. Auger, ward 6 
Robert Leggett, ward 7 . 
Hanson R. Armstrong, ward 7 
Robert Morrow, ward 7 . 
George B. Barnes, ward 8 
Auguste Filion, ward 8 . 
Benjamin Mack, ward 8 . 
Oswald Paris, ward 9 
Gideon Belisle, ward 9 . 
Martin J. Rafferty, ward 9 



^19.00 
19.00 
15-50 
15-50 
15-50 
17-25 
17-25 
17-25 
22.50 
22.50 
22.50 
15-50 
15-50 
15-50 
13-75 
13-75 
13-75 
12.75 
17-25 
17-25 



SUPERVISORS, 1893 ^ND 1 894. 



Paid William B. Stearns, ward i 
William F. Graner, ward i 
Fred C. Hale, ward 2 
Frank A. Gay, ward 2 
H. F. W. Little, ward 3 
David H. Young, ward 3 
Eugene B. Worthen, ward 4 
Patrick Fahey, ward 4 . 
Patrick E. Daly, ward 5 
Thomas F. Riordan, ward 5 
Chester Demick, ward 6 
Michael F. Burke, ward 6 
W. T. Payne, ward 7 
John W. Davis, ward 7 . 



,19.25 
19.25 
22.75 
22.75 
19.25 
14.00 
21.00 
21. oc 
24.50 
24.50 
29-75 
29-75 
15-75 
15-75 



$448.25 



544 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Charles H. Hodgman, ward 8 
Josiah G. Dearborn, ward 8 
Albert Montgomery, ward 9 
Emile H. Tardivel, ward 9 



BALLOT INSPECTORS. 



Paid Charles Edgar, ward i . 

A. W. Patch, Avard i 
Paul H. Boire, ward i . 
Benjamin F. Crudden, ward 
Henry P. Priest, ward 2 
Harry E. Andrews, ward 2 
Walter M. Morgan, ward 2 
John W. Center, ward 2 
Cyrus H. Little, ward 3 
George E. Prime, ward 3 
Samuel J. Laflamme, ward 3 
Allison L. Partridge, ward 3 
Harry T. Lord, ward 4 . 
Frank H. Lussier, ward 4 

L. E. Desrochers, ward 4 
John P. Broderick, ward 4 
Thomas F. Slattery, ward 5 
Harry T. Lemay, ward 5 
James Orr, ward 5 
John H. Slater, ward 5 . 
Charles Lucier, ward 6 . 
Joseph P. Chatel, ward 6 

B. Frank Welch, ward 6 
Richard J. Brickley, ward 6 
E. S. Stratton, ward 7 . 
James H. Haughey, ward 7 
N. P. Colby, ward 7 
Arthur J. McDerby, ward 7 
Frank O. Clement, ward 8 
Edward F. Scheer, ward 8 



!i7-5o 
17-50 
23-63 
23-63 



0.50 
0.50 
0.50 
0.50 
0.50 
0.50 
0.50 
0.50 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
0.50 
0.50 
0.50 
0.50 
2.25 
2.25 
2.25 
2.25 

7-50 
7-5° 
7-5° 
7-50 
0.50 
0.50 

8.75 
10.50 

8-75 
8.75 



ii.Si 



AUDITOR S DEPARTMENT. 



545 



Paid Theodore Graf, ward 8 . 
Henry Lien, ward 8 
Louis Pare, ward g 
John Montplaisir, ward 9 
Henry R. Fontain, ward 9 
Scott E. Sanborn, ward 9 

Total expenditures 
Balance to new account . 



Appropriation 



Auditor's Department. 



Expenditures. 



8.75 




12.25 




12.25 




12.25 




12.25 






^425.25 






^18,763.37 




61.64 




$18,825.01 


". 


52,000.00 



LABOR. 

Paid James B. Straw, salary as auditor for 

January, 1894 .... $83.33 
James E. Dodge, salary as auditor, 
balance of 1894 . . . . 927.77 

Paid Lizzie M. Cogswell : 

Services as clerk .... 600.00 

Extra work evenings . . . . 21.15 

SUPPLIES, ETC. 

Paid the American Book Co., i Web- 
ster's dictionary, and express on 
same ...... $8.70 

A. A. Bunton, reseating office chair .75 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co.: 

Invoice book . . . . '. 1.75 

16 pounds paper .... 1.60 

Paid Lizzie M. Cogswell : 

Cash paid for horse-car fares . . .20 

Cash paid for chamois skins . . .30 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

3 pounds paper ..... 0.30 

35 



51,632.25 



546 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Printing loo postal notices 
12,500 billheads . 
Paid James E. Dodge : 
Cash paid for express . 

two fountain ink-stoppers 
Paid Daniels & Downs, 6 reams paper 
Paid W. P. Goodman : 

1 dictionary holder 

Ink, pencils, mucilage, paste, inkstand 
pens, and stationery 
Paid Hopkins & Holbrook, 500 stamped 
envelopes, and printing return 
notice . . . . . 

The Hammond Typewriter Co., car- 
bon paper . . . . . 
Peter Harris, 3 erasers sharpened 
The Thomas A. Lane Co., supplies, 
electric portable lamp and labor 
on same . . . . . 

J. B. McCrillis, typewriter ribbons . 
A. J. Smith, carbon paper 
Smith Premier Typewriter Co., i 
copying ribbon . . . . 
Irving L. Stickney, rubber bands . 
Albert Render, i dozen elastic ink- 
holders . . . . . 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 
3 blank books. No. 4215 

2 blank books. No. 4284, 4285 . 
Paste, cord ...... 

Paid John B. Varick Co., i oil-stone 

George Wallace, typewriter ribbon 
J. Arthur Williams, rubber stamp . 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund . 



^2.00 
47-50 

•15 
.60 



6.00 
8.70 

11.50 



•25 



4-9.S 
2.00 
7.00 

1. 00 

•75- 

•25 



6.00 




6.00 




.51 




•50 




•75 




.60 






$135-81 




. 


$1,768.06 


• 


231.94 




$2, 000.00 



STKEET AND PARK COMMISSION. 547 

Street and Park Commission. 



Appropriation ..... ^3,750.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 33-65 



CLERICAL SERVICES. 



Expenditures. 

salaries. 

Paid George H. Stearns, chairman . . ^600.00 
L. P. Reynolds .... 600.00 
H. P. Simpson .... 600.00 



Paid Allan E. Herrick, clerk of street and 

park commission .... ^900.00 
Julia F. Stearns, clerk in office of 

street and park commission . 463.50 



CARRIAGE HIRE. 

Paid George H. Stearns .... ^167.50 

L. P. Reynolds . . , . 167.50 

H. P. Simpson .... 167.50 

OFFICE SUPPLIES. 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co. : 

1 ream legal cap ..... ^4.75 
9 quires legal cap, numbered * . . 3.75 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co. : 

2 books, 175 pages each . . . 5.50 
400 return cards ..... 3.50 

Paid W. P. Goodman, i quart ink . . .55 

A. J. Smith, 2 dozen pencils . . i.oo 

T. H. Tuson, 300 sheets paper . . 1.50 



5,783-65 



^1,800.00 



^1,363-50 



502.50 



548 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

McGill fasteners, rubber bands, paste, 
blank books, etc. . . 

175 catalogue envelopes 
Paid George P. Wallace, 2 typewriter rib 

bons ...... 

Paid Samuel Ward Company : 

3 order books .... 

3 time books .... 

1 book ..... 
Paid T. Arthur Williams : 

2 self-inking rubber stamps . 

1 stamp on old frame . 
Printing 2,000 letter heads . 
Printing 350 billheads . 

2 rubber stamps .... 



;i8.6o 
1.40 

2.00 

10.00 
IO-75 



1.20 

•25 
3-50 
2.25 

•85 



$73-45 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

200 reports, 70 pages and cover . . $27.00 
Paid Allan E. Herrick : 

Cash paid for express .... .60 

Cash paid for postage . . . . 1.75 

Cash paid J. A. Wheeler for harness 

polish -50 

Paid Peter Harris, repairs on desk . . .35 

L. P. Reynolds, cash paid for ex- 
penses to Rochester . . . 2.50 
George H. Stearns, cash paid for ex- 
penses to Boston, September 25 10.50 
C. H. Wood, painting tin sign . i.oo 



Total expenditures 



$3)783-65 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



549 



Repairs of Highways. 



Appropriation 






. $24,000.00 




Expenditures. 




LABOR. 


Paid labor of men 


and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 


sion No. I : 




February . 


^64.65 


April 






56.15 


May 






121.25 


June 






. . 152-85 


August 






66.20 


September 






37.00 


October . 






13.00 


November 






103.00 






tff-f\-r A x r\ 






Paid labor of men 


and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 


sion No. 2 : 




January . 


^644.93 


February . 






3-50 


March 






399-35 


April 






877.04 


May 






• 1,390-83 


■ June 






. 1,464-85 


July 






1,612.01 


August 






. 1,249.01 


September 






1,924.22 


October . 






. 1,214.49 


November 






144.60 


December 






20.37 




iP^^jy^i'^'^ 


Paid labor of men 


and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 


sion No. 4 : 




April 


;^37-5o 


May 




. 


68.75 



550 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



June 


$105.75 


August . . . . . 


29.00 


September ..... 


70.50 


October ...... 


42.75 


November 


42.50 


Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 


sion No. 5 : 


March $8.12 


April 


64.25 


May 


148.71 


June ...... 


58.65 


July 


1-75 


August ..... 


144.37 


September .... 


115.87 


November .... 


12.62 


December . . ... 


3-75 


Paid labor of men and teams, as per pa 


y-roll, divi- 


sion No. 6 : 


March ^3-87 


May 


74.40 


June 


430.18 


July 


32.60 


August 


218.50 


September .... 


227.92 


October 


55-50 


December .... 


5-25 


Paid labor of men and teams, as per pa 


y-roll, divi- 


sion No. 7 : 


March ^98-75 


April 194-25 


May 483.51 


June .■ . 


196.25 



$396.75 



$558.09 



^1,048.22 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



551 



July . . . . 


giio.75 


August . . . . 


180.25 


September 


590.75 


October . . . . 


104.25 


November 


82.01 


December 


24.75 







Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 8 : 



March . 










^8.00 


April 










148.13 


May 










333-45 


June 










120.00 


July . . 










34-75 


August . 










97-36 


September 










66.61 


October . 










83.09 


November 










16.50 


December 










20.00 


labor of men and teams, as per pa 


y-roll, divi- 


sion No. 9 : 


May |i7-5o 


June 238.50 


September 95'00 


October . 


• 


• 


• 


• 


15.00 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 10 : 



January ..... 


^118.90 


January (Overdraft) 


9-75 


February 


6.12 


March 


173-87 


April 


244.70 


May 


408.41 



$2,065.52 



127. 



$366.00 



552 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



June 


^344-99 


July . . . 


501.24 


August . 


330.61 


September 


720.10 


October . 


393-19 


November 


241.92 


December 


68.00 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 12 : 



March . 
May 

November 
December 



$2-37 
24.62 

319-44 
32.00 



Paid A. C. Wallace, labor building foot-bridge, as 
per agreement ...... 



LUMBER AND OTHER MATERIAL. 



Paid James Benson, 60 feet pine plank . 


^1.20 


Oilman Clough, lumber . 


54-23 


Paid S. 0. Forsaith Machine Co. : 




203 tree-box pickets .... 


6.09 


Spruce lumber and labor . . . 


34-35 


Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 




600 feet 1x6 spruce .... 


9.00 


400 feet 2x3 spruce . „ . . 


6.20 


Sawing, planing, and working 


2.00 


250 chestnut posts .... 


38.00 


Paid Alcide Pellerin, 50 chestnut posts . 


5.00 


E. B. Veasey, lumber, nails, molding, 




labor. ..... 


27.65 


Paid A. C. Wallace : 




5 oak posts ..... 


3-75 


26 old posts ..... 


1.56 


214 chestnut posts 


34-72 



,561.80 



^378.43 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



553 



3,68 1 feet spruce fence boards 
260 feet rough hemlock boards . 
Other lumber .... 
Spikes, nails, etc., used in building foot 

bridge ..... 
Pickets, etc. .... 
Paid I. T. Webster, boards and posts 
David Wells, 38 chestnut posts 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 



555-30 
2.60 
1.50 



1.87 

1.06 

II. 16 

5-70 



502.94 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 




Spikes, wire, nails, mattock 


$4.53 


4 garden barrows 


10.00 


27 picks . . . . . 


27.00 


32 pick handles . . . . 


9.16 


3 plow points 


2.01 


Steel wedges, street hoe 


1-39 


Other hardware . 


.96 


Paid John B. Varick Co.: 




Plow points, plow beam 


4-85 


Picks and handles 


4-75 


Shovels .... 


13-74 


Axes and handles 


18.65 


Hoes, wrenches . 


2.20 


Spikes, bolts, nails 


7-95 


Powder and fuse 


2.25 


Other hardware . 


32.97 


Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co.: 




Powder, fuse, etc. 


8.08 


Spikes and nails . 


2.20 


Steel wedges 


.88 


Paid Allen N. Clapp : 




Nails and spikes 


1-35 


Oil, seeds, twine 


6.85 


Hammer, wicks, pails, etc. . 


3.21 



^164.98 



554 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



BLACKSMITHING AND REPAIRS. 

Paid L, M. Aldrich, repairing levels, fil- 
ing saw ..... ^1-30 

James Benson, sharpening tools . 2.05 
John Bryson, paint, sandpaper, and 

labor on drinking fountains . ^3-49 

J. M. Brouillette, sharpening pick . .50 

N. Decoteau, repairing picks . . i.oo 
R. W. Flanders, sharpening picks, 

repairing chains, etc. . . . 6.40 

Paid John Hadlock : 

Repairing road machine . . . 58.00 

Bolts, castings, etc. .... 17.00 

Paid James Morison, sharpening picks . 1.75 
Paid J. B. McCrillis &;Son : 

Mending chain ..... .15 

Repairing road scraper . . . 1.58 



STONE, GRAVEL, CLAY, ETC. 

Paid Boyce & Merrill, 17 loads gravel . ^i-7o 

William Campbell, 50 loads gravel 5.00 

I. R. Dewey, 132 loads gravel . 26.40 
Paid Edwards O. Dodge : 

3 loads stone ..... 3.00 

139 loads gravel . , . . 13-90 

Paid Mrs. A. G. Gray, 73 loads gravel . 7.30 

Mrs. Mary Hartshorn, 93 loads sand 9.30 

Addison Gray, 83 loads gravel . 8.30 

Paid W. G. Landry : 

40 loads sand . . . . . 12.00 

113 loads dirt ..... 28.25 

Paid John Loveren, 80 loads gravel . 8.00 

Ida Libbey, 264 loads gravel . . 26.40 

Byron E. Moore, 105 loads clay . 6.30 

John Parmenter, 119 loads gravel . 11.90 



;io3.22 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 555 

Paid Frank Preston, 50 loads gravel . ^5-°° 

Paid C. C. Webster : 

60 loads clay 3- 60 

Stone for widening culvert . . 4- 00 

Paid Thomas Walker, Jr., 20 loads gravel 1.20 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid Boston & Maine Railroad, freight on 

bolts, wheels, and axle . . $1-04 

E. R. Coburn Co., blank books and 

pencils ..... 3.27 
Concord & Montreal Railroad, 

freight on hose and bolts . . 1.29 
Alfred T, Dodge, use of team to 

November 28, 1893 . . . 39- 00 

F. L. Downs, 2 pairs men's rubber 

boots 5.75 

Eager & Rand, salt . . . .60 

H. Leibing, paint, glass, etc. . 5.64 
Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co. : 

I 8-inch Akron elbow ... .63 

Plugs, caps, pipe, and labor . . .55 

Paid Clarence R. Merrill, 3 barrels lime 2.85 
Frederick Perkins, attendance on 

Michael Rainey . . . 8.00 
Paid Luther S. Proctor : 

I drag 3.50 

1 lot railing poles .... 3.00 
Paid Charles H. Robie Co., concreting 

sundry crossings, etc. . . . 447.12 
Paid People's Gas-Light Co. : 

Gas from February i, 1894, to March 

I, 1894, Fire King engine-house . .84 

2 chaldrons coke .... 8.00 
Paid D. L. Robinson, i drag chain . 2.00 



^181.55 



556 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Sanborn Carriage Co., i iron grate $0.50 

Paid L. and W. T. Seiberlich : 

2 whitewash brushes . . . . 1.50 

Setting glass ..... .50 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Ledgers and pencils .... 2.50 

Paper, mucilage, ink, pens, blank books 13-71 

Paid J. T. Underbill & Co., concreting 

sundry crossings . . . 238.83 

^790.62 

Total expenditures ..... $22,435.31 
Transferred to snow and ice appropriation . . 1,335.02 

Transferred to Stark and Derryfield parks appropri- 
ation . . . , . . . . 158-73 
Transferred to reserved fund ..... 7o-94 



)24,000.00 



Snow and Ice. 

Appropriation ..... $4,000.00 
Transferred from repairs of highways ap- 
propriation ..... 1,335.02 



i,335-o2 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. I : 
February ...... . $22.25 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 2 : 
January ...... $624.03 

February ..... 1,980.34 

March 591-58 

^3.195-95 



SNOW AND ICE. 557 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 4: 
January ...... $^-2S 

February 48.75 

$57-oo 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 5 : 

January ^8.75 

February . . . . . 83.74 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 6 : 
January ...... ^4-82 

February ..... 34-99 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 7 : 

January $57-25 

February ..... 136.51 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 8 : 

January $5.75 

February ..... 47*25 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 9 : 
January ...... $16.50 

February . . . . . 70.12 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. ID : 

January ;?5 13-47 

February ..... 708.00 

March ...... 266.91 



12.49 



$193-76 



$S3-°o 



$86.62 



$1,488.38 



558 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 12 : 
February ..... ^3-oo 

March . . . . . . 49.12 



SAND AND SALT. 



Paid Eager & Rand, salt 

H. Fradd & Co., salt . 
Austin Goings, 20 loads sand 
Mary Hartshorn, 195 loads sand 



$6.45 
4.40 
4.00 

19.50 



SUPPLIES AND MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid A. N. Clapp, 6 shovels . . . ^3-90 

H. Fradd & Co., shovels . . 2.50 
The Head & Dowst Co., one half 
window to replace one broken by 

snow and ice . . . . .65 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 

I pair brackets ..... .35 

I dozen pick handles .... 2.50 

Pulley and sash weights ... .35 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Barbed wire staples .... .04 

20 square feet sand screening . . 4.40 

I sidewalk cleaner .... • .60 

Shovels ...... 4.00 



Total expenditures 



$34.35 



$19.29 



55335-02 



New Highways. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



. $20,000.00 

367-35 

$20,367.35 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 
Expenditures. 



559 



LABOR. 



Paid men, as per pay-ro 
June 
July . . 

Paid men, as per pay-ro 
January . 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 

July 

August 
September 
October 
November 

Paid men, as per pay-ro 
May 
June 

July . 

August . 
September 

Paid men, as per pay-ro 
April 
May 
June 

July 

August 
September 



, in division No. i 



5200.00 
358-25 



$558-25 



, in division No. 2 



^45.00 
36.00 

109.76 
1,080.57 
2,781.31 
1,406.82 
1,011.20 
1.589.52 

445-79 
1,909.26 

681.68 



^11,096.91 



, in division No. 7 



$320.75 

661.00 

202.75 

340.00 

30.00 



, in division No. 10 : 

^378.61 
1,149.89 



$1,554-50 



866 

576 

75 
346 



37 

91 
61 



560 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



October 

November 



I667.05 
70-93 



Paid D. H. Dickey, work on culvert, Cohas avenue : 



9 days' labor ..... 
Laying 462 feet stone 
Paid H, Haibert, building bank wall from 
Wayne street to Amory street on 
Main back street 
O. E. Kimball, one half cost build- 
ing and painting picket fence at 
South Manchester 
John F. Larkin, contract for setting 
fence rails, Second-street bridge . 
Paid Moore & Preston : 
Building Trenton street 
Teaming 32 loads sand 
Paid John H. Proctor, building Page 
street, as per contract 

TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 



^16.74 
32-37 



755-00 



35 


78 


148 


00 


175 


00 


8 


00 


380 


00 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 




Pick handles . . . . . 


$11-25 


. Steel bar 


4-39 


6 Ames shovels . . . . . 


5-25 


30 picks 


30.00 


Plow points . . . . . 


8.64 


Other hardware . . . . . 


1. 61 


Paid John B. Varick Co.: 




Plow points .... 


51.98 


I Doe plow with wheel and cutter 


17.00 


Shovels 


46.00 


Rope 


5-7° 


Lanterns 


14.00 


Street hoes, mattocks . 


8.40 



^,131-85 



$1,550.89 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 5t)l 



Steel crowbars, ax . . . 


$4.67 


Padlocks, lath yarn 


1.72 


Other hardware .... 


53-08 


Paid The Wadleigh Hardware Co.: 




I water yoke .... 


1.25 


Powder, fuse, etc. 


60.49 



STONE, LUMBER, AND OTHER MATERIALS. 

Paid Charles A. Bailey : 

561^ perch covering stone, East Man- 
chester culvert .... ^339.00 

391^ perch covering stone. Sagamore- 
street culvert . . . . . 136.27 

Paid F. S. Bodwell, 81 posts for marking 

new streets . . . . 101.25 

Warren Harvey, 9 loads covering 

stone ..... 27.00 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 

1,217 fs^t spruce . . . . 18.26 

142 feet drag plank .... 5.68 

Ironwork, etc., on drags . . . 2.71 

Labor, etc. . . . . . 4.58 

Paid Jesse Tirrell, 6 loads cobblestones . 5.40 

A. C. Wallace, 656 feet spruce fence • 

boards 9.84 

Adams & Tasker, i barrel lime . .95 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid James Briggs, tin dippers, oil can ^0.55 
The Thomas A. Lane Co., i 1x6 

nipple, I ell for steam drill . .19 
Moore & Preston, 2,325 pounds of 

Cumberland coal . . . 6.39 

Star Stamp Co., 6 brass checks . 1.20 

36 



;25-43 



^650.94 



562 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid John E. Towle & Co., 5 pork barrels ^2.50 

Wingate & Gould, 4 pairs rubber 

boots ..... 12.75 



^23.58 

Total expenditures ..... ^19,892.35 
Transferred to appropriation for South Main street 

bridge . . . . . . . . 475.00 



^20,367.35 



Damage of Land Taken for Highways. 

Appropriation ..... $8,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . , 8,430.71 

$16,430.71 

Expenditures. 

damages awarded by mayor and aldermen. 

Paid Mrs. EmmaF. Brown, land damage, 

extension of Cass street . . $103.49 

Sydney A. Blood, land damage. 

Dearborn street .... 100.00 

Lawrence Dowd, extension of Ma- 
ple street ..... 475.00 
Mrs. Ed\^idge Eno, land damage, 

execution ..... 94.26 

George H. Elliott, land damage, 

building street .... 500.00 

S. G. Fletcher, land damage and 

moving buildings, Hayward street 1,800.00 

Charles G. Hastings, land damage, 

extension Cypress street . . 1,100.00 

John T. Hanigan, land damage, 

Cartier street .... 700.00 

Horace I. Johnson, et al., judgment 

recovered 1,999.51 



AVATERING STREETS. 563 

Paid A. S. Lamb, land damage, Hayward 

street $1,205.28 

John Mulligan, land damage, Cass 

street 90.89 

Patrick O'Neil, land damage, Cartier 

street ..... 450.00 

M. Prout, land damage. Young and 

Hayward streets . . . 949-30 

Mrs. Susan Prescott, land damage, 

Cass street .... 9.89 

Louis St. John, land damage, exe- 
cution ..... 70-87 

Chas. P. Still, land damage, execution 461.31 

Joseph Trudeau, land damage, exe- 
cution ..... 104.76 

Theophile Trottier, land damage, 

Cartier street . . ... 800.00 

John T. Underhill, land damage, 

building sewer .... 500.00 

George R. Vance, land damage, exe- 
cution ..... 326.62 

Flora A. Woodman, executrix, land 

damage, execution . . . 1,065.55 

Sarah B. Woodman, land damage, 

judgment recovered . . . 751-98 

Hannah Welch, et al, land damage, 

execution ..... 300.00 

D. C. Whittemore, land damage, 

Bartlett street .... 2,472.00 

$16,430.71 



Watering Streets. 
Appropriation • $4,000.00 



564 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-r 


oil, in 


division No. 2 : 


January .... 


^33-25 


March . 






129.69 


April -. 






141.05 


May 






334-45 


June 






461.64 


July . . 






597-31 


August . 






564.98 


September 






366.59 


October . 






289.00 


December 






14.12 


Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in 


division No. 10 : 


March ^4.50 


April 






14-37 


May 






123.37 


June 






III. 75 


July . . 






168.13 


August , 






147-87 


September 






97.25 


October . 






. . 62.50 


REPAIRS 


. 


Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 


50 feet oak ^1.75 


72 feet chestnut, and 


labor 




2.41 



Paid John T. Beach, repairing sprinkler 

wheels ...... 13-65 

Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co..- 

Material and labor on troughs and foun- 
tains 95.75 



^2,932.08 



^29.74 



WATERING STREETS. 



565 



Material and labor on standpipes 

Repairs on fountains, shutting off water 
and turning on same for painters, etc 
Paid Frank I. Lessard & Co.: 

Material and labor on fountains . 

Repairing street pipe, junction of Main 
and McGregor streets 

Repairing standpipe, Turner street 
Paid George W. Rief: 

Labor on trough 

Repairs on sprinkler . 
Paid A. Filion, repairing sprinklers 
Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 

Repairing pipe to troughs . 

Labor on fountains, etc. 

Material and labor on sprinklers . 

Dippers, chains, etc. . 
Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., repairs 

on axle 
Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

600 bolts . 

4 drills 

1^2 pounds oakum 

Steel and iron . 

Paint, varnish, brushes, etc 

Other hardware . 
Paid Adams & Tasker, i 5-inch bend 
John Driscoll, 3 dozen dippers 
John Bryson, paint and labor 



$9.70 
17.46 

50-30 

2.51 
1-95 

1.60 
2.68 

12.30 

5.81 

5-30 

37-29 

5-63 

6.15 

10.15 

3-45 

•75 

3-67 

20.09 

5-09 
•56 

5-40 
.66 



122.26 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



,984.08 
15.92 



566 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Appropriation 



Paving Streets. 



Expenditures. 



),000.00 



LABOR. 






Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 


sion No. 2 : 


March $19-13 


April 






72.26 


May 






271.50 


June 






344.25 


July . . . 






388.50 


August . 






382.99 


September 






310-95 


October . 






305- 2. S 


November 






59.00 



Paid labor of men andf teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 7 : 

August $55-oo 

September ..... 20.00 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 


sion No. 10 : 


April $136-37 


May .... 


279.14 


June .... 


226.00 


July .... 


319.99 


August .... 


127.34 


September 


12.38 


October .... 


68.43 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 

I 50-foot tape-line .... 



$2,153.83 



$75.00 



- $i!i69.65 



$0.30 



PAVING STREETS. 567 

I fibre pail ..... ;^o.45 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

Hammers and handles . . . 1.70 

23 pounds steel ..... ' 2.99 

64 pounds Norway iron . . . 2.24 

Other hardware ..... 2.75 

Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., 6 rules . 1.50 



PAVING STONE AND GRAVEL. 

Paid W. H. Colburn, 392 loads paving 
stone ..... 

Mrs. Mary Hartshorn, 24 loads pav- 
ing stone ..... 30.00 
Joseph Peltier, 8 loads paving stone 14.00 
Charles A. Bailey, 4,686 paving 

blocks ..... 220.66 



CONCRETE CROSSINGS. 

Paid C. H. Robie Co. : 

Concrete, sundry places . . . $826.91 

412 gallons pitch .... 61. So 

Paid J. T. Underbill & Co., concrete, 

sundry places 581.48 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid George W. Rief, lumber and labor . 15-76 

Paid Charles A. Bailey: 

3 cesspool stones . . 

36 circles ...... 

30 feet curbing ..... 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



$950.66 



>i, 470-19 



9.00 




108.00 




12.00 


^134-76 




. 


$5,966.02 




33-9^ 



$6,000.00 



568 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Macadamizing Streets. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



^15,000.00 
165.99 





Expenditures. 






LABOR. 


Paid labor of men, 


as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 


March 


$52-50 


April 




99.00 


May 




534-84 


June 




584.81 


July 




1,809.69 


August 




2,211.08 


September 




i,To8.73 


October . 




1,073.05 



$15,165.99 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 10: 
August ........ 

FUEL, FREIGHT, AND WATER. 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 3 tons Cum- 
berland coal .... 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 3 tons 
Cumberland coal 

D. M. Poore, i ton Cumberland 
coal ...... 

People's Gas-Light Co., 22 chal- 
drons coke ..... 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 
on oil, castings, powder 

Concord & Montreal Railroad, 
freight on gravel 

board of water commissioners, use 
of water ... 



518.00 

18.00 

6.00 

88.00 

6.40 

4.00 

15.00 



57.473-70 

$853-55 



$155-40 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 



569 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 



Paid Champion Flue Scraper Co., 2 scra- 
pers ....... 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 




1 2 canal barrow trays . 


10.00 


7 dozen sledge handles 


11.40 


91 pounds drills .... 


13-65 


Lath yarn and twine . 


.60 


Other hardware .... 


33-50 


Paid John B. Varick Co.: 




Rubber packing .... 


3-70 


Oil and oilers .... 


2.68 


Cotton waste .... 


12.50 


Steel and iron .... 


16.14 


Emery cloth, snips, white lead . 


2.56 


Hammers ..... 


33-15 


Trowels 


2.20 


Files 


2.99 


Rivets, bolts, hinges, screws 


3-42 


Other hardware .... 


51-32 


Paid The Wadleigh Hardware Co.: 




Ratchet, rotating bar . 


11.88 


Pawl, springs, buffers, nuts, etc. . 


11.05 


Nails, padlock . 


2.05 


Forcite, fuse, powder, etc. . 


365-47 


Tallow 


6.10 


Other hardware .... 


8.75 



LUMBER, CASTINGS, AND REPAIRS. 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 

Material and labor on road roller . $14.66 

Material and labor on crusher . . 87.33 

Material and labor .... 58.87 

Labor putting teeth into gear . . i.oo 

New parts to crusher and moving same 170.00 



570 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

New and complete building for engine, 

crusher, etc. ..... $1,472.00 

Repairs ...... 1.65 

Erection of crusher plant, and putting 

same in running order . . . 475.00 

Paid Joseph Huneau, repairs -on crusher 

and pump ..... 9.97 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry and Ma- 
chine Works, castings for crusher 16.12 
The Head & Dovvst Co., lumber . 16.44 
The Thomas A. Lane Co., coup- 
lings, packing, pipe, labor . . 43-6i 
Swan & Finch Co., 50 gallons ma- 
chinery oil .... I5-00 

The Farrell Foundry & Machine 

Co., plates, bearings, etc. . . 50-38 

Vacuum Oil Co., 50 ^^ gallons ma- 
chinery oil .... 34-33 

F. E. Webster, repairing and paint- 
ing wagon ..... 19-50 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . . . 25.54 



STONE. 



CONCRETE. 

Paid George F. Higgins, repairing road- 
way, Merrimack street . . $25.00 
C. H. Robie Co., concrete, sundry 

places 1,181.51 

J. T. Underhill & Co., concrete, 

sundry places .... 316.32 



Paid Charles A. Bailey, 34 carloads stone 

chips and freight on same . . $254.43 

Massachusetts Broken Stone Co., 2,- 

469,100 pounds broken stone . 1,728.43 



52,511.40 



$1,522.83 



$1,982.86 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



571 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Eager & Rand, 4 hogsheads . 
L, M. Aldrich, filing two saws 
James Briggs, i tunnel, 4 sheets tin 
Bartlett & Thompson, 40^ lbs. suet 
H. I. Faucher, i hogshead 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & 
Insurance Co., insurance for one 
year. May 21, 1895 . 
Paid Pike & Heald Co.: 

I dipper ...... 

Labor and material, stone crusher 
Paid People's Gas-Light Co., 400 cubic 
feet gas, city crusher . 
George W. Rief, i gallon belt dress- 
ing 

Sacred Heart Hospital, care and at- 
tendance, case Michael Murphy . 

Total expenditures 



14.00 
.40 

•85 
1.62 

1. 00 



22.50 

.10 
5.61 

•56 

2.50 
15.00 



$i5'i65.99 



Appropriation 



Grading for Concrete. 



Expenditures. 



1-, 000.00 



LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in division No. 2 
March 



j.*xan-ii .... 

April .... 


202.49 


May .... 


167.76 


June .... 


227.75 


July .... 


226.62 


August .... 


326.73 



572 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



September 
October 
November 
December 



^247.38 
5.87 

43-5° 
5.12 

^1^539-23 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in division No. 7 : 
August ...... 163.00 

September . . . . . 35 -oo 

December ..... 8.00 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in division No. 10 



April 

May. 

June 

July 

August 

September 



Paid Charles A. Bailey : 

Curbstone . 

141 circles 

58 cesspool stones 
Paid Warren Harvey : 

1,205}^ feet curbstone 

Covering stone . 



$12.75 

119.88 

68.24 

156.25 

79.06 

20.12 



STONE. 



^628.64 
519.00 

174.00 

482.20 

53-6o 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid The Wadleigh Hardware Co., powder and fuse 

Total expenditures ..... 
Transferred to reserved fund . . . . . 



^106.00 



$456.30 



$1,857.44 



$1.26 

$3,960.23 
39-77 



SCAVENGER SERVICE. 



573 



Scavenger Service. 



Appropriation 








. $16,000.00 


Expenditures. 




LABOR. 


Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 


January . 


• ^933-45 


February . 


. 






735-98 


March 


. 






i»35i-33 


April 


. 






760.70 


May 


. 






814-35 


June 








729.69 


July . . . 


• 






612.92 


August 








773-19 


September 








698.96 


October . 


. 






932.64 


November 


. 






894.70 


December 








775-73 




p,.^,WL^.yj^ 


Paid labor of men, as pei 


pay-roll, division No. 10 : 


January . 


^170.20 


February . 








142.14 


March 








297-75 


April 








298.63 


May 








275.93 


June 








125.94 


July . . 








201.63 


August 








179.62 


September 








104.63 


October , 








188.31 


November 








128.37 


December 








118.73 



ON CONTRACT, 

Paid city farm, scavenger service one year to Janu- 
uary i, 1895 



$2,499.96 



574 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 6 steel 






rakes 


$2.00 




Pike & Heald Co., 6 scoops . 


3.60 




Paid John B. Varick Co. : 






Forks and handles .... 


2.00 




6 rakes 


2.25 




13 rattan brooms .... 


7.04 




Other hardware 


44.20 


$61.09 






SUNDRIES. 






Paid The Fred Allen Co., 8 storm horse 






covers ..... 


$30.00 




The John B. Clarke Co., printing 






3,100 scavenger cards . 


10.00 




The Head & Dowst Co., lumber 


4.04 




. Kimball Carriage Co., horse covers 


16.50 




M. Prout, I gallon alcohol 


2-75 




George W. Rief, lumber and labor. 






repairing sleds .... 


10.70 


$73-99 






Total expenditures 


. 


$14,880.56 


Transferred to reserved fund . 




1,119-44 




$16,000.00 


Street Sweeping. 




Appropriation 


• 


$1,200.00 


Expenditures. 






LABOR. 







Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 

April $119-75 

May 196.61 



BRIDGES. 



575 



June 
July . 
August . 
September 
October . 



173-59 
171.98 
106.25 

159-39 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 10 : 



August . 
September 



HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co. 
I pair pliers 
I 1 2 -inch wrench 



REPAIRS. 

Paid Abbott-Downing Co., sprinkler gears 
S. A. Felton & Son Co., street 

sweepers refilled 
I. L. Stickney, 4 yards enameled 

cloth 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid D. H. Maxfield, cash paid for express 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund . 



$7-50 
19.00 



^0-75 
.65 



$7.00 

64.00 

1.40 



!i,o2i.45 



$26.50 



$1.40 



$72.40 



$1.00 

$1,122.75 
77-25 

$1,200.00 



Bridges. 



Appropriation 



5,000.00 



576 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 
January ...... $67.86 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October . 

November 

December 



27.99 
7.88 

41.25 

81.14 
162.50 
173-57 
147-31 
118.50 
165.14 

50.69 
102.30 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 9 : 
October ....... 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 10 : 

March ^9-13 

May 61.00 

June ...... 3.06 

August ...... 9.50 



Paid John F. Larkin, labor on fence rails. 
Second-street bridge . 
S. F. Patterson, labor on Amoskeag 
bridge ..... 



LUMBER. 



Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., lumber, 
Granite bridge .... 
The Head & Dowst Co., lumber, re- 
, pairs on different bridges 



$8.00 
38.00 

^329-95 
352-94 



[46.13 
514.25 



52.69 



SOUTH MAIN-STREET BRIDGE. 



577 



Paid S. F. Patterson, lumber, etc. . 

A. C. Wallace, 72,249 feet 3-inch 
hemlock plank, per contract 

HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., nails, 
spikes, files, etc. .... 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Nails, spikes, screws .... 
Auger bit, hammer, turpentine, pencils 
Iron, paint, brushes .... 
Other hardware ..... 

Paid The Wadleigh Hardware Co., spikes 

SUNDRIES, 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson Foundry and Ma- 
chine Works, material and repairs 
on patterns, level, etc. 
Pike & Heald Co., railing, South 
Main-street bridge, per contract, 
^58; less charge to George East- 
man, $2.97 .... 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund . 



$16.69 

787-53 

$30.60 

22.91 

6-75 
4.68 

•93 

1.84 



;i.4o 



55-03 



$1,487.11 



$67.71 



^56-43 

$2,900.32 
99.68 

$3,000.00 



South Main-Street Bridge. 

Appropriation ..... $20,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 7!975-oo 
Transferred from new highway appropri- 
ation ....... 475-00 

37 



$28,450.00 



578 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures, 
contract. 
Paid L. F. Kittredge & Son .... 



City Teams. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 
January .... . $357.48 

February 



March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 10 : 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 



$28,450.00 



,300.00 
698.40 



220.37 
120.64 
166.30 

156-51 
135-81 
145-43 
175-50 
204.43 



$26.49 
15.24 
8.50 
12.25 
17.12 
21.00 

17-25 
20.44 

27-37 



5,998.40 



$1,682.47 



$165.66 



CITY TEAMS. 



579 



OATS, CORN, FEED, HAY, AND STRAW. 



Paid Adams & Tasker . 






^201.76 


Annis Flour & Grain Co. 




400.76 


F. H. Brown . . . . 




14.04 


George Butterfield 






90.86 


D. Butterfield 






19.26 


W. Currier 






39.20 


Henry Chandler . 






5.60 


Freeman & Merrill 






95.20 


A. G. Fairbanks 






64.08 


Gage & McDougall 






711-34 


J. P. Griffin . 






7-58 


Frank D, Hanscom 






25.42 


Clarence R. Merrill 






416.83 


Peter Parker . 






45.22 


Partridge Brothers . 






161. 15 


Michill Parault 






226.88 


H. C. Smith . 






8.30 


Frederick Smyth . 






85.00 


C. D. Welch . 






160.62 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid Connor & Grossman, horseshoeing . 

HARNESSES AND REPAIRS. 



^2,779.10 



)IO.OO 



Paid Kimball Carriage Co.: 




Oil, soap, sponges .... 


$6.12 


4 blankets, lettered .... 


29.00 


Paid Ranno Harness Co.: 




Repairing harnesses .... 


"•75 


Storm covers ..... 


9-25 


Bit, crupper, strap, whips . 


3-85 


Calking boot, snaps, surcingle, etc. 


9-35 


New harness 


42.00 


Currycombs, sponges, reins . 


4-05 



580 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Thomas P. Riley, repairing har- 
nesses, etc. ..... ^93'7S 

N. J. Whalen, whips, straps, collars, 

etc 13.25 



;^222.37 



REPAIRS ON CARRIAGES AND NEW CARRIAGES. 



Paid John T. Beach, repairs, etc. . 


^62.90 


Paid A. Filion : 




New wheels, ironed .... 


29,00 


5 pair cart wheels, and painted . 


29.00 


Repairs ...... 


10.00 


Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son : 




Repairs, etc 


33-65 


I 2-horse sled 


75.00 


2 i-horse sleds ..... 


120.00 


Paid Sanborn Carriage Co., i shaft and 




bolts 


2.25 


HARDWARE. 





Paid J. H. Farnham, files and rasps . ^10.81 

H. Leibing, paint, brushes, sandpaper 5.83 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 

Axle grease . . . . ! 3.50 

1 2 barrow trays ..... 10.00 

Bolts, bits ...... 3.21 

Paint, varnish, etc. .... 19-99 

Other hardware . . . . . 10.15 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Steel and iron 78.99 

Horseshoes ...... 34-04 

Bits, files, nails, rivets .... 29.27 

Cherry welding compound . . . 2.90 

Bolts and screws . .... 11.30 

Turpentine, paint, oil, etc. . . . 17.06 



^361.80 



CITY TEAMS. 




Nuts, washers, wrenches, drills . 




^17-34 


Sponges, soap .... 


. 


17.69 


Other hardware .... 




62.50 


lid Wadleigh Hardware Co.: 






Harness hooks .... 




.90 


Axle grease, shears, brooms, wicks, 


rope, 




tarred paper .... 


• 


9-74 



581 



;^345-22 



MEDICAL SERVICES AND INSURANCE. 

Paid A. W. Baker, dentistry work on 

horses' teeth ..... ^20.00 

Paid Z, Foster Campbell : 

5 gallons Pulsifer's Healer . . . 20.00 

Sweet spirits nitre .... 3.99 

Camphoria, witch hazel . . . 1.22 
Paid J. A. Charest, V. S.: 

Medicine ...... 2.00 

Filing teeth ..... i.oo 

Paid Edward H. Currier, i can Sure Cure 2.50 
J. L. Golden, medical services, 

medicine ..... 27.45 

John F. Kerwin, 600 lbs. Peel's 

Food ...... 36.00 

W. B. Mitchell, medicine . . 1.05 
Security Live Stock Insurance Co., 

fees and assessments on policies . 241.84 



^357-05 



STOCK. 

Paid Cavanaugh Brothers, gray mare 

WATER, GAS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid Water-works, use of water to Janu- 
ary I, 1895 .... $61.00 
People's Gas-Light Co., gas at stable 157-64 



582 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., use of telephone . $72.90 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 13 tons egg 

coal ...... 77.00 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 4 tons 

Cumberland coal . . . 24.50 

Moore & Preston, 2 tons Cumber- 
land coal ..... 11.00 

People's Gas- Light Co., 3 chaldrons 

of coke ..... I2.00 

J. F. Wyman, 2 tons egg coal . 12.50 



REPAIRS ON blacksmith's SHOP AND 


CITY STA] 


Paid John Driscoll : 




12 joints pipe 


^4.20 


I elbow 


•35 


Labor 


•75 


Paid The Head & Dowst Co., lumber 




and labor 


39-05 


The Thomas A. Lane Co., i ^^-inch 




cock 


■49 


Pike & Heald Co., plumbing mate- 




rial and labor .... 


170.00 


George W. Rief, lumber and labor . 


8.24 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


17-13 


William E. Williams, repairs on 




blacksmith's shop 


12.36 


HORSE HIRE. 




Paid Clarence B. Danforth, use of horse . 


$3.00 


W. J. Freeman, use of team . 


1. 00 


E. T. James, use of teams 


49-5° 


Lamoreaux Brothers, use of team . 


1.50 


C. H. Simpson, use of teams . 


56-50 


Whitten & Fifield, use of team 


2.00 



[28.S4 



$252.57 



SII3-50 



REPAIRS OF SEWERS. 583 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Paid F. S. Bodwell, stone for setting tires ^25.00 
A. N. Clapp, oil, brooms, nails, salt, 

hinges ..... 9.29 

Concord & Montreal Railroad, 

freight on snow plow . . .33. 
John Driscoll, galvanized iron pipe 3.25 
Eager & Rand, soap and matches . 1.55 
C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Works, 2 stamps . . 2.0a 
Chas. A. Hoitt & Co., 4 shades . 1.72 
T. F. Hannaford, 12 brooms . . 6.50 
A. & W. S. Heath, pair rubber boots 3.50 
The Thomas A. Lane Co., i hose 

nozzle ..... .40 

Clarence R. Merrill, i barrel lime . .95 

E. D. Rogers, 12 pails axle paste . 6.00 
L. & W. T. Seiberlich, glass and 

setting . . , . . 1. 10 
Irving L. Stickney, 29^ pounds 

leather . . . . . 12.28 

Union Oil Co., 5 gallons naptholeum 6.25 



Total expenditures ^6,998.40 



Repairs of Sewers. 
Appropriation ....... 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 

January ^83.23 

February ..... 29.00 



584 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



March . . . . 


^216.86 


April . . . . 


34-63 


May . . . . 


419.36 


June 


247.88 


July . . . 


199.93 


August . 


624.64 


September 


435-57 


October . 


540.14 


November 


276.10 


December 


46.81 


Paid labor of men, as per pay 


-roll, division No. 10 : 


January . 


^6.41 


March . 


6.12 


April 


41.06 


May 


174.25 


June 


55-19 


July . . ■ .. 


54.26 


August . 


91.12 


September 


109.12 


October . 


231.99 


November 


30.87 


December 


1.75 



$3>i54.i5 



>02.I4 



HARDWARE. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., 28 cesspool dipper handles 

MATERIAL, LABOR, ETC. 

Paid M. J. Coleman, plumbing repairs, 

Mrs. E. H. Collins . . . ^i4-75 

Samuel Eastman & Co., 500 feet 

leather hose .... 500.00 

W. P. Farmer, i pair rubber hip 

boots 4.00 

Gatz & Graupner, lumber and labor 9.50 



$11.67 



NEW SEWERS. 



585 



Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co., piping 

material and labor . . . ^115.78 
Pike & Heald Co., 2 dippers . . 1.74 

George L. Robinson, 2 pairs rubber 

boots ...... 7.50 

Paid Irving L. Stickney : 

5 oil suits ...... 1 1-25 

2 hats ....... 1. 00 

Paid Palmer & Garmon, cutting cesspool 

stone ....... 16.45 



CEMENT, BRICK, STONE, LUMBER. 

Paid F. S. Bodwell, 24 cesspool stones . $66.00 
W. F. Head & Son, 7 M. brick . 42.00 

The Head & Dowst Co., 500 feet 

lox 10 spruce . . . . 7.75 

Clarence Merrill, 4 barrels cement . 5.40 

Warren Harvey, edge stone, steps, 
flagging, etc 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid Concord & Montreal Railroad, 

freight on brick .... 

John B. Hall, labor cleaning three 

cellars, Cilley block . 
Manchester Heating & Lighting 
Co., repairs on blasting battery . 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund . 



New Sewers. 



390-93 



$28.00 



10.00 



1.60 



;i.97 



; 1 2.08 



$39.60 

$5,201.61 
798-39 

$6,000.00 



Appropriation 



586 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
October ..... 

November ..... 
December ..... 



No. 2 : 
^785.06 
2,294.30 

2,931-50 
2,930.91 

3,628.17 

2,852.51 

3,618.44 
2,597.46 
2,640.05 

No. 7 : 
$33-°o 
102.01 
30.00 



$24,278.40 



id labor of men, 


as per pay 


-roll, 


division 


No. 10 : 


May 


$317-38 


June 










1,096.64 


July . 










1,409.86 


August . 










2,130.36 


September 










1,841.87 


October . 










1,873.59 


November 










819.68 


December 










661.42 



HARDWARE. 

Paid A. N. Clapp, nails, saw blade, pow- 
der $3.25 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 

12 picks and handles . . . . 14-50 

Lanterns, fibre pails, axes . . . 7.25 

Tapes and rules, cords, rope . g.46 



$165.01 



$10,150.80 



NEW SEWERS. 




Spikes, nails .... 


^9.85 


Shovels 


15-75 


Other hardware .... 


10.03 


Paid John B. Varick Co.: 




Picks and handles 


32.00 


Shovels 


36.80 


4 dozen ruby globes . 


11.98 


Steel and iron .... 


72.98 


Nails, dipper handles, hammers . 


16.17 


Barrows 


10.50 


Rope, twine .... 


17-59 


Other hardware . . . . . 


72.88 


Paid The Wadleigh Hardware Co.: 




Forcite, fuse, wire 


619.00 


Pick handles, picks, shovels 


26.50 


Other hardware 


38.33 


SEWER PIPE. 




Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 


^522.04 


George D. Goodrich 


5»36i-46 



587 



^1,024.82 



^5»883-5o 



MATERIAL, LABOR, ETC. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., labor 
painting and paint stock 
Bartlett & Gay, i steam drill and 

fittings complete 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., 3 tons Cum 

berland coal 
James Briggs, dippers . 
Paid Carson Trench Machine Co.: 
I trench machine, complete 
4 54 -yard tubs .... 
Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 27 tons 
coal ...... 



d 


$13.06 




225.00 




18.00 




.60 




3,250.00 




200.00 



161.25 



588 . REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Dodge & Straw, 4 pairs rubber boots ^12.00 

W. P. Farmer, 6 pairs rubber boots 19-25 
Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 

Labor on bolts and drills . . . 12.30 

Repairs on steam pump . . . 2.50 

Paid Lowell O. Fowler, 3 pairs rubber boots 7.50 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor . . 7.33 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Works, cesspool traps, cast- 
ings, grates, repairs, etc. . . 1,016.21 

A. H. Kittredge, dualin and fuse . 168.30 
Frank I. Lessard & Co., material . 1.16 

The Thomas A. Lane Co., Akron 

pipe, packing, labor, etc. . . 1 15-34 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 

grates and castings . . . 43.20 

Paid Manchester Heating & Lighting Co.; 

Repairing battery .... 3.85 

2 dippers ...... .50 

Paid Moore & Preston, 2 tons Cumber- 
land coal ..... 11.00 

Pike & Heald, Akron pipe . . 8.95 

D. M. Poore, 1,970 pounds of Cum- 
berland coal .... 

George L. Robinson, i pair rubber 
boots ..... 

Ranno Harness Co., pump washers, 

snaps, manilla rope, labor . . 2.12 

Paid C. H. Thayer : 

7 pairs rubber boots . . . . 19-25 

Cork sole . . . . . . .10 

Paid Wingate & Gould, 8 pairs rubber 

boots ...... 26.00 



5-91 

3-75 



CEMENT, BRICK, STONE, LUMBER. 

Paid Adams & Tasker, 5 barrels cement . $13-75 
Bartlett & Gay, 22,124 feet plank . 160.09 



)354-43 



NEW SEWERS. 



589 



Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co.: 




1,038 barrels cement . 


. ^1,264.12 


118 barrels cement 


^138-85 


Less 230 empty sacks re- 




turned .... 


28.75 
1 10. 10 



52 barrels cement 

Less 59 empty sacks returned 



$59.80 
7-37 



Paid W. F. Head & Son, 5 1 1 M brick . 
Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 

2,830 feet spruce .... 

Lumber and labor .... 

Paid Clarence R. Merrill, 48 bbls. cement 

George Rief, lumber and labor 

A. C. Wallace, lumber and labor . 

FREIGHT. 

Paid Boston & Maine Railroad 

Concord & Montreal Railroad 



52-43 


2,859.50 


42.45 


16.90 


64.60 


10.00 


378.26 



^39-50 

398.38 



MEDICAL AND SURGICAL. 

Paid D. S. Adams, M. D., services attend- 
ing Patrick Kendrigan, account of 
claim for damages . . . $28.00 

I. L. Carpenter, M. D., attendance 
on Patrick Kendrigan, settlement 
of claim ..... 5.00 

E. H. Currier, medicines furnished 
Patrick Kendrigan, settlement of 
claim . . . . . 8.60 

Paid J. A. Jackson, M. D.: 

Examination, Patrick Kendrigan . 5.00 

Attendance on Patrick Kendrigan, set- 
tlement of claim .... 10.00 



$4,972.20 



^37-88 



590 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid M. E. Kean, M. D.: 

Surgical consultation, case of Patrick 

Kendrigan ..... ^5-oo 

Attendance on Patrick Kendrigan, set- 
tlement of claim . . . . 125.00 
Paid Frederick Perkins, M. D., surgical 

treatment, case of Augustin Nolette 40.00 

C. F. Starr, M. D., surgical consul- 
tations, case of Nolette . . 6. do 
G. L, Wakefield, M. D., dressing and 

treatment of Hugh Conroy's hand 5.00 



$0.60 


5-15 


195.00 


2.00 


28.61 


6.25 


3-73 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Adams & Tasker, 6 bag strings 
L. M. Aldrich, filing saws 
Harry J. Briggs, 78 days services, as- 
sistant, engineer's office 
Clark M. Bailey, 20 lbs. wiping waste 
Paid A. N. Clapp : 

408 gallons oil 

115 pounds oatmeal .... 
Matches, wicks, twine, etc. . 
Paid The John B. Clarke Co., advertising 

proposals for sewer pipe . . 8.50 
Frank H. Challis, advertising pro- 
posals for sewer pipe . . . 3.90 
J. Choate & Co., repairing damages 
on E. H. Chadbourne's house, 
caused by blasting . . . 1.55 
James R. Carr & Co., glass and set- 
ting 3.25 

P. Duval, filing saws . . . 6.40 

Lowell O. Fowler, repairing 6 pairs 

rubber boots .... 5.00 



^237.60 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



591 



Paid A. M. Finney, cleaning and laying 
carpets damaged by blasting Wal- 
nut-street sewer .... 

Leonard Mudgett, oatmeal 

Henry W. Parker, 2' barrel oatmeal 

C. H. Simpson, use of teams . 

H. Stratton, repairs on pump . 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 
proposals for sewer pipe 

George W. Wales, 30 days' services, 
assistant, city engineer's depart- 
ment ...... 

York Market Co., suet . 

Harrie M. Young, 30 days' services, 
assistant, city engineer's depart- 
ment ...... 



15-39 
3-50 
6.00 

•50 
9.60 



75.00 
•36 



82.50 



$466.27 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



$52,970.91 
2,029.09 



$55,000.00 



Appropriation 



Lighting Streets. 



. $43,000.00 



Expenditures. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 



Paid Manchester Electric Light Co.: 




Charges. 


Discounts 


January . . . $3,150.44 


$4.16 


February . . . 3,172.08 


12.28 


March. . . . 3,172.08 


10.40 


April .... 3,172.08 


7-56 


May .... 3,172.08 


8.82 



592 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 









Char 


ges. 


Discounts 


June .... ^3,172.08 


$7-87 


July .... 3,172.08 


6-93 


August . . . 3,223.74 


5-67 


September . . . 3,241.06 


15-75 


October . . . 3,292.93 


7-56 


November . , , 3,342.60 


14.80 


December . 


3.439-30 


10.40 


^38,722.55 


^112.20 


Total discounts deducted 


112.20 




GAS. 




id People's Gas-Light Co.: 




January ..... 


$75.88 


February 










73-92 


March . 










60.76 


April 










56.84 


May 










58.10 


June 










49.28 


July . 










43-96 


August . 










45.78 


September 










48.02 


October . 










S3-20 


November 










63.42 


December 










66.78 



CARE OF GAS AND OIL LAMPS. 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for lighting, extin- 
guishing, and care of gas and oil street lights : 
January ...... $140.10 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



142.35 
126.80 

135-10 
144.02 
142.10 



5,610.35 



^695.94 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 



593 



July . . 




^144.27 


August 




142.10 


September 




142.10 


October . 




137-95 


November 




142.80 


December 


SUNDRIES. 


137.70 







Paid Clark M. Bailey : 

72 dozen chimneys .... 

7 dozen burners ..... 

5j^ dozen B. founts . . . . 

wicks, etc. . . . ... 

Paid F. W. Elliott, oil and lighting street 
lamp from July 19, 1893, to De- 
cember 31, 1894 .... 

W. J. Freeman, hacks 
C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., repairing lamplighter . 
Paid People's Gas-Light Co.: 
21 barrels kerosene oil 
7 boxes glass ..... 

1 gallon whiskey ..... 

2 gross matches ..... 
Sperm oil, glass cutters, etc. 

Paid Mary Reed, lighting lamp at Massa- 
besic from Dec. i, 1893, to Aug. i, 1894 



72.00 

11.00 

9.00 

2-75 



22.35 
15.00 



75-71 

17.77 

2.25 

1.78 

2.63 

6.00 



$1,677.39 



$240.24 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



^i, 223.92 
1,776.08 



Engineer's Department. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



38 



[,300.00 
716.72 



$5,016.72 



594 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid W. H. Bennett, services as engineer ^1,200.00 
Mrs. A. G. Bennett, 237 days' labor, 

clerk 355-50 

J. Edward Baker, 104 da3's' labor, 

assistant ..... 182.00 

Harry J. Briggs, 248^ days' labor, 

assistant . . . . . 621.25 
George M. Currier, 209^ days' 

labor, assistant .... 261.88 
A. H. Sanborn, 39 days' labor, as- 
sistant ..... 97'5o 
Herbert L. Watson, 69^ days' 

labor, assistant . . . . 86.87 

George W. Wales, 277 days' labor, 

assistant ..... 692.50 
Harrie M. Young, 268 days' labor, 

assistant ..... 737'00 



^j234.5o 



TEAM AND TEAM EXPENSES. 

Paid Frederick Allen : 

I saddle pad ...... $0.50 

I bit . . .■ . . . . 2.50 

I blanket ....... 7.00 

Lettering blanket .... 2.50 

Paid John T. Beach, carriage repairs . 30.40 

Connor & Grossman, shoeing horse 1.25 

W. J. Freeman, use of teams . . 16.25 

Kimball Carriage Co, 2 whips . 2.00 
Manchester Street Railway, car 

tickets . • . . . . 20.00 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, carriage re- 
pairs ...... 33'6o 



engineer's department. 



595 



Paid C. H. Simpson, use of teams . 
Whitten & Fifield, use of teams 

TELEPHONE. 



$3-5° 
22.50 
$142.00 



Paid New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 
of telephone ....... 



SUPPLIES AND OFFICE EXPENSES. 



Paid W. H. Bennett : 

Cash paid for hooks, brush broom 

Cash paid for postage . 

Cash paid for i Challenge eyelet press 

and eyelets .... 

Paid Mrs. A. G. Bennett, cash paid for 

express .... 

Walter Blenus, repairs on tapes 

Barton & Co., 5 yards flannel 

Paid Buff" & Berger : 

2 Boston rods .... 

Repairing instruments, etc. 
Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Making 2 small portfolios . 

2 cases for books 

Binding report .... 
Paid E. R. Coburn Co. : 

I letter copy book 

I cloth bath .... 

I No. 5 letter press . . $6.00 

Less I No. 4 press returned 2.25 



Pens, ink, blotting paper 

Paper, envelopes, blank-books, pencils 

I basket ...... 

Other stationery .... 

Paid P. C. Cheney Co., i piece jacketing 



4.00 

3.00 

•45 
6.65 
1.25 

30.00 
11.70 

4.00 
•50 
•25 

2.00 
3-25 



3-75 
10.68 

8.15 

•75 
.60 



$3^-3° 



596 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid G. B. Cressey : 
Carting guide boards . 
Painting signs .... 
Paid J. G. Ellinwood, i photograph 

Second-street bridge . 
Paid Frost & Adams : 

I roll blue print .... 
Paper, cloth, curves, etc. 
Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co., 2 stools . 
Paid J. Hodge : 
2,000 pine stakes 
1,000 chestnut hubs . 
720 feet 2 -inch spruce 
1 2 hours' labor on same 
I drafting board 
Paid J. J. Holland, 2 pounds chlorid 
lime ..... 
The Nate Kellogg Co., i M work 

blanks .... 

Lovejoy & Stratton, i clock . 

Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co. : 

I self-lighting burner . 

Labor putting on same 

Paid Morgan, Grossman & Co. : 

I Bates numbering machine 

3 stamps ..... 

Paid J. B. McCrillis 81 Son, i typewriter 

ribbon ..... 

Thomas H. McCollin & Co., i 

curve pen, ^-inch wheel opis- 

ometer ..... 

E. G. Soltmann, paper and[rubbers 

Irving L. Stickney, i rubber mat . 

Joseph St. Laurent, 2,150 grade 

pickets . . . . . 

The Head & Dowst Co., 18 hours' 

labor, office .... 



^2.00 
4.00 

•50 

4.5 a 

216.84 

6.00 

18.00 

20.00 

12.96 

4.80 

7.66 

•30 

2-75 
5.00 

•75 
•25. 

16.00 
2. So 



3.86 

7-3° 
2.09 

19-35 

5.04 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT, 597 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

2 blank books ..... ^22.00 
260 sheets parchment paper . . 23.00 

200 sheets No, 4421 paper . . . 6.75 

Pens, cord, erasers, paste, scrap-books 6.87 

Ink, record books, wax, etc. . . 8.63 

Paid Union Manufacturing Co., 1,000 

I ^ -inch house numbers . . . 45 -oo 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 
Twine, emery cloth, rules . 
Crayons, floor brush, steel, axes, etc. . 
I pair field glasses .... 
Other hardware ..... 

Paid C. H. Wood : 

Painting rods, pins, targets . . ' . 
I office sign ..... 

Paid George P, Wallace, i Remington 

typewriter ribbon . . . i.oo 

Harrie M. Young, cash paid for 

postage ..... 2.00 

$603.92 

Total expenditures . . . . . $5,016.72 



2.64 


6.15 


15.00 


3-58 


3-50 


1.50 



Health Department. 

Appropriation ....... $3,500.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid C. W. Downing, M. D., salary as 
member of board of health for 6 
months ending February i, 1894 $100.00 
Joseph B. Sawyer, salary as member 
of board of health, for year end- 
ing February i, 1894. . . 200.00 



598 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid C. F. Starr, M. D., salary as member 
board of health for year ending 
February i, 1894 . . . $200.00 

Richard J. Barry, 203 days' services 

as plumbing inspector , . 507-50 

Herbert S. Clough, 329 days' labor 

as health inspector . . . 987.00 

John F. Looney, 31654 days' labor 

as health inspector . . . 702.88 

Charles Langmaid, loi days' labor 202.00 

Paid labor, as per pay-roll, in division 
No. 2 : 

July 11.50 

August ^. 21.75 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid Frank H. Challis, printing and bind- 
ing certificates, notices, blanks, etc. . $16.00 
Paid The John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing 3,850 bulletins . . . 36.75 

1,000 postals, both sides . 13-00 

300 reports, 28 pages and cover 14.00 

3,000 cards, blanks, etc. . 53-25 

autograph on photograph of 

Dr. Crosby . . . .50 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., paper, envelopes, 

ink, blank books . . . 6.13 

Hopkins & Co., 1,000 letter heads, 
and printing . . . . 2.75 

Paid Wallace G. Stone : 

2,000 stamped envelopes, and printing 36.00 

Printing and binding 1,500 notices and 
blanks ...... 6.50 

Printing 250 circulars . . . 1.25 



$2,932.63 



$186.13 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



599 



TEAMS. 

Paid R. J. Barry, horsecar fares 

F. X. Chenette, use of teams . 
Paid Herbert S. Clough, cash paid : 
Teams ..... 
Horsecar fares .... 
Carfare, to Massabesic 
Boat at lake .... 
Labor burying horse, moving boat, etc 
Paid W. J. Freeman, use of team . 
John F. Looney, horsecar fares 
Whitten & Fifield, use of teams 



HOUSE OF ISOLATION. 

Paid Judith Sherer, matron, 7 4-7 weeks' 
board of patients 
building steps, and lumber for same . 

OFFICE EXPENSES. 

Paid H. S. Clough : 
Postage and envelopes 
Cuspidor, matches, ink, express, etc. 
Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co., i desk 
John F. Looney, blank books 
People's Gas-Light Co., gas . 
George Whitford, i cord hardwood 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paint 

Edmund R. Angell, analysis of water 
Bailey, Farrell Manufacturing Co., 

I smoke test machine 
H. B. Burnham, M. D., services case 

French family, McGregorville . 



529.00 
31.00 

1.25 

25.70 
3-40 
3.00 
1.85 
2.00 

15-95 
31.00 



)22.72 
2.00 



^23.05 

1.56 

30.00 

•15 
2.38 
6.00 



^2.98 

22.70 

15.00 



$144-15 



i24.72 



$63.14 



600 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Burnham, Brown & Warren, legal 






services ..... 


^18.00 




C. W. Colby, moving bed, etc., 41 






Orange street .... 


1.00 




Paid Herbert S. Clough : 






Alcohol, sulphur, lime 


.78 




Bluing, disinfectants .... 


•45 




Witness fee, paid N. P. Kidder . 


•77 




Freight on smoke test machine . 


•50 




Paid The John B. Clarke Co., advertis- 






ing, I column 4 times 


35-00 




John F. Looney, alcohol, disinfect- 






ants, etc 


1.25 




Manchester Hardware Co., i pair 






oar locks 


•50 




E. H. Stowe, 8 dinners, 4 horses fed 


6.00 




Paid W. H. Tibbetts : 






1 1 lbs. paint for boat .... 


1.32 




One half day's labor .... 


1-13 




Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising. 






314^ inches 3 times .... 


6-53 




Paid John B..Varick Co.: 






25 pounds sulphur .... 


•75 




Padlock, chain, staple 


•75 




I pair oars 


•75 


^118.16 






Total expenditures 


^3>468.93 


Transferred to reserved fund . 


• 


31.07 



5,500.00 



Repairs of Schoolhouses. 

Appropriation ..... ^5,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 464.67 

^5)464-67 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 601 

Expenditures, 
masonwork. 

Paid B. W. Robinson : 

Plastering, kalsomining, whitewashing, 

sundry schoolhouses . . . $217.49 

Repairing boiler, etc., sundry school- 
houses ...... 124.67 

Paid Warren Harvey, 5 loads stone, labor, 

use of tools ..... 37-00 

-^ $379-i6 



PAINTING AND GLAZING. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, painting and glazing, 

sundry schoolhouses . . . $219.65 

T. S. Avery, setting glass . . 7.35 

Paid J. Choate & Co.: 

Glass, and labor setting same . . 12.93 

Paper ...... 6.75 

Paid William H. Huse, cash paid for 

painting lines on blackboards . 2.50 

C. F. Jack, 15 lights glass, putty, 

and setting same . . . 2.86 

W. H. Newry, glass and setting same 3.80 

John A. Sargent, painting and glaz- 
ing, sundry schoolhouses . . 284.31 



CONCRETING. 

Paid George F, Higgins, patching, re- 
pairing, and new concrete, Goffe's 

Falls $60.00 

C. H. Robie Concrete Co., concret- 
ing, Amoskeag, Lowell street . 23.11 
J. T. Underbill & Co., concreting, 
Harvey district, Main street . . 173-35 



5540.15 



$256.46 



602 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WOODWORK. 




Paid Bobrick School Furniture Co.: 




48 sets No. I castings .... 


$141.60 


48 sets No. 2 castings .... 


146.40 


Paid G. H. Dudley, lumber, hardware, 




labor 


747-25 


The Head & Dowst Co., lumber, 




labor, etc 


461.41 


Manchester Hardware Co., i 7-foot 




pump 


3.00 


Horace Stearns, lumber and labor, 




on fence 


3-5° 



$1,503.16 



PLUMBING AND IRONWORK. 



Paid S. C. Austin & Co.: 

118 feet lightning rod, i point, addi- 
tion Webster-street .... $49-20 
Material and labor repairing rods, sun- 
dry schoolhouses . . . . 40.45 
Paid F. W. Blood, material and labor re- 
pairing roo.^s, sundry schoolhouses 322.33 
Henry A. Boone, repairing pump, 

Harvey district . . . . 1.50 

Paid E. M. Bryant & Co : 

Labor repairing bells, Webster-street . 4.20 

Labor and material . . . . 5.10 

Paid Cressey & Colby, repairing irons for 

furnace . . . . . 1.25 

Peter Harris, repairing locks . • .25 

The Thomas A. Lane Co., material 
and labor, plumbing, piping, etc., 
sundry schoolhouses . . . 868.90 
Clemens Langer, material and labor, 

plumbing at Main -street . . 10.15 



EEPAIRS OF SCHOOLIIOUSES. 603 

Paid Manchester Heating and Lighting Co.: 
Labor changing wires, Bakersville . $i,oo 

Plumbing material and labor, Training 

school ...... 74-96 

Labor and material, sundry school - 

houses ...... 335-30 

Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, i fire iron . .40 

Pike & Heald Co., labor on furnace, 
changing radiators, cleaning stove- 
pipes, etc. ..... 298.27 

$2,013.26 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid C. W. Anderson & Co., repairing 

clocks . . . . . $9-75 

D. J. Adams, repairing pencil sharp- 
eners, etc. ..... 6.05 

George W, Bailey, use of teams . ii-5o 

Charles F. Cram, building 120 feet 
fence between residence and 
Hallsville schoolhouse . . 16.38 

Robert Clark, labor on lawn, Web- 
ster street ..... 10.00 

Emergency Hand Fire Extinguisher 

Co., extinguishers . . . 125.00 

John T. Gott, cleaning vault . . 5.00 

E. T. James, use of teams . . 6,00 
Hiram W. Moulton, grading Halls- 
ville schoolhouse lot . . . 15-00 

Palmer & Garmon , material and labor 1 9.05 
Edward Sears, putting up and tak- 
ing down flags .... 8.00 
James P. Slattery, repairing clocks . 3.85 
C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks . 18.50 
Gordon Woodbury, 10 loads loam . 13-00 



604 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid P. O. Woodman, 540 feet sod, Halls- 
ville ...... 



.40 



Total expenditures .... 
Transferred to contingent expenses appropriation 



$272.48 

$4,964.67 
500.00 

$5,464.67 



Fuel. 
Appropriation .... 

Expenditures. 

COAL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co.: 

116 tons egg coal .... $754.00 

41,100 pounds egg coal . . . 1 33-5 7 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co.: 

556 9-50 tons egg coal . . . 2,910.08 

35 tons 1,990 pounds stove coal . . 210.93 

Paid Moore & Preston, 23 tons egg coal . 149-50 

D. M. Poore, 47 15-16 tons coal . 3ii-o9 

WOOD. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co.: 

2^ cords pine wood, sawed and split . $14-50 

I cord hard wood, sawed and split . 9.25 
Paid Oilman Clough : 

64J cords hard wood .... 338.62 

41 cords pine wood .... 153-75 
Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., i* cords 

pine wood, sawed and split . 9.25 

J. Hodge, 2 loads kindlings . . 3.50 

Moore & Preston , 4 cords wood , sawed 24.50 

D. M. Poore, 3 J cords pine, cut . i9-5o 



,500.00 



$4,469.17 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 605 

Paid Luther S. Proctor : 

1 6 cords pine wood .... ^64.00 
9 cords hard wood .... 53-io 

$689.97 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Gary F. Abbott, 8 ash sifters . . $54-oo 
The John B. Clarke Co., advertising 
proposals for fuel, 2} inches, 6 
times . . . . . iO'i3 

M. Dana, teaming wood from Low- 
ell street to Spring street . . i.oo 



Furniture and Supplies. 

Appropriation ..... $700.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 173-21 



Expenditures. 



■13 



Total expenditures ..... $5,224.27 
Transferred to reserved fund . . . . . 275.73 



;,5oo.oo 



$873.21 



PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL APPARATUS, SUPPLIES, ETC. 

Paid E. S. Ritchie & Sons, i gyroscope, 

etc. ...... $23.18 

Tebbetts & Soule, chemical supplies, 74-65 



597-83 



HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., hose, 
screw hooks, screws, lawn seed, 
etc $4.56 



606 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., brooms, coal 
hods, brush, shovels, drinking 
cups, dustpans, etc. . . . ^19.30 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., 5 floor 

brushes ..... 8.49 

John B. Varick Co., lawn mowers, 
hose, ostrich dusters, wire mats, 
ash barrels, brooms, baskets, coal 
hods, etc 329.46 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Paid Henr)' W. Allen, i leveling rod, 

surveying chain .... $10.00 
Boston School Supply Co., 2 Mon- 
roe's reading charts . . . 14.20 
E. R. Coburn Co., cardboard, 

splints, kindergarten supplies . 5.08 

Educational Publishing Co., i sub- 
scription Primary Education from 
January i, 1894 ... . . i.oo 

W. P. Goodman, rubber bands, mu- 
cilage, envelopes, ink stands, etc. 6.85 
Ginn & Co., 3 charts and easels . 25.45 
Paid J. L. Hammett : 

Carmine ink . . . . . 9.75 

2 rolls, 5x3 feet, blackboards . . 7.07 
Tablets, etc 2.58 

Paid Kasson & Palmer : 

3 years' subscription for "Education," 

to January i, 1895 . • • • 9'00 

5 copies " Education," back numbers 

for completing volume . . . 1.75 

Paid E. L. Kellogg Si Co., subscription 

to " Teachers' Institute " . . . i.oo 

Paid Novelty Advertising Co. : 

5 M book loan slips .... 5.00 



1:361.81 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 607 

5 M cards, assorted colors . . . $6.25 

1 rubber stamp ..... i.oo 
Paid New England Publishing Co. : 

2 years' subscription for " American 
Teacher," to January, 1895 • • ^-^^ 

I year's subscription for "Journal of 
Education," to January, 1894 . 2.50 

Paid George S. Perry : 

9 dozen Star ink-wells . . . 18.25 

I Gem chuck and holder . . . 1.35 

Paid Irving L. Stickney, 2 pecks pegs . .50 

Temple & Farrington Co., card- 
board, cutting tape, etc. . . 6.79 
Paid George P. Wallace : 

1 Remington ribbon .... 
Oil, carbon paper, paper 

Paid G. F. King & Merrill, i globe 

Prang Educational Co., models, i set 
solids, express on same 

$15547 

FURNITURE. 

Paid C. W. Anderson & Co., clocks . ^17.00 
William H. Elliott & Son, i piano 
cover ..... 

Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co. : 

3 bent wood chairs . . . 
Express (Goffe's Falls) 
31 chairs . . . . . . 

Paid L. H. Josselyn & Co. : 

2 tables, with drawers 
2 oak chairs ..... 
2 tables ...... 

Paid J. Y. McQueston Co., i oak teach- 
er's desk . . . . . . 11-50 



•75 


2.15 


•94 


15.26 



2.50 



4.50 


•25 


31-95 


5.00 


2.50 


5.00 



608 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid New Hampshire Furniture Co.: 

25/4 yards tapestry carpet . . . ^21.68 
I roll-top desk ..... 25.00 

Paid Syndicate Furniture Co., making 6 

shades ..... 3.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 6 shades 
and making .... 
Paid United States Furniture Co. : 

1 desk .... ^17.00 
Less freight and cartage . .96 

2 desks .... $22.00 
Less freight and cartage . 1.34 

20.66 

2 No. 77 desks . . . $22.00 
Less freight . . . .92 

21.08 

Paid Weston & Hill Co., carpet made, 

laid-, etc. ...... 7.95 



3-3° 



16.04 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Barton & Co., 10 lbs. wrapping paper $0.80 

Frank Fitts, braid, whisk broom . .65 
Paid Tilton F. Fifield : 

Soap ....... 2.91 

Oil, oil tanks ..... 2.99 

Paid J. J. Holland, chloride of lime, sal 

ammoniac ..... .45 

H. J. Holmes, soap and oil . . .80 
A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos and 

repairs ..... io-5o 

John A. Kane, oil, soap, ammonia . 1.7 1 
Joseph Lewis, reseating chairs . 2.75 
The Thomas A. Lane Co., i electric 
portable lamp, green shade, hold- 
er, etc. ..... 5.20 

R. McQuarry, 24 wash basins . . 1.67 



$199.41 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 609 

Paid F. E. Nelson : 

3 1-6 dozen stone jars . . . ^7-60 

Tooth picks, oilcloth, scissors . . 1.75 
Paid The Head & Dowst Co., lumber and 

labor ..... 17-83 

York Market Co., 6 gallon jugs . 1.08 



Total expenditures 



^58.69 



Books and Stationery. 

Appropriation ....... ^200.00 

Expenditures. 

sundries. 

Paid The John B, Clarke Co., 2^ reams 

paper ...... $4-oo 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co.: 

Paper, cardboard . . . . 1.50 

41 note books, other stationery . . 4.61 

Paid Daniels & Downs, i ream No. 416 

paper 1.55 

Paid W. P. Goodman : 

Ink and ink-stands .... 3.95 

Paper and envelopes . .• . . 7.53 

Rubber bands, other stationery . . 5.29 

Paid S. S. Piper, postmaster, postage and 

postal cards .... 10.00 

Smith & White Manufacturing Co., 

8 M envelopes .... 6.99 

Temple & Farrington Co., i blank 

book, canvas cover . . . 10.50 



^55-92 

Total expenditures ^55-92 

Transferred to reserved fund 144.08 

^200.00 



610 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Printing and Advertising. 

Appropriation $350.00 

Expenditures, 
sundries. 

Paid The John B. Clarlie Co., printing: 

400 reports, 80 pages and cover . . ^41.50 

High school graduation tickets . . 4.50 

Report cards, circulars, blanks, exami- 
nation papers, orders, etc. . . 245.18 
Binding 18 volumes .... 20.05 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 115 

note circulars ..... .85 

$Z12.o8 



Total expenditures I312.08 

Transferred to reserved fund ..... 37-92 

$350.00 



Contingent Expenses. 

Appropriation ..... $1,100.00 
Transferred from repairs of schoolhouses 

appropriation . . . • . . 500.00 



$1,600.00 



Expenditures. 

freight and cartage. 

Paid Frank P. Colby, moving High school 
grand piano to and from Opera 
House ..... $6.00 

J. G. Jones, freight and truckage, 
school furniture, chairs, text- 
books, etc. .... 63.11 
Benjamin Plumer, cartage of settees .50 



).6i 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 611 

WATER, GAS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Paid board of water commissioners, use of 

water ..... $509.40 
Manchester Electric Light Co., elec- 
tric lights ..... 9.80 
The Electric Co., electric lights . 24.00 
Union Electric Co., electric lights . 18.85 
People's Gas-Light Co., gas . . 230.02 



12.07 



ANNUAL GRADUATION. 

Paid Barton & Co.: 

427^ yards cambric .... $i7'ii 

Thread ...... .06 

Paid Frank W. Fitls, 57^ yards ribbon . 4.03 
E. W. Harrington, rent of Opera 

House ..... 50.00 

Wm. Heron, Jr., writing diplomas . 44-05 
John Robbie Co., ribbon for di- 
plomas . . . . . 13-24 



$128.49 

OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT AND SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Paid S. S. Piper, postmaster, postage stamps . . $10.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid W. E. Buck : 

Freight, telegrams, etc. . . , $26.21 
Carriage hire, visiting schools . . 76.00 

Paid Sam N. Boyce, clearing school yard, 

Harvey district .... 1.50 

Robert Clark, 12 hours' labor on 

lawn ...... 1.80 

Paid Emma J. Ela, cash paid : 

For carrying water 12 weeks . . iS-oo 



612 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



For putting in wood, etc. . . . |0'75 

Paid John T. Gott, cleaning vaults . 44.00 

Ginn & Co., 75 coda . . . 1.35 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & 

Insurance Co., insurance policies 320.00 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos . 18.00 

Chas. A. Hoitt & Co., use of chairs 4.00 

N. W. Lafiotte, posting cards . 2.00 

pay-roll, division No. 2 . . . 21.62 



;30.23 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



^1,530.40 
69.60 



^1,600.00 



Care of Rooms 


. 


Appropriation ^4,400.00 


Transferred from reserved fund 

Expenditures. 


49-iS 




JANITORS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 


Paid J. S. Avery ^600.00 


H. G. Batchelder . 






450.00 


James E, Bailey . 






170.04 


E. P. Cogswell 






487.52 


William F. Conner 






412.51 


Merton Coleman . 






39.00 


Henry C. Dickey . 






300.00 


D. S. Dunbar 






29.50 


Henry P. Dobbins 






30-50 


Emma J. Ela 






46.12 


Charles F. Jack 






312.48 


William H. Morrill 






362.51 


William H. Newry 






506.22 



b449-i5 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



613 



Paid Almon Proctor .... ^30- 75 

John O. H. Smith ... 1 7-oo 

William Stevens .... 450.00 

Inez M. Warren . . . . 40.25 

C. M. Whiting .... 150.00 

Paid Robert Clark, labor 2 men, i^ 

days, Webster street . . . $6.00 

Mrs. Herbert and Anne Fox, clean- 
ing schoolhouses . . . 3-75 

Mrs. B. Firkinwort, cleaning Goffe's 

Falls schoolhouse . . . 5-oo 

Total expenditures 



Evening Schools. 


Appropriation .... 


• 


Expenditures. 




SALARIES. 




Paid Etta F. Boardman, 67 evenings 


$134.00 


Gertrude A. Burns, 27 evenings 


24.30 


Honorie J. Crough, 70 evenings 


70.00 


L. H. Carpenter, 70 evenings 


154.00 


Charles E. Cochran, 70 evenings . 


154.00 


Lottie M. Clement, 28 evenings 


25.20 


Mary A. Clement, 8 evenings 


7.20 


Isabel Esty, 47 evenings 


54.00 


Lizzie D. Hartford, 35 evenings 


35-00 


Maggie G. Linen, 57 evenings 


51-30 


Arthur W. Morgan, 5 2 evenings 


70.00 


William J. Mooar, 42 evenings 


42.00 


Annie R. Morison, 3 evenings 


2.70 


Hattie S. Tuttle, 25 evenings . 


22.50 


Mary A. Walker, 18 evenings 


16.20 



$4,434-40 



$14.75 
,449-15 



$862.40 



614 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid William F. Conner . 
William H. Morrill 



JANITORS. 



SUNDRIES. 



$24.00 
18.40 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 
100 placards .... 

J. G. Jones, carting tables and chairs 

Clemens Langer, stovepipe, labor . 

Pike & Heald Co., gas-pipe and la- 
bor, city hall .... 

B. W. Robinson, stock and labor re- 
pairing plastering, city hall 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund . 



^2.4o 



3-50 
2.50 

17.94 

3-37 

^30.81 

$935-6i 
264.39 

$1,200.00 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



Teachers' Salaries. 

. $63,000.00 



151-03 





Expenditures. 




Paid teachers, as per pay-rolls : 




January ..... 


$5,939-61 


February 








6,223.85 


March . 








6,13402 


April 








6,158.45 


May 








6,185.48 


June 








6,267.27 


September 








6,439-36 


October . 








6,542.62 


November 








6,793-59 


December 








6,466.78 



$63,151.03 



$63, 151. OJ 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 



615 



Evening School of Mechanical Drawing. 



Appropriation . . . . . 




Expenditures. 




SALARIES. 




Paid Henry W. Allen, services 


§190.00 


John M. Kendall, services 


190.00 



JANITOR. 

Paid William H. Morrill, services . 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co.: 

15 T squares .... 
2 reams drawing paper 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund . 







Free Text-Book 


s. 


App 


ropriat 


on . . . 










Expenditures. 








FREE text-books AND SUPPLIES. 


Paid 


AUyn 


& Bacon 




§26.65 




American Book Co. 




748.92 




Boston School Supply Co. 




12.70 




T. H. 


Castor & Co. 




54.41 




W. G 


Colesworthy 




10.25 




P. P. 


Caproni & Brother 




8.44 




DeWolfe, Fiske & Co. . 




2.00 



§550.00 



5380.00 



;i9.2o 



§7.20 




36.00 






§43.20 






§442.40 




107.60 



§550.00 



,500.00 



616 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Educational Publishing Co. . 


$87.67 


Estes & Lauriat 


10.20 


Ginn & Co • 


499.60 


Greenough, Adams & Gushing 


•25 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


197.41 


J. L. Hammett 


164.40 


The Holden Patent Book Cover Co 


49.00 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


66.43 


William R. Jenkins 


8.00 


G. F. King & Merrill . 


440.26 


C. H. Kimball 


5.60 


Lee & Shepard 


65.27 


Longmans, Green & Co. 


15.12 


Leach, Shewell & Sanborn 


3-75 


Library Bureau 


7-75 


Maynard, Merrill & Co. 


29.38 


Mead, Dodge & Co. 


4-65 


Alfred Mudge & Son 


18.00 


The Prang Educational Co. . 


. 509-83 


George S. Perry & Co. . 


214.98 


Silver, Burdett & Co. . 


24.35 


Smith & White Manufacturing Co 


284-57 


Thompson, Brown & Co. 


42.00 


The Werner Co 


3.20 


University Publishing Co. 


20.00 


William Ware & Co. 


357-82 



^3,992.8-6 



LABOR. 



Paid Fannie L. Sanborn, services as clerk in superin- 
' tendent's office ...... 



)i.5o 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



^4,484.36 
15.64 



^,500.00 



CITY LIBRARY. 



617 



Manual Training. 
Appropriation ...... 

Expenditures. 
Paid Fred E. Browne, services as teacher ^1,075.60 
Eixby & Wilson, 9 drafting boards 2.52 
Concord Foundry Co., 10 iron cast- 
ings 1.35 

Concord Machine Co., labor on 



levers ..... 


•65 


E. R. Coburn Co., i roll blue print 


1-75 


Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 




7 carpenters' benches, 


70.00 


Lumber and labor .... 


15^-15 


Hanover-street Laundry, laundry 




work ...... 


1.25 


Manchester Electric Light Co., elec- 




tric lights ..... 


3.20 


D. A. Simons, i table . 


2.50 


Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 




I roll blue print ..... 


1-75 


50 sheets cardboard .... 


2.25 


cutting paper ..... 


1.25 


one half gross tacks .... 


1-13 


Paid John E. Varick Co.: 




17 Bailey planes .... 


iS.oo 


2 1 saws ...... 


23.71 


Rules 


20,70 


Chisels, hammers, bits, bevels, etc. 


68.78 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



^1,500.00 



$1,447-54 

$1,447-54 
52.46 



City Library. 

Balance from last year unexpended . $3,244.38 

Appropriation ..... 4,500.00 



$1,500.00 



$7,744-38 



618 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures, 
librarian and assistants. 

Paid Mrs. M. J. Buncher, librarian, to 

April I, 1894 .... $199.98 
Kate E. Sanborn, librarian, from 

March 25, 1894 .... 712.50 

James A. Buncher, assisting librarian 81.25 

John H. Colby, assistant . . 3.40 

George R. Fletcher, assistant . . 342.00 

A. C. Fitzpatrick, assistant . . 39- 10 

Fred A. Foster, assistant . . 104.30 

Leonard A. Kebbon, assistant . 23.05 

C. W. McCoy, assistant . . . 3.65 

CATALOGUE AND CATALOGUE SUPPLIES. 

Paid C. A. Cutter : 

I Ex. classification .... $4.00 

I Cutter order table .... 1.25 

I Sanborn order table .... i.oo 

Postage .63 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

1,000 catalogues, covers, etc. . . 424.73 
Paid Library Bureau : 

Index cards ..... 51-90 

15 tray slip cases .... 23.00 

Shelf sheets, etc. ..... 27.30 

Paid Louise E. Newell, copyist . . 179-33 
Emma A. H. Piper, assisting on 

card catalogue .... 12.80 

Edith O. Simmons, copyist . . 237.90 
Temple & Farrington Co., slips, 

blanks, cards, etc. . . . 63.95 



^1,509-23 



$1,027.79 

BINDING, REBINDING, AND RESEWING. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. .... $296.04 



CITY LIBRARY. 619 

NEW BOOKS. 

Paid trustees of city library ..... ^1,000.00 

WATER, GAS, FUEL, INSURANCE. 

Paid Water-Works, use of water . . $16.00 
People's Gas-Light Co., gas . . 230.30 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co.: 

A cord pine slabs .... 2.50 

3 cords hard wood .... 22.50 

Paid Clough & Twombly, premium on 
$10,000 insurance on contents of 
library, ^tna and N. H. Insurance 
Co. ....... 125.00 



NEWSPAPERS. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., for " Daily Mirror and 
American" to April i, 1894 . . . . 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 10 pounds 

ice daily, May 3 to Oct. 31 . $7- 15 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

200 reports .... 11.00 

Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co : 

Labor on frozen water pipes . . 2.10 

Burner, shade, chimney, etc. . . 2.40 

Paid Charles F. Livingston, printing 1 2,- 

000 covers ...... 12.00 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 
500 postals and printing 
Envelopes and paper .... 

Hanging pictures, cord, and wire 
Paid U. D. Tenney, varnishing portraits 

Total expenditures 
Balance transferred to new account 



$396.30 



6.50 

2.15 

1.65 

3.00 


$47-95 






$4,283.31 
3,461.07 



^744•38 



620 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Fire Department. 

Appropriation . . , . . ^50,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 3,539.72 

Expenditures. 

services. 

Paid Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer . ;^i, 300.00 
Fred S. Bean, assistant engineer . 125.00 
Ruel G. Manning, assistant engineer 125.00 
Eugene S. Whitney, assistant engi- 
neer ...... 125.00 

Clarence D. Pahner, assistant engi- 
neer 125.00 

Fred S. Bean, clerk . . . 25.00 



^53.539-72 



teamsters and engineers, 


as per pay-rolls : 


January . 


• ^1.959-95 


February 


1,920.68 


March . 


1,900.14 


April 


• 1,893.43 


May 


. 1,906.93 


June 


• 1,893-87 


July . . . . 


. 1,949-69 


August . 


• 1,969-94 


September 


2,002.12 


October . 


1,980.19 


November 


. 1,989.19 


December 


. 1,954-87 



CALL MEMBERS. 

Paid Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine Co. : 

For year 1894 ..... ^1,150.00 
Extra labor ..... 10.00 

Paid N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Co. : 

For year 1894 ..... 1,150.00 



^1,825.00 



,23,321.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



621 



Extra labor 


^10.00 




Paid Chemical Engine Co. : 






For year 1894 ..... 


325.00 




Paid Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder Co. : 






For year 1894 ..... 


1,268.31 




Extra labor 


10.00 




Paid Fire King Steam Fire Engine Co. : 






For year 1894 ..... 


1,140.00 




Extra labor 


10.00 




Paid Fulton Engine and Ladder Co. : 






For year 1894 


1,660.00 




Extra labor 


10.00 




Paid Massabesic Hose Co. : 






For year 1894 


1,145.00 




Extra labor ..... 


10.00 




Paid Merrimack Steam Fire Engine Co. : 






For year 1894 ..... 


i>543-03 




Extra labor 


10.00 




Paid Pennacook Hose Co. : 






For year 1894 ..... 


1,145.00 




Extra labor ..... 


8.00 




Paid General Stark Steam Fire Engine Co. 






For year 1894. .... 


1,276.66 




Extra labor ' 


10.00 


,891.00 




Pll 


OTHER LABOR. 






Paid J. Newell Brown, 72 days' labor 


$162.00 




Cavanaugh Brothers, use of horses 






for Ladder No. 6 


94-5° 




John Martin, error in Co. No. 2 






pay-roll ..... 


2.16 




Paid Ralph C. Mitchell: 






21 days' labor as driver 


31-50 




5 nights' care sick horse 


7-5° 





622 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Frank O. Moulton, fourteen days' 
labor as driver .... 
Alcide Provencher, 4 days' labor . 
E. V. Rowe, 6 days' labor 
Benjamin Richardson, 28 days' la- 
bor as driver .... 
Paid Edward Sargent : 
14 days' labor as driver 
Labor as machinist to September 4 
Paid Frank W. Tibbetts, 68 days' labor 
as driver ..... 
Charles Woods, 14 days' labor as 
driver ..'..'. 

Charles J. Wiley, 17 days' labor as 
driver ..... 

Paid labor, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 
January ...... 

February ..... 

March 



^21.00 

9.00 

10.50 

42.00 

21.00 
2.05 

102.00 

21.00 

25-50 



LAUNDRY. 



Paid Mrs. Richard Gal way 
Mrs. G. M. Goodwin 
Mrs. M. H. Hulme 
Margaret Powers . 
Mrs. C. C. Tinkham 
Mrs. W. F. Wheeler 



$12.00 


18.00 


3.00 


^38.05 


43-50 


84.40 


17-50 


23.46 


13-35 



FURNITURE, ETC. 



Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co. : 
6 comforters 
3 pairs pillows 

8 chairs . . . . 
3 mattresses . . . . 



$9.00 
4-50 

14.80 
7-50 



^551-71 



$33-oo 



$220.26 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



623 



3 beds and bureaus 

3 springs 

Paid J. Y. McQueston Co. : 

2 wardrobes .... 

4 chairs ..... 
2 springs ..... 

5 bureaus, beveled glass 

Quilts, pillows, mattresses, bed^, bu 
reaus, etc. ..... 

Paid D. A. Simons : 

8 cuspidors . . . . • . 

Mugs, stools .... 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., window 

curtains, fixtures, and hanging same 
Paid Weston & Hill Co.: 



3 spreads .... 


3.28 


3 dozen cases 


7.08 


7 dozen sheets . 


15.00 


130 yards crash . . • . 


16.25 


5 yards silesia . 


r.25 


5!/^ yards matting and ends 


4.72 


12 towels .... 


1.50 


5 rugs .... 


9.05 



$34-50 
8.25 

26.00 

4.00 

5.00 
42.50 

52-25 

6.00 

.81 

16.10 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

400 reports, 62 pages and cover . . $37-oo 

Paid Nate Kellogg : 

325 postals and printing 

200 running cards 

1,500 official running cards, bound 

Rosters, note circulars, blank returns, etc 

Paid W. E. Moore, printing circulars 
C. P. Trickey, ink and stationery 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

3 dozen pencils ..... 1.50 



6.25 


2.75 


65.5c 


c. 25.50 


3.00 


5-53 



$289.34 



624 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



I gross rubber bands 
Other stationery 



$0.19 



Paid Water-works, use of water 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas . 
The Electric Co., electric lights, 

Fulton engine house . 
Union Electric Co., electric lights, 

Fulton engine house . 
N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephones 

FUEL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co.: 
15 tons cannel coal 
25 tons egg coal 
6 cords pine slabs, sawed . 
Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., i45^f-§- 
tons egg coal 
Stephen Gardner, splitting wood 
Lester Hall, 9^ cords pine wood 
S. S. Young, sawing and splitting 
wood ..... 



$506.04 
1,044.96 

28.40 

23-30 
255-96 



$240.00 

162.50 

33-00 

775-37 
10.00 

42.75 
12.00 



FREIGHT AND TRUCKAGE. 



Paid Concord & Montreal R. R. 
James Reid, truckage 
John W. Wilson, truckage 



freight 



SUPPLIES. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey : 

3 cases toilet paper . 

I bale waste .... 
Paid Cavanaugh Brothers, 6 horses . 



52.73 
1. 00 

4-65 



$30.00 

72. So 

1,200.00 



$148.10 



WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, TELEPHONE. 



$1,858.66 



$1,275.62 



5.38 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



625 



Paid A. V. Chase & Co., 12 " Burni- 




shine" ...... 


$7-34 


Paid Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co. 




3 mats 


22.50 


9 suction hose washers 


2.25 


Paid C. G. Braxmar, 20 nickel badges . 


12.00 


Boston Belting Co., 10 pure rings . 


1. 18 


J. A. & W. Bird, i barrel bicarbon- 




ate of soda .... 


15.68 


The Champion Flue Scraper Co., i 




scraper ..... 


4.50 


Paid Cornelius Callahan Co.: 




Repairing hose, pony nozzle 


2.50 


2 Hale collars and hames 


S5-00 


2 Regan hooks and poles 


20.00 


12 cotton H. and L. straps . 


12.00 


I Chemical hose nozzle 


2.75 


Paid Combination Ladder Co., i pair of 


safety locks .... 


25.00 


A. N. Clapp, oil, etc. 


5-33 


Eureka Fire Hose Co., 2,000 feel 




2^ -inch Surprise hose 


1,260.00 


Tilton F. Fifield, 3 gross matches 


1-95 


Fire Extinguisher Manufacturing 




Co., 3 rubber valves . 


•33 


D. M. Goodwin, 24 stable brooms . 


9-50 


Paid S. F. Hayward & Co.: 




3 white rubber coats . 


20.25 


I gross pony bottles . 


9.00 


I pony 


4-45 


Paid A. S. Jackson : 




1 2 hose suspenders 


6.00 


6 squilgees 


7-50 


Paid Kimball Carriage Co.: 




2 exercise wagons 


560.00 


2 fire gongs .... 


25.00 


40 





626 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co. : 

Hose bands, couplings, etc. . . $7.38 

2 gas stoves ..... 1.74 

Paid Andrew J. Morse &: Son, i double 

hydrant gate .... 22.50 

New England Gamewell Co., i 6- 

inch gong ..... 30.00 

Paid Plumer & Holton : 

18 reefers . . . . . . i57'5o 

26 pairs overalls ..... 39'Oo 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., lantern globes . 1.57 

L. L. Reilly, 20 hat badges . . 13-00 

I. L. Stickney, rubber cloth . . 1.08 
Talbot Dyewood & Chemical Co., 

848 lbs. bicarbonate soda . . 30. So 
Union Oil Co., i gallon chloro- 

naphtholeum . . . . 1.50 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., ammonia, su- 
gar, etc. ..... 7.70 



PLUMBING, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber and labor . ^1.14 

Blanchet & Co., lo^^ lbs. paint . 1.34 

Boston Belting Co., repairing suc- 
tion hose ..... 5.95 
Paid James R. Carr & Co.: 

Glass and setting . . . . 2.30 

Paint, brushes, etc. .... 16.87 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 2 bar- 
rels sawdust . . . . .20 
A. M. Finney, cleaning and laying 

carpets . . . . . 7.15 

The Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

and labor ..... 43-03 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor, sundry 

engine houses .... 29.91 



,708.5! 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 627 

Paid C, H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co.: 

230 pounds castings .... ^8.05 

Eye bolts and pattern ... .75 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., material and 

labor . . . . . . . 52.72 

Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 

1 steel gong bell .... 5.50 

2 brass pole covers .... 2.00 
I horse pole ..... 7.50 
I single pressure gauge stand . . i.oo 
Repairs, etc 102.58 

Paid Pike and Heald Co., material and 

labor ..... 10.65 

George W. Reed, repairing suction 

hose ...... 2.50 

Truax & Truax, 8 iron castings . 6.96 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks . 1.75 

A. C. Wallace, lumber, Fire King 

engine house . . . . 11. 10 

John K. Wilson, labor on closet . 1.50 



HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co. . . $61.03 
John B. Varick Co. . - . 109.16 

Wadleigh Hardware Co. . . 160.85 



MEDICAL, SURGICAL, INSURANCE. 

Paid A. W. Baker, dentistry, 19 horses . $38.00 
J. A. Charest, V. S., visits and med- 
icine 53.25 

Z. Foster Campbell, medicines . 13-45 

N. Chandler, 12 cans hoof ointment 9.00 
E. H. Currier, 12 boxes Williams's 

Sure Cure ..... 7.00 



$322.45 



;i.04 



628 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid J. L. Golden, V. S.: 

Medicine ...... 

Boarding horses ..... 

Paid John F. Kerwin, i barrel Peel's food 

W. B. Mitchell, ^ dozen witch hazel 

tonic ..... 

Snelling & Woods, medicine . 
S. M. Worthley, vinegar, salt, mus- 
tard, ginger, etc. 
Security Live Stock Insurance Co., 
fees and assessments on policies . 



^40.97 

16.00 

7-5° 



1-75 
23-55 



615.89 



^828.58 



CARRIAGE WORK AND REPAIRS. 



Paid Couch & McDonald, carriage hard- 
ware $27.65 

A, Filion, repairing carriage . . 58. 00 
I. Grant, repairing pung sleigh . 5.00 
S. S. Joy, 2 wagon jacks . . 5.50 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, carriage re- 
pairs 452.70 

Sanborn Carriage Co., carriage re- 
pairs 51-28 



BLACKSMITHING. 




Paid Joseph Breault . . . . 


$67.85 


J. M. Brouillette . , . . 


146.35 


D. F. Cressey . . . . 


136.58 


Cressey & Colby . 


6.25 


John E. Davis 


65.80 


Davis & Thompson 


•75 


Thomas Hickey 


33-50 


Mahaney & McSweeney 


458.25 


D. B. Thompson . 


.75 



300.13 



116.08 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



629 



tlAV, Lt 

Paid Adams & Tasker 


KAliN , 


CH^. 


$255-35 


Joel F. Austin 






35-91 


William Clark 






214.39 


Mrs. Carrie F. Corliss . 






9.20 


P. Doyle 






32.98 


Milton Flint . 






17-34 


J. L. Fogg . 






23.59 


Gage & McDougall 






883.06 


H. R. Hall . 






53-49 


Melvin Hall . 






42.94 


J. B. Huse 






14.77 


Clarence R. Merrill 






. 2,171.67 


H. F. Miller . 






28.00 


Henry W. Parker . 






253.28 


Partridge Brothers . 




. 


536-74 


J. N, Vasseur . 


• 




116.82 



$4,689.53 



HARNESSES AND HARNESS REPAIRS. - 



Paid W. H. Adams, harnesses and repairs ^245.15 

Frederick Allen Co., repairs, etc. . 35-95 
W. E. Greeley, repairing bridles, 

etc .75 

Paid Kimball Carriage Co. : 

I nose and jaw strap . . . . 1.75 

I head check ..... 2.00 

I leather cushion . .... 5.00 

Paid C. N. Perkins, 6 No. 4 snaps . . 9.00 

Paid Ranno Harness Co. : 

I pair swing harnesses .... 100.00 

Blankets and hoods .... 44.00 

Repairs, etc. . . . . . 162.57 

Paid Underhay Oil Co., 5 gallons har- 
ness oil ..... . 6.00 



)I2.I7 



630 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid The t)aniels-Cornell Co., 5 boxes 

soapine $16.25 

Flint & Little, filing and setting 

saws ...... .30 

Peter Harris, keys and filing saw . .75 

Paid Thomas W. Lane : 

Expenses to Montreal to attend Na- 
tional Association of Fire Engineers 36.25 
Postage on annual reports . . . 4.00 
Express on supplies . . . . 11. 19 

Paid F. W. Leeman, 3 lights glass and 

sash, broken by hook-and-ladder 13-00 

Paige & Myrick, rubber stamp for 

linen ...... .50 

G. W. Reed, pasturing horse 7 

weeks ..... 7.00 

George E. Richards, i gallon alco- 
hol . * 2.85 

Hartley E. Vaughan, burying 2 

horses ..... 8.00 



^100.09 



Total expenditures ..... $53,530.72 
Ralph Mitchell, services as driver, bill disallowed, 

money turned into treasury .... 9.00 



! 3)539-72 



Fire-Alarm Telegraph. 

Appropriation ..... $1,400.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 533-88 

$1,933-88 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll : 

January $78.00 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



631 



February 








^62.00 


March . 
April 








65.00 
82.50 


May 








78.00 


June 








70.25 


July . . 








74-75 


August . 








76-75 


September 








52-50 


October . 








54-25 


November 








50-75 


December 








49.00 



Paid W. B. Corey & Co., labor on wire 
and poles ...... $46.50 

Paid Flint & Little :. 

Filing saw ...... .35 

Putting on Yale lock .... .38 

Paid E. A. Sears, labor on fire-alarm . 5.00 

John K. Wilson, labor on fire-alarm 

standures ..... 1.50 

SUPPLIES. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.: 

I standure for electric wire . . . $7-25 

Labor ....... .60 

Paid American Electrical Works : 

502 feet Americanite .... 10.05 

Spools wound and repaired . . . 2.40 

Paid The James Baldwin Co., 300 plain 

pins 3.00 

Paid J. H. Bunnell & Co.: 

50 jars 8.33 

51^ pounds tape 3.47 

Insulators, buttons, etc. . . . 24.15 

Paid James R. Carr & Co.: 

I tin sign ...... .50 



^793-75 



$53-73 



632 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paint and brush . 
Glass and setting 
Paid The Electric Gas-Lighting Co 
2 extension bells . 
I receiver, and box 
Paid W. A. Heselton, 25 telegraph poles 
J. Hodge, lumber and labor . 
Morgan, Grossman & Company, ; 

rubber stamps 
The Thomas A. Lane Co., pipe 
Paid New England Gamewell Co.: 
I standard galvanometer 

1 indicator, with 15 -inch gong com 
bined ..... 

2 automatic signal boxes 
Repairing fire-alarm boxes . 

Paid J. B. Prescott & Son, 150 standard 

zincs ..... 
Pike & Heald Co., tin, copper, etc 
Talbot Dyewood & Chemical Co., 6 

barrels blue vitriol 
John B*. Varick Co., hardware 
D. B. Varney, zinc castings 
Wadlelgh Hardware Co., brush 

stake chains, washers, etc. 
Washburn & Moen Manufacturing 

Co., wire . 



FREIGHT AND TRUCKAGE. 



$3-34 


•75 


7.00 


1-35 


6S.75 


15.20 


2.25 


5-5° 



250.00 

250.00 

14-45 

35-45 

1-75 

106.43 

10.50 

198.10 

1-55 
35-53 



^1,079.65 



Paid W. B. Corey & Co., trucking chairs, 
etc. ...... 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 



•25 
•50 



•75 



Total expenditures 



^1.933-88 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Hydrant Service. 
Appropriation ..... 

Expenditures. 
Paid Water-Works, rent of 557 hydrants . 



Police Departm 


ent. 


Appropriation .... 






Expenditures 


• 




SERVICES. 






Paid N. P. Hunt, police justice 




^1,500.00 


Isaac L. Heath, associate justice 




375-00 


John C. Bickford, clerk . 




600.00 


Michael J. Healy, chief of police 




900.00 


John F. Cassidy, deputy chief 


of 




police .... 




800.00 


regular patrol 




27,542.16 


extra time of regular patrol 




i,575-io 


special patrol 




784.05 


C. B. Hildreth, private detective 




322.00 


Frank P. Wiggin, janitor 




638.75 


Miss A. B. Brown, matron 




414.00 



638 



;i3.925.oo 



$13,925.00 



1.0,400.00 



WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, FUEL. 

Paid Water- Works, use of water at station, 

Clinton-street, and Slayton house $183.87 
People's Gas-Light Co., gas . . 73-92 

The Electric Company, electric 

lights ..... 180.00 

Union Electric Company, electric 

lights ..... 187.40 

Paid L. B. Bodwell& Co.: 

3 tons egg coal . . . . . 18.75 



;,45i.o6 



634 



REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 



y^, cord wood ..... 


^4.00 


Paid DcCourcy, Holland & Marshall : 




74,965 pounds egg coal 


243-63 


3 tons egg coal ..... 


19.50 


ii^ cords pine wood, cut . 


9.00 


Paid DeCourcy & Holland : 




10,090 pounds coal . . . . 


32-79 


3 tons egg coal . . . . . 


19.50 


I ^ cords wood ..... 


10.00 


Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co.: 




29,640 pounds egg coal 


77-51 


47 tons 600 pounds egg coal 


247.38 



$1,307-25 



TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH. 



Paid New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., use of telephones 
Western Union Telegraph Co., tele- 



TEAMS 



Paid G. W. Bailey 
Boyd Brothers 
Joseph Breault 
W. J. Freeman 
E. T. James . 
J. C. Nichols & Son 
C. H. Simpson 



$211.38 
9-51 



$2.50 
2.00 
1.50 

237-25 

165.00 

1. 00 

2.00 



FEEDING AND CONVEYING PRISONERS. 

Paid Daniel Davis, rations furnished to 

December 20, 1894 . . . $290.55 

W. D. Ladd & Co., 766 lbs. crackers 38.18 

Healy & Cassidy, conveyance of 

prisoners . . . . . 1,010.00 



$220.89 



$411-25 



$1,338.73 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



635 



PRINTING, ADVERTISING, AND STATIONERY. 



Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printing : 




Civil dockets ..... 


$60.50 


3,000 writs ..... 


48.50 


2,500 liquor warrants .... 


25.00 


1,300 copies " record of judgments " . 


6.00 


Envelopes, etc. ..... 


20.25 


Paid Frank H. Challis : 




Printing 500 application blanks . 


10.25 


Advertising Fourth of July . 


2.00 


Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing: 




Blank book ..... 


12.50 


Civil docket, court record . 


24.00 


130 certificates ..... 


10.50 


1,500 letter heads .... 


6.00 


Blanks, etc. ..... 


18.25 


Paid W. P. Goodman : 




Record books 


5-89 


Diaries and pencils .... 


25-50 


I time book, to order .... 


5-50 


Waste basket ..... 


.63 


Envelopes, ink, etc. .... 


5-85 


Paid Star Stamp Co., i handled stamp 




and pad ..... 


2.00 


Temple & Farrington Co., ink, mu- 




cilage, penholders, blocks, etc. . 


16.96 



MEDICAL, SURGICAL, AND SANITARY. 



Paid G. W. Bailey : 

Use of horse and driver for ambulance 
Storage and care of ambulance . 
Paid F. X. Chenette, burying horse 

I. L. Carpenter, M. D., surgical and 
medical treatment of sundry per- 
sons ...... 



$8.25 

12.00 

5.00 



$306.08 



636 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid J. J. Holland : 

1 carboy aqua ammonia 
Cotton, carbolic oil . 

Paid M. E. Kean, M. D., professional 
services ..... 

C. W. Lerned & Co., disinfectants . 

Frederick Perkins, M. D., surgical 
and medical treatment, sundry 
persons ..... 

C. F. Starr, M. D., surgical treat- 
ment, sundry persons . 

F. H. Thurston, medicines . 

Hartley Vaughan, burying 2 horses 

LAUNDRY, ETC. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey : 

ID gross matches .... 

2 cases toilet paper .... 
Paid Napoleon Daigle, soap, etc. 

The Daniels-Cornell Co., soap 
Mrs. Filbert, washing floors and 

windows ..... 
Mrs. Glacken, cleaning paint, etc. . 
Mrs. A. M. George, cleaning paint, 

etc. ...... 

J. N. Lacourse & Co., soap . 

Patrick Ryan, soap 

John B. Varick Co., mop waste, 

brooms, duster, sponges 
Mrs. J. F. Wiggin, washing towels, 

blankets, etc. .... 

rogues' gallery. 

Paid L. W. Colby, photographing crimi- 
nals ...... 

J. G. Ellinwood, photographing 
criminals ..... 



;io.32 
8.17 

1.50 
14-95 



I53-00 

15.00 

3-45 

7.00 



$7.00 

20.00 

2.97 

4-75 

4.00 

20.50 

96.30 
.60 



6.18 
65.00 



^36-50 
6.00 



$250.64 



— ^228.42 



^2.50 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



637 



REPAIRS, ETC. 



Paid L. M. Aldrich, labor 


^0.38 


Combination Ladder Co,,, i Detroit 




door opener .... 


20.00 


Paid Peter Harris : 




Keys . . . . ■ . 


2.00 


Repairing cell ..... 


2.50 


Unlocking trunks .... 


•50 


Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co.: 




I desk 


35-00 


I table 


7.00 


I chair . . . _ . 


5-50 


4 shades, made and hung . 


2.72 


Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co., labor on 




boiler grate .... 


29.41 


Manchester Heating 8z Lighting 




Co., I shade and ring 


•50 


E. H. McQuade, electric bell 


1.65 


Henry McQuade, electric bells, la- 




bor on same .... 


14.90 


Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 




Repairing waste pipe 


7.8s 


Repairing dippers .... 


•95 


Paid Leander Pope, repairing bunks, etc. 


3.80 


John B. Varick Co., lanterns, hose 




menders, globes, etc. . 


10.98 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid C. F. Abbott, i Abbott ash sifter . 
Adams & Tasker, 50 lbs. lime and 

salt 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 20 lbs. ice daily 

from May 1 6 to November 6 
Miss A. B. Brown, rent of matron's 

room ...... 



^6.75 

.70 

10.01 

75.00 



$i-:5.64 



638 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Champion Flue Scraper Co., i flue 

scraper ..... $A-5° 

Paid John Driscoll : 

6 brooms ...... 

25 lbs. mop waste .... 

Paid M. J. Healy, cash paid, witness fees 
and other expenses 
B, A. Moody, caring for lost children 
Paid Charles Noll : 

104 letter file boxes .... 

103 box covers ..... 

Paid D. F. O'Connor, services defending 
minor . . . . ■ . 

A. C. Osgood, services defending 
minor ..... 

Paige & Myrick, police badges 
James P. Slattery, repairing clocks . 
Frank P. Wiggin, killing dogs 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund . 



^•75 


3-75 


307-53 


4.90 


41.60 


10.30 



2.00 




5.00 




2-75 




19.00 






$497-.S4 






$40,200.00 


• 


200.00 




$40,400.00 



Repairs of Buildings. 

Appropriation ..... $4,000.00 
Transferred from appropriation for Halls- 

ville schoolhouse .... 320.3*3 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 764.71 

^5jo8.S-o4 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in di- 
vision No. 2 : 

January ...... $30.00 

February ..... 24.00 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 



639 



March . 










$24.00 


April 
May 










24.00 
30.00 


June 










24.00 


July . 

August . 

September 

October 










24.00 
30.00 
24.00 
30.00 


November 










24.00 


December 










24.00 



Paid Lovejoy & Stratton, labor and care 
of clocks on schoolhouses and other 
public buildings, from Dec. 22, 1892, 
to Dec. 31, 1893 .... 

CITY HALL. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

Repairing chairs .... $0.85 

Lumber and labor on floor . . . 4.00 

Lumber and labor, messenger's and 

street commissioners' offices . . 6.98 

Paid John Bryson, labor and paint, engi- 
neer's office .... 24.13 
Baker & O'Brien, paint and labor . 2.20 
C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Works, 295 pounds grate 
castings . . . . . 16.23 
Head & Dowst Co. , lumber and labor 1.25 
Daniel McAuliffe, repairing and kal- 

somining city treasurer's office . 16.20 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing mate- 
rial and labor .... 65.75 
Joseph St. Laurent, lumber and labor 67.66 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid Baker & O'Brien, paint and labor . $146.84 



$397-50 



$205.25 



640 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 

Material and labor .... ^33- 15 

Material and labor, per contract . . 155-00 
Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co., plumbing 

material and labor . . . 83.55 
B. F. McDonnell, painting and dec- 
orating section of library, as per 

contract ..... 475 -oo 

Daniel McAuliffe, kalsomining . 20.97 
Pike & Heald Co., plumbing mate- 
rial, etc. ..... 37-49 

Joseph St. Laurent, material and 

labor. ..... 105.37 

Shirley & Stuart, mason work . 5.55 

Wm. E. Williams, repairing slate roof 1 8. 1 6 

POLICE STATION. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, material and labor . ^175.19 

J. J. Abbott, material and labor . 191-33 
John Driscoll, material and labor, 

Clinton-street station . . . 24.25 
Eastman & Martin, repairs on boiler 12.75 
Larkin & Connors, repairs on water- 
closet, Clinton street . . . 1.80 
Pike & Heald Co., plumbing mate- 
rial and labor .... 101.30 
Shirley & Stuart, mason-work . 6.75 

ENGINE HOUSES. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber and labor : 

Chemical house ..... $2.70 

General Stark house . . . . 27.76 

Merrimack house . . . . 151.20 

Massabesic hosehouse . . . . 23.25 

Vine-street house .... 23S.37 



$1,081.08 



$513-37 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 



641 



Paid Baker & O'Brien, paint and labor 

Merrimack house 

Pennacook hosehouse 

Vine-street house 

Chemical house . 

General Stark house 

Fulton house 

Fire King house 

Paid John Bryson, paint and labor 

General Stark house 

Fulton house 

Fire King house . 

Paid F. W. Blood & Co., material and 

labor, repairing roof. Vine street 

M. J. Coleman, plumbing material 

and labor. General Stark house . 

Dana & Provost, material and labor, 

fixing windows .... 

Joel Daniels & Co., paint, glass, etc. 

Wm. E. Goodwin, bracket, globe, 

gas burner, etc.. Chemical house 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Lumber and labor, Vine street 

•Plastering, Merrimack house 

Lumber and labor, Merrimack house . 

Bill for slate roof, Merrimack house 

Paid Larkin & Connors, plumbing repairs 

Frank L Lessard & Co., plumbing 

material and labor, Fulton house 

The Thomas A. Lane Co., plumbing 

material and labor. Vine-street 

house . . . . . 

Mills & Sturtevant, repairs, Fire 

King 

P. J. McGrangahan, washing and 
kalsomining ceiling, Chemical 

41 



^12.85 

15-07 
207.95 

32-45 
2.63 
1.42 
1. 21 

207.42 

27.65 

8-73 

42.39 

78.03 

13.10 
3-67 

3-5Q 

26.20 
6.16 

44.88 

8.99 

46.82 

33-94 



12.93 

141-54 

5.00 



642 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Pike & Heald Co. , plumbing mate- 
rial and labor : 
Vine-street house 
Fire King house 
Fulton house 
Massabesic house 
General Stark house . 
Merrimack house 
South Manchester hosehouse 
Paid Joseph St. Laurent : 

Repairing stalls, Merrimack house 
Repairing roof, etc., Fulton house 
3 airing traps, Fire King house . 
Paid Shirley & Stuart, mason-work, Ful- 
ton ...... 

William E. Williams, material and 

labor, putting snow guards on 

Merrimack house 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., hardware, 

etc. ...... 



BATTERY BUILDING. 



;3i6.47 
3-35 

24.94 

3-35 
27.14 

125-58 
10.60 

2-95 
136.82 

4-5° 
8.30 



12.69 
26.57 



52,131.07 



Paid L. M. Aldrich, material and labor . ^12.04 

J. Choate & Co., setting glass . 9.81 
Pike and Heald Co., plumbing and 

labor 85.24 

COURT HOUSE. 



$107.09 



Paid L. M. Aldrich, repairing lock . $0.73 

F. W. Blood & Co., repairs on roof 16.62 

Kirby Floral Co., plants . . 36.15 
The Thomas A. Lane Co., labor on 

waste pipe .... 3.07 



WARD 5 WARDROOM. 643 

Paid Larkin & Connors, plumbing re- 
pairs ^i7-o5 

Pike & Heald Co., repairs on steam 

and water pipe .... 8.42 



SCHOOLS. 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., material and labor : 

Webster-street ^43-oi 

Bakersville ...... 1.50 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

and labor, Webster-street . . . 111.17 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid D. Barker, i office desk . . . ^5 -00 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., brass fittings . . i.oo 
Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

Labor and material . . . . 15- 75 

Removing voting booths . . . 3.50 

Paid Warren Harvey, removing loam and 

grading lot, Union and Bridge streets 30-45 

Paid Larkin & Connors : 

Repairs, public comfort . . . 20.00 

Ward 8 wardroom .... 11-56 

Paid Clemens Langer, plumbing material 10.90 

Pike & Heald Co., labor cleaning 

waste pipe ..... 1.80 



)2.04 



$155.68 



$99.96 

Total expenditures ..... $5,085.04 



Ward 5 Wardroom. 

Balance from last year, unexpended . $2,274.63 
Appropriation 3,000.00 



;>274.63 



644 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



ARCHITECTS. 



Paid Chickering & O'Connell : 

Details and superintendence of base 

ment, and general drawings 
Details and superintendence of first 
floor ..... 

, General drawings and specifications 
two-story wardroom building . 
Altering drawings of one-story building 
Altering specifications 
Details of one-story building 
Supervision of construction of ward 
room, ij4, per cent . 
Paid Francois Gallipeau, on account 

foundation ..... 
Paid Maurice & Dufresne : 

Covering in wardroom, on account 
Final payment, first floor . 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to new account 



$66.50 

51-30 

167.50 
36.00 
10.00 
45.00 

67.50 

665.25 

17T.00 
342.00 



Pearl-Street Schoolhouse. 

Balance from last year, unexpended . $1,120.95 
Appropriation ..... 8,500.00 
Appropriation (resolution, June 5, 1894) 2,800.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 562.05 



$1,622.05 

$1,622.05 
3*652. 58 

$5)274-63 



$12,983.00 



Expenditures. 



BUILDING. 

Paid W. M. Butterfield, balance due on contract 



PEARL-STREET SCHOOLHOUSE. 645 



CONTRACTS. 



Paid Mead, Mason & Co., balance due 

for erection of school building , $10,000.00 

Smead Warming & Ventilating Co., 
second payment on heating appa- 
ratus ...... 812.50 

Underbill Warming & Ventilating 
Co., Assignee of Smead Warming 
and Ventilating Co., final pay- 
ment on heating apparatus . 406.25 



$11,218.75 



FURNITURE. 

Paid the Bobrick School Furniture Co.: 

48 sets, at $3.25 .... $156.00 
48 sets, at $3.50 .... 168.00 
Paid The Head & Dowst Co., labor plac- 
ing seats 9.35 

J. G. Jones, trucking castings and 

desks ..... 3.50 



^336.85 



EXTRAS. 

Paid E. M. Bryant & Co., electrical work $174.37 

S. W. Bascomb, labor grading 

schoolhouse lot . . . . 13S.15 

Joseph Langley, labor grading 

schoolhouse lot . . . . 89.40 

Pike & Heald Co., 691 feet gas pip- 
ing 55-28 

Dennis Sullivan, labor grading 

schoolhouse lot . . . . 65.40 

Timothy Sullivan, labor grading 
schoolhouse lot . 

J. T. Underbill & Co., concreting 
driveway and walks 



13-50 



646 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., 30 pounds 

grass seed ..... $4-5 o 

S750.60 



Total expenditures $12,666.20 

Amount transferred to new account . . . 316.80 



$12,983.00 



New Schoolhouse, Ward 9. 

Balance from last year, unexpended . $4,900.00 

Appropriation ..... 12,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 41 9- 79 

$i7>3^9-79 

Expenditures. 

contract. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. . . $13,250.00 

Warren Harvey, foundation . . i, 337-5° 

Underbill Warming & Ventilating 

Co., heating and ventilating . 1,625.00 

$16,212.50 



ARCHITECT. 

Paid W. M. Butterfield 

EXTRAS. 

Paid E. M. Bryant & Co., material and la- 
bor $170-55 

Head & Dowst Co., material and la- 
bor 107.74 

Pike & Heald Co., 696 feet gas 

piping 52-20 



50.49 



Total expenditures $175002.99 

Amount transferred to new account . . • 316.80 

$i7>3i9-79 



ADDITION TO AVEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLHOUSE. 647 

New Schoolhouse, Hallsville. 

Balance from last year, unexpended . . . $703.16 

Expenditures. 

furniture. 

Paid Concord & Montreal Railroad, 

freight on school desks . . $48.45 

Manitowoc Seating Co., desks . 268.38 

Winchester Furniture Co., 4 No. ^20 

teachers' desks .... 66.00 

$382.83 



Total expenditures ..... $382.83 
Transferred to appropriation for repairs of buildings 320.33 



$703.16 



Addition to Webster-street Sciioolliouse. 

Balance from last year, unexpended . $2,425.00 
Appropriation ..... 3,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 997-29 



),422.29 



Expenditures. 

contract. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co., balance 

contract ..... $4,285.00 
Smead Warming & Ventilating Co., 

first payment on heating apparatus 597'5o 
G. H. Underbill, assignee Smead 
Warming & Ventilating Co., final 
payment on heating apparatus . 597'5o 



$5,480.00 



648 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CONCRETE. 

Paid J. T. Underbill & Co ^261.50 

EXTRAS. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co.: 

Material and labor .... ^385.40 
96 sets school furniture . . . 106.60 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., plumbing mate- 
rial and labor ..... 36.63 

^528.63 



Total expenditures $6,270.13 

Transferred to reserved fund . • . . , 152.16 



,422.29 



Lincoln School Curbing. 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Amount transferred to appropriation for incidental 

expenses $1,000.00 



Fulton Engine House. 

Appropriation ..... $1,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 2.71 

$1,002.71 

Expenditures. 

building. 

Paid Mead, Mason & Co., balance of contract . $585.00 



HOSEHOUSE, SOUTH MANCHESTER. 649 

EXTRAS. 

Paid John Bryson, paper and hanging . $46.63 
Dana & Provost, material and labor 10.68 

Frank I. Lessard «& Co., 7 lbs. lead .32 

Paid Mead, Mason & Co.: 

Changing stalls, floors, etc. . . 250.00 

2 brass slide poles .... 22.00 

Cutting through and putting door in 

wardroom ..... 13-00 

Iron grating, etc. .... 13-90 

Screen frames and covering . 12.75 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., paper and 

molding ...... 48.43 

$417-71 



Total expenditures . . . . . $1,002.71 



Repairs Vine-street Hook-and-Ladder House. 

Amount transferred from reserved fund by resolution, 

March 6, 1S94 ...... . $445.00 

Expenditures. 

contract. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, finishing rooms, as per contract $445.00 



Hosehouse, South Manchester. 

Balance from last year, unexpended . $2,500.00 

Appropriation ..... 1,500.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 203.24 



54,203.24 



Expenditures. 

contract. • 

Paid L. M. Aldrich .... $3,800.00 
Chickering & O'Connell, services as 

architects ..... 190.00 



,990.00 



650 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 
EXTRAS. 



Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

Changing doors and partition . . $44.50 

2^ hours' labor .... .63 

Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co., material 

and labor ..... loS.ii 

C. H. McKenney & Co., electric 

fixtures ..... 60.00 



Total expenditures 



;2i3.24 



$4,203.24 



Water-Works. 

Balance from last year, unexpended . $95,144.16 

. 110,210.29 
. 50,000.00 



Cash received for water rents, etc. . 
Amount received from bonds issued 





Expenditures. 


4 




LABOR. 




Paid labor of men, 


as per pay-roll : 




January . 


. 


$1,730.70 


February . 










1,015.04 


March 










1,092.05 


April 










1,988.95 


May 










3jI95-oi 


June 










2,464.39 


July 










2,586.87 


August 










. 3'344.86 


September 










2,734-85 


October . 










3,428.56 


November 










2,745-54 


December 


• 








. 2,614.87 



$255,354-45 



$28,941.69 



WATER-WORKS. 



651 



Paid E. A. G. Holmes : 

Labor and lumber, bench . . . ^61.92 
Labor, lumber, and hardvvare, houses 
on Hanover and Belmont streets, 
damaged by blasting . . . i4-7o 

Lumber and labor . . . '. 183.21 

Paid J. H. Proctor, labor of men and 

teams ..... 645.84 

Wm. Shretski, 2^ days' labor, dig- 
ging sidewalk .... 8.00 
A. D. Sherer, labor at reservoir . 5.60 

GENERAL EXPENSE. 



119.27 



Paid Charles K. Walker : 

Salary as superintendent . . . ^1,999.92 

Gas ....... 20.04 

Postage stamps . . . . . 28.50 

Express ...... 26.44 

Amos Webster . . . . . 5.00 

Car-fare, pens, recording deeds, soap, 

etc. ...... 4.62 

Wire, glue, lamp chimney . . . .95 

Drills and tape ..... 1.87 

Mr. Austin, plans of gate chamber . iS-oo 

Book, job team, blue print . . . 2.20 

Incidentals ..... 20.10 

Eaton place sale .... 5.00 

Paid A. R. Ingham, 5 dinners, water 

commissioners . . . . 3.75 

Frank W. Elliott, dinners, board 

water commissioners and guests . 42.25 
Henry Chandler, 35 meetings of 

board . . . . . 140.00 

Alpheus Gay, 40 meetings of board 160.00 

E.J. Knowlton, 7 meetings of board 28.00 



652 



REPORT OF THf; CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Chas. T. Means, 21 meetings of board 

C. H. Manning, 25 meetings of board 
Byron Worthen, 13 meetings of board 

D. B. Varney, 2 meetings of board 
A. C. Wallace, 35 meetings of board 
Jas. A. Weston, 40 meetings of board 
James A. Weston, clerk . 

N. E. Confectionery Co., for lunch 
served at engine test . 

A. M. Winchester, 16 lunches with 
coffee and cocoa for men testing 
engines ..... 

E. H. Stowe, dinners for county 
commissioners .... 



$84.00 
100.00 
52.00 
8.00 
140.00 
160.00 



2.32 



5.00 



10.25 



$3^165.21 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co.: 

Printing 16,000 water notices . . $22.40 

1,000 postals and printing . . . n-So 

Printing 2,500 4-page meter pamphlets 7.50 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing: 

1,500 postals ..... 20.50 

17,150 water bills .... 35-75 

600 reports ..... 37-50 

2,400 note heads . . . . 9.00 

235 blanks ...... 22.00 

500 postal notices .... 6.50 

100 half-letter heads .... 2.25 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., advertising: 

Petition, 23 inches, 3 times . . 46.23 

One line, 27 times . . . . 6.75 

Printing blank book with sheets . . 16.75 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., stationery . 42.61 
Exeter Gazette, publishing petition 

in regard to flowage rights . . 3 7- 50 



WATER-WORKS. 653 

Paid Republican Press Association, pub- 
lishing petition and order . . ^36.00 
Union Publishing Co., advertising 

water bills . . . . . 6.45 

$367-19 



ENGINEERING SERVICES. 

Paid George S. Rice and George E. Evans : 

16854 days' services .... $2,022.00 
Typewriter's services . . . . 20. 28 

Paid Joseph B. Sawyer, services of self 
and men ...... 1,054.13 



TEAMS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid George W. Bailey, use of teams . ^50.00 
E. T. James, use of teams . 240.50 
Whitten & Fifield, use of teams . 248.00 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., use of telephones . 138.00 
James Baldwin Co., i load shavings .75 
Paid L. B. Bod well & Co.: 

Egg coal 233.69 

I ton stove coal .... 7.50 
Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 4^ tons 

Cumberland coal . . . 29.00 
Moore & Preston, 4 tons Cumber- 
land coal ..... 26.00 
John D. Robmson, sawing and split- 
ting wood . . . . . 25.50 
Paid J. Albert Walker : 

83 1-28 tons Cumberland coal . . 314-27 

38 tons 280 pounds Cumberland coal . 127.72 
Paid J. A. & A. W. Walker, 131 tons 660 

pounds Cumberland coal . . 459-54 

George Whitford, hard wood . 9.00 

J. F. Wyman, ^ cord wood . . 4.00 

G. W. Flint, Yn cord wood . . 1.75 



5,096.41 



$1,915.22 



654 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



LAND. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., as 

per deed ..... $5,676.00 

Cora K. Bell, self and guardian, as 

per deed ..... 3,436,86 

Elizabeth C. Canfield, as per deed 1,750.00 

A. N. Clapp, as per deed . . 3,500.00 

Benjamin Eaton, trustee, as per deed 950.00 
Mrs. Lucy A. FoUansbee, as per 

deed ...... 1,500.00 

Cleaves N. Harvey, as per deed . 1,600.00 

Sallie S. Harvey, as per deed. . 1,000.00 

N. P. Kidder, as per deed . . 3,600.00 

David W. Perkins, as per deed . 3,650.00 

Susan G. Prescott, as per deed . 1,000.00 

LEGAL SERVICES. 

Paid Drury & Peaslee, services in saw- 
dust, Devonshire Mills, and flow- 
age cases ..... $221.94 

Dana W. King, recording deposi- 
tions ...... 50.00 

William Morrill, recording deposi- 
tions ...... 50.00 

H. W. Moore, services taking depo- 
sitions, sundry cases . . . 101.28 

James P. Tuttle, services taking 

depositions .... 167.00 

Samuel Webber, services in claim of 

Devonshire Mills v. City . . 50.00 



$27,662.86 



DAMAGES. 




Paid M. D. Johnson : 




Breaking 2 squares of glass 


$1.00 


Damage to ceiling .... 


•.SO 



WATER-WORKS. 655 

Paid C. M. Rowell, damages to cellar by 

water $37-5° 

J. O. Turcotte, damage to goods in 
cellar by water from main pipe in 
Elm street .'.... 150.00 



FURNITURE. 




Paid J. Y. McQueston Co.: 




I flat-top desk ..... 


$15.00 


7 chairs ...... 


14.00 


6 spittoons ..... 


4-5° 


Leather seating 2 chairs 


4.50 


CONTRACTS. 




Paid Bartlett, Gay & Young : 




Balance due on contract . 


$2,216.25 


5 per cent interest, 9 months 8 days . 


85-57 


Paid Frank S. Bodvvell : 




Furnishing cut stones for gate house . 


350-50 


14 stone monuments . . . . 


10.50 


Paid Head & Dowst Co.: 




Balance due on contract No. 3, engine 




house foundation and intake pipe 


2,548.58 


Balance due on contract No. 4, engine 




house and chimney 


6,650.00 


157 cubic yards dry rubble masonry, 




laid in rear of pumping station, high 




service supply .... 


706.50 


Contract for building barn . 


1,300.00 


Contract for building dwelling . 


3,000.00 


Lumber and labor . . 


1,065.77 


Paid Moore & Co.: 




Balance due on contract 


i,545-6i 


5 per cent interest, 9 months 8 days . 


59.68 



656 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Trumbull & Ryan : 
On account, contract No. 5, 

reservoir . . . ^34,089.77 

Less bill for laying pipes, 

and pump . . . 392.04 

^33^697.73 

Labor and material grouting ledge . 15-62 

Labor on 24-inch gates and setting bolts 20.18 

Extra work and tools .... 80.30 

Pumping ...... 13-87 

6 hours' pointing bottom reservoir . 1.32 

Freight, cartage, repairs, etc. . . 130.93 



$53A9^-9^ 



HARDWARE, BLACKSMITHING, FREIGHT, 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., shovels, 

picks, pick handles, etc. . . $110.25 
John B. Varick Co., hardware, all 

kinds ..... 730.58 
Wadleigh Hardware Co., powder, 

fuse, hammers, etc. . . . 196.41 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening tools, etc. 367.57 

Cressey & Colby, sharpening tools . 26.30 

A. Filion, setting tire . . . 2.00 

F. H. Senter, sharpening tools . 23.05 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight on 

hydrants, pipe, etc. . . . 1,761.86 
Concord & Montreal Railroad, 

freight on hydrants, coal, pipe, etc. 779-17 

P. W. Dickey, carting oil . . 1.50 



SUPPLIES. 



Paid Adams & Tasker : 

16 casks cement .... $23.05 

1)4 bushels summer rye, and bag . 1.65 



$3,998.69 



WATER-WORKS. 657 

Paid American Supply Co., 20 coils pack- 
ing, less freight .... $96.05 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.: 

Elbows, safety valves, bolts, labor . 474-31 
Angle irons, straps, hinges, etc. . . 67.36 

Paid Atlantic Works, 2 61-inch Manning 

boilers, as per contract, less freight 2,068.00 
C. G. H. Bennink, 35 rubber washers 3.50 

Boston Belting Co., hose and coup- 
lings ...... 68.00 

Builders' Iron Foundry, sleeves, 

branches, bends, etc. . . . 452.00 

Paid Chadwick Lead Works : 

Pipe, solder, and tin . . . . 83.25 

600 pigs lead ..... 1,953.28 

Paid Chapman Valve Manufacturing Co.: 

I 20-inch Bell light water gate . . 94.88 
10 water gates ..... 136.20 
Hydrants, etc. ..... 345.14 

Paid P. C. Cheney Co., 100 pounds wip- 
ing waste ...... 9.00 

Paid Allen N. Clapp : 

357 gallons kerosene oil . . . 26.06 

Barrels ...... 4.5 a 

Paid M. T. Davidson, repairing engine . 16.50 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co.: 

II barrels cement .... 14-35 
12 barrels lime ..... 12.60 

Paid Edson Manufacturing Co., i No. 3 

pump head ..... 3.61 

Paid Garlock Packing Co.: 

13^ lbs. ring packing . . . 12.26 

i^ lbs. flax packing .... i.i^ 

1171^ trappers flax .... 76-38 

Paid Hays Manufacturing Co.: 

300 No. 3 stop boxes .... 265.71 



668 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



51 i-inch curb cocks 
50 No. 3 curb boxes 

Less freight 



^40.80 
45.00 

^85.80 
3.02 



Paid J. Hodge : 

300 meter boxes 

Material and labor 
Paid Holyoke Hydrant & Iron Works, hy 
drants, jackets, hydrant heads, etc 
Joel Knapp & Son, 64 stone bolts 
Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co.: 

Material and labor 

Labor on pump at pipe yard 

Chisels, valves, plugs, etc. . 
Paid Leonard & Ellis, machinery and cyl 

inder oil . 
Paid Ludlow Valve Manufacturing Co.: 

4 sluice gates . . . $ 

4 standards, special compo- 
sition . . • • 1 1 1. 60 



20 



Less bolts and nuts 



^585.80 
11.20 



$82.78 





90.00 




156.48 




1,184.00 




5-3° 




324-34 




1.65 




6-39 



30S.48 



574-6o 

Paid Manchester Locomotive Works, cov- 
ers, domes, iron, etc., repairs . 1,548.01 
McNeal Pipe &: Foundry Co., pipe 14,307.96 
Mills & Sturtevant, lumber and labor 242.05 
Paid National Meter Co.: 

Meters 2,305.85 

Repairing meters, etc. . . . 36.50 
Paid N. E. Water Pipe Co., pipe and 

coupling 940-57 

Paid S. C. Nightingale & Childs : 
Magnabestos plastic covering to fire 

boxes of two boilers . . . 53.65 



AVATER-WORKS. 



659 



Carting material to station . 


$3.00 


Paid E. P. Noll & Co.: 




Cherry cornice for map 


9-50 


Express on map 


1-15 


Paid Peet Valve Co., 79 water gates 


1,199.42 


Perrin, Seamans & Co., 3 ladles 


5-5° 


Pike & Heald Co., material and la- 




bor ...... 


23.27 


Orrin D. Person, curve tile, etc. 


41.44 


Pratt & Cady Co., hydrants . 


964.78 


Luther S. Proctor, 22 poles and set- 




ting same ..... 


30.00 


Ranno Harness Co., tool bag . 


2.00 


Rice & Co., 16 copper screens 


220.00 


Sewall & Day Cordage Co., 5 coils 




jute packing .... 


32.64 


J. Schultzbach, standard rain gauge 


4.00 


J. B. Smith, material and labor 


3-85 


Paid I. L. Stickney : 




Rubber valves and packing 


12.13 


Belt leather 


•75 


25 gaskets, cut to order 


3.00 


11^ pounds packing leather 


2.25 


Paid G. G. Stillman, damper regulator, 




complete ...... 


119.50 


Paid Taunton Locomotive Works: 




Lead melting furnace .... 


20.00 


I grate ...... 


2.01 


Paid Truax & Truax : 




735 pounds plugs .... 


22.05 


60 pounds washers .... 


1.80 


1,653 pounds iron castings . 


49-59 


Paid Thomson Meter Co.: 




20 Thomson meters .... 


200.00 


Couplings ...... 


11.00 


Repairs on meters .... 


5.00 



660 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Union Brass Co.: 

300 i-inch nipples .... $31-25 
i8}4 dozen curb stops . . . 194-25 
Curb cocks 193-83 

Paid Union Water Meter Co., meters 

and repairing meters .... 1,636.11 

Paid G. R. Vance : 

12 galvanized iron pails . . . 12.00 

Oil cans, dippers . . . . 1.45 

Paid D. B. Varney, 32 pieces brass, cut 

to order ...... 3.00 

Paid Waldo Brothers : 

I tub clay ...... .50 

5 barrels clay ..... 7.50 

Paid Warren Foundry & Machine Co., 75 

pieces 6-inch pipe . . . 33S.27 
R. M. West, 2 ladders . . . 10.04 

Paid Henry R. Worthington : 

Engines Nos. 834, 835, delivered, as per 

agreement, May 25, 1893 • ■ 8,000.00 
Due on pumping engines Nos. 834, 835, 
ready for steam .... 8,000.00 

Balance ...... 7,000.00 

Machinist's time and expenses, running 

engines Nos. 834 and 835 . . 84.86 

Paid George Woodman Co.: 

20 7-12 feet 3-inch pipe . ... 8.44 

810 nipples, all sizes . . . . 45- 16 

Paid Yale & Towne Manufacturing Co., 3- 

ton pulley block traveler . . . 550.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid town of Auburn, taxes on land . $76.74 

Paid J. J. Abbott : 

47 rolls paper 6.20 

37 yards border . .... 2.22 



;7,583-67 



WATER-WORKS. 661 

Paid A. T. Barr : 

Testing 4 set scales .... ^2.00 

Team ...... i.oo 

Paid M. Badger, paint, paper, labor . 43.12 

Wm. M. Butterfield, general draw- 
ings and details for pumping sta- 
tion, 25 per cent cost . . . 236.25 
Paid J. Choate & Co.: 

Painting crane ..... 3.75 

Painting roof over portico . . . 1.50 

Paid W. M. Darrah & Co., slating gate- . 

house at high service reservoir . 155-33 
Dean & Main, to making duty tri- 
als of two pumping engines and 
boilers, and making report thereon 600.00 
A. D. Emery, services from Jan. 24, 

1891, to Nov. I, 1894 
James P. Finn, paint and labor 
Paid R. D. Gay : 

104 rolls paper ..... 

182 yards border 
Paid Hill-Spaulding Harness Co., strap- 
ping 1.00 

H. J. Lawson, iron, solder, wire, 

and labor ..... 45-07 

Merrill & Laird, repairing chimneys 

and stone work at pumping station 146.60 
W. H. Noiseaux, 200 loads loam . 50.00 

C. H. Robie Concrete Co., concret- 
ing at new station . . . 335-65 
F. M. Smith, rent of land to Oct. i, 

1894 ...... 100.00 

treasurer of sinking fund, amount of 

hydrant tax for 1894 . . . 13,925.00 

G. W. Wales, making map of city . 145-00 



45' 


.00 


152 


.22 


15 


,10 


10. 


86 



662 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Wm. E. Williams, repairing slate 
roof at pumping station 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to interest appropriation 
Transferred to new account . 



- ^16,107.59 

$198,123.93 
• 38>399-oo 
. 18,831.52 

^255,354.45 







Commons. 




Appropriation ..... $3,500.00 


Transferred from reserved fund 

Expenditures. 


3-46 




LABOR. 


Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 


January ^250.50 


February 










194.88 


March . 










172.00 


April 










161.00 


May 










159.00 


June 










183.25 


July . 










III. 74 


August . 










193-39 


September 










180.62 


October . 










207.25 


November 










90.10 


■ December 










92.87 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 2 : 
December 



h5°3-46 



$1,996.60 



COMMONS. 



663 



PLANTS, LOAM, TREES, ETC. 

Paid A. G. Hood, plants . . . $60.00 

H. H. Huntress, plants . . . 68.00 

The Kirby Floral Co., plants . . 26.00 

Ray Brook Garden Co., plants . 32.00 
J. S. Holt& Co., 1,568 bushels ashes 196.00 

J. A. Chamberlen, 57 trees . . 57-oo 

John Perham, 12 maple trees . . 4.80 



WATER AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 



Paid Water Commissioners, use of water . 

The Electric Co., running lights at 

Merrimack-street public comfort . 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 



$700.00 

18.00 
18.00 



REPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 



Paid Adams & Tasker, i bushel salt 

J. J. Abbott, paint for painting seats 
on commons 
Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

Filing saws .... 

Lumber and labor 
Paid John Bryson, paint and labor . 
Paid Flint & Little : 
Re-cutting 12 large files 
Filing saws .... 

Paid John N. Foss, use of teams 
John Fullerton, 2 keys . 
C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma 

chine Co., material and repairs 
A. & W. S. Heath, 4 pairs rubber 

boots ..... 
The Thomas A. Lane Co., hose, la 

bor on fountains, etc. . 
People's Gas-Light Co., i chaldron 
coke ..... 



^0.35 
11.83 

•95 

5.60 

14.99 

2.18 

•15 

44.00 

1. 00 

26.25 



19-35 
4-50 



$443-8o 



$736.00 



664 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Pike & Heald Co.: 

Cleaning waste pipe .... 

Repairs ...... 

Paid Leander Pope, sharpening tools, etc. 
John B. Varick Co., tools, hard- 
ware, etc. ..... 

Parnell Brothers, 6 barrels 
I. L. Stickney, 4 pairs rubber mittens 
Wingate & Gould, 4 pairs rubber 
boots ..... 

Total expenditures 



^0.50 

1. 10 

31.90 

136.11 

2.10 
4.00 

13.00 



Stark and Derryfield Parks. 

Appropriation ..... ^5,000.00 
Transferred from appropriation for repairs 

of highways ..... 158.73 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, com 
mons : 
January 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 



g32.oo 

12.50 

11.50 

40.25 

1,257.88 

i>254.75 
1,140.62 

705-97 
240.00 



$322.06 



^5.158.73 



$4,695.47 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2 : 
September ....... 



:ii5-7S 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



665 



TOOLS, HARDWARE, AND REPAIRS 

Paid L. M. Aldfich, lumber and labor . $ 

J. J. Abbott, painting signs . 
Adams & Tasker, barrel cement 
Edwards O. Dodge, 54 loads stone 
J. G. Ellinwood, i tintype, Stark 
park plan ..... 
Gage & Adams, sawing 11^ thou- 
sand feet lumber 
A. E. Herrick, cash paid, expenses 

to Boston and return , 
Kilburn & Cross, i electrotype of 

plan of Stark park 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs 
Massachusetts Broken Stone Co., 
broken stone .... 
Trumbull & Ryan, sharpening tools 
John B. Varick Co., tools, hard- 
ware, etc. ..... 



p.71 
7.29 

2-75 
13-50 

•50 

23'5o 

3.00 

6.00 
6-95 

74.84 
12.90 



187-57 



Total expenditures 



^347-51 

$5>i5S.73 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



J, 000.00 
730-93 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 

January ^184.25 

179-25 



February 
March . 
April 



158.50 
257-45 



>. 730-93 



666 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



May 








;^547-i4 


June 

July . 








577-95 
608.48 


August . 








602.46 


September 
October . 
November 








375-47 
394-38 
172.03 


December 








140.18 



LAND. 



Paid E. C. Howlett, land for addition to 

cemetery $1,000.00 

C. C. Webster, balance due on land 1,000.00 



PLANTS, LOAM, ETC. 

Paid Sidney A. Blood, drawing 65 loads 
loam ...... 

Crafts & Green, 244 loads loam 

A. G. Hood, plants 

H. H. Huntress, plants . 

C. C. Webster, 178 loads clay 



$05.00 
122.00 

50-23 

39.68 

178.00 



WATER, TELEPHONE, INSURANCE, FUEL. 

^34-50 



Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 5 tons 
stove coal ..... 

Everett & Smith, premium on pol- 
icy No. 733,882, N. H. Insur- 
ance Co. (Howlett house) . . 15.00 

A. Elliott & Co., premium on pol- 
icy No. 738,741 (Howlett house) 5.00 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephones . . . 86.85 

Water Commissioners, use of water . 756.00 



t,i97-54 



$2,000.00 



$454-91 



$897-35 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 667 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

receipt book ..... $2.25 

Paid W. P. Goodman : 

I quart ink ..... .75 

I index journal ..... 1.09 

Paid W. E. Moore : 

Printing, binding, and lettering i inter- 
ment book, and one water rent book 9.50 
Printing lot blanks with stubs . . 2.00 

Paid B. A. Stearns, 300 stamped envelopes 6.54 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

3 blocks ...... .21 

Paper ...... .25 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid F. Allen, repairing grave straps . $0.30 

John T. Beach, i one-horse sled . 45.00 

J. Hodge, 400 chestnut hubs . . 8.00 

The Head & Dowst Co., lumber and 

labor ...... 6.74 

Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co.: 

Re-caning 4 chairs .... 4.00 

I cushion ...... 2.00 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., 15 pounds castings . .53 
The Thomas A. Lane Co., material 
and labor on fountain and water 
pipe ...... 267.92 

Paid Palmer & Garmon : 

Setting over Kimball monument, put- 
ting in foundation . . . . 6.70 

8 bound posts ..... 14.00 

Paid Joseph St. Laurent, glass, putty, 

knobs, screws . ... . 7.30 



522.59 



668 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid A. J. Sawyer, lumber 




. 


$66.80 


C. E. Lord, mason -work 




17.30 


Truax & Truax, 205 


feet iron fence, 




as per contract 


. 


. 


440.75 


Paid John B. Varick Co.: 








Grass seed . 






52.04 


6 7-foot settees . 






36.00 


12 5 -foot settees . 






52.80 


150 feet hose 






13-50 


Hardware . 






19-13 


Lawn sprinklers . 






4.76 


I lawn mower 






6.50 


Paid N. J. Whalen, i pair 


straps and 


re- 




pairs .... 


• 




2.00 



REPAIRS ON HOWLETT HOUSE. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paper, paper hanging, 

paint $27.53 

Adams & Tasker, 2 casks lime . 1.90 

Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

Contract for remodeling and repairs . 677.00 
Material and labor .... 30.70 

Paid J. Choate & Co., graining, varnish- 
ing, paint, paper, etc. . . 9.52 
Charles A. Hoitt & Co., 156 feet 

molding ..... 5.64 

C. H. Robie Concrete Co., 91.4 

square yards concreting . . 41-13 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . . . 37-64 

John B. Varick Co., door stops, glass, 

putty, brackets, locks, nails, etc. . 9.31 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid L. M. Aldrich, filing saws . . $0.80 

Chas. H. Bartlett, services as clerk 
of trustees of Pine Grove cemetery 
for 1891, 1892, and 1893 . . 75'Oo 



51,074.07 



$840.37 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



669 



Paid L. B. Clougb, lot of land in ceme- 
tery, No. 1724 . . . . $40.00 
D. N. Gove, use of team . . 1.50 
Paid Pike& Heald Co.: 

6 stoppers . . . . * . . .60 

Labor repairing stove . . . . 5.70 

Paid B. A. Stearns, expenses of trustees to 

Forest Hills and other cemeteries 

in Massachusetts . . . 70.00 

C. H. Simpson, use of teams . . 26.00 

J. C. Nichols & Son, use of teams . ix.oo 

Whitten & Fifield, use of teams . 13-50 



1244.10 



Total expenditures 



)730-93 



Valley Cemetery. 



Appropriation 

• 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 



January 












577-50 


February . 












62.75 


March 












64.63 


April 












141.20 


May 












275.08 


June 












225.08 


July 












217.24 


August 












265.91 


September 










201.91 


October . 










214.61 


November 










124.77 


December 












76.48 



5,000.00 



$1,947.16 



670 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid B. F. Bascomb : 




13 1-5 days' team labor 


^56.80 


Drawing 45 loads loam 


43-25 


342 loads sand 


68.40 


2^ cords manure 


9-33 


Breaking roads 


13-25 


Paid William Berwick, team labor . 


12.30 



WATER AND TELEPHONE. 

Paid Water Commissioners, use of water . ^125.70 



New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., use of telephone 



26.60 



TURF, LOAM, PLANTS, ETC. 




Paid J. Francis, plants .... 


^53-5° 


Paid Neil Fullerton : 




7 loads loam ..... 


8.75 


177 feet turf ...... 


1.77 


Team ...... 


2.00 


Paid Henry W. Hall, 31 loads loam 


15-50 


Paid A. G. Hood : 




Plants 


17.28 


30 loads loam ..... 


15.00 


Paid H. H. Huntress, plants . 


14-95 


Manchester Slaughtering & Render- 




ing Co., 400 pounds fertilizer 


7-50 


Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 




Grass seed ...... 


3.00 


100 pounds top dressing 


2.00 


Paid A. C. Osgood, 3 cords manure 


12.00 


John B. Varick Co., grass seed 


17.62 


Wadleigh Hardware Co., grass seed 


1.50 


Paid P. 0. Woodman : 




10 loads loam ..... 


5.00 


645 feet turf ..... 


6-45 



$203.33 



;i52.3o 



$183.82 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 671 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Paid E. J. Knovvlton, postmaster, enve- 






lopes and postal cards 


$2.43 




S. S. Piper, postmaster, 50 2-cent 






stamped envelopes 


1.09 




Paid Temple & Farrington : 






2 receipt books 


4.00 




I blank book ..... 


5-75 




200 billheads ..... 


I. GO 




Other stationery .... 


•75 


$15.02 






REPAIRS, TOOLS, AND IMPROVEMENTS. 




Paid L. M. Aldrich, filing saws 


$0.20 




J. J. Abbott, paint and glass . 


•95 




A. L. Bixby, lumber and labor 


60.17 




Frank X. Chenette, use of team 


2.00 




Timothy Foley, 4 days' labor white- 






washing tomb .... 


12.00 




C. E. Forbes, i 20-foot ladder 


2.00 




J. Hodge, lumber, etc. . 


1.46 




John F. Larkin, material and labor 






on water pipe .... 


93-35 




Lovejoy & Stratton, cleaning clock 


1. 00 




Manchester Hardware Co., tools 


7.35 




Pike & Heald Co., pipe, hose, noz- 






zles, etc. ..... 


87.04 




W. H. Tibbetts, paint and labor . 


127.71 




J. T. Underbill & Co., 143.32 yards 






concrete ..... 


64.49 




John B. Varick Co., tools, etc. 


5.82 




Wadleigh Hardware Co., tools 


5-85 


5471-39 






Total expenditures 


12,973.02 


Transferred to reserved fund . 




26.98 



5,000.00 



672 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



5150.00 
4.24 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid James E. Bailey, labor .... 

HARDWARE. 

Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., paint and brushes 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Water Commissioners, use of water 

Total expenditures .... 



Pau 


pers off the Farm. 


Appropriation 
Transferred from reserv 


ed fund 
Expenditures. 


. ^7,000.00 
. 2,866.88 








GROCERIES. 




Paid Annis & Co. . 
H. H. Alton . 








^15.98 
6.00 


E. R. Barry . 
Bartlett & Thompson 
A. N. Clapp . 
Eager & Rand 
H. Fradd & Co. . 






3.00 
96.00 

9.00 

69.00 

212.00 


T. F. Fifield . 








621.00 


Fred Fifield . 








2.00 


A. G. Grenier 








118.00 


Griffin Brothers 
Joseph Huard 








1,194.56 
180.00 



5154-24 



ii35-5i 



•73 



1154.24 



^9,866.88 



PAUPERS OFF. THE FARM. 



673 



Paid 0. D. Knox & Co. 






^148.00 


Lamoureaux Brothers 






215.50 


C. S. Magoon & Co. 






16.00 


Thomas H. Mahoney 






344.00 


Edward Marchand 






372.55 


McQuade Brothers 






36.00 


Parnell Brothers . 






4.00 


E. W. Perkins 






236.73 


D. M. Poore & Son 






62.00 


Joseph Quirin 






210.00 


Eugene Quirin 






16.00 


D. A. Shanahan 






144.00 


Schricker Brothers 






16.00 


Scheer & Renker . 






3.00 


J. 0. Turcotte 






46.00 


H. A. Tirrell 






85.00 


Joseph Trehan & Co. 






6.12 


Calixte Vigneault . 






27.00 


M. Verrette, Jr. 






8.00 


Henry Weber 






48.00 


Carl E. York 






11.00 


FUEL. 




Paid Clement Beaudett .... ^37.60 


DeCourcy, Holland & Marshall 


•50 


DeCourcy & Holland 


10.25 


Dunlap & Wason Coal Co. 




16.01 


S. L. Flanders 




39.00 


Moore & Preston . 




29.63 


John Perham 




10.00 


C. E. Pollard 




3.00 


D. M. Poore & Son 




20.38 


J. P. Russell & Co. 




49-5^ 


E. V. Turcotte 




72.50 


J. T, Wyman 




59-14 


43 









,581.44 



674 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Oscar M. Titus . , . . 


^6.00 


Joseph Masse . . . . 


1. 00 


BOARD AND CARE, AND 


RENT. 


Paid A. A. Lamprey . . . . 


$2.00 


county of Hillsborough . 


492.00 


Daniel Davis . . . . 


•50 


John Ferguson . . . . 


20.00 


W. H. Gilmore . . . . 


130-57 


A. D. Hatch . . . . 


30.00 


Carrie E. Jackson 


74.48 


W. M. Kendall . . . . 


12.00 


Mrs. Horace P. Marshall 


3-25 


Christina Maycook 


I31.0S 


Mary McLowe . . . . 


22.00 


Agnes Massey . . . . 


96.00 


N. H. Orphans' Home . 


46.00 


Mary Nadeau 


27.00 


Mrs. Margaret O'Brien . 


15.00 


Clara H. Pressey . . . . 


57.77 


John Reynolds . . . . 


5.00 


D. L. Robinson . 


94.00 


St. Patrick's Old Ladies' Home 


98.00 


St. Patrick's Orphans' Home . 


120.00 


Sacred Heart Hospital . 


25.00 


State Industrial School . 


. 2,964.44 


William Whelpley . 


120.00 


CLOTHING. 




Paid Beauchemin & Beaumier 


$1.50 


Lightbody & Burbank . 


24.45 


M. A. McDonough 


1. 00 


M. F. O'Toole . 


9-75 


Parent & Trudeau 


1.25 


G. L. Robinson . 


7.00 



$354-5^ 



^4,596.09 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 675 

Paid p. F. Toole ^3-5o 

Weston & Martin .... i.oo 

Wingate & Gould .... 3.50 

^52.95 

MEDICINES, MEDICAL SERVICES, FUNERAL EXPENSES. 

Paid Mrs. Anna Brooks, nurse services . $2.00 

I. L. Carpenter, M. D., medical ex- 
amination ..... 3.00 

J. J. Holland, medicine . . .80 

John B. Hall, medicines . . 7.80 

Frederick Perkins, M. D., medical 
attendance .... I3'00 

F. H. Thurston, medicine . . . 42.24 

county of Hillsborough, burial ex- 
penses, Christian Eberle . . 10.00 

T. F. Collins, burial expenses, John 

Kenney ..... 25.00 

T. F. Collins, burial expenses, John 

Dowd's son .... 25.00 

F. X. Chenette, burial expenses, Jo- 
seph Davis ..... 25.00 

Kean & Sheehan, burial expenses, 

child of Mary Shea . . . 10.00 

E. V. Turcotte, burial expenses, 

Mrs. Allison . . . . 25.00 

E. V. Turcotte, burial expenses, 

D. Allison ..... 25.00 

^213.84 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Officer J. J. Connor, conveying 

Theophile Lemire to asylum . $1.12 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 700 

billheads ..... 6.50 

A. G. Grenier, railroad tickets, F. 

Marcotte and wife . . . 15.00 



676 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid W. P. Goodman, stationery . 

E. T. James, use of hacks 
Paid W. H. Maxwell : 

Expense conveying T. Lemire to asylum 

Expense conveying Mary A. Cook to 

asylum ..... 

Paid Paige & Myrick, i hand stamp 

E. V. Turcotte, removing Mrs. E 

Masson to Elliot Hospital . 
Whitten & Fifield, use of teams 

Total expenditures 



S22.69 
2.00 

5-05 



8.44 




1.25 




2.00 




4.00 







$68.05 


. 


$9,866.88 





City Farm. 




Appropriation $8,000.00 


Transferred from reserved fund 

Expenditures. 


486.35 




HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 


Paid Zebina Annis .... $1-50 


Bertha Bagley 








114.86 


Lester Brooks 








44.73 


William Burke 








177.67 


Sarah Cahill . 








182.00 


Donat Duval 








21.63 


Charles Fuller 








266.88 


Daniel Griffin 








150-53 


Daniel Grant 








69.65 


Hannah Hackett 








108.71 


Chauncy Hazen 








242.60 


Fred Krause . 








68.93 


John Kelly . 








104.85 


E. G. Libbey 








500.00 


Annie Libbey 








300.0Q 



;^8,486.35 



CITY FARM. 


Paid Joseph Murphy 


^168.67 


Christina McDonald 


41.00 


John L. Proctor 


84.32 


Kate Pendergast . 


50.00 


Levi J. Proctor 


10.00 


Martha Raycraft . 


10.72 


James Rourke 


43.62 


William Thompson 


187.29 



677 



Paid Adams & Tasker, grinding corn . ^15-62 

Paid Gage & Adams : 

Labor sawing 156.8 feet lumber . . 313-60 

Moving mill from Dunbarton . . 12.00 

Paid V. B, Martin, threshing oats . . 12.00 

Edward Merrill, grinding corn . 23.05 

Paid Samuel Richardson : 

Grinding apples .... 5.08 

Sawing lumber ..... 3.83 



FUEL. 




Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 25,455 lbs. 




egg coal ...... 


^79-55 


Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co.: 




Egg coal 


84.7s 


Stove coal 


13-50 


Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., kind- 




ling wood ..... 


1.50 


Moore & Preston, stove coal . 


77.70 


D. M. Poore, ^ ton Cumberland 




coal . . 


2.50 



CLOTHING AND DRY GOODS. 

Paid Burke Brothers, shoes . . . ^1.25 

Barton & Co., cotton, crash, hose, 

etc. . . . . . . 38.28 



^2,950.16 



^259.50 



678 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 



Paid George Blanchet, cotton, crash, etc. ^4.62 
Cushman & Hardy, jumpers, shirts, 

overalls, etc. .... 38.30 

Clark & Estey, rubbers, buttons, 

hose, etc. ..... 9.07 

W. P. Farmer, boots and shoes . 9.90 

Stanley E. Gould, boots and shoes . 86.89 

Frank P. Kimball, clothing . . 49-56 

F. W. Leeman, drilling . . . 5.63 
Manchester One Price Clothing Co., 

clothing ..... 46.44 

John Robbie Co., table linen, cot- 
ton, etc 12.24 

P. H. Tierney, shirts and drawers . 9.60 

Weston & Hill Co., dry goods . 104.27 

Wingate & Gould, boots and shoes 20.90 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 



Paid Annis Flour & Grain Co. 
F. J. Bixby . 
Bartlett & Thompson 
Barlow & Nye 
Clough & Co. 
C. E. Cox . 
E. P. Desrochers . 
Daniels-Cornell Co. 
Doane & Welch . 
Dodge & Laing . 
Eager & Rand 
A. M. Eastman 
H. B. Fairbanks . 
Flanders & Martin 
Granite State Grocery Co. 
A. L. Gadbois 
A. G. Grenier 
Hubbell & Goings 



460.04 

77-95 

18.54 

3-92 

7.70 

27.21 

5-8o 

130.77 

55-89 
63.16 
16.38 
14.03 
2.09 
3.00 

5-59 

4-85 

47-97 

1-54 



^436-95 



CITY 


FARM. 




Paid J. S. Holt & Co. . 




^12.00 


Daniel Johnson 




2.00 


Horace Marshall . 




4.08 


Manchester Provision Co 




126.29 


Manchester Beef Co. 




15.96 


Manchester Slaughtering 


& Render 




ing Co. 




8.05 


McQuade Brothers 


. 


78.77 


E. S. Newton 




81.28 


New York Market . 




14.14 


Henry W. Parker . 




114.41 


Phoenix Market 




16.22 


J. B. Pickard 


. 


1.94 


W. E. Prescott 




.80 


D. M. Poore & Son 


. 


19.25 


Parnell Brothers^ . 


. 


142.08 


Public Market & Packing 


Co. 


57-07 


E. W. Perkins 




16.32 


Queen City Market 




4-3S 


Joseph Quirin 


. 


209.97 


Fred Ray 


. 


12.25 


Tom W. Robinson 


. 


39-72 


Summer Street Market . 




3.21 


E. M. Slayton 




17.86 


South Manchester Union 


Society . 


1-25 


Sawyer & Clay 


. 


5-07 


J. H. Wiggin & Co. 


. 


37-84 


York Market Co. . 


. 


19.24 


T. E. McDerby . 


• 


5.66 



679 



^2,013.54 



FURNITURE AND KITCHEN UTENSILS. 



Paid Clark M. Bailey, brooms, chimneys, 

baskets, lanterns, etc. . . $30.03 

John Driscoll, wicks, copper bot- 
tom on boiler, etc. . . . 1.85 



680 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid R. K. Home, plates, pans, pails, 
tumblers, dippers, mops, wicks, 
etc. ...... ^14-99 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., lamps, 

pitchers ..... 2.30 

F. E. Nelson, sponges, dippers, cups 

and saucers, tinware, etc. . . 9.32 

Pike & Heald Co., dippers . . i.oo 

D. A. Simops, crockery, etc. . . 3.78 

R. M. West, ironing board . . 1.25 



$64.52 



MEDICINE, MEDICAL SERVICES, LIVE STOCK INSURANCE. 

Paid A. L. Dodge, D. V. S., services as 

veterinary surgeon . . . $9-75 

J. L. Golden, medicine . . . 4.15 

J. J. Holland, medicine . . • 3.35 

George E. Richards, medicine . 2.40 

C. E. Silver, medicine . . . 1.25 

F. H. Thurston, medicine . . 14.40 
Security Live Stock Insurance Co., 

fees and assessments . . . 88. 85 

LIVE STOCK. 

Paid John N. Foss, clipping horses . $2.50 
Irving R. French, balance due on 

trade ..... 10.00 

Welch & Hall, i horse . . . 125.00 



BLACKSMITHING, HARNESSES, ETC 

Paid The Fred Allen Co., blankets, lin- 
ing and lettering same, etc. 

J. M. Brouillette, shoeing horses 

H. A. Green, shoeing oxen . 

Manchester Horse Shoeing Co., 
shoeing horse .... 

N. J. Whalen, harness repairs, etc. 



$14.60 

116.57 

6.00 



1.25 
102.80 



$124.15 



$137-50 



;241.22 



CITY FARM. 



681 



CARRIAGES, AND CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

Paid Couch & McDonald, repairing car- 

i-iages ^i4.55 

Dennis Clifford, i log sled . . 3.50 

Paid A. Filion : 

New shafts . . . . . . 1.75 

Setting axle ..... i.oo 

Paid S. A. Garland, repairing wheel . 5.75 

Paid Kimball Carriage Co.: 

Painting wagon ..... 12.00 

Repairs on carriages . . . , 13- 85 

Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son : 

Ironwork, bar, setting box . . . 1.75 

Repairs on carriages .... iO'95 

Paid F. H. Senter, splicing shaft . . .75 

Timothy Shea, i sled . . . 35- 00 

HAY, GRAIN, AND OTHER FEED. 

Paid Annis Flour & Grain Co. . . ^82.30 



Freeman & Merrill 
John F. Kerwin . 
Clarence R. Merrill 
Partridge Brothers . 



9-50 
6.00 

459-47 
■40.25 



HARDWARE, FERTILIZERS, SEEDS, ETC. 

Paid Dr. Collity, i load manure 

Jas. J. H. Gregory, seeds, all kinds 

John B. Varick Co., paint, brushes, 

seeds, hardware . . . . 

Wadleigh. Hardware Co., powder, 

fuse, locks, etc. .... 



^I.OO 

9.60 
242.36 



5-56 



INSURANCE, 



Paid John Dowst, agent, Capitol Fire In- 
surance Co., policy No. 26,134 . 



$100.85 



;97-52 



;^258.52 



682 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid A. Elliott & Co.: 

Policy No. 10,292, Northern Insurance 

Co. ...... ^40.00 

Policy No. 92,003, Granite State Insur- 
ance Co. ..... 40.00 

Paid Richardson & Goggin, policy No. 

44,025, N. H. Fire Insurance Co. 60.00 

John A. Sheehan, policy No. loi,- 
039, Imperial Insurance Co. . 40.00 



TELEPHONE AND STATIONERY. 

Paid N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone . . . ^44-55 

E. R. Coburn Co., stationery . 4.91 

W. P. Goodman, stationery . . 2.30 

Novelty Advertising Co., stamps . .70 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

I clock ...... 1. 00 

Stationery ...... 2.87 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paint, paper, etc. . ;^5'23 

L. M. Aldrich, filing saws . . 1.20 

Bert Barlow, electrical supplies . 7.36 
Frank Brendle, repairs on floor, roof, 

etc. ...... 13-60 

Thomas Coughlin, i day building 

chimney ..... 3.00 

Dana & Provost, lumber and labor . 2.90 

Freeman & Merrill, lime and hair . 2.84 
A. E. Gage, labor and timber for 

moving buildings . . . i5-oo 
William E. Goodwin, plumbing ma- 
terial and labor . . . . 32.81 

R. D. Gay, paper and border . . 2.70 



$200.00 



^56.33 



CITY FARM. 




Paid The Head & Dowst Co., labor and 




lumber ..... 


$52.92 


Peter Harris, repairs and fitting keys 


2-55 


Paid The S. M. Howes Co.: 




I Jewett range, etc 


138.70 


I 40-gallon boiler .... 


24.00 


Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co., paper and 




border 


3-96 


J. Hodge, lumber .... 


33-30 


Paid C, Langer: 




Labor connecting range with boiler 


6.00 


2 sheets zinc ..... 


2.50 


2 large oven pans . ." . . 


1.50 


copper teakettle, re-bottomed 


1.25 


Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co., pipe, 




coupling, etc 


2.90 


Pike & Heald Co., plumbing mate- 




rial 


6.21 


George W. Rief, i pump handle 


.90 


Irving L. Stickney, rubber cement . 


.40 


Joseph St. Laurent, lumber 


18.26 



683 



^381.99 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid American Express Co., express on 

castings and seeds 
Concord & Montreal Railroad, 

freight on soap and horses . 
Frank H. Challis, 25 copies rules 

and regulations .... 
Emergency Hand Fire Extinguisher 

Co., 12 small extinguishers . 
Wm. Hayes, 6 cider barrels . 
George Hook, castrating pigs 
Frank R. Hazelton, 500 feet hose . 
O. Hardy, i pruner 



7.58 



12.00 

6.00 

2.00 

175.00 

1. 00 



684 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid E. G. Libbey, cash paid : 

I pair horse clippers .... $2.00 

Expenses to Laconia for J. O'Brien, es- 
caped prisoner .... 6.69 

Expenses to Boston (2 men), for return 

of James Quinn, runaway . . 9.25 

Expenses to Lowell, return of Henry 

Rivers 
"Daily Union," 1894 . 
Postage stamps 
Postoffice box rent 
Paid James Morse, running boiler . . 10.00 

Edward Merrill, scraping snow and 

cutting ice . . . . . 11.00 

Sampson, Murdock Sz Co., i direc- 
tory ...... 2.00 

"The New England Homestead," i 

subscription to May i, 1895 . 1.50 

Paid J. Arthur Williams, printing : 

TOO invitations ..... .75 

125 bills of fare ..... i.oo 

Paid Mark A. Torrey Co., soap and soap 

stock . . . ... . . 12.15 



2.78 

6.00 

.60 

3.00 



^278.42 
Total expenditures ..... ^8,486.35 



Indigent Soldiers. 






Appropriation ..... 


$250.00 




Transferred from reserved fund . . 


42.00 


$292.00 






Expenditures. 






GROCERIES. 






Paid S. L. Flanders . . . . 


$8.00 




Griffin Brothers .... 


70.00 





SACRED HEART HOSPITAL. 685 



^176.00 



Paid 0. D. Knox & Co. 
Thomas H. Mahoney 
D. M. Poore & Son 


^24.00 
12.00 
62.00 


FUEL. 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co. 
C. E. Pollard 


;^6.oo 
6.00 



BOARD AND CARE. 

Paid Ellen McGrath 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Frederick Perkins, M. D., medical examinations 
Total expenditures ..... 



Free Beds, Elliot Hospital. 
Appropriation ...... 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Elliot Hospital, amount appropriated for free 
beds ......... 



$12.00 



Women's Aid & Relief Hospital. 
Appropriation ....... ^600.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Women's Aid and Relief Hospital, amount ap- 
propriated for hospital purposes .... ^600.00 



Sacred Heart Hospital. 

Appropriation ....... ^600.00 

expenditures. 

Paid Sacred Heart Hospital, amount appropriated 

for hospital purposes . . . . ... ^600,00 



686 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Decoration of Sold 


iers' 


Graves. 




Appropriation .... 


• 


^350.00 


EXPENDITURES. 






Paid Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. R. 


^296.95 




The Head & Dowst Co. 


53-05 


^350.00 






Militia. 




Appropriation .... 


. 


$900.00 


EXPENDITURES. 






Paid Amoskeag Veterans 


^100.00 




Brigade Headquarters . 




50.00 




First Regiment Band 




100.00 




Lafayette Guards . 




100.00 




Manchester Cadets 




100.00 




Manchester War Veterans 




100.00 




Regimental Headquarters 




50.00 




Scammon Rifles 




100.00 




Sheridan Guards . 




100.00 




Upton Light Infantry . 




100.00 




Total expenditures 


es. 


$900.00 


Abatement of Tax 




Appropriation .... 


^3,000.00 




Balance old account 


503-13 




Transferred from reserved fund 


1,415-63 


$4,918.76 


EXPENDITURES. 






Paid sundry persons on taxes abated 


• . • 


$4,918.76 


State Tax. 




Appropriation .... 


. 


$65,615.00 


EXPENDITURES. 






Paid Solon A. Carter, state treasun 


;r 


. 


$65,615.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 687 

County Tax. 
Appropriation $63,895.37 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Edwin F. Jones, county treasurer . . . $63,895.37 



Resolution Raising Money and Making Appropria- 
tions for the Year 1 894. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 
That the sum of one hundred thousand dollars (;^ioo,ooo) be 
borrowed for the use of the city for the following permanent mu- 
nicipal improvements, viz.: 

Fifty-five thousand dollars ($55,000) for new sewers ; twenty 
thousand dollars ($20,000) for new highways; twenty thousand 
dollars ($20,000) for South Main street bridge; and five thou- 
sand dollars ($5,000) for the development and improvement 
of Derryfield and Stark parks ; and that the joint standing com- 
mittee on finance are hereby authorized to issue bonds of the 
city for said amount of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) 
payable April i, 1914, with interest coupons attached, for the 
payment of interest semi-annually at four per cent ; said bonds 
to be signed by the city treasurer and countersigned by the 
mayor ; said bonds to be sold to the highest responsible bidder, 
upon a call issued by the joint standing committee on finance for 
bids. 

Resolved, further, That the sum of five hundred and one 
thousand one hundred and thirty-five and thirty-seven one hun- 
dredths dollars ($501,135.37) be raised for the use of the city 
for the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four (1894) 
by tax on the polls and estates liable to be taxed thereon, which 
sum, together with the one hundred thousand dollars to be bor- 
rowed as above provided, and with such unappropriated money 
as may be now in the city treasury, or may hereafter come into 
it, shall be appropriated as follows, viz.: 



688 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 



Interest 
Reserved fund 
City hall 

Printing and stationery 
Incidental expenses 
Mayor's incidentals 
City officers' salaries . 
Sinking fund 
Auditor's department . 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Street and park commission 
Repairs of highways 
South Main-street bridge 
New highways 
Land taken for highways 
Watering streets 
Paving streets 
Macadamizing streets 
Grading for concrete 
Scavenger teams . 
Street sweeping 
Lighting streets 
Bridges .... 
City teams 
Sewers and drains . 
Other new sewers . 
Snow and ice . 

Engineer's Department 

Health Department . 



SCHOOL department. 



Repairs of schoolhouses 
Fuel .... 



524,500.00 

20,000.00 

2,700.00 

2,000.00 

12,000.00 

300.00 

16,700.00 

5,000.00 

2,000.00 



24,000.00 

20,000.00 

20,000.00 
8,000.00 
4,000.00 
6,000.00 

15,000.00 
4,000.00 

1 6, 000. CO 
1,200.00 

43,000.00 
3,000.00 
6,300.00 
6,000.00 

55,000.00 
4,000.00 

;^4,3oo.oo 

^3,500.00 

^5,000.00 
5,500.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



689 



Furniture and supplies . 
Books and stationery . 
Printing and advertising 
Contingent expenses 
Care of rooms 
Evening schools . 
Teachers' salaries 
Evening schools, mechanical 
Free text-books . 
Manual training . 
Pearl-street schoolhouse 
McGregorville schoolhouse 
Webster-street schoolhouse 

City Library 

Fire department . 
Fire-alarm telegraph 
Hydrant service . 
South Manchester hosehouse 
Fulton engine house 



draw 



FIRE, 



Police 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



Repairs of buildings 

Ward 5 wardroom .... 

Lincoln school curbing . 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Commons 

Stark and Derryfield parks 
Pine Grove cemetery 
Valley cemetery 
Amoskeag cemetery 



;g7oo.oo 

200.00 

350.00, 

1,100.00, 

4,400.00 

1,200.00 

63,000.00 

550.00 

4,500.00 

1,500.00 

8,500.00 

12,000.00 

3,000.00 

$4,500.00 

$50,000.00 

1,400.00 

13,925.00 

1,500.00 

1,000.00 

$40,400.00 



$4,000.00 
3,000.00 
1,000.00 

$3,500.00 

5, 000. CO 

9,000.00 

3,000.00 

150.00 



PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Paupers off the farm ....... 

City farm 



;7,ooo.oo 
8,000.00 



690 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 



Indigent soldiers . . . . 
Women's Aid and Relief Hospital 
Free beds, Elliot Hospital 
Decoration of soldiers' graves 

Militia 

Sacred Heart Hospital . 



TAXES, 



Abatement of taxes 
State taxes , 
County tax . 



$250.00 
600.00 
600,00 
350.00 
900.00 
600.00 



$3,000,00 
65,615.00 
63.895.37 









^735)935-37 


ESTIMATED RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR. 


Amount to be raised by tax $5°^^'^35-37 


Insurance tax 






4,300.00 


Railroad tax . 






25,000.00 


Savings bank tax . 






77, 000. 00 


Literary fund 






6,000.00 


City hall 


■ , 




2,000.00 


Tuition . , , . 






500.00 


Police department , 






9,000.00 


Pine Grove cemetery 






4,000.00 


Valley cemetery . 






1,500.00 


County of Hillsborough 






1.500.00 


City farm 






3,500.00 


Interest on taxes . 






500.00 


Bonds .... 






100,000.00 



^735>935-37 



VALUATION AND TAXES. 



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692 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Assessors' Oath. 

We, the Assessors of the City of Manchester, do solemnly 
swear that in making the invoice for the purpose of assessing the 
foregoing taxes, we appraised all taxable property at its full value, 
and as we would appraise the same in payment of a just debt due 
from a solvent debtor". So help us God. 



Valuation and Taxes. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on the real and 

personal estate, within the city of Manchester, N. H., for the 
year 1894, was as follows : 

Valuation. Rate per $1,000. Tax. 

Real estate . . $23,719,120 $17-80 $422,200.34 

Personal property . 3,462,290 61,628.76 



$27,181,410 $483,829.10 

No. of polls, 12,103. 1,210,300 $17.80 21,543.34 



Totals . . $28,391,710 $505,372.44 

The share distributed to Manchester of the 
amount of the tax assessed, as per returns made 
by the corporations to state treasurer : 

On railroads $28,301.49 

On savings banks ...... 72,379-38 

On insurance companies 2,598.75 

On literary fund 7,252.97 



Grand tax total $615,905.03 

Appropriated and assessed in 1894 for city ap- 
propriation ....... $483,925.00 

Appropriated and assessed in 1894, for state tax 65,615.00 



VALUATION AND TAXES. 



693 



Appropriated and assessed in 1894, for county 

tax $63,895.37 

Overlay^ ........ 2,469.66 

Grand tax total ..... ^615,905.03 

For further information in relation to taxes collected by the 
state, see State Treasurer's Report. 

TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



Year. 


Is 

e « 

to 

Q 


§1 
.2d 


Collected in 1894. 


CO 

£ 

s 

o 


Taxes of 1SS5 


$1,205.71 

1,264.85 

1,163.94 

1,580.13 

1,397.03 

1,692.81 

2,075.32 

3,032.82 

( 51,056.45 
} 1,443.76 

505,372.44 






$1,205.71 


Taxes of 18S6 






1,264.85 
1,163.94 
1,580.13 
1,397.03 
1 687 08 


Taxes of 1887 












Taxes of 1889 






Taxes of 1890 




$5.73 
103.35 

379.14 

45,829.30 
463,609.07 


Taxes of 1891 




1,971.97 
2 620 15 


Taxes of 1892 


$33.53 

6,098.31 

2,778.72 


Taxes of 1893 


4,572.60 
38,924.65 


Taxes of 1894 




Totals 


$571,285.26 


$4,910.56 


$509,986.59 


$56,388.11 





* This overlay consists of $4,237.07, assessed by the local assessors under 
the provisions of General Laws, chapter 57, section 4; less $1,767.41 received 
from railroads, banks, insurance companies, and literarj^ fund below tlie 
amount estimated by the city councils. 



694 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

TAX VALUATIONS, ETC., FROM 1890 TO 1894, INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. polls. 


Poll tax. 


Val.ofpoll. 


1890 


$24,207,740 
24,872,492 
25,932,044 
27,439,742 
28,391,710 


$462,869.17 
443,541.76 
506,465.17 
507,640.68 
505,372.44 


9,723 
10,367 
10,673 
11,835 
12,103 


$1.91 
1.78 
1.95 
1.85 

1.78 


$100 


1891 


100 


1892 


100 


1893 


100 


1894 


100 







For years prior to 1890, see reports of 1890 and 1891. 



Abated. 



Settlement of Account of George E. Morrill, Tax Col- 
lector for City of Manchester, N. H., June 1 , 1 894. 

Balance out- 
standing June 
1, 1894. 

$1,205.71 

1,264.85 

1,163.94 

1,580.13 

i>397-03 
1,687.08 
1,971.97 
2,620.15 



Amount collected 

Credited by cash, as per treas- 
urer's receipts Nos. 72, 73, 74 





Amount out- 






Standing June 


Collected. 




1, 1893. 




Tax list, 1885 


$1,205.71 




1S86 


1,264.85 




1887 


1,163.94 




1888 


1,580.13 




1889 


15397-03 




1890 


1,692.81 


$5-73 


1891 


2,075-32 


103-35 


1892 


3,032.82 


379-M 



$33-53 



Interest collected, 1890 


. 


$1.86 


1S91 


. 


20.92 


1892 


. 


34.62 


1893 


■ ■ 


896.96 
$95436 


Credited by cash, as per 


treas- 




urers receipts Nos. 69, 


70 


$954-36 



ACCOUNT OF GEORGE E. MORRILL, COLLECTOR. 695 
Dr. 



189,:;. 


To resident list . ■ . 


$506,486.72 




non-resident list 


1.153-96 




voluntary taxes 


1,409.90 




cash overpaid treasurer 
Cr. 


33.86 






IS9I. 


By cash paid city treasurer, as 





;o9,o84.44 



per receipts . . . $496,866.76 

abatements . . . 3,045.60 

unpaid taxes, June i, 1894 4,572.60 
cash on deposit, N. H. 

Trust Co. . . . 3,834.48 
Cash on deposit, Com- 
monwealth Bank . . 765.00 



$509,084.44 



City of Manchester to George E. Morrill. 
Dr. 



To salary for year ending June i, 1894 $1,650.00 
commission on old taxes . . 29.85 



$1,679.85 



Cr. 

By cash paid by treasurer, on account 

of salary ..... $800.00 

balance paid by treasurer, as per 

bill 879.85 



$1,679.85 

Manchester, N. H., November 20, 1894. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George 
E. Morrill, tax collector of said Manchester, and find the same 
correct, as above stated. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



696 . REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Some Laws and Decisions relating to Exemptions 
from Taxation. 

Constitution of New Hampshire, Article 82, Page 38, 
Public Statutes. 

encouragement of literature, etc. 

Article 82. "Knowledge and learning generally diffused 
through a community being essential to the preservation of a free 
government, and spreading the opportunities and advantages of 
education through the various parts of the country being highly 
conducive to promote this end, it shall be the duty of the legisla- 
tors and magistrates, in all future periods of this government, to 
cherish the interest of literature and the sciences, and all semina- 
ries and public schools ; to encourage private and public institu- 
tions, rewards, and immunities for the promotion of agriculture, 
arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures, and natural his- 
tory of the country ; to countenance and inculcate the principles 
of humanity and general benevolence, public and private charity, 
industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, sincerity, sobri- 
ety, and all social affections and generous sentiments among the 
people ; provided, nevertheless^ that no money raised by taxation 
shall ever be granted or applied for the use of the schools or in- 
stitutions of any religious sect or denomination." 

Public Statutes, chapter 55, section 2. 

Section 2. " Real estate, whether improved or unimproved, 
and whether owned by residents or others, is liable to be taxed, 
except houses of public worship, twenty-five hundred dollars of 
the value of parsonages owned by religious societies and occupied 
by their pastors, schoolhouses, seminaries of learning, real estate 
of the United States, state, or town used for public purposes, and 
almshouses on county farms." 

Section ii. "Towns may by vote exempt from taxation for 
a term not exceeding ten years any manufacturing establishment 
proposed to be erected or put in operation therein, and the capi- 
tal to be used in operating the same, unless such establishment 
has been previously exempted from taxation by some town." 



EXEMPTIONS FROM TAXATION. 697 

OPINION OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

58 N. H. Rep. page 623. "The exemption in each case is 
limited to ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole power 
of taxation would be the destruction of government ; and the 
dangerous tendency of legislation suspending any part of that 
power, for any period, is manifest. P. Ba7ik v. Billings, 4 Pet. 
514, 561. So long as the existing laws remain unrepealed, and 
the constitutional construction heretofore adopted remains un- 
changed, contracts hereafter made under those laws and that con- 
struction will be valid. If the legislature for any reason wish to 
prevent the making of any more such contracts, their object can 
be accomplished by a repeal of the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective 
charters as " being of the nature of a public charity," as follows: 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute Women, N. H. Laws of 
1889, chapter 199. 

Elliot Hospital, N. H. Laws of 188 1, chapter 178. 

Manchester Women's Aid & Relief Society, organized in Jan- 
uary, 1875 ') N- ^- Laws, 1891, chapter 283. 

Orphanage and Home for Old Ladies (Catholic) on Hanover 
street, N. H. Laws, 1883, chapter 56. 



Schedule of Property used for Religious, Charitable, 
and Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Tax- 
ation by Law, not including that Owned by the City 
of Manchester. 

Convent, Sisters Jesus Mary, French Catliolic ; East 
Spruce street, near Beech : 

Building ^10,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land . . 2,600.00 

$12,600.00 

Convent, Sisters of Mercy, Catholic; 415 Union 
street, corner Laurel : 

Building $30,000.00 



698 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

12,600 square feet of land . . $6,300.00 



$36,300.00 



Mount St, Mary's Academy, Catholic ; from convent 
lot east to Beech street : 

Building $25,000.00 

31,500 square feet of land . . 9,450.00 

^34,45o-oo 

Lot south side Laurel street, corner Union street, 
Catholic ; McDonald school : 

Building ..... $35,000.00 

10,800 square feet of land . . 5,000.00 

$40,000.00 



Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' Home, 
Catholic ; Amherst and Hanover streets : 

Building ..... $8,000.00 
40,500 square feet of land . . 30,375.00 



$3S..S75-oo 



St. Patrick's Orphan Asylums, Catholic ; 1S4 Han- 
over street : 

Building ..... $35,000.00 
' 40,500 square feet of land . . 40,500.00 



,500.00 



St. Joseph's High School, Catholic ; Lowell street, 
corner of Birch : 

Building ..... $12,000.00 
8,000 square feet of land . . 8,000.00 



$20,000.00 



Union-street school, Catholic ; corner Union and 
Laurel streets : 

Building ..... $4,000.00 

5,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 



,500.00 



St. Agnes' school, Catholic ; corner Cedar and Pine 
streets : 

Building ..... $12,000.00 
20,000 square feet of land . . 3,200.00 



$15,200.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 699 

St. Joseph's school for girls, Catholic ; corner Pine 
and Lowell streets : 

Building $10,000.00 

Land included in cathedral lot. $10,000.00 

Convent of the Holy Angels, French Catholic ; Beau- 
port street, corner Wayne, West Manchester : 

Building $15,000.00 

22,500 square feet of land . . 4,500.00 



Orphanage school, Beauport, Wayne, and Putnam 
streets ; French Catholic : 

Building ..... $25,000.00 
30,000 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 



St. Augustine's academy, French Catholic ; corner 
Beech and Spruce streets : 

Building ..... $8,000.00 
15,000 square feet of land . . 4,500.00 



St. Mary's parochial school, French Catholic ; cor- 
ner Wayne and Cartier streets : 

Building ..... $12,000.00 
25,000 square feet of land . . 2,000.00 



Residence priest St. Augustine's church, French 
Catholic ; No. 383 Beech street : 

Building ..... $6,000.00 
7,500 square feet of land . . 1,875.00 



$7,875.00 

Orphan children's school, parish St. Augustine; 251, 
253 Lake avenue : 

Building ..... $12,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 5.000.00 



119,500.00 



112,500,00 



$14,000.00 



)2,500.00 



$17,000.00 



700 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Residence priest St. Anne's church, Catholic ; No. 
231 Merrimack street: 

Building ..... ^5,000.00 
8,820 square feet of land . . 2,646.00 



^7,646.00 

Residence Catholic bishop ; No. 145 Lowell street : 

Building ..... ^40,000.00 

24,000 square feet of land . . 12,000.00 



^52,000.00 
Residence priest St. George's church, French Cath- 
olic ; Orange street, corner Pine : 

Building ..... ^2,500.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 4,000.00 



^6,500.00 
Residence priest St. Mary's church, French Cath- 
olic ; 376 Beauport street. West Manchester: 
Building ..... ^2,500.00 
5,000 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 



$3,500.00 
St. Anne's church. Catholic ; Union street, corner 
Merrimack : 

Building ..... $30,000.00 
10,180 square feet of land . . 5,090.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$35,090.00 



St. Augustine's church, French Catholic ; Beech 
street, corner East Spruce : 

Building ..... $28,000.00 
13,000 square feet of land . '. 3,250.00 



11,250.00 



St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel, Catholic; Pine 
street, corner Lowell : 

Building ..... $70,000.00 
40,000 square feet of land . . 30)375-oo 



-^100,375-00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 701 

St. Mary's church, French Catholic; Bea'hport street, 
corner Wayne, West Manchester : 

Building $25,000.00 

70,000 square feet land . . 14,000.00 



St. Raphael's church and school, German Catholic ; 
Third street, corner Ferry, West Manchester : 

Building $35,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land . . 3,400.00 



,400.00 



St. George's church, French Catholic ; Pine street, 
corner Orange : 

Building $75,000.00 

18,690 square feet of land . . 7,614.00 



)2,6r4.oo 



, St. Patrick's church and school, Catholic ; Kelley 
street, Cartier street, and Cooledge avenue : 

School building .... $20,000.00 
56,281 square feet of land . . 4,502.00 



$24,502.00 

First Baptist church ; Union street, corner Concord : 
Building . . . . ■ . $28,000.00 

11,250 square feet of land - . 6,750.00 

$34,75°-°° 

First Freewill Baptist church ; Merrimack street, cor- 
ner Chestnut : 

Building ..... $12,400.00 
12,600 square feet of land . . 12,600.00 

$25,000.00 

Second Baptist church ; Merrimack street, near 
Pine : 

Building ..... $9,000.00 
9,450 square feet of land . . 3,780.00 

$12,780.00 



702 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

People's Baptist church ; Chestnut street, corner 
Concord : 

Building ..... $8,000.00 
3,200 square feet of land . . 2,000.00 

$10,000.00 

First Congregational chruch ; Hanover street, cor- 
ner Union : 

Building ..... $30,000.00 
43,200 square feet of land . . 34,560.00 

$64,560.00 



Second Congregational church ; Market street, cor- 
ner Franklin : 

Building ..... $25,000.00 
19,000 square feet of land . . 19,000.00 



Third Congregational church ; South Main street, 
corner Mil ford, West Manchester: 

Building ..... $8,000.00 
23,000 square feet of land . . 3,000.00 



$11,000.00 

First M. E. Church ; Valley street, corner Jewett : 
Building . . " . . . $8,000.00 
11,400 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 

$9,000.00 

St. Paul's M. E. church ; Union street, corner Am- 
herst : 

Building ..... $25,000.00 
10,010 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 

$31,000.00 

St. James M. E. church ; Pennacook street, corner 
Pine : 

Building ..... $9,000.00 
11,000 square feet of land . . 2,200.00 

$11,200.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 703 

Grace church, Episcopal; Lowell street, corner 
Pine : 

Building ..... $20,000.00 
9,300 square feet of land . . 6,975.00 

$26,975.00 

First Unitarian church ; Concord street, corner 
Beech : 

Building ..... $24,000.00 
13,500 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 

$30,000.00 

First Universalist church ; Lowell street, near Elm : 
Building ..... $17,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 15,000.00 

$32,000.00 

Christian church, Protestant ; Pine street, corner 
Merrimack : 

Building ..... $6,000.00 
9,000 square feet of land . . 6,700.00 



,12,700.00 



First Presbyterian church, German ; Second street, 
corner Bath, West Manchester: 

Building ..... $3,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 



$5,500.00 



Swedish Lutheran church, Protestant ; Sagamore 
street, corner Pine : 

Building $7,500.00 

10,950 square feet of land . . 2,000.00 



,500.00 



Swedish Baptist church ; Arlington street, near ^[a- 
ple : 

Building $5,000.00 

4,432 square feet of land . . 1,100.00 



704 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Second Advent church ; Amherst street, between 
Pine and Union : 

Building ..... 5^5,100.00 
4,500 square feet of land . . 3?375-oo 

City Mission chapel, Protestant ; Merrimack street, 
corner of Beech : 

Building ..... ^7,000.00 
12,600 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 



5,475.00 



$13,000.00 



Westminster Presbyterian church ; Brook street, cor- 
ner Hazel : 

Building ..... $15,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 

$17,500.00 

South Manchester Union chapel, Protestant; Elm 
street, south : 

Building $2,500.00 

10,747 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 



,500.00 



Episcopal Mission church ; North Main street, cor- 
ner School, West Manchester : 

Building $3,500.00 

19,412 square feet of land . . 4,000.00 



,500.00 



Residence pastor St. Paul's M. E. church ; Union 
street, near Amherst : 

Building $3,000.00 



$2,500.00 

Residence pastor First Congregational church ; No. 
590 Beech street, near Bridge : 

Building $5,000.00 

8,100 square feet of land . . 2,400.00 

$2,500.00 

$7,400.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 705 

Residence pastor Grace Episcopal cliurch ; corner of 
Harrison and Union streets : 

Building ..... ^6,000.00 
15,000 square feet of land . . 3,750.00 

^2,500.00 



$9,750.00 
German School Society ; Third, Bath, and Ferry 
streets : 

Building $4,500.00 

10,187 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 



Elliot Hospital, Protestant ; East Manchester : 

Building ..... $23,000.00 
Land ...... 7,000.00 



^,000.00 



$30,000.00 

Elliot Hospital lot ; Hanover street, corner Chestnut : 
Building ..... $3,000.00 
Land . . . . . . 13,000.00 

$16,000.00 

Elliot Hospital .- 



Land and buildings. Main street . $4,000.00 
Land and building, Quincy street 2,500.00 



,500.00 



Women's Aid and Relief Hospital ; Pearl street, cor- 
ner Beech : 

Building ..... $15,000.00 
57,530 square feet of land . . 10,000.00 



Manchester Children's Home ; Webster street : 

Building ..... $20,000.00 
55,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 



Residence pastor Swedish Lutheran church ; Saga- 
more street, corner Pine : 

Building ..... $3,000.00 
10,200 square feet of land . . 1,020.00 



) 2 5, 000.0c 



>22,500.00 



$2,500.00 



45 



706 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Gale Home : 

One half Manchester Bank block, 

Elm street .... $38,000.00 
One half Martin's block, Elm street 25,000.00 
Land and building, Pearl street, 

corner Ash .... 25.000.00 



$88,000.00 



Recapitulation. 

EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 



Church property, Catholic 
Convent property, Catholic 
Parochial residences, Catholic . 
Parochial schools, Catholic 
Hospitals and other charitable insti- 
tutions ..... 

Church property, Protestant 
Parochial residences, Protestant 
Private school property, Protestant . 
Hospitals and other charitable institu- 
tions ...... 

TAXABLE. 

Land and buildings, Catholic . 
Land and buildings, Protestant 

Total exempt and taxable 



$356,729.00 

68,400.00 

12,500.00 

195,152.00 

113,875.00 

$426,040.00 

10,000.00 

7,000.00 

188,000.00 



;65,o2i.oo 
14,170.00 



$746,656.00 



11,040.00 



$79,191.00 
$1,456,887.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 



7or 



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708 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT, CITY OF MAN- 
CHESTER, N. H., FROM JAN. 1 TO DEC. 31, 1894.* 



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Five per cent, 
cemetery bonds§ 


$70,000 isaued Oct. 
31, 1863. $50,000 
issued July 1, 
1864. Six per cent, 
to fund debts. 


Issued Julyl, 1881, 

four per cent, to 

build McGregor 

bridge. 


1890 


$400,000 
400,000 
300,000 
300,000 
30O,C00 


$200,000 
200,000 
300,000 
300,000 
350,000 






$13,850 
18,850 
20,000 
26,000 
31,000 


$120,000 
120,000 
120,000 
120,000 
50,000 


$60,000 


1891 . . 






60,000 
60.000 
60,000 
60,000 


1892 






1893 

1894 


$100,000 
100,000 


$100,000 
100,000 



00 00 O 


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Amount of 6 per 
cent bonds re- 
funded at 4 per 
cent. 


Total amount of 
bonded debt, De- 
cember 31, 1894. 


Amount of 6 per 
cent city bonds 
on which inter- 
est has ceased, 
not yet present- 
ed for payment. 


Amount of 6 per 
cent water bonds 
on which inter- 
est has ceased, 
not yet present- 

Eed for payment. 


$155,000 
155 000 




$948,850 
953,850 
955,000 

1,261,100 


$99,900t 

100 

99,900 

65,500 

50,000 


$100,000 


$948,850 

953,850 

955,000 

1,195,600 

1,296,000 




$100 






155,000 
155,000 
155 000 




100,000 




100 


$100,000 
200,000 


$4,500 


100 

















Remarks. — The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in 
the cemeteries of the city to parties who pay $ioo and upward. 
There are $31,000 in cemetery bonds, so called, not negotiable, 
in the hands of the city treasurer, which are included in the 
$1,296,000. 

♦$70,000, issued October 31, 1863, are paid ; $100,000 issued July 1, 1893, im- 
provement bonds, 4 per cent; $100,000 issued June 1, 1894, improvement 
bonds, 4 per cent; $100,000 issued August 1, 1893, water bonds, 5 per cent; $100,- 
000 issued November 1, 1893, water bonds, il4 per cent; $50,000 issued October 
1, 1894, water bonds, 4 per cent. 

t $400,000 water bonds, issued January 1, 1872; $100,000 of these bonds re-fund 
ed January 1, 1887; $100,000 re-funded January 1, 1892. 

t $200,000 water bonds, issued July 1, 1874; $100,000 of these bonds re-fu nded 
July 1, 1890. 

§ $2,200 cemetery bonds, issued in 1884, and other additional bonds each year. 

The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the cemeteries. Bonds 
payable July 1, 1913. 



BONDED DEBT. 709 

Total amount of bonded debt, including ceme- 
tery bonds ....... $1,296,000.00 

Net indebtedness for water purposes . . . 850,000.00 



Net debt after deducting water debt 

As shown in the assessors' books for the year 1894: 

The assessed value of personal property, includ- 
ing poll tax $4,735,368.00 

The assessed value of real estate . . . 23,656,342.00 



Total value for taxation . . . $28,391,710.00 

Tax rate, 1.78 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for • 

water purposes) to assessed valuation . . 1.57 

Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt for 

water purposes) to assessed valuation . . 4-565 

Population, census of 1890 .... 435983 

Population, census of 1880 .... 32,458 



Increase of population in ten years . iIj525 

Increase of population since 1890 (estimated) . 5,000 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been promptly paid at 
maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being payable in 
gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

A sinking fund was established in 1893. 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the 
water-works is limited to the sura of $600,000 by section 6, chap- 
ter 70, New Hampshire Laws of 1871, entitled ''An act to ena- 
ble the city of Manchester to establish water-works," except as 
further extended, an amount of $300,000, by laws of 1891, chap- 
ter 26. 



710 



REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 















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BONDED DEBT. 



711 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE BONDED 

DEBT. 



Year. 


Six 
per ct. 
water 
bonds. 


Four 
per ct. 
water 
bonds. 


Four 
and a 

half 
and 5 
per ct. 
water 
bonds. 


Five 
per ct. 
ceme- 
tery 
boniis. 


Six 

per ct. 

to fund 

debt. 


Four 
per ct. 
to b'ld 

Mc- 
Gregor 
bridge. 


Four 
per ct. 
to fund 

debt. 


Four 
per ct. 

Imp. 
bonds. 


Total 

of 

annual 

inteiest. 


1890 

1S91 

1S92 

1893 

1894 


$27,000 
24,000 
18,000 
18,000 
18,000 


$6,000 
8,000 
12,000 
12,000 
14,000 


19,500 


$623.75 
813.92 
1,000.00 
1,041.66 
1,550.00 


$7,200 
7,200 
7,200 
7,200 


$2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 


$6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 


$8,000 


$49,423.75 
48,613.92 
46,800.00 
46,841.66 
59,650.00 



SUMMARY OF CITY DEBT. 

Amount of bonded debt January i, 1894 
Amount of cemetery bonds issued in 1894 . 
Amount of water bonds issued in 1894 
Amount of improvement bonds issued in 1894 
Accrued interest on bonded debt 



Amount of bonds paid in 1894 . . . . 

'^Amount of security note or bond 

Total indebtedness January i, 1895 . 

AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Net cash on hand January i, 1895 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1894 .... 

Stock of Suncook Valley Railroad, estimated value 

BONDED DEBT. 

Total net indebtedness January i, 1895 
Total net indebtedness January i, 1894 

Increase ...... 



51,191,000.00 

5,000.00 

50,000.00 

100,000.00 

25,100.00 

$1,371,100.00 
50,000.00 

Si, 321, 100. 00 
100,000.00 

Si, 421, 100. 00 



^76,712.90 
38,924.65 
14,500.00 

^i3o>i37-55 

$1,290,962.45 
1,032,018.09 

$258,944-36 



*This loan was made by authority of resolution passed January 26, 1894. 



712 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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714 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Valuation of Real Estate Owned by the City. 

High School, Beech street, corner Lowell : 

Building ..... ^40,000.00 
59,400 square feet of land . . 17,820.00 



;7,82o.oo 



Franklin-street school, Franklin street, corner 
Pleasant : 

Building ..... $16,000.00 
19,200 square feet of land . . 19,200.00 



Spring-street school, Spring street : 

Building ..... $13,000.00 
13,600 square feet of land . . 13,600.00 



$35,200.00 



$26,600.00 



Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, corner Merri- 
mack : 

Building ..... $45,000.00 
40,000 square feet of land . . 8,000.00 



$53,000.00 

Ash-street school, Ash street, corner Bridge : 

Building ..... $50,000.00 
57,537 square feet of land . . 17,262.00 

$67,262.00 

Main-street'school, North Main street. West Man- 
chester : 

Building ..... $6,000.00 
40,293.4 square feet of land . . 10,073.00 

$16,073.00 



Webster-street school, Webster street : 

Building ..... $39,000.00 

55,7143^ square feet of land . 13,928.00 

Blodget-street school, Blodget street : 

Building ..... $1,500.00 

9,000 square feet of land . . 3,600.00 



$52,928.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 715 

Schoolhouse lot, Bridge street, corner Union : 

10,000 square feet of land .... ^5,000.00 

Lowell-street school, Lowell street, corner Chest- 
nut : 

Building ..... $1,000.00 
9,000 square feet of land . . 9,000.00 



,10,000.00 



Merrimack-street school, Merrimack street, corner 
Union : 

Building ..... $15,000.00 
12,600 square feet of land . . 6,300.00 



,21,300.00 



Wilson Hill school, Manchester street, corner Wil- 
son : 

Building ..... $500.00 
15,850 square feet of land . . 1,902.00 



School-street school. School street. West Manchester : 
Building ..... $1,000.00 
12,176 square feet of land . . 3,044.00 



)2,402.00 



^,044.00 



South Main-street school, South Main street. West 
Manchester : 

Building ..... $500.00 
13,650 square feet of land . . 2,047.00 

^2,547.00 

Bakersville school. Elm street, south : 

Building ..... $10,000.00 

24,184 square feet of land . . 3,628.00 

$13,628.00 

Stark District school, River road, north : 

Building $1,000.00 

43,560 square feet of land . . 100.00 

$1,100.00 



716 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Amoskeag school, Front street, Amoskeag : 

Building $1,500.00 

6,000 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 

$2,500.00 

Rimmon school, corner Aniory and Dubuque streets: 

Building $17,400.00 

16,600 square feet of land . . 2,490.00 



$19,890.00 



Goffe's Falls School, Goffe's Falls : 

Building $4,000.00 

47,916 square feet of land . . 250.00 



$4,250.00 



Harvey District school, Nutt road : 

Building $2,000.00 

21,780 square feet of land . . 100.00 

Webster Mills school, Webster Mills : 

Building $400.00 

5,445 square feet of land . . 100.00 

Old Hallsville school. East Manchester : 

Building $500.00 

30,075 square feet of land . . 3,008.00 

Youngsville school, Youngsville : 

Building $500.00 

51,228 square feet of land . . 100.00 

Mosquito Pond school, Mosquito Pond : 

Building ."...- $400.00 

10,890 square feet of land . . 100.00 



$2,100.00 



$500.00 



$3,508.00 



$600.00 



$500.00 



Pearl-street school : 

Building $18,700.00 

Land 3,200.00 

$21,900.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 717 

Varney school, Bowman street, corner Mast, West 
Manchester : 

Building ^43,750.00 

Land ...... 6,700.00 

^50,450.00 



New Hallsville school, Jewett street, corner Young, 
East Manchester : 

Building ..... $29,800.00 
44,000 square feet of land . . 3,300.00 



$33,100.00 



ii3,302.oo 



ENGINE HOUSES. 



Engine house and stable, Central station, Vine 
street : 

Building ..... $31,800.00 
21,718.86 square feet of land . 25,438.00 



17,238.00 



Clinton-street engine house, Clinton street, West 
Manchester : 

Building ..... $1,000.00 
3,790 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 



North Main-street engine house, North Main street, 
West Manchester : 

Building ..... $18,000.00 
11,819 square feet of land . . 2,955.00 



$20,955.00 

Webster-street engine house, Webster street, corner 
Chestnut : 

Building $12,000.00 

8,510 square feet of land . . 2,180.00 

$14,180.00 

Merrimack engine house. Lake avenue : 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land . . 3,000.00 

$18,000.00 



718 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Hosehouse and cottage, Maple street, corner East 
High: 

Building $3,000.00 

18,330 square feet of land . . 3,666.00 

Engine house and ward room, ward 9, Rimmon and 
Amory streets, West Manchester : 

Building $22,755.00 

6,000 square feet of land . . 870.00 

South Manchester hosehouse : 

Building . . . ' . . $4,200.00 

4,278 square feet of land . . 684.48 



,666.00 



$23,625.00 



$4,884.48 
$147,548.48 

OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City library. Dean avenue, corner Franklin street : 

Building $35,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land . . 30,000.00 



1,000.00 



City hall. Elm street, corner Market : 

Building ..... $10,000.00 
100,000 square feet of land . . 150,000.00 



— $160,000.00 



City farm, Mammoth road : 

Building $5,000.00 

46.66 acres, west Mammoth road . 70,000.00 

81.55 acres, east Mammoth road . 65,240.00 

$140,240.00 

Court house, Franklin street, corner West Merri- 
mack : 

Building $20,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land . . 57,000.00 

$77,000.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OAYNED BY THE CITY. 719 

Battery Building, Manchester street : 

Building Si3?ooo.oo 

3,400 square feet of land . . 5,100.00 



Police station, Manchester street, corner Chestnut : 
Building ..... ^40,000.00 
7,500 square feet of land . . 15,000.00 



Slayton lot, Manchester street : 
Building 
2,908 square feet of land 



^300. 00 
4,700.00 



$18,100.00 



$55,000.00 



;,ooo.oo 



City stable and other buildings, Franklin street : 



Building 

44,656 square feet of land 



$12,300.00 
89,312.00 
$101,612.00 



City stable, district No. 10 . 

City scales, Franklin street : 

Building ...... 

Gravel lots, Goffstown : 

2 acres ...... 

Gravel lot, Bakersville, South Manchester 

Gravel lot, district No. 10, bought of Brooks & 
Brock (city has right to remove gravel until Au- 
gust 25, 1903): 

I Vs acres ...... 



;i, 200.00 

$300.00 

$400.00 
$700.00 



Land bought of A. D. Gooden : 






28,750 square feet of land . 


. 


$i;35i-oo 


Ward 5 wardroom. Lake avenue : 






Building .... 


. $4,500.00 




Land ..... 


1,000.00 








$5,500.00 



;i,903.oo 



720 



REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 



PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 

Property in care city engineer ... . ^1,149.00 

in care chief engineer iire department . 105,497.50 

in care street and park coromission . . 21,838.22 

in care superintendent of schools . . 36,755.00 

in care city messenger .... 2,759.00 

in care city marshal and janitor . . 1,971.00 

in care superintendent of city farm . 11,889.61 

in care trustees city library . . . 29,333.00 
in care superintendent of Pine Grove 

cemetery ...... 248.35 

in care superintendent Valley cemetery . 106.00 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad, in care of city 

treasurer ....... 50,000.00 

Personal property in care city weigher . . 1,000.00 

;^262,546.68 

Uncollected taxes in 1893 ..'... ^4,572.60 

Uncollected taxes in 1894 ..... 38,924.65 

Net cash in the treasury, December 31, 1894 . 76,712.90 



^120,210.15 

OTHER REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 



Soldiers' monument . 
Permanent inclosure of commons 
Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 
Fountains and water-troughs on streets and com 
mons ....... 

Two city tombs . 

McGregor bridge ..... 

Granite bridge ...... 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 
Second-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 
Print- Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 
Two bridges in highway district No. 9 



525.000.00 
10,200.00 
25,000.00 

3,600.00 
10,000.00 
90,000.00 
25,000.00 
28,450.00 
52,036.06 
5,000.00 
2,000.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 721 



One bridge at Goffe's Falls 
Expended on construction of sewers 



PARKS AND CEMETERIES 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres 
Pine Grove cemetery, about 96 acres 
Amoskeag cemetery, 1.23 acres . 
Stark park, 28 aci;es . 
Derryfield park, 76 acres 
Concord common, 4.48 acres 
Tremont common, 2.25 
Hanover common, 3 acres . 
Park common, 3.49 acres . 
Merrimack common, 5.89 acres . 



WATER-WORKS. 

Real estate and personal property of water-works, 
at cost price ....... 

RECAPITULATION. 

Real estate owned by the city, schoolhouses . 

Real estate owned by the city 

Real estate owned by the city, engine houses 

Water-works at cost price . 

Personal property owned by the city 

Uncollected taxes and cash 

Other real and personal property 

Parks and cemeteries . 



$1,000.00 
438,586.15 

$715,872.21 



5200,000.00 

46,700.00 

4,340.00 

9,000.00 

25,000.00 

200,000.00 

40,000.00 

100,000.00 

60,000.00 

200,000.00 



,040.00 



$1,300,264.14 



PROPERTY ACCOUNT. 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1894 
Inventory of assets, December 31, 1893 

Gain in valuation 



^5i3'302.oo 

63i)903-oo 
147,548.48 
1,300,264.14 
262,546.68 
120,210.15 
715,872.21 
885,040.00 

$4,576,686.66 

$4,576,686.66 
4,334.551-41 

$242,135.25 



722 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 



The increase in valuation as above stated 
amount expended in 1894 on : 
Sewers and drains 
Rimmon schoolhouse . 
South Main-street bridge 
Land purchased for cemeteries 
Pearl-street schoolhouse 
Engine-house and wardroom, ward 9 
South Manchester hosehouse 
Water-works, construction . 
Webster-street schoolhouse . 
City stable, district No. 10 
Ward 5 wardroom 
Personal property, fire department 
Street and park commission 



results from the 



$53,000 00 

18,450.00 

17,400.00 

4,400.00 

18,700.00 

1,000.00 

4,200.00 

158,606.61 

6,500.00 

200.00 

4,500.00 

1,600.00 

4,233.22 



$292,789.83 
Deduct decrease of uncollected taxes and net cash 

in the treasury ...... 50,654.58 



Total net gain ...... $242,135.25 

Details of inventory are on file in the auditor's office. The 
water-works would sell readily for $2,000,000, and are growing 
yearly more valuable to the city. The large increase in the re- 
valuation of the public buildings and lands owned by the city is 
fully warranted by the opening and improvement of Derryfieid 
park in the vicinity of the city farm lands, the high pressure 
service now introduced under the management of the water- 
works, the facilities for travel furnished by the street railway, 
and the rapid increase in our population and industries. 



Auditor's Office. 

City hall building. Open from 8 to 12 a. m., 2 to 5 p. m.; 
7 to 9 P. M. on Thursday. 

In every bill presented to the city auditor for his approval, the 
following points will be considered and passed upon : 

I. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination within 



auditor's office. 723 

the scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on the city 
government ? 

2. Is the bill certified by the party legally authorized to make 
the contract, or cause the expenditure to be made ? 

3. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, 
and is there a balance unexpended sufficient to pay this bill ? 

4. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measurements 
either of dimensions, quantities, or weights correctly and fully 
stated, and is the proof of the delivery to the city of the whole 
amount charged sufficient ? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely 
in excess as to require the attention of the city councils to be 
called to the same? 

6. Is the bill written in a fair, legible hand, correctly cast, 
and on paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its 
proper backing and filing ? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and 
the total amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the 
amount of the work not yet completed, and the per cent re- 
tained, if any, should be stated on the bill. 

8. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which affect 
the question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for further information 
or correction as the circumstances of each case may require. 

COURT DECISIONS, LEGAL POINTS AND RULES, RELATING TO THE 
APPROVAL OR DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

No bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until the 
auditor has approved it as correct. 

Public trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the city 
councils cannot be delegated to others. Dillon'' s. Municipal Cor- 
po7-ations, section 96, volume i. 

No member of either branch [of the city councils], except the 
mayor, shall receive any compensation for his services, or shall 
hold any office or agency created during his continuance in 
office. General Laws, chapter 46, section 13. 



724 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

The executive powers of the city, except where vested in the 
mayor, shall be exercised by the mayor and aldermen. General 
Laws, chapter 46, section 14. 

The mayor and aldermen have all the powers and authority of 
selectmen of towns unless it is otherwise provided by law. Gen- 
eral Laws, chapter 46, section 14. 

Joint standing committees have advisory powers only ; they 
cannot legally be endowed with executive or legislative powers 
by ordinance or resolution of the city councils, as no by-law or 
ordinance shall be repugnant to the constitution or laws of the 
state. 

No member of either branch of the city councils can enter 
into any verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to, or do 
any work for the city. Any firm of which a member is also a 
member of the city councils is included in this prohibition. 

No city official, or department, or board of officials having 
legal power to expend money for the benefit of the city, can pur- 
chase of or contract with themselves, with any one of the board,, 
or with any firm of which one of said officials is a member. Dil- 
lon' s Municipal Corporations, volume i, page 436, section 444. 

Every bill against the city shall specify the particular appro- 
priation to which the same should be charged, and the moneys 
paid will be charged to such appropriations only. 

He who is intrusted with the business of others cannot be 
allowed to make such business a source of profit to himself. 

All orders passed by the city councils authorizing a ministerial 
act to be performed by its agent or agents must be strictly con- 
strued, and the act to be done must be specifically stated. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. (^Gen- 
eral Laws, chapter 106, section 11.) They have no power con- 
ferred upon them by law or ordinance to purchase new apparatus 
of any kind. 

The joint standing committee on fire department have advis- 
ory powers only. 

The laws and ordinances require the city auditor to withhold 
his signature from all bills against any appropriation where the 



auditor's office. 725 

amount of the appropriation is expended, until the city council 
shall have provided the means of paying the same. Section 4, 
chapter 3 of the City Ordinances, and section 4, ordinances re- 
lating to duties of the city auditor, approved January 7, 1890. 

The power of towns to raise and appropriate money is derived 
solely from statutory provisions, which restrict the power to cer- 
tain specified objects and other necessary charges. 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those pre- 
scribed by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, and 
generally will not be permitted, to carry such votes into effect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discretion of 
towns to vote gifts or to select donees ; their charity is a duty 
defined, commanded, enforced, and regulated, and the objects of 
it are designated by law. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a minority in an 
unlimited manner. Gove v. Epping, 41 N. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to 
make expenditures, within the scope of their powers, for their 
respective departments : For fire department and fire-alarm tele- 
graph, the chief engineer, to be submitted monthly to the ap- 
proval of the board of engineers j for police department, mayor 
and police commission ; for police court, police judge ; for 
water-works department, superintendent, subject to the rules of 
the board of commissioners and the ordinances relating thereto ; 
for city farm, superintendent ; for overseers of the poor, each 
overseer, subject to the rules of the board of overseers, and their 
monthly review and approval ; for schools, superintendent, or 
such person as the board of school committee may designate, 
bills to be approved by the board monthly; for streets, sewers, 
. and other work under these departments, street and park com- 
missioners ; for city clerk's office, treasurer's office, tax collector's 
office, assessors' office, auditor's office, incidental expenditures, 
city physician, city messenger, city solicitor, city engineer, — 
mayor; for cemeteries, superintendents, subject to board of 
trustees (to consist of citizens not members of the city councils) ; 
for health department, board of health, subject to approval of 



726 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

mayor ; city library, board of trustees or person designated by 
them. It may be stated as a general rule, that all subordinate 
officials are under the supervision and control of the mayor, 
subject to such limitations and restrictions as the board of alder- 
men, acting as a board, may require. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TREASURER OF SINKING FUND. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TREASURER OF SINKING FUND. 



To the Trustees of the Sinking Fund : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the second annual 
report of the receipts of this board for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1894: 

Total amount of fund January i, 1894, for the pay- 
ment of improvement bonds .... ^5,000.00 
Income received during the year .... 202.00 



Total amount of fund December 31, 1894 . ^5,202.00 

Total amount of fund January i, 1894, for the pay- 
ment of water bonds ...... ^12,750.00 

Income received during the year .... 395-15 



Total amount of fund December 31, 1894 . ^13,145.15 
Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 
Treasurer of the Trustees of Sinking Fund. 



This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts 
of Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees of the sinking 
fund, embracing the receipts for the year ending December 31, 
1894, and find the same correct and properly vouched. 



730 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

I have also examined the securities in which said fund is in- 
vested and find as follows : 

FOR THE PAYMENT OF IMPROVEMENT BONDS. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H., 4 per cent, 

1913 • • • ^S,ooo.oo 

Cash on hand ....... 202.00 



Total amount of fund December 31, 1894 . $5,202.00 

FOR THE PAYMENT OF WATER BONDS. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H., 4 per cent, 

1913 

Cash on hand 

Total amount of fund December 31, 1894 

Total amount of improvement fund 
Total amount of water-works fund . 



$5,202.00 
I3'i45-i5 



Total amount of sinking fund Dec. 31, 1894 $18,347.15 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Atiditor. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDI- 
NANCES. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES 

PASSED IN 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution providing for the issue of One Hundred Thousand 
Dollars in Bonds. 

Resolved^ by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That for the purpose of paying certain indebtedness of the city 
now outstanding, and providing for a secured depository of the 
moneys and funds of the city, the bonds of the city be issued to 
the amount of one hundred thousand dollars (^100,000) payable 
in two years from the date of issue ; that said bonds be offered to 
the national banks located in Manchester for purchase, and sold 
to that one of said banks which shall offer to purchase the same 
at the lowest rate of interest ; and to bear the rate of interest so 
bid, and to be in denominations satisfactory to said purchasing 
bank. Said bonds to be non -negotiable, payable only to the 
purchasing bank and to be sold on the condition that, upon their 
issue, they shall forthwith be by said purchasing bank deposited 
with the city treasurer to secure all deposits which shall be made 
in said bank by the city treasurer or collector of taxes of the 
money? or funds of the city ; and in case of any loss of any o 
said moneys or funds by any act, neglect, or failure of said bank, 
said bonds to be offset against said loss. 

Resolved, further, that all moneys or funds collected and held 



734 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

either by the city treasurer or collector of taxes after the sale of 
said bonds and their deposit with the city treasurer, shall be de- 
posited in said purchasing bank; and said treasurer and collector 
of taxes are hereby instructed after such issue and deposit of said 
bonds, to make a deposit of the moneys and funds of the city in 
no other bank except said purchasing bank, and in case of loss 
of any of said funds or moneys by the failure or other inability 
of said purchasing bank to pay on demand said funds and 
moneys, said treasurer and collector of taxes shall be relieved 
from all responsibility for the moneys and funds so deposited in 
said purchasing bank, and that, as a further consideration for the 
purchase of said bonds, no interest shall be charged upon any of 
the deposits so made in the purchasing bank. 

Resolved further, that said bonds be signed by the mayor and 
countersigned by the city treasurer, that the mayor and joint 
standing committee on finance are hereby authorized to call for 
bids for the purchase of said bonds from the national banks lo- 
cated in Manchester, to issue said bonds, and to make all neces- 
sary contracts with the purchasing bank regarding the deposits 
and the lodging of the bonds as collateral security therefor, for 
two years from the date of issue of said bonds. 

Resolvediv^x\}cvtx, that the money received from the sale of said 
bonds be applied to the payment of fifty thousand dollars 
(^50,000) of the funded debt, due July i, 1894; of twenty-five 
thousand dollars (^25,000) of temporary loan due December i, 
1894; and of twenty-five thousand dollars (^25,000) of the 
funded debt due July i, 1895, ^^^ f^'' ^o other purpose. 

Resolved further, that this resolution shall take effect upon its 
passage. 

Passed January 26, 1894. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 785 



City of Manchester. 
Resolutions on the death of City Auditor James B. Straw. 

The committee appointed to prepare resolutions on the death 
of City Auditor James B. Straw submit the following : 

Resolved, That by the death of Mr. Straw the city loses one 
of its most efficient officers, one peculiarly fitted for the duties 
of the office which he held. 

The strength and moral wealth of the community is main- 
tained largely by its office holders who, without seeking pub- 
licity, do their duty, uphold the highest standard of character, 
and give courage and support to those about them. Such a man 
was James B. Straw. Possessing by nature a strong and well- 
balanced mind, he had by thought and readnig made himself 
familiar with the underlying principles of state and municipal 
affairs, so that when he was appointed to the responsible office of 
city auditor he brought to the discharge of its duty unusual 
qualifications. 

As a public officer he consulted neither his fears nor his self- 
interest ; his high sense of justice and right compelled the re- 
spect of every one and made his office impregnable to fraud. 
He devoted himself unreservedly to the interests of the city and, 
like his distinguished brother whose far-reaching sagacity laid 
the foundation of the remarkable prosperity which this city has 
enjoyed, he has left behind him an honorable and upright career 
which attests his ability and worth as a citizen and a man. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be placed upon our 
records, and another sent to the family of the deceased, to 
whom we respectfully tender our sympathy. 

A. D. Maxwell, 
James Lightbody, 

B. B. Aldrich, 
John J. Twomey, 
George B. Rogers. 



736 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

City of Manchester. 

Resolution relating to the Manchester Street Railway. 

Resolved by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Manchester : 

That the Manchester Street Railway be and hereby is author- 
ized to use in furnishing electrical motive power upon its road, 
as now laid out, the system known as the single trolley system, 
if its directors deem the same expedient or necessary in order 
to equip the road as an electric road ; provided, that if the rail - 
way complete the electric system by June i, 1895, the request 
of the Manchester Horse Railway be granted. 

Passed May i, 1894. 

City of Manchester. 

Resolution to make a temporary loan of One Hundred Thou- 
sand Dollars. 

Resolved hy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city as 
may fall due before the tenth day of December, 1894, the mayor 
be and hereby is authorized to make a temporary loan, for the 
use of the city, of a sum not exceeding one hundred thousand 
dollars (^100,000), being in anticipation of the taxes of the 
present year, giving for the same the notes of the city signed by 
the mayor and countersigned by the city treasurer. 

Passed May 18, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution exempting from taxation the Eaton Heights Shoe 

Company. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 
That the corporation known as the Eaton Heights Shoe Com- 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 737 

pany, a corporation duly established under the laws of the state 
of New Hampshire, who propose to erect a brick building and 
put in operation in said city of Manchester an establishment for 
the manufacture of boots and shoes and represent that the cap- 
ital used in operating the same, including plant, is twenty thou- 
sand dollars ($20,000), be it hereby 

Resolved, That said company be exempt from taxation for a 
term of ten years ; provided, a brick building is built for said 
purpose. 

Passed June 5, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution making a temporary loan of One Hundred Thou- 
sand Dollars. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city as 
may fall due before the fifteenth day of December, 1S94, the 
mayor be and hereby is authorized to make a temporary loan for 
the use of the city of a sum not exceeding one hundred thousand 
dollars ($100,000) being in anticipation of the taxes of the pres- 
ent year, giving for the same the notes of the city signed by the 
mayor and countersigned by the city treasurer. 

Passed August 7, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution providing for the borrowing of Fifty Thousand Dol- 
lars for Water- Works purposes. 

Resolved, by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of constructing a high service system of 
47 



738 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

water-works, and of maintaining and extending the present sys- 
tem of water-works in this city in accordance with the authority 
granted in the act passed by the legislature of New Hampshire at 
the January session, 1893, entitled : "An act in amendment of 
the act passed June session, 1871, entitled: 'An act to enable 
the city of Manchester to establish water-works,' and in amend- 
ment of all acts passed subsequently thereto relating to said wat- 
er-works," and approved February 28, 1893, the mayor and the 
joint standing committee on finance are hereby authorized to 
borrow the sum of fifty thousand dollars (^50,000) in the name 
and behalf of the city of Manchester, and to issue therefor the 
bonds of the city payable in twenty (20) years from the date of 
their issue, signed by the city treasurer and countersigned by the 
mayor, with coupons annexed for the payment of the interest 
annually at four (4) per cent, and in denominations of one thou- 
sand dollars (^1,000) each ; said money to be borrowed and said 
bonds to be issued as the progress of the work aforesaid shall 
require, and upon the written demand for said money by the 
board of water commissioners. And the mayor and the joint 
committee on finance are authorized hereby to do all things 
necessary and proper to borrow said sum of fifty thousand dollars 
(^50,000) and issue said bonds. 

And this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 4, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution in relation to the issue of Water Loan Bonds, pro- 
viding for the payment of the interest semi-annually. 

Resolved, by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the interest upon the issue of fifty thousand dollars (^50,- 
000) of bonds authorized by vote of the city councils September 
4, 1894, be and the same is hereby made payable semi-annually 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 739 

on the first day of April and October of each year ; and that so 
much of the resolution passed September 4, 1894, as is inconsist- 
ent herewith be and the same is hereby repealed. 

Resolved, further, that the action of the mayor and the joint 
standing committee on finance in calling for proposals and pre- 
paring bonds with interest payable semi-annually as aforesaid, be 
and the same is hereby ratified, confirmed, and approved. 

Passed October 2, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 
Resolution discontinuing a portion of Ainsworth Avenue. 

Resolved, by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester^ in City Council assembled, as follows : 
That five feet on the west side of Ainsworth avenue as laid out 

by the board of mayor and aldermen, be and the same is hereby 

discontinued, so that said Ainsworth avenue shall be twenty-five 

feet in width. 

Passed October 2, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution relating to Exemption from Taxation the South 
Manchester Building Association. 

Resolved^ by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That, whereas the South Manchester Building Association, for 
the purpose of establishing a new industry in the city of Man- 
chester, propose to erect a brick factory, and equip the same, in 
which to carry on the business of manufacturing shoes and other 
articles, on a tract of land containing about 75,000 feet situate 
southwest corner of Lincoln and Silver streets in Manchester, 
N. H., marked " F " on plan made by J. B. Sawyer ; therefore 



740 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

Resolved, That said land, the brick building erected thereon, 
the equipment of the same, and the capital stock and other prop- 
erty of said company, be exempt from taxation for a term of ten 
years from the first day of January, 1895, A. D., providing the 
amount invested in said plant shall not be less than $30,000. 

Passed November 9, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution relating to Exemption from Taxation the Eureka 
Shoe Company. 

Resolved, by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follov^s : 

Whereas, the Eureka Shoe Company, a corporation estab- 
lished by law, with a capital stock of $50,000, desires to locate 
their business, and carry on the manufacture and sale of their 
own product of shoes and other articles in the city of Manches- 
ter, providing sufficient inducements are given said company by 
said city of Manchester ; therefore 

Resolved, That the capital of the Eureka Shoe Company afore- 
said, its machinery, materials, raw and in process of manufacture, 
and other property necessary in conducting its business, shall be 
exempt from all taxation for a period of ten years from the first 
day of January, 1895, A. D. 

Passed November 9, 1894. 



Ci;rY OF Manchester. 
Resolution for a Joint Special Committee. 

Resolved^ by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That a joint committee of three, consisting of one alderman 
and two menders of the common council, be appointed to con- 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 741 

fer with the agent of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., to ascer- 
tain at what terms the city could procure the land bordering on 
Christian brook, so called, between Union and Elm streets, for 
the use of said city as a public park. 

Passed July 3, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution exempting from Taxation the Redman & Eaton 
Shoe Company. 

Resolved, by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That whereas the Redman &: Eaton Shoe Company, a corpo- 
ration duly established under the laws of the state of New Hamp- 
shire, proposes to erect a brick building and put in operation in 
said city of Manchester an establishment for the purpose of man- 
ufacturing, buying, selling, disposing of, and dealing in boots, 
shoes, rubbers, and leather, and represents that the capital to be 
used in operating the same, including plant, is thirty-five thou- 
sand dollars ; therefore, 

Resolved, that said establishment, and the capital to be used in 
operating the same, be and the same are hereby exempt from tax- 
ation for a term of ten years, providea a brick building is built 
for said purpose. 

Passed December 4, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to print the Forty-eighth Annual Report of the Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on finance be and they hereby are 
authorized to procure for the use of the inhabitants of said city 



742 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

the printing of the Forty-eighth Annual Report of the Receipts 
and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, including the re- 
ports of the joint standing committee on finance, the city audi- 
tor, the school board and superintendent of schools, superinten- 
dent of water-works, water commissioners, engineer of fire de- 
partment, city marshal, overseers of the jDoor, trustees, librarian, 
and treasurer of the city library, committee on cemeteries, joint 
standing committee on city farm, city physician, city solicitor, 
city engineer, street and park commissioners, and such other 
matters relating to city affairs as said finance committee may di- 
rect, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
printing and stationery. 

Passed January 26, 1S94. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order fixing the Pay of Street and Park Commissioners for 

Team Hire. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the street and park commissioners be allowed the sum of one 
hundred and fifty dollars ($150) each, and no more, per annum, 
for team hire for themselves in the performance of their duty. 

Passed February 6, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing an Appropriation of Two Thousand Dol- 
lars (^2,000) for Improved Wardroom and Police Station Fa- 
cilities in West Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on finance be authorized to report 
an appropriation of two thousand dollars (^2,000) for repairs 
upon the Clinton-street engine house, so called, in order that the 
same may be improved as a wardroom and sub police-station. 

Passed February 6, 1894. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 743 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase a Desk for use of Police Commissioners. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor ana Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on lands and buildings be author- 
ized to purchase a desk for the use of the police commissioners, 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for police 
department. 

Passed February 6, 1894. 



City of Manchester 

An Order relative to the South Manchester Hosehouse. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized to receive proposals for building the South Man- 
chester hosehouse, the expense thereof to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for that building. 

March 6, 1894, passed. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to Clinton-street Wardroom. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on lands and buildings be and are 
hereby authorized and requested to procure estimates of the ex- 
pense necessary to fit up the Clinton-street wardroom building so 
that the same shall be suitable for wardroom and police station 
purposes, and report the result of their inquiries to the city coun- 
cils. 

Passed March 6, 1894. 



744 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to make Purchases for the City Farm. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on city farm be and 
hereby are authorized to purchase a cooking range and boiler, 
and a carpet, the latter to be placed in the sitting-room, for use 
at the city farm ; the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for city farm. 

Passed March 6, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relative to the McGregorville Schoolhouse. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized to receive proposals for building the McGregor- 
ville schoolhouse, the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for that building. 

Passed March 6, 1S94. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relative to Ward 5 Wardroom. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized to receive proposals for the building of ward 5 
wardroom, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for that building. 

Passed March 6, 1894. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 745 

City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to Ward 2 Wardroom. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on lands and buildings be and 
hereby are authorized to purchase a suitable lot of land for a 
wardroom for said ward, 2, and procure plans and proposals for 
the building of a wardroom. The total expenses of land and 
building not to exceed the sum of three thousand dollars, the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for inci- 
dental expenses. 

Passed March 6, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order making a transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to transfer from the 
reserved fund the sum of four hundred and forty-five dollars 
($445), and converting the same into a special account, from 
which the cost of finishing additional rooms at the Excelsior 
hook-and-ladder truck company's headquarters shall be paid. 

Passed March 6, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order transferring one thousand three hundred thirty-five 
dollars and two cents ($1,335.02) from the appropriation for 
Repairs of Highways to the appropriation for Snow and Ice. 

Ordered, If the board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be authorized to transfer the sum of thirteen 
hundred thirty-five dollars and two cents ($1,335.02) from the 
appropriation for repairs of highways to the appropriation for 
snow and ice. 

Passed April 3, 1894. 



746 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

City of Manchester. 
An Order relative to changes in City Hall Building. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
inasmuch as the premises heretofore occupied by the New Hamp- 
shire Trust Company in the city hall building have been va- 
cated, the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and 
buildings be and hereby are authorized to fit up the same for 
the use of the city clerk, and the quarters at present occupied 
by that official be converted into a private office for the' mayor ; 
the expense necessitated by these changes to be charged to the 
appropriation for city hall. 

Passed April 3, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relative to Matron at Police Station. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and chief of police be authorized to employ some 
suitable woman to perform the duties of matron at police sta- 
tion, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
police department. 

Passed April 19, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relative to Supply Wagons for the Fire Department. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department be 
and hereby are authorized to receive proposals for purchasing 
two supply wagons for the use of the fire department, and report 
the same to the city councils. 

Passed x\pril 19, 1894. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 747 

City of Manchester. 
An Order making a transfer of Money. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make a transfer of 
seven thousand nine hundred and seventy-five dollars (^7,975) 
from the reserved fund to the appropriation for South Main- 
street bridge. 

Passed April 19, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Horses for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department be 
and hereby are authorized to purchase a pair of horses for use on 
the Walter M. Fulton company apparatus, the expense thereof to 
be charged to the appropriation for the fire department. 

Passed May i, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase land for the Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and committee on Pine Grove cemetery be and here- 
by are authorized to purchase the Hewlett property, containing 
ten acres, more or less, and buildings situated thereon, the pur- 
chase price being four thousand four hundred dollars. One 
thousand dollars of this amount to be paid on delivery of deed, 
the balance in April, 1895, the expense to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for Pine Grove cemetery. 

Passed May i, 1894. 



748 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Supply Wagons. 

Of-dered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department be 
authorized to purchase two supply wagons of the Kimball Car- 
riage Co., and the expense of five hundred and sixty dollars be 
charged to the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed May lo, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Appropriate Money for Open-air Band Concerts. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur : That the 
board of mayor and aldermen be and are hereby authorized, act- 
ing under the statutes passed by the New Hampshire legislature 
at the January session, 1893, to expend the sum of three hundred 
dollars for open-air band concerts ; the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed May 10, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order making a Transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make a transfer of 
ten thousand dollars (^10,000) from the reserved fund to the 
appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed May 18, 1894. 



^ City of Manchester. 

An Order in relation to the Premium received for the Improve- 
ment Bonds, Series B. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the premium received for the improvement bonds be applied and 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 749 

appropriated as follows : The sum of twenty-eight hundred dol- 
lars ($2,800) be applied to the appropriation for the Pearl-street 
schoolhouse, and the balance to the reserved fund ; and that the 
city clerk be and hereby is authorized' to make the entries as 
above directed. 

Passed June 5, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to put Curbing around Lincoln-street Schoolhouse. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on lands and buildings be author- 
ized to curb the grounds at Lincoln-street schoolhouse, the ex- 
pense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for curbing 
Lincoln-street schoolhouse, and that the joint standing commit- 
tee on lands and buildings cease work as soon as the appropria- 
tion is expended. 

Passed July 3, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order making a transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the sum of two and seventy-one one hundredths dollars ($2.71) 
be transferred from reserved fund to the appropriation for engine 
house and wardroom in ward 9 ; that the "sum of three hun- 
hundred twenty and thirty-three one hundredths dollars (^320.- 
33) be transferred from appropriation for Hallsville schoolhouse 
to the appropriation for repairs of buildings ; that the sum of 
eighteen hundred thirty-three and four one hundredths dollars 
$1,833.04) be transferred from reserved fund to the appropriation 
for land taken for highways ; and that the city clerk be and 
hereby is authorized to make the entries as above directed. 

Passed July 3, 1894. 



750 - RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order making a transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make a transfer of 
nine hundred and ninety-seven and twenty-nine one hundredths 
dollars (I997.29) from reserved fund to the appropriation for 
addition to Webster-street schoolhouse. 

Passed July 3, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to erect certain Lamp-posts. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
an electric light be erected at the corner of Hanover and Bel- 
mont, Elm back and Mechanic, Wilson and Prescott, Silver and 
Lincoln, Somerville and Jewett, Laurel and Laurel avenue, Wil- 
son road and Lowell, Chestnut and Auburn \ Prout's avenue, oil 
lamp ; Jewett and Cilley, oil lamp. 

Passed July 3, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order in relation to the appropriation for Decoration of 
Soldiers' Graves. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the bill of The Head «& Dowst Co., amounting to ^53.05 for 
erecting a stand on Merrimack common, be paid out of the ap- 
propriation for decoration of soldiers' graves, and that the bal- 
ance of the appropriation, amounting to ^296.95 be paid Louis 
Bell Post No. 3, G. A. R., to go towards defraying their expenses 
on that day. 

Passed July 3, 1S94. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 751 

City of Manchester. 

An Order for the erecting of Electric Lights. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
an electric light be erected at the corner of Harrison and Maple, 
Union and North, on Elm between Appleton and Clarke, Mun- 
roe street and River road, Front street and Dunbarton road, 
Marion street and McGregor, Amory street and Bartlett, South 
Main and Harvell, Hancock and Dartmouth \ George street, an 
oil lamp. 

Passed August 7, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

On Order relative to House Pay of Members of the Police 

Force. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the house pay of members of the police force be paid regularly 
each month, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for police department. 

Passed August 7, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect Watering-trough. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur : That the 
board of street and park commissioners be and hereby are au- 
thorized to erect a watering-trough at the corner of Valley and 
Union streets, the expense to be charged to incidentals. 

Passed September 4, 1894. 



752 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order making a Transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the appropriation for curbing around the Lincoln-street school 
be transferred to fund for incidental expenses. 

Passed September 4, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order making a Transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make a transfer of 
five hundred dollars (^500) from the appropriation for repairs of 
schoolhouses to the appropriation for contingent expenses. 

Passed September 4, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to Pay of the Militia. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the sum of ^100 be paid to the Sheridan Guards, Upton Light 
Infantry, Scammon Rifles, Lafayette Guards, Manchester Cadets, 
Manchester War Veterans, Amoskeag Veterans, First Regiment 
Band ; and fifty dollars (^50) to the Brigade Headquarters and 
Regimental Headquarters. 

Passed September 4, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase a Pair of Horses. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur : That the 
horses now on trial at Vine-street station be purchased ; price 
not to exceed $400 for the pair. 

Passed September 4, 1894. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 753 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to pay Police for House Pay. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur : That the 
patrolmen be paid for house duty from January i, 1894. 

Passed September 4, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order for the Erection of Electric Lights. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur : That an 
electric light be erected at the corner of North and Bay, Orange 
and Linden, High and Buzzell, Kelley and Rimmon, Kelleyand 
Coolidge avenue, South Main and West Hancock, Mast road and 
Forest, Nutt road and Auger avenue (proposed), Union and 
Grove, Young road and Taylor, and Boynton. 

Passed October 2, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to meet Expense for Proposed New Schoolhouse. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur : That the 
sum of six hundred and eighty-two dollars and forty-three one 
hundredths ($682.43) be paid for expens6 in proposed new school, 
the same to be paid from appropriation for incidental expenses 
to the following : The John B. Clarke Publishing Co., Union 
Publishing Co., T. & R. D. McFarland for one set of plans, 
American Express Co., A. J. Lane, securing option of land; 
providing, that the payment to C. T. & R. D. McFarland for 
one set of plans be in full payment for all services for work, ad- 
vice, and plans against the city to October i, 1894. 

Passed October 2, 1894, 

48 



754 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to erect Certain Electric Lights. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on lighting streets cause to be 
erected electric lights as follows : 

Corner of Spruce street and Barry avenue, corner of Hall 
street and Summer street, corner of Lincoln and Cedar streets, 
corner of Massabesic street and Hall road, the expense thereof 
to be charged to the appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed November 9, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to furnish Two Additional Rooms at the Pearl- 
street School. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized to furnish two additional rooms at the Pearl-street 
school, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
Pearl-street school. 

Passed November 9, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase 500 feet of Hose for use at the City 
Farm. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on city farm be author- 
ized to purchase 500 feet of hose for use at the city farm, ex- 
penses to be charged to the appropriation for city farm. 

Passed November 9, 1894. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 755 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to furnish Two Additional Rooms at Rimmon 

School. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized to furnish two additional rooms at Rimmon school 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for Rim- 
ifion school. 

Passed November 9, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order making a transfer of Money. 

Ordered^ If the board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be and is hereby authorized to make the following 
transfers : 

From appropriation for repairs of highways to appropriation 
for Stark and Derryfield parks, ^158.73. 

From appropriation for new highways to appropriation for 
South Main-street bridge, ^475. 

From reserved fund to appropriation for repairs of buildings, 

Passed November 9, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to the Merrill Cemetery, so-called. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city of Manchester accept from the trustees and owners of 
the Merrill cemetery, so-called, situated at the junction of the 
Nutt and Merrill roads, a proper deed in trust, together with the 
transfer of such trust funds as are in the hands of the trustees, 



756 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

and that said cemetery be, after the delivery of such deed and 
funds, managed and controlled by the board of trustees of 
cemeteries, subject to all the provisions of the laws and ordi- 
nances so far as the same may be applicable under the deed of 
trust. And the joint standing committee on commons and cem- 
eteries is authorized to accept such deed to the city from the 
trustees and owners as may be proper to carry into effect the 
provisions of this order. 

Passed December 4, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to erect certain Electric Lights. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lighting streets 
cause to be erected certain electric lights, as follows : 

At the corner of Main and Wayne, Kelley and Alsace, Myrtle 
and Elm back street, Pearl and Oak, Harrison and Ash, Hall 
and Lowell, Laurel and Beacon, Liberty between North and 
Webster, East Spruce and Wilson, crossing Lawrence Railroad 
and Beech street, Montgomery and Conant, Wentworth and 
Bell, Silver and Wilson, Central and Canal, Beech and Young, 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for light- 
ing streets. 

Passed December 4, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order providing for the pay of the Election Officers at the 

late Election. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the moderators of the several wards of the city, who acted in said 
capacity at the election just past in November, be paid for all 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 757 

services in connection with elections the sum of five dollars per 
day for each day's service of eight hours per diem, the same to 
be inclusive of all pay for such services now provided for by 
ordinance. 

That the ward clerks of the several wards, who acted as such 
at said election, be paid the sum of five dollars per day for each 
day's service of eight hours per diem, and the selectmen of the 
several wards be paid the sum of three dollars and fifty cents per 
day for each day's service of eight hours per diem, the same to 
be in addition to what is now provided by ordinance. 

That all other election officers, who acted in said capacity at 
said election, be paid the sum of three dollars and fifty cents per 
day for each day's service of eight hours each, spent at the poll- 
ing places in the several wards, the same to be inclusive of all 
pay for such services at such election now provided by ordinance 
or statute. 

Passed December 4, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order making a transfer of Money. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make the following 
transfers, to wit : 

From reserved fund to Pearl-street schoolhouse . . ^,316.80 
From reserved fund to ward 9 schoolhouse . . 316.80 



Total ^633.60 

Passed December 31, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to the Final Transfers for the Year 1894. 
Orde?'ed, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 



758 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 



the City clerk be and hereby rs authorized to make the following 
transfers, to wit : 

To reserved fund : 



interest . . .' . 


$3P1^-45 


city hall ....... 


151.16 


mayor's incidentals . . . . . 


136.70 


auditor's department . . . . . 


231.94 


repairs of highways . . , . . 


70.94 


watering streets ..... 


15.92 


paving streets ..... 


33.98 


grading for concrete . . ... 


39-77 


scavenger service .... 


1,119.44 


street sweeping ..... 


77-25 


lighting streets ..... 


1,776.08 


bridges ...... 


99.68 


repairs of sewers .... 


798.39 


health department .... 


31.07 


fuel . . . . 


275.73 


books and stationery .... 


144.08 


printing and advertising . 


37-92 


contingent expenses .... 


69.60 


evening schools ..... 


264.39 


evening school, mechanical drawing . 


107.60 


free text-books ..... 


15.64 


manual training .... 


52.46 


police department .... 


200.00 


addition Webster-street schoolhouse . 


152.16 


Valley cemetery .... 


26.98 


other free cash in treasury not already appro 




priated ...... 


■ 38,304.97 



Total .... 

From reserved fund : 

To printing and stationery . 
incidental expenses 



^7>3io.3o 

^12.61 
1,615.57 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 



759 



To city officers' salaries 








$2,125.01 


street and park commission 








33-65 


new highways 








367-35 


land taken for highways 








6,597-67 


macadamizing streets 








165.99 


city teams 








698.40 


engineer's department . 








716.72 


repairs of schoolhouses . 








464.67 


furniture and supplies 








173.21 


care of rooms 








49-15 


teachers' salaries . 








151-03 


fire department 








3'539-72 


fire-alarm telegraph 








533-88 


repairs of buildings 








614.71 


schoolhouse, ward 9 








102.99 


Pearl-street schoolhouse . 








245-25 


hosehouse, South Manchester 








203.24 


commons 








3-46 


Pine Grove cemetery 








730-93 


Amoskeag cemetery 








4.24 


paupers off the farm 








2,866.88 


city farm 








4S6.35 


indigent soldiers . 








42.00 


abatement of taxes 


• 




1,415-63 


Total .... 








^2^, 960.^1 



Passed December 31, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 



IN THE YEAR ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY- FOUR. 

An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 31, sections 3 and 10, 
of the City Ordinances. 

Be it ordained hy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 



760 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as fol- 
lows : 

That chapter 31, section 3, of the City Ordinances relating to 
"Regulating hackney carriages, etc.," be amended by striking 
out the words "and driver" in the fifth line, so that the section 
as amended shall read : 

" Section 3. Every carriage licensed as aforesaid shall be 
conspicuously marked with the number assigned to it by the 
mayor and aldermen, in metallic figures not less than one and a 
half inches long, and the name of the owner, the number of the 
carriage, and the rates of fare duly established, shall be conspic- 
uously posted on a printed card in every such carriage." 

And section 10 shall be amended by inserting the words at the 
beginning of the section " Every owner of carriages licensed as 
aforesaid shall be responsible for the acts of the driver thereof, 
and," so that the section shall read : 

" Section 10. Every owner of carriages licensed as aforesaid 
shall be responsible for the acts of the driver thereof, and any 
persons licensed as aforesaid who shall violate any of the provi- 
sions of this ordinance, or any person who shall set up, employ, 
or use hackney carriages for the conveyance of persons for hire, 
from place to place within the limits of the city, without license, 
shall be fined not exceeding twenty dollars, or be imprisoned 
not exceeding thirty days." 

Passed to be ordained February 6, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four. 

An Ordinance establishing the Compensation of the Members 
of the Board of Police Commissioners. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as fol- 
lows : 

That the members of the board of police commissioners ere- 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 761 

• 

ated by the legislature at the January session, 1893, ^^''^.U receive 
the following compensation, viz.: The chairman the sum of one 
hundred and fifty dollars. (;^ 150) ; the other members the sum of 
one hundred dollars (gioo) each, all payable annually in the 
month of December. 

Passed to be ordained February 6, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

* 

IN THE YEAR ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-FOUR. 

An Ordinance to change section ^^, chapter 6. 

Be it ordained \iy 'C^t Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as fol- 
lows : 

That section 33, chapter 6, be amended by inserting the words 
"street and park commissioners" after the words "or either 
board thereof" in tl\e eleventh line of said section, so that said 
section shall read as follows : 

"Section 33. The civil engineer of the city shall have his 
office in the city hall ; he shall, under the direction of the mayor 
and board of aldermen, have charge of all plans of public 
grounds, streets, sewers, and main drains belonging to the city. 
He shall, by himself or his assistant, for whom he shall be respon- 
sible, make all such surveys, estimates, admeasurements, and lev- 
els, and perform such other duties as may be required of him by 
the mayor, board of aldermen, or any committee of the city 
councils, or either board thereof, or the street and park commis- 
sioners. He shall make, collect, and file in his office, for the 
city, accurate plans of all public grounds, streets, sewers, and main 
drains, showing all entrances thereto and all estates abutting 
thereon, with their frontage and owners' names. He shall make 
or cause to be made complete and accurate plans of all public 
grounds, at present existing or that may hereafter be laid out ; 
also complete and accurate plans of all changes and improve- 



762 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

ments that may be made thereon, and keep said plans in his 
office. He shall also make or cause to be made, complete and 
accurate profiles of all public streets at present existing or that 
may hereafter be laid out, and shall draw on said profiles, lines 
to represent the proposed grade of sidewalks, on each side of said 
streets, and said proposed grade, when approved by the city 
councils, shall become the established grade of said streets, and 
said grade shall not be changed except by the city councils, and 
hereafter all abuttors making improvements or building sidewalks 
within the limits of said street shall cau§e the same to conform to 
said established grade. All books and papers containing files, 
notes, and other memoranda shall be the property of the city." 

Passed to be ordained March 6, 1894. 



City of Manchester, 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four. 

An Ordinance in amendment of section 20, chapter 6, of the 
Laws and Ordinances of the City of Manchester. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as fol- 
lows : 

That section 20, chapter 6, be amended as follows : By strik- 
ing out the words "seventy-five" in the twelfth line thereof 
and inserting the words "one hundred," so that said section 
shall read as follows : 

"The board of overseers shall appoint one of their number 
clerk of the board, whose duty it shall be to record all the 
proceedings of the board, to make a record of all bills passed 
by the board, to notify all towns which may have paupers assisted 
by the city, to collect all bills due from such towns to the city, 
to arrange the county pauper bills, with a catalogue of the same, 
to be presented to the judges of the court at each term, and to 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 763 

make a copy of such catalogue, to be kept with the records of 
the board. He shall receive in full for his services the sum of 
one hundred dollars per annum, to be paid in equal semi-annual 
payments." 

Passed to be ordained April 3, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four. 

An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 38, City Ordinances. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as fol- 
lows : 

That sections i and 3, chapter 38 of the City Ordinances, be 
amended as follows : 

Add to section i : "And said registrar shall not grant to any 
undertaker any permit to bury the body of any person who shall 
die within the limits of the city until said registrar shall be fur- 
nished a certificate of some physician who shall have viewed the 
dead body, setting forth as nearly as he can the cause of death 
and the time of death. If the deceased person shall have been a 
county or a city charge, and no physician attended such person 
during the last illness of such person, then it shall be the duty of 
the city physician or of one of the physicians who may be a mem- 
ber of the board of health, at the request of the registrar, to view 
said dead body and make such certificate. And if there be any 
circumstance to arouse his suspicion that the death of such per- 
son has been caused by foul means, to report the facts to the 
mayor, that an inquest may be had." So that said section shall 
read as follows : 

" Section i. The city clerk shall be a registrar, whose duty it 
shall be, in addition to those now imposed by law, to receive, re- 
cord, and index the following facts concerning the deaths in the 
city of Manchester, separately numbering and recording the same 



764 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

in the order in which he receives them, designating in separate 
cokuims the date of death, name, sex, color, condition, whether 
single, widowed, or married, age, residence, occupation, place of 
birth, names and places of the birth of parents, cause of death 
and place of burial of the deceased, and date of record. And 
said registrar shall not grant to any undertaker any permit to 
bury the body of any person who shall die within the limits of 
this city until said registrar shall be furnished a certificate of some 
physician who shall have viewed the dead body, setting forth as 
nearly as he can the cause of d^ath and time of death. If the de- 
ceased person shall have been a county or city charge, and no 
physician attended such person during the last illness of such per- 
son, then it shall be the duty of the city physician, or of one of the 
physicians who may be a member of the board of health, at the re- 
quest of the registrar, to view said dead body and make such certif- 
icate. And if there be any circumstance to arouse his suspicion 
that the. death of such person has been caused by foul means, to 
report the facts to the mayor, that an inquest may be had." 

Section 3 shall be amended by striking out the words " twenty- 
five dollars " and inserting the words " twenty dollars," so that 
said section 3 shall read as follows : 

" Section 3. The registrar is authorized to give permission 
for the burial and for the removal of dead bodies from the city, 
and no person shall bury or inter, or cause to be buried or in- 
terred or disinterred, entombed or disentombed, or shall have 
charge of the obsequies or funeral rites preliminary to the inter- 
ment of a human body, or assist in the removal of a dead body 
for interment, without first having obtained permission to do so 
from the registrar ; and any person who shall violate this section, 
or the terms of the permit given by the registrar, shall be fined 
not more than twenty dollars nor less than five dollars." 

Passed to be ordained April 3, 1894. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 76o 

City of Manchester. 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four. 

An Ordinance to regulate the Sale of Merchandise, Fruit, and 
Other Goods. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
-of the City of Manchester, in City Councils assembled, as fol- 
lows : 

That no person shall cry fruit, vegetables, or other goods for 
the purpose of selling or offering for sale such merchandise on 
any square, street, alley, lane, or avenue of the city. 

Any person convicted of such offense shall pay a fine not ex- 
ceeding twenty dollars. 

Passed to be ordained April 3, 1894. 



City of Manchester. 

IN THE year one THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-FOUR. 

An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 6, section 14, of the 
Cit) Ordinances. 

Be it ordained \)y the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as fol- 
lows : 

That chapter 6, section 14, of the City Ordinances relating to 
the "duties and compensation of city officers " shall be amended 
by inserting the words " and sergeants " after the word " watch " 
in the first line, and changing the word "his " to "their " in 
the second line, so that the section as amended shall read ae fol- 
lows : 

" Section 14. The captain of the watch and sergeants shall 
receive in full for their services two dollars and fifty cents per 
day." 

Passed to be ordained April 3, 1894. 



766 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINAXCES. 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four. 

An Ordinance relating to Bicycles. 

Be it ordai?iedhy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as fol- 
lows : 

Section i. Whoever, without the permit provided for in sec- 
tion 3 of this ordinance, rides in a public highway, street, 
square, or park a bicycle at a rate of speed exceeding eight miles 
an hour, or rides such machine on a sidewalk, or rides such ma- 
chine in the streets, squares, or parks of the city when the same 
is not provided with a suitable alarm bell adapted for use by the 
rider, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding ten dollars for 
each offense, and shall be further liable for all damages occa- 
sioned to any person by such unlawful act. 

Sect. 2. The term sidewalk, as used in this ordinance, shall 
mean any sidewalk laid out by the city in the city limits, and 
any walk in the city which is reserved by custom for the use of 
pedestrians, or which has been specially prepared for their use. 
It shall not include cross-walks, nor shall it include footpaths on 
portions of public ways lying outside the thickly settled parts of 
the city which are worn only by travel and are not improved by 
the city or the abutters. 

Sect. 3. The mayor of the city or the park and street com- 
missioners may, in their discretion, upon any special occasion 
grant permits to any person or persons to ride such machines dur- 
ing a specified time, upon specified portions of the public ways 
of the city, at any rate of speed, and may annex such other rea- 
sonable conditions to such permits as they shall deem proper. 
This is meant to include the use of bicycles by members of 
the fire department or in case of emergency. 

This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained October 2, 1894. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 767 

CiTV oi'' Manchester. 

IN THE YEAR ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-FOUR. 

An Ordinance in amendment of section 5, chapter iS, of the 
City Ordinances. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Coun- 
cil of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as 
follows : 

That section 5, chapter 18, be amended by inserting after the 
word " branches," in the last line of said section, " The board 
of street and park commissioners shall, upon receipt of notice 
from the city engineer that the license has been obtained, cause 
to be laid the Y branch in the city sewer and see that the con- 
nection is properly made, the owner of the abutting property to 
do all the work of excavation and furnish all labor with the ex- 
ception of furnishing the Y branch and the placing the same in 
position. A location of the same shall be filed with the city 
engineer and recorded on the city's sewer plans," so that said sec- 
tion 5, chapter 18, shall read as follows : 

" No person shall enter any drain or pipe into any of the 
sewers constructed by the city, without first obtaining a license 
therefor, and any person violating the provisions of this section 
shall be fined not less than one nor more than ten dollars, and a 
like penalty for every day he shall suffer such drain or pipe to 
continue so entered, after notice from the city clerk to discon- 
nect the same. Before any license can be granted by the city 
clerk for a connection with a public sewer, or any house drain- 
age put in or repairs made on them, a permit must be obtained 
of the city engineer, stating the frontage of the lot and the lo- 
cation of the same, with the plan proposed approved by him for 
the committee on sewers and drains. Such permit shall be 
made upon forms appioved by the committee on sewers and 
drains and all connections with the city's sewers shall be made 
with Y branches. The board of street and park commissioners 
shall, upon receipt of notice from the city engineer that the 



768 RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 

license has been obtained, cause to be laid the Y branch in the 
city sewer and see that the connection is properly made, the 
owner of the abutting property to do all the work of excavation 
and furnish all the labor with the exception of furnishing the Y 
branch and the placing the same in position. A location of the 
same shall be filed with the city engineer and recorded on the 
city's sewer plans." 

Passed to be ordained November 9, 1894. 



INDEX. 



INDEX. 



Page 

Abatement on taxes 686 

Assets, statement and inventory of 714 

Annual interest charge on bonded debt 711 

Auditor, city, report of 501 

Auditor's department 545 

Appropriations for 1894 by city councils 687 

Appendix, school 216 

Amoskeag cemetery 672 

B 

Bridges 575 

Books and stationery 609 

Buildings, repairs of 638 

public, occupied by private parties 712 

Board of water commissioners, organization of 42 

report of 43 

health, report of 351 

Bonded debt 708, 710 

tabular statement of 708 

detailed statement of for 1894 710 

annual interest charge 711 

c 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax 697 

City Hall 517 

officers' salaries 538 

teams 578 

officials, list of 3 

engineei', report of 379 

engineer's department, organization of 380 

solicitor, report of 329 

City auditor's report 501 

treasurer's report 502 

councils, orders and ordinances 731 



772 INDEX. 

City physician, report of 335 

auditor's department 545 

farm 676 

report of joint standing committee 323 

librai-y 617 

report of trustees of 461 

treasurer's report 468 

librarian's report 474 

donations to 479 

Contingent expenses 610 

Care of rooms 612 

Commons 662 

Cemetery, Pine Grove 665 

Valley 669 

Amoskeag 672 

Cemeteries, report of sub-trustees of Valley 309 

Pine Grove 308 

treasurer of 312 

treasurer of fund 304 

reportof trustees of fund 303 

County tax 687 

D 

Debt, payment of funded 513 

bonded, statement of 708-712 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 686 

Derryfield and Stark parks 664 

E 

Engine house and wardroom, ward 9 648 

Engineer's department 593 

Expenses, incidental 524 

mayor's 537 

contingent 610 

Evening schools 613 

school, mechanical drawing 615 

Electric lights, location of. 485 

Elliot Hospital 685 

Exempted from tax, property 697 

Eaton Heights Shoe Company, resolution in relation to 736 

Eureka Shoe Company, resolution in relation to 740 

F 

Fund, reserved 514 

Fuel 604 

Furniture and supplies 605 

F ree text-books 615 

beds, Elliot Hospital 685 



INDEX. 773 

Fire department 620 

report of chief engineer 247 

value of personal property 285 

names and residences of members 293 

location fire-alarm boxes 274 

Fire-alarm telegraph 630 

Farm, paupers off 672 

Farm, city 676 

G 

Grading for concrete 571 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 6S6 

Gas-lights, location of 495 

H 

Highways, new 558 

land taken for 562 

watering 563 

paving 566 

macadamizing 568 

grading for concrete on 571 

scavenger service 573 

sweeping 574 

lighting 591 

bridges 575 

city teams 57S 

repairs of 549 

Health department 597 

board of, report of 351 

Hospital, Women's Aid and Relief 685 

Elliot, free beds 685 

Sacred Heart 685 

Hosehouse, South Manchester 649 

Hydrant service 633 

Hallsville schoolhouse 647 

I 

Interest 512 

annual charge, bonded debt 711 

Incidental expenses 524 

Indigent soldiers 6S4 

Inspector, milk, report of 339 

Inventory of assets 714 



Laws relating to exemptions 696 

Loans, temporary 736,737 

Land taken for highways 562 

Lighting streets 591 

Library, city 617 

Lincoln school curbing 648 



774 INDEX. 

M 

Manual training 617 

Ma3'or's incidentals 537 

Macadamizing streets 568 

Militia 686 

Milk inspectoi-, report of 339 

Municipal receipts and expenditures 506 

Manufacturing property exempt from taxation 707 

N 

New highways 558 



Overseers of the poor, report of 317 

Oil lamps, location of 496 

Organization of school board for 1S95 232 

Ordinances and orders 731 

Order relative to appropriation for decoration of soldiers' graves 750 

to purchase horses for fire department 747, 752 

to build certain sewers 423, 421, 426, 427, 428, 429 

to build certain streets 424, 426, 429 

to erect -watering-trough 751 

to establish certain grades 423, 425 

to change grade of Cartier street 427 

to change grade of Valley street 427 

to establish the grade of Harrison street 427 

to establish the grade of Page, Kelley, Kimmon, and Dubuque 

streets 428 

to establish the grade of Union and Sagamore streets 429 

to meet expense for proposed schoolhouse 753 

relating to South Manchester hosehouse 743 

to print forty-ninth report '. 2, 741 

to purchase supply wagons 746, 748 

relative to curbing at Lincoln school 749 

to purchase hose 754 

relative to changes in city hall 746 

to make purchases at city farm 744 

to erect certain electric lights 751, 753, 754, 756 

to erect certain lamp posts 750 

relating to wardroom and police station, West Manchester 742,743 

relating to team hire, sti-eet and park commission 742 

for band concerts 748 

providing pay for election oflScers 756 

making transfer of money 745, 747, 748, 749, 750, 752, 755, 757 

to pvirchaseiand for Pine Grove cemetery 747 

to build Wentworth street 425 

relating to ward 5 wardroom 744 

to ward 2 wardroom 745 

to premium on bonds 748 



INDEX. 775 

Order relating to pay of militia 752 

to police matron 746 

to Pearl-street school 754 

to McGregorville scboolhouse 744, 755 

to pay of police force 751, 753 

to Merrill cemetery 755 

Ordinance relating to bicycles 766 

amending section 20, chapter 6 762 

amending section 33, cliapter 6 761 

amending section 3, chapter 31 759 

amending chapter IS, section 5 767 

amending chapter 38 763 

amending chapter 6, section 14 765 

establishing pay of police commissioners 760 

regulating sale of merchandise 765 

P 

Payment of funded debt ' 513 

Printing and stationery 521 

and advertising 610 

Paving streets 566 

Police department 633 

Pine Grove cemetery 665 

Paupers off the farm 672 

Property account, real and personal 714 

Public buildings occupied by private parties 712 

Park, Derryfleld 664 

Stark 664 

Pai-sonages, valuation of, exempt from taxation 697 

Pearl-street schoolhouse 644 

Police commissioners, report of 345 

R 

Reserved fund 514 

Repairs of schoolhouses 600 

of buildings 638 

Rooms, care of 612 

Repairs of highways 549 

of Vine-street hook-and-ladder house 649 

Resolutions, orders, and ordinances 731 

on death of Auditor James B. Straw 735 

relating to street railway 736 

to bonds 733 

to, water bonds 737, 738 

to A ins worth avenue 739 

for a joint special committee 740 

in relation to South Manchester Buildi