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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

City of Manchester, N. H, 




. . . TO . . . 



N. H. Historical Society. 



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Fiftieth Annual Report 



Receipts and Expenditures 



City OF Manchester 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1895 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING 
TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER : 

PRINTED BY THE JOHN B. CLARKE CO. 
1896. 






CITY OF Manchester. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN ORDER to print the Fiftieth Annual Report of the Receipts and Expen- 
ditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the joint stand- 
ing committee on finance be, and they hereby are, authorized to procure, for the 
use of the inhabitants of said city, the printing of the Fiftieth Annual Report of 
the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, including the reports 
of the joint standing committee on finance, the city auditor, the school board 
and superintendent of schools, superintendent of waterworks, water commis- 
sioners, engineer of fire department, police commissioners, overseers of the 
poor, trustees, librarian, and treasurer of the cily library, committee on ceme- 
teries, joint standing committee on city farm", city physician, city solicitor, city 
engineer, street and park commissioners, and such other matters relating to 
city affairs as said finance committee may direct, the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for printing and stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. February 4, 1896. 
Passed. 

JOHN T. GOTT, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. February 4, 1S96. 
Passed in concurrence. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, Mayor. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 
189J. 



Mayor. 



WILLIAM C. CLARKE 



Office, City Hall 



Chosen at biennial election in November, 1894. Salary, ^1,800 per annum, 
payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1848, section i. Chapter 223, Laws of 
1883. Public Statutes, chapter 47.) Telephone at house and office. 



Aldermen. 



Act 

Ward I. 
street. 
Ward 2. 
Ward 3. 
Ward 4. 
Ward 5. 
Ward 6. 
Ward 7. 
Ward 8. 
Ward 9. 



of June, 1848, section i. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 
Gardner K. Browning, 55 Stark Corporation, Canal 

George E. Heath, River road north, at Hooksett line. 

George W. Reed, 483 Chestnut street. 

Howard C. Holt, 41 1 Amherst street. 

Richard J. Barry, 240 Lake avenue. 

Frank H. Libbey, Nutt road. 

Johann A. Graf, 10 Middle street. 

Christian L. Wolf, 36 Clinton street. 

Frank T. Provost, 21 Amory street. 



President of the Common Council 
John T. Gott,'_Mammoth road. 

3 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Members of the Common Council. 

Act of June, 1848, section i. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 
Ward i. 

Charles E. Blanchard, 53 Market street. 

William Watts, 31 Stark Corporation, Mechanic street. 

Carl E. Rydin, 28 Stark Corporation, Mechanic street. 

Ward 2. 

Eben Carr, Union, near River road north. 
Ossian D. Knox, 757 Chestnut street. 
John A. Lindquist, 48 Blodget street. 

Ward 3. 

Fred L. Allen,* 6 Linden street. 
Clarence E. Rose, 337 Pearl street. 
Joseph O. Tremblay, iS Malvern street. 
William F. Elliott, f 194 Concord street. 

Ward 4. 

George H. Phinney, 133 Hanover street. 
George E. Richards, 12 Ash street. 
Jules Deschenes, 323 Concord street. 

Ward 5. 

William J. Allen, 181 Lake avenue. 
Michael R. Sullivan, 296 Pine street. 
Daniel A. Murphy, 103 East Spruce street. 

* Elected city treasurer. t Special election. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 5 

Ward 6. 

John T. Gott, Mammoth road. 
Charles Hazen, 436 Central street. 
Fred S. Sloan,* 132 Massabesic street. 
B, Frank Welch,t 14 Elm street. 

Ward 7. 

Norris P.° Colby, 1 7 Middle street. 
Samuel F. Davis, 57 West Merrimack street. 
Robert Morrow, 66 Amoskeag Corporation, West Merrimack 
street. 

Ward 8. 

Edward F. Scheer, 135 Milford street. 
John W. Wilson, 215 Turner street. 
William R. Blakely, 162 Blaine street. 

Ward 9. 

John Gildard, 646 Main street. 
Stephen P. Martel, Stark Mills. 
Richard F. Schindler, 294 Beauport street. 



Clerk of Common Council. 

George L. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 

Salary, $200. (General Laws, chapter 46, sections 7-9. City Laws and 
Ordinances, page ;^2' chapter 6, section 11.) 



* Resigned. t Special election. 



6 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

City Clerk. 

Nathan P. Kidder Office, City Hall 

Salary, ^900. The city clerk, in addition -to his salary, is in receipt of fees 
as registrar of births, marriages, and deaths, and as a recording officer for rec- 
ord of mortgages on personal property, of attachments of real estate, of partner- 
ships and assignments, and for recording various other legal papers. He also 
receives fees for issuing dog licenses, billiard and bowling alley licenses, for 
certifying records, and for various other matters. 

These fees are established by the state legislature under various laws, and 
are estimated to be between ^2,100 and ^2,500 per annum. Chosen in con- 
vention of City Councils in January, annually. (Charter, section 22. Public 
Statutes, chapter 50. Act of 1849. City Laws and Ordinances, pages 42, 43^ 
68, 72, 73, 84, 86, 89, 114, 122, 123, 124, 166, 189.) Residence, 313 Man- 
chester street. 



City Auditor. 
James E. Dodge Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,000. Appointed by Mayor and approved by Board of Aldermen, 
in January, annually. (Laws of 1889, chapter 287. City Ordinances, pages 
44, 71, 83-88, 173.) Residence, River road north. 



Auditor's Clerk. 

Lizzie M. Cogswell . . . Auditor's Office, City Hall 
ResideDCe, 1589 Elm street. 



City Treasurer. 

Sylvanus B. Putnam * Office, City Hall 

Fred L. Allen. 

Salary, $1,200. Elected in convention of City Councils in January, annu- 
ally. (Charter, section 23. Act of 1856, section 4. General Laws, chapter 
48, sections 3, 4. Act of 1859, section 4. City Laws and Ordinances, pages. 
36, 86-89, 170. 172-) 



* Died December, 1895, and Fred L. Allen elected. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 7 

Treasurer's Clerk. 

Blanche E. Bullock . . . Treasurer's Ofifice, City Hall 



Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salary, 5 1 1650 and fees. Elected by Mayor and Aldermen before May i, 
annually. (Act of July, 185 1. Act of June, 1859, section 6. Public Statutes, 
chapter 43. City laws and ordinances, chapter 23-) Residence, 740 Chest- 
nut street. 



Deputy Collector of Taxes. 

Edwin C. Paul .... Collector's Office, City Hall 

Paid by collector. Appointed by tax collector with approval of Mayor and 
Aldermen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 33, section 3.) Residence, 
416 Central street. 



City Solicitor. 

Edwin F. Jones . . Office, Patten's Block, 936 Elm street 

Salary, $800. Elected in convention of City Councils, in January, annually. 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6, pages 70, 72.) Residence, 15 High 
street. 



City Messenger. 
John A. Barker Office, City Hall 

Salary, ^700. Elected in convention of City Councils in January, annually. 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6.) Residence, 49 Appleton street. 



Joint Standing Committees. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Graf; Councilmen 
Knox, Colby, and Hazen. 



8 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Browning and Provost; Coun- 
cilmen Watts, Blakely, and W, J. Allen. (Meet Wednesday 
succeeding the 24th of each month. All bills must be left at the 
city auditor's office, properly approved, not later than the 20th 
of each month.) 

On Claims. — Aldermen Libbey and Reed ; Councilmen Rose, 
Martei and Wilson. (Meets third Friday in each month.) 

On Streets. — Aldermen Reed and Heath ; Councilmen Trem- 
blay, Scheer, and Hazen. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Wolf and Heath ; Coun- 
cilmen Phinney, Sullivan, and Lindquist. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Browning and Wolf; Coun- 
cilmen Deschenes, Carr, and Murphy. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Graf and Barry ; Coun- 
cilmen Sloan, Welch, Davis, and Richards. 

Ofi Fire Department. — Aldermen Libbey and Holt; Council- 
men Tremblay, Blanchard, Sloan, and Welch. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Graf and Holt ; 
Councilmen Blanchard, Gildard, and Carr. 

On Public Lnstruction. — Aldermen Heath and Provost ; 
Councilmen Lindquist, W. J. Allen, and Morrow, 

On Water Works. — Aldermen Reed and Holt ; Councilmen 
Wilson, Watts, and Davis. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Barry and Reed ; Councilmen 
Allen, Rydin, and Gildard. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Reed and Barry ; Coun- 
cilmen Murphy, W. J. Allen, and Schindler. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Provost and Browning ; 
Councilmen Rose, Scheer, and M. R. Sullivan. 

On Public Health. — Aldermen Holt and Wolf; Councilmen 
Martei, Richards, and Colby. 



Standing Committees. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Reed and Barry, 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Browning and Wolf. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



On Market. — Aldermen Holt and Libbey. 

On Marshafs Accounts. — Aldermen Heath and Proves:. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Provost and Graf. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Libbey and Barry. 

On Special Police. — Aldermen Holt and Browning. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



On Election Returns. — Councilmen Phinney, Watts, and 
Murphy. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Councilmen Knox, F. Allen,* 
Elliott, and Hazen. 

On Enrollment. — Councilmen Rydin, Carr, and Deschenes. 



City Physician. 
Frederick Perkins .... Office,' 895 Elm street 

Salary, ^600. Elected by City Councils in convention in January, annually. 
(Laws of 1S70, chapter 99. City Ordinances, chapter 9, sections 29, 30.) 
Residence, Clark street, corner Chestnut. 



City Engineer. 
Winfred H. Bennett Office, City Hail 

Salary, ^1,200. Chosen by City Councils in convention in January, annu- 
ally. (City Ordinances, chapter 6, sections 33, 34.) 



Water Commissioners. 

(Chapter 70, Laws of 1871. City Ordinances, chapter 36, and Laws of 
1S91, chapter 26, page 319, act approved March 31, 1891. Chapter 183, Laws 
of 1893.) One commissioner elected annually by Mayor and Aldermen, in 
the month of September, for a term of six years. Office at Court House, cor- 
ner Franklin and West Merrimack streets. Telephone at office and at pump- 
ing station. 



* Elected City Treasurer. 



10 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

The Mayor, ex officio. 

Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1901. 
Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1900. 
Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1899. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1898. 
James A. Weston,* term expires January, 1897. 
Harry E. Parker,f term expires January, 1897. 
Charles T, Means, term expires January, 1902. 
Alpheus Gay, chairman. 

James A. Weston, clerk. Salary, $100. Chosen by the board 
of commissioners. 



Superintendent of Water-Works. 

Charles K. Walker . Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, ^2,000. Chosen by water commissioners annually. Residence, 68. 
South Main street, West Manchester. 



Clerk of the Water- Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns . Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, ^1,500. Chosen by water commissioners annually. Residence, 421 
Hanover street. 



Engineer at Old Pumping Station. 

Josiah Laselle. Salary, ^700, rent, fuel, and use of land. 
Chosen by water commissioners annually. 



Engineer at New Pumping Station. 

Henry A. Donaway. Salary, $2.50 per day, rent, and fuel. 



^Died May 8, 1895. t Elected to vacancy. 



LIST. OF OFFICERS. 11 

Justice of the Police Court. 

Nathan P. Hunt.* Isaac L. Heath, court room at Police Sta- 
tion, corner Manchester and Chestnut streets. 

Salary, $1,500. Appointed by the Governor, with the advice of the Council. 
(General Laws, chapter 215 ; chapter 163, sections 17, 18, 19, of the Laws of 
1878, as amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1881. Public Statutes, chapter 
211.) 



Associate Justice of the Police Court. 

Isaac L. Heath. f Salary, $300 per annum. 
George W. Prescott. 

Appointed by the Governor, with advice of the Council. (Chapter 215, 
General Laws, sections 2-14. Public Statutes, chapter 211. Chapter 296, 
Laws of 1893.) 



Clerk of the Police Court. 

John C. Bickford. Salary, $600. 

Appointed by the justice of the police court. (Chapter 163, sections 17-19, 
General Laws, amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1881. Public Statutes, chap- 
ter 211.) Residence, 15 Ash street. 



Police. 



The members of the police are appointed by the Police Commissioners, and 
hold their commissions during good behavior. They are, by virtue of their ap- 
pointment, constables and conservators of the peace, and their jurisdiction ex- 
tends throughout the city. (Chapter 253, section 5, General Laws; chapter 
303, Laws of 1887 ; chapter 202, Laws of 1893.) Police station, at the corner 
of Chestnut and Manchester streets. 



* Resigned, and Heath appointed successor. 

t Appointed judge, and Prescott appointed successor. 



12 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Police Commissioners.* 

Isaac L. Heath, f term expires January, 1900. 
Noah S. Clark,! term expires January, 1898. 
Frank P. Carpenter, term expires January, 1896. 
David Perkins,! term expires January, 1900. 
Harry E. Loveren,§ term expires January, 1900. 



Cliief of Police. 

Michael J. Healy Office at Police Station 

Salary, ^900. Residence, 304 Central street. Telephone at house and 
office. 



Deputy Chief of Police. 

John F. Cassidy ..... Office at Police Station 
Salary, $800. Residence, 415 Manchester street. 



Captain of the Watch. 

Lafayette Tebbetts. Salary, $2.50 per day. 
Levi J. Proctor. Salary, ^2.50 per day. Residence, Candia 
road corner Massabesic. 



Sergeant. 



Henry McAllister, died May 21, 1895. 

Thomas E. Steele. Salary ^2.50 per day. Residence, 56 
Nashua street. 



■ See chapter 202, Laws 1893. t Chairman, resigned, t Clerk. § Present chairman. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 13 

Patrolmen. 

SALARY, ^2.25 PER DAY. 

Randall W. Bean, 77 Ash street. 

Frank E. Bourrassa, 552 Lincoln street. 

Lucius M. Rollins, 437 Laurel street. 

Olaf Ring, 29 Upton's block, Elm street. 

Benjamin F. Lake, 496 Chestnut street. 

John T. O'Dowd, Laurel street. 

Florence Sullivan, 213 Cedar street. 

Henry A. Burns, 451 Manchester street. 

Theodore Flodin, 232 East High street. 

George A. Lovejoy, 99 Orange street. 

John D. Healy, 129 East Spruce street. 

Frank W. Harden, 400 Belmont street. 

Oscar R. Poehlman, 386 Dubuque street. 

Albert Russell, 36 School street. 

Leon E. Magoon, 355 East Spruce street. 

Joseph Archambeault, 382 Cedar, corner Maple street. 

James S. Butler, 41 Cedar street. 

John C. Badger, 325 Amherst street. 

Peter Callaghan, 122 Jewett street. 

John J. Connor, 155 Pine street. 

John T. Foley, 224 Shasta street. 

Elmer A. Gibbs, 300 Lowell street. 

Frank P. Moore, 47 Elm street. 

William Steele, 115 Pearl street. 

Edwin A. Hutchins, 11 Mill street, Amoskeag. 

John T. Welch, 1263 Elm street. 

William M. Caldwell, 269 Merrimack street. 

John T. Nixon, 121 Hanover street. 

Elmer E. Somers, 336 Lake avenue. 



Janitor of Station. 

Frank P. Wiggin. $1.75 per day. Residence, 21 Laurel 
avenue. 



14 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Miss A. B. Brown, 
nut street. 



Matron. 

^15 per annum. Residence, 329 Chest- 



School Committee. 

Chosen at the biennial election in November, 1894 ; Mayor and president of 
the Common Council members ex officio. The board of school committee 
choose the clerk of the board, the superintendent of public instruction, the 
truant officer, and the teachers in the public schools, and determine their sal- 
aries. They have charge of the repairs of schoolhouses, to a limited extent, 
and the purchase of free text-books and other supplies, and are limited by the 
appropriation of the City Councils. The salary of the committee is ^10 each. 



Walter B. Heath. 

Augustus P. Home. 
George D. Towne. 
Charles M. Floyd. 
James P. Slattery. 

Harry I. Dodge. 
Marshall P. Hall. 



Ward i. 

Walter H. Lewis.* 
Elliott C. Lambert. 

Ward 2. 

Charles H. Manning. 
Ward 3. 

Louis E. Phelps. 

Ward 4. 

Nathaniel L. Colby. 

Ward 5. 

William J. Sughrue.* 
Harry J. Woods. 

Ward 6. 

Herbert E. Richardson. 

Ward 7. 

Edward B. Woodbury. 



* Resigned. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 15 

Ward 8. 
Luther C. Baldwin. Josiah G. Dearborn. 

Ward 9. 

Robert E. Walsh. Jeremiah Sullivan. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio chairman. 
John T. Gott, ex officio. 
Marshall P. Hall, vice-chairman. 
Edward B. Woodbury, clerk. 



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

William E. Buck Office, City Hall 

Salary, ^2,300. Residence, 324 Myrtle street. 



Superintendent's Clerk. 

Fannie L. Sanborn . . Residence, 161 Hanover street 
Salary, ^500. 



Truant Officer. 

Curtis W. Davis Office, City Hall 

Salary, $750. Residence, 849 Chestnut street. 



Assessors. 



One assessor from each ward chosen at the biennial election in November. 
Paid $2.50 each for each day while employed in the assessment and abate- 
ment of taxes. Office, City Hall. (Charter, section 25. Public Statutes, 
chapter 48, section i ; chapter 50, section 4; chapter 49, sections 10, 11, 12. 
City Ordinances, chapter 6, section 26.) Assistant assessors, not exceeding 
six, chosen by the City Councils. 



16 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Ward I. 

Ward 2. 

Ward 3. 

Ward 4. 

Ward 5. 

Ward 6. 

Ward 7. 

Ward 8. 

Ward 9. 



Henry Lewis, 32 Amoskeag Corporation. 
John E. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 
David O. Furnald, 384 Lowell street. 
Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 
George F. Sheehan, 85 Cedar street. 
George H. Dudley, 159 Laurel street. 
William T. Rowell, 14 Manchester Corporation. 
Frank N. Daniels, 137 Milford street. 
Lawrence F. Bradley,* 568 Main street. 
Julius Wiesner,f 16 Rimmon. 



CHAIRMAN OF ASSESSORS. 

David O. Furnald ..... Office, City Halt 

CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 

George H. Dudley Office, City Hall 



Inspectors of Check-Lists. 

One in each ward, chosen at the biennial election in November. Compen- 
sation, ^2.25 per day for each day actually employed. Office, City Hall. 
(Laws of 1878, chapter 163, sections 5, 6, 7, 9,10, 11, 12, 13, 14, r6, and 
City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) 

Ward I. George C. Kemp, 40 Machine Shop block. 
Charles B. Tucker, 777 Union street. 
William B. Corey, 88 Pearl street. 
Samuel J. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 
Patrick Daley. 

Albert J. Peaslee, Cohas avenue, near Water Works. 
Joseph A. Foster, 42 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Charles C. Tinkham, 9 Parker avenue. 
John B. Bourque, 22 Wayne street. 



Ward 


2. 


Ward 


3- 


Ward 


4. 


Ward 


5- 


Ward 


6. 


Ward 


7- 


Ward 


8, 


Ward 


9- 







Resigned. t Elected to vacancy by city councils. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. IT 

Overseers of the Poor. 

One in each ward, chosen at biennial election in November. The Mayor is- 
a member ex officio. Compensation, ^25 per annum, each; clerk of the board, 
$100 per annum, determined by City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 18, as- 
amended by Ordinance of August 5, 1890. Meet third Wednesday of each 
month in City Hall building. 

Ward I. William H. Maxwell, clerk, 20 Amoskeag Corpora- 
tion, Stark street. 

Ward 2. Thomas L. Quimby, railroad station, foot West Sal- 
mon street. 

Ward 3. Benjamin F. Garland, 28 Linden street. 

Ward 4. George S. Holmes, 296 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. Patrick Costello, 106 East Spruce street. 

Ward 6. Charles Francis, Candia road, East Manchester. 

Ward 7. William Marshall, 72 Amoskeag Corporation, West 
Manchester. 

Ward 8. Charles S. McKean, 495 Granite street. 

Ward 9. Moise Bessette, 322 Rimmon street. 

William G. Clarke, ex officio, office, City Hall. 



Board of Health. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 1885, chap- 
ter 165 ; Laws of 1887, chapter 227 ; Public Statutes, chapters 108, 109, no.) 
One member appointed by the Mayor in January of each year, to hold office 
for a term of three years. Salary, $200 each per annum. Office, Court House,. 
West Merrimack, corner of Franklin street. 

Clarence W. Downing, M. D. Term expires first Monday \\\ 
February, 1896. 

Joseph B. Sawyer, clerk, civil engineer, 356 Hanover street. 
Term expires first Monday in February, 1895. 

William K. Robbins, 290 McGregor. Term expires first Mon- 
day in February, 1898. 

Cornelius F. Starr, M. D., 49 Manchester street. Term expires 
first Monday in February, 1897. 
2 



18 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Herbert S. Clough, sanitary inspector, Hanover-street road. 
Office, Court House, Merrimack, corner of Franklin street. 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector, 164 Auburn street. Office, 
Court House, Merrimack, corner of Franklin street. 

Richard J. Barry, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, 
Merrimack, corner Franklin street. 



Fire Department. 

The chief engineer and four assistant engineers are chosen annually, in the 
month of January, by a majority of the City Councils in convention. The sal- 
ary of the chief engineer is ^1,300 per annum; the assistant engineers, each 
$125 per annum. They exercise the powers and perform the duties of fire- 
wards. The said engineers constitute the board of engineers, and elect a clerk 
whose compensation is ^25 a year. The annual compensation of the call mem- 
bers of the several hook-and-ladder, hose, steam fire erxgine, and chemical 
engine companies is as follows: Foremen, each ^115; assistant foremen, each 
$110; clerks, each $110; engineers, each $135; assistant engineers, each 
$10^ ; all other members, each $100 ; payable in equal semi-annual payments, 
on the first of January and July. (Laws of 1S70, chapter 99. General Laws, 
chapter 106. City Ordinances, chapters 6 and 12.) Five members are per- 
manently employed as engineers at ;Si76.25 per month each, and nineteen as 
drivers at $68.33^^ per month each, and receive no compensation as call mem- 
bers. Members of the companies are appointed by Board of Mayor and Alder- 
men in the month of February, annually, on list presented by the board of 
engineers. The officers of each company are appointed by the board of engi- 
neers. 



Chief Engineer. 

Thomas W. Lane . . Office, Central Station, Vine street 

Residence, 1937 Elm street. Telephone at house and oftice. 

Fred S. Bean, clerk, 102 Orange street. 
Ruel G. Manning, 52 Douglas street. West Manchester. 
Eugene S. Whitney, River road north, corner West North 
street. 

Clarence R. Merrill, 418 Merrimack street. 

For further information see chief engineer's report. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 19 

Trustees of City Library. 

(Laws of 1854, chapter 1588. See contract with Manchester Atheneum, 
printed on pages 107 and 108 of City Report for fiscal year ending January 31, 
1855.) Board of seven trustees, one of whom is elected by Aldermen and 
board of trustees in joint convention in September, annually. Term of service, 
seven years ; no salary. Two additional trustees. Mayor, and president of 
Common Council, ex officio. 

Lucien B. Clough,* term expires October i, 1895, 181 Walnut 
street. 

Frank P. Carpenter, term expires October i, 1902, Elm, cor- 
ner West North. 

Nathan P. Hunt, term expires October i, 1901, 774 Union 
street. 

Herman F. Straw, term expires October i, 1900, 607 Chest- 
nut street. 

Walter M. Parker, term expires October i, 1899, ^Vest Web- 
ster street, corner Elm. 

Isaac W. Smith, term expires October i, 1898, 1855 Elm street. 

Moody Currier, term expires October i, 1897, Ash street, cor- 
ner Myrtle. 

C. D. McDuffie, term expires October i, 1896, Ash street, 
corner Myrtle. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio. 

John T. Gott, ex officio. 



Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 

The City Councils in joint convention, biennially, elect one member of said 
board for a term of six years. Not more than two members can be of the same 
political party. Said board, consisting of three members, has full charge, man- 
agement, and control of the building, constructing, repairing, and maintaining 
of all the streets, highways, lanes, sidewalks, bridges, and public sewers and 
drains, and public parks and commons. (See Laws of 1893, chapter 264.) 
Office, City Hall building. Open from 8 to 12 A. M., 2 to 5 P. M. Regular 



* Died July 28, 1895. 



20 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

meeting of the board at 2 o'clock p. M., each day. Salary of each member, 
^600 per year, payable quarterly, and each are allowed ^150 annually for horse 
hire. 

George H. Stearns, chairman, term expires 1898. 
Leonard P. Reynolds, term expires 1896. 
Horace P. Simpson, term expires 1900. 



Clerk. 

Appointed by commissioners. Salary, ^75 monthly. 

Allan E. Herrick, 91 Russell street, corner of Prospect. 
Assistant Clerk, Julia F. Stearns. 



City Weigher. 

Elected annually in convention of City Councils. Salary, ^400 per annum ; 
all fees for weighing returned monthly to city treasurer with sworn statement. 
Stationed at city scales on Franklin street. 

Asa B. Eaton . . . ... . Office, city scales 

Residence, 23 Appleton street. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Harry C. Blanchard. 

Elected annually in January by City Councils in convention. Paid by fees. 
(Section 25, chapter 43, Public Statutes, and chapter 125, Public Statutes.) 



Fish and Game Wardens. 

(Public Statutes, chapter 130.) Elected by City Councils in convention. 

John C. Higgins, 143 Orange street. 
George A. Clark, 304 Central street. 
Robert Snyder. 

Harry P. Ray, River road north. 
C. R. Hodge, 574 Hall street. 
Henry C. Wallace, 64 Hanover street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 21 

Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39, sections i, 2, 3, 4.) Two trustees elected by 
City Councils in convention in Januarj', annually, for the term of four years. 
Sub-trustees appointed by board of trustees. 

George W. Bacon, 65 Stark Corporation, Canal street, term 
expires January, 1899. 

William H, Huse, Mammoth road, term expires 1899. 

John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street, term expires 1898. 

Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street, term expires 1898. 

Stillman P. Cannon, 43 Elm street, terra expires 1897. 

James E. Bailey, Goffstown road near Front street, term ex- 
pires 1897. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 25 High street, term expires January, 
1896. 

John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street, term expires January, 



iJ 



S. B., Putnam,* clerk and treasurer, 437 Amherst street. 
Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer, 6 Linden street. 



Sub-Trustees of Cemeteries. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Alderman Howard C. Holt, 41 1 Amherst street. 
Councilman John Gildard, 646 Main street. 
John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street. 
Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street. 
Stillman P. Cannon, 43 Elm street. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Alderman J. Adam Graf, 10 Middle street. 
Councilman Charles E. Blanchard, 53 Market street. 
George W. Bacon, 66 Stark Corporation, Canal street. 
John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street. 
Charles H. Bartlett, 25 High street. 

• Deceased. 



22 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

Councilman Eben Carr, North Union street. 
James E. Bailey, Goffstown road near Front street. 
William H. Huse, Mammoth road, East Manchester. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Byron A. Stearns. Office and residence at the cemetery. 
Telephone. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Charles H. G. Foss. Office at the cemetery; residence, 267 
Lake avenue. 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

James A. Westbn,* chairman, 621 Maple street. 

Charles H. Bartlett,t 25 High street. 

Person C. Cheney,;}; Harrison street, corner Elm. 

Otis Barton,"}" 122 Orange street. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio. 



Inspector of Milk. 
Edward C. Smith Office, 1277 Elm street 

Residence, 97 Sagamore street. Term expires February i, annually. (Pub- 
lic Statutes, chapter 127.) Appomted by Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $300 
per annum. 



Inspector of Buildings. 
Thomas W. Lane . . Office at Central Fire Station 

Residence, 1937 Elm stieet. Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
biennially, in February. Salary, ;$ioo per annum. (City Ordinances, chapter 
15. Laws of 1883, chapter 94. Public Statutes, page 170.) Telephone at 
house and office. 



* Died May 8, 1895. t Appointed to vacancy. \ Resigned. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



23 



Joseph B. Baril 
John Cayzer 



Inspectors of Oil. 



99 Bridge street 
583 Granite street 



(Public Statutes, chapter 129, sections 25-34. City Ordinances, chapter 25. 
Paid by fees, ^ of i per cent per gallon. 



9 ; chapter 36, 
See Public Stat- 



Moderators. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 31, sections 
section 9; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordinances, page iS. 
utes relating to towns and cities.) 

Ward I. Abial W. Eastman, 24 Amoskeag Corporation, Stark 
street. 

Ward 2. Lyman W. Colby, 753 Chestnut street. 



Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 



Arthurs. Bunton, 27 Walnut street. 
George H. Warren, 461 Hanover street. 
John B. Rodgers, 240 Lake avenue. 
Herbert S. Clough, 45 Middle street. 
Frank A. Dockham, 18 Pleasant street. 
Robert E. McKean, 50 Main street. 
John T. Hannigan, 159 Cartier street. 



Ward Clerks. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 44, sections 10, 12. City Or- 
dinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Ward I. Frank X. Foster, 1382 Elm street. 

Ward 2. Charles A. Allen, 68 Liberty street. 

Ward 3. John H. Hayes, 106 Arlington street. 

Ward 4. Joseph W. Abbott, 256 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. Martin J. Whalen. 

Ward 6. Arthur B. Dickey. 

Ward 7. Charles E. Bartlett, 68 West Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. Fred L. Hodgman, 363 South Main street. 

Ward 9. Frank I. Lessard, 320 Dubuque street. 



24 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Selectmen. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter i, section 27 ; chapter 12, sec- 
tion 6; chapter 40, sections 2, 3 ; chapter 109, section 27; chapter 213, sec- 
tion I. City Ordinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns and 
cities.) 

Ward i. 

John H. Wales, Jr., 19 Machine Shop block, Water street. 
Olaf H. Nyberg, 27 Machine Shop block, Canal street. 
Alexander Hanna, 22 Boyden street. 

Ward 2. 

Daniel G. Andrews, 777 Union street. 
William H. Maxwell, Goffstown road. 
Fred K. Ramsey, Webster, corner River road. 

Ward 3. 

George N. Baker, 78 Ashland street. 
John Cronin, 284 Bridge street. 
Edward C. Smith, 97 Salmon street. 

Ward 4. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 251 Concord street. 
Wilfred Beauchemin, 525 Beech street. 
Charles B. Clarkson, 249 Concord street. 

Ward 5. 

Thomas A. Foley, 156 East Spruce street. 
Patrick Maloney, 177 East Spruce street. 
Robert F. Murray, 176 East Spruce street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 25 

Ward 6. 

George M. Bean, Massabesic road. 
Harrison W. Haselton, 261 Laurel street. 
Edward P. Cogswell, Candia Road. 

Ward 7. 

Hanson R. Armstrong, 58 Amoskeag Corporation, West Mer- 
rimack street. 

Melvin M. Halen, Hall road. 

Robert Leggett, 50 Amoskeag Corporation, Canal street. 

Ward 8. 

William H. Marshall, 265 Douglas street. 
Hervey Stratton, 32 Quincy street. 
George W. Flint, loi Milford street. 

Ward 9. 

Albert Oliver, 309 Bartlett street. 
Martin J. Rafferty, 450 Beauport street. 
Joseph Trahan, 508 Dubuque street. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

A time-honored custom requires the mayor of Manchester to 
begin his official action by delivering an address containing aii 
exhibit of the condition of the several departments and an out- 
line of his views in regard to them. In trying to discharge this 
duty I am impressed with the belief that it would be better if the 
unwritten law relieved me of it and imposed it upon the out-go- 
ing mayor, whose familiarity with the needs of the city and whose 
experience in the administration of its affairs must qualify him 
to speak much more authoritatively than a new man, who has 
had no sources of information other than those that are open to 
all citizens, and whose opinions must be given subject to the 
probability that they must be changed as he proceeds, can do. 

In the nature of things we who are entirely new to the posi- 
tions we occupy, as most of us are, can today start with little 
more than an honest and fixed purpose to justify the confidence 
which our fellow citizens have imposed on us by so conducting 
ourselves that our action will always promote their welfare and 
contribute to the progress of the city in which their interests are 
centered and of which they are so justly proud. We must hold 
ourselves in readiness to learn by the light of experience, and 
walk in the path to which our best judgment points us, as we go 
along. To provide what revenues are actually needed by the 
city by methods which tax as lightly as possible the property of 
the present and future, and to so disburse them that the public 
may receive a full equivalent, are in general the tasks we have 
assumed, and in performing them I know of no better rule than 

29 



30 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

this: Do the city business as an intelligent, broad-minded, and 
progressive man would do it if he and his family owned all the 
property, paid all the taxes, and received all the benefits from 
city expenditures. 

Manchester has not escaped the financial convulsions and in- 
dustrial storms which wrecked business during the years 1893-94, 
but she has suffered less than almost any other city of her size.' 
Her manufacturers were so strong in material resources and rep- 
utation that they were able, except for brief periods, to keep their 
machinery running and furnish employment to their operatives 
when others were forced to suspend ; her merchants were so en- 
terprising and so strong financially that they were able to com- 
mand trade when others could not ; her working people were so 
thrifty and so honest that they could endure a season of enforced 
idleness without severe suffering, when a similar affliction else- 
where produced privation and want. 

Many new industries have been established here during the 
last two years, our population has largely increased, and building 
has been more extensive than at any other period in our history. 
The boundaries of the city proper have been constantly enlarged, 
and streets, dwellings, and business blocks now occupy a large 
territory which was field and pasture. This rapid expansion has 
created a pressing demand for public improvements. With such 
a suburban development as our city has enjoyed, new streets, 
bridges, sewers, schools, street lights, and commons, and increased 
water, fire, and police service, are needed much faster than they 
can possibly be supplied, and in addition to this the growth of 
population and business renders inadequate some of the public 
institutions in the central part of the town. In the effort to 
supply the demands of a growing city a large amount of money 
has been spent, and more must be provided for the same purpose 
in the immediate future. The times are not propitious for un- 
dertaking public enterprises which can well be postponed. Our 
debt is large and burdensome. Our expenses, with the best of 
management and the most scrupulous honesty, must be very 
heavy. Our tax rate is as high as it can be made without causing 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



31 



distress, until business has fully recovered and incomes are re- 
stored to their former proportion. 

THE CITY DEBT. 

For many years Manchester has had the reputation of owing 
very little money compared with other cities of its size, and this 
fact has carried great weight with prudent men who were seeking 
locations for their business and homes, and who are now among 
our best and most useful citizens. Our debt is not now so large 
as to destroy this reputation and turn away population and busi- 
ness, but it has been nearly doubled in a very brief time. I find 
upon investigation that it is now $1,397,000, and that that sum 
will be increased in the near future at least $350,000 without 
further legislative action. If we do not spend a cent for im- 
provements other than those already authorized, we shall soon 
have a debt of a million and three quarters, and if, as appears 
absolutely necessary, we must add to this the cost of a new high 
school building, we shall ere long be dangerously near the two 
million dollar mark, which is about 7 per cent of our assessed val- 
uation. 

January i, 1893, the following was the city's bonded indebt- 
edness : 



Amount of bonded indebtedness January i, 1892 

Amount of cemetery bonds issued in 1S92 . 

Accrued interest on bonded debt .... 

Today it is $1,397,000, divided as follows : 

Water bonds 
City bonds 
Bridge bonds 
Improvement bonds 
Cemetery bonds 
Security bonds . 

Total . 



^953.850 

1,150 
21,050 

$976,050 



$850,000 
155,000 
60,000 
200,000 
32,000 
100,000 

$1,397,000 
t semi annual 



There is now due, or will be due, on the occasion of the nex 
payment, $25,000 of interest on the above bonds, to be provided for by appro 
priation. 



32 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

This includes ^100,000 security bonds which were sold to the 
Second National Bank last year with an agreement that interest 
should commence to run from the date of their issue, but that 
they should not be paid for until May i, 1896. The city re- 
ceived ^50,000 of this July I, 1894; $25,000 December i, 1894; 
and the remaining $25,000 will be paid July i, 1895. The city 
is, however, paying interest on the whole $100,000, and is giv- 
ing the bank the use of our deposits free. In addition to the 
above there will soon be $300,000 of improvement bonds and 
$50,000 of water bonds that have already been authorized but 
not issued, making a total of $1,747,000 or of $1,897,000, if 
provision is made for a new high school house. 

With these facts confronting us, it behooves us to exercise 
every prudence in the administration of the great trust placed in 
our hands. Expenditures which would be warranted under 
other circumstances should be avoided for the present as far as 
possible, and our motto during the next two years should be re- 
trenchment and reform. 

By the act establishing the board of street and park commis- 
sioners it is made obligatory upon the city to set aside a sinking 
fund to redeem the permanent improvement bonds of which 
$500,000 have already been authorized. This sinking fund 
must be at least five per cent of the gross amount issued, making 
an appropriation necessary of $25,000 a year when the bonds 
have all been put upon the market. The idea is an excellent 
one, and I believe similar provision should be made for all the 
city's outstanding indebtedness in order that, in twenty years or 
sooner, the present debt may be wiped out. 

THE STREET COMMISSION. 

By an act approved March 29, 1893, a street commission was 
created for Manchester, and was given full charge, management, 
and control of the building, constructing, repairing and main- 
taining of all streets, highways, lanes, sidewalks, and bridges, 
public sewers and drains, and of the public parks and commons in 
Manchester, and intrusted with the expenditure of all appropri- 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 33 

ations which the city councils should from year to year vote for 
such purposes. All bills for expenditures from the appropria- 
tions voted from year to year by the city councils for such pur- 
poses are approved by the board. In brief, this board has for such 
purposes all the powers formerly vested in the board of mayor 
and aldermen, the city councils, and the highway surveyors of 
the city, except ihe laying out of streets. The commission also 
has the power to authorize the obstruction of streets for certain 
purposes, and to regulate the stringing of wires and the laying of 
pipes through the streets. In the same act the city was author- 
ized to borrow $500,000 for use in making permanent improve- 
ments. Two hundred thousand of this amount has already been 
borrowed, and the city is empowered to borrow $300,000 more. 
Under the provisions of the act the commission is given prac- 
tically autocratic power in its department. Duties that were 
formerly discharged by the entire city government have now 
been turned over to three men, and the only check that the city 
government can exert on the commission after streets are laid 
out is in the matter of appropriation. 

THE POLICE COMMISSION. 

Another important department has been taken from the con- 
trol of the city council by the act creating a police commission 
of three members, who are appointed by the governor and coun- 
cil. In the selection, organization, discipline, and direction of 
the police force we have no responsibilities and no powers. 
When we have voted the money necessary to support it our 
duty is discharged. 

THE WATER-WORKS. 

Manchester is exceptionally fortunate in having an abundant 
supply of pure water and a system of water-works which dis- 
tributes that supply in every direction of the city. Our water 
system has cost a large amount, but it is doubtful if we get so 
satisfactory return from any other outlay, and its market value is 



34 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

probably enough to cancel the entire city debt. In one sense it 
has been self supporting from the beginning, the net receipts 
having been sufficient to meet the interest on the cost and pro- 
vide for the payment of the debt representing it, if they had 
been applied for that purpose. A considerable share of those 
receipts, however, have been paid from the city treasury. Prac- 
tically the water-works and all that pertain to them are outside 
the province of the city council, their control, financial and 
otherwise, being vested in a board of water commissioners. 

The city is the real party in interest, but it has delegated its 
authority to agents, reserving to itself little more than buying 
the water which :t needs for hydrant purposes and guaranteeing 
the contracts made by the commissioners, an arrangement which 
has thus far proved very satisfactory. During the past year a 
high-service system has been added to the one which was laid 
from the outlet of Lake Massabesic twenty years ago. It in- 
cludes a new pumping station at the lake, a large and most sub- 
stantial reservoir on Oak Hill, and all necessary mains, and is so 
arranged that it can be used to supplement or take the place of 
the old one in all parts of the city. The growth of the city in 
elevated sections, which could not be supplied with water from 
the old reservoir, created an imperative necessity for a high-ser- 
vice system, and it was judged best in satisfying this to provide 
against the possibility — perhaps the probability — that the 
breaking of the machinery or the bursting of pipes used in the 
Cohas system might leave us without water and subject to the 
horrors of fire and drouth. To meet the expense of the high 
service and protect the water supply, an issue of bonds to the 
amount of $300,000 was authorized by the legislature, and 
$25o,ooo'worth have been sold and the proceeds handed to the 
commissioners. 

The substitution of iron mains for the cement pipes which 
■were laid originally has been going on slowly for some time. It 
will probably have to be pushed more rapidly hereafter, as every 
year weakens the old pipe. With an abundant water supply 
assured, it remains to do whatever is necessary to keep it pure. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 35 

Public sentiment in this respect has been steadily rising dur- 
ing the past few years until it has reached a point where there is 
an absolute demand that a strip of land of necessary width 
around the entire shore of Massabesic lake, the source of our 
water supply, shall be condemned and set apart forever as public 
property upon which no buildings shall be erected and which 
shall separate the water itself from cottages, boat houses, and 
other structures. The commissioners have been engaged for 
several years in buying up the land along the shore of the lake 
by piecemeal and have very quietly acquired nearly two fifths of 
the entire shore of the lake. In answer to an aroused public 
sentiment it has now been decided to condemn all the remainder 
of the land about the lake front for a safe distance back from 
the shore, and the work of appraising this land by the Hills- 
borough county commissioners is now going forward. 

Another matter, which is of interest in this connection and 
which will probably be settled during our term of office, is the 
suit for ^50,000 brought by the Devonshire Mills against the 
city of Manchester for diverting the water from Cohas brook. 
The proprietors of the mills and the commissioners have already 
had two meetings and- agreed to refer the whole matter to a 
board of referees. 

How much it will cost to adjust this matter and to secure that 
portion of the lake front now owned by others can only be con- 
jectured, but it will certainly be much in excess of the §50,000 
which can be made available by the sale of the bonds not yet 
issued and another large sum will have to be provided soon. 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Next to the public health our public schools are the most im- 
portant subjects that require our attention. Whatever may be 
omitted or neglected, they must be provided for. Commodious, 
well-located, and healthy schoolhouses must be had, cost what 
they may. Many of our schools are so crowded as to impair 
their efficiency and deprive scholars of advantages which no 
community can afford not to furnish. The high school has out- 



36 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

grown the building which was erected for it in 1866 at a cost of 
$40,000, exclusive of the land. At that time our population was 
less than one half what it is now, and the edifice has long been 
unfit and inadequate for the purpose for which it was intended. 
It is my opinion, and I think it is shared by all of our citizens 
who have investigated the situation, that we should at once select 
a new site and erect a structure thereon which will meet the re- 
quirements not only of the present but of the future, so far as we 
are able to foresee them. If this is done the old building can be 
used for new grammar and primary schools, of which there is 
pressing need in that vicinity. The expense will probably not 
be less than $150,000, and if, as appears, this is too large an 
amount to be added to the tax levy in one or two years, a por- 
tion, if not all of it, will have to be secured by an issue of bonds, 
authority for which must be obtained from the legislature, and 
should be asked for immediately. 

In the last report made by Principal Somes of the high school 
to the superintendent of schools, he says : 

" Each year the number of pupils in the high school has in- 
creased until this year we have 266. With this number the 
building is very much crowded and every available room has to 
be used for a recitation room. With insufficient light in the 
study room,, no system of ventilation, and a heating apparatus 
which does not heat the building on cold days, our schoolhouse 
is not only inconvenient but uncomfortable. I earnestly call 
the attention of the school board to the condition of our build- 
ing." 

This being true, it would be little less than criminal to allow 
such a condition of things to continue. Investigation further 
shows that not only is a new high school demanded to supplant 
and replace the present building, but it is also demanded in order 
that the present structure may provide facilities for children in 
the primary and grammar grades, who are now packed into the 
overcrowded school buildings we already possess. If the high 
school is removed from the present building, and the edifice is 
given up to primary and grammar grades, it will relieve the pres- 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 37 

sure in the Lincoln school, the Ash-street school, the training 
school, and the Lowell-street school, and will enable us to do 
away with the proposed Wilson Hill school on Manchester street, 
which cannot be erected at a cost less than ^25,000. By reliev- 
ing the Lowell-street school and the training school we shall be 
able also to provide suitable quarters for the manual training 
school and the evening drawing school, and we shall obtain a 
new primary division at the Lowell-street school. 

Of course if the high school building is unfit for use as a high 
school it must be unfit as it stands for schools of lower grade, 
but by an expenditure of from $5,000 to $10,000 it can probably 
be put in shape so that it can be used for many years for the pur- 
poses of a grammar and primary school, and I believe such alter- 
ations should be made, thus avoiding the necessity of the erection 
of another schoolhouse in the eastern section of the city of the 
grammar grade. With the erection of a new high school and the 
■construction of a new primary school at South Main street, which 
is called for, and the estimated cost of which is about $20,000, 
the city will be in shape to care for the rising generation, as far 
as educational facilities are concerned, for the present. 

The total enrollment of pupils in our public schools for the 
year ending December 15, 1894, was 4,975, and they were ac- 
commodated in twenty-four buildings. It is evident that the 
number will rise above 5,000 the present year. The finance 
committee of the board of education has determined to ask for 
$100,500 for its appropriation for 1895. 

THE CITY LIBRARY. 

The city library, under the progressive administration of Miss 
Sanborn, has apparently entered a new era of usefulness. She 
has inaugurated many reforms, none of them, perhaps, being bet- 
ter appreciated than the purchase of books monthly, instead of 
quarterly or semi-annually, as heretofore. By this innovation the 
popular books are on the shelves of the library ready for circula- 
tion almost as quickly as they are found on the counters of the 
booksellers themselves. The library now contains 38,351 vol- 



38 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

umes, there having been added during the year 1,147 ^^^^^ books. 
Miss Sanborn has just issued a fiction catalogue containing the 
names of between six and seven thousand volumes, and for the 
tabulation of which there was a pressing demand, and is now 
engaged in preparing a general catalogue of all the books in the 
library. The latter work is of a monumental character, and will 
be several years in completion. The demands of the general 
public will, however, be subserved, it is believed, by the fiction 
catalogue, supplemented by the general card catalogue, which is, 
under her careful supervision, being brought down thoroughly to 
date. An innovation which, it is expected, will be of great in- 
terest to the public schools, is the issuance of a teacher's card, 
allowing the latter to take out six books at a time, to be used as 
supplementary reading for the scholars in the schoolroom or 
otherwise, as they may see fit, the idea being to create in the 
young people in our schools a taste for a better class of reading. 
This plan has been tried with signal success in other cities and 
will be introduced here at once. 

The library building itself needs to be repaired, and if the 
structure is to remain where it is there should be a reading room 
added to it in order to popularize it. The facilities of the library 
should be more generally enjoyed by our people. Few cities of 
the size of Manchester possess a better equipped institution of its 
kind. 

OUR STREETS. 

Our streets are costing us a very large sum. . The street and 
park commissioners had $200,000 in round figures to spend in 
their department in 1894, and they have asked for as much more 
in 1895. A large portion of this money goes to the building of 
new streets and repairing old ones. Up to the year 1890 the 
length of new highways yearly laid out in this city was compara- 
tively small. In 1886 it was a mile and a quarter ; in 1887 not 
quite a mile; in 1888 a mile and a quarter ; and in 1889 a mile 
and a half. But in 1890 it jumped to four miles and a half; in 
1 89 1 it was almost eight miles, and in 1892 it had increased to 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 39 

twelve miles; in 1893 ^^ ^^^ seven miles, and in 1894 two and 
one half miles. During the past five years there have been laid 
out thirty-four miles of new streets. 

At the present time there are not less than twenty-five miles of 
streets that have been laid out and never built, some of them dat- 
ing back to 1889, and fifty-one miles now that have been but 
partially built. As the street commission reports the average- 
cost of building streets last year at ^2,619.97 per mile, we are 
warranted in estimating the cost of completing those already laid 
out at more than $100,000. It is to be borne in mind that when 
streets are laid out, and damage awarded for the land taken, the 
owner can collect the amount, and that when the city neglects to 
build a street for two years after it is laid out, it maybe indicted 
and punished. I am informed that considerable amounts have 
recently been recovered by land owners to whom damages have 
been awarded for streets laid out long ago upon tracts of territory 
upon which there has never been a building erected, and that 
legal proceedings are threatened in many cases where streets have 
not been built. With such a legacy it certainly behooves us to 
be very conservative in laying out new streets, especially those 
which so far as appears are needed only for the convenience of 
imaginary citizens who are expected to buy house lots. 

In general, I believe we should complete the streets already 
laid out, and improve those already built, instead of laying out 
more for which there is not immediate need. 

GRANITE STREET. 

Travel is more congested upon that section of Granite street 
between Canal and Turner than in any other portion of the city, 
and how to relieve this thoroughfare is one of our most serious 
problems. Granite bridge, which was built when there was only 
a small settlement on the west side of the Merrimack, is narrow, 
old, and somewhat out of repair. If there were no street-car 
tracks upon it it would not accommodate the business that rolls 
over it in constantly increasing voluime, and as it is, travel is 
crowded and choked upon it. 



40 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

When an electric road occupies three feet and four inches 
more of its width than is now taken by the horse cars, the 
trouble will be greatly aggravated, and something must be done 
to prevent the bridge from becoming impassable. The Granite- 
street crossing over the Concord & Montreal railroad is another 
fruitful source of annoyance, danger, and damage, to the removal 
of which our people have looked forward so long that hope de- 
ferred has made them heartily sick and well-nigh discouraged. 

What can be done to improve the situation upon the bridge 
and at the crossing I am not experienced and wise enough to 
say, but the subject clearly demands our earnest attention and 
prompt action as soon as we can satisfy ourselves as to what is 
practicable. 

PARKS AND COMMONS. 

Manchester's system of parks and commons comprises some 
beautiful territory, which has been still further adorned by a 
judicious outlay on the part of the city itself. Stark park has 
had a plan made for it which calls for the ultimate outlay of 
about ^100,000, and if the resolution calling for the appropria- 
tion of $50,000 to build an equestrian statue of General Stark, 
which is now before congress, passes that body, we shall have 
one park which will compare favorably with those of more met- 
ropolitan cities. Derryfield park is also a delightful tract of land, 
with great capabilities as a pleasure resort, and in a few years, 
when our people become better acquainted with its attractions, 
it will be largely frequented. Both the commons and parks of 
tne city show the excellent care that is bestowed upon them by 
Superintendent Fullerton, and in appearance and attractiveness 
have improved wonderfully during the past few years. The cus- 
tom of constructing flower plats upon the various squares during 
the summer months is an excellent one, and I believe might be 
further extended and elaborated. 

CEMETERIES, 

Manchester has, like most New England cities, a large number 
of small and two large cemeteries. These cities of the dead, 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 41 

where many of us have laid all that is mortal of those near and 
dear to us, should be sacredly preserved and not allowed under 
any circumstances to fall into decay or neglect. 

Valley cemetery has nearly reached the point where it must 
cease to receive the bodies of the dead, and Pine Grove must 
hereafter, more and more, come to be our common burying 
ground. The system of bonding the lots in this cemetery in 
order to insure their perpetual care seems to be an excellent one, 
and I wish such action might be extended so as to become the 
universal custom. While the original cost to the lot owner may 
be a little greater, the resultant effect is certainly most gratifying, 
and with such a rule in general operation the cemetery would 
present an appearance of beauty and care which it can never bear 
while parts of the lots receive, as at present, the intermittent at- 
tention of individuals. 

SEWERS. 

Manchester's sewerage facilities are generally very good and 
quite adequate. The city has today some fifty-two miles of sew- 
ers, an increase for the year of almost three miles. There are six 
miles that have been ordered but not yet built. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The fire department of Manchester is a source of pride to all 
her citizens. It ranks among the very best in the world. The 
department is now well housed and generally well provided with 
the most modern apparatus, and I do not see why there should 
be a further call for special expenditures of any consequence in 
this department during the next two years, aside from the equip- 
ment of the new hose house at South Manchester. 

STREET LIGHTS. 

Our street lights cost ^41,223.92 last year, and they will not 
cost less until the ten-year contract executed in 1893 is abrogated 
or expires by limitation. Our control of the matter is limited 
to the location of new lights and the appropriation of money 
with which to pay the bills. 



42 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

BUILDING INSPECTOR. 

There appears to be need of a building inspector who will give 
his entire time to that most important duty. He needs to be not 
only a practical builder and artisan, but a man of great force of 
character and absolutely incorruptible. Such a man would be 
invaluable. 

AN EMERGENCY WARD. 

The need of some form of an emergency ward where victir^s 
of accident or sudden illness on our streets may receive prompt 
and suitable care and treatment has increased with the steady 
growth of the city. The choice of a proper location, the cost of 
equipment and maintenance constitute a problem which might 
not be altogether easy of solution in the immediate future, be- 
cause of other pressing demands upon the city treasury. Fortu- 
nately, however, the generosity of a well-known lady, now de- 
ceased, and the enthusiasm of other ladies who appreciate the 
value of such a ward in serving the interests of a common human- 
ity, have solved the problem. 

An emergency ward is to be established in the best possible 
location, in the heart of the city and near the police station, fully 
equipped for surgical work and the care of patients, and open day 
and night throughout the year. In view of the unquestioned 
value that such an enterprise will be to the city of Manchester, 
I would suggest that the city councils consider the propriety of 
a small appropriation toward defraying the running expenses of 
the proposed ward, on the reasonable condition, which I am sure 
will be complied with, that the ward be open at all times to any 
victim of accident or sudden illness upon our streets, without re- 
gard to nationality, religious belief, or other circumstances, save 
only that there is need of immediate assistance. 

CITY HALL. 

I trust the city hall can be made to serve the purposes for 
which it was designed until a relief from the pressure in other 
directions enables us to erect a hew one which will correspond 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 43 

to the size of the city and gratify the pride, as well as satisfy the 
needs, of its people, but I believe that while we have the old one 
it should be utilized as far as possible for public purposes. It is 
conveniently located, it contains room enough for the public 
offices, and if it is safe it can be endured for a time. It will be 
much more endurable if the city retires from the landlord busi- 
ness and appropriates to its own use some of the space now occu- 
pied by tenants. The city clerk's office should be moved to the 
ground floor, where it would be easily accessible, and the closet 
in which he is now forced to perform his duties converted into a 
private office for the mayor. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

A careful study of the needs of each department should pre- 
cede the appropriations, and when they are made expenditures 
should be restricted to them, and they should be so apportioned 
as to last through the year, or until the object for which they 
are voted is accomplished. I apprehend that one of our most 
difficult tasks will be to avoid overdrawing appropriations or ex- 
hausting them so early in the year that work which is necessary 
later cannot be performed, but we have no clearer duty than 
this. 

CONCLUSION. 

Other matters will demand our attention from time to time, 
but I do not deem it profitable to discuss them here, because I 
have no fixed opinion in regard to them. We cannot safely lay 
down today many rigid rules. We must learn as rapidly and do 
as well as we can. I believe the people, whose servants and agents 
we are, demand of us an economical administration. They do 
not want a niggardly and parsimonious government, for they 
feel that they can afford and should pay for what is necessary for 
the prosperity and progress of Manchester ; but they reasonably 
object to extravagance or profuseness. 

We must complete what has been begun, prepare to meet obli- 
gations already contracted, which will mature during our term of 



44 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

office, maintain the efficiency of the departments supported at 
the public expense for the public good, and inaugurate such im- 
provements as cannot wisely be postponed ; but beyond this we 
need not and should not go. 

I trust our relations may be pleasant, and that we may so con- 
duct ourselves and administer the affairs of the city as to prove 
worthy of the confidence bestowed npon us. Looking to the 
author of all good governments for His guidance and blessing, I 
pledge you, members of the city councils and fellow citizens, my 
untiring devotion to the high office which has been conferred 
upon me, and trust you will extend to me your sympathy and 
support in the administration. 

Respectfully, 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 

Mayor. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Board of Water Commissioners, 
1895. 



WILLIAM C. CLARKE, Mayor, ex officio. 
Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1899. 
Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1900. 
Harry E. Parker,* terra expires January, 1897. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1898. 
Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1901. 
Charles T. Means, term expires January, 1902. 



Officers. 



Alpheus Gay, President. 

Henry Chandler, Clerk. 

Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

Josiah Laselle, Engineer at Low Service Pumping Station. 

H. A. Donaway, Engineer at High Service Pumping Station. 

* Ex-Gov. James A. Weston died in May, 1S95, and Harry E. Parker was elected to fill 
the vacancy. 

46 



MANCHESTER WATER BOARD. 



MAYORS, ex officio. 

James A. Weston, 1871, 1874. 

P. C. Cheney, 1872. 

Charles H. Bartlett, John P. Newell, 1873. 

Alpheus Gay, 1875. 

Ira Cross, 1876-77. 

John L. Kelley, 1877-80. 

H. B. Putnam, 1881-84. 

George H. Stearns, 1885-86. 

John Hosley, 1887-88. 

D. B. Varney, 1889-90, 1894. 

E. J. Knowlton, 1891-94. 
Byron Worthen, 1894. 
William C. Clarke, 1895-96, 

COMMISSIONERS ELECTED BY ALDERMEN. 

E. A. Straw, 1871-75, died October 23, 1882. 
William P. Newell, 1871-85, died October 11, 1885. 
Aretas Blood, 1871-80. 
Alpheus Gay, 1871. 
Andrew C. Wallace, 187 1. 

E. W. Harrington, 1871-76, died July 11, 1876. 
James A. Weston, 1875-95, died May 8, 1895. 
J. Q. A. Sargent, 1876-80. 
Eben T. James, 1880-86. 

Edward H. Hobbs, 1880-90, died November 26, 1890. 
47 



48 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Joseph F. Kennard, 1885-92, died November 7, 1892. 
Henry Chandler, 1886. 
Charles H. Manning, 1890. 
Charles T. Means, 1892. 
Harry E. Parker, 1895. 

PRESIDENTS OF THE BOARD, 

E. A. Straw, 1871-75. 

Alpheus Gay, December 9, :i876, to date. 

CLERKS OF THE BOARD. 

Samuel N. Bell, 1871 to October 25, 1877. 
James A. Weston, 1877 to May, 1895. 
Henry Chandler, 1895 to date. 

Water Board elected by Mayor and Aldermen, August i, 1871. 
Water Board organized August 7, 1871. 

First meeting, E. A. Straw elected president, Samuel N. Bell» 
clerk. 

FIRST WATER BOARD. 

E. A. Straw, President. 

Samuel N. Bell, Clerk. 

James A. Weston, Mayor, ex officio. 
AVilliam P. Newell, Aretas Blood, 

Alpheus Gay, Andrew C. Wallace, 

E. W. Harrington. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners herewith 
submit their twenty-fourth annual report to your honorable body 
for the year ending December 31, 1895, with the report of the 
superintendent during the same period of time, to which refer- 
ence is made for the details of the service connected with this 
department. 

The receipts and expenditures for the year have been as fol- 
lows : 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1894 . . 118,831.52 

Received from water rentals and miscellaneous . 118,374.50 

Received from bonds sold ..... 50,000.00 



Total . • $187,206.02 

Paid interest on water bonds . . ^42,620.00 

current expenses and repairs . 35-5°^-93 

construction .... 50,565.08 

hydrant rentals set aside for 

sinking fund . . . 15,800.00 



Total expenditures .... $144,486.01 



Balance unexpended ...... $42,720.01 

The premium received by the city on $150,000 of water bonds 
sold in 1895, amounting to $9,867.56, has not been credited to 
the Water-Works department. 

49 



50 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The late James A. Weston, whose death occurred May 8, 1896, 
who was an active and esteemed member of this board for more 
than twenty years, and who also realized the needs of a high ser- 
vice system, made a provision in his will bequeathing to the city 
the sum of ;^5,ooo, to be used in the construction of an ob- 
servatory on the summit of Oak Hill, to be called " The 
Weston Observatory," provided the city shall lay out said sum- 
mit of Oak Hill as a public park and comply with certain other 
provisions in his will, within three years after his decease. 

This location is near the site of the high service reservoir, and 
is also one of the most commanding in the city. 

Nearly one year having passed since his demise, we deem it 
not improper to call your attention to this matter and trust your 
honorable bodies will take such action as will secure for our citi- 
zens the benefits of this generous bequest. 

Acquiring possession of lands bordering on the shores of the 
5ake has been continued and about 6,200 lineal feet were secured 
during the year. 

Negotiations having failed in a few instances with landholders 
'in Hillsborough county, the city, under authority of law granted 
by the legislature, proceeded to condemn the land desired and 
called upon the county commissioners to assess the damage to 
landholders. 

The amount returned by them seemed so excessive that your 
■water commissioners rejected the awards. 

In the suit of the Devonshire Mills against the city, the parties 
have not yet agreed upon the referees to arbitrate the case. 
Respectfully submitted. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio, 
Alpheus Gay, 
Henry Chandler, 
Andrew C. Wallace, 
Charles H. Manning, 
Charles T. Means, 
Harry E. Parker, 

Water Commissioners. 
January i, 1896. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Hono7-able Board of Water Commissioners of the City of 
Manchester : 

The report of the superintendent for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1895, is herewith respectfully submitted : 

LAKE MASSABESIC. 

In the early part of the year, the water was very low, being 30 
inches below the dam January i. 

On February 22 it was 30^ inches belOw, which was the low- 
est point reached. The water in the old reservoir was so low 
that on January i the steam pumps began supplying water to the 
low service reservoir, by letting it run from the high service 
through the gate at the intersection of the Massabesic and Can- 
dia roads. 

February 27 we began pumping direct into the low service res- 
ervoir, the water being so low that the old pumps could not run 
more than seven hours out of the twenty-four. This was contin- 
ued until March 23, which was the last day that water was pumped 
by steam into the old reservoir. Today the water stands 20 
inches above the dam, 4 feet and 11 inches higher than last year 
at this time. 

The steam pumps saved a water famine to the city, which 
would have resulted last winter had not the steam pumps been in 
operation to assist the water power pumps. 

The pumps at the old station are working well. They have 
been painted and varnished, a new disc wheel put on the David- 
son pump, the old one having become disabled. The new wheel 

51 



52 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

was made in Brooklyn, N. Y., and was fitted to the shaft by ma- 
chinists from the Amoskeag corporation. The heating boiler 
was repaired and moved back from the wall, in order to more 
readily get at the flues when repairs are needed. The woodwork 
in the pump room has been shellaced; which while improving 
its appearance, preserves the wood. 

No repairs have been necessary at or about the old reservoir. 
The force and supply main appear to be in good condition ; 
still accidents may occur at any time. 

The following is the amount pumped at the old station : 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



53 



I— I 
o 

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(^ 

W 
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Ph 

an 

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.2 P « 

2 '"So . 
•£ » ftT* aj 

W >j3 at* 



-.T3A'B XllHQ 



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-Tunu iBjox 



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CC O --H^-rr lo ^^oi C-- rH 05 Ci -^ OS t 

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COOCOGOiCCiCOC. C:<M(M<XfCD(MiOO 

COcO-^i— irt^ClC-liOirscD -^Tj* -tt^O 



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3;rH—^ t--CDCO»i:50SOCOCOCDTj<C5000 
a5CD-*CDClCiQOOOl-^t-aoSoOiOCDO 



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54 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

THE NEW PUMPING STATION. 

The condition of the interior of the pump house receives favor- 
able commendation from all visitors. The pumps are doing their 
arduous work with apparent ease, and all the machinery is kept 
clean and shows attentive care. 

It was found that the barn which was first built was too 
small and a larger one has been constructed, sufficient in capac- 
ity to store the crops, tools, and other necessary paraphernalia 
which are required about the station. There has also been built 
a shed for the storage of wood and other purposes. 

A large amount of work has been done outside of the station 
in cutting the wood, removing the stumps, fertilizing the land 
and getting it in condition for garden and lawn purposes. Fruit 
trees have been set, ditches dug, stone walls built, and the fields, 
sub-divided by a wood fence. 

This pumping station is in a very desirable location, and when 
the grounds are properly graded and seeded down, a labor which 
will be performed by the engineer and his assistant when the 
pumps are idle, will be one of the most attractive pumping sta- 
tions in New England. 

Mr. H. A. Donaway, the engineer who has charge of the 
pumps and grounds, gives satisfaction and is to be commended 
for the efficient manner in which he is executing the work neces- 
sary to be performed there. 

The amount pumped by steam for the year 1895 is 214,271,720. 
gallons, as will be seen by the following table : 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



55 



CO 

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~ X O 35- ■ 

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M«5 



56 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

THE NEW RESERVOIR. 

The Weston reservoir seems to be perfectly water-tight and 
proves to be of first class construction. As a rule, reservoirs 
built in a ledge are quite likely to leak, but this shows no sign 
of water waste. 

A fence has been built around the reservoir as a safeguard 
against accidents as well as to prevent intrusion by animals. 

Loam has been put upon the ground inside this fence but none 
upon the slopes. It is important that something should be done 
in the spring to prevent the washing of the slopes, either by sod- 
ding or seeding. 

A driveway has been finished from Bridge street to the west 
side of the reservoir and a temporary road built to the top of the 
hill at the proposed site of the Weston tower. The gate house 
is built from stone taken from the excavation for the reservoir, 
with the exception of the trimmings, which are of cut granite 
from the Bodwell ledge. 

This structure is pronounced by good judges of this class of 
work to be the best of its kind outside of Boston. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



57 



The following table shows the rainfall at high service pumping 
station for 1895. 



Day. 


p 

si 

1-5 


® 


1 


P. 
< 


^ 

g 


a 




4^ 

a 

< 


« 

a 
4-> 

p. 

(/3 


I" 







r4 

a 

t> 


!2i 





1.... 






.02 
.42 


.11 




.07 


.32 








1.48 
*.53 








.04 


.05 






44 


■3 




*.17 
.26 





.08 






'4 




*.ll 
.04 


**!46" 


.02 
.07 

.28 


.ii 










6 




.03 


".'36' 










16 

lb ....... 


*.45 
.11 










* 63 




'*'.3d 


*.23 
.39 






.30 










8 


.07 
.64 
.27 










.17 






9 




.05 




.87 






.09 
.21 




10 


*.14 
.09 








.15 
.17 
.49 


".'35 

2.84 
1.30 




11 
















12 








.58 






.39 

.31 






13 


*.07 






1.64 

1.22 

.21 

.04 


.05 


.66 
.04 


".06' 

1.74 




14 




1.02 




15 






.20 


.11 








16 


*.30 




*.10 


.08 










17 






.02 


.51 
.22 




18 






*.04 




.05 






1.58 


.03 




19 












20 






















.11 
.23 




21 
























22 


.41 






.03 




.11 


.15 








S" 


23 












*.03 
.15 
.28 
.51 
.09 




24 






.02 
.27 


















25 










.23 












26 


*.62 






.20 

1.88 
.03 






.42 






27 






.05 


.64 
.38 
.14 
.07 






53 


28 




*.29 


1.34 

■ ■ .'78' 






.41 




29 ... 


.03 




.06 

"■;32' 








30 




.07 


.51 




1.02 








31 










1 10 




























2.22 


.58 


3.26 


5.22 


3.02 


2.24 


4.61 


3.18 


2.28 


5.09 


6. 84 


3.52 



*Snow melted. 

Total rainfall, 1895,. 42.06 inches. 



58 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPE. 

There have been about 44 miles of extension laid and 3 miles 
of cement pipe taken out and relaid with cast iron. 

A lo-inch pipe was laid in Maple street, from Bridge street 
north to Harrison street. 

This is on the high service system and supplies water on this 
street and all other streets east of Maple and north of Bridge. 
The high service runs down Myrtle to Beech, thence up Beech 
to Sagamore. It runs down to Walnut on Gore and Sagamore, 
and up Walnut to Webster, down Webster to Union, up Union 
to Appleton and Clarke, and from there to Elrn on both these 
streets. At the intersection of Elm and Appleton streets there is 
a gate on line with the south side of Appleton. 

The high service has also been extended north on Union to 
Carpenter street and south on Wilson and Taylor streets to Vin- 
ton street. 

A 14-inch pipe has been extended on Elm street 106 feet 
north of Thayer street, where we encountered a ledge. By the 
experience we have had on Sagamore street, where blasting was 
done in solid ledge for the sewer extension, it does not seem de- 
sirable to lay water pipe further north on Elm street, where it is 
all ledge cutting, until the sewer trench is cut through. Some 
arrangement should be made with the sewer department, 
whereby one ditch could be so constructed as to accommodate 
both the sewer and the water pipes. 

There have been a few bad breaks in the old cement pipe, but 
not much damage resulted. The cast iron pipes have leaked 
more than usual, on account of the pressure from the high ser- 
vice, where they did not leak under the low service pressure. 

Pipes have been extended on Auburn, Amherst, Bridge, Beech, 
Boynton road. Bell, Beacon, Byron, Belmont, Candia road, 
Clay, Concord, Dubuque, Elm, Grove, Green, Hosley, Green- 
wood avenue, Hall, Hay ward, Josselyn, Jones, Malvern, Maple, 
Manchester, Nelson, Putnam, Redmond, Ray, Schiller, Second, 
Stevens, Silver, Sagamore, Sullivan, Spruce, Summer, Somer- 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 59 

ville, Thornton, Taylor, Union, Vinton, Wilson, Weston, Went- 
worth, and Woodbine avenue, — 48 streets, about 4:]- miles, — 
the expense being $23,767. 

Pipes have been relaid in A street, Amherst, Arlington, Ash, 
Brook, Blodget, Birch, Chestnut, Concord, Depot, Granite, 
Main, Manchester, Maple, Myrtle, Mast, Milford, Pleasant, Pine, 
and Pearl, — about 3 miles, — at a cost of $13,618. 

Pipe lowered on account of grade, 394 feet on Baker street, 
272 feet on Gore street, 362 on Prospect, 200 on Milford, 260 
on Green, 125 on Carroll, 325 on Morrison, and 150 feet on 
Dubuque, 2,088 in all. 

HYDRANTS. 

We have set 40 new hydrants and taken out 10 old ones and 
replaced them with a better pattern. They required constant 
care last winter, the ground being frozen so deep. In some 
localities service pipes were frozen where laid five feet under 
ground. 

There have been laid 299 service pipes during the year, and a 
number of old ones taken out and relaid with new. We found 
old pipes filled with rust and in some instances rusted through. 
Experience proves that 25 years is as long as wrought iron ser- 
vice pipes will last in this city- 
There are now nearly 85 miles of pipe to be looked after and 
cared for, and about 15 miles of this is cement. This will have 
to be taken out by degrees and cast iron substituted in its place. 
We had at one time 27 miles of wrought iron and cement pipe, 
but by taking out a Ijttle every year it has been reduced to 15 
miles. 

The water takers have become so large in number that the old 
office was not of sufficient capacity to accommodate those people 
who waited until the last day of grace, the 20th of the month 
before paying their water bills. It was, therefore, deemed advis- 
able to enlarge the office by removing the partition and taking 
in the room west of it, giving two entrances, so that customers 
can come in at one door and go out at the other withQut discom- 
moding them as under the old arrangement. 



60 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

It also gives access to the fire proof safe, where are stored the 
books and papers which are valuable and it is necessary to 
preserve. 

In concluding this report, the superintendent will state that 
the works have been run with as little trouble or friction as in 
any year since he took charge* of the same. There has been 
very little damage resulting from water breaks, and no serious 
accident has occurred to the working force of the system, 
although a large amount of labor has been performed during the 
year. 

The income from sale of water for 1895 has been as follows: 

Received for water by rate . . ^32,903.99 

for water by meter . . 67,465.90 

for building purposes . . 808.20 

from fines .... 300.40 

$101,478.49 

Received for hydrant rent .... . $15,800.00 

Received for old cement pipe . . $106.00 

for labor and pipe sold . 104.87 

from Rimmon Manufactur- 
ing Co., 6-inch pipe . 37'25 

from Redman & Eaton Man- 
ufacturing Co., 6-inch pipe 143-45 

from South Manchester Man- 
ufacturing Co., 6-inch pipe 69.35 

from Eaton Heights Shoe 

Co., 4-inch gate . . 15-00 

from J. A. Weston, 6-inch 

pipe .... 60.47 

from Sacred Heart Hospital, 

4-inch pipe . . . 30-30 

from J. B. McCrillis & Son, 

4-inch pipe . . . 53' 10 



BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 61 

Received from St. George's church, for 

2-inch pipe . . . $19-5 7 

from city, for 2-inch pipe 

and valves . . . 128.81 



17 



from Chas. Spofford, for hay ^40.00 

from Chas. Spofford, for rent 

(Camfield building) . 12.00 

from W. G. Brown, rent on 

Cochrane building . . 30.00 

from grange, for rent of hall 50.00 

from G. G. Griffin, for lease i.oo 

from Fletcher Brown, for 

lease .... i.oo 

from Evans & Rice, for test- 
ing machine . . . 75 00 

from Annis Grain Co., for 
lumber .... 58.84 

from S. G. Prescott, for rent 60.00 



;27.84 



Total receipts . ... . . $118,374.50 

Abatements, $517.37. 

Amount on hand Dec. 31, 1894. . $18,831.52 

received from water bonds . 50,000.00 

rents . 102,574.50 

hydrant rentals 15,800.00 



Total receipts, 1895 .... $187,206.02 

Amount paid for current expenses . $35,500.93 

construction expenses 50,565.08 

Interest on bonds, 1895 . . . 42,620.00 
Hydrant rentals set aside for sinking 

fund 15,800.00 



Total expenditures, 1895 .... $144,486.01 



Balance on hand December 3:, 1895 • $42,720.01 



62 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The premium on water bonds sold in 

1893, amount ^200,000, was .... ^6,090.00 

1894, amount, $50,000, was .... 2,395.00 
July, 1895, amount $100,000, was . . . 6,265.00 
December, 1895, amount $50,000, was . . 3,602.56 

Total $18,352.56 

This amount has not been credited to the water-works depart- 
ment as it should have been, but has been used by the city for 
other purposes. 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1 895. 

Superintendence, repairs, and renewals, $24,018.93 



Stationery and printing 




297.28 




Office and incidental expenses . 




4,676.01 




Pumping expenses, — low service 




2,548.36 




high service 




3>593-95 




Repairs to canal, dam, and reservoirs . 


15-03 




Repairs to buildings . 


895 


351-37 




Total current expenses for i 




^35.500.93 


Service pipes .... 




$4,282.55 




Distribution pipes 




22,592.69 




Fire hydrants and valves . 




2,265.78 




Meters ..... 




4,579-04 




Lands ..... 




12,372.00 




Pumping machinery and buildings 




1,552.61 




Reservoir ..... 




319-32 




Road to reservoir 




966.59 




Grading and fencing 




1,634.50 




Total construction expenses 


for 


1895 


$50,565.08 


Total expenses 


$86,066.01 


Sinking fund .... 


• 


• 


15,800.00 


Total .... 


$101, 866. 01 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



63 



Construction Expenses. 
Land and water rights . . ;g 103,209.00 



Dam, canal, penstock, and races 
Pumping machinery, pump houses, and 

buildings 
Distribution reservoir 
Force and supply main 
Distribution pipes 
Fire hydrants and valves 
Meters and fixtures 
Service pipes 
Grading and fencing 
Tools and fixtures 
Boarding and storehouses 
Roads and culverts . 
Supplies 
Engineering 

Livery and traveling expenses 
Legal expenses . 



101,399.16 

174,794-77 

117,697.90 

89,769.02 

547,795-05 
56,274.07 

46,835.72 

65,026.35 

15,222.76 

10,649.35 

919.36 

4,405.20 

550-39 
22,176.19 

2,856.64 
563-79 



Total construction to Dec. 31, 1895 • • ^^,360,144.72 
Cuj'rent Expenses. 
Superintendence, collecting, repairs, ^251,782.83 



Stationery and printing 
Office and incidental expenses . 
Pumping expenses at low service 
high service 
Repairs to buildings . 
Repairs to dam, canal, races, and res 
ervoir ..... 



6,708.76 
28,077.69 

49-505-04 
6,189.32 

3.170-73 
4,824.52 



Total current expenses to Dec. 31, 1895 

Interest ...... ^40,678.51 

Highway expenditures . . . 14,000.53 



5350,258.89 

$54,679.04 



Total amount of bills approved to date . $1,765,082.65 



64 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Interest, discount, and labor performed 
on highways, transfers, and tools and 
materials sold .... $65,090.55 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1895 . 350,258.89 



^I5)349•44 



Total cost, exclusive of interest and current 

expenses ^1,349,733.21 

Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 1894, $758,834.5 1 
for 1895 .... 42,620.00 

Total interest and discount to Dec. 31, '95 $801,454.51 

Amount paid toward interest to Dec. 

31, 1894 .... $616,636.00 

Amount paid toward interest in 1895 . 42,620.00 

), 256.00. 



100,000' 

100,000 

100,00a 
100,000 

100,000 

100,000- 

100,00a 

50,00a 

100,000 



AMOUNT OF WATER BONDS ISSUED TO DECEMBER 3I, 1895. 

Issued January i, 1872, rate 6 per cent, due January 

I, 1897 

Issued January i, 1872, rate 6 per cent, due January 

I, 1902 ........ 

Issued January i, 1887, rate 4 per cent, due January 

I, 1907 

Issued July i, 1890, rate 4 per cent, due July i, 1910 
Issued January i, 1892, rate 4 per cent, due January 

I, 191° 

Issued August i, 1893, rate 5 per cent, due August 

I, 1913 

Issued November i, 1893, rate 4^ per cent, due No- 
vember I, 1913 ....... 

Issued October i, 1894, rate 4 per cent, due October 

1, 1914 

Issued July i, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due July i, 1915 
Issued December 16, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due De- 
cember 16, 1915 



50,000 



Total . 



)oo,ooa 



BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



65 







jj 


6 




gM . 




<o i> 


TJ SB 


CO 






s 




s 


■2 a to 

OJ'C O 




ftSo 




of 






OS 






>-< a 








'^ !5 


o 


a 
o 






3 


"U - S 


00 


o3 cj ^^ 


S.^ to 


s 


1872 


.$573.61 

2,097.60 

32,154.07 












$573.61 
200.07 
699.85 






1873 


i 


$l",692.'69 

7,987.27 


' '$190.84 
1,436.56 




'$14.66 

104.18 




8 

98 


1874 


( $22,425 00 


'$ii9.io 




1875 


27,119.15 


13,095.00 


10,292.13 


3,348.11 


122.13 


120.59 


2,245.64 




160 


1876 


38,879.47 


16,320.00 


16,192.03 


6,305.81 


72.32 


180.16 


249.55 




166 


1877 


43,823.30 


17,475.00 


18,064.51 


7,783.09 


136.10 


233.04 


131.56 




202 


1878 


48,874.26 


17,970.00 


20,255.97 


10,090.25 


83.60 


232.82 


241.62 




226 


1879 


53,143.17 


18,165.00 


21,610.13 


12,732.93 


81.60 


240.64 


303.87 




251 


1880 


57,655.25 


18,300.00 


23,795.96 


14,794.34 


79.50 


210.39 


465.06 


'$10.66 


280 


1881 


60,215 62 


18,780.00 


25,336.18 


15,554.98 


105.60 


223.99 


203.87 


11.00 


SIO' 


1882 


67,630 13 


20,130.00 


26,803.06 


19,898.69 


146.65 


197.49 


443.24 


11.00 


371 


1888 


73,458.20 


20,520.00 


28,838.24 


23,431.20 


314.65 


208.04 


125.07 


21.00 


404 


1884 


75,.5S0.08 


21,350.(10 


31,724.07 


21,329.75 


195.10 


231.96 


738.20 


11.00 


446 


1885 


80,404.12 


18,900.00 


33,597.02 


27,425.35 


102.50 


186.80 


181.45 


11.00 


486 


1886 


75,129.99 


19,750.00 


33,062.11 


21,573.45 


287.40 


130.80 


320.23 


6.00 


613 


1887 


S0,.518.17 


20,437.50 


33,497.21 


25,277.09 


351.70 


119.20 


819.47 


16.00 


739 


1888 


85,643.82 


21,000.00 


33,864.78 


29,8.38.82 


543.80 


149.80 


243.62 


3.00 


842 


1889 


86,700.46 


18,240.00 


34,140.99 


33,596.05 


361.95 


153.20 


205.27 


53.00 


951 


1890 


90,463.37 


19,880.00 


32,431.10 


37,009.80 


649.90 


151.80 


298.77 


42.00 


1,135 


1891 


76,605.23 


4,590.00 


30,588.79 


40,479.25 


494.80 


160.40 


200.99 


91.00 


1,313 


1892 


83,474.79 


5,000.00 


31,344.24 


46,139.35 


416.00 


168.40 


139.80 


267.00 


1,608 


1893 


104,170.08 


12,750.00 


32,60359 


.58,103.20 


1,033.75 


159.60 


339.38 


180.56 


1,89.5 


1894 


110,210 29 


13,925.00 


32,176.28 


62,.501.35 


697.80 


227.40 


334.82 


347.64 


2,182 


1895 


118,374.50 


15,800.00 


32,90399 


67,465.90 


808.20 


300.40 


768.17 


154.00 


2,520 



1878, meter rate was changed. 1884, hydrant rates reduced. 1886, meter 
and other rates reduced. 1889, hydrant rates reduced. 1891 and 1892, re- 
ceived only part of hydrant rent, and nothing from water-troughs or street 
sprinklers. 1893, hydrant rent and water-closets rate reduced. 

The following amounts have been paid over to the city treas- 
urer, and credited to the water-works : 

1872, supplies and materials sold . . . ^573-6i 

1873, supplies and materials sold ■ • • i77-o7 
accrued interest on water bonds sold . . 193-26 
accrued interest on state bonds sold . . 146.00 
water rents ...... 1,920.53 

1874, supplies and materials sold ... 607.89 
March 12, highway expenditures, transferred 

from water account .... 14,000.55 

March 17, interest and discount transferred 

from water account .... 12,347.25 



m 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1874, September i, interest and discount trans 

far red from water account 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 
December 29, interest transferred 
1S75, December 18, one anvil sold 

September 25, engine, crusher, and material 

sold .... 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1876, May 20, derrick sold 
May 20, rent of derrick . 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1877, water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1875, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
old plow sold . 

1879, derrick sold 

May 29, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
1S80, water and hydrant rent, etc. 

sale of grass 

level, transit, etc. 
e88i, water and hydrant rent, etc. 

sale of grass 

derrick .... 

received of G. G. Griffin . 

1882, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
received of G. G. Griffin . 

of James Baldwin & C 
for the sale of grass 
from Goodhue & Birnie 
for old plank 
for use of derrick 

1883, received of G. G. Griffin . 

for sale of grass . 

for water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1884, received of G. G. Griffin . 

for stone 

from sale of grass 



522,361.74 

30=233.54 

4.566.25 

15.C0 

2,089.45 
27,119.15 
125.00 
24.00 
38^879.47 
43)823.30 
48,873.26 

I. GO 

75.00 

53,068.17 

57»395-25 

10.00 

250.00 

60,154.62 

10.00 

50.00 

1. 00 

67,403.76 

1. 00 

175.00 

10.00 

24.37 

1. 00 

15.00 

1. 00 

20.00 

73>437-20 

1. 00 

5.00 

10.00 



BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 



67 



1884, received from pipe sold and labor 

for water and hydrant rent 

1885, received from G. G. 'Griffin 

of B. P. Kimball, for grass 
for labor and pipe sold 
for water and hydrant rent 

1886, received from G. G. Griffin 

of B. P. Kimball, for grass 

for wood 

for labor and pipe 

for water and hydrant rent 

1887, received for labpr and pipe 

of G. G. Griffin . 

C. C. Cole . 

of B. P. Kimball, for grass 

of A. J. Crombie, for grass 

of A. Goodwin, for poles 

of W. G. Brown . 

of T. H. Risdon & Co., for freight 

for water and hydrant rent 

1888, received for labor and pipe 

of G. G. Griffin . 

of George P. Clark 

of R. D. Wood & Co., gear 

for water and hydrant rent 

1889, received for labor and pipe 

of G. G. Griffin . 
of B. P. Kimball, for grass 
of W. G. Brown, for rent 
of James Baldwin, for pipe 
of Mr. Clement, for pipe 
for water and hydrant rent 

1890, received of G. G. Griffin, lease. 

of Fletcher Brown, lease 
of George P. Clark, lease 
of B. P. Kimball, for grass 



$616.20 

74,947-88 

1. 00 

10.00 

13-45 
80,379.67 

I CO 

5.00 

37.80 

282.43 

74,803.76 

768.86 

I. CO 

•50 

10.00 

5.00 

10. CO 

25 CO 

15. II 

79,682.70 

227.33 

I. CO 

2.00 
16.29 

85,397-20 

89.77 

1. 00 
2.00 

50.00 

65. CO 

•50 

86,492.19 

I. CO 

1. 00 

2. CO 

2.00 



68 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1890, received of W. G. Brown, for rent . 

of N. W. Ellis & Co., for pipe 
of J. H. Dearborn, for pipe 
for water and hydrant rent . 

1 89 1, received for water and hydrant rent 

for labor and pipe sold 
of G. G. Griffin, lease . 
of Fletcher Brown, lease 
of W. G. Brown, rent . 
of Mr. Prescott, rent . 
of William Bryant, rent 
of B. P. Kimball, grass 
of G. W. Reed, grass . 
of C. H. Patten, grass . 

1892, received for water and hydrant rent 

for labor and pipe sold 

of T. C. Pratt, for house 

for cement-lined pipe . 

of Grange, for rent 

of William Prescott, for bar 

for potatoes 

tor cutting ice 

of W. G. Brown, rent. 

of G. G. Griffin, lease 

of F. Brown, lease 

of H. N. Hall, use of pasture 

of C. F. Whittemore, grass 

of Charles Reed, grass 

of G. S. Patten, grass . 

of G. G. Prescott, rent 

1893, received from water rents . 

for labor and pipe sold 

for old cement pipe 

from Queen City Co., laying 

pipe 
from Elliott Mfg. Co., laying 

pipe 



6-inch 



6-inch 



^36.00 

i53-oc> 

3540 

90,232.97 

76,313-24 
200.99 

I.OO 

1. 00 

21.00 

50.00 

8.00 
2.00 

5.00 

3.00 

83,067.99 

45-55 
100.00 

94-25 
50.00 
15.00 
4.00 
10.00 
21.00 

I.OO 
I.OO 

20.00 

4.00 

4.00 

7.00 

30.00 

90,900.14 

72.88 
73-50 

35-00 
50.00 



BOAKD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



69 



1893, ref^eived from Kimball Carriage Co., laying 

6-inch pipe 
from Dana & Provost, laying i 

inch pipe .... 
from E. C. Blanchard, repairin 

hydrant .... 
from G. G. Griffin, lease 
from F. Brown, lease . 
for grass on Smith land 
for grass on Neal land . 
for grass on Mills land . 
for molasses .... 
for use of hall by Grange 
from W. G. Brown, house rent 
from S. G. Prescott, house rent 
for cutting ice , 

1894, received from water rents . 

for labor and pipe sold 

for old cement pipe 

for laying 4-inch main to Kennard 

block .... 
for laying 3-inch main to Cilley 

block .... 
for pipe and castings from J. A 

Weston .... 
for pipe and castings from Amos 

keag corporation 
of G. G. Griffin, lease . 
of F. Brown, lease 
of S. G. Prescott, for old house 
of S. G. Prescott, rent of store 
of Grange, for ball 
of W. G. Brown, rent of Cochran 

residence .... 
of E. C. Camfield, rent 
of Charles Read, for grass 



^51.00 

32.00 

25.00 

1. 00 

1. 00 

5.00 

3.00 

4.00 

16.56 

50.00 

30.00 

60.00 

10.00 

95,602.83 

35-86 

90.00 

30.00 

22.90 

109.90 

46.16 

1. 00 

1. 00 

100.00 

90.00 

50.00 

36.00 

36.00 

3-39 



70 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1894, received of C. F. Whittemore, for grass on 

Mills land .... 
of A. D. Savory, for grass on Smith 

land ..... 

of Bartholomew, for grass on Neal 

land ..... 

of J. T. Gott, for grass at reservoir 
for apples ..... 
of Sarah Gilbert, for grass on 

Brown land .... 

1895, received from water rents • • • • 

for labor and pipe sold 

for old cement pipe 

of Rimmon Mfg. Co., 6-inch pipe . 

of Redman Eaton Co., 6-inch pipe 

of So. Manchester Co., 6-inch pipe 

of Eaton Heights Co., 4 gates 

of J. A. Weston, 6-inch pipe 

of Sacred Heart Hospital, 4-inch 

pipe .... 

of J. B. McCrillis & Son, 4-inch 

pipe . . . 

of St. George's church, 2-inch pipe 
of city, 2-inch pipe 
of S. G. Prescott, rent . 
of Auburn Grange, rent 
of Charles Spofford, rent (Camfield) 
of Charles Spofford, hay 
of Annis Grain Co., lumber . 
of F. Brown, lease 
of G. G. Griffin, lease . 
of Rice & Evans, testing machine 
of W. G. Brown, rent (Cochran) 

Total received for water to date 



^4-00 

5.00 

7.00 
S.oo 
3.00 

3-25 

101,478.49 

104.87 

106.00 

37-25 

143-45 

69-35 

15.00 

60.47 

3o-3<> 

53-1^ 

19-57 

128.81 

60. OO' 

50.00 

12.00 
40.00 

58.84 

1. 00 
1.00 

75.0Q 

30.00 

$1,584,979.57 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 71 

$940,000.00 



Amount appropriated to date 

Amount of bills approved to date 

Amount paid toward interest 

Amount on hand December 31, i; 

SERVICE PIPES. 



$2,524,979.57 
1,765,082.65 

§759,896.92- 
659,256.00. 

$100,640.92: 



Forty-seven hundred and fifty-nine (4,759) service pipes have 
been laid to date, as follows : 

32 ^-inch diameter 
1,666 ^-inch diameter 
2,929 i-inch diameter 

22 i^^-inch diameter 

24 I ^ -inch diameter 

64 2-inch diameter 
I 2^ -inch diameter 

5 3-inch diameter 
10 4-inch diameter 

6 6-inch pipe . 

Total length of service pipe 
Number miles service pipe, 23.19. 

METERS. ' 

The number of meters set during the year has been three hun- 
dred and forty (340). 

Total number of meters now in use, twenty-five hundred and 
twenty (2,520). 

The number of applications for water has been three hundred 
and five (305). 

Total number of applications to date, 4,935. 

Two hundred and ninety-nine (299) service pipes have been 
laid this year, as follows : 



7 1 1.6 feet 


43-573-S 




73.973-6 




893-5 




736.2 




2,136.7 




57-0 




89.8 




269.5 




122,441.7 


feet. 



72 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

289 i-inch diameter ...... 7,103.6 feet 

I ii/^-inch diameter . . . . . 17.0 " 

9 2-mch diameter ...... 108.0 " 

1 4-inch diameter, for fire sprinklers. 

2 6-inch diameter, for fire sprinklers. 



SERVICE PIPES RELAID. 

I i4-inch diameter ii.o feet to i -inch diameter 

39 ^ " " 1,021.2 " to I " " 

I ^4 " '* 33-7 " to 2 " 

91" " 276.0 " to I " " 



1. 341. 9 feet 
14 *' " changed to 6-inch cast iron. 

14" " " to 4 " '' 



7: 


,228.6 feet 




II.O 


feet 




995-3 


11 




330 


(I 




221.2 


(< 


I 


,260.5 


feet 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



73 



The following streets are where cement-lined pipe was taken 
up ?nd r?st-iron laid. 



Streets. 


Length 


IN Feet. 


Location. 


14 in 


10 in. 


8 in. 


6 in. 


jV 








61 
290 

1402 

50 

44 

1481 

2894 

927 

14S1 

150 

61 

1205 

9C0 
23 


Corner Main. 










Elm to Vine (to 8 in.). 
Corner Vine 
















Maple to Ashland. 
Corner Bridge. 


Ash 


















Blodget 








Elm to Union. 




















Elm to Pine (to 8 in.). 
Elm to Union. 










Chestnut 








North of Lowell. 
Corner Bridge. 












480 


1 








Turner to Main (to 10 in.). 
West side of Main 












729 










t") 
152 
360 
316 

38i 
580" 
202 
638 

63 
690 

"'28' 
59 


Lincoln to Wilson 








Pine eastward. 








Chestnut to Pine cto 8 in.). 


















Bridge to Pearl (to 10 in.). 


Mast • • ■ • 








Bowman to Mrs Head's 


Milf oi-d 














j 


Beech to Maple. 
Corner Maple. 
Canal to Franklin. 


Pearl 




1 






1 


Pine 






60 


Corner Bridge. 
Corner Main, 
















Corner Elm. 














4S0 


729 


60 
1577 


14765J 
1577 












Oranite and Maple 6 to 
10 inch 


480 


729 
1216 


1637 


131S8J 
1216 












480 


1945 


1637 


11972J 





Total feet relaid, 16,0345, or 3.36S miles. 

6-inch gate on west side of Main, corner Granite, taken out. 

6-inch gate on east side of Main, corner Granite, taken out. 

6-inch gate on Maple, corner Bridge, taken out. 

6-inch gate on Maple, corner Pearl, taken out. 



74 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



75 



% 
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North of Grove. 

East of .Jewett. 

North of Nelson. 

South of Byron. 

Corner Granite. 

South of Bridge. 

Ea.st of Milton. 

Corner Lincoln. 

Pearl to Harrison. 

Corner Maple. 

West of Alanimoth road. 

Corner Maple. 

Corner Maple. 

Corner Bridge. 

Corner Franklin. 

Corner Maple. 

West of Main. 

South of Clark. 

North of Kelly. 

East of Walnut. 

Second to Wentworth. 

South of Schiller. 

To Hall. 

Beech to Union. 

East of Canton. 

South of Baker. 

West of Thornton. 

Corner Wilson. 

No. 173 to Vinton. 

South of Sullivan. 

South of Brook. 

Opposite G. A. Campbell's, 


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Main, North 

I\l;il\ern 

IManchester 

Manchester 

Maple. 

Myrtle 

Nelson 

Orange 

Pearl 

Pine 

Pleasant 

Prospect 

Putnam 

Ray . 


Sagamore 

Scliiller 

Second.. 

Silver 

Somerville 




3 . 
: c 


'S ; '. 

^^2 
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76 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 






'^ 

CO 

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-91 





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North of E. A. Jones's. 
East of Taylor. 
Corner Union. 
South of Lowell. 
North of Schiller. 
Spruce to silk mill. 
North of Candia road. 




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BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 77 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN 1 895. 

Amherst, corner Beacon and corner Elm. 

Auburn, corner Hall and corner Wilson. 

Bell, corner Wilson. 

Boynton, near Bedford line. 

Bridge, corner Elm, corner Beacon, corner Weston, and cor- 
ner Highland. 

Clay, corner Wilson and corner Hall. 

Concord, corner Ash and opposite No. 276. 

Depot, west of Franklin. 

Granite, at Barr & Clapp block. 

Hayward, east of schoolhouse. 

Josselyn, near Josselyn shop. 

Manchester, corner Milton. 

Nelson, corner Hall road and corner Jones. 

Ray, corner Clark and near O. Green's residence. 

Sagamore, corner Beech, corner Ash, corner Maple, and cor- 
ner Oak. 

Schiller, corner Wentworth. 

Second, corner Harvel. 

Silver, corner Hall. 

Sullivan, corner Whipple. 

Summer, corner Wilson. 

Taylor, opposite Quincy Young's residence and corner Vinton. 

Union, opposite E. A. Jones's residence, opposite Mrs. Camp- 
bell's residence, and near Dr. Campbell's residence. 

Vinton, opposite R. P. Stevens's residence. 

Wentworth, corner Bell. 

Woodbine, corner Longwood. 



78 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



P5 
O 

p 

o 



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CO 



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a 

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1694 
1556 
1458 
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1496 
1099 

768 


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Length and size of cement-lined pipe laid. 


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6738 
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Ashland 

Aubnrn 

Baker 


>> 

s 


Beacon 

Bedford 

Beech 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



79 



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80 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



P5 

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590 

806 
1099 
713 
490 
231 
1200 


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Dearborn 

Depot 


B 
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£ 




Everett 

Foster avenue 


Glenwood 

Gore 


9 £ 

1 s 

o o 


■• a 

a 
t 

o 



BOARD OP WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



CO-HCOIOlNOOMOS 



CO • »H CO rt CJ 05 



eo-^i-iO-HTifcoco 



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886 
871 
1181 
2657 
32 
2182 
151U 
4426 

1040 
731 
532 

527 
220 
539 

25 

2280 

427 

2540 




1 ; ^ : 


::::!::::? 








; 53 2 

C<1 




































: : S : : 












0^ • • • 

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2645 
1525 

25 




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rvard 

sel 

'h 

'hland Park . . . 

lis 

sley 

i-ett 


c 
> 


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ce avenue 

gdon 

rel 






fed M 



82 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Pi 
W 
CQ 

O 

Q 

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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



83 



-* "J" tC ■* r-1 (N 



M to — « CO IC rr 



i-ioot-i(NMf-'*cor-iOi-' — CO -e^mco -co 



548 
81 
1107 
547 
3150 
37 
1053 
1570 
24S8 

727 
318 

2832 
300 
484 

1742 
275 
711 

3517 

1001 

53 


1919 
800 

1012 
49G7 






• \ 
















53 








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; • 00 • 






























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t road ' 

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lard avenue. 

nacook 

I 


1 1 1 


ion 

ta 

sr 




9 



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84 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



sj 



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O 



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P 

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•BiUBJp^H 


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4854 
26 

799 

325 
1166 
4755 
5938 

217 
39 

466 
2120 

695 

3338 

10 

337 


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Stark 

State 


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Washington 

Water 

Webster 

Weston 

Wilson 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



85 



^r5(N eo(N -.-cot- • -cic-j -.-i-hco — to 








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404 
1212 
1388 

836 

410 

525 

10 

27 
47 
606 

18 

517 

3579 

48 

1036 

1573 

835 

2287 








14 
2312 
2836 

1801 


05 O 

■ s § 






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/illow 

i^oodbine 

t'^oodland avenue. 


(5 : 

a : 

a 

m '. ^ 

" £ : J 

a • c 


I.sace 

imory (north) . . . 
Ltnory (south)- • • • 

5 

!arr 

iaitlett . . 

iath 

teauport 

isinarck 


o 

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&:&:&?- 



86 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



■siaBjp^U I '^ "^ 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



87 



Tjl ■ CS • (N 



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^ y-^ 1-t C* -co i-> S* rt 



MCN-^i-liqcONi-iMCJ 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



•s^acjp^H 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



89 





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^ 60 - 



90 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1895. 



Size. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


1 Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates- 


20-incli diameter 


20,560 feet. 


24,486 feet. 


is 


14-inch diameter 


5,645 " 


9,296 " 


13 


12-incli diameter 


7,444 " 


20,496 " 


30 


10-inch diameter.. .. 


779 " 


20,207 " 


:5<> 


S-inch diameter 


5,190 " 


49,587 " 


76 


6-inch diameter 


35,427 " 


221,941 " 


532 


4-incli diameter 


2,644 " 


17,537 " 


57 




77,689 feet. 


369,550 feet. 


705 



Cement-lined pipe in use . 
Cast-iron pipe in use . 

Total pipe 

672 hydrants. 
765 gates. 
13 air valves. 



14.713 miles. 
69.990 " 



84. 703 miles. 



CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superintendetii. 



Uses for which Water is Supplied. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



I Jail. 
27 Churches. 

1 Court house. 

9 Hose companies. 
6 Fire engines. 

2 Hook-and-ladder. 

2 Opera houses. 

3 Convents. 

4 City hospitals. 



4 Cemeteries. 

I Orphanage. ' 

I Postoffice. 

I City library. 

6 Banks. 

9 Hotels. 

I Masonic Hall. 

I Odd Fellows' Hall. 

7, Halls. 



BOAKD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



91 



2 Old Ladies' Homes. 
I Soldiers' monument. 

1 Turner Hall. 
4 Fountains. 

2 Trust companies. 
I City farm. 

3 Depots. 



32 Schoolhouses. 
I Battery building. 
I Skating-rink. 
I Kitchen. 
I Wardroom. 

1 Gymnasium. 

2 Police stations. 



MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 



I Hosiery mill. 

1 Silver-plating. 

2 Iron foundries. 
2 Dyehouses. 

t; Machine shops. 

6 Clothing manufactories. 

8 Harness shops. 
I Cornice works. 
I Brush shop. 

9 Carriage shops. 
12 Cigar factories. 

I Brass and copper foundry, 
I Locomotive works. 
I Gristmill. 
I Silk-mill. 



3 Granite works. 

2 Electric light stations. 

4 Sash and blind shops. 
I Brewery. 

6 Shoeshops. 

I Gas works. 

4 Slaughter houses. 

I Soap factory. 

4 Needle manufactories. 

6 Beer-bottling. 

3 Book binderies. 

1 Paper-mill. 

2 Box- makers. 

I Paper-box manufactory, 



MARKETS. 



6 Fish. 
12 Meat and fish. 



21 Livery. 
I Electric railroad. 



18 Dentists. 
I Telephone. 

1 Telegraph. 

2 Express. 



Meat (wholesale). 



STABLES. 

1,065 Private. 



OFFICES. 



14 Printing. 
I Gas. 
17 Coal. 



92 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SHOPS. 



50 Barber. 

9 Wheelwright. 
18 Blacksmith. 

8 Carpenter. 

2 Tinsmith. 

I Copper. 



4 Auction. 
34 Drug. 
22 Jewelry. 

I Fur. 

3 House-Furnishing goods. 
20 Fancy goods. 
I Wholesale paper. 

5 Wholesale produce. 
24 Dry goods. 

12 Candy. 

I Cloak. 
16 Millinery. 

3 Tea. 

9 Furniture. 

I Wholesale grocer. 



3 Currying. 
19 Plumber and gas and water 

pipe. 
14 Paint. 

3 Gunsmith. 



STORES. 



107 Grocery. 

6 Meal. 

3 Hardware. 
34 Boot and Shoe. 
1 1 Stove. 
17 Gents' furnishing goods. 

7 Book. 

I Leather and shoe-finders. 

3 Music. 

3 Upholstery. 

9 Undertakers. 

5 Sewing-machine. 

I Feather-cleaner. 

I Rubber. 



18 Dining. 
7 Billiard. 



6 Clubrooms. 

3 Bleacheries. 
23 Laundries. 

4 Icehouses. 

13 Photographers. 



SALOONS. 

65 Liquor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

9 Greenhouses. 
2 Band rooms. 
25 Bakeries. 
2 Waste. 
I Business college. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



93 



WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 



10,813 Families. 

145 Boarding-houses. 
14,403 Faucets. 
3,272 Wash-bowls. 
8,495 Water-closets. 

493 Wash-tubs. 
2,346 Bath-tubs. 
191 Urinals. 



3,114 Sill-cocks. 
672 Fire-hydrants. 
48 Stand-pipes. 
28 Watering-troughs. 
7 Drinking-fountains. 
2,407 Horses. 
134 Cattle. 

I Public urinal. 



Materials on Hand. 



8,300 feet 20 inch. 

3,400 feet 14 inch. 

2,950 feet 12 inch, 

720 feet 10 inch. 



2 double 6 on 20. 
4 double 6 on 12. 
2 double 8 on 12. 
I double 6 on 10. 
I double 6 on 14. 

1 double 4 on 4. 

2 double 4 on 6. 



2 20 inch. 
114 inch. 
112 inch. 
510 inch. 



BRANCHES. 



5,000 feet 8 inch. 

8,500 feet 6 inch. 

550 feet 4 inch. 



1 single 6 on 20. 

2 single 10 on 20. 
I single 12 on 14. 

3 single 6 on 10. 

1 single 8 on 8. 
17 single 6 on 6. 

7 single 6 on 12. 

2 single 10 on 10. 
I single 4 on 6. 

3 20-inch Y's. 



WHOLE SLEEVES. 



5 8 inch. 

8 6 inch. 

22 4 inch. 



94 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



4 8 inch. 

Four hydrants. 



REDUCERS. 



9 8 inch to 6 inch. 310 inch to 6 inch. 

5 10 inch to 8 inch. i 6 inch to 4 inch. 

TURNS. 

1 20 inch 1-16. 2 8 inch 1-4. 

2 ID inch 1-4. 4 6 inch 1-4. 
2 10 inch 1-8, 7 6 inch 1-8. 

RISERS. 

2 10 inch. 2 8 inch. 
4 6 inch. 

tiATES. 

1 12 inch. 10 6 inch. 

2 10 inch. 2 4 inch. 



REPORT 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To His Honor the Afayor and City Councils of the City of 

Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with the requirements of the 
last clause of section i, " Act establishing a Board of Street and 
Park Commissioners for the City of Manchester," that body sub- 
mits herewith its third annual report, comprising the transac- 
tions of the board for the year 1895. 

OFFICE. 

The last year has brought the usual amount of work, and the 
methods previously employed for tabulating work completed 
have been continued with satisfactory results. The facilities for 
clerical work have been greatly increased by the changes made 
in the city hall building, and the commission have two commo- 
dious offices well equipped for needs of the department. 

The time of all employed by the commissioners has been 
copied from the foreman's books each week and pay-rolls made 
up for the treasurer's use. One hundred ninety-two pay-rolls 
have been written during the year, for divisions 2, 10, and 7, in- 
cluding monthly pay-rolls for the outside divisions. Twenty- 
four divisions-of-labor sheets have been made out for use of city 

97 



.98 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



auditor, besides a typewritten summary of each monthly draft, 
which is carefully filed for reference. Over three hundred let- 
ters, statements, notices, orders, etc., have been typewritten and 
placed on file. Over nine hundred orders for supplies were 
issued to local dealers, and forty-seven orders given for concret- 
ing street crossings, etc. Forty-six permits to encumber were 
granted to contractors and others. Ten bonds were filled out 
and signed by those engaged on special contracts. A balance 
sheet .of appropriations was submitted each month and cash ac- 
count kept. Returns of all work done on sewers and streets, 
cesspools built, edge stone set or reset, arrival and delivery of all 
stock, srxh as brick, stone, sewer pipe, lumber, castings, were 
recorded and tabulated for the annual report. All requests and 
complaints received were recorded and reported, and the report 
of the work for the entire year compiled according to the city 
ordinance. 

The following gives the receipts and expenditures of the office 
for the past year : 



EXPENDITURES 



Commissioners' 


r. 

salaries . 


^\. r 11. i\ ij I L uPvco. 


^1,800.00 


Clerical services 






1,399-50 


Carriage allowance 




450.00 


Office supplies 






131-73 


Blank books . 






41.48 


Telephone 






20.00 


Incidentals 






71-45 


Total . 


^3,914.16 






RECEIPTS. 





Pipe 

Stone 
Old iron 



$88.Si 

5.00 

10.13 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



99 



Old boiler .... 
Old plank .... 

Less cash paid out for express, etc. 
Peposited with city treasurer . 



$75.00 
6.00 

$184.94 
• 7-7° 

$177.24 



Inventory of City Property. 

'Commissioners' ofifice, including typewriter, furni- 
ture, ofifice supplies ...... $394.66 

Division No. 2, including 16 horses, dump carts, 
sprinklers, snow plows, road-machine, tools, 
Carson trench machine complete, etc. . . 18,813.83 
City stable, storage shed, blacksmith shop, carpen- 
ter shop ........ 15,950.00 

Lot of land on Franklin street .... 89,312.0c 

Valuation of pipe on hand, city yard . . . 1,238.69 

Division No. i ...... . 7.00 

Division No, 4 ...... . 2.00 

Division No. 5 ...... . 36.07 

Division No. 6 ...... . 23.25 

Division No. 7 ...... . 72-30 

Division No. 8 ...... . 34-oo 

Division No. 9 . . . . . . . 22.00 

Division No. 10, including horses, road-machine, 

dump-carts, etc. ...... 1,466.20 

Stable and lot, division No. 10 . . . . 1.200.00 

Valuation of pipe on hand, division No. 10 . . 45-22 
•Commons, including horse lawn-mower, swings, 

seats, etc. ....... 32997 

Total ........ $128,947.19 



100 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Orders Received from City Government, with Date 
of Passage, 1895. 

ORDERS TO BUILD CERTAIN SEWERS. 

Sagamore, Walnut to Oak. 

Hevey, Conant street northerly, 300 feet. 

Boynton, present sewer southerly to McDuffie. 

Prince, Boynton to Huntress. 

McDufifie, Boynton to Huntress. 

Passed May 7. 

Elm, Monroe south l;)ack to Thayer. 

Alsace, Kelly to Columbus avenue. 

Joliette, Kelly to Amory. 

Amory, Joliette to Essex. 

Tilton, Milford to Bowman avenue. 

Mast, near Bowman, westerly. 

Christian brook, from Canal and Pennacook, easterly. 

Passed June 4. 

Union, from Clark to Trenton. 
Cedar, Maple easterly, 300 feet. 
Jewett, to Somerville, 900 feet. 
Somerville, Jewett westerly, 400 feet. 
Silver, Elm to Valley, to Lincoln and Silver. 

Passed July 2. 

Union east back street. Christian brook northerly, 500 feet. 

Union east back street. Christian brook southerly, 400 feet. 

Jewett, Somerville to Clay. 

Lowell, Belmont to Beacon. 

Beech, Sagamore north^ 175 feet. 

Prospect, Hall easterly, 100 feet. 

Hayward, Jewett easterly, 300 feel. 

Hall, Concord northerly, 180 feet. 

Union, Silver to Plumnier. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 101 

Wilton, Main westerly, 150 feet. 
Valley, Jewett easterly, 300 feet. 

Passed September 3. 

Wentworth, Schiller northerly, 400 feet. 
Merrimack, Beacon easterly, no feet. 
Beacon, Merrimack northerly, 60 feet. 
Second, Schiller northerly, 300 feet. 

Passed November 5. 

Cedar, Wilson easterly, 212 feet. 

Cedar south back street easterly to Hall. 

Ray, present sewer northerly, 325 feet. 

Second, Schiller to Harvell. 

Belmont, Bridge southerly, 200 feet. 

Mead, Hall to Belmont. 

Putnam, Beauport to Cartier. 

Cartier east back street, Putnam northerly, 400 feet. 

Cartier east back street, Putnam southerly, 400 feet. 

Passed December 3. 

ORDERS TO BUILD CERTAIN STREETS. 

Cartier, from Putnam to Wayne. 
Putnam, from Cartier to Dubuque. 
Hall, Myrtle to Prospect. 
Vinton, Jewett to Taylor. 

Passed May 7. 

Hevey, Amory to Wayne. 

Passed September 3. 

Wilson, Spruce to Valley. 

Passed November 5. 

MISCELLANEOUS ORDERS. 

Order to erect watering-trough, Hanover street, west side ot 
Candia road. 

Passed May 7. 



102 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Macadamize Elm street from street crossing north intersection' 
Brown avenue, southerly to Baker. 

Passed August 6. 

Order to erect watering-trough on North Union street between 
Arah and River road. 

Passed October i. 



Date. 


Contract, Materia], or liocation. 


Awarded to or agree- 
ment with. 


Feb. 


6 


To furnish sewer pipe 


George D. Goodrich. 




21 




Nichols & Allen. 


March 


1 


To furnish No. 1 clipped oats 


Partridge Bros. 




1 


To furnish castings 


Hutchinson Co. 




1-2. 


To furnish shrubs for commons. . . 


H. Gurney. 




15 


To furnish brick 


AV. F. Head & Son. 




15 


To furnish cement 


Adams & Tasker. 




19 


To furnish trees for parks 


Orison Hardy. 




29 


To furnish lumber 


Head & Dowst Co. 




30 


To furnish cesspool stone 


NA'^arren Harvey. 


April 


S 


To build storage shed at city yard. 


Head & Dowst Co- 


' 


"i? 


To concrete Merrimack street — 


J. T. Underbill Co. 
C. H. Robie Co. 


May 


30 


Building bank wall, Mast street... 


William G. Landry. 




20 


Building culvert, Second street. . . 


Warren Harvey. 




20 




Head & Dowst Co. 




10 




John Proctor. 


July 


30 


Building culverts, " Eddy road ". . 


Warren Harvey. 


Aug. 


16 


Concreting Amherst street 


J.T. Underbill Co. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
PERMITS TO ENCUMBER. 



103 




L. E. Desrocher. 
S. T. Worthen... 



Heail & Dowst Co.. 
Mead, Mason & Co. 

Owen Kenney 

Ed. Madden 

E. P. Desrocher . . . 

Timothy Sliea 

Head & Dowst Co.. 
Jos. A. Jackson — 
J. H. Mendell 



A. L. Bixby 

Brown & Straw . . . 

Alpheus Gay 

J. H. Mendel) 

Head & Dowst Co. 

D. G. Mills 

A. L. Bi.Kby 



J. T. Moore 

Herman Fisher 
Mead, Mason & Co. 

Ella J. iMai-tin 

E. P. Desrocher.... 

C. J. Brown 

Charles Colburn . . . 

S. T. Worthen 

G. A. Plamondon .. 

S. L. HiKgins 

Patrick Kearns — 
Head & Dowst Co . . 

E. P. Desrocher 

E. A. Randall 

Timothy Shea 

Head & Dowst Co.. 

A. \V. Prescott 

J. H. Mendel 1 



William Carr. 
A. M. Smith . . 



365 Amherst street | Jan. 

Hanover and Chestnut i 



Prospect above Linden 

Wilson street 

Pleasant street (Public Market) 

" The Keimard," Elm street 

7'2 Lake avenue 

190 Lake avenue 

125 Orange street 

Chestnut and Lowell 

Lowell street (Calumet Club) 

203 Merrimack 

Union and Lake avenue 

234 Lake avenue 

Wilson and Merrimack 

Elm and West Merrimack 

Amherst (Hospital) 

fi2 Laurel street 

Laurel (Convent) 

1st lot Clapp's corner 

]9(> Merrimack street 

318 Lake avenue 

31.T Lake avenue 

201 Hanover 

Conant street 

Merrimack street (church) 

Amherst and Button 

Union and Lake avenue 

Prince near Boynton . . 

AVilson and East Spruce 

Orange and Pine 

113 Central street 

Manchester near Lincoln 

Church and Bridge 

Beech, between Concord and Lowell 

Pine and Orange 

Front street, A moskeag 

Union and Bridge 

Elm, near Amherst 

171-173 Manchester street 

Bridge and Church 

Pearl back, near church 

.394 Concoril street 

278-280 Lowell street 



March 



April 3 

n 

13 
19 
22 
24 
24 
24 
25 
25 
30 
30 



May 



June 

July 
Ajigust 



Oct. 



Nov. 



19 
■Id 



Note.— A bond of .$500 being tiled with city clerk in cacii ease when permit 
is granted. 



104 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 105 

CITY YARD IMPROVEMENTS. 

The growth of work on streets and sewers, the ever increasing 
-demand for scavenger service and removal of ice and snow, has 
created a demand for greater space for storage supplies, suitable 
facilities for repairing, painting, and blacksmith work at the city 
yard. This demand has been provided for by building a large 
-and commodious storage building on Granite street. This build- 
ing is 84 feet in length, 78 feet wide, and has a height in the 
center of 13 feet 3 inches, and outside of 12 feet, with flat gravel 
roof, and is so constructed that the sprinklers and large dump 
carts can be housed for protection during the winter months, or 
when not in use. 

A special storage room has been partitioned off in the storage 
barn where the portable boiler and special tools can be locked 
up. This building has also a large roomy cellar or basement 
where snow plows and sleds can be kept, and has a space sepa- 
rated where sand is stored for sanding streets. 

This building has proved to be just what is wanted, and was 
built by contract with the Head & Dowst Co., at a cost of 
^3,000, the expense being met by a special appropriation. 

An addition connecting the blacksmith shop, built last year, 
with the storage barn has just been completed and is 73 feet long 
by 20 feet wide with a height of 12 feet in the center. The 
building is erected on substantial brick piers, and on the west 
side there is a faced stone wall 3 feet high. This addition was 
built by the Head & Dowst Co., at a cost of $648.63, and 
will be used for repairing and painting carts, sprinklers, etc., 
and is partitioned off for tool room at southern portion. This 
arrangement brings all repairing on iron work done by the black- 
smith under one roof. 

SCAVENGER SERVICE. 

The contract to remove all perishable waste throughout the 
■city, made by the street and park commissioners with the joint 
standing committee on city farm, for the yearly payment of $2,- 
500, has been satisfactorily carried out during the last year. 



106 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Three scavenger teams especially built for this service have 
been employed, with three drivers. The central portion of the 
city has been visited daily, and all perishable garbage collected 
and carried to the city farm, where it is used as a fertilizer. Over 
2,070 loads have been taken to the farm this season. The driv- 
ers call about the same time and on the same days that the city 
men call for the ashes and non-perishable garbage. 

The growth of the city will soon oblige an extension of routes. 
All citizens can materially assist the scavenger department by 
carefully and regularly placing all perishable waste in one recep- 
tacle, and the non-perishable waste in another receptacle, always 
separating the perishable from the non-perishable, and also by 
placing all cans, barrels, or other receptacles in plain view on 
the sidewalk or near by where the teamsters can readily reach 
them on the days to call. (See City Ordinances, chapter 19, 
sections 7 and 30.) 

MACADAMIZING. 

It is a well established fact that there is a growing interest int 
the construction and maintenance of our streets and highways. 
The practical question, therefore, arises, How shall we obtain 
good roads that shall answer all the demands of public travel ; 
what is the best and most feasible means of reaching this stand- 
ard ? 

Three things are certainly necessary; namely, money, meiJiod, 
and material. Our leading municipalities are considering this 
subject, and many experiments are being tried with greater or less 
success, but after all the question is a local one. What facilities 
have we as a city, for road building and maintenance ? 

It may be safely stated that if our city had a ledge of stone 
especially adapted to road building, or gravel banks near enough 
to be of practical service, much more might be done. The de- 
mand for new highways is so great, and the growth of the city 
so extended, that better facilities for road making become im- 
perative. A new and larger crusher is needed at the city ledge 
to meet the call for crushed stone. A crusher for the West Side 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 107 

could be used to great advantage, and a larger appropriation for 
new highways and macadamizing would materially assist in im- 
proving the condition of the streets and thoroughfares of the 
city. When it is considered that a large share of the appropri- 
ations have been unexpectedly called upon to cover amounts 
necessary to repair damages to streets and bridges, it may be 
truthfully affirmed that all has been done that could be done 
with the funds at the disposal of the commissioners. 

About 22,335 feet of new streets graded have been built this 
year in District 2 alone, against a total of 19,358 feet of new 
streets graded last year. Thus it will be seen that although the 
commission have been handicapped they have built more streets 
than last year. Many of these streets were difficult to construct 
and had to be cut through ledges or expensive fills made. 

The highway leading to Massabesic lake along the route of 
the electric road was greatly narrovved by the laying of double 
tracks, and immediate relief became a necessity to enable car- 
riages to pass on either side. To remedy this the commissioners 
at once began to widen Lake avenue and Hanover street along 
the electric roadbed, 13,200 feet in length, or about 2j^ miles. 

On Manchester street a large amount of work was called for 
on account of widening the street to allow the electric road 
room for tracks. One thousand two hundred thirty-six feet of 
paving was done from Elm to Union streets, part of which was 
28 feet wide, at a cost of ^239.05. Edgestone along the same 
street was reset 2,400 feet in length, at a cost of $;iig-4S} mak- 
ing a total of $558.50. 

Elm street, from Langdon to Webster, was left in bad condi- 
tion from tearing up of the street for the purpose of laying 
tracks for electric road. This condition was remedied by care- 
fully grading and topdressing with crushed ledge stone, 830 
loads being used and a length of 2,600 feet covered. 

At Bridge street, east of Belmont, a fill of three feet 300 feet 
long was made, at a cost of $390.65 for labor of men and teams, 
on account of raising tracks for electric road. 

At many places along the route grade was raised and paving 



108 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

relaid. The "Eddy road" was an outcome of the spring 
freshet. One thousand four hundred seventy-five feet of graded 
roadbed was built, 50 feet wide, at a cost of $2,228.90 for labor 
and teams, with an additional cost of $833 for two stone cul- 
verts across the roadbed, making a total cost of $3,061.90. 

The eastern abutment of the Amoskeag bridge was entirely 
carried away by the force of the water during the freshet and the 
bridge was rendered unsafe for travel. Consequently the com- 
missioners commenced repairs as soon as possible and a solid 
stone abutment was completed by the Head & Dowst Co. at a 
cost of $3,851. About $22,000 were spent for repairs caused 
by the freshet and the electric road. 

In pursuance of their plan of last year, the commissioners 
have extended the repairs on the principally traveled streets 
leading off from Elm street, as far as the funds would allow. 

Central street from Elm to Union was greatly improved by 
picking up, topdressing with 600 loads of crushed stone and 150 
loads of Salem stone. Also the same street topdressed from Elm 
west to Canal, 400 loads of crushed stone and 50 loads of Salem 
stone being used, total length topdressed, 2,350 feet, at a total 
cost, for labor and teams, of $2,073.40. 

Hanover street from Hall to Milton was improved by a dress- 
ing of 370 loads of crushed stone, costing $872.29. 

Amherst street from Chestnut to Union was thoroughly mac- 
adamized 900 feet in length, 620 loads of crushed stone being 
used, costing $1,342.65, and from Union to Beech this same 
street was concreted on macadam foundation, producing a fine 
roadway beside Hanover common, at a cost of $951.64 for mac- 
adamizing and $1,551.80 for concreting. 

Lowell street from Elm to Nashua, a distance of 2,500 feet, was 
picked up and rolled and covered with 705 loads of crushed 
stone from the ledge, rolled down by steam road roller, with a 
binder course of 159 loads of Salem stone, costing for labor and 
teams $1,291.58. 

Franklin street from Granite to Merrimack is one of our busy 
streets and was in bad condition on account of holes. A great 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 109 

improvement was made in the roadbed by picking up and top- 
dressing with crushed stone, at a cost of $992.60 for labor 
and teams. 

Chestnut street from Central to Lake avenue called for mac- 
adamizing, using 230 loads of crushed stone and 30 loads of 
Salem stone for finish, costing $575 for labor and teams. 

In West Manchester, besides the "Eddy road" already re- 
ferred to, Turner street from Granite to School was thoroughly 
macadamized, 435 feet in length. Crushed stone was first laid 
in the excavated roadbed, 139 loads being used, then stone 
chips well pounded in, 17 carloads used, and finally 45 loads of 
Salem stone rolled down as binder. 

North Main street from Fire King engine-house to Adams 
street was thoroughly repaired and graded up by the use of 147 
loads of crushed stone, and rolled down by road roller at a cost 
of ^256.38. 

Eight other streets on this side have been treated to topdress- 
ing of clay or gravel on roadbed, to distances of from 260 to 
600 feet. 

The wants of the heavy teams in the business section shoul 
have attention, and call for streets paved with granite on a suita- 
ble foundation. The bicyclist desires a smooth, well-beaten 
track, free from sharp cutting stones, and all fully appreciate a 
good macadamized or concrete road surface. Therefore, if proper 
facilities for good roadraaking can be had, with a suitable ex- 
penditure of money, the people of Manchester may expect, and 
surely will have, excellent streets and highways. 

The following is a summary of the work for the last year. 



110 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



MACADAMIZING. 



Location. 



I.ength 



Square; Cruslied 



feet. J'^'^'i^-i stone. 



Amherst, Chestnut to Union 


900 


3,40C 




500 


2 000 


Chestnut, Central to Lake avenue. . 


■225 


900 




l,4.i0 


5,S00 
4,000 




t)00 




2,000 


3,467 

3,778 


Franklin, Granite to Merrimack.... 


1,000 



Hanover, Hall to Milton 

Lowell, Elm to Nashua 2,500' 10,000 



Total 



620 
220 
230 
600 
400 
830 
510 
370 
705 



Salem 
stone. 



10,725 36,956 



4,485 



Labor. 



30 
1.50 
50 



20 



159 



$1,342.65 
951.64 
,i75.00 

1,296.00 
777.40 

* 413.82 
992 60 
872.29 

1,291.58 



S8,512.98 



SUMMARY 

Cost Salem stone . 

Cost coal and coke 

Cost lumber .... 

Incidentals .... 

Labor on streets and at city ledge 

Concrete .... 

Forcite powder 

Total .... 

NOTES. 



51,101.63 

132.75 
433-60 
651.90 
8,512.98 
2,783.86 
289.51 



^13,906.23 



Average number of days crusher was run, 16S, from March 25 
to November 2. 

Average cost labor of men per day, $30. 
Average cost labor of teams per day, ^4.25. 
Average number loads stone crushed each day, 51. 
Number of loads used for macadamizing, 5,030. 
Number of loads used for patching, 3,425. 



* Balance cost of labor charged to repairs of highways. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



Ill 



NEW STREETS GRADED. 



Location . 



Length 
in feet. 



Asliland, between Arlington unil Pearl . 

Asl), south of Gore 

Beech, north of Gore 

Bridge, east of Belmont 

Bell, Pine to Union ] 

Baker, Elm to Caief road i 

Campbell street 

Elm, north of Ray brook 

East High, Malvern to Ashland I 

Green, Elm east ' 

Grove, Union east ! 

Grove, Pine to Union | 

Hall, south of Prospect 

Hall, south of East High 

Harvard, Beech east 

Morrison, Pearl south 

Manchester. Beacon east 

Prospect, east of Russell 

Pleasant, Franklin west 

Russell, Harrison north 

Ray, north of Appleton 

Road to Massabesic lake 

Sagamore, east of Walnut 

Shasta, Beech west 

.Stevens, Baker south 

Salmon, east of Walnut 

Wilson, west of schoolhouse 

Walnut, south of Sagamore 

Titus avenue from Beech 



200 
200 
COO 
300 
2.i0 
300 



800 
1,100 
4.'J0 
250 
500 
2.50 
300 
(iOO 
375 
300 



375 
120 
175 
13,200 
1,150 
.500 
200 
100 
640 
100 
.500 



Cut or 
All. 



Labor. 



Cut.. 
Fill... 
Both. 
Fill.., 
Cut.. 



Fill. 



Both.. 
Cut.., 
Both. 
Fill... 
Cut. . . 
Both. 
Cut. . . 



Fill. 
Cut. 



Both. 



Total 23,335 



Fill. 
Cut. 



Both. 



$190.75 

230.00 

696.00 

390.65 

250.00 

350.00 

150.00 

246.00 

138.00 

261.50 

250.00 

300.00 

277.00 

298.00 

382 00 

262.50 

308.67 

31.50 

459.85 

22.50 

125.00 

1,805.00 

1,311.00 

1,040.50 

175.00 

32.40 

689.85 

115.00 

70.00 



$10,858.67 



NOTE. 

The scavenger teams have contributed 3,500 loads of material 
from back streets to the various dumps and other places where 
new streets will be built. Twenty-five hundred loads of road 
material from miscellaneous sources were used for the same pur- 
pose. 

SUMMARY. 

Total cost for labor for new highways and new cul- 



Covering stone for culverts 


• ^ 


2,219.47 


Lumber used . . . . 




32-45 


Hardware .... 




147-2S 


Fencing .... 




III. 71 


672 loads filling at 25c per load 




168.00 


General incidentals 




99-43 


Total .... 


■ $ 


21,273-39 



112 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CONCRETE WORK. — CHARLES H. ROBIE CO. 
STREET CROSSINGS. 



Location. 



Square 
yards. 



Beauport and Adams 

Beauport and Putnam south back 
Beaui)0]'t and Putnam south back 
Chestnut and Central south back. 

Chestnut and Lake avenue 

Chestnut and Lowell 

Chestnut and Lowell north back. . 

Douglas and North Main 

Lowell and Chestnut 

McGregor at mill entrance 

Milton at D. Perkins's 

Massabesic and Spruce 

Massabesic and Summer 

Pine and High south back 

Pine and Lowell south back 

I'utnam and McGregor. 

Putnam and Main 

Pine and Lowell south back 

Russell and Prospect 

Ray and Appleton 

Sullivan and Beauport 

School and Turner 

School and Turner south back 

Sagamore and Elm 

Total 



119 
36 
18 
16 
•i8 
30 
13 
•24 
30 
18 
15 
49 
43 
8 
33 
33 
29 
33 
.54 
33 
29 
30 
18 



782.21 



Price 
per j'd. 



0.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.50 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 



Total 
cost. 



$89.67 
27.30 
14 1& 
12.53 
21.33 
22.66 
10.00 
18.66 
22.65 
14.00 

7.55 
37.00 
33.99 

6.02 
25.35 
25.00 
22.33 
25.33 
40.87 
23.32 
22.27 
22 06 
13.66 
26.00 



$584.31 



SIDEWALKS. 



Location. 



C and B streets, M. Kearns.. 

Lowell and Cliestnut , 

Main at A. C. Wallace's 

Main at Ranno's shop 

No. 274 Merrimack 

Merrimack at Bodwell's — 
Pine and Lowell south back 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



48.67 

S.7o 
34.58 
16.97 
52.03 
58.05 

4.40 



223.45 



Price 
pr. yd. 



$0.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 



Total 
cost. 



$21.90 

3.93 

15.56 

7.64 

23.41 

26.13 

1.98 



$100.54 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
CROSSINGS AND WALKS REPAIRED. 



113 



Location. 



Chestnut and Lake avenue... 

Massiibesic and Spruce 

McGregor at mill entrance . . 
Pine ai:d Lowell south back. 

Putnam and McGregor 

School and Turner 

Tremont and Granite 



Square 
yards. 



Total. 



19.33 
3.33 
5.56 
3 5 
13 ii 
21.00 
15.89 



81.05 



Price, 
per yd 



$0.30 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.37 



Total 
cost. 



$5.80 
1.50 
2.50 
1.57 
5.59 
9.45 
5.88 



$32.29 



ROADWAYS. 



LOCATION. 



Chestnut, Merrimack to Manchester 
Chestnut, Meri'imack to Manchester 
Merrimack street 

Total 



Square Price 
yards, iper yd. 



1,086.78 

18.66 

1,175.63 



2,281.06 



$0.50 
.75 
.50 



Total 

cost. 



$543 39 
13.99' 

587.81 



$1,145.19 



114 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CONCRETE WORK. J. T. UNDERHILL CO. 

STREET CROSSIXGS. 



Location. 



Aclams, corner of Clark 

Adams and Main 

Adams and Alain 

Amherst, corner Walnut 

Bridge and Ash 

Beauport and Schuyler 

Brook and Beech east back 

Brook and Ash 

Biook and Ash east back 

Bridge and Nashua 

Bridge and Malvern 

Central and Chestnut 

Central and Chestnut 

City yard 

Elm and Monroe 

Elm and Monroe south back 

Elm arid Monroe 

Franklin and Depot 

■Gates and Dubuque east back 

■Gates and Dubuque 

Oates and Cartier 

Morrison and Pearl 

Main and Sullivan 

Main and Putnam 

Orange and Pine 

Pearl and Union 

Rimmon east back and Amory — 

Rimmon and Amory 

Spruce and Barry avenue 

Salmon and Union 

JSagamore and Union east back (2) 
Wilson and Spruce 

Total . .. 



Square 


Price 


Total 


yards. 


per yd. 


cost. 


30.20 


$0.75 


$22.65 


18.89 


. lO 


14.17 


7.50 


.75 


5.62 


58.25 


.75 


43.68 


29.80 


.75 


22.35 


17.78 


.75 


13.33 


16.89 


.75 


12.66 


60.00 


.75 


45.00 


17.78 


.75 


13.33 


69.44 


.75 


52.08 


56.89 


.75 


42.66 


30.20 


.75 


11.17 


58.05 


.75 


43.54 


39.18 


.75 


17.63 


26.67 


.75 


20 00 


23.61 


.75 


17.70 


16.50 


.75 


12.37 


29.24 


.75 


21.93 


35.56 


.75 


26.67 


61.36 


.75 


46.02 


29.96 


.75 


22.47 


17.15 


.75 


12.86 


29.87 


.75 


22.40 


31.09 


.75 


23.32 


28.27 


.75 


21. 2U 


.SO 20 


.75 


11.17 


20.00 


.75 


15.00 


30.20 


.75 


22.65 


12.40 


.75 


9.30 


30.22 


.75 


22.66 


35.55 


.75 


26.55 


60.40 


.75 


45.30 


1,059.10 




$759.44 



SIDEWALKS. 



Location. 



Amherst and Walnut east back 

Bridge and Ashland 

Central and Chestnut 

Derryfield park 

Merrimack common 

Main and Putnam 

Orange and Pine ■. . 

Spruce and Barry avenue 

Wilson and Spruce 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



.50.05 
26 80 
12.00 
67. 14 
244.85 
10 40 
12.83 
4.44 
17.41 



Price 
per yd. 



445.92 



$0.45 
.45 
.25 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 



Total 
cost. 



12.06 

3 00 
30.21 

110.18 

4 68 
5.77 
2.00 
7.83 



$198.45 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
CROSSINGS AND WALKS REPAIRED. 



115 



Location. 



Adams and Clark 

Bridge and Nashua 

Elm and Bridge 

Elm and Monroe, at Holbrook's 

Elm and Monroe 

Lowell and Pine 

Merrimack common 

Manchestt^r street, 21/2 days and stock . 

Main and Marion 

Main and \V ayne 



Total 



Square [ Price 
yards, per yd 



5.50 

2.67 

70.00 

158.92 

1.33 

21.33 

U7.40 



60.90 
60.44 



528.49 



$0.45 
.45 
.37 
.35 
.45 
.37 
.37 



.37 

.37 



Total 
cost. 



$2.47 

1.20 

25.90 

55.62 

.59 

7.89 

54.54 

1.50.00 

23.53 

22.36 



$344.10 



ROADWAYS. 



Location. 



Amherst, Union to Beech (new). 

Merrimack and Elm 

Merrimack street 

Union and Laurel 

West Merrimack (patching) 



Square 
yards. 



Price 
per yd 



1,485.40 I $1.00 
414.69 .50 



Total 3,015.62 



1,102 20 
13.33 



.50 
.75 



Total 
cost. 



$1,485.40 

207.35 

551.10 

10.00 

40.00 



$2,293.85 



SUMMARY. 
Concrete Work by Charles H. Itobie Co., Street and Park Commission Department. 



New crossings 

Re-covered crossings. 
Re-covered roadways 
New sidewalks 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



782.21 

81.05 

2,281.06 

223.45 



3,367.77 



Total cost. 



$584.31 

32.29 

1,145.19 

100.54 



$1,862.33 



116 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Concrete Work by J. T. Underhill Co., Street and Park Commission Department. 



New crossings 

Re-covered crossings 

New roadways 

Re-covered roadways 
New sidewalks 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



1,059.10 

528.49 

1,485.40 

1,530.22 

445.92 



5,049.13 



Total cost. 



$759.44 
344.10 

1,485.40 
808.45 
198.45 



$3,595.84 



STREETS TURNPIKED WITH ROAD MACHINE. 



Streets. 










No. feet. 


Appleton 1,648 


Adams .... 








682 


Amherst . 










900 


Ash . . . 










500 


Alfred . 










400 


Auburn . 










3.000 


Bridge . 










4,900 


Brook 










2,200 


Blodget . 










800 


Beech 










6,000 


Belmont 










1,000 


Baker . 










500 


Brown avenue 










5,000 


Chestnut 










4,500 


Concord 










3,000 


Central . 










1,500 


Cedar . 










• 3)000 


Elm 










1,112 


East High 










500 


Gore 










735 


Harrison 










2,200 


High . . 










600 


Hall 










1,600 


Hanover 










• 3,575 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



117 



Highland 












2,000 


Jane 












200 


Liberty . 












800 


Lowell . 












I,OCO 


Lincoln . 












1,000 


Laurel . 












. 3.000 


Lake avenue 












2,000 


Myrtle . 












• ^>352 


Maple . 












• 3-500 


Milton . 












500 


Merrimack 












500 


North . 












. 2,680 


Nashua . 












1,000 


Orange . 












2.687 


Pearl 












2,687 


Prospect 












1,648 


Pennacook 












800 


Pine 












6,500 


Ray 












800 


Russell . 












500 


Sagamore 












400 


Sahnon . 












900 


South 












200 


Spruce . 












3,000 


Union . 












4,500 


Webster . 












2,000 


Walnut . 












2,000 


Wilson . 












800 


Total . 


Qg,8o6 



99,806 or 18.91 miles. 



118 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Location. 



Ashland, between Arlington and Pearl 

Ash and Orange 

Adams and Clark 

Arlington and Nashua 

Beech, Gore north 

Beech, north of Sagamore 

Bridge, east of Belmont 

Bell, Pine to Union 

Baker, Elm to Calef road 

Brown avenue, Byron north 

Beacon, north of "Merrimack 

Clark, south of Adams 

Clark and Cliestnut 

Calef road, Baker south 

Everett, south of Clark 

East High, east of Malvern 

Elm, near Ray brook 

Elm, Baker north 

Elm, Baker south 

Green, Pine east , 

Grove, Union east 

Grove, Pine to Union 

Hancock 

Harrison and Russell 

Hall, south of Prospect 

Hall, south of East High 

Hall, between Bridge and Pearl 

Harvard, Beech easterly 

Hall, between Bridge and Pearl 

Lowell and Belmont 

Linden, Orange north 

Myrtle, east of Russell 

Merrimack, west of Beacon 

Morrison, Pearl south 

Manchester, Beacon west 

North Elm, Clark north 

Orange, between Pine and Union 

Orange, east of Hall 

Orange and Hall 

Prospect, west of Russell 

Prospect, east of Linden 

Pennacook, west of Walnut 

Prospect, east of Linden 

Prospect, east of Russell 

Russell, south of Harrison 

Sagamore, east of Walnut 

Salmon, Walnut east 

Union, Green south 

Walnut, south of Sagamore 

Total 



Length 
in feet. 



300 
150 
200 
125 
800 
350 
400 
500 
600 
100 
70 
50 
200 

2,000 
300 

1,050 
200 
275 
SOD 
900 
500 
500 
525 
300 
250 
500 
400 

1,200 
400 
30 
150 
110 
65 
700 
300 
400 
250 
150 
375 
100 
150 
50 
750 
400 
100 

2,300 
200 
250 
150 



20,425 



Width 

in 

feet. 



Cut or 
fill. 



Labor. 



Both. 

Fill.. 

Both. 

Cut. 

Both. 

Cut.. 

Fill. . 

Cut.. 

Both. 

Fill.. 

Both. 

Fill . . 



Cut.. 
Both. 



Fill... 
Both.. 
Cut... 
Both.. 
Cut... 

Fill!!! 

Cut... 
Fill... 
Both., 
Fill... 
Both.. 
Cut... 
Fill... 

Cut'. '. '. 

Fin'.'.'. 

Cut'.!! 

Fill... 
Cut... 
Fill... 

Both. 
Fill.. 
Cut... 
Both. 

Cut.'!! 



$40.00- 
47.00 

7.oa 

4.50 
40.50 
28.66 
37.50 
30.00 
36.00> 
23.00 
20.50 
19.00 
28.00- 
120.00 
64.00 
39.75 
50.00 
48.36 
24 00 
71.00 
30.00 
50.00 
42.00 
15.00 
23.33 
36.66 
80.00 
63.30 
24.00 
10.75 
22.00 
28.50 
23.00 
55.00 
18.00 
34.62 
17.50 
18.00 
20.50 

8.50 
14.75 

3.25 
70.00 
32.50 
17.34 
126.60 
25.50 
33.50 
15.34 



1,738.21 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



1J9 



EDGE STONES SET. 



Ash and Bridge 

Amherst and Beech . 

Amherst, between Walnut and Beech 

Amherst near Walnut 

Auburn, between Union and Beech 

Bay and Appleton 

Beech and Sagamore . 

Brook and Ash .... 

Beech and Amherst . 

Back street, between Amherst and Beech 

Back street, between East Spruce and Pine 

Beech and Gore 

Belmont and Lowell . 

Brook and Union 

Brook, between Beech and Ash 

Beacon and Manchester 

Bridge, between Elm and Chestnut . 

Chestnut, between Lake avenue and Spruce 

Central, near Elm .... 

Clark and Adams .... 

Cedar, near Lincoln .... 

Chestnut and Laurel .... 

Central, near Chestnut 

Central and Wilson .... 

Chestnut and Lowell .... 

Chestnut, between Merrimack and Elm 

Central and Chestnut 

Concord and Hall .... 

Clark avenue, between Pearl and Orange 

Elm and West Pennacook . 

East High and Ashland 

Elm and Monroe .... 

East High and Buzzell 



Feet. 

32 ■ 
16 

13. 
16 

32 

314 

124 
32 

13 
27 
16 
r8 
18 
18 
60 
20 
137 
14 

32 

80 

300 

50 

16 

300 

36 

25 
16 
118 
24 
16 
80 
16 



120 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Franklin and Depot . . . , 








32 


Granite, near city stable 








24 


Harrison and Russell 








32 


Hall and Pearl .... 








16 


Hall and East High . . . . 








16 


Laurel and Milton . . . . 








32 


Laurel and Lincoln . 








24 


Laurel and Belmont . . . . 








16 


Laurel, between Pine and Union 








21 


Lincoln and Merrimack 








24 


Lake avenue and Chestnut . 








32 


Merrimack, between Beech and Mapl( 








120 


Massabesic and Spruce 








26 


Milton and Manchester 








36 


Merrimack-street Baptist church 








75 


Merrimack and Beacon 








16 


Merrimack, between Pine and Union 








28 


Milton and Manchester 








16 


Manchester and Wilson 








16 


Malvern near Lowell , 








83 


North near Elm 








16 


Nashua and Arlington 








16 


Nashua and Bridge . 








58 


Orange and Pine . 








16 


Pearl and Russell 








16 


Pine and Auburn 








180 


Prospect and Russell . 








350 


Pine and Orange 








1 20 


Pine near cathedral . 








32 


Pearl near Elm .... 








35 


Pearl and Walnut 








32 


Pine and Orange 








32 


Pearl and Beech ... 








16 


Russell and Union . ... 








20 


Russell and Harrison 








no 


Spruce and Union 








16 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION 



Spruce and Wilson , 
Spruce and Wilson . 
Sagamore and Beech . 
Spruce and Chestnut . 
Sagamore, No. 165 
Sagamore, east of Union 
Salmon and Union . 
Salmon and Union . 
Union and Cedar 
Union, between Brook and 
Wilson and Spruce . 
Wilson and Spruce . 
Wilson-street schoolhouse 
Walnut and Amherst 

Total . 



Harrison 



121 



160 
16 
32 

65 
16 
16 
16 
16 
100 

75 
2 

720 
32 



5'i65 



EDGE STONES RESET. 
Location. 

Central, west of Elm . 

East High, east of Pine 

Manchester and Milton 

Manchester, between Elm and Union 

Union, south of Manchester 

Union and Cedar .... 

Total 



Feet. 

56 

200 

20 

2,400 

40 
2,779 



Total number of feet of edge stones set or reset, 7,944. 
Total cost for labor of foregoing work, $598.25 , an average 
cost of ^0.076 per foot. 



122 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Streets. 



Amherst, between Union and 

Beech 

Auburn, east of Pine 

Belmont, between Lake ave- 
nue and Central 

Brook, between Beech and 

Maple 

Belmo't, Lowell and Chestnut 

Cedar and Maple 

Chestnut and Lowell 

Chestn't, Salmon and Webster 
Chestnut, between Central 

and Cedar 

East High, Malvern east 

East Spruce, between Pine 

and Union 

Elm, near ilay brook 

Elm, between Appleton and 

Clark 

Elm, between Pen'acook and 

Salmon 

Hanover, west of Chestnut .. 

Laurel, Belmont east 

Lake avenue and Milton 

Manchester and Milton 

Milton street 

Monroe, west of Elm 

Pleasant, Franklin west 

Pine and Salmon 

Prospect, between Oak and 

Russell 

Russell, between Prospect 

and Hai-rison 

Russell, between Orange and 

Myi-tle 

Russell and Harrison 

Union, north of Clark 

Total 



Sq. yds. 


No. 
loads. 


379 


39 


22 


2 


60 


6 


117 


15 


111 


12 


67 


8 


67 


8 


750 ■ 


35 


550 


55 


393 


101 


350 


36 


Gil 


70 


340 


35 


87 


9 


64 


9 


78 


10 


39 


4 


20 


2 


20 


2 


136 


14 


291 


30 


68 


8 


171 


10 


172 


10 


88 


9 


78 


8 


14 


1 


5,143 


548 



Cost per 
load. 



$1.75 



Cost of 
stone. 



$68.25 
3.50 

10.50 

26.25 
21.00 
14.00 
14.00 
61.25 

96.25 
176.75 

63.00 
122.50 

61.25 

15.75 
15.75 
17.50 
7.00 
3.50 
3..'i0 
24.50 
52.50 
14.00 

17.60 

17.50 

15.75 

14.00 

1.75 



$959.00 



Cost of 
labor. 



^112.50- 
3.00 

8.00 

32.00 
31.00 

11. oa 

6.50 
131.20 

88 60 
94.00 

59.00 
132.50 

88.40 

43.60 

23.00' 

70.50 

22.00 

3.0O 

3.00 

10.00 

150.00 

12.96 

37_.62 

37.84 

19.36 
17.16 
3.00 



$1,259.74 



Total cost of foregoing work, ^2,218.74; an average cost of 
$0,431 per square yard. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



128 



PAVING RELAID. 
Street. Sq. yds. 

Chestnut to Union, Manchester street .... 256 

Concord, Belmont to Maple , . . . . .100 

Elm, near Cilley building ...... 45 

Elm, near Dean street ....... 400 

Elm, north of Bridge ....... 700 

Granite, between Canal and Granite bridge . . . 249 

Granite, between Bridge and Canal bridge . . . 1,005 

Granite street bridge, easterly . . . . .510 

Laurel, Belmont to Hall ...... 39 

Lake avenue and Beech ...... 78 

Manchester, between Elm and Chestnut . . . 1,456 

Pine, between Concord and Lowell .... 69 

Total . . . . , . . . . 4,907 

Total cost of foregoing work, $987.90. 

CULVERTS. 



Location. 


Length 
in feet. 


"Width 
in feet. 


Stone. 


Labor. 


Inci- 
dentals. 


Total 
cost. 




75 

300 
......... 


2* 

16 
10 
12 

6 




$40.00 
623.00 




$40.00 
1,024.86 


Beech, over Cemetery 
brook (2) .'. 


$382.56 


$19.30 






200 


106.40 
272.96 


219.25 
656.00 


2.50 


328.15 


Lincoln, over Cemetery 


928.96 








Total 


663 




$761.92 


$1,538.25 


$21.80 


$2,321.97 





Two culverts repaired, Bridge street near Hall, and Hanover 
street near G. H. Hubbard's. Cost for labor, $18. 



124 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



STONE. 

Paid F. S. Bodvvell, for covering stone 

Charles A. Bailey, for block paving 
Wm. H. Coburn, for cobble stone . 
Warren Harvey, for circles, cesspool stone, etc 
Warren Harvey, for covering stones 
George F. Higgins, cobble-stone . 

Total 



^770.92 

249-75 
761.25 

1,365-34 

1,383.00 

11.00 



t,54i.26 



SNOW AND ICE. 



Receipts. 



Appropriation . . . . . 


$4,000.00 




Transferred from repairs of Fligh . 


1,271.38 


$5»27i.38 


• 




Expenditures. 






Labor, January draft . . . . 


$1,907.69 




February draft . . . . 


2,510.00 




March draft . . . . 


661.22 




Bills for sand and supplies . 


77-47 




Paid for snow-roller and snow-plows 


115.00 


^5^271.38 






FENCING. . 






Beech and Valley .... 




. 100 feet 


Green, east of Pine .... 




. 100 " 


Prospect, east of Russell . 




• 250 '' 



Total 



450 feet 



Fencing repaired on Pine street near Auburn, Lake avenue 
near Hall, and Elm street near Pennacook. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



125 



Location. 




Aslilancl and East High 

Amherst and Beacon 

Amher&t and Belmont 

Amherst, between Union and Beech 

Ashland and Arlington 

Buzzell and East High 

Buzzell and East High 

Back street, between Merrimack and Manchester 

Brook, between Beech and Ash 

Brook and Union 

Brook, between Ash iftid Maple .' 

Chestnut, between North and Webster 

Chestiuit east back, between North and Webster.. 

Chestnut, between Cedar and Central 

Concord and Belmont 

Cedar and Ijincoln 

Cedar and Wilson 

East Spruce, between Pine and Union 

Elm, near Valley 

Elm, between Welch avenue and Shasta 

Granite, near Canal 

Granite, near Print Works 

Gore, Pine back 

Hall and Pearl 

Hall, near Pearl 

Laurel, east of Beacon 

Laurel, between Pine and Union 

Lowell and Belmont 

Lowell and Hall 

Laurel and Belmont 

Manchester and Milton 

Manchester, between Elm and Chestnut 

Manchester and Milton 

Merrimack and Hall 

Monroe and Elm 

Oak, between Harrison and Prospect 

Prospect and Russell 

Pine,-between Central and Laurel 

Pine and Silver 

Prospect and Li nden 

Prospect, between Linden and Russell 

Pearl and Morrison 

Pearl and Belmont 

Russell and Harrison 

Ray and Appleton 

Salmon and Pine 

Union , between Brook and Prospect 

Union, between Sagamore and Pennacook 

Union and Silver 

Welch avenue, near Elm 

Walnut and Sagamore 

Wilson and Auburn 



Cost of 
material. 



Total. 



$50.59 
31 27 
35.. i3 
47.98 
33.48 
15.66 
32.64 
12.61 
20.40 
45.81 
21.66 
63. ,58 
13.39 
94.12 
15.19 
28.44 
25.. 52 
46.44 
15.24 
65.33 
17.38 
12.67 
14.65 
13 93 
33.32 
25.37 
14.89 
60.40 
43.96 
13.35 
12.49 
25.69 
10.16 
12 29 
.52.88 
13.19 
28 57 
12.97 
25.29 
61.02 
13.19 
13.19 
13.37 
15.96 
15.78 
13.39 
S5.21 
.36.36 
.55.46 
31.61 
39.46 
15.37 




Labor. 



$34.50 

22.50 

8.00 

25.75 

24.. 50 

6.75 

18.75 

6.25 

17.88 

29.00 

18.75 

35.00 

8.25 

58.90 

5.00 

14.50 

25.00 

20.25 

6.00 

41.92 

7.50 

5.00 

6 50 

8.50 

15.50 

19.00 

5.. 50 

29.92 

22.00 

6.25 

17.00 

8.50 

8.. 50 

7.75 

30.50 

10.25 

16.50 

5.00 

14.50 

39.00 

10.25 

13.50 

12.50 

8.50 

6.50 

10.50 

39.50 

27.90 

32.00 

16.50 

27.80 

12 50 



$930.57 



126 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



Amherst, between Beech and Union 

Ash back street, between HaiTlson and Brook 

Bridge and Russell 

Chestnut and Manchester 

Chestnut, north of Salmon 

Chestnut, between Lake avenue and Cedar 

Elm back, near "The Kennard" 

Elm and Pearl 

Elm, between Welch avenue and Shasta 

Franklin and Granite 

Granite, near the bridge 

Laurel, between Beech and Maple 

Lake avenue and Union 

Lowell and Ashland 

Malvern and Lowell 

Fennacook and Elm 

Prospect, between Pine and Union 

Pine and Manchester 

Prospect, between Linden and Hall 

Spruce, between Pine and Union 

Union and Bridge 

Union, between Harrison and Brook 

Total 



No. 



30 



Cost of 
material. 



$7.45 

..TO 

4.97 

15. U 
2.84 
3.91 
4.95 
1.72 
2.30 

11 98 
5.38 
1.41 
.29 
4.94 
4.94 
6.00 
3.28 

11.42 

10.64 

2.91 

1.00 

.36 



$107.42 



Labor. 



$5.50 
2.50 
2.00 

10.50 
2.00 
3.50 
2.00 
3.75 
2.00 
S.OO 
4.50 
4.00 
2.00 
3.50 
3.50 
6.00 
5.75 

10.. 50 
6.50 
3.50 
1.00 
2.00 



$94.50 



REPAIRED SEWERS. 



Location. 



Ash, between Amherst and Concord 

Auburn back, between Union and Beech. 

Blodget, west of Chestnut 

Elm, near city hall 

Elm back, near Electric Light station. . 
Elm, between Welch avenue and Shasta . 

Hanover back, west of Pine 

Hanover and Pine 

Maple, between Concord and Lowell 

Ray brook 

Thawed out cessijools 



Total . 



Cost of 
material. 



$2.32 
13.76 



14.60 
5.46 
2.30 



14.35 
11.83 
16.34 



$80.96 



Labor. 



$6.00 

5.50 

15.00 

12.75 

2.00 

2.00 

20.50 

10.00 

8.00 

12.00 

164.45 



$258.20 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 127 

TRENCH MACHINE. 

The Carson trench machine, used on West Manchester sewers 
this last season, is a patented apparatus by which four, or any 
other, number, of loaded tubs are hoisted from a trench or pit, 
moved horizontally as far as desirable, and dumped. The tubs 
are then returned, lowered to the place from which they were 
first hoisted, and the process repeated by substituting tubs vvhich 
have been filled while the others were being handled. 

The same power which hoists the tubs also moves them back- 
ward and forward to and from the dumping place without dis- 
connecting them from the ropes by which they were hoisted. 
The foregoing gives a general idea of the principle of working. 
The machine, which was purchased by the commissioners over a 
year ago, has two uprights or towers, which are generally placed 
from 295 to 300 feet apart. Thrown over these uprights is a two- 
inch wire guy cable, which is drawn tight and led to anchors 
buried six feet deep in the ground at each end. This not only 
supports the uprights but serves as a trolley line for a sheave to 
ride upon connected with two wire cables. One of these cables 
being endless, revolves over a drum attached to the engine in the 
boiler house, furnishing the necessary power to run the tub in 
which the soil is along the wire cable to where it is to be dumped. 
The second cable attached to the sheave is for the purpose of 
controlling the raising and lowering of the tub into or out of the 
trench, and is connected to another drum on the engine. Thus 
the engineer controls the movements of the bucket or tub directed 
by a signal man who stands beside the trench, and who also usu- 
ally dumps the loaded bucket by disconnecting an automatic 
dumping arrangement on the side of the bucket. The rapidity 
with which a trench can be excavated by the aid of this machine 
is wonderful, and should be seen to be appreciated. 

Five sewers in West Manchester were excavated by means of 
the trench machine, viz.: Kelly street from Hevey east back to 
Alsace, a distance of 1,540 feet, over 20 feet deep, through sandy 
soil; Hevey east back to Kelly southerly a distance of 652 feet, 
14 feet deep; Schiller, Hill westerly 493 feet in length, iS feet 



128 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

deep; Joliette south of Kelly, a distance of 518 feet, 12 feet 
deep ; and Alsace south of Kelly, 345 feet in length, 12 feet deep. 
To illustrate the economy in sewer excavation by the use of 
this machine, it can be stated that only an average of twenty- 
three men were employed on any of the sewers mentioned, di- 
vided in regard to service as follows : Seven men to construct 
bracing and staging, two men to lower pipe, two men to lay pipe, 
one man to mix mortar, one signal man, one water boy, one fore- 
man, and eight shovelers. If the machine were not used these 
sewers would take a gang of from sixty to seventy men to cover 
the work. Besides, the soil is removed away from the edge of 
the trench when machine is used, thus preventing accidents or 
caving in of back filling. Generally three stagings are used in a 
sewer 20 feet deep, as a man cannot shovel higher than his head 
to advantage. All this is done away with in case of the trench 
machine. The commissioners are well pleased with its work 
during the last season, and there is no doubt that it has saved 
more than fifty per cent in the cost of labor. 



STEEET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



129 



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STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



131 



Length of sewers, West Side, division No. lo . 6,129 feet 
Length of sewers. East Side, division No. 7 . . 1,458 " 
Length of sewers, East Side, division No. 2 . . 15,565 " 

Total .23,152 feet. 

Cost of sewers, West Side, division No. 10 . . ^12,259.45 

Cost of sewers, East Side, division No. 7 . . 8,254.17 

Cost of sewers, EastSide, division No. 2 . . 51,437.14 

Total $71,950.76 

Average cost per foot, West Side, division No. 10 . $2.00 

Average cost per foot, East Side, division No. 7 . 5.66 

Average cost per foot. East Side, division No. 2 . 3.30 

Average total cost per foot, $3,064. 

The following table shows how the cost for new sewers, in- 
cluding Silver street and Christian brook sewers, has been 
divided : 



132 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 





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STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



133 



BRIDGES. 



The following table gives the dimensions, material, and num- 
ber of spans of the various bridges within the city limits : 



Location. 



Length 

in 
feet. 



^moskeag 7G5.5 

Bridge street, at canal 57 

Bridge st., jNIcGregor and approaches 1,085 

Cohas avenue, at Great Cohas 36 

Derry road, at Great Cohas 3S 

Derry road, near Cohas avenue 20 

Derry road, near town line 21 

Dunbarton road, Black brook 25 

Elm street, at railroad 89 

Front street, at Black brook 16.5 

Granite street, at canal 56.3 

Granite street, at river , .. 465.7 

Harvey road, at Great Cohas 32 

island Pond road, outlet to lake 41 

Main street, at 'Squog river ISO 

Mammoth road, at Great Cohas 38 

Mammoth road, near town line 14 

Mill road, at Harvey's mill 59 

Parker street, at railroad ...... 1 53 

River road, at Little Cohas 16 

River road, below James Cheney's. . . 6 

Kiver road, at Goffe's Falls 30 

Second street, at 'Squog river 62 

Second street, at 'Squog river 127 

South road jo 

^Febster road, at water-works dam.. . 100 

Weston road, east of D . Connor's | 6 



Width 

of 

roadway 



20 

22.5 

24 

30.5 

20 

17 

20.5 

17.5 

29 5 

33 

37.3 

26 

21 

1G.7 

34 

IS 

20 

20.5 

24 

20 

16 

30 

32.5 

32 5 

22 

17.5 

16 



No. of 
walks. 



Width j 

of I Material, 
walks. 



5.5 

7 
6 



8.75 
8.75 



Wood. 
Iron. 



Stone. 
Wood . 



Iron. 
Wood. 



Stone. 
Wood. 



Iron. 
Wood. 



Steel. 



Wood. 



Arch- 
es or 
spans. 



Stone bridges, 2 ; steel, 2; iron, 4; wood, 19; total, 27. 



134 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

GENERAL REPAIRS. 

Patched Amory street from Main to Beauport with ashes and 
clay ; labor ^15. 

Graveled Second street from Hancock to Blaine; labor $10. 

Patched Hooksett road; labor ^20. 

Graveled Second street, Blaine to School ; labor $15. 

One hundred loads of gravel put down throughout division ; 
labor ^64. 

Graveled Front street, Amoskeag ; labor ^40. 

Repaired Mast street, near Baldwin's; labor ^200. 

Repaired Cartier street, north of Amory ; labor ^50. 

Repaired Rimmon back street, north of Amory; labor $75. 

Patched Gates street with clay ; labor $10. 

Patched Beauport street with clay ; labor ^2.50. 

Bushes cut throughout both divisions; cost for labor $']^. 

Road-machine used on roads throughout both divisions ; 
labor $200. 

Tree boxes whitewashed ; labor ^15. 

Gutters cleaned out, crossings scraped, stones picked up, 
streets patched, gravel screened, etc.; labor ^1,004.36. 

Total cost of the above work, ^1,795.86; charged to the 
appropriation for Repairs of Highway's. 

FENCING. 

Railroad street, Second street at culvert, Second street, south 
of Hancock, Eddy road. Farmer road, Amoskeag, old back road 
south of ice houses. 

Total number of feet fencing, 1,667 ; labor, etc., ^97.19. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
NEW STREETS GRADED. 



Location. 



Amory, west of Bartlett >.. 

Amory, west of Bartlett 

Alsace, betweeen Amory and Kelly. 

Boutelle, west of .Joliette 

Cohimbus avenue, west of Boutelle. 

Cartier, south of Sullivan 

Dubuque, Amory to Kelly 

Eddy road 

Prince, west of Boynton 

Railroad, near AVliittemore's 

Second, from Schiller 

Wentworth, south of Hancock 



Total , 



Length 
in feet. 



,645 

,270 

,520 

75 

43 

825 

660 

475 

525 

,095 

,405 

20 



10,558 



Cut or 

mi. 


Labor. 


Cut... 


^613. 50 


" 


100.00 


Both.. 


3('8.00 


Fill... 


40.00 


" 


25.00 


Cut... 


100.00 


Fill... 


158.75 


Both.. 


2,228.90 


Fill... 


20.00 


Both.. 


113.98 


" 


810.00 


Fill... 


23.50 




$4,541.63 



Note. — In some cases the above streets were only turnpiked 
with road-machine. 

For incidentals see summary of new streets graded in report 
of division No. 2. 

STREETS TOPDRESSED. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Adams, Main to Cartier 

Amoskeag, west of bridge 

Beauport, Adams to Milton . . . 
Beauport, Sullivan to Putnam 
Bowman, south of Mast road . 

Conant ■. 

Front street, Amoskeag 

Forrest, extension of Milford. 

McGregor and Main 

McDufiie, west of Boynton 

North Main 

Old Mast road 

Second .street 

Turner street 

Total 



400 
350 
260 
450 
300 
225 
850 
300 
550 
150 
725 
600 
325 
350 



5,835 



Width 
in feet. 



Labor. 



$150.00 
75.00 
75.00 

200.00 
25.00 
15.00 

200.00 

150,00 
40.00 
15.00 

256.38 
.50.00 
35.00 
40.00 



$1,326.38 



136 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



MACADAMIZING. 

Turner street, Granite to School, 1,354 square yards. 

Cost Salem stone ....... ^122.36 

Cost granite chips . . . • . . . 204.00 

Incidentals ........ 325.65 

Labor . . . . . . . . . 491.13 

Total ^1,143.14 

GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Location. 



Adams 

Amory, between Rimmon and Hevey. 

Amoi-y, north of Rimmon 

Beauport 

Bowman 

Beauport, north of Adams 

Bath, east of Second 

Barr, south of Conant 

Conant 

Cartier 

Conant, west of Dubuque 

Cartier, north of Gates 

Conant, west of West 

Clinton, east of Dover 

Gates and Cartier 

Kelly, west of Beauport 

McGregor 

Main and McGregor 

McGregor, north of Putnam 

Putnam street extension 

Putnam, west of Main 

Prince, west of Boynton 

Rimmon and Amory 

South Main-street bridge 

South Main, south of Boynton 

Tliird, between Walker and Ferry 

Walker, east of JSIain 

Wilton, west of Main 



Total 



Length 
in feet. 



192 
120 
150 
275 
400 
100 
200 
100 
100 
150 
220 
200 
200 
100 
240 
100 
545 

80 
350 
350 

82 
450 

75 



350 
200 
350 
100 



5,779 



Width 
in feet. 



Cut or 
fill. 



Both. . 

Cut... 



Fill. 



Cut. 



Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 

Cut. 



Fill.. 



Cut. 

¥in'. 



Labor. 



$10.00 
10.00 
18.00 
10.00 
15.00 

5.00 
10.00 

4.50 
10.00 
12.00 
15.00 
15.00 

5.50 

S.iiO 
20.00 

9. CO 
15.00 

6.80 
15.00 
10.00 

3.00 
12.00 
10.00 

5.63 
11.25 
15.01) 
12.00 

5.00 



$295.18 



EDGE STONES SET, 



Location. 

Amory and Rimmon 
Adams and Beauport , 
Amory and Dubuque 



Feet. 

54 
32 
16 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



137 



Amory and Rimmon . 

Blaine, west of Third 

Beauport and Adams . 

Back street, between Beauport and Main 

Beauport and Sullivan 

Beauport back, between Putnanj and Sullivan 

Beauport back, west of Adams . 

Beauport back, north of Adams . 

Bath back, south of School 

Conant and Barr 

Cartier ..... 

Cartier, between Kelly and Amory 

Cartier back, near Dubuque 

Cartier back, near Rimmon 

Douglas and Main 

Douglas, west of West 

Gates, corner Cartier 

Gates, corner Dubuque 

Main and Adams 

Main and McGregor 

McGregor, north of Putnam 

North Main, No. 406 

North Main, north of Putnam . 

North Main and Putnam . 

Putnam and Main 

Rimmon and Amory . 

Rimmon back, between Rimmon and Heve 

Schuyler and Beauport 

Schuyler back, between Schuyler and Adams 

Third and Walker 

Turner and School , 

Total .... 



150 
72 

32 
32 
32 
32 
.16 
16 
16 
16 

50 
50 
32 
16 
16 

50 
32 
48 
16 
32 
24 
49 
50 
32 

8 

32 
8 
16 
16 
16 



1,141 



Total number of feet of edge stones set, 1,141 ; cost for labor, 
$255.50 ; average cost per foot for setting, $0,223. 



138 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Location. 



Adams 

Adams 

Beauport 

Bowman 

Beauport, iiortli of Sullivan 

Beauport, south of Adams 

Barr, Conant to Douglas 

Conant, west of West 

Cartier, north of Conant 

C 

Cartier, soutli of Amory 

Cartier, north of Conant 

Conant 

Dubuque, north of Amory 

Douglas, east of Barr 

Dubuque, north of Gates 

Gates, between Cartier and Dubuque 

Milf ord, west of Carroll 

Milford, east of Riddle 

McGregor 

Milford, west Bowman 

Mai-ion, between Main and McGregor 

North Main, near McGregor 

North Main 

" 'Skeag Eddy " 

Turner, Granite to Bath 

W^est 

Walker, west of Third 

Total 



Square 


No. 


yards. 


loads. 


'r85 


13 


210 


25 


122 


13 


204 


18 


311 


35 


101 


12 


88 


7 


168 


15 


155 


18 


2 


<> 


169 


20 


66 


10 


109 


12 


88 


13 


58 


9 


23 


3 


132 


14 


3 


1 


3 


1 


242 


31 


85 


9 


34 


3 


135 


16 


210 


35 


190 


12 


556 


.52 


72 


10 


23 


3 


3,644 


411 



Labor. 



$40.00 
75.00 
40.00 
75.00 

112.00 

74.00 

25.00 

45.00 

50.00 

1.75 

95.00 

60.00 

65.00 

35 00 

25.00 

20.00 

45.00 

2.00 

1.00 

100.00 
44.00 
13.50 
44.00 

110.00 
75.00 

200.00 
40.00 
13.00 



$1,524.75. 



PAVING RELAID. 

Beauport, north of Adams .... 
Clinton, east of Dover ..... 
Granite street, from Bridge to Main 
Main street, from stone bridge to Granite street 

Total 

Total cost for labor, ^1,059.38. 



75 feet 
100 " 

1,135 '' 

1,000 " 

2,'::io feet 



STKEET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



139 



Location. 



Adams and Main 

Amory and Dubuque 

Beauport and Wilton 

Beauport and Adams 

Beauport and Sullivan 

Cartier and Conant 

Conant and West 

Douglas, east of Barr 

Gates and Cartier 

McGregor and North Amory 

McGregor and Nortli Main 

Mcgregor back and North Amory. 
McGregor back and North Main. . . 

Sullivan and Main 

Turner and Bath 

Turner and School 

West and Granite 



Total 



21 



Cost of 
material. 



$13.15 
29.79 
12.43 
15.69 

8.74 
14.41 
12.43 

8.64 
44.49 
11.44 
15.35 
11.63 
18.55 
12.61 
12.09 
24.68 
13.96 



$280.08 



Labor. 



$15.00 
33.00 
15.00 
25.00 
15.00 
10.00 
15.00 
9. CO 
62.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
30.00 
15.00 
10.00 
30.00 
20.00 



$354.00 



REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



Adams and Beauport 

Amory and Main 

Barr and Douglas 

Granite, between Second and Turner 

McGregor and Wayne. 

Main 

North Main near Amory 

North Main and Wayne 

Putnam and Main 

Putnam and Beauport 

Sullivan and Beaupoi't , 

Soutli Main street bridge 

Turner and Bath 

West and Douglas 

Winter 

West and Granite 

Wayne and Main 

Total 



Cost of 
material. 



$9.06 
2.28 
1.71 

.55 
2.28 

.85 

.84 
4.78 
4.49 
1.18 
3.15 
13.71 
2 83 

.85 
2.55 

.85 
2.28 



$54.24 



Labor. 



$8.00 
2.50 
4.0O 
3.00 
3.00 
2.00 
4.00 
3.50 
4.00 
4.00 
8.00 

30,00 
5.-00 
2.00 
8.00 
2.. 50 
2.50 



$96.00 



Cleaned out cesspools throughout division lo in January, Feb- 
ruary, March, May, June, July, September, October, at a total 
cost of $787.18. 



140 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
• REPAIRED SEWERS. 



Location. 



Amoskeag, thawed out culverts 

North Main, flushed out sewer 

Walker, flushed out sewer 

Adams and west Beauport 

Adams and Beauport 

€artier, south end 

McGregor bridge underneath bridge 

Granite, near North Weare railroad, manholes. 

Dubuque back 

Baldwin's yard 

Wayne, cleaned out cesspools 

South Main 

Turner aud Bath 

Beauport and Adams 



Total. 



Cost of 
material. 



$0.85 
2.02 
1.71 
1.71 
3.43 
.85 
1.07 
1.80 
4.78 
2.03 



$20.25 



Labor. 



$10.00 

5.00 

4.00 

2.00 

2.50 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

3.00 

15.00 

31.00 

3.50 

5.00 

G.OO 



$109.00 



For new sewers built in division No. lo, see table " New 
Sewers." 



COMMONS. 

Public opinion in our city has for some years been in favor of 
a system of parks, and securing for the same special sections 
which shall contain all the beauties of natural forest, meadow, 
and stream, to be within the city limits, for the promotion of 
the health, pleasure, and recreation of our citizens. 

Manchester is indeed fortunate in possessing abundant means 
of supplying these demands, and already much has been done to 
secure an extensive park system. 

We have now six small parks or commons scattered through- 
out the thickly settled portion of our city, containing x9.11 
acres, with two larger parks in the north and eastern parts, con- 
taining in all 98 acres. 

Our city is thus provided with a total of 11 7. 11 acres of park 
lands. Springfield, Mass., has twenty-two parks, large and 
small, amounting to 445.16 acres; Boston, ten parks, with a 
total of 1,888 acres; Baltimore, nine parks, total, 861 acres ; St. 
Louis, twenty-one parks, 2,180 acres; Chicago, twenty-one 
parks, 2,594 acres; Minneapolis, forty-three parks, with a total 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 141 

of 1,552 acres. In comparison with other cities, Manchester 
has only made a beginning. With but little trouble and expen- 
diture, as compared with other cities, our city could secure a 
section of land in West Manchester, which should take in Rock 
Rimmon and vicinity, and with a section in South Manchester 
would complete an extensive circular system of parks. 

It is to be hoped that such a system may be developed in the 
coming years for the future benefit of our citizens. 

During the last year many improvements and changes have 
been made on our commons under the direction of the commis- 
sion. 

After the skating season was over in March, the commons were 
carefully drained and cleaned up, the seats repaired and painted 
ready to set. In April, the holes and bad places in the lawns- 
were filled up, regraded,and sown down with grass seed. A ton 
of phosphate with a large amount of wood ashes and other dress- 
ing was spread over all the lawns and grass plots. 

A broad new pathway was built and graded, extending from 
the north side of Merrimack common to the soldiers' monument^ 
and concreted. Eleven maples, comprising six varieties, were 
set out on either side of the walk, adding greatly to the appear- 
ance of the common. During April the commissioners purchased 
three hundred shrubs and ornamentals, which were carefully set 
out in well chosen localities on all the commons, where they 
would add to the general effect of ornamentation and would 
please the public eye. Nearly all these trees and shrubs have 
lived and have shown a vigorous, healthy growth during the last 
season, and abundantly repay the cost by their attractive appear- 
ance. Eight different beds of flowers were located on Merri- 
mack common, four beds on Park common, four beds on Con- 
cord common, three beds on Tremont common, and three beds 
on Hanover common. These beds were filled with geraniums 
and other bright blooming flowering plants. All the ornamental 
trees, shrubs, and beds were properly fenced with wire fencing 
and protected with strong stakes and posts, the same being neatly- 
painted in harmonious colors. 



142 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 

During the summer months the grass was cut eight times on 
all the commons, and each common was thoroughly inspected 
every day, all paper, stones, or rubbish carefully picked up and 
carted away. Twice every week the walks on the commons were 
swept, and also after all public gatherings. All shrubs and beds 
of flowers were watered when necessary and fences and seats re- 
paired. 

Eight band concerts were held on the commons or in their 
vicinity^ one being held on Merrimack common when a portable 
band stand was used, erected by Superintendent Fullerton and 
his men. Three concerts were held on Concord common where 
the regular stand was used, one concert on Park common, one 
on Hanover common, one at School street, West Manchester, 
and one on McGregorville common. The superintendent and 
his men have provided the stands, chairs, etc., and have looked 
after the protection of trees, shrubs, and flower beds. During 
Memorial day. Fourth of July, and Merchants' Week the com- 
mons were used, and all plants and trees liable to injury carefully 
protected by boardmg, fences, etc. 

During the first part of August attention was called to the tus- 
sock moth, which had appeared in large quantities on the trees 
of the commons. Measures were immediately taken to destroy 
the moths, and Superintendent Fullerton and his men were 
directed by the commission to gather the cocoons and burn 
them. This was done on all the commons at a cost of $io6. 
The moths were also removed from other locations at a cost of 

In September and October all cesspools and drains were cleaned 
out, leaves raked up and the fountains covered for winter. 

In November preparations were made for skating. All cess- 
pools were closed up where overflows were to be made, and all 
trees and shrubs protected by boarding, etc. 

The remark has often been heard this season that "our com- 
mons never looked better." This has been true because the 
commission has endeavored to have them carefully and system- 
atically attended to. The season was a good one for growth of 



STKEET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



143 



grass and flowers, and our citizens have as a general rule endeav- 
ored to second the commissioners in their efforts. 

Some complaints have been made on account of thoughtless 
boys playing football on the lawns, or cutting the shrubs to ob- 
tain wood for whistles, or dashing down the concrete walks in 
wagons to the damage of pedestrians ; but on the whole Man- 
chester has reason to be well satisfied with the condition of the 
commons. 

There should be separate appropriations for water and light, 
and one for skating , the actual appropriation for commons could 
then be used directly for repairs and improvements. 

The following is a tabular statement of the expenditures on 
commons : 

CARE OF COMMONS. 



App. 


'opriation. 




Appropriation for commons . 


$4,000.00 


Extra appropriation 


200.00 


Transferred from reserved fund 


15.02 


Expenditures. 




Labor, including skating 


$2,484.51 


Water-works 




720.00 


Trees, shrubbery, flowers 




353-82 


Concreting . 




164.72 


Incidentals, repairs, etc. 




101.32 


Tools and supplies 




59.62 


Grass seed and dressing 




230.78 


Seats .... 




33-8o 


Painting 




30-45 


Lights .... 




36.00 


Total 





^,215.02 



$4,215.02 



144 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

STARK PARK. 

Work was commenced early in April on Stark park, cleaning 
up and repairing all washouts preparatory to improvements for 
the season. 

Early in the winter Mrs. Arthur M. Eastman, of this city, 
made a generous gift of a large handsome vase to be placed on 
the lawn at Stark park. Accordingly it was transferred, as soon 
as the ground was in suitable condition, to an elevated spot on 
the lawn near the River road. A base was prepared of granite, 
three feet square, and the foundation carefully ironed. Later in 
the season the bowl of the vase was filled with earth, and flowers 
were set out. It is a great addition to the beauty of the park. 

Af'ter repairs were made, caused by heavy rains in the fall and 
early spring, the lawns were regraded and dressed with fifteen 
loads of wood ashes besides phosphate and dressing. Eighty 
trees, consisting of maples, tamaracks, balsams, spruces, and 
elms, were set out on the north line of the park. Thirty-eight 
trees, nearly all cedars, were placed on the south line, and twelve 
trees put in the grove, all sugar maples, the twelve maples being 
a gift from Miss Lizzie Stark, of this city ; also four lilac shrubs 
and two flowering trees were given by this lady, and were set out 
in line with the cemetery fence. One hundred and fifty-five 
trees in all were set out in Stark park. The locations of all 
shrubs and trees were selected with reference to the accepted 
plan for laying out the park, and were not allowed to interfere 
with proposed roadways or paths. 

The special work this season has been the building of the 
north road, leading from the north entrance at the River road to 
the grove. 

After the route and grade was given the subsoil was removed 
to a depth of two feet and carried a short distance to the grove 
to fill up the ravine where the road would eventually pass. Four 
hundred and eighty feet of drain pipe were laid across the lawn 
before it was graded, to take the wash from the road and from 
the junction with the central road. The foundation of roadbed 
consisted of stone broken with the hammer, crushed ledge stone 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 145 

being placed on top of this and evenly rolled in courses, and 
fine Salem stone rolled wet, used for final dressing. The length 
of the road was 874 feet, width 18 feet, with 14-inch paved gut- 
ters on both sides. A short piece of road was added to complete 
the plan of road service of the eastern part of the park, and was 
236 feet in length, 18 feet wide, with 14-inch paved gutters, mak- 
ing a total length of 1,110 feet built this season. Cesspools 
have been put in at the junction of these new roads and all other 
places where surface drainage was needed. 

All the roads in the park when completed will probably receive 
names from the famous battlefields of the old hero Gen. John 
Stark, whose remains are buried in the cemetery in the park. 

Much important work has been done in the way of draining. 
A deep ditch has been dug along the eastern front of the park ta 
keep the surface water from injuring the park land. A covered 
drain has also been built from the large spring in the ravine 
about 66 feet in length with manhole, 8-inch pipe being laid, 
without cement, and covered with broken stone. 

The lower part of the park is seamed with ravines or gullies, 
and the surface is of a rolling nature, forming many water sheds, 
which force the water down the numerous brooks toward the low 
land next the railroad. Here it is proposed to form a double 
pond connected by a bridge for skating and ornamental pur- 
poses. It has been the purpose of the commission to so drain 
all roads, when built, that the flow of water would be down these 
ravines to the pond. There are twelve different springs in this 
section of the park, consequently there will always be an abun- 
dant supply of water. 

Seven acres were plowed, graded, and grass seed sown mixed 
with winter rye, which should produce a fine lawn next season. 
The grass and weeds have been cut twice. — in June and August. 
The underbrush in the grove down to the railroad was cut to pre- 
vent bush fires starting from sparks from locomotives. 

A very decided improvement has been made in the burial lot,, 
the old headstones being removed from the section where menir 



146 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

bers of the Stark family have been buried, the plain granite shaft 
erected to the memory of Gen. John Stark alone remaining. A 
handsome memorial monument of Troy granite has been erected, 
consisting of an urn and cap, die, plinth, and base, the whole 
combining to make a beautiful memorial, standing six feet high. 
The names of those buried in this part of the lot have been put 
upon three sides of the die, which is polished. The name Stark 
appears on the front in large raised letters handsomely polished ; 
the rest of the monument is fine hammered work. This memo- 
rial has been placed in the burial lot by Miss Lizzie and Augus- 
tus Stark, grandchildren of the famous general. The original 
■shaft still remaining was erected to the memory of Stark in the 
year 1829 by his eldest son, Caleb Stark of Dunbarton. The 
burial place of the old hero has always been held in respect by 
our citizens as marking the spot where the warrior sleeps, and it 
wall be very satisfactory to the public to know that further im- 
provements will probably be made another season. 

(For summary of expenditures see Derryfield park.) 

DERRYFIELD PARK. 

The first work on this park was the cleaning up, grading, and 
'filling caused by the heavy spring rains. Early in March the 
-commissioners ordered 108 choice selected trees for the parks 
and commons. The following list was purchased : Sixty-five 
American Elms, 75 rock maples, 6 silver- leaved maples, 6 purple- 
leaved beeches, 6 Kilmarnock willlows, 6 ash-leaved maples, 6 
weir-cut-leaved maples, 10 horse chestnuts. Out of this variety 
46 maples and horse chestnuts were set out, 40 feet apart, on 
the south side of the park, along the line of Bridge street. These 
trees were strengthened and protected by stakes. 

All the trees have lived and in a few years will add their 
beauty to that of the shrubbery. Forty-six elms, maples, and 
horse-chestnuts were also planted, forty feet apart, around the 
circular driveway, all showing thrifty growth, and will soon give 
delightful shade to this favorite carriage drive and bicycle track. 

Upon the extension of the electric road a culvert was built at 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 147 

the extreme southwest corner, on Bridge street, and a wide, well- 
graded walk was made extending along the south side, parallel 
with Bridge street, leading to the upper Bridge-street entrance, a 
distance of one thousand six hundred feet. The banking along 
this walk was turfed and graded four hundred feet. Connection 
was made with the water main on Bridge street, and pipe laid to 
the park, where two small drinking fountains were attached, one 
in the grove and one half way down the western slope. This 
walk was completed and water-supply put in before the Fourth 
of July celebration, and added greatly to the comfort and con- 
venience of the ten thousand people who visited the ])lace at 
that time. Two electric lights, on poles, have been erected, one 
^t the upper Bridge-street entrance and one in the grove near 
the junction of the circular driveway with the road through the 
grove. This improvement has been appreciated by all patrons, 
■especially the bicycle riders. The trees were trimmed, under- 
brush, grass, and weeds cut twice, in June and August. A large 
number of stone posts will soon be placed in the grove for the 
•convenience of carriage owners. All the fountains and pump in 
the grove have been protected with concrete. The chief work 
this season was the preparatory grading of the roadbed, as laid 
out in the accepted plan, of driveway extending from the north-, 
em entrance to the grove, on old Bridge-street road, along the 
southern side of Oak Hill, winding around until it joins the old 
Bridge-street road again near the southwestern entrance. Soon 
after commencing this w'ork it was found that an extensive ledge 
extended across part of the proposed route, and that numerous 
springs interfered with the grading. These difficulties were 
overcome by digging a deep drain on both sides of the road, one 
thousand five hundred two feet in length, and laying drain pipe 
covered with broken stone obtained by blasting the ledge. 
Seven cesspools and one manhole were built to take away sur- 
face water. 

About five hundred feet of the roadbed were cut from five to 
seven feet and four hundred feet were filled from two to seven 
feet ; the rest of the roadway was both filled and cut. Over two 



148 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

thousand loads of coarse broken stone, from the stone dump on 
the park, were placed on the roadbed for foundation. . The- 
entire -length of road prepared for macadamizing was one thou- 
sand five hundred feet, with a width of thirty feet. This road- 
way will be completed next year. 

Derryfield park is fortunate in possessing an abundant water- 
supply and abounds in springs. It is the plan of the commis- 
sion to utilize these natural water courses by directing all drains 
down to the location of the large pond, as shown on the plan. 

As there was considerable standing water in this section a, 
drain ten feet deep was extended from the drains beside the road- 
bed, already alluded to, eight hundred feet, to the end of the 
Pearl-street sewer, where a trap and manhole were put in. This, 
plan of drainage seems to work satisfactorily. 

Various conveniences for the public have been built this sea- 
son and new seats supplied. The usual number of swings have 
been used by the children and have greatly added to their 
pleasure. 

It is intended to provide a playground inside of the circular 
driveway, and a coasting way will sometime probably be built on^ 
the side of Oak Hill. 

It is interesting to note the variety of trees, birds, plants, 
ferns, mosses, etc., that are found within the limits of the park. 
On Oak Hill red and white oak is growing in picturesque clumps 
mingled with white and hard pine. The large grove used for 
picnics and out-of-door meetings contains old-growth white pine, 
interspersed with white and black or silver birch and some alder. 
In the northwest portion of the park there are some fine speci- 
mens of white and hard pine. All the native. birds inhabit the 
groves, and flocks of quail are often seen near the high-service 
reservoir. Red and gray squirrels are found and the striped, 
squirrel. Along the damp places and in the groves a great va- 
riety of beautiful ferns adorn the banks, while ground pine,, 
mountain laurel, juniper, and meadow pinks abound. 

A number of rhododendrons have been planted in favorable- 
places and seem to flourish, and other flowering shrubs are being 
introduced. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 149 

The plan laid out by the city government, and followed by 
the commissioners, calls for a great variety of walks and road- 
ways, and when completed will produce an artistic arrangement 
of lawn, foliage, plants, and shrubs that together will combine 
to make a beautiful retreat. 

It is needless to state that one of the best and most extended 
views of our beautiful city is that from the top of Oak Hill. 
This site is being improved every year, and a good road leads to 
that locality. The land around the high-service reservoir has 
been graded, and it is expected that a handsome stone observ- 
atory will soon be built at this spot, to commemorate the gen- 
erosity of the late James A. Weston. 

All these improvements call for additional means to keep 
everything in good order. 

A portable crusher and road-roller, especially for the parks, 
would greatly assist in caring for the roads, and a storage barn 
and shelter for this park would enable the superintendent to keep 
necessary tools for immediate use. The growth of the city and 
the popularity of this section, combined, call for extra care, as 
thousands visit the park every day during the summer months. 
It will be necessary soon to provide rules and regulations, and 
also to establish regular park police, to protect the shrubs and 
trees and to stop would-be hunters from shooting birds and 
squirrels. Two men have been detailed each Sunday this last 
season who have done police duty and who report that, owing to 
the consideration of most of the patrons, their duties, for the 
most part, have been light. 

The following is a summary of expenses attending the season's 
work : 

Appropriation for Stark and Derryfield parks . . ^5,000.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Stark Park. 

Labor . 12,029.98 

Stone 218.84 



150 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 



Trees and shrubbery 

Tools and supplies 

Ashes . 

Painting 

Incidentals, repairs, etc 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



^148.00 
64.76 
70.25 
14.02 
17.40 



Derryfield 


Park. 


Labor ....... $1,268.01 


Stone .... 






31-35 


Incidentals, repairs, etc. 






35-78 


Tools, supplies 






13.64 


Pipe . . , . 






22.17 


Lumber 






26.46 


Painting 






18.99 


Concreting . 






30.21 



$2,56^ 



$2,436.61 

$4,999.86. 
.14 

$5,000.00. 



REPORTS FROM HIGHWAY DIVISIONS. 



INTRODUCTION. 

As the city extends its growth, the demand for additional 
streets running through the suburbs and connecting with the 
main thoroughfares leading to business centers, keeps pace with 
the growth ; consequently each year brings the outside divisions 
somewhat into the city proper, and causes a greater outlay of 
labor and materials for construction and maintenance of new 
highways, sewers, and repairs. 

To give an idea of the territory covered by the outside divi- 
sions the number of miles of traveled roads is given, and the 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 151 

length of highways broken out after snowstorms. When it is 
considered that all these roads have to be kept in repair, stones 
removed, bushes cut, culverts built, cleaned, and repaired, and 
in some divisions near the city sidewalks and streets graded, 
sewers and cesspools built, etc., it will be seen that much care 
and time must be expended to keep everything as near as possi- 
ble to the public requirements for safe and comfortable travel. 

The following reports will speak for themselves regarding the 
improvements made and care taken of the outside divisions : 



Division No. 1 . 

John C. Ray, Agent. 

Number miles traveled road in this division, about 5. Over 
2 miles of the division have been repaired by use of the road- 
machine during the year, and ten old culverts repaired. 

Number of feet of road graveled, 825. Number of feet of roads 
widened, 1,237. Number of cubic yards filled, 200. 

Bushes cut on River road from Clarke street to Hooksett line,. 
Elm street from Clark street to Industrial School, Union from 
Clark to junction of Hooksett road and North River road. 

The roads have been broken out after snowstorms, and all gen- 
eral repairs throughout the division attended to. 



Division No. 4. 

Byron E. Moore, Agent. 

There are over 5 miles of traveled roads in this division, with 
an average width of 40 feet. 

Number of feet of new roads built this year, 1,000. Number 
of feet in length of roads turnpiked, 2,175. Number of feet in 
length of roads graveled, 1,200. Number of feet in length of 
roads widened, 1,000. Number of feet in length of railing built,. 



152 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

350. Number of feet in length of fencing built, 1,000. Num- 
ber of cubic yards filled, 500. Number of bridges repaired 2. 

Four new culverts have been built and one repaired. 

Bushes have been cut both sides of the roads throughout the 
division, and all roads broken out after snowstorms. 



Division No. 5. 

Mark E. Harvey, Agent. 

Number of miles of traveled road in this division, 14, with an 
average width of 22 feet. 

Nutt road graveled for a length of 1,425 feet. All other roads 
graveled for a length of about 1,560 feet. 

Goffe's Falls road and Center road turnpiked with road-ma- 
chine. 

Nutt road graded 361 cubic yards. 

Seventy-five feet of new railing built. 

Bushes cut and loose stones removed from all roads in the divi- 
sion twice a month from April to November. All roads plowed 
out after snowstorms. 



Division No. 6. 

Daniel H. Dickey, Agent. 

The roads in this division are too narrow for public travel, the 
average width being 12 feet. There are 6^ miles of traveled 
roads. 

Number of cubic yards filled, 566. One bridge repaired with 
400 feet new plank ; two culverts built, — one stone and one iron. 

Road-machine has been used on all roads throughout the en- 
tire division, and bushes cut on both sides of road for about 3 
miles. General repairs attended to, and roads broken out after 
storms. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 

Division No. 7. 

Charles Francis, Agent. 
streets graded. 



153 



Clay, Jevvett to Cypress 
Hall street .... 

Vinton street .... 
Wilson street, line of electric road 



Length in feet. 


Labor. 


35° 


$265.00 


35° 


125.00 


I,200 


140.00 


6oo 


200.00 



Totals 



2,500 



STREETS GRAVELED. 



;73o.oo 



» 


Feet. 


Mammoth road 


1,500 


Candia road ....... 


850 


Hayward street ....... 


800 


Valley street ....... 


400 


Total 


3>55o 


GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 






Feet. 


Dearborn 


335 


Summer street ....... 


50 


Hosley street ....... 


100 


Grove street ....... 


178 


Wilson street ....... 


75 


Cypress street ....... 


150 


Summer and Hosley streets .... 


50 


Total 


938 


EDGE STONE SET. 






Feet. 


Dearborn street ...... 


335 


Summer and Hosley streets .... 


150 


Summer street ....... 


50 



154 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Valley and Cypress streets . 
Cypress and Hayward streets 
Spruce and Belmont streets 
Spruce street and Falls road 

Total . 



Cypress street 
Dearborn street 
Spruce street 
Belmont street 

Total 



GUTTERS PAVED. 



i6 
i6 
i6 
i6 

599 

Feet. 
150 
335 
I5C> 
100 

735 



ROAD MACHINE USED. 



The road-machine was used on Paige, Taylor, Jewett, and 
Spruce streets, and Mammoth road. 



NEW CESSPOOLS BUILT. 

Two, corner Spruce and Belmont; materials, ^32.97 ; labor, 
$40 ; total cost, ^72.97. 

Corner Valley and Belmont; materials, ^6.64; labor, $10; 
total cost, ^16.64. 

NEW SEWERS BUILT. 

Dearborn street, 380 feet lo-inch pipe. Cost of materials,. 
$86.36 ; labor, $160 ; total cost, $246.36. 

Jewett street, 1,158 feet 15-inch pipe. Cost of materials, 
$1,256.73; labor, $6,665.82 ; total cost, $7,922.55. (This sewer 
was built through solid ledge.) 

(For further details see sewer table.) 

One new culvert has been built on Platts avenue, size 20 feet 
X i^ feet X i^ feet. 

There are over fourteen miles of streets and roads in this divis- 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 155 

ion, all of which have to be broken out after snowstorms. Gen- 
eral repairs have been attended to, bushes cut, stones removed 
from roads, etc. 



Division No. 8. 

John H. Proctor, Agent. 

Hanover street widened 500 rods in length, 20 feet in width j 
also two culverts 4 feet in length, 2 feet in width ; three culverts 
10 feet in length, 2 feet in width. 

Lake avenue widened 18 rods in length, 8 feet in width, one 
fill made of 100 feet in length, 20 feet in width, i^ feet in 
depth, one wall built 150 feet in length 4 feet in height. 

Candia road widened 80 rods in length, 20 feet in width, and 
a large amount of blasting done, another piece widened 300 feet 
in length, 25 feet in width, 6 feet in depth, with a large amount 
of blasting done. One culvert lengthened out 15 feet 4x4, an- 
other culvert lengthened out 15 feet, 2x2, two other culverts 
lengthened out 4 feet i x i. 

Bridge street widened out 100 feet in length, 8 feet in width, 
and culvert built 50 feet long. 

Lake Shore road blasted and widened 300 feet in length,. 8 
feet in width. 

About three miles of road turnpiked with road-machine, and 
three hundred loads of gravel used in patching. Bushes have 
been cut, roads plowed out after snowstorms, and all other neces- 
sary work attended to. There are over eight miles of traveled 
road in this division. 



Division No. 9. 

Lester C. Paige, Agent. 

This division contains eleven miles of traveled road, the greater 
portion of which is sand and requires a large amount of gravel to 



156 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

keep it in repair. The bank on Cohas avenue, which has furnished 
gravel for the past fifteen years, is completely exhausted and some 
provision for obtaining gravel will have to be made before an- 
other season. If two or more banks could be purchased in differ- 
ent parts of the division it would be a great saving in the cost of 
teaming. 

Number of loads of gravel used this year, 370. Number of 
feet in length roads turnpiked, 544. Number of feet in length 
roads graveled, 4,000. Number of feet in length railing built, 
So. Number of miles of bushes cut, 5. 

One bridge on Mammoth road near Londonderry line was 
newly planked, using 760 feet of plank. Three stone culverts 
were taken up, cleaned and relaid, and two lengthened. Also 
one half of the large stone culvert over Hall brook was taken up 
•and relaid and a retaining wall built on the north side, using 
five perch of stone. The average width of the roads in this divis- 
ion is about three rods. 

ROAD MACHINE USED. 

On Mammoth road, from division line to Londonderry line. 

On South road, from Mammoth road to division line. 

On Dickey road, from Derry road to division line. 

On Mooreville road, from Mammoth road to division line. 

On Paige road, from Mammoth road to Londonderry line. 

On Webster road, from Derry road to division line. 

On Cohas avenue, from Derry road to division line. 

On Derry road about one half mile in length. 

Small stones were removed from the roads several times during 
the summer season. All roads throughout the division were 
broken out after snowstorms and kept in a passable condition 
during the winter months. 



Division No. 12. 

Eugene G. Libbey, Agent. 

This division covers about five miles of traveled roads, some 
of them quite hilly and hard to keep in good condition. Many 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 15T 

are too narrow, and the rapid growth of the city in the direction 
of Mammoth road calls for more care each year on the roads 
and highways. 

During the last year Mammoth road has been widened 700 
feet in length and made 8 to 10 feet wider near the city farm 
where there is large travel. Also this road, which is the most 
traveled in this division, has been widened 6 to 8 feet, 400 feet 
in length, south of the Kennard road junction, and patched with 
gravel 700 feet in length, filling about a foot on an average. 
Considerable work has been done on old Bridge street extension 
near junction with Mammoth road. Two hundred feet of this 
road was graded and filled from 6 to 8 inches. 

On the Bald Hill road repairs have been made. Three hun- 
dred feet of this highway from junction with Mammoth road 
have been widened to 40 feet, giving a good road at the junction 
of the Bell road. Bald Hill road, and Mammoth road. The Bell 
road has also received attention and is now widened to 40 feet, 
100 feet from junction with Bald Hill road. Bushes have been 
cut^and all roads broken out after snowstorms and other neces- 
sary repairs made throughout the division. 

ITEMS. 

Under this head we sum up items of general interest which 
cannot be gathered under any special account. 

The supplies for the city stables, stock and tools have been 
purchased at low rates. Hay and oats have been bought by the 
carload, and pipe, brick, cement, and castings obtained at un- 
usually low prices. 

During the last year 46 cars of Akron pipe have been received 
containing 27,858 feet of pipe. Of this amount 18,146 feet has 
been used on the sewers. There has been very little breakage 
in shipment and no unnecessary delay in transportation ; entire 
cost of pipe $5,992.78. Two large brick sewers have been built 
this season, Silyer street and Christian brook, including a length 
of 4,694 feet all of brick. The size of Silver-street sewer was 
3 feet 2 inches by 4 feet 9 inches ; 588,000 of brick were used 
and 1,032 casks of cement. Christian brook sewer was 3 feet 
6 inches by 5 feet 3 inches, 503,473 bricks were used and 1,040. 



158 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

barrels of cement. The details of sewers are given in tabular 
statement. One hundred eighty-three cars of brick were deliv- 
ered ; total cost of brick ^6,597.15 and of freight $929.60. 
Twenty-three cars of cement containing 2,465 casks have been 
used, at a cost of $2,634.59. The details of castings used on 
sewers will be found in the sewer table.' 

At the opening of the season, April 8, a new Ingersoll-Sergeant 
steam drill was purchased, with tripod, complete set of tools, one 
set li shank swedges and 75 feet 5-ply hose and couplings, at a 
cost of $329.69. Another steam drill with 50 feet of steam 
hose and drill steel was purchased August 17, at a cost of 
$321.90. May 17, a drinking fountain for people, horses, and 
dogs was bought, according to order passed May 7, at a cost of 
$110, and placed in front of Pike «& Heald Co.'s store on Elm 
street, and the stone trough that was at this location was trans- 
ferred to the junction of Candia road and Hanover street. 

Extensive repairs have been made on McGregor, Amoskeag, 
and Granite bridges. McGregor bridge has been thoroughly 
inspected by an expert and all iron work scraped and tested. 
The upper and lower decks have been replanked and the whole 
bridge put in good condition for public travel. All decayed 
plank on Granite and Amoskeag bridges has been removed and 
replaced with new bridge plank and new stringers put in where 
necessary. 

The building of the electric road caused much extra work 
that was not calculated for and thus much time and money was 
expended that would otherwise have been utilized in other 
directions. The building of new schoolhouses has called for 
outlay of material and labor in grading. So each year has its 
special demands sometimes not previously arranged for. 

The year's labor on the whole has been satisfactory and the 
annual report is submitted with the feeling that conscientious 
work has been done. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE H. STEARNS, 
LEONARD P. REYNOLDS, • 
HORACE P. SIMPSON, 

Street and Park Commission. 



REPORT 



CITY EiNGINEER. 



City Engineer's Department 

1895. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT. 

FIRST ASSISTANT ENGINEER, FIELD AND OFFICE. 

HARRIE M. YOUNG. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ENGINEER, DRAUGHTING. 

GEORGE W. WALES. 

THIRD ASSISTANT ENGINEER, FIELD AND OFFICE. 

HARRY J. BRIGGS. 

ASSISTANTS. 

GEORGE M. CURRIER, Jan. 14 to July 16, Sept. 7 to. Nov. 5. 

HERBERT L. WATSON, Mar. 23 to Aug. 24. 

ALFRED T DODGE, April 22 to Nov. 5. 



160 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting my tenth annual report, 
being the seventeenth annual report of the work of the city 
engineer's department, for the year ending December 31, 1895. 

Expenses of the department for the year 1895, per monthly 
draft : 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Total 
Appropriation 



Amount overdrawn 
Amount charged to other appropriations 

Actual amount overdrawn . 



;^327.2S 
291.39 
523.20 
479.76 

349-94 
632.04 
436.81 
296.45 
561.24 
.^31-25 

145-79 
39 2.1 c- 

^4,767-25 
4,500.00 

^267.25 

2^ I. CO 



25 



161 



162 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Itemized account of expenses for the year : 

Tor salary of city engineer . 
salary of assistants . 
salary of assistants charged to other appropri 

ations 
supplies for office . 
additions to office furniture 
stakes and lumber . 
horse shoeing and repairs of wagon and harness 
street-car fares 
•express and JDOstage 
repairing 
books and folios 
printing 
telephone 
liorse hire 
typewriter supplies 
typewriter clerk 
•street numbers 
painting rods . 
-extra work 
expenses 
reports .... 

Total. 
The items for salaries may be divided as follows 

Tor giving lines and grades for the extension and 

construction of streets and sidewalks . 
plans and profiles relating to the construction 

of streets and sidewalks .... 
surveys and levels for the construction of streets 

and sewers ....... 

giving lines and grades for and superintending 

the construction of sewers . . . . 

plans and profiles relating to the construction 

of sewers ....... 



$1,200.00 
2,801.86 

231.00 

138.20 

14.32 

63-55 
1.70 

30.10 
4.00 

II. 15 

29-45 
18.00 

36-25 

68.00 

8.50 

205.50 

2.02 

2.50 

91.88 

11.62 

28.65 

$4,998.25 



$685.07 

225-37 
262.53 
282.97 
244.23 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



163 



For surveys, measurements, and plans for the assign- 
ment of street numbers .... 

making plans for improvements other than those 
mentioned in this account .... 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 
given for improvements in Pine Grove cem- 
etery ....... 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 

given for improvements in Valley cemetery 

making plans and new maps of Pine Grove 

cemetery . . 

making map of Pine Grove cemetery for city 
treasurer ....... 

■surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 
given for repairing and extending the street 
railway ....... 

collecting data, classifying accounts, and other 

work in relation to office report . 
lines, grades, and superintendence given for the 

construction of avenues in Stark park . 
lines, grades, and superintendence given for the 

construction of avenues in Derryfield park 
locating position of trees in Simpson square 
indexing plans and notes 
■checking notes, figures, etc. 
new sewer map of city- 
new sewer book 
measuring and figuring concrete laid for the city 
-attendance upon meetings of the street and park 

commissioners, and data furnished them 
•soundings and plans in reference to proposed 
bridge across Merrimack river at Granite street 
■surveys and plans for determining line between 
city farm property and adjoining land owners 
plans, lines, and grades given for the construc- 
tion of bank wall on Mast road at J. Baldwin 
Company's land ...... 



$102.30 
241.12 

67.18 
68.00 
33-50 

105-25 

167.05 
63.10 

27-35 

32.82 
8.50 

34-17 

23.12 

5.00 

224.04 

27.67 

166.00 

50-50 

57-05 

4I-I5 



164 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



For notes in reference to grade crossing at Granite 

street $20.00 

making plans of streets laid out and sewers con- 
structed in city clerk's record book . . 29.90 
record of streets laid out, office use . . . 20.10 
locating and putting up street signs and guide- 
boards ....... 12.67 

locating and setting stone bounds . . . 10.17 

office work, preparing notes, data, records, etc. 169.76 

Pine Grove cemetery book, list of owners . 10-25 

new sewer license book ..... 10.00 

procuring abutters' names .... 28.06 

lettering and finishing plans .... 40.00 

information given engineers and others regard- 
ing lines, grades, sewers, etc. . . . 240.00- 

researches of deeds for property lines and own- 
ership ....... 20.00 

plans for and attendance upon board of alder- 
men at street hearings .... 58.00 

attendance upon meetings of the committee on 

streets, and plans pertaining thereto . . 54-oa 
attendance upon meetings of the committee on 
sewers and drains, clerical work, including 

orders written ...... 59-oo 

attendance upon meetings of the committee on 
lands and buildings, and plans pertaining 

thereto ....... 50.00 

list of streets laid out, for tables . . . 6.69 

list of sewers, for tables ..... ^4'33 

street petitions ...... 20.00 

sewer petitions ...... 10.00 

addition to contour maps .... 14.89 

sewer sheet tables ...... 10.00 

sewer licenses and permits . . . . 50-25 

attendance upon meetings of special committee, 

and plans pertaining thereto . . . 40.00 



Total 



$4,232.86 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 165 

The following bills, charged to other appropriations, have 
been certified to by this department : 

BOOKS. 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank books . . . ^14.00 

STREET SIGNS AND GUIDE-BOARDS. 

George B. Cressey, to painting 2 guide-boards, 55c. 
to painting 5 guide-boards, 45c. 
to 15 pounds paint, loc. . 
to 2^2, days' labor, $2.50 . 
to painting 65 street signs, 20c. 



STONEWORK. 



%^- 


.10 


2, 


•25 


I 


•50 


6. 


■25 


13' 


,00 



;24.io 



F. S. Bodwell, covering stone for Hall street culvert, 

26.6 perch, $4 . . . . $106.40 
covering stone for Lincoln street cul- 
vert, 68.24 perch, $4 . . . 272.96 

GRANITE BRIDGE. 

T. A. Lane Co., appliances for sounding . . ^8.53 

G. W. Wales, H. J. Briggs, H. L. Watson, labor . 34.05 

STREET NUMBERS. 

Union Manufacturing Co., 1,000 street numbers . 45-oo 

CONCRETE. 

John T. Underhill & Co., 8,366.86 square yards . $4,843.79 
Charles H. Robie Co., 4,973.57 square yards . . 2,438.41 

Vouchers for the amount of material called for in the following 
bills are on file in this office from measurements made by the 
department. 

STONEWORK. 

Pine Grove cemetery, 26.5 perch of stone sold for cellar on 
Stevens street. 

William G. Landry, Mast street bank wall, 1,163.19 perch. 



166 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



F. S. Bodwell, covering stone for Beech street culvert exten- 
sion, 9 perch lo feet long, 86.64 perch 8 feet long. 

LAND DAMAGES. 

Manley E. Clough, Auburn street, 17,132.20 square feet. 

The amount of work done by this department during the year 
is as follows : 



Number of orders for surveys, street lines and grades 
for sewer grades . 
for paving grades 
for street railway grades 
for Pine Grove cemetery grades 
for profile levels . 

Total number of orders 



1^035 
119 

63 

33 
16 

52 
1,318. 



Levels for profiles for establishing grades, 18,425 feet, equal 
to 3.49 miles. These profiles have three lines of levels on each 
street, making a total distance actually leveled of 55,275 feet. 



Levels for sewer profiles . 

for center profiles . 

in Derryfield park 

in Stark park 
Other levels .... 

Total levels taken . 
Equal to 29.18 miles. 

Levels for cross section . 

Surveys of streets and street lines 
in Pine Grove cemetery 
in Valley cemetery 
in Derryfield park 



Feet. 

15,900 

43)5S2 

4,650 

75 
34,588 

154,070. 

Sq.Feet. 
16,600 

Feet. 

63,300 

3>40O 

5^300 

3,000 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



167 



Surveys for street numbers 
Other surveys . 

Total surveys made 
Equal to 26.17 niiles. 



Equal to 32.78 miles. 

Lot owners looked up 
Equal to 2.96 miles. 



22,800 
40,400 

138,200. 











Feet. 


Street lines marked on ground 


34,70c 


Lines of lots and avenues, Pine Grove cemetery 


5,200. 


of lots and avenues, Valley ce 
of avenues, Stark park . 
of avenues, Derr)'.field park 
for gutters . . _ . 
for curbs 


meter 


y 




300 

4,164 

3,ioc. 

23,464 

8,018. 


for sewers . . ' . 
for street railway . 
Other lines .... 








24,404 

65,432- 
17,200. 


Total length of lines marked on the ground 


• 185,982 


Equal to 35.22 miles. 






Feet. 


Grades set for sidewalks ...... 


31)444 


for gutters 
for curbs 








23,464 
8,018. 


for sewers 

for street railway tracks 

for building streets . 








24,404 
44,232- 
33,887 


in Pine Grove cemetery 
in Stark park . 
in Derryfield park . 
Other grades 








1,074 
2,164 
3,100 
1,316 


Total length of grades set 


173,10^ 



Feet. 



15,620 



168 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



BATTERS SET. 

Beech street, culvert at Cemetery brook. 

Calef road, cemetery fence- 

Eddy road, 2 culverts. 

Elm street, retaining wall at hosehouse. 

Elm street, culvert at Ray brook. 

Hall street, culvert at Cemetery brook. 

Lincoln street, culvert at Cemetery brook. 

Mast street, bank wall. 

Second street, culvert at McQuesten place. 

Old lots restaked in Pine Grove ceme1?ery 
New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery 

Total cemetery lots laid out 

Street numbers assigned and put on 
replaced 

assigned but not put on 
changed 

Total 



19 

58 

77 

327 
44 

55 
6 

432 



PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

Dubuque, Bremer to Putnam. Two plans. 
Lowell, Elm to Ashland. Four plans. 
Montgomery, Conant northerly. 
Nashua, Concord to Bridge. 
Rimmon, Kelley to south of Wayne. 
Total plans and profiles, 9. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Alsace, Amory to north of Bremer. 

Amherst, Elm to Union. 

Amherst, Belmont to Beacon. 

Amory, west of Montgomery to Kimball. 

Auburn, Elm to Pine. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 169 

Beacon, Spruce to Bridge. Two plans. 
Canton, Lake avenue to Auburn. 
Cartier east back, Sullivan to Wayne. 

Christian brook and surrounding streets, Canal and Penna- 
cook to Maple and Webster. 
Clinton, Main to West. 
Conant south back, Main westerly. 
Dearborn, Summer to Taylor. 
Dickey, West Hancock to Main. 
Green, Pine to Pine east back. 
Green south back. Pine east back to Union. 
Grove south back. Pine east back to Union. 
Hall, Spruce south back to Bridge. 
Hevey, Conant northerly. 
Hevey east back, Amory to Kelley. 
Hill, Gilman to Wolf & Wagner's south line. 
Joliette, Amory to north of Bremer. 
K,elley, west of Montgomery to Morgan. 
Lake avenue. Elm to Chestnut. 
Laurel, Union easterly. 
Laurel, Belmont to Beacon. 

Liberty east" back, Salmon to Salmon south back. 
Liberty east back, Webster southerly. 
Manchester, Belmont to Beacon. 
Manchester south back. Elm east back to Union. 
Montgomery, Conant northerly. 
Montgomery east back, Kelley to Amory. 
North, Elm to Pine. 
Pearl, Russell easterly. 
Pine, Auburn to Green. 
Pine east back. Green to Valley. 
Pine east back, Amherst to Concord. 
Putnam, Beauport to Cartier. 
Rimmon, Amory to south of Wayne. 
Sagamore, Walnut to Oak. 
Schiller, Merrimack river to Hale. 



170 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Second, Bell to south of Harvell. 

Spruce south back, Elm east back to Chestnut west back^ 

Union east back, Webster southerly. 

Wilson, Lake avenue south back to Hayward. 

Total sewer plans, 45. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Byron, Brown avenue to Josselyn. Two plans. 
Kennedy, Brown avenue to Josselyn. Two plans. 
River road, Salmon to Rowell. Six plans. 
Total numbering plans, 10. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Allen, Boynton to South Main, showing lots. Copy. 

Bald Hill and Mammoth roads, land of J. L. Fogg. Copy. 

City farm land, east of Mammoth road. 

Concord railroad and Union street, land of State Industrial 
school. Copy, 

Dunbarton road. Front westerly. Location. 

Eddy road. Main to Front. Location. 

Elm, land of Eliza Creighton at Ray brook. Copy. 

Granite, Canal to Main. Proposed widening and bridge loca- 
tion. 

Mammoth and Hooksett roads at town line, land of Col. John 
Ray. Copy. 

Rimmon park, proposed laying out. 

Section south of Granite and west of Elm. 

South Manchester, land of Edwin Kennedy. Copy. 

Valley cemetery. Plan of part of. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 13. 

WORKING PLANS. 

Amoskeag bridge. Sketch of abutment. 

Bridge, Russell to Belmont. Profile. 

Brook, location of Electric Light Company's buildings. 

Carpenter, Elm to Union. Profile. 

Cemetery brook, Wilson to Maple. Location. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 171 

Christian brook, Canal to Chestnut. Sewer profile. 
Corner curbstones. Details for contractors. 
Depot, plan and location of street railway car-house and sheds. 
Dubuque and Amory, schoolhouse and lot. 
Eddy road, sketch of culverts. Two plans. 
Elrn, at hose house. Sketch of bank wall. 
Elm, at Ray brook. Sketch of culvert. 
Forest, Milford to Rockland avenue. Profile. 
Hall, at Cemetery brook. Sketch of culvert. 
Lincoln, school lot. Profile of curbing. 
Lincoln, at Cemetery brook. Sketch of culvert. 
Mast, at Baldwin's land. Sketch of retaining wall. 
Milford, Carroll to Amherst road. Profile. 
Nutt road, Valley to Silver. Sewer profile. 
Pennacook street and Christian brook, Canal to Walnut. Two 
sewer profiles. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Demerett lot for Palmer & Garmon. 

Pleasant, Elm to Canal. Profile. 

Railroad station. Proposed grade of surrounding streets. 

Second, at McQuesten's land. Sketch of culvert. 

Shasta, Nutt road to Beech. Profile. 

Silver, Merrimack river to Lincoln. Sewer profile. 

Somerville, Union to Maple. Profile. 

Straw schoolhouse. Sketch of walks. 

Taylor, Grove to Young. Profile. 

Turner, Granite to Bath. Profile. 

Valley, Elm to Lincoln. Sewer profile. 

Vinton, Taylor to Jewett. Profile. 

Wilson schoolhouse. Sketch of walks. 

Total working plans, 35. 

TRACINGS. 

Amoskeag bridge. Sketch of abutments. 
Arab, Union easterly. Land of A. W. Prescott. 
Brook. Location of Electric Light Company's buildings. 
Candia road, Mammoth to Proctor road. Street railway loca- 
tion. 



172 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Candia road, Hanover to Lake Massabesic. Street railway- 
location. 

Cilley road. Part of Maynard land. 

City hall. Old plan. 

Concord railroad land, right of way. Southern section. 

Depot. Street railway car sheds, showing grade. 

Dunbarton road, Front westerly. Original layout. 

Elm, at Ray brook. Proposed widening. 

Elm, at Ray brook. Sketch of culvert. 

Elm, Clarke, Trenton, and Walnut. Square bounded by. 

Granite, Canal to Main. Proposed widening and bridge lo- 
cation. 

Hall at Cemetery brook. Sketch of culvert. 

Hanover, Lake avenue to Proctor road. Street railway loca- 
tion. 

High school lots, proposed locations. Six plans. 

Lake avenue, Hall to Hanover. Street railway location. 

Lincoln, at Cemetery brook. Sketch of culvert. 

Lincoln, at schoolhouse lot. Sketch of curbing. 

Mast, at Baldwin's land. Sketch of retaining wall. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Section east of Pine lawn. 

Porter. Land adjoining land of George Porter. 

Railroad station. Surrounding streets. 

River road and Union. Land of Otis Clark heirs. 

Road around Eddy, from Amoskeag Company's plans. 

Second, at McQuesten's land. Sketch of culvert. 

Silver-street sewer. Sectional plan for drainage. Two plans. 

Union, Palmer and Whitford. Land of Bond & Dodge. 

Valley cemetery. Plan of part of. 

West Manchester. Section of for sewerage. 

Total tracings, 37. 

BLUE PRINTS. 

Granite, Canal to Main. Proposed widening and bridge lo- 
cation. Three plans. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 173 

Pine Grove cemetery. Section east of Pine Lawn. Two 
plans. 

Total blue prints, 5. 

MAPS. 

City of Manchester, East Side, showing sewers. Two blue 
prints. 

City of Manchester, West Side, showing sewers. Blue print. 
Southern section of city. Contour map tracing. 
Towlesville, showing lots as originally laid out. 
Total maps, 5. 

Eight plans of lots in the Pine Grove cemetery have been 
made in the new book of the city treasurer, and seventy-one 
sheets of plans in the sewer book, 

Seventy-two plans have been made in city clerk's book of 
streets laid out. 

Total of all plans made, 501. 

Five plans are under way which will be completed during the 
year. 

Plans made over in sewer book, 5. 

Sewer plans brought up to date, 30. 

Numbering sheets brought up to date, 32. 

Plans lettered and finished, 12. 

Plans made for establishment of grade on laid-out streets, 15,- 
700 feet. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on streets not laid 
out, 5,200 feet. 

Total, 20,900 feet, equal to 3.96 miles. 



174 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Street. 



Adams 

Amherst 

Beacon 

Belmont 

Cass 

Cedar south back 

Central 

Chestnut (private land) . 

Christian brook 

Dearborn 

Elm 

Hall 

High south back 

Jewett 

Jewett 

Laurel 

Laurel 

Laurel 

Liv^ermore land 

Livermore land 

Lowell south back 

Lowell south back 

Manchester 

Manchester south back.. 
Manchester south back.. 

Merrimack 

Merrimack 

Nutt road 



Location. 



Ray brook to Clarke Akron 

Belmont to Beacon 

From Merrimack northerly 

From Bridge southerly 

Central to Laurel 

From Maple easterly 

Fi-om west of Cass westerly 

Chestnut to Chestnut east back . . 

From east of Canal to E. of Liberty. 'Brick.. 



From Taylor northwesterly . . . . 

Valley to Hay ward 

From Concord northerly 

From Pine easterlj' 

Valley to north of Young 

Valley to north of Young 

From Cass westei'ly 

Hall to Beacon 

From Union easterly 

Chestnut to Union 

Chestnut to Union 

Chestnut to Pine 

At Pine 

From west of Milton to Beacon. 

Chestnut to west of Union 

Chestnut to west of Union 

From east of Beacon easterly . . 

From Beacon easterly 

Elm to Silver 



Akron . 
Brick. . 
Akron . 

Portland 
Akron . 



Portland 
Akron . 



Iron. . 
Akron 



)5rick. . , 



10 

12 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
8 

42x63 
10 

38x57 
10 
12 
15 
15 
10 
10 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
10 
12 
12 
10 
10 

38x57 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



J 75 



IN 1S95.-EAST SIDE. 






•^ 






o 


r— 


-a 


o 


® 


« 


>*-. 




^ 








SJ 


o3 




♦J 


g^ 


s« 


o 




;a 


^ 


fJ 



Foreman. 



66 



352 

200 
39 



234 



335 
20 



$466.11 $0,932 



1.474 
1.229 



765.62 
95.90 

298.411 1.492 

I 

48S.0S 1.976 

I 

291 S8j 0.829 

392.38' 1.971 

I 

119.21 0.685 

13,297.00 6.3.50 

331.62 1.105 

3,959.6r 6.7226 

171.51 1.043 

2.0814 



732.67 

7,922.55 

648.26 
2,649.60 
♦159.77 

958.61 

697.28 

41.63 

t801.44 

1,079.92 

151.95 

122.90 

7,421.73 



6.841 

2.165 
3.080 
0.682 

1.184 

2.0814 
2.0814 
2.671 

1.411 

2.11 
1.229 



Apr. 17 


Apr. 22 


June 1 


June 8 


Nov. 13 


Nov. 16 


" 16 


" 22 


Apr. .30 


May 28 


Sept. 17 


Sept.21 


May 1 


May 20 


.Tunc 24 


June 26 


Oct. 17 


Dec. 21 


Apr. 19 


Apr. 26 


July 25 


Oct. 22 


Sept. 23 


Sept .25 


July 5 


July 27 


July 12 


Dec. 27 


May 2 


May 31 


" 24 


July 22 


Sept. 23 


Sept. 24 


Apr. 11 


May 7 


July 5 


July 27 


5 


" 27 


Apr. 28 


May 29 


Sept. 30 


Oct. 10 


May 21 


May 28 


Nov. 13 


Nov. 16 


July 25 


Oct. 22 



*Part of excavation done by Head & Dowst. 

fTlie actual cost was $1,701.44. Tlie water-works paid 



John Kelley. 
George Prescott. 
John Kelley. 



Joseph Ashland. 
John Kelley. 
Charles Francis. 
John Kelley. 
John Connor. 
John Kelley. 

Charles Francis. 

John Kelley. 
Nelson Wheelock 
Timothy Clifford. 

John Kelley. 



Nelson Wheelock. 

John Connor. 

John Kelley. 
George Prescott. 
John Kelley. 

5900 of this. 



176 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SEWERS BUILT IN 1895. 



Street. 


Location. 


"3 
S 


N 






Iron 

Akron .. 

Brick.... 
Akron .. 

Iron 

Akron .. 


10 
10 










15 




From Lowell so. b'k to High so", b'k. 


12 




12 






38x57 






10 


Wilson Hill 




15 


Wilson Hill 




12 


Wilson 




20 




20> 









REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



177 



— EAST SIDE.— Concluded. 







o 



o5 

o 

S 

1 
1 

7 


03 

® 
X 

3 


a 

6 

10 

5 

10 

32 

22 

7 
5 

54 
514 


33 
H 

o 
o 

a 

en 
m 

OJ 


tn 

O 
o 

"3 
1 


o 
o 

CM 

s 

p 

m 
O 


s 

Oj 

s 


When lin- 

ishecl. 


Foreman. 


12 1 




4 
3 

2 

10 

:! 

1 

62 


$266.08 

783.02 

720.18 

2,410.42 

6,097.37 

565.50 

1,043.11 
3,648.37 


$1,695 

1.695 

2.0814 

7.048 

6.7226 

1.020 

1.949 
1.903 


.June 6 

June 6 
July 5 
Oct. 30 
July 25 
April 22 

April 29 
June 13 


June 17 

June 17 
July 25 
Dec. 23 
Oct. 22 
April 27 

May 29 
Aug. 3 


John Kelley. 

Daniel Cronin. 
John Kelley. 


145) 

462 

211 

342 

907 

554 

278 

257 

36 1 
1,854) 


135 


1 

1 
3 

2 

1 
1 

7 
63 


14,877 


2,146 


$59,599.69 



















Average cost of sewers, East Side, $3.50 per foot. 
Average cost of sewers, both sides of river, I3.103 per foot. 
12 



178 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT IN 



Street. 



Location. 



Alsace 

Amory 

Cartier east back 

Dickej' 

Hevey 

Ifevey east back. 

Joliette 

Jollette 

Joliette 

Kelley 

Putnam 

Schiller 

Second 

Wilton 



From Kelley southerly 

Joliette to Essex 

From Putnam northerly 

West Hancock to Main 

From Conant northerly 

Kelley to A mory 

From Kelley northerly 

Kelley to Amory 

Kelley to Amory 

Hevey east back to Joliette. . 
Beauport to Cartier east back 

Hill to Hale 

From Schiller northerly 

From Main westerly 



Akron .. 


12 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


S 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


1-2 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


12 


Portland 


12 


Akron .. 


20 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


15 


" .. 


10 




10 



fla 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



179 



1895 — WEST SIDE. 



Hi 


in 

V 

O 
03 


en 

£ 
o 

p. 

a 

ei 


03 


71 

o 
o 

« 


o 
o 

"3 
o 
E-i 


o 

>2 

m 
O 

o 


s 
s 


■ 2 


Foreman. 


■532 


2 




19 


2 


$683.54 


$1,285 


June 20 


Oct. 7 


Frank Bennett. 


327 


1 




10 


1 


416.19 


1.273 


Sept. 9 


Oct. 7 


" 


224 


2* 


1 


.... 


2 


373.34 


1.666 


Dee. 3 


Dec. 13 


<i i< 


782 


2 


1 


29 


5 


1,222.20 


1.563 


April 15 


June 20 


" 


500 


1 




10 


2 


454.78 


1.516 


Oct. 28 


Nov. 2 




703 


2 




25 


1 


1,128.62 


1.605 


June 23 


July 13 




250 






7 




166.72 
924.05 


666 


Sept. 9 
Sept. 9 


Oct. 7 


IC «. 


5.121 
20 ) 


2 




20 


2 


1.644 


Oct. 7 




1,472 


6 




28 


6 


3,919.24 


2.662 


April 15 


June 20 


. 


130 


1 


1 




2 


200.49 


1.542 


Dec. 3 


Dec. 13 


" 


465 


2 




11 




2,181.23 


4.690 


July .16 


Sept. 7 


" 


236 


1 




10 


2 


429.00 


1.817 


Nov. 8 


Nov. 18 


"' 


146 


1 
23 


1 

4 


5 

174 


2 

27 


160.27 


1.098 


Oct. 7 


Oct. 9 


11 c< 


<6,119 


$12,259 67 





















* Cesspool manholes. 

Average cost of sewers, West Side, per foot, $2. 

Average cost of sewers, both sides of river, per foot, 



.103. 



180 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 



PIPE KEMOVED WHERE NEW SEWERS HAVE BEEN BUILT. 



Street. 



Cedar south back — 

High south back 

Jewett 

Laurel 

Lowell south back... 
Manchester S. back. 
Manchester S. back.. 
Pine 



Location. 



Total . 



Maple easterly 

Pine to Union 

Valley southerly 

Union easterly 

Chestnut to Pine 

Chestnut to west of Union. . 
Chestnut to west of Union. . 
Lowell to High south back . 



Material. 



Akron 

Cement.. 
Portland, 
Cement. . 

Akron — 

Cement... 



03 


S 01 

S d 
1-5 -' 


8 


66 


9 


353 


15 


2S& 


9 


334 

33S 



342 
423 
135 

2,126 



SUMMARY OF SEWERS BUILT IN 1 895. 



Total 42 X 63 inches, brick 
38 X 57 inches, brick 
20-inch Akron pipe 
20-inch iron pipe . 
15-inch Akron pipe 
15-inch Portland pipe 
12-inch Akron pipe 
12-inch Portland pipe 
12-inch iron pipe . 
lo-inch Akron pipe 
1 0-inch iron pipe . 
8-inch Akron pipe 

Total . 



Feet. 

2,094 
2,600 

36 

2,163 

200 

5)729 

36 

12 

6,54^ 
12 

398 

23)152 



REPOET OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



181 



Following is the total amount of sewerage in the city, Jan- 
uary I, 1896 : 



Total 8-inch Akron pipe 
lo-inch Akron pipe 
12-inch Akron pipe 
15-inch Akron pipe 
18-inch Akron pipe 
20-inch Akron pipe 
24-inch Akron pipe 

Total Akron pipe . 
Equal to 34.908 miles. 

8-inch Portland pipe, old 
12-inch Portland pipe, old 
1 8-inch Portland pipe, old 

Total Portland pipe, old 
Equal to 0.919 miles. 

■lo-inch Portland pipe, new . 

12-inch Portland pipe, new . 

15-inch Portland pipe, new , 

18-inch Portland pipe, new . 

20-inch Portland pipe, new . 

-24-inch Portland pipe, new . 

Total Portland pipe, new 
Equal to 4.483 miles. 

• 

9-inch cement pipe 

12-inch cement pipe 

15-inch cement pipe 

18-inch cement pipe 



Feet. 

8,394 
61,904 
73.069 

21,505 
3,964 

10,236 
5,256 

184,328 

Feet. 

90 

3,990 
770 

4,850 



Feet. 
7,605 
4,526 
4,518 
395 
3,345 
3,284 

23,673 



Feet. 

11,658 

21,040 

490 

860 



182 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



24-inch cement pipe 

16 X 24 inches, cement pipe. 

Total cement pipe . 
E(|ual to 6.91 miles. 

lo-inch earthen pipe 
12-inch earthen pipe 

Total earthen pipe 
Equal to 0.704 miles. 

18-inch brick sewers 
24-inch brick sewers 
29-inch brick sewers 
36-inch brick sewers 
42-inch brick sewers 
44-inch brick sewers 
57-inch brick sewers 
60-inch brick sewers 

17 X 26 inches, brick sewers 
20 X 30 inches, brick sewers 
22 X 33 inches, brick sewers 
24 X 36 inches, brick sewers 
26 X 39 inches, brick sewers 
29 i X 44 inches, brick sewers 
30 X 46 inches, brick sewers 
32 X 48 inches, brick sewers 
36 X 54 inches, brick sewers 
38 X 57 inches, brick sewers 
40 X 44 inches, brick sewers 
42 X 63 inches, brick sewers 
50 X 75 inches, brick sewers 

Total brick sewers . 
Equal to 8.14 miles. 



735 
1,697 

36,480 



Feet. 
1,175 
2,545 

3'720 

Feet. 

5.532 
2,060 
1,600 

545 
446 

i>i95 
1,400 
285 
1,506 
1,197 

387 
9,880. 

514 

4,530 
1,360 

3,279 
1,067 

2,600 
790 

2,094 
712 

42,979 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



183 



8-inch iron pipe 
lo-inch iron pipe 
1 2 -inch iron pipe 
1 4- inch iron pipe 
20-inch iron pipe 
24-inch iron pipe 
36-inch iron pipe 

Total iron pipe 
Equal to 0.096 miles. 

24-inch steel pipe . 
48-inch steel pipe . 



Total steel pipe ...... 

Equal to 0.076 miles. 

Total in all sewers, 296,9371^ feet, equal to 56.236 miles. 



Feet. 
24 
li 

24 
24 

122 
24 

Feet. 
28 

400 



184 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL^REPORTS. 



STREET GRADES ESTABLISHED IX 1895. 



No. 

of 

plan. 



57 

4161 

788 

4131 

4177 

797 

779 

661 

87] 

168 

169 

4177 

179 

179 

146 

4040 

4119 

1057 

4174 

4109 

1064 



Street. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Main . 



Belmont . 
Bridge.. . 

Elm 

Everett... 
Forest — 
Hancock. 
Laurel . . . 



Manchester 



Laurel to Merrimack, east side, changed 

Hall to Belmont 

Elm avenue to Shasta, center, changed 

Clarke to Waldo 

Milf ord northerly 

Brown avenue to Concord Railroad — 
Belmont to Beacon 



Sullivan to Putnam, changed 



West side of Union to 300 feet east ol 
Beech, center, changed 

Milford Forest to Old Amherst road 

jUiHon Laurel to Merrimack, east side,chang'd 

Milton Laurel to Merrimack, we.st side,chang'd 

Nashua Bridge to Pearl 

Prospect Russell to Linden, changed . 

Shasta Union to Lincoln 

Union Harrison to Brook, east side 

Vinton Jewett to Taylor 

Wentworth ... West Hancock to Harvell's line 

Woodbine ave Candia road to C. & P. R. R 



210 
309 
500 
325 
235 
1,200 
493 

412 

890 

524 

211 

125 

375 

400 

1,800 

380 

1,200 

1,570 

1,333 



Order 
passed. 



12,492 



Nov. 
Oct. 
May 
Nov. 

Aug. 
Nov. 



May 7 



Nov. 5 

" 5 

5 

5 

Aug. 6 

Nov, 5 

5 

June 4 

Nov. 5 

" 5 



Equal to 2.366 miles. 

On some of the plans both sides of the street are shown, mak- 
ing the actual distance of grade established 22,668 feet or 4.293 
miles. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



185 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city 
in 1895 by John T. Underhill & Co., under the direction of the 
street and park commissioners. The measurements relating 
thereto have been made by this department and rendered as 
vouchers for the same : 

STREET CROSSINGS. 



Location. 



Adams at Main we.9t back 

Adams at Main 

Amory at Riramoneast back 

Bridge at Ash 

Bridge at Nashua (2) 

Bridge at Malvern 

Beauport at Schuyler south back 

Brook at Beech east back 

Brook at Asli ('2) 

Brook at Ash east back 

■Chestnut at Central (2) 

■Chestnut at Central 

Clarke at Adams 

Elm at city hall 

Elm at Monroe, at Holbrook's — 

Elm at Monroe 

Elm at Monroe south back 

Franklin at Depot 

Gates at Carlier 

Gates at Dubuque (2) 

Gates at Dubuque east back 

Laurel at Union 

Lowell at Pine 

Main at M arion (2) 

Main at Putnam 

Main at Sullivan. 

Main at Wayne (2) 

Morrison at Pearl south back 

Orange at Pine 

Pearl at Union 

Pine at North 

Rimmon at Amory 

Sagamore at Union east back (2;. 

Salmon at Union 

Spruce at Barry avenue 

Spruce at Wilson (2) 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



Price 
per yd, 



1,191.67 



$0.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.37' 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.75 



Total 
cost. 



$14.17 

5.62 
15.00 
22.35 
52.08 
42.66 
13.33 
12.66 
45.00 
13.33 
43.53 
11.17 
22.65 
25.90 
12.37 
20.00 
17.70 
21.93 
22.47 
46.02 
26.67 
10.00 

7.89 
23 53 
23.32 
22.40 
22.36 
12 80 
21.20 
11.17 

3.00 
22.65 
26.55 
22.66 

9.30 
45.30 



$790.80 



186 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
SIDEWALKS. 



Location. 



Amherst, at Union and Beech 

Ashland at Bridge 

Bridge at Nashua 

Chestnut at Central 

Clarke at Adams 

Derryfleld park 

Elm and Monroe at Holbrook's and Hewlett 

Elm, at Monroe south back 

Main, at Putnam 

Merrimack square, re-covered 

Merrimack square walk, new 

Orange at Pine 

Pine at Nortli — 

Spruce at Barry avenue 

Spruce at Wilson 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



.50.50 
26.80 

2.67 
12.00 

5.. 50 
67.14 
158.92 

1.33 

10.40 

147.40 

244.85 

12.83 

14.05 

4.44 
17.41 



776.24 



Price 
per yd 



0.45 
.45 
.45 
.25 
.45 
.45 
.35 
.45 
.45 
.25 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 



Total 
cost. 



$22.72 

12.06 

1.20 

3.00 

2.47 

30.21 

55.62 

.59 

4.68 

36.85 

110.18 

5.77 

6.32 

2.00 

7.83 



$301 .50 



ROADWAYS. 



Location. 



Amherst, Union to Beech 

Amherst, Union to Beech 

Merrimack, Elm to Chestnut 

Merrimack west, P^lm to Franklin. 
Merrimack and Elm, junction 



Total. 



Square I Price 
yards, per yd, 



1,485.40 

58.25 

1,102.20 



414.69 



3,060.54 



$1.00 
.75 
.50 



.50 



Total 
cost. 



$1,485.40 
43.68 

551.10 
40.00 

207.35 



$2,327.53 



REPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 



187 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city, 
in 1S95, by John T. Underhill & Co., under the direction of 
the committee on lands and buildings and the cemetery trustees : 



Location. 



City yard, eaves gutters 

Clinton street, sub-police station, driveway. 

Clinton street, sub-police station, walks 

Lake-avenue engine-house, patching 

Rimnion schoolhouse, walks 

Rimnion schoolhouse, driveway 

Straw school house, walks 

Straw schoolhouse, driveway 

Straw schoolhouse, re-covered 

Valley cemetery, walks 

Ward 5 ward-room, walks and cellar 

Ward 5 Avard-room, eaves gutters 

Wilson schoolhouse, walks 

Wilson schoolliouse, driveway 



Square 
yards. 



39.18 

94.10 

184.79 



368.. 5.5 
151.80 
208.59 
3-24.47 
20-2.30 
271.41 
301.50 
41.00 
874.28 
276.44 



Total 3,338.41 



Price 
per yd. 



.45 
.75 
.45 
.60 
.25 
.45 
.35 
.45 
.35 
.45 



Total 

cost. 



$17.03 

42.35 

64.68 

4.00 

165.85 

113.85 

93.86 

194.68 

.50.57 

122.12 

105.52 

18.45 

.306.00 

124.40 



$1,423.96 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city 
in 1S95 by the Charles H. Robie Co., under the direction of the 
street and park commissioners. The measurements relating 
thereto have been made by this department, and rendered as 
vouchers for the same : 

STREET CROSSINGS. 



L0C.\.T10N. 



Appleton at Ray 

Beauport at Adams (4) 

Beauport at Putnam south back (3) . 

Beauport at Sullivan 

Chestnut at Lake avenue 

Chestnut at Central south back 

Cliestnut at ^lanchester south back 

Chestnut at Lowell (2) 

Chestnut at Lowell north back 

Douglas at North Main 

Elm at Sagamore 

Massabesic at Summer . . 

McGregor at mill entrance 

Milton, gutter at D. Perkins's 

Pine at High south back 

Pine at Lowell south back (4) 

Putnam at Main 

Putnam at McGregor 

Russell at Prospect (2) 

Spruce at Massabesic 

Tremont at Granite 

Turner at School 

Turner at School south back 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



31 

119, 
55, 
29. 
28, 
16, 
18, 
60, 
13. 
24 
34, 
45, 
18, 
15, 
8 
67, 
29, 
33. 
54. 
49. 
15. 
30. 
18. 



Price 
per yd. 



818.76 



$0.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.50 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.75 



Total 
cost. 



$23.32 
89.67 
41.46 
22.27 
21.33 
12.53 
13.99 
45.31 
10.00 
18.66 
26.00 
33.99 
14.00 
7.55 
6.02 
.50.68 
22.33 
25.00 
40.87 
37.00 
5.88 
22.66 
13.66 



$604.18 



188 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SIDEWALKS. 



Location. 



B and C at T. Kearns's 

Chestnut at Lake avenue 

Chestnut at Lowell 

Main at A. C. Wallace's mill.. 

Main at Ranno's store 

McGregor at mill entrance. . . 
Merrimack at Davis's, No. 274 
Merrimack at C. H.Bodwell's 
Pine at Lowell south back — 

Putnam at McGregor 

School at Turner 

Spruce at Massabesic 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



48.67 
19.33 

8.73 
34.58 
16.97 

5.56 
52.03 
58.05 

7.90 
12.44 
21.00 

3.33 



288.61 



Price 
per yd. 



$0.45 
.30 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 



Total 
cost. 



$21.90 

5.80 

3.93 

15.56 

7.64 

2.50 

23.41 

26.12 

3.55 

5.59 

9.45 

1.50 



$126.95 



ROADWAYS. 



Location. 



•Chestnut, Merrimack to Manchester 
Merrimack, Chestnut to Elm 

Total 



Square i Price 
yards, per yd, 



1,086.78 $0.50 
1,175.62 .50 



2,262.40 



Total 
cost. 



$543.39 
587.81 



$1,131.20 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city, 
in 1895, by the Charles H. Robie Co., under the direction of 
the committee on lands and buildings : 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Price, 
per yd. 


Total 
cost. 




117.89 


fto.sn 


$35.36 




33.44 .45 
296.15 : .25 
293.39 -.S5 


15.05 


Lincoln-street schoolhouse, walks topdressed 


74.03 
102.68 




19.11 
540.34 
303.48 


.25 

.30 
.60 


4.77 


Webster-street engine-house, walks topdressed... 


J62.10 
182.09 






Total 


1 
1 603.80 


$576.08 









REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



189 



SUMMARY. 
Concrete Laid by John T. UnderMll <b Co. 



Crossings 

Sidewalks 

Roadways 

Miscellaneous. 



Total 



Square 
yards. 



1,191.67 

776.24 

3,060.54 

3,338.41 



8,366.86 



Total cost. 



$790.80 

301.50 

2,327.53 

1,423.96 



$4,843.79 



Concrete Laid by (he Charles H. Rohie Co. 



Crossings 

Sidewalks 

Roadways 

Miscellaneous. 



Total 



Square 
yards. 



818.76 

288.61 

2,262.40 

1,608.80 



4,973.57 



Total cost. 



$604.18 
126.95 

1,131.20 
576.08 



$2,438.41 



Total concrete laid for the city, 13,340.43 square yards, at a 

cost of S7,282.20. 



190 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



BRIDGES. 



The following table gives the dimensions, material, and num- 
ber of spans of the various bridges within the city limits : 



Location. 


Length 

in 
feet. 


Width 

of 

roadway 


No. of 
walks. 


Width 

of 
walks. 


Material. 


Arch- 
es or 
spans 




765.5 

57 
1,085 

36 

38 

20 

21 

25 

89 

16.5 

56.3 
465.7 

32 

41 

90 

38 

14 

59 

53 

16 
6 

30 

62 
127 

12 

100 

6 


20 

22.5 

24 

30.5 

20 

17 

20.5 

17.5 

29.5 

33 

37.3 

26 

21 

1G.7 

34 

18 

20 

20.5 

24 

20 

16 

30 

32.5 

32.5 

22 

17.5 

16 


1 
2 
2 


5.5 

7 
6 


Wood. 
Iron. 

Stone. 
Wood. 

Iron. 
Wood. 

Stone. 

Iron. 
Wood. 

Steel. 
Wood. 


3 




1 


Bridge St., McGregor and approaches 


3 

9 










Derry road, near Cohas avenue 
























1 


4.5 










2 
2 


6 
5 




Granite street, at river 














2 


6.5 


























2 


6 




River road, at Little Cohas 




River road, below James Cheney's. . . 








River road, at Goffe's Falls 








Second street, at 'Squog river 

Second street, at 'Squog river 

South road 


2 

2 


8.75 
8.75 


5 


Webster road, at water-worlcs dam.. . 






Weston road, east of D . Connor's 






1 











Stone bridges, 2 ; steel, 2; iron, 4; wood, 19; total, 27. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 
KEW HIGHWAYS LAID OUT IX 1895. 



191 



Streets. 


Location. 


When 
laid out. 


Width 
in feet. 


Length 
in feet. 


Arab 


Union to Hooksett line 

Coolldge avenue to Riminon 


July 31 


fin 


3,162 

400 

2,900 

3,515 

490 

305 


Bremer 

Campbell 

Eddy road 

Foster avenue. . 


Oct. 23' 50 
Sept. 20 ^ 


Main to Amoskeag bridge road . . . 
Vallej' to Hayward 


July 17 

31 

June 12 

June 12 


50 
30 
46 
56 


Pleasant 




69S 










11,490 



Equaling 2.17 miles. 



192 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following table shows the streets laid out to date which 
have not been built. Many of these are in passable condition, 
but have not been brought to grade, nor have the gutters or 
sidewalks been constructed. Those marked (*) in most cases 
have not been opened, and are impassable with a few exceptions. 
It will necessitate the expenditure of a considerable amount of 
money to properly build them to grade. 

STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT. 



Streets. 



Adams, Appleton to Clarke 

Ainsworth avenue, Haywavd to Young 

Alfred, Hanover to Amherst 

Allen, Main to Boynton 

Alsace, sovith of Kelley northerly * 

Amory , to Kimball 

Amory extension to Bartlett 

Arah, Union to Hooksett line 

Ash, Gore northerly * 

Auburn, Maple to Lincoln* 

Auburn, Wilson to Belmont 

Auburn, Cypress to Platts avenue * 

B, Prince to C 

Bartlett, Amory extension southerly 

Beech, north of Gore.. 

Beech, Salmon southerly * 

Beech, Webster to Clarke* 

Bell, Wilson easterly 

Belmont, Young to <31ay 

Belmont, Bridge to Pearl 

Benton, Jones to James Hall road 

Blaine, Second to Hiram 

Boutwell, Amory northerly* 

Bremer. Coolidge avenue to Rimmon 

Byron, Brown avenue to Josselyn 

Campbell, Union to Ash 

Campbell, Ash to Hooksett Road 

Canal, 82 feet north of Pleasant to Granite 

Canton, Spruce to Auburn 

Carpenter, Elm to Union * 

Cedar, Wilson easterly 

Central, James Hall road westerly* 

Clay, Jewett to Cypress 

Cleveland, Blaine to Merrimack i-iver 

Colby, West Hancock to Log 

Columbus avenue, Cartier to Amory* — 

Conant, to Montgomery 

Cypress, Lake avenue to Massabesic 

Dartmouth, West Hancock to Frederick 

Dickey, Main to West Hancock 

Dubuque, north of Conant northerly 

Eddy road. Main to Amoskeag bridge road 

Erie, South Main westerly 

Essex, Amory southerly 

Forest, Milf oi-d to Old Mast road 

Foster avenue, Valley to Hay ward 

Glenwood avenue, Mammoth road to J.Cronin's* 
Grant, Hanover to Mammotli road* ; 



Length 
in feet. 



925 

499 
212 
700 

1,160 

2,800 
735 

3,162 
590 
600 
809 
967 
2.58 

1,800 
220 
287 

1,176 
636 

1,395 
717 
240 
395 

1,693 
400 
998 
860 

2,900 

1,023 
550 

1,350 
665 
304 
387 

1,487 
220 

3,110 
470 

1,300 
636 
857 
50 

3,515 
470 
575 

1,460 
490 

2,085 

1,008 



When laid out. 



( June 27, 1889. 
I July 26, 1892. 
Augusts], 1893. 
July 19, 1893. 
Julv 24, 1891. 
May 26, 1893. 
November 17, 1891.. 
June 26, 1892. 
July 31, 1895. 
June 9, 1893. 
July 28, 1891. 
August 15, 1892-. 
June 9, 1893. 
January 15, 1892. 
Julv 26, 1892. 
June 9, 1893. 
June 27, 1894. 
November 29, 1893. 
August 15, 1892. 
September 1, 1891. 
June 27, 1894. 
August 31, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
May 26, 1893. 
October 23, 1895. 
October 3, 1893. 
September 26, 1892. 
September 20, 1895. 
January 15, 1892. 
August"2, 1892. 
December 19, 1894. 
August 15. 1892. 
July 6, 1892. 
August 31, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
November 16, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
June 26, 1893. 
December 28, 1892. 
August 28, 1891. 
August 28, 1891. 
May 20, 1892. 
July 17, 1895. 
June 20. 1893. 
November 20, 1893. 
December 16, 1890. 
July 31, 1895. 
December 28, 1892. 
October 20, 1893. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 193 

STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT.— Continued. 



Streets. 



Green, Douglas northerly 

Green, Pine to Beech 

Green, Wilson to Belmont 

Grove, Pine to Beech 

Grove, Wilson to Belmont* 

Grove, Taj'lor westerly 

Hale, across Wolf & Wagner land 

Hall, Haywarcl to Young 

Hall, Lake avenue to Bell 

Hall, Pearl to north side of Prospect * 

HatTison, Russell to Hall 

Harrison, Hall to Belmont 

Harvard, Union to Maple 

Harvell, Main to Second 

Hayes avenue, Massabesic to Chase avenue 

Hay ward, Beech to Mammoth road 

Hevey, Conant northerly 

Hevey, Kelley to Columbus avenue 

Highland Park avenue, Candia road to Glen 

wood avenue 

Hosley, Green to Summer 

Huntress, Bank to north of Prince 

Jewett, Cilley road to Weston road* ..;... 

Joliette, south of Kellej' northerly 

Jones, Nelson to R. 1. Stevens's land 

Josselyn, Hyron to Varney 

Kelley, to M. &N.W. R. R , 

Kennedy, Brown avenue to Josselyn 

Knowllon, Hay ward southerly 

Lafayette, Amory northerly * 

Laval, Araorj' northerly * 

Liberty, North southerly , 

Liberty, south of North to Salmon , 

Lincoln, Cedar to Shasta* 

Longwood ave.. Mammoth rd. to Woodbine ave 

Maple, Gore northerly* 

McUuffie, Boynton to Huntress 

McKinnon, Central to Pleasant* 

McNeil, Second to West Hancock 

Mead, Hall to Belmont 

Merrimack, east of Beacon to Hanover 

Miliord, Amherst road westerly 

Mitchell, Beech to Brown avenue * 

.Montgomery, Conant northerly 

Morgan, Amory to Kelley 

Mystic avenue, Candia road northerly 

Nelson, James Hall road to Mammoth road 

Oak, Gore northerly * 

Oakland avenue, A. W. Palmer's to J. Cronin's. 

Orchard avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

Page, Hanover to Bridge 

Passageway, Elm to Everett 

Platts avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

Prince, Boynton to Huntress 

Prospect, Derry old line to Hall 

Prout avenue. Hay ward southerly 

Putnam, to Dubuque 

Quincy, Douglas northerly 

Ray, Ray bi ook to Clarke * 

Revere avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

Rimmon, north of Conant to Gates 

13 



Length 
in feet. 



96 
990 
809 
990 
809 
757 
.SOD 
125 

1,890 
716 

1,218 
365 

1,190 

1,060 
471 

6,000 
300 

1,165 

1,007 

490 

648 

3,650 

1,150 

562 

161 

652 

922 

487 

1,690 

1,698 

150 

325 

4,321 

1,100 

600 

455 

192 

299 

312 

1,000 

517 

3,000 

400 

6.50 

1,200 

509 

600 

l,.50O 

1,337 

2,500 

200 

1,0.52 

520 

325 

500 

300 

96 

666 

1,200 

158 



When laid out. 



July 28, 1891. 
August 31, 1893. 
August 15, 1892. 
July 19, 1893. 
September 9, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 
July 2.5, 1894. 
July 6, 1892. 
June 23, 1893. 
June 12, 1891. 
October 25, 1892. 
May 21, 1894. 
November 18, 1892> 
July 25, 1894. 
October 19, 1894. 
September 21, 1893. 
July 25, 1894. 
July 6, 1892. 

December 28, 1892. 
November 16, 1893. 
September 18, 1891. 
November 27, 1891. 
May 26, 1893. 
August 31, 1893. 
October 3, 1893. 
June 23, 1891. 
September 21, 1891. 
November 27, ls91. 
May 26, 1893. 
May 26, 1893. 
April 26, 1892. 
June 12, 1895. 
May 20, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 
June 9, 1893. 
September 18, 1891. 
June 7,1892. 
August 28, 1891. 
June 27, 1894. 
Julv 28. 1891. 
December 16, 1890. 
( October 28, 1890. 
I November 29, 1892. 
May 26, 1893. 
May 26, 1893. 
December 28, 1893. 
August 21, 1893. 
June 9, 1893. 
December 28, 1892. 
December 28,1892. 
June 19, 1889. 
August 15, 1893. 
August 24, 1894. 
September 18, 1891. 
May 29, 1889. 
June 6, 1893. 
June 5, 1888. 
July 28, 1891. 
May 21, 1894. 
December 28. 1892. 
October 27, 1891. 



194 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT.— Continued. 



Streets. 



Rimnion, to south of Wayne 

Sagamore, Union to Walnut 

Sagamore, Walnut to Oak 

Salmon, Pine to Walnut 

Salmon, Walnut to Beecli* 

Schiller, Hale to AVentworth 

Schiller, Wentworth to Merrimack river . 

Second, Blaine to Main 

Silver, Union to Maple 

Somerville, Union to Hall 

Stevens, Baker southerly 

Summer, Wilson to Massabesic 

Titus avenue, Union to Beech 

Union, A uburn to Nutt road 

Yarney, .losselyn to west of C. & M. R. R.* 

Vinton, Taylor to .lewett 

Wallace, W'inter southwesterly* 

Wayland avenue, Massabesic to Mammoth road 

Wayne, west of Dubuque westerly 

"Wentworth, West Hancock southerly* 

"West Hancock, Merrimack river westerly 

Wilkins, Rockland avenue to Bedford line 

Willow, Hay ward to Nutt road* 

Wilson, north line of C. & P. R. R to Clay 

AVilton, Main to Cartier 

Woodbine avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R... 
Woodland avenue, C. & P. R. R. to James Dear- 
born's 

Woodland avenue, Jas. Dearborn's to Candia r'd 



Length 
in feet. 



735 
270 

1,112 
764 
270 
855 
218 

5,528 
690 

2,925 
300 

1,480 
540 

4,175 
290 

1,256 
165 
134 
150 

1,546 
700 
595 
292 

1,800 
575 

1,290 

770 
426 



When laid out. 



September 26, 1892. 
August 28, 1891. 
October 19, 1894. 
June 12, 1891. 
June 27, 1894. 
July 25, 1894. 
Julv 25, 1894. 
Sep'tember 18, 1891. 
June 7, 1892. 
June 7, 1892. 
November 29, 1892. 
September 22, 1891. 
May 21, 1894. 
October 25, 1892. 
October 3, 1893. 
August 31, 1893. 
November 23, 1894. 
August 24, 1894. 
June 23, 1893. 
September 21, 1893. 
November 28, 1890. 
July 0, 1892. 
June 23, 1893. 
June 26, 1892. 
June 26, 1893. 
December 28, 1892. 

December 28, 1892. 
November 23, 1894. 



Equaling 27.30 miles. 

Tabulated Statement of Work Done and Present 
Standing Relative to Streets and Sewers, Janu- 
ary 1, 1896. 

New streets laid out in 1893 36,666.00 ft., equal to 6.940 miles 



" " 1S95 

New streets built in 1893 

" 1894 . 
" 1895 • 

Sewers built in 1893 . 

" 1894 . 

" " 1895 • 



T3>325-oo " " 2.330 

12,090.00 " " 2.290 " 

15,840.00 ft., equal to 3.000 miles 
18,513.00" " 3.506 " 

16,943.00 " " 3.220 " 

21,716.00 ft., equal to 4.1 10 miles 
19,612.00 " " 3-714 " 

23,152.00 " " 4-383 " 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 195 

Sewers voted in 1893 . . 34,007.00 ft., equal to 6.440 miles 

" " 1894 . . 18,366.00 " " 3.480 " 

" 1895 . . 24,136.50 " " 4.569 " 

Streets laid out but not 

built to January i, 1896 144,761.00 ft., equal to 27.420 miles 
Sewers ordered in but not 

built to January I, 1896 29,648.00" '•' 5-6i5 " 

Total amount of sewers January i, 1895, equal to 52.256 miles 
Actual increase in 1895 equal to . . . 3-980 " 



Total amount of sewers January 1, 1896 . 56.236 miles 

Length of streets open for 

travel .... 577,087.00 ft., equal to 109.297 miles 
Length of streets planned 

for on ground . . 91,905.00 " " 17-234 " 

Length of roads opened 

for travel . . . 323,400.00 " " 61.250 " 

Length of avenues opened 

for travel . . . 44,142.00 " " 8.360 " 

Length of avenues planned 

for on ground . . 16,234.00 '• " 3-074 " 



1,052,768.00 ft., equal to 199.388 miles 

Length of walks on streets 642,978.00 ft., equal to 121.776 miles 
Length of walks on roads 4,740.00 " " 0.897 " 

Length of walks on avenues 33,158.00 " " 6.280 " 



680,876.00 ft., equal to 128.953 ™iles 

'Cobblestone paving 2,720.00 ft., equal to 0.515 miles 
Block '• " 9,890.00 " " 1.873 " 

Coal tar concrete 9,346.00 " " i-77o " 

ways, j Macadam . . 25,867.00 " " 4.899 " 

1 Telford . . 26,497.00 " " 5-oi8 " 



Road- 



Total length of improved 

streets . . . 74,320.00 ft., equal to 14-075 miles 



196 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Streets, roads, and avenues open for travel January i, 1896,, 
944,629.00 ft., equal to 177.013 miles. 



Area of city, 21,700 acres, or 33.906 square miles. 

Area of Derryfield park 

Oak Hill reservoir park 

Stark park 

Concord square 

Hanover square 

Merrimack square 

Park square 

Simpson square 

Tremont square 
Total area of parks 

squares . ' 



68.00 acres 

25-65 
30.00 

4.48 
3.00 

5-89 
3-49 
0.56 
2.25 
123-65 
19.67 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



197 



SUMMARY OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM SINCE 1880. 



Tear. 



1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 



1 ^ >> 
m be 

c a 

C-r' 
go 


o 

D 

ol 


6'^ 
g« 

S S< !- 
C ci 
O o « 

be 

?n 2-5 


si 

t< to 

S2I 


1.62 
2. IS 
3.37 
2.54 
1.73 
1.56 
2.15 


18.66 
20.84 
24.21 
26.75 
28.48 
30.04 
33.19 






























1.44 


33.63 






1.73 

2.66 


35.36 

38.02 








2,003 


1.81 


39.83 


64 


2,067 


3.08 


42.91 


153 


2,220 


3.13 


46.04 


214 


2,434 


3.31 


49.35 


191 


2,625 


2.91 


52.26 


258 


2,883 


3.98 


56.24 


255 


3,138 



$19,919.40 
23,895.12 
24,148.13 
21,452.05 
21,548.60 
28,122.84 
44,479.15 
19,593.92 
31,154.19 
27,513.73 
39,297.97 
55,409.73 
39,724.65 
51.392.15 
46,116.01 
71,859.36 



$12,295.92 
10,961.06 
7,165.65 
8,445.69 
12,455.84 
18,027.46 
20,687.97 
13,815.22 
18,008.20 
10,343.51 
21,711.58 
17,990.17 
12,691.58 
15,526.33 
15,847.42 
18,055.11 



Total cost for 16 years, $565,927.00. 

In the year 1888 a plan was made by the present city engineer 
for a system of sewerage embracing the entire city, this being 
the first comprehensive plan ever compiled for that purpose. 
Since its adoption the majority of the sewers constructed have 
followed this plan ; those that have not are only temporary, and 
will have to be relaid when the growth of the city demands it. 
Since 1888 there have been 20.88 miles built, at a cost of ^331,- 
313.60, at an average cost of $15,867.51 per mile. 



198 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Orders. 

The following orders have been written by this department for 
the various committees. 

An Order to Appropriate Money. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the 
joint standing committee on finance be and are hereby author- 
ized to set apart in the annual appropriation the sum of twenty- 
five hundred dollars to be used in widening Elm street on the 
west side at Ray brook. 

Recommended by the committee on streets February 15, 1895. 



An Order to establish Certain Grades. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grades as shown on the following plans," No. 66 and No. 87 
of North Main street from Sullivan to Putnam, that the grade as 
shown on said plans be changed to the blue lines on said plans. 
On plans No. 168 and No. 169 of Manchester street, that the 
center grade of said street be changed from the west side of 
Union street to about 300 feet east of Beech street, as shown by 
blue lines. On plan No. 788 of Elm street, that the center grade 
of said street be changed to conform to the blue lines of said 
plan. 

The lines above described and shown on said plans to be and 
are hereby made the established grade of said streets. 

Recommended by the committee on streets April 4, 1895. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Vinton Street. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade as shown on plan of Vinton street from Jewett street 
to Taylor street on file in the city engineer's department, be and 
is hereby made the established grade of said street. 

Recommended by the committee on streets May 3, 1895. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 199 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers as follows : 

In Sagamore street, from Walnut to Oak street. 

In Hevey street from Conant street northerly about 300 feet. 

In Boynton street, from present sewer southerly to McDufifie 
street. 

In Prince street from Boynton street to Huntress street. 

In McDufifie street, from Boynton street to Huntress street. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for sewers and drains. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains April 
30> 1895- 



An Order to build Certain Streets. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build the following streets to the grade as estab- 
lished by the city : 

Cartier west back from Putnam to Wayne street. 

Putnam street from Cartier to Dubuque street. 

Hall street from Myrtle to Prospect street. 

Vinton street from Jewett to Taylor street. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for new streets. 

Recommended by the committee on streets May 3, 1895. 



An Order to transfer Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the amount of fifteen thousand dollars be transterred from the 



200 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

appropriation for Pennacook-street sewer to the appropriation 
for Christian brook sewer. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains May 
29, 1895. 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor *and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers as follows : 

In Elm street from Monroe south back to Thayer street. 

In Alsace street from Kelley to Columbus avenue. 

In Joliette street from Kelley to Amory street. 

In Amory street from Joliette to Essex street. 

In Tilton street from Milford to Bowman avenue. 

In Mast street from near Bowman westerly. 

And the expense thereof to, be charged to the appropriation 
for new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains May 
28, 1895. 

An Order to build Christian Brook Sewer. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build Christian brook sewer from Canal to Penna- 
cook street easterly, as shown by plans in the city engineer's de- 
partment, to Walnut and North streets, and the expense thereof 
be charged to the appropriation for Christian brook sewer. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains May 
29j 1895. 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers, as follows : 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 201 

In Union street from Clarke northerly to Trenton, about 1,700 
feet. 

In Cedar south back street from Maple easterly, about 300 
feet. 

In Jewett street to Somerville, about 900 feet. 

In Somerville street, Jewett westerly, about 400 feet. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for 
new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains June 
28, 1895. 



An Order to build Silver-Street Sewer. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build the Silver-street sewer from Elm and Valley 
streets to Lincoln and Silver streets, as shown by the plans in the 
city engineer's department, and the expense thereof be charged 
to the appropriation for Valley-street sewer. 

Recommended by committee on sewers and drains July 2, 
1895. 



An Order to transfer Money. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the amount of fifteen thousand dollars be transferred from the 
appropriation for the Valley-street sewer to the appropriation for 
the Silver-street sewer. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains July 2, 
1895. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers, as follows: 



202 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

In Union east back from Christian brook northerly, about 500. 
feet. 

In Union east back from Christian brook southerly, about 400 
feet. 

In Jevvett street from Somerville to Clay street. 

In Lowell street from Belmont to Beacon. 

In Beech street from Sagamore northerly, about 175 feet. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation* 
for new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains August 
2, 1895. 



An Order to macadamize Elm Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to macadamize Elm street, from the street crossing 
north of the intersection of Brown avenue, thence southerly to 
Baker street, and the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for macadamizing. 

Recommended by Alderman Libbey August 6, 1895. , 



An Order to establish the Grade of Hancock Street. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade as shown on plan No. 797 of Hancock street, from 
Brown avenue to the Concord Railroad track, and dated August 
2, 1895, be and is hereby made the established grade of said 
street. 

Recommended by the committee on streets August 6, 1895. 



An Order to change the Grade of Prospect Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade as shown on plan No. 4040 of Prospect street, frona 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 203 

Russell to Linden street, be and is hereby changed to the grade 
as established in 1892, to the red lines as shown on said plan. 

Recommended by the committee on streets August 6, 1895. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. ' 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers, as follows : 

In Prospect street from Hall street easterly about 100 feet. 

In Hayward street from Jewett street easterly about 300 feet. 

In Hall street from Concord street northerly about 180 feet. 

In Union street from Silver street southerly to Plummer street. 

In Wilton street from Main street westerly about 150 feet. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains August 
3°^ 1895- 



An Order to build Hevey Street. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build Hevey street to the grade as established from 
Amory to Wayne streets in said city, and the expense thereof to 
be charged to the appropriation for new streets. 

Recommended by the committee on streets August 19, 1895. 



An Order to erect a Watering-trough on North Union Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to erect and supply a watering-trough on North 



204 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Union street between Arah street and the River road, and the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for incidental 
expenses. 

Recommended by the committee on streets September 19, 1895. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Bridge Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade of Bridge street be established as follows : 

The elevation at the southeast corner of Bridge and Hall 
streets shall be 228, and thence in an easterly direction on the 
south line of Bridge street about 309 feet to the corner of Bel- 
mont street, and the corner of Belmont street shall be 239.60, 
making a straight grade of 309 feet at 3.75 per 100. The north 
side of said street shall be as follows : 

The northeast corner of Bridge and Hall streets to be 226.50. 

Fifty feet east of Hall street is to be 228.85. 

One hundred feet east of Hall street is to be 231.20. 

One hundred and fifty feet east of Hall street is to be 233.30. 

Two hundred feet east of Hall street is to be 235.25. 

Two hundred and fifty feet east of Hall street is to be 237. 

Three hundred and nine feet east of Hall street is to be 238.75. 

And the same shall be and is hereby made the established 
grade of said street, reference being made to the plan No. 41 61 
in the city engineer's department. 

Recommended by the committee on streets October i, 1895. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Woodbine Avenue. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade of Woodbine avenue be established as follows: 

Beginning at the north line of the Candia road and on the 
west line of Woodbine avenue at elevation 219.40, and thence 
in a northerly direction about 1006 feet, the grade to drop at the 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 205 

rate of 0.30 per 100 feet to elevation 216.38; thence northerly 
about 47 feet to the south line of Glenwood avenue, the grade 
to be 215.85 ; thence northerly about 50 feet across Glenwood 
avenue, grade to be 215 ; thence northerly 50 feet, grade to be 
214; thence northerly 50 feet, grade to be 212.60; thence 
northerly 50 feet, grade to be 211.40; thence northerly 5a 
feet, grade to be 210.65; thence about 30 feet to the cen- 
ter of the Concord & Portsmouth right of way, grade to be 
210.25 ; on the east side elevation to be 221.30 for the north- 
east corner of Candia road; thence 995 feet at 0.40 per 100 to 
elevation 217.32; thence about 50 feet to elevation 216.85; 
thence about 50 feet to elevation 216.10; thence 50 feet to ele- 
vation 215; thence 50 feet to elevation 213.5c; thence 50 feet 
to elevation 212.25 ; thence 50 feet to elevation 211.40; thence 
about 32 feet to elevation 211, the center of the railroad, and 
the same shall be and is hereby made the established grade of 
said avenue, reference being made to plan No. 1064, city engi- 
neer's department. 

Recommended by the committee on streets October i, 1895. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Everett street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade of Everett street be established as follows : 

Beginning at the south side of Clarke street and the east side 
of Everett street at elevation 150.50, thence southerly 100 feet 
level at 150.50, thence southerly 200 feet at 0.25 per 100 feet, mak- 
ing that end at 150 on the west side of Everett street, the 
grade to be 150.25 at the corner of Clarke street; at 50 feet 
south of Clarke, the grade to be 150.45 ; at 100 feet south of 
Clarke, the grade to be 150.50 ; thence southerly 250 feet at 
0.20 per 100 feet, making the grade 156, and the same shall be 
and is hereby made the established grade of said Everett street, 
reference being made to plan No. 4131 in the city engineer's 
department. 

Recommended by the committee on streets October i, 1895. 



206 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An Order to build a Sewer in Valley Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build a sewer in Valley street from Jewett street 
easterly 300 feet, and the expense thereof be charged to the ap- 
propriation for new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains Octo- 
ber I, 1895. 



An Order to sell Land on Spruce Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and are hereby authorized to sell the land on Spruce street 
east of Beacon, consisting of 250 feet in length on Spruce street 
and 115 feet deep. 

Recommended by the joint standing committee on lands and 
buildings October, 1895. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers as follows : 

In Wentworth street, from Schiller northerly about 400 feet. 

In Merrimack street, from Beacon easterly about no feet. 

In Beacon street, from Merrimack northerly about 60 feet. 

In Second street, from Schiller northerly about 300 feet. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for new sewers. 

Recommended by the joint standing committee on sewers and 
drains October 22, 1895. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 207 

An Order to establish the Grade of Nashua Street. 

Ordered. If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade of Nashua street between Bridge and Pearl streets be 
-and is hereby made the established grade as follows : 

The northwest corner of Bridge and Nashua streets shall be 
153.15, thence northerly on the east side of Nashua street about 
170 feet, the grade to rise 4.535 per 100 feet to the southeast 
corner of Arlington street, grade to be 160.86, the northeast cor- 
ner of Nashua and Arlington to be 162.50, thence the grade to 
rise 4.062 per 100 feet to the southeast corner of Pearl street, 
grade to be 169. On the west side the grade of Bridge and 
Nashua to be 153-50, then the grade to rise at the rate of 4.21 
per 100 feet for about 375 feet to the corner of Pearl street, there 
the grade to be 169.30. The grade is the same as the concrete 
now in, and the street to be cut down to correspond with this 
grade, reference being made to plan No. 146 in the city engineer's 
department. 

Recommended by the board of aldermen October 30, 1895. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Union Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade of Union street on the east side from Harrison to 
Brook street be and is hereby established as follows : 

At the northeast corner of Harrison and Union streets, grade 
elevation to be 153.64. 

At 100 feet northerly from said corner, grade to be 154.65. 

At 180 feet northerly from said corner, grade to be 155.13. 

At 280 feet northerly from said corner, grade to be 155.75. 

At 380 feet northerly from said corner, grade to be 157.44. 

Which is the southeast corner of Brook and Union streets, ref- 
erence being made to notebook 102, page 45, city engineer's 
department. 

Recommended by the board of aldermen October 30, 1S95. 



208 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An Order to establish the Grade of Milford Street. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade of Milford street from Forest street to old Amherst 
road be established as follows : 

On the north side of Milford street at the intersection with 
Forest street, the grade to be 105.50, thence easterly 514 feet, 
the grade drops 1.361 per 100 feet to elevation 98.50 at the old 
Amherst road. On the south side at the intersection of Forest 
street and Milford street, grade to be 105.50, thence easterly 
about 535 feet, the grade drops 1.308 per 100 feet to elevation 
98.50, reference being made to plan No. 4177 on file in the city- 
engineer's department. 

Recommended by the board of mayor and aldermen October 
30, 1S95. 



An Order to change the Grade of Belmont Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade of Belmont street between Laurel and Merrimack streets 
be changed as follows : 

The northeast corner of Laurel and Belmont streets to be 
190.50, thence 105 feet, the grade to rise 8.66 feet per 100 feet, 
making the elevation 199.60 ; at 155 feet grade to be 203.55, at 
210 feet on the corner of Merrimack street to be 206, and the 
grade as changed is hereby made the established grade of said 
street, reference being made to plan No. 57 in the city engineer's 
department. 

Recommended by the board of aldermen October 30, 1895. 



An Order to build Wilson Street to Grade, 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 209 

authorized to build to grade Wilson street from Spruce to Valley- 
street, provided the Elliott Manufacturing Company put in con- 
crete sidewalks adjoining their property. 

Recommended by the board of aldermen October 30, 1895. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Wentworth Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade of Wentworth street between West Hancock and the 
Harvell estate be established as follows : 

The southwest corner of West Hancock and Wentworth streets 
to be 35.28. The northwest corner of Frederick and Wentworth 
to be 33.25, the southwest corner of Frederick street to be 33, at 
270 feet south of Frederick street on the west side grade to be 
30, then 200 feet level at 30, then 220 feet to the north side of 
Gilman street the grade to be 31. The south sides of Oilman 
and Wentworth streets to be 31, then the grade to rise about 685 
feet at the rate of 0.16 per 100 feet to the Harvell land, there 
grade to be 32.10. 

On the east side, grade to the southeast corner of West Han- 
cock and Wentworth to be 34.75, at the northeast corner of 
Frederick to be 33.25, at the southeast corner grade to be 33, 
from here southerly the grade to be level with the grade on the 
west side of said Wentworth street, reference being made to plan. 
No. 4109 in the city engineer's department. 

Recommended by the board of aldermen October 30, 1895. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Forest Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade of Forest street, from Milford street northerly, be es- 
tablished as follows : 



210 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

On the westerly side of Forest street at its intersection with 
Milford street the grade elevation shall be 105.50. 

At 50 feet north of the intersection, grade shall be 105.60. 

At 100 feet north of the intersection, grade shall be 106.25. 

At 150 feet north of the intersection, grade shall be 107.60. 

At 200 feet north of the intersection grade shall be 109.50. 

At 250 feet north of the intersection, grade shall be 112.25. 

On the easterly side, the grade elevation at the intersection 
shall be 105.50. 

At 20 feet northerly of the intersection, grade to be 105.60. 

At 70 feet northerly of the intersection, grade to be 106.25. 

At 120 feet northerly of the intersection, grade to be 107.60. 

At 170 feet northerly of the intersection, grade to be 109.50. 

At 220 feet northerly of the intersection, grade to be 112.25. 

Reference being made to the plan and profile of Forest street, 
on file in the city engineer's department. 

Recommended by the board of aldermen October 30, 1S95. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Laurel Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade of Laurel street, on the north side, from Belmont to 
Beacon, be and is hereby established as follows : 

The northeast corner of Belmont and Laurel street shall be 
graded 190.50; thence 200 feet easterly, grade to rise 7.25 feet 
per 100, making the corner of Milton street 215 on the west 
side of Milton street, and grade 218 on the east side of Milton 
street. 

At 50 feet east of Milton, grade to be 220.25. 

At 100 feet east of Milton, grade to be 220. 

At 150 feet east of Milton, grade to be 223.30. 

Then 103 feet the grade to rise 2.62 per hundred feet, making 
ihe corner of Beacon street 226. The grade on the south side 
to be 1.50 feet below and parallel to the grade on the north side. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 211 

Reference being made to plan No. 779 in the city engineer's 
department. 

Recommended by the board of aldermen October 30, 1895. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Shasta Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade be established as follows : 

At the northwest corner of Shasta and Union, grade to be 
128; at the northeast corner, 128.85; thence easterly on the 
north side at 48 feet from Union, grade to be 129.80; at 76 
feet from Union, grade to be 130.40 ; at 126 feet from Union, 
grade to be 131. 10; at 176. feet from Union, grade to be 131.50; 
at 226 feet from Union, grade to be 131.70; then 265 feet to 
Beech-street level, at elevation 131.70; then 50 feet across Beech 
street the grade is at an elevation of 131.70; then 450 feet from 
Beech street grade is at an elevation of 135.40; then 500 feet 
from Beech street grade is at an elevation of 136 ; then 550 feet 
from Beech street grade is at an elevation of 136.65 ; then 600 
feet from Beech street grade is at an elevation of 137.50 on the 
west side of Maple street; then 650 feet from Beech street the 
^rade is at an elevation of 138.50 on the east side of Maple 
street ; then 700 feet from Beech street the grade is at an eleva- 
tion of 139.70 ; then 750 feet from Beech the grade is at an ele- 
vation of 141 ; then 800 feet from Beech street the grade is at 
an elevation of 142.40; then 850 feet from Beech street the 
grade is at an elevation of 144; then 1,050 feet from Beech 
street the grade is at an elevation of 151. 10; then 1,100 feet 
from Beech street the grade is at an elevation of 153 ; then 
1,150 feet from Beech street the grade is at an elevation of 154.60; 
then 1,200 feet from Beech street the grade is at an elevation of 
156. Beginning at Union and Shasta on the south side, grade 
at the southwest corner is 128.10; at the southeast corner the 
grade is 129.50. 



212 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

At 48 feet east of Union street, south side grade to be 130.40. 
At 75 feet east of Union street, south side grade to be 130.80.. 
At 125 feet east of Union street, south side grade to be 
131.40. 
At 175 feet east of Union street, south side grade to be 

I3I-55- 
At 225 feet east of Union street, south side grade to be 

131.60. 

From here grade is level to Beech street at 131.60 ; from Beech 
street to Lincoln street the grade on the south side is level with 
the north side, reference being made to plan No. 41 19 in the 
city engineer's department. 

Recommended by the board of aldermen October 30, 1895. 



An Order to change the Grade of Milton Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade of Milton street, between Laurel and Merrimack streets,, 
be changed as follows : 

The grade at the northwest corner of Milton and Laurel to be 
215 on the west side. 

At 25 feet north of Laurel street, grade to be 218.45. 

At 50 feet north of Laurel street, grade to be 221.40. 

At 75 feet north of Laurel street, grade to be 223.45. 

At 100 feet north of Laurel street, grade to be 225.80. 

At 125 feet north of Laurel street, grade to be 227.50. 

On the east side, grade at the corner of Laurel to be 218 ; 25 
feet north of Laurel, to be 220.90 ; 50 feet north of Laurel, to 
be 223.40; 75 feet north of Laurel, to be 225.65; 100 feet 
north of Laurel, to be 227.60; 125 feet north of Laurel, to be 
229.35 ; 150 feet north of Laurel, to be 230.65 ; 175 feet north 
of Laurel, to be 231.80 ; 200 feet north of Laurel, to be 232.80 ; 
211 feet north of Laurel, to be 233, and the grade as changed be 
and is hereby made the established grade, reference being made 
to plan No. 179 in city engineer's department. 

Recommended by the board of mayor and aldermen October 
30, 1895. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 213 

An Order to establish the Grade of Sah-non Street, from Wal- 
nut to Beech Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the grade of Salmon street, from Walnut to Beech street, be and 
is hereby established as follows : 

The southeast corner of Walnut and Salmon street shall be at 
-an elevation of 167.60; thence easterly on the south side of 
Salmon street at 50 feet east of Walnut, the grade to be 169.75. 

At 100 feet east of Walnut, the grade to be 172.80. 

At 120 feet east of Walnut, the grade to be 173.85. 

At 170 feet east of Walnut, the grade to be 176.10. 

At 220 feet east of Walnut, the grade to be 177.40. 

The last station being on the west line of Beech street. The 
.■grade on the north side of said Salmon street to be parallel and 
0.60 lower than the south side of said street, reference being 
made to the plan and profile of Salmon street on file in the city 
■engineer's deparment. 

Recommended by the board of mayor and aldermen Novem- 
tber 22, 1895. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers, as follows : 

In Cedar street from Wilson easterly about 212 feet, thence 
southerly to Cedar south back, thence easterly in Cedar south 
^back to Hall street. 

In Ray street from the present sewer northerly about 325 feet. 

In Second street from Schiller to Harvell street. 

In Belmont street from Bridge southerly about 200 feet. 

In Mead street from Hall to Belmont street. 

In Putnam street from Beauport to Cartier east back. 

In Cartier east back from Putnam street 400 feet northerly. 

In Cartier east back from Putnam street 400 feet southerly. 



214 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

A-nd the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
ior new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains No- 
vember 29, 1895. 



An Order to build Wentworth Street to Grade. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build Wentworth street from West Hancock street, 
thence southerly to a stake at the southerly end of said street to 
land of the late Charles Harvell. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for new streets. 

Recommended by the joint standing committee on streets 
December 16, 1895. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers, as follows : 

In Hevey east back street from Amory to Wayne street. 

In Auburn south back street from Wilson to 150 feet east of 
Hall. 

In Belmont street from Mead to Bridge street. 

In Spruce street from Canton street easterly 250 feet. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains De- 
cember 26, 1895. 



An Order to appropriate money to build Public Bath-houses. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the joint standing committee on finance be and are hereby au- 



REPORT or THE CITY ENGINEER. 215 

thorized to appropriate the sum of five thousand dollars in the 
appropriations for 1896, for the purpose of building and main- 
taining, for one year, two public bath-houses, — one to be located 
near the foot of Webster street in the Merrimack river, the other 
in said river near the foot of Ferry street. 

Recommended by the special committee on public bath- 
houses December 30, 1895. 



216 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Following is the report of the committee on sewers and 
drains, prepared by the city engineer as clerk of the committee : 

Manchester, N. H., December 30, 1895. 

Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

The committee appointed by your honorable board to act as 
the joint standing committee on sewers and drains would sub- 
mit the following report of the work done by them the present 
year, and the first in their term of office. 

At the opening of the season there were thirty-five orders for 
sewers voted in but not built. The following list gives the 
street, location, date of order, and length. 



Street. 


Location. 


Length 
in feet. 


Date 
ordered. 






540 

2,600 

1,230 

600 

352 

200 

250 

850 

160 

2,800 

101 

700 

450 

1,500 

1,200 

1,500 

800 

810 

blO 

200 

300 

200 

3,000 

250 

130 

684 

400 

565 

600 

4,900 

226 

1,800 

1,800 

550 


Apr. 3, 1894 






May 2, 1893 






Apr. 3, 1894 






Nov. 9, 1894 






Nov. 9, 1894 






Sept. 6. 1887 






July 10, 1893 


Dickey 


West Hancock to South Main. . 


July 10, 18'.3 




Sept. 4, 1894 


Front 




Sept. 5, 1S93 


Grove 

Harvell 


Present sewer easterly 

Hale to South Main 


Nov. 9, 1894 
Nov. 9, 1894 


Hale 


Nov. 9, 1894 


Hevej' east back 


Kelley to Columbus avenue 


July 10, 1893 
July 10,1893 






July 10, 1893 






Nov. 7, 1893 






Apr. 3, 1894 


jMast . ... 


Extension westerly 


Apr. 3, 1894 




Oct. 6, 1891 






Sept. 4, 1894 






May 2, 1893 




Canal to Union east back 


Nov. 7, 1893 


Porter 


May 2, 1893 


Pearl 




Nov. 9, 1894 


River road 


Monroe to Clarke 


July 10, 1893 






July 5, 1892 


Schiller 


Hill to Hale 


Nov. 9, 1894 


Union 




May 1,1894 


Valley 




Nov. 7, 1893 


West 




Sept. 4, 1894 




Spruce to Valley 


Apr. 3, 1894 




Aug. 7, 1894 


Wilson Hill 


Central to Merrimack 


Sept. 21,1893 






Total 


32,858 











Equaling 6.223 miles. 



223 



224 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

Of these the following have been built during the year 



Street. 



Adams 

Dearborn 

Dickey 

Hevey east back. 

Jewett 

Kelley 

Laurel 

Livermore land.. 

Manchester 

Pearl 

Schiller 

Union 

Wilson 

Wilson Hill 



Total 



Location. 



Clarke southerly 

Extension to Taylor 

West Hancock to South Main. 

Kelley to Amorj' 

Extension to Young 

Extension to Joliette 

Hall to Beacon 

Chestnut to Union 

Extension to Beacon 

Hall westerly 

Hill to Hale 

Ray brook to Clarke 

Spruce to Valley 

Central to Merrimack 



Length 
in feet. 



5oa 

300 

782 

703 

1,15S 

1,472 

860 

809 

300 

157 

465 

554 

1,890 

535^ 



10,485- 



Leaving 22,383 feet of sewers voted in previous to January i, 
1895. 

Of the above amount appropriations were made for a part of 
the Pennacook street and Valley street mains, but upon recom- 
mendations made by the committee both appropriations were 
transferred to new locations for both sewers, the Valley street to 
Silver street, and Pennacook street to Christian brook sewer. 
The original estimate of the Pennacook street sewer was about 
$30,000, and by the change the distance was shortened, and 
2,094 feet have been built at an average cost of about $6.35 per 
foot; and as there is still a balance of $1,703 on this sewer, to 
reach the terminus at Walnut and North streets. There remains 
only 523 feet to be built, which at the same cost would necessi- 
tate about $2,618 to complete, or about $12,382 less than it 
would have cost by following the city streets. 

The Silver-street sewer has been completed to Union street^ 
but as this sewer was voted to Lincoln and Silver streets there is. 
yet to be built about i,Soo feet. This is the main sewer to drain 
the section between Elm and Jewett streets and Valley street 
and Cilley road, a territory of about five hundred acres. As soon 
as this main is completed, numerous calls will be made for lateral 
sewers to accommodate this rapidly-growing section. Another 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 225 

section which has been brought to the committee's attention, 
and which could not be acted upon on account of the pressing 
needs in other directions, is the Whittemore section, for which 
several parties have been given leave to withdraw. Before sew- 
ers can be granted here it will be necessary for the city to get a 
right of way to the Piscataquog river. This can be done by pur- 
chase if necessary, and then using the low ground for a dump, 
and when the section is brought to the required grade, the same 
could be sold for building purposes. 

Two petitions for sewers which would drain into the Mast 
street main, were given leave to withdraw. This main has been 
voted in a distance of i,8oo feet, but owing to more pressing 
demands has not been built. Sewers were voted in in Elm street 
from Monroe south back to Thayer street, and in Union street 
from Clarke to Trenton street. Neither of these should be built 
until there is a main sewer in Clarke street. This Clarke-street 
main will connect with the River road sewer, which is voted in 
to Clarke and built as far as Ray brook. 

Many other sections have been called to the committee's atten- 
tion by owners and prospective builders, and the committee have 
examined carefully all the locations called for in the petitions 
referred to them. 

During the year 42 orders for sewers have received favorable 
action ; of these, 14 have been built. At the present time there 
are orders for 51 sewers which have passed your honorable board 
but which have not been constructed, and 4 which have been par- 
tially built. 

The committee has held eight meetings, as follows : April 30,. 
May 29, June 28, August 2, August 30, October 22, December 
26, December 29. 

The total number of petitions presented to your committee has 
been 41. Eight reports were sent in to the city councils, rec- 
ommending the passage of orders authorizing the building of 
certain sewers. These orders will be found in the list of orders 
written by the city engineer's department. Orders recommended, 
31. Leave to withdraw, 5. Reports to other committee, i. 

15 



226 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Petitions. 



The following is a list of the petitions referred to the commit- 
tee, and the action taken upon them. The date of the passage 
of the order to build the same will be found in the engineer's 
report of orders written for presentation to the city councils. 

MiLFORD, Old Amherst Road, Mast Street, commencing 
at the intersection of Milford with Forest street, thence running 
east on Milford street to Old Amherst road, and thence in a 
northerly direction to Mast street, and then to connect with the 
sewer now built. 

F. Tersa. 

Committee voted leave to withdraw until the sewer in Mast 
street and Amherst road, already voted in, had been built, Octo- 
ber 22. 

Joliette AND Amory STREETS, commencing at Kelley and 
Joliette streets, thence southerly to Amory street through Joliette 
street, and thence in a westerly direction about 200 feet to Essex 
and Amory. 

Sullivan & Sheehan. 

Committee voted to prepare an order as asked for, May 29. 

Carroll, Old Amherst Road, Mast Street, commencing 
at the northerly end of the sewer at the top of hill midway on 
Carroll street, and thence in a northwesterly direction to Old 
Amherst road, thence northerly to Mast street, thence connecting 
with sewer now partially completed. 

C. A. Brooks. 

Committee voted leave to withdraw until the sewer in Mast 
street and Amherst road, already voted in, had been built, Octo- 
ber 22. 

BoYNTON, Prince, McDuffie, Huntress Streets, commenc- 
ing at the corner of Boynton and C streets, and running 1,700 
feet south on Boynton street, also westerly from Boynton street 
through Prince and McDuffie streets to Huntress street, a distance 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 227 

of 600 feet and 500 feet respectively, thence through Huntress 
street from corner of Prince street southerly, a distance of 400 
feet. 

H. H. Huntress. 

Committee voted to build Boynton street to McDufifie street, 
to build Prince street from Boynton to Huntress, to build Mc- 
Dufifie street from Boynton to Huntress, April 30. 

Orange Street, commencing at the Union-street intersection 
of Orange street and thence in a westerly direction to Pine street 
on Orange street. 

Mrs. Henry A. Gage. 

Committee voted to refer the matter to the board of street 
commissioners, as it was in the nature of repairs, August 30. 

Elm Street, commencing at or near Thayer street on North 
Elm street, and thence in a southerly direction, to connect with 
Elm street or Clarke street sewer. 

A. Z. Jenkins. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build sewer as asked 
for to connect with Elm-street sewer. May 29. 

Hevey Street, commencing at Conant and Hevey streets, 
and thence in a northerly direction in Hevey street about 300 
feet. 

Ernst Schmittchen. 

Committee voted an order to build, April 30. 

Hall Street, commencing with the present sewer in Concord 
street at Hall and thence in a northerly direction in Hall street 
about 180 feet. 

William Carr. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, August 30. 

Alsace Street, commencing at Columbus avenue and Alsace 
street in Alsace street, and thence in a northerly direction to 
Kelley street, a distance of about 400 feet. 

Eugene Quirin. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build as asked for. 
May 29. 



228 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Belmont Street, commencing at Valley and Belmont streets^ 
and thence in a southerly direction to Clay street. 

E. L, Corey. ' 

Committee voted leave to withdraw, October 22. 

Sagamore Street. Commencing at Walnut and Sagamore 
streets, and thence in an easterly direction to Oak street in Saga- 
more street. 

Warren Harvey. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build, April 30. 

Mast Street. Commencing at present sewer in Mast street^ 
opposite land of James Baldwin Co., and thence in an easterly 
direction to Bowman street. 

Eugene W. Brigham. 

Committee voted to recommend to build the sewer 200 feet 
easterly, May 29. 

Beaufort West Back Street. Commencing in Beauport 
west back street from Wayne-street sewer, and thence in a south- 
erly direction to Sullivan street. 

Louis Schindler. 

Committee voted to recommend a sewer from Beauport west- 
erly in Putnam street with cesspools to connect with same on 
the north and south sides of Putnam street, May 29. 

TiLTON Street. Commencing at Milford street, and thence 
in a northerly direction to Bowman avenue, a distance of about 
450 feet. 

Andrew Netsch. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build the sewer, 
May 29. 

Jewett and Somerville Streets. Commencing at the 
present sewer in Jewett street, including the 500 feet now 
granted, and thence in a southerly direction to Somerville 
street, and thence westerly in Somerville street about 400 feet. 

A. H. Gladden. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build the sewer as 
asked for, June 28. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 229 

Wilton Street. Commencing at the present sewer in Main 
street at Wilton street, and thence in a westerly direction about 
150 feet in Wilton street. 

Mary A. Leacock. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build the same, 
August 30. 

Union Street. Commencing at the corner of Union and 
Clarke streets, and thence in a northerly direction to the corner 
of Union and Trenton streets. 

Charles S. Kidder. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build the sewer, 
June 28. 

Bartlett and Putnam Streets. Commencing at Bartlett 
and Wayne streets, thence southerly in Bartlett street to Sullivan 
street. Also from Bartlett and Putnam streets, thence westerly 
to the Piscataquog river. 

Albert Oliver. 

Committee voted leave to withdraw, as there was no city street 
in which to build the sewer, June 28. 

Cedar South Back Street. Commencing at the present 
sewer in Cedar south back street at Maple street, and thence in 
an easterly direction to Lincoln street. 

Jerry Sullivan. 

Committee voted to put in an order to build sewer 300 feet, 
as the grade of the street will not permit any further extension, 
June 28. 

Pine and Sagamore Streets. Cesspools at the northeast 
corner of Pine and Sagamore and at the southeast corner of Pine 
and Sagamore streets. 

J. A. Nelson. 

Committee voted to put in the two cesspools as asked for, 
August 2. 

Lowell Street. Commencing at Belmont and Lowell 
streets, and thence in an easterly direction. 
R. P. Silver. 



230 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Committee voted to build sewer as asked for from Belmont tO' 
Beacon street, August 2. 

Jewett Street. Commencing at Somerville street on Jewett 
street, and thence in a southerly direction to Clay street. 

J. J. McTiernan. 

Committee voted to build sewer as asked for to Clay street^ 
August 2. 

Union East Back Street. Commencing at North and 
Union east back street, and thence in a southerly direction about 
400 feet in Union east back street according to the city's plans 
of sewers. 

Robert R. Chase. 

Committee voted to prepare an order, August 2, 

Union Street. Commencing at Union east back street and 
the Christian brook sewer near North street, and thence in a nor- 
therly direction about 500 feet toward Webster street, according 
to the city's plan of sewerage. 

H. H. Cole. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build the sewer, 
August 2. 

Union Street. Commencing at the corner of Union and 
Silver streets, and thence in a southerly direction to Plummer 
street. 

G. H. Hastings. 

Committee voted that an order be prepared to put in the 
sewer as asked for, August 30. 

Prospect Street. Commencing at the present sewer in 
Prospect street at Hall street, and thence in an easterly direction 
about 100 feet. 

James E. Charnley. 

Committee voted that an order to build the sewer be prepared 
August 30. 

Valley Street. Commencing at the corner of Jewett and 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 231 

Valley streets, and thence in an easterly direction to a point 300 
feet on Valley street. 

Walter M. Morgan. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build the sewer 
and signed the order without a meeting. 

Hayward Street. Commencing at Jewett and Hayward 
streets, and thence in an easterly direction 300 feet on said Hay- 
ward street. 

Charles F. Cram. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build the sewer as 
asked for, August 30. 

Cedar South Back Street. Commencing at the proposed 
Wilson-street sewer at Cedar south back street, and thence in an. 
easterly direction to Hall street about 461 feet. 

J. L. T. Brown. 

Committee voted to defer action, October 22, 

Hevey East Back Street. Commencing at the present 
sewer in Hevey east back street, near Amory street, thence in a 
southerly direction to Wayne street. 

Joseph Caron. 

Committee voted an order to build, December 26. 

Putnam and Cartier East Back Streets. Commencing 
at the sewer at the corner of Putnam and Beauport streets, and 
thence in a westerly direction to Cartier east back street, and 
thence north and south in said back street about 400 feet each 
way. 

Peter Fleming. 

Committee voted to report an order to build, November 29. 

Wentworth Street. Commencing at the sewer in Schiller 
street, and thence in a northerly direction about 400 feet in 
• Wentworth street. 

Henry Newmann. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, October 22. 



232 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Mead Street. Commencing at the present sewer in Hall street 
at Mead street, and thence in an easterly direction in Mead 
street to Belmont street. 

Mead, Mason & Co. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, Novem- 
ber 2g. 

Merrimack and Beacon Streets. Commencing at the pres- 
ent sewer in Merrimack street east of Beacon street, and thence 
in a westerly direction to Beacon street, and thence northerly in 
Beacon street about 60 feet. 

W. H. Carpenter. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build as asked 
for, October 22. 

Maple Street. Commencing at the sewer in Silver street, and 
thence in a northerly direction to Harvard street in Maple street. 
Alonzo Elliott. 
Committee voted to give leave to withdraw, October 22. 

Ray Street. Commencing at the Ray brook sewer where it 
crosses Ray street, and thence in a northerly direction about 
325 feet. 

Oliver B. Green. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build from pres- 
ent sewer northerly 325 feet, November 29. 

Belmont Street. Commencing at the present sewer in Bridge 
street at Belmont street, and thence in a southerly direction in 
Belmont street about 200 feet. 

John P. Newell. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build from Bridge 
street southerly 200 feet, November 29. 

Second Street. Commencing at Second and Schiller streets 
at the sewer already in, and thence in a southerly direction to. 
Harvell street, according to the city's plan of sewers. 

C. A. Prasse. 

Committee voted to prepare an order for the same, Novem- 
ber 29. 



REPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 233 

Spruce Street. Commencing at the sewer in Canton street 
at Spruce street, and thence in an easterly direction 600 feet on 
Spruce street. 

George L. Anderson. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build 250 feet, De- 
cember 26. 

Mead and Belmont Streets. Commencing at Mead and 
Hall streets, and thence in an easterly direction to Belmont 
street in Mead street, thence southerly in Belmont street to 
Bridge street, according to the city's plans. 

W. H. Wright. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build, December 26. 

Auburn South Back Street. Commencing at the corner of 
Wilson and Auburn south back streets at the manhole now in, 
and thence in an easterly direction in Auburn south back street 
to 150 feet east of Hall street. 

A. H. Merrill. 

Committee voted an order to build, December 26. 



234 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
SEWERS ORDERED BUILT IN 1895. 



Alsace 

Aiiioiy 

Beacon 

Beech 

Belmont 

Boynton 

Cartier east back 
Cartier east back 

Cedar 

East of Wilson . . . 
Cedar south back 
Cedar south back 
Christian brook.. 

Elm 

Hall 

Hay ward 

Hevey 

Jewett 

Jewett 

Joliette 

Lowell 

Mast 

Mead 

McDuflBe 

Merrimack 

Prince 

Prospect 

Putnam 

Ray 

Sagamore 

Second 

Second 

Silver 

Somerville 

Tilton 

Union 

Union 

Union east back . 
Union east back . 

Valley 

Wentworth 

Wilton 



Location. 



Kelley to Amory 

Joliette to Essex 

Merrimack northerly 

Sagamore northerly 

Bridge southerly 

C to McDuffle 

Putnam northerly 

Putnam southerly 

Wilson easterly 

Cedar to Cedar south back 

East of Wilson to Hall 

Maple easterly 

Canal and Pennacook to Walnut 
and North 

Monroe south back to Thayer 

Concord northerly 

Jewett easterly 

Conant northerly 

To Somerville .." 

Somerville to Clay 

Kelley to Amory 

Belmont to Beacon 

Near Bowman westerly 

Hall to Belmont 

Boynton to Huntress 

Beacon easterly 

Boynton to Huntress 

Hall easterly 

Beauport to" Cartier east back 

Ray brook northerly 

Walnut to Oak 

Schiller northerly 

Schiller to Harvell 

Elm and Valley to Lincoln and Sil- 
ver 

.Tewett westerly 

Mil ford to Bowman avenue 

Clarke to Trenton 

Silver toPlummer 

Christian brook northerly 

Christian brook southerly 

•Jewett easterly 

Schiller northerly 

Main easterly 



Date or- 
dered. 


Length. 


June 4 


527 


4 


325 


Nov. 5 


60 


Aug. 6 


175 


Dec. 3 


200 


May 27 


572 


Dec. 3 


400 


" 3 


400 


" 3 


212 


" 3 


126 


" 3 


299 


July 2 


300 


June 4 


2,900 


" 4 


1,313 


Sept. 3 


180 


" 3 


300 


May 27 


300 


July 2 


900 


Aug. 6 


330 


June 4 


561V». 


Aug. 6 


500" 


June 4 


200 


Dec. 3 


362 


May 27 


507 


Nov. 9 


110 


May 27 


583 


Sept. 3 


100 


Dec. 3 


126 


" 3 


325 


May 27 


1,103 


Nov. 5 


300 


Dec. 3 


450 


July 2 


4,320 


" 2 


400 


June 4 


510 


July 2 


1,700 


Sept. 3 


350 


Aug. 6 


500 


" 6 


400 


Oct. 1 


300 


Nov. 5 


400 


Sept. 3 


150 




24,1361/2 



Equaling 4.569 miles. 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 235 

SEWERS ORDERED BUT NOT BUILT, TO JANUARY 1, 1896. 



Street. 



Amherst 

Amherst road 

Auburn 

Blaine 

Beech. 

Boynton 

Canton 

Concord 

Cai'tier east back . . 

Cedar 

East of Wilson 

Cedar south back.. 
Christian brook.... 

Dover 

Elm 

Elm 

Front 

Grove 

Hale 

Harvell 

Hay ward 

Hevey east back .. . 

Jewett 

Jewett 

Lowell 

Mast 

Mast 

Mead 

Merrimack 

McDuffie 

Myrtle 

Porter 

Trince 

Prospect 

Ray 

River road 

Sagamore 

Second 

Second 

Somerville 

Silver 

Tilton 

Union 

Union 

Union east back . . . 
Union east back . . . 

Valley 

Valley 

West 

Wentworth 

Wilson 



Location. 



Union to Ashland 

Mast southerly 

Canton easterly 

Second to Hiram 

Sagamore northerly 

C to McDuffle 

Auburn northerly 

Hall easterly 

Putnam southerly 

Wilson easterly 

Cedar to Cedar south back 

East of Wilson to Hall 

East of Liberty to Walnut 

Clinton northerly 

Monroe south back to Thayer.. 

Shasta to Baker 

Railroad bridge to Elm avenue 

Eddy to north of hotel 

Present sewer easterly 

Schiller southerly 

Hale to South Main 

Jewett easterly 

Amory to Columbus avenue .. . 

To Somerville 

To Clay 

Belmont to Beacon 

Near Bowman westerly 

Extension westerly 

Hall lo Belmont 

Belmont to Milton 

Boynton to Huntress 

Hall westerly 

Amherst northerly 

Boynton to Huntress 

Hall easterly 

Raj' brook northerly 

Monroe to Clarke 

Beech to Oak 

Blaine to Hiram 

Schiller to Harvell 

Jewett westerly 

Union to Lincoln 

JNIilford to Bowman avenue . . . 

Clarke to Trenton 

Silver to Plummer 

Christian brook northerly .... 

Christian brook southerly 

Elm to Belmont 

Jewett easterly ..' 

Clinton northerly 

Schiller southerly 

Valley to Somerville 



Length. 



2,600 

1,230 

600 

400 

175 

572 

353 

200 

400 

212 

126 

299 

523 

160 

1,313 

332 

1,373 

2,800 

101 

450 

700 

300 

800 

.550 

330 

500 

200 

610 

362 

200 

507 

200 

250 

583 

100 

325 

684 

803 

400 

450 

_, 400 

1,790 

, 510 

1,700 

350 

500 

, 400 

4,900 

300 

226 

400 

1,800 



Date 
ordered. 



29,648 



May 

April 

Nov. 

July 

Aug. 

May 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Dec. 



June 
Sept. 
June 
May 

Sept. 
Nov. 



Sept. 
July 

Aug. 

June 
April 
Dec. 

Oct. 
May 



Sept. 
Dec. 
July 
May 
July 
Dec. 
July 

June 
July 
Sept. 
Aug. 

Nov. 
Oct. 

Sept. 
Nov. 
Aug. 



1893 
1894 
1854 
1892 
1895 
1895 
1894 
1887 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1894 
1895 
1890 

1893 
1894 
1894 
1894 
1895 
1893 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1894 
1895 
1891 
1895 
1893 
1893 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1893 
1895 
1892 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1893 
1895 
1894 
1895 
1894 



Equaling 5.615 miles. 



236 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This comprises all the work that has come within the province 
of the committee on sewers and drains, and is respectfully sub- 
mitted. 

C. L. Wolf, Chairman^ 
George E. Heath, 
George .H. Phinney, 
John A. Lindquist, 
Michael R. Sullivan, 
Committee on Servers and Drains. 
W. H. Bennett, 

Clerk of Committee. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON STREETS. 



The third annual report of the committee on streets, prepared 
by the city engineer as clerk of the committee, is herewith pre- 
sented : 

Manchester, N. H., December 30, 1895. 

Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

The committee appointed by your honorable board to act as 
the joint standing committee on streets, would submit the follow- 
ing report of the work done by them and under their direction 
the present year : 

The committee has held seventeen meetings, as follows : Feb- 
ruary 4, February 15, March i, March 19, April 4, April 17, 
May 3, May 23, May 28, June 18, July 26, July 30, August 19, 
September 10, September ig, October 29, December 16. 

Number of petitions received, 50 ; laid over to May, 1896, 2 ; 
referred to city engineer to fix grade, 2 ; referred to street and 
park commissioners, 2 ; where orders to build streets were rec- 
ommended, 6 ; where orders to establish grade were recom- 
mended, 2 ; recommended leave to withdraw, 13 ; recommended 
to a hearing, 23 ; total, 50. 

The committee have twice examined the territory on the west 
of Derryfield park where the proposed speedway has been recom- 
mended, but definite action has been postponed. The petition 
for the extension of Kelley street was signed by a hundred and 
thirty-four persons, and after examining the premises the commit- 
tee was of the opinion, with so large a representative population 
signing the same, that they should be given a hearing, especially 
as a part of the road has been built at the westerly end by the 
owners of the property. Many sections have been visited to ex- 
amine in reference to grades and new streets so as to be more 

237 



238 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

conversant with the same when petitions for the actual work 
came before them. Beech street extension southerly was brought 
up, but upon* examination it was found that the street had been 
laid out and only remained to be built. Chestnut street from 
near Clarke to Trenton, which has been before the committee 
previously and given leave to withdraw, has been recommended 
to a hearing, as all the parties at interest have waived damages and 
the owners are anxious to have the same laid out. 

In the building of the Christian brook sewer it has done away 
with all the culverts built to get the streets through. Could the 
sewer be voted in for another block to the east it would be cheaper 
to build than a culvert, and as the length of the culvert needed 
at Christian brook would be about 200 feet, the extension of the 
sewer would be more economical than a culvert. 



Petitions. 

The following is a list of the petitions referred to the commit- 
tee, and the action taken upon them : 

DiNSMORE Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake on the north side of West Hancock street, and 320 feet 
east of the east line of Second street, said stake being on the west- 
erly line of Dinsmore street, and thence in a northeasterly direc- 
tion about 250 feet to a stake on the bank of the Piscataquog 
river, as shown on the plans of the New Hampshire Improvement 
Company's land, known as No. 589 in the city engineer's de- 
partment. 

George P. Crafts and others. 

May 3, committee voted that a hearing be granted. 

North Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake in the center of Union and North streets, and thence 
in an easterly direction to a stake at the center of Walnut and 
North streets, according to the city's plan of streets. 

J. E. Floyd and others. 

May 3, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 239 

Alfred Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at Hanover street, being an extension of Alfred street, running 
south to Merrimack street. 

F. B. Balch and others. 

May 3, committee voted to grant a hearing. 

Liberty Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake south of North street, and in the center of Liberty 
street, being the southern terminus of Liberty street as laid out, 
and thence in a southerly direction to a stake on the north line 
of Salmon street as shown by the Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany's plan, being an extension of Liberty street to Salmon 
street. 

Henry A. Smith and others. 

May 3, committee voted to grant a hearing. 

Belmont Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at the intersection of the center line of Belmont street with 
the center line of Pearl street as now laid out, and thence in a 
northerly direction to a point in the center line of Harrison 
street, or Harrison street produced, 339-65 feet east of the east- 
erly line of Hall street. 

Nicholas J. Whalen and others. 

November 18, given leave to withdraw until the Boulevard 
question is settled. 

Christopher Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a" stake in the land of John H. Groux, and thence in 
an easterly direction to a stake in the westerly line of Railroad 
street. 

John H. Groux and others. 

May 3, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Porter Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake in the center of Porter street opposite the land of S. S. 
Piper, and thence in an easterly direction to a stake on the west 
line of Ashland street. 

S. S. Piper and others. 

October 29, action deferred to May meeting in 1896. 



240 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SoMERViLLE STREET. For a ncw highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake in the center of Hall and Somerville streets laid 
out by the board of mayor and aldermen June 7, 1892, and 
thence in an easterly direction to a stake in the center of Jewett 
and Somerville streets, being an extension of Somerville street. 

H. H. Young and others. 

May 3, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Somerville Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake in the center of Somerville and Jewett streets and 
thence in a westerly direction to a stake 415 feet west of the cen- 
ter of Jewett street and in the center of Somerville street, as 
shown by a plan of said section known as plan No. 69, Hillsbor- 
ough county records. 

Levi W. Page and others. 

May 3, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Somerville Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake in the center of Hall and Somerville streets, and 
thence in an easterly direction to a stake in the center of Bel- 
mont street and on the center line of Somerville street produced 
easterly, being an extension of Somerville street from Hall to 
Belmont street. 

John Muir and others. 

May 3, committee voted to recommend a hearing. 

Putnam Street. For grading of the highway in said city, 
beginning at Cartier and Putnam, and thence in a westerly 
direction to Putnam and Dubuque streets. 

Louis Beaudoin and others. 

April 17, committee voted to recommend an order to build. 

Hall Street. For building the highway in said city, begin- 
ning at Hall and Myrtle streets, and thence in a northerly direc- 
tion to Hall and Prospect streets over Hall street. 

Ed P. Donnelly and others. 

May 3, committee voted to recommend an order to build. 



REPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 241 

Putnam Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake in the center of Putnam and Dubuque streets, being 
the westerly terminus of Putnam street as laid out June 5, 1888, 
and thence in a westerly direction to a stake at Putnam and 
Bartlett streets, being an extension of Putnam street. 

Albert Oliver and others. 

April 17, committee voted to give leave to withdraw. 

Cartier West Back Street. For grading of the highway 
in said city, beginning at Putnam and Cartier west back streets, 
and then in a northerly direction in Cartier west back street to. 
Wayne street. 

Louis Beaudoin and others. 

April 17, committee voted to recommend an order to build. 

New Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning at 
a stake on the west side of Old Mast road and on the north line 
of the land now owned by the city of Manchester, being used as 
a driveway to the city's gravel bank, and thence in a westerly 
direction to a stake on the Goffstown town line and on the nor- 
therly line of said city's land. 

William F. Alger and others. 

May 25, committee voted leave to withdraw. 

Vinton Street. For establishing the grade of highway in 
said city, beginning at Taylor and Vinton streets, and thence in 
an easterly direction to Jewett and Vinton streets. 

R, P. Stevens and others. 

Mav 3, committee voted that the grade be established. 

Vinton Street. For building the highway in said city, be- 
ginning at Taylor and Vinton streets, and thence in an easterly 
direction to Vinton and Jewett streets. 

R. P. Stevens and others. 

May 3, committee voted to recommend an order to build the 
same. 

Hayward Street. For the extension of Hayward street, 
from Hall to Belmont streets. 
C. H. Durgin and others. 
May 28, committee voted leave to withdraw. 



242 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

Whitford Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake on the east line of Union street, about 150 feet 
south of the division line between the land of Dodge & Bond 
and the Fellows land, and thence in an easterly direction to the 
Hooksett town line, said line to be parallel to the division line 
of said property and to be known as Whitford street. 

C. M. Dodge and others, with waiver of notice and damage. 

June 18, committee voted to grant a hearing. 

Prescott Street. For a highway in said city, beginning at 
a stake in the center of Maple and Prescott streets, and thence 
in an easterly direction to a stake in the center of Prescott and 
Lincoln streets. 

A. Elliott and others. 

July 30, committee voted leave to withdraw. 

Bremer Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake on the westerly line of Coolidge avenue, so called, 
and on the southerly line of the proposed Bremer street, and 
said stake is about 689.5 ^'^^^ northerly, measuring on the west- 
•erly line of said Coolidge avenue, from the northerly line of 
Kelley street, at its intersection with the westerly line of Cool- 
idge avenue, and thence in a westerly direction about 400 feet 
to a stake at the intersection of the easterly line of Rimmon 
street produced northerly, and the south line of Bremer street 
produced westerly, being the laying out of Bremer street from 
Coolidge avenue to Rimmon street, according to the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company's plan. 

T. J. Howard and others. 

June 18, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 

Maynard Avenue. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake on the west line of the Huse road, and in the 
center of Maynard avenue, and thence in a westerly direction 
to a stake on the easterly line of Porter street and in the center 
of Maynard avenue. 

John H. Maynard and others. 

June 18, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 243 

New Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning at 
a. stake in front of the house owned by Napoleon Daigle on the 
old Fogg land (now owned by Daigle, on the Bald Hill road), 
■and thence in a northerly direction to a stake on the north line 
of the Bald Hill road. 

Napoleon Daigle and others. 

July 26, committee voted to defer action until next meeting 
on account of time. 

September 10, committee voted leave to withdraw. 

North Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at Union street and continue North street, so called, through to 
Walnut street, and grade sidewalk, also grade sidewalk on the 
west side of Walnut street from North street to Webster street. 
We that are abutters on North street agree to accept grade as 
•established by city engineer. 

James M. Hart and others. 

July 30, committee voted leave to withdraw. 

Putnam Street. For an extension of highway in said city, 
beginning at a stake in the center of Putnam and Dubuque 
streets, being the westerly terminus of Putnam street as laid off 
June 5, 1888, and thence in a westerly direction to a stake at 
Putnam and Bartlett streets, being an extension of Putnam 
street. 

Johann Hammer and others. 

June 18, committee voted leave to withdraw. 

Dunbarton Road. For straightening and locating the high- 
way in said city, beginning at a stake on the westerly line of the 
River road, and on the south line of the Dunbarton road, so 
called, and thence in a northwesterly direction to a post about 
20 rods west of the River road and on the south side of the 
Dunbarton road. 

George H. Colby and others. 

August 19, committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted- 



244 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Clay Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at the intersection of Union and Clay streets, and thence in an 
easterly direction to Beech street, being an extension of Clay 
street from Union street to Beech street. 

Joseph Vaccarest and others. 

July 30, committee voted leave to withdraw. 

Glenwood Avenue. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake set on the center of Glenwood avenue at the 
southeast line of Daniel Cronan's lot, on land contributed by 
Walter Cody for a public highway,' and thence in an easterly 
direction about 200 feet from and parallel with the Portsmouth 
branch of the Concord & Montreal railroad, to a stake on the 
land of James A. Colby, the same being an extension of Glen- 
wood avenue. 

David Lovering and others. 

November 18, committee voted to recommend that a hearing 
be granted. 

Putnam Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at the stake m the center of Putnam and Dubuque streets, being 
the westerly terminus of Putnam street as laid out June 5, 1888, 
and thence in a westerly direction to a stake at Putnam and Bart- 
lett streets, being an extension of Putnam street. 

L. Martineau and others. 

July 26, committee voted leave to withdraw, as it conflicted 
with the city's agreement with the Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company. 

Watering-Trough. For a watering-trough at the corner of 
Amory street and Columbus avenue. 

F. I. Lessard and others. 

July 26, committee voted leave to withdraw, as there was no 
chance to drain the same. 

Mammoth Road. For locating the highway in said city, begin- 
ning at the stake in the center of the Mammoth road at the 
Hooksett town line, and thence in a southerly direction to a 



. REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 245 

stake in the center line of Hanover street road and the center 
line of the Mammoth road as shown by plan No. 4127 in the city 
engineer's department. 

B. W. Hill and others. 

September 10, committee voted to grant a hearing. 

Pearl Street. For grading the highway in said city, begin- 
ning at Morrison street on Pearl street, and thence in a westerly 
direction toward Ashland street on Pearl street. 

Alex Dahlberg and others. 

September 10, committee voted to refer the matter to the street 
and park commissioners. 

Lake Shore Road. For locating the highway in said city, 
beginning at a stake on the south line of Candia road and on the 
west line of the present Lake Shore road or Borough road, and 
thence in a southerly direction to a stake on the center line of 
the Lake Shore road and on the north line of the Concord & 
Portsmouth right of way. 

R. Schaarschmidt and others. 

October 29, committee voted to grant a hearing. 

Hevey Street. For grading the highway in said city, begin- 
ning at Hevey street and Amory street on Hevey street, and 
thence in a southerly direction to Wayne street on Hevey street. 

E. Leamerises and others. 

August 19, committee voted to build the street to grade. 

Hevey Street. For establishing the grade of the highway in 
said city, beginning at Conant and Hevey streets, and thence in 
a northerly direction in Hevey street about 300 feet. 

Joseph H. Terrell and others. 

September 19, committee voted to recommend an order to 
establish the grade of Hevey street. 

Putnam South Back Street. For a back street in said city, 
beginning at a point on the east line of Beauport street, no feet 
south of the south line of Putnam street, and thence in an east- 



246 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

erly direction 191 feet to a point in the center of Main west back 
street no feet south of the south Une of Putnam street. 

Arthur T. Beaumier and others. 

September 19, committee voted to give leave to withdraw. 

Montgomery Street. For a highway in said city, beginning 
at the stake in the center of Columbus avenue and Montgomery 
street, and thence in a northerly direction to a stake in the cen- 
ter of Kelley and Montgomery streets, according to the plan of 
said section made by the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. 

S. Roberge and others. 

September 19, committee voted to recommend a hearing. 

Isabella Street. For a highway in said city, beginning at 
a stake on or near the westerly line of Railroad street and 168.8 
feet southerly from the southwesterly corner of the house of Cath- 
erine Gemmel and thence in a southerly direction and across the 
Piscataquog river to a stake on the easterly line of Centennial 
street at a point 18 feet south of the north line of Isabella street 
as laid out on land of John H. Groux. 

John H. Groux and others. 

September 19, committee voted that a hearing be granted. 

Watering Trough. For a watering-trough in said city, on 
Union street between River road and Arah street. 

Luther Campbell and others. 

September 10, committee voted that an order be given for the 
street and park commissioners to put in the trough as asked for. 

North Street. For a highway in said city, beginning at the 
intersection of Union and North streets at a stake, and thence 
in an easterly direction to a stake at the intersection of Walnut 
and North streets, according to the Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company's plan of lots. 

George L. Kibbee and others. 

September 10, voted to grant a hearing. 

New Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning at 
a stake on the east side of Porter street between Concord and 
Amherst streets. Said stake is about six feet southerly of the 



KEPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 247 

northwest corner of land of J. N. Lacourse, and thence in an 
easterly direction and parallel to Amherst street to the lot line 
of Curtis J. Holt to a stake on said line. 

W. B. Sanford and others. 

October 29, committee voted to defer action to May meeting 
in 1896. 

Wentworth Street. For building to grade the highway in 
said city, beginning at Wentworth and West Hancock streets,, 
and thence in a southerly direction to a stake at the southerly 
end of said Wentworth street at land of the late Charles Harvell. 

Marie Fellbaum and others. 

December 16, committee voted to recommend an order tO' 
build the street. 

Glenwood Avenue. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at Page street and 200 feet south of Concord & Montreal 
railroad right of way, and thence in an easterly direction about 
900 feet across the land of George Richardson and David P. 
Lovering to a stake 200 feet south of the Concord & Montreal 
railroad right of way, to a stake on the east line of Page street. 

George F. Laird and others. 

November 18, committee voted to recommend that a hearing 
be granted. 

Montgomery Street. For establishing the grade and laying 
out of the highway in said city, beginning at a stake in the cen- 
ter of Montgomery and Amory streets, and thence in a northerly 
direction to Kelley street on Montgomery, to a stake set at the 
intersection of said streets as shown by the Amoskeag Manufac- 
furing Company's plans. 

D. C. Beauchesne and others. 

December 16, committee voted to refer to city engineer, he 
to fix grade and report at next meeting of the committee. 

Plummer Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake on the east line of Pine street. Said stake is about 
1,855 f^^t south of south line of Valley street and on the north 
line of Plummer street, so called, and thence in an easterly 



248 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

direction to a stake on the west line of Union street. Said stake 
is about 1,762 feet south of the south line of Valley street, and 
on the north line of Plummer street. 

Thomas Stewart and others. 

November 18, committee voted to recommend that a hearing 
be granted. 

Carpenter Street. For establishing grade of street in said 
city, beginning at Elm and Carpenter streets in said city, and 
thence in an easterly direction on Carpenter street to Union. 

C. M. Dodge and others. 

December 16, committee voted to refer to city engineer, he to 
fix grade and report at the next meeting of the committee. 

Merrill Street. For a new highway in said city, beginning 
at a stake on the east line of Jewett street and 220 feet south of 
the south line of Valley street measuring from the stone bound 
at the southeast corner, and thence in an easterly direction 350 
feet to a stake 220 feet south of the south line of Valley street, 
and on the west line of the land of Flora A. Woodman and 
shown on plan of lots of P. O. Woodman as Merrill street. 

Peter O. Woodman and others. 

November 18, committee voted to grant a hearing. 

Kelley Street. For a highway in said cit}', beginning at a 
stake at the present terminus of Kelley street on the westerly 
line of the Manchester & North Weare Railroad, and thence in 
a westerly direction about 1,700 feet to a stake on the town line 
between Manchester and Goffstown. 

Joseph Dana and others. 

December 16, committee voted that a hearing be granted. 

Chestnut Street. For extension of highway in said city, 
beginning at a stake in the center of Chestnut street. Said stake 
is 356 feet northerly of the north line of Clarke street, and 
thence in a northerly direction to a stake in the center of Tren- 
ton and Chestnut streets, 

Josiah Carpenter and others. 

December 16, committee voted that a hearing be granted. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 249 

This committee also met three times with a special committee 
in reference to the grade crossing at Granite street, and also in 
reference to a new granite bridge to replace the present wooden 
bridge over the Merrimack river. 

This comprises all the work that has come within the province 
of the committee on streets, and is respectfully submitted. 

George W. Reed, Chairman, 
George E. Heath, 
Joseph O. Tremblay, 
Edward F. Scheer, 
Charles Hazen, 

Committee on Streets. 
W. H. Bennett, 

Clerk of Committee. 



It may not be out of place at this time to once more call 
attention to the pressing need of a larger appropriation for this 
department. The greatly increasing call for work, year by year, 
has necessitated the employment of additional assistants. 

Whereas a few years ago three men could attend to the work, 
it now requires double the force. The appropriation has not 
been increased in proportion, and in the fall it has been neces- 
sary to discharge several of the men. This has been disadvan- 
tageous to the city in many ways. At that season of the year, 
outside surveying can be done cheaper on account of the 
absence of leaves, and, as it is impossible to attend to it in sum- 
mer during the rush of the regular work, it is left until that time. 
With the decreased force little time can be used in getting out- 
side surveys, as the regular city work usually keeps three men 
busy until snow flies. At that time the department is engaged 
in completing the plans and notes of work done during the year, 
and preparing the data for the various departments for their 
reports to the city councils, and has no time to devote to the out- 
side work, even should the weather prove suitable. 



250 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An increased appropriation that would allow of one party- 
being kept in the field as long as practicable would be of advan- 
tage to the city. It has been spoken of so many times in former 
reports, of the necessity of procuring surveys of all the outlying 
roads, that a repetition at this time seems hardly necessary. For 
the benefit of those who may be unfamiliar with the situation, 
however, it will be briefly stated. Years ago, when the outlying 
roads were accepted by the city or town, they were not suitably 
marked, and little care was exercised in properly building them. 
The description often reads "As near thereto as good ground 
will allow," which is decidedly indefinite, and apt to result in 
confusion by attempting to mark the lines for an individual 
without the data for the whole road. Whenever it has become 
necessary to so mark the lines, a survey and plan of the entire 
road has to be made, and the lines fixed on it from the most 
authentic information obtainable. Oftentimes weeks of labor 
must be expended before the line is satisfactorily established. 
Sometimes old points will be found and the work thereby les- 
sened. It is with special reference to this latter idea that this 
article is written, and a word or two will explain it fully. 

Year by year, through the ravages of time and the elements,, 
or carelessness on the part of the land owners, these points are 
becoming destroyed, and thus gradually every means of deter- 
mining the exact lines are becoming effaced and the work of 
relocating the lines made correspondingly difficult. The sooner 
the surveys are made and on file in the department the cheaper 
and easier the work can be done. 

Streets. 

With the rapid extension of the city in all directions comes a 
corresponding lack of unanimity in the location of streets. In 
most cities throughout the country, one finds the older portions 
badly laid out, while the new additions are just the opposite. 
In this city the conditions are reversed ; the streets of the older 
portions, laid out by the Amoskeag Company, are at right angles 
to each other, almost regular distances apart, and having back 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 251 

Streets in each block. The newer portions, except those laid out 
by the same company and by one or two private individuals, a^,e 
run regardless of the existing streets, and at various widths and 
distances as best suited the property to be divided. Back streets 
are rarely mtroduced, the idea seeming to be to sell every foot 
of land possible. This state of affairs is deplorable in more 
ways than one, and a few of the objections may be stated. 

First. Back streets are the proper place for sewer, water, and 
gas pipes, as the necessity for frequently digging them up for 
repairs, or connections, keeps the city constantly torn up and, 
besides interfering with traffic, spoils the thoroughfares for 
driving. 

Second. All the poles and wires for telephone, telegraphy 
electric lights, etc., should be put in the back streets as a matter 
of appearance. An unsightly pole in the main thoroughfare does 
not add to the beauty of the city. 

Third. Coal, wood, ice, groceries, ashes, and the like can be 
better taken care of in the rear of the lots. Nothing looks more 
out of place than to see a garbage wagon backed up to the front ■ 
door of a nice residence, or the coal men tramping over a well- 
kept lawn delivering their commodities. 

Fourth. The ease with which a fire may be subdued when 
access can be had to both sides of the building is a strong argu- 
ment in favor of the back streets. Boston furnishes a notable 
example of the lack of such places, and her large fires are due, 
in a great measure, to the impossibility of reaching the rear 
of the building. 

It is time that something should be done to remedy this state 
of affairs. Probably nothing can be done with those sections 
already laid out, but by preparing an ordinance covering the 
essential parts, such as width of street, direction, minimum and 
maximum distance apart, and providing for the introduction of 
back streets in each block, the evil may be remedied. This mat- 
ter has been brought to the attention of the landowners by this 
department frequently, and in some cases the benefits of the idea 
have manifested themselves to the parties. In many instances 



252 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the innate desire to get every dollar possible out of the land, has 
caused the advances to meet with rebuffs, and a statement that 
the individual "would do nothing of the kind." The attention 
of the city councils is called to this matter as one that should 
receive immediate and serious attention. , 

Granite Street. 

When the question of constructing a new bridge over the river 
and abolishing the grade crossing at the depot was brought up, 
this department was instructed to prepare data in reference to 
the proposed change. Considerable time was devoted to this. 
Plans were made showing the situation at the passenger station, 
and the location of the fences and buildings the entire length of 
Granite street. Soundings to determine the character of the 
subsoil under the bed of the river were also taken. In company 
with Mr. E. K. Turner, the expert engineer called in by the city 
on the question, the city engineer went over the ground thor- 
oughly, and secured a volume of information which would be of 
value should the city decide to make the improvement. 

Candia Road. 

The most important piece of work in the outlying districts the 
past year has been the widening of Candia road from its junction 
with the Hanover-street road nearly to the Londonderry turn- 
pike. 

When it was decided to build the street railway line to the 
lake it was thought that by laying the rails within eighteen feet 
of the south line all necessity for widening the road would be 
obviated. This was true until the double track project material- 
ized, when it was found that the rails encroached on the roadway 
so much that widening became necessary. The work has been 
well done; perhaps not quite as thoroughly as could be desired 
had there been more money to work with, but still making a 
road that is considerable wider and better than ever before. 

The principal changes are where the Bridge-street extension 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 253 

Strikes the highway, and opposite the swamp east of the Lake 
Shore road. At the former place the hollow has been filled four 
feet with a solid foundation of stone. Opposite the swamp the 
high land has been cut back to line nearly its entire distance. 

Nearly all the way fences or walls that encroached on the high- 
way were set back, and the general appearance of the road much 
improved. If the city and private individuals along the high- 
way would set out ornamental trees, in a few years an exceed- 
ingly pleasant drive would result. Several years ago Gen. Charles 
Williams offered to give the city enough trees for this purpose, 
provided the authorities would set them out and grade the road 
its full width. His generous offer was not accepted at the time, 
but it would seem good policy, provided the offer still holds 
good, to accept it and start the improvement the coming season. 
In time to come this would make one of the pleasantest drives 
leading out of the city, and one that citizens would show with 
pride to visitors. 

Mammoth Road. 

Two or three years ago steps were taken towards locating the 
lines of Mammoth road. Surveys and plans were made showing 
existing state of affairs from the Hooksett town line to several 
hundred feet south of the reservoir. When an attempt was made 
to make the original layout agree with the existing walls and 
fences, it was found a practical impossibility. In no case did 
they agree, and in several instances the walls were thirty or forty 
feet from their supposed location. A new line was then pro- 
jected and marked on the ground a portion of the distance. 
This will be covered by a petition to establish the lines which 
will come up for action the coming year. It is hoped that the 
roadway can be widened for the convenience and safety of those 
using it. 

The expense would be greatly lessened as plenty of good gravel 
can be obtained in the banks along the sides. 

Dunbarton Road. 

In response to a petition to determine the line of the Dunbar- 
ton road, a survey was made of a portion beginning at Front 



254 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

street, and extending to the top of the hill. When an attempt 
was made to fit the original layout to the plan, trouble was expe- 
rienced immediately, as the abutting fences projected into the 
street on both sides. Considerable contention was raised be- 
tween the property owners, each claiming his line was correct, 
and the outcome of the affair was that the matter was dropped 
for the time. Before anything like a correct line can be estab- 
lished it will be necessary to survey the entire road, and then 
decide upon a line that will be mutually agreeable to the abut- 
ters. 

Other Roads. 

Lines have been called for on the Lake Shore road, and a sur- 
vey from the Candia road to the Island Pond road should be 
made before they can be properly marked. 

That portion of the North River road lying between the Row- 
€ll estate and Union street will have to be surveyed shortly, as 
extensive land deals in that portion of the city are in progress, 
and it is necessary to complete our plans of that section in order 
to properly mark the lines of the city streets. 

Public Bath-houses. 

During the latter part of the year the question of public bath- 
houses, that was agitated several years ago, was brought up. 

Under the championship of Alderman Wolf a committee was 
appointed consisting of Aldermen Wolf and Graf and Council- 
men Murphy, Wilson, and Watts, with instructions to investigate 
the subject and report to the full board. Under their direction 
the city engineer obtained from the Board of Health of Boston, 
sketches of their bath-houses and a copy of their rules and regu- 
lations. These were laid before the committee, and after thor- 
oughly investigating the subject, the following report was pre- 
pared : 

To the City Councils : 

Gentlemen, — The special committee, to whom was referred 
the question of public bath-houses, having duly considered the 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 255 

matter and examined several locations suggested, would recom- 
tnend that two bath-houses be constructed and located as follows : 
One in the Merrimack river near the foot of Webster street, 
and the other in said river at the foot of Ferry street. The 
committee also examined the plans and rules in vogue in other 
places in reference to the cost of the houses and the use of the 
same, and would recommend the passage of the accompanying 
-order authorizing the finance committee to appropriate the sum 
of ;g5,ooo for building and maintaining the bath-houses for one 
year. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Alderman C. L. Wolf, 
Alderman J. Adam Graf, 
Councilman Daniel J. Murphy, 
Councilman John W. Wilson, 
Councilman William • Watts, 

Cotnmittee. 
Manchester, N. H., December 30, 1895. 

Accompanying the report was the following order : 

To appropriate Money to Build Public Bath-Houses. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the joint standing committee on finance be and are hereby 
authorized to appropriate the sum of ^5,000 in the appropria- 
tion of 1896 for the purpose of building and maintaining for 
one year, two public bath-houses, one to be located in the Mer- 
rimack river near the foot of Webster street, and the other in 
said river near the foot of Ferry street. 

Recommended by the special committee on public bath-houses, 
December 30, 1895. 

Both the report and the accompanying order will be presented 
to the city councils at an early meeting, and the indications are 
that Manchester will have what she has so long needed before 
summer passes. 



256 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Following are the rules governing such institutions, as revised 
to meet the requirements of the proposed structures : 

Baths will be open daily from June i to October i as follows : 
Men. — Week days, 5 a. m. to 9 p. m. ; Sundays, 5 a. m. to 12 

M. 

Women. — Week days, 6 a. m. to 8 p. m. ; Sundays, 6 A. m. to 

9.30 A. M. 

Superintendents in charge will see that adults remain in the 
water not longer than twenty minutes, and children under twelve 
not longer than fifteen minutes. 

Bathers will be expected to provide their own towels ; female 
bathers will be required to furnish suitable bathing dresses. 

Those desiring towels can obtain them of the superintendent 
in charge at three cents each. 

Boys and girls under fifteen years of age will not be permitted 
in the bath-houses. after 7 o'clock p. m., and the decision of the 
superintendent in charge against admission will be final. 

Each superintendent in charge will have full charge of his 
premises and authority to withhold the facilities from all not con- 
forming to the rules, and will be required to render every rea- 
sonable assistance to the applicants for baths. 

No smoking, profanity, or noisy conversation will be allowed 
on the premises, and any person guilty of defacing the dressing- 
rooms, fences, or tanks by writing, marking, or cutting, or any 
other misconduct, will be excluded from the baths or arrested, 
according to the offense. 

All questions as to priority in bathing or in the use of the 
dressing-rooms must be referred to the superintendent in charge, 
whose decision will be final. 

A police officer will be in constant attendance for the purpose 
of preserving order and enforcing the rules and regulations in 
concurrence with the superintendent in charge. 

Street Railway. 

The introduction of the electric street railway threw a large 
amount of extra work on the department that ordinarily it would 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 257 

not be called upon to do. Early in the season, when it was de- 
cided to construct the road, an examination of the streets over 
which the track was to run, disclosed the fact that in many of 
the streets the old track was not laid to grade. Accordingly 
levels were taken over the entire system, plans made, and a grade 
fixed thereon. 

In the right of way given the road by the mayor and alder, 
men, it is expressly stated that the company shall follow the es- 
tablished grade of the streets through which the road passes. 
Chapter 6, section ^^, of the city laws and ordinances provides 
that the city engineer shall furnish information regarding lines, 
grades, etc., when called for, and in pursuance of this as a mat- 
ter of economy the data were given on the ground. 

On account of the pressure of other work and the hindrance 
of the street traffic during the day this was done in the early 
morning, beginning as soon as it was light enough to see dis- 
tinctly. 

Considerable talk has been made by individuals not familiar 
with the situation on account of the expense to the city for grad- 
ing the streets when the road was built. It must be remembered 
that the old road, especially that portion constructed years ago, 
was not laid to grade in all cases, and as it was not the policy to 
lay the new track other than at grade, the street had to be cut 
or filled to correspond. The only streets where the track was 
not laid to grade were Valley street, Wilson street from Valley 
to the railroad, and on the lake line. These streets being sparsely 
settled and not having been improved to any great extent it was 
not deemed advisable to expend any money on them at present. 
On Elm and Granite streets the paving was so uneven that it 
needed relaying, and that it had to be done cannot be charged 
to the railroad. In point of fact, the introduction of the wide 
guage system was a positive benefit to the city's streets. 

Sewers. 

Sewer work has progressed this year under difficulties, many of 
the sewers having been constructed through ledges. Jewett street 

17 



258 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

was one of the most marked, and throughout its entire length of 
1,158 feet all but 200 feet was through solid ledge, the cut vary- 
ing from four to fourteen feet. The sewers in Sagamore street, 
Manchester street and Laurel street were also built through 
ledges. 

Upon examination of the route of the proposed Pennacook 
street sewer, it was decided to abandon the first project and fol- 
low the ravine through which Christian brook runs, thereby 
effecting a considerable saving in distance and in money. With 
the exception of where the sewer crosses Elm, Sagamore, Chest- 
nut, Salmon, and Pine streets the cut averaged about four feet. 
The original order was to build the sewer as far east as Walnut 
street, but on account of the lateness of the season it was only 
built to Liberty east back street. The valley of the brook being 
the natural avenue for draining the section around Webster street, 
it would seem good policy to extend the sewer easterly to Maple 
street through the valley and then run to Webster street, bring- 
ing the laterals across the latter street from the north. By doing 
this a considerable amount of digging would be avoided, and 
advantage taken of the natural slope of the ground. 

The Silver-street sewer, as it is called, ha^^ been built as far east 
as Union street. It was at first proposed to run this sewer directly 
into the river through Silver street. Upon examination of the 
territory a ledge of considerable extent was discovered just east 
of the railroad track, where the deepest cut was to be made. 

It was also reported that the ledge extended under the railroad 
track and for quite a distance westerly. As the appropriation 
would not warrant any extra outlay for ledge work, a change was 
made in the plans and the sewer built through Nutt road and 
Elm street, connecting with the main sewer in Valley street. 
This sewer is designed to drain the entire southern section and 
will eventually be built to Lincoln street. 

On the west side, the principal sewer constructed was the Kel- 
ley street main, which was extended to Joliette street, with later- 
als in Hevey east back, Alsace and Joliette streets. 

The average cost per foot in district No. 2 has been $3.50 and 
that in district No. 10 has been $2. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 259 

In the 23,152 feet of sewers there were built 86 manholes and 
II lampholes ; 89 cesspool connections were put in besides the 
Y branches for 688 house connections. 

The number of cesspools built and repaired, their cost and the 
cost of repairs on sewers, together with other details regarding 
sewer work, will be found in the report of the street and park 
commission. 

Parks. 

Little work has been done by this department in the parks the 
past year. In Derryfield park, lines and grades were given for 
the continuation of the main avenue already built through the 
grove. 

In Stark park, lines and grades were given for the construction 
of one of the main avenues. The location of one of the ave- 
nues through the woods was also marked. Sketches were made 
and suggestions given regarding the curbing to be placed around 
the General Stark burial lot. 

Cemeteries. 

In the Valley cemetery surveys and plans have been made 
along the valley, showing the bank on the west side and the ad- 
joining lots. 

This section is designed for tomb locations and will be laid 
out with this end in view. 

In Pine Grove cemetery part of the new section east of Pine 
Lawn has been staked out into lots, and grades given for that 
and adjoining avenues. 

City Farm. 

Surveys and plans of a portion of the farm east of the Mam- 
moth road have been made for the purpose of establishing the 
line between the city and the various abutters. The work was 
accomplished under difficulties, as the old deeds and plans would 
not agree with the situation on the ground. It is believed that 
the line as fixed, however, will be satisfactory to all parties. 



260 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Committee Work. 

The city engineer, as clerk of the committee on streets and 
on sewers and drains, has attended each meeting, keeping a 
complete record of the proceedings, which are on file in this 
office. 

In addition, meetings of the city government, committees on 
Valley cemetery, Pine Grove cemetery, city farm, lands and 
buildings, claims, commons and parks, the street and park com- 
mission, and the board of aldermen have been attended. 

Besides the work before enumerated, many questions have 
been answered from engineers, boards of trade, and others in 
various cities throughout this country and Canada. 

I would respectfully tender my acknowledgments to his Honor 
the Mayor and the various committees of the city council for 
the support which they have given. 

I also wish to acknowledge the courtesies shown by the vari- 
ous heads of departments, and the co-operation of the assistants 
of this department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT, 

City Eitgineer. 
January i, 1896. 



REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



I'o the School Board and by said Board to the City Councils : 
Called upon for the third time to prepare my annual report, 
with reference to its fitness for adoption by the school board as 
its report of the public schools to the city councils, I present the 
following as the forty-ninth annual report of the public schools 
of the city of Manchester, and the final report of the superin- 
tendent for the year 1895. 

SCHOOLHOUSES. 

There are twenty-seven schoolhouses belonging to the city, of 
which the old Hallsville and the School-street houses were years 
ago abandoned for day school purposes. Of the remaining 
twenty-five schoolhouses, two have been built this year and re- 
spectively named the Straw school and the Wilson school ; but 
the latter, as yet unseated and lacking in minor details of com- 
pletion, has not been placed at the disposal of the board. 

The Straw school was entirely built between June 20 and 
September 20, of the present year, and by the city councils it 
was at once entrusted to the school board. Thereupon the high- 
school furniture, pupils, and teachers were transferred to the 
Straw school, for temporary occupancy while a new high-school 
building shall be erected upon the site of the former high-school 

263 



264 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

house on Beech street. To make room for the new building 
upon this site, the old house there was torn down immediately 
after the transfer of the school to the Straw schoolhouse. The 
foundation for the new high school is substantially complete, 
and the erection of its walls is fairly started. A fine large house, 
containing more than two millions of brick, is promised ; and its 
completion is expected before the close of the coming year, 
when a description of its arrangements and conveniences can 
be fully given. 

The new Straw school is delightfully situated at the corner of 
Harrison and Chestnut streets ; and, upon removal of the high- 
school pupils therefrom, it is designed to use this schoolhouse for 
occupancy by the two primary schools in the Blodget-street 
schoolhouse and by other pupils of primary and middle-school 
grades from the surplus at the Ash-street, Lowell-street, Spring- 
Street, and Webster-street houses, — where there are more pupils 
in these grades than can be properly accommodated. The Straw 
school is admirably located for the purposes named, and a few 
years hence some of its rooms will doubtless be needed, also, for 
the accommodation of third and fourth grammar-school divi- 
sions. 

The Straw schoolhouse is a nearly square building, attractive 
and an ornament to the section of the city in which it stands. 
It contains eight fine, airy, well-lighted, spacious schoolrooms; 
also convenient teachers' rooms and commodious basement 
apartments. The general internal arrangements are much like 
those of the new Hallsville schoolhouse, which has proved quite 
satisfactory. Because of the location of the new schoolhouse 
upon the Straw estate, at the corner of Harrison and Chestnut 
streets, the house has been appropriately named the Straw school, 
quite fittingly also in honor of ex-Gov. E. A. Straw, on 
account of the great interest which he took in effectively exer- 
cising his distinguished abilities for the promotion of the growth 
and prosperity of Manchester. 

The new Wilson schoolhouse, named in honor of Hon. Henry 
Wilson — one of the most eminent statesmen to whom New 



REPORT OF TUB SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 265 

Hampshire has given birth — is located at the corner of Wilson 
and Auburn streets. It is an oblong building, and not so attrac- 
tive externally as is the Straw school, but it is imposing and sub- 
stantial, and built upon a popular modern plan. This plan, in 
brief, provides a wide corridor upon nearly the entire length of 
the colder side of the house and the arrangement of its rooms 
^upon the sunny side, whereby it is claimed not only that the 
schoolrooms are made lighter and pleasanter, but that better 
ventilation is secured at a smaller cost for fuel. This house also 
-contains eight fine schoolrooms, convenient teachers' rooms, and 
commodious basement apartments. It will be ready for use 
early in the coming year. 

The new Wilson school is not placed in the locality which the 
school authorities thought most desirable ; but there was diffi- 
culty about obtaining a suitable lot where the board wanted the 
house located, and the city councils, — having .the power of de- 
termination, — seemed to think the present location quite as 
likely yet to prove the center of population which would most 
need accommodation. In regard to this difference of opinion, 
time alone can fully determine which is correct. 

The board a year ago suggested what was believed an econom- 
ical way of providing temporary relief for the overcrowded con- 
dition of the schools east of Union street, by the use of the old 
high school building on Beech street for lower grade schools and 
the erection of a new high-school building elsewhere, etc. This 
was suggested in the fear and belief that otherwise there would 
be an attempt made to remodel the Beech-street house for high- 
school purposes, but the city councils have taken a more satisfac- 
tory course and pursued what will doubtless in the end prove a 
wiser and more economical policy ; because the carrying out of 
the suggestion of last year would only have postponed for a few 
years the erection of two new schoolhouses in localities near 
those occupied by the new Straw and Wilson schools, while 
these two houses now at hand, together with the new high-school 
building promised complete before the close of another year, 
will doubtless suffice the eastern part of the city for many years 
to come. 



266 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The section of our city next in most urgent need of greater 
and better schoolroom accommodation is in the vicinity of the 
present South-Main-street school, and in its place there is need 
of a building similar to the Rimmon schooihouse. The need,, 
too, is immediate and imperative ; for the lower grades in the- 
Varney school are more overcrowded than ever, and there is ab- 
solutely no room whatever at the South-Main-street house for the 
accommodation of the 15 to 25 beginners sure to apply for ad- 
mission there at the opening of next spring term. For an 
account of the distress endured at this house last year, I refer to- 
page II of the school report of 1894. 

REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 

The committee on repairs had granted for their use, this year^. 
an appropriation of only ^4,000. Last year the appropriation 
for repairs of schoolhouses was $5,000. This was overdrawn by 
about $1,000, which was paid out of the $4,000 allotted for this 
year's use. From the $3,000 remaining, the committee felt 
obliged to expend over $500 on the water-closet extension at the 
Bakersville school. 

Hence there was left less than $2,500 with which to make only 
those more necessary repairs that could not be avoided upon the 
24 schoolhouses in the hands of the board, of which the 14 larger 
houses contain 96 schoolrooms. Though the other 10 houses, 
aggregate but 15 schoolrooms, they have desks, other furniture,. 
and heating apparatus, some of which (in one school or an- 
other) are in need of almost constant attention, to say nothing 
of the general repairs found necessary every summer vacation. 

An inspection of the detailed list of minor repairs, made upon 
our schoolhouses this year, indicates that what has been done 
could have been accomplished only under the direction of expert 
supervision. This list reveals heavy expenditures for repairs 
upon the heating apparatus at both the Webster and Franklin 
street schools, as well as numerous small jobs of plumbing at 
various schoolhouses. Repairs of fences, roofs, floors, doors, 
windows, window blinds and cords, thresholds, blackboards, 
(some new slate ones being put in at the Ash-street and Harvey 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 267 

district schools), repairs also of desks, chairs, and settees, — be- 
sides the construction of new book closets and platforms, and the 
conversion in several rooms of pupils' double desks into single 
ones (so that now there are none of the former kind in our 
schools), — comprise the greater part of the carpenter and plumb- 
ing work done upon the schoolhouses this year. 

There are, moreover, other equally long lists of repairs made 
by painters and masons. The Webster's Mills schoolhouse has 
been repainted ; and still much greater expense has been incurred 
for painting fences, covings, all new woodwork, and the scraping 
and varnishing of pupils' desks in various schools. Some plas- 
tering and much whitewashing and tinting of walls has also been 
well done. 

More than a hundred dollars' expense was incurred in mov- 
ing furniture, apparatus, libraries, etc., from the high school 
house to the Straw school, together with the basement fittings at 
the latter house for pupils' lunch counters, which was also charged 
to the account of repairs of schoolhouses. 

It might seem, in view of all this, that the committee on re- 
pairs should feel satisfied with the result of their efforts, — as, 
indeed, they well may, in consideration of the means at their 
disposal ; but the regret comes in the knowledge that the mate- 
rial condition of the schoolhouses has deteriorated rather than 
improved, notwithstanding all their efforts. There are many 
houses to be cared for, the major part of them are large, and a 
still greater number of them are the worse because of the ravages 
of time. One who is most conversant with the condition and 
needs of our schoolhouses, and fully competent to judge, assures 
me that upon a conservative estimate your board should have an 
annual appropriation of at least $6,000, in order to keep the 
school buildings in proper repair, and in this matter best con- 
serve the interests of the city. 

DIET KITCHEN. 

As I have made mention of the lunch counters in the basement 
of the Straw school, which is occupied by the high school, it may 
not be improper in this place to express our appreciation of the 



268 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

kindly offices of the promoters of the diet kitchen, who daily offer 
healthful lunches at a minimum price to pupils during the mid- 
day recess. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE DAY SCHOOLS. 

By an amendment to the public statutes of this state, made by 
its last legislature, the school year for all public schools tlirough- 
out the state was made to comprise the months between two suc- 
cessive Augusts. The State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
accordingly required that our annual school statistics for 1895 
should be compiled and returned to him by August of this year, 
and that they represent the results for the year preceding. 

The following, therefore, shows the organization of our public 
schools from August, 1894, to August, 1895 : 

The average number of schools for the entire year was 105 
(also an additional school in the Pearl-street house for one term), 
reckoned as follows : The equivalent of 8 rooms of high-school 
grade; 27 grammar-school divisions, one more than last year; 
21 middle schools, i more than last year; 41 primary schools, 
2 more than last year (also the one in the Pearl-street house 
already named as in existence but one term) ; 2 partially graded 
schools; 5 ungraded suburban schools; and i manual training 
school. 

It thus appears that there has been a gain of four schools over 
the number of last year, the four in the Rimmon schoolhouse. 
The gain in enrollment of pupils over the number of last year has 
been 231. The total enrollment in all the schools, from August, 
1894, to August, 1895, was 5,206. This number is greater by 
231 pupils than was ever before enrolled in any one year in the 
public schools of Manchester. 

There were employed for the care of the 105 day schools 
throughout the year: Seven male principals of large schools; a 
lady principal and a general assistant (2)* for the care of the 
training school for teachers ; 100 class-room teachers, f of whom 



* Aided by the young ladies constituting the sub-teachers' classes, who had charge of the 
several class-rooms. 

t Of these loo, two are males, — the teacher at Youngsville and the teacher of the man- 
ual training school. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 269 

II ladies were also principals of schools containing two or more 
rooms ; and 2 special teachers of music and drawing, or in all, 

III teachers for the entire year, and another one also for one 
term. 

THE PUBLIC EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The evening school for instruction in mechanical and archi- 
tectural drawing, taught for several years from October to March 
by Mr. John M. Kendall and Mr. Henry W. Allen, is an alto- 
gether good and profitable school, and as satisfactory as may 
be properly expected from the accommodations of space and 
equipment afforded. 

But the evening schools designed to give instruction in the 
common English branches, I am sorry to say, are far from being 
satisfactory or anything like as profitable as they should or might 
be. Their shortcomings are chiefly due to brevity of member- 
ship and irregularity of attendance. An average of results for 
the past five years shows that the evening average attendance 
upon these schools has been only 17.5 per cent (or but little 
more than one sixth) of the whole number of pupils enrolled. 
Upon the opening of these schools this fall, accommodations 
were provided for seating the usual large influx of pupils at the 
opening of the term, and during the first month there were en- 
rolled 465 different pupils. For their care and instruction there 
were provided 17 teachers, but before the close of the third week 
of the term 195 pupils had dropped out of the schools and 4 of 
the teachers were excused from further service. These teachers 
had cost the city ^36 for temporary services, and the expense was 
practically thrown away, because the 195 pupils who had occa- 
sioned the employment of these extra teachers were not mate- 
rially profited by an attendance of less than three weeks. 

Similar conditions have prevailed for many years, and I feel it 
again my duty to remind you of the propriety of making an 
effort to overcome or at least to improve them. 

A very large majority of the pupils who attend the evening 
schools for affording instruction in the common English branches 
are foreigners desirous of learning our language, a most merito- 



270 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

rious and praiseworthy object ; but as pupils under sixteen years 
of age are not admitted to these schools, such being required to 
attend the day schools, it would seem that those who are ad- 
mitted to the evening schools, at the advanced age required for 
admission, should know at the beginning of a term whether or 
not they care enough for the advantages of the schools to attend 
somewhat regularly. But, though the majority of these pupils 
appear to be more than twenty years of age, they drop out of the 
evening schools annually upon the first occurrence of a " fair " 
gotten up by people of their own nationality ; also more or less 
of them upon the appearance in town of inferior and cheap shows. 
Some one of these fairs usually occurs by the second or third 
week of the term, a large delegation of pupils withdraws from 
school, and this so demoralizes others that they rapidly drop out 
individually. Doubtless the majority expect they will soon re- 
turn to school, but by the time attendance upon a three days' 
fair has been accomplished. Thanksgiving week, other attractions, 
and the near approach of the Christmas holidays combine to 
cause these souls so indifferent about learning the English lan- 
guage to forget all about the evening schools till they see them 
advertised in the following fall. 

It is this element which I have described that causes our even- 
ing schools to be so unnecessarily expensive and otherwise aftects 
them injuriously. Such persons, therefore, as are not materially 
profited by only a brief attendance upon the evening schools, 
and yet unduly increase the cost of them, should be so condi- 
tioned that they will be caused to keep away from them alto- 
gether, or else to pay a fine (or fines) for an absence, after regis- 
tration, of more than thirty per cent of the whole number of 
evenings in a term, in order that they may justly be compelled 
to bear at least a part of the extra and unnecessary expense 
which they occasion without profit to themselves and with harm 
to the schools. 

Years ago, in several of the manufacturing cities of Massachu- 
setts, also somewhat recently in Nashua of our own state, the idea 
of causing those who needlessly increase the cost of the evening 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 271 

schools to bear a portion of such cost was put into practical ope- 
ration, and with the general effect of improving the schools, ac- 
cording to the reports of school superintendents in said cities. 
^' The plan, in brief, requires that pupils upon registration shall 
deposit one dollar as a guaranty of good faith in their intention 
to attend regularly enough to make their course one of reasonable 
profit. The dollar is paid back to those who may have been in 
attendance seventy per cent of the term, and by the others the 
dollar is forfeited to the evening school fund." In 1888 I rec- 
ommended atrial here of the plan presented, but the board hesi- 
tated to adopt it because some one suggested it might keep out 
of the evening schools worthy persons who could not deposit a 
dollar, notwithstanding they might procure its return by attend- 
ance seven tenths of the term. To obviate this objection in my 
annual report of that year I presented the following plan : " Let 
those who may wish to attend the evening schools each deposit 
with the principal at the time of registration twenty-five cents, 
with the understanding that the money shall be forfeited to the 
evening school fund, first, if the pupil fails to enter the school 
within a week after registration or withdraws therefrom at any 
time except at the close of a school month ; second, whenever a 
pupil has been five times absent or ten times tardy, for other rea- 
sons than providential detention, the same to be settled to the 
satisfaction of the principal. Forfeiture of the deposit should 
constitute forfeiture of membership in the school, and no rein- 
statement of a pupil who has forfeited his membership shall be 
allowed to occur unless he shall first make another similar de- 
posit subject to like conditions." Such small fines may appear 
trivial, but it is desired only to correct the prevailing evil relat- 
ing to attendance upon the evening schools. Without some 
effectual plan for approximately determining early in the fall the 
number that will be in attendance upon the evening schools for 
the term, the city is likely to continue being put to much unnec- 
essary expense in providing for many who will attend only a few 
evenings or but two or three weeks at most. If there be a ques- 
tion about the fitness of any person over sixteen years of age for 



272 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

attendance upon the evening schools who cannot honorably se- 
cure a dollar to deposit upon registration, there can certainly be 
no question about the unfitness of one who cannot properly ob- 
tain twenty-five cents for such a purpose. 

Notwithstanding what has been said about the undesirability 
of the attendance upon the evening schools, at their opening and 
only for a brief period, of many who do not first seriously deter- 
mine that they particularly care for the instruction offered, the 
evening schools afford, nevertheless, valuable instruction to all 
who attend them with a fair degree of constancy; and since 1891 
the evening attendance upon these schools has averaged about 
eighty per cent of the average number belonging, which is quite 
creditable and found to be highly profitable. 

TEACHERS. 

Changes in the corps of teachers, of which the particulars 
may be learned upon page K of the appendix, have this year 
been uncommonly few, but the withdrawal of three by death 
in one year is not only very uncommon but extremely sad. 

Obituaries. 

Prof. Jason J. Kimball, special director and instructor of 
music in the public schools of this city since 1871, suddenly 
died of heart disease Friday evening, September 27, 1895, at 
the close of a musical rehearsal at his residence and while in a 
highly enjoyable performance upon the violin. 

During his nearly twenty-four years of service in our schools,. 
Mr. Kimball proved himself a thoroughly honest, conscientious 
man, faithful to the performance of the duties devolving upon 
him, generous of his time and labor in rendering extra services, 
and gentlemanly and kind in his consideration of the feelings 
of others. As a musical instructor, Mr. Kimball was highly 
competent; and he wrought a good work in our schools, which 
for years has been markedly shown by the improvement made in 
the study of music throughout the public schools of our city. 

Appropriate resolutions were passed and spread upon the rec- 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 273 

ords of the school board upon the death of Mr. Kimball, as well 
as upon the deaths of Miss Edith S. Dole, Miss Hattie G. Flan- 
ders, and Janitor Henry C. Dickey. 

Miss Dole died June 30, 1895, during the summer vacation. 
She ranked high among the excellent ones of the younger por- 
tion of our corps of teachers. Miss Dole was teacher of the 
fourth division of the Ash-street grammar school, and the teach- 
ers and pupils of that school will ever hold her memory in lov- 
ing remembrance. 

Miss Hattie G. Flanders died October 19, 1895, after a brief 
illness. Her death occurring quite unexpectedly greatly shocked 
both pupils and teachers of the Franklin-street school, where she 
had been teacher of the lower-middle grade about thirty-five 
years. Miss Flanders was an earnest, faithful teacher, and a 
musician of no mean order. 

Mr. Henry C. Dickey, janitor of the Bakersville school, died 
October 21, 1895, ^^^^^ prolonged illness. Mr. Dickey was a 
good janitor, and by his generous, cheerful, and helpful ways he 
had endeared himself to both teachers and pupils of the Bakers- 
ville school, who sincerely mourn his loss. 

RECENT LEGISLATION. 

Our state legislature, in 1893 and again in 1895, enacted and 
amended laws pertaining to public schools, some of which I 
think should appear where they may be readily accessible to all 
in authority over our city schools; and I, therefore, insert the 
following in this report : 



An Act requiring truant officers, or agents appointed by the 
school boards of cities and towns, to make an annual enumer- 
ation of children between the ages of five and sixteen years. 

£e it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in 
General Court convened : 

Section i. Truant officers or agents appointed by school 
boards of cities and towns, shall annually, m the month of 

IS 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

April, make an enumeration of the children of each sex, between 
the ages of five and sixteen years, in their town or city, giving 
such items in regard to each child as may be required by the 
school board or the state superintendent of public instruction, 
and shall make a report to the school board thereof within fif- 
teen days after the completion. 

Section 2. Section 14, chapter 43, Public Statutes, and any 
other acts inconsistent with this act, are hereby repealed. 

Section 3. This act to take effect upon its passage. 

Approved March 19, 1895. 

There appears to be no penalty attached for neglect to comply 
with the provisions of the foregoing law, nor were they complied 
with last spring in this city, because it was held that the truant 
officer could not make the required census in the month of April 
and no funds were available for the employment of other agents. 

No accurate census of the school population has been 
ascertained since 1880, when such census was tabulated (by spe- 
cial permission and at considerable expense) from the results of 
the United States agents who canvassed the city for the decen- 
nial census required by the general government for that year. 
The present vice-chairman of your board well said in the school 
report of 1880: " We spend large sums of money in the edu- 
cation of such scholars as attend school, but the best test of 
progress in public education is found in success in reaching the 
masses, not in great expenditures for the few. The increase in 
our population is largely of foreigners who do not appreciate 
the advantages of an education for their children. But this 
does not lessen the responsibility of the city. If the new-come 
citizens do not send their children to school willingly, then they 
must be compelled. It is the dictate alike of justice and polit- 
ical wisdom to give their children the benefit of the public 
school. The parents have not much in conmion with us; they 
will not readily adopt our institutions; many of them will 
return to their old homes. But thousands of their children have 
come to stay. They soon forget their birthplace. They rapidly 
learn our language and customs and will soon become citizens." 

This department is surprised and shocked nearly every year to 
learn that some child has " never attended school in the States," 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 275 

though claimed to be lo or 12 years of age and to have resided 
in our city several years. A school census will prove a most 
efificient aid to the truant ofificer throughout the year, and I rec- 
ommend that the school board seek an appropriation for the 
employment of agents to assist him to make the census next 
April as required by law. 

II. 

An Act to amend section 6 of chapter 92 of the Public Statutes 
relating to the study of physiology and hygiene, having spe- 
cial reference to the effects of alcoholic stimulants and narcot- 
ics upon the human system. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives 
in General Court convened: 

Section i. They (school board) shall prescribe in all mixed 
schools, and in all graded schools above primary, the studies of 
physiology and hygiene, having special reference to the effects of 
alcoholic stimulants and narcotics upon the human system, and 
shall see that the studies so prescribed are thoroughly taught in 
said schools and that well-approved text-books upon these sub- 
jects are furnished to teachers and scholars, and may permit or 
prescribe the study of algebra, geometry, surveying, bookkeep- 
ing, philosophy, chemistry, and natural history, or any of them, 
and other suitable studies. 

Section 2. If any member of the school board shall neglect 
or refuse to comply with the provisions of the preceding section, 
he shall forfeit the sum of two hundred dollars. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved March 13, 1895. 

The foregoing is presented for the purpose of calling your at- 
tention to the requirement of the law in regard to furnishing 
text-books upon physiology and hygiene to pupils, as well as to 
teachers, of high, grammar, and middle-school grades ; also to 
the heavy penalty imposed upon members of school boards for 
refusal or neglect to comply with the above amendment. 

Section 6 of chapter 92 is further amended as follows : 

School boards shall, annually, in the month of June or July, 
and at such other times as they deem best, hold an examination 
of candidates for certificates of qualification to teach in the pub- 



276 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

lie schools. Candidates shall be examined in the studies pre- 
scribed by law, or by the school board in accordance with law. 
Such candidates as pass an examination satisfactory to the school 
board and present satisfactory evidence of good moral character 
and capacity for government, shall receive certificates of qualifi- 
cation signed by the school board, to continue in force not more 
than one year from the date thereof. 

The literal significance of the above amendment would seem 
to indicate that all public school teachers of this state should be 
required to pass a formal examination every year, without regard 
to a prior certificate of ample qualification or possibly many 
years of eminently successful service in the profession. Such a 
requirement would be as absurd as to demand that all clergymen, 
physicians, and lawyers should annually pass a formal examina- 
tion as a condition of continuance in their several professions; 
and I note with pleasure the sensible and liberal interpretation 
which our State Superintendent of Public Instruction has put 
upon this law, as follows: " It is unfortunate that the meaning 
of the term examination has been restricted in educational affairs 
to a formal oral or written test in certain branches of study. 
The scope of the word is much broader than this. The funda- 
mental meaning involves the idea of accurate weighing, and just 
this idea should predominate in the determination of a teacher's 
qualifications for the performance of his functions. Scholarship, 
moral character, capacity for government, are important attri- 
butes of a suitable and competent teacher. Just as in our best 
schools instructors no longer depend solely upon formal written 
tests, given at stated tunes, for determining the promotion of 
pupils from class to class, but judge merit in a larger, broader, 
truer way; just as college presidents accept statements from prin- 
cipals of approved schools regarding the ability of students to 
enter their institutions, so school officers judge teachers by wiser 
and more satisfactory methods. Under the present law, school 
boards may demand that teachers, regardless of length and effi- 
ciency of service, in spite of intimate acquaintanceship on the 
part of those in authority, shall take an annual written examina- 
tion. This is wholly unnecessary, if not unwise. Frequent visi- 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 277 

Nation of the teacher in the schoolroom, a study of the work of 
the teacher and the pupils, a careful inspection of the results 
secured, a thoughtful study of the teacher in his entirety, are 
better bases for sound judgment in the issuance of certificates 
than any other test, oral or written. An examination of this sort 
is sufficient. In the case of new or untried teachers, a test, oral 
or written, or both, seems to be a necessity. While scholarship, 
and not always that, may be somewhat fairly judged by the 
results of a written examination, something more is desirable, 
and school officers must ever be good judges of human nature. 
Without further detail, it may be said that for teachers already 
in the corps, an examination, a weighing of results, of the school 
generally is best ; for those unknown, untried, or doubtful, who 
seek admission to the force, a test oral or written, preferably 
both, should be applied. By this mode of procedure the spirit 
of the law will be kept." 

Chapter 92 is also still further amended, so that the following 
sections now read as presented below : 

III. 

Section 7. They (school board) shall purchase at the expense 
of the city or town in which the district is situated, text-books 
and other supplies required for use in the public schools; and 
shall loan the same to the pupils of such schools free of charge, 
subject to such regulations for their care and custody as the school 
board may prescribe. They shall make provision for the sale of 
such books at cost to pupils of the school wishing to purchase 
them for their own use. 

Section 8. No book shall be introduced into the public 
schools calculated to favor any particular religious sect or politi- 
cal party. 

Section 12. School boards shall, on or before the first day of 
August in each year, send to the superintendent of public instruc- 
tion copies of their annual reports and answers to the questions 
proposed by him, relating to the schools in their district ; the 
school year shall begin with the fall term. 

Section 13. Any member of a school board who shall neglect 
or refuse to comply with the provisions of the preceding section 
shall be fined not exceeding fifty dollars. 



278 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

The foregoing do not need comment, nor does the following 
new law : 

IV. 

An Act providing that certain sessions of the Public Schools 
shall be devoted to exercises of a Patriotic Nature. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in Gen- 
eral Court convened : 

Section i. In all the public schools of the state the last reg- 
ular session prior to Memorial Day, or a portion thereof, shall 
be devoted to exercises of a patriotic nature. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved February 21, 1895. 

In accordance with the preceding act, the following order was 
duly sent all our public school teachers ; but I may properly add 
that for several years previous exercises similar to these under 
consideration had been encouraged in our schools, and a large 
portion of our teachers had voluntaril}' superintended their per- 
formance. 

Office of Superintendent of 

Public Instruction, 
Manchester, N. H., May 25, 1895. 

To Principals and all their Associate Teachers : 

By a recent enactment of our state legislature, all public school 
teachers are required to devote the school session, or a part of it, 
next preceding Memorial Day to exercises of a patriotic nature. 
You will please observe this requirement, in so far at least as to 
have your school salute the flag and sing appropriate songs, — 
which exercises may be supplemented by the reading or telling 
of interesting historical events by either yourself or your pupils; 
also by other appropriate exercises, at your discretion. 
Very respectfully yours, 

William E. Buck, 

Superintendent, 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 279 

Another amendment to our state school laws was made by the 
legislature of 1895, which is more far-reaching in its scope and 
by far more effective for the general good than any other modi- 
fications of our school laws that have been made in many years. 
It is the addition of section 20 to chapter 93, and it reads as 
follows : 

V. 

Section 20. No certificate as provided in the foregoing sec- 
tions shall be issued for attendance at any private school, unless- 
such school shall have previously been approved by the school 
board of the district in which it is situated as furnishing instruc- 
tion in the English language in all the studies required by law 
equal to that given in the public schools of said district, and 
unless the record of attendance shall be kept in the form required 
by the public schools and be open to the inspection of the school 
board of the district at all times. 

Among the sections above referred to by the words, "as pro- 
vided in the foregoing sections," is the following section : 

Section ii. No child under the age of sixteen years who can- 
not read and write shall be employed in any manufacturing 
establishment during the time the public schools in the district 
in which he resides are in session. 

The common sense interpretation of this latter section is, of 
course, that the required reading and writing should be in the 
language of the country where the law was enacted, — our coun- 
try, and in our language, the English. How else, indeed, can 
the foreign youth in our midst be properly trained for American 
citizenship than in the language of our common schools ? It is 
in the common schools that the masses are educated. They are 
freely open to all and they are as good as the best, certainly of 
any considerable number in our country, that provide for an 
elementary education. Section 20 is not therefore designed to- 
discriminate against private schools, but to put them upon the 
same footing as the public schools ; and this the school board 
has done for the private schools of this city, in so far, at least, as. 
the laws which affect the employment of children in manufac- 
turing establishments are concerned, by adopting the report 



280 • ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

made by a special committee appointed by the board to con- 
sider this matter, which report was as follows : 

" Your committee report that we approve of the private schools 
only so far as pupils coming from those schools and applying for 
certificates shall pass a satisfactory examination in the English 
language in all the studies required by law." 

Now, as it happens that section ii contains the only scholastic 
requirement imposed by the statutes upon the children who 
would work in manufacturing establishments, no children should 
be required to pass examination for purposes of such employ- 
ment in any other studies than in reading and writing ; for sec- 
tion 20 does not modify the conditions of employment of public 
school children, and the provisions of section 11 therefore con- 
tinue to apply to them ; so, unless section 20 can be shown as 
designed to discriminate against children in private schools, they 
cannot properly be required to pass examination in other studies 
(for purposes of employment) than in reading and writing, as 
provided in section 11. 

Hence, so far as the special committee's report is applicable, it 
simply makes clear that the requirements of section 11 are de- 
signedly interpreted by section 20 to mean that the reading and 
writing specified in section 1 1 was intended to be in the English 
language, and that all children, of whatever nationality they may 
be or from whatever schools they may come, are subject alike to 
a proper interpretation of the laws regulating the employment of 
children in manufacturing establishments, and your honorable 
board, by adoption of the special committee's report, has recog- 
nized this construction of the laws in question. Our truant offi- 
cer is accordingly applying said laws impartially to all concerned. 

Moreover, this application of the law is giving very general 
satisfaction. The more intelligent of foreign birth unite with 
all native Americans in pronouncing the provisions of section 20 
as eminently wise and right. The mill agents and superintend- 
ents of other manufacturing establishments have also cordially 
united with our efforts to secure a just and proper enforcement 
of all laws that affect children of school a^e. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 281 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 

Text-books and other free supplies were first furnished our 
schools in January, 1890. Then, and until the law was repealed 
by our last legislature, the public statutes required that text-books 
once introduced in the public schools of this state should con- 
tinue in use for a period of five years. The time of limitation 
having expired this year, the board has taken advantage of the 
opportunity to exchange many badly and altogether worn-out 
books for other new and" in every way more desirable ones upon 
the subjects of arithmetic, grammar, and geography ; whereby 
considerable expense has been saved the city in consequence of 
the allowance granted for the old books given in exchange for 
the new ones adopted. Use of the new books during the fall 
term has also demonstrated their superiority over the former 
ones. 

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS. 

The condition of our schools in general is good, and many of 
them are excellent. The progress they have made during the 
year is the result of such healthful growth as comes from a faith- 
ful discharge of daily duties well performed, and is consequent 
upon the conscientious and painstaking efforts of a corps of 
teachers of which any city might be justly proud. Schools can- 
not be discussed apart from their teachers,' for the saying that 
*'as is the teacher so is the school," is as true today as at the 
time of its original assertion. 

Teachers have ceased to be mere hearers of recitations, for 
they have largely become teachers in fact as well as in name. 
There is a fuller application of object teaching than formerly, 
greater inculcation of principles, more natural methods of teach- 
ing. It is of the highest importance that knowledge shall be 
gained in such a way that the capacity of attainment shall be en- 
larged and the faculties stimulated and quickened. Useful as is 
a reasonable culture of the memory, remembering is not the high- 
est power of the human mind. How to think is vastly more 
important ; and in view of the fact that our youth are not long 



282 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

to be held in leading strings, it is of first importance that teach- 
ers should instruct their pupils how to investigate and acquire 
knowledge for themselves. Hence it follows that of all things 
which school boards can do most highly to promote the interests 
of their schools, the greatest is to procure the best teacher possi- 
ble for every school. 

Among the things that should ere long receive the attention 
of the board are the establishment of kindergarten schools and 
the compulsory requirement of military drill in the high and 
grammar schools. 

Lack of sufficient schoolrooms may unavoidably postpone for 
awhile the opening of kindergarten schools in our midst, but 
aside from the utility of these schools for the children of all 
classes, they would prove such an inestimable blessing to those 
whose parents are obliged, through the necessities of living, to 
neglect their little ones, that kindergarten schools should be a 
part of our school system, and of the school system of all large 
manufacturing cities. 

In regard to military drill I cannot do better than quote the 
remarks or ex-President Harrison upon this subject, reported in 
the " Century Magazine " a year or two ago, as follows : 

" Military drill is good in every aspect of it — good for the 
boys, good for the schools, and good for the country. A free, 
erect, graceful carriage of the body is an acquisition and a de- 
light. It has a value in commerce as well as in war. Arms and 
legs are distressing appendages to a boy under observation until 
he has been taught the use of them in repose. The chin is too 
neighborly with the chest, and the eyes find the floor too soon ; 
they need to have the fifteen paces marked off. The sluggish 
need to be quickened and the quick taught to stand, the wilful 
to have no will and all to observe quickly. The disputatious 
need to learn that there are conditions where debate is inadmis- 
sible ; the power and beauty there is in a company — moved by 
one man and as one man. 

"Military drill develops the whole man, head, chest, arms, and 
legs proportionately , and so promotes symmetry and corrects 



KEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 283 

the excesses of other forms of exercise. It teaches quickness of 
eye and ear, hand and foot ; qualifies men to step and act in un- 
ison ; teaches subordination ; and, best of all, qualifies a man to 
serve his country. The flag now generally floats above the 
schoolhouse, and what more appropriate than that the boys 
should be instructed in the defense of it ? 

*' Under our system of government we shall never have a large 
standing army, and our strength and safety are in a general dis- 
semination of military knowledge and training among the peo- 
ple. What the man and citizen ought to know in order fully to 
discharge his duty to his country should be imparted to 
the boy. Nothing will so much aid to enlarge our state militia, 
and to give it efficiency and character, as the plan proposed. 
The military taste and training acquired in the school will carry 
our best young men into the military organizations, and make 
those organizations reliable conservators of public order, and 
ready and competent defenders of the national honor." 

For the information of the more recent members of the board 
who may care to know my views upon such topics as school gov- 
ernment, the kind of treatment that should be given the various 
subjects taught, and some other matters pertaining to the inter- 
nal affairs of schools, I here append references to former reports 
in which I have written upon the subjects in question, — as a 
course more likely to be satisfactory than the prolongation of 
this report for the purpose of setting forth my ideas anew. 

Teachers. 1877, p. 33; 18S1, p. 27; 1882, p. 30; 1889, p. 

25- 

School government. 1887, p. 21, 

Reading. 1879, P- 4^ '> 1S80, p. 30 j 1886, p. 42; present 
Course of Study, p. 7. 

Penmanship. 1879, P- 47 ' Course of Study, p. 16. 

Spelling. 1879, P- 4S ; Course of Study, p. 9. 

Arithmetic. 1879, P- 48 ; 1884, p. 22 ; 1887, p. 32. Course 
of Study, p. 10. 

Language. 1879, P- 5^ ; 1883, p. 31 ; Course of Study, p. 11. 



284 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Geography and history. 1879, P- 5°j Course of Study, pp. 
12 and 15. 

Nature studies. 1893, p. 18 ; 1894, p. 13. 

Written reviews and promotions. 1877, p. 4^ ; 1887, p. 25; 
1888, p. 19. 

Exhibitions. 1877, p. 45. 

Admissions to high school. 1877, P- 44; 1881, p. 40; 1883, 

P- 35- 

High school. 1878, p. 43 ; 1884, p. 23 ; 1891, p. 16. 

Brevity of pupilage. 1888, p. 13; 1892, p. 16. 

Music. 1879, p. 52 ; 1883, p. 51. 

Drawing and manual training. 1891, p. 23; 1892, p. 27; 
1873, P- 16. 

Supplementary reading. 1878, p. 51 ; 1882, p. 38. 

Relation of public library to the public schools. "1894, p. 15. 

Selection and examination of teachers. 1877, p. 37; 1879, 
p. 31 ; 1881, p. 36; 1882, p. 44. 

Supervising principals. 1880, p. 39; 1883, p. 36; 1892, p. 

25 ; 1^93' P- 21. 

Elementary schools. 1884, p. 20 ; 1885, p. 34; 1887, p. 32. 

Evening schools. 1885, p. 28; 1888, p. 35. 

Training school. 1880, p. 41; 1S86, p. ;^^ ; 1891, p. 19. 

School flag. 1889, p. 36 ; 1S90, p. 19. 

Parental duties. 1877, P- 37- 

Historical. 1886, p. 24. 

General considerations. 1S80, p. 45 ; 1887, p. 31 ; 1895, p. 
281. 

CONCLUSION. 

That I may not transgress my intention to bring this report to 
a speedy close, I will merely add that I most cordially thank the 
several members of your honorable board, all teachers of our 
schools, and many good citizens for continued co-operation, 
friendly encouragement, and much valuable advice. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 
December 27, 1895. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 285 



OBITUARY. 



Marshall P. Hall, a prominent member of the Manchester School 
Board for nearly a quarter of a century, died February 12, 1S96, since 
the foregoing report was written ; but it is fitting that an obituary notice 
should appear in the School Report for 1S95, near the close of which 
year Mr. Hall was obliged to forego all active service. 

In the death of Marshall P. Hall, Manchester was called upon to 
mourn the loss of one of her most loyal citizens, a man of high principle 
and unusual worth, who leaves behind him a record which deserves and 
receives the respect and admiration of all. The good which he has 
done is spoken of on every hand, while no shadow of evil can be 
brought to mind. It may well be said that there was no man in Man- 
chester who stood higher in the estimation of those who knew him. He 
lived a straightforward, honest, upright, and helpful life, and was a man 
of highest honor and integrity. 

In his long term of service upon the school board of this city, Mr. 
Hall devoted much intelligent labor as well as much of his time to the 
upbuilding of Manchester's public schools. A man of keen and broad 
intelligence himself, he kept constantly in touch with latest thought on 
educational subjects, and his loss will be a distinct one to the school in- 
terests. He had been clerk and vice-chairman of the board and also 
served upon many important committees. 

March 6, 1896, the School Board by a rising vote unanimously 
adopted the following resolutions : 

Resolved, That in the death of Marshall P. Hall the school com- 
mittee of Manchester loses the valuable services of a man of marked 
ability, of exalted character, and of cheerful and constant devotion to 
the performance of all the duties that devolved upon him as a member of 
this board ; that the public schools of the city lose an active and faith- 
ful friend who was always interested in every movement which looked 
to their greatest efficiency and a higher standard of e.xcellence ; and 
that the city itself suffers the irreparable loss of a respected and 
honorable citizen. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be spread upon the 
records of the Manchester School Board, that they be published in the 
city papers, and that a copy be sent to the family of our dear brother. 



APPENDIX. 

I. Population, etc. 

II SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 
V. Pupils. 

VI. Truancy. 

VII. Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1895. 

IX. High School Graduating Class. 

X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

XI. Organization of Committees, 1896. 

XII. List of Teachers, 1896. 

XIII. School Year, 1896. 

287 



APPENDIX. 

STATISTICS. 

I.— Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1890 . . 43,983 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 



II.— Schoolhouses. 

Number of schoolhouses in use ...... 24 

Number of schoolhouses not in use ..... 2 

(Old house in Hallsville and School-street house.) 
Number of schoolrooms used for day schools . . .106 

(Five of the same, and two others, used for evening schools. Rooms unoc- 
cupied by city for day schools are one at Hallsville, two at the Spring-street 
house, and four at the School-street house.) 



Number of rooms used for High-school classes . 
Number of rooms used for Grammar schools 
Number of rooms used for Middle schools . 
Number of rooms used for Primary schools 
Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools 
Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools 
Number of rooms used for Manual Training schools 



27 

21 

42 

2 

5 
I 



II!.— Schools. 

(AH for both .sexes.) 
Number of High schools (buildings) . 
None exclusively Grammar.) 

(A) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



289 



Number of combined Grammar and lower grade (Middle 
and Primary) schools . . . . . . .10 

Number of combined Middle and Primary schools . . 3 
Number of schools all Primary grade ..... 5 

Number of Ungraded schools ...... 5 



IV.— Teachers. 

Male teachers in the High school 
Female teachers in the High school . 
Male teachers in the Grammar schools 
Female teachers in the Grammar schools * . 
Female teachers in the Middle schools* 
Female teachers in the Primary schools f . 
Female teachers in the partially graded schools 
Female teachers in the Ungraded schools . 
Special teachers ..... 
Average number of male teachers ^ 
Average number of female teachers | . 
Male teachers in the evening schools 
Female teachers in the evening schools 
Average number of male teachers in the evening schools 
Average number of female teachers in the evening schools 
Male teachers in the evening Drawing schools . 
Average number of male teachers in the evening Drawing 
schools ......... 



3 

5 

6 

27 

22 

38 
2 

5 
3 
9 

99 
4 

I r 

4 
4 
2 



* Six of the 27 are masters' assistants, and i of the 22 is assistant to the principal of the 
Training school. 

t Three of the 41 primaries were in the Training school. They had no regular teachers, 
being taught by sub-teachers under the direction of the principal, who, for convenience, is 
reckoned among the middle-school teachers. 

t Exclusive of special teachers. 

(B) 



290 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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l|£ 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 295 
DAY SCHOOLS. 

Summary of attendance upon the several grades of public day 
schools for the year 1894- 1895 : 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Partially graded.. 
Ungraded 

Totals, 1895 
Totals, 1894 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



Boys. Girls. 



130 

542 

497 

1,359 

44 

55 



147 

596 

463 

1,294 

32 

47 



2,627 2,579 
2,533 I 2,442 



o ■ 



243 
974 
815 
1,638 
74 
73 



3,817 
3,662 



•=* 






231 

903 

751 

1,483 

69 

62 

3,499 
3,336 






95.1 
92.7 
92.1 
90.5 
93.2 
84.9 



91.7 
91.1 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Summary of attendance upon the several grades of public 
evening schools for the year 1894- 1895 - 



City hall 

Spring street . 

Bimmon 

School street. 



Drawing schools 



f Mechanical .. . 
( Architectural . 



Totals, 1895. 
Totals, 1894.. 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



Boys. 



130 



165 
111 
34 
34 



474 
484 



(H) 



Girls. 



84 
128 

30 
1 
1 



244 
177 



o to 



•s ® 



45 
34 

142 
32 
28 
22 



303 

188 



37 
21 
110 
29 
22 
19 



238 
153 



St-" 



82.2 
61.8 
77.5 
90.6 
78.6 
86.4 



78.5 
81.4 



296 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Evening School Teachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal of City Hall school, for boys. 

Assistants — Honorie J. Crough, Gertrude A. Burns, and 
Mary A. Walker. 

Etta F. Boardman, principal of Spring-street school, for girls. 

Assistants — Maggie Linen and Hattie S. Tuttle. 

L, H. Carpenter, principal of Spring-street school, for both 
sexes. 

Assistant — Lottie M. Clement. 

Arthur W. Morgan, principal of Rimmon school, for both 
sexes. 

Assistants — William J. Mooar, Isabel Esty, Margaret C. 
Lane, Lenora J. Clough, and Harriet H. Richardson. 

JSvening Drawing- School Teachers. 
John M. Kendall and Henry W. Allen. 

CI) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



291 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 

The following table presents the main features of interest per- 
taining to the attendance upon the public schools for the last ten 
years : 



Date. 



Whole No. 
belougiug.* 



"" o 

II 
a ^ 
1^ 



1886 


3,632 


1887 


3,670 


1888 


3,712 


1889 


3,787 


1890 


3,814 


1891 


4,071 


1892 


4,298 


1893 


4,775 


1894 


4,975 


1895 


5,206 



Boys. 



1,812 
1,817 
1,806 
1,862 
1,881 
2,003 
2,181 
2,445 
3,5a3 
2,627 



Girls. 



1,820 
1,853 
1,906 
1,025 
1,933 
2,068 
2,117 



i 


'i 


-a 








t, 


•^ 










3 


>> 




—^ 


^ . 


-o 








« # 


^S) 




S a 


s « 










< 


<, 


2,698 


2,475 


2,711 


2,468 


2,768 


2,500 


2,801 


2,581 


2,795 


2,536 


2,940 


2,689 


3,130 


2,837 


3,425 


3,111 


3,662 


3,336 


3,817 


3,499 



91.9 79 
90.8 98 
00.3 116 



92.2 
90.7 
91.5 
90.6 



177 
141 
166 
174 



90.8 I 194 
91.1 153 
91.7 238 



g 


o 


^ 












be 




s 


n 


S-^ 


o 




a 


































'2^ 


^ 


W i 


"« . 










Is « 


■^•r 


'^° 


n". 


2 3 




a ■" 


•a "3 


78 


71 


53 


42 


98 


95 


61 


42 


88 


80 


58 


45 


101 


96 


73 


55 


121 


114 


83 


33 


120 


101 


69 


26 


116 


103 


67 


42 


129 


127 


78 


41 


175 


162 


112 


63 


168 


156 


112 


40 



c a, 
« a 



74 
76 
76 
75 
75 
82 
87 
99 
104 
108 



* In comparing the pupilage and cost of the schools for any year since 1877 with any 
year prior to 1878, the following facts should receive full consideration : In the reports issued 
prior to 1869, so also in the report for 1876, no care was taken to exclude duplicate enrollments; 
and, as a consequence, the number of different pupils represented in the schools for each of the 
years prior to 1869, as well as for the year 1876, is very erroneous. From certain data at hand, 
it is likely that the number given for each of the years in question is about 1,000 too large. It is 
perfectly evident, from the statistical tables in the reports for the years named, that duplicate 
enrollments were not excluded. As a result of the failure to exclude such enrollments, all 
pupils enrolled in any grade of school at the opening of the year and passing by promotion 
to a higher grade before the close of the year would be doubly reported. And as whole 
classes, substantially, from every grade in every part of the city become doubly enrolled at the 
time of the mid-year promotions, likewise most pupils who changed their residence, it is readily 
seen how largely erroneous the reports must be that do not provide for the exclusion of all 
re-enrollments. 

For many years this matter, and the importance of it, has been well understood; and its 
failure to receive attention in 1S76 was doubtless accidental. See footnotes on page 51 of 
the Report for 1873, prepared by Superintendent Edgerly; likewise page 45 of the Report for 
1S75, prepared by Superintendent Dearborn; and, also, pages so an i 51 of the Report for 
1877. In consequence of the change mentioned in the last-named report, the only item of 
attendance records reported for the years prior to 1S7S which can with reliability be com- 
pared with those reported since 1S77 is the " Average Daily Attendance," and this item is 
evidently far from right (as given in the report) for 1866. Since 1877, all of the several 
items of attendance record have been based upon uniform data. 
Including grammar classes in suburban schools. 

t Exclusive of special teachers. 

(J) 



298 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CHANGES IN CORPS OF TEACHERS. 

The whole number of different teachers employed one term or 
more in the day schools, within the year, has been no. Their 
respective positions may be learned from the attendance tables 
on pages C, D, E, F, G, and H of the Appendix, but the various 
changes made within the year can be more readily understood by 
an inspection of the following : 

Date of begin- 
ning service. 

Dec, '94. 

Jan., '95- 
April, '95. 



Teachers. 



Date of effect of 
resignation. 



Teachers' 



Dec. 



Mary G. Worthen. 

At Rimmon school. 

At Franklin-street school. 



94. Mary L. Ayer. 

Lenora J. Clough. 
Alice C. Taggart. 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 



Sub-teachers. Graduated. 

Emma B. Abbott, Jan. 25, '95. 

Lenora J. Clough. " " 

Marcia M. Moore. " " 

Hellen Morison. 

Maud L. Smith. 

Hattie S. Tuttle. 

Amy K. Northrup, June 21, '95. 

Lizabell Savory. 

Helen E. True. 

Hattie O. Willand. 

Flore'ce L. Abbott. Jan. 24/96. 

Blanche L. Bachelder. 

Alice M. Lamprey. 

Margaret C. Lane. 

Ha'ri't H. Richardson. 



Sub-teachers. Entered. 

Katie E. Bacheller. Dec. 31,' 94. 

Blanche E. Hicken. 

Minnie M. Phillips. 

Dora B. Tuson. 

Bessie Cochran. Sept. 9, '95. 

Maude M. Greaney. 

Mary L. Heath. 

Mabel F. Robinson. 

M. Frances Abbott. Jan. 24, '96. 

Mary A. Cotter. 

Katharine Frain. 

Lura B. Gage. 



(K; 



KEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



299 



VI.— Work of Truant Officer. 



Date. 



January. . . 
February ., 
March . . . . . 

April 

May 

June 

September . 
October — 
November . 
December . . 

Totals . 



Absentees 


No. volun- 


No. re 


ported 


o 


"S"^ 


1^ 


reported 


tarily re- 


caused to 




S '3 


from 


turned to 


attend 


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O 


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3 " 


£^ 


3^ 


Oh 


3 ■» 


Ph 
16 


o -» 


1" 


^ 


115 


27 


19 


11 


31 


6 


15 


19 


82 


16 


9 


3 


55 


16 


4 


9 


6 


78 


13 


4 


5 


38 


9 




15 


20 


69 


13 


9 


3 


43 


13 


2 


1 


9 


178 


21 


23 


12 


92 


16 


9 


19 


25 


50 


8 


2 


2 


32 


8 


3 


.6 


8 


64 


14 


4 


3 


25 


12 


5 


5 


22 


89 


27 


5 


6 


35 


36 


12 


14 


6 


64 


26 


5 


3 


33 


25 


3 


4 


15 


20 


9 


4 




8 


8 


1 


5 


3 


809 


174 


84 


48 


412 


159 


45 


93 


133 



Date. 



January.. 
February. 
March.. . . 

April 

May 

June 

September 
October . . 
November. 
December 

Totals. 



2-0 -g 
9= » 



41 
32 
19 
45 

61 

64 
46 
43 
4 



No. truants 

caused 
to attend 



! 2* 

26 

24 

! 31 

I 2 
! 29 
! 30 

[ 20 

! 2 



196 



17 

6 

11 

21 

29 

35 
16 
23 
2 



S,fl 


^ 


i§ 


£ i 














«o 




o S . 






■° i 


o £ 5 


2 

a 


is 




"§5 


c 


O is 

O.C8 .: 


^5 
o o 


3 J3 




p B 




i^g 


o « 


6«M 


O" 


iz; 


S5 


;2i 


S5 


101 
76 

136 
82 


135 
120 
122 
118 








I 






1 




146 


217 


2 




117 


63 


3 




79 


122 


1 




119 

208 
81 


118 
216 
79 










1 




1,145 


1,310 


8 





46 
39 
64 
89 
66 
33 
41 
39 
32 
58 

507 



(L) 



300 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

VII.— Finances.— 1 895. 



Items of Account. 



Resources from 
appropriations and Expenditures, 1895. 
transfers. 



Salaries of teachers 

Books aud stationery 

Free text-books and supplies 

Furniture and supplies 

Repairs 

Care of rooms 

Fuel 

Printing and advertising. . . . 

Contingent expenses 

Evening common schools . . . 
Evening drawing schools. . . . 
Manual Training 

Totals • 



«68 

4 
1 
4 

4 
5 

1 
1 

1 



,499.21 
67.25 
,915.35 
,027.23 
358.00 
728.82 
,718.06 
358.23 
,520 07 
456.93 
436.00 
,349.10 



$94,434.25 



$68,499.21 
67.25 
4,915.35 
1,027.23 
4,358.00 
4,728 82 
5,718.06 

358.23 
1,520.07 
1,456.93 

436.00 
1,349.10 



$94,434.25 



COST OF CITY SCHOOLS.* 

Expenditures, as above specified 

Sala7-ies. 
Members of the school board .... 

Clerk of the board ...... 

Superintendent of schools .... 

Truant officer ....... 

Total 

Receipts on Account of Schools. 
Literary fund ....... 

Non-resident tuition f . . . . . 

Sale of text-books ...... 

Total 

Net amount raised by taxation 

* See foot-note marked* on page J of this Appendix. 
1 Tax from Londonderry included, J42.06. 

(M) 



b434-25 



$196.67 

150.00 

2,300.00 

750.00 

17,830.92 



$4,760.28 
412,96 
202.66 



>5'375-9o 
)2,455.o2 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 301 

The city valuation for 1S95 is $28,861,122; and hence the 
rate of school tax for the year is $92,455.02 -;- $28,861,122, or 
.0032 -f-. Last year the rate was .00290 -{-. 



VIII. — School Year, 1894- 1895. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 10, 1894; 
closed .December 14. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened December 31, 1894; 
closed March 22, 1895. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 8, 1895; closed 
June 21, 1895. Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above by 
the school board, 185. 

Average number of days the schools were taught, 175. 

(Being closed several holidays, days of " Teachers' Institutes,'' and half-days on account 
of bad weather or insufficient heat.) 



IX.— High School Graduation. 

Program. 

Chorus. "Happy Land." 

Salutatory. " The Social Effect of Higher Education." 

Mabelle Elvira Porter. 
Chorus. " The Woodman." 
Address and Award of Diplomas. " The Art of Study." 

William DeWitt Hyde, D. D., Pres. of Bowdoin College. 
Chorus. '"TisMorn." 

Valedictory Jennie Flanders Currier 

The Class Ode. Words by Arthur Warren Hopkins. 

Music by Annie M. C. Boire. 

(N) 



302 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Graduates. — Class of '95. 



FOUR YEARS ENGLISH COURSE. 



Grace Perry Adams. 
Fred B. Preston. 



Lura Blanche Gage. 
John Freeman Woodman. 



THREE YEARS ENGLISH COURSE. 



Roy Vincent Baketel. 
Alice Gertrude Colby. 
W. Robert Forsaith. 
Mabel Mae Potter. 
Effie Susie Wilbur. 



Florence Alma Caldwell. 
George Arthur Dewey. 
Florence Humphrey Moore. 
Elizabeth Frances Walsh. 
Charlotte Blanche Bolton. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



May Frances Abbott. 
Louise Campbell. 
Alice Josephine Edgerly 
Edith Adele Fogg. 
Mary Gertrude Kane. 
Mae Leonora Lovejoy. 
Clinton Phelps. 
Carlena Augusta Savory. 



Annie M. C. Boire. 
Lillian Frances Crowther. 
Stella A. Emery. 
Carrie Forsaith. 
Bertha Louise Hill. 
Mendon Preston Moore. 
Mabel Elvira Porter. 
Lyman Willard Walker. 



COLLEGE COURSE. 



May Gertrude Benson. 
Jennie Flanders Currier. 
Helen Hall. 

David Woodbury Parker. 
M. Motley Sargeant. 



Blanche Emeline Clough. 
Ora Emily Goodwin. 
Arthur Warren Hopkins. 
Jennie Edith Patch. 
Harry Arthur Weeks. 



Gertrude Hurd. 
James Sullivan. 



TWO YEARS CERTIFICATE. 

Robert A. Leckie. 



SPECIAL SCHOLAR. 



Florence Pearl Garland. 



(O) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



303 



HONOR SCHOLARS. 



English Course 
Classical Course 
College Course 



John Freeman Woodman 

Mabelle Elvira Porter 

Jennie Flanders Currier 



X.— Winners of Clarke Prizes 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, JANUARY 28, 1 895. 



Emily M. Corey, $t 
Irma B. True, ^4. 
Nora A. Quirin, $2. 



Florence G. Barr, ^16. 
Charlotte B. Bolton, $14. 
Harry Noyes, ^10. 
Blanche P. Varnum, ^8. 

XI.— Organization, 1896. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, Mayor, Chairman ex officio. 

JOHN T. GOTT, President of Common Council^ ex officio. 

Ward I. Elliott C. Lambert. 

Walter B. Heath. 
Ward 2. Charles H. Manning. 

Augustus P. Home. 
Ward 3. George D. Towne. 

Louis E. Phelps. 
Ward 4. Nathaniel L. Colby. 

Charles M. Floyd. 
Ward 5. James P. Slattery. 

Harry J. Woods. 
Ward 6. Harry I. Dodge. 

Herbert E. Richardson. 
Ward 7. Fred W. Pillsbury. 

Edward B. Woodbury. 
Ward 8. Luther C. Baldwin. 

Josiah G. Dearborn. 
Ward 9. R. Emmet Walsh. 

Jeremiah J. Sullivan. 

(P) 



304 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

GEORGE D. TOWNE. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

EDWARD B. WOODBURY. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

superintendent's CLERK. 

FANNIE .L. SANBORN. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

CURTIS W. DAVIS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. Mayor Clarke and Messrs. Gott, Pillsbury, Wood- 
bury, and Richardson. 

Salaries. Messrs. Woodbury, Slattery, Heath. 

Text-Books. Messrs. Baldwin, Dearborn. Pillsbury, 

Music. Messrs. Lambert, Phelps, Walsh. 

Drawing. Messrs. Baldwin, Pillsbury, Slattery. 

Manual Training. Messrs. Baldwin, Floyd, Pillsbury. 

Examination of Teachers. Messrs. Towne, Dearborn, Colby. 

Fuel and Heating. Mr. Phelps, Mayor Clarke, Messrs. Gott, 
Manning, Home. 

Repairs. Messrs. Manning, Baldwin, Phelps. 

Attendance. Messrs. Woods, Lambert, Richardson. 

Health. Messrs. Towne, Dodge, Sullivan. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. Messrs. Manning, Pillsbury, Towne, Phelps, 
Slattery, Dearborn, Baldwin. 

(Q) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 305 

Franklin-street. Messrs. Woodbury, Lambert, Richardson. 

Spring-street and Lowell-street. Messrs. Lambert, Slattery, 
Home. 

Lincoln-street. Messrs. Floyd, Colby, Woodbury. 

Ash-street and Pearl-Street. Messrs. Phelps, Towne, Pills- 
bury. 

Webster-street and Blodgei-street. Messrs. Towne, Manning, 
Home. 

Bakersville. Messrs. Slattery, Richardson, Dodge. 

Varney School. Messrs. Baldwin, Dearborn, Colby. 

Training School. Messrs. Phelps, Baldwin, Pillsbury. 

Wilson Hill School. Messrs. Woods, Floyd, Sullivan. 

Main-street and South Main- street. Messrs. Dearborn, Sulli- 
van, Lambert. 

Riminon School. Messrs. Home, Walsh, Heath. 

Amoskeag atid Stark District. Messrs. Heath, Slattery, Walsh. 

LLallsville and Youngsville. Messrs. Richardson, Woods, 
Floyd. 

Goffe's Falls and LLarvey District. Messrs. Dodge, Woods,. 
Heath. 

Webster's Mills and Mosquito Fond. Messrs. Walsh, Dodge, 
Sullivan. 

Evening Schools. Messrs. Colby, Manning, Woodbury. 



List of Teachers. 

HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 

Master. Albert Somes. 
Sub-Master. George L Hopkins. 
Assistants. Harry N. McLaren. 

Nellie Pickering. 

Camille Benson. 

Theresa B. Stanton. 

Mary J. Wellington. 

Sara Hunt. 

(R) 

20 



306 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Fred L. V. Spaulding. 
Master's Assistant. Alice C. Taggart. 
Assistants. Carrie E. Holt. 

L. May Choate. 

Carrie E. Head. 

First Floor. — Loiuer Grades. 

Higher Middle. Nellie C. Parker. 
Lower Middle. Amy K. Northrup. 
Higher Primary. Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. Susie L. Dodge. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOL. 

Secojul Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie P. Gove. 

Higher Middle. Emma L, McLaren. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. Nellie I. Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. Maud L. Smith. 
Lower Primary. Florence M. Grififin. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Frank S. Sutcliffe. 

Master's Assistant. Annie W. Patten. 

Assistants. Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Mabel J. Brickett. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

Mary J. Corcoran. 



Nettie B. Fogg. 



(S) 



EEPOKT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 307 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Hellen Morison. 
Lower Middle. Bessie E. Dodge. 
Higher Primary. Cora B. Gilford. 
Mixed Primary. Theodora Richardson. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Charles W. Bickford. 

Master's Assistant. Mary Hickey Dowd. 

Assistants. Vacancy (2d division). 

Mabel Ruth Brown. 

Amelia L. Graupner. 

Fh'st Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Emma J. Cooper. 
Lower Middle. Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Gra7nmar Grades. 

Master. B. S. Andrew. 
Master's Assistant. Abbie E. Wilson. 
Assistants. Helen E. Frost. 
Alta C. Willand. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Eva F. Tuson. 
Lower Middle. Edith L. Hammond. 
Higher Primary. Jean Gillan. 
Lower Primar- . Mary E. Murphey. 

(T) 



308 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns. 
Assistant. Lelia A. Brooks. 
Mixed Middle. Cora M. Farmer. 
Higher Primary. Augusta S. Downs. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Primary. S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. Annie Brigham. 

VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Gra^nmar Grades. 

Master. George Winch. 
Master's Assistant. Barbara B. Joy. 
Assistant. Rosabelle M. Franklin. 
Higher Middle. Mary E. Moulton. 

First Floor. — Alixed Grades. 

Assistants. Esther M. Dickey. 

Ellen E. McKean. 

Millie S. Morse. 
Mixed Middle. Blanche L. Batchelder. 
Lower Middle. Mary A. Seavey. 
Higher Primary. Mary J. Walsh, 

HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Master. William H. Huse. 
Master's Assistant. Ella F. Barker. 
Assistant. Olive A. Rowe. 
Higher Middle. Susie G. Woodman. 

(U) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 309 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. Mary L. Ayer. 
Higher Primary. Bertha L. Kemp. 
Lower Primary. E. Alfreda Hall. 
Lower Primary. Annie R. Corson. 

RIMMON SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 

Principal. Mary E. Brophy. 
Mixed Middle. Marcia M. Moore. 

First Floor. 

Higher Primary. Lenora J. Clough, 
Lower Primary. Emma B. Abbott. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

(Merrimack street, corner Union.) 

Principal. Caroline E. Wing. 
Head Assistant. Annie W. Cofran. 

The principal is also assisted by the sub-teachers, i. e., mem- 
bers of the training class. The school embraces the first four 
years of school work, in the following grades : Lower Primary, 
Higher Primary, and Lower Middle. There are four rooms, 
two of lower primary grade. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Mary W. Mitchell. 
Lower Middle. Gertrude A. Burns. 
Higher Primary. Mary A. Clement. 
Higher Primary. Lottie M. Clement. 

(V) 



310 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

First Floor. — Primary Grades. 

Higher Primary. M. Minnie Sturtevant. 

Lower Primary. Hattie O. Willand. 

Lower Primary. Kate T. Clarke. 

Lower Primary. Gertrude L. Southard. 

BLODGET- STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary. Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. Edith M. Stebbins. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 

Lower Primary. Mary S. Richardson. 
Lower Primary. Mabel M. Stevens. 

First Floor. 

Higher Primary. Helen M. Morrill. 

PEARL-STREET SCHOOL, 

Lower Middle. Mary G. Tynan. 
Higher Primary. Nellie M. Smith. 
Lower Primary. Ella Hope. 

WILSON HILL SCHOOL. 

Lower Primary. Huldah C. Graupner. 
Lower Primary. M. Clara Hawks. 

SOUTH MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Lower Primary. Delle E. Haines. 
Lower Primary. Georgia M. Cheney. 

(W) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 311 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. Lettie M. Smith. 
Mixed Primary. Clydie M. Flanders. 
Goffe's Falls.* Georgie Kendrick. 
Mixed Primary. Blanche M. Folsom. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS.* 

Stark. Inez M. Warren. 
Harvey. Emma J. Ela. 
Youngsville, Louis H. Bailey. 
Webster's Mills. Josephine L, Riddle. 
Mosquito Pond. Nellie M. Atwood. 



No. I 

2 

3 

4 
5 



SPECIAL TEACHERS. 



Music. Fred B. Bowers. 

Florence Dow. 
Drawing. Charlotte J. Emmins. 
Manual Training. Fred E. Browne. 

EVENING COMMON SCHOOLS. 

(Open from October to March, five evenings each week. 

City Hall Building. 

One school for boys. 

Spring-street Building. 

Two schools for girls. 

School-Street Building. 

Two schools, one for each sex. 

Rimmon School. 
Two schools, one for each sex. 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

(Open from October to March.) 



Suburban. 

(X) 



312 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Spring-Street Building. 

Machine-drawing classes meet on Monday and Thursday- 
evenings. 

Architectural-drawing classes meet on Tuesday and Friday 
evenings. 

JANITORS. 

High School and Ash-Street School. 

John S. Avery. 

Lincoln-Street and Wilson Hill Schools. 

William Stevens. 
Webster-Street and Blodget-Street Schools. 

Charles F. Jack. 
Spring-Street and Lowell-Street Schools. 
William H. Morrill. 
Training School and Franklin-Street School. 
Varnum H. Hill. 
Varney and South Main-Street Schools. 
H. G. Batchelder. 
Main-Street and Rimmon Schools. 
William F. Conner. 
Bakersville School. 
Eben Paul. 
Hallsville and Pearl-Street Schools. 
William H. Newry. 
Afnoskeag School. 
James E. Bailey. 

m 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 313 

XIII.— School Year, 1895-1896. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opens September 9, 1895 ; closes 
December 13, 1895. Vacation of two Weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens December 30, 1895; 
closes March 20, 1896. Vacation of three weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 13, 1896; closes 
June 26, 1896. Vacation of eleven weeks. 

(Z) 



314 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Engineer's Office, No. 8 Vine Street, 

Manchester, N. H., Dec. 31, 1895. 

To His Honor, William C. Clarke, Mayor, and Ge?itleinen 

of the City Councils : 

In compliance with section 5, chapter 12 of the Laws and 
Ordinances of the city, I herewith submit my seventeenth 
annual report (it being the fiftieth of this department) for the 
year ending December 31, 1895, together with a statement of 
the alarms and fires that have been attended to by this depart- 
ment and cause of the fires as far as could be ascertained, with 
the value of property endangered, the amount of insurance car- 
ried, the loss, and the amount of insurance paid. 

It is somewhat singular that, while the state statutes require a 
return of the value of property endangered by fire to be made 
by the heads of fire departmejits to the insurance commissioners 
of the state, property holders in many instances hesitate, and in 
some refuse to give the value of their property, thus making it a 
difficult task to obtain reliable information. 

The report will also contain a complete list of the working 
force of the department, giving their rank, occupation, resi- 
dence, etc., a list of the fire alarm stations and location of keys 
to the same. 

319 



320 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

There have been fifty-one (51) bell alarms and fifty-seven (57) 
still alarms, making a total of one hundred eight (108), two of 
which were the " out of town " calls of 2-2-2. 

The year has been a fortunate one as regards fire losses, as will 
be seen by the following figures : 

Value of buildings endangered by fires . . $254,051.80 

Value of contents endangered by fires . . . 74,610.62 



$328,662.42 

Insurance on buildings endangered by fire . . $127,495.00 
Insurance on contents endangered by fire . . 59:5°3-33 



$186,998.33 

Damage to buildings endangered by fire . • $10,013.93 
Damage to contents endangered by fire . . 29,483.74 



^39'497-67 
Insurance paid on buildings endangered by fire . $8,710.14 
Insurance paid on contents endangered by fire . 28,275.23 

$3^>9^5-37 
The above figures do not include the value of property where 
still-alarms have occurred, where no losses were sustained. 

THE MANUAL FORCE 

of the department consists of one hundred sixty (160) men, 
thirty-three (33) of whom are on permanent duty, and one hun- 
dred twenty-seven (127) are "call" members, divided as fol- 
lows : 

I chief engineer. 
4 assistant engineers — call. 

Engine Co. No. i — 14 men — 3 permanent and 11 call. 
Engine Co. No. 2 — 14 men — 3 permanent and 11 call. 
Engine and ladder Co. No. 3 — 20 men — 5 permanent and 
15 call. 
Engine Co. No. 4 — 14 men — 3 permanent and 11 call. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 321 

Engine and ladder Co. No. 5 — 20 men — 4 permanent and 
16 call. 

Engine and ladder Co. No. 6 — 20 men — 4 permanent and 
16 call. 

Hose Co. No. i — 12 men — i permanent and 11 call. 

Hose Co. No. 2 — 12 men — i permanent and 11 call. 

Hose Co. No. 3 — 8 men — 2 permanent and 6 call. 

Aerial truck No. i — 15 men — 3 permanent and 12 call. 

Chemical Co. No. i — 5 men — 2 permanent and 3 call. 

Spare driver — i man. 

Hose Company No. 3 on South Elm street went into com- 
mission August I with two permanent and six call men. No- 
vember I Ladder No. 5 was attached to Engine Company No, 5 
at Webster street and five call and one permanent man added to 
the combined company, thus giving us a much needed additional 
ladder service in the northern and northeastern section of the 
city, and relieving our heavy aerial truck of some long runs. 
April 24 one permanent man was elected to act as substitute 
driver and engineer for the " day off" granted by the passage of 
an ordinance granting the permanent men that privilege, mak- 
ing in all an increase of fifteen men to the force. 

THE BUILDINGS. 

The addition of Ladder No. 5 necessitated enlarging the sta- 
ble for room for an additional stall and the apparatus room " re- 
cessed " back to admit the ladders. 

Extensive alterations had to be made in the stable and appa- 
ratus room in the new house for Hose Company No. 3 before it 
was suitable for occupancy. 

Convenient and serviceable wagon sheds have been constructed 
at Hose No. 2, Engine and Ladder Companies Nos. 5 and 6, to 
shelter the exercise wagons at these stations. 

A similar shed ought to be erected for the storage of the exer- 
cise wagon at the station of Engine and Ladder No. 3. It is now 
housed in the basement under the stable, and is rather inconven- 
ient getting out and in as well as blockading the cellar for other 
use. 
21 



322 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The stable of Engine and Ladder No. 6 should be enlarged so 
as to contain a box stall. This can be done by an addition to 
the northeast corner of the building. 

THE APPARATUS 

Belonging to this department consists of 6 Amoskeag steam fire 
engines in first class condition, 5 hose wagons, 4 hose carriages, 
I aerial ladder truck (with other ladders), 3 ladder trucks, 2 hose 
carriages in the outlying districts without companies attached, i 
with independent company, i supply wagon, 6 exercise wagons, 
located as follows : 

2 steam fire-engines, with three-horse hitch, at Central station, 
each with one-horse hose wagon attached. 

I steam fire-engine, three-horse hitch, with i two-horse hose 
wagon. North Main street. 

I steam fire-engire and i two-horse hose wagon, at corner 
Lake avenue and Massabesic street. 

I two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

I steam fire-engine and one-horse hose carriage, at corner of 
Webster and Chestnut streets. 

I two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

I steam fire-engine and one-horse hose carriage on Rimmon 
street, corner of Amory street. 

I two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

I one-horse hose carriage at Central station. 

I one-horse hose carriage, corner Maple and East High streets. 

I two-horse combination hose wagon, South Elm street. (Ba- 
kersville.) 

I aerial hook-and-ladder truck at Central station (three-horse 
hitch). 

I double tank (60 gallons each) chemical engine at Central 
station. 

I supply wagon at Central fire station. 

I steam fire-engine Creserve) at station of Engine No. 2. (of 
but little use for fire purposes). 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 323 

6 exercise wagons, one at Central fire station, one at Engine 
No. 2, one at Engine and Ladder No. 3, one at Engine and Lad- 
der No. 5, one at Engine and Ladder No. 6, one at Hose Com- 
pany No. 2. 

I four-wheeled hand hose carriage at junction of Old Falls road 
and Front street, Amoskeag. 

I two-wheeled hose carriage, Devonshire Mills, Goffe's Falls. 

I two-wheeled hose carriage at W. P. Farmer's at junction of 
Candia road and Hanover street. 

Several additions and transfers have been made in the appa- 
ratus. 

One new Gleason & Bailey steel frame ladder truck, equipped, 
placed in station of Engine No. 5, one two-horse hose wagon in 
station of Engine and Ladder No. 3, and the one-horse hose 
carriage transferred to Engine and Ladder No. 5, the combina- 
tion hose carriage of Engine No. 5 remodeled into a combination 
hose wagon and placed in station of Hose Company No. 3, and 
two new exercise wagons, one for Engine and Ladder No. 5 and 
one for Hose No. 2. 

The department is pretty well equipped at present, but its 
efficiency can be considerably increased by a chemical engine at 
station of Engine No. 2. 

In the near future additional protection should be given to 
that section west of Derryfield park, which should be done by 
locating a light steamer there and transferring Hose No. 2 to 
run in connection with said steamer. It would thus afford pro- 
tection to property on the highlands and be "down grade" to 
all property this side. 

THE HORSES. 

There are forty horses in constant service in this department, 
with one " spare," too old to be of much service on any of our 
apparatus, which should be exchanged for one suitable to do the 
spare work often required by some of the horses being on the 
sick list. 

The putting into service of new apparatus necessitated the 
purchase of three new horses, and two on account of horses dy- 
ing. 



324 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

The spare horse " Barney " dropped dead of heart disease at 
station of Engine and Ladder No. 6 while on duty there August 
24 ; one of the blacks of Truck No. 3 dropped dead on the way 
to an alarm from Box 6, September 6, and " Don," of Engine 
No. 4, died December 3. 

FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

During the past year the service of this branch of the depart- 
ment has been prompt and reliable, and the construction has 
been improved gradually as time would permit, by changing the 
wires to more permanent structures, removing them in some in- 
stances from buildings and out from among trees, and the run- 
ning of some insulated wires where changes could not be made 
to take them wholly out of the trees. There have been 9 poles 
set, 83 two-pin arms and 8 four-pin arms put up, 9 two-pin ex- 
tensions and 1 1 single extensions put up, ;^6 tappers taken out 
and put in. 

Two new fire alarm boxes, one (216) at Jewett and Silver 
streets, and another (324) at Aniory and Laval streets, have been 
added to the system, and about four miles of new wire run. 
There are now about thirty-seven miles of main line and thirty- 
four miles of "tapper " line, requiring the use of four hundred 
fifty-two jars of gravity battery. 

During the year a circular box, designed by Charles F. Hall, 
engineer of engine No. i, has been attached to all the boxes. It 
contains the key to the fire-alarm box, which can be obtained by 
breaking the glass. This arrangement facilitates the giving an 
alarm. 

Owing to the "don't care" manner in which the feeder and 
trolley wires for the street railroad were "put up, we have received 
considerable trouble from these wires, at one time having three 
instruments burned out and at another two, and in the first in- 
stance came very near setting fire to a tenement block on Chest- 
nut street by contact with their wires. 

Considering the calls there will be made upon the city for 
more tower strikers and tappers, I would urgently recommend 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 325 

putting in a large steam gong, and the making arrangements 
either with the Electric Light Company or the Amoskeag Manu- 
facturing Co., for steam to work such a gong. I mention these 
two companies as being the only places I know of carrying steam 
day and night the entire year, sufficient to blow such a whistle. 

Such an instrument could be heard in all sections of the city, 
and probably fill the want of additional fire-alarm instruments 
for some time to come. 

THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL PARADE. 

No provision being made by an appropriation, this parade was 
held Wednesday, October 1 6, during "Merchants Week," the 
expenses being paid partly by the Board of Trade and partly by 
assessments of the individual companies of the department. 

CASUALTIES. 

Only two slight accidents have occurred to members during 
the year. March ii, Frank W. Tebbetts of Engine-and-Ladder 
No. 6, while responding to an alarm from Box 56, received in- 
jury to his hand ; and May 3, Fred S. Sloan, then of Engine-and- 
Ladder No. 3, while working at fire of Frank I. Paige's house, 
No. 261 Cypress street, had wrist cut with glass. 

Death entered our ranks and took while in the prime of man- 
hood, 



HENRY SYLVESTER REED, 
Born in Auburn, N. H., 
. October 12, 1845, 

DIED AT 

Manchester, N. H., April ii, 1895, 
Aged 49 Years, 5 Months, 29 Days. 



He was driver of Hose for Engine Co. No. 5 from October 
29, 1 89 1, and for a number of years previous was driver of supply 
wagon. 



326 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



His funeral occurred at the station, where he resided, Sunday^ 
April 14, and was attended by the entire department. 

THE firemen's RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

Owing to good fortune the drafts upon this association have 
been very light, and the donations from liberal citizens, with 
the interest on deposits, have swelled the balance ^153.16 from 
last year. 

The following is the statement of the financial standing to 
date : 



Receipts. 

Balance in treasury February 13, 1895 
Received for membership 

donations, A. P. Olzendam & 
Sons . 
The Head & Dowst 

Co. . 
Board of Trade 
Barton & Co. 
Hon. D. A. Taggart 
G. B. and Henry 



Chandler 
Michael McCabe 



Dividend on deposits 



Expenditures. 



Paid funeral benefit Henry S. Reed 

Frank W. Tebbetts, injuries at fire 
Fred S. Sloan, injuries at fire . 
Joseph R. Merrill, secretary . 
postage and printing 

Balance now in treasury 



)549-53 
17.00 

25.00 

25.00 
25.00 
15.00 
15.00 

10.00 

5.00 

107.51 



550. 00 
6.00 
6.00 

25.00 
4-35 



5,794.04 



11-35 



5,702.69 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENaiNEER. 327 



THE DANGEROUS TROLLEY WIRES. 

In addition to the danger to life and property by telephone, 
telegraph, and fire-alarm wires becoming crossed with the trolley 
wires, there are other dangers of a serious nature to be feared by 
the overhead trolley, as will be seen by the following report of 
electrical experts as submitted to the International Association 
of Fire Engineers, at Augusta, Ga., October 7-10, 1895 • 

To the International Association of Fire Engineers : 

Gentlemen, — Your committee, to whom was referred the subject of elec- 
trolysis, and the rapid corrosion of gas, water, and other pipes, and the lead 
covering of underground electric wires and cables, due to the escape of cur- 
rent from the rails and supplementary wires of street railways using the 
overhead single trolley system, respectfully submit the following report : 

It is the unanimous opinion of this committee that the method of distribut- 
ing electric currents to street car motors by means of the overhead single 
trolley and feed wires, track and supplementary wire and ground, is a men- 
ace to the water and gas systems of every town and city where such trolley 
systems are in operation. 

We believe that the trolley, guard, and span wires are also a serious and 
dangerous obstruction to all Are departments in the performance of their 
duty, often causing serious delays, as they render it next to impossible to 
elevate ladders and water towers until they have been removed. When cut 
or broken, to penidt tlie free and unobstructed use of such apparatus, the 
span and guard wires often become as dangerous as the ti'olley and feed wires 
themselves, by being crossed and mixed up one with the other. 

While the shock received from wives conveying current at a pressure of 
550 volts will not in all cases cause the death of a strong, healthy man, yet 
severe injuries due to burns and shocks have been, and are, very frequent, 
and produce a very demoralizing effect on the members of all flre depart- 
ments. 

While several remedies have been proposed for preventing the rapid de- 
struction of gas and water pipes, we believe that there is but one that will in 
the end prove effective, viz. : To discontinue the use of the rail and ground 
as a part of the electric circuit, and substitute therefor an entirely metallic 
circuit with no ground connections. 

While the overhead double trolley may be permitted on i-ailroad lines rryi- 
ning through rural districts, and possibly in the sparselj' populated portions 
of towns and cities, no overhead system should be tolerated in the mercan- 
tile, manufacturing, or densely populateil sections of the latter. 

It can no longer be said that street railroads cannot be constructed and 
successfully operated in any other manner than by means of the overhead 
single trolley system, as electric railways have been built, and are in success- 
ful operation, in which the feed and trolley wires or bars are beneath the 
surface of the street, and no part of the rails or earth is used as a portion of 
the circuit, thus effectually preventing the escape of current, with its attend- 
ant dangers, and removing a serious and unsightly obstruction from the 
streets. 

But we have the overhead single trolley system in a great many of our 
towns and cities, with all its attendant evils, and if not entirely removed, how 
can these evils be even slightly remedied ? 

The first step to be taken is to employ some competent electrical engineer 
to ascertain the amount of current that escapes to the earth, anil the effect of 
the same on the gas and water pipes. If it is excessive in amount, immedi- 
ate steps should be taken to reduce the resistance of the rails, by re-bonding 
the joints and adding return feeders of low resistance. 

The corrosion of metal pipes, due to that action of the electric current, 
takes place only at the points wliere the current leaves them and seeks the 
earth, no evil effects being visible at the points where the current flows to 
the pipe. For this reason, metallic connections of low resistance should be 
provided between the pipes and the negative side of the dynamos at the 
power-generating station. 



328 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

There are two or more methods of conducting the cui-rent that seeks the 
pipes back to the genei-ators ; but they are not a perlect remedy for the rapid 
corrosion of water and gas pipes, except In the immediate vicinity of the 
generating station, where, it is true, this corrosion is most rapid and destruc- 
tive. They do not prevent corrosion at the pipe joints, where a greater 
amount of resistance to tlie passage of the current is offered than at any 
other place, either in the pipe or surrounding earth. 

Your committee would most earnestly impress on the mind, of every fire 
department chief the immediate necessity of prompt action on the part of 
town and city authorities in this all-important matter, and of directing their 
attention to the following points: 

First. Have determined at once whether the rapid corrosion of the water 
pipe is going on, due to this cause, and to what extent. 

Second. To take immediate steps to stay its progress. 

Third. Use all your influence in preventing companies and individuals 
from procuiing a hanchise to build and operate electric roads equipped with 
the overhead single trollej' system. 

Fourth. Serve the community, and protect yourselves, by warning those 
in authority that the water system may fail you at a most critical moment 
and completely paralyze your efiforts to stay the progress of the flames. 

Fifth. That gas pipes may become so weak from this cause that they will 
pour their contents into the soil, dwellings, stores, warehouses, and facto- 
ries, to such an extent as to endanger these structures and the lives of the 
inmates as well. 

Having done all this, you will have performed your whole duty; and if 
your note of warning is not heeded, the responsibility for possible future 
disaster will rest on the shoulders of those who blindly invited it. 

Caft. William Bropht, Boston, Mass., 
John P. Bakrett, Chicago, 111., 
>iOKRis W. Mead, Pittsburg, Pa., 
B. S. Flanders, Boston, Mass., 

Covimittee. 

The foregoing report received the unanimous endorsement of 
the convention. 

CONCLUSION. 

Owing to what appeared suspicious circumstances about the 
ojigin of a fire that occurred in the Moison block, 274 West 
Hancock street, April 11, 1895, at 12.4c a. m., an investigation 
as to its cause was held by the board of engineers at the office of 
City Solicitor Jones on the 29th of April, 1895. 

Col. John C. Linehan, insurance commissioner for this state, 
was also present. 

While nothing was brought out in the evidence presented at 
this hearing to convict any one, the board are of the unanimous 
opinion that the fire was of an incendiary origin. The report 
of the investigation has been filed with the insurance commis- 
sioner. 

This instance and others which have occurred during the year 
is a strong argument in favor of a state fire marshal, similar to 
one in Massachusetts, whose entire duty it is to investigate allsus- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 329 

picious fires. Such an officer in that state has aheady reduced 
the number of incendiary fires, and I trust insurance underwriters 
and property-holders in this state will take steps to secure the 
passage of a law at our next session of the legislature for the ap- 
pointment of a similar officer in New Hampshire. 

Walter L. Blenus, who for a number of years was a faithful 
driver of Hose No. i, as well as a courageous fireman, resigned 
his position on account of injuries received while in the dis- 
charge of his duties at a fire, October 2, 1894, from which inju- 
ries he has been unable to perform any labor since, and it is 
feared he will never fully recover therefrom. Such cases and 
where injuries are received by firemen in the discharge of their 
duties, and where from long service their health becomes im- 
paired, should be rewarded by being placed on the retired list at 
half pay, as in many states is now the case. This would not be 
charity, but a duty communities owe to faithful servants. 

In closing I desire to express my appreciation to the assistant 
engineers, the officers and men comprising the several companies, 
for their fidelity in the discharge of their duties, to His Honor 
Mayor Clarke and members of the city councils for the interest at 
all times manifested in the department, and to the chief of police 
and the officers of his force for their co-operation and assistance 
at fires. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 

Chief of Fire iJepartment . 



List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 1895, 
with Losses and Insurance. 

Still. Friday, January 4, 8.45 p. m. Smoke in house and 
cellar in block, corner of Auburn and Chestnut streets. Chem- 
ical responded but could find no fire. 

Box 17. Sunday, January 6, 3.23 p. m. Two story wooden 
house (four tenements), 305, 307 Amherst street, owned by Mrs. 



830 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

H. P. Watts and occupied by C. H. Scobey, M. P. Moulton, R. 
A. Dow, and W. F. Bailey. The fire started in the cellar from 
the furnace being too near the woodwork and went up through 
the partitions to the roof. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding : Engines i and 3, Chemical, Hose i ahd 2, Truck 
3. Value of buildings, ^4,500; damage, $900; insurance, 
$4,000; insurance paid, $900. Value of contents, $1,600; dam- 
age, $75 ; no insurance. 

Still. Friday, January 11, 6.45 p. m. Goodman's book- 
store, 41 Hanover street. Paper in window caught fire from gas 
jet. Chemical responded. Extinguished before its arrival. 

Box 4. Wednesday, January 16, 9.32 p. M. Chimney fire 
in Prout's block, corner of Elm and Central streets. Needless 
alarm. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding. Engines i, 2, 3, and Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i and 
3. Extinguished with stream from Chemical. 

Still. Saturday, January 19, 12.15 P- ^^- Burning chimney 
in cottage house of F. L. Gray, 143 Pearl street. The roof about 
the chimney ignited, but slight damage was done. Chemical en- 
gine and Truck i responded. Value of building, $3,000 ; dam- 
age, $14.21; insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, $14.21. No 
damage to contents. 

Still. Sunday, January 20, 9.30 a. m. Cottage house, 45 
Lake avenue, owned by Patrick Harrington and occupied by 
Joseph Leroy. Burning chimney ignited woodwork of the roof. 
Extinguished with Chemical engine. Chemical and Truck i 
responded. Value of building, $1,500. Damage, $50; insur- 
ance, $1,200; insurance paid, $50. No damage to contents. 

Box 8. Sunday, January 20, 10.30 p. m. Two-story wooden 
block, 1 281 Elm street, owned by Gordon Woodbury and occu- 
pied by Isaac Siegel as a fruit and confectionery store. The fire 
originated in the basement from a gas jet left burning. There 
was but little damage by fire, but mostly by smoke. Box pulled 
by officer. Companies responding : Engines 1,4, 5, and Chem- 
ical, Hose I and 2, Truck i. Value of building, $5,000. Dam- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 331 

age, ^lo; insurance, ^4,000; insurance paid, $10. Value of 
contents, ^500. Damage, ^212.50; insurance, ^450; insurance 
paid, $212.50. 

Still. Sunday, January 27, 8.44 a. m. Chimney fire at 452 
Chestnut street. Used Pony. No damage. 

Box 82. Sunday, January 27, 3.25 p. m. Three-and-a-half- 
story wooden block (Lowell-street house) 43 Lowell street, owned 
by Aretas Blood and occupied by Mrs. C. E. Cobb as boarding 
and lodging house. The fire originated in the "blind" attic of 
the L, and extended through to the main part of the building, 
and was confined entirely to the upper story. Cause unknown. 
Box pulled by Officer Rollins. Companies responding : Engines 

1, 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Truck i. Value of build- 
ing, $7,000. Damage, $1,000; insurance, $4,000; insurance 
paid, $1,000. Value of contents, $5,000. Damage, $1,000 ; in- 
surance, $2,500; insurance paid, $1,000. 

Still. ^ Monday, January 28, 5.50 p. m. Chimney fire at 144 
Manchester street. Responded with Pony. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, January 29, 9 a. m. Steam mistaken for 
smoke at Mrs. C. E. Cobb's. 43 Lowell street. Responded with 
Pony. 

Box 15. Thursday, January 31, 8.48 p. m. Three-story 
wooden tenement block, Pearl street, owned by David H. Young. 
The fire originated from some unknown cause about a lounge on 
first floor, and burned through the base-board into partition, and 
from there into the second story. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines i, 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose i and 

2, Truck I. Value of building, $25,000. Damage, $140; in- 
surance, $3,000; insurance paid, $140. Value of contents, 
$1,500. ■ Damage, $40. No insurance. 

Box 8. Friday, February i, 2.59 a. m. Four story brick 
block at 1 286-1 288 Elm street, owned by Morrill, Simons & Si- 
mons, and occupied by A. ^. Gadbois as grocery store and meat 
market. The fire originated from some unknown cause among 
some friction matches, but was discovered in season to prevent 
any serious damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 



382 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

spending : Engines i, 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, 
Truck I. Value of buildings, ^35,000. Damage, $60; insur- 
ance, ^40,000; insurance paid, ^60. Value of contents, ^4,000. 
Damage, $300 ; insurance, ^2,600; insurance paid, ^200. 

Still. Friday, February i, 5.06 p. m. Chimney fire at 405 
North Main street, in house owned by P. D. Lynch and occupied 
by Andrew Hurd. Members of Engine 6 responded with Pony. 
No damage. 

Box 7. Sunday, February 3, 5.29 a. m. Four story brick 
block, No. 37 Manchester street, owned by Edward Wagner and 
occupied by George Connor as a saloon. Soot in the chimney 
took fire and fell to the basement to some rubbish, causing con- 
siderable smoke but little damage by fire.. Extinguished with 
Chemical engine. Box pulled by officer. Companies respond- 
ing : Engines i and 3 and Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i and 3. 
Value of building, $20,000. No damage to building. Value of 
contents, $1,500 ; damage, $100; insurance, $1,000; insurance 
paid, $100. 

Still. Tuesday, February 5, 12.50 p. m. Chimney fire in 
Perham's block, corner of East High and Malvern streets. Mem- 
bers of Hose 2 responded. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, February 5, 1.55 p. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 57 Central street. Members of Chemical responded with 
Pony. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, February 5, 7.25 p. m. Steam issuing from 
the Weston block, corner of Lowell and Chestnut streets, was 
mistaken for smoke. Chemical engine responded with Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, February 6. Thawing water pipes with 
paper in rear of 48 Amherst street set fire to woodwork. Mem- 
bers of Chemical company responded. No damage. 

Still. Friday, February 8, 7.25 p. m. Chimney fire at 102 
Lake avenue. No damage. Members of Chemical responded. 

Still. Saturday, February 9, 9.05 A. m. Wooden "ten- 
footers," 309 Concord street, owned and occupied by Julian B. 
Huntley as plumber's shop. Spark from a parlor match set fire 
to oakum. Members of Hose 2 responded. Damage slight. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENaiNEBR. 33 3 

Value of building, ^150. No damage. Value of contents, ;^30o ; 
damage, 1^5.70; insurance, ^100; insurance paid, ^5.70. 

Still. Tuesday, February 12, 7.10 a. m. Two-story dwelling 
at No. 29 Wayne street, owned by Mrs. CoUity. In thawing 
water pipes set fire to sawdust packing. Members of Engine and 
Ladder 6 responded with hose carriage. Used Pony. Damage 
slight. 

Still. Sunday, February 17, 11.08 a. m. Smoke issuing 
from the foundry, corner Wilson and Valley streets, was taken 
for a fire. Members of Engine and Ladder No 3 responded. 
No damage. 

Box 4. Sunday, February 17, 7.17 p. m. Curtain caught fire 
in Griffin's block on Chestnut street, causing an unnecessary 
alarm. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding : Engines i, 2, and 3, Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i 
and 3. 

Still. Saturday, February 23, 10.20 p. m. Chimney fire at 
115 West street, in tenement of Adolph Becker. Members of 
Engine 2 responded. Used Pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, March 2, 11.45 ?• ^^- Smoke in Martin's 
block discovered by police. Members of Chemical responded. 
No fire discovered. 

Box 82. Monday, March 4, 7.01 p. m. Three-story brick 
block, 1083 Elm street, known as Martin's block, owned by A. 
F. Perry and "The Gale Home." The fire originated froni 
some unexplained cause in the store of 1083 Elm street, occupied 
by Miss S. Coricke-Messier as a millinery store. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding : Engines i, 4, 5, and Chem- 
ical, Hose I and 2, Truck i. Value of building, ;^35,ooo; dam- 
age, $225; insurance, $18,000; insurance paid, $225. Value 
of contents, $2,100 ; damage, $1,087.28 ; insurance, $2,000 ; in- 
surance paid, $1,087.28. 

Still. Tuesday, March 5, 5.31 a. m. Chimney fire at 21 
Amherst street. No damage. Members of Chemical responded 
with Pony. 



S34 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 73. Friday, March 8, 6.20 p. m. Three-story brick 
schoolhouse, corner of East Spruce and Beech streets, owned and 
occupied by the St. Augustine (French Catholic) society. The 
fire originated in a waste paper box in the cellar, probably from 
carelessness with matches, and was confined mostly to the cellar, 
the smoke damaging the rooms above. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose i, 
Ladder 3. Value of building, ^12,000; damage, ^190; insur- 
ance, ^4,000 ; insurance paid, $190. No damage to contents. 

Box 315. Saturday, March 9, 2.53 A. m. Two-story wooden 
building at 162 Front street, 'Skeag, owned by Tom W. Robin- 
son, occupied by Cloeph Cote as carriage shop and Augustus H. 
Stark for carriage and sign painting. Cause of fire unknown. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 5, 
6, and Chemical, and Ladder 6. Value of building, $1,400; 
damage, $530; insurance, $800; insurance paid, ;^53o. Value 
of Cote's contents, $800 ; damage, $731 ; insurance, ;^8oo ; in- 
surance paid, $731. Value of Stark's contents, $450; damage, 
I154.25 ; insurance, $300 ; insurance paid, $154.25. 

Box 56. Monday, March 11, 1.57 A. m. Cottage house, 
shed, and barn on Goffstown road about two miles from the city, 
owned and occupied by Thomas G. Blackstock. The fire is sup- 
posed to have caught from a defective chimney. Owing to the 
distance from the city and delay in giving the alarm, the build- 
ings and most of their contents were entirely destroyed. Box 
pulled by Officer Caldwell. Companies responding : Engines 2, 
6, and Chemical, Hose i. Ladder 6. Value of building, $1,500; 
damage, $1,000; insurance paid, $1,000. Value of contents, 
$900 ; damage, $361 ; insurance, $500 ; insurance paid, $361. 

Still. Friday, March 15, 12.45 p- ^^* Rubbish in basement 
of No. 1 1 Washington street caught fire from some unexplained 
cause. Chemical engine called, but fire extinguished by Officer 
Ring before its arrival. No damage. 

Still. Monday, March 18, 8 p. m. Chimney fire at No. 72 
Winter street, in tenement owned by A. C. Wallace and occu- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 335 

pied by William Ashford. No damage. Members of Engine 2 
responded. Used Pony. 

Box 82. Sunday, March 24, 10.31 p. m. Two-and-a-half 
story dwelling, No. 25 Birch street, owned by estate of George 
Whitford and occupied by several families. Cause, careless con- 
struction of stovepipe and poor connection with the chimney. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding : Engines i, 4, 
5, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Truck i. Value of building, 
^2,000; damage, $15.15; insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, 
^15.15. No damage to contents. 

Still. Monday, March 25, 9.10 a. m. Smoky stove caused 
excitement enough to call the Chemical engine to 374 Chestnut 
street. No damage. No fire. 

Box 13. Monday, March 25, 3.17 p. m. Two-and-a-half 
story wooden house. No. 667 Chestnut street, known as the old 
Soapery. The fire started in a shed adjoining the house, caused 
by children playing with matches. The building is leased by 
Charles Williams, and occupied by Frank Kelley, Samuel Gag- 
non, George Grow, and S. Costello. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines i, 5, and Chemical, Hose i, 
Truck I. Value of buildings, $1,000; damage, $425 ; insurance, 
^625 ; insurance paid, $425. Value of contents, $600 ; damage 
to contents, $40. No insurance. 

Still. Thursday, March 28, 9.30 p. m. Chimney fire in 
Washington block, Pearl street. Members of Chemical responded 
with Pony. All out on their arrival. 

Box 315. Friday, March 29, 9.56 a. m. Ice-house, situated 
on Black brook, Amoskeag, owned and occupied by Charles E. 
Stearns. Sparks from a portable steam sawmill set fire to the 
sawdust packing. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing : Engines 5, 6, and Chemical, Ladder 6, and Riverside 
Hose No. 5. All-out signal at 12 o'clock m. Value of build- 
ing, $200; damage, $20; insurance, $100; insurance paid, $20. 
Value of contents, $200 ; no damage. 

Still. March 31, 11.04 a. m- Chimney fire at No. 61 Pearl 
street. Sparks from chimney set fire to a few shingles, which 



336 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

was extinguished with Pon3^ Members of Chemical responded. 

Box 4. Thursday, April 4, 10.18 A. m. Four-story brick 
block at corner of Elm and Spruce streets, owned by Daniel 
Connor, and occupied by Mrs. Benjamin Contine and others. 
Fire was discovered in the attic, and was caused by rats and 
matches. Box pulled by Officer Proctor. Companies respond- 
ing : Engines i, 2, 3, and Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i and 3. 
Value of building, $20,000. Damage, $20; no insurance. No 
damage to contents. 

Box 12. Sunday, April 7, 10.35 p- ^i- Cottage house at 735. 
Pine street, owned and occupied by Irving L. Stickney. The 
fire originated from some unknown cause in a closet upstairs, 
and communicated to the roof. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engine 5, Chemical, Hose i, Truck i. Value 
of building, $1,400. Damage, $200; insurance, $1,000 ; insur- 
ance paid, $200. Value of contents, $1,000. Damage, $475 ; 
insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, $475- 

Box 15. Monday, April 8, 7.30 p. m. Small barn at corner 
of Elm east back and Pearl street, owned and occupied by Joseph 
Dubois. Fire originated from some unknown cause, and spread 
so rapidly that two horses were burned to death. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines i, 3, 5, and Chemical, 
Hose I and 2, Truck i. Value of building, $75. Damage, $50 ; 
insurance, $50; insurance paid, $50. Value of contents, $150. 
Damage, $100; insurance, $100; insurance paid, $100. 

Still. Wednesday, April 10, 1.20 P. M. Chimney fire in 
Wheat's block, 244 Chestnut street. No damage. Members 
of Chemical responded. Used Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, April 10, 9.03 p. m. Chimney fire in 
Connor's block, 611 Elm street. No damage. Chemical engine 
responded. 

Box 53. Thursday, April 11, 12.39 A. m. Three-story tene- 
ment block, 274-6-8 West Hancock street, owned by Mrs. W. 
H. Moison, and occupied by Joseph Blais as tenement and car- 
penter's shop. Most of the building was unoccupied. The 
fire started in the cellar, under the stairway, and shavings 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 337 

saturated with kerosene were found in the cellar after the fire. 
Box pulled by Officer Caldwell. Companies responding: En- 
gines 2 and 6, Chemical, Hose i, Truck 6. Value of building, 
;^3,ooo. Damage, ;^775 ; insurance, 52,500; insurance paid, 
$TTS' Insurance on contents, $1,000. Investigation as to 
cause held April 29. 

Still. Thursday, April 11, 11.40 a. m. Chimney fire at Dr. 
J. L. Golden's, ;^86 Merrimack street. Members of Engine and 
Ladder 3 responded. No damage. Used Pony. 

Still. Saturday, April 20, 5.40 a. m. Chimney fire in Web- 
ster block, Elm street. Members of Chemical responded. No 
damage. 

Box 4. Saturday, April 20, 10.05 p- ^^- False alarm. Steam 
was seen issuing from the waste pipes of Hodge's shop, 485 Elm 
street, and some excited individual pulled the alarm. Compa- 
nies responding : Engines i, 2, and 3, Chemical, Hose i, Trucks 
I and 3. 

Still. Sunday, April 21, 1.20 p. m. Brush fire in woods 
south of Nutt's pond. Word was telephoned, and Chemical 
responded. The fire doing no damage, nor endangering houses, 
in that vicinity, engine returned without doing service. 

Still. Wednesday, April 24, 2.04 p. m. Grass fire in field 
of A. G. Fairbanks, Eaton Heights, Pond road. Responded 
with men and supply wagon. No damage. 

Still. Friday, April 26, 5.45 p. m. Tvvo-and-a-half-story 
wooden dwelling, owned and occupied by Rev. Fr. Hevey at 
367 Beauport street. Cause, overheated furnace, causing slight 
fire in partition. Responded to by members of Engine and Lad- 
der Co. No. 6. Value of building, $4,500. Damage, $11.42 ; 
insurance, $3,500 ; insurance paid, $11.42. No damage to con- 
tents. 

Still. Thursday, May 2, 1.50 p. u. Smoky chimney in 
Mirror office. Members of Chemical responded. No damage. 

Box 212. Friday, May 3, 12.50 a. m. Cottage house at 261 
Cypress street, owned and occupied by Frank I. Paige. Fire 
originated in a closet from spontaneous combustion of oily 

22 



S38 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

waste. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding : Engines 
I, 3, and Cliemical, Hose 2, Track3. Value of buildings, ^4,000. 
Danfiage, ^1,500; insurance, ^2,700; insurance paid, $1,500. 
Value of contents, $1,500. Damage, $800; insurance, $300; 
insurance paid, $300. 

Box 21. Monday, May 6, 5.59 a. m. Chimney fire at 31 
Laurel street. Needless alarm. No damage. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding : Engines 3, 4, and Chemical, 
Hose I, Trucks i and 3. 

Box 21. Friday, May 10, 6.53 p. m. Three-story wooden 
block, 126 Central street. Match thrown from an adjoining 
block on the shingles caused slight fire, which was extinguished 
with a dipper of water. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines i, 3, and Chemical, Hose i, 
Trucks I and 3. 

2-2-2. Saturday, May 11, 2.55 p. m. Brush fire on Hooksett 
road near town line. Chemical engine and detail of men from 
Central station, and Engine 5 with company. The fire was on a 
cleared lot near house of Joseph Goodwin. Cordwood on 
the lot, which was fully insured, was consumed. Steamer re- 
iiiained until 10 o'clock, and Chemical three hours. 

Still. Saturday, May 11, 8.35 P. M. Lunch cart. 

Still. Sunday, May 12, 10.35 a. m. Chimney fire at 83 
Amherst street. Responded to by members of Chemical Co. 
No damage. 

Still. Monday, May 20, 2.08 p. m. Brush fire on Webster 
street near Hooksett road. Engine 5 with detail of men re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, May 21, 9.45 a. m. Brush fire on Webster 
street corner of Hooksett road. Engine 5 with detail of men 
responded. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, June 2, 12.45 p. m. Brush fire at head of 
Prospect street near Derryfield pai-k. Responded with Chemical. 
Services not needed. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, June 2, 4.53 p. m. Chimney fire at corner of 
Pine and Laurel streets. Members of Chemical responded. No 
damage. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 339 

Box 21. Wednesday, June 5, 10.12 a. m. Two-and-a-half 
story house at 121 Central street, owned by Thomas Corcoran 
and occupied by Robert McVicker. Pot of meat boiled dry and 
meat burned, filling the house with a dense smoke. Box pulled 
by Officer Rainville. No damage. Companies responding: 
Engines i, 3, and Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i and 3. 

Still. Monday, June 10, 7.10 p. m. Burning chimney at 
Straw estate between Elm and Chestnut and Harrison and Brook 
streets, occupied by Mayor William C. Clarke. Responded to 
by members of Chemical. Used Pony. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, June 16, 11. 31 a. m. Sparks on roof of 
cobbler's shop in shed rear of J. E. Merrill & Co.'s currying 
works, 646 Elm street. Extinguished with pails of water. 
Chemical responded. No damage. 

Box 4. Friday, June 28, 7,09 p. m. Chimney fire, rear of 
642 Elm street. No damage. Box pulled by Officer Welch. 
Companies responding : Engines 2, 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose 
I, Trucks I and 3. 

Box 8. Monday, July i, 9.38 a. m. Two-story tenement 
block at No. 8^ Orange street, owned and occupied by Mrs. 
Sarah E. Fisk. The fire originated in a back entry from a leaky 
gasoline stove, doing but little damage to the house but burning 
Mrs. Fisk so that she died in the afternoon. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Companies responding: Engines i, 4, 5, and Chemical, 
Hose I and 2, Truck i. Fire extinguished before department 
arrived. Value of building, ^1,500; damage, $10 j insurance, 
^1,000. No damage to contents. 

Box 5. Tuesday, July 2, 6.15 a. m. One-story wooden build- 
ing on corners of Franklin, Pleasant, and West Central streets, 
owned and occupied by the Public Market and Packing Com- 
pany as a market. The fire was caused by an electric light wire 
coming in contact with roof of building. Box pulled by Officer 
Steele. Companies responding : Engines i, 2, 3, and Chemical, 
Hose I, Trucks i and 3. Extinguished by Chemical. Value of 
building, $3,500 ; damage, $50 ; insurance, $3,000 ; insurance 
paid, $50. 



340 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 8. Wednesday, July 3, 11.47 p- ^i- Three-story wooden 
block, No. 1277 Elm street, owned by David H, Young and oc- 
cupied by E. C. Smith & Co. as a drug store. Some careless 
person threw a firecracker down the bulkhead of the cellar, caus- 
ing a slight fire which was quickly extinguished. Damage slight. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding : Engines i, 4, 
5, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Truck i. Value of building, 
^6,000; damage, ;^5 ; insurance, $5,000; insurance paid, $5. 
No damage to contents. 

Box 82. Thursday, July 4, 12.47 a. m. A firecracker thrown 
into a tub of clothes in rear of tenement No. 31 Bridge street, 
occupied by Joseph Dubois. Fire extinguished with but little 
damage before the arrival of the department. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines i, 4, 5, and Chemi- 
cal, Hose I and 2, Truck i. 

Still. Thursday, July 4, 7.51 p. m. Firecracker in roof of 
boarding block, corner of Vine and Concord streets. No dam- 
age. Responded to by members at Central station. 

Box 17. Thursday, July 4, 8.06 p. m. Two-and-a-half story 
wooden house. No. 310 Hanover street, owned and occupied by 
Walter Neal. The fire was caused by a rocket exploding on the 
roof which burned the roof slightly. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose i 
and 2y and Truck 3. Value of buildings, $4,500 ; damage, 
$18.25; insurance, $4,000 ; insurance paid, $18.25. 

Still. Friday, July 12, 10.59 ^* ^i- Wooden tenement block 
at No. 436 Granite street, owned by Thomas L. Thorpe and oc- 
cupied by several families. Children playing with matches set 
fire to rubbish in cellar. No damage. Members of Engine 2 
responded with Pony. 

Still. Monday, August 5, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire at 48 
Dover street, in house owned by A. N. Clapp and occupied by 
John T. G. Dinsmore. Members of Engine 2 responded. No 
damage. 

Box 314. Tuesday, August 20, 8.39 a. m. Wooden store- 
house at Amoskeag, owned and occupied by the P. C. Cheney Co. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 341 

as a waste house. The fire was caused by spontaneous combus- 
tion. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding : Engines 
5, 6, and Chemical, Hose i, Truck 6. Value of buildings, 
^526.80; damage, $300; insurance, ^320; insurance paid, 
^276.21. Value of contents, $1,510.62 ; damage, $959.01 ; in- 
surance, $853.33; insurance paid, $825.50. 

Still. Saturday, August 24, 8.30 a. m. Four-story brick 
block, 1 1 28 to IT 38 Elm street, owned by Clough & Hall and 
occupied by Fred Cotton as New City hotel. The fire originated 
from the cooking range to woodwork. Chemical responded. 
Value of building, $6,000; damage, $37.15 ; insurance, $4,000 ; 
insurance paid, $37.15. Value of contents, $3,500; damage, 
$6 ; insurance, $3,000 ; insurance paid, $6. 

Box 213. Friday, August 30, 4.41 p. m. Small cottage house 
situated on Maple street near Shasta, owned by Frank Rankin 
and unoccupied. Cause unknown. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines i, 3, and Chemical, Hose 2, 
Truck 3. Value of building, $500 ; damage, $150. Insurance 
canceled by house being unoccupied. 

Box 21. Monday, September 2, 1.15 p. m. Chimney fire 
rear of iSo Central street, in cottage house owned by Thomas 
O'Donald and occupied by Mrs. Long. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose i, 
Trucks I and 3. Value of building, $2,500: damage, $15 ; 
insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, $15. No damage to con- 
tents. 

Box 6. Friday, September 6, 9.27 p. m. Four-story brick 
block known as Merchants Exchange, corner Elm and Man- 
chester streets, owned by Harrington, Lane, & Barton and occu- 
pied by Merchants National Bank, who sub-let the basement 
where the fire originated to James Watts as an eating saloon. 
The fire originated near the range, and was caused by that being 
too near the woodwork. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding : Engines i, 2, 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, 
Trucks I and 3. Value of building, $20,000; damage, $180; 
insurance, $iS,ooo; insurance paid, $180. Value of Watts's 



342 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

contents, $300; damage, $200; insurance, ^300; insurance 
paid, $200. Damage to bank contents, ^330 ; insurance, $1,700 ^ 
insurance paid, $330. 

Box 6. Friday, September 6, 10.38 p, m. Needless alarm on 
account of steam and smoke from above fire. Box pulled by 
Officer Hutchinson. Companies responding : Engines i, 3, 
4, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Trucks i and 3. 

Still. Saturday, September 14, 7.45 a. m. Chimney fire at 
95 Amherst street. Used Pony. No damage. Members of 
Chemical responded. 

Box 53. Tuesday, September 24, 4.20 a. m. One-story 
wooden milk-shed on South Main street near the Bedford road, 
owned by William Esty. Cause unknown. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Companies responding : Engines 2, 6, and Chemical, Hose 

1, Truck 6. Value of building, $200; damage, $100. No in- 
surance. 

Box 213. Friday, September 27, 7.35 p. M. Cottage house 
on Shasta street, owned by Charles Robitaille and occupied by 
Julius Reuben. The fire was caused by carelessly leaving a lighted 
candle in house while occupants were away. Box pulled by cit- 
izen. Companies responding : Engines i, 3, and Chemical, Hose 

2, Truck 6. Value of building, $600 ; damage, $318, insurance, 
^500; insurance paid, $318. Value of contents, $500; damage, 
$100; insurance, $500 ; insurance paid, $100. 

Box 7. Friday, October 4, 12.49 ^- ^^- One-story wooden 
stable in rear of 40 Merrimack street, owned by K. of P. Asso- 
ciation and occupied by E. L. Carswell. Cause of fire, breaking 
of lantern. Box pulled by officer. Companies responding : 
Engines i, 3, and Chemical, Hose i, Trucks i and 3. Value of 
building, $200; damage, ^too ; insurance, $100; insurance 
paid, ;^ 1 00. Value of contents, $500 ; damage, $87 ; insurance, 
^400; insurance paid, $87. 

Still. Saturday, October 5, 7 A. m. Chimney fire rear of 
66 Concord street. No damage. Members of Chemical re- 
sponded. Used Pony. 

2-2-2. Out of town call. Sunday, October 27, 6.20 p. m. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 343 

Brush fire near Cedar swamp, outside the city limits. Responded 
to by Assistant Engineer Merrill with Engine 5 and a detail of 
men from other companies. 

Still. Wednesday, October 30, 5.30 p. m. Chimney fire at 
70 Cedar street. Responded to by Chemical Engine Co. No 
damage. Used Pony. 

Box 15. Monday, November 4, 10.58 p. m. , Four-story 
wooden block, 61 Pearl street. Slight fire in woodbox caused 
by children playing with matches. Extinguished before arrival 
of department. No damage. Companies responding : Engines. 
I. 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose i and 2, Trucks i and 5. 

Still. Sunday, November 10, 8.23 p. m. Slight fire in a 
woodbox in a house owned and occupied by Edward Wyman at 
100 West street. Members of Engine 2 responded. Used Pony. 

Box 4. Thursday, November 14, 6.37 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney, 55 Spruf-e street. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines i, 2, 3, and Chemical, Hose 
I, Trucks !• and 3. 

Box 212. Monday, November 18, 6.16 a. m. Burning chim- 
ney at 585 Valley street. Needless alarm. Companies respond- 
ing : Engines 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. No damage. 
Box pulled by citizen. Used Pony. 

Box 45. Thursday, November 21, 10.24 a. m. Two-story 
brick block, 385 to 397 Elm street, owned by the Head & Dowst 
Co., and occupied by The Daniels-Cornell Co. as wholesale gro- 
cers. The fire originated in the rear part of the main store on 
first floor, from some unknown cause, and spread so rapidly that 
on arrival of department the entire store was filled with such 
dense smoke it was hard to reach the seat of fire. Companies 
responding: Engines i, 2, 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose i, Trucks. 
I and 3. Box pulled by citizen. Value of building, $12,000. 
Damage, $i.,5oo; insurance, $7,500; insurance paid, $1,500. 
Value of Daniels-Cornell Co. contents, $4,000. Damage, $21,- 
500; insurance, $36,000; insurance paid, $21,500. Value of 
Charles A. Hoitt & Co.'s contents, $6,000. Damage, $750; in- 
surance, $3,500; insurance paid, $500. 



344 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Friday, November 22, 10.20 p. m. Slight fire at 
Mechanics hall, probably caused by cigar stub. Chemical engine ' 
called by telephone, but the fire was extinguished by Officer 
Burns before their arrival. No damage. 

Box 7. Saturday, November 23, 5.34 p. m. Two-story 
wooden block owned by Mrs. J. M. Knowles, and occupied by 
several families, at 331 Chestnut street. In the tenement occu- 
pied by Mrs. McCauley a picture fell upon a stove, causing an 
alarm to be pulled by Deputy Chief of Police Cassidy. No dam- 
age. Companies responding : Engines 3, 4, and Chemical, Hose 
I, Trucks I and 3. 

Box 71. Sunday, November 24, 12.15 p- ^^- Smoke was seen 
issuing from F. X. Chenette's blacksmith shop, corner of Pine 
and Cedar streets, and some excited individual pulled in a need- 
less alarm. Companies responding: Engines i, 3, and Chemical, 
Hose I, Trucks i and 3. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Saturday, November 30, 1.30 p. m. Burning chimney 
in Smyth «Sc Carpenters' block, 1224 Elm street. No damage. 
Responded to by members of Chemical. Used Pony. 

Box 82. Saturday, November 30, 7,07 p. m. Four-story 
brick block, 1061 Elm street, owned by Weston, Hill & Fitts. 
The fire was in room 41, occupied by Bertha Foster, and was 
caused by a cigarette being thrown on lounge, causing damage 
to lounge only, and none to building. No hose wet. Fire ex- 
tinguished by officers with pails of water. Standpipes inside 
building would not work. Companies responding: Engines i, 
4, 5, and Chemical, Trucks i and 5, Hose i and 2. 

Still. Friday, December 13, 11.25 p. m. Burning chimney 
in Merchants Exchange building, corner of Elm and Manchester 
streets. Chemical engine responded. Used Pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, December 14, 5.15 a. m. Three-story 
wooden flour and grain mill, 120 South Main street, owned by 
Adams & Tasker, and occupied by Clarence R. Merrill. The 
fire was caused by burglars blowing open the safe. The wood- 
work about the office was somewhat burned, and "lights of glass 
broken from windows. Responded to by members of Engine 2. 
Damage, $25. Insured. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 345 

Still. Saturday, December 14, 10.08 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney at 8 Clark avenue. Pearl street. No damage. Used Pony. 

Still. Monday, December 16, 10.38 p. m. One-story 
wooden building at 672 Elm street, occupied by Howe & Streeter 
as bottlers. Room found full of smoke by Officer Magoon. 
Investigation showed that scraps of meat had been thrown into 
stove when filling it with coal for the night. Chemical engine 
responded. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, December 17, 2.45 p. m. Four-story brick 
block, owned by Clark & Congdon, 891 Elm street. Rubbish 
in a club-room caught from some unknown cause, filling room 
with smoke but doing slight damage. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. Extinguished before their arrival. 

Box 6. Tuesday, December 17, 6.47 p. M. Boiling over of 
a kettle of fat at 61 Hanover street, Standard Bread Co.'s bake 
shop, caused some "crazy" individual to pull in an alarm. No 
damage. Companies responding: Engines i, 4, and Chemical, 
Hose I and 2, Trucks i and 3. 

Box 82. Saturday, December 21, 6.57 p. m. Lunch cart rear 

77 Lowell street, owned by Smith, and occupied by Thomas 

Cromie. Cause, gasoline stove. Box pulled by officer. Com- 
panies responding: Engines i, 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose i and 
2, Trucks I and 5. Value of'contents, ^75. Damage ^50. No 
insurance. 

Box 62. Thursday, December 26, 11.57 p. m. Two-story 
wooden house, Essex street, near the tannery in Bakersville, 
owned by Mrs. Mary P. Gauthier, and occupied by her and 
several other families, with one tenement vacant. The fire was 
set in closet in unoccupied tenement down stairs, and in one 
room on second floor, and in two rooms in attic. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines i, 3, and Chemi- 
cal, Hose I, Truck 3. Value of building, ^800. (?) Damage, $59.- 
75; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, §59. 75. Value of 
contents, $200. Damage, $20; insurance, $600 ; insurance un- 
paid. 

Still. Saturday, December 28, 243 p. m. Four-story brick 
block, 1 137 Elm street, owned by John Young. Cause, over- 



346 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



heated chimney. Members of Chemical responded. Used 
Pony. Value of building, ^8,000. Damage, ^10; insurance, 
;g6,ooo; insurance paid, $10. No damage to contents. 

Box 82. Saturday, December 28, 7.15 p. m. Chimney fire at 
16 Church street, in block owned by Higgins Bros., and occupied 
by Louis Burton and John Valliere. No damage. Box pulled 
by Officer Butler. Companies responding: Engines i, 4, 5, and 
Chemical, Hose i and 2, Trucks i and 3. 

Still. Tuesday, December 31, 10.24 a. m. Chimney fire irv 
brick cottage, 143 Pearl street, owned and occupied by F. L. 
Gray. No damage. Responded to by members of Chemical. 
Used Pony. 

Number of bell alarms . 



Number of still alarms . 

Total 

Valuation of property endangered 
Insurance on property endangered 

Aggregate losses for 1895 
Amount of insurance paid 



51 
57 



108 



^328,662.42 
186,998.33 

36,985-37 



Net loss not covered by insurance . . ^2,512.30 
The several companies have responded to alarms as follows : 



Engine No. i — 35 times. 
Engine No. 2 — 17 times. 
Engine No. 3 — 29 times. 
Engine No. 4 — 24 times. 
Engine No. 5 — 23 times. 
Engine No. 6 — 9 times. 
Chemical — 85 times. 



Hose No. I — 43 times. 
Hose No. 2 — 25 times. 
Hose No. 3 — 2 times. 
Truck No. i — 38 times. 
Truck No. 3 — 28 times. 
Truck No. 5 — 4 times. 
Truck No. 6 — 9 times. 



Number and Location of Fire Alarm Boxes and 

Keys. 

A KEY IS ATTACHED TO Each Box and Can be had by breaking 
the glass. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 347 

No. 3. Blood's lower shop. Keys at offices of gas-works, 
county jail, Manchester Coal and Ice Co.'s sheds, and Charles 
H. Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. Corner Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel Ox- 
ford, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, Street Rail- 
way stables, and W, C. Blodgett's office. 

No. 5. Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at Teb- 
betts & Soule's and Currier's drugstores, and Manchester House. 

No. 6. City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Thurston's drug- 
stores, J. A. Riddle's office, and residence of J. L. Brock, 21 
Amoskeag Corporation. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of Manchester and Chestnut 
streets. Keys at chief of police's office and with all police offi- 
cers. 

No. 8. Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Edward C. 
Smith's and Colby's drugstores, and Partridge Bros.' grain store. 

No. 9. Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, Dr. E. Fritz, 
and station of Engine No. 5. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at residences 
of John Mooar, George Emerson, Walter A. Green, and O. D, 
Knox. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at res- 
idences of Welcome Jencks and Mrs. Lewis Simons, No. i Sen- 
ter's block, and Gate's grocery store. 

No. 14. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys at res- 
idences of Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. George W. Riddle, D. J. Adams, 
E. L. Bryant, A. H. Olzendam, and Mrs. Thomas Morgan. 

No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of William B. Corey, Henry W. Shannon, and J. Fred 
Chalker. 

No. 16. Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. R. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys at 



348 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

residences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and Mrs. 
William Perkins. 

No. 21. Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys at A. 
D. Smith's drugstore, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. L. Walker's 
office, and residence of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. Engine and Ladder Co. No, 3 house, corner of Mas- 
sabesic street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. M. 
Goodwin and station of Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

No. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at 
residences of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, the late Horace 
Stearns, the late Horace Gordon, and James R. Straw. 

No. 26. Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys at Mc- 
Crillis's carriage shop, John N. Foss's stable, and residence of 
John N. Chase. 

No. 27. Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys at 
residences of H. M. Tarbell, A. G. Fairbanks, E. S. Fletcher, 
William Carr, and George H. Hubbard. 

No. 31. Corner of Canal and Hollis streets, Blood's shop. 
Keys at office, Amory Mills, Langdon Mills watchrooms. 

No. 32. Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and Brook 
streets. Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Company's mill, Langdon 
watchroom, and Electric Light station. 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Keys at watchroom and pumping 

Stark Mills. Keys at watchroom. 
Amory Mills. Keys at watchroom. 
Hillsborough county jail. Keys at office. 
Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watchroom. 
Manchester Mills. Keys at watchroom. 
Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watchroom. 
The S. C. Forsaith Co. 's shops. Keys at freight depot 
C. Forsaith Co.'s office. 

Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys at stores 
of F. Riedel and William Weber. 



station 




No. 


35' 


No. 


36. 


No. 


39- 


No. 


41- 


No. 


42, 


No. 


43 


No. 


45 


and S. 


C. 


No. 


51 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 349 

No. 52. Barr's brick block, West Manchester. KeysatFradd 
& Co.'s and A. N. Clapp's stores, Merrimack House, and Engine 
No. 2 house. 

No. 53. Wallace's steam mill. Keys at Wallace's office, I. 
R. Dewey's tenement block, and Ranno Harness Co.'s store. 

No. 54. Corner of A and Bowman streets. Keys at residences 
of Lord sisters, Neil Fullerton, and George W. Davis's store. 

No. 56. Baldwin's bobbin shop. Keys at Baldwin's office 
and residences of J. C. Smith, E. P. Littlefield, and with watch- 
man at works. 

No. 61. Corner of River road and Hancock street, Bakers- 
ville. Keys at Mary Stack's saloon, True W. Jones Co.'s brew- 
ery, store of John A. Kane, and Hose 3. 

No. 62. Gerrish Wool & Leather Co.'s, River road. Keys at 
tannery, the Edwin Kennedy house, and Hose 3. 

No. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at residences 
of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, Thomas J. Smith, Simon Mc- 
Carthy, and store of J. J. Toomey. 

No. 72. Corner of Lake avenue and Lincoln street. Keys at 
residences of the late Austin Jenkins, James Briggs, and Clar- 
ence D. Palmer. 

No. 73. Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Rev. J. A. Chevalier and Timothy Carr. 

No. 81. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at all the 
engine rooms. 

No. 82. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Church streets. 
Keys at Syndicate Furniture Co.'s, Lowell-street stable, Nichols's 
stable, and Fames Bros.' drugstore. 

No. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of W. T. Stevens, W. A. Clarkson, M. D. Johnson, 
Charles F. Chase, and William H. Drury. 

No. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. William B. Abbott, W. N. Johnson, and E. M. 
Topliff. 

No. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at residences 
of A. P. Olzendara, G. A. Olzendam, W. S. Shannon, and John 
J. Bennett. 



350 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 212. Shoeshop, Ilallsville. Keys at the office of the shoe 
factory and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn, 
Mrs. Milton A. Abbott, M. V. B. Garland, and Walter Cody's 
block. 

No. 213. Sash and blind factory, south Beech street, junction 
of Portsmouth Railroad. Keys at offices of Austin, Flint & 
Day and Dana & Provost. 

No. 214. Elliott silk mill, corner of Wilson and Valley 
streets. Keys at office and watchroom of mill. 

No. 215. Hoyt & Co.'s shoeshop, corner of Lincoln and Sil- 
ver streets. Keys at offices of shoeshop and Kimball Carriage 
Co. and residence of Mrs. A. B. Johnson. 

No. 216. Jewett and Somerville streets. Keys at residences 
of G. H. Hill, 140 Jewett street, and W. B. Brown, 128 Jewett 
street. 

No. 261. Pearl-street grammar school. Keys at schoolroom 
and residences of C. E. Rose, S. W. Bascom, and Charles W. 
Cheney, Jr. 

No. 312. Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor streets. 
Keys at residences of James Spence (309 Main street), Thomas 
Bolton, gate No. 11 Mill. 

No. 313. Corner of Amory and Main streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Bouthillier & 
Gingras's drugstore, Miville & Co.'s drugstore, gate of No. 11 
mill, and station of Engine and Ladder No. 6. 

No. 314. P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper mill. Keys at office and 
Riverside Hose house. 

No. 315. Old Brick Store at 'Skeag. Keys at Flanders's 
store, Riverside Hose house, and D. L. Robinson's residence. 

No. 321. Corner Beauport and Wayne streets. Keys at Holy 
Angels Convent, the Brothers' School, and residences of E. H. 
Doherty and Rev. Father Hevey. 

No. 323. Corner of Putnam and Bartlett streets. Keys at 
Albert Oliver's store, P. J. Archambeault's bakery, and residence 
of Officer Lewis Clement. 

No. 324. Amory and Laval streets. Key at residence of 
Desire Martin, No. 494 Amory street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



351 



No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at res- 
idences of Amelia Davis, William A. Tufts, and James Kearns. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Keys at 
residences of J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Elizabeth 
Ward. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular police. 

The true time will be given at precisely 12.30 p. m. from 
Charles A. Trefethen's jewelry store, and will be denoted by one 
stroke of the fire bells. 



Telephone Galls. 

Chemical Engine, Central station 

Chief Engineer's office 

Chief Engineer's residence . 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's residence 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's office 

Assistant Engineer ^Merrill's residence 

Assistant Engineer Merrill's store 

Engine No. 2 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 

Engine and Ladder No. 5 

Engine and Ladder No. 6 

Hose No. 2 

Hose No. 3 



64-3 
64-3 
64-4 

34-4 

73-3 
206-3 

55-4 
64-2 

64-5 

64-6 

64-7 

1 1 6-4 

25-2 



Instructions to Key-holders and Citizens. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be immediately 
communicated to the nearest alarm box, the keys to which are in 
the hands of all regular police, and generally of persons at the 
corner or nearest house. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive in- 
formation of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook 
once as far as it will go (without jerking), and then let go. 



352 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Shut the door, but do not try to remove the key, as it is locked 
in by a trap-lock, and can only be removed with a release-key, 
which is carried by each of the engineers, who will, as soon as 
convenient, release and return it. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to remain by 
the box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull 
again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box 
and give an alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never touch the 
box except to give an alarm of fire. Give an alarm for no cause 
other than actual fire. Don't give an alarm for a chimney 

FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless called 
for by the chief engineer. If yoii change your residetice or place 
of business^ where the keys are kept, return the keys to the same 
office. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to inform 
themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near their property, 
also all places where the keys are kept. Be sure the alarm is 
promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the city, 
and the number of the box will be given thus : Box 6, six blows, 
2 J seconds apart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, 
pause of .6t seconds, one blow, same pause, and two blows, 
2 — I — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the 
bells at any time ; and in case of testing the boxes, each test will 
be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



353 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST, SEC- 
OND. AND THIRD ALARMS. 



Boxes. 



FiBSX Alabm. 



Engine. 



Ist R 

Ist R, 

1st R, 

lst& 

1st R 

lst& 

1st R, 

5 

IstR, 

1st R, 

lst& 

IstR. 

IstR, 

IstR. 

IstR, 

1st K, 

IstR, 

IstR. 

IstR. 

IstR, 

IstR, 

1st R, 

1st & 

1st & 

lst& 

l.st R. 

lst& 

1st & 

IstR. 

Ist & 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

IstR. 

IstR. 

IstR. 

IstR. 

IstR. 

1st & 

l8t& 

IstR. 

IstR. 

IstR. 

1st R. 

IstR. 

IstR. 

Ist R. 

IstR. 

IstR. 

IstR. 

IstR. 

5-6 

5-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 



,3 

2-3 

2-3 
2dR. 
,3 
2dR. 5 

5 

5 
,5 
2dR. 5 

5 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

6 

5 

2d R. 5-6 
2d R. 5-6 
2d R. 5-6 

2d R. 2-3 
2d R. 2-3 
2-3 
2d R. 2-3 



3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

2dR. 
2dR. 
, 5 

5 

5 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

2-6 

2-6 



C. 1 



1-3 

1-3 

1 

1-2 

1 

1-2 

1 

1 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

1 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

2 

1 

1 

1-2 

1 

1 

1-3 

1 

1 

1 

1 



1 

1-3 
1-3 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1-2 
2 
2 

1-2 
2 

2-3 
2-3 
2-3 
2 
2 



1-3 

1-3 

1-3 

1-3 

1-3 

1-5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

1-5 

1-5 

3 

3 

1-3 

3 

3 

3 

5 

3 

1-5 

1-5 

1-5 

1-5 

1-5 

1-3 

1-3 

1-3 

3 

1-3 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

1 

1-5 

5 

5 

5 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

5 

6 

6 

5 

5 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 



Second Alabm. 



2dR.2 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2-3 

2dR. 

3 

2d R. 

1st R. 

2d R 

2dR. 3 

3 

2dR. 3 

2dR.5 

2dR. 

2d R. 2 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2dR.5 

2dR. 

2dR.5 

2dR. 6 

2-3 

2-3 

2-3 

2d R. 2 

5-6 

5-6 

2d R. 6 J3-2 

5 '3-2 

1st R.3 1 

1st R.3 

1st R.3 

IstR. 

let R.3 

2dR.2 

2dR.2 

2d R. 

2dR. 

2dR. 



5-6 

2dR. 

2d R. 

2d R.3 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2d K. 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2dR.5 

2dR.5 

2dR.5 

l.st R 2 

IstR. 

1st R.5 

IstR. 5 

1st R.5 

IstR. 

IstR. 



5 

5 

5 

5 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

3 

1 

1 

5 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

6 

6 

3-6 

3-6 

3-6 

5 

5-6 

6-5 

1 



1 
1 

1 

3-5 

3-6 

1 

3 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

6 

6 

1 

1 

5 

3 



TmBD Alabu. 



5-6 

5-6 

5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2-3-6 

2d R.2-3-6 

2d R.2-3-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

2-3 

2-3 



5-6 



5 

6 

2d R. 5 

2dR. 5 

2dR. 5 

2d R. 3-5 

2dR. 5 

5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2 

2-3-6 

2-3-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-G 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

3 

3 

2dR. 3 

2dR. 2-3 

2d R. 3 

2dR. 3 

2d R. 3 

2d R. 3-5 

2d R. 3-5 



5-& 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

3-6 

3-6 

6-3 

6-3 

6 

6 

e-s 

6-5 

6 

6-5 

6-5 

6-5 

6-1 

6-5 

3 

3 



6-5 

6 

1-5 

1-5 

1-5 

1-3-5 
1-5 

1-6-5 
6-5 
6-5 
6-5 
6-5 
6 



6-3 
6-1 
6-1 
6-5 
5-6 
6-5 
6-5 
5-6 
6-3 
3-5 
3-5 
1-3 
1-3 
3-5 
3-5 
1-3 
1-5 
1-3-5 



23 



354 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Rules and Regulations in Regard to Responding to 
Fires and Alarms. 

The following rules have been adopted by the board of engi- 
neers, and the fire department will strictly comply until other- 
wise ordered, and will attend alarms of fire as per " official 

RUNNING CARD." 

RUNNING RULES. 

Whenever an alarm is sounded, the members of all companies 
not called to that box will report to their respective company 
quarters, and there remain until dismissed by the signal on the 
bells or by an engineer in charge. 

In case companies on their first run have responded to an 
alarm, companies on their second run to the box from which the 
alarm has been sounded will answer all first-run boxes of the 
absent companies; and in case engines are out that would re- 
spond to another box, then third-alarm companies will respond. 
In case of an alarm from a box that does not call for a third 
alarm, companies on their second run will then answer to all 
other boxes. 

Whenever two trucks answer to first alarm, the other truck 
will answer to all other boxes. 

At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, hose 
carriage, or truck that leaves the house first will have the right to 
lead to the fire. Whenever a horse lags or gives out, drivers 
should then give others the right of way, so as not to delay the 
rest of the apparatus. No running by will be allowed, ex- 
cept IN CASE OF accident, UNDER PENALTY OF DISMISSAL OF 
THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

The drivers shall not permit persons not connected with the 
department to ride upon their apparatus, and in muddy weather 
or heavy wheeling they shall not permit any one to ride upon 
their apparatus when returning from fires. 

Engineers of steamers will not run over eighty (So) pounds 
water pressure, except when orders are received from a member 
of the board of engineers or of the officer in command of the 
company. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 355 

WHISTLE SIGNALS. 

The following code of signals will be observed by members of 
the department : 

For captain, or officer in command of company, one long 
whistle. 

For coal, two long whistles followed by as many short whis- 
tles as indicate the number of the engine. 

To LIMBER UP, three long whistles. 

THIRD alarm. 

On THIRD ALARM all apparatus will respond. 
general alarm. 

In the event of a fire of such magnitude that second and third 
alarms are needed, a general alarm will be given by striking ten 
BLOWS, in which case all companies will respond. 

SPECIAL CALLS ON FIRE ALARM. 

When more apparatus is wanted without giving a second or 
third alarm, the following special calls will be given : 

I — T — I for Aerial Truck. 
3 — 3 for Truck 3. 

3-5 " " 5- 
3_6 '' " 6. 

4 — I for Hose i. 

4—2 " " 2. 

4-3 " " 3- 
Companies answering "special calls" will wait thirty seconds 
before leaving quarters to prevent mistakes. 

OUT OF TOWN CALL. 

For a fire out of the city 2 — 2 — 2, in which case all companies 
will assemble at their respective quarters and await orders. 



2 — I for Engine 


I. 


2 — 2 " " 


2. 


2—3 " 


3- 


2-4 '' '' 


4- 


2-5 '' " 


5- 


2—6 " 


6, 



356 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ALL OUT SIGNAL. 

Two blows on the bells, which dismisses all members at com- 
pany quarters. 

This signal will be given after companies working at a fire 
have returned to quarters, "made up," and are ready to respond 
to another alarm, and captains should report to headquarters, per- 
sonally or by telephone, as soon as their respective companies, 
are ready. 

TEST SIGNAL. 

One blow at 12.30 noon. 

SCHOOL SIGNALS. 

I — I, with fifteen seconds between blows, closes primary and 
middle schools, 

2 — 2, with fifteen seconds between the 2's, closes all the schools. 
Time for giving same, 7.45 a. m., 11.30 a. m., or 1.15 p. m. 

MILITARY CALL. 

12 blows twice. 



Rules for Exercising Horses. 

It shall be the duty of the drivers of engines, hose carriages, 
hose wagons, hook-and-ladder trucks, and all other apparatus 
connected with this department, to exercise their horses every 
day, weather permitting, except Sunday, with the exception of 
engines having "first" and "second runs," and in such cases 
must exercise on days of "second run," the same to be done 
within the following limits : 

CENTRAL STATION. 

North to Pearl street. East to Union street. 

South to Merrimack street. West to Elm street. 

NORTH MAIN STREET STATION. 

North to Adams street. East to Main street. 

South to Granite street. West to Dubuque street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 357 



LAKE AVENUE STATION. 



North to Manchester street. East to Belmont street. 
South to Summer street. West to Maple street. 



MAPLE-STREET STATION. 



North to Myrtle street. East to Linden street. 

South to Hanover street. West to Union street. 

WEBSTER-STREET STATION. 

North to Clarke street. East to Union street. 

South to Pennacook street. West to Beauport street. 

RIMMON-STREET STATION (mcGREGORVILLE). 

North to Kelly street. East to Beauport street. 

South to Wayne street. West to Rimmon street. 

BAKERSVILLE STATION. 

North to bridge over B. & M. East to Calef road. 

R. R. West to Brown avenue. 

South to Baker street. 

Drivers must confine themselves to the above, and in no case 
take their horses beyond the prescribed limits, except for shoeing 
and in case of fire, without permission from the chief or an as- 
sistant engineer. 

In exercising, care must be taken to avoid colliding with other 
teams. In approaching corners, crossings, street-car tracks, and 
in going down grades the speed of the horses must be checked. 

In case of an alarm use gong freely while returning to quar- 
ters. 

Any driver violating these rules will be liable to suspension or 
■discharge. 



Stations and Sleeping Rooms. 

All stations of this department will be open from 7 a. m. until 
9 p. M., and the members at the several stations will receive vis- 



358 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

itors and citizens courteously, answer all questions in a gentle- 
manly manner, and give any proper information. 

Gambling of any kind shall not be done or permitted in or 
about any of the houses or premises occupied by the department. 

Stations to be closed at lo o'clock p. m. 

All games must cease at lo o'clock p. m. and the stations be 
closed at that hour, to permit the permanent men and those 
detailed to sleep in the station, to retire undisturbed. 

None of the stations will be open after the above hour (except- 
ing in case of an alarm of fire) without permission of the chief 
or board of engineers. 

Stations may be kept open Saturday evenings until ii o'clock. 

No spirituous or malt liquors shall be allowed in or about any 
of the fire stations, and any member of the fire department seen 
intoxicated at any fire or alarm of fire, or who shall be known to 
frequent places where liquors are sold, during the progress of a 
fire, or whenever in uniform, shall be subject to reprimand, or 
dismissal, as the board of engineers may determine. 

Any permanent member visiting any liquor saloon in uniform,^ 
except in the performance of his duty as a member of the fire 
department, or who is intoxicated or visits places where intoxi- 
cating liquors are sold, while on duty, shall be suspended, or 
discharged, as the board of engineers may determine. 

Commanding officers of companies, having knowledge of the 
violation of the foregoing rules, will suspend the offender and 
report the same to the chief, or board of engineers. 

The permanent men shall exercise a careful supervision over 
the sleeping apartments, see that the rooms are put in order and 
the beds made as early as ii o'clock a. m., and that the bedding 
is changed at suitable intervals. The occupants of each bed will 
be held responsible for the cleanliness of the same, and held 
strictly accountable for any damage to either bed or bed cloth- 
ing through carelessness. After lo p. m. occupants shall refrain 
from loud talking or in any manner disturbing the rest of any 
who have retired. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 359 

Absence from Station. 

No permanent member shall leave his station to visit any sec- 
tion of the city without permission of the chief or an assistant 
engineer, or leave the city, or be granted leave of absence, with- 
out notifying the chief engineer and procuring a substitute to his 
acceptance, and the substitute shall be on duty before the appli- 
cant leaves his post. 

Afiy call trieniber expecting to be absent from the city shall tiotify 
the captain of his compa?iy, and before leaving the city shall pro^ 
cure a substitute satisfactory to said captain. 

Any member of the department not complying with the above- 
rules shall be liable to suspension or expulsion from the depart- 
ment. 



An Ordinance Passed March 5, 1895. 

RELATING TO PERMANENT MEMBERS OF THE FIRE I>EPARTMENT. 

Each permament member of the fire department shall be allowed one 
whole day leave of absence in each month, in addition to two weeks vacation 
in each year, without loss of pay; but the chief engineer shall determine 
what days the leave of absence shall be granted. 

Permanent men out of the city on any such day shall be accounted present, 
at roll-call and not be subject to a fine for absence. No leave of absence 

SHALL EVER BE GRANTED ANY MEMBER OF THE DEPARTMENT ON THE FOURTH 

DAV OF JULY of any year, and all members absent on leave shall report at 
their company quarters at 8 o'clock in the evening of July 3 of each year. 
All ordinances inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed. 



360 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The " days off" shall be as follows : 





Name. 


Company. 




Name. 


Company. 


1 


Hall 


Engine 1. 
1. 
1. 
Hose 1. 
Engine 4. 
4. 
" 4. 
Truck 1. 
" 1. 
" 1. 
Chemical 1. 
" 1. 
Engine & Ladders. 
" 3. 
" 3. 


17 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 


George 

Seaward 

Morse 

Smith 


Eng. & Ladder 3. 
Hose 2. 

Eng. & Ladder 5. 
" 5.* 

" " 5 


2 
3 
4 


Harvey 

Barker 

Parsons* 

Abbott 

Dustin 

Rowe 


6 

7 


Hubbell.' 

Morrill 


" 5. 
Engine 2. 
" 2. 


9 
10 
11 
1? 


Denyou 

Pherson 

Wheeler 

Richardson.. 

rorsaith 

Piper 

Wheeler 

McLeod 


Whitcomb ... 

Weeks 

Foster 


" 2. 
Eng. & Ladder 6. 
6. 
" " 6 


13 

14 
15 
16 


Crosby* 

Rogers* 

Sloan* 


" " 6. 
Hose 3. 
" 3. 



*NOTE.— In February Crosby will take the 16th, and Rogers the 26th ; in July 
Parsons will take the 14th; and in February. April, June, September, and 
November, Sloan will take the 27th. 

The hour of leaving will be 7 o'clock a. m., and members 
will not leave their station until the arrival of the spare driver. 
They must report J>romJ>f/y at 7 0' clock the following morning for 
duty. 

Those whose breakfast hour is 6 o'clock will remain at sta- 
tion until 7 o'clock on the date of their "day off." 

Should a fire be in progress at the hour of changes, men will 
remain on duty until the "all out" is given, except permission 
is obtained of the chief, or engineer in charge of fire, to retire. 

Should a "general " or third alarm be rung in while members 
are in town, they will be expected to report for duty. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



361 



On the ''day off" of the engineer of a steamer, the assistant 
shall, on his arrival at the fire, act as engineer. 

The time of change from first and second run will be made at 
7 o'clock A. M., on and after May i, 1895. 



Entering Buildings with Line of Hose. 

All hose companies are instructed not to enter any building 
with a line of hose unless the stop nozzle is closed, except in 
cases where they can see the fire, and when their streams will 
reach it without damage to other property. 

Steamer companies are not to enter a building with a line of 
hose without orders unless fire can be seen. 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 
Engine No. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



I first-size Amoskeag steamer 
I one-horse wagon . 

3 gray horses for steamer . 
I gray horse for hose wagon 

4 swinging harnesses 
I pair double exercise harnesses 
I single exercise harness . 

2,350 feet fabric hose 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 
Tools, furniture, and fixtures 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



,4,000.00 

400.00 

685.00 

225.00 

200.00 

50.00 

40.00 

1,292.50 

80.00 

200.00 

200.00 

17,402.50 



3()2 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Engine No. 2. 

LOCATED AT NORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQUOG 

I second size Amoskeag steamer 
I hose wagon .... 
I exercise wagon, poles, shafts, and 3-horse hitch 
3 bay horses for steamer . 
I pair gray horses for hose wagon 
3 exercise harnesses, 2 at ^40, i at ^2 
5 swinging harnesses 
I double sled .... 
3,200 feet fabric hose 

Stable fixtures and blankets 
Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc. 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



i4,ooo.oo 
600.00 
340.00 
617.00 
450.00 
100.00 
250.00 

60.00 
1,760.00 

94.00 
466.00 
150.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CORNER MASSABESIC STREET. 

I second-size Amoskeag steamer 



I two-horse hose wagon . 
I two-horse truck and equipments 
I three-horse hitch attachment (extra) 
I pair black horses for steamer . 
T pair bay horses for hose wagon 
I pair bay horses for truck 
3 exercise harnesses, 2 at ;^5o, i at ;^4o 
6 swinging harnesses 
,200 feet fabric hose 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 

Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc. 

Firemen's suits and badges 

I exercise wagon 

Total amount 



^3,500.00 
400.00 

1,700.00 
200.00 
417.00 
400.00 
400.00 
140.00 
300.00 

1,760.00 
80.00 

575-0O 
200.00 
292.50 

^10,364.50 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



363 



Engine No. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

I first-size Amoskeag steamer 

I hose wagon . 

3 horses for steamer . 

I horse for hose wagon 

3 exercise harnesses . 

4 swinging harnesses 
2,2oo feet fabric hose 

Hall furniture, beds, bedding, etc. 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



)4,200.00 

400.00 
600.00 
200.00 
60.00 
200.00 
1,210.00 

275.00 
75.00 

150.00 
!7,37o.oo 



Engine and Ladder No. 5. 



LOCATED ON WEBSTER STREET, CORNER 

I third-size Amoskeag steamer . 

I two-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage 

I steel frame ladder truck 

I pair bay horses for steamer 

I pair bay horses for truck 

I bay horse for hose carriage 

I exercise wagon 

1 double sled . 
5 swinging harnesses 

2 pairs exercise harnesses 
2,500 feet fabric hose 

Bedding, furniture, tools, etc 
Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 
Firemen's suits, badges, etc. 



CHESTNUT. 

^3,600.00 
60c .00 
1,650 00 
500.00 
400.00 
200.00 
325.00 
50.00 
250.00 
100.00 

247.00 

90.00 

200.00 



Total amount 



$9,587.00 



364 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Engine and Ladder No. 6. 

LOCATED AT CORNER AMORY AND RIMMON STREETS. 



I second-size Amoskeag steamer 

I hook-and-ladder truck (with Bangor extension) 

1 one-horse carriage 

2 gray horses for steamer . 
2 bay horses for truck 
I gray horse for hose carriage . 
5 swinging harnesses 

2, coo feet fabric hose 

Hall furniture, carpets, beds, bedding, etc, 
Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 
Firemen's suits and badges 
I exercise wagon 

Total amount 



!3, 500.00 

1,680.00 

600.00 

400.00 

267.00 

200.00 

250.00 

1,100.00 

375-00 

85.00 

187.00 

290.50 

S8,935-5o 



Hose No. 1, 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



I four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage 




^600.00 


2 horses ...... 




500.00 


2 single harnesses 








70.00 


I single cart .... 








40.00 


I single sled .... 








40.00 


I hose sled .... 








20.00 


2,000 feet fabric hose 








1,100.00 


500 feet leather hose . 








250.00 


Furniture and fixtures 








200.00 


Beds, bedding, etc. . 








60.00 


Stable fixtures and blankets 








50.00 


Firemen's suits and badges 








120.00 



Total amount 



,050.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



365 



Hose No. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH 

I four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage 

I bay horse . . . . . ... 

I exercise harness ...... 

I swinging harness ...... 

I exercise wagon ...... 

1,900 feet fabric hose ..... 

1,100 feet leather hose ..... 

Furniture and fixtures ..... 

Firemen's suits and badges 



^000.00 

100.00 

30.00 

50.00 

325.00 

1,045.00 

440.00 

100.00 

120.00 



Total amount 



^2,790.00 



Hose No. 3. 



LOCATED ON SOUTH ELM STREET, BAKERSVILLE. 

I combination hose wagon (with ladders) . . ^1,000.00 

I pair gray horses ...... 400.00 

I pair swinging harnesses ..... 100.00 

I pair exercise harnesses ..... 50.00 

I double cart ....... 50.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose . , . . . . . 1,100.00 

Furniture, fixtures, bedding, etc. . . . ■ 85.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. .... 65.00 

Firemen's suits and badges .... 80.00 



Total amount 



$2,930.00 



Hook-and-Ladder No. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



I aerial hook-and-ladder truck 
3 horses .... 



,200.00 
800.00 



366 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



3 exercise harnesses 

3 swinging harnesses 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 

7 rubber blanket covers . 

Furniture and fixtures 

Beds, bedding, and furniture . 

Stable fixtures and blankets 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



Chemical Engine No. 1 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 double tank (6o gallons each) engine 

I pair black horses 

I pair exercise harnesses . 

I pair swinging harnesses 

Furniture and fixtures . 

Stable fixtures and blankets 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



^50.00 
150.00 
360.00 
168.00 
200.00 
75.00 
60.00 
150.00 

5,153.00 



^2,250.00 
400.00 
50.00 
100.00 
75.00 
50.00 
35-00 

$2,960.00 



Supply Wagon. 

I supply wagon, with boxes and engineers' lanterns 



Spare Hose. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

Soo feet leather hose 

1,700 feet fabric hose ..... 

Total amount ..... 



5250.00 



3400.00 
935-00 

$1)335-00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



367 



Exercise Wagon. 

CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

I four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole^ shafts, 
three-horse hitch, and coal boxes 



E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine. 

STORED AT CLINTON-STREET ENGINE HOUSE. 

Old U tank Amoskeag engine (may be worth for ex- 
change) $250.00 



Engineers' Department 



5 fire hats .... 
5 engineers' white rubber coats 
Furniture and fixtures . 

Total amount . . . 



j^IO.OO 

37.50 
175.00 

$222.50 



Riverside Hose Co. No. 5. 

LOCATED AT CORNER OF OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET. 



1 four-wheeled hose carriage 
800 feet leather hose 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc. 
Furniture and fixtures 

Total amount 



3400.00 

300.00 

40.00 

10.00 

$750.00 



368 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 



1 two-wheeled hose-carriage 
300 feet fabric hose 

2 hose pipes 

Total amount 



^30.00 

100.00 

10.00 

1^140.00 



Pond Road Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED IN BASEMENT OF W. P. FARMER'S BARN. 

I two-wheeled hose-carriage . . , . ^30.00 

500 feet leather hose ...... 150.00 



Total amount 



Sleeping-Hall. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

6 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc. 



Extra Horse. 



I bay horse off duty 



^180.00 



^260.00 



Fire Alarm Telegraph. 

At cost, including additions previous to 1885 
Remodeling in 1885 
Additions in 1886 . 

in 1887 . 

in 1888 . 

in i88q . 



^21,625.00 

6,000.00 

775.00 

375-00 
575-00 
430.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



^369 



Aaauions in 1590 . 








^300.00 


in 1891 . 








280.00 


in 1892 . 








150.00 


in 1893 • 








500.00 


in 1894 . 








250.00 


in 1895 . . . 








500.00 


" Individual Tapper" system 








3,000.00 


Wire, ladders, arms, brackets, etc. 








125.00 


Total .... 


. ^34,885.00 


Recapitulation. 




Engine No. i 


. $7>402.5o 


Engine No. 2 . . . . 








8,887.00 


Engine and Ladder No. 3 








10,364.50 


Engine No. 4 . . . . 








7,370.00 


Engine and Ladder No. 5 








9,587.00 


Engine and Ladder No. 6 








8,935-50 


Harrington Engine (old) 








250.00 


Hose No. I . 








3,050.00 


Hose No. 2 








2,790.00 


Hose No. 3 . 








2,930.00 


Hook-and-Ladder No. i 








6,153.00 


Chemical Engine No. i 








2,960.00 


Supply wagon .... 








250.00 


Spare hose ..... 








i,335-oo 


Exercise wagon (Central station) 








350.00 


Engineer's department . 








222.50 


Riverside Hose No. 5 . 








750.00 


Hose Carriage on Pond Road 








180.00 


Goffe's Falls Hose carriage 








140.00 


Sleeping Hall (Central station) 








260.00 


Extra horse 








50.00 


Fire-Alarm Telegraph . 








34,885.00 


Total 








^109,102.00 



24 



370 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



60 . 

•c o 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 


Thomas W.Lane 

Fred S. Bean 


Chief 




1937 Elm. 


o 


Asst. and clerk 
Assistant 


Machinist 

Carpenter 

Supt. Elec. Light 
Grain dealer 




3 
4 
5 


Ruel G. Manning 

Eugene S. Whitney 

Clarence R. Merrill. .. 


55 Douglas. 
N. River road. 
414 Merrimack 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House, 28 Vine Street. 



60 . 

»o o 
P5 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


7 


Charles P. McCoy 


Captain 


Machinist 


50 Mechanic. 


8 


Frank E. Stearns 


Lieutenant 


Paper hanger . . . 


389 Lake ave 


18 


James L. Brock 


Clerk 


Tinsmith 


21 Market. 


6 


Charles F. Hall 


Engineer 


Engineer 


28 Vine. 


13 


JoseiDhH. Gould 


Asst. Engineer 


Machinist 


78 Lowell. 


11 


Frank H. Harvej' 


Driver engine.. 


Teamster 


28 Vine. 


12 


Artemas C. Barker 


Driver hose 




28 Vine. 


43 


Frank B. Marston 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


14 Mechanic. 


15 


Thomas J. Wyatt 








26 Mechanic. 


9 


Lewis G. Bryant 





«< 


1451 Elm. 


10 




,1 


Machinist 

Gas-fitter 


43 Nashua. 


14 


Nelson C. Whitney . . . 


74 Lowell. 


17 


Mel vin Walker 





Carpenter 


6 Water. 


19 


Charles H. Eraser 


" 


" 


9 Mechanic. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENaiNEER. 



371 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 
Hotise on Nwtli Main Street, 'Squog. 



Mo 

PQ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


67 


David G. Mills 




Carpenter 

Harness-maker. . 


607 Granite. 


71 


Charles G. Ranno 


Lieutenant — 


63 Parker. 


76 
120 


Jeremiah Lane 

Harry C. Morrill 


Clerk and dri- 
ver engine . . 
Engineer 


Teamster 

Engineer 


210 No. Main. 
53 Beauport. 


119 


Stephen Thomes 


Asst. engineer. 


Carpenter 


55 Douglas. 


69 


Arthur W. Whitcomb. 


Driver of hose. 


Teamster 


151 Douglas. 


72 


Samuel A. Hill 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


86 School. 


75 


Robert J. Hill 


,, 


Carpenter 

Machinist 


86 School. 


77 


Daniel B. Emery 





Williams. 


73 


Charles S. Cousius 





Harness-maker.. 


323 Douglas. 


74 


Tliomas C. Foote 


« 


Wool sorter 


56 No. Main. 


66 


Joseph H. Alsop 





Wool waste sort'r 


54 Douglas. 


70 


Chas. M. Tewksbury.. 





Clerk.B & M R.R. 


113 Parker. 


68 


George P. Ames 


" 


Supt. Streets . . . . 


226 No. Main. 



372 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 3. 

House on Lake Avenue, corner Massabesic. 



<0 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


86 


Frank F. Porter 


Captain 


Manufacturer — 


330 E. Spruce. 


97 
98 
89 


Edwin C. Paul 


Lieut, engine . 










268 Bridge. 




Clerk 


Clerk 


121 


George B. Forsaith.. . . 
John P. Walker 


Engineer 

Asst. engineer 






122 


Machinist 


352 Lake ave. 


87 


George H. Wheeler . . . 


Driver engine.. 


Teamster 


384 E. Spruce. 


81 


William S. McLeod. . . 


Driver hose... 


Teamster 


Engine house. 


82 


Lyman W. Piper 




Dresser 


398 Merrimack 


114 




Carpenter 

Clerk 




no 


Albert W. Smith 




534 Lincoln. 


84 


Walter M. Moulton . . . 


,, 




367 Hanover. 


80 


Clarence Hackett 


" 


Laundryman — 


401 Central. 


153 


Charles P Tuxhury... . 





Carriage trim' er 


422 Merrimack 


85 


John W. Finn 


t( 




501 Wilson. 


88 


George Taylor 


'< 


Mechanic 


382 Lake ave. 


78 


George Dunnington.. . 





Harness-maker. . 


510 Wilson. 


105 


Carl K. Beadle 


II 


Clerk 


125 Belmont. 


79 




II 




373 Hall. 


148 


Orren S. Coburn 


" 


Clerk 


386 Central. 









REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



373 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House, No. 20 Vine street. 



<0 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


20 


JLucius B. Snelling. . . . 


Captain 


Pharmacist 


103 Walnut. 


28 


John H. Wales, Jr 


Lieutenant .... 


Brick mason — 


19,M. S. B. 


V, 


Thomas W. Lane, Jr. . 


Clerk 


Electrician 


1937 Elm. 


21 


Edgar G. Abbott 


Engineer 


Machinist 


12 Linden. 


27 


Edward Sargent 


Asst. Engineer 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 


31 


Frank J. Dustin 


Driver engine.. 


Teamster 


20 Vine. 


29 


Ellsworth V. Rowe. . . . 


Driver of hose. 


Teamster 


20 Vine. 


22 


Walter A. Clarkson. . . 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


Walnut. 


25 


Frank B. Stevens 


« 


Clerk 


20 Gore. 


?S 


George Thompson 

Harvey E. Harris 


II 


Clerk 


85 Walnut. 
21 South. 


24 


•• 


Laundryman 


32 


Luther A. Knight 


" 


Engineer 


78 Lowell. 


30 


James C. Newton 


" 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 


26 


Alfred Gustaf son 


" 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 



374 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 5. 
House, No. 44 Webster Street. 



<0 

pa 


Name. 


Ranli. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


■It 


Charles W. Brown — 

Milo B. Wilson 

George N. Burpee 


Captain 

Lieutenant 


Clerk 


16 Hazel. 


101 




44 Blodget. 


162 


Electrician 


136 Sagamore. 


46 


Woodbury Davison . . . 
Walter Morse 


Clerl£ 


Carpenter 

Machinist 


817 Union. 


10? 


Engineer 


61 Pennacook. 


42 


Daniel W. Morse 


Asst. engineer. 


Engineer 


1419 Elm. 


195 


ErailH. Smith 


Driver engine. 


Teamster 


44 Webster. 


124 


Benjamin C. Cann 


Driver truck.. 




44 Webster. 


83 


Ernest E. Hubbell .... 


Driver hose . . . 





44 Webster. 


47 




Hoseman 


Clerk 


863 Chestnut. 


95 


Edward H. Clough .... 
Alvin McLane 




859 Chestnut. 


T>6 


,, 


Carpenter 

Clerk 


15 Liberty. 


108 


Edward L. Towle 


72 N. Adams. 


123 


Charles H. Gile 


11 


Carpenter 


896 Union. 


99 


Will G. Eraser 


,. 




54 Pennacook. 


41 


Frank A. Kinne 


Machinist 


75 Sagamore. 


160 


George E. Badger 





Steam -fitter 


46 Upper Canal 


161 


Irving S. Bryant 





Second-hand 


15 Bay. 


168 


Andrew S. Fantom . . . 





Cigar-maker 


1440 Elm. 


159 







Clerk 


31 N. Adams. 









REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



375 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 6. 
House on Amory and Eimmon Streets. 



a. 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


140 


rrank W. Tlbbetts.... 


Captain 


Loom-fixer 


312 Cartler. 


147 


James A. Farley 


Lieut, engine.. 


Machinist 


385 Dubuque.^ 


130 


Thomas E. Gorman... 


Lieut, truck... 


Loom-fixer 


356 Rimmon. 


1?9 




Clerk. . 


Machinist 

Engineer 


624 N. Main. 
Engine-house- 


132 


Edwin E. Weeks 


Engineer 


133 


Alcide Provenclier . . . 


Asst. engineer. 


Machinist 


516 Beauport. 


134 


Alphonso E. Foster. . . 


Driver engine. 


Carpenter 


Engine-house. 


135 


George A. Cann 


Driver hose . . . 


Steam-fitter 


" 


136 


Henry C. Crosby 


Driver truck.. 


Teamster 


" 


138 


Tlios. F. Fitzsimmons 


Hoseman 




258 Beauport. 
268 Beauport. 


141 


John J. Conroy 




Blacksmith 


142 


Frank St. Jobn 





Marble finisher.. 


5 Barr. 


143 




(1 




467 Hevey. 
516 Beauport. 


144 


Arthur Provost 


»< 


Wool sorter 


145 


John E. Herring 





Loom-fixer 


402 Rimmon. 


131 


John C. Gemmell. 
William H.Marshall.. 


., 


Laborer 




137 




266 Douglas. 


1W 


John H. McCabe 

Gideon Belisle 


II 


Clerk 


310 N. Main. 


K<^ 




335 Dubuque. 
460 N. Main. 


146 


Richard F. Galway 


" 


Cigar -maker 



376 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House, Ko. 26 Vine Street. 



to 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Kesidence. 


36 

33 
48 
37 
52 
53 
35 
45 
31 
34 
50 
39 


Joseph E. Merrill 

George H. Porter 

Albert A. Puffer 

Henry C . Parsons 

Charles B. French 

John E. Sanborn 

Samuel W. Patten 

George I. Ayer 

Edwin W. Merrill 

Charles J.Wiley 

Andrew S. Heath 

Geox-ge W. Snadden.. . 


Captain 

Lieutenant — 
Clerk 




21 Ash. 


Carpenter 

Teamster 

Carpenter 

Belt maker 

Electrician 

Clerk 


279 Laurel. 
499 Beech 




16 Prospect. 
39 M. S. B, 
274 Laurel. 
3M. S. B. 
28 M. S. B. 
21 Ash 


Hoseman 


Mechanic 

Clerk 


482 Chestnut. 
283 East High. 
373 Brid°'e 









HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 
House on Maple Street, cornier East High. 



IS 

'O o 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


54 


John F. Seaward 


Captain 


Carpenter 


27 Warren. 


55 


Revilo G. Houghton.. 


Lieutenant — 


Gas fitter 


288 Bridge. 


59 
57 
€2 

60 




Clerk 


Carpenter 


521 Maple. 
521 Maple. 
35 Dutton. 






Julien B. Huntley 

Charles W.Powell.... 








Carpenter 


540 Maple. 


61 


Addison Seaward 







255 Bridge. 


56 


Arthur B. Merrill 








425 Lake ave. 


63 


James A. Rogers 





(t 


761 Beech. 


65 


John M. Emerson 





Plumber 


245 LoweU. 


58 


Thomas Smith 


If 


Carpenter 


24 South. 


64 


Mclviu W. Worthen .. 


" 


" 


260 E. High. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



377 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 3. 
House, South Elm Street. 



■c o 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


150 


FredS. Sloan 


Captain 


Fireman 


23 Elm. 


151 


Elmer R. Laing 


Clerk 


Teamster 


34 Brown Ave. 


152 


Charles H. Rogers — 


Driver 




21 Elm. 


153 


James H. McKenzie . . 


Hoseman 


Sash-maker 


Elm. 


154 


William P. Hall 





" 


128 Calef road. 


155 


Henry O. Follansbee.. 





Gas-maker 


205 Elm. 


15fi 


William E. Pierson. .. 


« 


Foreman 


122 Willow. 


157 


Frank D. Hardy 


» 


Yard brakeman. 


20 Cheney pic. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1.' 
House, No. 8 Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


115 


Edward A. Sears 


Captain 


Electrician 


247 Concord. 


117 


Warren F. Wheeler .. 


Clerk & driver 


Teamster 


8 Vine. 


103 


Benj. R. Richardson. . 


Pipeman 


Machinist 


12 Mechanic. 


116 


Clarence D. Palmer . . 


Fireman 


Marble dealer. .. 


366 Lake Ave. 


41 


Asa W. Gage * 




Lineman 


239 Beauport. 







378 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOOK- AND-L ADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

House, No. 18 Vine Street. 



« 

M 


Name. 


Bank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


91 


Jerome J. Lovering . . 


Captain 


Carpenter 


175 Hanover. 


111 
90 
94 
96 
92 




Lieutenant. . . . 




46 Stark. 


Henry Johnson 

Charles M. Denyou . . . 


Clerk 




73 Ash. 






18 Vine. 


Fir eTn an 




100 Blodget. 


Oscar P. Stone 






Clerk 


312 Manchest'r 


104 


Harrison H. Cole 






Carpenter 


45 M. S. B. 


109 


George M. Jones 






Gardener 


25 Prospect. 


107 
113 








Manufacturer . . . 


JSVine. 


Charles H. Laxon 






Carpenter 


20 M. S. B. 


106 


Charles Edgar 









16 M. S. B. 


100 
112 


Frank M. Frisselle 






Reporter 


478 Beech. 


Charles A. Butterfleld 






Carpenter 


26 Vine. 


118 


Frank A. Pherson 






Machinist 


18 Vine. 


93 


Fred W. Bond 






Loom-flser 

] 


54 Stark. 













* Detailed as driver of supply wagon. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

The Trustees of the City Library respectfully submit their 
forty-second annual report of the affairs of the library, and ac- 
companying the same the report made to them by the treasurer 
of the board, containing an account of the sums received and 
the expenditures made by him in behalf of the board from the 
funds in their possession and under their control ; and also the 
report of the librarian made to the board, giving in detail the 
statistics of the operation of the library for the past year and its 
condition at the close of the year. 

From the librarian's report it appears that the library has been 
open for the delivery of books the same number of days as the 
year previous, namely three hundred and six days, during which 
period fifty-nine thousand four hundred and ninety-five books 
were delivered for home use, an average of about one hundred 
and ninety-five per day. In addition to the above number deliv- 
ered for general circulation, ten thousand nine hundred and thirty- 
four books were delivered for use in the reading room at the li- 
brary, being an average of a little less than thirty-six per day. The 
total number of books delivered for general circulation and for 
use in the reading-room was seventy thousand four hundred and 
twenty-nine, an average of over two hundred and thirty per day. 
As compared with the year preceding the circulation for home use 
shows an increase of four thousand four hundred and forty-one, 

381 



382 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

and the number delivered for use at the reading-room an increase 
of one thousand and sixty-one. The total circulation was five 
thousand five hundred and two greater than the previous year, 
and the largest since the library was established. The libra- 
rian has compiled and included in her report a tabic showing 
the variation in the circulation of books, both for home and for 
library use, for the years 1879 to 1896 inclusive. 

The number of periodicals regularly received at the library 
during the year was seventy-five — fifty-seven by purchase and 
eighteen by gift — and on the completion of the several volumes 
they have been bound and placed upon the shelves for general 
circulation. As opportuniiy has occurred during the year the 
trustees have purchased the early volumes of the series of the 
periodicals in the library to make the sets as complete as possi- 
ble. It will be remembered that the library lost nearly all its 
books by fire in 1856. 

The number of volumes withdrawn from circulation during 
the year from worn and defaced condition was one hundred 
and twenty-five. Of these and of others retired from circulation 
for the same reason in previous years, one hundred and sixty- 
four volumes have been replaced at a cost of one hundred fifteen 
dollars and sixty-one cents. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the last 
report, including maps and pamphlets, was thirty-eight thousand 
three hundred and fifty-one. During the year there have been 
added seven hundred and thirty volumes by purchase, two hun- 
dred and eighty-one volumes by donation, and eighty- seven 
volumes of periodicals have been bound, a total of one thousand 
and ninety-eight volumes, making the number of bound volumes 
in the library at the close of the year thirty-eight thousand 
seven hundred and thirty-one, and the total library, including 
sixteen maps and seven hundred and two pamphlets, thirty-nine 
thousand four hundred and forty-nine. 

The work of reclassifying and recataloguing the library, which 
was commenced the year previous, has been continued during 
the past year, and the librarian reports that the three largest sec- 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 383 

tions, fiction, biography, and history, are now finished, and the 
fourth, geography and travels, nearly completed. The librarian 
estimates that nearly one third of the books in the library are 
now reclassified on the shelves according to subjects, and prop- 
erly catalogued. 

The plan outlined in the last report of the librarian of bring- 
ing the library and the public schools into closer relations was 
the past year put into practical operation, and the result has been 
a marked success. During the year one thousand and thirty 
volumes were issued on teachers' cards for use in the schools. 
A large number of the teachers in the public schools have taken 
advantage of the aid rendered to their work by this new feat- 
ure, and cordially assisted to make it of the most practical use 
to the pupils. 

In December last the trustees decided as an experiment to 
change the hours during which the library should be open to the 
public. Hitherto the library has been open eight hours each 
day, viz. : from 9 o'clock a. m. to 12 m. ; from 2 to 5 o'clock p. 
M., and 7 to 9 o'clock each evening week days excepting Wed- 
nesday. By the new arrangement the library is to be open ten 
hours continuously, viz. : from 10 o'clock a. m. to 8 o'clock p. 
M. The result has been so far that the delivery of books has 
been more evenly distributed, more expeditious service, and ac- 
commodation of many patrons who could better come at the 
noon or evening hours. 

Accompanying the report of the librarian will be found the 
names of the persons who have made donations of books to the 
library during the year, with the number presented by each. 
The trustees have caused due acknowledgment of these dona- 
tions to be given to all who have in this manner shown their in- 
terest in the library. 

The treasurer reports that during the year the sum of eleven 
hundred eighty-two dollars and eighty-two cents has been ex- 
pended for the purchase of books and the sum of one hundred 
eighty-one dollars and twenty-two cents for periodicals, making 
a total expenditure for both these purposes of thirteen hundred 



384 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

sixty-four dollars and four cents. Of the amount expended for 
the purchase of books, the sum of one hundred fifteen dollars 
and sixty-one cents was used for the purchase of books to replace 
those worn out and withdrawn from circulation. Exclusive of 
this amount, the sum expended for the purchase of new books 
was one thousand sixty-seven dollars and twenty-one cents, leav- 
ing a balance in the hands of the treasurer at the close of the 
year of four hundred seventy-two dollars and fifty-seven cents. 

The balances of the accumulated income, at the close of the 
year, of the several funds under the control of the trustees, were 
as follows : 

Dean fund ........ ^7,286.95. 

Mary E. Elliot fund 1,130.45, 

Eliza A. Eaton fund ...... 249. 9& 

No expenditures were made from any of these funds during 
the past year on account of the work of reclassifying the 
library. It is proposed, however, to make large purchases from 
the Dean fund in the near future, as the reclassification of that 
section will soon be taken up. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the past year have 
been three thousand seven hundred forty dollars and sixty-five 
cents, included in which amount is the sum of five hundred sev- 
enty-nine dollars and ninety cents expended on account of re- 
classification of the library and additions to the card catalogue. 

The items of these expenditures, the bills for which have been 
paid by the city treasurer, upon approval by the trustees, from 
the sum appropriated by the city councils, may be found in 
detail in the annual report of the city. 

The librarian. Miss Kate E. Sanborn, has conducted the duties 
of her position with the same conscientious effort and fidelity as 
in the past, and to the entire satisfaction of the trustees and 
patrons of the library. 

The trustees return their acknowledgments to the members of 
the city councils, and particularly to the committee on lands 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 385 

and buildings, for the courtesy and consideration with which 
their suggestions relating to the library have been received and 
carried out. 

March 17, 1896. 

In board of trustees read and approved, and ordered to be 
transmitted to the city councils. 

WM. C. CLARKE, 

3Iayor. 
N. P. Hunt, 

Clerk. 

25 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The treasurer of the board submits the following account of 
the receipts and expenditures by the board of the funds received 
on account of the library. 

1895. 

. To balance of appropriation . 
Kate E. Sanborn, fines, 

catalogues, etc. 
appropriation for books for 
1895 .... 



Jan. 

Feb. 



5- 



July 17. 



Jan. 



July 



Oct. 



Jan. 7. 



Oct. 



Dr. 

$756.66 

77.61 



1,000.00 



To balance of income of Dean 




fund .... 


$6,803.24 


income of Dean fund 


loS.oo 


income of Dean fund 


loS.oo 


interest on accumulation of 




income .... 


217.60 


income of Dean fund 


45.00 


interest on accumulation of 




income .... 


5-II 


To Mary E. Elliot fund . 


$2,000.00 


balance of mterest on Mary 




E. Elliot fund 


1,039.28 


interest on Mary E, Elliot 




fund .... 


60.00 


interest on accumulation of 




incom? .... 


31-17 



$1,834.27 



$7,286.95 



$3>i30-45 



386 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



Jan. 



Oct. 



1895. 

Jan. 15. 
IS- 
iS- 
16. 
16. 
Feb. 5. 
6. 
6. 
6. 
March 14. 
14. 
14. 
April 13. 

IS- 
IS- 



May 



June 



22. 
6. 
17- 
17- 
iS. 

4- 
12. 

13- 



To Eliza A. Eaton fund . ^3,000.00 




balance of interest on Eliza 




A. Eaton fund . . iSS-SS 




interest on Eliza A. Eaton 




fund .... 88.30 




interest on accumulation of 




income .... 6.^;^ 






^3,249.98 






;^iS»Soi-65 




Cr. 


Paid New England News Co., periodicals 


^i4.S3 


Little, Brown & Co., books . 


2.00 


VV. B. Clarke & Co., books . 


81.47 


Boston Book Co., periodicals 


5.00 


Publishers' Weekly, periodicals 


8.00 


Granite Monthly Co., books .- 


1.25 


Geo. H. Polley & Co., periodicals 


6.00 


New England News Co., periodicals 


10.05 


Little, Brown & Co., books . 


3-So 


W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 


103.46 


New England News Co., periodicals 


12.41 


Publishers' AVeekly, books 


3-So 


W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 


65.78 


New England News Co., periodicals 


iS-94 


W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 


96.97 


W. B. Clarke & Co., books (re- 




placed) 


41.98 


T. P. W. Rogers, books 


20.00 


New England News Co., periodicals 


10.19 


W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 


183.14 


J. H. Lamb, books 


5.00 


Publishers' weekly, books 


3-66 


New England News Co., periodicals 


14.91 


Microscopical Publishing Co., peri- 




odicals 


4-50 


W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 


97.01 



388 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



July 



Aug. 
Sept. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



6. Paid New England News Co., periodicals 
1 8. Boston Book Co., books (replaced) 

1 8. John Sheldon, Treas. , books. 

19. Little, Brown & Co., books . 
19. Granite Monthly Co., books . 

1. New England News Co., periodicals 

4. Library Bureau, books . 

5. New England News Co., periodicals 

12. W. B. Clarke & Co., books (re- 

placed) 

13. W. B. Clarke & Co., books 

3. New England News Co., periodicals 
10. W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 

10. W. B. Clarke & Co., books (re 

placed) 

2. Boston Book Co., books (replaced) 
2. George C. Gilmore, books 

4. Lawyers' Co-op. Pub. Co., books 

5. New England News Co., periodicals 

6. W. B. Clarke & Co., books 
iS. Little, Brown & Co., books 
23. George E. Littlefield, books 
25. . Little, Brown & Co., books 
25. Library Bureau, books . 
25. A. G. Whittemore, books 
27. Sampson, Murdock & Co., books 

4. New England News Co., periodicals 

11. W. B. Clarke & Co., books 
16. Little, Brown «Sr Co., books 
16. W. B. Clarke & Co., books 
31. By balance of appropriation . 

balance of accumulation of Dean fund 
Mary E. Elliot fund and interest 
Eliza A. Eaton fund and interest 



$14.49 

98.00 

4.20 

2.00 

1.25 

10.63 

2.00 

17.66 

36-39 

84.10 

8.82 

94-79 

2.74 

34.50 
2.00 
5.00 

II. 17 

39-37 

2.00 

.90 

3-75 
1. 00 
2.60 
2.00 
16.92 
40.24 

4-25 
8.68 

472.57 
7,286.95 

3>i3o-45 
3,249.98 



$15. =501.65 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 389 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the library for 
the year ending December 31, 1895, the bills for which have 
been paid through the office of the city treasurer upon the ap- 
proval of the committee on accounts of the board of trustees, the 
items of which will be found in the annual report of the city, are 
as follows : 



Services of librarian 






$900.00 


Services of assistants to librarian 






766.45 


Fuel (two years) .... 






629.68 


Gas and electricity .... 






285.63 


Insurance 






125.00 


Binding ....... 






118.29 


Rebinding ..... 






143.60 


Reclassification and cataloguing 






579.90 


Supplies ...... 






99.40 


Printing 






33-30 


Water 






16.00 


Newspapers 






6.00 


Incidentals 






37-40 



,740.65 



RECAPITULATION. 



Balance December 31, 1894 
Appropriation for 1895 • 



S3.869.77 
4,500.00 



$8,369.77 



Paid trustees for purchase of books . . $1,000.00 

incidental expenses . . . 3,740.65 

Balance of appropriation Dec, 31, 1895 . 3,629.12 



5,369-77 



Respectfully submitted. 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of Tmstees of City Library. 



890 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

December 31, 1895. 

We have examined the foregoing report, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 
WALTER M. PARKER, 

Committee on Accoiints of City Library. 

December 31, 1895. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of receipts and 
expenditures embraced in the foregoing report of the treasurer 
of the trustees of the city library, and find the same correctly 
cast and properly vouched. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Tnisteis of the Manchester City Library : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit the forty-second annual re- 
port of the city library : 

Whole number of accessions December 31, 1894 . 38,355 

Added during the year 1895 : 

By purchase 730 

By gift 281 

Periodicals bound .... 87 



1,09s 



Whole number at present 

Including : 

Maps 

Pamphlets 
Bound volumes 



Number of periodicals regularly received : 

By purchase ..... 

By gift 

Number of days the library was open for reading and 

distribution of books .... 
Number of volumes delivered for home use 
Average per day ..... 
Largest number any one day, February 23 
Largest number any one month, March . 
Smallest number any one month, September 
Number of volumes delivered in the reading room 

391 



39)449 



i6 




702 




38,731 


39>449 






57 




18. 


ing and 






306 




59:495 




194 




512 




6,309 




4,217 


room . 


10,934 



392 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS 



Average per day ..... 

Number of cards used on deposit 

Number of cards issued during the year . 

Whole number issued since new registration 

Number of cards relinquished during the year 

Postals sent to delinquents 

Worn-out books removed from circulation 

Number of volumes replaced . 

Number of books lost or injured and paid for 

Number of volumes repaired at the bindery 

Number repaired and covered at the library 

Cash on hand January i, 1895 

Amount received from Jan. i to Dec. 31, 1895 • 

For fines ^209.46 

catalogues, 181 at 30c. . . 54-30 

books lost and paid for . . 8.85 



Paid to N. P. Hunt, treasurer, February 5, 

1895 

Paid for expressage and incidentals . 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1895 

ACCESSIONS. 



577-61 
86.29 



36 

3 

659 

10,319 



235 

164 

8 

525 
10,330 

^77.61 



^272.61 

$350.22 



$163.90 

$186.32 



Of the seven hundred and thirty volumes purchased during 
the year, the usual number were the new and popular books de- 
manded by our readers, but a large proportion were books of 
permanent value needed to round out certain sections of the 
library, especially those of biography and history. In arranging 
the library by classes it is easily seen what important books are 
lacking in each class, and these it is our intention to buy so far 
as the sum of money at our disposal will permit. 

Several magazines often called for have been added to our pe-' 
riodical list — The Review of Reviews, New England Magazine, 
Nation, and Electrical World. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 393 
CIRCULATION. 

The following table shows the variation in the circulation of 
books both for home and library use for the past seventeen years : 



Year. 



1879. 
18S0 
1881. 
1SS2 
1883 
1884. 
1885 
1S86. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890 
1891. 
1892. 
1893 
1894 
1895 



Home 
issue. 



53,558 
45,109 
38,12-2 
41,788 
53,948 
50,914 
5.5,142 
54,037 
50,335 
50,417 
49,187 
51,498 
56,265 
55,874 
55,295 
55,054 
59.495 



Library 
issue. 



10,861 
7,128 
4,916 
4,770 
4,380 
5,848 
5,156 
5,540 
5,665 
6,031 
9,383 

10,015 
8,270 
7,846 
8,203 
9,873 

10,9.34 



Total. 



64,419 
52,237 
43,038 
46,558 
58,328 
56,762 
60,298 
59,577 
56,000 
56,448 
58,570 
61,513 
64,535 
63,720 
63,498 
64,927 
70,429 



It will be seen that the issue for 1895 was the largest in the 
history of the library, the home issue alone being 4,441 in excess 
of that of the preceding year. 

This gain is the more gratifying because for several years the 
home issue had been slowly but steadily decreasing. There has 
also been a gain in the library issue, although, as usual, the fig- 
ures given do not fairly represent the total number of volumes 
consulted, an exact account of which it is not possible to keep. 

A larger number of cards has been given to borrowers than in 
any other year, and an increase of eighty-three over 1894. 



394 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

CLASSIFICATION AND CATALOGUE. 

The labor of reclassifying and recataloguing the library has 
gone on steadily during the year, being interrupted only by the 
summer vacations. The three largest sections are now done, 
namely — Fiction, Biography, and History, and the fourth,. 
Geography and Travels, is nearly completed. 

We estimate that nearly one third of the books contained in 
the library are now classified on the shelves according to their 
subjects, and are properly catalogued. 

The advantages of these new methods are becoming more and 
more understood and appreciated by our readers. The card 
catalogue has grown in favor and is in constant use, and the new 
arrangement of the books on the shelves is found to be most help- 
ful both to the people seeking information and to the librarian 
and assistants endeavoring to supply it. 

The fiction catalogue, published in December, 1894, has had 
a good sale, and has undoubtedly contributed very largely to the 
increased circulation. 

SCHOOL WORK. 

In my report of last year I outlined briefly the plan adopted 
for introducing books into the public schools. This has been 
carried out with marked success. The first teacher's card was 
issued January 15, and forty teachers of our grammar schools 
have made use of these cards, to draw six books at a time for 
the use of their pupils. Through the year 1,039 volumes were 
issued in this way. The books taken have all been of a high 
character. By far the largest draft has been made upon the de- 
partment of travels, though many volumes of history, especially 
of United States history, have been used, and science and gen- 
eral literature have by no means been neglected. Bound vol- 
umes of St. Nicholas and Harper's Young People have 
been in great demand. The books are used in various ways. 
Some teachers permit pupils to take them home, keeping, of 
couise, a careful record of them ; others employ them mainly in 
reference work at school, but in all cases the children are en- 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 395. 

couraged to read them and taught the value and use of them. 
No books have been lost or injured. The teachers all speak in 
highest praise of this privilege granted by the library ; of the 
aid it gives them in their work; and many have reported a man- 
ifest improvement in the quality of reading chosen by the chil- 
dren since this plan was carried into effect. Perhaps in no 
branch of library work is it more difficult to make figuies tell 
the whole story. Indeed, the whole story they cannot tell. We 
may report that forty teachers have taken out in one year a 
thousand books which their pupils have read or consulted ; but 
how many children have learned that there are scores of books 
on the subject they are studying besides the text-book in hand, 
and will in future turn to the public library for information of 
all kinds ; how many have been aroused to an interest in some 
subject uncared for before ; how many have been stimulated to 
read a higher class of literature, — all this figures cannot tell. But 
if it be the aim of education to make honest, enlightened, and 
useful citizens, we may feel that the library has rendered a great 
service to the city by this particular line of work undertaken in 
the past year. 

CHANGES. 

Two changes made by the trustees are worthy to be chronicled^ 
the first being in direct line with the foregoing subject. It was 
voted at the April meeting to lower the age limit at which a per- 
son could hold a card in his own name from sixteen to twelve 
years. Since April 15, there have been issued sixty cards to 
children between the ages of twelve and sixteen. This shows 
that a step has been taken in the right direction, and the good 
resulting from it will be more and more recognized each year. 

The second important change is in the library hours. 
Previous to December i, 1895, the library had been kept 
open eight hours a day (six on Wednesdays), having been 
closed two hours at noon and two hours at tea time. 
This probably answered very well until recent years when the 
growth of the city, and the varying interests of its people, de- 



396 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

manded a greater hospitality of the public library. Many found 
its doors closed just when it was most convenient for them to 
visit it, and readers had often to be turned out at its closing 
hours. Now the library is open ten hours of each week day, 
from lo A. M. to 8 P. m. There has been less inconvenience 
caused by its opening an hour later in the morning and closing 
an hour earlier in the evening than might have been antici- 
pated, and this has been more than compensated for by the 
greater advantage of being open continuously. Many have ex- 
pressed themselves as thoroughly pleased with the innovation, 
and greatly accommodated by it. It is found that there is an 
increasing number who visit the library at the time during which 
it used to be closed, and that the giving out of books is more 
evenly distributed through the day. The result of this is that 
the demand upon the assistants at the issue desk is less severe at 
certain hours, and that the people are more expeditiously served. 
Although this arrangement has been of the nature of an experi- 
ment and in operation only one month, it is safe to say that no 
one will wish to return to the old custom. 

BUILDING. 

The repairs made by the land and buildings committee have 
greatly increased the comfort and convenience of both patrons 
and employees of the library. The electric lights give great 
satisfaction, and the building is now for the first time adequately 
lighted. All had suffered from the insufficient lighting by gas, 
and the books themselves were not the least sufferers, gas being 
one of the most effective agents in destroying bindings, and our 
building is so shaded that artificial light is required much of the 
time. Not less appreciated are the smaller but quite as necessary 
improvements made, such as refurnishing the dressing room, 
mending furniture, and providing us with convenient drawers at 
the desk. The linoleum carpet placed upon the floor of the 
book room has added materially to the comfort of everyone, the 
much worn floor being thus covered, and the sound of footsteps 
considerably deadened. It is to be hoped that the committee 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 397 

will give US more carpeting this year. Some of the aisles and 
alcoves need it badly; the noise of the scraping of the step- 
ladders on the floor is very annoying, and at times almost un- 
bearable. 

It is to be regretted that we have not a large reading- 
room. The space designated by that name is occupied 
mainly by people consulting catalogues, and is not suitable 
for a reading-room, which should be kept always quiet. 
The going in and out of the delivery room, the necessary talk- 
ing by those inquiring for books, the unavoidable noise made 
by the boys in getting books, running up and down the step- 
ladders, etc., is disturbing to one who wishes to read or study. 
But this is perhaps not more desirable than an entire new build- 
ing. We need to be provided with a large, pleasant, well-lighted 
room, where magazines and newspapers could be displayed and 
made attractive in order to entice to the library the many peo- 
ple of the city who never enter it ; also with a study room where 
cyclopedias, dictionaries, and the most used reference books 
could be freely consulted ; a book room furnished with stacks 
not so high as to require ladders such as are now in use, and 
many other modern equipments. The library cannot be made 
to reach out to all classes of people and to be the power for 
good in the community that it should be, nor to take a high 
rank among the libraries of New England until it is given a 
building which can make possible various lines of work utterly 
useless to attempt in its present quarters. 

RECAPITULATION. 

In reconsidering briefly the results of the year's work, — an 
increased circulation ; the advancement made upon the rear- 
rangement of the books and the structure of a more comprehen- 
sible catalogue ; the success of the experiment of introducing 
books into the public schools ; the lowering of the age limit ; 
the opening of the library during the entire day, and the ira- 



S98 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

proved condition of the building, — I think we may be justified 
in feeling that the library has gone forward in its career of ser- 
vice to the public, and in looking forward to a still greater de- 
gree of usefulness in the future. 

Respectfully submitted. 

KATE E. SANBORN, 

Librarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY. 



Aguilar Free Library, New York City 
Baillie's Inst. Free Library, Glasgow 

Balch, E. S 

Bartlett, C. H 

Bigelow Free Public Library, Clinton 

Blair, H. W 

Boston, Mass. — City Auditor . 
Boston, Mass. — Public Library . 
Bridgeport, Conn. — Public Library 
Brookline, Mass. — Public Library 
Brooklyn, N. Y. — Library 
Bronson Library, Waterbury, Conn. 
Cardiff, Wales. — Free Libraries 
Cary Library, Lexington, Mass. 

Challis, F. H 

Chicago, Fil. — Public Library . 
Children's Aid Society, New York 
Cincinnati, Ohio. — Public Library 
Civil Service Reform Association 

Clark, H. S 

Clarke, J. B. Co. . . . 
Cleaves, G. P. . 

Cleveland, Ohio. — Public Library 
Cobden Club .... 
College of New Jersey, Princeton, N 
Concord, N. H.— Mayor . 
Detroit, Mich. — Public*Library 
Dover, N. H. — Public Library . 
Emerson, James 

399 * 



Mass 



Books. Pamph's. 
• I 



I 

IS 



i8i 
5 



400 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md 
Fall River, Mass. — Public Library 

Fellows, J. W 

Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. 
Fitz Public Library, Chelsea, Mass. 
Fitchburg, Mass. — Public Library 
Fitzgerald, D. . 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt. 
Friends' Free Library, Germantovvn, Pa. 

Gould, S. C 

Grand Rapids, Mich. — Public Library 
Hartford, Conn. — Public Library 
Harvard College .... 

Huse, W. H 

Illinois. — Bureau of Labor Statistics , 

Indian Rights x\ssociation 

Jersey City, N. J. — Free Public Library 

Lancaster, Mass. — Town Library 

Lenox Library, New York City . 

Library Co. of Philadelphia 

Lord, Miss M. A 

Lynn, Mass. — Public Library . 

Macullar, Parker & Co. 

Maimonides Free Library, New York City 

Maiden, Mass. — Public Library 

Manchester, N. H. — Chief Engineer Fire Depart 
ment 
'• " City Auditor 

" • City Clerk . 
" Eng. — Public Free Libraries 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Medford, Mass. — Public Library 

Melrose, Mass. — Public Library 

Milwaukee, Wis. — Public Library . , 

Minneapolis, Minn. — Public Library 

Mitchell, Mrs. W. H. . . . 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 401 



Morse Institute, Natick, Mass. , 
Mount Holyoke College .... 
Nashua, N. H. — Mayor .... 
New Hampshire. — Insurance Commissioner 
" " Secretary of State . 

" " State Library 

New Hampshire Woman's Christian Temperance 

Union ....... 

New Haven, Conn. — Public Library . 
New Jersey. — State Library 

Nesmith, Miss A 

Newark, N. J. — Public Library . 
Newberry Library, Chicago, 111. 
Newton, Mass. — Free Library . 
Nickerson, S. D. 

Pawtucket, R. I. — Free Public Library 
Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. 
Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery 
Peoria, 111. — Public Library 
Portland, Oregon. — Library Association . 
Providence, R. I. — Public Library 
Reynolds Library, Rochester, N. Y. . 
Robbins Library, Arlington, Mass. 
Rochester, N. H. — Public Library 
St. Louis, Mo. — Mercantile Library . 

" " Public Free Library 

Salem, Mass. — Public Library . 
San Francisco, Cal. — Mercantile Library Associ 

ation ....... 

Sanborn Seminary, Kingston, N. H. . 
Scranton. Pa. — Public Library . 
Somerville, Mass. — Public Library 
Springfield, Mass. — City Library Association 
Staples, C. J. . 

United States. — Agricultural Department . 
" " Bureau of Education 

26 



5- 

t 

z 

I 
r 

2- 
I 

I' 

y 

3- 
1 

I 

2: 

I 

f 

2- 
2- 

r 

2- 
X 

2- 

114. 

s 



402 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



United States.- 


— Civil Service Commission 


I 


2 


< 




Coast Survey . . . . 


2 


4 


< 

e 




Commissioner of Patents . 
Fish Commission 


2 


2 


~t 




Interior Department 


140 


55 


■e 


[ a 


Labor Department . 


2 


I 


■4 


u 


Smithsonian Institution . 


2 


15 


-i 


( u 


State Department 
Treasury Department 


I 

4 


I 


11 u 


War Department 


2 


2 


University of Pennsylvania 




I 


" of Tennessee .... 




I 


Unknown 




2 


2 


Utica, N. Y.— 


Public Library . 




I 


Whittier, J. H. 






I 


Woburn, Mass 


— Public Library 




I 


Woodward, C 


M 




2 


Worcester, Mass. — Public Library 




I 



Periodicals Presented. 

•Catalogue of United States Public Documents. 
■Christian Science Journal. 
Home Market Bulletin. 
Jersey City Library Record. 
Manchester. — Advertiser. 

" Echo (High School). 

" Emerald. 

" Union. 

.Manifesto. 
Monthly Bulletin Bureau of American Republics. 

Notes and Queries. 

'Official Gazette of United States Patent Office. 

Plymouth Record. 

Reveil, Le. 

-Salem Public Library Bulletin. 

Tennessee University Magazine. 

Travelers Record. 

Veterans' Advocate. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

In compliance with the ordinance of said city the Overseers of 
the Poor herewith present their annual report for the year 1895 : 

The whole number of families that have received more or less 
assistance off the farm during the year has been eighty, consist- 
ing of four hundred persons, all of whom have a settlement in 
this city. Five of this number died during the year. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the city farm dur- 
ing the year has been three, more or less of the time. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the county farm 
during the year has been six, at a cost of two dollars per week 
for each pauper. 

The whole number of minor children supported at the State 
Industrial School during the year has been six, at a cost of one 
dollar and fifty cents per week for each minor child. 

In compliance with sections i and 2, chapter 116, Laws of the 
state of New Hampshire, passed at the January session, 1895, in 
relation to dependent minor children having a settlement in 
cities and towns, said dependent minor children having a settle- 
ment in this city are supported as follows : 

At St. Patrick's Orphans' Home, Hanover street, four, at a cost 
of one dollar and twenty-five cents per week for each minor 
child. 

At Notre Dame de Lourdes Home, in charge of the Gray 
Nuns, West Manchester, four minor children, at a cost of seventy- 
five cents per week for each minor child. 

405 



406 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



At the Orphans' Home, Franklin, one minor, at a cost of one 
dollar per week. 

At the residence of William Whelpley, 401 Cedar street, three 
minor children, at a cost of eighty-three cents per week for each 
minor child. 

At the residence of Agnes Masse, on Winter street, one minor 
child, at a cost of two dollars per week. 

At the residence of D. L. Robinson, Amoskeag, one minor 
child at a cost of one dollar and twenty-five cents per week. 

All of the said minor children have educational advantages. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the Old Ladies' 
Home, Hanover street, was two, at a cost of two dollars per 
week for each pauper. 

The overseers of the poor have given and allowed eight hun- 
dred and seventy-five orders to the paupers off the farm during 
the year. Said orders consisted chiefly of orders for groceries, 
fuel, medicine, board, and clothing, care, and emergencies. 

The whole amount allowed to the several persons who applied 
for assistance from time to time from the several wards of the 
city during the year, was as follows: 

Ward I 

2 . 



Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 



I244.50 
203.50 

453-70 
880.36 
2,540.90 
634.28 
211.09 
776.52 
690.00 



,634-85 



MISCELLANEOUS ' BILLS ALLOWED. 



State Industrial school, board of inmates 
Books and stationery 



,720.01 
37-87 



>757- 



Total cost 



^10,392.73 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OP THE POOR. 40T 

Cash received from the county of Hillsborough for 
board of inmates of State Industrial School and 
paid to the city treasurer . . . . • $2,3 77.5 r 

Total expense to the city .... $8,015.22: 

And there are uncollected bills due the city amounting to. 
eight hundred and fifty-seven dollars and fourteen cents- 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

William H. Maxwell, Ward i, 
Thomas L. Quimby, Ward 2, 
Benjamin F. Garland, Ward 3^ 
George S. Holmes, Ward 4, 
Patrick Costello, Ward 5, 
Charles Francis, Ward 6, 
William Marshall, Ward 7, 
Charles S. McKean, Ward 8, 
MoiSE Bessette, Ward 9, 
Overseas of the Poor for the City of Manchester^ 

A true copy. Attest : 

William H. Maxwell, 

Clerk. 



Aid to Soldiers, Sailors, and their Dependent 

Families. 

To the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

In compliance with sections i and 2, chapter 81, Laws of the 
state of New Hampshire, passed at the June session, 1S81, in* 
relation to indigent soldiers and sailors of the War of the Rebel- 
lion, the Overseers of the Poor herewith present their annual 
report under the head of " Aid to soldiers and sailors and their 
dependent families," for the year 1895. 



408 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The whole number of indigent soldiers and sailors who have 
had more or less assistance during the year has been four, con- 
sisting of four families, all of whom have a settlement in this 
•.city, at a total cost of ^421, 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

William H. Maxwell, Ward i, 
Thomas L. Quimby, Ward 2, 
Benjamin F. Garland, Ward 3, 
George S. Holmes, Ward 4, 
Patrick Costello, Ward 5, 
Charles Francis, Ward 6, 
William Marshall, Ward 7, 
Charles S. McKean, Ward 8, 
MoiSE Bessette, Ward 9, 
Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 

A true copy. Attest : 

William H. Maxwell, 

Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR, 



Office of Inspection of Milk, No. 1277 Elm Street. 

To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of 
Manchester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit the following re- 
port for the department of inspection of milk and butter for the 
year 1895. 

The result of the inspection of milk for the 5^ear ending Jan- 
uary 31, 1896, has on the whole been satisfactory. It has given 
the department a good understanding of how the work should 
be conducted, and the result of the inspections for the coming 
year will be as good as the present law will allow. 

On the first o'f every month the tests of the preceding month 
will be published in the city papers, giving the citizens a chance 
to see just what the character of the milk is the dealers bring 
into the city. 

During the year four dealers were brought before the court for 
not marking their vehicles as required by law, and fined, and this 
section will be strictly enforced the coming year. 

Upon entering upon the duties of this office, I found that the 
city owned only one whole instrument with which to test milk, 
but through the approval of the mayor, the necessary apparatus 
was purchased, and the property of the city held by this depart- 
ment at present is as follows : 

City records, milk grip, 10 pint cans, 5 evaporating dishes, i 
case containing lactoscope, thermometer, glass cylinder for cream 
test, etc., 2 packages filter paper, and 3 odd pieces of chemical 
apparatus. 

411 



412 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

LICENSES. 

The state law requires that every person who conveys milk in 
carriages or otherwise, for the purpose of selling the same, within 
the limits of the city, shall be licensed annually by the inspector 
of milk, and shall pay fifty cents each to the use of the city. 
Every person selling milk or offering it for sale in a store, booth, 
stand, or market place, shall pay fifty cents, which fee is paid but 
once, by the dealer in milk, and is not transferable. Each 
license records the name, residence, place of business, number of 
carriages or other vehicles used, the name and residence of every 
driver or other person engaged in carrying or selling, and the 
number of the license. The licensee is required to cause his 
name, the number of his license, and his place of business to be 
legibly placed on each outer side of all carriages or vehicles 
used by him in the sale of milk, and to report to the inspector 
any change of driver or other person employed by him which 
may occur during the term of the license. 

The provision that requires the name, place of business, and 
number of the license to be legibly placed on the outer side of 
all carriages or vehicles is very essential in establishing the own- 
ership of routes in case of sales or failure in taking out a license. 
By neglecting to do so the city secures a sure case against the 
evader for conveying milk without marking the vehicle with 
name, license, or place of business, or for carrying milk without 
a license, or both. The number of licenses issued during the 
year has decreased from the usual number, the tendency being 
for the larger routes to purchase the smaller ones and combine 
them. 

Number of licenses issued to dealers conveying milk by 
carriages or otherwise for purposes of sale . . . loo 

Number of new registration of storekeepers engaged in the 
sale of milk . . . . . . . .12 

Total number of licenses and registrations . .112 

Amount of money received for the same and turned over to 
the city treasurer, ^56. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 413 

THE MILK STANDARD. 

The state has fixed the standard of milk to prevent the adul- 
teration of the same, and it requires that to be of good standard 
quality milk must yield on analysis not more than eighty-seven 
per cent of watery fluid, nor less than thirteen per cent of milk 
solids. By many this standard is considered unnecessarily high, 
because many cows yield milk which falls below this limit. Cows 
of the Holstein breed, and others of no particular breed at all, 
yield milk wherein quality is sacrificed to quantity, but the mixed 
milk of the herd will almost invariably prove to be above the 
standard. The value of milk as a food is dependent on the 
amount of solid matter which it contains, and its quality in this 
respect is of very great importance in the rearing of infants and 
in help of invalids. 

The public has a right to demand that the milk supplied to 
them shall be of good average quality, and it is asserted that the 
present standard in New Hampshire is precisely this and no 
more. 

INSPECTION. 

Collections of samples for inspection are made on week days 
and frequently on Sundays. The time varies according to cir- 
cumstances, but most of them are made in the early morning and 
forenoon. The usual method of collecting samples is as follows : 
The inspector goes to the part of the city which he has selected 
the previous day and begins his work very early in the morning, 
usually about two or three o'clock. He carries a grip in which 
are sample cans each containing one pint, and at the time makes 
a series of memoranda as follows : The name on the wagon, 
license number, and the name of the driver in charge. As soon 
as he has collected a sufficient number of samples he proceeds to 
his office, where the necessary examination and analysis are made. 

SKIMMED MILK. 

No dealer in milk and no servant or agent of a dealer shall 
sell, exchange, or deliver, or have in his custody or possession 



414 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

with intent to sell, exchange, or deliver milk from which the 
cream or any part thereof has been removed, imless in a conspic- 
uous place above the center upon the outside of every vessel, can, 
or package from or in which such milk is sold, the words 
"skimmed milk" are distinctly marked in letters not less than 
one inch in length. There are few, if any, such marked cans in 
use in this city, and the opportunities for fraud in the sale of 
skimmed milk are considerable. The cost of marking cans as 
required by law is estimated not to exceed ten cents per can. 
This law has never been required to be fulfilled, and the dealers 
feel that if they put a sign upon the outside of the vehicle carry- 
ing the same, designating the character of the milk carried, they 
are fulfilling all that ought to be required of them. This may be 
true if only one kind of milk is carried, but where both are con- 
veyed together, I am of the opinion that the law should be ful- 
filled. I submit this important question to your consideration. 

TUBERCULOSIS. 

There was only one complaint from tuberculous cows, and it 
received prompt attention from this office. Through the advice 
of the mayor a veterinary surgeon was taken to Bedford, and 
after a thorough examination he pronounced the complaint erro- 
neous and substituted one of starvation, the owner giving as his 
reason that spring was near and he was feeding as lightly as pos- 
sible, as he did not propose to buy any more hay. 

The case was promptly dropped, as it was only a question 
which would give out first, the hay or the cows. 

OLEOMARGARINE. 

Under the present law where no license is required, it is almost 
impossible to detect the fraudulent sales of this article. Only 
one sale was contested, and after much controversy it was deemed 
best to drop the case. 

EDWARD C. SMITH, 

Inspector of Milk, 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

I herewith submit my report of such of the city poor as came 
under my care as city physician for the year ending December 
3^> 1895. 

Number of calls made, 893 ; number of cases treated, 88. 

Diseases treated : Aortic regurgitation, i ; anaemia, pernicious, 
I ; alcoholism, 5 ; bronchitis, chronic, 2 ; bronchitis, acute, 3 ; 
constipation, chronic, 5 ; confinement, i ; delirium tremens, 7 ; 
diphtheria, 2 ; dysmenorrhoea, 4 ; epilepsy^ 4 ; erysipelas, i ; in- 
sane, 3; la grippe, 4; indigestion, acute, 2; noma, i; phthisis 
pulmonalis, 7 ; pneumonia, 2 ; rheumatism, acute articular, 8 ; 
scarlet fever, 5 ; tabis dorcilis, i ; syphilis, 3. 

Cases requiring surgical treatment, 16: Incised wound of 
head, i ; incised wound of eyebrow, i ; incised wound of fin- 
ger, I ; incised wound of foot, i ; lacerated contused wound of 
head, 2 ; lacerated wound of head, 2; contused wound of eye, 
I ; compound comminuted fracture of both bones of nose, i ; 
fracture of lower jaw, i ; fracture of bones of foot, i ; dislo- 
cated shoulder, i ; caries of thigh bone, i ; cut throat, i ; ab- 
cess of foot, I. 

Twelve children were vaccinated. 

Number of deaths, 2 : Aortic regurgitation, i ; noma, i. 

FREDERICK PERKINS, M. D., 

City Physician. 

417 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR, 



Getitlemen of the City Councils : 

The City Solicitor reports as follows for the year 1895 : 
Of the cases pending in court January i, 1895, the following 
were disposed of during the year, viz.: Campbell &= Maxwell y. 
Manchester and Whittemo7-e and others v. Manchester, dismissed 
by the court ; W. E. Dunbar v. Alanchester, tried by jury, with 
a verdict in favor of the defendant ; Manchester v. Warren &= 
Beede, Clough v. Manchester, Auburn street case, Batchelder &= 
Clark v. Manchester, Butterfield v. Manchester, Page v. Man- 
chester, The Elliot Hospital v. Manchester, and Sevigny v. 
Manchester having been aajusted out of court. The other cases 
still stand upon the various dockets. 

During the year, at the request of.the city, the court approved 
the discontinuance of the Old Falls road between Belmont and 
East Spruce streets; and the following cases were begun or en- 
tered in the supreme court for Hillsborough county during the 
year, viz.: Maurice Grcaney v. Matichester, an action for dam- 
ages for injuries received while working as an employee in a sewer 
trench ; Julia Bresnahan v. Manchester, a suit for damages for 
injuries alleged to have been occasioned by improper blasting for a 
sewer trench; E. M. Boire, administrator of Joseph Desivchers v. 
Manchester, iox damages for injuries resulting in the death of 
Desrochers while employed at the city stone crusher. Frances 
B. Home filed a petition for leave to bring a claim for dam- 
ages for personal injuries, alleged to have been caused by a de- 
fective condition of Union street. Joseph Wilkins filed a peti- 
tion for leave to take an appeal from the award of damages 
made to him by the mayor and aldermen for land taken in lay- 

421 



422 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ing out Cypress street, the statutory time having expired. 

During the year many claims have been investigated and ad- 
justed in connection with the committee on claims or the 
mayor. 

The work of this office is of a very varied nature and grows 
in volume from year to year. The solicitor has endeavored, to 
the best of his ability, to respond to the many demands upon him 
made by the city councils, or either branch, by committees and 
city officials, the details of which it would be impossible to re- 
port, and which, if reported, would be of little interest to any- 
one. With the expression of thanks to all city officials for their 
courteous treatment during the past year, this report is 

Respectfully submitted. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORTS 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES 



CEMETERY FUND. 



REPORT 

OP THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

The sub-committee of the trustees of the Pine Grove ceme- 
tery submit the following report : 

During the past year the grounds have been well cared for, 
substantial improvements made in many directions, and the gen- 
eral appearance of the cemetery greatly improved. 

The iron fence on the east side has been extended in accord- 
ance with the plan heretofore adopted, of constructing not less 
than two hundred feet annually until the whole is inclosed. 

Landscape Lawn having all been sold, the demand for perpet- 
ual care lots in that vicinity now falls on Chapel Lawn, which 
will supply the call for this class of lots for some considerable 
time, while Riverside Lawn is already attracting attention in 
another part of the cemetery. 

The wisdom of providing lots of this character is already 
manifest in the splendid exhibit made by them, and it is a mat- 
ter of regret that other portions of the cemetery were not early 
placed under like restrictions. 

Special attention has been given to the " G. A. R. " lot and 
great improvement made in its appearance. 

The practice of selling lots in advance of grading has been 
discontinued, and none are now sold until prepared for occu- 
pancy. 

425 



426 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The "Field of Monesquo," the slumber ground of all who 
have no other provision for their final rest, has received special 
attention, and it is contemplated to make this locality bear tes- 
timony to the affection and regard in which we hold the dead, 
whatever of inequality may exist in life. 

C. H. BARTLETT, 

For the Committee. 



Valley Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the Valley cemetery respectfully submit 
the following report for the year 1895 • 

During the year, Mr. C. H. G. Foss, the superintendent, has, 
under the direction of the trustees, made the following improve- 
ments : 

The office and chapel have been painted two coats inside; 
two new water-closets have been put in to comply with the regu- 
lations ; the small water pipe on Pine avenue has been replaced 
by four hundred feet of two-inch and w^ater has been taken to 
five lots ; two flights of steps, extending from the valley to Pine 
path, have been reset and concreted between the steps ; the grad- 
ing on the south bank of the valley has been completed ; a stone 
gutter has been built from the bridge, up the hill, on the Chest- 
nut-street side. 

The sub-trustees have held three regular meetings during the 
year. They believe the work of the superintendent and his em- 
ployees has been faithfully and well performed, and they espe- 
cially commend Mr. Foss for his fidelity, his courtesy, and his 
ability. 

There have been Si burials ; placed in tomb, 80. 

MATERIAL USED. 

Loads loam ........ 102 

Loads sand ........ 150 

Feet turf ........ 2,250 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



427 



Cords manure ....... 4 

Yards concrete laid ...... 234 

Feet 2-inch pipe laid ...... 400 

The following amount was collected and paid to the city 
treasurer 



For water 


$317-5" 


Care of lots . 


653.48 


Sundries 


340.26 


Tomb fees 


291.50 


Interments 


205.00 


Removals 


6.50 




gi, 814.24 


• 


Respectfully submitted. 




S. P. CANNON, 




BUSHROD W. HILL, 




JOHN L. SANBORN, 




Sub- Trustees of Valley Cemetery. 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the Amoskeag Cemetery respectfully sub- 
mit the following report : 

With the small appropriation annually given to this cemetery, 
but little can be done except to keep it mown and presentable. 
During the year one hundred and fifty loads of gravel have been 
drawn for paths without cost to the city except for the labor of 
hauling. The fence has been kept in repair except a piece about 
one hundred and forty feet in length where a new fence is needed 
at once. It has been thought advisable to make a beginning at 
this point for an iron fence. This recommendation would be 
respectfully made by the sub-trustees. Another need of the cem- 
etery is an extension of the water pipe to the center of the 



428 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 

grounds, a distance of about two hundred and twenty feet. At 
present the end of the pipe is on one side. 

The lots have been mown three times during the season and 
paths raked and kept clean. 

There have been ten burials in this cemetery during the year 
1895. 

EBEN CARR, 
JAMES E. BAILEY, 
WILLIAM H. HUSE, 
Sub- Trustees of Amoskeag Cemetery. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you the annual report of 
the money received during the year ending December 31, 1895 : 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Number of deeds delivered during the year, sixty-two. 

To cash received for the same . . $2,848.12 
interest " t: n _ _ 30.19 

cash received from superintendent . 2,321.05 



$5>i99-36 



Cr. 



By treasurer's receipts, S. B. Putnam . $2,000.00 

" " F. L. Allen . 878.31 

superintendent's receipts . . . 2,321.05 



$5>i99-36 



Valley Cemetery. 

To cash received from superintendent . $1,814.24 
cash received from F. L. Allen, treas- 
urer ...... 19.00 

^i>S33.24 

429 



430 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Cr. 



By superintendent's receipts . . . ^1,814.24 
treasurer's receipts .... 19.00 

^1,833-24 

Respectfully submitted. 

FRED L. ALLEN, 

Treasiirer. 



I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of Fred L. 
Allen, treasurer of the trustees of cemeteries, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched for. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

Auditor. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund present 
their sixteenth annual report, including the report of the treas- 
urer, showing in detail the administration of the fund for the 
year ending December 31, 1895. 

The amount held for the benefit of lots in the respective ceme- 
teries will be found therein stated, as well as the increase of the 
fmid during the past year, which is highly gratifying. 

The trustees have established the price requisite for the proper 
care of lots at forty cents per foot ; the minimum, however, to be 
jgioo for any lot. 

The price is fixed at this low figure in order that persons of 
limited means, as well as the rich, may avail themselves of the 
privilege of the perpetual care of the last and final resting place 
of all mankind, but the committee believe that this sum wisely 
and economically administered, will satisfactorily answer the pur- 
pose intended. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 
OTIS BARTON, 
CHARLES H. BARTLETT, 

Trustees of Ccinetery Fund. 
431 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit to you the thirteenth annual 
report of the funds received and expenses paid to December 31, 
1895 : 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January i, 1895, ^24,229 00 
Receipts during the year : 



A. D. Buzzell 




$164.70 


Eunice J. Willand 




198.00 


Mrs. C. M. Prout . 




J0S.75 


Moses French 




342.94 


Mary Parrett 




75.00 


Sadie Harley 




75.00 


Jennie C. Thompson and Katie 


Den- 




your ..... 




127.60 


John M. Johnson . 




140.25 


Rufus K. Pike estate 




334-78 


Mrs. Myra D. Whittemore 




97.70 


John Milligan 




119.62 


Louisa D. Glines . 




127.60 


Claris Hadley 




179.S9 


George W. Haselton 




68.44 


Louise S. Paradise 




125-75 


Isaac W. Smith 




296.16 


Edward Wagner . 




53°-44 


Sarah B. Carley estate . 




150.00 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUND. 



48a 



From Mrs. Nancy P. Nichols 
Joseph Beddows . 
Stephen and Thomas Wiggin 
Martha J. Emery estate 
F. M. Hoyt . 



$70.70 
340.22 
131.96 
147.80 
379-59 



$4,332-89. 



Total permanent fund December 31, 1895 • $28,561.89. 



Income on hand January i, 1895 
Income during the year . 

Expenses paid during the year : 
Balch & Austin 
J. B. Varick Co. . 
Stark Mills .... 
B. A. Stearns, superintendent 
Cash on hand 



$1,540.75 
1,238.48 



$25.00 
22.60 

12.3s 

615.00 

2,104.28 



$2,779-23-. 



!2;779-23; 



Valley Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January i, 1895, $7,649.23, 
Received during the year : 
From Oliver T. Richardson estate 
Frederick Smyth . 



Mrs. Maria A. Fogg 
S. W. and J. E. Parsons 



$200.00 
1,000.00 
300.00 
300.00 
128.00 
400.00 



Total permanent fund December 31, 1895 . 

Income on hand January i, 1895 . . $646.89 
Income received during the year . . 393-96 



$2,328.00- 



),977-2S 



$1,040.85 



434 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Expenses paid during the year : 




Palmer & Garmon 


$6.25 


R. P. Stevens .... 


12.00 


C. H. G. Foss, superintendent 


164.37 


Cash on hand .... 


858.23 



^1,040.85 



Piscataquog Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January 31, 1895 ^300.00 

Income on hand January i, 1895 . . ^61.08 

Income received during the year . . 15-00 

^76.08 

Total permanent fund December 31, 1895 . ^376.08 
Expenses paid during the year : 

C. A. Rowell ^4.00 

<' <' 7.00 

" " ..... 7.00 

Cash on hand ..... 58.08 

^76.08 



Merrill Cemetery. 
Amount of permanent fund on hand January i, 1895 ^200.00 
Received during the year : 
From Cleaves N. Hardy, treasurer .... ^287.89 



Income on hand January i, 1895 . . ^20.75 
Income during the year . . . . 12.08 



^487.89 

^32-83 

FRED L. ALLEN, 

Treasurer Cejuetery Fund. 



REPORT OP TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUND. 435 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts 
of Fred L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the cemetery fund, 
embracing the receipts and expenditures for the year 1895, and 
I find the same correct and properly vouched. I have also ex- 
amined the securities in which said fund is invested, and find as 
follows r 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

5 per cent, 1913 . . . . . $14,700.00 
5 per cent, 1942 ..... 12,000.00 
Cash on hand ..... 1,861.89 



Total amount of bonds and cash . . . ^28,561.89 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

5 per cent, 1913 ..... $4,800.00 

5 per cent, 1942 ..... 4,000.00 

Cash on hand ..... 1,177.23 



Total amount of bonds and cash . . . $9,977-23 

PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

5 per cent, 1913 . . . . . $300.00 

Cash on hand ..... 76.08 



Total amount of bonds and cash . . . $376.08 

.MERRILL CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

5 per cent, 1913 $200.00 

5 per cent, 1942 ..... 250.00 

Cash on hand ..... 37-89 

Total amount of bonds and cash . . . $487.89 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

Auditor. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



To the Trustees of the Sinking Fund : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the third annual 
report of the receipts of this board for the year ending December 
3i> iS95- 
Total amount of fund Jan. i, 1895, ^^^ 

the payment of improvement bonds . ^5,202.00 

Appropriation for 1894 . . . . 5,000.00 

Income received during the year . . 402.50 



Expenses during the year : 


^1<J,UU^.5V^ 


Bonds on hand January i, 1895 


. ^5,000.00 


Bonds bought during the year 


5,000.00 


Premium on bonds 


381.85 


Cash on hand .... 


222.65 




$10,604.50 



Total amount of fund January i, 1895, 

for the payment of water bonds . . $13,145.15 
Water-works, hydrant service, 1894 . 13,925.00 

Income received during the year . . 1,127.10 

$28,197.25 

439 



440 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Expenses during the year : 
^Bonds on hand January i, 1895 . . ^8,000.00 
^Bonds bought during the year . . 18,000.00 
Premium on bonds . . ... 1,374.66 

■Cash on hand ..... 822.59 

^28,197.25 

FRED L. ALLEN, 

Treasurer Sinking Fu7id. 



This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts 
■of Fred L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the sinking fund, 
■embracing the receipts and expenditures for the year ending 
December 31, 1895, and find the same correct and properly 
vouched. I have also examined the securities in which said 
fund is invested, and find as follows : 

For the payment of improvement bonds. 
Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. : 

4 per cent 1913 bonds .... $5,000.00 
4 per cent 19 14 bonds .... 5,000.00 
'Cash on hand December 31, 1895 • • 222.65 



110,222.65 



For the payment of water bonds. 
Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. : 

4 per cent 1913 bonds .... $8,000.00 
-4 per cent 191 4 bonds .... 18,000.00 
Cash on hand December 31, 1895 . . 822.59 



$26,822.59 

Total amount of sinking fund, December 31, 1895 . $37,045.24 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

Auditor. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE. 



To the Honorable Board of Police Commissioners : 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordinances, I 
would respectfully submit the following report of all cases which 
have been brought before the police court, and their results, 
from January i, 1895, to January i, 1896 

Assault .......... 83 

Aiding boy to escape from Industrial School . . i 

Assault on officer ....... 3 

A.ssault with intent to kill ..... i 

Adultery ......... 14 

Admitting minors into saloon ..... i 

Assault with intent to rape ..... 3 

Breaking and entering ...... 29 

Begging 4 

Breaking glass ........ 6 

Common seller of spirituous liquor 
Cruelty to animals . 
Drunk .... 

Disorderly conduct . 

Defacing buildings . 

Disorderly house 

Driving over hose at fires . 

Discharging firearms in street 

Evading carfare 

Exposure of person . 

Embezzlement 

Forgery .... 



3 

>557 
II 

4 

7 
I 
I 

I 
I 
2 



443 



444 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Fornication 

Fast driving 

Gambling 

Idle person 

Impersonating an ofificer 

Incest 

Injuring personal property 

Keeping malt, liquor for sale 

Keeping malt liquor for sale, second offense 

Keeping liquor for sale . 

Keeping liquor for sale, second offense 

Keeping open on Sunday 

Keeping gambling house . 

Keeping dogs unmuzzled . 

Larceny from the person . 

Larceny . . . . ". 

Murder 

Malicious injury .... 

Non-support ..... 

Noise and brawl .... 

No name or number on milk team . 

Obstructing an officer 

Over-driving ..... 

Obscene and profane language . 

Obtaining goods by false pretenses . 

Obstructing sidewalk 

Obtaining money under false pretenses 

Offering tainted meat for sale . 

Putting salt on horse railroad track . 

Peddling without a license 

Playing ball in streets 

Passing a forged order 

Permitting gambling 

Present when gambling . 

Riding bicycle on sidewalk 

Rescue of prisoner .... 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE. 



445 



Receiving stolen goods . 
Running away from house of c 
Selling malt liquor . 
Stealing a ride 


orrect 


ion 






4 

lO 

15 
I 


Selling liquor . 
Selling leased property 
Stubborn child 










13 
I 

3 


Selling cigarettes to minors 
Tramps .... 
Throwing garbage in street 
Violating fish and game laws 










15 
17 

4 


Total . . . . 


^,018 



The foregoing cases were disposed of as follows : 

Paid fine imposed . . . . . . . 1,544 

Committed to the house of correction for non-pay- 
ment of fines ....... 789 

Committed to the house of correction on sentence . 116 

Committed to jail for non-payment of fine . . 72 

Committed to jail on sentence ..... 7 

Committed to the State Industrial School ... 8 

Bound over for their appearance at the supreme court 47 

Committed to jail, bail not furnished . . . 130 
Committed to the county house of correction at Goffs- 

town ......... 50 

Continued for sentence ...... 15 

Sentence suspended . ...... 113, 

Appealed 55 

Nol pressed . . . . . . . . 32 

Discharged ........ 35 

Committed to jail, no bail ..... i 

Paid fine, costs remitted ...... i 

Whole number arrests ...... 3,736 

Whole number females ...... 336 

Whole number males ...... 3,400 

Nol pressed on payment of costs .... i 



446 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Paid costs ..... 
Whole number admitted for lodging 
Accidents reported .... 
Assisted out-of-town officers 
Buildings found open, and secured . 
Cases investigated .... 
Cases cruelty to animals investigated 
Defective streets and sidewalks reported 
Disturbances suppressed . 
Dogs killed . . . 
Dogs lost and found 

Dangerous dogs, notice served to owners 
Fires discovered and alarms given . 
Fires extinguished without an alarm . 
Injured and sick persons assisted 
Intoxicated persons taken home 
Lights extinguished in buildings 
Lights furnished for dangerous places 
Lost children returned to their parents 
Money or other stolen property recovered 
Money or other lost property recovered 
Nuisances abated .... 
Search warrants for liquor served, none found 
Search warrants for stolen goods served 
Stray teams put up . 
Street obstructions removed 



5 

1^389 

29 

73 
665 

1,310 

23 

100 

620 

25 
16 

14 
12 

27 

245 
So 
81 

112 
$9,861.52 

^1,171-95 

43 

30 

12 

128 

169 

The following amount has been received for fines and costs 
imposed by the police court from January i, 1895, to January 
I, 1896, $62,008.88. 

Respectfully submitted. 

M. J. HEALY, 

C/u'e/ of Police. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE 
ON CITY FARM. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY 

FARM. 



To his Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of Man- 
chester : 

Gentlemen, — The Joint Standing Committee on City Farm 
hereby submit to you their annual rej^ort for the year ending 
December 31, 1895 : 

Having fairly and impartially appraised all personal properly 
at the farm, we find the summary as follows : 

Live stock . . . . . 
Wagons, carts, and team furnishings 
Hay, grain, and produce 
Household furniture 
Provisions and fuel .... 
Farming implements 



Total . 

By cash received from farm 
permanent improvements 
increase in stock 



Total number weeks board 
Average cost per week 
Total number prisoners . 

29 



Cr. 



^2,484.00 

1,420.00 

4.056.00 

2,592.02 

665.00 

957.75 



;^i2, 174.77 

^4,658.02 

1,000.00 

102.40 

$5,760.42 

3,014 4-17 

;^o.79 7-10 

905 



449 



450 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Following is a list of crops harvested the past season, not in- 
cluding the amount used during the summer and fall: 



Squash 
Cabbage . 
Meadow hay 
Straw 
Field corn 
Hay 

Pop corn 
Sweet corn 
Oats 

Potatoes . 
Corn on cob 
Beans 
Parsnips . 
Blood beets 
Turnips . 
Carrots . 
Mangold wurtzels 



The labor done which constitutes the permanent improve- 
ment outside, this year, is as follows : 

Removing stone walls, clearing of pasture and sprout lands, 
filling and grading in and outside of highways, setting of trees, 
digging and carting away stone, digging stumps, etc. 

Removing stone wall south of building in the orchard, (i8o 
feet long, 2 feet thick, and 35 feet high). 

Removing a double wall running north and south from the 
buildings to Bridge street (a distance of 800 feet). 

These stones were buried and graded over with gravel, thus 
making a nice sidewalk and adding to the beauty of the fields 
on both sides of the road. 

The lands which have been put into better condition are : 

Twenty acres of land west of the Mammoth road. 





2 tons 




10 " 




12 " 




15 " 




35 " 


100 " 


25 


bushels 


ICO 


(( 


236 


(( 


700 


(( 


1,400 


a 


3 


barrels 


25 


<( 


4,000 


pounds 


20,000 


(( 


20,000 


iC 


23,000 


(( 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 451 

Four acres of pasture land has been broken up and sowed with 
corn. 

Six acres of sprout land on the north side of Bridge-street ex- 
tension, planted with potatoes. 

Stone buried south of barn and grading the side sloping to 
the highway. 

The larger stones which accumulated were given to cellar 
contractors for removal, as the city farm had no place or use for 
them. 

The sanitary arrangements have been greatly improved. Three 
water-closets have been put in in the house in place of the old 
vaults, as the latter were deemed a nuisance by the committee- 
The wash-tubs have all been piped with city water. 

A sewer put in the barn cellar 200 feet in length. Another 
to drain the barnyard 150 feet in length, and run across the 
Mammoth road into the field. 

During the past year the barn has been twice thoroughly white- 
washed, the roof of the ice-house patched, a new floor put in the 
boiler room, the kitchen painted and store-room papered, new 
floors in the halls and the house whitewashed throughout. 

SCAVENGER SERVICE. 

The scavenger service requires three single teams with an aver- 
age of almost two loads a day per team. 

The best of the garbage is used as food for pigs, and the re- 
mainder is put upon the fields as a fertilizer. 

Few complaints have reached the committee the past year, 
and all complaints have received prompt attention from Super- 
intendent Libby. 

Respectfully submitted. 

R. J. Barry, Chairman, 
George W. Reed, 
William F. Elliott, 
John Gildard, 
Carl E. Rydin, Clerk^ 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor : 

The following is submitted by the Board of Health as its re- 
port for the year 1895 : 

Mr. William K. Robbins was appointed to the board, and 
began his duties February i, taking the place of Mr. Joseph B. 
Sawyer, whose term of office expired at that date. The board 
was organized with Neil F. Starr, M. D., as chairman, and Wil- 
liam K. Robbins, M. Sc, as clerk. Very soon after its organiza- 
tion it caused the following letter, signed by each member of the 
board, to be sent to Mr. Sawyer and published in th^ daily pa- 
pers : 

" Mr. Joseph B. Sawyer having served the city of Manchester 
for the past ten years as a member of the board of health, we, its 
present members, desire to give expression to the esteem and good 
will in which we hold him, and our appreciation of the valuable 
services he has rendered the public during these years. For the 
entire time he has been the efficient clerk of the board, and its 
records have been scrupulously "kept. He, with Dr. Hoitt and 
the late Dr. Webster, constituted Manchester's first health offi- 
cials. Having faithfully served the board through its darkest 
days, when public opinion was somewhat averse to the introduc- 
tion of sanitary methods, too high an estimate of his conscien- 
tious work cannot be made. All his services have been charac- 
terized by an impartiality and fearlessness in right doing which 
has won our highest esteem, and we unite our heartiest good 
wishes that long years of future usefulness and happiness may be 
his. It will be a pleasure to put this expression on our records 
and forward Mr. Sawyer a copy." 

455 



456 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



EXPENDITURES. 

The expenditures have been as follows 

Salaries ...... 

Labor ...... 

Printing and advertising . 

Postage and envelopes 

Street-car fares .... 

Teams ...... 

Pest-house, board, fuel, etc. 

Board of horse .... 

Telephone service .... 

Office expenses 

Legal expenses .... 

Contagious diseases (outside of pest-house) 
Disinfectants ..... 

Annual inspection Lake Massabesic . 
Sundries ..... 



gooo.oo 

2,653.00 

226.71 

122.50 

71.00 

70.00 

55-84 
54.86 

33-3° 

35-05 
17.04 
21.19 
11.85 
12.00 
12.42 



Total $3)996-76 

This leaves a balance of $3.24 of the appropriation unex- 



■pended. 



MEETINGS. 



The increasing amount of work coming under the direction of 
the department has made frequent meetings and inspections 
necessary, and early in the summer it was decided that a weekly 
meeting should be held. Since that time the board has been at 
the office every Wednesday evening, with one or two exceptions, 
for the transaction of such business as came to its attention. 
The usual number of special meetings have been held, and fre- 
quent trips or inspection tours have been taken. 

INSPECTORS. 

The same inspectors have been retained as during last year. 
Owing to the change in the law by which burial permits are 
granted by the board of health, it has been necessary to keep Mr. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 457 

Clough in the office eight hours per day, thus throwing a larger 
proportion of the outside work into Mr. Looney's care. Mr. 
Barry is still specially detailed to attend to the enforcement of 
the plumbing regulations. 

ABATEMENT OF NUISANCES. 

The work of cleaning and removing privy-vaults, caring for 
sink-water, and abating other nuisances has been surrounded by 
the same conditions as in previous years, and the manner of pro- 
cedure in such cases has not been materially changed. As in 
former years, the substitution of water-closets for privy-vaults has 
been pushed as fast as conditions would warrant. The more 
densely populated portion of the city is now almost free from 
privy -vaults, and the work in the residential portion has made 
good progress. 

SEWERS. 

The board would be pleased to see every street in the city 
supplied with a sewer, but it realizes the immensity of the under- 
taking, and it is much gratified with the progress now being 
made. The board would, however, earnestly recommend that 
the collection of a fee for entering sewers be abolished. Many 
people feel it an injustice to be compelled to pay for entering a 
sewer that their property has already been taxed to help con- 
struct. The cost of putting in a plumbing system is no light 
burden to many householders, and when this improvement is 
forced upon them by the action of the board the increase in ex- 
pense due to the fee often puts the citizen to so much trouble as 
to cause what was intended as a benefit to become a hardship. 
This fee has been used several times as an excuse that action be 
deferred until the householder becomes better able financially to 
bear the expense, and in many cases it has operated to the detri- 
ment and delay of needed improvements. 

PLUMBING. 

Another year's experience with the plumbing regulations has 
confirmed our belief in their usefulness and necessity. The pre- 



458 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ceding year's experience and observation had taught us that some 
changes were necessary, and such changes were put in force early 
in the season. The results have been satisfactory. Several citi- 
zens have asked to be allowed to infringe upon the regulations, 
alleging as an excuse that the substances to be thrown into the 
fixtures were only clean water or something equally harmless. 
Such people have been instructed that the danger from defective 
plumbing is not in the matter that goes into the drains, but from 
the gas that is generated in and rises from the pipes and sewers. 
The men engaged in the business are, as a rule, self-respecting 
and honest, and their work is a credit to the trade. The law as 
at present construed allows any one who registers at the office of 
the board of health to engage in the business, and occasionally 
someone who is incompetent from lack of knowledge and expe- 
rience, attempts to pursue the occupation. The work done by 
such "plumbers" is far from satisfactory. There are others, 
happily few in number, who understand their business and are 
fairly good workmen, but who are dishonest and endeavor to 
defraud their customers with work or material not up to the 
standard. The board hopes in time to have the advantage of 
such measures as will enable them to determine the fitness of an 
applicant for registration, and also to weed out the dishonest 
and incompetent already engaged in the business. 

TENEMENT BLOCKS. 

The most difficult and unsatisfactory work of the board of 
health relates to tenement blocks. Such blocks are usually built 
so as to secure the greatest number of rooms on the land occu- 
pied. The plumbing and ventilation are of secondary consider- 
ation. Bedrooms not directly connected with the outer atmo- 
sphere but whose light and air must come through other rooms 
are a common occurrence. Plumbing fixtures are designed to 
occupy dark corners or out-of-the-way places where the room 
cannot be conveniently utilized in any other way. Water-clos- 
ets especially are liable to become nuisances if not well lighted 
and ventilated. This bad arrangement is not the result of acci- 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 459 

dent but the plans are drawn and accepted, showing conclusively 
that it is the intention of the builder to so construct the block. 
The board has vigorously protested during the past season 
against such a manifest disregard of sanitary laws, but its power 
is limited in the matter and at best it can only enforce such few 
suggestions as slightly improve but do not remedy the evil. We 
would therefore earnestly recommend that there should be some 
authority to pass upon the plans of such buildmgs before their 
construction is commenced, and insist that such important mat- 
ters as sanitation and ventilation be properly arranged for. 

Eleven old blocks or buildings have been ordered put into 
sanitary condition during the past year. The board has met 
with considerable opposition in its efforts in this direction. 
Many of the tenement blocks were erected before sanitary 
plumbing had become so important a factor in the arrangement 
of our dwelling places, and such blocks are not constructed so as 
to properly protect traps, etc., from frost when they are pro- 
vided. While the board realizes this to be partly true it cannot, 
in justice to itself and the occupants of tenements of such 
blocks, allow such occupation of tenements it believes to be un- 
sanitary. It will therefore continue its present policy in such 
matters. 

DISPOSAL OF WASTES. 

The city dumps have been inspected several times and the 
board fully Realizes that a proper disposal of a city's waste is a 
problem that requires much patient effort to solve. At present 
the material sent to the dump consists mostly of ashes, old plas- 
ter, leaves, grass, limbs of trees, old wooden and paper boxes, 
and papers mixed with such swill and other perishable matter as 
finds its way into the scavenger's cart. This is dumped into some 
ravine at a point where a street is to be built and a thin layer of 
soil spread on top. The mass, consisting as it does of matter 
that is in part perishable, in time decomposes and a gas is gen- 
erated that finds its way out through the sides which are not cov- 
ered. This gas is, we believe, unwholesome and it is certainly 



460 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

unpleasant to the sense of smell. The mass also settles as it de- 
composes and in time the roadway sinks and holes are formed 
that have to be filled with soil or road material. The board be- 
lieves that the same labor that is expended in caring for the 
dump would be better engaged in separating the wood, grass, 
paper, and in fact any combustible perishable matter from the 
ashes and miperishable matter and in burning the former. The 
ashes resulting from such burning could be thrown in with the 
imperishable wastes and the result would be a mass of material 
that would not cause offense by decomposing nor would the 
roadway thus made need more than the ordinary repair. 

The city farm teams have continued to collect the swill, etc. 
Part of it is fed to swine and the rest is plowed into the soil for 
manure. Both the collection and disposal have been done in a 
satisfactory manner. A considerable amount of swill is collected 
by private parties, and many of them do their work in a fairly 
neat and creditable way. There are some, however, who arrange 
to go ahead of the city teams and cull over the swill in the 
buckets, transferring the better part of it to their wagons. This 
is unfair to the city farm. That of course is a small matter, but 
many of the drivers facilitate their selection by turning the swill 
in the receptacle onto the ground, and do not properly clean up 
the same before they leave. This swill left on the ground cre- 
ates a nuisance that is finally removed by the scavenger service 
cart, which takes it to the dump there to become a source of 
offense to the residents in the immediate vicinity. It would be 
well if some means were devised to place the private swill gath- 
erers under better control, and an ordinance to that effect would 
be appreciated by the board. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



461 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 



The following table shows the number of contagious diseases 
reported during each month of the year and the deaths result- 
ing therefrom : 



Months. 



January ... 
February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October.... 
November. 
December.. 

Total. 



Membra- 
neous 
croup. 





06 










<u 


eS 


a 





o 


U 



Diph- 
theria. 



Typhoid 
fever. 





in 




.a 








d 


eS 





« 






Measles. 



Scarlet 
fever. 



Totals, 



O 

22 
13 
4 
15 
42 
15 
28 
23 
37 
26 
. 20 
15 

260 



462 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The table following, which contains the number of cases of 
contagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom during the 
past eleven years, is put in for the purpose of comparison. 





Mem- 
braneous 
croup. 


Diphthe- 
ria. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Measles. 


Totals. 


Years. 




CO 

0) 


CD 

<v 
O 


C3 
O 

R 


to 
® 
to 

d 
O 


(0 

Q 


to 


to 

d 

a; 
Q 


m 

d 
O 


to 

ft 


in 

a} 
to 
d 
O 


to 

d 
P 


1885 


* 


* 


* 


18 


* 


20 


* 


5 


* 


36 


* 


79 


1886 


* 


« 


* 


9 


* 


12 


* 




* 


5 


* 


26 


1887 


* 


* 


73 


17 


28 


18 


94 


4 


* 


9 


* 


48 


1888 


* 


* 


126 


30 


35 


12 


44 


1 


187 


9 


392 


52 


1889 


* 


* 


79 


23 


36 


16 


259 


5 


54 


4 


428 


48 


1890 


* 


* 


41 


9 


36 


17 


63 


3 


298 


6 


438 


35 


1891 


* 


«t 


21 


2 


76 


18 


25 




■89 


2 


211 


22 


]8»2 


* 


* 


26 


5 


33 


11 


44 


2 


451 


11 


554 


29 


1893 


* 


« 


7 1 1 


79 


15 


110 


5 


212 


2 


408 


23 


1894 


12 


12 


42 


11 


74 


21 


67 


3 


223 


8 


418 


55 


1895 


17 


11 


47 


n 


73 


21 


55 4 


68 


1 


260 


48 



*No returns made during this year. 

By a glance at the above tables, it will be seen that the num- 
ber of cases of contagious and infectious diseases was less during 
the year than for any of the three preceding years. It will also 
be noticed that the decrease is due to the falling off in the num- 
ber of cases of measles rather than to a diminished number of 
the more dangerous contagious and infectious diseases. The 
number of cases of diphtheria, scarlet fever, and typhoid fever, 
and the deaths therefrom, have been normal. The regulations 
for the restriction and prevention of such diseases have been 
amended so as to be more effective and the inspectors have been 
ordered to be particularly efficient in their enforcement. Such 
an enforcement is sometimes the cause of considerable inconven- 
ience to people living in houses where such diseases exist. The 
department has seen to it, however, that all such people were 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 463 

supplied with the actual necessities of life. The expense in- 
curred, when small, has been paid for from the appropriation for 
this department. When the amount called for was too large to 
warrant its being so disposed of the cases were referred to the 
overseers of the poor. This latter disposition of such cases has 
been unsatisfactory and unjust because the recipient of such help 
becomes, in the legal sense, a pauper and, if a citizen, is de- 
prived of his right to vote. Through the recommendation of 
this board the city councils have increased the appropriation at 
the disposal of the department for 1896, and it is probable that 
in future all such cases can be attended to in a manner that will 
cause no hardship to result therefrom. 



464 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DEATH EETURNS. 

TABLE SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES 
AND BY MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1895. 



Causes of Death. 


P 


3 
1^ 


p 

s 


ft 
< 




0) 

c 

1-5 


>> 

s 


(O 

3 
SB 
3 
< 


ft 

03 


o 

O 


CI 

.a 
o 

S5 


■a 

o 




i 

o 






















1 




I 


2 




















1 


1 






I 




















1 


Abscesses and perit'nitis 
























1 












3 












3 


** comp'und frac- 




I 




















1 


crusliing of ab- 












1 


"i' 


.... 






1 














I 




2 


** fracture neck 




1 


















1 


fract're of skull 
" killed by cars.. 

" poisoninjr 

" rupture j'jun'm 
" sh'ck from el'c- 
















1 




I 




2 


1 


1 

1 














2 








1 


1 












3 
















I 

1 


1 
























1 


Albuminuria from preg- 










I 
I 














1 


























1 




2 


I 


4 

1 




1 


1 


2 


2 


2 






Ifi 








1 


Aorta, spleen & kidney, 








1 

2 
2 
















1 


Apoplexy 


I 


2 "V 


. . . . 


2 
I 


1 


3 


2 


1 

I 






15 










It 
















1 




1 

"i' 


1 
1 








1 












S 


" and influenza.. 
Bladder, ulceration of... 
Bowels, dyspepsia of... 












1 


1 




















1 




















1 










1 














1 


" inflammation of 












1 




I 

I 








3 
















1 


















I 








1 


Brain, congestion of 






2 


4 






I 
1 






I 
1 


.... 


9 


3 

1 


1 

1 


I 


7 














3 


5 




















1 












I 
1 
1 






I 
I 

1 








/) 


















I 


s 


" acute 




2 




2 


2 




1 


1 




n 






1 










1 
4 


I 
5 














2 




4 


7 


4 


5 

I 
1 


2 


1 


3 


"i' 


5 


3 


43 




2 


" capillary ... 
'< chronic 


3 


2 
2 


1 










I 






in 




I 


.... 


4 


1 














1 








1 










1 








">, 










I 












"i" 


2 


" of liver 




1 








1 


3 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH, 
TABLE. — Cotiti?iued. 



465 



Causes of Death. 


>> 

S 

s 

B 
<A 


3 




a 
< 




^71 


'pi 

3 
1-5 


3 
< 


g 

s 

a 


s 

1 

o 
O 


a 

> 

o 


.a 

s 

o 

P 




Cancer, ovarian 
























1 




" of rectum 




















3 








1 


1 










3 


2 


1 


1 
1 


1 






1 




1 










1 






















2 


4 


iJ7 


56 
2 


32 


11 


3 


1 
















Complication of diseases 


1 












1 




























1 


2 


1 


"i 


2 


1 




1 




2 


1 








Croup, membraneous — 


3 


1 




1 




1 


"i' 


1 




3 
1 


"i' 


















1 


.... 


1 










" clironic 




































1 
1 

5 
1 












Debility 




2 


3 

1 


2 

1 


2 

1 


3 

2 


1 

1 


1 1 1 










1 




2 

1 


1 






Diarrhea 




" acute dyspeptic 














1 












1 










































1 












1 








1 
1 






... 






























1 
3 








2 










4 
1 
1 














1 


2 






" & pneumonia 
















Dropsy 


























Dysentery 












2 


.... 


3 


2 

1 




























Eclampsia puerperal. . . . 










1 












1 




Enceplialitis 


















1 




























2 

1 






1 
















1 


1 
1 












1 












Entero colitis 












2 












Epilepsy 








1 




















1 


















1 








1 






















1 








1 
1 

1 








1 


1 






" septic 




2 

1 


i' 


J 
1 

1 














1 




3 


5 


5 


2 


2 






















1 












" diphtheritic... 












1 














Gastritis 


1 














1 






















1 

1 


















4 


1 


2 
















" and cerebral men- 




1 
1 














" and heart disease.. 




1 
1 


1 














































1 




















" and typhoid fever.. 






1 
1 




















Harelip and cleft palate. 


























Head, malformation of.. 














1 












Heart, fatty degenei-a- 
tion of 


1 

























1 
1 

12 
3- 
1 

146 
2 
2- 
1 

12 
1 

11 
3 
2 
1 
I 

16 

15 
2 

1 

1 
1 

2 
1 
3 

1(V 
1 
1 
7 
1 



30 



466 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE.— Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


►A 

S 
a 

1-5 


p 


p 

5 
s 


P< 
< 


& 
S 


4) 

a 

3 
i-s 


s 

1-S 


St 

3 
< 


s 
s 

ST 

IB 


0) 

o 

u 


0) 

s 

o 
'A 


s 


1 





8 


4 

1 


4 
1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


2 


4 


4 


11 


6 


50 


& Bright's 


9 






1 
















1 








1 


















1 








1 
1 


















1 




1 
1 

1 

i 


3 


4 


3 


2 






4 








IS 














1 


" & ulceration 
























1 


" bronchopul- 
monary. .. 
















1 








\ 












2 




3 


** post part*m 










1 










1 












1 






1 






2 












1 






1 




1 






1 
1 






1 












2 








1 
















2 
















1 






1 














2 


2 


1 








5 


















1 




1 




1 




















I 






1 


1 


3 


4 


4 


2 


3 


3 




3 
1 


''') 


Inflammation of large 






1 










2 


1 














3 


*' and pneumonia 
" acute and cere- 
bral hyper- 






1 
1 
















X 




















1 














1 












1 


ijaryngismus stridulus, 
opium poisoning 




.... 


1 


















1 














1 






2 


** acute catar'al 


















1 




1 


















1 




1 








1 








1 
1 
2 










£> 
























2 










1 




i 






1 




4 












2 








2 










2 






2 


1 




4 


1 




1 
1 


3 


1 


4 


'>n 






<> 


" hemorrhage of .. 


1 




















1 




1 
















1 
2 


"2' 


2 






2 


1 










3 


2 


IS 






1 






1 


Melanosis, mesenteric... 




1 
4 
1 




















1 


3 
1 


2 


1 


2 
1 


3 




6 
1 


1 


3 
1 


3 

"i' 

1 


35 








*' cerebro spin'l 























1 
1 






I 






3 


Myelitis, chronic 


1 














2 












2 








1 


Old age 




2 
2 
1 


2 
1 




9. 1 


.... 


1 


2 


3 

1 


4 


IS 




1 








s 










1 


JParaplegia 




.... i 




....] 











1 


2 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 
TABLE. — Continued. 



467 



Causes of Death. 


3 
1-5 


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3 

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1 


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•-5 


3 
1-5 


P 
3 
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a 

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u 

1 




S 

> 



1 
u 

S 

u 

a) 



■5 























1 

1 

1 






1 

1 

10 


" laryngo-trau 
























Peritonitis 




2 


1 




1 


1 


2 


1 


"i 




1 






1 




1 
1 






1 
















2 


" and stone in 






















1 


Pericarditis 


1 
'12* 






















1 




.... 

5 


1 
1 
6 

1 
1 




















1 


Phthisis 










1 
6 










3 


" pulmonary 

" pulmonary, and 


5 


7 


4 


2 


3 


10 


8 


8 


76 
1 


Pleurisy 

" clironic 


1 


1 














1 




1 


5 




1 










1 
















1 
3 

1 








1 

8 
2 

1 


2 


Pneumonia 


12 

1 


9 

"i' 


7 
1 
1 


3 

1 


6 
"2' 


4 


4 


1 


3 


8 


68 


" broncho 

" pleuro 


6 
5 


" pleuro and 
gangrene of 
lungs 

'• pleuro and 
meningitis. 

" typhoid . .. 


1 














1 
















1 








1 




] 
1 

1 


... . 


1 


















" and hiccough 


■••• 


















i 






















1 


" and polypus 


1 




















1 


Premature birth 


1 






1 




3 


4 


2 


3 


3 


1 


18 


Prenatal causes 






1 


1 




1 






















1 
1 


Sarcoma, melanotic 


1 






















Spina bifida 






1 


















1 


Spine, Pott's disease of . 






















1 

2 


1 


Stillborn 

Stricture of rectum, sy- 
philitic 


10 


3 


8 


7 


9 


9 


9 
1 


7 


8 


6 


8 


86 
1 


Stomach, cancerous hu- 
















1 








1 


" ulceration of. 












1 












1 


Suicide 




















1 




1 




1 




















1 
















1 










1 


" gunshot wound.. 


1 














1 








1 
















1 






2 

1 




















2 


Tumor 
















1 






2 










1 














1 


" abdom'nal, shock 
from operation 
for 






1 


















1 


" fibroid .... 
















1 








1 












1 














1 


Typhilitis 












1 












1 


















1 








1 






2 


2 






1 






1 
1 

92 






6 
















1 

81 


73 ] 


<) 


















2 
14 ] 


13 


2 


Total 


85 


99 


93 


67 


86 


72 1 


04 


106 







468 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 469 

The table of deaths given shows the death rate to have been a 
little less than the average for the past ten years. The number 
of deaths of children under five years of age is still alarmingly 
large. We are in hopes that in time some way may be found to 
take better care of the little ones. Certain it is that we cannot 
hope for much of a reduction in our death rate while 53 per cent 
of the total number of deaths are of children under five years of 
age. In some of the larger cities the mortality among children 
has been much reduced by the introduction and use of sterilized 
milk. It is probable an attempt will be made in that direction 
the coming summer in this city. 

The granting of burial permits has been in charge of the 
board for a part of the year. This change will, we hope, in 
time lead to more accurate statements as to the causes of death, 
and thus make the statistics published by the board of more 
value for scientific purposes. In this connection we would earn- 
estly request the physicians to aid us as much as possible by tak- 
ing extra pains to be definite and accurate in all returns with 
which they have to do. It will be noticed that the term " cause 
not stated " has been eliminated from the table and that the 
number in which the cause is given as unknown is not so large 
as to cause comment. 

The thanks of this board are hereby extended to all who have 
aided in the work, and most particularly to your Honor for the 
benefit we have received from your advice and support. 
NEIL F. STARR, M. D., 
C. W. DOWNING, M. D., 
WILLIAM K. ROBBINS, M. Sc, 
Board of Health of Manchester. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Health : 

We beg leave to submit the following as the report of 
itary inspectors for the year 1895 
Vaults and privies inspected 
Vaults inspected after cleaning 
Water-closets inspected 
Yards and alleys inspected . 
Cellars inspected 
Barns and outbuildings inspected 
Tenements inspected . 
Barn cellars inspected . 
Latrines inspected 

Teams and riggings of excavators inspected 
Soaperies, slaughter-houses, etc., inspected 

Cleaning or repairs were ordered as follows : 

Vaults cleaned . 

Yards and alleys cleaned 

Cellars cleaned . 

Barn cellars cleaned 

Barns, etc., cleaned 

Tenements cleaned 

Privies cleaned . 

Latrines cleaned . 

Water-closets cleaned or repaired 

Vault covers repaired . 

Leaky drainpipes repaired . 

470 



the san- 

1,274 
782 

1,005 

1,320 

954 

239 
813 

314 
25 
47 
23 

138 

214 

31S 

17 

26 

27 

27 

2 

262 

62 

33 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH, 471 

Complaints to the number of 443 have been investigated- 
Relief has been given in 318 cases and in 125 cases it was found 
that no cause existed, or the same was beyond the control of the 
department. 

Openings other than leaks in the drainage system were found! 
in 66 places and the same were closed by order of the depart- 
ment. One thousand two hundred sixty sinks have been exam- 
ined and traps were provided upon 645. 

Sewage was found running on the surface of the ground in 
loS places and such nuisances were abated either by entering 
the sewer or by carrying away in some manner not offensive. 

It has been necessary to make 2,786 calls and write 1,192 let- 
ters in doing the work of the department. 

Forty-one dead animals have been properly disposed of. 

One hundred nineteen hens and small animals have beenn 
ordered removed from cellars. 

The people in loi tenement blocks have been warned against 
throwing garbage into the street. 

The city dumps have been inspected 25 times and nuisances 
there to the number of 5 abated by the street department. 

Private swill collectors have been notified 37 times to be 
neater in their work. 

Householders have been given 34 permits to clean their owrt 
vaults. 

Two hundred ninety-seven notices have been prepared and 
served and proper returns made. 

Eight samples of water from wells about the city have been 
sent away for analysis. 

Eleven complaints have been made against the scavenger ser- 
vice. In each case the proper parties were notified and relief 
afforded. 

Twenty-two catch-basins or street cesspools were flushed or re- 
paired by the street department at the request of the inspectors.. 

Seventy-one nuisances not otherwise classified have beei'h 
abated through the efforts of this department. 

One hundred thirteen swine and 13 cows were discovered be- 



472 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ing kept within the sanitary limits without licenses. The same 
were removed or licenses procured. 

In two places, where no privy accommodations had been pro- 
vided, the owners were ordered to provide water-closets. 

An entire circus train was inspected on complaint that some 
of the employees were suffering from smallpox. 

Leaky drains to the number of 33 were ordered repaired. 

Eleven blocks were ordered put into sanitary condition, in- 
cluding the plumbing therein. 

Permits to the number of 788 were granted for the removal of 
dead bodies, and the returns forwarded to the city registrar. 

Weekly reports of contagious and infectious diseases have 
been sent to the state board of health, Concord, and the United 
States Marine Hospital service, Washington, D. C. 

Contagious and infectious diseases have been reported as fol- 
lows : Measles, 68 ; diphtheria, 47 ; scarlet fever, 55 ; membra- 
neous croup, 17; typhoid fever, 73; total, 260. 

Two hundred thirty-two of the cases were reported by physi- 
cians and 28 by householders or discovered by the inspectors. 

The inspectors were unable to trace the cause of the disease in 
136 cases. In 95 cases the connection with some previous case 
was clearly traceable. Six people contracted the disease outside 
the city, and in 13 cases it was reasonable to attribute the cause 
to unsanitary surroundings. 

In 96 cases disinfectants were being used. The inspectors 
ordered their use in 1 64 places. At most of these latter places 
instructions were given as to their use and in many of them the 
department furnished the disinfectants. 

At 5 1 dwellings it was necessary for the inspectors to order 
isolation. In nearly all these cases the inspectors were obliged 
to give instructions as to the steps to be taken. 

Fourteen houses were watched to see that the rules of isolation 
were complied with, and 16 funerals were attended to prevent a 
too public observance of the same. 

Eighteen tenements where disease had existed were fumigated 
by the inspectors. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 473 

Thirty-eight children who were attending school and forty 
people who were working and resided in houses where conta- 
gious diseases existed were restrained from attendance at school 
or employment until all danger from contagion had passed. 

Two cases have been cared for at the contagious disease hos- 
pital during the past year. 

One hundred and fifty houses have been placarded and the 
placards removed at the termination of the sickness. 

About I, GOG pamphlets issued by the state board of health have 
been distributed in localities where contagious diseases existed. 

A monthly statement of mortality has been prepared and copies 
sent to over 2gg other towns and cities and to local physicians, 
€tc. 

Addison Streeter was employed as sanitary patrolman at Lake 
Massabesic 73 days. He was aided by the sanitary inspectors 20 
Sundays and holidays. 

There has been no material change in the number of buildings 
during the past season except the addition of four new buildings 
there, and the old buildings were inspected frequently and the 
following other work done : 

Bathers to the number of 99 were ordered from the water and 
warned not to enter it again. 

Five hundred and fifteen dead fish were removed from the 
lake or its shore and buried. Two dead snakes, two dead tur- 
tles, and a dead frog were also cared for. 

At 12 places it was necessary to order swill and slops deposited 
farther away from the water. 

Several picnics were visited and the managers warned to pre- 
vent the careless disposal of waste and rubbish. 

A party was caught washing clothes and another was caught 
washing dishes in the lake. Both were reprimanded and warned. 

Twenty-one parties were warned as to the disposal of sink- 
water, swill, etc. 

Nuisances to the number of seven not otherwise classified were 
abated. 

Rags, papers, tin cans, and rubbish of all sorts has been re- 
moved whenever found. 



474 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The inspection of plumbing has as last year been attended to 



by Richard J. Barry with the following results 
Number of jobs reported 

tank water-closets . 

pressure closets 

Kelley & Genesee closets 

sinks .... 

bath-tubs 

wash-bowls . 

wash-trays 

slop-hoppers . 

urinals .... 



8io 

1,175 
17a 

19 

870. 
422 

370 
61 

9 



Total number fixtures put in . .• . . .3,122 

The pipe put in was tested with water at 773 places. 

At 21 places where water was not accessible the smoke test was 
used instead of water. 

A total of 1,775 inspections were made of the work during its 
progress and after completion. 

Defective work was found as follows : 
Lines of pipe leaking . . . . . . .213; 

Split pipe 34 

Ventilation defective ....... 41 

At 127 places defective work was found that is not otherwise 
classified. 

Several plumbers were caught trying to deceive the inspector 
by using black wax and resin on joints that .should have been 
made tight with molten lead. In one case a cotton batting 
blanket had been wound around the soil pipe at a point where it 
would be likely to escape the notice of the inspector, and it was 
absorbing the water that came from several small leaks above. 
Perhaps the most flagrant case was one where the plumber put a 
plug in a four-inch pipe about a foot from the top and poured a 
couple of pails of water on top of it. This trick was discovered 
and the plug removed by the inspector, who saw that the pipe 
was properly filled and tested. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



475 



The inspector has been to some trouble to secure from his re- 
ports the following statistics as to new buildings, which he thinks 
may be interesting : 

Total number reported, 232. 

Single tenement buildings . . . .. . . 126 

Two " " 51 

Three " " 50 

Four " " 3 

Five '' " I 

Six " " 5 

One each of twelve, eight, sixteen, twenty, and twenty-two 
tenements. 

New schoolhouses, 2 ; churches, including one rebuilt, 3 ; shoe 
shop, I ; large livery stable, i ; sub-police station, i. The Sa- 
cred Heart hospital was rebuilt, also an emergency ward for the 
Elliot hospital. 

The total value according to his best judgment was ^585,000. 

There have been 28 firms, employing 185 men, engaged in the 
plumbing business during the past year. 

The inspectors hereby extend their sincere and heartfelt thanks 
to all who have aided them in the work of the department, and 
most especially to the members of the board of health, who have 
so ably directed their efforts. 

HERBERT S. CLOUGH. 
JOHN F. LOONEY. 
RICHARD J. BARRY. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, ETC. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL 

LAMPS. 



Electric Lights in Use. 

No. I. Cypress and Massabesic, arm. 

2. Massabesic and Old Falls road, pole. 

3. Lake avenue and Beacon, arm. 

4. Central and Hall, " 

5. Lake avenue and Massabesic, <« 

6. Wilson and Laurel, " 

7. Merrimack and Hall, " 

8. Manchester and Hall, " 

9. Manchester and Wilson, " 

10. Hanover and Ashland, " 

11. Hanover and Hall, «' 

12. Hanover and Beacon, " 

13. Concord and Ashland, " 

14. Bridge and Hall, " 

15. Myrtle and Russell, " 

16. Pearl and Linden, '< 

17. Pearl and Russell, " 

18. Bridge and Nashua, " 

19. Nashua and High, " 

20. Concord and Button, " 

21. Amherst and Lincoln, " 

22. Hanover and Lincoln, " 
2*3. Manchester and Lincoln, " 

24. Merrimack and Lincoln, " 

25. Laurel and Lincoln, " 

479 



480 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 26. Central and Lincoln, arm. 

27. Lake avenue and Lincoln, 

28. Spruce and Lincoln, 

29. Spruce and Maple, 

30. Lake avenue and Maple, 

31. Central and Maple, 

32. Merrimack and Maple, 

33. Manchester and Maple, 

34. Hanover and Maple, 

35. Amherst and Maple, 

36. Concord and Maple, 

37. Lowell and Nashua, 

38. Bridge and Maple, 

39. Myrtle and Maple, 

40. Orange and Ash, 

41. Harrison and Beech, 

42. Myrtle and Beech, 

43. Pearl and Beech, 

44. Bridge and Beech, 

45. Lowell and Ash, 

46. Amherst and Ash, 

47. Lowell and Beech, 

48. Concord and Walnut, 

49. Amherst and Beech, 

50. Hanover and Beech, 

51. Hanover square, pole. 

52. Manchester and Beech, arm. 

53. Merrimack and Beech, 

54. Laurel and Beech, 

55. Central and Beech, 

56. Lake avenue and Beech, 

57. Spruce and Beech, 

58. Cedar and Union, 

59. Lake avenue and Union, 

60. Central and Union, 

61. Laurel and Union, 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 481 



No. 62. Merrimack and Union, 
62,. Manchester and Union, 

64. Hanover and Union, 

65. Amherst and Union, 

66. Concord and Union, 

67. Lowell and Walnut, 

68. Lowell and Union, 

69. High and Union, 

70. Bridge and Union, 

71. Bridge and Walnut, 

72. Orange and Union, 

73. Prospect and Union, 

74. Brook and Union, 

75. Pennacook and Union, 

76. Webster and Pine, 

77. North and Pine, 

78. Sagamore and Pine, 

79. Blodget and Pine, 

80. Harrison and Hazel, 

81. Prospect and Pine, 

82. Myrtle and Pine, 

83. Orange and Pine, 

84. Pearl and Pine, 

85. Bridge and Pine, 

86. Tremont square, 

87. High and Pine, 
2>2>. Lowell and Pine, 
89. Concord and Pine, 
90*. Amherst and Pine, 

91. Hanover and Pine, 

92. Manchester and Pine, 

93. Merrimack and Pine, 

94. Laurel and Pine, 

95. Central and Pine, 

96. Lake avenue and Pine 

97. Cedar and Pine, 



ariru 



pole, 
arm. 



pole. 
arm. 



31 



482 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 98. Auburn and Pine, arm. 

99. Cedar and Chestnut, " 

[oo. Park square, pole. 

[Qi. Lake avenue and Chestnut, arm. 

. Central and Chestnut, " 

[03. Merrimack square, east, pole. 

[04. Merrimack and Chestnut, arm. 
[05. Manchester and Chestnut, " 

[06. Hanover and Chestnut, " 

[07. Concord square, east, pole. 
[08. Concord square, west, " 

[09. Chestnut and Concord back, arm. 

10. Chestnut and High, " 

11. Chestnut and Bridge, ** 
:i2. Chestnut and Pearl, " 

13. Chestnut and Myrtle, " 

14. Chestnut and Harrison, " 

15. Chestnut and Brook, " 

16. Pennacook and Chestnut, pole. 
;i7. Salmon and Chestnut, " 
:i8. Webster and Chestnut, arm. 

19. Clark and Elm, " 
:20. Webster and Elm, " 
:2i. North and Elm, " 
:22. Salmon and Elm, " 

23. Pennacook and Elm, " 

24. Brook and Elm, " 
125. Harrison and Elm, " 

26. Langdon street, ' pole. 

■.2"]. Dean and Elm, arm. 
:28. Prospect and Chestnut, 

20. Orange and Elm, 
[30. Kidder and Elm, 
[31. Elm east back, on Pearl, 
[32. Bridge and Elm, 
:33. Washington and Church, 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 483 

No. 134. Birch and Lowell, arm. 

135. Lowell and Elm, " 

136. Elm east back between Lowell and Concord, '' 

137. Water and Elm, " 

138. Vine and Concord, " 

139. Vine and Amherst, " 

140. Amherst and Elm, " 

141. Spring and Elm west back street, ** 

142. Stark street, *' 

143. Market and Franklin, " 

144. Market and Elm, " 

145. Hanover and Elm east back, " 

146. Elm and Manchester, " 

147. Dean avenue and Elm west back, " 

148. Elm and Merrimack, " 

149. Franklin and Merrimack, " 

150. Middle street, " 

151. Merrimack square, west, pole. 

152. Elm and Central, arm. 

153. Elm and Lake avenue, " 

154. Elm and Spruce, " 

155. Elm east back between Spruce and Cedar, pole. 

156. Elm and Cedar, arm. 

157. Franklin and Granite, 

158. Elm and Auburn, 

159. Elm and Green, 

160. Elm and Valley, 

161. Elm and Brown avenue, 

162. Summer and State, pole. 

163. Granite and State, arm. 

164. Granite bridge, east, pole. 

165. Bedford and Granite, " 

166. Canal and Granite, " 

167. Depot and Canal, " 

168. Central between Franklin and Canal, " 

169. Bedford and Central, arm. 



484 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 170. Canal and Merrimack, arm. 

71. Canal and Middle, " 

72. Canal and Stark, '* 

73. Canal and Mechanic, " 

74. Canal and Spring, " 

75. Canal and Bridge, " 

76. McGregor bridge, east, pole. 

77. Canal and Hollis, " 

78. Canal and Dean, '' 

79. Canal and Langdon, arm. 

80. River road and North, " 

81. Amoskeag bridge, east, o 

82. Amoskeag bridge, west, o 

83. Amoskeag watering-trough, pole. 

84. Amoskeag brick store, 

85. McGregor and Main, 

86. McGregor and Bridge, 

87. McGregor bridge, west, 

88. Amory and Main, 

89. Amory and Beauport, 

90. Wayne and Beauport, 

91. Marion and Main, 

92. McGregor and Wayne, 

93. McGregor and Putnam, arm. 

94. Sullivan and Main, pole. 

95. Beauport and Sullivan, " 

96. Main and Schuyler, " 

97. Wilton and Main, ' arm. 

98. Douglas and Main, " 

99. Douglas and Barr, " 

200. Granite and Green, ** 

201. West and Granite, '* 

202. Granite and Main, *' 

203. Granite and Second, " 

204. Granite bridge, west, pole. 

205. School and Turner, - arm. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 485 

No. 206. School and Third, arm. 

207. Second and Bath, pole. 

208. Ferry and Turner, arm. 

209. Ferry and Third, " 

210. Walker and Second, "" 

211. Blaine and Third, " 

212. Clinton and Main, " 

213. Walker and Main, " 

214. Parker and West, ** 

215. Winter and Parker, " 

216. Main and Mast, pole. 

217. Main and Milford, arm. 

218. Main and A, " 

219. Carroll and Milford, " 

220. Old Mast road and Mast, ** 

221. Hall and Amherst, " 

222. Laurel and Maple, *' 

223. Central and Wilson, " 

224. Harrison and Pine, " 

225. Massabesic and Belmont, pole. 

226. Union and Appleton, arm. 

227. Elm and Young, , pole. 

228. Franklin and Pleasant, arm. 

229. Ehn and Appleton, " 

230. Milford and Riddle, " 

231. Nutt road and Portsmouth railroad, pole. 

232. Lake avenue and Canton, " 

233. Laurel and Hall, arm. 

234. Beech and Brook, " 

235. Kidder and Boyden, pole. 

236. Myrtle and Walnut, arm. 

237. Bridge and Linden, " 

238. Lowell and Ashland, " 

239. Lowell and Belmont, ** 

240. Pearl and Union, " 

241. Salem and Union, pole. 



486 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 242. Water street, arm. 

243. Arlington and Ashland, . ** 

244. Orange and Oak, " 

245. Prospect and Oak, " 

246. Arlington and Russell, *' 

247. Walnut and Gore, ** 

248. Laurel and Milton, " 

249. Massabesic and Hospital road, pole. 

250. Lake avenue and Wilson, arm. 

251. Bridge and Ash, • " 

252. Franklin and Depot, ** 

253. Spruce and Union, ** 

254. Malvern and East High, pole. 

255. Hanover and Highland, ** 

256. Auburn and Beech, " 

257. Kidder and Whitney, " 

258. Valley and Jewett, " 

259. Concord and Derry, ' " 

260. Auburn and Union, " 

261. Harrison and Walnut, arm. 

262. West Hancock and Second, pole. 

263. Douglas and West, " 

264. Hooksett road, Amoskeag, . " 

265. Ash and Prospect, arm. 

266. Canal and Salmon, pole. 

267. Harrison and Russell, arm. 

268. Gates and Dubuque, pole. 

269. Baker and Elm, " 

270. Auburn and Maple, ** 

271. Pine and Salmon, " 

272. Adams and Appleton, ** 

273. Clark and River road, arm. 

274. North Main and Bremer, pole. 

275. Beech and Cedar, " 

276. Cass and Lake avenue, ** 

277. Mast and Riddle, " 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 487 

No. 278. Brown avenue and Baker, arm. 

279. Brown avenue and Hancock, pole. 

280. Clark and Union, arm. 

281. Brook and Maple, pole. 

282. Market and Canal, arm. 

283. Brook and Hazel, pole. 

284. Webster and River road, " 

285. Webster and Walnut, " 

286. Chestnut, near Ray Brook, ** 

287. Concord and Beech, arm. 

288. Prospect and Linden, pole. 

289. Pearl and Morrison, "' 

290. Concord and Hall, arm. 

291. Merrimack and Belmont, " 

292. Spruce and Beacon, " 

293. Belmont and Grove, " 

294. Bowman, near Milford, ** 

295. Amory and Rimmon, pole. 

296. Pine and Valley, " 

297. Manchester and Milton, " 

298. Mammoth and Candia road, " 

299. Cypress and Hayward, " 

300. Conant and Rimmon, " 

301. Cartier and Kelley, " 

302. Monmouth and McGregor back, " 

303. Calef road and Welch avenue, ** 

304. Valley and Taylor, arm. 

305. Pine and Brook, " 

306. Conant and Beauport, " 

307. Douglas and North Weare Railroad, pole. 

308. Orange and Hall, " 

309. Wayne and Dubuque, arm. 

310. Putnam and Cartier, " 

311. Hall road and Lake avenue, pole. 

312. Walker and Fourth, arm. 

313. Winter, near Main, " 



488 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 314. Walker and Turner, pole. 

315. Ainsworth avenue and Young, arm. 

316. Valley and Belmont, " 

317. Pine and Grove, *' 

318. Blaine and Second, " 

319. Amory and Morgan, " 

320. Amory and Alsace, *' 

321. East High and South, " 

322. Blaine and Main, " 

323. Dover and Clinton, " 

324. Elm back street on Blodget, *' 

325. B and C, pole. 

326. Milford and Bismarck, " 

327. Merrimack and Wilson, arm. 
32S. Pennacook and Canal, pole. 

329. Adams and Cartier^ " 

330. Amherst and Ashland, arm. 

331. Putnam and Bartlett, pole. 

332. Auburn and Chestnut, arm. 

333. Laurel and Laurel avenue, " 

334. Hanover and Belmont, " 

335. Lowell and Malvern, " 

336. Wilson and Adams, " 

337. Lincoln and Silver, *' 
:^;^8. Somerville and Jewett, '' 

339. Elm and Ray brook, " 

340. Amory and Bartlett, " 

341. West Hancock and Dartmouth, " 

342. Monroe and River road, " 

343. Marion and McGregor, " 

344. South Main and Harvell, " 

345. South Main and Hancock, " 

346. Boynton street, " 

347. Mast road and Forest, " 

348. North and Union, " 

349. Kelly and Rimmon, " 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 489 

No. 350. Cooledge, near Kelly, arm. 

351. Buzzell and East High, 

352. Mechanic and Elm south back, 

353. Harrison and Maple, 

354. North and Bay, 

355. Front and Dunbarton, 

356. Orange and Linden, 

357. Myrtle, near Belmont, 

358. Taylor and Young road, 

359. Nutt road and Auger avenue, 

360. Union and Grove, 

361. Kelly and Alsace, 

362. Main and Wayne, 

363. Spruce and Barry avenue, 

364. Lowell and Hall, 

365. Central and Canal, 

366. Myrtle and Elm back, 

367. Wilson and Silver, 

368. Beech and Young, 

369. Beech and Lawrence Railroad, 

370. Lincoln and Cedar, 

371. Wilson and Spruce, 

372. Laurel and Beacon, 

373. Harrison and Oak, 

374. Pearl and Oak, 

375. Liberty and Webster, 

376. Wentworth and Bell, 

377. Montgomery and Conant, 

378. Massabesic and Hall road, 

379. Summer and Hall, 

380. Harrison and Ash, 

381. Bridge and Highland, 

382. Lowell and Chestnut, 

383. Spruce and Chestnut west back, 

384. Tilton and Bowman avenue, 

385. Prince and Boynton, 



490 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 386. Carroll and Charlestown avenue, 

387. Beech and Silver, 

388. Beech and Portsmouth railroad, 

389. Merrimack and Franklin west back, 

390. Prospect and Elm back, 

391. Pine and Pennacook, • 

392. Sagamore and Walnut, 

393. Bridge and Belmont, 

394. Cypress and Valley, 

395. Carpenter and Union, 

396. North River road and Rowell, 

397. North River road and Stark park, 

398. Hanover and Grant, 

399. Page and Portsmouth railroad, 

400. Central and Cass, 

401. Second and Schiller, 

402. Mast and Bowman, 

403. North and Union, 

404. Gore and Ash, 

405. South Elm street, 

406. Beech and Nutt road, 

407. Ashland and East High, 

408. Laurel and Belmont, 

409. Lake avenue and Beacon, 

410. Pine and Green, 

411. Hanover and Page, 

412. Beech and Green, 

413. New Mast road and Wilkins, 

414. Derry field park, 

415. Charles street, 

416. State, near Granite, 

417. Union and Valley, 

418. Union and Silver, 

419. Valley and Wilson, 

420. Auburn and Wilson, 

421. Cedar near Maple, 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 491 

No. 422. Thornton and Sullivan, arm. 

423. New Mast and D, " 

424. Pearl and Belmont, " 



Gas Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Chestnut. 

Appleton, west end. 

Salmon, between Elm and Canal. 

Blodget and Chestnut. 

Orange and Chestnut. 

Orange, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Bridge, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Pearl and Walnut. 

Orange and Walnut. 

Orange and Beech. 

Pearl and Maple. 

Arlington and Maple. 

East High and Maple. 

Lowell and South. 

Concord and Belmont. 

Amherst and Belmont. 

Concord and Beacon. 

Lowell and Beacon. 

East High and Belmont. 

East High and Hall. 

Belmont and Central. 

Maple and Cedar. 

Willow and Merrill. 

Auburn and Franklin. 

Three lights on State. 

River, near Turner Hall. 

Milford and Bowman. 

Milford and B. 

River and Douglas. 

Dover and Granite. 



492 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Two lights on Hancock, west of River road. 

Dover and Douglas. 

Douglas, half way between Main and River streets. 

Two lights on Pleasant between Franklin and Canal. 

Two lights on Mechanic. 

Spring. 

Manchester and Belmont. 

Hanover and Milton. 

One light on River road, corner Shasta. 

Monroe, west of Elm. 



Oil Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Adams. 

Pearl and Linden. 

Canal, near Amoskeag bridge. 

Merrimack and Beacon. 

Hanover and Mammoth road. 

Lake avenue and Hall road. 

Elm and Shasta. 

Elm and Baker. 

One light on Baker. 

Douglas and West. 

Douglas and Quincy. 

Granite and Quincy. 

Mast road and Riddle. 

Carroll. 

Bowman. 

A and B streets. 

Light near the Huntress gardens. 

Mammoth road and Cohas avenue. 

" " and Island Pond road. 

" " and Cilley. 

" " and Young. 

Massabesic and Hall road. 
Massabesic and Taylor. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 493 

Belmont and Green. 

Valley and Taylor. 

Valley and Cypress. 

Cypress and Prout avenue. 

Jewett and Young. 

Young and Taylor. 

Three lights on River road, south of Blue store. 

Ten lights in Goffe's Falls. 

Three lights in Youngsville. 

One light on Candia road, near Noah Reed's. 

One light on Candia road, near Walter Cody's house. 

One light at junction of Lake avenue and Hanover. 

One light on Island Pond road, Mill-Dam House. 

Amherst and Beacon. 

One light at junction Ainsworth avenue and Young road. 

One light at junction Ainsworth avenue and Young street. 

One light on Taylor, near Byron Stearns's house. 

One light on Taylor, near Gilmore's house. 

One light on Valley, near Eastman's store. 

One light on Candia road, at P. Rogers's. 

One light on Candia road, at Dan Cronin's. 

One light on Candia road, at G. Bean's. 

One light on Candia road, at C. Francis's. 

One light on Candia road, at S. Mead's. 

One light on Candia road, at Claflin's. 

One light on Hanover, at Sam Page's. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Page. 

One light at Brown's. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Proctor. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Candia roads. 

One light at junction of Proctor and Candia roads. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF CITY AUDITOR. 



To the City Comicils : 

Gentlemen, — The auditor herewith submits to your honor- 
able body his annual report. 

WORk OF THE OFFICE. 

There have been made during the year the usual examinations 
of the treasurer's accounts, examinations of the city clerk's ac- 
counts, annual examination and settlement with the tax collector, 
annual examination of water-works accounts, annual examination 
of accounts of superintendents of Pine Grove and Valley ceme- 
teries and of the treasurer of the cemeteries, annual examination 
of the accounts of the superintendent of the city farm, monthly 
examination of the accounts of the weigher at the city scales, 
quarterly examinations of the accounts of chief of police, semi- 
annual examination of the account of the clerk of the police 
court, annual examination of the accounts of the superintendent 
of public instruction ; and compiled and superintended the pub- 
lication of the annual report. 

Five thousand nine hundred twenty-two bills against the city 
have been examined and certified as correct. All the pay-rolls 
for the street and park commission, for the schools, for the fire 
department, the water-works, the police department, the ceme- 
teries, the city farm, and the city officials have been examined 
and certified to. 

Twelve monthly drafts, amounting in the aggregate to ^1,320, - 
564.72 have been drawn on the city treasury. 

Accounts have been kept with all the appropriations, with the 
treasurer, and the tax collector. 

497 

33 



498 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

A large number of circulars concerning the city's debt and 
bonds were sent to bankers and brokers, besides the general cor- 
respondence of the office, and reports, orders, and resolutions 
typewritten for various joint standing committees. 

At the request of the joint standing committee on finance, the 
auditor has procured the printing of the bonds sold during the 
year and furnished certified copies of orders, resolutions, and 
laws showing the legality of the issue of said bonds to the bank- 
ers, brokers, and firms bidding for the purchase of the same. 

EXPENDITURES. 

The amount of the appropriation for auditor's depart- 
ment was ........ $2,000.00 

Expended for salaries .... $1,683.41 

Expended for supplies .... 267.66 

Balance transferred to reserved fund . 4S.93 



2,000.00 



The auditor especially desires to call the attention of the vari- 
ous standing committees to the law in regard to contracting bills 
in behalf of the city. 

" Standing committees have advisory powers only." That is, 
they can recommend to the city councils the making of contracts. 
" They cannot legally be endowed with executive or legislative 
powers by ordinance or resolution of the city councils." That 
is, they cannot be authorized to purchase anything in behalf of 
the city. For instance : If the committee on fire department 
desire to purchase a hose wagon for the fire department, said 
committee should present to the city councils an order like this, 
to wit : 

" An Order to purchase a Hose Wagon for the Fire Department. 

'■'■ Ordered, tic. ^ That the city purchase of . . . a two- horse hose 
wagon for use of the fire department, at a cost of ... , the ex 
pense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire depart- 
ment, and the mayor and joint standing committee on fire 
department are authorized to execute a contract for the same." 



REPORT OF CITY TREASURER. 



499 



Several of the committees have been very lax in this respect 
during the past year, and have attempted to make contracts with- 
out the least semblance of authority from the city councils, which 
has put the parties contracted with to great annoyance and 
trouble in getting their bills approved, having to wait sometimes 
months for the necessary ratification by the city councils. Clerks 
of all committees should be requested by the chairman, when an 
expenditure of money is deemed necessary, to prepare an order 
and present to the councils for legal authority before proceeding 
to make any contract. 

The auditor returns his thanks to Mayor Clarke, the city coun- 
cils, the committee on accounts, the street and park commission, 
and the heads of departments for their uniform courtesy and 
kindness. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



STATEMENT OF THE ACCOUNTS OF THE LATE 
SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, CITY TREASURER. 



To improvement bonds 

premium on improvement bonds 

accrued interest 

schoolhouse bonds 

premium on schoolhouse bonds 

accrued interest 

temporary loan 

city hall rents 

M. J. Healy, police department 

J. C. Bickford, police department 

water-works, receipts 

B. A. Stearns, Pine Grove cemetery, receipts 

S. B. Putnam, treasurer, lots sold 





Dr. 




^100,000.00 




5,639.00 




idd.e^ 




70,000.00 




1,001.00 




528.89 




200,000.00 




515-00 




37,926.61 




()(>e.iz 




116,249.63 


^, receipts 


1,765.80 


. 


2,000.00 



500 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To C. H. G. Foss, Valley cemetery, receipts 
board of paupers off the farm . 
E. G. Libbey, city farm 
milk licenses, H. F. W. Little 
milk licenses, E. C. Smith 
William Bailey, city scales, receipts 
A. B. Eaton, city scales, receipts 
cemetery funds, bonds sold . 
William E. Buck, tuition 
■ L. O. Shedd, peddler's license 
town of Londonderry, school tax for 1894 
Joseph T. Soley, peddler's license 
Solomon Caplan, peddler's license 
Simon Levenstain, peddler's license 
Isaac Gordon, peddler's license 
S. Levanson, peddler's license 
A. H. Weinstein, peddler's license 
James Irvine, peddler's license 
Mary S. Danforth, M. D., incidental expenses 

overdraft .... 
Ephraim Booth, peddler's license 
William C. Clarke, difference in typewriter 
William H. Darling, old copper and zinc 
William C. Clarke, sale of Lake avenue steamer 

horse "Dolly" .... 
E. H. Rollins & Son, water bonds sold 
E. H. Rollins & Son, premium on water bonds 
Abram Alfert, peddler's license 
Max Rosengood, peddler's license . 
Timothy Shea, for land 
Curtis & Motley, premium on notes 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., repairs of high 

ways, overdraft . 
I. Schwartz, peddler's license 
S. Morrisin, peddler's license 
Joseph D. Sweet, peddler's license 



^1,200.00 

2,377-51 
3,681.1 1 

4-50 

44-5» 

33-92 

306.06 

5,250.00 
205.80 
20. oo 
42.06 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20. oo. 
20.00 
20.00 

8.7s 

20.00 
37-5° 

■ 5-55 

85.00 

100,000.00 

6,265.00 

20.00 

20.00 

500.00 

i3-5c> 

•30 

20.00 
20.00 
20.00 



REPORT OF CITY TREASURER. 



501 



To Abraham Shapiro, peddler's license 

John Robbie Co., furniture and supplies, over- 
draft 

street and park commissioners 

George E. Morrill, collector, redemption of 
land sold for taxes ..... 

George E. Morrill, collector, taxes for year 
1894 

George E. Morrill, collector, taxes for year 

1895 

N. P. Kidder, sewer licenses .... 



Cash on hand January i, 1895 . 
Unpaid bills November 15, 1895 



$20.00 

15-32 
107.27 

2,467.39 

28,615.99 

88,450.18 
2,531-55 



$779,507.74 

122,237.30 

12,424.44 

;9i4,i69.48 



Cr. 



By January draft, 1895, No. i 



February 


(( 


u 


2 


28,429.43 




March 


a 


(C 


3 


. 38,576.84 




April 


u 


u 


4 • 


54,568.15 




May 


(1 


u 


5 • 


56,533-72 




June 


11 


(( 


6 . 


84,969.07 




July 


(( 


u 


7 • 


109,529.45 




August 


c( 


a 


8 . 


76,376.31 




September 


(( 


u 


9 • 


76,895.10 




October 


u 


u 


10 . 


188,582.54 




November 


u 


<( 


II (special 


) 83,379.12 


^831,875-38 


paid bills. 


January 


I, 


1895 . 


. 


45,524-40 



$34,035.65 



Total drafts and unpaid bills 
Cash on hand November 15, 1895 



$877,399-78 
36,769.70 



114,169.48 



502 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF CITY TREASURER. 



To schoolhouse bonds .... 

premium on schoolhouse bonds 

accrued interest on schoolhouse bonds . 

water bonds ...... 

premium on water bonds 
accrued interest on water bonds 
J. C. Bickford, police department . 
M. J. Healy, police department 
water-works ...... 

F. L. Allen, treasurer, lots sold, Pine Grove 

cemetery ...... 

F. L. Allen, treasurer, lots sold. Valley cem 

etery, 1892 ..... 

B. A. Stearns, Pine Grove cemetery, receipts 

C. H. G. Foss, Vafley cemetery, receipts 
E. G. Libbey, city farm 

A. B. Eaton, city scales .... 
William E. Buck, tuition 
William E. Buck, free text-books . 
N. P. Kidder, rent of tenements . 
** " dog licenses 
" " billiard table licenses 
" " show licenses . 
" " sewer licenses . 
" " city hall rents . 
George E. Morrill, taxes, 1894 

" " abatement taxes, 1894 

" " old taxes . 

" " interest on taxes, 1894 

" " taxes, 1895 

" " abatement taxes, 1895 

Nathan Abrams, peddler's license . 
J. R. Laflamme <& Co., city farm, overdraft 



Dr. 

$50,000.00 

1,260.00 

750.00 

50,000.00 

3,602.56 

16.67 

718.25 

20,000.00 

3'524-87 

878.31 

19.00 

555-25 
614.24 
208.33 
67.91 
165.1a 
202.66 

517-04 

1,729.76 

610.00 

448.50. 

321-45 

18.00 

5,789.66 

1,798.44 
467.18 
845.94 

371,051-50 

631.28 

20.00 

3.9a 



REPORT OF CITY TREASURER. 



503 



To C. W. Boynton, land sold, Spruce street 

S. Lichtenstein, peddler's license . 

George E. Morrill, redemption of land sold 
for taxes ....... 

County of Hillsborough, coal delivered at 
court house ...... 

H. B- Fairbanks, sale of land, Spruce street . 

Solon A. Carter, insurance tax 
" " railroad tax 

" " savings bank tax . 

"■ " literary fund 

Herbert A. Woodbury, sale of land. Spruce 
street ....... 

street and park commissioners, money from 
sundry persons ...... 

Charles A. Flint, sale of land, Spruce street . 

Angie Tapley, city farm, overdraft . 

S. H. Watts, division No. lo, pay-roll, over- 
draft 

George W. Whitford, fuel, overdraft 

Cash on hand November 27, 1S95 

Unpaid bills January i, 1896 .... 



By unpaid bills, November 27, 1895 
November draft, 1895, No. 11 
December draft, 1895, ^o* ^^ 

Total drafts and unpaid bills 
Cash on hand January i, 1896 . 



^346.26 
20.00 

581.20 

40.65 

500.00 

2,613.75 

28,357-49 

52,472.63 

4,760.28 

475.00 

69.97 

353-45 
1.50 

3.00 
2.00 

^607,432.98 
34,425.02 
66,831.82 

;^7o8,689.82 

Cr. 

$12,424.44 



162,756.65 
425,932.69 



$488,689.34 

• $501. 113-78 
207,576.04 

$708,689.82 

FRED L. ALLEN, 

City Treasurer. 



504 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

To the City Councils of the City of Mafichester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — I have examined the accounts of the late Syl- 
vanus B. Putnam and of Fred L. Allen, city treasurers, for the 
year ending December 31, 1895, ^^'^ ^^^ proper vouchers for all 
payments and all receipts duly accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January i, 1895, was . . ^76,712.90 
Receipts during the year 1,386,940.72 

Total ^1,463,653.62 



Amount of drafts during the year . . .$1,320,564.72 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1895 • • • 143,088.90 



Total $1,463,653.62 



The cash balance taken December 31, 1895, ^ ^^^ ^^ ^e as 
follows : 

Deposited in Suffolk National Bank . . . $13,157.00 

Second National Bank . . . 120,738.64 

ofifice safe ..... 73,680.40 
National Bank of the Commonwealth 

in the late Treasurer Putnam's name 2,344.68 



Gross amount of cash on hand . . . $209,920.72 

Deduct amount of bills unpaid .... 66,831.82 



Net cash on hand December 31, 1895 • ^i43)088.9o 

Respectfully submitted, together with a tabular statement of 
the receipts and expenditures of the city for the year 1895. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Aui/itor. 



RECEIPTS. 



505 



STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDI- 
TURES OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER 
FOR THE YEAR 1 895. 

Receipts. 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 




Received from : 






Direct city taxes .... 
Cost and interest on taxes 


$496,804.23 
845.94 


$497,650.17 


Licenses to enter sewer 


$2,853.00 




Licenses to keep dog . 
Licenses to sell milk 


1,729.76 
49.00 




Licenses to keep billiard table 
Licenses to shows and exhibitions 


610.00 
448-50 




Licenses to peddle 


340.00 


$6,030.26 
1,050.04 


Rents 


• 


SUNDRIES. 


^5^4,730-47 


Received from : 






City scales ..... 
Miscellaneous sources . 


$407.89 
332.22 , 


$740.11 






SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 




Received from text -books and tuition 




^573-56 


POLICE DEPARTMENT. 




Received from fines and costs . 




$59,611.24 



PUBLIC PLACES. 



Received from : 

Pine Grove cemetery 
Valley cemetery . 



• $5»i99-36 
1,833.24 



$7,032.60 



500 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

WATER-WORKS. 

Gross receipts ..... . $119,774.50 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Received from : 

City farm . . . . . ;^3,889.44 

Hillsborough county, boarding pau- 
pers and Industrial School in- 
mates ..... 2,377.51 



3,266.95 



MISCELLANEOUS, 

Received from : 

Premium on bonds and notes sold . $17,781.06 



Accrued interest on bonds . 
Land redeemed from tax sale 
Other miscellaneous sources . 
Land sold .... 



1,662.23 

3'048.59 

90-55 

2,174.71 



S24,757-i4 



Total ordinary receipts during the year 1895 $723,486.57 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Received from loans in anticipation of tax of 1895 $200,000.00 

STATE. 

Received from : 

Insurance taxes .... $2,613.75 

Railroad taxes .... 28,357.49 

Savings bank taxes . . . 52,472.63 

Literary fund . . . • 4,760,28 



,204.15 



BONDED DEBT. 

Received from : 

Improvement bonds sold . . $100,000.00 

Water bonds sold . . . 150,000.00 

Cemetery bonds sold . . . 5,250.00 

Schoolhouse bonds sold . . 120,000.00 



$375>25o-oc> 



EXPENDITURES. 



607 



Gross receipts . 
Net cash on hand 



$1,386,940.72 
76,712.90 

^1,463,653.62 



Expenditures. 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 



Paid interest on water bonds . 
interest on city bonds 
interest on cemetery bonds 
interest on temporary loan, an- 
ticipation tax, 1895 



Paid city hall . 

printing and stationery 
incidental expenses . 
mayor's incidentals . 
city officers' salaries 
city auditor's department 
sinking fund trustees 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Paid street and park commission 
repairs of highways . 
snow and ice . 
new highways . 
land taken for highways 
watering streets 
paving streets . 
macadamizing streets 
grading for concrete 
scavenger service 



$3,914.16 

23>349-95 
5,658.54 

21,273-39 
5,995-oo 
3,999-76 
6,381.51 

15,201.40 

4,543-05 
14,759-77 



$69,634.56 



142,620 00 
21,499.00 

1,557-23 

3,958-33 

$5,919.01 

1,955-80 

13,551-12 

277.10 

12,872.72 

1,951.07 

10,000.00 

$46,526.82 



508 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid street sweeping 


. ^1,323-55 




lighting streets . 


46,800.71 




bridges . 


8,327.72 




city teams 


6,021.26 




repairs of sewers 


4,803.19 




new sewers 


■ 44,112.55 




Silver-street sewer . 


17,478.71 


■ 


Christian brook sewer 


13,297.00 




widening Mast street 


3,874.96 




widening Elm street 


2,499.02 




storage shed, city yards 


3,000.00 


^256,615.20 






engineer's 


DEPARTMENT. 




Paid engineer's department 


. 


^4,767.25 


HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 




Paid health department . 


. 


$3,996.76 


SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 




Paid repairs of schoolhouses 


^4,358.00 




fuel 


5,718.06 




furniture and supplies 


1,027.23 




books and stationery 


67.25 




printing and advertising 


358.23 




contingent expenses . 


1,520.07 




care of rooms . 


4,728.82 




evening schools 


1,456.93 




teachers' salaries 


68,499.21 




salaries school committee 


, clerk. 




truant officer 


1,096.67 




salary of superintendent 


2,300.00 




evening school of mec 


lanical 




drawing 


436-00 




free text-books 


4,915-35 




manual training 


1,349.10 


$97,830.92 



EXPENDITURES. 509 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid city library .... . . $4,740.65 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid fire department . . . ;^S 6,346. 73 
fire-alarm telegraph . , . 1,932.09 
hydrant service . . . 15,800.00 

South Manchester hose-house . 1,785.29 

$75,864.11 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid police department .... . ^41,157.28 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



Paid repair of buildings . 


^5=741-69 




ward room, ward 5 . 


4,705-07 




Pearl-street schoolhouse . 


316.80 




new schoolhouse, ward 9 . 


316.80 




addition to Bakersville school- 






house ..... 


1,200.00 




sub-poiice station, ward 8 


3,843.82 




city hall repairs 


18,516.77 




new schoolhouses 


101,153-39 




Lincoln-street school, curbing . 


1,142.65 


^136,936-99 






WATER-WORKS. 




Paid water-works .... 


$87,466.01 




water-works, sinking fiand 


15,800.00 


$103,266.01 






PUBLIC PLACES. 




Paid commons 


$4,215.02 




Stark and Derryfield parks 


4,999.86 




Pine Grove cemetery 


10,825.20 




Valley cemetery 


2,982.49 




Amoskeag cemetery . 


150.00 


$23,172.57 







510 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 



Paid paupers off the farm . 


^10,450.84 




city farm .... 


8,165.68 




indigent soldiers 


277.00 




Women's Aid and Relief Hos- 






pital 


600.00 




celebration, Fourth of July 


1,000.00 




Emergency ward, Elliot Hospital 


300.00 




free beds, Elliot Hospital . 


600.00 




decoration of soldiers' graves . 


361-93 




militia ..... 


700.00 




Sacred Heart Hospital 


600.00 




police matron .... 


100.00 




band concerts .... 


300.00 


$23,455-45 






ABATEMENTS. 






Paid abatement of taxes . 




$2,989.78 


Total of ordinary municipal expenditures . 


^890,954.35 


te:mporary loan. 




Paid loan made in anticipation of tax for 1S94 


$200,000.00 


BONDED DEBT 






Paid water bonds .... 




$100, IOC. 00 


STATE AND COUNTY 


TAXES. 




Paid state tax . 


$65,615.00 




county tax .... 


63>895-37 


$129,510.37 



Grand total of expenditures during the year $1,320,564.72 

Cash on hand December 31, 1895 • $209,920.72 
Less unpaid bills .... 66,831.82 



Net cash on hand . 



$143,088.90 
$1,463,653.62 



RECEIPTS. 



1891 
1892 
1S93 
189+ 
1895 



$79,5 )2.02 
93,1 JO.li 



96,4|!'7.18 ■ 425,538.75 628.33 

I 

116.7ff5.JG , 510,637.67 \ 1,930.82 

2.90 496,801.23 845.94 



1891.. 
1892.. 



$32,09,^.00 
31,069.00 
1893.. 30,102.00 
1894. . 38,399.00 
1895.. 42,620.00 



$15,584.00 
15,929.00 I 
15,826.00 i 
16,815.00 
21.499.00 I 



$729.35 
925.48 
1,041.66 
1,295.83 
1,557.23 



$4,659.34 I $2,804.62 $16,630.62 

3,772.14 2,239.62 1 25,129.05 

7,573.22 1,960.48 20,638.99 

3,312.72 2,012.61 24,615.57 

3,958.33 1,955.80 13, .551. 12 



• Salaries of truant officer, committees, and superiillendunt take 



J391,652.45 j $411.96 $2,103.30 | $2,155.58 
435,947.43 i 614.13 ! 3,126.05 j 2,060.97 



1,700.00 j 1,874.79 
4,120.56 1 1,721.29 
2,853.00 1,729.76 



66.50 
62.00 
69.50 
49.00 



table. 



xhibitionij. 



$316.00 I $169.00 $2,887.29 

400.00 266.00 3,130.97 

."jO.OO 167.50 j 2,696.23 

520.00 823.00 | 2,962.02 

610.00 788..50 ' 1,050.04 



trial ScUnuI 



$1,783.72 
2,458.11 
2,927.06 
3,977.08 
3,889.44 



$1,789.10 
1,192.93 
1,512.36 
3,269.70 
2,377.61 



$1,926.96 
4,410.16 



2,174.71 



$2,178.00 
6,090.00 
7,.576.00 

17,781.06 



I $374,50 1 $951,74 1 $4.45 $415,67 1$ 

$960.00' 575.52 \ 521.12!.. 



1,998.41 
1,564.24 
3,048.69 



759.19 
747.98 
422.77 



459.46 
407.89 



EXPENDITU 



$234.46 
221.80 
144.90 
163.30 
277.10 



$11,768.45* 
14,124.18 
13,849.93 
15,438.37 
12,872.72 



$1,380.37 
2,193.60 
2,164.08 
2.548.84 
5,919.01 



$1,699.51 
1,930.07 
1,9.54.50 
1,768.06 
1,951.07 



$37,937.07 
40,406.28 
42,643.74 
40,200.00 
41,1.57.28 



> 9EWCK DEPARTMENT. 



$3,783.65 
3,914.16 



i' and ice. 



$22,850.29 
24,647.25 
25,804.30 
27,770.33t 
29,008.49§ 



$14,448.09 
24,038.08 
17,149.71 
19,892.36 
21,273.39 



Widening 
Elm 
street. 



3,274.33 



$3,847.96 



I $5,704.46 

I 11,601.73 

16,182.41 

16,430.71 

5,995.00 



$5,364.26 
4,552.29 
6,338.14 
3,984.08 
3,999.76 



56,511.80 $19,616.23 '$5,532.84 $18,892.25 

I I 

7,540.11 ! 16.083.83 5,564.90 t 15,555.31 



9,847.87 I 21,266.13 
6,966.02 16,165.99 
6,381.51 15,201.40 



6,440.90 \ 19,000.88 
3,960.23 1 14,880.56 
4,643.05 14,759.77 



I 
$1,198.31 $42,908 



1,293.79 
1,430.76 
1,122.75 
1,323.55 



38,746 
40,517 
41,223 
46.800 



city officers' salt ries and carried to gcliool department. 



t Includes constructiou. 



EXPENDITl 



: DEI'ABTMENT. 



1891.. $40,641.04 
1892.. I 42,262.88 
50,135.41 



1894.. 
1895.. 



$1,164.66 
1,269.62 
1,813.25 



12,760.00 
63,539.72 I 1,933.88 13,925.00 
56,346.73 1 1,932.09 15,800.00 



$755.32 

441.55 
500.00 



$2,456.96 
2,892.75 
5,866.74 
5,085.04 

30,761.73 



$1,163.69 |....l.... 

I .$445.00 

3,000.00] 



Additions I New schnol- 

to Wi-bstr-r houses, lands 

St scltool- bulldinjfs. am 

liout,e. I fiirnilure. 



Ilallsville toilvTan, 
»'=''"""'°"=«--- I buying" 



A<ldition8 lEnglne.lious 
to Goire'3 I and ward- 
Falls school room for 



2,575.00 
6,270.i:; 



$101,153.39 



$20,759.25 

8,845.61 

3,796.84 

382.83 



$2,000.00 ' $870.00 

' 21,7.55.23 

1,002.71 



Schoolhoui 

and lot ii 

West Man 

Chester. 



$2,490.00* $684.48 

100.00 
17,002.99 4,203.24 
1,785.29 



Pearl street 
scliool 
house. 



$8,879.05 

12,606.20 

316.80 



1,622.05 
4,705.07 



WATER-WOKKS. 



pense 



$49,626.66 

49,945.35 
166.275.82 j $12,750.00 
184,198.93 j 13,925.00 

87.406.01 I 15,800.00 



L'BLIC PLACES. 



Stark. Dorrj-fleld. 



$2,406.76 
3,726.64 
4.638.43 
3,503.06 
4,215.02 



$371.81 

1,.500.25 I $500.05 

4,0.54.28 ' 1,162.86 

1,832.73 3,326.00 

2,563.25 2,436.61 



$6,941.34 

6,840.97 j $520.29 
7,883.45 1,000.00 
7.730.93 2,000.00 

10,825.20 



$2.79. 
2.98: 
3,07! 
2.97; 



•Taken from iuciUentdil expenses. 



RECEIPTS. 



11.74 
'5.52 I 
i9.19 
17.98 
!2.77 



$415.67 
521.12 
500.35 
469.46 
407.89 



'Tolal ordwiaryl 



$3,047.58 $459.45. $7,902.04 I $4,593.77 I $1,600.00 $70,605.23 $50l),095.11 | $210,000.00 



576.70 
752.0(1 
713.44 
573.6G 



9.7I5..'i7 
8,350.74 
16,097.38 
59,611.24 



4,708.68 I 1,800.00 



3,779.52 
5,881.98 
5,199.36 



2,000.36 
1,814.64 
1,833.24 



83,474.79 i 558,073.58 

I 
104,170.08 ' 505,553.67 



110,210.29 
119,774.50 



074,088.04 
723,486.57 



150,000.00 
226,000.00 
250,000.00 
200,000.00 



Boniletl. , 

$5,000.00 I $46,032.47 
101,150.00 I 61,076.55 
300,000.00 j 01,076.55 | 4,900.50 
255,000.00 |.... 
375,250.00 1 



$3,920.25 
4,199.25 



$22,059.03 I $73,275.55 
25,849.65 78,101.94 
25,743.05 82,044.77 
379.38 



2,598.75 28,301.49 
2,613.75 28,357.49 



52,472.63 



$5,287.50 
6,010.88 
6,940.42 
7,252.97 
4,700.28 



and stiite ta.xos 

$305,574.80 
420,388.27 
712,:'05.29 
615,532.59 

1,386,940.72 



iiiK the yyiiv, 

inclutnng 
cash on liand. 



$951,221.93 
1,077,651.99 
1,374,336.14 
1,400,396.09 
1,463,053.02 



EXPENDITURES. 



S,892.25 
5,555.31 
9,000.88 
4,880.56 
4,759.77 



$1,198.31 
1,293.79 
1,430.70 
1,122.75 
1,323.66 



8ocond.8trt'ut 
I uiKl South 
Malii-tttt'uul 
bl-lflguH. 



$42,908.78 $2,072.25 

38,746.31 3,133.fi«i 

40,517.97 , 4,453.73 j $.52,030.00 
41,223.92 I 2,900.32 I 28,450.44 
40.8OO.7I I 8,327.72 



$5,290.73 
0.129.08 
9,733.48 
0,998.40 
0,021.20 



$55,409.73t 
3U,724.65t 
8,291.15 
5,201.01 
4,803.19 



Now scwefS. 



$43,097.80 
52,970.91 
74,888.20 



EnKlnoer* 
depart. 
Sinking mum. 



$6,000.00 
6,000.00 
10,000.00 



i $3,499.90 

! 4,100.01 
i 

5,048.84 

5,010.72 

4,767.25 



$1,904.00 
2,424.01 
3,253.13 
3,468.93 



$4,044.86 
4,995.01 
5,263.08 
4,964.67 



3,996.76 1 4,358.00 




5,718.06 1,027.23 



Books Printing 
and tttQ. and udvtir 
tlonery. tislng. 



$62.60 $396.10 

299.73 i 333.76 

71.93 ' 411.80 

55.92 I 312.08 

07.25 ' .358-23 



Contin- 
gent ex- 
penses. 



Evening Teachers' sal' 



$931.92 
1,229.99 
2,137.21 
1,530.40 
1,520.07 



$3,715.75 
4,060.77 
4,135.09 
4,449.16 
4,728.82 



$1,004.53 

973.93 

1,257.20 

935.01 



$49,398.52 
54,600.36 
59,4.S7.65 
03,151.03 



1,450.93 08,499.21 



inlttees 
and truant 
officers. 



fl,030.00' 
1,030.00 
1,050.00 
1,025.00 
1,090.07 



of schools. 



$2,OC0.0Ol 
2,O00.W 
2,150.00 
2,300.00 
2,300.00 



$552.71 
405.15 
632.37 
442.40 
436.00 



$3,210.73 
3,489.31 
4,456.68 
4,484.36 
4,915.35 



$1,091.50 
1,447.54 
1,349.10 



$3,525.73 , $1,000.00 
3,808.44 ' 1.000.00 
4,149.02 1,000.00 

3,283.31 I 1,000.00 

I 
3.740.05 , I,0U0.00 



EXPENDITURES.-coNTiNUKD. 



.■unucrt.A«cs. 


CUAUITV, PATRIOTISM, PHILANTlinOfV. ' 




Funded debt. 


Temporary 
loan. 






Total of loan 
debt and 

state and eoun. 
ty tax ex. 
pcndlturo. 

$289,567.47 
406,591.55 
392,091.65 
459,110.37 
429,610.33 


Grand total of 
expenditures. 

$858,031.79 
981,174.81 
1,257,660.68 
1,329,683.19 
1,320,664.72 




- Pine Gi-ove 
comotei7. 


Land. 


Valley com- 
otery. 


Receiving 
loinh. 

$520.00 
295.22 


Anioitkcng 
cemetery. 


K. Man. 
Chester 

lery. 


Paupers oir 
the farm. 


City farm. ,P»|U,». 


Indigent 
auldlers. 


• . ' i 
Decoration „.„^ i *a?.i"„",V,'i' Celehration, Five beds, 
of soldiers' „°';2,. JJllltla. „',V^i^ Fonrth of 1 Elliot 
graves. 'JOnoe™- Hospital. -""J • """Pltal. 


soered „y ward, ' menls. 
Heart i-niiothos. 
Hospital. pitai 


Tolul of ordl. 
nuiy municipal 
expenditures. 


state lax. 


County tax. 


Cash on 
Imnd. 


$5,941.34 
6,840.97 


$2,794.79 

$520.29 2,982.85 






$4,928.24 
5,726.94 
7,545.63 
9,866.88 

10,450.84 


$6,612.89 

8,259.17 


$900.40 
201.40 






' ' $2,567.24 

2,794..53 

1 
$260.00 , 3,145.10 

600.00 4,918.76 

600.00 1 $300.00 2,989.78 


$508,404.32 
574,.i83.26 
805,469.13 
870,572.82 
890,954.35 


$100.00 1 $180,000.00 
99,900.00 i 180,000.00 
65,400.00 i 200,000.00 


$63,435.00 
66,615.00 
65,615.00 
65,615.00 
65,615.00 


$46,032.47 
61,076.55 
61,076.55 
63,896.37 
63,895.37 


$93,190.14 


$178.09 
602.97 
154.24 


$99.36 


321.76 


900.00 


500.00 ' ' 900 00 


96,477.18 


7,883.45 1,000.00 i 3,079.60 

1 
7,730.93 2,000.00 1 2,973.02 


9,023.37 

8,486.35 


246.25 
292.00 
277.00 


342.98 

360 DO 


900.00 
900.00 
700.00 


600.00 i • 600.00 


116,775.46 
76,712.90 


10,825.20 




2,982.49 




150.00 




8,165.68 1 $100.00 


361.93 $300.00 


600.00 $1,000.00 j 600.00 


100.100.00 


200,000.00 


143,088.90 



PAYMENT OF FUNDED DEBT. 511 



Interest. 



Appropriation ..... ^25,000.00 
Transferred from water-works . , 42,620.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 2,014.56 



Expenditures. 

Paid R. L. Day & Co., discount on 
one note of $100,000, eight 
months twenty days, at 3 9-10 
per cent .... $2,816.66 
Manchester National Bank, in- 
terest coupon No. 46 from 
bond No. 32 . . . 30.00 

Curtis «& Motley, discount on 
four notes of $25,000 each, 
four months nineteen days, 
at 3 per cent . . . 1,141.67 

coupons on cemetery bonds . 1,557.23 

coupons on security bonds . 2,500.00 

coupons on city bonds . . 8,615.00 
coupons on improvement bonds 10,334.00 
coupons on water bonds . . 42,594.00 
coupons on water bonds . . 26.00 

coupons on bridge bonds . . 20.00 



$69,634.56 



Total expenditures .... $69,634.56 



Payment of Funded Debt. 

Cash received for water bonds sold . $100,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . 100.00 



$100,100.00 



512 



report of the city auditor. 

Expenditures. 



Paid city bond No. 8, dated October 
31, 1S63, and payable Novem- 
ber I, 1893 • • • • 
water bonds, due July i, 1895 



$100.00 
100,000.00 



$100,100.00 



Appropriation . 



Sinking Fund. 



Expenditures. 



;io,ooo.oo 



Paid commissioners of sinking fund, sinking fund 

for improvement bonds .... $10,000.00 



Reserved Fund. 




Balance from old account . • ^23 


043.40 


Appropriation . . . -5 


,000.00 


Transferred from the following accounts : 




Printing and stationery 


544.20 


Mayor's incidentals 


22.90 


City officers' salaries . 


492.25 


Auditor's department . 


48.93 


Street and park commission . 


85-84 


Watering streets .... 


.24 


Scavenger service .... 


240.23 


Street sweeping .... 


176-45 


Lighting streets .... 


199.29 


Repairs of sewers .... 


196.81 


Widening Elm street . 


.98 


Health department 


3-24 


Books and stationery . 


132-75 



RESERVED FUND, 



513 



Contingent expenses . 


^79-93 


Evening school, mechanical draw- 




ing 


114.00 


Free text-books . 


84.65 


Manual training . 


150.90 


Fire-alarm telegraph 


67.91 


Police commission 


3,079.21 


Ward 5 ward -room 


47-51 


Valley cemetery . . . . 


17-51 


Indigent soldiers . 


23.00 


Decoration of soldiers' graves 


38.07 


Abatement of taxes 


10.22 


Free cash in treasury in excess o 


f 


appropriations . 


14,644.96 


EXPENDITUI 


lES. 


By transfers to the following account 


s: 


Interest .... 


$2,014.56 


City hall .... 


3,219.01 


Incidental expenses 


1,551-12 


Repairs of highways 


5»i2i.33 


Snow and ice . . . 


387.16 


New highways 


i>273.39 


Land taken for highways 


995.00 


Paving streets 


381.51 


Macadamizing streets . 


201.40 


Grading for concrete . 


543-05 


Bridges .... 


5)327-72 


City teams .... 


21.26 


Engineer's department . 


267.25 


Repairs of schoolhouses 


358.00 


Fuel 


218.06 


Furniture and supplies . 


227.23 


Printing and advertising 


8.23 


33 





5,545-38 



514 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Care of rooms . . . . 


$28.82 


Evening schools . . . . 


156.93 


Teachers' salaries . 


1,499.21 


Fire department . 


6,346.73 


Police court 


1,154.14 


Police station 


382-35 


Sub-police station, ward 8 


843.82 


Repairs of buildings . 


741.69 


Lincoln school curbing 


142.65 


Repairs of city hall 


11,016.77 


Commons .... 


215.02 


Pine Grove cemetery . 


825.20 


Paupers off the farm 


450.84 


City farm .... 


165.68 


Addition Bakersville schoolhouse 


1,200.00 


Widening Mast street . 


874-96 


Payment of funded debt 


100.00 


South Manchester hosehouse 


285.29 







^48,545-38 



Temporary Loan. 



Receipts. 

Received from Curtis & Motley, on 
four notes of $25,000 
each, dated July 27, 1895, 
and payable December 
15, 1895 
from R. L. Day & Co., on 
three notes of $25,000 
each, and two notes of 
$10,000 each, and one 
note of $5,000, all dated 
March 15, 1895^ and 
payable December 5, 
189s .... 



$100,000.00 



100,000.00 



$200,000.00 



CITY HALL. 515 



Expenditures. 



Paid Curtis & Motley, four notes of 
;g25,ooo each, dated July 27, 
1895, and payable December 
15, 1895 .... ^100,000.00 
R. L. Day & Co., three notes of 
^25,000 each, two notes of 
;$io,ooo each, and one note of 
55,000, all dated March 15, 
1895, and payable December 
5, 1895 .... 100,000.00 



5200,000.00 



City Hall. 



Appropriation ..... $2,700.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 3,219.01 



,919.01 



Expenditures. 



FUEL AND LIGHTS. 



Paid Manchester Electric Light Co., 

electric lights .... $121-60 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas . . 266.14 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 284.11 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., 90,780 lbs. 

egg coal ..... 260.99 
Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 15 tons 

broken coal .... i4.3'75 
Paid Moore & Preston : 

I cord sawed wood .... 6.50 

20 i-io tons broken coal . . . 1^5-5 7 

Paid D. M. Poore, 2 cords slabs . . 8.00 



51,216.66 



516 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WATER AND TELEPHONE. 

Paid New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., use of telephones . $83.81 
Manchester Water-Works, use of 

water ..... 480.00 



CLEANING OFFICES, LAUNDRY WORK, ETC. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey, brooms, mops, 

toilet paper, etc. . . . $18.71 

T. F. Fifield, matches, soap . . 1.58 

Mrs. Mary Higgins, cleaning offices 6.20 

J. J. Holland, soap, chamois, etc. 5.10 

J. S. Holt & Co., 70 gallons soap 8.74 
R. K. Home, pans, brushes, mop 

waste ..... I. ID 

India Alkali Works, i keg Savogran 8.58 

Florence Marston, cleaning offices 24.00 

Ida McPherson, cleaning offices . 1,20 
Mary Nolan, cleaning offices and 

care ladies' toilet . . . 232.40 

Mrs. Hannah Quinn, cleaning halls 5.60 
John B. Varick Co., brooms, dust- 
ers, keys, waste baskets, chamois, 

brushes, etc. . . . . 24.78 



INCIDENTAL REPAIRS. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paint and labor . $4-04 
D. J. Adams, fitting keys, repair- 
ing locks 9.55 

Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

Repairing locks, etc. . . . 2.23 

8 keys . , ' . . . . . 2.00 



$563-81 



$337-99 



CITY HALL. 517 

Paid A. A. & E. W, Bunton, reseating 

chairs ..... $4-25 

James R. Carr & Co., paint, glass, 

labor ..... 1.92 

Joel Daniels & Co., changing glass 

in window .... 2.00 

W. E. Goodwin, repairs, public 

comfort ..... .70 

Peter Harris, repairing lock, key . i.oo 

The Head & Dowst Co., labor . 1.30 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., repairing chair .25 

Paid George Holbrook : 

Material and labor on windows and 

doors ...... 6.80 

Clearing snow off roof . . . 17.00 

Paid Frank I. Lessard & Co. : 

Filter, hose nipple, labor on same . 1.50 

Covering steam pipes . . . 75-00 

Paid T. A. Lane Co. : 

Pipe, labor on gas pipes, electric 

lights, boiler, water-closets, etc. . 122.68 

Labor on telephone .... 82.60 

Labor on gas pipes and wires in tower 30.77 

Paid Daniel Mahoney, labor putting up 

awnings ...... 2.25 

Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 

Ash cans, globes, repairs . . . 6.00 

Material and labor, engineer's office . 24.50 

Paid Sanborn Carriage Co., repairing 

furnace tools . . . . . 1.70 



FURNITURE, FIXTURES, OFFICE SUPPLIES. 

Paid E. M. Bryant & Co., wiring and 

fixtures for electric lights . . $549.01 



1.00.04 



518 



REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid W. C. Clarke, i leather couch, 2 

willow chairs, for office . . $76.75 
Derby Desk Co., i desk, 11 chairs, 

I inkstand, mayor's office . 200.00 
Paid R. D. Gay : 

Large and small awnings . . . 348-39 

50 shades ..... 72.26 

Making over burnt awning . . 4.00 

6 hooks ...... .30 

Paid Hey wood Bros. & Co., 12 arm- 
chairs, aldermen's room . . . 42.00 
Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co. : 

I office table ..... 6.00 

T oak table, mayor's office . . 9.00 

I hall seat, mayor's office . . . 9.50 

1 jardiniere stand, mayor's office . 3.00 

I oak mirror stand, mayor's office . 7.50 

I umbrella stand, mayor's office . 1.50 

6 tumblers, mayor's office . . . -^3 

13 i/^ dozen chairs, city hall . . 60.00 

12 cuspidors ..... 7.20 

I chair cushion, city messenger. . i.co 

I mattress, janitor .... 2.50 

I table, overseers poor . ^ . 7.50 

I umbrella stand, clerk . . . 1.50 
Paid R. K. Home : 

6 cuspidors ..... 3.00 

Flower-pot saucers, towel rack, soap 

dish, mayor's office ... i.oo 
Paid Manchester Locomotive Works, i 

horizontal tubular boiler . . 700.00 
Manchester Hardware Co., rope, 

sash cord, wire, bolts, etc. . 6.14 
C. H. McKenney & Co., chande- 
liers, gas and electric fixtures . 263.50 



CITY HALL. 



519 



Paid J. B. McCrillis &: Son : 

I No. 6 Remington type-writer, city 

clerk $97-5° 

I roll-top desk, city clerk . . . 45-oo 

Paper, carbon, ribbon, etc., city clerk 7.65 

Paid J. Y. McQueston Co., i roll-top 

desk, overseers poor .... 32.00 

Paid N. H. Furniture Co.: 

I bookcase and drapery, city clerk . '4-75 

1 flat table desk, city clerk . . 40.00 

2 office chairs, city clerk . . . 8.00 
I office chair, mayor . . . 4.00 

Paid D. A. Simons : 

I desk, street and park commission . 25.00 

13 chairs, overseers poor . . . ip-S^ 

Paid James P. Slattery : 

I cuckoo clock, mayor's office . . 15-00 

I Dutch clock, mayor's office . . 10.00 

Paid I. L. Stickney : 

Rubber hose . . . . . 9.15 

.2 rubber mats, mayor . . . 3.50 

10 yards enameled cloth, assessors , 3.50 

10 yards green muslin ... .30 

Paid Syndicate Furniture Co.: 

I roll-top desk, assessors . .' . 25.00 

1 flat desk, assessors .... 13-00 
10 office chairs, assessors . . . 37-50 

Paid C. P. Trickey, i copy-holder, clerk 1.50 
Union Electric Co., furniture, fix- 
tures, superintendent's office . 150.00 
George P. Wallace, i ribbon and 

carbon paper, mayor . . 1.25 
Paid Weston & Hill Co.: 

2 new awnings, hanging 2 old awnings 6.50 



520 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

68 yards linoleum and laying, asses- 
sors $72.08 

39 yards linoleum and laying, clerk . 27.69 

I mat, superintendent schools . . 15-85 

12 towels, soap, crash, mayor . . 3.16 

Paid C. H. Wood, painting 5 tin signs 10.00 



$3,081.26 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell, ice daily from May 

9, 1895, to August I, 1S95 . . $5.60 

Paid A. Elliott & Co. : 
Policy No. 415,416, on plate glass . 25.00 

Policy on building .... 30.00 

Paid C. M. Edgerly, premium on policy 

No. 587, on building . . 50.00 

Emergency Hand Fire Extin- 
guisher Co., 20 large extinguish- 
ers . . . . • • 40.00 
Charles L. Harmon, premium on 

insurance policy, on building . 30.00 

J. G. Jones, freight and truckage 6.23 

Paige & Myrick, steel stamp . 2.40 

pay-roll, division 2, December . 3.00 

Richardson & Goggin, premium on 

policy No. 5603 . . . 25.00 

S. B. Stearns, premium on policy 

No. 46,397 .... 50.00 

Stark & Blanchet, premium on pol- 
icy No. 5284 .... 30.00 
Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co. : 

I iron wheelbarrow . . . . 12.25 

Pulley block, wrench, etc. . . 2.72 

Paid J. H. Wiggin & Co., fly paper . .30 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



521 



Paid Weston & Hill Co., use of flag for 
mayor's office, July 4 ' . 
John W. Wilson, trucking safe, 
chairs, couch, etc. 

Total expenditures 



5-75 



ii9-2.S 



1,919.01 



Printing and Stationery. 



Appropriation 


• 


Expenditures. 




ASSESSORS. 




Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 




Advertising notice 7 times 


^7-87 


Printing 20 additions to ward 6 list . 


3-5° 


Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 




33 blank books, 3 canvas covers 


S3.62 


150 postals and printing . 


2.50 


Ink, pens, pencils, blocks, inkstands, 




blotting paper, penholders 


^3-3^ 


Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising 




notice 7 times ..... 


5-46 



^2,500.00 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

25,000 blank bills . . . $25.00 

E. J. Knowlton, postmaster, 1,500 

envelopes . . . . 32.70 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

I canvas cover ..... i.oo 

Pencils, blank books, etc. . . . 3.65 



$116.28 



>2-35 



522 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY CLERK. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing: 

i,ooo license blanks .... 

700 blanks ..... 

Paid The Nate Kellogg Co., printing 

500 blanks .... 

Temple & Farrington Co., ink, 

blocks, envelopes, rubber bands 



^6.80 
9.00 

2.25 

14.61 



$32.66 



CITY TREASURER. 

Paid The Nate Kellogg Co., printing 

1,000 blanks .... 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper, 

envelopes, rubber bands, etc. 
Thomas H. Tuson, printing 600 
receipts 



21.44 



CITY AUDITOR. 




Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing : 




350 tabular statements 


$9-1S 


400 note circulars .... 


14.00 


800 annual reports .... 


1,136-53 


300 billheads ..... 


4.00 


200 postals ..... 


2.00 


Binding 155 reports .... 


155-00 


55 reports lettered .... 


5-5° 


95 reports stamped with seal 


•95 


Labels, etc. ..... 


3-05 


Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 8 blank 




books, city scales .... 


26.34 



$27.64 



^1,357-12 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



523 



CITY COUNCIL AND COMMITTEES. 



Paid American Bank Note Co., engrav- 
ing and printing school loan 
bonds .... 
Frank H. Challis, 500 blanks 
Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

1,450 envelopes 

4,000 note headings . 

3,800 blanks .... 

400 roll cards, 12 ward lists 

300 pamphlets, inaugural address 

300 manilla envelopes 

Binding laws .... 

Stamping name on books . 
Paid The Nate Kellogg Co. : 

300 rosters .... 

1,000 certificates 

Reprinting 200 petitions . 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Mucilage, envelopes, letter heads, 
mayor's office .... 

Blank book and cover 
Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising 

Dog licenses, 18 times 

Proposals for sub-police station . 
Paid J. Arthur Williams, postals, labels, 

blanks . . • . 



1165.00 
4.00 

9-50 
13.00 

33-00 
8.00 

26.00 

1. 00 

1.25 

•75 

22.50 

5-25 
1. 00 



S-iS 
9.00 

22.50 
11.26 

9.60 



5347-76 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid E. R. Coburn Co., typewriter pa- 
per, mayor . . . . 



.14 



524 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co., letter 
heads, note books, envelopes, 
ink, paper, etc. 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund . 



5.85 



$11.99 
544.20 



Incidental Expenses. 



i2,5O0.O0 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



$12,000.00 
1,551-12 







Expenditures. 






LABOR. 


id labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls : 


January 


$30.00 


February 










24.00 


March . 










24.00 


April . 










30.00 


May 










24.00 


June 










36.76 


July . 










30.00 


August . 










24.00 


September . 










24.00 


October 










30.00 


November 










24.00 


December 










24.00 



!i3, 551-12 



$324.76 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



525 



BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS. 



Paid 0. D. Abbott 






$5.00 


H. J. Achard 






11.50 


D. S. Adams 






6.25 


A. A. E. Brien . 






62.75 


John L. Burnham 






8.25 


I. L. Carpenter . 






16.75 


J. A. Chevalier . 






19-75 


Charles Corey 






•25 


N. L. Colby 






9-75 


Henry E. Cooke . 






4.00 


Mary L. Dan forth 






20.75 


C. W. Downing . 






12.25 


Charles E. Dodge 






15-75 


Clarence M. Dodge 






11-75 


E. B. Dunbar 






14.25 


L. M. French 






22.50 


George Frechette 






19.50 


E. N. Fugere 






72.50 


J. E. Fortier 






35-75 


C. F. Flanders . 






53-75 


Moise Guerin 






46.50 


F. M. Garland . 






2.00 


P. Hevey . 






8.75 


J. A. Jackson 






15-50 


M. E. Kean • . 






24-75 


N. P. Kidder 






513-20 


P. G. Laberge 






25-25 


J. E. A. Lanouette 






29-75 


J. D. Lemay 






37-25 


Urban Lemay 






6.50 


J. E. Lemaitre . • . 






26.25 


J. W. D. McDonald . 






30.50 


Jacob W. Mooar . 






5.00 


G. B. Morey 






12.50 



526 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid W. H. Morrison . 






$6.50 


C. S. Murkland . 






3-75 


W. H. Pattee . 






7-75 


Frederick Perkins 






12.25 


J. E. E. Roy 






8.50 


Gillis Stark . 






30-25 


A. G. Straw 






4.00 


C. B. Sturtevant . 






10.00 


E. Sylvain . 






18.75 


R. L. True . 






3-75 


E. C. Tremblay . 






1. 00 


L. Tremblay 






4-5° 


Florian Widman . 






4-75 


G. L. Wakefield . 






4.25 


A. F. Wheat 






6.00 



$1,332-70 



DAMAGES AND JUDGMENTS. 

Paid Seth C. Austin, damages to horse, 

harness, and wagon . . . $20.00 

Benjamin F. Batchelder, damages 

to premises by water . . 15-00 

Lydia M. Beckwith, damages to 

carpet by water . . . 5.00 

Sarah E. Butterfield, settlement of 

suit ...... 400.00 

George W. Dearborn, damage to 

real estate . . . . 22.00 

A. P. French, damage to real estate 11.00 

C. 11. Hutchinson, damage to poul- 
try by dogs .... 15-00 

Andrew Leckie, damage to real 

estate ..... 40.00 

S. H. Mead, settlement of suit . 125.00 

W. H. H. Perkins, settlement of 

damages for injury to horse . 60.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 527 

Paid Adlaid Sevigny, damages caused 

by changing grade of street . $250.17 

Mrs. Luvillo Smith, damage to 

poultry by dogs . . . 3.00 

C. F. & M. A. Willey, personal 
damages . . . . ■ . 70.00 

Wm. Woodbury, settlement of dam- 
ages to real estate . . . 11.00 



LEGAL EXPENSES. 

Paid W. C. Clarke, council fees incurred 

legislative session, 1895 . . . $100.00 
Paid county commissioners : 

Case, Sevigny v. city . . . 27.60 

Case, Moore v. city .... 38.60 

Paid Alpheus Gay, services as referee . 10.00 

Warren Harvey, estimating dam- 
ages, Dow case . . . 10.00 
Thomas Hobbs, summoning wit- 
nesses ..... 4.00 

E. F. Jones, services before legis- 
lative committees, etc. . . 296.17 

Thomas D. Luce, certifying ap- 
peals, etc. .... 3.20 

W. H. Orrill, services case Canney 

v. city ..... 4.00 

R. J. Peaslee, opinion, matter of 

teachers' salaries . . . 5.00 

F, T. E. Richardson, procuring 

waivers, Silver-street sewer . 10.00 

Paid W. J. Starr : 

Summoning witnesses . . . 1.74 

Services procuring waivers for dam- 
ages from abutters on Candia road 33-oo 
Paid Ezra S. Stearns : 

Engrossing acts .... 4.50 

Certified copies .... 2.00 



;i,o47.i7 



$549.81 



528 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 



Paid American Bank Note Co. : 

Engraving alterations, and furnishing 

loo improvement bonds 
Engraving text and printing loo water 
bonds ...... 

Paid Fred L. Allen : 

Expenses to Boston and return . 
Expenses to Concord and return 
Woodcut of signature 
Paid John A. Barker, cash paid for car 
fares ..... 

G. W. Bailey, hacks and carriages 
Paid L. A. Biron & Co., advertising : 
Dog licenses three weeks . 
Proposals for fuel 
Proposals for addition to Bakersville 
schoolhouse .... 

Funeral notice .... 

Paid Boston Bank Note and Lithograph 
ing Co., 50 water loan bonds 
Boyd Brothers, hacks . 
Paid The John B. Clarke Co., publishin 
Dog licenses six weeks 
Proposals for fuel ... 
Proposals for annex, Bakersville school 
house ..... 

Printing 100 slips 

Paid Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on chairs 

N. P. Colby, expense preparing 

list of annual appropriations 
F. X. Chenette, use of barouche 
J. H. Dearborn, hacks . 



;67.oo 
75.00 

5-75 
.72 

2.00 

9-30 
82.00 

6.00 
5.00 

4.00 
3.00 

75.00 
10.00 

30.00 
15-50 

16.18 

•75 

•25 

13-54 

5.00 

10.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



529 



Paid Deutsche Post, advertising : 




Dog licenses 


$9.00 


Proposals for fuel .... 


1.50 


Paid James E. Dodge : 




Expenses to Concord 


1.25 


Expenses to Boston .... 


12.80 


Cash paid for telegrams, express, etc. 


1.60 


Paid P. Donovan, Jr., hacks 


70.00 


W. J. Freeman, hacks . 


40.00 


E. T. James, hacks 


86.00 


Kean & Doyle, hacks , . : 


80.00 


E. J. Knowlton, P. M., stamps 


30.00 


Paid L'Avenir National, advertising : 




Dog licenses 


6.00 


Proposals for fuel .... 


3.00 


Proposals for annex to Bakersville 




schoolhouse ..... 


3-5^ 


Paid Manchester Street Railway, use three 




barges 


15.00 


N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., 




use of telephone, city solicitor . 


32-25 


J. C. Nichols & Son, hacks . 


10.00 


Plummer & Brown, use of carriages 


10.00 


Paid S. B. Putnam : 




Expenses to Concord and Boston 


4.07 


Expenses to Boston to deliver bonds . 


13.20 


Paid 0. G. Reed, hacks 


i79-5» 


Paid C. H. Simpson : 




Hacks 


30.00 


Use of team ..... 


3.00 


Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising: 




Proposals for annex,Bakersville school- 




house ...... 


10.76 


Proposals for fuel .... 


15-37 


Paid Upton's N. H. Furniture Store, i 




oak table, i office chair . 


23-50 


Whitten & Fifield, hacks 


10.00 



;i, 137.29 



34 



530 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, sharpening lawn 

mower ..... $o-2^ 

John A. Barker, care of boiler . 133-00 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 

on plaster casts . . . 9.44 

Geo. Holbrook, lumber and labor 

on Lincoln statue . . . 14.90 

John Rogers, expenses from New 
Canaan, Conn., to city in rela- 
tion to Lincoln statue . . 20.00 



CITY SCALES. 




Paid H. E. Blanchard, testing and seal- 




ing scales .... 


$r.5o 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., >4 cord hard 




wood ..... 


4-5° 


Clark M. Bailey, brooms, duster. 




etc. 


3.20 


E. R. Coburn Co., tablets, pen- 




cils, etc. ..... 


1.61 


Paid John Driscoll : 




Revolving smoke-jack, iron, labor 


13.00 


Stove, pipe, zinc, and labor 


19-45 


Paid Asa B. Eaton, cash paid for repairs 




on lock ..... 


•15 


The Fairbanks Co., examining and 




adjusting hay scale . 


6.75 


Paid D. M. Poore : 




2 tons coal 


12-75 


^ cord hard wood .... 


6.00 


Paid The Head & Dowst Co., lumber 




and labor ..... 


.68 



$177-59 



$69.59 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



531 



MILK INSPECTOR. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co., advertising notice two 
weeks $5.25 



RELATING TO STREETS. 

Paid George B. Cressey, painting and 
lettering street signs 

John Moss, expense repairing road 
leading from Bald Hill road to 
house ..... 

C. H. Sargent & Co., 140 shade 



^24.10 



trees 


140. CO 


Union Manufacturing Co., 1,000 




plated house numbers 


45.00 


MAYOR. 




Paid W. C. Clarke, services of type- 




writer . . . . 


^6.75 


Grace E. Downer, services as clerk 


329-75 


Paid Daniels & Downs : 




Typewriter supplies .... 


3-70 


Stenographer's services 


9-85 


Paid Edson C. Eastman : 




I copy laws, 'gi and '93 . 


2.00 


I copy Statutes of New Hampshire . 


10.00 


Paid W. P. Goodman 




I copy Reed's rules .... 


•75 


24 pencils 


1. 00 


34 copies directory .... 


68.00 


Pencils and diary .... 


1.90 


Paid Kirby Floral Co., i palm 


10.00 


Florence M. Kidder, 1 7 hours cler- 




ical services .... 


4-25 



;2i9.io 



532 



REPORT OF THE CITI AUDITOR. 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co : 




I inkstand ..... 


^2.00 


I dictionary stand .... 


3.00 


I Bible , . 


3.00 


Record books, etc 


3-91 


Paid George P. Wallace : 




I Smith Premier typewriter, without 




baseboard and cover 


95.00 


I typewriter ribbon .... 


1. 00 


Paid Belle Wilson, services as stenog- 




rapher ..... 


20.25 


John B. Varick Co., hooks, cast- 




ings, etc. .... 


1. 00 



;77-ri 



ASSESSORS. 

Paid B. W. Robinson, horse hire, deliv- 
ering inventory blanks 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 
I copy Laws .... 
Rebinding Public Statutes 

TAX COLLECTOR 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., du 

plicate tax, Frank L. Griffin 
Burton W. Buck, 2^4 days labor 
Concord Evening Monitor, adver 

tising tax-list . 
The John B. Clarke Co., advertis 

ing sale non-resident taxes 
H. E. Daniels, typewriting three 

copies tax-list . 
E. J. Knowlton, P. M., 1,000 

cent stamped envelopes 
Manchester Hardware Co., 6 hooks 



;i-25 

1. 00 

•75 



$7-67 
5.00 

7-50 

36.98 

3.00 

21.80 
•OS 



?.oo 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 533 

Paid G. E. Morrill : 

Over-payment on account non-resi- 
dent tax, 1893 .... $3^-45 
Taxes of 1894 sold and purchased by 

city 4,405.80 

Delivering tax bills .... 93-88 

Paid Novelty Advertising Co., i set dates i.io 

Francis Pratt, Jr., 3 gross pens . 4.50 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

I tax-book ..... 10-50 

Blotting paper, blank books . . 1.99 



- $4,631.22 



CITY CLERK. 



Paid J. D. Bartley, 6 book-holders . $0.75 

E. R. Coburn Co., 6 blank books 60.00 

J. J. Holland, chamois . . .40 
J. G. Jones, freight and cartage, 

desk ..... 3.65 
Florence M. Kidder, services as 

clerk ..... 468.00 
Pike & Heald Co., 4 tin boxes . 7.72 
Sampson, Murdock & Co., i Bos- 
ton Register and Directory . 2.00 
Temple & Farrington Co., envel- 
opes, inky inkstand, etc. . . 6.06 
Union Publishing Co., i N. H. 

Directory .... 2.00 

C. H. Wood, lettering 4 tin boxes .85 



$55^-43 



CITY TREASURER. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber and labor . $0.66 

Amoskeag National Bank, use of 

safe in bank vault one year . 25.00 

Blanche E. Bullock, services as 

clerk 512.00 



534 



REPORT OF TEE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid W. p. Goodman : 

Inkstands .... 

I Shannon file . . ... 
Paid T. Lyons, 2 gross pens 

Pike & Heald Co., 4 tin boxes 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Paper and twine 

20 document boxes . 

1 blank book and canvas cover 
7 M pay envelopes . 

2 pieces board . 
Paid Win gate & Gould, i satchel 



^i.oo 
1.50 
4.00 
1. 12 

1-55 

1.60 

11.25 

5-25 

•25 

2-35 



^567-53 



COURT HOUSE. 

Paid D. J. Adams, repairing lawn mower ^2.00 

Clark M. Bailey, broom and mop .75 

Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 

I ash can . . . . . . 1.75 

Hose splicers, bands, and labor . .50 

Paid D. M. Poore, 22 tons 995 lbs. coal 129.36 

Timothy P. Shea, services as janitor 521.67 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

Phosphate and lawn seed . . . 12.60 

Sponges, brooms, nails, duster . . 2.66 

GRANITE BRIDGE. 



'1. 29 



Paid Harry J. Briggs, 3 days' labor and 

carfare . . . . . $1-1^ 

Thomas A. Lane Co., material and 

labor 18.53 

E. K. Turner, services as consulting 
engineer on grade crossings and 
Granite bridge, and expenses . 320.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 535 

Paid G. W. Wales, 6i days' labor and 

carfare ..... ^16.45 

H. L. Watson, 62 days' labor and 

carfare ..... 9.90 

^372.58 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid American Express Co., express on 

reports ..... $7-25 

George W. Bailey, use of horse and 

driver for ambulance . . 2.00 

J. L. Burnham, M. D., services, 

Huntress case .... 3.00 

Charles M. Bailey, examining two 
horses ..... 4.00 

Bobrick School Furniture Co., 4 

teachers' desks .... 44.00 

John Bickford, services as coroner 3.00 

Jerry Burke, 2 nights stoker of en- 
gine at Amoskeag ledge . . 3.00 

Concord Foundry Co., i fountain 
and stand .... 110.00 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on fountain and stand . . 1.50 

I. L. Carpenter, M. D., 4 visits, 

Mr. Sallsville .... 6.00 

W. H. Carpenter, burying horse . 4.50 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., i ton 

coal 5.75 

A. L. Dodge, examining glandered 

horse ..... 7.00 

estate D. C. Whittemore, right, of 

way, April i, 1894, to July i, 1895 25.00 

Frank A. Emerson, grading Rim- 

mon school yard . . . 300.00 

H. B. Fairbanks, services and ad- 
vertising real estate . . . i5o-5o 



636 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid First Light Battery, powder, pri- 
mers, cartridges, and firing na- 
tional salute, July 4 . . . $42.00 

J. L. Golden, examining horse . 2.00 

Hale & Whittemore, i gold frame 

for ex-Mayor Worthen's portrait 3.50 

H. W. Herrick, water color por- 
trait ex-Mayor Worthen . . 8.00 

J. G. Jones, delivering city reports 1.50 

E. J. Knowlton, postmaster, postage 107.00 
Carl Koehler & Son, lunch fur- 
nished men while pumping at 
Amoskeag ledge . . . 6.71 

N. H. Furniture Co., i roll-top 

desk, police commission . . 33-oo 

Paid Frederick Perkins, M. D. : 

Treatment of Jeremiah Cronin . . 3.00 

Vaccination of Ola Wooden . . i.oo 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., labor at pest 

house ..... 1.66 

Thomas Stewart, teaming sawdust 
for ward 5 ward-room, election 
day, 1894 .... 1.50 

R. P. Stevens & Co., 2 tablets, 
Rimmon and Pearl-street school- 
houses ..... 32.00 
Sulpho Napthol Co., 50 gallons 

sulpho napthol .... 100.00 

town of Goffstown, taxes on gravel 

lot . . . . . . 1.98 

F. H. Thurston, 7 vaccine points . i.oo 
John T. Underbill & Co., concrete 

work at Rimmon school . . 254,70 

C. C. Webster, watering-trough and 
maintaining same on River road 
south from 1888 to 1895 . . 21.00 



CITY OFFICEKS' SALARIES. 537 

Paid J. H. Wiggin & Co., matches . $0.15 
John W. Wilson, trucking 11 cases, 

library . . . . . 2.00 

C. H. Wood, painting signs . 4.75 



^i;304-95 

Total expenditures .... . ^13,542-37 

Dr. Mary Danforth, duplicate bill, money turned 

into treasury ..... . . 8.75 



City Officers' Salaries. 

Balance from old account . . . $61.64 

Appropriation ..... 16,700.00 



Expenditures. 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 



ii3,55i-i2 



§16,761.64 



Paid William C. Clarke, mayor . . ^i, 80c. 00 

Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer . 1,050.00 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer . . 125.00 

Nathan P. Kidder, city clerk . 900.00 

Edwin F. Jones, city solicitor . 800,00 
George L. Stearns, clerk common 

council ..... 200.00 
Thomas W. Lane, inspector of 

buildings ..... 100.00 

H. F. W. Little, milk inspector . 25.00 

Edward C. Smith, milk inspector . 275.00 

William Bailey, city weigher . 38.89 

Asa B. Eaton, city weigher . . 363.33 

John A. Barker, messenger . . 699.96 

J. K. Rhodes, messenger, two weeks 24.00 



5,401. 18 



538 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY PHYSICIAN AND OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Paid Frederick Perkins, city physician 
William H. Maxwell, ward i 
Thomas L. Quimby, ward 2 . 
Benjamin F. Garland, ward 3 
George S. Holmes, ward 4 
Patrick Costello, ward 5 
Charles Francis, ward 6 
William Marshall, ward 7 
Charles S. McKean, ward 8 
Moise Bessette, ward 9 
William C. Clarke, chairman ex 

officio, overseers poor, 1895 
William H. Maxwell, clerk of board 
Judith Sherer, matron of pest-house 



$400.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 

25.00 
100.00 
360.00 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Paid William E. Buck, superintendent 

of schools 
Curtis W. Davis, truant officer 
William C. Clarke, chairman ex 

officio .... 
E. B. Woodbury, clerk of board 
John T. Gott, president of common 

council ex officio 
Walter B. Heath, ward i 
Walter H. Lewis, ward i 
Elliot C. Lambert, ward i 
A. P. Home, ward 2 . 
Charles H. Manning, ward 2 
George D. Towne, ward 3 
Louis E. Phelps, ward 3 
Charles M. Floyd, ward 4 
N. L. Colby, ward 4 . 
James P. Slattery, ward 5 



52,300.00 
750.00 

10.00 
150.00 

10.00 
10.00 
6.67 
2.50 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



CITY OFFICERS SALARIES. 



539 



Paid W. H. Sughrue, ward 5 
Harry I. Dodge, ward 6 
Herbert E. Richardson, ward 
Marshall P. Hall, ward 7 
E. B. Woodbury, ward 7 
Luther C. Baldwin, ward 8 
Josiah G. Dearborn, ward S 
Robert E. Walsh, ward 9 
Jeremiah Sullivan, ward 9 



^7-5° 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



^3)396-67 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

Paid Henry Lewis, ward i . . . ^142.50 

John E. Stearns, ward 2 . . 166.00 

D. O. Fernald, ward 3 . . 815.00 

Harrison D. Lord, ward 4 . . 267.00 

George F. Sheehan, ward 5 . . 132.50 

George H. Dudley, ward 6 . . 467.50 

William T. Rowell, ward 7 . . 140.00 

Eugene W. Brigham, ward 8 . 403.00 

Lawrence F. Bradley, ward 9 . 120.00 

Julius Weisner, ward 9 . . i7'5o 

Hiram Forsaith, assistant . . 77'5o 

N. Nichols, assistant . . . 312.50 

John Cayzer, assistant . . . 42.50 

S. J. Lord, assistant . . . 90.00 

Henry F. Stone, assistant . . 62.50 

Isaac Whittemore, assistant . . 106.00 

H. L. Currier, clerical services . 155-00 

Louis Comeau, interpreter . . 55'Oo 

J. H. Collette, interpreter . . 22.50 

Jean B. Rejimbal, interpreter . 55-oo 

Paid A. S. Peaslee : 

Work on checklists 16 days . . 36.00 

Use of team, special election, ward 6 1.25 



^3,686.75 



540 



EEPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 



TAX COLLECTOR. 




Paid George E. Morrill : 




Salary . 


$1,650.00 


Commission on old taxes . 


24.79 








jl)i,u/4./y 


Total expenditures 


. $16,269.39 


Transferred to reserved fund 


492.25 




$16,761.64 


Auditor's Department. 


Appropriation 


. $2,000.00 


Expenditures. 




LABOR. 




Paid James E. Dodge, salary as auditor 


$1,016.67 


Paid Lizzie M. Cogswell : 




Services as clerk .... 


660.00 


Extra work December, 1894 


6.74 




dfj <Q^ ^T 




j,i,uo3.4i 


SUPPLIES, ETC. 




Paid J. J. Abbott, painting and paper- 




ing office .... 


^37-48 


Clark M. Bailey, 23 lbs. manilla 




paper ..... 


1.38 


J. J, Boyer, cleaning typewriter. 




supplies ..... 


6.00 


Paid Lizzie M. Cogswell, cash paid : 




Hammer ...... 


.10 


Washing towels .... 


1.50 


Typewriting supplies 


1.05 


Express, soap, etc. .... 


1.60 



auditor's department. 



541 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Printing letter heads and envelopes 
Binding i vol. Laws, manilla paper 
Paid E. R. Coburn Co. : 
Blotting paper, wire, etc. . 
I picture ..... 
Paid James E. Dodge, cash paid for tel 
egrams .... 
W. P. Goodman, envelopes, ink 

mucilage, etc. . 
Hale & Whittemore, pictures 
Hardy & Folsom, i mat 
Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co. : 

3 chairs ..... 
I Brussels art square 
Paid G. F. King & Merrill, 6 bottles 
paste .... 
The Kitchen, waste basket, basin 

soap-dish .... 
L. P. LaBonte, silk and cotton bat 

ting .... 

Lovejoy & Stratton, cleaning clock 
T. Lyons, i gross pens 
Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son : 
Balance due on typewriter 
I ribbon, 2 rubbers . . . . 
Paid C. S. McKean, i black walnut case 
Manchester Hardware Co., 2 balls 
twine . . . . . 
Niagara Publishing Co., i subscrip- 
tion " Municipality and Coun- 

ty" 

Charles Noll, 70 document boxes . 
John Robbie Co., cheese cloth, 
cotton . . . . . 
D. A. Simons, i jardiniere . 



510.75 
1.80 

1.25 
2.50 

•25 

7-25 
8.00 

•50 

17.00 

15.00 

.63 

2.17 

2.03 
1.50 
2.00 

57-5° 

1.03 

32.86 

.20 



2.00 
14.00 

•55 
1.25 



642 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid I. L. Stickney, 3 yards enameled 

cloth ^1.20 

A. J. Smith, I black record ribbon, 

$1 ; less 2 spools returned, 50c. .50 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 
Desk-pads, crayon .... 1.40 

I blank book and cover . . . 11.25 

Paid Upton's N. H. Furniture Co., i oak 

table 1.75 

John B. Varick Co., tacks and brush .43 

Weston & Hill Co., 4 rugs . . 20.00 

Total expenditures .... 
Transferred to reserved fund 



^267. 66 

48.93 

$2,000.00 



Mayor's Incidentals. 



Appropriation 



EXPENDITURES. 






Paid W. C. Clarke : 






Team hire ..... 


^179-75 




2 trips to Concord, 3 to Boston 


12.40 




I stamp and pad .... 


2.50 




Telegrams ..... 


5.80 




Extra stenographic labor . 


2.20 




Express ...... 


1. 10 




Incidentals 


10.85 




Paid Herbert W. Eastman, one half ex- 






pense entertaining visiting dele- 






gation from Kansas City . 


55-00 




W. J. Freeman, horse hire . 


7-50 




Total expenditures 


. 


$277.10 


Transferred to reserved fund 




22.90 




$300.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



543 



Street and Park Commission. 



Appropriation 



Expenditures. 



SALARIES. 

Paid George H. Stearns, chairman 

L. P. Reynolds .... 
H. P. Simpson .... 

CLERICAL SERVICES. 

Paid Allan E. Herrick, clerk 
Julia F. Stearns, clerk . 



CARRIAGE HIRE. 



Paid George H. Stearns 
L. P. Reynolds . 
H. P. Simpson 



^600.00 

600.00 

600.00 
$1,800.00 



■)9oo.oo 
499.50 



$150.00 
150.00 
150.00 



^1-399-50 



;o.oo 



OFFICE SUPPLIES AND FURNITURE. 



Paid D. J. Adams, keys 


^o-75 


J. J. Boyer, cleaning typewriter . 


4.00 


Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 




Printing 2oo]reports .... 


34.00 


Binding 25 pamphlets, cloth 


7-50 


Die 


1.65 


Paid E. R. Coburn Co., i ream paper . 


4-50 


W. P. Goodman, i Shannon file . 


.20 


Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co. : 




14 chairs 


28.50 


I cuspidor, i mirror .... 


1-75 


4 rugs 


20.50 


3 cushions 


3-75 


Repairing chairs .... 


6.50 



544 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid E. J. Knowlton,P. M., i,ooo envel- 
opes 

The Lyon Platinum Pen Co., 3 

gross pens 
Morgan, Grossman & Co., i lb 

rubber bands ... 
Pike & Heald Co., 9 tin boxes 
A. J. Smith, 12 pencils 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 
Blank books, letter heads, envelopes 
Ink, inkstand, deskpads, etc. 
I letter book .... 
Paid George P. Wallace : 

4 reams paper .... 
I ribbon ..... 
Paid Weston & Hill Co., i drapery, 
poles, etc. .... 

J. A. Williams, 2,000 blank orders 

SUNDRIES. 



5-50 

2.25 
1.80 

•SO 

49.28 

4.58 
2.50 

9.60 
1. 00 

4-95 
3-75 



Paid L. M. Aldrich, sash cord and labor 
Paid Kilburn & Cross : 

Half tone plate, view So. Main-street 
bridge ...... 

Half tone plate, view park 
Paid N. E. Telephone and Telegraph Co., 
use of telephone 
G. H. Stearns, expenses to Boston 
October 5 . . . . 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



9.85 
9-85 

20.00 
3-5° 



^43-55 

5,914.16 
85.84 



|., 000.00 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



545 



Repairs of Highways. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



^19,500.00 
5^121.33 



$24,621.33 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No I : 



May 
June . 
October 



;gi46.oo 
4.20 

41.25 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 2 : 



January 










$17.88 


February 










55-31 


March . 










441.69 


April . 










769.02 


May 










405.80 


June 










1,084.04 


July . 










2,623.45 


August . 










3>35o-i8 


September , 










2,964.09 


October 










462.51 


November 










242.44 


December 










64.79 


Paid labor of men and teams, as per j 


)ay-roll, divi- 


sion No. 4 : 


May $Z°'?,1 


June 










184.99 


■ July . . 










62.75 


August . 










43.00 


October 








. 


110.00 



^191-45 



;i2,48l.20 



il.II 



35 



546 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 


sion No. 


S: 


April . 


^2.50 


May . 


140.62 


June 


. •. . . . 283.84 


August . 


24.63 


September 


14-25 


October 


26.50 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 6 



April . 












^17.41 


May 












103.62 


June 












25-50 


July . . 












28. So 


August . 












36-77 


September 












36.00 


October 










ay 


4.00 


id labor of mer 


1 and team 


s, as per p 


■roll, divi- 


sion No. " 


J : 








April . 








^141.13 


May 












288.70 


June 












603.96 


July . 












344-3° 


August . 












60.00 


September . 












101.00 


October 












III. 00 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 8 : 



April 
May 
June 



^32.75 

139-35 

96-75 



12.34 



5252. 10 



^1,650.09 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



547 



July . 
August . 
September 
November 



^83-75 

86.22 

401.71 

113. 14 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 9 .• 

April $15-38 



June . 
August . 
September 
November 



31 1. 00 
74.00 
26.25 
33-°° 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 10 : 



January 










$56.25 


March . 










81-75 


April . 










378.75 


May 










410.48 


June 










589.24 


July . 










591-37 


August . 










802.96 


September . 










421.61 


October 










1,047.05 


November 










260.78 


December 










49.64 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 1 2 : 



June . 
October 



^104.68 
143.00 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, com- 
mons : 



$953-67 



$459-63 



$4,689.88 



$247.68 



September . 



$14-50 



548 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 



Paid John H. Proctor, labor grading 

Candia road .... ^400.00 
Robert I. Stevens, building bank 

wall on Lake avenue . . 20.00 



LUMBER AND OTHER MATERIAL. 



Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 




836 feet spruce plank 


^12.54 


Lumber and labor .... 


40.54 


Paid George Holbrook, labor, lumber, 




nails 


4.50 


Paid A. C. Wallace : 




1,674 feet spruce .... 


25.11 


1,057 feet spruce fence boards, labor . 


20.86 


72 chestnut posts .... 


13-30 



^116.85 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 




Hoes, wire nails .... 


^3-oi 


I horse scraper .... 


6.00 


Other hardware .... 


.40 


Paid John B. Varick Co. : 




24 hoes 


10.00 


Snow-shovels . . . . . 


112.40 


Nails, brads, bolts, rope, chain . 


11-73 


Picks and handles . . . . 


1.80 


Hammers and handles 


2.60 


Powder and fuse 


4.60 


Other hardware 


35-62 


Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., bolts, Ian 




tern globes, etc. 


1.82 



$189.98 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 549 



BLACKSMITHING AND REPAIRS. 



Paid John Bryson, paint and labor on 




fountains 


^2.60 


James Benson, sharpening tools . 


12.13 


G. A. Farwell, bushings and coup- 




lings 


.26 


R. W. Flanders, sharpening tools 


4.40 


Forsaith Machine Co., 6 pieces 




spruce ..... 


•30 


J. Hadlock, repairs on road-ma- 




chine ..... 


43-75 


Paid T. A. Lane Co. : 




Material and labor on troughs and 




fountains 


59.12 


Repairing street lantern . 


3-40 


Repairs at city yard 


8.91 


Paid Frank I. Lessard & Co., material 




and labor on fountains 


19.65 


H. F. W. Little, repairing hand-saw 


•45 


Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son : 




Repairs on road-machine . 


4.75 


Sharpening drills, etc. 


1.60 


Paid Pike & Heald Co., material and 




labor on fountains . 


13-32 


George W. Rief, lumber and labor 


3-04 


J. T. Underbill & Co., labor and 




stock, concreting Manchester 




street, city stables, Merrimack 




street 


190.00 



STONE, GRAVEL, CLAY, ETC. 

Paid C. A. Brooks, 5 loads pavers . ^8.75 

Paid E. O. Dodge : 

659 loads gravel .... 65.90 

147 loads stone chips . . . 29.40 



^367.68 



550 REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid M. E. Dickey, 31 loads gravel . ^3-io 

Addison Grey, 991 loads gravel . 99.10 

Austin Goings, 25 loads sand . 4.17 

John Lovering, 81 loads gravel . 8.10 

Ida Libbey, 413 loads gravel . 41-30 

Merrill & Boyce, 137 loads gravel 13-70 

Paid Byron E. Moore : 

100 loads clay ..... 6.00 

100 loads gra-vel .... 6.00 

Paid L. C. Paige, 35 loads gravel . . 3.50 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Adams & Tasker, lime and cement ^3-93 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 

on wheels .... .30 

C. H. Bodwell, grading and turfing, 

264 Merrimack street . . 10.00 
George M. Currier, one half day 

locating street mark . . . .88 

A. N. Clapp, 50 gallons oil . . 5.50 
Paid John Driscoll : 

112 dippers ..... "^S-S^ 

4 tunnels . . . . . . ^ .20 

Paid Eager & Rand, salt ... 1.30 

S. L. Flanders, 15 gallons oil . 1.95 
W. G. Landry, steps for Holbrook 

house ..... 2.00 

Clarence R. Merrill, 3 barrels lime 2.85 
People's Gas Light Co., 7 chaldrons 

coke ..... 28.00 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

24 time books ..... 9.36 

Account books, blocks, blotting paper .62 

Directory, pencils .... 3.00 

Paid R. M. West, 2 ladders . . . 3.50 



^289.02 



$86.77 



Total expenditures ... . . $23,333.95 



SNOW AND ICE, 551 

Transferred from water-works account, charged by 

mistake ........ $16.00 

Transferred to snow and ice account . . . 1,271.38 



;g24,62i.33 



Snow and Ice. 

Appropriation ..... $4,000.00 

Transferred from repairs of highways 

account ...... 1,271.38 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 387.16 



^5)658.54 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and. teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. I : 

March ........ $39-2$ 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 2 : . 

January $1,214.23 

February ..... 1,390.43 

March ..... 327.41 

December ..... 312.33 



1,244.40 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 4 : 

January ..... ^9-63 

February 34.37 



552 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 5 : 

January ^5.25 

February ..... 69.98 

March 7.00 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 6 : 

January ..... ^11.50 

February ... . . . 32-55 

March ..... 29.80 

December . . . . . 13-51 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 7 : 

January $56-63 

February 148.75 

xMarch 119.88 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 8 : 

January ..... 

February ..... 

March 

December ..... 



^20.76 


18.75 


6.63 


2.00 



>2.23 



$87-36 



125.26 



.14 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 9 : 

February ..... . . $7o-95 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll^ divi- 
sion No. 10 : 

January ..... ^542.82 
February 655.79 



SNOW AND ICE. 



653 



March . 
December 



$131-25 
34.16 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 12 : 

February ..... 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, com- 



mons : 



January 
February 



I46.87 
, 42.50 



$1,364.02 



$45-93 



SAND AND SALT. 



Paid A. N. Clapp, 2 bags salt . . $i'5o 

Mary L. Hartshorn, 117 loads sand 11.70 

Clarence R. Merrill, 8 bags salt . 3.60 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid A. B. Black, i snow plow . . $40.00 
Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 2.96 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., lum- 
ber for snow plows . . . 16.16 
C. H. Leighton, i snow roller . 75 -oo 
H. C. Ranno & Son, repairing har- 
nesses ..... 3.85 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Shovels ...... 7.15 

■ Brooms, bolts, iron, paint, chain . 39-83 
Iron and paint, repairing tree-boxes 

damaged by snow plows . . 9.63 

Paid J. F. Wyman, i ton coal . . 6.25 



$16.80 



$200.83 



Total expenditures 



$5'658.54 



554 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



New Highways. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



^20,000.00 
1,^73-39 



$21,273.39 



Paid men, as per pay-ro 

January . 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November, 

December 



Paid men, as per pay-ro 

May 
June 

July . 

September 

October 

Paid men, as per pay-ro 

October . 

Paid men, as per pay-ro 

April 
May 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

, in division No. 2 



$45.00 

39-25 

78.01 

575-63 
1,586.95 
1,498.31 

1,598-39 

1,940.92 

962.36 

2,753-03 
517-54 
407.38 



in division No. 7 : 



i39o.oo 
20.00 
70.00 
20.00 

107.00 



., in division No. 8 : 



, in division No. 10 



$364-25 
791.12 



512,002.77 



307.00 



^36-13 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



555 



June $19-50 

July 1,375-38 

August 1,223.07 

September 1,050.83 

October 303-25 

November ..... 101.75 

Paid Moore & Preston, building Camp- 
bell street .... ^150.00 
Jerome Titus, building highway . 70.00 



,229.15 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE, 

Paid Allen N. Clapp, powder, fuse, nails, 

etc. ....... 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 

46 pounds chain .... 

Picks, axes, lanterns, etc. . 
Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Shovels ...... 

Plow points, handles, etc. 

Bolts, nails, hasps, hinges 

Other hardware .... 

Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., powder . 



115. 41 



2.30 


10.50 


101.40 


25-50 


7-93 


9.29 


2.75 



$175-08 



STONE, LUMBER, AND OTHER MATERIALS. 



Paid William Blaisdell, 300 posts . 
F. S. Bodwell, covering stone 
Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 

Oak and labor .... 

I ash pole to order . 
Paid Warren Harvey : 

I load stone and teaming . 

Building culverts, " Eddy " road 

Building culverts, Second street 



^39.00 
770.92 

-75 
2.25 

3-50 
833.00 

550.00 



556 REPOKT 01 THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 




Lumber and labor .... 


^91.05 


672 loads filling .... 


168.00 


Paid Soule, Dillingham & Co., i Ames 




plow 


26.67 


George W. Rief, lumber and labor 


1.70 


A. C. Wallace, lumber, etc. . 


48.86 


SUNDRIES. 




Paid James Briggs & Son, i oil can 


^o-75 


L. A. Biron & Co., advertising pro- 




posals ..... 


3-5° 


TheJJohn B. Clarke Co., advertising 




proposals 


15-13 


Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 


•39 



^2,535.70 



Dunlap &|Wason Coal Co., 2 1 tons 

Cumberland coal . . . i4-i3 

S. L. Flanders, 25 gallons kerosene 

oil 3-25 

T. A. Lane Co., plugs, L's, etc. . .61 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

proposals 12 times . . . 29.80 



^67.56 



Total expenditures ..... ^21,273.39 



Damage of Land Taken for Highways. 

Appropriation ..... ^5.000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 995 00 

^5>995-oo 



Expenditures. 

Paid Lucie A. Clough, settlement of 

suit. Auburn street . . . ^1,850.00 



WATERING STREETS. 



567 



Paid Fred M. Dow, settlement of claim, 

changing grade, Prospect street |!955.oo 
Lawrence F. Bradley, settlement of 

claim, changing grade . . 400.00 

Elliot Hospital, settlement of suit, 

Cypress and Auburn streets . 2,500.00 
F. A. Platts, land damage, Foster 

avenue ..... 30.00 

James P. Tuttle, costs, two actions 100.00 

William Walker, land damage, 

changing grade . . . 160.00 



Appropriation 



Watering Streets. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



,995.00 



^,ooo.oo 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in division No. 2 : 
January . . . . . ^21.87 



February 
March . 
April . 
May . 
June 
July . 
August . 
September 
October 



19.00 

16.75 

IS3-I3 

505-45 
495-5° 
429.37 

541-13 
454-50 
169.62 



^2,836.32 



558 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in division No. lo 



January 

February 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 



^3-25 
6.50 

25.24 
167.00 
143.12 
118.50 
iiS.oo 
159.00 

77-50 



REPAIRS. 

Paid John Bryson, paint and labor . $16.83 

James Briggs & Son, fixing chain . .50 

John T. Beach, spokes and felloes 2.50 

J, W. Fiske, vase, brackets, for 

fountain ..... 8. 25 

The Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

and labor .... 17.18 

Joseph Huneau & Son, material 

and labor on watering-trough . 1.90 

The Thomas A. Lane Co., material 

and labor on troughs and foun- 
tains ..... 27.41 
F. I. Lessard, material and labor 

on fountains .... 5.95 

Manchester Hardware Co., iron, 

screws, cement, etc. . . . 1.28 

Manchester Heating & Lighting 

Co., 10 sprinkler standpipes . 85.00 

Manchester water-works, laying 

pipe, labor and material . . 128.81 

Pike & Heald Co., material and 

labor ..... 2.95 



PAVING STREETS. 



559 



Paid George W. Rief, lumber and labor 

John B. Varick Co., paint, varnish, 

etc. ..... 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 

castings ..... 

John Driscoll, dippers and agate 

drinking cups .... 

Total expenditures . 
Transferred to reserved fund 



^9-45 
30-32 



^0.25 
6-75 



$33^-33 



^3>999-76 
.24 

^4,000.00 



Paving Streets. 



Appropriation ^6,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 381.51 


$6,381.51 


Expenditures. 




LABOR. 




Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 




sion No. 2 : 




April $20.50 

May . . . . . . 295. Si 




June 355-OI 

July 439-24 

August ..... 366.74 
September ..... 143-74 
October 346-59 





$1,967.63 



5(J0 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 7 : 
June 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion lo : 

January . . . . . $28.75 

February 



March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 



12.75 
12.00 

15-63 
513-01 
384.06 

357-61 

80.12 
119.36 

328.51 



$40.00 



$1,851.80 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 2 pav- 
ing hammers .... 
John B. Varick Co., tools 



$2.50 
2.09 



$4-59 



PAVING STONE AND GRAVEL. 



Paid Charles A. Bailey, 5,550 paving 

blocks ..... $249.75 

W. H. Coburn, 435 loads paving 

stone 761.25 

Warren Harvey, curbstones, circles, 

etc 189.87 

Mary L. Hartshorn, 20 loads sand 2.00 

George F. Higgins, 22 loads pavers 11.00 



$1,213.87 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 



561 



CONCRETE CROSSINGS ANQ OTHER WORK. 



Paid C. H. Robie Co. . 

John T. Underbill & Co. 

Total expenditures . 



$547-65 
755-97 



$1,303.62 
$6,381.51 



Macadamizing Streets. 



Appropriation 










$15,000.00 


Transferred from reserved fund 


201.40 




^^15,201.40 


Expenditures. 




LABOR. 




Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in di 


vision No. 2 : 


March 


$11.12 


April . 










646.64 


May . 










1,927.90 


June 










1,810.45 


July . 










1,550-64 


August . 










152-03 


September 










135-50 


October 










1,864.89 


November 










241.92 


Deceniber 








323.92 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 10 : 

September $215.13 

October ..... 276.00 



$49i-iS 



36 



562 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



FUEL, FREIGHT, WATER. 

Paid L. B. Bod well & Co., 2 tons coal . ^11.00 

Oilman Clough, 7 cords wood . 19-25 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 2 tons 

coal ..... 12.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., i load 

cut wood . . . . . 1.75 

Moore «Sc Preston, 2,100 lbs. coal . 5.75 

Perham & Mead, 29 11-16 cords 

wood ..... 103-91 

A. J. Lane, 17 J cords wood . 43-75 

People's Gas-Light Co., 26 chal- 
drons coke .... 104.00 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 

castings, powder, etc. . . 11-03 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on oil, hose, powder, etc. . . 7.04 

Water Commissioners, use of water 30.00 



^349-48 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., pack- 
ing, putty, nails . . . $14.18 
The B. H. Piper Co., 72 sledge 

handles . . . . . 9.18 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

300 feet hose ..... 36.00 

Hammers and handles, paint . . 36.46 

Drills, files, rasps, chisels . . . 4i-95 

Iron, steel, and other hardware . . . 61. 86 
Paid The Wadleigh Hardware Co. : 

2 rockers ...... 8.00 

6 rocker pins ..... 6.00 

2 sets piston rings, 2 rubber cushions 8.00 

Porcite, fuse, wire, caps, etc. . . 131-35 



^352.98 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 563 



LUMBER, CASTINGS, AND REPAIRS. 



Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., re- 
pairs on boiler, stone crusher . ^38.66 
George A. Farwell, material and 

repairs on steam roller . . 95'ii 

Paid Farrell Foundry & Machine Co. : 

4 15 X 9 steel bearings . . . 10.00 

2 pair 15x9 plates .... 54-oo 

Boxing ...... .25 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., labor 

on gears . . . . . 10.70 

Hutchinson Foundry & Machine 
Works, labor and material on 
crusher ..... 83.96 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 

LumbeT and labor, erection addition 

crusher plant, city ledge . , 431 -99 

107 feet spruce boards . . . 1.61 

Paid T. A. Lane Co.: 

Labor on pipe, steam roller . . 1.46 

Packing, pipe, iron, labor . . . 8.28 

Paid Manchester Locomotive Works, re- 
pairs on crusher . . . 1.60 
Pike & Heald Co., iron and labor i.io 
Paid George W. Rief : 

Lumber and labor .... 4.54 

1 gallon belt dressing . . . 2.50 
Paid Taylor Iron and Steel Co., 154 

pounds steel cheeks .... 18.48 

Paid Vacuum Oil Co.: 

2 barrels cylinder oil ... 43-33 
I 6o-gallon tank . . . . 2.25 



STONE. 



Paid Charles A. Bailey, 17 carloads 

broken granite .... ^204.00 



^809.82 



564 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Massachusetts Broken Stone Co., 

i>748,5oo pounds broken stone . ^1,223.99 



CONCRETE. 



Paid C. H. Robie Co., repairing road- 
ways ..... ^621.80 
John T. Underbill & Co., repair- 
ing roadways .... 2,162.06 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Emergency Hand Fire Extinguisher 

Co., 6 small extinguishers . . ^6.00 

Eager & Rand, barrel salt . . i.oo 

Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection 
and Insurance Co., insurance 
three years from May 20 and 21, 
on policies 23,309, 23,318 . 100.00 

A. H. Kittredge, dualin and fuse . 202.45 

J. L. Fogg, damage to house by 

explosion at ledge . . . 8.93 
D. G. Mills, 6 signs " No trespass- 
ing " 1-50 

I. L. Stickney, 100 feet 2-inch lacing 1.25 



^1,427.99 



^2,783.86 



Total expenditures ..... ^15,201.40 



Grading for Concrete. 

Appropriation ^4,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 543-o5 

$4,543-°S 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



565 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, 

January . 

April 

May 

June 

July , . 

August . 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, 

June .... 
November 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

in division No. 2 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in division No. 10 : 

April ^9.63 

May ...... 150.62 

June ...... 214.05 

July 177-87 

August . ... . . . 60.62 

September 23.87 

October 57-75 



91.74 
159.18 

315-94 
348.08 
210.76 
208.88 
281.99 
68.76 
50-78. 



in division No. 7 : 

$25.00 
20.00 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, commons^: 
May 

STONE. 

Paid Warren Harvey, edgestones, circles, etc. . 



$1,779.24 



;.oo 



$694.41 
;^4S-25 

^984-39 



566 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CONCRETE, 



Paid C. H. Robie Co., crossings, patch- 
ing ^692. 

John T. Underhill & Co., crossings 

and patching .... 292. 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid M. E. Bradley : 

One half expense damage to sidewalk 
Labor on curbing .... 



55.00 
4.C0 



^985.76 



Total expenditures 



^543-05 



Scavenger Service. 



Appropriation 



115,000.00 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, in division No. 2 : 



January 










^724.14 


February 










509.24 


March . 










875-31 


April . 










1,042.85 


May . 










696.07 


June 










645.68 


July . 










863.79 


August . 










746.75 


September . 










675-91 


October 










832.62 


November 










652.39 


December 










607.50 



5,872.25 



SCAVENGER SERVICE. 



567 



-*aid labor of men 


as pe 


r pay- 


roll, i 


n division No. lo : 


January 


^172.49 


February 








146.99 


March . 








270.25 


April . 








39S.96 


May 








155.00 


June 








178.99 


July . 








294.51 


August 








1S7.02 


September 








151.87 


October 








249.13 


November 








205. 87 


December 






147.31 






ON 


::oNTE 


.ACT. 



^2,558.39 



Paid city farm, scavenger service one year to January 

I, 1896 ....... . ^2,499.96 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co.,naiIs, etc 
Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

Iron, hinges, steel, bolts . 

Shovels, axle grease . 

Oil, soap, sponges, scoop . 

I tire bender . 

I horse-clipper, screws, rivets 

Shoes, calks, nails 

Drills and other hardware 



$^•55 

116.02 

7-95 
12.36 
22.75 

3-94 
19.47 
17-51 



5201.55 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 
carts ...... 



$2.74 



668 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid John T. Beach : 
Labor on dump-cart 
I shaft ...... 

Paid W. H. Carpenter, burying horses . 

E. H. Currier, witch hazel, alcohol 

A. N. Clapp, glass, sandpaper 

The Chapman Manufacturing Co., 

2 Eureka carts .... 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., i ton 
coal ..... 

Eager & Co., soap, ginger, mustard 
A. Filion, carriage repairs 
Dr. J. L. Golden, veterinary services 
The Head & Dowst Co., lumber 
and labor .... 

Holt Bros. Manufacturing Co., i 
set wheels, ironed, i axle, i axle 

bed 

Hutchinson Foundry & Machine 

Works, castings and labor 
John F. Kerwin, harness supplies . 
Paid Kimball Carriage Co. : 

I collar pad . . . . . 

Curry comb, blankets, and leathering, 

^24.95 ; credit by 400 loads filling, 

$20 

Paid D. G. Mills, paint and oil . 

P. F. McDonald, 2 patent hand 

push carts 
Partridge Bros., hay 
Ranno Harness Co., repairing har 

ness .... 

J. A. Ried, 2,180 lbs. hay 

Geo. W. Rief, lumber and labor 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paint and 

varnish . . . . . 



^4.35 

i.6s 

7.00 

2.00 

.18 

50.00 

5-5° 
3-90 
3-95 

120.70 

7.86 



60.00 

22.31 
33-63 



•75 



4-95 
1.66 

65-75 
184.29 

1-75 
19.63 

13-03 
5-69 



STREET SWEEPING. 
Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber . 



Total expenditures . 
Transferred to reserved fund 



^4-35 



569 



$627.62 



^14,759-77 
240.23 

$15,000.00 



Street Sweeping. 

Appropriation ..... . . $1,500.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 



May . . 


119.63 


June .... 


167.57 


July .... 


60.51 


August 


. . 76.56 


September . 


232.32 


October 


183.74 


November . 


173-13 



$1,094.96 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 10 : 



August 
September 
October 
November 



$6.50 

44-63 

4-75 
78.99 



HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 24 rat- 
tan brooms .... 
John B, Varick Co., 24 rattan 
brooms ..... 



$10.00 



$i34-87 



$20.00 



570 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPAIRS. 



Paid S. A. Felton & Son Co., refilling 
sweepers . . . . . 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., repairing sweeper 

Total expenditures . 
Transferred to reserved fund 



$64.00 
9.72 



^73-72 

^15323-55 
176.45 



ii,5oo.oo 



Bridges. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



;3,ooo.oo 
5)327-72 



$8,327.72 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 



January 


^35-94 


February 


6.88 


March 


31-50 


April .... 


214.63 


May .... 


284.76 


June 


73.00 


July 


166.69 


August 


98.07 


September . 


340.74 


October 


237.40 


November . 


459-87 



$1,949.48 



BRIDGES. 



571 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 5 : 

July 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 10 : 

March . . . . . . $i-75 

April 32.13 

June ...... 3.00 

October ..... 4.00 



$5.88 



10.88 



LUMBER AND STONE. 

Paid Charles W. Farmer, 11,245 ^^^^ 

lumber ..... ^140.56 

G. A. Farmer, lumber . . . 4.00 

Warren Harvey, i load stone . 5.50 
Paid The Head & Dowst Co, : 

1 1,020 feet plank .... 120.87 

Other lumber and labor ... 1 7.41 

Paid G. W. Rief, lumber and labor . 2.86 
Paid A. C. Wallace : 

5,693 feet pine timber . . . 11 3. 86 

34,957 feet lumber .... 382.42 



HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., screws, 
spikes, nails ..... $37-58 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

Bolts, nails, spikes .... 145. 24 

Hammers, saws, rope, brooms, etc. . 15-64 

Paid The Wadleigh Hardware Co., 8 

kegs wire spikes .... 26.00 



REPAIRS. 



Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., re- 
pairs on McGregor bridge 



$23.30 



$224.46 



572 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid James Briggs, 9 pounds lead . ^0*36 
W. M. Darrah & Co., material and 

labor, McGregor bridge . . 45'5o 

G. A. Far^ell, drilling sockets . 1.40 
Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Repairs on Amoskeag bridge . . 3,851.87 

Material and labor, Granite bridge . 96.06 

Material and labor, McGregor bridge 1,215.90 
Paid Hutchinson Foundry & Machine 

Works, labor on castings . . . 1.15 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., advertis- 
ing proposals, 2 inches, 6 times ^9.00 
L'Etoile, advertising proposals for 

painting McGregor bridge . 3.00 

L' Avenir National, advertising pro- 
posals for painting McGregor 
bridge . . . . . 3.00 

New City Hotel, ii^ days' board 14-38 

Paid C. H. Perkins : 

Board H. T. Hauser, 34 days . . 42.50 

Moving baggage .... .25 

Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising 
proposals for painting McGregor 

bridge 7.87 

C. H. Wood, painting 2 signs . 4.00 



City Teams. 



Appropriation $6,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 21.26 



55'235-54 



.00 



Total expenditures ..... $8,327.72 



),021.26 



CITY TEAMS. 



573 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 

January $236.38 

February 165.06 

March . . . . . . 157-56 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 10 : 
January ...... $45.88 

February ..... 20.63 

March ...... 2^.62 



OATS, CORN, FEED, HAY, STRAW. 



Paid Adams & Tasker . 






$106.40 


J. F. Austin . 






9.86 


George W. Butterfield 






36.3^ 


H. J. Cilley 






7-5° 


Freeman & Merrill 






42.94 


Gage & McDougall 






37-3° 


Clarence R. Merrill 






355-38 


Nichols & Allen . 






304-53 


Partridge Brothers 






1,214.86 


Henry W. Parker . 






170.25 


C. D. Welch 






112. 13 



HARNESSES AND REPAIRS. 

Paid G. H. Graffam & Co., 3 gallons 

harness blacking . . . $3-00 

John F. Kerwin, harness repairs 

and supplies .... 137-90 

Kimball Carriage Co., harness re- 
pairs and supplies . . . 131.62 



159.00 



$90.13 



$2,397-51 



574 REPORT or THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Ranno Harness Co., repairing 

harnesses ..... ^i9'33 

Thomas P. Riley, repairing har- 
nesses ..... 13-60 



REPAIRS ON CARRIAGES. 



Paid A. Filion, repairing wagon . . ^6.00 

Paid Kimball Carriage Co. : 

I pair wheels ..... 14.00 

Painting and repairing wagon . . 10.00 



HARDWARE. 

Paid A. N. Clapp, sandpaper, nails, 

hinges ..... go. 64 
J. H. Farnham, files and rasps . 5.45 
Manchester Hardware Co., horse- 
shoes, rivets, iron , . . 3.80 
Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Nuts and washers .... 2.56 

Steel and iron ..... 95-28 

Nails, rivets, screws, bolts . . 33-29 

Horseshoes 34-50 

I anvil ...... 15-84 

I Burk's foot vise .... 12.00 

Other hardware .... 44-32 



MEDICAL SERVICES AND INSURANCE. 

Paid A. W. Baker, dentistry work, 1 1 

horses $22.00 

E. H. Currier, medicine . . 14-95 
J. L. Golden, V. S., medicine and 

visits ..... 80.15 

John F. Kerwin, 2 bags Peel's food 2.75 



$305-45 



$247.68 



CITY TEAMS. 575 

Paid W. B. Mitchell, witch hazel and 

alcohol . . . . . $i.oo 

Security Live Stock Insurance Co., 

assessments on policies . . 114.60 



LIVE STOCK. 



Paid Cavanaugh Bros., pair brown mares ^325.00 
Welch & Hall, 3 horses . . 430.00 



WATER, GAS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid Water-works, use of water to Jan- 
uary I, 1896 .... ^66.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas at sta- 
bles ...... 132.02 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephones . . . 7245 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 27,830 lbs. 

coal ..... 77-OI 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co.: 

2 tons 180 lbs. Cumberland coal . ii-45 

2 tons egg coal .... 12.50 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co., i chaldron 

coke ..... 4.00 

J. F. Wyman, 2 tons egg coal . 12.00 



LUMBER, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid G. A. Farwell, threading nut . ^0.80 
Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 

Lumber and labor, city yard . . 436.55 

Lumber and labor, stables . . . 321.19 

Lumber and labor .... 15-23 
Paid The T. A. Lane Co., material and 

labor on soil and gas pipes . 48.22 

H. Leibing, paints, oil, putty, etc. 6.74 



$235.45 



15-00 



$387-43 



576 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid D. G. Mills, 2 lights glass set 
G. W. Rief, lumber and labor 
L. & W. T. Seiberlich, setting glass 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

HORSE HIRE. 

Paid Clarence B. Danforth . 

E. T. James .... 

C. H. Simpson .... 
keeping 5 horses one day 



^i.oo 

26.94 

1. 00 

6.12 



513-50 

40.50 

22.00 

S.oo 



^863.79 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 100 
second quality bags, used un 
loading oats 
Clark M. Bailey, pails, matches 
L. B. Bddwell & Co., freight on 3 
horses .... 
Paid A. N. Clapp : 

52 gallons kerosene oil 
Water pail, glass, putty 
Paid Eager & Rand : 

Soap, ginger .... 

Mustard 

Paid Emergency Hand Fire Extinguisher 

Co., 12 small extinguishers 

S. S. Joy, 2 wagon jacks 

Thomas A. Lane Co., i bracket 

cock .... 

Paige & Myrick, i stencil 
E. D. Rogers, axle grease 
G. H. Stearns, expense of commis 
sion to Boston . 



$10.00 
1.83 

5.28 

3-77 
•65 

4.20 
1. 00 

12.00 
6.00 

.64 

2.50 
7.00 

10.95 



$65.82 



Total expenditures 



$6,021.26 



REPAIRS OF SEWERS. 



577 



Appropriation 



Repairs of Sewers. 



;,ooo.oo 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 

January ^45-74 

44.50 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



201.39 

213-25 
192.76 

215-97 
492.28 
272.64 

360.95 
301-75 
366.89 
176.56 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 7 : 

June ...... ^60. CO 

August ...... ^5.00 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 10: 
January ...... $8.80 



February 
March . 
April 
May 
June 
July . 
August . 



34.88 
1 1 1.06 

134.87 
129.88 

86.69 
198.38 

44.50 



^2,884.68 



c.oo 



678 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

September $71 -5° 

October 149-75 

November . . . . . 73- 18 



$1,043.49 

HARDWARE. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., trowel, hammer, cesspool- 
dipper handles, etc. .... . . $24.47 

MATERIAL. LABOR, ETC. 

Paid Amoskeao; Manufacturing Co. : 
4 steel wedges, forged 
Cutting sewer pipe, etc. . 
Paid John DriscoU, 6 scoops 

Dodge & Straw, i pair rubber boots 
Paid Hutchinson Foundry & Machine Works 
12 cesspool grates .... 
Traps, manholes, covers, etc. . 
Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., piping mate- 
rial and labor .... 
Pike & Heald Co., cesspool scoops 
I. L. Stickney, i oil suit 



$12.00 


11.56 


7-.SO 


3-25 


23.18 


69-54 


15-78 


10.32 


2.25 



CEMENT, BRICK, STONE, LUMBER. 

Paid Adams & Tasker, 100 casks cement $106.88 
Warren Harvey, cesspool stone . 207.35 
W. F. Head & Son, 42 M brick . 216.30 
Clarence R. Merrill, 4 barrels ce- 
ment ..... 5 00 
Palmer & Garmon, cutting cesspool 

stone ..... 24.61 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid Adams & Tasker, Akron pipe . $2.68 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 

brick ..... 33-6o 



$155-38 



$560.14 



NEW SEWERS. 



579 



Paid A. N. Clapp, i bag salt . . $0.75 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., i ton 
Cumberland coal, used thawing 
cesspools ..... 6.00 

Samuel Eastman & Co., material 
and three days' labor repairing 
old hose ..... 17.00 



Total expenditures . 
Transferred to reserved fund 



• §4,803.19 
196.81 



; ,000.00 



New Sewers. 

Balance from last year unexpended . $2,029.09 
Appropriation ..... 45,000.00 



§47,029.09 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 



May .... 


^!>^,w33-4<-' 
2,651.43 


June .... 


2,199.19 


July .... 


3,721.77 


September . 


144.12 


October 


885.05 


November . 


i>335-99 


December . 


945-05 



$13,516.00 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 7 : 

May ...... $160.00 

July 407.24 



580 



REPORT OF TEE CITY AUDITOR. 



August 


. ^1,314.60 


September . 


1,151-95 


October 


1,844.26 


November . 


293.71 


December . 


791.46 


id labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. lo: 


April , 


^502.37 


May . 


1,204.34 


June . 


1,867.67 


July .... 


1,217.03 


August 


1,045.16 


September , 


1,055.64 


October 


946.03 


November . 


1,156.31 


December . 


387.41 



Paid Harry J. Briggs, 34 days' labor lo- 
cating sewers .... 
Alfred T. Dodge, i day's labor 

laying out sewer work 
George W. Wales, 4^ days' labor 
laying out sewer work 



$85 


.00 


I 


75 


II 


25 



;,963.22 



,381.96 



HARDWARE. 

Paid A.N. Clapp, 125 lbs. spikes . 
Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 

Picks and handles 

Iron, steel, lanterns, and globes 

Other hardware 
Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

Paint, varnish, etc. . 

Cherry welding 

I triplex hoist .... 

Drills, rope .... 



35-75 


21.13 


39-57 


16.54 


8.40 


52.50 


60.49 



NEW SEWERS. 




Pails, barrows, mattocks, shovels 


$90.51 


Steel, iron, files .... 


200.51 


Lanterns, globes, dynamite 


55-12 


Other hardware .... 


96.66 


lid The Wadleigh Hardware Co. : 




135 shovels 


114.00 


Picks and handles .... 


7.00 


Forcite, wire, etc. .... 


90.79 


Other hardware .... 


66.28 


SEWER PIPE. 





581 



Paid George D. Goodrich ..... 

MATERIAL, LABOR, ETC. 

Paid Amory Manufacturing Co., 820 lbs. 
sacking ...... $4.80 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. : 

Material and labor on sewer engine . 7.44 

Welding and setting cart axle . . 2.25 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 26 tons, 2,096 

lbs. Cumberland coal . . 121.95 

James Briggs & Son, i oil can . .75 

Clark M. Bailey, lanterns, globes, 

pails, etc. .... 19.40 

Paid A. N. Clapp : 

460^ gallons oil . . . . 50-61 

Oatmeal, matches, wicks . . . 8.98 

Paid Carson Trench Machine Co., top 

sheaves, bolts,and express on same 9.25 

G.W.Dodge, 12 pairs rubber boots 33-oo 

F. C. Dow, 12 pairs rubber boots . 36.00 

Dodge & Straw, 8 pairs rubber boots 20.71 

Dunlap& Wason Coal Co., 67 tons, 

4,370 lbs. Cumberland coal . 329.39 

Edson Manufacturing Co., i Edson 
, pump, hose, etc. . . . 169.00 



^959-43 



1,992.78 



582 REPOUT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Lowell O. Fowler, repairing 13 

pairs rubber boots . . . $16.25 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., labor 

on steam drill .... 1.06 

W. P. Farmer, rubber boots . . 23.55 

G. A. Farwell, material, repairs on 

steam drill .... 12.85 

Hutchinson Foundry & Machine 
Works, manholes, cesspool grates, 
castings, repairs, etc. . . 1,225.44 

Paid Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co. : 

2 drills, tools, swedges, complete . 600.00 

Hose 45.43 

Piston bushings, bolts, etc. . . 35'23 

Feed nuts, drill steel . . . 28.16 

Paid A. H. Kittredge, dualin, fuse, etc. 1,727.19 
Lightbody & Burbank, 27 pairs 

rubber boots .... 79-8 1 

The Thomas A. Lane Co., Akron 

pipe, packing, labor . . . 64.40 

F. I. Lessard & Co., galvanized 

iron, etc. ..... ,96 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 

pump leathers and washers . 2.50 
Montplaisir& Fowler, 10 pairs rub- 
ber boots ..... 30.00 

Moore «&: Preston, 26 tons, 1,190 

lbs. Cumberland coal . . 209.30 

H. W. Parker, i barrel oatmeal . 5.50 
Paid B. H. Piper : 

72 sledge handles .... 8.42 

24 pick handles .... 2.70 

Paid Ranno Harness Co., snaps, rope, 

axle grease . . . . 1.75 

G. W. Rief, lumber and labor . 1.70 
G. L. Robinson, i pair rubber boots 3.50 



NEW SEWERS. 583' 

Paid C. H. Simpson, express wagon . $87.76 

G. H. Sampson, feed screws, piston 

rings, chuckings, bushings, etc. 
I. L. Stickney, 3 oil suits 
R. M. West, I 35-foot ladder 
Wilson & Asselin, files . 
Wingate & Gould, 26 pairs rubber 

boots ..... 



33-25 


6-75 


5-25 


•50 


67.50 



CEMENT, BRICK, STONE, LUMBER. 

Paid Adams & Tasker, 481 casks cement $514.06 

W. F. Head & Son, 140 M brick . 721.00 
Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

800 brick ..... 5.60 

99 days' use derrick, engines, en- 
gineer ...... 390.40 

Spruce lumber and labor . . . 1,159.43 
Paid J. Hodge, lumber and labor . . ^3-95 
Clarence R. Merrill, 5 barrels cem- 
ent ...... 6.25 

A. C. Wallace, spruce fence boards, 

post 23.56 



FREIGHT. 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 

brick, pipe, pump . . . $40.67 

Concord & Montreal R. R., 

freight on brick . . . 67.20 



Paid Adams & Tasker, 5 lbs. bag string $0.46 

L. M. Aldrich, filing saws . . 6.70 



;,i4c.24 



$2,834.25 



$107.87 



584 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid John N. Chase, cash paid for ex- 
press ..... ^0.20 
Peter Duval, filing saws, etc. . 12.00 
D. M. Guerin, M. D., medical ser- 
vices, case Ernest Souse . . 11.00 
The Head & Dowst Co., repairing 

iron-work on dump box . . 46.44 

C. A. Marland, damages caused by 

blasting ..... 2.00 

L. P. Reynolds, expenses to Boston 3.50 

Gillis Stark, M. D., attendance on 
George Gingras and Charles 
Coakley ..... 36-50 



$118.80 

Total expenditures . . . . . $44,112.55 

Transferred to Silver-street sewer account . . 2,478.71 

Balance to new account ..... 437-83 



^47,029.09 



Silver-Street Sewer. 

Appropriation ..... $15,000.00 
Transferred from new sewers account . 2,478.71 



$17,478-71 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 

August $4,090.53 

September ..... 4,351.14 

October 3,994.12 

$12,435.79 



CHRISTIAN BROOK SEWEK. 585 

HARDWARE. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., spikes, ax, rope, nails, oil, 

etc $12.56 

CEMENT, BRICK, STONE, LUMBER. 

Paid Adams & Tasker, 934 casks cement |i,ooi.62 
W. F. Head & Son, 588 M brick 3,028.20 
The Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

and labor .... 
J. Hodge, lumber and labor 
T. A. Lane Co., pipe, etc. . 
Clarence R. Merrill, 98 barrels 

cement ..... 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

$4,570-48 

FREIGHT. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight on brick . . $459.20 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid John Driscoll, 2 dippers . . $o.t8 

G. R. Vance, i large tunnel . .50 

$0.68 



376.99 


20.68 


.65 


107.80 


34-54 



Total expenditures ..... $17,478.71 



Christian Brook Sewer. 

Appropriation ....... $15,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 
October $1,181.53 



586 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



November 
December 



$4,775-62 
3,087.70 



Paid Harrie M. Young, 36 days' labor on sewers 

HARDWARE. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., nails, rope, twine, etc. 

CE^IENT, BRICK, LUMBER. 

Paid Adams & Tasker, 700 casks cement $748.16 

Adams Brothers, 340 casks cement 363-39 

W. F. Head & Son, 518 M brick . 2,631.65 

G. W. Rief, lumber and labor . 2.46 



FREIGHT. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight on brick 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 

I brick hod ..... 

I mortar hod ..... 

Paid Moses G. Lane, 2 lights glass and 

setting, damage caused by blasting 

Moore & Preston, 31-10 tons coal 

Total expenditures 
Balance transferred to new account 



),o44.85 
$99.00 

$22.69 



$3,745-66 
$364.00 



^1.25 




1.50 




1. 00 




17-05 






$20.80 






$13,297.00 




1,703.00 



ii5,ooo.oo 



Storage Shed, City Yard. 



Appropriation 



5,000.00 



WIDENING ELM STREET. 587 

Expenditures. 

contract. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. .... $3,000.00 



Widening Mast Street. 

Appropriation ..... ^3,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 874.96 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid W. G. Landry, labor and material ^3,865.26 
J. B. Sawyer, professional services . 2.50 

A. C. Wallace, 450 ft. spruce plank 7.20 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 2 : 

July . $676.37 

August ...... 182.82 

September ..... 200.00 

December ..... 122.75 



MATERIAL. 



Paid Mrs. Otis Clark, 1,836 loads filling $146.88 
The Head & Dowst Co., building 

culvert as per contract . . 1,135 00 



5,874-96 



;, 874-96 



Widening Elm Street. 

Appropriation ...... . 1 2,500.00 



;i,i8i.94 



588 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid John C. Ray, 280 loads filling 

Horace Willey, 50 loads stone chips 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



$25.20 
10.00 



$1,317.08 

$2,499.02 
.98 

$2,500.00 



Appropriation 



Lighting Streets. 



Expenditures. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 



Paid Manchester Electric Light Co. 









Charges. 


Discounts. 


January . . . $3,495-3^ 


$14.49 


February 






3,620.21 


16.70 


March . 






3'635-23 


7-25 


April . 






3,641.67 


5-99 


May . 






3,641.67 


3-78 


June . 






3,641.67 


4.41 


July . 






• 3>6s7-73 


28.35 


August . 






■ 3.681.76 


6.30 


September 






3>703-S2 




October 






3,816.79 


47-49 


November 






3,842.91 


7-25 


December 






• 3>857-54 


8.19 


$44,236.31 


$150.20 


Less discount . . . 150.20 













$44,086.11 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



589 



GAS. 



id People's Gas-Light Co.: 








January 


$68.04 


February 










65.66 


March . 










52-36 


April . 










51-38 


May 










45.64 


June 










41.58 


July . 










37-38 


August . 










38.78 


September 










41.86 


October 










45-64 


November 










55-16 


December 










58.10 



CARE OF GAS AND OIL LAMPS. 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for lighting, extinguish- 
ing, and care of gas and oil street lights : 



January 




. 




$142.80 


February 






142.80 


March . 




. 




127.50 


April . 








142.10 


May 








137.02 


June 








142.10 


July . 








137.02 


August . 








142.60 


September 








142.10 


October 








137.02 


November 




. 




142.10 


December 




- 




136-35 






SUNDRIES. 




M. H. Allen 


, haclf 


: and team 


$7.00 


Clark M. Be 


liley, 


chimneys, burn- 




ers, wicks 


etc. 






64.83 



501.58 



^1,671.51 



590 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Frank W. Elliott, oil and lighting 
street lamp from January i, 1895, 
to January i, 1896 . 
Globe Gas-Light Co., burners, fix- 
tures^ naphtha, etc. . 
Kean & Doyle, use of teams 
Paid People's Gas-Light Co. : 
27 barrels oil . 
Matches . 
3 boxes glass . 
3 gallons whiskey 
Glass cutters, sperm oil 
Paid Mary E- Reed, lighting lamp at 
Massabesic from August i, 1894, 
to May I, 1895 
O. G. Reed, hack and teams 
C. H. Simpson, use of hacks 
Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

1 dark lantern ..... 

2 boxes glass ..... 
Paid Whitten & Fifield, use of teams . 



Total expenditures . 
Transferred to reserved fund 



;i5-39 



123.13 




7-50 




125.76 




14.10 




6.30 




6.00 




1.25 




6.75 




21.00 




10.00 




•75 




4-25 




27.50 






$441-51 




. 


$46,800.71 




199.29 




$47,000.00 



Engineer's Department. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



},5oo.oo 
267.25 



1,767-25 



engineer's department. 



591 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Paid W. H. Bennett, services as engineer $1,200.00 
Mrs. A. G. Bennett, services as 

clerk ..... 240.00 

Harry J. Briggs, assistant . . 627.50 

George M. Currier, assistant . . 379-75 

Alfred Dodge, assistant . . 275.63 

George W. Wales, assistant . . 712.50 

Herbert L. Watson, assistant . 216.25 

Harrie M. Young, assistant . . 647.61 



$4,299.24 



TEAM AND TEAM EXPENSES. 

Paid Fred Allen Co. : 

I hitch rope, i weight strap . . $i-45 

Repairing strap ..... .25 

Paid Kean & Doyle, use of teams . 13- 75 
Paid Manchester Street Railway : 

Tickets ...... 30.00 

Use of horse ..... 2.25 

Paid O. G. Reed, use of teams . . 25.00 
C. H. Simpson, use of wagon 26 

days ..... 1300 

Whitten & Fifield, teams . . 14.00 

Harrie M. Young, carfare . . .10 



TELEPHONE. 



$99.80 



Paid N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., use of tele- 
phone ...... 

SUPPLIES AND OFFICE EXPENSES. 

Paid Walter Blenus, repairing tapes . $6 40 



$36.25 



592 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid W. H. Bennett : 

Expenses to Boston, Nashua 

Expenses with Mr. Tanner, 2 dinners 

Postage stamps 
Paid A. V. Benoit, engineer's supplies 
J. J. Boyer, cleaning and readjust 
ing typewriter . 
Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

950 blanks .... 

Cards, slips, envelopes 

200 reports, 82 pages and cover 

Binding, leather, i book . 

Canvas cover on 5 blank books 
Paid E. R. Coburn Co. : 

Pencils, paper, ink . 

Blank-books, index, frames, etc. 

Blue print, copy book 
Paid George M. Currier : 

Cash paid for keys . 

Repairs on instrument 
Paid Dodge & Straw, i pair rubber boots 
F. J. Dustin, repairing tapes 
Joseph Dana, i whitewood chest 
Frost & Adams, paper, cloth 
Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

I light plate .... 

Labor ..... 
Paid J. J. Holland, soap, fly paper 
Paid J. Hodge : 

4,700 pine and spruce stakes 

Lumber ..... 
Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co. : 

I stool ..... 

I oak mirror .... 

I door mat .... 



$10.12 
T.50 

4.00 
10.00 

5.00 



8.75 


3-50 


28.00 


.65 


4.25 


9-25 


12.50 


3-75 


.90 


•15 


3-40 


4.60 


7.00 


38.9s 


8.50 


.62 


1-45 


48.60 


14-95 


3.00 


6.00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



593 



Paid The Nate Kellogg Co. 



I M letter-heads .... 


^5-75 


2 blank books 


8.00 


Paid Keystone Blue Paper Co., paper, 




ink ....... 


3-98 


Paid The Thomas A. Lane Co. : 




Tin, solder, pipe, labor . 


10.71 


Labor, electric work 


4-32 


Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son : 




2 leather cushions .... 


13.00 


I typewriter ribbon . . . 


I. GO 


Paid Temple «S>: Farrington Co. : 




Scrap books, paste .... 


2.10 


12 blank books .... 


6.60 


Cord, pulleys, etc. .... 


2.26 


Paid John B. Varick Co. : 




1 dozen rules ..... 


13.00 


Nails, twine, screws, plumb bobs, etc. 


7.18 


Paid George P. Wallace : 




Typewriter ribbon .... 


1. 00 


I copy holder 


1.50 


Paid C. H. Wood, painting rods, etc. . 


4.52 


Harrie M. Young, cash paid for nails 


•25 



^33i-9& 



Total expenditures 



t,767-25 



Health Department. 



Appropriation 



|., 000.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid C. W. Downing, M. D., salary as 
member of board of health for 
year ending February i, 1895 . 

38 



5200.00 



594 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Joseph B. Sawyer, salary as member 
of board of health for year end- 
ing February i, 1895 . . $200.00 
C. F. Starr, M. D., salary as mem- 
ber of board of health for year 
ending February i, 1895 . . 200.00 
R. J. Barry, 312 days' services as 

plumbing inspector . . . 780.00 

Herbert S. Clough, 326 days' ser- ■ 

vices as health inspector . . 978.00 

John F. Looney, 319 days' services 

as health inspector . . . 717-75 

J. J. Hampston, 4 days' labor . 7.00 

E. D. Johnson, 11 days' labor . 19-25 

Addison Streeter, 73 days' labor . 146.00 

Albert W. Tucker, i day's labor . 1.75 



,249-75 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co. 


printing : 




Bulletins .... 




^43-55 


300 reports 




14.00 


Circulars, note headings . 




8.75 


Envelopes 




70.50 


500 plumbing regulations . 




15.00 


Other printing . 




33-75 


Advertising 16^ inches, 3 


times 


26.50 


Binding 25 pamphlets 




3-75 


Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 500 




cards .... 


. 


2.50 


Paid E. R. Coburn Co. : 






Frames, paper, pencils, ink 


. 


7-55 


Blank books 




4-35 


Paid F. H. Challis, printing permits, re- 




turns, blanks, note heads . 


. 


47-25 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



595 



Paid Union Publishing Co. : 

Advertising ..... 

Signatures, Geo. A. Crosby, William 

Webster ..... 



HOUSE OF ISOLATION. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., i wringer 
Paid Judith Sherer, board : 

Bussiere family, two weeks 

Mandeville family .... 

Tatro family, 24 days 
Paid John B. Varick Co., i step ladder 

OFFICE EXPENSES. 

Paid H. S. Clough, envelopes, stamps . 

L. W. Colby, I photograph Dr. 

Webster 



$31.66 
1.50 



TEAMS. 




Paid R. J. Barry : 




Carfares 


$30-25 


Job team 


•25 


Paid H. S. Clough : 




Carfares 


20.80 


Railroad fares,. Massabesic 


.80 


Teams, sundry places 


17-50 


Paid F. X. Chenette, teams . 


16.25 


W. J. Freeman, teams, board of 




horse ..... 


54.86 


Kean & Doyle, team . 


1. 00 


Paid John F. Looney : 




Carfares ...... 


19-45 


Railroad fares, Massabesic ; job team 


.70 


Paid Whitten & Fifield, teams 


34.00 



$3-50 

24.00 

1. 71 

10.72 
1-75 



$52.00 
3.00 



$310.61 



$195.86 



$41.68 



596 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 2 tons 

egg coal ^12.50 

Hale & Whittemore, 4 oak frames, 

etc . . 3.90 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., I iron cuspidor .75 
J. T. Langley, i platinotype print, 

Dr. G. A. Crosby ... 2.00 

John F. Looney, books . . .10 
N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone . . . 33-3° 
Paid People's Gas-Light Co. : 

Gas 2.52 

2 Welsbach lamps .... 4.50 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., labor on stove ].66 

John B. Varick Co., i letter press . 7.00 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, changing door numbers $0.50 

D. S. Adams, M. D., examination 

of Alma Bussiere after death . 10.00 

Paid R. J. Barry, cash paid : 

For digging ditch .... .50 

For Mandeville family ... .30 

Paid Burnham, Brown & Warren, legal 

services ...... 14.00 

Paid II. S. Clough : 

Express, soap, disinfectants . . 10.42 

Disinfecting hack .... 2.25 

Witness fees, etc 3.04 

Paid officer to watch house . . 2.00 

Paid board of Bussiere children . 3.25 

Paid M. E. Kean, M. D., i visit to as- 
certain cause of death of Maho- 
ney child .... 1.50 

A. Laberge, wood delivered De- 

mers family .... 4.50 



,123.23 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 597 

Paid J. F. Looney, disinfectants, tacks ^4«38 

Star Stamp Co., 5 badges . . 3.75 
E. H. Stowe, entertainment of 

board at outing, including boat 12.00 

Addison Streeter, cash paid for tacks . i o 
Eugene Quirin, groceries for Israel 

Demers , . . . . 3.14 



$75-63 



Total expenditures ..... $3,996.76 
Transferred to reserved fund .... 3.24 



Repairs of Schoolhouses. 



Appropriation ..... 


$4,000.00 


Transferred from reserved fund 


358.00 


Expenditures. 




MASONWORK. 




Paid Charles E. Lord .... 


$110.77 


. B. W. Robinson .... 


213-52 


PAINTING AND GLAZING. 


Paid J. S. Avery, setting glass . . 


$4-25 


Paid J. J. Abbott : 




Material and labor, Webster's Mills . 


39-3° 


Glass and setting same, sundry school- 




houses ...... 


23-55 


Paid J. Choate & Co., 17 lights glass 




and setting .... 


5.62 


C. F. Jack, glass and setting same 


4-25 


John A. Sargent, painting and glaz- 




ing 


408.44 



UOOO.OO 



$4,358.00 



$324.29 



$485.41 



598 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CONCRETING. 

Paid C. H. Robie Co $55.18 

WOODWORK. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

Building annex, Bakersville . . $485.00 

Plastering, painting, etc. . . . 11.00 

Paid G. H. Dudley, lumber, hardware, 

labor ...... 783.23 

Paid Head & Dowst Co.: 

Lumber & labor, basement Straw school 83.58 

Teaming seats and labor . . . 85.86 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., i lock 1.75 

$1,450-42 

PLUMBING AND IRONWORK. 

Paid D. J. Adams, repairing locks, fit- 
ting keys ...... $8.70 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.: 

84 desk legs ..... 27.95 

Boiler fronts, door grates, repairs . 128.89 

Paid A. A. Amlaw, plumbing material 

and labor .... 2.63 

A. L. Belanger, filter, cement, labor 9.60 

F. W. Blood «Sc Co., material and 
labor, repairing roofs of sundry 
schoolhouses . . . . 59'55 

E. M. Bryant & Co., repairing bells 7.50 
Peter Harris, repairing locks, fit- 
ting keys 3.25 

The T. A. Lane Co., material and 
labor, plumbing, piping, etc., 
sundry schoolhouses . . . 703-92 

Manchester Heating & Lighting 
Co., electric fixtures, lamps, 
shades, etc. .... 604.47 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 



599 



Paid Pike & Heald Co., labor cleaning 
stovepipes, plumbing, etc. 
Harvey Stratton, material and la- 
bor putting up pipes 
Scannel & Wholey, 162 lbs. mouth- 
pieces ..... 



$186.32 



IO-7S 



6.48 



$1,760.01 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Paid Carl W. Anderson «Sr Co., repair- 
ing clocks .... $3-oo 
O. D. Case & Co., slate blackboards 78-83 
Charles F. Cram, painting one-half 

fence, Hallsville . . . 6.60 

C. E. Clough, cartage . . . 16.00 
W. M. Darrah & Co., slates and 

labor . . . . . 14-23 
Fuller Warming & Ventilating Co., 

2 fireplace grates . . . 10.00 
Hutchinson Foundry & Machine 

Works, repairing pencil sharpener .60 
S. B. Hope, teaming desks . . 6.00 
S. J. Russell, cleaning vaults . 45-00 
E. A. Sears, putting ropes on flag- 
staffs 3-50 

J. P. Slattery, repaining clocks . 46-50 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks . 17-50 
Paid G. H. Underbill Co.: 

'4 lower back linings . . . 19.68 

Superintendent's time and expenses . 5.25 

Paid W. C. Richardson, cartage . . 10.00 



$282.69 



Total expenditures 



$4,358.00 



600 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Fuel. 

Appropriation ^5,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . • 218.06 



Expenditures. 

COAL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 244 12-100 

tons egg coal $1,403.69 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co.: 
213 tons 130 pounds egg coal , 
92 tons 1,300 pounds stove coal 
Paid Moore & Preston, 89 tons 1,250 
pounds egg coal 
E. W. Poore, 74 tons 225 pounds 
egg coal ..... 

D. M. Poore, 89 tons 685 pounds 
egg coal ..... 

J. P. Russell & Co., 265 tons egg 
coal ..... 

E. V. Turcotte, 33 tons 1,825 
pounds egg coal 

J. F. Wyman, 100 tons 120 pounds 
egg coal . . . . f . 

WOOD. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., i cord hard 

wood ^8.50 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 4* 

cords wood .... 28.15 

J. Hodge, 2 loads kindling . . 3.50 

Joseph Lanier, 2 cord pine wood . 1.50 



1,225.12 


555-90 


515-32 


426.15 


513-71 


152-38 


195.00 


575-34 



,718.06 



5,562.61 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 601 

Paid D. M. Poore : 

4 cords pine wood .... ^25.25 

I cord hard wood .... 6.75 

Paid G. W. Whitford, pine wood, sun- 
dry schools ..... 74-55 

$148,20 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., mov- 
ing coal from high school to 
Straw school .... ^5-oo 

Georgie Kendrick, paid for sawing 

wood ..... .25 



5-25 



Total expenditures ..... $5,716.06 
Overdraft, George Whitford's bill, money turned 

into treasury ..... . . 2.00 

$5,718.06 



Furniture and Supplies. 

Appropriation ..... $800.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 227.23 



$1,027.23 

Expenditures. 

chemical supplies. 

Paid Tebbetts & Soule . . . . . $204.11 

HARDWARE. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 24 

desk legs . . . . . $13-20 



602 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid A. A. & E. W. Bunton, ^4 baskets . $3-4° 

Manchester Hardware Co., twine, 

screws, call bells, hooks, faucets 4.17 

John B. Varick Co., mats, brooms, 

dusters, baskets, shovels, locks, 

wrenches, etc. .... 269.00 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., floor 

brushes, brooms, etc. . . i4-59 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Paid Boston School Supply Co., maps, 

reading charts .... $35'i5 

Milton Bradley Co., kindergarten 

supplies ..... 7.35 

Oliver Ditson Co., musical mer- 
chandise ..... 6.75 
Educational Publishing Co., i 
year's subscription " Primary 
Education" to January i, 1896 
Frost & Adams, drawing materials 
Paid J. L. Hammett : 

16 maps ...... 

Globes 

Paid Manchester Novelty Co. : 

80 gallons ink ..... 
Cards and envelopes 
Paid Prang Educational Co., 2 sets sol- 
ids, and express . . . 29.80 
Temple & Farrington Co., pen- 
holder and ink . . . .60 
Paid U. S. School Furniture Co. : 

Maps 2.00 

2 No. 77 desks, less freight . . 33-5 S 

Paid George P. Wallace, typewriter rib- 
bons, paper, oil .... 6.05 



1. 00 


1.92 


60.00 


15.00 


49-5° 


1.30 



$304-36 



^250.00 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



603 



FURNITURE. 



Paid Barton & (]o., shades, making and 

hanging SS-^S 

Cressey & Colby, 2 large steel 

pokers ..... 4-co 

R. D. Gay, making and repairing 

shades ..... 42.40 

W. G. Hallock, counter and floor 

brushes ..... 12.90 

T. F. Hannaford, 24 brooms . 6.00 
Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co. : 

7 chairs ...... 12.95 

2 tables . .' . . . . 6.75 

18 chestnut chairs .... 9.00 

36 chairs, evening school . . . i3-5o 

2 arm chairs ..... 7.50 

Paid L. H. Josselyn, i table, Rimmon 

school ..... 2.50 

Josselyn & Read, i table . . 2.50 

R. McQuarry, 24 basins . . 1.68 

G. S. Perry & Co., inkwells . . i3-4S 
Paid Pike & Heald Co, : 

48 drinking cups .... 3.74 

Dustpans, brushes, etc. ... 7.51 

Paid Weston & Hill Co., mats, matting, 

curtai'n poles ..... 16.62 



$166.28 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid Barton & Co., cambric 

E. M. Bryant & Co., i No. 2 

tery carbon 
Eager & Rand, 6 stone jugs 
Tilton F. Fifield, soap, oil . 
H. J. Holmes, 3 gallons oil 



bat- 



$4.84 

.60 
1.20 
5-14 

•45 



604 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co. : 

Use of chairs and table . . . • ^7.10 
151 pounds excelsior ... 1.5 1 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co., 105 feet 

lumber . . . . . 5.25 

Manchester Hardware Co., 4 call- 
bells ..... 2.00 
L. Mudgett, 4 gallons kerosene . .40 
Albert Moulton, 20 barrels . . 3.40 
F. E. Nelson, toothpicks, scissors, 

paint brushes . . . . 2.15 

Charles Noll, 60 boxes . . 4.C0 

Pike & Heald Co., labor, cleaning 

chimney ..... i.oo 

People's Gas-Light Co., i 3-burner 
' gas stove, etc. .... 3.60 

John Robbie Co., 198 yards rib- 
bon, for diplomas 
D. A. Simons, rent 75 chairs 
Albert Somes, services ten assist- 
ants, moving books, etc., from 
high to Straw school . 
Weston & Hill Co., 2 flags . 



Total expenditures 
John Robbie Co., duplicate bill, money turned into 
treasury ...... 



15-32 




2.25 




17.20 




9-75 


$87.16 






$1,011.9.1 


i into 




• 


15-32 




$1,027.23 







Books and Stationery. 

Appropriation ..... . . $200.00 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING, 605 

Expenditures, 
sundries. 

Paid American Book Co., i dictionary l9-5o 

A. S. Campbell & Co., 300 postals 

and printing .... 3.75 

E. R. Coburn Co., blotting paper, 

paper ..... 1.49 

Daniels & Downs, ^ ream paper . 1.50 

W. P. Goodman, inkstand, rubber 

bands, cards, Bibles, books, etc. 20.21 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., postage 

stamps ..... 13-00 

Novelty Advertising Co., 3 M en- 
velopes ..... 

Library Bureau, 6 books 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank 
book ..... 

E. B. Woodbury, postage 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



2.70 




5.10 




5.00 




5.00 


$67.25 




,' 


$67.25 


• 


132-75 




$200.00 



Printing and Advertising. 

Appropriation ..... $350.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 8.23 



Expenditures, 
sundries. 



^358-23 



Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 
blanks, postals, etc. .... 



606 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 
Cards, circulars, blanks, postals . 
400 reports, 54 pages and cover 
500 pamphlets, bound 
3 reams newspaper cut 
Music, bound, 40 books . 
Programs and tickets 

Total expenditures 



$241.83 
36.00 
42.25 

4-75 

7.00 

20.25 



^358-23 

$358.23 



• Contingent Expenses. 
Appropriation ..... 

Expenditures, 
freight and cartage. 

Paid J. G. Jones, freight and truckage, school furni- 
ture, chairs, text-books, etc. .... 

WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Paid Board of Water Commissioners, 

use of water .... $666.25 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas . . 268.24 
Manchester Electric Light Co., 

electric lights .... 34-oo 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 90.07 



ANNUAL GRADUATION. 

Paid F. P. Colby, moving piano . 

R. W. Bean, services at Opera House 

W. Heron, Jr., writing diplomas . 

Manchester Opera House Co., rent 

of house ..... 



$9.00 

1.50 

38.15 

50.00 



$1,600.00 



$74.35 



$1,058.56 



$98.65 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



607 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, clearing off snow. 

Franklin-street schoolhouse 
Paid W. E. Buck : 

Use of team .... 
Paid for freight and express 
Paid C. W. Davis, use of team 

William J. Dinsmore Co., i flag 
Paid E. J. Ela, cash paid : 
For carrying water . 
Piling wood in shed . 
Paid Andrew Fox, cleaning Youngsville 
schoolhouse 
A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos 
Kasson & Palmer, i subscription 
"Education" to Jaii. i, 1896 . 
E. L. Kellogg & Co., i subscrip- 
tion "Teacher's Institute" to 
March, 1896 . . . . 
Paid J. J. Kimball : 
Hektograph and paper 
Expenses to Boston for music . 
Paid E. C. Lambert, expenses to Hart- 
ford, Conn., looking up music 
teacher . . . . . 
Amelia Martsch, cleaning Goffe's 

Falls schoolhouse 
Byron Moore, furnishing water 6 

months, Goffe's Falls 
Pay-roll, division No. 2 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



^0.75 

78.00 

13.60 

105.00 

6.15 

15.00 
- 1-25 

5.00 
14.00 

3.00 



1. 00 



6.75 




3.00 




10.52 




5.00 




3.00 




17.49 


^288.51 






^1,520.07 




79-93 




$1,600.00 



608 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Care of Rooms. 



Appropriation ..... 
Transferred from reserved fund 


^4,700.00 
28.82 


$4,728.82 






Expenditures. 





JANITORS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 



Paid John S. Avery 






$600.00 




James E. Bailey . 






170.04 




H. G. Batchelder 


J 




475.02 




E. P. Cogswell . 






291.69 




W. F. Conner 






545-80 




Merton C. Coleman 






37.00 




H. C. Dickey 






250.00 




D. S. Dunbar 






29.25 




Emma J. Ela 






52.60 




V. H. Hill . 






208.35 




C. F. Jack . 






487.50 




W. H. Morrill . 






399.96 




W. H. Newry . 






549.96 




Almon Proctor 






30-75 




Fred Perron 






17.00 




J. 0. H. Smith . 






31.00 




William Stevens . 






450.00 




R. D. Sleeper 






50.00 




Inez M, Warren . 






40.25 








$4,716.17 




Paid Susan A. Barker, cleaning windows, 




Straw school .... $10.65 




M. C. Colman, cleaning schoolhouse 2.00 







$12.65 


Total expenditures 






• 


$4,728.82 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



609 



Evening Schools. 



Appropriation 






^1,300.00 


Transferred from reserved fund 

Expenditures. 


156.93 




SALARIES. 


Paid Florence L. Abbott . . . $3-^o 


Mrs. W. S. Adams 






8.10 


Etta F. Boardman 






88.00 


Gertrude A. Burns 






II 70 


Mary A. Buzzell . 






6.30 


L. H. Carpenter . 






169.40 


Lenora J. Clough 






11.70 


Honorie J. Crough 






77.00 


C. E. Cochran 






169.40 


H. E. Daniels 






2.70 


Isabel Esty . 






62.00 


W. W. Forbes . 






30.00 


Lizzie D. Hartford 






3-75 


Lillian C. Hall . 






33-00 


Myrtie Hatch 






14-95 


Margaret C. Lane 






29.70 


Maggie G. Linen 






69.30 


Carrie G. Mason . 






29.70 


Annie R. Morison 






32.40 


W. J. Mooar 






115.60 


A. W. Morgan 






129.80 


Josephine A. Mitchell 






66.00 


Florence Richardson 






21.60 


Harriet Richardson 






2.70 


Lizabell Savory . 






35-IO 


Hattie S. Tuttle . 






36.90 


Hattie 0. Willand 






29.70 


Mary A. Walker . 






29.70 


E. F. Walsh 






23.40 



^1,456.93 



39 



;^i,343.2o 



610 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 
JANITORS. 



Paid John H. Cole 
W. F. Conner 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid American Book Co., 70 arithmetics 
J. F. Burton, mason work 
Henry S. Clark, rent of hall, No- 
vember and December 
Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 2 tons 
coal ..... 

S. L. Derick, moving table and 
chairs ..... 
Manchester Hardware Co.,i hatchet 

Total expenditures 



51S.00 
19.00 



$36.90 
^■33 

26.00 
11.50 

•50 

•50 



$37.00 



^76.73 
^i>456.93 





Teachers' 


Salaries. 


Appropriation 


. 


. 


$67,000.00 


Transferred from i 


reserved fund 


• 


1,499.21 




EXPENDITURES. 




Paid teachers, as per pay-roll : 






January 






$6,562.96 


February 






7,088.83 


March 






6,741.46 


April . 






6,762.18 


May . 






6,853.71 


June . 






6,718.61 


September 






6,944.53 


October 






6,982.75 



,499.21 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 611 

November . ... . . ^6,874.83 

December . ... . . 6,969.35 

$68,499.21 



Total expenditures ..... ;^68,499.2i 





Eveni 


ng School of Mechanical 


Drawing 




Appi 


•opriation 


• 


Expenditures. 


• 


$550.00 












SALARIES. 






Paid 


Henry W. Allen , 
John M. Kendall 


. 


$199.50 
199.50 


$399.00 












SUNDRIES. 







Paid E. R. Coburn Co., 2 reams paper . $36.00 

John B. Varick Co., i hammer, i 

wrench . . . . . i.oo 



Total expenditures ., . . . . $436.00 

Transferred to reserved fund . ... . . 114.00 



;5o.oo 



Free Text-Books. 

Appropriation ...... . $5,000.00 

Expenditures. 

text-books and supplies. 

Paid American Book Co. . . . $985-30 

Allyn & Bacon .... 32.05 

Boston School Supply Co. . . ^0.95 

E. E. Babb & Co. . . . 103.75 



612 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Miss M. P. Beane 


^18.00 


W. G. Colesworthy 


6.75 


E. R. Coburn Co. 


II. 14 


Eagle Pencil Co. . 


98.10 


Educational Publishing Co. . 


10.30 


Ginn & Co. 


507-75 


J, L. Hammett . 


243-75 


D. C. Heath & Co. . 


147.20 


Henry Holt & Co. 


4.20 


Holden Patent Book Cover Co. 


35-60 


Hegewald & Rodelsperger . 


143.00 


G. F. King & Merrill . 


678.41 


C. H. Kimball . . 


.22 


King, Richardson & Co. 


225.90 


Lee & Shepard . 


18.48 


Leach, Shewell & Sanborn . 


59.82 


Longmans, Green & Co. 


15.96 


Maynard, Merrill & Co. 


8.48 


Meade, Dodge & Co. . 


1-55 


Manchester Novelty Co. 


.60 


G. S. Perry & Co. 


208.12 


The Prang Educational Co. . 


454.64 


Thompson, Brown & Co. 


32.62 


University Publishing Co. . 


50.42 


William Ware & Co. . 


210.41 


LABOR. 





Paid Fannie L. Sanborn, services as clerk in superin- 
tendent's office .... 



^323-47 



;oo.oo 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 242 blank- 
books ..... . . $91.88 

Total expenditures . . . ■ . . $4,915.35 

Transferred to reserved fund .... 84.65 



; ,000.00 



CITY LIBRARY. 613 

Manual Training. 

Appropriation ...... . ^1,500.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Fred E. Browne, services as teacher ^1,199.91 
E. R. Coburn Co., i roll blue print 1.50 

J. L. Hammett, i gross pencils . 2.50 

Hanover-street Laundry, washing • 

and repairing aprons . . 2.50 

W. F. Hubbard, lumber, and labor 

sawing and planing same . . 5.92 

Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

1,303 feet lumber .... 
Lumber and labor .... 
Paid Palmer, Parker & Co., lumber 

John B. Varick. Co., tacks, locks, 
butts, saws, glue 

Total expenditures . 
Transferred to reserved fund 



65- 


15 








47- 


15 








9- 


.86 








14, 


,61 


$1 


>349- 












$^ 


:349' 


.10 








150. 


90 




$1 


,500.00 



City Library. 



Balance from last year unexpended . $3,461.07 

Appropriation ..... 4,500.00 



$7,961.07 



Expenditures. 
librarian and assistants. 



Paid Kate E. Sanborn, librarian . .' $900.00 
George R. Fletcher, assistant . 3S9.75 

Fred A. Foster, assistant . . 122.50 



614 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid A. C. Fitzpatrick, assistant . 
Arthur H. Fletcher, assistant 
L. B. Hammond, assistant 
Bertram James, assistant 
C. W. McCoy, assistant 
G. W. Swallow, assistant 
A. N. Tasker, assistant . 



$32.40 
162.50 

2.80 
11.65 

4-25 

18.75 
21.85 



CATALOGUE AND CATALOGUE SUPPLIES. 



Paid Library Bureau : 






100 shelf-holders 


. 


$7.40 


8 M index cards 


. 


23.10 


Labels 




.30 


Paid Louise E. Newell, 


copyist 


205.65 


Edith 0. Simmons, copyist . 


374.25 



Jl, 666.45 



$610.70 



BINDING, REBINDING, AND RESEWING. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. .... 

NEW BOOKS. 

Paid trustees of city library . . . . . $■ 

WATER, GAS, FUEL, INSURANCE, ELECTRIC LIGHTS 



$261.89 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 119,615 lbs. 

coal ..... 

Clough & Twombly, premium on 

$10,000, insurance on contents 

of library .... 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 54 

tons 1,290 lbs. coal . 
People's Gas-Light Co., gas . 
Union Electric Co., electric lights 
Water- Works, use of water . 



^343-89 



125.00 

285.79 
114.80 

185.83 
16.00 



51,071.31 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 615' 



NEWSPAPERS. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co., "Mirror" one year, 
to April I, 1895 .... 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing : 

Placards, reports, labels . . . $15-2 S 

Advertising 4-line local 4 times . 4.80 

Paid N. P. Hunt, postage ... 2.74 

George Holbrook, labor and mate- 
rial, drawers and cases . . 34-66 
C. F. Livingston, printing covers . 1 4.00 
Neilson Manufacturing Co., 6 Neil- 
son binders .... 8.75 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 
Envelopes and printing 
Blank books, slips, etc. 
Paper ...... 

Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising 
notice, 4 lines, 5 times 

Total expenditures 
Balance transferred to new account 



3-75 

29-35 

6-75 

4.25 


^124.30 

^4,740.65 
3,220.42 


• 




$7,961.07 



Fire Department. 

Appropriation . . ' . . . ;^5o,ooo.oo 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 6.346. 7 j 



^56,346.73 



Expenditures. 



SERVICES. 



Paid Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer . $1,300.00 
Fred S. Bean, assistant engineer . 125.00 



616 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Ruel G. Manning,assistant engineer 
Eugene S. Whitney, assistant engi- 
neer ..... 
Clarence R. Merrill, assistant engi- 
neer ..... 
Fred S. Bean, clerk 



5125.00 

125.00 

125.00 
25.00 



"teamsters and engineers 


as per pay-roll : 


January 


$2,018.19 


February 


2,002.19 


March . . . . 


1,984.12 


April . . . . 


2,035.06 


May . . . . 


2,041.19 


June . . . . 


2,036.37 


July . . . . 


2,040.19 


August . . . . 


2,199.10 


September . 


2,263.14 


October 


2,196.85 


November 


2,262.93 


December . . . 


2,241.54 



$1,825.00 



$25,320.87 



CALL MEMEERS. 

Paid Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine Co.: 

For year 1895 . . . . . $1,150.00 

Extra labor ..... 8.00 

Paid N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Co.: 

For year 1895 • • • • • 1,150.00 

Extra labor ..... 8.00 

Paid Chemical Engine Co., for year 1895 325.00 

Paid Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder Co.: 

For year 1S95 ..... 1,226.66 

Extra labor ..... 8.00 

Paid Fire King Steam Fire Engine Co.: 

For year 1895 ..... 1,140.00 

Extra labor ..... 8.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



617 



Paid Fulton Engine and Ladder Co.: 



For year 1895 . 
Extra labor 


• 


^1,651.67 
8.00 




Paid Massabesic Hose Co.: 








For year 1895 . 
Extra labor 


. 


1,145.00 
S.oo 




Paid Merrimack Steam Fire 


Engine Co.: 






For year 1895 . 
Extra labor 


• 


1,503.28 
8.00 




Paid Pennacook Hose Co.: 








For year 1895 . 
Extra labor 


• 


1,145.00 
8.00 




Paid Gen. Stark Steam Fire 1 


i^ngine Co.: 






For year 1895 . 
Extra labor 


• 


1,271.72 
8.00 




Paid Hose Co. No. 3, for 
from August i . 


year 1895, 


259.18 


039-51 




2^12 


OTHER LABOR. 






Paid John N. Brown, labor as spare 






driver ..... 
Walter Blenus, 5 days' labor as 


$195-75 




driver ..... 


11-33 




Charles Edgar, 12 days' services as 






driver ..... 


I S.oo 




Asa W. Gage, 13 days' labor as 
driver 


22.75 




R. J. Galway, 6 days' labor as pipe 
man of Chemical 


9.00 




E. E. Hubbell, 28 days' labor as 






driver ..... 


<2 00 




Herbert Jenney, 97 day's labor as 






driver ..... 
W. L. Lang, 2 days' labor . 
Edward Sargent, 44 days' labor as 


145-50 
3.00 




driver 




66.00 





618 



ilEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Frank W. Tebbetts, 48 days' labor 

as driver ..... 

John P. Walker, 13 days' services 

as engineer .... 

C. J. Willey, 50 days' labor as driver 

Melvin Worthen, 14 days' labor as 

driver ..... 

LAUNDRY. 

Paid J. E. Cheney 

Mrs. Richard Galway 

Mrs. G. M. Goodwin 

Mrs. M. H. Hulme 

Mrs. W. Morse . 

Mrs. Margaret Powers 

Mrs. Susie E. Reed 

L. A. Sanger 

Mrs. C. C. Tinkham 

Mrs. W. F. Wheeler 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., soap 

FURNITURE, ETC. 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co.: 
4 beds 
4 mattresses 
4 springs . 
10 chairs , 

3 bureaus and glasses 

Pillows, comforters . 

Paid N. H. Furniture Co., bedstead, 

bureau, mattress, pillows, etc. 

John Robbie Co., 18 pillow cases, 

6 sheets ..... 

Temple & Farrington Co., window 

shades, fixtures, etc. , 



29.25 
75.00 



^2.60 

33-95 

54-35 
56.70 

IO-55 

5S.35 

6.00 

1-95 

23-75 

8.50 

1. 00 



19.50 


12.00 


10.00 


6.90 


24.00 


22.50 


19-75 


5-70 


5-85 



^710.58 



5257-70 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 619 

Paid Weston & Hill Co. : 

Matting, iron ends, etc. . . . $6.49 

120 yards cotton .... 20.85 

Pillowcases, crash, spreads, satteen, etc. 21.67 

^175.21 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing : 

1,000 envelopes .... $24.25 

400 reports ..... 35-oo 

Paid The Nate Kellogg Co., printing : 

5 order books ..... 5.50 

Rosters, postals, ordinances and orders, 

slips, note heads, cards, etc. . . 30-9° 

Paid C. P. Trickey : 

I blank book ..... 
Mucilage, paper, ink 

WATER, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS, TELEPHONE. 

Paid Water-Works, use of water . 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 
People's Gas-Light Co., gas . 
N. E, Telephone & Telegraph Co., 
use of telephones 

FUEL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

59 tons, 7S0 lbs. egg coal . . . ;^34i.49 

Pine wood, sawed . . . . 41-25 
Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 4 tons 

coal ..... 24.00 

Stephen Gardner, splitting wood . 3.00 
Moore & Preston, 15 tons Lehigh 

coal ..... 86.25 

E. W. Poore, 30 tons, 610 lbs. coal 174-25 



1.50 


2.16 


:lephone 
$518.85 


49-45 


949.76 


279.06 



$99-3^ 



;i,797.i2 



620 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid D. M. Poore, 9 tons, 1890 lbs. egg 

coal . . . . . ^5 7- 1 8 

Petterson & Lindquist, 17 tons, 

1,920 pounds broken coal . . 103.00 

Paid J. P. Russell & Co. : 

25 tons bKoken coal .... 
41 tons egg coal .... 
I load wood ..... 

FREIGHT AND TRUCKAGE. 

Paid Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 




on zinc, vitriol, etc. . 


$5.26 


W. B. Corey, truckage 


8.75 


John W. Wilson, truckage 


23.10 


SUPPLIES. 




Paid Clark M. Bailey : 




1 2 quarts axle grease 


^i.6c 


541 pounds waste .... 


54.10 


Toilet paper ..... 


10.00 


Paid J. A. & W. Bird & Co., bicarbonate 




of soda ..... 


35-28 


Boston Belting Co., hose, etc. 


51.26 


Cavanaugh Brothers, 5 horses 


1,040,00 


Couch & McDonald, i hose wagon 


450.00 


Paid Cornelius Callahan Co. : 




Repairing hose .... 


171.00 


Binders, ferrules, gong 


25-25 


390 feet hose ..... 


97.50 


2 collars ...... 


50.00 


Paid The Daniels-Cornell Co., 6 boxes 




soap ..... 


24.00 


Eureka Fire Hose Co., 1,500 feet 




hose 


900.00 


T. F. Fifield, matches, sugar 


4.85 



il,2I2.67 



17.11 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



621 



Paid A. Filion, 2 exercise wagons . $650.00 
Gleason & Bailey Manufacturing 
Co., I special hook-and-ladder 

truck 1,650.00 

D. M. Goodwin, 24 heavy brooms 9.25 
Paid S. F. Hay ward & Co. : 

I Pony extinguisher, etc. . . . 34- 13 

I Pony extinguisher cup . . . 4.13 

I rubber coat ..... 6.75 

150 feet Chemical hose, coupled . 59-75 

I play pipe 10.00 

Repairs on extinguisher head . . 2.25 
Paid C. T. HoUoway : 

I gross Pony bottles .... 8.00 

1 Pony extinguisher head, complete . 5.00 
Paid A. W. Harris Oil Co., valve oil and 

can ...... 8.05 

Paid A. S. Jackson : 

2 Boston pipes ..... 29.00 
Hose and supplies .... 29.50 

Paid T. A. Lane Co. : 

250 feet 3^ inch hose . . . 24.80 

2 gas stoves ..... 2.00 

Paid Merrimack Chemical Co., vitriol . 14.16 

Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 

I hose hook ..... i.oo 

I set grates ..... 4.50 

I gong hammer and spring . . 4.25 

I special brake block . . . 1.50 

Valves, springs, castings, screws, labor 66.52 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co. : 

I stove, tubing 2.72 

I Welsbach lamp .... 2.50 

Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 

Coalhod, ash barrel .... 4.10 

Lantern, burners, cans, etc. . . i4-55 



622 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid B. H. Piper Co., 12 ax handles 

Plumer & Holton, 10 reefers 
Paid I. L. Stickney : 
I pair rubber gloves . 
15 feet rubber tubing 
Paid Stark Mills, duck . 

Edward Sears, i automatic switch 

and weight 
H. Thompson, 12 rattan brooms 
Union Manufacturing Co., nickel 
plating three pairs pliers . 



^2.25 
87.50 

1.25 
1.50 
2.09 

5-5° 
5.00 

•95 



1,669.29 



PLUMBING, REPAIRS, ETC. 



Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., box 

corners ...... $2.50 

Paid Henry K. Barnes : 

Washers for suction hose . . . 1.18 

3^ feet hose coupled . . . 2.10 

Paid J. R. Carr & Co. : 

Glass and setting same ... 1.05 

Paint, painting .... 4.04 

Paid J. Hodge, lumber and labor . . .84 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Works, castings and labor io-79 
The Head & Dowst Co., material 

and labor on coal boxes . . 32.47 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor 85.24 

F. I. Lessard & Co., lining 2 meal 

boxes ..... 1.40 

Pike & Heald Co., material and 

labor 17.42 

George W. Rief, lumber and labor 1.50 



^160.53 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



623 



HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co. 
John B. Varick Co. 
The Wadleigh Hardware Co. 



$3885 
129.79 
1 1 1. 61 



MEDICAL, SURGICAL, INSURANCE. 



Paid A. F. Abbott, V. S., visits and med- 
icine . . . . . 
A. W. Baker, dentistry work on 16 

horses .... 
P. H. Boire, medicines 
N. Chandler, hoof ointment 
Z. Foster Campbell, medicine 
E. H. Currier, medicine 
A. L. Dodge, V. S., visits and 

medicine .... 
E. B. Dunbar, medicine 
J. L. Golden, V. S., visits and 

medicine .... 
John F. Kerwin, Peel's food 
W. B. Mitchell, liniment 
Rief & Silver, medicine 
A. D. Smith, medicine 
C. E. Silver, condition powders 
Snelling «Sc Woods, medicine 
Security Live Stock Insurance Co., 
fees and assessments on policies 



S127.25 

32.00 
9-35 
4-5° 
6-95 

10.50 

4-5° 
3-40 

71-50 
5-50 
1.90 

2.08 

7-65 
2.50 

11-55 

283.19 



CARRIAGE WORK AND REPAIRS. 



Paid Couch & McDonald, repairs on 

carriages ..... 

M. W, Ford, Jr., rubber wheel 

hub bands .... 



^16.74 
4.00 



)28o.25 



$584.32 



624 



EEPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, carriage 
repairs ..... 
Sanborn Carriage Co., carriage re- 
pairs ..... 
D. B. Varney, repairing hose car- 
riage ..... 
Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 
Material and repairs on rear spring. 
Engine No. 3 . . . . 
Repairing hose carriage . 



$438.86 

28.40 

2.50 



31-75 
6.00 



BLACKSMITHING. 




Paid Joseph Breauit .... 


$50-33 


J. M. Brouillette .... 


237-50 


Cressey & Colby .... 


104.00 


Thomas Hickey .... 


74.00 


A. Lemire ..... 


49-35 


Mahaney & McSweeney 


382.50 



128.25 



$897.68 



HAY, GRAIN, ETC. 



Paid Adams & Tasker . 




• 


$63-25 


Annis Flour &: Grain Co. 




193-44 


Henry A. Boone . 




5-00 


F. Brown 






11.05 


William Clark . 






23-50 


G. E. Fellows 






1.20 


Gage & McDougall 






723.48 


Clarence R. Merrill 






1,126.22 


Nichols & Allen . 






1,265.11 


Henry W. Parker 






351-66 


. Partridge Brothers 






360.62 



^,124.53 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



625 



HARNESSES AND HARNESS REPAIRS. 



Paid The Fred Allen Co. : 

Repairs and supplies .... $64.70 

I pair harnesses .... 100,00 

Paid W. H. Adams, repairs, supplies . 106.35 
Charles E. Berry, collars and 

hames ..... 40-50 

F. J. Dustin, 12 collar rolls . . 4,80 
Paid H. A. Glazier : 

Harness hanger .... 6.00 

12 links ...... 5.00 

Paid W. E. Greeley, repairing harnesses 2.70 

C. N. Perkins, 4 No. 4 snaps . 6.00 
Paid Ranno Harness Co. : 

Whips ...... 32-65 

Blankets, collars, brushes, repairs . 146.69 

Paid N. J. Whalen, harness dressing . i.oo 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice from July 

10 to October 24 . . . |4>64 

Joseph Breault, burying horse . 5.00 

C. G. Braxmar, 12 nickel badges . 7.20 

W. H. Carpenter, burying horse . 3.50 

F. X. Chenette, burying horse . 5.00 
Daniels & Downs, stenographic 

services ..... g.oo 

P. Donovan, Jr., use of hacks . 10.00 

W. J. Freeman, baiting horses , 1.00 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 2 

pieces pine .... .50 
John C. Gold, i pair climbing 

spurs ..... 2.90 
Hale & Whittemore, framing 2 

cards . . . ... i.oo 

40 



;i6.39 



626 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Kean & Doyle, use of hack . . ^5-oo 

Thomas W. Lane, postage, express, 

telegrams. . . . . 15-67 

F. T. E. Richardson, sheriff's ser- 
vices, investigating fire in Moi- 

son's block .... 7.20 

Mrs. Susie Reed, making 14 sheets 
and whitening same . . . 2.80 

Paid George W. Reed : 

Pasturing 3 horses . . . . 15-00 

Repairing 3 rubber coats . . . 1.50 

Paid C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks, 

etc 3.50 

G. H. Wheeler, use of horse 10 

days . . • . . . 10.00 



;iio.4i 



Total expenditures 



i6,346.73 



Fire-Alarm Telegraph 


, 


Appropriation . . • . 


• 


Expenditures. 




LABOR. 




Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll : 




January 


$49.00 


February .... 




45-5° 


March 




47-25 


April 




49.00 


May 




50-75 


June . . . ' . 




47-25 


July 




49-75 


August 




47-75 


September .... 




49.00 



$2,000.00 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 627 

$51.25 



October ..... 

November ..... 49.00 

December ..... 47-25 



SUPPLIES. 

Paid American Electrical Works, wire . ^31.60 
Paid J. H. Bunnell & Co.: 

85 jars 14.16 

Switches, staples, bells, etc. . . 35-1° 
Paid The James Baldwin Co.: 

325 plain pins 3.25 

175 brackets ..... 1.75 

Paid James R. Carr & Co., paint, oil, 

brushes, etc. . . . . • 15-68 

M. J. Coleman, material and labor 1.55 
Paid The Edes Manufacturing Co.: 

200 zincs ...... 45«oo 

50 cylinder zincs .... 3.25 

Paid William Forsyth, i set pullers . 4.54 

William A. Hazelton, 15 poles . 37-5° 

Jeremiah Hodge, lumber and labor 29.93 
T. A. Lane Co., pipe, melting-pot, 

ladle 2.1 1 

H. J. Lawson, 66 pounds copper, 

and labor . . . . i5«57 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, lumber and 

labor ..... 31-70 
Paid N. E. Gamewell Co.: 

100 battery zincs .... 30.00 

100 zinc screw caps .... 8.00 

75 keys to signal boxes . . . 18.75 

2 signal boxes ..... 250.00 

Springs, copper wire, etc. . . . 3i'03 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., copper, tin . 1.13 



52.75 



628 REPOllT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Sanborn Carriage Co.: 

Steeling tongs ..... ;^o.25 

Roof bracket standard . . . i.oo 

Hooks, rings, staples . . . .80 

Paid Talbot Dyewood & Chemical Co., 

12 barrels vitriol . . . 208.63 

D. B. Varney, 450 zinc castings, etc. 284.16 

John B. Varick Co., cord, rope, 

screws, etc. .... 20.58 

Washburn & Moen Manufacturing 

Co., wire ..... 192.86 

The Wadleigh Hardware Co., wire, 

rings, etc. .... 3.61 

A. C. Wallace, lumber and labor . 18.78 



^1,342.27 



FREIGHT AND TRUCKAGE. 



Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight . $1.19 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 2.76 

John W. Wilson, truckage . . 3.12 



.07 



Total expenditures ... . . $1,932.09 

Transferred to reserved fund . . . . 67.91 

;^2, 000.00 



Hydrant Service. 
Appropriation . ;^i5, 800.00 



Expenditures. 
Paid Water-works, rent of 632 hydrants . . . $15,800.00 



POLICE STATION. 



629 



Police Department.— Station. 



Appropriation 


^2,500.00 


Transferred from reserved fund 


382.35 


Expenditures. 




SERVICES. 




Paid Miss A. B. Brown, matron . 


^407.00 


Frank P. Wiggin, janitor 


640.50 



52,882.35 



$1,047.50 



WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, FUEL. 

Paid Water-works, use of water at station, 

Clinton-street, and Slayton house $153-32 
People's Gas-Light Co., gas . . 79.1° 

Union Electric Company, electric 

lights ..... 384.00 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co.: 

3)4 tons egg coal .... 21.50 

Hard and pine wood . . . 11.25 

Paid DeCourcy & Holland, 41,025 lbs. 

egg coal 117-97 

J. H. DeCourcy, 10 tons egg coal . 57-5o 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., i cord 

wood ..... 6.00 

D. M. Poore, i cord pine wood . 4.50 

E. V. Turcotte, 68 tons 1,690 lbs. 

egg coal 395.81 

J. F. Wyman, ^ ton egg coal . 3.13 

LAUNDRY, ETC. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey, toilet paper, 

brooms, etc. .... $24.58 

The Daniels-Cornell Co., soap, 

matches, toilet paper . . 14.43 



11,234.08 



630 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Mrs. A. M. George, cleaning paint, 

etc. ...... ^100.52 

C. W. Lerned & Co., disinfectants, 

insect powder .... 23.55 

Mrs. J. F. Wiggin, washing blan- 
kets, towels, etc. . . . 55-88 

York Market Co., soap . . 9.44 



)228.40 



MEDICAL, SURGICAL, SANITARY. 

Paid J. J. Holland, ammonia . . ^11-52 

M. E. Kean, M. D., surgical and 

medical treatment, sundry persons 21.50 

Frederick Perkins, M. D., surgical 
and medical treatment, sundry- 
persons ..... 71.00 
F. H. Thurston, medicines . . 3.80 
George D. Towne, M. D., profes- 
sional services .... 1.50 



REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, 4 windows and labor 
J. J. Abbott, glass and setting same 
Paid George Holbrook : 
Work on window 
Lumber and labor 
Paid Peter Harris, repairing locks 
Paid The T. A. Lane Co. : 

500 feet hose .... 
Material and labor, plumbing . 
I ruby lamp .... 
Paid The Manchester Hardware Co., i 
rat-trap 

Leander Pope, repairs on bunk 
chains, etc. 



^109.32 



^7.80 
6.62 

4.00 

8.75 
4.00 

5-5° 

12.71 

.60 



3-55 



POLICE COURT. 



631 



Paid John Robbie Co., ticking, cotton, 
towels ..... 
Paid The John B. Varick Co. : 

500 paper bags .... 

Duster, brooms, rope, snow-shovels, etc. 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co. : 

6 oak arm chairs 

I desk ..... 
Paid Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice 

daily from May 10 to November i 
Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son : 

I four-drawer desk . 

I Remington typewriter and cover 
Paid Edward Sears, putting rope in flag 
pole .... 

Frank P. Wiggin, killing dogs 

Total expenditures 



•32 

10.90 



^69.75 



$15.00 
20.00 

10.80 

25.00 
98.50 

3.00 
21.00 

^193-30 

. $2,882.35 



Police Department. — Court. 
Appropriation ..... $2,700.00 



Transferred from reserved fund 


1,15414 


Expenditures. 




SERVICES. 




Paid N. P. Hunt, police justice 


$590.42 


Isaac L. Heath, police justice 


867.50 


Isaac L. Heath, associate justice . 


161.27 


George Prescott, associate justice . 


175.00 


John C. Bickford, clerk 


600.00 


John H. Andrews, holding court 




one day ..... 


2.12 



l3>S54-i4 



^2,396.31 



()32 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CONVEYING PRISONERS. 

Paid Healy and Cassidy ..... $891.00 

PRINTING, ADVERTISING, STATIONERY. 

Paid A. S. Campbell «Sc Co., printing : 

300 dockets ..... $67.50 

Warrants, writs, slips, envelopes . 86.90 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing : 

Criminal dockets .... 12.75 

Binding one docket .... .75 

Paid W. P. Goodman, record books, ink- 
stands ...... 2.80 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

2 dockets ..... 1. 00 

Ink, paper ..... 2.64 

^174-34 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid M. J. Healy, cash paid for witness 

fees and other expenses . . $386.49 

J. E. Lemaitre, M. D., examination 

Alexander Martin for insanity . 3.00 

J. W. D. McDonald, M. D., exam- ■ 
ination Alexander Martin for in- 
sanity ..... 3.00 



^392.49 

Total expenditures ..... $3,854.14 



Police Department. — Commission. 

Appropriation . . , . . . . . $37,500.00 



POLICE COMMISSION. 



633 



Expenditures. 



SERVICES. 

Paid Michael J. Healy, chief of police . $900.00 
John F. Cassidy, deputy chief . 800.00 

Paid Isaac L. Heath, chairman commission : 

Salary for 1894 . . . ' . 150.00 

ii^ quarter, 1895 .... 56.25 

Paid David Perkins,chairman commission 

from May 15 to Oct. 22, 1895 • 65'5° 

Harry Loveren, chairman commis- 
sion from Oct. 22 to Jan. i, 1896 27.75 
N. S. Clark, commissioner, salary, 

1894 and 1895 . . . 200.00 

F. P. Carpenter, commissioner, sal- 
ary, 1894 and 1895 ' • • 200.00 
C. B. Hildreth, private detective . 163.50 
Regular patrol .... 26,395.27 
Extra time of regular patrol . . 1,482.81 
Special patrol .... 2,481.32 
John Fullerton, 3^/^ days' special 
patrol ..... 



$32,928.52 



TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH. 



Paid N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., 



use of telephones 


$306.71 


Western Union Telegraph Co., tel- 




egrams ..... 


31.81 


TEAMS. 




Paid George W. Bailey 


$24.75 


Boyd Brothers .... 


4.00 


F. X. Chenette .... 


6.00 


W. J. Freeman .... 


181.50 


E. T. Jam.es .... 


36.00 



^338.52 



634 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



A. N. Nettle 
J. C. Nichols & Son 
C. H. Simpson 
G. E. Wheeler . 



51-50 
3.00 
9.00 
3-50 



FEEDING PRISONERS. 



Paid Daniel Davis 

W. D. Ladd & Co. 



533-IO 
32-65 



PRINTING, STATIONERY, ADVERTISING. 

Paid L. A. Biron & Co., advertising 

Fourth of July notice . . $2.00 
J. E. Bernier, advertising Fourth 

of July notice .... 3.00 

Paid John B. Clarke Co., printing : 

Circulars, quarterly reports . . 4.00 

3,000 letter-heads .... 12.25 

1,000 envelopes . . . . 2.25 

225 rules ...... 68.84 

Binding 225 rules . . . . 56-25 

Advertising Fourth of July notice . 8.50 
Paid W. P. Goodman : 

84 diaries ..... 49.00 

Envelopes, books, pencils, ink . . 7.90 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co., blocks 

and pens ..... 6.75 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

Fourth of July notice . . 5.46 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid G. W. Bailey, storage of ambu- 
lance . . . . . $12.00 
L. W. Colby, photographing crim- 
inals . . . . . 44*50 



$269.25 



^365-75 



$226.20 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 635 

Paid J. C. Ellinwood, photographing 

criminals ..... $8.00 

Isaac L. Heath, drawing rules and 
regulations, correcting proof, 
etc. ...... 1 25.00 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co. : 

I 7-foot table ..... 36.00 

6 chairs ...... 39-oo 

Paid A. J. Lane Co., typewriting reports .90 

Lovejoy & Stratton, 5 badges . 19-50 

B. E. Moore, conveyance of 
George Swallow from Goffe's 
Falls to police station . . 2.00 

Stephen Piper, photographing crim- 
inals ..... 4.00 

Upton's N. H. Furniture Store, i 



lock, etc. .... 

N. J. Whalen, repairing bolts 


•65 
1. 00 




J5292.55 


Total expenditures . 
Transferred to reserved fund 


. $34,420.79 
3,079.21 




$37,500.00 



Police Matron. 

Appropriation ..... . . $100.00 



Expenditures. 
Paid A. B. Brown, office rent 



Repairs of Buildings. 

Appropriation ..... $5,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 741-69 



$5'74i-69 



636 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as 


per pay-roll, divi- 


sion No. 2 : 


January 
February 
March . 








$30.00 
24.00 
24.00 


April . 
May . 








30.00 
24.00 


June . 








24.00 


July . 

August . 

September 

October 








30.00 
24.00 
24.00 
30.00 


November 








24.00 


December 








24.00 



5312.00 



Paid Lovejoy & Stratton, labor and care 
of clocks on schoolhouses from 
December 31, 1893, to Decem- 
ber 30, 1894 . . " . . $377-75 
to December 18, 1895 . . . 383-50 

M. Connolly, labor at South Man- 
chester hosehouse . . . 4.80 



$766.05 



CITY LIBRARY, 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paint and labor . $i3-75 
W. E. Goodwin, plumbing mate- 
rial and labor . . . . 53-76 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co.: 

I couch ...... 9.00 

I mirror ...... 5-°° 

132 yards linoleum .... 99.00 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 637 

Paid George Holbrook, material and 

labor ..... $29.60 

L. H. Josselyn & Co., i table . 7.00 

Thomas A. Lane Co., plumbing 

material and labor . . . 47-54 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing mate- 
rial and labor .... i3-66 

B. W. Robinson, material and ma- 
son work ..... i9'87 

M. B. Wilson, cement and labor . ii-75 



POLICE STATION. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich : . 

Contract work ..... ;^32.oo 

Material and labor .... 4.84 

Paid Connor Brothers, repairing water- 
closets ..... 5.67 
W. E. Goodwin, plumbing mate- 
rial and labor . . . . 1320 
The Head & Dowst Co., cement, 

brick, labor . . . . 4.12 

Thomas A. Lane Co., plumbing 

material and labor . . . 5.38 

D. G. Mills, repairs on School- 
street schoolhouse, used for po- 
lice purposes .... 43-12 



ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Paid F. C. Atwood, material and labor, 

Merrimack house .... $35-5o 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, material and labor : 

Fire King house .... 4.90 

Pennacook hosehouse . . . 3.33 



509-93 



:^io8.33 



638 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid J. J. Abbott, paint and labor, sun- 
dry engine-houses .... 
Paid Baker & O'Brien, paint and labor 
Amoskeag hosehouse ... 
South Manchester hosehouse 
Fulton engine-house . 
Paid C. H. Brown, repairing roofs 

Blanchet & Co., i light glass, Ful 

ton engine-house 
E. M. Bryant & Co., electrical sup 
plies, labor. South Manchester 
hosehouse ..... 
Connor Brothers, plumbing, South 

Manchester hosehouse 
James R. Carr & Co., paint and 
labor, Massabesic hosehouse 
Paid Joel Daniels & Co.: 

Setting glass . . . . . 
Paint and labor, Vine-street 
Paid Joseph Dana : 

Building carriage-house, Fulton house 
Painting same . . . . . 
Material and labor, Gen. Stark house 
Paid The Head &: Dowst Co., lumber 
and labor : 
Vine-street house . . . . 
General Stark house . . . . 
Massabesic hosehouse 
South Manchester hosehouse 
Paid J. B. Huntley, plumbing material 
and labor, sundry houses . 
J. Hodge, I sash . . . . 

Paid Geo. Holbrook, lumber and labor : 
Amoskeag hosehouse 
Vine-street house . . . . 

Paid F. I. Lessard &i Co., plumbing, etc. 



$18.39 

5.81 

41-93 

7.00 

106.39 



7.00 

39-98 
13.90 

•75 
37.86 

175.00 

10.00 

831.07 



94.81 

1.81 
4.88 

65.07 
•75 

28.25 
94.69 
41. II 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 639 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., plumbing 
material and labor : 
Lake avenue engine-house . . $8.29 

Vine-street house .... 8.08 

Fire King house .... 25.00 

South Manchester house . . . 39-44 

Paid Larkin & Connors, repairs on water- 
closet, General Stark house . 3.00 
}{. Leibing, painting, Amoskeag 

hosehouse .... 64.50 

Herman Maynard, paper, paper 
hanging, whitewashing Vine-street 
house ..... 12.60 

U. G. Mills, material and labor, 

sundry houses .... 524.92 

Charles Newell, paint and labor, 

Lake avenue house . . . 35 -oo 

Paid Pike &: Heald Co., plumbing mate- 
rial and labor : 
Vine-street house .... 
General Stark house .... 
Lake avenue house .... 
Paid The C. H. Robie Co., concrete 
work, General Stark house 
Patrick Ryan, labor at South Man- 
chester hosehouse 
Sanborn Carriage Co., material and 

labor ..... 4.36 

Paid J. T. Underbill & Co., concreting : 

Lake avenue house .... 4.00 

South Manchester hosehouse . . 136.13 

Paid John B. Varick Co., rope, Fire 

King house .... .55 

Weston & Hill Co., 19 shades . 16. 11 

$3,052.66 



59-70 


57.00 


2.50 

• 


344.19 


4.80 



640 



REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 



BATTERY BUILDING. 



Paid D. G. Mills, laying floor . . ;^i5o.oo 
Pike & Heald Co., plumbing mate- 
rial and labor . . . , 31-69 

COURT HOUSE, 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, material and labor ^2.37 

Paid Baker & O'Brien, material and 
labor : 

Health office 45-48 

Graining front doors . . . . 10.00 

Paid W. E. Goodwin, plumbing mate- 
rial and labor . , . . 152,67 
Kirby Floral Co,, plants . . 15-00 
Larkin & Connors, repairs on steam 

and water pipes ... 9.0c 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor 

on boiler ..... i7-35 

D. G. Mills, lumber and labor . 45-04 

B. W. Robinson, repairs on boiler i4'87 

Paid John B, Vatick Co.: 

I brass faucet ..... .75 

12 quart cans, 12 corks . . . 1.87 

SCHOOLS, 

Paid Warren Harvey, resetting curbing, 

Lincoln street .... ;^S-5o 

T. A. Lane Co,, plumbing mate- 
rial and labor, North Main-street 238.02 

S. J, Russell, cleaning vaults , 12,00 

J. T, Underbill & Co., concrete 

work, Rimmon , , , . 25,00 

John B. Varick Co., 300 pounds 

phosphate ..... 5.10 



^181.69 



114.40 



^288.62 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 641 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid M. H. Allen, use of hacks . . ^lo.oo 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., in- 
specting boilers . . . 13-25 

Baker & O'Brien, glass and setting 

same 2.25 

John Bryson, paint and labor, city 

scales ..... 14.21 

John Cronin, 16 extinguishers . 32.00 

Connor Brothers, repairing waste 

pipes, pesthouse . . . 4.77 

Joel Daniels & Co., plate glass, 

mayor's office .... 4.00 

Emergency Hand Fire Extinguish- 
er Co., 24 extinguishers, sundry 
buildings 48.0a 

The Head & Dowst Co., flag poles, 

rope, labor .... 68.49 

Hutchinson Foundry and Machine 

Works, 3 grates . . . 20.00 

Kean & Doyle, hack . . . 5.00 

Larkin & Connors, material and 

labor on gas pipes . . . 16.47 

C. H. Simpson, use of hacks . 15.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., curtains 

and fixtures . . . . iO'93 

John T. Underbill & Co., concrete 

work, ward 5 wardroom . . 123.97 

Whitten & Fifield, use of hack . 5.00 

John K. Wilson, repairing bell 

tower, Prospect street , . 14-67 



I40S.01 



Total expenditures ..... ^5,741 6a 

41 



642 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 

Ward 5 Ward Room. 

Balance from last year unexpended . ^3,652.58 
Appropriation ..... 1,100.00 

$4,752-58 

Expenditures, 
contract. 

Paid John Drlscoll, furnace, complete . ^150.00 
Mead, Mason & Co. . . . 4,547.07 

$4,697.07 

FURNITURE. 

Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co., table and chairs . $8 00 

Total expenditures . , . . . ^4,705.07 

Transferred to reserved fund .... 47-5 1 

$4,752.58 



Pearl-Street Schoolhouse. 
Balance from last year unexpended . . . ^316.80 

Expenditures. 

furniture. 

Paid Bobrick School Furniture Co. . . . $216.80 



New Schoolhouse, Ward 9. 

Balance from last year unexpended . . . ^316.80 

Expenditures. 

furniture. 

Paid Bobrick School Furniture Co. . . . g^i6.8o 



NEW SCHOOLHOUSES. 643 

Addition to Bakersville Schoolhouse. 

Transferred from reserved fund .... 1 1,200.00 



» EXPENDITURES. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, building annex . . . ^1,200.00 



New Schoolhouses. 

Received from sale of bonds . . ;^i 20,000.00 

Cash on account, sale of Bridge-street lot 500.00 



-^120,500,00 



Expenditures. 

high school. 

Architect. 

Paid W. M. Butterfield, professional ser- 
vices, on account . . . $3,300.00 

Chickering & O'Connell, making 

competitive sketches . . 100.00 

Hartwell, Richardson & Driver, 

making competitive sketches . 100.00 



$3,500.00 

Contract. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co., on account . . $25,800.00 

Advertising. 

Paid L. A. Biron & Co. . . . $12.50 

The John B. Clarke Co. . . 35.17 

L'Avenir National . . . 9.00 

Union Publishing Co. . . . 57-35 

$114.02 



644 EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

STRAW SCHOOL. 

Land. 
Paid heirs of E. A. Straw, 32,400 feet land . . ^16,200.00 

Architect. , 
Paid Chickering & O'Connell, drawings and specifi- 
cations $1,453-05 



Contract. 




Paid The Head & Dowst Co. 


^25,785.00 


Extras 


935-46 


Fuller & Warren Warming & Ven- 




tilating Co., on account . 


2,080.00 


Burlington Venetian Blind Co., 74 




Venetian blinds 


276.36 



$29,076.82 



Sundries. 

Paid L. A. Biron & Co., advertising 

proposals ..... ;^4.oo 

The John B. Clarke Co., advertising 

proposals . . . . . 14-14 

The Head & Dowst Co., flagpole 

and labor on same . . . 61,92 

Thos. A. Lane Co., electric lamps, 

globe?, etc 85'65 

L' Avenir National, advertising pro- 
posals ..... 4.00 

John T. Underhill & Co., concrete 

work ..... 339- 1 1 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 
proposals ..... 12.30 



WILSON SCHOOL. 

Land. 

Paid Elliott Manufacturing Co., 40,000 square feet 
land 



LINCOLN SCHOOL CURBING. 645 

Architect. 

Paid W. M. Butterfield, professional services, on ac- 
count . $950.00 

Contract. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co., on account $16,000.00 
G. H. Underbill & Co., heating and 

ventilation, on account . . 1,792.50 

$17,792.50 

Advertising Proposals. 

Paid L. A. Biron & Co, . . . $4-00 

The John B. Clarke Co. . . 13-12 

L'Avenir National . . . 4.00 

Union Publishing Co. , . . 12.30 

^33-42 



Sundries. 

Paid Warren Harvey, curbing . . $207.75 
The Head & Dowst Co., flagpole 

and labor on same . . . 61.91 

John T. Underbill & Co., concrete 

work ..... 430.40 

The John B. Varick Co., 8 hitch 

posts ..... 12.40 



$712.46 



Total expenditures .... $101,153.39 

Balance to new account ..... 19,346.61 

$120,500.00 



Lincoln School Curbing. • 

Appropriation . . . . . $1,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 142.65 

$1,142.65 



646 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 

contract. 

Paid Warren Harvey, stone curbing . $800.00 
The C. H. Robie Co., concrete 

work 176.71 



SUNDRIES. 




Paid L. A. Biron & Co., advertising, 3 


• 


inches, i week .... 


$3.00 


The John B. Clarke Co., advertis- 




ing proposals, 2 ^^ inches, 8 times 


14.96 


L'Avenir National, advertising pro- 




posals ..... 


4.00 


Paid pay-roll, commons : 




October 


52-25 


November 


81.48 


Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising 




proposals 


10.25 



I976.7I 



$165.94 

Total expenditures .... $1,142.65 



City Hall Repairs. 

Appropriation $7,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 11,016.77 



$18,516.77 



Expenditures. 

Paid Chickering & O'Connell, profes- 
sional services .... $919.97 

The Head & Dowst Co., remodel- 
ing building .... 13,943-87 

F. I. Lessard & Co., plumbing . 3,652.93 



$18,516.77 



Total expenditures ... . . $18,516.77 



SUB-STATION, WARD 8. 647 

South Manchester Hosehouse. 



Appropriation ^1,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 285.29 



$1,785.29 



Expenditures. 

equipment. 

Paid Connor Bros., i Torrent hose- 
washer ..... |8o.oo 

Eureka Fire Hose Co., 2,500 feet 

hose ..... 1,500.00 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., beds, mat- 
tresses, bureaus, chairs, etc. . 7^-^5 

S. S. Joy, I wagon jack . . 3.00 

Thomas A. Lane Co., 50 feet hose 

and couplings .... 6.70 

The Ranno Harness Co., i set 

swing harness .... 100.00 

John B. Varick Co., shovels, 

brushes, chain, oil, etc. . . 23.74 



$1,785.29 



Total expenditures ..... $1,785.29 



Sub-Station, Ward 8. 

Appropriation . . . . . $3,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 843.82 



$3,843.82 



Expenditures, 
architect. 



Paid Chickering & O'Connell, professional services, 

preparing drawings, etc. ..... $209.31 



648 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 
CONTRACT. 



Paid F. X. LaFlamme .... 


^3,490.00 


extra work .... 


93.82 


SUNDRIES, 




Paid L. A. Biron & Co., advertising pro- 




posals 


^7-5° 


The John B. Clarke Co., advertis- 




ing 


24-93 


L'Avenir National, advertising 




proposals 


7.00 


Union Publishing Co., advertising 




proposals .... 


11.26 



;,583-82 



Total expenditures 



^50.69 
^3,843.82 



Water-Works. 

Balance from last year, unexpended 
Cash received from water rents 
Amount received from bonds issued 
Overdrafts . ... 



^18,831.52 

118,374.50 

50,000.00 

1,416.00 



-^188,622.02 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-rolls : 
January 
February 
March . 
April . 
May . 
June 
July . 



^1,887.25 
1,176.21 
1,319.64 
2,130.26 
3,164.20 
2,872.67 
2,763.12 



WATER-WORKS. 



649 



August . 

September 

October 

November 

December 



$2,187.14 
2,156.96 
2,666.81 

2,198-53 
1,992.16 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2 : 
June 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division No. 10 : 
August ...... 

Paid E. A. G. Holmes, labor and lum- 



$26,514.95 

$900.00 

$16.00 



ber ...... 

J. H. Proctor, labor of men and 
teams . . ' . 



GENERAL EXPENSE. 

Paid Daniels & Downs, stenographic ser- 
vices ...... 

Paid F. W. Elliott, dinners : 

Board of water commissioners . 
County commissioners 
Paid G. H. Marvell, dinners, county 
commissioners .... 

A. P. Partelow, use of boat . 
W. C. Clarke, 15 meetings of board 
Henry Chandler, 32 meetings of 
board ..... 

Alpheus Gay, 39 meetings of board 

Charles H. Manning, 18 meetings 

of board ..... 

Charles T. Means, 18 meetings of 
board ..... 

Harry T. Parker, 11 meetings of 
board ..... 

A. C. Wallace, 32 meetings of board 



$78.05 
1,226.46 

$123.80 

14.00 

52.75 

14-95 
10.50 
60.00 

128.00 
156.00 

72.00 

72.00 

44.00 
128.00 



^1,304-51 



650 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Jas. A. Weston, 5 meetings of board 


^20. OQ 


Jas. A. Weston, clerk, i month 


8.33 


Henry Chandler, clerk, 7 months . 


58-33 


Paid C. K. Walker : 




Salary as superintendent . 


1,999.92 


Gas 


18.76 


Postage stamps .... 


36-75 


Express ...... 


S.02 


Recording deeds, telegrams 


1.86 


Oil, bolts, etc 


I-I5 


Expenses to Burlington 


14.00 


Incidentals 


15.48 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printing >- 

12,000 water notices . . . ^22.40 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing : 

18,300 water bills .... 33-oo 

800 reports ..... 88.00 

300 blanks, 1,000 envelopes . . 7.75 

50 lists, names . . . . . 1.75 

Blocks, slips, etc. .... 22.50 

Advertising i line 23 times . . 5.75 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co.: 

Ink, pencils, envelopes, etc. . . 8.78 

4 No. 1,758 books .... 33-00 

4 No. 1,770 books .... 45 -oo 

Paid Republican Press Association, half- 
tone of gate house . . . 7. CO 
Temple & Farrington Co., 12 pen- 
cils ...... 1.50 

Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising : 

One line, 28 times . . . * . 6.10 

8 zinc cuts . . . . . 16.25 



5,058.60 



^298.78 



$1,507-63 



WATER-WORKS. 651 



ENGINEERING SERVICES. 

Paid Arthur W. Dudley, services and ex- 
penses $285.65 

George S. Rice" and George E. Ev- 
ans, 33^ days' services . . 42.00 

Joseph B. Sawyer, services of self 

and men 1,179.98 

TEAMS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid E. T. James, use of teams . . $259.00 

Whitten & Fifield, use of teams . 22.00 
N. E. Telephone and Telegraph 

Co., use of telephones . . 144.00 
PaidL. B. Bodwell& Co.: 

18 tons coal 113.00 

Charcoal and coal .... 227.89 

Paid Allen N. Clapp, lot sawed wood . 25.00 
J. A. & A. W. Walker, 244 tons, 

660 pounds Cumberland coal . 795-63 

I. T. Webster, 6^ cords wood . 29.25 



$1,615.77 



Paid Charles Bunton, land as per deed . ^5,500.00 

Gilman Clough, land as per deed . 3,880.00 

H. I. Faucher, land as per deed . 2,000.00 
E. L. Kimball, admr., land as per 

deed 542.00 

Mary O. Pierce, land as per deed 

(overdraft) .... 1,400.00 

Joseph Wilkins, land as per deed . 450.00 

LEGAL SERVICES. 

Paid Webster C. Brown, services and 

mileage in land cases . . $207.00 

G. A. Cochran, services and mile- 
age in land cases . . . 356.60 



$13,772.00 



652 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Drury & Peaslee, services in matter 

of water rights, depositions, etc. ^876.19 

B. G. Herrick, services and mile- 
age, land cases ..... 291.60 

Lewis Simons, services searching 

records ..... 2.00 

G. A. Wagner, services and ex- 
penses at register of deeds office 56.82 

DAMAGES. 

Paid Albert Moulton, damage to barrels 

in cellar, Winter street . . ^25.00 

T. E. McDerby, amount of judg- 
ment, supreme court . . 74-67 
Harris Ross, damage to horse and 

harness, caused by leak in pipe . 20.00 



FURNITURE. 

Paid Carl W. Anderson & Co., i clock $4.50 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 12 chimneys . 2.40 
Temple & Farrington Co., shades 

and fixtures .... 21.04 



HARDWARE, BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., hardware ^120.09 

John B. Varick Co., hardware . 350-57 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., hardware 69.01 
Cressey & Colby, sharpening tools, 

etc 355.12 

F. H. Senter, sharpening tools . 7.25 

FREIGHT. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 

hydrants, pipe, meters, etc. . ^276.74 
Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on coal, water meters, pipe . 804.68 



^1,790.21 



^119.67 



$27.94 



§902.04 



;i,o8i.42 



WATER-WORKS. 653 

SUPPLIES. 



Paid Adams & Tasker : 




31 casks cement .... 


$46.50 


9* casks lime 


11.20 


Cartage 


2.50 


4 feet Akron pipe .... 


•3. =5 


Paid Adams Brothers, 6 casks lime and 




truckage 


8.45 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 4 




trucks, 2 axles, labor, etc. . 


36.38 


Paid Austin, Flint & Day : 




Screens, screen doors, hinges, etc. 


25.06 


Windows, doors, frames, etc. 


45-56 


Paid Builders' Iron Foundry, branches, 




offsets, increasers, etc. 


296.00 


Fletcher Brown, 200 posts 


24.00 


Bartlett & Gay, Edson diaphragm 




pump with hose 


45.00 


Paid Boston Lead Manufacturing Co.: 




100 pigs lead 


■ 324.08 


203J lbs. solder .... 


22.39 


Paid Chadwick Lead Works : 




Pipe, solder 


49.89 


400 pigs lead 


1,227.81 


Paid Chapman Valve Manufacturing Co.: 




10 No. 14 gates 


118.12 


12 No. 3 valves 


38.40 


30 hydrants 


983-3° 


Paid P. C. Cheney Co., wiping waste . 


68.90 


Crosby Steam Gauge & Valve Co., 




repairing gauge, etc. . 


4-25 


Chelmsford Foundry Co., 4 iron 




ladders 


64.00 


A. N. Clapp, 251 gallons oil, less 




2 barrels ..... 


38.92 


Crane Company, 6 6-inch gates. 




less freight .... 


52.39 



654 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid W. M. Darrah & Co., 25 No. i red 
' slates ..... $2.50 

John Driscoll, naphtha . . . .15 

E. M. Dart Manufacturing Co., 56 

stop-cocks .... 90.00 

Paid M. T. Davidson, i crank disc, com- 
plete, with crank pin . . . 240.00 
Eager & Rand, salt, soap, oil, etc. 11.21 
Edson Manufacturing Co., 30 feet 

hose ...... 42.91 

James P. Finn, paint and labor . 424.76 

Garlock Packing Co., 56 15-16 lbs. 

ring packing . . . . 41.01 

Hays Manufacturing Co., 300 No. 
3 curb boxes, 303 i-inch cocks, 
less freight .... 470.70 

Hersey Manufacturing Co., 10 f- 

inch meters .... 126.50 

A. Higgins Sz: Co., 2,600 washers 4.29 

Paid J. Hodge : 

400 meter boxes .... 120.00 

100 pine grade stakes . . . .90 

Window blinds, lumber, labor . . 10.25 

Paid Holyoke Hydrant & Iron Works : 

Hydrant heads, valves, screws . . 26.10 

Pipe for hydrant flanges . . . 10.80 

Steamer hydrants .... 659.35 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co. : 

Pipe, lead, valves, solder . . . 118.74 

Copper wire, wrenches, electric fix- 
tures, hose washers, etc. . . . 184.42 

Paid Leonard & Ellis, machinery oil . 120.30 

Stephen Lowell, i i6-foot boat . 18.10 

Lead-Lined Iron Pipe Co., lead- 
lined couplings, etc. . . . 469.22 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 
castings, collars, sleeves, domes, 
nuts, etc., and repairs , . 685.58 



WATER-WORKS. , 655 

Paid McNeal Pipe & Foundry Co., pipe, 

offsets, etc. .... ^89.35 
Paid National Meter Co.: 

Meters 2,749.05 

Repairing meters .... 68.25 

Paid Neptune Meter Co., meters, etc. . 134.30 
New England Water Pipe Co., 

pipe and coupling . . . 997-i6 
Newark Brass Works, i rubber gas- 
ket 1. 00 

Pike & Heald Co., tin, solder, etc. 26.64 

Peet Valve Co., 52 water-gates . 778.00 

David Perkins, 16 poles . . 8.00 

Rice & Co., office railing . . 90.00 
Paid Smith & Winchester : 

I No. 3 friction drill . . . 7.65 
I Armstrong stock .... 7.20 
Paid Stone & Peterson, 2 castiron ket- 
tles 4.00 

I. F. Sturtevant, chestnut posts, 

lumber 158.89 

George S. Smith, 100 chestnut 

posts ..... 12.00 
I. L. Stickney, rubber mitts and 

packing ^.88 

Sumner & Goodwin, 50 stop boxes • 47.63 
Paid Thomson Meter Co. : 

25 meters, etc 295.25 

Repairing meters . . , . 90.75 
Paid Union Water Meter Co., meters 

and repairs .... 1,656.65 
Union Brass Co., nipples, cocks, 

caps, couplings, etc. . . . 211.80 

G. R. Vance, kettles and pails . 14.00 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil . . . 28.05 
Walworth Manufacturing Co., i 

castiron cutter and die . . 24.30 



656 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid R. D. Wood & Co., pipe, branches, ^16,649.56 
R. M. West, I 14-foot ladder . 1.40 

Henry R. Worthington, material 

and labor on engines . . 89.00 

George Woodman Co., 552 cocks, 

etc. ...... 220.14 



11,875. 14 



REPAIRS. 



Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.: 

Repairs on boiler .... ^i55-47 
Refitting crank disc .... 23.95 

Labor on pumps .... 4.80 

Paid J. Choate & Co., paint and labor 100.83 

F. X. Daniels & Son, labor at old 

station and new barn . . 399-34 

J. Finn, paint and labor . . 3.97 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

and labor .... 258.65 

Hutchinson Foundry & Machine 

works, labor on boiler . , 5.40 

Merrill & Laird, resetting boiler, 

etc., at pumping station . . 102.80 

G. T. Pickett, cleaning and point- 
ing stone work, etc. . . . 136.00 

Paid C. E. Rowe : 

Labor on stone work . . . 65.09 

Laying wall for barn cellar . . 56.24 

Paid Schaffer & Budenberg, repairs on 

engine ..... 7.10 

G. G. Stillman, repairing regulator 7.10 

Ira F. Sturtevant, lumber and labor 661.65 

H, Stratton, repairing pump rod . 1.25 

L. Wolf, labor and stock, hot-air 

furnace, new station . . . 150.00 



$2,139.64 



COMMONS. 657 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid town of Auburn, tax on land, 1895 ^72.60 

F. X. Chenette, 3 cords dressing , 9.00 

Commissioners of Sinking Fund, 

amount of hydrant tax for 1895 15,800.00 
S. B. Dickey, 19 cords manure . 107.25 

C M. Edgerly, insurance on 

Faucher building . , . 16.00 

J. T. Gott, manure . . . 10.00 

Josie B. Hunter, chestnut posts, 

ashes, manure . . '. . 37-25 

Manchester Street Railway, barge 

to pumping station . 
C. H. Robie Co., repairing streets 
N. A. Sleeper, 6 loads loam . 
A. F. Wheat, M. D., services 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to interest appropriation 
Balance to new account 



30 


.00 


138 


.61 


I, 


■50 


135- 


50 




#>i")357-7i 




^103,282.01 




42,620.00 


• 


42,720.01 




$188,622.02 



Commons. 



Appropriation ..... $4,000. 00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 215.02 



,215.02 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 

January $328.00 

February 200.00 

42 



658 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



March $111.63 

April 153-25 

May 286.25 

June 253.94 

July ...... 212.24 

August ..... 246.34 

September 247.46 

October 158.63 

November . . . . , . 138.12 

December . . . . . 136.90 

PLANTS, LOAM, TREES, ETC. 

Paid Balch «S: Austin, i ton phosphate . $25.00 

H. H. Gurney & Co., shrubbery . 120.00 
J. S. Holt & Co., 1,000 bushels 

ashes ..... 125.00 

A. G. Hood, plants . . . 60.00 

H. H. Huntress, plants . . 65.00 

Kirby Floral Co., plants . . 54-57 

Ray Brook Garden Co., plants . 40.00 

G. W. Sargent, 19 shade trees . i4'25 
The John B. Varick Co., seed and 

phosphate .... 50-90 



$2,472.76 



^554-72 



WATER AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 



Paid Water Commissioners, use of water $720.00 
Union Electric Company, lights at 

Merrimack-street public comfort 36.00 



$756.00 



REPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paint for painting seats $18.12 

L. M. Aldrich, filing saws . . 1.90 

John Bryson, paint and labor . 11.07 

Eager & Rand, 2 bushels salt . i.oo 



STARK AND DERRYFIELD PARKS. 



659 



Paid C. S. Fuller, repairing rubber boots 
J. Hodge, lumber and labor . 
O. Hardy, i pruner 
The Head & Dovvst Co., lumber 
and labor .... 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Works, material and repairs 
Paid Thomas A. Lane Co. : 

Brimstone .... 

Labor on fountains . 
Labor on gate, electric lights . 
Paid H. F. W. Little, repairing saws, etc 
Clarence R. Merrill, i barrel ce- 
ment .... 
Leander Pope, sharpening tools 
Pike and Heald Co., 6 dippers 
G. W. Rief, lumber and labor 
John T. Underhill & Co., concret 

ing walk, Merrimack common 
G. R. Vance, repairs on stove 
The John B. Varick Co., tools, 
hardware . . . . . 
N. J. Whalen, 4 gallons oil . 

Total expenditures 



^4.00 

23.82 

1.50 

25-99 
40.98 

.10 
6.48 

2.20 
.80 

1.25 
18.91 

1.20 
II. 15 

164.72 
3-5° 

•89.65 

3.20 



;i-54 



,215.02 



stark and Derryfield Parks. 
Appropriation ..... 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per commons pay- 
roll : 



April 
May 



$115-50 

752.00 



660 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



June . 


• $15138.35 


July . . . 


1,398.74 


August , 


627.37 


September 


229.53 


October 


20.00 


November 


5-75 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, divi- 
sion No. 10 : 



July 



TOOLS, HARDWARE, REPAIRS, ETC. 



Paid J. J. Abbott, paint 

L. M. Aldrich, labor on signs 

D. J, Adams, keys 

F. S. Bodwell, granite base . 
A. H. Chadbourne & Co., 181 trees 
Mrs. Otis Clarke, 4 stone posts 
John H. Campbell, 80 loads stone 

E. O. Dodge, 98 loads stone 

The Head & Dowst Co., lumber . 
W. J. Hoyt and F. A. Palmer, 43 

loads stone .... 
J. S. Holt & Co., 562 bushels ashes 
W. G. Landry, sharpening tools . 
Thomas A. Lane Co., material and 

labor ..... 

■ H. F. W. Little, 2 chestnut posts 

and labor ..... 

Manchester Hardware Co., tools . 

Massachusetts Broken Stone Co., 

130,950 pounds stone 
People's Gas-Light Co., 2 chaldrons 

coke ..... 

Ray Brook Garden Co., filling vase 



$14.02 

10.00 

1.05 

10.00 

136.00 

2.00 

20.00 

24.50 

24.40 

10.75 
70.25 
14.32 

22.17 

2.06 

7.00 

91.67 

9.00 
12.00 



$4,287.24 



$io.7s 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY, 



661 



Paid G. W. Rief, lumber and labor 


I3.60 




John A. Sargent, paint and labor . 
J. T. Underbill & Co., concreting 


18.99 




walks ..... 


30.21 




Paid G. R. Vance : 






90 feet tin roofing .... 
Iron, zinc, solder, etc. 


5-40 
23-23 




Pump ...... 

Paid John B. Varick Co., seed, tools, 


1.50 




hardware ..... 
Horace Willey, 192 loads stone . 


89-75 
48.00 


$701.87 






Total expenditures 


. 


$4,999.86 


Transferred to new account . 




.14 




$5,000.00 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



|io,ooo.oo 
825.20 



$10,825.20 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 



February .... 


190.80 


March 


171.41 


April 


289.70 


May 


549.76 


June 


635.12 


July 


709.73 


August .... 


413.76 



662 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



September . ... 

October . . , . 

November ..... 

December ..... 

Paid Antoine LePage, 4^ days' work . 

LAND. 

Paid E. C. Howlett, balance due on land 

PLANTS, TREES, LOAM, ETC. 

Paid A. H. Chadbourne «S: Co., nursery 
stock ..... 

J. A. Colby, 462 loads loam 

H. H. Gurney & Co., nursery stock 

A. G. Hood, plants 

H. H. Huntress, plants 

Patrick Kean, 27 loads loam 

Manchester Slaughtering and Ren- 
dering Co., I ton fertilizer 

Mrs. Agnes J. Phillips, 140 loads 
loam ..... 

C. C. Webster, 122 loads clay 



5340.03 
438-50 
233-44 
153-76 



$24.00 
693.00 
25.00 
12.38 
11.84 
13-50 



70.00 
122.00 



5 1 4-93 

$7.11 



$3,400.00 



11.72 



WATER, TELEPHONE, INSURANCE, FUEL. 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 4 tons 

stove coal .... $24.75 

Everett & Smith, premium on pol- 
icy No. 741,698 . . . 18.75 
N. E. Telephone and Telegraph 

Co., use of telephones . . 87.05 

Water Commissioners, use of water 666.30 



$796.85 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 663 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Paid E. R. Coburn Co., stationery 


$0.90 


W. P. Goodman, paper, mucilage, 




ink, envelopes, etc. . 


2.80 


E. J. Knowlton, P. M., 200 stamped 




envelopes .... 


4.32 


Paid W. E. Moore : 




Printing notices .... 


3.00 


Blank books ..... 


10.50 


Paid Temple & Farrington Co., station- 




ery 


5-04 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber and labor . ^4-53 

Austin, Flint & Day Co., screens 

and screen doors . . . 13-50 

Cyrus A. Brown, 5 windows and 

frames ..... 6.25 

John T. Beach, material and labor 

on dump cart .... 55-oc> 

The Casket Lowering Co., i burial 

machine and truck . . . 175.00 

John Driscoll, dippers, sprinklers . 4.75 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor . 12.40 

A. J. Knight, lumber and labor . 48.05 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co.: 

Labor on pipes .... 44-93 

Hose washers ..... .30 

Paid F. I. Lessard & Co., repairing ball 

cock ..... .80 

Estate Charles E. Lord, whitewash- 
ing 2.25 

Clemens Langer, labor on roof of 

office ..... 13-10 



^26.56 



664 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Stone & Peterson : 

Building fence ^461.25 

600 numbers for lots . . . 60.00 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., spring 

fixtures, cornice, etc. . . 2.50 

John B. Varick Co., seeds, tools, 
hardware ..... 08.20 



^1,002.81 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid C. W. Anderson &: Co., repairing 

clock $0-75 

John Cronin, 8 Emergency fire ex- 
tinguishers . . . . 16.00 

A. Elliott & Co., insurance premi- 
um, on dwelling . . . 7.50 
Paid E. C. Howlett, interest on note, 1 1 
months, at 6 per cent 

Clemens Langer, labor on roof 

H. Leibing, painting barn . 

S. J. Russell, cleaning vaults 

G. R. Vance, i dipper 

Whitten & Fifield, teams 

Total expenditures 



169.00 








IS.50 








37-47 








3.00 








1. 00 








12.00 












$285. 


22 




• 


$■■ 


[0,825. 


.20 



Valley Cemetery. 
Appropriation . ^3,000.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 

January ..... $70.00 

February 58.84 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



665 



March . 










^63.50 


April . 










159.92 


May . 










210.98 


June 










214.98 


July . 










275-44 


August . 










215.74 


September 










224.58 


October 










222.19 


November 










165.05 


December 










76.55 


Paid B. F. Bascomb : 






Labor breaking roads 




$14.00 


Labor of men and teams . 




135-10 


Paid Freeman & Merrill, labor in 


cem 




etery 










15.40 



WATER AND TELEPHONE. 



Paid N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., 
use of telephone 
Water Commissioners, use of water 



$36.00 
99-15 



^1.957-77 



$164.50 



5135-15 



TURF, LOAM, PLANTS, ETC. 

Paid B. F. Bascomb : 

42 loads loam ..... $21.25 

SS loads gravel . . . . 3.30 

Paid Balch & Austin, 400 lbs. fertilizer 6.00 

H. E. Babcock & Co., shrubs . 3.25 

A. H. Chadbourne & Co., shrubs 4.75 

C. H. Colburn, turf and loam . i7-5o 

C. C. Chase, 4^ cords manure . i7-75 

John Francis, plants . . . 47.62 

H. H. Huntress, plants, etc. . 16.55 

A. G. Hood, plants . . . 15-48 

J. W. Lathe, 8 loads loam . . 4.00 



666 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co.: 

Phosphate $2.00 

Seeds 15.51 

Paid Jeremiah Murphy, 18 loads loam . 9.00 
D. H. Nutt, 8 loads loam . . 2.00 
Stone & Wellington, shrubs . ' . 2.75 
John B. Varick Co., 100 lbs. phos- 
phate 1.80 

P. O. Woodman, 345 feet turf . 3.45 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid E. J. Knovvlton, postmaster, 125 

2-cent envelopes . . . ^2.73 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper, 
pencils, pens, etc. . . . 3.85 

REPAIRS, TOOLS, AND niPROVEMENTS. 

Paid Adams & Tasker . 

I barrel lime ..... $0.50 

I cask cement ..... 2.75 

Paid D. J. Adams, repairing lawn mower 3.50 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Works, labor on drinking 
fountains ..... 1.48 

A. C. Hovey, i stove, pipe, zinc, 

etc. ...... 10.00 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co.: 
Labor on water pipe 
Hose ...... 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., tools . 

Palmer & Garmon, slate cover for 

vault ..... 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing 

B. W. Robinson, building brick 

vault ..... 8.50 



3°' 


•74 


6. 


20 


24.47 


12. 


00 


^95' 


,11 



^193.96 



•5S 



AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 667 

Paid R. p. Stevens & Co., resetting slab 

in Chase lot . ' . . . ^2.50 

W. H. Tebbetts, paint and labor . 79-24 

John T. Underbill & Co., concret- 
ing walks ..... 122.12 

John B. Varick Co., tools . . 9.60 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., hose and 

tools 8.72 



;i7-43 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid G. W. Bailey, use of teams . . $3-S° 

F. X. Chenette, use of team . . 3.60 



Total expenditures ..... $2,982.49. 
Transferred to reserved fund . . . . 17-51 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 




Appropriation 


$150.00. 


Expenditures. 




LABOR. 




Paid James E. Bailey .... $114.50 




Anson McGaffey . . . . i9'5o 


$134.00 




SUNDRIES. 





Paid Manchester Water- Works, use of 

water ..... $12.00 

I. S. York, 3 pairs of straps . . 4.00 



$16.00 



Total expenditures . . . . . $150.00 



668 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paupers off the Farm. 

Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



§10,000.00 
450.84 

$10,450.84 



Expenditures. 




GROCERIES. 


Paid Annis Flour & Grain Co. . . $3-23 


Bartlett & Thompson , 




96.00 


John Cashman . 






46.50 


Eager & Rand 






25.00 


Eager & Co. 






30.00 


A. E. Eastman 






18.00 


H. Fradd & Co. . 






188.00 


T. F. Fifield 






485-85 


G. E. French 






9.00 


A. G. Grenier 






101.50 


Austin Goings Co. 






66.11 


Griffin Brothers . 






1,159.14 


Joseph Huard 






92.00 


R. Hecker . 






3-00 


0. D. Knox & Co. 






247.40 


J. N. Lacourse 






8.00 


Lamoreaux Brothers 






86.50 


G. C. Lord 






12.00 


E. Marchand 






264.80 


Thomas H. Mahoney 






345.00 


A. W. Morse 






22.00 


Parent & Trudeau 






3.00 


E. W. Perkins . 






176.00 


Eugene Quirin . 






104.55 


D. A. Shanahan . 






144.00 


Scheer & Renker . 






5-99 


J. 0. Turcotte 






139.00 



PAUPERS OFF THE FAKM. 



669 



Paid H. A. Tirrell 


^83.00 


Trahan & Co. 


74.00 


Henry Weber 


88.00 


Carl E. York 


16.00 


FUEL, 




Paid Clement Beaudet , 


$4.00 


J. B. Bourque 


9.00 


V. Bourque .... 


9.25 


B. J. Cate .... 


2-75 


J. H. DeCourcy . 


4.00 


DeCourcy & Holland . 


12.00 


W. E. Dunbar & Son . 


10.25 


Dunlap & Wason Coal Co. . 


77.90 


S. L. Flanders 


12.00 


William Godbout 


3.00 


Philias Graveline 


10.00 


Moore & Preston 


22.50 


C. Pollard .... 


18.00 


John Perham 


20.00 


D. M. Poore 


24-75 


J. P. Russell & Co. . 


1 1 1.95 


E. V. Turcotte . 


12.25 


J. F. Wyman 


51-75 


Wilson & McKee 


2.50 


BOARD AND CARE AND 


RENT. 


Paid Mary E. Buck . 


^54.00 


Sister Cabana 


110.00 


County of Hillsborough 


389.24 


Mary Cox .... 


2.00 


W. H. Gilmore . 


130-57 


Mary McLure 


15.00 


Christina Maycook 


134.10 


Agnes Massey 


96.00 



hi42.57 



5417-85 



670 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid N. H. Asylum for Insane 
Mary Nadeau 
N. H. Orphans' Home 
Margaret O'Brien 
Celia Pressey 
D. L. Robinson . 
State Industrial School 
St. Patrick's Old Ladies' Home 
St. Patrick's Orphans' Home 
William Whelpley 



^58.39 

54.00 

52.00 

24.00 

208.88 

60.00 

3,720.01 

128.00 

220.00 

120.00 



CLOTHING. 




id Burke Brothers .... ^2.00 


William Gate 






3'5o 


James T. Donahoe 






7-5° 


Lane & Duzois . 






5-35 


Lightbody & Burbank 






22.44 


M. A. McDonough 






6.00 


P. F. Toole 






7-75 


Weston & Martin 






1. 00 


Weston & Hill . 






1. 00 


Wingate & Gould 






1.50 



^5>576.i9 



^58.04 



MEDICINES, MEDICAL SERVICES, FUNERAL EXPENSES. 

Paid H. D. W. Garvelle, M. D., medical 

attendance .... ^4.00 

F. X. Ghenette, burial expenses, 

Aristide Demers . . . 10.00 

E. N. Fugere, M. D., medical at- 
tendance ..... 6.00 
Paid Fairbanks & Wallace, burial expenses : 

G. H. Lefieur . . . . . 25.00 

Rufus W. Lamprey .... 25.00 

Paid Kean & Sheehan, burial expenses 

Michael Spain . . . . 25.00 



CITY FARM. 671 

Paid W. B. Mitchell, medicine . . $4-to 
Frederick Perkins, M. D., medical 

attendance .... 3.C0 

F. H. Thurston, medicines . . 44-4© 
E. V. Turcotte, burial expenses, 

Nazaire Pare .... 6.00 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R.: 

I ticket, Brockton, Mass. . . . $i-7o 

3^ tickets. Three Rivers . . . 3^-3^ 

Sleeping car ..... 5.00 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

3,000 bill-heads . . . 14.00 

W. P. Goodman, books and sta- 
tionery ..... 23.87 

G. S. Holmes, transportation fur- 
nished Mrs. Roberts and daughter i i.go 
E. T. James, use of hack . . 2.00 
Wm. Marshall, assisting J. Harring- 
ton to county farm . . . 1.50 
Paid W. H. Maxwell : 

Conveying Cyril Lebreque to insane 

asylum ...... 4.05 

Conveying J. Harrington to Wilton . 5.39 

I copy State Laws .... i.oo 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., wash boiler, 

clothes basket, J. McNay ... 1.90 



1152.50 



$103.69 
Total expenditures ..... $10,450.84 



City Farm. 
Appropriation ..... $8,ooo.co 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 165.68 



$8,165.68 



672 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

Paid E. G. Libbey, superintendent . ^500.00 
Mrs. Annie Libbey, matron . . 300.00 

HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and women^ as per pay-roll : 

January ^i 75-14 

February 144-52 

March 144-52 

April 188.78 

May 165.67 

June 185.58 

July 225.96 

August 185.58 

September 155-72 

October 208.46 

November ..... 163-58 

December , . . • . 163.34 

Paid Adams & Tasker, grinding corn 
Alice Butterfield, 20 days' labor 
Robert Kirk, 9 days' labor . 
V. B. Martin, threshing grain 
Clarence R. Merrill, grinding cob 
C. H. Monteith, i^ days' labor 
Porter Palmer, 17)^ days' labor 
Angie Tapley, 3 days' labor . 

FUEL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co.: 

2 tons stove coal .... ^11.00 

18,170 pounds stove coal . . . 49-97 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 15 tons 

1,990 pounds egg coal . . . 86.42 



13-15 


10.00 


20.25 


14.22 


9-85 


3-75 


12.83 


1.50 



g8oo.oo 



^2,106.85 



^75-55 



CITY FARM. 673 

Paid Moore & Preston : 

9-10 ton egg coal .... ^5-i8 

10,365 pounds egg coal . . . 29.80 

Paid D. M. Poore, 27 7-10 tons egg coal 154-59 

E. F. Wilson, 8^ cords wood . 17-50 



CLOTHING AND DRY GOODS. 

Paid Barton & Co., print, cotton, etc. . ^5- 10 

Beauchemin & Beaumier, shoes . 9.88 

Beauchemin & Quirin, shoes . 9.27 

Burke Brothers, 6 pairs rubbers . 3.00 

Cushman & Hardy, shirts, hose, 

overalls ..... 36-35 

Clark & Estey, socks, combs, etc. . 5.00 

W. P. Farmer, shoes . . . 40-34 

C. M. Floyd, clothing . . . 33.98 

F. P. Kimball, clothing , . 8.00 

Lightbody & Burbank, boots and 
shoes , . . . . 23.10 

J. R. LaFlamme & Co., boots and 
shoes ..... 

William Marcotte & Co., clothing 

Miville & Deschenes, cotton cloth, 

etc. ...... 

H. M. Moody, clothing 
John Robbie Co., cotton goods . 
Sage & Co., rubber boots 
Paid Weston & Hill Co.: 

22 yards scrim ..... 2.20 

Thread, cotton cloth, buttons, hose, 

etc 85.78 

Paid Wingate & Gould, boots and shoes 16.80 



3-90 


13.00 


25.92 


16.13 


31.70 


75-72 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 



Paid Annis Flour and Grain Co. . . $261.00 
Bartlett & Thompson . . . 13-90 



^354.46 



^445-17 



43 



674 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Barlow & Nye 
F. J. Bixby . 
C. E. Cox . 
Clark & Robinson 
The Daniels-Cornell Co 
Dodge & Laing . 
Doane & Welch . 
Gage & McDougall 
A. L. Gadbois 
A. G. Grenier 
Daniel Johnson . 
O. D. Knox & Co. 
Lindquist Brothers 
McDerby & Co. . 
Manchester Provision Co 
Manchester Beef Co. 
Thomas H. Mahoney 
McQuade Brothers 
Nelson, Morris & Co. 
E. S. Newton 
Henry W. Parker 
Parnell -Brothers . 
E. W. Perkins . 
Public Market & Packing Co 
Tom W. Robinson 
Summer Street Market 
E. M. Slayton 
R. G. Sullivan 
J. E. Towle & Co 
H. D. Turner 
Carl E. York 
York Market Co 



^70.67 
40.79 

45-3° 

22.06 

115.29 

35-13 
19.87 
16.25 

8-93 
43-84 

8.40 
21.00 

8.98 

3-24 

155-79 

31-97 

20.56 

89.49 

15-30 

55-06 

129.69 

187.12 

1-75 

6.41 

65.09 

109.21 

28-33 
8.10 
9.69 
4.98 

22.30 
1.77 



^1,677.28 



FURNITURE AND KITCHEN UTENSILS. 

Paid Barton & Co., carpet and shades . $1-55 



CITY FARM. 



675 



Paid Clark M. Bailey, chimneys, brooms, 
mops, brushes, etc. . 
H. B. Fairbanks, crockery 
Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co.: 

I roll-top desk .... 
Crockery, glassware, etc. . 
Paid R. K. Home : 

12 plates . . . . 

Oil-cans, toothpicks, knives, pans 

Paid Manchester Broom Co., 24 brooms 

F. E. Nelson, kettles, brushes, 

cups, wicks, etc. 
D. A. Simons, crockery and glass- 
ware ..... 



^23.62 
10.86 

30.00 
4.80 

1.25 

16.88 

5-70 

5.22 
13-56 



^113-44 



MEDICINE, MEDICAL SERVICES, ETC. 



Paid P. H. Boire, medicines . . $12.20 
A. L. Dodge, V. S., services as 

veterinary surgeon ... 9.75 
J. L. Golden, V. S., services as 

veterinary surgeon . . . 2.50 
J. J. Holland, medicines . . 3.60 
Frederick Perkins, M. D., treat- 
ment of inmate . . . 6.00 

E. C. Smith, medicine . . . 6.90 

F. H. Thurston, medicines . . 14-25 

BLACKSMITHING, HARNESSES, ETC. 

Paid The Fred Allen Co., harness sup- 
plies and repairs . . . $61.00 
J. M. Brouillette, shoeing horses . 18.60 
John F. Kerwin, brushes, repairing 

collar, etc. .... iS-^S 



$55-20 



676 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Leander Pope, repairs . . . ^0.50 

N. J. Whalen, harness supplies and 

repairs ..... 34-So 



CARRIAGES AND CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

Paid Couch & McDonald, carriage re- 
pairs ^56.95 

J. B. McCrillis & Son., carriage re- 
pairs 55.28 

Paid Sanborn Carriage Co.: 

Carriage repairs .... 19.60 

I 2-seated Democrat wagon ^110.00 
Front boot for wagon . 2.50 



$112.50 
Allowance on second-hand 

wagon .... 30.00 



82.50 



HAY, GRAIN, AND OTHER FEED. 

Paid Annis Flour & Grain Co. . . $354-75 

John F. Kerwin .... 12.98 

Clarence R. Merrill . . . 213.16 

Partridge Brothers . . . 208.93 



HARDWARE, FERTILIZERS, SEEDS, ETC. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co. . . $i5'87 

Clarence R. Merrill . . . 2.80 

John B. Varick Co. . . . 308.38 

The Wadleigh Hardware Co. . 7.41 



INSURANCE. 



Paid John Dowst, premium on insurance 
policy No. 29,953 .... $17-5^ 



$130-05 



i2i4.33 



$789.82 



$334-4^ 



CITY FARM. 677 

Paid A. Elliott & Co.: 

Premium on insurance policy No. 

99)711 $35-0° 

No. 10,346 17.50 

Paid Richardson & Goggin, premium on 

insurance policy No. 74,6230 . . 52-50 

Paid John A. Sheehan : 

Premium on insurance policies ^70.00 

By return policy . . 26.45 



43-55 



TELEPHONE AND STATIONERY. 

Paid W. P. Goodman, stationery . . $16.75 
N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone . . . 44-5o 
Paid J. A. Williams, printing : 

100 invitations. .... .75 

100 menus ..... i.oo 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paint and brushes . $32.75 

Paid D. J. Adams : 

Repairing lawn mower . . . 1.25 

Fitting keys ..... .50 

Paid Joseph Dana, lumber and labor . 66.70 

W. E. Goodwin, plumbing mate- 
rial and labor .... 6.65 

The Head & Dowst Co., labor and 

lumber ..... 20.80 

J. Hodge, lumber . . . 13-16 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Works, labor on shackles, 
etc. ..... 3 1 '40 

The Thomas A. Lane Co., water 

piping, per contract . . . 42.00 



$166.05 



$63.00 



678 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Clemens Langer, plumbing mate- 
rial and labor . . . . $6.i6 
John F, Larkin, plumbing mate- 
rial and labor .... 133-13 
F. I. Lessard & Co., plumbing ma- 
terial and labor ... 8.78 
Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 

Repairs on hay-cutter . . . 2.05 

I play pipe ..... 5.00 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., scoops, repairs 

on tinware .... 2.69 

A. C. Wallace, sawing lumber . 11.00 



^384.02 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid American Express Co., express . $0.65 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., i 

hose nozzle .... 6.00 

Annis Flour & Grain Co., Paris 

green ..... 1.25 

Balch & Austin, i ton phosphate . 35 -oo 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 

hose, linseed oil, disinfectants . 2.60 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., cutting ice . 5.00 
The John B. Clarke Co., advertis- 
ing ...... i.oo 

John P. Cronin, kerosene oil . 14-17 

John Driscoll, gasoline, naphtha . 1.60 

P. Donovan, Jr., use of hacks . 15-00 

H. H. Dustin, office fee for girl . .50 
Charles I. Earl, repairing and 

cleaning sewing machine . . 2.75 
Forest City Linseed Oil Co., i bar- 
rel raw linseed oil . . . 27.61 
S. M. Heselton, 8 sled crooks, for 

runners ..... 10.00 



CITY FARM. 




Paid Kean & Doyle, hacks . 


$15.00 


M. W. Libbey, repairing saws 


1.25 


Paid E. G. Libbey, cash paid : 




Expenses to Lowell, escaped prisoners 


7.0a 


" Daily Mirror," one year 


6.00 


Postoffice box rent . 


3.00 


Postage 


1.60 


Paid C. W. Lerned & Co., 7 gallons 




disinfectant .... 


17-50 


Lovejoy & Stratton, repairing clock 


3-50 


Manchester Water-Works, use of 




water 


145-95 


Manchester Slaughtering & Ren- 




dering Co., killing hogs . 


7.00' 


B. F, McDonnell, 25 lbs. paris 




green ..... 


7.00 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, sawing tim- 




ber 


15-67 


Orange Judd Co., i year's sub- 




scription to " N. E. Homestead," 




to May I, 1896 


I. GO 


II. W. Parker, lime and cement . 


3-45 


E. M. Prescott, soap . 


2.50 


0. G. Reed, use of hacks . 


20.00' 


Harrison Rowe, pasturing one pair 




oxen ..... 


I2.00- 


Sampson, Murdock & Co., i direc- 




tory 


2.00 


James P. Slattery, repairing clock 


•75 


I. L. Stickney, shoemaker's sup- 




plies, rubber matting 


13.24 


Pay-roll, division No. 2 : 




March 


9.18 


June 


8.25 


July 


7-99 


September 


9.12 



679 



680 REPORT 01 THE CITY AUDITOR. 

October ..... 
November ..... 



Total expenditures 
Overdraft, duplicate bill 



^3-64 

S.38 


$452.10 




, 


$8,161.78 

3-9° 




$8,165.68 



Indigent Soldiers. 






Appropriation 


• 


$300.00 


Expenditures. 




GROCERIES. 






Paid A. H. Gray .... 


$13.00 




Griffin Brothers .... 


12.00 




D. M. Poore & Son . 


122.00 


$147.00 






FUEL. 






Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co. . 


$6.00 




C. Pollard 


21.00 




D. M. Poore .... 


7.00 


$34.00 






BOARD AND CARE. 






Paid Ellen McGrath . . -. . 


• 


$96.00 


Total expenditures 


. 


$277.00 


Transferred to reserved fund 




23.00 




$300.00 



Emergency Ward, Elliot Hospital. 
Appropriation ..... . . $300.00 



MILITIA. 681 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid Mrs. Mary C. Higgins, treasurer, amount appror 

priated ...... . . $300.00 



Free Beds, Elliot Hospital. 
Appropriation 

Expenditures. 
Paid Elliot Hospital, amount appropriated 



Militia. 
Approj)riation .... 



Women's Aid and Relief Hospital. 
Appropriation ...... . $600.00 



Expenditures. 

Paid Women's Aid and Relief Hospital, amount ap- 
propriated ..... . . $600.00 



Sacred Heart Hospital. 

Appropriation ..... . . $600.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Sacred Heart Hospital, amount appropriated . $600.00 



682 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 


Paid Anioskeag Veterans 


^lOO.OO 


First Regiment Band . 


lOO.OO 


Lafayette Guards . 


100. oo 


Manchester War Veterans 


lOO.OO 


Manchester Cadets 


lOO.OO 


Scammon Rifles . 


lOO.OO 


Upton Light Infantry . 


lOO.OO 


Total expenditures 





lyoo.oo 



Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 
Appropriation ..... . . ;$4oo.oo 



Expenditures. 

Paid Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. R. . $336.93 
Pay-roll, commons . . . 25.00 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



56^-93 

38.07 



$400.00 



Fourth of July Celebrati 


on. 




Appropriation 


• 


$1,000.00 


Expenditures. 




Paid W. C. Clarke, chairman, as follows : 






Prizes ...... 


$646.50 




Music 


300.00 




Printing ..... 


19.20 




Bill-posting ..... 


16.29 




Incidentals 


18.01 




Total expenditures 


• 


$1,000.00 



Appropriation 



COUNTY TAX. 

Band Concerts. 

Expenditures. 



68a 



^300.00 



Paid First Regiment Band 
Manchester City Band 

Total expenditures 



$150.00 
150.00 



Abatement of Taxes. 



Appropriation 



Expenditures. 
Paid sundry persons on taxes abated 



Expenditures. 
Paid Solon A. Carter, state treasurer 



County Tax. 
Appropriation . . . , . 

Expenditures. 
Paid F. C. Livingston, county treasurer 



5,000.00. 



$2,989.78 



Total expenditures ... 
Transferred to reserved fund 


. $2,989.78 
10.22 




$3,000.00 






State Tax. 
Appropriation ..... 


. $65,615.00 



;.6i5.oo 



^63,895.37 



^63,895.37 



684 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Resolution Raising Money and Making Appropria- 
tions for the Year One Tiiousand Eigint Hun- 
dred and Ninety-five. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermeji, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, i?i City Council Assembled, as follows : 

That the sum of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) be 
borrowed for the use of the city for the following permanent mu- 
nicipal improvements, viz.: 

Seventy-five thousand dollars ($75,000) for new sewers ; twenty 
thousand dollars ($20,000) for new highways; and five thousand 
dollars ($5,000) for the development and improvement of Derry- 
field and Stark parks ; and that the joint standing committee on 
finance are hereby authorized to issue bonds of the city for said 
amount of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) payable April 
I, 1915, with interest coupons attached, for the payment of in- 
terest semi-annually at four per cent. Said bonds to be signed 
by the city treasurer and countersigned by the mayor. Said 
bonds to be sold to the highest responsible bidder upon a call 
issued by the joint standing committee on finance for bids. 

Resolved, further, That the sum of four hundred and ninety- 
four thousand five hundred and sixty and thirty-seven one hun- 
dredths dollars ($494,560.37) be raised for the use of the city 
for the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five (1895) 
by tax on the polls and estates liable to be taxed theieon, which 
sum, together with the one hundred thousand dollars to be bor- 
rowed as above provided, and with such unappropriated money 
as may be now in the city treasury or may hereafter come into 
it, shall be appropriated as follows, viz.: 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 



Interest 
Reserved fund 
City hall . 
Printing and stationery 
Incidental expenses 
Mayor's incidentals 



$25,000.00 

5,000.00 

2,700.00 

2,500.00 

12,000.00 

300.00 



APPROPRIATIONS 



685 



City officers' salaries 




116,700.00 


Sinking fund . 


10,000.00 


Auditor's department 


2,000.00 


STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 




Street and park commission . . . . . 


^4,000.00 


Widening and straightening Mast street 


3,000.00 


Widening Elm street at Ray brook 


2,500.00 


Repairs of highways ..... 


19,500.00 


New highways 




20,000.00 


Land taken for highway 


s . . . . . 


5,000.00 


Watering streets . 




4,000.00 


Paving streets 




6,000.00 


Macadamizing streets 




15,000.00 


Grading for concrete 




4,000.00 


Scavenger teams . 




15,000.00 


Street sweeping 




1,500.00 


Lighting streets . 




47,000.00 


Bridges 




3,000.00' 


City teams . 




6,000.00 


Sewers and drains 




5,000.00 


Sewer, Penacook, Canal to Union east back street 


15,000.00 


Sewer, Valley, Elm to Belmont 


15,000.00 


Other new sewers ...... 


45,000.00 


Snow and ice ..... . 


4,000.00 


Storage shed, city yard .... 


3,000.00 


Engineer's Department .... 


^4,500.00 


Health Department ..... 


$4,000.00 


SCHOOL department. 




Repairs of schoolhouses .... 


;^4,ooo.oo 


Fuel 


5,500.00 


Furniture and supplies ..... 


800.00 


Books and stationery 


200.00 


Printing and advertising .... 


350.00 


Contingent expenses 




1,600.00 



686 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Care of rooms .... 
Evening schools .... 
Teachers' salaries .... 
Evening school, mechanical drawing 
Free text-books .... 
Manual training . '. 

City Library .... 



FIRE. 



Fire department . 
Fire-alarm telegraph 
Hydrant service . . ' , 
South Manchester hosehouse 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Commission . 
Court . 
Station 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



Repairs of buildings 
Ward 5 wardroom 
Lincoln school curbing 
City hall, repairs . 
Sub station, ward 8 



PUBLIC PLACES. 



$4,700.00 
1,300.00 

67,000.00 

550.00 

5,000.00 

1,500.00 

$4,500.00 



550,000.00 

2,000.00 

15,800.00 

1,500.00 



537>5oo-oo 
2,700.00 
2,500.00 



55,000.00 
1,100.00 
1,000.00 
7,500.00 
3,000.00 



Commons ........ $4,000.00 

Stark and Derryfield parks ..... 5,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery ...... 10,000.00 

Valley cemetery ....... 3,000.00 

Amoskeag cemetery ...... 150.00 

PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Paupers off the farm ...... $10,000.00 

City farm ........ 8,000.00 

Indigent soldiers ....... 300.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



687 



Women's Aid and Relief Hospital 

Free beds, Elliot Hospital 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 

Police matron 

Militia .... 

Sacred Heart Hospital . 

Emergency ward, Elliot Hospital 

Band concerts 

Fourth of July celebration . 



TAXES. 



Abatement of taxes 
State tax 
County tax . 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR. 



Amount to be raised by tax 

Insurance tax 

Railroad tax 

Savings bank tax . 

Literary fund 

City Hall . 

Tuition 

Police department 

Pine Grove cemetery 

Valley cemetery . 

County of Hillsborough 

City farm 

Interest on taxes . 

Bonds . 

Land redeemed . 



$600.00 
600.00 
400.00 
100.00 
700.00 
600.00 
300.00 
300.00 

1,000.00 



13,000.00 
65,615.00 
63>895-37 

$73i>36o.37 



$494,560.37 

2,600.00 

28,000.00 

70,000.00 

7,500.00 

1,000.00 

700.00 

13,000.00 

5,500.00 

1,500.00 

1,500.00 

4,000.00 

500.00 

100,000.00 

1,000.00 



$7315360.37 



REPORT OF THE. CITY AUDITOR. 









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C H 52i 



VALUATION AND TAXES. 689 



Assessors' Oath. 



We, the Assessors of the City of Manchester, do solemnly 
swear that in making the invoice for the purpose of assessing the 
foregoing taxes, we appraise all taxable property at its full value, 
and as we would appraise the same in payment of a just debt due 
from a solvent debtor. So help us God. 



Valuation and Taxes. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on the real and 
personal estate, within the city of Manchester, N. H., for the 
year 1895, ^^^ ^^ follows : 

Valuation. Rate per $1,000. Tax. 

Real estate . . ^24,463,174 $17-40 $425,659.23 
Personal property . 3>i53)548 54,871.23 



$27,616,722 $480,530.46 

No. of polls, 12,244 . 1,244,400 1740 21,652.56 



Totals^ - . $28,861,122 $502,183.02 

The share distributed to Manchester of the 
amount of the tax assessed, as per returns made 
by the corporations to state treasurer : 

On railroads ....... $28,357.49 

On savings banks ...... 52,472.63 

On insurance companies . . . . 2,613.75 

On literary fund ...... 4,760.28 



Grand tax total ..... $590)387. 17 

For further information in relation to taxes collected by the 
state, see State Treasurer's Report. 
44 



690 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



YEAR. 


Due Jan. 1, 1895, 
assessed in 1895. 


5 = 


in 

1 

o 
o 

o 

o 


U 

m 

a 

PrH 
ft 


Taxes Of 1885 c. 

Tq-vpq of 1S9fi 


$1,205.71 

1,264.85 

1,163.94 

1,580.13 

1,397.03 

1,687.08 

1,971.97 

2,620.15 

4,572.60 

I 38,924.65 
j 1,208.25 

502,183.02 






$1,205.71 
1,264.85 
1,163.94 






TiiTTA^ nf lftS7 












1,580.13 








1,397.03 


Tfnrpcj of 1S90 






1,687.08 
1,968.41 


Tasesof 1891 

Taxes of 1892 




$3 ..56 
25.35 

438.27 

33,954.69 
459,501.68 


-• 


2,594.80 


TaTP« nf ISQS 


4,134.33 


Taxes of 1894 


$2,249.40 
631.28 


3,928.81 


Taxes of 1895 


42,050.06 






Totals 


$558,092.30 


$2,880.68 


$493,923.55 


$61,288.07 





TAX VALUATIONS, ETC., FROM 1890 TO 1895, INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. polls. 


Poll tax. 


Val.ofpoU. 


1890 


$24,207,740 
24,872,492 
25,932,044 
27,439,742 
28,-391,710 
28,861,122 


$462,869.17 
443,541.76 
506,465.17 
507,640.68 
505,372.44 
502,183.02 


9,723 
10,367 
10,673 
11,835 
12,103 
12,244 


$1.91 
1.78 
1.95 
1.85 

1.78 
1.74 


$100' 


1891 


100 


1892 


100 


1893 


100 


1894 


100 


1895 


100 







For years prior to 1890, see reports of 1890 and 1891. 



ACCOUNT OF GEORGE E. MORRILL, COLLECTOR. 691 



Settlement of Account of George E. Morrill, Tax Col- 
lector for City of Manchester, N. H., June 1, 1895. 



Tax list, 1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 



Amount out- 

stanfling June 

1, 1894. 

$1,205.71 

1,264.85 

1,163.94 

1,580.13 

i)397-03 
1,687.08 
1,971.97 
2,620.15 

4,572.60 



Collected. 



13-56 

25-35 
438.27 



Amount collected 

Credited by cash, as per treas- 
urer's receipt No. 157 

Interest collected, 1891 . 

1892 . 

1893 • 

1894 . 



Credited by cash, as per treas- 
urer's receipt No. 158 



$467.18 

$467.18^ 

$1.00 

4.91 

28.57 

811.46 

^845-94 
$845-94 



Balance out- 
standing June 
1, 1895. 

$1,205.71 

1,264.85 

1,163.94 

1,580.13 

1.397-03 
1,687.08 
1,968.41 
2,594.80 
4,134.33 



1894. Dr. 

June I. Balance due on settlement of 1893 list . 
1894. Cr. 

June 16. By cash paid treasurer, per 

receipt No. 82 . . . $170.00 

Dec. 7. By cash paid treasurer per 

receipt No. 159 . . 170.00 



$4,599-48 



June I, 1895, ^^^ o^ 1893 ^^^^ 



$340.00 
$4,259.48 



092 report op the city auditor. 

1894. Dr. 

To warrant resident list . . . 1^504,254.99 

warrant non-resident list . . . 1,117.45 
voluntary list ..... 1,208.25 



-^506,580.69 



1894, 1895. Cr. 

By cash paid treasurer, as per vouchers 
Nos. 96, 109, 116, 150, 153, 191 
in year 1894; and receipts Nos 
27. I05' 153. 156, in year 1895 
abatements, vouchers Nos. 69, 174 

154 

unpaid taxes, June i, 1895 



$497,623.76 

5,028.12 
3,928.81 
$506,580.69 



City of Manchester to George E. Morrill. 
Dr. 



To salary for year ending June i, 1895 $1,650.00 
commission on old taxes . . . 24.79 



$1,674.79 



Cr. 

By cash paid by treasurer, on account of 

salary $800.00 

balance paid by treasurer, as per bill 874-79 



$1,674.79 



Manchester, N. H., December 5, 1895. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George 
E. Morrill, tax collector of said Manchester, and find the same 
correct, as above stated. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



EXEMPTIONS FROM TAXATION. 693 

Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions 
from Taxation. 

Constitution of New Hampshire, Article 82, Page 38, 
Public Statutes. 

encouragement of literature, etc. 

Article 82. " Knowledge and learning generally diffused 
through a community being essential to the preservation of a free 
government, and spreading the opportunities and advantages of 
education through the various parts of the country being highly 
conducive to promote this end, it shall be the duty of the legis- 
lators and magistrates, in all future periods of this government, 
to cherish the interest of literature and the sciences, and all sem- 
inaries and public schools ; to encourage private and public in- 
stitutions, rewards, and immunities for the promotion of agricul- 
ture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures, and natural 
history of the country; to countenance and inculcate the prin- 
ciples of humanity and general benevolence, public and private 
charity, industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, sincer- 
ity, sobriety, and all social affections and generous sentiments 
among the people ; provided, nevertheless, that no money raised 
by taxation shall ever be granted or applied for the use of schools 
or institutions of any religious sect or denomination." 

Public Statutes, chapter 55. 

Section 2. " Real estate, whether improved or unimproved, 
and whether owned by residents or others, is liable to be taxed, 
except houses of public worship, twenty-five hundred dollars of 
the value of parsonages owned by religious societies and occupied 
by their pastors, schoolhouses, seminaries of learning, real estate 
of the United States, state, or town used for public purposes, 
and almshouses on county farms." 

Section ii. " Towns may by vote exempt from taxation for 
a term not exceeding ten years any manufacturing establishment 



694 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

proposed to be erected or put in operation therein, and the capi- 
tal to be used in operating the same, unless such establishment 
has been previously exempted from taxation by some town." 

OPINION OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

58 N. H. Rep. page 623. " The exemption in each case is 
limited to ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole power 
of taxation would be the destruction of government ; and the 
dangerous tendency of legislation suspending any part of that 
power, for any period, is manifest. P. Bank v. Billings, 4 Pet. 
514,561. So long as the existing laws remain unrepealed, and 
the constitutional construction heretofore adopted remains un- 
changed, contracts hereafter made under these laws and that 
construction will be valid. If the legislature for any reason wish 
to prevent the making of any more such contracts, their object 
can be accomplished by a repeal of the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective 
charters as " being of the nature of a public charity," as follows : 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute Women, N. H. Laws of 
1889, chapter 199. 

Elliot Hospital, N. H. Laws of 1S81, chapter 178. 

Manchester Women's Aid and Relief Society, organized in 
January, 1875 j N- H- Laws, 1891, chapter 283. 

Orphanage and Home for Old Ladies (Catholic) on Hanover 
street, N. H. Laws, 1883, chapter 56. 



Schedule of Property used for Religious, Charitable, 
and Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Tax- 
ation by Law, not including that Owned by the City 
of Manchester. 

Convent, Sisters Jesus Mary, French Catholic ; East 

Spruce street, near Beech : 

Building ..... ^10,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land . . 2,600.00 

^12,600.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 695 

Convent, Sisters of Mercy, Catholic; 415 Union 
street, corner Laurel : 

Building . . . . . 130,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land . . 6,300.00 



^36.300.00 

Mount St. Mary's Academy, Catholic ; from convent 
lot east to Beech street : 

Building ..... 1^25, 000. 00 
31,500 square feet of land . . 9,450.00 

$34,450.00 

Lot south side Laurel street, corner Union street, 
Catholic ; McDonald school : 
Building ..... $35,000.00 
I o,Soo square feet of land . . 5,000.00 



}o,ooo.oo 



Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' Home, 
Catholic ; Amherst and Hanover streets : 

Building ..... $8,000.00 
40,500 square feet of land . . 30,375.00 



>375-oo 



St. Patrick's Orphan Asylums, Catholic; 184 Han- 
over street : 

Building ..... $35,000.00 
40,500 square feet of land . . 40,500.00 



$75,500.00 

St. Joseph's High School, Catholic ; Lowell street, 
corner of Birch : 

Building $12,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land . . 8,000.00 

$20,000.00 

Union-street school, Catholic ; corner Union and 
Laurel streets : 

Building $4,000.00 

5,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 

$6,500.00 



696 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. Agnes' school, Catholic ; corner Cedar and Pine 
streets : 

Building ;^i 2,000.00 

20,000 square feet of land . . 3,200.00 

^15,200.00 

St. Joseph's school for girls. Catholic ; corner Pine 
and Lowell streets : 

Building 1 10,000.00 

Land included in cathedral lot. ^10,000.00 

Convent of the Holy Angels, French Catholic ; Beau- 
port street, corner Wayne, West Manchester : 

Building ^15,000.00 

22,500 square feet of land . . 4,500.00 

^19,500.00 

Orphanage school, Beauport, Wayne, and Putnam 
streets ; French Catholic : 

Building ^25,000.00 

30,000 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 

^31,000.00 

St. Augustine's academy, French Catholic; corner 
Beech and Spruce streets : 

Building ..... $8,000.00 
15,000 square feet of land . . 4,500.00 

$12,500.00 

St. Mary's parochial school, French Catholic ; cor- 
ner Wayne and Cartier streets : 

Building ..... $12,000.00 
25,000 square feet of land . . 2,000.00 

$14,000.00 

Residence priest St. Augustine's church, French 
Catholic; No. 383 Beech street: 

Building ..... $6,000.00 
7,500 square feet of land . . 1,875.00 

$2,500.00 

$7,875.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 697 

Orphan children's school, parish St. Augustine ; 251, 
253 Lake avenue: 
Building ..... ^12,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 5,000.00 



,17,000.00 



Residence priest St. Anne's church, Catholic; No. 
231 Merrimack street : 

Building ..... ^5,000.00 
8,820 square feet of land . . 2,646.00 



$7,646.00 

Residence Catholic bishop; No. 145 Lowell street: 
Building ..... $40,000.00 
24,000 square feet of land . . 12,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



Residence priest St. George's church, French Cath- 
olic ; Orange street, corner Pine : 

Building ..... $2,500.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 4,000.00 



$6,500.00 

Residence priest St. Mary's church, French Catho- 
lic; 376 Beauport street, West Manchester: 

Building ..... $2,500.00 
5,000 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 



$2,500.00 



i2,500.00 



$3,500.00 

St. Anne's church. Catholic ; Union street, corner 
Merrimack : 

Building ..... $30,000.00 
10,180 square feet of land . . 5,090.00 



$35,090.00 

St. Augustine's church, French Catholic ; Beech 
street, corner East Spruce : 

Building $28,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land . . 3,250.00 

$31,250.00 



698 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel, Catholic ; Pine 
street, corner Lowell : 

Building $70,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land .. . 30,375.00 

■ $100,375.00 

St. Mary's church, French Catholic ; Beauport street, 
corner Wayne, West Manchester : 

Building $25,000.00 

70,000 square feet of land . . 14,000.00 

$39,000.00 

St. Raphael's church and school, German Catholic ; 
Third street, corner Ferry, West Manchester : 

Building $35,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land . . 3,400.00 

$38,400.00 

St. George's church, French Catholic ; Pine street, 
Corner Orange : 

Building $75,000.00 

18,690 square feet of land . . 7,614.00 

■ $82,614.00 

St. Patrick's church and school. Catholic ; Kelly 
street, Cartier street, and Cooledge avenue : 
School building .... $20,000.00 
56,281 square feet of land . , 4,502.00 

$24,502.00 

First Baptist church ; Union street, corner Concord : 

Building $28,000.00 

11,250 square feet of land . . 6,750.00 

$34,750.00 



First Freewill Baptist church ; Merrimack street, cor- 
ner Chestnut : 

Building $12,400.00 

12,600 square feet of land . . 12,600.00 



$25,000.00 



PKOPERTY EXEMPT FROM ' TAXATION. 699 

Second Baptist church ; Merrimack street, near 
Pine : 

Building ^9,000.00 

9,450 square feet of land . . 3,780.00 

$12,780.00 

People's Baptist church ; Chestnut street, corner 
Concord : 

Building ..... $8,000.00 
3,200 square feet of land . . 2,000.00 

$10,000.00 

First Congregational church ; Hanover street, cor- 
ner Union : 

Building $30,000.00 

43,200 square feet of land . . 34,560.00 

$64,560.00 

Second Congregational church ; Market street, cor- 
ner Franklin : 

Building ..... $25,000.00 
19,000 square feet of land . . 19,000.00 

$44,000.00 

Third Congregational church ; South Main street, 
corner Milford, West Manchester : 

Building ..... $8,000.00 
23,000 square feet of land . . 3,000.00 



— SI 1,000.00 



First M. E. church ; Valley street, corner Jewett : 
Building ..... $8,000.00 
11,400 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 



St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, corner Am- 
herst : 

Building . . . . . $25,000.00 

10,010 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 

$31,000.00 



700 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. James M. E. church ; Pennacook street, corner 
Pine: 

Building ^9,000.00 

11,000 square feet of land . . 2,200.00 

^r 1,200.00 

Grace church, Episcopal ; Lowell street, corner 
Pine : 

Building . . . . . $20,000.00 

9,300 square feet of land . . 6,975.00 

$26,975.00 

First Unitarian church ; Concord street, corner 
Beech : 

Building ..... $24,000.00 
13,500 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 

$30,000.00 

First Universalist church ; Lowell street, near Elm : 
Building ..... $17,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 15,000.00 



;2, 000.00 



Christian church, Protestant ; Pine street, corner 
Merrimack : 

Building ..... $6,000.00 
9,000 square feet of land . . 6,700.00 



;i2,7oo.oo 



First Presbyterian church, German ; Second street, 
corner Bath, West Manchester : 

Building ..... $3,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 



,500.00 



Swedish Lutheran church, Protestant ; Sagamore 
corner Pine : 

Building $7,500.00 

10,950 square feet of land . . 2,000.00 



,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 701 

Swedish Baptist church ; Arlington street, near Ma- 
ple: 

Building ..... $5,000.00 
4,432 square feet of land . . 1,100.00 



:),ioo.oo 



Second Advent church ; Amherst street, between 
Pine and Union : 

Building $5,100.00 

4,500 square feet of land . . 3)375-oo 



>,475.oo 



City Mission chapel, Protestant ; Merrimack street, 
corner of Beech : 

Building ..... $7,000.00 
12,600 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 

$13,000.00 

Westminster Presbyterian church ; Brook street, cor- 
ner Hazel : 

Building ..... $15,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 

$i7>5oo-oo 

South Manchester Union chapel, Protestant ; Elm 
street, south : 

Building ..... $2,500.00 
10,747 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 

$3,500.00 

Episcopal Mission church ; North Main street, cor- 
ner School, West Manchester : 

Building ..... $3,500.00 
19,412 square feet of land . . 4,000.00 

$7,500.00 

Residence pastor St. Paul's M. E. church ; Union 
street, near Amherst : 

Building ..... $3,000.00 

$2,500.00 



702 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Residence pastor First Congregational church; No. 
590 Beech street, near Bridge : 

Building ^5,000.00 

8,100 square feet of land . . 2,400.00 

^2,500.00 

^7,400.00 

Residence pastor Grace Episcopal church ; corner of 
Harrison and Union streets : 

Building ..... ^6,000.00 
15,000 square feet of land . . 3,750.00 



52,500.00 



$9,750.00 

German School Society; Third, Bath, and Ferry 
streets : 

Building ..... $4,500. 00 

10,187 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 



7,000.00 



Elliot Hospital, Protestant ; East Manchester : 

Building ..... $23,000.00 
Land ...... 7,000.00 



Elliot Hospital lot ; Hanover street, corner Chestnut : 
Building ..... $3,000.00 
Land ... . , . . 13,000.00 

$16,000.00 

Elliot Hospital : 

Land and buildings, Main street . $4,000.00 
Land and building, Quincy street 2,500.00 

$6,500.00 

Women's Aid and Relief Hospital ; Pearl street, cor- 
ner Beech : 

Building ..... $15,000.00 

57,530 square feet of land . . 10,000.00 

$25,000.00 

Manchester Children's Home ; Webster street : 

Building ..... $20,000.00 

55,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 

$22,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 



703 



Residence pastor Swedish Lutheran church ; Saga- 
more street, corner Pine : 

Building $3,000.00 

10,200 square feet of land . . 1,020.00 



$2,500.00 



Gale Home : 

One half Manchester Bank block, 

Elm street .... $38,000.00 
One half Martin's block. Elm street 25,000.00 
Land and building, Pearl street, 

corner Ash .... 25,000.00 



Recapitulation. 

EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 



Church property, Catholic 
Convent property, Catholic 
Parochial residences, Catholic . 
Parochial schools. Catholic 
Hospitals and other charitable insti 
tutions . . . . . 

Church property, Protestant 
Parochial residences, Protestant 
Private school property, Protestant . 
Hospitals and other charitable* insti- 
tutions . . , . . 

TAXABLE. 

Land and buildings, Catholic . 
Land and buildings, Protestant 

Total exempt and taxable 



$356,729-oo 

68,400.00 

12,500.00 

195,152.00 

113,875.00 

$426,040.00 
10,000.00 

7,000.00 

188,000.00 



165,021.00 
14,170.00 



$746,656.00 



$631,040.00 



$79,191.00 



$1,456,887.00 



704 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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BONDED DEBT. 



705 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT, CITY OF MAN- 
CHESTER, K. H., FROM JAN. 1 TO DEC. 31, 1895. 





t-l X 


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3* 

it 

< 


if 

0? 


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2 

CD 


$70,000 issued Oct. 
31, 1863. $.50,000 
issued July 1, 
1864. Six percent, 
to fund debts. 


Issued Julyl, 1881, 

four per cent, to 

build McGregor 

bridge. 


d 


1890. 


$400,000 
400,000 
300,000 
300,000 
300,C00 
200,000 


$200,000 
200,000 
300,000 
300,000 
350,000 
500,000 






$13,850 
18,850 
20,000 
26,000 
31,000 
36,250 


$120,000 
120,000 
120,000 
120,000 
50,000 


$60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 


$155,000 
155,000 
155,000 
155,000 
155,000 
155,000 


1891 






1892. 






1893. 
1894. 
1895 


$100,000 
100,000 
100,000 


$100,000 
100,000 
100,000 







a 
Sg 

§2 


P<0 • 





Amount of 6 per 
cent bonds due 
and paid. 


Amount of 6 jjer 
cent bonds re- 
funded at 4 per 
cent. 


i . 

00 — 
53 -SCO 

isg 

a; 


Amount of 6 per 
cent city bonds 
on which inter- 
est has ceased, 
not yet present- 
ed for payment. 


Amount of 6 per 
cent water bonds 
on which inter- 
est has ceased, 
not yet present- 
ed for payment. 






$948,850 
953,850 
955,000 

1,261,100 


$99,900 

100 

99,900 

65,500 

50,000 


$100,000 


$948,850 
953,850 
955,000 
1,195,600 
1,296,000 
1,571,250 




$100 












100,000 




100 


$100,000 
200,000 

300,000 




$4,500 


100 






$20,000 






100,000 













Remarks. — The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in 
the cemeteries of the city to parties who pay ^100 and upward. 
There are ^36,250 in cemetery bonds, so called, not negotiable, 
in the hands of the city treasurer, which are included in the 

* $400,000 water bonds, issued January 1, 1872; $100,000 of these bonds re-fund- 
ed January 1, 1887; $100,000 re-funded January 1, 1892. 

t $200,000 water bonds, issued July 1, 1874; $100,000 of these bonds refunded 
July 1, 1890, and $100,000 re-funded July 1, 1895. 

t $2,200 cemetery bonds, issued in 1884, and other additional bonds each year. 

The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the cemeteries. Bonds 
payable July 1, 1913. 



706 REPOET OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Total amount of bonded debt, including ceme- 
tery bonds ^1,571,250.00 

Net indebtedness for water purposes . . . 900,000.00 

Net debt after deducting water debt . ^671,250.00 

As shown in the assessors' books for the year 1895 : 

The assessed value of personal property, includ- 
ing poll tax $4,397,948.00 

The assessed value of real estate . . . 24,463,174.00 



Total value for taxation . . . $28,861,122.00 

Tax rate, 1.74 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for 

water purposes) to assessed valuation . . 2.326 

Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt for 

water purposes) to assessed valuation . . 5 "444 

Population, census of 1890 .... 43j983 

Population, census of 1880 . . . " . 32,458 

Increase of population in ten years . HjS^S 

Increase of population since 1890 (estimated) . 14,000 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been promptly paid at 
maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being payable in 
gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

A sinking fund was established in 1893. 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the 
water-works is limited to the sum of $600,000 by section 6, chap- 
ter 70, New Hampshire Laws of 187 1, entitled "■ An act to ena- 
ble the city of Manchester to establish water-works," except as 
further extended, an amount of $300,000, by laws of 1891, chap- 
ter 26. 



BONDED DEBT. 



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708 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE BONDEI> 

DEBT. 



Teak. 


per ct. 
water 
bonds. 


Four 
per ct. 

water 
bonds . 


Four 
and a 
half 
and 5 
per ct. 
water 
bonds. 


Five 
per ct. 
ceme- 
tery 
bonds. 


Six 

per ct. 

to fund 

debt. 


Four 
per ct. 
to b'ld 

Mc- 
Gregor 
bridge . 


Four 

per ct. 

to fund 

debt. 


Four 
per ct. 

Imp. 
bonds. 


Four 
per ct. 
school 
bonds. 


Total 

of 
annual 
interest. 


1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 


$27,000 
24,000 
18,000 
18,000 
18,000 
18,000 


$6,000 
8,000 
12,000 
12,000 
14,000 
14,000 


$9,500 
9,500 


$623.75 
813.92 
1,000.00 
1,041.66 
1,550.00 
1,812.50 


$7,200 
7,200 
7,200 
7,200 


$2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 


$6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 






$49,423.75- 
48,613.92 
46,800.00 














46,841.66 
59,650.0& 
68,712.50 


$8,000 
12,000 


$4,800* 



SUMMARY OF CITY DEBT. 

Amount of bonded debt January i, 1895 
Amount of cemetery bonds issued in 1895 
Amount of water bonds issued in 1S95 
Amount of improvement bonds issued in 1895 
Amount of school bonds issued in 1895 
Accrued interest on bonded debt 



Amount of security note or bondf 

Total indebtedness January i, 1S96 . 

AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Net cash on hand January i, 1896 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1895 .... 

Stock of Suncook Valley Railroad, estimated value 

BONDED DEBT. 

Total net indebtedness January i, 1896 
Total net indebtedness January i, 1895 

Increase ....... 



$1,296,000.00 

5,250.00 

50,000.00 

100,000.00 

120,000.00 

30,000.00 

$1,601,250.00 
$100,000.00 



51,701,250.00 

$143,088.90 
42,050.06 
14,500.00 

$199,638.96 

51,501,611.04 
1,290,962.45 



$210,648.59 



*This amount will be reduced $400 annually by payment of principal. 
fXhis loan was made by authority of resolution passed January 26, 1894. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



709 



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710 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 711 

Valuation of Real Estate Owned by the City. 

High School, Beech street corner Lowell : 

Building ..... ^40,000.00 
59,400 square feet of land . . 17,820.00 

$57>820.oo 

Franklin-street school, Franklin street, corr.er 
Pleasant : 

Building ..... ^16,000.00 
19,200 square feet of land . . 19,200.00 

$35,200.00 

Spring-street school. Spring street : 

Building ..... ^13,000.00 
13,600 square feet of land . . 13,600.00 

$26,600.00 

Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, corner Merri- 
mack : 

Building ..... $45,000.00 
40,000 square feet of land . . 8,000.00 

$53,000.00 

Ash-street school, Ash street, corner Bridge : 

Building ..... $50,000.00 
57,537 square feet of land . . 17,262.00 

$67,262.00 

Main-street school, North Main street, West Man- 
chester : 

Building ..... $6,000.00 
40,293.4 square feet of land . . 10,073.00 

$16,073.00 

Webster-street school, Webster street ; 

Building ..... $39,000.00 
55,714! square feet of land . . 13,928.00 

$52,928.00 



712 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Blodget-street school, Blodget street : 

Building ^1,500.00 

9,000 square feet of land . . 3,600.00 



;,ioo.oo 



Lowell-street school, Lowell street, corner Chest- 
nut : 

Building ^1,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land . . 9,000.00 



ilOjOOO.OO 



Merrimack-street school, Merrimack street, corner 
Union : 

Building $15,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land . . 6,300.00 

$21,300.00 

Wilson Hill school, Manchester street, corner Wil- 
son : 

Building $500.00 

15,850 square feet of land . . 1,902.00 

$2,402.00 

School-street school, School street, West Manchester : 

Building $1,000.00 

12,176 square feet of land . . 3,044.00 

$4,044.00 

South Main-street school. South Main street. West 
Manchester : 

Building $500.00 

13,650 square feet of land . . 2,047.00 

$2,547.00 

Bakersville school, Elm street, south : 

Building $10,000.00 

24,184 square feet of land . . 3,628.00 

$13,628.00 

Stark District school, River road, north : 

Building $1,000.00 

43,560 square feet of land . . 100 00 

$1,100.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 713 

Amoskeag school, Front street, Amoskeag : 

Building ..... $1,500.00 
6,000 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 

^2,500.00 

Rimmon school, corner Amory and Dubuque streets : 

Building ..... $17,400.00 

• 16,600 square feet of land . . 2,490.00 

$19,890.00 



Goffe's Falls school, Goffe's Falls : 

Building ..... $4,000.00 

47,916 square feet of land . . 250.00 

Harvey District school, Nutt road : 

Building $2,000.00 

21,780 square feet of land . . 100.06 



Webster Mills school, Webster Mills : 

Building ..... $400.00 

5,445 square feet of land . . 100.00 



Old Hallsville school, East Manchester : 

Building ..... $500.00 

30,075 square feet of land . . 3,008.00 



Youngsville school, Youngsville : 

Building ..... $500.00 

51,228 square feet of land . . 100.00 



,250.00 



$2,100.00 



; 00.00 



$3,508.00 



$600.00 



Mosquito Pond school, Mosquito Pond : 

Building ..... $400.00 

10,890 square feet of land . . 100.00 



Pearl-street school : 

Building $18,700.00 

Land ...... 3,200.00 

$21,900.00 



714 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Varney school, Bowman street, corner Mast, West 
Manchester : 

Building ^43,750.00 

Land ...... 6.700.00 

$50,450.00 

New Hallbville school, Jewett street, corner Young, 
East Manchester : 

Building ..... $29,800.00 
44,000 square feet of land . . 3,300.00 



Straw school, Chestnut street, corner Harrison : 

Building ..... $30,000.00 
32,400 square feet of land '. . 16,200.00 

New Wilson school, Wilson, Cedar, and Auburn 
streets : 

Building ..... $30,000.00 
40,000 square feet of land . . 5,000.00 



), 200.00. 



$35,000.00 



), 502.0a 

ENGINE HOUSES. 

Engine-house and stable. Central station. Vine 
street : 

Building $31,800.00 

21,718.86 square feet of land . 25,438.00 

$57,238.00 

Clinton-street engine-house, Clinton street, West 
Manchester : 

Building ..... $1,000.00 
3,790 square feet of land ,. . 1,000.00 

$2,000.00' 

North Main-street engine-house, North Main street. 
West Manchester : 

Building $18,000.00 

11,819 square feet of land . . 2,955.00 

$20,955.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 715 

Webster-Street engine-house, Webster street, corner 
Chestnut : 

Building ..... ^12,000.00 
8,510 square feet of land . . 2,180.00 

^14,180.00 

Merrimack engine-house, Lake avenue : 

Building ..... ^15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land . . 3,000.00 

^18,000.00. 

Hosehouse and cottage. Maple street, corner East 
High: 

Building . . . . . ;^3,ooo.oo 
18,330 square feet of land . . 3,666.00 

$6, 666.0a 

Engine-house and wardroom, ward 9, Rimmon and 
Amory streets, West Manchester ; 

Building ..... ^22,755.00 
6,000 square feet of land . . 870.00 



— ^23,625.00. 



South Manchester hosehouse : 

Building ..... $4,200.00 
4,278 square feet of land . . 684.48 



$4,884.4S 



^i47,548.4& 

OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City library. Dean avenue, corner Franklin street : 
Building ..... $35,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land . . 30,000.00 

$65,000.00. 

City hall. Elm street, corner Market : 

Building ..... $20,000.00 

100,000 square feet of land . . 150,000.00 

$170,000.00 



716 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



City farm, Mammoth road ; 

Building ^5,000.00 

46.66 acres, west Mammoth road . 70,000.00 

81.55 acres, east Mammoth road . 65,240.00 



$140,240.00 



Court house, Franklin street, corner West Merri- 
mack : 

Building ..... $20,000.00 
19,000 square feet of land . . 57,000.00 



Eattery Building, Manchester street 
Building .... 
3,400 square feet of land 



; 1 3,000.00 
5,100.00 



Police station, Manchester street, corner Chestnut : 
Building ..... $40,000.00 
7,500 square feet of land . . 15,000.00 



Slayton lot, Manchester street 
Building 
2,908 square feet of land 



$300.00 
4,700.00 



'7, 000. 00 



,18,100.00 



;,ooo.oo 



City stable and other buildings, Franklin street : 

Building $15,950.00 

44,656 square feet of land . . 89,312.00 

City stable, district No. 10 . 

City scales, Franklin street : 

Building ...... 

Gravel lots, Goffstown : 

2 acres ...... 

Gravel lot, Bakersville, South Manchester 



$105,262.00 
;i, 000.00 

$300.00 

$400.00 
$700.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 717 



Gravel lot, district No. lo, bought of Brooks & 
Brock (city has right to remove gravel until Au- 
gust 25, 1903): 

I li acres ...... 



Ward 5 wardroom, Lake avenue 
Building 
Land .... 



54, 500. 00 
1,000.00 



,500.00 



PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 

Property in care city engineer .... $1, 149. co- 
in care chief engineer fire department . 109,102.00 

in care street and park commission . 22,685.19 

in care superintendent of schools . . 36,755.00 

in care city messenger .... 3,000.00 

in care city marshal and janitor . . 2,000.00 

in care superintendent of city farm . 12,174.77 

in care trustees city library . . . 29,333.00. 
in care superintendent of Pine Grove 

cemetery ...... 24S.35 

in care superintendent Valley cemetery . 106.00 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad, in care of city 

treasurer ........ 50,000.00 

Personal property in care city weigher . . . 1,000.00 



Uncollected taxes in 1894 

Uncollected taxes in 1895 ..... 
Net cash in the treasury, December 31, 1S95 

^189,067.08 

OTHER REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 



$ 


267,553 


31 




$3^928 


12 




42,050 


06 




143,088 


90 



Soldiers' monument . 
Permanent inclosure of commons 



525,000.00 
10,200.00 



718 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 
Fountains and water-troughs on streets and com- 
mons .... 
Two city tombs . 
McGregor bridge 
Granite bridge . 
South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river . 
Second-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 
Print-Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 
Two bridges in highway district No. 9 
One bridge at Goffe's Falls .... 

Expended on construction of sewers . 



PARKS AND CEMETERIES 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres 
Pine Grove cemetery, about 96 acres 
Amoskeag cemetery, 1.23 acres . 
Stark park, 28 acres . 
Derryfield park, 76 acres . 
Concord common, 4.48 acres 
Tremont common, 2.25 acres 
Hanover common, 3 acres . 
Park common, 3.49 acres . 
Merrimack common, 5.89 acres . 



WATER-WORKS. 

Real estate and personal property of water-works, 
at cost price ....... 

RECAPITULATION. 

Real estate owned by the city, schoolhouses 

Real estate owned by the city . 

Real estate owned by the city, engine houses 



^25,000.00 

3,600.00 

10,000.00 

90,000.00 

25,000.00 

28,450.00 

52,036.06 

5,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

5i3»474-4i 

^790,760.47 



g200,000.00 

46,700.00 

4,340.00 

9,000.00 
25,000.00 

200,000.00 
40,000.00 

100,000.00 
60,000.00 

200,000.00 

^885,040.00 



>i)349. 733-21 



$589,502.00 
644,002.00 
147,548.48 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 719 



Water-works at cost price . 
Personal property owned by the city 
Uncollected taxes and cash 
Other real and personal property . 
Parks and cemeteries . 



PROPERTY ACCOUNT. 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1895 
Inventory of assets, December 31, 1894 

Gain in valuation .... 

The increase in valuation as above stated 
amount expended in 1895 on : 

Sewers and drains 

Straw schoolhouse and land 

Wilson schoolhouse and land 

City hall building 

City stable buildings, Franklin street 

Water-works, construction . 

City farm ..... 

New furniture, police station and city hall 

Personal property, fire department 

Street and park commission 

Increase in uncollected taxes 

Increase in net cash in treasury . 



^i)349!733-2i 

267>553-3i 
189,067.08 
790,760.47 
885,040.00 



$4,863,206.55 

. $4,863,206.55 
. 4,576,686.66 

. $286,519.89 
results from the 



574,888.26 

46,200.00 

35,000.00 

10,000.00 

3,650.00 

49,469.07 

285.16 

270.00 

3,604.50 

846.97 

2,480.93 

66,376.00 



Deduct Bridge-street school lot and the 
Gordon land sold .... 

Deduct decrease in city stable. District 
No. 10 . . . . ' . 



3,351.00 



$293,070.89 



6,551.00 
$286,519.89 



Total net gain ..... 

Details of invenfory are on file in the auditor's office. The 
water-works would sell readily for $2,000,000, and are growing 
yearly more valuable to the city. 



720 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Auditor's Office. 

City hall building. Open from 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5 p. m.; 
7 to 9 p. M. on Thursday. 

In every bill presented to the city auditor for his approval, the 
following points will be considered and passed upon. 

1. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination within 
the scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on the city 
government ? 

2. Is the bill certified by the party legally authorized to make 
the contract, or cause the expenditure to be made ? 

3. Has any .appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, 
and is there a balance unexpended sufficient to pay this bill ? 

4. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measurements 
either of dimensions, quantities, or weights correctly and fully 
stated, and is the proof of the delivery to the city of the whole 
amount charged sufficient ? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely 
in excess as to require the attention of the city councils to be 
called to the same? 

6. Is the bill written in a fair, legible hand, correctly cast, 
and on paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its 
proper backing and filing ? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and 
the total amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the 
amount of the work not yet completed, and the per cent re- 
tained, if any, should be stated in the bill. 

S. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which affect 
the question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for further information 
or correction as the circumstances of each case may require. 

COURT DECISIONS, LEGAL POINTS A'ND RULES, RELATING TO THE 
APPROVAL OR DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

No bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until the 
auditor has approved it as correct. 



auditor's office. 721 

Public trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the city 
councils cannot be delegated to others. Dillon's Municipal Cor- 
porations, section 96, volume i. 

No member of either branch [of the city councils], except the 
mayor, shall receive any compensation for his services, or shall 
hold any office or agency created during his continuance in 
office. General Latvs, chapter 46, section 13. 

The executive powers of the city, except where vested in the 
mayor, shall be exercised by the mayor and aldermen. General 
Laws, chapter 46, section 14. 

The mayor and aldermen have all the powers and authority 
of selectmen of towns unless it is otherwise provided by law. 
General Lazvs, chapter 46, section 14. 

Joint standing committees have advisory powers only ; they 
cannot legally be endowed with executive or legislative powers 
by ordinance or resolution of the city councils, as no by-law or 
ordinance shall be repugnant to the constitution or laws of the 
state. 

No member of either branch of the city councils can enter 
into any verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to, or do 
any work for the city. Any firm of which a member is also a 
member of the city councils is included in this prohibition. 

No city official, or department, or board of officials having 
legal power to expend money for the benefit of the city, can pur- 
chase of or contract with themselves, with any one of the board, 
or with any firm of which one of said officials is a member. Dil- 
lon's Municipal Corporations, volume i, page 436, section 444, 

Every bill against the city shall specify the particular appro- 
priation to which the same should be charged, and the moneys 
paid will be charged to such appropriations only. 

He who is intrusted with the business of others cannot be 
allowed to make such business a source of profit to himself. 

All orders passed by the city councils authorizing a ministerial 
act to be performed by its agent or agents must be strictly con- 
strued, and the act to be done must be specifically stated. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. ( Gen- 

46 



722 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

eral Laws, chapter io6, section ii.) They have no power con- 
ferred upon them by law or ordinance to purchase new apparatus 
of any kind. 

The joint standing committee on fire department have advis- 
ory powers only. 

The laws and ordinances require the city auditor to withhold 
his signature from all bills against any appropriation where the 
amount of the appropriation is expended, until the city council 
shall have provided the means of paying the same. Section 4, 
chapter 3 of the City Ordinances, and section 4, ordinances re- 
lating to duties of the city auditor, approved January 7, 1890. 

The power of towns to raise and appropriate money is derived 
solely from statutory provisions, which restrict the power to cer- 
tain specified objects and other necessary charges. 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those pre- 
scribed by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, and 
generally will not be permitted, to carry such votes into effect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discretion of 
towns to vote gifts or to select donees ; their charity is a duty 
defined, commanded, enforced, and regulated, and the objects of 
it are designated by law. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a minority in an 
unlimited manner. Gove v. Epping, 41 N. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to 
make expenditures, within the scope of their powers, for their 
respective departments : For fire department and fire-alarm tele- 
graph, the chief engineer, to be submitted monthly to the ap- 
proval of the board of engineers ; for police department, mayor 
and police commission; for police court, police judge; for 
water-works department, superintendent, subject to the rules of 
the board of commissioners and ordinances relating thereto ; 
for city farm, superintendent ; for overseers of the poor, each 
overseer, subject to the rules of the board of overseers, and their 
monthly review and approval ; for schools, superintendent, or 
such person as the board of school committee may designate, 
bills to be approved by the board monthly; for streets, sewers, 



auditok's office. 723 

and other work under these departments, street and park com- 
missioners ; for city clerk's office, treasurer's office, tax collector's 
office, assessors' office, auditor's office, incidental expenditures, 
city physician, city messenger, city solicitor, city engineer, — 
mayor ; for cemeteries, superintendents, subject to board of 
trustees (to consist of citizens not members of the city councils); 
for health department, board of health, subject to approval of 
mayor ; city library, board of trustees or person designated by 
them. It may be stated as a general rule, that all subordinate 
officials are under the supervision and control of the mayor, sub- 
ject to such limitations and restrictions as the board of alder- 
men, acting as a board, may require. 



RESOLUTIONS. ORDERS, ORDI- 
NANCES. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES 

PASSED IN 1895. 



City of Manchester. 
Resolution relating to Meetings of Joint Standing Committees. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

No meeting of any joint standing committee shall be held 
without twenty-four hours' notice to each of the members there- 
of and the mayor, unless by unanimous consent of all the mem- 
bers of said committee. 

Passed March 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution making a Temporary Loan of One Hundred Thou- 
sand Dollars. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city as 
may fall due before the fifth day of December, 1895, the mayor 
be and hereby is authorized to make a temporary loan for the 
use of the city, of a sum not exceeding one hundred thousand 
dollars (^100,000) being in anticipation of the taxes of the present 
year ; giving for the same the notes of the city signed by the 
mayor and countersigned by the city treasurer. 

Passed March 5, 1895. 

727 



728 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manchester. 

Resolution in relation to the Celebration of Independence Day. 

Resolvedhy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That a joint special committee of three, consisting of the 
mayor, one alderman, and one councilman, be appointed with 
authority to make all arrangements for the celebration of Inde- 
pendence Day, and to expend the appropriation therefor ; pro- 
vided, however, that said committee shall not incur any expense 
in excess of said appropriation. 

Passed March 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution for the appropriation of Fifty Thousand Dollars for 
an extension to the present High School Building and for 
the issue of Bonds for said Amount. 

Resolvedly the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, there is an urgent and universally admitted demand 
for increased facilities for the Manchester high school, and where- 
as it is the opinion of the city councils that this demand can best 
be met by the construction of an extension to the present high 
school building, be it 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council pf 
the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, that the sum 
of fifty thousand dollars (^50,000) be, and the same is hereby 
appropriated for the purpose of building, completing, and equip- 
ping a two-story addition to the present high school building. 

Resolved^ further, that said sum of fifty thousand dollars, or 
so much thereof as may be necessary, be raised by the issue of 
the bonds of the city of Manchester, said bonds to be dated July 



RESOLUTIONS. 729 

I, 1895, and pa3'able to bearer, ten thousand dollars ($10,000) 
upon each of the following dates, viz., July i, 1896, July i, 1897, 
July I, 1898, July I, 1899, and July i, 1900; said bonds to 
bear the city seal, to be signed by the mayor and countersigned 
by the city treasurer^, and to bear interest at the rate of four per 
cent per annum from date, and to have coupons attached bearing 
ihtfac-su/iik' signature of the city treasurer, for the payment of 
interest at said rate, semi-annually on the first days of January 
and July of each year ; and the city treasurer is authorized to 
fix the place of payment of interest and principal of said bonds, 
and under the instructions of the mayor and joint standing com- 
mittee of finance is authorized to sell said bonds as the money 
shall be needed ; and do all things necessary and proper to com- 
plete and carry into effect the issue of said bonds ; said bonds 
to be issued in accordance with an act of the legislature of New 
Hampshire passed at the January session, 1895, entitled : "An 
act to authorize municipal corporations to issue bonds." 
This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 2, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution authorizing and ratifying the issuance and sale of 
Negotiable Coupon Bonds of the City of Manchester, by the 
Finance Committee of the City Council, or the Mayor and 
Treasurer of said City. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of 
Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That all acts, doings, and proceedings of the joint standing 
committee on finance of the city councils of the city of Man- 
chester, and of the chairman thereof and of the mayor and treas- 
urer of said city, in making, executing, signing, countersigning, 
issuing, selling, and delivering the sixty thousand dollars ($60,- 
000) issue of bonds known as the "bridge loan bonds," dated 



730 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

July I, iSSi^ having thirty years to run, and due July i, 191 1, 
purporting on the face of the bonds to have been authorized by 
resolution of September, 18S0, which have heretofore been issued 
and sold by said committee, or by said mayor, are, and each one 
of said acts, doings, and proceedings, is hereby fully ratified, ap- 
proved, confirmed, and made binding and effectual upon the 
city of Manchester and made the acts of the city of Manchester ; 
and the said sixty thousand dollars ($60,000) issue of said bonds, 
heretofore issued and sold are hereby adopted as, and are made 
the bonds, obligations, and indebtedness of the city of Manches- 
ter in all respects, and as fully, to all intents and purposes, as if 
the making, issuing, and selling thereof had been fully author- 
ized by the city of Manchester by resolution of the city councils, 
approved by the mayor, prior to the issuance or sale of any 
thereof. 

Passed April 16, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution relating to the Use of Center Construction of a 
Portion of the Manchester Street Railway. 

Resolved by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen : 

That the Manchester Street Railway be requested to use in the 
construction of its electric railroad the so-called center construc- 
tion upon that portion of said railway in Elm street north of 
Prospect street to Trenton street ; and said Manchester Street 
Railway is hereby authorized to make use of such center con- 
struction on said portion of Elm street, upon condition that said 
railway shall make no claim for and receive no damages there- 
for, and 

Resolved, That this board, upon due application therefor, will 
give all necessary authority, if any is required, to enable this 
vote to be carried into effect. 

Passed April 19, 1895. 



RESOLUTIONS. 731 

City of Manchester. 

Resolution relating to the discontinuance of the Old Falls Road 
between Belmont and East Spruce streets. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the city solicitor be authorized to enter a petition in the 
supreme court for Hillsborough county in the name of the city 
of Manchester, asking for the consent of said court to the dis- 
continuance of the Old Falls road between the center lines of 
Belmont and East Spruce streets, upon being furnished a guar- 
anty from the parties interested that no costs or expenses shall be 
made to the city. 

Passed May 7, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution for the issue of ^100,000 of Water Loan Bonds to re- 
fund the ^100,000 Six Per Cent Bonds, maturing July i, 1895. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That for the purpose of re-funding the one hundred thousand 
dollars of water loan, six per cent bonds, which come due July i, 
1895, and for the purpose of obtaining the money to pay said 
maturing bonds, there be issued by the city of Manchester, in 
accordance with the authority granted by the legislature of the 
state of New Hampshire, by an act passed at the January session, 
1895, one hundred thousand dollars of the bonds of the city of 
Manchester, to bear date July i, 1895, i^^ denominations of one 
thousand dollars each, with interest coupons attached for the 
payment of interest semi-annually on the first days of January 
and July of each year, at four per cent per annum ; said bonds 
to be payable in twenty years from the date of their issue, and 



732 EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

to be signed by the mayor and countersigned by the city treas- 
urer, and the coupons to bear the facsimile signature of the 
mayor. And the joint standing committee on finance and the 
mayor are hereby instructed and authorized to do everything 
necessary to carry into effect the issue of said bonds, with power 
to determine the place of payment of the principal and interest 
thereof. 

Passed May 7, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution for the appropriation of $120,000 for new School 
Buildings, and the issuance of Bonds for said Amount. 

if^Wz'^?// by the Mayor and Aldermen and Common Council of 
the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

First, That the resolution for the appropriation of fifty thou- 
sand dollars ($50,000) for an extension to the present high school 
building, and for the issue of bonds for said amount, passed at a 
meeting of the city councils held April 2, 1895, ^^ ^^^ ^^e same 
is hereby reconsidered and rescinded. 

Second, Resolved, That the sum of one hundred and twenty 
thousand dollars ($120,000) be and the same is hereby appropri- 
ated for the following purposes : For the purpose of building, 
completing, and equipping an addition to the present high school 
building, the sum of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000); for the 
purpose of buying two lots of land, and the erection of an eight- 
room school building on each of said lots, the sum of seventy 
thousand dollars ($70,000). 

Resolved further. That said sum of one hundred and twenty 
thousand dollars ($120,000), or so much thereof as may be neces- 
sary, be raised by the issue of bonds of the city of Manchester, 
said bonds to be dated July i, 1895, and payable to bearer ten 
thousand dollars upon each of the following dates : July i, 1896 ; 
July I, 1897; July I, 1898; July i, 1899; July i, 1900; July 



RESOLUTIOJJS. 733 

I, 1901; July I, 1902; July I, 1903; July i, 1904; July i, 
1905; July I, 1906; July I, 1907; said bonds to bear the city 
seal, to be signed by the mayor, and countersigned by the city 
treasurer, and to bear interest at the rate of four (4) per cent per 
annum from date, and to have coupons attached bearing the fac- 
simile signature of the city treasurer, for the payment of interest 
at said rate, semi-annually, on the first days of January and July 
of each year, and the city treasurer is authorized to fix the place 
of payment of interest and principal of said bonds, and under 
the instructions of the mayor and joint standing committee on 
finance, is authorized to sell said bonds as the money shall be 
needed, and do all things necessary and proper to complete and 
carry into effect the issue of said bonds ; said bonds to be issued 
in accordance with an act of the legislature of New Hampshire, 
passed at the January session, 1895, entitled: "An act to au- 
thorize municipal corporations to issue bonds." 
This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 7, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 



Resolution in memoriam of the late James A. Weston. 

Whereas, James A. Weston, a native, lifelong resident, and 
eminent citizen of Manchester, who was three times elected to 
the mayoralty of the city, and twice to the governorship of the 
state, and for many years discharged with rare fidelity and success 
many important trusts, has died ; 

Resolved, by the city councils, that we record our appreciation 
of his worth and of the value of his achievements to the commu- 
nity in which he lived, and in whost service he never wearied 
nor failed. 

Resolved, For ourselves and in behalf of the people whom we 
represent, that in the death of Mr. Weston, so pure in private 



734 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

life, so competent and faithful in official station, so amiable and 
gentle in his communication with all classes, so willing to 
work and to give in every good cause, so prudent and painstak- 
ing in all fiduciary positions, so helpful in his church, his 
neighborhood, and his city, so affectionate and wise in his fam- 
ily, and so incorruptible, devoted, and successful in all the rela- 
tions of life, Manchester loses one who was the peer of the best 
and most useful, whose career was, is, and will be an encourage- 
ment in well-doing, and whose memory should be tenderly, 
proudly, and gratefully cherished. 

Resolved, That we tender our sincere sympathy to the mem- 
bers of his home circle and close personal friends in their great 
bereavement. 

Resolved^ That these resolutions be spread upon the records, 
and a copy transmitted to Mr. Weston's family, and that in 
token of our respect, we attend the funeral in a body. 

Passed May ii, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution of Thanks to John Rogers. 

Resolvedly \\\s. Board of Mayor and Aldermen and Common 
Council of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled : 

That the city of Manchester hereby accepts the gift of John 
Rogers, sculptor, of the statue of Abraham Lincoln, and in be- 
half of the citizens of the city, their thanks and the thanks of the 
city government are hereby extended to Mr. Rogers for his kind 
and generous donation ; and 

That a copy of these resolutions be sent to Mr. Rogers. 

Passed July 2, 1895. 



RESOLUTIONS. 735 

City of Manchester. 

Resolution to make a Temporary Loan of One Hundred Thou- 
sand Dollars. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city as 
may fall due before the fifteenth day of December, 1895, the 
mayor be and hereby is authorized to make a temporary loan for 
the use of the city of a sum not exceeding one hundred thou- 
sand dollars (^100,000), being in anticipation of the taxes of the 
present year ; giving for the same the notes of the city, signed 
by the mayor and countersigned by the city treasurer. 

Passed July 2, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution relative to Bequest of Mary G. Carvelle, deceased. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

Whereas, Mary G. Carvelle, late of Manchester, deceased, by 
her will proved before the probate court for the county of Hills- 
borough, on the 19th day of March, 1894, made the following 
bequest : 

" I give and bequeath to the city of Manchester for the pur- 
pose of a Convalescent Home the lot of land on the north side 
of the Pond road, extending to the Thomas Gamble lot, and in- 
cluding the oak grove, in consideration that when established 
my relations in case of want shall have a home " ; and, 

Whereas, said land is subject to a certain mortgage, and the 
payment of the same and the erection and maintenance of such 
a Convalescent Home would call for the appropriation and ex- 
penditure by the city of large sums of money, which it has no 
legal authority to appropriate and expend for such purpose ; 
therefore, 



736 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Resolved, by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen and Common 
Council of Manchester, in City Council assembled : That while 
appreciating the motives which prompted Mrs. Carvelle to make 
such bequest, it is inexpedient that the city of Manchester should 
accept said becjuest, and decline to do so. 

Passed August 6, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution for the appropriation of ^130,000 for a new High 
School Building, and the issuance of Bonds for the same Amount. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

First, that so much of the resolution passed May 7, 1895, ^^" 
titled, "A Resolution for the appropriation of $120,000 for 
new school buildings and the issuance of bonds for said amount," 
as provides for the appropriation of fifty thousand dollars 
($50,000) for an extension to the present high-school building 
and for the issue of bonds for said amount, be and the same is 
hereby reconsidered, rescinded, and repealed; and so much of 
said resolution as relates to the appropriation of seventy thou- 
sand dollars ($70,000) for the purpose of building, completing, 
and equipping two eight-room school buildings, and the pur- 
chase of lots upon which the same stand, and the issuance of 
seventy thousand dollars ($70,000) of bonds therefor, is hereby 
re-enacted and continued in force. 

Resolved further, that the sum of one hundred and thirty 
thousand dollars ($130,000) be and the same is hereby appro- 
priated for the purpose of building, completing, and equipping 
a new high-school building upon the present high-school lot, 
bounded by Concord, Beech, Lowell, and Ash streets, and that 
said sum of one hundred and thirty thousand dollars ($130,000), 
or so much thereof as may be necessary, be raised by the issue 
of the bonds of said city, said bonds to be dated July i, 1895, 



RESOLUTIONS. 737 

and payable to bearer, ten thousand dollars (^10,000) upon each 
of the following dates: July i, 1903; July i, 1904; July i, 
1905 ; July I, 1906 ; July i, 1907 ; July i, 190S ; July i, 1909 ; 
July I, 1910; July I, 1911 ; July i, 1912; July i, 1913; July 
I, 1914; July I, 1915. 

Said bonds to bear the city seal, to be signed by the 'mayor 
and countersigned by the city treasurer, and to bear interest at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum from date, and to have 
coupons attached bearing the facsimile signature of the city 
treasurer, for the payment of interest at said rate, semi-annually, 
on the first days of January and July of each year; and the city 
treasurer is authorized to fix the place of payment of interest and 
principal of said bonds, and under the instructions of the mayor 
and joint standing committee on finance, is authorized to sell 
said bonds as the money shall be needed, and do all things 
necessary and proper to complete and carry into effect the issue 
of said bonds. Said bonds to be issued in accordance with an 
act of the legislature of New Hampshire passed at the January 
session, 1895, entitled "An act to authorize municipal corpora- 
tions to issue bonds." 

This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 3, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 
Resolution providing a Sinking Fund for the Schoolhouse Loan. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of paying the interest and principal as it 
shall become due, of the schoolhouse loan bonds, amounting to 
two hundred thousand dollars (^200,000), authorized by the res- 
olutions of the city councils, dated May 7, 1895, and Septem- 
ber 3, 1895, there shall annually be raised by the city councils 

47 



738 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

in the years 1896 to 1915, inclusive, such sum of money as shall 
be sufficient to meet the interest upon the bonds each year out- 
standing; and a further sum of ten thousand dollars (^10,000) 
each year of a sinking fund for the payment of the principal of 
said bonds as it shall become due, the same to be turned over to 
the board of sinking fund commissioners, created by ordinance 
of November 7, 1893, and applied to the payment of said bonds. 

Passed September 3, 1S95. . 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution relative to Land for Park Purposes in southern sec- 
tion of the City. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That His Honor the Mayor confer with the agent of the 
Amoskeag Corporation in reference to land for park purposes in 
southern section of the city, and report at next meeting of the 
city councils. 

Passed September 3, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution in regard to Grade. 

Resolved by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Manchester, assembled, as follows : 

That the city engineer be instructed whenever he shall here- 
after give a statement of the grade of any street to any party to 
give said statement in writing and keep in his office in book 
form a duplicate of said statement. 

Passed September 3, 1895. 



RESOLUTIONS. 739 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution in Memoriam. 

Resolved, That the City Councils of Manchester place upon 
record their deep appreciation of the great loss which this mu- 
nicipality and this community have sustained in the death of 
Sylvanus B. Putnam. 

He was a gallant soldier who attested his devotion to his 
country by heroic service and sacrifices, which crippled and tor- 
tured him through life. He was an upright, modest, useful citi- 
zen who deserved and had the respect of all who knew him, and 
the confidence and love of a large circle of associates and 
friends. 

For nearly fifteen years he was the honored treasurer of our 
city and in that arduous and responsible position he showed 
himself always competent, honest, and faithful. He was patient, 
painstaking, and thoroughly devoted to the discharge of his 
duties. He was affable and considerate to all who had occasion 
to visit his office. Nearly a million dollars passed through his 
hands every year, and every penny was carefully guarded while 
in his keeping and promptly accounted for when it was paid out. 
He leaves a record which is a precious legacy to the many who 
loved him, and a guide for those who will succeed him. 

Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be spread upon the 
city records and that one be sent to his bereaved family. 

Passed in joint convention, unanimously, November 14, 1895. 



740 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 

City of Manchester. 

Resolution relative to the Exemption from Taxation of a cer- 
tain Manufacturing Establishment proposed to be erected and 
put in operation by the Manchester Mills. 

Resolved hy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

Whereas, it is provided by section ii, chapter 55 of the 
Public Statutes of the state of New Hampshire, that " Towns 
may by vote exempt from taxation for a term not exceeding ten 
years, any manufacturing establishment proposed to be erected 
or put in operation therein, and the capital to be used in oper- 
ating the same, unless such establishment has been previously 
exempted from taxation by some town " ; and, 

Whereas, the Manchester Mills propose to erect an additional 
mill in said city of Manchester, on the east side of the Merri- 
mack river, and on the south side of Granite street, and operate 
the same with machinery for manufacturing purposes. 

Resolved^ That said additional mill and machinery be ex- 
empted from taxation for the term of ten years. 

Passed November 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution relating to Transfer of Land by Water Commis- 
sioners. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That Alpheus Gay, chairman of the board of water commis- 
sioners for the city of Manchester, be and hereby is authorized 
to execute for and in the name of said city, a deed to Charles 
Spofford of eight acres of the Porter lot, so called, in Auburn, 
New Hampshire, as surveyed by Joseph B. Sawyer, in accord- 
ance with the agreement of the land committee of said board 
with said Spofford. 

Passed November 5, 1895. 



RESOLUTIONS. 741 

City of Manchester. 

Resolution relating to a Celebration in 1896 of the Semi-Cen- 
tennial Anniversary of the Establishment of the City of Man- 
chester. 

Eesolvedhy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That a special committee consisting of the mayor, the presi- 
dent of the common council, three aldermen, and three mem- 
bers of the common council be and hereby are appointed for 
the purpose of considering the matter of a celebration in the 
year 1896 of the semi-centennial anniversary of the establish- 
ment of the city of Manchester. Said committee to consider 
the time and the form of such celebration, the estimated cost 
thereof, and to make a report with recommendations at some 
subsequent meeting of the city councils. 

Passed November 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 
Resolution for the Issue of ^50,000 of Water Loan Bonds. 

Jiesolvedhy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That, for the purpose of obtaining money for the purpose of 
extending and maintaining the water-works system of the city 
of Manchester, there be issued by the city of Manchester in 
accordance with the authority granted by the legislature of the 
state of New Hampshire, by an act passed at the January session, 
1895, ^50,000 (fifty thousand dollars) of the bonds of the city 
of Manchester, to bear date December 16, 1895, ^^ denomina- 
tions of ^1,000 (one thousand dollars) each, with interest cou- 
pons attached for the payment of interest semi-annually on the 
fifteenth days of June and December of each year, at 4 (four) 



742 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

per cent per annum. Said bonds to be payable in 20 (twenty) 
years from the date of their issue, to be signed by the mayor 
and countersigned by the city treasurer, and the coupons to 
bear the fac-si?niie signature of the mayor ; and the mayor and 
joint standing committee on finance are hereby instructed and 
authorized to do everything necessary to carry into effect the 
issue of said bonds, with power to determine the place of pay- 
ment of principal and interest thereof. 

Passed November 14, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 
Resolution for Sale of ^50,000 of School Loan Bonds. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That, whereas there is need of the money for the purpose of 
payments on the contracts for new schoolhouses, there be sold 
fifty thousand dollars of school loan bonds, heretofore author- 
ized by vote of the city councils, to E. H. Rollins & Sons, at the 
rate of one hundred two and fifty-two hundredths per cent. 

Passed November 22, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution in regard to the sale of the Lot of Land on East 
Spruce Street east of Beacon Street. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the action of the mayor and joint standing committee on 
lands and buildings in selling at public auction the lot of land 
on East Spruce street east of Beacon street, be ratified and con- 



ORDERS. 743 

firmed, and that the mayor be authorized to execute and deliver 
a deed of said land to the purchasers at said sale for and in the 
name of the city of Manchester. 

Passed December 3, 1S95. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to Claims and Suits against the City. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and the city solicitor be authorized to dispose of suits 
against the city now pending in court, or which may be entered 
in court during the ensuing two years, as they deem best, and 
that they be a special committee to consider claims against the 
city, with authority to settle such claims as they deem proper 
when the amount involved in such settlement does not exceed 
two hundred and fifty dollars. 

Passed March 5, 1S95. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to print the Forty-ninth Annual Report of the Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on finance be, and they hereby are, 
authorized to procure for the use of the inhabitants of said city, 
the printing of the Forty-ninth Annual Report of the Receipts 
and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, including the 
reports of the joint standing committee on finance, the city audi- 
tor, the school board and superintendent of schools, superintend- 
ent of water-works, water commissioners, engineer of fire depart- 
ment, police commissioners, chief of police, overseers of the poor, 
trustees, librarian, and treasurer of the city library, committee on 
cemeteries, joint standing committee on city farm, city physician, 



744 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

city solicitor, city engineer, street and park commissioners, and 
such other matters relating to city affairs as said finance commit- 
tee may direct, the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for printing and stationery. 

Passed March 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to print the Mayor's Inaugural Address. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the committee on finance cause to be printed four hundred copies 
of Mayor Clarke's Inaugural Address, the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for printing and stationery. 

Passed March 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Hose for Fire Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on fire department be authorized to 
purchase four thousand feet of hose for use in fire department, 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire 
department. 

Passed March 5, 1S95. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Exercise Wagon. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on fire department be authorized 



ORDERS. 745 

to purchase one exercise wagon for use at the General Stark en- 
gine-house, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for fire department. 

Passed March 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase a new Two-horse Hose Wagon. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on fire department be authorized to 
purchase a new two-horse hose wagon to be placed in the Merri- 
mack engine-house on Lake avenue, the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed March 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Hook and Ladder Truck. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on fire department be authorized 
to purchase a hook and ladder truck to be placed in the General 
Stark engine-house on Webster street, the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed March 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order making Certain Transfers. 

Ordered, If the Bpard of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on fire department be authorized 
to transfer the combination hose carriage at the General Stark 



746 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

engine-house on Webster street to the hosehouse at Bakersville ; 
and that the one-horse hose carriage at Merrimack engine-house 
on Lake avenue be transferred to General Stark engine-house on 
Webster street. 

Passed March 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to dispose of Sub-station on Clinton street. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and are hereby authorized to dispose of the sub-police station 
on Clinton street. 

Passed April 2, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to curb the Lincoln-Street School Lot. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and are hereby authorized to curb the Lincoln-street school 
lot; expense of same not to exceed the appropriation, and ex- 
pense of same to be charged to the appropriation for curbing 
Lincoln-street school lot. 

Passed April 2, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to make needed Repairs on City Hall. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 



OKDERS. 747 

be and are hereby authorized to make needed repairs on the city 
hall building, and the expense of the same be charged to the ap- 
propriation for repairs on city hall. 

Passed April 2, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for a new Sub-Police Station. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and are hereby authorized to procure plans, specifications, 
and bids for a sub-police station on the Clinton-street lot, ex- 
pense not to exceed the appropriation, and the expense of same 
to be charged to the appropriation for sub-police station. 

Passed April 2, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to appropriate Money for Open Air Band Concerts. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the board of mayor and aldermen be and hereby are authorized, 
acting under the statutes passed by the New Hampshire legisla- 
ture at the January session, 1893, to expend the sum of three 
hundred dollars for open air band concerts, the expense there- 
of to be charged to the appropriation for band concerts. 

Passed April 2, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to grade and concrete the Rimmon School Lot. 
Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 



748 ■ REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 

the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and are hereby authorized to grade and concrete the Rimmon 
school lot, and the expense of the same to be charged to inci- 
dental expenses. 

Passed April 2, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the construction of a Two-Story Addition to the 
present High School Building. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and they are hereby made and constituted a special commit- 
tee to build, complete, and equip a two-story extension to the 
high school building ; and they are hereby authorized, em- 
powered, and instructed to procure plans and estimates, to make 
all contracts for and in the name of the city of Manchester, nec- 
essary and proper to carry on said work, and to do all things 
necessary and proper to carry into effect the full purpose and in- 
tent of this order ; and the expense of said work to be charged 
to the appropriation of fifty thousand dollars made for the pur- 
pose of building, completing, and equipping a two-story addition 
to the present high school building. 

Passed April 2, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to new School Buildings. 

Ordered by the Common Council, if the Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen concur : That the joint standing committee on lands 
and buildings and the mayor be authorized and directed to pur- 
chase a lot of land upon the sputheast corner of Wilson and 



ORDERS. 749 

A-uburn streets, containing 20,000 square feet, for a sum not ex- 
ceeding $2,500, and a lot of land upon the northwest corner of 
Harrison and Chestnut streets, being 240 by 135 feet, containing 
32,400 square feet, at a price not exceeding $16,200; and that 
they be further authorized to sell at public auction the lot of 
land owned by the city situated on the northeast corner of Bridge 
and Union streets ; also to sell the lot owned by the city situated 
upon the northwest corner of Manchester and Wilson streets, and 
that the money realized from the sale of said lots be added to 
the appropriation of $120,000 for new school buildings. Said' 
sales to be made by said committee as soon as the matter of the 
release of the restrictions upon the same be adjusted by the trans- 
fer of said restrictions to one of the lots to be purchased ; and 
said committee on lands and buildings and the mayor are fur- 
ther authorized upon each of said lots to erect and complete and 
equip an eight-room school building, with all proper and neces- 
sary conveniences and appliances, at a price not exceeding $30,- 
000 for each of said buildings, and said sum to be charged to the 
appropriation for new school buildings. And said committee is- 
further authorized to erect, complete, and equip an extension to 
the present high school building at a price not exceeding $50,- 
000. Said sum to be charged to the appropriation for said new 
school buildings. And said committee and mayor are author- 
ized and instructed to do any and everything (to make all con- 
tracts) necessary and proper for and in behalf of the city, to 
carry into effect the full purpose, meaning, and intent of this 
order. 

Passed May 7, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to Granite Street Grade Crossing. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint special committee on Granite-street grade crossing be 



750 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

and they are hereby authorized to employ a competent civil en- 
gineer to assist them in their duties, the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed May 7, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Four Horses for use in the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department be 
authorized to purchase four horses for use in the fire department, 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire 
department. 

Passed May 7, 1S95. 



City of Manchester, 

An Order to Build Wagon Shed at Fulton Engine-house. 

Orde7-ed^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and are hereby authorized to build a wagon shed at Fulton 
engine-house, expense not to exceed two hundred dollars, and 
the expense of same to be charged to the appropriation for re- 
pairs of buildings. 

Passed May 7, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Exercise Wagon for use in Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department be 



ORDERS. 751 

authorized to purchase an exercise wagon for use in the fire de- 
partment, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for fire department. 

Passed May 7, 1S95. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect a Watering-trough. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the street and park commissioners be authorized to erect a water- 
ing-trough on the south side of Hanover-street road and west 
side of Candia road, at the intersection of Hanover-street road 
and Candia road, the expense to be charged to the appropriation 
for incidental expenses. 

Passed May 7, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect Certain Electric Lights. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lighting streets be 
authorized to erect certain electric lights, as follows : 

Corner of Beech and Silver streets, corner of Lowell and 
Chestnut streets, corner of Chestnut back street and Spruce, cor- 
ner of North Union and Carpenter streets, corner of Beech street 
and Concord & Portsmouth Railroad, corner of Tilton street 
and Bowman place, corner of Page street and Concord & Ports- 
mouth Railroad crossing, on West Merrimack street between 
Franklin and Canal streets, the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed June 4, 1895. 



752 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the matter of a New Granite Bridge 
across Merrimack River on Granite Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets and a special 
committee consisting of the president of the common council, 
two councilmen to be appointed by the president, and two aldermen 
to be appointed by the mayor, to act in conjunction with the 
joint standing committee on streets, be instructed to consider the 
subject of a granite bridge across Merrimack river on Granite 
street to replace the present structure, and that such committee 
be empowered to secure such advice from competent persons as 
may be necessary to enable them to decide as to the kind, grade, 
number of arches, and general condition of a bridge which shall 
be best adapted for the desired purpose, and for this purpose to 
expend a sum of money not exceeding ^i,ooo, the same to be 
charged to the appropriation for incidental expenses, and to 
make report to the city councils of the result of their investiga- 
tion as soon as may be. 

Passed June 4, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the Purchase of Land for New School 

Building. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized and directed to purchase a lot of land upon the 
southeast corner of Wilson and Cedar streets, containing 20,000 
square feet, for a sum not exceeding ^2,500, said sum to be 
charged to the appropriation for new school buildings, said lot 
to be used with the lot at the corner of Wilson and Auburn 
streets, as authorized by order of May 7, 1895. 

Passed June 4, 1895. 



ORDERS. 753 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Transfer Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the amount of fifteen thousand dollars be transferred from the 
appropriation for Pennacook street sewer to the appropriation 
for Christian brook sewer. 

Passed June 4, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase a Typewriter for use at Police Station. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor be authorized to purchase a typewriter for use at the 
police station, the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for incidental expenses. 

Passed June 4, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to the Purchase of Trees. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and the committee on setting trees be and hereby are 
authorized to purchase one hundred and forty trees to be set in 
the schoolhouse yards, or in such other places as said committee 
shall determine, at a price not exceeding one dollar per tree, 
and that the expense of said purchase be charged to the appro- 
priation for incidental expenses. 

Passed July 2, 1895. 

48 



754 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order for the Distribution of the 1895 Appropriation for 

the Militia. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the seven hundred dollars ($700) duly appropriated for the mili- 
tia be apportioned as follows : 

^100 to the First Regiment Band. 

^100 to Co. C, First Regiment. 

^100 to Co. E, First Regiment. 

^100 to Co. H, First Regiment. 

^100 to the Amoskeag Veterans. 

^100 to the Manchester Cadets. 

^100 to the Manchester War Veterans. 

Passed July 2, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to pay the bill of Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. R., 
for Expenses incurred on Memorial Day. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the bill of Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. R., for expenses in- 
curred on Memorial Day, amounting to $336.93, be paid and 
that the same be charged to the appropriation for decoration of 
soldiers' graves. 

Passed July 2, 1S95. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to Additional Land for Derryfield Park. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
His Honor the Mayor be and hereby is appointed a special com- 



OKDERS. 755 

mittee to see what arrangements can be made with the owners of 
land adjoining Derryfield park upon the west, for the purchase 
of enough land to straighten the west line of said park to the 
line of Belmont street extended. 

Passed July 2, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build Addition to South Manchester Schoolhouse. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and are hereby authorized to build addition to South Man- 
chester schoolhouse with water-closets and sewer connections, 
and the expense of same not to exceed twelve hundred dollars 
.($1,200). 

Passed August 6, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to Purchase of Furniture. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and are hereby authorized to purchase of the tenants of .city 
hall building such furniture as they deem necessary for fitting up 
the offices, and the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for the city hall. 

Passed August 6, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order transferring from Repairs of Highways to Appro- 
priation for Snow and Ice. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 



756 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

the city clerk be hereby authorized to transfer one thousand two 
hundred seventy-one dollars and thirty-eight cents ($1,271.38) 
from the appropriation for repairs of highways to the appropri- 
ation for snow and ice. 

Passed August 6, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase a Desk. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and are hereby authorized to purchase. a roll-top desk for 
police commissioners' office, and expense of same to be charged 
to incidental expenses. 

Passed August 6, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the Transfer of ($5,000) Five Thousand 
Dollars from the Reserved Fund to the Street and Park Com- 
mission for the Repairs of Bridges. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000) be transferred from the 
reserved fund to the street and park commission for the repairs 
of bridges. 

Passed August 6, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Furniture for Use in the City Clerk's 

Office. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 



ORDERS. 757 

the mayor be authorized to purchase a roll-top desk, a typewriter 
and desk, a copying table, a bookcase, and a carpet for use in 
the city clerk's ofifice, the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for city hall. 

Passed August 6, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lighting streets be 
authorized to erect an electric light at the corner of Wilson and 
Valley streets, the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for lighting streets. 

Passed August 6, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the transfer of Money. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make a transfer of 
five hundred dollars from the reserved fund to the appropriation 
for sub-police station, ward 8 ; and twelve hundred dollars from 
the reserved fund to the special appropriation for an addition to 
the South Manchester schoolhouse. 

Passed August 6, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the purchase of Furniture for Mayor's Office. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor be and hereby is authorized to purchase such furniture 



758 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

for the mayor's office as he shall deem proper, to an amount not 
exceeding three hundred dollars (^300), and the expense of the 
same to be charged to the appropriation for city hall. 

Passed September 3, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for a deed of the Lot of Land on the Corner of 
Union and Bridge Streets. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the acts of the mayor and joint standing committee on lands 
and buildings in the sale at public auction of the lot of land on 
the corner of Union and Bridge streets for the sum of seventy- 
seven hundred dollars ($7,700) be and the same are hereby rati- 
fied, confirmed, and approved, and the mayor is hereby author- 
ized to execute for and in the name of the city, a deed of said 
lot of land to the purchaser at said sale. 

Passed September 3, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the purchase of a Desk for the Overseers of the 

Poor. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized to purchase a roll-top desk and table for the use of 
the overseers of the poor, the expense of the same to be charged 
to the appropriation for city hall. 

Passed September 3, 1895. 



ORDERS. 759 

City of Manchester. 

An Order for the purchase of Furniture for the Assessors and 
Inspectors of Check-lists. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized to purchase furniture for the assessors' and inspec- 
tors of check-lists' room to an amount not exceeding one hundred 
dollars (;gioo), the same to be charged to the appropriation for 
city hall. 

Passed September 3, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the erection of a New High School Building. 

Ordered, If the Board of IVIayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the order heretofore passed authorizing the mayor and joint 
standing committee on lands and buildings to build, complete, 
and equip an addition to the present high school building be 
and the same is hereby repealed. 

Ordered, further, that said mayor and joint standing commit- 
tee on lands and buildings be and are hereby authorized and in- 
structed to build, complete, and equip upon the present high 
school lot, bounded by Concord, Beech, Lowell, and Ash streets, 
a new high school building, the expense of the same to be charged 
to the appropriation of one hundred and thirty thousand dollars 
(^130,000) for a new high school building made this day ; and 
said mayor and joint standing committee are authorized to ac- 
cept plans, call for proposals, make all contracts for and in be- 
half of the city, and do everything necessary to carry into effect 
the full force and intention of this order. 

Passed September 3, 1895. 



760 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to make a Transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be and is hereby authorized to make the following 
transfers : 



From reserved fund to city hall repairs . 

From reserved fund to city hall 

From reserved fund to land taken for highways 

From reserved fund to widening Mast street . 

From reserved fund to repairs of highways 

From reserved fund to payment of funded debt 

From reserved fund to South Manchester hosehouse 285.29 

Passed October i, 1895. 



10,000.00 

2,000.00. 

500.00 

874.96 

5,000.00 

100.00 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the purchase of Furniture for the Aldermen's 

Room. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor be authorized to purchase a desk and chairs for the 
aldermen's room to an amount not exceeding one hundred dol- 
lars (^100), the same to be charged to the appropriation for in- 
cidental expenses. 

Passed November 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to pay the Bill for Interest on Note of Enos C. 
Hewlett dated May 3, 1894. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the bill of Enos C. Howlett, for interest on note dated May 3, 



ORDERS. 761 

1894, and running eleven months at 6 per cent, and amounting 
to ^189, be paid, and that the mayor see that the bill is paid 
this year out of some other account than Pine Grove cemetery. 

Passed November 22, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase a Desk for Police Inspector. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and are hereby authorized to purchase a desk for the police 
inspector, and expense of same not to exceed twenty dollars 
(^20). 

Passed November 22, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to pay Claim of R. P. Stevens. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
His Honor the Mayor cause to be paid this year the claim of 
R. P. Stevens, amounting to $32, out of money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated. 

Passed November 22, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order making a Transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be and is hereby authorized to transfer two hun- 
dred dollars ($200) from the reserved fund to the appropriation 
for commons. 

Passed November 22, 1895. 



762 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order for the Transfer of certain Money. 

Ordered^ If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be and is hereby authorized to transfer from the 
appropriation for new sewers to the appropriation for the Silver- 
street sewer the sum of twenty-four hundred and seventy-nine 
and seventy-one hundredths dollars (^2,479.71). 

Passed November 22, 1895. 



City of Manchester, 
An Order to erect Certain Fire-Alarm Boxes. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department be 
authorized to erect certain fire-alarm boxes, as follows : 

At corner of Amory and Joliette streets ; at corner of Somer- 
ville and Jewett streets, the expense thereof to be charged tO' 
the appropriation for fire-alarm telegraph. 

Passed December 3, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to pay Election Officers in Ward 6. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor be authorized to pay the officers in the special elec- 
tion in ward 6, August 27, 1895, such sums as they may be en- 
titled to, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for incidental expenses. 

Passed December 3, 1895. 



ORDERS. 



768 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to the Final Transfers for the Year 1895. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make the following 
transfers, to wit : 

To reserved fund : 



m printing and stationery 


$544.20 


mayor's incidentals .... 


22.90 


city officers' salaries .... 


492.25 


auditor's department .... 


48.93 


street and park commission . 


85.84 


watering streets 


.24 


scavenger teams ..... 


240.23 


street sweeping ...... 


176-45 


lighting streets 


199.29 


repairs of sewers 


196.81 


widening Elm street .... 


.98 


health department . .• . . 


3-24 


books and stationery .... 


132-75 


contingent expenses .... 


79-93 


evening school, mechanical drawing 


114.00 


free text-books ..... 


84.65 


manual training ..... 


150.90 


fire-alarm telegraph .... 


67.91 


police commission .... 


3,079.21 


ward 5 wardroom .... 


47-51 


Valley cemetery ..... 


17-51 


indigent soldiers 


23.00 


decoration of soldiers' graves 


38.07 


abatement of taxes 


10.22 


free cash in treasury in excess of appropriations 


> 14,644.96 



Total 



$20,501.98 



764 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



From reserved fund 



To interest . 










^2,014.56 


city hall 










1,219.01 


incidental expenses 










1,551-12 


repairs of highways 










121.33 


snow and ice 










387.16 


new highways 










i>273.39 


land taken for highways 










495.00 


paving streets 










381.51 


macadamizing streets 










201.40 


grading for concrete 










543-05 


bridges . 










327.72 


city teams 










21.26 


engineer's department 










267.25 


repairs of schoolhouses 










358.00 


fuel 










218.06 


furniture and supplies 










227.23 


printing and advertising 










8.23 


care of rooms 










28.82 


evening school 










156.93 


teachers' salaries . 










1,499.21 


fire department 










6,346.73 


police court '. 










1,154.14 


police station 










382.35 


sub-police station, ward 


8 








343.82 


repairs of buildings 










741.69 


Lincoln-school curbing 










142.65 


repairs of city hall . 










1,016.77 


commons 










15.02 


Pine Grove cemetery 










825.20 


paupers off the farm 










450.84 


city farm 










165.68 



$22,885.13 



Passed January 2, 1896. 



ORDINANCES. 765 

City of Manchester, 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five. 

An Ordinance relating to Permanent Members of the Fire De- 
partment. 

Be it ordained \>Y the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as fol- 
lows: 

That each permanent member of the fire department shall be 
allowed one whole day's leave of absence in each month, in 
addition to two weeks' vacation in each year, without loss of 
pay ; but the chief engineer shall determine what days the leave 
of absence shall be granted. 

Permanent men out of the city on any such days shall be ac- 
counted present at roll-call, and not be subject to a fine for 
absence. 

No leave of absence shall ever be granted any member of the 
department on the fourth day of July of any year, and all mem- 
bers absent on leave shall report at their company quarters at 
eight o'clock in the evening of July 3, of each year. 

All ordinances inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed. 

Passed to be ordained March 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

IN THE year one THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-FIVE. 

An Ordinance amending section 30 of chapter 6 of the Ordi- 
nances of the City of Manchester, relating to the Compensa- 
tion of the City Physician. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as fol- 
lows : 

Section 30 of chapter 6 of the Ordinances of the City of Man- 



766 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Chester, relating to the compensation of the city physician, is 
hereby repealed and the following inserted and enacted in place 
thereof: 

" Section 30. The city physician shall receive for his ser- 
vices and all the duties appertaining to his office, six hundred 
dollars per annum, payable in equal quarterly payments, said 
sum to be in full payment for all medical, surgical, and other 
professional services performed by him at the request of the over- 
seers of the poor, the police commission, chief of police, the 
superintendent of the city farm, the street and park commission- 
ers, the board of mayor and aldermen, or the mayor." 

Passed to be ordained_ October i, 1895. 



City of Manchester, 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 15, Chapter 6 of the 
Laws and Ordinances. 

Beit ordained \iy \}ci&lAd,y ox ^ Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as fol- 
lows : 

That section 15, chapter 6, of the Laws and Ordinances be 
amended by striking out the words " one dollar and seventy-five 
cents per day while actually employed on duty," in the second 
and third lines thereof, and inserting the words, " two dollars 
and twenty-five cents per day while employed on regular duty," 
so that said section shall read as follows : 

" Section 15. The pay of special police officers of the city shall 
be at the rate of two dollars and twenty-five cents per day while 
actually employed, and payable monthly. 

" The city marshal, assistant marshal, watchmen, and regular 
police officers shall, at their own expense, furnish themselves 



ORDINANCES. 767 

with appropriate uniform of blue, with gilt buttons bearing the 
letters M. P., and shall wear said uniforms at all times when on 
duty. The committee on marshal's account shall furnish to each 
police officer a uniform badge, suitably lettered and numbered, 
to be worn at all times when on duty in some conspicuous place 
designated by said committee." 

Passed to be ordained November 5, 1895. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five. 
An Ordinance for the protection of Pneumatic Tired Vehicles. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as fol- 
lows : 

Section i. No person shall put or place, or cause to be put 
or placed, in or upon any street, lane, alley, or other public place 
in the city any ashes, glass, crockery, scrap iron, nails, tacks, or 
any other articles which would be liable to injure or damage the 
tires of wheels of bicycles or any other vehicles which have 
wheels with rubber or pneumatic tires. 

Sect. 2. Any person violating the provisions of the preced- 
ing section shall be liable to a fine of not more than twenty 
dollars for each offense. 

Sect. 3. This order shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained November 22, 1895. 



768 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manchester, 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 2, Chapter 5, relating 
to the Office of Auditor. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as fol- 
lows: 

That section 2, chapter 5 of the Laws and Ordinances, be 
amended by striking out the words " one thousand " in the sec- 
ond line thereof and inserting the words " twelve hundred." 

Passed to be ordained December 3, 1S95. 



INDEX. 



49 



INDEX. 



Abatement on taxes 683 

Account of Tax Collector, settlenaent of 691 

Assets, statement and inventory of 711 

Annual interest charge on bonded debt 708 

Auditor, city, report of 497 

Auditor's department 540 

Appropriations for 1895 by city councils 684 

Appendix, school 288 

Amoskeag cemetery 667 

B 

Band concerts 683 

Bridges 570 

Books and stationery 604 

Buildings, repairs of 635 

public, occupied by private parties 709 

Board of water commissioners, organization of 46 

report of 49 

health, report of 455 

Bonded debt, tabular statement of 705 

detailed statement of tor 1895 707 

annual interest charge 708 

c 

Christian brook sewer 585 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax 681 

City hall 515 

repairs of 646 

officers' salaries 537 

teams 572 

officials, list of 3-25 

engineer, report of 161 

engineer's department, organization of 160 

solicitor, report of 421 

771 



772 INDEX. 

City auditor's report 497 

treasurer's report 499-503 

councils, orders, ordinances 727 

physician, report of 417 

auditor's department 540 

farm 671 

report of joint standing committee 499 

library 613 

report of trustees of 381 

treasurer's report 386 

librarian's report 391 

donations to 399 

Contingent expenses 606 

Care of rooms 608 

Commons 657 

Cemetery, Pine Grove 661 

Valley 664 

Amoskeag 667 

Cemeteries, report of sub-trustees of Valley 426 

Pine Grove 425 

Amoskeag 427 

treasurer of 429 

treasurer of fund 432 

'report of trustees of fund 431 

County tax 683 

D 

Debt, payment of funded 511 

bonded, statement of 705 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 682 

Derryfleld and Stark parks 659 

E 

Engineer's department 590 

Expenses, incidental • 524 

mayor's 542 

contingent . 606 

Evening schools 609 

school, mechanical drawing 611 

Electric lights, location of . . 479 

Elliot Hospital 681 

Emergency Ward 680 

Elm street, widening of 587 

Exempted from tax, property 694 

F 

Fund, reserved 512 

Fuel 600 

Furniture and supplies • 601 



INDEX. 773 

Free text-books 611 

beds, Elliot Hospital 681 

Fire department 615 

report of chief engineer 319 

value of personal property 361 

names and residences of members 370 

location flre-alarm boxes 346 

Fire-alarm telegraph 626 

Farm, paupers off 668 

Farm , city 671 

Fourth of July celebration 683 

G 

Grading for concrete 564 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 682 

Gas-lights, location of 491 

H 

Highways, new 554 

land taken for 556 

watering 557 

paving 559 

macadamizing 561 

grading for concrete on 564 

scavenger service 566 

sweeping 569 

lighting 588 

bridges 570 

city teams 572 

repairs of 545 

Health department 593 

board of, report of 455 

Hospital, Wonien's Aid and Relief 681 

Elliot, free beds 681 

Sacred Heart 681 

Hosehouse, South Manchester 647 

Hydrant service 628 

I 

Inaugural address of Mayor 29-44 

Interest 511 

annual charge, bonded debt 70S 

Incidental expenses 524 

Indigent soldiers 680 

Inspector, milk, report of 411 

Inventory of assets 711 

L 

Laws relating to exemptions 693 

Loans, temporary 514,727, 735 



774 INDEX. 

Land taken for highways 556 

Lighting streets 585 

Library, city ' 613 

Lincoln scliool curbing 645 

Legal points and rules relating to claims against the city 720 

M 

Manual training 613 

Mayor's incidentals 543 

Macadamizing streets 561 

Militia - 681 

Milk inspector, repoi't of 411 

Municipal receipts and expenditures 505 

Manufacturing property exempt from taxation 704 

Mast street, widening of 587 

N 

New highways 554 



Overseers of the poor, report of 405 

Oil lamps, location of 491 

Organization of school board for 1896 303 

Ordinances, orders, resolutions 727 

Order relative to appropriation for decoration of soldiers' graves 754 

to purchase horses for fire department 750 

to build certain sewers 199, 200, 201, 202, 206, 213, 214 

to build certain streets 199 

to erect watering-trough 203, 751 

to establish certain grades 198 

to change grade of Prospect street 202 

to change grade of Belmont street 208 

to establish the grade of Vinton street 198 

to establish the grade of Woodbine avenue and Bridge street . . . 204 

to establish the grade of Everett street 205 

to establish the gi-ade of Wentworth and Forest streets 209 

to establish the grade of Laurel street 210 

to establish the grade of Shasta street 21 1 

to establish the grade of Salmon street 213 

to establish the grade of Hancock street 202 

to establish the grade of Nashua and Union streets 207 

to establish grade of Milford street 208 

to build Wilson street to grade 208 

to change grade of Milton street 212 

to build Wentworth street to grade 214 

to appropriate money to build public bath-houses 214 

relating to claims and suits 743 

to print mayor's inaugural address 744 

to purchase hose wagon 745 



INDEX. 775 

Order to purchase Hook and Ladder truck 745 

to dispose of sub-station at Clinton street 746 

to grade and concrete Rinnnon-school lot... 747 

to purchase land for new school building 7,52 

to purchase typewriter 753 

relating to expenses of Louis Bell Post 754 

to build addition to South Manchester schoolliouse 755 

to print forty-ninth report 743 

to print fiftieth report 2 

to purchase supply wagons 744, 7.tO 

relative to curbing at Lincoln school 746 

to purchase hose 744 

relative to repairs in city hall 746 

to erect certain electric lights 751,757 

relating to wardroom and police station, West Manchester 747 

for band concerts 747 

providing pay for election officers 762 

making transfer of money 199, 201, 745, 753, 755, 756, 757, 760, 761,*762, 763 

to build Hevey street 203 

to build Christian brook sewer 200 

to build Silver street sewer 201 

relating to pay of militia 754 

to deed land corner Union and Bridge streets 758 

relating to the erection of new high school building 759 

to macadamize Elm street 202 

to build sewer in Valley street 206 

to sell land 206 

relating to addition to high school 74S 

relating to new school buildings 748 

relative to Granite street grade crossing 749 

to build wagon shed at Fulton engine-house 750 

relating to new granite bridge 752 

to purchase trees 753 

relating to land for Derryfleld Park 754 

relative to pui-chase of furniture 755, 756, 757, 758, 759, 760, 761 

relating to interest on Howlett note 760 

to pay claim of R. P. Stevens 761 

to erect fire-alarm boxes 762 

Ordinance relating to bicycles 767 

relating to the permanent members of fire department 765 

relating to compensation of city physician 765 

amending section 15, chapter 6 766 

amending section 2, chapter 5 768 



Payment of funded debt 511 

Printing and stationery 521 

and advertising 605 

Paving streets 559 



776 INDEX. 

Police department, station 629 

court 631 

comrfiission 632 

chief of, report of 443 

matron 635 

Pine Grove cemetery 661 

Paupers off the farm 668 

Property account, real and personal 711 

Public buildings occupied by private parties 709 

Parks — Derryfield and Stark 659 

Parsonages, valuation of, exempt from taxation 681 

Pearl-street sclioolhouse 642 

Petitions for new streets 226,238 

R 

Reserved fund 512 

Repairs of schoolliouses 597 

of buildings 635 

of highways 545 

Rooms, care of 608 

Resolutions, orders, and ordinances 727 

on death of Sylvanus B. Putnam 739 

on death of James A. Weston 734 

relating to street railway 730 

to bonds 729, 731, 732, 742 

to water bonds 

for a joint special committee 

raising money and making appi'opriations for 1895 684 

providing a sinking fund for the schoolhouse loan 737 

relative to land for park 738 

in regard to grade 738 

exempting from taxation Manchester Mills 739 

appropriating $130,000 for new high school building 736 

in regard to sale of land 742 

relating to meetings of joint standing committee 727 

making temporary loan 727, 735 

in relation to celebration of Independence Day 728 

appropriating $50,000 for extension to high school building 728 

relating to discontinuance of Old Falls road 731 

of thanks to John Rogers 735 

relative to bequest of Mary Carvelle 735 

Report of board of Water Commissioners 45 

Superintendent of Water-works 51 

City Engineer 161 

Chief Engineer Fire Department 319 

Trustees of City Library 381 

Sub-Trustees of Valley cemetery 426 

Pine Grove cemetery 425 

Amoskeag cemetery 427 

Treasurer of cemeteries 429 

Treasurer of Cemetery Fund 432 



INDEX. 777 

Report of Trustees of Cemetery Fund 431 

Treasurer of Sinking Fund 439 

Ovei'seers of tlie Poor 405 

Joint Standing Committee on City Farm 449 

Street and Park Commission 07, 15S 

Committee on Sewers and Drains 223 

Committee on Streets 237 

City Solicitor 421 

Milk Inspector 411 

School Committee 

Superintendent 263 

Board of Health 455 

City Auditor 497 

City Physician 417 

City Treasurer 499, 503 

t'.hief of Police 443 

Keal and personal estate owned by the city 711 

property, exempt from taxation, other than public property 704 

Rules, etc., relating to bills against the city (auditor's department) 720 

Receipts and expenditures, 1890,1891, 1892,1893, 1894, 1895 511 

municipal, for 1895 505 

s 

Salaries of city officials 537 

Scavenger service 56(J 

Street sweeping 569 

Street and park commission 543 

report of 97 

Sewers, repairs of 577 

new 578 

School department, organization of 303 

evening, mechanical drawing 611 

superintendent's report 263 

Schoolhouses, new 643 

ward 9 642 

Bakersville, addition to 643 

parochial, and seminaries of learning 

repairs of 597 

Salaries, teachers' 610 

Snow and ice 551 

Sewer permits granted, list of 216 

Silver street sewer 584 

Storage sheds, city yards 586 

Stark and Derryfield parks 659 

Soldiers, indigent 680 

State tax 683 

Solicitor, city, report of 421 

Statement of bonded debt 'i'05 

public buildings occupied by private parties 709 

Sinking fund 512 

treasurer's report 439 



778 INDEX. 

Sacred Heart Hospital 681 

Summary of city debt 705 

Streets laid out, not built 192 

Sub-station, ward 8 647 

T 

Temporary loan 514 

Text-books, free 611 

Teachers, list of 305 

Teachers' salaries. 610 

Taxes, abatement of 683 

Tax, state 683 

county 683 

Treasurer, city, report of 499, 503 

Taxation, appropriations for 1S95 684 

exemption 694 

by board of assessors 683 

statement of total 689 

table of taxes due and uncollected 690 

valuations from 1890 to 1895, inclusive 690 

settlement of tax collector's account to June 1, 1895 691 

Teams, city 572 

Tabular statement of receipts and expenditures 511 

Training, manual 613 

V 

Valley cemetery 664 

Valuation and taxes 689 

w 

Watering streets 557 

Women's Aid and Relief Hospital 681 

VV ater-woi'ks, superintendent's report 51 

commissioners' report 49 



expenses. 



648 



Ward 5 wardroom 642 



1