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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

City of Manchester, N. H. 




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N. H. Historical Society. 






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HON. WILLIAM C CLARKK. 

MAVOK OK MANCHKSTER, N H., I S95 - 96 - 97 - 98. 



Fifty-first annual Report 



Receipts and Expenditures 



City OF MANCHESTER 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FOR THE FISCAL, YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1896. 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING 
TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER: 

PRINTED BY THE JOHN B. CLARKE CO. 
1897. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 

1896. 



Mayor. 

WILLIAM 0. CLARKE Office, City Hall 

Chosen at biennial election in November, 1894. Salary, $1,800 
per annum, payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1848, section 1. 
Chapter 223, Laws of 1883. Public Statutes, chapter 47.) Tele- 
phone at house and office. 



Aldermen. 
Act of June, 1848, section 1. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 

Ward 1. Gardner K. Browning, 55 Stark Corporation, 
Canal street. 

Ward 2. George E. Heath, River road north, at Hook- 
sett line. 

Ward 3. George W. Reed, 483 Chestnut street. 

Ward 4. Howard C. Holt, 411 Amherst street. 

Ward 5. Richard J. Barry, 240 Lake avenue. 

^Vard 6. Frank H. Libbey, Nutt road. 

^V^ard 7. Johann A. Graf, 10 Middle street. 

Ward 8. Christian L. Wolf, 36 Clinton street. 

Ward 9. Frank T. Provost, 21 Amory street. 

3 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

President of the Common Council 
John T. Gott, Mammoth road. 



Members of the Common Council. 

Act of June, 1S48, section 1. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 

Ward 1. 

Charles E. Blanchard, 53 Market street. 

William Watts, 31 Stark Corporation, Mechanic street. 

Carl E. Eydin, 28 Stark Corporation, Mechanic street. 

Ward 2. 

Eben Carr, Union, near River road north. 
Ossian D. Knox, 757 Chestnut street. 
John A. Lindqiiist, 48 Blodjjjet street. 

Ward 3. 

Clarence E, Rose, 337 Pearl street. 
Joseph O. Tremblay, 18 Malvern street. 
William F. Elliott, 194 Concord street. 

Ward 4. 

George H. Phinnoy, 133 Hanover street. 
George E. Richards, 12 Ash street. 
Jules Deschenes, 323 Concord street. 

Ward 5. 

William J. Allen, 181 Lake avenue. 
Michael R. Sullivan, 21)0 Pine street. 
Daniel A. Murphy, 103 East Spruce street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



Ward 6. 



Jolm T. Gott, Mammoth road. 
Charles Hazen, 436 Central street. 
B. Frank Welch, 14 Elm street. 

Ward 7. 

Norris P. Colby, 17 Middle street. 
Samuel F. Davis, 57 West Merrimack street. 
Robert Morrow, 66 Amoskeag Corporation, West Mer- 
rimack street. 

Ward 8. 

Edward F. Scheer, 135 Milford street. 
John W. Wilson, 215 Turner street. 
William E. Blakely, 162 Blaine street. 

Ward 9. 

John Gildard, 646 Main street. 

Stephen P. Martel, Stark Mills. 

Richard F. Schindler, 294 Beauport street. 



Clerk of Common Council. 

George L. Stearns, 58 Mj'rtle street. 

Salary, $200. (General Laws, chapter 46, sections 7-9. City 
Laws and Ordinances, page 33, chapter 6, section 11.) 



City Clerk. 
]S[athan P. Kidder Office, City Hall 

Salary, $900. The city clerk, in addition to his salary, is in re- 
ceipt of fees as registrar of births, marriages, and deaths, and as 



6 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

a recording officer for record of mortgages on personal property, 
of attachments of real estate, of partnerships and assignments, 
and for recording various other legal papers. He also receives 
fees for issuing dog licenses, billiard and hoveling alley licenses, 
for certifying records, and for various other matters. 

These fees are established by the state legislature under vari- 
ous laws, and are estimated to be between $2,100 and $2,500 per 
annum. Chosen in convention of City Councils in January, an- 
nuall3^ (Charter, section 22. Public Statutes, chapter 50. Act 
of 1849. City Laws and Ordinances, pages 42, 43, 68, 72, 73, 84, 86, 
89, 114, 122, 123, 124, 166, 189.) Residence, 313 Manchester street. 



City Auditor. 

James E. Dodge Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Appointed by Mayor and approved by Board of 
Aldermen, in January, annually. (Laws of 1889, chapter 287. 
City Ordinances, pages 44, 71, 83-88, 173.) Residence, River road 
north. 



Auditor's Clerk. 

Lizzie M. Cogswell Auditor's Office, City Hall 

Residence, 1589 Elm street. 



City Treasurer. 
Fred L. Allen Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Elected in convention of City Councils in Janu- 
ary, annually. (Charter, section 23. Act of 1856, section 4. Gen- 
eral Laws, chapter 48, sections 3, 4. Act of 1859, section 4. City 
Laws and Ordinances, pages 36, 86-89, 170, 172.) 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 7 

Treasurer's Clerk. 
Blanche E, Bullock Treasurer's Office, City Hall 



Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,650 and fees. Elected by Mayor and Aldermen be- 
fore May 1, annually. (Act of July, 1851. Act of June, 1859, sec- 
tion 6. Public Statutes, chapter 43. City Laws and Ordinances, 
chapter 33.) Residence, 740 Chestnut street. 



Deputy Collector of Taxes. 

Edwin C. Paul Collector's Office, City Hall 

Paid by collector. Appointed by tax collector with approval 
of Mayor and Aldermen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 
33, section 3.) Residence, 416 Central street. 



City Solicitor. 
Edwin F. Jones Office, Patten Block, 936 Elm street 

Salary, $800. Elected in convention of City Councils, in Janu- 
ary, annually. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6, pages 
70, 72.) Residence, 15 High street. 



City Messenger. 

John A. Barker Office, City Hall 

Salary, $700. Elected in convention of City Councils in Janu- 
ary, annually. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6.) Res- 
idence, 49 Appleton street. 



8 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Joint Standing Committees. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Graf; Council- 
men Knox, Colby, and Hazen. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Browning and Provost; Coun- 
eilmen Watts, Blakely, and W. J. Allen. (Meet Wednes- 
day succeeding the 24th of each month. All bills must 
be left at the city auditor's office, properly approved, not 
later than the 20th of each month.) 

On Claims. — Aldermen Libbey and Reed; Councilmen 
Rose, Martel, and Wilson. (Meets third Friday in each 
month.) 

On Streets. — Aldermen Reed and Heath; Councilmen 
Tremblay, Scheer, and Hazen. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Wolf and Heath; 
Councilmen Phinney, Sullivan, and Lindquist. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Browning and Wolf; 
Councilmen Deschenes, Carr, and Murphy. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Graf and Barry; 
Councilmen Welch, Davis, and Richards. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Libbey and Holt; 
Councilmen Tremblay, Blanchard, and Welch. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Graf and 
Holt; Councilmen Blanchard, Gildard, and Carr. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Heath and Provost; 
Councilmen Lindquist, W. J. Allen, and Morrow. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Reed and Holt; Council- 
men Wilson, Watts, and Davis. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Barry and Reed; Council- 
men Elliott, Rydin, and Gildard. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Reed and Barry; 
Councilmen Murphy, W. J. Allen, and Schindler. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Provost and Brown- 
ing; Councilmen Rose, Scheer, and M. R. Sullivan. 

On Public Health. — Aldermen Holt and Wolf; Council- 
men Martel, Richards, and Colby. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 9 

Standing Committees. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Reed and Barry. 
On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Browning and 
Wolf. 

On Market. — Aldermen Holt and Libbey. 

On Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Heath and Provost. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Provost and Graf. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Libbey and Barry. 

On Special Police. — Aldermen Holt and Browning. 

COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Councilmen Phinney, Watts, 
and Murphy. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Councilmen Knox, Elli- 
ott, and Hazen. 

On Enrollment. — Councilmen Rydin, Carr, and Des- 
chenes. 



City Physician. 
Frederick Perkins OflSce, 895 Elm street 

Salary, $600. Elected by City Councils in convention in Janu- 
ary, annually. (Laws of 1870, chapter 99. City Ordinances, 
chapter 9, sections 29, 30.) Residence, Clark street, corner 
Chestnut. 



City Engineer, 
Winfred H. Bennett OfiSce, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Chosen by Citj^ Councils in convention in Janu- 
ary, annually. (City Ordinances, chapter 6, sections 33, 34.) 



10 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Water Commissioners. 

(Chapter 70, Laws of 1871. City Ordinances, chapter 36, and 
Laws of 1891, chapter 26, page 319, act approved March 31, 1891. 
Chapter 183, Laws of 1893.) One commissioner elected annually 
by Mayor and Aldermen, in the mouth of September, for a term 
of six years. Office at Court House, corner Franklin and West 
Merrimack streets. Telephone at office and at pumping station. 

The Mayor, ex-officio. 

Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1901. 
Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1900. 
Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1899. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1898. 
Harry E. Parker, term expires January, 1897. 
Charles T. Means, term expires January, 1902. 
Alpheus Gay, chairman. 

James A. Weston, clerk. Salary, |100. Chosen by 
the board of commissioners. 



Superintendent of Water-Works. 

Charles K. Walker. .Oflfice, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $2,000. Chosen by Avater commissioners annually. 
Eesidence, 68 South Main street. West Manchester. 



Clerk of the Water- Works. 
Arthur E. Stearns. .Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $1,500. Chosen by water commissioners annually. 
Residence, 421 Hanover street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 11 



Engineer at Old Pumping Station. 

Josiah Laselle. Salary, |700, rent, fuel, and use of 
land. 

Chosen by water commissioners annually. 



Engineer at New Pumping Station. 

Henry A. Donaway. Salary, $2.50 per day, rent, and 
fuel. 



Justice of tine Police Court. 

Isaac L. Heath, court room at Police Station, corner 
Manchester and Chestnut streets. 

Salary, $1,500. Appointed by the Governor, With the advice of 
the Council. (General Laws, chapter 215; chapter 163, sections 
17, 18, 19, of the Laws of 1878, as amended by chapter 236, Laws 
of 1881. Public Statutes, chapter 211.) 



Associate Justice of the Police Court. 

George W. Prescott. Salary, $300 per annum. 

Appointed by the Governor, with the advice of the Council. 
(Chapter 215, General Laws, sections 2-14. Public Statutes, 
chapter 211. Chapter 296, Laws of 1893.) 



Clerk of the Police Court. 



John C. Bickford. Salary, 

Appointed by the justice of the police court. (Chapter 163, 
sections 17-19, General Laws, amended by chapter 236, Laws of 
1881. Public Statutes, chapter 211.) Eesidence, 15 Ash street. 



12 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Police. 

The members of the police are appointed by the Police Com- 
missioners, and hold their commissions during good behavior. 
They are, by virtue of their appointment, constables and con- 
servators of the peace, and their jurisdiction extends through- 
out the city. (Chapter 253, section 5, General Law^s; chapter 
303, Laws of 1887; chapter 202, Laws of 1893.) Police station, at 
the corner of Chestnut and Manchester streets. 



Police Commissioners. 
See chapter 202, Laws 1893. 

Noah S. Clark, clerk, term expires January, 1898. 
Frank P. Carpenter, term expires January, 1902. 
Harry E. Loveren, chairman, term expires January. 
1900. 



Chief of Police. 

Michael J. Healy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $900. Eesidence, 304 Central street. Telephone at 
house and office. 



Deputy Chief of Police. 

John F. Cassidy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $800. Residence, 415 Manchester street. 

Captain of the Watch. 

Tliomas E. Steele. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 
56 Nashua street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 13 

Sergeant. 

William M. Caldwell. Salary, $2.50 per day. Resi- 
dence, 269 Merrimack street. 



Patrolmen. 

SALARY, $2.25 PER DAY. 

Randall W. Bean, 85 Ash street, 

Frank E. Bourrassa, 552 Lincoln street. 

Lucius M. Rollins, 437 Laurel street. 

Olaf Ring, 330 Central street. 

Jolm T. O'Dowd, 311 East Spruce street. 

Florence Sullivan, 340 Cedar street. 

Henry A. Burns, 451 Manchester street. 

Theodore Flodin, 21 Jane street. 

George A. Lovejoy, 99 Orange street. 

John D. Healy, 172 East Spruce street. 

Frank W. Marden, 423 Belmont street. 

Oscar R. Poehlman, 386 Dubuque street. 

Albert Russell, 352 Amherst street. 

Leon E. Magoon, 355 East Spruce street. 

Joseph Archambeault, 64 Merrimack street. 

James S. Butler, 41 Cedar street. 

John C. Badger, 325 Amherst street. 

Peter Callaghan, 470 East Spruce street. 

John J. Connor, 155 Pine street. 

Frank P. Moore, 47 Elm street. 

John T. Welch, 1263 Elm street. 

Jolm T. Nixon, 314 Lake avenue. 

Elmer E. Somers, 336 Lake avenue. 

Levi J. Proctor, Candia road corner Massabesic. 

Joseph A. Farrell, 323 East Spruce street. 

James S. Hampston, 179 Central street. 



14 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Janitor of Station. 

Frank P. Wiggin. |1.75 per day. Residence, 255 Au- 
burn street. 



Miss A. B. Brown. 
Chestnut street. 



Matron. 
|415 per annum. Residence, 329 



School Committee. 

Chosen at the biennial election in November, 189-t; Maj'or and 
president of the Common Council members ex-offlcio. The board 
of school committee choose the clerk of the board, the superin- 
tendent of public instruction, the truant officer, and the teachers 
^n the public schools, and determine their salaries. Thej^ have 
charge of the repairs of schoolhouses, to a limited extent, and 
the purchase of free text-books and other supplies, and are lim- 
ited by the appropriations of the City Councils. The salary of 
the committee is $10 each.. 

Ward 1. 



Walter B. Heath. 



Augustus P. Home. 



George U. Towne. 



Charles M. Floyd. 



Elliott C. Lambert. 
Ward 2. 

Charles H. Manning. 
Ward 8. 

Louis E. Phelps. 
Ward 4. 

Nathaniel L. Colby. 



James P. Slattery. 



Harry I. Dodge. 



Marshall P. Hall.* 
Fred W. Pillsbury, 



Luther 0. Baldwin. 



Robert E. Walsh. 



list of officers. 
Ward 5. 

Harry J. Woods. 
Ward 6. 

Herbert E. Richardson. 
Ward 7. 

Edward B. Woodbury. 

Ward 8. 

Josiah G. Dearborn. 
Ward 9. 

Jeremiah Sullivan.*- 



15 



William C. Clarke, ex-officio chairman. 
John T. Gott, ex-officio. 
George D. Towne, vice-chairman, 
Edward B. Woodbury, clerk. 



, Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

William E. Buck Office, City Hall 

Salary, $2,300. Kesidence, 324 Myrtle street. 



Superintendent's Clerk. 

Fannie L. Sanborn Residence, 161 Hanover street 

Salary, $500. 
♦Deceased. 



16 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Truant Officer. 

Curtis W. Davis Office, City Hall 

Salary, $750. Kesidence, 849 Chestnut street. 



Assessors. 



One assessor from each ward chosen at the biennial election in 
November. Paid $2.50 each for each day while employed in the 
assessment and abatement of taxes. Office, City Hall. (Chartei% 
section 25. Public Statutes, chapter 48, section 1; chapter 50, 
section 4; chapter 49, sections 10, 11, 12. City Ordinances, chap- 
ter G, section 26.) Assistant assessors, not exceeding six, chosen 
hy the city councils. 

Ward 1. Henry Lewis, 32 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Ward 2. John E. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 
Ward 3. David O. Furnald, 384 Lowell street. 
Ward 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 
Ward 5. George F. Sheehan, 85 Cedar street. 
Ward 6. George H. Dudley, 159 Laurel street. 
Ward 7. William T. Kowell, 14 Manchester Corpora- 
tion. 

Ward 8. Frank N. Daniels, 137 Milford street. 
Ward 9. Julius Wiesner, 16 Rimnion street. 



CHAIRMAN OF ASSESSORS. 

David 0. Furnald Office, City Hall 

CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 

George H. Dudley Office, City Hall 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



17 



Inspectors of Check-Lists. 

One in each ward, chosen at the biennial election in November. 
Compensation, $2.25 per day for each day actually employed. 
Office, City Hall. (Laws of 1878, chapter 163, sections 5, 6, 7, 9, 
10, 11, 13, 13, 14, 16, and City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) - 

Ward 1. George C. Kemp, 40 Machine Shop block. 

Ward 2. Charles B. Tucker, 777 Union street. 

Ward 3. William B. Corey, 88 Pearl street. 

Ward 4. Samuel J. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. Patrick Daley, 188 Chestnut street. 

Ward 6. Albert J. Peaslee, Cohas avenue, near Water- 
Works. 

Ward 7. Joseph A. Foster, 42 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 8. Charles C. Tinkham, 9 Parker avenue. 

Ward 9. John B. Bourque, 22 Wayne street. 



Overseers of the Poor. 

One in each ward, chosen at biennial election in November. 
The Mayor is a member ex-officio. Compensation, $25 per annum, 
each; clerk of the board, $100 per annum, determined by City 
Ordinanees, chapter 14, section 18, as amended by Ordinance of 
August 5, 1890. Meet third Wednesday of each month in City 
Hall building. 

Ward 1. William H. Maxwell, clerk, 20 Amoskeag Cor- 
poration, Stark street. 

Ward 2. Thomas L. Quimby, railroad station, foot of 
West Salmon street. 

W^ard 3. Benjamin F. Garland, 28 Linden street. 

Ward 4. George S. Holmes, 296 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. Patrick Costello, 106 East Spruce street. 

Ward 6. Charles Francis, Candia road. East Manches- 
ter. 



18 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Ward 7. William Marshall, 72 Amoskeag Corporation, 
West Merrimack. 
Ward 8. Cliarles S. McKean, 495 Granite street. 
Ward 9. Moise Bessette, 322 Rimmon street. 
William C. Clarke, ex-officio, Office, City Hall. 



Board of Health. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 
188.5, chapter 165; Laws of 1887, chapter 227; Public Statutes, 
chapters 108, 109, 110.) One member appointed by the Mayor in 
January of each year, to hold office for a term of three years. 
Salarj^ $200 each per annum. Office, Court House, West Merri- 
mack, corner of Franklin street. 

Clarence W. Downing, M. D. Term expires first Mon- 
day in February, 1896. Reappointed. 

William K. Robbins, 290 McGregor. Term expires 
first Monday in February, 1898. 

Cornelius F. Starr, M. D., 49 Manchester street. Term 
expires first Monday in February, 1897. Resigned 
March, 1896. » 

William J. Starr, 1008 Elm street. Term expires first 
Monday in February, 1897. 

Herbert S. Clough, sanitary inspector, Hanover-street 
road. Office, Court House, Merrimack, corner of Frank- 
lin street. 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector, 164 Auburn street. 
Office, Court House, Merrimack, corner of Franklin 
street. 

, Richard J. Barry, sanitary inspector. Office, Court 
House, Merrimack, corner of Franklin street. Residence, 
232 Lake avenue. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 19 

Fire Department. 

The chief engineer and four assistant engineers are chosen an- 
nually in the month of January, by a majority of the City Coun- 
cils' in convention. The salary of the chief engineer is $1,300 per 
annum; the assistant engineers, each $125 per annum. They 
exercise the powers and perform the duties of firewards. Tho 
said engineers constitute the board of engineers, and elect a 
clerk whose compensation is $25 a year. The annual compensa- 
tion of the call members of the several hook-and-ladder, hose, 
steam fire engine, and chemical engine companies is as follows: 
Captain, each $165; lieutenants, each $160; clerks, each $160; 
assistant engineers, each $155; all other members, each $150; 
payable in equal semi-annual payments, on the first of January 
and July. (Laws of 1870, chapter 99. General Laws, chapter 
106. City Ordinances, chapters 6 and 12.) Six members are 
permanently employed as engineers at $76.25 per month each, 
and twenty-one as drivers at 68.33y3 jjer month each, six other 
permanent men at $65 per month each, and receive no compensa- 
tion as call members. Members and officers of each company 
are appointed by the board of engineers. 



Chief Engineer. 

Thomas W. Lane. . . .OflQce, Central Station, Vine street. 
Eesidence, 1937 Elm street. Telephone at house and office. 

Fred S. Bean, clerk, 102 Orange street. 
Ruel G. Manning, 52 Douglas street. West Manchester. 
Eugene S. Whitney, River road north, corner West 
North street. 

Clarence R. Merrill, 418 Merrimack street. 
For further information see chief engineer's report. 



Trustees of City Library. 

(Laws of 1854, chapter 1588. See contract with Manchester 
Atheneum, printed on pages i07 and 108 of City Eeport for fiscal 



20 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

year ending January 31, 1855.) Board of seven trustees, one of 
whom is elected bj^ Aldermen and board of trustees in joint con- 
vention in September, annually. Term of service, seven years; 
no salary. Two additional trustees, Maj'or, and president of 
Common Council, ex-officio. 

Frank P. Carpenter, term expires October 1, 1902, Elm, 
corner West North street. 

Nathan P. Hunt, term expires October 1, 1901, 774 
Union street. 

Herman F. Straw, term expires October 1, 1900, 607 
Chestnut street, 

Walter M. Parker, term expires October 1, 1899, West 
Webster street, corner Elm. 

Isaac W. Smith, term expires October 1, 1898, 1855 
Elm street. 

Moody Currier, term expires October 1, 1897, Ash 
street, corner Myrtle. 

C. D. McDuffie, term expires October 1, 1903, Ash 
street, corner Myrtle. 

William C. Clarke, ex-officio. 

John T. Gott, ex-officio. 



Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 

The City Councils in joint convention, biennially, elect one 
member of said board for a term of six years. Not more than 
two members can be of the same political party. Said board, 
consisting- of three members, has full charge, management, and 
control of the building, constructing, repairing, and maintain- 
ing of all the streets, highways, lanes, sidewalks, bridges, and 
public sewers and drains, and public parks and commons. (See 
Laws of 1893, chapter 264.) Office, City Hall building. Open 
from 8 to 12 a. m., 2 to 5 p. m. Regular meeting of the board at 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 21 

2 o'clock p. M. each day. Salary of each member, $600 per year, 
payable quarterly, and each are allowed $150 annually for horse 
hire. 

George H. Stearns, clerk, term expires 1898. 
Leonard P. Keynolds, term expires 1896. 
Horace P. Simpson, chairman, term expires 1900. 
Byron Worthen, term expires 1902. 



Assistant Clerk. 
Julia F. Stearns. 

City Weigher. 

Elected annually in convention of City Councils. Salary, $400 
per annum; all fees for weig'hing" returned monthly to city 
treasurer with sworn statement. Stationed at city scales on 
Franklin street. 

Asa B. Eaton. Office, city scales; residence, 23 Apple- 
ton street. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Harry C. Blanchard. 

Elected annually in January by City Councils in convention. 
Paid by fees. (Section 25, chapter 43, Public Statutes, and chap- 
ter 125, Public Statutes.) 



Fish and Game Wardens. 

(Public Statutes, chapter 130.) Elected by City Councils in 
convention. 

John C. Higgins, 143 Orange street. 
George A. Clark, 304 Central street. 



22 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Kobert Snyder. 

Harry P. Ray, River road north. 

C. R. Hodge, 574 Hall street. 

Henry C. Wallace, 64 Hanover street. 



Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39, sections 1, 2, 3, 4.) Two trustees 
elected by City Councils in convention in January, annuallj% for 
the term of four years. Snb-trustees appointed by board of trus- 
tees. 

John F. Frost, 11 Manchester Corporation, term ex- 
pires January, 1899. 

William H. Huse, Mammoth road, term expires 1899. 

John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street, term expires 1898. 

Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street, term expires 
1898. 

Stillman P. Cannon, 43 Elm street, term expires 1897. 

James E. Bailey, Goffstown road near Front street, 
term expires 1897. 

Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street, term expires January, 
1900. 

John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street, term expires 
January, 1900. 

Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer, 6 Linden street. 



Sub-Trustees of Cemeteries. 

A^ALLBY CEMETERY. 

Alderman Howard C. Holt, 411 Amherst street. 
Councilman John Gildard, 646 Main street. 
John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street. 
Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street. 
Stillman P. Cannon, 43 Elm street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 23 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Alderman J. Adam Graf, 10 Middle street. 
Councilman Charles E. Blanchard, 53 Market street. 
John F. Frost, 11 Manchester Corporation. 
. John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street. 
Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street. 

AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

Councilman Eben Carr, North Union street. 
James E. Bailey, Goffstown road near Front street. 
William H. Huse, Mammoth road, East Manchester. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Byron A. Stearns. Office and residence at the ceme- 
tery. Telephone. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Charles H. G. Foss. Office at the cemetery; residence, 
2G7 Lake avenue. 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 25 High street. 
Otis Barton, 122 Orange street. 
William C. Clarke, ex-officio. 



Inspector of Milk. 
Edward C. Smith Office, 1277 Elm street 

Residence, 97 Sagamore street. Term expires February 1, an- 
nually. (Public Statutes, chapter 127.) Appointed by Mayor 
and Aldermen. Salary, $300 per annum. 



24 MANCIIESTEll CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Inspector of Buildings. 

Thomas W. Lane Office at Central Fire Station 

Eesidence, 1937 Elm street. Appointed by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen, biennially, in February. Salary, $100 per annum. 
(Citj' Ordinances, chapter 15. Laws of 1883, chapter 94. Public 
Statutes, page 170.) Telephone at house and office. 



Inspectors of Oil. 

Joseph B. Baril .' 99 Bridge street 

John Cayzer 383 Granite street 

(Public Statutes, chapter 129, sections 25-34. City Ordinances, 
chapter 25.) Paid by fees, V4 of 1 per cent per gallon. 



Moderators. 



Elected bienniallj'. (General Laws, chapter 31, sections 3, 9; 
chapter 36, section 9; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordinances, 
page 18. See Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Ward 1. Abial W. Eastman, 24 Amoskeag Corpora- 
tion, Stark street. 

Ward 2. Lyman W. Colby, 753 Chestnut street. 
. Ward 3. Arthur S. Bunton, 27 Walnut street. 

Ward 4. George H. Warren, 461 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. John B. Rodgers, 240 Lake avenue. 

Ward G. Herbert S. Clough, 45 Middle street. 

Ward 7. Frank A. Dockham, 18 Pleasant street. 

Ward 8. Robert E. McKean, 50 Main street. 

Ward 9. John T. Hannigan, 159 Cartier street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 25 

Ward Clerks. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, cliapter 44, sections 10, 12. 
City Ordinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns and 
cities.) 

Ward 1. Frank X. Foster, 1382 Elm street. 
Ward 2. Charles A. Allen, GS Liberty street. 
Ward 3. John H. Hayes, lOG Arlington street. 
Ward 4. Joseph W. Abbott, 256 Manchester street. 
Ward 5. Martin J. Whalen, CO Cedar street. 
Ward 6. Arthur B. Dickey, 39 Elm street. 
Ward 7. Charles E. Bartlett, 68 West Merrimack 
street. 
Ward 8. Fred L. Hodgman, 363 South Main street. 
Ward 9. Frank I. Lessard, 320 Dubuque street. 



Selectmen. 



Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 1, section 27; 
chapter 12, section 6; chapter 40, sections 2, 3; chapter 109, sec- 
tion 27; chapter 213, section 1. City Ordinances, page 18. Pub- 
lic Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Ward 1. 

John H. Wales, Jr., 19 Machine Shop block, Water 
street. 

Olaf H. Nyberg, 27 Machine Shop block, Canal street. 
Alexander Hanna, 22 Boyden street. 

Ward 2. 

Daniel G. Andrews, 777 Union street. 

William H. Maxwell, Goffstown road. 

Fred K. Ramsey, Webster, corner River road. 



26 manchester city government. 

Ward 3. 

George N. Baker, 78 Ashland street. 
John Cronin, 284 Bridge street. 

Ward 4. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 251 Concord street. 
Wilfred Beaneliemin, 525 Beech street. 
Charles B. Clarkson, 249 Concord street. 

Ward 5. 

Thomas A. Foley, 156 East Spruce street. 
Patrick Maloney, 177 East Spruce street. 
Robert F. Murray, 176 East Spruce street. 

Ward 6. 

George M. Bean, Massabesic road. 
Harrison W. Haselton, 261 Laurel street. 
Edward P. Cogswell, Candia road. 

Ward 7. 

Hanson R. Armstrong, 58 Amoskeag Corporation, 
West Merrimack street. 

Melvin M. Halen, Hall road. 

Robert Leggett, 50 Amoskeag Corporation, Canal 
street. 

Ward 8. 

William H. Marshall, 265 Douglas street. 
Hervey Stratton, 32 Quincy street. 
George W. Flint, 101 Milford street. 



list of officers. 27 

Ward 9. 



Albert Oliver, 309 Bartlett street. 
Martin J. Rafferty, 450 Beauport street. 
Joseph Trahan, 508 Dubuque street. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

Gentlemen, — The Manchester Board of Water Com- 
missioners herewith submit their twenty-fifth annual re- 
port to your honorable body for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1896, with the report of the superintendent during 
the same period, to which reference is made and which 
indicates the gratifying results of the service connected 
with this department. 

The receipts and expenditures for the year have been 
as follows: 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1895 |42,720.01 

Eeceived from water rentals and miscellane- 
ous 128,907.03 

Total 1171,627.04 

Paid interest on water bonds $11,446.00 

current expenses and repairs 30,894.36 

construction 65,099.32 

hydrant rentals set aside for 

sinking fund 16,800.00 

1154,239.68 

Balance unexpended |17,387.36 

31 



32 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The premium received by the city on |100,000 of water 
bonds refunded at four per cent, amounting to |6,248.00, 
has not been credited to the water-works department, 
making total premium on bonds sold, which has not been 
credited to this department, |24,G00.56. 

Your commissioners have continued acquiring posses- 
sion of lands bordering on Lake Massabesic, and during 
the year have secured 10,041 lineal feet. 

In a portion of this purchase is included lands in Hills- 
borough county which were condemned by the city and 
damages assessed by the board of county commissioners, 
and which have since been secured to the city at several 
thousand dollars less than the amount awarded by them. 

In the Devonshire Mills' suit against the city there has 
been but little progress made during the year. 

Aside from the damage resulting from the freshet in 
the Merrimack river in March, 1896, no serious accident 
or losses caused by defective pipes have occurred during 
the year. 

The city having accepted the terms of the bequest of 
the late Ja,mes A. Weston, a contract has been awarded 
for the construction of an observatory on Oak Hill inDer- 
ryfield Park, near the new reservoir. 

Its location commands an extensive view of the city 
and surrounding country, and will be a point of interest 
to our own people as well as to those who may be visiting 
our city. 

Universal harmony has prevailed among the members 
of the board during its deliberations, and the execution 
of its plans carried forward with promptness. 

In its negotiations with the various parties with whom 
the board has had dealings, in connection with the pur- 
chase of lands bordering on the Lake, the utmost cour- 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 33 

tesy and friendliness has been shown by all those with 
whom it has had business relations. 

Respectfully submitted. 

William C. Clarke, ex-officio, 
Alpheus Gay, 
Henry Chandler, 
Andrew C. Wallace, 
Charles H. Manning, 
Charles T. Means, 
Harry E. Parker, 

Water Commissioners. 
January 1, 1897. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Commissioners of the 
City of Manchester : 

The report of the superintendent for the jear ending 
December 31, 1896, is herewith respectfully submitted: 

MASSABESIC LAKE. 

The water in the lake has been low throughout the 
summer and fall. The lowest point reached was Sep- 
tember 1, when it stood twenty-six inches below the dam. 
This was four inches higher than the lowest point in 1894. 

The water now stands twenty inches below the dam, 
which is three feet and four inches lower than last year 
at this time. 

October 12 it was four feet below the dam at the head 
of the canal. 

In the month of October, we pumped by steam into the 
low service reservoir three different times, to assist the 
low service pumps in filling it. When the water is so 
very low, it takes the head from the wheel, and requires 
more gallons to pump up one; also more hours of pump- 
ing, which is a loss of water to the lake. When the lake 
is full, the pumps run twenty-two strokes per minute; 
while in low water it is from sixteen to eighteen strokes. 
The Davidson pump delivers into the reservoir 152 gal- 
lons each stroke; the R. D. Wood pump, 13G gallons each 
stroke. 

34 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 35 

These pumps are in good condition. The man in 
charge keeps them in good working order. Pumping fif- 
teen to nineteen hours out of twenty-four requires almost 
constant care. 

As will be seen by the following table, more water was 
pumped at the old station this year than in 1895. 



36 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



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88 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

HIGH SERVICE STATION. 

The pumps at this station are doing their work satis- 
factorily, and as a rule, one pump running every other 
day. The engineer in charge understands perfectly how 
to run the pumps, and also how to make any repairs on 
the same. 

The pumping station, the dwelling-house, barn, and 
sheds are clean, and kept in condition beyond criticism. 
The grounds about the premises are in excellent condi- 
tion, and show great care and attention. About the same 
amount of labor has been exjjended in improvements 
about the station as last year. The low land at the 
mouth of Slager brook has been cleared of bushes and 
I)artly graded. Stone walls haA'e been built and fences 
made. The highway leading from the Borough road to 
the pumping station has been repaired, and is in good 
condition. A portion of the land on the Kidder place 
has been plowed and seeded down to grass. The land 
just north of the pumping station, which was a part of 
the Hunter purchase, was woodland, but since acquiring 
this property, a strip near the superintendent's dwelling 
has been cleared as a protection against fire in the future. 
The buildings have often been endangered in the past by 
brush fires in this immediate vicinity, and only from the 
fact that the hydrant service was at command, have the 
buildings been saved from destruction. It is thought 
the danger of fire from this source is now avoided. 

LOW SERVICE STATION. 

It having become apparent that the storage room was 
insufficient in capacity, at the old station, it was thought 
advisable to take down the barn on the Webster land, 
which is owned by the city, and use the lumber in the 
erection of a new barn at this station, which has been 
completed. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 39 

RESERVOIRS. 

There lias been no expenditure of labor or money at the 
old reservoir or upon the grounds surrounding it. The 
fence around it, which was built some twenty years ago, 
is showing visible signs of decay, and must of necessity 
undergo rei^airs. 

The new reservoir on Oak Hill shows no apparent 
leaks. The banks have been topdressed and re-seeded, a 
process w^hich will probably have to be continued until 
the banks are in such condition as to prevent washing. 
A gauge has been put in the gate-house to measure the 
height of the w^ater in the reservoir. 

All the land taken for a reservoir site has been turned 
over to the street and park commissioners, except the 
land enclosed by the fence at its base. 

MAIN PIPES. 

The high service cast-iron force main has had five 
leaks the past year, which have occurred at the joints, 
fill without serious damage. 

A break occurred on the low service force main under 
the Webster brook, about one thousand feet from the 
pumping station. This was caused by the water under- 
mining the stonework and letting the stone down upon 
the pipe. This was the old wrought-iron and cement 
pipe, and on examination it was deemed advisable to re- 
place 193 feet of it with new cast-iron pipe. 

There have been quite a number of leaks repaired on 
this line of pipe the past year. The pipe appears sound 
when uncovered, and as a rule the leaks are in the joints. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES. 

There has been considerable trouble with the distribu- 
tion x^ipes during the year. The first serious break was 



40 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

in Februarj^, at the corner of Elm and Bridge streets. 
There were no personal claims for settlement, the dam- 
age being confined to the street. 

On the second day of March, owing to the unprecedent- 
ed freshet in the Merrimack river, a portion of Granite 
bridge was swept away, and with it one of the supply 
mains for West Manchester. 

A supply main which had been laid in the bed of the 
Merrimack river twenty-one j^ears ago, about one thou- 
sand feet below Granite bridge, has always been kept in 
repair for use should accidents occur whereby the sus- 
pended p!pe on the bridge became disabled. Some delay 
was experienced in letting the water into this pipe, the 
gate being covered by eight feet of water. 

When this pipe was laid in the river the gate w^as two 
hundred feet further east and twenty-five feet higher. 
Later it was moved to its present position, as the railroad 
company was grading the ground in its vicinity, to in- 
crease their yard room, and also to be available in case of 
fire to Granite bridge. 

An examination of the river pipe was made this last 
summer, and only one leak was found, which was re- 
paired. There are now three lines of pipe to West Man- 
chester, one in the bed of the river, and one each on Gran- 
ite and McGregor bridges. 

The pipe across the canal on Granite street rusted 
through and was replaced by a fifteen-inch steel pipe 
made by the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. The 
pipe removed was fourteen-inch plain wrought-iron, and 
had been in use seventeen years. 

About three miles of water-pipe extensions have been 
made on thirty-seven different streets, at an expense of 
$15,774. There have also been laid over about one and 
three fourths miles with cast-iron pipe, at a cost of |5,6S0. 
The grade having been changed in the streets, about 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 41 

one fourth of a mile of pipe lias been lowered to conform 
to the grade. There are now laid nearlj^ eighty-eight 
miles of distribution pipe, thirteen of which are cement. 
There have been laid two hundred and twenty-four 
service pipes during the season, and some have been re- 
laid that were filled with rust. Nearly one half the ex- 
tensions have been made in hard soil, and considerable 
rock has also been encountered. 

The trench at the north end of Elm street is now being 
excavated through solid ledge, the expense being borne 
by the sewer and water departments, both laying their 
pipes therein. This method is to be avoided when not 
too expensive, for a leak over a sewer would not be de- 
tected readily, and considerable loss of water might en- 
-sue before discovery. 

FISH. 

There have been quite a number of service pipes exam- 
ined and fish found therein. This cannot be avoided. It 
is common in all water-works where the supply is taken 
from open waters. They pass through the screens when 
in the fry, and are so small that they will go through the 
smallest kind of a mesh, and grow in the pipes. The only 
remedy is to remove them when so found, which is not a 
frequent occurrence. 

The loudest complaint against the water department 
caused by fish comes from persons who own houses near 
the city watering-troughs, and supply them from this 
source, while they have a water meter on their premises. 
If a fish gets into the pipe to stop the water, your su- 
perintendent is immediately notified that the public good 
requires these troughs to be supplied with running w^ ater 
all the time. 

For the first time since the operation of the water- 
works, complaint was made in April that the water had a 



42 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

disagreeable taste and the odor was Terv unpleasant. 
The complaints were from persons who were drawing 
from the high service supply, and it was asserted that an 
animal had been drowned in the reservoir. The objec- 
tionable features soon passed away, and the water as- 
sumed its normal condition. 

Although this condition has never before appeared 
here, the water in other localities has been affected simi- 
larly. There is a vegetable growth in all lake waters 
which, when developed to a certain stage, and with agita- 
tion of the water by continuous high winds, will produce 
an odor that is distinguishable, but at the same time 
harmless. The condition appeared to be the same 
whether in deep or shallow water. It extended north to 
the shore, east to Deer Neck bridge, and south to within 
about fifteen hundred feet of the outlet for the low ser- 
vice system. 

This is a subject which has been discussed at meetings 
of the New England Water-Works Association, and no 
remedy for its avoidance has as yet been discovered. As 
the water when in this condition seems to be harmless, 
no fear need be had from its use for culinary purposes. 

It is a demonstrated fact that more water is wasted 
than is used for domestic and fire jjurposes. More pub- 
lic w^atering-troughs are running water to waste than in 
any other city the size of Manchester. 

Meters have a tendency to decrease the waste of water, 
but they are expensive. They have to be looked after 
every month, and twelve dollars a year is too low for a 
minimum rate. 

The old building on the west bank of the river near 
River street, long and familiarly known as the ''old 
shantj'," has been removed. It was built twenty years 
ago on the Amoskeag Company's land, the late E. A. 
Straw giving the water-works department the privilege 



BOAKD OF WATEK COMMISSIONERS. 



43 



to build and haTe the use of the land from Ferry street 
nearly to Granite for a pipe yard. In this shanty were 
kept branches, cast-iron sleeves, wood, cement, and other 
material to repair the pipe. The railroad has taken pos- 
session now, and it does not leave much yard room. 
There is not so much need of it now, there being not more 
than six hundred feet of cement pipe now in use on the 
west side of the river. 

The following table shows the rainfall at high service 
pumping station for 1896. 



Day. 


5 

1-5 


>> 

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3 


< 


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^ 


2 

5 

1-5 


1^ 


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1 




*.30 


1.53 

.31 

*.43 














.03 
.05 











.42 
.33 








1.32 


'".es 




3 












4 




.06 

.04 

2.75 








.07 
.04 
.52 
.09 


■"86' 
.16 

'".16 




5 




*.ll 




.10 


.15 


.17 
.44 
.46 


i'ji' 




6 




06 










*.4S 




.27 
.28 


.24 




8 


*.04 










9 


*.17 






.24 










1 12 


10 


*.5!9 








.64 






.54 

.08 








11 












.09 






.is 




12 






*.23 










13 


*.09 


*.22 








.47 
*'!o9' 


".'22' 


.04 


.61 

.82 
.53 


*.07 




14 








.12 

.08 




15 














16 






*.36 
.18 










* 63 


17 








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.06 


.09 








18 




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'"oe" 




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19 




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*.1I 


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.41 


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.62 
.22 




20 






. . 












21 




.04 


.05 


.78 




.14 


*.64 




22 








.21 


.05 
.36 
.16 


.43 




23 












.09 






* 07 


24 
















.64 


.06 




25 


*.64 
.10 












.89 




26 








.61 










.28 




27 




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.02 


.11 








28 




















29 




.55 


.68 
.43 




.83 










.07 


.43 




30 






.08 


".'31' 


.77 




31 








1.11 




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1.16 


4.30 


5.91 


1.11 


3.06 


1.49 


2.90 


3.66 


6.14 


3.92 


2.84 


1.92 



♦Snow melted. 

Total rainfall, 38.41 inches. 



-44 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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X. X « X X X X X X X X X X. X X X X X. X. X X X 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



45^ 



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46 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



47 



7r< 
P 

< 



P3 

H 

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; 


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79 
0.62 
3.83 

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4.00 
9.03 
6.54 
1.60 




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6.96 
5.59 

8.75 
8.41 

4.75 


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3.54 
5.34 

3.70 
1.28 


cot-i 






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8.55 
3.80 
5.95 
13.80 


com 






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3.54 
9.35 
7.45 
3.70 


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4.65 
13.87 
0.62 
5.30 


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48 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The income from sale of water for 189G has been as fol- 
lows: 

Eeceived for water bv rate |32,540.03 

for water by meter. . . 77,G10.10 
for building purposes. 638.48 

from tines 302.80 

1111,091.41 

Eeceived for hydrant rent 16,800.00 

Received for old cement pipe ... . . $162.00 

for labor and pipe sold 83.42 
for labor and pipe sold 

S. C. Forsaith Co 48.45 

for old brass 74.25 

from city, for 2-inch 

pipe and valves 72.00 

440.12 

Received from Mel. Hall, for five 

buildings $300.00 

from H. Severance 

(Heath cottage) 12.00 

from Arthur Sinclair 

(Faucher barn) 25.00 

from Chas. Pettigrew 

(Webster building). 25.00 

from S. G. Prescott 

(Wilkins' building). 10.00 

from S. G. Prescott, 

rent 6(T.OO 

from Massabesic 

Grange, rent 50.00 

from Asa Heselton, 

rent 12..50 

from Sarah II. Gilbert, 

rent two years 4.00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 49 

Keceived from W. G. Brown, rent 

(Coclirane building). |36.00 

from Charles Whitten, 

grass on Reed land. . 5.00 

from Charles Spofford, 

grass on Canfleld 

land 20.00 

from L. E. Emery, grass 

on Eaton land 3.00 

from T. E. Reed, grass 

on C. Reed land 3.00 

from G. G. Griffin, lease 1.00 

from F. Brown, lease. . . 1.00 

from J. A. Sinclair, rent 8.00 

1575.50 

Total receipts $128,907.03 

Abatements, |467.89. 
Amount on hand Dec. 31, 1895. ... |42,720.01 
received from water 

rates, etc 112,107.03 

received from hydrant 

rentals 10,800.00 

Total receipts |171,G27.04 

Amount paid for current ex- 
penses $30,894.36 

paid for construction 

expenses 65,099.32 

Interest on bonds, 1896 41,446.00 

Hydrant rentals set aside for 

sinking fund 16,800.00 

Total expenditures, 1896 |154,239.6S 

Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1896 |17,387.3a 

4 



50 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The premium on water bonds sold in 

1893, amount |200,000, was $6,090.00 

3894, amount |50,000, was 2,.395.00 

July, 1895, amount |100,000, was 6,265.00 

December, 1895, amount |50,000, was 3,602.50 

1896, amount |100,000 (refunded), was 6,248.00 



Total 124,600.56 

This amount has not been credited to the water-works 
department as it should have been, but has been used by 
the city for other purposes. 

CLASSIFICATION OP ACCOUNTS FOR 1896. 

Superintendence, repairs, and re- 
newals 121,271.42 

Stationery and printing 317.67 

Office and incidental expenses. . 3,329.57 

Pumping expenses, — low service 2,150.61 

Pumping expenses, — high ser- 
vice 2,569.23 

Repairs to dam, canal, dam and 

reservoir 209.86 

Repair to buildings 46.00 



Total current expenses for 1896 $30,894.36 

Service pipes $.3,591.54 

Distribution pipes 20,216.19 

Fire hydrants and valves 1,442.62 

Meters 4,257.34 

Land 32,525.00 

Pumping machinery and build- 
ings 1,577.42 

Grading and fencing 1,489.21 

$65,099.32 



Total construction expenses for 1896 . . 95,993.08 
Sinking fund 16,800.00 



Total $112,793.68 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 61 

Construction Expenses. 

Land and water rights |135,T34.00 

Dam, canal, penstock and races. 101,399.16 
Pumping machinery, pump 

house, and buildings 176,372.19 

Distribution reservoir 117,697.90 

Force and supply main 89,769.02 

Distribution pipes 568,011.24 

Fire hydrants and valves 57,716.69 

Meters and fixtures 51,093.06 

Service pipes 68,617.89 

Grading and fencing 16,711.97 

Tools and fixtures 10,649.35 

Boarding and store houses .^ 919.36 

Roads and culverts 4,405.20 

Supplies 550.39 

Engineering 22,176.19 

Livery and traveling expenses. . . 2,856.64 
Legal expenses 563.79 

Total construction expenses to Deo. 

31, 1896 11,425,244.04 

Current Expenses. 

Superintendence, collecting, and 

repairs |273,054.25 

Stationery and printing 7,026.43 

Ofiice and incidental expenses.. 31,407.26 

Pumping expenses at low ser- 
vice 51,655.65 

Pumping expenses at high ser- 
vice , 9,758.55 

Eepairs to buildings 3,216.73 

Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 

reservoir 5,034.38 

Total current expenses to Dec . 31, 

1896 $381,153.25 



62 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Interest |40,678.51 

Highway expenditures 14,000.53 

$54,078.04 

Total amount of bills approved to 

date $1,8G1,076.3S 

Interest, discount, and labor 
performed on highway, trans- 
fers, and tools and materials 

sold 166,106.17 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 

1896 381,153.25 

1447,259.42 

Total cost, exclusive of interest and 

current expenses |1,413,S16.91 

Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 

1895 1801,454.51 

Interest for 1896 41,446.00 

Total interest and dis- 
count to Dec. 31, 1896 $842,900.51 

AMOUNT OF WATER BONDS ISSUED TO DECEMBER 31, 1896. 

Issued January 1, 1872, rate 6 per cent, due 

January 1, 1902 |100,000 

Issued January 1, 1887, rate 4 per cent, due 

January 1, 1907 100,000 

Issued July 1, 1890, rate 4 per cent, due July 

1, 1910 100,000 

Issued January 1, 1892, rate 4 jjer cent, due 

January 1, 1910 100,000 

Issued August 1, 1893, rate 5 per cent, due 

August 1, 1913 100,000 

Issued November 1, 1893, rate 4^ per cent, 

due November 1, 1913 100,000 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 53 

Issued October 1, 1894, rate 4 per cent, due 

October 1, 1914 |50,000 

Issued July 1, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due July 

1, 1915 100,000 

Issued December 16, 1895, rate 4 per cent, 

due December 16, 1915 50,000 

Issued January 1, 1897, rate 4 per cent, due 

January 1, 1917 100,000 

1900,000 

SINKING FUND. 

1893 112,750.00 

1894 13,925.00 

1895 15,800.00 

1896 16,800.00 



Total $59,275.00 



54 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 





^ 


« 


u 


^bD 




i 


-= M) 








a) 


u 




IP'S 




B^6 








4J 
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111 


V 

a 


111 


!.§! 


3 


h 


w 


^ 


^ 


tf 


Em 


k) 


« 


^ 


1872 


$573.61 

2,097.60 

32,154.07 













$.573.61 
200.07 






1873 


( $1,692.69 


$190,84 
1,436.56 




$14.00 




8 


1874 


i $22,425,001 7,987.27 


$119.10 


104.18 


699.85 




98 


1875 


29,223.60 


13,095,00, 10,292.13 


3,348.11 


122.13 


120., 59 


2,245.64 




160 


1876 


39,028.47 


16,320.00 15,900.03 


6,305.81 


72.32 


180.16 


249.55 




166 


1877 


43,823.30 


17,475.00 1S,064.,51 


7,783.09 


136.10 


233.04 


131. ,56 




202 


1878 


48,874.26 


17,970.00 20,255.97 


10,090.25 


83.60 


232.82 


241.62 




226 


1879 


'53,14,1.17 


18,165.00 21,610.13 


12,732.93 


81.60 


240.64 


303.87 




251 


1880 


57,655.25 


18,300.00: 23,795.96 


14,794.34 


79. .50 


210.39 


465.06 


$10.60 


280 


ISSl 


60,215.62 


18,780.00, 25,336.18 


15,,5,54,9S 


105.60 


223.99 


203.87 


11.00 


310 


1882 


67,630.13 


20,130 00; 26,803.06 


.19,898,69 


146.65 


197.49 


443.24 


11.00 


371 


isas 


73,4.58.20 


20,520.00 28,83>i24 


23,431.20 


314.65 


208.04 


125.07 


21.00 


404 


1884 


75,580-08 


21,350.00! 31,724.07 


21,329.75 


19.5.10 


231.96 


738.20 


11.00 


446 


1885 


80,404.12 


18,900.00 33,,597.02 


27,425.35 


102.50 


186.80 


181,45 


11.00 


486 


1886 


75,129.99 


19,7.50.00 33,062.11 


21, .573.45 


287.40 


130.80 


320.23 


6.00 


613 


1887 


80,518.17 


20,437.,50 33,497.21 


25,277.0£ 


351.70 


119.20 


819.47 


16.00 


739 


1888 


85,643.82 


21,000.00 33,864.78 


29,8.38.82 


543.80 


149.80 


243.62 


3.00 


842 


1889 


86,700.46 


18,240.00 34,140,99 


33,596.05 


361.95 


153.20 


1.55.27 


53.00 


951 


1890 


90,463.37 


19,880.00 32,431.10 


37,009,8( 


649 90 


151.80 


298.77 


42.00 


1,135 


1891 


76,605.23 


4,590.00 30,,5S8.79 40,479.25 


, 494.80 


160.40 


200.99 


91.00 


1,313 


1S92 


83,474.79 


5,000 00, 31,344.24 46,139.35 


416.00 


168.40 


139.80 


267.00 


1,608 


1893, 104,170.08 


12,750.00 32,603.59 58,103.20 


' 1,033.75 


159.60 


339.38 


180.56 


1,895 


1894', 110,210.2f 


13,925.00 32,176.28 62,.501.3.i 


697.80 


227.40 


334.82 


347.(34 


2,182 


1895 


118,374.50 


15,800.00 32,903.99 67,465.90 


808.20 


300.40 


768.17 


327.84 


2,520 


1896 


128,907.03 


16,800.00 32,540 03 77,610.K 


638.48 


302.80 


440.12 


575.50 


2,856 



1878, meter rate "was changed. 1884, hydrant rates reduced. 1886, meter 
and other rates reduced. 1889, hydrant rates reduced. 1891 and 1892, re- 
ceived only part of hydrant rent, and nothing from water-troughs or street 
sprinklers. 1893, hydrant rent and water-closets rate reduced. 

The following amounts have been paid over to the city 
treasurer, and credited to the water-works : 

1872, supplies and materials sold 1573.61 

1873, supplies and materials sold 177.07 

accrued interest on water bonds sold 193.26 

accrued interest on state bonds sold.. 146.00 

water rents 1,920.53 

1874, supplies and materials sold 607.81> 

March 12, highway expenditures 

transferred from water account. . . 14,000.53 
March 17, interest and discount trans- 
ferred from water account 12,347.25 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 55 

1874, September 1, interest and discount 

transferred from water account... |22,361.74 

water and hydrant rent 30,233.54 

December 29, interest transferred . . . 4,566.25 

1875, water and hydrant rent 27,119.15 

sundry items 2,104.45 

1876, sundry items 149.00 

water and hydrant rent 38,879.47 

1877, sundry items 131.56 

water and hydrant rent 43,691.74 

1878, water and hydrant rent 48,632.64 

sundry items 241.62 

1879, sundry items 303.87 

water and hydrant rent 52,839.30 

1880, water and hydrant rent " 57,180.19 

sundry items 475.06 

1881, water and hydrant rent 60,000.75 

sundry items < 214.87 

1882, water and hydrant rent 67,175.89 

sundry items 454.24 

1883, water and hydrant rent 73,312.13 

sundry items 146.07 

1884, water and hydrant rent 74,830.88 

sundry items 749.20 

1885, water and hydrant rent 80,211.67 

sundry items * 192.45 

1886, water and hydrant rent 74,803.76 

sundry items 326.23 

1887, water and hydrant rent 79,682.70 

sundry items 835.47 

1888, water and hydrant rent 85,397.20 

sundry items 246.62 

1889, water and hydrant rent 86,492.19 

sundry items 208.27 

1890, water and hydrant rent 90,122.60 



56 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1890, sundry items 1340.77 

1891, water and hydrant rent 76,313.24 

sundry items 291.99 

1892, water and hydrant rent 83,007.99 

sundry items 400.80 

1893, water rent 90,900.14 

sundry items 519.94 

1894, water rent 95,602.83 

sundry items 682.46 

1895, water rent ■ 101,478.49 

sundry items 1,090.01 

1896, water rent lll,091.4i 

sundry items 1,015.02 



Total 11,697,086.60 

METERS. 

The number of meters set during the year has been 
three hundred and thirty-six (336). 

Total number of meters now in use, twenty-eight hun- 
dred and fifty-six (2,856). 

The number of applications for water has been two 
hundred and seventeen (217). 

Total number of applications to date, fifty-one hundred 
and fifty-two (5,152). 

SERVICE PIPES. 

Two hundred and twenty-four service pipes (224) have 
been laid this year, as follows: 
221 1-inch 5,369.0 feet 

3 2-inch 16.0 " 

Total 5,415.0 feet 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 57 
SERVICE PIPES RELAID. 

3 1-inch dia. 91.0 feet to 1-inch dia 63.5 feet 

48 finch dia. 1,-331.0 feet to 1-inch dia 1,285.6 " 

1 finch dia. 34.0 feet to U-inch dia 34.0 " 

1 1-inch dia. 155.8 feet to 1-inch dia 44.0 '' 

1 2-inch dia. 8.5 feet to 2-inch dia 8.5 " 



1,620.3 feet 1,435.6 feet 

Old pipe, 1,620.3 feet; new pipe, 1,435.6 feet. 
Forty-nine hundred and eighty-three (4,983) service 
pipes have been laid to date, as follows: 

29 |-inch diameter 620.6 feet 

1,617 f-inch diameter 42,208.8 " 

3,201 1-ineh diameter 80,579.9 " 

22 If inch diameter 893.5 " 

24 1^-inch diameter 770.2 " 

67 2-inch diameter 2,182.7 " 

2 2^-inch diameter 57.0 " 

5 3-inch diameter 89.8 " 

10 4-inch diameter 269.5 " 

6 6-inch diameter " 

127,672.0 feet 
Number miles service pipe, 24.18. 



68 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Tlie following streets are where cement-lined pipe was 
taken up and cast-iron laid in 1896: 



Streets. 



Amherst ... 

Brook 

Canal 

Central 

Colias Ave 

Dean 

Douglas 

Dutton 

Green 

Grove 

Hollis 

Kidder 

Langdon — 

Laurel 

S. Main 

Manchester. 



Length of Pipe. 



20 in. 10 in. 8 in. 6 in. 4 in 



193 



193 



172 



1890 



1890 



2300 
661 



1243 

48 

10 

228 



59 
59 
25 

710 
33 

653 



6887 



471 



Location. 



Beech to flail. 
Elm lo Canal. 
Bridge to Brook. 
Maple to Wilson. 
At Culvert. 
Cor. Canal. 
East of Main. 
Amherst to Concord. 
Elm near freight station. 

Cor. Canal. 

Canal to Elm. 

Cor. Canal. 

Wilson to east of Hall. 

Near Mil ford. 

No. 200 to Beech. 



Total relaid, 9,613 feet, or 1.82 miles. 

Hydrant on Massabesic, corner Old Falls road, was 
moved over on Old Falls road. 

The pipes, gates, and hydrants on Green, Grove, and 
Summer, corner Elm, at new freight station, were 
changed to Elm street. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



59 



Location. 


c 

ccti! 
00 

ccZ 


Belmont and Beacon. 

Corner Beech and Dutton. 

South of Mast. 

Northward to Salmon. 

Auburn to Valley. 

Corner Beech. 

Over 20-inch pipe at Valley St. 

South of Clay. 

North of Orange, 

Canal across the river. 

West of Union. 
North of Kelley. 
Across Lincoln street. 
To Lincoln. 
Thayer. 
Corner Beech. 
Corner Beech. 
Cedar to Auburn. 
VV^'st of Belmont. 
Hall to Belmont. 

Eii^t of Tine. 
To Kelley street. 
Aniory to Wayne. 
Corner Montgomerjf. 
Corner Elm. 
East of Canton. 
East of Mammoth. 
East of Cass. 


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Amherst 

Amherst 

Avon 

Beech 

Beech... 

Bell 

Belmont 

Belmont 


Belmont 

Bridge 

Canal 

Cartier 


: ■ s « • 


Harrison 

Harvard 

Hay ward . 

Hay ward 

Hevey 

Hovey 

Kelley 


S60 

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3 
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60 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



H 
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Corner Hall. 

Corner Blaine. 

Corner Union and Beech. 

To Fullerton residence. 

Westward. 

Aniory to Kelley. 

West of Masaabesic. 


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East of Oak. 
East of Beech. 
West of Boynton. 
West of Beech. 
North of Milford. 
To Carpenter. 
Extended north. 


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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 61 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN 1896. 

Avon, near A. Dickey's residence. 
Belmont, south of Clay. 
Carpenter, west of Union. 
Clay, corner Lincoln. 
Grove, corner Beech. 
Harrison, corner Belmont. 
Harrison, corner Hall. 
Harvard, corner Hall. 
Hay ward. 

Hevey, south of Amory. 
Kelly, corner Montgomery. 
Lake, east of Canton. 
Lake, east of Mammoth road. 
Shasta, corner Maple. 
Summer, corner Beech. 

Hydrant on Massabesic, corner Old Falls road, moved 
on to the Old Falls road. 



62 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 



63 



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476 

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604 

495 

1949 

1263 

2371 

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2934 

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2056 
4620 












993 
1062 
382 
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64 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



65 



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66 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



67 



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68 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



6 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



69 



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70 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



71 





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AXKUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



73 



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74 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1896. 



SIZE. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20-inch diameter 


- 
20,367 feet 


24,679 feet. 


18 


14-inch diameter 


5,645 " 


9,948 " 


14 


12-inch diameter 


7,444 " 


21,953 " 


31 


10-inch diameter 


607 " 


26,607 " 


40 


8-inch diameter 


3,300 " 


53,895 '• 


83 


6-inch diameter 


28,540 " 


240,774 " 


566 


4-inch diameter 


2,173 " 


18,308 " 


58 




68,076 feet. 


396,164 feet. 


810 



Cement-lined pipe 12.893 miles 

Cast-iron pipe 75.031 " 

Total pipe 87.924 miles 

687 hydrants. 
810 gates. 
13 air yalves. 

Yours respectfully, 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



Uses for which Water is Supplied. 

WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 

11,123 Families, 148 boarding-houses, 14,616 faucets, 
3,549 wash-bowls, 2,845 bath-tubs, 9,408 water-closets, 
539 wash-tubs, 206 urinals, 3,332 sill-cocks, 2,674 horses, 
126 cattle, 687 fire-hydrants, 28 watering-troughs, 8 
drinking-fountains, 51 stand-pipes, 2 public urinals. 



BOAKD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 75 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

1 Jail, 27 churches, 1 court house, 10 hose companies, 6 
fire engines, 2 hook-and-ladder, 3 opera houses, 3 con- 
vents, 4 city hospitals, 4 cemeteries, 1 orphanage, 1 post- 
office, 1 city library, 6 banks, 9 hotels, 1 Masonic hall, 1 
Odd Fellows' hall, 3 halls. 

SHOPS. 

57 Barber, 10 wheelwright, 19 blacksmith, 8 carpenter, 
2 tinsmith, 1 copper, 3 currying, 19 plumber and gas and 
water pipe, 14 paint, 3 gunsmith. 

STORES. 

4 Auction, 35 drug, 22 jewelry, 1 fur, 3 house-furnish- 
ing goods, 20 fancy goods, 1 wholesale paper, 5 wholesale 
produce, 24 dry goods, 12 candy, 1 cloak, 16 millinery, 3 
tea, 9 furniture, 1 wholesale grocer, 107 grocery, 6 meal, 3 
hardware, 34 boot and shoe, 11 stove, 17 gents' furnish- 
ing goods, 7 book, 1 leather and shoe-finders, 3 music, 3 
upholstery, 9 undertakers, 5 sewing-machine, 1 feather- 
cleaner, 1 rubber^. 

SALOONS. 

18 Dining, 7 billiard, 55 liquor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

6 Clubrooms, 3 bleacheries, 37 laundries, 4 ice-houses, 
11 photographers, 1 Mercy Home, 2 old ladies' homes, 1 
soldiers' monument, 1 Turner hall, 4 fountains, 2 trust 
companies, 1 city farm, 3 depots, 9 greenhouses, 2 band 
rooms, 26 bakeries, 2 waste, 1 business college, 32 school- 
houses, 1 battery building, 1 skating-rink, 1 kitchen, 3 
ward-rooms, 1 gymnasium, 2 police stations. 



76 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

, MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 

1 Hosiery mill, 1 silver-plating, 2 iron foundries, 2 dye- 
houses, 5 machine shops, G clothing manufactories, 8 har- 
ness shops, 1 cornice works, 1 brush shop, 9 carriage 
shops, 12 cigar factories, 1 brass and copper foundry, 1 
locomotive works, 1 grist-mill, 1 silk-mill, 3 granite 
works, 2 electric light stations, 4 sash and blind shops, 1 
brewery, 6 shoe shops, 1 gas works, 4 slaughter- houses, 1 
soap factory, 4 needle manufactories, 6 beer-bottling, 3 
book-binderies, 1 paper-mill, 2 box-makers, 1 paper-box 
manufactory. 

MARKETS. 

6 Fish, 12 meat and fish, 3 meat (wholesale). 

STABLES. 

23 Livery, 1 electric railroad, 1,073 private. 

OFFICES. 

20 dentists, 1 telephone, 2 telegraph, 2 express, 14 
printing, 1 gas, 17 coal. 



Materials on Hand. 

PIPE. 



8,100 feet 20-inch, 2,000 feet 14-inch, 5,000 feet 12 -inch, 
2,500 feet 10-inch, 1,000 feet 8-inch, 1,000 feet 6-inch. 



BRANCHES. 



2 double 6 on 20, 1 double 6 on 12, 2 double 8 on 12, 
double 6 on 10, 6 double 6 on 14, 1 double 4 on 4, 1 double 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 77 

4 on 6, 1 single 6 on 20, 2 single 10 on 20, 1 single 12 on 14, 
6 single 6 on 14, 2 single 6 on 10, 1 single 8 on 8, 5 single 
on 12, 2 single 10 on 10, 1 single 4 on 6, 3 single 20-incli 
Y's, 17 single 6 on 6. 

WHOLE SLEEVES. 

2 20-incti, 2 14-inch, 1 12-inch, 10 10-inch, 21 8-inch, 37 6- 
inch, 22 4-inch. 

REDUCERS. 

5 8-inch to 6-inch, 5 10-inch to 8-inch, 2 14-inch to 12- 
inch, 4 10-inch to 6-inch, 2 6-inch to 4-inch, 2 10-inch to 14- 
inch. 

TURNS. 

2 20-inch 1-16, 2 10-inch 1-4, 2 10-inch 1-8, 2 8-inch 1-4, 
4 6-inch 1-4, 5 6-inch 1-8. 

RISERS. 

2 10-inch, 2 6-inch, 2 8-inch. 

GATES. 

1 12-inch, 1 10-inch spigot, 1 10-inch hub, 2 8-inch 
spigot, 3 8-inch bells, 9 6-inch spigots, 7 6-inch bells. 



REPORT 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of 
Manchester, N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — We have the honor herewith to submit 
the fourth annual report of this department. 

The following gives the receipts and expenditures of 
the office for the year 1896: 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from Manchester Street Railway.. |1,228.00 

from sundry sources 172.07 

Total 11,400.07 

Deposited with city treasurer 1,391.29 

Cash paid out for express, etc 8.2.5 

Balance on hand .53 

Total 11,400.07 

EXPENDITURES. 

Commissioners' salaries |1,800.00 

Clerical services 1,174.46 

81 



82 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Carriage allowance 

Office supplies 

Blank books 

Incidentals 

Telephone 

Total $3,712.03 



1450.00 


72.42 


92.44 


82.96 


39.75 



Inventory of City Property. 

Commissioners' office, including typewriter, 

furniture, office supplies $349.25 

Division No. 2, including 18 horses, dump- 
carts, sprinklers, snow'-plows, road-ma- 
chine, tools, Carson trench machine, 

steam hoister, etc 20,724.49 

City stables, storage shed, blacksmith shop, 

carpenter shop 15,950.00 

Lot of land on Franklin street 89,312.00 

Valuation of pipe on hand at city yard 1,075.27 

Division No. 4 2.00 

Division No. 5 37.73 

Division No. 6 23.50 

Division No. 7 77.65 

Division No. 8 37.50 

Division No. 9 23.00 

X>ivision No. 10, including 3 horses, road- 
machine, dump-carts, sprinklers, etc 1,849.40 

-Stable and lot, Division No. 10 1,200.00 

Valuation of pipe on hand. Division No. 10.. 25.27 
Commons, including horse lawn-mower, 

swings, seats, etc 335.96 

Total $131,023.02 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 83 

Orders Received from City Government, v/ith Date 
of Passage. 

ORDERS TO BUILD FOLLOWING SEWERS. 

Hevey east back, Amory to "Wayne. 

Auburn south back, Wilson to 150 feet east of Hall. 

Belmont, Bridge to Mead. 

Spruce, Canton easterly 250 feet. 

Passed January 7. 

Valley, Wilson easterly 200 feet. 
Beacon, Spruce northerly 150 feet. 
Orange, Hall to Belmont. 
Clarke, River road to Elm. 
Elm, Clarke to Rowell. 
Passed February 4. 

Pine, Auburn northerly to Cedar south back. 
Cedar south back, Pine to Beech. 
Passed May 5. 

Cartier east back, present sewer to 250 feet south of 
Sullivan. 

Dartmouth, Dickey to Frederick. 
Conant, Cartier westerly 60 feet. 
Cesspool in Main west back. 
Two cesspools, corner Myrtle and Hall. 
Passed June 2. 

B, C street northerly about 150 feet. 
Valley, Jewett westerly to Foster ave. 
Foster avenue, Valley southerly to Hayward. 
Merrimack, northerly to Hanover east of Beacon. 
Hanover, above sewer easterly about 500 feet. 
Passed July 14. 



84 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

Quincy, present sewer southerly 90 feet. 
Beauport east back, Wayne southerly 350 feet. 
Locust, Christian brook to Sagamore. 
Sagamore, Locust easterly about 136 feet. 
Sagamore, Salmon 120 feet west to west line of Elm. 
Liberty, Christian brook to 200 feet north of Xorth. 
Old Bridge street, Belmont westerly 125 feet. 
Belmont, Valley to Clay. 
Green south back. Union to Beech. 
Passed August 4. 

Laurel to Merrimack. 
Hall, Prospect to Harrison. 
Harrison, Hall to Belmont. 
Union, Appleton north 150 feet. 
Maple, Silver to Prescott. 
Passed September 1. 

Carroll, Amherst road southerly 250 feet. 
Lake avenue, Canton easterly 300 feet. 
Grove south back, Union easterly 150 feet. 
Passed October 6. 

Beacon, Amherst to Concord. 

Schiller, Hale to South Main. 

Sagamore, Oak to Linden. 

Walnut east back, Christian brook to Salmon. 

Montgomery east back, Kelly to Amory. 

Carpenter, Elm to Union. 

Auburn south back, Maple westerly about 50 feet. 

Passed November 10. 

Walnut east back. Christian brook northerly 200 feet. 
Linden, Prospect to Harrison. 
Harrison, Linden to Russell. 
Passed December 1. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 85 

ORDERS TO BUILD FOLLOWING STREETS. 

Wentworth. 
Passed January 7. 

Shasta, Beech to Lincoln. 
Spruce, Canton to J. Hall road. 
Carpenter, Elm to Union. 
Passed June 2. 

Sagamore, Oak to Smyth road. 
Passed July 14. 

€olby, West Hancock to Log. 
Passed August 4. 

Candia road, Mammoth road easterly to Kevere ave. 
Passed October 6. 

MISCELLANEOUS ORDERS. 

Order to erect steel bridge across the Merrimack river 
on Granite street. 
Passed April 27. 

Order to concrete Nutfield Lane from Amherst to Con- 
cord. 

Passed June 2. 

Order to macadamize Chestnut street from Lake ave- 
nue to Valley cemetery. 
Passed July 7. 

Order to erect and equip a horse drinking-fountain at 
Amory and Hevey east back street. 
Passed August 4. 

Order to erect and equip a drinking-fountain west side 
of Elm near Bridge. 
Passed August 7. 



86 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



List of Apfropriations. 



Amount 
appropriated. 



Amount 
expended. 



Repairs highways 

New highways 

Watering streets 

Paving streets 

Macadamizing streets 

Grade for concrete 

Scavenger 

City teams 

Street sweeping 

Street and park commission 

Bridges 

Repair of sewers 

Christian Brook sewer 

Silver-street sewer 

•River road and Elm street sewers. 

t New sewers , 

Snow and ice 

Widening Old Mammoth road 

Commons 

Stark and Derryfield pai'ks 

t New Gianite bridge 



S19 

20, 
5, 
6, 

20, 
5. 

16: 

6 
3, 

4, 
f 

6, 

15, 

15, 

40< 

4. 

1 

4 

5 

131. 



,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
703.00 
000.00 
000.00 
437.83 
OOO.qO 
,000.00 
500.00 
,000.00 
228.00 



Total . 



$18,370.94 

18,617.52 
4,196.48 
6,320.69 

19,848.48 
6,035.82 

14,991.10 
6,285.70 
2,968.44 
3,712.03 
5,336.88 
5,421.63 
.%187.08 

16,124.13 
9,302.43 

41,015.68 
5,250.78 
1,000.00 
4,351.15 
5,000.00 
137,755.73 



$336,092.69 



♦Includes $1,703 balance 1895, 1 
t Includes 437 " 1S95, j^ 

J Includes 1,228 from M. S. R. Co. J 



Total expended in excess of appropria- 
tion, $223.86. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
COXTRACTS. 



87 



Awarded to or agree- 
ment with 



Clarence R. Merrill 

A. H. Chadbourne Co.... 

Warren Harvey 

W. F. Head & Son 

C. H. Hutchinson Co 

Henry W. Parker 

A. C.Wallace 

Thomas A. Lane Co 

Manchester H. & L. Co.. 

Head & Dowst Co 

A. H. Chadbourne Co 

Groton Bridge Co 

Charles A. Bailey 

Charles H. Robie Co 

J. T. Underbill Co 

Webster & Moore 

Charles A. Bailey 

Clemens Langer 



Contract, Material, or Location. 



To furnish No. 1 clipped oats 

To furnish shrubs 

Cesspool, edgestone 

Sewer brick 

Iron castings 

Cement 

Spruce bracing 

Sewer pipe 

Sewer pipe 

Bridge plank 

To furnish trees 

Superstructure new bridge 

Stone for new bridge 

Concreting Chestnut street 

Concreting Chestnut street 

Building Beech street extension.. 

Block paving 

Iron railing, to approaches new 
bridge 



Date. 



January 


6 


February 


29 


April 


3 




3 




3 




3 




3 




3 





3 




30 




30 


June 


20 




20 


October 


24 


November 


1 



88 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
PERMITS TO ENCUMBER. 



Given to 



J. H. Cram 

D. J. Adams 

Jolin E.Towle & Co ... 

William C. Preston 

J. C. Quiniby 

B. R. Dufresne & Co.... 

Smith & Pliitts 

J. A. Jack.son 

S. T. Wortlien 

Bixby & Wilson 

Albert J. Sawyer 

Mary Mullen 

Jas. H. Mendell & Co.. 

A.L. Bixby 

Head & Dowst Co 

S. T. Worthen 

Peter McQuillan 

Ward Bros 

John Campbell 

L,. M. Aldrich 

D. M. K. Phillips 

FredM. Smith 

Postal Tel. & Cable Co. 

John Morrison ,. 

W. H. Plumer 

S. T. Worthen 

James F. Brown .... 

Flint & Lewis 

Stark Mills 

Fred Smith 

Merrimack Elec. Co 

N.W.Page 

Thomas Shea 

J. H. Mendell & Co.. 

Stark Mills 

F. L. Flanders 

James Collity 

N.W.Page 

Charles M. Floyd 

"Mead, Mason & Co. . 

Peter Rogers 

Flint & Lewis 

Union Pub. Co 



Location. 



Young road 

98 Pennacook street 

Elm west back 

317 Pine street 

727 Beech street 

Cedar and Union 

River road 

203 Merrimack street 

Elm at Weeks block 

A street 

Auburn street 

1736 Cedar street 

Spruce and Union 

Hall and Spruce 

Straw's block 

Pine street 

Belmont and Lake avenue 

Elm and Auburn 

Belmont street 

Manchester south back 

Central sti-eet 

Cedar and Pine 

Erect poles, Pine street — 

Cedar and Union 

Nutfleld lane 

Ash street 

Brook street 

South Main street 

Bridge street 

Salmon street 

Erect poles. River road — 
Lake avenue and Milton.., 

78 Lowell street 

331 Merrimack street 

Spring street 

Spruce street 

North street 

Milton and Lake avenue. . 

Elm street 

JNIain street 

Cedar street 

Birch street 

Hanover street 



Date, 1896. 



Jan. 



March 
April 



May 



July 



Aug. 

Sept. 
Nov. 

Dec. 



6 

3 
IS 

3 
18 
20 
23 
25 
28 
29 

1 
II 
14 
18 
18 
20 
21 
25 



9 
13 
14 
15 

IS 

28 

29 

5 

5 

8 

13 
26 
5 
10 
22 
11 
17 
17 
18 
17 
24 



NOTE.— A bond of S500 being filed with city clerk in each case when permit 
is granted. 

STREETS TURNPIKED WITH ROAD MACHINE. 

Appleton 1,000 feet. 

A.dams 1,200 

Ash, Brook to Harrison 300 

Ash, Harrison to M3'rtle 500 

Bay, Webster to Sagamore 1,500 

Blodget, Elm to Union 900 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 89 

Brook, Pine to 'Ksh 1,000 feet. 

Beech, Gore to Sagamore 300 

Beech, Gore to Myrtle 1,000 

Brook, Elm to Pine 800 

Beech, Prospect to Harrison .... 400 

Brook, Maple to Ash 250 

Beech, Nutt road to top of Beech 6,000 

Clarke 1,600 

Chestnut 1,200 

Chestnut, Pennacook to Brook. . 300 

Elm, Clarke to Sagamore 3,500 

Elm, Clarke to Reform School. . .. 3,500 

Elm, railroad bridge to Brown 

ave 1,700 

Gore, Union to Ash 500 

Oore, Beech to Smith road 1,500 

Hazel, Brook to Harrison 600 

Harrison, Elm to Union 1,000 

Harrison, Union to Maple 1,000 

Harrison, Maple to Russell 600 

Hooksett road, Webster to Hook- 
sett line 6,800 

Hall, East High to Bridge 300 

Kennard road, between Smith 

and Mammoth road 3,000 

Liberty 800 

Munroe 500 

Maple, Gore to Myrtle 1,200 

Maple, Valley to Silver 1,500 

North, Bay to Elm 700 

North River road 3,000 

North River road. Reform School 

to Union street '. .'. . . . ... 7,000 

North River road. Union to Hook- 
sett line 4,000 



90 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Oak, Harrison to Myrtle 500 feet. 

Pine 1,400 

Pennacook, Elm to Union 900 

Pine, Brook to Salmon 900 

Pine, Prospect to Brook 600 

Prospect, Elm to Union 1,000 

Prospect, Union to Russell 1,350 

Prospect, Linden to Hall 600 

Pine, Cedar to Valley 1,000 

Ray 400 

Russell, Harrison to Gore 600 

Salmon 900 

Sagamore, Elm to Bay 200 

Sagamore, Chestnut to Walnut. . 1,600 

Salmon, Pine to Walnut 500 

Salmon, River road to Elm 800 

Sagamore, Pine to Walnut 400 

Smith road 5,000 

Titus avenue, Beech west 800 

Trenton, River road to Union. . . . 2,000 

Union 1,800 

Union, Salmon to Brook 900 

Union, Myrtle to Brook 800 

Union, Hooksett line to Clarke. . 10,000 

Union, between Cedar and Spruce 300 

W^ebster 2,100 

Walnut, Brook to Salmon 900 

Walnut, Brook to Myrtle 800 

Walnut, Webster to Salmon 1,000 

Webster, Hooksett road to Smith 

road 5,000 

Total 106,000 ft.,or 20.09 ms. 

Labor for this work charged to repairs of highways. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



91 



STREETS GRAVELED. 

Beech, railroad to Mitchell. 

Baker, Nutt road to railroad. 

Calef road, near Pine Grove cemetery. 

Calef road, east of Pine Grove cemetery. 

Elm, Valley south to Brown ave. 

Gore. 

Hooksett road. 
- Myrtle. 

Kutt road, Kailroad bridge east. 

Prospect and Linden. 

Smith road. 

Webster. 

1,300 loads of gravel used; labor charged to repairs of 
highways. 

NEW CULVERTS. 



Location. 


Length Width 
Id feet. in feet. 


Labor. 




68 i^ 


$78.00 




68 

48 


16 


283.96 




14.80 








Total 


184 




$376.76 









REPAIRED CULVERTS. 



Calef road, labor 

Elm, near Ray brook. 

Lincoln 

.Wilson, near Valley . . 



Total , 



$32.00 

358.22 

128.00 

98.40 

$616.62 



92 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

STREETS. 

We will make mention in this portion of our report 
of some of the most important permanent improvements 
made upon our streets the past season. 

Built Carpenter street, Elm to Union, 1,400 feet; Ma- 
ple, Valley to Silver, 1,500 feet; Sagamore, Oak to Smith 
road, 1,300 feet; Shasta, Beech east 1,200 feet; Wilson, 
East Spruce to Valley, 1,750 feet; Ray, Appleton to 
Clarke, 600 feet; Hevey, Amory to Wayne, 350 feet; He- 
vey, Kelly to Amory, 660 feet; Kelly, 3,113 feet; all the 
above were built to grade. 

Bridge-street extension from Mammoth road to Hano- 
ver road widened and graded 7,000 feet. Extension of 
Beech street at junction of River road, 1,200 feet. Mam- 
moth road from Bridge street north, 2,000 feet. 

Retaining wall on Mast street built, using 415 perch of 
stone. 

Two culverts, 6x6, built at Ray and Union streets over 
Ray brook. Total amount expended on new streets, |19,- 
617.52. 

Macadamizing North Main street from Adams to Put- 
nam, 3,412 cubic j'ards stone used. Auburn, Elm to 
Chestnut, 600 feet, 2,266 square yards; Central, Maple to 
Hall, 1,825 feet, 6,896 square yards; Concord, Union to 
Ash, 800 feet, 3,211 square yards; Elm, Pennacook to 
Webster, 1,900 feet, 5,277 square yards; Merrimack, 
Chestnut to Union, 800 feet, 3,200 square yards; Wilson, 
1,840 feet, 6,951 square yards; repaired Bridge, Elm to 
Canal, Dean street, and Myrtle street, a distance of 1,150 
feet, 5,954 square yards. 4,025 loads of crushed stone 
used in general repairs upon dur streets, at a total cost of 
$19,848.48. 

There has been put in 12,801 square yards of cobble 
gutters; 1,265 loads of paving used. 6,542 feet of new 
fencing built, two rails high. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 93 

The amount of new concrete laid in street crossings 
and streets is 8,760 square yards, at a cost of |4,846.65. 

The above in tabulated form appears under the several 
respective heads. 

The views of the commissioners cannot be better ex- 
pressed than by quoting from His Honor the Mayor's in- 
augural address, delivered before the city councils, Jan- 
uary 5, 1897. 

"In common with nearly every city and town in the 
United States, Manchester is vitally interested in the 
subject of good roads, and in the adoption of a more efli- 
cient, economical, and equitable system of highway im- 
provements. It has become the fashion in this city for 
certain classes of people to denounce in a wholesale man- 
ner the condition of our streets and roads, and to bitterly 
criticise our street dei^artment for not making them bet- 
ter. For one, I believe that a large share of this criticism 
is undeserved, and is the result either of ignorance or 
malice. As a class, our streets and roads are fairly good, 
and will stand comparison with those of other cities 
which have the same or similar conditions of native soil 
and rock to deal with. Ours is a loose and sandy soil, and 
our native rock has been proven unfit for road building 
except for purpose of ballast. Not until the street com- 
missioners adopted the policy of sending elsewhere for a 
top dressing for our streets, was the work of macadamiz- 
ing successfully accomplished. Since the advent of the 
Salem trap rock the streets of Manchester have shown 
great improvement, and as the commissioners and the 
public are well satisfied with the present system of build- 
ing a macadam road, it is likely to be continued with in- 
creasing favorable results. In macadamizing streets 
under the new process, a ballast consisting of native 
broken stone taken from the stone crusher, is laid about 
twelve inches deep, and on top of this is placed trap rock 



94 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

to the thickness of about four inches, and the whole rolled 
down by the citv road-roller, weighing eighteen tons. 
Samples of this kind of road-building may be found in 
various parts of the city, and where the work has been 
thoroughly done, the streets are in a most excellent con- 
dition. 

"Aside from an inferior quality of soil and rock, Man- 
chester is poorly provided with a first-class quality of 
gravel, an essential quantity in good road building. So, 
in many ways, the conditions here are largely against the 
best roads, and when such are built, they are very expen- 
sive. 

"If Manchester was provided, as some cities are, with 
an abundance of good material for good roads, the prob- 
lem of building them would be an easy one; but as she is 
not, the officials of our street department have to do the 
best they can with the material at their command; and by 
buying the rest from other sections according to the 
means placed at their disposal. 

"It is an easy matter to criticise the condition of our 
streets; but did you ever stop to consider that there are 
200 miles of streets and roads within our city limits that 
call for the attention of our street department? If yon 
have, then you will understand why Manchester has not a 
larger percentage of good streets, and a smaller percent- 
age of poor ones. Herein lies the fundamental reason 
for so many bad streets and roads, — we have too many of 
them laid out." 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



95 



NEW STEEETS GRADED. 



Location. 



Ashland 

Carpenter, Elm to Union 

Laurel, from Belmont 

Milton, from Laurel 

Maple, Valley to Silver 

Ray, Appleton to Clarke 

Summer, west Beech 

Sagamore, Oak to Smyth road. 

Salmon, Walnut to Beech 

Shasta, Beech east 

Wilson, East Spruce to Valley 

Total 



Length 
in feet. 



262 

1,400 

200 

300 

1,500 

600 

150 

1,300 

150 

1,200 

1,750 



S,S13 



Cut or 
fill. 



Both. 



Cut.. 
Both. 
Cut.. 
Both. 



Cut.. 
Both. 



Lahor. 



$100.75 
951.86 



522.20 
t55.50 
311.50 
30.00 
980.50 
198.75 
560.00 
453.50 



$4,164.56 



SUMMARY. 



Total cost for labor for new highways, cul- 
verts, etc., including all the divisions. ..... $16,900.05 

Covering stone for culverts 336.35 

Paving stone and curbing 982.63 

Hardware 69.78 

Concrete 107.15 

General incidentals 68.75 

Fencing and railing 152.81 

Total $18,617.52 

* Labor Included in Milton street. t Turnpiked with road-machine. 



96 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
NEW MACADAMIZING. 



Location. 


Length 

in 

feet. 


Square 
yards. 


Crushed 
stone. 


Other 
stone. 


Labor. 


Auburn, Elm to Chestnut 


600 
1,825 

800 

850 

1,900 

100 

800 

1,275 

1,840 


2,266 
6,896 
2,845 
3,211 
5,277 
222 
3,200 
3,412 
6,951 


450 

1,180 
325 
500 

1,060 

50 

650 

846 

1,350 


12 

84 

96 
250 


$1,020.80 

2,046.53 

858 75 


Central, Maple to Hall 




Chestnut, Lake avenue south 

Elm, Webster to Pennacook 

Manchester B. S., Chestnut east . . . 

Merrimack, Chestnut to Union 

North Main, Putnam to Adams 

Wilson 


1,005.00 
2,093.8O 
90.00 
1,674.51 
1,272.25 
2,315.17 


Total 


9,990 


34,280 


6,411 


442 


$12,376.81 





REPAIRED MACADAMIZING. 



Location. 


Length 

in 

feet. 


Square 
yards. 


Crushed 
stone. 


Labor. 


Bridge, Canal to Elm 


700 
250 
200 


4,200 

1,000 

754 


350 

200 

150 

4,023 


$775.00 


Dean, Elm west 


''55 00 


Myrtle, from Elm 


203.58 


General repairs 


2,746.69 










Total 


1,150 


5,954 


4,723 


$3,980.27 





Crusher was run from April 13 to November 16; aver- 
age number of loads crushed each day was 49. 

Number of loads used for new macadamizing, 6,411; 
and 4,768 loads used on repairing. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



97 



SUMMARY. 

Incidentals 1364.61 

Stone chips 547.75 

Salem stone 623.00 

Coal, coke, oil, wood 350.98 

Forcite powder 934.16 

Repairs on crusher, roller, drills 550.98 

Eepairs on concrete crossings 89.92 

Water- Works 30.00 

Labor 16,357.08 

Total 119,848.48 

PAVING STREETS. 



Location. 


Sq. yds. 


No. 
loads. 


Cost of 
stone. 


Cost of 
labor. 




223 

448 

272 

24 

54 

88 

544 

156 

27 

327 

252 

233 

21 

12 

564 

241 

111 

13 

1,303 

291 

33 

1,200 

106 

584 

350 

175 

165 

88 

51 

39 

1,250 


23 

30 

35 

3 

7 

9 

58 

16 

2 

38 

30 

28 

2 

2 

65 

32 

11 

2 

135 
30 
4 
50 
11 
48 
15 
20 
17 
11 
5 

"iso' 


$40.25 
52.50 
61.25 

5.25 

12.25 

15.75 

101.50 

28.00 

3.50 
60.50 
52.50 
49.00 

3.50 

3.50 

113.75 

56.00 

19.25 

3.50 
236.25 
52.50 

7.00' 
87.50 
19.25 
84.00 
26.25 
35.00 
29.75 
19.25 

8.75 

'262 iso' 


$41.60 




68.80 




♦ 54 00 


Bi'idge, east of Ashland 


6.50 


Belmont and Old Bridge 

Brook, between Union and Walnut 


11.30 

17.50 

194.. 50 


Chestnut, Cedar to Auburn 


35.75 




5.30 




64.00 




36 50 


Hazel, Harrison north 


32. 55 


Hanover and Ashland 


5.00 




3.25 




106.40 


Laurel and Milton 


88.00 




35.50 




2.75 


INIaple to Hall on Central 


201.20 


Malvern and East High 


56.80 


Manchester and Hall 


7.50 


Manchester, between Union and Beech 
Manchester, bet. Lincoln and Wilson.. 
Merrimack, Chestnut to Union 


195.50 
15.50 
90.50 
63.80 


Prospect and Union 


28.50 


Russell to Linden, on Myrtle 


,35.25 


Russell, bet. Prospect and Myrtle 

Union, Salmon to North 


20.00 
6.50 


Union, south of Sagamore 


5.50 


Wilson, East Spruce to Valley 


209.10 






Total 


9,245 


889 


$1,555.75 


$1,744.85 





98 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PAVING RELAID. 

Elm, ne.ir New City Hotel 

Elm, near Ray brook 

Elm, near Bridge 

Hall and Manchester 

Lake avenue, between Pine and Union . . 
Lake avenue, between Canton and Cass. 

Lowell street 

Spruce and Hall 



Total 

Labor, |75.25. 



GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 



188 sq 

12 

7G 

34 
113 

83 

46 
7 



yds. 



559 sq. yds. 



Location. 



Appleton and Chestnut 

Auburn, Beech and Maple 

Belmont, south Concord 

Beech and Harrison 

Bridge, near Hall 

lU'ook and Ash 

Belmont, north Bridge 

Belmon t and Pearl 

Ca)ef road, near cemetery 

Carpenter, Elm to Union 

E. Spruce, Valley ou Wilson 

Elm, north Clarke 

Grove ajid Union 

Harvard and Pine 

Lake avenue, Belmont "west 

Lake avenue, east Hall 

Lake avenue, east Belmont 

Lake avenue, No. t!05 

Lake avenue and Belmont 

Milton and Laurel, north side 

Milton and Laurel, south side 

Merrimack and Hall 

Noi'th and Walnut 

North Union, near Carpenter 

Old Bridge, northeast to Belmont. 
Orange, between Linden and Hall 

Pearl and Belmont 

Pine, south North ■ 

Pine, Salmon and Nortli 

South ICIni, south railroad bridge. 

Salmon and Liberty 

Union and Biidge 

Union, south Webster 

Union, nortli A))pleton 

Walnut, north Salmon 

Total 



Length 
in feet. 



100 
50 
200 
100 
50 
200 
200 
100 
865 
2,800 
J,o00 
100 
150 
100 
300 
200 
400 
175 
200 
375 
275 
200 
50 
520 
400 
150 
50 
75 
500 
500 
150 
400 
200 
275 
200 



Width 


Cut or 


in feet. 


fill. 


8 


Fill... 


8 


" ... 


8 


" ... 


8 


Cut... 


8 


Fill... 


S 


Cut... 


8 


" . . 


8 


Both.. 


8 


Fill... 


8 


Both.. 


8 


" ,. 


16 


" .. 


8 


'< .. 


8 


Fill... 


8 


" ... 


8 


" ... 


8 


" ... 


8 


Cut... 


8 


It 


8 


«< ... 


8 


Both. . 


8 


Fill... 


8 


" ... 


8 


Both.. 


8 


" .. 


8 


Cut... 


8 


Fill... 


8 


" ... 


8 


" ... 


8 


" ... 


S 


Both.. 


8 


Fill... 


8 


Both.. 


8 


Fill... 


8 


... 











Labor. 



$12.50 
10.00 
20.00 
17.00 
10.00 
28.00 
3G.00 
14.50 
122.00 
544.00 
1C4.00 
24.50 
9.00 
17.00 
22.00 
40.00 
20.00 
21.00 
30.00 
50.00 
65.00 
12.00 
10.00 
243.00 
.58.00 
25.25 
9 25 
16.00 
72.00 
40.00 
97.00 
12.00 
37.00 
32.75 
23.50 



$1,964.25 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 99 

FENCING. 

W 

Arlington street 145 feet 

Everett street 300 

Elm, near Carpenter 278 

Gore east to Russell 583 

Nutt road 720 

Pennacook street 48 

Prospect east to Russell 250 

Ray, near Ray brook 185 

Sagamore, between Elm and Chestnut 480 

Union, near Ray brook 83 



Total 3,072 feet 

Note. — Labor on above charged to repairs of high- 
ways. 

EDGESTONES SET. 

Location. Feet. 

Appleton and Chestnut 30 

Ash and Concord 48 

Ash and Brook IG 

Auburn, east of Wilson 40 

Auburn, between Pine and Chestnut 100 

Brook and Walnut 17 

Belmont and Amherst 16 

Belmont and Laurel 16 

Beech and Sagamore 16 

Bridge and Belmont 10 

Beech and Orange IG 

Bridge and Maple 16 

Bridge and Russell 17 

Bridge and Russell 16 

Bridge and Maple. , 40 

Blodget and Union 8 



100 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Beech and Orange 48 

Beech and Concord 50 

Clarke and Chestnut 18 

Concord and Ashland 2<> 

Clarke and Chestnut 16 

Central and Wilson 1(> 

Cedar and Union 200 

Carpenter, Elm to Union 148 

Cedar south back and Union 65 

Elm and Baker 24 

Elm and Webster 20 

Granite 146 

Hanover and Hall 18 

Harrison and Hazel 5:i 

Hall and Laurel 34 

Hall and Spruce 14 

Lake avenue, between Pine and Union 100 

Laurel and Milton 32 

Lake avenue and Belmont 16 

Lowell and Malvern IS 

Linden and Prospect IS 

Lake avenue and Beacon 16 

Lowell and Birch 17 

Lowell and Birch 24 

Lake avenue and Beacon.. IS 

Lowell, east of Ashland 32 

Lincoln and Central 45 

Milton and Laurel 36 

Maple, near Nashua 25 

Maple and Bridge 32 

Manchester and Hall 100 

Maple and East High 52 

Malvern and East High 36 

Manchester and Maple l'> 

Merrimack and Chestnut 100 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 101 

Orange and Pine 13 

Orange and Walnut IG 

Pine and Prospect 10 

Pine and Amherst 14 

Pine, near Lowell 60 

Pine and Cedar 103 

Spruce south back on Union 41 

Salmon and Walnut 32 

Sagamore and Union 150 

Shasta -. 50 

Salmon and Liberty 16 

Union and Grove 24 

Union and Green IS 

Union and Grove 30 

Union, between Salmon and North 103 

Union and Spruce 200 

Walnut and Orange IS 

Wilson and Valley 202 

Wilson, between Summer and Cedar 215 

Walnut and Bridge 52 

Walnut and Concord 62 

Total 3,551 

EDGESTONES RESET. 

Location. Feet. 

Auburn, west of Chestnut ; 136 

Elm south back at Lowell 61 

Granite 325 

Lincoln and Central 50 

Total 572 

Total cost for labor of foregoing work, $388.30; an aver- 
age cost of $0,094 per foot. 



102 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

CONCRETE WORK.— J. T. UNDERBILL CO. 



Location. 



Amory and Dubuque 

Aniory and Columbus 

Amory and Ilevey cast back 

Amorj' and Hevey 

Bridge and Maple 

Clarke and Cbestnut 

Cedar and Maple 

Elm and Welch avenue 

East Higb and Belmont 

Elm near Brown avenue 

Elm and Clarke '. 

Gore and Walnut 

Hay ward and Jewett 

Hay ward and Front avenue 

Hosley avenue and Summer 

!Milton and Laurel 

Milton and Laurel 

INIilton and Lake avenue 

ISIilton 

Merrimack and Pine 

Orange and Beecb 

Orange anil Walnut 

Pine and Prospect south back . . 

Pine and Prospect 

Pearl and Walnut 

Pearl and Warren 

Prospect and Linden 

Salmon and Union 

Salmon and Liberty east back. . 

Sagamore an d Walnut 

Wilson and Bell 

Wilson and Grove south back.. . 

AVilson and Grove 

Wilson and Green south back. . . 

Wilson and Green 

Wilson and Summer south back 

Wilson and Summer 

Wilson and Auburn south back. 

Wilson and Auburn 

Wilson and Cedar south back... 

Wilson and Cedar 

Wilson and Spruce 

Wilson and Auburn 

Total 



Square 


Price 


yards. 


per yd. 


90.67 


$0.75 


30.22 


.75 


17.33 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


62.22 


.75 


62.22 


.75 


29.33 


.75 


55.. 56 


.75 


.57.78 


.75 


56.00 


.75 


88.00 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


32.89 


.75 


20.44 


.75 


25.00 


.75 


92.00 


.75 


17.33 


.75 


18.67 


.75 


32.89 


.75 


89.06 


.75 


50.89 


.75 


62.04 


.75 


17.78 


.75 


38.22 


.75 


28.00 


.75 


28.44 


.75 


58.67 


.75 


28.89 


.75 


17.77 


.75 


61.33 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


17.74 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


16.89 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


16.89 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


16.89 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


16.89 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


60.44 


.75 


5.78 


.75 


1,668.92 






Total 
cost. 



$68.00 
22.06 
13.00 
22.66 
46.66 
46.66 
22.00 
41.67 
43 33 
42.00 
66.00 
22.66 
24.66 
15.33 
18.75 
69.00 
13.v,0 
14.00 
24.66 
66.79 
42.66 
46.53 
13.33 
28.66 
21.00 
21.33 
44.00 
21.66 
13.33 
46 00 
22.66 
13.33 
22.66 
12.66 
22.66 
12.66 
22.66 
12.66 
22.66 
12 06 
22.66 
45.33 
4.33 



$1,261.58 



SIDEWALKS. 



Location. 



Milton 

Wilson, south Spruce 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



180.. 59 
17.77 



198.36 



Price 
per yd, 



$0.35 
.45 



Total 
cost. 



863.20 
7.99 



871.19 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



103 



CROSSINGS AND SIDEWALKS REPAIRED. 



Location. 



Bridge and Union 

Bridge and Union, east back, 

Bridge and Maple 

Bridge and Maple 

Clarke and Chestnut 

Hallsville sclioolhouse 

Lake avenue and Pine 

Milton and Lake avenue 

Orange and Pine 

Orange and Pine 

Sagamore and Vfalnut 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



27.11 

17. 7S 
63.56 
24.47 
3.90 
28.3!) 
28.89 
46.. 56 
84.71 
10.56 
11.61 



347.54 



Price 
per yd, 



$0..37 
.37 
.37 
.45 
.45 
.37 
.37 
.35 
.37 
.45 
.45 



Total 
cost. 



$10.03 
6.58 
23.51 
11.01 
1.75 
10.50 
10 68 
16.29 
31.34 
4.75 
5.22 



$131.66 



ROADWAYS RE-COVERED. 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Price 

per yd. 


Total 
cost. 






1,106.47 
352.86 


$0.50 
.50 


$553.24 
176 43 












Total 


1,459.33 




$729.67 







SUMMARY. 

Concrete Work by J. T. Underhill Co., Street and Parle Covimission Department. 



Square 
yards. 



Total cost. 



New crossings 

New sidewalks , 

Crossings and walks repaired 
Roadways recovered 

Total 



1,668.92 
198.36 
347.54 

1,459.33 



$1,251.58 

71.19 

131.66 

729.67 



2,184.10 



104 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CONCRETE WORK.— CHARLES II. ROBIE CO. 
STREET CROSSINGS. 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Price 
per yd. 


Total 
cost. 


Amory and Beauport 


29.70 
8i.71 
20.00 
29.33 
20 22 
6r78 

8.00 
36.44 
27., '56 
55.56 
40.00 
31.83 
18.67 
34.00 
30.00 
15 H 
17.33 
56.90 
30.00 

9.00 
28.78 

7.94 
15.97 
30.20 
30.20 
28.40 
53.33 
30.22 
35.44 
32.44 
42.00 
17.33 
16.89 

3.. 56 

9.78 
17.78 


$0.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 


J22.27 
63 53 


Appleton and Chestnut 


Beacon and Manchester 


15 00 




22 00 




19 66 


Bridge i^nd Walnut.. 


46.33 


Beecli and Myrtle 


6 00 


Bath and Tliird 


07 33 




20 67 




41.67 


Concord and Walnut 


30 00 


Concord and Beech 


23.87 


Concord and Ash 


14 00 




25 95 


Elm at Bakersville school 


22 50 


Harrison and Beech 


11.33 


Harrison and Walnut east back 


13.00 




42 67 




22.50 


Lake avenue west of Hall 


6 75 


Lowell and Malvern 


21.58 


Milf ord and Tilton 


5.95 


North and Elm 


11 97 


North and Bay 


22 65 


Russell and Harrison 


22 65 


Russell and HaiTison 


21.30 


Sagamore and Walnut 

Salmon and Walnut 


40.00 
22.66 


South Elm, at engine-house 


26 58 


Summer and Hall 


24.33 


South Main and A .... 


31 50 


Union and Grove south back 


13.00 


Union and Green 


12.66 




2.67 


Walnut and Myrtle 


7.33 


Wilton and Cartier 


13.33 






Total 


1,056.90 




S797.19 







SIDEWALKS. 



Location. 



Auburn 

Amory, Coolidgc avenue to Beauport 

Bridge and Elm 

Concord common 

Concord common 

Harrison and Beech 

Lake avenue engine house 

No. 224 Laurel 

Peter McQuillan's 

Total 



Square 


Price 


yards. 


per yd. 


23.57 


$0.35 


127.08 


.35 


2.00 


.40 


300.10 


.50 


81.28 


.35 


80.22 


.40 


25.00 


.40 


7.20 


.50 


98.00 


.35 


744.45 





Total 
cost. 



S8.25 

44.48 

.80 

'i7s!49 

32.08 

10.00 

3.60 

34.30 



$312.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



105 



CROSSINGS AND SIDEWALKS REPAIRED. 



Location. 



Amory and Beauport 

Beech and Myrtle 

Beech and Orange 

Bridge and Walnut 

Bridge and Walnut 

Brook anil Union 

Brook and Union 

Central and Hall 

Central and Hall 

Central and Wilson 

Central and Lincoln 

Central and Lincoln 

Concord and Beech 

Concord and Ash 

Concord and Walnut 

Elm at Christian brook 

Elm at Christian brook 

Elm and Webster 

Granite and Second 

Granite bridge approaches 

Harrison and Beech 

Market and Elm west back 

Myrtle and A.sh 

McGregor at mill entrance 

Milford and Tilton 

Orange and Beech 

Salmon and Walnut 

Walnut and Orange 

Walnut and Myrtle 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



10.60 
28 89 
35.11 
31.61 
61.78 
25.44 
.58.84 
28.00 

2.78 
12.84 
20.00 
22.11 
28.78 
10.67 
56.27 
37.78 
12.89 

3.50 
37.44 
214.30 
51.56 
28.00 
66.22 

6.67 

7.94 
32.89 

7.56 
11.56 
12,00 



953.41 



Price 
per yd 



0.50 
.37 
.37 
.45 
.37 
.35 
.37 
.37 
.45 
.25 
.37 
.25 
.37 
.37 
.37 
.25 
.40 
.75 
.37 
.37 
.37 
.37 
.37 
.37 
.3/ 
..37 
.37 
.37 
.37 



Total 
cost. 



S5.30 

10.68 

12.99 

14.23 

5:2.85 

8.90 

21.77 

10.36 

1.25 

3.05 

7.40 

5.52 

10.64 

3.94 

20.82 

9.44 

5.15 

2.62 

10.15 

107.15 

19.07 

10.36 

24.50 

2.46 

2.93 

12.16 

1.89 

4.27 

4.44 



$377.28 



ROADWAYS RE-COVERED. 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Price 
per yd. 


Total 
cost. 


Amherst 


14.25 

1,105.67 

118. 56 

18.00 

10.00 
174.44 
761.19 

20.94 
108.06 


$0.50 
.50 
.50 
.50^ 
..50 
..50 
.50 
1.00 
.50 


■^7 12 


Chestnut, Hanover to Amlierst 


552.89 


Chestnut, near the common 


59.28 


Hanover ■. 


9 00 


Nutfleld lane 


5 00 


North Main at engine-house 


87 33 


Union 


380.60 


Union and Central south back 


■'0 94 


West Merrimack 


54.03 






Total 


2,331.11 




$1,176.08 





106 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SUMMARY. 
Concrete Work by Charles H. Robie Co., Street and Park Commission Department. 



New crossings 

New sidewalks 

Crossings and walks repaired 
Roadways recovered 

Total 



Square 
yards. 



1,056.90 
744.45 
953.41 

2,331.11 



5,085.87 



Total cost. 



$797.19 
312.00 
377.28 

1,176.08 



$2,662.55 



STONE. 



Paid F. S. Bodwell, covering-stone f 80.75 

Warren Harvey, covering-stone 73.G0 

Warren Harvey, circles, cesspool stone. . 1,388.39 

Charles A. Bailey, covering-stone 438.00 

Charles A. Bailey, pinners 290.00 

Charles A. Bailey, stone for new bridge 10,233.97 

Charles A. Bailey, paving stone 1,042.63 

J. H. Coburn, cobble stone 1,212.75 

Palmer & Garmon 13.06 

Brooks & Brock, cobble stone 18.50 

John McCarty, cobble stone 9.00 

Total $14,800.65 



SNOW AND ICE. 



Receipts. 

'Appropriation $4,000.00 

Transferred from repairs of high- 
ways 941.84 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 308.94 



,250.78 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION, 



107 



Expenditures. 



Labor, January draft |1,0G8.67 

February draft 1,695.42 

March draft 1,731.13 

April draft 177.74 

December draft 308.94 

Bills for sand and supplies 68.88 

Paid for snow plows 200.00 



,250.78 



REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



Concord, Union to Beech. 

Cedar and Union 

Cedar and Union 

Elm, near Concord 

Hanover and Cliestnut . . . , 
Lake avenue, near Pine. . . 
Lake avenue, near Beecli . 
Manchester, east of Union 

Salmon and Elm 

Spruce, east of Union 

Union and Lake avenue.. . 

Total 



No. 



Cost of. 
material. 



Labor. 



$7.4T 
8.62 

12.48 
1.12 
7.17 
3.15 
1.42 
9.20 
5.47 
7.97 
8.68 



$7.25 
4.50 
5.00 
1.50 
5.00 
6.75 
1.50 
5.00 
4.00 
4.25 
3.00 



$47.75 



REPAIRED SEWERS. 



Location. 



Chestnut back, corner Cedar 

Elm, near Ray Brook 

Hall and Merrimack 

Total 



Cost of 
material. 



$2.11 
12.95 
1.73 



$16.79 



Labor. 



tl4.25 
6.00 
8.50 



$28.75 



108 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



KEW CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 




Cost of 
material. 



Labor. 



Auburn back, uear IMaple 

Amherst, between Hall and Belraont... 

Arlington and Monison 

Amherst and Lincoln 

Bridge and Helmont 

Bridge, east of Walnut 

Beech and Gore 

Belmont and Amherst 

Belmont and Hall 

Belmont and Lake avenue 

Bridge and Walnut 

Bridge and Maple 

Clarke, near Chestnut 

Cedar back, near Lincoln , 

Central and Hall 

Concord and Union 

Concord and Nashua 

Concord and Beech 

Concord and Walnut 

Chestnut, between Cedar and Auburn 

Cheney Place 

Elm and North , 

Elm and Sagamore 

Elm and Salmon 

Elm and Myrtle 

Gore and ^Valnut 

Hall and Manchester 

Hall and Laurel , 

Hazel and Harrison 

Harrison, near Elm 

Hall, uear Mead 

Hall and Amherst 

Laurel and Belmont 

Laurel and Milton 

Lake avenue, near Belmont 

Lake avenue, east of Wilson 

Lowell, near Birch 

Lake avenue, near Pine 

Lake avenue, rear of engine-house. . . 

Myrtle and Hall 

Market, near City Hall 

Myrtle and Walnut 

Mead and 15elmont 

Malvern, south of Bridge 

Merrimack and Wilson 

Myrtle and Kussell 

Malvern and East High 

Kutt road 

North and Liberty ■ 

Orange and AValnut 

Orange and Linden 

Orange and Morrison 

Prospect ;ind Union 

Pine aud Harrison 

Forward 



§13. 33 
13.38 
13.69 
12. OS 
57.24 
14.39 
2,5.42 
14,39 
16.06 
14.04 
10.50 
26.49 
15.70 
ll..')l 
16.50 
13.47 
10.05 
27.30 
10.79 
60.53 
14.09 
60.16 
13. OS 
31.35 
13.09 
44.90 
13.09 
44.99 
42 .52 
13^51 
26.65 
16.39 
,14.87 
62.09 
27.67 
11.68 
12.28 
24.43 
13.79 
25.81 
12.62 
47.42 
11.5fi 
12.09 
14.00 
17.24 
34.21 
13.90 
73.29 
16.94 
30.41 
13.98 
13.39 
13.98 



$7.50 
6.50 
5.75 
3.50 

40.00 
6.50 
8.50 

10.00 
7.0C 
6.50 
4.50 

12.50 
6.75 
6.75 
6.50 
7.00 
7.00 

15.00 
6.50 

36.80 
8.00 

38.00 
6.75 

13.00 
6.50 

18.00 
8.00 

18.75 

18.50 
5.75 

14.25 

10 00 

16.20 

50.00 

14.. 50 
5.75 
6.50 

17.50 
0.50 

13.00 
5.50 

39.50 
7,50 
6,. 50 
6.. 50 
7.50 

13.00 
9.75 

30.50 

12.00 

17.00 
8.50 
5.00 
5.50 



$1,249.83 ?6S0.75 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
NEW CESSFOOhS.— Continued. 



109 



Location. 



Amount forward 

Pearl and Hall 

Pine and Sagamore 

Russell and Myrtle 

Kiver road and Munroe 

Salmon and Union 

Union, near Grove 

Union, near Ray Brook 

Union and Grove 

Wilson, between East Spruce and Valley 

Wilson and Central 

Walnut, near Gore 

Walnut and Bridge 

Total 



No. 



113 



Cost of 
material. 



Labor. 



82 


$1,249.83 


$680.75 


2 


33.08 


18.00 


2 


31.59 


13.. 50 


1 


13.98 


6.50 


1 


14.35 


6.50 


1 


15.57 


8.00 


2 


45.71 


18.00 


2 


31.75 


n..5o 


2 


40.37 


16.75 


12 


209.35 


97.00 


2 


22.77 


19.50 


1 


13.41 


6.00 


3 


50.19 


20.50 



$1,771.95 



$922.50 



SEWERS. 



There have been built 26,530 feet or 5 miles of new sew- 
ers the past year. Among the most important built as 
trunk sewers were the Silver street sewer, Christian 
brook sewer, River road sewer, Elm street sewer, Jewett 
street sewer, and Sagamore street sewer. The most of 
these sewers were built through solid ledge. Three 
steam drills were in constant use during the season. The 
total amount expended was |6G,408.87. 

There will be a large demand for sewers for the year 
1897. The total length of sewers voted in to date is 35,- 
067 feet, or 6.6 miles. The orders recommended by the 
committee on sewers to be presented to the citj^ councils 
contain 5,454 feet, or 1.03 miles, making a total of 40,521 
feet, or 7.63 miles, at an estimated cost exceeding $100,- 
000. 

This estimate does not include the demand that will be 
made on the city government for new sewers for the 
coming year. 



no 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Street. 



Amherst 

Auburn 

Auburn south back.. 
Auburn south back . . 

Beacon 

Beech 

Beech 

Beech east back 

Belmont 

Canton 

Cedar 

Cedar south back. . . . 
Cedar south back .... 
Central south back.. 
Central south back.. 

Christian brook 

Clarke 

Elm 

Elm 

Elm 

Elm west back 

Granite 

Granite 

Green south back 

Green south back. . . . 

Grove 

GroTe south back. ... 
Jewett 



Location. 



From east of Ashland easterly 

From Canton easterl j' 

From west of Maple easterly 

From Wilson easterly 

From Spruce northerly 

From Gore northerly 

From Sagamore northerly 

From south of Concord northerly 

Mead to old Bridge 

From south of Spruce to Auburn 

Wilson to Wilson east back 

Pine to west of Beech 

From Wilson east back easterly 

Union to Beech 

From east of Wilson easterly 

Liberty east back to Beech east back 

River road to Elm 

Clarke to Thayer 

Thayer 

From Clarke southerly 

Christian brook to Salmon 

At east end of bridge 

At east end of bridge 

From Union westerly 

From Union easterly 

From west of Taylor westerly 

From west of Union easterly 

From north of Young to Clay 



Akron.. 


8 


II 


10 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


8 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


12 


" .. 


12 


<• .. 


10 


" .. 


15 


II 


10 


II 


15&12 


II 


12 


Brick . . 


42x63 


i< 


24x36 


(I 


22x33 


Akron.. 


16 


" .. 


8 


" .. 


10 


Steel.... 


36 


Brick... 


36 


Akron.. 


12 


II 


10 


II 


10 


II 


10 


(I 


15 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



Ill 



IN 1896.— EAST SIDE. 



s 

c'3 



c <0 

ID <S 





si 


m 


m 


o 


o 


.a 


ft 




H 


Cj 


a 


g 


iJ 



660 
2 



19 



$13.25 

1,572.25 

165.58 

513.27 

70.44 

355.19 

378.61 

56.27 

410.04 

388.14 

198.50 

277.60 

2,370.87 

899.23 

82.28 

5,187.08 

1,927.26 

1,752.78 

3,016.00 

34.48 

734.78 

592.27 

150.20 
686.19 
137.02 
468.37 
3,635.13 



$0.17 
3.083 
0.827 
1.00 
0.355 
3.116 
0.91 
0.296 
1.694 
1.102 
0.936 
0.925 
2.651 
1.606 
0.872 
5.135 
3.794 
3.794 
4.00 
0.189 
1.212 

6.966 



Oct. 
Nov. 

Nov. 
June 

March 
Oct. 
July 
June 

Sept. 



July 
April 
Sept. 
April 
August 11 
" 11 

Sept. 17 



Oct. 4 

Dec. 1 

July 15 

June 12 

Ma r. 28 

Oct. 12 

July 9 

June 31 

" 20 

Oct. 4 

4 

Sept. 16 

May 9 

Sept. 23 

May 30 

Dec. 30 

" 30 

" 30 



Sept. 



16 



Sept. 30 



1.444 

1.38 ! 

1.356 June 



1.446 
4.145 



Oct. 15 

April 20 



July 3 
Oct. 27 
June 12 



112 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SEWERS BUILT IN 1896. 



Street. 



Liberty east back 

Lincoln 

Malvern 

Mead 

Merrimack south back 

Old Bridge 

Pine 

Porter 

Kay 

Kiver road 

River road 

Sagamore 

Silver 

Union 

Union east back 

Union east back 

Valley 

Valley 

Valley 

Walnut ea;st back 

Wilson 

Wilson 

Wilson east back 

Wilson Ui!l 

Wilson Hill 



Total. 



Location. 



From Christian brook northerly ... 

From Silver northerly 

At Bridge 

Hall to Belmont /. 

From Beech westerl j' 

From Belmont westerly 

Auburn to Cedar south back 

From Amherst northerly 

From Ray brook northerly 

At Ray brook 

Monroe to Clarke 

From east of Beech to Oak 

Union to Lincoln 

From Appleton northerly 

From Christian brook southerly ... 

Christian brook to Webster 

From Wilson to east of Belmont... 
From Wilson to oast of Belmont... 

From Jewett easterly 

From Christian brook southerly . . . 

Valley to Prescott 

Prescott to Harvard 

Cedar to Cedar south back 

Laurel to Merrimack 

Merrimack northerly 



Akron. 



Iron . . . 
Brick.. 
Akron. 
Brick.. 
Akron. 



Iron . . . 
Akion. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



113 



— EAST SIDE.— Continued 



453 
215 

67 
362 
148 
125 
142 
260 
504 
24 
663 
829 

1,788 

150 

350 

607 

12 

1,030 
300 
410 
807 
336 
126 
257 
250 



bES 

c o 



14 



18,938 1,541 69 10 594 73 $56,127.59 



$473.83 
38.02 
108.24 
655.56 
163.14 
127.62 
336.54 
149.89 
475.43 

2,606.39 

2,617.17 

16,124.13 

79.50 

565.00 

942.54 

2,400.63 

229.00 
445.71 
779.02 
294.80 
106.27 
400.14 
35.94 



O 



$1,045 
0.180 
1.615 
1.811 
1.102 
1.021 
2.37 
0.576 
0.943 

3.794 

3.157 
9.018 
0.530 
1.615 
1.552 

2.304 

0.763 
1.087 
0.965 
0.877 
0.843 
1.557 
0.144 



Sept. 21 
August 15 
May 9 



Dec. 
Sept. 

July 
May 
April 



August 11 

June 12 

May 20 

Sept. 26 

June 13 

" 13 



May 

Nov. 
Oct. 



=3 -a 

«.2 



Sept. 28 

Aug. 17 

May 13 

Jan. 18 

Sept. 22 

" 29 

" 16 

May 14 

April 25 



Aug. 6 
15 

Sept. 29 

Aug. 12 

12 

June 12 

May 7 

Nov. 23 

" 10 



Oct. 



114 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT IN 



Street. 



Amherst road. 
Amherst road . 



B. 



Bo ynton 

Carroll 

Cartier cast back. 

Conaut 

Dartmouth 

Granite 

Granite 

Heyey cast back. . 
Main west back. . . 

Mast 

Mast 

McDuffle 

Parker avenue. . . . 

Prince 

Quincy 

Second 

Tilton 



Location. 



Total. 



Mast to south of Carroll 

South of Carroll southerly 

From C northei'ly 

C to McDuffle 

From Amherst road southerly. . . 

From Putnam southerly 

From west of Cartier westerly. . . 

Dickey to Frederick 

At west end of bridge 

At west end of bridge 

From Arnory southerly 

From Wayne southerly 

Fi'om west of Bowman easterly. 
From west of Riddle westerly — 

Boynton to Huntress 

From Parker southerly 

Boynton to Huntress 

From Douglas southerly 

From Schiller southerly 

From Milford northerly 



Akron. 



Steel . . 
Akron. 



24 
10 
10 
15 
10 
10 
10 
10 
24 
15 
12 
12 
10 
24 
10 
8 
10 
10 
12 
10 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



115 



1896.— WEST SIDE. 

















4i 


^ 






II 

o 


•a 


en 

<v 

o 

s 
g 


as 
a) 

g 

a 

S 

oS 
1^ 


» 

3 
O 

n 


O 
O 

& 

® 


in 
O 
o 

o 


O 

<2 ■ 

O 

m 
O 

O 


C 




il 

c 


416 




1 


11 


4 


$2,238.26 


$5,381 


May 


29 


Oct. 2 


184 








1 

7 


1 


141.47 
188.17 


0.769 
0.905 


July 


29 
29 


• « 2 


219 




1 




Aug. 1 


577 




2 




20 


3 


527.53 


0.914 


April 


21 


April 27 


250 




1 


1 


3 


1 


178.64 


0.715 


Oct. 


3 


Oct. 6 


344 




3 


1 




3 


247.80 


0.721 


May 


10 


May 21 


56 








2 
14 


2 
) 


36.52 
322.97 


0.652 
0.913 


June 


16 

17 


June 17 


354 






1 


" 24 




39 


















562.85 


3.127 


Oct. 


6 


Oct. 20 




141 


1 


1 




4) 












404 




1 




16 




291.20 


0.721 


May 


5 


May 9 


350 




2 




2 


1 


306.99 


0.877 


Oct. 


7 


Oct. 19 


202 




1 




4 


1 


203.91 


1.01 


June 


9 


June 15 


610 




2 




15 


6 


3,297.42 


5.602 


May 


29 


Oct. 2 


512 




1 




18 


3 


313.99 


0.613 


April 


30 


May 2 


150 




1 


1 


6 




60.58 


0.404 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 13 


588 




2 




17 


3 


299.00 


0.509 


April 


28 


AprU 30 


84 


4 


.... 


1 


4 




56.88 


0.646 


August 


25 


Aug. 27 


290 




1 




12 




762.08 


2.973 


May 


12 


May 28 


277 






1 


11 


1 


245.02 


0.881 


April 


13 


April 16 








5,867 


184 


20 


7 


152 


33 


$10,281.28 










1 





116 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Length of sewers, East side, division No. 2 . 15,377 feet 
Length of sewers, East side, division No. 7.. 5,102 " 
Length of sewers, West side, division No. 10 6,051 " 

Total 26,530 feet 

Cost of sewers. East side, division No. 2 $48,032.42 

Cost of sewers, East side, division No. 7 8,095.17 

Cost of sewers, West side, division No. 10. . . . 10,281.28 

Total $66,408.87 

Average cost per foot. East side, division No. 2 $3,123 

Average cost per foot. East side, division No. 7 . 1.586 
Average cost per foot, West side, division No. 

10 1.700 

Average total cost per foot, $2,503. 

SUMMARY. 

Total appropriation for new sewers $77,326.81) 

Expended, Silver street sewer $16,124.13 

Christian brook sewer, 5,187.08 
Kiver road and Elm 

street sewer 9,302.43 

new sewers. East side.. 25,513.95 
new sewers, West side. 10,281.28 

113 new cesspools 2,694.45 

On hand, River road sewer 5,697.57 

supplies at city yard. . , . 2,526,00 

Total $77,326.89 

The following table shows how the cost for new sewers, 
including Silver street, Christian brook, and River road, 
has been divided: 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



117 



O 
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118 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SCAVENGER SERVICE. 

The scavenger service has become one of the most im- 
portant features of this department. 

There are nine teams in daily use collecting the waste 
matter about the city. These teams will average six or 
more loads each, per day, or exceeding 17,000 for the 
year. 

The city farm, which has the contract for removing the 
perishable waste, disposes of 3,000 loads, making in all 
20,000 loads of waste matter collected. The question 
arises for future consideration, What disposition can be 
made of this large accumulation of waste matter? 

There are some over 3,000 cesspools that require clean- 
ing out three or fouriimes each year, making 4,000 loads. 
The sweeping department collects 3,000 loads, making a 
total of 27,000 loads which is carted to the dumps. 

SUMMARY. 

Labor. '. |11,432.5.5 

City farm 2,291.67 

Incidentals 118.87 

Repairs on teams and sleds 257.06 

Repairs on harnesses 118.68 

Hay, grain, feed 722.73 

Horse shoes 49.51 

Total $14,991.10 

NEW BRIDGE, GRANITE STREET. 

On March 3, 1896, the city experienced the most disas- 
trous flood known in its history, carrying away the old 
wooden bridge at Granite street, which had stood the test 
of wind and flood for fifty years. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 119 

McGregor and Amoskeag bridges were more or less 
damaged, necessitating expensive repairs; the abutments 
of bridges on the Gofifstown road and at Harvey's Mills 
were carried out, requiring rebuilding; while costly re- 
pairs had to be made upon the streets and highways, 
caused by extensive washouts. 

As early as practicable a contract was made with The 
Head & Dowst Co., to build a foot-bridge at Granite 
street, which was completed in about three weeks, the 
water commissioners bearing a portion of the expense. 
This step was much appreciated by the people on the 
West side. 

On April 27 the city councils passed a resolution au- 
thorizing the street and park commissioners to build a 
steel bridge, to replace the old wooden structure, and ap- 
propriated $130,000 for the same. 

Previous to this, proposals had been received from fif- 
teen reputable bridge contractors throughout the coun- 
try, with plans and specifications, only three of which 
were selected to cRoose from, the others being deemed 
impracticable. 

Finally the plan of the Groton Bridge Co., Works & 
Briggs agents, was selected, and a contract made for a 
steel high truss bridge, with granite road bed. 

Proposals were also received from plans prepared by 
the city engineer, for building the piers and abutments, 
but the bids received were considered too expensive. 

The character of the river bed and the old piers was 
such that the commissioners deemed it advisable to have 
the work done by the city instead of by contract. 

L. F. Kittredge & Son were employed, and they com- 
pleted the work in a most satisfactory manner, at a sav- 
ing to the city of about $1,000. Work was commenced 
May 18, and the bridge opened to public travel November 
28. 



120 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The commissioners are much indebted to Capt. Charles 
H. Manning, consulting engineer, for his sound advice 
and good judgineut given, while the bridge was in process 
of building. 

SUMMARY OP NEW BRIDGE, GRANITE STREET; 

548 loads of sand $411.00 

2,844 barrels of Hoffman cement 2,957.76 

33 barrels of Portland cement 83.25 

Hardware 166.11 

Coal 209.18 

Lumber 910.50 

Stone 10,293.97 

Use of derricks and tools 2,959.50 

Incidentals 346.68 

Pay-roll 27,667.78 

146,005.73 
Superstructure 92,750.00 

^138,755.73 
Less Manchester Street Railway |1,228.00 

Less cost of foot-bridge 1,000.00 

2,228.00 



Actual cost $136,527.73 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



121 



BRIDGES. 



The following table gives the dimensions, material, 
and number of spans of the various bridges within the 
city limits: 



Location. 



Amoskeag 

Bridge street, at canal 

Bridge st., McGregor and approaches 

Cohas avenue, at Great Cohas 

Derry road, at Great Cohas 

Derry road, near Cohas avenue 

Derry road, near town line 

Dunbarton road, Black brook 

Elm street, at railroad 

Front street, at Black brook 

Granite street, at canal 

Granite street, at river .. 

Harvey road, at Great Cohas 

Island Pond road, outlet to lake 

Main street, at 'Squog river 

Mammoth road, at Great Cohas 

Mammoth road, near town line 

Mill road, at Harvey's mill 

Parker street, at railroad 

River road, at Little Cohas 

River road, below James Cheney's. . . 

River road, at Goffe's Falls 

Second street, at 'Squog river 

Second street, at 'Squog river 

South road 

Webster road, at water-works dam.. . 
Weston road, east of D . Connor's . . 



Length 

in 
feet. 



Width 

of 

roadway 



765.5 

57 

1,085 

36 

38 

20 

21 

25 

89 

10. 5 

56.3 

472 

32 

41 

180 

38 

14 

59 

53 

16 

6 

30 

62 

127 

12 

100 

6 



20 
22.5 
24 
30.5 
20 
17 

20.5 
17.5 
29.5 
33 
37.3 
40 
21 

16.7 
34 
IS 
20 
20.5 
24 
20 
16 
30 

32.5 
32.5 
22 
17.5 
16 



No. of 
walks. 



Width 

of 
walks. 



5.5 

7 

6 



4.5 



Material. 



8.75 
8.75 



Wood. 
Iron. 



Stone. 
Wood. 



Iron. 
Steel. 
Wood. 

Stone. 
Wood. 



Iron. 
Wood. 



Steel. 



Wood. 



Arch 

es or. 
spans- 



Stone bridges, 2 ; steel, 3; iron, 4; wood, IS; total, 27. 



122 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

Report of Division No. 10. 

GENERAL REPAIRS. 

Repaired Black brook bridge, labor $12.00 

Repaired Parker street bridge, labor 35,00 

Repaired bridge, Goffstown road, labor 39,00 

186.00 

Graveled Amory back street, labor |10,00 

Black brook road, labor 12.25 

Beauport" street 47.75 

Cleveland street 25.00 

Douglas street 3.00 

Front street 23.50 

Mast street 23.00 

1144.50 
Used 234 loads of gravel. 

Repaired Eddy road with stone chips, labor, $19.75. 
Repaired Parker street, labor, $15. 
Repaired Railroad street, labor, $5. 

Culverts repaired. Railroad street, labor $6.00 

Rockland avenue, labor... 6.00 

Amoskeag, labor 9.00 

Mast road 3.25 

$24.25 

Cut bushes, labor, $25. 

Whitewashing tree boxes, material and labor, $21.20. 
Qleaned out gutters, scraped crossings, and general re- 
pairs, labor, .$849.64. 

FENCING. 

Back road, Amoskeag 36 feet 

Back road, Amoskeag 350 " 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



123 



Bedford road 200 feet 

Goffstown road 200 " 

Hooksett road 1,000 " 

Mast road 310 " 

Milford street 224 " 

New Mast street 150 " 

Total 2,470 feet 

Cost of materials and labor, |145.50. 

NEW STREETS GRADED. 



Location. 



Bremer 

Back road , Amoskeag 

Carroll 

Dickey 

Dubuque, Wayne to Sullivan ... 

Daitmouth 

Greenwood 

Hevey, Kelley to Atnory 

Hevey, Amofy to Wayne 

Hevey, north of Conant 

Joliette, Kelley to Amory 

Kelley street 

McDuffle 

Montgomery, Kelley to Amory. 
Putnam, Beauport to Cartier... 

Rimmon 

Rimmon, north Conant 

Wheelock 



Totals , 



Length 
in feet. 



350 
510 
800 
300 
.5-20 
350 
800 
660 
350 
310 
550 
3,113 
150 
560 
175 
650 
100 
40 



10,288 



Cut or 
fill 



Both 



Cut... 
Fill.. 



Cut.. 



Both 
Cut.. 
Both 
Fill . . 
Both 
Cut.. 
Both 
Fill.. 



No. feet 
graveled 



225 

800 
300 
520 



400 



.550 
2,228 



560 
175 



5,758 



Labor. 



$24.00 

97.00 

176.00 

247.25 

289.50 

25.00 

29.00 

797.06 

184.25 

15.00 

294.12 

2,196.92 

40.00 

341.37 

25.00 

40.70 

22.00 

25.00 



$4,869.17 



Wall built on Mast road, 279 perch stone, labor 
Wall built on New Mast road, 136 perch stone. 



$141.50 



labor 



118.50 

Total $260.00 

Note. — In some cases above streets have only been 
turnpiked with road-machine. 

For incidentals see summary of new streets graded in 
report of Division No. 2. 



124 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



• MACADAMIZING. 

*Xorth Main street, Putnam to Adams, 3,412 square 
yards. 

Used 961 loads of crushed stone. 
Used 96 loads of chips. 
Labor, $1,272.25. 

STREETS TOP-DRESSED. 



Location. 



Amory-street bill 

Bryant 

Bedford road 

Beauport, north Conant. 

Eddy road 

Front street 

Goffstown road 

Mast road 

Mast road 

Mast road 



Total. 



Length in. 
feet. 



300 
300 
350 
230 
1,150 



230 
400 
200 
200 



3,360 



Width in 
feet. 



23 

27 
15 

28 
18 



Labor. 



$68.25 
37.64 
66.50 
30.30 
20.00 
27.00 
55.50 
30.00 
56.25 
23.25 



S414.69 



COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Location. 



Amory 

A 

Bryant 

Bath 

Carroll 

Dubuque 

Dubuque, north of Amoi-y. 
Dubuque, south of Wayne. . 
Dubuque, north of Conant.. 

Kelley 

Mast road 

North Main and McGregor. 

Putnam 

Riddle 

Rinimon 

Riinmon 



Total. 



Square 
yards. 



156 

85 

370 

76 

445 

58 

20 

97 

162 

92 

573 

842 

124 

102 

243 

111 



3,556 



No. 
loads. 



16 

9 

47 

9 

54 

8 

3 

13 

22 

10 

18 

100 

13 

11 

30 

13 



376 



Labor. 



$86.24 
27.00 

123.86 
21.00 

119.25 
19.87 
6.50 
25.00 
51.50 
17.00 

218.11 

380.65 
58.34 
55.26 
77.32 
47.75 



51,334.65 



* Included in table for macadamizing in Division 2 report. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 125 
PAVING RELAID. 

Beauport, north of Adams 20 feet 

Eddy road 100 " 

Forrest street.' 60 " 

Main street 160 " 

West end McGregor bridge 10 " 

Total 350 feet 

Labor, |140.50. 

EDGBSTONES SET. 

Feet. 

Amory and Columbus 16 

Amory and Essex 16 

Amory Manufacturing Co.'s lot 356 

Amory and Laval 16 

Amory and Dubuque 16 

A and Bryant 23 

Amory and Cartier 167 

Amory and Coolidge avenue 19 

Amory and Beauport 13 

Beauport and Conant 22 

Beauport and Milton 35 

Cartier and Milton 24 

Cartier and Putnam 38 

Conant .and Dubuque 24 

Dickey and Dartmouth 28 

Douglas 76 

Granite bridge, west end 144 

Granite and Green 14 

Harvard and Second 14 

Hevey and Amory 32 

Wallace's mills 8 

Total 1,101 

Labor, $132.91. 



126 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 



Location. 


Length 
in feet. 


Width 

iu 

feet. 


Cut or 
fill. 


Labor. 




50 
160 
1.50 
150 
275 
200 
440 
250 
112 
350 
600 
375 
1,000 
420 
8G0 
100 
100 
450 

50 
1,550 

75 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
6 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
7 

& 
6 

S 


Fill... 

Both" 

Fill.. 
Cut... 

Fill'.!". 

Cut.'.".* 
Fill... 
Cut... 


$1 50 




5.00 




28.75 




10.00 




29.00 




8.00 




11.00 




8.36 




6.00 




11.50 


* Dickey 






Both.. 

Fill... 

Both" 
Fill... 
Both.. 
Cut... 
Both.. 


9.00 


Milford 


61.00 


Milton 


15.50 




20.00 




7.00 




16.00 




10.00 




10.00 




29.50 




22.00 






Total 


7,717 






$309.11 











* Lahor charged to new highways. 



STREET AND PARK COxMMISSION. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



127 



Location. 



Amory and Rimmon 

Amory 

A 

Amherst road 

Boynton and Prince 

Boynton and McDuffle 

Bath 

Boynton 

Canton and Wayne 

Canal 

City yard, division No. 10 

Cartier and Sullivan 

Dickey and Dartmouth. . . 

Dubuque and Wayne 

Dubuque and Coriant 

Granite and Turner 

Hancock and Second 

Kelley and Dubuque 

Kelley and Rimmon 

Kelley 

Main at Wallace's mills. . 

Mast road 

Mast road 

McGregor 

Main, west back 

North Main 

Rimmon and Conant 

Rimmon and Conant 

Turner 

Williams 

Total 



No. 



46 



Cost of 
material. 



$17.24 
44.21 

7.96 

4.90 
21.14 
11. OS 

9.45 
24.04 
19.80 
29.74 

7.66 
13.04 
25.90 
12.60 
16.50 
28.92 
17.40 
25.16 
16.94 
53.32 
17.71 
86 0-2 
12.27 
33.91 
10.20 
16.36 
13.80 
15.07 

9.98 
17.72 



$640.04 



Labor. 



$13.25 
41.22 
12.00 

7.00 
12.00 

7.00 
12.50 
37.70 
13.50 
30.00 

8.00 
12.00 
26.50 
33.50 
15.50 
15.00 
16.25 
25.62 
22.50 
66.67 
18.00 
59.62 

9.75 
22.00 

5.00 
11.50 
10.90 
16.50 
10.00 
13.50 



$584.48 



128 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
REPAIRED SEWERS AND CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



Bath atid Second 

Beauport 

C street (sewer) 

Conant and Waj-nc 

Kelley (sewer) 

McGregor 

Mast road 

Milford 

North Main 

Cleaning out cesspools. 



Total. 



Cost of 
material. 



$0.82 



1.29 



8.90 
2.32 



1.43 
1.12 



Cost of 
labor. 



$1.50 

2.50 

40.00 

1.75 

248.00 
3.75 
1.50 
1.50 
6.00 

361.97 



$668.47 



The following table gives only the length in feet and 
total cost of sewers built in this division the past season. 
For further details see (Sewer Table) division No. 2 re- 
port. 



NEW SEWERS. 



Location. 



Amherst road, Mast to south of Carroll . . 
Amherst road, south of Carroll southerly 

B, C northerly 

Boynton, C to McDuffle 

Carroll, Amherst road, southerly 

Cartier east back, Putnam southerly 

Conant, west of Cartier westerly 

Dartnioutli, Dickey to Frederick 

Granite bridge, west end 

Hevey east back, Amory southerls' 

Main, west back, Waj'ne southerly , 

Mast, west of i'.owman easterly 

Mast, west of Riddle westerly 

McDuflie, Boynton to Huntress 

Parker avenue, Parker southerly 

Prince, Boynton to Huntress 

Quincy, Douglas southerly 

Second, Schiller southerly 

Tilton, Milford northerly 

Total 



Length 
in feet. 



416 
184 
219 
577 
250 
344 

56 
354 
180 
404 
350 
202 
610 
612 
150 
588 

88 
290 
277 



6,051 



Total 
cost. 



§2,2,38.26 
141.47 
188.17 
527.53 
178.64 
247.80 

36.52 
322.97 
562.85 
291.20 
306.99 
203.91 
3,297.42 
313.99 

60.58 
299.00 

56.88 
762.08 
245.02 



$10,281.28 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 129 

REPORTS FROM HIGHWAY DIVISIONS. 



Division No. 4. 
Byron E. Moore, Agent. 

Number of feet of new roads built this year, 550. 

Number of feet of roads graveled, 1,000. 

Number of feet of roads widened, 500. 

The total number of cubic yards filled has been 2,000. 

Two new stone culverts have been built, and one pipe 
culvert repaired. 

Bushes have been cut both sides of the roads through- 
out the division, and all roads broken out after snow- 
storms. 

Total amount expended for labor, |566.87. 



Division No. 5. 
Mark E. Harvey, Agent. 

Number of feet in length of roads graveled, 4,950. 

Number of feet in length of roads turnpiked, 895. 

Graded by cut. Porter street 445 cu. yds. 

Graded by cut, Londonderry old road 646 " 

Graded by cut, Weston road 74 '' 

Total 1,165 cu. yds. 

Londonderry old road has been widened 7^ feet for a 
distance of 1,050 feet, making a fill of from one to five feet 
deep. The high water last spring washed out the east 
abutment of the bridge across Cohas brook near the old 
Harvey mill site. This abutment, together with the en- 

9 



130 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

tire bridge, has been rebuilt, using new timbers where 
necessary. This bridge has been narrowed about three 
feet, and straightened, making it more in line with the 
highway than before. One stone culvert has been taken 
up, cleaned, and relaid. Loose stones removed from the 
roads twice a month from April until November. All 
roads broken out after each snowstorm. 
Total amount expended for labor, |707.01. 



Division No. 6. 
Daniel H. Dickey, Agent. 

Turnpiked 2,280 feet with road-machine, graveled 
Dickey road, covered two bridges with new plank, rebuilt 
six culverts, three stone and three of pipe. 

Bushes cut on both sides of the road for about three 
and one half miles. Eoads broken out after all snow- 
storms, and general repairs made throughout division. 

Total amount expended for labor, $365.52. 



Division No. 7. 

Charles Francis, Agent. 

new highways. 

Cypress street, turnpiked Young road to 

" Clay street 1,200 feet 

Harvard street, by cut of 2 feet, Wilson to 

Hall 315 " 

Revere avenue, by cut and fill 250 " 

Grove street, graded and graveled 600 " 

Wilson street, from Valley to Silver, graded.. 1,400 " 

Total 3,765 feet 



STKEET AND PARK COMMISSION. 131 

GRADE FOR COXCRETE. 

Grove street 100 feet 

AVilson street 450 " 

Vinton street 200 " 

Harvard street 300 " 

Prout avenue 200 " 

Jewett street 300 " 

Falls road 120 " 

Total 1,670 feet 

STONE WORK. 

Built culvert Highland and Glenwood avenue, 1 foot x 
li feet. 

Built culvert Belmont street and Young road, 2 feet x 2 
feet. 

Gutter paved Falls road, 150 feet. 

Edgestone set, Jewett and Hay ward 16 feet 

Hay ward and Prout avenue. . 32 " 

Summer and Massabesic 16 " 

Hosley and Summer 32 " 

Hay ward and Taylor 16 " 

Total 112 feet 

Used road-macliine on following roads: Mammoth 
road, Huse road, Hall road, Candia road, Young road, 
Paige street, Belmont street, Longwood avenue. High 
land avenue, Orchard avenue. 



132 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



NEW SEWERS BUILT. 



Location. 



Auburn, Canton easterly 

Auburn sontli back, Wilson easterly 

Beacon, Spruce northerly 

Canton, south of Spruce to Auburn 

Cedar, Wilson to Wilson east back 

Cedar south back, Pine to west of Beech 

Grove, west of Taylor westerly 

.Jewett, north of Young to Clay 

Vallev, Jewett easterly 

Wilson, Valley to Prescott 

■Wilson, Prescott to Harvard 

Total 



.9,102 



Length 


Total 


in feet. 


cost. 


.510 


$1,.572.25 


51.5 


.513.27 


198 


70.44 


3.52 


388.14 


212 


198.50 


894 


277.60 


101 


137.02 


877 


3,635.13 


300 


229.00 


sn: 


779.02 


33f; 


294.80 



S8,095.17 



Note. — Most of the work in this division this year has 
been on new sewers, the above list giving only the length 
in feet and total cost. For further details see (Sewer Ta- 
ble) division No. 2 report. 

General repairs have been made throughout the divi- 
sion, all roads broken out after snowstorms, bushes cut, 
stones removed from the roads, etc. 

Total amount expended for labor, including new sew- 
ers, 18,892.12. 



Division No. 8. 

George H. Penximax, Agext. 

Considerable work has been done on the Bridge-street 
extension this year. The street has been widened and 
graded for a distance of 3,000 feet. Number of cubic 
yards cut, 2,987; filled, 3,007. Number of cubic yards 
rock blasted, 74; 8.3 cubic yards ledge blasted near Can- 
dia road, and 100 cubic yards stone removed. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 133 



178 feet x 1 foot x 1 foot culvert laid. 
75 feet x 1 foot x 1^ feet culvert laid. 
26 feet x 1 foot x 2 feet culvert laid. 
15 feet X H feet x 2 feet culvert laid. 



294 feet total length. 

Stonework for above culverts, including covering, 63.7 
cubic yards. 

Rubble for above culverts, 20 cubic yards. 

Graded three sidewalks on Hanover road, total length 
in feet, 708; and paved gutters, 204 square yards. Built 
bank wall; 142 feet. 

Number of cubic yards filled, 600. 

3,564 feet of roads turninked. 

Stone culverts (new) built : 
12 feet X 11 feet x 1^ feet. 
24 feet x 2 feet x 1^ feet. 
165 feet x 1 foot x 1 foot. 
15 feet X 1 foot x U feet. 



216 feet total new. 

Stone culverts relaid : 
23 feet x 2 feet x 1^ feet. 
25 feet x 2 feet x 1 foot. 
27 feet x 1 foot x li feet. 

133 feet stone and pipe. 

112 feet plank. 



320 feet total relaid. 

Stonework for above culverts, including covering, 123 
cubic yards. 

Rubble for above culverts, 27 cubic yards. 

Bank wall built. 111 feet x 3^ feet x 2 feet, 31 perch 
stone. 



134 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Bank wall built, 142 feet x 4 feet x 2 feet, 45 perch 
stone. 
New railing built : 60 feet of wood. 

205 feet 4x6 rail, 18 iron posts set in 

stone on Page's hill. 
430 feet 4x4 rail, 40 iron posts set in 
stone on Hanover road. 
Built two driveways, using 27 feet 10-inch iron pipe. 
Bushes have been cut both sides of the road for a dis- 
tance of twelve miles. General repairs made throughout 
the division, loose stones removed from roads once a 
week. All roads broken out after snowstorms. 
Total amount expended for labor, $2,502.36. 



Division No. 9. 
Lester C. Paige, Agent. 

Number of feet of roads graveled, 3,780. 

Number of feet of roads plowed and turnpiked, 708. 

Number of feet of railing built, 128. 

The bridge over Cohas brook on Mammoth road was 
newly planked, using 2,400 feet; also the bridge on Derry 
road was patched with 800 feet of plank. 

ROAD-MACHINE USED. 

On Cohas avenue, from Derry road to division line. 

On Webster road, from Derry road to division line. 

On Paige road, from Mammoth road to Londonderry 
line. 

On Mammoth road, from division line to Londonderry 
line. 

Derry road about one and one half miles. 

Bushes have been cut on all roads throughout the divi- 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 135 

sion. Small stones were removed from the roads several 
times during the season. All roads broken out after 
snowstorms, and kept in a passable condition during the 
winter months. 

Total amount expended for labor, $465.78. 



Division No. 12. 

Eugene C. Liebey, Agent. 

Koads broken out and opened for travel during the 
winter months. Cleaned out the culverts and ditches 
throughout the division. Graveled the entire length of 
the hill on Bald Hill road; also graveled 810 feet on Mam- 
moth road. Widened and graded 3,400 feet Bridge-street 
extension, lengthened on and built over several culverts. 
Made general repairs throughout the division. 

Total amount expended for labor, |889.72. 



COMMONS. 

John Fullerton, Superintendent. 

The principal labor done on the commons in the winter 
months is preparing and flooding the small ponds for 
skating purposes. This costs but a small sum, and is 
well worth the expenditure for the pleasure it affords the 
boys and girls in outdoor healthful exercise. There are 
eight ponds so cared for, — three on Merrimack, two on 
Park, one on Concord, one on Hanover, and two on Tre- 
mont commons. 

Early in the spring a general cleaning up is made of all 
accumulated waste, seats painted and put in position, 
and all dead trees removed and new set out. The grass 
is cut several times during the season, and flowers and 



136 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

shrubbery cared for. Before freezing, all flowering 
plants are removed and distributed among the various 
schools throughout the city. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures on 
commons : 

Labor $2,450.00 

Water- Works 700.00 

Trees, shrubs, and flowers 282.75 

Concreting 222.97 

Incidentals 1.39.28 

Tools and supplies 74.13 

Grass seed and dressing 160.87 

Seats 81.30 

Painting 64.53 

Lights 30.00 

Hose 145.20 



Total 14,351.15 

DERRYFIELD PARK. 

The plan adopted by the city councils in regard to beau- 
tifying both Derryfield and Stark parks has been fol- 
lowed as far as possible with the limited appropriations 
available for this work. 

There has been constructed on the north of old Bridge 
street a circular macadamized driveway, 1,528 feet by 20 
feet, 4,415 square yards, using 1,500 loads of stone, with a 
cobble gutter on both sides 2^ feet wide, 1,154 cubic 
yards; also the west side of the avenue leading to Oak 
Hill has been paved 2^ feet wide for 1,500 feet. A stone 
culvert 2x2 has been built across Bridge street to take 
care of the water coming down Oak Hill. Several acres 
of bushes have been cut and burned. Five new cesspools 
have been built, and 84 feet of 8-inch pipe laid. 

All manure made at the city stables has been carried to 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 137 

the park and thoroughly mixed with loam, making an ex- 
cellent fertilizer of over two hundred loads, which will be 
utilized for top dressing the coming season. 

The foundation for the Weston Observatory was put 
in, and the same will be erected the coming year, which 
will add much to the attraction of the park. 

The area of Derryfield park, with the addition of Oak 
Hill, is now 93.65 acres. 

Following is a summary of expenditures on this park 
for the season : 

Labor |3,832.95 

Stone 38.50 

Incidentals 11.57 

Water-Works 24.00 

Coke 17.00 

Hardware 55.08 

Forcite powder 23.27 

Total ^,002.37 

STARK PARK. 

Early in the season all ditches and gutters were 
cleaned out and roadways repaired, bushes cut, and all 
waste matter collected and burned. Eleven acres have 
been top-dressed with ashes and other fertilizers; set out 
twenty-five trees, and beautified the grounds with over 
eight hundred flowering shrubs carefully selected for 
this purpose. 

There was also built a tool-house. The lot about the 
Stark cemetery was graded and an attractive curbing 
placed in position, furnished by Augustus Stark and Miss 
Elizabeth Stark. 

All trees and shrubbery were well watered during the 
dry season. Six hundred feet of new fencing was built 
on the north side of the park. Grass was cut several 



138 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

times during the season, and trees trimmed in the natural 
grove located in the northwestern section of the park. 

Following is a list of expenditures on this park for the 
season: 

Labor $535.75 

Trees and shrubs 335.00 

Dressing ! 112.50 

Hardware 14.38 

Total $997.63 

Following is the area of the different parks and squares 
throughout the city, showing the extensive territory to 
be taken care of with the small amount of money availa- 
ble for this purpose: 

Area of Derryfield park 93.65 acres 

Stark park 30.00 " 

West side park 9.76 " 

Rimmon park (proposed) 42.91 " 

Concord square 4.48 " 

Hanover square 3.00 " 

Merrimack square 5.89 " 

Park square 3.49 " 

Simpson square .56 " 

Tremont square 2.25 " 

Total area 195.99 acres 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIOM. 



139 



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140 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

In closing we desire to extend our thanks to His Honor 
the Major and the members of the Committee on Streets, 
Sewers, and Commons for the uniform courtesy and read- 
iness to aid and assist us in the discharge of our duties. 

We also wish to express our api)reciation of the faith- 
ful and efficient services of those connected with us in 
carrying out the work in the various departments. 

HORACE P. SIMPSON, 
GEORGE H. STEARNS, 
BYRON WORTHEN, 

Street and Park Commissioners. 
January 1, 1897. 



REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER 



City Engineer's Department 

1896. 



CITY EXGINEER. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT. 

FIRST ASSISTANT, FIELD AND OFFICE. 

HARRIE M. YOUNG. 

BECOND ASSISTANT, DRAUGHTING. 

GEORGE W. WALES. 

THIRD ASSISTANT, FIELD AND OFFICE. 

HARRY J. BRIGGS. 

ASSISTANTS. 

GEORGE M. CURRIER, Jan. 6 to Apr. 25. 

HERBERT L. WATSON, May 25 to Sept. 3. 
ALFRED T. DODGE, began Apr. 14. 

LOUIS B. WEBSTER, began Apr. 28. 

TYPEWRITERS. 

MISS LENA A. DODGE, Jan. 2 to Jan. 17. 
MISS ELLA M. BARKER, Oct. 1 to Jan. 1. 

142 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Coun- 
cils: 

Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting my eleventh an- 
nual report, being the eighteenth annual report of the 
work of the city engineer's department, for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1896. 

Expenses of the department for the year 1896 per 
monthly draft: 

January |284.50 

February , 275.11 

March 635.01 

April 329.63 

May 575.04 

June 823.77 

July 480.27 

August 351.75 

September 715.70 

October 357.85 

November 394.65 

December 671.94 

Total 15,895.25 

Appropriation 4,500.00 

Amount overdrawn |1,395.25 

143 



144 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Itemized account of expenses for the year: 

For salary of city engineer .$1,200.00 

salary of assistants 3,717.85 

supplies for office 206.67 

additions to office furniture >. . .. 4.25 

stakes and lumber 84.38 

horse shoeing and repairs of wagon and 

harness 32.25 

new wagon 75.00 

street-car fares 55.65 

express and postage 4.02 

repairing 14.15 

books and folios 48.75 

printing 11.00 

telephone • 36.80 

horse hire 87.00 

typewriter supplies 65.00 

typewriter clerk 105.06 

street numbers 45.00 

painting rods 3.00 

photographs 11.50 

expenses 7.00 

reports 68.57 

deeds and lay-outs 12.35 

Total $5,895.25 

The items for salaries may be divided as follows: 
For giving lines and grades for the extension 
and construction of streets and side- 
walks 1704.05 

plans and profiles relating to the con- 
struction of streets and sidewalks 197.51 

surveys and levels for the construction 

of streets and sewers 456.90 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 145 

For iniving: lines and grades for and superin- 
tending the construction of sewers. . . . |286.8i> 

plans and profiles relating to the con- 
struction of sewers 195.75 

surveys, measurements, and plans for the 

assignment of street numbers 96.65 

making plans for improvements other 
than those mentioned in this account. . 324.42 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and 
grades given for improvements in Pine 
Grove cemetery 77.41 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and 
grades given for improvements in Val- 
ley cemetery 33.42 

making new map of Valley cemetery. . . . 82.73 

making plans and new majj of Pine Grove 

cemetery 123.33 

making additions to map of Pine Grove 

cemetery for city treasurer 14.48 

plan, survey, and location of lots in Mer- 
rill yard 28.05 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and 
grades given for repairing and extend- 
ing the street railway. ? 82.73 

collecting data, classifying accounts, and 

other work in relation to ofltice report. . 110.04 

lines, grades, and superintendence given 
for the construction of avenues in Stark 
park 20.03 

lines, grades, and superintendence giten 
for the construction of avenues in Der- 
ryfield park 29.32 

indexing plans and notes 28.76 

checking notes, figures, etc 22.5G 

new sewer map of city 21.31 

10 



146 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

For new sewer book $117.95 

measuring and figuring concrete laid for 

the city 29.15 

attendance upon meetings of the street 
and park commissioners, and data fur- 
nished them 180.00 

plans made for location of wires and 

boxes, police patrol 33.27 

plans, lines, grades, and other data in ref- 
erence to Granite bridge 455.68 

sketches, lines, and grades for construc- 
tion of walks at new high school lot 55.92 

mating plans of streets laid out and sew- 
ers constructed, in city clerk's record 

book 27.00 

record of streets laid out, office use 22.28 

locating and putting up street signs and 

guideboards 11.10 

locating and setting stone bounds 9.07 

office work, preparing notes, data, rec- 
ords, etc 186.05 

procuring abutters' names 25.04 

figuring areas ." 27.94 

lettering and finishing plans 50.00 

information given engineers and others 

regarding lines, grades, sewers, etc.. . . 300.00 

researches of deeds for property lines and 

ownership 30.00 

plans for and attendance upon board of 

aldermen at street hearings 60.00 

attendance upon meetings of the commit- 
tee on streets, and plans pertaining 

thereto 55.00 

attendance upon meetings of the commit- 
tee on sewers and drains, clerical work, 
including orders written 65.00 



KEPOflT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



147 



For attendance upon meetings of the commit- 
tee on lands and buildings, and plans 

pertaining thereto 150.00 

attendance upon meetings of special com- 
mittees, and plans pertaining thereto. . 40.00 

list of streets laid out, for tables 6.00 

list of sewers, for tables 15.00 

street petitions 21.60 

sewer petitions 10.00 

addition to city maps 11.82 

sewer sheet tables 10.00 

sewer licenses and permits 60.12 

testing cement 16.52 

Total $4,917.85 

The following bills, charged to other appropriations, 
have been certified to by this department. 



STREET SIGNS AND GUIDE-BOARDS. 




Charles H. Wood, to painting 2 signs for 




Granite bridge, @ 




11.50 


$3.00 


to painting 2 guide- 




boards, @ $1 


2.00 


to painting 12 street 




signs, (5) 35c 


4.20 


to painting 3 guide- 




boards, @ 11.25 


3.75 


to gilding sign for May- 




or 


1.25 


SUNDRIES. 




E. R. Coburn Co., 3 sheets parchment 


12.25 


4 sheets Bristol board 


.50 


' ■ 1 dozen flags, Rimmon park 


1.00 



148 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

CONCRETE. 

John T. Underbill & Co., 4,135.05 square yards $2,433.2G 

Charles H. Robie Co., 7,157.84 square yards. .. 3,656.84 
The amount of work done by this department during 
the year is as follows: 
Number of orders for surveys, street lines, 

and grades 741 

for sewer grades 108 

for paving grades 91 

for street railway grades. 10 
for Pine Grove cemetery 

grades 29 

for profile levels 37 

for Granite bridge grades 60 

Total number of orders 1,076 

Level for profiles for establishing grades, 16,156 feet, 
equal to 3.06 miles. These profiles have three lines of 

levels on each street, making a total distance actually 
leveled of 48,478 feet. 

Levels for sewer profiles 9,461 

for center profiles 12,587 

in Pine Grove cemetery 2,039 

in Stark park 176 

Other levels 18,506 

Total levels taken 91,247 

Equal to 17.28 miles. 

Surveys of streets and street lines 94,200 

in Pine Grove cemetery 2,000 

for street numbers 43,575 

Other surveys 20,382 

Total surveys made 159,957 

Equal to 30.29 miles. 



REPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 149 

Street lines marked on ground 20,500 

Lines of lots and avenues, Pine Grove ceme- 
tery 4,500 

of avenues. Stark park 2,088 

of avenues, Derryfield park 3,000 

for gutters 32,400 

for curbs 4,74»; 

for sewers 28,715 

for street railway 15,950 

Other lines 12,000 

Total length of lines marked on the 

ground 123,905 

Equal to 23.47 miles. 

Grades set for sidewalks 32,001 

for gutters 32,406 

f or^ curbs 4,746 

for sewers 28,715 

for street railway tracks 15,950 

for building streets 30,581 

in Pine Grove cemetery 3,367 

in Stark park 88 

in Derryfield park 3,000 

Other grades 1,779 

Total length of grades set 152,633 

Equal to 29.98 miles. 
Lot owners looked up, 31,560 feet. 
Equal to 5.98 miles. 

BATTERS SET. 



Beech street, culvert near Brown avenue. 
Elm street, retaining wall at schoolhouse. 
Granite street, at bridge. 



150 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Mast street, bank wall at Mrs. Head's. 

Mast street, bank wall at Hiram Hoitt's. 

Prospect street, bank wall at Burke's. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Josiah Carpenter's tomb. 

Ray street, culvert at Ray brook. 

Wilson street, culvert near Bell street. 

Old lots restaked in Pine Grove cemetery /.. 20 

New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery 41> 

Total cemetery lots laid out 69 

Street numbers assigned and put on 24.5 

replaced 19 

assigned but not put on 60 

changed 8 

Total 333 

Street signs put up, 15; guide-boards, 10; sewer per- 
mits granted, 237. 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

Auburn, Elm to Pine. 

Chestnut, Clarke to north of Trenton. Two plans. 

Cypress, Valley to Clay. Two plans. 

Front, Bridge road to GofFstown road. 

Huntress, Albert to north of Prince. 

Prout avenue, Hayward to Young. 

Salmon, Union to Maple. 

Somerville, Union to Maple. 

Somerville, Taylor to Jewett. 

Trenton, Elm to Union. 

Total plans and profiles, 12. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Auburn, Canton to James Hall road. 
Beech, Gore to Salmon. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 151 

Belmont, Spruce to Merrimack. 

Belmont, East High to Gore. 

Cedar, Wilson to east side of school lot. 

Cedar south back, east side of school lot to Belmont. 

Cedar south back, Maple to Lincoln. 

East of Wilson, Cedar to Cedar south back. 

Elm, Valley to Hayward. 

Hayward, Jewett to Mammoth road. 

High south back, Pine to Union. 

Jewett, Young to Cilley road. 

Lake avenue, Hall to Beacon. 

Lowell south back. Chestnut to Pine. 

McDuflfie, Boynton to Huntress. 

Mead, Hall to Belmont. 

Nutt road. Elm to Silver. 

Pine, High south back to Lowell south back. 

Prince, Boynton to Huntress. 

Silver, Nutt road to Lincoln. 

Tilton, Milford to Bowman place. 

Walnut east back. Sagamore to Webster. 

Wilson, Hayward to Cilley road. • 

Wolf and Wagner land, sewerage. 

Myrtle, and Woodbury lot. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 25. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Cedar, Hall to James Hall road. Two plans. 
Dartmouth, east of Wingate to east of Harvell. 
Hale, Wingate to Harvell. 
Hill, Bell to east of Schiller. 
Hillside avenue, Milford southerly. 
Nutfleld Lane, Manchester south back to Lowell. Two 
plans. 

Sagamore, Russell to east of Smyth road. 



152 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Spiingview avenue, Somerville northerly. 
Wheelock, Belknap to east of Harvell. 
Williams, Milford northerly'. 
Total numbering plans, 13. 

GRANITE BRIDGE PLANS. 

Details of masonr3^ Two plans, two tracings, two 
blue prints. 

Details of stonework, at abutments. Two plans. 

East abutment and piers. Three plans, four tracings. 

Groton Bridge Co.'s plans. Two blue prints. 

Location of piers. Two plans. 

Manchester Mills land at east end. Tracing. 

Pier No. 1. One working plan, two tracings, three 
blue prints; one working plan of nose stone, one tracing, 
two blue prints. 

Pier No. 2. One working plan, one tracing, two blue 
prints; one working plan of nose stone, one tracing, two 
blue prints. 

Pier No. 3. One working plan, two tracings, three 
blue prints; one working plan of nose stone, one tracing, 
three blue prints. 

Proposed bridge, location for E. K. Turner. One plan, 
one tracing, two blue prints. 

Bailing at approaches. Plan and tracing. 

Section showing sewer outlet. Two plans, one trac- 
ing. 

Sketch of bridge site for using old piers. One plan, 
one tracing. 

Sketches at bridge. One tracing, five blue prints. 

Sketches at bridge for street commissioners. Thir- 
teen blue prints. 

Transverse and cross section of spans for wooden 
bridge. Three plans. 

Total bridge plans, 81. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 153 



MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Borough road laud, bought of Clough aud Proctor. 

Bridge and Malvern, land of J. B. McCrillis. Copy. 

Glenwood park, plan of a part of. Copy. 

Hanover, Page aud C. & P. R. R., laud of J. W. Rand. 
Copy. 

Jewett aud Cypress, laud of L. W. & A. A. Page. Copy. 

Mammoth road, laud of D. B. Morency. Copy. 

Taylor, land of A. B. Page. Copy. 

Union, Walnut, aud Beech, land of Mrs. H. C. Lowell. 
Copy. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 8. 

WORKING PLANS. 

Baker, Elm to Calef road. Center profile. 

Beacon, Hanover to Amherst. Profile. 

Beech, Concord to Bridge, street railroad line. 

Beech, Lake avenue to Orange. Profile. 

Beech, north of Mitchell to River road. Profile. 

Bedford road, Milford to west of town line. Location. 

Bridge street fountain. Details of cooler. 

Calef road. Baker to Pine Grove cemetery. Layout. 

Calef road. Baker to Pine Grove cemetery. Center pro- 
file. 

Cedar south back, Pine to Beech. Sewer profile. 

Central, Lincoln to Hall. Profile. 

Central south back. Union to Maple. Sewer profile. 

Concord, Union to Ash. Profile. 

Concord, Hall to Beacon. Profile. 

East Manchester, portion of, for sewer book. 

Hall, Harrison to Gore. Profile. 

High school lot. Location of building, trees, and 
walks. 



151 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

High school lot. Details of curbing and posts. Two 
plans. 

High school lot. Sketch for drainage. 

Holt avenue, Candia road to Borough road. Two plans. 

Island Pond road. Land of William Corey. 

Lalie avenue, Belmont to Mammoth road. Profile. 

Laurel, at No. 62. Sketch for county solicitor. 

Liberty east back, Christian brook northerly. Sewer 
profile. 

Manchester. Plan of city land for police patrol stable. 

Merrill yard. Plan of lots. 

Merrimack, Hanover and Beacon. Lot sewerage. 
Profile. 

Milford and Bedford road to Catholic cemetery. Cen- 
ter profile. 

^Milton, Beacon, Hanover, Amherst, square bounded 

by. 

Milton, Hanover to Amherst. Profile. 

]Nrontgomery, Amory to Kelley. Profile. 

New Mast, Mast to Goffstown line. Location. 

New Mast, Mast to Goffstown line. Layout. 

Old Bridge, Hall to Belmont. Profile. 

Parker avenue, Parker southerly. Sewer plan and 
profile. 

Pennacook, Granite, Elm, and railroad. Corporation 
land. 

Pine GroVe cemetery. Proposed lots south of Pine 
lawn. Three plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Proposed drainage. Three 
plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Linden avenue. Profile. 

Rimmon park. Proposed layout. Two plans. 

Ryderyille road and adjoining land. Location. 

Sagamore, Union to east of Smyth road. Profile. 

South Main, schoolhouse lot and adjoining land. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 155 

South Manchester school lot. Bank wall. 
Stark park. Design for curbing around burial lot. 
Stark park. Profile through burial lot. 
Union east back, Gore to Webster. Two sewer pro- 
files. 
Valley cemetery. Proposed lots. 
Valley cemetery. Lots and avenues. Five plans. 
Vault shelves. Details of construction. 
West Manchester. Land of N. H. Improvement Co. 
Total working plans, 63. 

TRACINGS. 

Amoskeag, Front and Goffstown road, northwesterly. 
Part of a plan of. 

Amoskeag, old back road. Land of Mrs. Agnes Linen. 

Baker, Elm to Calef road. Street railroad location. 

Baker, Elm to Calef road. Land of Waterman Smith. 

Beech, Hayward and Harvard. Land of Harrington 
and Shea. 

Beech, Lake avenue to Sagamore. Location of street 
railroad. 

Borough road, land of Clough and Proctor. 

Bowditch, Boylston, and Woodlawn avenue. Lots in 
Woodlawn. 

Bridge, Union, Lowell, Chestnut, square bounded by. 

Calef road, Baker to Pine Grove cemetery. Street 
railroad location. 

Candia road, Londonderry turnpike. Land of Samuel 
G. Reed. 

Canton, Spruce to Auburn. Sewer profile. 

Cemetery brook. Pine to Maple. Location. 

Clay, Cypress to Jewett. Land of William H. Thayer. 

Dickey avenue, D street and New Mast road. Land of 
John W. Dickey. 



156 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

East Manchester. Land of Moore, Fellows, and Miller. 

Elm, Union, Carpenter, Griffin, Kidder, Farrington. 
For assessors. 

Elm, Hanover and Maple. Location of conduits. 

Foster avenue. Land of Fred A. Platts. 

Goffstown road. Land of Meserve, Carr, and Fellows. 

Groux Island. Land of John H. Groux. 

Grove. Land of William E. Moore. 

Hall road, Mammoth road and Lake avenue. Land of 
Eobert I. Stevens. 

Harvard, Union to Beech. Land-takings. 

Hayward, Belmont and Taylor. Land of A. S. Lamb. 

High school lot. Proposed drainage. 

High school lot. Details of curbing and posts. 

High school lot. Curbing and walks. 

High school lot. Elevation of Beech and Ash street 
sides. 

High school lot and adjoining land. Proposed improve- 
ments. 

Holt avenue, Candia road to Lake Shore road. 

Jewett and Cilley road. Land of Thomas Gorman. 

Kelley, M. & N. W. R. R. to Goffstown line. Proposed 
extension. Two plans. 

Lake avenue, Hall to Cass. Proposed widening. 

Lakeview and Summit. Land of E. P. Cummings. 

Laurel extension. Plan of lots. 

Lovering. Land of David Lovering. 

Mammoth road. Land of George L. Sargent. 

Maple. Land of Elliott and Burpee. 

Massabesic street. Land of Fred A. Platts. 

Merrill yard. Plan of a part of. 

Mitchell. Land of W. H. Smith. 

Mystic. Land of M. N. Badger. 

Nutt road. Land of Joseph N. Auger. 

Paere and Bell. Land of S. T. Page. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 157 

Page, Candia road and C. & P. K. R. Land of David 
Lovering. 

Pine. Land of A. J. Lane. 

Pine park. Land of Fred A. Palmer. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Lots and avenues. Four trac- 
ings. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Lots Nos. 1167 and 1170. For 
A. G. Fairbanks. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Location of water pipes. Two 
plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Lay-out of Manesquo field. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Proposed drainage. 

Rimmon park. Proposed lay-out. Four plans. 

Eyderville road, Goffstown road to Front street. 

Second. Land of Charles F. Harvell. 

Silver, Harvard, Beech, Maple. Land of Thomas John- 
son. 

Somerville and Hall. Proposed extension. 

South Main school lot and adjoining land. Two plans. 

South Manchester school lot. Bank wall. 

Summer, Milton, and Dearborn. Land of Austin Go- 
ings. 

Taylor, Clay, Somerville. Land of Mrs. Cotton. 

Taylor and Massabesic. Land of Melvin Badger. 

Township of Chester. Plan of a part of. 

Union, Walnut, Beech. Land of Mrs. H. C. Lowell. 
Two plans. 

Valley cemetery. Lots and avenues. Five plans. 

Wilson Hill sewer. Proctor claim. 

Total tracings, 82. 

BLUE PRINTS. 

Canton, Spruce southerly. Sketch showing sewer. 
East Manchester. Land of Moore, Fellows, and Miller. 
Elm. Land of People's Gas Co. 



158 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Groux Island, Land of John H. Groux. 

Grove. Land of ^Yilliam E. Moore. 

Harvard, Union to Beech. Land takings. 

Hay ward, Belmont to Taylor. Land of A. S, Lamb. 

Holt avenue, Candia road to Lake Shore road. Loca- 
tion. 

Isabella, at 'Squog river. Proposed bridge. 

Jewett and Cilley road. Land of Thomas Gorman. 

Maple. Land of Elliott & Burpee. 

Massabesic street. Land of Fred A. Platts. 

Page, Hanover to Bridge. Land of S. T. Page. 

Rimmon park. Proposed lay-out. Twelve plans. 

Ryderville road, Goffstown road to Front. Location. 
Two plans. 

Sagamore, Oak easterly. Land of W. A. Burgess & 
Go. 

Second. Land of Charles F. Harvell. Two plans. 

Sherburne, Candia road northerly. Land of Samuel 
D. Sherburne. 

Silver, Harvard, Beech, Maple. Land of Thomas 
Johnson. 

Stark park. Design for curbing around burial lot. 
Profile. 

Valley cemetery. Water pipe plan. 

Valley cemetery. Lots and avenues for superintend- 
ent. Four plans. 

Whittemore land, West Manchester. Proposed sewer- 
age. 

Total blue prints, 39. 

MAPS. 

City of Manchester, east side, showing sewers. Blue 
print. 

City of Manchester, west side, showing sewers. Two 
blue prints. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 159 

City of Manchester, for police patrol system. Tracing. 

City of Manchester, for police patrol system. Four 
blue prints. 

City of Manchester, for locating boxes police patrol 
system. Blue print. 

City of Manchester, for New England Telephone and 
Telegraph Co. Two blue prints. 

City of Manchester, southern section. Lot map. 

City of Manchester, northern section. Lot map. 

Derryfield park and adjoining land. Tracing. 

Pine Grove cemetery and extensions. Showing water 
pipe. 

Valley cemetery. Lots and avenues. 

Total maps, 16. 

Four plans of lots in the Pine Grove cemetery have 
been made in the new book of the city treasurer, and 
twenty-nine sheets of plans in the sewer book. 

Six plans have been made in city clerk's book of streets 
laid out. 

Total of all plans made, 378. 

Four plans are under way which will be completed dur- 
ing the year. 

Sewer plans brought up to date, 25. 

Numbering sheets brought up to date, 6, 

Plans lettered and finished, 20. 

Plans made for establishment of grade on laid-out 
streets, 36,210 feet. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on streets 
not laid out, 5,130 feet. 

Total, 41,890 feet, equal to 7.93 miles. 



160 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Amberst 

Auburn. 

Auburn soutli back — 
Auburn soutli back — 

Beacou 

Beech 

Beech 

Beech cast back 

Belmont 

Canton 

Cedar 

Cedar south back 

Cedar south back 

Central south back — 
Central south back — 

Christian brook 

Clarke 

Elm 

Elm 

Elm 

Elm west back 

Granite 

Granite 

Green south back 

Green south back 

Grove 

Grove south.back 

Jewett 



Location. 



From east of Ashland easterly 

From Canton easterly 

From west of Maple easterly 

From Wilson easterly 

From Spruce northerly 

From Gore northerly 

From Sagamore northerly 

From south of Concord northerly 

Mead to old Bridge 

From south of Spruce to Auburn 

Wilson to Wilson east back 

Pine to west of Beech 

From Wilson east back easterly 

Union to Beech 

From east of Wilson easterly .*, 

Liberty east back to Beech east back 

River road to Elm 

Clarke to Thaj'er , 

Thayer to Carpenter 

From Clarke southerly ■ 

Christian brook to Salmon 

At east end of bridge 

At east end of bridge 

From Union westerly 

From Union easterly 

From west of Taylor westerly 

From west of Union easterly 

From north of Young to Clay 



Akron.. 


8 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


8 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


12 


" .. 


12 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


15 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


|16 
il2 


" .. 


12 


Brick . . 


42xG3 




24x36 


II 


22x33 


Akron.. 


15 


" .. 


8 


" .. 


10 


Steel.... 


36 


Brick... 


36 


Akron.. 


12 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


•' .. 


10 


" .. 


15 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 
IN 1896.— EAST SIDE. 



161 



s a 








CO 


m 


£1 










a 


P, 




H 


ci 


ci 


S 


►^ 



o 



202 
358 



101 
324 
877 

* To take surface water. 
11 



$13.25 

1,572.25 

165.58 

513.27 

70.44 

355.19 

278.61 

56.27 

410.04 

388.14 

198.. "50 

277.60 

2,370.87 

899.23 

82.28 

5,187.08 

1,927.26 

1,752.78 

3,016.00 

34.48 

734.78 

.592.27 

150.20 
686.19 
137.02 
468.37 
3,635.13 



$0.17 
3.083 
0.827 
1.00 
0.355 
3.116 
0.91 
0.296 
1.694 
1.102 
0.936 
0.925 
2.651 
1.606 
0.872 
5.135 
3.794 
3.794 
4.00 
0.189 
1.212 

6.966 

1.444 

1.38 

1.356 

1.446 

4.145 



Oct. 
Nov. 

Nov. 
June 

March 
Oct. 
July 
June 

Sept. 



July 
April 
Sept. 
April 
August 11 

" . 11 
Sept. 17 



Oct. 4 

Dec. 1 

July 15 

June 12 

Mar. 26 

Oct. 12 

July 9 

June 30 
20 

Oct. 4 

" 4 

Sept. 16 

May 9 

Sept. 23 

May 30 

Dec. 30 

" 30 
30 



Sept. 



Sept. 30 



June 

Oct. 

April 



July 3 
Oct. 27 
June 12 



162 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SKWERS BUILT IN 1896. 



Street. 



Liberty east back 

Lincoln 

Malvern 

Mead 

Merrimack south bacli 

Old Bridge 

Pine 

Porter 

Ray 

River road 

River road 

Sagamore 

Silver 

Union 

Union oast back 

Union east back 

Valley 

Valley 

Valley 

Wal nut east back 

Wilson 

Wilson 

Wilson east back 

Wilson mil 

Wilson Hill 



Location. 



Total. 



From Christian brook northerly. 

From Silver northerly 

At Bridge 

Hall to Belmont 

From Beech westerly 

From Belmont westerly 

Auburn to Cedar south back 

From Amherst northerly 

From Ray brook northerly 

At Ray brook 

Monroe to Clarke 

From east of Beech to Oak 

Union to Lincoln 

From Appleton northerly •. 

From Christian brook southerlj' . 

Christian brook to Webster 

From Wilson to east of Belmont. 
From Wilson to east of Belmont. 

From Jewett easterly 

From Christian brook southerly. 

Valley to Prescott 

Prescott to Harvard 

Cedar to Cedar south back 

Laurel to INIcrrimack 

Merrimack northerly 



Akron. 



Iron... 
Brick.. 
Akron. 
Brick.. 
Akron. 



Iron . . . 
Akron. 



10 
8 
15 
12 
12 
12 
15 
10 
10 
20 

24x36 
12 

38x57 
8 
12 
12 
20 
20 
10 
10 
12 
10 
10 
■ 10 
10 



Average cost of sewers, East Side f Division No. 2, $3 123 

I " No. 7, $1,586 

Average cost of sewers, both sides of river, S2.603 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



163 



— EAST SIDB.— Continued. 



2 
c'3 






1,541 



29 

9 

12 

25 

11 

3 

5 

3 

594 



73 



$473.83 
38.02 
108.24 
655.56 
163.14 
127.62 
336.54 
149.89 
475.43 

2,606.39 

2,617.17 

16,124.13 

79.50 

565.00 

942.54 

2,400.63 

229.00 
445.71 

779.02 
294.80 
106.27 
400.14 
35.94 

$56,127.59 



$1,045 
0.180 
1.615 
l.Sll 
1.102 
1.021 
2.370 
0.576 
0.943 



Sept. 21 
August 15 
May 9 



Dec. 

Sept. 

i( 

July- 
May 
April 



3.794 August 11 



3.157 
9.018 
0.530 
1.615 
1.552 

2.304 

0.763 
1.087 
0.965 
0.877 
0.843 
1.557 
0.144 



June 
May 
Sept. 
June 

<4 

May 

Nov. 
Oct. 



r3 



Sept. 28 

Aug. 17 

May 13 

Jan. 18 

Sept. 22 

" 29 

" 16 

May 14 

April 25 



Aug. 6 

15 

Sept. 29 

Aug. 12 

12 

June 12 

May 7 

Nov. 23 

10 

10 

Oct. 5 

7 



164 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT IN 



Street. 



Location. 



Amherst road Mast to south of Carroll 

Amherst road South of Carroll southerly 

B From C northerly 

Boynton C to McDuffle 

Carroll From Amherst road southerly. . . 

Cartier east back From Putnam southerly 

Conant From west of Cartier westerly. . . 

Dartmouth Dickey to Frederick 

Granite At west end of bridge 

Granite At west end of bridge 

Hevey cast back From Amory southerly 

Main west back From Wayne southerly 

Mast Fi'om west of Bowman easterly. 

Mast From west of Riddle westerly.. . , 



McDuffle 

Parker avenue. 

Prince 

Quincy 

Second 

Tilton' 



Total. 



Boynton to Huntress 

From Parker southerly. . . 

Boynton to Huntress 

From Douglas southerly. 
From Schiller southerly. , 
From Milford northerly. 



Akron.. 


24 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


1.5 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


^j 


10 


" .. 


10 


Steel . . . 


24 


Akron.. 


15 


" .. 


12 


" .. 


12 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


24 


'■ .. 


10 


" .. 


8 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


10 


" .. 


12 


" .. 


10 



• Cesspool manholes. 

Average cost of sewers, West Side, per foot, $1.70. 

Average cost of sewers, both sides of river, per foot, §2.503. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



165 



1896.— WEST SIDE. 



si ® 



416 
1S4 
2!9 
577 
250 
344 
56 
354 



404 
350 
202 
610 
512 
150 
588 
84 
290 
277 

5,867 











!K 












fi'S 




<D 


05 


>H 


r- 11 


o 


O 


>< 


o 


*3 ■>-' 


o 


P. 

a 


<0 

3 


p. 


OJ 0) 


c3 


(rt 


O 




^A^ 


S 


^ 


ta 


O 




1 


11 


4 








1 

7 


1 




1 






2 




20 


3 




1 


1 


3 


1 




*3 


1 


2 


3 






1 


14 


2 
4J 


39 
141 




1 


1 






1 




16 






2 




2 


1 




1 




4 


1 




2 




15 


6 




1 




18 


3 




1 


1 


5 






2 




17 


3 


4 


1 


1 


4 
12 








1 


11 


1 






184 


20 


7 


152 


33 



$2,238.26 
141.47 
188.17 
527.53 
178.64 
247.80 
36.52 
322.97 

562.85 

291.20 
306.99 
203.91 
3,297.42 
313.99 

60.58 
299.00 

56.88 
762.08 
245.02 

$10,281.28 



$5,381 
0.769 
0.905 
0.914 
0.715 
0.721 
0.652 
0.913 

3.127 

0.721 
0.877 
1.010 
5.602 
0.613 
0.404 
0.509 
0.646 
2.973 
0.881 



May 

July 

April 

Oct. 

May 

June 

Oct. 



May 

Oct. 

June 

May 

April 

Nov. 

April 

August 25 

May 12 

April 13 



«.2 



Oct. 2 

t( .2 

Aug. 1 

April 27 

Oct. 6 

May 21 

June 17 
24 

Oct. 20 

May 9 

Oct. 19 

June 15 

Oct. 2 

May 2 

Nov. 13 

April 30 

Aug. 27 

May 28 

April 16 



166 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 



PIPE REMOVED WHERE NEW SEWERS HAVE BEEN BUILT. 



Street. 



Cedar south back — 

Cedar south back 

Central south back. . 

Granite 

Granite 



Location. 



Pine to Union 

Union to west of Beech 
Union to Beech 

At east end of Bridge. . 
At west end of Bridge.. 



Material. 


- ai 




S.5 


Cement... 


12 


Akron — 


12 


Cement.. 


12 


Brick .... 


36 




24 



v d 

K?-^ 



400 

560 

85 

160 

1,671 



SUMMARY OF SEWERS BUILT IN 1896. 

Feet . 

Total 42 X 63 inches, brick 1,010 

38 X 57 inches, brick 1,788 

24 X 36 inches, brick 1,171 

22 X 33 inches, brick 462 

36-inch, brick 46 

36-inch steel pipe 39 

24-inch Akron pipe 1,026 

24-inch steel pipe 39 

20-inch Akron pipe 1,030 

20-inch iron pipe 36 

15-inch Akron pipe 3,65 1 

12-inch Akron pipe 5,422 

10-inch Akron pipe 9,834 

8-inch Akron pipe 973 

Total 26,530 

Following is the total amount of sewerage in the city, 
January 1, 1897: 

Feet. 

Total 8-inch Akron pipe 9,367 

10-inch Akron pipe 71,734 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



167 



Feet. 

Total 12-inch Akron pipe 78,091 

15-inch Akron pipe 25,159 

18-inch Akron pipe 3,964 

20-inch Akron pipe 11,266 

24-inch Akron pipe. . . . , 6,282 

Total Akron pipe 205,863 

Equal to 39.059 miles. 

Feet. 

8-inch Portland pipe, old 90 

12-inch Portland pipe, old 3,990 

18-inch Portland pipe, old 770 

Total Portland pipe, old 4,850 

Equal to 0.919 miles. 

Feet. 

10-inch Portland pipe, new 7,605 

12-inch Portland pipe, new 4,526 

15-inch Portland pipe, new 4,518 

18-inch Portland pipe, new - 395 

20-inch Portland pipe, new 3,345 

24-inch Portland pipe, new 3,284 

Total Portland pipe, new 23,673 

Equal to 4.483 miles. 

Feet. 

9-inch cement pipe 11,658 

12-inch cement pipe 20,011 

15-inch cement pipe 490 

18-inch cement pipe 860 

24-inch cement pipe 735 

16 X 24 inches, cement pipe 1,697 

Total cement pipe 35,454 

Equal to 6.716 miles. 



168 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Feet. 

10-inch earthen pipe l,17o 

12-inch earthen pipe 2,515 

Total earthen pipe 3,720 

Equal to 0.704 miles. 

Feet. 

18-inch brick sewers 5,532 

24-inch brick sewers 1,900 

29-inch brick sewers 1,600 

364nch brick sewers 506 

42-inch brick sewers 4"46 

44-inch brick sewers 1,195 

57-inch brick sewers 1,400 

60-inch brick sewers 285 

17 X 26 inches, brick sewers 1,506 

20 X 30 inches, brick sewers 1,197 

22 X 33 inches, brick sewers 849 

24 X 36 inches, brick sewers 11,051 

26 X 39 inches, brick sewers 514 

29^ X 44 inches, brick sewers 4,530 

30 X 46 inches, brick sewers 1,360 

32 X 48 inches, brick sewers 3,279 

36 X 54 inches, brick sewers 1,067 

38 X 57 inches, brick sewers 4,388 

40 X 44 inches, brick sewers 790 

42 X 63 inches, brick sewers 3,104 

50 X 75 inches, brick sewers 712 

Total brick sewers 47,211 

Equal to 8.941 miles. 

Feet- 

8-inch iron pipe 24 

10-inch iron pipe 12 

12-inch iron pipe 24 

14-inch iron pipe 24 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



169 



20-inch iron pipe 

24-inch iron pipe 

36-ineh iron pipe 

Total iron pipe 

Equal to 0.103 miles. 

24-inch steel pipe 

36-inch steel pipe 

48-inch steel pipe. . 

Total steel pipe 

Equal to 0.00 miles. 

Total in all sewers, 321,7921 feet, equal to G0.945 miles 

STREET GRADES ESTABLISHED IN 1896. 



Feet. 

158 
24 

2771 

5431 

Feet. 

67 

39 

372 

47S 



No. of 
plan. 



4092 
1000 



4181 
1084-5 



Street. 



741 
993-4-5-6 



Alsace 

Amberst 

Beacon 

Carpenter . . 
Chestnut ... 

Concord 

Essex 

Lake ave . . . 

Milton 

Salmon 

South Main. 



Location. 



Kelley to Bremer 

Belmont to Beacon 

Hanover to Amherst 

Elm to Union 

Clarke to Trenton 

Belmont to Beacon 

Amory southerly 

J. Hall road to Hanover 

Hanover to Amherst 

Walnut to Beech 

Boynton to Bedford town line. 



Length 
in feet. 



Order 
passed. 



550 
452 
312 

1,346 

1,645 
450 
574 

1,450 
312 
220 

4,040 



11,351 



Jan . 4, 1S97 
June 2 
June 2 
June 19 
Jan. 4, 1897 
Aug. 4 
Aug. 4 
Oct. 6 
June 2 
Jan. 7 
Jan. 4, 1897 



Equal to 2.15 miles. 

On these plans both sides of the street are shown, mak- 
ing the actual distance of grade established 22,702 feet, 
or 4.30 miles. 



170 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for 
the city in 189G by John T. Underhill & Co., under the di- 
rection of the street and park commissioners. The meas- 
urements relating thereto haye been made by this depart- 
ment, and rendered as vouchers for the same: 

STREET CROSSINGS. 



Location. 



Amory and Dubuque (3) 

Auburn at Wilson 

Auburn south back at Wilson 

Auburn south back at Wilson, repairs.. 

Beacon at Manchester 

Beacon at Lake avenue 

Bell at Wilson 

Bridge at Union, top-dressed 

Bridge and Maple (2) 

Bridge and Maple (2) top-dressed 

Cedar at Wilson 

Cedar south back at Wilson 

Clarke and Chestnut (2) 

Clarke and Chestnut, patching 

Columbus at Aniory 

East High and Belinont(2) 

Elm at Welch avenue 

Elm near Brown avenue 

Elm at Clarke 

Gore at Walnut 

Green at Wilson 

Green south back at Wilson 

Grove at Wilson 

Grove south back at Wilson 

Hay ward at Jewett 

Hevey at Amory 

Hevey east back at Amory 

Hosley at Suminer 

Lake avenue and Pine, top-dressed 

Laurel south back at ^Milton 

Liberty east back at Salmon 

Maple at Cedar 

Merrimack and Pine (3) 

Milton and Laurel (4) 

Orange and Pine (3) top-dressed 

Orange and Walnut (2) 

Orange and Beech (2) 

Pearl at Walnut 

Prospect and Pine (2) 

Prospect south back at Pine 

Prospect and Linden (2) 

Pi'out avenue at Hay ward 

Sagamore and Walnut (2) 

Sagamore and Walnut, patching 

Spruce at Wilson (2) 

Spruce south back at Wilson, repairs.. 

Summer at Wilson 

Summer south back at Wilson 

Union east back at Bridge, top-dressed 

Union at Salmon 

Warren at Peai-1 



Square 


Price 


yards. 


per yd. 


90.67 


$0.75 


30.22 
1G.S9 


.75 
.75 


5.78 


.75 


20.00 


.75 


1S.G7 
30.22 


.75 
.75 


27.11 


.37 


62.23 


.75 


63.56 


.37 


30.22 


.75 


16.89 


.75 


62.22 


.75 


3.90 


.45 


30.22 


.75 


57.78 


.75 


55.56 


.75 


56.00 


.75 


88.00 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


16 89 


.75 


30.22 


.iO 


17.74 


.75 


32.89 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


17.33 


.75 


2.-,. 00 


.75 


28.89 


.37 


17.33 


.75 


17.77 


.75 


29.33 


.75 


89.06 


.75 


92.00 


.75 


84.71 


.37 


62.04 


.75 


56.89 


.75 


28.00 


.75 


38.22 


.75 


17.78 


.75 


58.67 


.75 


20.44 


.75 


61.33 


.75 


11.61 


.45 


60.44 


.76 


17.77 


.45 


30.22 


.75 


16.89 


.75 


17.78 


.37 


28.89 


.75 


28.44 


.75 


1,911.36 





Total 
cost. 



$68.00 
22.66 
12.66 

4.33 
15.00 
14.00 
22.66 
10.03 
46.66 
23.51 
22.66 
12.66 
46.66 

1.75 
22.66 
43.33 
41.67 
42.00 
66.00 
22.66 
22.66 
12.66 
22.66 
13.33 
24.66 
22.66 
13.00 
18.75 
10.63 
13 00 
13.33 
22.00 
66.70 
69.00 
31.34 
46.52 
42.66 
21.00 
28.66 
13.33 
44.00 
15.33 
46.00 

5.23 
45.33 

7.99 
22.66 
12.66 

6.58 
21.66 
21.33 



$1,339.02 



REPORT OF THE CITY EJJGINEER. 
SIDEWALKS. 



171 



Location. 



Beacon and Lake avenue at Abbott's — 

Bridge and Maple, patcliing 

IMilton at George W. Cheney's 

Milton at George W. Cheney's driveway 
Orange and Pine, patching 



Square 
yards. 


Price 
per yd. 


46.56 
24.47 
180.59 
32 89 
10.56 


$0.35 
.45 i 
.35 
.75 
.45 


295.07 





Total 
tcost. 



$16.29 

11.01 

63.20 

24.66 

4.75 



$119.91 



ROADWAYS. 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Price 
per yd. 


Total 
cost. 


Chestniit, Hanover to Manchester, top-dressed — 
Concord, Elm east back to Vine, top-dressed 


1,106.47 
252.86 


$0.50 
.50 


$553.24 
176.43 




1.359.33 




S729 67 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the 
city in 1896 by John T. Underhill & Co., under the direc- 
tion of the committee on lands and buildings and the 
cemetery trustees : 



Location. 



East Manchester schoolhouse, repairs. 

High school, driveways in rear 

Main-street engine-house, repairs 

Parker school, around building 

Valley cemetery 



Square 
yards. 



28.39 
359.64 



118.66 
62.60 



Price 
per yd, 



569.29 



$0.37 
.44 



.45 
.20 



Total 
cost. 



$10.50 

158.24 

10.00 

53.40 

12.52 



$244.66 



The following shows the amountof concrete laidforthe 
city in 1896 by the Charles H. Robie Co., under the direc- 
tion of the street and park commissioners. The meas- 



172 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



urements relating thereto have been made by this depart- 
ment, and rendered as vouchers for the same : 

STREET CROSSINGS. 



Location. 



Square Price | Total 
yai-Qs. per yd.| cost. 



Amberst at Belmont I 26. 

Appleton and Chestnut (3) 5 fc4. 

Bath at Third 36. 

Bay at North 30. 

Beauport at Anoprj- 29. 

Beauport at Amory, patching 10. 

Beech and Orange, top-dressed 32. 

Beech at Myrtle, patcliing 28. 

Beech at Myrtle 8. 

Beech and Orange, patching 35. 

Bridge and Walnut (2) 61. 

Bridge and Walnut (2) re-covered I 61. 

Cartier east hack at Wilton I 17. 

Central and Lincoln (3) i 55, 

Central and Lincoln, patching 20. 

Central at Wilson 27 

Central at Hall, i op-dressed , 28, 

Concord and Walnut (2) i 40 

Concord and Walnut (2) top-dressed : 56 

Concord and Beech (2) 31 

Concord and Beech (2) top-dressed ! 28. 

Concord and Ash i 18. 

10 
34 
37 
15 
3 
16 
17 
32 
17 
15 
51 
9 
30 
56 
2S 
28 
9 
12 



Concord and Ash, top-dres.«ed. 

Coolidge avenue at Amory 

Elm at Christian Brook, top-dressed... 

Elm at North 

Elm antl Webster, repaired 

Green south back at Union 

Grove south back at Union 

Hall at Sanimer 

Harrison and Walnut east back 

Harrison and Beech 

Harri.son and Beech (2) top-dressed — 

Lake avenue west of Hall 

Lake avenue and Belmont 

Lowell and Belmont (2) 

Malvern at Lowell 

Mai'ket at Elm west back, top-dressed. 

Myrtle at Walnut 

Myrtle at Walnut, patching 

Myrtle and A sh (2) top-dressed 

Russell and Harrison (2) 

Salmon at Walimt 

Salmon at Walnut, patching 

Second atGriinite, top-dressed 

South Main at A 

Tilton at .Milford 

Tilton at Milford, top-dressed 

Union at Brook 

Union at Urook (2) top-dressed 

Walnut and Orange 

Walnut and Orange, patching 

Walnut at Sagamore (2) 



Total . 



1,602.94 



$0.75 



.75 
.50 
.37 
.37 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.75 
..37 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.25 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.37 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.25 
.37 
.75 
.75 
.37 
.75 
.S7 
.75 
.37 
.75 



SI 9.66 
63.53 
27.33 
22.65 
22.27 

5.30 
12.16 
10.68 

6.00 
12.99 
46.33 
22.85 
13.33 
41.67 

7.40 
20.67 
10.36 
30.00 
20.82 
23.87 
10.64 
14.00 

3.94 
25.95 

9.44 
11.97 

2.62 
12.66 
13.00 
24.33 
13.00 
11.13 
19 07 

6.75 
22.50 
42.67 
21.58 
10.36 

7.33 

4.44 
24.50 
43.95 
22.60 

1.89 
10.15 
31.50 

5.95 

2.93 
22.00 
21.77 

2.67 

4.27 
40.00 



S961.63 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



173 



ROADWAYS. 



Square 


Price 


yards. 


per yd. 


14.2.') 


$0.50 


1.105.67 


.50 


118.56 


.50 


18.00 


.50 


7.20 


.50 


174.44 


.50 


108.06 


.50 


10.00 


..TO 


507.86 


.50 


253.33 


.50 


20.94 


1.00 


'2,338.31 





Total 
cost. 



Amherst, patching 

Chestnut, Hanover to Amherst, top-dressed 

Chestnut, patching 

Hanover, patching 

Lake avenue at engine-house, repairs 

Main street at engine-house, patching 

Merrimack, west of Elm, patching 

Nutfleld Lane and Amherst, patching 

Union, Concord to Lowell, patching 

Union, patching 

Union and Central south back 

Total 



$7.V2 

552.89 

59.28 

9.00 

3.60 

87.22 

.54.03 

5.00 

253.93 

126.67 

20.94 



§1,179.68 



SIDEWALKS. 



Location. 



Square price 
yards, per yd. 



Total 
cost. 



Amory at square 

Auhurn at M. Sullivan's, repaired 

Bridge and Elm at fountain 

Bridge and Walnut, patching 

Brook and Union, patching 

Central and Lincoln, repaired 

Central and Wilson, repaired 

Central and Hall 

Concord square, Chestnut 

Concord square. Chestnut, top-dressed.. 

Elm at Christian Brook 

Granite bridge, approaches 

Granite street at Gage & McDougall's. . . 
Harrison at Mrs. E. E. Patch's, repaired. 

Lake avenue at Peter McQuillan's 

McGregor at mill entrance 



Total 



127,08 , $0.35 



2.00 
31.61 
25.44 
22.11 
12.22 

2.78 
300.10 
81.28 
12.89 
167.30 
47.00 
80.22 
98.00 

6.67 



1,016.70 



$44.48 

8.25 

0.80 

14.22 

8.90 

5.53 

3.05 

1.25 

150.05 

28 44 

5.15 

83.65 

23.50 

32.08 

41.16 

3.46 



The following shows the amount of concrete laid for 
the city in 189G by the Charles H. Robie Co., under the di- 



174 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 



reel ion of the committee on lands and buildings and cem- 
etery trustees. 



LOCATIOX. 



Square! Price 
yards, per yd. 



Ash streeet school, walks and corners ' 565 

East Manchester school [ 19 

Pine Grove cemetery, patching ' 9 

Pine Grove cemetery, lodge house cellar 22 

Pine Grove cemetery, eaves , 18 

Pine Grove cemetery | 43 

Pine Grove cemetery, driveway 423 

Police station at patrol stable I 84 

South Manchester engine-house, driveway ' 35 

Soulh Manchester school, driveway 30 

South ^lanchester school, driveway 110 

South Manchester school, walks 115 

South Manchester school, walks re-covered 294 

Valley cenieterj% walks 66 

Valley cemetery, walks i 82 

Varney school, walk 8 

Varney school, walks 106 

Varney school, sidewalk 155 

Varney school, driveway 

Webster-street school 



51 
33 
00 
30 
25 
56 
31 
11 
44 
00 

a3 

.97 
45 
50 
42 
22 
44 
75 
8.44 



3.44 
.50 
.25 
.40 
.40 
.50 
.65 
.50 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.40 
.35 
.35 
.35 
.50 
.35 
.40 
.50 



Total 
cost. 



$248.82 

9.66 

2.25 

8.94 

7.30 

21.78 

275.15 

42.05 

26.58 

22.50 

83.12 

46.38 

103.05 

23.27 

28.84 

4.11 

37.25 

62.30 

4.22 

5.00 



2,199.89 i$l,062.57 



SUMMARY. 

Concrete laid by John T. Underhill d- Co. 



Location. 



Crossings 

Sidewalks 

Roadways 

Miscellaneous. 



Square I Total 
yards. I cost. 



1,91136 
295.07 

1 ,.359.33 
569.29 


$1,339.02 
119.91 
729.67 
244.66 



Total 4,135.05 



§2,433.26 



Concrete laid by the Charles H. liobie Company. 



Location. 



Square Total 
yards, cost. 



Crossings 1,602.94 

Sidewalks 1,01070 

Roadways 2,.3H8.31 

Miscellaneous 2,199.89 

Total 7.157.8-1 



$961.63 

4.52.96 

1,179.68 

1,062.57 



$3,656.84 



Total concrete laid for the city, 11,292.89 square yards, 
at a cost of $6,090.10. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



175 



BRIDGES. 



The following table gives the dimensions, material, 
and number of spans of the various bridges within the 
city limits : 



Location. 


Length 

in 
feet. 


Width 

of 

roadway 


No. of 
walks. 


Width 

of 
walks. 


Material. 


Arch, 
es or 
spans 




765.5 

57 
1,085 

36 

38 

20 

21 

25 

89 

16.5 

56.3 
468 

32 

41 

90 

38 

14 

59 

53 

16 
6 

30 

62 
127 

12 

100 

6 


20 

22.5 

24 

30.5 

20 

17 

20.5 

17.5 

29.5 

33 

37.3 

40 

21 

16.7 

34 

18 

20 

20.5 

24 

20 

16 

30 

32.5 

32.5 

22 

17.5 

16 


1 
2 
2 


5.5 

7 

6 


Wood. 
Iron. 

Stone. 
Wood. 

Iron. 
Steel. 
Wood. 

Stone. 
Wood. 

Iron. 
Wood. 

Steel. 
Wood. 


3 




1 


Bridge st., McGregor and approaches 


3 

2 










Derry road, near Cohas avenue 








Derry road, near town line 








Dunbarton road. Black brook 










1 


4.5 




Front street, at Black brook 






2 
2 


6 

8 








Harvey road, at Great Cohas 














2 


6.5 




Mammoth road, at Great Cohas 




Mammoth road, near town line 




^ 




Mill road, at Harvey's mill 








Parker street, at railroad 


2 


6 




River road, at Little Cohas 




River road, below James Cheney's. . . 








River road, at Goffe's Falls 








Second street, at 'Squog river 

Second street, at 'Squog river 

South road 


2 
2 


8.75 
8.75 




Webster road, at water-works dam.. . 






5 


Weston road, east of D. Connor's 






J 











Stone bridges, 2 ; steel, 3; iron, 4; wood, 18; total, 27. 



176 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPOKTS. 



NEW HIGHWAYS LAID OUT IN 1896. 



Streets. 



Bay 

Chestnut.. . 
Cypress... 
Glenwood ave 
Holt avenue.. 
Maynard ave . 

Merrill 

North 

Plummer 

Sagamore. ... 
Somervllle ... 
Summer 



Location. 



Trenton northerly 

North of Clarke to Tren 

ton 

Young to Clay 

Page easterly 

Candia road to Lake 

Shore road 

Huse road to Porter 

Jewett easterly 

Union to Walnut 

Pine to Union 

Oak to Smyth road. 

Jewett to Cj'press. . 

Beech westerly 



c2 

m O 




5^ 


^.2 


June 


I'J 


50 


580 


April 
Sept. 


24 
2.") 


50 


1.337 

860 


Sept. 


25 


50 


725 


July 
Aug. 


31 

28 


66 
50 


7,8,50 
1,345 


April 


22 


50 


350 


Aug. 


28 


50 


220 


May 


26 


40 


450 


June 


19 


40 


1,453 


July 


31 


50 


410 


Nov. 


25 


50 


200 


15,780 



Petition of 



A. O. Brown. 



J. Carpenter. 
J. A. Kimball. 

Geo. F. Laird. 



G.W.Dearborn. 
J. H. Maynard. 

P. O. Woodman. 

G. L. Reed. 

Thos. Stewart. 

W. R. Call. 

C. W. Dan forth. 

Pat. J. Horan. 



Equaling 3.00 miles. 

The following table shows the streets laid out to date 
which have not been built. Many of these have been 
turnpiked, and are in passable condition, but have not 
been brought to grade, nor have the gutters or sidewalks 
been constructed. Those marked (*) in most cases have 
not been opened, and are impassable with a few excep- 
tions. It will necessitate the expenditure of a considera- 
ble amount of money to properly build them to grade. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 
STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT. 



177 



Streets. 



Ainswortb avenue, Hay ward to Young 

Alfred, Hanover to Amherst 

Allen, Main to Boynton 

Alsace, south of Kelley northerly , 

Amory to Kimball 

Amory extension to Bartletl 

Arah, Union to Hooksett line 

Ash, Gore northerly* 

Auburn, Maple to Lincoln 

Auburn, Wilson to Belmont , 

Auburn, Cypress to Flatts avenue * , 

Bartlett, Amory extension southerly 

Bay, Trenton northerly , 

Beech, Webster to Clarke* 

Bell, Wilson easterly , 

Belmont, Young to Clay 

Benton, Jones to James Hall road , 

Blaine, Second to Hiram , 

Boutwell, Amory nortberly * , 

Bremer, Coolidge avenue to Rimmon , 

Byron, Brown avenue to Josselyn 

Campbell, Union to Ash 

Campbell, Ash to Hooksett road 

Canal, 82 feet north of Pleasant to Granite. . — 

Canton, Spruce to Auburn , 

Cedar, Wilson easterly , 

Central, James Hall road westerly * , 

Chestnut, north of Clarke to Trenton * 

Clay, Jewett to Cypress 

Cleveland, Blaine to Merrimack river 

Colby, West Hancock to Log , 

Columbus avenue, Cartier to Amory* 

Cypress, Lake avenue to Massabesic * 

Cypress, Young to Clay 

Dartmouth, West Hancock to Frederick 

Erie, South Main westerly , 

Essex, Amory southerly , 

Forest, Milford to Old Mast road 

Foster avenue, Valley to Hay ward 

Glenwood ave.. Mammoth road to J. Cronin's *. . 

Glenwood avenue, Page easterly , 

Grant, Hanover to Mammoth road * 

Green, Douglas northerly 

Green, Pine to Beech 

Green, Wilson to Belmont * 

Grove, Wilson to Belmont * 

Grove, Taylor westerly 

Hale, across Wolf and Wagner land 

Hall, Hay ward to Young 

Hall, Lake avenue to Bell 

Hall, Pearl to north side of Prospect* 

Harrison, Russell to Hall 

Harrison, Hall to Belmont 

Harvard, Union to Maple 

Harvell, Main to Second 

Hayes avenue, Massabesic to Chase avenue — 

Hay ward. Beech to INIammotb road 

Highland Park avenue, Candia road to Glen 

wood avenue 

Holt avenue, Candia road to Lake Shore road * 

Hosley, Green to Summer 

Huntress, Bank to north of Prince 

12 



Length 
in feet. 



499 
212 
700- 

1,160 

2,800 
735 

3,162 
590 
600 
S09 
967 

1,800 
580 

1,176 
636 

1,395 
240 
395 

1,693 
400 
998 
860 

2,900 

1,023 
550 
665 
304 

1,337 
3S7 

1,487 
220 

3,110 

1,300 
860 
636 
470 
575 

1,460 
490 

2,085 
725 

1,008 
96 
990 
809 
809 
757 
800 
125 
1,890 
716 

1,218 
365 

1,190 

1,060 
471 

6,000 

1,007 

7,850 

490 

648 



When laid out. 



August 31, 1893. 
July 19, 1893. 
Julv 24, 1891. 
May 26, 1893. 
November 17, 1891. 
June 26, 1892. 
July 21, 1895. 
June 9, 1893. 
July 28, 1891. 
August 15, 1892. 
June 9, 1893. 
July 26, 1892. 
June 19, 1896. 
November 29, 1893. 
August 15, 1892. 
September 1, ls91. 
August 31,1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
May 26, 1893. 
October 23, 1895. 
October 3, 1893. 
September 26, 1892. 
September 20, 1895. 
January 15, 1892. 
August 2, 1892. 
August 15, 1892. 
July 6, 1892. 
April 24, 1896. 
August 31, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
November 16, 1S93. 
May 20, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 
September 25, 189P 
August 28, 1891. 
June 20, 1893. 
November 20, 1893. 
December 16, 1890. 
July 31. 1895. 
December 28, 1892. 
September 25, 1896. 
October 20, 1893. 
July 28, 1891. 
August 31, 1S93. 
August 15, 1892. 
September 9, 1893. 
December 28, 1892. 
July 25, 1894. 
July 6, 1892. 
June 23, 1893. 
June 12, 1891. 
October 25, 1892. 
May 21, 1894. 
November 18, 1892. 
July 25, 1894. 
October 19, 1894. 
September 21, 1893. 

December 28, 1892. 
July 31, 1896. 
November 16, 1893. 
September 18, 1891. 



178 ANNUAL OFFICIAL. REPORTS. 

STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT.— Continued. 



Streets. 



Length 
in feet. 



When laid out. 



Jewett, Cilley road to Weston road * 

Joliette, south of Kelley northerly 

Jones, Nelson to K. I. Stevens's land 

Josselyn, Kyron to Varney 

Kelley, to M. &N.W.R. R 

Kennedy, Brown avenue to Josselyn 

Knowlton, Hay ward southerly 

Lafayette, Amory northerly * 

Laval, Amory northerly* 

Liberty, North southerly 

Liberty, south of North to Salmon 

Lincoln, Cedar to Shasta * 

Longwood ave., Mammoth rd. to Woodbine ave. 

Maple, Gore northerly* 

Moynard avenue, Huse road to Porter* 

McKinnon, Central to Pleasant* 

McNeil, Second to West Hancock 

Merrill, Jewett easterly 

Iderrimack, east of Beacon to Hanover 

Millord, Amherst road westerly 

3Iitchell, Beech to Brown avenue • 



Montgomery, Conant northerly 

Morgan, Amory to Kelley 

Mystic avenue, Candia road northerly 

Nelson, James Hall road to Mammoth road.... 

North, Union to Walnut* 

Oak, Gore northerly * 

Oakland avenue, A. W. Palmer's to J. Cronin's 
Orchard avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R.. . 

Page, Hanover to Bridge 

Platts avenue, Candia road to 0. & P. R. R 

Plum Hi er. Pine to Union 

Prospect, Derry old line to Hall 

Prout avenue. Hay ward southerly 

Putnam, to Dubuque j 

Quincy, Douglas northerly — i 

Revere avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R j 

Rinimon, to south of Wayne 

Sagamore, Oak to Smyth road I 

Salmon, Walnut to Beech * 

Schiller, Hale to Wentworth 

Schiller, Wentworth to Merrimack river 

Second, Blaine to Main 

Silver, Union to Maple 

Somerville, Union to Hall 

Somerville, Jewett to Cypress 

Stevens, Baker southerly 

Summer, Beech westerly 

Summer, Wilson to Massabesic 

Titus avenue. Union to Beech 

Union, Auburn to Nutt road 

Varney, .losselyn to west of B. & M. R. R.* 

Vinton, Taylor'to .Jewett 

Wallace, Winter southwesterly * 

Wayland avenue, Massabesic to Mammoth road 

Wayne, west of Dubuque westerly 

Wentworth, West Hancock southerlj'* 

West Hancock, .Merrimack river westerly 

Wilkins, Rockland avenue to Bedford line 

Willi )w. Hay ward to Xutt road* 

WocxUiine avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R... 
Woodland avenue, C. & P. R. R. to James Dear- 
born's 

Woodland avenue, Jas. Dearborn's to Candia r'd 



3,000 

400 
650 

1,200 
509 
220 
600 

1,500 

1,337 

2,500 

1,0.52 
4.50 
325 
500 
300 
96 

1,200 
735 

1,4.53 
270 
855 
218 

5,528 
690 

2,925 
410 
300 
200 

1,480 
540 

4,175 
290 

1,256 
165 
134 
150 

1,.546 
700 
595 
292 

1,290 




November 27, 1S91. 
May 26, 1893. 
August 31, 1893. 
October 3, 1893. 
June 23, 1891. 
September 21, 1891. 
November 27, 1S91. 
May 26, 1893. 
May 26, 1893. 
April 26, 1892. 
June 12, 1895. 
May 20, 1892. 
December 28, 1S92. 
June 9, 1893. 
August 28, 1896. 
June 7, 1892. 
August 28, 1891. 
April 22, 1896. 
,Julv 28, 1891. 
December 16, 1890. 
( October 28, 1890. 
\ November 29, 1892. 
May 26, 1893. 
May 26, 1893. 
December 28, 1893. 
August 21, 1893. 

August 28, 1896. 

June 9, 1893. 

December 28, 1892. 

December 28, 1892. 

June 19, 1889. 

August 24, 1894. 

May 26, 1896. 

May 29, 1889. 

June 6, 1893. 

June .5, 1888. 

July 28, 1891. 

December 28, 1892. 

September 26, 1892. 

June 19, 1896. 

June 27, 1894. 

Julv 25, 1894. 

.Julv 25, 1894. 

Sep'tember 18, 1891. 

June 7, 1892. 

June 7, 1892. 

July 31, 1896. 

November 29, 1892. 

November 25, 1896. 

September 22, 1891. 

May 21, 1894. 

October 25, 1892. 

October 3, 1893. 

Augusts], 1893. • 

November 23, 1894. 

August 24. 1894. 

June 23, 1893. 

September 21, 1893. 

November 28, 1890. 

July 6, 1892. 

June 23, 1893. 

December 28, 1892. 

December 28, 1892. 
November 23, 1894. 



Equaling 25.70 miles. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 179 

Tabulated Statement of Work Done and Present 

Standing Relative to Streets and Sewers, 

January 1, 1897. 

New streets laid out in 1893. . . 36,666.00 ft., equal to 6.940 miles. 

1894... 13,325.00 " " 2.330 

" 1895... 12,090.00 " " 2.290 " 

" 1896... 15,780.00 " " 3.000 " 

New streets built in 1893 15,840.00" " 3.000 " 

" 1894 18,513.00 " " 3.506 " 

" " " 1895 16,943.00" " 3.220 " 

" " 1896 19,950.00 " " 3.778 " 

Sewers built in 1893 21,716.00" " 4.110 " 

" 1894 19,612.00 " " 3.714 " 

" " 1895 23,152.00 " " 4.383 " 

" " 1896 26,530.00" " 5.024 " 

Sewers voted in 1893 34,007.00" " 6.440 " 

" " 1894 18,366.00" " 3.480 " 

" " 1895 24,136.50 " " 4.569 " 

" " 1896 22,444.00" " 4.250 

Streets laid out but not built 

to January 1, 1897 135,693.00 ft., equal to 25.700 miles. 

Sewers ordered in but not 

built to January 1, 1897.... 35,067.00" " 6.640 " 

Total amount of sewers January 1, 1896, equal to.. 56.240 miles. 

Actual increase in 1896 equal to 4.710 " 

Total amount of sewers January 1, 1897 60.950 miles. 

Length of streets open for 

travel 588,527.00 ft., equal to 111.463 miles. 

Length of streets planned 

for on ground 88,205.00" " 16.705 " 

Length of roads open for 

travel 323,400.00 " " 61.250 " 

Length of avenues oj)ened 

for travel 45,257.00 " " 8.571 " 

Length of avenues planned 

for on ground 16,234.00 " " 3.074 " 

1,061,623.00 " " 201.065 miles. 



180 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Length of walks on streets. 664,900.00 ft., equal to 125.928 miles. 
Length of walks on roads.. 4,740.00 " " .897 " 

Length of walks on avenues 35,388.00 " " 6.702 " 



705,028.00 ft., equal to 133.527 miles. 
KOADWAYS. 

Cobblestone paving 2,720.00 ft., equal to 0.515 miles. 

Block paving 10,358.00 " " 11.961 

Coal tar concrete 0,346.00" " 1.770 

Macadam 35,257.00 " " 6.677 

Telford 27,097.00 " " 5.132 



Total length of improved 
streets 84,778.00 ft., equal to 16.056 miles. 

Streets, roads, and avenues open for travel January 1, 
1897, 057.184.00 feet, equal to 181.281 miles. 

City Hall step is 219.352 feet above sea level. 

The highest point in the city above mean sea level, 539 
feet; the lowest, 129 feet. 

Four cemeteries belonging to the city have a combined 
area of 105 acres, and eleven private burying grounds 
about 50 acres. 

The largest sewer in the city is 50 x 75 inches; the 
smallest, 8 inches. There are seven sewer outlets into 
the river, two above high water mark, and five submerged 
from one to eight feet. 

The city owns wholly or in part forty-three public 
buildings, of which one is built of brick and stone, thirty- 
five of brick, and seven of wood. 

The common width of streets is fifty feet; the narrow- 
est is twenty feet; the widest, one hundred. 

There are ninety miles of streets having shade trees. 

Area of city, 21,700 acres, or 33.906 square miles. 

Area of Derryfield park 68.00 acres 

Oak Hill reservoir park 25.65 " 

Rimmon park (proposed) 42.91 " 

Stark park 30.00 " 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



181 



Area of West side park. . , 
Concord square. . . 
Hanover square... 
Merrimack square. 

Park square 

Simpson square... 



9.76 acres 

4.48 

3.00 

5.89 

3.49 

0.56 



Total area of parks 123.65 acres 

Total area of squares 19.67 " 

SUMMARY OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM SINCE 188C. 



Tear. 


81 


o 

3 

C« 
O eS 
Orz 
m O 


p. 

5 ^ ^ 

5 O o3 
O o 4) 

"* bo 


, -a 
u a; 
*? 
c S 
o " 

o.2o 


tn 

u 

m 
O 

a 


O 


18S0 


1.62 
2.18 
3.37 
2.54 
1.73 
1.56 
2.15 
1.44 
1.73 
2.66 
1.81 
3.08 
3.13 
3.31 
2.91 
3.98 
4.71 


18.66 
20.84 
24.21 
26.75 
28.48 
30.04 
32.19 
33.63 
35.36 
38.02 
39.83 
42.91 
46.04 
49.35 
52.26 
56.24 
60.95 






$19,919.40 
23,895.12 
24,148.13 
21,452.05 
21,548.60 
28,122.84 
44,479.15 
19,893.92 
31,154.19 
27,513.73 
39,297.97 
55,409.73 
39,724.65 
51,392.15 
46,116.01 
71,859.36 
66,408 87 


$12,295.92 

10,961.06 

7,165.65 

8,445.69 

12,455.84 

18 0''7 46 


1881 






1882 






1S83 .. . 






1884 






1885 






1886 






20,687.97 
13,815.22 
18,008.20 
10.343.51 

21 711 58 


1887 






1888 






1889 




2,003 
2,067 
2 220 
2,434 
2,625 
2,883 
3,138 
3,375 


1S90 


64 
153 
214 
191 
258 
255 
237 


1891 


17,990.17 
12,691.58 
15,526.33 
15,847.42 
18,055.11 
14,099.33 


1892 


1893 


1894 


1895 


1896 





Total cost for 17 years, $632,335.87. 



182 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

In the year 1888 a plan was made by the present city 
engineer for a system of sewerage embracing the entire 
city, this being the first comprehensive plan ever com- 
piled for that purpose. Since its adoption the majority 
of the sewers constructed have followed this plan; those 
that have not are only temporary, and will have to be re- 
laid when the growth of the city demands it. Since 1888 
there have been 25.59 miles built, at a cost of |397,722.47; 
at an average cost of |15,542.10 per mile. 



Orders. 



The following orders have been written by this depart- 
ment for the various committees. 

'An Order to sell land on School Street, West Manches- 
ter. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur. 
That the mayor and joint standing committee on lands 
and buildings be and are hereby authorized to sell the 
land on School street, containing 12,176 square feet, and 
known as lots Nos. 30 and 31 on the Amoskeag Co.'s plan 
of land in said section. 

Recommended by the joint standing committee on 
lands and buildings. 



An Order to purchase a Desk for the City Treasurer's 

Office. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the mayor and joint standing committee on lands 
and buildings be and are hereby authorized to purchase a 
desk for the city treasurer's office, the expense thereof to 
be charged to the appropriation for City Hall. 

Recommended by the mayor and joint standing com- 
mittee on lands and buildings. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 183 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

In Valley street from Wilson street easterly about 200 
feet. 

In Beacon street from Spruce street northerly about 
150 feet. 

In Orange street from Hall to Belmont. 

In Clarke street from River road to Elm street. 

In Elm street from Clarke to Rowell street. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains 
January 27, 1896. 



An Order to Appropriate Money to build a Public Bath- 

House. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the joint standing committee on finance be and are 
hereby authorized to apxjropriate the sum of |2,500 in the 
appropriation for 1896, for the purpose of building and 
maintaining for one year a public bath-house, located at 
the foot of Ferry street, in the Merrimack river. 

Recommended by the special committee on public 
bath-houses February 3, 1896. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur. 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build the following sewers: 



184 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

In Pine street from Auburn street northerly to Cedar 
south back street, and in Cedar south back from Pine to 
Beech street. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for new sewers. 

Kecommended by committee on sewers and drains May 
•5, 189G. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Beacon street from 
Hanover street to Amherst street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the grade of Beacon street from Hanover to Am- 
herst be established as follows: 
The corner of Hanover and Beacon on the west 

side of Beacon to be elevation 250.75 

50 ft. north of corner of Hanover to be elevation 254.15 
■J 00 ft. north of corner of Hanover to be elevation 25G.50 
150 ft. north of corner of Hanover to be elevation 258.00 
Then the grade to rise 2.1G per 100 feet for 162 feet, 
making the corner of Amherst and Beacon 2G1.50. 
On the east side the corner of Hanover and Bea- 
con 252.60 

50 ft. north of corner of Hanover and Beacon to 

be 255.40 

100 ft. north of corner of Hanover and Beacon to 

be 257.50 

150 ft. north of corner of Hanover and Beacon to 

be 2.^8.50 

Then the grade to rise 2.16 per 100 feet for 162 feet, 
making the corner of Amherst and Beacon 262.00 on the 
east side of Beacon street. 

And the same is hereby made the established grade of 
said street. 

Recommended by the committee on streets May 14, 
1896. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 185 

An Order to establish the Grade of Milton street from 
Hanover to Amherst street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the grade of Milton street from Hanover to Am- 
herst street shall be as follows: 

The west side of Milton and the north side of Hanover 
street shall be 237.00; then the grade to rise 3.04 per 100 
feet for 312 feet to the south side of Amherst street, when 
grade shall be 216.50. 

On the east side of Milton street at the line of Hanover 
street the grade to be 239.70; and then rise 2.91 per 100. 
feet for about 312 feet to Amherst street, where grade 
shall be 218.80. 

And the same is hereby made the established grade of 
said street. 

Recommended by the committee on streets May 14, 
1896. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Amherst street from 
Belmont to Beacon street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur. 
That the grade of Amherst street from Belmont to Bea- 
con street be established as follows: 
The corner of Amherst and Belmont streets on 

•north side of Amherst to be elevation 235.41 

50 ft. east of corner of Belmont and Amherst 

streets to be 237.90 

100 ft. east of corner of Belmont and Amherst 

streets to be 240.70 

150 ft. east of corner of Belmont and Amherst 

streets to be 243.70 

200 ft. east of corner of Belmont and Amherst . 

streets to be 247.00 



186 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

250 ft. east of corner of Belmont and Amherst 

streets to be 250.60 

300 ft. east of corner of Belmont and Amherst 

streets to be 253.85 

350 ft. east of corner of Belmont and Amherst 

streets to be 256.S8 

400 ft. east of corner of Belmont and Amherst 

streets to be 259.80 

452 ft. or the corner of Beacon and Amherst to be 

elevation 262.50 

On south side the corner of Amherst and Bel- 
mont to be elevation , 234.41 

50 ft. west of Belmont street to be elevation .... 237.30 

100 ft. west of Belmont street to be elevation 240.30 

150 ft. west of Belmont street to be elevation 243.40 

200 on the corner of Milton and Amherst to be 

elevation 247.00 

240 on the corner of Milton and Amherst to be 

elevation 248.80 

50 ft. east of Milton to be elevation 252.30 

iOO ft. east of Milton to be elevation 255.50 

150 ft. east of Milton to be elevation 258.40 

212 ft. or the corner of Beacon and Amherst to be 

elevation 216.50 

And the same is made the established grade of said 

street. 

Recommended by the committee on streets May 14, 

1896. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Carpenter Street 
from Elm to Union street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the grade of Carpenter street from Elm to Union 
street be established as follows: 



REPORT OF TEE CITY ENGINEER. 187 

The corner of Carpenter and Elm street on north 

side to be elevation 188.00 

Then the grade to rise 0.22 per 100 feet for 260 

feet, making the corner of Bay street and 

Carpenter street to be elevation 188.57 

The east corner of Carpenter and Bay street to 

be elevation 188.68 

Then the grade to rise 0.22 per 100 feet for 140 

feet, making the elevation 189.00 

50 ft. east of elevation 189.00 to be elevation .... 189.40 
100 ft. east of elevation 189.00, or corner of 

Chestnut and Carpenter street, to be eleva- 
tion 190.00 

The east corner of Carpenter and Chestnut to be 

elevation 190.75 

50 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Chestnut 

to be elevation 191.G0 

100 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Chestnut 

to be elevation 192.60 

150 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Chestnut 

to be elevation 193.70 

185 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Chestnut 

to be elevation 194.50 

220 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Chestnut 

on the corner of Adams and Carpenter to be 

elevation 195.45 

The east corner of Carpenter and Adams to be 

elevation 196.75 

50 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Adams to 

be elevation 198.25 

100 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Adams to 

be elevation 199.75 

150 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Adams to 

be elevation 201.45 

185 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Adams to 

be elevation 202.6^ 



188 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

220 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Adams on 
the corner of Ray and Cari)enter to be eleva- 
tion 204.00 

The east corner of Carpenter and Ray street to 

be elevation 205.00 

30 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray street 

to be elevation 206.75 

60 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray street 

to be elevation 209.50 

85 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray street 

to be elevation 212.40 

110 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray street 

to be elevation 215.75 

135 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray street 

to be elevation 219.35 

160 ft. east of corner of Carpenter «,nd Ray street 

to be elevation 222.55 

183 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray street 

to be elevation 225.15 

206 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray street 
on the corner of Union and Carpenter to be 
elevation 226.50 

The corner of Carpenter and Elm street on the 

south side to be elevation 185.U0 

Then the grade rises 0.49 per 100 for 2G0 ft. to 

corner Bay and Carpenter, making elevation 186.27 

The east corner of Carpenter and Bay street to 

be elevation 186.52 

Then the grade to rise 0.49 per 100 for 140 ft., 

making the elevation 187.20 

50 ft. east of elevation 187.20 to be elevation 187.70 

100 ft. east of elevation 187.20 on corner Chest- 
nut and Carpenter to be elevation 188.50 

The east corner of Carpenter and Chestnut street 

to be elevation 189.25 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 18& 

50 ft. east of corner Carpenter and Chestnut 

street to be elevation lOO.lS 

100 ft. east of corner Carpenter and Chestnut 

street to be elevation 191.15 

150 ft. east of corner Carpenter and Chestnut 

street to be elevation 192.35 

185 ft. east of corner Carpenter and Chestnut 

street to be elevation 19-3.20 

220 ft. east of corner Carpenter and Chestnut 

street on the corner of Cari)enter and Adams 

to be elevation 191.10 

The east corner of Carpenter and Adams to be 

elevation 195.50 

50 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Adams to 

be elevation 197.00 

100 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Adams to 

be elevation 108.05 

150 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Adams to 

be elevation 200.35 

185 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Adams to 

be elevation 201.65 

220 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Adams on 

the corner of Carpenter and Ray street to be 

elevation 203.00 

The east corner of Carpenter and Ray streets to 

be elevation 204.00 

30 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray 

streets to be elevation ♦. 205.65 

00 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray 

streets to be elevation 208.25 

85 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray 

streets to be elevation 211.00 

110 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray 

streets to be elevation 214.00 

135 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray 

streets to be elevation 217.25 



190 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

160 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray 

streets to be elevation 220.30 

183 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray 

streets to be elevation 222.50 

206 ft. east of corner of Carpenter and Ray 
streets on the corner of Union and Carpen- 
ter to be elevation 224.00 

And the same is hereby made the established grade of 

said street. 

Recommended by the committee on streets May 14, 
1896. 



An Order to Concrete Nuffield Lane from Amherst to 
Concord street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to concrete Nutfield Lane from 
Amherst street to Concord street. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for macadamizing. 

Recommended by the committee on streets May 14, 
1896. 



A Resolution Changing the Name of Certain Streets. 

Section 1. That the names of certain streets in said 
city be changed as follows: 

That the highway commonly known as Everett Street 
Passageway, leading from Elm street near Clarke to Ev- 
erett street, be called Waldo street. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its pas- 
sage. 

Recommended by the committee on streets May 14, 
1896. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 191 

An Order to build Spruce Street from Canton to J. Hall 

Koad. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build to grade as established 
Spruce street from Canton street to the J. Hall road. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for new streets. 

Recommended by the committee on streets May 20, 
1896. 



An Order to build to Grade Shasta Street from Beech to 
Lincoln Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build to grade Shasta street 
from Beech to Lincoln street. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for new streets. 

Recommended by the committee on streets May 26, 
1896. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur. 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build sewers as follows: 

In Cartier east back from present sewer to 250 feet 
south of Sullivan. 

In Dartmouth street from Dickey to Frederick street. 

In Conant street from Cartier westerly about 60 feet. 



192 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Also a cesspool in Main west back about 50 feet south 
of Schuyler. 

Also two cesspools at the southeast and northeast cor- 
ner of Myrtle and Hall streets. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the a})propri- 
ation for new sewers. 

Eecommended by committee on sewers and drains May 

28, 1896. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur^ 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

In B street from C street northerly about 180 feet. 

In Valley street from Jewett street westerly to Foster 
avenue. 

In Foster avenue from Valley street southerly to Hay- 
ward street. 

Wilson Hill from Merrimack street northerly to Hano- 
ver street east of Beacon street. 

In Hanover street to Highland. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for new sewers. 

Eecommended by the committee on sewers and drains 
June 24, 1890. 



Ax Order to establish the Grade of Essex Street. 

Ordered; If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur. 
That the grade as shown on plan Xo. 4103 of the city en- 
gineer's department be and is hereby made the estab- 
lished grade of said street as follows: 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 193 

The northwest corner of Amory and Essex street shall 
be 163.89; 100 feet south of corner to be 164.70; then the 
street to rise 0.30 per 100 for 474.49 feet. 

On the west side the grade to be 164.05; 100 feet south 
of corner the grade to be 164.70; then the grade to rise 
0.30 per 100 for 474.49 feet; and the same is hereby made 
the established grade of said street. 

Recommended by the committee on streets June 4, 
1896. 



'An Order to build Sagamore Street Extension. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build the extension of Sagamore 
street from Oak street to the Smyth road to the estab- 
lished grade of said street 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for new streets. 

Eecommended by the committee on streets July 7,1896. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Concord Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the grade of Concord street from Belmont to Bea- 
con street be established as follows: 
The south line of Concord street with the east 

line of Belmont street shall be 242.76 

At 50 ft. east of Belmont on south side grade 

shall be 246.75 

100 ft. east of Belmont on south side grade 

shall be 250.50 

150 ft. east of Belmont on south side grade 

shall be 254.00 

13 



194 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

'At 200 ft. east of Belmont on south side grade 

sliall be 257.35 

250 ft. east of Belmont on south side grade 

shall be 260.45 

300 ft. east of Belmont on south side grade 

shall be 263.40 

350 ft. east of Belmont on south side grade 

shall be. 200.10 

400 ft. east of Belmont on south side grade 

shall be 268.40 

450 ft. east of Belmont on south side grade 

shall be 270.75 

The north side shall be parallel and 1 foot higher than 
the grade on the south side. 

And the same is hereby made the established grade of 
said street. 

Recommended by the committee on streets July 29, 
1896. 

An Order to Erect and Equip a Horse Drinking-Foun- 

tain. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to erect and equip a horse drink- 
ing-fountain on Amory street at Hevey east back street, 
and supply the same in proper working condition, on the 
above location, at an expense not exceeding one hundred 
twenty-five, dollars. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for incidental expenses. 

Recommended by the committee on streets July 29, 
1896. 



An Order to build Colby Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 195 

are hereby authorized to build to grade Colby street in 
West Manchester from West Hancock to Log street. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for new streets. 

Eecommended by the committee on streets July 29, 
1896. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

In Quincy street from present sewer southerly about 
90 feet. 

In Beauport east back street from Wayne street south- 
erly about 350 feet. 

In Locust street from Christian brook to Sagamore. 

In Sagamore from Locust street easterly about 136 feet. 

From Sagamore street to Salmon street 120 feet west 
of the west line of Elm street. 

In Liberty east back from Christian brook to 200 feet 
north of North street. 

In Old Bridge street from Belmont street westerly 125 
feet. 

In Belmont street from Valley to Clay street. 

In Green south back from Union to Beech street. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers August 3, 
1896. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 



196 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

From Laurel to ^Merrimack street through the laud of 
Mara, Moore, aud Muzzey. 

In Hall street from Prospect to Harrisou street. 

In Harrison street from Hall to Belmont street. 

In Union street from Appleton street northerly about 
150 feet. 

In Maple street from Silver to Prescott street. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for new sewers. 

Eecommended by the committee on sewers and drains 
August 31, 1896. 



An Order to build to Grade Candia road. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur^ 
That the board of street and park" commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build to grade Candia road from 
the Mammoth road easterly to Revere avenue. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for new streets. 

Eecommended by the committee on streets September 
10, 1896. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

In Carroll street from Amherst road southerly about 
250 feet. 

In Lake avenue from Canton street easterly about 300 
feet. 

In Elm street from Clarke southerly, the city to furnish 
pipe, Mr. Ray to excavate for the same. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 197 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains 
September 29, 1896. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

In Beacon street from Amherst to Concord street. 

In Schiller street from Hale to South Main street. 

In Sagamore street from Oak to Linden street. 

In Walnut east back from Christian brook to Salmon 
street. 

In Montgomery east back from Kelley to Amory street. 

In Carpenter street from Elm to Union street. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for new sewers. 

Recommended by the committee on sewers and drains 
November 6, 1896. 



An Order to establish the Grade of South Main Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the grade of South Main street from Boyntou street 
to Bedford town line be established as follows: 
The intersection of South Main and Boynton on 

the west side of South Main shall be 71.50 

At 19 ft. south of Boynton street on west side 

grade shall be 71.30 

09 ft. south of Boynton street on west side 

grade shall be 70.70 

119 ft. south of Boynton street on west side 

grade shall be 70.10 



198 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

At 169 ft. south of Boynton street on west side 

grade shall be 69.60 

219 ft. south of Boynton street on west side 

grade shall be 69.20 

269 ft. south of Boynton street on west side 

grade shall be 69.00 

319 ft. south of Boynton street on west side 

grade shall be 69.00 

Then the grade to fall 0.115 per 100 for 1,300 feet. 
Then at 1019 ft. from south of Boynton street on 

west side grade shall be 67.50 

1669 ft. from south of Boynton street on 

west side grade shall be 67.55 

1719 ft. from south of Boynton street on 

west side grade shall be 07.70 

1769 ft. from south of Boynton street on 

west side grade shall be 68.00 

1819 ft. from south of Boynton street on 

west side grade shall be 68.45 

1869 ft. from south of Boynton street on 

west side grade shall be 68.80 

1919 ft. from south of Boynton street on 

west side grade shall be 69.00 

Then 100 feet level at 69.00 

Then the grade to rise 0.125 per 100 for 400 ft. 

grade to be 69.50 

Then 50 ft. from elevation 69.50 the grade shall 

be 69.50 

'At 100 ft. from first elevation 69.50 the grade 

shall be 69.30 

150 ft. from first elevation 69.50 the grade 

shall ibe 69.00 

Then the grade to fall 0.407 per 100 for 900 ft. 

grade shall be 64.80 

At 50 ft. from elevation 64.80 the grade shall be 64.55 
100 ft. from elevation 64.80 the grade shall be 64.10 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 199 

At 150 ft. from elevation 6-1.80 the grade shall be 63.50 

200 ft. from elevation 64.80 the grade shall be 63.00 

250 ft. from elevation 64.80 the grade shall be 62.60 

300 ft. from elevation 64.80 the grade shall be 62.30 

Then the grade to fall 0.1107 per 100 for 271 ft. 

grade shall be 62.00 

The east side of South Main shall be parallel to the 
west side of said street, and one foot lower, as shown on 
plans 993, 994, 995, 996 on file in the city engineer's de- 
partment. 

And the same is hereby made the established grade of 
said street. 

Recommended by committee on streets November 12, 
1896. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Alsace Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the grade of Alsace street from Kelley street north- 
erly to Bremer be and is hereby made the established 
grade as follows: 

That the grade of Alsace street from Kelley street north- 
Alsace street and the north line of Kelley street 

shall be 142.22 

At 50 ft. north of Kelley street grade shall be 143.75 
100 ft. north of Kelley street grade shall be. .. 145.90 
150 ft. north of Kelley street grade shall be. .. 147.75 
200 ft. north of Kelley street grade shall be. . . 149.10 
250 ft. north of Kelley street grade shall be. . . 149.80 
300 ft. north of Kelley street grade shall be. . . 150.00 
Then 200 ft. straight grade at 0.20 per 100 ft., 
making elevation at corner of Bremer and Al- 
sace streets 150.50 

The east side of the street shall be level with the grade 
of said west side. 

Eecommended by committee on streets November 12, 
1896. 



200 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An Order to build Cleveland Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Maj'or and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build to grade Cleveland street 
from its intersection with Second, thence easterly to the 
Merrimack river. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for new streets. 

Recommended by committee on streets November 12, 
1896. 



An Order to establish the Grade of Chestnut Street. 

The grade of Chestnut street from Clarke to Trenton 
street be established as follows: 
At northwest corner Clarke and Chestnut grade 

shall be elevation 156.50 

Then grade to rise 2.75 per 100 ft. for 400 ft. to 

elevation 167.50 

Then grade to rise 2.411 per 100 ft. for 170 ft. to 

elevation 171.60 

Then grade to rise 2.444 per 100 ft. for 180 ft. to 

elevation 176.00 

Then grade to rise 2.912 per 100 ft. for 412 ft. to 

elevation 188.00 

Being the southwest corner Chestnut and Carpenter. 
The northwest corner Chestnut and Carpenter 

streets grade shall be 189.50 

At 36 ft. from corner Chestnut and Carpenter 

streets west side grade shall be 100.90 

86 ft. from corner Chestnut and Carpenter 

streets west side grade shall be 193.53 

136 ft. from corner Chestnut and Carpenter 

streets west side grade shall be 197.20 

Then grade to rise 8.50 per 100 for 100 ft. grade 

shall be 205.70 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 201 

At 50 ft. from elevation 205.70 grade shall be.. . 209.70 
100 ft. from elevation 205.70 grade shall be. . . 213.10 
150 ft. from elevation 205.70 grade shall be.. . 216.10 
200 ft. from elevation 205.70 grade shall be. . . 218.60 
247 ft. from elevation 205.70 on the southwest 
corner Chestnut and Trenton streets the 

grade to be 220.50 

The grade of Chestnut street from Clarke to Trenton 
street on east side shall be as follows: 
At the northeast corner Clarke and Chestnut 

grade shall be 156.50 

Then grade to rise 2.75 per 100 for 400 ft. to ele- 
vation 167.50 

Then grade to rise 2.588 per 100 for 170 ft. to ele- 
vation 171.90 

Then grade to rise 2.011 per 100 for 180 ft. to ele- 
vation 176.60 

Then grade to rise 2.949 per 100 for 412 ft. to ele- 
vation 188.75 

Being the southeast corner of Chestnut and Carpenter 

streets. 
The northeast corner Chestnut and Carpenter 

grad^ shall be 190.25 

At 36 ft. from corner Chestnut and Carpenter 

east side grade shall be 191.50 

86 ft. from corner Chestnut and Carpenter 

east side grade shall be 194.20 

136 ft. from corner Chestnut and Carpenter 

east side grade shall be 197.85 

Then grade to rise 8.40 per 100 ft. for 100 ft. to 

elevation 206.25 

At 50 ft. from elevation 206.25 grade shall be... 210.20 
100 ft. from elevation 206.25 grade shall be. . . 213.65 
150 ft. from elevation 206.25 grade shall be. . . 216.65 
200 ft. from elevation 206.25 grade shall be. . . . 219.10 



202 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

At 2-17 ft. from elovation 20G.25 on the southeast 
corner Chestnut and Trenton the grade 
shall be 221.00 

Eecommended by committee on streets November 12, 
1896. 



An Order to build Chestnut Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build to grade as established by 
the city, Chestnut street from the north line of Clarke 
street, northerly in said Chestnut street to Trenton 
street. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for new streets. 

Eecommended by committee on streets November 12, 
1896. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur. 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

In Walnut east back street from Christian brook sewer 
northerly about 200 feet. 

In Linden street from Prospect street to Harrison 
street. 

In Harrison street from Linden street to Russell street. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for new sewers. 

Eecommended by the committee on sewers and drains 
November 30, 1896. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 203 

An Order to purchase lot of Land on the Bank of the 
Piscataquog Eiver. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the mayor and joint standing committee on sewers 
and drains be and are hereby authorized and instructed 
to purchase from Gustavus F. Swift the lot of land owned 
by him situated on the bank of the Piscataquog river in 
West Manchester, for a sum not exceeding thirty-five 
hundred dollars (|3,500), the expense of the same to be 
charged to the appropriation for the purchase of land on 
the bank of the Piscataquog river. 

Kecommended by the committee on sewers and drains 
December 1, 1896. 



An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur. 
That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

In Dubuque east back street from Kelley street north- 
erly to Coolidge avenue west back street, and thence 200 
feet north of Bremer street in Coolidge avenue west back 
street. 

In Milford street from Amherst road westerly about 
300 feet. 

In Hanover street from near Beacon street to Highland 
street. 

In Valley street from near Belmont to Cypress street. 

In Harvard street from Wilson street easterly 200 feet. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for new sewers. 

Eecommended by the committee on sewers and drains 
December 18, 1896. 



204 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Following is the report of the committee on sewers and 
drains, prepared by the city engineer as clerk of the com- 
mittee: 

Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1896. 
Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

The committee appointed by your honorable board to 
act as the joint standing committee on sewers and drains, 
would submit the following repoft of the work done by 
them the present year, and the second in their term of 
oflSce. 

At the opening of the season there were fifty-two or- 
ders for sewers voted in but not built. The following list 
gives the street, location, date of order, and length. 

211 



212 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Street. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Amherst Union to Asliland . . . 

Amherst road j Mast southerly 

Auburn i Canton easterly 

Blaine Second to Hiram 

Ueech : Sagamore northerly. 

Boynton i C to McDuffie 

Canton ' Auburn northerly... 

Concord I Hall easterly 

Cartier east back \ Putnam southerly. 

Cedar 

East of Wilson. .. 
C^edar south back 
Christian brook . . 

Dover 

Elm 

Elm 



Date 
ordered. 



Front 

Grove 

Hale 

Harvell 

Hay ward 

Hevey east back 

Jewett 

Jewett 



Wilson easterly 

Cedar to Cedar soutli back 

East of WiLson to Hall 

East ot Liberty to Walnut 

Clinton northerly 

Monroe south back to Thayer. 

Shasta to Baker 

Railroad bridge to Elm avenue 

Eddy to north of liotel 

Present sewer easterly 

Schiller southerly 

Hale to South Main 

Jewett easterly 

Amory to Columbus avenue .. 

To Somerville 

To Clay 

Lowell j Belmoiit to Beacon 

Mast 1 Near Bowman westerly 

Mast ' Extension westerly 

Mead { Hall to Belmont 

Merrimack i Belmont to Milton 

McDuffle Boj'nton to Huntress 

Myrtle I Hall westerly 

Porter ' Amherst northerly 

Prince Boynton to Huntress 

Prospect ' Hall easterly 

Ray I Rajr brook northerly 

River road ' Monroe to Clarke 

Sagamoi-e Beech to Oak 

Second i Blaine to Hiram 

Second Schiller to Harvell 



Somerville 

Silver 

Tilton 

Union 

Union 

Union east back . . 
Union east back . 

Valley 

Valley 

West 

Wentworth 

Wilson 



Total 



•Tewett westerly 

Union to I.,incoln 

Milford to Bowman avenue 

Clarke to Trenton 

.Silver to Plummer 

Christian brook northerly .. 
Christian brook southerly .. 

Elm to ]!elmont 

.Icw(^tt easterly 

(;iinton northerly 

Schiller southerly 

Valley to Somerville 



2,000 

1,230 

600 

400 

17.5 

.572 

3.52 

200 

400 

212 

126 

299 

523 

160 

1,313 

332 

1,373 

2,800 

101 

4.50 

700 

300 

800 

550 

330 

500 

200 

610 

362 

200 

507 

200 

250 

5&3 

100 

325 

G84 

803 

400 

450 

400 

1,790 

510 

1,700 

350 

500 

400 

4,900 

300 

226 

400 

1,800 



May 2, 
Apr. 3, 
Nov. 9, 
July 5, 
Aug. 6, 
May 27, 
Nov. 9, 
Sept. 6, 
Dec. 3, 
Dec. 3, 
Dec. 3, 
Dec. 3, 
June 4, 
Sept. 4, 
June 4, 
May 6, 

Sept. 5, 
Nov. 9, 
Nov. 9, 
Nov. 9, 
Sept. 3, 
July 10, 
July 2, 
Aug. 6, 
Aug. 6, 
June 4, 
Apr. 3, 
Dec. 3, 
Oct. 6, 
May 27, 
May 2, 
May 2, 
May 27. 
Sept. 3, 
I Dec. 3, 
July 10, 
May 27, 
July 5, 
Dec. 3, 
July 2, 
July 2, 
June 4, 
Julv 2, 
Sept. 3, 
Aug. fi, 
Aug. 6, 
Nov. 7, 
Oct. 1, 
Sept. 4, 
Nov. 5, 
Aug. 7, 



1893 
1894 
1894 
1892 
1895 
1895 
1894 
1S87 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1894 
1895 
1890 

1893 

1894 

1894 

1804 

1895 

1893 

1895 

1895 

1895 

1895 

1894 

1895 

1891 

1895 

1893 

1893 

1895 

1895 

1895 

1893 

1895 

1892 

1895 

1895 

1895 

1895 

1895 

1895 

1895 

1896 

1893 

1895 

1894 

1895. 

1894 



Equaling 5.615 miles. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



213 



Of these the following have been built during the year: 



Street. 



Location. 



Amherst road 

Auburn 

Beech 

Boynton 

Canton 

Cartier east back 

Cedar 

East of Wilson 

Cedar south back 

Christian brook i East of Liberty to Walnut 

Elm Clarke to Thayer 

Grove j Present sewer easterly 

Hevey east back i Amory to Cojumbus avenue. 

Jewett ! To Somerville 

Jewett [To Clay 

Mast Near Bowman westerly 

Mast [Extension westerly , 



Mast southerly 

Canton easterly 

Sagamore northerly 

C to McDuffle 

Auburn northerly 

Putnam southerly 

Wilson easterly 

Cedar to Cedar south back. 
East of Wilson to Hall. 



Hall to Belmont. 
Boynton to Huntress. 
Amherst northerly. . . 
Boynton to Huntres.s. 
Ray brook northerly. 

Monroe to Clarke 

Beech to Oak. 



Mead. 
McDuffle ... 

Porter 

Prince , 

Ray 

River road . 
Sagamore.. 

Second j Schiller southerly. 

Silver Union to Lincoln 

Tilton Milford southerly 

Union east back Cliristian brook northerly. 

Union east back Christian brook southerly. 

Valley j Wilson to Belmont 

Valley ; j. Jewett easterly 

Wilson Valley to Harvard '. ... 



Total 



Length 
in feet. 



60C 
510 
175 
572 
352 
344 
212 
126 
299 
523 
462 
101 
404 
550 
330 
200 
610 
362 
507 
2.50 
583 
325 
684 
803 
290 

1,790 
277 
500 
350 
860 
300 

1,143 



15,394 



Leaving 14,254 feet of sewers voted in previous to Jan- 
uary 1, 1896. 

Special appropriations were made for three of the sew- 
ers constructed this year, namely: The extension of the 
Silver-street main, and for the Christian brook and 
North Elm-street mains, the former having been built to 
Union street in 1895. This season the w^ork was taken 
up at that point, and continued easterly to the manhole 
in Lincoln street. This sewer, which is of brick, 3 feet 2 
inches x 4 feet 9 inches, was of necessity quite deep in cer- 
tain sections, the average cut being about 20 feet. Much 
thought has been given to the location of the mains and 
laterals in this section, with a view to lessening the exca- 



214 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

vation as much as possible, and still properly draining 
the entire area. The Silver-street main, besides being 
laid at considerable depth, was built through a wet, quick- 
sand bottom for quite a distance, making the excavating 
and briek-laj'ing more than ordinarily expensive; still, 
with the laterals which have been called for, and those 
which will ultimately drain into this sewer, the cost of 
the whole when completed will be about the average cost 
per foot for the entire sewerage system. 

Already two connecting sewers have been voted in for 
this section, — one in Union street from Silver southerly, 
and one in Maple street from Silver to Prescott. These 
were recommended by your committee after carefully 
considering the plans and examining the section to be 
drained. 

Christian brook sewer has been completed to Beech 
east back street. This location in the valley was recom- 
mended by the committee in order that the expense of 
culverts, which would be called for in this section when 
the streets are built, could be avoided and the sewer 
made to answer a double purpose, as a culvert for the 
brook, and a means of drainage for the section bounded 
by Webster street, Smyth road. Sagamore and Union 
streets. 

Could other sections of the city have been provided for 
as this one is now, in advance of the street building, by a 
main sewer, considerable expense could have been saved, 
as ordinarily the work of buildng a sewer is much less 
through new land than through graded streets. 

Sagamore-street sewer, which was laid to Beech street 
in 1895, has been built to Oak street this season, and your 
committee has recommended an order to continue it to 
Linden street, as the increased building in this section 
seemed to warrant the extension. 

In Carpenter street a sewer was also recommended, as 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 215 

it will be needed the coming season in order to drain the 
land and take care of the residences which are to be built. 
It will connect with the Elm-street main, which has been 
completed to this point. 

Early in the season there was an urgent demand for a 
sewer connecting with the Wilson-Hill sewer east of Bea- 
con street and south of Hanoyer. This sewer was de- 
signed to run northerly to Hanover street, thence east- 
erly to Highland street. The ground was thoroughly 
looked over and soundings made to determine the extent 
of the ledge. Acting on the report received from the city 
engineer, the committee decided to give the petitioners 
leave to withdraw, and recommend a new location begin- 
ning at the present sewer in Hanover street near Beacon 
street, thence easterly in Hanover street to Highland 
street. This will provide drainage for more lots than the 
other would, with but little difference in the expense, 
which in either case would be considerable, owing to the 
ledge to be gone through. 

' Owing to there being a ledge in Elm street between 
Sagamore and Salmon streets, the houses on the west 
side of the streets have been without suitable drainage. 
To remedy this your committee, after consulting with the 
owners and securing a waiver of damages from them, rec- 
ommended a sewer beginning at the Christian brook 
sewer, thence along their westerly lot line to Salmon 
street. From this point a branch was laid to Elm street 
to connect with cesspools on Elm street, which heretofore 
could not be built, owing to the lack of suitable facilities 
for draining them. 

Your committee was obliged to act adversely on two 
petitions for sewers in Amory and Essex streets, for the 
reason that the Amory-street sewer, with which it was 
proposed to connect, is not of sufficient depth or capacity 
to drain the area intended in these petitions. The sewer- 



216 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

age plan embracing this section calls for the drainage 
into Kelley street, which cannot be done until the Kellej- 
street main is continued westerly to a point where these 
sewers can be connected with it. 

Many complaints regarding the condition of the sewer 
in Pine and Cedar south back streets were received by the 
committee, together with a petition for a new sewer. The 
matter was referred to the street and park commission- 
ers, as it was in the nature of repairs, and they have re- 
moved the cause b}^ laying a larger sewer at greater 
depth, which will properly drain the entire section. 

At its first meeting your committee recommended an 
order to build a sewer in Valley street from the AYilson- 
street sewer, which was completed late last year, easterly 
to about 200 feet east of Belmont street. This sewer pro- 
vides means for draining an extensive area, including the 
large blocks at the corner of Belmont and Valley streets. 
At the meeting on December 18, the committee recom- 
mended the passage of an order extending this sewer to 
Cypress street. This will afford drainage to a section 
that has long needed it, particularly that portion on the 
north side of Valley street between Taylor and Cypress 
streets, where nearly every lot is occupied.. 

It has hitherto been impossible to afford relief to this 
section, on account of the lack of an outlet for the sewer. 
This lateral will eventually be connected with a sub-main 
'from the Silver-street sewer. 

On Beauport street and at the top of the hill near Put- 
nam street, numerous complaints were made regarding 
the surface water coming from the land on the west down 
the slope toward Beauport street, to the injury of the lots 
and the inconvenience of the occupants. Your commit- 
tee recommended the construction of a sewer in Cartier 
east back street from Putnam street northerly and soutli- 
erly, with a sufficient number of cesspools to take care of 
all surface drainage. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 217 

A sewer was recommended in Belmont street from 
Valley to Clay streets. This section has repeatedly asked 
for sewerage facilities, which could not be granted, ow- 
ing to the lack of a main with which to connect. As the 
Valley-street main has been built to Belmont street, your 
committee felt justified in recommending the construc- 
tion of the sewer called for. This will afford relief to the 
houses in this section, and also take care of the large 
quantities of surface water. 

The sewer in Amherst road, the construction of which 
was recommended in 1894, has been completed to Carroll 
street, connecting with the Mast-street sewer, which was 
extended to Amherst road. A smaller pipe has been car- 
ried southerly from Carroll street,'to take care of the sur- 
face water. The sewer will undoubtedly be extended to 
Milford street the coming season. This has been a some- 
what expensive piece of work, as the Mast-street sewer 
was nearly all built through solid ledge, while on Am- 
herst road a cut of considerable depth was necessary. 

One of the petitions presented your committee called 
for a sewer through Beacon street from Spruce to Laurel 
street. Investigation revealed the fact that there was a 
ledge for nearly the whole distance, and as all the lots 
could be drained into extensions from other sewers, the 
request was not granted. 

The construction of the Elm-street sewer was recom- 
mended by the committee at its January meeting, in com- 
pliance with the request of a large number of petitioners. 
This petition called for the extension of the sewer in 
River road from Monroe to Clarke street, thence easterly 
in Clarke street to Elm street, and northerly in Elm 
street* to Rowell street. A special appropriation was 
made for the construction of this sewer. Rapid progress 
was made in the work until the sewer had nearly reached 
Thayer street, where ledge was encountered. This ledge 



218 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

has continued throuj;liout the entire distance constructed 
this rear, and will undoubtedly be found in greater or less 
quantities for the remainder of the distance. 

It will be a source of considerable expense to the city in 
future years to provide proper drainage for this section. 
as the underlying- stratum of rock reaches "nearly to the 
surface over the entire area. This section, designed to be 
one of the handsomest residential portions of the city, is 
already laid out into lots and partially built upon. Many 
of the streets have been accepted by the city, and their 
locations cannot be changed. Sewers will have to be 
constructed, and a large appropriation should be granted 
in future years if this section is to be properly taken care 
of in the matter of sewerage. 

For four years or more petitions have been presented 
to this and former committees, asking for drainage in the 
rapidly-growing district south of Amory street and west 
of the Amoskeag Company's line, commonly called the 
Whittemore section. This section is peculiarly situated, 
being on an intervale seventy feet lower than the bluff in 
McGregorville, too low to be drained toward the east. 
The only way out of the difficulty was by running a sewer 
into the Piscataquog river. Here another objection was 
met in the shape of an ice-cutting privilege owned by the 
Swift Beef Co., one of the abutters on the river. To over- 
come this it was necessary to purchase their land; and 
accordingly an order was passed by the city councils au- 
thorizing such action. 

A plan has been prepared providing for the drainage of 
this section and that adjoining owned by the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Co., embracing some seventy acres. The 
owner of the land through which the sewer is to pass has 
granted a right of way, and permission has been secured 
from the Boston & Maine Railroad to pass under their 
tracks. The sewer, which will be of 24-inch pipe, will fol- 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 219 

low a natural ravine nearly the entire distance, some 
2,000 feet. It is designed to run the main to Wayne and 
Bartlett streets, and from this point build a lateral in 
Bartlett street, running as far south as Sullivan. Should 
it be thought desirable, many of the lots along the hhift 
could also be drained through this system. 

Your committee has thoroughly examined the locali- 
ties where sewers have been petitioned for, in many cases 
making several inspections before coming to a decision; 
and in all cases acted in a fair and impartial manner as 
was deemed for the best interest of the cit}-. 

During the year forty-seven orders for sewers have re- 
ceived favorable action; of these nineteen have been 
built, and two partly. At the present time there are or- 
ders for fifty- eight sewers which have jiassed your honor- 
able board, but which have not been constructed. 

The committee has held nine meetings, as follows: 
January 27, May 28, June 24, August 3, August 31, No- 
Tember 6, November 30, December 18. 

The total number of petitions presented to your com- 
mittee has been forty-seven. Of these, one was referred 
to the street and park commissioners, as it was a case of 
repairs; one had been cared for by order of the mayor; 
nine recommending leave to withdraw; and one recom- 
mending the purchase of land. 

Nine reports were sent in to the city councils, recom- 
mending the passage of orders authorizing the building 
of thirty-five sewers. 

These will be found in the list of orders written by the 
<3ity engineer's department. 



Petitions. 



The following is a list of the petitions referred to the 
€ommittee, and the action taken upon them. The date of 



220 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the passage of the order to build the same will be found 
in the engineer's report of orders written for presenta- 
tion to the city councils. 

Valley Street. From Wilson easterly, commencing 
at the present sewer at Wilson street, and thence in an 
easterly direction about 200 feet east of Belmont in Val- 
ley street. 

L. B. Bodwell. 

Committee yoted to prepare an order to build the same^ 
January 27, 18.96. 

Amory Street. From Essex to Morgan, and Morgan 
commencing at terminus of present sewer, and thence in 
a wester]}' direction to No. G31 Amory street, thence 
northerly on Morgan street to No. 48. 

Harry H. Piper. 

Committee yoted to defer action until Kel ley-street 
sewer is built. May 28, 1896. 

Essex Street. From Amory southerly, commencing 
at Amory and Essex street, and thence in a southerly di- 
rection about 560 feet. 

Tobias Steinlehuer. 

Committee yoted to lay it oyer, January 27, 1896. 

Elm Street. From Thayer to Kowell, commencing at 
Thayer street on Elm street, and thence in a northerly 
direction to Rowell street. 

C. T. Means. 

Committee yoted to prepare an order to build the same, 
January 27, 1896. 

Orange Street. From Hall to Belmont, commencing 
at Hall and Orange at the present sewer in Hall street, 
and thence in an easterly direction to Belmont street in 
Orange street. 

F. F. Cate. 

Committee yoted to prepare an order for the same, 
January 27, 189G. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 221 

Beacon Street. From Lake avenue to Spruce, com- 
mencing at corner of Lake avenue and Beacon streets, 
and tlieuce in a southerly direction on Beacon street to 
Spruce street. 

Alnora E. McDole. 

Committee voted to report an order for 150 feet north 
of Spruce street, January 27, 1896. 

Across Private Land. From Merrimack east of Bea- 
con to Hanover, commencing at the present sewer north 
of Merrimack street and east of Beacon, and thence in a 
Dortherly direction to Hanover street, thence easterly on 
Hanover street about 500 feet. 

Walter R. Cox. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build, provided 
owners waive all damages and grant right of way. May 28, 
1896. 

CoNANT Street. From Cartier westerly, commencing 
at the manhole in Cartier and Conant street, and thence 
in a westerly direction about 40 feet in Conant street. 

Otto C. Merkel. 

Committee voted to prepare an order for 60 feet. May 
28,1896. 

Main West Back Street. From 50 feet south of 
Schuyler street, in Main west back street northerly to 
Schuyler street. 

Frank A. Koerner. 

Committee voted to prepare an order for the same as 
asked for, 50 feet south of Schuyler, May 28, 1896. 

Valley Street. Commencing at the easterly ter- 
minus of the sewer already voted in in Valley street, and 
thence in an easterly direction to a point near Cypress 
street. 

Mrs. G. C. Noyes. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build the same, 
December 18, 1896. 



222 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

Cartier East Back Street. Eunning southerly from 
Sullivan street 250 feet. 

John T. Hannigan. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build the same. 
May 28, 1896. 

Liberty East Back Street. Commencing at the man- 
hole in Christian brook sewer at Liberty east back street, 
and thence in a northerly direction in said Liberty east 
back about 200 feet north of North street. 

J. H. Grifiin. 

Committee voted to prepare an order for the same, 
August 3, 1896. 

Dartmouth Street. From Dickey to Frederick, com- 
mencing at Dickey street on Dartmouth, and thence in a 
southerly direction to Frederick street. 

John O. Boody. 

Committee voted to prepare an order for the same, 
May 28, 1896. 

B Street. Commencing at G street and thence in a 
northerly direction through B street about 150 feet. 

Elmer E. Bullard. 

Committee voted to prepare an order for the same, 
January 24, 1896. 

Myrtle and Hall Streets, Two cesspools, at north- 
east and southeast corner of Myrtle and Hall streets, to 
drain surface water with. 

D. B. Sanborn. 

Committee voted to prepare an order as asked for May 
28, 1896. 

MiLFORD Street. From Old Amherst road westerly 
300 feet, commencing at the corner of Milford street and 
the Old Amherst road, and thence in a westerly direction 
about 300 feet on Milford street. 

George G. Hatch, 

Committee voted to lay it over, June 24, 1896. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 22S 

Garland Avenue. From Cypress westerly 200 feet» 
commencing at a Y set in Cypress street sewer near the 
southerly corner of Kimball Brothers' shoe shop, and 
thence in a westerly direction to a stake set in the center 
of Garland avenue, so-called, 200 feet from first stake. 

Walter E. Bailey. 

Committee voted that leave to withdraw be granted, as 
no right of way was secured, December 18, 1896. 

Green South Back. From Union to Beech, commenc- 
ing at the present terminus of Green south back street 
near Union street, and thence in an easterly direction to 
near Beech street. 

Patrick Healey. 

Committee voted to prepare an order for the same^ 
August 3, 1896. 

Pine. From Auburn to Cedar south back. Cedar south 
back from Pine to Beech, commencing at Pine and Au- 
burn streets, thence northerly to Cedar south back street, 
and thence in an easterly direction to Beech street in Ce- 
dar south back street. 

John Morrison. 

Committee voted to have this referred to street and 
park commissioners, as it was in the nature of repairs^ 
May 28, 1896. 

Beaufort East Back Street. From Wayne street 
southerly 350 feet, commencing at Wayne and Beauport 
east back, and thence in a southerly direction to about 
350 feet toward Putnam street in Beauport east back. 

P. Hevey. 

Committee voted to prepare an order, August 3, 1896. 

Valley and Foster Avenue. Commencing at the 
present sewer in Valley and Jewett streets, thence in a 



224 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

westerly direction in Valley street to Foster avenue, and 
thence in a southerl}' direction to Hayward street. 

F. A. Platts. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build tlie same, 
June 24, 189G. 

Massabesig Street. From Jewett to Mammoth road, 
commencing at the present sewer in Jewett and Massabe- 
sic streets, and thence in an easterly direction to Old 
Mammoth road in Massabesic street. 

Joseph Quirin. 

Committee voted to defer action, August 3, 1896. 

Montgomery East Back Street. From Kelley to 
Amory, commencing at Kelley street and on Montgomery 
east back street, and thence in a southerly direction in 
Montgoniery east back to Amory street. 

Joseph Vincent. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build, Novem- 
ber 6, 1896. 

Elm West Back. From Christian brook to Salmon, 
commencing at a stake on the Christian brook sewer line 
about 120 feet west of the west line of Elm street, and 
about 55 feet north of the north line of Pennacook, and 
thence in a northerly direction and parallel to the west 
line of Elm street, to a stake on the south line of Salmon 
street about 120 feet west of the west line of Elm street. 

William J. Hoyt. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build, August 
3, 1896. 

Old Bridge Street. From Belmont westerly 150 feet, 
commencing at Belmont and Old Bridge street, and 
thence in a westerly direction 125 to 150 feet. 

B. S. Maben. 

Committee voted to prepare an order for the same, 
August 3, 1896. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 225 

Belmont Street. From Valley to Clay, commencing 
at Valley street on Belmont street, and tlience in a south- 
erly direction to Glaj street. 

L. A. Dodge. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build, August 
3, 1S9G. 

Wayne and Putnam Streets. From Bartlett to Pis- 
cataquog river, commencing at Bartlett and Wayne 
streets, thence southerly in Bartlett street; also from 
Bartlett and Putnam streets, thence westerly to the 
Piscataquog river. 

Albert Olivier. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build the same, 
December 18. 1896. 

Linden, Prospect to Harrison, Harrison, Linden to 
Russell, commencing at Prospect and Linden streets, 
and thence in a northerly direction to Harrison street, 
thence in a westerly direction to Russell street, according 
to the city's plan of sewers of said section. 

Charles A. Underbill. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build the same, 
November 30, 189G. 

QuiNCY Street. From south of Douglas southerly, 
cionnecting with the sewer on Douglas street, and thence 
in a southerly direction to Granite street, a distance of 
about 90 feet. 

E. C. Stratton. 

Committee voted to prepare an order for the same, 
August 3, 1896. 

MA:fLE Street. From Silver to Prescott, commencing 
at the Silver-street sewer, corner of Maple, and thence in 
a northerly direction to Prescott street through Maple 
street. 

William Smith. 

Committee voted that an order be prepared to build the 
same, September 1, 1896. 

15 



226 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Union Street. From Apjileton northerly 150 feet, 
commencing at the Apfjleton-street sewer at Union, and 
thence in a northerly direction about 150 feet in Union 
street. 

Charles McCauley. 

Committee voted that an order be prepared to build the 
same, August 31, 1896. 

Hall, Prospect to Harrison, Harrison, Hall to Bel- 
mont. Commencing at the present sewer, corner 
Hall and Prospect, and thence in a northerly direction to 
Harrison street, thence easterly in Harrison street to 
Belmont street, according to the city's plan of sewers. 

William E. Pierson. 

Committee voted that an order be prepared to build, 
August 31, 1896. 

Wilson Hill. From Merrimack street, and thence in 
a southerly direction to Laurel street through land of 
Mara, Moore, and Muzzey. 

W. E. Littlefield. 

Committee voted that an order be prepared to build, 
provided that all the owners waive all claims for a right 
of way, for the sewer, August 31, 1896. 

Merrill Street. From Jewett easterly 350 feet, com- 
mencing at Jewett and Merrill streets, and thence in an 
easterly direction about 350 feet. 

Charles B. Beal. 

Committee voted to grant leave to withdraw, Decem- 
ber 18, 1896. 

Sagamore Street. From Oak to Linden, commencing 
at Sagamore and Oak streets, and thence in an easterly 
direction to Linden street, being an extension of Saga- 
more-street sewer. 

Henry L. Kennedy. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, No- 
vember 6, 1896. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 227 

Carroll Street. Commencing at the northerly end 
of the sewer now in Carroll street, and thence in a north- 
erly direction to the new sewer now in process of con- 
struction in Bedford road. 

George S. Cauley. 

Committee voted that an order be prepared to build, 
September 29, 1896. 

Lake Avenue. Commencing at Lake avenue and Can- 
ton street on Lake avenue, and thence in an easterly di- 
rection in Lake avenue about 300 feet. 

Silas W. Call. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build, Septem- 
ber 29, 1896. 

Schiller Street. From Hale to South Main street, 
commencing at the present sewer in Schiller street at 
Hale street, and thence in a westerly direction to South 
Main street in Schiller street. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, No- 
vember 6, 1896. 

Walnut East Back Street. Commencing at Walnut 
<^ast back and the Christian brook sewer, and thence in a 
southerly direction to Salmon street. 

Maurice Hoifman. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, No- 
vember 6, 1896. 

Beacon Street. From Amherst to Concord, com- 
mencing at Amherst street on Beacon street, and thence 
in a northerly direction to Concora street. 

John H. Andrews. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, No- 
vember 6, 1896. 



228 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Walnut East Back Street. Commencing at; the 
Christian brook sewer at Walnut east back street, and 
thence in a northerly direction about 200 feet in Walnut 
east back. 

C. S. Bojnton. 

Committee voted to prepare an order for the same, No- 
Tember 30, 1S9G. 

Morrison Street. Cesspool in Morrison street near 
Arlington street. 

Clarence E. Rose. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build, Novem- 
ber 6, 1896. 

Beacon Street. Commencing at the present sewer in 
Spruce street at Beacon street, and thence in a northerly 
direction in Beacon street to Laurel street. 

George D. Totman. 

Committee voted that leave to withdraw be granted, 
December 18, 1896. 

Carpenter Street. Commencing at the proposed 
sewer in Elm at Carpenter, and thence in an easterly di- 
rection in Carpenter street to Union. 

C. M. Dodge. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build the same, 
November 6, 1896. 

Harvard Street. Beginning at Wilson street, and 
thence in an easterly direction 250 feet in Harvard street. 

R. G. L. Tilton. 

Committee voted that an order be prepared to build, 
December 18, 1896. 

Dubuque East Back and Coolidge Avenue West 
Back. From Kelley to 200 feet north of Bremer, com- 
mencing at Kelley and Dubuque east back street, and 



REPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 229 

theuce in a northerly direction in Dubuque east back and 
Coolidge avenue west back street to a i^oint about 200 
feet north of Bremer street. 

John Montplaiser. 

Committee voted to prepare an order to build, Decem- 
ber 18, 1S96. 



An Order to purchase Land. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, 
That the mayor be and is hereby authorized to purchase 
for and in the name of the city of Manchester, the land 
situated on the Piscataquog river and owned by the Swift 
Beef Co., the same being necessary for the use of said city 
in constructing and maintaining sewers in that section. 
And the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation 
for the reserve fund. 

Eecommended by S. P. Martel, August 29, 1896. 

I>ecember 1 an order was presented by this committee 
recommending the purchase of the same. 



230 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
SEWERS ORDERED BUILT IN 1896. 



Street. 



Auburn south back. . 
Auburn south back. . 
B 



Location. 



Beacon , 

Beacon 

Beauport east back 

Belmont 

Belmont 

Carpenter 

Carroll 

Cartier east back .. 
Cedar south back .. 

Clarke 

Conant 

Dartmouth 

Elm 

Elm 

Elm west back 

Foster avenue 

Green south back. . 
Grove south back. . 

Hall 

Hanover 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Hevey east back. . . 

Lake avenue 

Liberty east back — 

Lintlen 

Locust 

Maple 

Montgomery east b'k 

Old Bridge 

Orange 

Pine 

Quincy 

Sagamore 

Sagamore 

Schiller 

Spruce 

Union 

Valley 

Valley 

Walnut east back. 
Walnut east back. 

■VTilson Hill 

Wilson Hill 



Total. 



Maple westerly 

Wilson to 150 feet east ol Hall 

C northerly 

Spruce northerly 

Amherst to Concord 

Wayne southerly 

Valley to Clay. ." 

Mead to Bridge 

Elm to Union 

Amherst road southerly 

Present sewer 250 feet so. of Sullivan 

Pine to Beech 

River road to Elm 

Cartier westerly 

Dickey to Frederick 

Clarke southerly 

Clarke to Rowell 

Sagamore to Salmon 

Valley to Ilayward 

Union to Beech 

Union easterlj- 

Prospect to Harrison 

East of Beacon to Highland 

Hall to Belmont 

Linden to Russell 

Amory to V/ayne 

Canton easterly 

Christian brook to 200 ft. no. of North 

Prospect to Harrison 

Christian brook to Sagamore 

Silver to Prescott , 

Kelley to Amorj' 

Belmont westerly 

Hall to Belmont 

Auburn to Cedar south back 

South of Douglas southerly 

Locust easterly 

Oak to Linden 

Hale to South Main 

Cedar easterlj' 

Appleton northerly 

Wilson easterly 

Jewett to Foster avenue 

Christian brook to Salmon 

Christian brook northerly 

Merrimack to Hanover 

Laurel to Merrimack 



Length. 



Date 
ordered. 



50 
665 
180 
1,^0 
303 
350 

2,100 
442 

1,413 
250 
312 

1,069 

508 

60 

354 

1S2 

2,716 
423 
540 
602 
150 
270 
500 
365 
4,50 
550 
300 
427 
270 
198 
640 
700 
125 
365 
142 
90 
136 
902 
S.'iO 
2.50 
150 
200 
248 
6(!0 
200 
380 
257 



Nov. 10 

Jan. 7 

July 14 

Feb. 4 

Nov. 10 

Aug. 4 
4 

Jan. 7 

Nov. 10 

Oct. 6 

June 2 

May 5 

Feb. 4 

June 2 



Sept. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Nev. 



22 444 



Oct. 6 

Feb. 4 

Aug. 4 

July 14 

Aug. 4 

Oct. 6 

Sept. 1 

July 14 



Aug. 
Feb. 

May 
Aug. 



4 
4 
5 
4 
4 

Nov. 10 

10 

7 

1 

4 



Jan. 
Sept. 
Feb. 
July 14 
Nov. 10 
Dec. 1 
July 14 
Aug. 4 



Equaling 4.25 miles. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 231 

SEWERS ORDERED BUT NOT BUILT, TO JANUARY 1, 1897. 



Street. 



Amherst 

Amherst road 

Auburn 

Auburn south back 

Beacon 

Belmont 

Belmont . .. 

Blaine 

Carpenter 

Cartier east back.. 
Cartier east back .. 

Cedar south back.. 

Concord 

Dover 

Elm 



Location. 




Elm 

Elm 

Foster avenue . . . 

Front 

Hale 

Hall 

Hanover . 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Harvell 

Hay ward 

Hevey east back . 
Hevey east back . 



Lake avenue 

Linden 

Locust* 

Lowell 

Maple 

Merrimack 

Montgomery east b'k 

Myrtle 

Orange 

Prospect 

Sagamore * 

Sagamore 

Schiller 

Second 

Second 

Somerville 

Spruce 

Tilton 



Union 

Union 

Union east back 



Valley 

Valley 

Walnut east back. 
W alnut east back . 

West 

Wentworth 

Wilson 

Wilson Hill 



Union to A shland 

South of Carroll southerly 

East of Canton easterly 

Hall easterly 

Amherst to Concord 

Valley to Clay 

Old Bridge to Bridge 

Second to Hiram 

Elm to Union 

South of Putnam southerly 

North of Sullivan to 250 feet 
south of Sullivan 

Beech westerly 

Hall easterl J' 

Clinton northerly 

Shasta to Baker 

Railroad bridge to Elm avenue 

Munroe south back to Clarke. . 

Carpenter to Rowell 

Valley to Hayward , . 

Eddy to north of hotel 

Schiller southerly 

Prospect to Harrison 

East of Beacon to Highland ... 

Hall to Belmont 

Linden to Russell 

Hale to South Main 

Jewett easterly 

Wayne northerly 

South of Amory to Columbus 
avenue 

Canton easterly 

Prospect to Harrison 

Christian brook to Sagamore.. 

Belmont to Beacon 

Silver to Prescott 

Belmont to Milton 

Kelley to Amory 

Hall westerly 

Hall to Belmont 

Hall easterly 

Locust easterly 

Oak to Linden 

Hale to South Main 

Blaine to Hiram 

South of Schiller to Harvell . . . 

.Jewett westerly 

Canton easterly 

South of Milford to Bowman 
place 

Clarke to Trenton 

Silver to Plummer 

South of Christian brook south- 
erly 

ElmtoWilson 

Jewett to Foster avenue 

Salmon northerly 

Christian brook northerly 

Clinton northerly 

Schiller southerly 

Harvard to Somerville 

Merrimack to Hanover 



2,600 

630 

90 

150 

303 

2,100 
200 
400 

1,413 
56 

312 
175 

200 
160 
332 

1,373 
»<51 

1,500 
540 

2,S00 
450 
270 
500 
365 
450 
700 
300 
146 

396 
300 
270 
•198 
500 
640 
200 
700 
200 
365 
100 
136 
902 
850 
400 
160 
400 
250 



Date 
ordered. 



50 
4,040 

248 



May 


2, 


1893 


April 


3, 


1894 


Nov. 


9, 


1894 


Jan. 


/, 


1896 


Nov. 


10, 


1896 


Aug. 


4, 


1896 


Jan. 


I, 


1896 


July 


5, 


1893 


Nov. 


10, 


1896 


Dec. 


3, 


1895 


June 


2 


189t> 


May 


5, 


1896 


Sept. 


«, 


1896 


" 


4 


1894 


May 


6, 


1890 


June 


4, 


1895 


Feb. 


4, 


1896 


July 


14. 


1896 


Sept. 


5, 


1893 


Nov. 


9, 


1894 


Sept. 


1, 


1896 


July 


14, 


1896 


Sept. 


1, 


1896 


Dec. 


1, 


1896 


Nov. 


9, 


1894 


Sept. 


3, 


1895 


Jan. 


7, 


1896 



July 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

May 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

July 
Dec. 
July 
Jan. 



233 June 

1,700 July 

350 Sept. 



Aug. 
Nov. 
July 



250 ; Nov. 

200 Dec. 

226 

400 

657 

380 



Sept. 

Aug. 
July 



10, 1893 
6, 1896 
1, 1896 
4, 1896 
6, 1895 

1, 1896 

6, 1891 
10, 1896 

2, 1893 
4, 1896 

3, 1895 

4, 1896 
10, 1896 
10, 1896 

5, 1892 

3, 1895 
2, 1895 

7, 1896 

4, 1895 

2, 1895 

3, 1895 

6, 1895 

7, 1893 
14, 1896 
10, 1896 

1, 1896 

4, 1894 

5, 1895 
7, 1894 

14, 1896 



Equaling 6.64 miles. 

* Sewer changed to other location. 



232 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This comprises all the work that has come within the 
province of the committee on sewers and drains, and is re- 
epectfully submitted. 

C. L. WOLF, Chairman, 
GEORGE E. HEATH, 
J. A. LINDQUIST, 
GEORGE H. PHINNEY, 
MICHAEL R. SULLIVAN, 
Committee on Seicers and Dizains. 
W. H. BENNETT, 

Clerk of Committee. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON STREETS. 



The annual report of the committee on streets, pre- 
pared by the city engineer as clerk of the committee, is 
herewith presented : 

Manchester, N. H., December 30, 1896. 
Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

The committee appointed by your honorable board to 
act as the joint standing committee on streets, would sub- 
mit the following report of the work done by them and 
under their direction the present year: 

The committee has held nine meetings, as follows : May 
14, May 26, June 4, June 18, July 29, August 19, Septem- 
ber 16, November 12, December 4. 

Number of petitions received, 48; laid over to 1897, 1; 
referred to street and park commissioners, 2 ; referred i:o 
board of aldermen, 1; where orders to build streets were 
recommended, 4; where orders to establish grades were 
recommended, 9; where orders to concrete were recom- 
mended, 1; where orders to change names were recom- 
mended, 2; where orders to change names were denied, 2; 
recommended leave to withdraw, 13; recommended to a 
hearing, 13; total, 48. 

The committee has carefully examined the location in 
all cases where petitions to establish grade were pre- 
sented, the situation being explained by the city engineer 
before orders were prepared for introduction into the 
council. Among the more important were Lake avenue, 
from the Mammoth road to Hanover street ; South Main 
street, from A to the Bedford town line; Chestnut street, 

283 



234 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

from north of Clarke to Trenton; Carpenter street, from 
Elm to Union; and Essex street, from Amory southerly. 

Among the orders presented recommending the build- 
ing of streets were: For Spruce street from Canton to 
James Hall road, Cleyeland street from Second easterly, 
and Shasta street from Beech to Lincoln. 

An order was also presented to concrete Nuffield Lane 
from Amherst to Concord. 

The location mentioned in the petition for widening 
Lake avenue east of Belmont was thoroughly examined 
by your committee, plans drawn, and the situation dis- 
cussed with every abutter before action was taken. It 
was finally decided to recommend a hearing. 

The streets petitioned for in East Manchester, south of 
Young street near Jewett, were carefully looked over, as 
were also the proposed extensions near Belmont street 
south of Young street. In all these cases the committee 
recommended a hearing. 

One of the most important petitions that has been pre- 
sented the committee called for the extension of Elm 
street from Grove to Mitchell. The matter will come up 
for settlement before the new board, and is a subject that 
demands careful consideration. 

The petition for the extension of Porter street to Con- 
cord street was carefully considered, the committee visit- 
ing the locality four times. As the expense attendant on 
carrying out the intent of the petition would be consider- 
able, and hardly warranted, it was recommended that the 
petitioners be given leave to withdraw. 

The usual petition for the extension of Putnam street, 
that is presented every year, was received. The chair- 
man was instructed to confer with the owners of the land 
desired for the street, and upon his report the petitioners 
were given leave to withdraw. Similar action was also 
taken in reference to several streets near the Iloyt shoe 
shop, on account of land damages being claimed. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 235 

Petitions. 

The following is a list of the petitions referred to the 
committee, and the action taken upon them : 

Essex Street. For establishing the grade of highway 
in said city, beginning at Amory and Essex streets, and 
thence in a southerly direction about 560 feet, as laid out. 

Tobias Steinlehuer and others. 

June 4, committee voted to recommend grade as shown 
by the city engineer's plan No. 4103. 

Morgan Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at Amory street, and thence in a northerly direc- 
tion on Morgan street about GOO feet to Kelley street. 

Moise Ladouceur and others. 

June 4, committee voted to recommend leave to with- 
draw be given. 

Glenwood Avenue. For a new highway in said city, 
beginning at the present terminus of Glenwood avenue 
as now laid out through Highland park, so-called, and 
thence in an easterly direction parallel with and 200 feet 
south of the C. & P. R. E. to Paige street. 

Alfred J. Sanborn and others. 

May 26, committee voted to recommend leave to with- 
draw, on account of excessive damages. 

New Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at Bald Hill road, and thence northerly to the house 
owned by Napoleon Daigle, on what was known as the 
Fogg land. 

Napoleon Daigle and others. 

May 26, committee voted leave to withdraw, as street 
was uncalled for, and on account of damages. 



236 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

North River Road. For changing the name of the 
higliway in said city, beginning at Salmon street, and 
running north to the union of River road and Union 
street, to be called Stark avenue. 

John C. Ray and others. 

May 14, committee voted to prepare an order for the 
change as asked for. 

Lake Avenue. For widening the highway in said city,, 
beginning at a stake on the east side of Belmont street, 
ten feet south of the south line of Lake avenue, and 
thence in an easterly direction parallel to the south line 
of Lake avenue to a stake on the west line of Beacon 
street, ten feet south of the south line of Lake avenue. 

Peter McQuillan and others. 

May 26, committee voted to recommend that a hearing 
be granted. 

Walnut Street. For a new highway. in said city, be- 
ginning at a stake on the center line of Webster and Wal- 
nut streets, and thence in a northerly direction to a stake 
on the south line of the Ray Brook Garden Co., and on the 
center line of Walnut street extended. 

Richard M. Foster and others. 

May 14, committee voted to recommend that a hearing 
be granted. 

Elm East Back Street. For concreting the highway 
in said city, beginning at Amherst street and Elm east 
back, and thence in a northerly direction to Concord 
street, meaning to concrete said back street between the 
above streets. 

Edwin B. Weston and others. 

May 14, committee voted to recommend an order to 
concrete the same, as asked for. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 237 

Washington Street. For changing name of said 
highway in said city, beginning at Elm street, and thence 
easterly to Birch street, known as Washington, to be 
changed to some other name. 

F. W. Slack and others. 

June 18, committee voted to report inexpedient to leg- 
islate. 

]\IiLTON, Beacon, and Amherst Streets. For estab- 
lishing the grade of the highway in said city, beginning 
at Hanover and Milton streets, thence northerly on Mil- 
ton street to Amherst street, thence easterly on Amherst 
street to Beacon street, thence southerly on Beacon 
street to Hanover street in said city. 

Eussell O. Burleigh and others. 

May 26, committee voted to recommend orders to es- 
tablish the grade as shown by the plans of the city engi- 
neer. 

Bedford Road. For locating the lines of the highway 
in said city, beginning at the junction of Milford street 
and Amherst road, and thence in a w^esterly direction 
over the Bedford road to the westerly line of the city of 
Manchester. 

John McGinnis and others. 

November 12, committee voted to recommend that a 
hearing be granted. 

Second Street. For macadamizing Second street in 
said city, beginning at Granite street, and thence in a 
southerly direction to Second-street bridge. 

R. P. Grossman and others. 

June 4, committee voted to refer to full board of alder- 
men. 

Everett Street Passageway. For naming the high- 
way in said city, beginning at Elm street south of Clarke 
(and commonly knowm as Everett-street passageway), 



238 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and thence in a westerly direction to Everett street, and 
that the name of the same be known as Waldo street. 

A. J. Lane and others, 

^May 14, committee voted to recommend an order to 
change the name, as asked for. 

Central Street. For building the highway from Bel- 
mont to Milton street. 

N. P. Byrne and others. 

June 4, committee voted to recommend that the street 
and park commissioners repair, and that the grade be es- 
tablished from that. 

Spruce Street. For building the highway in said 
city, beginning at Spruce and Canton streets on Spruce, 
and thence in an easterly direction to J. Hall road, as laid 
out by the board of aldermen. 

Mead, Mason & Co. and others. 

May 26, committee voted to recommend an order to 
build, as asked for. 

North Main Street. For a new sidewalk in said city, 
beginning at No. 344 North Main street, 50 feet long. 

J. O'Connell and others. 

June 4, committee voted to recommend leave to with- 
draw. 

Walnut East Back Street. For a highway in said 
city, beginning at a stake at the intersection of the center 
line of Salmon street with the center line of the back 
street between Walnut and Beech streets, and thence in a 
southerly direction to a stake on the north line of the Up- 
ton, Harvey & Weston land. 

George D. Fitts and others. 

May 14, committee voted leave to withdraw, on account 
of uncalled-for expense. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 239 

Shasta Street. For building to grade the higliway in 
said city, beginning at Beech street and Shasta, and 
thence in an easterlj' direction on Shasta street to Lin- 
coln street, as laid out, and to the grade as established 
October 30, 1895. 

George Dennis and others. 

May 26, committee voted to recommend an order to 
build, as asked for. 

Washington Street. Citizens of Manchester and 
tax-payers on property situated on Washington street, 
protest against the proposed change of name of the above 
street. 

Littlefield Drug Co. and others. 

June 18, committee voted to recommend it inexpedient 
to legislate. 

Drinking-Fountain. For a spring drinking-fountain 
in said city, at the corner of Elm street and Bridge street. 

John P. Mullen and others. 

July 7, committee voted to recommend that owing to 
the nearness of the sewers, and the poor quality of the 
water, that it was cheaper and better to have the same 
supplied with city water. 

Cypress Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stake on the southerly line of Young street, 
and in the center of Cypress street, as proposed, and 
thence in a southerly direction to a stake on the northerly 
line of Cilley road, tind on the center line of Cypress 
street, as proposed. 

J. A. Kimball and others. 

June 18, committee voted to recommend that a hearing 
be granted. 

SoMERviLLE STREET. For a uew highway in said city, 
beginning at a stake in the center of Somerville and Cy- 
press streets, as shown on plans of said sections on file in 



240 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the city engineer's department, and thence in a westerly 
direction to a stake on the easterly line of Taylor, and in 
the center line of Somerville street. 

H. B. Tobie and others. 

June IS, committee voted to recommend that a hearing 
he granted. 

Alsace Street. For establishing the grade of high- 
way in said citj^ beginning at Alsace and Kelley streets, 
and thence in a northerly direction to Bremer street on 
Alsace street. 

J. H. Mendell and others. 

November 12, committee voted to recommend that 
grade be established according to city engineer's plan. 

Somerville Street. For a new highway in said city, 
beginning at a stake in the center of Somerville and Cy- 
press streets, as shown on plans of said section on file in 
the city engineer's department, and thence in an easterly 
direction to a stake on the westerly line of Jewett street, 
and on the center line of Somerville street. 

C. W. Danforth and others. 

June 18, committee voted to recommend that a hearing 
be granted. 

PuTXAM Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stake in the center of Putnam and Dubuque 
streets, being the westerly terminus of Putnam street as 
laid out June 5, 1888, and thence in a westerly direction 
to a stake at Putnam and Bartlett streets, being an exten- 
sion of Putnam street. 

Stephen P. Martell and others. 

August 19, committee voted to recommend that leave to 
withdraw be granted, owing to claim for land damages. 

Chestnut Street. For establishing the grade of the 
highway in said city, beginning at Chestnut and Clarke 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 241 

streets, and thence in a northerly direction on Chestnut 
street to Trenton street. 

Luther M. Pike and others. 

November 12, committee voted to recommend that 
grade be established according to city engineer's plan. 

Colby Street. For building to grade the highway in 
said city, beginning at West Hancock and Colby streets 
in West Manchester, and thence in a northerly direction 
to Log street over Colby street. 

Henry Milburn and others. 

July 29, committee voted to prepare an order to build 
the same. 

Concord Street. For establishing the grade of the 
highway in said city, beginning at the intersection of Bel- 
mont and Concord streets, and thence in an easterly di- 
rection to Beacon street on Concord street. 

Charles P. Porter and others. 

July 29, committee voted to have an order prepared to 
establish the same, as shown by the city engineer's plan. 

Belmont Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stake at the intersection of the center line of 
Belmont street with the center line of Pearl street, and 
thence in a northerly direction to a stake at the intersec- 
tion of the center line of Belmont street with the center 
line of Harrison street. 

Mary E. Gray and others. 

July 29, committee voted to recommend that a hearing 
be granted. 

North Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stake in the center of Union and North 
streets, and thence in an easterly direction to a stake at 
the center of Walnut and North streets, according to the 
city's plans of streets, being an extension of North street. 

George L. Read and others. 

July 29, committee voted to recommend that a hearing 
be granted. 

IG 



242 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Holly Avenue. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stake 210 feet east of Taylor street and about 
340 feet north of Vinton street, and thence in a westerly 
direction and parallel to Vinton street about 350 feet 
west of Taylor street, to a stake set in the ground, and 
known as Holh' avenue, 

R. P. Stevens and others. 

November 12, committee voted to recommend that a 
hearing be granted. 

Dubuque Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stone bound in the center of Kelley and Du- 
buque street, and thence in a northerly direction in Du- 
buque street to Mason street, according to the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Co.'s plan. 

Lawrence Rooney and others. 

August 19, committee voted to recommend that a hear- 
ing be granted.* 

Beauport East Back Street, For establishing the 
grade of the highway in said city, beginning at Sullivan 
and Beauport east back streets, and thence in a southerly 
direction to Schuyler street through Beauport east back. 

John H. McCabe and others, 

November 12, committee voted to recommend that 
leave to withdraw be granted, 

Beauport East Back Street, For a highway in said 
city, beginning at a stake at the intersection of the south 
line of Sullivan street and the center of Beauport east 
back street, and thence in a southerly direction to a stake 
in the north line of Schuyler and in the center line of 
Beauport east back street, said streets being the same as 
shown on the Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.'s plan of 
lots, 

John H, McCabe and others, 

November 12, committee voted to recommend that 
leave to withdraw be granted. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 243 

Hanover Street and Lake Avenue. For establish- 
ing the grade- of the highway in said city, beginning at 
James Hall road on Lake avenue, and thence easterly to 
Hanover street; also from James Hall road on Hanover 
street, and thence in an easterly direction to Lake avenue, 
meaning to establish the grade on Hanover and Lake ave- 
nue from James Hall road to where they intersect each 
other. 

Charles Williams and others. 

September 16, committee voted to recommend that 
grade be established according to city engineer's plans. 

Columbus Street. For building a new highway in 
said city, beginning at the intersection of Amory and Co- 
lumbus streets, and thence in a southerly direction about 
(400) four hundred feet. 

V. Bourque and others. 

Kovember 12, committee voted to take no action, as 
street was not laid out. 

Cleveland Street. For a building to grade the high- 
way in said city, beginning at Second and Cleveland 
streets, and through Cleveland street, and thence in an 
easterly direction to Merrimack river, known as Cleve- 
land street. 

Thomas T. Milnes and others. 

November 12, committee voted to recommend the pas- 
sage of an order to build the same. 

Elm Street. For widening the highway and building 
a retaining wall in said city, beginning at the south line 
of Valley street on the west side of Elm street, and 
thence in a southerly direction to the bridge over the 
Manchester & Lawrence Railroad tracks. 

George H. Dunbar and others. 

November 12, committee voted to recommend that the 
board of street and park commissioners make a report to 
the city government as to the cost of the same. 



244 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Elm Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake on the north line of land of H. D. Lord, 
and in the center of Elm street, being the terminus of 
Elm street as laid ont south of Baker street, and thence in 
a southerly- direction to a stone bound on the center line 
of Elm street, produ(?ed, and the north line of Mitchell 
street, proposed. 

James H. McKenzie and others. 

XoA'ember 12, committee voted to recommend that a 
hearing be granted. 

South Main Street. For establishing the grade of 
the highway beginning at Boynton street, and thence in 
a southerly direction to the Bedford town line. 

Kovember 12, committee voted to recommend that 
grade be established according to city engineer's jjlan. 

Columbus Street. For a new highway in said city, 
beginning at a stake at the intersection of Amory and Co- 
lumbus streets, and thence in a southerly direction about 
400 feet to a stake in said street, as shown on plan of said 
section. 

P. Hevey and others. 

December 4, committee voted to recommend that it be 
referred to the next city council. 

Porter Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stake on the east side of Porter street be- 
tween Concord and Amherst streets; said stake is about 
six feet southerly of the northwest corner of land of J'. N. 
Lacourse, and thence in an easterly direction and parallel 
to Amherst street, to the lot line of Curtis Holt, to a stake 
on said line in said city. 

W. B. Sanford and others. 

June 4, committee voted to recommend that leave to 
withdraw be granted. 



EEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 245 

Porter Street. For a new highway, beginning at a 
stake in the center of Porter street opposite the land of S. 
S. Piper, and thence in an easterly direction to a stalie on 
the west line of Ashland street. 

S. S. Piper and others. 

June 4, committee voted to recommend that leave to 
withdraw be granted. 

Montgomery Street. For establishing the grade and 
lay-out of the highway in said city, beginning at a stake 
in the center of Montgomery and Amory streets, and 
thence in a northerly direction to Kelley and Montgom- 
ery streets, to a stake at the intersection of said streets, 
as shown by the Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.'s plan of 
said land. 

D. C. Beauchene and others. 

July 18, committee voted to recommend an order to es- 
tablish the grade according to city engineer's plan. 

Carpenter Street. For establishing grade in said 
city, beginning at Elm and Carpenter streets in said city, 
and thence in an easterly direction on Carpenter street to 
Union street. 

C. M. Dodge and others. 

May 14, committee voted to recommend an order to es- 
tablish the grade as shown by city engineer's plan. 

This comprises all the work that has come within the 
province of the committee on streets, and is respectfully 
submitted. 

GEORGE W. REED, Chairman, 
JOSEPH O. TREMBLAY, 
GEORGE E. HEATH, 
EDWARD F. SCHEER, 
CHARLES HAZEN, 

Committee on Streets. 
W. H. BENNETT, 

Clerk of Committee. 



246 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This department has been particularly fortunate this 
year in being allowed to retain the entire office force up to 
the end of the year. During the busy season, when calls 
for lines and grades by the city and by private individu- 
als are numerous, little time is found to make outside sur- 
veys. As has been said many times in previous reports, 
this is an important item, and the sooner surveys are 
made of the outlying roads, the more accurate will be tlie 
information obtained. This fall, after the pressure of 
the regular work abated somewhat, a party was put into 
the field and kept there as long as suitable weather 
lasted. The result will be spoken of at greater length 
hereafter. 



Streets. 



Nothing has been done this year toward following out 
the suggestions made in the last report regarding the lay- 
ing out of new streets. 

This is a matter not to be lightly passed by. Perhaps 
the pernicious effects of the sj^stem in vogue are not appa- 
rent now, and may not be for a number of years; yet the 
time will surely come when the city will realize the mis- 
take it made in not compelling land owners to conform to 
a recognized plan in laying out their lots. Other cities 
have seen the evil effects of the lack of a systematic plan 
and have taken steps to remedy it. Manchester seems 
content to drift along without making any attempt to 
change the existing conditions. 

The city. is growing, and growing rapidly. New streets 
are projected on all sides, laid out without regard to 
width, direction, or distance, as compared to those al- 
ready built; in fact, jumbled together in a heterogeneous 
mass that in time will resemble a section of Boston's 
time-honored thoroughfares. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 247 

Before it is too late, something ought to be done look- 
ing toward uniformity, either by preparing a plan locat- 
ing the position of streets to be laid out, or by an ordi- 
nance defining the width, direction, and distance apart, 
and providing for the introduction of back streets in each 
block. 

If this is not done, Manchester will soon lose her well- 
laid-out appearance, that has been a source of so much 
pride to her citizens in the past, and a subject for remark 
by visitors. 

Another point that is lost sight of in locating streets, is 
the facility with which they can be drained. Due care 
should be exercised in avoiding ledges when it can be 
done, and the natural lay of the ground taken advantage 
of as far as possible without conflicting with the regular- 
ity of the streets. 



Granite Street Bridge. 

With the advent of the spring freshet came the loss of 
the old wooden bridge that for forty-five years had 
spanned the Merrimack at Granite street. Then came 
the absolutely imperative demand for a new bridge. The 
previous year this department had made surveys and 
soundings, and taken levels in this vicinity, in anticipa- 
tion of the probable action of the city regarding a new 
bridge. This part of the work of course did not have to 
be gone over again. 

It was thought by the street and park commissioners 
that the old piers could be utilized as the foundation of a 
new structure to be built of wood, and accordingly meas- 
urements were made to determine their exact location, 
and also to see what would have to be done provided it 
was decided to build a wider bridge. Plans were also 
made for a wooden bridge, which w^ere submitted to the 
board. 



248 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

When it was decided to build a steel bridge, a thorough 
examination of the piers was made, and a report submit- 
ted that they would have to be rebuilt from the water 
line, if not entirely. Subsequent investigations revealed 
the fact that the foundations rested on wooden supports, 
and it was decided to rebuild them entirely. 

Considerable time was devoted to preparing the neces- 
sary data, and in making sketches to be submitted to the 
various bridge firms. 

Frequent visits were also made to the scene in com- 
pany with agents of the different companies, and alto- 
gether considerable time was spent in preliminary work. 

When the contract for building the piers was let, 
sketches were made for the contractor to cut the stone 
by, and lines and grades given on the ground for the loca- 
tion of the piers. During the progress of both the sub 
and super structure daily visits were made to the scene, 
and the services of two men required almost constantly 
in furnishing points, measuring stone work, and attend- 
ing to the numerous details of construction. 



Road Surveys. 

In response to numerous requests for establishing the 
lines of the Borough road, or Lake Shore road as it is now 
called, a survey was made from the Candia road to the 
Island Pond road, and whatever points and bounds could 
be found were located. During the winter a plan will be 
made, and the original lines shown as nearly as possible. 
In some places changes will be suggested in the lines that 
will improve the road to a considerable extent without 
damage to the abutters. 

The survey was also continued up the Island Pond road 
to the Mammoth road, connecting with a previous survey 
of this latter road. This will also be plotted during the 
winter, and the lines established. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 249 

It was the intention, had the weather permitted, to 
have extended the survey of the Mammoth road southerly 
to the town line, and also to have made surveys of the 
Derry road and several of the smaller roads in the vicin- 
ity. This will cover the southeast section of the city, and 
will allow of the correct lines being given to property 
owners when called for. It is hoped that this work may 
be pushed as rapidly as possible next season. 

A survey is also needed of the Nutt road and the River 
road at the south end, and of the Bald Hill road at the 
north end. 

In Amoskeag considerable time was devoted to a sur- 
vey of the Ryderville road, for the purpose of determin- 
ing the lines. In this connection partial surveys had to 
be made of many of the abutting lots. A plan was pre- 
pared, and the lines established and marked on the 
ground. 

Nothing was done toward finishing the survey of the 
Dunbarton road begun last year, owing to more pressing 
demands in other directions. It will be necessary to 
complete the survey to the town line before the street 
lines can be properly established. 

A survey was made of the Mast road from Mast street 
to the Goff stown line, and a line established according to 
the most authentic data obtainable. Considerable dis- 
satisfaction was expressed by the property owners along 
the southerly part of the road, regarding the lines as 
marked. The lines given them by private engineers 
when their property was purchased appear to have been 
on a fifty-feet layout instead of sixty-six feet, as the old 
records call for. Ko settlement has been reached as yet, 
and the probable outcome is a matter of doubt. It may 
be necessary to lay out the road fifty feet wide to amica- 
bly adjust matters. 

Surveys have also been made of the Old Mast road 
westerly to the Goffstown line, and of the Bedford road 



250 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

from Mil ford street to the Bedford line, the latter {)eing 
necessary in order to mark the line for the extension of 
the street railway. 



Mammoth Road. 

When the appropriations for the year were made up, a 
sum was set aside for grading Mammoth road from Old 
Bridge street northerly. This improvement has long 
been desired, as the roadway in places was not wide 
enough for two teams to pass. The bushes have been cut, 
and the banks of gravel removed for a distanc of about 
3,000 feet. The roadway now averages about 35 feet 
wide, and is built in a first-class manner. Minor im- 
provements were also made on Old Bridge street at its 
junction with Mammoth road. 



Street Railway. 

Considerable time has been devoted to preparations for 
the extension of the street railway. On the Bedford 
road, as before mentioned, a survey was made and levels 
taken. Levels were also taken on Milford street from 
Main street to the Bedford road. On Beech street a sur- 
vey was made from Lake avenue to Salmon street. On 
Baker street and Calef road levels were taken as far as 
the Pine Grove cemetery. 

The same method was pursued in giving the lines and 
grade as was followed last year. Spikes were driven 
flush with the ground every fifty feet on a line parallel to 
the track, and at a certain distance away. Levels were 
afterwards taken on the spikes, and the cuts or fills 
therefrom given to the contractor. This has been found 
to work satisfactorily, and can be done at considerable 
less expense than by the former method. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 251 

Elm Street Extension. 

One of the matters that will be brought before the in- 
coming board is that of extending Elm street to the Pine 
Grove cemetery, a petition to that effect having been re- 
ferred to them by the present board. 

This is an important subject, and one that means con- 
siderable for the development of the city in that direc- 
tion. 

The proposed extension would strike the cemetery at 
about the center of its north line, where would, undoubt- 
edly, be made the principal entrance. 

The distance covered by the petition is about 2,500 feet, 
a portion of the way through a ledge of suitable stone for 
road-making purposes. Should it be decided to grant the 
petition and construct the road, it would be good policy 
to purchase a stone-crusher to be located there. No 
doubt arrangements might be made with the street-rail- 
way company whereby their track could be utilized for 
conveying the crushed stone to various portions of the 
city, at greatly reduced cost for teaming. 



Sewers. 



A large amount of sewer work has been done this year, 
the season beginning early and continuing till late in the 
fall. As was the case last year, several of the sewers 
have been built through ledge, making the work slow and 
expensive. This has been the case in Jewett street, 
where some 800 feet was built, the rock cut being from 4 
to 10 feet; in Auburn street from Canton easterly 510 
feet, the cut averaging 6 feet; in Mast street 610 feet, va- 
rying from 6 to 10 feet; and in Elm street from Thayer to 
Carpenter, 751 feet, from 4 to 10 feet cut. The work has 
progressed as rapidly as possible, and the showing made 
was remarkably good considering the difficulties encoun- 
tered. 



252 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Four of the principal mains projected last year have 
been completed. Christian brook sewer has been carried 
to Beech east back street, a distance of 1,010 feet, this 
season, practically completing it for the present. This 
sewer will drain the territory north of Sagamore street 
and east to the Smyth road, and will also take care of the 
waters of Christian brook, doing away with the necessity 
of building culyerts w^here the streets cross. 

The Silyer-street main has been built to Lincoln street, 
a distance of 1,788 feet, practically furnishing means of 
draining the entire southern section. Owing to the sandy 
soil in this section, future sewer extensions will not en- 
tail a very heayy outlay. 

The Mast-street main has been completed to Amherst 
road, and through Amherst road to a short distance south 
of Carroll street. This sewer is designed to drain the 
section around Milford-street extension, and will un- 
doubtedly be completed the coming season. 

The Jewett-street main has been extended to Clay 
street, a distance of 877 feet. As has been stated, this 
sewer was laid through a ledge of considerable extent, 
but of such a nature that it was easily removed by blast- 
ing, and the sewer built at an unusually low cost per foot. 

The Valley-street sewer, beginning at Wilson street, 
has been carried some 200 feet east of Belmont street. 
This is an important main, and its completion at an early 
date is a necessity, as it will afford means for draining a 
large section heretofore without sewerage of any kind. 

The principal main constructed the past year has been 
that in River road, Clarke and Elm streets. The work on 
this sewer progressed rapidly until Thayer street was 
reached, when, as before mentioned, ledge was struck, 
and the progress necessarily retarded. It is the inten- 
tion to continue the work as long as the weather is suita- 
ble, as the earth excavation is completed to Trenton 
street, and blasting can be done to good advantage in the 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 253 

winter. This main will eventually extend to Rowell 
street. There has alreadj^ been built 2,411 feet, leaving 
1,500 feet to be built. 

In rebuilding the piers at Granite bridge it was neces- 
sary to relay the sewer outlets at each side of the river. 
This was done by constructing cylinders of steel firmly 
riveted together and imbedded in the masonry of the pier 
about low water mark, bringing them up to meet the sew- 
ers at the proper points. 

The section drained by the Amherst-street sewer is 
badly in need of improved facilities. The Amherst-street 
main is not large enough, and the laterals are overcrowd- 
ing it more each year. The necessity of relaying it has 
been frequently mentioned, and it is apparent that some- 
thing must be done before the sanitary condition of that 
section can be much improved. 

The usual amount of sub-mains and laterals have beea 
constructed, and everything considered, the showing 
made has been excellent. 

The average cost per foot in District Xo. 2 has been 
13.12; in District :N'o. 7, $1.59; in District No. 10, |1.70. 

In the 26,530 feet of sewers there were built 89 man- 
holes and 16 lampholes; 106 cesspool connections were 
put in, besides the Y branches for 756 house connections. 

The sewer tables on preceding pages, and the report of 
the committee on sewers and drains will give an account 
of the work done more in detail, as will also the report of 
the street and park commissioners regarding the number 
of cesspools built and repaired, their cost, and the cost of 
repairs on sewers. 



Parks. 
Little work has been done by this department in the 
parks the past year. In Derryfield park lines and grades 
were given for building the main avenue north of the old 
road. 



254 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

In Stark park lines and grades were given for the curb- 
ing around the burial lot, and tlie locations of the clumps 
of trees sliown on the proposed plan marked on the 
ground. 



Cemeteries. 



The maps showing the lots in the Valley cemetery have 
been completed, and the lots renumbered according to 
the ideas of the sub-committee. Blue prints have been 
made for the superintendent and for the treasurer. As 
far as was i^ossible to, the names of the present lot own- 
ers have been ascertained and marked on the plans. The 
renumbering was necessary in order to avoid the confu- 
sion now resulting from the fact that there are three sets 
of numbers in use in different portions of the cemetery. 

In Pine Grove cemetery lots have been laid out in the 
new section east of Pine Lawn. The range ways in Man- 
esque field have been continued, to conform to the new 
plan. Grade has been established for a portion of Chapel 
Lawn, and several new lots laid out thereon. 

A survey has been made of the Merrill yard, showing 
the lots and walks as far as possible. Owing to pressure 
of other work the plan has not been completed. Some 
difficulty will be experienced in properly locating the 
lots, as the original bounds have become obliterated, 
though a fairly good layout can be obtained. 



Committee Work. 



The city engineer, as clerk of the committee on streets 
and on sewers and drains, has attended each meeting, 
keeping a complete record of the proceedings, which are 
on file in this office. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 255 

In addition, meetings of the city government, commit- 
tees on Valley cemetery. Pine Grove cemetery, city farm, 
lands and buildings, claims, commons and parks, the 
street and park commissioners, and the board of alder- 
men have been attended. 

Besides the work before enumerated, many questions 
have been answered from engineers, boards of trade, and 
others in various cities throughout this country and Can- 
ada. 

I would respectfully tender my acknowledgments to 
his Honor the Mayor, and the various committees of the 
city council for the support which they have given. 

I also wish to acknowledge the courtesies shown by the 
various heads of departments, and the co-operation of the 
assistants of this department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT, 

City Engineer. 

January 1, 1897. 



REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



To tJie ScJiool Board and hy said Board to the City Councils: 

The following is presented as the semi-centennial re- 
port of the public schools of the city of Manchester, and 
the final report of the superintendent for the year 1896. 

SCHOOLHOUSES. 

The new Wilson school, nearly completed at the close 
of last year, was first occupied at the opening of the 
spring term in April. It has eight school rooms, five of 
them being occupied at the outset; and at the opening of 
the fall term another school was opened in this house, 
leaving only two vacant rooms to meet the needs of the 
rapidly-growing school population in that section of the 
city. 

During the current year a new house, known as the 
Parker school, has been erected upon the South Main- 
street lot in place of the poorly-constructed two-room 
wooden house so long in service there. The Parker 
school has four completed school rooms, and provisions 
for four others. It is constructed upon the general plan 
of the new Wilson school, which is proving quite satisfac- 
tory; and similar gratification is expected from use of the 
new Parker house, now occupied but a few weeks. 

259 



260 ANNUAL- OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The new high-scliool structure is rapidly nearing com- 
pletion, and it should be ready for occupancy by the first 
of April, when the Straw schoolhouse, now occupied by 
the High school, will be very urgently needed for the re- 
lief of various lower grades in the Spring-street, Lowell- 
street, and Ash-street houses. The Straw school will 
also house the two primary schools occupying the Blod- 
get-street house, and the city will thus be enabled to dis- 
pose of the latter house, or use it for other than school 
purposes. 

The new high-school house will grandly meet long-suf- 
fering necessities, and for many years satisfy the rapidly- 
growing demands for such a structure. The extended 
use that will at once need to be made of the new high 
school house will be so apparent that the cost of its im- 
mediate completon will be fully justified, and the build- 
ing therefore become the pride of the city; so, also, be- 
cause it will be the best high-school building in the state^ 
and compare favorably with several new high school 
houses recently constructed in various New England 
cities at greater individual expense. 

From lists in the subjoined sketch, it will be apparent 
that the city now has twenty-four schoolhouses in use. 
The school board heartily thanks the city government for 
the efficient way in which it has provided for the long and 
greatly needed relief of several badly overcrowded 
schools, in different parts of the city, by the completion 
this year of the new Wilson school and the erection of the 
Parker school in West Manchester: also for the evident 
promise of the early completion of a fine high-school 
building. 

The next new schoolhouse that will be needed for the 
use of our public schools, and it cannot be provided too 
soon, should be so located that it will furnish relief for 
the very badly overcrowded rooms in the Training school, 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 261 

and also afford better accommodations for the entire 
Franklin-street school. The board asks the city govern- 
ment early to provide therefor, and to consider whether 
there is any better way to meet the n^eds in question 
than to erect a new and commodious schoolhouse to take 
the place of the one now on Franklin street. Such a 
house would also best furnish partial relief for the over- 
crowded rooms in the Spring-street house, the Straw 
schoolhouse supplying the rest of the relief needed for 
the Spring-street schools. 

HISTORICAL. 

It is deemed proper that the school committee's report 
for the semi-centennial year of our city's life should con- 
tain at least a supplement to the history of our schools 
prepared by William Little, Esq., and issued in the school 
report for 1876, the hundredth anniversary of our na- 
tion's birth. 

I therefore add the following in regard to the city's 
schoolhouses for the last twenty years. 

In 1876, the following schoolhouses were in use: The 
Intermediate, at corner of Manchester and Chestnut 
streets, torn down in 1884; Bakersville, sold in 1881; the 
high school, at corner of Beech and Lowell streets, torn 
down in 1895; Center-street, later known as School-street, 
abandoned in 1891, and sold in 1896; Hallsville, aban- 
doned in 1892, and changed into a hose house in 1896; 
Wilson-Hill, at corner of Manchester and Wilson streets, 
sold in 1896; South Main-street, sold in 1896; and, in addi- 
tion to the foregoing seven old houses, the following fif- 
teen, — which are still in use, — Training school, Lowell- 
street, Spring-street, Franklin-street, Blodget-street, 
North Main-street, Lincoln-street, Ash-street, Stark, 
Amoskeag, Goffe's Falls, Harvey, Youngsville, Webster's 
Mills, and Mosquito Pond. 



262 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Of the foregoing twenty-two scboolhouses, the seven 
first-named, containing twenty-three school rooms, have 
ceased to be used for school purposes; and within the last 
score of years, to fill the places of the seven old houses 
and provide for additional needs, the nine following 
schoolhouses have been erected: Webster, 1882; Bakers- 
ville,* 1884; Varney, 1891; Hallsville, 1892; Pearl-street, 
189*; Eimmon, 1894; Straw, 1895; Wilson, 1896; Parker, 
1896. Additions have also been made to the following 
schoolhouses: North Main-street; Goffe's Falls; and 
Training school, on Merrimack street. By these struc- 
tures and additions, sixty-three school rooms have been 
supplied in place of the twenty-three discontinued; or, by 
the changes made in schoolhouses during the last twenty 
years, there has resulted a gain of forty school rooms and 
great improvement in the sanitary and general character 
of the city's schoolhouses as a whole. 

During these twenty years there has been no time 
when there have not been overcrowded school rooms, as 
now, notwithstanding the increase of forty school rooms; 
for the increase in the number of pupils has made the de- 
mand for more school rooms almost incessant. 

REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 

The city government has this year recognized more 
fully than usual the competency of the School Board to 
determine the amount of appropriations necessary for the 
proper care and conduct of the schools. It wisely 
granted the requests of the Board in general; and for the 
repairs of schoolhouses allowed an appropriation of 
§6,000. The following account of its expenditure will 
satisfy all concerned as to the good and necessary uses to 
which the money has been put. 



Six rooms, the assembly hall being divided for two. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 263 

The training-school building and the schoolhouse at 
Mosquito Pond, which were each in quite dilapidated con- 
dition, have both been so extensively repaired that they 
may be said practically to have been renewed. The roof 
of the training-school building had been so many times 
repaired, and yet proved leaky, it was deemed necessary 
to give it extensive repairs. The leaky roof had also so 
injured the walls of the school rooms that they all had to 
be relathed, as well as replastered. The woodwork of 
this house, outside and inside, was repainted; and the 
heating and lighting appliances repaired. 

The Mosquito Pond house was reshingled and replas- 
tered; was provided with a new floor, and with slate for 
blackboards. It also had its old-fashioned pupils' desks 
cut in two, and made into modern single desks. 

The Spring-street schoolhouse demanded considerable 
outlay. The roof had to be extensively repaired; the 
chimney, also. Slates, for blackboards, were put in all 
but one of the school rooms. The house was also re- 
painted. 

At the Franklin-street school the heating apparatus 
was repaired, the basement ceiling renewed, the sash of 
several windows put in proper condition, and other minor 
repairs made. 

The chimney of the Main-street school was partially re- 
built, the walls and ceilings of the several school rooms 
re-dressed, and a new flagpole provided. The Lowell- 
street building, another of the older houses, had its walls 
also re-dressed, and the inside woodwork painted. 

At the Ash-street house more new slate, for black- 
boards, was provided; and highly desirable changes in 
the curbing of the yard were made, a part of the expense 
being defrayed by the committee on lands and buildings. 

The roof of the Lincoln school is a bad one. It was re- 
paired to prevent its leakage from again injuring the 



264 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

house. The basement floor was renewed, and minor re- 
pairs were made. 

The Varney schoolhouse required extensive repairs 
upon its roof and tower, caused by shrinkage of timbers 
of which the trusses were made. A large supply closet 
has been built, many new outside windows have been pro- 
vided, and the concrete walks repaired. 

At the Bakersville school, the principal's room has 
been rearranged, the interior woodwork all varnished, 
concrete walks repaired, and a rear fence built on top of 
the retaining wall constructed in the summer by the com- 
mittee on lands and buildings. 

The Webster-street school had its heating apparatus 
rearranged, to remove the chill from the girls' basement. 
A new flagpole was also provided. 

When the Hallsville school was built, there was no 
sewer near it. Connection was made with the sewer put 
in last summer, though at considerable expense. 

At Goffe's Falls, new slate, for blackboards, was placed 
in the older school room there. A new fence about the 
lot was built by the committee on lands and buildings. 

In the Amoskeag, Webster's Mills, and Harvey District 
schools several minor repairs were made. 

Among the more important repairs that ought to be 
made this year, is the rearrangement of the heating appli- 
ances at the Lincoln and Ash-street schools, in order that 
proper ventilation may be secured. There is no adequate 
provision for ventilation in either of those large and im- 
portant schools, and pupils suffer greatly from lack of it 
in cold weather. The ceiling of the assembly hall in the 
Lincoln school also needs repairing. 

As a matter of economy in the use of fuel, there should 
be another boiler at the training school; or, in the place of 
two, a large one. The boiler at the Main-street school is 
too old for much longer use, and it should be replaced^ by 
a new one. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 265 

The heating and rentilation of the Franklin and 
Spring-street schools, thirty rears behind the times, 
should be replaced by new apparatus, if these houses are 
to be continued in use for day schools; but it is the opinion 
of the committee on repairs that a new building should 
take the place of the Franklin-street schoolhouse, suffi- 
ciently large for housing- the Franklin school, half the 
Spring-street schools, and also afford relief for the over- 
crowded rooms in the Training School. The other half 
of the pupils in the Spring-street school could be accoru- 
modated, with the surplus in the Lowell-street house, at 
the new Straw school. This arrangement would leave 
the Spring-street building as the one best located for the 
use of the evening schools, drawing and common, and 
also for use of the manual training school. A separate 
house for these schools is greatly needed. 

The committee on repairs are of the same opinion as 
last year, that an appropriation of |6,000 will be annually 
needed for the proper repair of schoolhouses. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE DAY SCHOOLS. 

By an amendment to the public statutes of this state, 
made by its last legislature, the school year for all public 
schools throughout the state was made to comprise the 
months between two successive Augusts. The State Su- 
perintendent of Public Instruction accordingly requires 
that our annual school statistics shall be compiled and re- 
turned to him by August, and that they represent the 
results for the year preceding. 

The following, therefore, shows the organization of our 
public schools from August, 1895, to August, 1896. 

The average number of schools for the entire year was 
108, reckoned as follows: The equivalent of 8 rooms of 
high-school grade; 28 grammar-school divisions, 1 more 



266 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

than last year(a); 21 mifldle scliools, the same as last 
yeav(h); 43 primary schools, 2 more than last year(c); 2 
partially-graded schools; 5 ungraded suburban schools; 
and 1 manual training school. 

It thus appears that there has been a gain of three 
schools over the number of last year. The gain in enroll- 
ment of pupils over the number of last year has been 17<>, 
ample justification for the equipment of the three new 
schools organized. The total enrollment of different pu- 
pils in the day schools for the year was 5,382, and in the 
evening schools 448. 

There were employed for the care of the 108 day 
schools throughout the year: Seven male principals of 
large schools; a lady principal and a general assistant (2) 
(d) for the care of the training school for teachers; 103 
class-room teachers(e), of whom eleven ladies were also 
principals of schools containing two or more rooms; and 
three special teachers of music and drawing; or in all, one 
hundred fifteen teachers for the entire year. 



{a) Miss Morison's division in the new Wilson school. 

(6) The Bakersville Lower :Micklle of last year has been displaced by a 
Higher Primary this year, while the reverse of this happened at the Pearl- 
street house. The loss of a middle grade at the Lincoln school has also been 
oflf-set by the formation of another for two terms in the Varney house and of 
yet another for one term in the new Wilson building, these two being 
equivalent to one for the entire year. 

(c) The formation of a second lower primary at Pearl-street and of another 
also at Spring-street, each for one term, with the new primary at Bakersville 
for the entire year, makes the gain in primaries equivalent to two new ones 
for the j-ear. 

{d) Aided by the young ladies constituting the sub-teachers' classes, who 
had charge of the several class rooms. 

(e) Of these 103, four are males,— two sub-masters in the high School, the 
teacher at Youngsville, and the teacher of the manual training school. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTE^fDENT OF SCHOOLS. 267 



HISTORICAL. 



The number and growth of our public schools, during 
the last twenty 3'ears, may be quite fully seen by an in- 
spection of the following table: 



1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892, 
1893, 
1894, 
1895, 
1896 



69 

69 

72 

74 

75 

74 

74 

75 

75 

77 

78 

78 

77 

77 

84 

89 

96 t 
101 
105 
108 



70 
70 
73 
76 
77 
76 
72 
73 
73 
75 
77 
77 
76 
76 
83 
89 
101 
107 
111 
115 



f^ 



3,607 
3,515 
3,798 
4,136 
4,235 
4,095 
4,062 
3,91 S 
3,806 
3,632 
3,670 
3,712 
3,787 
3,814 
4,071 
4,298 
4,775 
4,975 
5,206 
5,382 



2,571 
2,571 
2,859 
2,970 
2,858 
2,957 
2.848 
2,872 
2,725 
2,698 
2,711 
2,768 
2,801 
2,795 
2,940 
3,130 
3,425 
3,662 
3,817 
3,999 



2,413 

2,348 
2,648 
2,727 
2,602 
2,712 
2,612 
2,645 
2,430 
2,475 
2,468 
2, .500 
2,581 
2,536 
2,689 
l2,837 
3,111 
3,336 
3,499 
3,651 



■3 




ii 

-o 
^g 

V > 

> * 


93.8 


96 


91.3 


106 


92.6 


145 


92.0 


91 


91.0 


110 


91.7 


164 


91.4 


103 


92.1 


95 


90.6 


96 


91.9 


79 


90.8 


9S 


90.3 


116 


92.2 


177 


90.7 


141 


91.5 


166 


90.6 


174 


90.8 


194 


91.1 


153 


91.7 


238 


91.3 


140 



3 T3 O O 

t'« s ^ ^ 



60 
94 
77 
75 

64 
76 
97 

85 
98 
78 



101 
121 

120 
116 
129 
175 
168 
138 



60 
94 
77 
75 
62 
65 
75 
71 
89 
71 
95 
80 
96 
114 
101 
103 
127 
162 
156 
130 



2 o 



2i 



48 
84 
52 
61 
54 
57 
66 
49 
71 
53 
61 
68 
73 
83 
69 
67 
78 
112 
112 
119 



O o 



^2 

60 O 



179 
185 
196 
183 
174 
172 
159 
163 
163 
175 
178 
185 
181 
184 
217 
226 
2S7 
251 
243 
270 



* Including special teachers, principals, assistants, etc. 
t And the A class in suburban schools. 

J Also a manual training school for one ttrm, which is included in the number of schools 
for the next three years. 



268 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

From the foregoing statistics it may be observed that 
the number of schools for fourteen years, out of the past 
twenty, varied by only one, two, or three occasionally; 
and that the net gain during these fourteen years was but 
eight schools, or an average gain of only the fraction of a 
school annually. In 1890 the free text-book law went 
into operation; and this, together with the more rapid 
growth of our city's population, has increased the num- 
ber of schools by thirty-one within the past six years, an 
average increase of five schools annually. The net gain 
in twenty years has been thirty-nine schools. The great- 
est annual increase was in 1891, the year after the adop- 
tion of free text-books, when seven schools w^ere added. 

From observation of the "Attendance" column, I recall 
that children of French parentage came into the public 
schools in large numbers during 1879, 1880, and 1881. 
Then the French parochial schools began to be organized, 
and from 1881 till 188G the withdrawal of French chil- 
dren from the public schools was so effectual that by 1880 
there were scarcely more of them in our schools than in 
1878. Since 1886, however, the public school enrollment 
has steadily grown from 3,632 to 5,382 ; or, there has been 
an average increase of 175 pupils annually, about 60 per 
room for the average increase of the three new school 
rooms yearly provided during the last ten years. This 
explains why we still have overcrowded schools that can- 
not be relieved without further increase of school accom- 
modations. 

iiTGn SCHOOL. 

Now that there will be ample room in the new high- 
school house for all grammar-school pupils who will be- 
come fitted for the High school, it seems wise so to modify 
the high-school course of study that a much larger pro- 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 269 

poi'tion of grammar-scliool graduates will enter the High 
school than have heretofore done so; and be induced to 
enter because more of them shall be made to feel that its 
course of study affords lines of work and training that 
broadly prepare for every general vocation. Only about 
seventy per cent of our grammar-school graduates have 
been in the habit of entering the High school. A large 
part of the other thirty per cent have presumably hurried 
out into the work of life because they have not been able 
to see in our school system much more that would appear 
to help them esi^ecially better to j^erform the duties of the 
vocations of their choice. I therefore recommend that 
the teaching of stenography, typewriting, and cooking be 
early incorporated in our high-school course of study, and 
that provision be made for first-class instruction in these 
subjects. 

I would think it a mistake, however, to grant the high- 
school diploma for any period of attendance less than 
three years, the shortest course for which it is now 
granted. Any pupils who might desire to give special 
attention to the new studies suggested, could be allowed 
to take any two of them as an equivalent, in the English 
course, of Algebra the first year; of Geometry the second 
year; and of any one of the two optional studies the third 
year. Pupils who withdraw from the High school in 
good standing at the close of the second year are now 
granted a certificate of their completion of a two years' 
course. The certificate is of the size of the diploma, 
awarded in the same way, and upon the same occasion. 
This is sufficient recognition of the completion of a two 
years' course. 

The diploma was formerly granted at the end of such a 
course, and it was then frequently observed that those 
pupils most eager to get it were ones best able to afford a 
longer course; and that the influence of the graduation of 



270 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

these pupils sometimes caused all in the English course 
to complete it at the end of its second rear. (See. for in- 
stance, the School Keport for 1S84, page 30.) Further 
evil efifects of granting the high-school diploma at the end 
of a two years' course were to cheapen it in the estima- 
tion of nearly all good scholars, and to bring into the 
school too many who had so false a notion of the proper 
meaning of a diploma that they apparently became mem- 
bers of the school chiefly to obtain it; and, naturally, iu 
the briefest time possible, and at the minimum amount of 
effort. Hence the English course was brought into 
greater or less contempt, and not patronized by the more 
scholarly grade of pupils; but since the award of the di- 
ploma for a two years' course was abandoned, the three 
and four years' English courses have been well patron- 
ized, the membership of the school has steadily increased, 
and the high-school course of study been held in much 
higher esteem. 

This much has been said about the high-school diplo- 
ma, lest upon the introduction of the new studies recom- 
mended, the mistake of granting the diploma for a two 
years' course might be repeated, through the idea that 
the award of the diploma for a brief course would be for 
the good of the school ; but the facts, as experience has 
shown, are so clear that the good of the school would not 
be thus promoted, I have thought best to present them in 
connection with my recommendation. 

Something should be done much to increase the size, 
and otherwise improve, the high-school library; and there 
should also be an annual appropriation of at least a hun- 
dred and fifty dollars, to provide for a yearly quota of 
new books and to rebind earlier supplies. 

As soon as the High school can have sufficient rooms 
for a proper division of its classes, it should be provided 
with more teachers; and with a clerk to the principal, 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 271 

also, to act as librarian, have charge of text-books aud 
other free supplies, look after the excuses of absentees, 
etc, A graduate of the school, suitable for this work, 
could be procured at a low salary. It is not to the advan- 
tage of the city to . require the principal of its High 
school, or other high-salaried teachers there, to do any 
more merely clerical work than that which cannot be 
avoided. 

If, for lack of sufficient appropriations or other rea- 
sons, inexperienced teachers are emj^loyed in the High 
school, they should not, however scholarly, be allowed to 
instruct pupils that have not been members of such a 
school for a year and a half or two years; for beginners in 
high-school studies should be led to see such superiority 
in these studies as only experienced teachers can fully re- 
veal, by reason of their greater skill in the presentation 
of them and their increased ability to promote and secure 
thoroughness upon the part of the pupil. Pupils who for 
the last two years of the grammar-school course have 
been under the instruction and discipline of such experi- 
enced and strong teachers as have charge of those grades 
here, will, upon entering the High school and there being 
placed under the instruction of either a weak or an inex- 
perienced teacher, so grievously feel the difference, in the 
lack of helpfulness of treatment, that there must be dan- 
ger they will discredit the High school at the outset, 
make invidious comparisons, spread reports of ineffi- 
ciency, and declare the High school inferior to the gram- 
mar schools, kind for kind considered. To save the school 
from criticisms based upon such feelings, as well as to 
afford beginners that solid foundation they should early 
have in their high-school studies, I suggest that, when- 
ever inexperienced teachers have to be employed in the 
High school, they be assigned recitations from among 
those of the two higher classes. As none but college 



272 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

graduates are eniployed as teachers in the High school, 
they are sufficiently scholarly for instructing the more 
advanced classes; and they can more easily and better 
serve the interests of those well started in the work of the 
school. 

HISTORICAL. ■ 

But little need be said of the High school, historically; 
because the utility, iDurposes, and results of this school 
have been so specifically set forth in former reports. It 
is therefore sufficient to call attention to the growth of 
the school, which is made apparent in the extended statis- 
tical table presented on a previous page. 

From tlie last column of the statistical table it may be 
observed of the Higli school, as was the case of the lower- 
grade schools, that its number of pupils was more or less 
depleted from 1S81 to 18SG; and that there has been a 
good growth in the number since then, with a marked in- 
crease since 1890, when the free text-book law went into 
operation. During 1887, the average number of pupils 
belonging to the High school was 178; during 1888, 185; 
during 1889, 181; during 1890, 184; during 1891, 217; dur- 
ing 1892, 226; during 1893, 237; during 1891, 251; during 
1895, 213; during 1S9G, 270. The enrollment of pupils 
during each of these years was, of course, somewhat 
larger than the average number belonging, which only is 
given above as the more correct representation of the con- 
stant size of the school. The enrollment during 1887 was 
183. This gradually increased so that in 1892 the enroll- 
ment was 237; and for the school year ending June, 1896, 
it was 300. During the fall term, just closed, the enroll- 
ment was 323. 

Our High school has a larger enrollment than any other 
school of similar grade in the state, by more than 100 
pupils. Though our city is the metropolis of the state, 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 273 

and might therefore be expected to have a still larger 
High school than it has, both relatively and absolutely, it 
should be borne in mind that there are in our city at least 
two extensive parochial school systems, including both 
academic and high-school grades, a fact which should ma- 
terially modify comparisons as ordinarily made in regard 
to the number of pui)ils in our school. Moreover, when. 
the size of our High school, which contains only high- 
school classes, is compared with the- size of high schools 
in Massachusetts' cities, of about our population, it 
should be known whether or not the respective schools in 
Massachusetts, with which our High school may be com- 
pared, contain grammar-school classes, as some of them 
do ; without this knowledge, any comparison made might 
be very erroneous and unjust to our school. 

TRAINING SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS. 

On account of the ill health of its principal, Miss Caro- 
line E. Wing, the Training school was without her valua- 
ble services from January, 1895, till September, 1896. The 
school was in the meantime in charge of three different 
substitutes; and, of course, to its harm. During the win- 
ter and spring terms of this year, the school was in 
charge of Miss Etta A. Blaisdell, of Cambridge. She 
showed herself a very competent teacher for training- 
school work. Miss Blaisdell is now employed at an in- 
creased salary as assistant superintendent in the Brock- 
ton, Mass., public schools. 

During the fall term, just closed, the Training school 
has labored under difficulties. There are 192 regular pu- 
pils' desks in its four school rooms, and there have been 
284 pupils enrolled. Of these, 106 belonged to the lowest 
primary grade, there being three primary grades in thisi 
school. The average number belonging has been 229» 

IS 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This has necessitated constant use of a recitation room as 
a school room; and that, too, without adequate relief. 
Moreover, the school has been short of its regular quota 
of pupil-teachers, which has further embarrassed the 
work. There are but three members of the Middle Class; 
and one of these has been absent on account of illness for 
so large a part of the term that she cannot become a mem- 
ber of the Senior Class at the regular time of advance- 
ment, February 1. -Hence there will be but two Seniors 
to have charge of five school rooms, after that date; for it 
will be necessarv to continue the use of the recitation 
room as a school room. Teachers for the other three 
rooms will therefore need to be provided till July; and I 
recommend the employment till then of three members of 
the present Senior Class (who will graduate the first of 
February) at regular substitutes' pay, ?1.50 per day. 

There is great need of raising the standard of fitness 
for the graduation of pupil-teachers from the Training 
school. The first thing necessary to this end is the re- 
quirement of other qualifications upon the part of candi- 
dates for entrance to the school than mere completion of 
a high-school course. Too many are employed as regular 
teachers who have not sufficient vital force to last them 
through more than a term or two of teaching; and those 
who have constitutions so impaired, or weak, that they 
cannot be expected to enter the corps as forceful teach- 
ers, should certainly not be allowed to enter the Training 
school. There should therefore be a physical, as well as 
mental, examination of candidates for entrance to this 

school. 

For a year or two, many more have sought admission to 

the Training school than could be allowed entrance. As 
the school is now organized, not more than five pupil- 
teachers can be admitted semi-annually; but there are 
thirty-one applicants waiting admission to the school. 



KBPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 275 

The present is therefore an opportune time for the sub- 
committee of the school to inaugurate a better method of 
determining admissions to the school than to grant them 
upon the principle. ''First come, first served." As long 
as there were not more than one or two applicants more 
than openings in the school, it was not so serious a mis- 
take to admit them in the order of the dates of their writ- 
ten applications for admission. Xow, however, the gen- 
eral standard of the Training school can be raised, and 
eventually the corps of teachers in general greatly im- 
proved, by determining the order of admission to the 
Training school from the results of a proper examination. 
There are also other Avays of improving the Training 
school; but it would require too many pages here for their 
elaboration, and it will be better every way to make them 
the subject of a special report sometime before June. 

HISTORICAL. 

The Training school was first organized experimentally 
in . 1869, the ''Higher Department" (of middle-school 
grade) under the charge of Miss Nancy S. Bunton as 
teacher, in the Merrimack-street schoolhouse at the cor- 
ner of Union street; and the "Primary department" un- 
der the charge of Miss Helen M. Morrill as teacher, in the 
Manchester-street schoolhouse at the corner of Chestnut 
street. The design of the school was to afford means for 
supplying the city schools with better teachers, and with 
those somewhat conversant with a graded system; and 
also to provide for a better class of substitute teachers 
than could be secured from among the fresh graduates of 
the High school, who, it may be remarked, were soon 
found to be given permanent situations as regular teach- 
ers, and to attain greater success as such than those of 
experience whom the salaries here paid would attract 
from abroad. It was therefore reasoned that the city 



276 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

schools could in no war be so surely and economically im- 
proved as by the establishment of a school for the proper 
training of the young lady graduates of the High school. 
So, largely through Superintendent Edgerly's instrumen- 
tality, the school was started as before mentioned. 
Later, the primary department of the school was trans- 
ferred to the Merrimack-street house. The Training 
school was now improved by a re-organization which 
made Miss Bunton principal, with Miss Mintie C. Edgeriy 
assistant, of the middle school department; and Mrs. 
Martha N. Mason principal, with Miss Anna O. Heath as- 
sistant of the primary department. For about a dozen 
years the work was wholly practical, and the training 
otherwise acquired was almost entirely by observation. 

In 1SS2 the school was reorganized, to secure the ad- 
vantages to be derived from a course of professional 
training for the teachers' class. The school has since 
prospered, and continued to supply the city schools with 
a large majority of their lady teachers. Many of its 
graduates are also successful teachers in other places. 

This school affords opportunities for normal study, and 
for observation and practice in graded schools, at a mod- 
erate expense. Its advantages are offered, preferably, to 
young lady residents of Manchester, and graduates of the 
Manchester High school. So many of these have sought 
admission to the school in recent years that non-residents 
have practically ceased to be admitted. 

For particulars in regard to improvements made by the 
reorganization of the Training school in 1882, see the an- 
nual school reports for 1882 and 1883. 

The report for 1884 affords information in regard to the 
cost of the school, and it also furnishes other interesting 
particulars about results then attained. 

The report for 1891 contains a copy of the "Circular of 
Information" issued that year, which sets forth the form 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 277 

of organization under which the Training school is still 
operated. It also contains its course of study, and the 
rules and regulations made by the school board for the 
government of the school. 

Principals.— Miss Nancy S. Bunton, 1S69--1SS1. Miss 
Sarah E. Sprague, 1882--lS84(f/). Miss Olive A. Evers, 
1880--1S87. Miss Caroline E. Wing, 1887(&). 

Pupil-teachers. At first there was no fixed period dur- 
ing which pupil-teachers were required to remain in the 
school, and many of them were soon called away to serve 
as substitutes or permanent teachers in the public 
schools. 

The following is a list of those who served for different 
periods of time in the primary department, while located 
in the Manchester-street house: 

Addie A. Marshall, Alice G. Lord, Nellie Tappan, Ida 
Gee, Martha N. Mason, Mary F. Barnes, Ella F. Salisbury, 

Celia Chase, Gertrude Borden, Putnam, 

Bartlett, and Emma F. Beane (12). 

The following also served in the Merrimack-street 
house, in the early history of the school, for short and va- 
rying periods of time: Eliza I. Young, Kate W. Osgood, 
Clara E. Davis, Isabella G. Mack, Mary A. Buzzell, A. Liz- 
zie Tolles, Nellie Cheney, Nellie Pearson, Susan Page, 
Emma H. Perley, Hattie B. Childs, Isabelle R. Daniels, 
Ella Whitney, Anna O. Heath, Lizzie H. Patterson, Anna 
J. Dana, Kate Joy, Annie M. Offutt, Nellie Tappan, Julia 
D. Marston, Emma M. Bennett, Addie M. Lear, Martha J. 
Boyd, and Rocilla M. Tuson (24). 

When the two departments were first united, at the 
Merrimack-street house, it w^as provided that pupil-teach- 
ers should serve six months. — three weeks in each of the 



{a) Tin the fall term, during which Miss Eleanor E. Jones was principal. 
(b) Granted leave of absence from February, 1895, till September, 1896. 



278 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

four grades and twelve weeks in the grade of their 
choice, — before being considered 

Graduates of the Training ScJiool. 

The following is a complete list of such graduates, as 
shown by the records of the school: Martha E. Clough, 
Augusta S. Downs, Estella X. Howlett, Minnie C. Abbott, 
Jennie F. Bailey, Mary A. Smith, Annie M. Nichols, Me- 
dora Weeks, Etta J. Carley, Lucy W. Perkins, Emma J. 
Henry, Emma E. Lawrence, Jennie G. Stebbins, M. Eu- 
genia Lord, Cora M. Dearborn, Ella F. Sanborn, Flora M. 
Senter, Florence McEvoy, Nellie M. Dennett, Ella F. 
Barker, Carrie M. Gilmore, Ida R. Eaton, Ellen A. Mor- 
rill, Lilla O. Cressey, Clara E. Woods, Emma C. Gee, Nel- 
lie B. Putnam, Clara G. Fogg, Jessie B. Farmer, Bertha 
L. Dean, Mary W. Mitchell, Belle M. Kelly, Clara J. Gar- 
land, Susan G. Woodman, Mary E. Sylvester, Fannie D. 
Moulton, Gertrude H. Brooks, Florence A. Nichols, 
Louisa R. Quint, Emma L. Stokes, May R. Fuller, Emma 
W. Mitchell, Myra P. Richardson, Lizzie J. West, Lizzie 
A. Burns, Emma S. Sanborn, Hattie L. Johnson, Annie 
W. Patten, Nellie M. James, Nettie C. Woodman, Lenora 
C. Gilford, Carrie I. Stevens, Josie H. Martin, Mary E. 
Bunton,* Kate M. Follansbee,* Georgie A. Wyman,* 
Nina D. Annis, Lizzie D. Hartford, Fannie L. Sanborn, 
Kittie J. Ferren,* Susie E. Greenwood, Edith M. Steb- 
bins, Helen M. Wetherbee, Nettie F. Ainsworth, Susie H. 
Frame, Mary L. Gage, Ella Hope, Eva F. Tuson,* Lelia A. 
Brooks, Bessie M. Hall, Mattie E. Sanborn, Genevieve L. 
Whitten, Alta C. Willand, Carrie A. F. Bartlett, Nina B. 
Corning, Mary J. Hickey, May F. Nutt, Barbara B. Joy, 
Sarah B. Paige, Alice E. Page.* Hulda C. Graupner, Lil- 
lian C. Hall, Mary Southard, Cora B. Gilford, Lettie Isl. 
Smith, Emma McLaren, Mary J. Walsh, Theodora Rich- 



HEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 279 

ardson, Genieve Knight, Xellie M. Atwood, Nettie B. 
Fogg, Abbie E. West, Lillian Little, Inez M . Warren, 
Kate Townsend, Maude L. Kent, Emma B. Abbott, Al- 
Terta P. Barrett, Millie S. Morse, Bertha A. Young, Annie 
B. Goodwin,* Mabel J. Brickett, Mary E. Moulton, Ger- 
trude L. Southard, Mary G. Worthen, Georgia M. Cheney, 
Gertrude A. Burns, Annie M. Sleeper, Mary A, Clement, 
Susie L. podge,* Mary W. Allen, Issa M. Tuttle, Mabel R. 
Brown, L. May Choate,* Annie R. Corson, Mary J. Cor- 
coran,* E. Alfreda Hall,* Carrie E. Head, Mertie C. 
Hawks,* Josie L. Riddle, Marj- S. Richardson,* M. Minnie 
Sturtevant, Annie Brigham,* Josephine A. Mitchell,* 
Xellie C. Parker,* Xellie M. Smith,* Bertha L. Kemp,* 
Bessie E. Dodge,* Cora M, Farmer,* Clydie M. Flanders, 
Mary A. Fay,* Marcia M. Moore,* Emma B. Abbott,* 
Maud L. Smith,* Hellen Morison, Lenora J. Clough, Hat- 
tie S. Tuttle, Amy K. Xorthrup, Helen E. True, Lizabell 
Savory, Hattie O. Willand, Florence L. Abbott, Blanche 
L. Batchelder, A. Maude Lamprey, Margaret C. Lane, 
Harriet H. Richardson, Katie E. Batchelder, Blanche E. 
Hicken, Minnie M. Phillips, Dora B. Tuson (150). 

The foregoing arrangement of names does not indicate 
the relative times of graduation, but the order of en- 
trance to the school. The order of graduation has been 
interfered with by sickness and other causes. 

Several others entered the Training school undoubt- 
edly for the purpose of graduation; but most of those 
entering prior to those named in the list of graduates 
were called away before they had completed the course, 
to fill positions as teachers here or elsewhere, and others 
voluntarily withdrew for reasons of their own. The fol- 
lowing constitutes a list of both these classes, and of all 
those who, not heretofore named, have entered the school 

* Elected regular teacher before completing full period of training-scliool 
service; Ijut provision is made for award of training-scliool diploma to such 
under certain conditions. 



280 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Annie H. Abbott, Elvira S. Prior, Belle B. Corey, Josie A. 
Bosher, Cleora E. Bailey, Ara A. Piatt, Olive J. Randall, 
Helen ]\I. Locke, Sarah M. Hadley, Izetta 8. Locke, Julia 
A. Dearborn, Etta C. McLaren, Nellie M. Brown, Olive 
A. Rowe, Ella J. Trickey, Jennie Spence, Florence G. 
Bartlett, Annie L. Prescott, Anne E. Abbott, Emma M. 
Streeter, Bertlia M. Cayzer, Carrie E. Litch, Perla E. Hig- 
gins, Rowena L. Walker, Dora M. Martin (deceased), and 
Mabel L. How (26). 

MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The propriety and advantage of affording instruction 
in manual training in the public schools are quite fully 
set forth in the Annual School Report for 1891, pages 23, 
24, etc. These pages will reveal what is meant by man- 
ual training, and indicate the purpose of teaching it some- 
what extendedly in the public schools. 

In the fall of 1S92, an expert teacher of drawing was 
first employed in our schools for full time, as it had come 
to be seen that a good knowledge of drawing is the essen- 
tial basis of every form of manual training. In Septem- 
ber of the same year, a high-grade course in manual 
training was introduced in our school system by the 
equipment and opening of a school, on Lowell street, for 
the purpose of teaching the use of tools to pupils in the 
last two years of the grammar-school course. This school 
was placed in charge of Mr. Fred E. Brown, of Concord. 
It was a success from the start, and it has proven more 
decidedly so every term since. During the fall term, this 
3'ear, 187 pupils have been enrolled in this school, 20 more 
than in the fall of 1895. The average weekly attendance 
and the number of pupils who have not been absent from 
any lesson is proportionally still more increased. This is 
significant of the growing interest; but improvement in 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 281 

facilities has not kept pace with the advancement of the 
ability of the pupils to pursue courses requiring greater 
skill, because of the lack of sufficient room and equipment 
for furnishing the more extended instruction needed. 

When the manual training school was first opened, it 
was equipped only for such instruction as could be af- 
forded beginners in the use of tools. The school has now 
been in existence three years and one term. Some of the 
boys who entered the manual training school when it was 
first opened are still members of it, though now high- 
school pupils. These, as well as those doing second year 
work in this school, are in sore need of more extended 
facilities for practice in the use of tools. The manual 
training school cannot longer be carried on in the most 
profitable manner without increased facilities for prop- 
erly advancing its work, as originally intended. Doubt- 
ers of the utility of this school, before hesitating to give it 
loyal support, will do well to read the School Report of 
1891 (pages 23, 24, etc.), the Report of 1893 (page 42), the 
Report of 1894 (pages 18, 19, etc.), and school reports of 
other cities in which the shop form of manual training 
has been introduced; and still more especially should 
doubters consult the two or three hundred pupils who 
have patronized the school in this city, and their parents 
also. 

The first additional need of the manual training school 
is more room. This may be had at the new high school 
house; at the Straw school house, when the High school 
shall be removed therefrom; or, possibly best, at the 
Lowell-street house, by transferring one of the primary 
schools there to the Straw school house, which will soon 
be available for elementary schools. The next need 
of the manual training school is an equipment of three or 
four wood-turning lathes and a band saw, with electrical 
or other power. Wood-turning is one of t^ie very best 



282 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

features which can be introduced into this line of school 
work. It is of a character which brings a pupil to the 
necessity of thought and study; it teaches self-reliance, 
and trains the eye to see and the hand to perform difficult 
work with precision. Pattern making affords excellent 
training; it has a practical bearing also upon the indus- 
tries, and will be undertaken if proper facilities are 
granted. 

Wood-carving has already received some attention, of 
which specimens can be seen at the school; so, also, of 
writing-desks, bookcases, and a corner what-not, with 
panelled sides and inlaid casings; also other inlaid struc- 
tures, and abundance of joint forms and other elementary 
work. There was a good exhibit of some of this work in 
my office window last June, which received much atten- 
tion and high public commendation. 

The manual training school has a fully competent and 
deeply-interested teacher, who has given many extra 
hours of service to the school. The school is also under 
the charge of a committee whose chairman is especially 
well equipped for the oversight of such an institution. 
The school is only in need of an adequate appropriation 
to make its work a grand success. The appropriation for 
this school, and the introduction of cooking in the High 
school, should for the coming year be not less than $3,500. 

MUSIC. 

Not long after the decease of Professor Kimball, who 
had for many years been a most successful director and 
teacher of music in our schools. Prof. Fred B. Bower was 
selected to fill the vacancy. A few months before his 
appointment, the American Music System had been intro- 
duced on trial in all our primary schools. This system 
has i)roved quite satisfactory; and its use has been ex- 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 283 

tended so tbat it is now taught throughout all our pri- 
mary, middle, and suburban schools. The introduction 
of the system was given over to Miss Florence Dow, as 
assistant director, and most admirably did she accom- 
plish the work. It was greatly to the regret of all that 
she was obliged to resign during the summer vacation on 
account of ill health. Miss Dow's place was filled by the 
appointment of Miss Jennie C. Heath. Though quite 
young for so responsible a position, and inexperienced in 
public-school teaching, she has succeeded surprisingly 
well. Professor Bower, who understands both the old 
system and the new, — the latter being gradually worked 
into the higher grades, — is head supervisor of instruc- 
tion in music. His regular work as teacher is that of in- 
structor in the high, grammar, and higher-middle 
schools. 

Music is being uncommonly well taught in our schools; 
and the Standing Cornmittee on Music is entitled to much 
credit for painstaking carefulness, and resultant success 
in making selections of efficient and satisfactory teachers 
in this department. 

DRAWING. 

The instruction afforded in drawing since 1891 has 
been very satisfactory. In 1892, Miss Charlotte J. Em- 
mins, of Boston, became full-time director and teacher of 
drawing in all grades of our schools. The fine exhibits of 
drawings, from our various schools, which were made in 
my office last May and June, must have convinced all per- 
sons conversant with the state of drawing in the schools 
prior to 1892 that remarkably good progress had been 
made in the study of this subject during the past four 
years. 

Miss Emmins was graduated at the Massachusetts 
Normal Art School. She subsequently studied in Eu- 



284 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

rope, the better to perfect herself to become a teacher. 
Before coming here she had also had a few j^ears' experi- 
ence as special teacher in the public schools of other 
cities. She not only thoroughly understood her subject, 
but knew equally well how best to handle it for the bene- 
fit of teachers and pupils. Miss Emmins was a conscien- 
tious, painstaking, and faithful teacher. She made long 
days, worked hard, and was quite persistent in requiring 
proper attention and adequate results from grade teach- 
ers. She also otherwise manifested so great earnestness 
about her work that she caused her co-laborers properly 
to respond through the inspiration which she afforded, 
and the marked degree of progress which was constantly 
being made through her efforts caused all to feel well re- 
paid for their co-operation. 

Miss Emmins became Mrs. Edward H. Trask before the 
close of the school year; and her withdrawal from our 
schools at the close of the spring term was the occasion 
of much regret by all concerned. 

Prof. J. Warren Thyug, elected to the position vacated 
by Mrs. Trask, has now served one term as director and 
teacher of drawing. Professor Thyng produced evidence 
of special training and of good success in teaching draw- 
ing in the public schools of two or three cities where he 
had formerly taught. He has made a favorable impres- 
sion upon the corps of teachers, and is rendering good 
service. 

The present course of study in drawing is the product 
of l\Irs. Trask, It was formulated by her, at the request 
of the committee on drawing, as the result of the growth 
of the subject under her supervision here. Much labor 
was involved in preparing the course for the printer; and, 
as it was gratuitously done after her resignation, as a 
labor of love, Mrs. Trask is entitled to the cordial thanks 
of us all. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 285 

The course of study in drawing, as applied last year, 
was put in print in order that, with the incoming of a new 
supervisor of the subject, there might be no undesirable 
break in the study of drawing in our schools. The pres- 
ent use of this course will enable Professor Thyng to see 
what the schools have undertaken in this study, and what 
progress they can make in its following. He has shown 
excellent judgment and adaptability in adjusting his 
methods of instruction to the course of study; and, when 
it is outgrown, he will doubtless show wisdom in the 
character of his recommendations for its improvement. 

THE WORK OF THE SCHOOLS. 

The schools have in general made good progress 
throughout the year. The exhibits that were last sum- 
mer made in my office of results attained in the teaching 
of penmanship, drawing, and manual training bore wit- 
ness to the degree of efficiency acquired in these studies; 
and the attainments were, I think, generally conceded to 
be very good. Better work in arithmetic and geography 
has this year been done in the lower grades than ever be- 
fore. This is, doubtless, largely due to the introduction 
of improved text-books, which have opened the eyes of 
teachers to greater possibilities and increased the inter- 
estof pupils. Instruction in the study of good literature 
in the elementary schools has been more general and 
much improved. The culture afforded by this instruc- 
tion has also been supplemented by somewhat extended 
decorations of the school room walls, due to the efforts of 
teachers and the liberal response of many parents and 
friends. 

The character of school work is everywhere recognized 
as chiefly dependent upon the teacher; and, if any in our 
corps have failed to exercise good judgment, shown lack 



286 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

of knowledge or of tact, or in any war been unskilful, the 
shortcomings of such may be "attributed to errors of the 
head rather than of the heart"; for I take pleasure in tes- 
tifying to the devotion and faithfulness of all our teach- 
ers in an earnest endeavor to promote the good of the 
schools. 

Obituary. 

The close of a successful year's work was greatly sad- 
dened by the very sudden death of one of our more promi- 
nent teachers. Mr. Benjamin S. Andrew, Master of the 
Webster school since March, 1889, suddenly died the last 
day of October, away from home but accompanied by his 
devoted wife and among kind friends. Principal Andrew 
had been specially trained for the teacher's vocation. 
He was thoroughly devoted to it, and greatly in love with 
its work. He was a good teacher and an efficient princi- 
pal. He will be long and sadly missed, but pleasantly 
remembered. 

Appropriate resolutions upon the death of Mr. Andrew 
were passed by the Masters' Association, of which he was 
president; and, also, by the school board, the latter of 
which were spread upon the records of the board. A 
copy of each set of the resolutions was sent to Mrs. An- 
drew, as evidence of the sympathy of her husband's asso- 
ciates and co-laborers. 

SEMI-CEXTEXNIAL CELEBRATION. 

The celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of our city's 
existence, the second week of last September, was every 
way a notable event; but it is not necessary here to en- 
large upon it, since a memorial history of the celebration, 
about to be published, will give full particulars. 

Suffice it now to say that the exercises in the mammoth 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 287 

tent on Wednesday forenoon were for and by the city's 
school children, from the public, the parochial, and other 
private schools; and, though the celebration was during 
the summer vacation, about 6,000 children j)articipated 
in the happy occasion. 

CONCLUSION. 

It becomes me again to thank you, gentlemen of the 
school board, as I most cordially do, for many kindly con- 
siderations and generous support. I extend thanks to 
the teachers, too, for hearty co-operation in all things cal- 
culated to improve the schools, and, in particular, to the 
grammar masters for special assistance in various ways. 
I also gladly acknowledge myself indebted to many pa- 
rents and citizens for helpful suggestions and encourag- 
ing commendations. 

Very respectfully submitted. . 

WILLIAM E. BUCK, Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 

I. PorULATION, ETC. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 
V. Pupils. 

VI. Truancy. 

VII. Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1896. 

IX. High School Graduating Class. 

X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

XL Organization of Committees, 1897. 

XII. List op Teachers, 1897. 

XIII. School Year, 1897. 

289 



APPENDIX. 

STATISTICS. 
I.— Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1890 43,983 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 



II.— Schoolhouses. 

Number of schoolhouses in use 24 

Number of schoolhouses not in use 

Number of school rooms used for day schools 110 

( Five of the same, and two of others, used for evening schools. Rooms 
unoccupied by city for day schools are one at Hallsville, two at the Spring- 
street house, and four at the School -street house.) 

Number of rooms used for High-school classes 8 

Number of rooms used for Grammar schools 28 

Number of rooms used for Middle schools 22 

Number of rooms used for Primary schools 44 

Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools. 2 

Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools 5 

Number of rooms used for Manual Training schools.. i 



III.— Schools. 

( All for both sexes. ) 

Number of High schools (buildings) , 

None exclusively Grammar. 

(A) 

290 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 291 

Number of combined Grammar and lower grade 

(Middle and Primary) schools 12 

Number of combined Middle and Primary schools. . . Tj 

Number of schools all Primary grade :^ 

Number of Ungraded schools 5 

IV.— Teachers. 

Male teachers in the High school 3 

Female teachers in the High school 5 

Male teachers in the Grammar schools <» 

Female teachers in the Grammar schools (a)2S 

Female teachers in the Middle schools (a)23 

Female teachers in the Primary schools (&)^1 

Female teachers in the partially graded schools 2 

Male teachers in the Ungraded schools 1 

Female teachers in the Ungraded schools 4 

Special teachers 3 

Average number of male teachers (c)12 

Average number of female teachers (c)103 

Male teachers in the evening schools 5 

Female teachers in the evening schools 14 

Average number of male teachers in the evening 

schools 5 

Average number of female teachers in the evening 

schools 7 

Male teachers in the evening Drawing schools 2 

Average number of male teachers in the evening 

Drawing schools 2 



(a) Six of the 28 are masters' assistants, and 1 of the 23 is assistant to the 
principal of the Training school . She and her assistant are, for convenience, 
both reckoned among the middle-school teachers. 

(6) Three of the 44 primaries were in the Training school. They had no 
regular teachers, being taught by sub-teachers under the direction of the 
principal and her assistant. 

(c) Including special teachers. 



292 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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294 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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296 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 297 



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298 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DAY SCHOOLS. 



Summary of attendance upon the several grades of 
public day schools for the year 1895-1896: 



Ghadbb. 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Partially graded 
Ungraded 

Totals, 1S96 
Totals, 1895 



Whole numV>o' 
different pupils. 



Boye. 



132 

595 

550 

1,398 

39 

58 



2,772 
2,627 



Girls. 



16S 

622 

512 

1,229 

39 

40 






•2 U 
.2 B 



2,610 
2,579 



270 

1,034 

837 

1,722 

65 

71 



3,999 

3,817 



248 

961 

769 

1,554 

60 

59 



3,651 
3,499 



" a 



91.8 
92.9 
91.9 
90.2 
92.3 
83.1 



91.3 
91.7 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Summary of attendance upon the several grades of 
public evening schools for the year 1895-1896: 



«- "* s 



Schools. 



Merchants' Exchange 

Spring street 

Rimmon 

School street 

( Mechanical. 



Drawing schools 



( Architectural. 



Totals, 1896. 
Totals, 1895., 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



Boys. Girls. 



190 



61 
64 
47 
26 



288 
474 



(.1) 



!Zi M 



114 
12 
34 



160 
244 



58 
30 
36 
15 
20 
15 



174 
303 



47 
24 
25 
13 
IS 
13 



140 
238 



81.0 
80.0 
69.4 
86.6 
90.0 
86.6 



80.5 
78. 5 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 299 

Evening Sclwol Teachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal at Merchants' Exchange, 
for boys. 

Assistants — William J. Mooar, Honorie J. Crough, 
Mary A. Walker, and Mary A. Buzzell. 

Josephine Mitchell, principal of Spring-street school, 
for girls. 

Assistants — Maggie Linen, Hattie S. Tuttle, and Hat- 
tie O. Willand. 

L. H. Carpenter, principal of School-street school, for 
both sexes. 

Assistant — Myrtie Hatch. 

Arthur W. Morgan, principal of Rimmon school, for 
both sexes. 

Assistants — William W. Forbes, Lillian G. Hall, Annie 
R. Morison, Lizabell Savory, Elizabeth F. Walsh, Carrie 
G. Mason, and Florence Richardson. 

Evening Drawing-School Teachers. 

' .John M. Kendall and Henry W. Allen. 

GENERAL SUMMARY. 

See statistical table in the body of this report for a con- 
densed statement of the main features of interest pertain- 
ing to the number of schools, pupils, teachers, graduates, 
and attendance upon the public schools, for the last 
twenty years. 

CHANGES IN CORPS OF TEACHERS. 

The whole number of different teachers employed one 
term or more in the day schools, within the year, has been 
110. Their respective positions may be learned from the 
attendance tables on pages C, D, E, F, G, and H of the 
Appendix, but the various changes made within the year 
can be more readily understood by an inspection of the 
following: 

(J) 



300 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Date of effect of 
resignation. 



Eliza P. Dougherty. Dec. 13/95. 
Issa May Tuttle. " " 



Date cf begin- 
Teachers. ning service. 

Blanche L. Bachelder. Feb., '96. 
Hattie O. Willand. 
Margaret C. Lane. April, '96. 

Harriet H. Richardson. " 
Lizabell Savorv. " 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 



Sub-teachers. 



Graduated. 



Flore'ce L. Abbott. Jan. 24,'96. 
Blanche L. Bachelder. " " 
Alice M. Lamprey. " '• 

Margaret C. Lane. " " 

Ha'ri't H. Richardson. " " 
Katie E. Batchelder. June26,'96. 
Blanche E. Hicken. " " 
Minnie M. Phillips. " 
Dora B. Tuson. 

Bessie Cochrane. Jan. 29, ^97. 
Maude M. Greaney. " " 
Mary L. Heath. " " 

Mabel F. Robinson. " *' 



Sub -teachers. 



Entered. 



M. Frances Abbott. Jan. 24, '96 
Mary A. Cotter. " 

Katharine Frain. " 

Lura B. Gage. " 

Florence L. Abbott. Sept. 14,'96. 
Lillian F. Crowther. 
Winnifred W. Hall. 
Florence Richardson. " 

Gertrude Adams. Feb. 1, 

Annie B. Angell. " 

Mary E. McLaren. " 

Grace A. Phillips. 
Ede B. Quimby. 
Flora M. Walker. 
Elizabeth F. Walsh. 



(K) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



301 



VI.— Work of Truant Officer. 



DATE. 



September 
October . . . 
November 
December . 
January.. . 
February . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

Totals 



Absentees 

reported 

from 



64 
89 
64 
20 
78 
62 
45 
74 
89 
81 



.5 o 

lei 

Oh 



14 
27 
26 
9 
38 
26 
10 
48 
32 
40 



No. volun- 
tarily re- 
turned to 



4 

5 

5 

4 

8 

3 

2 

14 

10 

13 



.S m 

2o 



No. reported 

caused to 

attend 



25 
35 
33 
8 
41 
33 
20 
46 
52 
50 



343 



12 
36 
25 

8 
22 
18 

7 
29 
21 
26 



204 



5 
12 
3 
1 
7 
2 
1 
3 
13 
4 



"S-o 






5 
14 

4 
5 

n 

12 
12 
7 
6 
11 



87 



S » 

"13 

o "S a 



126 



Date. 



September 
October . . 
November. 
December 
January.. 
February . 
March .. . . 

April 

May 

June 

Totals. 



O 3 

III 
3 S-s 



392 



No. truants 

caused 
to attend 



29 
30 
20 

2 
30 
20 

6 
24 
28 
17 



206 



.So 
•=! 9 

o a 

U CO 

Ph 



35 
16 
23 

2 
23 
16 

2 
16 
40 
13 



186 



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79 


122 


1 




119 

208 
81 


118 

216 

79 










1 





265 


212 


1 




141 
109 


179 
73 






1 




207 


163 






'.^39 


253 


4 


2 


187 


136 


1 




1,625 


1551 


9 


2 



as 



41 
39 
32 
58 
65 
47 
73 
55 
71 
30 

611 



(L) 



302 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

VII. — Finances.— 1 896. 



Resources from 



Items of Accocnt. 



Salaries of teachers 

Books and stationery 

Free text-books and supplies 

Furniture and supplies 

Repairs 

Care of rooms 

Fuel 

Printing and advertising 

Contingent expenses 

Evening common schools ... 
Evening drawing schools — 
Manual training 

Totals 



appropriations and 
transfers. 


Expenditures, 
1896. 


$72,838.95 


$72,838.95 


46.04 


40.04 


5,058.42 


5,058.42 


1,114.14 


1,114.14 


6,578.38 


6,578.38 


6,031.56 


5,031.56 


6,784.03 


6,784.03 


429.56 


429.56 


1,857.79 


1,857.79 


1,061.50 


1,061.50 


356.25 


356.25 


1,403.29 


1,403.29 


$102,559.91 


$102,559 91 



COST OF CITY SCHOOLS. 

Expenditures, as above specified $102,559.91 

S^alaries. 

Members of the school board $200.00 

Clerk of the board 150.00 

Superintendent of schools 2,300.00 

Truant officer 750.00 

Total $105,950.91 

Receipts on Account of Sehools. 

Literary fund $3,SG9.60 

Non-resident tuition* 334.03 

Sale of text-books 216.43 

Total. $4,420.05 

* School tax from Londonderry included, $44.47. 

(M) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 303 

Net amount raised by taxation $101,539.86 

The city valuation for 1896 is $29,443,668; and hence 
the rate of school tax for the year is |101,539.86 divided 
by $29,443,668, or .0034 plus. Last year the rate was 
.0032. 



VIII. — School Year, 1895-1896. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 9, 1895; 
closed December 13. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened December 30, 
1895; closed March 20, 1896. Vacation of three weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 13, 1896; 
closed June 26, 1896. Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above 
by the school board, 185. 

Average number of days the schools were taught, 175. 

( Being closed several holidays, days of " Teachers' Institutes " and half- 
daj-s on account of bad weather or insufficient heat. ) 



IX. — High School Graduation. 
Program. 



Salutatory. "Character." 

Flora Mildred Walker. 

Chorus. "The House that Jack Built." 
Alfred J. Caldicott. 

Class History Frank Sewell Chase 

Class Prophecies Celia Huntington Rogers 

Chorus. "Day-break." 

J. D. G. Parker. 

(N) 



301 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Class Poem Harry Louis Bailey 

Piano Solo, "La Caressante" Blumenthal 

Harry Chase Whitteraore. 

Oration. "A Liberal Education." 

Winfred Egbert Burbank. 

Chorus. ''The Miller's Wooing." 

Valedictory. ''The Development of Character." 
Gertrude Adams. 

Award of Diplomas Rev. C. J. Staples 

Class Ode. 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

Gertrude Adams. Georgina Harper Morisou. 

Harry Tanner Adams. Ethel Alberta Nicholson, 
William Edward Boire. Ede Belle Quinby. 
Burton Winthrop Buck. William Josei)h Simons. 
Alice Patterson Burnham. Georgia Ida Southard, 
Harry Wilfred Fitts. George Langdon Spaulding, 

Grace Florence Francis. Edward Balch Stearns. 
Barbara Adelaide Gulliver, Lillian Cobleigh Tarbell. 
Winnifred Wadleigh Hall, Flora Mildred Walker, 
Mary Pierce Johnson, Harry Chase Whittemore, 

Frederick George Bradstreet Kemp. 

Henry Albert Worthen. 

COLLEGE COURSE. 

Harry Louis Bailey. Royden Winthrop Cheney. 

Oliver Winslow Branch. Ralph William McAllester. 
Elisabeth Seribner Brown. ]\Iary Eleanor McLaren. 
Winfred Egbert Burbank. Arthur Newman Tasker. 

(O) 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 305 
THREE years' ENGLISH COURSE. 

Shirley Payson Dodge. Celia Huntington Rogers. 

Mary Francis French. Ida Siddall. 

Lizzie May Grant. Bertha May Tisdale. 

Clara O. DeMoulpied. Grace Mary Tolman. 

Harry Hall Preston. Verna Augusta Wason. 

FOUR years' ENGLISH COURSE. 

Annie Belle Angell. Frank Sewell Chase. 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Frederick Edwin Atwood. 

TWO years' CERTIFICATE. 

Harry Dexter Heath. Hovey Edward Slayton. 

SPECIAL STUDENT. 

Grace Longley Kendall. 

HONOR SCHOLARS. 

Classical Course Gertrude Adams 

College Course Arthur Newman Tasker 

English Course Annie Belle Angell 



X. — Winners of Clarke Prizes 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, JANUARY 31, 

1896. 

Oratorical Style of Delivery. 

Lynn B. Hammond, $10. Lena Mae Crough, $6. 
Frank L. Parshley, |4. 

(P) 



306 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Dramatic Hbjle of Delivery. 

Edna L. Merrill, $10. Aubrey E. Burnham, |( 

Blanche Pearl Varnum, $4. 

Narrative Style of Delivery. 

Clara Foster, $10. Georgia Marion Kelty, 

Gladys I. Lougee, |4. 



XI. — Organization, 1897. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, Mayor, Chairman ex-officio. 

GEORGE B. ROGERS, 

President of Common Council, ex-officio. 

Ward 1. Elliott C. Lambert. 
Walter B. Heath. 

Ward 2. Charles H. Manning. 
Augustus P. Home. 

Ward 3. George D. Towne. 
Louis E. Phelps. 

Ward 4. Nathaniel L. Colby. 
Henry D. Soule. 

Ward 5. James P. Slattery. 
John T. Kelley. 

Ward 6. Harry I. Dodge. 

Herbert E. Richardson. 

Ward 7. Edward B. Woodbury. 
Edson S. Heath. 

Ward 8. Luther C. Baldwin. 
Xed T. Wallace. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 307 

Ward 9. R. Emuiet Walsb. 
Henry I. Lemay. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

GEORGE D. TOWNE. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

EDWARD B. WOODBURY. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

superintendent's clerk. 
FANNIE L. SANBORN. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

CURTIS W. DAVIS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. Mayor Clarke and Messrs. Rogers, Wood- 
bury, Richardson, and Wallace. 

Salaries. Messrs. Woodbury, Slattery, W. B. Heath. 

Text-Books. Messrs. Baldwin, Towne, Richardson, and 
Lambert, 

Music. Messrs. Walsh, Phelps, W. B. Heath. 

Drawing. Messrs. Towne, Baldwin, Slattery. 

Manual Training. Messrs. Richardson, Towne, Bald- 
win. 

Examination of Teachers. Messrs. Colby, Lambert, 
Woodbury. 

Fuel and Heating. Mr. Dodge, Mayor Clarke, Messrs. 
Rogers, Manning, Home. 

Repairs. Messrs. Manning, Phelps, Lemay. 

Attendance. Messrs. Phelps, E. S. Heath, Kelley. 

Health. Messrs. Soule, Walsh, Towne. 



308 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SUB-COMMITTEES. 



High School. Messrs. Manning, Towne, Phelps, Slat- 
lery, Baldwin, Lambert. 

Franklin-strcct. Messrs. Woodbury, Lambert, Rich- 
ardson. 

Spring-street Messrs. W. B. Heath, Slattery, Home. 

Lincoln-street and Youngsville. Messrs. Colby, Wallace, 
Woodbury. 

Ash-street. Messrs. Phelps, Walsh, Baldwin. 

Wehster-street. Messrs. Towne, Manning, Kelley. 

Bakersville and Mosquito Pond. Messrs. Slattery, 
Dodge, E. S. Heath. 

Tarney. Messrs.Baldwin, Colby, W. B. Heath. 

Hallsville and Harvey. Messrs. Richardson, Lemay, 
Towne. 

Rimmon School. Messrs. E. S. Heath, Home, Lemay. 

Training School. Messrs. Lambert, Baldwin, Walsh. 

North Main-street. Messrs. Home, W. B. Heath, Slat- 
tery. 

Parker. Messrs. Wallace, Richardson, Colby. 

Amoskeag and Stark. Messrs. Lemay, E. S. Heath, 
Wallace. 

Loicell-street and Webster^s Mills. ^Messrs. Kelley, 
Soule, Lambert. 

Pearl-street. Messrs. Soule, Woodbury, Dodge. 

Wilson and Goffe's Falls. Messrs. Dodge, Kelley, 
Soule. 

Blodget-street. Messrs. Walsh, Phelps, Manning. 

Evening Schools. Messrs. Colby, Manning, Woodbury. 



List of Teachers. 

HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 

Master. Albert Somes. 
Sub-Master. George I. Hopkins. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 309 

Assistants. Harry N. McLaren. 
Nellie Pickering. 
Florence M. Locke. 
Theresa B. Stanton. 
Mary J. Wellington. 
Sara Hunt. 
Annie W. Colby. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Fred L. V. Spaulding. 
Master's Assistant. Alice C. Taggart. 
Assistants. Carrie E. Hoit. 

L. May Choate. 

Carrie E. Head. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Nellie C. Parker. 
Lower Middle. Amy K. Northrup. 
Higher Primary. Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. Susie L. Dodge. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Frank S. Sutcliffe. 

Master's Assistant. Annie W. Patten. 

Assistants. Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Mabel J. Brickett. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Mabelle E, Porter. 
Lower Middle. Bessie E. Dodge. 
Higher Primary. Theodora Richardson. 
Lower Primary. Hulda C. Graupner. 



310 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ASH-STEEBT SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Charles W. Bickford. 

Master's Assistant, Mary Hickey Dowd. 

Assistants. Mabel Ruth Brown. 

Lyle D. Glovier. 

Amelia L. Graupner. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Emma J. Cooper. 
Lower Middle. Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. John Gault. 

Master's Assistant. Helen E. Frost. 

Assistants. Luna A. Whitlock. 

Alta C. Willand. 

Eva F. Tuson. 

First Floor. — Loicer Grades. 

Higher Middle. Edith L. Hammond. 
Lower Middle. Jean Gillan. 
Higher Primary. Mary E. Murphy. 
Lower Primary. Ora E. Goodwin. 

VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. George Winch. 

Master's Assistant. Barbara B. Joy. 

Assistant. Rosabelle M. Franklin. 

First Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Assistants. Esther M. Dickey. 
Ellen E. McKean. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 311 

Higher Middle. Millie S. Morse. 
Lower Middle. Mary J. Walsh. 
Higher Primar}-. Marcia M, Moore. 
Lower Primary. EfiSe M. Philbrook. 

HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Master. William H. Huse. 
Master's Assistant. Ella F. Barker. 
Assistants. Olive A. Eowe. 

Katie E. Batchelder. 
Higher Middle. Susie G. W^oodman. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. Mary L, Ayer. 
Higher Primary. Bertha L. Kemp. 
LoAver Primary. E. Alfreda Hall. 
Lower Primary. Annie R. Corson. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie P. Gove. 

Higher Middle. Emma L. McLaren. 

Mixed Primary. Maud L. Smith. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. Nellie I. Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. Lizabell Savory. 
Lower Primary. Helen E. True. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns. 
Assistant. Lelia A. Brooks.* 

* Third floor. 



312 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Higher Middle. Cora M. Farmer.* 
Lower Middle. Augusta S. Downs. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Primary. S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. Mary L. Heath. 

RIMMON SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 

Principal. Mary E. Brophy. 
Mixed Middle. Mary A. Seavey. 

First Floor. 

Higher Primary. Hattie S. Tuttle. 
Lower Primary. Blanche E. Hicken. 

WILSON SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 

Grammar. Hellen Morison. 
Higher Middle. Cora B. Gilford. 
Lower Middle. Harriet H. Richardson. 

First Floor. 

Principal. Mary J. Corcoran. 
Higher Primary. M. Clara Hawks. 
Lower Primary. Florence L. Abbott. 
Lower Primary. Bessie Cochrane. 

I 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

(Merrimack street, corner Union.) 
Principal. Caroline E. Wing. 
Head Assistant. Blanche L. Batchelder. 

. Third floor. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 313 

The principal is also assisted by the sub-teachers, i. c, 
members of the training class. The school embraces the 
first four years of school work, in the following grades: 
Lower Primary, Higher Primary, and Lower Middle. 
There are four rooms, two of lower-primary grade. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Mary W. Mitchell. 
Lower Middle. Gertrude A. Burns. 
Middle and Primary. Mary A. Clement. 
Higher Primary. Lottie M. Clement. 

First Floor. — Primary Grades. 

Higher Primary. M. Minnie Sturtevant. 
Mixed Primary, Hattie O. Willand. 
Lower Primary. Kate T. Clarke. 
Lower Primary. Margaret C. Lane. 

PEARL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary G. Tynan. 
Lower Middle. Nellie M. Smith. 
Higher Primary. Ella Hope. 
Lower Primary. Georgia M. Cheney. 

PARKER SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary E. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. Delle E. Haines. 
Lower Primary. Blanche M. Folsom. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 
Principal. Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. Edith M. Stebbins. 



31-4: ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 

Lower Primary. Mary S. Richardson. 
Lower Primary. (Vacancy.) 

First Floor. 
Principal. Helen M. Morrill. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. Lettie M. Smith. 
Mixed Primary. Clydie M. Flanders. 
Goffe's Falls.* Mary L. P>rown. 
Mixed Primary. Edith Caldwell. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS.* 

No. 1. stark. Inez M. Warren. 

2. Harvey. Emma J. Ela. 

3. Youngsville. Louis H. Bailey. 

4. Webster's Mills. Josephine L. Eiddle. 

5. Mosquito Pond. Kellie M. Atwood. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. Fred B. Bower. 

Jennie C. Heath. 
Drawing. J. Warren Thyng. 
Manual Training. Fred E. Browne. 

JANITORS. 

High Scliool and Ash-Street School. 
John S. Avery. 

Lincoln-Street School. 
William Stevens. 

* Suburban. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 315 

Webster-Street and Blodget-Street Schools. 

Charles F. Jack. 

Spring-Street and Lowell-Street Schools. 

S. H. Batchelder. 

Training School and Franklin-Street School. 

Varnum H. Hill. 

Yarney and Parker Schools. 

H. G. Batchelder. 

Main-Street and Rimmon Schools. 

William F. Conner. 

. Bakersville School. 

Edwin N. Baker. 

Hallsville and Pearl-Street Schools. 

William H. Newry. 

Wilson School. 

J. S. Washburn. 

Amoskeag School. 

James E. Bailey. 



Xlll. — School Year, 1896-1897. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opens September 14, 1896 ; 
closes December 18, 1896. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 4, 1897; 
closes March 26, 1897. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 12, 1897; 
closes June 25, 1897. Vacation of eleven weeks. 

* Suburban. 



316 



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REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Chief Engineer's Office, 
Central Station, No. 8 Vine Street. 

Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1896. 

To His Honor, William G. Clarke, Mayor, and Gentlemen of 
the Gity Councils: 

In compliance with the Laws and Ordinances of the 
city of Manchester, I herewith submit my eighteenth an- 
nual report (it being the fifty-first of this city) for the year 
ending December 31, 1896. 

The number of alarms the department have responded 
to, in part or as a whole, will be found in the following 
pages, and the cause of fires as far as could be ascer- 
tained, together with the value of property endangered, 
amount of insurance on the same, and loss thereon. 

There have been eighty-six bell alarms and eighty-seven 
still alarms, making a total of one hundred and seventy- 
three calls during the year. Of the bell alarms, one was 
the "out-of-town-' 2-2-2, for a brush fire just across the 
city line, in Hooksett, endangering several buildings; and 
seven were false alarms, pulled by malicious persons, and 
for which the authorized reward of $20 was offered; but 
as yet no one has been apprehended; and of the "still 

321 



322 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

alarms," one was by telephone from Epping, N. H., to 
which Steamer No. 4, with Hose Wagon and delegation of 
men were sent; and fifteen were for brush fires in the out- 
skirts of the city, where in some cases buildings were en- 
dangered, but no damages resulted, except the one of 
May 13, on the Dunbarton road, where considerable pine 
wood was destroyed. 

The amount of property endangered where fires have 
occurred has been quite large, but the net amount of loss 
very small, as will be seen by the following figures: 

Value of buildings endangered $660,500.00 

Value of contents endangered. 114,385.00 

$774,885.00 

Insurance on buildings endangered $349,550.00 

Insurance on contents endangered 71,200.00 

$420,750.00 

Damage to buildings endangered $10,960.12 
Damage to contents endangered 12,999.13 

$23,959.25 

Insurance paid on buildings en- 
dangered $10,276.92 

Insurance paid on contents en- 
dangered 10,750.13 

$21,027.05 

Net loss uncovered by insurance $2,932.20 



THE MANUAL FORCE 

of the department remains the same as last year, one hun- 
dred and sixty,— thirty-three of whom are permanent, 
and are divided as follows: 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 323 

Call. Permanent 

1 Chief Engineer 1 

4 Assistant Engineers 4 

Engine Co. No. 1 11 3 

Engine Co. No. 2 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3 15 5 

Engine Co. No. 4 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 5 16 4 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 6 16 4 

Hose Co. No. 1 11 1 

Hose Co. No. 2 11 1 

Hose Co. No. 3 6 2 

Aerial Truck No. 1 12 3 

Chemical No. 1 3 2 

Spare driver 1 

127 33 

THE BUILDINGS. 

The stations of Engine No. 2 and Engine and Ladder 
No. 3 are greatly in need of painting outside. Neither of 
them has received any attention in this particular since 
they were completed, the former in 1886, and the latter in 
1888. 

The roof over the apparatus room and hay loft of Truck 
No. 1, at Central station, ought to receive early attention. 
The present construction allows most of the surface 
water to trickle down the south wall, and in winter ice 
freezes on the same, both of which tend to wash out the 
mortar, and weaken that side of the building. 

Additions ought to be made to the stables of Engine 
and Ladder Companies Nos. 5 and 6, and bos stalls 
arranged for the accommodation of a horse when sick, as 
there is no room in either stable at present to properly 
care for them when "off dutv." 



324 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

A shed for the storage of the exercise wagon for Engine 
and Ladder No. 3, alluded to in previous reports, should 
be erected at that station, as well as one for Hose No. 3. 

THE APPARATUS 

Of this department consists of 6 Amoskeag steam fire 
engines in good condition, 4 hose carriages with reels, 5 
hose wagons, 4 ladder trucks, 1 of which is an aerial truck 
carrying other ladders, 2 hose carriages in outlying dis- 
tricts, with independent companies attached, 2 hose car- 
riages, without companies, 1 supply wagon, 7 exercise 
wagons, located as follows: 

2 steam fire-engines, with three-horse hitch, at Central 
station, each with one-horse hose wagon attached. 

1 steam fire-engine, three-horse hitch, with 1 two-horse 
hose wagon. North Main street. 

1 steam fire-engine and 1 two-horse hose wagon, at cor- 
ner Lake avenue and Massabesic street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 steam fire-engine and one-horse hose carriage, at cor- 
ner of Webster and Chestnut streets. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 steam fire-engine and one-horse hose carriage on Kim- 
mon street, corner of Amory street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 one-horse hose carriage at Central station. 

1 one-horse hose carriage, corner Maple and East High 
streets. 

1 two-horse combination hose wagon. South Elm 
street. (Bakersville.) 

1 aerial hook-and-ladder truck at Central station 
(three-horse hitch). 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) chemical engine at Cen- 
tral station. 

1 supply wagon at Central fire station. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 325 

1 steam fire-engine (reserve) at station of Engine No. 2 
(of but little use for fire purposes). 

1 four-wheeled hand hose carriage at junction of Old 
Falls road and Front street, Amoskeag. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, Devonshire Mills, Goffe's 
Falls. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage at W. P. Farmer's at junc- 
tion of Candia road and Hanover street. 

1 two- wheeled hose carriage, junction Mammoth road 
and Massabesic street (Hallsville). 

7 exercise wagons, 1 at Central fire station, 1 at Engine 
No. 2, 1 at Engine and Ladder No. 3, 1 at Engine and 
Ladder No. 5, 1 at Engine and Ladder No. 6, 1 at Hose 
No. 2, 1 at Hose No. 3. 

I trust another year will not pass without the addition 
of a chemical engine for the West Side, which I have pre- 
viously recommended. The efficiency of these engines at 
the early stages of a fire cannot be doubted, and the use of 
them in many cases prevents a considerable amount of 
damage by water. 

THE HORSES. 

There are at the present time forty horses owned by 
this department, including the "spare" horse, which is 
kept pretty busy most of the time, and even with an extra 
horse, we have been obliged to hire another a portion of 
the time, while others were on the sick list. 

There has been during the past year a great deal of 
needless swapping, shifting, and trading by the com- 
mittee, to suit their whims, or those of some others, 
which has increased the bill for horses to an unnecessary 
extent; and even with the many changes that have been 
made, there are still three horses unfit for the duties re- 
quired of them. The gray horse "Frank," of Engine No. 
1, and the bav mare of Hose No. 2, are both too old for the 



326 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

service required, and one of the grays of Engine No. G, on 
account of lameness, should also be retired. 

The rest of the horses, barring accidents, are in fairly 
good condition. 

THE FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Storage battery for fire alarm service is no longer an 
experiment, and actual tests of several years' trial 
demonstrate it to be much cheaper and more effective 
than the gravity battery so long in use. 

I would strongly recommend the adoption of the stor- 
age battery, at an early date, for our fire alarm telegraph. 
Our already overcrowded battery room requires the 
change, and its adoption can be had on quite reasonable 
terms; or it could be put in on rental, with a guarantee 
that its yearly cost will be much less than it now is for 
our present gravity system, thus making it a safe invest- 
ment for the city. 

August 22, box 115, at corner of Gore and Ash streets, 
and box 217, at corner of Massabesic street and Candia 
road, were added to the system; and two additional boxes 
have recently been voted by the city councils, and will be 
numbered 28. at corner of Merrimack and Beacon 
streets, and 57, at corner of D street and Mast road. 

The placing of the box-key under a glass on the box has 
given malicious persons opportunity for giving seven 
false alarms; but its convenience in case of actual fires 
has fully demonstrated its usefulness, and we hope the 
police may yet be successful in apprehending the guilty 
parties, and thus stop a proceeding that endangers life 
and property. 

The electric railroad, wholly regardless of the orders of 
the city councils, have failed to construct and maintain 
properly insulated guard-wires over their trolley wires. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 327 

This matter ought to receive the immediate attention of 
the incoming city councils, and the managers of the elec- 
tric road be obliged to put guard-wires the entire length 
of their trolley wires, as the falling of a telephone or tele- 
graph wire on the trolley wires in any section is liable to 
cause a fire, even some distance from the cross, by the 
crossing of other wires. During the month of October 
last, the entire fire-alarm system of a city in Michigan 
was burned out through the contact with a trolley wire, 
and with the present unguarded trolley of this city, our 
fire-alarm is liable to the same fate. Safety to life and 
property demands early attention to this matter. 

A steam gong would add much to the eflBciency of this 
system for an outside alarm, and could be heard in any 
portion of the city. 

During the year 18 new poles have been set, 6 old ones 
re-set, put up 181 two-pin, 20 four-pin, and 3 six-pin cross- 
arms, 9 box-arms, 20 single extensions, 10 two-pin, and 2 
four-pin extensions, changed 23 gongs, run about 3 miles 
of bare wire, 1 mile of insulated tree-wire, and changed 
over about 5 miles of wire. There are now about 40 
miles main line and 35 miles "tapper" line of wire. 

THE SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL PARADE. 

During the week of the semi-centennial celebration of 
the city, this department helped celebrate the fiftieth 
anniversary by making its seventeenth annual parade on 
Wednesday, September 8, and it was witnessed by one of 
the largest crowds of people ever assembled in this city. 

CASUALTIES. 

During the year four slight and one serious accidents 
have occurred. February 2, Lyman W. Piper, driver of 
Truck No. 3, injured his knee while coming down the slid- 



328 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ing pole; May 22, Thomas C. Foote, of Engine Co. No. 2, 
while working at the fire at Wallace's planing mill, 
burned his hand so as to be unable to work for seventeen 
days; October 18, Arthur W. Whitcomb, driver of hose 
wagon of Engine No. 2, while hitching his horses in re- 
sponse to an alafm from box 42, was injured by the pole 
of the wagon swinging against him, and was unable to do 
duty for thirty-eight days; October 20, Charles M. Den- 
you, driver of Truck No. 1, was injured in his hand while 
harnessing his horses for stray blows, caused by the 
street department breaking the wires in cutting down 
trees, disabling him for three weeks. 

The most serious accident that has occurred in the de- 
partment for many years was the instant death of Lieut. 
Thomas E. Gorman, of Engine and Ladder No. 6, caused 
by being thrown from the truck while responding to an 
alarm from box 53, for a fire on the river road in Bedford. 
Lieutenant Gorman had been connected with the depart- 
ment since the organization of his company, October IG, 
1893. 

Edwin E. Weeks, engineer of the same company, died 
on the 2d of May, at Pembroke, N. H., while absent on 
sick leave. Mr. Wrecks joined the department as a "call 
member" of Hose No. 1, April 5, 1880; was transferred to 
Assistant Engineer of Engine No. 3, February 11, 1888, 
and promoted to Permanent Engineer of Engine No. 6, on 
the formation of that company, October 16, 1893, which 
position he held at the time of his death. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 329 



3Fn Sl^cmoriam. 



EDWIN E. WEEKS, 

Engineer of Engine No. 6. 

Born at Manchester, N. H., April 12, 1859, 

Died at 

Pembroke, N. H., May 27, 1896. 

Aged 37 Years, i Month, 15 Days. 



THOMAS E. GORMAN, 

Lieutenant of Truck No. 6, 

Born at Augusta, Maine, 1856, 

Killed December 30, 1896, 

While Responding to an Alarm from 

Box 53. 

Aged 40 Years. 



330 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

THE firemen's RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

On account of the number of drafts upon the treasury, 
and the small number of contributions, the funds of this 
association have fallen below that of last year. The re- 
ceipts for the year have been as follows: 

Receipts. 

Balance in treasury February 11, 

1896 13,702.69 

Received for membership 7.00 

donation, A. P. Olzeu- 

dam Co 25.00 

donation, Jeremiah 

Hodge 15.00 

donation, Rt. Rev. Bish- 
op Bradley 10.00 

Dividend on deposits 116.61 

$3,876.30 

Expenditures. 

Paid funeral benefit of Edwin E. 

Weeks $50.00 

Thomas C. Foote, injuries at 

fire 17.00 

Andrew S. Heath, injuries at 

fire 5.00 

Lyman W. Piper, injuries. . .. 6.00 

Arthur W. Whitcomb, inju- 
ries 49.50 

Charles M. Denyou, injuries. . 19.00 

Joseph E. Merrill, secretary.. 25.00 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing 

By-Laws 7.25 

$178.75 

Balance in treasury $3,697.55 

Making an excess of $5.14 over the receipts. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 331 

CONCLUSION. 

I trust those in charge of buying horses for this de- 
partment during the administration of the incoming city 
government will exercise such care in their selection as 
will give us horses better adapted for the duties required 
of them, and at less prices, than has prevailed during the 
last two years. 

The salary paid the permanent captains ought to re- 
ceive consideration and adjustment. According to the 
present construction of the ordinance, they are now re- 
ceiving less pay than other permanent men; and it seems 
that an officer with the care and responsibility of the men 
and apparatus under his immediate charge, should re- 
ceive more salary than that of the privates under him. 

I desire again to allude to the urgent necessity of a 
State Fire Marshal. The importance of such an officer in 
Massachusetts has done much to lessen the fire losses, as 
well as to bring many guilty parties to justice. It would 
not only be a saving to insurance companies, but property 
holders as well; and what is for the interest of one party, 
is, in a great measure, for the interest of the other; and I 
trust both will unite in asking for the passage of an act 
by our state legislature, creating such an office. 

In closing, I desire to extend many thanks to His 
Honor Mayor Clarke, for the many courtesies received at 
his hands, and the interest he has at all times manifested 
in the welfare of this department; to the members of the 
city councils, to the chief of police and the officers under 
his charge. To the assistant engineers, officers, and men 
great credit is due for the prompt and efficient manner in 
which they have responded to every call for duty, and 
they are entitled to, and have, my heartiest thanks. 
Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 
Chief of Fire Department. 



332 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 1 896, 
with Losses and Insurance. 

P.ox 511. Wednesday, January 1, 10.13 a. m. Three- 
story wooden tenement block at 246 Douglas street, 
owned by Frank P. Johnson, and occupied by August 
Schmalf uss. The fire originated in a bed, from some un- 
known cause. Damage slight. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, and 
Truck 6. Fire extinguished without aid of department. 

Box 312. Wednesday, January 1, 1.33 p. u. False 
alarm. Box pulled by mischievous boys, who broke 
glass and obtained key. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Wednesday, January 1, 4.35 p. m. Chimney 
fire in tenement house 133 Manchester street, owned by 
Mrs. Joy. No damage. Members of Chemical respond- 
ed. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 215. Thursday, January 2, 11.25 p. m. Two-story 
brick carriage factory at corner Lincoln and Somerville 
streets, owned and occupied by Kimball Bros. The fire 
was caused by boards piled against the boiler and ignited 
from the furnace. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. 
No damage. 

Box 71. Saturday, January 4, 10.06 p. m. Chimney 
fire in Mrs. Kearns's block, corner of Lake avenue and 
Pine street. No damage. Box pulled by Officer Sumner. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Truck 3. 

Still. Sunday, January 5, 10 p. m. Chimney fire in 
wooden block, corner of Washington and Church streets. 
No damage. Used two charges of Pony. 

Still. Monday, January 6, 9.54 a. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 36 Pearl street. Used one charge of Pony. No dam- 
age. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 333 

Still. Monday, January 6, 9.56 a. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 14 Clark avenue. Used two charges of Pony. No 
damage. 

Kox 8. Monday, January 6, 7.55 p. m. Chimney fire in 
Webster block, No. 8 Winter Place. Used Pony. No 
damage. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemi- 
cal, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Tuesday, January 7, 8.50 a. m. Slight fire in 
partition at No. 1074 Elm stireet, Wells block, caused by 
thawing water pipes with blow-lamp. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, January 7, 9.55 a. m. Two-aiid-a- 
half-story house at No. 65 Amherst street. Funnel of 
stove fell off, filling rooms with smoke. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, January 7, 10.05 a. m. Three-story 
brick building, occupied by H. J. Lawson as metal cor- 
nice-maker. Slight fire in partition caused by forge. 
No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, January 7, 6 p. m. Chimney fire in 
Martin's block, McGregor street, owned by Gordon 
Woodbury. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. 
Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 82. Thursday, January 9, 6.03 p. m. One-story 
woodshed, in rear of No. 1077 Elm street, owned by E. K. 
Rowell, and occupied by Boston Clothing Co. The con- 
tents of the shed were of no value; consequently no dam- 
age to that part. Box pulled by Thomas Kelley. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 5. Cause unknown. Value of buildings, $100; 
damage to building, |25; no insurance. 

Box 321. Thursday, January 9, 6.55 p. m. Chimney 
fire in two-and-a-half-story house. No. 39 Sullivan street, 
owned and occupied by Charles Buckley. No damage. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
2, 5, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 5, 6. 

Still. Saturday, January 11, 10.46 p. m. Chimney, 



334 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

fire in Kimball's block, No. 1221 Elm street. Members of 
Chemical responded. No damage. Used one charge of 
Ponj. 

Box 15. Sunday, January 12, 1.09 p. m. Three-story 
wooden block at No. 541 Chestnut street, owned by Nasou 
HaJe and Mrs. Phineas Adams, and occupied by Mrs. 
Charles Huntress and others. The fire was caused by 
thawing water-pipes with burning paper, and spread rap- 
idly through the partition to the roof. Box pulled by E. 
H. Holmes. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, 
$4,500; damage, $350; insurance, $2,000; insurance paid, 
$350. Value of contents, $1,500. Damage, $20; no in- 
surance. 

Box 4. Tuesday, January 14, 5.55 p. m. Chimney fire 
at No. 64 Cedar street in tenement house, owned by Hugh 
Kelley. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Compa- 
nies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Wednesday, January 15, 9.40 a. m. Chimney 
fire at No. 136 Lake avenue. Members of Chemical re- 
sponded. No damage. Used three charges of Pony. 

Still. Monday, January 20, 2.20 p. m. Three-story 
wooden block, Clark avenue. Pearl street, owned by 
Charles C. Hayes, and occupied by several families. The 
fire was in a partition near the chimney, and caught from 
a defective flue. Chemical Engine responded. Value of 
building, $6,000; damage, $30; insurance, $4,000; insur- 
ance paid, $^0. No damage to contents. 

Still. Thursday, January 23, 8.30 a. m. Hose No. 3 
was called to the Slaughter and Eendering works on Han- 
cock street, for slight fire in a partition. Considerable 
smoke, but no damage. 

Still. Fridaj', January 24, 8.26 a. m. Chimney fire in 
two-story wooden block, No. 47 Church street. No dam- 
age. Used one charge of Pony. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 335 

Box 7. Tuesday, January 28, 7.22 p. m. Two-story 
wooden block, at No. 42 Merrimack street, owned by the 
Knights of Pythias Association, and occupied by Joseph 
Keller as tailor shop on first floor, and Dennis Daily as 
tenement up stairs. The fire originated in the back room 
of Keller's shop, from some unknown cause, while Keller 
was out. Box pulled by Officer Welch. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of buildings, |3,200; damage, $50; insurance, 
|3,000; insurance paid, $50. Value of contents, $400; 
damage, $200; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $200. 

Still. Thursday, January 30, 6 p. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 22 Wayne street, owned by Kate Cullity, and occu- 
pied by F. Roy. No damage. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Co. No. 6 attended, using two charges of Pony. 

Box 54. Sunday, February 2, 9.54 p. m. Unoccupied 
cottage house. No. 38 Prince street, owned by Hollis 
Tolles, of Londonderry. The cause is unknown. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, G, 
Chemical, Truck 6. Value of building, $1,000; damage, 
$800; insurance, $800; insurance paid, $800. 

Box 15. Monday, February 3, 3.01 p. m. Cottage 
house at 114 Orange street, owned and occupied byW. H. 
Moison. The fire was caused by careless construction of 
fire-place. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Ex- 
tinguished with Chemical engine. Value of buildings, 
$4,500; damage, $47; insurance, $2,000; insurance paid, 
$47. Value of contents, $3,000; damage, $217; insurance, 
$2,000; insurance paid, $168. 

Still. Friday, February 7, 7.57 p. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 38 Washington street. No damage. Members of 
Chemical responded. 

Box 51. Sunday, February 9, 7.06 a. m. Barn, at cor- 
ner of Turner and Walker streets, OAvned and occupied by 



336 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

John W. Wilsou. A dead telephone wire crossed with 
electric light wire, and resting on the roof, set fire to 
shingles. No damage. Box pulled by John W. Wilson. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, G, Chemical, Truck 6. 

Box 82. Sunday, February 9, G..32 p. m. Tenement 
house at Xo. 27 AYashington street, owned by John H. Ma- 
jor, and occupied by Charles Sincer. The fire was in a 
box of clothes and a bed, doing but little damage. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 5, Extinguished by Chemical engine. 

Still. Thursday, February 13, 5.30 p. m. Chimney 
fire at No. 1280 Elm street, Webster block. Members of 
Chemical responded. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, February 16,7.34 p. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 37 Laurel street. No damage. Members of Chemi- 
cal responded. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 6. Monday, February 24, 9.37 p. m. Four-story 
brick block (Opera block). No. 18 Hanover street, owned 
by Harrington heirs and Parker, and occupied by George 
Gossman & Co., as dry and fancy goods store. The fire 
originated from some unknown cause, near the center of 
the store, and spread with such rapidity as to burst from 
the side windows before it was discovered. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding : Engines 1, 4, Chemi- 
cal, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $75,000; 
damage, $800; insurance, $50,000; insurance paid, $800. 
Value of contents, $7,000; damage, $4,352.59; insurance, 
$6,500; insurance paid, $4,352.59. 

Box 5. Wednesday, February 26, 5,43 p. m. Four- 
story granite building, 797 Elm street, owned by John 
Cleworth, and occupied by J. F. Dignam & Co., apotheca- 
ries. Fire was caused by open chimney in basement. 
Extinguished by Chemical engine. No damage. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 3. 



REPORT OP THE FIRE ENGINEER. 337 

Box 71. Monday, March 2, 6.50 p. m. Slight fire in 
shed belonging- to Mrs. Michael Maloney, rear of No. 191 
Lake avenue. Fire was caused by hot ashes in wooden 
tub. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. 

Still. Tuesday, March 3, 1.04 p. m. Chimney fire in 
block owned by T. L. Thorpe, corner Granite and West 
streets. No damage. Members of Engine No. 2 re- 
sponded. Used three charges of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, March 3, 6.10 p. m. Chimney fire cor- 
ner of Elm and Cedar streets. No damage. Responded 
to by members of Hose 3. 

Still. Tuesday, March 3, 6.28 p. m. Chimney fire in 
wooden tenement block, Nos. 15-25 Marion street. No 
damage. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 6 respond- 
ed. Used two charges of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, March 3, 7,30 p. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 132 East Spruce street. No damage. Members of 
Chemical responded. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Friday, March 6, 8.55 a. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 552 Chestnut street. No damage. Members of 
Chemical responded. 

Box 6. Friday, March 6, 3.09 p. m. A smoking stove 
caused an alarm for what was supposed to be a fire in the 
Damon Club room. No. 31 Hanover street. No damage. 
Box pulled by police officer. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 9. Monday, March 9, 10.40 p. m. Barn in rear of 
No. 771 Chestnut street, owned and occupied by H. Frank 
Morse. Fire caught from sparks from stove in hostler's 
room. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. Value of build- 
ing, $1,200; damage, |90; insurance, |1,000; insurance 
paid, |90. Value of contents, $2,000; damage, |40; no in- 
surance. 

22 



338 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Friday, March 18, 7.20 P. M. Chimney fire at 
Kidder Court. Chemical responded, but not used. No 
damage. 

Still. Tuesday, March 24, 10.05 a. m. Chimney fire 
at No. 220 Chestnut street, in house owned and occupied 
by Patrick Horan. No damage. Used one charge of 
Pony. 

Box 511. Tuesday, March 24, 9.35 r. m. Two-story 
house on Groux's Island, 'Squog river, owned by Peter 
Groux, and unoccupied. The bridge was washed away, 
and the island was out of reach of the department. 
Cause of fire unknown. Box pulled by OflScer Connor. 
Companies responding, Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Truck G. 
Value of building, $1,000; damage, |G00; insurance, fOOO; 
insurance paid, |600. 

Still. Friday, March 27, 10.05 a. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 30 Washington street. No damage. Used one 
charge of Pon3\ 

Still. Friday, March 27, 3.10 r. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 62 Concord street. No damage. Used one charge of 
Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, April 1, 12.19 p. m. Chimney fire 
in Webster block, 3 ^A'inter Place. No damage. Used 
one charge of Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, April 1, 2.13 p. m. Chimney fire 
in Webster block, 3 AVlnter Place. No damage. Used 
one charge of Pony and garden hose. 

Still. Friday, A})ril 10, 1.20 r. m. Burning grass on 
North Kiver road and south of Webster street. Caught 
from sparks from engine. Responded to by members of 
Engine and Ladder No. 5, with Hose carriage. No dam- 
age. 

Box 15. Wednesday, April 15, 3.49 p. m. Stable in 
rear of No. 502 Chestnut street, owned by Mrs. E. A. Kim- 
ball, and occupied by Charles W. Shirley. Caused by 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 339 

match thrown on roof from adjoining building. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 
5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, 
$800; damage, |3.93; insurance, |500; insurance paid, 
$3.93. 

Still. Thursday, April 10, 9 a. m. Brush fire on Bald 
Hill road, near the residence of F. C. Lougee. Responded 
with a detail of men. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, April 16, 3.20 p. m. Brush fire on 
Rockland avenue, near residence of U. A. Caswell. Re- 
sponded with detail of men from Engine No, 2. 

Still. Monday, April 20, 12.48 p. m. Chimney fire in 
cottage at No. 322 Central street, owned and occupied by 
Mrs. J. S. Bacheler. No damage. Used two charges of 
Pony. 

Still. Saturday, April 25, 9.23 a. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 403 Pine street, owned and occupied by Thomas Gon- 
ley. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, April 26, 1.20 p. m. Brush fire on the 
hill south end of Beech street. Responded with thirteen 
men. 

Box 513. Wednesday, April 29, 10.55 a. m. Brush fire 
on Bedford road. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Truck 6. 

Still. Friday, May 1, 1.12 p. m. Brush fire on Nutt 
road, opposite fair grounds. No damage. Responded 
with detail of men. 

Still. Thursday, May 7, 5.52 a. m. Chimney fire rear 
No. 4 Pearl street. No damage. Used one charge of 
Pony. 

Box 7. Friday, May 8, 9.03 a. m. Blacksmith shop at 
No. 195 Manchester street, owned by Levi Dodge, and 
occupied by O. P. Smith. Fire caught on roof from 
sparks from chimney. No damage. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 



340 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Friday, May 8, 7.30 p. m. Brush fire on North 
Union street, near Charles S. Kidder's residence. Dele- 
gation from Engine and Ladder No. 5 responded. 

Box 21. Tuesday, May 12, 7.25 p. m. Three-story 
wooden tenement block at No. 253 Chestnut street, owned 
by John Sweeney, and occupied by John Hughes, over 
whose tenement the fire originated. Cause, "rats and 
matches." Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value 
of building, |8,000; damage, |130; insurance, |7,000; in- 
surance paid, $100, Value of contents, |400; damage^ 
$12; no insurance. 

Box 315. Wednesday, May 13, 4.50 p. m. Brush fire 
on wood lot on Dunbarton road, owned by Will H. Colby, 
the cord-wood on same belonging to Napoleon Bouchard. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
5, 6, Chemical, Truck 5. Wood valued at $360 ; loss, $240 ; 
insurance, $573. 

Box 4. Thursday, May 14, 5.42 p. m. Fire was discov- 
ered in wood-yard of Joseph R. Dufresne, rear of No. 62 
Lake avenue. The buildings were owned by Jeremiah 
Horan. The brick stable east, owned and occupied by 
W. E. Prescott, and the cottage west, owned by Plumer 
heirs, and leased by George W. Hamlin, were damaged by 
fire. Cause, unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Compa- 
nies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 
1,3. Buildings of J. Horan valued at $2,000; damage, 
|60; insurance, $1,600; insurance paid, $60. Building of 
Plumer heirs valued at $500; damage, $125; insurance, 
$400; insurance paid, $125. Joseph Dufresne, value, 
$400; loss, $200; po insurance. Building of W. E. Pres- 
cott valued at $6,000; damage, $48.19; insurance, $2,000; 
insurance paid, $48.19. 

Still. Saturday, May 16, 11.50 p.m. Brush fire on Bald 
Hill road and Londonderry turnpike, near residence of 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 341 

Charles Foster and others. Detail of men responded. 
Fire was out on their arrival. 

Box 31. Sunday, May 17, 6.05 a. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 26 Hollis street. No damage. Used two charges of 
Pony and garden hose. Box pulled by citizen. Compa- 
nies responding: Engines 1, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 
1,5. 

Still. Sunday, May 17, 3.25 p. m. Brush fire on Boyn- 
ton street, on land owned by Kennard heirs. Engine Co. 
No. 2 responded with hose wagon. 

Box 82. Monday, May 18, 8.48 a. m. Wood-yard of 
Joseph Dubois, at rear No. 26 Bridge street. Slight fire 
in pile of kindling-wood, started from some unknown 
cause. Extinguished with a few pails of water before ar- 
rival of department. No damage. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Monday, May 18, 9.40 a. m. Forest fire on Lon- 
donderry turnpike and Bald Hill road. Several houses 
being in danger, took detail of men. 

Box 2-2-2. Monday, May 18, 10.15 a. m. Forest fire on 
Hooksett road, near Hooksett line. Engine No. 5 and de- 
tail of men responded, thus saving several houses in that 
Ticinity. 

Box 71, Monday, May 18, 6.57 p. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 340 Cedar back street, in house occupied by David 
Beliseau. No damage. Used two charges of Pony and 
one tank of Chemical. Box pulled by a small boy. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 
3. 

Still. Monday, May 18, 7.44 p. m. The above Hook- 
sett road fire had made headway toward North Union 
street, so as to endanger the house of John H. Stone on 
Arah street. Engine No. 5 with detail of men responded. 

Box 54. Wednesday, May 20, 1.25 a. m. Two-and-a- 



842 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

half-story wooden house, corner of Bedford and River 
road, owned by Mr. Woodbury, and occupied by An- 
drew Krember. Cause of fire unknown. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemi- 
cal, Truck 6. Value of building, |3,200; damage, $113.- 
61; insurance, |2,750; insurance paid, |113.61. Value of 
contents, $800; damage, $100; insurance, |500; insurance 
paid, |75. 

Box 7. Thursday, Maj 21, 2.54 a. m. Wholesale 
liquor store of Quirin & Duhaime, No. 85 Manchester 
street. Cigar stub in sawdust. Extinguished with pail 
of water before arrival of department. No damage. 
Box pulled by officer. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. 

Still. Thursday, May 21, 12.14 p. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 10 Clark avenue, Pearl street. No damage. Used 
Pony. 

Box 53. Friday, May 22, 8.50 r. m. Planing-mill at 
No. 168 South-Main street, owned and occupied by A. G. 
Wallace. Fire was first discovered in planing-mill, and 
spread to dry-house adjoining. Cause unknown. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of buildings, $1,300; 
damage, $750; insurance, $400; insurance paid. 
Value of contents, $2,500; damage, $400; insurance, 
insurance paid, $300. 

Still. Sunday, May 24, 5.20 p. m. Cottage house, at 
No. 80 Dover street, owned by Samuel McElroy, and occu- 
pied by Mrs. Francis. Slight fire under doorstep, caused 
by cigar stub. Extinguished by member of Engine Co. 
No. 2 with Pony. Damage slight. 

Box 72. Wednesday, May 27, 8.45 p. m. Two-story 
house at No. 301 East Spruce street. Curtain caught fire. 
Extinguished before arrival of department. Damage 
slight. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 343 

Still. Thursday, May 28, 2.40 a. m. Electric light 
wire on McGregor bridge set fire to planking. Used 
Pony. Damage slight. 

Still. Saturday, May 30, 12.28 p. m. Chimney fire in 
brick block, No. 1307 Elm street. Used one charge of 
Pony. No damage. 

Still. Monday, June 1, 7.25 p. m. Lamp explosion in 
five-tenement block, owned by H. M. Moody, No. 243 East 
High street, occupied by Peter Shannon. Damage slight. 
Members of Hose No, 2 responded. 

Box 5. Friday, June 5, 7.36 a, m. Two-story wooden 
block, No. 49 Central street, owned by Philip Riley, and 
occupied by Connor Bros, as plumber's shop. A match 
accidentally thrown among some oakum caused slight 
fire, doing but little injury to building, and none to con- 
tents. Box pulled by Ofificer Sullivan. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of building, |12,000; damage, |25; insurance, 
$9,000; insurance paid, $20. 

Still. Saturday, June 6, 6 p. m. Overturning of an 
oil-stove created considerable smoke in the house of Jo- 
seph Frahen, No. 508 Dubuque street. No damage. 
Members of Engine No. 6 responded. 

Box 21. Wednesday, June 10, 7.14 p. m. Chimney fire 
at No. 312 Pine street, in three-story wooden block, 
owned by Dr. Wheat, and occupied by several families. 
No damage. Used one tank of Chemical and one charge 
of Pony. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Wednesday, June 10, 10.20 p. m. Same chim- 
ney as above. No damage. Members of Chemical re- 
sponded. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Thursday, June 11, 8.05 p. m. Chimney fire at 

No. 311 Pine street, in block owned by Littlefield. 

No damage. Members of Chemical responded. 



344 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Friday, June 12, 6.10 p. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 27 Kidder street. No damage. Responded to by 
members of Chemical. Used Pony. 

Box 51. Saturday, June 13, 11.20 a. m. Two-story 
wooden house at No. 183 Turner street, owned by Merrill 
Farmer, and occupied by Mrs. McCarty and others. Fire 
caught on shingles and burned through roof, doing but 
little damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Truck 6. Value of 
building, $2,500; damage, |55; insurance, |2,000; insur- 
ance paid, $55. 

Box 212. Thursday, June 18, 12.12 a. m. Unoccupied 
cottage house at No. 352 Taylor street (nearly finished), 
owned by Melvin Badger. Fire originated from sponta- 
neous combustion of oily rags used by painters in finish- 
ing. Box pulled by Leroy M. Streeter. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. 
Value of building, $2,500; damage, $750; insurance, 
$1,500; insurance paid, $750. 

Box 24. Thursday, June 18, 5.26 a. m. Two-and-a- 
half-story wooden house on Canton street, owned and oc- 
cupied by H. M. Platts. Fire originated in cellar among 
shavings (from spontaneous combustion), where it was 
wholly confined. Box pulled by George H. Wheeler. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
2, Truck 3. Value of building, $8,000; damage, $000; in- 
surance, $6,000; insurance paid, $900. Value of contents, 
$2,000; damage, $200; insurance, $500; insurance paid, 
$130. 

Still. Friday, June 19, 2.45 a. m. Five-story brick 
building at No. 937 Elm street. Waste paper in ash-can. 
No damage. Members of Chemical responded. 

Still. Tuesday', June 23, 11.50 p. m. Brush fire in 
Riddle's Grove, caused by boys. No damage. Members 
of Engine No. 2 responded with hose carriage. Used two 
charges of Pony. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 345 

Box 71. Wednesday, June 24, 3.43 p. m. Two-and-a- 
half-story wooden house at No. 162 Spruce street, owned 
and occupied by Patrick Conway. Sparks from stove ig- 
nited wood-box. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Truck 3. 

Still. Monday, June 28, 9.33 p. m. Tenement block 
on South-Main street, near North Weare Railroad, owned 
by D. B. and George S. Eastman, and occupied by several 
families. Smoke was seen issuing from all parts of the 
building, but on examination no fire was discovered. 
Members of Engine No. 2 responded. 

Box 45. Thursday, July 2, 7.05 a. m. Shavings in 
boiler-room of J. W. Mears, Canal street, east of freight 
depot. Extinguished before arrival of department. No 
damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 7. Friday, July 3, 12.45 a. m. Woodshed, rear of 
No. 71 Manchester street, owned by Lizzie Dailey. Box 
pulled by Officer Badger. Cause unknown. Companies 
responding : Engines 1, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of building, |350; damage, |65; insurance, |300; in- 
surance paid, $65. 

Still. Saturday, July 4, 10.08 p. m. Two-story 
wooden building, corner of Belmont and Merrimack 
streets, owned and occupied by W. H. Carpenter & Co. 
The fire originated in the grocery store in the basement. 
Cause unknown. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 3 
responded with hose carriage. Used one charge of Pony. 
Value of buildings, |3,000; damage, |115; insurance, |2,- 
000; insurance paid, $95. Value of contents, |300; dam- 
age, |85; insurance, |700; insurance paid, |85. 

Still. Sunday, July 5, 12.45 a. m. Fireworks on roof 
of house belonging to Whitford heirs, on East Merrimack 
street, set fire to shingles. Members of Engine and Lad- 



346 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

der No. 3 responded. Xo damage. Used one charge of 
Pony. 

Box 81. Sunday, July 5, 2.58 a. m. The Kennard, a 
six-story stone building at No. 1008 Elm street, owned by 
Kennard heirs (leased by N. H. Trust Co.). Fire started 
in a closet on fifth floor, from cross with electric light and 
telephone wires. The fire was mostly confined to the 
closet, and the office of E. H. Tardivel, adjoining. Box 
pulled by Officer Floden. Companies responding. En- 
gines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. Value of building, 
1300,000; damage, |377.84; insurance, $125,000; insurance 
paid, 377.84. Value of Tardivel's contents, $600; dam- 
age, $225; insurance, $500; insurance paid, 122.50. Other 
loss, $20; no insurance. 

Box 4. Wednesday, July 8, 7.30 a. m. Slight fire in 
bed in Connor's block. Hotel Gagnon, No. 595 Elm street, 
was extinguished before the arrival of department. 
Cause unknown. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Thursday-, July 9, 2.10 p. m. Grass fire on 
land owned by Mrs. George A. Abbott, corner of Taylor 
street and Portsmouth Railroad. No damage. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder No. 3 responded. 

Box 313. Thursday, July 9, 10.32 p. m. Four-story 
wooden block at No. 525 North Main-street, McGregor- 
ville, owned by Francis C. Miville, and occupied by Jo- 
seph H. Wilson, Jr., as hardware store. Fire originated 
from some unknown cause, in the basement, where it was 
mostly confined. Box pulled by Dean. Compa- 
nies responding: Engines 1, 2, 0, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 
6. Value of building, $12,000; damage, $722; insurance, 
$12,000; insurance paid, $722. Value of contents, $5,000; 
damage, $2,464; insurance, $4,000; insurance paid, $2,464. 

Box 17. Friday, Julv 10, 8.51 a. m. Oil-stove in tene- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 347 

ment at No. 293 Amherst street, occupied by Zotique Ber- 
linguette, tipped over, doing no damage, and was extin- 
guished before arrival of department. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 

Box 21. Saturday, July 11, 7.22 p. m. Four-story 
wooden tenement-block at No. 225 Manchester street. 
Joseph Massea, who kept a store in basement, was boiling 
syrup on oil-stove. Stove tipped over, causing considera- 
ble smoke, but doing no damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Sunday, July 12, 11.40 a. m. Unadjusted Ther- 
mostat at Kimball Bros.' shoe shop, corner of Cypress 
and Massabesic streets, caused false alarm. No damage. 
Responded to by Hose wagon from Engine and Ladder 
No. 3. 

Box 4. Sunday, July 12, 2.11 p. M. Dwelling-house at 
No. 67 Lake avenue, owned and occupied by James 
Byrnes.. Sparks from chimney burned hole through the 
roof. Box pulled by F. Tibedeau. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value 
of building, |700; damage, |1.50; insurance, |600; insur- 
ance paid, |1.50. 

Box 15. Wednesday, July 22, 10.04 a. m. A small pile 
of straw bedding for horses, in stable of O. I. Bloomey, 
rear of No. 80 Bridge street, owned by David H. Young, 
caught, probably from a match from boys playing. No 
damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 3. Monday, July 27, 6.24 p. m. Wooden foundry 
building on South Elm street, near M. & L. R. R., owned 
by Hartwell Foundry Co. Sparks from locomotive set 
fire to some sleepers in rear, damaging building slightly 
without injury to contents. Box pulled by A. B. Dickey. 



348 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, ?rl,000; damage, |8; in- 
surance, fOOO; insurance paid, |8. 

Box 313. Saturday, August 1, 8.27 p. m. Three-story 
wooden block, No. 481 North-Main street, owned by Rob- 
ert Leggett, and occupied by several families. The fire 
originated in the attic, caused by carelessly throwing a 
match into a closet. Extinguished with pails of water 
and Pony. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 2, 1, C, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of 
building, •1?8,000; damage, |33; insurance, |5,500; insur- 
ance paid, $33. 

Still. Monday, August 3, 1.20 p. m. Four-story brick 
block at No. 1214 Elm street, owned by Smyth & Carpen- 
ter. Smoke in room caused a little scare. No fire found. 
Members of Chemical responded. 

Still. Sunday, August IG, 10.55 a. m. Chimney fire 
at Mrs. B. P. Cilley's, No. 236 Amherst street. Members 
of Chemical responded. No damage. 

Box 15. Tuesday, August 18, 10.58 a. m. Three-story 
wooden tenement-block at No. 8 Clark avenue, owned by 
heirs of Joseph B. Clark, and occupied by several fami- 
lies. Fire was found in a bed in tenement occupied by 
Augustine Croteau. Cause unknown. Extinguished 
with Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 
No damage to building. Value of contents of room, $15; 
damage, .$5; no insurance. 

Still. Tuesday, August 18, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire 
in brick block at No. 49 West Merrimack street, occupied 
by Kenney & Thompson as boarding-house. Chemical 
engine responded. Used one tank and one charge of 
Pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, August 22, 7.50 p. m. Burning sul- 
phur in an unoc(;upied tenement at No. 209 Hanover 



REPORT OF THE FIRE EMGINEER. 349 

street, owned by John Hickey. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, August 23, 6.30 p. m. Chimney in ten- 
ement-block at No. 521 North Main-street, owned by F. C. 
Miville, and occupied by A. T. Beaumier. No damage. 
Used one charge of Pony. Members of Engine and Lad- 
der No. 6 responded. 

Box 16. Saturday, August 29, 12.46 a. m. Two-story 
wooden house at No. 126 Lowell street, owned by the Cal- 
umet Club, and occupied as a club-house. Cause, sponta- 
neous combustion. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding : P^ngines 1, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 
Value of building, |1S,000; damage, .flOO; insurance, |18,- 
000; insurance paid, |100. Value of contents, |7,000; 
blanket policy. 

Box 24. Saturday, August 29, 4.05 p. m. At No. 408 
Belmont street, house owned by John McCleary and occu- 
pied by J. F. Stevens,- kettle of fat boiled over. Box 
pulled by citizen. No damage. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 

Still. Thursday, September 10, 5.15 p. m. Fire 
among the rubbish in cellar at No. 347 East Spruce street, 

in house owned by Magoon, and occupied by K. 

Flanders. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 3 re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, September 12, 11.15 a. m. Boiling 
over of a kettle of tar used in repairing A. N. Clapp's 
building, corner Main and Granite streets. No damage. 
Members of Engine No. 2 responded. 

Box 315. Wednesday, September 16, 7.34 p. m. Wood- 
shed connected with the Amoskeag schoolhouse. Cause 
unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 5, 6, Chemical, Hose 5 (Independent), Truck 
6. Damage about |10; no insurance.. 

Box 8. Saturday, September 19, 10.11 p. m. Three- 



350 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

story brick-front building at No. 1203 Elm street, owned 
by Kimball heirs, and occupied by Mrs. Odile Caron & Co. 
as furniture store. Cause unknown. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of contents, |3,500; dam- 
age, $60; insurance, |2,000; insurance paid, $60. 

Box 81. Tuesday, September 22, 11.07 p. m. Four- 
story brick block at No. 986 Elm street, owned by Kim- 
ball, Rowell, and others, and occupied by M. Jennie Lee 
(up-stairs) as boarding-house. Fire started in a bed in an 
unoccupied room, from some unknown cause. Box 
pulled b}^ Officer Floden. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 4, Cliemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. Value of contents, 
$900; damage, $45; insurance, $600; insurance paid, $45. 

Still. Wednesday, October 7, 9.45 a. m. Electric 
light wires crossed with telephone wires at George A. 
Leighton's, corner of Concord and Beech streets. Mem- 
bers of Chemical responded. 

Box 25. Friday, October 9, 7,21 p. m. False alarm. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Truck 3. 

Box 23. Monday, October 12, 7.54 p. m. False alarm. 
Companies responding. Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Truck 3. 

Still. Monday, October 12, 8 p. m. The town of Ep- 
ping asked for assistance. Engine 4 and hose wagon 
with twenty men responded. 

Box 8. Wednesday, October 14, 7.21 p. m. Chimney 
fire at rear of No. 24 Orange street. Used three charges 
of Chemical. Box pulled by Officer Connor. Companies 
responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 
5. No damage. 

Box 81. Friday, October 16, 3.48 a. m. One-story 
wooden building, rear of No. 39 Amherst street, owned by 
estate of John D. Bean, and occupied by J. H. Wiggin & 



' REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 351 

Co. as bake-shop. Fire caused by hot ashes against side 
of building. Box pulled by Officer Bourassau. Compa- 
nies responding: Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. 
Value of building, |750; damage, $6.25; insurance, |500; 
insurance paid, §6.25. 

Box 213. Saturday, October 17, 7.42 p. m. Two-story 
dwelling on Nutt road, owned by Timothy McKenna, and 
occupied by Louis Alj)ert. Hanging-lamp fell from ceil- 
ing, doing slight damage to contents. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Comi)anies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, 
Hose 2, 3, Truck. 3. Value of building, |2,000; damage, 
flOO; insurance, |2,000; insurance paid, $100. Value of 
contents, foOO; damage, |5; insurance, $500; insurance 
paid, $2.50. 

Box 42. Sunday, October 18, 8.01 a. m. The old pas- 
senger station of the Concord Railroad, used as a car- 
house and freight depot, corner of Bedford and Granite 
streets. Cause of fire, overheated stove in office. Box 
pulled by w^atchman at Manchester Mills. Companies 
responding: Engines 1, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 
3. Value of building, $8,000; damage, $2,000; insurance, 
$6,500; insurance paid, $1,900. Value of contents, 
$2,000; damage, $135; insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, 
$135. 

I'ox 511. Sunday, October 18, 2 p. m. Brick cottage 
at No. 201 Douglas street, owned by William Thompson, 
and occupied by Valentine Faust. Cause, fumigating 
house after diphtheria. Box pulled by citizen. Compa- 
nies responding : Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Truck 6. Value 
of building, $1,000; damage, $8.35; insurance, $1,000; in- 
surance paid, $8..35. Value of contents, $600; damage, 
$35; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $35. 

Box 21. Sunday, October 18, 6 p. m. Three-story 
block at corner of Chestnut and Central streets, owned 
by John Sweeney. Fire originated in basement at No. 95 



352 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Central street, occupied by E. Beausejour as grocery 
store, from some unknown cause. No damage to build- 
ing. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of 
contents, f 3,600; damage, |223.71; insurance, |1,500; in- 
surance paid, $223.71. 

Box 5. Wednesday, October 21, 12.30 a. m. Five- 
story brick building at No. 32 Merrimack street, the Man- 
chester House, owned by Weston, Varick, and Elliott, 
and occupied as hotel by A. M. Winchester. Fire started 
in basement in boiler-room, where it was mostly confined. 
Cause unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of building, $00,000; damage, |525; insurance, 
$32,500; insurance paid, $525. Value of contents, $15,- 
000; damage, $100; insurance, $9,000; insurance paid, 
$100. A claim of $300 damage from smoke is claimed on 
furniture in the Hotel Windsor connected. 

Box 31. Thursday, October 22, 8.37 p. m. Chimney 
fire at No. 14 Arkwright street, owned by Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Co., and occupied by George Gildard. No 
damage. Used two charges of Pony. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 4, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Friday, October 23, 9.30 p. m. Chimney fire at 
New City Hotel, No. 1128 Elm street. No damage. Used 
two charges of Pony. 

Still. Saturday, October 24, 9.20 p. m. Chimney fire 
in tenement house of John Foster at No. 320 Douglas 
street. Members of Engine No. 2 responded. Used 
Pony. 

Still. Monday, October 26, 3.02 p. m. Chimney fire 
at Dr. J. L. Golden's, No. 386 Merrimack street. Used 
one charge of Pony. No damage. Members of Engine 
No. 3 responded. 

Still. Wednesday, October 28, 9.20 a. m. Chimney 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 353 

fire at No. 50 Birch street. Used two charges of Pony. 
No damage. 

Box 7. Thursday, October 29, 2.02 a. m. One-story 
"vvooden building at No. 99 Hanover street, owned by 
Hamilton Melendy, and occupied by M. Padovani as a 
fruit store. The fire originated from an overheated 
stove. Extinguished by Chemical. Box pulled by Offi- 
cer Bourassau. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, |2,000; 
damage, |55; insurance, |2,000; insurance paid, |5.5. 
Value of contents, |1,000; damage, |300; insurance, |1,- 
000; insurance paid, |300. 

Box 71. Friday, October 30, 4.21 p. m. Small barn in 
rear of No. 52 Cedar street, owned by Mark Menton, and 
occupied by A. Monette*. Cause, matches by boys. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. Value of building, |.50; dam- 
age, |20; no insurance. Value of contents, |20; damage, 
|5; no insurance. 

Box 261. Tuesday, November 3, 3.59 p. m. Two-story 
cottage house at No. 341 Orange street, owned and occu- 
pied by Job Grenier. Fire originated under the roof 
from some unknown cause, and damage by fire was all 
above the second floor. Box pulled by citizen. Compa- 
nies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 
3, 5. Value of building, $3,200; damage, |.375; insurance, 
|2,000; insurance paid, $375. Value of contents, $800; 
damage, $125; insurance, .$500; insurance paid, $125. 

Still. Thursday, November 5, 3.15 p. m. Chimney 
fire at No. 415 Lake avenue, in house owned by J. A. Fol- 
som, and occupied by Fred Follansbee. No damage. 
Members of Engine and Ladder No. 3 responded. 

Box 4. Saturday, November 14, 9.18 a. m. Three- 
story wooden tenement-block at Nos. 70-72 Spruce street, 
owned by William G. Cotter, and occupied by him and 

23 



354 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

several others. Fire started in barn attached to rear 
end of building, probably from carelessness of boys. Box 
jjulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $6,- 
OUO; damage, $100; insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, 
$43.75. Value of contents, $1,500; damage, $25; no insur- 
ance. 

Box 4. Saturday, Xovember 14, 2.28 p. m. One-story 
brick storehouse. Elm street, owned by Head & Dowst 
Co., and occupied by Patrick Harrington. Falling stove- 
funnel filled room with smoke. No damage. Box pulled 
by Officer Rollins. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 324. Sunday, November 15, 10.46 a. m. Small 
hen-pen in rear of barn of John B. Favreau, No. 22 Laval 
street, McGregorville. Cause, hot ashes. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Truck G. Value of building, $150; damage, $30; 
no insurance. 

Box 31. Sunday, November 15, 7.53 p. m. False 
alarm. Companies resx)onding: Engines 4, 6, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 81. Monday, November 16, 8.41 p. m. During a 
torch-light procession fireworks set fire to the awning of 
Temple & Farrington Co.'s bookstore. Damage slight. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. 

Still. Monday, November 16, 10.42 p. m. Awning at 
Clark Bros.' Bee-Hive caught from fireworks. Damage 
slight. Chemical responded. 

Box 23. Tuesday, November 17, 0.02 p. m. False 
alarm. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 

Still. Friday, November 20, 11.35 a. m. Chimney fire 
in Shannahan block at No. 36 Lake avenue. No damage. 
Used Ponv. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 355 

Still. Friday, November 20, 12.55 p. m. Chimney fire 
at No. 532 Chestnut street. No damage. Used Pony. 

Still. Saturday, November 21, 6' p. m. Sparks from 
Roman candle set fire to clothing in chamber of house 
owned and occupied by John Gossler, at No. 402 Rimmon 
street. Damage slight. Members of Engine and Ladder 
No. 6 responded. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 4. Thursday, November 26, 2.54 p. m. Three- 
story wooden block at Nos. 70--72 Spruce street, owned by 
William G. Cotter, and occupied by him and several oth- 
ers. Rubbish under cellar stairs of rear tenement 
caught fire from some unknowm cause. Extinguished 
with Chemical. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 45. Saturday, November 28, 5.20 a. m. Boiler- 
room connected with three-story brick building of Leigh- 
ton Machine Co., on Canal street, owned by Mrs. Antoin- 
ette L. Hill, and occupied by Leighton Machine Co., John 
W. Mears' Loom Harness, and Manchester Nickel Plat- 
ing Co. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of 
building, 120,000; damage, |158.50; insurance, fll.OOO; in- 
surance paid, 1158.50. Damage to contents, |15 ; fully in- 
sured. 

Still. Sunday, November 29, 10.35 a. m. Chimney 
fire at No. 59 Pearl street. Members of Chemical re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, December 2, 9.55 p. m. Chimney 
fire at No. 38 Lowell street, McCabe's block. Used one 
charge of Pony. 

Still. Thursday, December 3, 9.07 a. m. Chimney 
fire at No. 10 Washington block. Pearl street, owned by 
Charles C. Hayes. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 6. Saturday, December 5, 10.58 p. m. Three- 



356 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

story brick block on Hanover street, owned by Bartlett, 
Gay & Wells, and occupied by The John B. Clarke Co, 
for printing. The fire started in room No. 8, occupied by 
George F. Willey, publisher of "Willey's Book of Nut- 
fi'eld," where was stored nearly the entire edition of the 
work. Cause unknown. Box pulled by officer. Compa- 
nies responding: Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 
1, 3. Value of building, |50,000; damage, |210; insur- 
ance, 121,500; insurance paid, $210. Value of contents 
(Willey's), |10,000; damage, |3,000; insurance, $3,000; in- 
surance paid, |1,S00. Value of contents of The John B. 
Clarke Co., |10,000; damage, $2G.83; insurance, $35,000; 
insurance paid, $26.83. 

Still. Tuesday, December 8, 5.40 a. m. Chimney fire 
at Xo. 59 Pearl street. No damage. Used one charge of 
Pony. 

Box 82. Wednesday, December 0, 10.52 p. m. False 
alarm. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemi- 
cal, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 52. Sunday, December 13, 4.20 p. m. An over- 
abundance of smoke in the old flour mill, corner of Main 
street and the North Weare Railroad, caused an unneces- 
sary alarm. No damage. Companies responding: En- 
gines 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck G. 

Still. Thursday, December 17, 12.20 a. m. Chimney 
fire at No. 15 Pearl street. No damage. Used one 
charge of Pony. 

Still. Friday, December 18, 1.40 p. m. Chimney fire 
in block owned by Michael Connor, No. 571 Elm street. 
No damage. Used two charges of Pony. 

Box 21. Sunday, December 20, 1.20 p. m. Two-and-a- 
half-story wooden building, owned by Kate Cullity, and 
occupied by Patrick Barry and Edward Douval, at No. 
115 Central street. The fire started from some unknown 
cause in a blind attic in south end of building, where it 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 357 

was wholly confined. Companies responding: Engines 1, 
3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, |2,- 
000; damage, |150; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid. 
$150. Value of contents, $300; damage, $15; no insur- 
ance. 

Still. Wednesday, December 23, 4.05 p. m. Chimney 
fire in John Cashman's block, No. 34 Church street. No 
damage. Used two charges of Pony. 

Still. Thursday, December 24, 6.10 a. m. Chimney 
fire in Washington block, No. 26 Pearl street. No dam- 
age. Used one charge of Ponj". 

Still. Thursday, December 24, 9.58 a. m. Chimney 
fire in block owned by George W. Hamlin, rear of No. 40 
Lake avenue. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Friday, December 25, 7.40 a. m. Chimney fire 
in Union block. No. 22 Concord street, owned by George 
B. and Henry Chandler. No damage. Used one charge 
of Pony. 

Still. Sunday, December 27, 1.02 p. m. Chimney fire 
in three-story wooden block at No. 25 Laurel street, 
owned by Nason Hall, and occupied by Charles Brooks. 
Chemical engine responded. No damage. Used two 
charges of Pony. 

Still. Monday, December 28, 9.30 a. m. Tenement- 
block owned by John A. Riddle, rear of No. 25 Amherst 
street. Plumbers thawing water-pipes set fire to straw 
packing. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 21. Tuesday, December 29, 12.12 p. m. Three- 
story wooden block at No. 236 Chestnut street, owned by 
Irene A. and Arthur F. Wheat, and occupied by Mrs. 
Mary Linnehan. Fire originated in clothes-closet from 
some unknown cause, doing but little damage. Bos 
pulled by citizen. Comj)anies responding: Engines 3. 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $12,- 
000; damage, $36.95; insurance, $3,000; insurance paid, 



358 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

$36.95. Value of contents, $250; damage, $25; no insur- 
ance. 

Box 73. Tuesday, December 29, 12.31 p. m. Two-and-a 
half-story liouse, No. 177 Spruce street, owned and occu- 
pied by John Maloney. An overcoat hanging in hall took 
fire from a smoker's pipe. No damage to building. Box 
pulled by Stephen Maloney. This fire occurring before 
companies responding to preceding one had returned to 
quarters, all "second run" apparatus responded, — En- 
gines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 3, Trucks 1, 3, 5. Dam- 
age (to coat only), $8; no insurance. 

Box 71. Tuesday, December 29, 11.05 p. m. False 
alarm. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Truck 3. 

Box 53. Wednesday, December 30, 7.13 p. m. This 
alarm was for a fire in Bedford, for barn belonging to the 
heirs of George Foster on River road, about three miles 
from city hall. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck G. 
Lieut. Thomas E. Gorman, of Truck 6, was thrown from 
the truck at Clapp's Corner, and injured so that he died 
almost instantly. 

Number of bell alarms 8fi 

Number of still alarms 87 

Total 163 

Value of property endangered $774,885.00 

Insurance carried on same 420,750.00 

Damage to property for 1896 $23,959.25 

Insurance paid on same 21,027.05 

Net loss above insurance paid $2,932.20 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 359 

The several companies have responded to alarms as fol- 
lows : 

Engine No. 1 — 45 times. Hose Xo. 1 — 71 times. 

Engine No. 2 — 19 times. Hose No. 2 — 26 times. 

Engine No. 3 — 42 times. Hose No. 3 — 11 times. 

Engine No. 4 — 47 times. Truck No. 1 — 49 times. 

Engine No. 5 — 19 times. Truck No. 3 — 44 times. 

Engine No. 6 — 21 times. Truck No. 5 — 20 times. 

Chemical — 91 times. Truck No. 6 — 17 times. 

Owing to Granite bridge being gone, there were eleven 
alarms that Engine No. 2 did not respond to, which they 
otherwise would. 



Number and Location of Fire Alarm Boxes and 

Keys. 

A KEY IS ATTACHED TO Each Box, and cau be had by 
breaking the glass. 

No. 3. Blood's lower shop. Keys at oifices of gas- 
works, county jail, Manchester Coal and Ice Co.'s sheds, 
and Charles H, Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. Corner Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel 
Oxford, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, Street 
Kailway stables, and office of Blodgett & Young's block. 

No. 5. Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at 
Tebbetts & Soule's and Currier's drugstores, and Man- 
chester House. 

No. 6. City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Thurston's 
drugstores, J. A. Kiddle's office, and residence of J. L. 
Brock. 21 Amoskeag Corporation. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of Manchester and Chest- 
nut streets. Keys at chief of police's office and with all 
police officers. 



3G0 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 8. Corner of Elm and Ilollis streets. Keys at Ed- 
ward 0. Smith's and Colby's drugstores, and Partridge 
Bros.' grain store. 

No. 9. Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at 
residences of Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clougli, Dr. 
E. Fritz, and station of Engine No. 5. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of John Mooar, George Emerson, Walter A. 
Green, and O. D. Knox. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of Welcome Jencks and Mrs. Lewis Simons, 
No. 1 Senter's block, and Gate's grocery store. 

No. 11. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. George W. Riddle, 
D. J. Adams, E. L. liryant, A. H. Olzendam, and Mrs. 
Thomas Morgan. 

No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of Wiliam B. Corey, Henry W. Shannon, 
and J. Fred Chalker. 

No. 16. Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. R. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of Mrs. H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. 
Keys at residences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, 
and Mrs. William Perkins. 

No. 21. Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys 
at A. D. Smith's drugstore, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. 
L. Walker's office, and residence of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys at 
residences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3 house, corner of 
Massabesic street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence 
of D. ]\r. Goodwin and station of Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

No. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 361 

at residences of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, the late 
Horace Stearns, the late Horace Gordon, and James R. 
Straw. 

No. 26. Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys 
at McCrillis's carriage shop, John N. Foss's stable, and 
residence of John N. Chase. 

No. 27. Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. 
Keys at residences of H. M. Tarbell, the late A. G. Fair- 
banks, E. S. Fletcher, William Carr, and George H. Hub- 
bard. 

No. 28. (To be placed on IMerriraack, near Beacon.) 

No. 31. Corner of Canal and Hollis streets, Blood's 
shop. Keys at office, Amory Mills, Langdon Mills watch- 
rooms. 

No. 32. Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and 
Brook streets. Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Company's 
mill, Langdon watchroom, and Electric Light station. 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Keys at watchroom and pump- 
ing station. 

No. 35. Stark Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 36. Amory Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 39. Hillsborough county jail. Keys at office. 

No. 41. Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 42. Manchester Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 43. Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 45. The S. C. Forsaith Co.'s shops. Keys at 
freight depot and S. C. Forsaith Co.'s office. 

No. 51. Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys 
at stores of F. Riedel and William Weber. 

No. 52. Barr's brick block, West Manchester. Keys 
at Fradd & Co.'s and A. N. Clapp's stores, Merrimack 
House, and Engine No. 2 house. 

No. 53. Wallace's steam mill. Keys at Wallace's 
office, I. R. Dewey's tenement block, and Ranno Harness 
Co.'s store. 



362 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Xo. 54. Corner of A and South Main streets. Keys at 
residences of Lord sisters, Neil Fullerton, and George W. 
Davis's store. 

Xo. 56. Baldwin's bobbin shop. Keys at Baldwin's 
office and residences of J. C. Smith, E. P. Littlefield, and 
with watchman at works. 

Xo. 57. (To be placed at Mast road near D street.) 

Xo. 61. Corner of Kiver road and Hancock street, Ba- 
kersville. Keys at Mary Stack's saloon, True W. Jones 
Co.'s brewery, store of John A. Kane, and Hose 3. 

Xo. 62. Gerrish Wool & Leather Co.'s, River road. 
Keys at tannery, the Edw in Kennedy house, and Hose 3. 

Xo. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, Thomas J. 
Smith, Simon McCarthy, and J. J. Toomey. 

Xo. 72. Corner of Lake avenue and Lincoln street. 
Keys at residences of the late Austin Jenkins, James 
Briggs, and Clarence D. Palmer. 

Xo. 73. Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys at 
residences of Kev. J. A. Chevalier and Timothy Carr. 

Xo. 81. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at 
all the engine rooms. 

Xo. 82. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Church 
streets. Keys at Syndicate Furniture Co.'s, Lowell- 
street stable, Xichols's stable, and Fames Bros.' drug- 
store. 

Xo. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. 
Keys at residences of W. T. Stevens, W. A. Clarkson, M. 
D. Johnson, Charles F. Chase, and William H. Drury. 

Xo. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys 
at residences of Mrs. William B. Abbott, W. X. Johnson, 
and E. :M. Topliff. 

Xo. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at 
residences of Mrs. A. P. Olzendam, G. A. Olzendam, W. S. 
Shannon, and John J. Bennett. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 363 

Xo. 115. Corner Gore and Ash streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of James A. Eogers and Cyren Bixby. 

Xo. 212. Shoeshop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of 
the shoe factory and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. 
,W. Dearborn, Mrs. Milton A. Abbott, M. V. B. Garland, 
and Walter Cody's block. 

No. 213. Sash and blind factory, South Beech street, 
janction of Portsmouth Railroad. Keys at offices of 
Austin, Flint & Day and Dana & Provost. 

Xo. 214. Elliott silk mill, corner of Wilson and Valley 
streets. Keys at office and watchroom of mill. 

No. 215. Hoyt & Co.'s shoeshop, corner of Lincoln and 
Silver streets. Keys at offices of shoeshop and Kimball 
Carriage Co. and residence of Mrs. A. B. Johnson. 

No. 216. Jewett and Somerville streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of G. H. Hill, 140 Jewett street, and W. B. Brown, 
128 Jewett street. 

No. 217. Corner Candia road and Massabesic street. 
Keys at residences of L. M. Streeter, William Gadbois, 
and Charles P. Still. 

No. 263. Pearl-street grammar school. Keys at school 
room and residences of C. E. Rose, S. W. Bascom, and 
Charles W. Cheney, Jr. 

No. 3i2. Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor 
streets. Keys at residences of James Spence (309 Main 
street), Thomas Bolton, gate No. 11 Mill. 

No. 313. Corner of Amory and Main streets. Keys at 
residences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Bou- 
thillier & Gingras's drugstore, Miville & Co.'s drugstore, 
gate of No. 11 mill, and station of Engine and Ladder 
No. 6. 

No. 314. P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper mill. Keys at office 
and Riverside Hose house. 

No. 315. Old Brick Store, 'Skeag. Keys at Flanders's 
store. Riverside Hose house, and D. L. Robinson's resi- 
dence. 



364 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

jS'o. 321. Corner Beauport and Wayne streets. Keys 
at Holy Angels Convent, the Brothers' School, and resi- 
dences of E. n. Doherty and Rev. Father Hevey. 

Xo. 323. Corner of Putnam and Bartlett streets. 
Keys at Albert Oliver's store, P. J. Archambeault's ba- 
kery, and residence of Officer Lewis Clement. 

No. 324. Amory and Laval streets. Key at residence 
of Desire Martin, No. 494 Amory street. 

No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys 
at residences of Amelia Davis, William A. Tufts, and 
James Kearns. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Keys 
at residences of J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Ward. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular po- 
lice. 

The true time will be given at precisely 12.30 p. m. from 
Charles A. Trefethen's jewelry store, and will be denoted 
bv one stroke of the fire bells. 



Telephone Calls. 

Chemical Engine, Central station G4 -3 

Chief Engineer's office 04-3 

Chief Engineer's residence 64-4 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's residence 39-4 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's office T3--3 

Assistant Engineer Merrill's store and residence 212-3 

Engine No. 2 64-2 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 64-5 

Engine and Ladder No. 5 64-6 

Engine and Ladder No. 6 64-7 

Hose No. 2. 116-4 

Hose :N o. 3 -3"-^ 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER, 365 

Instructions to Key-holders and Citizens. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearest alarm box, the keys 
to which are in the hands of all regular police, and gener- 
ally of persons at the corner or nearest house. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or posi- 
tive information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down 
the hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and 
then let go. Shut the door, but do not try to remove the 
key, as it is locked in by a trap-lock, and can only be re- 
moved with a release-key, which is carried by each of the 
engineers, and they will, as soon as convenient, release 
and return it. 

3. Ail persons giving fire alarms are requested to re- 
main by the box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in 
the box, pull again; if you still hear no clicking, go to the 
next nearest box and give an alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Give an 
alarm for no cause other than actual fire. Don't give an 

ALARM FOR A CHIMNEY FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the chief engineer. // i/ou change your resi- 
dence or place of husiness, where the keys are kept, return the 
keys to the same office. 

G. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested 
to inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near 
their property; also all places where the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the 
city, and the number of the box will be given thus : Box 6, 
six blows, 2^ seconds apart, repeated three times. Box 
212, two blows, pause of 6^ seconds, one blow, same 
pause, and two blows, 2 — 1 — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke 
of the bells at any time; and in case of testing the boxes, 
each test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST, SEC- 
OND, AND THIRD ALARMS. 





First Alarm. 


Second Alarm. 


Third Alarm. 




» 




-« 1 1 


•i 






'^ . 


Boxes. 


Engine. 


i 


§1 ! £? 


i 




§!1 


2 
"Sb 


i 


P c 

cS » 






a 


K , H 


n 


t^ 


^ ; 


n 1 


n 


3 

4 


1st R. 3 C. 1 
1st R. 2-3 


1 3 


1-3 2d R. 2 




5 6 


2 


5-6 


1-3 


1-3 2d R. 2 


5 


5-6 




6 


5 


Ist R. 2-3 " 


1 


1-3 2dR. 2-3 ' 5 


5-6 


t 


6 • 


6 


Ist & 2d R. 


1-2 


1-3 2-3 


3 5 


5-6 




6 


7 


IstR. 3 


1 


1-3 2d R. 


2 5 


2-5-6 


3 


6 


S 


Ist & 2d R. 5 


1-2 


1-5 3 


.... 


3 


2-6 


3 


6 


9 


IstR. 5 " 


1 


5 2dR. 


2 


1 


2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


12 


5 " 


1 


6 1st R. 


2 


1 


2d R. 2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


13 


Ist R. 5 " 


1-2 


5 2d R. 




1 


2d R.2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


14 


IstR. 5 " 


1-2 


5 1 2d R. 3 




1 


2-6 


3 


3-6 


15 


Ist & 2d R. 5 


1-2 


1-5 3 




3 


2-6 


3 


6 


16 


Ist R. 5 " 


1-2 


1-5 2dR. 3 




3 


2-6 


3 


6 


17 


1st K. 3 


1-2 


3 2d R. 5 




1 


2-6 


3 


3-6 


18 


IstR. 3 " 


1-2 


3 2dR. 




1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


21 


IstR. 3 " 


1 


1-3 


2dR. 2 


2 


5 


5-6 


3 


6 


23 


IstR. 3 " 


1-2 


3 


2dR. 




1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


24 


1st R. 3 


1-2 


3 


2dR. 




1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


25 


Ist R. 3 " 


1-2 


3 


2dR. 




1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


26 


IstR. 3 " 


1-2 


5 


2dR. 5 




3 


2-6 


3 


1-6 


27 


IscR. 3 " 


2 


3 


2dR. 


i 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


28 


3 " 


2 


3 


IstR. 


1 




2d R.2-5-6 


3 


1-5-6 


31 


1st R. 6 


1 


1-5 


2d R. 5 


2 


6 


2-3 


3 


3 


32 


IstR. 5 


1 


1-5 


2dR. 6 


2 


6 


2-3 


3 


3 


34 


1st & 2d R. 5-6 " 
1st & 2d R. 5-6 " 
1st & 2d R. 5-6 " 
IstR. 3 " 


1-2 
1 
1 
1-3 


1 5 


*> 3 




6-3 




3 




35 

36 

39 


1 5 


2 3 





6-3 




3 




1 5 


"3 2 


3-6 




s 




1-3 


2d R. 2 2 


5 


5-C 




6 


41 


1st & 2d R. 2-3 " 
1st & 2d R. 2-3 " 
1st R. 2-3 " 


1 
1 
1 


1-3 


K ft 9 5 


5-6 








4') 


13 5 6 2 3 


6-6 








43!!!!!!! 


3 2d R. 6 2-3 


1 


5 




6-5 


45 


1st & 2d R. 2-3 " 


1 


1-3 5 2-3 


5 


6 




6 


51 


2-6 " 




6 


Ist K.3 1 


•i 


2dR. 5 


6^2 


1-6 


52 


2-6 " 


1 


6 


1st R.3 3 


3 


2dR. 5 


2 


1-5 


53 


2-6 " 


1 


6 . 


l8tR.3 .... 


3 


2dR. 5 


2-3 


1-5 


54 


2-6 " 




6 


1st R. 1 




2d R. 3-5 


2-3 


1-3-5 


56 


2-tJ " 


1 


6 


1st R.3 3 


3 


2dR. 5 


2 


1-5 


57 


2-3 " 


1 


6 


6 3 


3 


lst&2d R.3-5 


2-3 


1-3-5 


61 

62 

71 


1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 " 

1st R. 3 " 


1-3 
1-3 

1 


3 
3 
3 






5 6 


2 


1 5-6 


2d R 2 




5 6 





1-5-6 


2d R. 2-3 


i 


2-5-6 




5-6 


72 


1st R. 3 " 


1 


3 


2d R. 2 11 


2-5-6 


3 


6-6 


73 


IstR. 3 


1 


3 


2dR. 2 ; 1 _ 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


81 


1st & 2d R. 


1 


1 


5 2 


3-S 


V6 


3 


6 


82 

112 


1st & 2d R. 5 " 
1st R. 5 " 


1-2 
2 


1-5 
5 


3-6 

2dR. 1 










1 


2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


113 


1st K. 5 " 


2 


5 


2dR. 1 


3 


2-3-6 


3 


1-6 


114 


1st R. 5 " 


1-2 


5 


2d R.3 .... 


3 


2-6 


3 


1-6 


115 


1st K. 5 


2 


5 


2dR. 1 


1 


2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


212 


Ut R. 3 " 


2 


3 


2d R. 1-3 


1 


2-5-6 




5-6 


213 


1st R. 3 " 


2-3 


3 


2dR. 11 


2-5-G 


i 


6-5 


214 


1st R. 3 


2-3 


3 


2dR 


•1 


2-5-6 


1 


6-6 


215 


Ist K. .'i 


2-3 


3 


2d K. 1 


1 


•J-5-6 




6-6 


216 


1st K. 3 " 


2 


3 2d R. 1 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


217 


IstR. 3 " 


2 


3 


2dR. 1 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


261 


1st R. 3 " 


1-2 


3 


2d R. 5 . . . . 


5 


2-6 




3-6 


312. 


Ist R. 2-6 " 




6 


2<1 R. 5 2 


1 


3 


3 


3-5 


313 


1st R. 2-6 




6 


2d R. 5 2 


1 


3 


3 


3-5 


314 


5-6 




6 


]8tR.2..... 


6 


2d R. 3 


2-3 


1-3 


315 


5-6 




3 


l8tR. 1 


6 


2d R. 2-3 


2-3 


1-3 


321 


2-6 




6 


l8tR.5 .... 


1 


I'd R. 3 


2-3 


3-5 


323 


2-6 " 




6 


l8tR.5 .... 


5 


2d R. 3 


2-3 


1-3-5 


324 


2-6 " 




6 


lstR.5 .... 


5 


2d R. 3 


3-2 


1-3 


511 


2-6 " 




6 


1st R. 1 


3 


2d R. 3-5 


2-3 


1-b 


513 


2-6 " 




6 


1st R. 1 




2d R. 3-5 


2-3 


1-3-5 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 367 

Rules and Regulations in Regard to Responding to 
Fires and Alarms. 

The following rules have been adopted by the board of 
engineers, and the fire department will strictly comply 
until otherwise ordered, and will attend alarms of fire as 
per "official running card." 

RUNNING RULES. 

Whenever an alarm is sounded, the members of all 
companies not called to that box will report to their re- 
spective company quarters, and there remain until dis- 
missed by the signal on the bells or by an engineer in 
charge. 

In case companies on their first run have responded to 
an alarm, companies on their second run to the box from 
which the alarm has been sounded will answer all first- 
run boxes of the absent companies; and in case engines 
are out that would respond to another box, then third 
alarm companies will respond. In case of an alarm from 
a box that does not call for a third alarm, companies on 
their second run will then answer to all other boxes. 

Whenever two trucks answer to first alarm, the other 
truck will answer to all other boxes. 

At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, 
hose carriage, or truck that leaves the house first will 
have the right to lead to the fire. Whenever a horse lags 
or gives out, drivers should then give others the right of 
way, so as not to delay the rest of the apparatus. No 

RUNNING BY WILL BE ALLOWED, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCI- 
DENT, UNDER PENALTY OF*DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FROM 
THE DEPARTMENT. 

The drivers shall not permit persons not connected 
with the department to ride upon their apparatus, and in 



368 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

muddy weather or heavy wheeling they shall not permit 
any one to ride upon their apparatus when returning 
from fires. 

Engineers of steamers will not run over eighty (80) 
pounds water pressure, except when orders are received 
from a member of the board of engineers or of the officer 
in command of the company. 

Captains, or commanding officers, upon return from 
alarms will report to headquarters immediately, person- 
ally or by telephone, after apparatus is "made up" and 
ready for duty. 

THIRD ALARM. 

Ox THIRD ALARM all apparatus will respond. 

GENERAL ALARM. 

In the event of a fire of such magnitude that second 
pnd third alarms are needed, a general alarm will be 
given by striking ten blows, in which case all companies 
will respond. 

SPECIAL CALLS OX FIRE ALARM. 

When more apparatus is wanted without giving a sec- 
ond or third alarm , the following special calls will be 
given : 

2 — 1 for Engine 1. 1 — 1 — 1 for Aerial Truck. 
2—2 for Engine 2. 3—3 for Truck 3. 
9_a for Engine 3. 3—5 for Truck 5. 
2—4 for Engine 4. 3— G for Truck 6. 
2 — 5 for Engine 5. 4— JL for Hose 1. 
2—6 for Engine 6. 4—2 for Hose 2. 

4—3 for Hose 3. 
Companies answering "special calls" will wait thirty 
seconds before leaving quarters, to prevent mistakes. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER, 369 
OUT OF TOWN CALL. 

For a fire out of the city 2 — 2 — 2, in which case all com- 
panies will assemble at their respective quarters and 
await orders. 

ALL OUT SIGNAL. 

Two blows on the bells, which dismisses all members at 
company quarters. 

This signal will be given after companies working at a 
fire have returned to quarters, "made up," and are ready 
to respond to another alarm. 

TEST SIGNAL. 

One blow at 12.30 noon. 

SCHOOL SIGNALS. 

1 — 1, with fifteen seconds between blows, closes pri- 
mary and middle schools. 

2 — 2, with fifteen seconds between the 2's, closes all the 
schools. Time for giving same, 7.45 a. m., 11.30 a. m., or 
1.15 p. M. 

MILITARY CALL. 

12 blows twice. 



Rules for Exercising Horses. 

It shall be the duty of the drivers of engines, hose car- 
riages, hose wagons, hook-and-ladder trucks, and all 
other apparatus connected with this department, to exer- 
cise their horses every day, weather permitting, except 
Sunday, with the exception of engines having "first" and 
"second runs,'' and in such cases must exercise on days of 
"second run," the same to be done within the following 
limits: 

24 



370 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

CENTRAL STATION. 

North to Pearl street. East to Union street. 

South to Merrimack street. West to Elm street. 

NORTH MAIN-STREET STATION. 

North to Adams street. East to Main street. 
South to Granite street. West to Dubuque street. 

LAKE AVENUE STATION. 

North to Manchester street. East to Belmont street. 
South to Summer street. West to Maple street. 

MAPLE-STREET STATION. 

North to Myrtle street. East to Linden street. 

South to Hanover street. West to Union street. 

WEBSTER-STREET STATION. 

North to Clarke street. East to Union street. 

South to Pennacook street. West to Elm street. 

RIMMON-STREBT STATION (mCGREGORVILLB). 

North to Kelley street. East to Beauport street. 

South to Wayne street. West to Rimmon street. 

BAKERSVILLE STATION. 

North to bridge over B. & East to Calef road. 

M. R. R. West to Brown avenue. 

South to Baker street. 

Drivers must confine themselves to the above, and in 
no case take their horses beyond the prescribed limits, ex- 
cept for shoeing and in case of fire, without permission 
from the chief or an assistant engineer. 



REPORT OP THE FIRE ENGINEER. 371 

In exercising, care must be taken to avoid colliding 
with other teams. In approaching corners, crossings, 
street-car tracks, and in going down grades the speed of 
the horses must be checked. 

In case of an alarm use gong freely while returning to 
quarters. 

Any driver violating these rules will be liable to sus- 
pension or discharge. 



Stations and Sleeping Rooms. 

All stations of this department will be open from 7 a. 
M. until 9 p. M., and the members at the several stations 
will receive visitors and citizens courteously, answer all 
questions in a gentlemanly manner, and give any proper 
information. 

Gambling of any kind shall not be done or permitted in 
or about any of the houses or premises occupied by the 
department. 

Stations to be closed at 10 o'clock p. m. 

All games must cease at 10 o'clock p. m., and the sta- 
tions be closed at that hour, to permit the permanent men 
and those detailed to sleep in the station, to retire undis- 
turbed. 

None of the stations will be open after the above hour 
(excepting in case of an alarm of fire) without permission 
of the chief or a member of the board of engineers. 

Stations may be kept open Saturday evenings until 
11 o'clock. 

No spirituous or malt liquors shall be allowed in or 
about any of the fire stations, and any member of the fire 
department seen intoxicated at any fire or alarm of fire, 
or who shall be known to frequent places where liquors 
are sold, during the progress of a fire, or whenever in uni- 



372 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

form, shall be subject to reprimand, or dismissal, as the 
board of engineers may determine. 

Any permanent member visiting any liquor saloon in 
uniform, except in the performance of his duty as a mem- 
ber of the fire department, or who is intoxicated or visits 
places where intoxicating liquors are sold, while on duty, 
shall be suspended, or discharged, as the board of engi- 
neers may determine. 

Commanding officers of companies, having knowledge 
of the violation of the foregoing rules, will suspend the 
offender, and report the same to the chief, or board of en- 
gineers. 

The permanent men shall exercise a careful supervi- 
sion over the sleeping apartments, see that the rooms are 
put in order and the beds made as early as 11 o'clock a. m., 
and that the bedding is changed at suitable intervals. 
The occupants of each bed will be held responsible for the 
cleanliness of the same, and held strictly accountable for 
any damage to either bed or bed clothing through care- 
lessness. After 10 p. M. occupants shall refrain from 
loud talking or in any manner disturbing the rest of any 
who have retired. 



Absent from City or Station. 

No permanent member shall leave his station to visit 
any section of the city without permission of the chief or 
an assistant engineer, or leave the city, or be granted 
leave of absence, without notifying the chief engineer 
and procuring a substitute to his acceptance, and the sub- 
stitute shall be on duty before the applicant leaves his 
post. 

Any call mcmhcr expecting to he absent from the city shall 
notify the captain of his company, and before leaving the city 
shall procure a substitute satisfactory to said captain. 

Any member of the department not complying with the 
above rules shall be liable to suspension or expulsion 
from the department. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 
DAYS OFF. 



373 






Name. 



Hall 

Harvey 

Barker 

Parsons* .. . . 

Gould 

Truell 

Rowe 

Dyer 

Denyou 

Pherson 

Porter 

Richardson. 

Forsaith 

Piper 

Wheeler 

McLeod 



Company. 



Engine 1. 
1. 
" 1. 
Hose 1. 
Engine 4. 
4. 
" 4. 
Truck 1. 
" 1. 
•' 1. 
Chemical 1. 
" 1. 
Engine & Ladder 3, 
" 3, 
" " 3, 

« <> 3 






17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Name. 



Porter 

Seaward 

Morse 

Smith 

Cann 

Hubbell 

Morrill 

Lane 

Whitcomb .. 

Edgar 

Foster 

Cann 

Crosby* 

Rogers* 

Sloan* 



Company. 



Eng. & Ladder 3. 
Hose 2. 

Eng. & Ladder 5. 
" " 3. 

'' " 5. 

•• 5. 
Engine 2. 
" 2. 
" 2. 
Eng. & Ladder 6. 



Hose 3. 
" 3. 



* In February Crosby will take the 16th, and Rogers the 26th; in Jnly 
Parsons will take the 14th; and in February. April, June, September, and 
November, Sloan will take the 27th. 

The hour of leaving will be 7 o'clock a. m., and mem- 
bers will not leave their station until the arrival of 
the spare driver. They must report prompthj at 7 
o'clock the following morning for duty. 

Those whose breakfast hour is 6 o'clock will remain at 
station until 7 o'clock on the date of their "day off." 

Should a fire be in progress at the hour of changes, men 
will remain on duty until the "all out" is given, except 
permission is obtained of the chief, or engineer in charge 
of fire, to retire. 

Should a "general" or third alarm be rung in while 



374 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

members are in town, they will be expected to report for 
duty. 

On the "day off" of the engineer of a steamer, the as- 
sistant engineer shall, on his arrival at the fire, act as en- 
gineer. 

The time of change from -first and second run will be 
made at 7 o'clock a. m. 



Entering Buildings witii Line of Hose. 

All hose companies are instructed not to enter any 
building with a line of hose unless the stop nozzle is 
closed, except in cases where they can see the fire, and 
when their streams will reach it without damage to other 
property. 

Steamer companies are not to enter a building with a 
line of hose without orders, unless fire can be seen, due 
care being exercised as to whether their services are 
needed. 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 
Engine No. 1 . 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer 14,000.00 

1 one-horse wagon 400.00 

3 gray horses for steamer 685.00 

1 gray horse for hose wagon 225.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

1 pair double exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 single exercise harness 40.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 375 

2,000 feet fabric hose |1 100.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Tools, furniture, and fixtures 200.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 200.00 



Total amount $7,110.00 



Engine No, 2. 



LOCATED AT NORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQUOG. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $4,000.00 

1 hose wagon 600.00 

1 exercise wagon, poles, shafts, and 3- 

horse hitch 340.00 

3 bay horses for steamer G17.00 

1 pair gray horses for hose wagon 450.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $40, 1 at $20 100.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

1 double sled 60.00 

3,200 feet fabric hose 1,760.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 94.00 

Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc 466.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

Total amount $8,887.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CORNER MASSABESIO STREET. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

1 two-horse hose wagon 400.00 

1 two-horse truck and equipments 1,700.00 

1 three-horse hitch attachment (extra) . . . 200.00 



376 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1 pair black horses for steamer $417.00 

1 pair bay horses for hose wagon 400.00 

1 pair bay horses for truck 400.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at |50, 1 at $40 140.00 

6 swinging harnesses 300.00 

3,200 feet fabric hose 1,760.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc. 575.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 200.00 

1 exercise wagon 292.50 

Total amount $10,364.50 



Engine No. 4. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 first-size Amoskeag steamer $4,200.00 

1 hose wagon 400.00 

3 horses for steamer 600.00 

1 horse for hose wagon 200.00 

3 exercise harnesses 60.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

2,600 feet fabric hose 1,430.00 

Hall, furniture, beds, bedding, etc 275.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 75.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

Total amount $7,590.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 5. 

LOCATED ON WEBSTER STREET, CORNER CHESTNUT. 

1 third-size Amoskeag steamer $3,600.00 

1 two-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage. . 600.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 377 

1 steel frame ladder truck |l,6o0.00 

1 pair bay horses for steamer 500.00 

1 pair bay horses for truck 400.00 

1 bay horse for hose carriage 200.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

1 double sled 50.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2 pairs exercise harnesses 100.00 

2,300 feet fabric hose 1,265.00 

Bedding, furniture, tools, etc 247.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 90.00 

Firemen's suits, badges, etc 200.00 

Total amount $9,477.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 6. 

LOCATED AT CORNER AMORY AND RIMMON STREETS. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

1 hook-and-ladder truck (with Bangor ex- 
tension) 1,680.00 

1 one-horse carriage 600.00 

2 gray horses for steamer 400.00 

2 bay horses for truck. 267.00 

1 gray horse for hose carriage 200.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 1,100.00 

Hall furniture, carpets, beds, bedding, etc. 375.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 85.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 187.00 

• 1 exercise wagon 290.50 

Total amount |8,935.50 



378 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Hose No. 1 . 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage |600.00 

2 horses 500.00 

2 single harnesses 70.00 

1 single sled 40.00 

1 hose sled 20.00 

2,300 feet fabric hose 1,265.00 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding, etc 60.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 120.00 

Total amount $2,925.00 



Hose No. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage.. $600.00 

1 bay horse 100.00 

1 exercise harness 30.00 

1 swinging harness 50.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

1,900 feet fabric hose 1,045.00 

150 feet leather hose 60.00 

Furniture and fixtures 100.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 120.00 

Total amount $2,410.00 



Hose No. 3. 

LOCATED ON SOUTH ELM STREET, BAKERSVILLE. 

1 combination hose wagon (with ladders) $1,000.00 

1 pair gray horses 400.00 

1 pair swinging harnesses 100,00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 379 

1 pair exercise harnesses |50.00 

1 exercise wagon 50.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 1,100.00 

Furniture, fixtures, bedding, etc 85.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 65.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 80.00 

Total amount , |2,930.00 



Hook-and-Ladder No. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 serial hook-and-l adder truck $4,200.00 

3 horses 800.00 

3 exercise harnesses 50.00 

3 swinging harnesses 150.00 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 360.00 

7 rubber blanket covers 168.00 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding, and furniture 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 60.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 



Total amount $6,153.00 



Chemical Engine No. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 double tank (GO gallons each) engine $2,250.00 

1 pair black horses 400.00 

1 pair exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 pair swinging harnesses 100.00 

Furniture and fixtures 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 35.00 



Total amount $2,960.00 



380 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Supply Wagon. 



1 supply wagon, with boxes and engineers' 

lanterns |2o0.00 



Spare Hose. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

200 feet leather hose $100.00 

500 feet fabric hose 275.00 



Total amount $375.00 



Exercise Wagon. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole, 

shafts, three-horse hitch, and coal boxes.. $350.00 



E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine. 

STORED AT SHEDS OF ENGINE NO. 2. 

Old U tank Amoskeag engine (may be worth 

for exchange) $250.00 



Engineers' Department. 

5 engineers' white rubber coats $37.50 

Furniture and fixtures 150.00 

Total amount $187.50 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 381 

Riverside Hose Co. No. 5. 

LOCATED AT CORNER OF OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage 1400.00 

800 feet leather hose 300.00 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc 40.00 

Furniture and fixtures 10.00 

Total amount $750.00 



Hallsville ( Independent ) Hose. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage '. |30.00 

500 feet leather hose 150.00 

Nozzle, wrenches, etc 15.00 

Total amount -. . |195.00 



Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage |30.00 

2 hose-pipes 10.00 



Total amount |40.00 

Pond Road Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED IN BASEMENT OF W. P. FARMER'S BARN. 

1 two-wheeled hose-carriage $30.00 

500 feet leather hose 150.00 

Total amount $180.00 



382 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Sleeping-Hall. 



AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

6 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc 



Extra Horse. 



1 steel gray horse. 



Fire Alarm Telegraph. 

At cost, including additions previous to 1885. 

Kemodeling in 1885 

Additions in 1886 

in 1887 

in 1888 

in 1889 

in 1890 

in 1891 

in 1892 

in 1893.. 

in 1894 

in 1895 

in 1896 

"Individual Tapper" system 

Wire, ladders, arms, brackets, etc 



$260.00 



1175.00 



121,625.00 
6,000.00 
775.00 
375.00 
575.00 
430.00 
300.00 
280.00 
150.00 
500.00 
250.00 
500.00 
410.00 
3,000.00 

, . 150.00 



Total $35,310.00 



Recapitulation. 

Engine No. 1 $7,110.00 

Engine No. 2 8,887.00 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 10,364.50 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



383 



Engine No. 4 |7,590.00 

Engine and Ladder No. 5 9,477.00 

Engine and Ladder No. 6 8,935.50 

Harrington Engine (old) 250.00 

Hose No. 1 2,925.00 

Hose No. 2 2,410.00 

Hose No. 3 2,930.00 

Hook-a^d-Ladder No. 1 6,153.00 

Chemical No. 1 2,960.00 

Supply wagon 250.00 

Spare hose 375.00 

Exercise wagon (Central station) 350.00 

Engineer's department 187.50 

Eiverside Hose No. 5 750.00 

Hallsville Hose 195.00 

Goffe's Falls Hose 40.00 

Pond road Hose 180.00 

Sleeping Hall 260.00 

Extra horse 175.00 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 35,310.00 

Total 1108,064.50 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 






Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Thomas W. Lane Chief 

Fred S. Bean \ Asst. and clerk 

Ruel G. Manning Assistant 

Eugene S. Whitney " 

Clarence R. Merrill «' 



Machinist 

Carpenter 

Supt. Elec. Light 
Grain dealer .... 



1937 Elm. 
102 Orange. 
55 Douglas. 
N. River road. 
414 Merrimack 



384 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE COMPANY NO 1. 

House, 28 Vine Street. 



o 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


7 


Charles F. McCoy 


Captain 


Machinist 


50 Mechanic. 


8 


Frank E. Stearns 


Lieutenant 


Paper hanger.... 


289 Lake ave. 


18 


James L. Brock 


Clerk 


Tinsmith 


21 Market. 


6 


Cliarles F. Hall 


Engineer 


Engineer 


28 Vine. 


13 


Joseph H. Gould 


Asst. engineer 


Machinist 


78 Lowell. 


11 


Frank H. Harvey 


Driver engine. . 


Teamster 


28 Vine. 


12 


Artemas C. Barker .. . 


Driver hose.... 


it 


28 Vine. 


43 


Frank B. Marston 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


14 Mechanic. 


15 


Thomas J. Wyatt 


'• 


i« 


26 Mechanic. 


9 


Lewis G. Bryant 








1451 Elm. 


10 


Fred A. Lang 


,, 


Machinist. . . . 1 .. . 


43 Nashua. 


17 


Melvin Walker 


.' 


Carpenter 


43 Nashua. 


19 


Charles H. Eraser 


" 





9 Mechanic. 


14 


Edgar A. Young 


" 


Clerk .' 


369 Merrimack 









REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



385 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 
House on North Main Street, 'Squog. 



a. 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


71 


Charles G. Ranno 


Captain 


Harness-maker. . 


270 So. Main. 


68 


George P. Ames 


Lieutenant 


Supt. Streets.... 


226 No. Main. 


76 
120 


Jdremiali Lane 

Harry C. Morrill 


Clerk and dri- 
ver of engine. 
Engineer 


Teamster 

Engineer 


210 No. Main. 
53 Beauport. 


119 


Stephen Thomas 


Asst. engineer. 


Carpenter 


55 Douglas. 


69 


Arthur "W. Whitcomb. 


Driver of hose. 


Teamster 


151 Douglas, 


72 


Samuel A. Hill 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


86 School. 


75 


Robert J. Hill 


« 


• • 


86 School. 


77 


Daniel B. Emery 


" 


Machinist 


Williams. 


73 


Charles S. Cousins — 


" 


Harness-maker. . 


323 Douglas. 


74 


Thomas C. Foote 


<< 


Wool sorter 


56 No. Main. 


66 


Joseph H. Alsop 


" 


Wool waste sort'r 


54 Douglas. 


70 


Chas. M. Tewksbury. . 


" 


Clerk B & M R R 


113 Parker. 


67 




" 


Truckman 


431 Granite. 









386 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY" NO. 3. 
Hov.se on Lake Avenue, corner Massabesic, 



to . 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


86 


Frank F. Porter 


Captain 


Manufacturer . . . 


330 E. Spruce. 


97 




Lieut, engine.. 
Lieut, of truck 






98 


John N. Chase 


Overseer 


2G8 Bridge. 


89 


Parker R. Brown 


Clerk 


Clerk 




121 


George B. Forsaith .... 


Engineer 


Engineer 


455 Hanover. 


123 


John P. Walker 


Asst. engineer 


Machinist 


430 Lake ave. 


87 


Geo. H. Wheeler 


Driver engine. 


Teamster 


384 E. Spruce. 


81 


William S. McLeod... . 


Driver hose . . . 


' " 


415 Lake ave. 


82 


Lyman W. Piper 


Driver truck . . 


Dresser 


398 Merrimack 


114 






Carpenter 

Clerk 




110 


Albert W. Smith 




331 Merrimack 


84 


Walter M. Moulton .... 


„ 


Plumber 


367 Hanover. 


80 


Clarence Hackett 





Laundryman — 


401 Central. 


1 85 


JohnW. Finn 


.< 


Painter 


501 Wilson. 


88 


George Taylor 




Mechanic 


382 Lake ave. 


78 


George Dunnington.. . 





Harness -maker.. 


510 Wilson. 


79 


Lewis N. Dufrain 

Orren S. Coburn 

Edson F. Wyman 







373 Hall. 


148 


Clerk 


386 Central. 


153 


Manufacturer.... 


389 Lake ave. 


105 


Herbert E. Dunbar . . . 


11 


Clerk 


310 Maple. 







REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



387 



ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 

House, Ko. 20 Vine Street. 



a. 

-3 
P3 


NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


20 


Lucius B. Snelling — 


Captain 


Pharmacist 


103 Walnut. 


28 


John H. Wales, Jr 


Lieutenant 


Brick mason.... 


19 M. S. B. 


3S 


Thomas W. Lane, Jr.. 


Clerk 


Electrician 


1937 Elm. 


21 


Edgar G. Abbott 


Engineer 


Machinist 


12 Linden. 


27 


Edward Sargent 


Asst. Engineer 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 


152 


Charles H. Rogers .... 


Driver engine. 


Teamster 


20 Vine. 


29 


Ellsworth V. Rowe. . . 


Driver of hose. 


Teamster 


20 Vine. 


22 


Walter A. Clarkson. . . 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


Walnut. 


?,0 


Frank B. Stevens 


,> 


Clerk 


20 Gore. 


''S 


George Thompson — 
Harvey E. Harris 


,( 


Clerk 


85 Walnut 


24 


i< 


Laundryraan 


414Manohest'r 


32 


Luther A. Knight 





Engineer 


16 Stark. 


30 


James C. Newton 


(1 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 


26 


Alfred Gustafson 


<i 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 



388 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 5. 
Jlouse, No. 44 Webster Street. 






49 

101 

162 

46 

102 

42 

125 

124 

S3 

47 

95 

126 

108 

123 

99 

41 

160 

161 

158 

159 



Name. 



Charles W. Brown. . . . 

Milo B. Wilson 

George N. Burpee 

Woodbury Davison... 

Walter Morse 

Daniel W. Morse 

EmilH. Smith 

Benjamin C. Cann 

Ernest E. Hubbell .... 

Russell Cilley 

Edward H. Clough. . . 

Alvin McLane 

Edward L. Towle — 

Charles H. Gile 

Will G. Eraser 

Frank A. Kinne 

George E. Badger — 

Irving S. Bryant 

Andrews. Eantom.. 
Clarence D. Parker. . 



Rank. 



Captain 

Lieutenant — 



Clerk 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer 
Driver engine 
Driver truck . 
Driver hose . . 
Hoseman 



Occupation. 



Clerk 

Mason 

Electrician . 
Carpenter .. 
Machinist.. . 
Engineer ... 
Teamster... 



Clerk 



Carpenter . . . . 

Clerk 

Carpenter 

Dresser 

Machinist — 
Steam-fitter.. 
Second-hand. 
Cigar-maker. 
Clerk 



Residence. 



16 Hazel. 

44 Blodget. 
136 Sagamore. 
817 Union. 
54 Appleton. 
1419 Elm. 
44 Webster. 
44 Webster. 
44 Webster. 
863 Chestnut. 
859Ctjestnut. 
15 Liberty. 
72 N.Adams. 
896 Union. 
655 Chestnut. 
75 Sagamore. 
46 Upper Canal 
884 Union. 
1443 Elm. 
31 N. Adams. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



389 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 6. 
House on Amory and Rinimon Streets. 



n 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


140 


Frank W. Tibbetts — 


Captain 


Loom-fixer 


313 Cartier. 


147 


Jame8 A. Farley 


Lieut, engine.. 


Machinist 


385 Dubuque. 


130 


Thomas E. Gorman*.. 


Lieut, truck ... 


Loom-flxer 


356 Rimmon. 


134 


Alpbonso E. Foster. . . 


Clerk & driver 


Carpenter 


Engine-house. 


133 




Engineer 

Asst. engineer. 


Engineer 

Machinist 


it 11 


133 


Alcide Provencher... . 


516 Beauport. 


135 


George A. Cann 


Driver hose . . . 


Steam-fltter 


Engine-house. 


136 


Henry C. Crosby 


Driver truck . . 


Teamster 


" 


129 




Hoseman 




624 N. Main. 


138 


Thos. F. Fitzsimmons 




258 Beauport. 
268 Beauport. 


141 


John J. Conroy 






Blacksmith 


142 


Frank St. John 






Marble finisher . 


5 Barr. 


143 


Henry Stein.... 






Blacksmith 


467 Hevey. 


141 


Arthur Provost 







Wool sorter 


516 Beauport. 


145 


John E. Herring 






Loom-flxer 


402 Rimmon. 


ni 


John C. Gemmell 

William H. Marshall. . 








71 Conant. 


137 




366 Douglas. 


T'8 


John H. McCabe 

Gideon Belisle 

Richard F. Galway .... 







Clerk 


310 N. Main. 


139 




370 Cartier. 


146 


Cigar-m aker 


460 N. Main. 



* Thomas E. Gorman killed December 30. 



390 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOSE COMPAXY XO. 1. 
House, Ko. 26 Vine Street. 



sc • 

-C 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


36 


Joseph E. Merrill 

George H. Porter 

Albert A. Puffer 

Henry C. Parsons 

Charles B. French 

John E. Sanborn 

Samuel W. Patten 

George I. Ayer 

Edwin W. Merrill 

Charles J. Willey 

Andrew S. Heath 

George W. Snadden... 


Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 




21 Ash. 


38 
48 


Carpenter 

Teamster 

Carpenter 

Belt maker 

Electrician 

Clerk 


279 Laurel. 
499 Beech. 


37 




16 Prospect. 
39 M. S.B. 
274 Laurel. 
3 M. S. B. 

28 M. S. B. 
21 Ash. 


52 
53 
35 
45 
51 


Hoseman 

(1 


34 
50 


Mechanic 

Clerk 


205 Hanover. 
283 East Hi'^h 


39 


Plumber 


373 Bridge. 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 
Bouse on Maple Street, corner East High. 



9 

l>5 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


54 


John F. Seaward 


Captain 


Carpenter 


27 Warren. 


55 Revilo G. Houghton . . 


Lieutenant — 


Gas fitter 


288 Bridge. 


59 


Jos. W. Batchelder.... 


Clerk 


Carpenter 


521 Maple. 


57 


Walter Seaward 

Julien B. Huntley 

Charles W. Powell ... 




Teamster 


521 Maple. 


63 


Hoseman 


35 Dutton. 


60 


Carpenter 


540 Jlaple. 


61 


Addison Seaward 








255 Bridge. 


66 


Arthur B. Merrill 








327 Amherst. 


63 


James A. Rogers. . .-. . . 


<i 





761 Beech. 


65 

58 




„ 




245 Lowell. 


Thomas Smith 




Carpenter 


24 So\ith. 


64 


Melvin W. Worthen. . 


" 


" 


21 South. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER, 



391 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 3. 

House, South Elm Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


150 


FredS. Sloan 

Elmer R. Laing 

Frank J. Dustin 


Captain 

Clerk 


Fireman 


23 Elm. 


151 




34 Brown ave. 
21 Elm. 


31 


Driver 




153 


James H. McKenzie. . 


Hoseman 


Sash-maker 


Elm. 


154 


William P. Hall 





II ii 


128 Calef road 


155 


Henry O. Follansbee. 





Gas-maker 


205 Elm. 


156 


William E. Pierson . . 





Foreman 


122 Willow. 


157 


Frank D. Hardy 


<t 


Yard brakeman. 


20 Cheney pic 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House, No. S Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


115 


Edward A. Sears 


Captain 


Electrician 


247 Concord. 


117 


Warren F. Wheeler 


Clerk & driver 


Teamster 


8 Vine. 


103 


Benj. R. Richardson. . 


Pipeman 


Machinist 


12 Mechanic. 


116 


Clarence D. Palmer .. 


Fireman 


Marble dealer... 


355 Lake ave. 


44 


Asa W. Gage * 





Lineman 


239 Beauport. 



* Detailed as driver of supply wagon. 



392 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 
House 18 Vine Street. 



tin , 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


111 




Captain 

Lieutenant... 






92 


Oscar P. Stone 


Clerk 


312Maiichest'r 


90 


Henry Johnson 


Clerk 


Steam-fitter .... 


316 Walnut. 


94 


Charles M. Denyou.. 


Driver 


Teamster 


18 Vine. 


91 


Jerome J. Levering.. 


Fireman 


Carpenter 


175 Hanover. 


104 


Harrison H. Cole 


ii 


11 


45 M. S. B. 


109 


George M. Jones 


" 


Gardener 


25 Prospect. 


107 




,1 




18 Vine 


113 


Charles II. Laxon 


<i 


Carpenter 


13Ray. 


100 


Frank M. Frisselle... 





Reporter 


454 Pine. 


112 


Chas. A. Butterfield.. 


«i 


Carpenter 


26 Vine. 


118 


Frank A. Pherson 





Machinist 


IS Vine. 


93 


Fred W. Bond 





Loom-fixer 


46 Stark. 


106 


Benj. F. Marsh 


t( 


Carpenter 


1480 Elm. 


96 


Louis F. Kettle 





" 


40 Orange. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith respectfully 
present their forty-third annual report of the affairs of 
the library, and with the same the report made to them 
by the treasurer of the board, containing a statement of 
the sums received and the expenditures made by him in 
their behalf, from the funds in their possession and under 
their control; and also the report of the librarian to the 
board, giving in detail the statistics of the operation of 
the library during the year. 

The report of the treasurer shows that during the year 
the sum of thirteen hundred and one dollars and six cents 
has been expended for the purchase of books, and the sum 
of one hundred and seventy-seven dollars and forty-one 
cents for the purchase of periodicals, making a total ex- 
penditure for both these purposes of fourteen hundred 
and seventy-eight dollars and forty-seven cents. 

Of the amount expended for the purchase of books, the 
sum of sixty-five dollars and twenty-eight cents was used 
to purchase books to replace those worn out and with- 
drawn from circulation; and the sum of four hundred and 
ninety-six dollars and ninety-three cents was taken from 

395 



396 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the income of the Dean fund and used for the purchase of 
books for that department of the library. Excluding 
these two items, the sum expended for the purchase of 
new books was seven hundred and thirty-eight dollars 
and eighty-five cents; and leaving a balance in the hands 
of the treasurer at the close of the year, of the amount ap- 
propriated by the city councils for the purchase of books, 
of six hundred and seventy-seven dollars and thirty-five 
cents. 

The balances of the accumulated income at the close of 
the year, of the several funds under the control of the 
trustees, were as follows: 

Dean fund $7,291.87 

Mary E. Elliot fund 1,230.20 

Eliza A. Eaton fund 353.52 

During the year two hundred volumes were purchased 
from the Dean fund, at a cost, as above stated, of four ' 
hundred and ninety-six dollars and ninety-three cents. 

No purchases have been made from the Mary Elliot 
fund, as the trustees have as yet been unable to arrange 
for the proper shelving and care of the same apart from 
the books intended for general circulation. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the past year 
have been three thousand eight hundred and seventy- 
seven dollars and thirty-seven cents, which amount in- 
cludes the sum of six hundred and twenty-six dollars and 
eighty-five cents, expended on account of the re-classifica- 
tion of the books in the library and additions to the card 
catalogue. 

The expense of conducting the affairs of the library for 
the past year has been somewhat in excess of the average 
for the previous years, owing, principally, to the in- 
creased expense for services for assistants to the libra- 
rian, necessitated by the arrangement keeping the library 
open additional hours, and the additional cost for light- 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 397 

ing the library by the use of electricity in place of gas 
formerly used. 

The items that make up the amount of these incidental 
expenditures will be found in detail in the annual report 
of the city, the bills for the same having been paid by the 
city treasurer from the sum appropriated for the library, 
upon their approval by the trustees. 

The librarian reports that the library has been open 
during the past year, for the delivery of books, three hun- 
dred and seven days, during which time the number of 
books delivered for home use was sixty-six thousand four 
hundred and eighty-eight, being an average of nearly two 
hundred and seventeen jDer day. In addition to this num- 
ber delivered for general circulation, fifteen thousand 
four hundred and eighty books were delivered for use in 
the reading-room at the library, an average of about fifty 
per day. The total number of books delivered during the 
year for both these purposes was eighty-one thousand 
nine hundred and sixty-eight, an average of two hundred 
and sixty-seven per day. As comj^ared with the previous 
year, the circulation for home use shows an increase of 
six thousand nine hundred and ninety-three, and the 
number delivered for use at the reading-room an increase 
of four thousand five hundred and forty-six. The total 
circulation was eleven thousand five hundred and thirty- 
nine greater than the year preceding, and the largest of 
any year since the library was established. 

The number of books withdrawn from circulation dur- 
ing the year, on account of their worn and defaced condi- 
tion, was seventy-nine. Of this number, and of others re- 
tired from circulation in previous years for the like rea- 
son, eighty-four have been replaced, at a cost of sixty-five 
dollars and twenty-eight cents. The trustees, in this con- 
nection, would respectfully renew the recommendation 
made several years ago, that a special appropriation be 



398 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

made by the city councils to cover this expense of pur- 
chasing books in place of those worn out, so that the 
usual annual appropriation of one thousand dollars may 
be used, as no doubt intended in the contract with the 
city, for the purchase of new books and periodicals for the 
increase of the library rather than for replacing those 
worn out. 

Seventy-three different periodicals have been regularly 
received at the library, fifty-five by purchase and eighteen 
by donation, and at the completion of the several volumes 
they have been bound and i)laced upon the shelves for 
general circulation. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the 
last report, including maps and pamphlets, was thirty- 
nine thousand four hundred and forty-nine. During the 
year there have been added eight hundred and eleven vol- 
umes by purchase, two hundred and one by donation, and 
ninety-seven volumes of periodicals have been bound, a 
total of eleven hundred and nine, making the number of 
bound volumes in the library at the close of the year, 
thirty-nine thousand eight hundred and forty, and the 
total number, including sixteen maps and seven hundred 
and two pamphlets, forty thousand five hundred and 
fifty-eight. 

The work of re-classifying and re-cataloguing the 
library has been continued during the year, and the libra- 
rian now reports that one half of the volumes in the li- 
brary have been classified and catalogued, embracing the 
more imjiortant subject-heads and those most in demand 
for general circulation. 

Following the report of the librarian will be found the 
names of the persons who have made donations of books 
to the library during the year, with the number presented 
by each. To all who have so generously contributed to 
the increase and usefulness of the library^ the trustees 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 399 

have caused due acknowledgment to be made in belialf 
of the city. 

The trustees are not aware that any circumstance has 
occurred during the past year to disturb the harmonious 
operation of the library. The librarian, Miss Kate E. 
Sanborn, has fulfilled the duties of her position with the 
same fidelity as heretofore, and to the entire satisfaction 
of the trustees. 

The trustees desire to renew their acknowledgments to 
the members of the city councils, and particularly to the 
committee on lands and buildings, for the courtesy and 
consideration with which their suggestions relating to 
the library have been received and carried out. 

March 17, 1897. 
In board of trustees read and approved, and ordered to 
be signed by the chairman and clerk of the board, and 
transmitted to the city councils. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 

Mayor. 
N. P. Hunt, 

Clerh. \ 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The treasurer of the board submits the following ac- 
count of the receipts and expenditures by the board of 
the funds received on account of the library : 

1896. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropri- 
ation 1472.57 

April 11. Kate E. Sanborn, 
fines, catalogues, 
etc 186.32 

July 17. appropriation for 

books for 1896... 1,000.00 

$1,658.89 

Jan. 1. To balance of income of 

Dean fund $7,286.95 

income of Dean 

fund 108.00 

July 1. income of Dean 

fund 108.00 

interest on accumu- 
lation of income.. 230.95 
Oct. 1. income of Dean 

fund 47.81 

interest on accumu- 
lation of income.. 7.09 

$7,788.80 

400 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 401 

Jan. . 1. To Mary E. Elliot fund $2,000.00 
balance of interest 

on same 1,130.45 

Oct. 1. interest on Mary E. 

Elliot fund 63.75 

interest on accumu- 
lation of income.. 36.00 

5,230.20 



Jan. 1. To Eliza A. Eaton fund $3,000.00 
balance 'of interest 

on same 249.98 

Oct. 1. interest on Eliza A. 

Eaton fund 96.52 

interest on accumu- 
lation of income.. 7.92 



5,353.52 



),031.41 

1896. Cr. 
Jan. 7. Paid New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 110.97 

7. Publishers' Weekly, periodi- 
cals 5.00 

7. W. B. Clarke & Co., books. . . . 25.00 

7. Granite Monthly Co., books. . 1.25 

17. Boston Book Co., books 71.00 

17. Little, Brown & Co., books. .. 3.50 
17. Publishers' Weekly, periodi- 
cals • 3.00 

27. Boston Book Co., periodicals, 5.00 

27. Isaac Walker, books 4.25 

Feb. 4. New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 9.58 

14. W. B. Clarke & Co., books. . . 44.86 
14. * W. B. Clarke & Co., (replaced) 

books 3.84 



402 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



March 


4. 




5. 




5. 




9. 




28. 




30. 




30. 


April 


3. 



May 



11. 

13. 
13. 
20. 
23. 
23. 
4. 



7. 

7. 

19. 

21. 

June 3. 

4. 

4. 

18. 

July 2. 

3. 

8. 
18. 
20. 



Paid George H. Polley & Co., peri- 
odicals 16.00 

New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 17.91 

Publishers' Weekly, books. .. 3.50 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books .... 39.07 
Boston Society of Natural 

History, periodicals 8.00 

Publishers' Weekly, books... 3.50 
Little, Brown & Co., books. .. 2.00 
New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 9.61 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

books 2.00 

Little, Brown & Co., books. . 6.00 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books. . . 8.40 

Joel Daniels & Co., books. . . . 1.00 

P. L. Clark, books 4.00 

H. H. Metcalf, books 4.00 

New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 9.58 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books. . . 113.31 

Little, Brown & Co., books.. . 3.50 

John Sheldon, books 4.20 

George E. Littlefleld, books. . 7.20 

D. Appleton & Co., books 5.00 

New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 17.65 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books. . . 5.92 
Little, Brown & Co., books.. . 58.75 
Little, Brown & Co., books. . 4.25 
New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 9.60 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books .... 48.92 

Granite Monthly Co., books.. 1.25 

Boston Book Co., books 41.50 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 403 

Aug. 4. Paid New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 110.86 

4. Little, Brown & Co., books. . . 2.00 

6. .W. B.Clarke & Co., (replaced) 

books 41.48 

28. Lawyers' Co-op. Pub. Co., 

books 5.00 

Sept. 3. New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 15.19 

9. Little, Brown & Co., books. . . 1.50 

9. W. B. Clarke & Co., books... 5.70 

9. W. B. Clarke & Co., (replaced) 

books 12.55 

Oct. 3. New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 10.95 

3. Little, Brown & Co. (Dean 

fund), books 94.15 

5. John Wiley & Sons (Dean 

fund), books 113.00 

7. D. Van Nostrand Co. (Dean 

fund), books 187.60 

15. Library Bureau, books 1.00 

15. Little, Brown & Co., books. .. 3.50 
19. W. B. Clarke & Co., books .... 95.43 

19. W. B. Clarke & Co., (replaced) 

books 11.92 

22. Damrell & Upham (Dean 

fund), books 83.07 

Nov. 4. New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 15.04 

11. D. Van Nostrand Co. (Dean 

fund), books 19.11 

16. W. B. Clarke & Co., books. . . 55.36 

20. Microscopical Publishing Co., 

periodicals 4.00 

23. George E. Littlefield, books.. 16.00 



404 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Dec. 3. Paid New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 19.47 

5. W. B. Clarke & Co., (replaced) 

books 2.34 

22. Little, Brown & Co., books. .. 3.75 

22. W. B. Clarke & Co., books. . . 25.63 

31. By balance of appropriation 677.35 

balance of Dean fund income. . 7,291.87 
Mary E. Elliot fund and inter- 
est 3,230.20 

Eliza A. Eaton fund and inter- 
est 3,353.52 

$16,031.41 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the li- 
brary for the year ending December 31, 1896, the bills for 
which have been paid by the city treasurer upon the ap- 
proval of the committee on accounts of the board of trus- 
tees, the items of which may be found in the annual re- 
port of the city, have been as follows: 

Services of librarian $900.00 

Services of assistants to librarian 934.00 

Fuel 321.60 

Gas and electricity 342.45 

Insurance 125.00 

Binding 99.79 

Rebinding 139.34 

Supplies 324.03 

Re-classification and cataloguing 626.85 

Printing 8.50 

Water 16.00 

Newspapers 6.00 

Incidentals 33.72 

$3,877.37 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 405 



RECAPITULATION. 

Balance December 31, 1895 $3,629.12 

Appropriation for 1896 4,500.00 

?,129.12 



Paid trustees for purchase of books |1,000.00 

incidental expenses 3,877.37 

Balance of appropriation Decem- 
ber 31, 1896 3,251.75 

$8,129.12 

Respectfully submitted. 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 

December 31, 1896. 

We have examined the foregoing account, and find the 
same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 
WALTER M. PARKER, 

Committee on Accounts of City Library. 

December 31, 1896. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the treasurer of the trustees of the city library, and 
find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Manchester City Library: 

Gentlemen, — I herewitli submit the forty-third annual 
report of the city library: 
Whole number of accessions December 31, 

1895 39,449 

Added during the year 189G : 

By purchase 811 

By gift 201 

Periodicals bound 97 

1,109 

Whole number at present 40,553 

Including: 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets 702 

Bound volumes 39,840 

40,558 

Number of periodicals regularly received: 

By purchase 55 

By gift 18 

Number of days the library was open for read- 
ing and distribution of books 307 

Number of volumes delivered for home use. . . 66,488 

Average per day 217 

Largest number any one day, November 7 . . . . 510 

406 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 407 

Largest number any one montli, March G,G4S 

Smallest number any one month, July 4,484 

Number of volumes delivered in the reading 

room 15,480 

Average per day 50 

Number of cards used on deposit 7 

Number of cards issued during the year 654 

Whole number issued since new registration . . 10,97-5 

Number of cards relinquished during the year 122 

Postals sent to delinquents 321 

Worn-out books removed from circulation. ... 70 

Number of volumes replaced 84 

Number of books lost or injured and paid for.. 5 

Number of volumes repaired at the bindery, .. 481 

Number repaired and covered at the library. . 16,620 

Cash on hand January 1 , J S96 1186.32 

Amount received from January 1 to December 
31, 1896: 

For fines $239.25 

catalogues, 64 at 30c 19.20 

books lost and paid for. .. . 2.47 

1260.92 



1447.24 



Paid to N. P. Hunt, treasurer, April 

11, 1896 $186.32 

Paid for expressage and incidentals. 89.59 

$275.91 

Balance on hand December 31, 1896 $171.3:^ 

CIRCULATION. 

The report of last year contained a table showing the 
variation in the circulation since 1879, and the gain of 
1895 over all preceding years. The gain for 1896 was 



408 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

much larger, 7,000 more Tolimies having been issued for 
home use tlian in 1895, and over 4,500 more for library 
use, making a total gain of 11,539. It often happens that, 
owing to the publication of a new catalogue, a change in 
library hours, or some other measure which tends to 
make a library more popular for a time, the circulation 
shows a large increase for a year, and then drops back to 
its old limit. Such has not been our experience, and the 
slow yet steady increase of the use of the library indi- 
cates that it is reaching out to a larger number of people, 
and making its influence more and more felt in the com- 
munity. That the action of the trustees in reducing the 
age limit from sixteen to twelve years has been appreci- 
ated is shown by the fact that there have been issued 
during the past year 110 cards to children over twelve 
and under sixteen years of age. The number of children 
drawing books from the library, reading in the building, 
and clustering about the catalogue is very noticeable. 

ACCESSIONS. 

Besides the current books there have been added to the 
library some valuable and important works. Each year 
an effort is made to fill up the gaps occurring in different 
classes of literature, by the purchase of the best books in 
those classes. Equally important is the filling up of sets 
of periodicals. One hundred and two volumes of The Ed- 
inburgh Review, and seventy-one volumes of The North 
American Review were bought last year. We need to 
make complete many other sets of magazines which are 
much in demand for reference work. Two hundred vol- 
umes w^ere purcthased from the Dean fund, all treating of 
scientific and technological subjects, and a large propor- 
tion relating to electricity, engineering, and textile man- 
ufactures, subjects of special interest to our citizens. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 409 
CLASSIFICATION AND CATALOGUE. 

Great progress has been made upon this part of the 
work during the year. Six thousand nine hundred and 
twenty volumes were classified according to the new sys- 
tem, and seven thousand two hundred and ninety-three 
volumes were catalogued. There are now systematically 
arranged on our shelves, according to their subjects, all 
the books belonging to the following classes: Fiction, 
Biography, History, Geography and Travels, Natural Sci- 
ence, Useful Arts, and Fine Arts. Literature is well be- 
gun, and when it is finished there will remain only Phil- 
osophy, Religion, Social Science, and some reference 
books to be done. By actual count of the volumes, very 
nearly one half of the library is completed, and the half to 
be done includes many long sets of magazines, the news- 
papers, and the government documents, which will not 
consume the amount of time in classifying and catalogu- 
ing that has been occupied by the half already done. 
During the summer the thousand volumes belonging to 
the Dean Purchase, together with the two hundred recent 
additions, were classified and catalogued. As this will 
become in time a large collection of technical works in 
science and useful arts, it was deemed best to classify the 
books very closely, and this was perhaps the most diffi- 
cult work to be done in connection with the re-arrange- 
ment of the library. 

SCHOOL WORK. 

The same privileges have been given to the teachers in 
the public schools as in the preceding year. When this 
work was begun it was impossible to foresee what books 
would be most needed for the pupils. Now that it is 
known what are the most useful books, it would be of 



410 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

great assistance to the teachers if a small sum of money 
could be devoted to the purchase of duplicates. Several 
teachers often want the same book at the same time, to be 
used in their history and geography classes, and if the 
library could furnish several copies of such books as Cof- 
fin's and Knox's, much more could be accomplished with 
the schools than is now possible. 

BUILDING. 

Some small repairs have been made on the library 
building by the land and buildings committee, chief 
among them being the painting of the outside woodwork 
and of the walls of the vestibules. The most pressing 
need at present is more of the linoleum carpeting, which 
has proved so satisfactory in that part of the library in 
which it is used. The aisles and some of the alcoves of 
the book room should be covered with it; and if the entire 
floor of the delivery and reading rooms could also be cov- 
ered, it would add much to the comfort of those who use 
the library. The floor has become so worn with the use 
of many years, that it is impossible to keep it well swept 
and washed; and the bookcases are so exposed that the 
books receive much of the dust necessarily raised by 
sweeping. The linoleum could be kept clean with much 
less dust arising from it. Thus our books would be the 
gainers, as well as our readers, who would no longer be 
disturbed by the sound of heavy boots on the uneven 
floor. With the number of people using the library con- 
stantly on the increase, the inadequate provision made 
for them in the way of reading and reference rooms be- 
comes more and more apparent. The present reading 
room is often 111 led to its utmost capacity, and it is 
neither an attractive nor comfortable place. As the 
mayor said in his recent inaugural "address, until the 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 411 

library is provided with a large, well-lighted reading 
room, and a convenient reference room, the ''institution 
will never attain its full measure of popularity and edu- 
cational value." 

GIFTS. 

Our collection of portraits of distinguished men of the 
city has been augmented by the portrait of Dr. W. W. 
Brown, which was given to the library by the will of his 
widow. Ex-Governor Currier, to whose generosity the 
library owes its French and German books, is about to 
present to us a well-selected collection of Swedish books. 
'As the books are not yet actually purchased, however, 
this note will more properly belong to the report for 1897. 

Following this report is a list of the donors of books 
and pamphlets presented to the library during the year. 
Respectfully submitted. 

KATE E. SANBORN, 

Lihrat'ian. 
January, 8, 1897. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY. 



Books. Pamph. 

Abbott, S. A. B 1 

Aguilar Free Library, New York City. . .. 1 

Amherst College 1 

Apprentices' Library, Philadelphia, Pa. . 1 

Baillie's Inst. Free Library, Glasgow. ... , i 

Balch, E. S '. 1 

Bulch, T. W 1 

Baldwin, E. T 1 

Benton, J. H., Jr 1 

Bigelow Free Public Library, Clinton, 

Mass 1 

Boston, Mass. — Public Library 3 

Bridgeport, Conn. — Public Library 1 

Brookline, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Brooklyn, N. Y. — Library 1 

Brooklyn Ethical Association 1 

Cambridge, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Chicago, 111. — Public Library 1 

Chicago University 1 

Children's Aid Society, New York 1 

Cincinnati, Ohio — Public Library 1 

Civil Service Reform Associaton 1 

Cleaves, George P 2 2 

Cleveland, Ohio — Public Library 1 

412 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 41S 

Cooke, J. P 1 

Crocker, U. H 1 

Demarest, Rev. G. L 2 

Detroit, Mich. — Public Library 1 

Dover, N. H. — Public Library 2 

Eggleston, Dr. T 1 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md 1 

Fall River, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, 111. . . 2 

Pit/ Public Library, Chelsea, Mass 1 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt. . . 1 

Forbes Library, Northampton, Mass 1 

French, J. C 1 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, 

Phila 1 

Fuller, E. N 3 

Gildehaus, C 1 

Gould, S. C 1 

Grand Rapids, Mich. — Public Library. ... 2 

Harvard University 2 1 

Howson and Howson 1 

Jamaica Agricultural Society 1 

Jersey City, N. J. — Free Public Library. . 1 

La Crosse, Wis. — Public Library 1 

Lancaster, Mass. — Town Library 1 

Lawrence, Mass.^Public Library 1 

Library Co. of Philadelphia 2 

Lord, C. C 1 

Lynn, Mass. — Public Library I 

McNamee, J. H. H 1 

Maimonides Free Library, New York City 1 

Maiden, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Manchester. — Board of Health 1 1 

" Chief Engineer Fire De- 
partment 1 



414 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Manchester. — City Auditor 1 

" City Clerk 1 

" Water Commissioners.... 1 
Massachusetts. — Bureau of Statistics of 

Labor 2 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology.. 3 

Medford, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Melrose, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Milwaukee, Wis. — Public Library 1 

Minneapolis, Minn. — Public Library 1 

Missouri Botanical Garden 1 

Moore, W. E 1 

Morse Institute Library, Natick, Mass ... 1 

Mount Holyoke College 1 

Munson, M. A 1 

Nashua, N. H. — Mayor 1 

National Divorce Reform League 2 

New England Society in Brooklyn 1 

New Hampshire. — Insurance Commis- 
sioner 1 

" " Library Commision... 2 

" " Railroad Commission. 1 

" " Secretary of State.... 8 

" " State Library 1 1 

New Haven, Conn. — Public Library 3 

New York City. — Mercantile Library. ... 1 

Newark, N. J. — Free Public Library 1 

Newton, Mass. — Free Library 1 

Ohio. — State Librajry 1 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md 1 

Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery. . .1 

Pennsylvania Prison Society 1 

Peoria, 111. — Public Library 1 

Portland, Maine. — Public Library 1 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. — City Library 1 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 415 

Providence, R. I. — Public Library 1 

Robbins Library, Arlington, Mass 1 

Rogers, T. P. W 1 

St. Laurent, C. F 1 

St. Louis, Mo. — Mercantile Library 2 

" " " Public Free Library 1 

Salem, Mass. — Public Library 2 

San Francisco, Cal. — Free Public Library 1 
" " " Mercantile Library 

Association 1 

Scranton, Pa. — Public Library 3 

Seattle Library Commission I 

Securities Co., Philadelphia 1 

Somerville, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Southbridge, Mass. — Library 1 

Springfield, Mass. — City Library Associa- 
tion 1 

Syracuse, N. Y. — Central Library 1 

Tulane University of Louisiana 1 

United States. — Bureau of Education... 8 

" " Labor Dei^artment 2 5 

" " Smithsonian Institution 3 4 

" " Supt. of Documents 123 141 

" " War Department 5 1 

University of Pennsylvania 1 

Unknown 1 9 

Uruguay 1 

Walker, A. H 1 

Walker, H. E 1 

Wheeler, J 1 

Wilmington Institute Free Library 1 

Woburn, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Worcester, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Y. M. C. Associations 2 



416 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Periodicals Presented. 



Boston Public Library Bulletin. 

Case and Comment. 

Catalogue of United States Public Documents. 

Home Market Bulletin. 

Jersey City Library Record. 

Manchester. — Advertiser. 

" Echo (High School). 

" Emerald. 

" Union. 

Manifesto. 

Monthly Bulletin Bureau of American Republics. 
Notes and Queries. 

Official Gazette of United States Patent Office. 
Plymouth Record. 
Salem Public Library Bulletin. 
Tennessee University Magazine. 
Travelers' Record. 
Veterans' Advocate. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



27 



REPORT 

OF THE 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Coun- 
cils: 

In compliance with the ordinance of said city, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their annual report for 
the year 1896: 

The whole number of families that have received more 
or less assistance off the farm during the year has been 
one hundred and thirty-seven, consisting of four hundred 
and forty-one persons, all of whom have a settlement in 
this city. None of this number have died during the 
year. The whole number of paupers supported at the 
city farm during the year has been four, more or less of 
the time. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the county 
farm during the j-ear has been seven, more or less of the 
time. 

The whole number of minor children supported at the 
State Industrial School during the year has been six. 

In compliance with sections 1 and 2, chapter 116, Laws 
of the state of New Hampshire, passed at the January ses- 
sion, 1895, in relation to d(;pendent minor children having 
a settlement in cities and towns, said dependent minor 
children having a settlement in this city are supported as 

follows: 

419 



420 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

At St. Patrick's Orphans' Home, Hanover street, six 
more or less of the time. 

At Notre Dame de Lourdes Home, in charge of the 
Gray Nuns, West ^lanchester, four , more or less of the 
time. 

At the Orphans' Home, Franklin, one minor child, 
more or less of the time. 

At the residence of William Whelpley, No. 401 Cedar 
street, two minor children, more or less of the time. 

At the residence of Agnes Masse, on Winter street, one 
minor child, more or less of the time. 

At the residence of D. L. Robinson, Amoskeag, one 
minor child, all of the time. 

All of the said dependent minor children have educa- 
tional advantages. 

The overseers of the poor have given and allowed 
eleven hundred and three orders to the paupers off the 
farm during the year. Said orders consisted chiefly of 
orders for groceries, fuel, medicine, board and clothing, 
care, and emergencies. 

The whole amount allowed to the several persons who 
applied for assistance from time to time, from the several 
wards of the city, during the year, was as follows: 

Ward 1 1237.38 

Ward 2 40.00 

AVard 3 330.35 

Ward 4 1,109.21 

Ward 5 2,578.09 

Ward 6 1,024.07 

Ward 7 278.95 

Ward 8 973.98 

Ward 9 1,401.93 

— 18,124.50 



REPORT OP THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 421 

MISCELLANEOUS BILLS ALLOWED. 

State Industrial School, board of in- 
mates ■ 13,748.28 

Books and stationery 37.65 

13,785.93 

Total amount $11,910.49 

Cash received from the county of Hillsbor- 
ough and paid to the city treasurer $3,400.71 

Total cost to the city $8,509.78 

And there are uncollected bills due the city amounting 
to seven hundred and tifty-six dollars and twenty-one 
cents. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 
WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Ward 1, 
THOMAS L. QUIMBY, Ward 2, 
BENJAMIN F. GARLAND, Ward 3, 
GEORGE S. HOLMES, Ward 4, 
PATRICK COSTELLO, Ward 5, 
CHARLES FRANCIS, Ward 6, 
WILLIAM MARSHALL, Ward 7, 
CHARLES S. McKEAN, Ward 8, 
LEANDER S. BOIVIN, Ward 9, 
Overseers of the Poor for the. City of Manchester. 
A true copy. Attest: 

William H. Maxwell, 
Clerk. 



Aid to Soldiers, Sailors, and their Dependent 

Families. 

To the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

In compliance with sections J and 2, chapter 81, Laws 
of the state of New Hampshire, passed at the June ses- 



422 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

sion, 1S81, in relation to indigent soldiers and sailors of 
the War of the Rebellion, th(^ Overseers of the Poor here- 
with present their annual report under the head of "Aid 
to soldiers and sailors and their dependent families," for 
the .year 1S9G. 

The whole number of indigent soldiers and sailors who 
have had more or less assistance during the year has been 
six, consisting of six families, all of whom have a settle- 
ment in this cit.v, at a cost of |289.30. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 
WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Ward 1, 
THOMAS L. QUIMBY, Ward 2, 
BENJAMIN F. GARLAND, Ward 3, 
GEORGE S. HOLMES, Ward 4, 
PATRICK COSTELLO, Ward 5, 
CHARLES FRANCIS, Ward G, 
WILLIAM MARSHALL, Ward 7, 
CHARLES S. McKEAN, Ward 8, 
LEANDER S. BOIVIN, Ward 9, 
Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 
A true copy. Attest: 

William H. Maxwell, 
Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR; 



Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

The City Solicitor makes the following report for the 
doings of the year 1895: 

Of the cases pending in court on January 1, ISOG, that 
of CarvcIJe v. Monchcster was adjusted between the plaint- 
iff and Koard of Water- Works Commissioners. Clough v. 
Mancliester, being an appeal from damages awarded for 
land taken for Canton street, was tried before the county 
commissioners, and a verdict satisfactory to the defend- 
ant rendered, from which decision an appeal was taken by 
the plaintiff to the jury. The case was settled by the 
payment of the amount awarded by the county commis- 
sioners, with the addition of what it would have cost to 
have tried the case by jury; and the settlement is deemed 
an eminently satisfactory one. The other cases still 
stand upon the various dockets. 

During the year, John Stanton v, Mancliester, John Shoe- 
han V. j\[anchest€)\ and Theresa Maler v. Manchester, have 
been brought and are now pending in court. The Stan- 
ton and Sheehan cases are both for damages for personal 
injury received by the plaintiff while in the employ of the 
Board of Street and Park Commissioners, at work in a 
sevrer trench. The Maier case is one for personal inju- 
ries received by being thrown from a carriage on South 
Main-street, over an embankment, where, the plaintiff 
claims, there was no suitable railing. * 

425 



426 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Durinj; the year mauy claims for damages for various 
causes of acliou have beeu iuvestij^ated and adjusted, in 
connectiou with the Committee on Claims and the Mayor. 
The solicitor would say that of the cases pending; against 
the city, eight are for damages arising from alleged dam- 
ages to real estate, caused by the city's use of the water in 
Lake Massabesic and Cohas brook; and five are for dam- 
ages for ])ersonal injuries to employees of the Street and 
Park Commission, received while working at their labor. 
This latter class of cases the solicitor hopes will all be dis- 
posed of without trial of any (juestion, except the law in- 
volved, as the trend of decisions in this state, if followed, 
holds the city free from liability in such class of cases. 

In addition to the management of the cases in court, 
the demands made upon the solicitor by the mayor and 
other city officials, and by the city councils and their vari- 
ous committees, have been numerous and vai-ied; and 
each year the number of demands increases, and more 
time of the solicitor is required to be devoted to the per- 
formance of the duties of the office. Whatever duties 
have arisen, the solicitor has endeavored to perform to 
the best of his ability. 

Expressing thanks for the courteous treatment from 
the members of the city government and the city officials, 
this rejiort is 

Respectfully submitted. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

City Solicitor. 
December 31, 1896. 



REPORTS 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



Pine Grove Cemetery, 

The sub-trustees of the Pine Grove cemetery submit 
the following report: 

During the year 1896 the Pine Grove cemetery has been 
cared for on the same general lines as have been followed 
the last few years. Many substantial improvements 
have been made, and the general appearance of the 
grounds permanently bettered. The rule adopted some 
time since, that no more lots should be sold until graded, 
has worked well, and is bringing about a greater uniform- 
ity in the looks of the lots; while the absence of walks re- 
sults in an improved general elfect. Twenty-three lots 
were sold in the lawns under perpetual care, showing 
that the preference for such lots is still marked, on the 
part of those who can afford to buy them. Thirty-four 
other lots were also sold during the year. 

About the usual amount of work was done during the 
year in the ordinary care of the grounds; and in addition 
the following permanent improvements have been made. 
About three thousand feet of water-pipe, and eight hun- 
dred and fifty feet of sewer pipe have been laid, covering 

429 



430 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

what, it is believod. will be the needs of the cemetery for 
several years, so far as main water and sewer pipes are 
concerned; although every year connecting pipes and ex- 
tensions to lots will have to be laid. Catch basins have 
been set in the southeast portion of the cemetery, where 
water has fre(inently covered the ground in springtime to 
the depth of fifteen inches; and their marked efficiency 
fully warrants a further expenditure for drainage by 
this means in the future. 

The avenues and paths have been kept in a generally 
good condition. Wildey avenue has been concreted, and 
also a considerable length of gutters on several avenues 
has been concreted. Over five hundred yards of concrete 
were laid during the year. In certain portions of the 
cemetery, where tliere is a considerable slope to the ave- 
nues, there is need of concreting or of graveling to quite a 
depth, in order to put the avenues into a suitable condi- 
tion, as in their present sandy state they are easily 
washed out by rains and thaws. 

The section in the western part of the cemetery north 
of the main gates has been graded, making one of the 
greatest improvements in the appearance of the grounds 
in recent years. A part of Chapel Lawn has also been 
graded, and a number of lots sold therein; and this lawn 
and Riverside Lawn bid fair to equal Landscape Lawn as 
spots of beauty. Five triangular plots at the intersec- 
tion of avenues have been laid out and set with shrubs, 
and settees placed therein, making mucli-n(^eded places of 
rest for visitors, and, we think, adding to the appearance 
of the grounds. Shrubs have been planted about the en- 
trances, the building has been painted outside, and the 
chapel improved and repaired. Six new settees were 
purchased, and four new iron drinking-fonntains of orna- 
mental design placed in ditTerent parts of the yard. 

Five linndred and sixteen iron markers, of the design 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 431 

approved by the last board, have been set in the ''Field of 
Manesquo," to take the place of the marble markers; and 
when all the graves in the public grounds have been so 
marked, and the marble markers removed, the appear- 
ance of those sections will be vastly improved. 

Altogether, the sub-trustees think that the work of the 
year has been satisfactorily done, and that this, the larg- 
est and most important cemetery in the city, is in a better 
general condition than ever before, and that our citizens 
may well be proud of the beauty, in site and in adorn- 
ment, of this home of the dead. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 
For the SuhTrustees. 



Valley Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the Valley cemetery respectfully 
submit the following report for the year 1896: 

During the past year the work has been under the same 
general plan as has been followed the past few years. 
The following improvements have been made: 

The stone steps on the west bank have been reset and 
concreted. The j^ath from the bridge in the valley to the 
office has been concreted. A new foot-bridge has been 
erected, and the driving bridge at the west side of the val- 
ley has been rejjaired. Grading has been commenced on 
the west side. The lots have been renumbered, and iron 
numbers placed on each lot. A larger number of lots 
than usual have been graded. 

MATERIAL USED. 

Loads loam : 89 

Loads sand 250 

Feet turf 2,200 

Cords manure 2 1-3 

Yards concrete laid 205 



432 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The following amount was collected and paid to the 
city treasurer: 

For water 1369.50 

Care of lots 748.25 

Sundries 383.5() 

Tomb fees 219.00 

Interments 164.00 

Removals 16,00 



11,900.31 

The sub-trustees think the work has been satisfactorily 
done, and the cemetery has been kept in a neat and tidy 
condition. The beautiful valley, with the plots of shrubs 
and liowers which have been planted, have helped to 
make this one of the most beautiful places known for the 
last resting-place of the dead. 

Respectfully submitted. 

S. P. CANNON, 
Fo7' the Committee. 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the Amoskeag cemetery respect- 
fully submit the following report for the year 1896: 

There have been three burials in this cemetery since 
our last report. In addition to the regular work of mow- 
ing the lots and keeping the paths clean, which has been 
done in an efficient manner, sixt}' loads of gravel have 
been i)laced where needed for grading the paths; one hun- 
dred and forty-six feet of iron fence have been built; one 
hundred and sixty-six feet of one-and-one-half-inch water- 
pipe have been laid to the center of the cemetery, with 
two stand-jupes attached thereto; and the old fence has 
been kept in repair. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 433 

There are a few needs for the coming year that are so 
imperative as to warrant being i^laced in this report. In 
accordance with the recommendation of our last report, a 
beginning lias been made in putting an iron fence around 
the cemetery. Not less than sixty feet should be added 
the coming season. At sometime in the past, for some 
unaccountable reason, the paths were dug out until in 
some places they were no longer paths, but ditches. The 
present superintendent has filled what he could with 
sand or gravel, that cost the city nothing but for the labor 
of hauling it. It is believed that now a small allowance 
in each annual appropriation should be made for such a 
purpose, that the aforesaid ditches may be filled more 
rapidly. 

Applications have been made the past year for lots, but 
there were none to sell. The city is growing rapidly in 
that direction, and before many years a new burial 
ground, or an enlargement of this, will be an absolute ne- 
cessity. Inasmuch as the Amoskeag Company has al- 
ready laid out streets in the vicinity, and houses are lia- 
ble to be built within a short distance at any time, it is 
deemed advisable to recommend that negotiations re- 
garding the purchase of more land from the company be 
entered upon in the immediate future. 

EBEN CARR, 
JAMES E. BAILEY, 
WILLIAM H. HUSE. 
Suh-Triistees of Amoskeag Cemetery. 

28 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you the annual re- 
port of the money received during the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1890: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Number of deeds delivered during the year, fifty-eight. 

To cash received for the same |2,327.96 

interest received for the same. . 15.9G 
cash received from superin- 
tendent 2,781.41 

15,125.33 

Ok. 

By treasurer's receipts |2,343.92 

superintendent's receipts 2,781.41 

^0,1^0.00 

Valley Cemetery. 

To cash received from superintendent $1,900.31 

Cr. 

By superintendent's receipts |1,900.31 

Respectfully submitted. 

FKED L. ALLEN, 
Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 



I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of 
Fred L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of cemeteries, and 
find the same correctly cast and properly vouched for. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

Auditor. 
434 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund pre 
sent their sixteenth annual report, including the report of 
the treasurer, showing in detail the administration of the 
fund for the year ending December 31, 1896. 

The amount held for the benefit of lots in the respective 
cemeteries will be found therein stated, as well as the in- 
crease of the fund during the past year, which is highly 
gratifying. 

The trustees have established the price requisite for 
the proper care of lots at forty cents per foot; the mini- 
mum, however, to be $100 for any lot. 

The price is fixed at this low figure in order that per- 
sons of limited means, as well as the rich, may avail them- 
selves of the privilege of the perpetual care of the last 
and final resting-place of all mankind; but the committee 
believe that this sum wisely and economically adminis- 
tered, will satisfactorily answer the purpose intended. 
Eespectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 
OTIS BARTON, 
CHARLES H. BARTLETT, 

Trustees of Cemetery Fund. 
435 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit to you the fourteenth 
annual report of the funds received and expenses paid to 
December 31, 1896: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January 

1, 1896 ".. 128,561.89 

Keceipts during the year: 

From Mrs. James Morrison |165.00 

M. E. Beard 115.20 

George W. Dodge 165.91 

Lewis M. Lull 92.98 

E. C. Howlett 160.00 

Mrs. L. M. Kendall 95.71 

W. H. Griffin 166.50 

George W. Barber 100.01 

John, George, and Lizzie M. 

Porter 198.00 

Annie B. F. Brown 200.00 

J. Franklin Robinson 165.00 

H.W.Oxford 140.25 

Mrs. Alma Witters 109.90 ' 

Waldron Chase 126.10 

436 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUND. 437 

From Ida A. Cusbman |131.97 

James E. Blanchard 200.00 

Hannah D. Hall 253.60 

Mrs. Marshall P. Hall 316.20 

Charles W. Hanson 119.83 

Sarah S. Pattee 165.00 

Charles E. French 108.06 

David Perkins 182.06 

Mrs. O. S. Danforth 140.25 

Marv E. Crawford 144.00 

Josiah Carpenter 720.00 

Joseph Bean 144.00 

Calvin Boynton heirs 50.00 

$4,675.53 



Total permanent fund Dec. 31, 1896. . $33,237.42 

Income on hand January 1, 1896 . . . |2,104.28 
Income received during the year. . . 1,473.22 



Expenses paid during the year: 

Joseph Benoit |18.75 

John B. Variek Co 4.97 

John B. Variek Co 20.75 

John B. Variek Co 23.75 

Manchester S. i& R. Co 40.00 

B. A. Stearns, superintendent 712.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1896. . 2,757.28 



5,577.50 



5,577.50 



Valley Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand Janu- 
ary 1, 1896 • 19,977.23 

Receipts during the year: 
From Mrs. Mary D. Perkins $100.00 



438 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

From S. E. Fitch |115.20 : 

Mrs. E. E. Balcb 488.40 

J. C. Bickford, adm'r 200.00 

Mrs. L. W. Nourse 115.20 

C. T. Allen, adm'r James 

Mitchell estate 150.00 

S. Josephine Butterfleld. . .. 120.00 

Martha W. Browii estate. . . 500.00 
Caroline I. Shattuck and 

Annie S. Griffin 144.00 

Mrs. Harriet K. Prime 108.00 

Mrs. Joseph H. Haines , 200.00 

12,240.80 

Total permanent fund Dec. 31, 1896. . . $12,218.03 

Income on hand January 1, 1896. .. $858.23 
Income received during the year. .. 505.09 

$1,363.32 



Expenses paid during the year: 

C. H. G. Foss, superintendent $293.18 

Cash on hand December 31, 1896. . 1,070.14 



$1,363.32 



GALE FUND, VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Amount of income on hand Janu- 
ary 1, 1896 $104.49 

Interest received during the year.. 13.16 

Expenses paid during the year: 

Care of lot $6.00 

Painting fence around Gale and. 

Ayer tomb 8.20 

Cash on hand December 31, 1896 . . 103.45 



$117.65 



$117.65 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUND. 439 

Piscataqua Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January 

1, 1896 POO.OO 

Keceived from Charles K. Walker 50,00 

Total permanent fund Dec. 81, 1896 . . . $350.00 

Income on hand January 1, 1896. . |58.08 

Income during the year 15.00 

173.08 

Cr. 

By cash on hand December 31, 1806 |73.08 

MARY P. HARRIS FUND. 

Amount of fund January 1, 1896 1500.00 

Total permanent fund Dec. 31, 1896. . . $500.00 

Income received from John K. McQuesten .... |289.33 

Cash on hand December 31, 1896 $289.33 



Merrill Cemetery. 

Amount of fund January 1, 1896 $487.89 

Total permanent fund Dec. 31, 1896. . . . $487.80 
Income on hand January 1, 1896. . $32.83 

Income received during the year. . 25.49 

$58.32 

Expenses paid during the year : 

Joseph Pelleron $6.00 

B. A. Stearns, superintendent .... 6.00 

Palmer & Garmon 3.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1896.. . 43.32 $58.32 

$58.32 

Respectfully submitted. 

FRED L. ALLEN, 
Treasurer of Cemetery Furid, 



440 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of ac- 
counts of Fred L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the 
cemetery funds, enibracinjjj the receipts and expenditures 
for the year ISOG, and I find the same correct and prop- 
erly vouched. I have also examined the securities in 
which said fund is invested, and find as follows: 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

5 per cent, 1913 114.700.00 

5 per cent, 1942 16,000.00 

Cash on hand 2,537.42 

Total amount of bonds and cash De- 
cember 31, 1890 133,237.42 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

5 per cent, 1913 |4,800.00 

5 per cent, 1942 6,000.00 

Cash on hand 1,418.03 

Total amount of bonds and cash De- 
cember 31, 1896 $12,218.03 

PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H., $300.00. 
Cash on hand. '. 50.00 

Total amount of bonds and cash De- 
cember 31, 189G $350.00 

Ma?'ij P. Harris Fund. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

6 per cent, 1897 $500.00 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUND. 441 

MERRILL CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. 

5 per cent, 1913. ! 1200.00 

5 per cent, 1942 250.00 

Cash on hand 37.89 

Total amount of bonds and cash De- 
cember 31, 1S9G 1487.89 



Total permanent fund Dec. 31, 1896. . . |4G,793.84 
JAMES E. DODGE, 

Auditor. 



Manchester, N. H., Dec. 26, 1896. 

John K. McQuesten respectfully submits the following 
statement of account as trustee of funds for the care of 
Piscataquog cemetery: 

Charges himself as follows: 

NoYember 7, 1891, amount on bank-book at 

Manchester SaYings Bank f 218.82 

July 1, 1892, interest on same 8.63 

July 1, 1893, interest on same 6.56 

1894, interest on same 5.89 

January 1, 1895, interest on same 7.64 

1897, interest on same 11.91 

Interest on bonds 1892, '93, '94, '95, and '96. . . 150.00 



.45 
Cr. 

By expenditures |120.12 

By cash on hand 289.33 

$409.45 



442 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

And claims tlie following credits as per vouchers, viz.: 

May 9, 1892, R. P. Stevens & Co |5.75 

May 9, 1892, N. E. Fullerton 1.00 

July 1, 1892, T. A. Lane 82.87 

December 30, 1894, C. A. Rowell 1.50 

June 8, 1895, L. & W. T. Seiberlich 4.33 

June 24, 1895, Bixby & Wilson 4.97 

June 4, 1895, Head '& Dowst 19.70 

January 1, 1897, cash in bank 284.35 

January 1, 1897, cash on hand 4.98 

1409.45 

Auditor's Office, December 26, 1896. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the within ac- 
count, and the same is correct. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

Auditor. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



To the Trustees of the Sinking Fund: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the fourth an- 
nual report of the receipts of this board for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1896. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund Jan. 1, 1896, 
for the payment of improvement 

bonds 110,222.65 

Appropriation for 1895 10,000.00 

Income received during the year. .. 606.50 

$20,829.15 



Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1896 |10,000.00 

Bonds bought during the year 10,000.00 

Premium on bonds 252.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1896. . 577.15 



120,829.15 



Dr. 

Total amount of fund Jan. 1, 1896, 

for the payment of water bonds . . |26,822.59 
Water-works, hydrant service, 1895 15,800.00 
Income received during the year. .. 1,378.33 

445 



144,000.92 



446 annual official reports. 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand Janviarj 1, 189G. $26,000.00 
Bonds bought during the year. . . . 16,000.00 

Premium on bonds 403.20 

Cash on hand December 31, 1896 . . . 1,597.72 



144,000.92 
Respectfully submitted. 

FRED L. ALLEN, 
Treasurer Sinking Fund, 



This is to certify that I have examined the books of ac- 
counts of Fred L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the 
sinking fund, embracing the receipts and expenditures 
for the year ending December 31, 1896, and find the same 
correct and properly vouched. I have also examined the 
securities in which said fund is invested, and find as fol- 
lows: 

For the payment of improvement bonds. 
Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. : 

4 per cent, 1908 flO,000.00 

4 per cent, 1913 5,000.00 

4 per cent, 1914 5,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1896. . . 577.15 

120,577.15 

For the payment of water bonds. 
Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. : 

4 per cent, 1909*^ $10,000.00 

4 per cent, 1910 6,000.00 

4 per cent, 1913 8,000.00 

4 per cent, 1914 18,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1896. . 1,597.72 

$43,597.72 



Total amount of sinking fund Dec. 31, 1896. . . $64,174.87 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

Auditor. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF HEALTH, 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor: 

The following is submitted by the Board of Health as 
its report for the year 189G: 

Dr. C. W. Downing having been re-appointed to suc- 
ceed himself, the board organized by re-electing Dr. C. F. 
Starr as chairman, and William K. Bobbins, M. Sc, as 
clerk. Early in the year Dr. C. F. Starr resigned on ac- 
count of ill health, and William J. Starr was appointed to 
serve out his term of office. Dr. C. W. Downing was then 
elected chairman of the board to serve out the unexpired 
time of Dr. Starr. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Salaries 1620.83 

Labor 2,740.0L 

Office furniture 35,82 

Printing and advertising 209.25 

Postage and envelopes 14.93 

Team • 59.50 

Car fares 73.95 

Board of team 102.74 

Express 7.90 

Telephone service 36.50 

Gas 1.68 

Legal expenses 16.74 

449 

29 



450 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Antitoxin 104.15 

T)ii>lith('ria oxnniiiiations 20.00 

Disinfectants m.:V.\ 

Aid given families quarantined rJO.O.") 

Board, fuel, etc., for jx^st-liouse 'MM7> 

Sundries 25.80 

Total $4,1()3.10 

MEETINGS. 

The regulai' weekly meetings begun last rear have been 
continued, it having proved a convenience to the public to 
know tha;t the board may be found at its ofiflce every 
Wednesday evening at 7 i'. m. Besides this, a somewhat 
smaller number of special meetings have been held, and 
the usual number of trips of inspection have been made. 

INSPECTORS. 

The same inspectors have been retained as during last 
year. The board felt that it was losing much of the value 
of Mr. Clough's services as an inspector and executive 
officer by ke])ing him in the oHice to attend to the grant 
ing of burial permits; so, in place of employing a man to 
give his whole time to the patroling of Lake Massabesic, 
Miss Ethel A. ^Marston was employed to take charge of 
the office, thus relieving Mr. ('lough, and giving the board 
two inspectors free from office duties. The work was 
therefore so arranged that, during the summer months, 
one or both of the inspectors should spend some part of 
each day at the lake. In this manner we believe the 
source of the city's water supply was guarded quite as 
well as usual. 

]Mr. Barry was retained as last year to give his special 
attention to the enforcement of the plumbing regula- 
tions. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 451 
SEWERS. 

The progress made during the year in putting in sewers 
is gratifying to the board, and we would suggest that 
special attention be given to the locality wnere there are 
springs, as in such, cesspools are of no avail, and trouble- 
some nuisances result from attempts to use them. Espe- 
cially is this the case in the southeastern part of the city. 

TLUMBING. 

The administration of the plumbing rules has pro- 
ceeded much the same as last year. While there is a bet- 
ter general voluntary compliance with the regulations, 
there are still some difficulties in the way of the best sani- 
tary arrangement and location of the drainage of build- 
ings. It is to be expected that in old buildings some con- 
cessions must be made in location; but it is very much to 
be regretted that, owing to the absence of building in- 
spectors, new buildings are constantly being erected 
wherein the drainage is located where it may be put in 
cheapest, and will be as far as possible from frost. 

The plumbing work in general has been more skillfully 
done, owing to the discontinuance of several parties who 
followed, but scarcely knew, the trade of a plumber. 

TENEMENT BLOCKS. 

Fewer tenement blocks have required the attention of 
the board this year than usual, but there are still many 
that require constant watching, and some that the board 
will insist must be renovated soon. 

DISPOSAL OF WASTES. 

The various dumps about the city have given the board 
more than the usual work this year; not that they are any 
worse than usual, they have always been decidedly bad, 



452 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

but because houses are beiuj? erected on or near them. 
The board is fully convinced that all the dumps now in 
use should be discontinued at once, and it will use every 
legitimate means to bring this about. The time has ar- 
rived when our general wastes must be disposed of, either 
by burning or by removal far out of the city, and we 
would recommend that, until a crematory can be in- 
stalled, a contract of some kind be made with the Boston 
& Maine Kailroad to remove the wastes by rail. For this 
purpose, cars specially fitted could be left at various 
parts of the city to receive the waste, and could be taken 
off to some distant swamp or waste land each day. The 
present arrangement for collecting the garbage, with 
some slight amendments, will give satisfaction for a 
while. 

First, the ordinance requiring swill and other matters 
kept separate by the householders, should be rigidly en- 
forced; and second, the private swill-gatherers should be 
put under control. At present, they roam about the city, 
taking any desirable swill they find, with no uniformity 
of time or manner. It will be taken from some houses so 
long that the city farm teams will discontinue looking for 
it, and then it will be left, and complaint made. Again, 
it often happens that several different swill teams will go 
through the same back street the same day, or even the 
same hour. This board would recommend that an ordi- 
nance be passed requiring all private swill-gatherers to 
be licensed by the Health Department, said license being 
revokable when all regulations are not properly ob- 
served. In such case we could prescribe the vessels and 
vehicles for transportation, and manner and time of gath- 
ering. For instance, if Mr. A wants to take the swill of 
Smith and Jones in one back street or block, he must also 
take that of Brown and whoever else lives in that district, 
so that no team other thniA that of Mr. A will cover that 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 453 

territory. In such a manner a very considerable saving 
of territory covered by the city farm team would be made, 
and at a corresponding economy; also the number of swill 
teams frequenting a given locality would be reduced to 
one. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASE HOSPITAL. 

The large number of contagious diseases during the 
year has impressed upon us anew the need this city has 
for a proper place of refuge for these diseases. The im- 
proper location of the place now used for such purposes 
was deeply impressed upon us during this summer, when 
we found it necessary to remove a case of varioloid from a 
hotel, and put it in the most popular public park of the 
city. We would again most earnestly urge upon your 
Honor, and through you the city councils, the great and 
immediate need of a contagious disease hospital. 

The following tables show the number of cases of con- 
tagious and infectious diseases reported during each 
month of the year, and the deaths resulting therefrom; 
also the average number of cases and deaths for the past 
twelve years, which is put in for the purpose of compari- 
son: 



454 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 





Membra- 
neous 
croup. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Vario- 
loid. 


Totals. 


Months. 


m 




m 
O 
m 
d 
O 

2 
1 
2 
2 

1 


03 

Oi 

Q 

1 


09 

« 

0) 

U 

10 
12 
9 
6 
4 
8 
2 
6 
10 
7 
1 
S 

81 


2 
d 
Q 

3 

5 
3 

1 

1 
2 
1 

1 

1 
2 

20 




d 
Q 


in 
» 

09 

d 

9 
9 
10 
1 
2 
2 
4 
3 
2 
6 
8 
6 

61 


CD 

d 

o 


o: 

4) 


09 

d 
« 
Q 


09 

<0 
09 

d 

21 
23 
23 
18 
15 
43 
33 
31 
26 
106 
125 
299 

763 


to 

d 


January .... 


1 


5 








1 

1 

7 

8 

31 

27 

19 

6 

61 

93 

246 

500 


1 
1 

1 
3 






5 




1 
2 


1 
1 








4 


April 

Mav .... 








2 










June 

July 


1 


1 




1 




? 






<? 


August 


1 




2 

8 
28 
19 
38 

103 


1 
1 
7 
3 
15 

28 








?, 








1 


October 

November.. 
December . . 

Totals... 


4 
4 
4 

17 


4 
4 
3 

14 








1? 








8 






. . . . 


?1 


1 


1 




66 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



455 



Years. 



1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
ISSS. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 



Membra- 
neous 


Diph- 


Typhoid 


Measles. 


croup. 


theria. 


fever. 










03 




fn 




OD 


m 




w 


X3 


m 


.a 


x 


.a 




















Cj 


en 


e! 




d 


« 


d 


ej 


OJ 


d 


« 




a; 




<o 


CJ 


Q 


U 


Q 


O 


Q 


o 


Q 



Scarlet 
fever. 



73 
126 
79 
41 
21 
26 
7 
42 
47 
103 



94 
44 

259 
63 
25 
44 

110 
67 
55 

500 



Vario- 
loid. 


Tots 


^ 




0? 






© 


m 






ei 


(D 


cS 


U 


Q 


O 



* 


7& 


* 


36 


« 


48 


392 


52 


428 


48 


438 


35 


211 


22 


554 


29 


408 


23 


418 


55 


260 


48 


763 


66 



*No returns made during this year. 

Inspection of these tables will reveal the fact that the 
number of contagious diseases is much larger than for 
several years. It will be noticed that the increase is due 
principally to the greater number of cases of measles and 
diphtheria. One probable reason for the excessive num- 
ber of cases of measles is doubtless want of isolation of 
patients. Many people seem to have a strange prejudice 
against the placarding of their premises, and as this dis- 
ease is usually not considered dangerous, in many cases 
no physician was called. The people ignorantly or will- 
fully failed to report the cases, and from such, of course^ 
the public had no protection. It is a relief to know that 
the death-rate from this disease has been very low. 

Diphtheria has, during the year, especially the latter 
part, been very prevalent. There have been reported to 



456 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the board 120 cases, with a mortality of 42, a fraction 
over 30 per cent. The board has been vigilant in trying 
to suppress the disease; witli what result, no one can tell; 
but it is safe to say that something has been accom- 
plished by isolation, quarantine, and disinfection. There 
has seemed to be no common cause of the disease, as 
nearly all sections of the city have suffered. We have 
feared that the dumps^ which are a standing menace, 
while not directly responsible, have, in some instances, 
aggravated the malady. The serum treatment of the dis- 
ease, which may still be regarded as suh judicc, is still 
sulTicienth' recognized to warrant the board in keeping on 
hand reliable antitoxin, which is furnished to physicians 
at cost for such of their patients as are able to i>ay for it; 
to those unable to pay for it, it is furnished gratis. We 
think a few lives have been saved by its timely use. 

Of the other diseases there have been about the usual 
number. Measles is placarded, but not quarantined. 
Scarlet fever and diphtheria, however, are maintained by 
the board in strict quarantine as nearh' as practicable. 

The special item, for use in aid of destitute families, in 
the appropriation this year, was most timely, as the quar- 
antine left man}- jjeople in need of the necessaries of life, 
and these were furnished by the board upon investiga- 
tion, nothing being paid for except what was ordered spe- 
citically by the inspectors. The board feels that in this 
way much suffering has been relieved, and that the 
spread of the disease has been materially checked. 

DISINFECTIOX. 

During the year the board has had constructed a lamp, 
invented by I'rof. F. C. Kobinsoii, which generates for- 
maldehyde gas from methyl akohol, or "wood spirit." 
This gas is generally conceded to be more effective as a 
disinfectant tlian sulphur fumes, and at the same time 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 457 

less liable to injure fabrics and colors. This method of 
fumigation has, therefore, been in use the latter part of 
the Tear. It costs more than sulj)hur, hence the expense 
for disinfectants is somewhat increased. 

DEATH RETURNS. 

In the granting of burial i)ermits we have insisted upon 
more careful statements of the causes of death, and al- 
though this has at times entailed some extra labor upon 
undertakers and ph3sicians, we think the accuracy of our 
statistics upon this subject justifies the extra pains and 
bother. 



458 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DEATH RETURNS. 

TABLE SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES 
AXD BY MONTHS FOR THE YEAB 1S96. 



CaijSes of Death. 




>> 
c3 

3 

B 

o 


o 
u 

d 


< 




6 


s 
<-> 


i 

3 

to 

< 


u 

a 

o 

o 
to 


B 

o 

O 


o 

S 
o 
> 

o 


« 

E 
o 
o 
» 


"3 
1 


















1 










1 
















1 










1 


'* concussion of 


1 






















1 








.... 


1 

1 


1 




1 


1 
1 






2 


g 


*< fall 




1 


3 










1 
1 


1 








1 


4 


*' injury to spine 
•' Internal inj'ies 
*' poison i n g by 


















1 
















1 



















1 

2 

1 










1 


*• run over by 






















3 


** run over by 
electric cars 
























1 


1 






















1 


Albuminuria and ob- 


1 






















\ 








2 

1 
















2 
























1 
















2 








4 


Aneurism of mesenteric 






















1 








1 

1 
3 






1 










3 


















1 


Apoplexy, cerebral i 2 


1 
I 
1 






1 


1 


I 


8 


3 




1 


18 
1 
























1 












2 


i 








1 


4 














1 




















1 
1 




1 


Bone, caries and compli- 




















1 


















2 

1 






2 






.... 


.... 


1 


.... 


... 


.... 








1 


4 










1 














1 
3 












1 






3 




3 


"i" 


1 












IS 














1 






1 

1 

1 




1 














1 


6 


















2 
























1 






1 


2 
1 


3 
3 
















H 


" " chronic 


.... 


3 








.... 




3 




10 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 459 

TABLE. — Continued. 



Causes of Death. 




a 

ei 
>-> 








eS 


4) 

3 


3 


tn 
3 
SC 
3, 
< 


3 
S 

03 



« 




s 

> 


S 

.a 
3 

03 



a 


"3 




1 


1 
1 

i 


4 

1 


4 
3 


2 
3 

1 




1 


2 


3 
2 


5 
2 


6 
2 


3 

1 


30 


" capillary 


12 


" chronic 


1 




1 


1 


6 
1 


Cancer of brain 


1 
1 




















1 


" of breast 






1 














1 


.... 


3 










1 










1 


" of head 








1 




1 












2 


" of liver 


1 




















1 










1 
















1 


" of perineum 


1 






















1 


















1 






1 






1 








1 
1 
1 


1 


1 


1 






5 


" of throat 










1 










1 


2 
















Carcinoma 












1 








J 


Catarrh, acute gastric... 
Childbirth 


1 






















1 










1 

7 


■47' 

2 


31 










1 


Cholera infantum 








3 


1 


13 


6 


2 




109 


" morbus 








2 


Collitis ileo 








i 

1 
1 






1 
1 










1 




1 


1 


.5 
1 
1 


... 


.... 


2 


2 






2 
3 
2 


15 


Croup, membraneous . . 


4 


4 
2 


14 


" spasmodic 












g 






1 
1 
2 








1 


Debility 


1 


1 


3 


2 

1 


3 




2 


4 
2 


2 
2 


.... 


2 
1 


21 




8 
1 
3 










1 




" mellitus. 








3 


















1 
1 

1 




1 








1 
1 


1 
1 
2 
2 








4 

28 

4 

7 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

10 

11 

4 












7 


3 


15 


Dropsy 






1 








Dysentery 












5 








Eclampsia 












1 














1 
1 




















Embolism 
























Empysema 












1 












" & bronchitis.. 




















1 
1 




Encephalitis, chronic ... 






















Endocarditis '* 


1 


"i' 


1 


2 














Enteritis 






2 
2 
1 


1 
4 


1 
1 


2 

1 


2 

"i" 


1 
1 


" gasti'O 








1 


1 


Entero-collitis 










Epilepsy 


1 






3 












4 


Epistaxis 




















1 


Erysipelas 


1 














1 











" & phlegmanous 
Exposure to cold 








1 












" 


1 
2 
1 
7 
2 
2 






1 


1 
















Fever, bilious 










1 
1 












" brain 






2 


1 






3 










" infantile i 










1 


.... 




1 


" remittent 




1 


1 












" scarlet 


3 




















1 


" typhoid 


5 


3 


1 






2 


1 




1 


1 


2 


19 


" typho-malarial... 




1 


X 


" unspecified 












1 
1 












1 


Gangrene 








1 
















2 


Gastritis 






1 
l 






3 


1 








5 


" acute alcoholic 




'i 


"i 


i 


1 










1 


Grippe 














3 


" insanity from 












... 






1 



460 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE.— Conti7med. 



Causes of Death. 


c 


>> 

s 


s 


'^3 

ft 
< 


>> 




s 


>. 

•? 


a 

< 


g 


ft 



v 

1 f 
8 §, 


s 



V 

P 























1 






1 




! 














1 


" dise!i!-e of.. 5 


5 2 


10 


6 


4 


3 

1 


3 






1 


1 


40 
1 












1 








1 
1 
2 


1 

7 


3 












. . . . 








1 


" valvular disease of 






1 




5 




4 


4 
1 


3 


4 


30 






1 


Hydrocephalus 




1 






1 


1 
1 


1 




1 




5 










1 


Intestine, perforation of 
















1 
5 








1 


1 


1 




1 


1 
1 




6 


2 


3 


4 


1 


W 


Insanity 


1 


Jaundice 
















1 


1 




?, 


Kidnej-s, congenital de- 














1 




1 










1 
















" carcinoma of. ....... 


















1 




1 










1 






1 
1 




1 


3 








1 

"i' 










91 




1 


3 


1 






1 








6 
















1 


" inflammation of.. 
Locomotor ataxia 












1 








1 










1 














1 










" ■ 


1 
3 












1 


" congestion of ... 2 






1 


1 




1 




1 


1 


1 


11 


" edema of 




1 
1 
1 


1 


Malnutrition 




.... 


1 




.... 












2 


M arasmus 




.... 

2 
1 

1 


1 
1 

2 


3 


2 


3 


1 


2 
1 

1 
1 
2 


14 


Measles 




3 


Meningitis 


1 

1 


"2 


3 

1 
2 


8 
.... 


5 
2 


3 


1 
2 
I 
1. 


1 
2 
1 


1 
3 


9,7 


cerebral 

" tubercular... 


17 

8 


Metritis 




1 


Morpbineism 








1 














1 


Multiple abscess 




1 


















1 


Muscular consumption. ..... 

Nephritis 


1 




















1 








2 

1 
1 


2 






1 






fi 


" chronic 1 


















9, 
























1 


" pyelo 
















1 






1 


Obstruction gall bladder 








1 












1 


Occlusion of rectum, con- 
genital 




















1 




1 


Old age 


3 

1 


2 

1 
1 


2 

1 


2 


2 


.... 


1 


3 
3 


3 


2 


?n 


Paralysis 




1 


7 


" cerebral 
















1 


" it heart dise'se 










1 














1 


" infantile 




















I 


1 


9 










1 


1 












f, 


Pericarditis 






1 
















1 


Peritonitis . ; 


1 


2 


1 




1 


"i" 


2 


1 
1 


3 


3 


3 


17 
2 


" metro 


" & pneun)onia 
" tubercular . .. 


.... 


1 
















1 




1 


















1 


Pertussis 




1 










1 


1 


3 


and broncho- 
pneumonia.. 




1 
















1 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 
TABLE.— Continued. 



461 



Causes of death. 


u 

S 

1-5 


>> 

s 

3 


March. 
April. 




03 

3 


>> 


m 
S 
SO 

s 
< 


3 

a 


.a 





s 

1 


s 

s 

® 

Q 


1 


H 




1 

5 




















1 


Pharyngitis 

Phthisis, pulmonary .. .• 


15 


14 12 


14 


5 


11 


6 


14 


7 

1 
1 
8 


7 


6 


116 
1 








. . 
















1 


Pneumonia 

" broncho 

" & heart dis- 


7 
1 


3 


5 


4 
1 


7 
1 


4 


3 

1 


"i' 


3 
1 


5 

1 


12 

2 


61 
9 


1 

1 




1 


" & paralysis . 




















1 















1 










" typhoid 

Poisoning.ac'te alc'holic 


1 


1 
















„ 








1 


"4 

1 










i 


1 

I'l 


1 




4 




2 




















1 


"i 




1 




1 








3 


















1 










1 
















'• muscular.. 
Sclerosis.posterior spin'l 


.... 




1 


















1 
1 
1 




























1 














Septica-mia 








1 


1 
1 




































1 
3 
























7 


10 


7 


8 


8 

1 




3 


7 




10 


7 


85 




1 


" hemorrhage of 
















1 








1 







1 














1 








1 






2 




1 






4 




















1 






1 








1 






















1 










1 


















1 








1 


" hereditary 

Tetanus, traumatic 


* i 

1 


1 
















1 
























1 








1 






j 




2 


.5 




1 










! 




1 


" of septicfe- 










1 














1 




















^ 






1 












1 
2 














1 




1 


1 
2 

80 




3 




1 






1 


2 


1 
1 

100 


11 






1 

98 




4 


Totals 


73 


91 


99 


101 


74 


135 

1 


108 


91 


86 


j 
1136 




1 



462 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 463 

The nnniber of deaths of ehiklren under five years of 
age is still unreasonably large, and the usual cause of 
death is preventable by sufficient and proper care and 
feeding. The board has given what encouragement it 
could to the use of sterilized milk. In this connection we 
are impressed that material aid in the direction of whole- 
some food for children might be secured by a more vigor- 
ous inspection of milk sold in this city. As the business 
is at present conducted, milkrmay well be considered as a 
dangerous source of food. The inspection of it should ex- 
tend to the very source of production, and all milk re- 
fused, sale in the city, where the health of the cattle and 
cleanliness of the stable is not first-class. In this matter 
the health department is powerless, as the inspection of 
milk is at present beyond our jurisdiction. 

In conclusion, we would express our thanks to your 
Honor, the city councils, and many citizens who have 
given us encouraging and timely assistance. 

C. W. DOWNING, M. D., 
WILLIAM K. ROBBINS, 
WILLIAM J. STARR, 
Board of Health of Manchester. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of H<ealth: 

We be<? leave to submit the following as the report of 
the sanitary inspectors for the year 189G: 

Vaults and privies inspected 646 

Vaults inspected after cleaning 625 

Water-closets inspected 2,350 

Yards and alleys inspected 1,952 

Cellars inspected 1,599 

Barns and outbuildings inspected 82 

Tenements inspected 382 

Barn cellars inspected 271 

Latrines inspected 16 

Teams and riggings of excavators Inspected. ... 13 

Soaperies, slaughter-houses, etc., inspected 14 

Cleaning or repairs were ordered as follows: 

Vaults and privies cleaned 107 

Yards and alleys cleaned 367 

Cellars cleaned 479 

Barn cellars cleaned. 21 

Barns, etc., cleaned 17 

Tenements cleaned 42 

Water-closets cleaned or repaired 398 

Vault covers repaired 24 

Leaky drainpipes repaired 3(i 

Openings other than leaks in the drainage system were 
found in (54 places, and same were closed by order of the 

464 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 465 

department. One thousand three hundred and three 
sinks have been examined, and 603 have been provided 
with traps. 

Sewerage was found running on the surface of the 
ground in 73 places, and such nuisances were abated 
either by entering the sewer or carrying away in some 
manner not offensive. 

In doing the work of the department it has been neces- 
sary to make 2,357 calls, and to write 1,209 letters. 

Three hundred and ninety-eight complaints have been 
investigated. In 269 cases th£ inspectors have been able 
to give relief, and in 129 cases it was found that no cause 
existed, or that same was beyond the control of the de- 
partment. 

Thirty-eight dead animals have been properly disposed 
of. 

One hundred and seventy-six hens and small animals 
have been removed f rotn cellars. 

One hundred and forty-five swine and cows have been 
discovered being kept within the sanitary limits of the 
city, without licenses. Same were ordered removed or 
licenses procured. 

Twelve complaints were made against the scavenger 
service; in each case the proper parties were notified and 
relief afforded. 

Eleven persons were discovered throwing garbage in 
the back street, and were warned against the practice. 

Private swill collectors have been notified seventeen 
times to be neater in their work. 

Eighteen catch-basins or street cesspools have been 
flushed or repaired by order of this department. 

Eighty-eight notices have been prepared and served, 
and proper returns made. 

A sanitary inspection has been made of 25 bakeshops. 

Two theaters were ordered cleaned and put into proper 
sanitary condition. 

30 



466 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Circus grounds have been inspected six times, and nui- 
sance abated once. 

Stable bedding was found in back street in 19 places, 
and ordered removed. 

The dumps have been inspected 72 times, and nuisances 
there to the number of 4 abated by the street department. 

One hundred and fifty-six nuisances not otherwise clas- 
sified have been abated through the efforts of this depart- 
ment. 

Thirty-three samples of water secured from Lake Mas- 
sabesic and springs and wells about the city, have been 
sent away for analysis. 

Householders have been given 26 permits to clean their 
own vaults. 

Permits to the number of 1,347 have been granted for 
the burial or removal of dead bodies, and the returns for- 
warded to the city registrar. 

A statement of mortality has been prepared each 
month, and copies sent to over two hundred other towns 
and cities, to local physicians, etc. 

Contagious and infectious diseases have been reported 
as follows: Measles, 500; diphtheria, 103; typhoid fever, 
SI; membraneous croup, 17; varioloid, 1; total, 763. six 
hundred and forty-one of these cases were reported by 
physicians, 48 by householders, and 74 were discovered 
by the inspectors. The inspectors were unable to trace 
the cause in 413 cases; in 308 cases the connection with 
some previous case was clearly traceable. Colds were 
the probable cause in 22 cases; 5 cases were contracted 
outside of the city; and in 15 cases it was reasonable to at- 
tribute the cause to unsanitary surroundings. 

In 110 cases disinfectants were being used. The in- 
spectors ordered their use in 153 cases. At most of these 
latter places instructions were given as to their use, and 
in many cases the department furnished the disinfect- 
ants. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 467 

In 59 cases patients were found well isolated, and in 
182 cases inspectors were obliged to order isolation. In 
nearly all of these cases it was necessary for the inspec- 
tors to give instructions as to the steps to be taken. 

Nine houses were watched to see that the rules of isola- 
tion were complied with; and 14 funerals were attended 
to prevent a too public observance of the same. 

Fifty houses where disease had existed were fumigated 
by the inspectors. 

Xinety-seven children who were attending school, and 
86 people who were working and living in houses where 
contagious disease existed, were either restrained from 
attending school and employment, or instructed as to 
thorough isolation from the disease until all danger from 
contagion had passed. 

Four cases have been cared for at the contagious dis- 
ease hospital. 

Four hundred and seventy-six houses have been pla- 
carded, and the placards removed at the termination of 
the disease. 

About 2,500 pamphlets issued by the State Board of 
Health have been distributed in the localities where con- 
tagious disease existed. 

Weekly reports of contagious and infectious diseases 
have been sent to the State Board of Health, Concord, 
and the United States Marine Hospital service, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

The inspectors have each in turn patroled the shores of 
Lake Massabesic, Sundays, holidays, and part of every 
other day from June 1 to October 1. 

Thirty-three people who were found bathing in the lake 
were driven out and warned not to enter it again. 

One hundred and eighteen dead fish were removed 
from the lake or its shores, and buried. Two cows were 
driven out of the water. 



468 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Kine persons were warned as to the disposal of sink- 
water. 

Two parties Avere cauglit washing clothes in the lake, 
and one throwing washing water in the lake. Both were 
reprimanded and warned. 

A pile of garbage found on the shore of the lake was 
Lurned. One party was restrained from throwing old 
pipe, into the water. One privy was ordered cleaned. 

Nuisances to the number of 14, not otherwise classified, 
were abated. 

Several picnics and band concerts were attended, to 
prevent the careless disposal of waste and rubbish in the 
lake or on its shore. 

Banana skins, sawdust, tin cans, paper, and rubbish of 
all sorts, have been removed whenever found. 

The inspection of plumbing has, as during the last two 
years, been attended to by Richard J. Barry, with the fol- 
lowing results: 

Number of jobs reported ' 798 

tank water-closets 1,0G2 

pressure closets 73 

Kelley & Genesee closets 2(1 

sinks G62 

bath-tubs 440 

wash-bowls 358 

wash-trays 78 

slop-hoppers 8 

urinals 4 



Total number of fixtures- put in 2,074 

The pipe put in was tested with water in G97 places. 
'At 15 places where water was not accessible, the smoke 
test was used in place of water. 

A total of 2,289 inspections were made of the work dur- 
ing its progress and after its completion. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 469 

At 248 places work was foimd defective. In all such 
cases the defective work was removed and proper work 
substituted therefor. 

In several cases i)lumbers were found trying to deceive 
the inspector, but in most cases the work has been more 
expertly done than in previous years, as several parties 
who were inclined to be dishonest, or were incompetent 
from lack of knowledge and experience, have discontin- 
ued the occupation. 

The inspector has been to some trouble to secure from 
his reports the following statistics as to new buildings, 
which he thinks may be interesting : 

Total number reported 15G 

Single tenement buildings 98 

Two-tenement buildings 29 

Three-tenement buildings 17 

Four-tenement buildings 3 

Six-tenement buildings 2 

Eight-tenement buildings 1 

Sixteen-tenement buildings 1 

New schoolhouses, 2; large apartment block, 1; cracker 
factory, 1; freight depot, 1; and police patrol stable, 1. 

The total value, according to his best judgment, is 
1700,000. 

The inspectors desire to express their thanks to the 
honorable board who have so ably directed their efforts; 
also to all who have aided them in the work of the depart- 
ment. 

HEKBERT S. CLOUGH, 
JOHN F. LOONEY. 
RICHAllD J. BARRY. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS. AND 
ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELFXTRIC 

LIGHTS. 



Gas Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Chestnut. 

Appleton, west end. 

Salmon, between Elm and Canal. 

Blodget and Chestnut. 

Orange and Chestnut. 

Orange, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Bridge, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Pearl and Walnut. 

Orange and Walnut. 

Orange and Beech. 

Pearl and Maple. 

Arlington and Maple. 

East High and Maple. 

Lowell and South. 

Concord and Belmont. 

Amherst and Belmont. 

Concord and Beacon. 

Lowell and Beacon. 

East High and Belmont. 

East High and Hall. 

Belmont and Central. 

Maple and Cedar. 

Willow and Merrill. 

473 



474 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Auburn and Franklin. 
One lijjlit on State. 
Kiver, near Turner Hall. 
Milford and Bowman. 
Mil ford and B. 
River and Doujrlas. 
Dover and Granite. 

Oil Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Adams. 

Pearl and Linden. 

Canal, near Amoskeag bridge. 

Merrimack and Beacon. 

Hanover and Mammoth road. 

Lake avenue and Hail road. 

Elm and Shasta. 

Elm and Baker. 

One light on Baker. 

Douglas and West. 

Douglas and Quincy. 

Granite and Quincv. 

Mast road and Riddle. 

Carroll. 

Bowman. 

A and B streets. 

Light near the Huntress gardens. 

Mammoth road and Cohas avenue. 

Mammoth road and Island Pond road. 

Mammoth road and Cilley. 

Mammoth road and Young. 

Massabesic and Hall road. 

Massabesic and Taylor. 

Belmont and Green. 

Valley and Taylor. 

Valley and Cypress. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 475 

Cypress and Prout avenue. 

Jewett and Young, 

Young and Taylor. 

Three lights on River road, south of Blue store. 

Ten lights in Goffe's Falls. 

Three lights in Youngsville. 

One light on Candia road, near Xoah Reed's. 

One light on Candia road, near Walter Cody's house. 

One light at junction of Lake avenue and Hanover, 

One light on Island Pond road, Mill-Dam House. 

Amherst and Beacon. 

One light at junction Ainsworth avenue and Young road. 

One light at junction Ainsworth avenue and Young 

street. 
One light on Taylor near Byron Stearns's house. 
One light on Taylor, near Gilmore's house. 
One light on Valley, near Eastman's store. 
One light on Candia road, at P, Rogers's. 
One light on Candia road, at Dan Cronin's. 
One light on Candia road, at G. Bean's, 
One light on Candia road, at C. Francis's. 
One light on Candia road, at S, Mead's, 
One light on Candia road, at Claflin's. 
One light on Hanover, at Sam Page's, 
One light at junction of Hanover and Page. 
One light at Brown's. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Proctor, 
One light at junction of Hanover and Candia roads. 
One light at junction of Proctor and Candia roads. 

Electric Lights in Use. 

No. 1. Cypress and Massabesic, arm. 

2, Massabesic and Old Falls road, pole. 

3. Lake avenue and Beacon, arm. 

4, Central and Hall, " 

5. Lake avenue and Massabesic, " 



476 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Kg. 0. Wilson and Laurel, arm. 

7. Merrimack and Hall, •' 

8. ]Manchesler and Hall, " 

9. Manchester and Wilson, " 

10. Hanover and Ashland, " 

11. Hanover and Hall, * " 

12. Hanover and Beacon, " 

13. Concord and Ashland, " 

14. Bridge and Hall, " 

15. Myrtle and Russell, " 

16. Pearl and Linden, " 

17. Pearl and Eussell, "' 

18. Bridge and Nashua, " 

19. Nashua and High, " 

20. Concord and Dutton, " 

21. Amherst and Lincoln, " 

22. Hanover and Lincoln, " 
2.3. Manchester and Lincoln, " 
24. Merrimack and Lincoln, " 
2.5. Laurel and Lincoln, " 
20. Central and Lincoln, " 

27. Lake avenue and Lincoln, " 

28. Spruce and Lincoln, " 

29. Spruce and Maple, '•' 
?.(). Lake avenue and Maple, " 
31. Central and Maple, " 
?,2. Merrimack and Maple, " 
33. Manchester and Maple, *' 
.34. Hanover and Maple, 

35. Amherst and Maple, " 

30. Concord and Maple, " 

37. Lowell and Nashua, " 

38. Bridge and Maple, " 
.'J<:'. Mjrtle and Maple, " 

40. Orange and Ash, " 

41. Harrison and Beech, " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 477 

No. 42. Myrtle- and Beech arm. 

43. Pearl and Beech, « 

44. Bridge and Beech, " 

45. Lowell and Ash, " 

46. Amherst and Ash, " 

47. Lowell and Beech, " 

48. Concord and Walnut, "■ 

49. Amherst and Beech, " 

50. Hanover and Beech, " 

51. Hanover square, pole. 

52. Manchester and Beech, arm. 

53. Merrimack and Beech, " 

54. Laurel and Beech, 

55. Central and Beech, 

56. Lake avenue and Beech, 

57. Spruce and Beech, 

58. Cedar and Union, 

59. Lake avenue and L'^nion, 

60. Central and LTnion, 

61. Laurel and Union, 

62. Merrimack and Union, 

63. Manchester and L^nion, 

64. Hanover and Union, 

65. Amherst and Union, 

66. Concord and Union, 

67. Lowell and Walnut, 

68. Lowell and Union, 

69. High and Union, 

70. Bridge and Union, 

71. Bridge and Walnut, 

72. Orange and Union, 

73. Prospect and Union, 

74. Brook and Union, 

75. Pennacook and Union, 

76. Webster and Pine, 

77. North and Pine, pole. 



478 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 78. Sag:aiiioi'e aud Pine, arui. 
. 79. Blodjjet and Pine, '* 

80. Harrison and Hazel, " 

81. Prospect and Pine, « 

82. Myrtle and Pine, « 
88. Orange and Pine, '• 

84. Pearl and Pine, « 

85. Bridge and Pine, " 

86. Tremont square, pole. 

87. High and Pine, arm. 

88. Lowell and Pine, " 

89. Concord and Pine, 

90. Amherst and Pine, " 

91. Hanover and Pine, " 

92. jNIanchester and Pine, " 

93. Merrimack and Pine, " 
91. Laurel and Pine, " 

95. Central and Pine, " 

96. Lake avenue and Pine, " 

97. Cedar and Pine, " 

98. Auburn and Pine, " 

99. Cedar and Chestnut, " 

100. Park square, pole. 

101. Lake avenue and Chestnut, arm. 

102. Central and Chestnut, 

103. INIerrimack square, east, pole. 

104. Merrimack and Chestnut, arm. 

105. Manchester and Chestnut, " 

106. Hanover and Chestnut, " 

107. Concord square, east, pole. 

108. Concord square, west, '' 

109. Chestnut and Concord back street, arm. 

110. Chestnut and High, " 

111. Chestnut and Bridge, '* 

112. Chestnut and Pearl, " 

113. Chestnut and Myrtle, " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 479 

No. 114. Chestnut and Harrison, arm. 

115. Chestnut and Brook, "• 

116. Pennacook and Chestnut, pole. 

117. Salmon and Chestnut, " 
lis. Webster and Chestnut, arm. 

119. Clarke and Elm, " 

120. Webster and Elm, " 

121. North and Elm, 

122. Salmon and Elm, " 
12.3. Pennacook and Elm, " 

124. Brook and Elm, " 

125. Harrison and Elm, " 

126. Langdon street, pole. 

127. Dean and Elm, arm. 
12S. Prospect and Chestnut, " 

129. Orange and Elm, " 

130. Kidder and Elm, " 

131. Elm east back street, on Pearl, " 

132. Bridge and Elm, " 

133. Washington and Church, " 

134. Birch and Lowell, " 

135. Lowell and Elm, " 

136. Elm east back street, between Lowell and 

Concord, " 

137. Water and Elm, " 

138. Vine and Concord, " 

139. Vine and Amherst, " 

140. Amherst and Elm, " 

141. Spring and Elm west back street, " 

142. Stark street, " 

143. Market and Franklin, " 

144. Market and Elm, " 

145. Hanover and Elm east back street, " 

146. Elm and Manchester, " 

147. Dean ayenue and Elm west back street, 

148. Elm and Merrimack, " 



480 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

N'o. 149. Franklin and Merrimack arm. 

150. Middle street, '* 

151. Merrimack square, west, pole. 

152. Elm and Central, arm, 

153. Elm and Lake avenue, " 
15-4. Elm and ISpruce, " 

155. Elm east back street, between Spruce and 

Cedar, pole. 

156. Elm and Cedar, arm, 

157. Franklin and Granite, " 

158. Elm and xVuburn, " 

159. Elm and Green, '' 

160. Elm and Valley, 

161. Elm and Brown avenue, " 

162. Summer and State, pole. 

163. Granite and State, arm. 

164. Granite bridge, east, pole. 

165. Bedford and Granite, 

166. Canal and Granite, " 

167. Depot and Canal, " 

168. Central, between Franklin and Canal, 

169. Bedford and Central, arm, 

170. Canal and Merrimack, •' 

171. Canal and Middle, 

172. Canal and Stark, " 

173. Canal and Mechanic, ** 

174. Canal and Spring, '' 

175. Canal and Bridge, " 

176. McGregor bridge, east, pole, 

177. Canal and Hollis, '' 

178. Canal and Dean, " 

179. Canal and Langdon, arm. 

180. Kiver road and North, " 

181. Amoskeag bridge, east, o 

182. Amoskeag bridge, west, o 

183. Amoskeag watering-trough, pole. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 481 



No. 184. Amoskeag brick store, 

185. McGregor and Main, 

186. McGregor and Bridge, 

187. McGregor bridge, west, 

188. Amory and Main, 

189. Amory and Beauport, 

190. Wayne and Beauport, 

191. Marion and Main, 

192. McGregor and Wayne, 

193. McGregor and Putnam, 
191. Sullivan and Main, 

195. Beauport and Sullivan, 

196. Main and Schuyler, 

197. Wilton and Main, 

198. Douglas and Main, 

199. Douglas and Barr, 

200. Granite and Green, 

201. West and Granite, 

202. Granite and Main, 

203. Granite and Second, 

204. Granite bridge, west, 

205. School and Turner, 

206. School and Third, 

207. Second and Bath, 

208. Ferry and Turner, 

209. Ferry and Third, 

210. Walker and Second, 

211. Blaine and Third, 

212. Clinton and Main, 

213. Walker and Main, 

214. Parker and West, 

215. Winter and Parker, 

216. Main and Mast, 

217. Main and Milford, 

218. Main and A, 

219. Carroll and Milford, 

31 



pole. 



arm. 
pole. 



arm'* 



pole, 
arm. 

a 

pole, 
arm. 



pole, 
arm. 



482 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 220. Old Mast road and Mast, arm. 

221. Hall and Amherst, " 

222. Laurel and Maple, " 
-223. Central and Wilson, " 

224. Harrison and Pine, " 

225. Massabesic and Belmont, pole. 

226. Union and Appleton, arm. 

227. Elm and Young, pole. 

228. Franklin and Pleasant, arm. 

229. Elm and Appleton, " 

230. Milford and Riddle, " 

231. Nutt road and Portsmouth railroad, pole. 

232. Lake avenue and Canton, *' 

233. Laurel and Hall, arm. 

234. Beech and Brook, *' 

235. Kidder and Boyden, pule. 

236. Myrtle and Walnut, arm. 

237. Bridge and Linden, " 

238. Lowell and Ashland, . " 

239. Lowell and Belmont, " 

240. Pearl and Union, " 

241. Salem and L'nion, pole. 

242. Water street, arm. 

243. Arlington and Ashland, " 
. 244. Orange and Oak, " 

245. Prospect and Oak, " 

246. Arlington and Russell, *' 

247. ^Valnut and Gore, " 

248. Laurel and Milton, " 

249. Massabesic and Hospital road, pole. 

250. Lake avenue and Wilson, arm. 

251. Bridge and Ash, " 

252. Franklin and Depot, " 

253. Spruce and Union, " 

254. Malvern and East High, " 

255. Hanover and Highland, pole. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 483 



No. 256. Auburn and Beech, 
257. Kidder and Whitney, 
25S. Valley and Jewett, 

259. Concord and Derrj, 

260. Auburn and Union, 

261. Harrison and Walnut, 

262. West Hancock and Second, 

263. Douglas and West, 

264. Hooksett road, Amoskeag, 

265. Ash and Prospect, 

266. Canal and Salmon, 

267. Harrison and IJussell, 

268. Gates and Dubuque, 

269. Baker and Elm, 

270. Auburn and Maple, 

271. Pine and Salmon, 

272. Adams and Appleton, 

273. Clarke and River road, 

274. North Main and Bremer, 

275. Beech and Cedar, 

276. Cass and Lake avenue, 

277. Mast and Riddle, 

278. Brown avenue and Baker, 

279. Brown avenue and Hancock, 

280. Clarke and Union, 

281. Brook and Maple, 

282. Market and Canal, 

283. Brook and Hazel, 

284. Webster and River road, 

285. Webster and Walnut, 

286. Chestnut, near Ray Brook, 

287. Concord and Beech, 

288. Prospect and Linden, 

289. Pearl and Morrison, 

290. Concord and Hall, 



pole. 



arm. 
pole. 



arm. 
pole, 
arm. 
pole. 



arm. 
pole. 



arm. 
pole, 
arm. 
pole, 
arm. 
pole. 



arm. 
pole. 

a 

arm. 



484 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 291. Merrimack and Belmont, " arm. 

292. Spruce and Beacon, " 

293. Belmont and Grove, •' 

294. Bowman, near Milford, " 

295. Amory and Rimmon, pole. 

296. Pine and Valley, " 

297. Manchester and Milton, " 

298. Mammoth and Candia road, " 

299. Cypress and Hayward, " 

300. Conant and Rimmon, " 

301. Cartier and Kelley, ■* 

302. Monmouth and McGregor back street, '* 

303. Calef road and Welch avenue, " 

304. Valley and Taylor, arm. 

305. Pine and Brook, " 
30G. Conant and Beauport, " 

307. Douglas and North Weare Railroad, pole. 

308. Orange and Hall, '' 

309. Wayne and Dubuque, arm. 

310. Putnam and Cartier, arm. 

311. Hall road and Lake avenue, pole. 

312. Walker and Fourth, arm. 

313. Winter, near Main, " 

314. Walker and Turner, pole. 

315. Ainsworth avenue and Young street, arm. 

316. Valley and Belmont, " 

317. Pine and Grove, " • 

318. Blaine and Second, " 

319. Amory and Morgan, " 

320. Amory and Alsace, , " 

321. East High and South, " 

322. Blaine and Main, " 

323. Dover and Clinton, " 

324. Elm back street, on Blodget, " 

325. B and C, pole. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 485 

No. 326. Milford and Bismarck, - pole. 

327. Merrimack and Wilson, arm. 

328. Pennacook and Canal, pole. 

329. Adams and Cartier, " 

330. Amherst and Ashland, arm. 

331. Putnam and Bartlett, pole. 

332. Auburn and Chestnut, arm. 

333. Laurel and Laurel avenue, " 

334. Hanover and Belmont, " 

335. Lowell and Malvern, " 

336. Wilson and Adams, " 

337. Lincoln and Silver, « 

338. Somerville and Jewett, " 

339. Elm and Ray brook, " 

340. Amory and Bartlett, i " 

341. W^est Hancock and Dartmouth, " 
842. Monroe and River road, " 

343. Marion and McGregor, , " 

344. South Main and Harvell, " 

345. South Main and Hancock, " 

346. Boynton street, " 

347. Mast road and Forest, " 

348. North and Union, « 

349. Kelley and Rimmon, " 

350. Cooledge, near Kelley, " 

351. Buzzell and East High, " 

352. Mechanic and Elm back street, " 

353. Harrison and Maple, " 

354. North and Bay, " 

355. Front and Dunbarton, " 

356. Orange and Linden, '' 

357. Myrtle, near Belmont, " 

358. Taylor and Young road, " 

359. Nutt road and Auger avenue, " 

360. Union and Grove, j " 



486 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 361. Kelley and Alsace, arm. 

362. Main and Wayne, '< 

363. Spruce and Barry avenue, " 
. 36-4. Lowell and Hall, " 

365. Central and Canal, « 

366. Myrtle and Elm back street, " 

367. Wilson and Silver, « 

368. Beech and Young, " 

369. Beech and Lawrence Railroad, " 

370. Lincoln and Cedar, " 

371. Wilson and Spruce, " 

372. Laurel and Beacon, " 

373. Harrison and Oak, " 

374. Pearl and Oak, " 

375. Liberty and Webster, " 

376. Wentworth and Bell, " 

377. Montgomery and Conant, " 

378. Massabesic and Hall road, " 

379. Summer and Hall, . " 

380. Harrison and Ash, " 

381. Bridge and Highland, " 

382. Lowell and Chestnut, " 

383. Spruce and Chestnut west back street, " 

384. Tilton and Bowman avenue, " 

385. Prince and Boynton, " 

386. Carroll and Charlestown avenue, " 

387. Beech and Silver, " 

388. Beech and Portsmouth railroad, " 

389. Merrimack and Franklin west back street, '' 
. 390. Prospect and Elm back street, " 

391. Pine and Pennacook, " 

392. Sagamore and Walnut, " 

393. Bridge and Belmont, *' 

394. Cypress and Valley, *' 

395. Carpenter and Union, . *' 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 487 

No. 396. North River road and Rowell, arm. 

397. North Kiver road and Stark park, •' 

398. Hanover and Grant, " 

399. Page and Portsmouth railroad, *' 

400. Central and Cass, ♦<■ 

401. Second and Schiller, '^ 

402. Mast and Bowman, *' 

403. North Union, '^ 

404. Gore and Ash, " 

405. South and Elm, « 

406. Beech and Nutt road, " 

407. Ashland and East High, " 

408. Laurel and Belmont, '- 

409. Lake avenue and Beacon, '' 

410. Pine and Green, ** ' 

411. Hanover and Page, " 

412. Beech and Green, " 

413. New Mast road and Wilkins, " 

414. Derryfield park, " ; 

415. Charles street, " 

416. State, near Granite, " 

417. Union and Valley, •' 

418. LTnion and Silver, " 

419. Valley and Wilson, " 

420. Auburn and Wilson, "■ 

421. Cedar, near Maple, '^ 
422. Thornton and Sullivan, '' 

423. New Mast road and D, " 

424. Pearl and Belmont, " 

425. State, south of Granite, " 

426. State east back, '^ 

427. Elm and Shasta, '^ 

428. North and Union, '<■ 

429. Nutfield Lane, north of Amherst, '"^ 

430. Elm and Elm avenue, "■ 



488 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 431. Arlington and Warren, arm. 

432. Merrimack and Belmont, " 

433. Amory, near Montgomery, '' 

434. Granite bridge, center, pole. 

435. Prospect and Hall, arm. 

436. Gore and Beech, " 

437. Union and Whitford, " 

438. Bedford road, 

439. Elm and Carpenter, " 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF CITY AUDITOR. 



To the City Councils: 

Gentlemen, — The auditor herewith submits to your 
honorable body his annual report. 

WORK OF THE OFFICE. 

There have been made during the year the usual annual 
examination of the accounts of the treasurer, city clerk, 
water-works, superintendents of Pine Grove and Valley 
cemeteries, treasurer of cemeteries, tax collector, super- 
intendent of city farm, superintendent of schools; 
monthly examination of the accounts of city weigher, 
quarterly examination of the accounts of chief of police, 
semi-annual examination of the account of the clerk of 
the police court; and compilation and superintendence of 
the publication of the annual report. 

Six thousand three hundred and forty-one bills against 
the city have been examined and certified as correct. All 
the pay-rolls for the street and park commission, schools, 
fire department, water-works, police department, ceme- 
teries, city farm, and city officials, have been examined 
and certified to. 

Twelve monthly drafts, amounting in the aggregate to 
$1,402,007.01, have been drawn on the city treasury. 

Accounts have been kept with all the appropriations, 
with the treasurer, and tax collector. 

491 



492 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

EXPENDITURES. 

The amount of appropriation for auditor's de- 
partment was 12,000.00 

Expended for salaries |1,8G0.00 

Expended for supplies 109.77 

Balance transferred to reserved 

fund 30.23 

$2,000.00 

The auditor desires especially to again call the atten- 
tion of the various standing committees to the law in re- 
gard to contracting bills in behalf of the city. 

"Standing committees have advisory powers only." 
That is, they can recommend to the city councils the mak- 
ing of contracts. "They cannot legally be endowed with 
executive or legislative powers by ordinance or resolution 
of the city councils." That is, they cannot be authorized 
to purchase anj'thing in behalf of the city. For instance: 
If the committee on fire department desire to purchase a 
hose wagon for the fire department, said committee 
should present to the city councils an order like this, to 
wit: 

"An Order to purchase a Hose Wagon for the Fire De- 
partment. 

"Ordered, etc., That the city purchase of a two- 
horse hose wagon for use of the lire department, at a cost 
of $. . ., the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for fire department; and the mayor and joint 
standing committee on fire department are authorized to 
execute a contract for the same." 

Several of the committees have been very lax in this 
respect during the past year, and have attempted to make 
contracts without the least semblance of authority from 
tlje city councils, which has put the parties contracted 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 493 

with to great annoyance and trouble in getting their bills 
approved, having to wait sometimes months for the nec- 
essary ratification by the city councils. Clerks of all 
committees should be requested by the chairman, when 
an expenditure of monej^ is deemed necessary, to prepare 
an order and present to the councils for legal authority, 
before proceeding to make any contract. 

The auditor returns his thanks to Mayor Clarke, the 
city councils, the committee on accounts, the street and 
park commission, and the heads of departments, for their 
uniform courtesy and kindness. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 
I Auditor. 



494 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 



Dr. 

To Second Xational Bank, temporary loan. |100,000.00 

E. H. Rollins & Sons, bridge bonds 130,000.00 

E. H. Rollins & Sons, premium on bonds 832.00 
E. H. Rollins & Sons, accrued interest 

on bonds 72.20 

sinking fund trustees, school bonds. . . . 26,000.00 
sinking fund trustees, premium on 

bonds G55.20 

George A. Fernald & Co., school bonds. 54,000.00 
George A. Fernald & Co., premium on 

bonds 2,354.40 

George A. Fernald & Co., accrued inter- 
est on bonds 36.00 

George A. Fernald & Co., school bonds. 40,000.00 
George A. Fernald & Co., premium on 

bonds '. 1,214.40 

George A. Fernald & Co., accrued inter- 
est on bonds 182.22 

George A. Fernald & Co., improvement 

bonds 100,000.00 

George A. Fernald & Co., premium on 

bonds 5,317.00 

George A. Fernald & Co., accrued inter- 
est on bonds 188.90 

N. r. Kidder, city hall receipts 48.00 

Philharmonic Society, rent city hall 28.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 495 

To N. p. Kidder, dog licenses $1,281.07 

N. P. Kidder, billiard table licenses 175.00 

N. P. Kidder, lunch-cart licenses 62.50 

N. P. Kidder, show licenses 298.00 

N. P. Kidder, sewer licenses 3,236.48 

< N. P. Kidder, rent of bill board , 30.00 

N. P. Kidder, rent of tenements 275.96 

; H. D. Lord, rent of tenements 203.30 

M. J. Healy, police department 62,769.19 

i J. C. Bickford, police department 1,236.32 

Charles K. Walker, water-works re- 
ceipts 128,907.03 

B. A. Stearns, Pine Grove cemetery 2,781.31 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer Pine Grove 

cemetery 2,343.92 

C. H. G. Foss, Valley cemetery 1,900.31 

county of Hillsborough, paupers off the 

farm 3,400.71 

E. G. Libbey, superintendent city farm, 

receipts 4,494.12 

E. C. Smith, milk licenses. 80.00 

A. B. Eaton, city scales, receipts 313.43 

, cemetery fund trustees, bonds 6,000.00 

William E. Buck, tuition 289.55 

William E. Buck, free text-books 216.43 

George E. Morrill, taxes, 1893 591.79 

George E. Morrill, abatement taxes, 

1895 532.47 

George E. Morrill, taxes, 1895 36,592.46 

George E. Morrill, interest on taxes, 

1895 1,031.31 

George E. Morrill, taxes, 1896 490,304.44 

George E. Morrill, abatement of taxes, 

1896 588.43 

George E. Morrill, redemption of land, 

1893 1,788.29 



496 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

To George E. Morrill, redemption of land, 

1894 11,376.77 

George E. Morrill, redemption of land, 

1895 1,258.40 

street and park commission, sundry per- 
sons 1,391.29 

Pike & Heald Co., overdraft, health de- 
partment 1.66 

Barnard Taffe, peddler's license 20.00 

Barnet Giistin, peddler's license 20.00 

[A.. Noalett, overdraft. Division No. 10 

pay-roll 4.50 

P. Coiiley, overdraft, Division No. 10 

pay-roll 4.50 

town of Londonderry, school-tax, 1895. . 44.47 

Timothy Shea, land sold on Bridge 

street 7,200.00 

Solomon Kaplan, peddler's license , 20.00 

C. H. Hutchinson Co., old boiler 10.00 

Cyrille LeBrun, peddler's license 20.00 

Simon Leonenstein, peddler's license. . ., 20.00 

C. H. Manning, old iron .50 

S. Levenson, peddler's license 20.00 

Second National Bank, security bond. . 100,000.00 
Second National Bank, premium on 

bond 5.00 

A. Weinstein, peddler's license 20.00 

.W. H. Darling, fire-alarm telegraph, old 

zincs 6.43 

William M. Parsons, rent of Hallsville 

school yard 5.00 

H. B. Fairbanks, account land sold on 

Wilson street . 726.50 

Lewis & Heald, account land sold on 
Wilson street 1,199.20 



REPORT OP THE CITY TREASURER. 497 

To Lewis & Paige, account laud sold ou 

Wilson street |1,760.00 

J. Hodge, overdraft, commons .70 

Taggart & ManaJian, laud sold. School 

street .650.00 

Charles A. Flint, land sold. Spruce 

street 553.44 

Charles A. Flint, interest on note 19.30 

Trinity M. E. church, land sold. School 

street 2,407.55 

A. N. Clapp, land sold, School street... . 602.66 

S. Peltin, peddler's license 20.00 

Barbara Kalie, peddler's license 20.00 

S. Harrison, peddler's license 20.0() 

Asehr Weinices, peddler's license 20.00 

M. Severson, peddler's license 20.00 

F. A. Dockham, school building, South 

Main street 75.00 

C. W. Boynton, land sold, Spruce street. 182.09 

C. W. Boynton, interest on note 32. 7S 

George E. Morrill, old taxes 350.68 

Solon A. Carter, insurance tax 2,632,50 

Solon A. Carter, railroad tax 29,530.64 

Solon A. Carter, savings bank tax 50,770.79 

Solon A. Carter, literary fund 3,869.60 

Sarah I. Locke, land sold. South Man- 
chester 145.00 

H. B. Fairbanks, land sold, South Man- 
chester 50.00 

Water-works, pay-roll Division No. 7. . . 12.00 

S. Lichtenstein, peddler's license 20.00 

George S. Eastman, hose house build- 
ing, Clinton street 50.00 



,419,841.15 



32 



498 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Unpaid bills December 31, 1890 |80,09S.53 

Cash on hand January 1, 1S96 207,576.01 

Amount of deposit in Commonwealth Bank, 

January 1, 1896 2,344.68 

11,709,860.40 

Cr. 
Total amount of drafts for the year 1896. . . $1,402,067.01 

Unpaid bills, January 1, 1896 66,831.82 

Cash on hand January 1, 1897 240,961.57 

$1,709,860.40 
FRED L. ALLEN, 

City Treasurer. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester, N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — I have examined the accounts of Fred L. 
Allen, city treasurer, for the year ending December 31, 
1896, and find proper vouchers for all payments, and all 
receipts duly accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January 1, 1896, was . . $143,088.90 
Receipts during the year 1,419,841.15 

Total $1,562,930.05 

Amount of drafts during the year $1,402,067.01 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1896 160,863.04 

Total $1,502,930.05 

The cash balance taken December 31, 1896, 1 find to be 
as follows: 

Deposited in Suffolk National Bank $20,652.00 

Deposited in Second National Bank 212,404.12 



KEPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 499 

Deposited in oflQce safe |6,498.61 

Deposited in National Bank of the Common- 
wealth 1,406.83 



Gross amount of cash on hand $240,961.57 

Deduct amount of bills unpaid 80,098.53 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1896 . $160,863.04 

Respectfully submitted, together with a tabular state- 
ment of the receipts and expenditures of the city for the 
year 1896. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 

STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDI- 
TURES OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER 
FOR THE YEAR 1896. 



Receipts. 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Received from: 

Direct city taxes |528,960.27 

Cost and interest on taxes. . . 1,031.31 

$529,991.58 

Licenses to enter sewer $3,236.48 

to keep dog 1,281.07 

to sell milk 80.00 

to keep billiard ta- 
ble 175.00 

to shows and exhi- 
bitions 298.00 

to peddle 260.00 

to lunch-carts 62.50 

$5,393.05 

Rents 585.26 

$535,969.89 



500 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

Keceived from: 

City scales 1313.43 

Miscellaneous sources 384.05 

1697.48 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Eeceived from text-books and tuition $505.98 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Received from fines and costs 164,005.51 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Received from: 

Pine Grove cemetery $5,119.23 

Valley cemetery 1,900.31 

$7,019.54 

WATER-WORKS. 

Gross receipts $128,907.03 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Received from: 

City farm $4,494.12 

Hillsborough county, board- 
ing paupers and Industrial 
school inmates 3,400.71 

$7,894.83 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Received from: 
Premium on bonds and notes 

sold.. $10,.378.00 

Accrued interest on bonds. . . 531.46 



RECEIPTS. 601 

Land redeemed from tax sale $4,423.46 
Manchester Electric R. R., on 

account of Granite bridge. 1,228.00 

Land sold 15,476.44 

132,037.36 

Total ordinary receipts during the 
year 1896 $777,037.62 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Received from loans in anticipation of tax 
of 1896 1100,000.00 

STATE. 

Received from: 

Insurance taxes $2,632.50 

Railroad taxes 29,530.64 

Savings bank taxes 50,770.79 

Literary fund 3,869.60 

;-j $86,803.53 

BONDED DEBT. 

'Received from: 

Improvement bonds sold $100,000.00 

Bridge bonds sold 130,000.00 

Cemetery bonds sold 6,000.00 

Schoolhouse bonds sold 120,000.00 

Security bonds sold 100,000.00 

$456,000.00 

Gross receipts $1,419,841.15 

Net cash on hand January 1, 1896 143,088.90 

$1,562,930.05 



502 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Paid interest on water bonds. . $41,44G.OO 
interest on city bonds. . .. 30,362.00 
interest o n cemetery] 

bonds 1,912.48 

interest o n temporally 

loan, anticipation tax, 

1896 925.01 

Paid city ball |5,316.61 

printing and stationery. . 1,938.55 

incidental expenses 16,526.42 

mayor's incidentals 249.54 

city officers' salaries 14,885.49 

city auditor's department 1,969.77 

sinking fund trustees.... 15,000.00 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Paid street and park commis- 
sion 13,712.03 

repairs of highways 18,370.94 

snow and ice 5,250.78 

new highways 18,617.52 

land taken for highways. 2,911.12 

watering streets 4,196.48 

paving streets 6.320.69 

macadamizing streets . . . 17,019.13 

grading for concrete 5,035.82 

scavenger service 14,991.10 

street sweeping 2,968.44 

lighting streets 51,426.60 

bridges 4,336.88 



174,645.49 



55,886.38 



EXPENDITURES. 503 

Paid city teams |6,285.70 

repairs of sewers 5,421.63 

new sewers 41,015.08 

Silver-street sewer 16,124.13 

Cliristian brook sewer. . . 5,187.08 
Kiver road and Elm- 
street sewer 9,302.43 

widening and straighten- 
ing old Mammoth road. 1,000.00 
macadamizing Central 

street 2,829.35 

new bridge, Granite 

street 138,755.73 

1381,079.26 

engineer's department. 

Paid engineer's department |5,895.25 

health department. 

Paid health department |4,163.39 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT, 

Paid repairs of schoolhouses . . . $6,578.38 

fuel 6,784.03 

furniture and supplies... 1,114.14 

books and stationery 46.04 

printing and advertising. 429.56 

contingent expenses 1,857.79 

care of rooms 5,031.56 

evening schools 1,061.50 

teachers' salaries 72,838.95 

salaries school committee, 

clerk, truant officer. .. . 1,100.00 
salary of superintendent. 2,300.00 
evening school, mechani- 
cal drawing 356.25 



504 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid free text-books $5,058.42 

manual training 1,403.29 

— 1105,959.91 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid city library |4,877.37 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid fire department |63,567.G5 

fire-alarm telegraph 1,730.42 

hydrant service 16,800.00 

_ 182,098.07 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid police department |43,047.05 

police patrol 9,999.81 

153,046.86 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Paid repairs of buildings $7,549.68 

new schoolhouse, ward 8.. 20,255.54 
new schoolhouses 101,003.32 

$128,808.54 

WATER-WORKS. 

Paid water-works $95,993.68 

water-works sinking fund 16,800.00 

$112,793.68 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Paid commons $4,351.15 

Stark and Derryfield 

parks 5,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery .... 8,593.54 

Valley cemetery 3,006.84 

Amoskeag cemeterv 349.72 

$21,301.25 



EXPENDITURES. 605 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Paid paupers off the farm .f 12,140.67 

city farm 8,463.89 

indigent soldiers 285.85 

Women's Aid and Relief 

Hospital 300.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital . . . 300.00 

free beds, Elliot Hospital. 300.00 
Emergency ward, Elliot 

Hospital 300.00 

free beds, Notre Dame des 

Lourdes Hospital 300.00 

cemi-centennial celebra- 
tion 2,000.00 

decoration of soldiers' 

graves 407.47 

militia 800.00 

band concerts 300.00 

■ 125,897.88 



ABATEMENTS. 

Paid abatement of taxes |1,183.98 

Total of ordinary municipal expendi- 
tures 11,057,637.29 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Paid loan made in anticipation of tax for 

1896 1100,000.00 

BONDED DEBT. 

Paid school bonds $10,000.00 

security bonds 100,000.00 

'■ 1110,000.00^ 



606 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STATE AND COUNTY TAXES. 



Paid state tax 168,225.00 

county tax 66,204.72 

1134,429 . 72 



Grand total of expenditures during 
the year $1,402,067.01 

Cash on Land December 31, 

1896 1240,961.57 

Less unpaid bills 80,098.53 

:Net cash on hand 1160,863.04 



11,562,930.05 



Interest. 

Appropriation $35,000.00 

Transferred from water-works. 41,446.00 

$76,446.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Second National Bank, in- 
terest on 1100,000 bond 
one month $208.33 

discount on $100,000, forty- 
three da^'S 716.68 

coupons on bridge bonds . . 2,402.00 

coupons on city bonds. . .. 6,200.00 

coupons on improvement 

bonds 13,940.00 

coupons on schoolhouse 

bonds 5,320.00 



RECEIPTS. 





Jiiniiary 1. 
Bulnnce 
on band. 


Direct city 


Costa and 

interest on 

taxes. 


LICENSES. 


Rents. 


City taim. 


Hlllsboro' 
county, 
board of 
panpera 
anil Indus, 
tiial .School 
inmates. 


Land .sold. 


Premium 

on bonds 

sold. 


Accrued 
interest on 
bonds sold. 


Land 
redeemed. 


Mlscella. 


Bridges. 


City scales. 


Tuition 

and te.Tt. 

books. 


Court fines 
and costs. 


Pine Grove 
cemetery. 




Year. 


To enter 


To keep 
dog. 


To sell 
milk. 


To keep 
billiard 
tabic . 


For ped- 
dle rs.shows, 
exhibitions 

and 
lunch carta. 


Valley iGrosa 
cemetery. , wale 

1 


1890* 


$143,088.90 


$528,900.27 


$1,031.31 


$3,236.48 


$1,281.07 


$80.00 


$175.00 


$620.50 


$.o86.2C 


.$4,4U4.12 


.$3,400.71 


$15,476.44 


$10,378.00 


$531.46 $4,423.46 


$384.05 


$1,228.00 1 $313.43 $505.98 1$64,805.51 


$5,119.23 $1,900.31 $128 



EXPENDITURES. 



«™hE8T. 


Cityofflccrsi* 
salai-ies. 


City ball. 










»T«EETA.r,SEWEKBBPA..TME>.T. 


Year. 

On water 
bonds. 


On city 
bonds. 


On 

cemetery 
bonds. 


On tem- 
porary loan. 


Auditor's 
department. 


Police 
department. 


Street and 
park com- 
mistiion. 


Hepairs of 
snowMuf'iie 


New 
highways. 


Widening 
old Mam- 
moth road. 


Land 
damages. 


Sprinkling. 


Paving. 


Macadamiz- 
ing. 


Grading for 
concrete. 


Scavenger 
teams. 


Street 
sweeping. 


LigbtinK 
Streets. 


Bridges, 
tenauce. 


Granite- 
street bridge. 


City teams. 


Repaii-9 of 
sewers and Ne 
drains. 

j 


1890.. $41,446.00 


$30,362.00 


$1,912.48 


$925.01 


$14,886.49 


$5,310. 61 


$1,909.77 


$53,040.86 


$3,712.03 


.823,021.72 


$18,617.62 


$1,000.00 


$2,911.12 


$4,196.48 


.$6..320.69 


$19,848.48 


.$5,035.82 


$14,991.10 


$2,968.44 


$51,426.60 


$4,336.88 


$138,755.73 


$6,285.70 


$5,421.63 1 $ 



EXPENDITUR ES.- continued. 









Incidental 
e.xpensea. 


Mayor's 

inci- 
dentals. 


CITV LIBRAUY. 


FIBB DEPAttT.MENT. 


PDBLIC BmLmNOS. 


WATKK-WOniCS. 


Punuc PLACES. 


CHARITY, PATRIOTISM, VI 


Year. 


Engineer's Health 
depart- depart- 
ment, ment. 


Printing 

and 
stationei'y. 


Main- 
tenance. 


Books. 


Fire depart- 
ment. 


Fire-alarm 
telegraph. 


Hydrant 
service. 


llepaira. 


N'ew school- 

liouses. lands, 

buildings and 

furniture. 


Construction, 
repairs, and 

penses. 


Sinking 
fund. 


Commons. 


Stark and 

Derrylield 

parks. 


1 Pine Grove 
' cemetery. 


Vftlloy 
cemetery. 


Amoskeag 
cemetery. 


Paupnrs off 
tile farm. 


City farm . 


Notre- Dame 

de Lourdes 

hospital. 


DecoTBr 
Indigent Uon of 
soldiers soldiers' 

graves. 


Sand 
concerts. 


M 


1896.. 


$5,895.25 $4,163.39 


$1,938.55 


$16,520.42 


.$249.54 


$3,877.37 


$1,000.00 


$63,567.65 


$1,730.42 


$16,800.00 


$7,549.68 


$121,258.86 


$95,993.68 


$16,800.00 


84,351.15 


$5,000.00 


$8,593.54 


$3,006.84 


$349-72 


$12,140,671 $8,463.89 


$300.00 


$285.85 ! $407.47 

■ 


$300.00 


$8 



* See Reports for 1894 and IK96 for comparison with other years. 



RECEIPTS. 





Premium Accrued 
on bonds interest on 
sold. bonds sold. 


Land 
reileemcd. 


Miscellu- 


Bridges. 


City scales. 


Tuition 

and text- 
books. 


Court fines 
and costs. 


Pine Grove 
ecmetciy. 


Valley 
cemetery. 


Gross receipts 
water- works. 


Tot'l ordinary 
receipts dur- 
ing the year, 

e^cclnding 
cusli on hand. 


LOAN. 


TAXES KECEIVED FROM THE STATE. 


Total receipts 

from loans and 

state taxes. 




I,nTnl sold. 


Temjior.iry. 


Bonded. 


Insurance 
lax. 


Rail toad 


Savings 
bank tax. 


I.iterars' 
fund. 


receipts during 

the year. 

Including 

cash on hand. 


S15,476.44 


$10,378.00 $631.46 


$4,423.46 


$384.05 


$1,228.00 $313.43 


$S05.98 ($64,005.51 


$5,119.23 


$1,900.31 


$128,907.03 


$777,037.62 


$100,000.00 


$456,000.00 


$2,632.50 


$29,530.64 


$50,770.79 


$3,869.60 


$642,803.53 


$1,562,930.05 



EXPENDITURES. 



STREET AND BEWEK DKPAKTBIENT. 






SCHOOL D 


BP.BTMBKT- 








aving. 


Macadainiz- 
ing. 


Grading for 
concrete. 


Scavenger 


Street 
sweeping. 


Ligliting 
streets. 


Bridges, 
tonancc. 


Granite- 
street bridge. 


City teams. 


Repairs of 

sewers and 

drains. 


New sewers. 


Slnkinj! 
fund. 


Repairs 
of school- 
houses. 


Pnol. 


Furniture 

and sup- 

plies. 


Books and 
stationery. 


Printing 
and adver- 
tising. 


Contingent 
expenses. 


Care of 


Evening 
schools. 


Teachers' 
salaries. 


Salaries of 
school com- 
mittees 
and truant 
officers. 


Salary of 

auperlnten- 

dentof 

schools. 


Evening 

schools, Free text- 
mechanical books, 
drawing. 


Manual 
trainvng. 


5,320.69 


$19,8-J8.48 


$5,035.82 


$14,991.10 


$2,968.44 


$51,426.60 


$4,336.88 


$138,755.73 


$6,285.70 


$5,421.63 


$71,629.32 


$15,000.00 


$6,578.38 


$6,784.03 


$1,114.14 


$46.04 


$429.56 


$1,857.79 


$5,031.66 


$1,061.50 


$72,838.95 


$1,100.00 


$2,300.00 


$356.25 S5.058.42 


$1,403.29 









EXPENDITURES. 


— CONTINUED. 


































PUBLIC PLACES. 


CHAttITT, PATltlOTISM, I'UILANTIIKOPT. 


Tax abate- 


Total of ordi- 
nary municipal 
expenditures. 


Debt. 


Temporary 
loan. 


State tax. ', County tax. 


Total of loan 
debt and 
state and coun- 
ty tax ex- 
penditure. 


Grand total of 
expenditures. 




mmons. 


Stark and b 

Derryfleld f 

parks. 1 


Pine Grove 
cemetery. 


Valley 
cemetery. 


Amoskcag 
ccmctery- 


Paupnrs off 
the farm. 


City (arm . 


Notrc-Damo 

dc Lourdes 

hospital. 


Indigent 
aouricrs 


Decora- 
tion of 
Boidlei's' 
graves. 


Sand 
concerts. 


Militia. 


Women's 
Aid and 

Relief 
hospital- 


Scmi-Cen- 
tennial cele- 
bration. 


Free beds, 

Elliot 
hospital. 


Sacred 
Heart 
hospital. 


Emergen- 
cy -ward, 
Elliot h09. 
pital. 


Cash on hand. 


4.351.15 


$5,000.00 


$8,593.54 


83,006.84 


$349-72 


$12,140.67 $8,463.89 


$300.00 


$285.85 $407.47 


$300.00 


$800.00 


$.300.00 


$2,000.00 


$300.00 


$300.00 


$300.00 


$1,133.96 


$1,057,637.29 


$110,000.00 


$100,000.00 


$68,225.00 $66,204.72 


$344,429.72 ;$1,402.067.01 


$160,863.04 



coupons on improvement 

bonds 13,910.00 

coupons on scboolhouse 

bonds 5,320.00 



SINKING FUND. 507 

Paid coupons on water bonds. ., 141,446.00 
coupons o n cemetery 

bonds 1,912.48 

coupons on security note. 2,500.00 

— |74,G45.49 

Total expenditures |74,645.49 

Transferred to reserved fund 1,800.51 

176,446.00 



Payment of Funded Debt. 

[A^ppropriation 110,000.00 

Eeceived from Second National 

Bank for bonds sold 100,000.00 

1110,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Second National Bank, 
four notes of |25,000 
each, dated March 1, 
1894, and due March 1, 

1896 1100,000.00 

schoolhouse bonds, due 
July 1, 1896 10,000.00 

1110,000.00 



Sinking Fund. 
:A:ppropriation $15,000.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid sinking fund commissioners |15,000.00 



608 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Reserved Fund. 

Appropriation |10,000.00 

Keceived from sale of land 1,G60.21 

Transferred from the following accounts: 

Interest 1,800.51 

Printing and stationery 561.45 

City officers' salaries 2,714.51 

Mayor's incidentals 50.46 

Auditor's department 30.23 

Street and park commission. 287.97 

land taken for highways 2,088.88 

Watering streets 803.52 

Macadamizing streets 151.52 

Street sweeping 31.56 

Scavenger service 1,008.90 

Lighting streets 573.40 

Health department 36.61 

Books and stationery 53.96 

Care of rooms 468.44 

Teachers' salaries 1,161.05 

Evening schools 438.50 

Evening school, mechanical 

drawing 143.75 

Manual training 96.71 

Fire-alarm telegraph 269.58 

Police station 487.69 

Police court 32.01 

Police patrol .19 

Commons 148.85 

Amoskeag cemetery .28 

Indigent soldiers 164.15 

Abatement of taxes 1,816.04 

Free cash in treasury in ex- 
cess of appropriations 9,191.80 



$36,272.73 



RESERVED FUND 509 



Expenditures. 



Transfers to the following accounts: 

City hall 1316.61 

Incidental expenses 3,026.42 

Eepairs of highways 312.78 

Snow and ice 308.94 

Bridges 336.88 

Grading for concrete 35.82 

City teams 285.70 

Repairs of sewers 421.03 

New bridge, Granite street . . 7,527.73 

Engineer's department 1,395.25 

Repairs of schoolhouses 578.38 

Fuel 284.03 

Furniture and supplies 114.14 

Printing and advertising. . . . 129.56 

Contingent expenses 257.79 

Free text-books 58.42 

Fire department 2,567.65 

Police commission 866.75 

Repairs of buildings 1,549.68 

New schoolhouse, West Man- 
chester 10,255.54 

Valley cemetery 6.84 

Pine Grove cemetery 93.54 

Paupers off the farm 1,640.67 

City farm 463.89 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 7.47 

New sewers 186.06 

New schoolhouses 2,923.87 

Paving streets 320.69 



.73 



510 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Temporary Loan. 

Receipts. 

Received from f^econd National Bank, on 
two notes of .^^50,000 each, dated October 
24, 1896 $100,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Second National Bank, two notes of 
150,000 each, dated October 24, 1896 |100,000.00 



City Hall. 



Appropriation |4,000.00 

Transferred from appropriation 

for public bath-hoases 1,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 316.61 



5,316.61 



Expenditures. 

FUEL AND lights. 

Paid Manchester Electric Light 

Co., electric lights flSl.OO 

Manchester Electric Co., 

electric lights 128.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., 

gas 2.59.00 

Union Electric Co., elec- 
tric lights 499.49 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

30 tons broken coal 187.50 

4 cords wood 24.00 



CITY HALL, 511 



Paid Moore & Preston, 20 tons 

broken coal 1125.00 

E. V. Turcotte, 68 tons, 

1,250 lbs. coal 367.14 



WATER AND TELEPHONE. 

Paid New England Telephone & 
Telegraph Co., use of 

telephones $75.00 

Manchester Water- Works, 

use of water 476.70 



CLEANING OFFICES, ETC. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey: 

Brooms, mops, toilet paper, 

etc 113.95 

2 ash-cans 6.00 

Paid A. M. Eastman, matches. . .36 
J. S. Holt & Co., 156 gal- 
lons soap 22.22 

Mary Nolan, cleaning of- 
fices 285.00 

Oscar Perkins, care gents' 

toilet, etc 352.00 

F. H. Thurston, soap, 

mayor's office 1.00 

John B. Varick Co., pails, 
mops, mop-yarn, brooms, 

hose, etc 11.97 

Weston & Hill Co., 60 
yards scrim 2.16 



L,741.13 



1551.70 



1694.66 



512 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



INCIDENTAL REPAIRS. 



Paid J. J. Abbott, glass and set- 




ting same, lettering 




transoms, etc 


124.40 


Adams Brothers, 40 lbs. 




cement 


.40 


D. J. Adams, keys, repair- 




ing Qlieck i)iincli 


2.55 


Paid L. M. Aldrich: 




Lumber and labor 


10.59 


Wire cloth, etc 


1.56 


Paid E. M. Bryant & Co., lamps, 




shades, labor 


5.54 


Bunton Bros. & Co., re- 




seating chairs 


6.95 


J. F. Burton, mason work 


1.70 


James K, Carr «& Co., 4 




lights glass and setting 




same 


1.90 


Peter Harris, keys ... 


.40 


Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 




Lumber and labor 


47.58 


Bill for painting 


63.76 


Screen cloth, screens, screen 




doors, etc 


138.04 


Paid George Holbrook, lumber 




and labor 


15.75 


George W. Hamlin, paint 




and labor 


38.89 


Kimball & Hobbs, enam- 




eled cloth, etc 


.67 



CITY HALL. 513 



Paid T. A. Lane Co. : 

Labor on water-closets $23.02 

Labor on telephone and elec- 
trics 11.90 

1 light glass .20 

Paid Perkins & Franks, repair- 
ing fan motor 2.50 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Copper wire, chain, nippers, 

etc 1.40 

1 door-spring and catch 3.50 

2 thermometers 1.75 

Paid P. W. Webb, assignee F. I. 

Lessard & Co. : 
Material and bronzing radia- 
tors 23.05 

Repairing locks 3.68 



FURNITURE, FIXTURES, OFFICE SUPPLIES. 

Paid T. W. Day, 2 vols. ''Reid on 

Corporate Finance" $11.00 

R. D. Gay, awnings and 

shades 122.58 

Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co.: 

72 chairs 27.00 

Use 192 chairs 9.60 

2 cuspidors, treasurer's of- 
fice 1.00 

1 desk, treasurer's office 35.00 

2 office chairs, treasurer's of- 
fice 15.00 

2 pine tables 3.70 

Paid ^Manchester Hardware 
Co., twine, locks, lan- 
tern, iron, etc 4.35 

33 



$431.68 



514 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co., 1 
Welsbacli lamp, stand, 
and tubing, assessor's 
office 14.50 

Pike & neald Co., 1 ash- 
can cover 3.50 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., 

1 N. E. Directory 6.00 

Second National Bank, 1 
large iron and brick 
vault, doors, etc.; 1 steel 
safe, with safety deposit 
boxes; 1 black walnut 
counter with appurte- 
nances; 1 large black 
walnut library table; 6 
office chairs; 1 uphol- 
stered lounge 1,500.00 

D. A. Simons, 1 chair, su- 
perintendent schools. . . 5.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 
1 cash-book and canvas 
cover, treasurer 8.00 

John B. Varick Co., 



shovel, oil, can 

Weston & Hill Co., 2 flags.. 


1.20 
14.50 


SUNDRIES. 

A. Elliott & Co., premium 
on insurance policy. . . . 

T. E. Fifleld, matches 

R. D. Gay, taking down 
awnings 


131.16 
.72 

10 25 


W. P. Goodman, paste. . .. 


.10 



L,771.93 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 515 

Paid pay-roll, division No. 2 : 

Januajj !|1.46 

July 6.82 

Paid Richardson & Goggin, pre- 
mium on insurance pol- 
icy 25.00 

John A. Sheehan, pre- 
mium on insurance pol- 
icy 50.00 



1125.51 



Total expenditures 15,316.61 

Printing and Stationery. 
Appropriation |2,500.00 

Expenditures. 

assessors and inspectors. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing : 

400 blanks |6.00 

Check-lists 321.50 

Additions to check-lists 79.40 

Advertising 13.50 

Paid A. E. Martell & Co., 3 let- 
ter books 7.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 
pencils, books, rubber 

bands, etc 12.92 

$440.82 



516 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
advertising : 

Sale non-resident lands, three 
times 135.70 

Printing notices and receipts. 29.00 

Paid Independent Statesman, 

advertising tax-list 7.50 

Paid A. E. Martell & Co. : 

1 letter book , 3.50 

6 deposit slip books 4.75 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 

paper 1.45 



CITY CLERK. 




Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 




printing : 




Certificate blanks, letter 




headings, circulars, cards. 




etc 


122.90 


Blank books 


32.00 


Paid Nate Kellogg Co., : 




300 envelopes 


7.75 


Dog licenses 


8.25 


Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, pa- 




per, covers, fasteners, 




etc 


3.20 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




envelopes, seals, blank 




book 


7.25 



181.90 



$81.35 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 517 

CITY TREASURER. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing pay-rolls, letter 
headings, blank books, 

note circulars /f 33,50 

W. P. Goodman, cash ^ 

book, inkstand, ledgers, 
envelopes, pen-holders, 

erasers, etc 33.29 

Paid The Nate Kellogg Co., 
printing : 

2,500 orders, 500 receipts 9.00 

1,000 pay-rolls, 1,000 postals. 17.75 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

1 leather envelope .75 

200 deeds 4.00 

198.29 



CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing: 

100 statements bonded debt.. |8.00 

1,000 blank bills 6.00 

800 reports 950.66 

Binding 150 reports 150.00 

Lettering 52 reports 5.20 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Diary , .50 

72 document envelopes 5.76 

4 blank books 8.00 



MAYOR. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing order blanks.. 



11,1.34.12 



518 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid E. E. Coburn Co., type- 
writer paper |2.49 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Paper, envelopes 34.48 

Mucilage, shorthand books.. 2.95 

CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
notices, blanks, envel- 
opes 119.25 

The Nate Kellogg Co., 

printing 29.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 
paper, ink, pen-holders, 
inkstand 1.15 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to reserved fund 

Incidental Expenses. 

Appropriation $12,000.00 

Keceived from sale of land, res- 
olution May 5, 1896 2,000.00 

Transferred from appropriation 

for public bath-houses 1,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 3,026.42 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
roll, division Xo. 2: 
Januarv $30.00 



$52.17 



$49.90 

$1,938.55 
561.45 

$2,500.00 



.$18,526.42 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 519 

February |2J:.00 

March 24.00 

April. 30.00 

May..' 24.00 

June 191.95 

.July 24.00 

August 24.00 

September 30.00 

October 24.00 

November 24.00 

December 30.00 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
rolls, division No. 10: 

June 1358.49 

July 174.13 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per i^ay- 
roll, commons: 

June $21.00 

July _. 25.64 

August '. 1.99 

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS. 

Paid O. D. Abbott, M. D $14.25 

H. J. Achard, M. D 0.00 

D. S. Adams, M D 1.50 

Rev. F. S. Bacon 9.00 

Rev. O. S. Baketel .50 

Rev. L. D. Bragg 1.00 

A. A. E. Brien, M. D 20.75 

Rev. M. W. Borthwick. . .. 2.75 

H. W. Boutwell, M. D 1.75 

Lillian G. Bullock, M. D. . ■ .75 

H. B. Burnliam, M. D .25 



$479.95 



$532.62 



$48.63 



520 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid John L. Burnham, M. D 


$0.75 


I. L. Carpenter, M.I) 


8.25 


Rev. J. A. Chevalier 


22.75 


' Rev. T. E. Clapp 


2.00 


Rev. N L.Colby 


10.75 


Rev. H. E. Cooke 


1.50 


Rev. E. Jay Cooke 


1.00 


Rev. C. R. Crossett 


1.25 


Charles Corey, M. D 


1.25 


Mary L. Danf orth, M. D 


10.00 


G. M. Davis, M. D 


1.75 


Charles E. Dodge, M. D 


5.00 


C.M.Dodge, M. D 


7.00 


C. W. Downing, M. D 


G.OO 


Henry Diiehine, M. D 


.25 


E. B. Dunbar, M. D 


11.50 


John Ferguson, M. D 


59..50 


C. F. Flanders, M. D 


39.50 


A.M.Foster, M. D 


.25 


J. E. Fortier, M. D 


41.50 


George Frechette, M. D 


44.25 


E. N. Fugere, M. D 


30.50 


J. H. Gleason, M. D 


3.25 


S.J. Girouard, M. D 


5.25 


Moise Guerin, M. D 


33.75 


M. Guggenheim, M. D 


3.75 


Rev. C. R. Hennon 


21.00 


Rev. P. Hevey 


10.75 


Rev. C. D. Hills 


15.25 


J. A. Jackson, M. D 


28.00 


M. E. Kean, M. D 


12.25 


Rev. G. L. Kibbee 


1.00 


N. P. Kidder 


052.95 


J. E. A. Lanouette, M. D 


44.(10 


P. G. Laberge, M. D 


10.50 


J. D. Lemay, M. D 


20.25 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 521 



Paid J. E. Lemaitre, M. D 


11-1.25 


Rev. J. J. Lyons 


7 75 


Rev. W. C. McAllester 


5.50 


J. W. D. McDonald, M. D.... 


23.25 


G. B. Morey, M. D 


2.00 


Rev. W. H. Morrison 


15.50 


Jacob W. Mooar, M. D 


2.25 


C. A. Palmer, M. D 


1.25 


W. H. Pattee, M. D 


1.75 


Frederick Perkins, M. D 


9.25 


Anna Pollmer, midwife 


9.25 


William Richardson, M. D.. .. 


.75 


J. F. Robinson, M. D 


6.25 


J. L. Robinson, M. D 


3.25 


J. E. E. Roy, M. D 


10.00 


V.N. Sikosky, M. D 


.25 


Rev. C. J. Staples 


1.75 


Gillis Stark, M. D 


21.00 


CO. Smith, M. D 


.50 


Servule St. Pierre, M. D 


14.00 


A. G. Straw, M. D 


1.50 


Zatae L. Straw, M. D 


5.50 


F. C. Stuart, M. D 


.75 


C. B. Sturtevant, M. D 


16.25 


E. B. Swett, M. D 


.25 


E. Sylvain, M. D 


17.25 


W. F. Templeton, M. D 


.25 


Arthur J. Todd, M. D 


.75 


George D. Towne, M. D 


2.00 


E. C. Tremblay, M. D 


43.25 


L. Tremblay, M. D 


8.00 


R. L. True, M. D 


2.50 


Ellen A. Wallace, M. D 


.50 


George L. Wakefield, M. D . . . 


2.00 


George M. Watson, M. D . . . . 


.25 


A. F. Wheat, M. D 


3.00 



11,516.70 



522 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

DAMAGES AND JUDGMENTS. 

Paid Aujjust Berger, settlement of 

claim $19.00 

L. B. Bodwell, damage to coal 

pocket by water 25.00 

H. H. & W. B. Burpee, dam- 
age to real estate 175.00 

D. J. Cameron, damage to 
house by water 17.00 

Bridget Cahill, damage to 

wagon, etc 12.00 

William Campbell, damage 

to real estate 50.00 

Frank A. Colby, settlement 

of claim 75.00 

Charles A. Flint, settlement 

of claim 75.00 

C. B. Foster, ducks and hens 

killed by dog 10.00 

Gage & Adams, settlement of 
suit 475.00 

George "W. Hamlin, damages 
for killing horse 36.00 

Warren Harvey, damage to 
Burke house by change of 
grade 405.04 

Ellen ;M. eTohnson, settlement 

of claim 115.00 

Joseph Lemay, settlement of 

suit 225.00 

Michael Madden, settlement 

suit 150.00 

G. H. & G. W. Morrison, set- 
tlement of suit 100.00 

Samuel T. Page, settlement 
of suit 1,800.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 523 

Paid Charles H. Paul, settlement 

of claim $15.00 ' 

George W. Eeed, damage to 

hack 5.45 

Charles Eobitaille, settle- 
ment of claim 13.03 

C. E. Silver, settlement of 
suit 25.00 

Jacob and Dorothea Streit, 

settlement of claim 15.00 

John Z. Sprague, settlement 

of claim 300.00 

Hattie E. Wilson, settlement 

of claim 150.00 

Hattie E. Wilson, guardian, 

settlement of claim 100.00 

J. W. Wilson, damage to 

wagon 1.25 

14,448.77 



LEGAL EXPENSES. 

Paid W. C. Brown, services and ex- 
penses, Clough V. Manchester. . . $11.60 
Paid C. H. Burns: 

Ketainer in Canney case 10.00 

One day's services examining 

case, ek! 25.00 

Paid George A. Cochran, services 
and expenses, hearing 

Clough V. City 18.00 

D. F. Healy, serving notices, 

etc 11.34 

Benjamin G, Herrick, ser- 
vices and expenses, hearing 
Clough V. City 14.00 



524 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Dana W. King, copying 

deeds, etc |5.29 

Fred G. Stark, services and 
expenses securing quit- 
claim deed of Soutli Main- 
street scboolliouse lot 25.00 

F. E. Shurtleff, copy of bill, 
taking testimony, etc 12.1.5 



CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

PaidF. L. Allen: 

Expenses to Boston, sundry 

times, to deliver bonds $13.50 

Expenses to Concord ,72 

Express and telegrams 1,80 

Paid American Bank Note Co,, 370 

lithographed bonds 257,00 

John A. Barker, car fares. . ,, 5.05 
George W, Bailey, hacks and 

carriages 68.00 

Boyd Brothers, hacks 21.00 

A. S, Campbell & Co., print- 
ing cards 1,25 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
X^rinting : 

Blanks and circulars G.QO 

100 copies "Tyng's Township".. . 23.00 

Advertising dog licenses 17.50 

Advertising city meeting 0.50 

Advertising i)roposals for fuel. .. 11.05 

Advertising safe for sale 4.40 

Paid Deutsche Post, advertising : 

Dog licenses 9.00 

Proposals for fuel 1.50 



1132.38 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 525 

Paid James E. Dodge: 

Expenses to Boston, sundry 

times, to deliver bonds |10.45 

Express on bonds .15 

Paid P. Donovan, Jr., hacks and 

teams 1G5.00 

W. J. Freeman, backs 35.00 

E. T. James, backs and car- 
riages 54.00 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., post- 
age stamps 25.00 

Paid L'Avenir National, advertis- 
ing: 

Citizens' meeting 3.00 

Proposals to furnisb High scbool 3.00 

Dog licenses 8.00 

Proposals for fuel 4.50 

Paid Le Merrimack Publisbing Co., 
advertising: 

Dog licenses 9.00 

Proposals for fuel 4.50 

Paid Manchester Street Railway, 

tickets 10.00 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 
Co., use of telephone, so- 
licitor 36.00 

Plummer & Brown, backs. . .. 35.00 

O. G. Reed, hacks 80.00 

Charles H. Simpson, backs. . . 105.00 

Paid Union Publisbing Co., adver- 
tising: 

Proposals for stone bridge 5.46 

Safe for sale 4.95 

Assessors' notice 6.15 

Paid Whitten & Fifield, use of 

team 2.50 

$1,062.93 



526 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid John A. Barker, care of boiler 1134.50 

CITY SCALES. 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., paper, pens, 

ink, etc 12.99 

John Driscoll, coal-hod, ax. .. 1.24: 

Asa B. Eaton, cash paid for 

washing windows 1.00 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 7 chairs .... 10.00 

Pike & Heald Co., cement, 

pipe, labor 9.09 

Paid D. M. Poore: 

2 cords hard wood, cut 16.00 

2 tons coal 13.25 

Paid John B. Yarick Co., brooms, 
lamps, duster, ax, etc 4.96 



MILK INSPECTOR. 

Paid E. C. Smith: 

Lactoscope, lactodensimeter. . . . |11.00 

Milk grip 7.50 

Milk-cans, filtering paper, etc. . . 5.00 

RELATING TO STREETS. 

Paid C. H. Wood, painting street 

signs 119.80 

John B. Varick Co., 5 lbs. 

nails .10 

MAYOR. 

PaidE. R. Coburn Co.: 

Paper , |3.43 

Glue and mucilage .20 



158.53 



123.50 



119.90 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 627 

Paid Grace E. Downer, services 

as clerk 1530.00 

J. G. Ellinwood, photographs 
city hall, Granite bridge, 

etc 15.70 

W. P. Goodman, pencils and 

pens 8.50 

PaidC.A. Hoitt&Co.: 

1 jug .25 

1 jardiniere stand 3.00 

Paid R. K. Home, 1 flower-pot and 

saucer .25 

Paid E. J. Knowlton, P. M. : 

Stamps 28.00 

Postals 1.00 

Paid D. L. Miller, 1 "Atlas of Man- 
chester" 25.00 

A. H. Sanborn, photographs 

of flood 2.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., pa- 
per, envelopes 2.90 

F. H. Thurston, sponge ...... .35 

Paid George P. Wallace: 

Typewriter ribbons 2,00 

Carbon paper , .50 

Paid F. S. Webster & Co., type- 
writer ribbon, and oil 1.25 

$621.83 



ASSESSORS. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Ink, blotting-paper, pads |1.13 

33 blank books, 3 canvas covers. . 88.86 

54 blank books 25.45 

Paid B. W. Robinson, use of team, 

distributing inventorv blanks... 2.50 



5117.94 



528 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

PaidE. K. Coburn Co., 1 blank 

book $1.65 

Fred W. Chambei'lain, labor 

on tax bills 12.50 

Daniels & Downs, typewrit- 
ing tax list 3.00 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., 
stamped envelopes 43.G0 

G. I. Haselton, 3 days' labor 

in oflflee 4.50 

Lyons Platinum Pen Co., 

pens. . . ." 4.00 

Paid George E. Morrill : 

Taxes of 1895 sold May 27, 189G, 

and purchased by city 3,002.86 

Distributing tax bills 91.40 

Paid S, J. Putnam, 4 days' labor in 

office 6.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

books, blocks, ink 7.06 

F. H. Thurston, brush .20 

John B. Varick Co., cash-box. 1.50 

CITY CLERK. 

Paid Florence M. Kidder, clerk.. . . $512.00 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, paper, 

fasteners, and punch 3.20 

D. L. Miller & Co., 1 ''Atlas of 

Manchester'' 25.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

rubber bands, etc l.,30 



J,778.27 



S541.50 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 529 



CITY TREASURER. 



Paid D. J. Adams, keys |0.50 

W. E. Buck, pencil sharpener .75 

Blanche E. Bullock, services 

as clerk 549.00 

H. S. Clay, ink eraser .40 

Daniels & Downs, typewrit- 
ing 5.00 

W. P. Goodman, rubber 

bands, blank books 2.75 

E. P. Gerould & Co., letter 

book 3.50 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., post- 
age stamps 130.00 

Jennie W. Ladd, 12 j)ens .25 

Lyons Platinum Pen Co., pens 2.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

chamois, scissors .51 

Novelty Advertising Co., 1 

set dates .50 

W. H. Shilvock, wood engrav- 
ing, autograph, stamp, and 

pad 1.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 
ink, ibooks, envelopes, 

blocks, etc 6.10 

G. H. Warren, sharpening 

scissors, erasers ..30 



COURT HOUSE. 

Paid D. J. Adams, repairing lawn- 
mower $3.00 

D. J. Adams, making keys ... .70 

L. M. Aldrich, putting on 

windows .65 

34 



.f703.0G 



530 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid county of Hillsborough, one 
half expense of coal, 24 
tons, 650 lbs 

Timothy P. Shea, janitor 

E. V. Tui'cotte, 25 tons coal. . 

John B. Varick Co., water- 
pot, brooms, etc 

SCHOOLS. 

Paid Jos. A. Chamberlain, trees 

and setting 174.80 

Orison Hardy, trees, etc G3.94 



179.05 


531.66 


133.75 


3.53 



ELECTION EXPENSES. 

Paid J. W. Abbott, rendering re- 
port election, stationery, 

etc 15.80 

C. A. Allen, postage, fees, etc. 5.15 

PaidL. M. Aldrich: 

44 ballot boards • 22.80 

Lumber and labor 34.10 

Paid D. G. Andrews, material and 

labor, ward 2 11.25 

Charles E. Bartlett, election 

returns 1.00 

A. G. Bean, labor, ward 6. . . . 2.25 

William C. Clarke, express on 

grate, ward 5 ward room . , .40 
C. B. Clarkson, labor and ma- 
terial, ward 4 16.36 

E. P. Cogswell, labor, ward 6 3.50 

PaidW. E.Cobb: 

Rent Mechanics hall, special 

election 50.00 



1752.34 



L3S.74 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 531 

Eent Mechanics' iiall, ward 3 

election $150.00 

Paid E. R Coburn Co., pencils ,95 

Joseph Dana, labor, material, 

ward 9 19.85 

A. B. Dickey, use of team. ... .50 

G. H. Dudley, labor, ward 2. . 5.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

saw^dust 2.00 

The Head iS: Dowst Co., labor 

and material 9.17 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., use of ta- 
bles ■ 1.00 

C. F. Jack, cleaning Blodget- 

street school rooms 2.00 

H. F. W. Little, material and 

labor 31.00 

J. Y. McQuesten Co., chairs, 

table 9.25 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

18 dozen pencils 7.56 

Sealing-wax 1.50 

Paid Martin J. Whalen, pencils, 

ink, postage 3.60 

John H. Wales, Jr., pencils, 

ink, pens .50 

1396.49 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid American Express Co., ex- 
press on reports |8.32 

Amoskeag National Bank, 

rent of safe deposit box. . . . 25.00 

Clark M. Bailey, paper .66 



532 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid George W. Bailey : 

Use horse and driver for ambu- 
lance 11.00 

Care of ambulance 18.00 

Paid C. M. Bailey, V. S., examining 

glandered horse 2.00 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 

on fountain 1.12 

William Campbell, labor cor- 
ner North Union street and 
River road, per agreement . 50.00 

Paid William C. Clarke, cash ex- 
pended : 
Expenses of committee on Gran- 
ite bridge to Lowell, Boston, 

and vicinity 87.40 

Expenses of jommittee on lands 
and buildings to Somerville, 

etc 31.85 

Expenses of committee to vari- 
ous cities inspecting police pa- 
trol systems 138.65 

Paid Concord Foundry Co., 1 foun- 
tain 100.00 

Joseph Dana, lumber and 

building staging, Oak Hill. 80. OG 

E. O. Dodge, bounty on hawks .50 

James E. Dodge, cash paid 

for delivering reports. . .•. . 1.55 

Dustin & Heath, tax of Davis 

& Sargent, 1893 14.32 

Paid H. B. Fairbanks: 

Services selling Wilson school- 

hou.se lot 73.71 

Advertising 28.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 533 

Paid George Ferrj, horse killed, 

glanders 110.00 

First Light Battery, powder, 
etc., firing salute July 4 42.00 

George C. Gilmore, expenses 
and services acquiring pro- 
prietors' records of Tyng's 
Township 76.75 

John F. Gillis, transfers of 
real estate for assessors. . . 9.00 

Carl Harrington, bounty on 

hawks .75 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber, labor 5.84 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe and la- 
bor, Merrimack common. . . 2.37 

D. L. Miller & Co., 1 "Atlas of 
Manchester" 25.00 

Mary Nolan, cleaning offices.. 30.00 

A. H. Sanborn,; photograph 

flood, engineer 2.50 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., 25 

directories 50.00 

Frank Sullivan, labor, per 

May and August draft, 

1879 6.87 

E. V. Sullivan, bounty on 

hawk .25 

Taggart & Manahan, services 

selling School-street lots. . . 70.43 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

100 mailing cases, auditor. 5.00 

town of GofEstown, taxes on 

gravel lots 2.30 



534 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid John W. Wilson, freight and 

cartage .fO.90 

C. H. Wood, painting signs. .. 2.75 

|l,014.7o 

Total expenditures |1G,526.42 

Transferred to appropriation for new school- 
house, West Manchester 2,000.00 

118,526.42 



City Officers' Salaries. 
[A.ppropriation |21,000.00 

Expenditures. 

central department. 

Paid William C. Clarke, mayor |1,S00.00 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer 1,200.00 

Xathan P. Kidder, clerk 900.00 

Edwin F. Jones, solicitor 800.00 

George L. Stearns, clerk com- 
mon council 200.00 

Thomas W. Lane, inspector of 

buildings 100.00 

Edward G. Smith, milk in- 
spector 300.00 

Asa B. Eaton, city weigher. . 400.00 

John A. Barker, messenger. . 700.00 
J. K. Rhodes, messenger, two 

weeks 24.00 

$6,424.00 



CITY officers' salaries. 535 

CITY PHYSICIAN AND OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Paid Frederick Perkins, city physi- 
cian 1600.00 

W. H. Maxwell, ward 1 25.00 

Thomas L. Qiiimby, ward 2. .. 2.5.00 

Benjamin F. Garland, ward 3 25.00 

George S. Holmes, ward 4 . . . . 25.00 

Patrick Costello, ward 5 25.00 

Charles Francis, ward 6 25.00 

William Marshall, ward 7. . . 25.00 

Charles S. McKean, ward 8. . 25.00 

Moise Bessette, ward 9 10.60 

Leander S. Boivin, ward 9.. 12.50 
W. C. Clarke, chairman ex- 

officio 25.00 

William H. Maxwell, clerk of 

the board 100.00 

eTudith Sherer, matron of 

pest-house 360.00 

$1,308.10 

SCHOOL OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Paid W. E. Buck, superintendent 

of schools $2,300.00 

Curtis W\ Davis, truant offi- 
cer 750.00 

W. C. Clarke, chairman ex- 

officio 10,00 

E. B. Woodbury, clerk of 

board 150.00 

John T. Gott, president of 

common council cx-officio.. 10.00 

Walter B. Heath, ward 1 10.00 

Elliott C. Lambert, ward 1 . . . 10.00 

A. P. Home, ward 2 10.00 

Charles H. Manning, w^ard 2.. 10.00 



536 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Georji^e D. Towuo, ward 8 $10.00 

Louis E. Phelps, ward :^ 10.00 

C. M. Floyd, ward 4 10.00 

Nathaniel L. Colby, ward 4. .. 10.00 

James P. Slattery, ward 5. . .. 10.00 

Harry J. Woods, ward 5 10.00 

Harry I. Dodge, ward 10.00 

Herbert E. Eichardson, ward 

6 10.00 

Edward B. ^Yoodbury,ward 7 10.00 

Marshall P. Hall, ward 7 2.00 

Fred W. Pillsbury, ward 7. . . 8.00 

Luther C. Baldwin, ward 8. .. 10.00 

Josiah G. Dearborn, ward 8,. 10.00 

Kobert E. Walsh, ward 9 10.00 

Jeremiah Sullivan, ward 9. .. 10.00 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

Paid Henry E. Lewis, ward 1 $147.50 

John E. Stearns, ward 2 212.50 

David O. Fernald, ward 3 922.50 

Harrison D. Lord, ward 4. . .. 343.00 

George F. Sheehan, ward 5. .. 147.50 

George H. Dudley, ward 0. . . 477.50 

William T. Powell, ward 7. .. 152.50 

Eugene W. Brigham, ward 8. 452.50 

Julius Weisner, ward 9 95.00 

Hiram Forsaith, assistant. . . 80.00 

N. Nichols, assistant 315.00 

John Cayzer, assistant 40.00 

H. F. Stone, assistant 62.50 

Isaac L. Whittemore, assist- 
ant 107.00 



13,400.00 



CITY officers' salaries. 537 

Paid Harvey L. Currier, clerical 

services 1180.00 

Arthur W. Rowell, clerical 

services 80.00 

Joseph Collette, interpreter. . 52.50 

Louis Comeau, interpreter. . . 40.00 

C. A. U. Ouellette, interpreter 40.00 

Joseph Berube, interpreter. . 14. G3 
George H. Nichols, use of 

team 6.75 

$3,968.88 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid George E. Morrill, salary 1800.00 

MODERATORS, 1895 AND 1896. 

Paid A. W. Eastman, ward 1 |15.00 

Lyman W. Colby, ward 2 15.00 

Arthur S. Bunton, ward 3. . . . 15.00 

George A. Bailey, ward 4. . . . 15.00 

John B. Rodgers, ward 5 15.00 

Herbert S. Clough, ward 6. . . 15.00 

J. Adam Graf, ward 7 15.00 

Robert E. McKean, ward 8.. . 15.00 

John T. Hannigan, ward 9. . . 15.00 

1135.00 



WARD CLERKS, 1895 AND 1896. 

Paid Frank X. Foster, ward 1 |20.00 

Charles A. Allen, ward 2 20.00 

John H. Hayes, ward 3 20.00 

J. W. Abbott, ward 4 20.00 

Martin J. Whalen, ward 5. . . . 20.00 

Arthur B. Dickey, ward 6. . .. 20.00 

Charles E. Bartlett, ward 7. . 20.00 

Joseph R. Fradd, ward 8 20.00 

Frank I. Lessard, ward 9 20.00 



1180.00 



538 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LIST, 1895 AND 1896. 

Paid George C. Kemp, ward 1, 4G 

days $103.50 

Charles B. Tucker, ward 2, G3 

days 1.39.50 

William B. Corey, ward 3, 6(5 

days 148.50 

Paid Samuel J. Lord: 

Ward 4, GS days 153.00 

Cash paid interpreter 10.13 

Paid Patrick E. Daley, ward 5, 51 

days 114.75 

Paid Arthur J. Peaslee: 

Ward C, 70 days 157.50 

Horse and carriage 12.50 

Paid Joseph A. Foster, ward 7, 55 

days 123.75 

Charles C. Tinkham, ward 8, 

00 days . 148.50 

Joseph B. Bourque, ward 0, 

55 days 132.75 

Isaac Whittemore, ward 5, 

assista^nt, 24 da^s 54.00 

William B. Corey, ward 3, 
special election, December 

27, 1895, 141 days 32.03 

§1,331.01 

SELECTMEN, 1895 AND 1890. 

Paid John H. Wales, Jr., ward 1 . . . $15.00 

Olaf Xyberg, ward 1 15.00 

Alexander Hanna, ward 1. . . 15.00 

Daniel G. Andrews, ward 2 . . 15.00 

Fred K. Kamsay, ward 2 15.00 

William H. Maxwell, ward 2. 15.00 



CITY officers' salaries. 539 

Paid George X. Baker, ward 3 $15.00 

John Cronin, ward 3 15.00 

Edward C. Smith, ward 3 3.50 

Charles H. Bartlett, ward 4. . 15.00 

Charles B. Clarksou, ward 4 . . 15.00 

Patrick Malouey, ward 5 15.00 

Eobert F. Murray, ward 5.. 15.00 

Thomas A. Foley, ward 5 15.00 

George M. Bean, ward C 15.00 

Harrison W. Heselton, ward 

G • 15.00 

Edward P. Cogswell, ward 6. 15.00 

H. R. Armstrong, ward 7. . . . 15.00 

Robert Leggett, ward 7 15.00 

Zara B. Sawyer, ward 7 15.00 

Hervey Stratton, ward 8. . . . 15.00 

William H. Marshall, ward 8. 15.00 

George W. Flint, ward 8 15.00 

Albert Oliver, ward 9 15.00 

Martin Rafferty, ward 9 " 15.00 

Joseph Trehan, ward 9 15.00 

• 1378.50 



ELECTION INSPECTORS, 1895 AND 1896. 

Paid Arthur W. Patch, ward 1 $10.00 

Charles Edgar, ward 1 10.00 

Benjamin F. Cudden, ward 1. 10.00 

John B. Reardon, ward 1 10.00 

Benjamin F. Clark, ward 2. . 10.00 

Edward C. Smith, ward 2 10.00 

John W. Center, ward 2 10.00 

Frank A. Gay, ward 2 10.00 

George E. Prime, ward 3. . . . 10.00 

F. Marcotte, ward 3 10.00 

George W. Fowler, ward 3... 10.00 

Aimie Boisvert, ward 3 10.00 



540 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Ludger E. Desrochers, ward 4 
Cyrille E. Lebnm, ward 4. . . 
Frank H. Lussier, ward 4 
John F. Gillis, ward 4. . . 
John H. Slater, ward 5. . 
Michael Hawkins, ward 5 
John C. Ryan, ward 5 . . . 

John Lj'nch, ward o 

Edwin N. Baker, ward G . 
Charles Lucier, ward G. . 
William H. Moison, ward 
Charles A. O'Connor, war 
William F. Welch, ward 7 
George H. Shields, ward 7 
Arthur W. Rowell, ward 7 
Henry W. Allen, ward 7. . 
Frank O. Clement, ward 8 
Theodore Graf, ward 8 . . . 
Herman Leibing, ward 8.. 
William Doherty, ward 8. 
Frank I. Lessard, ward 9. 
John Montplaisir, ward 9. 
Scott E. Sanborn, ward 9. 
John E. Herring, ward 9. 



$10.00 
lO.lUt 
lU.OO 
10.00 
lO.OfI 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



S.3G0.00 



* Total expenditures. ... 
Transferred to reserved fund, 



118,285.49 
2,714.51 

$21,000.00 



Auditor's Department. 
Appropriation ^2,000.00 



auditor's department. 541 

Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid James E. Dodge, salary as 

auditor |1,200.00 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, services 
as clerk 000.00 



SUPPLIES, ETC. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice, July 

10 to October 20 |1.71 

Paid The Jolau B. Clarke Co., 
priuting: 

Envelopes, note headings 10.10 

Blocks.... .25 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., blotting- 
paper .75 

Paid Lizzie M. Cogswell, cash paid: 
Pencils, paper, brushes, chamois, 

pail .80 

Soap, postal cards, paper-knife. . 1.13 

Pencil sharpener, paper 2..55 

Washing office towels. ; . .• 2.80 

Paid City Government Publishing 
Co., 1 year's subscription 

to magazine 3.00 

The Carter's Ink Co., type- 
writer ribbons 2.00 

Daniels & Downs, 4 reams 

paper 8.00 

Warren S. Dobson, paper fas- 
tener 2.00 

J. G. Ellinw^ood, photograph, 

city hall 1.00 



11,800.00 



542 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid A. M. Finnej, cleaninj? rugs. . |1.05 
W. P. Goodman, ])on-holders, 
inkstand, ink, pencils, mu- 
cilage 2.90 

Hale & Wliittemoro, framing 

picture 1.75 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 1 desk 32.50 

K. K. Home, 2 glasses .10 

Thomas Lyons, 2 boxes pens. 4.00 
Morgan, Grossman & Go., 1 

stamp and pad l.SO 

N. H. Furniture Store, 1 table 1.75 
Arthur J. Smith, carbon pa- 
per 6.00 

Paid Temple & Farrington Go. : 

Erasers, paste 2.05 

1 blank book 3.00 

3 blank books 6.00 

Paid John B. Varick Go., shears. . . .75 
George P. Wallace, type- 
writer ribbon 1.00 

$109.77 

Total expenditures §1,969.77 

Transferred to reserved fund 30.23 

$2,000.00 



Mayor's Incidentals. 
Appropriation $.300.00 

EXPEXDITURES. 

Paid Boyd Brothers, teams $7.00 

Paid W. G. Clarke: 

Team hire 142.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 543 

Telegrams fl.OO 

Express and repairing cha,ir. . , . .GO 

Semi-centennial incidentals 67.50 

Incidentals 31..35 

1249.54 

Total expenditures $249.54 

Transferred to reserved fund 50.40 

1.300.00 

Street and Park Commission. 
Appropriation 14,000.00 

Expenditures, 
salaries. 

Paid George H. Stearns $G00.00 

L. P. Reynolds 165.00 

H. P. Simpson 600.00 

Byron Worthen 438.00 

11,803.00 

CLERICAL SERVICES. 

Paid A. E. Herrick 1317.50 

George H. Stearns 330.00 

Julia F. Stearns 526.96 

$1,174.46 

USE OF TEAMS. 

Paid L. P. Reynolds 137.50 

George H. Stearns 150.00 

H.P.Simpson 150.00 

Bvron Worthen 109.50 

1447.00 



544 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

OFFICE SUrrLIES. 

Paid The Jolin B. Clarke Cft., 
printing: 

400 blanks $3.25 

250 reports 70.00 

Paid E. R. Cobnrn Co., G frames G.50 

J. G. Elliuwood, photographs 

and frame 8.35 

D. L. Miller & Co., 1 ^'Atlas of 

Manchester'' 25.00 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., use of telephone 39.75 

W. H. Shilvoek, 1 half-tone 

cut 4.50 

Julia F. Stearns, pencil 

sharpener ,75 

George H. Stearns, pens 2.00 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

Blank books 23.84 

Canvas covers 7.95 

Blocks, pencils, paj'-roll sheets. . 12.72 

Paid John B. Varick Co., shears, 

twine, awl, knife, pliers. . . . 2.95 
George P. Wallace, type- 
writer ribbon 1.00 

J. Arthur Williams, rubber 

stamp and pad .65 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Bunton Brothers & Co., re- 
seating chairs $10.05 

L. P. Reynolds, expenses of 

commission to Boston 7.50 

Paid H. P. Simpson: 

Expenses commission to Boston, 

sundry times 23.55 



$209.21 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 545 



Expenses commission, Messrs. 
Ames and Cheney, to Concord 
and Lowell 



.25 



Expenses commission and Mr. J. 

B. Smith to Boston 10.04 

Paid George H. Stearns, expenses 
commission to Goffstown and 
Boston 13.97 

178.36 

Total expenditures |3,712.03 

Transferred to reserved fund 287.97 

14,000.00 

Repairs of Highways. 

Appropriation $19,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . . 312.78 

119,312.78 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division Xo. 1 : 

April 131.75 

September 9.75 

141.50 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 

division No. 2: 

January 1183.04 

March 83.37 

April 1,500.70 

May 1,886.11 

June 1,902.06 

July 898.23 

35 



546, REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

August 11,341.80 

September 429.81 

October 151.11 

December 44.00 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 4: 

April 1108.25 

May 55.00 

June 104.25 

July 45.50 

August 49.12 

September 50.00 

October 50.00 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 5 : 

April 1112.00 

May 221.75 

June 110.50 

October 5.50 

November 18.00 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 0: 

March |25.00 

April 00.18 

May 100.75 

June 22.25 

July 11.75 

August 5.00 

September 30.87 

October 27.25 

November 18.37 



18,420.95 



1468.12 



$467.75 



1310.37 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 647 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 7: 

January 179.09 

March 110.13 

April 323.33 

May 180.00 

June 150.00 

July 280.82 

Auj2-ust 190.25 

September 16.00 

October 101.06 

December 12.75 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 8: 

April 157.09 

June 175.00 

July 541.37 

August 170.13 

September 205.48 

October 111.30 

December 19.67 



L,446.43 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 9: 

April f;29.03 

May 117.00 

June 207.50 

July 56.75 

September. 38.25 



11^83.04 



$448.53 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 10 : 

January $104.84 

February 42.60 

March • 48.53 



548 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

April |45o.05 

May 192.87 

June. 285.50 

July.; 335.98 

August 208.20 

September 157.63 

October 364.30 

November 204.64 

December 64.37 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 12: 

April 128.52 

September 46.00 

Paid John H. Proctor, labor on 

Candia road 1100.00 

C. S. Whittaker, building cul- 
vert, per contract 30.00 

LUMBER AND OTHER MATERIAL. 

Paid James Baldwin Co., plank. . .. |8.64 

C. W. Farmer, 137 posts 17.12 

F. R. French, 60 posts 7.20 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Lumber and labor 257.69 

Drag plank 11.68 

Paid G. W. Rief, lumber and labor. 16.36 
A. C. Wallace, lumber and la- 
bor 144.90 

C. M. Wheeler, 276 posts. . . . 30.30 

TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid Allen N. Clapp, nails §0.75 

J. H. Farnham, files and rasps 10.25 



},464.51 



174.52 



$130.00 



$493.95 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 549 

Paid J. Hadloek: 

1 road machiue, less old machine |230.00 
Edges and bolts 16.50 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 

shovels, spikes, chain 4.90 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

1 grindstone 7.00 

2 brushes 4.00 

1 cutter 2.00 

Iron, drills, files, saws, nails, 

paint, scoops 98.67 

Shovels, barrows, steel, nuts, 

washers 191.01 

1565.08 



REPAIRS. 

Paid R. W. Flanders, sharpening 

tools 14.90 

C. A. Healy, painting foun- 
tains 21.27' 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & 
Machine Works, washers, 

etc .88 

Paid T. A. Lane Co. : 

Material and labor, troughs and 

fountains 27.97 

Dippers 2.64 

Paid F, I. Lessard & Co., repairing 

fountain 5.61 

Maynard & Hevey, material 
and labor, thawing out 

troughs, etc 5.13 

C. H. Robie Co., concreting. , 414.65 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paint. . 5.47 

J. T. Underbill, concreting. . . 922.97 

F. W. Webb, labor on trough. .92 



1,412.41 



550 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

STONE, GRAVEL, CLAY, ETC. 

Paid Adams Brothers, lime |0.95 

F. S. Bodwell, covering stone. 10.00 
Byron Corning, 158 loads 

gravel 15.80 

Devonshire Mills, 250 loads 

gravel 15.00 

M. E. Dickey, 38 loads gravel. 3.80 

A. G. Gray, 501 loads gravel. . 50.10 

Austin Goings, 20 loads sand, 3.33 
Mark E. Harvey, 52 loads 

gravel 5.20 

Warren Harvey, covering 

stone 51.00 

Ida Libbey, 798 loads gravel . . 79.80 
John Lovering, 190 loads 

gravel 19.00 

Byron E. Moore, 75 loads clay 4.50 

Partridge Brothers, lime .95 

A. P. Tasker, lime 4.75 

C.C. Webster, 50 loads clay.. 3.00 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, filing saws f 1.10 

Paid James Briggs & Son : 

36 dippers 

Eepairing pipe 

Paid Boston & Maine R. E., freight 

on road-scraper 

J. H. Chamberlain, 1 tree. . . . 
Allen N. Clapp, 101 gallons 

oil. 

Robert Clark, moving tree. , . 



5.25 


1.35 


7.15 


2.00 


.1.G2 


1.00 



1267.18 



SNOW AND ICE, 551 

Paid Diinlap & Wason Coal Co., 2 

tons coal |11.00 

C. H. Simpson, use of teams. . 18.00 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

2 directories 4.00 

Pencils, ink, books 2.13 

Paid L. B. West Co., 40 dippers and 

cups....- 6.00 

R. M. West, ladders 6.00 

176.60 

Total expenditures 118,370.94 

Transferred to appropriation for snow and ice. 941.84 



119,312.78 

Snow and Ice. 

Appropriation $4,000.00 

Transferred from repairs of high- 
ways account 941.84 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 308.94 

$5,250.78 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 1 : 

January $18.75 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 2: 

January $581.84 

February 1,182.60 

March 970.85 

April 126.70 

December 181.31 

$3,043.30 



552 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 4 : 

March $56.50 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 5 : 

January $1.50 

March ."^ 28.26 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division Xo. 0: 

January $5.00 

March 50.15 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 7: 

January |77.74 

February 80.56 

March 110.12 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 8: 

January |1.50 

March 31.85 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 9: 
]March 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 10 : 

January $351.22 

February 401.89 

March 463.15 

April 51.04 

December 127.63 



129.76 



55.15 



1268.42 



39 



$1,400.9J 



NEAV HIGHWAYS. 553 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
commons : 

January $28.12 

February 27.37 

$55.49 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid A. B. Black, 5 snow-plows. . .. $200.00 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 2.75 

A. N. Clapp, 1 bag salt .75 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber and labor on snow- 
plows 16.83 

J. F. Wyman, 2 tons coal 13.25 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

24 snow shovels 9.00 

24 scoops 14.00 

Paint, iron, chain 12.30 

$268.88 

Total expenditures $5,250.78 

New Highways. 
Appropriation $20,000.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2: 

January $175.77 

February 36.00 

March 36.00 

April 61.76 

May 823.19 

June 44.3.81 

July 509.28 

August 362.67 



554 REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

September |;i,()05.53 

October 900.57 

November 668.00 

December 715.23 

$6,337.87 

Paid men, as per pay-roll, division No. 5: 

August 1116.38 

September 03.12 

$209.50 

Paid men, as per paj-roll, division No. 7: 

May $354.00 

June 298.25 

August 114.52 

October 178.37 

November 150.50 

December 48.01 

$1,143.65 

Paid men, as per pay-roll, division No. 8: 

May $315.82 

June 772.40 

November 94.75 

December 42.25 

$1,225.22 

Paid men, as per pay-roll, division No. 10: 

April $306.75 

May 1,245.17 

June 1,838.89 

July 1,421.44 

August 156.10 

September 144.00 

October 362.70 

November 360.26 

December 231.64 

$6,066.95 

Paid men, as per pay-roll, division No. 12: 

September $815.20 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 555 

Paid Clemens Langer, furnishinji:, 
putting up, and painting 
iron pipe railing, new 
bridge, per contract 17-4.00 

Wallace Laird, building two 

culverts, River road 100.00 

Fred Mahron, building stone 
wall, Mast road, per con- » 

tract.... 106.87 

Moore & Webster, building 
South Beech street, per 
contract 650.00 

G. W. Rief, labor on street 

signs 5.40 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 

nails $0.38 

B. H. Piper Co., 48 pick han- 
dles 7.40 

John B. Varick Co., plows, 
plow points, rakes, ham- 
mers, powder, fuse, etc ... . 78.25 



STONE, LUMBER, AND OTHER MATERIAL. 

Paid Charles A. Bailey, covering, 

paving, and curb-stone |1,201.63 

F. S. Bodwell, covering stone 34.75 

E. O. Dodge, 3 loads stone 3.00 

Warren Harvey, covering 

stone 73.60 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber 7.68 



1936.27 



186.03 



556 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

PaidC. H. Kobie Co., 14 loads 

gravel $10.50 

Palmer & Garmons, G loads 

stone 6.00 

A. C. Wallace, lumber 50.13 

David Wells, 175 posts 21.00 

$1,408.29 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, filing saws $0.55 

James H. Cram, sharpening 



tools 



22.35 



R. W. Flanders, sharpening 
picks .90 

Albert Monlton, 2 water bar- 
rels .80 

C. H. Robie Co., concreting 
walks. Granite bridge 107.15 

C. H. Simpson, use of teams.. 12.00 

Soule, Dillingham & Co., pav- 
ing ends and approaches, 

Granite bridge 244.79 

.54 



Total expenditures $18,617.52 

Balance to new account 1,382.48 

$20,000.00 



Damage of Land Taken for Highways. 
Appropriation $5,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid ]\Irs. Lucie A. Clougb, land 

damage $1,034.79 

Clinton French, administra- 
tor of estate of Charles T. 
Harvell, land damage 1,231.25 



WATERING STREETS. 557 

Paid A. W. Morgan, services and 
expenses, summoning wit- 
nesses, Clougb V. City |19.7i 

D. A. Taggart, settlement of 
action, E. N. Batchelder, G. 
F. Higgins, admr. M. C. 
Higgins, J. M. Clarli v. City 625.34 

12,911.12 

Total expenditures |2,911.12 

Transferred to reserved fund 2,088.88 

15,000.00 



Widening and Straightening Old IVIammoth Road. 
Appropriation 11,000.00 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2: 

October 1824.50 

November 175.50 

11,000.00 



Total expenditures |1,000.00 

Watering Streets. 
Appropriation |5,000.00 



558 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, dirision 
Ko. 2 : 

January |11.81 

February 12.21 

March 24.97 

April 191.76 

May 512.18 

June 521.20 

July 480.18 

August 404.50 

September 203.30 

October 147.60 

November 77.12 

December 34.92 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 10: 

January $13.94 

Februai^v 10.52 

March..' 8.-32 

April 28.00 

May 184.00 

June 177.37 

July 154.00 

August 125.00 

September 92.00 

October 16.00 

November 4.00 

December 3.37 



12,624.75 



$816.52 



WATERING STREETS. 559 

REPAIRS, SUPPLIES, ETC. 

Paid Abbott-Downing- Co., 1 large 

sprinkler 1325.00 

Ainoskeag Manufacturing 
Co., material and labor. . . . 33.43 

John T. Beach, repairs on 
sprinkler 3.80 

J. R. Carr & Co., paint and la- 
bor 1.20 

A. Filion, jjole for sprinkler. . 3.00 

J. W. Fisk, 1 fountain 200.00 

Warren Harvey, stone 13.50 

R. K. Home, dippers 1.20 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & 
Machine Works, labor on 
rocker iron 3.35 

Kinaball Carriage Co., leather 

piping 2.00 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co.: 

Repairs on standpipes 12.86 

Couplings, valves, bends, etc .... 23.95 

Paid Lessard & Hevey, repairs on 

sprinkler 2.05 

Manchester Heating & Light- 
ing Co., 2 standpipes with 
valves 17.00 

Manchester Water- Works, 
work on standpipes 72.00 

Pike & Heald Co., repairs on 
sprinkler .95 

H. Stratton, cleaning and re- 
pairing pipes to fountain. .. 1.00 

1716.29 



560 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

HARDWARE. 

Paid Mancliestei* Ilaidware Co., 

wrench, lead pipe $2.98 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 31.44 

134.42 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight $4.50 



Total expenditures |4,19G.48 

Transferred to reserved fund 803.52 



$5,000.00 



Paving Streets. 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 320.69 



),320.69 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per i)ay-roll, 
division No. 2: 

April $98..37 

May 475.88 

June 260.42 

July 3T5.2L 

August 256.40 

September 214.81 



$1,681.09 



PAVING STREETS. 561 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 7: 
October flS.OO 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 

division No. 10: 

January 152.28 

February 30.60 

March. 7.20 

April 104.75 

^lay 442.81 

June 474.10 

July 154.50 

August 394.65 

September 330.58 

12,051.47 

HARDWARE. 

Paid John TJ. Yarick Co., steel |2.2S 

PAVING STONE AND GRAVEL. 

Paid Charles A. Bailey, 1,200 pav- 
ing blocks $60.00 

J. H. Coburn, 558 loads pav- 
ing stone 976.50 

E. O. Dodge, 8 loads stone. . . 8.00 

John McCarty, 6 loads stone. . 9.00 
C. H. Robie Co., 69 loads 

stone 120.75 

11,174.25 

CONCRETE CROSSINGS, AND OTHER WORK. 

Paid C. H. Robie Co $173.64 

John T. Underbill & Co 1,222.96 

$1,.306.60 

Total expenditures .$ 6,-320.69 

36 



562 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Macadamizing. 

Appropriation |15,000.00 

Transferred from appropriation for 

macadamizing Central street.. . . 2,170.05 

$17,170.65 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2 : 

March |39.25 

April 201.75 

May 1,110.92 

June 902.01 

July 84.3.11 

August 3,403.79 

September 1,748.04 

October 2,304.05 

November 2,150.02 

112,890.17 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 

No. 10: 

August 1175.25 

September 1,093.50 

October 141.03 

11,410.38 

Paid labor as per commons pay-roll : 

August flO.OO 

FUEL, FREIG-HT, WATER. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight |13.47 
Duulap & Wason Coal Co., 7| 
tons coal 41.25 



MACADAMIZING. 563 

Paid J. A. Fracker, 30J cords wood 1107.62 
]VIancliester Water- Works, 

use of water 30.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., 29 

chaldrons coke 116.00 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 6 

lanterns |2.25 

B. H. Piper Co., 27 dozen han- 
dles 40.60 

Paid John B. Yarick Co. : 

Steel, dynamite 21.58 

Wire, fuse, hammers, files, rasps, 
etc 850.90 

LUMBER, CASTINGS, REPAIRS. 

Paid Frank L. Elliott, 900 lbs. for- 

cite 1207.00 

Paid Farrell Foundry & Machine 
Co.: 

1 shaft bearing 1.00 , 

1 special shaft for crusher 63.00 

Plates, steel bearings, pitman, 

etc 147.30 

Paid Hutchinson Foundry & Ma- 
chine Works : 
Labor and material, crusher. . . . 114.75 

Labor and material, road-roller.. 17.65 

48 lbs. plate and labor 3.48 

Paid lugersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., 

feed nuts 6.15 

Thomas A. Lane Co., coup- 
lings, nipples, etc , 12.46 



1308.34 



1915.33 



564 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Link Belt En??. Co., 1 28-incb 

wheel and express $0.20 

W. C. Oastler, 50 spikes and 

cotters 00.00 

Perkins & Franks, repairing 

discharging dynamo 9.50 

Taylor Iron & Steel Co., tog- 
gle bearings, plates, etc.. . . 125.28 
Paid Vacuum Oil Co.: 

Cylinder oil 02.73 

Engine oil 11.38 

STOXE. 

Paid Charles A. Bailey |290.00 

Brooks & Brock 18.50 

J. H. Coburn 54.25 

Massachusetts" Broken Stone 

Co 171.85 

Palmer & Garmons 3.00 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid A. L. Bixby, repairing build- 
ings damaged by cutting 

down trees $07.43 

C. H. Simpson, use of teams.. 32.00 



IS47.8S 



$537.00 



$00.43 



Total expenditures $17,019.13 

Transferred to reserved fund 151.52 



$17,170.05 



Macadamizing Central Street. 
Appropriation $5,000.00 



grading fok concrete. 565 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
Xo.2: 
June 12,046.53 

STONE. 

Paid J. H. Cobiirn, 104 loads stone . . |182.00 
Massachusetts Broken Stone 
Co., 644,500 lbs. broken 

stone 451.15 

1633.15 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boston & Maine K. R., freight $3.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., 3 

chaldrons coke 12.00 

C. H. Robie Co., concreting.. . 89.92 

John B. Varick Co., powder. . 44.75 

1149.67 

Total expenditures |2,829.35 

Transferred to appropriation for macadamiz- 
ing streets 2,170.05 

15,000.00 



Grading for Concrete. , 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . . 35.82 

$5,035.82 



566 report of the city auditor. 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2 : 

April 1194.50 

May 351.62 

June 393.86 

July 551.27 

August 61.25 

September 76.42 

October 51.75 

§1,683.67 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 

No. 7: 

May 1.52.00 

July 35.00 

October 25.00 

1112.00 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 

No. 10: 

April $16.63 

May 148.37 

June 91.52 

July 55.25 

August 87.73 

September 8.50 

1408.00 

Paid labor of men, as per commons pay-roll : 

May $41.00 

STONE. 

Paid Warren Harvey, cesspool and edge- 
stones $1,096.26 



SCAVENGER SERVICE. 567 

CONCRETE. 

Paid C. H. Robie Co., crossings and 

patching |1,653.22 

J. T. Underbill & Co., cross- 
ings 41.G7 

$1,694.89 

Total expenditures |5,035.82 



Scavenger Service. 

'Appropriation |1G,000.00 , 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 2: 



January $672.17 

February 522.89 

March 663.65 

April 1,002.09 

May 618.92 

June 644.86 

July 607.44 

August 633.70 

September 939.75 

October 745.84 

November 1,179.82 

December 945.57 

19,176.70 



668 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid labor of men aud teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 10: 

January $225.18 

February 184.59 

March 197.57 

April 222.50 

May 101.12 

June 187.50 

July 150.00 

August 120.25 

September 191.76 

October 154.88 

Kovember 27G.50 

December 181.00 

$2,255.85 

CONTRACT. 

Paid city farm, scavenger service 11 months 
to December 1, 189G $2,291.67 

TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & 

Machine Works, 6 stamps 

and handles $1.86 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

files, rake, globes, soap. . . . 5.52 

John B. Varick Co., bolts, 

iron, nails, steel, rope, etc.. 179.45 

$186.83 

LUMBER, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid John T. Beach : 

Setting 2 boxes $1.50 

1 dump cart 100.00 



SCAVENGER SERVICE. 



669 



I8.G2 
1.60 
2.00 

35.67 
20.23 

31.54 



Paid James Briggs & Son, iron, 

pipe, and labor 

J. Clioate & Co., paint 

A. Filion, new sliafts 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 

Lumber and labor 

Repairs on carts and sleds 

Paid Kimball Carriage Co., repair- 
ing harnesses, and supplies 
John F. Kerwin, harness re- 
pairs 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe and labor 
Ranno Harness Co., repairing" 

harnesses 

George W. Rief, lumber and 
labor on carts and sleds, . .. 



HAY, C4RAIN, AND OTHER FEED. 

Paid Adams Brothers |17.C0 

George Eaton 54.20 

C. J. Estey 19.48 

Freeman & Merrill 623.00 

Gage & McDougall 1.60 

W. F. Merrill 5.20 



15.95 


.6(r 


3.30 


50.77 



?271.7S 



f721.0S 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey, waste, 

brooms $3.13 

A. N. Clapp, ginger, oatmeal, 

oil 11.78 

E. H. Currier, 3 lbs. sulphur. . .25 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., visits and 
medicine 3.75 



570 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 

coal 12.75 

Eaijer & Co., soap 2.90 

H. H. Gerward, sboeinj; horse 1.20 
Manchester Water-Works, 

use of water 17.00 

W. B. Mitchell, medicine for 

horses 3.47 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., use of telephone 18.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas. . 22.96 

^87.10 

Total expenditures §14,991.10 

Transferred to reserved fund 1,008.90 

§16,000.00 

Street Sweeping. 
Appropriation |3,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2 : 

April 1240.68 

^lay 278.80 

June 259.50 

July 252.78 

August 147.83 

September 300.07 

October 187.91 

November 2.30.98 

11,898.55 



STREET SWEEPING. 571 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
Xo. 10: 

January $8.06 

April 150.10 

May 49.49 

June 37.13 

July 43.37 

August 60.75 

September 87.00 

October 59.42 

November 72.24 

$567.56 

HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 12 

hoes $5.00 

John B. Varick Co., iron, 

nails, hoes, etc 39.88 

$44.88 

REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 

Paid Edson Manufacturing Co., 1 

two-horse sweeper $373.50 

S. A. Felton & Son Co., refill- 
ing sweeper 32.00 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & 
Machine Works, castings, 

gears, labor 7.19 

Paid Hickory Broom Fibre Co. : 

12 brooms with scrapers 8.50 

Filling two machine brooms 

with hickory fibre 35.00 

$456.19 



572 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight on brooms ?1.20 

Total expenditures $2,968.44 

Transferred to reserved fund 31.50 

$3,000.00 



Bridges. 

Appropriation $4,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 33G.SS 

$4,336.88 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
Ko. 2: 

January $13.41 

February 5.29 

March..' 12.60 

April 375.24 

May 102.34 

December 26..33 

$535.21 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 10 : 
March $32.12 

April 2.00 

$34.12 

LUMBER, STONE, HARDWARE. 

Paid A. N. Clapp, nails, rope $2.84 

Gilman Clough, lumber 165.44 



NEW BRIDGE, GRANITE STREET. , 573 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Lumber 1780.48 

Building foot-bridge, Granite 

street 2,119.70 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 

spikes and nails 5.08 

John B. Variek Co., padlocks, 

hinges, nails, spikes, etc. . . 88.00 

A. C. Wallace, lumber, j)osts. 24.68 

$3,180.22 

REPAIRS. 

Paid C. W. & G. A. Farmer, oak 

plank 1104.81 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Repairs on Amoskeag bridge.. . . 254.90 

Repairs on east end Granite 

bridge 167.00 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., repair- 
ing rail, Granite bridge. . . . ; 8.07 

1534.78 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Groton Bridge Co., labor on 

McGregor bridge |12.13 

Manchester Electric Co., elec- 
tric lights 34.42 

146.55 

Total expenditures |4,336.S8 



New Bridge, Granite Street. 

Appropriation, bonds issued |130,000.00 

Received from Manchester Elec- 
tric R. R 1,228.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . 7,527.73 

1138,755.73 



574 » report of the city auditor. 

Expenditures. 

labor and stone ■vtgrk. 

Paid Charles A. Bailev, stone $10,233.97 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 24 

tons, IMO lbs. coal 104.73 

The Head & Dowst Co., 30 

casks cement 75.00 

Paid L. F. Kittredge & Son: 

Labor 27,667.78 

Use of derricks, engines, pump. . 2,826.50 

Teaming 133.00 

Cash paid Ward Bros., for stone. 60.13 
Paid Moore & Preston, 21 tons, 300 

lbs. coal 101.45 

H. W. Parker, cement 2,966.01 

144,171.57 

IRONWORK. 

Paid Groton Bridge Co 192,750.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Allen N. Clapp, kerosene $5.50 

The John B. Clarke Co., ad- 
vertising proposals 13.88 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber 905.07 

Paid C. H. Manning : 

Services as consulting engineer.. 250.00 

Expenses to Groton, N. Y 34.00 

PaidC. H. Robie Co., 548 loads 

sand 411.00 

Union Publishing Co., adver- 
tising proposals 12.30 



CITY TEAMS. 575 

Paid John B. Varick Co., hardware |160.41 

A. C. Wallace, lumber 5.45 

Wingate & Gould, 6 pairs 

rubber boots 27.55 

C. H. Wood, painting signs. . . 3.00 

11,834.16 

Total expenditures |138,755.73 



City Teams. 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 285.70 

16,285.70 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 2: 

January $304.91 

February 193.48 

March 161.01 

April 201.24 

May 149.50 

$1,010.14 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 

division No. 10: 

January $32.85 

February 26.90 

March 32.50 

April 40.63 

$132.88 



576 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

GRAIN, HAY, STRAW. 

Paid Adams Brothers 107.18 

John Austin 1.3.85 

G. W. Butterfield 109.19 

William Clarke 35.81 

Freeman & Merrill 205.28 

Gage & McDougall 0.70 

Frank Hobbs 0.10 

Isaac Huse 178.50 

Clarence R. Merrill 151.03 

W. F. Merrill 18.12 

Jonathan McAllister 92.50 

J. M. & D. A. Parker 20.41 

A. J. Peasley 14.50 

Partridge Brothers 419.75 

W. H. Stearns 04.00 

C. D. Welch 283.15 



■?2,0S2.97 



HARNESSES AND REl'AIRS. 

Paid John F. Kerwin, repairs and 

supplies ^124.02 

Kimball Carriage Co., repairs 

and supplies 1.30.07 

Paid The Pianno Harness Co. : 

1 harness 42.00 

Repairs and supplies 40.03 

Paid Ivory S. York, supplies 8.25 



NEW CARRIAGES AND CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

Paid John T. Beach, repairs $8.88 

Kimball Carriage Co., repair- 
ing sleigh 19.00 



1345.51 



CITY TEAMS. 577 

Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, paint- 
ing wagon, etc |12,15 

James Richards, 1 two-horse 

dump-cart 75.00 

1115.03 

HARDWARE. 

Paid Allen N. Clapp, nails, hinges, 

etc 12.10 

Manchester Hardware Co., 
chain, locks, pulleys, paint, 

brackets i.HT 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

Screws, bolts, hinges 22.54 

Paint, varnish, etc 81.64 

Cement, iron, steel, nails, bitts, 

soap 54.91 

Hose, brooms, sponges, etc 81.09 

1249.65 

LIVE STOCK, AND VETERINARY "EXPENSES. 

Paid A. F. Abbott, V. S., visits and 

medicine |15.25 

Charles M. Bailey, V. S., vis- 
its and medicine 25.50 

F. L. Bodwell, dressing 

horses' teeth 36.00 

William Boynton, 1 horse. . . . 150.00 

Cavanaugh Bros., 2 horses. .. 237.50 

E. H. Currier, medicine.. . . . . 10.10 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., visits and 

medicine 14.75 

Eager & Co., salt 2.00 

W. H. Gibson, hoof ointment. 2.00 

J. L. Golden, Y, S., medicine. 17.75 

37 



578 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid W. B. Mitchell, liuiment, 

horse powdtM's |9.52 

G. H. Simpson, 1 horse 02. 50 

PaidTebbetts&Soule: 

Syringes 1.70 

Medicine .25 

Paid Welch and Hall, 3 horses 375.00 



WATER, GAS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 10 tons 

coal 165.00 

Manchester Waterworks, 

use of water 51.00 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., use of telephones 54.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas at 

stables 148.40 

J. F. AY vman, 3 tons coal 20.25 



LUMBER, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, glass, putty, 

painting blinds, etc |22.20 

F. W. Blood Roofing Co., 

roofing cement 1.75 

John Driscoll, pipe, collar, 

dampers, zinc, etc 8.78 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Repairs on storage shed 061.00 

Lumber and la])()r 171.51 

Paid C H. Hutchinson Foundry & 
Machine Works, castings 
and drilling 17.72 



1338.65 



CITY TEAMS. 579 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., material 

and labor on gas and soil 

pipes ". 144.29 

Maynard & Hevey, plumbing 

material and labor 4.11 

Pike & Heald Co., 1 sink 2.75 

G. W. Rief, lumber and labor. 21.62 

L. & W. T. Seiberlieh, glass, 

paint, nails, etc 3.48 

A. C. Wallace, lumber 10.39 



HORSE HIRE. 



Paid C. B. Danf orth |7.00 

E. T. James 19.50 

C. H. Simpson 6.00 



$969.60 



132.50 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight |5.50 

James Briggs & Son, dippers, 
iron, copper coyer, sprink- 
lers, etc 5.05 

W. H. Carpenter, removing 

dead horse 3.50 

A. N. Clapp, kerosene 14.46 

Eager & Co., soap, matches. . 1.08 

E. D. Rogers, axle grease. . . . 5.50 

The Sulpho-Napthol Co., sul- 

pho-napthol 8.75 

White Mountain Oil Co., axle 

oil 1.85 

R. M. West, 1 ladder 3.20 

$48.89 

Total expenditures $6,285.70 



580 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Repairs of Sewers. 

Appropiiation |5,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 421.63 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2 : 

January |230.04 

February G8.G7 

March 147.76 

April 633.57 

May 651.03 

June 363.53 

July 355.12 

August 264.18 

September 203.22 

October 287.83 

December 117.50 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 10: 

January 170.39 

February 58.34 

March.. "^ 237.12 

April 281.43 

May 220.25 

June 33.51 

July 68.37 

August 108.24 

September 60.75 

October 176.48 

November 200.12 

December 63.62 



5,421.63 



13,322.45 



$1,578.62 



REPAIKS OF SEWERS. 581 



HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 

6 cesspool dipper handles. . |3.00 

John B. Varick Co., oakuin, 

pails, etc 25.70 



MATERIAL, LABOR, ETC. 

Paid Boston Woven Hose & Rub- 
ber Co., hose 1174.00 

Warren Harvey, stone 227.63 

The Head & Dowst Co., 

boards and posts 1.52 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & 
Machine Works: 

Labor on couplings 15.50 

Traps, grates, etc 21.38 

Paid Kimball & Hobbs, 2 oil suits . . 4.50 

Thomas A. Lane Co., pipe, 

bends, etc 8.86 

Lessard & Hevey, cement, la- 
bor 2.00 

Palmer & Garmons, labor on 

stone 4.06 

Pike & Heald Co., 3 scoops . . . 2.61 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight |16.80 
C. H. Simpson, use of teams. . 18.00 



128.70 



1457.06 



134.80 



Total expenditures |5,421.63 



582 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

New Sewers. 

Balance from last year unexpended $4.37.8.3 

Appropriation 40,000.00 

Transferred from appropriation for 

Silver-street sewer 391.79 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 186.06 



.f41,015.6S 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
:Ko. 2: 

January 1800.64 

February 145.65 

March 46.58 

April 642.46 

May 1,198.63 

June..... 1,644.11 

July 1,860.41 

August 1,798.59 

September 1,835.08 

October 827.36 

November 1,018.79 

December 134.42 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 7: 

April 1300.11 

May 1,563.75 

June 1,679.49 

July 869.12 

August 405.78 

September 382.87 

October 210.00 

November 489.50 



111,952.72 



$5,906.62 



NEW SEWERS. 583 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 10: 

April 1398.62 

May 1,037.49 

June 1,491.00 

July 864.71 

August 921.81 

September 1,095.36 

October 629.14 

November 319.90 

16,758.03 

HARDWARE. 

Paid A. N. Clapp, nails and spikes. |20.46 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 

Globes and lanterns 10.00 

Eules, tapes, hose, etc 27.38 

Paid B. H. Piper Co., 48 handles. . . 5.78 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

Screws, bolts, nails 20.32 

Steel and iron 199.99 

Wedges, hammers, chain, rope. . 72.80 

Powder, fuse, etc 504.25 

Shovels, picks, handles, etc 366.09 



SEWER PIPE. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. $393.94 

George D. Goodrich 113.53 

Thomas A. Lane Co 5,492.38 

Manchester Heating «& Light- 
Co 2,034.04 

Pike & Heald Co 12.69 



L,227.07 



18,046.58 



684 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

MATERIAL, LABOR, ETC. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey, 4S lanterns. |2G.OO 

L. B. Bodwell & ('o., 53 tons, 

900 lbs. coal 233.4G 

Boston & Maine R. R., labor 
of section men on account 
of sewer at East Manches- 
ter 24.85 

Boston Woven Hose & Rub- 
ber Co., 750 feet hose 322.50 

James Briggs & Son, dippers, 

sprinkler l.GO 

Paid S. A. Blood: 

Pine wood, sawed 8.75 

Oak logs 1.50 

Paid Carson Trench Machine Co., 

2 wheels 10.10 

A. N. Clapp, pails, oil, etc 38.26 

Dodge & Straw, 1 pair rubber 

boots 3.40 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 25 

tons, 1,080 lbs. coal 115.29 

Edson Manufacturing Co., 

I)umj) heads 14.00 

The Fairbanks Co., 1 cement 

tester 99.00 

Charles F. Gee, castings for 

derrick 7.90 

A. & W. S. Heath, 1 pair 

boots 3.75 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & 
Machine Works: 

Grates, traps, manholes, etc 1,263.52 

Repairing drills , . .40 



NEW SEWERS. 585 

Paid The Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill 
Co.: 
Valve buffers, paw^l springs, pis- 
ton rings, etc |145.81 

1 drill, chuck, etc., com- 
plete 1300.00 

Less 2 drills returned. . . 80.00 

220.00 

Hose and express 17.75 

Paid Kimball & Hobbs, rubber mit- 
tens, oil suits, belting 

leather 15.29 

A. H. Kittredge, 500 lbs. for- 

cite 125.00 

Thomas A. Lane Co., hose 

bauds, unions, valves, etc. . 47.44 

Lightbody & Burbank, 10 

pairs boots 27.50 

Clemens Langer, repairing 

w'ater-pipe 8.80 

Mead, Mason & Co., sail cloth, 

and freight on same 30.45 

Moore & Preston, 25 tons, 

1,780 lbs. coal 112.13 

Charles H. Parker, hoisting 

engine with boiler, etc * 800.00 

Luther Proctor, blasting 

wood 31.50 

Paid James Robertson : 

400 feet rope 32.00 

1 derrick, hose, etc 541.00 

Paid G. H. Sampson, battery and 

wire 25.70 

Paid Sw\an & Finch Co.: 

Cylinder oil 25.25 

Engine oil 18.20 



586 REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Wingato & Gould, 38 pairs 

rubber boots |02.45 

J. H. Wiggiu & Co., 1 hogs- 
head 1.00 

14,491.55 

CEMENT, BRICK, LUMBER. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Brick 114.00 

Lumber 85.92 

PaidW. F. Head & Sou, 118 M 

brick 610.79 

John Kenney, 12,400 feet 

spruce plank 142.60 

Clarence R. Merrill, cement . . 2.75 
Henry W. Parker, 704 bbls. 

cement 732.16 

A. C. Wallace, lumber 729.62 

12,317.84 

FREIGHT. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight on brick, 

hose, blocks, etc 1142.78 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. M. Aldrtch, filing saws .... |3.55 
Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Advertising proposals 16.80 

Printing pay-rolls and bills 18.00 

Paid Peter Duval, filing saws 7.80 

John Ferguson, M. D., attend- 
ance on J. J. Stanton 40.00 

The Head & Dowst Co., team- 
ing engine and derrick 3.00 



SILVER STREET SEWER. 587 

Paid Laommi Searles, use of der- 
rick 110.50 

Julia F, Stearns, cash paid 

for express 1.00 

S. B. Stearns, policy No. 
25,489, Hartford Steam 
Boiler Co., 3 years 50.00 

Union Publishing Co., adver- 
tising bids 11.34 

John T. Underbill, concreting 10.50 

$172.40 

Total expenditures |41,015.68 



Silver Street Sewer. 

Appropriation |15,000.00 

Transferred from appropriation for 

Christian brook sewer 1,515.92 

116,515.92 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 

No. 2: 

May 1173.26 

June 4,472.66 

July 3,951.66 

August 2,856.81 

111,454.39 

HARDWARE. 

Paid John B. Varick Co $38.72 



588 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CEMENT, BRIOK, LUMBER. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber 1100.25 

W. F. Head & Son, 491,470 

brick 2,531.07 

Henry ^Y. Parker, 901 casks 

cement 945.59 

A. C. Wallace, lumber 406.61 

$3,983.52 

MATERIAL, ETC. 

Paid The Edson Manufacturing 
Co., 2 pumps, suction hose, 
etc 116.3.80 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & 
Machine Works, material 
and labor on pumps, etc. . . 25.23 

Thomas A, Lane Co., pipe, 

washers, etc 28.58 

1217.6 L 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R. : 

Freight |397.60 

Cost of labor taking up track 

sticks on account of sewer. . . . 27.20 

Paid Amory Manufacturing Co., 

sacking 5.09 

$429.89 



Total expenditures $16,124.13 

Transferred to appropriations for new sewers. 391.79 

$16,515.92 



CHRISTIAN BROOK SEWER. 589 

Christian Brook Sewer. 

Balance from last year unexpended |1,703.00 

Appropriation 5,000.00 

$6,703.00 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2: 

February |29.57 

April 230.12 

May 2,384.46 

June 228.17 

$2,872.32 

HARDWARE. 

Paid John B. Variek Co $10.23 

CEMENT, BRICK, LUMBER. 

Paid Adams Brothers, 2 bbls. ce- 
ment $5.60 

W. F. Head & Son, 252 M 
brick 1,297.80 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber 3.10 

Clarence R. Merrill, cement. . 3.50 

Henry W. Parker, 500 casks 
cement 520.00 

A. C. Wallace, lumber 188.90 

$2,018.90 



590 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

FREIGHT. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R 1209.04 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid James Briggs & Son, dippers. |0.75 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & 
Machine Works, manholes, 

grates, traps, etc 70.51 

Thomas A. Lane Co., Akron 

pipe 5.33 

176.59 

Total expenditures |5,187.0S 

Transferred to appropriation for Silver-street 
sewer 1,515.92 

16,703.00 

River Road, Clarke, and Elm Street Sewer. 
Appropriation $15,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2: 

August 11,110.40 

September 2,691.21 

October 1,093.80 

November 1,567.79 

$6,463.20 



RIVER ROAD, CLARKE, AND ELM STREET SEWER. 591 
HARDWARE. 

Paid F. L. Elliott, forcite |121.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware 5.06 

John B. Varick Co., dynam- 
ite, fuse, etc 432.12 

1558.68 

CEMENT, iBRIOK, LUMBER. 

Paid J. Hodge, lumber |10.93 

W. F. Head & Son, 196 M 

brick 1,009.40 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber 31.72 

Henry W. Parker, 501 casks 

cement 522.75 

11,574.80 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal |221.02 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 161.80 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 

1 ton coal 2.75 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & 

Machine Works, labor on 

steam drill 5.20 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., 

feed nuts, pawl springs, 

hose, etc 134.64 

Kimball & Hobbs, lacing, and 

oil suit 3.50 

Thomas A. Lane Co., hose, 

hose bands, etc 10.29 

Moore & Preston, coal 114.35 



592 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid M. F. Wliiton & Co., 725 feet 

steel hoist $52.20 

1705.75 

Total expenditures |9,302.43 

Transferred to new account 5,697,57 

115,000.00 

Lighting Streets. 
Appropriation 152,000.00 

Expenditures, 
electric lights. 
Paid Manchester Electric Light Co. : 

Charges. Discounts. 

January |3,944.12 |23.31 

February 4,063.33 53.86 

March. /. 4,063.33 29.91 

April 4,071.52 11.76 

May 4,072.92 39.28 

June 4,081.74 9.64 

$24,296.96 $167.76 
Less discount : . . . . 167.76 

$24,129.20 

Paid Manchester Electric Co. : 

Charges. Discounts. 

July $4,003.33 $4.01 

August 4,063.65 3.98 

September 4,063.33 6.18 

October 4,063.33 10.06 

November 4,132.00 21.42 

December 4,163.44 34.96 

$24,54!>.08 $81.21 

Less discount 81.21 

$24,467.87 



LIGHTING STREETS. 593 

GAS. 

Paid People's Gas-Light Go.: 

January |o5.16 

February 56.84 

March 48.44 

April 46.06 

May 41.16 

June 37.24 

July 32.90 

August 34.02 ' 

September 37.38 

October 41.02 

November 50.26 

December 52.50 

1532.98 



CARE OF GAS AND OIL LAMPS. 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for 
lighting, extinguishing, and 
care of gas and oil street 
lights : 

January |133.40 

February 128.15 

March 60.00 

Paid Patrick Dobbins, lighting 

lamps at Gofife's Falls $165.67 

Frank W. Elliott, lighting 
street lamp to January 1, 
1897 ^ . . 15.41 

C. D. Francis, lighting street 

lamps 225.04 

Joseph Goodwin, lighting 

street lamps 1,104.00 

38 



^321.55 



594 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Mrs. Mary E. Reed, ligbtiug 
lamp at Massabesic to Jan- 
uary 1, 1897 115.00 

Koali B. Reed, furnishing oil 
and supplies for liglit from 
September 1, 1891, to Sep- 



tember 1, 189G 


12.00 




"ftl ^'^7 \^ 




•jpXjOO I ,\.u 


SUNDRIES. 




Paid Clark M. Bailey: 




30 dozen chimneys 


142.00 


Founts, burners, wicks, etc 


15.20 


Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight 




on naphtha 


2.92 


Paid Allen N. Clapp: 




Kerosene oil 


76.96 


Gasoline 


125.74 


Matches 


.70 


Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., plugs, 




caps, etc 


.37 


Paid Clemens Langer: 




Labor putting in operation 15 




gasoline lamps 


5.50 


Fixing blow lamp 


.50 


Paid Byron E. Moore, drawing, set- 




ting, and repairing lamp- 




posts 


9.50 


John F. Moore, erecting 




building for storing gaso- 




line 


75.00 


Paid People's Gas-Light Co. : 




Glass 


8.50 


Kerosene 


16.71 


Whiskey 


3.00 


Sperm oil, etc 


1.65 



engineer's department. 595 

Paid C. C. Perry, use of hack and 

team. .'. |7.50 

Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 

Labor on gas-pipe .25 

6 burners, 1 thumb screw 6.25 

Paid O. G. Reed, use of hack and 

team 7.00 

John B. Varick Co., glass, 

matches, burners 8.13 

Whitten & Fifleld, use of 

hacks and teams 24.50 

1437.88 



Total expenditures $51,426.60 

Transferred to reserved fund 573.40 



$52,000.00 



Engineer's Department. 

Appropriation |4,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 1,395.25 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid W. H. Bennett, engineer |1,200.00 

Harrie M. Young, first assist- 
ant 847.00 

George W. Wales, second as- 
sistant 861.87 

Harry J. Briggs, third assist- 
ant 726.25 



5,895.25 



596 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Alfred Dodge, assistant |3SG.75 

G. M. Currier, assistant 108.00 

L. B. Webster, assistant 522.50 

Herbert L. Watson, assistant 157.88 

Earl Raino, labor .'^O.OO 

Ella M. Barker, clerk 81.25 

John P. Young, labor 9.00 



TEAM EXPENSES. 

Paid W. H. Bennett, car fares $0.30 

P. Donovan, Jr., use of team.. 10.00 

A. Filion, repairing sleigh. . . G.OO 

Paid Kimball Carriage Co. : 

Repairing wagon 25.00 

1 whip 1.25 

Paid Manchester Street Railway: 

22 books car tickets 55.00 

Use of horse 3.00 

Paid T. W. Robinson : 

1 express wagon $100.00 

Less 1 second-hand 

wagon 25.00 

75.00 

Paid G. W. Wales, cash paid use of 

teams 2.00 

Whitten & Fifleld, use of 

teams 74.00 

Harrie M. Young, car fares. . ..'j5 



TELEPHONE. 



$4,990.50 



.|1251.90 



Paid N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., use of 
telephone $30.80 



engineer's department. 597 

supplies and office fixtures. 

Paid W. H. Bennett: 

Cash paid for postage |2.00 

Express 1.10 

Deeds, car fare to Nashua 6.10 

Paid Harry J. Briggs, cash paid for 

express .25 

W. L. Blenus, repairing tapes 13.55 
Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Printing 150 reports 68.57 

Binding 1 boolv .50 

2 canvas covers 1.50 

Paid E. K. Coburn Co.: 

Water colors, India ink 5.27 

Paper, erasers, hooks, pencils, 12 

flags 12.10 

Paid The Carter's Ink Co., 1 ribbon 1.00 
Paid Daniels & Downs: 

Stenographer's services 23.81 

Use of typewriter 1.50 

Carbon paper, etc .75 

Paid J. G. Ellinwood, photographs 4.00 

Frost & Adams Co., supplies. 130.00 
W. P. Farmer, 2 pairs rubber 

boots 7.50 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

6,700 stakes, per contract. . 62.50 
W. P. Goodman, diaries, jour- 
nal, pencils 6.60 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 1 duster. . . 1.25 
The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber and labor 17.88 

J. Hodge, wood .30 

Kimball & Hobbs, 1 lb. rub- 
ber bands 2.40 



598 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid The Nate Kellogg Co. : 

Letter beads $7.00 

1,500 blanks 4.00 

Paid Dana W. King, examining 

copies 5.50 

Tbe Tbomas A. Lane Co., G 

cuspidors, etc 3.60 

H. F. W. Little, lumber, nails, 

and labor 3.70 

T. D. Luce, copying extract 

from road report , .75 

Lyons Platinum Pen Co., pens 5.00 

A. E. Martell & Co., letter 

books 10.00 

D. L. Miller & Co., 1 ^'Atlas of 
Manchester" 25.00 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, change 
of typewriter and use of 
one three months 65.00 

John Eobbie Co., flannel 1.00 

E. G. Soltmann, ink, brushes 

blue print 20.63 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Books, paste 6.00 

Binding and repairing books .... 5.75 

Paid John B. Yarick Co., hardware 10.73 

C. H. Wood, painting rods. . . 3.00 

R. M. West, 1 ladder 1.60 

G. W. Wales, drawing paper. .35 

E. A. Watson, photographs. . 7.50 

Harrie M. Young, paper .00 



SUNDRIES. 



$556.63 



Paid F. W. Elliott, 8 dinners and 

horse fed $7.00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 599 

Paid R. W. Shepard, keys |0.50 

Union Manufacturing Co., 

1,000 numbers 45.00 

J. W. Wilson, freight and 

truckage .92 

$53.42 

Total expenditures |5,895.25 



Health Department. 
Appropriation $4,200.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid C. W. Downing M. D., salary 
as member of board of health for 

year ending February 1, 1896 $200.00 

Paid Cornelius F. Starr, M. D. : 
Salary as member of board of 
health for year ending Febru- 
ary 1, 1896 200.00 

For 1| months 20.83 

Paid W. K. Bobbins, salary as 
member of board of health 
for year ending February 

1, 1896 200.00 

Richard J. Barry, 318 days' 
services as sanitary in- 
spector 795.00 

Herbert S. Clough, 333^ days' 
services as sanitary in- 
spector 1,000.50 

John F. Looney, 338 days' ser- 
vices as sanitary inspector. 760.51 

Ethel A. Marston, clerk 184.00 

$3,300.84 



coo REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co. : 

Printing note heads, circulars, 

etc $25.30 

25,000 plumbing notices 35.00 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing : 

Bulletins 40.20 

Health laws 58.30 

800 reports 20.10 

Note circulars 1.60 

Binding 25 books 3.75 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., blank books, 

ink 4.71 

F. H. Challis, printing circu- 
lars, cards, returns 10.75 

The Nate Kellogg Co., blank 

books 11.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 

blank book 8.85 

J. Arthur Williams, 1,000 cer- 
tificates 3.00 

TEAMS, 

Paid R. J. Barry, car fares §12.65 

Paid Herbert S.Clough: 

Car fares 34.90 

Teams 1.50 

Paid F. X. Chenette, use of hacks. . 11.50 
• W. J. Freeman, boarding 

team 102.74 

J. F. Looney, car fares 26.40 

Plummer & Brown, team. . . . 3.00 



S222.81 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 601 

Paid George E. Wheeler & Son, 

hack 12.00 

Whitten & Fifield, use of 

teams 42.00 

$236.69 



PEST-HOUSE. 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co., 1 spring. . . . $3.50 

Pike & Heald Co., centers to 

range .60 

Judith Sherer, board, sundry 

persons 32.75 



SUNDRIES. 



OFFICE EXPENSES. 

PaidH. S. Clough: 

Envelopes, mucilage $11.30 

Postage 2.66 

Paid G. B. Cressey, labor and ma- 
terial on desk 6.26 

John F. Looney, books, tacks. .99 

Moore & Preston, wood 2.00 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., use of telephone 36.50 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co. : 

Gas 2.28 

Mantels and chimneys 1.20 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., iron and 

labor on testing machine. . . 3.02 

.Weston & Hill Co., 12 towels. 1.10 



PaidR. J. Barry: 

Repairs on boat $5.00 

Card rack .25 



$36.85 



;7.si 



602 REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Bnrnluam, Brown & Warren, 

legal services $14.00 

PaidH. S. Clough: 

Disinfectants 11.10 

Express and telegrams 5.25 

Expense for McArdle family. ... .93 

Demijohns, keys, vaccination 

points 4.60 

Summoning witnesses, dinners 

at lake 3.74 

Use of steamboat 5.00 

Expenses to Concord 6.22 

Paid T. Cliilcott, burying horse 2.00 

Harold C. Ernst, M. D., diph- 
theria examination. ....... 29.00 

G. C. Hoitt, M. D., services.. . 3.00 

O. D. Knox & Co., groceries 
delivered William Trasil- 

lian 17.37 

'I'homas A. Lane Co., material 

and labor on furnace 9.14 

Lehn & Fink, antitoxin 35.00 

Paid J. F. Looney: 

Disinfectants 6.75 

Wood, tin pans .69 

Paid Ethel A. Marston, express 

and mucilage 2.70 

The II. K. Mulford Co., anti- 
toxin 12.15 

D. F. O'Xeil, groceries, Bro- 

deur family 2.95 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 

coal, Brodeur family 1.85 

Felix Provencher, burial of 
child 7.00 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 603 

Paid Snelling & Woods, sulpliur, 

alcohol 110.80 

The Sulpho-Napthol Co., 10 

gallons sulphonaphthol. . . 17.50 

F. H. Thurston, antitoxin... . 17.00 

John B. Yarick Co., sulphur, 
alcohol, lantern, f)air oars,. 7.90 

$238.89 

Total expenditures $4,163.39 

Transferred to reserved fund 36.61 

$4,200.00 



Repairs of Schoolhouses. 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . . 578.38 

$6,578.38 



Expenditures, 
masoxwork. 

Paid B. W. Kobiu^ou $165.99 

Shirley & Stuart 707.23 

$873.22 

PAIXTIXG AXD GLAZING. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, j)ainting and 

glazing $405.75 

J. S. Avery, setting glass .... 5.60 

J. Choate & Co., setting glass. .50 

Joel Daniels & Co., setting 
glass .75 

C. F. Jack, glass and setting 
same 1.18 



604 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid H. LoibillJ,^ paiut $1.95 

E. Paul, glass and setting 

same 1.80 

Jolin A. Sargent, painting 

and glazing C13.G4 

Inez M. Warren, 1 light glass. .25 

$1,031.42 

COXCRETIXG. 

Paid C. H. Robie Co $505.09 

WOODWORK. 

Paid Alonzo Day, 33 windows $79.40 

G. H. Dudley, lumber, bard- 
ware, labor 1,329.45 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

9,100 laths 20.47 

Lumber and labor 91.78 

Paid J. Hodge, lumber, windows, 

doors, etc 102.54 

$1,623.64 

PLUMBING, IRONWORK, REPAIRS. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

repairing boilers $146.66 

S. C. Austin & Co., lightning 

rods 51.90 

D. J. Adams, repairing locks, 

fitting keys 9.35 

F. W. Blood Roofing Co., re- 
pairing roofs 336.47 

E. M. Bryant & Co., repairing 

bells..' 12.54 

Burlington Venetian Blind 

Co., Venetian blinds 103.00 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 605 

Paid Cressey & Colby, repairing 

shovel and poker fl.lo 

W. M. Darrah & Co., material 

and labor on roofs 23.74 

Peter Harris, reijairing door- 
knobs .35 

C. H.' Hutcliinson Foundry & 
Machine Works, labor on 
boiler, etc 6.90 

Thomas A. Lane Co., material 
and labor, plumbing sun- 
dry schoolhouses 686.71 

Manchester Hardware Co., 
lock, sash fasts 13.75 

Pike & Heald Co., labor clean- 
ing stove-pipes, plumbing, 
etc 393.82 

S. M. Plumer & Co., repairing 

locks, fitting keys, etc 1.70 

G. S. Perry & Co., repairing 

pencil sharpeners 3.00 

James P. Slattery, repairing 
clocks 2.00 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing 
clocks 13.25 

The G. H. Underbill Co., cor- 
ridor heater 243.20 

John B. Varick Co., nails. . . . 5.20 

Perkins & Franks, electrical 

work 5.97 

.^2,120.66 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. : 
Cutting and hauling grass. Straw 

school lot 13.00 



606 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Labor on flag-staff 111.66 

Labor grading, Ash-strcet lot. . . 9.52 
Paid O. D. Case & Co.. slate black- 
boards 216.14 

F. S. Eastman, reefing rope 

through flag-pole 2.00 

Warren Harvej, drilling 

holes, use of tools 11.25 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

3 flag-poles 66.50 

Bronze escutcheons .24 

Paid V. H. Hill, cash paid for 

cleaning Training school.. 4.93 

E. T. James, use of team 3.00 

C. F. Jack, cash paid for re- 
pairing rope 1.00 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos. 12.00 
J. G. Jones, freight on black- 
boards 16.61 

J. G. Johnson & Co., 2 stone 

steps 21.00 

S. J. Russell, cleaning vaults. 35.00 
E. A. Sears, putting ropes on 

flag-poles 10.50 

1424.35 

Total expenditures |6,57S.38 



Fuel. 

Appropriation $6,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 284.03 



),784.03 



FUEL. 607 

I 

Expenditures. 

COAL. 

PaidL. B. Bodwell & Co., 61 tons 

coal 1382.75 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 

116 tons, 410 lbs. coal 743.64 

Moore & Preston, 90 3-10 tons 

coal 564.36 

E. W. Poore, 4 tons coal 23.00 

D. M. Poore, 60 tons, 250 lbs. 

coal 375.78 

E. V. Turcotte, 710 tons, 440 

lbs. coal 3,858.58 

J. F. Wjman, 2 tons coal .... 12.50 



15,960.61 



WOOD. 

Paid Oilman Clougb, 151^ cords 

wood " 1668.25 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 4 

cords wood 22.13 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 

Boards 1.62 

3^ cords wood 24.77 

Paid J. Hodge, kindling wood 1.75 

Michael McCabe, I cord wood 2.00 

Moore & Preston, wood 1.75 

Lester C. Paige, 2 cords wood 11.00 

E. W. Poore, wood 51.05 

D. M. Poore, wood 10.00 

Wilson & McKee, 2 cords wood 12.50 

J. F. Wymau, wood 11.50 



1818.32 



608 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUKDUIES. 

Paid W. R, Blakelej', moving wood 

and coal |3.G0 

Whitteu & Fifield, use of team 1.50 

l-o.lO 

Total expenditures .f6,784.0o 



Furniture and Supplies. 

Appropriation |1,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . 114.14 

11,114.14 



Expenditures. 



HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 

locks, screws, brushes, 

wrenches, sash cord, etc. . . |19.36 

John B. Variek Co., dusters, 

brooms, mats, basketSj 

locks, etc 325.01 

1344.37 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., Cushings' 

Manual, etc |1.65 

Oliver Ditsou Co., music books 53.22 

W. P. Goodman, books, craj'on, 

etc 2.70 

Educational Publishing Co., 
subscription to ^'Primary 
Education" to January, 1^07 1.00 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 609 

Paid J. L. Hammett Co., 1 globe. . . |9.00 
Kas&on & Palmer, subscription 
to ''Education" to January, 

1897 3.00 

G. F. King & Merrill, IG maps 43.50 

Novelty Advertising Co., cards 1.00 
G. P. Wallace, carbon paper, 

paper, ribbon 4.85 

1119.98 



FURNITURE. 

Paid Bobrick School Furniture Co. : 

48 desks and seats, Varney $156.00 

42 desks and seats, Spring-street 136.50 

PaidC. A. Hoitt&Co.: 

Chairs and desks 98.81 

96 rubber chair tips 3.84 

Use of chairs 13.21 

Paid Josselyn & Bead, tables 10.50 

Paid G. S. Perry & Co. : 

Inkwells 20.48 

Mats, sand disks, pencil sharp- 
eners 33.73 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., 24 dustpans 4.75 



SUNDRIES. 




Paid Joel Daniels & Co., paint. . . . 


$0.40 


T. F. Fifleld, soap, ammonia, 




oil 


10.70 


The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 




ber, labor 


16.31 


William J. Heron, Jr., letter- 




ing diplomas 


20.35 


39 





$477.82 



610 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Horace Holmes, oil |0.45 

J. G. Jones, cartage 6.50 

Georgie Kendrick, oil aud 

matches .62 

Kimball & Hobbs, 2^ yards 

enamel .88 

Lightbody & Burbank, 2 

brushes .60 

F. E. Nelson, sponges, scis- 
sors, etc 13.35 

NoTelty Advertising Co., 

stamp, pad, ink 8.85 

G. W. Eief, sawdust, etc .95 

John Robbie Co., 243 yards 

ribbon 19.86 

The Sulpho-Napthol Co., sul- 

pho-naphthol 21.00 

Paid Weston & Hill Co. : 

6 flags 47.00 

Matting, etc 4.15 

1171.97 

Total expenditures $1,114.14 

Books and Stationery. 
Appropriation 1100.00 

Expenditures. 

sundries. 

Paid W. P. Goodman, books and 

stationery |S.04 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., 

stamps, postals 10.00 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 611 

Paid N. E. Publishing Co. : 

Subscription to "Journal of Ed- 
ucation" to January, 1896 |4.25 

Subscription to "American Teach- 
er" to January, 1896 .50 

Paid Novelty Advertising Co., en- 
velopes 4.25 

E. B, Woodbury, postage and 

stationery 10.50 

George P. Wallace, paper.. . . 8.50 

146.04 

Total expenditures |!46.04 

Transferred to reserved fund 53.96 



$100.00 



Printing and Advertising. 

Appropriation |300.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 129.56 

1429.56 

Expenditures. 

sundries. 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., print- 
ing 125 note circulars |1.25 • 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing : 
Cards, circulars, postals, diplo- 
mas 368.91 

400 reports 59.40 

1429.56 

Total expenditures $429.56 



612 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Contingent Expenses. 

Appropriation |1,600.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 257.70 



,857.79 



Expenditures. 

freight and cartage. 

Paid J. G. Jones, books, school furniture, lum- 
ber, etc fOG.Oa 

WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Paid Manchester Electric Light 

Co., electric lights 140.40 

Manchester Electric Co., elec- 
tric lights 38.40 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas. . 285.60 
Union Electric Co., electric 

lights 120.05 

water commissioners, water. 703.55 

11,284.90 

ANNUAL GRADUATION. 

Paid F. P. Colby, moving grand 

piano IG.OO 

Paid Daniels & Downs: 

Engrossing diplomas . .' 13.65 

25 covers .10 

Paid Manchester Opera House Co., 
use of Opera House June 23, 

1806 60.00 

Piper & Mclntire, music .... 7.22 
Frank T. Weeks, taking tick- 
ets at Opera House 2.00 

$88.97 



CARE OF SCHOOL ROOMS. 613 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid W. E. Buck, use of team vis- 
iting suburban schools , . . $94.00 

C. W. Davis, use of team 150.00 

Emma J. Ela, cash paid for 

carrying water 17.50 

S. B. Hope, use of team carry- 
ing special teacher of music 

to suburban schools 93.00 

Byron Moore, furnishing 
water for Goffe's Falls 

school 6.50 

Paid pay-roll, division No. 2: 

February * .' 18.53 

March 8.33 

$387.86 

Total expenditures $1,857.79 



Care of School Rooms. 
Appropriation $5,500.00 

Expenditures. 

janitors of schoolhouses. 

Paid J. S. Avery $600.00 

James E. Bailey 170.04 

H. G. Batchelder 500.04 ' 

S. H. Batchelder 166.65 

W. F. Conner 549.96 

M. C. Colman 12.00 

Ida E. Corning 14.00 



614 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



PaidD. S. Dunbar 

G. E. Demick . . . 

Eose Elliott 

Emma J. Ela . . . 

V. H. Hill 

C. F. Jack 

W. H. Morrill . . . 
Fred W. Morse . 
W. H. Newry . . . 
Almon Proctor . 

Eben Paul 

Fred Perron .... 
J. K. Khodes . . . 
William Stevens 
E. D. Sleeper . . . 
Inez M. Warren . 
J. S. Washburn 



SUNDRIES. 



122.20 

23.07 
11.00 
52.07 

500.04 

500.04 

133.32 
5.55 

549.96 
21.35 

345.37 
30.50 
60.00 

416.64 

6.00 

40.25 

269.26 



14,999.31 



Paid Ida E. Corning, cleaning 
Webster's Mills school- 
house 12.00 

D. S. Dunbar, cleaning Mos- 
quito Pond schoolhouse. . . 3.00 

H. I. Dodge, cash paid for 

cleaning schoolhouse 6.50 

L. W. Harwood, cleaning Par- 
ker schoolhouse 5.85 

Mrs. J. E. Langley, cleaning 

Youngsville schoolhouse . 3.00 

G. L. Spaulding, assisting jan- 
itor, high school 9.50 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 615 

Paid Albert Somes, cash paid for 

cleaning $2.40 

$32.25 



Total expenditures $5,031.5a 

Transferred to reserved fund 4G8.44 



$5,500.00 



Evening Schools. 
Appropriation $1,500.00 

Expenditures. 

salaries. 

Paid L. H. Carpenter $97.00 

C. E. Cochran 156.20 

Honorie J. Crough 102.00 

Sarah B. Dunbar 27.90 

W. W. Forbes 61.00 

Julius Hegewald 31.00 

Tilla E. Johnson 31.00 

Maggie G. Linen 58.00 ' 

Carrie G. Mason ' 21.60 

A.W.Morgan 134.20 

Josephine A. Mitchell 60.00 

W. J. Mooar 59.00 

Mary McLaren 27.90 

Mary E. Paige 27.90 

A. W. Rowell 31.00 

Lizabell Savory 3.60 

Elizabeth Walsh 54.00 

Mary A. Walker 18.00 

$1,001.30 



616 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



JANITORS. 



Paid W. F. Conner $0.00 

Morton E. Sanborn 22.50 

128.50 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid American Book Co., 10 arith- 
metics 15.40 

H. S. Clarlv, rent of ball two 

months 26.00 

John B. Varick Co., 1 broom ..30 

$.31.70 

Total expenditures $1,061.50 

Transferred to reserved fund 438.50 

$1,500.00 



Teachers' Salaries. 
Appropriation $74,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid teachers, as per pay-roll : 

January $7,037.52 

February 7,381.33 

March .' 6,977.17 

April 7,045.55 

May 7,531.74 

June 7,417.64 

September 6,918.97 

October 7.586.02 

November 7,424.59 

December 7.355.42 

$72,075.95 



FREE TEXT BOOKS. 617 

Paid Annie W. Cofran |25.00 

Guv W. Cox 50.00 

Arthur W. Kowell, 88.00 

1163.00 

Total expenditures $72,838.95 

Transferred to reserved fund 1,1G1.05 

171,000.00 



Evening School Mechanical Drawing. 
Appropriation .fSOO.OO 

Expenditures. 

salaries. 

Paid Henry W. Allen |159.75 

John M. Kendall 158.50 

1318.25 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid W. M. Butterfield, blue prints $20.00 
E. R. Coburn Co., paper 18.00 

138.00 

Total expenditures 1356.25 

Transferred to reserved fund 113.75 

1500.00 



Free Text-books. 

Appropriation |5,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . . 58.12 

15,058.42 



618 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

EXTENDITURES. 
FREE TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

Paid AUyn & Bacon 1104.80 

American Book Co 799.03 

B. S. Andrew 40.00 

Balch Brothers 22.25 

E. E. Babl) & Co 859.83 

Boston School Supply Co. . . . 70.20 

T. H. Castor & Co . 102.07 

W. O. Crosby 34.50 

Oliver Ditson Co 9.26 

Directors of Old South Work .30 

Eajjle Pencil Co 135.20 

W. H. Elliott 4.90 

Ginn & Co 567.51 

J. L. Hammett Co 180.95 

D. C. Heath & Co 199.03 

Holdeii Patent Book Cover 

Co 113.58 

Edwin E. Howell 4.00 

G. F. King & Merrill 436.58 

King-Richardson Publishing 

Co 93.15 

Kimball & Hobbs .60 

C. H. Kimball 1.65 

Lee & Shepard 16.00 

Leach, Shewell & Sanborn . . 26.75 

Longmans, Green & Co 28.62 

Maynard, Merrill & Co 32.80 

Mead, Dodge & Co 5.58 

The Prang Educational Co., . 456.64 

Henuan Koedelsperger 5.00 

George S. Perry & Co 54.35 

Silver, Burdett & Co 70.35 



MANUAL TRAINING. 619 

Paid Albert Somes |8.00 

Thompson, Brown & Co 79.85 

The Manchester Ink Co 30.00 

University Publishing Co. . . 88.29 

William Ware <& Co 362.65 

G. P. Wallace .65 

M. G. Wright & Co 12.50 

14,558.42 

LABOR. 

Paid Fannie L. Sanborn, services as clerk in 

superintendent's office $500.00 

Total expenditures |5,058.42 



Manual Training. 
Appropriation |1,500.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Fred E. Browne, teacher |1,199.91 

Mrs. Ora Burpee, material and 

making 36 aprons 10.00 

E. E. Coburn Co., blue print, 

drawing paper 3.46 

J. L. Hammett Co., gross pen- 
cils 2.50 

Hanover-street Laundry, in- 
delible ink .50 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber and labor 67.84 

J. Hodge, lumber 55.36 

Palmer, Parker & Co., Ill 

feet gum wood 15.03 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

cardboard, envelopes 3.47 



620 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 

Paid John B. Varick Co., brads 
tacks, screws, locks, sandpaper 

etc Y 145.22 

$1,403.29 

Total expenditures $1,403.29 

Transferred to reserved fund 00.71 

$1,500.00 



City Library. 

Balance from last year unex- 
pended $3,220.42 

Appropriation 4,500.00 

$7,720.42 

EXPENDITURES. 
LIBRARIAN AND ASSISTANTS. 

Paid Kate E. Sanborn, librarian . . . $900.00 

Georo-e R. Fletcher 430.50 

Arthur H. Fletcher 294.50 

A. C. Fitzpatrick 1.45 

L. B. James 18.45 

G. W. Swallow 133.25 

A. N. Tasker 49.85 

$1,834.00 

CATALOGUE AND CATALOGUE SUrrLIES. 

Paid Library Bureau: 

Index card? $50.35 

Binders 4.40 

Fasteners, shelf sheets, etc 5.40 

Paid Louise E. Newell, copyist .... 255.90 

Edith O. Simmons 370.95 

Temple & Farrington Co., 
slips, ink, books, postals 

and printing 78.90 

$7G5.90 



CITY LIBRAKY. 621 

NEW BOOKS. 

Paid trustees of city library |1,000.00 

WATER, GAS, FUEL, INSURANCE. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood. . . |20.25 

Clough & Twombly, premium 

on 110,000 insurance on 

library contents 125.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 26.60 

E. V. Turcotte, 56 tons, 700 

lbs. coal 301.44 

Union Electric Co., electric 

lights 315.85 

water-works, use of water. . , 16.00 

1805.14 

BINDING, RE-BINDING, AND RE-SEWING. 

Paid Boston Book-binding Co |49.62 

Temple & Farrington Co 189.51 

1239.13 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice daily: 

May 8 to October 31, 1895 |5.84 

May 1 to October 31, 1896 7.50 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., "Mir- 
ror" to April 1, 1896 6.00 

Paid T. A. Lane Co. : 

Labor on electric lights .50 

24 lamps, flue brush 5.67 

Paid C. F. Livingston, book covers » 

and printing 193.48 

Kate E. Sanborn, cash paid 
for cleaning 12.53 



622 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., pic- 
ture cord, and hanging one pic- 
ture 11.68 

$233.20 

Total expenditures $4,877.37 

Transferred to new account 2,843.0.5 

$7,720.42 



Fire Department. 

Appropriation $61,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . . 2,567.65 

$63,567.65' 

Expenditures. 

services. 

Paid Thomas W. Lane, chief en- 
gineer $1,300.00 

Fred S. Bean, assistant en- 
gineer 175.00 

Ruel G. Manning, assistant 
engineer 175.00 

Eugene S. Whitney, assistant 
engineer 175.00 

Clarence R. Merrill, assistant 
engineer 175.00 

Fred S. Bean, clerk 25.00 

$2,025.00 

Paid teamsters and engineers, as per pay-roll : 

January. $1,758.65 

Februarv 2,262.68 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 623 

March I2JG9.14 

April 2,194.18 

May 2,262.93 

June 2,275.14 

July 2,269.60 

August 2,241.10 

September 2,359.14 

October 2,303.68 

November 2,299.43 

December 2,267.89 

127,263.56 



CALL MEMBERS. 

Paid Engine Co. No. 1: 

For year 1896 |1,690.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Engine Co. No. 2 : 

For year 1896 1,679.99 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Elngine and Ladder Co. No. 3 : 

For year 1896 2,270.60 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Engine Co. No. 4: 

For year 1896 1,690.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Engine and Ladder Co. No. 5: 

For year 1896 2,450.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Engine and Ladder Co. No. 6: 

For year 1896 2,441.70 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Chemical Engine Co. No. 1, for 

year 1896 465.00 

Paid Hook-and-Ladder Co. No. 1 : 

For year 1896 1,820.83 



624 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Extra labor |8.00 

Paid Hose Co. No. 1 : 

For year 189G 1,GS5.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Hose Co. No. 2: 

For year 189G 1,685.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Hose Co. No. 3: 

For year 189G 910.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

$18,868.12 

OTHER LABOR. 

Paid J. Newell Brown, labor as en- 
gineer 1220.50 

C. A. Butterfield, labor as 

driver 263.25 

Frank O. Bartlett, labor as 

driver 21.00 

Fred W. Bond, labor as 

driver 21.00 

Richard F. Galway, labor as 

driver 22.50 

Fred A. Lang, labor as 

driver 21.00 

Alcide Provencher, labor as 

driver 31.50 

Thomas Smith, labor as 

driver 21.00 

F. W. Tebbetts, labor as 

driver 63.00 

Jesse W. Truell, labor as 

driver 76.50 

John K. Wilson, labor 1.75 

$763.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 625 



LAUNDRY. 



Paid Mrs. Richard Gal way |20.09 

Mrs. G. M. Goodwin 38.19 

Charles N. Cutler 7.00 

Mrs. M. H. Hulme 57.28 

W. Morse 18.75 

Mrs. Margaret Powers 60.09 

Mrs. Susie E. Reed 8.40 

L. A. Sawyer 17.95 

Mrs. C. C. Tinkham 7.00 

Mrs. W. F. Wheeler 5.25 



FURNITURE, ETC. 

Paid Barton & Co.: 

Matting, iron ends, etc |21.47 

Blanket 1..38 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co.: 

5 mattresses 15.00 

10 comforters 16.00 

2 springs 5.00 

Bedsteads, bureaus, chairs 37.00 

4 pillows 3.00 

Screen, table, mirror, etc 10.85 

Matting, zinc ends 16.43 

Paid John Robbie Co., pillow slips 6.90 

C. A. Trefethen, 1 clock 3.50 

Weston & Hill Co., cotton, 
crash, matting, spreads, 

gingham 49.85 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co., print- 
ing: 
1,000 envelopes |24.00 



1240.00 



1186.38 



626 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



400 reports 167.75 

Advertising notice 25.50 

Paid W. P. Goodman. 1 journal. . . 2.00 
The Nate Kellogg Co., print- 
ing circulars, envelopes, 

cards, etc 58.55 

Temple & Farrington Co., pa- 
per, ink, pencils, books, etc. 15.19 

Engine Co. No. 1 10.00 

Engine Co. No. 2 10.00 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3 . 10.00 

Engine Co. No. 4 10.00 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 5. 10. 00 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. . 10.00 

Chemical Engine Co. No. 1. . 10.00 

Hook-and-Ladder Co. No. 1. . 10.00 

Hose Co. No. 1 10.00 

Hose Co. No. 2 10.00 

Hose Co. No. 3 10.00 

$302.99 

WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, TELEPHONE. 

Paid N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., use of telephones $281.71 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 914.90 

Union Electric Co., electric 

lights 64.00 

Water- Works, water 417.80 

$1,679.01 

FUEL. 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

98 3-5 tons broken coal $613.75 

10 tons egg coal 62.50 

Cannel coal 306.60 

16 cords slabs 91.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 627 

Paid Bert Jarvis, splitting wood.. . |1.25 

Paid Moore & Preston : 

Coal 50.00 

2 loads slabs 10.00 

Paid J. P. Russell &Co.: 

10 tons egg coal 67.50 

1 load mixed wood 3.25 

Paid E. V. Tureotte, 106 tons, 1,920 

lbs. coal 572.24 

11,778.09 



SUPPLIES. 

Paid Clark M. Bailer, toilet paper, 

dusters $28.10 

Paid Henrj^ K. Barnes : 

3 electric wire-cutters 28.80 

Washers, globes, hooks, etc 41.97 

PaidJ. A. &W. Bird: 

Bicarbonate soda 19.00 

Ammonia 3.52 

Brushes 31.80 

Paid Boston Belting Co., hose- 
washers, etc 10.15 

Boston Woven Hose & Rub- 
ber Co., 1 ladder 24.00 

J. H. Bunnell & Co., insula- 
tors 6.25 

Fletcher Brown, 15 chestnut 

poles 37.50 

Paid Cornelius Callahan Co. : 

1 Boston pipe 15.00 

1 rotarj' gong 15.00 

1 collar and hames 26.00 

Buckets, mat, matting 16.25 



628 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Cavanaugh Brothers : 

7 horses |1,250.00 

Freight G.UO 

Board and difference in trade of 

horses 198.35 

Paid Cooper Hose Jacket Co., 25 

hose jackets 250.00 

The Daniels-Cornell Co., 300 

packages soap powder 9.00 

G. A. Farmer, oak wood 4.00 

T. F. Fifield, soap, oil, 

matches, sugar 8.03 

H. Fradd & Co., oil 3.70 

R. D. Ga}', awnings and 

frames 15.00 

D. M. Goodwin, 24 brooms. . 9.00 

A. W. Harris Oil Co., 120 lbs. 

scouree 30.00 

T.F.Hannaford, 24 brooms.. 9.50 

S. F. Hayward »& Co., pon}' ex- 
tinguishers, bottles, and 

holders 47.50 

Charles T. Holloway, hose. . . 3.50 

J. Hodge, lumber 10.85 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & 

Machine Works, castings. . 18.G3 

A. S. Jackson, hose, brushes, 

globes, etc 29.75 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, packing,, 

lamps, hose 66.35 

Manchester Broom Co., 24 

brooms 7.50 

Manchester Locomotive 
Works, hose, brackets, 
valve springs, packing .... 21.80 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 629 

Manchester Mills, cotton 
waste 5.26 

Miller Smoke Protector Co., 

1 smoke protector 4.50 

Norfolk Manufacturing Co., 

soap, etc 18.75 

C. N.Perkins & Co., 12 snaps. 18.00 
People's Gas-Light Co., 1 

mantel .50 

Plumer & Holton, overalls, 

reefers, duck 319.00 

Pike & Heald Co., lanterns, 

globes, can, water-pot, etc. . 21.62 

The Reilly Medal Co., 25 

badges 16.25 

Stark Mills, canvas aprons, 

duck 4.32 

The Sulpho-Napthol Co., 

sulpho-naphthol 21.00 

Talbot Dyewood & Chemical 

Co., soda 5.04 

D. B. Varpey, brass castings, 

etc 9.95 

R. M. West, ladder 5.32 

12,751.31 

PLUMBING, REPAIRS; ETC. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

castings |10.29 

F. W. Blood Roofing Co., re- 
pairing 2 lanterns .25 

J. R. Carr & Co., paint and la- 
bor 6.22 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber, labor 5.94 



630 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid T. A. Lane Co., material and 

labor 155.56 

H. J. Law son, copper and la- 
bor 9.50 

Paid Manchester Locomotive 

Works: 

Casting^s and repairs 78.92 

Splicing sliding pole 3.00 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., material 

and labor U.37 

G. W. Eeed, labor on engine. . 2.00 

E. J. Sears, services on 

Chemical engine 4.00 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing 

clock 1.00 

Union Manufacturing Co., 
plating lanterns, brackets, 
etc 7.05 

D. B. Varney, castings .50 



HARDWARE, 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co. . . . |71.52 

John B. Varick Co 213.3G 

Wadleigh Hardware Co 3.33 



MEDICAL AXD SURGICAL. 

Paid A. F. Abbott, V. S., visits and 

medicine $200.80 

Charles M. Bailey, V. S., vis- 
its and medicine 22.75 

P. H. Boire, medicines 6.55 



1198.60 



$288.21 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 631 

Paid Z. F, Campbell, alcholiol, oint- 
ment $3.65 

N. Chandler, hoof ointment. . 4.50 
E. H. Currier, 12 boxes Wil- 
liams's Sure Cure 7.00 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., visits and 

medicine 13.75 

Charles Harvey, medicine.. . . 2.75 

A. A. Potter, salve 4.00 

C. E. Silver, medicine, etc.. . . 8.85 

A. D. Smith, medicine 7.20 

PaidE. C. Smith: 

Syringes 1.80 

Campho-naphthaline .75 

Paid Snelling & Woods, medicine. . 9.08 

Tebbetts & Soule, medicine. . 2.00 

1295.43 



CARRIAGE-WORK AND REPAIRS. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey, axle-grease. . |2.60 

Couch & McDonald, carriage 

repairs 65.25 

A. Filion, repairing wagon . . . 9.50 

Paid Manchester Locomotive 
W^orks : 

1 set wheels 145.00 

Ee-setting tires 10.00 

Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, car- 
riage repairs 425.41 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repairs 

on wagons 12.50 

BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid J. M. Brouillette $257.00 

Cressey & Colby 144.37 



$670.26 



632 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Thomas Hickey $57.00 

A. Lomire G3.80 

Mahanej & McSweeney 472.50 

HAY, GRAIN, ETC. 

Paid Adams Brothers $22.10 

Annis Flour & Grain Co 875.70 

W. E. Clark 18.54 

George Eaton 52.12 

Freeman & Merrill 185.68 

Gage & McDoiigall 588.75 

Clarence R. Merrill 777.15 

W. F. Merrill 1,175.90 

Nichols & Allen 872.07 

Partridge Brothers 89.84 

A. P. Tasker 88.86 

HARNESSES AND HARNESS SUPPLIES. 

Paid The Fred Allen Co., repairs 

and supplies $75.46 

W. H. Adams , repairs, sup- 
plies 119.95 

George Dunnington, repairs, 

supplies 26.60 

W. E. Greeley, repairs 3.45 

John F. Kerwin, 4 pails paste. 5.00 
Paid The Ranno Harness Co.: 

12 whips 19.80 

Supplies and repairs 143.34 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid J. R. Carr & Co., painting 

cover for hose wagon $1.25 

C. J. Cronin, cleaning carpets 12.45 



$994.67 



$4,746.71 



$393.60 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 633 

Paid p. Donovan, Jr., use of backs. |40.00 

A. M. Finney, cleaning car- 
pets 6.59 

E. R. Laing, cloth for cover. . . 1.88 

Thomas W. Lane, express 

and cartage 5.85 

Morgan, Grossman & Co., 3 

stamps 2.25 

O. G. Reed, use of hack 5.00 

E. Sargent, drawing hay 4.50 

C H. Simpson, use of hacks. . 10.00 

Weston & Hill Co., repairing 

flag 2.75 

John W. Wilson, freight and 

truckage 30.04 



J. H. Wiggin & Co., vinegar . . .15 



$122.71 



Total expenditures |63,567.65 

Fire Alarm Telegraph. 
Appropriation |2,000.00 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men, 
January 


as 


LABOR. 

per pay-roll : 


$54.00 
50 00 


February. . . . 








March 








52.00 


April 








52.00 


May 








52.00 



634 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



10.25 


7.50 


1.00 


3.00 



June 152.00 

July 5(;.00 

Aufjiist 52.00 

September 52.00 

October 50.00 

November 52.00 

December 54.00 

Paid Daniel Cameron 

Alfred Gustaffson 

Edward A. Sears 

M. A. Weathers 

SUPPLIES. 

Paid American Electrical Works, 

wire $31.04 

James Baldwin Co., 600 pins. 6.00 

J. A. & W. Bird & Co., vitriol . 84.83 

J. H. Bunnell & Co., tele- 
graph supplies 83.16 

The Brodie Electric Co., re- 
pairing telephone, etc 16.36 

James R. Carr »& Co., paint.. . 21.48 

The Edes Manufacturing Co., 

zincs 3,58 

The Electric Gas-Lighting 

Co., tacks and rings .88 

John C. Gold, climbing spurs. 5.80 

Charles F. Hall, patterns and 

castings 8.00 

W. A. Hazelton. 20 poles 55.00 

J. Hodge, lumber, etc 35.89 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe and coup- 
ling. .63 

Morgan, Grossman & Co., 7 

stamps 3.70 



1634.00 



$17.75 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 635 

PaidN. E. Gamewell Co.: 

2 fire-alarm boxes |lo0.00 

1 gong 7.00 

Repairs 7.25 

Paid Pettengill Andrews Co., wire, 

etc 21.00 

Pike & Heald Co., solder, tin. .51 

Sanborn Carriage Co., 3 roof 

tripods, repairs, etc 9.30 

Stark Mills, duck 1.06 

Talbot Dyewood & Chemical 

Co., vitriol 212.46 

C. A. Trefetben, 3 bottles 
watch-oil .75 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 19.94 

D. B. Varney, castings 123.89 

Washburn & Moen Manufac- 
turing Co., wire 128.09 

11,067.60 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid W. B. Corey, drawing poles. . . |9.50 

Peter Harris, drilling .15 

Union Manufacturing Co., 

plating .60 

John W. Wilson, freight and 

truckage .82 



$11.07 



Total expenditures $1,730.42 

Transferred to reserved fund 269.58 

$2,000.00 



636 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Hydrant Service. 

Appropriation |1G,800.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Water- Works, rent of 632 hydrants $16,800.00 

Police Department. — Station. 
Appropriation $2,800.00 

Expenditures. 

services. 

Paid Frank P. Wiggin, janitor $652.75 

WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, FUEL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co.: 

4 tons coal $25.00 

1 cord wood 9.00 

Paid J. M. Clark: 

26 tons coal 155.50 

1 cord wood 6.00 

Paid Duulap & Wason Coal Co. : 

3 tons coal 19.50 

3 cords wood 15.00 

Paid People's Ga^-Ligbt Co., gas.. . 150.50 

D. M. Poore, 1 cord wood 4.50 

E. V. Turcotte, 63 tons, 670 

lbs. coal 338.86 

Union Electric Co., electric 

lights 333.78 

Water- Works, use of water. . 217.57 

$1,275.21 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. — STATION. 637 

LAUNDRY, ETC. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey : 

Toilet paper |27.64 

Mop-yarn, pails, dusters, etc 8.86 

Paid A. N. Clapp, broom, mop, soap 1.17 
The Daniels-Cornell Co., soap- 
powder 3.36 

Mrs. A. M. George, washing 

floors, etc 93.60 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

.5 lbs. scouree 1.25 

J. J. Moran, dippers, etc 2.75 

John B. Varick Co., brooms, 

sponge, yarn 3.97 

Mrs. J. F. Wiggin, washing 

towels, blankets, etc 55.20 

Miss M. A. Wiggin, washing 

towels, etc •1.32 

1202.12 



SANITARY. 

Paid J. J. Holland, ammonia |12.00 

C. W. Lerned & Co., disin- 
fectants 11.50 

The Sulpho-Napthol Co., sul- 

pho-naphthol 17.50 



REPAIRS, ETC. 

PaidL. M. Aldrich: 

Repairing desk f 1.33 

Repairing window •. . . . 1.35 

Paid D. J. Adams, repairing cell- 
doors, etc 11.20 



114.00 



638 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid M. J. Colemnii. inaterial and 

labor I1G.80 

J. F. Conway, repairing chair .50 

Aloysius 'Eastman, mason- 
work 2.41 

Peter Harris, clock-work. . . . 1.25 

George Holbrook, fixing 

doors and windows 2.50 

T. A. Lane Co., hose, asphal- 
tum, labor 6.40 

Merrill & Laird, repairing 

lock, etc 1.49 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing 
material and labor 54.42 

Leander Pope, repairing 

bunk-cliains, etc G.IO 

Charles Thompson, repairing 
clock 1.00 

Union Manufacturing Co., 

plating door-spring, etc. . . . 1.00 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co. : 

Enamel cloth, cushion $1.25 

Chairs, shades, etc 1G.03 

Paid John P). A'arick Co., matches.. G.OO 
Weston & Hill Co., GO yards 

crash 7.20 



i.iO 



$30.48 



Total expenditures $2,312.31 

Transferred to reserved fund 487.69 

$2,800.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. — COURT. 639 

Police Department. — Court. 
Appropriation ,|3,900.00 

Expenditures. 

services. 

Paid John C. Bickford, clerk |600.00 

IsaacL. Heath, police justice . 1,500.00 « 

George Prescott, associate 

justice 300.00 

12,400.00 

CONVEYING PRISONERS. 

Paid Healy & Cassidy f 871.00 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 
warrants, civil dockets, 
writs, etc |154.50 

The John B. Clarke Co., print- 
ing blank books 20.75 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

stationery 2,35 

J. Arthur Williams, rubber 

stamps 1.25 

$178.85 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid M. J. Coleman, hose bibb and 

labor 11.10 

M. J. Healy, cash paid for 
witness fees and other ex- 
penses 407.48 



640 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid T. D. Luce, certificate of ap- 
peal 12.00 

People's Gas-Liglit Co., gas. . 7.56 

$418.14 

Total expenditures |3,867.99 

Transferred to reserved fund 32,01 

$3,900.00 



Police Department. — Commission. 

Appropriation $36,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . . 866.75 

$36,866.75 



Expenditures. 

services. 

Paid Michael J. Healy, chief of 

police $900.00 

John F. Cassidy, deputy chief 800.00 

Hariy Loveren, chairman 
commission, salary 150.00 

X. S. Clark, commissioner, 

salary lUU.OO 

Frank P. Carpenter, commis- 
sioner, salary- 100.00 

C. B. Hildreth, private detec- 



tive 29.2 



o 



, A. B. Brown, jjolice matron. . 423.00 

Reguhfr Jijatrol 23,246.61 

Extra time of regular patrol . . 1,405.51 

Special patrol 0,807.10 

— $33,961.47 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. — COMMISSION. 641 
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH. 

PaidN. E. Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., use of telephones • 1322.64: 
Western Union Telegraph 
Co., telegrams 6.67 



TEAMS. 

Paid G. W. Bailey |7.00 

Boyd Brothers 1.50 

W. J. Freeman 222.51 

E. T. James 1.00 

J. C. Nichols & Son 1.50 

C.H.Simpson " 24.50 

G. E. Wheeler & Son 2.50 



FEEDING PRISONERS. 

Paid Daniel Davis |185.40 

Diet Kitchen Association. . . . 113.00 

W. D. Ladd&Co 31.11 



PRINTING, ADVERTISING, STATIONERY. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., print- 
ing: 

Notices, envelopes, papers, etc. . $11.25 

Record arrests 34.00 

Application papers 12.50 

Blank book 8.80 

Advertising notice 8.50 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., stationery. . 2.25 
F. W. Barry, Beale & Co., 500 

blanks... 21.00 

41 



$329.31 



$260.51 



$329.51 



642 REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid W. P. Goodman : 

Stationery $11.50 

48 diaries 34.39 

Paid E. P. Gerould & Co., 2 letter 

books 5.50 

L'Avenir National, advertis- 

inf; notice. . .' 3.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., rec- 
ord book 1.00 

Union Publishing Co., adver- 
tising notice 4.01 



PATROL SYSTEM EXPENSES. 

Paid Adams Brothers, oats, straw, 

feed 119.88 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., visits and 

medicine 7.00 

L. M. Aldrich, material and 

labor . 10.44 

Ernest Beauregard, labor 

changing wires 19.00 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 

on horse 4.20 

J. ^I. Brouillette, shoeing 

horse 1.75 

Thomas F. Degnan, labor as 

lineman 17.50 

Roscoe Dyer, hanging swing 

harness 5.00 

A. L. Dodge, \'. S., visits and 

medicine 11.75 

Paid A. Filion: 

1 two-seatiMl wagon 140.00 

New shafts and painting 13.00 



1158.26 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. — COMMISSION. 643 

Paid George S. Hedden, labor as 

lineman |17.50 

Mrs. H. E. Hutchinson, 1,240 

lbs. straw 10.52 

John F. Kerwin, harnesses, 

robes, etc 56.85 

Kimball Carriage Co., robes 

and blankets 31.00 

Kimball & Hobbs, rubber 

blankets, apron, hose, etc. . 14.00 

Manchester Electric Co., 1 

pole 3.00 

Paid The Municipal Signal Co. : 

100 rolls register paper, etc 18.60 

Time stamp ribbons 4.00 

Police signal supplies 423.81 

Paid N, E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., 1 barrel glass 9.69 

Perkins & Franks, electrical 

work 19.97 

Partridge Brothers, grain. . . . 40.65 
Pettengill Andrews Co., elec- 
trical supplies 156.59 

The Ranno Harness Co., bri- 
dles 7.00 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repairs 9,20 

H. H. Simons, hay 40.20 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 53.39 
Washburn & Moen Manufac- 
turing Co., wire 126.25 

J. F. Woodbury, horse-shoe- 
ing 17.50 

J. W. Wilson, freight and 

cartage 5.25 

PaidN. J. Whalen: 

1 harness 65.00 



644 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Blankets, straps, etc |10.15 

Paid A. M. Winchester, 10 dinners, 7.50 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. W. Colby, photographing 

criminals $36.00 

H. D. W. Carvelle, M. D., pro- 
fessional services 5.00 

Louis Derome, use of boats. .. 5.00 

J. G. Ellinwood, photograph- 
ing criminals. ... * 10.75 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 
stock and labor 30.32 

E. H. Holmes, moving goods 

from Creighton house 5.00 

George Holbrook, labor, lum- 
ber, etc 7.25 

Peter Harris, brass tubes, 

flanges, locks 9.00 

C. H. Hutchinson, castings 
and labor 7.40 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., carpet, 

chairs, basket 8.40 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor. . 10.96 

Thomas A. Lane Co., globe, 

w ire, etc 3.47 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 
ice from May 11 to October 
20 9.25 

A. W. Mitchell Manufactur- 
ing Co., 42 badges 47.25 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

screws, rof^e, wire 2.60 

Paid Leander Pope: 

Grapple hook 1.25 



11,397.14 ' 



POLICE PATROL SYSTEM. 645 

Repairing tools $3.75 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., material 

and labor 7.00 

Star Stamp Co., stencil, 
brush, ink 1.80 

D. A. Taggart, services and 
expenses at Concord, peti- 
tion against police commis- 
sioners 79.41 

E. M. Topliff, services and ex- 
penses at Concord, petition 
against police commission- 
ers 52.14 

F. H. Thurston, medicine. . . . 5.60 
John B. Varick Co., hardware 70.15 

G. L. Wakefield, M. D., profes- 
sional services 6.00 

Weston & Hill Co., blankets, 

etc 5.50 

$4,30.55 

Total expenditures $36,866.75 

i === 

Police Patrol System. 
Appropriation $10,000.00 

Expenditures. 

architect. 

Paid Chickering & O'Connell, drawings and 

specifications of stable $218.96 

CONTRACTS. 

PaidL. M. Aldrich: 

Building stable $3,997.00 



646 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Extras 1229.38 

Paid E. M. Bryant & Co. : 

Wiring stable for lights 94.80 

Batteries, tubing, etc 3.80 

Paid The Municipal Signal Co., po- 
lice signal system 4,625.00 

18,949.98 

EQUIPMENTS. 

Paid Cavanaugh Brothers, 2 horses $290.00 
A. Filion, 1 patrol wagon 340.00 

$630.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., ad- 
vertising proposals $17.28 

Daniels & Downs, typewrit- 
ing .90 

Edwin F. Jones, expenses 
to Boston and Cambridge 
with chairman of police 
commission 7.40 

T. A. Lane Co., material and 
labor, gas and electric fix- 
tures 11.66 

Le Merrimack Publishing 

Co., advertising proposals.. 4.50 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing 

material and labor 145.24 

Union Publisliing Co., adver- 
tising proposals 13.89 

$200.87 

Total expenditures $9,999.81 

Transferred to reserved fund .19 

$10,000.00 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 647 

Repairs of Buildings. 

Appropriation |6,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 1,549.68 

17,549.68 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 2 : 

January 130.00 

February 24.00 

March 24.00 

April 30.00 

May 24.00 

June 30.00 

July 24.00 

August 24.00 

September 30.00 

October 24.00 

Kovember 24.00 

December 30.00 

$318.00 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 

division No. 7: 

December |8.49 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 10 : 

November 1210.50 

December 178.78 

1389.28 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
commons: 

November 1300.37 

December 740.50 

11,040.87 



648 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, 3 lights glass and 

setting 10.75 

C. B. Brown, mateiial and la- 
bor 87.76 

J. F. Burton, masonwork. . . . 3.70 

J. E. Charnley, material and 

labor repairing cornice .... 6.27 

W. E. Goodwin, plumbing .85 

Paid George Holbrook : 

Clearing snow off roof 13.00 

Lumber and labor. 44.45 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co., stools and 

table 9.00 

George Hamlin, painting ex- 
terior 156.35 

T. A. Lane Co., material and 

labor, electric lights, etc. . . 427.02 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing 

radiator valves 4.19 



POLICE STATION. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, material and 

labor $98.90 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Labor 2.01 

1 door 1.60 

Paid George Holbrook, lumber and 

labor, patrol stable 63.00 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing 

material and labor 121.79 

C. H. Robie Co., concrete 
work 42.05 



$753.34 



1329.35 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 649 

SUB-POLICE STATION. 

Paid Robert J. Hill, sheathing, box- 
ing pipes 1150.00 

H. J. Lawson, extra work. . . . 20.00 

Clemens Langer, material 

and labor 186.13 

Leibing Bros., paint and labor 49.72 

Leibing & Kuhn, glass 1.65 

Perkins & Franks, electric 

supplies 17.10 

J. T. Underhill & Co., con- 
crete 107.03 

$531.63 



ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paint, labor, etc., 

sundry houses |242.20 

M. Badger, paint, glass, labor, 

East Manchester hosehouse 5.38 

James R. Carr & Co., paper 7.87 

Joel Daniels & Co., paint. 

Lake avenue 6.51 

J. P. Finn, hanging paper, etc. 44.73 

D. E. Guiiiey, plumbing re- 
pairs 43.52 

George Hamlin, glass and 

labor 9.96 

George Holbrook, lumber and 

labor, sundry houses 292.03 

J. Hodge, windows, door 

frames, lumber 60.51 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber and labor, sundry 
houses 187.21 



650 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Robeit J. Hill, repairs |97.00 

Samuel Hill, paiutiug 85.00 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co. : 

Table, chairs, East Manchester 

hosehoiise 14.28 

desk, chairs. South Manchester 

hosehouse 26.95 

Paper, Lake avenue house 28.62 

Paid Clemens Langer, repairing 

roof 12.80 

W. G. Landry, bank wall, 
South Manchester hose- 
house 94.00 

T. A. Lane Co., changing 

steam pipes 7.05 

Herman Maynard, painting 
and papering East Man- 
chester hose house 28.00 

PaidD. G. Mills: 

Eepairs and painting Vine street 

house 185.00 

Repairs, Fulton house 16.70 

Paid P. J. O'Brien, painting Lake 

avenue house 88.00 

Perkins & Franks, electric 
supplies, South Manchester 

hosehouse 11.97 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., plumbing 
material and labor: 

Vine-street house 181.17 

Gen. Stark house 59..34 

Fire King house 93.17 

Paid B. W. Robinson, piasou 

work. Vine street 18.85 

Thomas Smith, labor and 

lumber 129.05 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 651 

Paid L. M. Streeter, shingles, rope, 
pulleys, labor, East Man- 
chester hosehouse 24.37 

W. H. Sullivan, material and 
labor, Tarnishing interior 
Fire King house 69.00 

John T. Underbill & Co., con- 

ccete 10.00 

Whittemore & Johnson, labor. 

East Manchester hosehouse 12.00 

A. C. Wallace, lumber 22.33 

Oliver Whyte & Co., 2 gates . . 30.00 

$2,244.57 



COURT HOUSE. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, taking off win- 
dows 10.75 

Charles B. Brown, gravel 

roofing, etc 122.33 

D. E. Guiney, plumbing re- 
pairs 46.46 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber and labor 50.87 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., cocoa 

matting and laying same. . . 8.80 

C. A. Healy, paint and labor. 10.18 

George Holbrook, screen 

door, window screens, etc.. 12.75 
The Kirby Floral Co., plants. 18.70 
T. A. Lane Co., steam fittings. 28.78 
John B. Varick Co., seed, fer- 
tilizer, rakes, etc 22.22 



$321.84 



652 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SCHOOLS. 

Paid The Bobrick School Furniture 
Co., 48 No. 2 desks, Wilson 

school $168.00 

H. I. Dodge, painting fence 

and shed, Goffe's Falls 42.25 

Warren Harvey, stone and la- 
bor. Ash-street school 149.63 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., desk and 

chairs 19.85 

Paid T. A. Lane Co. : 

Fitting augers and extension, 

high school 1.00 

Marble slab, etc., Straw school . . 9.85 

Paid W. H. Perkins, painting fence, 

etc., Goffe's Falls 55.35 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing . . 35.06 

G. Allen Putnam, 95 loads 
loam, South Main-street 

school 38.00 

C. H. Robie Co., grading, 
transplanting trees, con- 
creting, Ash-street school.. 298.32 

C. A. Trefethen, 4 clocks 14.00 

John B. Varick Co., paint and 
oil 15.70 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber and la- 
bor $6.05 

E. M. Bryant & Co.. Ayiring 
sub-police station for vot- 
ing purposes 38.36 



$847.01 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 653 

Paid The Jolrn P.. Clarke Co., ad- 
vertising proposals |7.50 

Connor Brothers, work at 

ward five ward-room 22.40 

P, Donovan, Jr., use of.. 

hack. 5.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

Hall's rocking grater 40.50 

Warren Harvey, building re- 
taining wall 381.00 

Israel Huneau, labor, lumber, 

nails 20.82 

J. B. Huntle}', pipe and coup- 
ling 6.08 

Robert J. Hill, building box- 
es, ward 8 ward-room 20.00 

George Holbrook, lumber and 

labor 34.25 

W. F. Hubbard, repairing 

window, etc 1.00 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 

Lumber, labor, pest-house S.Ol 

Fence rails, labor, Goffe's Falls.. 50.38 

Paid Clemens Langer, repairing 

furnaces, ward five ward-room . . . 30.55 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., material 
and labor: 

Ward five ward-room 7.00 

Battery building 2.03 

Public comfort 2.45 

Paid C. H. Simpson, use of hacks. . 20.00 
P. J. O'Brien, glass, putty, la- 
bor 8.73 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 18.69 

C. M. Wheeler, 12 posts 27.00 



654 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

PaidWhitten & Fifield, use of 

liacks $7.50 

$7G5.30 



Total expenditures |7,549.GS 

Public Bath-Houses. 
Appropriation |2,500.00 

Expenditures. 

Transferred to city hall appropria- 
tion 11,000.00 

Transferred to incidental expenses 

appropriation 1,500.00 

12,500.00 

New Schoolhouses. ' 

Balance from last year unexpended |19,316.61 

Receiyed from sale of bonds 120,000.00 

Received from sale of land 10,885.70 

Transferred from reserved fund . . . 2,923.87 

$153,156.18 

Expenditures. 

high school. 

Architect. 

Paid W. M. Butterfield, on account $3,082.50 

Contract. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co., on ac- 
count $76,384.00 

Thomas A. Lane Co., heating, 

on account 0,200.00 

$85,584.00 



NEW SCHOOLHOUSES. 655 

Advertising. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., ad- 
vertising proposals $16.G7 

Union Publishing Co., adAer- 

tising proposals 11. 9G 

128.63 



Sundries. 

Paid pay-roll division No, 2, July. . |79.75 
John T. Underhill & Co., con- 
crete 158.21 



1237.99 



STRAW SCHOOL. 

Contract. 

Paid Fuller & Warren Warming & Ventilat- 
ing Co., balance due 1520.00 

WILSON SCHOOL. 

Architect. 

Paid W. M. Butterfield, professional services. . |3G5.00 

Contracts. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Balance due |7,787.00 

Extras 1,413.85 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co. : 

Speaking tubes and electric bells 96.00 

Combination gas and electric fix- 
tures 375.00 

Paid The George H. Underhill Co., 

final pavment for heating 597.50 

110,269.35 

Furniture. 

Paid The Bobrick School Furniture 
Co., 240 adjustable desks 
and seats 1833.60 



656 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid C. A. noitt & Co., desks and 

chairs |58.75 

C. A. Tref etheu, 5 clocks 17.50 

1909.85 

Sundries. 

Paid J. Choate & Co., gildiug letters ou tablet . |6.00 

Total expenditures .f 101,003.32 

Balance to new account 52,152.86 

1153,156.18 



New Schoolhouse, West Manchester. 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . |10,255.51 
Transferred from appropriation 

for incidental expenses 2,000.00 

Transferred from appropriation 

for addition to Derryfield park. . 8,000.00 

$20,255.54 



Expenditures. 

contract. 
Paid W. M. l^utteriield, contractor §19,965.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., material 

and labor $237.14 

Jolm T. Uudei'hill Co., con- 
crete work 53.40 

$290.54 

Total expenditures .$20,255.54 



WATER-WORKS. 657 



Water-Works. 



Balance from last year unexpended 142,720.01 
Cash received from water rents . . . 128,907.03 

1171,027.04 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-rolls: 

January |1,480.55 

February 1,241.15 

March 1,355.30 

April 1,781.65 

May 2,082.67 

June 2,470.87 

July 1,958.39 

August 2,049.42 

September 2,428.87 

October 1,919.74 

November 1,956.24 

December 2,308.37 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2: 

March $25.00 

December 1,262.82 



123,036.22 



11,287.82 



Paid J. H. Proctor: 

Labor on highway, seeding lawn 

at high service station |79.86 

Labor and use of team, grading, 
etc 913.89 



42 



lO 



658 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

GENERAL EXPENSE. 

Paid F. W. Elliott, dinners, annual 

inspection $25.00 

W. C. Clarke, 11 meetings of 

board 44.00 

Henrv Chandler, 32 meetings 

of board 128.00 

Henry Chandler, clerk 100.00 

Alpheus Ga^', 30 meetings of 

board , 120.00 

Charles H. Manning, 14 meet- 
ings of board 56.00 

Charles T. Means, 15 meet- 
ings of board 60.00 

Harry T. Parker, 14 meetings 

of board 5G.00 

A. C. Wallace, 11 meetings of 

board 44.00 

Paid Manchester Street Kaihvay: 

Barges 23.00 

Tickets 1.00 

Paid A. P. Partelow, use of steam- 
er 8.00 

PaidC. K.Walker: 

Salary as superintendent 1,999.86 

Gas 27.45 

Express 9.05 

Postage stamps 18.20 

Map, pens, insurance 7.67 

Incidentals 8.42 

PRINTING, ADVERTISING, STATIONERY. 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 

19,500 notices |28.00 



12,735.65 



WATER-WORKS. 



659 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co., print- 
ing: 

20,000 blank bills $40.00 

2,500 postals 29.50 

1,000 notices 1.75 

700 reports. 120.00 

Books, signs 12.40 

Advertising, 1 line, 28 times 7.00 

Binding 1 volume reports 1.00 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., stationery. . 15.21 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Stationery 2.71 

Binding maps 2.50 

Paid Union Publishing Co., adver- 
tising 6.05 

ENGINEERING SERVICES. 



1266.12 



Paid Joseph B. Sawyer, services of self and 
men 1308.34 



TEAMS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

54 tons, 1,880 lbs. coal ^. |395.76 

1 barrel coal .40 

Wood 12.00 

Paid Bangs & Horton, 85 7-10 tons 

coal ' 285.92 

Gilman Clough, 10 cords 

wood 30.50 

E. T. James, use of teams. . . . 17.50 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., use of telephones 144.45 

J. A. & A. Walker, 150 tons, 

1,000 lbs. coal 506.83 



660 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid George Whit ford, wood |17.00 

Wliitten & Fifield, use of team 2.00 

J. F. Wjman, bard wood 6.00 



LAND. 

Paid George A. Alger, land as per 

, deed 1100.00 

G. J. & A. M. Cyr, land and 

buildings as per deed .... 1,200.00 

Ann Currier, land as per deed 500.00 

Martba JNI. Chase, land as per 

deed 1,400.00 

Mrs. L. A. Follansbee, land as 

per deed 75.00 

Addie Fletcber, land and 

buildings as per deed 3,100.00 

Asa B. Haselton, land as per 

deed 5,000.00 

Emma M. Heath, land as per 

deed 800.00 

J. A. Hutchinson, land and 

buildings, as per deed 3,100.00 

Josephine B. Hunter, land 

and buildings, as per deed. 7,100.00 
Isaac Huse, land as per deed. 2,500.00 
Anna P. Partelow, land and 

buildings as per deed 500.00 

Luther S. Proctor, land and 

buildings as per deed 5,000.00 

Mary E. Stuber, land and 

buildings as per deed 2,000.00 

Clara B. Wheeler, land as per 

deed 150.00 



,424.36 



132,525.00 



WATER-WORKS. 661 



LEGAL SERVICES. 



Paid C. H. Burns, retainer in dam- 
age cases, and other ser- 
vices 11,120.00 

Drury & Peaslee, legal ser- 
vices 991.24 

Wm. Morrill, copy of deeds. , 60.20 

John M. Parker, services ap- 
praising land 25.00 

Geo. S. Peavey, examining 
property for appraisal 71.25 

Kimball Webster, services 
and expenses 45.58 



HARDWARE, BLACKSMITHING, FREIGHT. 

Paid John T. Beach, welding $2.00 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 2,415.11 
James H. Cram, sharpening 

tools 5.10 

Cressey & Colby, sharpening 

tools, etc 267.50 

A. Filion, shafts for roller. . . 6.00 
Manchester Hardware Co., 

tools 60.39 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 406.81 



SUPPLIES. 

Paid Adams Brothers, 20 casks 
cement |27.50 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. : 
2 kevs 4.50 



12,319.27 



J,192.91 



662 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Pipe, etc 1485.31 

Paid Boston Reltiug Co., 100 feet 

hose 30.50 

Builders' Iron Foundry, pipe. 33.75 
Boston Lead Manufacturing 

Co., solder 10.15 

F. Brown, 175 posts 21.00 

A. N. Clapp, kerosene 33.30 

P. C. Cheney Co., wiping 

waste 24.15 

Paid Chadwick Lead Works: 

225 pigs lead 635.16 

125 bars lead 357.84 

pipe 53.32 

Paid Chapman Valve Manufactur- 
ing Co., hj'drants, gates, etc 591.44 

Coffin Valve Co., 1 stem 2.50 

James H. Cram, 2 grapples, 

2 rings 2.00 

G. E. Foster & Co., 1 second- 
hand steel chest 200.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 1 

flue cleaner : 2.50 

Garlock Packing Co., packing 36.91 
Gould & Stevenson, 10 hy- 
drants 320.00 

W. H. Griffin, 80-foot flagpole 10.00 

Groton Bridge Manufacturing 

Co., spruce lumber 5.70 

A. W. Harris Oil Co., valve 

oil 27.25 

A. Higgins & Co., 2,800 wash- 
ers 3.95 

Paid Ilays Manufacturing Co. : 

300 stop boxes 255.00 



"WATER-WORKS. 663 

49 curb cocks 134.30 

Paid Hersey Manufacturing Co., 

brass meters 598.75 

Paid J. Hodge: 

400 meter boxes 120.00 

lumber, etc 3.30 

Paid M, L. Johnson, curb stops, nips, 

etc 462.08 

Kimball & Hobbs, rubber 

galskets, washers 38.40 

C. M. Kemp Manufacturing 

Co., 1 stock, pawl, spring. . 8.19 

Thomas A. Lane Co., valves, 

gaskets, unions, etc 73.78 

H. T. Lawson, copper. ...... 1.21 

^Leonard Sc Ellis, machine oil 

and tanks 186.00 

Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co., pipe 1,253.31 
Manchester Locomotive 
Works, valves, castings, 

sleeves, bolts, etc 705.06 

W. P. Miller & Co., 1 keg 

lubricant 16.50 

Albert Moulton, barrels 3.60 

McXeal Pipe & Foundry Co., 

pipe 12,187.61 

National Meter Co., meters . . . 1,928.05 
National Tube Works, pipe, 

sleeves, etc 483.10 

Neptune Meter Co., meters. .. 258.60 

Paid Norwood Engineering Co.: i 

Hydrant post 6.00 

Hydrant cases 152.50 

Paid Peet Valve Co., 15 water gates 199.00 
Paid Pratt & Cady Co. : 

5 hydrants 155.00 



664 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

1 tap for liydraut $14.00 

Paid Rensselaer Manufacturing Co., 

water gates 205.00 

T. H. Kisdon & Co., 1 spider 

and lever for water wheel.. 8.47 

Schaflfer & Budenburg, 24 

springs 12.00 

G. O. Spencer, 100 posts 12.00 

Thomson Meter Co., meters. . 299.95 

Union Brass Co., caps, cocks, 

nipples 220.21 

Union Water Meter Co., me- 
ters 1,442..35 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil. 57.05 

Paid Walworth Manufacturing Co. : 

200 cocks 103.91 

2. pipe tongs 23.40 

Paid Mrs. F. A. Woodman, 20 cords 

manure 120.00 

Weston i& Hill Co., 1 flag G.25 

Henry R. Worthington, jacket 

elbows, etc 6.95 

L. B. West Co., water pail . . .65 



$24,580.26 



REPAIRS. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.: 

Repairing counter $1.50 

Labor on gears, etc 33.50 

Paid F. X. Daniels & Co., labor on 

barn 455.17 

J. B. Dickinson, batteries, and 

repairing line 23.34 

A. M. Finney, repairing chairs 

and desk 10.73 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 
iron and labor .76 



WATER-WORKS. 665 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Material and labor strengthening 
foot-bridge, Granite street, for 

pipe 1306.86 

Lumber and labor 3.97 

Paid Joseph Huneau & Son, mate- 
rial and labor 19.65 

Thomas A. Lane Co., labor 
and material, electric 

lights, etc 20.49 

Manchester Locomotive 
Works, labor on boiler, col- 
lars, etc 58.55 

National Meter Co., repairing 

meters .* 61.81 

Pike & Heald Co., repairs. . . 1.14 
C. H. Robie Concrete Co., con- 
creting 452.81 

PaidL. & W. T. Seiberlich: 

Painting barn and shed 75.00 

Paint and labor 75.39 

Paid Ira F. Stiirtevant, lumber and 

labor 667.31 

Charles P. Still, labor on cel- 
lar and barn 73.05 

C. J. Shanessy, repairing 

wheels 4.85 

J. T. Underbill & Co., laying 

gravel roof, etc 44.41 

Union Water Meter Co., re- 
pairs on meters 92.74 

H. Wyman, moving barn, and 

one day's labor 51. 50 

Westover & Co., frames, sash- 
es, casings 75.22 

12,609.75 



666 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid town of Auburn, taxes on 

land and buildings §103.88 

W. B. Corey, cartage 2.00 

A. S. Chadbourne, trees 25.00 

Jacob P. Chase, stones and 

distributing same 12.25 

Dickey & Coleman, manure. . 118.20 

Forbes Lithograph Manufac- 
turing Co., 1 zinc block. . . . 15.00 
D. L. Miller & Co., "Atlas of 

Manchester" 25.00 

Paid J. H. Proctor: 

Carting coal 91.40 

Paid men for cutting trees a.-id 

brush 109.90 

Paid Luther S. Proctor, moving 
and distributing bound 

stones 6.00 

Albert Palmer, manure 81.30 

Sinking Fund commissioners, 
amount of hydrant tax for 

189G 16,800.00 

G. W. Townsend, services and 

expenses as diver. . ■ 16.75 

W. H. Shilvock, half-tone, 

station and dam 11.55 

$17,514.23 

Total expenditures $112,793.68 

Transferred to interest appropriation 41,446.00 

Balance to new account 17,387.36 

$171,627.04 



COMMONS. 667 

Commons. 
Appropriation |4,500.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 

January |2o9.10 

February 165.49 

March 70.99 

April 18S.12 

May 146.50 

June 181.25 

July 118.25 

August 163.12 

September 498.40 

October 238.10 

November 286.86 

December 133.88 

12,450.06 

PLANTS, TREES, ETC. 

Paid Orison Hardy, 15 trees |11.25 

A. G. Hood, plants 60.00 

J. S. Holt & Co., ashes 160.87 

H. H. Huntress, plants 70.00 

The Kirby Floral Co., plants. 53.50 

Paid Eay Brook Garden Co. : 

Tulips 36.00 

Other plants 52.00 

1443.02 

■WATER AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS, 

Paid Union Electric Co., electric 

lights $30.00 

Water-Works, use of water. . 700.00 

$730.00 



66S REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

REPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 

PaidJ. J. Abbott: 

Green paint $19.3G 

Lettering- signs 3,25 

PaidL. M. Aldrieh: 

Filing saws 4.40 

Lumber, signs, etc S.09 

Paid Boston Woven Hose & Rub- 
ber Co., hose 145.20 

W. E. Goodwin, repairing 

fountain and pipe 31.20 

Peter Harris, keys 2.00 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber 39.42 

C. A. Healy, paint and labor. . 41.92 

J. Hodge, lumber, etc 13.34 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 10 yards 

burlap 2.00 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & 
Machine ^Yorks : 

Castings and labor 29.22 

Material and labor on ice- 
scraper, lawn-mower, fence, 

etc 19.4G 

Paid T. A. Lane Co. : 

Material and labor on gas-pipe.. . 2.93 

Labor on fountains, band-stand. 15.14 

7 tin dippers 1.40 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 

nails, chain 3.44 

C. E. Palmer, tin, solder, and 

labor 5.00 

Parnell Brothers, 5 barrels.. . 2.50 

Leander Pope, sharpening 
tools 2S.G0 



STARK AND DERRYFIELD PARKS. 669 

Paid Public Market Co., 5 barrels. . $2.50 

C. H. Robie Co., concreting 

walks 222.97 

John B. Varick Co., tools, 

hardware 58.13 

Wingate & Gould, 8 pairs 

rubber boots 26.00 

1727.47 



Total expenditures |4,351.15 

Transferred to reserved fund 148.85 



14,500.00 



Stark and Derryfield Parks. 

Balance from last year unexpended |0.14 

Appropriation 5,000.00 



15,000.14 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per commons 
pay-roll : 

January |30.00 

February 20.75 

March 54.12 

April 193.25 

May 821.37 

June 1,253.72 

July 808.33 

August 477.83 

December 23.90 

$3,683.27 



670 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division Xo. 2 : 

June $185.43 

July SUO.OO 

?5.43 



TOOLS, HARDWARE, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid J. H. Hoben, 30 loads paving 

stone 137.50 

J. Hodge, oak rod .70 

W. G. Landry, stone 1.00 

T. A. Lane Co., valve, bibb . . . 2.22 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware 17.22 

John A. Sargent, paint and 

labor 6.60 

John B. Varick Co., tools, 

hardware 74.81 

$140.05 

SHRUBS, TREES, ETC. 

Paid A. H. Chadboiirne & Co., 

shrubs and trees $335.00 

J. S. Holt & Co., ashes, 900 
bushels 112.50 

$447.50 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid John Fullerton, 4 barrels $2.00 

Manchester Water- W o rk s , 

use of water 24.00 

Parnell Brothers, 1 hogshead .75 

People's G as-Light Co., 4 

chaldrons coke 17.00 

$43.75 

Total expenditures $5,000.00 

Transferred to new account .14 

$5,000.14 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 671 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Appropriation |8,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 93.54 



18,593.54 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 

January |161.15 

February 168.26 

March •. . 157.76 

April 432.20 

May 621.26 

June 716.07 

July 536.69 

August 487.00 

September 482.41 

October 362.13 

November 473.17 

December 270.32 



t,868.42 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 2: 
October |11.12 

PLANTS, TREES, LOAM, ETC. 

Paid F. B. Balcb, 2 tons fertilizer. . $50.00 
A. H. Chadbourne & Co., 

shrubs 30.00 

James A. Colby, 55 loads loam 82.50 
Frank Chenette, 19 loads 

loam 19.00 

C. W. Eager, 154 loads loam.. 231.00 

H. H. Gurney& Co., shrubs.. 75.00 

Addison Gray, 99 loads gravel 9.90 



672 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid H. H. Ilimtress, plants $12.10 

K. K. Uorue, li) loads loam. . . 9.50 

A. G. Hood, plants 52.80 

Joseph Poor, 86 loads gravel. 8.60 

John B. ^'al'ick Co., seed 45.36 

C. C. Webster, 32 loads clay.. 32.00 



1657.76 



WATER, TELEPHONE, INSURANCE, FUEL. 

Paid A. Elliott & Co., premium on 
insurance policy No. 760,- 

777 '. 12.50 

Co., use of telephones 84,00 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 3 

tons coal 21.00 

Water- Works, use of water. . 922.50 



11,030.00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., print- 
ing bills, contracts, notices, 

blanks $13.65 

E. R. Coburu Co., paper .40 

W. P. Goodman, stationery.. . 3.35 
E. J. Knowlton, P. M,, envel- 
opes 2.17 

W. E. Moore, printing re- 
ceipts 2.00 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

Filing saw $0.35 

Hardware and labor. . . , 6.21 



p21.o7 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 673 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paper and hang- 
ing same |2.49 

John T. Beach, repairing cart 7.10 
J. Choate & Co., paint and la- 
bor 2.13 

Day & Boynton, sheathing, 

jambs, door 5.55 

Hartwell Foundry Co., cast- 
ings 1.80 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

3,000 brick 21.00 

Cement and lumber 15.17 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co., 12 folding 

chairs 10.00 

J. Hodge, lumber and stakes . 7.23 

C. H. Hutchinson Foundry & 
Machine Works, castings 

and labor 9.58 

Paid T. A. Lane Co. : 

Material and labor on fountain, 

etc 7.19 

Pipe and labor 148.95 

Paid Manchester Heating & Light- 
ing Co., pipe 6.66 

Theodore Miller, labor clean- 
ing and repairing stoves. . , 36.83 
Palmer & Garmons, setting 

over stones 7.10 

Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 

Material and labor on sewer 877.80 

Other labor 6.97 

Paid W. L. Roper, mason-work. . . . 3.75 

C. H. Robie Co., concreting.. . 315.12 

Morton E. Sanborn, 12 lawn 

sprinklers 9.50 

Shirley & Stuart, mason-work 7.70 

43 



674 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid W. H. Sulli^•an, repairs on 

office, chapel, etc |209.23 

Jolin B. Varick Co., tools, 

hardware 125.99 

L. B. West, drinking-cups. . . . 1.50 

G. R. Vance, water-pot .75 

11,853.95 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid C. H. Bartlett, services as 

clerk 150.00 

Hannah D. Hall, part of lot 

ISO. 1,100 71.00 

O. G. Reed, hacks 10.00 

S. J. Russell, cleaning vault. . 5.00 

• F. L. Wallace, box for removal 

of Hairs child 2.00 

Whitten & Fifleld, hack 5.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

lumber ( 4.72 

1150.72 

Total expenditures $8,593.54 



Valley Cemetery. 

Appropriation |3,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . G.81 

|3,006.8i 



Expenditures. 

LAI'.OR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 

January $78.25 

Februarv 59.75 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



675 



March $63.50 

April , 165.87 

Mar 224.67 

June 266.45 

Julv 220.89 

August 208.52 

September 230.93 

October 176.40 

November 164.52 

December 86.72 

Paid B. F. Bascomb |84.00 

James Hannon 6.25 

Freeman & Merrill . 4.00 

Peter Rodgers 3.75 

WATER AND TELEPHONE. 

Paid N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., use of telephones |36.00 

water commissioners, use of 

water 165.90 

TURF, LOAM, PLANTS, ETC. 

Paid H. E. Babcock, trees |6.00 

B. F. Bascomb, loam, stone. . 45.75 
J. Francis, plants 62.62 

C. H. G. Foss, cash paid for 

shrubs 2.00 

H. H. Gurney, shrubs 6.50 

H. H. Huntress, plants 18.75 

C. Menseau, loam 1.30 

Jeremiah Murphy, 3 loads 

loam 1.50 

Peter Rodgers, 163 loads sand 32.60 
P. O. Woodman, turf and 

loam 32.83 



11,946.47 



198.00 



1201.90 



$209.85 



676 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid E. J. Knowlton, P.M., stamped 

envelopes $3.52 

Temple & Farrinjiton Co., sta- 
tionery 7.45 



REPAIRS, TOOLS, AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, painting fence. . . $24.77 

John Francis, 1 jiair rubber 
boots 2.75 

Hartwell Foundry Co., 1,203 
numbers 180.45 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber and labor 89.07 

Kimball & Hobbs, hose and 
couplings 18.50 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on urinal 

and faucet 11.90 

F. I. Lessard & Co., pipe, hose, 

etc 10.90 

Palmer & Garmons, setting 

stones 10.00 

Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 

Hose, nozzles, pipe, etc 27.08 

Material and labor 10.80 

Paid C. H. Kobie Co., concreting 

walks 52.11 

D. A. Simons, 1 chair 2.50 

John T. Underbill & Co., con- 
crete work 12.52 

John B. Varick Co., tools and 

hardware 57.63 

Weston & Hill Co., 1 rug 8.00 



$10.97 



$518.98 



AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 677 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid G. W. Bailey, use of team |1.50 

B. F. Bascomb, 2^ cords ma- 
nure 8.17 

S. P. Cannon, services as 
clerk of sub-trustees 10.00 

Lovejoy & Stratton, cleaning 

clock 1.00 

120.67 

Total expenditures |3,006.84 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 
'Appropriation $350.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid James E. Bailey |67.00 

F. D. Heath 20.62 

Anson McGaffey 11.25 

$98.87 

SUNDRIES. 

PaidW. E. Goodwin: 

Plumbing material and labor. . . . $33.77 

Iron fence, two posts 197.80 

Paid Mancliester Water- W o r k s , 

use of water 12.00 

Palmer & Garmons, setting 

stones 7.28 

$250.85 

Total expenditures $349.72 

Transferred to reserved fund .28 



$350.00 



678 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paupers off the Farm. 

Appropriation |10,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 1,640.07 



$12,140.67 



Expenditures. 

GROCERIESj ETC. 

Paid Burke Brothers |4.00 

Bartlett & Thompson 9G.0O 

Ernest Boisvert 40.00 

Eager & Co 50.00 

Edson Eastman & Co 15.75 

A. M. Eastman 12.00 

H. Fradd & Co 245.00 

T. F. Fifield 714.41 

G. E. French, 50.88 

A.H.Gray 04.00 

A. G. Grenier... 0-3.00 

Griffin Brothers 1,.378.22 

Joseph Huard 225.50 

O. D. Knox & Co 232.02 

Lamoreaux Brothers 53.77 

J. N. Laeourse 13.00 

Patrick Lynch 5.00 

E. Marchand 604.30 

Thomas H. Mahoney 324.00 

A. W. Morse 204.00 

McQuade's Market 93.00 

Noyes & Prince 77.04 

F. X. Parent 15.00 

D. M. Poore & Son 51.00 

O. W. Price 0.12 

E. W. Perkins 18.00 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 679 



Paid Queen City Market 

Eugene Quirin 


18.00 
282 17 


Charles Robitaille 

Scheer & Renker 


31.7G 
5.00 


D. A. Shanahan 

J. 0. Turcotte 

H. A. Tirrell 

Trahan & Co 


144.00 
50.00 
25.00 
75.00 


Calixte Vigneault.. 

Moise Verrette 

Henry Weber 


2.00 
40.00 
60.00 






FUEL. 

Paid James Baldwin Co 


12.50 
13.50 


L. B. Bodwell & Co 


V. Bourque & Co 


70.50 


Boisclair & Raiclie 


3.00 


B. J. Cate 

F. X. Chenette 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co. . . . 
W. E. Dunbar & Co 


3.50 

2.50 

59.50 

19.50 


Philias Gravelin, . . * 

William Godbout 


29.00 
18.25 


Joseph Masse 


7.00 


Moore & Preston 


29.00 


John Perham 


10.00 


D. M. Poore 

W. E. Prescott 

John P. Russell & Co 

E. V. Turcotte 

J. F. Wyman 


37.88 

4.00 

164.75 

44.50 

90.38 



),384.54 



1609.26 



680 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

BOARD AND CARE AND RENT. 

Paid C. H, Allard 110.00 

Mrs. Mary E. Buck 5.00 

Sister Cabana 40.00 

Frank A. Cadwoll lO.OO 

county of Hillsborough 717.92 

Mrs. Louis Duhaime 24.00 

Elliott Hospital 50.00 

W. H. Gilmore 130.09 

Mary Harrington 32.00 

Agnes Massey 64.00 

Christina Maycook 134.14 

N. H. Orphans' Home 28.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hos- 
pital 20.00 

Napoleon Paris 4.00 

Celia Pressey 232.30 

D. L. Robinson 60.00 

State Industrial School 3,748.28 

St. Patrick's Orphans' Home. 280.00 
St. Patrick's Old Ladies' 

Home 192.00 

William Whelpley. .* 102.00 

Fred Weissbach 15.00 

CLOTHING. 

Paid F. C. Dow |1.50 

A. «& W. S. Heath 2.00 

Lightbody & Burbank 24.30 

John L. Xiven 3.10 

Michael 0'Do^vd 21.25 

P. F. O'Toole 25..-)0 

Daniel Stevens 12.00 

O. G. Trudeau 11.25 

Weston & :Mar(in 1.00 



15,907.73 



,^101.90 



CITY FARM. 681 

MEDICINES, jSIEDICAL SERVICES. 

Paid Irving- L. Carpenter, M. D., 
medical examination, Mc- 

Nab Webster .f 3.00 

F. H, Tliurston, medicines . . . 70.35 



SUNDRIES. 



173.35 



Paid Boston & Maine K. R., tickets. |7.33 

Paid Tlie Jolm B. Clarke Co., print- 
ing: 

200 postals 3.00 

50 copies rules, etc 12.00 

Paid W. P. Goodman, stationery. . . 5.36 
C. S. McKean, meals deliv- 
ered destitute persons 1.25 

W. H. Maxwell, conveyance 
of sundry persons to county 
farm and insane asylum. . . 13.30 

Charles IMorgrage, carrying 

J. Landry to county farm . . 5.00 

A. E. Martell & Co., 2 letter 

books 5.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 
copy of General Statutes 

and express 11.15 

163.89 

Total expenditures |12,140.67 



City Farm. 

Appropriation |S,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . . 463.89 

$8,463.89 



682 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

Paid E. G. Libber, superintendent . 1500.00 

Mrs. Annie Libbey, matron.. . .SOO.OO 

HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and women, as per pay-roll : 

January $207.55 

February 152.05 

March. . .^ 129.16 

April.. .* • 181.89 

May 162.38 

June 226.48 

July 169.28 

August 183.66 

September 230.43 

October 177.45 

November 191.71 

December 181.89 

Paid Alice Butterfield |5.50 

John Casey 10.22 

Augustine Freeman 15.40 

Fred Gannon 5.13 

Maude Hazen 2.15 

George Lake 17.60 

Eddie Moore 1.25 

Christina McDonald 2.00 

Ellen Sewell 1.72 

FUEL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal |31.62 

J. M. Clark, 6 tons coal 34.50 

Warren M. Davis, 62J cords 

wood 110.03 



.|800.00 



$2,193.93 



160.97 



CITY FARM. 683 

Paid Petterson & Lindquist, 1,700 

lbs. coal 14.50 

D. M. Poore, coal 38.72 

E. V. Turcotte, 28 tons, 1,900 

lbs. coal 151.89 



CLOTHING AND DRY GOODS. 

Paid Beauchemin & Quirin, shoes, 

rubbers, etc |28.08 

Clark & Estey, buttons, hose, 

hats, etc 24.15 

Cushman & Hardy Co., cloth- 
ing 39.36 

G. W. Dodge, boots and shoes 44.95 

W. P. Farmer, boots and 

shoes 17.10 

Patrick Kean, shirting, flan- 
nel, etc 19.83 

Frank P. Kimball, clothing. . 29.15 

Lightbody & Burbank, boots 

and shoes 5.35 

Manchester One Price Cloth- 
ing Co., clothing 29.25 

H. M. Moody, shirts, hats, suit 27.70 

Miville & Deschenes, cotton, 

print, handkerchiefs, etc. . . 32.06 

Plumer & Holton, 48 mittens . 10.00 

Joseph Quirin, boots and 

shoes 8.40 

John Robbie Co., dry goods. . 13.68 

Wingate & Gould, boots and 

shoes 2.65 

Weston & Hill Co., cambric, 
napkins, print, towels, com- 
forters, pins, needles, crash 94.21 



1374.20 



1425.92 



684 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Paid Annis Flour & Grain Co |435.66 

Bartlett & Thom])son 10.44 

Barlow & Nye 113.75 

F. J. Bixby 6.70 

Clark & Robinson 32.00 

C. E. Cox 10.32 

Daniels-Cornell Co 40.77 

Dod^e «& Laiug ! . . . 57.75 

C. H. Dnrgin 5.23 

T. F. Fifleld 17.86 

A. L. Gadbois 7.40 

A. G. Grenier 7.26 

W. D. Ladd & Co 8.57 

Lindquist Brothers 7.50 

Manchester Beef Co 12.28 

Manchester Provision Co ... . 147.19 

Horace Marshall 10.36 

McQuade's Market 2().00 

M. M. McQuade 32.29 

Edward F. Murray 7.73 

E. S. Newton 42..34 

Henry W. Parker 201.79 

Parnell Brothers 209.94 

E. W. Perkins 22.74 

W. E. Prescott 7.50 

D. M. Poore & Son 24.57 

Public Market & Packing Co. 11.00 

Fred Ray 2.25 

L. P. Reynolds 6.72 

Tom Robinson 67.84 

W. J. Starr 7.90 

R. G. Sullivan 12.32 

William Schonland 21.60 

Summer-Street ^Market 37.69 



CITY FARM. 



685 



Paid E. M. Slayton |24.79 

J. E. Towle & Co 13.59 

J. O. Turcotte 28.35 

B.F.Welch 41.13 

J. H. Wiggin & Co 33.26 

M. R. Wiggiu 1.75 

FURNITURE AND KITCHEN UTENSILS. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey, mop-waste, 
chimneys, burners, can-rub- 
bers, etc 117.63 

The Daniels-Cornell Co., soap 

and pails 15.87 

H. B. Fairbanks, tables, 

chairs 12.80 

R. K. Home, crockery and 

tinware 8.59 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co. : 

1 mirror 4.50 

1 lounge 7.50 

12 chairs 5.00 

1 bed and spring 10.00 

Crockery 4.15 

Paid Kimball & Hobbs, matting. . . 1.88 
W. D. Ladd & Co., 1 gross 

steel knives and forks 3.00 

F. E. Nelson, crockery 2.17 

C. A. Trefethen, 1 clock 3.75 



MEDICINE, MEDICAL SERVICES. 

Paid Charles M. Bailey, Y. S., 1 

visit 11.00 

George M. Davis, M. D., med- 
ical attendance 1-50 



L,843.73 



.84 



686 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid A. L. Dodjie, V. S., visits and 

medioine |]().75 

Charles Harvey, medicine. . . 4.25 

J. J. Holland, medicine 5.50 

T. G. Ostle, Y. S.. visits and 

medicine 5.00 

E. C. Smith, medicines 14.15 

F. H. Thurston, medicine. . . . 14.78 
C. H. Williams, medicines.. . . 7.32 

BLACKSMITHING, HARNESSES, ETC. 

Paid The Fred L. Allen Co., repair- 
ing harnesses $1.3.05 

J. M. Bronillette, shoeing 

horses 80.20 

Thomas Hickey, shoeing 

horses 10.25 

Paid John F. Kerwin : 

Harness 25.00 

Harness supplies 12.10 

Paid N. J. Whalen, harness sup- 
plies and repairs 28.50 

CARRIAGE AND CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

Paid Couch & McDonald, carriage 

repairs |28.30 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, car- 
riage rep.airs 11.43 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repairs 39.10 

HAY, GRAIN, AND OTHER FEED. 

Paid Adams Brothers $134.41 

Annis Flour & Grain Co 355.31 

Freeman .•C' :\Ierrill 75.33 



$64.25 



$175.10 



$78.83 



CITY FARM. 

Paid John F. Kerwin |3.75 

Clarence R. Merrill 61.85 

W. F. Merrill 14.30 

Partridge Brothers 15.00 

HARDWARE, FERTILIZERS, SEEDS, ETC. 

Paid Adams Brothers |37.S5 

J. J. H. Gregory 9.31 

Manchester Hardware Co. . . . 28.05 

John B. Varick Co 289.41 

B.F.Welch 12.75 

INSURANCE. 

Paid John Dowst, premium on pol- 
icy Xo. 29,971 117.50 

A. Elliott & Co. J premium on 

policies 55.42 

• John A. Sheehan, premium 

on policies 70.00 

Richardson & Goggin, premi- 
um on policies 52.50 

PRINTING, STATIONERY, TELEPHONE. 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., stationery. . $1.10 

W. P. Goodman, stationery. . 2.09 
Paid The Xate Kellogg Co., print- 
ing: 

500 envelopes 2.00 

200 inyitations and menus 5.00 

Paid X. E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., use of telejihone 44.45 



687 



$659.95 



$377.40 



$195.42 



$54.64 



688 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



KErAIRS AND IMI'IIOVEMEXTS. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paiut, paper, etc. |20.93 

F. W. Blood Roofing Co., re- 
pairing" tea-kettle .30 

J. K. Carr & Co., lead and 
gilding 6.25 

Connor Brothers, plumbing 
material and labor, chang- 
ing pipes, repairing boiler, 
etc 225.88 

W. H. Drury, assignee for J. 

P. Slattery, repairing clock 1.00 

C. I. Earl, repairing sewing- 
machine 3.00 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 

Fence boards, etc 3.04 

Lumber and shingles 21.78 

Paid B. Garland, labor on fence. . . . 6.75 

Peter Harris, keys, etc 1.35 

The Head & Dowst Co., lum- 
ber and labor 51.03 

J. Hodge, repairing door 1.25 

J. B. Huntley, plumbing re- 
pairs 5.73 

Kimball & Hobbs, shoemak- 
ers' supplies 18.36 

T. A. Lane Co., material and 
labor 23.79 

Clemens Langer, linings for 
range 

Pike & Ilea Id Co., plumbing 
repairs 16.73 



50 



1412.67 



CITY FARM. 689 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid American Express Co., ex- 
press 11.00 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 1.00 

J. E. Buerk, 500 dials 1.75 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., cutting- 
ice 0.00 

Porter Blanchard's Sons Co., 

dasher for churn 1.00 

Cavanaugh Brothers, 2 horses 250.00 

The John B. Clarke Co., ad- 
vertising .30 

Allen N. Clapp, kerosene. . . . 20.06 

P. Donovan, Jr., use of hacks. 45.00 

J. G. Ellinwood, 12 photo- 
graphs of farm (3.00 

M. D. Fife & Co., machine 

needles .90 

W. H. Griffin, grinding corn. . 12.10 

P. Harrington, 1 barrel 1.25 

George Hook, castrating pigs. 12.00 

Kimball & Hobbs, hose, noz- 
zle, couplings 7.15 

C. W. Lerned & Co., disinfect- 
ants. 58.40 

PaidE. G. Libbey: 

Postage 2.50 

Daily Mirror 0.00 

Paid Manchester Slaughtering & 
Rendering Co., dressing 
hogs 2.50 

Manchester Water- Works, 
use of water 183.95 

J. T. O'Dowd, 4 live geese 4.50 

J. L. Pendexter, 2 pigs 15.00 

41 



690 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid pay-roll division Xo. 2: 

January f5.5(t 

March 10.37 

April 2.75 

Paid O. G. peed, use of hacks 20.(10 

J. H. Reynolds, 1 barrel 1.00 

Harrison Rowc. pasturing 

cattle 25.00 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., 1 

directory 2.00 

$649.98 

Total expenditures |8,463.S9 



Indigent Soldiers. 

Appropriation 1450.00 

Expenditures. 

groceries. 

Paid McQuade's Market |12.00 

D. M. Poore & Son 96.00 

1108.00 

FUEL. 

Paid C. E. Pollard 1^24.00 

D. M. Poore 28.00 

^52.00 

nOAUn AND CARE. 

Paid Ellen McGrath |96.00 



SACRED HEART HOSPITAL. 691 

MEDICINES. 

Paid E. C. Smith |29.85 

Total expenditures 1285.85 

Transferred to reserved fund 164.15 

1450.00 

Women's Aid and Relief Hospital, 
Appropriation 1300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Women's Aid and Relief Hospital, appro- 
priation for free beds $300.00 

Free Beds, Elliot Hospital. 
Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Elliot Hospital, appropriation for free 
beds $300.00 

Emergency Ward, Elliot Hospital. 
Appropriation $300.00 

Paid Cora M. Dearborn, treasurer, amount ap- 
propriated $300.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital. 
Appropriation $300.00 



692 report of the city auditor. 

Expenditures. 

Paid Sacred Heart Hospital, amount appro- 
priated $300.00 



Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital. 
Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital,amount 
appropriated $300.00 

Militia. 
Appropriation 1800.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Amoskeag Veterans $100.00 

Co. C, First Regiment N. H. 

N. G 100.00 

Co. ^, First Regiment N. H. 

N. G 100.00 

Co. H, First Regiment N. H. 

N. G 100.00 

Co. L, First Regiment N. H. 

N. G 100.00 

First Regiment Band 100.00 

Manchester Cadets 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans. . . 100.00 

$800.00 



ADDITION TO DERRYFIELD PARK. 693 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 

Appropriation 1400.00 

Transferred from reserved fund. . . 7.47 

$407.47 

Expenditures. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co., labor. |7.68 

Louis Bell Post, No. 3, G. A. 
R., expenses incurred Me- 
morial day 350.67 

pay-roll, commons, June 49.12 

$407.47 



Band Concerts. 
Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Manchester City Band $150.00 

Manchester Military Band . . . 150.00 

$300.00 

Semi-Centennial Celebration. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Herbert W. Eastman, treasurer $2,000.00 

Addition to Derryfleld Park. 
Appropriation $8,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Transferred to appropriation for new school- 
house, West Manchester $8,000.00 



694 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Abatement of Taxes. 

Appropriation |3,000.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid sundry persons on taxes abated $1,183.90 

Total expenditures 1,183.9(> 

Transferred to reserved fund 1,816.04 

$3,000.00 

State Tax. 
Appropriation $68,225.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Solon A. Carter, state treasurer $68,225.00 

County Tax. 
Appropriation $66,204.72 

Expenditures. 
Paid Hillsborough county $66,204.72 



APPROPRIATIONS. 695 

Resolution Raising Money and Making Appropria- 
tions for tine Year One Tinousand Eight Hun- 
dred and Ninety-six. 

Eesolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) 
be borrowed for the use of the city for the following permanent 
municipal improvements, viz.: 

Seventy-five thousand dollars ($75,000) for new sewers; 
twenty thousand dollars ($20,000) for new hio-hways; and five 
thousand dollars ($5,000) for the development and improve- 
ment of Derrj^field and Stark parks; and that the joint stand- 
ing committee on finance are hereby authorized to issue the 
bonds of the city for said amount of one hundred thousand 
dollars ($100,000) dated April 1, 1896, and i^ayable April 1, 
1916, with interest coupons attached for the i^ayment of inter- 
est semi-annually :at four per cent; said bonds to be signed by 
the city treasurer and countersigned by the mayor, and said 
coupons to bear the facsimile signature of the mayor; said 
bonds to be sold to the highest responsible bidder upon a call 
issued by the joint standing committee on finance for bids. 

Resolved, further, That the sum of five hundred and forty- 
five thousand three hundred and twenty-nine and seventy-two 
one hundredths dollars ($51:5,329.72) be raised for the use of 
the city for the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
six (1896) by tax on the polls and estates liable to be taxed 
thereon, which sum, together with the one hundred thousand 
dollars ($100,000) to be borrowed as above provided, and with 
such unappropriated money as may be now in the city treas- 
ury, or may hereafter come into it, shall be a^jpropriated as 
follows, viz.: 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Interest $35,000.00 

Eeserved fund 20,000.00 



696 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City hall expenses 4,000.00 

Printing and stationery 3,r)00.00 

Incidental expenses 12,000.00 

Mayor's incidentals 300.00 

City officers' salaries 21 ,000.00 

Sinking fund 15,000.00 

Payment of funded debt 10,000.00 

Auditor's department, salaries and expenses. . . . 2,000.00 

STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Board of street and park commissioners, salaries 

and expenses $4,000.00 

Repairs of highways 19,000.00 

Widening and straightening of Old Mammoth 

road 1 ,000.00 

Building new highways 20,000.00 

Land taken for new highways 5,000.00 

Watering streets 5,000.00 

Paving streets 6,000.00 

Macadamizing streets 15,000.00 

Macadamizing Central street east from ]\[aplo. . . 5,000.00 

Grading for concrete 5,000.00 

Scavenger teams 1 (1,000.00 

Street sweeping 3,000.00 

Lighting streets 52,000.00 

Repairs of bridges 4,000.00 

City teams 6,000.00 

Repairs of sewers and drains 5,000.00 

New sewer. Christian l)rook to j'eech street. . . . 5,000.00 
Xew sewer, River i-oad, Clarke and Elm to Tren- 
ton street 1 5.000.00 

Xew sewer, Silver street, Cnion to Wilson 15.000.00 

Other new sewers 10,000.00 

Removal of snow and ice 1,000.00 



appropriations. 697 

engineer's department. 

Salaries and expenses $4,500.00 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries and expenses $4,200.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Eepairs of schoolhouses $6,000.00 

Fuel 6,500.00 

Furniture and supplies 1,000.00 

Books and stationery 100.00 

Printing and advertising 300.00 

Contingent expenses 1,600.00 

Care of rooms 5,500.00 

Evening schools 1,500.00 

Teachers' salaries 74,000.00 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 500.00 

Eree text-books 5,000.00 

Manual training 1,500.00 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Salaries and expenses $4,500.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries and general expenses $61,000.00 

Eire-alarm telegraph 2,000.00 

Hydrant service 16,800.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries and expenses of commission and force. . $36,000.00 

Expenses of court 3,900.00 

.Care and maintenance of station 3,800.00 

Patrol system, stable, and equipments 10,000.00 



698 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Eepairs of hiiildings $0,000.00 

Public bathhouses 3,500.00 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Care of commons $4,500.00 

Care of Stark and Derryfield parks 5,000.00 

Care of Pine Grove cemetery 8,500.00 

Care of Valley cemetery 3,000.00 

Care of Amoskeag cemetery 350.00 

Purchase of addition to Derryfield park 8,000.00 

PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AXD PHILAXTHROPIC. 

Support of paupers off the city farm $10,500.00 

Maintenance of city farm 8,000.00 

Support of indigent soldiers 450.00 

Bed for city patients, Women's Aid and Eelief 

Hospital 300.00 

Bed for city patients, Elliot Hospital 300.00 

Bed for city patients. Sacred Heart Hospital .... 300.00 

Notre Dame des Lourdes Hospital 300.00 

Support of city patients, Emergency AVard, Elliot 

Hospital 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 400.00 

Militia armories 800.00 

Band concerts 300.00 

Semi-centennial celebration 2,000.00 

TAXES. 

Abatement of taxes $3,000.00 

State taxes ()8,225.00 

County taxes 66,204.72 

$810,229.72- 
Passed February 28, 1896. 



EXEMPTIONS FROM TAXATION. 699 

Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions 
from Taxation. 

Constitution of N"ew -Hampshire, Article 82, Page 38, 
Public Statutes. 

encouragement of literature, etc. 

Article 83. "Knowledge and learning generally diffused 
through a community being essential to the preservation of a 
free government, and spreading the opportunities and advan- 
tages of education through the various parts of the country 
being highly conducive to promote this end, it shall be the 
duty af the legislators and magistrates, in all future periods of 
this government, to cherish the interest of literature and the 
sciences, and all seminaries and public schools; to encourage 
private and public institutions, rewards, and immunities for 
the promotion of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, 
manufactures, and natural history of the country; to counte- 
nance and inculcate the principles of humanity and general 
benevolence, public and private charity, industry and econ- 
omy, honesty and punctuality, sincerity, sobriety, and all social 
affections and generous sentiments among the people; pro- 
vided, nevertheless, that no money raised by taxation shall ever 
be granted or applied for the use of schools or institutions of 
any religious sect or denomination.'* 

Public Statutes, Chapter 55. 

Section 2. "Eeal estate, whether improved or unim- 
proved, and whether owned by residents or others, is lialjle to 
be taxed, except houses of public worship, twenty-five hundred 
dollars of the value of parsonages owned by religiotls societies 
and occupied by their pastors, schoolhouses, seminaries of 
learning, real estate of the United States, state, or town used 
for public purposes, and almshouses on county farms." 



700 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Section 11. *^'Towns may by ^vote exempt from taxation 
for a term not exceeding ten years any manufacturing estab- 
lishment proposed to be erected or put in operation therein, 
and the capital to be used in operating the same, unless such 
establishment has been previously exempted from taxation by 
some town." 

OPINION OF the SUPREME COURT. 

58 ]Sr. H. Rep. page 623. "The exemption in each case is 
limited to ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole 
power of taxation w^ould be the destruction of government; 
and the dangerous tendency of legislation suspending any part 
of that power, for any period, is manifest. P. Banh v. Bill- 
ings, 4 Pet. 514, 561. So long as the existing laws remain 
unrepealed, and the constitutional construction heretofore 
adopted remains unchanged, contracts hereafter made under 
these laws and that construction will be valid. If the legis- 
lature for any reason wish to prevent the making of any more 
such contracts, their object can be accomplished by a repeal of 
the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective 
charters as "being of the nature of a public charity," as fol- 
lows: 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute AYomen, IST. H. Laws of 
1889, chapter 199. 

Elliot Hospital, N. H. Laws of 1881, chapter 178. 

Manchester Women's Aid and Relief Society, organized in 
January, 1875, N. H. Laws, 1891, chapter 283. 

Orphanage and Home for Old Ladies (Catholic) on Hanover 
street, N. H. Laws, 1883, chapter 56. 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 70^1 

Schedule of Property used for Religious, Charitable, 
and Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Tax- 
ation by Law, not including that Owned by the City 
of Manchester. 

Convent, Sisters Jesus Mary, French Catholic; 
East Spruce street, near Beech: 

Building $10,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 2,600.00 

$12,600.00 

Convent, Sisters of Mercy, Catholic; 415 Union 
street, corner Laurel: 

Building $30,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 

$36,300.00 

Mount St. Mary's Academy, Catholic; from con- 
vent lot east to Beech street: 

Building $25,000.00 

31,500 square feet of land 9,450.00 

$34,450.00 

Lot south side of Laurel street, corner Union 

street, Catholic; McDonald school: 

Building $35,000.00 

10,800 square feet of land 5,000.00 

$40,000.00 

Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' 

Home, Catholic; Amlierst and Hanover streets: 

Building $14,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 30,375.00 

$44,375.00 

St Patrick's Orphan Asylums, Catholic; 184 Han- 
over street: 

Building $47,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 40,500.00 

$87,500.0a 



702 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. Joseph's High School, Catholic; Lowell street, 
.Corner of Birch: , 

, Building $12,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

$20,000.00 

Union-street school, Catholic; corner Union and 

Laurel streets: 

Building $4,000.00 

5,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

$6,500.00 

St. Agnes' school, Catholic; corner Cedar and Pine 

streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

20,000 square feet of land " 3,200.00 

$15,200.00 

St. Joseph's school for girls. Catholic; corner Pine 

and Lowell streets: 

Building $10,000.00 

•Land included in cathedral lot. $10,000.00 

Convent of Holy Angels, French Catholic; Beau- 
port street, corner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building $15,000.00 

22,500 square feet of land 4,500.00 

$19,500.00 

Orplianage school, Beauport, Wayne, and Putnam 

streets; French Catholic: 

Building $25,000.00 

30,000 square feet of land 6,000.00 

$31,000.00 

St. Augustine's academy, French Catholic; corner 

Beech and Spruce streets: 

Building $8,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 4,500.00 

$12,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 703 

St. ]\Iary's parochial school, French Catholic; cor- 
ner AVayne and Cartier streets: 

Bnilding $12,000.00 

25,000 square feet of land 2,000.00 

$14,000.00 

Kesidence priest St. Augustine's church, French 

Catholic; No. 383 Beech street: 

Building $6,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land : 1,875.00 

$2,500.00 

$7,875.00 

Orphan children's school, parish St. Augustine; 
251, 253 Lake avenue: . 

Building $12,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

$17,000.00 

Eesidence priest St. Anne's church. Catholic; No. 

231 Merrimack street: 

Building $5,000.00 

8,820 square feet of land 2,646.00 

$2,500.00 

$7,646.00 

Eesidence Catholic bishop; No. 145 Lowell street: 

Building $40,000.00 

24,000 square feet of land 12,000.00 

$2,500.00 

$52,000.00 

Eesidence priest St. George's church, French 
Catholic; Orange street, corner Pine: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,000 square feet of land 4,000.00 

$2,500.00 

$6,500.00 

Eesidence priest St. Mary's church, French Catho- 
lic; 376 Beauport street. West Manchester: 

Building $2,500.00 

5,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$2,500.00 



704 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. Anne's church, Catholic; Union street, corner 
Merrimack: 

Building $30,000.00 

10,180 square feet of land 5,090.00 

$35,090.00 

St. Augustine's church, French Catholic; Beech 

street, corner East Spruce: 

Building $28,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 3,250.00 

$31,250.00 

St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel. Catholic; Pine 

street, corner Lowell: 

Building $70,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 30,375.00 

$100,375.00 

St. Mary's church, French Catholic; Beauport 
street, corner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building $25,000.00 

70,000 square feet of land 14,000.00 

$39,000.00 

St. Eaphael's church and school, CTerman Catho- 
lic; Third street, corner Ferry, West Manchester: 

Building $35,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 3,400.00 

$38,400.00 

St. George's church, French Catholic; Pine street, 

corner Orange: 

Building $75,000.00 

18,G90 square feet of land 7,014.00 

$82,614.00 

St. Patrick's church and school. Catholic; Kelly 

street, Cartier street, and Coolidge avenue: 

School huilding $20,000.00 

56,281 square feet of land 4,502.00 

$24,502.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION, 705 

First Baptist church; riiion street, corner Con- 
cord : 

Building. $28,000.00 

11,350 square feet of land 6,750.00 

$34,750.00 

First Freewill Baptist church; Merrimack street, 

corner Chestnut: 

Building $12,400.00 

12,600 square feet of land 12,600.00 

$25,000.00 

Second Baptist church; Merrimack street, near 

Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

9,450 square feet of land 3,780.00 

. $12,780.00 

People's Baptist church; Chestnut street, corner 
Concord: 

Building' $8,000.00 

3,200 square feet of land 2,000.00 

$10,000.00 

First Congregational church; Hanover street, cor- 
ner Union: 

Building $30,000.00 

43,200 square feet of land 34,560.00 

$64,560.00 

Second Congregational church; Market street, cor- 
ner Franklin: 

Building $25,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 19,000.00 

'■ $44,000.00 

Third Congregational church; South Main street, 
corner Milford, West Manchester: 

Building $8,000.00 

23,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

$11,000.00 

First M. E. church; Valley street, corner Jewett: 

Building $8,000.00 

11,400 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$9,000.00 

45 



706 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, coruer Am- 
herst : 

Building $25,000.00 

10,010 square feet of land 6,000.00 

$31,000.00 

Trinity M. E. church; School street: 

Building $2,000.00 

12,176 square feet of land 3,000.00 

$5,000.00 

St. James M. E. church; Pennacook street, corner 

Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

11,000 square feet of land 2,200.00 

$11,200.00 

Grace church. Episcopal; Lowell street, corner 

Pine: 

Building $20,000.00 

9,300 square feet of land 6,975.00 

$26,975.00 

First Unitarian church; Concord street, corner 

Beech: 

Building $24,000.00 

13,500 square feet of land 6,000.00 

$30,000.00 

First Universalist church; Lowell street, near Elm: 

Building $17,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 15,000.00 

$32,000.00 

Christian church, Protestant; Pine street, corner 
Merrimack: 

Building $6,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land ■. 6,700.00 

$12,700.00 

First Presbyterian church, German; Second street, 

corner Bath, West Manchester: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

$5,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 707 

Swedish Lutheran church, Protestant; Sagamore, 
corner Pine: 

Building $7,500.00 

10,950 square feet of land 2,000.00 

$9,500.00 

Swedish Evangelical Mission; Pine street, corner 

Orange: 

Building $6,500.00 

Land 4,100.00 

$10,600.00 

Swedish Baptist church; Arlington street, near 

Maple: 

Building $5,000.00 

4,432 square feet of land 1,100.00 

$6,100.00 

Second Advent church; Amherst street, between 

Pine and Union: 

Building $5,100.00 

4,500 square feet of land 3,375.00 

$8,475.00 

City Mission chapel, Protestant; Merrimack street, 

corner of Beech: 

Building $7,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,000.00 

$13,000.00 

Westminster Presbyterian church; Brook street, 

corner Hazel: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

$17,500.00 

South Manchester Union chapel, Protestant; Elm 
street, south: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,747 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$3,500.00 



708 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Episcopal Mission chiirch; North Main street, cor- 
ner School, West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

19,412 square feet of land 4,000.00 

$7,500.00 

Eesidence pastor St. Paul's M. E. church; Union 

street, near Amherst: 

Building $3,000.00 

$2,500.00 

Residence pastor First Congregational church; 

jSTo. 590 Beech street, near Bridge: 

Building $5,000.00 

8,100 square feet of land 2,400.00 

$2,500.00 

$7,400.00 

Eesidence pastor Grace Episcopal church; corner 
of Harrison and Union streets: 

Building $6,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 3,750.00 

$2,500.00 

$9,750.00 

German School Society; Third, Bath, and Ferry 
streets: 

Building ,$4,500.00 

10,187 square feet of land 2,500.00 

$7,000.00 

Elliot Hospital, Protestant; East Manchester: 

Building $23,000.00 

Land 7,000.00 

$30,000.00 

Elliot Hospital lot; Hanover street, corner Chest- 
nut: 

Building $3,000.00 

Land . 13,000.00 

$16,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 709 

Elliot Hospital: 

Land and buildings, Main street $4,000.00 

Land and building, Quincy street 2,500.00 

$6,500.00 

Women's Aid and Eelief Hospital; Pearl street, 

corner Beech: 

Building ■. $15,000.00 

57,530 square feet of land 10,000.00 

^ • _ $25,000.00 

Manchester Children's Home; Webster street: 

Building $20,000.00 

55,000 feet of land 2,500.00 

$22,500.00 

Residence pastor Swedish Lutheran church; Saga- 
more street, corner Pine: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,200 square feet of land 1,020.00 

$2,500.00 

$4,020.00 
Gale Home: 

One half Manchester Bank 

block. Elm street $38,000.00 

One half Martin's block. Elm 

street 25,000.00 

Land and building, Pearl street, 

corner Ash 25,000.00 

$88,000.00 

EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 

Church property, Catholic $357,729.00 

Convent property. Catholic 68,400.00 

Parochial residences. Catholic... 12,500.00 

Parochial schools. Catholic 194,152.00 

Hospitals and other charitable 

institutions 131,875.00 

$764,656.00 



710 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Church property, Protestant $440,640.00 

Parochial residences, Protestant. 10,000.00 
Private school property, Protestant 7,000.00 
Hospitals and other charitable 

institutions 188,000.00 

$645,640.00 

TAXABLE. 

Land and buildings. Catholic $65,021.00 

Land and buildings, Protestant. . 14,170.00 

$79,191.00 



Total exempt and taxable $1,489,487.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FJIOM TAXATION. 



711 



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REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF BOXDED DEBT, CITY OF MAN- 
CHESTER, N. H., FROM JAN. 1 TO DEC. 31, 1896. 





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$70,000 issued Oct. 
31, 1SG3. $50,000 
issued July 1, 18G4. 
Six per cent, to 
fund debts. 


Issued July 1, 1881, 
four per cent, to 
build McGregor 
bridge. 


Pi 
II 

Sod 5 
1-1 


1890 


$400,000 
400,000 
300,000 
300,000 
300,000 
200,000 
200,000 


$200,000 
200,000 
300,000 
300,000 
350,000 
500,000 
500,000 






$13,850 
18,850 
20,000 
26,000 
31,000 
36,250 
42,250 


$120,000 

120,000 

120,000 

120,000 

50,000 


$60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60.000 
60,000 
60,000 


$155,000 


1891 






155,000 


1892 






155,000 


1893 
1894 
1895 


$100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 


$100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 


155,000 
155,000 
155,000 


1896 




155,000 





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p 

^ ft 


a « 

i 

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fto^ 

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Four per cent 
Granite-street 
bridge bonds. 


Amount of 6 per 
cent bonds due 
and paid. 


Amount of six per 
cent bonds re- 
funded at four 
per cent. 


<M 6 

o ® 

Hi 


Amount of 6 per 
cent city bonds 
on which interest 
lias ceased, not 
yet presented 
for payment. 


Amount of 6 per 
cent water bonds 
OQ whicli Interest 
has ceased, not 
yet presented 
for payment. 








$99,900 

100 

99,900 

65,500 

50,000 


$100,000 


$948,850 
953,850 
955,000 
1,195 600 
1,296,000 
1,671,260 
1,917,250 




$100 


















100,000 




100 


$100,000 
200,000 
300,000 
400,000 






$4,500 


100 










$20,000 
230,000 




100,000 






$130,000 

















* $400,000 water bonds, issued January 1, 1872; $100,000 of these bonds re- 
funded January 1, 1S87; $100,000 re-funded January 1, 1892. 

t $20(1.000 water bonds, issued July 1,1874; $100,000 of these bonds re-funded 
July 1, 1890, and $l(i0.000 refunded July 1, 1895. 

I $2,200 water bonds, issued in 18S4, and other additional bonds each year. 

The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the cemeteries. Bonds 
payable July 1, 1913. 



BONDED DEBT. 713 

Eemaeks. — The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots 
in the cemeteries of the city to parties who pay $100 and 
upward. There are $42,850 in cemetery bonds, so called, not 
negotiable, in the hands of the city treasurer, which are in- 
cluded in-the $1,917,350. 
Total amount of bonded debt, including ceme- 
tery bonds $1,917,250.00 

Net indebtedness for water purposes 900,t)00.00 

Net debt after deducting water debt. $1,017,250.00 

As shown in the assessors' books for the year 
1896 : 

The assessed value of personal property, in- 
cluding poll tax $4,412,552.00 

The assessed value of real estate 25,031,116.00 

Total value for taxation $29,443,668.00 

Tax rate, 1.86 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt 

for water purposes) to assessed valuation. . . 3.777 

Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt 

for water purposes) to assessed valuation. . . 6.834 

Population, census of 1890 43,983 

Population, census of 1880 32,458 

Increase of population in ten years. . . . 11,525 

Increase of population since 1890 (estimated) . 14,000 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 
■ The interest on the debt has always been promptly paid at 
maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being payable in 
gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

A sinking fund was established in 1893. 



714 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the 
water-works is limited to the sum of $600,000 by section 6, 
chapter TO^, New Hampshire Laws of 1871, entitled "An act to 
enable the city of Manchester to establish water-works," ex- 
cept as further extended an amount of $300,000, by laws of 
1891, chapter 26; and $200,000, by laws of 1895, chapter 172. 



BONDED DEBT. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE BONDED DEBT. 



Xeae. 



1890... 
1891... 
1892... 
1893... 
1894... 
1895... 
1896... 



Six Four 

per ct. per ct. 
water water 
bonds, bonds. 



$27,000 
24,000 
18,000 
18,000 
18,000 
18,000 
12,000 



$6,000 
8,000 
12,000 
12,000 
14,000 
14,000 
20,000 



Four 
and a 
half 
and 5 
per ct. 
water 
bonds. 



S9,500 
9,500 
9,500 



Five Six i ^°"f^ I Four 
per ct. 'perct.'^\,]^' perct. I 
ceme- to jyj" to 

tery fund ft„_._ fund 
bonds, debt, jbridfe "^«^^- 



$623.75 $7,200 $2,400 
813.92 7,200 2,400 
1,000.00 7,200i 2,400 
1,041.66 7,200 2,400 
1,550.00 2,400 



1,812.50! 
2,112.50' 



2,400 
2,400 



Four 
per ct 

Imp. 
bonds, 



$6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 



$8,000 
12,000 
16,000 



Four 
per ct. 
school 
bonds 
and 
Granite 
bridge. 



Total 

of 

annual 

interest. 



$4,800* 
14,400t 



$49,423.75 
48,613.92 
46,800.00 

46,841.66 
59,650.00 
68,712.50 
82,612.50 



SUMMARY or CITY DEBT. 

Amount of bonded debt January 1, 1896 $1,571,250.00 

Amount of cemeteiy bonds issued in 1896 6,000.00 

Amount of Granite Street Bridge bonds issued 

in 1896 130,000.00 

Amount of improvement bonds issued in 1896 100,000.00 

Amount of school bonds issued in 1896 120,000.00 

Accrued interest on bonded debt 31,750.00 

$1,959,000.00 

Amount of security note or bond X $100,000.00 

Total indebtedness December 31, 1896 $2,059,000.00 



*Thi8 amount will be reduced $400 annually by payment of principal. 
t This amount will be reduced $1,400 annually by payment of principal. 
t This loan was made by authority of resolution passed January 26, 1894, and renewed 
March 3, 1896. 



BONDED DEBT, 717 
AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Net cash on hand January 1, 1897 $160,863.04 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1896 56,758.63 

Stock of Suncook Valley Eailroad, estimated 

value 14,500.00 

Sinking fund , 96,401.50 

$338,523.17 

BONDED DEBT. 

Total' net indebtedness January 1, 1897 $1,730,476.83 

Total net indebtedness January 1, 1896 1,501,611.04 

Increase $288,865.79 



718 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 719 

Valuation of Real Estate owned by the City. 

High School, Beech street, corner Lowell : 

Building (unfinished) $100,000.00 

59,4:00 square feet of land 17,820.00 

$117,820.00 

Franklin-street school, Franklin street, corner 
Pleasant : 

Building $16,000.00 

19,200 square feet of land 19,200.00 

$35,200.00 

Spring-street school, Spring street : 

Building $13,000.00 

13,600 square feet of land 13,600.00 

$26,600.00 

Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, corner ]\Ier- 

rimack : 

Building $45,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

$53,000.00 

Ash-street school. Ash street, corner Bridge : 

Building $50,000.00 

57,537 square feet of land 17,262.00 

$67,263.00 

Main-street school, North Main street. West Man- 
chester : 

Building $6,000.00 

. 40,293.4 square feet of land 10,073.00 

$16,073.00 

Wehster-street school, Webster street : 

Building $39,000.00 

55,714f square feet of land 13,928.00 

$52,928.00 

Blodget-street school, Blodget street: 

Building $1,500.00 

9,000 square feet of land 3,600.00 

$5,100.00 



720 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Lowell-street school, Lowell street, corner Chest- 
nut : 

Building $1,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 9,000.00 

$10,000.00 

Merrimack-street school, Merrimack street, corner 

Union : 

Building $15,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 

$21,300.00 

South Main-street school. South Main street. West 

Manchester : 

Building $20,000.00 

13,650 square feet of land 2,0-17.00 

$22,047.00 

Bq.kersville school. Elm street, south : 

Building $10,000.00 

21,184 square feet of land 3,628.00 

$13,628.00 

Stark District school, Eiver road, north : 

Building $1,000.00 

43,560 square feet of land 100.00 

$1,100.00 

Amoskeag school, Front street, Amoskeag : 

Building $1,500.00 

6,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$2,500.00 

Eimmon school, corner Amory and Dubuque 

streets : 

Building $17,400.00 

16,600 square feet of land 2,490.00 

$19,890.00 

Goffe's Falls school, Goffe's Falls : 

Building $4,000.00 

47,916 square feet of land 250.00 

$4,250.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 721 

Harvey District school, Nutt road : 

Building $2,000.00 

21,780 square feet of land 100.00 

$2,100.00 

Webster Mills school, Webster Mills : 

Building $400.00 

5,445 square feet of land 100.00 

$500.00 

Old Hallsville school, East Manchester : 

Building $500.00 

30,075 square feet of land 3,008.00 

$3,508.00 

Youngsville school, Youngsville : 

Building $500.00 

51,228 square feet of land 100.00 

$600.00 

Mosquito Pond school, Mosquito Pond : 

Building $400.00 

10,890 square feet of land 100.00 

$500.00 

Pearl-street school : 

Building $18,700.00 

Land 3,200.00 

$21,900.00 

Varney school, Bowman street, corner Mast, West 

Manchester : 

Building $43,750.00 

Land 6,700.00 

$50,450.00 

New Hallsville school, Jewett street, corner 

Young, East Manchester : 

Building $29,800.00 

44,000 square feet of land 3,300.00 

$33,100.00 

Straw school, Chestnut street, corner Harrison: 

Building $30,000.00 

32,400 square feet of land 16,200.00 

$46,200.00 

46 



722 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

New Wilson school, "Wilson, Cedar, and xVuljurn 
streets: 

Building ' $30,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

$35,000.00 

$662,556.00 

EXGINE-HOUSES. 

Engine-house and stable, Central station. Tine 
street: 

Building $31,800.00 

21,718.86 square feet of land. . . 25,438.00 

$57,238.00 

North Main-street engine-house, North Main 

street, West Manchester: 

Building $18,000.00 

11,819 square feet of land 2,955.00 

$20,955.00 

Webster-street engine-house, Webster street, cor- 
ner Chestnut: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,510 square feet of land 2,180.00 

$14,180.00 

Merrimack engine-house. Lake avenue: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

$18,000.00 

Hosehouse and cottage, Maple street, corner East 

High: 

Building $3,000.00 

18,330 square feet of land 3,666.00 

$6,666.00 

Engine-house and wardroom, ward 9, Eimmon and 
Amory streets. West Manchester: 

Building $22,755.00 

6,000 square feet of land 870.00 

$23,625.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 723 

South Manchester hosehouse: 

Building $4,200.00 

4,278 square feet of land 684.48 

$4,884.48 



$147,548.48 

OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City library. Dean avenue, corner Franklin street: 

Building $35,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 30,000.00 

$65,000.00 

City hall, Elm street, corner Market: 

Building $20,000.00 

100,000 square feet of land. . . 150,000.00 

$170,000.00 

City farm. Mammoth road: 

Building $5,000.00 

46.66 acres, west Mammoth road 70,000.00 
81.55 acres, East Mammoth road 65,240.00 

$140,240.00 

Court house, Franklin street, corner West Mer- 
rimack: 

Building $20,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 57,000.00 

$77,000.00 



Battery building, Manchester street: 

Building $13,000.00 

3,400 square feet of land 5,100.00 



Police station, Manchester street, corner Chest- 
nut: 

Building $40,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 15,000.00 



$18,100.00 



$55,000.00 



$9,000.00 



724 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Slay ton lot, Manchester street: 

Police patrol stable $4,000.00 

Building 300.00 

2,908 square feet of land 4,700.00 

City stable and other ])uildings, Franklin street: 

Building $15,950.00 

44,G56 square feet of land 89,312.00 

$105,262.00 

City stable, district No. 10 $1,000.00 

City scales, Franklin street: 

Building $300.00 

Gravel lots, Goffstown: 

2 acres $400.00 

Police station, Clinton street, West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

3,790 square feet of land 1,000.00 



$4,500.00 



Gravel lot, district No. 10, bought of Brooks & 
Brock (city has right to remove gravel until 
August 25, 1903): 

1 1-3 acres $500.00 

Ward 5 wardroom, Lake avenue: 

Building $4,500.00 

Land 1,000.00 

$5,500.00 

$651,802.00 

PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 

Property in care city engineer $1,149.00 

in care chief engineer fire department 108,064.50 

in care street and park commission.. 25,761.02 

in care superintendent of schools 36,755.00 

in care city messenger 3,000.00 

in care city marshal and janitor 7,250.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 725 

Property in care superintendent of city farm. . . . $12,174.77 

in care trustees city library 30,000.00 

in care superintendent of Pine Grove 

cemetery 248.35 

in care superintendent Valley cemetery 106.00 
Stock in Suncook Valley Eailroad, in care of 

city treasurer 50,000.00 

Personal property in care city weigher 1,000.00 

$275,508.64 

Uncollected taxes in 1895 $4,925.13 

Uncollected taxes in 1896 56,758.63 

Net cash in the treasury, December 31, 1896 .... 160,863.04 

$222,546.80 

OTHER REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE OW^NED BY THE CITY. 

Soldiers' monument $25,000.00 

Permanent inclosure of commons 10,200.00 

Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 25,000.00 

Fountains and water-troughs on streets and com- 
mons 3,600.00 

Two city tombs 10,000.00 

McGregor bridge 90,000.00 

Granite bridge 130,000.00 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 28,450.00 

Second-street bridge, over Piscataquog river. . . . 52,036.06 

Print-Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 5,000.00 

Two bridges in highway district No. 9 2,000.00 

One bridge at Goffe's Falls 1,000.00 

Expended on construction of sewers 585,103.73 

$967,389.79 

PARKS AND CEMETERIES. 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres $200,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery, about 96 acres 46,700.00 



726 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

xlmoskeag cemetery, 1.23 acres $4,340.00 

Stark park, 28 acres 9,000.00 

Derryfield park, 76 acres 25,000.00 

Concord common, 4.48 acres 200,000.00 

Tremont common, 2.25 acres 40,000.00 

Hanover common, 3 acres 100,000.00 

Park common, 3.49 acres 60,000.00 

Merrimack common, 5.89 acres 200,000.00 

Wagner's park, 9.85 acres 12,000.00 

$897,040.00 

WATER-WORKS. 

Real estate and personal property of water-works, 

at cost price $1,413,816.91 

RECAPITULATION. 

Real estate owned by the city, schoolhouses . . . . $662,556.00 

Real estate owned by the city 651,802.00 

Real estate owned by the city, engine houses. . 145,548.48 

Water-works at cost price 1,413,816.91 

Personal property owned by the city 275,508.64 

Uncollected taxes and cash 222,546.80 

Other real and personal property 967,389.79 

Parks and cemeteries 897,040.00 

$5,236,208.62 

PROPERTY ACCOUNT. 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1896 $5,236,208.62 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1895 4,863,206.55 

Gain in valuation $373,002.07 



auditor's office. 727 



Auditor's Office. 



City hall building. Open from 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5 p. jl; 
7 to 9 P. M. on Thursday. 

In every bill presented to the city auditor for his approval, 
the following points will be considered and passed upon. 

1. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination 
within the scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on 
the city government? 

2. Is the bill certified by the party legally authorized to 
make the contract, or cause the expenditure to be made? 

3. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expendi- 
ture, and is there a balance unexpended sufficient to pay this 
bill? 

i. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measure- 
ments either of dimensions, quantities, or weights correctly 
and fully stated, and is the proof of the delivery to the city of 
the whole amount charged sufficient? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely 
in excess as to require the attention of the city councils to be 
called to the same? 

6. Is the bill written in a fair legible hand, correctly cast, 
and on j^aper of sufficient length and width to admit of its 
proper backing and filing? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and 
the total amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the 
amount of the work not yet completed, and the per cent re- 
tained, if any, should be stated in the bill. 

8. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which 
affect the question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for further informa- 
tion or correction as the circumstances of each case may 
require. 



728 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

COURT DECISIONS, LEGAL POINTS AND RULES, RELATING TO 
THE APPROVAL OR DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS AGAINST 
THE CITY. 

No bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until 
the auditor has approved it as correct. 

Public trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the 
city councils cannot be delegated to others. Dillon's Munici- 
pal Corporations, section 96, volume 1. 

No member of either branch [of the city councils], except 
the mayor, shall receive any compensation for his services, or 
shall hold any office or agency created during his continuance 
in office. General Laws, chapter 46, section 13. 

The executiv^e powers of the city, except where vested in the 
mayor, shall be exercised by the mayor and aldermen. Gen- 
eral Laws, chapter 46, section 14. 

The mayor and aldermen have all the powers and authority 
of selectmen of towns unless it is otherwise provided by law. 
General Laivs, chapter 46, section 14. 

Joint standing committees have advisory powers only; they 
cannot legally be endowed with executive or legislative powers 
by ordinance or resolution of the city councils, as no by-law or 
•ordinance shall be repugnant to the constitution or laws of the 
state. 

No member of either branch of the city councils can enter 
into any verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to, or do 
any work for the city. Any firm of which a member is also a 
member of the city councils is included in this prohibition. 

No city official, or department, or board of officials having 
legal power to expend money for the benefit of the city, can 
purchase of or contract with themselves, with any one of the 
•board, or with any firm of which one of said officials is a mem- 
ber. Dillon's Municipal Corporations, volume 1, page 436, 
section 444. 

Every bill against the city shall specify the particular appro- 
priation to which the same should be charged, and the mon- 
eys paid will be charged to such appropriations only. 



auditor's office. 729 

He who is intrusted with the business of others cannot be 
allowed to make such business a source of profit to himself. 

All orders passed by the city councils authorizing a minis- 
terial act to be performed by its agent or agents must be strictly 
construed, and the act to be done must be specifically stated. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. 
{General Laws, chapter 106, section 11.) They have no 
power conferred upon them by law or ordinance to purchase 
new apparatus of any kind. 

The joint standing committee on fire department have ad- 
visory powers only. 

The laws and ordinances require the city auditor to with- 
hold his signature from all bills against any appropriation 
where the amount of the appropriation is expended, until the 
city council shall have provided the means of paying the same. 
Section 4, chapter 3 of the City Ordinances, and section 4, 
ordinances relating to the duties of the city auditor, approved 
January 7, 1890. 

The po\^er of towns to raise and appropriate money is de- 
rived solely from statutory provisions, which restrict the 
power to certain specified objects and other necessary charges. 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those 
prescribed by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, 
and generally will not be permitted, to carry such votes into 
effect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discretion 
of towns to vote gifts or to select donees; their charity is a duty 
defined, commanded, enforced, and regulated, and the objects 
of it are designated by law. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a tninority in 
an unlimited manner. Gove v. Epping, 41 N. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to 
make expenditures, within the scope of their powers, for their 
respective departments: For fire department and fire-alarm 
telegraph, the chief engineer, to be submitted monthly to the 



730 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

approval of the board of engineers; for police department, 
mayor and police commission; for police court, police judge; 
for water-works department, superintendent, subject to the 
rules of the board of commissioners and ordinances relating 
thereto; for city farm, superintendent; for overseers of the poor, 
each overseer, subject to the rules of the board of overseers, 
and their monthly review and approval; for schools, superin- 
tendent, or such person as the board of school committee may 
designate, bills to be approved by the board monthly; for 
streets, sewers, and other work under these departments, 
street and park commissioners; for city clerk's office, treas- 
urer's office, tax collector's office, assessor's office, auditor's 
office, incidental expenditures, city physician, city messenger, 
city solicitor, city engineer, — mayor; for cemeteries, suj^erin- 
tendents, subject to board of trustees (to consist of citizens 
not members of the city councils); for health department, 
board of health, subject to approval of mayor; city library, 
board of trustees or person designated by them. It may be 
stated as a general rule, that all subordinate officials are under 
the supervision and control of the mayor, subject to such lim- 
itations and restrictions as the board of aldermen, acting as a 
board, may require. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDI- 
NANCES. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES 

PASSED m 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution for the appointment of a Special Committee to 
consider the revision of Chapter 6 of the Ordinances. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That a Joint special committee consisting of two aldermen 
and three councilmen be appointed to take into consideration 
the revision of chapter 6 of the ordinances of the city of Man- 
chester. 

Passed March 3, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution for a Police Patrol System. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the mayor and board of police commissioners be 
authorized to contract for and put in a police patrol system for 
said city of Manchester, at an expense not exceeding six thou- 
sand dollars; the same to be paid for out of the appropriation 
for the police commission, and that a joint committee of five, 
consisting of two aldermen and three councilmen, be ap- 
pointed to act in conjunction with mayor and police commis- 
sioners in the matter. 

Passed March 3, 1896. 

733 



734 report of the city auditor. 

City of Manchester. 

Eesolution providing for a Loan of One Hundred Thousand 

Dollars. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That whereas the Second ISTational Bank of Manchester, 
N. H., now holds a note of the city of Manchester for one 
hundred thousand dollars ($100,000), which wall be due and 
payable the first day of April next, that the mayor and joint 
standing committee on finance be hereby authorized to issue 
for and in the name of the city a new note in payment of said 
note for a term of two years from date; and that said com- 
mittee shall advertise for proposals to accept said note, and 
that the same be awarded to the party agreeing to accept said 
note and to furnish the money therefor at the lowest rate of 
interest, upon the same terms and conditions under which said 
former note was executed. 

Passed March 3, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesolution exempting from taxation the Worral Clutch 

Works. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That whereas the Worral Clutch Works, a corporation duly 
established under the laws of the state of Xew Hampshire, 
proposes to erect and put in operation in said city of Man- 
chester an establishment for the ])urpose of manufacturing, 
selling, disposing of, and dealing in friction clutches and 
patentable machinery of a similar character, and represents 
that the capital to be used in operating same, including plant, 
is now twenty-five thousand dollars. 



RESOLUTIONS. 735 

Therefore, resolved that said establishment, and the capital as 
now or hereafter fixed to be used in operating same, be, and 
the same are, hereby exempt from taxation for a term of ten 
years, provided that any building erected by said corporation 
for its purposes shall be built of brick. 

Passed March 3, 1896. 



City of Manchestee. 

EESOLUTioisr providing for a Semi-Centennial Celebration of 
the Inauguration of the City Government. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the semi-centennial anniversary of the inauguration 
of the city government of the city of Manchester be celebrated 
upon such days of the second week in September as the special 
committee upon semi-centennial celebration shall determine, 
and that the full charge of the arrangements for said celebra- 
tion be placed in the hands of the special committee heretofore 
appointed by the city councils, to which committee shall be 
added, to act conjointly with them, the following-named 
citizens: 

Frederick Smyth, Moody Currier, P. C. Cheney, Isaac W. 
Smith, Charles H. Bartlett, Alpheus Gay, George H. Stearns, 
David B. Varney, E. J. Knowlton, Byron Worthen, C. A. Sul- 
loway, James F. Briggs, H. W. Blair, David Cross, E. M. Top- 
liff, David P. Perkins, Joseph W. Fellows, N. P. Hunt, Henry 
E, Burnham, Isaac L. Heath, Lewis W. Clark, John C. Bick- 
ford, William H. Elliott, John B. Varick, William H. Plumer, 
John Mooar, J. Hodge, Otis Barton, George H. Hubbard, A. G. 
Fairbanks, Warren Harvey, William Boyd, Joseph L. Stevens, 
Orrin E. Kimball, Bushrod W. Hill, George C. Gilmore, An- 
drew Bunton, John C. French, Andrew C. Wallace, George S. 



736 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Holmes, George H. Tanswell, George IIoll)rook, Thomas Cor- 
coran, Walter Neal, M. Prout, S. D. Quint, Thomas L. Quimby, 
A. H. Daniels, William B. Patten, H. W. Herrick, David Per- 
kins, Ignatius T. Webster, A. J. Lane, William C. Knowlton, 
William S. Locke, E. K. Powell, Joseph Kidder, P. Kean, 
James E, Bailey, Israel Dow, Charles L. Kichardson, George 
A. Clark, Eben T. James, C. C. Webster, Patrick Harrington, 
Peed P. Silver, John S. Kidder, Edward Wagner, John E. 
Stearns, Daniel Connor, David H. Young, Daniel F. Straw, 
G. W. 0. Tebbetts, Frank Dowst, George W. Dodge, Z. F. 
Campbell, John B. Hall, William T. Stevens, H. N. Hall, 
Lawrence Dowd, John F. Chase, Allen N. Clapp, Horatio 
Fradd, C. H. Hutchinson, William Starr, Emil Custer, 0. D. 
Abbott, John Ferguson, W. M. Parsons, E. P. Ricliardson, 
Walter Cody, IST. S. Clark, Charles Chase, Clarence M. Edgerly, 
Charles AVilliams, D. M. Poore, Joseph Quirin, George F. El- 
liot, George Bisco, Josiah S. Sliannon, J. Q. A. Eager, 
Horace Pettee, Frederick C. Dow, C. W. Clement, John B. 
Prescott, Joseph Ferren, Stephen Piper, Clark Hadley, J. E. 
Bernier, L. W. Colby, N. S. Bean, J. A. V. Smith, Wifliam E. 
Moore, Gilman Clough, Charles D. Welch, Charles K. Walker, 
S. A. Felton, John N. Bruce, Francis B, Eaton, George A. 
Leighton, Joseph R. Weston, L. B. Bodwell, Frank P. Kim- 
ball, Henry B. Fairbanks, Frank Preston, Edward M. Slayton, 
Eoger G. Sullivan, John Hayes, John Dowst, Samuel H. 
]\Iead, Frank W. Fitts, S. C. Gould, Josiah G. Dearborn, John 
C. Pay, J. B. Estey, George W. Weeks, Thomas P. Badger, 
John A. McCrillis, Samuel Thompson, L. A. Biron, Gustav 
Langer, Herman F. Straw, C. D. McDufRe, S. N. Bourne, 
George F. Whitten, Frank P. Carpenter, A. P, Olzendam, 
Thomas Walker, Jr., F. A. Hoyt, George P. Crafts, N. W. 
Kimball, L. H. Josselyn, Aretas Blood, G. Byron Chandler, 
Walter M. Parker, Charles T. Means, Henry M. Putney, E. J. 
Burnham, AVilliam Corey, Thomas W. Lane, Alonzo Elliott, . 
Josiah Carpenter, William j^. Johnson^ Edward W. Harring- 
ton, James F. Cavanaugh, C. L. Harmon, William E. Buck, 



RESOLUTIONS. 737 

Tom W. Eobinsou, Charles C. Hayes, Charles W. Farmer, 
William J. Hoyt, Charles E. Stearns, Dennis F. O'Connor, 
Charles W. Bailey, Daniel F. Healy, Edmond Pinard, Henry F. 
Lindquist, Michael J. Healy, William Marcotte, James Spence, 
Perry H. Dow, C. M. Floyd, Walter M. Fulton, F. W. Leeman, 
J. H. Eiedell, Herbert W. Eastman, G. I. Hopkins, Frank S. 
Sutcliffe, William H. Huse, Harry I. Dodge, J. Frank Baldwin, 
D. S. Kimball, Joel Daniels, J. J. Abbott, Edwin F. Jones, F. 
N. Cheney, James E. Dodge, John P. Mullen, Henri Gazaille, 
George Blanchet, G. ]\I. L. Lane, H. I. Faueher, A. E. Bois- 
vert. Freeman Higgins, H. P. Simpson, William Weber, George 
W. Dearborn, Eufus Wilkinson, George S. Eastman, Henry A. 
Farrington, Walter G. Africa, A. A. Ainsworth, E. E. Coburn, 
Alonzo Day, Frank P. Colby, George F. Bosher, W. F. Hub- 
bard, John K. McQuesten, C. Albert iNTordstrom, George 0. 
Sorenson, Charles jSTelgy, Frederick Scheer, George L. Woods. 
Mrs. Aretas Blood, Mrs. David Cross, Mrs. Olive Eand 
Clarke, Mrs. Lucinda L. Farmer, Mrs. Mary Marshall James, 
Mrs. Helen Kinsley Dunlap, Mrs. Emma A. H. Piper, 
Mrs. Amanda W. Smith, Miss Betsey B. She]3ard, Mrs. Ange- 
line B. Cilley, Mrs. George W. Weeks, Mrs. C. E. Cox, Eliza- 
beth B. Stark, J\Irs. Arthur E. Clarke, Mrs. Joseph W. Fellows, 
Mrs. Charles B. Bradley, Mrs. Charles E. Balch, Sarah J. 
Green, Elizabeth McDougall, Mrs. C. W. Wallace, Mrs. John 
B. Varick, Mrs. H. P. Priest, Mrs. H. W. Blair, Mrs. W. K. 
Bobbins, Nancy S. Bunton, Mrs. Charles K. Walker, Mrs. E. 
W. Brigham, Miss Isabella G. Mack, Mrs. George H. Walker, 
Mrs. H. Wilbur Sargent, Mrs. Luther S. Proctor, Mrs. A. S. 
Lamb, Mrs. 0. D. Knox, Mrs. A. P. Tasker, Mrs. John Eobert- 
son. 

The expense of said celebration to be charged to the appro- 
priation for semi-centennial celebration and not to exceed the 
sum of two thousand dollars ($3,000), and the bills for the 
same shall be approved by the mayor. 

Passed March 3, 1896. 



738 report of the city auditor. 

City of Maxchestee. 

Eesolutiox appropriating One Hundred and Thirty Thou- 
sand Dolhirs for the Erection of a new Steel Bridge on 
Granite street, and providing for the issue of bonds for said 
amount. 

Besolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of erecting and completing a steel 
bridge, sixty feet in width, across the Merrimack river on 
Granite street, to replace the structure recently carried away 
by flood, there l^e, and hereby is, appropriated the sum of one 
hundred and thirty thousand dollars ($130,000), and that 
said sum of one hundred and thirty thousand dollars 
($130,000), or so much thereof as may be necessary, be 
obtained by the issue of the bonds of the city of Manchester. 
Said bonds shall bear date of July 1, 1896, and shall be pay- 
able as follows : $25,000, July 1, 1897; $25,000, July 1, 1898; 
$25,000, July 1, 1899; $25,000, July 1, 1900; $30,000, July 1, 
1901; and bear interest at four (4) per cent per annum, pa}'- 
able semi-annually on the first days of July and January of 
each year. Said bonds to be in denominations of $1000 each, 
and bear coupons for the semi-annual payments of interest as 
aforesaid; said bonds shall be payable to the bearer, shall be 
signed by the mayor and countersigned by the city treasurer 
with the seal of the city affixed thereto, and the coupons shall 
bear the facsimile signature of the city treasurer. 

The fixing of the place of payment and the sale of said bonds 
is hereby delegated to the city treasurer, he to act under the 
direction of the mayor and joint standing committee on 
finance. Said bonds to be sold to the highest bidder upon 
proposals for the purchase of the same issued by the city 
treasurer under direction as aforesaid,-and said bonds shall be 
issued as the money shall be needed for the work; and the city 
councils shall annually appro])riate sufficient money to pay the 



RESOLUTIONS. 739 

interest of said bonds and the amount of the principal as the 
same shall come due each year until the final payment. 

These bonds to be issued by virtue of the "municipal bonds 
act/' 1895, passed by the legislature of the state of New Hamp- 
shire. 

Passed April 27, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesolution making a Temporary Loan of One Hundred 
Thousand Dollars. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city 
as may fall due before the fifth day of December, 1896, the 
mayor be and hereby is authorized to make a temporary loan 
for the use of the city of a sum not exceeding one hundred 
thousand dollars ($100,000), being in anticipation of the taxes 
of the present year; giving for the same the notes of the city 
signed by the mayor and countersigned by tlie city treasurer. 

Passed April 7, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesolittion of Thanks to the town of Jaifrey. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the thanks of the city of Manchester be and the same 
are hereby extended to the town of Jaffrey for the generous 
gift %j said town to the city of the original records of the 
proprietors of Tyng's township; and 

That a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the town of 
Jaffrey. 

Passed April 7, 1896. 



740 report of the city auditor. 

City of Manchester. 

Eesolutiox providing for an Aclditiou to Derryfield Park. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That all the land now owned by the city of Manchester to 
the north of Derryiield Park as at present established, said 
land being the same purchased from the Amoskeag Manufac- 
turing Company by its deed dated November 1, 1893, and from 
the heirs of the late John J. Bell by deeds dated the first day 
of March, 1894, with the exception and expressly reserving^ 
that part of said land now occupied by the high pressure 
reservoir, and the land surrounding said reservoir and inclosed 
within the fence as now built, be and the same hereby is laid 
out and established as a part of and addition to said Derry- 
field park, and said land shall be occupied as a park, and is 
hereby placed under the control of the board of street and 
park commissioners; but the part Avhich is excepted as above 
is hereby left in the care of the board of water commissioners, 
and shall be managed and controlled subject to such rules and 
regulations as they from time to time see fit to make. 

Passed May 5, 1896. 



City of Maxchester. 

Eesolutiox relating to the Weston Observatory. 

Resolved lay the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, by the provisions of the will of the late Ex-Gov. 
James A. Weston the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000) 
was bequeathed to the city of Manchester for the purpose of 
erecting upon the summit of Oak hill an observatory to be 
known as the "AYeston Ol^servatory," on condition that the 



KESOLUTIONS. 741 

said summit of Oak hill be made a park or a part of a public 
park bj^ the city of ]\[anchester; and, whereas, said land has 
been laid out and established as a part of Derryfleld park, 
be it 

Eesolved, that a committee consisting: of the mayor, one 
alderman, to be named by the mayor, the president of the 
common council, one councilman, to be named by the president 
of the common council, the chairman of the board of street 
and park commissioners, and five citizens to be named by the 
mayor, be appointed for the purpose of buildino- such observa- 
tory, as soon as said bequest shall be paid to the city treasurer, 
and said committee are hereby giveu full power to do anything 
and everything necessary to carry into effect the full meaning 
and intent of this vote; all the expenses incurred by said com- 
mittee to be paid out of said bequest, and said observatory, 
when the same shall be completed, shall then be turned over 
to the board of street and park commissioners, to be main- 
tained in accordance with such rules and regulations as said 
board shall prescribe. 

Passed May 5, 1896. 



City of Maxchestee. 

Eesolution relating to Building Eegulations for the City of 
Manchester. 

Eesolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common, Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That a special committee consisting of His Honor the 
Mayor, one alderman, one member of the common council, and 
three citizens to be appointed by the mayor, be directed to 
draw up a set of building regulations for the city of Manchester, 
and report at the next meeting of the city government. 

Passed May 5, 1896. 



742 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesolutiox transferring Money and appropriating Twenty 
Thousand Dollars for a New School house. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of erecting a new eight-room school 
building upon the lot of land owned by the city in West Man- 
chester, situated on the corner of South Main, A, and Bowman 
streets, there be appropriated the sum of twenty thousand 
dollars ($20,000), the same to be known as "the special appro- 
priation for new West Manchester schoolhouse." 

Besolved, further, that the appropriation heretofore made 
for the purchase of additional land for Derryfield park of 
eight thousand dollars ($8,000) be and hereby is transferred 
to this special appropriation for new West Manchester school- 
house; 

Resolved, further, that ten thousand dollars ($10,000) be 
transferred from the appropriation heretofore made for re- 
serve fund to said appropriation for new West Manchester 
schoolhouse; 

Resolved, further, that two thousand dollars ($2,000) be 
transferred from the appropriation heretofore made for inci- 
dental expenses to the said appropriation for new West Man- 
chester schoolhouse; 

Resolved, further, that the amount of money realized from 
the sale of the School-street lot heretofore ordered by the city 
councils, when the same shall be received be appropriated as 
follows : Two Thousand dollars ($2,000) for incidental ex- 
penses, and the balance for reserve fund. 

Passed May 5, 1896. 



resolutions. 743 

City of Manchester. 

Resolution for the appropriation of $40,000 to complete and 
equip the new High School Building, and for the issuance 
of Bonds for the same Amount. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of ^Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of forty thousand dollars ($40,000) be and the 
same is hereby appropriated for the purpose of completing and 
equipping the new high school Imilding, now in i^rocess of erec- 
tion, and that said sum of forty thousand dollars ($40,000), or 
60 much thereof as may be necessary, be raised by the issue of 
bonds of said city of Manchester, said bonds to be dated July 1, 
1896, and payable to bearer upon the first day of Juh^ 1916. 

Said bonds to bear the city seal, to be signed by the 
mayor and countersigned by the city treasurer, and to bear in- 
terest at the rate of four (4) i^er cent per annum from date, and 
to have coupons attached bearing the facsimile signature of 
the city treasurer, for the payment of interest at said rate, semi- 
annually, on the first days of January and July of each year, 
and the city treasurer is authorized to fix the place of payment 
of interest and principal of said bonds, and under the instruc- 
tions of the mayor and joint standing committee on finance is 
authorized to sell said bonds as the money shall be needed, and 
do all things necessary and proper to complete and carry into 
effect the issue of said bonds. 

Said bonds to be issued in accordance with an act of the leg- 
islature of New Hampshire, passed at the January session, 
1895, entitled, "An act to authorize municipal corporations to 
issue bonds." And that, for the purpose of paying the inter- 
est and principal, as it shall become due, of the said bonds, 
there shall annually be raised by the city councils, in the years 
1897 to 1916 inclusive, such sum of money as shall be suffi- 
cient to meet the interest upon the bonds each year outstand- 
ing; and a further sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000), each 



744 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

3'ear, for a sinking fund for the payment of the principal of 
said bonds as it shall become due, the same to be turned over 
to the board of sinking fund commissioners, created by ordi- 
nance of November 17, 1893, and applied to the payment of 
said bonds. 

This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 14, 1896. 



':' City of Manchester. 

Resolutiox transferring certain Money. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That tlie city clerk be and is hereby authorized to make the 
following transfer: 

From the appropriation for the repairs of highways to the 
appropriation for snow and ice, nine hundred and forty-one 
and eighty-four one hundredths dollars ($941.8-1). 

Passed July 7, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution appropriating Twelve Thousand Dolhirs ($12,- 
000) for the purchase of Land in "Ward Eight. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of purchasing a tract of land to be 
established as a public common in ward 8, there be 
appropriated the sum of twelve thousand dollars ($12,000), 
and that said sum of money be obtained bv the issuing of 



RESOLUTIONS. 745 

the promissory notes of the city of Manchester, said notes to be 
dated the same day as the date of the deed from the owner of 
said hind to the city, and to be payable to the order of the 
maker of said deed on July 1, 1897, and to bear no interest 
before said Jvily 1, 189T, and to be signed by the city treasurer 
and countersigned by the mayor, and the mayor and city treas- 
urer are authorized to do all things necessary to issue said 
notes. 

Passed September 1, 1896. 



City oe* Maxchester. 

Resolution for the issue of $100,000 of Bonds to refund the 
$100,000 of AVater- Works Bonds coming due January 1, 1897. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of obtaining one hundred thousand 
dollars ($100,000), with which to pay the one hundred thou- 
sand dollars ($100,000) of water-works bonds now outstanding, 
bearing six (6) per cent interest, which come due January 1, 
1897, there be issued the bonds of the city of Manchester to 
the amount of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000), said 
bonds to be dated January 1, 1897, and payable to bearer 
twenty (20) years from the date thereof. 

Said bonds to bear the city seal; to be signed by the mayor 
and countersigned by the city treasurer, and to bear interest at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum from date, and to 
hare coupons attached bearing the facsimile signature of the 
city treasurer, for the payment of interest at said rate, semi- 
annually, on the first days of January and July of each year; 
and the city treasurer is authorized to fix the place of payment 
of interest and principal of said bonds, and under the instruc- 
tions of the mayor and joint standing committee on finance, 



746 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

is authorized to sell said bonds, as the money shall be needed, 
and do all things necessary and proper to complete and carry 
into effect the issue of said bonds. 

Said bonds to be issued in accordance with an act of the leg- 
islature of New Hampshire, passed at the January session, 
1895, entitled, "An act to authorize municipal corporations to 
issue bonds." 

This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Resolved, further, that, for the purpose of paying the inter- 
est and principal of said bonds, as the same shall become due, 
there shall be annually raised by tax by the city councils, in the 
years 1897 to 1916, inclusive, such sum of money as shall be 
sufficient to meet the interest upon the bonds each year out- 
standing; and a further sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000) 
each year, for a sinking fund for the payment of the principal 
of said bonds, as it shall become due, until a sufficient sinking 
fund has been so raised, the same to be turned over to the 
board of sinking fund commissioners, created by ordinance of 
November 17, 1893, and applied to the payment of said bonds. 

Passed November 10, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesolutiox accepting the Bequest of the late James A. 

AYeston. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the bequest of five thousand dollars ($5,000) to the 
city of Manchester, contained in the will of the Hon. James A. 
Weston, for the purpose of erecting an observatory on the 
summit of Oak Hill, be and hereby is accepted, and that a 
special committee consisting of the mayor, one alderman, and 



ORDERS. 747 

one member of the common council be appointed to consult 
with the representatives of the estate of Mr. Weston, and to 
consider what further steps it is necessary for the city to take in 
order to receive the full benefit of said bequest, and to make a 
report to the city councils, with recommendations, as soon as 
may be. 

Passed March 3, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesolution relating to the Deposit of Sylvanus B. Putnam, 
late City Treasurer. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the deposit in the National Bank of the Common- 
wealth of Manchester, j^. H., standing in the name of Sylvanus 
B. Putnam, city treasurer, amounting to twenty-three hun- 
dred and forty-four and sixty-eight one hundredths dollars 
($3,344.68) be accepted by the city of Manchester at its face, 
.and that the estate and bondsmen of said Sylvanus B. Putnam 
be hereby discharged from any claim upon the part of the city 
for any part of said sum. 

Passed March 3, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to establish the Grade of Salmon Street from 
AYalnut to Beech street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the grade of Salmon street, from Walnut to Beech, be and 
is hereby established as follows: 

The southeast corner of Walnut and Salmon streets shall be 



748 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

elevation 167.60; thence easterly, on the south side of Salmon 
street, at 50 feet east of Walnut, the grade to be 169.75; at 100 
feet east of Walnut the grade to be 172.80; at 120 feet east of 
Walnut the grade to be 173.85; at 170 feet east of Walnut the 
grade to be 176.10; at 220 feet east of Walnut the grade to be 
177.40, — the last station being on the west line of Beech street. 
The grade on the north side of said Salmon street to be parallel 
to and 0.60 feet lower than the south side of said street. 

Eeference being made to the plan and profile of Salmon 
street, on file in the city engineer's department. 

Passed January 7, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build Wentworth Street to Grade. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build Wentworth street, thence southerly to a 
stake at the southerly end of said street, to land of the late 
Charles Harvell, and the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for new streets. 

Passed January 7, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers, as follows: 

In Hevey east back street, from Amory street to Wayne 
street; in Auburn south back street, from Wilson street to 150 
feet east of Hall; in Belmont street, from Mead to Bridge 



ORDERS. 749 

street; in Spruce street, from Canton street easterly 250 feet; 
and the expenses thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
new sewers. 

Passed January 7, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect a small building for storing Gasoline and 
Supplies at Goffe's Falls. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and build- 
ings be and hereby are authorized to erect a small building at 
Goffe's Falls, for the purpose of storing gasoline and other sup- 
plies to light the street lamps in the district of Goffe's Falls. 
The cost not to exceed seventy-five dollars ($75), and the same 
to be charged to the appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed January 7, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect Certain Electric Lights in the City Proper, 
and some new Lanterns with Gasoline Attachments in the 
District of Goffe's Falls. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lighting streets be 
and are hereby authorized to erect the following electric lights: 

Corner of Hall and Belmont streets; corner of Charles and 
Bridge streets; corner of Wilson and Auburn streets; corner 
of Union and Silver streets; corner of Beech and Green 
streets; corner of Valley and Union streets; on Cedar street, 
150 feet west of Maple street; on Wilkins street near the Mast 
road; corner of Mast and D streets. 



750 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

And also the purchase and to erect 15 new copper top 
lanterns, with plate biirners and fixtures attached for gasoline, 
with all the apparatus necessary at the district in Goffe's 
Falls, and the furnishing the supplies necessary to supply and 
light the same, and the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed January 7, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Ax Order to appropriate Money for a Xew School Building. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and Joint standing committee on finance be and are 
hereby instructed to appropriate money for an eight-room 
school building to be located in West Manchester. 

Passed February 4, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order in regard to the Lands and Buildings Committee 
visiting Schoolhouses in the vicinity of Boston. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized to visit such schoolhouses in the vicinity of 
Boston as they shall deem expedient; the expense of the same 
not to exceed $50, and to be charged to the appropriation for 
incidental expenses. 

Passed February 4, 1896. 



ORDERS. 751 

City of Manchester. 

Ax Order to print the Fiftieth Annual Eeport of the Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of jVIayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the joint standing committee on finance be, and they hereby 
are, authorized to procure for the use of the inhabitants of 
said city, the printing of the fiftieth annual report of the 
receipts and expenditures of the city of Manchester, including 
the reports of the Joint standing committee on finance, the city 
auditor, the school board and superintendent of schools, super- 
intendent of water-works, water commissioners, engineer of 
fire department, police commissioners, overseers of the poor, 
trustees, librarian, and treasurer of the city library, committee 
on cemeteries, joint standing committee on city farm, city phy- 
sician, city solicitor, city engineer, street and park commis- 
sioners, and such other matters relating to city affairs as said 
finance committee may direct, the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for printing and stationery. 

Passed February 4, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Three Horses for use in the Fire 
Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department 
be authorized to purchase three horses for use in fire depart- 
ment, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for fire department. 

Passed February 4, 1896. 



752 report of the city auditor. 

City of Manchester. 

Ax Order to pay Election Officers in Ward Three. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the bill for services of ward officers at the special election, 
December 27, 1895, in ward 3, be paid and charged to inci- 
dental expenses. 

Passed March 3, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Horses for use in the Fire Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on tire department 
be authorized to purchase three horses for use in the fire depart- 
ment, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for fire department. 

Passed March 3, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to sell Steel Safe. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and build- 
ings be and are hereby authorized to sell steel safe stored in 
city treasurei*'s office. 

Passed March 3, 1896. 



City' of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the Committed on Setting Trees to 
expend $200 for Trees. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 



ORDERS. 753 

the committee on setting trees be authorized to expend $200 
for shade trees, the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for incidental expenses. 

Passed April 7, 1896. 



City OF Manchester. 

An Order for the procuring of Plans and Estimates for a new 
School Building in West Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of ]\Iayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and the Joint standing committee on lands and 
buildings be and they are hereby authorized to obtain plans 
and estimates for building, completing, and equipping an 
eight-room school building, to be located on the lot of land 
owned by the city of Manchester, on South Main street. 

Passed April 7, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the Proprietors' Eecords of Tyng's 

Township. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor be and he hereby is authorized to pay all expenses 
connected with the obtaining the original records of the pro- 
prietors of Tyng's township from the town of Jaffrey, and the 
making of a copy of that portion of said records relating to the 
territory now embraced in the town of Jaffrey, the said expense 
in all not to exceed the sum of one hundred dollars ($100), and 
to be charged to the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed April 7, 1896. 



754 report of the city auditor. 

City of Manchester. 

Ax Order for the establishment of a Police Telegraph and 
Patrol System. 

Or^erecZ, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the city of Manchester purchase and install a police telegraph 
and patrol system. 

Ordered, further, that the kind of system to be used, the 
number of boxes, and all other matters necessary to the estab- 
lishment of the system, except the erection of a stable, be de- 
termined by a special committee consisting of the mayor, the 
board of police commissioners, and the joint committee of the 
city councils heretofore appointed. 

Ordered, further, that said special committee be authorized 
to take all steps and do all things necessary to the establish- 
ment of said system, the expense of the same not to exceed 
the sum of $7,500, and to be charged to the special appropri- 
ation for patrol system, stable, and equipments. 

Ordered, further, that the mayor and the joint standing com- 
piittee on lands and buildings be and are hereby authorized 
and instructed to erect upon the lot of land owned by the city, 
east of and adjoining the lot upon which the police station 
stands, on the corner of Manchester and Chestnut streets, a 
stable to be used in connection with the said police patrol sys- 
tem, the expense of the same not to exceed the sum of $3,500, 
and be charged to the special appropriation patrol system, 
stable, and equipments. 

Ordered, further, that the board of street and park commis- 
sioners be instructed to notify all corporations maintaining in 
the highways of the city poles for the support of wires, to pro- 
vide for the use of the topmost arms of said poles for the wires 
of said police telegraph. 

Passed April 1, 1896. 



ORDERS. 755 

City of Maxchestee. 

An Order for the erection of a Steel Bridge across the Merri- 
mack Elver, on Granite Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be authorized and 
instructed to build across the Merrimack river, on Granite 
street, to replace the bridge recently carried away by flood, a 
steel bridge; the same to be sixty feet in width, and of the grade 
of Granite street at the time of building the same,- at an ex- 
pense not exceeding one hundred and thirty thousand dollars 
($130,000), and said board are empowered to do everything 
necessary and proper to complete the same, the expense of the 
same to be charged to the appropriation for the erection of a 
new steel bridge on Granite street, heretofore made. 

Passed April 27, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build an Eight-Eoom Schoolhouse in West Man- 
chester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and build- 
ings be and they are hereby authorized and instructed to build 
a new eight-room schoolhouse upon the lot of land owned by 
the city in West Manchester, situated at the corner of South 
Main, A, and Bowman streets, and to complete and equip at 
least four school rooms and a teacher's room in the same build- 
ing, at an expense not exceeding twenty thousand dollars 
($20,000); the same to be charged to the appropriation for new 
West Manchester schoolhouse, and said mayor and joint 
standing committee are authorized to db any and every thing 
necessary to complete said building. 

Passed May 5, 1896. 



756 report of the city auditor. 

City of Manchester. 

Ax Order relating to restrictions upon the Xortli Main-Street 

School. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
whereas, by mistake, the Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. did 
release the conditions, limitations, and restrictions upon the 
lot of land upon which the North Main-street school stands, in 
West Manchester, it being the lot upon School street upon 
which the restrictions should have been released, now the city 
of Manchester hereby releases the said manufacturing com- 
pany from all effect of the said release of said conditions upon 
said North Main-street lot, and the mayor is hereby author- 
ized and directed to execute a release in such form and manner, 
for and in the name of the city, as may be necessary. 

Passed May 26, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Ax Order to build Carpenter Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build Carpenter street from Elm to Union street 
according to the grade already established of said street, and 
the expense of the same be charged to the appropriation for 
new streets. 

Passed June 19, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Ax Order to Macadamize Chestnut Street, from Lake Avenue 
to Valley Cemetery. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the street and park commissioners be authorized to macada- 
mize Chestnut street, from Lake avenue to Valley cemetery. 



ORDERS. 757 

the expense thereof to be charged to the unexpended balance 
now in the appropriation for macadamizing Central street 
east from Maple. 

Passed July 14, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase Horses for use in Fire Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department 
be authorized to purchase four horses for use in the fire de- 
partment, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for fire department. 

Passed July 14, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the Transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make a transfer of 
one thousand dollars ($1,000) from the special appropriation 
for public bathhouses to the appropriation for city hall; and 
fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500) from the special appropri- 
ation for public bathhouses to the appropriation for incidental 
expenses. 

Passed August 4, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the apportionment of the Appropriation for 
Militia Armories. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the eight hundred dollars ($800) appropriated for militia 
armories be apportioned as follows: 



758 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

$100 to band. First Eegiment :N". H. N. G. 
$100 to Co. C, First Eegiment N. H. N. G. 
$100 to Co. F, First Eegiment N. H. X. G. 
$100 to Co. H, First Eegiment N. H. N. G. 
$100 to Co. L, First Eegiment X. H. N. G. 
$100 to Manchester War Veterans. 
$100 to Amoskeag Veterans. 
$100 to Manchester Cadets. 

Passed August 4, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the Transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make the trans- 
fer of the unexpended balance of the special appropriation for 
the Christian brook sewer to the special appropriation for the 
Valley-street sewer. 

Passed August 4, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the city treasurer be and hereby is authorized to turn over to 
the treasurer of semi-centennial finance committee, for the 
purposes of the celebration of the semi-centennial anniversary 
of the inauguration of the first city government of the city of 
Manchester, the sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000), the 
expense of the same to be charged to the appropriation for 
semi-centennial, heretofore made; and all bills for said celebra- 
tion to an amount not exceeding two thousand dollars ($2,000) 
shall be approved by the mayor. 

Passed August 4, 1896. 



ORDERS. 759 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Horses for City Farm. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and Joint standing committee on city farm be au- 
thorized to purchase one pair of horses for use at the city farm, 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
city farm; price for the pair not to exceed $250. 

..Passed August 4, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the purchase of Land in Ward Eight. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aklermen concur: Xhat 
the mayor and the joint standing committee on commons and 
cemeteries be and they are hereby authorized and instructed 
to purchase from Edward Wagner the lot of land owned by 
him, situated in West ]\Ianchester and bounded by Hale street, 
as laid out, and by Schiller, Wheelock,- and another unnamed 
street as proposed (being 850 feet long and 505 feet wide), 
for a sum not exceeding twelve thousand dollars ($12,000), 
the expense of the same to be charged to the appropriation for 
purchase of land in ward 8. And it is further ordered that 
said land when so purchased be laid out and established as a 
public park or common, and be placed in charge and control 
of the board of street and park commissioners. 

Passed September 1, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Erect and Equip a Drinking Fountain on the 
West Side of Elm Street, a few feet Xorth of Bridge Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 



760 REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to erect and equi]) a drinking fountain on the west 
side of Elm street, a few feet north of Bridge street, with an ice 
box arrangement for the cooling of the water, at an expense 
not to exceed three hundred dollars, the expense of the same 
to be charged to the appropriation for watering streets. 

Passed September 1, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Erect Electric Lights in the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lighting streets be 
and are hereby authorized to erect the following electric lights: 

State street, between Granite street and Olzendam's hosiery 
mill; corner of Elm and Shasta streets; Amory street, 200 feet 
west of Montgomery street; between Amherst and Concord 
streets, in Nuffield lane; corner East High and Hall; corner 
Arlington and Warren streets. 

Passed September 1, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the Sale of the old South Main-Street 
Schoolhouse. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and build- 
ings be authorized to sell at public auction or fjrivate sale, as 
may seem best to said committee, the old South Main-street 
schoolhouse, the proceeds from the sale thereof to be credited 
to the appropriation for the new South Main-street school- 
house. 

Passed September 1, 1896. 



ORDERS. 761 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to Establish the Grade of Lake Avenue. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermep. concur: That 
the grade of Lake avenue, as shown on plan 1070 of the city 
engineer's department plans, from J, Hall road to Hanover 
street, be and is hereby made the established grade of said 
street. 

Passed October 6, 1896. • 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Erect Five Electric Lights in the City. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and standing committee on lighting streets be and 
hereby are authorized to erect the following electric lights: 

Corner of Elm street and Elm avenue; Merrimack street, 
between Beacon and Milton streets; A street, between B street 
and Bowman street; corner N'orth and Walnut streets; Blod- 
get and Union streets; North and Chestnut streets. 

Passed October 6, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order for the Transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
for the purpose of paying the bill of the T. A. Lane Co., for 
materials furnished and labor done at the Wilson school, there 
be transferred from the appropriation for the reserved fund 
the sum of four hundred and seventy-one dollars ($471) to the 
appropriation for new schoolhouses, and that said bill be 
charged to said appropriation for new schoolhouses. 

Passed November 10, 1896. 



762 report of the city auditor. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect Electric Lights in the City of ]\Ianchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lighting streets be 
and hereby are authorized to erect the following electric lights: 

Corner of Grove and Beech streets; corner of North Elm and 
Carpenter streets; corner of Vinton and Taylor streets; Elm 
west back street and Winter Place; Myrtle and Union streets; 
Dearborn and Taylor streets; Dearborn and Summer streets. 

Passed November 10, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the Sale of the Bakersville Gravel Pit. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and build- 
ings be authorized and instructed to sell at public auction the 
city's interest in the acre of land owned by the city on Brown 
avenue, which was purchased from Mitchell, and has heretofore 
been used as a gravel pit; and that the mayor be authorized to 
execute a quit claim deed of the city's interest in said property. 

Passed November Q>, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Hose Jackets. . 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
ten hose jackets be purchased for use of the fire department, 
and the expense thereof be charged to fire department. 

Passed December 1, 1896. 



ordinances. 763 

City of Manchestee. 

4 

An Order to erect Electric Lights in the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lighting streets be 
and hereby are authorized to erect the following electric 
lights: 

On North Eiver road, midway between the present light at 
the corner of Clarke street and the next light north; corner 
Hall and Prospect streets; on North Adams street, between 
Applet on and Clarke streets; north of Eay brook; on Myrtle 
street, 250 feet west of Hall street; on the hill, midway between 
the Catholic cemetery on Bedford road; corner North Union 
street and Whitford street. 

Passed December 1, 1896. 

City of Maxchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
SIX. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Sections 23 and 24 of Chap- 
ter 6 of the City Ordinances, in relation to the Duties and 
Compensation of City Officers. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 

of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as 

follows: 

That section twenty-three of chapter six of the Ordinances 
be amended by striking out the words, "twenty-five," in the 
eleventh line of said section, and inserting the word, "seventy- 
five," in place thereof. 

That section 24 of said chapter be amended by striking out 
the word "fifteen," in the sixth line, and inserting the word 
"sixty-five" in place thereof; striking out the word "ten,"in the 



764 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

seventh line, and inserting the word "sixty"; striking out the 
word "ten," in the eighth line, and inserting the word "sixty"; 
striking out the word "thirty-five," in the ninth line, and in- 
serting the word "eighty-five"; striking out the word "five," 
in the eleventh line, and inserting the word "fifty-five," and 
inserting the word "fifty," in the eleventh line, after the word 
"hundred." 

The intent of this ordinance is to increase the pay of all call 
members of the fire department the sum of fifty dollars per 
annum, and shall take effect upon January 1, 1896. 

Passed to be ordained Januar}^ 14, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
SIX. 

An Ordinance regulating and licensing Night Lunch Carts. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as 
follows: 

The board of mayor and aldermen shall have power to 
grant licenses, to such persons as they shall deem proper, to 
carry on the business of selling food or serving lunches from 
carts or wagons, stationed in public highways in the city of 
Manchester, in the night time, between the hours of 9 o'clock 
in the evening and 5 in the morning. 

Every person granted such license shall pay for each cart or 
wagon used by him in such business, the sum of ten dollars per 
year, and he shall station his cart or wagon in such part of the 
highway as the board of street and ]Dark commissioners shall 
designate. 

Any person who shall carry on such business without first 
obtaining such license shall be fined for each offense not ex- 
ceeding twenty dollars. 



ORDINANCES. 765 

Any such license may be revoked by said board whenever in 
their opinion the public good requires. 

When special rights are allowed by the committee on 
licenses, the carts or wagons may go on the streets at such 
time as the committee may permit. 

Passed to be ordained March 3, 1896. 



City or Manchester. 

IN THE YEAR ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY- 
SIX. 

An Ordinance changing the name of Elm East Back Street. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as 
follows: 

That the highway now known as Elm east back street, ex- 
tending from the Manchester south back street to Lowell 
street, shall, from and after the passage of this ordinance, be 
known as ISTutfield lane, and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained June 2, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

IN THE year one THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY- 
SIX. 

An Ordinance changing the names of Certain Streets. 

Be it ordained by the j\Iayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as 
follows: 

Section 1. That the names of certain streets in said city 
be changed as follows: 



766 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

That the highway commonly known as Everett-street pas- 
sage-way, leading from Elm street near Clark to Everett street, 
be called Waldo street. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect on its passage. 

Passed to be ordained Aiie:ust 4, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year oxe thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
SIX. 

An Ordin'ance amending Sections 7, 21, and 22, of Chapter 6 
of the Ordinances of the City of Manchester, 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Covmcil 
of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as 
follows: 

Section 1. Section 7 of chapter 6 of the Ordinances of the 
city of IManchester is hereby amended by striking out the words 
"He shall have the care of the city hall buildings, city hall, and 
the rooms occupied by the city government, or any board or 
officer thereof, and the committee rooms occupied by them," 
and inserting in place thereof the words, "He shall be superin- 
tendent of the city hall buildings and all rooms therein, and of 
such rooms in the court-house as are used for city purposes, and 
of the janitors thereof," so that said section as amended shall 
read as follows: "The city messenger shall deliver all notices 
and orders issued by the mayor, the president of the common 
council, the city clerk, the city councils, or either branch 
thereof, or by any committee of the same, when so requested. 
He shall seasonably notify members of all meetings of com- 
mittees of the city councils, or of either branch thereof, of the 
board of assessors, overseers of the poor, school committee, and 
engineer, when requested, and of all special and regular meet- 
ings of the city councils, or of either branch thereof. He shall 
be superintendent of the city hall building and all rooms 



ORDINANCES. 767 

therein, and of such rooms in the court -house as are used for 
city purposes, and of the janitors thereof. He shall at all 
times perform any duties connected with the building or city 
government, when requested by the mayor, city council, or any 
member thereof. He shall receive in full, for all his services, 
the sum of seven hundred dollars per annum, to be paid in 
equal monthly payments." 

Sect. 3. Section 21 of chapter 6 of the Ordinances of the 
city of Manchester is herelsy amended by striking out the 
word "five," in the fourth printed line, and the word "ten," in 
the fifth printed line, and inserting in i^lace thereof the word 
"fifteen" and the word "twenty," respectively, so that said sec- 
tion as amended shall read as follows: "Section 21. Each of 
the selectmen of each ward in the city shall receive in full for 
his services, and for all the duties appertaining to his office, 
the sum of fifteen dollars, and the ward clerk of each ward the 
sum of twenty dollars, to be paid at the expiration of his offi- 
cial term." 

Sect. 3. Section 22 of chapter 6 of the Ordinances of the 
city of ]\Ianchester is hereby amended by striking out the word 
"three," in the third printed line, and inserting in place 
thereof the word "fifteen," and by adding to the end of said 
section the following words: "And each inspector of elections 
of each ward shall receive in full for his services, and for all 
duties appertaining to his office, the sum of ten dollars, to be 
paid at the expiration of his term of office," so that said sec- 
tion as amended shall read as follows: "Section 28. The 
moderator of each ward shall receive in full for his services, and 
for all the duties appertaining to his office, the sum of fifteen 
dollars, to be paid at the expiration of his official term. And 
each inspector of elections of each ward shall receive in full for 
his services, and for all the duties appertaining to his office, the 
sum of ten dollars, to be paid at the expiration of his term of 
office." 

Passed to be ordained December 1, 1896. 



INDEX. 



49 



INDEX. 



Abatement of taxes 694 

Addition to Derryfield park 693 

Assets, statement and inventory of 719 

Annual interest cliarge on bonded debt 716 

Auditor, city, report of 491 

Auditor's department 540 

Appropriations for 1S96 by city councils 695 

Appendix, school 289 

Amoskeag cemetery 677 

B 

rand concerts 693 

Bridges 572 

Books and stationery 610 

Buildings, repairs of 647 

public, occupied by private pai ties 718 

Board of vs^ater commissioners, organization of 10 

report of 31 

bealtb , report of 449 

Bonded debt, tabular statement of 712 

detailed statement of, for 1896 715 

annual interest charge 716 

Bath-houses G54 



Christian brook sewer 5S9 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax 701 

City hall 510 

officers' salaries 534 

teams 575 

officials, list of 3-27 

engineer, report of — 141 

engineer's department, organization of 142 

solicitor, report of , 425 

auditor's report 491 



772 INDEX. 

City treasurer's report 4y.j 

councils, ortlors, ordinances 733 

auditor's department 540 

f'wi" * C81 

library 620 

report of trustees of 395 

treasurer's report 400 

librarian's report 40c 

donations to 412 

Contingent expenses 612 

Care of rooms G13 

Cominons 667 

Cemetery, Pine Grove 671 

Valley 674 

Amoskeag 677 

Cemeteries, report of sub-trustees of Valley 431 

Pine Grove 429 

Amoskeag 432 

treasurer of 434 

treasurer of fund 436 

report of trustees of fund 435 

County tax 694 

D 

Debt, payment of funded 507 

bonded, statement of 712 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 093 

Derryfield and Stark parks 609 

E 

Engineer's department 595 

Kxjjenses, incidental 518 

mayor's 542 

contingent 612 

ICvening schools 615 

school, mechanical drawing 617 

Electric lights, location of 475 

Elliot Hospital 691 

Emergency Ward 691 

Exempted from tax, property 701 

F 

Fund, reserved 508 

Fuel *^06 

Furniture and supplies 6C8 

Free text-books 617 

beds, Elliot Hospital C91 



INDEX. 773 

Fire department 632 

report of chief engineer 32i 

value of personal property 374 

names and residences of members 384 

location lire alarm boxesj 359 

Fire-alarm telegraph 033 

Farm, paupers off. 678 

Farm, city 681 

G 

Grading for concrete 565 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 693 

Gas-lights, location of 473 

Granite-street bridge 573 

H 

Highways, new 553 

land taken for ^ 556 

watering 557 

paving 560 

macadamizing 562 

grading for concrete on 565 

scavenger service 567 

sweeping 570 

lighting 592 

bridges 572 

city teams 575 

repairs of 545 

Health department 599 

board of, report of 449 

Hospital, Women's Aid and Relief 691 

Elliot, free beds 691 

Sacred Heart 691 

Notre Dame de Lourdes 692 

Hydrant service 630 

I 

Interest 506 

annual charge, bonded debt 716 

Incidental expenses 51S 

Indigent soldiers 690 

Inventory of assets 719 

L 

Laws relating to exemptions 699 

Loans, temporary , 739 



774 INDEX. 

Land taken for highways 550 

Lighting streets 5!)2 

Library, city.. 620 

Legal points and rules relating to claims against the city 72S 

M . 

Manual training 619 

Mayor's incidentals 542 

Macadamizing streets 562 

Central street 564 

Militia 092 

INIunicipal receipts and expenditures 499 

Manufacturing property exempt from taxation 711 

N 

New highways 553 

schoolhouses 654 



Order relating to restrictions 756 

to establish grade of Lake avenue 7G1 

authorizing sale Bakersville gravel pit 762 

to purchase 'hose jackets 762 

to procure plans and estimates for new school building, West 

Manchester 753 

to sell land on School street 182 

to build Sagamore street extension 193 

to establish grade of Chestnut street 200 

to build Chestnut street 202 

to build Colby street 194 

to establish grade of Salmon street 747 

to erect a building at GofTe's Falls 749 

to appropriate money for new schoolhouse 750 

relating to lands and buildings committee 750 

to pay Ward 3 election officers ' 752 

to sell steel safe 752 

to purchase trees 752 

relating to Tyng's township 753 

police p.atrol system 754 

to purchase horses for fire department 751, 752, 757 

to build certain sewers 183, 191, 192, 195, 196, 197, 202, 203, 748 

to erect drinking fountain 759 

to establish the grade of Beacon street 1S4 

to establish the grade of Alsace .street 190 

to establish the grade of Carpenter street 186 

to build to grade Shasta street 191 

to establish the grade of Amherst street 185 



INDEX. 775 

Order to establish the grade of Concord street 193 

to establish tlie grade of So. Main street 197 

to establish the grade of Essex street 192 

to build Candia road to grade 19G 

to establish grade of Milton street 185 

to build Wentworth street to grade 748 

to appropriate money to build public bath-house 183 

to concrete Nutfleld lane 100 

to purchase desk for city treasurer 182 

to build Carpenter street 75G 

to print fiftieth repoi t 751 

to purchase horses for city fai-ni 759 

to erect certain electric lights 749, 760, 7G1, 762, 763 

making transfer of money 757, 758, 761 

to build Spruce street 191 

relating to pay of militia 757 

to macadamize Chestnut street 756 

to build Cleveland street 200 

to sell So. Main-street school building 760 

relating to new school building, W. M 755 

relating to new Granite bridge 755 

to purchase land 203, 759 

to erect and equip horse drinking fountain 194 

Ordinance amending sections 23 and 24, chapter (1 763 

amending sections 7, 21, 22, chapter 766 

changing name of certain streets 190, 765 

licensing lunch carts 764 

changing name of Elm east back street 765 

Ordinances, orders, resolutions 731 

Organization of school board for 1897 306 

Overseers of the poor, report of 419 

Oil lamps, location of 474 

P 

Parks — Derryfield and Stark 669 

Parsonages, valuation of, exempt from taxation 701 

Paupers off the farm ., 678 

Paving streets 560 

Payment of funded debt 507 

Petitions for new streets 219 

Pine Grove cemetery 671 

Police department, station 636 

court 639 

commission 640 

patrol system 645 

Printing and stationery ■ 515 

and advertising 611 

Property account, real and personal 719 

Public buildings occupied by private parties 718 



776 . INDEX. 

E 

Reserved fund 508 

Uepairs of sclioolhouses 603 

of buildings 647 

of highwaj'S 545 

Tloonis, care of 613 

Resolutions, orders, and ordinances 731 

for the appointment of a special committee to consider 

revision of ordinances 733 

for police patrol system 733 

exempting from taxation Worral Clutch Works 734 

regard to semi-centennial celebration 735 

appropriating $130,000 for new bridge, Granite street 738 

of thanks to the town of Jaffrey 739 

providing for addition to Derryfleld park 740 

relating to Weston Observatory 740 

relating to building regulations 741 

transferring money 742,744 

appropriating money and issuing bonds to complete High 

School building 743 

to purchase land 744 

accepting bequest of the late James A. Weston 740 

relating to the deposit of the late S. B. Putnam, City 

Treasurer 747 

relating to water bonds 745 

raising money and making appropriations for 1896 095 

making temporary loan 734, 739 

Report of board of Water commissioners 31 

Superintendent of Water-works 34 

City Engineer 141 

Ch icf Engineer Fire Department 321 

Trustees of City Library 395 

Sub-Trustees of Valley cemetery 431 

Pine Grove cemetery 429 

Amoskeag cemetery 432 

Treasurer of cemeteries 434 

Treasurer of Cemetery Fund 436 

Trustees of Cemetery Fund 435 

Treasurer of Sinking Fund 445 

Overseers of the Poor 419 

Street and Park Commission 81 

Committee on Sewers and Drains 211 

City Solicitor 425 

School Superintendent 259 

Board of Health 449 

City Auditor 491 

City Treasurer 4!H 

Real and personal estate owned by the city 719 

property, exempt from taxation, other than public properly C99 

Rules, etc., relating to bills against the city (auditor's department) 727 



INDEX. 777 

Receipts and expenditures, 1896 506 

municipal, for 1896 499 

River road, Clarke, and Elm-street sewer 590 



Sacred Heart Hospital .- 691 

Salaries of city officials , ... 534. 

Salaries, teachers' 616 

Scavenger service 067 

School department, organization of 360 

evening, mechanical drawing 617 

superintendent's report 259 

Schoolhouses, new 654, 656 

repairs of 603 

Semi-centennial celebration ■ '. 693 

Sewer permits granted, list of 204 

Sewers, repairs of 580 

new 582 

Silver-street sewer 587 

Sinking fund 507 

treasurer's report , 445 

Snow and ice 551 

Soldiers, indigent 690 

Solicitor, city, report of 425 

Stark and Derryfield parks 669 

Statement of bonded debt 712 

publi* buildings occupied by private parties 718 

State tax 694 

Street and park commission 543 

report of 81 

Streets laid out, not built 177 

Street sweeping 570 

Summary of city debt 712 



Temporary loan 510 

Text-books, free 617 

Teachers, list of 308 

Teachers' salaries 616 

Taxes, abatement of 694 

Tax, state 694 

county 694 

Treasurer, city, report of 494 

Taxation, appropriations for 1896 695 

exemption 701 

Teams, city 575. 

Tabular statement of receipts and expenditures 506 

Training, manual 619 



778 INDEX. 

V 

Valley cemetery 674 

w 

Watering streets 557 

■Women's Aid and Belief Hospital 691 

Water-"works, superintendent's report 34 

commissioner's report 31 

expenses 657 

Widening and straightening old Mammoth road 557 



i!