(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"



City of Manchester, N. H. 




. TO . . 



N- H. Historical Society. 



^j^^ -— ' ^ ry^^ Floor 

Presented by 




*'^^ip- 



?n^/CC'^9t€'nui <i^ 




-e4^ (O. ^Zy^'Ot/a^e 



y 



^^t'^tl^ f^J^tC^/oCG^ . 



FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



CITY OF MANCHESTER 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FOR THE FISCAL TEAR ENDING 



December 31, 1897. 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING 
TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. : 

PRINTED BY THE JOHN P.. CLARKE COiMPANy. 
189S. 



N 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 
1897. 



Mayor. 



WILLJAM C. CLARKE Office, City Hall 

Chosen at biennial election in November, 1896. Salary, $1,800 
per annum, payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1848, section 1. 
Chapter 223, Laws of 1883. Public Statutes, chapter 47.) Tele- 
phone at hoiise and office. 



Aldermen. 



Act of June, 1848, section 1. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 



Ward 1. 
Canal street, 
Ward 2 
Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Ward 5 
Ward 6 
Ward 7 
Ward 8 
Ward 9 



Gardner K. Browning, 55 Stark Corporation, 

Ossian D. Knox, 757 Chestnut street. 
George W. Reed, 483 Chestnut street. 
Charles E. Cox, 475 Hanover street. 
Richard J. Barry, 232 Lake avenue. 
John T. Gott, Mammoth road. 
John F. Frost, 11 West Merrimack street. 
Gillis Stark, 42 School street. 
Frank T. Provost, 21 Amory street. 



President of the Common Council. 
George B. Rogers, 277 Laurel street. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT- 

Members of the Common Council. 

Act of June, 1S48, section 1. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 

Ward 1. 

Murdock A. Weathers, 944 Elm street. 

William Watts, 31 Stark Corporation, Mecliauic street. 

Carl E. Rydin, 28 Stark Cori^oration, Mechanic street. 

Ward 2. 

De Lafayette Robinson, 255 Front street (A.). 
William H. Maxwell, Goffstown road (A.). 
James R. Carr, 104 Prospect street. * 

Ward 3. 

George N. Baker, 78 Ashland street. 

Edmond Pinard, 101 Pearl street. 

Carl A. Soderberg, 256 East High street. 

Ward 4. 

George H. Phinney, 133 Hanover street. 
Joseph W. Abbott, 256 Manchester street. 
Eugene B. Worthen, 515 Hall street. 

Ward 5. 

John J. Lynch, 104 Chestnut street. 
Edward F. Murray, 296 Lake avenue. 
James F. White, 52 Auburn street. 

Ward 6. 

George B. Rogers, 277 Laurel street. 
Charles Hazen, 436 Central street. 
William E. Pierson, 122 Willow street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 

Ward 7. 

Alexander Kniglit, 50 West Merrimack street. 
Samuel F. Davis, 57 West Merrimack street. 
Robert Morrow, 6G Amoskeag Corporation, West Mer- 
rimack street. 

Ward 8. 

Peter Gundermau, 211 Douglas street. 
G. Walter Taylor, 23 Boynton street. 
James F. Wyman, New Mast, near D street. 

Ward 9. 

Augustus Filion, 73 Beauport street. 
Joseph D. Masse, 332 Beauport street. 
John Montplaisir, 252 Coolidge avenue. 



Clerk of Common Council. 
George L. Stearns, 129 Salmon street. 

Salary, $200. (General Laws, chapter 46, sections 7-9. City- 
Laws and Ordinances, page 33, chapter 6, section 11.) 



• City Clerk. 
Edward 0. Smith Office, City Hall 

Salary, $900. The city clerk, in addition to his salary, is in re- 
ceipt of fees as registrar of births, marriages, and deaths, and as 
a recoi'ding officer for record of mortgages on personal property, 
of attachments of real estate, of partnerships and assignments, 
and for recording various other legal papers. He also receives 
fees for issuing dog licenses, billiard and bowling alley licenses, 
for certifying records, and for various other matters. 

These fees are established by the state legislature under vari- 
ous laws, and are estimated to be between $2,100 and $2,500 per 
annum. Chosen in convention of City Councils in January, an- 
nually. (Charter, section 22. Public Statutes, chapter 50. Act 
of 1849. City Laws and Ordinances, pages 42, 43, 68, 72, 73, 84, 86, 
89, 114, 122, 123, 124, 166, 189.) Residence, 900 Union street. 



6 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

City Auditor. 

James E. Dodge Office, City Hall 

Salai'y, $1,200. Appointed by Mayor and approved by Board 
of Aldermen, in January, annually. (Laws of 1889, cbaj)ter 287. 
City Oi'dinances, pages 44, 71, 83-88, 173.) Residence, Eiver road 
north. 



Auditor's Clerk. 

Lizzie M. Cogswell Auditor's Office, City Hall 

Residence, 1589 Elm street. 



City Treasurer. 
Fred L. Allen Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Elected in convention of City Councils in Janu- 
ary, annually. (Charter, section 23. Act of 1856, section 4. Gen- 
eral Laws, chapter 48, sections 3, 4. Act of 1859, section 4. City 
Laws and Ordinances, pages 36, 86-89, 170, 172.) 

Treasurer's Clerk. 
Blanche E. Bullock Treasurer's Office, City Hall 

Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,650 and fees. Elected by Mayor and Aldermen be- 
fore May 1, annually. (Act of July, 1851. Act of June, 1859, sec- 
tion 6. Public Statutes, chapter 43. City Laws and Ordinances, 
chapter 33.) Residence, 740 Chestnut street. 



Deputy Collector of Taxes. 

Edwin C. Paul Collector's Office, City Hall 

Paid by collector. Appointed by tax collector with approval 
of Mayor and Aldermen. (City Law's and Ordinances, chapter 
33, section 3.) Residence, 416 Central street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. / 

City Solicitor. 
Edwin F. Jones Office, Patten Block, 93G Elm street 

Salary, $800. Elected in convention of City councils, in Janu- 
ary, annually. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6, pages 
70, 72.) Eesidence, 15 High street. 



City IVIessenger. 
John A. Barker Office, City Hall 

Salary, $700. Elected in convention of City Councils in Janu- 
ary, annually. (Citj^ Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6.) Ees- 
idence, 49 Appleton street. 



Joint Standing Committees. 

On Finance. — Tlie Mayor and Alderman Cox; Council- 
men Hazen, Robinson, and Filion. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Provost and Browning; Couu- 
cilmen Taylor, Pierson, and Wortben. (Meet Wednes- 
day succeeding tbe 24tb of eacb montb. All bills must 
be left at tbe city auditor's office, properh^ approved, not 
later tban tbe 20tb of eacb montb.) 

On Claims. — Aldermen Cox and Reed; Councilmen 
Knigbt, Baker, and Maxwell. (Meets tbird Friday in 
eacb montb.) 

On Streets. — Aldermen Gott and Cox; Councilmen 
Robinson, Wymau, and Pinard. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Frost and Stark; 
Councilmen Masse, Weatbers, and Watts. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Browning and Gott; 
Councilmen Pbinney, Gunderman, and Montplaisir. 

On Lands and Biiildings. — Aldermen Reed and Provost; 
Councilmen Morrow, Carr, and Rydin. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Knox and Cox; Coun- 
cilmen Taylor, Pierson, and Murray. 



8 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Knox and 
Browning; Oouneilnien Knight, Soderberg, and Watts. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Stark and Knox; 
Conncilmen Montplaisir, Murray, and Morrow. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Frost and Provost; Conn- 
cilmen Gunderman, Wyman, and Pinard. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Frost and Barry; Council- 
men Watts, Weathers, and Soderberg. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Frost and Barry; 
Conncilmen White, Abbott, and Maxwell. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Barry and Gott; Conn- 
cilmen Lynch, Filion, and Baker. 

On Puhlic Health. — Aldermen Stark and Barry; Conn- 
cilmen Pinard, Lynch, and White. 



Standing Committees. 

BOARD OP ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Knox and Stark. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Reed and Frost. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Browning and Gott. 

On ^Setting Trees. — Aldermen Provost and Reed. 

COMMOX COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Conncilmen Phinney, Masse, and 
Baker. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Conncilmen Soderberg, 
Taylor, and Hazen. 

On Enrollment. — Conncilmen Carr, Abbott, and Wyman. 



City Physician. 
Irving L. Carpenter Office, 9(!1 Elm street 

Salary, $600. Elected by City Councils in con\ention in Janu- 
ary, annually. . (Laws of 1870, chapter 99. City Ordinances, 
chapter 9, sections 29, 30.) Residence, 1458 Elm street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 9 

City Engineer. 

Winf red H. Bennett Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Chosen bj' City Councils in convention in Janu- 
ary, annually. (City Ordinances, chapter 6, sections 33, 34.) 



Water Commissioners. 

(Chapter 70, Laws of 1871. City Ordinances, chapter 36, and 
laws of 1891, chapter 2C, page 319, act approved March 31, 1891. 
Chapter 183, Laws of 1893.) One commissioner elected annually 
by Mayor and Aldermen, in the month of September, for a term 
of six years. Office at Court House, corner Fi'anklin and West 
Merrimack streets. Telephone at office and at pumping station. 

The Mayor, ew officio. 

Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1901. 
Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1000. 
Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1899. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1898. 
Harry E. Parker, term expires January, 1903. 
Charles T. Means, term expires January, 1902. 
Alpheus Gay, chairman. 

Henry Chandler, clerk. Salary, |100. Chosen by the 
board of commissioners. 



Superintendent of Water-Works. 
Charles K. Walker. .Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $2,000. Chosen by water commissioners annually. 
Residence, 08 South Main street. West Manchester, 



Clerk of the Water-Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns. .Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $1,500. Chosen by water commissioners annually. 
Residence, 421 Hanover street. 



10 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Engineer at Old Pumping Station. 

Josiali Laselle. Salary, |700, rent, fuel, and use of 
land. 

Chosen bv water commissioners annnallv. 



Engineer at New Pumping Station. 

Henry A. Donaway. Salary, |2.50 per day, rent, and 
fuel. 



Justice of the Police Court. 

Isaac L. Heath, court room at Police Station, corner 
Mancliester and Cbestnut streets. 

Salary, $1,500. Appointed by the Governor with tlie advice of 
the Council. (General Laws, chapter 215; chaj)ter 163, sections 
17, 18, 19, of the Laws of 1878, as amended by chapter 336, Laws 
of 1881. Public Statutes, chapter 211.) 



Associate Justice of the Police Court. 

George W. Prescott. Salary, .f800 per annum. 

Appointed by the Governor, with the advice of the Council. 
(Chapter 215, General Laws, sections 2-14. Public Statutes, 
chapter 211. Chapter 296, Laws of 3893.) 

Clerk of the Police Court. 

John C. Bickford. Salary, .fGOO. 

Appointed by the justice of the jTOlice court. (Chapter 163, 
sections 17-19, General Laws, amended by chapter 236, Laws of 
1881. Public Statutes, cha])ter 211.) Residence, 15 Ash street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



11 



Police. 

The members of the jDolice are appointed by the Police Com- 
missioners, and hold their commissions dnring- good behavior. 
Thej^ are, by virtue of their appointment, constables and con- 
servators of the peace, and their jurisdiction extends through- 
out the city. (Chapter 253, section 5, General Laws; chapter 
303, Laws of 1887; chapter 202, Laws of 1S93.) Police station, at 
the corner of Chestniit and Manchester streets. 



Police Commissioners. 

See chapter 202, Laws 1893. 

Noah S. Clark, clerk, term expires January, 1898. • 
Frank P. Carpenter, terra expires January, 1902. 
Harry E. Loveren, chairman, term expires January, 
1900. 



Chief of Police. 

Michael J. Healy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $900. Eesidence, 304 Central street. Telephone at 
house and office. 



Deputy Chief of Police. 
John F. Cassidy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $S00. Eesidence, 415 ifanchester street. 



Captain of the Watch. 

Thomas E. Steele. Salary, |2.50 per day. Residence, 
56 Nashua street. 



Sergeant. 



Leon E. Magoon. Salary, |2.50 per day. Residence, 
355 East Spruce street. 



12 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Patrolmen. 

SALARY, |2.25 PER DAY. 



Randall W. Bean. 
Frank E. Bourrassa. 
Olaf Ring. 
John T. O'Dowd. 
Florence Sullivan. 
Henry A. Burns. 
Theodore Flodin. 
George A. Lovejoy. 
John D. Healy. 
Frank W. Marden. 
Oscar R. Poehlman. 
Albert Russell. 



Joseph Archambeault. 
James S. Butler. 
John C. Badger. 
Peter Callaghan. 
John J. Connor. 
Frank P. Moore. 
John T. Welch. 
John T. Nixon. 
Elmer E. Somers. 
Levi J. Proctor. 
Joseph A. Farrell. 
James S. Hampston. 



Janitor of Station. 

Frank P. Wiggin. |1.75 per day. Residence, 255 
Auburn street. 



Miss A. B. Brown. 
Merrimack street. 



Matron. 

^15 per annum. Residence, 277 



School Committee. 

Chosen at the biennial election in November, 189G; Mayor and 
president of the Common Council members ex officio. The board 
of school committee choose the clerk of the board, the superin- 
tendent of public instr action, the truant officer, and the teachers 
in the public schools, and determine their salaries. They have 
charge of the repairs of schoolhouses, to a limited extent, and 
the purchase of free text-books and other supplies, and are lim- 
ited bjr the appropriations of the City Councils. The salary of 
the committee is $10 each. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



13 



Walter B. Heath. 
Augustus P. Horne. 
George D, Towne. 
Henry D. Soule. 
James P. Slattery. 
Harry I. Dodge. 
Edson S. Heath. 
Luther C. Baldwin. 
Kobert E. Walsh. 



Ward 1. 

Elliott C. Lambert. 
Ward 2. 

Charles H. Manning. 

Ward 3. 

Louis E. Phelps. 
Ward 4. 

Nathaniel L. Colby. 

Ward 5. 

John T. Kelley. 

Ward 6. 

Herbert E. Richardson. 
Ward 7. 

Edward B. Woodbury. 

Ward 8. 

Ned T. Wallace. 

Ward 9. 

Henry I. Lemay. 



William C. Clarke, ex officio chairman. 
George B. Rogers, ex officio. 
George D. Towne, vice-chairman. 
Edward B. Woodbury, clerk. 



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
W'illiam E. Buck Office, City Hall 

Salaiy, $2,r!00. Eesidenee, 324 Myrtle street. 



14 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Superintendent's Clerk. 

Fannie L. Sanborn Residence, 161 Hanover street 

Salary, $500. 



Truant Officer. 

Curtis W. Davis. Office, City Hall 

Salarj^ $750. Eesidence, 849 Chestnut street. 



Assessors. 



One assessor from each ward chosen at the biennial election in 
November. Paid $2.50 each for each day while employed in the 
assessment and abatement of taxes. Office, City Hall. (Charter, 
section 25. Public Statutes, chapter 48, section 1; chapter 50, 
section 4; chapter 49, sections 10, 11, 12. City Oi'dinances, chapi- 
ter 6, section 26.) Assistant assessors, not exceeding six, chosen 
by the city councils. 

Henry Lewis, 32 Amoskeag Corporation. 
John E. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 
David O. Furnald, 381 Lowell street. 
Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 
George F. Sheehan, 85 Cedar street. 
George H. Dudley, 159 Laurel street. 
Robert Leggett, 50 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Eugene W. Brigham, 6 Marlboro street. 
Jobn T. Hannigan, 159 Cartier street. 

CHAIRMAN OF ASSESSORS. 

David O. Furnald Office, City Hall 

CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 

George H. Dudley Office, City Hall 



Ward 


1. 


Ward 


9 


Ward 


3. 


Ward 


4. 


Ward 


5. 


Ward 


G. 


Ward 


7. 


Ward 


8. 


Ward 


9. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



15 



Inspectors of Check-Lists. 

Oue in each ward, chosen at the biennial election in November, 
Compensation, $2.25 per day for each day actually emploj^'ed. 
Office, City Hall. (Laws of 1878, chapter 163, sections 5, 6, 7, 9, 
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 10, and City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) 

Ward 1. George C. Kemp, 40 Machine Shop block. 

Ward 2. Charles B. Tucker, 777 Union street. 

Ward 3. William B. Corey, 88 Pearl street. 

Ward 4. Albert T. Barr, 336 Merrimack street. 

Ward 5. Daniel A. Murphv, 246 Auburn street. 

Ward 6. Albert J. Peaslee, Cohas avenue, near Water- 
Works. 

Ward 7. Joseph A. Foster, 42 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 8. Charles C. Tinkham, 9 Parker avenue. 

Ward 9. John B. Bourque, 22 Wayne street. 



Overseers of the Poor. 

One in each ward, chosen at biennial election in November. 
The Mayor is a member ex officio. Compensation, $25 per annum, 
each; clerk of the board, $100 per annum, determined by City 
Ordinances, chapter 14, section 18, as amended hy Ordinance of 
August 5, 1890. Meet third Wednesday of each month in City 
Hall building. 

Ward 1. William H. Maxwell, clerk, 20 Amoskeag 
Corporation, Stark street. 

Ward 2. Thomas L. Quimby, railroad station, foot of 
West Salmon street. 

Ward 3. Benjamin F. Garland, 28 Linden street. 

Ward 4, Charles B. Clarkson, 249 Concord street. 

Ward 5. Patrick Costello, 106 East Spruce street. 

Ward 6. Charles Francis, Candia road, East Man- 
chester. 

Ward 7. William Marshall, 72 Amoskeag Corpora- 
tion, West Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. Charles S. McKean, 495 Granite street. 

Ward 9. Thomas C. Stewart, 27 Marion street. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio, Office, City Hall. 



16 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT, 

Board of Health. 

(City Ordinances, chaiiter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 
1885, chapter 165; Laws of 1887, chapter 227; Public Statutes, 
chapters 108, 109, 110.) One member appointed by the Mayor in 
Jantiary of each year, to liokl office for a term of three years. 
Salary, $200 each per annnm. Office, Court House, West Merri- 
maek, corner of Franklin street. 

John C. Bickford. Term expires first Monday in Feb- 
ruary, 1900. 

William K. Bobbins. Term expires first Monday in 
February, 1898. 

William M. Parsons, Term expires first Monday in Feb- 
ruary, 1809. 

William I>. Blake, sanitary inspector, Hanover-street 
road. Office, Court House, Merrimack, corner of Frank- 
lin street. 

John F. Loone}^, sanitary inspector. Office, Court 
House, Merrimack, corner of Franklin street. 

Carl O. Seaman, sanitary inspector. Office, Court 
House, Merrimack, corner of Franklin street. 



Fire Department. 

The chief engineer and four assistant engineers are chosen an- 
nually in the month of January, by a majority of the City Coun- 
cils in convention. The salary of the chief engineer is $1,300 per 
annum; the assistant engineers, each $125 j)er annum. They 
exercise the powers and perform the duties of firewards. The 
said engineers constitute the board of engineers, and elect a 
clerk whose compensation is $25 a year. The annual compen- 
sation of the call members of the several hook-and-ladder, hose, 
steam tire engine, and chemical engine companies is as follows: 
Captains, each $165; lieutenants, each $160; clerks, each $160; 
assistant engineers, each $155; all other members, each $150; 
payable in equal semi-annual payments, on the first of January 
and July. (Laws of 1870, chapter 99. (Jeneral Laws, chapter 
106. City Ordinances, chapters 6 and 12.) Six members are 
permanently emj)loyed as engineers at $76.25 per month each, 
and twenty-one as drivers at $68.33 1/; per month each, six other 
permanent men at $65 per month each, and receive no compensa- 
tion as call members. Members and officers of eacli company 
are apiJointed by the board of engineers. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 17 

Chief Engineer. 

Thomas W. Lane Office. Central Station, Vine street 

Kesidence, 1937 Elm street. Telephone at house and office. 

Fred S. Bean, clerk, 102 Orange street. 
Kuel G. Manning, 52 Douglas street, West Manchester. 
Eugene S, Whitney, River road north, corner West 
North street. 

Clarence R. Merrill, 418 Merrimack street. 

For further information see chief eng-ineer's report. 



Trustees of City Library. 

(Laws of 1854, chapter IJSS. See contract with Manchester 
Athene um, printed on pages 107 and 108 of City Report for fiscal 
year ending January 31, 1855.) Board of seven trustees, one of 
whom is elected by Aldermen and board of trtTstees in joint con- 
vention in September, annuallj^ Term of service, seven years; 
no sala^3^ Two additional trustees, Mayor, and president of 
Common Council, ex officio. 

Frank P. Carpenter, term expires October 1, 1902, Elm, 
corner West North Street. 

Nathan P. Hunt, term expires October 1, 1901, 747 
Union street. 

Herman F. Straw, term expires October 1, 1900, 607 
Chestnut street. 

Walter M. Parker, term expires October 1, 1899, 1883 
Elm street, corner Webster. 

Isaac W. Smith, term expires October 1, 1898, 1855 
Elm street. 

Moody Currier, term expires October 1, 1897, Ash 
street, corner Myrtle. Reappointed. 

C. D. McDuffie, term expires October 1, 1903, Ash 
street, corner Myrtle. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio. 

George B. Rogers, e.jo officio. 



18 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 

The City Councils in joint convention, biennially, elect one 
member of said board for a term of six years. Not more than 
two members can be of the same political party. Said board, 
consisting of three members, has full charge, management, and 
control of the building, constructing, repairing, and maintain- 
ing of all the streets, highways, lanes, sidewalks, bridges, and 
public sewers and drains, and public parks and commons. (See 
Laws of 1893, chapter 264.) Office, City Hall building. Open 
from 8 to 13 A. M., 2 to 5 p. m. Regular meeting of the board at 
2 o'clock F. M. each day. Salary of each member, $600 per year, 
payable quarterly, and each is allowed $150 annuallj^ for horse 
hire. 

George H. Stearns, clerk, term expires 1898. 
Horace P. Simpson, chairman, term expires 1900. 
Byron Wortlien, term expires 1902. 



Assistant Clerk. 
Julia F. Stearns. 



City Weigher. 

Elected annually in convention of City Councils. Salarj", $400 
per annum; all fees for weighing returned monthly to city 
treasiirer with sworn statement. Stationed at city scales on 
Pranklin street. 

Asa B. Eaton. Office, city scales; residence, 23 Apple- 
ton street. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Charles B. Clarkson. 

Elected annually in January by City Councils in convention. 
Paid by fees. (Section 25, chapter 43, Public Statutes, and chap- 
ter 125, Public Statutes.) 



LIST OF, OFFICERS. 19 

Fish and Game Wardens. 

(Public Statutes, chapter 130.) Elected by Citj' Councils ia 
convention. 

Jolin C. Higgins, 143 Orange street. 
Charles H. Richardson, 411 Hanover street. 
Dennis F. Scannell, 74 Clinton street. 
Harry P. Ray, Riyer road north. 
C. R. Hodge, 574 Hall street. 



Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39, sections 1, 2, 3, 4.) Two trustees 
elected by City Councils in convention in January, annually, for 
the term of four years. Sub-trustees appointed by board of 
trustees. 

J. Adam Graf, 10 Middle street, term expires January, 
1899. 

William H. Huse, Mammoth road, term exjjires 1899. 

John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street, term expires 1898. 

Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanoyer street, term expires 
1898. 

Stillman P. Cannon, 4.3 Elm street, term expires 1901. 

Alfred D. Maxwell, GoffstoAvn road near Front street, 
term expires 1901. 

Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street, term expires January, 
1900. 

John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street, term expires 
January, 1900. 

Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer, 6 Linden street. 



Sub-Trustees of Cemeteries. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Alderman Gardner K. Browning, .55 Canal street. 
Councilman Carl A. Soderberg, 2.56 East High street. 
John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street. 
Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street. 
Stillman P. Cannon, 43 Elm street. 



20 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Alderman Ossian D. Knox, 757 Chestnut street. 
Councilman Alexander Knight, 50 West Merrimack 
street. 

J. Adam Graf, 10 Middle street. 
John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street. 
Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street. 

AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

Councilman William Watts, 31 Mechanic street. 
Alfred D. Maxwell, Goffstown road near Front street. 
William H. Huse, Mammoth road, East Manchester. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Byron A. Stearns. Office and residence at the ceme- 
terj^ Telephone. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Charles H. G. Foss. Office at the cemetery; residence, 
267 Lake avenue. 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 25 High street. 
Otis Barton, 122 Orange street. 
W^illiam C. Clarke, ex officio. 



Inspector of Milk. 

Archie F. Precourt Central, corner Chestnut street 

Eesidence, 335 E. Spruce street. Term exjjires February 1, an- 
nually. (Public Statutes, chapter 127.) Appointed by Mayor 
and Aldermen. Salary, $300 per annum. 



Inspector of Buildings- 
Thomas W. Lane Office at Central Fire Station 

Kesidence, 1937 Elm street. Appointed by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen, bienniall3% in February. Salarj', $100 per annum. 
(City Ordinances, chapter 15. LaAvs of 1883, chapter 94. Public 
Statutes, page 170.) Telei^hone at house and office. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 21 

Inspectors of Oil. 

Joseph B. Baril 90 Bridge street 

John Cayzer •. 383 Granite street 

(Public Statutes, chapter 129, sections 25-34. City Ordinances, 
chapter 25.) Paid by fees, i/i of 1 per cent per g-allon. 



Moderators. 



Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 31, sections 3, 9; 
chapter 36, section 9; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordinances, 
page 18. See Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Ward 1. Abial AY. Eastman. 

Ward 2. William M. Butterfield. 

Ward 3. Allen W. Wilson. 

Ward 4. Ernest C. Wescott. 

Ward 5. Thomas F. Slattery. 

Ward 6. Herbert S. Clough. 

Ward 7. Robert Morrow. 

Ward 8. Eben C. Chase. 

Ward 9. Norbert Descoteau. 



Ward Clerks. 



Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 44, sections 10, 12. 
City Ordinances, page IS. Public Statutes relating to towns and 
cities.) 

Ward 1. George A. Stokes". 

Ward 2. Elmer W. Nutting. 

Ward 3. John H. Hayes. 

Ward 4. Robert H. Scott. 

Ward 5. Martin J. Whalen. 

Ward 6. Arthur B. Dickey. 

Ward 7. Charles E. Bartlett. 

Ward 8. G. L. Putnam. 

Ward 9. Jean B. Archambeault. 



22 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Selectmen. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 1, section 27; 
chapter 12, section 6; chapter 40, sections 2, 3; chapter 109, sec- 
tion 27; chapter 213, section 1. City Ordinances, page 18. Public 
Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Ward 1. 
John H. Wales, Jr. Jolm V. Brandt. 

Alexander Hanna. 

Ward 2. 

Fred K. Ramsey. Silas R. Wallace. 

James E. Orrill. 

Ward 3. 

Walter B. Wright. Victor Johnson. 

John Cronin. 

Ward 4. 

Albert E. Blanchard. Joseph E. Merrill. 

Thomas Miingall. 

Ward 5. 

William H. Quinn. Hugh 0. Duffy. 

Thomas F. Daly. 

Ward 6. 

George M. Bean. John Ferguson. 

Harrison W. Haselton. 

Ward 7. 

Edward S. Stratton. Hanson R. Armstrong. 

Robert Leggett. 

Ward 8. 

Richard P. Grossman. Hervey Stratton. 

Osman W. Pettingill. 

Ward 9. 

Louis Gauthier. Eugene Quirin. 

Treffle Raiche. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Conneils: 

Having by the oath of office this day administered to 
you assumed the duties of the positions to which you have 
been called by the suffrages of your fellow-citizens, your 
responsibility foi; the work of the ensuing year is now 
begun. 

Manchester occupies a prominent position in the affairs 
of our state and her influence is felt in many ways 
throughout New England. Her growth has been con- 
tinuous and prosperous and with the growth new condi- 
tions have arisen and new conditions must continue to 
arise to engage the attention of each succeeding adminis- 
tration. These requirements call for more careful consid- 
eration in every public expenditure and greater economy 
in every department. It is impossible to outline at the 
commencement of tlie municipal year the details of the 
work to be accomplished. I shall, however, give you a 
general synopsis of the work performed during the past 
two years by the several branches of our municipal gov- 
ernment, making such suggestions bearing upon the needs 
of the city as seem to me expedient, and submit some 
recommendations for your consideration. 

It is an easy matter to map out a policy for municipal 
administration, but it is not always easy to consistently 
follow it. It would be comparatively easy, however, in 
the common run of affairs, if there were a unanimity of 
opinion among a majority of the members of both branches 
of the city councils that the policy outlined Avas the cor- 

25 



26 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

rect one to" follow, and a determination npon their part to 
follow it. An experience of two rears in municipal affairs 
has convinced me that it is just as easy to run the affairs 
of this city in a straight, business-like, economical manner 
as it is for any successful man of business to conduct his 
own private affairs, providing always that business-like 
methods are adopted at the outset and rigidly adhered to. 

The lack of experience has a great deal to do with the 
success or failure of municipal administration in a city 
like Manchester, as it does in our state legislative bodies. 
Inexperienced men in city affairs, however able, compe- 
tent, and honest they may be, have much to learn before 
they can become useful public servants. We find in every 
new administration some men peculiarly well fitted for 
public service, but just as they have about acquired an in- 
telligent and practical knowledge of city affairs, and have 
become useful members, their term of office expires and 
their places are filled by others, who, while they may be 
equal, or perhaps superior, in general equipment, are apt 
to be wholly lacking in experience and must in turn serve 
an apprenticeship before they can become fully useful and 
efficient. And so it may be said that each new incoming^ 
city government is made up in a large measure of ''raw 
material" which must be develoi)ed before its true worth 
can be ascertained and utilized ; and this will always be so 
until the present custom of ward nominations is changed. 

In some respects the municipal government of the en- 
suing tAVO years is somewhat of an exception, as in its 
membership we find sixteen members who have had pre- 
vious experience in city affairs. This should augur well 
from the standpoint of experience, and as the new mem- 
bers include among their number men of accredited suc- 
cess in their own business, and others of brightness and 
intelligence in other avocations. I am encouraged to be- 
lieve that the affairs of the city during the next two 3'ears 
will be acceptably conducted. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS, 27 

There has seldom been a period in the history of this 
city when its general affairs were in better shape or when 
so little needed to be done. About every city depart- 
ment, so far as I know, is adequately provided for and 
calls for no more than ordinary expenses to operate. 
There is, of course, now, as there always has been and 
will be, opportunity for improvements, and they will doubt- 
less be vigorously called for; but in my judgment the 
best improvement this city government can give the tax- 
payers and citizens of Manchester, so far as possible, is to 
"let well enough alone" and conduct the business of the 
city under its present equipment. The present i^olicj^ of 
our large corporations and business houses of curtailment 
and economy wherever practicable is a wise policy for this 
administration not only to adopt but to follow. 

THE CITY DEBT. 

Manchester's city debt has not decreased any in the past 
two years, but on the contrary has been increased, and I 
have little hope' of seeing it much if any decreased in the 
two years to come. But this, my associates, w^e can do: 
We can, unless unforeseen emergencies arise, prevent it 
from being increased. For your information and that of 
the general public, I herewith submit the figures of Man- 
chester's bonded indebtedness January 1, 1897: 

City bonds $155,000 

School bonds 230,000 

"Water bonds . . 900,000 

33rJdge bonds 190,000 

Improvement bonds 400,000 

Cemetery bonds 42,250 

Security bonds 100,000 

$2,017,250 

By the foregoing you will observe that the total bonded 
indebtedness of the city is |2,017,250, or G.S4 per cent of 



28 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

our total assessed valuation. Omitting? the city water 
debt, the percentage is 3.79. It is customary, I know, 
not to reckon the bonded indebtedness of our water-works 
in this list, but really it is a part of the city's debt, for 
w'hicli the city as a corporation is alone responsible. 
These are large figures, a great deal larger than they 
should be, but they will never become any smaller until 
the policy of enlarging them by yearly bond issues ceases. 

There has been issued during the past four years 
|400,000 worth of permanent improvement bonds and 
under legislative enactment it is within your ])rovince to 
issue |100,00() more during your term of office. The 
question then for you to decide is, whether you will sanc- 
tion this further issue or wdiether you Avill stop where we 
are and keep the city debt from further increasing. 
For myself I can only speak, and I have no hesitation in 
saying that I believe the material interests and prosperity 
of Manchester urgently require us at this time not to in- 
crease the city's bonded indebtedness in any way that is 
not forced upon us. To save the city an additional burden 
of debt of 1100,000 during the next two years is some- 
thing to be seriously considered, and that it can be saved 
by a prudent apportionment of money I sincerely believe. 
Pay the city's bills from the taxes alone this year and next 
and contract no more bills than you can pay in this way, 
and you will have made a beginning at least toward pre- 
venting the city's debt from accumulating. 

Our taxes in themselves are not excessively burden- 
some but they bear heavil}', nevertheless, upon many of 
our people and should not be increased. It is in the con- 
dition of things that they necessarily fluctuate from year 
to year, yet I do not believe there is occasion at this time, 
with the citj-'s needs so generously cared for, to increase 
the present tax rate, but to reduce it if possible. As 
showing the manner in which our city taxes have operated 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 29 

during the past five administrations, eoverinc^ a period of 
ten 3'ears, I submit the following table of figures: 

Year. Rate. Average. 

1887 $1.70 

1888 1.95 $1,821/3 

1889 1.90 

1890 1.91 1-901/3 

1891 1.78 

1892 1.95 I.8C1/2 

1893 . . . ■ . . . . 1.87 

1894 .• 1.78 1-811/2 

1895 1.74 

1896 1.86 l.SO 

THE CITY TAXES. 

The total assessed valuation of the city of Manchester 
for the year 1896 was 129,443,008, and based upon this 
valuation there was collected in taxes about |54(),000. 
During the past two years collections have been the hard- 
est ever experienced in the ofiicial career of the present 
collector, covering a period of fifteen years. The amount 
of uncollected taxes assessed in 1896 was between -foO.OOO 
and 155,000, or about |13,000 larger than in 1895. This 
increase is accounted for by the fact that the total tax of 
1896 was about $45,000 larger than in 1895. Of the 
amount uncollected in 1896 a certain portion is collectible 
and will be paid this year. 

There is no denying the fact that the business depres- 
sion of the past two years has borne heavily upon many 
business men in Manchester and that taxes, whether great 
or small, have been in many instances extremely hai-d to 
collect. That some have not been paid is for the plain, 
honest reason that those now delinquent have not had the 
means at their command to pay them with. That the tax 
collector might have used the authority given him to 
cause arrests and imprisonment is doubtless true, but this 
would have been in hundreds of cases a most inhuman act 



30 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

of legal justice, as it would have plunged many families, 
now almost in distress, into a condition of absolute want 
and suffering, or would have aroused the pity of friends to 
such an extent that they would have stepped forward and 
made settlement in their behalf to avoid the disgrace of 
imprisonment. The record of the tax collector's office 
during the past fifteen years is a most creditable one and 
demonstrates that the interests of this important depart- 
ment of the city have been carefully and faithfully looked 
after. 

The amounts received from the si ate into the city tax 
fund for the year 1896 were as follows: Insurance tax, 
12,632. .50; railroad tax, |29,530.64; savings bank tax, 
150,770.79; literary fund, $3,869.60; total, |86,803.53. 
A comparison of these figures with those for past years 
shows a large decrease in the amounts received from the 
state each year by the city. The state tax upon the city 
is increasing steadily, while the other taxable properties, 
as shown above, and from which the city receives an an- 
nual revenue, are as steadily decreasing, in amount. 

In 1895, the state tax paid by the city was |65,615, and 
the amount paid the city by the state, $88,204.15, making 
the net income to the city |22,589.15. The state tax 
in 1894 was the same, or |65,615, and the state paid 
1110.532.59, or a balance of |44,917.59 to the city. In 
1893 the figures were |05,615 and |120,228.74, and the 
city received |54,613.74. The figures for 1892 were 
165.615 and if 114,161. 72, and the city benefited by the 
sum of 148,546.72. 

In 1891 the conditions were a little different. The state 
tax was only |63,435 and the amount due the city from 
the state was |104,542.33, a net balance paid into the city 
treasury by the state of |41,107.33. 

This change in money received from the state is most 
directly due to a falling off in the savings bank deposits 
and also to a reduction in the tax upon these deposits 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 31 

from 1 per cent to f of 1 per cent. The maximum of 
taxable deposits was reached in 1893, when tliev amounted 
to 177,024,282 for the state. In the three years follow- 
ing they haye decreased about seyeu millions each year, 
the total decrease being |20,140,082. In the year of 
1893 the sum of |2, 162,389.32, and in 1894 the sum of. 
13,169,790.90 was deducted under the state law exempting 
the banks on their real estate taxed locally whereyer it 
may exist, either within or without the state. In 1895 an 
.act was passed by the legislature exempting all loans at 5 
per cent made to parties in the state and secured by real 
estate within the limits of the state. This double exemp- 
tion on 5 per cent state loans increased the total amount 
exempted for that year to |6,643,139.73. Last year this 
amount was further increased, the exemption on the say- 
ings bank securities being |8,426,255.42. 

This large exemption, coupled with the immense de- 
€rease in deposits, has reduced the sayings bank tax real- 
ized by this city for the year 1896 to |50,770.79. 

It is due to the sayings bank tax more than to any other 
one item that the city receiyed last year from the state 
136,035.21 less than she did in 1893. 

This item makes a yery appreciable difference in meet- 
ing the expenses of the city and entails increased cave 
and prudence in the distribution of the city money. Dur- 
ing the two years just elapsed there has been received by 
the city from the state |41,167.68, as against |99,531.33 
during the two years immediately preceding, a difference 
against the city of |58,363.65. At the same time the 
state tax against the city is increasing. This is regulated 
by the assessed valuation and is apportioned according to 
the returns made to the state board of equalisation once 
in every four years. Since 1891, when the state tax was 
$63,435, it has increased |4,790, to the year 1896. For 
the succeeding three years it will remain at the present 
ligure and will at the end of that time be newly appor- 
tioned. In the insurance and railroad tax and the literary 



32 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

fund the clianjje year by year is very small and malces no 
appreciable difference in the balance accruinu to the city 
treasury from the state under the existing conditions. 

With the marked decrease in the difference between the 

state tax and the Aarious apportionments from the state, 

.which Manchester now realizes, the balance in a few 

years promises to be against the citA- rather than in its 

favor. 

With all of these conditions confronting us it is the 
sacred duty of every member of this city government to 
employ his best efforts to lighten the burdens of taxation 
in Manchester, and to avert, if possible, any increase in 
the city's debt. The estimates of the various departments 
for the current year are most of them larger than they 
have been in the past, and without curtailing expendi- 
tures which are necessary, still, proper economy should be 
observed, and we should not undertake new enterprises 
without most careful consideration. We should go 
slowly. The times do not warrant any unnecessary ex- 
penditure. Every class in the community has suffered 
by the financial depression of the past year, and the peo- 
ple should be given time to recuperate in 1897. The peo- 
ple want neither extravagance nor parsimony, but they 
have a right to demand econoni}'. 

The net cash in the city treasury December 31, 1896, 
was |160,8().3.04, against |143,088.90 December 31, 1895, 
and 176,721.90 December 31, 1891. The sinking fund 
deposits are steadily increasing, the amount now aggre- 
gating 191,645.24, of which |59,422.59 is credited to the 
water-works, and .|35,222.65 to the liquidation of improve- 
ment bonds. 

FolloAving is the statement of the city auditor after an 
examination of the accounts of the city treasurer for the 
3'ear ending December 31, 1896: 



INAUGUKAL ADDRESS. 



sa 



The net cash on hand January 1, 1S96, was 
Eeceipts during the year . 



Total 

Amount of drafts during the year 
Net cash on hand December 31, 1895 



Total 



The cash balance taken December 31, 1896, 
as follows: 

Deposited in Suffolk National Bank . 

Deposited in Second National Bank 

Deposited in office safe ...... 

Deposited in National Bank of Commonwealth 

Gross amount of cash on hand 
Deduct amount of bills unpaid .... 



Net cash on hand December 31, 1896 



$143, 088.9a 
1,419,841.15. 

$1,562,930.05 

$1,402,067.01; 
160,863.04- 

$1,562,930.05 

I find to be 

$20,652.00 

212,404.12 

6,498.62 

1,406.83 

$240,961.57 
80,098.53 

$160,863.04 



MUNICIPAL SUITS AND CLAIMS. 

In regard to suits and claims against the city for dam- 
ages for various reasons, those at present existing are em- 
braced mainly within three classes: First, damages 
claimed for the flowage of land by the water of Lake 
Massabesic, and the change of flow of the water in Cohas 
brook, occasioned by the use of these waters for water- 
works purposes; second, damages claimed to have been 
occasioned to real estate by the change of grade of high- 
ways; and third, damages for personal injuries received 
by employees of the street and park commission while 
engaged in the jjerformance of their work. 

The change of the law regarding damages occasioned 
by defective highways has limited the liability of the city 
practically to injuries received by travelers upon bridges 
and across culverts and sewers, and upon places in the 
highways where there are embankments without suitable 
railings. If the supreme court should follow the trend of 
its latest decisions, it is expected that it will be held that 



84 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

no liability exists upon the city for the injuries received 
by the employees of the street and park commission. If, 
however, the court should hold that the relation of mas- 
ter and servant exists between the city and such laborers, 
there are several cases which will have to be tried and will 
rest upon the determination of the jury whether or not 
the city was guilty of any negligence in not providing 
proper appliances or giving suitable instructions to the 
workmen. 

Eegarding the water-works cases, the disposition of 
the suits now existing and future claims which may arise, 
all will doubtless be adjusted by acquiring, under the due 
process of law, all rights in the waters which the needs 
of the water-works system may demand. The absolute 
€ontrol of the water in Lake Massabesic and Cohas brook 
by the city seems to be essential, and the authority of the 
statutes is sufficient to enable the city to acquire it, and 
with that control any future claims for damages will be 
obviated. 

As to the other classes of cases, the main conclusion to 
be drawn seems to be this: That boards of maj^or and 
aldermen should be extremely careful in laying out high- 
ways and the taking of land therefor; that the grade of 
highways should not be changed so as to damage the abut- 
ting real estate, except iu case of great necessity; that 
great care be exercised by the proper authorities in seeing 
that the bridges and sewers are kept in proper condition, 
■and that all dangerous embankments should be safel^y and 
securely guarded by strong and suitable railings. 

The legal work of the city has been ably and faithfully 
discharged by the present solicitor, who, during his term 
of office, covering a period of ten years, has acquired a 
broad and practical knowledge of municipal law, which 
renders him a very valuable public official. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 35 

MUNICIPAL FRANCHISES AND PRIVILEGES. 

The question of municipal f ranehises is one of great im- 
portance and the granting of them should be properly 
guarded. The city of Manchester receives a meagre re- 
turn from the corporations which have received many val- 
uable privileges at her hands. The street railway com- 
pany pays nothing to the city for the immensely valuable 
franchises granted to it years ago by the New Hampshire 
legislature. 

By a law passed at the January session, 1S95, important 
and responsible duties were placed upon the board of 
mayor and aldermen of cities relative to the supervision 
and regulation of railways in public highways. This law 
is so clear and concise that it requires no professional in- 
terpretation to be understood. It states plainly what the 
duties of a board of mayor and aldermen are and I re- 
spectfully urge upon the attention of the incoming bofird 
close and careful study and consideration of this law, that 
it may be able to act intelligently and judiciously for the 
interests of the city and the public. 

In past years the Manchester Street Railway has en- 
joyed many remarkable privileges at the hands of the 
city and has derived from the legislature even more re- 
markable franchises. That such wholesale privileges 
should be granted in the future without bringing in return 
therefor material benefits to the city no intelligent citizen 
believes, and it is a source of satisfaction to know that the 
aldermanic board, so lately retired from office, used its 
powers in some directions to save the city expenses that 
it had uncomplainingly borne in the past. No extension 
of the electric car service should be granted without re- 
quiring the railroad company to place the highways upon 
which its lines are built in a thorough and satisfactory 
condition after the work is completed, and whenever such 
extension is made over ungraded highwavs the railwav 



36 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

corpora"tion sliould be oblij;ed to place the street at g:rade 
and build it in a first-class manner along the full line of 
the extension. This the Manchester Street Railway was ♦ 
required to do in extending its lines to the Pine Grove 
cemetery and on Beech street last fall, and also to bear its 
proportion of the expense of paving the new Granite 
bridge and its approaches, and these are the only in- 
stances that I know of wherein the city has not given the 
street railway everything it asked for unconditionally. 

With the regulation of fares of the street railway the 
board of aldermen has nothing whatever to do. The fare 
question is one that the legislature alone can settle, or it 
can delegate this power to others. At present it is dele- 
gated to the board of railroad commissioners. 

In many of the large cities of the country where street 
railways are in operation, municipalities are in receipt of 
fixfd revenues from these corporations. In many instances 
this takes the form of a license fee for every car in use 
and a certain per cent, about 2^ per cent generally, of the 
gross earnings of the road. In some cities street railway 
franchises are sold at auction. In the year 1895 the city 
of New York sold one of these franchises for :^8^ per 
cent of the gross receipts of the proposed road. The 
roads of Milwaukee pay 1 per cent of the first |250,00() 
of the gross receipts and a larger per cent on larger re- 
ceipts. Buffalo gets 2^ per cent of the gross receipts of 
its street railway and in 1895 this was over |3(),000. 
Chicago collects an annual license of |50 for each car 
operated, and received in 1895 from that source nearly 
174,000. It also collects compensation for various per- 
mits granted the street roads, one of which paid |570,000 
for permission to change its horse car road into a trolley 
line, and another |250,000 for similar concessions. In 
Philadelphia the street railways are compelled to pave all 
streets in which their cars are operated. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 37 

And SO you will find that many of the larger cities are 
today requiring street railways to pay into the city treas- 
ury a percentage of their earnings, as well as a license 
fee. But the trouble here in Manchester is that about 
every valuable privilege and franchise enjoyed by the 
Manchester Street Kailway was freely given away by the 
legislature when the road was originally chartered in 
1864, and in the various extensions and amendments of 
its charter which have since been made, and that about all 
the city can do now is to refuse to grant further exten- 
sions of the road unless the corporation accedes to certain 
reasonable conditions, and these can be made very im- 
portant. Our citizens now begin to realize the fact that 
this city has allowed many very valuable privileges to be 
given away to corporations in years past, without the 
city's receiving any adequate return therefrom, and a vig- 
orous attempt should be made in the future to correct 
these mistakes so far as possible. 

The streets of Manchester are the property of the people 
of Manchester. The expense of laying out, building and 
improving them has amounted to millions of dollars and 
has been paid by the people in taxes. The mayor and 
aldermen are trustees, holding these streets in trust for 
the use and benefit of the people, and as such trustees it 
is the duty of this board to preserve the trust property 
solely for the interest and benefit of those who have 
trusted them. If the right to use these streets, which are 
the property of the people, is a grant of value in the mar- 
ket or to any corporation, it is manifest that this grant 
should not be given without just and full compensation. 
Our streets are becoming more valuable from year to year 
through inevitable increase in population, and the time 
has come when we must use further grants for the inter- 
ests of the city. We must look further ahead than to- 
morrow, remembering that we are laying the foundations 
of a city that is destined to become great and populous. 



38 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

The people fix the value of the streets, and no ^^urther- 
privileges should be granted without adequate returns to 
the citv. I would recommend that all privileges hereafter 
granted by the board of mayor and aldermen contain a 
clause guaranteeing to the cit}' a fixed percentage of the 
gross receipts of the party or company obtaining the 
privilege. The old gas company is a conspicuous instance 
of corj)orations that amassed great wealth as the result of 
franchises g-ranted them for which the city received no 
compensation. When this company changed hands a few 
years ago at what seemed upon the surface a large price, 
it was simply paying the stockholders for the value of the 
franchise it had acquired for nothing, and by acquiring it, 
it is able today to pay the stockholders of the old com- 
pany 32 per cent per annum and earn large dividends 
besides for the stockholders of the new company. 

It should be remembered that franchises are more valu- 
able than formerly, and that the utilization of machinery 
and improved methods have cheapened electricity, electric 
supplies and nearly every kind of material, which enables 
applicants for franchises to make better terms with the 
city. 

But these statements apply not alone to the street 
railway company. They apply with equal force and 
justice to all other corporations holding rights and privi- 
leges in the highways of this city. The electric light 
company, which has a ten j^ears' contract for lighting 
the streets, parks, and commons of Manchester, should 
of its own volition furnish the city with a certain number 
of free public lights, and under the terms of the contract, 
whenever it is able to do so, reduce the expense of lighting 
to the city, which now pays the company |115 per year for 
every light in use. Under the terms of this contract 
the company agreed that whenever the time arrived when 
there was a radical change in the manner of generating 
electricity, whereby the cost of producing the current was 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 39 

materiallT lessened, an adequate reduction in tlie price of 
the electric lighting" service would be made, and as there 
has been no disposition on the part of either party to 
break faith with the other, it is reasonable to suppose 
that the company w^ill fulfill this obligation. 

Regarding the New England Telephone and Telegraph 
Co., the city receives some benefits from the privileges, 
granted to it to lay an underground conduit in the 
streets, — the setting apart of one duct in the conduit for 
the use of city wires without expense to the city; but 
greater concessions, I believe, should be made by the 
company in the use of telephones by the city, for the use 
of public property for its private benefit. In this and 
other ways alluded to the revenue of the city of Man- 
chester would practically be increased by a lessening of 
the expenses necessary to be incurred annually and a con- 
sequent reduction of the tax rate, which is a matter of 
direct benefit to every taxpayer. 

It is the settled policy of some cities, which awakened 
to the importance of this subject earlier than Manchester, 
to exact cash returns for all privileges which may be 
granted by the city, and from these, large returns are re- 
ceived into the city treasury from street railway, electric 
light, telephone, gas, and other corporations holding 
rights in the streets and highways. The trend of popular 
municipal economies now is to own its own quasi-public 
plants. In nearly every city of England, Scotland, Ger- 
many, Belgium, and even in Italy, this is now the case^ 
and they are being leased by the cities at enormous profits. 
It is the case now in Toronto; Detroit has taken the 
initiative in this countr}- and the idea is growing. 

Whatever future contracts are made by the city of Man- 
chester in relation to these matters should be for a stipu- 
lated period, with the reserved right at the end thereof to 
purchase at an arbitrated consideration, or at the end of 
the contract to make new stipulations. And so there is a 



40 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

general awakening to a correct and enlightened under- 
standing of the public rights and interests on this subject, 
and the mayor and aldermen of Manchester cannot afford 
to shut their eves to the light or ignore the vested rights 
of the taxpayers and people, or be in a hurry to give away 
rights over and in the streets which are undoubtedly of 
great and increasing value. 

If there are any grave doubts in your minds relative to 
your powers in these matters it may be proper for you to 
consider whether it might not be advisable to apply to the 
next legislature for such remedial legislation as would en- 
able the city to more adequately protect its rights in these 
and all other questions regarding public franchises and 
privileges. 

CITY SALARIES. 

Manchester pays fair salaries to her officials and em- 
ployees; in some instances as much, if not more, than she 
can afford. Certain it is that the times do not at present 
warrant any further increase in any department. There 
have been several increases during the past two years that 
I believe to have been uncalled for, and by means of 
which the city salary list has been burdened too heavily. 
Here as elsewhere in municipal affairs the principles of 
men conducting their own private business should be 
strictly applied. 

There is one method prevailing in salaries that should 
be remedied, and that is the abolishment of all fees from 
every office where they now appertain. The paA^nent of 
a fixed salary to city officials is the only business way to 
pursue, and I hope to see this matter fairly and satisfac- 
torily adjusted during this administration. There are a 
few instances only of this kind in vogue and they have 
long been open to the deserved censure of taxpayers. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 41 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

The public building property owned by the city of Man- 
chester is generally in excellent condition and adequately 
meets all present and all immediately prospective require- 
ments made upon it. A recommendation made b}' me 
two years ago in regard to remodeling the city hall was 
adopted by the last administration, and I think I express 
public opinion fairh' when I say that the changes made 
upon it have since received almost universal approval. 
To my mind it is today one of the most attractive build- 
ings upon our principal business thoroughfare, and it is 
certainly as conveniently and comfortably arranged for 
the transaction of city business as any city hall I know of. 
The improvements were carried out for a comparatively 
small sum of money, and I can see no reason why the 
present city hall quarters will not answer Manchester's 
purposes for the next quarter of a century, and possibly 
longer. As there had been for several years prior to 
these alterations a strong and growing sentiment in favor 
of the erection of a new cit}' hall, with a fair prospect 
that such an enterprise would have been attempted within 
a few years, had these changes not taken place, it must 
be admitted that for the time being at least the city has 
been saved from an expenditure of not Jess than a quarter 
of a million of dollars. 

Our public school buildings, fire engine houses, city 
library, city farm, courthouse, and police station buildings 
are all in good condition, and aside from the usual yearly 
repairs called for are well enough, with the possible ex- 
ception of the city library building, and do not need to be 
changed. In fact, nearly all of the real estate property 
owned by the city is in good shape for the uses to which 
it is put. 

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Manchester has many reasons to be proud of her public 
library. It is of good size for a city of our proportions 



42 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

and contains an excellent collection of books. Its shelves 
contain 40,5.58 volumes, an increase of over 2,000 volumes 
duringf the past two years. The number of new books 
added in 1S9G was 1,109. The home circulation for the 
year was 66,488. What is most lacking at the library 
building" is a suitable public reading room, and until such 
is provided this institution will never attain its full meas- 
ure of popularity and educational value. A reference 
room, supplied with dictionaries, histories, encyclopedias, 
and other kindred books, where they will be of easy access, 
would also be of great value and convenience, particularly 
to professional men and women. A large, well lighted, 
attractive reading room, open early and late, Sundays as 
well as week days, with magazines and newspapers within 
reach, without having to be asked for, as they are now, 
would, I believe, do more to increase the educational value 
of our library than anything else that could be attempted. 
Until such a reading room is furnished there seems to be 
practical objection to keeping the library open on Sun- 
days, a matter I have always believed in and favored. 

And it is personally gratifying in this connection to 
state that a movement urged by me a little over a year 
ago, making a change in the library hours, met with favor- 
able consideration from the board of trustees, and that the 
new system has been a success from the start. Since 
December 1, 1895, the city library has been open week 
days continuously from 10 a. m. to 8 p. m., with the result 
that all of the old patrons of the library are well pleased 
with the change and many new ones have been secured 
thereby. The open noon hour is a great accommodation 
to the laboring classes, as is also the period from 5 to 7 
p. M., during which, under the old management, the library 
was closed. Neither the librarian nor the public would 
favor returning to the former method. 

Under the management of Miss Kate Sanborn, libra i-ian, 
the Manchester city library has steadily gained in circu- 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 43 

latioii. The "ain for 1805 was 1.441 over that of 1894, 
and for 189G, 6,993 over that of 1895. Tlie gain has been 
a steady one throughout and seems likely to continue. 
Miss Sanborn has brought to her duties an extensive and 
valuable knowledge of public library work and is con- 
stantly seeking after the newest and best ideas to build uj) 
the library and render greater its benefits. No library in 
New England is conducted under a more approved system, 
and none of its size is doing better work for a community. 
It is a matter of regret that the library is so inadequately 
supplied with good magazines and daily newspapers. 
Outside of the Manchester papers the library is today un- 
provided with a single daily new^spaper, while the supply 
of magazines is very meager. This is a condition of 
afifairs that should be remedied. 

During the past two years certain needed imi)rovements 
have been made in the interior of the library building, one 
of the most commendable being the substitution of elec- 
tric light for gas. Fnder the old system of gas the build- 
ing was very poorly lighted. A portion of the librarian's 
inclosure has been carpeted and a marked reduction of 
noise is noticeable. An extension of this work throughout 
the building would be a great improvement and one that 
those who go to the library to read w^ould especially 
appreciate. The building has also been much improved 
by needed painting within and without. A heroic statue 
of Abraham Lincoln, a gift of the eminent sculptor John 
Rogers, was presented to the city last year and placed 
in the library building. Owing to its great size and the 
cramped condition of the present public waiting and read- 
ing room, it occupies too much valuable space, and I 
would suggest that at the completion of the new high 
school it be transferred to that building, where it can be 
better received and displayed. The increase of help at 
the library occasioned by the change of hours, and the sub- 
stitution of electric lights for gas, have added somewhat 



44 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

to the running expenses of the institution and a little 
larger appropriation will be required for the library the 
coming year. 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Manchester pays a large sum of money annually for the 
maintenance of her public schools. The appropriation 
in 1895 was |92,500 and there was expended |91,431. 
In 1896 the sum of |103,500 was approj^riated and 
1102,559.91 expended, and the estimated expense by the 
school board of maintaining them for the year 1897 is 
1113.800. No city in New England is better equipped 
with public school buildings than Manchester. Under 
the last administration three new eight-room brick build- 
ings and a new high school building were erected to meet 
the pressing requirements of more school accommoda- 
tions. Three of these structures were built by means of 
the issue of school bonds and one was paid for directly out 
of the taxes. The school bonds issued are all provided 
with an annual sinking fund, and when the bonds mature 
in twenty years these improvements will be fully paid for. 

It is estimated that Manchester has today invested in 
public school property the large amount of |800,000. For 
a city of 55,000 population, and by no means a wealthy 
city, this is an enormous investment for the purposes of 
public school education, and yet the statistics of the last 
few years show that about as fast as new school buildings 
are erected, in whatever section of the city they are 
placed, they are rapidly filled, and in a short time there is 
again call for more. 

The last administration was confronted by an imper- 
ative demand for greatly needed school accommodations 
and they were provided; how wisely or well, you and the 
public have already had an opportunity to judge. It may 
be fairly said, however, that in design, construction, ap- 
pointments, and equipment they are thoroughly substan- 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 45 

tial and modern, and in these respects, and also in cost, 
will bear favorable comparison with similar school edi- 
fices erected anywhere in New England during the past 
two years. In securing plans and estimates for construc- 
tion and equipment the members of the city councils have 
been materially aided by representatives of the school 
board, both bodies co-operating harmoniously and zeal- 
ously in carrying forward these permanent improvements. 
To one member, especiall}^, of the board of education the 
city of Manchester is deeph' indebted for counsel and 
advice in these matters. I refer to Capt. Charles H. Man- 
ning, who has given generously, cheerfully, and gratui- 
tously of his time, ability, and expert knowledge in every 
instance where they have been sought (and this has been 
very often), and not a little of the credit for the superior 
excellence of these handsome and commodious institu- 
tions of learning belongs to him. 

Manchester is so well provided with public school build- 
ings at the present time that I can see no urgent necessity 
of erecting any more new ones during the coming two 
years. The new^ high school will be opened next spring 
and this will place at the disposal of the school authorities 
for other school needs the Straw building of eight rooms. 
This will be used for the relief of the overcrowded rooms 
of primary and middle grades in the Ash-street, Spring- 
street, and Lowell-street schools, and to this new build- 
ing will also be transferred the pupils of the Blodget-street 
school, who for many j-ears have been badly housed. 
The transfer of these schools will relieve any further use 
of the Blodget-street building for public school purposes. 
After the foregoing changes are elfected the Straw school 
will be organized with a lady principal tit its head, similar 
to the Spring-street school. 

The Straw school, named in honor of the late ex-Gov. 
E. A. Straw, remembered as one of Manchester's ablest 
and most illustrious citizens, was the first of the quartet 



46 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

of new school buildings to be finished during the last 
administration, and upon its completion was at once oc- 
cupied by the high school, and will continue to be so 
occupied until the new high school building is ready. This 
will probably be by the first of April next. 

The new high school is a noble and imposing edifice, 
*'built," as one of our public speakers not long since said, 
"^not for today, but for generations." It stands upon the 
old high school site, and since its erection the electric car 
service has been extended to its doors. The building is 
capable of accommodating 700 pupils. In arrangement it 
is a model of comfort and convenience. Aside from a 
complete equipment of study and recitation rooms, it is 
provided with a library, chemical laboratory, astronom- 
ical observatory, armory and drill room, and a spacious 
assembly hall that will seat 800 people, and where the 
public exercises of the school may hereafter be held. The 
building is perfectly lighted, ventilated, and heated. In 
fact, these three essentials are conspicuous not only in the 
new high school, but in the new Straw school, Wilson 
school, and Parker school, and offer a striking comparison 
in sanitary equipment to the conditions found in the Ash- 
street and Lincoln-street houses, that not so very long ago 
were pointed out as specimens of modern school buildings. 
Despite the apparent large seating capacity of the new 
high school building, a large part of it will be utilized at 
once when the high school is reopened there. As the 
grammar schools continue to further increase in attend- 
ance, the new building maj" be used to relieve them, as is 
successfully done in other cities, by transferring the first 
class of the first divisions of the grammar schools during 
their last year to tlie high school. This will not only 
avoid the expense of erecting other new grammar school 
buildings for some years, but will also bring grammar 
school pupils more closely in touch with high school work 
before taking up a regular course of high school studv. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 47 

If this plan is adopted the new high school building, in- 
stead of giving accommodations to some 300 pupils next 
spring, will ere long have an attendance of 500, and 
eventnallv of the full quota, 700. In this connection it 
can be said that Manchester's new high school building 
is practically fire-proof. 

It is a matter of general regret to our citizens that the 
Manchester high school has been of late years the scene 
of so many sensational disturbances and disruptions, and 
it is earnestly' to be hoped that the school will enter upon 
a new era of harmony and prosperity in the new building. 
Of the causes or origin of these troubles we are not now 
disposed to speak, but we believe we voice the sentiments 
of a large class of intelligent citizens in this community 
when we say that if some of the customs now followed 
by pupils of this school, outside of the class and study 
room, were prohibited, and pupils made to understand 
that they were not yet expected, and would not be permit- 
ted to ape the manners and habits of the colleges and sem- 
inaries, it would be far better, not only for the w^elfare of 
the school but for the welfare of the young ladies and 
gentlemen now pursuing there a course of education. 
The tendency of the hour in our public school system is 
to crowd into it too many superfluities, all clearly antago- 
nistic to the fundamental and legitimate aims and pur- 
poses of a common school education; and when to these 
are added silly imitations of college and boarding school, 
it is not surprising- that outbreaks occur and that the pub- 
lic exclaims, "What is the matter with our high school?" 

From an aggregate attendance in our public schools of 
3,632 in 1886, the attendance has increased during a de- 
cade, or until the close of the year 1896, to 5,382, a gain 
of 1,750. Ten years ago the number of public school 
teachers employed was 74; today the number is 115, an 
increase of 11. Our schools are generally well governed, 
and are taught by a corps of intelligent, conscientious. 



48 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

and ambitions teachers, who are well paid for their ser- 
vices. In standing they are classed among the best in 
New England. Certainly no city is more liberal than 
Manchester in affording school accommodations, and with 
considerably over one hundred thousand dollars at the 
disposal of the public school authorities, parents and citi- 
zens of all classes have a right to expect that the present 
high standard will be maintained. 

I am heartily in accord with the recommendation made 
by the superintendent of schools in the report just pre- 
pared b}^ him as the report of the school board to be 
transmitted to the city councils, wherein he urges a modi- 
fication of the high school course of study, that a larger 
proportion of grammar school graduates may be induced 
to enter the high school. Only about 70 per cent of our 
grammar graduates have been accustomed to enter the 
high school. There are several reasons accounting for 
this, not one of the least being a feeling prevailing in the 
community that the teaching of the English branches in 
this institution has been subordinated to the teaching of 
the classics. As comparatively few of the parents of 
pupils attending our public schools are able to send their 
children to the colleges or seminaries, instruction in such 
branches as will best meet the requirements of the masses 
should be of paramount consideration in the curriculum 
of this school, and not, as now, secondary. 

THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

To speak of the Manchester fire department is only 
to say, what every citizen of Manchester knows and takes 
pride in saying, that it is equal to any and excelled by 
none. This reputation was established years ago and has 
been sustained and steadily added to ever since. At no 
time in its honorable history has the Manchester fire de- 
partment ever stood upon a higher plane of excellence 
than it does todaj^; this not alone in the character and 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 49 

number of men connected with it, but in the quality and 
perfection of its equipment. 

A great deal has been done for the department during 
the past two j^ears. A new hose house has been opened 
at South Manchester and equipped with a two-horse com- 
bination liose wagon; a new independent hose company- 
has been installed at East Manchester; the old hose reel 
attachment at Lake avenue has been replaced by a two- 
horse hose wagon; a two-horse truck has been added to 
the Webster-street house and the stable and engine room 
enlarged. Three new exercise wagons, a large quantity 
of new hose, and a supply of fire-hose jackets have been 
purchased for the department; new wagon sheds have 
been built at the Fulton and Webster street houses; nine- 
teen horses have been bought, exchanged, or traded by 
the fire department committee, and at the opening of the 
year 1897 we find it amply equipped and with no imme- 
diate call for further apparatus. There are now thirty- 
four firemen under salary, and during the past year the 
pay of the call men has been raised. The expense of main- 
taining the fire department during the year 1896 was .$65,- 
298.07, and with the fire hydrant service added, |82,098.07. 
Thus it will be seen that while satisfactory as is this de- 
partment today to most taxpayers and property holders,, 
it is a very expensive department to maintain, and as 
there appears to be no imperative reason for additional 
outlay at the i^resent time, the expenses of the department 
ought not to be materially increased either this year or 
next. There were eighty-six box alarms of fire in 1896,, 
entailing a total fire loss of |23,882.30, on which |20,977.05 
insurance was paid, making the net fire loss for a city of 
not less than 55,000 population only $2,905.25. It is doubt- 
ful if there is another city in the United States the size of 
Manchester that can furnish a fire record as creditable as 
this. 



50 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

One menace to public safety has arisen tlie past year in 
the construction of the electric car service, through the 
failure or neglect of the Manchester Street Railway Co. 
to provide suitable guard wires along the full length of its 
trolley wires to prevent other wires from falling upon 
them. This applies not only to fire-alarm wires, but to tel- 
ephone, telegraph, or any other wires that might become 
loaded with sleet or ice and fall and become crossed with 
the fire-alarm or other wires. It was but a few weeks ago 
that the entire fire-alarm system of a Michigan town was 
burned out through the faulty construction of trolley 
wires connected with an electric railroad. Anything that 
threatens the security and safety of the fire-alarm service 
of Manchester should receive prompt attention at the 
hands of the city officials, and its interests should be 
closely watched and guarded at all times. 

The selection of suitable horses for service in the fire 
department is one entailing not a little care and judgment. 
Horses individually good and fit for many purposes may, 
upon trial, prove to be practically worthless as fire horses. 
There are in the department at the present time many 
good horses, but some of them are growing old and will 
soon have to be replaced. There are others that .were 
never suitable for fire service and never will be. Too 
much money has been paid generally for horses for the 
Manchester fire department. As long as the present 
market prices for horses hold, good fire horses should be 
and may be honestly bought at a price not exceeding |125 
per head, and until there is some marked change in the 
condition of the horse market no sum exceeding this 
should be paid. When horses are purchased and turned 
over to the fire department they should be under the 
absolute control and management of the board of fire 
engineers and should not be interfered with in any way 
by the committee on fire department without the knowl- 
edge and sanction of this board. And in all matters 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 51 

pertaining to this department, the chief engineer, who is 
its responsible head, should be fully consulted and co- 
operated with by the city committee whenever any action 
relating to the interests of the department is under con- 
sideration. 

In connection with the fire department I believe there 
should be established a pension system. The duties of a 
fireman aredangerous and exacting, and provisions should 
be considered for a pension fund for the relief of disabled 
firemen as well as for those who have given the best years 
of their lives in the employ of the fire department and 
have become unfitted to perform duty or labor in other 
occupations. 

STREET LIGHTING. 

Unquestionably, Manchester is one of the best lighted 
cities in the United States. There are in operation in the 
city at the present time about 440 electric arc lights of 
2,000 candle power each, besides a large number of oil, 
gas, and gasoline lamps in the suburbs. Of this number 
thirty-six were ordered in the past year; seven others 
have been voted in by the city councils and fifteen more 
have been recommended by the committee on street light- 
ing. Fourteen petitions were laid over by the committee. 
The electric lights burn from twilight to twilight, and 
during whatever periods they cease to burn, a correspond- 
ing reduction is made in the expense charged to the 
city. A record of the condition of the lights at night 
is kept by the patrolmen of the police force and is 
furnished the mayor each month for inspection and 
adjustment. The lighting is done by the Manchester 
Electric Co. under a contract running seven years longer 
at the yearly rate of |115 per light. It is hoped under 
the conditions of the contract between the city and the 
company that some material reduction in the expense of 
public lighting will be made during this administration. 



52 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

The cost of street lighting increases yearly, the ex- 
pense in 1896 being |51,426.60 as against |46,800.71 in 
1895, an increase of |4,625.89. The call for additional 
electric lights is a large and increasing one every year, 
and the committee having this department in charge is 
possessed of great responsibilities. To deal fairly with 
the petitioners and honestly with the city is far from easy. 
Many lights are petitioned for that are not needed; and as 
every electric light ordered in adds |115 annnally to the 
cit3''s expense, the utmost conservatism should prevail in 
the deliberations of this committee. A redistribution of 
many of the lights now in operation would be a marked 
saving to the city and might be done without impairing 
the general service. Another verA^ material saving might 
be made by the establishment of gas lamps in places 
where electric lights are called for. In some open places 
gas lamps provide sufficient light for all needed purposes 
and will continue to do so for several years to come; and 
as the expense of operating a gas lamp is about |15 a year, 
as against $115 for an electric light, a manifest lessening 
of expense could here be made. 

CITY WATER WORKS. 

The water-works department of the city of Manchester 
is managed bj^ a board of commissioners and in most re- 
spects holds no immediate relations with the city councils, 
yet it is at all times more or less under your suf)ervision 
and control, and as it is one of the most important of our 
city departments it should not be overlooked in any treat- 
ment of our public affairs. 

It is a rational statement to make that few cities in this 
country are so well equipped with a public water service 
as Manchester. The value of this plant is conservatively 
estimated at two million dollars, sufficient to liquidate the 
entire debt of the city. The water rates exacted will 
compare favorably with those of some other cities, but 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 53 

I believe they should be reduced whenever the water- 
works department is in a condition to do so. It seems to 
me that the city itself, owning the water-works, is required 
by those having its management in charge to pay too 
heavily for city w\iter privileges. Last year the city 
turned into the water- works department about |20,000, of 
which |1 6,800 was paid for the use of fire hydrants. The 
fire hydrant fee of twentj^-five dollars a year for each hy- 
drant in use is fixed by statutory law, and the money thus 
received is credited to the water-works and is to be held 
by it inviolate, as a sinking fund for the liquidation of the 
water loan bonds, under such conditions as the board of 
water commissioners and the city councils shall deem for 
the interest of the city. This arrangement is undoubtedly 
n wise one, as it provides a practical ultimate method of 
paying the indebtedness of the water- works. But aside 
from this tariff, the city pays some 14,000 for other water 
privileges, including |700 for the use of water on the 
commons, or about one sixth of the money annually ap- 
propriated for commons; nearly |800 for the use of the 
public schools; over |400 for the fire department; about 
|500 for city hall; nearly $1,100 for cemeteries, and pro- 
portionate amounts for other departments. Aside from 
the cemeteries, no revenue is received in return. 

By discontinuing charges to the city for the use of water 
for public purposes, or, at least, by making them nominal, 
the city would be saved an expense yearly of about |4,000, 
and I can see no good reason why this should not be 
done. 

Just at present it does not seem likely that the rates 
fixed for private water takers will be changed. As is well 
understood, the water commissioners are engaged in a 
great financial undertaking, that of acquiring the com- 
plete ownership and control of the full shore front of Lake 
Massabesic for the purpose of preserving the purity of 
Manchester's supply of drinking water. 



64 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Since this movement of land purchases was inaugu- 
rated the commissioners have acquired for tlie ownership 
of the city about 70 per cent of the shore front of the lake. 
The purchases of land made will average about 300 feet 
back from, and including, the shore front. While this 
undertaking on the part of the water-works is involving a 
large expenditure of money, intelligent public sentiment, 
which has been aroused by the dangers of recent years 
that have threatened the purity of Manchester's water 
supply, is generally in favor of the step, exorbitant though 
some of the prices paid for land seem to be. 

Some public alarm has been manifested for several 
years on account of the periods of low water in the lake. 
Today, with winter fully set in, the lake is extremely low, 
though not as low by a few inches as it was two years ago. 
No doubt that the light rainfall during the past summer 
months had much to do with this condition, and while 
there was an increased fall of rain during the recent 
autumn months, the lake did not fill up as formerly. A 
similar state of affairs exists in many other city water 
suj)plies in other parts of the country, and no satisfactory 
explanation is given why this is so other than tlie summer 
drouth. Brooks and springs that serve as feeders to the 
lake in periods of good water seem inactive in times of 
very low water. And yet there is not the slightest occa- 
sion for fearing a water famine in the city of Manchester.. 
With two pumping systems, a high service and low ser- 
vice, all of the water necessary for a city of 55,000, of 
100,000 people even, can be afforded from Lake Massabe- 
sic. The present low lake, however, entails a greater 
loss of water at the old pumping station than if the lake 
were full, as so much more runs to waste down Cohas 
brook, which is the means of furnishing water to the 
Devonshire mills at Goffe's Falls. 

The city of Manchester made a serious mistake years, 
ago in not acquiring this mill privilege, which it might 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 55 

have had at a very low cost and which it may eventually 
be oblij:;ed to obtain to protect its water interests. In- 
stead of taking seven or eight gallons to pump one at the 
low service station, it now requires from ten to twelve, 
this being altogether due to the low state of the lake. 
There is now being pumped on an average from the old 
station from two and a half to three millions of gallons of 
water daily, and from the high service station half a mil- 
lion gallons per day. So well equipped is the high service 
station that in case of any accident to the old station the 
new plant is abundantly able to furnish daily all the water 
required for use in Manchester. 

In addition to the heavy expenses now bearing upon the 
water-works from land purchases, the commissioners have 
yet to meet the cost of replacing some fourteen miles of 
old cement pipe, which was laid when the water-works 
was established, by new iron pipe. In the extension of 
w^ater service the board has adopted the general financial 
policy of making no extension unless water takers will 
guarantee the payment of 6 per cent interest on the cost 
of extending, based upon the cost of putting in a six-inch 
pipe. There are at the present time about eighty-eight 
miles of city water pipe laid in the city of Manchester. 

The total receipts of this department for the year 1890 
were |12S,907.03, and the total expenditures $118,068.36. 
The income from the sale of water during the year was 
1111,091.41. There were sixteen fire hydrants set during 
the year, making the total number now in use 688, and' 
placing the expense of the fire h,ydrant service to the city 
in 1897, if no more are added, at |17,200. The bond 
issue of the water-works department January 1, 1897, was 
1900,000. 

The suit for .f50,000 brought by the Devonshire mills 
for diverting the water from Cohas brook is not much 
nearer settlement than it was two years ago. There is a 
practical agreement that it shall be eventuallv tried bv a 



56 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

board of referees, who, in addition to trial of the suit 
itself, shall also determine the whole question of all dam- 
ages, prospective as well as actual, to the mills occasioned 
by the absolute control of the water-w^orks. But the 
referees themselves have not yet been selected. 

THE POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Here w^e have another department that is virtually 
managed without the assistance or co-operation of the 
city councils, beyond the appropriation of money to main- 
tain it. It is wholly in the hands of a board of police 
commissioners appointed by the governor and confirmed 
by his council. For its good or bad behavior the city 
councils of Manchester are in no way responsible and 
should not, therefore, be held responsible. About $53,000 
was appropriated last year for the expenses of this depart- 
ment, of which the sum of |10,000 was specially appro- 
priated for a police telegraph and patrol system. This 
system w\as installed the past year by the Municipal 
Signal Co. of Boston and is classed among the most 
modern cit3' improvements in Manchester of late years. 
The system works perfectly and has added greatly to the 
efficiency of the department and to the character of police 
work. The installing of the system necessitated the 
building of a stable in connection with the police station 
and the purchase of a patrol wagon, a pair of horses, and 
other equipments, about all of which were provided within 
the appropriation. 

The police force at present comprises thirty regular 
men and twelve special officers, and is believed to be well 
organized and efficient. Since the commission was estab- 
lished, three years ago, the number of liquor saloons in 
Manchester has been reduced from 352 to about 60. The 
total receipts from the police department in 1896 were 
$58,634.39, more than sufficient to meet the annual ap- 
propriation, as against |62,008.88 in 1895. All in all, the 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 57 

police department of Manchester is rated among the best 
connected with cities of this size anywhere, and it is 
assuredly as well equipped as any. Undoubtedly it has 
one need, and that is quarters for women prisoners sepa- 
rate from the main prison. To place men and women in 
the same quarters is reprehensible, and until separate 
accommodations are furnished for men and women the 
interior life of the police station will not be above taint 
and criticism. Arrangements should also be perfected 
for housing the city ambulance at police headquarters, as 
it is now subject to emergency calls the same as the patrol 
wagon. 

THE CITY FARM. 

It is an open question today whether the maintenance 
of a city farm is of any advantage to the city of Man- 
chester. There are many who believe that it is an 
expensive burden and should be abolished. The establish- 
ment of the county farm within a few miles of the city 
has opened the question if it would not be better and 
cheaper for the city to pay the board at this institution of 
such prisoners as it is obliged to furnish quarters for, 
after sentence in the police court, rather than the expense 
of keeping them at the city farm and operating that insti- 
tution at the city's expense. Comparatively few paupers 
find their way to the farm. There were four only in 1895, 
and not more than ten in 1896, and most of them were 
there for short periods only. 

The city farm land, comprising one hundred and twenty- 
eight acres, is a very valuable piece of property, and is 
yearly becoming more valuable. If put upon the market 
it would bring a round sum of money; but it is a question 
if now is a time to sell it even if there was no institution 
maintained at the city's expense upon it. A section of it 
might be a valuable and desirable annex in coming years 
to Derryfield park. There was appropriated last year for 



68 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

the maintenance of the farm |8,000. The receipts from 
the farm for the year were |4,494.12, leaving the actual 
cost to the city of running the farm |3,505.88. For the 
past few years the scavenger service of the street depart- 
ment has been let to the city farm, and this has brought 
in a revenue of about |2,500 annually, which formerly was 
not received. 

There is one way perhaps that the city farm might be 
made self-supporting; but if the method was attempted, 
it would undoubtedI,y receive severe condemnation. This 
w^ould be by requiring every able-bodied man sentenced to 
the farm to perform day labor on the city ledge under the 
street department. This system is employed in many 
cities and is the means of saving a great deal of money to 
these cities, besides providing means for some kind of 
adequate punishment to the prisoners. ''Convict labor'^ 
is far from popular in Manchester, and it is questionable 
whether this system could be successfully carried out 
here. 

As long as the city farm is maintained under the present 
method it is doing about as well as could be expected, and 
the fact that it has been maintained all these years while 
the property has been steadily appreciating in value may 
afford some reason for operating it and continuing its 
operation. A great deal of work has been accomplished 
at the farm during the past two years. Many noticeable 
Improvements upon the property have been made without 
cost to the city, and, judged throughout, the institu- 
tion has been well and faithfully managed. Like all 
institutions of this class, however, it is capable of im- 
provement, and whoever may be selected among you to 
supervise its management, I trust that you will carefully 
scrutinize its methods, and if a saving to the city in its 
management can be made you will promptly bring it 
about. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 59 

THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

It is the belief of a large number of the taxpayers of 
Manchester that the present method of assessing taxable 
property is attended by great injustice, and that the sys- 
tem should in some way be changed. This opinion is 
shared by me; but so long as a board of assessors is chosen 
as the present board is chosen, I see no immediate reason 
to expect change or improvement. The responsibilities of 
assessing the many millions of dollars' worth of property 
that should properly be assessed in a city like Manchester 
should be intrusted only to men of fairness, peculiar 
ability and sagacity, and unswerving honesty, and even 
with these qualifications, if they did not possess complete 
and accurate knowledge of the present values of property, 
and had not the courage and backbone to assess them 
upon a basis of strict equality, they would do no better 
than the present or past boards have done; and I believe 
that they have acted honestly and to the best of their abil- 
ity while in office. 

In seeking for a remedy to elevate the standard and 
Increase the efficiency and favor of this dei^artment, I 
would look to a judiciously selected board of well-qualified 
men chosen in some manner that would insure a wise and 
proper selection, and that they be paid an ample salary for 
the work they are called upon to perform. So long as the 
present method of assessment is pursued, so long will 
inequalities and injustice continue. This is a question 
worthy of the serious and careful consideration of the 
Manchester delegation to the coming New Hampshire 
legislature, and I should be glad to see it fairly investi- 
gated and treated by the members. Other New England 
cities have had experiences in this line similar to those 
now occupying our attention, and the question was not sat- 
isfactorily decided until the personnel of the board was. 
taken away from the loose and careless method of caucus 



60 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

nominations and placed upon a higher plane of more 
thoughtful and intelligent selection. 

THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT, 

The health department of Manchester has become a 
most important and beneficial adjunct of the city works. 
Decried for years, it has b,y intelligent and conservative 
management steadily gained in public favor and confi- 
dence and is now accomplishing a large amount of useful 
and practical work in the community. It is still badly 
hampered in some directions; but as the quality and effi- 
ciency of its work become better understood, public senti- 
ment is inclining toward enlarging and strengthening its 
field of action and supporting its methods. 

The matter of a hospital for contagious diseases has 
long been deferred and should not be set aside a great 
while longer. As is well known, all that is now available 
for such purposes is a building located in Derryfield park, 
which, while better than none, is far from satisfactory in 
itself and is in a most improper locality. The establish- 
ment of a suitable building or set of buildings, where 
diphtheria, scarlet fever, or smallpox may have separate 
and comfortable apartments, and where patients may be 
treated and nursed in a proper manner, is no longer sim- 
ply desirable but in the judgment of the health board 
necessary. Probably the cheapest way and the one most 
convenient for the health department would be the estab- 
lishment in the local hospitals of contagious wards where 
patients could be sent, with no further responsibility than 
the payment of the necesary bills; but this is not likely 
to be possible in the near future, as most of the hospitals 
are too near other buildings, and probably none have the 
money to invest in what must necessarily be a losing 
venture financially, owing to the small number and irreg- 
ularity of the occurring cases. 

The next best way would be the establishment and 
maintenance of a municipal contagious hospital; but this 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 6i 

in a sufficient completeness would be too expensive for a 
city of this size. It might, therefore, seem advisable for 
the city to build a set of small and inexpensive buildings 
to serve as a place of refuge for cases of contagious dis- 
eases, which may be closed up when not in use, and I 
would therefore recommend to the city councils that care- 
ful consideration be given to this matter. The health de- 
partment has been giving the matter much attention dur- 
ing the last year and has accumulated much information 
on the subject. The members of the board would be a 
valuable associate committee for doing the work, espe- 
cially as it will be for their use and control when com- 
pleted. 

There is another city office that should come under the 
jurisdiction of this department, and that is the office of 
milk inspector. As at present conducted the office accom- 
plishes very little and the money devoted to it is practi- 
cally wasted. Until it is made a part of some department 
that will give its influence and backing to the official serv- 
ing as milk inspector, it is not reasonable to expect much 
if any better results than those now attained, and they are 
far from satisfactory. This opinion is shared by those 
who have held this office as well as by others acquainted 
with its work. 

GARBAGE AND REFUSE. 

The problem of Manchester's waste and garbage con- 
fronts the city at this time as it has never done before. 
The usual way of carrying all the refuse to dumps for 
filling in low land is no longer deemed feasible by the 
street and health departments, the localities where this 
has been done in the past having, owing to the rapid 
growth of the city, become a part of the residential sec- 
tions; and this further use is not only unsightly and unde- 
sirable, but a menace to the health of the community. To 
cart the materials farther away can be only a temporary 



62 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

makeshift at increased expense, with the probable early 
complaints of nuisances wherever deposited. 

Attenuation is the scientific way of disposing of these 
materials, by converting them into perfectly harmless and 
inoffensive products, either by some process of reduction 
or by simple cremation. The reduction processes, which 
aim at the conversion of the refuse into harmless and use- 
ful products, which have a commercial value, is expen- 
sive in plan and costly in operation, the resultants not pay- 
ing the expense of the process even in the very large cities ; 
and, besides, thej consume only garbage, leaving the dead 
animals and general city refuse to be disposed of in some 
other manner; and it is the general refuse that gives 
Manchester the most concern. If these reduction pro- 
cesses cannot be worked economically in larger cities they 
must be proportionately more expensive for such a city as 
ours, aside from the fact that they do not fill the whole of 
our requirements. 

It seems clear, therefore, that the simple crematory is 
best suited to a city of our size and circumstances, the 
cost of both plant and operation being less than that 
of other processes. As much is always gained by expe- 
rience in the construction and operation of such plants, it 
seems advisable to start with a plant of considerably 
smaller size than would be considered adequate for con- 
suming all the waste of a city of this size, including all 
garbage and night soil. At present, garbage and night 
soil are disposed of in a manner which, while not satisfac- 
tory from a strict sanitary view, can be tolerated for a 
while longer. A plant that would take care of the pro- 
miscuous perishable waste, including dead animals, would 
not needtobe large, and while serving ourimniediate needs 
would afford a valuable basis of judgment for the estab- 
lishment of a plant that will do the entire work in a satis- 
factorv manner. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 63 

Just the exact cost of such a starting phmt cannot be 
stated, as no department has at present the proper author- 
ity to incur the expense necessary to a determinative in- 
vestigation of 'qualities and costs of the various crema- 
tories now in use; but from the best information at hand 
it is believed that it would require about |8,000 to cover 
the entire expense, outside of laud, for a location, and 
possibly |6,000 would answer. In all the cities where 
such plants are in operation they are either operated by 
the health department or under its authoritative super- 
vision, which appears to be the logical way, and should be 
so done in this city if a plant of this character is estab- 
lished. Certain it is that the garbage and refuse question, 
particularly the latter, must be fairly met within the next 
two years by the city of Manchester, and it is not any too 
early to take the matter under intelligent consideration. 

Manchester's streets and roads. 

In common with nearly every city and town in the 
United States, Manchester is vitally interested in the 
subject of good roads and in the adoption of a more 
efficient, economical, and equitable system of highway 
improvements. It has become the fashion in this city for 
certain classes of people to denounce in a wholesale 
manner the condition of our streets and roads and to 
bitterly criticise our street department for "not making 
them better. For one, I believe that a large share of this 
criticism is undeserved and is the result either of igno- 
rance or malice. As a class our streets and roads are 
fairly good and will stand comparison with those of other 
cities which have the same or similar conditions of native 
soil and rock to deal with. Ours is a loose and sandy soil 
and oar native rock has been proven unfit for road build- 
ing except for purpose of ballast. Not until the street 
commissioners adopted the policy of sending elsewhere 
for a top dressing for our streets was the work of macada- 



64 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

mizing successfully accomplished. Since the advent 
of the Salem trap rock the streets of Manchester 
have shown great improvement, and as the commissioners 
and the public are well satisfied with the present system 
of building a macadam road, it is likely to be continued 
with increasing favorable results. In macadamizing 
streets under the new process, a ballast consisting of 
native broken stone taken from the stone-crusher is laid 
about twelve inches deep and on top of this is placed trap 
rock to the thickness of about four inches, and the whole 
rolled down by the city road-roller, weighing eighteen 
tons. Samples of this kind of road building may be found 
in various jjarts of the city, and where the work has been 
thoroughly done the streets are in a most excellent con- 
dition. 

Aside from an inferior quality of soil and rock, Man- 
chester is poorly provided with a first-class quality of 
gravel, an essential factor in good road building. So in 
many ways the conditions here are largely against the best 
roads, and when such are built they are very expensive. 
If Manchester was provided, as some cities are, with an 
abundance of good material for good roads, the problem 
of building them would be an easy one; but as she is not, 
the ofiicials of our street department have to do the best 
they can with the material at their command, and by 
buying the rest from other sections according to the means 
placed at their disposal. 

It is an easy matter to criticise the condition of our 
streets; but did you ever stop to consider that there are 
two hundred miles of streets and roads within our city 
limits that call for the attention of our street department? 
If you have, then you will understand why Manchester has 
not a larger percentage of good streets and a smaller per- 
centage of poor ones. Herein lies the fundamental reason 
for so many bad streets and roads, — we have too many of 
them laid out. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 65 

For years past it has been the policy of Manchester city 
governments (and I do not know as they differ greatly 
in this respect from those of other cities) to lay out streets- 
petitioned for in a most lavish manner, regardless of the 
fact that the city is indictable if they are not built within, 
a period of two years, and that the expense of building 
them all must be met sometime. Under this repreheasible 
polic}^, burden after burden has been forced apon the 
city until she has today on her shoulders thirty miles of 
accepted streets that are not built. This, as every think- 
ing person and every taxpayer knows, is all wrong, and 
is a policy that should be stopped, and stopped now. 
"Lay out no more new streets, unless thej' are a public 
necessit}^, until the ones we have are properly taken care 
of," is a policy which, if adopted and consistently adhered 
to, would bring credit to the incoming board of aldermen. 
It is only fair to say of the board that has just gone out 
of office that it displayed commendable prudence in the 
matter of granting petitions for new streets, only about 
two miles of new streets being laid out in 1895 and three 
miles in 189G, and of these certain streets were built by 
the landowners before they were accepted and the owners 
placed under bonds for three years to continue improve- 
ments upon them. 

This leads me to remark that a too large share of the 
petitions that come before the city councils for new streets 
represent purely the personal motives of individuals own- 
ing land that they want developed at the city's expense. 
These land speculators (for this they certainly are) have 
been very successful in their efforts in the past, and to 
their selfish greed Manchester is today indebted for the 
great street burden resting upon her. In a large measure 
this sort of business has been stopped during the past two 
years by the refusal of the aldermen to lay out the streets 
petitioned for. This stand is right, and it should be the 
stand of the new board. These land schemes have cost 

5 



66 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

the taxpayers of Mancliester money enough already, and 
no man can honestly serve the city's interests who will 
assist in permitting them to thrive in the future, or who 
will not use his efforts and influence to prevent them 
going into effect. 

Another policy pursued by the last aldermanic board 
I also esteem worthy of being followed out, and that 
■relates to the purchase of land by the city for new streets. 
Not one dollar has been paid to landowners for the pur- 
poses of new streets and roads in Manchester during the 
two years just elapsed. Every abutting landowner has 
been required to give that portion of his land necessary for 
the laying out of a street and waive all claim for land 
damages, or the layout has not been granted. While in a 
few instances this has seemed a hardship to parties desir- 
ing the street, not for financial advantage but for public 
accommodation, the policy is thoroughly right, and should 
be adhered to. Let the speculators build the streets that 
are to personally benefit their pocketbooks before the city 
accepts them; and if there is land to buy in order for 
them to attain their ends, let them buy it, and not the city. 

As an illustration of the reckless manner in which new 
streets have been laid out in Manchester in the past, it 
may be said that on one afternoon several years ago a 
board of aldermen visited a certain section of this city 
and in less than twenty minutes, and without alighting 
from their carriages, voted to lay out a system of new 
streets that at a conservative estimate will cost the city 
f3(),00U to make passable, and not less than |50,000 to 
only fairly build them. And these grants were made 
solely in the interests of private landowners in that 
locality. 

Unquestionably some of the worst pieces of roadway 
we have in Manchester are found directly in the heart of 
the city on Elm street. This street was paved many 
years ago with a style of block paving that looks strange 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 67 

and old-fashioned compared with the new and modern 
block paving so recently completed on Granite bridge and 
its approaches. No doubt it was a good thing in its day, 
but it is now badly worn and uneven, full of holes and 
altogether a wretched looking piece of paved road, 
almost dangerous for horses under certain slippery condi- 
tions, and should be replaced with new and better paving. 
But the cost of paving is by no means small, and to at- 
tempt to repave Elm street throughout, where needed, in 
one year, would involve too burdensome an expenditure. 
However, if means warrant during your coming term of 
office, I think it might be advisable to make a beginning 
in this direction, and so continue this improvement year 
by year until the thoroughfare is paved with small block 
paving throughout its entire paved length. The old stones 
that are replaced might be utilized, if serviceable, to a 
good advantage in our back streets, sqme of which, in our 
business centers, already need paving quite as much as 
the main streets themselves. 

Up to January 1, 1895, there were laid out and not built 
in Manchester 25.42' miles of streets, and at the first of 
January this year, 1897, the number of miles is found to 
be 30.63. Of the little over five miles laid out in the past 
two years, 5,360 feet have been built and 9,347 feet turn- 
piked so as to be open to travel. 

The street department has had several large and impor- 
tant street and road undertakings to deal with the last 
two years, notable among them being the entire rebuild- 
ing of the Eddy road in Amoskeag, made necessary by the 
flood of 1895; the widening and building of Hanover road 
out to Lake Massabesic, an expense brought about by the 
extension of the electric car service; the widening and 
building of old Bridge street; the widening of the Mast 
road in West Manchester, and the building of Kelley 
street in McGregorville. The installation of the electric 
street railway also involved the city in considerable ex- 



68 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

pense at both ends of Elm street and on Manchester 
street. 

While npon the subject of streets I offer it as my opin- 
ion that concrete roadways are not a profitable invest- 
ment for the city, particularly so where there is heavy 
team traffic. There are no asphalt paved streets in Man- 
chester, the cost of the best quality of asphalt having 
been regarded too high to introduce here. It is conceded, 
however, that asphalt, properly laid, makes one of the 
finest, smoothest, and most enduring surfaces for city 
streets now in use. But one objection to using it in Man- 
chester is on account of the necessity almost yearly of 
making changes and repairs in city inpes laid under 
ground. If these had been originally placed in our back 
streets we should be spared the annoyance of having our 
main streets so frequently disturbed and injured by at- 
tention upon them. 

And right here it is proper to state that some more vig- 
orous means should be provided to protect the interests 
of our city streets against the damages wrought upon 
them every year by private individuals. A large source 
of the trouble arises from sewer enterers, who dig up the 
streets for the purpose of laying private sewer j)ipe and 
neglect to replace them in a satisfactory condition. It 
would seem wise if some regulations were adopted stop- 
ping private individuals from disturbing the streets in 
any way whatever, allowing all work pertaining to streets 
by private individuals to be done under the direction of 
the street department at a reasonable compensation. 
Under the present arrangement it costs the city annually 
a large sum to repair damages occasioned to the streets 
by private individuals. 

There are certain others that misuse our streets in the 
laying and repairing of underground pipes. The most 
complaint is made against the water-works department. 
This department is charged with handling our streets 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 69 

very badly, causing the city, it is claimed, an expense of 
not less than |2,000 every year for repairs on streets and 
crossings, the result of digging in and through them. As 
the city ordinances require the streets dug up by the 
water-works to be restored to a condition satisfactory to 
the superintendent of streets, this unnecessary expense 
should be promptly stopped. Frequent complaints have 
been made to the water-works department relative to 
this matter but they seem to have done no good, as the 
abuse continues year after year. I would suggest to the 
board of street and park commissioners if, after formal 
notice to the water-works department of the neglect of its 
employees to conform to the ordinances and the refusal of 
the department to complj-, that the work be performed 
by the street department and the expense charged to the 
wateriworks. Certainly there is no reason why this de- 
partment should be permitted, any more than private 
individuals or corporations, to add unjust expense to the 
care of our streets. If any lack of harmony exists be- 
tween these two departments it should be at once ad- 
justed and not made a burden of expense to the taxpayer. 
The street department may also be at fault in not co- 
operating more fully with the water-works department in 
all street matters. It is known to be a fact that the grade 
of streets holding city water pipes has been changed and 
the grade cut down, and in consequence water pipes have 
frozen. No grade of streets containing city water pipes 
should be cut down without the knowledge of the water- 
works department, and in all matters in which the inter- 
ests of the city are involved there should be the heartiest 
co-operation between department and department. And, 
while touching upon this question of street grade, permit 
me to say that herein lies a great deal of public dissatis- 
faction and uncalled for expense to the city. The chang- 
ing of street grades after they have been once legally 
established has cost the citv of Manchester thousands of 



70 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

dollars in damage suits. The solution of this trouble I 
believe would be easy if, when new streets were laid out, 
their legal grade was carefully established and never 
changed afterwards. This can and should be done, and 
when this has become a fixed policy in street affairs a 
large burden of expense that has yearly been forced upon 
the city would be removed. 

Some improvement has been shown during the past 
year or two in street cleaning, but the method still em- 
ployed is far from satisfactory. Our streets are not as 
clean as they should be or as clean as they might be made 
without incurring a burdensome expense. No doubt our 
streets are indebted for much of the odium cast upon 
them to the quantities. of loose paper which are carelessly 
permitted to be circulated. The ''paper nuisance" in our 
streets is one of the city's greatest nuisances, and more 
vigorous means should be adopted to abate it than those 
now in vogue. No street sweeping in the business section 
should be done until the streets are first sprinkled. The 
cloud of dust and dirt raised by dry street sweeping dam- 
ages goods in many of our stores and is the cause of 
general complaint throughout the business districts. 
Similar complaints also come from residential seciiions 
wherever concrete roadways are dry swept. Another 
public annoyance, although of a different nature, is 
caused by the storekeepers themselves in window and 
sidewalk washing during businesiS hours. This work 
should be done in the early morning before the sidewalks 
are occupied by men and women on their way to their 
places of business, and I would recommend that the board 
of street and park commissioners adopt and enforce some 
stricter and improved regulations relating to this matter. 

It is questionable if there is another city in New Eng- 
land more badly disfigured by poles set in the public 
streets than Manchester. It would seem as if no atten- 
tion whatever had been paid by the city authorities to 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 71 

this matter in years past, and that corporations had been 
permitted, unchecked, to encumber and disfigure our 
streets. The result is that Manchester todaj' i)resents a 
most disgraceful exhibition of pole construction. Not 
only are private corporations responsible for this deface- 
ment but the city itself, some of the most wretched speci- 
mens of poles now in use being the property of the city. 
That this contamination of our highways is a disgrace to 
the city every intelligent person who has ever directed 
his attention to the disfigurement well knows, and it is 
incumbent upon every city official having the power to 
assist in regulating this nuisance to exercise it in the di- 
rection of a sweeping improvement. 

The winter custom of flooding the public commons for 
skating purposes, as observed for several years past, is a 
popular one and worthy of being continued. The expense 
entailed is small, and as long as our water supply is in no 
way crippled thereby the custom should be followed. As 
a means of affording healthful recreation to the youth of 
Manchester, under conditions of perfect safety, it is to be 
highly commended. 

CITY SEWERS. 

There are about sixty miles of sewer pipe laid in the 
city of Alanchester at the present time and about six miles 
niore have been voted in. There was expended on sewers 
in 1895, 171,950.76, and in 1896, .$71,629.86. Sewers are 
among the most expensive public improvements this city 
has to deal with, and the monej' spent upon them is the 
least apparent. Some of the sewer building of the past 
two years has been extremely costly. For instance: the 
Jewett-street sewer cost to build .|6.84 per foot, while the 
Silver-street sewer cost the city over |8 per foot. These 
were two very important trunk sewers and had to be 
built. Until they were built and opened the public health 
was daily endangered. In one instance the expense was 



72 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

aggravated by the ledge, and in the other by a deep, soft 
bottom. The hitter invariably makes sewer building 
more costly than the former. In most of the big sewer 
improvements of the past two years the commissioners 
have encountered tracts of ledge which have rendered the 
work not only difficult but very expensive. 

Among the notable large sewers laid during the past 
two years may be mentioned those on Silver street, Jewett 
street, Christian brook, Mast road, and North Elm street. 
Fortunately the city is well equipped for the present with 
trunk sewers, one large one only being in contemplation 
of building this year, that to drain the large area in 
West Manchester (:'Overed by the Whittemore, Amoskeag 
Company, and other property. A settlement of some 
forty houses and tenement blocks and four hundred peo- 
ple in this section is now without sewer facilities of any 
kind, and the interests of the public health demand that 
accommodations be afforded here the coming season. A 
well-arranged plan for taking care of the present and 
future needs of this locality has been devised and the 
work will doubtless be carried out this year. 

A large number of branch s^w^ers have been ordered 
built in the suburban districts, some of them of consider- 
able importance. It is these growing sections that have 
of late years drawn so heavily upon the city's finances, 
and so long as they continue to enlarge, this expense will 
continue, though, as already stated, the large and most 
costly system is of trunk sew^ers now very well provided, 
and immediate future needs apply in a great measure to 
branch sewers, which are much less expensive to build. 
In regard to sewers, as also to streets, water, and lights, 
the city is paying heavily for the development of outside 
property, and in future extensions of these services the 
members of the city government should carefully consider 
not only the demands made by property holders but the 
abilitv of the citv to grant them. I*ersons building 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 73 

houses in remote parts of the city, where city improve- 
ments and accommodations have not yet reached, should 
not reasonably expect to acquire them at once; and yet it 
is a fact that they do, and that they look upon such public 
servants as oppose an expenditure of money to benefit 
them as guilty of gross meanness and injustice; yet it is 
your first duty to consult the city's interests and not the 
interests of the individual or individuals in every question 
that comes before you. 

HIGHWAY BRIDGES. 

In the two years that have just elapsed the city of 
Manchester has experienced two of the greatest floods 
ever known in the history of the Merrimack river, by 
which her bridge property severely sufl'ered. The flood 
of 1895 did serious damage to nearly every highway 
bridge in the city; but it was nothing compared to the 
disaster that came last spring, whereby every bridge was 
afl'ected and by which the city lost the most important of 
all its bridges, — Granite bridge. Public travel on Gran- 
ite bridge was stopped March 3, 1896, and was not fully 
resumed until November 28 of the same year. It was 
weeks after the flood had subsided before temporary pro- 
visions for foot travel could be eft'ected, and team traffic 
of every description was suspended from the day the old 
bridge was swept away until the new one was opened last 
November. 

The selection of a bridge lo replace Granite bridge was 
a matter a long time before the city councils, and no 
end of public discussion was indulged in before the city 
councils, with almost entire unanimity, decided in favor 
of a steel bridge sixty feet wide with a stone-paved 
roadway. It was found after the water in the river had 
reached a low point in the summer that all of the piers 
and abutments would have to be rebuilt to insure perfect 
safety to the new structure, and this discovery delayed 



74 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

the progress of the bridge some weeks. The bridge 
has now been open to the public about six weelvS and is 
regarded by all as a first-class modern structure through- 
out, and the equal of any highway bridge in this part of 
the country. The new piers and abutments were all built 
higher than the old ones so that the new bridge stands 
clear by eight feet of the high water mark of the flood of 
1896. The stone work of the bridge was built by L. F. 
Kittredge & Son of Lowell and the steel superstructure 
by the Groton Bridge Co. of Groton, N. Y. All of the 
work came under the direction of the board of street 
and park commissioners, who employed the assistance of 
W. H. Bennett as city engineer and Capt. Charles H. 
Manning as consulting engineer, and, so far as any one 
has yet been able to discern, was performed to the emi- 
nent satisfaction of the public. The bridge, including all 
stone work, cost |136,527.73. For its payment 4 per cent 
semi-annual bridge bonds were«issued in the sum of $130,- 
000, payable in five years, and a sinking fund established 
providing for the payment of these bonds at the expira- 
tion of this time, |25,000 being set aside annually for four 
years from the taxes, and |30,000 the fifth year, so that 
imperative as was the necessity of building the bridge, 
provisions that seem to me wise were adopted for its 
payment without involving the city in a long term of bond 
indebtedness. 

Our other two highway bridges across the Merrimack 
are not what most of us would like to see there, especially 
now, as they are held up to comparson with Granite 
bridge; but so far as we know both are safe for the 
business and travel that passes over them, and with care- 
ful attention paid to them every year will doubtless do 
good service a while longer, unless record-breaking floods 
repeat themselves and force the city to build others in 
their places. There has been some agitation concerning 
a new wooden bridge across the Merrimack at the foot of 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 75 

Hancock street, and another across the Piscataquog north 
of Kelley's Falls, petitions for each being received by the 
last administration. Doubtless these improvements will 
come in the future, but there does not appear to be any 
urgent necessity for erecting them now. 

BUILDING INSPECTOR. 

A recommendation made by me two years ago regard- 
ing the appointment of a building inspector for the city 
of Manchester has received consideration in so far that a 
special committee was selected for the purpose of prepar- 
ing a new set of rules and regulations, defining the duties 
and powers of such an official, which, if acceptable to the 
city councils, were expected tolbe incorporated into our 
city ordinances. This committee has given the subject 
intelligent consideration and will be able to make a report 
to you early in this administration. Until such rules 
and regulations are adopted it is useless in my opinion to 
continue the office. 

PARKS AND COMMONS. 

The parks and commons of Manchester are a source of 
pleasure, health, and of not a little pride to all of our 
citizens, and the improvements made in caring for them 
during the past few years are apparent to all. 

During the two years just elapsed, conspicuous im- 
provements have been made at both Derryfield and Stark 
parks. The former is the largest of Manchester's public 
"breathing places," and with its many natural advantages 
is destined to become one of the most beautiful and 
picturesque public grounds in New England. By the will 
of the late ex-Governor James H. Weston the sum of 
15,000 was bequeathed to the city for the purpose of 
erecting a public observatory to be known as the Weston 
Observatory, on the summit of Oak Hill, now part of this 
park. Under the conditions of the bequest steps have 



76 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

been taken by tlie proper authorities to secure a satisfac- 
tory plan, and this now liaving been agreed upon, bids for 
erecting the structure, will be received and the contract 
awarded for building it the coming season. The observa- 
tory will be constructed of stone, with a winding iron 
stairway on the interior leading to the top, and will be 
about sixty feet in height. The view from the summit of 
Oak Hill under natural conditions is a magnificent one, 
and from the top of the proposed observatory it will be 
one of the grandest to be obtained anywhere in this part 
of the state. The citizens of Manchester are certainly 
deeply indebted to Governor Weston for his thoughtful- 
ness and generosity in life toward his native city, for 
whose best interests he had always unselfishly and zeal- 
ously labored. 

A fine stretch of macadamized graded road 1,528 feet 
in length has been built in this park during the past two 
years, and 2,000 feet of sewer pipe laid for draining the 
land. There are several excellent pieces of driveway in 
the park, one leading to the summit of Oak Hill, and in 
future one should be laid out and built winding down from 
the summit toward the west, entering upon Belmont 
street. This would afl'ord a beautiful system of pleasure 
drives and one that the public would greatly enjoy in the 
summer season. The trees in the park have been care- 
fully trimmed, the brush cleared out, and the grounds ren- 
dered as attractive as possible, for the money expended 
upon them. 

There is one feature in this park that should no longer 
be permitted to remain, and that is the city "pesthouse," 
so called, for contagious diseases. This building stood 
upon the ground before it became a city park and its 
presence there now is so clearly bad that public sentiment 
calls for its promjit removal. During the past summer a 
case of varioloid was being treated within the building 
while a picnic party embracing 1,500 children was in 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 77 

progress in the groimds about it. Siicli a condition of 
aflt'airs in a public park, while no harm has thus far arisen, 
should no longer be tolerated. 

Stark park has received many improving touches and is 
yearly becoming more attractive. Some eight hundred 
flov^ering shrubs were set out here last year and roses 
were in blossom throughout the summer. A macada- 
mized driveway has been built and many things done that 
show a much improved condition of the park. 

All of the city commons have received intelligent 
and skillful treatment at the hands of superintendent 
Fullerton and are yearly growing in public favor. The 
condition of cleanliness pervading them is a source of 
general comment. Every morning during the summer 
and fall seasons the commons are cleaned and twice a 
week thoroughly swept. In the dry season the grass is 
sprinkled five times a week ; it is cut on an average nine 
times a year. About |500 has been expended in wood 
ashes for fertilizing the lawns on the commons within the 
past two years. Considerable has been done in improving 
the walks, noticeably on Merrimack and Concord com- 
mons, and in setting out new trees in the place of old 
ones that have died. Altogether, Manchester's parks and 
commons make a most gratifjing showing for the amount 
of money expended upon them, which was about |5,000 on 
the latter last year. 

Last year the city councils added to Manchester's park 
system by the purchase for |12,000 of about nine acres 
of land in the southeastern section of West Manchester, 
which it is proposed to establish as a park for the West 
Side, now wholly unprovided with such public benefits. 
The cost of the establishment and improvement of parks 
may be made large or small as the work is laid out and 
conducted. In the instance of the new West Side park, 
it would seem to be an economical policy to make a small 
beginning, and so by annual appropriations gradually 
carry forward the work of improvement. 



78 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

The history of many cities shows that the creation and 
maintenance of suburban parlvS are justified, and that 
from purely a financial point of view they are a good in- 
vestment for a community. Mucli attention has been 
given to this question in Boston. A reference to the 
annual report of the park department of that city for 1895 
will show that the value of the land in the vicinity of the 
Back Bay j)ark improvement trebled in thirteen years, 
while the balance of the city increased only eighteen per 
cent. The increase of taxes on the land on account of the 
increased value during that time was |2,000,000, which 
more than covered the cost of all improvements. They 
find that instead of increasing the rate of taxation the 
location and improvement of parks so affect the value of 
adjacent land that the rate may be reduced and still the 
tax levy be enough greater than before to provide for the 
maintenance of the parks. Parks must be a good thing 
else all the great cities of the world would not be acquir- 
ing so much land for the purpose. 

Another new park was projected last year, also on the 
west side of the river. This is in the vicinity of Rock 
Rimmon, and the proposition includes the rock itself, of 
which the Amoskeag Company offers to make a free gift 
to the city, and about seventeen acres of land about it 
owned by private individuals. The site is one of histori- 
cal interest and value and is well designed by nature for 
a public park. The cost of acquiring all of the land neces- 
sary for this park will be about |21,000. 

THE PUBLIC CEMETERIES. 

The most important matter relating to Manchester's 
public cemeteries that has transpired during the past two 
years was the action of the trustees of the cemetery funds 
changing the conditions of voluntary contributions re- 
ceived by the city for the perpetual care of cemetery lots. 
This action, now in effect, allows the city to accept |100 as 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 79 

the minimum sum for the perpetual care of lots contain- 
ing not more than 250 square feet, and forty cents per foot 
for all lots in excess of 250 square feet, the income there- 
from to be expended for the care of the lots as provided 
by law governing cemeteries. This action on the part of 
the trustees has met with general approval from cemetery 
lot owners, especially from a large class who felt that 
they were being discriminated against under the old man- 
agement, which seemed to favor the rich and deal un- 
justly by those of limited means. The money now in the 
hands of the trustees of the cemetery fund amounts to 
148.000, and is invested in five per cent bonds. 

At the Pine Grove cemetery there are 340 lots under 
perpetual care, and under the new and more popular con- 
ditions relating to them the number is sure to steadily in- 
crease. Among the most apparent recent improvements 
at this cemetery are those carried out on Chapel Lawn, 
the public ground, and the G. A. R. lot. The latter has 
been considerably enlarged and placed under perpetr.al 
care. The public ground has been graded and made as 
attractive as any other part of the cemetery. The water 
service in the cemetery has been extended, some 3,000 
feet of water pipe having been laid, and a number of new 
drinking fountains erected. About 800 feet of eight-inch 
sewer pipe has been laid for surface draining. Consider- 
able new concreting has been done, a number of new plots 
laid out with shrubs, and in other directions this cemetery 
bears evidence of painstaking and sagacious manage- 
ment. The appropriation for this cemetery in 1896 was 
$8,500, and the receipts of the year |5,125.23. 

Valley cemetery has lost nothing in public favor as a 
burying ground during the past two years. While the 
opportunities here for widespread improvements are not 
nearly so marked as at Pine Grove, this beautiful spot, so 
aptly named, continues to hold a warm place in the affec- 
tions of our citizens. There are now here under perpet- 



80 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

ual care some sixty lots. Within the past two years the 
work of grading over the valley and hills has been begun 
and carried forward with satisfactory results! The work 
of filling in the bank on the west side has also been 
started, corresponding to the improvements made on the 
east side. 

One of the best changes recently effected here is the 
adoption of a new system of numbering the lots. The 
plan has been well started, and when in thorough working 
will be a decided convenience to the management and to 
lot owners. The winding brook flowing through the 
grounds now contains a carefully laid stone bottom, an 
improvement of recent occurrence. One of the foot- 
bridges across the brook has been rebuilt and another re- 
paired; there have been a number of new concrete walks 
laid along the hill, and in other respects the past two 
years have seen a great deal of needed work faithfully 
and judiciously done here. There was appropriated by 
the city councils last year for the use of this cemetery 
13,000, and the receipts of the year were |1 ,900.31. 

At Amoskeag cemetery the first steps towards the erec- 
tion of a new iron fence about the grounds were taken 
last year, a section 146 feet in length being built. A 
much needed extension of the water service in the ceme- 
tery has been made, 166 feet of 1^ inch water pipe having 
been laid. About sixty loads of gravel have been used 
during the year. The cemetery paths, which were cut 
very deep when the cemetery was laid out, have been kept 
in good order and are being gradually brought up to 
proper grade year by year. The sub-trustees recommend 
that an additional purchase of land adjoining the ceme- 
tery be soon made, as all the present available space for 
lots is now occupied. There were three burials here dur- 
ing the past year, and the sum of |350 was appropriated 
for the maintenance of the cemetery. There is no 
income from this cemetery, a fact that should be borne in 
mind before further enlargements are granted. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 81 

There are fifteen burial grounds in Manchester, nine of 
which are private. The grounds owned and maintained 
by the city are Valley, Pine Grove, Amoskeag, Merrill's 
Yard, Moore, and the cemetery at East Manchester. The 
two latter are among the oldest and have of late years 
received no appropriations for maintenance from the city 
councils, Merrill's Yard was acquired in 1895. 

GENERAL PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS. 

Aside from the many permanent public enterprises 
conducted under the auspices of the city during the past 
two years, Manchester has received important improve- 
ments from various outside sources, conspicuous among 
them being the introduction of an electric street railway 
plant and various needed extensions of the service for 
the public accommodation. A first-class plant has been 
installed; it is generally conceded that there is none 
better anywhere. The Boston & Maine Railroad has also 
done a great deal for Manchester during the past year, 
giving the city a new freight station that is the equal of 
any in New England, and adopting plans for a new pas- 
senger station to be built this year. These are improve- 
ments of a general and long-needed character, and, while 
the city has long been suffering for the lack of them, their 
coming at last in such splendid and substantial form is 
the occasion of universal satisfaction. 

The establishment of a new passenger station below 
Granite street will be the means of greatly reducing the 
dangers and annoyances so long existing at the Granite- 
street railroad crossing. With the location of both the 
passenger and freight stations south of Granite street, 
the crossing at this point will be used only for through 
train trafiic, and the long waits and delays that public 
travel has encountered here for so many years will largely 
be done away with. It is sincerely to be hoped, however, 
that the time will come when all grade crossings within 
the city will be altogether eliminated. 



82 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

THE SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

An occasion that will lonj^^ be remembered with pleas- 
ure, satisfaction, and pride was celebrated in Manchester 
during the month of September last. It was the celebra- 
tion of the fiftieth anniversary of the incorporation of 
Manchester as a city, and citizens of all classes united in 
making the event a credit and honor to Manchester. One 
of the most interesting features of the anniversary was 
the gathering of old residents and the formation by them 
of an Old Residents' Association. Over one thousand 
men and women, who were identified with the city at or 
before its birth, assembled here during the week and took 
a conspicuous part in the exercises. That such a large 
number of pioneers were still living and holding an inter- 
est in the welfare of a community which they had helped 
to create was a surprise to everybody, and it is to be 
hoped that they may continue to meet annually in social 
and other helpful relations for years to come. 

The expenses of the celebration were met by means of 
a special appropriation of f2,000 by the city councils and 
personal contributions amounting to |5,258.75 by the 
people at large. So much of historical interest and 
value was developed by the anniversary that its general 
committee unanimously decided to secure the publication 
of an illustrated memorial volume of the occasion and the 
preparation of this is now well under way. It will be 
necessary in order to produce a creditable volume for 
the city councils this year to make a small appropriation 
sufficient only to meet the expenses of compilation, and 
I respectfully recommend that this be done. Authority 
to legalize such action is expected to be obtained of the 
coming New Hampshire legislature. 

THE CITY POOR. 

There are many worthy poor people in Manchester, and 
through the efforts of the city and county authorities and 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 83 

that most helpful charitable organization, the City Mis- 
sion, now so admirably managed by Miss Mary E. Gray, 
their interests are far better looked after than ever 
before. There are some two hundred worthy poor people 
being looked after at this season of the year by the city 
missionary, and her unselfish and devoted efforts merit 
every public and personal aid that can be afforded them. 
During the past year the overseers of the poor attended 
to 1,103 orders, the largest number that ever received the 
attention of this board in a single year. These cases ap- 
plied to 137 families, comprising 441 persons, all having 
a settlement in Manchester. There was expended by the 
board during the year |11,910.49, and there was received 
from the county commissioners |3,471, making the net 
cost to the city of conducting the business of this depart- 
ment, 18,510.78. Of the amount paid out the largest ex- 
penditure in any one ward was |2, 578.69 in ward five, and 
the smallest, |40, in ward two. The affairs of this depart- 
ment have been prudently and carefully carried out. As 
clerk of the board. Col. W. H. Maxwell has performed his 
duties faithfully and well and merits special commen- 
dation. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, permit me to urge that you 
pursue a policy as liberal in all directions as will be con- 
sistent with our financial situation, permitting only the 
welfare of our city and the most friendly motives to actu- 
ate you in your official intercourse with each other, that 
each member will be impressed with that deep sense of 
duty characteristic of such an intelligent body, a duty 
well performed to himself, and to the people, ever watch- 
ful and X3ritically inclined; bearing in mind at all times 
that honesty and integrity are the fundamental principles 
which should guide us in the performance of our public 
duty, and which if carried out will meet the approval of 



84 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

our fellow-citizens. Satisfactory work can be accom- 
plished only by a prompt and regular attendance at the 
sessions of the city councils, giving due consideration to 
all matters presented, and legislating in all with a regard 
for justice, economy, and the general welfare of the city. 
Under no circumstance neglect the work of the committee 
room, for here the real, practical, important work of 
municipal government is performed. To earn the reputa- 
tion of being a hard, faithful, and conscientious worker in 
the committee chamber is to win the name of being a use- 
ful and valuable public servant. 

Do not embarrass any department by the passage of 
orders which it may be impossible to execute by reason of 
limited appropriations. Previous to any recommenda- 
tion for the passage of an order for an expenditure of 
money, ascertain whether the interests of the petitioners 
as well as the city will be enhanced thereby, carefully 
remembering that to pass an order which cannot be exe- 
cuted by a lack of funds necessitates relegating it to a 
pigeonhole. 

Standing committees should especially bear in mind 
that they have advisory powers only, and, unless empow- 
ered by the passage of an order by the city councils, are 
wholly unauthorized to purchase anything in behalf of 
the city. 

In his last annual report the city auditor drew partic- 
ular attention to this subject, and in submitting his 
opinion I give it my free and hearty indorsement: "Sev- 
eral of the committees have been very lax in this respect 
during the past year, and have attempted to make con- 
tracts without the least semblance of authority from the 
city councils, which has put the parties contracted with 
to great annoyance and trouble in getting their bills ap- 
proved, having to wait sometimes months for the neces- 
sary ratification by the city councils. Clerks of all com- 
mittees should be requested by the chairman, when an 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 85 

expenditure of money is deemed necessary, to prepare an 
order and present to the councils for legal authority 
before proceeding to make any contract." 

I welcome jou to your new duties and ask your earnest 
co-operation in all measures which shall be for the public 
advantage; and when your work is completed I trust you 
may be able to feel that your acts have been prudent and 
wise and your duties well and faithfully performed. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 

Mayor. 

Manchester, N. H., January 5, 1897. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



BOARD OF Water Commissioners, 

1897. 



WILLIAM C. CLARKE, Mayor, ew officio. 
Alpiieus Gay, term expires January, 1899. 
Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1900. 
Harry E. Parker, term expires January-, 1903. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1904. 
Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1901. 
Charles T. Means, term expires January, 1902. 



Officers. 

Alphbiis Gay, President. 

Henry Chandler, Clerk. 

Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

JosiAH Laselle, Engineer at Loic Service Pumping Station. 

H. A. DoNAWAY, Engineer at High Service Pumping Station. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the Honorable the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 
Gentlemen, — The Manchester Water Board herewith 
submit their twenty-sixth annual report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1897, with the report of the superin- 
tendent during the same period, to which reference may 
be made for details of the service. 

FINANCIAL CONDITION. 

Receipts and expenditures for the year have been as 

follows: 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1896 . . . $17,387.36 

Received from water rentals and miscella- 
neous 125,719.17 

Premium on bonds sold 6,248.00 

Total 1149,354.53 

Paid interest on water bonds $40,414.00 

Current expenses and repairs. . . . 32,111.72 

Construction 33,002.25 

Hydrant rentals set aside for sink- 
ing fund 17,175.00 

122,702.97 

Balance unexpended $26,651.56 

The commissioners have continued the policy of acquir- 
ing land on the shore of the lake, and have deeds from 

89 



90 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

eight different owners of land since our last report, which 
includes the full ownership of the Harvey mill privilege, 
so called. 

No serious loss or damage has been incurred by leaks 
or defective pipes. No special progress has been made 
in the Devonshire Mill suit against the city during the 
year. 

Respectfully submitted. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio, 
Alpheus Gay, 
Andrew C. Wallace, 
Charles H. Manning, 
Charles T. Means, 
Harry E. Parker, 
Henry Chandler, 

Water Commissioners. 
January 1, 1898. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Commissioners of the 

City of Manchester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — The following is the report of your super- 
intendent for the year ending December 31, 1897, which 
is respectfully submitted: 

A gratifying feature of this report is as to the amount 
of water in the lake at the present time. It has been 
abundant enough to supply the city and run the low ser- 
vice pumps since February. The lowest point reached 
was 1 foot and 9 inches below the dam on January 3. The 
highest point reached was December 17, when it was 2 
feet 8 inches above the dam. 

The water stands today 2 feet above the dam, which is 
3 feet 8 inches higher than one year ago. The water has 
been higher at times, but the average through the summer 
and fall has not been so much for over twenty years. 

The amount of rainfall for 1897, measured at the new 
pumping station, was 49f inches, which is about 10 inches 
more than in 1896. 

LOW SERVICE STATION. 

The pumps at this station have done their work so satis- 
factorily that very slight repairs were required during 
the year. 

Two arms on the bevel gear on the jack-shaft became 
disabled and were repaired. A new crank pin was put 
into the Davidson pump and new brass plates on the 
piston head of one piston. 

On the east side of the station, a piazza was built from 
the pump house to the dwelling house, 12 by 18 feet, to 

91 



92 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

prevent the water which leaked through the concrete 
from running into the oil room. 

The fence in the front yard was improved by putting 
in twenty-five new posts and repainting. This completed 
the general repairs in and about the station. 

HIGH SERVICE STATION. 

At this station, some considerable work has been done 
by way of improvements. A substantial wall has been 
built along the east side of the Borough road, north of 
the road leading to the pumping station, and on the west- 
erly line of the Hunter place. Some grading has been 
done south of the station by the deposit of coal ashes 
from the boilers. A cottage which was included in the 
purchase of the Hunter farm has been moved to the 
northerly side of the barn and a shed built to connect 
them. All buildings have now been removed from the 
Hunter shore and also the Proctor shore. This removes 
all the buildings on the west shore of the Back Pond that 
are in Hillsborough county, so that the city now owns 
and controls all the shore to the Williams land. 

The pumps at this station are now being overhauled, 
set over, and repacked. As the repairs are now in prog- 
ress, the expense at the present time cannot be accurately 
estimated. 

The men in charge at each station fully understand 
their business and are well qualified to have charge of 
their respective premises. 

At the high service reservoir the banks were fertilized, 
which is all the improvement made at this point. The 
reservoir is in fine condition and as yet gives no evidence 
of leaks. 

The two force mains on the high and low service have 
caused considerable trouble by leaks. Little damage has 
been done, however, except by the blowout of one plug 
near the brook on the Mammoth road, which washed out 



BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 



93 



i-H 

o 

> 

CO 
P3 

o 
> 

O 
h^ 

a 

H 

o 

H 

I— I 

Q 

D 
Pi 

H 

tz; 
o 






t- f-" C^ T-t (M 00 o t- »o_ co^ '^l'^ 
eq o" o" cfr-ro" -^ -h" to oo" ooT 
coiO m-<i'»rt05»o ooo-^ — 



•muoin 

H a ■B 8 IT810X 



•padrand 



•S8J[O.HS 'OK 



coco -^(MCDCDtO iMOtM-^O 

i^irT cTiOiftirTcrr c*5t--ciococo 
IM CO '>» o CD 
00 t- 00 lO C5^ 

ef •*" cc oeo 



r- r-o CM 00 



- 00 00 O 00 CO i-^ 



00 1^ 
CD C-1 

tn lo 

CI CD 



CO CD 

00 CO 

fNCD 
t— CD 



COC-'ICOCDOCDCOCDCDOe^ 

■^r^Mioooo^to^Hc^co 

(MOO -H^-^ O (?1 t-^OO CO CC 
" IC «H" to" IC CD O 00 to l^ -^ *0 
OI--O^lCi^CDtCC0l^i0 

»-H o *?» oo^ic o^C5 00 r-^c^i--^ 
'lO'^ooo'coo'— r -^COO 

CD t^ 00 00 ^ GO 00 <X) to C* 



•*o 

tOCO_ 

■/Tco" 

O CD 

to oi_ 
on 

t^GO 



T)lh-^00'*COCOOOOCCCOOT«OCO'MO 
CCasiCC-l^l«CDt--^CDlO0DCD--^t;T— " 
O to ^ to CO CC CO CO CD t' O^^^CO C5^(?^ 00^"^ 

QO t-^(>5"o'oo r-^r-^'»j^cD'crcrcD't-^oo"t-^co"c^ 

COOt'-rHClCOtMOO^-l^CO lOCOlOCOtO 
to -^ -* -^ to to (M to to to CO r-i -^ to 



OiOO^^OSCOOCDCStOIOCS-^GO-^CDtOeO 
C^O-'^COT^CDlOOO^COt^tOCSOOOOOO 



•J(.XOAi 

I J n o q "OK 



OlO O OOOOIOOIOOOOOIO 
coo CO to CO -^i^ -^ CO CO -^ CO CO CO to ^ 



- ,_ OCOtOC3'<i<tO'MC5CiO 

CDI-C000tOt^O-^CD(Mrt clOirHCDCM 
■ ■<)• (U .1 CO -s< 



to to O O O to 

CDI-C000tot^_ 

^CO COCO'^^r^'^^ 



•drand pmj£ 



"3. -S 'C, 
.iH i X .-.3 

Q P Q 



- - "CH- 'S'5- "CH- 

- - o-^- or- o'S" 

05 0% og 
^Q ^O ^Q 



• >> • 5 • • 2 ® 

t-c3 ^'■'. ■■"S 3^ Sc 
§2- P ?^«3J.'?,-- So- ga 

S « i5 ^^ sa-s oo o<u 



94 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



U 

Pi 
CO 

a 
o 



Q 
O 

o 

w 

I— ( 

Oh 



•p^eaq ouutsUiSa; 



•IBOO JO -qi .lad 
padnincl suon^O 



•paclnind snoi 
-luS JO .laqiunji 



^2 eS 
O O 



M M 1-1 OJOroOOi 0-^005 






i^' fto" ^ lO »c 00 t-^ 33 1-^ r-^ :o c«r 



< a 



o! •Suiduincj 



: 3.^^ .■ 



•ajnuTUi .lad 
S8JIOJJS aS-BjaAv 



•eajions JO 
.laqmnu i'b^ox 






■gutdiund 
s.C^p jo .laqtunfj 



CT i-H* t-^ lO" W -tIh" Cf « of ^ r-i" oT 



■■ "T ^ Oi TO 






eoeocoM«-*'*'W- 



05 0CD05'* — MOOO'^O'"* 
cc ;o OO I- M c- 1^ — t~ C-l M o 

c^r -^ pH oT oi' o oT o oT of o" lo 






T-HiaCJOOOOSi-HC-l^DC-lrHtO 
GCrMM-^O5»C-*05m«*C<IC5 



- -J CO 'M "M 1-1 — O 0> 

(NMcJffiiMcoeiscococoeoM 



oooooooc^oooo 
eoooOTcoooioeoMOco 






<OOtCtO»J^^»Ot^iClCU^CD 



S » a a 
P =- ?^-!-' t^v :>,^„-2 o P « 

c.^ 3 i :? = _ ^D,« > " 



aj 5 o<i* S s 3 S* a O « 



° ilB 



c3 — 

^5 

® 3 

^ S aj 

co" ^ m 

'^ -^ —• ei 

S O O ^ 

C; 'i-i *^ 

«0 ■*-, O O 

•"^ O (K ^ 

h C "5 - 

2 o s s 

S M s>s P< 

m M lO O 

r^^ t- >a t- 

1*( <M rH M 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 95 

about fifty loads of dirt. The reservoir being full at that 
time, this accident caused no serious alarm, as the plug 
was soon restored and the pumps again commenced 
action. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES. 

These pipes have been extended about four and one half 
miles and there have been laid over about two and three 
quarters miles. There was laid in the same trench with 
the sewer pipe on the upper end of Elm street, 567 feet, 
on Carpenter street, 800 feet, and on Merrimack street, 
220 feet. An arrangement was made with the street 
department whereby an allowance was made to it of 
|2.50 per lineal foot on Elm and Merrimack streets, and 
$2 per foot on Carpenter street, toward the cost of exca- 
vation, this being for blasting through solid rock. A 
12-iuch pipe was extended on Elm street, from the north 
line of Trenton street to Rowell street, thence west on 
Rowell street to River road. From here, an 8-inch pipe 
was laid south on the River road to the north line of the 
Elizabeth Stark house. A connection was made at the 
corner of Rowell street and River road, and a 6-inch pipe 
laid from this point to the Industrial School yard by the 
state of New Hampshire, for fire purposes. The pipe was 
extended south on Beech street from the north side of the 
Nutt road 4,446 feet, to the south side of Norfolk street. 
Less rock excavation was encountered on this line than 
was expected. 

Distribution pipes have been extended in forty-three 
streets. A certain portion was relaid in twenty-three 
streets. The most expensive was on Elm street, where 
it was relaid from Manchester to Lowell streets, 1,540 feet, 
and at the same time most of the service pipes were laid 
over. In most cases, service pipes which have been 
laid fifteen to twenty years have become so corroded as to 



96 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

render unsatisfactory service, particularly where under 
one inch in diameter. 

There have been bursts in the cement pipe, although 
but little damage was done. There are now about ten 
miles of cement pipe in use, which is being gradually 
replaced with iron pipe, the completion of which we hope 
to see within two years. Water was supplied to West 
Manchester through the pipe on Granite bridge last win- 
ter. The expansion joint moved just one and one half 
inches from warm to cold weather. 

The main pipe on 'North Elm street, which was laid in 
the sewer trench last winter, broke under the excessive 
weight of granite which had been piled upon it. The 
water waste was first* discovered at the high service res- 
ervoir, where it seemed to leak out as fast as pumped in. 
It was traced, by the* gates, to that part of the pipe be- 
tween Carpenter and Trenton streets. The water was 
found to be running down- the sewer trench, under the 
water pipe, and thus did not show on the surface. This 
break occurred in the month of June and it was some time 
in August before the excavated rock was removed by the 
street department, so as to repair the pipe. When found, 
it proved to be a crack three feet long, caused by the 
weight of stone on top and insecure filling underneath. 
During this time the water remained shut off above Car- 
penter street. This only corroborates what has been said 
in former reports about the undesirability of laying the 
water pipe in the same trench with the sewer pipe. 

There are in the city 707 hydrants. They are the cause 
of a great deal of anxiety in the winter to the water-works 
oflficials, as they get out of order so easily. I will not re- 
peat what I have said before about using the hydrants in 
cold weather, but it seems to me they are oftentimes 
opened when not necessary. 

The following table shows the rainfall at the high ser- 
vice pumping station for 1897: 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 97 

RAINFALL AT HIGH SERVICE PUMPING STATION, 1897. 



DAT. 


s 

c 

eS 


'S 
p 





< 


eS 


5 


3 
1-5 


CO 

So 

< 


CD 

5 


'v 


1 





s 

a 

> 

'A 


s 

to 
Q 


1 .. 












.02 




.06 
.02 






.21 

2.09 
.06 











*.20 
*.39 




.29 
07 
.30 


.73 






3 .. 






.10 
.71 
.23 




*.16 


















5 


.77 






.22 




1.18 








.73 


6 




*.72 






.07 








1.03 


.04 
.07 
1.10 
.12 
.03 














*.07 


s 












.04 


.03 

.02 


"[94' 


*.0S 


9 








.2.5 
.07 
.47 
.92 
.45 


.67 

1.61 

.04 

.14 




.06 




]0 ... 






.28 




11 






"i'65* 

2.78 
1.01- 


.11 

.04 


.07 
' ' .'.SO* 


.02 
.1.31 






]2 




*.45 


.26 


n.90 


.81 


13 ... 






]4 






*.39 


".'si" 






.68 


]5 















1.56 


10 




*.09 










.47 






M 




17 






.26 








.11 








18 


34 


















*.03 


19 
















.22 






*.02 

*.12 

.11 




20 .... 






.33 

*.28 






1.12 




.26 
.09 






21 

02 


*1.11 


*.38 




06 


.04 
.29 
.08 


'"si' 

.13 

1 56 


*.27 


23 


*05 


*.56 














*.10 


.05 


24 .. 


*.63 




.02 
.66 
.34 
.59 




.51 






•25 








.15 








2(i 








.06 
.13 
.02 








.09 
.46 


*.i3 


07 














.16 


' " .'62' 




28 


*1.13 














29 










.91 






*.12 


*.12 


30 












.97 










31 










.28 


.04 










*1.02 
























3.40 


2.51 


3.48 


2.36 


4.77 


6.24 


6.35 


4.66 


2.27 


1.40 


6.63 


5.71 



Total rainfall, 49.78 inches, 1897. 
Total rainfall, 38.41 inches, 1896. 
Total rainfall, 42.06 inches, 1895. 

The income from sale of water for 1897 has been as 
follows: 

Received for water by rate |30,647.17 

for water by meter. . . . 76,148.60 
for building purposes 331.85 

from fines 321.80 

$107,449.42 

* Snow melted. 



98 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Received for old cement pipe . . . |172.00 

for labor and pipe sold 67.05 

from Smyth Block Co., 

4-incli main 31.25 

from Frank Clement, 

old brass 56.40 

from Peter Riley, old 

brass 80.76 

from State Industrial 

School, pipe 54.30 

from Stark Corpora- 
tion, pipe ,. 9.05 

from Claremont Water 

Co., bands 51.62 

from Manchester Elec- 
tric Light Co., pipe. . 63.23 

from Baker & Dear- 
born, stop boxes .... 2.00 

from E. R. Whitney, 
pipe 39.42 

Received from Asa Haselton, 

rent foO.OO 

from Mr. Hamblett, 

grass 2.00 

from L. E. Emery, 

grass 3.00 

from Charles Spofford, 

grass 20.00 

from Sarah Gilbert, 

grass 2.00 

from Mel Hall, 6 houses 150.00 

from F, H. Pettegrew, 

Perkins's pavilion. . 20.00 

from H. S. Clough, 

Hobbs house 40.00 



$627.08 



BOAKD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 99 

■ Eeceived from Amos Latuch, 

Proctor bouse |20.00 

from E. H. Fogg, Stu- 

ber boatbouse 20.00 

from Boston & Maine 

R. R., damage to 

woods 6.67 

from Fletcber Browm, 

lease 1.00 

from G. G. Griffin, 

lease ; 1.00 

from Massabesic 

grange, rent 50.00 

from S. G. Prescott, 

rent 50.00 

from C. Dratou, rent. . 4.00 

from J. A. Sinclair, 

rent 48.00 

$467.67 

$108,544.17 
Received for bvdrant rentals 17,175.00 

Total received !i?125,719.17 

Abatements, |614.05. 
Amount on band Dec. 31, 1896. . |17,.387.36 
received from water 

rates, etc 108,544.17 

received from bvdrant 

rentals 17,175.00 

Premium on bonds sold 6,248.00 

Total 1149,354.53 

Amount paid for current ex- 
penses f .32,111.72 

Amount paid for construction 

expenses 33,002.25 



100 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Interest on bonds, 1897 $40,414.00 

Hydrant rentals set aside for 

sinking fund 17,175.00 

Total expenditures, 1897 |122,702.97 

Balance on band December 31, 1897. . . |26,651.56 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1897. 

Superintendence, repairs, and re- 
newals 123,837.22 

Stationery and printing : . , 219.20 

Office and incidental expenses . . . .1,433.56 
Pumping expenses, low service 2,140.39 
Pumping expenses, liigb service 3,869.53 
Repairs to dam, canal, and res- 
ervoirs 239.99 

Repairs to buildings 371.83 

Total current expenses for 1897 |32,111.72 

Service pipes |3,064.05 

Distribution pipes 17,799.89 

Fire hydrants and valves 1,606.44 

Meters 3,356.92 

Land , 6,450.00 

Grading and fencing 664.95 

Total construction expenses, 1897.... 33,002.25 
Sinking fund 17,175.00 

Total 182,288.97 

Construction Expenses. 

Land and water rights |142,184.00 

Dam, canal, penstock and races 101,399.16 
Pumping machinery, pump- 
house, and buildings 176,372.19 



BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 101 

Distribution reservoirs |117,607.90 

Force and supply main 89,7G9.02 

Distribution pipes 585,811.13 

Fire hydrants and valves. ..... 59,383.13 

Meters and fixtures 51,149.98 

Service pipes 71,681.91 

Grading and fencing 17,376.92 

Tools and fixtures 10,649.35 

Boarding and store houses 919.36 

Roads and culverts 4,405.20 

Supplies 550.39 

Engineering 22,176.19 

Livery and traveling expenses . . 2,856.64 ' 

Legal expenses 563.79 

Total construction expenses to Dec. 31, 

1897 11,458,246,29 

Current Eaepenses. 

Superintendence, collecting, and 

repairs |296,891.17 

Stationery and printing 7,245.63 

Office and incidental expenses. . 32,840.82 

Pumping expenses at low ser- 
vice 53,796.04 

Pumping expenses at high ser- 
vice 13,628.08 

Repairs to buildings 3,588.56 

Repairs to dam, canal, races, 

and reservoir 5,274.37 

Total current expenses to Dec. 31, 1897 413,264.97 

Interest |40,678.51 

Highway expenditures 14,000.53 

54,679.04 

Total amount of bills approved to date |1,926,190.30 



102 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

Interest, discount, and labor 
performed on highway, trans- 
fers, and tools and materials 
sold 167,200.92 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 

1897 413,264.97 

s^4S0,465.89 



Total cost, exclusive of interest and 

current expenses |1,445,724.41 

Interest and discount to Dec. 

31, 1896 1842,900.51 

Interest for 1897 40,414.00 

Total interest and discount to Dec. 31, 
1897 1883,314.51 

AMOUNT OF WATER BONDS ISSUED TO DECEMBER 31, 1897. 

Issued January 1, 1872, rate 6 per cent, due 

January 1, 1902 |100,000.00 

Issued January 1, 1887, rate 4 per cent, due 

January 1, 1907 100,000.00 

Issued July 1, 1890, rate 4 per cent, due 

July 1, 1910 100,000.00 

Issued January 1, 1892, rate 4 per cent, due 

January 1, 1910 100,000.00 

Issued August 1, 1893, rate 5 per cent, due 

August 1, 1913 100,000.00 

Issued November 1, 1893, rate 4^ per cent, 

due November 1, 1913 100,000.00 

Issued October 1, 1894, rate 4 per cent, due 

October 1, 1914 50,000.00 

Issued July 1, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due July 

1, 1915 100,000.00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



103 



Issued December 16, 1895, rate 4 per cent, 

due December 16, 1915 |50,000.00 

Issued January 1, 1897, rate 4 per cent, due 

January 1, 1917 100,000.00 

1900,000.00 

SINKING FUND. 

1893 112,750.00 

1894 13,925.00 

1895 15,800.00 

1896 16,800.00 

1897 17,175.00 

Total 176,450.00 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



cj cS ;i 






'" a 



1872 
1873 
1874 
1875' 

1S7g! 
18771 
1S7S; 
18791 
1680! 
ISSl, 
1S82| 
18S3 
18841 
1885' 
1886' 
1887! 
1888; 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894: 
1895 
1896, 
18971 



$573.6] 
2,097.60 
32,154.07 
29,223.60 
39,028.47 
43,823.30 
48,874.26 
53,143.17 
57,655.25 
60,215.62 
67,630.13 
73,458.20 
75.580.08 
80,404.12 
75,129.99 
80,518 17 
85,643.82 
86,700.46 
90,463.37 
76,605.23 
83,474.79 
104,170.081 
110,210.29 
11 8,374.50 1 
128,907.03, 
125,719.17 



122,425.00 
13,095.00! 
16,320.00 
17,475.00, 
17,970.00 
18,165.00 
18,300.00, 
18,780.00, 
20,130.00 
20,520.00 
21,350.001 
18,900 00 
19,750.00 
20,437.50 
21 ,000.00: 
18,240.00! 
19,880.00 

4,590.03! 

5,000.00 
12,750.00 
13,925.00 
15,800.00 
16,800.00 
17,175.00 



51,692.69' 
7,987.27! 
10,292.13 
15,900.63 
18,064.511 
20,255.97 
21,610.13; 
23,795.96; 
25,336.18; 
26,803.06 
28,838.24^ 
31,724.07, 
33,597.02' 
33,062.11 
33,497.21; 
33,864 78 
34,140.99 
32,431.10 
30,588.79 
31,344.24 
32,603.59! 
32,176 28 
32,903.99, 
32,540.03! 
30,647.17 



$190.84' 
1,436:56 
3,348.11 
6,305.81 
7,783.09 
10,090.25 
12,732.93 
14,794.34 
15,55198 
19,898.69 
23,431.20 
21,329.75 
27,425.35 
21,573.45 
25,277.09 
29,838.8: 
33,596.05 
37,009.80 
40,479.25 
46,139.35 
58,103.20 
62,501.35 
67,465.90 
77,610.10 
76,148.60 



$119.10 

122.13 

72.32 

136 10 

83.60 

81.60 

79.50 

105.60 

146.65 

314.65 

195.10 

102.50 

287.40 

351.70 

543.80 

361.95 

649.90 

494.80 

416.00 

1,033.75 

697.80 

808.20 

638.48 

331.85 



$14.00 
104.18 
120.59 
180.16 
233.04 
232.82 
240.64 
210.39 
223.99 
197.49 
208.04 
231 96 
186.80 
130.80 
119.20 
149.80 
153.20 
151.80 
160.40 
168.40 
159.60! 
227.40 
300.40 
302.80 
321.80 



$573 61 
200.07 
099.85 

2,245.64 
249.55 
131. .56 
241.62 
303.87 
465.06 
203.87 
443.24 
125.07 
738.20 
181.45 
320.23 
819.47 
243.62! 
155.271 
298.77 
200.99 
139.80 
339.38 
334.82 
768.17 
440.12 
627.08 



$10.00 
11.00 
11.00 
21.00 
11.00 
11.00 
6.00 
16.00 
3.00 
53.00 
42.00 
91.00 
267.00 
1S0..56 
347.64 
327.84 
575.50 
467.67 



8 

98 

160 

166 

202 

226 

251 

280- 

310 

371 

404 

446 

486 

613 

739 

842 

951 

1,135 

1,313 

1,608 

1,895 

2,182 

2,520 

2,86& 

3,134 



1878, meter rate was changed. 1884, hydrant rates reduced. 1886, meter 
and other rates reduced. 1889, hydrant rates leduced. 1891 and 1892, re- 
ceived only part of hydrant rent, and nothing from water-troughs or street 
sprinklers. 1893, hydrant rent and water-closets rate reduced. 



104 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following amounts have been paid over to the city 
treasurer, and credited to the water-works: 

1872, supplies and materials sold » 157.3.61 

1873, supplies and materials sold 177.07 

accrued interest on water bonds sold 19H.26 

accrued interest on state bonds sold. . 140.00 

water rents 1,920.53 

1874, supplies and materials sold 607.80 

March 12, highway expenditures trans- 
ferred from w^ater account 14,000.53 

March 17, interest and discount trans- 
ferred from water account 12,347.25 

September 1, interest and discount 

transferred from water account . . . 22,361.74 

water and hydrant rent 30,233.54 

December 29, interest transferred .... 4,566.25 

1875, water and hydrant rent 27,119.15 

sundry items 2,104.45 

1876, sundry items 149.00 

water and hydrant rent 38,879.47 

1877, sundry items 131.56 

water and hydrant reiit 43,691.74 

1878, water and hydrant rent 48,632.64 

sundry items 241,62 

1879, sundry items 303.87 

water and hydrant rent 52,839.30 

1880, water and hydrant rent 57,180.19 

sundry items 475.06 

1881, water and hydrant rent 60,000.75 

sundry items 214.87 

1882, water and hydrant rent 67,175.89 

sundry items 454.24 

1883, water and hydrant rent 73,312.13 

sundry items 146.07 

1884, water and hydrant rent 74,830.88 

sundry items 749.20 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 105 

1885, water and byduaut rent |8U,211.G7 

sundry items 192.45 

1886, water and hydrant rent 71,803.76 

sundry items 326.23 

1887, water and hydrant rent 79,682.70 

sundry items 835.47 

1888, water and hydrant rent 85,397.20 

sundry items 246.62 

1889, water and hydrant rent 86,492.19 

sundry items ". 208.27 

1890, water and hydrant rent 90,122.60 

sundry items 340.77 

1891, water and hydrant rent 76,313.24 

sundry items 291.99 

1892, water and hydrant rent 83,067.99 

sundry items 406.80 

1893, water rents 90,900.14 

sundry items 519.94 

1894, water rents 95,602.83 

sundry items 682.46 

1895, water rents 101,478.49 

sundry items 1,096.01 

1896, water rents 111,091.41 

sundry items. . 1,015.62 

1897, water rents 107,449.42 

sundry items 1,094.75 

premium on bonds 6,248.00 

Total 11,811,878.77 

METERS. 

The number of meters set during the year has been two 
hundred and seventy-eight (278). 

Total number of meters now in use, thirty-one hundred 
and thirty-four (3,134). 



106 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The number of applications for water has been two 
hundred and fourteen (214). 

Total number of applications to date, fiftv-three hun- 
dred and sixty-six (5,366). 

SERVICE PIPES. 

Two hundred and eighteen (218) service pipes have 

been laid this year, as follows: 

216 1-inch 5,498.0 feet 

111-inch ; "... 33.0 " 

1 e-lnch 29.5 " 



Total 5,560.5 feet 

SERVICE PIPES RELAID, 1897. 

1 finch dia. 34.0 feet to 1-inch dia 33.0 feet 

li-inchdia. 21.0 " to 4-inch dia 19.0 " 

69 i-inch dia. 2,282.0 " to 1-inch dia 2,187.5 " 

1 1-inch dia. 0.0 " to 1-inch dia 18.0 " 

15 1-inch dia. 674.2 " to 1-inch dia 701.9 " 

2 1-inch dia. 31.8 " to 2-inch dia 30.8 " 

12f inch dia. 57.0 " to 2i-inch dia 63.0 " 



92 old pipes, 3,202.0 feet to new pipes, 3,157.0 feet 

Fift3^-two hundred and one (5,201) service pijies have 
been laid to date, as follows: 

27 |-inch diameter 565.6 feet 

1,548 f -inch diameter 39,926.8 " 

3,485 1-inch diameter 88,312.3 " 

22 If inch diameter 893.5 " 

25 If inch diameter 805.0 " 

69 2-inch diameter 2,213.5 " 

2 2f inch diameter 63.0 " 

5 3-inch diameter 89.8 " 

11 4-inch diameter 288.5 " 



133,158.0 feet 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



107 



Number miles of service pipe, 25.22. 
The following- streets are where cement-lined pipe was 
taken up and cast-iron pipe laid in 1897: 



Streets. 


Length of Pipe. 


Gates 
taken out. 


Location. 






.2 

at 


o 


d 

00 


a 

to 




c 

CO 


■iH 














58 




1 




Corner Elm. 






12 






Corner Pearl. 








583 
24 

55 
965 
58 
35 
21 
58 








Beech to Maple. 


































































1 




Corner Elm. 


Elm 


1543 










FrankUn» 








510 
"64 


i 


2 


Merrimack to Market 












Corner Elm. 


High 






















1,810 








South Main . . . 






557 










Ferry to Railroad. 
Beech to Lincoln. 










1,218 

58 
726 

36 
767 

1,588 




i 

1 

1 






































Canal to Elm. 










6 


Maple to Lincoln. 
Pine to Maple. 


Pearl 














Pine 








822 
















318 

699 

1,100 

848 












1 








1 


















Stark 
















Elm to Canal. 


Walnut 










50 
624 








Water 










41 

11,066 


1 








1543 


12 


557 


828 






8 


2 





Total relaid, 14,630 feet, or 2.77 miles. 



*Fi-anklin street, 9 feet 4ineh cast-iron was taken out, and 510 feet 4- 
inch and 21 feet 0-inch cement-lined was taken out, and 540 feet 6-inch cast 
iron laid instead ; also 2 4-inch gates were replaced with 6-inch gates. 



108 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



m 

m 

H 

< 

C 

Q 



CO 

w 

CM 
I— I 
P-i 



55 

O 
►-( 
H 

o 
1^ 


Ashland to Morrison. 

Bridge to Lowell. 

South of Webster. 

Near Nutt road to Norfolk. 

East of Wilson. 

North of High. 

Elm to Adams. 


O 


Corner of Elm. 
East side of Beech. 
South of Amory. 
West side of Beech. 


South of Amory. 

Sheridan to Glenwood. 

Carpenter to Rowell. [Water. 

North side Merrimack, south side Stark and 

South of Aniory. 

Corner of Market and Merrimack. 

To Lovering. 

At Donahoe. 

To Russell. 

To Cedar. 

Massabesic to Nelson. 

East to Linden. 

East of Merrill. 

Northward. 

To Laval. 

East side of Beech. 

To Kelley. 

East side of Glenwood. 

East side of Beech. 

Porter to Hall road. 


•ejuB.ip^H '"'::'"::: 


" : : i 


• r-ia-^ 


" ':^ 


'-::•'-: 
















H 

Hi 

M 
H 


•ui f 




: : : :'^ : 


















•ui 9 




'^ '. I '. 


'-' . 


rH rH rH rH r-( rH Cq 


«(Mrt 


rHpH^-eOrH 


rH(f)i-l ;pH • 


•at 8 




;!"*;' 




















•in zi 




:^ : : 








: !'-' 










•HI ti 












• • rtCO ; • • 

: : • * • 
























o 

N 

^- 

si 

?? 
a 
1-1 


•UI f 




: : ; ." CO 

. . . . lO 


















•UI 9 


t-50 -in CO 
og ;-wog 


o to '• '-m 


OlO CD 


CO -r-lrHOOrHCOIOO&lr-l 'C^CO '(M 


•up 8 




ill! 




















•UI SI 












• • 00 










•ui n 










■ '■ M 

: •:§ 






: ; .* ; 






H 

W 

as 
H 


1 
< 


Beacon 

Beech 

Beech 

Bell 


5c! 


i 

> ■' 
i i 


• ■ • 3- 

•d-a-gj 

; t< fci C ^ 
i S So i 


: a : 

. 03 • 


f 
5 


. a> s c c 


> 

: a 

ic 
5^ 


Hall 

Hall road 

Harrison 

Hay ward 


Kelley 

Laval 

Manchester 

Massabesic 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



109 



z; "1 M 
g 0) © 



v 
P. 
e3 . 

1° 

o) o 
1 .^-§ 

" 01 C 

, rt t- d ;= 
.C'-; (/J 05 3 



<r) CI 



o ;s =s s .r^ •.- 






— Cj '^ ^r; -M 01 _-3 

"^ S ■-' "1 <" '-' 

O O,* O cj eS O . 






ago 



o « 



^:^s 



o_ ..; 

:z S . 0) < 

t; ei =S -C -S • 

» 5 ^ rn' . S ^ S ! 

— O o S - P-^ S.' 

:=a oj c-^ « -; 
«H cii"^'^ o »-'" 

^■W S O O ^ ° r- - 

O O oS o3 d o-i O 
•T^ r-! r-T-l rv M ri^ "^ f:^ r 



^afflMfqfiqsiiicclSzi^ 



(f» -i-HrHi-l -m-ie^ 



cooocDOinoo 
ineo thco 









o o o t- 



CO „ „ 



110 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



P3 

u 

p 
o 



H 



Q 

<< 
w 

t-H 

o 

w 

o 

02 



•B^aBjpjfjj 


CO 


eo CO 


•* eo •* ^ 


eo •* 1-1 rH CO t- 


) 


• S8A1BA Jiy 




<N i-H _ ; 






. . . • . c 





a' 






; <N 


; ; : : ' ^ 


CO 

00 


IM 


eo 10 CO eo CO cq 


CO Tl< 10 i-l -* C-l 










(ft 






'"' 








CO 


a 




(M 




" 










: « 












_a 






























^ 


a 


































a 

i 


CJ ff) (M IH 
























■a 

Q. 
'0. 

a 


C8 
U 

<H 

(D 

■a 
la 


a 














■ 1 














_a 

CD 


CO 


10 


1308 
1694 
4401 
1765 
50 


3701 
1698 
1496 
1785 
768 


s 


a _ 
00 














■ g 






C5 








= 


a 



CO 

in 




s 










3 














a 
































i 


a 

^a 





































2 ?S S! ;S 

i-H Ci C-l CO 

g »-i CO 05 


























'6 
'S 

(0 

a, 
'S. 
rs 

a 

a 

a 

10 

i 

60 

a 
3 


a 
































a 

to' 






co 

CO (M 




CO 


g 

1- 


in 










-.S 
a? 
































eo 


a 

















» 




















































oc 

1 




_a 
-* 




































i 




00 

(M CO •* 


























1 

1 

i 
a 




* 


: 

a 

3 

Ph 


i-s 



c 

° I 

4 (I 


c 


'3 

S 
>■ 
"5 

D 




C 

<1 


B 
c 


< 


2 

.a 


a 
c 

t 

< 


•< 


"3 
1 

•< 


a 
3 

< 




> 

K 


a 



> 1 


C 


« 





BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Ill 



oo 


CO 


C-5 


m 


ei 


-- 


cc 


CO 


el «» N 03 r-( i-l 


■* CO -- '-'l 00 •* 




















(M 




























o\ 






; 










ow(MeO'^Nooc-2 




"^ 


50-^(MIMCOiyi50'H«0 


■CJ 






o 








e^ 


'^ I 




































CO 




































































































































































g 


i 














o : 

00 


6121 

883 
476 
1497 
4254 
282 
3289 
2832 




708 

45 

146 

771 

1404 

. 495 

1949 

1263 

2657 

4596 

2934 

4419 


Jj 














1018 
2056 
4620 












993 

1062 

382 

940 


























CO 
00 




















































































o 












































o 


























































o ■ 






^ s s 


£ 






















CO T** GO t- 

S g g ^ 






— 




o 








































































































































: S 
































































* 
I 

( 


3 

3 _ 




: j 


a 




3_ 


1 

5 i 




z 


< 


3 


r 


c 


i 




4i 


> 




"5 


t 


1 



,Si H a 



fflC5ii3fqfqpqj;pqcqp5u 



05 — — 



112 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



P3 
PQ 

O 

w 
p 

o 

H 



P 
H 
X 

H- ( 

c 
< 

CO 



O 

p 
o 

CO 



■sinBapXH 




(S d r-i ei 




- O CO 






i-l !M -* tH ff^ 


■SSAICA aiy 


















1 

a 


c" 






1 e 




;'"':■. 


: "^ '^ 




CO 




: * 


> rt (M 




• O TX 






; "J" CO m eo CO 


00 

S 

5 














^^ 














• ej 




































5 














TJH 




























\ "^ 




^ 














rj 




a 
S 




























; i 




1 

o. 
'El 

fl 
2 

1 

o 

13 
t 

a 


i 


•* 






s s ^ 

CO CO (N 










a 

CD 




. S S S '^ 

; . 03 <N O 




eo CO 






1130 
931 

1910 
713 
920 


00 

a 

o 
f— t 


















































































CO 






























i§ 




-* 

§ 














CO 
CO 




.s 


































i 

'Hi 

•s 

a 
S 

CI 

o 

§ 

bo 

a 

3 


_g 


































a 

00 










51 




















00 
















00 




















_g 

o 




































_g 
2 














































S : 




eo ; 














eo ; 




B 

O 
(M 








































3 

3 




c 

OS 


o 

cj 

0) 

Q 




3 


s 


"Si 

a 


3 
S 
cj 

3 
S 




3 

n 

> 
0) 

1 


3 

fS 


1 

B 

5 


£ 

o 

O 


s 

"c 

o 


a 
u 





BOARD OF WATER COMMMISSIONERS. 



J 13 



CO m ei o CO —I 



CO • rt M rH rt 



Ni-it-IOi-iO^CO 



rlCOrl -Cli-liHCOC^CO 



231 
1735 
1137 

GOO 
1181 
2715 
32 
3147 
2148 
5879 




1040 
756 
532 


t- rt a> o lO o 
CI t- eo .-1 (N t- 

■« -* "O ••• S 

CO 












i 




















o 




















2 ^ 

CI 
































































































































































•ft 

o 
























g 






























oo 
























O (M lO 
•* CO f 




























































































































































































































1 


z 

% 


1. 

I 1 


s 




pi 


1. 


< 


J 

I 

c 


1 

> 


1 

> 




^ 


ct 

2 




_5 


a 






1 






6 

a) 

> 



9 -3 - 



^ rt 



s 



114 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



P5 

o 

p 
o 



<t3 

H 
X! 



CO 

W 
Ph 
O 

w 

Q 

W 
o 

02 



•SJUBjp^H 


ei <M -H 


: - 


• CO i-H IN e-i CO 




; CO r- iM 


•S9AIBA aiV 






;•*•;;_ 
















o 


a 




• ri CO ; ; ; -^ ; 






to 


(N T-H rH 


; ° 


t- . o (s CO 


; « <N — I e^ r-( 


00 














(M 








• C) 




a 
S 
















■ CO 
























'. "^ 






















a 
































a 
S 
(?) 












^ ; 






<N 






























13 

1 

a 
o 

1 

*M 
O 

1 
IS 

i 
■& 

a 
•3 








: 1 


t- . . • (M . 

: § : : : 12 












S 1 


5 l' -^ O 
" lO tS Tj< 
H CO CO 


95 

CO 

4396 

46 

962 

■ 250 

362 

78S 

3926 

7C8 

31S 


a 

00 






















. 


1 




a 
o 
















CO 














9 
(M 










CO 

3 






















































a 




























!2 

.& 

■p. 

■a 
® 

a 

1 
<s 
o 

o 
"& 

B 


































a 

50 




g 




^ : 












CO 




00 










(M 

CO ; 






















o 
































1-4 










o 

CO 






















a 
•* 
































_a 

o 
































f 

a 




a 
o 

•s 

p 

J2 




1^ 


<D 
>• 

o 
1-5 




1 1 


i 

o 

o 

S 

1 


& : 

a) 

a_ 

? 

X ii 

1 1 
1 1 


— 

1 


d 


01 

1 




rt 


a 


_2 





BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



115 



(M • (M 



t^^r-IOTr-lT)l-^rl'tS^ 



CI • (N 



<N<N05^^r1f—0»«r-i 



§ 


o 






B 


1H 


K 


1380 
547 
405 

3176 
375 

1653 

1570 
"4076 

15fiR 


1 


CO «<: 


s 




oc 


























C4 CI 

o S 

r-. lO 






























































1 
















































































































s 




































i 














■* 
g 






; to CO • 


1 
































• CO 










































































































































































t 

1 


'■ c 

3 < 


_0 


2 i 


3 c 




J 


1 

! 

: I 


1 i 


< 


? 


a 
i 

; 1 

J) 


) • 

! 

i 
J 


C 
< 




• c 


^ «i 1 






! 
S 



|z;^;^!z;^;z;000 



116 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



C5 

a 

CQ 

o 
o 



W 
C3 
D 
H 
>^ 

Q 
P-t 

o 

Q 

S 
o 



•s^nBjpiCn 








^ 


•" 


■>* 


ifl 


«£ 




eo 


ei 


ee 


cc 




•* 


Tf< 


fH 




'BeAi«A aty 










; : i 




i : . 


















a 










' I I *"* I I ^ ! 




c 

S 

a 

00 


« rl IN ■* 


■* m m 


CQO(MC0rH10t*i-t 




'"' 
















'"' 














o 




















































^ 




















s 
'•9 






































G 






































3 
'3 

a 
S 

1 

o 

2 
'3 

a 
a 

■& 

s 

V 


5 


T)t 














5 
















to 




17 
750 
2548 
275 
1705 
3517 
1001 


753 
6954 
874 
799 
325 
1702 
4755 
58 


a 
00 




















s 














o 






















































CO 


























































a 








































































"2 
"3 

a< 
■p. 

-d 

.2 

a 
g 

o 

"o 
(» 

13 
C 

Cli 

C 


a 






































a 
«o 


























00 










_g 

00 






































a 

o 












































































a 
.2 








































































































t 


i 

1 


> 






c 
c 


c 
> B 

V. 


1 


V 


b 
a 
s 
c 
cr 




c 

V 


1 
tr- 


it 


1 

( 

5^ 


E 


£ 


5 


1 r 





BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



117 



t- — ^ >-' >c ■ cq 00 



>-i eo (M M • eq . r-< n 



rH eo tH 



eo " o 1-1 



" S 






;Dt2>>^^'^Es^^^^^^tS^<<1<< 



118 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



P3 

O 

Q 

O 
H 



<1 
hJ 

CO 

W 

H 
X 

1—1 

Q 

W 

I— I 

o 
w 

o 

a 
o 



•sjaejpjtjj 


t- 


'"' 






(?> 


<^^ 




"^ 


'"' 


CO 


" 


<o 




■^ 


" 


IN 


•^ 




-S9itI«A jiy 
































i 

1 


_j5__ 

g 
S 

a 

00 






'^ j 


I . '. I ^ '^ I ! 








T-l »-t 




rH •* rl r-l m <N CJ 


-H I-l Tj< rt 


•* 






'^ 












1— 1 i—i • 










c 
o 
















































































































a 






































13 

3 

o 

.2" 
i 

z 

O 

■s 

n 

a 

t 


a 








1 












i : 














t~ o to 

^ 5! § 


18 
517 
3579 
48 
1036 
1573 
835 
2287 


W 00 00 CO 
CO 01 lO 


a 

00 


1 






• 1 












eo 00 










a 

O 






































.9 

CM 

fl 










































































fl 






































'5 

1 
p. 

•s 

a 

1 

« 

o 
o 

T3 

a 

t8 
J3 

"So 

n 

>2 


fl 

5! 






































a 

to 






































a 

00 






































fl 
o 






































□ 

fl 










































































i 
















































































3 

< < 


3 

5 

5 P 


5 B 


■ A 

3 c 

3 P 




: ' 

I 

I < 
i p 


: c 

c 

iJ 4- 

H 


3 

i i 

1 L 

5 B 


1 

1 i 

1 

5 5 


i i 

! 

: < 


; i: 
< 


• 

3 


D 
10 

3 

5 L 


5 ;! 


! 


J i; 


> 
s 

a 

1 

i 

3 

:> 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



119 



1-1 fj 




.H O 




rH O 


"" 


e 


'"' 






e<: 








■* 




































; ; ; 0^ ; ; ; 








(N IN 


'"' 


N rl l-H rl « 


•* l-H rH 


(M rH rH rH 


rH CJ 






'"' 


'"' 














































































































































































































































i 
























"Ji Its 

I-l 




1791 
127 
575 
451 

1908 


2970 
1210 
640 


1554 
223 
32 
434 
191 
483 

2276 






s 


o 
^1 




































































1 






































































































































































































































































• 




















































































































































































































> 




I 


1 4. 




c 


1 

"5 


c 


. 


J. 


c 
c 

-• « 




> 




'Z 






c 
6 




C 

S 







r? — O 



;=! .= o 



OPOQQQQH 



|ii &i fci O O O O 



120 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



•B^IIBipjCxj 




Ol 




(M 


■" 




"^ 






00 




<M 


(M 


00 


in 


ax 


M 


'S9AIBA Jiy 




■*2 




'"'•'"' I t :;,::;::::: : 




; eO . rH •* • i-H ; ;eOeO(N— lOCJOIi-lM 


a 

00 


t '"':;:;.;!::!:; ^ : : 


o 


; <N ;•..•••■• i-H 










a 








a, 

'5. 
a 
2 

1 

u 
o 

(U 

13 

a 
a 

■& 

a 


a 




a 




§ 


1517 

1466 
524 
256 
448 
884 

2734 

598 

18 

290 

3849 

1821 
527 

2161 


.5 

00 




i 


























s 


c 
o 




s 
































































.s 

'■S 




































o 






































































2 
'S 

» 

% 

a 

a 
a. 
3 
o 

CM 

o 

i 


fi 




































a 
to 




































00 
o 














. 
























































Cl 


- 




































































s 
o 

CM 








, 































3 


a 
1 

E 
& 

C 

c 


i 

'i 




C 

ft 


> 


c 


• 


1 




> 


t 




C 






1 
P 


i 

o 



BOARD OF -WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



121 



c-i CO in i-H i-i .H 



CO >-l (N 



r-l'3>'»eilOr-cr-(-^'^r-cN 



CO CO a> lA 



la 00 lo 



05 CS t- 05 



« ?0 M 



I ^ 



S S 5 (S 



CG CC CG CC CO 



122 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 





•s^n«jp^H 


'"' 


IN 






'"' 


CO 


^ 


CO 


■^ 


i-< 


-*i 




CO 


<N 




s 






■saAi^A jjy 












CO 
















1 




1-1 • r-c • 




<M . M r-1 »-( 


s 




to 


(N rl 


1-1 .-1 c) ffi e^ 


,-1 «■< 


rH S-J 


8 




a 

00 

_c 
o 

<N 

.3 








<n 






















s 


































o 
































•* 


§§ 




































00 


































00 




























2 
"3 

i 
p> 

a 
2 
2 

OS 

o 

o 

13 

C3 

a 
3 


•* 


§ 


O <N 

§ 5 : 










i : 


00 






00 






01 O 


(MOC:<i->eot-t-oo— ■•!< 
cjojoo&iaooNco 


IN 

i 




00 






























to 

CO 

CO 




S 




































fl 




























§ 






5 






































a 
































i 






a 
« 

a 

o 
a 

3 


a 








00 

. 50 
















O 


1 "* 
1 "■ 






_g 


s 




























•* 

1 






00 
































e-1 




o 
































s 




_g 
































s^ 




a 
































2 




a 












































































( 

; 

3 J 


a 

3 ; 


a 
s 

H E 


S ; 

a 

5 J 


3 > 


i ! 


3 « 


• 

? 


3 

s 

3 ^ 
< 


ii 




1 > 

5 


'■ i 

: i 

■ 


i 
S 

a 
►. 

i. 

a. 

3 
3 


1 








S:: 



BOABD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 123 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN 1897. 

Arlington, corner Morrison. 

Beech, corner Nutt. 

Beech, corner Mitchell. 

Beech, between Brook and Cemetery. 

Beech, corner Mystic. 

Beech, corner Norfolk. 

Cedar, corner Hall. 

Donahoe, corner Glenwood. 

Elm, corner Trenton. 

Elm, corner Kowell. 

Essex, corner Monitor. 

Glenwood, corner Lovering. 

Gore, corner Kussell. 

Hayward, corner Porter. 

Merrimack, corner Milton. 

River road, corner Rowell. 

River road, opposite Lizzie Stark residence. 

Sheridan, corner Donahoe. 

Titus, corner Beech. 

Union, 600 feet north of Trenton street. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1S97. 



Size. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20-incli diameter 


20.367 feet. 

4,102 " 

7,432 " 
50 " 

2,472 " 
17,474 " 

1,549 «' 


24,679 feet. 
12,054 " 
23,157 " 
27,164 " 
61,616 " 
265,772 " 
18,782 " 


IS 




18 




33 


lO-inch diameter 


40 




94 




603 


4-incla diameter 


58 




53,44G feet. 


433,224 feet. 


864 



124 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Cement-lined pipe 10.12 miles 

Cast-iron pipe 82.05 " 

Total pipe 92.17 miles 

707 hydrants. 
864 gates. 

13 air valves. 

Yours respectfull}', 

CHARLES k. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



Uses for which Water is Supplied. 

WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 

11,267 Families, 148 boarding-houses, 14,876 faucets, 
3,920 wash-bowls, 3,177 bath-tubs, 10,479 water-closets, 
630 wash-tubs, 187 urinals, 3,-549 sill-cocks, 2,719 horses, 
132 cattle, 706 fire-hydrants, 30 watering-troughs, 8 
drinking-fountains, 51 stand-pipes, 2 public urinals. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

1 Jail, 27 churches, 1 court house, 10 hose companies, 6 
fire engines, 2 hook-and-ladder, 3 opera houses, 3 con- 
vents, 4 city hospitals, 4 cemeteries, 1 orphanage, 1 post- 
ofiice, 1 city library, 6 banks, 9 hotels, 1 Masonic hall, 1 , 
Odd Fellows' hall; 3 halls. 

SHOPS. 

57 Barber, 10 wheelwright, 20 blacksmith, 10 carpenter. 
2 tinsmith, 1 copper, 3 currying, 19 plumber and gas and 
water pipe, 14 paint, 3 gunsmith. 

STORES. 

4 Auction, 35 drug, 22 jewelry, 1 fur, 3 house-furnish- 
ing goods, 20 fancy goods, 1 wholesale paper, 5 wholesale 
produce, 24 dry goods, 12 candy, 1 cloak, 16 millinery, 3 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 125 

tea, 9 furniture, 1 wholesale grocer, 107 grocer}^ 6 meal, 3 
hardware, 34 boot and shoe, 11 stove, 17 gents' furnish- 
ing goods, 7 book, 1 leather and shoe-finders, 3 music, 3 
upholstery, 9 undertakers, 5 sewing-machine, 1 feather- 
cleaner, 1 rubber. 

SALOONS. 

18 Dining, 7 billiard, 55 liquor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

6 Clubrooms, 3 bleacheries, 37 laundries, 4 ice-houses, 
11 photographers, 1 Mercy Home, 2 old ladies' homes, 1 
soldiers' monument, 1 Turner hall, 4 fountains, 2 trust 
companies, 1 city farm, 3 depots, 9 greenhouses, 2 band 
rooms, 26 bakeries, 2 waste, 1 business college, .32 school- 
houses, 1 battery building, 1 kitchen, 3 ward-rooms, 1 
gymnasium, 2 police stations. 

MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 

1 Hosiery mill, 1 silver-plating, 2 iron foundries, 2 dye- 
houses, 5 machine shops, 6 clothing manufactories, 9 har- 
ness shops, 1 cornice works, 1 brush shop, 9 carriage 
shops, 12 cigar factories, 1 brass and copper foundry, 1 
locomotive works, 1 grist-mill, 1 silk-mill, 3 granite 
works, 1 electric light station, 4 sash and blind shops, 1 
brewery, G shoe shops, 1 gas works, 4 slaughter-houses, 1 
soap factory, 4 needle manufactories, 6 beer-bottling, 3 
book-binderies, 1 paper-mill, 2 box-makers, 1 paper-box 
manufactory. 

MARKETS. 

G Fish, 12 meat and fish, 3 meat (wholesale). 

STABLES. 

23 Livery, 1 electric railroad, 1,113 private. 

OFFICES. 

20 Dentists, 2 telephone, 2 telegraph, 2 express, 14 
printing, 1 gas, 17 coal. 



126 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Materials on Hand. 

PIPE. 

8,100 feet 20-inch, 1,200 feet 14-incli, 2,800 feet 12-incli, 
2,000 feet 10-iucb, 0,800 feet 8-inch, 1,200 feet 6-inch, 300 
feet 4-inch. 

BRANCHES. 

2 double 6 on 20, 8 double G on 12, 1 double 8 on 12, 4 
double 6 on 14, 5 double 4 on 4, 7 double 8 on 8, 22 double 
6 on 8, 4 double 8 on 14, 1 single 8 on 14, 2 single 10 on 20, 
1 single 14 on 14, 5 single G on 14, 2 single G on 10, 3 single 
6 on 12, 2 single 10 on 10, 3 single 4 on G, 3 single 20-inch 
Y's, 7 single G on 6. 

WHOLE SLEEVES. 

2 20-inch, 2 14-iuch, 5 12-inch, 9 10-inch, IG 8-inch, 18 G- 
inch, 20 4-inch. 

REDUCERS. 

7 8-inch to G-inch, 1 10-inch to 8-inch, 2 14-inch to 12- 
inch, 2 10-inch to G-inch, 3 10-inch to 14-inch, 3 10-inch .to 
12-inch, 1 20-inch to 14-inch, 2 12-inch to 6-inch. 

GATES. 

11 6-inch, 2 12-inch. 

TURNS. 

2 20-inch 1-16, 2 10-inch 1-4, 3 10-inch 1-8, 3 8-inch 1-4, 
3 6-inch 1-8, 7 14-inch 1-8, 1 8-inch 1-8, 1 12-iuch 1-8. 

RISERS. 

2 10-inch, 7 8-inch, 1 6-inch. 



REPORT 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of 

Manchester, N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — We have the honor herewith to submit 
the fifth annual report of this department. 

The following gives the receipts and expenditures of 
the office for the year 1897: 

RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand |0.53 

Keceived from Manchester Street Railway 

Company 3,899.39 

Received from sundry sources 93.66 

Total 13,993.58 

Deposited with city treasurer |3,980.81 

Cash paid out for express and postage 12.77 

Total 13,993.58 

EXPENDITURES. 

Commissioners' salaries $1,800.00 

Clerical services 1,011.28 

Carriage allowance 450.00 

*Office supplies 78.14 

Blank books 14.25 

Incidentals 34.31 

Telephone ?>9.93 

Total 13,427.91 

* Includes bill for printing annual report, 1896. 

129 

9 



130 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Inventory of City Property. 

Commissioners' office, including tj^pewriter, 

furniture, office supplies, etc |279.05 

Division No. 2, including horses, dump- 
carts, sprinklers, road-machine, crushers, 

tools, etc 2.3,522.29 

City^ stables, storage shed, blacksmith shop 15,950.00 

Lot of land on Franklin street 89,.312.00 

Valuation of pipe on hand 763.17 

Division No. 4 3.25 

Division No. 5 .32.65 

Division No. 6 21.00 

Division No. 7 101.75 

Division No. 8 27.10 

Division No. 9 19.10 

Divisions Nos. 10 and 11, including horses, 

road-machine, carts, sprinklers, etc 1,681.09 

Stable and lot in West Manchester 1,200.00 

Commons, including horse lawn-mower, 

swings, etc 354.78 

Total 1133,207.23 



Orders Received from City Government, with Date 
of Passage. 

ORDERS TO BUILD SEWERS. 

Silver street, Lincoln to Wilson. 

Laurel street, east of Beacon westerly 150 feet. 

Passed May, 1897. 

Walnut street, Salmon southerlj^ 175 feet. 
Passed June, 1897. 

Silver street, Wilson to Hall. 
Passed July, 1897. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 131 

Whittemore Land, West Manchester. 
Passed August, 1897. 

Union street, Silver to Hayward. 
Prescott street, Wilson east 20S feet. 
Hayward street, Belmont to Cypress. 
Taylor street, Valley northerly 400 feet. 
Amory street, Alsace easterly 200 feet. 
Grove south back street, east of Union to Beech. 
Rimmon east back street, Kelley to Mason. 
Everett street, Clark southerly 300 feet. 
Passed September, 1S07. 

Maple street, Prescott to Hayward. 

Beech street, Silver to Harvard. 

Harvard street, Beech to Maple. 

Somerville street, Wilson to Hall. 

Russell street, Harrison northerly 350 feet. 

Grove south back street, Wilson easterly 200 feet. 

River road, north from Clarke to Park avenue. 

Central street, Belmont to Milton. 

Passed November, 1897. 

MISCELLANEOUS ORDERS. 

Order to macadamize Pearl street, from Pine to Union. 
Passed August, 1897. 

Order to build Lake avenue to width and grade between 
Cass and Beacon streets. 
Passed September, 1897. 

Order to construct bicycle path on Hall road, com- 
mencing at corner of Massabesic street and Candia road. 
Passed October, 1897. 



132 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
APPaOPBIATIOXS. 



List of Appropriations. 



Amount 
appropriated. 



Amount 
expended. 



Street and park commission 

Repairs of higliways 

* New highways 

Snow and ice 

Watering streets 

Paving streets , 

Macadamizing streets 

Grade for concrete 

Scavenger teams 

City teams 

Bridges 

Street sweeping 

New sewers 

Repairs of sewers 

t River road sewer 

Repairing Amoslceag bridge 

Paving Elm and Granite streets 

Bicj'cle path 

Commons 

J Stark and Derryfield parks — 

Totals 



600.00 
000.00 

,382.48 
000.00 
000.00 

onooo 

000.00 
000.00 
,000 00 
,500.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
000.00 
697.57 
700.00 
000.00 
600.00 
500.00 
,000.14 



$168,980.19 



$3,427.91 

21,203.80 
8,381.97 
4,983.61 
3,762.64 
7,031.79 

14,472.74 
5,4^0.96 

15,260.85 
6,723.94 
3,407.52 
2,318.22 

35,698.29 
5,830.46 
5,258.06 
3,541.90 

11,653.41 

.564.36 

4,526.80 

5,003.84 



$168,503.07 



Unexpended balance, S477.12. 

CONTRACTS. 

Akron sewer pipe, Pike & Heald Co. 

Hoffman cement, J. A. & A. W. Walker. 

Bridge plank, A. C. Wallace, 

Sewer plank, Head & Dowst Co. 

Sewer brick, William F. Head & Son. 

Sewer castings, Mancliester Locomotive Works. 

Edgestones, cesspool stones, Warren Harvey. 

Paving blocks, Charles A. Bailey. 

Laying paving on Elm street, Soule, Dillingham & Co. 

Concreting Granite street, Charles H. Robie Co. 

Carload oats. Partridge Bros. 

Carload oats, Gage & McDougall. 

Carload oats. Gage & McDougall. 

Carload oats. Freeman & Merrill. 

Building Second street to grade, W. H. Coburn. 

Grading on Candia road, Charles Francis. 

Portable stone crusher. Climax Road Machine Co. 

« Includes Sl,382 48, 

t Includes 85,697.57, } balance from appropriation for 1896. 

j Includes S0.14, 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
PERMITS TO ENCUMBER. 



133 



Given to 



Location. 



Date, 1897. 



MelvlnHall 

James Benson 

I.E. Sturtevant 

Moore & Preston — 

C. P. Barney 

C. S. McKeon 

J.A.Wilson 

Mrs. M. Hackett 

Frank Bascom 

David H. Nutt 

Melvin Hall 

G. A. Plamondon . . . . 

Arthur Tremblay 

J. H. Mendell &Co .. 

Manchester Bank 

Fred Cotton 

Head & Dowst Co 

N. W. Page ;.. 

Melvin Hall 

Fred Cotton 

W. M. Buttei-fleld 

J. H. Mendell* Co... 

J. F. Mahoney 

Pike &Heald 

Amos Lutuch 

John Sweeney 

R. P. Stevens &Co... 

Thomas Shea 

Joseph Lavlne 

Gordon Woodbury.. . 

Shirley & Smith 

A.S.Walker 

N. W. Page 

Bixby & Wilson 

Boston & Maine R. R 

E. E. Smith 

Couch & McDonald. . 

Mark Harvey 

Hadley Higgins 

George L. Reed 

Fred H. Balch. 



Lake Shore road 

Derry turnpike 

Elm street (New York store) 

Elm street 

Wilson and Manchester 

495 Granite street 

East High and Buzzell 

225 Lake avenue 

East High and Ashland 

187 Merrimack street 

Lake Shore road 

221 Spruce south back 

329 Hinimon street 

239 Laurel street 

Elm west back street 

Water street 

Elm street (N. H. Ins. Co.) .. 

Ashland street 

Fletcher Island road 

Spring street 

158 Sagamore street 

S3 Sagamore street 

352 Lake avenue 

Towne block, Elm street • 

Lake Shore road 

Clark road 

Elm and Salmon 

Laurel north back 

501-517 Main street 

North Main near Granite 

Lowell street 

Pine and Manchester south back 

Milton and Merrimack.... 

Mast street, near Main 

West Central street 

191 Merrimack street 

Spruce and Belmont 

231 Laurel south back 1 

Sagamore near Maple Nov 

20 Malvern street Dec 

Wilson and Somerville 



Jan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
April 

May 



June 



July 



Au£ 



Sent. 



Oct. 



11 
1 

11 

5 

17 

1 

6 

10 

14 

24 

25 

28 

8 

8 

9 

14 

15 

24 

24 

25 

15 

15 

17 

19 

19 

27 

27 

29 

11 
18 
28 
10 
24 
27 
'l 
19 



Note.— A bond of $500 being filed in each case when permit is granted. 



Report of Division No. 2. 

George W. Cheney, Agent. 

snow and ice account. 

Appropriation 

Transferred from repairs of highways 

Transferred from reserved fund 

Total 



14,000.00 
494.28 
489.33 

14,983.61 



134 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Labor, January $595.00 

February 3,076.10 

March 710.57 

November 79.25 

December 110.08 

Paid, snowplows 75.00 

sand and supplies 37.53 



Total 14,983.61 

STREETS AND ROADS. 

The work done upon our streets and roads will be 
found in detail in the tables furnished. 

The road-machine has been used wherever such use 
would result in a saving to the city, and 10.28 miles of 
roadway have been turnpiked by it in division No. 2 alone. 
In the same division three miles of streets have been grav- 
eled, while in No. 10 4,460 feet have been treated in a like 
manner. About two miles of new streets have been built 
this year. The same law which relieved the city from 
much litigation and expense for injuries resulting from 
so-called defects in the highway provides that bridges, 
culverts, and steep embankments shall be protected by a 
guard rail. In compliance with this provision of the 
statute, 5,738 feet of such fencing was built during the 
season and it is believed that all such dangerous places 
are now protected. The dearth of good road material 
continues to increase the cost of repairs. This is as true 
of the suburban districts as of the city proper. The soil 
in the suburban districts contains many stones and 
ledges, and in the construction of the roads it has been 
customary to remove those which can be conveniently 
disposed of in that manner and cover the rest. It would 
be impracticable to do anything else, as the cost of remov- 



STKEET AND PARK COMMISSION. 135 

ing them all would be so great as to be unreasonable. In 
time the covering wears away, and the boulders and 
ledges are a source of discomfort to people riding over 
them. Recovering seems to be the only remedy. The 
surplus soil beside the roadway has been used for this 
purpose as well as for general repairs. It was not good 
material, but the best available. On many of the roads 
this supply has been exhausted and gravel has to be 
hauled long distances to be used in its stead. Any person 
who has had experience in hiring teams will realize that 
under the above conditions repairs will continue to cost 
much money. The board hopes it has found a remedy in 
the portable stone crusher. As fast as possible it will be 
moved about in the various districts and the stone which 
are now an inconvenience will be crushed and used in 
place of gravel with, we believe, the best results. 

STREETS TURNPIKED WITH RGAD-MACHIXE. 

Adams 1,400 feet 

Appleton 1,500 '• 

Amherst ' 1,800 " 

Ashland 1,400 " 

Ash 400 " 

Bay 800 " 

Blodget 700 '• 

Brook 1,500 " 

Bridge 2,500 " 

Belmont 2,000 " 

Beacon 1,050 " 

Beech 500 " 

Chestnut 1,200 " 

Clark 1,500 " 

Concord 400 " 

Button 300 " 

East High 1,800 " 

Elm 1,000 " 



136 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Hanover 2,200 feet 

Hall 1,700 " 

Highland 2,000 '' 

Jane 400 " 

Liberty 600 ." 

Linden 200 " 

Lowell 500 " 

Lincoln 350 " 

Munroe 150 " 

Myrtle 400 " 

Maple 2,500 " 

Merrimack 1,000 " 

North 600 " 

Pine 2,300 " 

Pennacook 700 " 

Pearl 500 " 

Eiver road north 4,850 " 

Ray 1,200 " 

Reform School road 300 " 

Salmon 1,600 " 

Sagamore 700 " 

Smith road 400 " 

South 400 " 

Trenton 1,000 " 

Union 3,000 " 

Walnut 1,000 " 

Webster 2,000 " 

Total 54,300 feet 

Total turnpiked, 54,300 feet, or 10.28 miles. 

Labor on this work charged to repairs of highways. 

STREETS GRAVELED. 

Amherst 300 feet 

Ashland 200 " 

Arlington 250 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 137 

Bridge 100 feet 

BelmoDt 150 " 

Beacon 150 " 

Chestnut 1,900 " 

Concord 500 " 

Carpenter 1,400 " 

Dutton 300 " 

Derry 300 '•' 

East High 150 " 

Elm (north) 800 " 

Hall 250 " 

Hooksett road 1,000 " 

Kennard road 500 " 

Lowell 200 " 

Laurel 500 " 

Liberty 500 " 

Orange 250 " 

Pearf 500 " 

Pine .' 500 " 

Eiver road (north) 600 " 

Sagamore 250 " 

Union 3,000 " 

Warren 500 " 

Webster 300 " 

Total 15,350 feet 

Total streets graveled, 15,350 feet, or 2.90 miles. 
Labor charged to repairs of highways. 

FENCING. 

Beech 340 feet 

Calef road, near Baker 200 " 

Chestnut, over Ray brook 172 " 

Deer Neck bridge 1,000 " 

Elm north of Pennacook 150 "' 



138 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Lake avenue, near Hall 80 feet 

Valley, between Beech and Union 112 " 

Total 2,058 feet 

Labor charged to repairs of highways. 

NEW STREETS GRADED. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Cut or 
fin. 



Labor. 



Ash, Sagamore north 

Adams 

Beacon, Manchester to Lake avenue 

Clark, Union west 

Calef road, near cemetery 

Chestnut, Clark north 

Clay, Beech west 

*Elm, north of Carpenter 

Maple, Silver south 

Myrtle, Belmont west 

Ray 

Summer, Beech east 

Somerville 

Trenton 

Union 

Waldo, Everett east 

Total 

Pond road culvert lengthened out. . . 



100 
200 

1,050 
220 
750 

1,050 
150 
500 
300 
350 
200 
100 
150 
300 
800 
200 



6,420 
30 



Cut. 

Both. 

Cut. 

Both. 

Cut. 



Both, 



Fill. 
Cut. 



Fill. 



$386.90 

50.00 

342.80 

100.00 

280.00 

349.00 

150.00 

2,100.00 

98.00 

39.90 

50.00 

16.00 

84.00 

100.00 

571.22 

92.50 



S4,810.32 
77.66 



84,887.98 



SUMMARY. 

Labor, division No. 2 |4,887.9S 

division No. 7 1,035.45 

division No. 8 330.97 

division No. 10 1,635.12 

on Second street, built by contract. . 300.00 

Hardware 152.85 

Stone for culvert 21.60 

General incidentals 18.00 

Total 18,381.97 

* This street was built to a width of 100 feet, and was cut through solid 
ledge to a depth of three feet most of the way. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 



139 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Width 
in feet. 



Cut or 
fill. 



Labor. 



Adams, between Clark and Appleton 

Adams 

Ash and Sagamore 

Beech, between Myrtle and Prospect. 

Belmont and Concord 

Beech and Cedar 

Bridge and Birch 

Brook and Maple 

Beech and Silver 

Belmont 

Chestnut and Clark 

Clark, Union west 

Chestnut, Clark north 

Clark and Adams 

Carpenter and Adams 

Elm, north of Carpenter 

Gore, west of Oak 

Hanover, east of Beacon 

Hall and Lowell 

Hall ." 

Lake Avenue, east of Canton 

Lowell, corner Hall 

Myrtle and Hall 

North and Union 

North and Liberty 

Pearl, between Linden and Hall 

Russell, north of Harrison 

Somerville, from Beech 

Trenton and Elm 

Union, south of Clark 

Walnut, between North and Webster. 
Walnut, between North and Salmon. . 



Total. 



200 
200 
100 
200 
250 
208 

60 
100 
300 
100 
300 
600 
200 
625 
225 
1,200 

50 

50 
ISO 
100 
100 
200 
150 
150 
150 

50 
100 
300 
150 

75 
100 

50 



6,823 



Fill. 
Cut. 



Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 



Cut. 



Fill. 
Both. 

Fill. 

Cut. 
Fill. 
Cut. 

Fill. 

Cut. 
Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 



$22.00 
21.00 
12.00 
16.50 
17.00 
16.00 

S.OO 
14.50 
18.50 
15.00 
12.00 
.54.00 
15.00 
55.00 
15.00 
110.00 
11.00 

8.00 
14.00 
10.00 
18.00 
22.00 
12.00 
18.12 
14.50 

6.50 
26.00 
24.50 
13.00 
21.50 

8.00 

6.50 



$655.12 



140 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
EDGESTONES SET. 



Location. 



Number 
of feet. 



Labor. 



Auburn, between Beech and Union 

Arlington and Warren 

Auburn and Pine 

Auburn n<;ar Pine 

Auburn east of Pine 

Ashland and Arlington 

Adams and Carpenter 

Amherst and Chestnut 

Beacon and Merrimack 

Beecli and Grove 

Beech and Cedar 

Bridge and Birch 

Bridge and Belmont 

Bell and Pine 

Bridge and Hall 

€edar, between Beech and Maple 

Clark and Chestnut 

Concord and Belmont 

Cedar and Pine 

Clark and Union 

Clark and Ray 

Central, west of Franklin 

Clark and Adams 

Carpenter 

Dean avenue 

Elm east back, between Concord and Lowell 

Elm, front of New York store .'... 

Elm and Hanover 

East High and Ashland 

Elm and Market 

Elm and Trenton 

East Spruce, between Beech and Maple 

Elm and Merrimack 

Green and Union 

Orove and Pine 

Orove and Beech 

Hanover and Beech 

High school lot 

Hall and Orange 

Jane and East High 

Liberty and Norlli 

Laurel and Beacon 

Lowell and Hall 

Lake avenue, near Canton 

Lake avenue and Union 

Lake avenue, between Union and Beech 

Lake avenue and Belmont 

Lowell, between Elm and Chestnut 

Laurel, between Pine and Union 

Merrimack and Pine 

Manchester and Wilson 

Maple and Brook 

Myrtle and Hall 

Market and Elm 

Maple and Bridge 

Maple and Sagamore 

North, between Union and Liberty 

Old Bridge and Hall 

Pine and Harrison 

Prospect and Elm 



Amount carried forward 



50 
18 
61 
25 
25 
17 
18 
17 
20 
28 
226 
19 
17 
16 
25 
126 
19 
17 
44 
21 
19 
55 
21 
445 

9 
56 
57 
.•i5 
16 
16 
28 
53 

8 
17 
21 
19 

8 
1,018 
20 
67 
19 
17 
18 
100 
75 
50 
18 
114 
25 
30 
18 
20 
38 

8 

8 
153 
12 
21 
118 
128 



13.25 
3.00 
7.00 
2.00 
2.. 50 
3.50 
3.50 
4.50 
3.50 
4.12 
20.00 
3.50 
2.00 
3.50 
6.75 
7.00 
3.25 
3.00 
3.50 
5.00 
3.50 
6.50 
3.50 
49.85 
2.00 
5.50 
9.00 
5.00 
2.00 
2.00 
4.00 
6.00 
1.50 
2.75 
3.50 
3.50 
1.00 
93.00 
2.00 
15.50 
2.75 
2..10 
2.00 
8.00 
5.50 
5.00 
3.50 
7.50 
5.00 
3.50 
3.00 
2.00 
5.00 
5.00 
1.75 
12.00 
1.00 
3.50 
10.00 
13.50 



3,787 



8417.97 



STREET AND PARK COMiMISSION. 
EDGESTONES SET.— Contimied. 



141 



LOCATIOK. 



Number 
of feet. 



Labor. 



Amount brought forward . 

Pine and Grove 

Pine, east back, and Grove . 

Ray and Carpenter 

Summer, near Beech 

Sagamore and Maple 

Spruce, near Union 

Salmon and Beech 

Salmon and Elm 

Sagamore and Ash 

Union and North 



Totals . 




S464.22 



EDGESTONES RESET. 



Auburn, west of Pine. . 
Chestnut and Amherst. 

Elm and Market 

Elm and Merrimack. . . 
Hanover 



Labor, |17. 



PAVING. 



25 feet 



100 
76 



251 feet 



This board has realized as fully as others that the past 
condition of Elm street has not been creditable to a 
city of this size. The members did not feel, however, 
that with the means at their command, and when there 
were such pressing needs in so many other directions, 
that they were justified in diverting such an amount of 
money from the general appropriation as would be neces- 
sary to make a decent commencement towards providing 
proper pavements. It was, therefore, with much pleas- 
ure that the board noted the appropriation set aside for 
the special purpose of repaving a portion of Elm street. 
After a thorough investigation, the commission settled 
upon the kind of paving which was laid, and it is believed 



142 « ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

to be such as will last for a long period of time without 
any expense for repairs. 

The old square blocks were removed and used in the 
paving of Elm west back and Manchester south back 
streets. This, by the way, was a much-needed improve- 
ment, as both streets are much used and both have been 
so muddy at times as to be offensive. After the old pav- 
ing was removed, the soil vfas taken out to a depth of 
about fourteen inches. A bed of concrete, consisting of 
cement, sand, and crushed stone, was then laid five inches 
deep. This when well set or hardened was covered with 
a cushion of sand from one to two inches deep, and on 
this cushion the small granite blocks were put into posi- 
tion by exj)erienced pavers. The crevices between the 
blocks were filled with a grout consisting of equal parts 
of Portland cement and sand. The cement was mixed 
with water and made moist enough so that it would flow 
readily into the cracks. It was brushed over the surface 
with a broom, care being taken to fill every crevice full. 
This left a roadbed which was smooth and solid, and 
which we have reason to believe will stand the test of 
time and use. The work was done under the immediate 
direction of Soule, Dillingham & Co., of Boston, Mass., 
and is a credit to them and to the city. That firm fur- 
nished the pavers, or the men who placed the blocks in 
position, but outside of this the labor was local. The 
street was thus treated from the north side of Merrimack 
to the south side of Stark street, which covers a surface 
of 3,704.78 square yards. The total cost was |9,822.96, 
making the cost per yard |2.65. Of the entire amoaat 
the Manchester Street Railway Co. paid as its share, 
11,822.96. 

The citizens on the west side of the river expressed a 
wish for a concrete rather than a granite block paving 
on Granite street. The commission is always ready to 
grant the reasonable request of any citizen when it is in 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 143 

its power so to do, and after an investigation decided to 
yield to their wishes and put in a concrete paving. The 
street was prepared in practically the same waj as was 
Elm street, but instead of the granite blocks a four-coat 
concrete was laid, under contract with the C. H. Robie 
Co. of this city. The work is guaranteed by them for five 
years. The total cost was |6,203.45, there being 5,304.64 
square yards, and the cost per square yard was $1 for the 
space between the car rails, and |1.25 for the space out- 
side the rails, the Manchester Street Railway Co. paying 
as its share, |2,076.42. 

In heavy showers much good road material on the hills 
has been washed into the cesspools, and is a loss not only 
of material which has to be replaced at a considerable 
cost, but the expense of cleaning the cesspools is no small 
matter. To remedy this difficulty the gutters in these 
locations are paved. In West Manchester, 3,797 yards of 
such paving have been laid, in doing which 265 loads of 
paving stones were used, all of which came from the city 
gravel bank in that district. Two hundred and sixty-five 
yards were relaid in that section. On this side of the 
river 6,415- square yards were put down, using 520 loads 
of stone, and 314 yards were relaid. Edgestones were 
set where furnished by the abuttors. In division No. 
2, 4,278 feet in length of such stones were set or reset, 
and in division No. 10, 251 feet were also cared for. 

It is to bp earnestly hoped that the policy begun last 
year, of paving a portion of Elm street, will be continued, 
and the commission expects the city government will this 
year, as last, set apart a certain sum for that purpose. 



144 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Location. 



Square 
yards. 



Number 
of loads 
of stone. 



Labor. 



Ashland, Lowell to east High 

Amberst, Hall to Belmont 

Beacon, Lake avenue to Manchester 

Belmont, Lake avenue to Central 

Blodget, Chestnut to Elm 

Calef road. Baker south 

Grove, Pine east 

Green, Pine east 

Laurel, Beacon to Milton 

Lake avenue, between Beacon and Cass . 
Lake avenue, between Union and Beech . 

Laurel, between Lincoln and Maple 

Liberty, north to Webster 

Lake avenue, Cass west 

Milton, between Lake avenue and Central 

Manchester, between Pine and Union 

Pine, Valley to Cedar 

Prospect, between Russell and Linden . . . 

Ray, Carpenter north 

Salmon, Beech to Walnut 

Totals 



179 

13 

777 

85 

19 

844 

748 

330 

136 

136 

693 

208 

467 

328 

68 

18 

l.li": 

63 

40 

134 



6,413 



77 

34 

16 

16 

21 

26 

50 

14 

8 

1 

112 

8 

5 

16 



S54.50 
2.00 

261.18 

22.00 

7.00 

256.50 

153.16 
62.46 
40 80 
50.78 
54.25 
80.60 
62.00 
20.00 
20.84 
2.00 

235. oa 

17.00 
21.50 
90.00 



81,513.57 



In a good many cases the stone that was used was taken 
from Elm street. 

COBBLE GUTTER PAVING RELAID. 



Location. 



Labor. 



Elm, near foundry 

Lowell, west Chestnut 

Market, near Elm 

Maple, between Harrison and Brook 

Prospect, near Russell 

Wilson 

Total 




S81.37 



MACADAMIZING. 



The building of roadway by this means has been pushed 
during the season. The portable crusher which was pur- 
chased early in the season has been used with extremely 
satisfactory results. It was first stationed at the corner 



STKEET AND PARK COMMISSION. 145 

of Elm and Carpenter streets, and the immense amount 
of rock which liad accumulated in the building of sewers 
in that section was crushed and used upon the streets. 
Afterwards the crusher was removed to the Amoskeag 
Companj-'s ledge in McGregorville. The total amount 
spent for the purpose during the year was |14,472.74, 
which included the price of the new crusher, |2,412.51, 
and the expense incident to the thorough repair of the 
road roller. 34,044 square yards, covering 9,275 feet in 
length of streets, were newly macadamized. Among the 
streets so treated were Pine, from Valley to Cedar; Mc- 
Gregor, from Putnam to ximory; Chestnut, from Lowell 
to Brook, and Pine, from Merrimack to Prospect. The 
first two streets mentioned were very badly in need of 
repair, and, being much used, the work w^as greatly ap- 
preciated. The ability to move the crusher about has 
materially diminished the cost of macadamizing. The 
location of the crusher in McGregorville enabled the de- 
partment to deliver twenty loads of crushed stone on 
McGregor street with the same amount of team labor 
that would have been required for five loads had it been 
taken from the city ledge, where the old permanent 
crusher is located. 

The cost per square yard for macadamizing this year 
has been only |0.425, as compared with |0.528, which was 
the cost during the year 1896. It should also be noted 
that in this cost per square yard is reckoned the price 
of the new crusher and the repairs to the road roller. 

The following table shows how the cost for macadamiz- 
ing has been divided: 

10 



146 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
MACADAMIZING STREETS. 



Location. 


Length 
in feet- 


Square 
yards. 


Crushed 
stone. 


Other 
stone. 


Labor. 




500 


1,889 


230 




S109.25 


Chestnut, Lowell to Brook 


2.300 


8,689 


505 




378.85 


McGregor (W. Manchester) (new) 


1,075 


3,822 


1,134 




3,341.07 


Pine, Valley to Cedar (new) 


1,700 


5,666 


890 


1,9.53 


2,!}64.00 


Pine, Merrimack to Prospect... 


3,100 


11,711 


730 




547.50 




600 


2,267 


230 




172.50 




1,738.54 














Total 


9,275 


34,044 


3,719 


1,953 


SS,611.61 







SUMMARY, 

Labor, division No. 2 |o,270.54 

Labor, division No. 10 3,341.07 

Portable crusher, comijlete 2,412.51 

Repairs on old crusher, steam drills, road- 
roller, etc 1,035.83 

Stone chips 732.80 

Forcite powder for blasting 724.26 

Incidentals 451.06 

Coal, coke, wood, oil 358 48 

Freight 116.19 

Water-works 30.00 



Total 



,472.74 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



147 



CONCRETE WORK.— MEAD, MASOX & CO. 
NEW CROSSINGS. 



Location. 



Square 
yards. 



Price per 
yard. 



Total cost. 



A and South Main 

Appleton and Elm 

Adams and Clark 

Bridge and Union cast back 

Coolidge avenue and Cartier 

Coolidge avenue and Bremer 

Cartier and Aniory 

Concord and Beech east back... . . 
Chestnut and Central south back 

Dubuque and Amory 

Grove and Pine east back 

Massabesic and Summer 

Myrtle and Hall 

McGregor and Amory 

McGregor and Wayne 

McGregor at mill gate 

Munroe and Elm 

Pine and Cedar 

Pine and Auburn 

Pine and Lowell 

Prospect 

Salmon and Liberty 

Total 



37.15 
64.67 
31.04 
•23.77 
38. 6S 
28.90 
30.22 
21.67 
17.60 
20.67 
16.62 
30. 5S 
30.22 
14.84 
17.60 
18.33 
30.67 
28.62 
30.04 
2.67 
32.00 
30.56 



).75 



597.12 



S27.86 
48.50 
23.28 
17.83 
29.01 
21.69 
22.66 
16.25 
13.20 
15.50 
12.46 
22.93 
22.66 
11.13 
13.20 
13.75 
23.00 
21.46 
22.53 
2.00 
24.00 
22.91 



S447.81 



SIDEWALKS REPAIRED. 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Price per 
yard. 


Total cost. 


Bridge and Union east back 


1.34 
18.60 
6.39 
71.22 
6.54 
3.25 
2.33 
39.67 
16.67 


80.45 

.50 
.45 

.25 
.37 


$0.60 

8 37 






2 88 




32 05 




3 27 




1 46 




1 05 




9 92 




6.16 






Total 


166.01 




S65.76 







148 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SUMMARY. 

Concrete work by Mead, Mason Co., for Street and Park Commission Department, 



Total cost. 



New crossings 

Sidewalks repaired 

Total 




$513.57 



CONCRETE WORK.— CHARLES H. ROBIE CO. 
NEW CROSSINGS. 



Location. 



Square 
yards. 



Price 
per yd. 



Total 
cost. 



Adams and North Main . . . 

Auburn 

Beauport and Sullivan... 
Carpenter and Chestnut.. 
Colby and West Hancock 

Carpenter and Adams 

Cedar and Hall 

Carpenter and Ray 

Concord and Belmont.... 
Dartmouth and Dickey... 

Green and Union 

Gore and Beech 

Granite 

Jewett and Valley 

Jewett and Valley 

Liberty and North 

Lake avenue and Milton . 
Lake avenue and Beacon 

Market and Elm 

McDuftle and Boynton 

North and Bay 

Pine and North 

Riddle and Milford 

Sagamore and Beech 

South Main and Mast 

Total 



8.00 


$0.75 


13.15 


.75 


29.78 


.75 


30.27 


.75 


22.84 


.75 


30.36 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


30.00 


.75 


28.44 


.75 


24.00 


.75 


30.22 


.75 


30.67 


.75 


133.30 


1.25 


29.78 


.75 


30.04 


.75 


55.38 


.75 


5.44 


.75 


5.78 


.75 


14.82 


.75 


25.78 


.75 


29 50 


.75 


27.56 


.75 


31.55 


.75 


25.33 


.75 


18.22 


.75 


740.43 





$6.00 
9.86 
22.33 
22.70 
17.13 
22.77 
22.67 
22.50 
21.33 
18.00 
22.67 
23.00 
166.62 
22.83 
22.53 
41.53 
4.08 
4.33 
11.12 
19.34 
22.12 
20.67 
23.65 
19.00 
13.66 



$621.95 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
REPAIRED CROSSINGS. 



149 



Location. 



Square Price 
yards, 'per yd, 



Total 
cost. 



Belmont and Massabesic 

Granite at Hadley's 

Granite at Wallace's 

Market and Elm 

Spruce and Massabesic. 

Second and Granite 

West and Granite 

Total 



41.36 
5.83 

11.00 
9.39 

92.44 
3.38 
3.55 



166.95 



$0.50 
.45 
.65 
.50 
.50 
.45 
.50 



2.62 
7.15 
4.69 
46.22 
1.52 
1.78 



$84.66 



SIDEWALKS REPAIRED. 



Location. 



Square 
yards. 



Price 
per yd 



Total 
cost. 



Beacon 

Colby and West Hancock — 

No. 218 Cartier 

Granite at Wallace's 

McGregor bridge 

Mast and South Main 

North and Bay 

North Main at engine house. 

Park common 

South Main and Mast 

West Hancock and Second... 



Total. 



1.11 

8.23 
55.44 
34.13 
36.36 
8.94 
3.51 
11.28 



57.68 
16.22 



232.90 



$0.45 
.45 
.35 
.45 
.50 
.45 
.45 
.50 



.45 
.50 



$0.50 

3.70 

19.39 

15.36 

18.18 

4.02 

1.58 

5.64 

33.50 

25.96 

8.11 



$135.94 



ROADWAYS REPAIRED. 



Location. 



Square 
yards. 



Price 
per yd, 



Total 
cost. 



Amherst 

Amoskeag bridge road 

Chestnut .. 

Chestnut 

Hanover 

Merrimack 

Maple 

Union 

Total 



16.05 


$0.50 


198.94 


.50 


12.28 


.50 


190.80 


.50 


51.39 


.50 


461.74 


.50 


95.00 


.50 


36.22 


.50 


1,062.42 





$8.02 
99.47 
6.14 
95.40 
25.69 
230.87 
47.. 50 
18.11 



$.531.20 



150 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SUMMARY. 

Concrete tvorJ: by Chas. H. Robie Co., Street and Parle Commission Department. 



Square 
yards. 



Total cost. 



New crossings 

Crossings repaired. 
Sidewalks repaired 
Roadways repaired 

Total 



740.43 

166.95 

232.90 

1,062.42 



1621.95 
84.66 
135.94 
531.20 



$1,373.75 



SCAVENGER SERVICE. 

The attention of the city government is most earnestly 
directed to the position in -which this board is placed in 
relation to the disposal of the city's waste. During the 
latter part of the year the board of health commenced 
legal proceedings, intended to restrain the street and park 
commissioners from the further use of the dumps. This 
commission has no voice in making the appropriations, 
and is given a certain sum of money for a certain purpose 
and is expected to exercise such judgment in its expendi- 
ture as will accomplish the purpose intended. At the 
time the proceedings in question were commenced it was 
apparent to us all that any radical change must result in 
an expenditure far beyond the means at command. The 
method in vogue might not have been a good one; that, 
however, is a matter of opinion, but it certainly i)ossessed 
the advantage of cheapness, which in these times of high 
taxes is a decided merit. Ever since the city was built 
it has been customary to use this waste matter in filling 
new streets which were being built through the ravines 
in the southern part of the city. As houses were erected 
in the immediate neighborhood this commission took 
extra precautions to secure the inhabitants from harm. 
Men were stationed at the dumps for the express purpose 
of covering the small amount of swill or other offensive 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 151 

matter wbicli might appear with the ashes. Every day or 
so clean sand or soil to a depth of three feet or more was 
dumped on top of the whole. This was done under the 
supervision of the superintendent of streets, and from our 
own observation we are satisfied that it was well done. 
That some other people used these dumps without our 
knowledge or consent is undoubtedly true. Teams have 
been seen dumping swill and other refuse material during 
the evening hours. Whenever such nuisances were dis- 
covered they were promptly abated by men connected 
with this department. It would seem that the board of 
health had a duty in the matter in discovering and pun- 
ishing such offenders. This department does not want 
to continue the present method if some better means can 
be found to care for the refuse. Above all things it does 
not want to quarrel or be in litigation with any other de- 
partment. Xo system has, that we know of, yet been in- 
vented which destroys this rubbish in an effective manner 
at a reasonable expense. The location of a crematory at 
a point near enough to a city to be practical has always 
raised a storm of indignation from the people who live in 
its vicinity. The cost of carting the refuse out into the 
country is very great. The building of new streets where 
filling is necessary will be increased. In the face of these 
difficulties, when we are instructed to exercise all possible 
economy, this board does not consider its duty to lie in 
recommending the expenditure of money to make experi- 
ments. It has been suggested that the board of health 
wishes to control the scavenger service. It is not a pleas- 
ant duty, and should the city government conclude it can 
be served in a better manner, with less expense, by that 
board, this commission will most cheerfully resign that 
part of its duties. In the meantime, this department will 
endeavor to keep thoroughly posted on the progress made 
in the disposal of city waste, and as soon as it becomes 
convinced that such a method has been devised as will 



152 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

do the work of destruction thorougbl}^ and without 
offense to the people living in the vicinity of its location, 
at a price which our citizens would consider reasonable, 
we will make every effort to secure it for the city's use. 

The collection of this refuse has, we believe, been well 
done. Our streets, both back and front, have never jire- 
sented a neater appearance than during the year past. 
Complaints against the men engaged in doing the work 
have been few indeed. 

If the board of health insists on pressing the case to a 
finish, and the injunction asked for is granted, a verj' 
large sum will be necessary to do the work in a manner 
satisfactory to it, and we ask the city government to note 
that fact in connection with the appropriation for 1898. 

The following summary shows how the cost for scaven- 
ger service has been divided: 

SUMMARY. 

Labor, men and teams $11,556.01 

City farm 2,708.30 

Kepairs on teams and harnesses 158.14 

Hay, grain, feed 809.65 

Incidentals 27.85 

Total 115,260.85 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



153 



Location. 



No. 


Cost of 
material. 


Labor. 


1 


$11.58 


$8.00 


3 


48.64 


28 00 


1 


13.64 


6.00 


2 


30.95 


19.00 


3 


35.89 


25.00 


1 


14.96 


10.00 


1 


14.01 


10.00 


2 


27.93 


15.00 


I 


25.65 


20.50 


2 


26.16 


15,00 


2 


44.96 


26.00 


4 


80.06 


40.00 


1 


11.17 


5.00 


1 


12.42 


10.00 


6 


55.68 


60.00 


3 


45.14 


30 60 


2 


16.39 


7.00 


2 


34.23 


20.00 


2 


24.93 


28.50 


2 


28.97 


22.00 


1 


9.98 


8.50 


4 


52.62 


32.00 


1 


12.16 


17.00 


1 


11.17 


10.00 


6 


107.85 


61.75 


2 


23.14 


16.75 


2 


19.96 


22.00 


2 


22.74 


13.50 


1 


14.01 


11.50 


2 


25.69 


20.00 


1 


14.01 


9.00 


2 


30.88 


14.75 


3 


47.70 


16..50 


1 


14.95 


12.75 


2 


37.48 


50.00 


1 


14.16 


8.50 


1 


10.77 


8.00 


1 


12.42 


9.00 


3 


40.29 


12.00 


1 


15.35 


13.00 


1 


10.57 


6.50 


1 


14.01 


12.50 


1 


11.17 


10.00 


1 


14.38 


9.0O 


2 


23.53 


25.00 


1 


13.35 


8.00 


6 


91.27 


44.25 


1 


15.21 


6.. 50 


1 


20.78 


34.00 


4 


79.32 


48.75 


1 


27.78 


17.50 


4 


49.03 


32.00 


1 


11.36 


8.00 


2 


30.16 


19.00 


107 


81,552.61 


$1,053.10 



Auburn, between Union and Beech. 

Ashland and Lowell 

Ash, between Harrison and Brook.. 

Ashland and Concord 

Alfred 

Beech and Prospect 

Beech and Cedar north back 

Beech and Orange 

Brook and Maple 

Belmont and Bridge 

Beech and Grove 

Beech and Auburn 

Concord and Beech 

Cedar between Lincoln and Wilson. 

Carpenter 

■Chestnut and Pennacook 

Calef road 

Clark and Chestnut 

Clark and Adams 

Chestnut and Carpenter 

Chestnut east back 

Everett 

Elm and Webster 

Elm, near Amherst — 

Green, between Pine and Union 

■Granite 

Harrison east of Hall 

Hanover, near Alfred , 

Hanoversouth back and Beech 

Hubbard and Hanover 

Lincoln and Cedar north back , 

Laurel and Beacon , 

Laurel and Wilson 

Lowell south back, west Chestnut..., 

Lake avenue and Beacon 

Laurel near Union , 

Liberty east back 

Maple and Cedar north back 

Merrimack and Beacon 

Milton and Lake avenue 

Manchester and Elm 

Manchester south back on Beech 

Merrimack, east Maple 

Nutt road near cemetery 

Orange and Beech 

Oak and Orange 

Pine, between Valley and Auburn.... 

Pine and Green 

Salmon and Pine 

Union and Grove 

Union and Bell 

Union, north Silver 

West Central back street 

Walnut and Salmon 



Total. 



154 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 
REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



No. 



Cost of 
mateiiaL 



Labor. 



Auburn, near Pine 

Amherst, between Hanover and Pine 
Beecb, between Orange and Myrtle.. . 

Concord and Dutton 

Elm and Granite 

Elm and Sagamore 

Elm near Dean 

Elm and Amherst 

Elm and Sagamore 

Lake avenue west Wilson 

Lake avenue west Maple 

Lake avenue east Pine 

Lake avenue and Laurel 

Laurel, between Union and Beech. ... 

Market and Elm , 

Orange and Chestnut 

Pine and Summer 

Pine and Green 

Pearl near Chestnut 

Salmon and Elm 

LTnion, between Harrison and Brook. 

Union east back 

Willow, between Valley and Merrill. 

Total 



28 



$2.54 
4.65 
6.62 
9.e5 
8 01 
6.61 
8.88 

11.76 
6.73 

10.24 

9.05 

.64 

2.39 

19.55 

12.56 
7.22 
1.94 
2.89 
5.06 
5.98 
8.32 
7.35 
3.29 



$161.33 



$2.50 

6.0O 

3.50 

23.78 

7. CO 

6.50 

5.00 

10.00 

15.00 

26.00 

21.00 

12.00 

10.62 

30.00 

8.00 

6.00 

3.00 

2.00 

l.CO 

2.50 

7.0O 

2.50 

15.00 



$226.50- 



SEWERS. 

The city owns four steam drills and a Carson trench 
machine, and the work done in putting in sewers during 
the season has shown conclusively the wisdom of their 
purchase. By the use of this machinery the cost per 
linear foot was only |1.75, during the year 1897, as com- 
pared with |2.50 per foot during 18D6. About four 
miles, or, to be exact, 20,657 feet, of new sewers were laid. 
Some of the more extensive jobs were trunk sewers, sit- 
uated as follows: 

Belmont street, from Valley to Hayward, 1,830 feet 
long; Hayward, Belmont to Tajior, 648 feet; Silver, 
Lincoln to Hall, 1,232 feet; Valle}', Belmont to Cypress, 
1,084 feet; Union, Silver to North of Prescott, 756 feet; 
Montgomery east back, from Kelley to Amory, 570 feat; 
Dubuque east back, from Kelley to Bremer, 624 feet; 
Whittemore land, Putnam to Piscataquog river, 847 feet ; 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 155 

Sagamore, from Kussell easterly, 754 feet; Elm, from 
Carpenter to Trenton, 556 feet; and Carpenter, from Elm 
to Union, 1,426 feet. 

In the Elm-street sewer it was necessary to make a cut 
fifteen feet deep in the solid ledge. This was done at 
a cost of 19.45 per linear foot. The sewer on Carpenter 
street was laid in a trench which was blasted to a depth 
of seven and eight feet in the ledge during its entire 
length. The cost per linear foot of this sewer was $2.21. 
The water-works department bore a part of the expense 
necessarj' to put in the two trenches on Elm and Carpen- 
ter streets, and the water pipe was laid at the same time 
the sewer was built. 

The extraordinary- growth of this city during the past 
years has made it almost impossible to supply the demand 
for sewers. At the present time some seven miles of 
sewers are ordered built by the city government, the 
building of which has not yet been begun. Most of the 
sewers now ordered built are located in the suburbs where 
the soil, as has been before stated, is filled with boulders 
and ledges, and the steam drills and dynamite have to be 
extensively used in their construction, which largely in- 
creases the cost. 

The attention of the city government is respectfully 
called to these two facts with a request that it will take 
them into consideration when the special appropriation 
for sewers is settled upon. 



156 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Street. 



Location. 





tn 




o 










03 




u 


<o 


S} 


ej 


N 


g 


t» 



Alfred 

Belmont 

Belmont 

Carpenter 

Carpenter 

Carpenter 

Central 

Elm 

Elm 

Everett 

Hall 

Hanover 

Hanover 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Harvard 

Hayward 

Hay ward 

Hayward 

Lake avenue ■ 

Laurel 

Lam-el 

Laurel 

Liberty east back. 

Linden 

Maple 



From Hanover northerls" 

Valley to Harvard 

Harvard to south of Somerville 

Elm to Ray 

Ray to Union 

In Union 

From east of Beacon westerly 

Carpenter to Trenton 

From south of Clarke southerly .. . . 

Clarke to Waldo 

Prospect to Harrison 

From w'st of Beacon to e'st of Hubbard 
From e'st of Hubbard to e'st of Alfred 
From Hall .easterly 

From Hall easterly 

From Linden westerly 

From Linden westerly 

From Wilson easterly 

Belmont to Taylor 

Belmont to Taylor 

From Taylor easterly 

From Canton easterly 

From east of Union to Beech 

From Beech easterly 

From east of Beacon westerly 

From north of North northerly 

Prospect to Harrison 

From Silver to north of Harvard 



A.kron 


10 


48 


" 


15 


1,140 


" 


10 


690 


" 


15 


1,161 


" 


12 


224 


" 


8 


40 


K 


10 


96 


" 


15 


556 


" 


8 


56 


" 


10 


358 


" 


I'i 


274 


" 


12 


371 


" 


10 


297 


Iron . . 


10 


12 


Akron 


10 


288 


Iron . . 


10 


13 


Akron 


10 
10 


302 
204 


Iron . . 


12 


10 


Akron 


12 


638 


" 


10 


350 


(( 


10 


398 


" 


12 




II 


10 
10 


147 


•• 


10 


192 


" 


15 


270 


.. 


15 


406 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



157 



IN 1897.— EAST SIDE. 



wS 






Nature of 
excavation. 



423 

[404 



60 



$38.75 

1,700.00 

660.50 

2,857.71 

440.00 

30.00 

87.80 

5,258.06 

13.80 

491.81 

462.00 

1,250.00 

539.26 

597.62 

543.47 

299.73 

536.81 

270.00 
353.51 
400.69 
363.20 
196.80 
130.57 
472.54 
799.17 



$0,807 
1.482 
0.957 
2.461 
1.964 
0.705 
0.914 
9.456 
0.246 
1.371 
1.686 
3.369 
1.815 

1.992 

1.729 

1.135 

0.826 

0.771 
0.888 
0.947 
0.899 
1.339 
0.517 
1.750 
1.968 



Oct. 13 


Oct. 


16 


7.0 


April 29 


June 


26 


10.0 


" 29 


" 


26 


9.0 


May 3 


Sept. 


7 


7.5 


3 


" 


7 


8.0 


3 


" 


7 


8.5 


Aug. 24 


Aug. 


26 


8.0 


Dec. 28 


May 


26 


15.0 


Aug. 25 


Aug. 


26 


4.0 


Dec. 11 


Dec. 


22 


9.0 


May 5 


May 


15 


10.5 


Aug. 16 


Oct. 


2 


7.0 


" 16 


" 


2 


6.5 


May 17 


June 


1 


8.5 


May 27 


June 


22 


8.0 


July 2 


July 


9 


8.0 


Sept. 20 


Oct. 


5 


8.5 


" 20 


" 


5 


8.0 


April 28 


May 


3 


8.5 


Sept. 22 


Oct. 


2 


8.5 


'• 22 


" 


2 


7.0 


Aug. 26 


Aug. 


30 


8.0 


" 31 


Sept. 


5 


6.0 


May 31 


June 


23 


10.5 


Sept. 6 


Sept. 


20 


16.5 



Gravel. 

Gravel and clay. 

Gravel and clay. 

Ledge. 

Ledge and gravel. 

Ledge and gravel. 

Sand. 

Ledge. 

Sand. 

Sand and hard clay 

Gravel and ledge. 

Gravel and ledge. 

Gravel. 



Hard gravel and 
ledge. 



Sand, gi-avel, and 
ledge. 

Gravel. 

Sand. 

Sand. 
Gravel. 

Sand and clayey 
gravel. 
Gravel and ledge. 
Gravel. 

Gravel and ledge. 
Sand. 



158 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SEWERS BUILT IN 1897. 



Street. 



Location. 



Merrimack 

Myrtle 

Myrtle 

Myrtle ... 

Orange 

Ray 

Russell 

Sagamore 

Sagamore 

Silver 

Silver 

Somerville 

Spruce 

Taylor 

Union 

Valley 

Walnut 

Walnut east back. . . 
Walnut east back. . . 

Wilson 

Wilson 



Total 



From Belmont to east of Milton 

From Hall westerly 

From Hall westerly 

From Hall westerly 

From Hall easterly 

From south of Clarke northerly 

From Harrison northerly 

Oak to Russell 

From Russell easterly 

Lincoln to Wilson 

Wilson to Hall . . 

Jewett to Cypress 

From Canton easterly 

From Valley southerly 

From Silver to north of Prescott. . . 
From e'st of Belm'nt to w'st of Cypress 

From Salmon southerly 

From north of Salmon southerly. . . 
Fi'om Christian brook northerlj- ... 

From Harvard southerly 

From Silver southerly 



Akron 
Iron . . 
Akron 



438 

30 

293 

172 

300 

68 

362 

450 

304 

669 

563 

441 

140 

8 

766 

1,084 

70 

54 

198 

150 

76 

15,236 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



159 



EAST S1V>E. — Contimied. 





m 




ai 


<u 


m 




o 


>H 


O 




<D 






m 


S 


J2 


s 


ej 


rf, 


o 


S 


h-1 


a 



0*J 
bBCJ 



Nature of 
excavation. 



28 



32 



954 



58 



$914.32 1$1.962 Oct. 30 Dec. 9 



364 59 1.128 



116.45 

1,076.25 

47.00 

106.50 

490.00 

294.87 

1,360.86 

971.85 

1,013.05 

169.40 

5.00 

1,210.36 

1,564.21 

70.10 

167.85 

335.76 

165.15 

167.45 



65 $29,404.82 



0.677 
3 587 
0.091 
270 
1.088 
0.969 
2 022 
1.726 
2.297 
1.210 
0.625 
1.606 
1.437 
1.001 
3.108 
1,695 
1.101 
2.203 



April 19 

" 19 
Aug. 25 

" 24 

Nov. 15 

Aug. 3 

3 

June 14 

" 14 
Aug. 3 
April 19 
June 30 
Oct. 20 
June 30 
Aug. 17 

" 31 

3 

June 29 

July 28 



Api-. 2S 



" 28 
Oct. 15 
Aug. 26 
Nov. 18 
Aug. 16 

" 16 

" 2 

" 2 
Sept. 1 
April 27 
July 30 
Nov. 9 |13.0 
July 30 9.5 



5.5 



8.0 



6.5 
10.5 
7.0 
4.5 
7 5 
7.0 
11.0 
10.5 
11.0 
9.0 
10.0 



Aug. 19 

Sept. 7 

3 

July 1 I 7.5 
Aug. 2 10.0 



5.0 
9 
10.0 



Gravel and ledge. 

Sand and gravel. 

Gravel and ledge. 
Gravel and ledge. 
Sand and gravel. 
Gravel. 

Gravel and ledge. 

Sand and clay. 

Sand and clay. 

Gravel and ledge. 

Gravel. 

Sand and gravel. 

Sand and clay. 

Sand and gravel. 

Clay and ledge. 

Gi-avel. 

Sand and ledge. 

Clay. 

Clay. 



160 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT' 



Street. 



Location. 



C <u 



Cartier east back — 
Dubuque east back. . 
Dubuque east back.. 

Granite 

Granite 

Granite 

Granite 

Granite 

Granite 

Montgomery east b'k 

Schiller 

Sullivan 

Third 

Wheelock 

Whittemore land 

Total 



From Sullivan southerly 

Kelley to Bremer 

From Bremer northerly 

Turner to Second 

Turner to Second 

From Second to east of Main 

From Second to east of Main 

Green to Quincy 

West of Second 

Kelley to Amory 

From Hale easterly 

Beauport to Cartier east back 

From south of Walker southerly. 

From Goff e northerly 

Piscataquog river to Putnam — 



Akron 



212 
624 
343 



50' 
700' 



144 
206 
160 
84T 

3,291 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



161 



IN J.897.— WEST SIDE. 



h1 


m 

O 

a 


© 
O 
P. 

S 

oi 
•J 


3 
O 


>-i 

O 

P. 

(Si 

■n 

a> 
O 


O 
O 


H 





s 

p, 





0) 
9) 







teas 

< 


Nature of 
excavation. 


94 
136 
521 

32 


2* 

2 

2 

1 
2 




23 
14 

4 
6 
18 


2 

2 
S 

1 
1 
2 

2 


$91.04 
619.25 
3G9.24 
191.75 
224.70 
458.90 

23.87 
233.51 

16.40 
608.12 
245.25 
214.07 
743.06 
115.62 
2,698.81 


$0,429 
0.992 
1.061 
2.039 
1.652 
0.880 
0.745 
0.849 
328 
0.868 
2.078 
1.456 
3.607 
0.722 
3.186 


Ms 
Ju 

Ma 

1 


ly 6 

ne 22 

22 

y 18 

18 
IS 

18 

7 

17 


May 17 

July 9 

9 

" 18 

" 18 

" 18 

" 18 

May 15 

•' 17 

June 22 

Aug. 2 

May 5 

Nov. 6 

Dec. 29 

Oct. 23 


7.0 

11.0 
7.0 
8.5 
8.0 
6.5 
6.0 
10.0 
8.0 
12.5 

13.0 
6.0 
6.5 
6.0 

10.5 


Sand. 
Sand. 
Sand. 

Stony gravel. 
Stony gravel. 
Stony gravel. 
Stony gravel. 
Sandy loam. 
Sand. 


275 


1 




11 

1 
23 

2 

8 
4 
6 


118 


2 

1 

1 

3 

17 




June 11 
July 20 
April 20 
Oct. 12 
Dec. 15 
Sept. 11 


Sand. 

Clay. 

Sand. 

Gravel and ledge. 

Muck and ledge. 

Clay and ledge. 


1176 


120 


21 


$6,853.59 

























♦Cesspool manholes. 
11 



162 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Length of sewers, east side, division No. 2. . 11,689 feet 
Length of sewers, east side, division No. 7. . 4,501 " 
Length of sewers, west side, division No. 10 4,467 " 

Total 20,657 feet 

Cost of sewers, east side, division No. 2. . . . |23,485.S5 
Cost of sewers, east side, division No. 7. . . . 5,918.97 

Cost of sewers, west side, division No. 10 . . 6,853.59 

Total $36,258.41 

Average cost per foot, east side, division No. 2 $2,009 

Average cost per foot, east side, division No. 7 1.315 

Average cost per ft., west side, division No. 10 1.534 
Average total cost per foot, $1,755. 

SUMMARY. 

Total appropriation for new sewers $45,697.57 

Expended, new sewers, east side $24,146.76 
new sewers, west side 6,853.50 
North Elm St. sewer 5,258.06 
107 new cesspools, 

division No. 2 2,605.71 

On hand, new sewers 4,301.77 

Kiver road sewer 439.51 

supplies at city vard. . 2,092.17 

■ $45,607.57 

The following table shows how the cost for new sewers, 
including North Elm street sewer, has been divided: 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



163 





•w c- to t. 


: t- CO (N IM - 


■1 « 


X 1- 


H in 




■>*00500041<'*rH«5^ 


-^ a 


3 CO 


■dw 


jj«f>co-i<o6oo-*dccr~.coif 


5 to 




1 lO" r^ t- 


- t- (M CO 00 a. ^ -^ 


S in 


■M m 


^i. 50 CO « O -* <> 


I CO CO 13 O - 


4 m- 


OO 
Eh « 


^ " 


< - 


" - 


■T to" t-T to cf to" CO ei" 1- 


^" s" 




























«» 












• o 


S § S g ^ 5 


> o . 












; Oi 


1 t^ 


M 










-* 


00 .-< ■*' CO - 


^ _ 


5 oi 


o 














c-l O rt I:- t- t- 


t^ 


•f-t 












■^ CI Ol f-* 




eo 


^ 










lb 
















« 


























^ 




■^ 


C' 


to 


^ 


o ■ to o eo ■* IN 


IN t£ 


05 


, a 


« 


a 


oc 


" 


e) t- o OO o o 


(M C 


CO 


"22 


«■ 


^ 


c 


^ 


to t-^ CO O CO 00 


r^ 


c; 


00 


SS 






f 






c 


C5 to O 


05 


O ^ 




c- 


ff- 


(^ 


■« 


00 ^ 






»• 






t~ 


ft^ 


6* 
























a" 


b 

V 






c 




CO 






cr 


to 




a 


in 










c 






m o 




c^ 


<M 








-^ 




to 






CO to 




«■ 


lO 


"s 






* 




C) 






§ =^ 








5 


























s^ 


hJ 
































^ 




c 


<= 


c 


o 


O 


o in 


C 


c 


o 


4J 03 

bObC 




c^ 






IT 


o- 


m 


C 


o in 


c- 


to 


eo 




c 




rr 


c 


CO 


c 


in 




C5 


t- 


If 


» '5 




* 




" 




■^ 


■<S' 


(M 


ffi IN 


e^ 




i 


^o 


































X 


ir 


in 


in 


in 


O 




in 






^ 


4^ 

a 


o 




c< 


(N 


c^ 


e< 


o 


in 




(N 






0| 


to 




-* 


,_ 


_ 


^ 




^- 




^ 






oi 


* 














!> 










CO 








"" 


^ 


"-< 




C^ 




■^ 






& 


0} 




























o 






























t^ 


O! 


*<* 


Tl 


in 


(, 




to 




to 


o* 


^ 


to 


a 


M 


to 


» 




o 


o 




(M 






ir 


-* 


o 


o ^ 


"* 


r^ 


o 


•f 


rg 


CO 




t; 


c- 


^ 


<z 


,_ 


o 




to 






c 




cc 








OC 






00 


p 














<> 










c^ 


(M 


m 
























^^ 


'"' 


































o 




eo 


m 


o 


in 


co 


CO 


t- 




to 








lO 




00 




^ 


o 


X 




(M 




OO 


aj 






ir 




,_J 


■r»< 


o 


c^ 


to 


in 


CO 




to 












CO 


CO 


o 




M- 


c^ 


c- 


















in 


00 




CO 










Ph 






^ 




" 
















a* 


Stings, 
pairs, 
lack- 
itliing. 


o 


^ 


"^ 


^ 


_ 


^ 


■^ 


r- 


c- 


•<t< 


c 


^ 


(N 


to 




o 




to 


^ 


lO 

c 


o 


ir- 

in 


to 


to 


5- 

X 


CO 
CO 


^ 


o- 


CM 


00 









-<* 




« 


Ir- 












<M 


-^ 


in 


c^ 




(M 


































^ 






























c- 


c- 


-# 


C 


o 


eo 


e^ 


_ 




t- 


to 


^ 


o 


^ 


»r: 


to 




c 


tl 


to 


o 


c 


<^ 




c 





to 


o 


ei 


c 


to 


in 


^ 


in 


CO 


j^ 




C-: 


— 


o- 


^ 


;2 


if: 


o 


lO 


't 


CO 




C5 


-^ 






c 


<x. 




d 


a: 




O! 


"^ 


a 




e- 


to 


c 


C 


to 


(- 




* 


























h-J 


»^ 






e 


-* 


co 


rH 




CO 






i 




























































> 


> 














< 
" 1 


= u 


1 ? 

5 a 


5 ct 




o 


c 

C 

c 




a 




£ 




a 


> 




a 




3 o 






&^ 


< 


H 


•« 


V 


J c 


2 


5 e 


:i 


1 



164 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Report of Division No. 10. 



George P. Ames, Agent. 



GENERAL REPAIRS. 

Patched with gravel, Amory street, labor. . . 
Boynton street, labor. 
Bartlett street, labor. 
Bowman street, labor. 
Front street, labor. . 
Granite street, labor 
Joliette street, labor 
Mast road, labor. . . . 
Mast road, labor. . . . 
North Main street, labor 
Railroad street, labor. 
South Main street, labo 
Second street, labor. . . 
Wayne street, labor . . . 



$10.00 

88.75 
5.3.62 
10.00 
48.?7 
13.00 
7.88 
20.00 
26.50 
20.00 
13.00 
27.50 
41.50 
10.00 



1396.12 

Turnpiked, Eddy road, labor $7.00 

Second street, labor 3.03 

Cut trees, Barr street, labor 13.50 

Douglas street, labor 33.00 

Granite street, labor 31.50 

West street, labor 20.50 

1100.1.3 
Built pipe culvert on Eiver road, 58 feet 

long, labor and materials fll.OO 

Whitewashing tree boxes,, material and labor 35.45 
Cleaned out gutters, scraped crossings, and 

general repairs, labor 707.38 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



165 



FEXCING. 

Amory street 264 feet 

Amoskeag bridge, east end 352 " 

Boynton street 32 " 

Bartlett street 512 " 

Eddy road 80 " • 

Front street 160 " 

Hooksett road 552 " 

Kelley street 208 '' 

Lavelle street 176 " 

Mast road 101 '' 

Shirley Hill road 90 •' 

South Main street 1,168 " 

Third street 40 " 

Total , 3,738 feet 

Cost of labor and materials, |212.98. 

STREETS GRAVELED. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Width in 
feet. 



Labor. 



Amory 

Bedford plains 

Coolidge avenue, repaired. 

Cartier, repaired 

Colby, repaired 

Hackett Hill road 

Mast road 

River road 

Railroad 

Sullivan 

Wayne 

West 



Total. 



325 

500 
750 
200 
200 
350 
1,050 



350 
240 
320 
175 



4,460 



S43.25 

75.00 

15.00 

5.00 

10.00 

50.00 

421.12 

500.00 

15.00 

32.00 

75.62 

25.00 



Sl,266.99 



166 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
NEW HIGHWAYS. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Cut or 

fin. 



No. of 
feet. 



Labor. 



Columbus. 
Cartier — 

Essex 

Hevey .... 
Larelle . . . 
Rimmon .. 
♦Second.. . 
Wayne... 



TotaL 



200 
200 
100 
968 
550 



100 



3,204 



Cut. 

Both. 
Cut. 



Cut. 



736 



$209.85 
105.50 
80.87 
319.64 
346.38 
436.53 
300.00 
136.35 



1,430 



51,935.12 



* Built by contract with Wm. H. Coburn. 

For incidentals, see summary of new streets graded in 
division No. 2 report. 

MACADAMIZING. 

McGregor street, from Amorj to Putnam streets, 3,822 
square yards. Used 1,134 loads of crushed stone; labor, 
$3,341.07. The portable crusher was set up at the Amos- 
keag Company's ledge, on North Kelley street, and was 
used in crushing all the stone for macadamizing McGre- 
gor street. 

COBBLE CUTTER PAVING. 



Location. 



Square 
j'ards. 



Number 
of loads. 



Labor. 



Adams 

A street 

Boynton 

Coolidge avenue 

Cartier 

C street 

Cartier 

Dubuque 

Granite 

Kelley 

Mast road 

McDuffle 

Rimmon 

South Main 

Wilton 

Total 



39 

41 
126 
120 
225 
400 
225 
125 
733 
204 
535 
1.^6 
163 
641 

64 



3,797 



24 

23 

,12 

19 

48 
8 



265 



S18.50 
20.00 
50.00 
44.45 
87.12 

131.18 
96.00 
48.00 

210.86 
72.50 

136.30 
56.31 
45.00 

165.37 
25.00 



11,206.59 



* Used old stone. 



Note. — Most of the paving stones used w^ere taken from 
the city's gravel bank in West Manchester. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 



167 



PAVING RELAID. 



B street 

Granite street 

Main and Mast streets. 
McGregor street . . . . , 



Labor, |288.99. 



34 sq. 


yds. 


145 


i( 


107 


a 


334 


u 


620 sq. 


yds 



GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Width 
in feet. 



Cut or 

mi. 



Labor. 



Amory and Cartler 

A and South Main 

Bowman 

Boynton and McDuffle 

C street 

Dubuque 

Front street, raised flagstones. 

Granite 

Mast road 

Wayne 



1.50 
600 
200 
730 
300 
375 



Total 



60 
300 
215 



Cut. 

Fill. 



Both. 
Cut. 



Cut. 
Fill. 



88.25 
12.00 
10.00 
20.00 
18.25 
21.00 
9.50 
1.50 
29.25 
15.00 



8144.75 



EDGESTONES SET. 



Adams and Main 

A and South Main . . . . . 

A and Bowman 

Bowman and Mast 

Boynton & McDuffie . . . 

Granite 

Mast and Main 

McGregor 

Packer and South Main 
Sullivan and Beauport. 
Wavne and Eimmon . . . 



23 feet 

15 " 

17 '' 
6 

37 
297 
112 
760 

31 

14 

18 



Total 

Three^foot circles set, 18. 
Labor, |1 86.45. 



1,330 feet 



168 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



Number. 



Cost of 
materials. 



Labor. 



Amory and Dubuque . 
Beauport back street.. 

Beauport 

Boynton and McDuflae 

Coolidge avenue 

Cartier and Kelley 

Cartier and Amory — 

Coolidge avenue 

C street 

Cartier 

Dartmouth 

Fourth 

Granite and Main 

Granite 

Mast road 

McGregor 

North Main 

Parker and Main 

Rimmon and Wayne .. 

South Main 

Wilton and Main 

Total 



$16.91 
9.65 
14.25 
13.55 
11.98 
64.23 
30.33 
15.37 
7.94 
13.85 
13.84 
17.05 
43.86 
114.60 
36.01 
37.48 
25.22 
23.96 
23.52 
71.28 
14.96 



59.00 
10.00 
12.50 
13.50 
21.75 
115.75 
37.12 
15.00 
10.00 
11.62 
15.00 
10.80 
34.50 
92.25 
16.75 
41.00 
22.50 
14.00 
17.00 
67.74 



}.84 



$596.65 



REPAIRED SEWERS AND CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



„ , Cost of 

Number, materials. 



Labor. 



Amherst road (sewer) 

Beauport 

Beauport (sewer) 

Conant and West 

Cartier and Kelley 

Cartier east back 

Clinton 

C street 

Ferry and Turner (sewer). 

Granite 

Mast road 

Marion and McGregor 

North Main 

Parker 

South Main 

Winter 

Cleaned cesspools 



Total. 



29 



$2.48 



3.51 
11.81 
1.89 
1.69 



14.33 
10.38 
15.69 
3.10 
2.79 
20.04 
4.39 



$11.70 
7.25 
9.11 
7.50 
5 00 
3.50 
10.50 
2.00 
4.69 
38.00 
8.87 
20.00 
5.00 
1.75 
15.00 
7.00 
491.27 



?.14 



The following table gives only the length in feet and 
total cost of new seAvers built during the season in divi- 
sion No. 10. For further details see sewer table, division 
No. 2 report. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
NEW SEWERS BUILT. 



169 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Total cost. 



Cartier east back, Sullivan southerly 

Dubuque east back, Kelley to Bremer 

Dubuque east back, Bremer northerly 

Granite, Turner to Second , 

Granite, Turner to Second 

Granite, Second to east of Main 

Granite, Second to east of Main 

Granite, Green to Quincy 

Granite, southwest of Second 

Montgomery east back, Kelley to Amory 

Schiller, from Hale easterly 

Sullivan, Beauport to Cartier east back 

Third, from south of Walker southerly 

Wheelock, Goffe northerly 

Whittemore land, Piscataquog river to Putnam 

Total 



212 
624 
34S 

94 
136 
521 

32 
275 

50 
70(» 
118 
144 
206 
160 
847 



4,467 



S91.04 
619.25 
369.24 
191.75 
224.70 
458.90 
23.87 
233.51 
16.40 
608.12 
245.25 
214.07 
743.06 
115.62 
2,698.81 



16,853.59 



REPORTS FROM HIGHWAY DIVISIONS. 



Division No. 4. 



Byron E. Moore, Agent. 

Number of feet of roads turnpiked with road-machine, 
1,900. 

Number of feet of roads graveled, 4,500. 

Number of feet of roads clayed and graveled, 2,750. 

One new wooden culvert has been built this year, and 
one repaired. 

Bushes have been cut throughout the division, and the 
roads have been kept clear of all stone and have been 
broken out after snowstorms. 

Total amount expended for labor, |G13.11. 



170 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Division No. 5. 
Mark E. Harvey, Agent. 

Number of feet of roads graveled, 3,155. 
Number of feet of roads turnpiked with road-machine^ 
440. 

Number of feet of new railing- built, 558. 

ROADS WIDENED. 

Londonderry road 118 cu. yds. 

Nutt road 222 " 

Merrill road 84 " 

Total 424 cu. yds. 

Graded by cut, Londonderry road 407 cu. yds. 

Graded by cut, Merrill road 306 '' 

2 culverts extended on Londonderry old road, each 5 
feet long. 

1 culvert extended on Nutt road, 9 feet in length. 

1 culvert extended on Merrill road, 5 feet in length. 

The bridge across Cohas brook on Nutt road has been 
repaired by having the floor timbers strengthened, rods 
tightened and newly planked. Also the small bridge 
near the Harvey mill site has been repaired. 

The small bridge on Weston road has been entirely 
rebuilt. Bushes have been cut on two and one half miles 
of road. New fencing has been built at the ends of 24 
culverts, loose stones removed from all roads once a 
month during the season, all- roads broken out after each 
snow storm, general repairs made throughout the 
division. 

There are many pieces of road in this division which 
need widening, as it is now dangerous for teams to pass 
one another, especially after dark, or when the roads are 
in an icy condition. 

Total amount expended for labor, -|4G5.86. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 171 

Division No. 6. 
Daniel H. Dickey, Agent. 

Turnpiked 36,960 feet of road with road-machine, one 
new culvert and driveway built, new railings built and 
old ones repaired. Stones have been removed from the 
roads once a month and all washouts and waterbars have 
been repaired by filling in with gravel. The roads have 
been broken out after all snowstorms. 

Total amount expended for labor, $-412.97. 



Division No. 7. 

Charles Francis, Agent, 

Turnpiked, Somerville street, Wilson to Hall. 

Cilley road, west from Jewett. 

Candia road. 

Paige street. 

Glenwood avenue. 

Orchard avenue. 
Graveled, Mammoth road, from Cohas avenue south, 
2,300 feet. 

Widened, Mammoth road, Wilson north 450 feet x 20 
feet X 3 feet. 
Widened, Candia road, at Mammoth road. 

NEW STREETS BUILT. 

Central, west from Hall road 150 feet 

Glenwood avenue, from Paige east 450 ■'■ 

Spruce, from Hall road west 450 ''■ 

Total 1,050 feet 

Built bicycle path, 4,460 feet. 



172 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

GUTTERS PAVED. 

Valley street 365 feet 

Jewett street 100 " 

Grove street 500 •' 

Summer street 750 " 

Dearborn street 120 " 

Hosley street 175 " 

Beacon street 200 " 

Spruce street 100 " 

Canton street 250 " 

Massabesic street (relaid) ....;... 350 " 

Total 2,910 feet 

GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 

Belmont street 200 feet 

Dearborn street 100 " 

Hall street 400 " 

Hosley street 50 " 

Summer street 400 " 

Total 1,150 feet 

EDGESTONES SET. 

Belmont and Summer 19 feet 

Cedar and Hall 36 " 

Dearborn and Summer 19 " 

Dearborn 50 " 

Hall and Cedar back street 16 " 

Hosley and Summer 18 " 

Massabesic 50 " 

Spruce and Canton 18 " 

Spruce and Beacon 18 " 

Summer and Hall 18 " 

Summer 50 " 

Total 312 feet 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



173 



Location. 



No. 



Cost of 
materials. 



Labor. 



Belmont 

Belmont and Grove . . . . 

Spruce and Beacon 

Summer and Dearborn 

Total 



$66.24 

6.97 

33.69 

9.40 



$116.30 



$40.00 

G.OO 

20.00 

10.00 



NEW SEWERS. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Total 
cost. 



Belmont, Valley to Harvard 

Belmont, Harvard to south Somcrville . 

Hay ward, Belmont to Taylor 

Hay ward, Taylor easterly 

Somerville, Jewett to Cypress 

Spruce, Canton easterly 

Taylor, Valley southerly 

Valley, east of Belmont to north Cypress 

Total 




$5,918.97 



For further details see sewer table, division No. 2 
report. 

Total amount expended for labor, |8,276.44. 



Division No. 8. 

George H. Penniman, Agent. 

Number of feet of roads graded, 1,848. 
Number of feet filled, 83-4. 
Number of feet cut, 2,910. 
Number of feet of sidewalks graded, 1,183. 
Number of feet of gutter paving laid, 141. 
Number of feet of board fence built, 600. 
Bank wall built, using 56 perch of stone. 
One new culvert laid and one repaired. 



174 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Built bicycle path 1,832 feet in length. This was both 
cut and fill, with a top-dressing of cinders drawn from the 
city. 

The road-machine has been used on the roads through- 
out the division, bushes cut on both sides of tlie roads, 
and all have been broken out after each snowstorm. 

Total amount expended for labor, $1,851.46. 

Division No. 9. 

Lester C. Paige, Agent. 

Owing to the amount of rain during the first part of the 
season, not as much work was done on the roads as usual. 
However, all general repairs have been attended to and 
the roads kept in a passable condition both summer and 
winter. All small stones were removed several times 
during the season, and bushes have been cut where needed 
throughout the division. The road-machine was used 
three days and did good work. Paige road was graveled 
for a distance of forty rods, using 63 loads of gravel; 35 
loads of gravel w^re used on Derry road. One new cul- 
vert was built on Morse road, and several large boulders 
were removed from the road. One culvert on Derry road 
was taken up, cleaned, and relaid, also one on Corning 
road was cleaned and lengthened out. Fifteen loads of 
stone were dumped in Cohas brook, to prevent it from 
washing and undermining the road. Fourteen hundred 
feet of plank have been used in repairing bridges, and rail- 
ings have been repaired and new posts set where needed. 

Total amount expended for labor, .f 185.25. 



Division No. 12. 

Eugene G. Libbey, Agent. 

Turnpiked Mammoth road with road-machine entire 
length; cleaned out culverts and ditches throughout the 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 175 

division; all roads broken out after snowstorms, and kept 
in good condition during the winter months. Kept 
bushes cut on both sides of roads and made general re- 
pairs throughout the division. 

Total amount expended for labor, |.385.75. 

PARKS AND COMMONS, JOHN FULLERTON, SUPERINTENDENT. 

Each common received its usual spring cleaning, and 
the debris of winter was removed. This includes a 
thorough raking and removal of the dead grass and leaves 
and a pruning of the trees, care being taken to cut out 
the dead limbs. The spots upon which the grass had 
died the winter before were reseeded. The flower beds 
were renewed, and shrubs and small trees set out to take 
the place of any that had died during the year. The seats 
were repainted and placed in position, low places graded, 
and in some cases a coat of paint applied to fences and 
stands. Later on the lawns received their usual atten- 
tion. The stands were erected in Monument square for 
memorial exercises, and the temporary stand used in giv- 
ing the eight band concerts was moved about as called for. 

At McGregorville the plot of ground between Coolidge 
avenue, Beauport and Amory streets, which the Amos- 
keag Manufacturing Company so generously donated to 
the city for the purpose of a common, was graded, top- 
dressed with loam, and seeded to grass. Shrubs and 
flowers were set out, and the common is now in a condi- 
tion more in keeping with its pleasant surroundings. 

In the fall several men are kept busy removing dead 
leaves, covering in the fountains, and getting everything 
in shape for the winter's skating. This latter takes the 
time of several men, as the commissioners maintain nine 
skating ponds or rinks, divided among the various com- 
mons as follows: Merrimack, three; Park and Tremont, 
two each; Hanover and Concord, one each. Each pond 



176 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

has to be scraped every day during the skating season, 
and flooded often enough to keep the ice in proper shape. 

As the years go by and the plans for the development 
of Stark and Derryfield parks are worked out, it becomes 
more and more apparent that both are almost perfect 
locations for park purposes. The usual work necessary 
to each season of the year was done at the parks, and 
flowers and shrubs were used to an extent justified by 
the appropriation. Some of the more extensive improve- 
ments at Stark park were the building of a road 1,450 
feet long and 18 feet wide. This roadway was graveled, 
and the gutters 2 feet wide on each side for 1,100 feet of 
its length were paved, so that it is in the best of condi- 
tion. Progress has been made in the drainage, as 640 feet 
of ten-inch Akron pipe were laid and several new cess- 
pools constructed. Open ditches 1,531 feet long were 
dug. It became necessary to increase the water-piping, 
and 1,300 feet of such pipe were laid. The ditch in which 
this was placed was partly filled with broken stone, so 
that this ditch aids also in the drainage. Seven hundred 
feet of railing was put up to guard the steep banks of 
roads. Four cannon and 212 connon balls were received, 
and will be used for ornamental purposes. Twenty-four 
trees were procured and planted in various parts of the 
park. 

The Grand Army of the Republic of this city has often, 
since the great struggle in which its members sacrificed 
so much, testified to its love of countrj^, but never was 
there conceived a more beautiful idea than that of plant- 
ing an Elm tree to represent each state of the Union. 
During the year this idea was executed by the Posts in 
this city. They raised the money for and procured the 
forty-four trees necessary, and selected the north and east 
ends of the park as the place where the trees should be 
planted. On Jul}- 4 appropriate dedicatory exercises 
were held under the direction of the Grand Army at the 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 177 

park. A stone tablet has been placed in position, upon 
which the story of the trees has been chiseled, and future 
generations, when they enjoy the beauty and shade of 
this magnificent colonnade of trees, will remember with 
grateful feelings the old soldiers whose taste and liber- 
ality provided it. The members of the commission here 
and now extend to each and all who were instrumental in 
their purchase their heartfelt thanks. 

At Derryfield park several extensive improvements are 
also called to your notice. A wall 1,000 feet long and 6 
feet wide has been built from stones cleaned from the 
land. For drainage, 2,000 feet of Akron pipe was laid, 
and GOO feet of open ditch dug; two cesspools and two cul- 
verts were built. Six acres of ground were plowed, 
graded, the stones removed from the surface, and then 
reseeded to grass after the liberal use of fertilizers. 
Ornamental and shade trees to the number of 110 were 
procured and set out. Over an acre of ground on the 
summit of Oak Hill was cleared of stumps, stones, and 
bushes, and properly graded. Several acres were cleared 
of stumps and stones, preparatory to grading and seed- 
ing later on. The road to the summit of Oak Hill was 
thoroughly repaired, and 2,350 feet of the Old Bridge road 
graded. Two cannon and lOG cannon balls were also 
secured for this park. 

The greatest event of the year, however, was the com- 
pletion and dedication of the Weston Observatory, with 
its transfer to the city. Oak Hill, on the summit of which 
it stands, is the highest point in this vicinity, and the 
shaft is not only an ornament to the park and the city, 
but from the observatorj' can be obtained a series of 
grand and beautiful views. Its purpose, so clearly stated 
by the donor to be ''For the advancement of science, for 
educational purposes, for the use, enjoyment, benefit, and 
mental improvement of the people of Manchester, and vis- 
itors, without expense to them," has been grandl}' accom- 



178 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

plished. The exercises were in eliarge of the Grand 
Lodge of Free Masons of the State of New Hampshire. 
The exercises, it is needless to say, were exceedingly in- 
teresting and instructive. 

These commons and parks are each year becoming more 
and more a source of enjoyment and health to our citizens. 
The time once was when a short walk in any direction 
would take one into what was practically the country. 
Owing to the growth of our city, the country is today too 
far away for children or tired grown people to reach by 
walking, and as a consequence the poorer classes of our 
citizens must turn to our commons and parks for their 
fresh air and recreation. That they do so is evident. 
Any pleasant summer afternoon mothers may be seen en- 
joying the grateful shade of the trees, with their children 
playing about them. The laborer in the evening finds 
a seat in some convenient spot and, over their pipes, he 
and his companions chat the hours away until bedtime, 
finding rest and comfort which would be denied them in 
the hot, stuffy tenements necessity compels them to in- 
habit. When the winter comes, thousands enjoy the 
skating with absolute safety. 

An actual count shows that 16,000 people visited the 
Weston Observatory last season, after its completion. 
With a knowledge that these places were and must be 
the poor people's pleasure grounds, this board has sought 
to make the money approjiriated for the purpose go as far 
as possible in securing that which would make them beau- 
tiful and comfortable. We believe in the past that this 
money has been well and wisely spent. In these days of 
adversity we realize that economy which would rob these 
icitizens who are the workers in our city of that which 
means so much to them would be a mistake if not a 
wrong, and we ask the city councils to be liberal as well 
as just in their appropriation for j)arks and commons for 
the coming year. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 179 

The following is a summary attending the season's 
work on the parks and commons: 

COMMONS. 

Labor |2,877.66 

Water-works 700.00 

Trees, shrubs, flow^ers , 291.50 

Concreting 33.50 

Incidentals 155.23 

Tools and supplies 105.07 

Grass seed and dressing 157.08 

Seats 94.52 

Painting 76.24 

Lights 36.00 



Total $4,526.80 

DERRYPIELD PARK. 

Labor |1,915.99 

Trees and shrubs 87.60 

Grass seed and dressing 125.51 

Hardware 50.14 

Incidentals 40.66 

Water-works 24.00 



Total 12,243.90 

STARK PARK. 

Labor |2,670.75 

Hardware 23.79 

Paving stone 29.75 

Incidentals 35.65 



Total $2,759.94 



180 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



t-co — miM— ;Noocooob-ooooo ^ 



« — ODT}>COt--*10L'3 0C^C010i-';iO 



uaqniaoga 



<oooooo--< 



lanrnfri 



00 CO CO 05 fri CO 00 

to 00 ■^ ci 'T id ui 

Oi -Ji a Ci "^ a '^ 



P3 
< 

W 

a 

H 
O 

I— I 

05 

Q 
W 

o 
o 

p5 
o 

ij 

<5 

P^ 
O 

H 

CO 

O 
O 

< 
H 
O 
H 



•j9qni9AOii 



O O C5 IC -H 



T)< t-ei t-cD 



03 t^ C-1 CO t- CO CO 



lO CO CI •* 1-1 1— I o 



uaqo^oo 



•jaqraa^das 



00 o o 
CO ci 1^ 
CO o t-^ 
**cos^ 



'IsnSnv 



COOi^ 

e-i ci (^i 
ff> — ^ 



o CO c<i ■» iM r- 00 

TI" to CO CO CO CO r-< 
CC CD IN -if CO CTJ t^ 
00 CO CO »C O CO Ci 
CO lO 05 lO T«< rl CO 



ooeoxJOOt-oocMrt 

-,ilC;t--;rHT);ooOOtO 
CO CO CI t^ C> CO '^ ci 00 
Olt-l/^O-^— ■lOlClOO 
CO CO O ^^ r--_CO CO CO C0_ 



osiTio-^iOcocoeoci 

OCOCOtT'^OO-^CtH 

©i-^C2c»c-itccocco 

■«<1000<MOC5CCCO 
■^C5t'--<J*rHCOrH CO 



O t-;C! 

eooor-i 

'J' t-(M 

COCO oo 



•Anf 



ri r— -^ 

lo-* in 

(MCOCO 

— mo 



I^UOO'-^'-HCOOlCOCl 
COC^t^t-^Ci-^CO-^-^ 



Oi O t^ '^ 

CO -*--lt^ 

•o — o: t- 



•annf 



C0O''*C0C0'*<0500C0O'-* 

CI CO t-; O O rH c: CI c: lO ■"* 

-»#rH^Ocicio6t-^GCC5t^ 
C3 O « C» CI O f-< CI IC r-H CO 
CO — CO C» CI 00 ■* CO -* t- 



•;£tJK 



mocswMcoic ■ot--cci 



CJ CC ^ '^ CD CC 00 . C-l »0 rH 

O Ci 1— I ^<r O M f-« . M" O GC 



•luclv 






^1 L-^ o «<5 c» M ir: r- oo G-1 o 

•^ CD I— CDC^irjO-^C^ 



■ •* C5 



; ci o 

. COr-> 



1 CO O O h- GC IfO 



•qo.iiJn 



t^ GC CO ■* "-H 



•jjjun.iqaj; 



•S.-wnwep 



CO CO Oi^ M< CO 
CO O IC lO o o 

cir-^oco — ci 

'^ CO -1* CO r-l CO 

^ CO 



CO C» C1 O -ll CO CJ 



OCIOCOCOClOOCJCOOCOlCCJt- 

ioco^i-H"^ — uoci-^iNiot^coi-^i- 
co'-'^cWf^cotior^uoci-^cocioco^ 

— 'CCCO'-'OOlC ClCOi-(r 

r-l CO CI CO «0 



^ I— I r-l CO Ci 



■ ^ °. 
'• oco 

.05 CO 



«» 




o 



Cj 



, tn !» e — 

fe >H o s_^ 

■•: o.i cj c/— ci 






STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 181 

In closing we desire to thank His Honor Mayor Clarke, 
and each member of the city government, as well as all 
others, for courtesies granted. To all our assistants, 
whatever their station, we also extend thanks for the abil- 
ity and interest they have shown in the work of the 

department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

HORACE P. SIMPSON, 
GEORGE H. STEARNS, 
BYRON WORTHEN, 

Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 
January 1, 1S9S. 



REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER. 



City Engineer's Department, 
1897. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT. 

ASSISTA-NTS. 

HARRIE M. YOUNG. 

GEORGE W. WALES. 

HARRY J. BRIGGS. 

ALFRED T. DODGE. 
HERBERT L. WATSON, July 12 to July 28. 

LOUIS B. WEBSTER, to February 18. 

STENOGRAPHER AND TYPEWRITER. 

MISS ELLA M. BARKER. 

184 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Coun- 
cils: 

Sirs, — I have the honor of preseuting my twelfth an- 
nual report, being the nineteenth annual report of the 

work of the city engineer's department, for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1897. 

Expenses of the department for the year 1897, per 
monthly draft: 

January |243.12 

Pebruary : 321.30 

March 573.38 

April 280.85 

May 282.00 

June : 706.00 

July 269.50 

August 286.89 

September 630.50 

October 278.72 

November 324.65 

December 581.00 

Total 11,780.91 

Appropriation 4,500.00 

Amount overdrawn $280.91 

Itemized account of expenses for the year: 

For salary of city engineer ; |1,200.00 

salary of assistants 2,996.25 

supplies for office 42.05 

185 



186 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS.' 

For stakes and lumber |22.9{) 

street-car fares 10.00 

repairs of wagon and team expenses. . . . 15.65 

express .30 

repairing 1.65 

books and folios 36.00 

telephone 36.40 

typewriter supplies 1.50 

typewriter clerk 373.12 

reports 45.00 

Total I4J80.91 

The following bills, charged to other appropriations^ 
have been certified to by this department : 
The John B, Clarke Co., printing 1,000 sewer 

license blanks |6.50 

Union Manufacturing Co., 80 street numbers 3.60 
C. H. Simpson, use of team 8 days, perambulat- 
ing town line 20.00 

CONCRETE. 

Charles H. Kobie Co., 11,170.93 sq. yds |7,229.34 

Mead, Mason & Co., 1,240.31 square yards 751.30 

The amount of work done by this department during 
the year is as follows: 
Number of orders for surveys, street lines, and 

grades 612 

for sewer grades 95 

for paving grades. . .• 82 

for curb grades 35 

for Pine Grove Cemetery 

grades 26 

for Valley cemetery grades 2 

for profile levels 39 

Total number of orders 891 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 187 

Levels for profiles for establishing grades, 19,799 feet, 
equal to 3.75 miles. These profiles have three lines of 
levels on each street, making a total distance actually- 
leveled of 59,397 feet. 

Levels for sewer profiles 1,717 

for center profiles 15,336 

in Valley cemetery 600 

in Stark park 8,400 

Other levels 19,762 

Total levels taken 105,212 

Equal to 19.92 miles. 

Levels for cross section Pine Grove cemetery, 291,375 
square feet. 

Surveys of streets and street lines 34,817 

for street numbers 16,640 

Other surveys 18,407 

Total surveys made 69,864 

Equal to 13.23 miles. 

Street lines marked on ground 10,579 

Lines of lots and avenues. Pine Grove cemetery 6,766 

Valley cemetery 60 

of avenues, etc.. Stark park 7,550 

for gutters 33,240 

for curbs 8,650 

for sewers 21,550 

Other lines 17,800 

Total length of lines marked on the 

ground 106,195 

Equal to 20.11 miles. 

Grades set for sidewalks 26,509 

for. gutters 33,240 

for curbs 8,650 

for sewers 21,559 



188 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Grades set for paving streets 3,334 

for building streets 26,460 

for Pine Grove cemetery 7,964 

in Valley cemetery 355 

in Stark park 8,400 

Other grades 500 

Total length of grades set 133,112 

Equal to 25.21 miles. 

Lot owners looked up, 15,518 feet; equal to 2.94 miles. 

BATTERS SET. 

High school, lot curbing. 

Pine street, retaining wall. Valley cemetery. 

Old lots restaked in Pine Grove cemetery. ....... 32 

New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery 44 

Old lots restaked in Valley cemetery 1 

Total cemetery lots laid out 77 

Street numbers assigned and put on 141 

replaced 52 

assigned but not put on 38 

changed 3 

Total 234 

Street signs put up, 15; sewer permits granted, 262, 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

Beech, Lake avenue to Salmon. Five plans. 

Central, Union to Hall. Two plans. 

Mast, Amherst road to town line. 

Somerville, Hall to east of Taylor. ' 

Taylor, INIassabesic to Hayward. 

Total plans and profiles, 10. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 189 

SEWER TLANS AND PROFILES. 

Auburn south back, Beech to Maple. 
Auburn south back, Wilson to Belmont. 
Carpenter, Elm to Union. 
Central south back, Union to Beech. 
Clarke, Kiver road to Elm. 
Dartmouth, Log to Schiller. 
Dubuque east back, Kelley to north of Bremer. 
Elm, Munroe to Rowell. 
Elm west back, Pennacook to Salmon. 
Hanover, Beacon easterl}-. 
Lake avenue. Canton to James Hall road. 
Main west back, Schuyler to Wayne. 
Merrimack, Beacon easterly. 

Parker avenue, Parker street to North Weare Railroad. 
Porter, Amherst to Concord. 
Eiver road, Munroe to Clarke. 
Sagamore, Oak to east of Linden. 
Union east back. Sagamore to North. 
Valley, Elm to Massabesic. Four plans. 
Whittemore land, Putnam, Whipple, and Wayne. 
Four plans. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 26. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Adams, Clarke to Trenton. Two plans. 
Ainsworth avenue. Young to Hayward. 
Alfred, Hanover to Amherst. 
Amherst, Beacon to east of Alfred. 
Ash, Gore to Salmon. 

Auburn, Belmont to J. Hall road. Four plans. 
Calef road, Baker to Pine Grove cemetery. Eight 
plans. 

Carpenter, Elm to Union. Two plans. 
Chestnut, Clarke to Trenton. Two plans. 



190 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Corliss avenue, Concord northerly. 

Elm, Baker to Campbell. Nineteen plans. 

Everett, Clarke to Waldo. 

Hanover, Mammoth road to Candia road. Ten plans. 

Huntress, Milford to south of Prince. 

Lake avenue, Canton to Hanover. Four plans. 

Maple, Cilley to Haj ward. Three plans. 

Maple, Gore to Salmon. 

Nutt road. Pine to Beech. Two plans. 

Oak, Gore to Sagamore. 

Kay, Clarke to Trenton. Three plans. 

Russell, Harrison to Gore. 

Salmon, Walnut to Maple. 

Stevens, Baker southerly. ' 

Trenton, Elm to Union. Two plans. 

Webster, Union to Hooksett road. 

William, Milford to Mast. 

Total numbering plans, 75. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Auburn, Cedar, Spruce, and Jones streets, Lake ave- 
nue, Candia and Mammoth roads, land of Robert I. Ste- 
vens. Copy. 

Belmont, Hayward, and Taylor streets, and Young 
road, land of A. S. Lamb. Copy. 

Burbank and Rimmon avenues, Fogg and Highland 
streets, land of Meserve, Carr, and Fellows. Copy. 

Burlington and Hanover, land of A. A. Page. Copy. 

Centennial, Palos, Isabella, Christopher, and Chicago, 
land of John H. Groux. Copy. 

Clay, Taylor, and Somerville, laud of Mrs. Cotter. 
Copy. 

Ellsworth, Elliott, Royden, Derry, and Reed streets, 
Bald Hill and Candia roads, and Londonderry turnpike, 
land of Samuel G. Reed. Copy. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 191 

Forest, Avon, lugalls, Sj^lvester, Whittier, Clement, 
Lilly, Dickey, and Eevere streets, and Mast road, land of 
Adam Dickey. Copj^ 

Grove street, land of W. E. Moore. Copy. 

Hanover street and Lake avenue, land of Charles Wil- 
liams. Copy. 

Hanover, Page, Bell, Normand, Summit, and Bridge, 
land of S. T. Page, et. al. Copy. 

Higli school grounds, proposed addition. 

Hobart and McKinley, land of Bartlett and Platts. 
Copy. 

Jewett street and Cilley road, land of Thomas Gorman. 
Copy. 

Jewett, Cypress, and Clay, land of W. H. Thayer. 
Cop3'. 

Lakeview and Summit streets, and Candia road, land 
of E, P. Cummings. Copy, 

Maple, Harvard, and Silver, land of Thomas Johnson. 
Copy. 

Maple and Silver, land of A. Elliott. Copy. 

Massabesic street, land of Fred Platts. Copy. 

Merrimack and Lincoln, land of Charles E. Rowe. 
€opy. 

Milton, Summer, Dearborn, and Massabesic, land of 
Austin Goings. Copy. 

Mitchell and Beech. Land of W. H. Smith.. Copy. 

Mystic, Beech, xlsh, and Maple, land of M. N. Badger. 
Copy. 

New Mast road, land of J. W. Dickey. 

Norfolk, Mystic, Beech, and, Union streets, Titus and 
Beech avenues, land of J. B. Titus. Copj'. 

Nutt road, land of Joseph N. Auger. Copy. 

Nutt road, Pine and Plummer streets, plan of Plummer 
land. Copy. 

Oakland, Glenwood, and Platts avenue, Cody street 
and Candia road, land of Walter Cody. Copy. 



192 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Page, May, and Levering streets, Glenwood avenue 
and Candia road, land of David P. Lovering. Copy. 

Pine, land of A. J. Lane. Copj'. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lot plan. 

Pine park, land of F. A. Palmer. Copy. 

Porter, Grafton, Cheshire, Hillsborough, and Rocking- 
ham streets and Cilley and Mammoth roads, land of 
George S. Sargent. Copy. 

Road petitioned for in 1852, Candia road to Island 
Pond road. Copy. 

Sherburne street and Candia road, land of S. D. Sher- 
burne. Copy. 

Town line, Hooksett and Manchester, showing stone 
monuments set. Two plans. 

Woodlawn, plan of lots. Copy. 

Young, Harvard, and Beech, land of Harrington and 
Shea. Copy. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 39. 

WORKING PLANS. 

Adams, Carpenter to Trenton. Profile. 

Alfred, Hanover to Amherst. Profile. 

Amherst, Concord, Vine, and Pine, showing changes in 
curbing. Four plans, 

Benton, Jones to J. Hall road. Profile. 

City Farm buildings, house, for electric lighting. 
Three floor plans. 

Colb}', West Hancock northerl3\ Profile. 

C3'press and Massabesic, plan showing location of rail- 
road track. 

Elm, Merrimack to Amherst. Profile. Two plans. 

Elm, sketch of flagging for Warren Harvey. 

Elm extension, Baker to Mitchell. Sketch for mayor. 

Glenwood avenue. Page to east of Lovering. Profile. 

Hall road, Massabesic to Hanover. Profile. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 198 

Hanover, Eaton place to Bridge. Center Profile. 

Jones, Nelson to north of Benton. Profile. 

Knowlton, Hayward to Young. Profile. 

Lorraine, Amory to Kelley. Profile. 

Main, Granite to Douglas. Profile of east side. 

Mammotli road, Candia road to Hanover. Profile. 

Manchester south back. Elm east back to Chestnut. 
Profile. 

Mystic, Beech to Calef road. Profile. 

Nelson, Mammoth road to J. Hall road. Profile. 

Nutt road, south of Beech to railroad. Profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery, part of southern section, includ- 
ing Greenbush, Riverside, and Short avenues, and Hem- 
lock path. 

Pine Grove cemetery, new Swedish Lawn. Two plans- 
Proposed street, Beech to Calef road. Profile. 

Ray, Carpenter to north of Trenton. Profile. 

Section bounded by Beech, Mitchell, Norfolk, and Calef 
road, showing proposed streets. 

Stark park. Profile of new avenue. 

Taylor, Massabesic to Young. Profile. 

Titus avenue. Beech to Calef road. Profile. 

Wayne, Rimmon street to Columbus avenue. . Profile. 

Weston, Concord to Bridge. Profile. 

Weston Observatory, chart showing direction of prom- 
inent points. Two plans. 

William, Milford to Mast. Profile. 

Total working plans, 42. 

TRACINGS. 

Ash and Nashua, proposed addition to high school lot. 
Bakersville, lot plan Calef road and Brown avenue. 
Candia road, showing various lands. Eight plans. 
Christian brook sewer. Canal, Webster, and surround- 
ing streets. 

13 



194 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

City Farm, house, for electric lighting. Three floor 
plans. 

Depot section, for sewerage. 

East Manchester, between Candia road and Hanover 
street, from Page easterly. 

Glenwood, showing additions. 

Granite, showing street railway layout at Concord & 
Montreal Kail road. 

Hanover square section, location of houses and sewers. 

Hanover street and Mammoth road, land of George H. 
Penniman. 

Kelley, Bremer and Rimmon, showing sewerage. 

Lake.Massabesic and surroundings, portions of, from 
water-works plans. Twenty-one tracings. 

Mast and South Main, land of Gordon Woodbury. 

Merrill yard and adjoining roads. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Chapel Lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Landscape Lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Pine Lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots east of Pine Lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Swedish section. Two tracings. 

Phillip, Brooklyn, Currier, Pembroke, Waltham, Wor- 
cester, Springfield, Albanj^ Rhododendron, and Canaan 
streets, Valuable and Massachusetts avenues, land of 
G. A. Currier. 

Proctor road, Candia road to Hanover street. 

Proctor road, Lake Shore to Candia road. 

Stevens pond and surrounding streets. 

Weston Observatory, chart showing direction of prom- 
inent points. 

Total tracings, 55. 

BLUB PRINTS. 

City Farm, house, for electric lighting. Three floor 
plans. 

Depot section, for sewerage. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 195 

Hanover square section, location of houses and sewers. 
Three plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Chapel Lawn. Thirteen plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Landscape Lawn. Seven plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots east of Pine Lawn. Seven 
plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Swedish section. Six plans. 

Valley cemetery, for city treasurer. Five plans. 

Weston Observatory, chart showing direction of x^rom- 
inent points. 

Whittemore land, showing sewer right of way, for city 
clerk. 

Total blue prints, 47. 

MAPS. 

City of Manchester, location of police signal boxes. 

Forty sheets of plans have been made in the new sewer 
books. 

Forty-five plans have been made in city clerk's book of 
streets laid out, and one plan in city clerk's deed book. 

Total of all plans made, 381. 

One hundred ninety-four old plans, that have been 
superseded by new plans, have been destroyed. 

Ten plans are under way, which will be completed dur- 
ing the year. 

Sewer plans brought up to date, 27. 

Numbering sheets brought up to date, 3. 

Plans lettered and finished, 25. 

Plans made for establishment of grade on laid-out 
streets, 26,670. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on streets 
not laid out, 9,500 feet. 

Total, 36,170 feet; equal to 6.85 miles. 



196 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PIPE REMOVED WHERE NEW SEWERS HAVE BEEN BUILT 



Street. 



Location. 



Material. 



a* 

® a 
uq.S 



Granite 

Granite 

Laurel 

Liberty east back. 

Merrimack 

Russell 

Scbiller 

Silver 

Valley 



Total . 



Turner to east of Main Cement.. 

Green to Quincy | Akron ... 

East of Union to west of Maple > Cement.. 

North of North northerly Akron . . . 

At Belmont " 

At Harrison 

Hale easterly 

At Lincoln 

East of Belmont 



920 

375 

826 

61 

28 

32 

118 

4 

4 



SUMMARY OF SEWERS BUILT IN 1897. 



Total 24-incli Akron pipe. 
20-inch Akron pipe. 
15-incli Akron pipe. 
12-inch Akron pipe. 
12-inch iron pipe. . . 
10-inch Akron pipe. 
10-inch iron pipe. . . 

8-inch Akron pipe. 

6-inch Akron pipe. 



1,520 


feet 


733 




5,041 




3,939 




10 




7,946 




54 




744 




70 





Total 20,657 feet 

Following is the total amount of sewerage in the city, 
January 1, 1898: 

Total 6-inch Akron pipe 70 feet 

8-inch Akron pipe 10,079 " 

10-inch Akron pipe 79,-591 " 

12-inch Akron pipe 81,755 " 

15-inch Akron pipe 30,678 " 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 197 

Total 18-inch Akron pipe 3,904 feet 

20-iuch Akron pipe 11,999 '' 

24-inch Akron pipe 7,79S " 

Total Akron pipe 225,934 feet 

Equal to 42.794 miles. 

8-inch Portland pipe, old 90 feet 

12-inch Portland pipe, old 3,990 " 

18-inch Portland pipe, old 770 " 

Total Portland pipe, old 4,850 feet 

Equal to 0.919 miles. 

10-inch Portland pipe, new 7,G05 feet 

12-inch Portland pipe, new 4,526 " 

15-ineh Portland pipe, new 4,518 " 

18-inch Portland pipe, new 395 " 

20-inch Portland pipe, new 3,345 " 

24-inch Portland pipe, new 3,284 " 

Total Portland pipe, new 23,673 feet 

Equal to 4.483 miles. 

9-inch cement pipe 9,912 feet 

12-inch cement pipe 20,014 " 

] 5-iuch cement pipe 490 " 

18-inch cement pipe 860 " 

24-inch cement pipe 735 " 

16 X 24 inches, cement pipe 1,697 " 

Total cement pipe 33,708 feet 

Equal to 6.384 miles. 

10-inch earthen pipe : 1,175 feet 

12-inch earthen pipe 2,545 " 

Total earthen pipe 3,720 feet 

Equal to 0.704 miles. 

18-inch brick sewers 5,532 feet 

24-inch brick sewers 1,900 " 



198 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

29-incli brick sewers 1,600 feet 

36-inch brick sewers 506 " 

42-inch brick sewers 446 " 

44-inch brick sewers 1,195 " 

57-inch brick sewers 1,400 " 

60-inch brick sewers 285 '' 

17 X 26 inches, brick sewers 1,506 " 

20 X 30 inches, brick sewers 1,197 " 

22 X 33 inches, brick sewers 849 " 

24 X 36 inches, bricli sewers 11,051 " 

26 X 39 inches, brick sewers 514 " 

29^- X 44 inches, brick sewers 4,530 " 

30 X 46 inches, brick sewers 1,360 " 

32 X 48 inches, brick sewers 3,279 " 

36 X 54 inches, brick sewers 1,067 " 

38 X 57 inches, brick sewers 4,388 " 

40 X 44 inches, brick sewers 790 " 

42 X 63 inches, brick sewers 3,104 " 

50 X 75 inches, brick sewers 712 " 

Total brick sewers 47,211 feet 

Equal to 8.941 miles. 

8-inch iron pipe 24 feet 

10-inch iron pipe 66 " 

12-inch iron pipe 34 " 

14-inch iron pipe 24 " 

20-inch iron pipe 158 " 

24-inch iron pipe 24 " 

36-inch iron pipe - 277^ " 

Total iron pipe 607^ feet 

Equal to 0.115 miles. 

24-inch steel pipe 67 feet 

36-inch steel pipe 39 " 

48-inch steel pipe 372 " 

Total steel pipe 478 feet 

Equal to 0.09 miles. 

Total in all sewers, 340,181^ feet, equal to 64.42 miles. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 
STREET GRADES ESTABLISHED IN 1897. 



199 



No. of 
plan. 



Street. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Order 
passed. 



799 
4163 
4195 
4196 
4194 
4195 
793-4 
2150 
4192 
4l95 
4197 

741 
4174 

160 



Baker 

Beech 

Benton 

Glenwo'd av 
J. Hall road.. 

Jones 

Lake avenue 

Mast 

Mammoth rd 

Nelson 

Nutt road 

Salmon 

Vinton 

Wayne 



Nutt road to M. & L. R. R 

Salmon southerly 

J. Hall road to Jones 

Page easterly 

Massabesic to Lake avenue . . 

Nelson to Benton 

Cass to J. Hall road * 

Amherst road westerly * 

Candia road to Lake avenue.. . 
J. Hall road to Mammoth road 

Baker to Beech 

Walnut east back to Beech 

Taylor easterly 

Dubuque to Hevey. 



350 

200 

240 

730 

2,254 

550 

1,385 

2,551 

2,837 

510 

976 

150 

1,100 

490 



Oct. 5 
May 4 
Sept. 7 
Aug. 25 
Sept. 7 
Sept. 7 
May 4 
Oct. 5 
Sept. T 
Sept. 7 
Oct. 5 
May 12 
June 1 
Nov. 2 



14,323 



Equal to 2.71 miles. 

On these plans both sides of the street are shown, mak- 
ing the actual distance of grade established 28,646 feet, or 
5.42 miles. 

CONCRETE LAID BY THE C. H. ROBIE CO. 



Desckiption. 



Square 
yards. 



Total 
cost. 



Crossings 

Sidewalks 

Roadways — 
Miscellaneous 

Total 



903.39 

146.04 

6,418.82 

3,702.68 



$703.46 

68.55 

4,592.34 

1,864.99 



11,170.93 $7,229.34 



* Center gi-ade. 



200 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

CONCRETE LAID BY MEAD, MASON & CO. 



Description. 



Square 
yards. 



Total 
cost. 



Crossings 

Sidewalks 

Miscellaneous 

Total 




$751.30 



Total concrete laid for the city, 12,411.24 square yards, 
at a cost of |7,980.64. 

NEW HIGHWAYS LAID OUT IN 1897. 



Streets. 



Location'. 



2 
^■1 



^.s 






^.5 



Petition of 



Avon 

Cartier 

Clay 

Dartmouth 

Dickey . 

Ingalls 

Log 

Maple 

Schiller .. . . 
Somerville 
Sylvester.. 



Ingalls to Mast 

Kelley to Coolidge ave 

Union to Beech 

West Hancock to Log. 

Avon to Clement 

Forest to Clement 

South Main to (Jolby.. . 

Hay ward to Shasta 

Hale to South Main 

Hall to Belmont 

Forest to Avon 



Nov. 19 
May 2G 
June 9 
Oct. 13 
Nov. 19 
Nov. 19 
Oct. 13 
Oct. 13 
Oct. 13 
Aug. 25 
Nov. 19 



45 


983 


50 


397 


50 


492 


40 


220 


45 


445 


45 


700 


40 


868 


50 


2,215 


50 


830 


50 


306 


45 


303 




7,759 



Adam Dickey. 
Medard Poulin. 
E. R. Dufresne. 
Fred G. Stark. 
Adam Dickey. 
Adam Dickey. 
Fred G. Stark. 
Charles A. Flint. 
Fred G. Stark. 
Jotin Muir. 
Adam Dickey. 



HIGHWAY DISCONTINUED IN 1897. 



Street. 


When 
Location. discontin- 
ued. 


Petition of 


" Landing" 


Main to Piscataquog river.. 


Oct. 13 


Fred G. Stark, 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGII^EER. 201 

The followinj^- table shows the streets hiid ont to date, 
which have not been built. Many of these have been 
turnpiked, and are in passable condition, but have not 
been brought to grade, nor have the gutters or sidewalks 
been constructed. Those marked (*) in most cases have 
not been opened, and are impassable with a few excep- 
tions. It will necessitate the expenditure of a consider- 
able amount of money to properly build them to grade. 



202 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT. 



Streets. 



Length 
in feet. 



When laid out. 



Ainswoith avenue, Hayward to Young 

Alfred, Hanover to Amherst 

Allen, Main to Boynton 

Alsace, south of Kelley northerly 

Amory, to Kimball 

Amory, extension to Bartlett 

Arah, Union to Hooksett line 

Ash, Gore northerly* 

Auburn, INIapIe to Lincoln 

Auburn, Wilson to Belmont 

Auburn, Cypress to Platts avenue* ' 

Avon, Ingalls to Mast 

Bartlett, Amory extension southerly 

Bay, Trenton northerly* 

Beech, Webster to Clarke* 

Bell, Wilson easterly 

Belmont, Young to Clay 

Benton, .Jones to James Hall road 

Blaine, Second to Hiram 

Boutwell, Amory northerly* 

Bremer, Cooliclge avenue to Rimmon 

Byron, Brown avenue to Josselyn 

Ci mpbell, Union to Ash 

Campbell, Ash to Hooksett road 

Canal, 82 feet north of Pleasant to Granite. . . 

Canton, Spruce to Auburn 

Clay, Union to Beech 

Cedar, Wilson easterly 

Central, James Hall road -westerly 

Chestnut, north of Clarke to Trenton 

Cartier, Kelley to Coolidge avenue 

Clay, Jewett to Cypress 

Cleveland, Blaine to Merrimack river 

Colby, West Hancock to Log 

Columbus avenue, Cartier to Amory* 

Cypress, Lake avenue to Massabesic* 

Cypress, Young to Clay 

Dartmouth, West Hsncock to Log 

Dartmouth, West Hancock to Frederick 

Dickey, Avon to Clement 

Erie, South Main westerly 

Essex, Amory southerly 

Forest, Milford to Old Mast road 

Foster avenue. Valley to Hayward 

Glenwood avenue, JMammoth rd. to J. Cronin's* 

Glen wood avenue, Page easterly 

Grant, Hanover to Mammoth road* , 

Green, Douglas northerly 

Green, Pine to Beech 

Green, Wilson to Belmont* 

Grove, Wilson to Belmont* , 

Grove, Taylor westerlv 

Hale, across Wolf & Wagner land 

Hall, Hayward to Young 

Hall, Lake avenue to Bell , 

Hall, Pearl to north side of Prospect 

Harrison, Russell to Hall 

Harrison, Hall to Belmont , 

Harvard, Union to Maple 

Harvell, Main to Second 

Hayes avenue, Massabesic to Chase avenue. ... 

Hayward, Peech to Mammoth road 

Highland Park avenue, Candia road to Glen 
wood avenue 



499 
212 
700 

1,160 

2,S00 
73.5 

3,162 
590 
600 
809 
967 
983 

1,800 
580 

1,176 
636 

1,395 
240 
395 

1,693 
400 
998 
860 

2,900 

1,023 
5f0 
492 
665 
304 

1,337 
397 
387 

1,487 

220 

I .3,110 

1,300 
860 
220 
636 
445 
470 

1,460 
490 

2,085 
725 

1,008 
96 
990 
809 
809 
757 
800 
125 

1,890 
716 

1,218 
365 

1,190 

1,060 
471 

6,000 

1,007 



August 31, 1893. 
July 19, 1893. 
Julv 24, 1891. 
May 26, 1893. 
November 17, 1S91. 
June 26, 1892. 
July 21, 1895. 
June 9, 1893. 
July 28, 1891. 
August 15, 1892. 
June 9, 1893. 
November 19, 1897. 
July 26, 1892. 
June 19, 1896. 
November 29, 1893. 
August 15, 1892. 
September 1, 1891. 
August 31, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
May 26, 1893. 
October 23, 1895. 
October 3, 1893. 
September 26, 1892. 
September 20, 1895. 
January 15. 1892. 
August 2, 1892. 
June 9, 1897. 
August 15, 1892. 
July 6, 1892. 
April 24, 1896. 
Jlay 26, 1897. 
August 31, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
November 16, 1893. 
May 20, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 
September 25. 1896. 
October 13, 1897. 
August 28, 1891. 
November 19, 1897. 
June 20, 1893. 
November 20, 1893. 
December 16, 1890. 
July 31, 1895. 
December 28, 1892. 
September 25, 1896. 
October 20, 1893. 
July 28, 1891. 
Augusts!, 1893. 
August 15, 1892. 
September 9, 1892. 
December 28, 1892. 
July 25, 1894. 
July 6, 1892. 
June 23, 1893. 
June 12, 1891. 
October 25, 1892. 
May 21, 1894. 
November 18, 1892. 
July 25, 1894. 
October 19, 1894. 
September 21, 1893. 

December 28, 1892. 



REPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER, 203 

STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT.— Continued. 



Streets. 



Length 
in feet. 



When laid out. 



Holt avenue, Candia road to Lake Shore road*. 

Hosley, Green to Summer 

Huntress, Bank to north of Prince 

Ingalls, Forest to Clement 

Jewett, Cilley road to Weston road* 

Jolietle, south of Kelley northerly 

Jones, Nelson to R. I. Stevens's land 

Jossely n, Byron to Varney 

Kelley to M. & N. W. R. R 

Kennedy, Brown avenue to Josselyn 

Knowlton, Hay ward southerly 

Lafayette, Amory northerly* 

Laval, Amorj' northerly* 

Liberty, North southerly 

Liberty, soutli of North "to Salmon 

Lincoln, Cedar to Shasta* 

Log, South Main to Colby* 

Longwood ave., INIammoth rd. to Woodbine ave 

Maple, Gore northerly* 

Maple, Hay ward to Shasta* 

Maynard avenue, Huse road to Porter* 

McKinnon, Central to Pleasant* 

McNeil, Second to West Hancock 

Merrill, Jewett easterly 

Merrimack, east of Beacon to Hanover 

Milford, Amherst road westerly 

Mitchell, Beech to Brown avenue 

Montgomery, Conant northerly 

Moi'gan, Amory to Kelley 

Mystic avenue, Candia road northerly , 

Nelson, James Hall road to Mammoth road , 

North, Union to Walnut* 

Oak, Gore northerly* 

Oakland avenue, A. W. Palmer's to J. Cronin's, 

Orchard avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

Page, Hanover to Bridge 

Platts avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

Plumnier, Pine to Union , 

Prospect, Derry old line to Hall , 

Prout avenue, Hay ward southerly 

Putnam, to Dubuciue , 

Quincy, Douglas northerly 

Revere avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

Rimmon, to south of Wayne 

Sagamore, Oak to Smyth road 

Salmon, Walnut to Beech 

Schiller, Hale to South Main* 

Schiller, Hale to Wentworth 

Schiller, Wentworth to Merrimack river 

Second, Blaine to Main 

Silver, Union to Jlaple , 

Somerville, Union to Hall 

Somerville, Hall to Belmont* 

Somerville, Jewett to Cypress 

Stevens, Baker southerly 

Summer, Beech westerly 

Summer, Wilson to Massabesic 

Sylvester, Forest to Avon 

Titus avenue. Union to Beech , 

Union, Auburn to Nutt road , 

Varney, Josselvn to west of B. & M. R. R* 

Vinton, Taylor to Jewett , 



7,850 
490 
G4S 
700 

3,650 

1,150 
562 
161 
652 
922 
487 

1,690 

1,698 
150 
325 

4,321 
868 

1,100 
600 

2,215 

1,315 
192 
299 
350 

1,000 
517 

3,000 

400 
650 

1,200 
509 
220 
600 

1,500 

1,337 

2,500 

1,052 
450 
325 
.'iOO 
300 
96 

1,200 
735 

1,453 
270 
830 
855 
218 

5,528 
690 

2,925 
306 
410 
300 
200 

1,480 
303 
540 

4,175 
290 

1,256 



July 31, 1896. 

November 16,1803. 

Septemb'r IS 1891. 

November 19,1897. 

November 27,1891. 

May 26, 1893. 

August 31, 1893. 

Octobers, 1893. 

June 23, 1891. 

Septemb'r 21, 1891. 

November 27,1891. 

May 26, 1893. 

May 26, 1893. 

April 26, 1892. 

June 12, 1895. 

May 20, 1892. 

October 13, 1897. 

December 28, 1892. 

June 9, 1893. 

October 13, 1897. 

August 28, 1896. 

June 7, 1892. 

August 28, 1891. 

April 22, 1896. 

July 28, 1891. 

December 16. 1890. 
I October 28, 1890. 
I November 29,1892. 

May 26, 1893. 

May 26, 1893. 

December 28, 1893. 

August 21, 1893. 

August 28, 1896. 

June 9, 1893. 

December 28, 1892. 

December 28, 1892. 

June 19, 1889. 

August 24, 1894. 

May 26, 1896. 

May 29, 1889. 

June 6, 1893. 

June 5, 1888. 

July 28, 1891. 

December 28, 1892. 

Septemb'r 26, 1892. 

June 19, 1890. 

June 27, 1894. 

October 13, 1897. 

July 25, 1894. 

July 25, 1894. 

Septemb'r 18, 1891. 

June 7, 1892. 

June 7, 1892. 

August 25, 1897. 

July 31. 1896. 

November 29,1892. 

November 25,1896. 

Septemb'r 22, 1891. 

November 19,1897. 

May 21, 1894. 

October 25, 1892. 

October 3, 1893. 

August 31, 1893. 



204 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

STREETS LAID OUT TO DATE BUT NOT BUILT.— Continued. 



Streets. 



Length 
in feet. 



When laid out. 



Wallace, Winter southwesterly* 

Wayland avenue, Massabesic to Mammoth road 

Wayne, west of Dubuque westerly 

Wentworth, West Hancock southerly* 

West Hancock, Merrimack river westerly 

Wilkins, Rockland avenue to Bedford line 

Willow, Hayward to Nutt road* 

Woodbine avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R. 
Woodland ave., C. &. P. R. R. to Jas. Dearborn's 
Woodland ave., Jas. Dearborn's to Candia road 



165 
134 
150 

1,546 
700 
695 
292 

1,290 
770 
426 



November 23,1S94. 
August 24, 1S91. 
June 23, 1893. 
Septemb'r21,1893. 
November 28,1890. 
July 6, 1892. 
June 23, 1S93. 
December 28, 1892. 
December28, 1892. 
November 23,1894. 



141,021 



Equal to 26.71 miles. 



Tabulated Statement of Work Done and Present 

Standing Relative to Streets and Sewers, 

January 1, 1898. 



New streets laid out in 1893. 
" " 1894. 

" " 1895. 

" " 1896. 

'• " 1897. 



New streets built in 1893 15, 

" 1S94 18 

" " 1895 16 

" " 1896 ..19, 

" " 1897 10 

Sewers built in 1893 21 

" " 1894 19 

" " 1895 23 

" " 1896 2a 

" " 1897 20 

Sewers voted in 1893 34 

" " 1894 18 

" " 1895 24 

" " 1896 22 

" " 1897 16 

Streets laid out but not built to Jan. 1, 1S9S. .141 

Sewei'S ordered in but not built to Jan. 1, 
1898 34 

Total amount of sewers Jan. 1, 1897 

Actual increase in 1897 



666.00 feet, 
325.00 

090.00 " 
780.00 

759.00 " 

840.00 " 

513.00 " 

943.00 " 

950.00 " 
,674.00 

716.00 " 

,612.00 " 

152.00 " 
530.00 

,657.00 " 
,C07.00 
,366.00 
136.50 

444.00 " 

366.00 " 

,021.00 " 

039.00 " 



equal to 6.940 miles. 
" 2.330 
" 2.290 
" 3000 
" 1.470 
" 3.C00 
" 3.500 
" 3.220 
" 3.778 
, " 2.021 
" 4.110 

3.714 
" 4.383 

5.024 
" 3.931 

6.440 
" 3.480 

4 5G9 
" 4.2.50 
" 3.100 
" 26.710 



6.446 

60.945 

3.508 



Total amount of sewers Jan. 1, 1898 64.453 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 205 

Length of streets open for travel — 592,749.00 feet, equal to 112.261 miles. 
Length of streets planned for on 

ground 95,205.00 " " 18.031 " 

Length of roads open for travel 323,400.00 '■ " 61.250 " 

Length of avenues opened for travel 45,257.00 " " S.571 " 
Length of avenues planned for on 

ground '. 16,234.03 " " 3.074 " 

1,072,815.00 203.190 " 

Length of walks on streets 664,900.00 feet, equal to 125.928 " 

Length of walks on roads 4,740.00 " " .897 " 

Length of walks on avenues 35,388.00 " " 6.702 " 

705,028.00 133.527 
ROADWAYS. 

Cobblestone paving ^. . 2,720.00 feet, equal to 0.515 miles 

Blockpaving , 9,258.00 " " 1.753 " 

Coal tar concrete 10,446.00 " " 1.978 " 

Macadam 38,032.00 " " 7.203 " 

Telford 27,097.00 " " 5.132 " 

Total length of improved streets 87,553.00 feet, equal to 16.562 miles 

Streets, roads, and avenues open for travel January 1, 
1898, 961,-100 feet, equal to 182.084 miles. 

City Hall step is 219.352 feet above sea level. 

The highest point in the city above mean sea level, 539 
feet; the lowest, 129 feet. 

Four cemeteries belonging to the city have a combined 
area of 105 acres, and eleven private burying grounds 
about 50 acres. 

The largest sewer in the city is 50 x 75 inches; the 
smallest, 6 inches. There are seven sewer outlets into 
the river, two above high water mark, and five submerged 
from 1 to 8 feet. 

The city owns wholly or in part 43 public buildings, of 
which 1 is built of brick and stone, 35 of brick, and 7 of 
wood. 

The common width of streets is 50 feet; the narrowest 
is 20 feet; the widest, 100 feet. 

There are 90 miles of streets having shade trees. 

Area of city, 21,700 acres, or 33.906 square miles. 

Area of Derryfield park 68.00 acres 

Oak Hill reservoir park 25.65 '' 

Rimmon park (proposed) 42.91 " 



206 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Area of Stark park 30.00 acres 

West Side park 9.76 '' 

Concord square 4.48 " 

Hanover square 3.00 '' 

Merrimack square 5.89 " 

Park square 3.49 " 

Simpson square 0.56 *' 

Tremont square 2.25 " 

Total area of- parks 176.32 acres 

Total area of squares. . . . , 19.67 " 

SUMMARY OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM SINCE ISSO. 



Year. 



'w 


'O 


OJ 


4) 






o . 


O 


3 •- 


p 


U 03 








C ^ 


a • 


O be 


O aJ 


O G 


'^ri 


91 U 


rj'C 


O S 


^O 








^. 


S 



^ ^ ^ 



§1 

o o 

a. Q 
C i-i 

W 






1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
188-1 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888, 
1889 
1S90 
1891. 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895, 
1896 
1897, 



1.02 
2.18 
3.37 
2.54 
1 73 
1.56 
2.15 
1.44 
1.73 
2.66 
1.81 
3.08 
3.13 
3.31 
2.91 
3.98 
4.71 
*3.93 



18.66 
20.84 
24.21 
26.75 
28.48 
30.04 
32.19 
33 63 
35.36 
38.02 
39.83 
42.91 
46.04 
49.35 
52.26 
56.24 
60.95 
64.42 



64 
153 
214 
191 
258 
255 
237 
283 



2,003 
2,067 
2 220 
2,434 
2,625 
2,883 
3,138 
3,375 
3,658 



$19,919.40 
23,895.12 
24,148.13 
21,452.05 
21,548.60 
28,122.84 
44,479.15 
19,893.92 
31,154.19 
27,513.73 
39,297. 97 
55,409.73 
39,721.65 
51,392.15 
46,116.01 
71,859.36 
06,408.87 
36,258 41 



812,295.92 
10,961 06 
7,165.65 
8,445.69 
12,4.55.84 
18,027.46 
20,687.97 
13,815.22 
18,008.20 
10,3-43.51 
21,711.58 
17,990.17 
12,091.58 
15,526.33 
15,847.42 
18,055.11 
14,099.33 
9,226.05 



Total cost for 18 years, .|668,594.28. 

* Includes old sewers relaid. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 207 

In the year 1888 a plan was made hj the present city 
engineer for a system of sewerage embracing the entire 
city, this being the first comprehensive plan ever com- 
piled for that purpose. Since its adoption the majority 
of the sewers constructed have followed this plan; those 
that have not are only temporary, and will have to be 
relaid when the growth of the city demands it. Since 
18S8 there have been 29.0G miles built, at a cost of $433,- 
980.88; at an average cost of |14,933.96 per mile. 



Orders. 



The following orders have been written by this depart- 
ment for the various committees. 

ORDERS TO BUILD SEWERS. 

Amory, from Alsace easterly about 200 feet. 

Beech, from Silver to Harvard. 

Central, from Belmont to Milton. 

Everett, from Clarke southerly about 300 feet. 

Grove south back, from east of Union to Beech. 

Grove south back, from Wilson easterly about 200 feet. 

Harvard, from Beech to Maple. 

Hayward, from Belmont to Cypress. 

Laurel, from east of Beacon westerly about 150 feet. 

Maple, from Prescott to Hayward. 

Prescott, from Wilson east about 208 feet. 

Rimmon east back, from Kelley to Mason. 

River road, from Clarke to Park avenue, proposed. 

Russell, from Harrison northerly 350 feet. 

Silver, from Lincoln to Wilson. 

Silver, from Wilson to Hall. 

Somerville, from Wilson to Hall. 

Taylor, from Valley northerly about 400 feet. 

Union, from Silver to Hayward. 

Walnut, from Salmon southerly 175 feet. 

Whittemore land. 

Recommended by committee on sewers and drains. 



208 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ORDERS TO ESTABLISH STREET GRADES. 

Adams, from Carpenter to Trenton. 

Baker, from Nutt road to Manchester & Lawrence 
Railroad. 

Bartlett, from Wayne to south of Sullivan. 

Beech, from Salmon southerly. 

Benton, from Hall road to Jones. 

Cypress, from Lake avenue to Massabesic. 

Glenwood avenue, from Page easterly 730 feet. 

Hall road, from Massabesic to Lake avenue. 

Jones, from Nelson to Benton. 

Lake avenue, from Cass to Hall road. 

Lafayette, from Kelley to Amory. 

Mammoth road, from Candia road to Lake avenue. 

Mast, from Amherst road westerly 2,551 feet. 

Nelson, from Hall road to Mammoth road. 

Nutt road, from Baker to Beech. 

Salmon, from Walnut east back to Beech, 

Vinton, from Taylor easterly. 

Wayne, from Dubuque to Hevey. 

Recommended by committee on streets. 

An order to build Cyi)ress street from Auburn to Massa- 
besic, recommended by committee on streets. 

An order to change the western boundary of Derry- 
field park, recommended by Councilman George H. 
Phinney. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SEWERS AND DRAINS, 



Following is the report of the committee on sewers and 
drains, prepared by the city engineer as clerk of the 
committee: 

Manchester, N. H,, December 28, 1897. 
Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

The committee appointed by your honorable board, to 
act as the joint standing committee on sewers and drains, 
would submit the following report of the work done by 
them the present 3'ear, and the first in their term of office. 

At the opening of the season there were fifty-eight 
orders for sewers voted in but not built. The following 
list gives the street, location, date of order, and length. 

209 

14 



210 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SEWERS ORDERED BUT NOT BUILT, TO JANUARY ], 1897. 



Street. 



Location. 



Amherst 

Amherst road 

Auburn 

Auburn south back. 

Beacon 

Belmont 

Belmont 

Blaine 

Carpenter 

Carrier east back... 
Cartier east back . . 

Cedar south back... 

Concord 

Dover 

Elm 



Length. 



Elm 

Elm 

Foster avenue . . . 

Front 

Hale 

Hall 

Hanover 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Harvell 

Hay ward 

llevey east back . 
Uevey east back . 



Lake avenue 

Linden 

Locust * 

Lowell 

Maple 

Merrimack 

Montgomery east b'k 

Myrtle 

Orange 

Prospect — 

Sagamore * 

Sagamore ' 

Schiller 

Second .. 

Second 

Somerville 

Spruce 

Tilton 



Union 

Union 

Union east back 



Valley 

Valley 

Walnut east back. 
Walnut east back. 

West 

Wentworth 

Wilson 

Wilson Hill 



Union to A shland 

South of Carroll southerly 

East of Canton easterly 

Hall easterly 

Amherst to Concord 

Valley to Clay 

Old Bridge to Bridge 

Second to Hiram 

Elm to Union 

South of Putnam southerly — 

North of Sullivan to 250 feet 
south of Sullivan 

Beech westerly 

Hall easterly 

Clinton northerly 

Shasta to Baker 

Railroad bridge to Elm avenue 

Munroe south back to Clarke.. 

Carpenter to Howell 

Valley to Hay ward 

Eddy to north of hotel 

Schiller southerly 

Prospect to Harrison 

East of Beacon to Highland . . . 

Hall to Belmont 

Linden to Russell 

Hale to South Main 

Jewett easterls' 

Wayne nortlierly 

South of Amory to Columbus 
avenue ". 

Canton easterly 

Prospect to Harrison 

Christian brook to Sagamore.. 

Belmont to Beacon 

Silver to Prescott 

Belmont to Milton 

Kelley to Amory 

Hall vresterly 

Hall to Belmont 

Hall easterly 

Locust easterly 

Oak to Linden 

Hale to South Main 

Blaine to Hiram 

South of Schiller to Harvell . . . 

Jewett westerly 

Canton easterly 

Soutli of Milford to Bowman 
place 

Clarke to Trenton 

Silver to Plummer 

South of Christian brook south- 
erly 

Elm to Wilson 

Jewett to Foster avenue 

Salmon northerly 

Christian brook northerly 

Clinton northerly 

Schiller southerly 

Harvard to Somerville 

Merrimack to Hanover 



2,600 

030 

90 

150 

303 

2,100 
200 
400 

1,4!3 
56 

312 
175 

200 
160 
332 

1,373 
S51 

1,500 
540 

2,800 
4.50 
270 
500 
365 
450 
700 
300 
146 

396 
300 
270 
198 
500 
640 
200 
700 
200 
365 
100 
136 
902 
S<50 
400 
160 
400 
250 

233 

1,700 

350 

50 
4,040 
248 
250 
200 
226 
400 
657 
380 



Date 
ordei'ed. 



35,067 



May 

April 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Jan. 

July 

Nov. 

Dec. 

June 
May 

Sept. 

May 

June 
Feb. 
July 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
July 
Sept. 
Dec. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Jan. 

July 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

May 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

July 
Dec. 
July 
Jan. 

June 
July 
Sept. 

Aug. 
Nov. 
July 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Sept. 

Aug. 
July 



Equal to 6.64 miles. 

♦Sewer changed to other location. 



REPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



211 



Of these the following have been built during the year 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Belmont. 

Carpenter 

Cartier east back 

Elm 

Hall 

Hanover 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Lake avenue 

Linden 

Maple 

Merrimack 

Montgomery east back 

Myrtle 

Orange 

Sagamore 

Somerville 

Spruce 

Walnut east back 

Walnut east back 

Wilson 

Wilson 



Valley to south of Somerville . . . 

Elm to Union 

Sullivan southerly 

Carpenter to Trenton 

Prospect to Harrison 

East of Beacon to east of Alfred 

Hall easterly 

Linden westerly 

Canton easterly 

Prospect to Harrison 

Silver to north of Harvard 

Belmont to Milton 

Kelley to Amorj- 

Hall westerly 

Hall easterly 

Oak to east of Russell 

Jewett to Cypress 

Canton easterly 

North of Salmon southerly 

Christian brook northerly 

Silver southerly 

Harvard southerly 



1,830 
1,413 
212 
556 
270 
297 
300 
314 
300 
270 
406 
200 
700 
200 
300 
754 
400 
140 
54 
200 
76 
150 



The following sewers, voted in previous to 1897, have 
been changed to other and more favorable locations: 



street. 


Length 
Location. jn feet. 

1 




Christian brook to Sagamore 


19S 






136 


Wilson hill 




380 










714 



Portions of the following sewers, voted in i^revious to 
1897, have been constructed far enough to provide proper 
drainage for the section, though not covering the entire 
distance voted in. 

The table shows the length remaining, which will not 
have to be built. 



212 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Street. 


Location. 


Length 
in feet. 






56 






100 






136 






1S2 










474 



Leavins^ 24,537 feet of sewers voted in ijrevious to Jan- 
uary 1, 1897. 

Brief mention is made in the following of the more 
important sewers built during the year: 

The work on the Elm-street main was continued 
through the winter and the pipe laid to Trenton street. 
It has been found that pipe laying through ledge excava- 
tion can be done considerably cheaper during the cold 
weather, when the ground is frozen, as the necessity of 
bracing is obviated, and the blasting operations do not 
disturb the top crust of earth to such an extent. There 
remain 944 feet to be laid to carr}^ this sewer to its pro- 
posed terminus, Rowell street. 

The Carpenter-street sewer has been built from Elm to 
Union street, most of the way through ledge, and drain- 
age provided for that rapidlj' growing section. The stone 
removed in blasting was crushed and used for repairing 
the city streets. By an arrangement with the water- 
works their pipe was laid in the sewer trench, they assum- 
ing a portion of the expense incurred in digging the 
trench, thereby reducing the cost of the sewer materially. 

The sewer in Belmont street, which was voted in last 
year, has been constructed from A'alley to Harvard street, 
and that section, so long desiring sewerage facilities, has 
been well provided for. In this section the Valley-street 
main has been continued nearly to Cypress street, a dis- 
tance of 1,084 feet. By the construction of these two 
sew^ers a large amount of territorv has been taken care 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 213 

of in the way of mains so tliat future sewer building will 
be in the nature of laterals in the various streets, as 
Deeded. 

In the F. M. Hoyt Shoe Company's section, the Silver- 
street main has been extended to IJall street, being of 
24-inch pipe to Wilson street and 20-inch pipe the re- 
mainder of the distance. Branches were also laid in 
Wilson street, from Harvard southerly, connecting with 
the Wilson-street main, and from Silver street southerly. 
This section is growing rapidly and will probably need 
increased facilities in the near future; in fact, several 
petitions have already been received, on some of which 
favorable action has been taken. In Maple and Union 
streets sewers have been built, connecting with the Silver- 
street main. 

On Wilson Hill the residents on Hanover street liave 
been given means of drainage by building a sewer from 
the old sewer on Hanover street, west of Beacon, to a 
point east of Alfred street. This was in accordance with 
the order passed last year, and takes the place of the one 
proposed to run across lots from INIerrimack to Hanover. 
Nearly half the distance was ledge excavation, the cut 
averaging about six feet. Laterals have also been con- 
structed in Central and Laurel streets connecting with 
the Wilson Hill sewer. 

The New Discovery and the surrounding sections have 
received needed attention, sewers having been built in 
Hall. Harrison, Linden, Myrtle, and Orange streets. This 
section is now well provided for, and future work will 
only be in the line of extensions to existing mains and 
laterals. 

The Laurel-street sewer, running from east of Union 
nearly to Maple, has been relaid deeper and numerous 
cesspools built to drain the surface water. No house con- 
nections were made, as they are provided for by sewers 
in the back streets. 



214 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

On the west side tlie principal sewer worlv lias been 
that in the Whittemore section. Arrangements were 
made last year whereby the city secured possession of a 
piece of land whose owners, holding an ice-cntting privi- 
lege, objected to the sewage running into the river. This 
year permission was granted by the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road and the Whittemore heirs to run through their land. 
This server starts at the Piscataquog river and runs east- 
erly under the railroad tracks, and along a private way, 
to the junction of Bow and Putnam streets. Here work 
was stopped for the season, leaving about 1,200 feet to 
be built to carry it to the terminus at Bartlett and Wayne 
streets. It is quite necessary that this should be built, 
as there are some fifty houses that are in need of the facil- 
ities that this main and its laterals will furnish. Eight 
hundred forty-seven feet of 24-inch pipe were laid, with an 
average cut of 10.5 feet. A small amount of ledge was 
encountered between the river and the railroad, but for 
the most part the excavating was through sand, with a 
sub-stratum of clayey gravel. 

The sewer in Granite street from Turner to Main was 
relaid, as the street was to be concreted and it was 
thought best to make sure that everything was all right 
rather than have to tear up the roadway at some future 
time. A portion of the Schiller-street sew^er was also re- 
laid, where the fiipe had fallen in from the effects of a 
washout. 

On Beauport street, and at the top of the hill near Put- 
nam street, numerous complaints were made regarding 
the surface water coming from the land on the west, down 
the slope toward Beauport street, to the injury of the 
lots and the inconvenience of the occupants. The former 
committee had recommended the construction of a sewer 
to remedy this, and this year it was built in Sullivan and 
Cartier east back streets. Cesspools were built where 
necessary, and the surface water is now properly taken 
care of. 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 215 

Your committee lias thoroughly examined the localities 
where sewers have been petitioned for, in many cases 
making several inspections before coming to a decision, 
and in all cases acted in a fair and impartial manner, as 
was deemed for the best interest of the city. 

During the year, twentj^-six orders for sewers have 
received favorable action; of these seven have been built, 
and six partly built. At the present time there are orders 
for sixty-three sewers, which have passed your honorable 
board, but which have not been constructed. 

The committee has held nine meetings, as follows: 
April 20, April 29, May 28, July 27, August 31, September 
2, October 22, November 22, December 28. 

The total number of petitions presented to your com- 
mittee has been twenty-seven. Of these, five have been 
laid over for further consideration; on five it has been 
voted to recommend that leave to withdraw be granted; 
one has been changed to another location, and seventeen 
have received favorable action. 

Seven reports were sent to the city councils, recom- 
mending the i^assage of orders authorizing the building 
of twenty-one sewers. 

These will be found in the list of orders written by the 
city engineer's department. 



Petitions. 



The following is a list of the petitions referred to the 
committee, and the action taken upon them: 

Laurel Street. From Beech to Maple street, com- 
mencing at or near Beech street, at the sewer in Laurel 
street, and thence in an easterly direction to Maple street 
in Laurel street. 

H. M. Wood. 

Committee voted that it be laid over to next meeting, 
April 29, 1897. 



216 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Committee voted that leave to withdraw be granted, 
May 28, 1897. 

Walnut East Back Street. From near Salmon 
southerly, about 250 feet, commencing at the southerly 
end of the sewer in Walnut east back, near Salmon street, 
and thence in a southerly direction in Walnut east back 
street, about 250 feet. 

William F. Miller. 

Committee voted to lay it on the table, April 29, 1897. 

Committee voted that leave to withdraw be granted, 
and that an order be prepared to build 175 feet in Walnut 
street, from Salmon southerly, May 28, 1897. 

Amory Street. From Rimmon to Alsace street, com- 
mencing at Bimmon street near the engine-house on 
Amory street, and thence in a westerly direction to Alsace 
street to connect with the other sewer. 

O. H. Nourry. 

Committee voted that the petitioners be given leave to 
withdraw, April 29, 1897. 

Silver Street. From Lincoln to Wilson, commenc- 
ing at the manhole in the sew^er at Lincoln and Silver 
streets, and thence in an easterly direction in Silver 
street to the center line of Wilson street, according to 
the city's plan of sewers for said section. 

William Cooper. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, 
April 29, 1897. 

Laurel Street. From Beacon easterly, commencing 
at or near the easterly line of Beacon street, at Laurel 
street, and thence in an easterly direction in Laurel 
street to the Wilson Hill sewer, a distance of about 200 
feet. 

George D. Totman. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, April 
29, 1897. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 217 

River Road. From Clarke to Park avenue, proposed, 
commencing at Clarke street and tlie River road, at the 
Eiver-road sewer, and thence in a northerly direction to 
Park avenue, proposed, as shown by the city's plans. 

Frank S. Davis. 

Committee voted to lay it on the table, May 28, 1897. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, Octo- 
ber 22, 1897. 

New Mast Road. From Mast northerly, commenc- 
ing at the present sewer in Mast street, at the New Mast 
road, and thence in a northerly direction about 1,000 feet 
in the New Mast road. 

James F. Wyman. 

Committee voted to lay it on the table until the street 
lines are established. May 28, 1897. ' 

Committee voted to lay it over, September 2, 1897. 

Union Street. From Silver to Hayward, commencing 
at corner of Union and Silver streets, and thence in a nor- 
therly direction to Hayward street. 

Martha S. Batchelder. 

Committee voted that petitioners be given leave to 
withdraw. May 28, 1897. 

Hayward Street. From Belmont to Cypress in Hay- 
ward, commencing at the present sewer in Belmont 
street, at Hayward street, and thence in an easterly di- 
rection to Cypress street, as shown by the city's plan of 
sewers in Hayward street. 

S. G. Fletcher. 

Committee voted that it be laid on the table for consid- 
eration, July 27, 1897. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, Sep- 
tember 2, 1897. 



tiiS ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Grove South Back. Commencing in Grove south 
back street, east. of Union street, and thence in an easterly 
direction to Beech street, in Grove south back street. 

Edward Coveny. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build^ 
July 27, 1897. 

Amory Street. From Alsace street easterly, com- 
mencing at the sewer at Alsace and Amory street, in 
Amory street, and thence in an easterly direction about 
200 feet in Amorj'. 

O. H. Nourry. 

Committee voted to lay it on the table, July 27, 1897. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build,. 
September 2, 1897. 

ITxioN Street. From Silver to Hayward, commenc- 
ing at Silver and Union streets, and thence in a northerly 
direction to Hayward street, in Union street, according 
to the city's plan of sewers. 

R. N. Batchelder. 

Committee voted to lay it on the table, July 27, 1897. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, 
September 2, 1897. 

Taylor Street. From Valley northerly, commencing" 
at the sewer proposed in Valley street at Taylor street^ 
and thence in a northerly direction in Taylor street about 
400 feet. 

Robert Harriman. 

Committee voted to lay it on the table, July 27, 1897. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build^ 
September 2, 1897. 

Everett Street. From Clarke southerly, commenc- 
ing at the manhole in Clarke street sewer at Everett 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 219 

street, and thence in a soutlierlv direction in Everett 
street about 300 feet. 

John E. Dinsmore. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, 
July 27, 1897. 

Harvard Street. From Oilman Clough's land to 
Hall street, commencing at the terminus of the location 
of the sewer already voted in on Harvard street, at the 
westerly line of G. Clough's land, and thence in an east- 
erly direction to Hall street. 

Alfred D. Plummer. 

Committee voted to lay it on the table, July 27, 1897. 

Committee voted to lay over for further consider- 
ation, September 2, 1897. 

EniMON East Back Street. From Kelley to Mason, 
commencing at tlje Kelley-street sewer at Rimmon east 
back street, and thence in a northerly direction to Mason 
street in Rimmon east back street. 

John Corliss. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, 
July 27, 1897. 

Prescott Street. From Wilson east about 208 feet, 
commencing at the intersection of Wilson and Prescott 
streets, and thence in an easterly direction in said Pres- 
cott street about 208 feet. 

A. E. Boisvert. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, 
September 2, 1897. 

Somerville Street. From Wilson to Hall, com- 
mencing at the sewer already voted in on Wilson street at 
Somerville street, and thence in an easterly direction to 
Hall street through Somerville street, according to the 
city's plan of sewers for said section. 

Eugene E. Reed. 



220 ANNUAL OFriCIAL REPORTS. 

Committee voted to lav it ou the table, September 2, 
1897. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, 
October 22, 1897. 

Garland Avenue. From Cypress westerly 200 feet, 
comnif ncing at a Y in the Cypress-street sewer Ifi feet 
from the southwest corner of Kimball Bros.' shoeshop, 
and thence in a westerly direction to a peach tree stand- 
ing in Garland avenue, so called, 200 feet from beginning. 

M. V. B. Garland. 

Committee voted to lay it on the table, September 2, 
1897. 

Committee voted to recommend that leave to withdraw 
be granted, October 22, 1897. 

Harvard and Beech Streets. Commencing at Silver 
and Beech streets, thence northerly in Beech street to Har- 
vard street, and thence in an easterly direction in Har- 
vard street to Maple street. 

Augustin Lennieux. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, 
October 22, 1897. 

Central Street. From Belmont to Beacon, com- 
mencing at the intersection of Central street on Belmont 
street, and thence in an easterly direction to Beacon 
street. 

Gilbert Wilber. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build to 
Milton street, October 22, 1897. 

Second Street. Harvell street southerly, commenc- 
ing at the Second-street sewer near Harvell street, and 
thence in a southerlj- direction in Second street about 
300 feet. 

Michael T. Sullivan. 

Committee voted to lay it on tjie table, October 22, 1897. 

Committee voted to lay it over to first meeting in 1898, 
November 22, 1897. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 221 

Grove South Back Street. From Wilson east 200 
feet, commencing at Wilson and Grove south back street, 
and tlience in an easterly direction to about 200 feet in 
Grove south back street. 

Mary E. Gray. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, 
October 22, 1897. 

Maple Street. From Harvard to Hayward, com- 
mencing at the present sewer in Maple street between 
Prescott and Harvard streets, and thence in a northerly 
direction to Hayward street. 

John McCarthy. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, 
October 22, 1897. 

Russell Street. From near Harrison street nor- 
therly, commencing at the present Russell-street sewer, 
and thence in a northerly direction 350 feet. 

Charles E. Green. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to build, 
October 22, 1897. 

Central Street. From east of Beacon to Beacon, 
commencing at the .present sewer in Central street east 
of Beacon, and thence in a westerly direction to Beacon 
street, according to the city's plan of sewers. 

William Heron, Jr. 

Committee voted to lay it over to first meeting in 1898, 
November 22, 1897. 

Lake Avenue. From near Canton to Hall road, com- 
mencing at the present sew^er east of Canton street in 
Lake avenue, and thence in an easterly direction to J. 
Hall road in Lake avenue. 

Nellie M. Sheehan. 

Committee voted to lay it over to first meeting in 1898, 
November 22, 1897. 



222 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SBWERS ORDERED BUILT IN 1897. 



STREET. 



Location. 



T „„,»tv. Date 
Length. Lj.jjpj.g^j_ 



Amory 

Beech 

Central 

Dubuque east back 

Everett ... 

Grove south back.. 
Gi'ove south back.. 

Hanover 

Harvard 

Harvard 

Hayward 

Laurel 

Maple 

Milford 

Prescott 

Putnam 

Rimmon east back 
River road north . . 

Russell 

Silver 

Silver 

Somerville 

Taylor 

Union 

Valley 

Walnut 

Wayne 

Whittemore land . . 
Whipple 



Total . 



Alsace easterly 

Silver to Harvard 

Belmont to Milton 

Kelley to 200 feet north of Bremer . 

Clarke southerly 

East of Union to Beech 

Wilson easterly 

Near Beacon to Highland 

Wilson easteily 

Beech to Maple 

Belmont to Cypress 

Beacon easterly 

Prescott to HayAvard 

Amherst road westerly 

Wilson easterly 

Bow to Whipple 

Kelley to Mason 

Clarke to Park avenue. Proposed . 

Harrison northerly 

Lincoln to Wilson 

Wilson to Hall 

Wilson to Hall 

Vallej' northerly — 

Silver to Hayward 

East of Belmont to Cypress 

Salmon southerly 

Whipple to Bartlett 

Piscataquog river to Putnam 

Putnam to vvayne 



16,087 



200 


Sept. 


7 


306 


Nov. 


2 


242 


" 


2 


S24 


Jan. 


4 


300 


Sept. 


7 


302 


" 


1 


200 


Nov. 


2 


802 


Jan. 


4 


200 


•' 


4 


650 


Nov. 


o 


1,396 


Sept. 


7 


150 


June 


1 


320 


Nov. 


2 


300 


Jan. 


4 


208 


Sept. 


1 


164 


Oct. 


6 


1,400 


Sept. 


7 


1,450 


Nov. 


2 


350 


" 


2 


673 


June 


1 


510 




6 


510 


Nov. 


<> 


400 


Sept. 


7 


958 


" 


7 


1,217 


Jan. 


4 


175 


June 


29 


500 


Oct. 


5 


844 


" 


5 


536 


" 


5 



Equaling 3.04 miles. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 223 

SEWERS ORDERED BUT NOT BUILT, TO JANUARY 1, 1898. 



Street. 



Location. 



Length. 



Date 
ordered. 



Amherst 

Amherst road 

Amory 

Auburn 

Auburn south back 

Beacon 

Beech 

Belmont 

Blaine 

Cedar south back. . 

Central 

Concord 

Dover 

Elm 



Elm 

Elm 

Foster avenue 

Front 

Grove south back. . 
Grove south back. . 

Hale 

Hanover 

Harrison 

Harvard 

llarvell 

Hay ward 

Hay ward 

Hevey east back. . . 
Hevey east back. .. 

Lowell 

Maple 

Maple 

Milf ord 

Orange 

Prescott 

Prospect 

Putnam 

Rimmon east back. 
River road north. . . 

Sagamore ; . 

Schiller 

Second 

Second 

Somerville 

Spruce 

Tavlor 

Tilton 

Union 

Union 

Union 

Union east back . . . 

Valley 

Valley 

Valley 

Walnut 

Walnut east back. 

Wayne 

West 

Wentworth 

Whipple 

Wilson 



Union to Ashland 

South of Carroll southerly 

Alsace easterly 

East of Canton easterl j' 

Hall easterly 

Amherst to Concord 

Silver to Harvard 

Old 1 a-idge to Bridge 

Second to Hiram 

Beech westerly 

Belmont to Milton 

Hall easterly 

Clinton northerly 

Shasta to Baker 

Railroad bridge to Elm avenue — 

Munroe south back to Clarke 

Trenton to Rowell 

Valley to Haj' ward * 

Eddy to north of hotel 

East of Union to Beech 

Wilson easterly 

Schiller southerly 

East of Alfred to Highland 

Belmont westerly 

Beech to Maple 

Hale to South Main 

Belmont to Cypress 

Jewett easterly 

Wayne nortlierlj' 

South of Amory to Columbus ave 

Belmont to Beacon 

North of Harvard to Prescott 

Prescott to Hayward 

Amherst road westerlj' \ 

Belmont westerly 

Wilson easterly 

Hall easterly 

Bow to Whipple 

Kelley to Mason 

Clarke to Park avenue. Proposed. 

Linden westerly 

Hale to South Main 

Blaine to Hiram 

South of Schiller to Harvell 

Wilson to Hall 

East of Canton easterly 

Valley nortlierly 

South of Milford to Bowman place 

Clarke to Trenton 

North of Prescott to Hay ward 

Silver to Plummer '. 

South of Christian brook southerly 

Cypress westerly 

Elm to Wilson 

Jewett to Foster avenue 

Salmon southerly , 

Salmon northerly , 

Whipple to Bartlett 

Clinton northerly 

Schiller southerly 

Putnam to Wayne 

South of Silver to Somerville . . 



Total. 



2,600 
630 
200 
90 
150 
303 
306 
200 
400 
175 
242 
200 
160 
332 

1,373 
851 
944 
540 

2,800 
302 
200 
450 
134 
65 
650 
700 

1,396 
300 
146 
396 
500 
234 
320 
300 
65 
208 
100 
164 

1,400 

1,450 
148 
850 
400 
160 
510 
110 
400 
233 

1,700 

192 

350 

50 

133 

4,040 
248 
105 
200 
500 
226 
400 
536 
149 



May 2, 
April 3, 
Sept. 7, 
Nov. 9, 
.Ian. 7, 
Nov. 10, 
" 2, 
Jan. 7, 
July 5, 
May 5, 
Nov. 2, 
Sept. 6, 

May 6, 



1893 
1894 
1897 
1894 
1896 
1896 
1897 
1896 
1892 
1896 
1897 
1896 
1894 
1890 



June 4, 1895 

Feb. 4, 1896 

July 14, 1896 

Sept. 5, 1893 

7, 1897 

Nov. 2, 1897 

9, 1894 

Jan. 4, 1897 

Sept. 1, 1896 

Nov. 2, 1897 

9, 1894 

Sept. 7, 1897 

" 3, 1895 

Jan. 7, 1896 

July 10, 1893 

Aug. 6, 1895 

Sept. 1, 1896 

Nov. 2, 1897 

Jan. 4, 1897 

Feb. 4, 1896 

Sept. 7, 1897 

3, 1895 

Oct. 5, 1897 

Sept. 7, 1897 

Nov. 2, 1897 

" 10, 1896 

" 10, 1896 

July 5, 1892 

Dec. 3, 1895 

Nov. 2, 1897 

Jan. 7, 1896 

Sept. 7, 1S97 

June 4, 1895 

July 2, 1895 

Sept. 7, 1897 

3, 1895 

Aug. 6, 1895 

Jan. 4, 1897 

Nov. 7, 1893 

July 14, 1896 

June 29, 1897 

Nov. 10, 1896 

Oct. 5, 1897 

Sept. 4, 1894 

5, 1895 

Oct. 5, 1897 

Aug. 7, 1894 



34,015 



Equaling 6,442 miles. 



224 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This comprises all the work that has come within the 
province of the committee on sewers and drains, and is 
respectfully submitted. 

JOHN F. FROST, Chairman, 
GILLIS STARK, 
MURDOCK A. WEATHERS, 
WILLIAM WATTS, 
JOSEPH D. MASSE, 
Committee on Sewers and Drains. 

W. H. BENNETT, 

■'j. Clerk of Committee. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON STREETS. 



The annual report of the committee on streets, prepared 
by the city engineer as clerk of the committee, is herewith 
presented : 

Manchester, N, H., December 31, 1897. 
Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

The committee appointed by your honorable board, to 
act as the joint standing committee on streets, would 
submit the following report of the work done by them and 
under their direction the present year : 

The committee has held eight meetings, as follows: 
February 25, April 5, May 25, June 18, July 8, August 31, 
October 14, October 21. 

Number of petitions received, 41; laid over to 1808, 4; 
laid over until Rule 29 was complied with, 3; where orders 
to establish grades were recommended, 11; recommended 
leave to withdraw, 4; recommended to a hearing. 19; 
total, 41. 

The committee has carefully examined the location in 
all cases where petitions to establish grade w^ere presented, 
the situation being explained by the city engineer before 
orders were prepared for introduction into the council. 
Among the more important were Nutt road and Baker 
street; Jones, Nelson, and Benton streets. Hall and Mam- 
moth roads in the Dr. C. M. Dodge land, and Bartlett 
street in the Whittemore section. 

In three cases, William, Adams, and Hall streets, the 
petitioners were instructed regarding Rule 29, and your 
committee, acting under its provisions, voted to recom- 
mend that the petitions be laid over until the rule had 
been complied with. The expense for building these 

225 

15 



226 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

streets would have been considerable and as they were 
not of great public necessity the above action was taken. 

The residents of South Beech street being desirous of 
securing a means of reaching the electric cars on Calef 
road by some route nearer than Mitchell street or by pass- 
ing over private land petitioned for a highway. Two 
petitions were presented, one calling for the laying out 
of Norfolk street from Beech street to the Calef road, 
and the other for Titus avenue from Union street to the 
Calef road. The city engineer was instructed to make 
surveys of the section to determine if a more feasible 
route could be selected. The conclusion reached was 
that the Titus avenue route would call for the least ex- 
penditure of money, and the former petition was denied, 
a hearing being granted on the latter petition. As the 
parties interested would not waive damages, the highway 
was not laid out. 

In one instance, Somerville street between Plall and 
Belmont, the committee departed from present custom 
and recommended the laying out of a highway where it 
was necessary to purchase the land. The residents of 
Belmont street, south of Young street, having no means 
of reaching the section west of them except by a round- 
about route, petitioned for the highway. Upon exami- 
nation by the committee, it was considered to be a public 
necessity and the petition was reported on favorably. 

Considerable time has been spent in discussing the 
merits of the petition for laying out the Moss road, from 
the Bald Hill road northerly. As your board is doubtless 
familiar with the situation, extended explanation is un- 
necessary. The committee carefully examined the local- 
ity and at a conference heard all parties who appeared 
either for or against the petition. As no agreement could 
be reached, the matter was laid over until the first meet- 
ing in 1898. 

The petitioners asking for the laying out of Beech 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. , 227 

street from Salmon to Webster were given leave to with- 
draw, as the benefits to be derived would not be commen- 
surate with the expense of building. A fill of consider- 
able extent would have to be made, and two culverts con- 
structed on the line of the street, besides removing a por- 
tion of a ledge and many large bowlders. 

The petition for the extension of Schuyler street was 
also denied. The situation here was such that there was 
liability of a suit against the city for damage to abutting 
property if the street was laid out and built. 

EuLE 29, Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Passed April 21, 1897. 

Eule 29. No petition for the laying out of any street 
or highway shall be considered by the board of mayor 
and aldermen unless it shall be accompanied by an agree- 
ment, signed by responsible parties, that said highway, 
if laid out by the board of mayor and aldermen, shall be 
built and graded to the satisfaction of the board of street 
and park commissioners, without expense to the city, or 
by a certificate from said board of street and park com- 
missioners that said asked for highway has already been 
built and graded to their satisfaction, without expense 
to the city, except in cases where two thirds of the board 
of mayor and aldermen shall deem the same to be of 
great public necessity; and upon the presentation to said 
board qf mayor and aldermen of any such petition, not 
accompanied by such agreement or certificate, the mayor 
shall, by virtue of this rule, declare forthwith that such 
petition is denied, subject to a motion of any alderman 
that the public necessity requires the consideration of 
such petition, and its adoption by a two thirds vote, as 
aforesaid. 

Petitions. 

The following is a list of the petitions referred to the 
committee and the action taken upon them: 

CoLUAiBus Street. For a new highway in said city, 
beginning at a stake at the intersection of Amorv and 



228 ^ ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Columbus streets, and thence in. a southerly direction 
about 400 feet to a stake in said street, as shown on plan 
of said section. 

P. Hevey and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, April 5, 1897. 

Brock Street. For establishing grade of the highway 
in said city, beginning at a stone bound in the line of Mast 
street, opposite the land of J. P. Brock, thence in a west- 
erly direction to Forest street. 

C. A. Brooks and others. 

Committee voted to recommend an order to establish 
the grade as shown by the city engineer's plans, April 5, 
1897. 

Titus Avenue. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stake on the westerly line of the proposed 
Union street and in the center line of Titus avenue, as 
laid out by the board of mayor and aldermen, May 21^ 
1894, said stake being about 540 feet west of Beech street, 
and thence in a westerly direction with Titus avenue 
already laid out, to a stake on the easterly line of Calef 
road, meaning an extension of Titus avenue from Union 
street to Calef road. 

B. B. Aldrich and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted. May 25, 1897. 

SoMERviLLE STREET. For a uew highway in said city, 
beginning at a stake on the east line of Hall street and on 
the south line of lot No. 10, as shown on the Hoyt plan of 
lots in said section, said stake is on the north line of Som- 
erville street, produced easterly across said Hall street, 
and thence in an easterly direction about 304 feet to a 
stake on the westerly line of Belmont street, said street 
being a proposed extension of Somerville street. 

John Muir and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, May 25, 1897. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 229 

Norfolk Street. For a new highway in said city, 
beginning at a stake on the west line of Beech street, and 
on the north line of Norfolk street proposed, said stake 
is about 1,878 feet south of the south line of Mitchell 
street already laid out, and thence in a westerly direction 
to a stake on the easterly line of Calef road. Said stake 
is on the north line of Norfolk street proposed. 

Frank E. Webster and others. 

Committee voted-to recommend that leave to withdraw 
be granted, May 25, 1897. 

William Street. For a new highway in said city, 
beginning at the intersection of Milf ord and William, and 
thence in a northerly direction on said William street to 
Mast street, and the said street to be 40 feet wide, as 
shown on Kiddle's plan of land. 

John A. Riddle and others. 

Committee voted to adhere to Rule 29, and when street 
is graded to consider petition, June 18, 1897. 

Beech Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stone bound set in the ground at the inter- 
section of the center lines of Beech and Salmon streets, 
being the northern terminus of Beech street as laid out 
by the board of mayor and aldermen, June 27, 1894, and 
thence in a northerly direction to a stake in the center of 
Webster street, and on the center line of Beech street 
extended, being an extension of Beech street as shown on 
the city and Amoskeag Manufacturing Company's plan 
of lots and streets. 

M. D. Johnson and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that leave to withdraw 
be granted. May 25, 1897. 

Alfred Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at the intersection of Hanover street and Alfred 
street as already laid out, thence extending southerly 
across Hanover street, through land of the estate of A. G. 



230 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Fairbanks and land of Bodwell and Balch to Merrimack 
street, being an extension of said Alfred street in a south- 
erly direction, said street being required for the extension 
of water and sewer pipes. 

J. A. Hutchinson and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, May 25, 1897. 

Laval Street. For building to grade the highway in 
said ciij, beginning at Amorj^ and Laval, and thence in a 
northerly direction through Laval street to Kelley street. 

John B. Favreau and others. 

Committee voted to recomend that leave to withdraw 
be granted, June 18, 1897. 

New Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake on the west line of Rockland avenue, so 
called, and on the south line of land of the city of Man- 
chester, and on the north line of land of Mr. Farrar, and 
thence in a westerly direction to a stake on the city line 
at a point 25 feet south of the land of D. H. Lamphrey. 

William F. Alger and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, April 5, 1897. 

Cartier Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stone bound in the centier of Kelley and Car- 
tier streets, being the northerly terminus of Cartier street 
already laid out by the board of mayor and aldermen, and 
thence in a northerly direction about 400 feet, to a stake 
on the westerly line of Coolidge avenue, and in the center 
of said Cartier street, according to the Amoskeag Manu- 
facturing Company's plan. 

Medard Poulin and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, April 5, 1897. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 231 

Schuyler Street, For a new highway in said city^ 
beginning at a stone bound at the intersection of Eeau- 
port and Schuyler streets in West Manchester, as shown 
on the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company's plans, and 
thence in a westerly direction over Schuyler street about 
125 feet, to a stake on the line of the back street. Said 
stakes are on the center line of said Schuyler street. 

George D. Herbert and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that leave to withdraw 
be granted, June 18, 1897. 

Baker Street. For establishing the grade of the 
highway in said city, beginning at Baker street and Nutt 
road, and thence in a westerly direction on Baker street 
to the Manchester & Lawrence Eailroad. 

Timothy McKenna and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that grade be estab- 
lished according to city engineer's plan. May 25, 1897. 

Nutt Road. For establishing the grade of the high- 
way in said city, beginning at Baker street and Nutt road, 
and thence southerly on Nutt road to Beech street. 

Timothy McKenna and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that grade be estab- 
lished according to city engineer's plan. May 25, 1897. 

Ray Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake in the center line of Carpenter and the 
center line of Ray street proposed, as shown by plans of 
said section, said section is about 1,115.82 feet east of the 
east line of Elm street, and thence in a northerly direc- 
tion to a stake on the south line of land of E. O. and J. E. 
Dodge, and being on the center line of Ray street pro- 
posed. 

F. E. Putney and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, May 25, 1897. 



232 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Harvard Street. For a new highway in said city, 
beginning at stake on the westerly line of land owned by 
Oilman Clough, this being the easterly end of Harvard 
street now laid out, and thence in an easterly direction 
to a stake on the east line of Hall street through said Har- 
vard street. 

Alfred D. Plummer and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, May 25, 1897. 

Summer Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stake in the center line of Beech street and 
the center line of Summer street, said stake is 270 feet 
south of the stone bound in the center of Auburn street 
and on the center line of Beech street, and thence in an 
easterly direction to a stake about 125 feet east of the 
east line of Beech street, and in the center of Summer 
street proposed. 

Margaret Gorman and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, May 25, 1897. 

Adams Street, For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake on the north line of Carpenter street, and 
in the center line of the proposed Adams street, said stake 
is 245 feet east of the east line of Chestnut street already 
laid out, and thence in a northerly direction to a stake 
on the south line of Trenton street, said stake is 245 feet 
east of the east line of Chestnut street, and known as 
Adams street on the plans of said section. 

H. J. Lawson and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that it be laid over 
nntil petitioners complied with Rule 29, May 25, 1897. 

Mammoth Road, Nelson, Jones, Benton, and Hall 
Road. For establishing the grade of the highways in 
said city, as follows: - 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 233 

On Mammoth road, from the Concord «& Portsmouth 
Railroad to line of Stevens property. 

On Nelson street, from Mammoth road to the Hall road. 

On Jones street, from Nelson to the Stevens prox^erty. 

On Hall road, from the Concord & Portsmouth Railroad 
to the Stevens property. 

On Benton street, from Hall road to Jones street. 

Oilman Clough and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that grade be estab- 
lished according to city engineer's plans, June 18, 1897. 

Putnam Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stake on the Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany's land, in the center line of Putnam street proposed, 
as shown on a plan of said section known as the D. C. 
Whittemore plan of lots, and thence in a westerly direc- 
tion to a stake in the center line of Whipple and the cen- 
ter line of Putnam proposed. 

Lazare Martineau and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, June 18, 1897. 

Mast Road. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a point on the north side of Mast street, thence in 
a northerly direction to the old Goffstown line, meaning 
that portion of the new Mast road that formerly belonged 
in Bedford. 

C. H. George and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, June 18, 1897. 

Maple Street. For a new highway in said city, be- 
ginning at a stake in the south line of Hay ward street, 
and in the center line of Maple street as laid out by the 
board of mayor and aldermen, August 5, 1873, and thence 
in a southerly direction and parallel to Beech, to a stake 
in the center line of Shasta street. 

Charles A. Flint and others. 



234 . ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, July 8, 1897. 

Dubuque Street. For a new highway in said city, 
beginning at a stake standing at the center of Kelley and 
Dubuque streets, as shown on the plans of said section 
in West Manchester, and thence in a northerly direction 
to a stake in the center of Mason and Dubuque streets. 

John Corliss and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, July 8, 1897. 

Wayne Street. For establishing the grade of the 
highway in said city, beginning at the back street between 
Dubuque and Rimmon streets, on Wayne street, and 
thence in a westerly direction about 270 feet to Hevey 
east back street. 

Joseph Minigan and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that grade be estab- 
lished according to city engineer's plan, July 8, 1897. 

Walnut East Back Street. For a new highway in 
said city, beginning at Salmon street, between Walnut 
and Beech streets, thence in a southerly direction about 
250 feet. 

George D. Fitts and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, August 31, 1897. 

Moss Road. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake on the north side of the Bald Hill road, 
and about 2 rods westerly of the west line of Frank 
Goings's house, and thence in a northerly direction about 
92 rods, to a stake on the Range line, and said stake is 
on the south side of the house of John Moss. 

John Moss and others. 

Committee voted to notify Messrs. Moss and Goings to 
appear before them for a conference, Oct. 11, 1897. Con- 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 235 

ference was held Oct. 21, and matter laid over until first 
meeting in 1898. 

"Landing." For discontinuing a highway in said city, 
beginning at the easterly line of South Main street, and 
known as the "Landing," and thence in an easterly direc- 
tion to the Piscataquog river, meaning and intending to 
discontinue so much of the "Landing" as lies east of the 
east line of South Main street. 

Fred G. Stark and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, August 31, 1897. 

Log Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake at the intersection of the south line of 
Log street, and the east line of South Main street, said 
stake is 241.32 feet north of the north line of West Han- 
cock street, and thence in an easterly direction over the 
proposed Log street to a stake on the westerly line of 
Colby street, said stake is 220 feet north of West Han- 
cock street, measuring on the line of said Colby street 
as shown by a plan of the New Hampshire Improvement 
Company's of said section. 

Fred G. Stark, for New Hampshire Improvement Com- 
pany, and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, August 31, 1897. 

Dartmouth Street. For a new highway in said city, 
begining at a stone bound in the intersection of the north 
line of West Hancock street and the westerly line of 
Dartmouth street, and thence in a northerly direction 
over the proposed Dartmouth street, to a stone bound on 
the south line of Log street, and the westerly line of 
Dartmouth street, as shown on a plan of said section, 
known as the New Hampshire Improvement Company's 
plan. 



236 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Fred G. Stark, for New Hampshire Improvement Com- 
pan}^, and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, August 31, 1897. 

Bartlett Street. For establishing the grade of the 
highway in said city, beginning at Amory street exten- 
sion and liartlett street, and thence in a southerly direc- 
tion over Bartlett street to its terminus south of Sullivan 
street. 

Leonard Grenier and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that grade be estab- 
lished according to city engineers plan, Oct. 14, 1897. 

SoMERviLLE STREET. For a uew highway in said city, 
beginning at a stake in the center line of Belmont, and 
said stake is in the center line of Somerville street, as 
laid out by the board of mayor and aldermen, August 25, 
1897, and thence in an easterly direction to a stake in 
the center of Cypress street, being an extension of Somer- 
ville as shown by the city's plan of streets. 

S. R. Stearns and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, October 14, 1897. 

Hall Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake in the north side of Prospect street as now 
laid out, and in the center of Hall, and thence in a nor- 
therly direction to a stake on the north line of Gore 
street, and in the center line of Hall street. 

Edward Belanger and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that it be laid over 
until petitioners had complied with Rule 29, October 14, 
1897. 

Lafayette Street. For establishing the grade of 
highway in said city, beginning at Amory and Lafayette 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 237 

streets, and thence in a northerly direction on Lafayette 
street to Kelley street, as shown on plan No. 4093, on file 
in city engineer's department. 

F. P. Nourie and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that grade be estab- 
lished according to city engineer's plan, Oct. 14, 1897. 

Clay Street. For a new highway in said city, begin- 
ning at a stake at the intersection of the center line of 
Clay street and the east line of Beech street, said stake 
is about 199 feet north of the Concord & Portsmouth Rail- 
road right of way, and thence in an easterly direction 
about 120.17 feet to a stake on the west line of the L. B. 
Bodwell land, and in the center line of Clay street. 

J. I*. Russell & Co. and others. 

Committee voted to recommend that a hearing be 
granted, October 14, 1897. 

Dubuque Street; For a new highway in said city^ 
beginning at a stake standing at the center of Kelley and 
Dubuque streets, as shown on the plan of said section in 
West Manchester, and thence in a northerly direction to 
a stake in the center of Bremer and Dubuque streets. 

John Corliss and others. 

Laid over until first meeting in 1898. 

Highland Park Avenue. For establishing the grade 
of the highway in said city, beginning at the intersection 
of Highland Park avenue and the Candia road, and thence 
in a northerly direction over Highland Park avenue to 
the Concord & Portsmouth Railroad right of way. 

George W. Hamlin and others. 

Laid over until first meeting in 1898. 

Oakland Avenue. For establishing the grade of the 
highway in said city, beginning at the intersection of 
Oakland avenue and Revere avenue, and thence in an 



238 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

easterly direction to about 103 feet east of Woodland 
avenue, over Oakland avenue. 

George W. Hamlin and others. 

Laid over until first meeting in 1898. 

This comprises all the work that has come within the 
province of the committee on streets, and is respectfully 

submitted. 

• J. T. GOTT, Chairman, 
CHARLES E. COX, 
D. L. ROBINSON, 
JAMES F. WYMAN, 
EDMOND PINARD, 

Committee on Streets. 

W. H. BENNETT, 

Clerk of Committee. 

This department has been without the services of one 
assistant this year, and considerable of the work that had 
been planned for had to be left undone. The refusal of 
the finance committee to make a sufficient appropriation 
to permit of employing additional assistants was respon- 
sible for this state of affairs. With the utmost economy 
it was impossible to avoid overdrawing, as a reference to 
page three will show. Had it not been for the sickness 
of one of the assistants and the absence of another from 
the city for a portion of the time the amount would have 
been much larger. Reference to the reports sent out by 
other cities shows that the amounts appropriated by 
them are greatly in excess of that allowed this depart- 
ment, and by cities oftentimes not as large as Manchester. 
It is hoped that the matter will be looked at in the proper 
light, and a sufficiently large appropriation given to allow 
of important work to be done which will be of inestimable 
benefit to the citv in future vears. 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 239 

STREETS. 

Nothing of importance can be said regarding the lay- 
ing out of streets the past season. Since the adoption of 
Kule 29, requiring the abutters to build the street to a 
satisfactory grade before it is accepted, there has been 
a noticeable improvement in the streets laid out. Only 
three cases have occurred where the streets asked for 
were denied on account of the provisions of this rule. 
One has been laid out where laud damages were paid, as 
it was considered a public necessity. 

There has been quite a falling off in the number of new 
streets projected the past season. For the past five or 
six years every one owning a piece of land immediately 
cut it up into house lots and put them on the market. 
Consequently there was an over supply, and prices as a 
rule went down. Possibly the prevailing hard times had 
something to do with it, but the fact remains that people 
as a general thing are not investing in suburban real 
estate with the avidity they displayed a few years ago. 

As has been said in former reports, it is greatly to be 
regretted that those having property to divide paid so 
little attention to existing streets. In some of the new 
sections care has been taken to have them conform to a 
regular plan, with streets of suitable width, and with 
back streets between the lots. For the most part, how- 
ever, little regard was paid to this, the main object seem- 
ing to be to lay out as many lots as possible regardless of 
the conveniences furnished in the matter of streets. 

Street lines too long neglected are liable to involve 
a city in legal difficulties, and cause it considerable ex- 
pense, as many cities are finding out if reports from these 
cities are true. 

It is one of the curious features of municipal govern- 
ment that street lines and grades are rarely fixed on a 
comprehensive, well-digested plan at a time when the 



240 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

property concerned is of small value. Generally nothing 
of the sort is done until the land is so well built up that 
the problem cannot be solved without damages to some 
parties, and when this occurs the unfortunate city engi- 
neer, who has little to do in the matter beyond carrying 
out the city council's orders, is the one called on to bear 
all the blame. 

Considerable attention has been paid to locating and 
setting stone bounds the past season. Whenever prac- 
ticable a bound has been set in place of the hub on the 
corners of new streets, and in a majority of cases the 
bound has been set at grade. It has been the aim of this 
department to encourage the marking of corners by per- 
manent bounds, and in several cases stones have been 
furnished to engineers who were willing to set them. 

ROAD SURVEYS. 

The surveys made of the Proctor road. Lake Shore 
road, and Island Pond road have been plotted, and the 
lines established as far as possible with the data obtain- 
able. 

On the Lake Shore road little was found to mark the 
original line, and it was necessary to fix a line agreeable 
to the abutters. This has been done and the line marked 
on the ground a portion of the distance. Along the city 
land, between the railroad and the Proctor road, the 
highway has been straightened by carrying the road 
wholly to the east, thereby avoiding the numerous sharp 
turns. Nothing has been done yet about building the 
road to the new line. 

On the Kennard road the lines have been established 
to the satisfaction of the abutters, and stone bounds set 
at the Smyth road and at the angle near the Mammoth 
road. 

It was the intention of this department to have com- 
pleted the surveys of other roads, but matters pertaining 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 241 

to the town line survey coming up it was found impossi- 
ble to do so. As has been stated in former reports, the 
sooner this work is done the better, as each year makes 
the work of re-locating old points more difficult. In many 
cases the points are entirely destroyed, and the method 
followed has to be similar to that employed on the Lake 
Shore road. 

The situation on the New Mast road remains un- 
changed. Stakes have been set showing the lines as 
called for by a 66-foot right of way. A petition was pre- 
sented, asking for the establishing of the lines by the 
board of mayor and aldermen. As the lines had already 
been marked according to the original records of the 
layout by the county commissioners and by the town of 
Bedford, no action was deemed necessary and the peti- 
tion was dismissed. 

SEWERS. 

The amount of sewers built the past season has been 
considerably less than for the two previous years, due to 
the fact that many of them have been through ledge, mak- 
ing the progress necessarily slow and expensive. As 
instances may be mentioned Elm street from Carpenter 
to Trenton; Carpenter street from Elm to Union; por- 
tions of Hall, Harrison, Hanover, Laurel, Linden, Merri- 
mack, Orange, Sagamore, Somerville, Third, Walnut, and 
Walnut east back streets, and in the Whittemore section. 
The work progressed as rapidly as possible, and the show- 
ing made was remarkably good considering the difficulties 
encountered. 

When the Massabesic-street main was laid in 1890, 
considerable fault was found, by those who could not 
understand the situation, because of the depth at which it 
was placed. When in 1892 that portion from Cypress to 
Jewett street was built, the grade was raised and the 
sewer laid on top of the ledge as a temporary makeshift. 

16 



242 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

As the original idea was to provide for tlie drainage of 
the section between Cypress street and the Mammoth 
road, comprising some 300 acres, it was necessary to keep 
as low as possible at Cypress street. This was under- 
stood by the committee, and the expectation was that the 
portion between Cypress and Jewett streets would have 
to be relaid. This will probably have to be done the 
coming season, as petitions are to be presented for sewers 
in Jones, Nelson, and Benton streets to drain that rapidly 
growing section. It is but. a matter of time also when 
the sewer will have to be extended to the section east of 
the Mammoth road and north of the Candia road, where 
there are some fifty dwellings built and occupied, and 
which are all without means of disposing of their sewage, 
unless by the primitive method of sinking a barrel in the 
lot and connecting therewith. 

In connection with this, however, the fact should be 
borne in mind that the outlet of the Massabesic-street 
main is not large enough to properly take care of all that 
is discharged into it at present, and the additional amount 
coming from these new sections would so far overtax its 
capacity as to be productive of injury to the sewer, and 
possible damage to the surrounding property. The plan 
adopted in 1888 calls for a main running from Elm street 
easterly through the valley to the junction of Massabesic 
and East Spruce streets to take the discharge from that 
section of East Manchester now running into Massabesic 
street main, and also from future extensions in Hall, Bel- 
mont, and surrounding streets. This main has already 
been built as far as Pine street in Auburn street, and 
some provision should be made for continuing it before 
any further extensions are made in East Manchester. 

The section drained by the Amherst-street sewer is 
badly in need of improved facilities. The Amherst-street 
main is not large enough, and the laterals are overcrowd- 
ing it more each year. The necessity of relaying it has 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 243 

been frequently mentioned, and it is apparent that some- 
thing must be done before the sanitary condition of that 
section can be much improved. 

The usual amount of sub-mains and laterals have been 
constructed, and, everything considered, the showing 
made has been excellent. On the east side 15,236 feet of 
new sewers have been laid and 954 feet relaid. In con- 
nection with these 58 manholes and 8 lampholes have 
been built, and 457 Y branches have been put in for house 
connections and 65 for cesspool connections. The total 
cost has been 129,404.82. The average cost per foot in 
district Xo. 2 has been |2.009; in district Xo. 7, |1.315. 
On the west side 3,291 feet of new sewers have been laid 
and 1,176 feet relaid. In connection with these 17 man- 
holes have been built; 120 Y branches have been put in 
for house connections and 21 for cesspool connections. 
The total cost has been $6,853.59, the average cost per 
foot being |1.534. 

The report of the committee on sewers and drains, on 
the preceding pages, and the report of the street and 
park commissioners, will give an account of the work 
more in detail. 

SEWER LICENSES. 

In compliance with the orders of the board of mayor 
and aldermen, passed November 19, a list has been pre- 
pared of all persons whose property abuts on a street 
where there is a sewer, or who can connect with a sewer 
.within a reasonable distance, for the purpose of ascertain- 
ing whether they were connected and whether they had 
paid the required license. The work has been thoroughly 
done, all the offlce records have been looked through, and 
frequent comparisons made with the assessors' books 
and those of the tax collector whenever any question arose 
as to a transfer of property. Only the east side has been 
taken up as yet, and some over 400 have been found who 



244 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

have not paid for their licenses. The work will be con- 
tinued on the west side as soon as it can be reached. 

In looking up those who had not paid their sewer 
licenses a radical change suggested itself which will 
greatly assist the proper authorities in attending to de- 
linquents. Heretofore, when the sewer was laid in any 
street, the abutters were sujiposed to secure their permit 
and license and connect with the sewer. In some cases 
this would not be attended to and when at the end of 
the year the returns were made up the fact would be dis- 
covered. It is now proposed to remedy this by ascer- 
taining all the abutters before work is commenced, and 
as fast as they obtain their permit and make their connec- 
tion to check their names. Those who fail to comply with 
the law in this respect will be reported to the proper au- 
thorities and immediate action can be taken. While this 
may entail increased work by this department during the 
summer, it will mean less work at the close of the season. 

During the latter part of last year work was commenced 
on a new set of sewer books. Formerly everything was 
kept in one large book which, through the rapid growth 
of the city in all directions, has become inadequate to 
show all that was required. The new set will probably 
consist of five volumes, three for the city proper and two 
for the west side. At present two of the books are prac- 
tically completed. Thej^ show the streets, lots, and 
sewers with the street and lot number and owner's name. 
Whenever the license has been paid the fact is recorded, 
together with the amount and date when paid. When 
the books are completed it will greatly simplify the office 
work in this line, as it will only be necessary to add from 
time to time the licenses that are taken out and the new 
sewers that are built. 

PAVING. » 

Agreeable to the requests of the board of street and 
park commissioners, a sum was set aside for repaving Elm 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 245 

and Granite streets. The work was commenced early in 
the summer, and Elm street from Manchester to Stark 
now possesses as fine a pavement as can be found in the 
country. The old pavement was torn up and a sufficient 
depth of earth removed to allow a six-inch foundation of 
broken stone and cement to be laid and thoroughly 
packed. This was covered with a coating of cement on 
which were laid paving stones ^'Boston block" sizes. The 
interstices were thoroughly filled with liquid cement 
grout and a layer of the same spread over the top surface. 
The cement was allowed to thoroughly harden before the 
street was opened to traffic, and as a consequence the 
roadway is now one solid mass, as firm and unyielding as 
a granite rock. 

It was decided to concrete Granite street in place of 
paving, between Turner and Mil in streets and on Main 
street as far south as School street. Practically the same 
method was followed as on Elm street. A five-inch course 
of cement and broken stone was put in, covered with a 
two-inch layer of sand. On this was laid a sub-foundation 
of medium cobbles covered with hot tar. These were in 
turn covered with the regular concreting material and 
the whole painted with asphaltum. The roadway thus 
obtained will wear for years and is much more satisfac- 
tory to the residents of that section than paving stone. A 
portion of Granite street between the canal and the river 
was also repaved, using the old stone where practicable. 
This was laid without the cement bed, as it was in the 
nature of temporary repairs. 

CEMETERIES. 

Considerable work has been done in the Pine Grove 
cemetery during the past season. It was decided by the 
trustees to grade a portion of the southern section, includ- 
ing a part of the land purchased of the late C. C. Webster. 
Accordingly cross-section levels were taken over about 



246 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

seven acres, and stakes set for the part where the work 
was to be done. Three main avenues through this sec- 
tion were also laid out. 

In the section bounded by Greenbush, Short, and River- 
side avenues and Hemlock path, stakes were set for grad- 
ing. After the grading was done the lots were relocated. 
Grade stakes were also set for the work to be done on 
the north end of Pine Lawn. 

Several sketches were made for the layout of the new 
Swedish section, and a number of the lots and ranges 
were staked out. It was finally decided by the two soci- 
eties to have separate sections and new plans were pre- 
pared. Upon their acceptance by the committees and the 
cemetery trustees the lots and ranges were laid out in 
accordance with them. A number of lots were also laid 
out on that portion of Chapel Lawn which was graded 
last year. 

In this connection might be suggested the advisability 
of remodelling the plans for the north end of Chapel 
Lawn. Before the city acquired possession of the land 
lying north of the original north line of the cemetery, it 
was designed to run an avenue parallel to the north line 
and the lots were laid out with that idea in mind. LTnder 
the present existing conditions this will not be necessary 
or desirable, as a much better layout can be obtained by 
following out the lawn system with winding walks and 
paths. In order to do this it will only be necessary to 
make a few changes in the plans, and the benefit accrued 
in added beauty will more than compensate for the slight 
expense incurred. 

Little work has been done in the Valley cemetery this 
year, and that mostly confined to suggestions given the 
superintendent, at his request, concerning the work. 
Batters were set on the Pine-street side, where the foun- 
dation to the iron fence was raised to conform to the 
grade of the street. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 247 

The Merrill yard plan has been completed and the lot 
lines established as accurateh' as possible with the limited 
data obtainable. It was the intention of this department 
to relocate the lots on the ground, but this was found im- 
possible on account of the pressure of other work this fall. 

TARKS. 

In Stark ftark line and grade has been given for the 
main avenues running north and west of the burial lot. 
Considerable time was required on account of the neces- 
sity of relocating points that had been destroyed through 
various causes. Lines were also given for the national 
colonnade of trees on the north, south, and east sides. 

In making the plans for the park the landscape gar- 
deners failed to provide for an avenue south of the burial 
lot for the convenience of those desirous of returning 
that waj' rather than retrace their steps over the avenue 
on the north side. In compliance with the wishes of the 
park commissioners a plan was prepared b}' this depart- 
ment remedying this oversight. 

In Derryfleld park instructions were given the super- 
intendent regarding the construction of the path leading 
from the main avenue to the Weston Observatory and 
the lines marked on the ground. 

STREET RAILWAY. 

The only work done in connection with the street rail- 
way has been that occasioned by the rebuilding of the 
Calef road and Baker street. Stakes were set for the 
gutter from Baker street to the Pine Grove cemetery, and 
lines of levels taken for computing the amount of earth 
removed from the roadway. This latter was only a waste 
of valuable time, as an account was kept of the number of 
carloads delivered at the cemetery and the dirt paid for 
accordingly. On Baker street stakes were set for the 
gutters from Elm street to Calef road. 



248 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

TOWN LINES. 

In compliance with the statutes requiring the town 
lines to be perambulated every seven years, the city engi- 
neer has this year personally visited every bound on the 
line, in company with the selectmen of the various ad- 
joining towns, and renewed the marks and bounds 
where necessary. In some cases new bounds were set 
where the old ones were in danger of being obliterated by 
the action of the elements. 

It was thought advisable to run a portion of the line 
between the city and Hooksett, as some doubt was ex- 
pressed as to whether the bounds were on a straight line 
as the description called for. This was accordingly done 
and they were found not to be on line. The state of affairs 
was reported to the selectmen of Hooksett, and a plan 
prepared showing the situation. After thoroughly con- 
sidering the matter it was decided to reset the bounds 
on the correct line, replace two that were insecure, and 
set three additional at prominent points on the line. The 
work was done by this department and the line after- 
wards perambulated in company with the Hooksett au- 
thorities. A portion of the expense of surveying the 
line and setting the bounds was borne by the town of 
Hooksett. The street and park commissioners kindly fur- 
nished the stone bounds gratuitoush', therebj' consider- 
ably lessening the expense. 

Whenever time can be found for the work, it would be 
advisable to make a survey of portions of the other lines 
in as thorough a manner as this line has been run. As an 
instance may be mentioned the entire line between the 
city and Bedford, and that part of the line between the 
city and Goffstown that lies between the Bedford line and 
the Dow road. Land in this locality is somewhat more 
valuable than in the other sections and it is of importance 
to have the line properly marked. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 249 

Whenever the line between the city and Auburn is run 
it should be done in the winter, as the major portion runs 
directly through Lake Massabesic and could be surveyed 
on the ice. 

COMMITTEE WORK. 

The city engineer, as clerk of the committee on streets 
and on sewers and drains, has attended each meeting, 
keeping a complete record of the proceedings, which are 
on file in this office. 

In addition, meetings of the city government, commit- 
tees on Valley cemetery, Pine Grove cemetery, city farm, 
lands and buildings, claims, commons and parks, the 
street and park commissioners, and the board of aldermen 
have been attended. 

Besides the work before enumerated, many questions 
have been answered from engineers, boards of trade, and 
others in various cities throughout this country and 
Canada. 

I would respectfully tender my acknowledgments to 
His Honor the Mayor, and the various committees of the 
city councils, for the support which they have given. 

I also wish to acknowledge the courtesies shown by the 
various heads of departments, and the co-operation of 
the assistants of this department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WINFEED H. BENNETT, 

City Engineer. 

January 1, 1898. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Chief Engineer's Office, 
Central Station, No. 8 Vine Street. 

Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1897. 

To His Honor, William C. Clarke, Mayor, and Gentlemen of 

the City Councils: 

In compliance with the Laws and Ordinances of the 
city of Manchester, I herewith submit my nineteenth an- 
nual report (it being the fifty-second of this city) for the 
year ending December 31, 1897. 

The department has responded to one hundred and 
fifty (150) alarms during the year, eighty-one (81) of which 
have been bell alarms and sixty-nine (69) still alarms. 
One of the "Stills" was in answer to a telephone message 
from Derry Depot, January 6, asking for help on account 
of the burning of Richardson's shoeshop. An engine and 
hose wagon with horses and a detail of men were quickly 
loaded on cars of the Boston & Maine Railroad, but before 
starting a telegram was received that the fire was under 
control, and we returned to quarters. 

The "three twos," 2-2-2, were struck on the bells Sep- 
tember 7, for the burning of Lake View House, at Massa- 
besic, in Auburn. Although the distance was five miles 
from Central station, and the roads hard, the apparatus 

253 



254 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

drove there in season to save a number of surrounding 
cottages. November 5 the same call was sent out for a 
fire at Derry, to which one engine, hose wagon, and horses 
responded, with a detail of men. OWing to much delay 
in getting cars and locomotive at the railroad yard, much 
time was consumed, so that on our arrival at Derry the 
fire was under control and the apparatus was not unloaded. 
We remained there, however, a short time in case of neces- 
sity. Four of the bell alarms were false, pulled by some 
malicious person. The decrease of these false alarms is, 
in a measure, owing to the vigi lan ce of our police officers, 
and, in this connection, I would recommend a change in 
the ordinance, making the fine for such offense not less 
than fifty nor more than two hundred dollars. I think 
this would have a beneficial effect upon the miscreants. 

The value of property, where losses have occurred, as 
near as could be ascertained, is as follows: 

Value of buildings 177,000.00 

Value of contents 73,208.50 

1150,208.50 

Insurance on buildings $48,475.00 

Insurance on contents 56,540.00 

$105,015.00 

Damage to buildings endangered $9,159.55 

Damage to contents endangered 14,109.95 

$23,269.50 
Insurance paid on buildings. . . . $7,979.55 

Insurance paid on contents 12,269.95 

20,249.50 

Net loss uncovered by insurance. . . . $3,020.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



255 



THE MANUAL FORCE 



Of the departnient is one hundred and sixty-five (165) men, 
consisting of one hundred and twenty-seven (127) call 
and thirty-three (33) permanent men. There has been 
no increase in tlie number of permanent men during the 
Jast three years, and, while a spirit of economy seems to 
pervade our city, I think no such economy should be prac- 
ticed as will not keep pace with its increased risks. To 
assist in keex)ing this department at its present standard 
and increase its efficiency, I would recommend the ap- 
pointment of a permanent captain to each of the remain- 
ing companies now having ''call" captains. 
The force is divided as follows: 

Call. Permanent 

1 Chief Engineer 1 

4 Assistant Engineers 4 

Engine Co. No, 1 11 3 

Engine Co. No. 2 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3 15 5 

Engine Co. No. 4 ; . . . 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 5 16 4 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 6 16 4 

HoseCo. No. 1 11 1 

Hose Co. No. 2 11 1 

HoseCo. No. 3 6 2 

Aerial Truck No. 1 12 3 

Chemical No. 1 3 2 

Spare driver 1 

127 33 

THE BUILDINGS. 

Owing to the want of sufficient appropriations for 
repairs of buildings, some of the wants of this department 
were not supplied. I cannot refrain from again referring 
to the urgent need of additional stable room in the way 



256 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. . 

of box stalls at Engine and Ladder Cos. Nos. 5 and 6, to 
properly care for horses when sick or disabled. 

The roof over the apparatus room of the Aerial truck 
still remains in bad condition, and ought to be raised and 
the south wall rebuilt and strengthened. 

Hose No. 3 is still without any facilities for storage of 
exercise wagon, and it is exposed to the weather, much to 
the detriment of the wagon. 

THE APPARATUS 

Of this department consists of 6 Amoskeag steam fire- 
engines in good condition, with the exception, possibly, 
of two that may require new boilers, 4 hose carriages with 
reels, 5 hose wagons, 4 ladder trucks, one of which is an 
aerial truck carrying other ladders, 2 hose carriages in 
outlying districts, with independent companies attached^ 
2 hose carriages, without companies, 1 supply wagon, 7 
exercise wagons, located as follows: 

2 steam fire-engines, with three-horse hitch, at Central 
station, each with one-horse hose wagon attached. 

1 steam fire-engine, three-horse hitch, with 1 two-horse 
hose wagon. North Main street. 

1 steam fire-engine and 1 two-horse hose wagon, at cor- 
ner Lake avenue and Massabesic street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 steam fire-engine and one-horse hose carriage, at cor- 
ner of W^ebster and Chestnut streets. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 steam fire-engine and one-horse hose carriage oh Rim- 
mon street, corner of Amory street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 one-horse hose carriage, corner Maple and East High 
streets. 

1 two-horse combination hose wagon. South Elm 
street. (Bakersville.) 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 25T 

1 aerial hook-and-ladder truck at Central station 
(three-horse hitch). 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) chemical engine at Cen- 
tral station. 

1 supply wagon at Central Are station. 

1 steam fire-engine (reserve) at station of Engine No. 2 
(of but little use for fire purposes). 

1 four-wheeled hand hose carriage at junction of Old 
Falls road and Front street, Amoskeag. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, Devonshire Mills, Goffe's 
Falls. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage at W. P. Farmer's at junc- 
tion of Candia road and Hanover street. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, junction Mammoth road 
and Massabesic street (Hallsville). 

7 exercise wagons, 1 at Central fire station, 1 at Engine 
No. 2, 1 at Engine and Ladder No. 3, 1 at Engine and 
Ladder No. 5, 1 at Engine and Ladder No. 6, 1 at Hose 
No. 2, 1 at Hose No. 3. 

' The boilers of Engines Nos. 1 and 6 have been in ser- 
vice about twenty-one years, and I have no doubt both 
engines will be obliged to have new ones put on during 
the coming year, and some minor repairs made at the 
same time. 

During the months of April and May considerable 
painting and varnishing of the apparatus, that was much 
needed, was done, the department furnishing the stock 
and Driver McLeod of Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3 being 
detailed to do the work. The Chemical engine was re- 
painted and varnished, the wheels of Engine No. 1 var- 
nished, the exercise wagons of Engine and Ladder Co. No. 
5 and of Hose Co. No. 2 were varnished, and the running 
gear of the exercise wagons of Engine Co. No. 2 and En- 
gine and Ladder Cos. Nos, 3 and 6 painted, and the whole 
work varnished. 

* 17 



258 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

New rims to the wheels of Engine No. 5 have been fur- 
nished, being deeper and with lieavier tires than formerly. 

THE HORSES. 

Forty-one horses are at present in use by this depart- 
ment, and steps should be taken at an early date to re- 
place at least three of them. 

A pair of blacks have taken the place of the grays on 
Engine No. 6, and a new one has taken the place of 
"Fannie" of Hose No. 2, that did good service in this de- 
partment for over fifteen years. 

FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

At the time of submitting my previous report, I was 
sincerely in hopes that a storage battery would be in- 
stalled before this. In the interest of economy, as well 
as efficiency, I urge a change from our gravity system to 
that of storage. 

August 30 fire alarm box 91 was added to the system, 
located at the Children's Home, corner of Webster and 
Walnut streets. 

September 9, while changing wires at Clapp's Corner, 
'Squog, a roof structure broke, letting the wire down on 
the trolley wires, which were unguarded, causing much 
damage to our No. 1 circuit,^burning out four boxes 
upon that circuit and damaging the repeater at the Cen- 
tral station. Had it not been for the presence of the 
writer at headquarters at the time, the entire fire alarm 
system of the city would have been disabled. 

Again, on the evening of December 24, during a heavy 
gale, No. 2 circuit broke on Granite street, at the Print 
Works gate, letting the wire on the unguarded trolley ivire, 
burning out the gong at Print Works; the box and gong 
at Manchester Mills; box and gong at Amoskeag Mills; 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 259 

and box at Stark Mills, thus depriving these three corpo- 
rations of the protection of the fire alarm service for 
upwards of forty-eight hours. The damages in both in- 
stances were the result of neglect of the street railroad 
to properly guard their trolley wires, after having been 
duly notified by order of the city councils. 

During the year eighteen new poles have been set. 
Wires have been changed from old poles to the top cross- 
arm of many new poles of the telephone and telegraph 
companies, and in these changes 86 two-pin, 33 four-pin, 
and 3 six-pin arms, 21 single, 7 double, and 2 four-pin ex- 
.tensions have been put up, the location of 20 "tappers" 
has been changed, and 8 new ones have been put in. One 
and one half miles of insulated tree wire, and four miles 
of bare wire have been run, and one mile of old wire has 
been taken down. About 79^ miles of wire are now con- 
nected with the fire alarm system, 43 miles of main line 
and 36^ miles of '^tapper" line. 

firemen's relief ASSOCIA.TION. 

The contributions from citizens to this fund have been 
less during the prese'nt year than in any previous year of 
its existence, and had it not been for a special assessment 
made upon the members of the department, the expense 
would have exceeded the receipts. 

Th falling off of contributions to this association is 
accounted for by the very liberal response to the "Man- 
chester Union's" "Gratuity Fund," donated to Mr. Walter 
L. Bienus, Driver of Hose No. 1, who was injured at the 
lire of October 2, 1894, and-has been disabled since that 
time. The amount raised for this purse was |1,443.68, 
and emphasizes the fact that the city, as a municipality, 
should care for its disabled firemen, injured while in the 
discharge of their duties, by the establishment of a pen- 
sion fund. 



260 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The receipts and expenses for the year are as follows: 
Receipts. 

Balance from last year's account . . |3,699.95 

Received for membership 7.00 

from members, special as- 
sessment 138.00 

Donation of R. D. Gay 5.00 

Will H. Colby 5.00 

Thomas Corcoran 5.00 

Jeremiah Hodge 10.00 

H. and G. B. Chandler . . 10.00 

Dividends on deposits 129.53 

14,008.48 

Expenditures. 

Paid Henry Johnson, injuries fll.OO 

Thomas J. Wyatt, injuries. . . 27.00 

printing 2.10 

Joseph E. Merrill, secretary. . 25.00 

G5.10 

Balance in treasury |3,943.38 

CONCLUSION. 

I desire to extend my thanks to His Honor Mayor 
Clarke and the committee on fire department for the uni- 
form courtesy they have shown me, and the interest they 
have manifested in the well being of this department, to 
the police force for their co-operation and assistance at 
fires. To the members of the board of engineers and the 
officers and men I also return my grateful acknowledg- 
ments for the assistance rendered by the faithful and 
efficient manner in which they have performed their 
duties. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 
Chief of Fire Department. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 261 

List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 1 897, 
with Losses and Insurance. 

Still. Friday, January 1, 8.55 a. m. Four-story 
wooden block, corner Elm and Bridge streets, owned by 
Connor heirs and Weston, and occupied as tenements and 
stores. The escape of gas in drugstore of Snelling & 
Woods caused explosion, blowing out four lights of glass 
in show window, and causing other damage. Chemical 
engine responded. Value of buildings,- 110,000; damage, 
$14.76; insurance, |4,000; insurance paid, |11.76. Value 
of contents, |4,500; damage, |7.13; insurance, |3,000; in- 
surance paid, 17.13. 

Box 4. Saturday, January 2, 6.03 a, m. Two-story 
wooden block, 663 Elm street, owned by A. D. Gooden 
and occupied by James J. Mulholland as liquor store. 
Fire caused by matches or cigar stub thrown on floor 
among the sawdust. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 
1, 3. Value of building, |2,500; damage, |5; insurance, 
f 1,500; insurance paid, |5. No damage to contents. 

Still. Saturday, January 2, 6.15 p. m. Chimney fire 
at 64 Concord street, in tenement owned by Blood & Par- 
sons, and occupied by John Madison. No damage. Used 
two charges of Pony. 

Still. Sunday, January 3, 3 a. m, A telephone mes- 
sage from Goflfe's Falls for fire in the building owned by 
Frank Moore and occupied by A, N. Nettel as grocery 
store and postoffice. Cause unknown. Delegation of 
men with Engine 4, hose wagon and supply wagon re- 
sponded. On arrival the fire was under control by 
streams from Devonshire Mills. Value of building, 
$1,000; damage, |1,000; insurance, |600; insurance paid, 
$600. Value of contents, |2,400; damage, $2,200; insur- 
ance, $1,500; insurance paid, $1,450. 



262 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 8. Sunday, January 3, 12.33 p. m. Explosion of 
gas in gasometer of the People's Gas-Light Co. on Dean 
street, blowing off a portion of the roof of porch, and the 
windows of same. Box pulled by M. A. Weathers. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, |20,000; damage, |150; 
insurance, |2,000; insurance paid, |150. 

Still. Wednesday, January 6, 6.25 p. m. Chimney 
fire in M. Front's block, corner Elm and Central streets, 
occupied by Andrew W. Gibbons. No damage. Used 
one charge of Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, January 6, 7.12 p. m. Word was 
received from Derry Depot by telephone, asking for assist- 
ance, on account of the burning of Myron Richardson's 
shoeshop. , Engine 1 and hose wagon were soon loaded on 
Boston & Maine Railroad cars but, a telegram being re- 
ceived saying flames were under control, the apparatus 
was unloaded and returned to quarters at 9.15. 

Still. Friday, January 8, 10 a. m. Lamp exploded 
in tenement house, 221 Hanover street, owned by Dr. 0. 
B. Sturtevant and occupied by Stanley E. Gould. Chem- 
ical engine responded, but fire was extinguished before 
their arrival. No damage. 

Still. Friday, January 8, 5.48 p. m. Chimney fire in 
three-story block, 91 Cedar street, owned by John J. 
Twomey, and occupied by him and several other families. 
No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Sunday, January 10, 1.32 p. m. Rubbish in 
rear of drugstore of Charles A. Williams, corner Lake 
avenue and Massabesic streets, took fire from some un- 
known cause. Members of Engine and Ladder 3 re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Box 81. Monday, January 11, 7.23 a. m. Four-story 
brick block, 22 Concord street, owned by George B. and 
Henry Chandler, and occupied by several families as ten- 
ements, and grocery store and pool room on first floor. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 263 

The fire originated in the tenement occupied by Mrs. 
Lane, on second floor, from defective flue, and communi- 
cated to partition and roof of adjoining projection. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, and Truck 1. Value of building, 
$9,000; damage, |150; insurance, |6,000; insurance paid, 
|150. 

Box 82. Tuesday, January 12, 7.48 p. m. Small wood- 
shed in rear of 1077 Elm street, owned by estate of E. K. 
Kowell, and occupied by Boston Clothing Co. Fire origi- 
nated from some unknown cause. Box pulled by citizen. 
No damage. Companies responding : Engines 1, 4, 5, and 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 71. Tuesday, January 12, 8.57 p. m. Chimney 
fire at 124 Auburn street, in three-story house, owned and 
occupied by Patrick Brennan. Box pulled by citizen. 
No damage. Companies responding : Engines 3, 4, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, Truck 3. 

Box 8. Saturday, January 16, 10.23 a. m. Three-story 
wooden tenement block, 21 Orange street, owned by heirs 
of Joseph B. Clark. Fire started in an unoccupied cellar 
among rubbish, and was extinguished without damage. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 4, 5, and Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 4. Monday, January 18, 4.44 a. m. Four-story 
brick block, 550 Elm street, owned by Blodgett & Young, 
and occupied by several families. Fire started in parti- 
tion on third floor, but was discovered before gaining 
much headway. Cause, "rats and matches." Box pullecj 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, 
$6,000; damage, f5; insurance, |2,000; insurance paid, |5. 
No damage to contents. 

Still. Tuesday, January 19, 7.15 p. m. Chimney fire 
in three-story wooden tenement house, 187 Manchester 
street. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 



264 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 7. Tuesday', January 19, 7..30 p. m. Chimney fire 
in two-story tenement house at 60 Merrimack street. No 
damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 21. Wednesday, January 20, 6.23 a. m. Chim- 
ney fire in tenement block owned by Nason Hall. Box 
pulled by citizen. No damage. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Wednesday, January 20, 11.55 a. m. Chimney 
fire in cottage house, 35 Lake avenue, owned by P. Har- 
rington. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, January 20, 4.40 p. m. Chimney 
fire in two-and-half-story dwelling, 27 Wilton street, 
owned and occupied by Benjamin Leacock. No damage. 
Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Sunday, January 24, 8.56 p. m. Chimney fire 
in tenement block, 273 Chestnut street, owned by Emma 
Smith and occupied by several families. No damage. 
Used two charges of Pony. 

Still. Thursday, January 28, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire 
at 4 Langdon block, West Brook street. No fire on 
arrival, and no damage. 

Still. Saturday, January 30, 9.05 a. m. Chimney fire 
at 419 Lake avenue, in house owned and occupied by Mar- 
garet Cronin. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 3 
responded. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, February 2, 12.31 p. m. Chimney fire 
in tenement block, 151 Hanover street, owned by W. G. 
Colcord and occupied by several families. Chemical en- 
gine responded. 

Still. Friday, February 5, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire in 
tenement house, 36 Amory street, owned by Joseph Quirin. 
Members of Engine and Ladder No. 6 responded. LTsed 
one charge of Pony. 

Box 7. Saturday, February 6, 1.58 a. m. Four-story 
brick block, 43 Manchester street, owned by Edward Wag- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 265 

ner and occupied by W. H. Hurd as saloon. Tlie fire orig- 
inated in rear of saloon, near kitchen, from some un- 
known cause, and was confined wholly to the first story. 
Box pulled by oflicer. Companies responding: Engines 
3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, 
$20,000; damage, |493; insurance, |6,000; insurance paid, 
$493. Value of contents, $4,000; damage, $1,500; insur- 
ance, $2,000; insurance paid, $1,500. 

Still. Saturday, February 6, 9 a. m. Chimney fire 
in unoccupied tenement, 58 Amory street, owned by 
Joseph Quirin. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 6 
responded. Xo damage. Used three charges of Pony. 

Still. Saturday, February 6, 10.03 a. m. Chimney 
fire in two-story house, 81 Cedar street, owned by J. H. 
Butler and occupied by James Ryan and John Shea. No 
damage. 

Box 56. Tuesday, February 9, 5.34 a. m. Barn in rear 
of 272 Mast street, owned by Eugene C. Smith. Breaking 
, of a lantern set fire to hay in the loft. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, $350; no damage; 
insurance, $150. Value of contents, $300; damage, $79; 
insurance, $150; insurance paid, $79. 

Still. Friday, February 12, 12.22 p. m. Chimney fire 
at 73 Amherst street. No damage. Used one charge of 
Pony. 

Boxes 54, 56, 513. Saturday, February 13, 4.33 a. m. 
Two-story wooden dwelling at 168 Milford street, owned 
and occupied by Mrs. Amanda Sargent. The cause of the 
fire is unknown. It was first discovered by neighbors. 
Mrs. Sargent, the only occupant of the house, perished in 
the flames. Box 513 pulled by citizen, and about the 
same time another pulled box 54, and about five minutes 
later the watchman at Baldwin's Bobbin shop pulled box 
56 for same fire. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 
4, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, 



266 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

|2,000; damage, $2,000; insurance, none. Value of con- 
tents, |250; damage, |250; insurance, none. 

Box 14. Saturday, February 13, 9.42 a. m. Two-and- 
half-story dwelling, 86 Prospect street, owned by R. D. 
Gay and occupied by him, and Mrs. George Mollyneaux 
upstairs. Fire originated in upstairs tenement, caused 
by clothes too near hot stove. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 4, 5, Hose 1, 2, Truck 5. 
Value of building, |4,500; damage, |50; insurance, $3,500; 
insurance paid, $50. 

Still. Saturday, February 13, 10.42 a. m. Chimney 
fire in Barr & Clapp's brick block. Granite street, corner 
Main. Members of Engine No. 2 responded. No dam- 
age. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Monday, February 15, 10,10 a. m. Chimney 
fire in tenement, 51 Church street, owned and occupied by 
Mary Hastings. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Friday, February 19, 11 p. m. Chimney fire in 
two-story wooden house, 187 Hanover street, owned by 
John Haines and occupied by Mrs. Carey. No damage. 
Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Sunday, February 21, 7.30 a. m. Members of 
Chemical Co. called to 954 Elm street for escaping steam 
in pipe. No damage. 

Still. Monday, February 22, 11.45 a. m. Wooden ten- 
ement block, owned by Robert Leggett and occupied by 
Cote, modiste. Fire in partition caused by faulty stove- 
pipe. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 6 responded. 
No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, February 24, 9.48 p. m. Chimney 
fire in three-story wooden block, 142 Central street, owned 
by Nason Hall and occupied by Mrs. Mary Rush. No 
damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 4. Thursday, February 25, 3.01 p. m. Old car- 
riage shed in rear of 24 Spruce street damaged slightly. 
Caused by children playing with matches. Box pulled 



REPOKT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 267 

by citizen. Companies responding : Engines 2, 3, 4, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 312, Thursday, February 25, 5.41 p. m. Two-and- 
half-story house, 78 Sullivan street, owned by Anthony 
Fay and occupied by him and James Thompson. Cause, 
rubbish in cellar, caught in some unknown way. Box 
pulled by citizen. No damage. Companies responding: 
Engines 2, 4, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Friday, February 26, 6.10 a. m. Chimney fire 
in wooden tenement, owned by Charles C. Hayes, 73 
Lowell street, and occupied by Virginia Gervais. No 
damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Monday, March 1, 10.45 p. m. Chimney fire in 
four-tenement block, 26 Birch street, owned and occupied 
by Mrs. Sweeney. Members of Chemical responded. 
Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Thursday, March 4, 8 p. m. Chimney fire in 
tenement block, 19 Orange street, owned by heirs of 
Joseph B. Clarke and occupied by W. E. Abbott. Mem- 
bers of Chemical responded. No damage. Used one 
charge of Pony. 

Box 82. Wednesday, March 10, 9.38 p. m. False 
alarm pulled by some malicious individual. Companies 
responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 
1,5. 

Box 5. Monday, March 15, 6.24 p. m. Three-story 
brick block at 46 Middle street, owned by the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Co. and occupied by Herman Hayes as a 
boarding house. The fire was caused by defective chim- 
ney, and burned in the partition of first and second 
stories. Companies responding : Engines 2, 3, 4, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, |10,000; 
damage, flOO; insurance, "Blanket." Value of contents, 
$1,000; damage, |50; insurance, none. 

Box 21. Monday, March 15, 6.48 p. m. Explosion of 
kerosene lamp at 112 Central street caused the death of 



268 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Miss Emma Garceau. No damage to the building. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 3, Trucks 3, 5. 

Still. Tuesday, March 16, 5 p. m. Chimney fire at 
163 Douglas street, in house owned and occupied by H. 
Volkmann. Members of Engine No. 2 responded. No 
damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 313. Thursday, March 25, 11.40 p. m. Four-story 
wooden tenement block, 16 Marion street, owned by Gor- 
don Woodbury and occupied by several families. A box 
of excelsior in the basement caught fire from some unex- 
plained cause, doing no damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, 4, 6, Chemical, Hose 
1, Truck 6. 

Still. Monday, March 20, 12.18 p. m. Brush fire in 
woods, coraer Webster street and Hooksett road. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder No. 5 responded with hose car- 
riage. No damage. Used two charges of Pony. 

Box 5. Monday, March 29, 12.58 p. m. Four-story 
brick block, 758 Elm street, owned by Harrington heirs 
and occupied as fruit store by K. Barber & Co. The over- 
flow of a gasoline stove caused a slight fire on wooden par- 
tition in basement. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Monday, March 29, 2.44 p. m. Grass fire in 
field of Samuel Hall estate on River road, corner Webster 
street. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 5 responded. 
No damage. 

Box 21. Wednesday, March 31, 6.50 p. m. Two-story 
wooden block, 289 Pine street, owned by Ellen Reardon 
and occupied by several families. The stove funnel in 
tenement occupied by Daniel Clifford fell, breaking a 
kerosene lamp, setting fire to wood-work. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 269 

Still, Saturday, April 3, 6.27 p. m. Chimney fire in 
wooden tenement block, rear of 175 Hanover street, owned 
by Mrs. Amos Hoyt and occupied by George F. Daniels. 
No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 324. Sunday, April 4, 1.11 p. m. Brush fire on 
Amory street extension. Box pulled by citizen. No dam- 
age. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Truck 1. 

Still. Sunday, April 4, 3.45 p. m. A grass fire on the 
farm of the late S. D. Bell, on Hanover-street extension, 
set fire to frame barn occupied by Frank A. Whittemore. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Xo. 3 responded with hose 
wagon. Value of buildings, |1,000; damage, |1,000; in- 
surance, |600; insurance paid, fOOO. Value of contents, 
$200 ; damage, |200 ; no insurance. 

Box 213. Tuesday, April G, 5.58 p. m. Burning grass 
between Beech and Pine streets, south of Portsmouth 
Eailroad, caused an alarm to be given by a thoughtless 
boy. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. 

Still. Thursday, April 8, 11.35 a. m. Chimnev fire in 
wooden six-tenement block, 23 "Washington street, owned 
by Michael Lane, and occupied by several families. No 
damage. ITsed one charge of Pony. 

Still. Monday, April 12, 10 a. m. Two-story wooden 
block, 403 East Spruce street, owned by People's Laun- 
dry Co. and occupied by E. R. Yates. Overheated smoke 
stack caused the fire, which was extinguished by mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder No. 3. Slight damage. Used 
three charges of Pony. 

Still. Monday, April 12, 4.35 p. m. Chimney fire in 
four-tenement wooden block, 68 Concord street, owned 
by Parson heirs and occupied by Joseph Hart. No 
damage. 

Box 45. Tuesday, April 13, 11.41 a. m. An emjity 
freight car. No. 3026, belonging to Maine Central Rail- 



270 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

road, in freight yard of Boston & Maine Railroad. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 
3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Damage about |150, 
fully covered by "blanket" policy. 

Still. Tuesday, April 13, 8.14 — m. Chimney fire in 
two-story house at rear of 133 Hanover street, owned 
and occupied by Mrs. Ella Phinney. No damage. Used 
one charge of Pony. 

Still. Sunday, April 18, 11.55 a. m. Chimney fire in 
three-story wooden tenement block, 30 Amherst street, 
owned by Lawrence Dowd and occupied by several fam- 
ilies. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Monday, April 19, 2.45 p. m. Chimney fire in 
three-story wooden tenement block, rear 66 Concord 
street, owned by heirs of S. W. Parsons and occupied by 
M. D. Dunn. No damage. Chemical engine responded. 
Used three charges of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, April 20, 10.02 a. m. Chimney fire 
in two-and-half-story dwelling, 86 Auburn street, owned 
and occupied by Patrick Reardon. No damage. Used 
two charges of Pony. 

^TiLL.' Tuesday, April 20, 3.50 p. m. Three-story 
wooden block, 1077 Elm street, owned by estate of E. K. 
Rowell and occupied by Julius Katz as clothing store. 
Fire started in pile of rubbish at foot of stairs from match 
or cigar stub thrown in from outside. Chemical engine 
responded. No damage. Used two charges of Pony. 

Still. Saturday, April 24, 4.35 p. m. Three-story 
wooden tenement block, 35 Central street, owned by Dr. 
John Ferguson and occupied by Joseph Joselin. Chil- 
dren lighted fire on roof. No damage. Chemical engine 
responded. 

Box 17. Tuesday, April 27, 12.45 a. m. Two-and-half- 
story house with barn connected, situated at 21 Ash street, 
owned by Clough & Hall and occupied by Joseph E. Mer- 
rill and W. H. Tarbell. Fire was confined whollv to the 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 271 

upper story of barn. Caused, probably, by hot aslies. 
Box pulled by officer. Companies responding: Engines 
3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value of building, 
$4,000; damage, |350; insurance, |1,500; insurance paid, 
|345. Value of contents, |1,000; damage, |10; insurance, 
$300; insurance paid, .f6. 

Still. Tuesday, April 27, 12.15 p. m. Chimney fire in 
house at 502 North Main street, owned and occupied by 
T, H. Donnelly. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 6 
responded. No damage. Used two charges of Pony. 

Still. Friday, April 30, 10.10 p. m. Kubbish in waste 
can in entry of Merchants' Exchange, 839 Elm street. 
No damage. Members of Chemical company responded. 

Box 315. Thursday, May 6, 1.46 p. m. Brush fire on 
Dunbarton road, on land owned by Will H. Colby. No 
damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 2, 6, and Truck 6. 

Still. Thursday, May 6, 8.05 p. m. Chimney fire in 
Union block, 22 Concord street, owned by Chandler Bros, 
and occupied by several families. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, May 8, 4.10 p. m. Brush fire at city 
dump, rear of Children's Home, Webster street. No dam- 
age. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 5 responded. 

Still. Saturday, May 8, 5.10 p. m. Kekindling of 
above fire. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 5 re- 
sponded with hose carriage. No damage. 

Still. Monday, May 10, 10.37 a. m. Chimney fire in 
three-story wooden tenement block, 353 Pine street, 
owned by Mrs. Caldwell. No damage. . L^sed one charge 
of Pony. 

Box 51. Tuesday, May 11, 8.18 p. m. A hanging lamp 
fell from ceiling at 53 Walker street, in two-story 
house owned by Ferdinand Reidell and occupied by 
"Straight Tip Club." No damage and no fire. Box 



272 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, 
Chemical, Truck 6. 

Still. Wednesday, May 12, 11.30 a. m. Chimney fire 
in two-story tenement house, 37 Amherst street, owned 
by Lawrence Dowd and occupied by Mary Fitzgerald. 
No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 21. Friday, May 14, 7.52 p. m. Two-story wooden 
building, 195 Manchester street, owned by Levi Dodge 
and occupied by J. B. Corbiere as blacksmith shop, and 
Angus Derry as carriage shop. Fire originated in the 
carriage shop, from some unknown cause. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of buildings, |700; damage, 
$270; insurance, |300; insurance paid, |270. Value of 
contents, |525; damage, |100; no insurance. 

Box 82. Monday, May J7, 10.38 p. m. False alarm. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 
1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Tuesday, May 18, 1.05 p. m. Brush fire adjoin- 
ing the Youngsville schoolhouse lot on Pond road. Re- 
sponded with delegation of men. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, May 19, 9.30 a. m. Chimney fire 
in tenement house at 180 East Spruce street, owned by 
Gideon Flanders. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 3 
responded. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, May 23, 6.45 p. si. Chimney fire in 
house owned and occupied by Mrs. C. L. McQuade, at 373 
Lake avenue. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 3 re- 
sponded. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, May 26, 7.50 a. m. Five-story 
brick block, 895 Elm street, owned by W. H. Plumer and 
occupied' by Plumer & Holton, clothiers, on first floor, 
and upper stories as oflflces, etc. The fire started from an 
electric light wire in office of Dr. Fred Perkins. Chem- 
ical engine responded. Value of building, |25,000; dam- 
age, |95; insurance, |17,000; insurance paid, |94.19. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 273 



Value of contents, 1,500; damage, |75; insurance, 
insurance paid, |75. 

Box 21. Thursday, May 27, 9.33 p. m. Grocery store 
of Napoleon Gauvin, 118 Central street. Hanging lamp 
fell and exploded, setting fire to kerosene tank. Flames 
spread on floor, but were quickly extinguished by Chem- 
ical engine without damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 511. Wednesday, June 2, 1.11 p. m. Lamp ex- 
plosion in tenement, 254 Douglas street. No damage. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
2, 6, Chemical, Truck 6. 

Still. Thursday, June 3, 10.30 a. m. Four-tenement 
wooden block, 11 Orange street, owned by David Young 
and occupied by Gilbert Pelland. Wood too near stove 
ignited, causing slight damag^ to partition. Members 
of Chemical responded. Used one . charge of Pony. 
Value of building, |8,500; damage, 135; insurance, |5,000; 
insurance paid, |35. No damage to contents. 

Still, Suudaj', June 13, 9.11 a. m. Two-tenement 
house, 110 Willow street, owned by H. B. Fairbanks and 
occupied by J. Hickok. Slight fire in bed, which was ex- 
tinguished before arrival of detail of men from Chemical 
company. 

Box 21. Saturday, June 19, 9.23 p. m. The breaking 
of a kerosene lamp at 22 Laurel avenue, in a four-story 
tenement block, owned by heirs of E. W. Bartlett and 
occupied by John Chonack as a Polish boarding house, 
caused an alarm to be pulled. Box pulled by citizen. 
No damage. Companies responding : Engines 3, 4, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 313. Thursday, July 1, 8.57 p. m. Two-and-half- 
story dwelling, 605 Main street, owned by John E. Rich- 
ards and occupied by August Gingrass. The gas chande- 
lier broke off and gas ignited as it came from pipe, doing 

18 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

no damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 2, 4, 6, and Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Monday, July 5, 12.25 p. m. Unadjusted ther- 
mostat at Crafts & Green's shoeshop caused false alarm. 
Hose wagon of Engine 2 responded. 

Still. Same date, 11.55 p. m. Three-story brick block, 
corner Elm and Mechanic streets, owned b}^ Eowell & 
Kimball heirs and occupied as tenements, stores, etc. 
The fire originated from over-heated range in eating 
rooms of Frank I. Paige. Chemical responded. Damage 
about |8, fully insured. Is^o damage to contents. 

Box 71. Thursday, July 8, 5.33 p. m. Four-story 
wooden block, 259 Tine street, owned by heirs of George 
Whitford and occupied by Michael Galvin and others. 
Caused by Mrs. Galvin lighting fire with kerosene. The 
oil in can ignited, burning Mrs. Galvin seriously, so that 
she died from injuries. No damage to building or con- 
tents. Box i^ulled by a boy. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. 

Still. Same date, 8 p. m. Chimney fire in two-and- 
half-story wooden house, 137 Manchester street, owned 
by heirs of Mary McMahon and occupied, by David Beli- 
more. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Friday, July 9, 0.20 p. m. A little too much 
smoke from a stove in tenement occupied by D. B. Mo- 
Tency resulted in a call for members of Engine and Lad- 
<ier No. 3. No fire (except in stove) to be found. 

Box 26. Tuesday, July 20, 2.45 p. m. Three-story 
wooden tenement block, 330 Lowell street, owned by D. 
B. Sanborn and occupied by several families, with grocery 
store in basement, where the fire originated, kept by Carl 
A. Friborg. Cause, match dropped in kerosene. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 5. Value of building, |8,000; 
damage, |584; insurance, $5,000; insurance paid, |584. 
Value of contents, |800; damage, |700; insurance, |.300; 
insurance paid, $300. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 275 

Box 4. Monday, July 26, 11.56 a. m. Wooden ten- 
footer, 16 Lake avenue, owned by Freeman & Merrill and 
occupied by L. E. DeLabarre as tailor shop. Cause, 
lighting gasoline stove. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 82. Thursday, August 12, 8.24 a. m. Four-story 
brick block, 1096 Elm street, owned by Welch & Clough. 
In room 4, occupied- by George Birtue, a kerosene stove 
tipped over, causing considerable fright to occupants, 
but no damage to property. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 3, 5. 

Box 57. Sunday, August 29, 1.26 p. m. Two-story 
wooden paint shop, situated on Shirley Hill road, just 
across the line in Goffstown. The shop was owned and 
occupied by William H. Goodwin. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Companies responding: Engine 2, Chemical, 
Truck 6. 

Still. Thursday, September 2, 11.55 p. m. Slight 
fire in a closet in the Moose Club's rooms in Merchants' 
Exchange, 839 Elm street. Cause unknown. Used one 
charge of Pony. 

Still. Sunday, September 5, 4.55 p. m. Chimney fire 
in two-story wooden block, 354 Pine street, owned by 
David Young and occupied bj' Timothy Garvin. Mem- 
bers of Chemical responded. Ko damage. 

2-2-2. Thursday, September 7, 2.20 a. m. Word was 
telephoned from Lake; View House, Lake Massabesic, 
Auburn, for assistance, as said house was on fire. En- 
gine 1 with hose wagon responded. Although the dis- 
tance was about five miles, and over a hard road, reached 
the scene in season to save some of the surrounding cot- 
tages. 

Still. Monday, September 27, 6.30 p. m. A chimney 
fire in four-storv wooden block, 126-150 McGregor street, 



276 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

owned by Gordon Woodbury and occupied by several 
families. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 6 re- 
sponded. No damage. Used two charges of Pony. 

Box 4. Same date, 7.03 p. m. Slight fire in a closet in 
the Drake & Carpenter block, 24 Granite street. Need- 
less alarm. Fire extinguished* without damage before 
arrival of department. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3^ 
Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Tuesday, September 28, 2.25 r. m. Chimney 
fire in cottage house, 240 Manchester street, owned and 
occupied by Charles Kilborn. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, September 30, 9.30 a. m. A cottage 
house at 73 Liberty street, owned and occupied by Fred 
G. Hartshorn. Lace curtain burned. Members of En- 
gine and Ladder No. 5 resj)onded. 

Box 113. Same date, 5.53 p. m. While Dr. C. B. Stur- 
tevant was burning brush on lot on Russell street, some 
one pulled in an alarm, thinking there was a fire. No 
damage resulted. Companies responding: Engines 1, 5, 
Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 5. 

Box 52. Friday, October 1, 9.40 p. m. Cottage house, 
938 Granite street, owned and occupied by D. O'Leary. 
Shawl in closet caught fire from some unknown cause, 
doing but slight damage. Extinguished before the arri- 
val of the department. Box pulled by a boy. Companies 
responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Box 6. Saturday, October 2, 9.28 a. m. Basement of 
three-story brick and stone block, 868-884 Elm street, 
owned by New Hampshire Insurance Co. and occupied 
by L. P. Labonte. A slight fire in box of excelsior which 
was in too close proximity to steam boiler. Extinguished 
with line from garden hose before arrival of department. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 3. No damage. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 277 

Box 82. Same date, 11.47 a. m. Two-and-lialf-story 
wooden tenement house, 17 Washington street, owned 
by Kennard heirs and occupied by several families. Fire 
started in tenement occupied by Daniel Dailey, from de- 
fective flue. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 
Value of building, |2,800; damage, |61.17; insurance, 
$2,100; insurance paid, |61.17. Value of contents, |800; 
damage, |45; no insurance. 

Box 321. Same date, 7.03 p. m. Three-story wooden 
tenement house, 267 Cartier street, owned by John Han- 
ney and occupied by him and Patrick J. O'Connell. The 
fire originated in the cellar from some unknown cause 
and communicated to first and second stories by the back 
stairwa3^ Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of 
building, |1,500; damage, |700; insurance, |1,300; insur- 
ance paid, 1693. Value of contents, |1,500 ; damage, |200; 
insurance, |1,500; insurance paid, f200. 

Box 73. Thursday, October 7, 6.29 p. m. Barn in rear 
of 246 Auburn street, owned and occupied by Daniel 
Murphy. Cause unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Truck 5. Value of building, |175; damage, |75; insur- 
ance, |50; insurance paid, |50. Value of contents, |100; 
damage, |30; no insurance. 

Box 81. Saturday, October 9, 3.25 p. m. Three-story 
brick tenement house, 44 Charles stre'et, owned by Stark 
Manufacturing Co. and occupied by Joseph Moquin. 
Slight fire in box of old clothes in third story. Cause un- 
known. Box pulled by officer. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. No damage to 
contents. Damage to building, |25; fully insured. 

Still. Sunday, October 10, 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire 
in Cilley block, 1037 Elm street, owned by Hari-y B. Cil- 
ley. No damage. 



278 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

Box 115. Tuesday, October 12, 6.03 p. m. False 
alarm. Companies responding: Engines 1, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 2, Truck 5. 

Still. Sunday, October 17, 12.35 p. m. Grass fire on 
land owned by the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, 
corner Valley and Wilson street. Members of Engine 
and Ladder No. 3 responded with hose wagon. No 
damage. 

Still. Monday, October 18, 6.15 a. m. Chimney fire 
in three-story wooden tenement house, 57 Amherst street, 
owned by Mrs. Charles H. Bradford. No damage. Used 
one charge of Pony, 

Box 4. Tuesday, October 26, 3.56 a. m. Four-story 
brick block, 20-30 Granite street, owned by Mrs. C. S. 
Aldrich and Frank P. Carpenter, and occupied by Dodge & 
Laing, No. 20; John E. Towle, No. 22; and H. W. Parker, 
No. 30, with upper stories for tenements. The fire orig- 
inated in store of John E. Towle & Co., and was confined 
mostly to that section of the building. Cause unknown. 
Most of the damage to occupants, aside from Towle & 
Co., was from smoke and water. Companies responding: 
Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value 
of building, |30,000; damage, |4,000; insurance, $15,000; 
insurance paid, |3,560. Towle & Co. : Value of contents, 
18,000; damage, $3,035.84; insurance, $6,900; insurance 
paid, $3,035.84. Dodge & Laing: Value of contents, 
$1,500; damage, $175; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, 
$175. H. W. Parker : Value of contents, $20,500 ; damage, 
$4,782 ; insurance, $16,000 ; insurance paid, $4,782. Value 
of property of other occupants, $2,000; damage, $200; no 
insurance. 

Box 57. Same date, 1.28 p. m. Brush fire on Mast 
road near Shirley Hill road. Needless alarni. No dam- 
age. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 2, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 2. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 279 

Box 61. TLiursday, October 28, 5.54 a. m. Two-and- 
half-story wooden slaughter bouse, corner Hancock street 
and Concord Kailroad, owned and occupied by Manchester 
Slaughtering & Rendering Co. Fire originated in sec- 
ond story from some unknown cause, and was confined 
wholly to the storeroom. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Truck 3. Value of building, |12,500; damage, |50; insur- 
ance, |12,500; insurance paid, |50. Value of contents, 
$3,000; damage, |393.13; insurance, |3,000; insurance 
paid, 1393.13. 

Box 313. Saturday, October 30, 12.54 a. m. Three- 
and-half-story wooden block, 507 North Main street, 
owned by Joseph Lariviere and occupied as grocery store 
by Eugene Quirin. The fire originated from an over- 
heated chimney, the base of which rested on an iron col- 
umn, and damage was mostly by smoke and water. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 4, 
6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, |8,000; 
damage, |260; insurance, |3,000; insurance paid, $2G0. 
Value of contents, |10,000; damage, |398.03; insurance, 
16.000; insurance paid, |398.03. 

Box 61. Same date, 6.08 p. m. The icehouse con- 
nected with the True W. Jones Brewing Co., on Hancock 
street, caught fire from some unknown cause. It con- 
tained but little ice and was used as storehouse also. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. Value of building, $1,500; 
damage, $947.38; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, 
$947.38. Value of contents, $712.50 ; damage, $287.50 ; in- 
surance paid, $287.50. 

Still. Sunday, October 31, 6.15 a. m. Members of Hose 
No. 3 called to brewery icehouse from fire in sawdust from 
last night's fire. Extinguished with few pails of water. 

Still. Same date, 12.32 p. m. Two-story wooden ten- 
ement house, 417 Pine street, owned by Albert Brigham 



280 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and occupied by Thomas Connor. Slight fire about porch. 
Members of Chemical responded. Used one charge of 
Pony. Value of building, |800; damage, $8; insurance, 
fSOO; insurance paid, |8. 

Box 15. Wednesday, November 3, 4.50 p. m. Some 
careless person dropped a lighted match into sawdust 
saturated with kerosene near an oil tank in grocery store 
of Mrs. S. D. McGee, GO Pearl street, doing no damage. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

2-2-2. Friday, November 5, 1.50 a. m. Telephone call 
from Derry for help. Took Steamer No. 1 with hose 
wagon and twenty-five men. Owing to delay in railroad 
yard in getting started, fire was under control on arrival, 
and apparatus was not unloaded, but kept in readiness 
until 4.40 A. M. 

Still. Saturday, November 6, 5.15 p. m. Chimney fire 
in tenement. house, 19 Clinton street, owned by George S. 
Eastman and occupied by several families. No damage. 
Members of Engine 2 responded. 

Box 213. Sunday, November 7, 9.21 a. m. Grass fire 
near oil tanks of Standard Oil Co. on Baker street. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. 

Still. Same date, 3.30 p. m. Three-story brick block, 
64 Hanover street, owned by Bartlett, Wells, Hill, and 
Gay, and occupied by John B. Clarke Co. for printing 
ofBce. Fire under entry floor of press room in basement. 
Damage slight. Cause, rats and matches. Chemical 
■engine responded. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Monday, November 8, 9.38 a. m. Chimney fire 
in two-story tenement house, 62 Lake avenue, owned by 
Jeremiah Horan and occupied by Joseph Dufrain. No 
damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box G. Sunday, November 14, 4.5G p. m. Electric light 
wire on the outside of Paris Store, 8G8-884 Elm street, 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 281 

t)ccnpied by L. P. Labonte, set fire to awning, damaging 
the sign |55, on which there was no insurance. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 
€hemical, HoseJ., 2, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 4. Wednesday, November 17, 7.48 p. m. Two- 
and-half-story wooden dwelling, 60 Spruce street, owned 
by Timothy Connor and occupied by A. E. Savard and 
Joseph Noel. Chimney fire. No damage. Box jmlled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 71. Tuesday, November 23, 5.58 p. m. Chimney 
fire at 259 Pine street, in tenement block owned by Mrs. 
Clara AVhitford. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Truck 3. 

Box 53. Sunday, November 28, 6.35 a. m. Sawmill 
and dryhouse at 168 South Main street, owned and occu- 
pied bj- A. C. Wallace. The fire originated near the dry- 
house and boiler-room. Cause unknown. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, |1,200; damage, 
$400; insurance, .$200; insurance paid, $200. Value of 
contents, |2,200; damage, |1,000; insurance, |600; insur- 
ance paid, 1600. 

Box 53. Monday, November 29, 10.55 p. m. Two- 
story wooden block, 165-169 South Main street, owned 
by Gordon Woodbury and occupied by the Eanno 
Harness Co. as harness shop and James P. Welch 
as barber shop and variety store. The fire origi- 
nated under a sink in variety store, from spontaneous 
combustion. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucl^ 6. Value of 
building, |6,000; damage, |791; insurance, |5,000; insur- 
ance paid, 1791. Welch: Value of contents, $725; dam- 
age, 1485; insurance, |475; insurance paid, |310. Ranno 



282 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Harness Co.: Value of contents, |19,000; damage, $1,503.- 
45; insurance, |17,000; insurance paid, |1,503.45. 

Still. Tuesday, November 30, 7.30 p. m. A lighted 
candle behind drapery in the 5 and lO-cent store of Wool- 
worth & Co., in Weston block, 981 Elm street, ignited the 
tissue paper trimmings, doing slight damage. Members 
of Chemical and Truck 1 responded. Used one charge of 
Pony. 

Box 5. Friday, December 3, 9.30 p. m. Two-story 
wooden projection to Adams Bros.' grain store, rear 754 
Elm street, owned by Rowell Bros. Fire originated under 
outside stairs in Elm west back street, by match or cigar 
stub thrown among litter of hay. Box pulled by citizen. 
No damage to stock. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Damage to build- 
ing, |25; insurance paid, |25. 

Box 315. Tuesday, December 7, 12.43 a. m. Cottage 
house and barn connected, on the Goffstown road, owned 
by the heirs of Gilman R. Stevens and occupied by Mrs. 
Stevens. Fire was first discovered in the barn, and 
before alarm was given had communicated with the 
house. Cause unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 5, 6, Chemical, Ladder 5. 
Value of buildings, |1,000; damage, |1,000; insurance, 
$500; insurance paid, $500. Value of contents, $500; 
damage, $500; no insurance. 

Box 45. Tuesday, December 14, 3.51 p. m. Three- 
story brick building, owned by Leighton Machine Co., 
corner Canal and Cedar streets, andoccupied by them and 
others for manufacturing purposes. The fire originated 
in the "tempering-room" of Dodge Needle Works, on sec- 
ond floor, caused by water in pot of tempering oil, spatter- 
ing oil into the fire. There was no damage and fire all 
out on arrival of department. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 
1, Trucks 1, 3. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 283 

Still. Saturday, December 18, 4.05 p. m. Grass fire 
on land of Henry A. Farriugton on Clarke street, between 
Elm and Chestnut streets. Responded to by members of 
Engine and Ladder No. 5. No damage. Used one charge 
of Pony. 

Box 3. Friday, December 24, 4.17 p. m. Saloon car 
No. 2718 of Boston & Maine Railroad, on sidetrack in 
railroad yard. Cause unknown. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
3, Trucks 1, 3. Damage to car, |15 ; value, |471. Blanket 
policy. 

Still. Same date, 5.59 p. m. Chimney fire at 99 Cedar 
street. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 71. Same date, 6.11 p. m. While a detail of men 
were at the chimney fire above mentioned, some "crazy- 
head" pulled box for same chimney. Companies respond- 
ing : Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. No damage. 

Still. Same date, 6.32 p. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block, 49 Spruce street. No damage. Used two 
chiarges of Pony. 

Still. Same date, 8.15 p. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block owned by heirs of John D. Patterson and oc- 
cupied by Richard Gallien. No damage. Used one 
charge of Pony. 

Still. Same date, 9.30 p. m. Chimney fire at 60 Con- 
cord street, owned by heirs of S. W. Parsons and occupied 
b}' Davis. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Same date, 10.48 p. m. Chimney fire in Wash- 
ington block, 3 and 4 Pearl street, owned by Charles C. 
Hayes and occupied by Oliver Gagnon and others. No 
damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Saturday, December 25, 1 p. m. Chimney fire 
in two-story wooden tenement block, 63 Pearl street, 
owned by Nason Hall and occupied by Nelson White. No 
damage. Used two charges of Pony. 



284 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still, Tuesday, December 28, 6.50 p. m. Three-story 
wooden tenement bouse, 32 Concord street, owned by 
John H. McCabe and occupied by John Peterson as cob- 
bler's shop. Lamp exploded. No damage. Used one 
charge of Pony. 

Box 8. Thursday, December 30, 5.45 p. m. Four- 
story wooden block, 1201 Elm street, owned by Mrs. J. L. 
Bradford and occupied by Thomas Kelley & Sons in base- 
ment as fruit store, and Fogg's lunch rooms, with variety 
store of Lizzie Gillis on first floor. Miss Gillis's damage 
was wholly by smoke. The fire originated in middle cel- 
lar of Kelley's store, from some unknown cause. Box 
pulled by L. F. Kettle. Companies responding: Engines 1, 
4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, 
$3,500; damage, |225; insurance, |2,000; insurance paid, 
f225. Kelley: Value of contents, |200; damage, |155; 
insurance, $150; insurance paid, |150. E. W. Fogg: 
Value of contents, |600; damage, |50; insurance, |200; 
insurance paid, |20. Lizzie Gillis: Value of contents, 
I; damage, flOO; insurance, |400; insurance paid, flOO. 



Number of bell alarms 81 

Number of still alarms 69 

Total 150 

Value of property endangered |150,208.50 

Insurance carried on same 105,015.00 

Damage to property where fires occurred. . . 23,269.50 

Insurance paid on same 20,249.50 

Net loss above insurance paid |3,020.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 285 

Number and Location of Fire Alarm Boxes and 

Keys. 

A KEY IS ATTACHED TO Each Box, and can be had by 
breaking the gkiss. 

No. 3. Blood's lower shop. Keys at offices of gas- 
works, county jail, Manchester Coal & Ice Co.'s sheds, 
and Charles H. Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. Corner Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel 
Oxford, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmou's, Street 
Eailway stables, and office of Blodgett & Young's block. 
No. 5. Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys 
at Tebbetts & Soule's and Currier's drugstores, Manches- 
ter House, and J. W. Hill Co.'s store. 

No. 6. City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Thurston's 
drugstores, J. A. Riddle's office, and residence of J. L. 
Brock, 21 Amoskeag Corporation. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of Manchester and Chest- 
nut streets. Keys at chief of police's office and with all 
police officers. 

No. 8. Corner of Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Ed- 
ward C. Smith's and Gadbois's drugstores, and Partridge 
Bros.' grain store. 

No. 0. Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at 
residences of Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, Dr. 
E. Fritz, and station of Engine No. 5. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of John Mooar, George Emerson, Walter A. 
Green, and O. D. Knox. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of Welcome Jencks and Mrs, Lewis Simons, 
No. 1 Senter's block, and Gate's grocery store. 

No. 11. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. George W. Riddle, 
D. J. Adams, A. H. Olzendam, and Mrs. Thomas Morgan. 
, No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys 



280 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

at residences of William B. Corej^ Henry W. Shannon, 
and J. Fred Clialker. 

No. 16. Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of Kt. Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. R. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of Mrs. H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. 
Keys at residences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, 
and Mrs. William Perkins. 

No. 21. Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys 
at A. D. Smith's drugstore, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. 
L. Walker's office and residence of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3 house, corner of 
Massabesic street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence 
of D. M. Goodwin and station of Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

No. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. 
Keys at residences of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, 
the late Horace Stearns, the late Horace Gordon, and 
James R. Straw. 

No. 26. Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys 
at McCrillis's carriage shop and John N. Foss's stable. 

No. 27. Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys 
at residences of H. M. Tarbell, the late A. G. Fairbanks, 
E. S. Fletcher, William Carr, and Mrs. George H. 
Hubbard. 

No. 28. Corner of Merrimack and Beacon streets. 
Keyt at residences of A. L. Garmon and Edward Dorsey. 

No. 31. Corner of Canal and Hollis streets. Blood's 
shop. Keys at office, Amory Mills, Langdon Mills watch- 
rooms. 

No. 32. Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and 
Brook streets. Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Company's 
mill, Langdon watchroom, and Electric Light station. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 287 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Keys at watcbroom and pump- 
ing station. 

No. 35. Stark Mills. Keys at watcbroom. 

No. 36. Amory Mills. Keys at watcbroom. 

No. 39. Hillsborougb county jail. Keys at office. 

No. 41. Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watcbroom. 

No. 42. Mancbester Mills. Keys at watcbroom. 

No. 43. Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watcbroom. 

No. 45. Tbe S. C. Forsaitb Co.'s sbops. Keys at 
freigbt depot and S. C. Forsaitb Co.'s office. 

No. 51. Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys 
at stores of F. Eiedel and William Weber. 

No. 52. Barr's brick block, West Mancbester. Keys 
at Fradd & Co.'s and A. N. Clapp's stores, Merrimack 
House, and Engine No. 2 bouse. 

No. 53. Wallace's steam mill. Keys at Wallace's 
office, I. R. Dewey's tenement block, and Ranno Harness 
Co.'s store. 

No. 54. Corner of A and Soutb Main streets. Keys at 
residences of Lord sisters, Neil Fullerton, and George W. 
Davis's store. 

No. 56. Baldwin's bobbin sbop. Keys at Baldwin's 
office and residences of J. C. Smitb, E. P. Littlefleld, and 
witb watcbman at works. 

No. 57. Corner Mast road and D street. Keys at res- 
idences of Rev. A. C. Bidwell and C. H. George, and F. W. 
Towle's store. 

No. 61. Corner of River road and Hancock street, Ba- 
kersville. Keys at Mary Stack's saloon, True W. Jones 
Co.'s brewery, store of Jobn A. Kane, and Hose 3. 

No. 62. Gerrisb Wool & Leatber Co.'s, River road. 
Keys at tannery, tbe Edwin Kennedy bouse, and Hose 3. 

No. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins, Daniel Sbeeban, Tbomas J. 
Smitb, Simon McCartby, and J. J. Twomey. 



288 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 72. Corner of Lake avenue and Lincoln street. 
Keys at residences of the late Austin Jenkins, James 
Briggs, and Clarence D. Palmer. 

No. 73. Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys at 
residences of Rev. J. A. Chevalier and Timothy Carr. 

No. 81. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at 
all the engine rooms. 

No. 82. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Church 
streets. Keys at Syndicate Furniture Co.'s, Lowell- 
street stable, and Fames Bros.' drugstore. 

No. 91. Corner of Webster and Beech streets. Keys 
at Children's Home and R, N. Foster's residence. 

No. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. 
Keys at residences of W. T. Stevens, W. A. Clarkson, M. 
D. Johnson, Charles F. Chase, and William H. Drury. 

No. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys 
at residences of Mrs. William B. Abbott, W. N. Johnson, 
and E. M. Topliff. 

No. 111. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at 
residences of Mrs. A. P. Olzendam, G. A. Olzendam, W. S. 
Shannon, and John J. Bennett. 

No. 115. Corner Gore and Ash streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of James A. Rogers and Cyren Bixby. 

No. 212. Shoeshop, Hallsville. Keys at the oftice of 
the shoe factory and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. 
W. Dearborn, Mrs. Milton A. Abbott, M. V. B. Garland, 
and Walter Cody's block. 

No. 213. Sash and blind factory. South Beech street, 
junction of Portsmouth Railroad. Keys at offices of 
Austin, Flint & Day and Dana & Provost. 

No. 211. Elliott silk mill, corner of Wilson and Valley 
streets. Keys at office and watchroom of mill. 

No. 215. Hoyt & Co.'s shoeshop, corner of Lincoln and 
Silver streets. Keys at offices of shoeshop and Kimball 
Carriage Co. and residence of Mrs. A. B. Johnson. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 289 

No. 216. Jewett and Somerville streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of G. H. Hill, 140 Jewett street, and W. B. Brown, 
128 Jewett street. 

No. 217. Corner Candia road and Massabesic street. 
Keys at residences of L. M. Streeter, William Gadbois, 
and Charles P. Still. 

No. 2G1. Pefiri-street grammar school. Keys at 
school room and residences of C. E. Rose, S. W. Bascom, 
and Charles W. Cheney, Jr. 

No. 312. Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor 
streets. Kej'S at residences of James Spence (309 Main 
street), Thomas Bolton, gate No. 11 mill. 

No. 313. Corner of Amory and Main streets. Keys at 
residences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Bou- 
thillier & Gingras's drugstore, Miville & Co.'s drugstore, 
gate of No. 11 mill, and station of Engine and Ladder 
No. 6. 

No. 314. P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper mill. Keys at office 
and Riverside Hose house. 

No. 315. Old Brick Store, 'Skeag. Keys at Flanders's 
store. Riverside Hose house, and D. L. Robinson's resi- 
dence. 

No. 321. Corner Beauport and Wayne streets. Keys 
at Holy Angels Convent, and Brothers' School, and resi- 
dences of E. H. Doherty and Rev. Father Hevey. 

No. 323. Corner of Putnam and Bartlett streets. 
Keys at Albert Oliver's store, P. J. Archambeault's ba- 
kery, and residence of Officer Lewis Clement. 

No. 324. Amory and Laval streets. Key at residence 
of Desire Martin, No. 494 Amory street. 

No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys 
at residences of Amelia Davis, William A. Tufts, and 
James Kearns. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Keys 
at residences of J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Eliz- 
abeth Ward. 

19 



290 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular 
police. 

The true time will be given at precisely 12. .30 p. m. from 
Charles A. Trefethen's jewelry store, and will be denoted 
by one stroke of the fire bells. 



Telephone Calls. 

NEW ENGLAND TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE CO. 

Chemical Engine, Central Station 64 — 3 

Engine No. 2 G4— 2 

Engine & Ladder No. 3 64—5 

Engine & Ladder No. 5 64—6 

Engine & Ladder No. 6 64—7 

Hose No. 2 116—4 

Hose No. 3 25—2 

Chief Engineer Lane's office 64 — 3 

Chief Engineer Lane's house 64 — 4 

.Assistant Engineer Bean's house 517 — 2 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's house 39 — 4 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's office 73 — 3 

Assistant Engineer Merrill's house 212 — 3 

Assistant Engineer Frisselle's house 175 — 2 

Two long rings, twice, all take down telephones. 

MANCHESTER TELEPHONE CO. 

Chemical Engine, Central Station 120 — 2 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's office 80 — 2 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's house - 81 — 2 

Assistant Engineer Merrill's house 162 — 2 



Instructions to Key-holders and Citizens. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearest alarm box, the key 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 291 

of wliich is in a circular box attached to right-liaud side 
of the fire alarm box. Keys are also in the hands of all 
regular police, and generally of persons at the corner or 
nearest house. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or posi- 
tive information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down 
the hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and 
then let go. Shut the door, but do not try to remove the 
key, as it is locked in by a trap lock, and can only be re- 
moved with a release key, which is carried by each of the 
engineers, and they will, as soon as convenient, release 
and return it. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to re- 
main by the box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in 
the box, pull again; if you still hear no clicking, go to the 
next nearest box and give an alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Give an 
alarm for no cause other than actual fire. Don't give an 

ALARM FOR A CHIMNEY FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the chief engineer. If you change your resi- 
dence or place of business, where the keys are kept, return the 
keys to the same office. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested 
to inform themselves of the location of alarm boxes near 
their property; also all places where the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. A larins will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the 
city, and the number of the box will be given thus: Box 6, 
six blows, 2^ seconds apart, repeated three times. Box 
212, two blows, pause of 6^ seconds, one blow, same 
pause, and two blows, 2—1—2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke 
of the bells at any time; and in case of testing the boxes, 
each test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



292 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE 



SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST, SEC- 
OND, AND THIRD ALARMS. 





FiEST Alarm. 


Second Alabm. 


Thibd Alarm. 








"O 






•s 














«S3 


6 




^S 


o 




g^ 




Engine. 


O 




B 


o 
U 




a 
'to 
a 
w 


W 


1^ 


3 


l8t R. 3 C. 1 
1st R. 2-3 


1-3 
1-3 


1-3 
1-3 


2dR. 2 
2dR. 






5-6 
5-6 


2 


5 6 


4 


2 


5 


6 


5 


1st R. 2-3 




1-3 


2dR. 


2-3 


5 


5-6 




6 


6 


Ist & 2d R. 


1-2 


1-3 


2-3 


3 


5 


5-6 




6 


7 


IstR. 3 




1-3 


2dR. 


2 


6 


2-5-6 


3 


6 


8 


1st & 2d R. 5 


1-2 


1-5 3 




3 


2-6 


3 


6 


9 


Ist K. 5 




5 ; 2d R. 


2 


1 


2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


12 


5 




5 1 Ist R. 


2 


1 


2d R.2-3-6 


3 


3-« 


13 


Ist R. 5 " 


1-2 


5 


2dR. 




1 


2d R.2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


14 


1st R. 5 " 


1-2 


5 


2dR. 3 




1 


2-6 


3 


3-6 


15 


Ist & 2d R. 5 " 


1-2 


1-5 


3 




3 


2-6 


3 


6 


16 


Ist R. 5 " 


1-2 


1-5 1 2d R. 3 




3 


2-6 


3 


6 


17 


1st K. 3 


1-2 


3 2d R. 5 




1 


2-6 


3 


3-6 


18 


1st R. 3 


1-2 


3 2d R. 




1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


21 


IstR. 3 " 




1-3 2dR. 2 


2 


5 


5-6 


3 


6 


23 


1st R. 3 " 


1-2 


3 2d R. 




1 


2-5-6 


3 


6-6 


24 


1st R. 3 


1-2 


3 2d R. 




1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


25 


1st R. 3 " 


1-2 


3 .] 2d R. 




1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


26 


1st R. 3 " 


1-2 


5 2d R. 5 




3 


2-6 


3 


1-6 


27 


IstR. 3 " 




3 j 2d R. 


1 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


28 


3 " 




3 IstR. 


1 




2d R.2-5-6 


3 


1-5-6 


31 


1st R. 6 




1-5 i 2d R. 5 


2 


6 


2-3 


3 


3 


32 


1st R. 5 " 




1-5 I 2d R. 6 


2 


6 


2-3 


3 


3 


34 


1st & 2d R. 5-6 " 


1-2 


1-5 1 2-3 




fi-3 




3 




35 


1st & 2d R. 5-6 " 




1-5 2-3 


?, 


6-3 




3 




36 


1st & 2d R. 5-6 " 




1-5 2-3 


2 


3-fi 




3 




39 


1st R. 3 " 


1-3 


1-3 i 2d R. 2 


2 


5 


5-6 




6 


41 


1st & 2d R. 2-3 '• 

1st & 2d R. 2-3 " 
1st R. 2-3 " 




1-3 
1-3 
3 


5-6 
5-6 
2dR. 6 


2-3 
2-3 
2-3 


5-6 
6-6 
1 








42 








43 


5 





6-5 


45 


1st & 2d R..2-? " 




1-3 


5 


2-3 


5 


6 




6 


51 


2-6 




6 


Ist R.3 


1 


3 


2dR. 5 


6-2 


1-5 


52 


2-6 " 




6 


1st R.3 


3 


3 


2dR. 5 


2 


1-5 


53 


2-6 




6 


1st K.3 




3 


2dR. 5 


2-3 


1-5 


54 


2-6 




6 


IstR. 


1 




2d R. 3-5 


2-3 


1-3-5 


56 


2-6 " 




6 


1st R.3 


3 


3 


2dR. 5 




1-5 


57 


2-3 




6 


6 


3 


3 


lst&2d R.3-5 


2-3 


1-3-6 


61 


IstR. 3 " 
1st R. 3 " 


1-3 
1-3 


3 
3 


2d R. 2 
2dR.2 






5-6 
5-6 


2 


1-5-6 


62 






1-5-6 


71 


IstR. 3 " 




3 


2dR. 


2-3 


1 


2-5-6 




5-6 


72 


1st R. 3 " 




3 


2dR. 


2 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


73 


1st R. 3 " 




3 


2dR. 


2 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


81 


1st & 2d R. " 




1 


5 


2 


3-5 


2-6 


3 


6 


82 


1st & 2d R 5 " 


1-2 


1-5 


3-6 




3 6 


2 






91 


1st R. 5 




5 


2dR. 


2 


1 


2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


112 


IstR. 5 " 


2 


5 


2dR. 


1 


1 


2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


113 


1st R. 5 " 


2 


5 


2d R. 


1 


3 


2-3-6 


3 


1-6 


114 


1st R. 5 " 


1-2 


5 


2d R.3 




3 


2-6 


3 


1-6 


115 


1st R. 5 " 


2 


5 


2dR. 


1 


1 


2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


212 


let R. 3 " 


2 


3 i 2d R. 


1-3 


1 


2-.5-6 




5-6 


213 


1st R. 3 " 


2-3 


3 2d R. 


1 


1 


2-5-6 


1 


6-5 


214 


1st R. 3 


2-3 


3 


2dR. 




1 


2-5-6 


1 


5-6 


215 


Ist R. 3 " 


2-3 


3 


2d R. 


1 


1 


2-5-6 




5-6 


216 


1st R. 3 " 


2 


3 


2d R. 


1 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


217 


IstR. 3 


2 


3 


2d R. 


1 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


261 


1st R. 3 " 


1-2 


3 


2dR. 5 




5 


2-6 




3-6 


312 


1st R. 2-6 




6 


2dR. 5 


2 


1 


3 


3 


3-5 


313 


1st R. 2-6 




6 


2dR. 5 


2 


1 


3 


3 


3-6 


314 


5-6 




5 


lstR.2 




6 


2dR. 3 


2-3 


1-3 


315 


5-6 




5 


1st R. 


1 


6 


2d R. 2-3 


Z-i 


1-3 


321 


2-6 




6 


Ist R.5 




1 


2dR. 3 


2-3 


3-6 


323 


2-6 " 




6 


1st R.5 




5 


2dR. 3 


2-3 


1-3-5 


324 


2-6 




6 


1st R.5 




5 


2dR. 3 


3-2 


1-3 


511 


2-6 




6 


IstR. 


1 


3 


2d R. 3-5 


2-3 


1-5 


613 


2-6 




6 


IstR. 1 




2dR. 3-5 


J-3 


1-3-6 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 293 

Rules and Regulations in Regard to Responding to 
Fires and Alarms. 

The followinn; rules have been adopted by the board of 
engineers, and the tire department will strictly comply 
until otherwise ordered, and will attend alarms of fire as 
per ''official running card.'' 

RUNNING RULES. 

Whenever an alarm is sounded, the members of all 
companies not called to that box will report to their re- 
spective company quarters, and there remain until dis- 
missed by the signal on the bells or by an engineer in 
charge. 

In case companies on their first run have responded to 
an alarm, companies on their second run to the box from 
which the alarm has been sounded will answer all first- 
run boxes of the absent companies; and in case engines 
are out that would respond to another box, then third 
alarm companies will respond. In case of an alarm from 
a box that does not call for a third alarm, companies on 
their second run will then answer to all other boxes. 

Whenever two trucks answer to first alarm, the other 
truck will answ^er to all other boxes. 

At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, 
hose carriage, or truck that leaves the house first will 
have the right to lead to the fire. Whenever a horse lags 
or gives out, drivers should then give others the right of 
way, so as not to delay the rest of the apparatus. No 

RUNNING BY WILL BE ALLOWED, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCI- 
DENT, UNDER PENALTY OF DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FROM 
THE DEPARTMENT. 

The drivers shall not permit persons not connected 
with the department to ride upon their apparatus, and in 
muddy weather or heavy wheeling they shall not permit 
any one to ride upon their apparatus when returning 
from fires. 



294 ANNfJAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Engineers of steamers will not run over eighty (80) 
pounds of water pressure, except when orders are received 
from a member of the board of engineers or of the offlcer 
in command of the company. 

Captains, or commanding officers, upon return from 
alarms will report to headquarters immediately, person- 
ally or by telephone, after apparatus is ''made up" and 
ready for duty. 

THIRD ALARM. 

Ox THIRD ALARM all apparatus will respond. 

GENERAL ALARM. 

In the event of a fire of such magnitude that second 
and third alarms are needed, a general alarm will be 
given by striking ten blows, in which case all companies 
will respond. 

SPECIAL CALLS ON FIRE ALARM. 

When more apparatus is wanted without giving a sec- 
ond or third alarm, the following special calls will be 
given : 

2 — 1 for Engine 1. 1 — 1 — 1 for Aerial Truck. 

2—2 for Engine 2. 3—3 for Truck 3. 

2—3 for Engine 3. 3—5 for Truck 5. 

2—4: for Engine 4. 3— G for Truck 6. 

2 — 5 for Engine 5. 4 — 1 for Hose 1. 

2 — 6 for Engine 6. 4 — 2 for Hose 2. 

4—3 for Hose 3. 

Companies answering "special calls"' will wait thirty 
seconds before leaving quarters, to prevent mistakes. 

OUT OF TOWN CALL. 

For a fire out of the city 2 — 2 — 2, in which case all com- 
panies will assemble at their respective quarters and 
await orders. 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 295 

ALL OUT SIGNAL. 

Two blows on the bells, which dismisses all members at 
company quarters. 

This signal will be given after companies working at a 
fire have returned to quarters, "made up," and are ready 
to respond to another alarm. 

TEST SIGNAL. " , 

One blow at 12.30 noon. 

SCHOOL SIGNALS. 

1_1^ with fifteen seconds between blows, closes pri- 
mary and middle schools. 

2 — 2, with fifteen seconds between the 2's, closes all the 
schools. Time for giving same, 7.45 a. m., 11.30 a. m., or 
1.15 p. M. 

MILITARY GALL. 

12 blows twice. 



Rules for Exercising Horses. 

It shall be the duty of the drivers of engines, hose car- 
riages, hose wagons, hook-and-ladder trucks, and all 
other apparatus connected with this department, to exer- 
cise the horses every day, weather permitting, except 
Sunday, with the exception of engines having ''first" and 
"second runs," and in such cases must exercise on days of 
"second run," the same to be done within the following 
limits: 

CENTRAL STATION. 

North to Pearl street. East to Union street. 

South to Merrimack street. West to Elm street. 

NORTH MAIN-STREET STATION. 

North to Adams street. East to Main street. 

South to Granite street. West to Dubuque street. 



296 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

LAKE AVENUE STATION. 

North to Manchester street. East to Belmont street. 
South to Summer street. West to Maple street. 

MAPLE-STREET STATION. 

North to Myrtle street. West to Union street. 

South to Hanover street. East to Linden street. , 

WEBSTER-STREET STATION. 

9 

North to Clarke street. East to Union street. 

South to Pennacook street. West to Elm street. 

RIMMON-STREET STATION (MCGREGORVILLE), 

North to Kelley street. East to Beauport street. 

South to Wayne street. West to Rimmon street. 

bakersville station. 

North to bridge over B. & East to Calef road, 

M. R. R. West to Brown avenue. 

South to Baker street. 

Drivers must confine themselves to the above, and in 
no case take their horses beyond the prescribed limits, 
except for shoeing and in case of fire, without permission 
from the chief or an assistant engineer. 

In exercising, care must be taken to avoid colliding 
with other teams. In approaching corners, crossings, 
street-car tracks, and in going down grades the speed of 
the horses must be checked. 

In case of an alarm use gong freely while returning to 
quarters, 

. Any driver violating these rules will be liable to sus- 
pension or discharge. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 297 

Stations and Sleeping Rooms. 

All stations of this department will be open from 7 a. m, 
until 9 p. M., and the members at the several stations will 
receive visitors and citizens courteously, answer all 
questions in a gentlemanly manner, and give any proper 
information. 

Gambling of any kind shall not be done or permitted in 
or about- any of the houses or premises occupied by the 
department. 

Stations to be closed at 10 o'clock p. m. 

All games must cease at 10 o'clock p. m., and the sta- 
tions be closed at that hour, to permit the permanent men, 
and those detailed to sleep in the station, to retire undis- 
turbed. 

None of the stations will be open after the above hour 
(excepting in case of an alarm of fire) without permission 
of the chief or a member of the board of engineers, 
although stations may be kept open on Saturday evenings 
until 11 o'clock. 

No spirituous or malt liquors shall be allow^ed in or 
about any of the fire stations, and any member of the fire 
department seen intoxicated at any fire or alarm of fire, 
or w^ho shall be known to frequent places where liquors 
are sold, during the progress of a fire, or whenever in uni- 
form, shall be subject to reprimand, or dismissal, as the 
board of engineers may determine. 

Any permanent member visiting any liquor saloon in 
uniform, except in the performance of his duty as a mem- 
ber of the fire department, or who is intoxicated or visits 
places where intoxicating liquors are sold, while on duty, 
shall be suspended, or discharged, as the board of engi- 
neers may determine. 

Commanding officers of companies, having knowledge 
of the violation of the foregoing rules, will suspend the 
offender, and report the same to the chief, or board of 
engineers. 



298 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The permanent men sliall exercise a careful supervi- 
sion over the sleeping apartments, see that the rooms are 
put in order and the beds made as early as 11 o'clock a. m., 
and that the bedding is changed at suitable intervals. 
The occupants of each bed will be held responsible for the 
cleanliness of the same, and held strictly accountable for 
any damage to either bed or bed clothing through care- 
lessness. After 10 p. M. occupants shall refrain from 
loud talking or in any manner disturbing the rest of any 
who have retired. 



Absent from City or Station. 

No permanent member shall leave his station to visit 
any section of the city without permission of the chief or 
an assistant engineer, or leave the city, or be granted 
leave of absence, without notifying the chief engineer 
and procuring a substitute to his acceptance, and the sub- 
stitute shall be on duty before the applicant leaves his 
post, except on his regular "day off." 

Any call memher expecting to he absent from the city shall 
notify the captain of his company, and before leaving the city 
sliall procure a substitute satisfactory to said captain. 

Any member of the department not complying with the 
above rules shall be liable to suspension or expulsion 
from the department. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 299 

DAYS OFF. 



Name. 



Company. 



03 fl 
pa 



Name. 



Company. 



9 
10 
n 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



Hall 

Harvey .... 

Barker 

Parsons *. . . 

Gould 

Truell 

Rowe 

Dyer 

Denyou 

Pherson 

Porter 

Richardson . 

Walker 

Piper 

Wheeler 

McLeod 



Engine 1. 
1. 
" 1. 
Hose 1. 
Engine i. 
4. 
" 4. 
Truck 1. 
" 1. 
" 1. 
Chemical 1. 
" 1. 

Engine & Ladder 3, 
3. 
3. 
" " 3. 



Porter . . . . . 
Seaward . . 

Morse 

Smith 

Cann 

Hubbell... 

Morrill 

Lane 

Whitcomb 

Edgar 

Foster 

Cann 

Crosby*... 
Rogers*..., 
Sloan* 



Bng. & Ladders. 

Hose 2. 

Eng. & Ladder 5. 

" " 5. 

" " 5. 

" 5. 
Engine 2. 



Eng. & Ladder 6. 



Hose 3. 
" 3. 



*In February Crosby will take the 16th, and Rogers the 26th; in July Par- 
sons will take the 14th; and in February, April, June, September, and No- 
.vember, Sloan -will take the 27th. 

The hour of leaving will be 7 o'clock a. m., and mem- 
bers will not leave their station until the arrival of the 
spare driver. They must report promptltj at 7 O'clock the 
following morning for duty. 

Those whose breakfast hour is 6 o'clock will remain at 
station until 7 o'clock on the date of their ''day off." 

Should a fire be in progress at the hour of changes, men 
will remain on duty until the ''all out" is given, except 
permission is obtained of the chief, or engineer in charge 
of fire, to retire. 

Should a "general" or third alarm be rung in while 
members are in town, they will be expected to report for 
duty. 



SOO ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

On the "day off" of the engineer of a steamer, the 
assistant engineer shall, on his arrival at the fire, act as 
engineer. 

The time of change from first and second run will be 
made at 7 o'clock a. m. 

All hose companies are instructed not to enter any 
building with a line of hose unless the stop nozzle is 
closed, except in cases where they can see the fire, and 
when their streams will reach it without damage to other 
property. 

Steamer companies are not to enter a building with a 
line of hose without orders, unless fire can be seen, due 
care being exercised as to whether their services are 
needed. 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 
Engine No. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer |4,000.00 

1 one-horse wagon 400.00 

3 gray horses for steamer 085.00 

1 gray horse for hose wagon 22.5.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

1 pair double exercise harnesses .50.00 

1 single exercise harness 40.00 

2,200 feet fabric hose 1,100.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc ., 80.00 

Tools, furniture, and fixtures 200.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 200.00 

Total amount ~ |7,110.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 301 

Engine No. 2. 

LOCATED AT ^'ORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQUOG. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $4,000.00 

1 hose wagon 000.00 

1 exercise wagon, poles, shafts, and three- 
horse hitch 340.00 

3 bay horses for steamer G17.00 

1 pair gray horses for hose wagon 450.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $40, 1 at |20 100.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

1 double sled 60.00 

2,900 feet fabric hose 1,450.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 94.00 

Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc 466.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

Total amount |8,577.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CORNER MASSABESIC STREET. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

1 two-horse hose wagon 400.00 

1 two-horse truck and equipments 1,700.00 

1 three-horse hitch attachment (extra) . . . 200.00 

1 pair black horses for steamer 250.00 

1 pair bay horses for hose wagon 400.00 

1 pair bay horses for truck 400.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $50, 1 at |40 140.00 

6 swinging harnesses 300.00 

3,400 feet fabric hose 1,700.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc. 575.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 200.00 

1 exercise wagon 292.50 

Total amount $10,137.50 



302 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Engine No. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer 14,200.00 

1 hose wagon 400.00 

3 horses for steamer 600.00 

1 horse for hose wagon 200.00 

3 exercise harnesses 60.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

2,800 feet fabric hose 1,400.00 

Hall furniture, beds, bedding, etc 275.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 75.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

Total amount |4,560.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 5. 

LOCATED ON WEBSTER STREET, CORNER CHESTNUT. 

1 third-size Amoskeag steamer $3,600.00 

1 two-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage.. 600.00 

1 steel frame ladder truck 1,650.00 

1 pair bay horses for steamer 500.00 

1 pair bay horses for truck 400.00 

1 bay horse for hose carriage 200.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

1 double sled 50.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2 pairs exercise harnesses 100.00 

2,550 feet fabric hose 1,275.00 

Bedding, furniture, tools, etc 247.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 90.00 

Firemen's suits, badges, etc 200.00 

Total amount 19,487.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 303 

Engine and Ladder No. 6. 

LOCATED AT CORNER AMORY AND RIMMON STREETS. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

1 hook-and-ladder truck (with Bangor ex- 
tension) 1,680.00 

1 one-liorse carriage GOO. 00 

2 gray horses for steamer 400.00 

2 bay horses for truck 267.00 

1 gray horse for hose carriage 200.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 1,000.00 

Hall furniture, carpets, beds, bedding, etc. 375.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 85.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 187.00 

1 exercise wagon 290.50 

Total amount |8,835.50 



Hose No. 1 . 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage . . |600.00 

2 horses 500.00 

2 single harnesses 70.00 

1 single sled 40.00 

1 hose sled 20.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 1,000.00 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding, etc 60.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 120.00 



Total amount $2,660.00 



304 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Hose No. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage. . |G00.00 

1 bay horse 150.00 

1 exercise harness 30.00 

1 swinging harness ; 50.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

1,900 feet fabric hose ' 950.00 

150 feet leather hose 60.00 

Furniture and fixtures 100.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 120.00 

Total amount |2,385.00 



Hose No. 3. 

LOCATED ON SOUTH ELM STREET, BAKERSVILLE. 

1 combination hose wagon (with ladders) ^1,000.00 

1 pair gray horses 400.00 

1 pair swinging harnesses 100.00 

1 pair exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 exercise wagon 50.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 1,000.00 

Furniture, fixtures, bedding, etc 85.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 05.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 80.00 

Total amount |2,830.00 



Hook-and-Ladder No. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 aerial hook-and4adder truck $4,200.00 

3 horses : 800.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 305« 

3 exercise harnesses 150.00' 

3 swinging harnesses 150.00 

2 extra Bangor extension Ladders 300.00' 

7 rubber blanlvet covers 168.00 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00- 

Beds, bedding, and furniture 75.00 

Stable fixtures and bhmkets 60.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 



Total amount $6,213.00 



Chemical Engine No. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) engine |2,250.0O 

1 pair black horses 400.00 

1 pair exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 pair swinging harnesses lOO.OO 

Furniture and fixtures 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 35.00 

V 

Total amount |2,960.0O 



Supply Wagon. 

1 supply w^agon, with boxes and engineers' 

lanterns $250.00 



Spare Hose. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

200 feet leather hose flOO.OO 

500 feet fabric hose 250.00 

Total amount $350.00 

20 



306 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Exercise Wagon. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINfi STREET. 

1 four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole, 

shafts, three-horse hitch, and coal boxes . . |350.00 



E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine. 

STOKED AT SHEDS OF ENGINE NO. 2. 

Old U tank Amoskeag engine (may be worth 

for exchange) $250.00 



Engineer's Department. 

Five engineers' white rubber coats 137.50 

Furniture and fixtures 150.00 

Total amount $187.50 



Riverside Hose Co. No, 5. 

LOCATED AT CORNER OF OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage $100.00 

800 feet leather hose 300.00 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc 40.00 

Furniture and fixtures 10.00 

Total amount $750.00 

Hallsville (Independent) Hose. 

LOCATED AT CORNER OP MAMMOTH ROAD AND MASSABESIC 

STREET. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage $30.00 

500 feet leather hose 150.00 

Nozzle, wrenches, etc 15.00 

Total amount $195.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 307 

Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage |30.00 

2 hose-pipes 10.00 

Total amount |40.00 



Pond Road Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED IN BASEMENT OF W. P. FAEMBR'S BARN. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage |30.00 

500 feet leather hose 150.00 

Total amount $180.00 

Sleeping-Hall. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

6 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc 1260.00 

Extra Horse. 

1 steel gray horse $150.00 

Fire Alarm Telegraph. 

At cost, including additions previous to 1885. . |21,625.00 

.Remodeling in 1885 6,000.00 

''Individual tapper" system 4,000.00 

Additions from 1886 to 1897 (inclusive) 3,635.00 

Wire, ladders, arms, brackets, etc 200.00 



135,460.00 



308 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

Recapitulation. 

Engine No. 1 |7,110.00 

Engine No. 2 8,577.00 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 10,137.50 

Engine No. 1 7,560.00 

Engine and Ladder No. 5 9,487.00 

Engine and Ladder No. 6 8,835.50 

Harrington Engine (old) 250.00 

Hose No. 1 2,060.00 

Hose No. 2 2,385.00 

Hose No. 3 2,830.00 

Hook-and-Ladder No. 1 , 6,213.00 

Chemical No. 1 2,960.00 

Supply wagon 250.00 

Spare hose 350.00 

Exercise wagon (Central station) 350.00 

Engineer's department 187.50 

Riverside Hose No. 5 750.00 

Hallsville Hose 195.00 

Goffe's Falls Hose 40.00 

Pond road Hose 180.00 

Sleeping Hall 260.00 

Extra horse 150.00 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph ' 35,460.00 

Total 1107,177.50 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



309 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



« 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 


Thomas W. Lane 

Fred S Bean 


Chief 




1937 Elm. 


2 


Asst. and clerk 
Assistant 


Machinist 

Carpenter 

Supt. Elec. Light 
Grain dealer .... 


102 Orange. 
55 Douglas. 
N. River road, 
414 Merrimack 


3 
4 
5 


Ruel G. Manning 

Eugene S. Whitney 

Clarence R. Merrill .... 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, 28 Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


7 


Charles F. McCoy 


Captain 


Machinist 


50 Mechanic. 


8 


Frank E. Stearns 


Lieutenant .... 


Paper hanger. .. 


2S9 Lake ave. 


IS 


James L. Brock 


Clerk 


Tinsmith .... — 


21 Market. 


6 


Charles F.Hall 


Engineer 


Engineer 


28 Vine. 


14 




Asst. engineer 
Driver engine. 


Clerk 




11 


Frank H. Harvey 


Teamster 


28 Vine. 


12 


Artemas C. Barker — 


Driver hose... 





28 Vine. 


43 


Frank B. Marston 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


14 Mechanic. 


15 


Thomas J. Wyatt 







26 Mechanic. 


9 


Lewis G. Bryant 







1451 Elm. 


10 








297 Bridge. 
43 Nashua. 


17 


Melvin Walker 




Carpenter 


19 


Charles H. Eraser 







9 Mechanic. 


13 


Nate M. Kellogg 




Printer 


1937 Elm. 



310 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 2. 
House on North Main Street, 'Squog. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


71 


Charles G. Ranno 


Captain 


Harness-maker . 


270 So. Main. 


68 


George P. Ames 


Lieutenant.... 


Supt. Streets .... 


210 No. Main. 


76 
120 


Jeremiah Lane 

Harry C. Morrill 


Clerk and dri- 
ver of engine. 
Engineer 


Teamster 

Engineer 


210 No. Main. 
53 Beauport. 


119 


Stephen Thomes 


Asst. engineer. 


Carpenter 


55 Douglas. 


69 


Arthur W. Whitcomb. 


Driver of hose. 


Teamster 


151 Douglas. 


7?- 


Samuel A. Hill 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


86 School. 


75 


Robert J. Hill 




It 


86 School. 


77 


Daniel B. Emery 




Machinist 


Williams. 


73 


Charles S. Cousins .... 




Harness-maker. 


151 Douglas. 


74 


Thomas C . Foote 




Wool sorter 


56 No. Main. 


66 


Joseph H. Alsop 




Wool waste sort'r 


54 Douglas. 


70 


Chas. M. Tewksbury . . 




Clerk, B.&M.RR 


113 Parker. 


97 






Truckman 


431 Granite. 









REPOKT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER, 



311 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 3. 
House on Lake Avenue, corner Massabesic. 



5?5 
P3 



NAME. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



86 


Frank F. Porter 


Captain 


Manufacturer. . . 


.330 E. Spruce. 


97 


Edwin C.Paul 


Lieut, engine.. 
Lieut, ot truck 


Collector 

Overseer . 


372 Lake ave. 


98 


John N. Chase 


462 Belmont. 


US 


Orren S. Coburn 


Clerk 


Clerk 


386 Central. 


122 


John P. Walker 


Engineer 


Machinist 


430 Lake ave. 


121 


Geo. B. Forsaith 


Asst. engineer. 


Engineer 


455 Hanover. 


87 


Geo. H. "Wheeler 


Driver engine. 


Teamster 


384 E. Spruce. 


81 


William S. McLeod. . . . 


Driver hose... 





415 Lake ave. 


8", 


Lyman W. Piper 

John Wilson 








114 


Fireman 


Carpenter 


19 Warren. 


110 


Albert W. Smith 






Clerk 


331Merrimack 


S't 


Walter M. Moulton. . . . 










80 


Clarence Hackett 






Laundryman.... 


401 Central. 


R'l 


John W. Finn 






Pain ter 


501 Wilson. 


88 


George Taylor 






78 


George Dunnington. . . 






Harness-maker . 


401 Manch'er. 


79 


Lewis N. Dufrain 

Parker R. Brown : 

Edson F. Wy man 








373 Hall. 


89 


Clerk 


422Merrini ack 


153 


Manufacturer . . . 


389 Lake ave. 


105 


Herbert E. Dunbar — 






Clerk 


810 Central. 



S12 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 4. 
House, N'o. 20 Vine Street. 



60 • 

■a o 

•pa 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



20 


Lucius B. Snelllng 


Captain 


Pharmacist 


103 Walnut. 


-.28 


JolmH. Wales, Jr 


Lieutenant — 


Brick mason .... 


19 M. S. B. 


7,^ 


Thos. W. Lane, Jr 


Clerk 


Electrician 


1937 Elm. 


21 


Joseph H. Gould 


Engineer 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 


27 


Edward Sargent 


Asst. engineer 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 


31 


Jesse W. Truell 


Driver engine. 


Teamster 


20 Vine. 


29 


Ellsworth V. Rowe — 


Driver of hose. 


Teamster 


20 Vine. 


22 


Walter A. Clarkson . .. 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


Walnut. 


25 






Clerk 


20 Gore. 


23 


George Thompson — 
Harvey E. Harris 




Clerk 


215 Salmon. 


24 




Laundryman — 


414 Manches'r 


3?. 


Luther A. Knight 




Engineer 


16 Stark. 


30 


James C. Newton 




Machinist 


20 Vine. 


26 


Alfred Gustaf son 




Machinist 


20 Vine. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



313 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 5. 
House, No. 44 Webster Street. 



pa 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


49 


Charles W. Brown 


Captain 


Clerk 


16 Hazel. 


101 


Milo B. Wilson 

George N. Burpee 






48 Blodget. 
136 Sagamore. 


162 


Lieut, engine.. 


Electrician 


4f> 


Woodbury Davison . . . 


Clerk 


Carpenter 

Macliinist 

Engineer 


817 Union. 


lO'T 


Engineer 

Asst. engineer 


54 Appleton. 


42 


Daniel W. Morse 


1419 Elm. 


195 


Emil H. Smith 


Driver engine. 
Driver truck. . 


Teamster 


44 Webster. 


124 


Banjamin C. Cann 


44 Webster. 


83 


Ernest E. Hubbell 


Driver hose... 





44 Webster. 


47 


Russell L.Cilley 

Edward H. Clough.... 
Alvin McLane 




Clerk 


863 Chestnut 


95 






(1 


859 Chestnut. 


126 






Carpenter 


15 Liberty. 


108 








Clerk 




123 


Charles H. Gile 






Carpenter 


896 Union. 


<»9 












41 


Frank A. Kinne 






Machinist 


75 Sagamore. 


160 


George E. Badger 






Steam fitter 


55 Pennacook 


161 


Irving S. Bryant 






Second hand 


884 Union. 


158 


Andrew S. Fantom 






Cigar-maker 


1443 Elm. 


159 


Clarence D. Parker 






Clerk 















314 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 6. 
Bouse on Amory and Rimmon Streets. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


140 


Frank W. Tebb'etts 


Captain 


Loom- fixer 


312 Cartier. 


147 


James A. Farley 


Lieut, engine.. 


Machinist 


385 Dubuque. 


142 


Frank St. John 


Lieut, truck. . . 


Marble finisher . 


15 Beauport. 


137 


William H. Marshall . . 


Clerk 


Leverman 


22 Quincy. 


132 


Charles Edgar 


Engineer 

Asst. engineer. 


Engineer 

Machinist 


Engine house. 
516 Beauport. 


133 


Alcide Provencher — 


134 


Alphonso E. Foster . . . 


Driver engine. 


Carpenter 


Engine house. 


135 


George A. Cann 


Driver hose... 


Steam-fitter 


It ti 


136 


Henry C. Crosby 


Driver truck. . 


Teamster 


It II 


129 




Hoseman 


Machinist 


624 N. Main. 


138 




258 Beauport. 
268 Beauport. 


141 


John J. Conroy 


« 


Blacksmith 


H? 




<( 


Blacksmith 


393 Hevey. 
516 Beauport. 


144 


Arthur Provost 


It 


Wool sorter 


145 


John E. Herring 





Loom-fixer 


402 Rimmon. 


131 




„ 






1?8 


John H. McCabe 


„ 


Clerk 


310 N. Main. 


139 
146 




(t 




370 Cartier. 


Richard P. Gal way.... 


'< 


Cigar-maker 


460 N. Main. 


130 




•1 


Loom-flxer 


377 Rimmon. 









REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



315 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House, No. 26 VinelStreet. 



-So 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Joseph E. Merrill 

John E. Sanhorn 

Albert A. Puffer 

Henry C . Parsons 

Charles B. French 

Samuel W. Patten 

George I. Ayer 

Edwin W. Merrill 

Charles J. Willey 

Andrew S. Heath 

George W. Snadden... 
WillH. Nelson 



Captain 

Lieutenant . 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman.... 



Currier 

Carpenter . 
Teamster. 



Carpenter 

Belt maker 

Electrician 

Clerk 

Mechanic 

Clerk 

Plumber 

Gas-works emp. 



21 Ash. 



499; Beech. 
16 Prospect. 
39 M. S. B. 
3M. S.B. 
28 M. S. B. 
21 Ash. 



283 East High. 
373 Bridge. 
100 Brook. 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 
House on Maple Street, corner East High. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


54 


John F. Seaward 


Captain 


Carpenter 


27 Warren. 


55 


Revilo G. Houghton.. 


Lieutenant — 


Gas fitter 


288 Bridge. 


59 
57 
62 
60 


Jos. W. Batchelder ... 

Walter Seaward 

Julien B. Huntley 

Charles W. Powell — 


Clerk 


Carpenter 


521 Maple. 




521 Maple. 






35 Dutton. 




Carpenter 


540 Maple. 


61 


Addison Seaward 








255 Bridge. 


56 


Arthur B. Merrill 








327 Amherst. 


63 


James A. Rogers 








761 Beech. 


65 

58 




„ 




245 Lowell. 


Thomas Smith 


" 


Cal'penter 


24 South. 


64 


Melvin W. Worthen . . 


" 


" 


22 Jane. 



816 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOSE COMPANY NO. 3. 
House, South Elm Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


150 


Fred S Sloan 


Captain 

Clerk 


Fireman 


23 Elm. 


151 
152 






34 Brown ave . 


Charles H. Rogers — 


Driver 




23 Elm. 


153 


James H. McKenzie . . 


Hoseman 


Sash-maker 


Elm. 


154 


William P.Hall 





" 


39 Elm. 


155 


Henry O. Follansbee . 





Gas-maker 


205 Elm. . 


156 


William E. Pierson .. . 





Foreman 


122 Willow. 


157 


Frank D. Hardy 


" 


Yard biakeman. 


20 Cheney plc. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House, No. 8 Vine Street. 



pa 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


115 
116 


Edward A. Sears 

Clarence D. Palmer .. 
Benj. R. Richardson. . 

George H. Porter 

Asa W. Gage* 


Captain 

Clerk 


Electrician 

Marble dealer. . . 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Lineman 


247 Concord. 
355 Lake are.' 


103 




8 Vine. 


117 
44 


Pipeman 


8 Vine. 

239 Beauport. 



* Detailed as driver of supply wagon. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



317 



HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 
House, 18 Vine Street. 



•^2 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



m 




Captain 

Lieutenant ... . 




18 Vine 


92 


Oscar P. Stone 


Clerk 


312 Manchest'r 


100 


Frank M. Frisselle .... 
Cliarles M. Denyou. . . 
Jerome J. Lovering .. 


Clerk 


Editor 


58 Myrtle. 


04 


Driver 


Teamster 


18 Vine 


91 


Fii'eman 


Carpenter 


175 Hanover. 


104 


Harrison H. Cole 







45 M. S. B. 


109 


George M. Jones 




Gardener 


25 Prospect. 


107 






Manufacturer ... 
Carpenter 


18 Vine. 
49 Jane. 


113 


Charles H. Laxon 




90 


Henry Johnson 




Steam-fitter 


316 Walnut. 


119 


Chas. A. Butterfleld . . . 




Carpenter 


26 Vine. 


118 


Frank A. Pherson .... 




Machinist 


18 Vine. 


9S 


Fred W. Bond 






46 Stark. 
1480 Elm. 


106 


Benj. F. Marsh 




Carpenter 


96 


Louis F. Kettle 







40 Orange. 



REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



To the Hchool Board and by said Board to tlie City Councils: 
The following is presented as tlie fifty-first annual 
report of the public schools of the city of Manchester, the 
same also being- the forty-second report of the superin- 
tendent of public instruction, the twenty-first of the pres- 
ent incumbent, and his final report for the year 1897 : 

ORGANIZATION OP THE DAY SCHOOLS. 

By a recent amendment to the Public Statutes, the 
school year for all public schools throughout the state 
has been made to comprise the months between two suc- 
cessive Augusts. The state superintendent of public 
instruction accordingly requires that our annual school 
statistics shall be compiled and returned to him annually 
by the first of August, and that the}^ shall represent the 
results for the year preceding. 

The following, therefore, shows the organization of our 
public day schools from August, 189G, to August, 1897. 

The average number of schools for the entire year was 
114, reckoned as follows: The equivalent of 9 rooms of 
high-school grade, 1 more than last year; 29 grammar- 

321 

21 



322 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

school divisions, 1 more tlian last year*; 25 middle 
schools, four more than last yearf ; forty-three primary 
schools, the same as last year:|: ; 2 partially graded schools; 
5 ungraded schools; and 1 manual training school. 

The total enrollment of different pupils for the year 
ending August 1 was 5,501. This is only 119 more in 
the general enrollment than for the year previous; but the 
average number belonging, the number for which seating 
capacity must be provided, was this year 214 larger than 
last year. Of this increase 20 entered the High school 
and 194 the lower grades. The small increase in the 
total enrollment, together with an increase larger than 
usual in the average number belonging, indicates that 
our school population may be becoming more stable, or 
less floating. The 194 pupils who represent the increase 
that entered the grades below the High school occasioned 
the employment of five of the six additional teachers 
employed this year, — the 194 additional pupils affording 
an average of 39 pupils to each of the five new teachers. 

There were employed for the care of the 114 day schools 
throughout the year: Seven male principals of large 
schools; a lady principal and a general assistant (2)§ for 
the care of the Training school for teachers; 109 class- 
room teachers, T[ of whom eleven ladies were also princi- 
pals of schools containing two or more rooms; and three 
special teachers of music and drawing; or, in all, 121 
teachers for the entire year. 

* At the Webster-sti'eet school. The formation of a fourth grammar-school 
division at the Ifallsville school was offset by the discontinuance of an extra 
fourth grammar division at the Varney school. 

t A Bakersville primary of last year became a middle grade this year, and 
a like change occurred at the Pearl-street school. To these two new middle 
grades there should be added two other new middle grades for the year at 
Ihe Wilson school. 

XA new primary grade in the Varney school and another new one in the 
Wilson school are offset by the two primaries of last year, which this year 
became middle grades. 

§ Aided by the young ladies constituting the sub-teachers' classes, who had 
charge of the several classrooms. 

ITOf these 109 four are males, two sub-masters in the High school, the teacher 
at Youngsville, and the teacher of the manual training school. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 323 

THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

An eminent educator has written: "The common 
schools have produced the best results where the means 
of higher education hare been most plentiful. Educa- 
tional improvement works from the top downward, and 
not from the bottom upward; and the common school is 
always feeble where high schools, academies, and colleges 
are wanting." 

Colleges, as heads of educational influence, stimulate a 
healthful ambition for the attainment of advanced schol- 
arship. This leads to the establishment and maintenance 
of high schools, which in turn become centers of local 
educational interest and influence. The high schools, 
constantly uplifted by the requirements of the colleges, 
themselves not only modify the courses of study of the 
common schools, but also furnish a large majority of the 
teachers of the common schools with their higher edu- 
cation. 

Hence, it is doubtless true that Dartmouth College, by 
its influence upon and through our High school, deter- 
mines the character of our lower-grade schools much 
more largely than do our lower-grade schools determine 
the character of our High school. It is thus seen that 
a good high school is necessary to the existence of a first- 
class system of graded schools, and must be pre-eminent 
therein. 

The time, however, is fortunately past for need of any 
argument to maintain a place in our system for the high 
school. Its importance has never been more fully ac- 
knowiedged and recognized than within the past year. 
The elegant new schoolhouse that the city government 
has provided for the home of the High school in this city 
is the pride of the whole community, and generally be- 
lieved to be the best possible public investment that 
could be made either for the present generation or for 



324 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

those to folIoAv; likely, also, to prove a most ijrofit- 
able financial investment because of its influence upon the 
city's growth and consequent tax-yielding power. 

Much credit for our admirable high-school building is 
due to the chairman of this board, who, as mayor, had 
the opportunity that he so wisely improved to secure a 
building not only fit for present needs but one that will 
prove sufficiently commodious and materially satisfac- 
tory for many years, but also, in the meantime, itself be 
a potent educator because of its imposing jn'oportions and 
artistic accessories. 

A description of the new high-school building, and an 
account of its dedication, will be found at the end of this 
report. 

The High school was for two years housed in the Straw 
schoolhouse, while the new high-school building was 
being erected. During this period the school, for lack of 
sufficient rooms, was obliged to drop the study of chem- 
istry and of drawing; otherwise the school was about as 
well accommodated in the Straw schoolhouse as in the 
old high-school building. 

At the opening of the fall term last September, the 
High school was transferred back to its former location, 
and housed in the new building there provided for it. 

The new schoolhouse evidently api^eared so well 
adapted to high-school purposes that nearly all who could 
take one of the high-school courses seemed to seize the 
opportunity; and, as a consequence, the High school 
enrolled 405 pupils the past term, this being 82 more than 
during the fall term last year. The 405 enrolled This 
fall also constitutes the largest enrollment, by 82, in the 
history of the school. 

The High school was this fall speedily adjusted to its 
new quarters, and admirably arranged, because of much 
prior thought and study of the problem by the principal 
before the opening of the term. Now that pupils will 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 325 

no longer study in an assembly hall, each teacher will 
have in constant charge a class studying as well as one 
reciting. For proper results under such conditions, 
skilled teachers must be had. Hence I would empha- 
size my recommendation of last year that only experi- 
enced teachers of known success should be employed in 
the High school; nor will there be serious difficulty in 
securing them, for they can be had even for the smallest 
salaries paid in our school. The study of chemistry and 
of drawing has been resumed, and all the studies will 
have received such treatment by July as will put the 
school in readiness at the opening of the fall term for 
the addition of courses in stenography and typewriting, 
recommended in my report of last year for reasons therein 
set forth. 

The high-school course of study might be printed in a 
form that would better indicate its practical application; 
and, in doing this, opportunity for strengthening the 
course in the study of the English language should be 
taken. 

TRAINING SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS. 

This school is also of pre-eminent importance to our 
school system, and it long since justified its right to exist; 
but, as I gave an extended account of its formation, organ- 
ization, and growth in the semi-centennial report of last 
year, I deem it unnecessary so soon again to rehearse its 
history. 

During the past year, the school has been in excelleilt 
condition; the princii)ars health has enabled her con- 
stantly to stay by the school, and give it the benefit of 
full services; the chairman of its sub-committee has for- 
tunately been so circumstanced that he has been able to 
give -the school comparatively unusual attention, much 
to its advantage; and the new plan of selecting sub- 
teachers has markedly improved the general tone and 



326 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

character of the material out of which our teachers 
largely emerge. 

The sub-teachers who entered the school last February 
have constituted one of the strongest classes in the school 
for many years. The members were selected in accord- 
ance with a new plan, which is substantially as follows: 

Candidates, upon application for admission to the 
school, are at once expected to write and return answers 
to the following questions, furnished in proper blank 
form : 

1. Do your parents reside in Manchester, N. H.? 
How long have you resided here? If your parents are 
not now living here, did they ever have a voting or tax- 
paying residence in this city? How long since? For 
how long a time? 

2. In what town (or city) were you chiefly schooled? 
In what school did you finish your common (or grammar) 
school education? In what year? In what high school, 
academy, or college did you finish your higher education? 
In what year? 

3. Are you a graduate of the Manchester, N. H., High 
school? If so, in what year? In which of its courses of 
study? How many years did you pursue it? 

4. What experience, if any, have you had in teaching? 
For what grade of school do you now propose to fit your- 
self as a teacher? (The answer to this will not prevent a 
change of choice.) 

5. Are you to any degree deaf? Have you any eye 
trouble? If so, is it so far remedied that you can readily 
see average sized blackboard writing twenty feet away 
from you, and at once looking at ordinary book print in 
hand prompty read it? How many hours for five consec- 
utive days, weekly, can you daily average being upon 
your feet (standing, walking, or both) without becom- 
ing unduly fatigued? Are you subject to any throat 
trouble? 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 327 

G. State the frequency of your absences from school 
during the last two years of your attendance on account 
of ill health. Indicate this by stating the probable aver- 
age number of times you think the school records would 
show the fact per week, month, term, or jeav. 

7. Since leaving school have you gained or lost in 
respect to power of physical endurance? For the last six 
months have you in general been well and strong or deli- 
cate and somewhat physically weak? 

8. To w^hat three or more teachers, clergymen, physi- 
cians, or other well-known persons do you refer as ones 
knowing your personal characteristics sufficiently well 
to testify as to your character, habits, temperament, etc.? 

9. Indicate whether you prefer to enter the Training 
school in the month of September or February, and in 
what year, also. 

Signature, . Age, 

The sheets containing replies to the foregoing questions 
are kept on file at the office of the superintendent of 
schools. He investigates the scholarship record of each 
candidate during the last year in the grammar school, 
also during the whole course through the high school*; 
he makes a record of the results on her sheet containing 
replies to the questions submitted in the preceding par- 
agraph. 

Candidates to the number of four, five, or six, according 
to the condition of the Training school, are admited to it 
at the opening of the fall term in September, and also at 
the time of making the mid-winter promotions, — about 
the first of February. Accordingly, in July or August, 
and again in January, all candidates who may have re- 
turned written answers to the questions before named 
are notified to appear before the sub-committee of the 
Training school for a personal interview. Though there 

* Extract from Regulations of the School Committee, chapter 5, section 2 : 
"Candidates for admission to the Training school must be graduates of some 
high school or an equivalent." 



328 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

are likely to be from fifteen to thirty present, each candi- 
date is interviewed separately and privately, — the com- 
mittee havinj; before them the sheet containing' the can- 
didate's scholarship record, and also her written state- 
ment in regard to health, purposes, etc. All the candi- 
dates are dismissed as soon as individually interviewed, 
and the committee, as soon as through with the inter- 
view, proceed to select a sub-teachers' class of four to 
six, to enter the Training school soon thereafter. 

Thus an effort is made to select the most meritorious 
of all the candidates seeking admission to the Training 
school, whenever a beginners' class is therein to be organ- 
ized, and the plan has thus far shown great superiority 
over any other heretofore tried. 

It may, therefore, be reasonably expected that the 
Training school will henceforth graduate more healthy, 
mentally stronger, and consequently better prepared 
teachers than it has before averaged. This should prove 
highly important, for the large majority of our lady 
teachers have for many years been selected from among 
the graduates of this school,* and much to the advantage 
of our public schools, which would have looked elsewhere 
in vain for their equals, salaries paid in the grades they 
have taught being considered, — though these have been 
fairl}' satisfactory in recent years. 

In concluding this subject, I may say that of the 102 
lady teachers in our schools this fall, not including any 
lady teachers in the High or in the Training school, 01) 
of them, or 68 per cent of the lady teachers of our gram- 
mar and lower grade schools, are graduates of our city 
Training school for teachers; and the average has been 

* Extract from Rules of the School ConiTnittee, chapter 3, section 3 : " When 
an additional teacher is required or a vacancy is to be filled, the sub-com- 
mittee of the respective schools shall nominate to the board one or more per 
sons qualified for the position to be filled, and the board shall then proceed 
to a choice, by ballot if more than one candidate is nominated. Qualifications 
being equal, preference shall be given to graduates of the Manchester 
Training school." 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 329 

about 70 per cent for the several terms computed in vari- 
ous years. Hence it may be seen that our schools must 
in a great degree be affected by the instruction afforded 
in the Training school, and how important, therefore, it 
is that this school be kept in first-class condition. 

MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL. 

In a sense the high school, the training school for 
teachers, and the manual training school may be regarded 
as special schools. Each is distinct from every other 
school in our system, in respect to both the work and the 
office which each has to perform. The high school treats 
of advanced scholarship and a broader culture; it leads 
to investigation and strength of character, and by reason 
of the nature of its work it uplifts and inspires the lower 
schools to higher aims and better results. The training 
school for teachers not only makes teachers of high- 
school graduates, but (through the teachers it makes) the 
training school also in a high degree determines the char- 
acter of the schools taught by its graduates. The manual 
training school "emphasizes sense activity and seeks to 
apply this principle wiiile instructing in other branches" ; 
and, to quote a distinguished writer upon this subject, 
the leading purposes of manual training .in the schools are 
"to stimulate correctness of perception, soundness of 
judgment, taste in design, ingenuity in overcoming diffi- 
culties, deftness in manipulation, and neatness of wrought 
as well as of written w^ork ; to give the pupil the power to 
do things, as well as to think and to talk about them; 
to pay a premium on energy, diligence, originality, and 
manliness; to place a barrier against idleness as the be- 
ginning of all crimes, and save the boy from incompetence 
and dishonesty; to keep the boys in school until the high- 
school course is completed; to reduce the difficulty of dis- 
cipline to a minimum; to awaken and sharpen attention, 
and give children an appreciation of, and love for, order 



330 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and exactness; to accustom the pupil to do thoroughly 
and well whatever he undertakes; to foster habits of 
observation, accuracy, and perseverance; to lay the foun- 
dation for many trades by presentation and mastery of 
principles that underlie all trades; to provide a third 
mode of expressing thought through forms represented 
and things produced; to produce more complete, and 
therefore more competent, men by educating all the 
powers of every boy; to take away the bitterness of the 
boy who is dull with his books and ready with his hands, 
because it teaches him to see that he is good for some- 
thing; to restore his confidence, quicken his interest in 
school, save his self-respect, and open a welcome door 
into practical life; to make the boy who chooses a 
learned profession a more useful and broad-minded citi- 
zen; to teach the future man to know, love, and respect 
labor, to appreciate correctly the value of labor products, 
and to comprehend the social value of laboring people.'^ 

Our manual training school is suffering for lack of suffi- 
cient room and for want of sufficient equipment. I can- 
not better state the case than as I wrote it last year, for 
the conditions now are substantially the same as then : 

"When the manual training school was first opened, 
it was equipped only for such instruction as could be 
afforded beginners in the use of tools. The school has 
now been in existence four years and one term. Some of 
the bo3's who entered the manual training school when it 
was first opened are still members of it, though now high- 
school pupils. These, as well as those doing second year 
work in this school, are in sore need of more extended 
facilities for practice in the use of tools. The manual 
training school cannot longer be carried on in the most 
profitable manner without increased facilities for prop- 
erly advancing its work, as originally intended. Doubt- 
ers of the utility of this school, before hesitating to give 
it loyal support, will do well to read the School Report of 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 331 

1891 (pages 23, 24, etc.), the Report of 1893 (page 42), the 
Report of 1894 (pages 18, 19, etc.), and school reports of 
other cities in which the shop form of manual training has 
been employed; and still more especially should doubters 
consult the parents of the three hundred (and more) pupils 
who have patronized the school in this city. 

''The first additional need of the manual training school 
is more room. This may be had at the Lowell-street 
house by transferring one of the primary schools there to 
the Straw schoolhouse, now available for elementary 
schools. The next need of the manual training school is 
an equipment of three or four wood-turning lathes and a 
band saw, with electrical or other power. Wood turning 
is one of the very best features which can be introduced 
into this line of school work. It is of a character which 
brings a pupil to the necessity of thought and study; it 
teaches self-reliance and trains the eye to see and the 
hand to perform difScult work with precision. Pattern 
making affords excellent training; it has a practical bear- 
ing, also, upon the industries, and will be undertaken if 
proper facilities are granted. 

"Wood carving has already received some attention, 
of which specimens can b§ seen at the school ; so, also, of 
writing-desks, bookcases, and four chess boards elegantly 
inlaid in different patterns, also an abundance of joint 
forms and other elementary work. 

"The manual training school has a fully competent and 
deeply interested teacher, who has given many extra 
hours of service to the school. The school is also under 
the charge of a committee whose chairman is especially 
well equipped for the oversight of such an institution. 
The school is only in need of an adequate appropriation 
to make its work a grand success." 

Twenty-five hundred dollars are needed for additional 
equipment in the manual training school, and to pay its 
other expenses, during the coming year. The appropri- 



332 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ations for support of the public schools are determined 
bv the city government, and it seems strange that the 
members of the city councils who are supposed especially 
to represent and care for the interests of the common peo- 
ple should at this point have last year failed to meet the 
request of this board for the appropriation needed prop- 
erly to equip the manual training school, lor this school 
is no more a special school than the high school or the 
training school for teachers. The manual training 
school's special province is so to train the muscles through 
the intellect as to give the hand and eye the dexterity and 
intelligent use which is the foundation of all mechanical 
trades and the various forms of manual labor, — voca- 
tions, indeed, by which the masses of the common people 
earn their living. 

Failure to make the needed appropriation must have 
been through mistake or misunderstanding or ignorance 
of what the manual training school is doing, even with in- 
sufficient equipment- 
Let the members of the city government visit this school 
and there witness the instruction and work done by one 
hundred and ninety-five pupils belonging to our eight 
large grammar schools, where the constituents of the 
city government send their children for a common school 
education that is desired and expected to be up with the 
times, because supplemented by the training w^hich only 
a properly equipped manual training school can afford. 
Personal visitation of the manual training school by the 
members of the city government, without undue prior 
prejudice, would undoubtedly result in a prompt grant 
of the appropriation needed for the additional equipment 
necessary for the proper conduct of the manual training 
school. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDE^'T OF SCHOOLS. 333 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

All grades of school below the high school are known 
among educators as elementary schools, the high-school 
grade being known as a secondary school. 

The elementary, or common, schools are of paramount 
importance and interest, for in them the masses are edu- 
cated, and of every hundred pupils enrolled in the Man- 
chester public schools, for the school year ending July 1, 
1897, there were six in the High school and ninety-four in 
the lower-grade schools. The percentage of entire enroll- 
ment by grades was as follows: High school, 6; grammar 
schools, 24; middle schools, 21; primary schools, 46; par- 
tially graded schools, 1; and ungraded (or suburban) 
schools, 2. 

Ninety-four hundredths of our public school pupils 
being in the grades below the high school, we may well 
esteem the character of the elementary schools objects of 
chief concern. In these schools are taught reading, writ- 
ing, spelling, arithmetic, use of language (oral and writ- 
ten), grammar, geography, United States history, civil 
government, the elements of bookkeeping, the elements 
of the natural sciences (orally), and music and drawing. 
Of these thirteen subjects, the first five and the last three 
are taught in the primary grades; and this is well, for in 
the primary grades there is enrolled nearly- one half (40 
per cent) of all the pupils in our public schools; and since 
two thirds of these will end their school life before enter- 
ing upon the grammar-school course,* it is highly impor- 
tant that thej' get all the training possible in the eight 
subjects taught in the primary and middle schools. 

The elementary schools have, for the most part, been 
in excellent condition during the past year. The work, 
in chief, has been done in a painstaking, thorough, pro- 
gressive, and interesting way, — which must have resulted 
in great enjoyment, as well as profit, to all concerned. 

* See School Report for 1892, page 17. 



334 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The one and first essential for the procurement of a 
good school is a right soul for it in the form of a teacher, 
and our schools appear in general to have right teachers. 
However, there are other things necessary to the exist- 
ence of good schools, and among these are good buildings. 
We are in this respect generally well provided, but the 
Franklin-street and Amoskeag schools are very poorly 
housed, and better accommodations should be provided 
for them at an early date. The attention of the city gov- 
ernment has several times been called, in former reports, 
to needed improvements for the housing of the Franklin- 
street school; and it is at this time, therefore, unneces- 
sary to say more in behalf of this school than that its 
need of a new house becomes yearly more and more appar- 
ent and more pressing. 

New ScJioolhouse. 

The citizens of Amoskeag have, indeed, a real grievance 
that should be met and redressed at the earliest possible 
moment. The schoolhouse at Amoskeag is unquestion- 
ably the poorest in the cit}'. It is a mere shell, dingy and 
inadequate, for lack of sufficient rooms, for the proper 
accommodation of the school population in that neigh- 
borhood. 

There are but two schoolrooms in the Amoskeag house. 
In the lower room is a mixed-primary school, often over- 
crowded, and in the upper room is a school that frequently 
comprises lower-grammar, higher and lower middle, and 
one or two of the higher-primary classes; so many classes, 
indeed, that the higher grammar-school pupils have in 
recent years been obliged to attend the Webster-street 
school, much to the inconvenience of themselves and of 
their parents. The number of these higher-grade pupils 
from Amoskeag, attending at Webster street, was twenty 
during the term just closed. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 335 

It is, therefore, perfectly apparent that there is un- 
mistakable need of a new four-room schoolhouse at Amos- 
keag, for three schools should be organized there as soon 
as rooms can be had for them, — one room for grammar 
and higher-middle grades, one for lower-middle grades, 
and a class or two of higher-primary pupils, and the third 
room for the remaining primary-school pupils. The 
fourth room would, ere many years, be also needed for 
school purposes. 

This arrangement would, at the outset, result in three 
partially graded schools, averaging 30 to 40 pupils for 
each room, under a form of organization that would 
greatly enhance the value of the efforts of the two highly 
efficient teachers at Amoskeag, and also afford the people 
of that village sufficient school accommodations for secur- 
ing a complete elementary school education for their chil- 
dren within their own precincts, and that, too, when, 
otherwise, a score or more of them must be required to 
cross the Merrimack and seek a school a mile or so away. 

Clean ScJioolrooms. 

In addition to commodious and well-built houses for 
the school accommodation of the city's children, it is for- 
tunate for them that the educational influence of such 
houses is greatly enhanced by such an adornment of their 
walls as has been made through the efforts of highly inter- 
ested teachers, the foremost ladies of the city in behalf of 
the various women's clubs which they represent, and a 
few other public spirited and appreciative citizens. 

Comparatively, it becomes more than ever incumbent 
upon the school authorities to see that the schoolhouses 
are kept as clean as possible, lest the esthetic culture de- 
signed for pupils through the influence of buildings 
erected after designs of architectural beauty, with walls 
adorned by pleasing and instructive pictures and Other 
artistic decorations, shall by contrast with unnecessary 
dirt be whollv neutralized and lost. 



336 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The schoolhonses, however, should be kept clean pri- 
marily because of the necessity of such a condition for 
the preservation of the bodily health of both teachers and 
pupils; and it would seem that regulations made by the 
board for the attainment of desired cleanly co-nditions 
should be fully realized, for section two of chapter nine 
of the rules of the board reads as follows: 

'^Janitors shall perform their duties subject to the 
direction and control of the principal (or teacher of the 
hig-hest grade) of the several schools; and principals shall 
promptly report in writing to the superintendent every 
neglect of duty, and any improper conduct, upon the part 
of janitors. The superintendent shall investigate the 
occasion of each report, and inform the chairman of the 
committee on fuel and heating of the particulars." 

The committee on fuel and heating may, I think, be 
relied upon to right anj wrongs, — wdiether dependent 
upon the indisposition of a janitor to do his whole duty, 
or upon the overtaxed ability of one to discharge all the 
duties assigned him. 

The Kinden/arten. 

In my report of 1895, I alluded to the propriety of an 
early consideration of the establishment of kindergarten 
schools as a part of our public school system, and I had 
designed to write somewhat fully of their utility in this 
report, but to do so would prolong my report unduly. I 
therefore suggest, to any particularly interested in this 
subject, that information may be had in the Lewiston, Me., 
school report for 1S96, which can doubtless be had upon 
application to the superintendent of schools at Lewiston. 

J'lihlie Concern. 

Aside from the interest and efficiency of teachers em- 
ployed, and of administrative forces in charge, nothing 



! 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 337 

can so mucli improve the efficiency of schools as a deep 
and abiding interest, and the hearty co-operation, of par- 
ents and citizens in general. 

Regularity and punctuality of attendance are thereby 
chiefly attained, so also that respect for, and good-will 
toward, the teacher which causes her to be looked upon 
as a friend and fit representative of the parent. From 
interested parents, too, there is often received intelligent 
criticisms of text-books in use. When such parents in 
undertaking to aid their children in school studies find 
phraseologies beyond their own ready comprehension, 
and oft repeated, they may well question the wisdom of 
using a text-book for children which fairly well schooled 
parents cannot easily understand. 

In crucial trials between teacher and puj^il, when sus- 
pension seems to be the last resort remaining to the 
teacher, a parent deeply interested for the continued edu- 
cation of his child will generallj^ prove an efficient medi- 
ator; for teachers rarely have any prolonged trouble 
with a child who sees his parents in accord with the 
teacher's demand for what is proper and right. Nor will 
any be more ready to acknowledge errors, with due apol- 
ogies, than teachers w^hom reasonable parents may con- 
vince of mistakes or unjust inferences in regard to the 
conduct of their children. Therefore in all serious trou- 
bles between the teacher and pupil, the parent should 
early seek a personal interview with the teacher as the 
only sure means of a full and proper understanding of 
the difficulty. With this attained, there is usually an 
immediate end of the trouble in question, and the child, 
thereby saved the disgrace of possible suspension, may 
realize the full benefit of his continued schooling because 
of restored friendly feelings townrd his teacher. 

Citizens in general are friends of the public schools. 
They recognize the necessity of their existence and sup- 
port, and, for the most part, they only ask that they 



338 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

be made as efficient as possible and be conducted with due 
eeononiY. The newspapers and all persons eminent in 
the various so-called professions ar(^ likewise friends and 
loval and most efficient supporters of the public school. 
In recognition of their appreciation and friendship, it 
will be well for all in authority over the public schools 
so to conduct and administer their affairs as to retain the 
good- will and generous support so cordially given them 
by our citizens in general. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

In accordance with a plan outlined in my report of 1895, 
the evening schools have this ^ear been greatly improved. 
By requirement of the payment of fifty cents as a regis- 
tration fee and guarantee of commendable regularity of 
attendance, those enrolled in the evening schools are 
pledged to an attendance seven tenths of the evenings in 
a term. Those who fulfill the requirements of this pledge, 
as most of them do, receive their fifty cents back again at 
the end of the term. By the others the fee is forfeited 
to the evening school fund, as a penalty for the injury 
they do the school by their irregularity of attendance. 

The operation of this plan has resulted in a fullness and 
regularity of attendance that has rendered the evening 
schools far more interesting and profitable to their at- 
tendants than ever before. 

MUSIC. 

Prof. Fred B. Bower has been director and head in- 
structor of music in our schools for nearly two years. 
His work has been progressive and very satisfactory. 
His assistant is Miss Jennie C. Heath, who has also ren- 
dered excellent service. She instructs the primary and 
lower-middle grades, and the suburban schools also. 

The American Music System, introduced in the lower 
grades of our schools about three years ago, has proved 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 339 

liiohlY satisfactorv. and this year its use has been ex- 
tended throughout the grammar grades. 

At my request. Professor Bower has kindly furnished 
an outline of the work he has endeavored to have emi)ha- 
sized in the schools during the past year. His statement 
is as follows: 

"Just what has been accomplished in music during the 
last school year would take too much space to enumerate. 
I will only touch upon a few salient points. We strive to 
give pupils a good quality of tone, and so to preserve 
their voices that when they reach the age of actual voice 
culture there may be no bad habits to overcome, 

"Then, too, we try to give pupils a proper conception 
of tonal relation, i. e., the intervals of the scales in their 
relation to one another. We so train the eye and mind 
that pupils may, especially in the grammar grades, read 
any ordinary composition in two, three, and four parts 
with success and understanding. I merely touch upon 
the writing of scales, transposing them both orally and in 
writing, teaching the signatures and the key notes. 
These are means to certain ends, and have to be taught 
before proper results can be accomplished. 

"Few people outside of those actually and closely con- 
nected with the schools realize the work necessary to 
attain the ends desired; and no one appreciates more than 
I the loyalty and hard work given to music by the regular 
teachers in the schools, without whose help it would be 
impossible to reach the results already attained. I be- 
lieve that music, as taught in our schools, tends to make 
the children better, both morally and physically; gives 
to the poorer element the brighter and better side of life, 
and to those in better circumstances a nobler and more 
beautiful idea of the good and ennobling things in this, 
the greatest of all arts, music.'' 



340 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

DRAWING. 

Prof. J. Warren Tlijiig has now been special instrnclor 
of drawing a year and one term. He has given most ex- 
cellent satisfaction to all concerned. His many years of 
prior and varied experience enabled him promptly to 
recognize the advantageous features of the tine founda- 
tion laid by Mrs. Trask for advanced work in drawing, 
and he has admirably improved the opportunity. 

Professor Thyng has greatly broadened the study of 
drawing by taking pupils beyond the schoolroom, into 
the realms of nature and of practical life, and to such an 
extent that his pupils instinctively look at natural forms 
and objects of architectural beauty critically, for the pur- 
pose of determining their basic forms and noting propor- 
tions. Xothing could be more helpful to the successful 
study of drawing and a due appreciation of works of art. 

Professor Thyng's methods of instruction are not only 
pleasing but calculated to win a love for the study of 
drawing, because of the constant revelations he makes 
to pupils of the practical relations this study has to most 
ordinary, as well as extraordinaiw, things, and to nearly 
all the vocations of life. 

Upon my request of Mr. Thyng for some report of the 
main features of the work he is undertaking in our 
schools, he writes as follows: 

''Complying with your request, I beg to submit tlie 
following report as an outliue of the work in drawing in 
the public schools of this city: 

"Perhaps there is no word used to designate any other 
study pursued in the schools less significant or compre- 
hensive in meaning than the word drawing. It would be 
interesting to seek the broader definition of the word by 
going from room to room throughout the entire school 
system, — beginning at its lower-primary grade and end- 
ing with the High school. It is believed that this would 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, 341 

reveal the faet that drawing i.s something more than the 
mere deyek)pmeut of eve and hand in unison. 

"The system of instruction begins with the entering 
class of the first school rear by at once taking up simple, 
but important, principles; and it passes on from grade to 
grade and from year to year through the essentials need- 
ful in developing the arts of observation, representation, 
construction, and ornamentation. 

"These are assisted in every grade by the use of proper 
models and objects. 

"As the pupil advances in the grading of his other 
studies, a corresponding advancement is made in the 
work in drawing; new principles and new applications 
are added according to a plan calculated to insure uni- 
formity of work, grade for grade, throughout the schools. 

"At the outset, to secure accurate habits of observation 
and reliable knowledge of form, various type solids, or 
models, are used, beginning with the sphere, because its 
shape is the one oftenest seen and best known by 
children. 

"These type-forms are not studied as the aim and end 
of the work. They are taken as a basis, — a dictionary as 
it were, — by which the pupil is guided and directed in a 
portion of his work, and from which to gather facts of 
form and appearance to be used later in all branches of 
representative and constructive art. 

"The bit of claj' which the young child molds with his 
fingers into the form of a sphere, and afterwards changes 
to the shape of an apple, and then from the apple back to 
the elementary sphere again, teaches an enduring lesson 
in form study. Then, when he has drawn its outline on 
paper, and perhaps has used that circle as the unit de- 
sign, and picked up some little truth of color, his feet 
have fairly started in the right path. 

"Thus, so far as they have constructional or artistic 
value, all the various type-forms are used, according to 



342 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

grade. As the work advances, they are employed to ex- 
emplify the principles involved in working drawings, and 
also to assist in teaching the art of representation, or free- 
hand perspective, it being the aim all the time to have 
each principle help another and all lead to something. 
Any one who will set before himself an object, and study 
it with reference to its proportions only, will learn how to 
see it. Then, if he will begin by drawing what seems to 
be its leading line, he will learn how to draw it. 

"The models are used for the elementary study of light 
and shade; they also are the prototypes of many artificial 
and natural objects, being represented in nature by vege- 
table and mineral forms. It is important, all along, to 
constantly associate and compare with type-forms as 
many other objects as possible. If the aim of the study 
of the facts of form in the schoolroom, from models, is to 
lead pupils to correctly estimate proportion of parts in 
constructive art, so the observation of appearances of 
form trains the eye to estimate at a glance comparative 
size and position in a multitude of things he may after- 
wards wish to describe, draw, or make. To accom- 
plish this a great variety of objects are placed, in many 
different positions, before the pupils. 

"Little is done by dictation, and less by vague observa- 
tion; after knowledge of facts of appearance is secured, 
then follow memory and time lessons; the former as a 
test, and the latter to secure rapid execution. 

"Attention is paid to the ornamental treatment of plant 
forms, both historically and as they are used for decora- 
tive purposes to increase the market value of certain 
manufactured i^roducts. 

"Color lessons which include the i)rimary, secondary, 
and tertiary colors are given; tints and hues, also. 

"Pupils, each according to his age, bring drawings, 
both constructive and representative, made at home from 
objects seen there. It adds vital interest to the work 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 343 

when they make sketclies of things suggested by a visit 
to a workshop, or by a journey, or a walk in the garden 
or field. In winter, at home, it may be that sketches of 
a house or tower, as seen from a window\ are made; or a 
working drawing for a sled is designed by the evening 
lamp. 

''Plant forms afford valuable materials for nature 
drawing. Color has been used, with pleasing results, in 
some higher grammar grades. It may be used profitably 
to indicate color values in vegetable, mineral, and plant 
forms, as well as to suggest different woods and metals in 
construction drawings; likewise in decorative design. 

''All along, the higher educational value of the work is 
kept in view. 

"Opportunity has been taken to bring into service such 
materials as conduce to make the W'Ork seem alive, and to 
extend its usefulness. Models of buildings and other 
structures, made by pupils, have furnished material for 
lessons, and occasionally a pupil has posed for the draw- 
ing class w:ith good results. 

"In all my work the constant and valuable assistance 
of teachers has been accorded me. 

"It has been the aim, when arranging drawing lessons 
for normal classes in the Training school, to have the 
work assist in equipping the teacher for duty in the 
school-room. 

"^Mlile waiting for the complete furnishing of the large 
drawing room in the High school, I have given the ten 
classes in drawing, numbering some over two hundred 
members, a series of lessons in practical perspective, tak- 
ing up the w^ork where the grammar schools leave it, to 
enable pupils to enter upon individual work with more 
strength and personal independence. The classification 
will include elementary machine drawling and building 
construction ; object and cast drawing in light and shade 
with charcoal; the art of illustrating with pen and ink, 



344 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

using models built by pupils; wator-eolor painting; model- 
ing in clay and freehand perspective." 

REPAIRS OP SCHOOLHOUSES. 

The data for this part of the school report were kindly 
furnished by Capt. Charles H. Manning, chairman of com- 
mittee on repairs of schoolhonses, and the following state- 
ments, estimates, and opinions substantially represent 
the facts and views presented b}^ Captain Manning. 

The school board asked for an appropriation of 10,000 
for the repairs of schoolhonses during the year 1897. The 
city government granted only |3,000 for repairs upon 
school property whose estimated valuation is |550,000. 
The appropriation granted was, therefore, less than |5.50 
for repairs upon each |1,000 worth of school property. 
When it is considered that "repairs of schoolhonses" 
also include repairs of furniture, heating and ventilating 
apparatus, fences, and walks, it becomes self-evident 
that an appropriation, made upon the ratio of the allow- 
ance granted this year, is not more than half enough 
under ordinary conditions. 

Owing to an early and serious report of the board of 
health in regard to defects alleged to exist in the sani- 
tary arrangements of several schoolhonses, and also be- 
cause of unavoidable repairs upon the roofs of several 
large houses, as well as the imperative need of numerous 
small repairs in the schoolhonses generallv, it was impos- 
sible to keep the school property in proper usable condi- 
tion without expenditures much exceeding the appropi'i- 
ation of the |3,000 granted. 

Upon pulling apart the water-closet arrangements at 
the Ash-street schoolhouse, they were found in such a 
decayed condition it was (with the mayor's approval) 
deemed unwise to attempt their repair. A large sum was 
here required for a proper new equipment. The arrange- 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 345 

merits were renewed, are now highly satisfactory, and 
tirst class in every particular. 

The recommendations of the board of health in regard 
to plumbing at the Webster-street school were carried 
out to the satisfaction of said board. 

Only such repairs on plumbing at the Franklin-street 
school as were unavoidable were made this year, but ex- 
tensive renewals will be needed at that house next year. 

Plumbing arrangements at the Main-street schoolhouse 
are only fairly satisfactory. At the Training school they 
are unsatisfactorj', and poorly located. The plumbing 
there will ere long need to be renewed, and removed from 
present dark quarters. All the other large schoolhouses 
have modern plumbing in good condition. 

At the Webster-street school, there were repairs of the 
roof and belfry. Partitions in the north hallway were re- 
moved to afford more light and better ventilation. The 
outside of this house will need repainting during the com- 
ing year. 

At the Pearl-street house a few slight changes were 
this fall made to satisfy criticisms provoked on account 
of the appearance of diphtheria, though this disease was 
not believed by the committee to have originated at the 
school. 

The Ash-street school roof was made tight, though a 
hard one to repair. The ventilation of this school is not 
good; and during the coming year a new boiler should 
take the place of an old one there, which would furnish 
additional needed heat and also provide means for secur- 
ing proper ventilation. 

A new fence was built around a part of the Spring- 
street lot, and minor repairs were made about the school- 
house. 

The Franklin-street house is old and difficult to keep 
in repair. This year several new window sash were pro- 
Tided, the fence fixed, and other minor repairs made. 



346 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

At the Training scliool, the boiler should be replaced 
by a new one for sake of economy of fuel and because 
the present boiler is too old for much further use. 

The Lincoln-street school roof was repaired. This is 
another of the difficult and costly roofs to keep in order. 
The assembly hall ceiling was repaired of damages caused 
by the leaky roof. Considerable kalsomining was also 
done at this house. There are entry partitions here that 
should be removed to improve the light and ventilation. 

At the Hallsville school the roof was repaired, some 
replastering was done, and minor repairs were also 
made. 

The Bakersville chimneys were repaired, and the 
schoolroom ceilings and walls redressed. 

At the Varney school, ceilings and interior walls w^ere 
also redressed. This house is now in excellent condition. 

At the ]\Iain-street house chimneys were repaired, and 
four of the schoolrooms Avere provided with new slate 
blackboards. During the coming year there should be 
new floors in the hallways, outside painting should be 
done, and a new boiler provided. The one there has been 
in use about twenty years, and is not of sufficient capacity. 

The Amoskeag schoolhouse, like that on Franklin 
street, is old, poor, a constant bill of expense, and insuffi- 
cient in number of schoolrooms. A new house is imper- 
atively needed. 

At the Goffe's Falls school, the ceilings and interior 
walls were redressed. 

The furniture in several of the schoolhouses above 
named was also redressed. 

The committee on repairs of schoolhouses estimate 
that for the coming year |9,1)00 will be needed for general 
repairs and to provide for new boilers and needed im- 
provements in the plumbing of several schoolhouses. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 347 
CONCLUSION. 

The year's work of the schools has resulted in a large 
measure of success. The school board has been harmo- 
nious, alert, and acted with wisdom in its endeavors to 
promote the good of the schools. The various committees 
have given prompt and effective attention to the needs 
of their several departments. The attentive truant ofli- 
cer and the efficient clerk in my office, so long faithful and 
true to her duties, have greatly aided and lightened my 
labors. Our teachers, always harmonious, and ever co- 
operative for the good of the schools, have earnestly 
labored for the moral and mental improvement of their 
pupils. School life is consequently ever growing more 
profitable, pleasanter, and more enjoyable. 

In such results I exceedingly rejoice, extending thanks 
of high appreciation to all. I may be pardoned, I trust, 
for saying that I esteem it a high honor to be accounted 
the executive officer in a cause and work so great, noble, 
and good. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK, 

i^upcrintendoit. 
December 31, 1897. 



NEW HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING. 



The following? description has been kindly furnished by 
the architect, Mr. William M. Butterfield: 

The main body of the building, fronting, the south, is 
118 feet by 54 feet, with a. wing at each end 10 feet by 80 
feet, slightly advanced from the main front and extend- 
ing 28 feet to the rear of the main body, also with a central 
wing 28 feet by 56 feet extended to the rear. 

A corridor 12 feet wide extends from end to end along 
the north side of the building, and all classrooms are 
arranged upon the east, west, and southerly exposures 
to light and air. 

The central wing is occupied on the first floor by the 
apartments for the principal and the library, while the 
toilet rooms for both sexes adjoin the outer wings. 

In the basement provision is made for an armory 25 
feet by 92 feet, and for toilet and recreation rooms; a por- 
tion can also be devoted to purposes of manual training, 
lunch rooms, etc., as may be required in the future. 

Six classrooms 25 feet by 36 feet are provided in the 
first story and eight in the second story, each being pro- 
vided with wardrobes, bookcases, a teacher's closet, and 
lavatories; each room is also equipped with a system of 
electric clocks with program alarm, and a telephone sys- 
tem connecting each room with the principal's room. 

In the third story of the west wing, there are chemical 
and physical laboratories, each connected with a lecture 
room provided with raised seats; a large drawing-room, 
a museum, and a classroom are similarly situated on the 
same floor of the east wing. 

The central portioil of the third story is occupied by a 

348 





t__ .,_J IBSS P» 

t„,™. i_i^ pi^w 1^ 

y..,™, '.lis IBl 



•"x 



~— 




»~»» 


^ 


J™..- 


- — ; 


fEsm 


fm. 


.,_— 


. :s' 


p::^ 


mm, 


— -. 


^„iW ' 


p^*^^ 


JGa. 


w,-^. 


.-^sa 


W^.«: 


»«««, 


>>._.._„ 


HUM! 


|um 


«„ 


,H_ — 




|e>«R 


.„. 


^.'— — 




• fS<IR 


1?* 


»*,«» 


»tt.llll» 


P» 


,' — -■ 


ItxKK 




pB* 


-- 


rr 







REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 349 

beautiful assembly hall, 52 feet by 66 feet, with a spa- 
cious stage and anterooms, and it has a seating capacity 
of 600. 

For telescopic observations the building is provided 
with a revolving observatory constructed above the roof, 
which is provided with a shutter that may be opened from 
the horizon to the zenith, the whole being operated by sim- 
ple mechanical means. 

The building is designed in the modified renaissance 
style, the exterior walls being faced with buff pressed 
brick, and relieved with terra cotta and molded sand- 
stone trimmings. There are four richly carved entrances. 

All walls along the interior corridors and stairways 
are also faced with buff and molded brick, and the ceil- 
ings throughout are finished with paneled metal work 
and decorated in buif and ivory tints. 

The walls of the laboratories are also faced with brick, 
the floors of which are asphalt. The staircases are iron, 
the treads being filled with asphalt. 

The building is provided with a complete system of 
heating and ventilation, by what is commonly known as 
the supplementary system of indirect radiation, by means 
of coils. The fresh air is supplied from a blower, or fan, 
located in the basement, capable of changing the air in 
each room every fifteen minutes. The supplementary coils 
are controlled automatically by means of thermostats 
placed in each room, the rooms being severally provided 
with foul air ventilating ducts leading to the main stacks. 

The interior is finished with western ash, the rooms 
being girted with a wainscoting of molded sheathing and 
slate blackboards. The floors are of birch, and the win- 
dows are supplied with Venetian shades. 

DEDICATORY EXERCISES. 

The new high-school building was dedicated on the 
afternoon of September K), 1S9T. with appropriate exer- 



350 ' ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

cises, the character of which may be nnderstood from the 
following 

PROGRAM. 

Music, ''Unfold, Ye Portals" Gounod 

Selected chorus of fifty voices, representing the public 

schools, under the direction of Prof. F. B. Bower. 
Invocation, Rev. B. W. Lockhart, D. D. 

Chorus, ''Anchored" Watson 

Eeport of the building committee, with the delivery of 
the building to the city, by Alderman George W. Keed, 
chairman of committee on lands and buildings. 
Acceptance of the building and delivery of the keys to 
the high-school sub-committee, by Mayor William C. 
Clarke. 

Chorus, "Heaven and Earth Display" Mendelssohn 

Acceptance of the keys on behalf of the high-school sub- 
committee, and delivery of keys to the principal of the 
school, by Capt. Charles H. Manning, chairman high- 
school sub-committee. 
Acceptance of the keys, with address, by Prof. Albert 
Somes, principal of the school. 

Chorus, "March of Our Nation" Geibel 

Dedicatory address, "How far shall we make Utility the 
end of Modern Education," Rev. William J. Tucker, 
D. D., president of Dartmouth College. 
Music, "America." 

A pleasant feature of the occasion was the presence 
upon the stage of Mrs. C. W. Wallace, the first graduate 
of the High school, and also of the following former mas- 
ters of the school: David P. Perkins, Samuel Upton, Wil- 
liam W. Colburn, Joseph G. Edgerly, and Edwin R. 
Goodwin. 

After the acceptance of the building by Mayor Clarke, 
who delivered the keys to Capt. Charles H. Manning, 
chairman of the high-school sub-committee. Captain Man- 
ning spoke as follows: 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 351 

"Ah ihe representative of the higii-scliool siib-com- 
mittee, it affords me j-reat pleasure to receive these Iceys 
as a token that this magniflceut building is now ready for 
the use for which it has been constructed. We of the 
committee have felt and have urged the need of a new 
building for some years past, and when His Honor Mayor 
Clarke came into office some two years and a half ago, 
we knew from the deep interest he has always taken in 
the city schools that our time had come. How well he, 
with the aid of two able lands and buildings committees, 
has met the needs, no one who has inspected this building 
needs to be told, as it far surpasses the brightest dreams 
any of us dared indulge in. I will merely add that we 
thank the mayor, the city government, and above all the 
taxpayers that pay the bills, for the finest high school in 
the New England states, and pledge ourselves to do our 
best to make worthy use of it. 

"To you, Mr. Somes, master of a school worthy to 
occupy such a building, I deliver the charge of these keys, 
knowing full well and with entire confidence that you 
with the aid of your accomplished assistants, will make 
such use of the building as will redound to the credit of 
the city." 

Principal Somes made an appropriate replv. He was 
followed by Rev. William J. Tucker, D. D.. president of 
Dartmouth College, who delivered a highly instructive 
and eloquent dedicatory address upon the subject given 
in the program. 

Following the close of the exercises, a committee was 
appointed to secure the organization of a general alumni 
association. 

In the evening the various rooms of the new school- 
house were taken possession of by classes of the old 
school, from 1848, the class in which Mrs. C. W. Wallace' 
graduated, to the class of 1897. 



352 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Good fellowsliip prevailed, permeated with memories 
of days gone by, days of long ago — some of them very 
long ago, ere the hair was tinged with gray or the A'oice 
was weakened by age, — but it was a pleasant occasion. 
All were young again. All lived over those hours of 
high-school life, with its joys, its many attractions, its 
trials, — which were then looked upon as so heavy but now 
as so trivial. All once more were seated before the 
teacher's eye, poring over the science of Euclid or Gre- 
cian and Latin lore. 

The new high-school building was alive from basement 
to dome. There was not a dull corner in the place. Youth 
and old age — no, youth and renewed youth — occupied 
the institution but a few hours before dedicated to 
knowledge. All met with a handshake and words of well 
wishing. Alumni were kings and queens.' They ruled. 

These gatherings will have a lasting effect upon the 
classes that have graduated from the High school. Many 
of them had no permanent alumni organization. In the 
evening the greater part of them organized and voted to 
hold reunions at stated intervals. All who were notified 
in time also chose representatives to the general alumni 
association. 

Several of the classes held reunions at the homes of 
members. These also proved very enjoyable. They were 
conducted on the same informal plan generally, and for 
this reason were all the more delightful. 



APPENDIX. 

I. Population, etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 

V. Attendance Tables. 

VI. Truancy. 

VII, Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1896-1897. 

IX. High School Graduating Class. 

X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

XI. Organization of Committees, 1897-1898. 

XII. List of Teachers, 1898. 

XIII. School Year, 1897-1898. 

353 

33 



APPENDIX. 

STATISTICS. 

1.— Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1890 43,983 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 



II.— Schoolhouses. 

Number of schoolhouses in use 24 

Number of schoolhouses not in use 

Number of school rooms used for day schools *115 

Number of rooms used for High-school classes 9 

Number of rooms used for Grammar schools 29 

Number of rooms used for Middle schools 25 

Number of rooms used for Primary schools f44 

Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools 2 

Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools 5 

Number of rooms used for Manual Training schools. . 1 



III.— Schools. 

(AU for both sexes.) 

Number of High schools (buildings) . 

None exclusively Grammar. 

« An average of 114 for the entire year. 
t An average of 43 for the entire year. 

354 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 355 

Number of combined Grammar and lower grade 

(Middle and Primary) schools 12 

Number of combined Middle and Primary schools. . 4 

Number of schools all Primary grade 2 

Number of Ungraded schools 5 



IV.— Teachers. 

Male teachers in the High school 3 

Female teachers in the High school 6 

Female teachers in the Training school 2 

Male teachers in the Grammar schools 6 

Female teachers in the Grammar schools (a)29 

Female teachers in the Middle schools (6)24 

Female teachers in the Primary schools (p)"^^ 

Female teachers in the Partially Graded schools. . 2 

Male teachers in the Ungraded schools 1 

Female teachers in the Ungraded schools 4 

Male teachers in Manual Training school 1 

Special teachers 3 

Average number of male teachers (c)13 

Average number of female teachers (c)108 

Total average number of teachers in day schools. . . 121 

Male teachers in the evening schools 7 

Female teachers in the evening schools 5 

Average number of male teachers in the evening 

schools 5 

Average number of female teachers in the evening 

schools 4 

Male teachers in the evening Drawing schools 2 

Average number of male teachers in the evening 

Drawing schools 2 

(a) Six of the 29 are masters' assistants. 

(6) One of the 25 miclrlle schools and 3 of the 44 primaries were in the Train- 
ing school. They had no regular teachers, being taught by sub-teachers 
under the direction of the principal and her assistant. 

(c) Including special teachers. 



356 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 






iCijep 89VJ8AV 



■3ai2ao[9q 



o an 
= S 



b 



>, 

o 

n 



. g- 



S ii d S g o 

"» 2 H •," w •" S 
. CO 5 



o; Q - 



1 " C8.S ^ 

J M -^ S "t; 
o a, . u „M^ 



.a' 



■«J !i W ^ |i( H S 02 -al 



'^ ,^ * <* .2 




05 O IC^ lO 
^ O tN — ^ 1 CO 

wi Oi a a \ Oi 



11 eoco c<5 

O OS C-. OS 



CO (neoeo 



rt inco"* 



05 »c OIO 
M wn< CO 



o 0«ON 



(M r-iricq 



lO ooco t- 



o» loeooj 



•paiioj 
-U9 -Oil 9ioqA\ 



tC COlOt- 






■» o s S 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



357 



CQ ^ h ^ bn 

I; P;d » a> 





H. Hu 
Barker 
Rowe. 
Batch 


.£3 

2 


U 
Is 

Stq 


William 
Ella F. 
Olive A. 
Katie E 


>> 



eo 05000 i-( 

o> ooooos ~ 






^ ^ ^ cc 



00 oon<-i 



i-i CO eoeoiM 



Oi oi a <ji 



00 00 (-0093 

to CO iNcon 



O O Of— I (M 

t~" ^ CO ^ ^ 



OS T* TftOOO 

11 IN .-ii-ie» 



•*co 



CO 1-1 CD OS 

i-H CO OS t- 









C^ C-l CO I 05 1-t N CO 



CO lOio I 

rl rt IM 



« eob-io 



5D iCCOtO 



CO t^io«o 

<fl rllMO^ 



SI- OS 



OS 00 00 o 

>o o »o lo 



00 OOOSiO 



* H 



p -o 



5.S 3 

0) J3 o 



n o 






s ^ 



358 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



M 
o 
< 

H 


Nellie C. Parker. 

Amy K. Northrup. 

Emma L. McLaren. 

Fannie D. Moulton. 
( C. E. Wing, Principal, 
j Blanche L. Baclielder, Assistant. 

Mabelle E. Porter. 

Bessie E. Dodge. 

Emma J. Cooper. 

Kittie J. Ferren. 

Millie S. Morse. 

Mary J. Walsh. 

Mary W. Mitchell. 

Gertrude A. Burns. 

Mary A. Seavey. 

Edith L. Hammond. 

Jean Gillan. 

Cora M. Farmer. 

Augusta S. Downs. 

Susie G. Woodman. 

Mary L. Ayer. 

Cora B.Gilford. 

Harriet H. Richardson. 

Mary G. Tynan. 

Nellie M. Smith. 

Mary E. Moulton. 




•gouB 
-pae^^B itjiBp 
JO qa90 ' J9J 


C^t-0!>H t- t-OOr-lCOlOt-— It-I«>.-I03r-10(MIOM-*CO.-I 


■* 

o 
at 


cJ<-it~od lo — l-.co<^i'^^coc^3(NmT1<loo6l^idoo— ico.-ioi 

OOOlCCOO 00 C5C5C5C-. CSC5C-. C5O>OJa>CC;O5C3O5C3O5O3O500 


•9oaBpn9:HB 

iClIBp 9SBJ9AV 


Mcococo ■* -* •* CO CO ca .* M 05 c^ m eo <M CO CO eo CO .* d ^ c^i co 


•3u!3uo[9q 

•Oil 93BJ9AY 


t-0"i|N 05 00 03 IM 00 (5><0 <>) CO 05 t- -< t^ CO O O IM to 00 50 00 
COCO-*'* •* ■**«i<COCOTj<COCO(MCOTI<<MCOniTl<T)<*(N->JI(N 






3 


•*cooor^ CO <N la m oio-* 1NIOC5C0100 t-iM ■*eq (Dooco t- 


s 


1 

P3 


^00 lO^ CO <35lMC005COOSIO,-(e^OCO^^kOOOCOOOiMt.-.-c* 
(MrHC^KM CO (N(N(NrHeirtrH(MC^iq!N<N«(NC^C4eOrHe<5i-l 


1 


•pgnoj 
-U9 -OK 9ioqAi 


ojt-oco o o— le^ iocn(N oo:iocnO(N oooiO>-it-cD-*^ 

tOOCDl^ « COCOiaiOIOCOl010'>a<"J<OTl<-*COl^CD50{00* 




c 



3 

d 


MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

Franklin-street, Higher 

" Lower 

Spring-street, Higher 

" Lower 

Merrimack-street, Lower 

Lincoln-street, Higher 

" Lower 

" Lower 

" Lower 

Main-street Higher 

" Lower 

Rimmon, INIixed 

Webster-street, Higher 

Bakersville, Higher 

Hallsville, Higher , 

Wilson, Higher ". 

Pearl street. Higher. 

Parker, Mixed 


■< 

g 

O 
O 

a 

.J 

Q 
C 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



359 



El 



§ o3 S 
«'2 c g o 



:2_roM 



g ta irt . . ^ M p4 






ti>> -8.5 = 



i a«.2 8 






5.2 <D.2 



>- •, -e « ® 
-^- E « 2 g'-5 aj 



S3 


.S-'S 


a . *i 






IB 4i C 






<i; .M a « 


II 
SO 

A ■ 




Tuttl 
E. Hie 
Cleme 
. Clem 








^t 


^.s 


02 2.<"ft 

.2o >,® 


Co 


•^ tS 


"S t8 =« -g 


SS 


oa 


K5S3 



> • a .ji 3 

(B 'o o a> o o 

. i^ a 2 fe o J! J2 . 

B = .S.o5£Btef1 

• M tj. I. O « •- -3 . S c 

a o &j'^ • ■ m * 
:S2«.g£t.2§£i 

I g S tsi <5 «= W Q ra 03 ^ 



00 QO X 00 C5 CO 00 CO 03 Ci C5 05 00 00 05 00 Oi Ca 05 00 00 00 C5 CT! Ci C5 O CS CO 00 CS 00 Ci 00 CO 00 



r}<>J<^T)<l»lcl0O t-lOOCMCO — OC^OOtC ^ t- i-H h- O lO ej in M CD lO CO — " to t- Ig 00 w 

05 (N to CO CO CO e^ c^ •* ■* Ti< ■* « (M o CO CO C0 1< ■<*'*in so co co co co eo co co '^ co co co <» co 

i-H t- 00 00 o »-i « — I o ■-! CO to -< ■* — • lo -- o CO Tjit-to CO ooiOQO!gog;£-eoc3:ig5S2? 

^ IM CO CO ■* ^ CO CO lO lO ^ rtl ■* (N CO CO >* tH ^ lO >*> O CO CO CO CO CO Tt< CO CO •* '^ "* CO CO CO 

.HOsiM--t-cDt~cortO-*coxiioo5yioo— ito oo«o t-t-t-e'Ot-'*coj"Oa3;g;2jn 

COT-ICOeO<MCOC^04COCOC^<NC^i^^^C4COCOCO C0C41O CIC^^C^CQi-HrHCOtN-^fNCOr-ICO 



1^ ^ OeO 00 t-O^ C^ to CD^ IM CO— ^ Ca lO<N 00 Oi OOCON 00 CDOO e^ Ti< QOtH OO^ b- ^^ »c 



!2g 



CO <— I CO 00 tH CC !M -^ C^ CO CO CO -r <M i-« CO CO <N ;0 -^ CO 00 I— ( CO ri iM CO C<1 CO n< CO CO I— I (N C^ CO 



t-'COrJ^h-OO'^OOQO^COCOC^COt-i-HlOOcNlO rfirtir-- OCiC^OOCDt-p-iOOOOf-iiOTfCO 

CDCOCDCOt-t-OCOCDO^COt-COiCCCOSO". CJ COtM"*:** lOCClOtDi:iiO^GOCOt— CDOWt- 






MX g 









be & & 



, ^ <D <D U ^ ^ 

' .c .a .a ^ ® ^ 

^ I X ffi K hj iJ ij 






taoS- 



"= a 



g .a 



g'sa 



■^ ^ s 



s s 



360 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



JO ;a8D jaj 



•9onBpa9;;B 
X[rep 93BJ9AY 



•Sa;3aoi9q 



"So » 



=•«•!§ 



SS ® — S .2 s ■& 






3S 



O00!0Tj<lC00t-U5 (M 

cj « in -^ t- iri (N t-^ lei 

Ci CO 00 Ci 00 00 05 00 I CO 



OrHrH(M«t-OOlO 



eoco CO 



o t-minooiM-Ho -2 

lO M M CO CO M ^ >Jt " 



CO'* t- 



• 'd o 

■^ 2 « o,.£ 

gai §^ 



ooe<>ooM 
oini»t-^!o 

00 00 t— t- CO 



^1 1- to t- lO 



lO o<-<o»e3 



00 CO 

05 05 



COOJ 
I—OS 

TjTco 






t-oofcqooooosoo 



f eqooooosc 

■*!NrHi-(r<< 



05CD'*'* (-50C<I10 
(M<MeOff>Cqi-ICN<N 



•pgijoj 
-a9 •0)j 9joq^ 



OOCDOOlOlOCOint- 



t- CO OS 00 t- 



°3 



ON OO'i'OO 



05 t- 



t-CS 05C0 OS 



tCkS 



;r^ o o 01 



a 2 



sS 



^^p: 



5-3 °. . — - 



So 






o •^.s 



be be 
bid bo 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 361 



DAY SCHOOLS. 



Summary of attendance upon the several grades of 
public day schools for the year 1896-1897. 



Gbadss. 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Partially graded 
Ungraded 

Totals, 1897 
Totals, 1896 



Whole numbe' 
different pupils. 



Boys. Girls. 



153 

612 

578 

1,366 

38 

52 



2,799 

2,772 



175 
649 
&49 
1,234 
41 
54 



2,702 
2,610 



o to 
^.5 



S i 



290 

1,085 

979 

1,716 

72 

71 



4,213 
3,999 



278 

1,007 

885 

1,532 

67 

57 



3,826 
3,651 



OS « 



95.9 
92.8 
90.4 
89.2 
93.1 
80.3 



90.8 
91.3 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Summary of attendance upon the several grades of 
public evening schools for the year 1896-1897. 



Schools. 


Whole number 
different pupils. 


d . 

^ SB 

p 

It 


is 

11 

1^ 


ill 




Boys. 


Girls. 


^ " 5 




95 


110 
43 


* 48 
53 
65 
21 
15 


42 

46 
57 
19 
13 


87.5 




88.5 




86 
31 
25 


87.7 




90.5 


Drawing schools \ 


86.6 






Totals, 1897 


237 

288 


153 
160 


201 
174 


177 
140 


80.4 


Totals, 1896 


80.5 







862 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Evening School Teachers. 

Charles E. Cocliran, principal at Merchants' Exchange, 
for boys. 

Assistants — William J. Mooar, A. W. Rowell, W. W. 
Forbes, and L. H. Carpenter. 

Honorie J. Crough, principal of Franklin-street school, 
for girls. 

Assistants — Maggie Linen, Sarah B. Dunbar, and Mary 
E. Paige. 

Arthur W. Morgan, principal of Rimmon school, for 
both sexes. 

Assistants — Julius Hegewald and Tilla E. Johnson. 

Evening Drawing- School Teachers. 
John M. Kendall and Henry W. Allen. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 



Sub-teachers. Graduated. Sub-teachers. " Entered 

Bessie Cochrane. Jan. 29, '97. Gertrude Adams. Feb. 1, 

Maude M. Greaney. " " Annie B. Angell. 

Mary L. Heath. " " Mary E. McLaren. 

Mabel F. Robinson. " " Grace A. Phillips. 

Katharine Frain. June 25, " Ede B. Quimby. 

Lura B. Gage. " " Flora M. Walker. 

Florence L. Abbott. Jan. 28, '98. Elizabeth F. Walsh. 

Lillian F. Crowther. " " 

Winnifred W. Hall. 

Florence Richardson " " 



97. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 363 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



The following table presents the main features of inter- 
est pertaining to the attendance upon the public schools 
for the last ten years. A similar report for twenty years 
may be found in Report for 1896, page 15. 



1888< 
1889 
1890 
1891, 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 



78 

77 

77 

84 

89 

96 1 
101 
105 
108 
114 



2 


« 






A 


.£ 


^ 


Q< 








a M 


^^ 


u° 






« a 


11 


•< 


1^ 


77 


3,712 


76 


3,787 


76 


3,814 


83 


4,071 


89 


4,298 


101 


4,775 


107 


4,975 


111 


5,206 


115 


5,382 


121 


5,501 



2,768 
2,801 
2,795 
2,940 
3,130 
3,425 
3,662 
3,817 
3,999 
4,313 



2S 



2,5C0 
2,58) 
2,536 
2,689 
2,837 
3,111 
3,336 
3,499 
3,651 
3,826 






90.3 
92.2 
90.7 
91.5 
90.6 
90.8 
91.1 
91.7 
91.3 
90.8 



116 
177 
141 
166 
174 
194 
153 
238 
140 
177 



a^ 

U 

■a o o 



"a 



101 
121 
120 
116 
129 
175 
168 
138 
215 



g a « 




80 


*58 


96 


73 


114 


83 


101 


69 


103 


67 


127 


78 


162 


112 


156 


112 


130 


119 


212 


1E7 



185 
181 
184 
217 
2?6 
2S7 
251 
243 
270 
290 



* Including special teachers, principals, assistants, etc. 
t And the A class in suburban schools. 

t Also a manual training school for one term, which is included in the number of schools 
the next four years. 



364 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



VI.— Work of Truant Officer. 



Date. 



Absentees 

reported 

from 



No. volun- 
tarily re- 
turned to 



No. reported 

caused to 

attend 



O 3 






o"o.9 



September. 
October . . . 
November . 
December . 
January ... 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Totals . 



33 

92 
55 
16 
99 
47 
87 
74 
100 
74 



677 



19 
62 
33 
6 
30 
29 
17 
44 
38 
28 



46 



79 



13 

45 

37 

4 

28 
23 
51 
47 
58 
37 



12 
33 
20 
1 
23 
15 
12 
34 
31 
17 



198 



29 



107 



9 

21 
9 
11 
40 
12 
20 
10 
19 
14 



165 



September 
October . . . 
November . 
December . 
January . . . 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 



46 
128 
33 
10 
49 
39 
15. 
63 
42 
25 



No. truants 
caused to 
to attend. 



28 
80 
14 
5 
17 
23 
10 
33 
21 
15 



18 
48 
19 

5 
32 
16 

5 
30 



164 
194 
247 
131 
350 
149 
139 
132 
268 
211 



t->e 


£ 














,Q 




2-e 

2§ 


td « 


. O.S 


fi, o 






o o o. 


653 


t5. 


iz; 



•211 



109 
287 
257 
147 
407 
179 
193 
205 
215 
165 



H 
■11 



73 
45 
16 
35 
39 
•22 
88 
51 
57 
31 



Totals . 



450 



245 



205 



1,985 



2,164 



16 



407 



KEPORT OP THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 365 

Vll.— Finances.— 1897. 



Items op Account. 



Resources from 

appropriations and 

transfers. 


Expenditures. 


$77,037.17 


$77,037.17 


59.13 


59.13 


6,320.36 


6,320.36 


1,451.8-4 


1,451.84 


5,872.74 


5,872.74 


5,720.28 


5,720.28 


6,628.26 


6,628.26 


304 43 


304.43 


3,111.94 


3,111.94 


1,388.15 


1,388.15 


364.36 


364.36 


1,370.86 


1,370.86 


$109,629.52 


$109,629.52 



Salaries of teachers 

Books and stationery 

Free text-books and supplies 

Furniture and supplies 

Repairs 

Care of rooms 

Fuel 

Printing and advertising. . . . 

Contingent expenses 

Evening common schools . . . 
Evening drawing schools. . . . 
Manual training 

Totals 



COST OF CITY SCHOOLS. 

Expenditures, as above specified |109,629.52 

Salaries. 

Members of the school board $190.00 

Clerk of the board 150.00 

Superintendent of schools 2,300.00 

Truant officer 750.00 

Total $113,019.52 

Receipts on Account of ScJiools. 

Literary fund $3,511.68 

Non-resident tuition* 387.92 

Sale of text-books • 208.68 

Total $4,108.28 

* School tax from Londonderry included, $38.87. 



366 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Net amount raised by taxation $109,111.24 

The city valuation for 1897 is |30,407,302; and hence 
the rate of school tax for the year is |109,lll-24 divided 
by 130,407,302, or .0035 plus. Last year the rate was 
.0034. 



VIII.— School Year, 1896-1897. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 14, 1896; 
closed December 18. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened January 4, 1897 ; 
closed March 26, 1897. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 12, 1897; 
closed June 25. Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above 
by the school board, 185, 

Average number of days the schools were taught, 175. 

(Being closed several holidays, days of "Teachers' Institutes," and half 
days on account of bad weather or insufficient heat.) 



IX.— High School Graduation. 

PROGRAM. 

Salutatory. "Evolution." 

Arthur Ela Buck. 

Chorus. "The Caravan" C. Pinsuti 

The Class. 

Class History Florence Howard James 

Oration. "Existing National Perils." 
Channing Harris Cox. 

Chorus. "Over the Fields of Clover Giebel 

The Class. 
With feolos by Miss Kane and Miss Browning. 

Class Poem .Bessie Louisa Neal 

Prophecy George Frederick Somes 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 367 

Chorus. "Estudiantina" P. Lacome 

The Class. 
Valedictory. "Education and Public Morals," 
Chester Edward Dimick. 

Award of Diplomas Rev. N. L. Colby 

The Ode. 

The Class of '97. 
Clara Vienna Clement, Class Pianist. 

ENGLISH COURSE, THREE YEARS. 

Libbie May Badger, Alfred Stanley Hoyt. 

Gladys May Baker. Theodore Mason Josselyn. 

Eda Marian Barr. Elizabeth Eleanor Kane. 

Florence Elizabeth Cass. David Clinton Lamprey. 

Michael Daniel Cody. James F. Macdonald. 

Frank Paj^son French. Kathryn A. McKeon. 

Sadie A. Gillan. Lucile Annie Patch. 

Abbie Monica Greaney. Richard W. Sanborn. 

Annie Frances Harrington. Guy Benjamin True. 

ENGLISH COURSE, FOUR YEARS. 

Annie Esther Walsh. 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

Mertie Amy Browning. Joseph Nightingale. 

Clara Vienna Clement. Sarah Price. 

Sybil Grace Crosby. Jessie Emma Patten. 

Herbert Earle Dunnington. Mary Estella Tallis. 

Walter Weeks Eastman. Charlotte L. True. 

Alice Fitzpatrick. Harriett Bailey Veasey. 

Lizzie Marie Flanders. Florence Margaret Ward. 

William Clark Hall. Grace Mabel Whittemore. 

Lora Etta Hill. Jennie Viola Williamson. 
Florence Howard James. 



368 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

COLLEGE COURSE, 

Arthur Ela Buck. Bessie Louisa Neal, 

Channing Harris Cox, Clinton Stanley Osgood. 

Chester Edward Dimick. Donald Taylor Page. 
George Frederick Somes. 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Bertha Mae Fogg. 

TWO years' CERTIFICATE. 

Ernest E. Austin. William Hilton Eaton. 

Harry J. Danforth. Edwin May Kogers. 

Frank Blood Dennett. Mitchel Hirsch Weinstein. 

HONOR SCHOLARS. 

English Course Frank Payson French 

Classical Course Florence Howard James 

College Course. . ,; Chester Edward Dimick 



X.— Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, FEBRUARY 3^ 

1897. 

Oratorical Style of Delivery. 

Georgia M. Kelty, |10. Gladys I. Lougee, |6. 

Minnie A. Kogers, |4. 

Dramatic Style of Delivery. 

Blanche M. Wingate, flO. Evangeline Dorion, |6. 
Agnes Shay, |4. 

Narrative Style of Delivery. 

Harold F. Parker, |10. Belle Johnson, |6. 

Grace M. Goodrich, $4. 



REPOKT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 369 

XI.— Organization, 1897-1898. 



WILLIAM C 
GEORGE B. 

Ward 1. 

Ward 2. 

Ward 3. 

Ward 4. 

Ward. 5. 

Ward 6. 

Ward 7. 

Ward 8. 

Ward 9. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

CLARKE, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 
ROGERS, 
Presidept of Common Council, ex officio. 

Elliott C. Lambert. 
Walter B. Heath. 

Charles H. Manning. 
Augustus P. Home. 

George D. Towne. 
Louis E. Phelps. 

Nathaniel L. Colby. 
Henry D. Soule. 

James P. Slattery. 
John T. Kelley. 

Henry I. Haselton. 
Herbert E. Richardson. 

Edward B. Woodbury. 
Edson S. Heath. 

Luther C. Baldwin. 
Ned T. Wallace. 

R. Emmet Walsh. 
Henry I. Lemay. 



VICE-CHAIRMAN OP THE BOARD. 

GEORGE D. TOWNE. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

EDWARD B. WOODBURY. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 



370 annual official reports. 

superintendent's clerk. 
FANNIE L. SANBORN. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

CURTIS W. DAVIS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. Mayor Clarke and Messrs. Rogers, Wood- 
bury, Richardson, and Wallace. 

Salaries. Messrs. Woodbury, Slattery, W. B. Heath. 

Text-Books. Messrs. Baldwin, Towne, Richardson, and 
Lambert. 

Music. Messrs. Walsh, Phelps, W. B. Heath. 

Draioing. Messrs. Towne, Baldwin, Slattery. 

Manual Training. Messrs. Richardson, Towne, Bald- 
win. 

Examination of Teachers. Messrs. Colby, Lambert, 
Woodbury. 

Fuel and Heating. Mr. Haselton, Mayor Clarke, Messrs. 
Rogers, Manning, Home. 

Repairs. Messrs. Manning, Phelps, Lemay. 

Attendance. Messrs. Phelps, E. S. Heath, Kelley. 

Health. Messrs. Soule, Walsh, Towne. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. Messrs. Manning, Towne, Phelps, Slat- 
tery, Baldwin, Lambert. 

Franl-rm -street. Messrs. Woodbury, Lambert, Rich- 
ardson. 

Spring-street. Messrs. W. B. Heath, Slattery, Home. 

Lincoln-street and Youngsville. Messrs. Colby, Wallace, 
Woodbury. 

Ash-street. Messrs. Phelps, Walsh, Baldwin. 

Webster-street. Messrs. Towne, Manning, Kelley. 

Bakersrille and 3[osquito Pond. Messrs. Slattery, 
Haselton, E. S. Heath. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 371 

Yarney. Messrs. Baldwin, Colby, W. B. Heath. 

HaUsi'ille and Harvey. Messrs. Richardson, Lemay, 
Towne. 

Rimmon School. Messrs. E. S. Heath, Home, Lemay. 

Training ScJiool. Messrs. Lambert, Baldwin, Walsh. 

North Main-street. Messrs. Home, W. B. Heath, Slat- 
tery. 

Parker. Messrs. Wallace, Richardson, Colby. 

Amoskeag and Stark. Messrs. Lemay, E. S. Heath, 
Wallace. 

Lowell-street and Webster's Mills. Messrs. Kelley, 
Soule, Lambert. 

Pearl-street. Messrs. Soule, Woodbury, Haselton. 

Wilson and Goffers Falls. Messrs. Haselton, Kelley, 
Soule. 

Straw School. Messrs. Walsh, Phelps, Manning. 

Evening Schools. Messrs. Colby, Manning, Woodbury. 



XII.— List of Teachers, 1898. 

HIGH SCHOOL. BEECH STREET. 



Master. Albert Somes. 
-Sub-Master. George L Hopkins. 
Assistants. Harry N. McLaren. 

Hiram A, Stearns. 

Nellie Pickering. 

Florence M. Locke. 

Theresa B. Stanton. 

Mary J. Wellington. 

Sara Hunt. 

Annie W. Colby. 

Mary H. Dowd. 

Helen S. Smith. 



372 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

FRAN'KLIX-STREET SCHOOL. 

Master. Fred L. V. Spaulding, Grammar. 
Master's Assistant. Alice C. Taggart. 
Assistants. Carrie E. Hoit. 

Carrie E. Head. 

Emma L. McLaren. 
Higher Middle. Nellie C. Parker. 
Lower Middle. Amy K. Northrup. 
Higher Primary. Alice M. Lamprey. 
Lower Primary. Susie L. Dodge. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Master. Frank S. Sutcliffe, Grammar. 
Master's Assistant. Barbara B.. Joy. 
Assistants. Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Mabel J. Brickett. 

Mary F. Barnes. 
Higher Middle. Mabelle E. Porter. 
Lower Middle. Bessie E. Dodge. 
Higher Primary. Theodora Richardson. 
Lower Primary. Hulda C. Graupner. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOL. 

Master. Charles W. Bickford, Grammar. 
Master's Assistant. Mabel Ruth Brown. 
Assistants. Amelia L. Graupner. 

Marguerite T. Farrell. 

Ellen E. Connor. 
Higher Middle. Emma J. Cooper. 
Lower Middle. Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOL. 

Master. John Gault, Grammar. 
Master's Assistant. Helen E. Frost. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 373 

Assistants. Luna A. Wbitlock. 

Alta C. Willand. 

Eva F. Tuson. 
Higher Middle. Edith L. Hammond. 
Lower Middle; Jean Gillan. 
Higher Primary. Mary E. Murphy. 
Lower Primary. Ora E. Goodwin. 

VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Master. George Winch, Grammar. 
Master's Assistant. Eosabelle M. Franklin. 
Assistants. Esther M, Dickey. 

Ellen E. McKean. 

Millie S. Morse. 
Higher Middle. Mary J. Walsh. 
Lower Middle. Marcia M. Moore. 
Higher Primary. Gertrude Adams. 
Lower Primary. Eflfie M. Philbrook. 

HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Master. William H. Huse, Grammar. 
Master's Assistant. Ella F. Barker. 
Assistants. Olive A. Rowe. 

Katie E. Batchelder. 
Higher Middle. Susie G. Woodman. 
Lower Middle. Mavy L. Ayer. 
Higher Primary. Bertha L. Kemp. 
Lower Primary. E. Alfreda Hall. 
Lower Primary. Annie R. Corson. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns, Grammar. 
Assistant. Lelia A. Brooks. 
Higher Middle. Cora M. Farmer. 
Lower Middle. Augusta S. Downs. 
Higher Primary. S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. Mary L. Heath. 



374 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

RIMMON SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary E. Brophy, Grammar. 
Mixed Middle. Mary A. Seavey. 
Higher Primary. Hattie S. Tuttle. 
Lower Primary. Blanche E. Hicken. 

. WILSON SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary J. Corcoran, Grammar. 
Assistant. Hellen Morison. 
Higher Middle. Cora B. Gilford. 
Lower Middle. Harriet H. Richardson. 
Higher Primary. M. Clara Hawkes. 
Lower Primary. Florence L. Abbott. 
Lower Primary. Bessie Cochrane. 

STRAW SCHOOL. 

Principal. Lizzie P. Gove, Grammar. 
Mixed Middle. Gertrude H. Brooks. 
Higher Primary. Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. Edith M. Stebbins. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

(Merrimack street, corner Union.) 
Principal. Caroline E. Wing. 
Head Assistant. Bertha A. Burgess. 

The principal is also assisted by the sub-teachers, i. e., 
members of the training class. The school embraces the 
first four years of school work, in the following grades: 
Lower Primary, Higher Primary, and Lower Middle. 
There are four rooms, two of lower-primary grade. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Annabel Emerson, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. ' Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. Nellie I. Sanderson. 
Mixed Primary. Lura B. Gage. 
Low^er Primary. Lizabell Savory. 
Lower Primarv. Helen E. True. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 375 
MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary W. Mitchell, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. Gertrude A. Burns. 
Lower Middle. Mary A. Clement. 
Higher Primary. Lottie M. Clement. 
Higher Primary. M. Minnie Sturtevant. 
Mixed Primary. Hattie O. Willand. 
Lower Primary. Kate T. Clarke. 
Lower Primary. Mabel F. Robinson. 

PEARL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary G. Tynan, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. Nellie M. Smith. 
Higher Primary. Ella Hope. 
Lower Primary. Georgia M. Cheney. 

PARKER SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary E. Moulton, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. Lois M. Magoon. 
Higher Primary. Delle E. Haines. 
Lower Primar}-. Blanche M. Folsom. 

LOW^ELL-STREBT SCHOOL. 

Principal. Helen M. Morrill, Higher Primary. 
Lower Primary. Mary S. Richardson. 
Lower Primary. Katharine A. Frain. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. Lettie M. Smith. 
Mixed Primary. Clydie M. Flanders. 
Goffe's Falls.* Etta L. Stearns. 
Mixed Primary. Maud M. Greaney. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS.* 

No. 1. Stark. Inez M. Warren. 
2. Harvey. Emma J. Ela. 

* Subui'ban. 



376 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 3. Youngsville. Louis H. Bailey. 

4. Webster's Mills. Josephine L. Riddle. 

5. Mosquito Pond. Nellie M. Atwood. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. Fred B. Bower. 

Jennie C. Heath. 
Drawing. J. Warren Thyng. 
Manual Training. Fred E. Browne. 

JANITORS. 

High School. 

Charles F. Jack. Engineer, David T. Robinson. 

FranJclin-strcet and Training Scliools. 

Varnum H. Hill. 

Lincoln-street School. 

William Stevens. 

Ash-street and Pearl-street Schools. 

John S. Avery. 

Webster-street and Straw Schools. 

William J. Powers. 

Yarney and Parker Schools. 

Robert Cook. 

Hallsville School. 

William H. Newry. 

BaTcersvillc School. 

Edwin N. Baker. 

Bimmon and Main-street Schools. 

William F. Conner. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 377 

Wilson School. 

J. S. Washburn. 

Spring-street and Lowell-street Schools. 

S. H. Batchelder. 

Amoskeag School. 

Frank D. Hanscom. 



XIII.— School Year, 1897-1898. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opens September 13, 1897 
closes December 17, 1897. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 3, 1898 
closes March 25, 1898. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 11, 1898 
closes June 24, 1898. Vacation of eleven weeks. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the CUy of Manchester: 

The Trustees of the City Library respectfully present 
their forty-fourth annual report of the affairs of the 
library, and, accompanying the same, the report made to 
them by the treasurer of the board, giving an account of 
the sums received and the expenditures made by him in 
behalf of the board from the funds in their possession 
and under their control; and also the reports of the two 
librarians made to the board, giving in detail the statis- 
tics of the operation of the library during the time each 
has been in charge of the library in the past year. 

From the reports of the librarians it appears that the 
library has been open for the delivery of books the same 
number of days as the two previous years, viz., three 
hundred and six, during which time seventy-eight thou- 
sand one hundred and forty-one books w^ere delivered for 
home use, an average of about two hundred and fifty-six 
per day. In addition to the above number delivered for 
general circulation, sixteen thousand eight hundred and 
thirteen books were delivered for use in the reading 
room, an average of about fifty-five per day. The 
total number of books delivered for general circulation 
and for use in the reading-room was ninety-four thou- 
sand nine hundred and fifty-four, an average of about 
three hundred and ten per day. As compared with the 
year preceding, the circulation for home use shows an 

381 



382 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

increase of eleven thousand six hundred and sixty-three, 
and the number delivered far use at the reading-room an 
increase of one thousand three hundred and thirty-three. 
The total circulation was twelve thousand nine hundred 
and eighty-six greater than the year previous, and was not 
only the largest circulation but also the largest net gain 
in circulation since the library was established. 

The number of periodicals regularly received at the 
library during the year was seventy-eight — fifty-five by 
purchase and twenty-three by gift — and on the comple- 
tion of the respective volumes they have been bound and 
placed upon the shelves for general circulation. 

One hundred and thirty-six volumes were withdrawn 
from circulation during the year, having become so worn 
and defaced as to be unfit for further use. Of these and 
of others retired from circulation in previous years for 
like reasons fifty-four volumes have been replaced at a 
cost of fifty dollars and eighty-five cents. 

The work of re-classifying and re-cataloguing the 
library, though somewhat interrupted by the change in 
librarians, has been continued during the year, and the 
present librarian reports the number of books re-classi- 
fied as six thousand seven hundred and fiftj'-one, and the 
number re-catalogued as seven thousand and twenty- 
three. 

Accompanying the report of the librarian will be found 
the names of the persons donating books to the library 
during the year, with the number presented by each per- 
son. Among these are sixtj'-nine volumes of Swedish 
books purchased by Hon. Moody Currier at a cost of one 
hundred dollars. Due acknowledgment has been made 
in behalf of the trustees to all who have in this manner 
shown their interest in the increase of the library. 

The report of the treasurer shows that during the year 
the sum of one thousand thirteen dollars and fifty-nine 
cents has been expended for the purchase of books and 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 383 

the sum of one Imndred seventj'-nine dollars and eighty- 
seven cents for the purchase of periodicals, making a 
total expenditure for both these purposes of eleven hun- 
dred ninety-three dollars and forty-six cents. Of the 
amount expended for the purchase of books, the sum of 
fifty dollars and eighty-five cents was used for the pur- 
chase of books worn out and withdrawn from circulation, 
and the sum of seventy-two dollars and fifty-six cents 
was taken from the income of the Dean fund for the in- 
crease of that department of the library. Exclusive of 
these two items the sum expended for the purchase of new 
books was eight hundred and ninety dollars and eighteen 
cents, leaving a balance in the hands of the treasurer at 
the close of the year, of the amount appropriated by the 
city councils for the purchase of books, of four hundred 
and seventy-two dollars and fifty-seven cents. 

The balances at the close of the year of the accumu- 
lated income of the several funds under the control of 
the trustees were as follows: 

Dean fund |7,731.07 

Mary E. Elliot fund 1,340.98 

Eliza A. Eaton fund 4G8.77 

During the year sixtj'^one volumes were purchased 
from the Dean fund at a cost, as above stated, of seventy- 
two dollars and fifty-six cents. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the past 
year have been three thousand six hundred and eighty 
dollars and forty-seven cents, included in which amount 
is the sum of six hundred and eighty-three dollars and 
twenty cents expended on account of re-classification of 
the library and additions to the card catalogue. 

The expense of conducting the library for the past two 
or three years has been somewhat larger than the average 
of former years, occasioned, as stated in the last report, 
by the employment of additional assistants to the libra- 
rian, necessitated by increased circulation and the ar- 
rangement keeping the library open additional hours, and 



384 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

also the additional cost of lighting the library by electri- 
city instead of gas. The items which make up the amount 
of these incidental expenditures, bills for which have 
been paid by the city treasurer upon the approval of the 
trustees from the sum appropriated for the library, will 
be found in detail in the annual report of the city. 

In April last, Miss Kate E. Sanborn, who for the pre- 
vious three years had acceptably filled the position of 
librarian, and under w^hose progressive and faithful ad- 
ministration the affairs of the library had been brought 
to a high standard of efficiency, tendered her resignation 
to take effect on the first day of June following. 

The trustees accepted the resignation of Miss Sanborn 
with great regret, and in this report desire to place on 
record their appreciation of her earnest endeavor for- the 
accommodation of the patrons of the library, and her 
fidelity to duty, always manifested during the term of 
her service as librarian. The position made vacant by 
the resignation of Miss Sanborn was filled by the election 
of Miss Florence E. Whitcher, of Lexington, Mass., who 
assumed the duties of the position December 1, 1897. 

Miss Whitcher has for a number of j^ears been librarian 
of the public library of Lexington, Mass., and the trustees 
entertain no doubt but she is well qualified by experi- 
ence to fill the position of librarian of our city library 
and will prove a competent successor to Miss Sanborn. 

The trustees return their acknowledgments to the mem- 
bers of the city councils, and particularly to the com- 
mittee on lands and buildings, for the courtesy and con- 
sideration with which their suggestions relating to the 
library have been received and carried out 

April , 1898. 

In board of trustees read and approved and ordered 
transmitted to the city councils. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 

Mayor. 

N. P. Hunt, 
Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library: 

The treasurer of the board submits the following ac- 
count of the receipts and expenditures by the board of 
the funds received on account of the library: 

1897. Dr. 
Jan. 1. To balance of appropri- 
ation 1677.35 

May 21. Kate E. Sanborn, 

catalogues sold . . 19.20 

Kate E. Sanborn, 

book lost 2.47 

Kate E. Sanborn, 

balance of fines. . 149.66 

26. Moody Currier, for 

books 100.00 

31. Kate E. Sanborn, 

catalogues sold. . 9.80 

Kate E. Sanborn, 

books lost 7.19 

Kate E. Sanborn, 

balance of fines. . 85.29 

June 9. appropriation for 

books for 1897... 1,000.00 

12,050.96 

Jan, 1. To balance of income 

of Dean fund. . . . |7,291.87 
income of Dean fund 

coupons 108.00 

385 

25 



386 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

July 1. To income of Dean fund 

coupons 190.00 

interest on accumu- 
lation of income 
to July 1, 1897, 
Manchester Sav- 
ings Bank, Book 

No. 16445 92.56 

interest on accumu- 
lation of income 
to July 1, 1897, 
Manchester Sav- 
ings Bank, Book 
No. 24442 144.34 

Oct. 1. income of Dean 
fund, Guaranty 
Savings Bank, 
Book No. 4078. .. 67.34 

interest on accumu- 
lation of income 
to Oct. 1, 1897, 
Guaranty Savings 
Bank, Book No. 
4557 9.52 



17,803.63 



Jan. 1. To Mary E. Elliot fund $2,000.00 
balance of interest, 
Mary E. Elliot 
fund 1,230.20 

Oct. 1. interest on Mary E. 
Elliot fund to 
Oct. 1, 1897, Guar- 
anty Savings 
Bank, Book No. 
2009 68.80 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 387 

Oct. 1. To interest on accumu- 
lation of income 
Oct. 1, 1897, Guar- 
ant}' Savings 
Bank, Book No. 

2010 141.98 

13,340.98 

Jan. 1. To Eliza A. Eaton fund |3,000.00 
balance of interest, 
Eliza A. Eaton 
fund 353.52 

Oct. 1. interest on Eliza A. 

Eaton fund to 
Oct. 1, 1897, Guar- 
anty Savings 
Bank, Book Iso. 

4327 103.15 

interest on accumu- 
lation of income 
to Oct. 1, 1897, 
Guaranty S a v- 
ings Bank, Book 
No. 4328 12.10 

3,468.77 

|16,664..34 

1897. Cr. 
Jan. 5. Paid New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 111.17 

Publishers' Weekly, period- 
icals 3.00 

George II. Policy & Co., peri- 
odicals 0.00 

15. Publishers' Weekly, period- 
icals 5.00 

Journal of Commerce, books 21.60 



388 ' ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Jan. 29. Paid New Hampshire Historical 

Society, books $8.00 

30. Boston Book Co., periodicals 5.00 

Feb. 2. New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 15.72 

12. Little, Brown & Co., books. . 1.50 

13. Francis P. Harper, books.. 4.70 

17. W. B. Clarke & Co., books. . . 67.70 

18. Granite Monthly Co., books 1.25 
March 2. New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 13.00 

3. Little, Brown & Co., books. . 2.00 

Publishers' Weekly, books.. 3.50 

12. Publishers' Weekly, books.. 3.50 

13. W. B. Clarke & Co., books. . 91.22 
25. D. L. Miller & Co., books 15.00 

April 2. New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 10.82 

5. Publishers' Weekly, books.. 12.50 
8. W. B. Clarke & Co. (Dean 

fund), books 72.56 

29. W. B.Clarke & Co., books... 19.97 

30. Little, Brown & Co., books. . 1.50 
May 5. New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 10.80 

13.' W. B.Clarke & Co., books... 43.77 
21. Sampson, Murdock & Co., 

books 2.00 

Cleveland Public Library, 

books 10.00 

John B. Clarke Co., books. . . .50 

George F. Willey, books 1.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

books .20 

27. T. H. Castor & Co., books. . . 98.57 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 389 

June 4. Paid New Eugland News Co., peri- 
odicals 116.25 

5. Little, Brown & Co., books. . 4.25 

W. B.Clarke & Co., books... 58.99 
W. B. Clarke & Co., (replaced) 

books , . 50.85 

18. T. H. Castor & Co., books 15.68 

July 8. W. B. Clarke & Co., books. . . 30.44 
Aug. 4. New England New s Co., peri- 
odicals 10.12 

13. Little, Brown & Co., books. . 3.50 
20. Little, Brown & Co., books. . 1.50 
Aug. 4. New England News Co. peri- 
odicals 16.83 

5. Little, Brown & Co., books . . . 2.00 
Sept. 4. New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 8.68 

6. Lawyers' Co-op. Pub. Co., 

books 5.00 

11, D. Appleton & Co., books. . . 5.00 
20. Temple & Farrington Co., 

books .40 

Oct. 6. New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 11.29 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books. . . 150.30 

9. H. Reinbeimer & Co., books 10.00 

12. Town of Dover, Mass., books 1.70 
Nov. 3. ■ New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 14.20 

10. Boston Book Co., books 105.00 

Dec. 2. ' New England News Co., peri- 
odicals 11.99 

9. W. B. Clarke & Co., books. . . 92.69 

16. Little, Brown & Co., books . . 3.75 



390 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Dec. 31. Balance of appropriation |930.06 

Balance of Dean fund income. . . . 7,731.07 
Balance of Elliot fund and in- 
terest 3,310.98 

Balance of Eaton fund and interest 3,408.77 

116,601.34 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the 
library for the year ending December 31, 1897, the bills 
for which have been paid through the office of the city 
treasurer upon the approval of the committee on accounts 
of the board of trustees, the items of which may be found 
in the annual report of the city, are as follows: 

Services of librarian |441.66 

Services of assistants to librarian 1,170.03 

Fuel 374.57 

Gas 28.98 

Electricity 209.18 

Insurance 125.00 

Binding 175.44 

Eebinding 190.29 

Re-classification and cataloguing 683.20 

Supplies 82.65 

Printing 59.45 

Water 16.00 

Newspapers 0.00 

Incidentals 57.42 



13,680.47 

RECAPITULATION. 

Balance December 31, 1896 |3,251.95 

Appropriation for 1897 4,500.00 

— 17,751.75 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 391 

Paid trustees for purchase of books |1,000.00 

incidental expenses 3,680.47 

Balance of appropriation December 

31, 1897 3,071.28 

17,751.75 

Kespectfully submitted. 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 

December 31, 1897. 
We have examined the foregoing report and find the 
same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

WILLIAM C. CLAKKE, 
WALTER M. PARKER, 
Committee on Accounts, City Library. 

December 31, 1897. 
I certify that I have, examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the treasurer of the trustees of the city library, and 
find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City A^lditor. 



LIBRARIANS' REPORTS. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Manchester City Library: 

Gentlemen, — Following is a report of the work which 
has been done during the first five months of the year, 
and the condition of the library June 1, 1S97: 
Cash on hand January 1, 1897 1171.33 

Amount received from Jan. 1 to May 31, 1897: 

For fines 1112.29 

catalogues, 49 at 20c 9.80 

books lost and paid for. . . 7.19 



Paid to N. P. Hunt, treasurer, May 

21, 1897 1171.33 

Paid for expressage and incidentals 27.00 



129.28 



$300.61 



198.33 



Balance on hand May 31, 1897, paid to 
N. P. Hunt $102.28 

Since January first 5,195 volumes have been classified, 
and 5,452 volumes catalogued. They include Language, 
Literature, Book Arts, and Periodicals. The classes re- 
maining to be done are Philosophy, Religion, Social Sci- 
ence, Medicine, and Reference books. It is not possible 
to state the number of volumes they contain, but they are, 
for the most part, small classes. Upon the completion 
of the catalogue and classification there are a few things 
to be done which up to this time it has been impossible to 
do, owing to the pressure of the work in connection with 
re-arranging and re-cataloguing the library. The pam- 

392 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 393 

plilets need to be counted, sorted, arranged, and many of 
them bound. There are also many duplicate yolumes 
which require sorting, among them a large number of 
United States goyernment publications, which may be 
returned to Washington and exchanged for • yolumes 
which the library lacks. Sixty-nine yolumes of Swedish 
books haye recently been receiyed, the gift of ex-Goyer- 
nor Currier. They are now being bound, but haye not 
yet been accessioned or catalogued. 

It will be remembered that the report for 1890 showed 
a large increase in the circulation of books. This in- 
crease still continues, and up to this date there has been 
a much larger increase of each month oyer the corre- 
sponding month of 1896, than there was for 189G oyer 
1895. 

In closing my work as librarian, I cannot refrain from 
expressing ni}- appreciation of the good will which the 
trustees have always shown toward me, and the uniform 
courtesy and kindness with which they haye treated me. 
I realize that the successful administration of any library 
is as much due to the efforts of the assistants as to those 
of the librarian, and I cannot speak too highly of the zeal, 
efficiency, and faithfulness with which my assistants haye 
done their work. Their aid has been inyaluable in my 
endeayor to serye the public, and to bring the library 
into as high a state of usefulness as possible. 
Respectfully submitted. 

KATE E. SANBORN, 

Lihrarian. 

May 31, 1897. 

To the Board of Trustees of the Manchester City Lihrarij: 

(jentlemen, — I herewith submit the forty-fourth an- 
nual report of the city library: 

Whole number of accessions Dec. 31, 1896. . . . 40,558 



394 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 



Added during: the year 1897: 

By purchase G12 

By gift 432 

Periodicals bound 110 

Whole number at present 

Including: 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets 702 

Bound volumes 40,991 

Number of periodicals regularly received: 

By purchase 

By gift 

Number of days the librar}- was open for read- 
ing and distribution of books 

Number of voltimes delivered for home use. . 

Average per day 

Largest number any one day, February 27. . . . 

Largest number any one month, March 

Smallest number any one month, June 

Number of volumes delivered in the reading- 
room 

Average per day 

Total circulation for 1897 

Number of cards used on deposit 

Number of cards issued during the year 

Whole number issued since new registration 

Number of cards relinquished during the year 

Postals sent to delinquents 

Worn-out books removed from circulation... 

Number of volumes replaced 

Number of books lost or injured and paid for. . 

Number of volumes repaired at the bindery. . 

Number repaired and covered at the library. . 



1,154 



41,712 



41,712 



55 
23 

30G 

78,141 

256 

568 
7,572 
5,869 

16,813 

55 

94,954 

5 

722 

11,722 

107 

428 

136 

54 

12 

921 

15,610 



REPORT OP" THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 395 

Amoimt received from June 1 to Dec. 31, 1897: 

For fines $143.66 

catalogues, 31 at 20c 6.20 

books lost and paid for 3.38 



1153.24 
Paid for expressage and incidentals 39.77 



Balance on hand January 1, 1898 |113.47 

During 1897 the total circulation for the year has been 
almost ninety-five thousand, and attention shouldbe called 
to the fact that this number does not include the use of 
reference books, and a great many other works that are 
constantly being consulted, and of which no record can 
be made. The number of books issued for home use has 
shown a steady increase throughout the year, 11,653 
more books having been issued than in 1896. The num- 
ber of books used in the reading-room has not increased 
so much this year as during the preceding one. An in- 
crease in this direction cannot be expected, as the library 
offers no accommodations for readers, and until a large 
and convenient reading-room can be provided, the useful- 
ness of the library in this department of its work will be 
seriously affected. Still, there has been a slight gain 
during the past year, 1,333 more books having been used 
in the reading-room than in 1896, making a total gain in 
circulation during 1897 of 12,986,— nearly 13,000. The 
library needs a large, well-appointed reading-room, where 
students, as well as persons using the magazines and ref- 
erence books, can be accommodated. The present read- 
ing-room is entirely inadequate for the growing needs 
of the city, and the library could reach a much larger pro- 
portion of the people if more suitable accommodations 
were provided. 

The number of books classified during the whole year 
has been 6,751, and the number of those catalogued 



396 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

7,023. The first of December the work of classifying 
Religion according to the new system was begun, and is 
smaking good progress. 

Sixty-one books have been purchased with the Dean 
fund. 

It is hoped that during the coming year the privilege 
of taking two books at a time will be granted to bor- 
rowers, provided that only one of these be a work of fic- 
tion. Many of the larger libraries are now adopting this 
method. The increased use of the library and the accom- 
modation it offers to readers in all cases where it has 
been introduced are greatly in favor of its adoption. 
This will involve a change in the delivery system, but it 
is hoped that the change can be effected with very little, 
if any, inconvenience to the patrons of the library. 

Seven books were missing at the annual examination 
of 1897. Of this number four were works of fiction, two 
were volumes of poems, and one was a scientific work. 

There are some improvements about the building that 
are necessary and should be made as soon as possible. 
New step-ladders are a very imperative need, and should 
be of an improved kind, made to run quietly, as that will 
add. greatly to the comfort of readers. It would not be 
necessary to put them in all the alcoves at once, but if a 
few were provided each year the expense would be com- 
paratively small, the safety of the assistants would be 
assured, as some of the ladders now in use are really be- 
yond repair, and at the same time the appearance of the 
library would be very much improved. Linoleum for the 
reading-room and for some of the aisles and alcoves of 
the book room is very much needed, as the floor cannot 
be properly cared for in its i^resent condition, and so 
much dust is a great injury to the books. 
Respectfully submitted. 

FLORENCE E. WHITCHER, 

Lihrarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY. 



Books. Pampb. 

Aguilar Free Library, New York City. . . 1 
American Conference on International 

Arbitration 1 

Amlierst College 5 

Apprentices' Library, Philadelphia, Pa. . 1 

Austin, Mrs. Josephine 1 

Baillie's Inst. Free Library, Glasgow. ... 1 

Baltimore, Md. — City Library 8 

Berlin, N. H.— Public Library 2 

Bigelow Free Public Library, Clinton, 

Mass 1 

Birmingham, Eng. — Free Libraries 1 4 

Boston, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Bradley, Denis M., Bishop 2 

Bridgeport, Conn. — Public Library 1 

Brookline, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Brooklyn, N. Y. — Library 1 

Cambridge, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Campbell, A. H 1 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburg, Pa 1 

Carvelle, H. DeW 5 348 

Chains, F. H 2 

Children's Aid Society, New York 1 

Christian Science Association, Manchester 1 

Clarke, Arthur E 7 

Clarke, William C 2 

Cleaves, George P 1 1 

Clough, John F 2 

Cole, S. M 2 

397 



398 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

College of New Jersey, Princeton, N. J. . . 1 

Concord, N. H. — Public Library 2 3 

'" " Water Department .... 14 

Conn, Dr. G. P 3 

Currier, Moody 69 

Detroit, Mich. — Public Library 1 

Dover, N. H. — Public Library- 2 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md. 1 

Evanston, 111. — Free Public Library. .... 1 

Everett, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Fairmount Park xVrt Association, Phila- 
delphia, Pa 2 

Ferguson, Dr. John 33 

Fitz Public Library, Chelsea, Mass 1 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt. . . 1 

French, John C 1 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Phil. 1 

Grand Kapids, Mich. — Public Library... 1 

Grant, J 1 

Green, Andrew H 1 

Hartford, Conn. — Public Library 1 

Harvard College 1 

Hawaiian Islands — Department of For- 
eign Affairs 1 

Hayes, J. S 1 

Henniker, N. H. — Free Library 1 

Hoar, G. F 1 

Holland, Denis A 1 

Hubbell, Mark S 1 

Indian Bights Association 7 

Jersey City, N. J. — Free Public Library. . 1 

John B. Clarke Co 110 13 

Kidder, Joseph 1 

Lancaster, Mass. — Town Library 2 

Lawrence, Mass. — Free Public Library. . 1 

Library Company of Philadelphia 6 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 399 

Lowell, Mass. — City Library 2 

" " Water Board 2 

Lynn, Mass. — Public Library . 1 

Lytle, J. J ' 1 

McCormick Harvesting Machine Company 1 

Maimonides Free Library, New York City 1 

Maiden, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Manchester, Eng. — Public Free Libraries 1 
Manchester, N. H. — Board of Water Com- 
missioners 1 

" " Chief Engineer Fire 

Department 1 

" " City Auditor 16 

" " Street and Park Com- 
missioners 1 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. . . 4 

Melrose, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Minneapolis, Minn. — Public Library 1 

Moore, W. E . 2 3 

Morse Institute Library, Natick, Mass .... 1 

Mount Holyoke College, S. Hadley, Mass. 1 
National Municipal League, Philadelphia, 

Pa 1 

New England Society in Brooklyn, N. Y. . 1 

New Hampshire. — Agricultural College. . 3 
^' Centennial Home for 

" the Aged 1 

" Ins, Commissioner ... 1 

" Library Commission . . 1 1 

" Secretary of State 9 2 

" State Library 2 

New Haven, Conn. — Free Public Library 1 

New York City. — Mercantile Library 1 

Newark, N. J. — Free Public Library 2 

Newberry Library, Chicago, 111 3 

Newton, Mass. — Free Library 1 



400 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

Nickerson, Sereno D 2". 

Omaha, Neb. — Public Library 1 

Parker, H. E 11 

Paterson, N. J. — Free Public Library. ... 1 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md 1 

Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery 1 

Peoria, 111. — Public Library 1 

Philadelphia, Pa. — Free Library 1 

Portland, Me. — Public Library 1 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. — City Library 1 

Providence, R. I. — Public Library 1 

Bobbins Library, Arlington, Mass 1 

St. Louis, Mo. — Mercantile Library 2 

Salem, Mass. — Public Library 3 

San Francisco, Cal. — Public Library 1 

Scranton, Pa. — Public Library 1 

Smiley, Albert K 1 

Society of Colonial Wars, Washington, 

D. C 1 

Somerville, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Southbridge, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Staples, C. J 10 

Steward, J. F 1 

Stockbridge, E. E 1 

Stokes, Anson P 1 

Straw, Herman F 2 

Syracuse, N. Y. — Central Library 

Thomas, Douglas H 

Union Publishing Company 

United States. — Agricultural Department 

" " Bureau of Education. . . . 

" " Civil Service Commission 

" " . Fish Commission 

" " Interior Department.... 

" " Labor Department 

" " Smithsonian Institution 





1 




1 


1 






59 


1 


4 




2 


4 




1 


39 


3 


6 


4 


11 



. REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 401 

"United States.— State Department 2 S 

" " Superintendent of Docu- 
ments 

" " Treasury Department , . 

" " War Department 

University of California 

University of Pennsylvania 

Unknown 

Uruguay 

Venn, Theo. J " 

Washington City Free Library 

Wliymper, E '. 

Wilmington Institute Free Library 

Winchester, Mass. — Public Library 

Winthrop, E. C, Jr 

Wisconsin. — Free Library Commission . . 1 

Woburn, Mass. — Public Library 2 

Woman's Hospital Aid Association, Con- 
cord, N. H 1 

Worcester, Mass. — Free Public Library. . • 1 

Wyman, E 2 



137 


130 


3 


1 


5 


1 




1 




1 


1 


2 




1 




1 




1 


1 






1 


1 




1 





Periodicals Presented. 

Le Bulletin. 

Bulletin of Bibliography. 

Case and Comment. 

Catalogue of United States Public Documents. 

Great Round World. 

Holy Cross Purple. 

Home Market Bulletin. 

L. A. AV. Bulletin of Good Roads. 

Manchester. — Advertiser. 

" Budget. 

" Echo (High School). 

26 



402 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Manchester. — Emerald. 

" Union. 

Manifesto. 

Monthly Bulletin Bureau of American Kepublics. 
New Earth. 
Notes and Queries. 

Official Gazette of United States Patent Office. 
Plymouth Record. 
Temple. 

Tennessee University Magazine. 
Travelers' Record. 
Veterans' Advocate. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

In making a report as City Solicitor, for the year 1897, 
I would return my thanks for the kind treatment I have 
received at your hands, and for the confidence which a 
unanimous re-election for another year would seem to 
denote. I also would acknowledge the courtesy and con- 
sideration received at the hands of all other city officers 
with whom I have had official relations during the year. 

My report for 1897 must be short, unless I should go 
into unnecessary details, which would be of little interest 
to you or to the public. No cases in court have been tried 
during the j'ear, and for the reason stated in my last 
report, that questions of law must first be determined by 
the full bench, before a satisfactory trial can be had of a 
majority of the pending cases; and it is hoped that a decis- 
ion of such cases will be reached the coming year. 

The water-works cases remain in the same condition 
as in January, 1897. One case was tried by jury several 
terms ago, and resulted in a verdict for the city, and 
since then the plaintiffs have manifested no desire to 
try another, but it cannot be definitely stated when more 
trials will be demanded. 

Maier v. Manchester, which was a suit for personal in- 
juries received by the plaintiff by being thrown over an 
embankment on South Main street, where there was no 
railing, was adjusted out of court. One of the board of 
aldermen was the principal witness against the city, and 

405 



406 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

it was deemed advisable not to hazard a jury trial, and a 
settlement, which I deem fair to both parties, was 
effected. 

The following new actions were begun during the year, 
and are now pending, yiz: Cross, adni'x, v. Manchester, 
Turcotte, adm'r, v. Manchester, Wilkins \. Manchester, 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. v. Manchester, and Foster 
et al. V. Manchester. 

Ada Cross, the widow and administratrix of Bert S. 
Cross, who was found dead in the water-works canal in 
the summer of 1896, has filed a petition for leave to bring 
a suit against the city to recover damages for his death, 
alleging a defective highway owing to an unsuitable fence 
along the canal. 

E. V. Turcotte, administrator of Ferdinand Allaire, 
has brought a suit for damages for the death of Allaire, 
who was injured in West Manchester while engaged in 
cutting down a large tree, while in the employ of the 
board of street and park commissioners. The questions 
of law above mentioned arise also in this case. 

Joseph Wilkins of Suncook has filed an appeal from 
the award of the board of mayor and aldermen for dam- 
ages for land taken in the laying out of Cypress street. 
N. M. Foster and others have also filed an appeal from 
the decision of the mayor and aldermen, w^ho refused to 
lay out a northerly extension of Walnut street. 

The Amoskeag Manufacturing Company has brought 
suit asking for an abatement of a part of its tax for 1897, 
alleging that the taxable value of its property is but 
14,000,000, instead of |G,000,000, as fixed by the assessors. 
This involves over $40,000, and is perhaps the most im- 
portant case to which the city has been a party for years. 
It has been referred by the supreme court to a committee 
consisting of Hon. J. G. Bellows of Walpole, Hon. A. S. 
Batchellor of Littleton, and Hon. John Kivel of Dover, 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 407 

who will try the facts the coining summer and repoz't 
thereon to the court, who will then decide upon the merits 
of the case. 

The foregoing covers court matters, and I will close 
this report by stating that the numerous and detailed 
duties of the position have been performed to the best 
of my ability, and, I trust, to your satisfaction. 
Kesi^ectfully submitted. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City 

of Manchester, N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit the following 
report for the department of inspection of milk and 
butter for the year 1897 : 

I inspected 187 samples of milk and, on the whole, 
found them quite satisfactory. In a few cases where 
they ran low or were in some way adulterated I would 
notify the dealer, and the result proved satisfactory. 

LICENSES. 

The state law requires that every person who conveys 
milk in carriages or otherwise, for the purpose of selling 
the same, within the limits of the city, shall be licensed 
annually by the inspector of milk, and shall pay fifty cents 
to the use of the city. Every person selling milk or offer- 
ing it for sale in a store, booth, or market place, shall pay 
fifty cents, which fee is paid but once, by the dealer in 
milk, and is not transferable. When I was first ap- 
pointed to fill this office I found several owners of stores 
and restaurants that had changed hands and were sell- 
ing milk without the required license, but after notifying 
them they took out the required license. 

Number of licenses issued to dealers conveying milk by 
carriages or otherwise for purpose of sale, 151. 

Number of new registrations of storekeepers and 
keepers of restaurants engaged in the sale of milk, 51. 

Total number of registrations, 202. 

411 



412 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Amount of money received and turned over to the city 
treasurer, |101. 

SKIMMED MILK. 

No dealer in milk, and no servant or agent of a dealer, 
shall sell, exchange, or deliver, or have in his custody or 
possession with intent to sell, exchange, or deliver, milk 
from which the cream or anj part thereof has been re- 
moved, unless in a conspicuous place above the center, 
upon the outside of every vesse'l, can, or package from 
or in which such milk is sold, the words "skimmed milk" 
are distinctly marked in letters not less than one inch in 
length. 

There has been but one complaint made to me that the 
law was not carried out. Upon investigation I found 
that the complainant was not acting in good faith, and 
nothing was done with the case. 

Property of the city held by the inspector at present is 
as follows: 

City records, milk grip, 10 pint cans, 1 case containing 
lactoscope, thermometer, 2 glass cylinders for cream 
tests, etc., 1 package filter paper, 2 specific gravity scales, 
1 pipette, and 3 odd pieces of chemical apparatus. 
ARCHIE F. PRECOURT, 

Inspector of Milk. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Coun- 
cils: 

In compliance with the ordinance of said city, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their annual report 
for the year 1897: 

The whole number of families that have received more 
or less assistance off the farm during the year has been 
one hundred and forty, consisting of four hundred and 
fifty persons, all of whom have a settlement in this city, 
except those people whom the overseers of the poor 
found in a destitute condition and who could not obtain 
help from any other direction. Section 1, chapter 84, 
Public Statutes of New Hampshire. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the county 
farm during the year has been eight, more or less of the 
time, at a cost of two dollars per week for each person, 
all of whom are insane and incurable. 

The whole number of minor children supported at the 
State Industrial School during the year has been five, 
more or less of the time, at a cost of one dollar and fifty 
cents for each minor child. 

In compliance with sections 1 and 2, chapter 116, Pub- 
lic Statutes of New Hampshire, passed at the January 
session, 1895, in relation to dependent minor children 
being supported at almshouses, the said minor children 

.415 



416 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

having a settlement in this city are supported as follows: 

At St. Patrick's Orphans' Home, Hanover street, six 
two months of the time at a cost of one dollar and twenty- 
five cents per week for each minor child. 

At Notre Dame de Lourdes Home, in charge of the 
Gray Nuns, West Manchester, four minor children, at a 
cost of one dollar per week for each minor child, more 
or less of the time. 

All of the said minor children have educational ad- 
vantages. 

The overseers of the poor have given eight hundred and 
twenty orders to the paupers off the farm during the year. 
The said orders consisted chiefly of orders for groceries, 
fuel, medicine, board and clothing, care and emergencies. 

The whole amount allowed to the several persons who 
applied for assistance from time to time, from the several 
wards of the city, during the year, was as follows: 

Ward 1 I2S4.G5 

Ward 2 51.90 

Ward 3 395.30 

Ward 4 38.3.37 

Ward 5 1,817.13 

Ward 6 663.13 

Ward 7 157.25 

Ward 8 675.33 

Ward 9 1,281.51 

15,709.57 

MISCELLANEOUS BILLS ALLOWED. 

Printing and stationery 137.75 

F. X. Chenette, burial of Fillia 

Welcome 17.50 

State Industrial School, board of 

inmates 2,878.00 

12,933.25 

Total amount allowed |8,642.82 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 417 

Cash collected and paid to the city treasurer 
as follows: 
From Perre Daniel, for board of 

Emma Daniel flG.OO 

From county of Hillsborough, for 

board of inmates State Industrial 

School 2,689.50 

12,705.50 

Total cost to the city $5,937.32 

There are uncollected bills due the city amounting to 
four hundred and thirty-nine dollars and seventy-two 
cents. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 
Ward 1, WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 
Ward 2, T. L. QUIMBY, 
Ward 3, B. F. GARLAND, 
Ward 4, CHARLES B. CLARKSON, 
Ward 5, PATRICK COSTELLO, 
Ward 6, CHARLES FRANCIS, 
Ward 1, WILLIAM MARSHALL, 
Ward 8, C. S. McKEAN, 
Ward 9, THOMAS C. STEWART, 
Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 
A true copy of records. Attest. 

William H. Maxwell, 

Clerk of the Board. 



Aid to Soldiers, Sailors, and their Dependent 
Families. 

To the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

In compliance with sections 1 and 2, chapter 81, Laws 
of the state of New Hampshire, passed at the June ses- 
sion, 1881, in relation to indigent soldiers and sailors of 

27 



418 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the War of the Rebellion, the overseers of the poor here- 
with present their annual report under the head "Aid 
to soldiers and sailors and their dependent families," for 
the 3' ear 1897. 

The whole number of indigent soldiers and sailors wlio 
have had more or less assistance during the year has been 
ten, consisting of six families, all of whom have a settle- 
ment in this city, at a cost of .f 128.74, 

All of which is respectfull}' submitted. 
Ward 1, WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 
Ward 2, T. L. QUIMBY, 
Ward 3, B. F. GARLAND, 
Ward 4, CHARLES B. CLARKSON, 
Ward 5, PATRICK COSTELLO, 
Ward 6, CHARLES FRxlNCIS, 
Ward 7, WILLIAM MARSHALL, 
Ward 8, C. S. McKEAN, 
Ward 9, THOMAS C. STEWART, 
Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 
A true copy of records. Attest. 

William H. Maxwell, 

Clerk of the Board. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor: 

The Board of Health submit the following report for 
the year 1897: 

Mr, John C. Bickford having been appointed to succeed 
William J. Starr, the board organized by re-electing Dr. 
C. W. Downing president and William K. Bobbins clerk. 
The last of April we were called to mourn the death of 
Dr. C. W. Downing, and May first Dr. William M. Parsons 
was appointed to serve out the unexpired term. Mr. 
John C. Bickford was then elected president of the board 
for the remainder of the year. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Salaries 1629.17 

Labor 2,365.38 

Office furniture 61.39 

Printing and advertising 186.83 

Postage and envelopes " 24.65 

Traveling expenses (teams and carfare) 178.10 

Express 11.95 

Telephone service .36.75 

Gas 4.24 

Legal expenses 13.00 

Fumigating lamps 24.60 

24 samples water analyzed 60.00 

Experimental plumbing work 24.60 

Antitoxine 228.93 

42J 



422 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Diphtlieria examinations $140.00 

Disinfectants 230.60 

Aid given families quarantined 98.27 

Board, fuel, etc., for pest-house 83.01 

Sundries 3G.39 



14,442.86 

The expenditure for labor is somewhat less than usual 
this year on account of changes in the inspectors em- 
ployed. Disinfectants and apparatus therefor have cost 
more than usual, for tv^o reasons: First, because this is 
the first whole year in which the board has done all the 
fumigation after contagious diseases, and second, be- 
cause the formaldehyde process is somewhat more ex- 
pensive, and, besides, there was a larger number of cases 
of contagious disease. Also the outbreak of diphtheria 
at the Children's Home and among the pupils attending 
the Pearl-street school occasioned an extra amount of 
fumigation. In all 601 rooms were fumigated, making 
the average cost per room about 39 cents. The process 
has worked well so far as we can determine, and from the 
reports of many capable investigators who have made 
careful and satisfactory tests with it we feel warranted 
in continuing the use of the formaldehyde gas fumigation. 
The expense for antitoxine and culture tests for diph- 
theria is also larger, because the physicians have em- 
ployed them more and apparently with good results, since 
the fatality from this disease has been reduced by eleven 
per cent compared with that of last year. 

MEETINGS. 

The regular weekly meetings have been continued, the 
time having been changed from Wednesday evenings to 
Tuesday evenings at seven o'clock. The public have 
become accustomed to this, so that special meetings have 
been seldom necessary. About the usual number of spe- 
cial meetings for trips of inspection have been held. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 423, 

INSPECTORS. 

Earh' in the year Mr. Clough severed bis connection 
with the board and no inspector was hired in his stead 
until July, when Mr. William B. Blake was employed. 

Mr. Barrj' retired May first and Mr. Carl O. Seaman 
was employed to give special attention to the enforcement 
of the plumbing regulations. 

THE TLUMBING RULES. 

. Mr. Seaman is a journeyman plumber, whose skill and 
good judgment have been well shown in this city by 
actual experience at the trade. Before beginning his 
duties as inspector he went to Boston and worked with 
the jilumbing inspectors in all parts of that city. Enter- 
ing upon his duties he modified the methods of inspec- 
tion previously" employed in many respects, the most im- 
I)ortant being the system of calking in all ferrules with 
lead-pipe starts, and calking in iron traps, then applying 
the water test to all with the stack. This system, has 
worked very satisfactorily. 

It seems necessary to use cellar drains in some sec- 
tions of the city, and these are usually connected with 
the main sewer. As a precaution of safety when the 
main sewer becomes clogged, or is flooded by hard show- 
ers, the board have required such cellar drains to be pro- 
vided with back-water valves or some other device satis- 
factory to the plumbing inspector. 

Many requests are still made for permission to locate 
water closets in cellars and basements, and in all such 
cases the premises are examined by the plumbing in- 
spector before permission is granted, and the citizens 
have thus been able to avail themselves of the valuable 
counsel of a. skilled and disinterested plumber in the loca- 
tion and arrangement of their plumbing, often at a sav- 
ing of expense to themselves and always avoiding unsan- 
itary conditions. 



424 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

There are a great many varieties of sanitary traps upon 
the market and an equal variety of claims made for and 
against them. The board has been often asked to ex- 
press an opinion for or against such traps, but has re- 
frained from doing so from lack of unbiased information. 
Therefore the plumbing inspector was instructed to use 
his spare moments in fixing up at the office an apparatus 
for testing traps. This is now completed and most of 
the varieties of traps have been secured and provided 
with windows so that the seal and the action of liquids 
passing through may be observed, and we shall soon be 
in possession of valuable original information upon this 
subject, and citizens who are interested may visit the 
office and see for themselves the action of any trap on the 
market. 

The regulations in general have been well complied 
with and the plumbing workmanship of the city steadily 
improves from year to year. 

SCHOOLHOUSES. 

Early in the summer the plumbing inspector was in- 
structed to make an examination of the drainage of all 
the schoolhouses, which he did, and his report, which is 
herewith included, was sent to the school board and the 
committee on lands and buildings of the city councils. 
All the principal defects noted were repaired during the 
summer vacation and at the Ash-street school the entire 
plumbing system was remodeled and relocated. 

A number of cases of diphtheria having occurred 
among the pupils attending the Pearl-street school, it 
was closed by the school board and the matter referred 
to the board of health. Careful inspection and examina- 
tion of the building was made by the board in connection 
with the sub-committee of the school. While nothing 
could be found to indicate that the disease originated 
there, it seemed quite probable that it had been trans- 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 425 

mitted from pupil to pupil there. The place was thor- 
oughly fumigated, the basements whitewashed, the 
drinking cups boiled in soda, solution, and the stock of 
lead pencils burned. The building was declared sanitary 
and the scliools opened, a special report of the findings 
being submitted to jour honor at the time. 

TENEMENT BLOCKS. 

About the same number of tenement blocks required 
attention this year as last. In some the entire system 
of drainage was condemned and modern arrangements 
substituted at the instance of this board. There are yet 
many blocks where the drainage is far from satisfactory 
and must soon be replaced. In some places the old 
vaults have been connected with the sewer, making 
latrines of them, in others small latrines have been in- 
stalled in place of water closets. All these, as usually 
cared for in tenement property, are nuisances and no 
better — often worse — than the old privy vaults, and their 
eradication is equally necessary. In a number of places 
where sewer connections have been required, the old- 
style direct-pressure water closets have been set outside, 
but it is found that to save the expense of water, and the 
danger tof freezing, the water is shut off for weeks at a 
time, and they become more offensive and dangerous than 
the old vaults. The setting of water closets out of doors 
is now earnestly discouraged b}' the board. 

DISPOSAL OF GARBAGE. 

It is a matter of sincere regret that the past year has 
brought no improvement in the place or manner of dis- 
posing of waste and rubbish. We would therefore re- 
iterate the suggestions of previous reports and if possi- 
ble make them more emphatic. 

The clean swill is gathered by private swill gatherers 



426 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and the city-farm teams; the latter taking- what is left by 
the former, who often mix what they leave with ashes 
and dirt to such an extent that it cannot be taken as swi-ll 
and is left by both. This, with all wastes and refuse of 
the streets and alleys, is collected by the scavenfjjer teams 
of the street department. There is not the slightest 
effort made to keep the perishable and imperishable mat- 
ters separate, as required by city ordinance. Tliis is 
now, as in the past, carted to low land and used as tilling, 
ostensibly for streets but often practically for building 
lots, the principal locality being along the valley of Cem- 
etery brook, which is typical of all the others. Formerly 
these fills known as the city dumps were a considerable 
distance from residence property, but as the city has 
grown, dwellings have been erected all about them, 
some almost on them. 

"NAliat are these dumps then? Simply huge piles, often 
twent}' to thirty feet deep, of all imaginable kinds of 
refuse, the greater bulk being of perishable matter, much 
of it when gathered being dry enough to burn. The rest 
is swill that has been spilled or deliberately mixed with 
so much other rubbish that it is unfit for feed or fertilizer, 
tin cans containing portions of vegetables, fish, or meat, 
papers and rags that are too much soiled to be fit for sale 
as paper stock, and the promiscuous materials gathered 
from lawns, gardens, and the back streets. The ashes, 
brick, lime, etc., constituting imperishable matter is 
ostensibly used to cover the rest, but practically it is 
mixed with the rest and no attemi)t is made at covering 
worthy the name. 

In these great piles there is always moisture enough 
to keep up a fermenting and rotting process. They are 
perfect culture media for all sorts of germs and from the 
nature of the material it is safe to presume the presence 
of all those causing the common contagious and infec- 
tious diseases. For these germs there is ample chance 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 427 

for distribution bv the winds, by rag picliers stirring up 
the surface, by flies swarming about the filthier portions, 
and probably most of all by rats which infest these dumps 
in great numbers, and overrun the neighboring dwelling 
houses. They burrow through the entire mass making 
holes w^hich serve as vents for the foul and dangerous 
odors and gases that are constantly being generated in 
volumes far exceeding all the sewer gas of the entire city. 
A small heap of such refuse upon any street or premises 
in the city would be complained of as a nuisance and we 
would compel the owner or person responsible to remove 
or abate it. But these immense dumps which are much 
more dangerous nuisances, and which if is quite impos- 
sible to remove or abate, are built by officials of the city, 
and so far we have been unable to prevent it. 

Collecting refuse from many streets and piling it up 
in a few to rot is not cleaning the city. The material 
might better lie scattered about the streets exposed to 
the purifying effects of sun and air. Therefore of the 
116,000 appropriated for scavenger service all has been 
worse than wasted so far as the sanitary condition of the 
city is concerned, except the small proportion paid to the 
city farm for work that has been well and faithfulh' per- 
formed. 

We therefore consider these dumps as unclean, un- 
sightly, unsanitary, disgusting, and dangerous to the 
public health. Not wishing to take our own views as 
final in so important a matter, we early in the year sent 
a circular letter to the physicians of the city asking their 
opinion of the method adopted by the city for the dispo- 
sition of wastes. Thirty-one replies were received, all 
condemning the system and declaring it dangerous to 
the public health. A communication was sent to the city 
government regarding this matter, and certain amend- 
ments to the city ordinances were proposed^ which it was 
thought might aid in the separation of the various kinds 



428 . ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

of refuse and thus improve the sanitary condition of the 
city. Botli tlie communication and the amendments 
were disregarded and the same old system continued 
without the slightest endeavor to remedy the evils com- 
plained of. In view of this fact and the numerous 
complaints of citizens, your board felt compelled, in jus- 
tice to themselves, the complainants, and the general 
public, to ask the supreme court to issue an injunction 
against the creation of these dumps within the sanitary 
limits of the city. Considering the plea of poverty and 
promises of greater care in collecting on the part of 
the officials having the work in charge, the matter has 
been allowed to rest without a hearing to the present 
time, but the board feels that it is their duty to ask the 
court to give an early hearing upon the petition and deter- 
mine whether or not the public health is to be continually 
endangered in this matter. 

Whatever the manner of final disposal, it is essential 
that the perishable and imperishable wastes be kept 
apart, and the first condition necessary to this end is 
that they be collected separately, because people will 
not keep them separate when all are mixed in the same 
cart for removal. To aid in this direction we would 
renew our request that private swill gatherers be put 
under license regulation. 

The only really sanitary manner of final disposal of 
such refuse is by burning. Crematories such as would 
dispose of all the refuse of this city are in successful oper- 
ation in other cities. If such cannot be had on account 
of the expense, then only the moist and putrifying portion 
should be collected and that taken to a considerable dis- 
tance from the city and there disposed of under orders 
from the board of mayor and aldermen as specified in 
chapter 9 of the city ordinances. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



429 



ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

The only place to which we can remove a case of con- 
tagious disease at present is the old makeshift known as 
the pest-house, located in the most popular park of the 
city. It grows poorer each year, so that now the service 
it renders is not worth what it costs the city to support it. 
We would once more respectfully urge upon your Honor 
and the city councils the great and immediate need of 
an Isolation Hospital. 

The following tables show the number of cases of con- 
tagious and infectious diseases reported during each 
month of the year, and the deaths resulting therefrom; 
also the average number of cases and deaths for the last 
tw^elve years, which is inserted for purposes of com- 
parison. 





Membra- 
nous 
croup. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Vario- 
loid. 


Totals. 


Months. 


0? 

31 


Q 


• t ^ 

m . ^ 
o — 
CO si 


cj 


in 

03 




o5 

03 

03 
O 


oi 
1 


o5 

V 
yi 

O 


Deaths. 

Cases. 


2 

V 

Q 




Q 


January — 


1 


1 


34 
15 
10 
21 
13 
1 


7 
2 
2 
2 

1 


4 
6 

1 

4 
5 
1 

11 
17 
13 
10 
5 

7S 


1 



1 

4 
3 

1 
1 

11 


252 
71 
31 
6 
4 
9 
3 
5 


2 

1 


1 








292 
92 
42 
33 
26 
IS 
5 
20 
41 
41 
41 
35 

681 


10 
4 
2 
5 
2 


February... . 








Marcli 














April 


2 

1 
1 


3 
3 

1 




2 

4 
2 
1 
1 
12 
8 
11 
12 

54 








May 








June 








July 








1 








2 
12 
19 
10 
11 

148 


5 

7 
1 
2 

'J9 








September. . 












9 

10 

5 








1 
2 

6 

387 


3 


1 






November.. 


8 

1 

14 


2 

1 

10 


December... 






4 
54 


Totals... 


1 















430 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 





Membra- 

UOU9 

croup. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Vario- 
loid. 


Totals. 


Years. 


in 


CO 

'S 

Q 


09 


'a 

Q 


at 
« 

c3 
O 


P5 


<v 
OS 


03 

Qi 



in 

a; 
to 

OJ 

O 


o 
Q 




CD 


V 

tn 
eS 


in 

« 

Q 


1885 


* 
* 

* 
* 

* 

• 
* 
* 
12 
17 
17 
14 


* 

* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
12 
11 
14 
10 


* 

73 

126 

79 

41 

21 

26 

7 

42 

47 

103 

148 


18 

9 

17 

30 

23 

9 

2 

5 

1 

11 

11 

28 

29 


* 
* 
28 
35 
36 
36 
76 
33 
79 
74 
73 
81 
78 


20 
12 
18 
12 
16 
17 
18 
11 
15 
21 
21 
20 
11 


* 

* 

94 

44 

259 
63 
25 
44 

110 
67 
55 

500 

387 


5 

4 

1 
5 
3 

2 
5 
3 
4 
3 
3 


* 

* 

* 

187 

54 

298 

89 

451 

212 

223 

68 

61 

54 


36 
6 
9 
9 
4 
6 
2 

11 
2 

8 
1 

1 
1 


* 
* 




* 
* 
* 
392 
428 
438 
211 
554 
408 
418 
260 
763 
681 


79 


1886 


•>« 


1887 


48 


1888 






5" 


1889 


48 


1890 






^^5 


1891 






?"> 


1892 






oq 


1893 






23 


1894 






55 


1895 






4S 


1896 


I 




6fi 


1897 


54 











Inspection of these tables will show that the deaths 
from these diseases for 1S97 is about an averajie of the 
previous three years. The remarkable prevalence of 
measles in January, February, and March swells the cases 
reported to an unusually large number. 

Diphtheria was pervalent during the winter months. 
The cases reported exceed those of 1896 by forty-five, 
while only a single death more than those of 1896 was 
recorded, thus making a considerable decrease in the 
percentage of deaths. That this is due in part to the in- 
creased employment of the antitoxine treatment there 
seems scarcely a doubt. The quarantine and disinfection 
have been carefully followed this year as last, and no 
case has been traced to another that had been jireviously 
recognized. 

*No returns ruade during this j'car. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 
DEATH RETURNS. 



431 



TABLE SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES 
AND BY MONTHS FOR THE YEAB 1897. 



Causes of Death. 


1-5 


>> 

s 

p 

« 


1 






a 

3 
1-5 


1-5 


03 

3 

P 
< 


g 
a 


u 

;= 
o 

o 

O 


3 

S 

> 
o 

IZi 


s 

u 





Abscess in head 

" of parotid gland 
















1 




1 












1 

1 














12 




1 








1 


1 










Accident, cerebral corn- 


1 
















Accident, crushed by 










1 

1 














Accident, drowned 






1 




2 


6 

1 








... . 


2 


" duri'g deliv'ry 

" g'nsbot wound 

Accident, inhaled burn- 






1 




•••• 




















....1...- 








Accident, overdo s e ofl 








1 


















I 






1 






1 




1 




Accident, smothered 












1 


Accident, thrown from 


















1 


1 




Alcoholism, acute 






1 














6 














2 


1 






1 
1 
1 


"i' 

2 












I 


1 
1 


1 


2 


Aneurism of aorta 














Angina pectoris 




1 
2 


















Apoplexy, cerebral 


2 


4 


4 


1 


1 


3 


1 


2 


4 




26 

1 
2 
3 
3 
4 
3 
5 
1 


" & heart disease. 
















2 
1 

"i' 
1 














1 












1 












1 




"i' 




2 






" congestion of. .... 




i 


1 
















1 


" inflammation of. . 




"i' 




1 






1 


" paralysis of 












' ■■■ 


" soften ing of 










1 

1 










" tumor of 






1 


"i' 
1 

2 

i 














2 

1 
58 
18 
9 
1 
4 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 
4 
3 
1 
1 


Breast, carcinoma of 








2 
1 

1 


2 

1 
3 


"3* 

1 


"3' 
2 

1 


Bronchitis 

" capillary 

" chronic 

Cancer, abdominal 




6 
2 

1 


17 
2 


6 

2 


4 


5 


2 


1 




1 
1 


" of breast 




1 
















1 


1 


" of bowels 


1 
















" of face 


















1 


" of head 






1 


2 

1 
















" of neck 






















" of rectum 




1 
















2 




" serpiginous — 




















" of stomach . ... 








1 
1 




1 


2 










" of uterus 






1 












Catarrh, intestinal 














1 




Cerebritls 












1 








Caries of ilium 


1 




















Cholera infantum 


1 


3 


2 


2 


26 


29 


26 

] 
1 


17 


1 


3 


no 
1 
2 


Cholera infantum and 
bronchitis 




Cholera infantum and 
dentition 
















1 







432 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

TABLE.— Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


s 


>> 

s 


1 

s 


< 


3 


3 

1-5 


>. 
*? 


CO 

3 
SB 


s 

.a 

5 
p. 


o 
o 

O 


s 

® 
> 
o 
1^ 


3 

5 
o 

« 


o 
H 
















1 












1 




















1 






1 


" of liver 




2 
















1 


1 
1 


4 


















1 


Complication of diseases 
(hearty liver & kidneys) 

Convulsions 

Croup, membranous 

** spasmodic 


















1 
2 

i 
1 

3 

1 
3 
2 






1 


7 
1 

1 


4 


2 


3 
3 
1 


2 
2 


. .. 


3 


1 




2 
2 


1 
i 


29 
10 






1 








1 
3 


^ 


















8 




















1 


Dentition 

" and diarrliea. . 


1 


1 


2 






2 


2 


2 
1 








H 










s 


2 


1 
1 
1 




::;;:::: 


1 










4 


" mellitus 

Diarrhea, clnonic. 




1 
















•^ 














1 




■^ 














1 
5 

1 
2 




1 




7 


2 


2 


2 

1 




1 








1 

1 


2 
.... 


?9 








2 
















2 


R 










1 






1 


Eclampsia 

" & pneumonia 
Elephantiasis and val. 


1 












1 










3 




















1 






















1 


1 












1 

1 
1 
1 


1 

"i' 






"i 






2 








1 


1 
2 








1 


4 








4 


9 












2 












1 












1 


Enteritis and cerebral 














1 
1 










1 










2 






1 








1 


6 












' 1 


1 
























1 








1 














1 


.... 


? 












1 










1 










1 








1 








3 
















1 






1 








1 


















1 






















1 




1 
















1 
1 








1 












i 

"i' 
1 






4 




, 1 


2 


T2 






1 










1 




1 




3 

1 
1 




1 




R 










2 










1 




3 


1 




1 


"i' 


8 










1 


Heart, disease of 

Heart, disease of, and 


1 






1 




2 

1 


1 


1 


3 3 


1 


13 
1 














1 

1 






j 1 


. 




2 


Heart disease & pulmo- 






















1 


Heart, cardiac insuffi- 
ciency 










.... 




' 1 




1 




1 


3 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 
TABLi:.—Co7ilinued. 



433 



Causes of Death. 


3 


>> 




< 




6 

a 
a 




S 
60 

< 


a 

« 
en 


» 

o 
o 
O 


^4 
o 

s 

ID 
> 
O 


g 


d 
O 


Heart, cardiac hypertro- 
phy 

" degeneration of, 




















1 






1 




















1 
1 




1 


" dilatation of 






1 
















9 


" fatty degenera- 














1 
1 






1 


" mitral lesion of .. 








1 
















2 


" mitral regurgita- 












2 













" non-development 
of 
















1 








1 
























1 


1 




















1 






1 








1 
3 


















1 


" valvular disease 
of. 


4 


6 


1 


2 


6 


3 


1 




1 


2 
2 


1 
"i' 


'^n 




2 
























1 


" meningeal 
" post parti- 






















1 


1 














1 








1 






















1 




1 












1 












1 
























1 


1 










1 

3 


' i' 


"i" 


1 
4 


2 
3 


1 
1 






5 




2 


7 


2 


4 

1 


2 


1 


SI 




1 






2 


3 
1 


















5 
























1 














1 












1 


Kidneys, cystic degene- 
















1 
1 








1 


Kidneys, disease of su- 
























1 










2 
















2 


" and complica- 










1 














1 


Laryngitis, acute 

" acute c a - 


1 






















1 


1 






















T 








' 














1 


1 




















1 
1 






1 








1 










, 








2 


" chronic atrophy 
of 










1 












1 








1 
1 


















1 


Lungs, congestion of — 


3 


1 
1 






3 




1 








1 


10 












1 








1 


















1 














1 












1 






















1 




1 












1 












1 




1 






1 


2 






1 


2 






7 












1 




1 


Measles 


2 
2 


1 

2 


















3 


Meningitis 


4 


2 








■2 


1 


1 






14 



434 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
T ABL¥.. —Co7iimued. 



Causes of Death. 






a 


P. 
< 




g 


>. 

§ 


1 


4) 

s 

4) 

as 


o 
O 


<o 

s 

• > 
o 


u 
o 

1 

V 

o 




"5 
1 




2 






2 
1 


2 


1 


1 










3 i 11 


'* cerebro-spi- 


1 

2 


4 






4 




1 i 11 


Meningitis, tubercular.. 


4 


1 






2 
1 


1 


1 


11 














1 














1 












o 






















1 

1 


1 




7 

1 


4 


3 


3 

1 




3 






2 


2 


i* 

1 


26 








3 




















1 


Neuritis, multiple, and 




















1 

,1 


1 




3 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


"' 


1 




1 




14 




1 


*' and senile gan- 






















1 
2 


1 




1 


3 




2 


2 


1 

1 


1 


2 


2 




2 


20 




1 


Paraplegia, \yitli asthe- 
















1 








1 






















1 


1 




1 
2 


1 




1 




"i" 


1 
3 


2 
4 




2 

1 
1 


"i' 


1 


10 


Pertussis .,.. 


13 
1 


** 1 and meningitis 


















1 
7 






1 


Phthisis pulraoaal is 

** l^ulmonalis and 


9 


6 


9 


6 




5 


6 


6 


10 

1 


4 


6 


87 
1 




















2 
6 


2 




15 

1 


7 
5 


16 
2 

1 


9 
3 


12 


3 
2 


2 


' 1 1 
1 4 


5 


4 
2 

1 


SI 


'* broncho 


20 
2 


*' pleuro 


1 




1 














2 


1 


















1 






j 
















1 


1 






1 


1 
4' 
















1 




2 


4 3 




7 
1 


3 


3 






3 


7 


41 


Pyelitis 


1 




















1 




1 












1 
2 










1 








1 




1 












4 


Shock, from surgical op- 


1 


1 












1 


«* from injury to 














1 
2 








1 














1 


"i" 








3 


Spina bifida 
















1 


Stenosis, mitral, and in- 
















1 
9 








1 




11 


5 


11 


8 

1 




5 


4 


6 


10 


6 


9 


91 




1 
















1 










1 


Stomach, ulceration of, 


























1 








1 


.... 


1 
.... 












Sunstroke 




. . .. 




2 








.... 


2 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 
TABLE.— Co7iti}tued. 



435 



Causes of Death. 


i 

1-5 


>> 

03 

a 
2 


p 

s 


ft 


^ 
S 


2 
5 

i-s 




00 

s 

SB 

P 


s 

s 

ft 
a> 



« 



45 

S 

CI 

> 



;4 

.a 

a 

« 
aj 
Q 


3 











1 


















1 




1 

2 










1 
1 






' 






2 






2 




3 


3 


1 


3 
1 

1 


4 


4 


2 


25 




1 


Tumor, abdominal 
























1 














. . . . 












1 






1 
1 
2 




















1 






















1 
1 


"i" 

1 

86 


2 


Unknown 


5 








1 


2 


.... 




"2' 


q 










6 


UraBmia and diabetes 














1 


Total 


128 


"97" 


119 


97 


83 


lo" 


109 


104 


126 


118 


77 


1124 







436 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CO 
> 






o 

CO 

O 

l-H 

H 

CZ5 

I— I 

H 
< 
H 

i-J 
H 



fa 
O 

CZ) 

;?; 
o 

CO 
l-H 

C3 
<1 
Ph 
1^ 
O 

o 
o 



.-H CO r-i W QO O ;D I— I r-1 



O O I— iCO »o 



'^Oic-iooo*-it-"r— I— iCicoM 



O O COCi 
O O lO 



(M GO t— 

CO C2 c^ 

55 05C0 CO^OO'^OCSOlC'^i-HrHC-l 



Jt^t-O iTi Ci C5 CO O "* -Tj* ^ :o ^H iM CO CO ■* 



•^.b lo 



rp I— c-1 »-i ic x< if^ 



<MC50i-<J*r-i'«!j<eo^iCii;5(M(M 



OCOOO I— ( OCO COCOC5COOCSOS'»(Mr-(i— I 

o^cic- o I— lie ooD eoco-^ 1— ii-( 



o o c:i CO -^ OD-H 

O CO l-H Ci -^ CO 



CO t- 

C^G-t ICi— (-"^lOCiGOOOCOC 
lO -^ 03 I— I CO O "^ 



CS-^l-CO CO COOS ■^COOSuOCOiiTSXilr^ir^CO'^CO 

cop,— (lio -^ a oct-c^oiMco'* r-i 



CO «C CI Ci -^ 



CO c: t— 



K0i«05-^Ot^»J^C0i^<MC:iO 
^OC^COCO'^C^ ri 



C<» rl.— I 



•^ ^ la 



coco CD CO CO »C Ir- C5 C; »C -^ t- 00 r-( 
'^ Oi ©fl l-H (M CO "* —1 



CO C-1 I— I -H '.* 



iC »C O --H Oi l-H tC i 



C-l t-irH 



<— I O C-1 1— " C-1 M 



'^COCsei (Tl CO'-' C0C5C0G^:0CiC1OiCOC0i-HC0C0C5'<*< 
COCOr-t— ' "* W XC5i— 11— iC^-^Ji-^ CJCOrH 0(N0 



■" 







ts 


>> 




;3 


0) 














Q. 




a 








cc 


-o 


a 


- 


s 



.2-0 o 



- ^ ■S 5 £ ' 



^ _ g 

a So 

sis 






J— o 
> a; q; « 



Oj > OJ 

oi-S Or^'^'d „ 

"^T^3 *"* 'a Qi A ^ m on a 
— ; -^ O *■ « r''t^ ^ ^1J-3 S*;S CiIT':^*;! 



KEPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 437 

Again we must note an increase in the deaths of chil- 
dren, and by reference to table beginning on page 431 it 
will be seen that the causes of death are very largely 
ailments that are preventable by sufficient care and 
proper food. 

Consumption (various forms of tuberculosis) still 
claims eleven per cent of the total deaths. With these 
two matters we can do little more than has been done 
until further legislation empowers us to control the sale 
of milk and requires consumption to be reported the same 
as the other contagious diseases, so that we may work 
intelligently toward its prevention. 

Pneumonia and its varieties caused ten per cent of the 
total deaths, and bronchitis eight and one half per cent. 
These are both much higher than last year. As they are 
not contagious diseases they are not usually considered 
as coming within the realm of officers of public health, 
but as they commonly follow exposure of weakened sys- 
tems, it seems proper that the public be at least warned 
of their fatality and reminded that they are in greater 
part preventable by sufficient care. 

We include herewith the report of the health inspec- 
tors, the plumbing inspector, upon the school buildings, 
and a special report of the board upon the Pearl-street 
schoolhouse. 

In conclusion we would express our thanks to your 
Honor and the city councils, as well as many citizens who 
have given us encouraging assistance. 

Respectfully submitted. 
JOHN C. BICKFORD, 
WILLIAM K. ROBBINS, 
WILLIAM M. PARSONS, M. D., 
Board of Health. 

Manchester, N. H., October 30, 1897. 



REPORT ON PEARL-STREET SCHOOLHOUSE. 



Eon. William C. Clarice, Mayor and Chairman of ScJiool 

Committee: 

Dear Sik, — Eight cases of diphtheria, two of them 
fatal, having been reported from the Pearl-street school, 
some alarm was felt among the pupils of that district and 
the sub-committee closed the school, requesting the board 
of health to make the proper investigation and decide 
when the school might be opened with safety. Accord- 
ingly this board, together with the sub-committee of the 
school and interested citizens, have made three special 
inspections of the building, in both favorable and unfa- 
vorable weathei', and with varying conditions and uses 
of the warming and ventilating apparatus, w^hich is of the 
Smead system. We have not been able to produce back 
drafts and can find no evidence that foul air from the 
closets has entered the school rooms, nor can we find any 
indication that the building was a casual factor in the 
breaking out of diphtheria among the pupils. 

As this disease becomes infectious in its earlier stages, 
there was possible communication of it among the pupils 
by personal contact and the common use by all of the 
drinking cups and lead pencils. 

The dark closet where slight odors were detected has 
been torn out. The basement walls have been white- 
washed; the pencils burned; the drinking cups boiled in 
strong lye and washed, and the building thoroughly fumi- 
gated. 

We can therefore report to you that we believe the 
Pearl-street school is entirely free from danger of diph- 

438 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 439 

theria or other contagious disease, and recommend that 
the school be opened for regular work Monday, November 
1. In this connection we would suggest the use of indi- 
vidual drinking cups and lead pencils in all the schools. 
JOHN C. BICKFOED, 
WILLIAM K. ROBBINS, 
WILLIAM M. PARSONS, M. D., 
Board of Health. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Health: 

We beg leave to submit the following as the report of 
the sanitary inspectors for the year 1897 : 

Vaults and privies inspected 706 

Vaults inspected after cleaning , 318 

Water closets inspected 1,995 

Yards and alleys inspected. . : 1,491 

Cellars inspected 2,290 

Barns and outbuildings inspected 194 

Tenements inspected 552 

Barn cellars inspected 173 

Latrines inspected 26 

Teams and riggings of excavators inspected. ... 22 

Soaperies, slaughter-houses, etc., inspected.... 21 

Cleaning or repairs were ordered as follows: 

Vaults and privies cleaned 148 

Yards and alleys cleaned 420 

Cellars cleaned 766 

Barn cellars cleaned. 59 

Sheds, etc., cleaned 51 

Tenements cleaned 84 

Water closets cleaned or repaired 584 

Vault covers repaired 8 

Leaky drainpipes repaired Ill 

Houses within 100 feet of a public sewer and not con- 
nected therewith, 51. 

Openings other than leaks in the drainage system were 
found in 24 places, and same were closed by order of the 

440 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 441 

department. One thousand five hundred and five sinks 
have been examined, and 415 have been provided with 
traps. 

Sewage was found running on the surface of the 
ground in 87 places, and such nuisances were abated 
either by entering the sewer or carrjing away in some 
manner not offensive. 

In doing the worlv of the department it has been neces- 
sary to malie 3,230 calls, and to write 1,051 letters. 

Two hundred and eighty-nine complaints have been 
investigated. In 225 cases the inspectors have been able 
to give relief, and in 64 cases it was found that no cause 
existed, or that same was beyond the control of the de- 
partment. 

Seventeen dead animals have been properly disposed 
of. 

One hundred and twenty-five hens and small animals 
have been removed from cellars. 

Twenty-eight swine and cows have been discovered 
being kept within the sanitary limits of the city, without 
licenses. Same were ordered removed or licenses 
procured. 

Twenty complaints were made against the scavenger 
service; in each case the proper parties were notified and 
relief afforded. 

Twenty-seven persons were discovered throwing gar- 
bage in the back streets and lake, and were warned 
against the practice. 

Private swill collectors have been warned forty-five 
times to be neater in their work. 

Twenty-six catch-basins or street cesspools have been 
flushed or repaired by order of this department. 

Eighty-five notices have been prepared and served, 
and proper returns made. 

A sanitary inspection has been made of 21 bakeshops. 



442 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Two theatres were ordered cleaned and put into proper 
sanitary condition. 

Circus gronnjds have been inspected G times, and nui- 
sances abated 3 times. 

Stable bedding was found in back street in 21 places^ 
and ordered removed. 

The dumps have been inspected 38 times, and nuisances 
there to the number of 4 abated by the street department. 

One hundred and fourteen nuisances not otherwise clas- 
sified have been abated through the efforts of this depart- 
ment. 

Thirteen samples of water secured from Lake Massa- 
besic and springs and wells about the city have been 
sent away for analysis. 

Householders have been given 26 permits to clean their 
own vaults. 

Permits to the number of 1,517 have been granted for 
the burial or removal of dead bodies, and the returns for- 
warded to the city registrar. 

A statement of mortality has been prepared each 
month, and copies sent to over two hundred other towns 
and cities, to local physicians, etc. 

Contagious and infectious diseases have been reported 
as follows: Measles, 380; diphtheria, 149; tj'phoid fever, 
78; scarlet fever, 54; membranous croup, 14; varioloid, 
0; total, 081. Five hundred and seven of these cases were 
reported by physicians, 102 by householders, and 72 were 
discovered by the inspectors. The inspectors were 
unable to trace the cause in 377 cases; in 273 cases the 
connection with some previous case was clearly trace- 
able. Colds were probably the cause in 15 cases; G cases 
were contracted outside of the city; and in 8 cases it was 
reasonable to attribute the cause to unsanitary sur- 
roundings. 

In 119 cases disinfectants were being used. The in- 
spectors ordered their use in 183 cases. At most of these 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 443 

latter places mstrnctioiis were given as to their use, and 
in many cases the department furnished the disinfect- 
ants. 

Bedding burned for contagious diseases 3 times. 

In 62 cases patients were found well isolated, and in 
198 cases inspectors were obliged to order isolation. In 
nearly all of these cases it was necessary for the inspec- 
tors to give instructions as to the steps to be taken. 

Nine houses were watched to see that the rules of iso- 
lation were complied with; and 7 funerals were attended 
to prevent a too public observance of the same. 

Six hundred and one rooms where disease had existed 
were fumigated by the inspectors. 

One hundred and six children who were attending 
school, and 57 people who were working and living in 
houses where contagious disease existed, were either re- 
strained from attending school and employment, or in- 
structed as. to thorough isolation from the disease until 
all danger from contagion had jjassed. 

Nine cases have been cared for at the contagious dis- 
ease hospital. 

Four hundred and forty-two houses have been pla- 
carded, and the placards removed at the termination of 
the disease. 

About 3,000 pamphlets issued by the State Board of 
Health have been distributed in the localities where con- 
tagious disease existed. 

Weekly reports of contagious and infectious diseases 
have been sent to the State Board of Health, Concord, 
and the United States Marine Hospital service, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

The inspectors have each in turn patroled the shores of 
Lake Massabesic, Sundays, holidays, and part of every 
other day from June 1 to October 1. 

Thirteen people who were found bathing in the lake 
were driven out and warned not to enter it again. 



444 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Twenty-seven dead fish were removed from the lake 
or its shores, and buried. 

Urinals and slophoppers inspected, 34. 

Found unsanitary, 7. 

Steamboats inspected 21 times. 

Warned parties about throwing swill in lake 20 times. 

Found swill and other refuse close to cottages 15 times. 

Nine persons were warned as to the disposal of sink- 
water. 

Four parties were caught washing clothes in the lake, 
and one throwing w^ashing water in the lake. Both were 
reprimanded and warned. 

Nuisances to the number of 114, not otherwise classi 
fled, were abated. 

Several picnics and band concerts were attended, to 
prevent the careless disposal of waste and rubbish in the 
lake or on its shore. 

Banana skins, sawdust, tin cans, paper, and rubbish of 
all sorts, have been removed whenever found. 

PLUMBING INSPECTIONS MADE. 

Number of jobs reported 669 

tank water closets 1,061 

pressure closets 32 

Kelley & Genesee closets 30 

sinks 716 

bath-tubs 451 

wash-bowls 416 

wash-trays 91 

slop-hoppers 6 

urinals 15 

Other fixtures not classed above 34 

Total number of fixtures put in 2,852 

The pipe put in was tested with water in 589 places. 
At 16 places where water was not accessible, the smoke 
test was used in place of water. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 445 

A total of 2,007 inspections were made of the work 
during its progress and after its completion. 

At 379 places work was found defective. In all such 
cases the defective work was removed and proper work 
substituted therefor. 

In several cases plurnbers were found trying to deceive 
the inspector, but in most cases the work has been more 
expertly done than in previous years, as several parties 
who were inclined to be dishonest, or were incompetent 
from lack of knowledge and experience, have discontin- 
ued the occupation. 

The inspector has been to some trouble to secure from 
his reports the following statistics as to new buildings, 
which he thinks may be interesting: 

Total number reported 217 

Single tenement buildings 74 

Two-tenement buildings 54 

Three-tenement buildings 19 

Four-tenement buildings 2 

Six-tenement buildings 2 

Nine-tenement buildings . . . . .~ 1 

Eesidences 29 

The new buildings include the Boston & Maine depot, 
Elliot Hospital Memorial building, mill for Devonshire 
Manufacturing Co., Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital, 
and 32 other buildings, viz : ten-footers, cook rooms, car- 
riage houses, stables, etc. Total number of new build- 
ings, 217; estimated value, |775,000. 

The inspectors desire to express their thanks to the 
honorable board who have so ably directed their efforts; 
also to all who have aided them in the work of the depart- 
ment. 

WILLIAM B. BLAKE. 

JOHN F. LOONEY. 
CARL O. SEAMAN. 



446 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

At the request of the board of health, riumbing In- 
spector Carl O. Seaman made an examination of the san- 
itary condition of the public schools. His report was 
forwarded to Mayor Clarke and presented to the school 
board. The document follows: 

Report of Plumbing Inspector. 

Manchester, X. H., May 29, 1897. 
To the Members of the School Board and Committee on Lands 
and Buildings: 

Gentlemen, — Believing that the health of the children 
of the city while in attendance at our public schools 
should receive the watchful care and attention of all upon 
whom any authority may rest in regard thereto, we have 
caused the several schoolhouses of the city to be in- 
spected, in order that any defects in their sanitary condi- 
tion may be made known to you, and that such repairs 
may be made during the summer vacation as seem neces- 
sary for the health of the attendants. Feeling confident 
that you will gladl}' make such changes and improve- 
ments as will insure protection against dangers from de- 
fects in the sanitary construction or condition of the 
school buildings of the city, we submit herewith the re- 
port of Mr. Carl O. Seaman, the inspector of plumbing, 
trusting that you will deem it worthy of attention with- 
out further comments from us. 

Yours very truly, 
JOHN C. BICKFOED, 
WILLIAM K. BOBBINS, 
WILLIAM M. PARSONS, M. D., 
Board of Health. 
To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with your directions I 
have examined the plumbing and sanitary condition of 
the several schoolhouses, and submit the following report 
as to their condition: 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 447 

ASH-STREET SCHOOL. 

Found plumbing very unsanitary. All water closets 
poorly flushed through a three fourths inch lead pipe, and 
nearly all without light. Could not find that the soil-pipe 
ran through the roof. Closets and plumbing in general 
very bad, and twentj^ years out of date. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOL. 

Found water closets (latrines) automatically flushed. 
Trap to sink in south end of basement sj'phons and breaks 
the seal, permitting odors to escape to second floor. 
Found blow-off to steam boiler entered in drain pipe, and 
drain pipe badly broken where blow-off enters; sewer gas 
<3ould escape freely. Found two two-inch joints of lead 
pipe to soil-pipe made with cement and loose. Found 
soil pipe carried above roof on outside of building through 
four-inch galvanized iron j^ipe. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOL. 

Found old vaults still in use. Sink waste on east side 
runs off very slowly. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Found water closets poorly lighted and flushed. Flush 
operates by door. Found two-inch joint of soil-pipe to up- 
stairs sink leaking. Soil-pipe run above roof in two 
places through four-inch galvanized pipe on outside of 
building. Plumbing in general very bad. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Found closets insufficiently flushed because they oper- 
ate by doors, and the bad odors are noticed from them 
all over the building in hot weather. Boiler blow-off 
enters sewer. Found leak in two-inch soil-pipe because 
not properly supported. Urinals very poor. Soil-pipe 
runs through roof outside in two places through galvan- 
ized iron pipes. 



448 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Foimd water closet in outhouse flushed by door; soil- 
pipe runs through roof; one sink which is thought to be 
trapped in the ground. 

SPRING-STREET -SCHOOL. 

Found Smead system in use; dry water closets in use 
in outhouse; Akron sewer pipe for four sinks in building; 
sink waste is of one-inch lead pipe. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Water closets dark; lighted by gas; poor flush operated 
by door; all supply pipes need cleaning out; principal 
complains of bad odors coming from plumbing all the 
time. Plumbing in general very bad. 

RIMMON SCHOOL. 

Wash-bowls and sinks are in good condition. Dry sys- 
tem of water closets; no odor; no complaint. 

HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Found dry system of water closets in use. Sinks all 
in good condition. Soil-pipe runs through roof. Prin- 
cipal complains of insufficient ventilation in lower story 
of building. ' 

VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Found Smead system of dry water closets in use. No- 
ticed bad odors coming from them. Found all fires out 
that keep the system going. As it depends on forced 
ventilation to keep odors out of the building, the closets 
as they are are worse than vaults in the basement. 
About one half of the closets are dark. Soil-pipe runs 
through roof through two-inch pipe in two places. One 
conductor pipe found broken. Middle room on east side 
of building, on first floor, is not properly Ventilated. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 449 

WILSON SCHOOL. 

Plumbing modern and in good condition. Not kept as 
clean as it should be. 

PEARL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Smead system of plumbing in fair condition. No com- 
plaints. Two sinks in basement need better foundation. 
Wash-bowls in some of the rooms need cementing be- 
tween bowl and slab. . 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Modern plumbing in fair condition. Water closets 
work by seat. Some need repairing. Some flush too 
soon; one not at all; and some seats need repairing. One 
sink in the girls' basement leaks in trap. 

PARKER SCHOOL. 

Modern plumbing. Several water closets on girls' 
side need repairing, and one on boys' side. 

STRAW SCHOOL. 

Modern plumbing in good condition. Urinals here out 
of date, very poor design. 

To put the buildings in proper sanitary condition, I 
would recommend the following: 

At Ash-Street School. — This entire system should be 
relocated and replaced by modern plumbing. 

At Webster-Street School. — The sink-trap in south end 
of the basement should be replaced by a non-syphon trap. 
The blow-off to the steam boiler should be disconnected 
from the sewer, and the two-inch joints of lead pipe 
should be made according to the plumbing rules. The 
Akron pipe in the basement should be replaced by iron 
pipe. The urinals should be connected with the sewer 
and provided with an automatic flush of water. 

29 



450 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

At the Franklin-street and Main-street Schools. — 
The water closets should be provided with better light, 
and changed so as to flush in a different manner. The 
urinals should be replaced b}^ a new system. The steam 
blow-off from the boiler should be disconnected from the 
sewer. 

At the Training School. — The water closets and ui'inals 
should be relocated and replaced by a new system, and 
the water supply pipes should be increased in size. 

At the Varney School and Hallsville School. — The dry 
system of closets and urinals should be replaced by a 
modern water-carriage system. 

At the Straw School. — The urinals can be made san- 
itary by supplying a slate safe and back. 

With repairs and alterations made as above, the sev- 
eral buildings will be in fair sanitary condition for the 
present, but only for the present, for I am satisfied that 
the Smead, or a similar system, with dry closets attached, 
is not desirable; that, in fact, there are too many ways by 
which, with slight negligence or oversight on the part of 
attendants, the rooms may become flooded with air from 
the privy vaults. 

Respectfully submitted. 

C. O. SEAMAN, 
Inspector of Plumbing. 



REPORTS 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES AND 
CEMETERY FUNDS. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

To the Trustees of Cemeteries ami to the City Councils: 

The sub-trustees of the Pine Grove cemetery make 
report as follows: 

During the year 1897, no radical change has been made 
in the policy of conducting this cemetery. The same 
superintendent has been continued in office, and the gen- 
eral management of the grounds has been satisfactory 
to the sub-trustees and, they hope, to the public also. 
The ai^pearance of the cemetery was never better than 
during the past warm season, and all improvements are 
now made with an eye to future development as well as 
to present needs. 

Eighty lots have been sold during the year, in all, — 
nineteen on the lawns under perpetual care, sixteen on 
Riverside and three on Chapel Lawn; sixty with lawn 
restrictions, so called (by which all lots are graded before 
sale and no walks are constructed between the lots) ; and 
one of the old unrestricted lots. Only three of the unre- 
stricted lots are now left, and hereafter, in accordance 
with the policy adopted some years ago, no more of this 
kind will be laid out. All lots will be sold either with 
lawn restrictions or under perpetual care. Experience 
has clearly demonstrated the advantage of this policy 

453 



454 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and the appearance of the grounds has been much bet- 
tered thereby. There are now unsold fifty-four lots on 
Riverside Lawn and fifteen on Chapel Lawn, all under 
perpetual care; and thirty-five lots with lawn restric- 
tions remain, ready for sale. 

During the year about one half of Pine Lawn, which 
lies just east of Riverside Lawn, and which is designed 
to accommodate a growing demand for small lots under 
perpetual care, has been graded; and it is intended to 
grade the remainder early in the coming season, and the 
lots thereon will be ready for use. The section just 
south of Riverside Lawn has been graded and is ready 
for top-dressing in the spring, and will be prepared as 
soon as possible for sale into lots with lawn restrictions. 

The ''Field of Manesquo" has been enlarged by the ad- 
dition of a section adjoining on the south, and four hun- 
dred additional iron markers for the graves procured. 
More care is given each year to these public grounds, 
and it is the desire and intention of the sub-trustees that 
they shall be well looked after. 

In preparing the new lot section, it became necessary 
to remove the old house, which had fallen into decay and 
was unoccupied; and it was sold and moved away by the 
purchaser. Torn down it was of no value, and its re- 
moval was imperative. The sub-trustees deem it highly 
advantageous that they were able to get a small sum for 
it and have it removed without cost to the cemetery. 

A section of the grounds lying south of the Swedish 
Lawn was during the year reserved for the Swedish Evan- 
gelical Mission church and Swedish Baptist church under 
an agreement and conditions similar to those under which 
the Swedish Lawn was reserved. They are to be known 
as the Swedish Mission Lawn and the Swedish Baptist 
Lawn. 

A great and lasting improvement in the southern part 
of the cemetery was effected in the spring by the repairs 



REPORTS OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 455 

which the board of street and park commissioners, at the 
request of the sub-trustees, made on the Calef road. 
Gutters or ditches were made on the sides of this high- 
way, and the surface water, which formerly flowed across 
the cemetery, is now conducted away by them, and much 
trouble in rainy seasons is avoided. The sub-trustees 
are grateful to the street commissioners for the prompt- 
ness and efficiency with which they responded to the 
request of the board. 

A work horse and harnessi were purchased in the 
spring, and a saving made over the expense of hiring, as 
was formerly done. Nearly twelve hundred yards of con- 
crete were laid in the avenues during the j'ear, and a 
large amount of earth, when the Calef road was rebuilt 
by the street railway, w^as procured for filling at an ex- 
pense extremely low, and will be very useful in the work 
of the coming season. 

Several receptacles for rubbish were placed in various 
parts of the grounds with good results, and it is hoped 
that as the people learn of their existence, there will be 
a still greater willingness to place dead flowers, papers, 
and other rubbish in them, instead of throwing it pro- 
miscuously over the grounds. A little care on the part 
of the visitors will save a good deal of needless labor for 
the employees, and add greatly to the appearance of the 
cemetery. 

The rules and regulations prescribed hj the sub- 
trustees for the management of the cemetery have been 
printed, and the lot owners can obtain copies by apjjly- 
ing to the superintendent. 

The Merrill yard, which is under the charge of this 
board, has received considerable attention the past year. 
The walks have been cleared, the trees trimmed, monu- 
ments and stones cleaned and straightened, and the gen- 
eral appearance of the yard improved. It is a very neat 



456 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and attractive yard, and there are still quite a number of 
desirable lots unsold. 

Without going into greater details, the expenses over 
which this board has control have been kept within the 
appropriations; and the sub-trustees hope that the re- 
sults of the year's work will receive the approbation of 
the trustees, the city councils, and the people. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

For the Board of Hnh-Trustees of the Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Valley Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the Valley cemetery submit the 
following report: 

During the year 1897 the Valley cemetery has been 
cared for on the same general plan as in former years. 
About the usual amount of work has been done during 
the year, in the ordinary care of the grounds. Perma- 
nent improvements have been made as follows: 

Raising the bank wall and setting the fence over on 
Pine street, at a cost of |4.36. This work was made neces- 
sary by the raising of the grade of Pine street. On the 
avenue leading by the city tomb, which was considered 
unsafe, especially in winter, about 225 feet of jjipe rail- 
ing have been put up at a cost of |115. On the Auburn- 
street side there have been some improvements by chang- 
ing the grades of the lots and removing trees that were a 
damage to them. If the work is carried out as begun, 
it will greatly improve that part of the cemetery. 

On the west side of the valley there has been an im- 
provement made by grading the bank, which was rough 
and unsightly. 

No. of bodies in tomb 67 

interments 60 

removals 11 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 457 

Cash received: 

For water 1340.00 

Care of lots ' 736.00 

Sundries 259.91 

Tomb fees 271.50 

Interments = 167.00 

Kemovals 38.00 

11,812.41 

Cash paid city treasurer |1,800.00 

Cash paid C. H. G. Foss 12.00 

Balance -41 

11,812.41 

Respectfully submitted. 

GARDNER K. BROWNING, 

BUSHROD W. HILL, 

S. P. CANNON, 

Suh-Trustees Talley Cemetery. 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of Amoskeag cemetery submit the 
following report: 

A change in the management of the cemetery has been 
made during the past year, owing to the death of the 
former superintendent, James E. Bailey, who died Sep- 
tember 7, 1897. Mr. Bailey was also a member of the 
board of trustees, and in both oflQces was faithful and 
conscientious in the discharge of his duties. The va- 
cancy in the board was filled by the election of Mr. A. D. 
Maxwell, and the trustees elected Mr. George Harwood 
superintendent. 

Four burials have been made in the yard during the 
year. The paths, which, for some unaccountable reason, 
were dug out several years ago, have been filled up with 
gravel and the cemetery presents a better appearance 



458 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

than ever before. The iron fence lias been painted. It 
was intended to add more fence, but the entire appropri- 
ation was used up in filling the paths. 

Several applications have been made for lots, but 
there are none to spare. For several years the project 
has been contemplated of purchasing more land of the 
Amoskeag Company, but it has not as yet been carried 
out. The city is growing in this direction, and if land 
is to be obtained it must be bought before houses get too 
near and the occupants object to the purchase of new 
cemetery land. 

WILLIAM WATTS, 
A. D. MAXWELL, 
WILLIAM H. HUSE, 
Sul)-Trustees of Amoskeag Cemetery. 



TREASURER'S REPORTS. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you the annual 
report of the money received during the year ending 
December 31, 1897: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Number of deeds delivered during the year, seventy- 
one. 

To cash received for the same. . . . |2,443.90 
interest received for the same 30.14 
cash received from superin- 
tendent 2,786.16 

15,260.20 

Cr. 

By treasurer's receipts $2,300.00 

superintendent's receipts .... ^ 2,786.16 
cash on hand 174.04 

15,260.20 

Valley Cemetery. 

To cash received from superintendent |1,800.00 

Cr. 

By superintendent's receipts |1,800.00 

Kespectfully submitted. 

FRED L. ALLEN, 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 

459 



460 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts 
of Fred L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of cemeteries, 
and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched 
for. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit to you the fifteenth 
annual report of the funds received and expenses paid to 
December 31, 1897: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January 

1, 1897 \ 133,237.42 

Receipts during the year : 

From George A. Parsons |114.04 

W. G. Everett and S. F. 

Murry 186.30 

Charles A. Merrill 185.01 

A. W. Dole 165.00 

C. W. Clement, Adm'r 176.00 

David H. Young 170.50 

John K. Wilson 172.40 

Willis P. Fogg 147.32 

Sarah B. Batchelder ., 144.00 

Mrs. Ada and W. H. Eaton . . 149.93 

M. Albertine Olzendam 300.00 

Clarissa Jenks 129.60 

Mrs. S. J. Wheeler 1.33.96 

George A. Clark and Mary 

A. Jones 198.00 

Frank T. Weeks 108.00 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES 461 

From Mrs. C. L. Richardson |136.00 

heirs of Mrs. J. C. Clough. . 115.20 

Lizzie Kelley 100.00 

S. S. Marden 111.00 

Charles A. Morgan 104.43 

Mrs. E. E. Weeks and Mrs. 

S. Amsden 108.00 

Josiah Laselle 97.46 

Edith M. Sargent, Sadie C. 

and Almira P. Dow 375.00 

Armenia J. Blaisdell and 

Emily A. Dustin 140.25 

John H. Buswell 143.55 

Louisa R. Cheney, C. W. 
Cheney, J. E. Cheney, and 

Clifton Williams 220.00 

Mrs. Charles Fradd and Min- 
nie Klinge 100.00 

D. H. Maxwell and J. W. 

Lane 165.00 

14,428.95 

Total permanent fund Dec. 31, 1897. . . . |37,666.37 
Cr. 
By bonds on hand January 1, 1897 |30,700.00 
Bonds bought during the jeav. . . . 4,500.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1897. . 2,466.37 

137,666.37 



Income on hand January 1, 1897. . |2,757.28 
from interest on bonds... 1,622.50 
from savings bank deposit 106.27 



Cr. 

Expenses paid during the year: 

Daniels & Downs |2.20 

Manchester S. «& R. Co 40.00 



$4,486.05 



462 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Palmer & Garmon |83.38 

Palmer & Garmon 14.10 

John B. Varick Co 1.68 

B. A. Stearns 857.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1897. . 3,487.69 



$4,486.05 



Valley Cemetery. 



Amount of i)ermanent fund on hand January 

1, 1897 '. $12,218.03 

Receipts during the year: 

Irene Hunt $300.00 

A. J. Lane, executor. 200.00 

A. J. Lane, executor 100.00 

Richard T. Green, executor 202.50 

Louis S. Brooks, executor 73.52 

Helen M. Jones 126.00 

Dudley P. Ladd, executor 124.00 

Mrs. Moody Carter 108.00 

Charles H. Kimball, administrator 100.00 

D. C. Moulton 126.00 

John C. Lyford 100.00 

Charles Bunton 114.00 

1,674.02 

Total permanent fund December 31, 1897 $13,892.05 
Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1897 $10,800.00 

Bonds bought during the year 2,700.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1897. . 392.05 

$13,892.05 

Income on hand January 1, 1897. . $1,070.14 
from interest on bonds .... 596.25 

from savings bank deposit 47.53 

1,713.92 



report of the trustees of cemeteries. 463 

Cr. 

Expenses paid during the year: 

C. H. G. Foss 1267.50 

Palmer & Garmon 12.05 

Cash on hand December 31, 1897. . 1,434.37 

11,713.92 

GALE FUND, VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Income on liand January 1, 1897. . |103.45 

from fund 9.82 

from savings bank deposit 3.38 

$116.65 

Cr. 

By cash paid C. H. G. Foss |6.00 

from savings bank deposit 110.65 

1116.65 

Piscataquog Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January 

1, 1897 1350.00 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1897 |300.00 
Bonds bought during the year 50.00 

1350.00 

Income on liand January 1, 1897 |73.08 
from interest on bonds. .. . 15.00 

from savings bank deposit 5.98 

$94.06 

Cr. 

Expenses paid during the year: 

C. A. Eowell $3.00 

C. A. Rowell 3.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1897. . 88.06 

$94.06 



464 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

MARY P. HARRIS FUND, PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Amount of fund January 1, 1897 |.500.00 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand December 31, 1897 $500.00 

Income on hand January 1, 1897. . |289.33 
from interest on bonds. . . . 27.50 

from savings bank deposit 4.69 

1321.52 

Cr. 

By cash on hand December 31, 1897 |.321.52 



Merrill Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January 

1, 1897 1487.89 

Cr. 



By bonds on hand January 1, 1897. $450.00 
Cash on hand December 31, 1897. . 37.89 



Income on hand January 1, 1897. . $43.32 

from interest on bonds .... 22.50 

from savings bank deposit 2.94 



Cr. 



$487.89 



$68.76 



By cash on hand December 31, 1897 $68.76 

Respectfully submitted. 

FRED L. ALLEN, 

Treasurer Cemetery Fund. 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of 
accounts of Fred L. Allen, treasurer of tlie trustees of 
the cemetery funds, embracing the receipts and expen- 
ditures for the year 1897, and I find the same correct and 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF CEMETERY FUND. 465 

properly vouched. I have also examined the securities 
in which said fund is invested and find as follows : 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the citv of Manchester, N. H. : 

5 per cent, 1913. |14,700.00 

5 per cent, 1942 20,500.00 

Cash on hand 2,466.37 

Total amount of bonds and cash Decem- 
ber 31, 1897 137,666.37 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H.: 

5 per cent, 1913 |4,800.00 

per cent, 1942 8,700.00 

Cash on hand 392.05 

113,892.05 

PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. : 

5 per cent, 1942.^ 1350.00 

Mary P. Harris Fund. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H.: 
5 per cent, 1942 foOO.OO 

MERRILL CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. : 

5 per cent, 1913 |200.00 

5 per cent, 1942 2.50.00 

Cash on hand 37.89 

Total amount of bonds and cash Decem- 
ber 31, 1897 1487.89 



Total permanent fund December 31, 1897 |52,896.31 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

Auditor. 



30 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



To the Trustees of the Sinking Fund: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the fifth an- 
nual report of the receipts of this board for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1897 : 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund Jan. 1, 1897, 

for the payment of improvement 

bonds 120,577.15 

Appropriation for 1896 15,000.00 , 

Appropriation for 1897 20,000.00 

Income received from interest on 

bonds 1,410.09 

Income received from savings bank 

deposit 27.35 

$57,014.59 

Or. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1897 |20,000.00 
Bonds bought during the year. . . . 35,000.00 

Premium paid for bonds 1,790.00 

Accrued interest on bonds 184.44 

Cash on hand December 31, 1897. . 40.15 

$57,014.59 

469 



470 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Db. 

Total amount of fund Jan, 1, 1897, 

for the payment of water bonds |43,597.72 

Water-works hydrant service, 1896 16,800.00 

Water-works hydrant service, 1897 17,175.00 

Appropriation for 1897 5,000.00 

Income received from interest on 

bonds 2,006.50 

Income received from savings bank 

deposit 67.42 



184,646.64 



Or. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1897 |42,000.00 

Bonds bought during the year 37,000.00 

Premium paid for bonds 2,497.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1897. . 3,149.64 



184,646.64 



Dr. 



Total amount of fund for the payment of 
school bonds, appropriation 1897 |2,000.00 

Or. 

By bonds bought during the year |2,000.00 

Respectfully submitted. 

FRED L. ALLEN, 
Treasurer Sinking Fund. 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of 
accounts of Fred L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the 
sinking fund, embracing the receipts and expenditures 
for the year ending December 31, 1897, and find the same 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF SINKING FUND. 471 

correct and j)roperly vouched. I have also examined the 
securities in which said fund is invested, and find as 
follows : 

For the payment of Improvement bonds. 
Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. : 

4 per cent, 1900 |15,000.00 

4 per cent, 1908 10,000.00 

4 per cent, 1913 5,000.00 

4 per cent, 1914 5,000.00 

4 per cent, 1915 4,000.00 

4 per cent, 1917 16,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1897 40.15 

— 155,040.15 

For the payment of water bonds : 
Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. : 

4 per cent, 1900 ^2,000.00 

4 per cent, 1909 10,000.00 

4 per cent, 1910 6,000.00 

4 per cent, 1913 10,000.00 

4 per cent, 1914 18,000.00 

4 per cent, 1916 11,000.00 

4 per cent, 1917 22,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1897 3,149.64 

182,149.64 

For the payment of school bonds. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H. : 

4 per cent, 1914 |2,000.00 

Total amount of sinking fund Decem- 
ber 31, 1897 1139,189.79 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

Auditor. 



GAS LIGHTS. OIL LAMPS, AND 
ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC 

LIGHTS. 



Gas Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Chestnut. 
Appleton, west end. 
Salmon, between Elm and Canal. 
Blodget and Chestnut. 
Orange and Chestnut. 
Orange, between Chestnut and Elm. 
Bridge, between Chestnut and Elm, 
Pearl and Walnut. 
Orange and Walnut, 
Orange and Beech. 
Pearl and Maple, 
Arlington and Maple. 
East High ajid Maple. 
Lowell and South. 
Concord and Belmont. 
Amherst and Belmont. 
Concord and Beacon. 
Lowell and Beacon, 
• East High and Belmont. 
East High and Hall. 
Belmont and Central, 
Willow and Merrill. 
Auburn and Franklin. 

475 



476 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

One light on State. 
River, near Turner Hall. 
Milford and Bowman. 
Milford and B. 
River and Douglas. 
Dover and Granite. 



Oil Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Adams. 

Pearl and Linden. 

Canal, near Amoskeag bridge. 

Merrimack and Beacon. 

Hanover and Mammoth road. 

Lake avenue and Hall road. 

Elm and Shasta. 

Elm and Baker. 

One light on Baker. 

Douglas and West. 

Douglas and Quiney. 

Granite and Quincj. 

Mast road and Riddle. 

Carroll. 

Bowman. 

A and B streets. 

Light near the Huntress gardens. 

Mammoth road and Cohas avenue. 

Mammoth road and Island Pond road. 

Mammoth road and Cilley. 

Mammoth road and Young. 

Massabesic and Hall road. 

Massabesic and Taylor. 

Belmont and Green. 

Valley and Taylor. 

Valley and Cypress. 

Cypress and Prout avenue. 



'gas lights, oil lamps, and electric lights. 477 

Jewett and Yoimg. 

Young and Taylor. 

Three lights on Kiver road, south of Blue store. 

Ten lights in Goffe's Falls. 

Three lights in Youngsville. 

One light on Candia road, near Noah Reed's. 

One light on Candia road, near Walter Cody's house. 

One light at junction of Lake avenue and Hanover. 

One light on Island Pond road, Mill-Dam House. 

Amherst and Beacon. 

One light at junction Ainsworth avenue and Young road. 

One light at junction Ainsworth avenue and Young 

street. 
One light on Taylor, near Byron Stearns's house. 
One light on Taylor, near Gilniore's house. 
One light on Valley, near Eastman's store. 
One light on Candia road, at P. Rogers's. 
One light on Candia road, at Dan Cronin's. 
One light on Candia road, at G. Bean's. 
One light on Candia road, at C. Francis's. 
One light on Candia road, at S. Mead's. 
One light on Candia road, at Claflin's. 
One light on Hanover, at Sam Page's. 
One light at junction of Hanover and Page. 
One light at Brown's. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Proctor. 
One light at junction of Hanover and Candia roads. 
One light at junction of Proctor and Candia roads. 



Electric Lights in Use. 

No. 1. Cypress and Massabesic, - arm. 

2. Massabesic and Old Falls road, pole. 

3. Lake avenue and Beacon, arm. 

4. Central and Hall, " 

5. Lake avenue and Massabesic, " 



478 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 6, Wilson and Laurel, arm. 

7. Merrimack and Hall, " 

8. Manchester and Hall. " 

9. Manchester and Wilson, " 

10. Hanover and Ashland, " 

11. Hanover and Hall, " 

12. Hanover and Beacon, " 

13. Concord and Ashland, " 

14. Bridge and Hall, " 

15. Myrtle and Russell, " 

16. Pearl and Linden, '* 

17. Pearl and Russell, " 

18. Bridge and Nashua, " 

19. Nashua and High, " 

20. Concord and Button, " 

21. Amherst and Lincoln, " 

22. Hanover and Lincoln, " 

23. Manchester and Lincoln, " 

24. Merrimack and Lincoln, " 

25. Laurel and Lincoln, " 

26. Central and Lincoln, " 

27. Lake avenue and Lincoln, '' 

28. Spruce and Lincoln, " 

29. Spruce and Maple, . " 

30. Lake avenue and Maple, " 

31. Central and Maple, " 

32. Merrimack and Maple, " 

33. Manchester and Maple, " 

34. Hanover and Maple, " 

35. Amherst and Maple, " 

36. Concord and Maple, " 

37. Lowell and Nashua, " 

38. Bridge and Maple, " 

39. Myrtle and Maple, " 

40. Orange and Ash, " 

41. Harrison and Beech, " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 479 

No. 42. Myrtle and Beech, arm. 

. 43. Pearl and Beech, " 

44. Bridge and Beech, 'f 

45. Lowell and Ash, " 

46. Amherst and Ash, " 

47. Lowell and Beech, " 

48. Concord and Walnut, " 

49. Amherst and Beech, " 
.50. Hanover and Beech, " 

51. Hanover square, pole. 

52. Manchester and Beech, arm. 

53. Merrimack and Beech, " 

54. Laurel and Beech, " 

55. Central and Beech, " 

56. Lake avenue and Beech, " 

57. Spruce and Beech, " 

58. Cedar and Union, " 

59. Lake avenue and Union, " 

60. Central and Union, " 

61. Laurel and L^nion, " 

62. Merrimack and Union, " 

63. Manchester and Union, " 

64. Hanover and Union, " 

65. Amherst and Union, " 

66. Concord and Union, " 

67. Lowell and Walnut, " 

68. Lowell and Union, " 

69. High and Union, " 

70. Bridge and Union, " 

71. Bridge and Walnut, " 

72. Orange and Union, " 

73. Prospect and Union, " 

74. Brook and Union, " 

75. Pennacook and Union, " 

76. Webster and Pine, " 

77. North and Pine, pole. 



480 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



^0. 78. 


Sagamore and Pine, 


arm. 


79. 


Blodget and Pine, 


u 


. 80. 


Harrison and Hazel, 


u 


81. 


Prospect and Pine, 


t( 


82. 


Myrtle and Pine, 


u 


83. 


Orange and Pine, 


11 


84. 


Pearl and Pine, 


li 


85. 


Bridge and Pine, 


il 


86. 


Tremont square. 


pole. 


87. 


High and Pine, 


arm. 


88. 


Lowell and Pine, 


a 


89. 


Concord and Pine, 


i( 


90. 


Amherst and Pine, 


(I 


91. 


Hanover and Pine, 


a 


92. 


Manchester and Pine, 


a 


93. 


Merrimack and Pine, 


a 


94. 


Laurel and Pine, 


a 


95. 


Central and Pine, 


a 


96. 


Lake avenue and Pine, 


a 


97. 


Cedar and Pine, 


(( 


98. 


Auburn and Pine, 


(( 


99. 


Cedar and Chestnut, 


u 


100. 


Park square, 


pole. 


101. 


Lake avenue and Chestnut, 


arm. 


102. 


Central and Chestnut, 


u 


103. 


Merrimack square, east, 


pole. 


104. 


Merrimack and Chestnut, 


arm. 


105. 


Manchester and Chestnut, 


a 


106. 


Hanover and Chestnut, 


<i 


107. 


Concord square, east. 


pole. 


108. 


Concord square, west. 


'■•' 


109. 


Chestnut and Concord back street, 


arm, 


110. 


Chestnut and High, 


a 


111. 


Chestnut and Bridge, 


il 


112. 


Chestnut and Pearl, 


u 


113. 


Chestnut and Myrtle, 


a 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 481 

No. 114. Chestnut and Harrison, arm. 

115. Chestnut and Brook, '' 

IK). Pennacook and Chestnut, pole. 

117. Salmon and Chestnut, " 

118. Webster and Chestnut, . - arni. 

119. Clarke and Elm, '' 

120. Webster and Elm, " 

121. North and Elm, " 

122. Salmon and Elm, " 

123. Pennacook and Elm, " 

124. Brook and Elm, " 

125. Harrison and Elm, '* 
120. Langflon street, pole. 

127. Dean and Elm, arm. 

128. Prospect and Chestnut, " 

129. Orano-e and Elm, " 

130. Kidder and Elm, '^ 

131. Elm east back street, on Pearl, " 

132. Bridge and Elm, " 

133. Washington and Church, " 

134. Birch and Lowell, " 

135. Lowell and Elm, " 

136. Elm east back street, between Lowell 

and Concord, " 

137. * Water and Elm, ' " 

138. Vine and Concord, " 

139. Vine and Amherst, ' " 

140. Amherst and Elm, " 

141. Spring and Elm west back street, " 

142. Stark street, " 

143. Market and Franklin, " 

144. Market and Elm, " 

145. Hanover and Elm east back street, " 

146. Elm and Manchester, 

147. Dean avenue and Elm west back street, " 

148. Elm and Merrimack, " 

31 



482 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 



i49. 


Franklin and Merrimack, 


arm. 


150. 


Middle street, 


a 


151. 


Merrimack square, west. 


pole. 


152. 


Elm and Central, 


arm. 


153. 


Elm and Lake avenue, 


a 


154. 


Elm and Spruce, 


a 


155. 


Elm east back street, between Spruce 






and Cedar, 


pole. 


156. 


Elm and Cedar, 


arm. 


157. 


Franklin and Granite, 


a 


158. 


Elm and Auburn, 


a 


159. 


Elm and Green, 


u 


IGO. 


Elm and Valley, 


i( 


161. 


Elm and Brown avenue, 


i( 


162. 


Summer and State, 


pole. 


163. 


Granite and State, 


arm. 


164. 


Granite bridge, east. 


pole. 


165. 


Bedford and Granite, 


a 


166. 


Canal and Granite, 


a 


167. 


Depot and Canal, 


« 


168. 


Central, between Franklin and Canal, 


a 


169. 


Bedford and Central, 


arm. 


170. 


Canal and Merrimack, 


a 


171. 


Canal and Middle, 


a 


172. 


Canal and Stark, 


li 


173. 


Canal and Mechanic, 


a 


174. 


Canal and Spring, 


i( 


175. 


Canal and Bridge, 


a 


176. 


McGregor bridge, east, 


pole. 


177. 


Canal and Hollis, 


<i 


178.. 


Canal and Dean, 


(I 


179. 


Canal and Langdon, 


arm. 


180. 


Eiver road and North, 


a 


181. 


Amoskeag bridge, east. 





182. 


Amoskeag bridge, west. 





183. 


Amoskeag watering-trough. 


pole. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 483 

No. 184. Amoskeag brick store, pole. 

185. McGregor and Main, " 

186. McGregor and Bridge, " 

187. McGregor bridge, west, " 

188. Amory and Main, " 

189. Amory and Beauport, '' 

190. Wayne and Beauport, " 

191. Marion and Main, " 

192. McGregor and Wayne, " 

193. McGregor and Putnam, arm. 

194. Sulliyan and Main, pole. 

195. Beauport and Sullivan, " 

196. Main and Schuyler, " 

197. Wilton and Main, arm. 

198. Douglas and Main, " 

199. Douglas and Barr, " 

200. Granite and Green, " 

201. West and Granite, " 

202. Granite and Main, " 

203. Granite and Second, " 

204. Granite bridge, west, pole. 

205. School and Turner, arm. 

206. School and Third, 

207. Second and Bath, pole. 

208. Ferry and Turner, arm. 

209. Ferry and Third, " 

210. Walker and Second, " 

211. Blaine and Third, " 

212. Clinton and Main, " 

213. Walker and Main, « 

214. Parker and West, " 

215. Winter and Parker, " 

216. Main and Mast, pole. 

217. Main and Milford, arm. 

218. Main and A, " 

219. Carroll and Milford, " 



484 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



:. 220. 


Old Mast road and Mast, 


arm. 


221. 


Hall and Amherst, 


a 


222. 


Laurel and Maple, 


a 


223. 


Central and Wilson, 


(( 


224. 


Harrison and Pine, 


u 


225. 


Massabesic and Belmont, 


pole. 


226. 


Union and Appleton, 


arm. 


227. 


Elm and Young, 


pole. 


228. 


Franklin and Pleasant, 


arm. 


229. 


Elm and Appleton, 


i( 


230. 


Milford and Riddle, 


(( 


231. 


Nutt road and Portsmouth Railroad, 


pole. 


232. 


Lake avenue and Canton, 


a 


233. 


Laurel and Hall, 


arm. 


234. 


Beech and Brook, 


i( 


235. 


Kidder and Boyden, 


pole. 


236. 


Myrtle and Walnut, 


arm. 


237. 


Bridge and Linden, 


a 


238. 


Lowell and Ashland, 


(( 


239. 


Lowell and Belmont, 


li 


210. 


Pearl and Union, 


a 


241. 


Salem and Union, 


pole. 


242. 


W^ater street. 


arm. 


243. 


Arlington and Ashland, 


ii 


244. 


Orange and Oak, 


a 


245. 


Prospect and Oak, 


a 


246. 


Arlington and Russell, 


a 


247. 


AYalnut and Gore, 


i( 


248. 


Laurel and Milton, 


a 


249. 


Massabesic and Hospital road. 


pole. 


250. 


Lake avenue and Wilson, 


arm. 


.251. 


Bridge and Ash, 


(( 


252. 


Franklin and Depot, 


a 


253. 


Spruce and Union, 


(( 


254. 


Malvern and East High, 


# 


255. 


Hanover and Highland, 


pole. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 485 

No. 256. Auburn and Beech, pole. 

257. Kidder and Wliitnev, " 

258. Valley and Jewett, " 

259. Concord and Derry, " 

260. Auburn and Union, " 

261. Harrison and Walnut, arm. 

262. West Hancock and Second, pole. 

263. Douglas and West, " 

264. Hooksett road, Amoskeag, " 

265. Ash and Prospect, arm. 

266. Canal and Salmon, pole. 

267. Harrison and Russell, arm. 

268. Gates and Dubuque. pole. 

269. Baker and Elm, 

270. Auburn and Maple, " 

271. Pine and Salmon, " 

272. Adams and Appleton, " 

273. Clarke and River road, arm. 

274. North Main and Bremer, pole. 

275. Beech and Cedar, " 

276. Cass and Lake avenue, " 

277. Mast and Riddle, " 

278. Brown avenue and Baker, arm. 

279. Brown avenue and Hancock, pole. 

280. Clarke and Union, arm. 

281. Brook and Maple, pole. 

282. Market and Canal, arm. 

283. Brook and Hazel, pole. 

284. Webster and River road, " 

285. Webster and Walnut, " 

286. Chestnut, near Ray brook, " 

287. Concord and Beech, arm. 

288. Prospect and Linden, pole. 

289. Pearl and Morrison, " 

290. Concord and Hall, arm. 



486 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 291. Merrimack and Belmont, arm. 

292. Spruce and Beacon, " 

293. Belmont and Grove, " 

294. Bowman, near Milford, " 

295. Amory and Rimmon, pole. 

296. Pine and Valley, " 

297. Manchester and Milton, " 

298. Mammoth and Candia road, " 

299. Cypress and Hayward, " 

300. Conant and Rimmon, " 

301. Cartier and Kelley, " 

302. Monmouth and McGregor back street, " 

303. Calef road and Welch avenue, " 

304. Valley and Taylor, arm. 

305. Pine and Brook, " 

306. Conant and Beauport, " 

307. Douglas and North Weare Railroad, pole. 

308. Orange and Hall, " 

309. Wayne and Dubuque, arm. 

310. Putnam and Cartier, " 

311. Hall road and Lake avenue, pole. 

312. Walker and Fourth, arm. 

313. Winter, near Main, " 

314. Walker and Turner, pole. 

315. Ainsworth avenue and Young street, arm. 

316. Valley and Belmont, " 

317. Pine and Grove, ■ " 

318. Blaine and Second, " 

319. Amory and Morgan, " 

320. Amory and Alsace, " 

321. East High and South, " 

322. Blaine and Main, " 

323. Dover and Clinton, " 

324. Elm back street, on Blodget, " 

325. B and C, pole. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 487 

No. 326. Milford and Bismarck, pole. 

327. Merrimack and Wilson, arm. 

328. Pennacook and Canal, pole. 

329. Adams and Cartier, " 

330. Amherst and Ashland, arm. 

331. Putnam and Bartlett, pole. 

332. Auburn and Chestnut, arm. 

333. Laurel and Laurel avenue, " 

334. Hanover and Belmont, '* 

335. Lowell and Malvern, . " 

336. Wilson and Adams, " 

337. Lincoln and Silver, "■ 

338. Somerville and Jewett, " 

339. Elm and Kay brook, " 

340. Amory and Bartlett, " 

341. West Hancock and Dartmouth, " 

342. Monroe and River road, " 

343. Marion and McGregor, " 

344. South Main and Harvell, " 

345. South Main and Hancock, " 

346. Boynton street, " 

347. Mast road and Forest, " 

348. North and Union, " 

349. Kelley and Rimmon, " 

350. Coolidge avenue, near Kelley, " 

351. Buzzell and East High, " 

352. Mechanic and Elm back street, " 

353. Harrison and Maple, " 

354. North and Bay, " 

355. Front and Dunbarton, " 

356. Orange and Linden, "- 

357. Myrtle, near Belmont, "■ 

358. Taylor and Young road, "■ 

359. Nutt road and Auger avenue, " 

360. Union and Grove, " 



488 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 361. Kelley and Alsace, arm. 

362. Main and Wayne, '" 

363. S])ru(e and Barry avenue, " 

364. Lowell and Hall, " 

365. Central and Canal, " 

366. Myrtle and Elm back street, " 

367. Wilson and Silver, " 

368. Beech and Young, " 

369. Beech and Lawrence Railroad, " 

370. Lincoln and Cedar, " 

371. Wilson and Spruce, " 

372. Laurel and Beacon, " 

373. Harrison and Oak, " 

374. Pearl and Oak, « 

375. Liberty and Webster, " 

376. Wentworth and Bell, " 

377. Montgomery and Conant, " 

378. Massabesic and Hall road, " 

379. Summer and Hall, " 

380. Harrison and Ash, " 

381. Bridge and Highland, " 

382. Lowell and Chestnut, " 

383. Spruce and Chestnut west back street, " 

384. Tilton and Bowman avenue, " 

385. Prince and Boynton, " 

386. Carroll and Charlestown avenue, " 

387. Beech and Silver, '' 

388. Beech and Portsmoutli Kailroad, " 

389. Merrimack and Franklin west back street, " 

390. I'rospect and Elm back street, " 

391. Pine and Pennacook, " 

392. Sagamore and Walnut, " 

393. Bridge and Belmont, " 

394. Cypress and Valley, « 

395. Carpenter and Union, " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 489 

No. 396. North River road and Rowell, arm. 

397. North River road and Stark park, "• 

398. Hanover and Grant, " 

399. Page and Portsmouth Railroad, " 

400. Central and Cass, " 

401. Second and Schiller, " 

402. Mast and Bowman, " 

403. North Union, " 

404. Gore and Ash, " 

405. South and Elm, " 

406. Beech and Nutt road, '' 

407. Ashland and East High, " 

408. Laurel and Belmont, '' 

409. Lake avenue, near Beacon, " 

410. Pine and Green, " 

411. Hanover and Page, " 

412. Beech and Green, " 

413. New Mast road and Wilkins, " 

414. Derryfield park, " 

415. Charles street, " 

416. State, near Granite, " 

417. T'nion and Valley, " 

418. Union and Silver, " 

419. Valley and Wilson, " 

420. Auburn and Wilson, " 
.421. Cedar, near Maple, " 

422. Thornton and Sullivan, " 

423. New Mast road and D, " 

424. Pearl and Belmont, " 

425. State, south of Granite, " 

426. State east back, '* 

427. Elm and Shasta, " 

428. North and Walnut, " 

429. Nutfield Lane, nortli of Amherst, " 

430. Elm and Elm avenue, " 



490 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 431. Arlington and Warren, arm. 

432. Merrimack and Belmont, " 

433. Amory, near Montgomery, " 

434. Granite bridge, center, pole. 

435. Prospect and Hall, arm. 

436. Grove and Beech, 

437. Union and Whitford, 

438. Bedford road, 

439. Elm and Carpenter, 

440. North and Chestnut, 

441. Blodget and Union, 

442. Dearborn and Taylor, 

443. Union and Myrtle, 

444. River road, near Otis, 

445. North Adams, near Ray brook, 

446. A street, near B street, 

447. Elm west back and Winter place, 

448. Amherst and Chestnut, 

449. Salmon and Beech, 

450. Summer and Dearborn, 

451. East High and Hall, 

452. Myrtle, west of Hall, • 

453. Merrimack, east of Beacon, 

454. Tavlor and Vinton, 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To the City Councils: 

Gentlemen, — The auditor herewith submits to your 
honorable body his auuual report. 

WORK OF THE OFFICE. 

There have been made during the year the usual annual 
examinations of the accounts of the treasurer, city clerk, 
water-works, superintendents of Pine Grove and ^'alley 
cemeteries, tax collector, superintendent of city farm, 
superintendent of schools; monthly examination of the 
accounts of city weigher, quarterly examination of the 
accounts of chief of police, semi-annual examination of 
the account of the clerk of the police court; and compila- 
tion and superintendence of the publication of the annual 
report. 

About six thousand bills against the city have been 
examined and certified as correct. All the pay-rolls for 
the street and park commission, schools, fire department, 
water-works, police department, cemeteries, city farm, 
and city officials, have been examined and certified to. 

Twelve monthly drafts, amounting in the aggregate to 
11,340,844, have been drawn on the city treasury. 

Accounts have been kept with all the appropriations, 
with the treasurer, and tax collector. 

493 



494 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 



EXPENDITURES. 



The amount of appropriation for auditors 
department was |2,000.00 

Expended for salaries |1,860.00 

Expended for supplies 60.65 

Balance transferred to reserved 

fund 79.35 

12,000.00 

Eespectfully submitted. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 



Dr. 

To Tower, Giddings & Co., water bonds. . |100,000.00 
Tower, Giddings & Co., premium on 

bonds 6,248.00 

Curtis & Motley, temporary loan 100,000.00 

Manchester National Bank, temporary 

loan 50,000.00 

F. S. Mosley & Co., temporary loan 50,000.00 

F. S. Mosley & Co., premium on loans . . .75 

E. L. Day & Co., temporary loan 50,000.00 

E. C. Smith, city hall 98.50 

M. J. Healy, police department 47,815.01 

John C. Bickford, police department.. 1,451.64 
Fred L. Allen, treasurer Pine Grove 

cemetery 2,300.00 

B. A. Stearns, Pine Grove cemetery... 2,786.16 

C. H. G. Foss, Valley cemetery 1,800.00 

county of Hillsborough, paupers off the 

farm 2,689.50 

A. F. Precourt, milk licenses 92.50 

trustees cemetery fund, bonds 7,750.00 

A. B. Eaton, city scales 457.89 

William E. Buck, tuition 349.05 

William E. Buck, free text-books 208.68 

N. P. Kidder, rent of tenements 5.82 

E. C. Smith, rent of tenements 202.55 

H. D. Lord, rent of tenement. 67.06 

George E. Morrill, taxes of 1893 85.00 

George E. Morrill, taxes of 1896 51,880.13 

George E. Morrill, abatement of 1896. . 965.78 
495 



496 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

To George E. Morrill, taxes of 1897 1570,072.76 

George E. Morrill, abatement of 1897.. 0.58.81 

George E. Morrill, old taxes 457.71 

George E. Morrill, interest on taxes. . . 1,449.91 

E. C. Smith, dog licenses 2,l;U.31 

E. C. Smith, billiard table licenses 8.S2.43 

EL C. Smith, show licenses 77.00 

N. P. Kidder, show licenses 658.00 

N. P. Kidder, sewer licenses 1,980.12 

E. C. Smith, sewer licenses 3,71().50 

E. C. Smith, lunch-cart licenses 67.50 

street and park commissioners, for sup- 
plies furnished sundry persons 81.42 

health department, antitoxine sold.... 69.55 

F. L. Allen, treasurer, unclaimed bills 

prior to December, 1892. . 29.64 

street and park commission, amount re- 
ceived from Manchester Street Rail- 
way 3,899.39 

Charles K. Walker, water-works 125,719.17 

E. G. Libbey, city farm 4,560.54 

E. C. Smith, temporary merchants 50.00 

B. Tafts, peddler's license 20.00 

Solomon Kaplan, peddler's license. . . . 20.00 

town of Londonderry, school tax, 1896 39.15 

Abraham Sharpiro, peddler's license. . 20.00 

Simon Lowanstan, peddler's license... 20.00 

Barnett Custen, peddler's license 20.00 

M. Kurtz, peddler's license 20.00 

Aaron H. Weinstein, peddler's license. . 20.00 
Joseph Breault, gray horse, fire depart- 
ment 20.00 

M. Rosenblum, peddler's license 20.00 

S. Levenson, peddler's license 20.00 

Israel Seidel, peddler's license 20.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 497 

To N. J. Bachelder, secretary, four fifths 
expense disposing of two glandered 

horses |18.40 

George E. Morrill, collector, redemption 

taxes, 1895 398.26 

George E. Morrill, collector, redemption 

taxes, 1894 1,444.1(> 

George E. Morrill, collector, redemption 

taxes, 189G 2,G35.60 

George E. Morrill, collector, redemption 

taxes, 1895 1,437.92 

Dana Dubin, peddler's license 20.00 

county of Hillsborough, coal for court 

house G6.87 

state of New Hampshire, four fifths ex- 
pense of killing glandered horse 14.40 

executor estate of James A. Weston, 
legacy bequeathed to city of Manches- 
ter for observatory on Oak Hill 5,000.00 

C. W. Boynton, land sold on Spruce St. 182.00' 

C. W. Boynton, interest on notes 20.02 

St. Raphael's school, desks 45.00 

J. E. Lanouette, overdraft 11.75 

Clark M. Bailey, overdraft lO.OO 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital, over- 
draft 30.00 

J. H. McKenzie 82.40 

Solon A. Carter, insurance tax 2,9(34.7.5 

Solon A. Carter, railroad tax 35,255.86 

Solon A. Carter, savings bank tax 48,516.24 

Solon A. Carter, literary fund 3,511. G8 

Charles W. Boynton, land sold on 

Spruce street 182.09 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., discount on October tolls .54 

32 



498 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

To John B. Clarke Co., overdraft 15.50 

town of Londonderry, school tax, 1897 . . 38.87 

T. C. Stewart, board of Emma Daniels 16.00 

Total receipts for year 1897 $1,302,0.33.33 

Cash on hand January 1, 1897 240,961.57 

Unpaid bills December 31, 1897 18,323.80 

$1,561,318.70 

Cr. 

By January draft |59,219.76 

February draft ' 143,549.68 

March draft 43,399.26 

April draft 38,009.83 

May draft 48,203.50 

June draft 116,404.70 

July draft 102,437.06 

August draft 112,584.38 

September draft 155,804.49 

October draft 46,218.14 

November draft 361,291.28 

December draft 113,721.92 

Total drafts of year 1897 $1,340,844.00 

Unpaid bills January 1, 1897 80,098.53 

Cash on hand December 31, 1897 140,376.17 

$1,561,318.70 
FRED L. ALLEN, 

Treasurer. 



To the City Councils of tJie City of Manchester, N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — I have examined the accounts of Fred 
L. Allen, city treasurer, for the year ending December 
31, 1897, and find proper vouchers for all payments, and 
all receipts duly accounted for. 



RECEIPTS. 499 

The net cash on hand January 1 was |160,863.04 

Keeeipts during the year 1,302,033.33 

Total $1,462,896.37 

Amount of drafts during the year |1,340,844.00 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1897 122,052.37 

Total 11,462,896.37 

The cash balance taken December 31, 1897, I find to 
be as follows: 

Deposited in Suffolk National Bank |21,057.00 

Deposited in Second National Bank 113,678.98 

Deposited in olHce safe 4,702.28 

Deposited in Commonwealth National Bank 937.91 

Gross amount of cash on hand |140,376.17 

Deduct amount of bills unpaid 18,323.80 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1897 $122,052.37 

Respectfully submitted, together with a tabular state- 
ment of the receipts and expenditures of the city for the 
year 1897. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 

STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDI- 
TURES OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER 
FOR THE YEAR 1897. 



Receipts. 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Received from : 

Direct city taxes $630,213.91 

Cost and interest on taxes. . . 1,449.91 



631,663.82 



500 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



lU CULC-l OCWC-1 

to keep dog 


2,131.31 


to sell milk 


92.50 


to keep billiard and 




pool tables, and 




lunch carts 


399.93 


to shows and exhi- 




bitions 


735.00 


to peddle 


270.00 



$9,325.36 
Rents 373.93 

SUNDRIES. 

Received from : 

City scales |157.89 

Miscellaneous sources 579.49 

11,037.38 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Received from text-books and tuition |557.73 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Received from fines and costs |19,2G6.65 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Received from : 

Pine Grove cemetery |5,086.16 

Valley cemetery 1,800.00 

16,880.16 

WATER-WORKS. 

Gross receipts |125,719.17 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Received from : 

City farm 14,560.54 

Hillsborough county, board- 
ing paupers and Industrial 
School inmates 2,689.50 



RECEIPTS. 501 

James A. Weston estate, 

Weston Observatory |5,000.00 

112,250.04 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Received from : 
Premium on bonds and notes 

sold 16,248.75 

Interest on notes 20.02 

Land redeemed from tax sale 6,422.22 
Manchester Electric Railway, 

on account of paving 3,899.39 

Land sold 364.18 

116,954.56 

Total ordinary receipts during the 

year 1897 |854,034.80 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Received from loans in anticipation of tax 
of 1897 1250,000.00 

STATE. 

Received from : 

Insurance taxes |2,964.75 

Railroad taxes 35,255.86 

Savings bank taxes 48,516.24 

Literary fund 3,511.68 

$90,248.53 

BONDED DEBT. 

Received from : 

Water bonds sold |100,000.00 

Cemetery bonds sold 7,750.00 

1107,750.00 

Gross receipts |1,302,033.33 

Net cash on hand January 1, 1897 160,863.04 

$1,462,896.37 



502 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Paid interest on water bonds . . |40,414.00 
interest on city bonds . . . 41,406.00 
interest on cemetery 

bonds 2,268.75 

interest on temporary 

loan, anticipation tax, 

1897 2,834.79 

Paid city hall $2,949.97 

printing and stationery . . 1,735.90 

incidental expenses 16,167.71 

mayor's incidentals 280.50 

city officers' salaries.... 14,627.18 

city auditor's department 1,920.65 

sinking fund trustees 27,000.00 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Paid street and park commis- 
sion 13,427.91 

repairs of highways 21,203.80 

snow and ice 4,983.61 

new highways 8,381.97 

land taken for highways. . 912.00 

watering streets 3,762.64 

paving streets 7,031.79 

macadamizing streets.... 14,472.74 

grading for concrete 5,450.96 

scavenger service 15,260.85 

street sweeping 2,318.22 

lighting streets 53,889.73 

bridges 3,407.52 

city teams 6,723.94 



186,923.54 



164,681.91 



EXPENDITURES. 503 

Paid repairs of sewers |5,830. 16 

new sewers 35,698.29 

bicycle path 564.36 

Eiver road and Elm-street 

sewer 5,258.06 

rebuilding A m o s k e ag 

bridge abutment 3,541.90 

paving Elm and Granite 

streets 15,552.80 

1217,073.55 

engineer's department. 

Paid engineer's department $4,780.91 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Paid health department |4,366.85 

school DEPARTMENT. 

Paid repairs of schoolhouses . . . |5,872.74 

fuel 6,628.26 

furniture and supplies. . . . 1,451.84 

books and stationery- ...... 59.13 

printing and advertising . . 304.43 

contingent expenses 3,111.94 

care of rooms 5,720.28 

evening schools 1,388.15 

teachers' salaries 77,037.17 

salaries school committee, 

clerk, truant officer 1,090.00 

salary of superintendent 2,300.00 
evening school, mechan- 
ical drawing 364.36 

free text-books 6,320.36 

manual training 1,370.86 

— . 1113,019.52 



604 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid city library |4,679.97 

E'IRE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid fire department |60,811.28 

fire-alarm telegraph 1,917.35 

hydrant service 17,175.00 

'■ 179,903.63 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid police station |2,526.57 

■ police court 3,630.94 

police commission 38,584.90 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



Paid repairs of buildings |3,489.01 

Parker school lot 287.74 

new schoolhouses 52,128.74 

Weston Observatory 4,997.94 



WATER-WORKS. 



Paid water- works |65,113.97 

water-works sinking fund 17,175.00 



PUBLIC PLACES. 

Paid commons |4,526.80 

West Side park 12,000.00 

land on 'Squog river 1,750.00 

Stark and Derryfield parks 5,003.84 

Pine Grove cemetery 8,304.87 

Valley cemetery 2,997.40 

Amoskeag cemetery 337.06 

Merrill vard 57.53 



144,742.41 



160,903.43 



>2,2S8.97 



$34,977.50 



EXPENDITURES. 505 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 



Paid paupers off the farm 


18,319.21 


citv fariu 


8,486.55 


indigent soldiers 


181.71 


Women's Aid Home 


300.00 


Sacred Heart Hospital . . . 


300.00 


free beds, Elliot Hospital 


300.00 


Emergency ward, Elliot 




Hospital 


300.00 


free beds, Notre Dame de 




Lourdes Hospital 


300.00 


semi-centennial history . . . 


600.00 


decoration of soldiers' 




graves 


399.51 


militia 


1,000.00 


band concerts 


300.00 


dedication of Weston Ob- 




servatory 


147.90 


dedication new high- 




school building 


84.75 



$21,019.66 

ABATEMENTS. 

Paid abatement of taxes |1,452.43 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 



Total of ordinary municipal expen- 
ditures 1821,414.28 



Paid loan made in anticipation of tax for 

1897 1250,000.00 



BONDED DEBT. 



Paid school bonds |10,000.00 , 

bridge bonds 25,000.00 

water bonds 100,000.00 

: 1135,000.00 



506 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

STATE AND COUNTY TAXES. 

Paid state tax |G8,225.00 

county tax 66.204.72 

.1f!134,429.72 

Grand total of expenditure during 
the year |1,340,844.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1897 |140,376.17 
Less unpaid bills 18,.823.80 

Net cash on hand 122,052.37 

$1,462,896.37 

. Interest. 

Appropriation |47,500.00 

Transferred from water-works 

account 40,414.00 

■ $87,914.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Curtis & Motley, discount 
on $100,000 notes, 5 
months, 26 days $1,388.45 

R. L.. Day & Co., discount 
on $50,000 note, 2 
months, 11 days 315.56 

Manchester National Bank 

discount on $50,000 note 620.40 

F. S. Moseley & Co., dis- 
count on $50,000 note, 4 
« months, 15 days 504.38 

coupons on bridge bonds 2,406.00 

coupons on water bonds. . 40,414.00 



1896* . 
1897 •. 



$143,088.90 
]G0,S63.04 



$528,960.27 
0,213.91 



Costs and 

interest on 

taxes. 



$1,031.31 1 $3,236.48 
1,449.91 6,696.62 



$1,281.07 $80.00 
2,131.31 1 92.50 



$175.00 
226.93 



$620.50 
1,078.00 



$585.26 $4,494.12 
373.93 4,560.54 



and Indus- 
trial School 
inmates. 



$3,400.71 
2,689.60 



$15,476.44 
364.18 



II uiiiui» tt'rcsion ........ 

sold. j bonds sold, redoeniod. 



$10,378.00l $531.46 ' $4,423.46 
6,248.7.'; 20.02 G,422.22 



REC E 1 PTS. 



$884.06 
579.49 



$313.43 
457.89 



$505.98 $64,005.51 



EXPENDITURES. 



189G..J $41,446.00 | $30,362.00 $1,912.48 
1897.. 40,414.00 \ 41,406.00 i 2,268.75 



$925.01 
2,834.79 




$5,816.61 
2,949.97 



$1,969.77 
1,920.66 



$53,046.86 
44,742.41 



> SUWBIt UEPARTMRNT. 



$3,712.03 
.3,427.91 



Uepaira of 
higliways. 



$23,621.72 
26,187.41 



$18,617.62 
8,381.97 



$2,911.12 
912.00 



$4,196.48 
3,762.64 



$6,320.69 
7,031.79 



$15,652.80 



$19,848.48 
14,472.74 



$5,035.82 $14,991.10 
5,450.96 15,260.85 



$2,968.44 
2,318.22 



$51,426.60 
53.889.73 



$4,336.88 
3,407.52 



$138,756.73 

$3,541.90 , 



EXPENDITUR E S.-™«tinued. 





ICriglnoors* 
dejiart- 


llenllh do. 
partnicnt. 


Printing atid 
Mtutloncry. 


Incidental 
i>.\piMiac». 






Mayor's 
Incidentals. 

$249.64 
280.60 




I'IBE DEl'ABTMENT. 


fUULIC BUILUtNUS. 


WATBR-WOH,«. 


PUBLIC PLACES. 






TKAH, 


Ml»Jclhi. 


I'i'^'^^: nooks. 


Fire depart- 
ment. 


Flrc.alarm 
telegraph. 


Hydrant 
service. 


New school- 
„ , houses, lands. 
Hepalrs. buildings and 
furniture. 


Construction, 
repairs, and 
current ex- 
penses. 


Sinking 
fund. 


Comniotis. 


Land. 


Stark and 

nerrytleld 

parks. 


Pino Grovo 
cemetery. 


Volley 
cemetery. 


AmoHkcnK 
comctory. 


Paupers off 
the farm. 


City farm. 


Notre-Panie 
de I.ourdes 
hospital. 


India 
soldi 


WM.. 
1897.. 


$6,895.25 
4,780.91 


$4,163.39 
4.366.85 


$1,938.55 
1,785.90 


$16,526.42 
16,167.71 


$8 


i2.G5 


$3,877.37 1 $1,000.00 
3,679.9?! 1,000.00 


$63,567.62 
60,811.28 


$1,730.42 
1,917.36 


$16,800.00 
17,175.00 


$7,549.68 $121,258.86 
3,489.01 ' 52,416.48 


$95,993.05 
65,113.97 


$16,800.00 
17,176.00 


$4,351.15 
4,526.80 


*13.750.00 


$5,000.00 
6,003.84 


$8,693.54 
8,304.87 


$3,006.84 
2.997.40 


$349.72 
387.06 


$12,140.67 
8,319.21 


$8,463.89 
8,486.65 


$300.00 
300.00 


$285 
181 


•Se 


Reports tor 


1894 and 18i» 


for coinpnrlHO 


B With other y 


,a... 











































RECEI PTS. 






























Mlscolln- 


1 1 1 


Court flnes 
ami costs. 


Pino Giovc 
oemetory. 




GrosB 

receipts, 

waterworks. 


Total m-di- ; LOAN. 


TAXES UECBIVKD FKOM THE STATE. 






'est on IjIIikI 
dssold. redeemoil. 


Bridges. 


City scales. 


Kleetric 
railroaJ. 


Tnilion 
and text- 
books. 


Vallov 
ceniftei-y- 


Weston 


dTiiing tlie 1 
year, exclud- ' i 
ing cash on | Temporary. , Bonded, 
hand. ' 


.nsurance 


Kailroad 


.Savings 
bank tax. 


Litevavv 
fund. 


from loans 
and state 


ceipts (luring 

the year, in. 

eluding cash 

on hand. 


531.46 $4,423.46 
20.02 0,422.22 


$384.06 
579.49 


$1,228.00 


$313.43 
457.89 


$3,890.?.9 


$505.98 
5.57.73 


$64,005.61 
49,266.65 


$5,119.23 
5,080.16 


$1,900.31 
1,800.00 


$6,000.00 


$128,907.03 
125,719.17 


$777,037.62 $100,000.00 $456,000.00 
854,034.80 250,000.00 107,750.00 


$2,632-50 
2,964.75 


$29,530.64 
35,255.86 


$50,770.79 
48,516.24 


$3,869.60 
3,511.68 


$642,803.53 
447,998.53 


$1,. 562,930.06 
1,462,896.37 











EXPENDITURES. 



STKEET 


AKD SEWEIl UEPAliTMENT. 
































SCHOOL 


.EPAimiEKI 




udinfT for 


.Scavenger 
teams. 


Street 
sweeping. 


I.lBlitlng 
streets. 


Hridges. 
tenanec. 


Amoskcag Granite 

bridge street bridge, 
abutment. ^ 


city teams. 


Repairs of 

sewers and 

drains. 


New sewers. 


Bicycle patli. 


Sinking 
fund. 


Repairs 

of sebool- 

bonses. 


Fuel. 


Furnituro 

and sup. 

piles. 


Books and 
stationery. 


l?rinting 
and adver- 
tising. 


Contingent 
expenses. 


Care ot 


Evening 
schools. 


Salaries of 
Teachers' eolJooi corn- 
salaries, nuttees 
aim truant 
omcers. 


SalaiT of 
superinten- 
dent of 
schools. 


Evening 

schools 

mechanical 

drawing. 


Free text- 
books. 


Hannal 
training. 


5,035.82 
5,450.96 


$14,991.10 
15,260.85 


$2,968.44 
2,318.22 


$51,426.60 
53.889.73 


$4,336.88 
3,407.52 


$3,541.90 


$138,755.73 


$6,285.70 
6,723.95 


$5,421.63 
5,830.46 


$71,629.32 
40,956.35 


$504.36 


$15,000.00 
27,000.00 


$6,678.38 
5,872.74 


$6,784.03 
6,628.26 


$1,114.14 
1,461.84 


$46.04 
69.13 


$429.56 
304.43 


$1,857.79 
3,111.94 


.$5,031.56 
6,720.28 


$1,061.50 
1.388.15 


$72,838.95 $1,100.00 
77,037.17 1.090.00 


$2,300.00 

2,300.00 


$356.25 
364.36 


$5,058.42 
6,320.36 


$1,403.29 
1,370.86 



EXPENDITURE S.-com.nukd. 





CIIAItlTY, PATRIOTISM, PHILANTHROPY. 


Tax abate- 
ments. 


Total of ordi- 
nary municipal 
expenditures. 

$1,057,637.29 
821,414.43 


Debt. 


Temporary 
loan. 


stale tax. 


County lax. 


Total of loan 
debt and 
state and 
county tax 

expenditure. 


Griind total of 
expenditures. 




tark and 
en-yfleld 

parks. 


Pine Grove 
cemetery. 


Volley 
cemeteiy. 


Amoskoag 
cemetery. 


Paupers off 
the faiTH. 


City farm. 


Notre-I>ame 
de Lonrdes 
hospital. 


Indigent 
soldiers. 


Decora- 
tion of 
soldiers' 
graves. 


Band 


Militia. 


Weston Ob- Women's 
servatory. Aid Home. 


Seml-Cen- 
tennial cel- 
ebration. 


beds? El- 1 i"";?;' 


Emergen- 
cy wai-d, 
Elliot lios- 
pltal. 


Casb on hand. 


ts.ooo.oo 


$8,593.54 
8,804.87 


$3,006-84 
2,997.40 


$349.72 
337.06 


$12,140.67 
8,319.21 


$8,463.89 
8,486.55 


$300.00 
300.00 


$285.86 
181.74 


$407.47 
399.51 


$300.00 
300.00 


$800.00 
1,000.00 


$300.00 


$2,000.00 


$300.00 1 $300.00 
300.00 300.00 


$300.00 
300.00 


$1,183.96 
1,462.43 


$110,000.00 
135,000.00 


$100,000.00 
250,000.00 


$68,226.00 
68,226.00 


$66,204.72 
66.204.72 


$344,429.72 
519,429.72 


$1,402,067.01 
1,340,844.00 


$160,863.04 


6,003.84 


$4,997.94 1 300.00 


122,062.37 













ly.fT 



.ui^,u? ' ooHr 






'l!Ht 



lol alioq-jii 



SINKING FUND. 507 

Paid coupons on improvement 

bonds 115,980.00 

coupons on school bonds. . 9,200.00 

coupons on city bonds. . . . 6,200.00 

coupons on Granite bridge 

bonds 5,120.00 

coupons on cemetery 

bonds 2,268.75 

interest on security note 2,500.00 

Total expenditures . . . ; |86,92.3.54 

Transferred to reserved fund 990.16 

187,914.00 



Paym,ent of Funded Debt. 

Appropriation 135,000.00 

Received from sale of bonds. . . 100,000.00 

'■ $135,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid water bonds • |100,000.00 

school loan bonds 10,000.00 

Granite bridge loan bonds 25,000.00 

'■ .fl.35,000.00 



Sinking Fund. 
Appropriation |27,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid sinking fund commis- 
sioners 127,000.00 



508 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Reserved Fund. 

Appropriation |10,000.00 

Uuclaimed bills covered into 
treasury, j)er resolution of 

December 7, 1897 29.64 

Transferred from the following 
accounts : 

Interest 990.46 

City hall 1,050.03 

Printing and stationery 264.10 

Mayor's incidentals 19.50 

Auditor's department 79.35 

Street and park commission 172.09 

Land taken for highways. . . . 4,088.00 

Watering streets 1,237.36 

Macadamizing streets 527.26 

Street sweeping 681.78 

Bridges 592.48 

Scavenger service 739.15 

New sewers 4,301.71 

Lighting streets 1,110.27 

Health department • 33.15 

Fire department 188.72 

Police station 273.43 

Police court 269.06 

Weston Observatory 2.06 

Dedication of Weston Ob- 
servatory 2.10 

Dedication of high-school 

building 65.25 

Parker school lot 12.26 

Valley cemetery 2.60 

Amoskeag cemetery 12.94 

Pine Grove cemetery » 195.13 

Fuel 1,371.74 



RESERVED FUND. 



509 



Furniture and supplies 


1548.16 


Books and stationery 


40.87 


Care of rooms 


279.72 


Evening schools 


111.85 


Evening school, mechanical 




drawing 


85.64 


Manual training 


129.14 


Care of Merrill yard 


42.47 


Paupers off the farm 


2,205.79 


Indigent soldiers 


118.26 


Decoration 'of soldiers' graves 


.49 


Abatement of taxes 


547.57 


Fire-alarm telegraph 


82.65 



132,454.28 



Expenditures. 

Transferred to purchase land 

on Piscataquog river |1,750.00 

Transferred to the following accounts: 

Parker school lot 300.00 

Dedication of Weston Ob- 
servatory 150.00 

Dedication of high-school 

building 150.00 

Bicycle path 600.00 

Incidental expenses 4,167.71 

Cit}' officers salaries 17.18 

Eepairs of highways 1,698.08 

Snow and ice 489.33 

New highways 1,999.49 

Paving streets 2,081.79 

Grading for concrete 450.96 

City teams 223.94 

Eepairs of sewers 830.46 

Paving Elm and Granite 

streets 495.31 



510 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Engineer's department 


1280.91 


Police commission 


581 90 


Commons 


26.80 


Stark and Derryfield paries. . 


3.70 


Repairs of sclioolbouses 


2,872.71 


Contingent expenses 


1,411.91 


Printing and advertising. . . . 


1.13 


. Teachers' salaries 


3,037.17 


Free text-books 


1,320.36 


City farm 


186.55 


Repairs of buildings 


1,531.07 


New schoolhouses 


2,599.89 


Transferred to new account. . 


2,939.52 







Temporary Loan. 

Receipts. 

Received from Manchester Na- 
tional Bank, on note of |50,- 
000, dated July 1, 1897 150,000.00 

Received from Hanover Nation- 
al Bank, New York, on four 
notes of 125,000 each, dated 
June 10, 1897 100,000.00 

Received from Suffolk National 
Bank, Boston, on note of |50,- 
000, dated July 30, 1897 50,000.00 

On note of $50,000, dated Sep- 
tember 29, 1897 50,000.00 



Expenditures. 

Paid Manchester National Bank 

note dated July 1, 1897 .$50,000.00 



52,454.23 



1250,000.00 



CITY HALL. 511 

Paid Hanover National Bank, 
New York, four notes of |25,- 
000 each, dated June 10, 1897 flOO.OOO.OO 

Paid Suffolk National Bank, 
Boston, two notes of |50,000 
each, dated July 30, 1897, and 

September 29, 1897 100,000.00 

1250,000.00 



City Hall. 
Appropriation |1,000.00 

Expenditures. 

fuel and lights. 

Paid Manchester Electric Co., 

electric lights |131.70 

People's Gas-Light Co., 

gas 180.74 

Union Electric Co., elec- 
tric lights 291.79 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 97,195 

lbs. coal 253.84 

J. M. Clark, 20 tons coal 128.00 

D. M. Poore, wood 11.50 

1997.57 

WATER AND TELEPHONE. 

Paid Manchester Water- Works, 

use of water 1342.15 

New England Telephone 
& Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 75.00 

1417.15 



512 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CLEANING OFFICES, ETC. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey, brooms. . |1.13 

John H. Cole, services as 

janitor 516.00 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap 5.62 

A. M. Eastman, soap .60 

John B. Hall, soap, toilet 

paper 1.50 

Manchester Mills, 600 gal- 
Ions soap 11.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

brushes .25 

Mrs. Mary Nolan, labor 

cleaning offices 104.00 

Oscar Perkins, services as 

janitor 575.00 

J. K. Rhodes, janitor for 

8^ days 17.00 

F. H. Thurston, Germol, 

soap 11.00 

J. J. Holland, borax. 1.00 

Talbot & Co., disinfectant 10.45 

J. B. Varick Co., brooms, 

dusters, brushes 25.20 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., soap, 

matches, oil 3.50 

FURNITURE, FIXTURES, SUPFLIES. 

Paid Adams Brothers, lime |0.95 

Clark M. Bailey, toilet 

paper 3.50 

J. (t. Ellinwood, photo- 
graphs 1.50 

Peter Harris, keys, etc ... . 1.25 



L,283.25 



CIIY HALL. 




Paid John B. Hall, 1 thermom- 




eter 


11.25 


Kimball & Hobbs, sole 




leather, hose, etc 


6.00 


Manchester Electric Co., 




15 lamps 


3.75 


Manchester Hardware Co., 




hinges, cord 


.57 


B. F. Shepard, keys, re- 




pairing chair 


1.25 


Paid James W. Hill Co. : 




1 flag 


7.50 


_■_ J^lLl^ •••• 

Crash and bunting 


2.75 


Hanging and taking down 




awnings 


19.17 


INCIDENTAL REPAIRS 


i. 


Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 




labor 


14.34 


J. J. Abbott, paint, glass, 


and labor 


2.85 


E. M. Bryant & Co., labor 




and fixtures . 


7.34 


A. L. Franks & Co., lamps 




and labor 


1.90 


George Holbrook, mate- 




rial and labor 


14.00 


Head & Dowst Co., mate- 




rial and labor 


33.79 


Lessard & Hevey, plumb- 




ing repairs . 


2.96 


J. Y. McQueston Co., re- 




pairing table, etc 


13.85 


Pike & Heald Co., mate- 




rial and labor 


28.57 


33 





513 



149.44 



514 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. B. Varick Co., asplial- 

tum 10.95 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co. : 

Electric fixtures, per contract 18.25 

Material and labor 7.50 

Paid C. L. Wolf: 

Material and labor, ladies' 

toilet 10.60 

Material and labor, city hall 

roof 4.50 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co., use of 

200 chairs flO.OO 

A. Elliott & Co., premium 
on insurance policy No. 
106,470 31.16 

Total expenditures 

Overdraft, C. M. Bailey 

Transferred to reserved fund 

Printing and Stationery. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures, 
assessors and inspectors. 

Paid John B. Clarke Co., print- 
ing 50 blanks |10.00 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Blank books and covers 55.00 

Pens, pencils, paper, ink, etc. 14.27 



L51.40 



141.16 

12,939.97 

10.00 

1,050.03 

14,000.00 



$2,000.00 



''i).Zi 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 515 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid The John B. blarke Co. : 
Advertising- sale non-res- 
ident lands $75.00 

Printing 25,000 bills 25.00 

1100.00 

MESSENGER. 

Paid W. p. Goodman, envelopes and note- 
heads 10.95 

CITY CLERK. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing blanks, lists, bill- 
heads, etc 171.50 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Rubber bands, envelopes. . . . 1.85 

Blank book and cover 6.00 

179.35 

AUDITOR. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing: 

Billheads, statements |28.00 

800 copies city report 1,046.60 

50 reports lettered ' 5.00 

Binding 150 reports 150.00 

Stamping seal 1.00 

$1,230.60 

ENGINEER. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 1,000 

license blanks |6.50 

CITY TREASURER. 

Paid W. P. Goodman, blotting 

paper, book 14.61: 



516 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 

pay-roll sheets |10.50 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., 

envelopes 10.90 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing: 

1,000 blanks 2.00 

Blanks and blank books 12.00 

Binding 1 pay-roll book 3.50 

MAYOR. 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., enve- 
lopes and paper |1.03 

W. P. Goodman, pencils, 

books 1.60 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing: 

300 inaugural addresses 65.00 

400 slips, 300 envelopes 3.50 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 

stationery 30.31 

MILK INSrECTOR. 



}.54 



1101.47 



Paid J. Arthur Williams, 100 postals and 
printing |1.60 

CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing: 

Blanks, postals, etc |7.75 

Advertising 12 times 27.60 

Paid The Nate Kellogg Co., 
printing notices, blanks, 

postals, etc 16.75 

Union Publishing Co., ad- 
vertising 12 times 27.67 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



517 



Paid J. Arthur Williams, cards, 
blanks, etc $6.85 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to reserved fund 



$86.62 

$1,735.90 
264.10 

$2,000.00 



Incidental Expenses. 

Appropriation $12,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 4,167.71 



$16,167.71 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, division No. 2 : 

January $24.00 

February 30.00 

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS. 

Paid O. D. Abbott, M. D $11.75 

D. S. Adams, M. D 3.50 

J, L. Beaumier, M. D .25 

J. S. Brown, M. D .25 

J. F. Brown, M. D .75 

H. W. Boutwell, M. D 30.25 

H. T. Boutwell, M. D .50 

A. A. E. Brien, M. I) 18.25 

J. L. Burnham, M. D 5.75 

L. P. Beaudet, M. D 1.00 

Lillian G. Bullock, M. D. . .25 

E. Bernier, M. D 1.00 

Rev. A. Carlsson 5.75 



$54.00 



518 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Charles Corey, M. D |1.00 

I. L. Carpenter, M. D 9.00 

Charles Chirurg, M. D. . . 3.00 

James M. Collity, M. D. . . ' 32.50 

Rev. N. L. Colby 5.00 

Rev. C. R. Crossett 2.50 

Rev. T. E. Clapp.. 4.50 

Rev. J. A. Chevalier 13.25 

Rev. A. C. Coult .25 

Rev. I. H. C. Davignon. . . 20.50 

E. B. Dunbar, M. D 10.25 

John F. Dowd, M. D .75 

G. M. Davis, M. D 5.75 

Henry Duchine, M. D 3.50 

Mary S. Danforth, M. D. . 0.00 

C. M. Dodge, M. D 3.00 

Charles E. Dodge, M. D . . . 12.00 

C. W. Downing, M. D 1.00 

. R. H. Dillon, M. D .75 

John Ferguson, M. D 24.75 

John Ferguson, Jr., M. D. .50 

George Frechette, M. D . . 13.50 

J. E. Fortier, M. D 11.50 

L. M. French, M. D 18.75 

C. F. Flanders, M. D 47.00 

E. N. Fugere, M. D 28.00 

Arthur Fournier, M. D . . . 10.00 

Moise Guerin, M. D 24.25 

J. H. Gleason, M. D 4.75 

N. E. Guillet, M. D .25 

M. Guggenheim, M. D . . . . 5.25 

S. J. Girouard, M. D 1.75 

G. H. Greeley, M. D .25 

William Holland, M. D. . . .25 

Thomas C. Hill, M. D. . . . 2.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 519 



Paid George C. Hoitt, M. D 


10.75 


G. W. Hazelton, M. D.... 


.50 


Kev. P. Hevey 


15.25 


Eev. C. E. Hennon 


20.25 


J. A. Jackson, M. D 


19.75 


N. P. Kidder 


635.75 


M. E. Kean, M. D 


29.50 


P. G. Laberge, M. D 


13.25 


J. E. Lemaitre, M. D 


9.50 


J. D. Lemay, M. D 


15.75 


H. D. Lord 


31.00 


J. E. Larocbelle, M. D 


8.75 


J. E. A. Lanouette, M. D . . 


18.00 


Rev. J. J. Lyons. 


6.50 


M. V. B.Morse, M. D 


.25 


C. A. Manning, M. D 


2.00 


G. B. Morey, M. D 


2.75 


Jacob W.Mooar,M.D.... 


1.00 


J. W. D. McDonald, M. D. 


11.75 


Clara Odman 


3.75 


Anna Pollmer 


11.00 


W. M. Parsons, M. D 


2.00 


Frederick Perkins, M. D . . 


9.00 


W. H. Pattee, M. D 


6.25 


C. A. Palmer, M. D 


.50 


George Porter, M. D 


.25 


Eev. 0. D. Patch, 


2.75 


William Richardson, M. D. 


2.25 


a. F. Eobinson, M. D 


3.75 


C. S. Eodier, M. D 


7.75 


J. E. E. Eoy, M. D 


4.25 


F. C. Stewart, M. D 


2.75 


Serville St. Pierre 


18.25 


A. G. Straw, M. D 


1.75 


Z. L. Straw, M. D 


7.00 


Gillis Stark, M.D 


29.25 



520 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid C. B. Sturtevant, M. D. . 


18.00 


V. N. Sikorsky, M. D.... 


1.50 


E. Sylvain, M. D 


12.75 


J. Sullivan, M. D 


27.00 


L. Tremblay, M. D 


2.25 


Arthur J. Todd, M. D... 


.50 


George D. Towne, M. D. 


3.50 


E. C. Tremblay, M. D 


34.75 


W. F. Templeton, M. D . . 


1.00 


R. S. True, M. D 


.50 


Harry P. Watson, M. D . . 


1.25 


G. M. Watson, M. D 


.75 


Hermann Wellner, M. D. 


1.75 


A. F. Wheat, M. D 


3.00 


G. L. Wakefield, M. D... 


1.25 


Ellen A. Wallace, M. D.. 


3.25 


G. A. Weaver, M. D 


.50 



L,473.75 



DAMAGES AND JUDGMENTS. 



Paid Adams & Tasker, settle- 
ment of claim 

Aug'uste Blanchet, glan- 
dered horse 

T. E. & M. T Burke, set- 
tlement of claim, inju- 
ries to horse 

Cavanaugh Brothers, set- 
tlement of claim, breach 
of contract 

Demas Dwinell, settle- 
ment of claim, damage 
to real estate 

Frank A. Dockham, settle- 
ment of claim 



20.17 
5.00 

43.00 

250.00 

125.00 
50.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 521 

Paid A. L. Dodge, destroying- 
diseased animals |13.00 

A. D. Gooden, settlement 
of claim, damage to real 
estate 100.00 

Selina H. Hoag, settle- 
ment of claim, damage 
to real estate 125.00 

J. G. Jones, settlement of 

claim, damage to wagon 3.00 

Ellen Kelliher, settlement 
of claim, personal in- 
juries 250.00 

James Kelliher, settle- 
ment of claim, injury to 
property 250.00 

Andrew Leckie, settle- 
ment of claim, damage 
to property 50.00 

Theresia Maier, settlement 
of claim, personal in- 
juries 1,300.17 

Joseph St. John, settle- 
ment of claim, injuries 
to horse 25.00 

Gordon Woodbury, settle- 
ment of claim, damage 
to real estate 250.00 

A. J. Wilkinson, glan- 

dered horse 4.00 



LEGAL EXPENSES. 



Paid E. H. Carroll, expenses 
incurred at legislature, 
session 1897 1300.00 



},213.34 



522 EEPOHT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Dana W. King, recording 

deeds, etc.... |3.28 

Thomas D. Luce, certify- 
ing appeals, etc 3.00 

John H. Riedell, legal ser- 
vices 10.00 

Ezra S. Stearns, engross- 
ing acts 6.75 

CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

Paid Fred L. Allen : 

Expenses to Boston sundry 
times, to deliver bonds, ne- 
gotiate loans, etc |23.80 

Express and telegrams .88 

Expenses to Concord .72 

Paid George W. Bailey, use of 

teams 118.50 

John A. Barker, care of 

boiler, city library 135.50 

Bo3'd Brothers, use of 

teams 43.00 

^'Le Bulletin," advertising- 
notices 5.00 

J. E. Bernier & Co., ad- 
vertising notices 21.00 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Blank book G.50 

Advertising notices 33.71 

Paid F. X. Chenette, use of 

teams 10.00 

W. J. Freeman, use of 

teams 70.00 

C. S. Fifleld, use of teams 10.00 
W. P. Goodman, direct- 
ories 97.50 



1323.03 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 523 

Paid E. T. James, use of teams $63.50 

E. J. Kuowlton, P. M., 

stamps 84.50 

O. D. Knox, expense in- 
curred by committee on 
lare department to Low- 
ell, Lawrence, Nashua. . 9.25 

Manchester Street Rail- 
way, car tickets 82.50 

J. C. McKeon, advertising 

licenses 5.00 

New England Telephone 
& Telegraph Co., use of 
telephone, solicitor. . . . 36.00 

Plummer & Brown, use of 

teams 25.00 

Felix Provencher, use of 

hack 5.00 

Charles H. Simpson, use 
of teams 100.00 

Union Publishing Co., ad- 
vertising notices 41.02 

Whitten & Fifield, use of 
teams 20.00 

G. E. Wheeler & Son, use 

of teams 15.00 



CITY LIBRARY. 



11,065.88 



Paid John B." Varick Co., broom, duster, 
brush 13.43 

STREETS. 

Paid Union Manufacturing Co., 

numbers |3.60 

C. H. Wood, painting signs 3.85 

17.45 



624 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CITY SCALES. 

Paid C. B. Clarkson, services 

as weigher |30.00 

John Driscoll Co., clean- 
ing pipe, etc 1.25 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 2.30 

D. M. Poore, coal and wood 23.50 

John B. Varick Co., 

brooms .74 

MILK INSPECTOR. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
advertising notice 6 

times $11.25 

Union Publishing Co., 
advertising notice 7.16 

MAYOR. 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., sta- 
tionery 110.09 

Daniels & Downs, covers, 

oil, oil can .72 

Grace E. Downer, services 

as clerk 330.00 

W. P. Goodman, pencils, 
envelopes, books, direc- 
tories 6.f)0 

S. Louise Hill, typewriting 

3i days 7.00 

James W. Hill Co., 12 fans .30 

Paid E. J. Knowlton, P. M. : 

Stamps and postals 107.00 

500 large envelopes 11.26 



$57.79 



$18.41 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 525 

Paid Francis Pratt, Jr., pens. . |3.00 

Paid Temple .& Farrington Co.: 

Fountain pen and ink 2.75 

Paper, envelopes 13.65 

Mucilage, ink, note books . . . 1.50 
Paid George P. Wallace, type- 
writer ribbons 2.00 

Maude Young, services as 

clerk 200.00 

Smith Premier Type- 
writer Co., repairing 
machine 8.15 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid E. K. Coburn Co., cash 

book, index, ink |8.35 

H. E. Daniels, typewriting 

3 copies tax list 5.25 

W. E. Gilmore, writing 

tax bills 13.50 

"Independent Statesman," 
advertising non-resident 

tax list, 1896 7.50 

Paid George E. Morrill: 

Taxes bought June, 1897 6,066.70 

Delivering tax bills 98.25 

CITY CLERK. 

Paid E. E. Coburn Co., blank 

books 125.25 

W. P. Goodman, ledger, 

envelopes, etc 9.00 - 

Florence M. Kidder, ser- 
vices as clerk 520.00 



1701.32 



6,199.55 



526 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Novelty Advertising Co., 

blanlvs, stamp, ink, pad' |12.05 

E. C. Smith, envelopes, 
postals, seals, etc 30.12 

Temple & Farrington Co., 
blank books, mucilage, 
ink, etc 18.00 

C. A. Trefetlien, repair- 
ing clock : .75 

CITY TREASURER. 

Paid D. J. Adams, fitting keys |0.15 

Blanche E. Bullock, ser- 
vices as clerk 540.00 

E. R. Coburn Co., sta- 
tionery 13.60 

Daniels & Downs, type- 
writing 2.36 

W. P. Goodman, cards and 

envelopes 20.10 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., pos- 
tals and stamps 35.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

pencils, mucilage, etc. . . . 1.92 

COURT HOUSE. 

Paid D. J. Adams, repairing 

lawn mowers |5.00 

L. M. Aldrich, screws, 

labor 1.05 

Moore & Preston, 30^ tons 

coal • 183.00 

Timothy P. Shea, janitor 488.33 

John B. A'arick Co., 

brooms, duster, sponge, 

etc 2.88 



1615.17 



1613.13 



1680.26 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



527 





SCHOOLS. 




'aid James W, Hill Co. 


, cotton 


11.26 


John B. Yarick Co., 


broom. 




cotton waste . . . 




2.63 


'aid insurance on High 


school : 




John Dowst 




60.00 


Clarence M. Edgerly. 




60.00 


A. Elliott & Co 




60.00 


Everett & Smith. .. . 




60.00 


Charles L. Harmon . . 




60.00 


D. A. Holland 




60.00 


D.W.Lane 




60.00 


Richardson & Goggin 




60.00 


John A. Sheehau .... 




60.00 


Stark & Blanchet... 




60.00 



ASSESSORS. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 

advertising 

John F. Gillis, furnishing 



$14.25 



transfers of real estate 


12.00 


G. H. Nichols, use of team 


6.00 


People's Gas-Light Co., 




mantle and chimney. . . 


.90 


B. W. Robinson, deliver- 




ing blanks 


3.75 


Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 




Pamphlet Laws 


100 


Blocks 


24 






SUNDRIES. 




Paid American Express Co., ex- 


' 


press on reports 


111.02 


Amoskeag National Bank, 




use of vault. . .' 


25.00 



1603.89 



138.14 



528 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Prof. E. R. Angell, exami- 
nation of spring water |3.00 

George W. Bailey, storage 

of ambnlance 19.00 

C. M. Bailey, V. S., exam- 
ining diseased animals 21.00 

A. T. Barr, testing weights 

and measures 1.00 

E. T. Bartlett, M. D., analy- 
sis of spring water 15.00 

Harry J. Briggs, making 

sewer book for city clerk 76.65 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 2 tons 
coal, Hallsville liose- 
house 13.00 

E. R. Coburn Co., paste. . .20 

J. M. Clark, 2 tons coal, 

Hallsville hosehouse... 13.00 

First N. H. Battery, pow- 
der and firing national 
salute July 1 46.00 

town of Goffstown, taxes 2.17 

John H. Hayes, stamps, 
stationery, etc., ward 
clerk ...\ 1.98 

John B. Hall, vaccine 
points 15.15 

Manchester Water- Works, 
use of water, 129 Man- 
chester street 3.38 

Kenneth McDonald, mov- 
ing desks 3.00 

!N. E. Confectionery Co., 

food for isolated family 2.00 

Ellen H. Richards, exam- 
ination of spring water 15.00 



CITY officers' salaries. 529 

Paid Clarence H. Sargent, trees foO.OO 

H. E. Smith, M. D., exam- 
ination of spring water 30.00 

Charles J. Senter estate, 
entrance to sewer 46,80 

George D. Towne, M. D., 1 

visit Oscar Swanson... 1.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

100 mailing boxes 4.00 

F. H. Thurston, bottles. . . 1.00 

Union Electric Co., lights 

at Hallsville hosehouse 19.24 

Sarah Whelpley, use of 
land in West Manches- 
ter, in full for all claims 
to date, June 9, 1897. . . 50.00 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., gro- 
ceries for isolated fam- 
ily 1.08 

17 



Total expenditures |16,167.71 



City Officers' Salaries. 

Appropriation |18,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 17.18 



,017.18 



Expenditures. 

central department. 

Paid William C. Clarke, mayor |1,800.00 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer. . 1,200.00 

Edwin F. Jones, solicitor 800.00 

Nathan P. Kidder, clerk . . 27.50 

34 



530 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Edward C. Smith, city 




clerlv 


$872.50 


George L. Stearns, clerk of 




common council 


200.00 


Tliomas W. Lane, buildirig 




inspector 


100.00 


Asa B. Eaton, weigher. . . 


400.00 


John A. Barker, messenger 


699.97 


E. C. Smith, milk inspector 


12.50 


Archie F. Precourt, milk 




inspector 


287.50 


J. K. Rhodes, messenger 


24.00 


John M. Crawford, 




weigher 


39.00 


Richard J. Barry, acting 




mayor 


60.00 







5,522.97 



CITY PHYSICIAN AND OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Paid Irying L. Carpenter, M. 

D., city physician $600.00 

W. H. Maxwell, ward 1. . . 25.00 

Thomas L. Quimby, ward 2 25.00 
Benjamin F. Garland, 

ward 3 25.00 

Charles B. Clarkson, 

ward 4 25.00 

Patrick Costello, ward 5 25.00 
Charles Francis, ward 6 . . 25.00 
William Marshall, ward 7 25.00 
Charles S. McKean,ward 8 25.00 
Thomas C. Stewart, ward 9 25.00 
William C. Clarke, chair- 
man ex officio . 25.00 



CITY officers' salaries. 531 

Paid William H. Maxwell, clerk 

of the board |100.00 

Judith Sherer, matron of 

pesthouse 360.00 

11,310.00 

SCHOOL OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Paid W. E. Buck, superintend- 
ent of schools 12,300.00 

Curtis W. Davis, truant 

officer 750.00 

W. C. Clarke, chairman 

ex officio '. 10.00 

E. B. Woodbury, clerk of 

board 150.00 

George B. Eogers, presi- 
dent of common council, 

ex officio 10.00 

Walter B. Heath, ward 1 10.00 

Elliott C. Lambert, ward 1 10.00 

A. P. Home, ward 2 10.00 

Charles H. Manning, ward 

2 10.00 

George D. Towne, ward 3 10.00 

Louis E. Phelps, ward 3. . 10.00 

Henry D. Soule, ward 4 . . . 10.00 

Rev. N. L. Colby, ward 4 10.00 

James P. Slattery, ward 5 10.00 

John T. Kelley, ward 5. . . 10.00 
Herbert E. Richardson, 

ward 6 10.00 

Edson S. Heath, ward 7. . 10.00 

E. B. Woodbury, ward 7. . 10.00 
Luther C. Baldwin, ward 

8 10.00 



532 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Ned T. Wallace, ward 8. . |10.00 

Robert E. Walsh, ward 9 . . 10.00 

Henry I. Lemay, ward 9. . 10.00 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

Paid Henry E. Lewis, ward 1 . . $152.50 

John E. Stearns, ward 2. . 207.25 

David O. Fernald, ward 3 940.00 

Harrison D. Lord, ward 4 387.50 

George F. Sheehan, ward 5 177.50 

George H. Dudley, ward 6 480.00 

Robert Leggett, ward 7.. 127.50 
Eugene W. Brigham, ward 

8 475.00 

John T. Hannigan, ward 9 115.00 

Hiram Forsaith, assistant 85.00 

N. Nichols, assistant 285.00 

John Cayzer, assistant... 42.50 
Henry F. Stone, assistant 67.50 
Isaac L. Whittemore, as- 
sistant 99.50 

C. B. Clarkson, assistant. . 42.50 
Charles W. Brown, assist- 
ant 65.00 

Harvey L. Currier, clerical 

services 185.00 

Arthur W, Rowell, clerical 

services 135.00 

Louis Comeau, interpreter 65.00 
Jean B. Rejimbal, inter- 
preter 72.50 

J. N. St. Germain, inter- 
preter 42.50 



13,390.00 



t,249.25 



auditor's department. 533 



TAX COLLECTOR. 



Paid George E. Morrill: 

Salary, balance due year end- 
ing 1895 1850.00 

Commission on old taxes 19.20 

Salary, balance due year end- 
ing 1896 850.00 

Commission on old taxes. . . . 25.76 

Salary, year ending Novem- 
ber 30, 1897 800.00 

12,514.96 

Total expenditures $18,017.18 



Auditors' Department. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid James E. Dodge, salary as 

auditor |1,200.00 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, ser- 
vices as clerk 660.00 

11,860.00 

SUPPLIES, ETC. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey, paper, . . |1.71 
Barton & Co., towels, 

hassock ., 1.13 

Paid The Carter's Ink Co. : 

Typewriter ribbon 1.00 

Coupon book 4.50 



534 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., blottiiig 

paper 10.50 

John B. Clarke Co., print- 
ing bills and postals. . . 10.00 
Paid Lizzie M, Cogswell, cash paid: 

Making book rest .50 

Postal cards, express 1.90 

Washing office towels, soap, 

etc , 3.40 

Paid James E. Dodge, express 

paid .25 

W". P. Goodman, stationery 3.90 

Lovejoy & Stratton,- 1 

clock 1.75 

Lyon's Platinum Pen Co., 

pens 9.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

twine .30 

Paid- Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Book, pencils, etc 2.50 

3 books 5.55 

Paid John B. Varick Co., screw 
drivers, tacks, twine 

holder .78 

Wycoff, Seamans & Bene- 
dict, adjusting type- 
writer 1.95 

George P. Wallace, carbon 

paper 1.00 



160.65 



Total expenditures |1,920.65 

Transferred to reserved fund 79.35 

12,000.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 535 

Mayor's Incidentals. 
Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Boyd Brothers, team hire |37.00 

Paid William C. Clarke: 

Team hire 1G8.00 

Entertainment of Chelsea and 
Boston oflScials, and other 
incidental expenses 75.50 

Total expenditures $280.50 

Transferred to reserved fund 19.50 

$.300.00 

Street and Park Commission. 
Appropriation $3,600.00 

Expenditures. 

salarie-s. 

Paid H. P. Simpson, chairman $G00.00 

George H. Stearns 600.00 

Byron Worthen 600.00 



CLERICAL SERVICES. 

Paid Julia F. Stearns $5.33.28 

George H. Stearns 468.00 

L. Robinson 10.00 

USE OF TEAMS. 

Paid H. P. Simpson. . ., $1.50.00 

George H. Stearns 150.00 

Byron Woitlien 150.00 



$1,800.00 



L,011.28 



$450.00 



536 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

OFFICE SUPPLIES. 

Paid T. S. Buck, stamps $3.46 

Paid The Carter's Ink Co.: 

Ribbon and carbon paper. . . . 1.50 

Coupon book . 4.50 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing : 

Blanks and letter heads 8.25 

Cloth signs 4.00 

200 reports 34.05 

Paid H. W. Eastman, cut of 

Weston Observatory . . . 2.50 
J, G. Ellinwood, photo- 
graphs 24.50 

W. P. Goodman, books and 

stationery 11.65 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., 

stamps 5.00 

New Engjand Telephone & 

Telegraph Co., use of 

telephone 39.93 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

blank books 7.00 

John B. Varick Co., brush 

and broom .73 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid H. P. Simpson, expenses of commis- 
sion to Boston & Worcester 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to reserved fund 



1147.07 



$19.56 

J,427.91 
172.09 



13,600.00 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 537 

Repairs of Highways. 

Appropriation |20,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 1,698.08 

121,698.08 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per i)aj-roll, 
division No. 1: 

May 13.00 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 2 : 

January |15.63 

March 48.75 

April 355.89 

May 810.71. 

June 1,766.19 

July 1,778.83 

August 3,058.03 

September 1,613.59 

October 326.59 

November 331.58 

December 118.36 

110,251.15 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 4: 

April 154.00 

June 215.87 

July 55.00 

September 203.24 

October 52.50 

1580.61 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 5: 
January |8.00- 



538 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

April 13.75 

May 28.00 

June 152.87 

August 135.99 

September 31.00 

October 50.62 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 6: 

May $128.87 

June 26.87 

July 58.12 

August 18.50 

September 36.00 

October 18.11 

December 7.50 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 7: 

April 11.38.00 

May 206.71 

June 361.97 

July 558.25 

August . 386.36 

September 170.62 

October 73.75 

November 96.12 

December 20.75 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 8: 

January |7.00 

May 223.62 

July 401.91 

August 185.71 

September 281.62 



$410.23 



1323.97 



12,015.86 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 539 

October |129.39 

November 8.35 

December 31.80 

11,269.40 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 9: 

May 191.25 

June 29.75 

September 23.00 

November 20.75 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 10 : 

January |119.06 

February 29.21 

March 130.97 

April '. ... 315.87 

May 611.73 

June 775.12 

July 665.37 

August 556.37 

September 498.62 

October 121.02 

November , 168.40 

December 96.12 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 12: 

August 112.00 

November 373.75 



LUMBER AND OTHER MATERIAL. 

Paid C. W. Farmer, 50 posts. . . |6.25 
The Head & Dowst Co., 

lumber and labor 43.72 

Charles Millar & Son, pipe 136.43 



64.75 



14,087.86 



$385.75 



'640 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber and 

labor 1179.44 

David Wells, 934 posts. . . 112.08 

TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid A. N. Clapp, tools |2.2.5 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

pick handles, scoops, 

rope, nails, bolts, etc. . . 28.00 

John B. Varick Co., tools 

and hardware 109.92 

BLAOKSMITHING AND REPAIRS. 

Paid James Benson, sharpen- 
ing tools : . . 15.15 

F. W. Blood Roofing Co., 
repairing slate roof, 303 

Hanover street 2.00 

James R. Carr & Co., mate- 
rial and labor on foun- 
tains 17.36 

James H. Cram, sharpen- 
ing tools 2.00 

O. L. Hevey, connecting 
watering-trough, Amos- 

keag 3.68 

Paid T. A. Lane Co., material 
and labor: 

Fence rail 4.89 

Fountains 119.93 

Paid Lessard & Hevey, mate- 
rial and labor. 13.43 

Wallace Laird, building 

culvert 40.00 



1477.92 



1140.17 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 541 

Paid C. S. McKean, filing saws $1.85 

Pike & Heald Co., repair- 
ing water pipe 3.39 

C. H. Kobie Co., concret- 
ing roadways 473.23 

C. L. Wolf, pipe and labor 14.22 



STONE, GRAVEL, CLAY, ETC. 

Paid G. W. Campbell, 495 loads 

gravel 149.50 

William H. Coburn, 100 

loads gravel 85.00 

M. E. Dickey, 102 loads 

gravel 6.30 

Edwards O. Dodge, 86 

loads gravel 8.60 

Mark E. Harvey, 94 loads 

gravel 9.40 

Ralph E. Hall, 61 loads 

gravel 6.10 

Frank Libbey, 29 loads 

gravel 2.90 

James Lovering, 11 loads 

gravel 1.10 

J. F. Moore, 200 loads 

gravel 12.00 

Byron E. Moore, 260 loads 

gravel and clay 15.60 

J. A. Poore, 582 loads 

gravel 58.20 

J. M. Richardson, 18 loads 

gravel 1.80 

R. P. Stevens & Co., 13 

loads stone chips 6.50 



1701.13 



542 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Thomas Walker, Jr., 20 

loads gravel |1.20 

R. N. Whittemore, 50 

loads gravel 3.00 

1267.20 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, filing saws |0.35 

John Campbell, use of 

water 3.00 

Concord Foundry Co., 1 

fountain 100.00 

John Driscoll Co., dippers, 

boxes 14.40 

S. L. Flanders, 2 pails .30 

J. W. Fiske, brackets for 

fountain 3.75 

1121.80 

Total expenditures |21,203.80 

Transferred to snow and ice account 494.28 

21.698.08 



Snow and Ice. 

Appropriation |4,000.00 

Transferred from repairs of 

highways account 494.28 

Transferred from reserved fund 489.33 

14,983.61 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 2 : 
Januarv 1341.60 



SNOW AND ICE. 543 



Februarr |1,867.39 

March /. 435.20 

November 79.25 

December 275.86 



$2,999.30 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division Xo. 4: 

February 132.50 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division Xo. 5: 

February $35.13 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division Xo. 6: 

February |89.00 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division Xo. 7 : 

January 148.37 

February 167.50 

March 67.12 

December 64.12 

$347.11 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division Xo. 8: 

February $38.50 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division Xo. 9: 

February $20.50 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division Xo. 10: 

January $205.12 

February 825.58 

March 208.25 

December 70.10 

$1,309.05 



544 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUPPLIES AND MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid A. N. Clapp, ax, pail |1.20 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

shovels 1-50 

C. H. Robie Co., 141 loads 

sand 1^-10 

Union Snowplow & 
Wagon Co., 1 8-foot 

snowplow 75.00 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Shovels 1.50 

Iron, shoes, scoops 19.22 

.fll2.52 

Total expenditures $4,983.61 



New Highways. 

Appropriation |5,000.00 

Balance from last year unex- 
pended 1,382.48 

Transferred from reserved fund 1,999.49 

$8,381.97 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid men, as per pay-roll, division No. 2: 

January \ 132.40 

February 40.50 

March 32.40 

April 242.13 

May 672.60 

June 312.43 

July 401.64 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 545 



August $1,221.6G 

September 1,626.53 

October 166.27 

November 107.02 

December 32.40 

Paid men, as per pay-roll, division No. 7: 

June 1400.75 

September 612.33 

November 22.37 



TOOLS AND HARDW^^RE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware 

Co., lanterns, globes... |2.75 

John B. Varick Co., tools 

and hardware 150.10 



STOXE AND OTHER MATERIAL. 



Paid Charles A. Bailey, cover- 
ing stone 121.60 

Luther Proctor, wood for 

blasting 12.00 



$4,887.98 



$1,035.45 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 8: 

June 1330.97 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 10: 

May 1422.09 . 

June 30.00 

July * 142.25 

August 619.86 

September 420.92 

11,635.12 



1152.85 



35 



$33.60 



546 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid C. C. Babbitt, work on 

Maple street |6.00 

W. H. Coburn, grading 

Second street 300.00 

1306.00 

, Total expenditures |8,381.97 



Damage of Land Taken for Highways. 
Appropriation $5.000.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid John B. Bickford $300.00 

Joseph K. Mitchell 612.00 

Total expenditures 1912.00 

Transferred to reserve'd fund 4.088.00 

$5,000.00 



Watering Streets. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2 : 

January $31.62 

February 3.60 

March 5.02 

April 183.78 

May 397.]9 



12,539.46 



WATERING STREETS. 547 



June |303;05 

July 444.12 

August 335.06 

September 445.45 

October 261.35 

November 48.25 

. December 80.97 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
Xo. 10 : 

January |5.50 

February 7.44 

April 74.25 

May 124.00 

June 88.50 

July 191.25 

August 99.00 

September 143.87 

October 148.85 

November 18.05 

SUPPLIES, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid Boston & Maine Railroad, 

freight |1.26 

John T. Beach, repairing 

sprinkler, etc 54.75 

Head i& Dowst Co., lumber 6.38 

C. H. Hutchinson, cast- 
ings and labor 4.10 

Thomas A. Lane Co., labor 
and material on stand- 
pipes 39.01 

Pike & Heald Co., repair- 
ing sprinkler .40 



71 



548 REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. L. & H. K. Potter, 

sprinkler attachments. . |140.00 
John B. Varick Co., hard- 
ware 76.57 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 2: 

May 1415.96 

June 386.00 

July , 637.90 

August 559.61 

September 273.07 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 7: 

May 156.00 

June 36.00 

July 70.50 

August 34.25 

September 47.75 



1322.47 



Total expenditures |3,762.64 

Transferred to reserved fund 1,237.36 

15,000.00 



Paving Streets. 

Appropriation |5,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 2,031.79 



17,031.79 



12,272.54 



f244.50 



PAVING STREETS. 549 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 10: 

January $55.12 

February 122.78 

March 8.25 

April 43.75 

May 224.81 

June 386.73 

July 279.90 

August 355.37 

September 341.38 



$1,818.09 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid John B. Varick Co 111.36 

PAVING STONE, GRAVEL, ETC. 

Paid C. A. Bailey, paving stone |849.77 

Paid Brooks & Brock: 

82 loads sand 72.90 

Paving stone 323.16 

Paid J. H. Coburn, 175 loads 

paving 306.25 

Daniel Connor, 16 loads 

stone 28.00 

F. M. Goings, 30 loads 

paving 45.00 

C. H. Robie Co., 95 loads 

sand 90.25 

$1,715.33 

CONCRETING. 

Paid C. H. Robie Co $240.80 



550 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid J. Hodge: 

504 stakes |11.09 

Lumber and labor 2.40 

Paid Soule, Dillingham & Co., 
paving Elm back street 

and Granite street 710.06 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

cardboard .50 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 5.12 

1729.17 

Total expenditures |7,031.79 

Paving Elm and Granite Streets. 

Appropriation |10,000.00 

Received from Manchester 

Street Railway 3,899.39 

Transferred from Amoskeag 

bridge abutment account. . . . 1,158.10 

Transferred from reserved fund 495.31 

$15,552.80 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 2 : 

July 1140.00 

August 537.23 

September 200.00 



1877.23 
Paid Soule, Dillingham & Co., paving Elm 

street |2,757.3S 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 551 

STONE, GRAVEL, SAND, CEMENT. 

Paid C. A. Bailey, paving 

blocks 14,968.11 

Brooks & Brock, sand and 

gravel 79.25 

Paid C. H. Robie Co.: 

318 loads sand 302.10 

32 loads roofing 96.00 

Paid J. A. & A. W. Walker, 

cement 667.50 

16,112.96 

CONCRETING. 

Paid C. H. Robie Co 15,730.23 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boston & Maine Railroad, freight |75.00 

Total expenditures $15,552.80 



Macadamizing Streets. 
Appropriation $15,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 2: 

June $2,264.78 

July 1,316.95 

September 1,406.63 

October 282.18 

$5,270.54 



552 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 10: 

September |1S.75 

October 1,964.77 

November 1,357.55 

FUEL, FREIGHT, WATER. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 25 

tons 1,400 lbs coal |9D.94 

Boston & Maine Kailroad, 

freight 110.19 

People's Gas-Light Co., 35 

chaldrons coke 140.00 

water-works, use of water 30.00 

George Young, 20 cords 

wood 45.00 

TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid A. N. Clapp, fuse, nails, 

etc $5.21 

B. H. Piper Co., sledge 

handles 39.61 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

Dynamite, fuse, etc 693.12 

Iron, hammers, packing, 

paint, etc 91.76 

LABOR, CASTINGS, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. : 

Oil 127.54 

Steel and labor 22.09 

Paid James Briggs & Son, pipe 

for smokestack 1.50 



,341.07 



1431.13 



$829.70 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 553 

Paid Climax Road Machine Co.: 

1 stone crusher, less freight. . |2,412.51 

Plates, sprockets, etc 74.66 

Paid W. M. Darrah & Co., roof- 
ing material 3.40 

The Farrel Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., plates and 

bearings 91.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine 
Co., repairs on crusher 

engine 111.74 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson: 

1 collar,^ steel, plate, etc 24.56 

Repairing road roller 7.57 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

and labor . 155.42 

Paid The Ingersoll-Sargeant 
Drill Co.: 

Repairs on drill 118.25 

Hose couplings, etc 7.22 

Paid Kimball & Hobbs, hose 

and couplings 65.00 

Thomas A. Lane Co., nips, 

valves, ells 28.73 

Lambert Hoisting Engine 

Co., 1 set grates 10.84 

Lessard & Hevey, pipe, 

. etc .96 

Manchester Locomotive 
Works, repairing road- 
roller 565.74 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil 46.00 

C. L. Wolf, hose, smoke 

pipe, etc 3.05 

$3,777.78 



554 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

STONE. 

Paid Charles A. Bailey, 749 

tons crushed $711.55 

H. Willey, 42i tons 21.25 

.f7.32.80 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid American Express Co., 

express |2.20 

James W. Hill Co., 4 flags .52 

Hartford Steam Boiler 
Inspection & Insurance 
Co., insurance 50.00 

Frederick Perkins, M. D., 
attendance on Charles 

Chabot 37.00 

189.72 



Total expenditures |14,472.74 

Transferred to reserA^ed fund 527.26 

115,000.00 



Grading for Concrete. 

Appropriation 15,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 450.96 

$5,450.96 

Expenditures. • 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2: 

April $66.39 

May 140.38 

June 173.38 



25.12 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 555 

Julv 1113.39 

August 99.26 

September 312.95 

October 67.70 

November 128.59 

December 249.67 

11,351.71 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 

No. 7: 

May 162.87 

June 12.50 

October 19.75 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 10: 

May 1138.38 

July 126.93 

August 28.63 

September 455.27 

1749.21 

Paid Soule, Dillingham & Co., labor 139.18 

STONE AND CONCRETE. 

Paid C. A. Bailey, curbing |52.67 

Warren Harvey, cesspool 

and edge-stone 1,610.15 

C. H. Robie Co., concrete 626.21 

Mead, Mason & Co., con- 
crete 513.56 







12,802.59 


SUNDRIES. 






Paid Charles Francis, grading 






and filling sidewalk .... 


1225.00 




Palmer & Garmons, cut- 






ting stone 


131.15 





556 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Frederick Perkins, M. D., 
attendance on Patrick 
Campbell |27.00 

1883.15 

Total expenditures |5,450.96 

Scavenger Service. 

Appropriation |16,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 2: 

January |7(50.26 

February 571.22 

March 911.19 

April 1,148.72 

May 696.89 

June 785.63 

July 586.70 

August 762.62 

September " 692.66 

October 528.27 

November 830.26 

December 691.96 

18,969.38 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 7: 

September |22.00 

October 25.75 

November 41.50 

December 19.25 

1108.50 



SCAVENGER SERVICE, 



557 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 10 : 

Januarv |162.49 

February 199.26 

March 215.35 

April 386.81 

May 161.00 

June 236.00 

July 145.88 

August 151.50 

September 196.50 

October 200.27 

November 184.93 

December 238.71 



12,478.73 



CONTRACT. 



Paid city farm, scavenger service 1 year, 1 

month 12,708.30 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware 

Co 10.85 

John B. Varick Co 77.44 



SUNDRIES. 



178.29 



Paid John T. Beach, 1 dump- 
cart 1100.00 

Freeman & Merrill, straw 28.83 

Gage &McDougall, oats. . 317.50 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 8.00 

M. B. Jones, hav 85.32 



558 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Partridge Brothers, 1,200 

bushels oats 1378.00 

1917.05 

Total expenditures 115,260.85 

Transferred to reserved fund 739.15 

116,000.00 



Street Sweeping. 
Appropriation |3,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2: 

April 1175.20 

May 131.54 

June 305.36 

July 118.46 

August 113.96 

September 267.08 

October . 340.42 

November 155.44 

December 4.53 

11,611.99 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 10: 

January |16.50 

April 18.50 

May 58.11 

June 113.63 

July • '. 126.86 

August 62.00 



BRIDGES. 559 



September 188.00 

October . ! 65.90 

November 44.23 

December 3.10 

REPAIRS, SUPPLIES, ETC. 

Paid Boston & Maine Railroad, 

freight |2.02 

Hickory Broom Fibre Co., 

refilling brooms 87.50 

John B. Varick Co., hoes 

and brooms 19.88 



1596.8? 



$109.40 



Total expenditures $2,318.22 

Transferred to reserved fund ' .', 681.78 

13,000.00 



Bridges. 
Appropriation $4,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2: 

January $9.76 

^larch 5.40 

April 5.12 

May 216.01 

June 75.78 

July 163.80 

September 227.99 

October 107.02 

November 78.14 

December 5.40 

$894.42 



560 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 

No. 10: 

April 13.50 

July 9.00 

September 20.50 

133.00 

Paid Head & Dowst Co |76.80 

LUMBER, STONE, HARDWARE. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., lumber |258.42 
Manchester Hardware Co., 

• hardware 29.60 

John B. Varick Co., hard- 
ware 38.57 

Paid A. C.Wallace: 

Lumber 668.25 

Plank 704.89 

.$1,699.73 

REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, painting Mc- 
Gregor bridge |421.32 

James K. Carr & Co., 

paint and labor 20.35 

C. H. Hutchinson, labor on 

bolts, etc 11.90 

Groton Bridge Co., paint- 
ing Granite bridge .... 250.00 

. 1703.57 

Total expenditures $3,407.52 

Transferred to reserved fund 592.48 

$4,000.00 

Rebuilding Amoskeag Bridge Abutment. 
Appropriation $4,700.00 



CITY TEAMS. 561 

Expenditures. 



Paid Boston & Maine Railroad, 
amount expended in rebuild- 
ing east abutment of bridge |3,541.90 



Total expenditures |3,541.90 

Transferred to ai^propriation for paving 

Elm and Granite streets 1,158.1(> 

14,700.00 



City Teams. 



Appropriation |6,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 223.94 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 2: 

January |82.83 

February 187.97 

March 209.11 

April 161.01 

May 116.13 

June 153.20 

July 119.25 

August 142.25 

September 170.09 

October 1.32.88 

November 187.86 

December 177.56 

36 



,723.94 



,840.14 



562 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 10: 

January 123.50 

February 31.50 

March 20.75 

April 37.50 

June 15.75 

July 14.00 

August 14.00 

September 22.25 

November 24.50 

December 19.25 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
commons: 

June 142.24 

July 180.00 

GRAIN, HAY, STRAW. 

Paid Adams Brothers |20.39 

Ame&Co 30.00 

William Corey 99.56 

Freeman & Merrill 703.84 

Gage & McDougall 326.00 

Albert H. George 172.71 

Granite State Grocery Co. 13.00 

John P. Griffin 40.70 

A.H.Hill 30.22 

H.O.Hill 28.32 

D. Kerwin 29.70 

C. R. Merrill 28.88 

S. Mullins 13.64 

G. F. Mills 119.11 

Partridge Brothers 469.75 

C. D. Welch...; 131.94 

F. B. Worthley 20.80 



$223.00 



^222.24 



12,278.56 



CITY TEAMS. 563 



HARNESSES AND REPAIRS. 



Paid The Fred Allen Co., re- 
pairs and supplies |21.00 

John F. Kerwin, repairs 

and supplies 30.90 

Kimball Carriage Co., re- 
pairs an'd supplies 114.10 

H. C. Ranno & Son, repairs 

and supplies 50.55 

John A. Ballou, repairs 

and supplies 9.70 

I. S. York, repairs and 

supplies 21.15 



CARRIAGES, CARRIAGE' REPAIRS. 

Paid John T. Beach, carriage 

repairs $113.33 

O. A. Craig, 1 one-horse 

sled 20.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

sled shoes, etc 8.75 

John B. Varick Co., 1 pair 

wheels, ironed, with 

axles 47.35 



HARDWARE. 

Paid J. H. Farnham, files |9.61 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

tools and hardware. . . . 96.61 

John B. Varick Co., tools 

and hardware 325.88 



1247.40 



1189.43 



14.32.10 



564 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 

LIVE STOCK, VETERINARY EXPENSES. 

Paid A. F. Abbott, V. S., visits 

and medicine |106.30 

Paid Cavanaugh Brothers : 

1 pair horses 287.50 

Difference in trading horses 115.00 

Paid E. H. Currier: 

Campho-naphthaline .50 

Nitre 1.40 

Paid A. L. Dodge, V. S., visits 

and medicine 9.25 

J. L. Golden, V. S., visits 

and medicine 12.00 

W. B. Mitchell, medicine 11.95 

A. A. Potter, salve 1.00 

John B. Varick Go., alco- 
hol, witch hazel 5.85 

B. F. Welch, difference in 

trading horses 30.80 

WATER, GAS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid Manchester Water-Works, 

use of water |68.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., 

gas 156.94 

New England Telephone 

& Telegraph Co., use of 

telephones 72.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 10 

tons coal 60.00 

John Perham, wood 6.56 

LUMBER, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid James Baldwin Co., lum- 
ber 116.38 



1581.55 



1363.50 



CITY TEAMS. 665 



Paid James Briggs & Son, gal- 




vanized iron and labor. . 


$8,2^ 


F. W. Blood Eoofing Co., 




material and labor 


4.44 


The Head & Dowst Co., 




lumber, labor 


114.16 


C. H. Hutchinson Foun- 




dry & Machine Works, 




castings, lumber, labor. 


7.53 


J. Hodge, planing lumber 


1.50 


Kimball & Hobbs, oil 




suits, etc 


5.83 


Paid Thomas A. Lane Co.: 




1 torch 


5.00 


Material and labor 


3.20 


Paid G. W. Rief, lumber, belt- 




dressing 


6.35 


L. & W. T. Seiberlich, 




paint, glass, etc 


2.42 


A. C. Wallace, lumber. . . 


1.69 


C. L. Wolf, stovepipe and 




labor 


4.30 


HORSE HIRE'. 




Paid C. B. Danforth 


13.00 


C. H. Simpson 


65.50 


MISCELLANEOUS. 




Paid C. M. Bailey, globes. ..... 


110.13 


Boston & Maine Railroad, 




freight on horse 


4.20 


Paid A. N. Clapp: 




Kerosene 


17,89 


Sandpaper, spikes, etc 


1.27 



$181.09 



$68.50 



566 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid John Driscoll Co., dippers, 

wire, etc |6,25 

Peter Duval, filing saws . . 7.20 
Eager & Co., soap, ginger, 

etc 7.25 

G. A. Hoitt & Co., 2 chairs 3.75 
Henry W. Parker, lime 

and salt 2.60 

E. D. Rogers, axle grease 5.50 
Temple & Farrington Co., 

books and pencils 22.69 

G. R. Vance, oil can .20 

R. M. West, 2 ladders 7.50 

$96.43 

Total expenditures $6,723.94 



Repairs of Sewers. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 830.46 

$5,830.46 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll,- division 
No. 2: 

January $136.17 

February 42.87 

March 74.51 

April 157.23 

May 490.11 

June 335.65 

July 450.65 



REPAIRS OF SEWERS, 567 



August 1233.87 

September 548.53 

October 293.53 

November 89.74 

December 236.79 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 10: 

January |56.38 

February 49.62 

March 88.70 

April 27.83 

May 324.66 

June 285.38 

July 243.37 

August 487.57 

September 220.12 

October 124.87 

November 119.33 

December 57.88 



MATERIAL, LABOR, ETC. 

Paid Boston & Maine Railroad, 

freight |42.66 

John Driscoll Co., dippers, 

copper wire, etc 9.50 

Warren Harvey, cesspool 

stone 150.53 

C. H. Hutchinson Foun- 
dry & Machine Works, 
castings, etc., and labor 181.78 

Kimball & Hobbs, 6 oil 

suits 13.50 

Thomas A. Lane Co., mate- 
rial 2.33 



13,089.65 



12,085.71 



568 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 

pails, oil can |2.89 

H. W. Parker, cement 17.36 

Pike & Heald Co., dippers, 

pipe, etc 8.35 

John B. Varick Co., weld- 
ing 3.70 

J. A. & A. W. Walker, 250 

barrels cement 222.50 

$655.10 



Total expenditures |5,830.46 

New Sewers. 
Appropriation $40,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2: 

April $280.61 

May 1,292.21 

June 2,907.51 

July 2,120.95 

August 866.30 

September 2,926.36 

October 1,311.71 

November 1,382.94 

December 733.00 

$13,821.59 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 7: 

April $110.00 

Mav 798.75 



NEW SEWERS. 



569 



June 1811.94 

July 611.12 

August 781.61 

September 484.88 

October 282.75 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 10: 

April 154.39 

May 320.13 

June 1,216.68 

July 566.45 

September 641.00 

October 1,418.31 

November 223.32 

December 56.25 

HARDWARE. 

Paid A. N. Clapp, nails, ham- 
mer, axes 15.08 

Manchester Hardware Co., 
nails, rakes, shovels, 

lanterns, globes, etc. . . . 202.72 
John B. Varick Co., steel, 
dynamite, fuse, drills, 

files, pails, spikes, etc. . . 784.81 



,881.05 



14,496.53 





— 1992.61 


SE'WER PIPE. 




Paid Pike & Heald Co 


16,056.81 



MATERIAL, LABOR, ETC. 

Paid Boston & Maine Railroad: 
Labor of section men guard- 
ing track while sewer was 



570 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

being laid in Wilson street, 

November, 1896 |10.65 

Putting timbers under track 

in West Manchester 5.50 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal. . 113.94 

Carson Trench Machine 
Co., 1 block hook with 
swivel 8.15 

A. N. Clapp, kerosene. . . . 40.30 
Frank L. Elliott, fuse and 

powder 563.98 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson: 

Castings 180.82 

Labor on drills 25.08 

Paid The Ingersoll-Sergeant 
Drill Co., drill, hose, 
couplings, supplies .... 510.06 
Thomas A, Lane Co., mate- 
rial and labor 73.70 

Manchester Locomotive 
Works, iron castings, 

etc 1,275.37 

Moore & Preston, coal .... 181.51 

D. M. Poore, coal 183.39 

B. H. Piper Co., pick 

handles 1Q.50 

James Robertson, 1 der- 
rick and trucking 110.00 

Wingate & Gould, 3 pairs 

rubber boots 8.00 

M. F. Whiton & Co., steel ' 

hoist 33.52 



5,334.47 



CEMENT, BRICK, STONE, LUMBER. 

Paid J. H. Coburn, 2 loads logs |8.00 

Warren Harvev, stone. . . . 78.53 



RIVER ROAD, CLARKE, AND ELM STREET SEWER. 571 

Paid W. F. Head & Son, 231 M. 

brick 11,178.10 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Lumber 508.75 

Cement 2.50 

Paid Kimball Carriage Co., 36 

M. brick 201.60 

J. A. & A. W. Walker, 

cement 778.75 

12,756.23 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boston & Maine Railroad, 

freight 1253.55 

Pike & Heald Co., dippers, 

labor 5.45 

Myra Whittemore, right to 
build sewer tlirough 

land 100.00 

1359.00 

Total expenditures 135,698.29 

Transferred to reserved fund 4,301.71 

$40,000.00 

River Road, Clarke, and Elm Street Sewer. 
Balance from last year unexpended $5,697.57 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2: 

January $852.59 

February 1,190.69 

March 956.14 



572 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

May 1476.51 

June 19.50 



HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 

graphite $0.10 

John B. Varick Co., dyna- 
mite, fuse, etc 1,128.18 



CEMENT AND LUMBER. 



Paid Luther Proctor, oak lumber $16.00 

H. W. Parker, 10 casks 
cement 10.52 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boston & Maine Railroad, 

freight |0.25 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 256.31 

Carson Trench Machine 

Co., grates for engine. . 9.50 

J. G. Ellinwood, photo- 
graphs of Gould house 12.00 
C. H. Hutchinson, labor 

on drills, etc 4.50 

The Ingersoll-Sergeant 

Drill Co., valves, nuts, 

bolts, piston, etc 99.54 

Thomas A. Lane Co., pipe, 

packing, etc 4.54 

Moore & Preston, coal .... 105.69 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe. . . 115.50 



,495.43 



11,128.28 



J6.o2 



$007.83 



Total expenditures $5,258.06 

Transferred to new account 439.51 

15,697.57 



COMMONS. 573 

Bicycle Path. 

Appropriation, transfer from reserved fund $600.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 7: 

October |191.60 

November 102.25 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
division No. 8: 

October $45.00 

November 212.59 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid J. J. Abbott, i)ainting 

signs 14.25 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., lum- 
ber and labor 4.42 



Commons. 

Appropriation $4,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 26.80 



$293.85 



^257.59 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per commons 
pay-roll: 
November $4.25 



^8.67 



Total expenditures $564..30 

Transferred to nev^^ account • 35.64 



$600.00 



t,526.80 



574 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls; 

January |179.75 

February 259.89 

March 83.87 

April 265.00 

May 197.25 

June 285.98 

July 145.86 

August 308.11 

September 78.73 

October 378.85 

November 486.75 

December 207.62 



PLANTS, TREES, ETC. 

Paid Clark & Estey, rose bushes |5.00 

J. A. Chamberlain, trees. . 2.00 

O. Hardy, trees 8.50 

A. G. Hood, plants 60.00 

J. S. Holt & Co., ashes 90.00 

Ingram & Richmond, 

plants 35.00 

Fred Johnson, trees 2.00 

Frank Koener, plants. . . . 20.00 
The Kirby Floral Co., 

plants 60.00 

James Richards, manure 10.50 
Ray Brook Garden Co., 

plants 64.00 

F. S. Worthen, plants 35.00 



12,877.66 



1392.00 



COMMONS. 575 



WATER AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 



Paid Manchester Water- Works, 

use of water 1700.00 

Union Electric Co., elec- 
tric liehts 36.00 



REPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paint |.37.94 

L. M. Aldricli, filing saws, 

lumber 6.06 

Adams Brothers, salt. ... .60 

Boston & ]Maine Railroad, 

freight .80 

J. R. Carr Co., paint nnd 

labor 38.30 

Albert Davis, pine boards 14,00 

W. E. Goodwin, repairs on 

fountains 6.72 

The Head & Dowst Co., 

lumber, labor 22.46 

Peter Harris, ke^'S .50 

J. Hodge, lumber, labor. . 33.23 
Paid C. H. Hutchinson Foundry 
& Machine Works: 
Repairs on scrapers, lawn- 
mowers, etc 14.16 

Labor on castings, etc 8.70 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., 18 

dippers 4.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

tools and seed 45.74 

Manchester Locomotive 
Works, castings and 
labor 47.04 



1736.00 



1439.39 



576 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., pipe |2.16 

Pope & Trudell, sharpen- 
ing tools 1-S5 

Leander Pope, sharpening 
tools 16.80 

C. H. Kobie Co., material 
and labor 33.50 

G. K. Vance, pipe 1.50 

John B. Varick Co., tools 
and hardware 71.10 

A. C. Wallace, lumber... 17.73 

Wingate & Gould, rubber 

boots 14.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid J. B. Dupaul, barrels |3.50 

John Fullerton, expenses 

to Boston to get 6 guns 

given the city 46.00 

Edward McMahon, rent of 

barn ..". 29.00 

Paige & Mj'rick, police 

badge 1.25 

K. G. Sullivan, tobacco 

stems 2.00 

181.75 

Total expenditures $4,526.80 



Stark and Derryfield Parks. 

Appropriation |5,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 3.70 
Balance from last year unex- 
pended .14 

15,003.84 



stark and derryfield parks. 577 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, 
commons : 

January f 33.0() 

February 13.37 

March 78.75 

April 140.12 

May 736.00 

June 1,046.50 

July 726.32 

August 806.06 

September 911.87 

October 94.75 



SHRUBS, PLANTS, TREES, ETC. 

Paid O. Hardy, trees and 

shrubs 187.60 

J. S. Holt & Co., ashes 56.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

grass seed 37.64 

Partridge Brothers, seed 3.90 



TOOLS, HARDWARE, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid D. J. Adams, fitting keys |0.85 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc. 1.93 

J. H. Coburn, paving 29.75 

The Head & Dowst Co., 

lumber and cement .... 22.96 
Thomas A. Lane Co., mate- 
rial and labor 11.24 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

tools and hardware. . . . 67.63 

37 



1,586.74 



1185.64 



578 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Manchester Water- Works, 

use of water |24.00 

Merrill & Laird, building 

cesspools 18.90 

C. E. Palmer, tin, solder, 

labor 8.70 

Leander Pope, sharpening 

tools, etc 14.25 

John B. Varick Co., tools 

and hardware 31.25 

1231.46 

Total expenditures |5,003.84 



Lighting Streets. 

Appropriation $55,000.00 

• Expenditures, 

electric lights. 
Paid Manchester Electric Co.: 

Charges. Discounts. 

January |4,206.00 $27.87 

February 4,207.08 18.49 

March 4,207.07 13.38 

April 4,207.08 15.97 

May 4,207.08 13.32 

June 4,242.05 16.22 

July 4,283.75 18.64 

August 4,290.37 27.91 

September 4,302.92 9.97 

October 4,307.96 8.00 

November 4,346.16 13.10 

December 4,350.83 11.93 

151,158.36 1194.80 

Less discount 194.80 

150,963.56 



LIGHTING STREETS. 579 



GAS. 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co. : 

January |53.06 

February 53.0G 

March 43.82 

April 44.10 

May 40.18 

June 35.14 

July 31.36 

August 32.48 

September 35.00 

October 39.34 

November 47.74 

December 49.98 



CARE OF GAS AND OIL LAMPS. 

Paid E. p. Cogswell, lighting 

street lamps |54.93 

William Brooks, lighting 

lamps at GofEe's Falls. . 104.30 

Patrick Dobbins, lighting 

lamps at Goffe's Falls. . 104.40 

F. W. Elliott, lighting 
lamps and oil for same 
to January 1, 1898 15.39 

Charles D. Francis, light- 
ing lamps 189.92 

Joseph Goodwin, lighting 

lamps 1,316.00 

Mrs. Mary E. Reed, light- 
ing lamps at Massabesic 
to January 1, 1898 9.00 



1505.26 



$1,793.94 



580 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUPPLIES. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey, chimneys, 

wicks, burners, etc |41.75 

Paid A. N. Clapp: 

Kerosene 50.74 

Gasoline 125.50 

Matches, lamps, chimneys. . . 5.05 

Paid Eager & Co., matches. . . . • .75 

Noah B. Reed, oil and 
supplies to September 

1, 1897 6.00 

John B. Varick Co., glass, 

matches, burners 23.33 

Paid C. L. Wolf: 

Lanterns with gasoline fix- 
tures, and labor putting up 287.00 
Repairs on fixtures 14.71 

1554.83 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boston & Maine Railroad, 

freight $2.64 

Boyd Brothers, use of 

hacks 17.00 

J. P. Brown & Co., use 

of hacks 10.00 

Plummer.& Brown, hacks 

and team 12.50 

C. C. Perry, use of hacks 20.00 

Felix Provencher, use of 

hack 5.00 

Whitten & Fifield, use of 

hack 5.00 

172.14 

Total expenditures 153,889.73 

Transferred to reserved fund 1,110.27 

155,000.00 



engineer's department. 581 

Engineer's Department. 

Appropriation |4,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 280.91 

$4,780.91 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid W. H. Bennett, engineer |1,200.00 
Harrie M. Young, first 

assistant 712.25 

George W. Wales, second 

assistant 858.00 

Harry J. Briggs, third 

assistant 697.50 

Alfred Dodge, assistant. . 586.50 

L. B. Webster, labor 112.50 

Herbert L. Watson, labor 28.00 

Frank A. Fox, labor 1.50 

Ella M. Barker, clerk... 373.12 

$4,569.37 

TEAMS, AND TEAM EXPENSES. 

Paid A. F. Abbott, V. S., visits 

and medicine |13.75 

Manchester Street Rail- 
way, tickets 10.00 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, car- 
riage repairs 1.90 

125.65 

TELEPHONE. 

Paid New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., use of telephone |36.30 

SUPPLIES AND OFFICE EXPENSES. 

Paid W, L. Blenus, repairing 

tapes 11.65 



582 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid E. R. Coburn, paper, pen- 
cils, copy book, envelopes, etc. |15.75 
Paid The Carter's Ink Co. : 

Typewriter ribbons 2.00 

Coupon book 4.50 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing : 

150 reports 45.00 

Blank book 9.50 

Binding books 19.00 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine 

Co., pine stakes 20.00 

Frost & Adams, drawing 

supplies 25.88 

The Head & Dowst Co., 

lumber and labor 2.99 

Manchester Index Co., 1 

index 1.00 

A. Mantell & Co., 12 sheets 

transfer paper 1.50 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid G. W. Wales, 36 yards 

cord 10.72 

Harrie M. Young, cash 

paid for telephone. ... .10 



$148.77 



).82 



Total expenditures .^,780.91 

Health Department. 
Appropriation |4,400.00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. * 583 



Expenditures. 




SERVICE'S. 




Paid C. W. Downing, M. D. : 




Salary as member of board 




of health for year ending 




February 1, 1897 


1200.00 


Three months' services 


50.00 


Paid W. K. EobbinS, salary as 




member of board of 




health for year ending 




February 1, 1897 


200.00 


William J. Starr, salary as 




member of board of 




health for lOf months . . 


179.17 


Richard J. Barry, sanitary 




inspector 


225.00 


William B. Blake, sanitary 




inspector 


348.75 


Herbert S. Clough, san- 




itary inspector 


78.00 


John F. Looney, sanitary 




inspector 


721.13 


Carl 0. Seaman, sanitary 




inspector 


577.50 


Charles B. Clarkson, 11^ 




days' labor 


23.00 


M. Alma Fracker, clerk . . , 


204.00 


Ethel A. Marston, clerk. . 


200.00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing : 

Bulletins |36.90 

Circulars, letter headings, etc. 125.65 

300 reports 14.28 



$3,006.55 



584 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid E. R. Coburn Co., sta- 
tionery 16.80 

W. P. Goodman, station- 
ery 3.30 

"Le Bulletin," printing 
2,000 circulars 4.00 

Ethel A. Marston, post- 
age, pencils, etc 12.95 

Novelty Advertising Co., 

blanks 6.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

1 directory 2.50 



PESTHOUSE. 



TEAMS. 

Paid G. W. Bailey, teams |11.00 

Paid W. B. Blake: 

Carfares 21.55 

Job team 2.50 

Paid R. J. Barry, carfares 8.50 

H. M. Clougli, team 1.00 

Herbert S, Clough, car- 
fares 4.25 

F. X. Chenette, teams 5.50 

W. J. Freeman, teams .... 4.00 

C. S. Fifield, teams 10.50 

E. T. James, teams 6.00 

John F. Looney, carfares 36.90 

C. O. Seaman, carfare. ... .10 

Whitten & Fifield, teams 15.50 



Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co., 1 spring |3.50 
- Judith Sherer, board sun- 
dry persons 44.66 



1212.38 



1127.30 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 585 

Paid A. D. Sherer, lumber and 

labor 19.73 

G. W. Whitford, coal and 

wood 38.00 



SUPPLIES FOR ISOLATED FAMILIES, 

Paid Annis Flonr & Grain Co., 

groceries |4.02 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

and wood 2.25 

A. H. Cate, groceries. . . . 12.49 

James M. Collity, M. D., 

medical consultation ... 3.00 

W. B. Blake, medicine and 

wood 2.50 

H. S. Clough, whiskey and 

disinfectants 1.45 

J. M. Clark, coal and wood 12.65 

E. L. Caswell, coal and 

wood 3.15 

T. F. Fifield, groceries. . . 11.26 
Freeman & Merrill, hay. . 2.48 
A. L. Gadbois, groceries. . 2.42 
J. F. Healy, groceries .... 8.01 
O. D, Knox & Co., gro- 
ceries 1.69 

John F. Looney, oil, eggs, 

whiskey, etc 2.42 

McQuade Brothers, gro- 
ceries 1.75 

Noyes & Prince, groceries 11.07 

F. H. Thurston, disin- 
fectants, prescriptions.. 13.42 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., gro- 
ceries 1.16 



)5.89 



197.19 



586 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

OFFICE EXPENSES AND SUPPLIES. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing 

Co., disinfectant lamps $14.50 

H. S. Clough, telegrams. . .90 

Paid Charles H. Coburn: 

Laying birch floor 25,00 

1 water tank and cover 2.00 

Paid G. V. Demers, paint and 

labor 2.70 

M. A. Tracker, envelopes, 

stamps, postals 11.85 

Paid C. A. Hoitt&Co.: 

1 hall tree 6.75 

1 ice chest, etc 5.94 

1 rubber mat, 1 rug, 1 hassock 3.50 

Paid James W. Hill Co., 4 

shades 5.20 

Lehn & Fink, antitoxine. . 45.00 

Library Bureau, 1 card 

index outfit 15.00 

n. K. Mulford Co., anti- 
toxine 90.78 

New England Telephone 
& Telegraph Co., use of 

telephone 36.45 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co.: 

Gas 2.94 

Mantles, chimney, shade 1.30 

Paid F. C. Kobinson, 1 lamp. . . 7.50 

L. A. Salomon & Co., 

methyl 47.30 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

Wood alcohol 187.45 

Lantern, varnish, etc 2.60 



1514.66 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 587 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Brodie Electric Co., drill- 
ing holes in generator 

plate 10.80 

Burnham, Brown & War- 
ren, legal services. ..... 13.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 

from July to January. . 4.74 

W. B. Blake, express, dis- 
infectants, telephone, 
expenses to Concord . . . 6.60 

Herbert S. Clough, express .90 

Arthur K. Day, M. D., 

diphtheria examination 116.00 

Harold C. Ernst, M. D., 

diphtheria examination 24.00 

M. A. Fracker, express 

and laundry 1.45 

John F, Looney, express, 

disinfectants, etc 1.90 

Ethel A. Marston, express, 

freight, laundry, etc ... . 8.85 

New Hampshire College 
of Agriculture, water 

analyzed 60.00 

Paid W. M. Parsons, M. D.: 
Traveling expenses attending 
meeting American Board of 

Health at Philadelphia 40.50 

Membership fee 5.00 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., plumb- 
ing material, etc 22.19 

C. O. Seaman, disinfect- 
ants, lumber 1.37 



588 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid star Stamp Co., badges. . . $3.00 
Snelling & Woods, disin- 
fectants 2.58 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to reserved fund 

ftepairs of Schoolhouses. 

Appropriation $3,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 2,872.74 

Expenditures, 
masonwork. 

Paid B. W. Robinson $315.55 

Z. B. Stuart 311.86 

PAINTING AND GLAZING. 

Paid J. J. Abbott $33.97 

J.S.Avery 80 

W. F. Conner 2.00 

Curtis & Peterson 1.95 

Joel Daniels i& Co 4.04 

C. F. Jack 2.00 

W. H. Newry .75 

Eben Paul 1.77 

John A. Sargent 440.66 

CONCRETING. 

Paid C. H. Robie Co 



$312.88 

$4,.366.85 
33.15 

$4,400.00 



$5,872.74 



$627.41 



$487.94 



$97.34 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 589 



WOODWORK, 



Paid George H. Dudley, lum- 
ber and labor . . /. |811.56 

J. Hodge, door, blinds, etc. 44.00 



PLUMBING, IRONWORK, AND REPAIRS. 

Paid D. J. Adams, repairing 

locks, fitting keys, etc . . |12.42 

Amoskeag Manufacturing- 
Co., castings, chain, etc. 109.20 

S. C. Austin & Co., repair- 
ing lightning rods, etc. 45.50 

C. W. Anderson, repairing 

clock 2.00 

E. M. Bryant & Co., repair- 
ing bells, etc 48.79 

Henry Boone, repairing 

clock 1.50 

Cressey & Colby, repairing 

flue rod .50 

W. M. Darrah & Co., roof- 
ing material and labor 109.12 
Paid A. L. Franks & Co. : 

1 desk push 1.00 

Supplies and labor 107.37 

Paid W. F. Gill, repairing clock 1.75 

The Head & Dowst Co., re- 
pairing roof and labor. . 10.82 

Peter Harris, sharpening 
lawn mowers, unlocking 
doors 5.40 

R. D. Jenkins, reseating 
chairs 1.35 



$855.56 



590 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid T. A. Lane Co., material 
and labor, electric lights, 
plumbing, etc., sundry 
schoolhouses 1291.63 

Lessard & Hevey, plumb- 
ing material and labor. . 2,438.73 

H. I. Lemay, repairing 

clocks 3.00 

Pike & Heald Co., material 
and labor, plumbing, 
etc 191.79 

W. L. Spaulding, plumb- 
ing material and labor 211.82 

W. H. Sullivan, material 
and labor, retinting 
rooms 51.00 

C. P. Still, stone steps 2.50 

George S. Perry. & Co., re- 
pairing sharpeners" .... 7.30 

Charles A. Trefethen, re- 
pairing and cleaning 
clocks 20.50 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid J. S. Avery, setting glass $0,50 

Paid W. F. Conner: 

Cash paid for work 4.00 

Mending hose, etc .25 

Paid J. G. Jones, trucking .... 5.25 

A. A, Jenkins, tuning 

pianos 31.00 

Napoleon Lemay, fixing 

flag rope 1.50 

Manchester Slaughtering 
& Rendering Co., fer- 
tilizer stock 8.00 



13,674.99 



FUEL. 591 

Paid Mrs. Charles Miller, labor 

at Straw school |1.50 

A. E. Newton, 12 force 

pumps 12.00 

'S. J. Russell, cleaning 

vaults 25.00 

Edward Sears, fixing flag 
rope 2.50 

B, A. Stearns, loam and 

grading 38.00 

1129.50 

Total expenditures $5,872.74 

Fuel. 
Appropriation $8,000.00 

Expenditures. 

COAL, 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 718 

tons 400 lbs. coal. . $3,954.35 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 

206 tons 428 lbs ' 1,340.06 

D. M. Poore, 6 tons coal . . 37.50 

E, V. Turcotte, 131 tons, 

1,345 lbs. coal 859.14 



WOOD. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood $5.50 

J. M. Clark, wood 121.13 

Gilman Clough. wood 24.20 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 
pine and hard wood, 

sawed 62.00 



),191.05 



592 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid W. E. Dunbar & Co., 34^ 

cords wood |138.50 

Moore & Preston, wood . . . 24.25 

D. M. Poore, hard and pine 

wood 31.63 

1407.21 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid C. B. Clarkson, 15 days' labor as 

weigher $30.00 

Total expenditures |6,028.26 

Transferred to reserved fund 1,371.74 

18.000.00 



Furniture and Supplies. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Expenditures. 

physical and chemical apparatus, supplies, etc. 

Paid Tebbetts & Soule |258.37 

HARDWARE. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 
snow shovel, bell, chain, 

brushes, etc $14.24 

John B. Varick Co., 
brooms, brushes, dus- 
ters, mats, pails, etc. . . . 299.80 

$314.04 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Paid Boston School Supply Co., 

reading chart $14.15 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 593 

Paid O. D. Case, & Co., black- 
boards 1116.64 

E. R. Coburn Co,, 3 sets 

pantograph 12.00 

Oliver Ditson Co., music 

books 20.75 

Educational Publishing 
Co., subscription to 
'Trimary Education," 

January 1, 1898 1.00 

The Greenwood School 
Supply Co., 1 duplicator 

and ink 3.02 

J. L. Hammett Co., maps 

and globes 112.00 

Paid New England Publishing 
Co., subscription to: 

"Journal of Education" 2.50 

"American Teacher" .50 

Paid Prang Educational Co., 

models, etc 31.66 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

Bibles 3.75 



FURNITURE. 

Paid W. & L. E. Gurley, survey- 
ors' instruments |120.00 

Paid C. A. Hoitt &Co.: 

Chairs 21.01 

Tables, matting, shade, polish 15.49 

Use of chairs 10.34 

Paid Jossehn & Read Co., 

tables and chairs 27.25 

Kimball & Hobbs, rubber 

mats, lettered 177.75 



mi.Ql 



594 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid F. E. Nelson, mugs, cups, 

duster |5.87 

Paid George S. Perry & Co.: 



Ink wells 


24.45 


Chucks for sharpeners 


6.75 


Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 




1 shade 


.97 


Weston & Hill Co., 1 flag 


12.00 


SUNDRIES. 




Paid Adams Brothers, salt... 


10.65 


Barton & Co., crash, 




cheese cloth 


.98 


Daniels & Downs, engross- 




ing diplomas 


48.25 


Frank W. Fitts, 306 yards 




ribbon 


21.19 


S. C. Forsaith Machine 




Co., lumber 


.75 


T. F. Fifield, oil, can, soap 


3.88 


H. J. Holmes, oil 


.36 


James W. Hill Co., 1 roller 




and cord 


.61 


W. F. Hubbard, sawdust 


.40 


C. H. Kimball, drumheads. 




sticks, and hooks 


5.88 


Paid Kimball & Hobbs: 




Shoe pegs 


.70 


Rubber bands, tips, cloth. ... 


2.91 


Paid Manchester Broom Co., 




brooms 


.50 


Manchester Mills, soap. . 


12.25 


Albert Nettle, chimneys. . 


.60 


Paid People's Gas-Light Co.: 




1 stove and tubing 


5.60 


Mantle and chimney 


.60 



121.88 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 595 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., mop 
waste, dustpans, meas- 
ures, shovels, etc $12.32 

Standard Oil Co., oil ... . 1.50 . 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

500 tags .65 

F. H. Thurston, disin- 
fectant 17.50 

A. C. Wallace, sawdust.. 1.50 

1139.58 

Total expenditures $1,451.84 

Transferred to reserved fund 548.16 

$2,000.00 

Books and Stationery. 
Appropriation $100.00 

Expenditures. 

sundries. 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., pos- 
tals and printing $1.50 

W. P. Goodman, books and 

stationery 12.01 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., pos- 
tage stamps 25.00 

New England Publishing 
Co., subscription to 
"Journal of Education" 
and "American Primary 
Teacher," to January 1, 
1897 3.00 

Novelty Advertising Co., 

envelopes, cardboard .... 9.12 



596 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid George P. Wallace, rib- 
bons and carbon paper $4.00 
E. B, Woodbury, postage 

and stationery 4.50 

159.13 

Total expenditures |59.13 

Transferred to reserved fund 40.87 

1100.00 



Printing and Advertising. 

Appropriation 1300.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 4.43 

1304.43 

Expenditures, 
sundries. 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., 

printing blanks $2.75 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing : 
Blanks, cards, circulars, lists, 

etc 245.44 

400 reports 50.74 

Binding books 5.50 

Total expenditures 1304.43 



Contingent Expenses. 

Appropriation |1,700.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 1,411.94 

_ 13,111.94 



contingent expenses. 597 

Expenditures, 
freight and cartage. 



Paid J. G. Jones |104.09 

C. A. Winberff 9.00 



WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Paid Manchester Electric Co., 

electric lights $62.25 

People's Gas-Light Co., 
gas 308.14 

Union Electric Co., elec- 
tric lights 231.85 

water commissioners, use 

of water 966.00 

ANNUAL GRADUATION. 

Paid F. P. Colby, moving 

pianos |6.00 

Oliver Ditson Co., music. . 13.58 
Daniels & Downs, engross- 
ing diplomas 2.60 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., use of 

52 chairs 2.00 

Paid Opera House Co.: 

Use of opera house 75.00 

Coupon tickets 1.15 

Paid Frank T. Weeks, taking 

tickets at opera house 2.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid W. E. Buck: 

Cash paid for express, freight, 

telegrams |39.07 

Use of team 79.50 



1113.09 



11,568.24 



$102.33 



598 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. P. Brown & Co., use of 

team ....'... |3.00 

Louis Bailey, cash paid 

for water, Youngsville 6.00 

Curtis W. Davis, use of 

team 150.00 

Paid Emma J. Ela: 

Cash paid for carrying water 18.50 

Cleaning schoolrooms 1.75 

Paid S, B. Hope, use of team, 

carrying special teacher 

of music to suburban 

schools 82.50 

Mrs. J. J. Kimball, piano . . 200.00 
E. J. Knowlton, P. M., pos- 
tage 10.00 

E. C. Lambert, expenses to 

Boston for teacher 6.32 

Byron Moore, water priv- 
ilege for Goffe's Falls 

school 6.00 

Albert Somes, cash paid 

for cartage books, etc., 

from Straw to High 

school 50.77 

Inez Warren, cash paid 

for carrying water 3.50 

D. A. Simons, rent of 

100 chairs 4.00 



SCHOOL CENSUS. 

Paid W. H. Andrews, 14 days. . |35.00 

Charles W. Brown, 14 days 35.00 
George H. Chadwick, 14 

days 35.00 

C. B. Clarkson, 14 days. . . 35.00 



1660.91 



CARE OF SCHOOL-ROOMS. 



599 



Louis Comeau, 14 days. . . |35.00 

Hiram Forsaith, 11 days 27.50 

E. Parker French, 14 days 35.00 
W. E. Gilmore, 14 days. . . 35.00 
Harry C. Graf, 14 days.. 35.00 

F. G. B: Kemp, 14 days. . 35.00 
Frank C. Lindquist, 14 

days 35.00 

T. E. McDerby, 14 days... 35.00 

A. W. Ro well, 14 days 35.00 

J. B. Rejimball, 14 days. . 35.00 
Nathan A. Sleeper, 14 days 

and use of team 41.00 

John C. Smith, 14 days. . . 35.00 
Paid Henry F. Stone: 

16 days 44.00 

Use of team 9.00 

Supplies 5.37 

Paid J. J. Sullivan, 14 days 35.00 

George Sheehan 10.00 

Total expenditures 

The John B. Clarke Co., overdraft 



IGG1.87 

13,106.44 
5.50 



J,111.94 



Care of School-Rooms. 
Appropriation 

Expenditures, 
janitors op schoolhouses. 

Paid John S. Avery fCOO.OO 

Nellie M. Atwood 37.00 

H. G. Batchelder 250.02 



$6,000.00 



600 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid S. H. Batchelder |399.9G 

Edwin N. Baker 350.04 

James E. Bailey 127.53 

W. F. Conner 525.00 

Kobert Cook 250.02 

Ida E. Corning 37.00 

Clarence Drayton 9.35 

Emma J. Ela 49.00 

Charles Ellis 23.33 

F. D. Hanscom 42.51 

V. H. Hill 500.04 

C. E. Jack 550.02 

W. H. Newry 474.96 

Fred Perron 73.00 

Almon Proctor 22.50 

W. J. Powers 300.00 

D. T. Kobinson 280.75 

William Stevens 399.9G 

J. S. Washburn 350.04 

Inez M. Warren 40.25 

Charles Watson 14.00 



SUNDRIES. 



15,706.28 



Paid Nellie M. Atwood, cash 
paid for cleaning school- 
rooms |2.50 

Mrs. Ida E. Corning, clean- 
ing school-rooms 2.00 

Mrs. Charles Ellis, labor 

at Straw school 1.50 

Charles Golding, cleaning 
school-rooms, Youngs- 
ville 3.00 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



601 



Paid Mrs. E. M. Martsch, clean- 
ing school-rooms, Goffe's 
Falls 15.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to reserved fund 



114.00 

),720.28 
279.72 



16,000.00 



Evening Schools. 



Appropriation 



11,500.00 



Expenditures. 



SALARIE-S. 




Paid L. H. Carpenter 


165.00 


Charles E. Cochran 


184.00 


Honorie J. Crough 


182.00 


Mabel S. Chasse 


28.00 


Beatrice Daly 


24.00 


Sarah B. Dunbar 


49.00 


W. W. Forbes 


52.00 


Julius Hegewald 


82.00 


M. C. Henry 


50.00 


Tilla E. Johnson 


21.00 


Maggie G. Linen 


90.00 


Carrie G. Mason 


4.50 


William J. Mooar 


52.00 


Marv McLaren 


4.50 


Arthur W. Morgan 


180.00 


Mary E. Paige 


54.50 


Arthur W. Rowell 


87.00 


Elizabeth Walsh 


4..50 


E, R. Wood 


8.00 







11,222.00 



602 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

JANITORS. 

Paid V. H. Hill 191.40 

Morton E. Sanborn 23.00 

1114.40 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Harry B. Ciller, rent of 

room y. 140.00 

J. G. Jones, cartage 2.50 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on 

gas pipe 2.00 

E. W. Poore, wood 7.25 

151.75 

Total expenditures |1,388.15 

Transferred to reserved fund 111.85 



11,500.00 



Teachers' Salaries. 

Appropriation 174,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 3,037.17 

$77,037.17 

Paid teachers, as per pay-roll : 

January |7,450.47 

February 7,632.28 

March 7,671.45 

April 7,321.34 

May 7,649.65 

June 7,639.88 

September 7,371.45 

October 8,166.32 

November 8,102.08 

December '. 8,032.25 

Total expenditures |77,037.17 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 603 

Evening School, Mechanical Drawing. 
Appropriation |400.00 

Expenditures. 

salaries. 

Paid H. W. Allen |180.50 

John M. Kendall 180.50 

$361.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., 12 triangles $3.36 



Free Text-Books. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 1,320.36 



Expenditures. 




FREE' TEXT-BOOKS AND i 


SUPPLIES 


id The American Book Co. . 


$752.86 


Allyn & Bacon 


59.03 


E. E. Babb & Co 


111.32 


Boston School Supply Co. 


19.10 


Cheney Globe Co 


12.50 


The Century Co 


3.50 


Clark & Estey 


.29 


E. R. Coburn Co 


3.06 


T. H. Castor & Co 


18.36 



Total expenditures $364.36 

Transferred to reserved fund 35.64 



$400.00 



5,320.36 



604 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid The Clark Manufacturing 




Co 


110.80 


Dodd, Mead & Co 


282.00 


Oliver Ditson Co 


16.82 


Eagle Pencil Co 


63.60 


W. P. Goodman 


38.75 


Ginn & Co 


931.90 


J. L. Hammett Co 


396.92 


D. C. Heath & Co 


123.65 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co . . . 


37.93 


Henry Holt & Co 


61.52 


Harper & Brothers 


8.83 


G. F. King & Merrill 


426.53 


G. F. King & Co 


228.91 


Kasson & Palmer 


3.00 


King-Richardson Publish- 




ing Co 


709.24 


C. H. Kimball 


1.65 


Longmans, Green & Co, . . 


4.00 


Lee & Shepard 


13.79 


Leach, Shewell & Sanborn 


35.11 


Maynard, Merrill & Co. . . 


75.75 


Manchester Ink Co 


• 8.25 


Novelty Advertising Co. . 


1.75 


The Prang Educational 




Co 


550.33 


George S. Perry & Co 


77.00 


Silver, Burdett i& Co 


24.70 


Thompson, Brown & Co. 


69.80 


University Publishing Co. 


40.25 


John B. Yarick Co 


3.00 


William Ware & Co 


587.14 


Werner School Book Co. . 


5.30 


George P. Wallace 


1.00 


F. W. Woolworth & Co. . . 


1.00 



15,820.24 



MANUAL TRAINING. 605 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Frank W. Fitts, cotton. . |0.12 
Fannie L. Sanborn, ser- 
vices as clerk in superin- 
tendent's office 500.00 

$500.12 

Total expenditures $r),.320..3G 

Manual Training. 
Appropriation |1,500.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Fred E. Browne, teacher |1,199.91 
Hanover-street Laundry, 

washing aprons 3.40 

The Head & Dowst Co., 

lumber and labor 04.41 

J. Hodge, lumber and 

labor 49.80 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 1 chair 1.75 

W. F. Hubbard, 25 feet 

cherry and planing. . . . 4.75 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

screw eyes .24 

Manchester Electric Co., 

fuses, lamps 1.75 

Palmer, Parker & Co., 

lumber 17.31 

John B. Varick Co., hard- 
ware 27.54 

11,370.86 



Total expenditures $1,370.86 

Transferred to reserved fund 129.14 

11,500.00 



606 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City Library. 

Balance from last year unex- 
pended ' 12,843.05 

Appropriation 4.500.00 

$7,343.05 

Expenditures. 

librarian and assistants. 

Paid Kate E. Sanborn, libra- 
rian 1375.00 

Florence E. Whitcher, 

librarian G6.06 

George H. Fletcher 504.50 

Arthur H. Fletcher 318.13 

George W. Swallow 279.00 

Arthur N. Tasker 5.85 

L. B. James 53.90 

W. C. Swallow 9.75 

11,612.79 

CATALOGUE AND CATALOGUE SUPPLIES. 

Paid Library Bureau, cards, 

list sheets, etc 130.98 

Louise E. Newell, copyist 273.30 

Edith O. Simmons, copyist 408.90 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

Ink, paper, envelopes 12.32 

5,000 cards 19.60 

1745.10 

BINDING, REBINDING, AND RESEWING. 

Paid Boston Bookbinding Co. . |174.09 

Temple & Farrington Co . . 204.39 

1378.48 



CITY LIBRARY. 607 



WATER, LIGHTS. FUEL, INSURANCE. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

63 tons, 435 lbs. coal |369.69 

Wood 4.88 

Paid Clough & Twombly, insur- 
ance premium 125.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., 

gas 28.98 

Union Electric Co., elec- 
tric lights 269.18 

Water- Works, use of 

water 16.00 



$813.73 



NEW BOOKS. 

Paid trustees of city library |1,000.00 

SUNDRIES, 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing : 

2.50 reports, 1895 f 18.15 

300 reports, 1896 21.00 

"Daily Mirror," one year. . . . 6.00 

Paid G. R. Fletcher, cash paid 

for cleaning 18.27 

N. P. Hunt, postage, 1896, 

1897 4.76 

C. F. Livingston, printing 

book covers 20.30 

W. E, Moore, printing 

labels 1.00 

Thomas A. Lane Co., 24 

lamps 6.00 

Mary E. Bobbins, expenses 
to Manchester to meet 
trustees 11.16 



608 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Kate E. Sanborn, cash 

paid for cleaning |16.23 

U. D. Tenney, mending 

portrait 7.00 

1129.87 

Total expenditures |4,679.97 

Transferred to new account 2,663.08 

17,843.05 



Fire Department. 
Appropriation |6] ,000.00 

Expenditures. 

service's. 

Paid Thomas W. Lane, chief 

engineer |1,300.00 

Fred S. Bean, assistant 

engineer 175.00 

Ruel G. Manning, assist- 
ant engineer 175.00 

Clarence R. Merrill, as- 
sistant engineer 175.00 

Eugene S. Whitney, assist- 
ant engineer 175.00 

Fred S. Bean, clerk 25.00 

12,025.00 

Paid teamsters and engineers, as per pay- 
roll: 

January $2,262.93 

February 2,269.43 

March 2,264.89 

April 2,262.93 

May 2,318.93 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 609 



June 12,305.14 

July 2,339.01 

August 2,393.68 

September 2,148.52 

October 2,361.50 

November 2,271.68 

December 2,359.39 

CALL MEMBERS. 

Paid Engine Co. No. 1: 

For year 1897 |1,690.00 

• Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Engine Co. No. 2: 

For year 1897 1,680.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3: 

For year 1897 2,285.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Engine Co, No. 4: 

For year 1897 1,690.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Engine & Ladder Co. No. 5: 

For year 1897 2,450.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Engine & Ladder Co. No. 6: 

For year 1897 2,450.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Chemical Engine Co. No. 1 : 

For year 1897 475.00 

Extra labor 4.00 

Paid Hook-and-Ladder Co., No. 1: 

For year 1897 1,820.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Hose Co. No. 1: 

For year 1897 1,685.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

39 



127,858.09 



610 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Hose Co. No. 2 :. 

For year 1897 |1,685.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

Paid Hose Co. No. 3: 

For year 1897 910.00 

Extra labor 8.00 

OTHER LABOR. 

Paid F. O. Bartlett, labor as 

driver 182.50 

C. A. Butterfleld, labor as 

driver 20.25 

F. W. Bond, labor as 

driver 31.50 

John W. Finn, labor as 

driver 9.75 

Alfred Gustafson, labor 

as driver 27.00 

William Gage, labor as 

driver 42.00 

Herbert W. Jenne, labor. . 41.25 
Thomas Smith, labor as 

driver 21.00 

LAUNDRY. 

Paid Mrs. Charles Cutler |21.59 

Mrs. G. M. Goodwin 18.00 

Mrs. H. H. Hulme 50.74 

L. A. Lamson 7.50 

W. Morse 8.21 

Margaret Powers 58.62 

Mrs. M. L. Porter 8.25 

Mrs. Annie Roberts 4.00 

Mrs. Susie E. Reed 9.50 

L.A.Sawyer 18.70 

Mrs. C. C. Tinkham 19.48 



118,904.00 



$275.25 



1224.59 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 611 

FURNITURE, ETC. 

Paid W. A. Dakin & Co., 2 mop- 
wringers |o.00 

Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co. : 

Iron bed 7.50 

Mattresses, springs, etc 29.00 

Pillows, comforters 9.50 

Chairs, shades 7.75 

Matting 12.25 

Ice tank, etc 5.50 

Paid James W. Hill Co., pillow 

slips, sheets, crash 18.57 

R. K. Home, 1 towel rack .35 
Kimball & Hobbs, mat- 
ting 3.13 

D. A. Simons, 3 mat- 
tresses 19.47 

1118.02 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 

printing 100 reports. . . . |45.56 
W. P. Goodman, copying 

book 1.36 

Paid Nate Kellogg Co., printing: 

Reports, postals, cards, etc . . . 103.15 

Binding cards and rosters. . . 8.55 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 

books and stationery 11.78 
Union Publishing Co., ad- 
vertising 16.52 

Engine Co. No. 1 10.00 

Engine Co. No. 2 10.00 

Engine & Ladder Co. No. 3 10.00 

Engine Co. No. 4 10.00 

Engine & Ladder Co. No. 5 10.00 



612 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 

Paid Engine & Ladder Co. No. 6 |10.00 

Chemical Engine Co. No. 1 10.00 

Aerial Truck Co. No. 1 10.00 

Hose Co. No. 1 10.00 

Hose Co. No. 2 10.00 

Hose Co. No. 3 10.00 

1296.92 

WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, TELEPHONE, 

Paid New England Telephone & 
Telegraph Co., use of 
telephones $295.41 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 807.10 

Union Electric Co., elec- 
tric lights 64.86 

water commissioners, use 

of water 460.58 

11,627.95 

FUEL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell &Co.: 

142 tons, 1,243 lbs. coal |845.36 

Wood 11.00 

Paid George Brown, sawing 

and splitting wood 4.50 

Alfred F. Davis, wood 7.00 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 

50 tons coal 300.00 

S. L, Flanders, wood 32,30 

J, E, French, wood 15.00 

E. V. Turcotte, 34 tons, 

930 lbs. coal 224.03 

11,439.19 

FREIGHT AND TRUCKAGE. 

Paid John W. Wilson $9.15 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 613 



SUPPLIES. 




Paid H. K. Barnes, 8-foot jacket 




suction, etc 


110.65 


Clark M. Bailey, 13 brooms 


5.77 


Paid J. A. & W. Bird & Co.: 




Bicarbonate of soda 


20.00 


Sulphuric acid 


11.06 


Paid Boston Woven Hose & 




Rubber Co., 1 nozzle. . . 


10.00 


Brodie Electric Co., 2 bells 


6.00 


Cavanaugh Brothers, 3 




horses 


425.00 


Cornelius Callahan Co., 




gong 


15.00 


The Daniels-Cornell Co., 




soap 


41.98 


S. L. Flanders, oil, oil cans, 




chimneys 


16.44 


D. M. Goodwin, brooms. . 


8.50 


A. W. Harris Oil Co., valve 




oil and cans 


6.05 


T. F. Hannaford, 12 




brooms 


4.75 


W. F. Hubbard, 10 barrels 




sawdust 


1.00 


A. S. Jackson, bottles and 




corks 


9.00 


Thomas A. Lane Co., hose. 




couplings, lamps, shade 


53.50 


C. W. H. Moulton, 1 set 




locks 


20.00 


Manchester Mills, 460 lbs. 




waste 


21.95 


Paid Pike Manufacturing Co. : 




Disinfecting fluid 


10.50 


Axle grease 


1.50 



614 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid F. O. Pierce Co.: 

Sal ammoniac .f 8.80 

Bristle sweep 11.32 

Paid Pike & Heald Co., kettle, 

stove, dippers, etc 13.21 

C. N. Perkins & Co., 1 noz- 
zle and attaching 1.75 

Plumer & Holton, reefers, 

jackets, overalls 104.00 

Revere Rubber Co., wash- 
ers 1.13 

S. E. Spencer, 40 hat- 
bands 4.00 

H. Stratton, 60 lbs. lead. . 2.40 

F. H. Thurston, Germol. . 2.50 

D. B. Varney, brass cast- 
ings, etc 40.69 

Weston & Hill Co., cotton, 

crash 10.52 



PLUMBING, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing 

Co., finishing brass 

sheaves, hangers, etc. . . |28.25 

Cornelius Callahan Co., 

repairing hose 1.00 

The Electric Gas-Lighting 

Co., battery and covers 17.00 

The Head & Dowst Co., 

lumber 2.92 

J. Hodge, lumber and 

labor .35 

Hutchinson Foundry & 

Machine Works, door 

weights 6.66 



$898.97 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 615 



Paid Thomas A. Lane Co., 
plumbing material and 
labor $15.64 

Joseph LeFavour, repairs 

on Chemical engine. . . . 3.00 

H. J. Lawson, iron and 

labor 1.05 

Pike & Heald Co., mate- 
rial and labor 10.96 

Manchester Locomotive 
Works, repairing en- 
gine, boiler, and gear. . . 56.00 

G. W. Keed, repairing fire 

bucket .75 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing 

indicator .50 

A. C. Wallace, lumber. . . . 1.28 



1145.36 



HARDWARE. 

Paid John B. Varick Co 1310.83 

VETERINARY SERVICES AND MEDICINES. 

Paid A. F. Abbott, V. S., visits 

and medicine |67.00 

Charles M. Bailey, V. S., 

visits and medicine 25.25 

E. H. Currier, medicine. . 3.50 
N. Chandler, ointment... 4.50 
Z. Foster Campbell, med- 
icine 4.95 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., visits 

and medicines 33.50 

The Granite Pharmacy, 

medicine 1,.30 

F. K. Hubbard, colic cure 2.00 



616 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid P. C. Lamprey, alcohol, 

etc "^ 14.75 

G. B. Peavy, medicine. . . . 3.00 

A. D. Smith, medicine, etc. 8.80 

Snelling & Woods, med- 
icine 12.06 

C. A. Williams, medicine 1.83 

• CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

Paid Couch & McDonald |21.60 

Manchester Locomotive 

Works 155.23 

J. B. McCrillis *& Son 223.03 

Sanborn Carriage Co. . . . . 24.84 

BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid C. H. Bodwell |4.00 

Cressey & Colby 108.55 

T. Hickey 24.75 

A. Lemire 57.65 

Mahaney & McSweeney. . 370.00 

J. O. Tremblay 197.50 

J. F. Woodbury Co 65.50 

HAY, GRAIN, ETC. 

Paid Adams Brothers $46.02 

B. W. Cate 12.71 

Freeman & Merrill 162.79 

Gage & McDougall 1,280.06 

A.H.Hill 71.86 

J. F. Kerwin 7.50 

W. F. Merrill 572.94 

C. R. Merrill 2,072.91 

Nichols & Allen 208.22 

Partridge Brothers 212.00 



1172.44 



$424.70 



$887.95 



1,647.01 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 617 



HARNESS REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 



Paid W. H. Adams, repairs... |117.35 

The Fred Allen Co., repairs 45.20 

Paid Charles E. Berry: 

Collar and hames 26.00 

Repairs 2.05 

Paid W. E. Greeley, repairs. . . . 2.45 

John F. Kerwin, supplies 3.12 

Paid H. C. Ranno & Son: 

Repairs 70.60 

Whips 17.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid T. Bloomey, sawing and 

splitting wood |2.25 

Joseph Breault, use of 

horse 83.25 

Cavanaugh Brothers, use 

of horse 78.25 

John Costello, sawing 

wood 2.25 

Tilton F. Fifleld, matches, 

oil, soap 10.48 

S. C. Forsaith Machine 
Co., sawdust '. . .70 

A. M. Finney, cleaning car- 
pets 5.61 

W. F. Hubbard, sawdust .30 

Thomas W. Lane, paid for 
postage, express, cart- 
age, freight 14.95 

H. F. W. Little, filing saws 1.05 

G. W. Reed, pasturing 

horses 29.00 



$283.77 



618 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid C. H. Simpson, use of 

hacks 115.00 

C. A. Trefethen, cleaning 

clock 1.00 

E, V. Turcotte, use of 

horse 17.50 

N. J. Whalen, soap .50 

$262.0a 

Total expenditures |60,811.28 

Transferred to reserved fund 188.72 



161,000.00 



Fire Alarm Telegraph. 
Appropriation |2,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per paj -roll : 

January 152.00 

February 48.00 

March 48.00 

April 52.00 

May 52.00 

June 52.00 

July 54.00 

August 52.00 

September 52.00 

October 52.00 

November 52.00 

December 54.00 

1020.00 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 619 



Paid Oscar Bineau 


14.50 


W. Hill 


1.50 


E. A. Sears 


5.50 


Charles S. Willis 


1.00 


SUPPLIES. 




Paid American Electrical 




TN^orks, wire 


$53.52 


James Baldwin Co., 350 


vj^ t^T^m-K^^ 


pins 


3.50 


J. H. Bunnell & Co., bells, 




zincs, jars 


34.31 


Brodie Electric Co., insul- 




ators, magnet, repairs, 




etc 


30.75 


James R. Carr Co., paint. . 


7.75 


John C. Gold, repairing 




climbers 


1.75 


J. Hodge, lumber and 




labor 


26.30 


The Head & Dowst Co., 




lumber 


3.46 


Kimball & Hobbs, leather, 




gloves 


5.90 


Thomas A. Lane, pipe 






3.52 


Paid The N. E. Gamewell Co. : 




Fire-alarm boxes 


225.00 


Lightning arresters 


18.00 


Repairing repeater, indicator 


27.14 


Paid Pike & Heald Co., gaso- 




line, copper 


1.40 


F. 0. Pierce Co., vitriol . . . 


34.68 


J. B. Prescott & Son, 50 




3-pound zincs 


11.50 



112.50 



620 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Talbot Dyewood & Chem- 
ical Co., vitriol |107.87 

D. B. Varney, zinc castings 282.00 
John B. Varick Co., hard- 
ware 75.22 

Washburn & Moen Manu- 
facturing Co., wire 216.45 

C. L. Wolf, pipe . 1.05 

$1,171.07 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid W. B. Corey, drawing 

poles... 13.50 

H. F. W. Little, filing saws .35 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, re- 
pairing and altering 
wagon 86.00 

Sanborn Carriage Co., 
sharpening bar, welding 
bit 1.45 

Union Manufacturing Co., 

plating pliers 3.95 

John W. Wilson, freight 

and cartage 18.53 

$113.78 

Total expenditures |1,917.35 

Transferred to reserved fund 82.65 

12,000.00 

Hydrant Service. 
Appropriation $17,175.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid water-works, rent of 687 hydrants .... $17,175.00 



POLICE STATION. 621 

Police Department. — Station. 

Appropriation $2,800.00 

Expenditures. 

service's. 

Paid Frank P. Wiggiu, janitor |642.25 

WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, FUEL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 107,- 

260 lbs. coal |280.12 

People's Gas-Light Co., 

gas 63.14 

D. M. Poore, wood 31.25 

E. V. Turcotte, 41 tons, 

1,505 lbs. coal 271.40 

Union Electric Co., elec- 
tric lights 574.21 

water-works, use of water 338.79 

J. F. Wyman, 2 tons coal 13.00 

11,571.91 

LAUNDRY, ETC. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey, brooms, 
mops, toilet paper, mop 
waste, etc 121.83 

The Daniels-Cornell Co., 

matches 2.75 

Griffin Brothers, soapine. . 6.50 

Mrs. A. M. George, wash- 
ing floors, etc 68.10 

James W. Hill Co., crash 4.88 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap 8.00 

J. N. Lacourse & Co., soap 1.00 

John Morley, cleaning 

paint 17.50 



622 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., mop 
waste, brooms, duster, 

etc 17.60 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., soap, 

matches, paper . 13.75 

Mrs. J. F. Wiggin, wash- 
ing towels, blankets, etc. 63.85 

SANITARY. 

Paid C. W. Lerned, disinfect- 
ant 125.00 

F. H. Thurston, Germol, 

etc 18.25 

REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 

labor 120.71 

John Driscoll Co., repair- 
ing ash barrel 1.50 

Thomas A. Lane Co., re- 
pairing gas pipe .20 

Pike & Heald Co., globes, 
pipe, repairs 4.46 

Leander Pope, repairing 
bunk chains, etc 8.59 

John B. Varick Co., hard- 
ware 3.19 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid T. F. Fifield, oil |0.60 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., 

spring for chair 2.25 

David Labell, labor 1.00 



$215.76 



$43.25 



138.65 



POLICE COURT. 623 



Paid Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 

ice from July to Oct. 20 $8.90 

Joseph Qiiirin, 1 barrel 
crackers 2.00 



$14.75 



Total expenditures |2,526.57 

Transferred to reserved fund 273.43 

12,800.00 



Police Department. ~ Court. 
Appropriation |3,900.00 

EXPENDITURE'S. 

# 

SERVICES. 

Paid John C. Bickford, clerk. . fOOO.OO 

Isaac L. Heath, police 

justice 1,500.00 

George Prescott, associ- 
ate justice 300.00 

, 12,400.00 



CONVEYING PRISONERS. 

Paid Healy and Cassidy 1781.00 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., 
printing civil dockets, 

etc. 199.50 

The John B. Clarke Co., 

3,000 writs 12.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

books and stationery . . 6.15 

1117.65 



624 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid M.. J. Healy, cash paid for witness 

fees, etc ". $.332.29 

Total expenditures ' |3,630.94 

Transferred to reserved fund 209.06 

$3,900.00 

Police Department.— Commission. 

Appropriation |38,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 584.90 

$38,584.90 

Expenditures. 

services. 

Paid Michael J. Healy, chief of 

police $900.00 

John F. Cassidy, deputy 
chief 800.00 

Harry Loveren, chairman 

of commission, salary. . 150.00 

N. S. Clark, commissioner, 

salary 100.00 

F. P. Carpenter, commis- 
sioner, salary 100.00 

A. B. Brown, police ma- 
tron 418.00 

regular patrol 22,1.33.95 

extra time of regular pa- 
trol 801.15 

special patrol 10,567.12 

$35,970.22 



i 



1298.25 



POLICE COMMISSION. 625 



FEEDING PRISONERS. 

Paid Diet Kitclien |222.40 

Hannah Green 41.80 

W. D. Ladd & Co 21.07 

Paris & Tremblay 5.50 

Joseph Quirin 2.48 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid The John B. Clarice Co., 

printing envelopes, let- 
ter headings, blanks, 

etc 134.75 

E. R. Coburn Co., blotting 

paper 6.75 

Clark & Estey, pens and 

paper 1.50 

W. P. Goodman, books and 

stationery 46.49 

Star Stamp Co., 1 stencil .54 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

books, paper 4.05 

PATROL SYSTEM EXPENSES. 

Paid A. F. Abbott, V. S., at- 
tendance and medicine $2.25 

Adams Brothers, straw, 

salt, etc. 11.10 

Samuel Adams, labor on 
wires 20.00 

W. H. Adams, strap and 

snap 1.10 

The Fred Allen Co., har- 
ness-dressing ,. 8.00 

40 



$94.08 



626 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Automatic Time Stamp & 
Register Co., time stamp 

ribbons |4.00 

Gordon Biirnham Battery 

Co., glass cells 44.00 

E. M. Bryant & Co., sup- 
plies 7.12 

W. B. Corey, trucking pole 2.00 

Daniel Cronin, hay 60.26 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., sewing 

wound 1.50 

Paid George A. Durgin: 

Repairs, etc., patrol wagon. . . 35.00 
Repairs and painting ambu- 
lance 74.00 

Paid George Dunnington, rope, 

blankets, collar, repairs 14,50 

Richard Ebbitt, V. S., at- 
tendance and medicine 7.50 
Paid A. Filion: 

1 2-seated sleigh 140.00 

Repairing wagon 5.75 

Paid Freeman & Merrill, oats, 

corn, feed 33.10 

Gage & McDougall, oats. . 12.00 

A. H. Hill, oats 11.00 

The Head & Dowst Co., 

labor 3.5.6 

J. Hodge, 50 arms and 

labor 19.30 

Peter Harris, repairing 

harness 1.50 

Mahaney & McSweeney, 

shoeing horse .65 



POLICE COMMISSION. 



627 



Paid C, H. Morse, expert ser- 




vice, drawing specifications, 




etc 


1107.00 


Paid Municipal Signal Co. : 




Supplies 


16.50 


1 automatic register 


250.00 


Paid New England Telephone 




& Telegraph Co. : 




Rent of private line and in- 




struments 


234.00 


27 6-pin cross arms 


6.75 






ister paper 


21.99 


Pettingell-Andrews Co., 




electrical supplies 


140.22 


Perkins & Franks, elec- 




trical material 


9.44 


Partridge Brothers, hay. 




straw, etc 


155.21 


Charles E. Perry & Co., 




register paper 


21.61 


Sanborn Carriage Co., re- 




pairs 


18.20 


Paid N. J. Whalen : 




Stock food 


4.50 


Repairing harnesses, etc 


44.65 


Paid T. J. Wiggin, hay 


20.40 


J. F. Woodbury Co., horse 




shoeing 


51.12 


Paid Zeigler Electric Co.: 




Labor and material putting 




police movements in first- 




class order 


11.40 


Repairs 


8.57 



1,640.75 



628 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

HARDWARE AND REPAIRS. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paint and 

setting glass |21,86 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 

labor 33.21 

James Baldwin Co., 100 
pins.... 1.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine 
Co., stock and labor . . . 35.46 

A. L. Franks & Co., elec- 
trical supplies 4.28 

George Holbrook, lumber 
and labor 9.75 

Kimball & Hobbs, rubber 

tubing and washers 4.90 

Thomas A. Lane Co., 
plumbing material, la- 
bor, etc 11.75 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware 6.78 

Pope & Trudell, repairing 

chains, etc 1.00 

John B. Varick Co., hard- 
ware 64.09 



TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH. 

Paid New England Telephone 
& Telegraph Co., use of 

telephones 1286.83 

Western Union Telegraph 

Co., telegrams 12.25 



1194.08 



$299.08 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 629 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid L. W. Colbj, photograph- 
ing criminals |47.00 

H. P. Diamond, labor as 

lineman 19.00 

John B. Hall, medicine. . . 2.40 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., 1 
chair and cushion 8.00 

J. J. Holland, medicine, 

etc 6.80 

John P. Lovell Arms Co., 

3 handcuffs 7.00 

H. C. Wallace, photo- 
graphs 2.00 

J. AY. Wilson, trucking . . . 1.24 

193.44 

Total expenditures $38,584.90 



Repairs of Buildings. 

Appropriation $3,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 1,531.07 

$4,531.07 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2: 

January $24.00 

February 30.00 

$54.00 



630 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid George W. Hamlin, jmint- 

ing, varnisliing |39.24 

Thomas A. Lane Co., mate- 
rial and labor .60 

Joseph St. Laurent, lum- 
ber and labor 22.04 

Pike & Heald Co., mate- 
rial and repairs 6.78 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing ma- 
terial and labor 5.76 



POLICE STATIONS. 




Paid J. R. Carr Co., painting 




and glazing 


166.37 


W. M. Darrah & Co., re- 


Tf ^ ^*^^ ' 


pairing roof 


28.46 


J. B. Huntley, labor on 




closet 


.50 


Thomas A. Lane Co., labor 




on water pipe and closet 


7.22 


Joseph St. Laurent, raate- 




rial and labor 


18.95 


Paid Shirley & Smith : 




Kalsomining and patching. . . 


55.00 


Pointing brick work 


11.60 


Paid C. L. Wolf, 1 sink and set- 




ting UD 


6.75 


*-■'■■'-*& ^r' 




ENGINE-HOUSES. 





$74.42 



$194.85 



Paid J. J. Abbott, glass and set- 
ting same, sundry houses. . . . $7.55 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 631 

Paid James E. Carr Co.: 
Paper, paper hanging, mold- 
ing, etc 1309.50 

Painting and glazing 16.61 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co., 

lumber and labor 1.19 

J. B. Huntley, plumbing 
material and labor, sun- 
dry houses 385.31 

C. E. Palmer, solder, pipe, 

labor 3.85 

Perkins & Franks, electric 

bell 1.00 

Pike & Heald Co., plumb- 
ing material and labor, 

sundry houses 26.50 

C. H. Robie Co., concreting 8.36 
Joseph St. Laurent, lum- 
ber, etc., and labor, sun- 
dry houses 615.99 

Thomas Smith, lumber 

. and labor 257.26 

W. H. Tebbetts, painting 

and papering 99.19 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing ma- 
terial and labor 99.12 

John B. Varick Co., hard- 
ware 54.29 

11,922.65 



COURT HOUSE. 



Paid D. E. Guiuey, repairing 

water-closet $1.50 

Joseph St. Laurent, lum- 
ber and labor 19.67 



632 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., grass 

seed, brooms $10.20 

C L. Wolf, plumbing ma- 
terial and labor 99.82 

SCHOOLS. 

Paid Bobrick School Furniture 
Co., 48 No. 2 desks and 

seats 1100.80 

Warren Harvey, 1 step, 

Parker school 20.00 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co.: 

Gilding letters 8.50 

Teaming, labor 18.61 

Paid J. B. Huntley, 1 vent cap .45 

Paid Joseph St. Laurent: 

6 posts 12.00 

100 tree boxes 150.00 

Paid C. A. Trefethen, 1 clock. . . 3.50 
C. L. Wolf, labor on gas- 
lights, etc., Webster- 
street school 40.95 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid F. W. Blood Roofing Co., 

repairing roof, etc |6.35 

James R. Carr Co., paper, 
paper hanging, etc., city 
tenements 16.40 

Joseph St. Laurent, lum- 
ber, labor 3.64 

Lovejoy & Stratton, care 
city clocks 470.25 

C. H. Simpson, use of 

hacks 95.00 



1131.19 



$414.81 



NEW SCHOOLHOUSES. 633 

Paid 0. A. Trefethen, care of 

city clocks 189.00 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing re- 
pairs 16,45 

1697.09 

Total expenditures |3,489.01 

Transferred to new account 1,042.06 



New Schoolhouses. 

Balance from last year unex- 
pended ' 152,152.86 

Transferred from reserved fund 2,599.89 



t,531.07 



154,752.75 



« Expenditures. — IIioii School. 

ARCHITECT. 

Paid W. M. Butterfield $1,757.90 

CONTRACT. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Balance due |135,750.00 

Extras 1,471.71 

Curbing around lot 2,253.00 

Besetting curbing and one 

additional piece 55.25 

Paid Ames Manufacturing Co., 

2 bronze tablets 275.00 

Bobrick School Furniture 

Co., 480 desks and seats 2,232.00 
Edward Hodgkinson, grad- 
ing grounds 295,00 



634 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Perkins & Franks, electric 

apparatus 1892.90 

C. H. Robie Co., concreting 985.14 
C. A. Hoitt & Co., furni- 
ture 813.58' 

Paid Thomas A. Lane Co. : 

Heating, balance due 3,635.00 

Extras 66.36 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Mrs. B. Abbott, labor |6.60 

Paid O. G. Brown: 

808 loads loam 1,212.00 

40 loads clay 40.00 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
advertising 8 lines 5 

times 1.00 

Mrs. Delaney, labor 2.25 

Jones & Co., paint 10.30 

Kimball & Hobbs, hose, 

etc 31.22 

Mrs. B. E. Landers, labor 8.10 

John L. Morley, labor. . . . 42.45 
Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll : 

July 105.77 

August 25.03 

September 36.15 

Paid Vedal Nadeau, labor grad- 
ing 7.65 

John B. Varick Co., hard- 
ware, etc ,- 107.54 

E. M. West, ladders 3.70 



,724.94 



WATER-WORKS. 635 

Paid Union Pnblisliing Co., ad- 
vertising notice |().l-i 

11,645.90 

Total expenditures |52,128.74 

Transferred to new account 2,624.01 

154,752.75 



Parker School Lot. 

Transferred from reserved fund by resolu- 
tion, July 6, 1897 $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Mead, Mason & Co.: 

Concreting |237.74 

Grading 50.00 

Total expenditures |287.74 

Transferred to reserved fund 12.26 

1300.00 



Water-Works. 

Balance from last year unex- 
pended 117,387.36 

Cash received from w^ater rents 125,719.17 

Premium on bonds sold 6,248.00 

1149,354.53 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll : 

January $1,296.32 

February 1,483.84 



636 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

March |1,22S.20 

April 1,786.04 

May 2,701.56 

June 3,193.67 

July 2,277.39 

August 2,276.29 

September 2,805.69 

October 2,480.44 

November 2,705.01 

December 2,259.96 



,494.41 



Paid labor of men, as per pay-roll, division 
No. 2: 

January |274.68 

April 1,043.90 

May 321.10 

August 2,143.50 

September 20.00 

13,803.18 

Paid E. A. G. Holmes 255.55 

GENERAL EXPENSE. 

Paid F. W. Elliott, dinners, an- 
nual inspection $19.25 

W. C. Clarke, 12 meetings 

of board 48.00 

Paid Henry Chandler: 

14 meetings of board 56.00 

Clerk 100.00 

Paid Alpheus Gay, 26 meetings 

of board 104.00 

Charles H. Manning, 13 

meetings of board 52.00 

Charles T. Means, 13 meet- 
ings of board 52.00 



WATER-WORKS. 



637 



Paid Harry E. Parker, 13 meet- 
ings of board 

A. C. Wallace, 14 meetings 
of board ■ 


152.00 
56.00 


Paid C. K. Walker: 

Salary as superintendent 

Gas 


1,999.93 
23.83 


Express and telegrams 

Postage 

Electric light 

Sundries 


15.60 

24.20 

1.69 

12.95 







PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid T. S. Buck, stamp, pad, ink |0.76 
A. S. Campbell & Co., 

printing 18,800 notices 24.00 
Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing : 

1,000 postals 11.50 

19,500 bills 35.00 

1,000 half-letter heads 4.00 

650 reports 64.80 

5 plates and inserting 20.00 

Cut 7.00 

Advertising, 1 line 29 times. . 7.55 
Kepairing and binding book 4.90 
Paid E. R. Coburn Co., station- 
ery 18.45 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

blank book 14.75 

Union Publishing Co., ad- 
vertising 1 line 27 times 7.25 



TEAMS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

Wood $5.00 

Coal 286.01 



12,617.45 



$219.96 



6B8 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid F. X. Chenette, use of 

barge " |6.00 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, pine 

wood -25 

C. S. Fifield, use of team. . 2.00 

Paid E. T. James, use of 

teams 33.50 

New England Telephone & 

Telegraph Co., use of 

telephone 144.00 

John L. Proctor, wood. . . . 7.50 

J. A. & A. W. Walker, 290 

tons, 1,130 lbs. coal 868.95 

Whitten & Fifield, use of 

team 2.00 

J. F. Wyman, wood 6.00 

G. W. Whitford, wood. . . 2.00 



LAND. 

Paid Charles H. Bartlett, land 

as per deed 1650.00 

K. J. Barry, land as per 

deed 150.00 

Frank W. Elliott, land and 

buildings as per deed. . . 2,500.00 
Martha D. Gould, land and 

buildings as per deed. . 600.00 

Luther S. Proctor, land 

and buildings as per 

deed 600.00 

Mary O. Pierce, land as 

per deed 1,400.00 

Fred Whittaker, land and 

buildings as per deed. . 300.00 

George Young, land as per 

deed 250.00 



11,363.21 



16,450.00 



1813.50 



WATEK-WORKS. 639 



LEGAL SERVICES. 

Paid Drury & Peaslee, legal 

services 1311.70 

Dana W. King, recording 
deeds 7.62 

Joseph A. Hutchinson and 
others, costs in land 
damage suit 484.38 

AYilliam Morrill, record- 
ing deeds 9.80 

HARDWARE, BLACKSMITHIXG, FREIGHT. 

Paid Boston «& Maine Railroad, 

freight $575.77 

Cressey & Colby, sharpen- 
ing tools, etc 369.98 

James Cram, repairing 
picks, etc 5.01 

Amos Latouche, teaming 
wood 24.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware 70.86 

John L. Proctor, drawing 

53 tons coal 21.20 

John B. Varick Co., hard- 
ware 508.24 

SUPPLIES. 

Paid Adams Brothers: 

Cement |47.80 

Hay and salt • 2.03 

Paid Boston Lead Manufactur- 
ing Co., solder and lead pipe 49.76 



1,575.06 



640 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Boston Belting Co. : 

Hose and couplings $30.94 

Packing 16.91 

Paid Builders' Iron Foundry, 

sleeves, bends, branches, etc. 365.75 

Paid Chapman Valve Manufac- 
turing Co. : 

Gates 380.28 

10 hydrants 283.50 

1 spindle 2.39 

Paid Chadwick Lead Works: 

300 pigs lead 1,022.31 

Keel and pipe 32.61 

Paid P. C. Cheney Co., wiping 

waste 54.15 

A. N. Clapp, oil 40.80 

Coffin Valve Co., 5 gates . . 75.00 

Dickey & Coleman, 21 

cords, 7f feet manure.. 131.80 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, 75 

loads filling 25.00 

Edson Manufacturing Co., 
pump heads, dia- 
phragms, etc 18.25 

S. C. Forsaith Machine 

Co., flue cleaner 1.88 

Garlock Packing Co., pack- 
ing 28.12 

Hays Manufacturing Co., 

stop boxes, rods, etc .... 416.25 

Hersey Manufacturing 

Co., meters 455.35 

Paid The Head & Dbwst Co. : 

Brick 70.20 

Cement 5.00 



AVATER-WORKS. 




Paid J. Hodge: 




300 meter boxes 


$90.00 


Lumber 


6.07 


Paid C. A. Hoitt & Co., chim- 




neys 


1.00 


I ngersoll- Sergeant Drill 




Co., wire, battery, etc. 


25.14 


C. M. Kemp Manufactur- 




ing Co., guides for No. 1 




stock 


.37 


Kimball & Hobbs, 25 rub- 






3.75 


Tbomas A. Lane Co., 




valves, unions, gaskets. 




etc 


192.43 


Ludlow Valve Manufac- 




turing Co., valves 


292.30 


Leonard & Ellis, machine 




oil 


133.28 


Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co., 




pipe and couplings 


991.82 


H. J. Lawson, copper. . . . 


2.60 


Manchester Locomotive 




Works, manhole covers, 




sleeves, plates, etc 


788.10 


National Meter Co., meters 


1,497.70 


Neptune Meter Co., me- 




ters, etc 


344.50 


Newark Brass Works, 




' cocks, feed screws, etc. 


556.40 


New England Water Pipe 




Co., nips, ells, couplings 


119.70 


Norwood Engineering Co., 




hydrants, etc 


662.00 


Pike & Heald Co., pipe, etc. 


19.01 







641 



642 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Rensselaer Manufacturing 

Co., 10 gates |115.00 

Richards & Co., 250 pigs 

lead 686.12 

I. F. Sturtevant, lumber. . 239.87 

Thomson Meter Co., 

meters, etc 227.15 

Union Water Meter Co., 

meters, etc 1,174.05 

Vacuum Oil Co., cylinder 

oil 87.76 

George R. Vance, 6 pails. . 6.00 

Walworth INIanufacturing 

Co., screws and gear. . . .67 

George Woodman & Co., 

couplings, nips, etc.... 56.00 

W. A. Wood & Co., waste 14.11 

Henry R. Worthington, 

shaft, jacket elbows 4.77 

McNeal Pipe & Foundry 

Co., pipe 8,806.07 



REPAIRS. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing 

Co., repairs on wagon. . $3.75 

American Steam Gauge 

Co., repairing gauge, etc. 2,40 

E. M. Bryant & Co., elec- 
trical supplies and labor 2.34 

Crosby Steam Gage & 
Valve Co., repairing 
gage 3.50 

W. M. Darrah & Co., slat- 
ing material and labor 8.64 



120,009.82 



WATER-AVORKS. 643 



Paid Hei'sey Manufacturing 

Co., repairing meters. . . |12.65 

The Head & Dowst Co., 

lumber and labor 12,50 

George F. Higgins, con- 
creting 25.00 

J. Hodge, lumber and 

labor 4.10 

Thomas A. Lane Co., labor 

on electric lights 2.00 

Manchester Locomotive 
Works, material and la- 
bor on gears, bolts, 
valves, etc 97.49 

National Meter Co., repair- 
ing meters 74.40 

C. H. Robie Co., repair- 
ing roadways 84.35 

Thomson Meter Co., re- 
pairing meters 3.80 

Union Water Meter Co., 

repairing meters 42.20 

George R. Vance, tin, pipe, 

and labor 30.78 

• SUNDRIES. 

Paid town of Auburn, taxes on 

land and buildings |178.48 

Warren Brown, services 

and expenses, land cases 61.25 

Dudley & Doherty, engi- 
neering 18.00 

F. L. Follansbee, moving 

building 20.00 



1409.90 



644 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. Gott, cleaning vault. . . |3.00 

New Hampshire Insur- 
ance Co., insurance on 
Hunter buildings, 3 
years 25.00 

Joseph B. Sawyer estate, 

labor surveying 49.50 

sinking fund commission- 
ers, hydrant rentals. . . . 17,175.00 

George L. Tatro, use of 
steamboat 10.00 

George W. Townsend, ser- 
vices of diver, and ex- 
penses caulking pipe. . . 46.70 



7,580.93 



Total expenditures |82,288.97 

Transferred to interest account 40,414.00 

Transferred to new account 26,051.56 



1149,354.53 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 
Appropriation $8,500.00 

EXPEXDITURE'S. • 

L.\BOR. 

Paid labor of men and fefims, as per pay-roll : 

January 1148.76 

February 193.20 

March 149.26 

April 277.26 

May 379.37 

June 619.31 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 645 

July 1509.23 

August 667.59 

September 672.84 

October 464.26 

November 370.70 

December 184.87 



Paid Charles Cameron |9.37 

Mark Harvey 4.00 

C. Henderson 6.75 

PLANTS, SHRUBS, LOAM, ETC. 

Paid A. H. Chadbourne, orna- 
mental shrubs 125.80 

James A. Colby, 271 loads 

loam 406.50 

Frank Goings, 37 loads 

loam 37.00 

A. G. Hood, plants, etc. . . 140.45 

Luke Brothers Co., rose 
bushes and shrubs 30.00 

Manchester Slaughtering 
& Eendering Co., ferti- 
lizer 20.00 

Manchester Street Rail- 
way, 2,170 loads gravel 138.50 

Agnes Phillips, 104 loads 

loam 119.00 

Milton K. Putney, 145 
loads loam 217.50 

C. C. Webster, 368 loads 

clay 368.00 

estate of C. C. Webster, 

160 loads clav and loam 223.50 



$4,636.65 



120.12 



L,726.25 



646 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

WATER, TELEPHONE, INSURANCE, FUEL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 2 tons 

coal 114.00 

A. Elliott & Co., premium 

on insurance policy. . . . 2.50 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 

1 ton coal 7.00 

New England Telephone & 

Telegraph Co., use of 

telephones 85.05 

water commissioners, use 

of water 347.25 

R. E. Wilson, coal 14.00 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., 
printing : 

1 blank book |2.25 

Receipts, blanks, bills bound 40.00 
Paid W. P. Goodman, station- 
ery 6.70 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., 

stamped envelopes .... 4.36 

W. E. Moore, printing 

cards 1.50 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paint, letter- 
ing, etc 121.79 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 

labor 102.68 

Frank S. Bodwell, labor of 

men 14.50 

John Driscoll Co., dippers 2.10 



$469.80 



154.81 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Paid Kichard Evans, white- 
washing and patching 
ceilings $7.45 

Freeman & Merrill, cement 2.60 

Hartwell Foundry Co., 

402 lot markers 60.30 

The Head & Dowst Co., 

lumber, etc 7.16 

J. Hodge, lumber and 

labor 27.48 

C. H. Hutchinson, labor 
on fence 3.60 

Thomas A. Lane Co., 
plumbing material and 
labor 26.14 

Pike & Heald Co., labor 

and material 4.27 

C. H. Robie Co., concret- 
ing 740.63 

Morton E. Sanborn, 12 

sprinklers 8.00 

John B. Varick Co., tools 

and hardware 98.80 

TEAM EXPENSES. 

Paid Adams Brothers, oats |3.69 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., pro- 
fessional services 7.00 

C. H. Bodwell, shoeing 
horse .80 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., pro- 
fessional services 1.00 

Thomas Hickey Co., shoe- 
ing horse 6.75 



64t 



1,127.50 



648 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Partridge Brothers, hay, 

grain |78.50 

B. F. Welch, 1 horse.... 100.00 

I. S. York, harness, collar, 

halter 42.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boyd Brothers, use of 

hack 15.00 

E. F. Jones, clerk of trus- 
tees one year 25.00 



12.39.74 



130.00 



Total expenditures |8,304.87 

Transferred to reserved fund 195.13 

18,500.00 



Valley Cemetery. 
Appropriation |3.000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 

January 165.00 

February 77.87 

March 63.50 

April 149.18 

May ^ 205.74 

Jane ' 262.13 

July 215.37 

August 212.89 

September 258.19 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 649 



October 1180.00 

November 153.10 

December 76.10 



Paid B. F. Baseomb, team and 

labor 145.00 

William Berwick, team . . . 1.00 

Frank M. Going;*, team 

and labor 37.20 



"WATER AXU TELEPHONE. 

Paid New England Telephone & 
Telegraph Co., use of tel- 
ephones 136.00 

water commissioners, use 
of water 37.50 



TURF, LOAM, PLANTS, ETC. 

Paid B. F. Bascomb, sand, 

loam, turf, etc |62.65 

A. H. Chadbourne, shrubs 2.40 

J. Francis, plants 57.00 

Frank M. Goings, loam. . . 13.00 

A. G. Hood, plants 23.95 

J. H. Johnston, loam.... 12.50 
John B. Yarick Co., seed, 

etc 24.31 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Paid E. J. Knowlton, P. M., 

stamped envelopes .... |4.35 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

ink, pens, book, etc. . . . 12.35 



,919.97 



$86.20 



173.50 



1195.81 



116.70 



650 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

REPAIRS, TOOLS, IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co., 
building wall and fence, 

per contract |436.00 

C. A. Hoitt Co., 9 chairs.. 7.47 

Kimball & Hobbs, 2 mats 3.00 

Thomas A. Lane Co., hose 

washers .75 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

tools and hardware. . . . 3.70 
Palmer & Garmons, set- 
ting stones 17.25 

Paid Pike & Heald Co. : 

Iron fence 115.00 

Plumbing material and labor 54.16 
Paid C. H. Robie Co., concret- 
ing ' 11.47 

Z. B. Stuart, mason work 12.05 
William Sutcliffe, repair- 
ing tools .90 

John B. Varick Co., tools 

and hardware ........ 31.47 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boyd Brothers, use of 

team |2.00 

S. P. Cannon, clerk for 
sub-trustees 10.00 



$693.22 



$12.00 



Total expenditures $2,997.40 

Transferred to reserved fund 200.00 

13,000.0(1 



MERRILL YARD. 

Amoskeag Cemetery. 
Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid James E. Bailey 136.75 

G. C. Harwood 1.50 

R. D. Heath 16.50 

A. McGafifey 19.50 

Paid pay-roll, commons: 

July 70.86 

August 108.95 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid J. H. Coburn, 50 loads 

gravel $60.00 

E. T. James, teams 3.50 

Manchester Water- Works, 

use of water 12.00 

Palmer & Garmons, set- 
ting headstones 4.50 

C. H. Simpson, use of team 3.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to reserved fund 

Care of Merrill Yard. 
Appropriation 

EXPENDITURE'S. 
LABOR. 

Paid Charles Cameron, labor. . |16.50 

Mark E. Harvey, labor. . . 6.50 



651 



1350.00 



254.06 



3.00 



1337.06 
12.94 

1350.00 



1100.00 



652 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Palmer & Garmons, mate- 
rial and labor |28.53 

Whitten & Fifleld, use of 

teams 6.00 

157.53 

Total expenditures 157.53 

Transferred to reserved fund 42.47 

1100.00 



Purchase of Land for West Side Park. 
Appropriation |12,000.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Edward Wagner | 12,000.00 

Land in West Manchester. 

Appropriation, transferred from reserved 

fund $1.750.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid G. F. & E. C. Swift $1.750.00 

Weston Observatory. 

Appropriation, legacy from James A. Wes- 
ton estate $5,000.00 

Expenditures. 

contracts. 

Paid Davis & Raynes, plans 

and specifications $91.00 



DEDICATION OF WESTON OBSERVATORY. 653 

Paid Warren Harvey, stone 

work $163.75 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Building 4,553.00 

Extras 19.24 

$4,826.99 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid J. P. Brown & Co., use of 

hacks $15.00 

The John B. Clarke Co., 

advertising 13.00 

pay-roll, commons, Sep- 
tember 133.50 

Union Publishing Co., ad- 
vertising 9.45 

$170.95 



Total expenditures $4,997.94 

Transferred to reserved fund 2.06 



$5,000.00 



Dedication of Weston Observatory. 
Appropriation .$150.00 

Expenditures, 
sundries. 

Paid G. W. Bailey, use of teams $10.00 

Boyd Brothers, use of 

teams 5.00 

The John B. Clarke Co., 

programs 4.60 

- W. J. Freeman, use of 

teams 10.00 



654 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid E. T. James, use of teams |10.00 

Manchester City Band, 

music 50,00 

Odd Fellows' Building 

Association, use of 

chairs 10.00 

D. A. Simons, use of chairs 8.30 

C. H. Simpson, use of - * 

teams 10.00 

A. M. Winchester, dinners, 

Grand Lodge Masons.. 30.00 

1147.90 

Total expenditures 1147.90 

Transferred to reserved fund 2.10 

.$150.00 



Dedication of New High School Building. 

Appropriation |150.00 

Expenditures, 
sundries. 

Paid G. W. Bailey, carriage. . . |5.00 

The John B. Clarke Co., 

l^rinting programs and 

badges 13.25 

W. J. Freeman, carriage. . 5.00 

E. M. Hawes, trucking 

chairs 2.00 

E. T. James, carriage 2.50 

W. J. Tucker, services and 

expenses 50.00 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM." 655 

Paid A. M. Winchester, board 
Dr. Tucker and W. W. Col- 
burn 17.00 

184.75 



Total expenditures $84.75 

Transferred to reserved fund 65.25 



1150.00 



Paupers off the Farm. 

Appropriation |10,525.00 

Expenditures. 

groceries, meats, etc. 

Paid Barlow & Nye |15.00 

Bartlett & Thompson 40.00 

Bessette & Trahan 30.00 

Burke Brothers 4.00 

John F. Cahill 81.95 

C.H.Clark 13.00 

A. M. Eastman 2.18 

E. C. Eastman 45.93 

Eager & Co 30.00 

H. Fradd & Co 91.41 

T. F.-Fifield 34.93 

Carl A. Friborg 30.00 

Griffin Brothers 886.90 

A. H. Gray 35.00 

A. G. Grenier, estate 7.00 

Henry C. Hall 7.00 

Joseph Huard 166.94 

John F. Healy 82.00 

O. D. Knox & Co 154.00 

J. ISr. Lacourse 11.00 



656 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid P. D. Lynch 


1203.00 


Lainoreaux Brothers .... 


55.02 


G. C. Lord 


15.00 


E. Marchand 


116.00 


Thomas H. Mahoney 


100.00 


McQuade's Market 


206.90 


A W. Morse 


53.00 


Edward F. Murray 


50.00 


Ulric Messier 


45.00 


Noves & Prince 


78.26 


F. X. Parent 


10.00 


E. W. Perkins 


62.00 


D. M. Poore & Son 


126.00 


Edmond Pinard 


45.00 


0. W. Price 


10.00 


Eugene Quirin 


161.00 


Joseph Quirin ..." 


31.00 


Paris & Trembhiy 


18.00 


Queen City Marl^et 


12.00 


Swinston & Kobinson. . . . 


12.00 


D. A.. Shanahan 


48.00 


H. A. Tirrell 


21.00 


Trahan & Co 


28.00 


J. 0. Turcotte 


20.00 


Moise Verrette 


59.90 


Calixte Vigneault 


100.00 


Henry W eber 


25.00 






FUEIi. 




Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co 


$18.00 


V. Bourque 


27.00 


Charles Boisclair 


39.00 


S. A. Blood 


9.00 


Charles Cota 


3.00 


W. E. Dunbar & Son 


13.75 



13,659.32 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 657 

Paid Dnnlap & Wason Coal Co. |7.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. 3.00 

Philias Graveline 28.00 

S. Lavoie 20.00 

David Lovering 3.00 

Joseph Masse 10.50 

Moore & Preston 22.00 

John Moss 2.25 

John Perham 2.50 

D. M. Poore 10.00 

John P. Russell & Co 126.75 

Louisa Schink 17.25 

E. V. Turcotte 12.25 

J. F. Wyman 32.13 

1406.38 



BOARD AND CARE AND RENT, 

Paid C. M. Bennett ^27.00 

county of Hillsborough.. 490.91 

W. H. Gilmore 127.04 

Thomas Kelley 7.00 

Christina Maycock 33.53 

Agnes Massey 32.00 

New Hampshire Asylum 

for Insane 22.56 

Notre Dame de Lourdes 

Hospital 84.00 

Napoleon Paris 23.00 

Celia H. Pressey 57.72 

D. L. Robinson 15.00 

State Industrial School.. 2,464.01 
St. Patrick's Old Ladies' 

Home 64.00 

St. Patrick Orphans' 

Home 120.00 

St. Mary's Orphans' Home 28.00 

Fred Weissbach 104.74 

William \yhelpley 40.00 

42 



J,746.54 



658 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CLOTHING. 

Paid W. H. Cate 

Dodge & Straw 

Liglilbody & Burbank . . . 

H. M. Moody 

John Montplaisir 

M. A. McDonough 

J. L. Niven 

Michael O'Dowd 

P. F. O'Toole 

G. L. Robinson 

O. G. Trudeau 

E. C. Wescott 

Weston & Martin 

MEDICINE', MEDICAL SERVICES, 

Paid D. S. Adams, M. D., assist- 
ing Dr. Carpenter 

board of health, medical 
treatment of isolated 

children 

Paid F. X. Chenette: 

Burial, Mrs. Blanchard 

Burial, Tillie Welcome 

Paid Dr. C. F. Flanders, M. D. : 
Examination F. P. Proctor. . . 

Assisting Dr. Carpenter 

Paid John B. Hall, medicine, 

etc 

Thomas C. Hill, M. D., 
assisting Dr. Carpenter 
John Holland, medicine. . 
W. B. Mitchell, medicine 
Felix Provencher, burial 
of child, J. Labonty. . . 



|1.0() 
1.50 

13.60 
2.00 
1.50 
2.38 
3.50 
7.00 

12.40 
3.00 

23.00 
3.50 
1.00 



175.38 



FUNERAL EXPENSES. 



13.00 



52.25 

25.00 
17.50 

3.00 
5.00 

132..30 

3.00 
3.93 
4.95 

10.00 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 659 

Paid F. H. Thurston, medicine |1.60 

E. V. Turcotte, burial of 

Mrs. Cote and child 25.00 

A. F. Wheat. M. D., con- 
sultation with Dr. Car- 
penter 3.00 

A. J. Todd, M. D., assisting 

Dr. Carpenter 3.00 

1292.53 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boston & Maine Eailroad, 
railroad tickets, sundry 

persons $38.40 

A. S. Campbell & Co., 

printing 4,000 billheads 24.75 

Charles B. Clarkson, con- 
veying sundry persons 

to insane asylum 18.07 

E. E. Coburn Co., rubber 

bands ,50 

The John B. Clarke Co., 

printing 2,500 blanks. . . 9.00 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing 

certificates 4,00 

A. D. Maxwell, wood 2.00 

Paid W. H. Maxwell : 

Transportation sundry per- 
sons to Concord and Gras- 

mere 9.84 

Postage 1.00 

Paid C. S. McKean, meals for 

six men 1..50 



flOO.OG 



Total expenditures |S,289.21 

Overdraft, Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital 30.00 

Transferred to reserved fund 2,205.79 

$10,-525.00 



660 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City Farm. 

Appropriation fS.flOO.OO 

Transferred from reserved fund 486.55 



Expenditures. 

Paid E. G. Libbey, superin- 
tendent 1500.00 

Mrs. Annie Libbey, matron .300.00 



HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and women, as per pay- 
roll : 

January |137.52 

February 181.89 

March 118.99 

April 117.04 

■ May 146.68 

June 207.96 

July 158.85 

August '. 209.31 

September 188.49 

October 166.05 

November 206.82 

December 155.78 

Paid labor, as per pay-roll, division No. 2: 

February .$6.34 

April 5.67 

September 8.03 

December 11.63 



18,486.55 



1800.00 



|2,055..38 



131.67 



CITY FARM. 



661 



Paid Flora Burpee 

Carrie E. Buck 

Andrew Crother . . . . 

Richard Evans 

Charles L. Fuller. . . , 

Daniel Griffin 

Maria Leonard 

Chester Majnard . . . 

Jerry Mahoney 

John T. Pitman 

John L. Martin 

Jacob Reed 

Daniel Webster 

Nellie F. Underwood. 



Paid 



14.00 

2.25 

6.60 

4.00 

14.67 

10.27 

3.43 

7.33 

5.S6 

4.00 

.75 

7.33 

1.50 

3.50 



FUEL. 




L. B. Bodwell & Co., 13 




tons, 160 lbs. coal 


177.40 


A. W. Prescott, 70 cords 




wood 


210.00 



CLOTHING, DRY GOODS, 

Paid Allen & Kimball, clothing 
Barton & Co., dry goods. . 
H. K. Boardman, boots 

and shoes 

Clark & Estey, stockings 
Cushman & Hardy, shirts, 

overalls, etc 

George W. Dodge, boots 

and shoes 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., 

boots and shoes 

F. C. Dow, boots and shoes 



ETC. 

15.60 
4.74 

40.00 
4.25 

20.92 

20.65 

8.70 
10.11 



175.49 



1287.40 



662 REPORT OF THE CIT^ AUDITOR. 

Paid W. P. Farmer, boots and 

shoes I2S.22 

Lowell O. Fowler, boots 

and shoes 12.90 

James W. Hill Co., cam- 
bric, cotton, buttons, 

print, etc 43.59 

A. & W. S. Heath, boots 

and shoes 8.25 

Patrick Kean, dry goods. . 27.29 

F. P. Kimball, hose 3.00 

Manchester One Price 

Clothing Co., clothing. . 34.25 

Manchester Stocking Co., 

5 dozen hose 3.25 

William Marcotte & Co., 

^ underclothing 26.00 

H. M. Moody, clothing 18.00 

Miville & Deschenes, dry 

goods 10.08 

Plumer & Holton, under- 
clothing, hats 28.46 

Robitaille, LaFlamme & 

Co., mittens, pants 10.75 

The Raymond Syndicate, 

•underclothing 6.85 

E. Therien, boots and 

shoes 7.25 

Weston & Hill Co., dry 

goods 10.83 

E. C. Wescott, flannel and 

cotton 14.17 

MEATS AXD PROVISIONS. 

Paid Annis Flour & Grain Co. .$77.35 

C. M. Abbott 55.95 



1408.11 



CITY FARM. 663 



Paid S. F. Adams |13.05 

Barlow & Nve 249.74 

Baker & Allen 30.20 

L. Belli 7.30 

Bixby's Market 9.22 

G.W.Clark 19.62 

The Daniels-Cornell Co... 632.56 

Dodge & Laing 68.41 

C. W. Draper 1.81 

C. H. Durgin 2.75 

The Granite State Grocery 

Co 13.00 

Granite State Beef Co. . . 4.12 

Gloucester Fish Market. . 2..32 

D. Johnson 8.52 

W. D. Ladd & Co 9.18 

Manchester Provision Co. 108.77 

Manchester Beef Co 52.93 

John J. McGovern 22.37 

E. S. Newton 27.38 

Parnell Brothers 213.93 

Henrv W. Parker 53.95 

Phoenix Market 32.81 

D. M. Poore & Son 8.59 

W. E. Prescott 4.90 

Joseph Qiiirin 7.20 

W. H. Raymond Grocery 

Co .32.86 

Tom Robinson 83.98 

Summer-street Market... 155.94 

Small & Jones 18.48 

Sears & Co 11.40 

John E. Towle & Co 74.51 

J. O. Turcotte 23.36 

J. H. Wiggin & Co 4.01 

John M. Woodbridge 2.10 



?2,144.,57 



664 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

FURNITURE AND KITCHEN UTENSILS. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey, tinware, 

brooms, dusters |29.13 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., 
crockery, glassware, oil- 
cloth, paper, etc 24.83 

E. K. Home, crockery and 

tinware 18.61 

Kimball & Hobbs, table 

oilcloth, etc 2.25 

J. Y. McQueston Co., 1 

chair 7.50 

Paid Pike & Heald Co.: 

Copper kettle 2.25 

Tinware 11.40 

Paid Taggart & Manahan, 

chairs, crockery 14.36 

MEDICINE, VETERINARY SERVICE'S. 

Paid A. F. Abbott, V. S., visits 

and medicine |27.60 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., visits 9.50 

Richard Ebbitt, V. S., 

visits 2.00 

John B. Hall, medicine. . . 9.25 

J. J. Holland, medicine. . 5.30 

A. J. Hedborg & Co., medi- 
cine 4.45 

E. C. Smith, medicine. . . 1.45 

F. H. Thurston, medicine, 

etc 10.30 

Charles A. Williams, med- 
icine 5.17 

Weeks & Potter, oil of 

cedar 4.85 



$110.33 



179.87 



CITY FARM. 665 



BLACKSMITHING, HARNESSES. ETC. 

Paid The Fred Allen Co., re- 
pairing harnesses |1.55 

John A. Ballon, blankets 21.00 

George Dnnnington, re- 
pairing harnesses 5.05 

Thomas Hickey Co., horse- 
shoeing 6.25 

Kimball Carriage Co., 

robes, collars, bits, soap 58.65 

J. F. Kerwin, blankets, 

rope ties, etc 13.50 

The Ranno Harness Co., 

feed bags 3.30 

' J. O. Tremblay, horseshoe- 
ing 84.40 

N. J. Whalen, repairing 

harnesses, etc 22.40 

CARRIAGE' REPAIRS. 

Paid Couch & McDonald, re- 
pairs 137.05 

George A. Durgin, repair- 
ing wagon, etc 28.64 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, re- 
pairs 17.08 

James Murphy, painting 
and varnishing wagon. . 13.00 

Sanborn Carriage Co., re- 
pairs 9.05 

HAY, GRAIN, AND OTHER FEED. 

Paid Adams Brothers < |57.55 

Cavanaugh Brothers 8.90 

Thomas W. Emerson Co . . 2.35 



1216.10 



1104.82 



666 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Freeman & Merrill |77.82 

Gage & McDougall 49.75 

W.F.Merrill 7.20 

C. K. Merrill 58.25 

Partridge Brothers 197.85 

1459.67 

HARDWARE, FERTILIZERS, SEEDS, ETC. 

Paid Adams Brothers |17.50 

J. J. H. Gregory 7.85 

Manchester Hardware Co. 16.64 

John B. Variek Co 280.83 

1322.82 

INSURANCE, 

Paid John Dowst, premium on 

policy $17.50 

A. Elliott & Co., premium 

on policy 35.00 

Jones & Perry, premium 

on policy 17.50 

Richardson & Goggin, pre- 
mium on policies 52.50 

John A. Sheehan, pre- 
mium on policies 70.00 

1192.50 

PRINTING, ADVERTISING, STATIONERY, TELErHONE. 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co. : 

Advertising notices |0.50 

Printing invitations 5.00 

Paid W. P. Goodman, station- 
ery 2.30 

New England Telephone 
& Telegraph Co., use of 

telephone 44.90 



CITY FARM. 667 



Paid Novelty Advertising Co., 

ink, pads, etc |1.15 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., 
1 directory 2.00 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paint and 

paper 131.50 

D. J. Adams, repairing 

lawn mower 1.00 

Adams Brothers, lime, hair, 

plaster 4.41 

F. W. Blood Hoofing Co., 

repairing boiler 2.00 

James K. Carr Co., paint, 

paper, glass 37.64 

Charles I. Earl, repairing 

sewing machine 3.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine 

Co., lumber 49.04 

D. E. Guinev, plumbing 

material and labor 7.15 

Paid The Head & Dowst Co. : 

Lumber and labor 25.62 

Posts 10.00 

Paid J. Hodge, lumber and 

labor 19.37 

Thomas A. Lane Co., pipe 

and labor on tank 8.51 

Pike & Heald Co., mate- 
rial and labor 28.03 

C, A. Trefethen, repairing 

clock .75 

C. L. Wolf, range linings 

and grate, and labor ad- 
justing same 16.67 



155.85 



$244.69 



^68 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Boston & Maine Railroad, 

freight |2.52 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 

and cutting ice 10.00 

George W. Bailey, use of 

hack 5.00 

Paid Cavanaugh Brothers: 

Pair horses |300.00 

Discount 50.00 

1250.00 
Bay horse at auction 51.00 

1199.00 

Commission 5.10 

201.10 

Paid John S. Cole, use of pas- 
ture in Auburn 45.00 

A, N. Clapp, kerosene. . . . 41.70 

The Daniels-Cornell Co., 

soap 24.68 

Perry H. Dow, 1 Jersey 

bull 12.00 

W. J. Freeman, use of 

hack 5.00 

Charles S. Fifield, use of 
hacks 10.00 

William Hayes, cider bar- 
rels ' 8.75 

A. H. Hill, grinding corn, 

etc. 174.83 

Kimball & Hobbs, shoe- 
makers' supplies 3.88 

Paid E. G. Libbey, cash paid: 
Return of escaped prisoners. . 20.49 



INDIGENT SOLDIERS. 669 

Postoffice box rent |6.00 

"Daily Mirror," one year. . , . 5.00 
Paid C. W. Lerned & Co., disin- 
fectant 12.50 

Manchester Mills, cotton 

waste 1.02 

Manchester Slaughtering 
& Eendering Co., oil and 

hogs dressed 4.50 

J. J. McGovern, soap and 

oil 9.60 

John T. Pitman, 1 gander 1.50 

Felix Provencher, use of 

hacks 5.00 

Quirin & Duhaime, 3 bar- 
rels 5.00 

L. P. Reynolds, tobacco. . . 12.58 

C. H. Simpson, use of 

hacks 15.00 

R. G. Sullivan, tobacco 

and pipes 10.54 

J. O. Turcotte, tobacco. . . 33.21 

water-works, use of water 177.90 

Whitten & Fifield, use of 

teams 17.00 

Paid Gordon Woodbury: 

Making cider 7.94 

Grinding corn 5.04 

1897.28 

Total expenditures $8,486.55 



Indigent Soldiers. 
Appropriation $300.00 



670 report of the city auditor. 

Expenditures. 

groceries. 

Paid T. F. Fifield $20.00 

E. Marchand 15.00 

E. F. Murray 4.00 

D. M. Poore & Son 70.00 

1109.00 

FUEL. 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. $2.50 

D. M. Poore 7.00 

C. E. Pollard 6.00 

115.50 

BOARD AND CARE. 

Paid Mrs. Thomas McGrath. . . |32.00 

Celia H. Pressey 8.00 

140.00 

MEDICINE, ETC. 

Paid J. J. Holland |12.99 

Edward C. Smith 4.25 

117.24 

Total expenditures |181.74 

Transferred to reserved fund 118.26 

$300.00 

Women's Aid Home. 
Appropriation $300.0 

Expenditures. 

Paid Women's Aid Home, appropriation 

for free beds $300.00 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 671 

Free Beds, Elliot Hospital. 
Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid A. M, Heard, treasurer, amount appro- 
priated $300.00 

Emergency Ward, Elliot Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Cora M. Dearborn, treasurer, amount 

appropriated $300.00 

Sacret Heart Hospital. 
Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Sacred Heart Hospital, amount appro- 
priated $300.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital. 

Appropriation . $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital, 

amount appropriated .$300.00 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 
Appropriation ; $400.00 



672 report of the city auditor. 

Expenditures. 

Paid Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. R., ex- 
penses incurred Memorial Day 1399.51 

Total expenditures 1399.51 

Transferred to reserved fund .49 

1400.00 



Militia. 
Appropriation $1.000.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Amoskeag Veterans flOO.OO 

Co. C, First Regiment 

N. H. N. G 100.00 

Co. F, First Regiment, 

N. H. N. G 100.00 

Co. H, First Regiment, 

N. H. N. G 100.00 

Co. L, First Regiment 

N. H. N. G.... 100.00 

First Regiment Band 100.00 

Joseph Frescbl Post, G. 

A. R 100.00 

Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. 

A. R . 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans 100.00 

Manchester Cadets 100.00 

11,000.00 



Band Concerts. 
Appropriation $300.00 



COUNTY TAX. 673 

Expenditures. 

Paid First Regiment Band |150.00 

Manchester City Band 150.00 

^300.00 

Semi-Centennial History. 

Appropriation $600.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Herbert W. Eastman |600.00 

Abatement of Taxes. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid sundry persons, on taxes abated $1,452.43 

Total expenditures $1,452.43 

Transferred to reserved fund 547.57 

$2,000.00 

State Tax. 

Appropriation $68,225.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Solon A. Carter, state treasurer $68,225.00 

County Tax. 
Appropriation $66,204.72 

Expenditures. 
Paid Hillsborough county $66,204.72 

43 



674 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Resolution Raising Money and Making Appropria- 
tions for thie Year One Thousand Eight Hundred 
and Ninety-Seven. 

Rcsolv&d by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of six hundred and thirty thousand dol- 
lars ($630,000) be raised for the use of the city for the year 
one thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven (1897) by tax 
on the polls and estates liable to be taxed thereon, which 
sum, together with such unappropriated money as may be now 
in the city treasury, or may hereafter come into it, shall be 
appropriated as follows, viz.: 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Interest $47,500.00 

Eeserved fund 10,000.00 

City hall expenses 4,000.00 

Printing and stationery 2,000.00 

Incidental expenses 12,000.00 

Mayor's incidentals 300.00 

City officers' salaries 18,000.00 

Sinking fund 27,000.00 

Payment of funded debt 35,000.00 

Auditor's dej)artment, salaries, and expenses. . . . 2,000.00 

STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Paving Elm and Granite streets $10,000.00 

Eebuilding Amoskeag bridge abutment 4,700.00 

Board of street and park commissioners, salaries 

and expenses 3,600.00 

Eepairs of highways 20,000.00 

Building new highways 5,000.00 

Land taken for new highways 5,000.00 

Watering streets 5,000.00 

Paving streets 5,000.00 

Macadamizing streets 15,000.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 675 

Grading for concrete $5,000.00 

Scavenger teams 16,000.00 

Street sweeping 3,000.00 

Lighting streets 55,000.00 

Eepairs of bridges 4,000.00 

City teams 6,500.00 

Eepairs of sewers and drains 5,000.00 

New sewers 40,000.00 

Eemoval of snow and ice 4,000.00 

exCtINEEr's department. 

Salaries and expenses $4,500.00 

HEALTH department. 

Salaries and expenses $4,400.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Eepairs of schoolhouses $3,000.00 

Fuel 8,000.00 

Furniture and supplies 2,000.00 

Books and stationery '. 100.00 

Printing and advertising 300.00 

Contingent ex]3enses 1,700,00 

Care of rooms 6,000.00 

Evening schools 1,500.00 

Teachers' salaries 74,000.00 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 400.00 

Free text-books 5,000.00 

Manual training 1,500.00 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Salaries and expenses $4,500.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries and general expenses $61,000.00 

Fire-alarm telegraph 2,000.00 

Hydrant service 17,175.00 



676 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries and expenses of commission and force. . $38,000.00 

Expenses of court 3,900.00 

Care and maintenance of station 2,800.00 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Eepairs of buildings $3,000.00 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Care of commons $4,500.00 

Care of Stark and Derryfield parks 5,000.00 

Care of Pine Grove cemetery ■ 8,500.00 

Care of Valley cemetery 3,000.00 

Care of Amoskeag cemetery 350.00 

Care of Merrill yard \ 100.00 

Purchase of land for West Side park 12,000.00 

PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Support of paupers off the city farm $10,525.00 

Maintenance of city farm 8,000.00 

Support of indigent soldiers 300.00 

Bed for city patients. Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Bed for city patients, Elliot Hospital 300.00 

Bed for city patients. Sacred Heart Plospital .... 300.00 
Bed for city patients, Xotre Dame de Lourdes 

Hospital 300.00 

Support of city patients. Emergency Ward, Elliot 

Hospital 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 400.00 

Militia .armories 1,000.00 

Band concerts 300.00 

Semi-celitennial historv 600.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 677 



TAXES. 



Abatement of taxes $2,000.00 

State taxes 68,225.00 

County taxes 66,204.72 



Total amount to be raised by taxation. . . $630,000.00 
Passed March 5, 1897. 



678 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CO 
P5 
O 

02 

CO 
CO 

< 

O 

Q 
D5 
<1 
O 

m 
o 

X! 
<1 
H 

O 
H 

W 
^ 

<J 
H 

CO 

<! 
t^ 



-"Sec . 




gggggggg 




03 


o-*ou5o6ocoo 


s 




K ;^ » 


°.SoS 


"3 




Cows 

and ot 

stock 

mont 






6 


t^-Hco-^ei — ot- 


<-tb-r^lOiCCCr- 'O 


Iz; 


t^ to to lO •* ■«< ■* >o 






ogoggogo 


c« Ml = 






OOOCDCCOOOO 




OC5C;rH(M(M.*.-i 




^_.fl< 10^40_IC -- .* rjo 


O go3 




o" w co"art^crt^t^ 


2 >• 




icnioioiftinioira 






OOOOOOOo 


i» 




oooooooo 




03 


to «5 »i iri ;o ■* o to 


B 


GCOXCCI-.COC5.^** 


■". "i ~ '-i *l '^i, '":. "^ 


^ P tj a) 


"3 


oTirf o o oo"-^.Hr 


> 


t^COO— lOOOOl^ 


[orses, 

and m 

ove 

montb 


rt i-H e-II-l e^ .H rt rH 




«» 




t^— »Ct-00O^'^t— 


o 


C-. in M t- O CO •* ^ 


t^*-* C'l t- » :o o CD 


n 


rH '^f c) (m' ffj »f (^^ cf 


^ 




OOOOOOOO 


5 s*£i 




oooo_oooo 


en frr 


ij'03 


O !D ^ -f o ti OC 00 

<M C-) o rt <= 4: ^ » 


>i .aj 


'^5 

2^ 


c := » O 


^1 :D 15 CO IC lO f-H 01 
00 C^ "O to of of t-^ co" 




^> 


t- cc t- o> — ■* ■* « 


COCOCO-^lCi— lrH»-< 




¥* 






OOOOOOOO 


c 




OOOOOOOO 






c^' (?i o CD ^ CO iji o 


Sl 




OOOjrHiC-anCOCO 




rt t^ t- CO C5 lO CO ■<1' 


m S3 








^H(M»0^*-ltOrHC^ 




lO CO lO "O C) CO 5-1 r- 






CO CO CO tC ^ .^ ■* t— 


C/3 






sT 




OOOOOOOO 




OOOOOOOO 


Cj . 




o d cc d d ^ CO e-i 


*J 03 




CI r- 1— r-. t^ ^1 CO c» 


to S 




T-iO O^CO O (M C-I_-H^ 








00 ■*' d'co' co"oo' ooco^ 


-H c5 




O Ol »-' O lO OC »C CO 


eS > 




CO — OiOOCOCOt' 






03 




C0-*-<)'COCOt-CO00 


tf 




^rt^rH^WrH,-( 






OOO ^ • • • • 






OOO . . • ; ; 




« 


(^^^ ',','.'. ', 




eS 


rl — 00 




H 


ooco t- 

«» : : : : : 


03 




bO 


•ri 




O 


a 


rtoin ',.'.• '. 


P 


\n-*-« ' '• •■■ 




« 






m 


• ' • ; • 


_03 


OCO O • ; I • • 










d 


t-t-t- • • • ; i 




a 








ogggggog 








03 


aSiio'6'S<6<S 




3 


OOOOOOOO 




CO r^co_io^co__-*_co -H_ 










c3 


e.i"cot-^eo'o'"'>j<"oo e-f 


, in 


t> 


f-COCO CO^IN lOO 


C500r^(N<M?^M 






«»^"rtrHr-ri-T-H^ 


O 






Ph 




cot^coifteo^co^ 

Ul CD t^ CO O "* CO 5) 
t^ CO^CO CO .-< (M »o^o 




6 






!?; 






ofd'cd^cr&fcTiM'" 


•^uapiea.!- 


uou 




puB ijuai 


nsaa 


CS O C2 02 ^ O O O) 
CO 00 CO CO « CO C» CO 



AMOUNT OF TAXATION. 



679 



O 

xn 

W 
cc 
in 
< 

O 

Q 

P2 
*^ 
O 

m 

w 

;^ 

o 
I— I 

H 
<d 

t^ 
H 

O 

H 

<J 
H 
<Ji 

P3 

P 
PQ 
< 






•pgjpunq jaci 
XBl JO 81'Ba 



lip 



O 3'3 O OS 



'd .' !» 

c s S a . 

"" 03 2 O OJ 



a> d 



otot^co-^^ioo 



H CO -^ t— 00 lO (M 



^ -'t "^ o O O -- ._ 



t- -X t^ O) -* <M O O 

i^f oT >o r-^ »o 'Ti" t-^ -^ 

tD-a-OOOO-^M 



>-icomicai'*ooo 

C! I- 03 !» t^ t- OO O 



«» 



§©oo oo oo 
_ o oo oooo 
o <?! "^ '?' o ^i CO :o 

t-T c^ c^ oT -H T-T CO ^ 

Ot-MCOOiCO-^OO 
-?« C-l ©I C» ^1 C-1 C^ CO 

«© 



oooooooo 
oooooooo 

OtOO'^OOOO 
»C t- O O 'O to o >o 
tJH^tr^C. C2 O' C» — * CD^ 

■-■)■*« -^ I- o to 
o^ CO :o :d to :o :o r^ 



coco- 



oo oo ooo 
o o o o o o o 
o oo oo dc5 
o o o o o o o 

Oi O^-^CO^'-' "^ o^ 



OOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOO 

OOOOOtO"-^^ 

ooooo-^o» 
in ^t' o o ^^cj^ 
o" o^ ^ t-^ o CO c: co" 

XC50— 'COtO'rtHCO 
C-1 01 CO CO Ol W 01 CI 



oooo 

CDcitO-"* 

•M iri -H t- 



oooooooo 
oooooooo 

COOcioOONCO 

■^C0'>a"eo(»x05i0 



t-(MMiCOOC5COCO 
■-lf-lr-lr-l'*e<'*CO 



OOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOO 

o c-i oi o o ■^ o o 

■^COt— OC-TMCOt- 
OOiOrHOOmC)'* 



■^ *0 IC CI CO (M CO lO 

o — ooi-Ht-incj'* 






1^ <l) 

CO bo 



as 

c3 3 



SB M 

O ci 



680 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Assessors' Oath. 

We, the Assessors of the City of Manchester, do solemnly 
swear that in making the invoice for the purpose of assessing 
the foregoing taxes, we appraise all taxable property at its full 
value, and as we would appraise the same in payment of a just 
debt due from a solvent debtor. So kelp us God. 

Valuation and Taxes. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on the real 
and personal estate, within the city of Manchester, N. H., for 
the year 1897, was as follows: 

Valuation. Rate per 81,000 Tax. 

Eeal estate $35,831,832 $20.80 $537,302.10 

Personal property. 3,363,014 69,950.01 

$29,194,846 $607,252.11 

No. of polls, 12,921 1,292,100 20.80 26,875.69 

Totals $30,486,946 $634,127.80 

The share distributed to Manchester of the 
amount of tax assessed, as per returns made 
by the corporations to state treasurer: 

On railroads $35,255.86 

On savings banks 48,516.24 

On insurance companies 2,964.75 

On literaiy fund 3,511.68 

Grand tax total $724,376.33 

For further information in relation to taxes collected by 
the state, see State Treasurer s report. 



VALUATION AND TAXES. 



681 



TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



Teak. 




a 
§2 . 

O 03 1^ 

.2eiS 

Q 


4) 
■■i . 

Sao 


O 

s 

SCO 


Taxes of 1S85 


$1,205.71 

1,264.85 

1,163.94 

1,580.13 

1,397.03 

1,687.08 

1,968.41 

2,588.95 

4,106.58 

3,578.13 

5,538.26 

i 56,758.63 \ 

\ 828.10 ) 

634,127.80 






$1,205.71 
1,264.85 
1,163.94 


Taxes of 1886 






Taxes of 1887 












1,580.13 


Taxes of 1S89 






1,397.03 
1,687.08 


Taxes of 1890 






Taxes of 1891 






1,968.41 


Taxes of 1892 




$1.95 

9.60 

46.28 

399.88 

51,373.85 

564,731.57 


2,587.00 
4,096.98 
3,531.85 
5,138.38 

5,247.10 

68,737.42 


Taxes of 1893 




Taxes of 1894 




Taxes of 1895 




Taxes of 1896 


$965.78 
658.81 


Taxes of 1897 




Totals 


$717,793.60 


$1,624.58 


$616,563.13 


$99,605.88 





TAX VALUATIONS, ETC., FROM 1890 TO 1897, INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 



Valuation. 



Taxes. 



No. polls. Poll tax. ^l^^^l^^ 



1890. 
1891. 
1893. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 



$24,207,740 
24,872,492 
25,932,044 
27,439,742 
28,391,710 
28,861,122 
29,443,668 
30,486,946 



$462,869.17 
443,541.76 
506,465.17 
507,640.68 
505,372.44 
502,183.02 
547,651.50 
634,127.80 



9,723 
10,367 
10,673 
11,835 
12,103 
12,244 
12,583 
12,921 



$1.91 
1.78 
1.95 
1.85 
1.78 
1.74 
1.86 
2.08 



$100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



For years prior to 1890, see reports of 1890 and 1891. 



682 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Settlement of Account of George E. Morrill, Tax Col- 
lector for City of Manchester, N. H., June 1 , 1 896. 

Amount out- Balance out- 

outstanding June Collected. standing June 
1, 1S95. 1, 1896. 

Tax list, 1885 $1,205.71 $1,205.71 

1886 l,26i.85 1,264.85 

1887 1,163.94 1,163.94 

1888 1,580.13 1,580.13 

1889 1,397.03 1,397.03 

1890 1,687.08 , 1,687.08 

1891 1,968.41 1,968.41 

1892 2,594.80 $5.85 2,588.95 

1893 4,134.33 27.75 4,106.58 

1894 3,928.81 317.08 3,578.13 

Amount collected $350.68 

Credited by cash, as per treasurer's 

receipt No. 202 $350.68 

Interest collected, 1892 $1.62 

1893 5.35 

1894 27.25 

1895 997.09 

$1,031.31 
Credited by cash, as per treasurers 

receipt Xo. 200 $1,031.31 

1895. De. 

June 1. Balance due on settlement of 1893 list $4,259.48 

1896. Ce. 

May 12. By cash paid treasurer 

per receipt Xo. 68. . . $170.00 

By cash paid treasurer 

per receipt No. 127.. 421.79 

$591.79 



December 31, 1896, due on 1893 list. . . . $3,667.69 



ACCOUNT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 683 

1895. De. 

To warrant resident list $501,170.67 

warrant non-resident list 1,013.35 

voluntary list 613.13 

$502,796.15 

1895 and 1896. Ce. 

By cash paid treasurer as per vouch- 
ers Nos. 83, 100, 130, 148, 160, 
201, in year 1895; and receipts 
Xos. 79, 161, 201, in year 1896. . $496,094.14 

By abatements " . 1,163.75 

unpaid taxes, June 1, 1896. . . . 5.538.26 

$502,796.15 

City of Manchestee to Geoege E. Moeeill. 

De. 

To salary for year ending June 1, 1896 $1,650.00 
commission on old taxes 19.20 

$1,669.20 

Ce. 

By cash paid by treasurer, on account 

of salary $800.00 

balance paid by treasurer, as per bill 869.20 

$1,669.20 

Manchestee, N. H., December 31, 1896. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George 
E. Morrill, tax collector of said Manchester, and find the 
same correct, as above stated. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



684 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Settlement of Account of George E. Morrill, Tax Col- 
lector for City of Manchester, N. H., June 1 , 1 897. 



1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1893. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 



Amount out- 

outstanOing June 

1, 1896. 


Collected. 


Balance out- 
standing June 
1, 1897. 


$1,205.71 




$1,205.71 


1,264.85 




1,264.85 


1,163.94 




1,163.94 


1,580.13 




1,580.13 


1,397.03 




1,397.03 


1,687.08 




1,687.08 


1,968.41 




1,968.41 


2,588.95 


$1.95 


2,587.00 


4,106.58 


9.60 


4;096.98 


3,578.13 


46.28 


3,531.85 


3,928.81 


399.88 


3,528.93 



Amount collected $457.71 

Credited by cash, as per treasurer's 
receipt No. 135 $ 457.71 

Interest collected $1,449.91 

Credited by cash, as per treasurer's 
receipt No. 136 $1,449.91 

1896. Dr. 

June 1. Balance due on settlement of 1893 list $4,259.48 

1897. Cr. 

May 10. By cash paid treasurer, 

per receipt No. 81... $85.00 

$85.00 

June 1, 1897, due on 1893 list $4,174.48 

1896. Dr. 

To warrant resident list $546,121.64 

warrant non-resident list 1,529.86 

voluntary list 828.10 

$548,479.60 



ACCOUNT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 685 

1896, 1897. Ck. 

By cash paid treasurer, as per vouch- 
ers Nos. 128, 143, 165, 167, 210, 
in year 1896; and receipts Nos. 
51, 86, 127, 134, in year 1897. . . $541,678.29 

By abatements, vouchers Nos. 189, 

128 : 1,554.21 

By unpaid taxes, June 1, 1897 5,247.10 

$548,479.60 

CiTT OF Manchester to George E. Morrill. 
Dr. 

To salary for year ending June 1, 1897 $1,650.00 
commission on old taxes 25.76 

$1,675.76 

By cash paid by treasurer, on account 

of salary $800.00 

balance paid by treasurer, as per bill 875.76 

$1,675.76 

Manchester, IST. H., August 2, 1897. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George 
E. Morrill, tax collector of said Manchester, and find the same 
correct, as above stated. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



686 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions 
from Taxation. 

Constitution or New Hampshire, Article 82, Page 38, 
Public Statutes. 

encourageilent of literature, etc. 

Article 82. "Knowledge and learning generally diffused 
through a community being essential to the preservation of a 
free government, and spreading the opportunities and advan- 
tages of education through the various parts of the country 
being highly conducive to promote this end, it shall be the 
duty of the legislators and magistrates, in all future periods of 
this government, to cherish the interest of literature and the 
sciences, and all seminaries and public schools; to encourage 
private and public institutions, rewards, and immunities for 
the promotion of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, 
manufactures, and natural history of the country; to counte- 
nance and inculcate the principles of humanity and general 
benevolence, public and private charity, industry and econ- 
omy, honesty and punctuality, sincerity, sobriety, and all social 
affections and generous sentiments among the people; pro- 
vide-d, nevertheless, that no money raised by taxation shall ever 
be granted or applied for the use of schools or institutions of 
any religious sect or denomination." 

Public Statutes, Chapter 55. 

Section 2. "Eeal estate, whether improved or unim- 
proved, and whether owned by residents or others, is liable to 
be taxed, except houses of public worship, twenty-five hun- 
dred dollars of the value of parsonages owned by religious 
societies and occupied by their pastors, school houses, semi- 
naries of learning, real estate of the United States, state, or 
town used for public purposes, and almshouses on county 
farms." 



EXEMPTIONS FROM TAXATION. 687 

Section 11. "Towns may by vote exempt from taxation 
for a term not exceeding ten years any manufacturing estab- 
lishment proposed to be erected or put in operation therein, 
and the capital to be used in operating the same, unless such 
establishment has been previously exempted from taxation by 
some town." 

OPINION OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

58 ]^. H. Eep. page 623. "The exemption in each case is 
limited to ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole 
power of taxation would be the destruction of government; 
and the dangerous tendency of legislation suspending any part 
of that power, for any period, is manifest. P. Banh v. Bill- 
ings, 4 Pet. 514, 561. So long as the existing laws remain 
unrepealed, and the constitutional construction heretofore 
adopted remains unchanged, contracts hereafter made under 
these laws and that construction will be valid. If the legis- 
lature for any reason wish to prevent the making of any more 
such contracts, their object can be accomplished by a repeal 
of the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective 
charters as "being of the nature of a public charity," as fol- 
lows: 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute Women, N. H. Laws of 
1889, chapter 199. 

Elliot Hospital, X. H. Laws of 1881, chapter 178. 

Manchester Women's Aid and Belief Society, organized in 
January, 1875, N. H. Laws, 1891, chapter 283. 

Orphanage and Home for Old Ladies (Catholic) on Hanover 
street, N. H. Laws, 1883, chapter 56. 



688 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Schedule of Property used for Religious, Charitable, 
and Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Tax- 
ation by Law, not including that Owned by the City 
of Manchester. 

Convent, Sisters Jesns Mary, French Catholic; 
East Spruce street, near Beech: 

Building $10,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 2,600.00 

$12,600.00 



Convent, Sisters of Mercy, Catholic; 415 Union 
street, corner Laurel: 

Building $30,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 



Mount St. Marys' Academy, Catholic; from con- 
vent lot east to Beech street: 

Building $25,000.00 

31,500 square feet of land 9,150.00 



Lot south side of Laurel street, corner Union 
street, Catholic; McDonald school: 

Building $35,000.00 

10,800 square feet of land 5,000.00 



Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' 
Home, Catholic; Amherst and Hanover streets: 

Building '.....'... $14,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 30,375.00 



St. Patrick's Orphan Asylums, Catholic; 184 
Hanover street: 

Building $47,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 40,500.00 



St. Joseph's High School, Catholic; Lowell street, 
Corner of Birch: 

Building ". $12,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 



$36,300.00 



$34,450.0a 



$40,000.00 



$44,375.00 



$87,500.00 



$20,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 689 

Union-street school, Catholic; corner Union and 
Laurel streets: 

Building $4,000.00 

5,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

$G,500.00 



St. Agnes' school. Catholic; corner Cedar and 
Pine streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

20,000 square feet of land 3,200.00 

$15,200.00 

'St. Joseph's school for girls. Catholic; corner Pine 
and Lowell streets: 

Building $10,000.00 

Land included in cathedral lot $10,000.00 

Convent of Holy Angels, French Catholic; Beau- 
port street, corner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building $15,000.00 

22,500 square feet of land 4,500.00 

$19,500.00 



Orphanage school, Beauport, Wayne, and Put- 
nam streets; French Catholic: 

Building $25,000.00 

30,000 square feet of land 6,000.00 

St. Augustine's academy, French Catholic; corner 
Beech and Sj^ruce streets: 

Building $8,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 4,500.00 

St. Mary's parochial school, French Catholic; cor- 
ner Wayne and Cartier streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

25,000 square feet of land 2,000.00 



Eesidence priest St. Augustine's church, French 
Catholic; ISTo. 383 Beech street: 

Building $6,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 1,875.00 

$7,875.00 

44 



$31,000.00 



$12,500.00 



$14,000.00 



$2,500.00 



690 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Orphan children's school, parish St. Augustine; 
251, 253 Lake avenue: 

Building $13,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Eesidence priest St. Anne's church. Catholic; No. 
231 Merrimack street: 

Building $5,000.00 

8,820 square feet of land 2,646.00 



$17,000.00 



$7,646.00 
Eesidence Catholic bishop; No. 145 Lowell street: 

Building $40,000.00 

24,000 square feet of land 12,000.00 



$52,000.00 
Eesidence priest St. George's church, French 
Catholic; Orange street, corner Pine: 

■ Building $2,500.00 

10,000 square feet of land 4,000.00 

$6,500.00 
Eesidence priest St. Mary's church, French Cath- 
olic; 376 Beauport street, West Manchester: 

Building $2,500.00 

5,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$3,500.00 
St. Anne's church. Catholic; Union street, corner 
Merrimack: 

Building $30,000.00 

10,180 square feet of land 5,090.00 



$2,500.00 



St. Augustine's church, French Catholic; Beech 
street, corner East Spruce: 

Building $28,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 3,250.00 



$35,090.00 



$31,250.00 



PKOPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 691 

St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel^ Catliolic; Pine 
street, corner Lowell: 

Building $70,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 30,375.00 

$100,375.00 

St. Mary's church, French Catholic; Beauport 

street, corner AYa.yne, West Manchester: 

Building $25,000.00 

70,000 square feet of land 14,000.00 

$39,000.00 

St. Eaphael's church and school, CTerman Catho- 

Ijc; Third street, corner Ferry, West Manchester: 

Building $35,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 3,400.00 

$38,400.00 

St. George's church, French Catliolic; Pine street, 

corner Orange: 

Building J $75,000.00 

18,690 square feet of land 7,614.00 

$82,614.00 

St. Patrick's church and school, Catholic; Kelley 

street, Cartier street, and Coolidge avenue: 

School building $20,000.00 

56,281 square feet of land 4,502.00 

$24,502.00 

First Baptist church; Union street, corner Con- 
cord: 

Building $28,000.00 

11,250 square feet of land 6,750.00 

$34,750.00 

First Freewill Baptist church; Merrimack street, 

corner Chestnut: 

Building $12,400.00 

12,600 square feet of land 12,600.00 

$25,000.00 



692 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Second Baptist church; Merrimack street, near 
Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

9,450 square feet of land 3,780.00 



People's Baptist church; Chestnut street, corner 
Concord: 

Building $8,000.00 

3,200 square feet of land 3,000.00 



First Congregational church; Hanover street, cor- 
ner Union: 

Building $30,000.00 

43,300 square feet of land 34,560.00 



Second Congregational church; Market street, 
comer Franklin: 

Building $35,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 19,000.00 



Third Congregational church; South Main street, 
corner Milford, West Manchester: 

Building $8,000.00 

33,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 



First M. E. church; Valley street, corner Jewett: 

Building $8,000.00 

11,400 square feet of land 1,000.00 



St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, corner 
Amherst: 

Building $35,000.00 

10,010 square feet of land 6,000.00 



Trinity M. E. church; School street: 

Building $3,000.00 

13,176 square feet of land 3,000.00 



$13,780.00 



$10,000.00 



$64,560.00 



$44,000.00 



$11,000.00 



$9,000.00 



$31,000.00 



$5,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 693 

St. James M. E. church; Penacook street, corner 
Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

11,000 square feet of land 2,200.00 



Grace church. Episcopal; Lowell street, corner 
Pine: 

Building $20,000.00 

9,300 square feet of land 6,975.00 



First Unitarian church; Concord street, corner 
Beech: 

Building $24,000.00 

13,500 square feet of land 6,000.00 



$11,200.00 



$26,975.00 



$30,000.00 



First Universalist church; Lowell street, near Elm: 

Building $17,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 15,000.00 



Christian church, Protestant; Pine street, corner 
Merrimack: 

Building $6,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 6,700.00 



First Presbyterian church, German; Second street, 
corner Bath, West Manchester: 

Building ." $3,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 



Swedish Lutheran church, Protestant; Sagamore, 
corner Pine: 

Building $7,500.00 

10,950 square feet of land 2,000.00 



Swedish Evangelical Mission; Pine street, corner 
Orange: 

Building $6,500.00 

Land 4,100.00 



$32,000.00 



$12,700.00 



$5,500.00 



$9,500.00 



$10,600.00 



694 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Swedish Baptist church; Arlington street, near 
Maple: 

Building $5,000.00 

4,432 square feet of land 1,100.00 

Second Advent church; Amlierst street, between 
Pine and Union: 

Building $5,100.00 

4,500 square feet of land 3,375.00 

City Mission chapel, Protestant; Merrimack street, 
corner Beech: 

Building $7,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,000.00 

Westminster Presbyterian church; Brook street, 
corner Hazel: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 



South Manchester Union chapel, Protestant; Elm 
street, south: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,747 square feet of land 1,000.00 

Episcopal Mission church; North Main street, 
corner School, West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

19,412 square feet of land 4,000.00 



Eesidence pastor St. Paul's M. E. church; Union 
street, near Amherst: 

Building $3,000.00 



Eesidence pastor First Congregational church; 
Ko. 590 Beech street, near Bridge: 

Building $5,000.00 

8,100 square feet of land 2,400.00 



$7,400.00 



$6,100.00 



$8,475.00 



$13,000.00 



$17,500.00 



$3,500.00 



$7,500.00 



$2,500,00 



$2,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 695 

Eesidence pastor Grace Episcopal church; corner 
of Harrison and Union streets: 

Building $6,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 3,750.00 

$2,500.00 



$9,750.00 

German School Society; Third, Bath, and Ferry 
streets: 

Building $4,500.00 

10,187 square feet of land 3,500.00 



$7,000.00 
Elliot Hospital, Protestant; East Manchester: 

Building $23,000.00 

Land 7,000.00 

$30,000.00 

Elliot Hospital lot; Hanover street, corner Chest- 
nut: ' 

Building $3,000.00 

Land 13,000.00 

$16,000.00 

Elliot Hospital: 

Land and buildings. Main street $4,000.00 
Land and building, Quincy street 2,500.00 

$6,500.00 

Women's Aid Home, Pearl street, corner Beech: 

Building $15,000.00 

57,530 square feet of land 10,000.00 

$25,000.00 

Manchester Children's Home; Webster street: 

Building $20,000.00 

55,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

$22,500.00 



696 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Eesidence pastor Swedish .Lutheran church; 
Sagamore street, corner Pine: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,200 square feet of land 1,030.00 



$4,020.00 
Gale Home: 

One half Manchester Bank 

block, Elm street $38,000.00 

One half Martin's block. Elm 

street 25,000.00 

Land and building, Pearl street, 

corner Ash 25,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$88,000.00 

EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 

Church property, Catholic $351,231.00 

Convent property, Catholic 68,400.00 

Parochial residences. Catholic 12,500.00 

Parochial schools. Catholic ,. 200,650.00 

Hospitals and other charitable in- 
stitutions 131,875.00 

$764,656.00 

Church property, Protestant $441,640.00 

Parochial residences, Protestant. . . 10,000.00 

Private school property, Protestant 7,000.00 
Hospitals and other charitable in- 
stitutions 188,000.00 

$646,640.00 

TAXABLE. 

Land and buildings. Catholic $65,021.00 

Land and buildings, Protestant. . . 14,170.00 

$79,191.00 



Total exempt and taxable $1,490,487.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT PROM TAXATION. 



697 



o 

w 
p-i 

W 

CO 

W 

o 

« 

Ph 
O 

;zi 

I— I 

H 
O 

<; 

fin 

o 

Q 

02 

P 

tH 

H 

P-i 
O 
P5 

Ph 

fa 
O 

.P 
P 

O 



as 



s a 
M a 



ooooo 



ooooo o o oo 

OOC^MCq CO CO r^ 



>«owM ^5 o eoco eo co»i< lo >o^t- 

)0300 o o oo o oo o ooo 






S8 



'X'OOOO 00 OQ 0000 00 00 '-«u 00 000000 



r^iD^ \S y^ C^C^ T^ w^tft t-T rn'^i-T 



Q^O < 









^ 



bf a- 



* rt aj ^ O 



to ' £'~ 

■0-2 s =* S 
= 5! — = §"0 : 

« ■- 'C "O ^ ^ 13 







^ ii 



Sosa 



2 3-0 n 

,Q^ O 3 « 
» 3 .i- -O .5 -O cs 

1*,°'*^ 33 3 a 



■M - 
of 

a « 



•° = -J 

3 avj 

lis 



I- 



^ © o 

= 21 






« '^ 



H M « 



£ 3 

« o ,^ 
Hen H 



3 t< 

a" 



« s 

•3 .5 

a a 

a a 






698 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TABULAR STATEMENT OP BONDED DEBT, CITY OF MAN- 
CHESTER, N. H., DEC. 31, 1897. 



•< 


■M a, 

(U'O 31 


a>H- 
«<^ 

3 ^ 


a 

(0 

si 


II 


-w oo 

«'2 


$70,000 issued Oct. 
31, 1863. $50,000 
issued July 1,1864 
Six per cent, to 
fund debts. 


Issued July 1, 1881, 
four per cent, to 
build McGregor 
bridge. 


-*i 
'^ a 

3_ 

iio 


1890 


$400,000 
400,000 
300,000 
300,000 
300,000 
200,000 
200,000 

1 100,000 


$200,000 
200,000 
300,000 
300,000 
350,000 
500,000 
500,000 
600,000 






$13,850 
18,850 
20,000 
26,000 
31,000 
36,250 
42,250 
50,000 


$120,000 

120,000 

120,000 

120,C00 

50,000 


$60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 


$155,000 
155,000 
155 000 


1891 






1892 






1893 
1894 
1895 


$100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 


$100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 


155,000 
155,000 
155,000 
155,000 
155,000 


1896 




1897 











c 
*i o 
CXI 

«a 
§,2 

u > 
13 O 
O -I 


Four per cent 
schoolhouse 
bonds. 


Four per cent 
Granite- street 
bridge bonds. 


«-« 
'35 to 

S fe fi 


Amount of six per 
cent bonds re- 
funded at four 
per cent. 




Amount of six per 
cent city bonds 
on whicli interest 
has ceased, not 
yet presented for 
payment. 


Amount of six per 
cent water bonds 
on whicli interest 
has ceased, not 
yet presented for 
payment. 








$99,900 

100 

99,900 

65,500 

50,000 


$100,000 


$948,850 
953,850 
955,000 
1,195,600 
1,296,000 
1,. 571, 250 
1,917.250 
1,890,000 




$100 
















100,000 




100 


$100,000 
200,000 
300,000 
400,000 
400,000 






$4,500 


100 






100,000 




$20,000 
230,000 
220.000 








$130,000 
105,000 

























* $400,000 water bonds, issued January 1, 1872; $100,000 of these bonds re- 
funded January 1, 1887; $100,000 re-funded January 1, 1892; $10u,000 re-funded 
January 1, 1897. 

t $200,000 water bonds, issued July 1. 1874; $100,000 of these bonds re-funded 
July 1, 1890, and $100,000 re-funded July 1, 1895. 

J $2,200 water bonds, issued in 1884, and other additional bonds each j-ear. 

The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the cemeteries. Bonds 
payable July 1, 1913. 



BONDED DEBT. 699 

Remarks. — The city guarantees the perjDetiial care of lots 
in the cemeteries of the city to parties who pay $100 and 
upward. There are $50,000 in cemetery bonds, so called, not 
negotiable, in the hands of the city treasurer, which are in- 
cluded in the $1,890,000. 

Total amount of bonded debt, including ceme- 
tery bonds $1,890,000.00 

Net indebtedness for water purposes 900,000.00 

Net debt after deducting water debt. . $990,000.00 

As shown in the assessors' books for the year 
1897: 

The assessed value of personal property, in- 
cluding poll tax $4,655,114.00 

The assessed value of real estate 25,831,832.00 

Total value for taxation $30,486,946.00 

Tax rate, 2.08 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt 

for water purposes) to assessed valuation. . . 3.575 

Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt 

for water purposes) to assessed valuation. . . 6.527 

Population, census of 1890 43,983 

Population, census of 1880 32,458 

Increase of population in ten years .... 11,525 

Increase of population since 1890 (estimated) 16,000 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been promptly paid at 
maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being payable 
in gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

A sinkinof fund was established in 1893. 



700 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the 
water-works is limited to the sum of $600,000 by section 6, 
chapter 70, New Hampshire Laws of 1871, entitled "An act 
to enable the city of Manchester to establish water-works," 
except as further extended an amount of $300,000, by laws of 
1891, chapter 26; and $200,000, by laws of 1895, chapter 172. 



BONDED DEBT. 



701 









w 






a 




















izi 






;z5 




















































h 




















OS 






o 


















c^ 




m 






33 


















tn - . 


05 






33 
















-(!)-- 


cS 


- 


' S" " 


oS 


• * •* ■• 


*•'•'• 


« >• 


* 






3 


o 


s 




o 


s 














^ 


s 


C2 




3 


s" 
















s 


, S-. 


o 




s.-. 


o 














OS 


























o 


03 


o 




OJ 


o 














P. 


n 


o 


fa 




o 


C9 














(U 




6 


. 




e 
















^ 


J^ 


o 


^ 




c 


M 












H 


« 




_tn 


a 




95 


5 












02 


S 


m 


o 


M 




£ 


tt 












M 




^, . - - 


!-l 


44 


_ 


j^ , - 


.a! 


. ,. » , 


. , . - 


• 


^ 




H 
S5 

M 




























o 




o 




in 


o 














3 




3 




9 


to 
















.4_i 


4J 


^J 




^ 


4J 
















"^ 


< 


< 




<1 


-=i 














ci 


3 
























<B,0 


C 
























.3 OS 


c3- 3 - - 
















































ft 


a 






















2^^ 


;3 
























oS ® S 
03 ft* 


-*-*-*lO-.i( 


Tfi «0«0«D 


■* 


■* 


■* ■*-*■* 


'^ 


hK-*^-* 


HXrfH Hj"^ 


-* 


Tt< 




gd . 


lO -» CO M ->■! 


t- e-K?)*! 


o 


lO 


t^ rHrHrH"" 


* 


■'lOt-CirH 


eOT)llf5CD'~ 


- -^ >o 






4) aa 










o oSo.^'So'^ 


O O OrH 


53 o oS,t 








05 03 !7S 03 O 


Oi o5Ci ai 


05 


5 


OS O 05 05 


"S C 5" 


C5 




1-H 1— < rH r-» t-( 


r-1 r-1 T-H I— < 


'H 


rH 


Ooo 3 


rH r-i rH rH 


rHrH rH rH g 


i °*^" 






P C OS 

•r: >> 


CD"-^rHi-rT-< 


rt rH-,,-« 


'^ 


rn" 


rt-rH-rH-rH- 


r^r^rn'r-^'^ 


§il^ 


-h" 




as ^ d 










el? lo'-'o oc 


rH 


d'S o' 






c3 ^ 


o« >^e 




>. 




'u 


2o-| 


>> 




Q a) m 






3 








rn-S 3 


3 
•-5 






ooooo 


o o o 


^ 


o o o 


oooo 


oooo 


o o 


o 


o 






o o o 




o o o 


oooo 


oooo 


oo 


o 


o 




o oooo 


o ° ^ 




o o o 


oooo 


oooo 


o o 


o 


o^ 


*WOX 


ooooo 


o o o 


o 


o o ic" 


o'ooio 


oooo 


oo 


o 


o 




lO lO ooo 


o o o 


o 


o o o 


la lOin 


oooo 


ooo 


"* 


7¥[ 




«» MrHrt 


rH 1— ( rH 


^ 




*"" 




i-H rH rHi-H 






CO 




ooooo 


o ooo 


Q 


o 


o ooo 


g 


oooo 


oooo 


oo 


o 






ooooo 


o coo 






o ir5 lO o 


oooo 


oooo 


o o 


o 






o__oo oo 


O 0,0 o 




o 


o 


oooo 


oooo 


oo 


o 




•lunoray 


o'cTcTo o 


O OrtM" 


o 


o" 


cT rH-oTcT 


icT 


oooio" 


o'ooo 


o o 


o* 






IC m o o o 


O MCO 


o 


o 


O ^rHCO 


o 


lOiO to 


oooo 


ooo 


^ 






^ tH rH iH 












^ 
















4© 


•S 


^ 


m 




€©■ 


5 








ooooo 


o ooo 


o 


o 


o ooo 


o 


oooo 


oooo 


o o 


o 




•uoii 


ooooo 


o ooo 


o 


o 


o ooo 


o 


oooo 




oo 


8,, 




«oo_^oo_ 


o !=liOO_ 


o 


o 




o_ 


oooo 




o o 




-TBuiraouaQ 


S " 








r-- 






rH-rH-rH-rH- 


*-H tH 






•jaqranj>i 


ooooo 


O O (M CO 


o 


o 


o ioaci 


o 


oooio 


oooo 


o o 


o 




l« lOOOO 


O CO«D«> 


o 


o 


o ^coco 


o 


ir^ o »o 


oooo 


oco 


tH 




























d 


CO 








rn 

-a 








i, 






o 


^ • - * - 












TO 


o5 








3 
S 


5 

03 












o- - - 

J2 


0' ~ • 


o 








■g- - - - 












5' " ■ 


ft 


03 






a> 


O -*CO« "M 


— ' — 01 Ol Ol 




. 




to 


ir5 lO IC lO 


W-* W CO 


io»« 


~co" 










05 o; o cv c: 


t- T3 (- r- ?. 


i| 


"o-n 


r^ --3 CO CO CO 

?g*S22 


o; 


oooo X) 00 


cioo^as 


oS 








00 GC 00 00 00 


§5 


00 


00 00 GO 00 


«j CO 00 CO 


00 00 
























"-I'D ... 


rtT; 


rH-C 


rH 'C ... 


. 


.... 


■^ » > » 


. 


^ 




tOT-TrH ,4'r-r 


.C'HrtrH 


-a 




. CrHrHrH 














r-* 


r-i g 


1-H g 


"^ a 


rH g 




rr 


.— . 








«■» ** y'c £5*1* d 


4) 3 « 


dv.b 

o! « 3 




ft 


3 §» 


3 








M 


Qos5<;t?i?K»? 


•?pi 


i^i; 


i-.'^hX 




<J 


•^•^< 


^ 







702 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE BONDED DEBT. 



Year, 


Six 
per ct. 
water 
bonds. 


Four 
per ct. 

water 
bonds. 


Four 
and a 
half 
and 5 
per ct. 
water 
bonds. 


Five 
per ct. 

ceme- 
tery 

bonds. 


Six 

aerct. 

to 

fund 
debt. 


Four 
per ct. 
to b'ld 

Mc. 
Gregor 
bridge. 


Four 
perct. 

to 
fund 
debt. 


Four 

per ct. 

Imp. 

bonds. 


Four 
per ct. 
school 

bonds 

and 

Granite 

bridge. 


Total 

of 
annual 
interest. 


1890.... 


$27,000 
24,000 
18,000 
18,000 
18,000 
18,000 
12,000 
9,000 


$6,000 
8,000 
12,000 
12,000 
14,000 
14,000 
20,000 
22,000 




$9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 


$623.75 
813.92 
1,000.00 
1,041 66 
1,550.00 
1,812.50 
2,112.50 
2,500.00 


$7,200 
7,200 
7,200 


$2,400 
2,400 
9..4nn 


$6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 






$49,423.75 


1891.... 






48,613.92 


1892.... 






46,800.00 
46,841.66 
59,650.00 
68,712.50 
82,612.50 
80,600.00 


1893.... 


7,200 '> "inn 






1894.... 
1895.... 
1896.... 
1897.... 




2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 


$8,000 
12,000 
16,000 
16,000 


$4,800 
14,400 
13,000* 



SUMJIARY OF CITY DEBT. 



Amount of bonded debt January 1, 1897 $1,917,350.00 

Amount of cemetery bonds issued in 1897. . . 7,750.00 

Accrued interest on bonded debt 40,300.00 

$1,965,300.00 
Amount of security note or bond f 100,000.00 

$3,065,300.00 
Amount of bonded debt paid in 1897 35,000.00 

Total indebtedness December 31,1897. $3,030,300.00 

AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Xet cash on hand December 31, 1897 $133,053.37 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1897 56,796.33 

* This amount will be reduced $1,400 annually by payment of principal. 
t This loan was made by authority of resolution passed January 26, 1894, and renewed 
March 3, 1896. 



BONDED DEBT. 703 

Stock of Suncook Valley Eailroad, estimated 

value $14,500.00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1898 139,189.79 



$332,538.39 



BONDED DEBT. 



Total net indebtedness January 1, 1898 $1,697,761.61 

Total net indebtedness January 1, 1897 1,730,476.43 

Decrease $33,714.83 



704 



REPORT 0¥ THE CITY AUDITOR. 



m 




W 




i—t 




H 




cc 




-< 




P-( 




tq 




H 




< 




> 




1— 1 




ei 




(1^ 




>H 




» 




g 




-91 


o 


fc 


u 




t3 


t^ 


w 


1— 1 


>H 


Q 


H 


1— 1 


H 


ti4 


«^ 


D 


W 



o 

o 
o 

o) 

o 

I— ( 

cq 
O 

D 

P-i 



a5 

s 


Battery occupies first and sec- 
ond floor and basement. 

Gnards occupy third floor. 

Ward meetings are lield in bat- 
tery room on second floor. , 


s 

S 
o 




05 

3 
o 
o 


CO 

a s 

O 
O 

U -H 


S 

o 
o 

O 


u 

0) 
S CO 

2 1 

« s 


c" 
o 

o 
O 
k1 


« 

<» 

u 
« 

« 

S3 


< 


6 



CD 

u 

s 


2 

d 

2 
"3 

m 

60 

.s 

SI 

as 

a 


-3 
S 

a 

o 


CO 

1 

s 

C5 

d 

sS 

2 
© 

03 


to 

a 

o 
o 


g 
o 

2 


!0 

u 
O 


CO 

^ 

d 

2 

« 

.d 


o 

o 
o 


6 

B 

> 
« 


< 


a3 
as 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 705 

Valuation of Real Estate Owned by the City. 

High School, Beech street, corner Lowell: 

Building $170,000.00 

59,400 square feet of land 17,820.00 . 

$187,820.00 

Franklin-street school, Franklin street, corner 
Pleasant: 

Building $16,000.00 

19,200 square feet of land 19,200.00 



Spring-street school. Spring street: 

Building $13,000.00 

13,600 square feet of land 13,600.00 

Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, comer Mer- 
rimack: 

Building $45,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 



Ash-street school. Ash street, comer Bridge: 

Building $50,000.00 

57,537 square feet of land 17,262.00 

Main-street school, North Main street, West Man- 
chester: 

Building $6,000.00 

40,293.4 square feet of land. . 10,073.00 



.Webster-street school, Webster street: 

Building • $39,000.00 

55,714| square feet of land. . . 13,928.00 



Elodget-street school, Blodget street: 

Building $1,500.00 

9,000 square feet of land 3,600.00 



$35,200.00 



$26,600.00 



$53,000.00 



$67,262.00 



$16,073.00 



$52,928.00 



$5,100.00 



706 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Lowell-street school, Lowell street, corner Chest- 
nut: 

Building $1,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 9,000.00 



Merrimaek-street school, Merrimack street, cor- 
ner Union: 

Building $15,000.00 

18,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 



Parker school. South Main street, West Man- 
chester: 

Building $20,000.00 

13,650 square feet of land 2,047.00 



Bakersville school. Elm street, south: 

Building $10,000.00 

24,184 square feet of land 3,628.00 



Stark District school, River road, north: 

Building $1,000.00 

43,560 square feet of land 100.00 



Amoskeag school, Front street, Amoskeag: 

Building $1,500.00 

6,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 



Rimmon school, corner Amory and Dubuque 
streets: 

Building $17,400.00 

16,600 square feet of land 2,490.00 



Goffe's Falls school, Goffe's Falls: 

Building $4,000.00 

47,916 square feet of land 250.00 



$10,000.00 



$21,300.00 



J2,047.00 



$13,628.00 



$1,100.00 



$2,500.00 



$19,890.00 



$4,250.00- 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 707 

Harvey District school, Nutt road: 

Building $2,000.00 

31,780 square feet of land. . . . 100.00 

$2,100.00 

Webster Mills school, Webster Mills: 

Building $i00.00 

5,445 square feet of land 100.00 

$500.00 

Old Hallsville school, East Manchester: 

Building $500.00 

30,075 square feet of land 3,008.00- 

$3,508.00 

Youngsville school, Youngsville: 

Building $500.00 

51,228 square feet of land 100.00 

$600.00 

Mosquito Pond school. Mosquito Pond: 

Building $400.00 

10,890 square feet of land 100.00 

$500.00 

Pearl-street school: 

Building $18,700.00 

Land 3,200.00 

$21,900.00 

Varney school, Bowman street, corner Mast, West 

Manchester: 

Building $43,750.00 

Land 6,700.00 

■ $50,450.00 

New Hallsville school, Jewett street, corner 

Young, East Manchester: 

Building $29,800.00 

44,000 square feet of land 3,300.00 

$33,100.00 

Straw school. Chestnut street, corner Harrison: 

Building $30,000.00 

32,400 square feet of land. . . . 16,200.00 

$46,200.00 



708 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

New Wilson school, Wilson, Cedar, and Auburn 
streets: 

Building $30,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

$35,000.00 



$732,556.00' 

ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Engine-house and stable. Central station. Vine 
street : . 

Building $31,800.00 

31,718.86 square feet of land. . 25,438.00 



ISTorth Main-street engine-house, Xorth Main 
street, West Manchester: 

Building $18,000.00 

11,819 square feet of land 2,955.00 



Webster-street engine-house, Webster street, cor- 
ner Chestnut: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,510 square feet of land 2,180.00 



Merrimack engine-house. Lake avenue: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 



Hosehouse and cottage. Maple street, corner East 
High: 

Building $3,000.00 

18,330 square feet of land 3,666.00 



Engine-house and wardroom, ward 9, Bimmon 
and Amory streets. West ]\Ianchester: 

Building $22,755.00 

6,000 square feet of land 870.00 



$57,238.00 



$20,955.00 



$14,180.00 



$18,000.00 



$6,666.00 



$23,625.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 709 

South Manchester hosehouse: 

Building . . $4,200.00 

4,278 square feet of land 684.48 

$4,884.48 



$145,548.48 

OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City library. Dean avenue, corner Franklin street: 

Building $35,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 30,000.00 

$65,000.00 

City hall, Elm street, corner Market: 

Building $20,000.00 

100,000 square feet of land. . . 150,000.00 

$170,000.00 

City farm. Mammoth road: 

Building $5,000.00 

46.66 acres, westMammoth road 70,000.00 
81.55 acres, east Mammoth road 65,240.00 

$140,240.00 

Court house, Franklin street, comer West Mer- 
rimack: 

Building $20,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 57,000.00 

$77,000.00 

Battery building, Manchester street: 

Building $13,000.00 

3,400 square feet of land 5,100.00 

$18,100.00 

Police station, Manchester street, corner Chest- 
nut: 

Building $40,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 15,000.00 

$55,000.00 



710 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Slayton lot, Manchester street: 

Police patrol stable $4,000.00 

Building 300.00 

2,908 square feet of land 4,700.00 

$9,000.00 

City stable and other buildings, Franklin street: 

Building $15,950.00 

44,656 square feet of land 89,312.00 

$105,262.00 

City stable, district Ko. 10 $1,000.00 

City scales, Franklin street: 

Building $300.00 

Gravel lots, Goffstown: 

2 acres $400.00 

Police station, Clinton street. West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

3,790 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$4,500.00 

Gravel lot, district No. 10, bought of Brooks & 

Brock (city has right to remove gravel until 

August 25, 1903): 

1 1-3 acres $500.00 

AYard 5 wardroom, Lake avenue: 

Building $4,500.00 

Land 1,000.00 

$5,500.00 

$651,802.00 

PERSONAL PROPEETY OWNED BY THE CITY. 

Property in care city engineer $1,149.00 

in care chief engineer fire department . 107,177.50 

in care street and park commission. . . 26,805.23 

in care superintendent of schools 36,755.00 

in care city messenger 3,000.00 

in care city marshal and janitor 7,250.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 711 

Property in care superintendent of city farm. . . $12,544.87 

in care trustees city library 30,000.00 

in care superintendent of Pine Grove 

cemetery 248.35 

in care superintendent Valley cemetery 106.00 
Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad, in care of 

city treasurer 50,000.00 

Personal property in care city weigher 1,000.00 

$276,035.95 

Uncollected taxes in 1897 $56,796.23 

Net cash in the treasury, December 31, 1897. . . 122,052,37 



$178,848.60 

OTHEK EEAL AND PEESONAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 

Soldiers' monument $25,000.00 

Permanent inclosure of commons 10,200.00 

Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 25,000.00 

Fountains and Avater-troughs on streets and com- 
mons 3,600.00 

City tomb 10,000.00 

McGregor bridge 90,000.00 

Granite bridge 130,000.00 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 28,450.00 

Second-street bridge, over Piscataquog river. . . . 52,036.06 

Print- Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 5,000.00 

Two bridges in highway district Xo. 9 2,000.00 

One bridge at Goffe's Falls 1,000.00 

Expended on construction of sewers 625,103.73 

$1,007,389.79 

PARKS AND CEMETERIES. 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres $200,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery, about 96 acres 46,700.00 

Amoskeag cemetery, 1.23 acres ' . . . 4,340.00 

Stark park, 28 acres 9,000.00 



712 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Derryfield park, 76 acres $25,000.00 

Concord common, 4.48 acres 200,000.00 

Tremont common, 2.25 acres 40,000.00 

Hanover common, 3 acres 100,000.00 

Park common, 3.49 acres 60,000,00 

Merrimack common, 5.89 acres 200,000.00 

Wagner's park, 9.85 acres 12,000.00 

Land on Piscataquog river 3,500.00 

$900,540.00 

WATER-WORKS. 

Eeal estate and personal property of water-works, 

,at cost price $1,458,246.29 

RECAPITULATION. 

Eeal estate owned by the city, schoolhouses . . . $732,556.00 

Eeal estate owned by the city 651,802.00 

Eeal estate owned by the city, engine-houses . . . 145,548.48 

Water-works at cost price 1,458,246.29 

Personal property owned by the city 276,035.95 

Uncollected taxes and cash 178,848.60 

Other real and personal property 1,007,389.79 

Parks and cemeteries 900,540.00 

$5,350,967.11 

PROPERTY ACCOUNT. 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1897 $5,350,967.11 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1896 5,236,208.62 

Gain in valuation $114,758.49 



auditor's office. ' 71,3 



« Auditor's Office. 

City hall building. Open from 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5 p. 
M.; 7 to 9 P. M. on Thursday. 

In every bill presented to the city auditor for his approval, 
the following points will be considered and passed upon. 

1. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination 
within the scope of the powers conferred by the legislature 
•on the city government? 

2. Is the bill certified by the party legally authorized to 
make the contract, or cause the expenditure to be made? 

3. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expendi- 
ture, and is there a balance unexpended sufficient to pay this 
Mil? 

4. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measure- 
ments either of dimensions, quantities, or weights correctly 
and fully stated, and is the proof of the d'elivery to the city 
of the whole amount charged sufficient? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so 
largely in excess as to require the attention of the city coun- 
cils to be called to the same? 

6. Is the bill written in a fair legible hand, correctly cast, 
arid on paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its 
proper backing and filing? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and 
the total amount of the contract, the amount already paid, 
the amount of the work not yet completed, and the per cent 
retained, if any, should be stated in the bill. 

8. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which 
affect the question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for further informa- 
tion or correction as the circumstances of each case may 
lequire. 



714 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

COURT DECISIONS, LEGAL POINTS AND RULES, RELATING TO 
THE APPROVAL OR DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS ASAINST 
THE CITY. 

No bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until 
the auditor has approved it as correct. 

Public trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the 
city councils cannot be delegated to others. Dillon's Munici- 
pal Corporations, section 96, volume 1. 

No member of either branch [of the city councils] , except 
the mayor, shall receive any compensation for his services, or 
shall hold any office or agency created during his continuance 
in office. General Laws, chapter 46, section 13. 

The executive powers of the city, except where vested in 
tlie mayor, shall be exercised by the mayor and aldermen. 
General Laws, chapter 46, section 14. 

The mayor and aldermen have all the powers and authority 
of selectmen of towns unless it is otherwise provided by law. 
General Laws, chapter 46j section 14. 

Joint standing committees have advisory powers only; they 
cannot legally be endowed with executive or legislative powers 
by ordinance or resolution of the city councils, as no by-law 
or ordinance shall be repugnant to the constitution or laws of 
the state. 

No member of either branch of the city councils can enter 
into any verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to, or do 
any work for the city. Any firm of which a member is also a 
member of the city councils is included in this prohibition. 

No city official, or department, or board of officials having 
legal power to expend money for the benefit of the city, can 
purchase of or contract with themselves, Avith any one of the 
board, or with any firm of which one of said officials is ,a mem- 
ber. Dillon's Municipal Corporations, volume 1, page 436,, 
section 444. 

Every bill against the city shall specify the particular 
appropriation to Avhicli the same should Ijo eliarged, and the 
moneys paid will be charged to such a})})r<)})riations only. 



auditor's office. 715 

He who is intrusted with the business of others cannot he 
allowed to make sucli business a source of profit to himself. 

All orders passed by the city councils authorizing a minis- 
terial act to be performed by its agent or agents must be 
strictly construed, and the act to be done must be specifically 
stated. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. 
(General Laws, chapter 106, section 11.) They have no 
power conferred upon them by law or ordinance to purchase 
new apparatus of any kind. 

The joint standing committee on fire department have ad- 
visory powers only. 

The laws and ordinances require the city auditor to with- 
hold his signature from all bills against any appropriation 
Adhere the amount of the appropriation is expended, until the 
city council shall have provided the means of paying the same. 
Section 4, chapter 3 of the City Ordinances, and section 4, 
ordinances relating to the duties of the city auditor, approved 
January 7, 1890. 

The power of towns to raise and appropriate money is de- 
rived solely from statutor}'' provisions, which restrict the 
power to certain specified objects and other necessary charges. 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those 
prescribed by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, 
and generally will not be permitted, to carry such votes into 
efl!ect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discretion 
of towns to vote gifts or to select donees; their charity is a 
duty defined, commanded, enforced, and regulated, and the 
objects of it are designated by law. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a minority in 
an unlimited manner. Gove v. Epping, 41 N. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance 
to make expenditures, within the scope of their powers, for 
their respective departments: For fire department and fire- 
alarm telegraph, the chief engineer, to be sulmiitted monthly 



716 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

to the approval of the board of engineers; for police depart- 
ment, mayor and police commission; for police court, police 
judge; for water-works department, superintendent, subject to 
tlie rules of the board of commissioners and ordinances relat- 
ing thereto; for city farm, superintendent; for overseers of the 
poor, each overseer, subject to the rules of the board of over- 
seers, and their monthly review and approval; for schools, 
superintendent, or such person as the board of school commit- 
tee may designate, bills to be approved by the board monthly; 
for streets, sewers, and other work under these departments, 
street and park commissioners; for city clerk's office, treas- 
urer's office, tax collectors office, assessor's oflfice, auditor's 
office, incidental expenditures, city physician, city messenger, 
city solicitor, city engineer, — mayor; for cemeteries, superin- 
tendents, subject to board of trustees (to consist of citizens 
not members of the city councils); for health department, 
board of health, subject to approval of mayor; city library', 
board of trustees or person designated by them. It may be 
stated as a general rule, that all subordinate officials are under 
the supervision and control of the mayor, subject to such lim- 
itations and restrictions as the board of aldermen, acting as a 
board, may require. 



RESOLUTIONS. ORDERS. ORDI- 
NANCES. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES 

PASSED IN 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

TiESOLUTiON making a temporary loan of One Hundred 
Thousand Dollars. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the 
•city as may fall due before the fifth day of December, 1897, 
the mayor be and hereby is authorized to make a temporary 
loan for the use of the city, of a sum not exceeding one 
Jiundred thousand dollars ($100,000), being in anticipation of 
the taxes of the present year; giving for the same the notes 
of the city, signed by the mayor and countersigned by the 
•city treasurer. 

Passed April 6, 1897. 



City of Maxchester. 

Pesolution appropriating $3,500 for the purchase of Land 
on the bank of the Piscataquog river. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of purchasing a tract of land on the 
1)3 nk of the Piscataquog river in West Manchester, there be 
appropriated the sum of thirty-five hundred dollars ($3,500), 

719 



720 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

and that said sum of money be obtained by the issuing of 
the promissory notes of the city of Manchester, said notes 
to be dated the same day as the date of the deed from the 
owner of said land to the city, and to be payable to the order 
of the maker of said deed, one half of the purchase price 
July 1, 1897, and the other one half July 1, 1898, and to 
bear no interest until after the date of payment of each of 
said notes; and to be sign'ed by the city treasurer and coun- 
tersigned by the mayor, and the mayor and city treasurer are- 
authorized to do all things necessary to issue said notes. 

Passed December 1, 1896. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesolution to discontinue certain Streets and Sewers. 

Besolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That all streets and sewers as shown on the 
city plan and wdthin the boundary of the land purchased by 
the city, and known as the West Side park, be and are hereby 
repealed. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 4, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution making a Temporary Loan of Two Hundred 
Thousand Dollars. 

17esoIved by the Mayor, Aldei*men, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the 
city as may fall due before the twenty-third of December, 



RESOLUTIONS. 721 

1897, the mayor be and hereby is .authorized to make a 
temporary loan for the use of the city, of a sum not exceeding 
two hundred thousand dollars ($200,000), being in anticipa- 
tion of the taxes of the present year; giving for the same 
the notes of the city, signed by the mayor and countersigned 
by the city treasurer. 

Passed June 29, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 
Eesolution for the Transfer of Money. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of paying a promissory note of sev- 
enteen hundred and fifty dollars ($1,750), of the city of 
Manchester, due July 1, 1897, being one of two such notes 
'held by Augustus F. and Edwin C. Swift against the city of 
Manchester, for the sale of a tract of land on the bank of 
the Piscataquog river in West Manchester, purchased by vote 
of the city councils in 1896, that there be transferred from 
the appropriation for the reserved fund the sum of seventeen 
hundred and fifty dollars ($1,750) to a special appropriation 
for the purchase of land on the bank of the Piscataquog 
river, and that said note, due July 1, 1897, be charged to 
said appropriation for the purchase of land on the bank of 
the Piscataquog river, and said sum of seventeen hundred 
and fifty dollars ($1,750) is hereby appropriated for said 
purpose. 

Passed June 29, 1897. 

46 



722 report of the city auditor. 

City of Maxchester. 

Resolution relating to the Transfer of Money. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make 
tlie following transfers: 

From the appropriation for reserved fund to a special 
appropriation, to be known as an appropriation for the dedi- 
cation of the Weston observ,atoiy, the sum of one hundred 
and fifty dollars ($150), and' that the joint standing commit- 
tee on finance be and hereby is authorized to expend such 
sum, or ,as much of it as may be necessary to defray the ex- 
penses of said dedication. 

Passed September 7, 1897. 



CiTY" OF Manchester. 

Eesolutiox relating to the Transfer of Money. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council ELSsem^bled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make 
the following transfers: 

From the appropriation for Ainoskeag bridge abutment to 
the appropriation for paving Elm and Granite streets, the 
unexpended balance of said appropriation for Amoskeag 
bridge abutment. 

Passed September 7, 1897. 



RESOLUTIONS. 723 

City of Manchester. 

EESOLrxiON relating to the Transfer of Money. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make 
the following transfers: 

From the appropriation for reserved fund to a special ap- 
propriation, to be known as an appropriation, for the dedi- 
cation of the Manchester high school, the sum of one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars ($150), and that the joint standing 
committee on finance be and is hereby authorized to expend 
such sum, or as much of it as may be necessary to defray the 
expenses of said dedication. 

Passed September 7, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesolution for transferring certain Money. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and is liereby authorized to make 
the following transfers: 

From the appropriation for repairs of liighways to the 
appropriation for snow and ice, $4:94.28; from the appropria- 
tion for reserved fund to the appropriation for repairs of 
buildings, $500; and from the appropriation for reserved 
fund to incidental expenses, $-1,000. 

Passed October 5, 1897. 



724 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of ]\Ianchester. 
An Order to erect certain Fire- Alarm Boxes. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the chief engineer of fire department be authorized to erect 
certain fire-alarm boxes as follows: 

On new Mast road near D street; at the corner of Merri- 
mack and Beacon streets. The expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for fire-alarm telegraph. 

Passed January 4, 1897. 



An Order to build certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

In Dubuque east back street from Kelley street northerly 
to Coolidge avenue west back street, and thence 200 feet 
north of Bremer street in Coolidge avenue west back street; 
in Milford street from Amherst road westerly about 300 
feet; in Hanover street from near Beacon street to Highland 
street; in Valley street from near Belmont to Cypress street; 
in Harvard street from Wilson street easterly 200 feet. And 
the expense 'thereof be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed January 4, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to establish the grade of South Main street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the grade of South Main street from Boynton road to Bed- 
ford town line be established as follows: 

The intersection of South Main and Boynton on the west 
side of South Main shall be 71.50; at 19 feet south of Boyn- 



ORDERS. 725 

ton road on -u-est side grade shall be 71.30; at 69 feet south 
of Boynton road on west side grade shall be 70.70; ,at 119 
feet south of Boynton road on west side grade shall be 70.10; 
at 169 feet south of Boynton road on west side grade shall 
be 69.60; at 219 feet south of Boynton road on west side 
grade shall be 69.20; at 269 feet south of Boynton road on 
west side grade shall be 69.00; at 319 feet south of Boynton 
road on west side grade shall be 69.00. Then the grade to 
fall 0.115 per 100 for 1,300 feet. Then at 1,619 from south 
of Boynton road on west side grade shall be 67.50; then at 
1,669 from south of Boynton road on west side grade shall 
be 67.55; then at 1,719 from south of Boynton road on west 
side grade shall be 67.70; then at 1,769 from south of Boyn- 
ton road on west side grade shall be 68.00; then at 1,819 
from south of Boynton road on west side grade shall be 68.45; 
then at 1,869 from south of Boynton road on west side grade 
shall be 68.80; then at 1,919 from south of Boynton road on 
west side grade shall be 69.00; then 100 feet level ,at 69.00. 
Then the grade to rise 0.125 per 100 for 400 feet; grade to 
be 69.50. Then 50 feet from elevation 69.50 the grade shall 
be 69.50; at 100 feet from first elevation 69.50 the grade 
shall be 69.30; at 150 feet from first elevation 69.50 the 
grade shall be 69.00. Then the grade to fall 0.467 per 100 
for 900 feet grade shall be 64.80. At .50 feet from elevation 
64.80 the grade shall be 64.55; at 100 feet from elevation 
64.80 the grade shall be 64.10; at 150 feet from elevation 
64.80 the grade shall be 63.50; at 200 feet from elevation 
64.80 the grade shall be 63.00; at 250 feet from elevation 
64.80 the grade shall be 62.60; at 300 feet from elevation 
64.80 the grade shall be 62.30; then the grade to fall 0.1107 
per 100 for 271 feet, grade shall be 62.00. The east side of 
South Main shall be parallel to the west side of said street, 
and one foot lower as shown on plans 993, 994, 995, 996 on 
file in the city engineer's department. 

And the same is hereby made the established grade of said 
street. 

Passed January 4, 1897. 



726 report of the city auditor. 

City of Maxchester. 
An Order to estalDlish the Grade of Alsace Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the grade of Alsace street from Kelley street northerly to 
Bremer be and is hereby made the established grade, as 
follows : 

The gi-ade at the intersection of the west line of Alsace 
street and the north line of Kelley street shall be 142.22; at 
50 feet north of Kelley street grade shall be 143.75; at 100 
feet north of Kelley street grade shall be 145.90; at 150 feet 
north of Kelley street grade shall be 147.75; at 200 feet north 
of Kelley street grade shall be 149.10; at 250 feet north of 
Kelley street grade shall be 149.80; at 300 feet north of Kel- 
ley street grade shall be 150.00; then 250 straight grade .20 
making elevation at the corner of Bremer and Alsace streets 
150,50. The east side of the street shall be level with the 
grade of said west side. 

Passed January 4, 1897. 



CiTi' OF Manchester. 

An Order to Build Cleveland Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That, 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build to grade Cleveland street from its inter- 
section of Second, thence easterly to the Merrimack river. 
And the expenses thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for new streets. 

Passed January 4, 1897. 



OKDERS, 727 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to establish the Grade of Chestnut Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the grade of Chestnut street from Clark to Trenton street 
be established as follows: 

At northeast corner of Clark and Chestnut grade shall be 
elevation 156.50. Then grade to rise 2.75 per 100 feet for 
400 feet to elevation 167.50; then grade to rise 3.411 per 100 
feet for 170 feet to elevation 171.60; then grade to rise 3.4-44 
per 100 feet for 180 feet to elevation 178.00; then grade to 
rise 2.913 per 100 feet for 413 feet to elevation 188, being 
the southeast corner of Chestnut and Carpenter. 

The northeast corner of Chestnut and Carpenter grade shall 
be 190.35. At 36 feet from corner of Chestnut and Carpen- 
ter, east side, grade shall be 191.50; at 86 feet from corner 
of Chestnut and Carpenter, east side, grade shall be 194.40; 
at 136 feet from corner of Chestnut .and Carpenter, east side, 
grade shall be 197.85; then grade to rise 8.40 per 100 feet 
for 100 feet to elevation 306.25. At 50 feet from elevation 
206.25 grade shall be 210.20'; at 100 feet from elevation 
.206.25 grade shall be 213.65; at 150 feet from elevation 206.25 
grade shall be 216.65; at 200 feet from elevation 206.25 grade 
shall be 219.10; at 247 feet from elevation 206.25 on the 
southeast corner of Chestnut and Trenton the grade shall 
be 221.00. 

The grade of Chestnut street from Clark to Trenton street, 
on west side, shall be as follows: 

At the northwest corner of Clark and Chestnut grade shall 
be 156.50; then grade to rise 2.75 per 100 for 400 feet to ele- 
vation 167.50; then grade to rise 2.588 per 100 for 170 feet 
to elevation 171.90; then grade to rise 2.611 per 100 for 180 
feet to elevation 176.60; then grade to rise 2.949 per 100 for 
412 feet to elevation 188.75, being the southeast corner of 
Chestnut and Carpenter streets. 



728 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

The northeast comer of Chestnut and Carpenter streets 
grade shall be 189.50. At 56 ^eet from corner of Chestnut 
and Carpenter, west side, grade shall be 190.90; at 86 feet 
from corner of Chestnut and Carpenter, west side, grade 
shall be 193.55; at 136 feet from corner of Chestnut and 
Carpenter, west side, grade shall be 197.20. Then grade to 
rise 8.50 per 100 for 100 feet, grade shall be 305.70. At 50 
feet from elevation 305.70 grade shall be 309.70; at 100 feet 
from elevation 305.70 grade shall be 313.10; at 150 feet from 
elevation 305.70 grade shall be 316.10; at 300 feet from ele- 
vation 305.70 grade shall be 318.60; at 347 feet from eleva- 
tion 305.70 on the southwest comer of Chestnut and Trenton 
streets the grade to be 330.50. 

Passed January 4, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the Final Transfers for the year 1896. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 

the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make the follow- 
ing transfers, to wit: 

To reserved fund: 

From interest $1,800.51 

printing and stationery 561.45 

city officers' salaries 3,714.51 

mayor's incidentals 50.46 

auditors department 30.33 

street and park commission 387.97 

land taken for highways 3,088.88 

watering streets 803.53 

macadamizing streets 151.53 

street sweeping 31.56 

scavenger service 1,008.90 

lio-htins: streets 573.40 



ORDERS. 729 

From health department $36.61 

books and stationery 53.96 

care of rooms 468.44 

teachers' salaries 1,161.05 

evening schools ' 438.50 

evening school, mechanical drawing 143.75 

manual training 96.71 

fire-alarm telegraph 269.58 

police station 487.69 

police court 32.01 

paving streets 320.69 

police patrol .19 

commons 148.85 

Amoskeag cemetery .28 

indigent soldiers 164.15 

abatement of taxes 11,816.04 

free cash in treasury in excess of appro- 
priations 8,540.42 

$24,281.83 
From reserved fund: 

To city hall $316.61 

incidental expenses , 3,026.42 

repairs of highways 312.78 

snow and ice 308.94 

bridges 336.88 

grading for concrete 35.82 

city teams 285.70 

repairs of sewers 421.63 

new bridge. Granite street 7,527.73 

engineer's department 1,395.25 

repairs of schoolhouses 578.38 

fuel 284.03 

furniture and supplies 114.14 

printing and advertising 129.56 

contingent expenses 257.79 



730 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

To free text-books $58.43 

fire department 2,567.65 

police commission 856.75 

repairs of buildings 1,549.68 

new sclioolhoiise, West Manchester 255.54 

Valley cemetery 6.84 

Pine Grove cemetery 93.54 

paupers off the farm 1,640.67 

city farm 463.89 

decoration of soldiers' graves 7.47 

new sewers 186.06 

new schoolhouses 2,452.87 



Total $25,471.04 

Passed January 4, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to Claims and Suits against the City. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and the city solicitor be authorized to dispose of 
suits against the city now pending in court, or which may 
be entered in court during the ensuing two years, as they 
deem best, and that they be a special committee to consider 
claims against the city, with authority to settle such claims 
as they deem proper, when the amount involved in such set- 
tlement does not exceed two hundred and fifty dollars. 

Passed Februaiy 9, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to print the Fifty-first Annual Eeport of the 
Eeceipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the Joint standing .committee on fina'nce be, and they hereby 



ORDERS. 731 

are, authorized to procure, fpr the use of the inhabitants of 
said city, the printing of the fifty-first annual report of the 
receipts and expenditures of the city of Manchesttr, includ- 
ing the reports of the joint standing committee on finance, 
the city auditor, the school board and superintendent of 
schools, superintendent of water-works, water commissioners, 
engineer of fire department, police commissioners, overseers 
of the poor, trustees, librarian and treasurer of the city library, 
committee on cemeteries, joint standing committee on city 
farm, city physician, city solicitor, city engineer, street and 
park commissioners, and such other matters relating to city 
affairs as said finance committee may direct; and also to pro- 
cure the printing of the mayor's inaugural address of Jan- 
uary 5, 1897, the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for printing and stationery. 

Passed February 2, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase Horses for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of ^layor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department 
be and are hereby authorized to purchase two horses for use 
of the Manchester fire department, at a cost not exceeding 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars ($125) for each horse 
purchased. The expense thereof to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for fire department. 

Passed March 5, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to repair Public Buildings. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and build- 



732 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

ings be and are hereby authorized to make necessary repairs 
ill and u}Don the public buildings, the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for repairing buildings. 

Passed April 6, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the Committee on Setting Trees to 
Expend $200 for Trees. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the committee on setting trees be authorized to expend two 
hundred dollars ($200) for shade trees, the expense thereof 
to be charged to the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed May 4, 1897. 



City of ]\Ianchester. 

An Order relative to the New High School. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and build- 
ings be and are hereby authorized and empowered to carry 
out and complete all contracts entered into by authority of 
order of city councils jDassed September 3, 1895; and are 
hereby invested with all the authority contained in said order. 

Passed May 4, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 



ORDERS. 733 

In Silver street from Lincoln to Wilson street; in Beacon 
street, from east of Beacon westerly about 150 feet; and the 
expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed Jnne 1, 1897. 



City op Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Horses for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department 
be and are hereby authorized to purchase two horses for use 
of the Manchester fire department, the expense thereof to 
be charged to the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed June 1, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build a Sewer in Walnut Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be ,and are hereby 
authorized to build a sewer in Walnut street, from Salmon 
street southerly 175 feet, and the expense thereof be charged 
to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed June 29, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for extra Electric Work at the N'ew High School. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the bill of Perkins & Franks for extra electric wiring and 



734 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

electric apparatus at the new high school, amomiting to 
$730.50, be paid, and the amount be charged to the appro- 
priation for new sehoolhouses. 

Passed July 6, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Oedee relating to the Parker School Lot. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the committee on lands and buildings be authorized and em- 
powered to complete the grading of the Parker school lot, 
pet the steps, concrete the walks and sidewalks, and do other 
necessary concrete work; and that there be .appropriated for 
that purpose the sum of three hundred dollars ($300), and 
that said sum of three hundred dollars be transferred, from 
the reserved fund, and to be known as the appropriation for 
the Parker school lot. 

Passed July 6, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Oedee in relation to the Appropriation for Decoration 
of Soldiers' Graves. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: Tlxat 
the bill of Louis Bell post, No. 3, G. A. E., for expenses in- 
curred on Memorial day, in decorating soldiers' graves, be 
paid, and that it be charged to appropriation for decoration 
of soldiers' graves. 

Passed July 6, 1897. 



ORDERS. 735 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to build a Sewer on Silver Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of ]\Iayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street ,and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build a sewer on Sih-er street, from Wilson to 
Hall street, and the expenses thereof be charged to the appro- 
priation for new sewers. 

Passed July 6, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to erect Electric Lights. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and the joint standing committee on lighting 
streets be and are hereby authorized to erect the following 
electric lights: 

Corner of Amherst and Chestnut: comer of Salmon and 
Beech streets. 

Passed August 3. 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Macadamize a Portion of Pearl Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to macadamize Pearl street, from Pine to Union 
street, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for macadamizing. 

Passed August 3. 1897. 



736 report of the city auditor 

City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to the Publication of the Semi-Centen- 
nial History of the City of Manchester, 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on finance be and 
they are hereby authorized to expend a sum not exceeding 
six hundred dollars ($600), in aid of the publication of a 
semi-centennial history of the city of Manchester, now in 
process of compilation by Herbert W. Eastman, under the 
direction of the special committee a]3pointed by the authority 
of the last city council, which had in charge the recent semi- 
centennial celebration, the expense to be charged to the spe- 
cial appropriation for semi-centennial history. 

Passed August 3, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the Apportionment of the Appropriation for 
Militia Armories. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the one thousand dollars ($1,000) appropriated for militia 
armories be apportioned as follows: 

$100 to band. First Eegiment N". H. K. 0. 
$100 to Co. C, First Eegiment N. H. N. 0. 
$100 to Co. F, First Keg'iment N. H. N. G, 
$100 to Co. H, First Eegiment N. H. JsT. O. 
$100 to Co. L, First Eegiment ?^. H. N. G. 
$100 to Manchester War Veterans. 
$100 to Amoskeag Veterans. 
$100 to Manchester Cadets. 
$100 to Louis Bell Post, G. A. E. 
$100 to Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. E. 

Passed August 3, 1897.. 



ORDERS. 737 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect New Lanterns with Gasoline Attachments 
in the District of Lake Massahesic. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and the joint standing committee on lighting 
streets are hereby authorized to purchase and erect thirty or 
more new copper top lanterns, with plate burners and fix- 
tures attached for gasoline, with all the apparatus necessary, 
at the district at -Lake Massabesic, and the expenses thereof 
not to exceed three hundred dollars ($300), and to be charged 
to the appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed Aug-ust 3, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to establish the Grade of Glenwood Avenue. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the grade of the northeast corner of Page and Glenwood 
avenue shall be elevation 237.10; then the grade drops in 
running east .90 feet per 100 feet for 730 feet, or to the Colby 
land, The southeast corner of Page and Glenwood avenue 
shall be elevation 237.60, and then the grade to drop .90 feet 
per 100 feet for 730 feet in going easterly or to the Colby land. 

And the same is hereby made the established grade of 
said street, reference being made to plan on file in the city 
engineer's department. 

Passed August 25, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build Lake Avenue to Width and Grade 
between Cass Street and Beacon Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 

47 



738 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

instructed to build Lake avenue to width and grade between 
Cass street and Beacon street, the same to be charged to the 
appropriation for grading for concrete. 

Passed September 7, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

In Union street from Silver to Hayward; in Prescott street 
from Wilson street east about 208 feet; in Hayward street 
from Belmont street to Cypress street; in Taylor street from 
Valley northerly about 400 feet; in Amory street from Alsace 
easterly about 200 feet. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation 
for new sewers. 

Passed September 7, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers, as follows: 

In Grrove south back from east of Union to Beech street; 
in Rimmon east back street from Kelley to Mason; in Everett 
from Clarke street southerly about 300 feet, and the expense 
thereof be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed September 7, 1897. 



ORDERS. 739 

City of Manchester. 

An Order for the construction of a Bicycle Side-Path. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the sum of six hundred dollars ($600) be and is hereby trans- 
ferred from the reserve fund to the street and park commis- 
sion, and that the same be used for the construction of a 
bicycle path on Hall road, commencing at the corner of Mas- 
sabesic street and Candia road; said path to be four feet wide, 
constructed of clay and cinders, built to the grade of the 
present road, and the street and park commissioners are re- 
quested to commence work immediately on the passing of 
this order. 

Passed October 5, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Sewer in Whittemore Land. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build a sewer in the Whittemore land accord- 
ing to deed from Mrs. Whittemore, dated December 12, 1896, 
and the Boston & Maine railroad, dated June 34, 1897, and 
rights granted by Gustave F. and Edmond C. Swift, by deed 
dated April, 1897, and as shown by plans of the same on file 
in the city engineer's department, and the expense thereof 
be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed October 5, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 



740 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

In Maple street from Preseott to Hayward street; in Beech 
street from Silver to Harvard street; in Harvard street from 
Beech to Maple street; in Somerville street from Wilson to 
Hall street; in Russell street from Harrison street northerly 
350 feet; in Grove sonth hack street from Wilson easterly 
about 200 feet; in River road north from Clarke street to Park 
avenue proposed; in Central street from Belmont to Milton 
street. 

And the expense thereof he charged to the appropriation 
for new sewers. 

Passed November 2, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase Horses for City Farm. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on city farm be 
authorized to purchase one pair of horses for use at the city 
farm, the price thereof not to exceed two hundred and fifty 
dollars ($350) for the pair, the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for city farm. 

Passed November 2, 1897. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to covering into the Treasury Unclaimed 
Bills prior to December, 1893. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, That 
the city treasurer be and hereby is authorized to cover into 
the city treasury, by charging to the reserved fund, the sum 
of twenty-nine dollars and sixty-four cents ($39.64). 

The amount being the sum due sundry persons at various 
times prior to December, 1893, and unclaimed, as shown on 
the list in the treasurers office. 

Passed December 7, 1897. 



ordinances. 741 

City of Manchestee. 

in the yeae one thousand eight hundeed and ninety- 
SEVEN. 

An Oedinance changing the Names of Certain Streets. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 

of the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as 

follows: 

Section 1. That the names of certain streets in said city 
be changed, as follows: Dickey street in West Manchester, 
which was laid out by the board of mayor and aldermen, 
August 28, 1891, running from South Main to West Hancock 
street, to Goffe street. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained August 3, 1897. 



City of Manchestee. 

in the yeae one thousand eight hundeed and ninety- 
seven. 

An Oedinance in Amendment to Chapter 14, Section 1. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council 

of the City of Manchester, in City Council .assembled, as 

follows: 

That there be inserted after the words ^T)rick or stone," 
in the sixth line, the words "or sheathed with metal or other 
incombustible material," so that said section when amended 
shall read as follows: 

Section 1. No person shall erect or build any steam 
mill, furnace, foundry, blacksmith shop, house for storing 
powder, nor shall any person use or occupy, or suffer any 
other person to use or occupy, any building already erected 
for such purpose, within the city of Manchester, unless the 



742 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

same is built of brick or stone or sheathed with metal or 
other incombustible material, and the roof thereof covered 
with slate or tin, or other incombustible material, and unless 
the board of mayor and aldermen shall give a license therefor. 

. Passed to be ordained December 7, 1897. 



INDEX. 



INDEX. 



A 

Abatement of taxes 673 

Assets, statement and Inventory of 705 

Annual interest charge on bonded debt 702 

Auditor, city, report of 493 

Auditor's department 533 

Appropriations for 1897 by city councils 674 

Appendix, school 353 

Amoskeag cemetery 651 

Amoskeag bridge abutment 560 

B 

Band concerts 672 

Bicycle path 573 

Bridges 559 

Books and stationery 595 

Buildings, repairs of 629 

public, occupied by private parties 704 

Board of water commissioners, organization of 88 

report of 89 

health, report of 421 

Bonded debt, tabular statement of 698 

detailed statement of, for 1897 701 

annual interest charge 702 

c 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax 6S8 

City hall 511 

officers' salaries 529 

teams 561 

officials, list of 3-22 

engineer, report of 185 

engineer's department, organization of 184 

solicitor, report of 405 

auditor's report 493 

treasurer's report 495 

councils, orders, ordinance.? 717 

745 



746 INDEX. 

City auditor's department 533 

farm GbO 

library GOG 

report of trustees of 381 

treasurer's report 385 

librarian's report 392 

donations to 397 

Contingent expenses GDG 

Care of rooms 599 

Commons 573 

Cemetery, Pine Grove G44 

Valley 648 

Amoskeag G51 

Cemeteries, report of sub-trustees of Valley 45G 

Pine Grove 453 

Amoskeag 457 

treasurer of 459 

treasurer of fund 4C0 

County tax G73 

D 

Debt, payment of funded • 507 

bonded, statement of 701 

Decoration of soldiers' graves G71 

Derryfield and Stark parks 576 

E 

Engineer's department 581 

Expenses, incidental 517 

mayor's 535 

contingent 59G 

Evening schools 601 

school, mechanical drawing 603 

Electric lights, location of 477 

Elliot Hospital 671 

Emergency Ward 671 

Exempted from tax, property 688 

P 

Fund, reserved 508 

Fuel 591 

Furniture and supplies 592 

Free text-books 603 

Fire department 608 

report of chief engineer 253 

value of personal property 308 

names and residences of members 309 

location fire-alarm boxes 285 

Fire-alarm telegraph 618 

Farm, paupers off 655 

city 6C0 



INDEX. 747 

G 

Grading for concrete 554 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 671 

Gas-lights, location of 475 

H 

Highways, new 544 

laud taken for 546 

watering 546 

paving 548 

macadamizing 551 

grading for concrete on 554 

scavenger service 556 

sweeping 558 

lighting 578 

bridges 559 

city teams 561 

repairs of 537 

Health department 582 

board of, report ot 421 

High School, dedication of 654 

Home, Women's Aid 670 

Hospital, Elliot, free beds 671 

Sacred Heart 671 

Notre Dame de Lourdes 671 

Hydrant service 620 

I 

Inaugural address 25-85 

Interest 50G 

annual charge, bonded debt 702 

Incidental expenses 517 

Indigent soldiers 663 

Inventory of assets 705 

L 

Laws relating to exemptions 686 

Loan, temporary 510 

Land in West Manchester 652 

taken for highways 546 

Lighting streets 578 

Library, city 606 

Legal points and rules relating to claims against the city ;.. 714 

M 

Manual training 605 

Mayor's incidentals 535 



748 INDEX. 

Macadamizing streets • 551 

Merrill yard 651 

Militia 672 

Milk inspector, report of 411 

Municipal receipts and expenditures 499 

Manufacturing property exempt from taxation 697 

N 

New highways 544 

schoolhouses 633 



Order to build Lake avenue to grade 737 

to establish grade of Chestnut street 727 

to erect certain fire-alarm boxes 724 

relating to Parker school lot 734 

to purchase horses for fire department 731, 733 

to build certain sewers 724, 732, 735, 738, 739 

to establish the grade of Alsace street 726 

to establish the grade of Glenwood avenue 737 

relating to the final transfers for 1896 728 

relating to claims and suits against the city 730 

to repair public buildings 731 

relative to new High school 732, 733 

relative to appropriation for soldiers' graves 734 

relative to semi-centennial history 736 

to erect gasoline lanterns 737 

to construct bicycle path 739 

relating to unclaimed bills 740 

to establish the grade of So. Main street 724 

to print fifty-first report 730 

to purchase horses for city farm , 740 

to erect certain electric lights 735 

relating to pay of militia 736 

to macadamize Pearl street 735 

to build Cleveland street 726 

to purchase trees 732 

Ordinance amending section 1, chapter 14 741 

changing name of certain streets 741 

Ordinances, orders, resolutions 717 

Organization of school board for 1897 369 

Overseers of the poor, report of 415 

Oil lamps, location of 476 

P 

Parks — Derryfield and Stark 576 

Parsonages, valuation of, exempt from taxation 6S8 

Paupers off the farm 655 



INDEX. 749 

Paving streets 548 

Paving Elm and Granite streets 550 

Payment of funded debt 507 

Pine Grove cemetery * 644 

Police department, station 621 

court 623 

commission 624 

Printing and stationery 514 

and advertising 596 

Property account, real and personal 705 

Public buildings occupied by private parties 704 

Pa rker school lot 635 

R 

Reserved fund 508 

Repairs of schoolhouses • 588 

of buildings 629 

of highways 537 

Rooms, care of 569 

Resolutions, orders, and ordinances 717 

transferring money 721, 722, 723 

to purchase laud on Piscataquog river 719 

to discontinue certain streets and sewers 720 

raising money and making appropriations for 1897 674 

making temporary loan 719, 720 

Report of board of Water commissioners 89 

Superintendent of Water-works 91 

City Engineer 185 

Chief Engineer Fire Department , 253 

Trustees of City Library 381 

Sub-Trusteees of Valley cemetery 456 

Pine Grove cemetery 453 

Amoskeag cemetery 457 

Treasurer of cemeteries 459 

Treasurer of Cemetery Fund 460 

Treasurer of Sinking Fund 4G9 

Overseers of the Poor 415 

Street and Park Commission 129 

Committee on Sewers and Drains 209 

City Solicitor 405 

School Superintendent 321 

Board of Health 421 

City Auditor 493 

City Treasurer 495 

Real and personal estate owned by the city 705 

property, exempt from taxation, other than public property G97 

Rules, etc., relating to bills against the city (auditor's department) 720 

Receipts and expenditures, 1897 506 

municipal, for 1897 499 

River road, Clarke, and Elm street sewer 571 



750 INDEX. 

s 

Sacred Heart Hospital 671 

Salaries of city offlcials 529 

Salaries, teachers' 602 

Scavenger service 556 

School department, organization of 369 

evening, mechanical drawing 603 

superintendent's report 321 

Schoolhouses, new 633 

repairs of 588 

Semi-centennial history 673 

Sewers, repairs of 566 

new 568 

Sinking fund 507 

treasurer's report 469 

Snow and ice 542 

Soldiers, indigent 669 

Solicitor, city, report of 405 

Stark and Derryfleld parks 576 

Statement of bonded debt 698 

public buildings occupied by private parties 704 

State tax 673 

Street and park commission 535 

report of 129 

Streets laid out, not built 202 

Street sweeping 555 

T 

Tabular statement of receipts 'and expenditures 506 

of taxation by Board of Assessors 678 

Taxes, abatement of , 673 

due and uncollected 681 

Tax, state 673 

county 673 

valuations 681 

Taxation, appropriations for 1S97 674 

exemption 688 

settlement of account tax collector 682-684 

Teachers, list of 371 

Teachers' salaries • 602 

Teams, city 561 

Temporary loan 510 

Text-books, free 603 

Training, manual 605 

Treasurer, city, report of 495 

V 

Valley cemetery 648 

Valuation and taxes, 1897 C80 



INDEX. 751 

W 

Watering streets 546 

Water- works, superintendent's report 91 

commissioner's report 89 

expenses 635 

Weston Observatory 652 

dedication of 653 

Women's Aid Home 670 



ilttfer«tr^ xxf 







(J '•'( 



^Tf