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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"




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FIFTY -Third annual report 



Receipts and Expenditures 



CITY OF MANCHESTER 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 3 I, 1898. 



TOGETHER WITH 



OIHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO 
THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. 

PRINTED BY THE JOHN B. CLARKE COMPANY". 
1899. 



35',, 
|g9S- 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

1898. 



Mayor, 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE Office, City Hall 

Chosen at biennial election in Xoveniber, 1896. Salary, $1,800 per 
annum, payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1848, section 1. Chapter 22.3, 
Laws of 1883. Public Statutes, chapter 47.) Telephone at house and 
office. 



Aldermen. 

Act of June, 1848, section 1. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 

Ward 1. Gardner K. Browning, 55 Stark Corporation. 

Ward 2. Ossian D. Knox, 757 Chestnut street. 

Ward 3. George W. Eeed, 483 Chestnut street. 

William F. Elliott,* 194 Concord street. 

Ward 4. Charles E. Cox, 475 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. Eichard J. Barry, 232 Lake avenue. 

Ward 6. John T. Gott, Mammoth road. 

Ward 7. John F. Frost, 11 West Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. Gillis Stark, 42 School street. 

Ward 9. Frank T. Provost, 21 Amory street. 



President of the Common Council. 
George B. Ecgers, 277 Laurel street. 



Members of tJie Common Council. 

Act of June, 1848, section 1. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 
Ward 1. 

Murdock A. Weathers, 944 Elm street. 
William Watts, 31 Stark Corporation, ISIechanic street. 
Carl E. Eydin, 28 Stark Corporation, Mechanic street. 
* Reed resigned and Wm.. F. Elliott elected to fill v.icancy. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Ward 2. 

De Lafayette Robinson, 255 Front street (A.). 
William H. Maxwell, Goffstown road (A.). 
James R. Carr, 104 Prospect street. 

Ward 3. 

George N. Baker,* 78 Ashland street. 
Edmond Pinard, 101 Pearl street. . 
Carl A. Soderberg, 256 East High street. 
Charles H. Clark, 17 Malvern street. 

Ward 4. 

George H. Phinney, 133 Hanover street. 
Joseph W. Abbott, 256 Manchester street. 
Eugene B. Worthen, 515 Hall street. 

Ward 5, 

John J. Lynch, 194 Chestnut street. 
Edward F. Murray, 296 Lake avenue. 
James F. White, 52 Auburn street. 

AVard 6. 

George B. Rogers, 277 Laurel street. 
Charles Hazen, 436 Central street. 
William E. lMerson,t 122 Willow street. 
Samuel M. Couch, 382 East Spruce street. 

W^ARD 7. 

Alexander Knight, 50 West Merrimack street. 
Samuel F. Davis, 57 West Merrimack street. 
Robert Morrow, 06 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 8. 

Peter Gunch'rnian, 211 Douglas street. 
G. Walter Taylor, 23 Boynton street. 
James F. Wyman, New Mast, near 1) street. 

W.Mil) <». 

Augustus Filion, 73 Beauixirt street. 
Joseph D. Masse, 332 Beau port street. 
John Montplaisir, 252 Coolldge avi'iuic. 

♦ Resigned iind ('.. H. Clnrk elected to lili viiciiiicy. 
t Died and S. .M. (;ouch elected to 1111 vmaiicy. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 5 

Clerk of Common Council. 

Georg-e L. Steanis, 129 Salmon street. 

SaJarv', $200. (General Laws, chapter 4G, sections 7-9. City Laws 
Did Ordinances, page 33, chapter 6, section 11.) 



City Clerk. 
Edward C. Smith Office, City Hall 

Salary, $900. The city clerk, in addition to his salary, is in receipt 
of fees as registrar of births, marriages, and deaths, and as a record- 
ing officer for record of mortgages on personal property, of attach- 
ments of real estate, of partnerships and assignments, and for record- 
ing various other legal papers. He also receives fees for issuing dog 
licenses, "billiard and bowling alley licenses, for certifying records, and 
for various other matters. 

These fees are established by the state legislature under various 
laws, and are estimated to be between $2,100 and $2,500 per annum. 
Chosen in convention of City Councils in January, annually. (Charter, 
section 22. Public Statutes, chapter 50. Act of 1849. City Laws and 
Ordinances, pages 42, 43, 68, 72, 73, 84, 86, 89, 114, 122, 123, 124, 166, 189.) 
Residence, 900 Union street. 



City Auditor. 
James E. Dodge Office, City Hall 

Salarj^ $1,200. Appointed by Mayor and approved by Board of Al- 
dermen, in Januar3% annually. (Laws of 1889, chapter 287. City Ordi- 
nances, pages 44, 71, 83-88, 173.) Residence, River road north. 



Auditor's Clerk. 

Lizzie M. Cogswell Auditor's Office, City Hall 

Residence, 1589 Elm street. 



City Treasurer. 

Pred L. Allen Office, City Hall 

Salary-, $1,200. Elected in convention of City Councils in Januarj% 
annually. (Charter, section 23. Acts of 1856, section 4. General Laws, 
chapter 48, sections 3, 4. Act of 1859. section 4. City Laws and Ordi- 
nances, pages 36, 86-89, 170, 172.) 



Treasurer's Clerk. 
Blanche E. Bullock Treasurer's Office, City Hall 



6 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salarj-, $1,650 and fees. Elected by Mayor and Aldermen before May 
1, annuallj'. (Act of July, 1851. Act of June. 1859, section 6. Public 
Statutes, chapter 43. City LaMS and Ordinances, chapter 33.) Resi- 
dence, 740 Chestnut street. 



Deputy Collector of Taxes. 

Edwin C. Paul Collector's Office, City Hall 

Paid by collector. Appoint-ed by t«x collector with approval of 
Mayor and Aldermen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 33, section 
3.) Eesidence, 41G Central street. 



City Solicitor. 

Edwin F. Jones Office, Patten Block, 936 Elm street 

Salary, $800. Elected in convention of City Councils, in January, 
annually. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6, pages 70, 72.) 
Residence, 15 High street. 



City Messenger. 

John A. Barker Office. City Hall 

Salary, $700. Elected in convention of City Councils in January, 
annually. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6.) Residence, 49 
Appleton street. 



Joint Standing Committees. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Cox; Councilmen TTazen, 
Robinson, and Filion. 

On Accotinta. — Aldermen Provost and Browning; Councilmen Taylor, 
Pierson, Coiich, and Worthen. (^feet Wednesday succeeding the 24th 
of each month. All bills must be left at the city auditor's office, prop- 
erly approved, not later than the 20th of each month.) 

On C/f/i;/i.s-.— Aldermen Cox, Reed, and Elliott; Councilmen Knight, 
Baker, (lark, and Maxwell. (Meets third Friday in each mouth.) 

On Strccln. — Aldermen (iott and Cox; Councilmen Robinson, Wyman, 
and Pinard. 

On finccrs and DniiuK.- WiU'vmvn Frost and Stark; Councilmen 
Masse, Weathers, and Watts. 

On Lif/hling Slnttfi. — Aldermen I'.iow ning and Gott; Councilmen Phin- 
ney, Gnndcrinan, and Mont plaisir. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 7 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Ileed, Elliott, and Provost; Coun- 
cilmen Morrow, Carr, and Rj'din. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen, Knox and Cox; Councilmen Taylor, 
Pierson, Couch, and Murray. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Knox and Browning; Council- 
men Knig^ht, Soderberg, and Watts. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Stark and Knox; Councilmen Mont- 
plaisir. ^lurray, and IMorrow. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Frost and Provost; Councilmen Gunder- 
man, Wj'man, and Pinard. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Frost and Barry; Councilmen Watts, 
Weathers, and Soderberg. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Frost and Barry; Councilmen 
White, Abbott, and Maxwell. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Barry and Gott; Councilmen Lynch, 
Filion, Baker, and Clark. 

On Public Health.— MAeTvaeTL Stark and Barry; Councilmen Pinard, 
Lynch, and White. 



Standing Committees. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Knox and Stark. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Reed, Elliott, and Frost. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Browning and Gott. 

0« Setting Trees. — Aldermen Provost, Eeed, and Elliott. 

COMMON corxciL. 

On Election Returns. — Councilmen Phinnej^ Masse, Baker, and Clark. 
On Bills on Second Reading. — Councilmen Soderberg, Taylor, and 
Hazen. 

On Enrollment.— CowncUmen Can-, Abbott, and Wyman. 



City Phiysician, 

Irving L. Carpenter Office, 961 Elm street 

Salary, $600. Elected by Citj- Councils in convention in January, 
annually. (Laws of 1S70, chapter 99. City Ordinances, chapter 9, sec- 
tions 29, 30.) Residence, 145S Elm street." 



City Engineer, 
Samuel J. Lord Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Chosen by City Councils in convention in January, 
annually. (City Ordinances, chapter 6, sections 33, 34.) 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Water Commissioners. 



(Chapter 70, Laws of 1871. City Ordimiiioes, chapter ;J6, aad Laws of 
1891, chapter 26, pag-e 319, act approved March 31, 1S91. Chapter 183, 
Laws of 1893.) One commissioner elected annually by Mayor and Al- 
dermen, in the month of September, for a term of six years. Office at 
Court House, corner Franklin and West Merrimack streets. Telephone 
at office and at pumping station. 

The Mayor, ex officio. 

Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1901. 
Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1900. 
Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1899. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1904. 
Harry E. Parker, term expires January, 1903. 
Charles T. Means, term expires January, 1902. 
Alpheus Gay, chairman. 

Henry Chandler, clerk. Salary, $100. Chosen, by the board of com- 
missioners. 



Superintendent of Water-Works. 

Charles K. Walker Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $2,000. Chosen by water commissioners aanually. Resi- 
dence, 68 South Main street. West Manchester. 



Clerk of the Water-Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $1,500. Chosen by water commissioners annually. Resi- 
dence, 421 Hanover street. 



Engineer at old Pumping Station. 

Josiah Laselle. Salary, $700, rent, fuel, and use of land. 
Chosen by water commissioners annually. 



Engineer at New Pumping Station. 
Henry A. Donaway. Salary, $2.50 per day, rent, and fuel. 



Justice of the Police Court. 

Isafic ]j. Treatl), coui-t r<)f)ni at rolice Station, corner Manchester and 
Chestnut streets. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 9 

Salary, $1,500. Apiwint-ed by the Governor with the advice of the 
Council. (General Laws, chapter 215; chapter 163, sections 17, 18, 19, 
of the Laws of 1878, as amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1881. Public 
Statutes, chapter 211.) 



Associate Justice of the Police Court. 

George W. Prescott. Salary', $300 per annum. 

Appointed by the Governor, with the advice of the Council. (Chapter 
215, General Laws, sections 2-14. Public Statutes, chapter 211. Chaj)- 
ter 296, Laws of 1893.) 



Clerk of the Police Court. 

John C. Bickford. Salary, $600. 

Appointed by the justice of the police court. (Chapter 163, sections 
17-19, General Laws, amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1881. Public 
St.atutes, chapter 211.) Eesidence, 15 Ash street. 



Police. 



The members of the police are appointed by the Police Commission- 
ers, and hold their commissions during- good behavior. They are, by 
virtue of their appointment, constables and conservators of the peace, 
and their jurisdiction extends throughout the city. (Chapter 253, sec- 
tion 5, General Laws; chapter 303. Laws of 1887; chapter 202, Laws of 
1893.) Police station, at the comer of Chestnut and Manchester streets. 



Police Commissioners. 

See chapter 202, Laws 1893. 

Noah S. Clark, clerk, term expires January, 1904. 

Frank P. Carpenter, term expires January, 1902. 

Harry E. Loveren, chairman, term expires January, 1900. 



Chief of Police. 

Michael J. Healy Office at Police Station 

Salarj^ $900. Residence, 304 Central street. Telephone at house and 
office. 



Deputy Chief of Police. 

John F. Cassidy Office at Police Station 

Salarj-, $800. Residence. 415 Manchester street. 



10 



[ANCUESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Captain of the Watch. 

Thomas E. Steele. Salarj-, $2.50 per day. Residence, .jG Nashua 
street. 



Leon E. Magoon. Salary, $:; 
street. 



Sergeant. 
jO per day. Residence, 355 East Spruce 



Albert Russell. 
Oscar R. Poehlman. 
Frank W. Marden. 
John D. Healy. 
George A. Lovejoj*. 
Henry A. Burns. 
Florence Sullivan. 
John T. 0'Do^Yd. 
Olaf Ring. 

Frajik E. Bourrassa. 
Randall W.. Bean. 



Patrolmen. 

SALARY, $2.25 PER DAY. 

Joseph Archambeault. 

James S. Butler. 

John C. Badger. 

Peter Callaghan. 

John J. Connor. 

Frank P. Moore. 

John T. Welch. 

John T. Nixon. 

Elmer E. Somers. 
* James S. Hampston. 

Levi J. Proctor. 
Clifton B. Hildreth. 



Janitor of Station. 

Frank P. Wiggin. $1.75 per day. Residence, 255 Auburn street. 



Miss A. B. Brown. 
=treet. 



Matron, 
per annum. 



Residence, 277 Merrimack 



School Committee. 

Chosen at the biennial election in ^'ovombcr. ISOfi; Mayor and presi- 
dent of the Common Council members rx oflicin. The board of school 
committee choose the clerk of the board, the superintendent of jniblic 
instruction, the truant oHIcer, and the teachers in the public schools, 
and determine their salaries. They have charge of the repairs of 
schoolhou.ses, to a limited extent, and the purchase of free text-books 
and other supiJies, and aiv limited by the apjiropriat ions of the City 
Councils. The salarv of the committee is $10 each. 



Walter P. Ueatli. 



Ward 1. 

i:ili(.tt C. Liimbert. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 11 

Ward 3. 
Augustus P. Home. Charles II. Manning. 

Ward 3. 
George D. Towne. Louis E. Phelps. 

Ward 4. 
Henry D. Soule. Nathaniel L. Colb3\ 

Ward 5. 
James P. Slattery. John T. Kelle3'. 

W^\RD G. 
Henry I. Haselton. Herbert E. Richardson. 

Ward 7. 
Edson S. Heath. Edward B. Woodbury. 

Ward 8. 
Luther C. Baldwin. Ned T. Wallace. 

Ward 9. 

Robert E. Walsh. Henry I. Lemay. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio chairman. 
George B. Rogers, ex officio. 
George D. Towne, Tice-chairman. 
Edward B. Woodburj-, clerk. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

William E. Buck Office, City Hall 

SaJarj', $2,300. Residence, 324 Myrtle street. 

Superintendent's Clerk. 

Fannie L. Sanborn Residence, IGl Hanover street 

Salary, $500. 

Truant Officer. 

Curtis W. Davis Office, City Hall 

Salary, $750. Residence, 849 Chestnut street. 



12 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



AssessorSc 

One assessor from each ward chosen at the biennial election in No- 
vember. Paid .$2.50 each for each day whrle employed in the as.se.ss- 
ment and abatement of taxes. Office, City Hall. (Charter, section 25. 
Public Statutes, chapter 48, section 1; chapter 50, .section 4; chapter 
49, sections 10, 11, 12. City Ordinances, chapter 6. section 20.) Assist- 
ant assessors, not exceeding six, chosen by the city councils. 

Ward 1. Henry Lewis, 32 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 2. John E. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 

Ward 3. David O. Fernald, 384 Lowell street. 

Ward 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. George F. Sheehan, 85 Cedar street. 

Ward 6. George H. Dudley, 159 Laurel street. 

Ward 7. Robert Leggett, 50 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 8. Eugene W. Brigham, 6 Marlboro street. 

Ward 0. John T. Hannigan, 159 Cartier street. 

CIIAIRMAX OV ASSESSORS. 



David O. Fernald. 



.OlHce. City Hall 



CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 



George H. Dudley 



.Ollice. City Hal 



Inspectors of Check-Lists. 

One in each ward, chosen at the biennial election in Xoveniber. Com- 
pensation, $2.25 per day for each day actually emjiloyed. Office, City 
Hall. (Laws of 1878, chapter 163, sections 5.' 6. 7, 9, 'lO, 11, 12, 13, 14, 
16, and City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) 

Ward 1. George C. Kemp, 40 Machine Shop block. 

Ward 2. Charles R. Tucker, 777 Union street. 

Ward 3. William P. Corey, 88 I»earl street. 

Ward 4. Albert T. Barr, 336 Merrimack street. 

Ward 5. Daniel A. Murphy, 246 Auburn street. 

Ward (). Albert J. Peaslee, Cohas avenue. 

Ward 7. Joseph A. Foster, 42 Amoskeag CorjKuation. 

Ward 8. Charles C. Tinkham. 9 Parker avenue. 

Ward 9. Joseph A. Guevin. 



Overseers of the Poor. 

One ill each ward, chosen at biennial eh'ction in NoxtMuhiT. The 
Mayor is a nu'ml)er <:r (iffii-ii). Compensation, .$25 j)er unnum, each; 
clerk of the board, $100 ])er annum, determine<l by City Ordinances, 
chapter II, section is, .-is MUHMidcd bv Onii nance of .\iignst .'). 1S90. 
Meet tliinl W.-dnrsdiiy of cmcIi mmitli" in City Hall Ixiilding. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 13 

Ward 1. William H. Maxwell, clerk, 20 Amoskeag- Corporation. 

Ward 2. Daniel O. Andrews, 777 Union street. 

Ward 3. Benjamin F. Garland, 28 Linden street. 

Ward 4. Charles B. Clarkson, 249 Concord street. 

Ward 5. Patrick Costello, lOG East Spruce street. 

Ward 6. Charles Francis, Candia road. 

Ward 7. William Marshall, 72 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 8. Charles S. McKean, 495 Granite street. 

Ward 9. Thomas C. Stewart, 27 Marion street. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio. Office, City Hall, 



Board of Health. 

(City Ortlinances, chapter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 1885, 
rhapt^r 165; Laws of 1887, chapter 227; Public Statutes, chapters 108, 
109, 110.) One member appointed by the Mayor in January of each 
year, to hold office for a term of three years. Salary, $200 each per 
annum. Office, Court House, West Merrimack, corner of Franklin 
street. 

John C. Bickford. Term expires first Monday in February, 1900. 

William K. Bobbins. Term expires first Monday in February, 1901. 

William M. Parsons. Term expires first Monday in February, 1899. 

William B. Blake, sanitary inspector, Hanover-street ro«,d. Office, 
Court House, Merrimack, comer of Franklin street. 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, Merrimack, 
comer of Franklin street. 

Carl O. Seaman, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, Merrimaek, 
cottier of Franklin street. 

M. Alma Fracker, office clerk. 



Fire Department. 

The chief engineer and four assistant engineers are chosen annually 
in the month of January, by a majority of the City Councils in con- 
vention. The salary of the chief engineer is $1,300 per annum; the 
assistant engineers, each $125 per annum. They exercise the powers 
and perform the duties of firewards. The said engineers constitute 
the board of engineers, and elect a clerk whose comj^ensation is $25 a 
year. The annual compensation of the call members of the several 
hook-and-ladder, hose, steam fire engine, and chemical engine com- 
panies is as follows: Captains, each $165; lieutenants, each $160; clerks, 
each $160; assistant engineers, each $155; all other members, each $150; 
payable in equal semi-annual payments, on the first of January and 
July. (Laws of 1870, chapter 99. General Laws, chapter 106. City 
Ordinances, chapters 6 and 12.) Six members are permanently em- 
ployed a.s engineers at $76.25 per month each, and twenty-one as drivers 
at .$68,331/3 per month each, six other permanent men at $65 per month 
each, and receive no compensation as call members. Members and offi- 
cers of each companj' are appointed by the board of engineers. 



14 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Chief Engineer. 

Thomas W. Lane (JtHce, Central Station, \ine street 

Residence, 19;!7 Elm street. Telephone at house and oflice. 

Fred S. Bean, clerk, 102 Orange street. 

Ruel G. Manning, 52 Douglas street. West Manchester. 

Eugene S. Whitney, Kiver road north, corner West North street. 

Clarence 11. Merrill, 418 Merrimack street. 

For further infonnation see chief engineer's report. 



Trustees of City Library. 

(Laws of 1854, chapter 158S. See contract with Maucliester Athe- 
neum, printed on pages 107 and 108 of City Report for fiscal year end- 
ing January 31, 1855.) Board of .seven trustees, one of whom is elected 
by Aldermen and board of trustees in joint convention in September, 
annually. Term of service, seven 3 ears; no salary. Two additional 
trustees, Mayor, and president of Common Council, ex officio. 

Frank P. Carpenter, term expires October 1, 1902, Elm, corner West 
North street. 

Nathan P. Hunt, term expires October 1, 1901. 747 Union street. 

Herman F. Straw, tenn expires October 1, 1900, 007 Chestnut street. 

Walter M. Parker, term expires October 1, 1899, 188.'? Elm street, 
comer Webster. 

Isaac W. Smith,* term expires October 1, 1898, 1855 Elm street. Re- 
appointed. 

John C. French, term expires October 1, 1904, 129 Bay street. 

C. D. McDuffie, term expires October 1, 1903, Ash street, corner 
:Myrtle. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio. 

George B. Rogers, ex officio. 



Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 

The City Councils in joint convention, biennially, elect one member 
of said board for a term of six yeai's. Not more than two nuMubers 
can be of the same jjolitical party. Said board, consisting of three 
members, has full charge, management, and control of the building, 
constructing, repairing, and maintaining of all the streets, highways, 
lanes, sidew.alks, bridges, and public sewers and drains, and public 
parks and commons. (See Laws of 1893, chapter 204.) OfVicc. City Hall 
building. Open from 8 to 12 A. M., 2 to 5 p. M. Regvilar nun'ting of the 
board at 2 o'clock P. M. each day. Salary of each member, $000 per 
year, ])avable quarterlv, and eacli is allowed $150 annualiv for hoi"se 
hire. 

(jcorgc II. Stearns, clerk, tenn expires 1898. Re-elected. 
Horace 1'. Simpson, chairman, term expires 1900. 
TSyron Worthcn, term expires 1902. 
• Died Nov. 28, 1898. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 15 

Assistant Clerk. 



Julia F. Stearus. 



City Weigher. 

Elected annually in .convention of City Councils. Salary, $400 per 
annum; all fees for weighing returned monthly to city treasurer with 
sworn statement. Stationed at city scales on Franklin street. 

Asa B. Eaton. Office, city scales: residence, 2;j Appleton street. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Charles B. Clarkson. 

Elected annualh' in January by City Councils in convention. Paid 
by fees. (Section 25, chapter 43. Public Statutes, and chapter 125, 
Public Statutes.) 



Fish and Game Wardens. 

(Public Statutes, chapter 130.) Elected by City Councils in conven- 
tion. 

John C. Hig-gins, 143 Orange street. 
Charles H. Richardson, 411 Hanover street. 
Dennis F. Scannell, 74 Clinton street. 
Harry P. Ray, River road north. 
C. R. Hodge, 574 Hall street. 



Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39, sections 1, 2, 3, 4.) Two trustees elected 
by City Councils in convention in January, annually, for the term of 
four years. Sub-tinistees appointed bj' board of trustees. 

J. Adam Graf, 10 Middle street, term expires Januarj^ 1899. 
William H. Huse, Mammoth road, term expires 1899. 
John L. Sanborn,* 25 Market street, term expires 1898. 
Bushrod W. Hill,* 299 Hanover street, term expires 1898. 
Stiilman P. Cannon, 99 Lowell street, term expires 1901. 
Alfred D. Maxwell, Goffstown road near Front street, term expires 
1901. 

Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street, term expires Januar^^ 1900. 
John P. Young, 346 Men-imack street, term expires January, 1900. 
Fred L. Allan, clerk and treasurer, 6 Linden street. 
* Reappointed. 



16 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Sub-Trustees of Cemeteries. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Alderman Gardner K. Browning, 55 Canal street. 
Councilman Carl A. Soderberg, 256 East High street. 
John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street. 
Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street, 
ytillman P. Cannon, 99 Lowell street. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Alderman Ossian D. Knox, 757 Chestnut street. 

Councilman Alexander Knight, 50 West Merrimack street. 

J. Adam Graf, 10 Middle street. 

John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street. 

Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street. 

AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

Councilman William Watt«, 31 Mechanic street. 
Alfred D. Maxwell, Goft'stown road near Front street, 
Williaon H. Huse, Mammoth road. East Manchester. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Byron A. Stearns. Office and residence at the cemetery. Telephone. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Charles H. G. Foss. Office at the cemetery; residence, 267 Lake 
avenue. 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 25 High street. 
Otis Barton, 122 Orange street. 
William C. Clarke, ex officio. 



Inspector of Milk. 

Archie F. Precourt Central, corner Chestnut street 

Residence, 335 Ea.st Sjjruce street. Term expires February 1, annu- 
ally. (I'ublic Statutes, chapter 127.) A])p()iiited by Mayor and Alder- 
men. Salary, $300 per annum. 



Inspector of Buildings. 

Thomas W. Lane OtVuc at Central Fire Station 

Residence, l')37 Elm street. A|)pointed by Board of iMayor and 
Aldermen, biennially, in February. Salary, $100 ])er annum. (City 
Ordinances. <-liap1cr ir>. Laws of" ISS.;, (•]i"Mpt<'r 'Jl. Public Statutes, 
pji^c ITO.) T(l.|.lioiic at Ik. list' and ollicc. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



17 



Inspectors of Oil. 

Joseph B. Baril 99 Bridge street 

John Cayzer 383 Granite street 

(Public Statutes, chapter 129, sections 25-34. City Ordinances, chap- 
ter 25.) Paid by fees, y^ of 1 per cent per gallon. 



% Moderators. 

• Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 31, sections 3, 9; chapter 
36, section 9; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordinances, page 18. See 
Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Ward 1. Abial W. Eastman. 

Ward 2. William M. Butterfield. 

Ward 3. Allen W. Wilson. 

Ward 4. George C. Gilmore. 

Ward 5. Hugh ISIcDonough. 

Ward 6. Herbert S. Clough. 

Ward 7. J. Adam Graf. 

Ward 8. Eben C. Chase. 

Ward 9. Xorbert Descoteau. 



Elected biennially. 
Ordinances, page 18. 



Ward Clerks." 

(General Laws, chapter 44, sections 10, 12. City 
Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 



Ward 1. 


George A. Stokes.' 


Ward 2. 


Elmer W. Nutting. 


Ward 3. 


John H. Hayes. 


Ward 4. 


Waldo E. Gilmore. 


Ward 5. 


Martin J. Whalen. 


Ward 6. 


Harry A. Piper. 


Ward V. 


Charles E. Bartlett. 


Ward 8. 


G. L*. Putnam. 


Ward 9. 


Charles C. Boisclair. 



Selectmen. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 1, section 27; chapter 12'. 
section 6; chapter 40, sections. 2, 3; chapter 109, section 27; chapter 213, 
section 1. City Ordinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns 
and cities.) 



Ward 1. 



John H. Wales, Jr. 



John V. Brandt. 



Alexander Hanna. 



18 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Ward 2. 

Fred K. Eamsey. Silas E. Wallace. 

James E. Orrill, 

Ward 3. 

Walter B. Wright. Victor Johnson. 

John Cronin. 

Ward 4. 

Albert E. Blanchard. Joseph E. Merrill. 

Thomas Mungall. 

Ward 5. 

William H. Quinn. Robert F. M^lrra3^ 

Thomas F. Daly. 

Ward 6. 

George M. Bean. John Ferguson. 

Harrison W. Haselton. 

Ward 7. 

Moses Sheriff. Hanson R. Armstrong. 

^ Robert Leggett. 

Ward 8. 
Richard P. Grossman. Hervey Stratton. 

Osman W. Pettingill. 

Ward 9. 

Louis Gauthier. Eugene Quirin. 

Treflfle Raiche. 



MAYOR'S MESSAGE. 



MAYOR'S MESSAGE. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils: ■ 

It is my purpose at this time to submit for your information and 
candid consideration some facts and figures relative to the city's pres- 
ent condition, financial and otherwise, believing that having completed 
one half of the term of office for which you were duly sworn on Jan- 
uary, 1897, that a statement of this character should be placed before 
you. 

In some respects the results of the year 1897 were extremely grati- 
fying. For the first time for a period of years the current expenses 
of the year were fully met by the annual receipts. No bonds for any 
purpose were issued, no money borrowed except the customary loan 
in anticipation of taxes, every outstanding bill against the city, so far 
as I am able to learn, was paid, and on the first day of January, 1898, 
there was a balance of net cash in the treasury to the credit of the 
city of $122,052.37. In addition to this there was a net reduction of the 
city debt of $27,250, while the sum of $44,175 was added to the city's 
sinking fund. This statement is eliacidated by the following financial 
tabulation of the city auditor: 

Total amount of bonded debt, including cemetery bonds. . $1,890,000 
Net indebtedness for water purposes 900,000 

Net bonded debt after deducting water debt $990,000 

Indebtedness existing in other forms than as above stated: 
Temporary notes 100,000 

$1,090,000 

Total debt $1,990,000 

Total amount of sinking fund December 31, 1897 $139,189.79 

As showTi in the assessors' books for the year 1897: 

The assessed value of personal property, including poll 

tax $4,655,114 

The assessed value of real estate 25,831,832 

Total value for taxation $30,486,946 

21 



22 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Tax rate on a hundred $2,080 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 3.575 

Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 6.527 

Eeceipts and expenditures of the city for the year 1897: 

Cash on hand January Ij 1897 $160,863.04 

Receipts during year 1,302,033.33 

$1,462,896.37 

Amount of drafts during j'ear $1,340,844.00 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1897 122,052.37 

$1,462,896.37 

That the foregoing condition of affairs was brought about by a high 
tax rate you and the public are well aware. That it dould have been 
reached in any other way I do not believe. The city might have in 
1897, as it had done for years previously, resorted to the issue of bonds 
for meeting certain indebtednesses, but the city council at the opening 
of the year declared by practically a unanimous vote its opposition to 
the policy of either bond issues or borrowing money, and this left but 
one course open, — the pajanent of all bills from the annual receipts. 
And, gentlemen, permit me to say here that I believe this policy was 
not only the correct one to have followed in 1897, but unless something 
unforeseen arises, is the right one to pursue in 1898. 

Having treated in detail this subject in m5' last inaugural address, 
and most other matters relating to the atfairs of the city over which 
j'ou have supervision, I do not now intend to tax your time and 
patience by an exhaustive message. On the other hand, I do feel the 
importance of ageun urging you to closely contemplate the business 
situation of the times, and by every official act of yours, however small, 
apply to it the methods of practical, wise economy. There are busi- 
ness reasons apparent to all of jou why the city of Manchester should 
not during the year now entered upon indulge in any undertakings 
that are not a public necessity. Nor is this all. I believe it to be your 
duty, and my duty as well, to ascertain at once in what departments 
a curtailment of expenses can be made and to make it. This is not 
perhaps ea.sj^ but by your united efforts it can be and should be 
accomplished. 

There are departments of the city tliat are known to cost too 
much money. Some are conducted, I am free to say, on a method of 
extravagance entirely out of keeping with our conditions and sur- 
roundings. Our heaviest expenses exist in the school depai-tment, the 
street department, the fire department, and the department of street 
lighting, to all of which, in mj' opinion, more economical principles 
should be strictly applied. As illustrating the great incrca.se of ex- 
pense attending the operation of these departments I submit for your 



mayor's message. 23 

consideration a comparative table showing- the cost of maintenance 
in 1887, and ten years later, in 1897: 

1S87. 1897. Increase. 

School department $59,005.77 $109,629.52 $50,623.75 

Street " 94,566.48 168,503.07 73,930.59 

Fire " 31,307.11 60,811.28 29,504.17 

Police " 30,560.44 44,742.41 14,181.97 

Lighting- streets 13,970.98 53,889.73 39,918.75 

The foregoing- fig-ures show that the agg-regate expenses of the school 
department and the tire department have nearly doubled in a decade, 
that the expenses of the street and park department have increased 
nearlji- $74,000, while the expense of lighting the citj^ streets has quad- 
rupled. These are strong facts, and in my judgment are not war- 
ranted either by an increase of population or an increase of valuation 
in the city of ^Manchester. Retrenchment should immediately take 
place in all of these departments, and I trust that before authorizing 
the expenditure of money for any purpose this j-ear you will seriously 
consider fair and judicious methods for cutting down these burden- 
some expenses. Whatever iDcrmanent improvements are necessary I 
am heartily in favor of, but beyond this we should not go. The cost 
of street lighting for the city of Manchester now amounts to $53,889.73, 
and as it is generally conceded that the city is abundantly well lighted 
at the present time to meet all demands of public safety and accommo- 
dation, I think the city councils will be acting wisely if they decline 
to further add to this expense during the current year; in other words, 
that they will refuse to vote in any additional electric lights in 1898. 

On the whole the public buildings of the city are in good condition 
and do not need a large outlay. There is scarcely any end to the num- 
ber of improvements sought for or recommended annually' upon this 
class of city property, but most of the buildings are nearl}- well 
enough as thej' are and will serve their purposes for the ensuing year 
without the expenditure of much money. 

An enormous bill of expense that the city now bears is that for fviel. 
This expense, in my judgment, is far too great, and rigid means should 
be taken this year to reduce it if possible. The suggestion has been 
made that the city might make a large saving in this direction by 
establishing a city coal pocket, buying its owti coal by the cargo, and 
screening and distributing it under the city's supervision. But whether 
this is done or not tlie city's fuel situation has now reached such a 
degree of extravagance that some action is imperatively demanded to 
lessen the cost of heating the public buildings. The city fuel bills for 
the year 1897 amounted to $9,192.40, apportioned as follows: Public 
school department, $6,628.26; fire department, $1,439.10; police station, 
$595.27; city hall, $393.34; city library, $374.57; court house, $183; city 
scales, $23.50. 

In offering- these facts for j-our consideration I am fully mindful of 
the ojjposition that will beset you in endeavoring- to. radically reduce 



24 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

expenses, yet I esteem it my official dutj' to present them to you. Our 
citizens of all classes in their business and living expenses are com- 
pelled to adopt such a policy; why should the municipality then de- 
cline to adapt its needs to the depressed business conditions now con- 
fronting- the people? But to talk economj'^ is not enough. It must be 
practiced, and practiced in every department of the city, if a substan- 
tial saving is to be made. If the times warrant anything, they war- 
rant the city councils of Manchester, during 1898, in scaling down 
every city expense that can be reduced without injury to the city's 
interests. 

And one statement more. "WTiile the expenses of the city will become 
no less unless you take determined measures to make them less, the 
receipts of the city during the past few jears from various sources 
have been steadily diminishing. There has been a very marked falling 
off in the receipts from the state in the past five A^ears. In 1893 the 
city of Manchester received from the state $120,228.74, while the state 
tax paid by the city was $65,615, or a balance to the city's credit of 
$54,613.74. In 1894 the state paid the city $110,532.59 and received in 
return $65,615, making a balance of $44,917.59, which was $9,696.15 less 
than in the year previous. For the j'ear 1895 the state turned into the 
city treasury $88,204.15, while the state tax was increased to $68,225, 
reducing the city's net income from the state to $19,979.15, or $24,938.44 
less than in 1894, and $34,634.59 less than in 1893. The receipts of the 
year 1896 from the state were $86,803.53, as against $68,225 paid back, 
leaving a balance of $18,578.53. In 1897 the city's receipts from the 
state were slightly increased, the figures being $90,248.53, while the 
state tax remained the same, $68,225, furnishing a balance of $22,023.53. 
This year, owing ta the fact that the state by legislative enactment 
will raise $75,000 less than in 1897, the state tax of this city will be 
.$57,991.25, or $10,232.75 less than in 1896, but this gain will be practically 
offset by the increase in the coiinty tax, which will be over $9,000 
larger in 1898 than in 1897. A recapitulation shows the receipts of the 
city from the state to have fallen oft" in the following ratio during the 
past five years: 

1893 $54,613.74 

1894 44,917.59 

1895 19,979.15 

1896 18,578.53 

1897 22,023.53 

The priMcii):il ciiusc for (lie reduction of tin- city's rcccijjts from the 
state is due to a failing oil" in the savings-banlc deposits, to a reduction 
in the tax ujran these de])Osits from 1 per cent to % of 1 per cent, 
and to exemptions under the law. The maximum of taxable deposits 
wa.s reached in 1893, when they amounted to $77,024,282 for the entire 
state. In the three years following they decreased at a rate of about 
.$7,000,000 a year, the tot^il decrease being $20,140,082. In 1893 the sum 
of $2,102,389.32, and in 1894 the sum of $3,169,790.90 was deducted under 



mayor's message. 25 

the stete law exemptingf banks on their real estate taxed locallj^ wher- 
ever it might exist, either within or without the state. In 1895 the leg- 
islature passed an act exempting all o per cent loans made to parties 
in the state and secured by real estate within the limits of the state. 
This double exemption of "> per cent state loans increased the total 
amount exempted for 1895 to .$6.()43,i;]9.73. In 1896 this amount was 
still further increased, the exemption on savings-bank securities being 
$8,426,255.42. This large exemption, together with the great decrease 
in deposits, reduced the savings-bank tax realized bj- the city of Man- 
chester for the year 1896 to $50,770.79 and in 1897 to $48,516.24, while 
the outlook for the year 1898 points to a still further reduction. It is 
due to the savings-bank tax more than to anj^ other one item that the 
city received from the state in 1897, $38,289.76 less than was received in 
1893. 

The responsibility of reducing some of the cit\- expenses rests 
largely with the joint standing committees. It is a belief long com- 
mon that a committee falls short of its duty if it fails to devise means 
for expending the full amount of the appropriation allotted to it. 
Happily all committees are not alike in this respect, otherwise the unex- 
pended balances in 1897 would not at the end of the j^ear just closed 
have exceeded the overdrafts. In my opinion, a committee will bring 
more credit to itself and will far better serve the interests of the city 
by trying to expend as little of its appropriation as needful, rather 
than by trjing to expend it all, or by exceeding it and then asking the 
city councils for a transfer. 

I am pleased to believe that the spirit of economy and reform mani- 
fest by the city councils the past year augurs favorably for still further 
retrenchment in the jear to come. There are not now apparent any 
extraordinary expenditures of urgent necessity that will require your 
favorable action, and if the majority of your members Avill heed the 
lesson of the hour and insist upon keeping down every city expense, 
whether large or small, I am confident that the affairs of the city 
will be administered during 1898 with credit to j'ourselevs, with the 
approval of all thinking" citizens, and under a tax rate of less than two 
dollars. And the place to begin is when you are called upon to pass 
upon the appropriations for the year. 

The past year has recorded the most important steps in the direction 
of good roads that have ever been put into effect in Manchester. In 
compliance with a strong sentiment in favor of better paved streets, 
the city laid on Elm street, from Manchester to Stark streets, a sample 
of granite block paving that is generally conceded to be as durable and 
satisfactory' a type of city paving of its kind as is to be found any- 
where. As it replaced one of the worst pieces of block paving in exist- 
ence in any city in the country the improvement became very marked, 
and I believe the city will be waiTanted in adding to the work this 
year. A high class of concrete paving was also laid on Granite and 
South Main streets, which is likewise regarded by the public with 
much favor, and is worthj- of being continued on the west side of the 



26 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

river. This movement in the line of good roads is, I believe, the right 
policy to pursue in the business streets of a city like Manchester, and 
if judiciously followed will give us in time what we have never had, — 
good streets, and good streets mean, or should mean, clean streets. 
Streets most in use are the ones, in my judgment, upon which the 
greatest outlay of money should be made, and while a good quality of 
paving costs more in the first instance it is ultimate economj^ to lay it 
rather than to expend so much money in macadamizing, the usefulness 
of which in ^Manchester, as a rule, has been short lived and demanding 
frequent repairs. In each of the enterjirises of new paving carried out 
last yeai* the jNIanchester Street Railway companj^ bore its proportion- 
ate part of the cost, an expense that it should be required to share in 
whatever similar improvements are made this year in streets occupied 
by its tracks. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 

Mayor. 
Manchester, N. H., February 1, 1S98. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



BOAED OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 1898, 



WILLIAM C. CLAKKE, Mayor ex offlcio. 

Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1905. 
Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1900. 
Harry E. Parker, term expires January, 1903. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1904. 
Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1901. 
Charles T. Means, term expires January, 1902. 



OFFICERS. 

Alpheus Gay, President. 

Henry Chandler, Clerk. 

Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

JosiAH Laselle, Engineer at Low Service Pumping Station. 

H. a. Donaway, Engineer at High Service Pumping Station. 



28 



EEPORT OF THE BOAED OF AVATEE COMMIS- 
SIONERS. 



To the Honorable the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

Gentlemen, — The Manchester Water Board herewith submit their 
twenty-seventh annual report for the year ending December 31, 1898, 
with the report of the superintendent during- the same period, to Avhich 
reference may be made for details of the service. 

FINANCIAL CONDITION. 

Eeceipts and expenditures for the year have been as follows: 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1897 $26,651.56 

Received from water rentals and miscellaneous 113,509.08 

Received from hydrant rentals • 17,675.00 

Total $157,835.64 

Amount paid for current expenses $40,101.23 

Construction 21,388.83 

Interest on bonds, 1898 39,682.50 

Hydrant rentals set aside for sinking fund 17,675.00 

Set aside for sinking fund, for payment of water 

bonds 5,000.00 

123,907.56 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1898 $33,928.08 

The income from the works has met all current expenses, has paid 
for all extensions, and also the interest on $900,000 of water bonds, 
without increasing the 'indebtedness, besides the puix-hase of lands and 
cottages on the shore of our water supply. 

A cordial invitation is extended to all our citizens, who have a desire, 
to inspect the pumping plants and familiarize themselves with their 
efficiency to supply the city with water in case of emergency. 

The acquisition of lands bordering on the lake has been continued 
during the year, when prices have been satisfactory to the commis- 
sioners. 

29 



30 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

In conclusion, we refer with pleasure to the friendly and pleasant 
relations that have at all times been maintained between the water 
commissioners, the chief executive of the city, and the cit^' council; 
the utmost harmony and courteous intercourse has existed in our 
board in all its deliberations and actions, which we trust our citizens 
will appreciate, and strengthen us to continue to gaiard, with watch- 
ful care, all the interests entrusted to us in this department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

William C. Clarke, ex ofjlcio, 
Ajlpheus Gay, 
Andrew C. Wallace, 
Charles H. Manning, 
Charles T. Means, 
Harry E. Parker, 
Henry Chandler, 

Water Commissioners. 
January 1, 1899. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S EEPORT. 



To the HonoraUc Board of Water Commissioners of the City of Manchester, 

N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — The report of your superintendent for the year 1898 is 
herewith respectfully submitted: 

Massabesic lake has been full of water the past year. This has en- 
abled the pumps at the low service station to keep up the supply with- 
out anj^ assistance from the steam pumps. Five inches below the dam 
is the lowest point reached, and thirty-two inches above is the highest. 
The water stands today twenty-four inches above the dam. 

The rainfall for 1898 was 47.15 inches; for 1897, 49.75 inches; for 
1896, 38.41 inches; for 1895, 42.06 inches. 

LOW SERVICE STATION. 

The most money laid out at this station has been on the buildings. 
The outside and inside of the dwelling-house have been painted and 
most of the rooms newly papered. The barn has been painted, also 
the woodwork, on the roof of the pump house. 

The pumps are running in good shape and no serious accident has 
occurred. A crack in the pillar-block Of the Davidson pump was dis- 
covered January 13, which was immediately repaired, and so well done 
it has not been necessary to put in the new one which was procured at 
the time. 

The dam penstock and water wheels have needed no repairs, so as 
a whole this part of the city water-works has been run with as little 
trouble as ever. 

The following is the amount pumped: 



31 



32 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



-JdAB AIIBQ 



•ii;noni 



■padrunci 
suo[ibS -ox 



•ajn 
-mui .lad 
88JIOJ18 -OK 



CO to >H tomio oi •o>nt--j» 
lO lO_ tO_ «0 CJ, iTj^ o H S^v_-ii» 



o to 'M 00-* ■>* ooe^a3~»cD 

00 t— OS CO-HI*! o ^*^C^lC-^ 

"2. "^ '^ '^ *V '^l '^ "?. ^^l"','-! 
coostoo— .SSo S — ?m 

"O^lO CSt-COO (M to r-i-*rtlO 

00 t- I- r^«5t- o3 c-i-t-«ot- 



;*O-2'(M00-*'*t0e000t0O->)<XCiM0D<N<0 
-^•^— MO-WMO N to ^l-iO OifiOOOT lO o 

?2 25 <2 ir ■* 5 '~ ''5" m' o* o 00 00 tc « ~ -T c" oT 
5og5ir:t<3-H<f:i^— — ^i-riot~rM^tD — 0005 
»0 05 l-^GO Xi-<-^eoc^torj*r-o»t^^-^»CiC 
tr of ►--«'»'« 'O'-J^ojirf' efeJt-^ tnt^tarf 
0(Mco eo to tot^ t-Nt^ t^t-toi- 



st-rrc^-^r-coooMrotct^-^-ooxiinoo 

J t- O t~ 00 I- Ol O lO M I- tl O 00 •* C-l -* t^ 



•sa}[o.ns 



•JIJOAV 

noil ovj 



•dinnd 

;o puiji 



osoototoosMoooas 

rH10.-ICO<>«0<N050 



h-OCSOOOtOO'O'M'* 

oe-Jtoe^t-itototccoto 



o«eoinot3ioooo«5Qioooo>ra 
com'0'<*oe<5iSrt«5eooBr-icoeoc<5iM<OT>< 






:Q>o>a>q; 






Q«QP3C«G«Q piOaJQcJQ 



2 »2 ? a 



fc. a I) ^-^ 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 33 

HIGH SERVICE STATION. 

At this station very little M-ork has been done outside of the pump 
house. At the time of the last annual report the pumps were being- 
repaired. The trouble was caused by the expansion plates under the 
pump ends having- been erected on a lead joint, instead of being brushed 
down on to a stone foundation and dowelled in place. The lead worked 
out, and allowed the whole strain to come on to the cylinder head 
joints which soon became leaky. The plates were replaced by new 
ones properly fitted, the joints remade, and today the pumps are run- 
ning in good order. The Worthington x^eople sent a first-class me- 
chanic to take charge of the work. 

The repairs on the pumps and machinery were done by the Amos- 
keag Corjxjration, and done quickly, thanks to Commissioner Manning. 
The man that was sent presented a bill for himself and expenses 
amounting to $232.57. The Worthington Pump company paid half, 
which was $110.28. The expense of these repairs at this time was 
about $900 in all. Since then, about $200 has been laid out, most of 
it for brass piping to the feed pumps. ^ 

The following is the amount pumped at this station: 



34 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



•pBaqoicaBu^a 



•juoo 
JO piinoci .i3cl 
p,diuncl8uo[[B9 



•padnind 
suoiibS jo -oii 



i^ S3 
O O 



sojio.ns JO .isq 
-lunu aSvj.iaAV 



•S0J(O.US JO 

jaqiuuii i«lox 



t- Oh ,, ! 



•Sui 
■diund SiSup ON 



I ei c^ciN 



-- ?^ !5 ^ tT '^ =; se s; 



to"— *-*';?•» oTei'H'Cct-^t-rt-r 
o: « i- "O i-^<o t-;.'-',— ,t^ c^ ». 
o i-^C5 toi-^oocoo'oc'croo" 

t-Cr-n-li-i>-cr-i|HC<?«<Mi-li-< 



;0 o o 1^ ^ o 



lO lo lo ■«< Tji 



•H*»C30Q0»rtCOrHt^003OC 

lO ^ lO •* lOin ;d ic* lo lO • 



.Mira CO a 00 



CO a 00 into 



OincDtDlOCCOO:C5(N'M<-l 

^ots-Tc:o(r-. mocoi-03 
t- t- M_ c: -»_ m -fl^ -"l^ o_ O ■d<_-^ 

CD iJ 00 C5 35" 05 O OS O" O" OT-* 



oco-<i<c;e)ooo-s<f-ioot^ 



coc<5coiNr:eo"*iMcocoeoM 









00000 ic 000000 in 

O OOMCO "WOOOCOO r1 



o -H 1^ CO c<j 1^ o :o t— fM Tc fri »o 

(NiNco — eioJcosoMirtoco ao 



^ 2 



d ^ 



"S O o CD 

llil 

2 bo a g 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 35 

The Hunter house, which was occupied by Mrs. Hunter under an 
agreement when the city bought the property that she might remain 
there two years, has been vacated by her. Eepairs amounting to about 
$150 were laid out in shingling, fencing, and painting and papering in 
the inside of the house. It is now let to one of the workmen at the 
station for six dollars per month. 

This last j'car more repairs have been made on the high service force 
main than on the old cement lined on the low service. The leaks have 
been in the lead joints. 

What has been done on both reservoirs consists in putting top dress- 
ing on to the banks to keep up the grass crop to prevent the banks 
from washing. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES. 

The water pipe has been extended about one mile and a half. It has 
been laid on twenty-eight different streets, at an expense of about 
$9,000. It has been extended according to the niles, which are that 
the abutters shall pay six per cent, or in other words, to take water 
enough to come to that. In some cases it is with difficulty that we 
can collect it, but as a rule they pay what they agree to. 

There have been laid over nearly four miles of pipe at an expense of 
$1-5,300. 

This leaves about six miles of cement-lined pipe still in use. The 
four, six, eight, and ten-inch is nearly all taken out, leaving in the 
twenty-inch force and supply main; also, about two miles of the four- 
teen-inch and twelve-inch in the city proper. 

There have not been many leaks in the city limits; what we have had 
were small joint leaks, or on the service pipes. 



36 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

RAINFALL AT HIGH SERVICE STATION, 1898. 



DAT. 


'5 

i 


1 
1 


i 


< 


^ 

a 


a 

3 


i-s 


1 

< 


1 
1 


1 




S 

1 


1 




*.70 






















I""." :.:::: 






*.02 




.02 
.09 
.16 














^ 












.42 
'".03 








I :::■■■;:: 








.26 


.02 


.40 
1.03 


.04 
2.07 






5 


.32 


'".is 


*.53 


*.46 


".n 

.02 


*1.37 


.44 






7 

g 


.31 






.18 





1.34 
.09 


'".ei' 














.36 
.09 
.07 
.69 














.17 


.07 






JQ 1 






.03 








*.97 
.73 




11 






.06 












12 


.16 
.03 


.22 


.10 










.18 




13 '.'.'. 

14 




.12 


.03 
.34 


.78 
.03 


.09 






•.38 












.14 

.02 


15 


.34 


*.42 
*.23 


'",'64' 


.66 
.54 








.86 






.35 

.04 












17 












.17 

.05 

1.33 

.21 




18 






.09 
.03 


i!43" 


.16 


.13 




19 




.26 
.05 






95 

.39 




20 


»1.34 


"*AC,' 
.28 
.32 


..53 
.02 


.15 


* 42 


21 


.29 








22 






.67 
.02 

"As 






.84 








.65 


.12 


.34 

1 84 

.06 

.05 


"!53' 
.62 
.16 
.50 
.02 






.71 
.95 




.57 




.06 
'".05 


.64 
.66 
.27 




».36 
.24 
















*.81 






"!45' 


.54 
.26 














28 










.05 


.02 




•1.06 




29 






.23 


.57 








* bi 


30 










.01 






.15 




31 


*.64 




*.35 














•.45 




















4.60 


2.81 


1.68 


5.12 


3.25 


3.35 


1.45 


5 73 


4.15 


6.40 


5.41 


3.20 



*Snow melted. 
1898. Total rainfall, 47.15 inches. 
1897. Total rainfall, 49.78 inches. 
1896. Total rainfall, 38.41 inches. 
1895. Total rainfall, 42.06 inches. 

The income from the sale of water for 180S has been as follows: 

Received for water by rate $29,409.58 

for water by meter S0,r>4.1.;!0 

for building- purposes 187.00 

from lines 3f)9.80 

$110, 599.68 

Received for old cement pipe $180.00 

for labor and pipe sold 54. (iO 

from F. O. Clement, old brass 15.50 

from Amoskea^ Corporation, pipe 82.30 

from Portsmouth Water Co., pipe 8.00 

from Union Electric Lif^iit Co., pipe... 9.00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 37 

Received from John Walker, labor $5.00 

from Kean & Sheehan, repairs to hy- 
drant 5.00 

from Tmo Wrapper Co., pipe and labor 52.90 

from St. George\s school, 4-inch main. . 29.00 

$441.90 

Keceived from Asa Heselton, rent of farm $50.00 

from C. Pierce, rent of farm 50.00 

from Sarah Gilbert, rent of land 2.00 

from J. A. Sinclair, rent of house... 26.00 

from Samuel McDonald, rent of house 17.00 
from W. G. Brown, rent of Cochrane 

residence 34.00 

from S. G. Prescott, rent of store 60.00 

from ISIassabesic Grange, rent of hall.. 100.00 

from George F. Hamblett, for grass... 1.50 

from T, F. Dodge, part of Bunton farm 1,850.00 

from V. Rosen, for Opelt building.... 125.00 

from Mr. Boone, building at Harv^ey's . . 40.00 

from N, Ahlquist, Gould building 35.00 

from F. L. Lewis, Palmer building.... 25.00 
from G. O. Bartholomew, Cochran 

building 50.00 

from Fletcher Brown, lease 1.00 

G. G. Griffin, lease 1.00 

2,467.50 

$113,509.08 
Received from hydrant rentals 17,675.00 

Total received $131,184.08 

Abatements, $750.43. 

Amount on hand December 31, 1897 $26,051.56 

received for water, etc 113,509.08 

received from hydrant rentals 17,675.00 

Total 157,835.64 

Amount paid for current expenses $40,161.23 

paid for construction expenses 21,388.83 

Interest on bonds, 1898 39,682.50 

Hydrant rentals set aside for sinking fund 17,675.00 

State law, 1897, water bonds, amount set aside for 

sinking fund 5,000.00 

123,907.56 

Amount on hand December 31, 1898 $33,928.08 



38 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1898. 

Superintendence, repairs, and renewals $31,476.01 

Stationery and printing- 225.78 

Office and incidental expenses 583.51 

Pumping- expenses, low service 2,128.90 

Pumping- expenses, high, service 4,971.88 

Repairs to dam, canal, and reservoirs 155.58 

Repairs to building 619.57 

Total current expenses, 1898 $40,161.23 

Service pipes $2,450.75 

Distribution pipes 9,342.30 

Fire hydrant and valves 1,054.99 

Meters 1,847.32 

Land 6,600.00 

Grading and fencing 93.47 

21,388.83 

Total construction expenses, 1898 $61,550.06 

Sinking fund, fire hydrants $17,675.00 

Sinking fund, water bonds 5,000.00 

22,675.00 

Total $84,225.06 

Construction Expenses. 

pwRrr^r r- . - , , 

Land and water rights $148,784.00 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races 101,399.16 

Pumping machinerj% pump house, and building 176,372.19 

Distribution reservoirs 117,697.90 

Force and supply mains 89,769.02 

Distribution pipes 595,153.43 

Fire hydrants and valves 60,438.12 

Meters and fixtures 56,297.30 

Service pipes 74,132.69 

Grading and fencing 17,470.39 

Tools and fixtures 10,649.35 

Boarding and store-houses 919.36 

Roads and culverts 4,405.20 

Supplies ' 550.39 

Engineering 22,176.19 

Livery and traveling expenses 2,856.64 

Legal expenses 563.79 

Total construction expen.ses to December 31, 1898 $1,479,635.12 



BOARD OF n^ATER COMMISSIONERS. 39 

Current Expenses. 

Superintendence, collecting", and repairs $328,367.48 

Stationery and printing- 7,471.41 

OflBce and incidentals 33,424.33 

Pumping- expenses at low service 55,924.94 

Pumping- expenses at high service 18,599.96 

Repairs to buildings 4,208.13 

Repairs to dam, canal, and reservoirs 5,429.95 

Total current expenses to December 31, 1898 $453,426.20 

Interest $40,678.51 

Highway expenditures 14,000.53 

54,679.04 

Total amount of bills approved to date $1,987,740.36 

Interest, discount, and labor jaerformed on high- 
way, transferred, and tools and materials sold $70,110.32 

Current expenses to December 31, 1898 453,426.20 

523,536.52 

Total cost, exclusive of interest and current expenses $1,464,203.84 

Interest and discount to December 31, 1897 $883,314.51 

Interest for 1898 39,682.50 

Total interest and discount to December 31, 1898 $922,997.01 

AMOUNT OF WATER BONDS ISSUED TO DECEMBER 31, 1898. 

Issued January 1, 1872, rate 6 per cent, due January 1, 1902 $100,000.00 

January 1, 1887, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1907 100,000.00 

July 1, 1890, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, 1910 100,000.00 

January 1, 1892, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1910 100,000.00 

August 1, 1893, rate 5 per cent, due August 1, 1913. . 100,000.00 
November 1, 1893, rate 41/2 per cent, due November 

1, 1913 100,000.00 

October 1, 1894, rate 4 per cent, due October 1, 1914 50,000.00 

July 1, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, 1915 100,000.00 

December 16, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due December 10, 

1915 50,000.00 

January 1, 1897, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1917 100,000.00 

$900,000.00 
SINKING FUND. 

1893 $12,750.00 

1894 1 3,925.00 

1895 1 5,800.00 

1896 lfi',800.00 

1897 17,175.00 

189S 17,675.00 

1898 5,000.00 

Total $99,125.00 



40 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 





"3 


f 


c: 




Received for 
bu i 1 d i n g 
purposes. 


i 

s 


lis- 
111 

1^ 


c to 
"a 

lis 


O 

s- f 

ii 
















8573.61 






I8TS 






51,692.69 
7,987 27 






S14.00 
104.18 




8 


1874 


32,154.07 


522,425.00 


1,436.56 


S119.10 


699.85 




98 


1875 


29,223.60 


13,095.00 


10,292.13 


3,348.11 


122.13 


120.59 


2,245.64 




160 


1876 


39,028.47 


16,320.00 


15,900.63 


6,305.81 


72.32 


180.16 


249.55 




166 


1877 


43,823.30 


17,475.00 


18,064.51 


7,783.09 


136.10 


233.04 


131.56 




202 


1878 


48,874.26 


17,970.00 


20,255.97 


10,090.25 


83.60 


232.82 


241.62 




226 


1879 


53,143.17 


18,165.00 


21,610.13 


12,732.93 


81.60 


240.64 


303.87 




251 


1880 


57,655.25 


18,300 00 


23,795.96 


14,794.34 


79.50 


210.39 


465.06 


310.00 


280 


1881 


60,215.62 


18,780.00 


25,336 18 


15,554.98 


105.60 


223.99 


203.87 


11.00 


310 


1882 


67,630.13 


20,130.00 


26,803.06 


19,898.69 


146.65 


197.49 


443.24 


11.00 


371 


1883 


73,458.20 


20,520.00 


28,838.24 


23,431.20 


314.65 


208.04 


125.07 


21.00 


404 


1884 


75,580.08 


21,350,00 


31,724.07 


21,329.75 


195.10 


231.96 


738.20 


11.00 


446 


1885 


80,404.12 


18,900.00 


33,597.02 


27,425.35 


102.50 


186.80 


181.45 


11.00 


486 


1S8C 


75,129.99 


19,750.00 


33,062.11 


21,573.45 


287.40 


130.80 


320.23 


6.00 


613 


1887 


80,518.17 


20,437.50 


33,497.21 


25,277.09 


351.70 


119.20 


819.47 


16.00 


739 


1888: 


85,643.82 


21,000.00 


33,864.78 


29,838.82 


543.80 


149.80 


243.62 


3.00 


842 


1889 


86,700.46 


18,240.00 


34.140.99 


33,596.05 


361.95 


153.20 


155.27 


53.00 


951 


1890 


90,463.37 


19,880.00 


32,431.10 


37,009.80 


649.90 


151.80 


298.77 


42.00 


1,135 


1891 


76,605.23 


4,590.00 


30,588.79 


40,479.25 


494.80 


160.40 


200.99 


91.00 


1,313 


1892 


83,474.79 


5,000.00 


31,344.24 


46,139.35 


416.00 


168.40 


139.80 


267.00 


1,608 


1893 


104,170.08 


12,7.50.00 


32,003.59 


58,103.20 


1,033.75 


159.60 


339.38 


180.56 


1,895 


1694 


110,210.29 


13,925.00 


32,170.28 


62,501.35 


697.80 


227.40 


334.82 


347.64 


2,182 


1895 


118,374.50 


15,800.00 


32.903.99 


67,465.90 


808.20 


300.40 


" 768.17 


327.84 


2,520 


1S9G 


128,907.03 


16,800.00 


32,540.03 


• 77,610.10 


638.48 


302.80 


440.12 


575.50 


2,866 


1897 


125,719.17 


17,175.00 


30,647.17 


76,148.60 


.331.85 


321.80 


627.08 


467.67 


8.134 


189S 


131,184.08 


17,675.00 


29,409.58 


80,643 30 


187.00 


359.80 


441.90 


2,467.60 


3,340 



1878, meter rate was changed. 1884, liydrant rates reduced. 1886, meter and other 
i-atos reduced. 1889, liydrant rates reduced. 1891 and 1892, received only iiart of hy- 
<lratit rent, and nolliing from water-troughs or street sprinklers. 18!t3, liytlrant rent 
and water closets rate reduced. 



The following' 

:iii(i civdilcd to 

IKTIi, tJii|i|ilifS nil 

J87:i, Kupplifs ill! 

jU'Cfiifd iiitt 

;iccni.Mi int< 



its li 



oil \\:it(T IioikIs sold 
on state bonds sold. . 



$.-.7:5.61 
177.07 
l<t;{.26 
146.00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 



41 



1873, water rents $1,920.53 

1874, supplies and materials sold 607.89 

March 12, highway expenditures transferred from 

water account 14,000.53 

March 17, interest and discount transferred from 

water account 1 2,347.25 

September 1, interest and discount transferred from 

_^ water account 22,361.74 

water and hydrant rent 30,233.54 

December 29, interest transferred 4,566.25 

1875, water and hydrant rent 27,119.15 

sundry items 2,104.45 

1876, sundry items 149.00 

water and hydrant rent 38,879.47 

1877, sundry items 131.56 

water and hydrant rent '. . . 43,691.74 

1878, water and hydrant rent 48,632.64 

sundry items 241.62 

1879, sundry items 303.87 

water and hydrant rent 52,839.30 

1880, water and hydrant rent 57,180.19 

sundry items 475.06 

1881, water and hydrant rent 60,000.75 

sundry items 214.87 

1882, water and hydrant rent 67,175.89 

sundry items 454.24 

1883, water and hydrant rent 73,312.13 

sundry items 146.07 

1884, water and hydrant rent 74,830.88 

sundry items. 749.20 

1885, water and hydrant rent 80,211.67 

sundry items 192.45 

1886, water and hydrant rent 74,803.76 

sundry items 326.23 

1887, water and hydrant rent 79,682.70 

sundry items 835.47 

1888, water and hydrant rent 85,397.20 

sundry items 246.62 

1889, water and hydrant rent 86,492.19 

sundry items 208.27 

1890, water and hydrant rent 90,122.60 

sundry items 340.77 

1891, water and hydrant rent 76,313.24 

sundry items 291.99 

1892, water and hydrant rent 83,067.99 

sundry items 406.80 

1893, water rents 90,900.14 

sundry items 519.94 

1894, water rents 95,602.83 

sundry items 682.46 



42 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1895, water rents $101,478.49 

sundry items 1,096.01 

1896, water rents 111,091.41 

sundry items 1,015.02 

1897, water rents 107,449.42 

sundry items 1,094.75 

premium on bonds 6,248.00 

1898, water rents 110,599.68 

sundry items 2,909.40 

$1,925,387.85 
METERS. 

The number of meters set during- the year has been two hundred and 
forty-one (241). 

Total number of meters now in use, thirtj^-three hundred and forty 
(3,340). 

The number of applications for water has been one hundred and 
seven (107). 

Total number of applications to date, fiftj'-four hundred and seventy- 
three (5,473). 

SERVICE PIPES. 

One hundred and thirteen (113) service pipes have been laid this 
year, as follows: 
113 1-inch diameter, service equal to 2,918.6 feet 

SERVICE PIPES RELAID. 

4 i/o-inch diameter 96.7 feet to 1-iuch diameter 86.0 feet 

121 %-inch diameter 3,615.6 " to 1-inch diameter 3,550.6 " 

1 %-inch diameter 18.0 " to 4-inch diameter 17.0 " 

18 1-inch diameter 548.9 " to 1-inch diameter 524.7 " 

1 114-inch diameter 17.5 " t« 1-inch diameter 17.0 " 

145 old pipes, 4,296.7 feet to new pipes 4,195.3 feet 

Fifty-three hundred and fourteen (5,314) service pipes have been laid 
to December 31, 1898, as follows: 

23 i/a-inch diameter 46S.9 feet 

1,426 3/1-inch diameter 36,293.2 " 

3,724 1-inch diameter 94,860.3 " 

21 li/i-inch diameter S76.0 " 

25 li/g-inch diameter S0."..0 " 

C9 2-inch diameter 2,213.5 " 

2 2Vi-inch (liamcter 63.0 " 

5 3-inch diameter 89.8 " 

12 4-inch diameter 305.5 " 

7 6-inch diameter 000.0 " 

5,314 135,975.2 feet 

Number miles of service pipes, 25.77. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



43 



The following streets are where cement-lined pipe was taken out and 
cast-iron laid in 1898: 





LENGTH RELAID IN FEET. 


GATES. 




Streets. 


d 


d 


a 
o 


d 

00 


5D 


d 


00 


d 


Location. 


Ash 










700 
62 
623 
«58 
554 
52 








Lowell to Bridge. 
Canal to Elm 


Bridge 








768 






1 


Cedar 












Beech to Maple. 
East side Elm 


Central* 














1 


















Central 
















VVp«t «i(1o Flm 










1,145 


Pearl to Hariison. 
Pearl to High. 
Lowell to Kidder. 
MerriniMck to Depot. 
Blow-oft taken out at 

Pleasant street. 
Maple to Beacon. 


Chestnut. 








708 








Elm 


686 
664 








Elm 
















Elm 






89 






1 












2,520 
1,525 




















High 










778 









Kidder 










40 
557 




1 


Corner Elm. 


Kidder Court. 
































Lowell 




76 














Maple 








734 

1,257 

*»38 

1,143 

*930 

854 

69 

31 

•■« 








Lowell to Bridge. 
Maple to Wilson. 
Elm to Pine. 
Pine to Beech. 
Elm to Pine 


Merrimack. . . 
















Myrtle 
















Myrtle* 
















Orange* 


































Pine 








329 








Bridge to Pearl. 














1 


Prospect 
















Third 
















Corner Ferry. 


Turner 










68 
















587 






Lowell to Bridge. 












(*300 
\ 181 






Walnut 










6S0 
10 






Lowell to Bridge. 
Corner Lake avenue. 
Corner Main. 


Wilson 






50 




' 






Winter 






20 










76 
76 
76 
76 


5C 
50 












1,350 


'■"S 


16,177 


1.347 


1 


4 






1,350 


2,242 
1,926 


16,177 
1,926 


1,347 


Blow off at Merrimack square not 

relaid. 
Mains on Central. Orange, and 




1,350 


50 
50 


4.168 


14,251 
300 


1,347 
30U 


Myrtle st. changed trom 6 to 8 In. 
Main on Walnut from Concord to 
Lowell changed from 4 to 6 in. 




1.350 


4,168 


14,551 


1,047 









Total, 21,242 ft., or 4.023 miles. 

* Central cor. Elm, Cinch pipe changed to 8-inch pipe. Myrtle, Elm to Pine, 
6-lnch pipe changed to 8-inch pipe. Orange, Elm to Pine, 6-ineh pipe changed to 
8-incli pipe. I- ight inch blow-off pipe on Elm at Pleasant street that used to go Into 
pond in Merrimack square was not relaid. 



44 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1 


Corner Lowell. 
Elm to Brown avenue. 
South of Sherman. 
North of Salmon. 
North of Milford. 
East of Maple. 
East of Wilson. 
East side K'eeh. 


West side Beech. 
West of Cypress. 
Clay to Somerville. 
South of McNeil. 
Corner Central. 
Corner Kidder. 

■Nnrthwnrfl. 


Silver to Harvard. 

North of Nelson. 

West of Mammoth road. 

Corner Maple, corner Belmonl. 

Corner Elm. 

Massabesic to Chase avenue. , 

Corner Tine. 

North of Harrison. 

P.orner Union. 


4) 

iS 

s 

c 

1 


Corner Elm. 
Corner Recch. 
Corner Elm. 
South Concord. 
Soutli of Hose Co. lot. 
Corner Maple, cast side. 
Corner Elm. 

Pnrnpr Elm. 


e 

3 

II 


•eiaBjp.iH 




- 


- 


-^^ . 




- 






" h 




-^ 










!- 






-- 




to 

1 


•at tl 
























-- 
































•ui 8 


















































-- 




•UT 9 


-- 




" 


— 


- 






r.^ 


— 








^^^ 


<-lr* 






- 


•uit 




































— 


















i 

Q 

a 


■UI Z\ 






|5 


















































•UI 8 


























































•UI 9 




ii°li§ 




^12 i 




isi 


o^oo 




s 


ri 




S^'SS 


•uit 


























g ; : 








s 






















i 

H 


•< 


tl 








il 


a 
I 






J 


C 
C 

! 


1 : 
1 • 
5 : 

m 


c 
c 

c 

J 




s 


i 


■1 


'- 


b 


i 


t 

c 
c 

!; 


• • 


4 


1 


_4 


4 
i 

1 




: 

3 C 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



45 



South of Valley. 

Walnut to Beech. 

Corner Elm. 

Corner Pine. ^ 

To Smyth road. # 

To Bedel street. 

Corner Hall. 

West of Cypress. 

South End. 

South of Brook. 

Corner Lowell. 

Corner Lowell. 

North of Lowell. 


• 




h; 


.- :-: 




S 












e» 






- 


MM: 




« 








"MM 


:-"- a 












c» 








: : :2 i 




i 


1 










1 




5* : 


B^«"i 


*"i93" 
6,984 










MM 


s 


6 
c 

0^ 


p.! 


H 

' 9 


Sagamore 

Sherman 

Silver 

Somerville 

Thornton 







46 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



•siuB.jpi£H 


N 


e<- 


M 














M 


IC 


- 


.1 n 


00 




« 


•S8AIBA.1IV 




C» 1-1 • 




% 








: : : "^ 


:::;:-:. 


(N 






c 
o 






i 




CI 






^ 






to CM ; 


<N 














n 














C 




























•^ 




•| 


































i 


=■4 CI <N r-l 


























a 

c 
,a 

1 


c 
















1 
















CO 

d 

00 




'^ 


1308 
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57 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1898. 



Cement-lined pipe. 



Cast-iron pipe. 



20-inch 
14-incb 
12-inch 
10-inch 
8-inch 
6-inch 
4-inch 





20,367 feet. 
2,752 " 
7,356 " 


24,679 feet. 
13,404 " 
23,765 " 
27,214 " 
67,182 " 
287,307 " 
20,140 " 


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33 






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1,297 " 

202 " 


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32,115 feet. 


463,691 feet. 


890 



Cement-lined pipe 6.082 miles 

Cast-iron pipe 87.820 " 



Total pipe. 
724 hydrants. 
890 gates. 
13 air valves. 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN 1898. 



93.902 miles 



Baker street, 420 feet west of Elm. 
Beech street, corner Salmon. 
Brook street, corner Oak. 
Cedar street, corner Wilson. 
Clay street, corner Cypress. 
Goffstown lane, or Ryderville road. 
Hall road, corner Benton. 
Harrison street, corner Elm. 
Hayes avenue, comer Chase. 
Lovrell street, corner Elm. 
Myrtle street, corner Elm. 
Orange street, corner Elm. 
Prospect street, comer Elm. 
Sagamore street, comer Linden. 
Sagamore street, corner Smyth road. 
Sherman street, corner Bedel. 
Somerville street, comer Cjpress. 



Yours respectfully, 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 59 

Uses for which Water is Supplied. 

WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 

11,831 Families, 149 boarding'-houses, 15,099 faucets, 4,213 wash-bowls, 
3,531 bath-tubs, 11,134 water-closets, G81 set tubs, 213 urinals, 3,785 
sill-cocks, 2,771 horses, 139 cattle, 724 hydrants, 30 watering-troughs, 
8 drinking foimtains, 51 standpipes, 2 public urinals. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

1 Jail, 27 churches, 1 court house, 10 hose companies, 6 fire engines, 
2 hook-and-laddcE, 3 opera houses, 4 convents, 4 city hospitals, 4 ceme- 
teries, 1 orphanage, 1 post-office, 1 city library-, 6 banks, 9 hotels, 1 
Masonic hall, 1 Odd Fellows' hall, 3 halls. 

SHOPS. 

58 Barber, 10 wheelwright, 20 blacksmith, 10 carpenter, 2 tinsmith, 
1 copper, 3 currying, 20 plumber and gas and water pipe, 14 paint, 3 
gnnsmith. 



4 Auction, 35 drug, 22 jewelry, 1 fur, 3 house-furnishing goods, 20 
fancy goods, 1 wholesale paper, 5 wholesale produce, 24 dry goods, 12 
candy, 1 cloak, 16 millinery, 3 tea, 9 furniture, 1 wholesale grocer, 107 
grocery, 6 meal, 3 hardware, 34 boot and shoe, 11 stove, 17 gents' fur- 
nishing goods, 7 book, 1 leather and shoe-finders, 3 music, 3 uphol- 
sterj-, 9 undertakers, 5 sewing-machine, 1 feather-cleaner, 1 rubber. 

SALOONS. 

16 Dining, 7 billiard, 53 liquor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

6 Clubrooms, 3 bleacheries, 37 laundries, 4 ice-houses, 11 photog- 
raphers, 1 Mercy Home, 2 old ladies' homes, 1 soldiers' monument, 1 
Turner hall, 4 fountains, 2 trust companies, 1 city farm, 3 depots, 9 
greenhouses, 2 band rooms, 26 bakeries, 2 waste, 2 business colleges, 
34 schoolhouses, 1 battery building, 1 kitchen, 3 ward-rooms, 1 gym- 
nasium, 2 police stations. 

MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 

1 Hosiery mill, 1 silver-plating, 2 iron foundries, 2 dye-houses, 5 
machine shops, 6 clothing manufactories, 9 harness shops, 1 cornice 
works, 1 brush shop, 9 carriage shops, 12 cigar factories, 1 brass and 
copper foundrj% 1 locomotive works, 1 grist-mill, 1 silk-mill, 3 granite 
works, 1 electric light station, 4 sash and blind shops, 1 brewery, 7 
shoe shops, 1 gas works, 4 slaughter-houses, 1 soap factory, 4 needle 
manufactories, 6 beer-bottling, 3 book-binderies, 1 paper-mill, 2 box- 
makers, 1 paper-box manufactory. 



60 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

MARKETS. 

6 Fish, 12 meat and fish, 3 meat (wholesale). 

STABLES. 

23 Livery, 1 electric railroad, 1,129 private. 

OFFICES. 

21 Dentists, 2 telephone, 2 telegraph, 2 express, 14 printing, 1 gas, 
17 coal. 



Materials on hand. 

PIPE. 

8,100 feet 20-inch, 1,700 feet 14-inch, 4,500 feet 12-inch, 2,100 feet 10- 
inch, 13,200 feet 8-inch, 4,775 feet 6-inch, 384 feet 4-inch. 

GATES. 
4 10-inch, 1 12-inch, 7 8-inch, 7 6-inch, 10 6-inch spigot, 3 4-inch spigot. 
TTTRNS. 

4 8-inch 1-4, 6 14-inch 1-8, 2 8-inch 1-8, 1 12-inch offset, 1 12-inch 1-8, 
9 6-inch offsets, 4 6-inch 1-4, 7 8-inch offsets, 1 10-inch 1-4, 2 10-inch off- 
sets, 1 10-inch 1-8, 1 4-inch 1-4. 

EEDUCERS. 

2 14-inch to 10-inch, 1 14-inch to 12-inch, 2 12-inch to 6-inch, 3 10-inch 
to 6-inch, 4 10-inch to 8-inch, 3 8-inch to 6-inch, 1 10-inch to 8-inch, 
1 4-inch to 6-inch. 

PLUGS. 

7 14-inch, 5 12-inch, 16 10-inch, 39 8-inch, 17 6-inch, 31 4-inch. 

SLEEVES. 

13 6-inch, 6 8-inch, 18 4-inch, 1 14-inch. 

CLAMP SLEEVES. 

5 12-inch, 3 14-inch, 3 20-inch. 

LEAD. 

16 pigs. 

BRANCHES. 

1 single 8 on 6, 9 single 6 on 6, 20 single 8 on 8, 1 single 6 on 10, 
1 single 10 on 10, 1 single 8 on 14, 1 single 6 on 14, 1 single 12 on 
14, 1 single 8 on 10, 1 single 4 on 10, 9 single 6 on 8, 1 single 6 on 
12, 5 single 6 on 10, 2 single 6 on 10, 1 single 4 on 14, 1 single 10 on 
10, 5 single 6 on 10, 1 single 8 on 8, 3 single 6 on 8, 1 single 14 on 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 61 

14, 6 double 6 on 10, 2 double 8 on 14, 1 double 8 on 8, 5 double G on 
8, 4 double ^ on 6, 1 double 6 on 14, 1 double 6 on 12, 3 double 6 on 
14, 1 double 8 on 12, 8 double 6 on 8, 1. double 4 on 4, 8 double 6 on 
8, 6 double S on 8, 4 double 4 on 4. 

SERVICE PIPES. 

14 feet 3-inch, 347 feet 34-incli lead-lined, 867 feet 1-inch lead-lined, 
86 feet li/i-inch lead-lined, 955 feet %-inch enamel, 313 feet 1-inch 
enamel, 306 feet 114-inch enamel, 73 feet 2-inch enamel, 77 feet 2yo-inch 
enamel. 

156 stop boxes. 

One hydrant. 



REPOET 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS, 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE STREET AND 
PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To Ei» Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of Manchester, 

N. H.: 

Gentlemen. — In accordance with the requirements of law, passed 
Januarj^ session, 1893, the Board of Street and Park Commissioners 
submit herewith their sixth anniial report. 

OFFICE. 

The foreman's time books are brought to the office twice each week, 
and the time copied into books kejjt in the office. From these books 
the weekly pay-rolls are made up for the city treasurer's use. 

Two hundred and eighty pay-rolls have been made for divisions 2, 
7, 10, including- pay-rolls for commons and the five outside divisions. 
Forty-eight division of labor sheets have been made out for the use of 
the city auditor, besides a monthly record of all bills contracted, filed 
for reference. Over twelve hundred orders were issued to local dealers 
for supplies for the different departments, and three hundred and 
five permits granted to contractors and others to encumber the streets. 

The following gives the receipts and expenditures of the office for 
the year 1898: 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand January 1, 1899 $0.53 

Received from Manchester Street Railway Co 4,G44.63 

from sundry sources 108.60 

Total .$4,753.76 

Deposited with city treasurer $4,741.47 

Cash paid out for express and postage 12.29 

Total $4,753.76 

Expeiiditnrcs. 

Commissioners' salaries $1,800.00 

Clerical services 991.32 

Cai-riage allowance 450.00 

Office supplies 131.26 

Incidentals* 105.55 

Telephone 38.45 

Total $3,516.58 

* Includes bill for printing annual report for 1897. 
5 

65 



QQ ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Inventory of City Property, 

Commissioners' office, including tj-pewriter, furniture, 

books, etc $318.70 

Division No. 2, including horses, dumpcarts, sprinklers, 

road-machine, crushers, tools, etc 25,145.20 

City stables, storage shed, shops 15,950.00 

Lot of land on Franldin street 89,312.00 

Pipe on hand 933.27 

Division No. 4 6.00 

Division No. 5 27.70 

Division No. G 15.00 

Division No. 7 160.00 

Division No. 8 29.38 

Division No. 9 24.00 

Division No. 10, including- horses, sprinklers, carts, tools, 

etc 1,828.67 

Stable and lot in West :Manchester 1,200.00 

Commons,' including horse lawn-mower, swings, tools, etc. 432.18 

Total $135,382.10 



Contracts. 



Akron sewer pipe, Thomas A. Lane Co. 

Hoffman cement. Brown and Titus. 

Sewer and bridge plank. Head & Dowst Co. 

Sewer brick, William F. Head & Son. 

Sewer castings, Hartwell Foundry Co. 

Edgestones, cesspool stones, Warren Harvej-. 

Paving blocks, Charles A. Bailey. 

Laying paving on Elm street, Soule, Dillingham & Co. 

Concreting North and South Main street, Charles II. Robie Co. 

Concreting Hanover street, Charles H. Robie Co. 

Concreting Lake avenue sidewalk, Charles H. Robie Co. 



Report of Division No. 2. 
Gkou(ik W. CniiNEY, Agent. 

SNOW AM) ICK ACCOVNT. 

Appro))!-!;!! ioii $8,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fu!id 2,197.22 

Total $10,197.22 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 67 
EXPENDITURES. 

Labor, Janxiarj^ $1,607.34 

February 4,582.28 

March 1,352.72 

April 107.55 

November 39.85 

December 2,391.50 

Supples 115.98 

Total $10,197.22 

STREETS TURXPIKED WITH ROAD-MACHINE. 

Amherst 950 feet 

Ashland 1,800 " 

Arlington 450 " 

Beech 2,150 " 

Brown avenue 5,100 " 

Baker 1,200 " 

Bridge 2,800 " 

Brook GOO " 

Buzzell 300 " 

Belmont 1,100 " 

Bay i 800 " 

Blodget 1,700 " 

Central 2,500 " 

Calef road 4,100 " 

Cheney place 600 " 

Clarke 1,000 " 

Chestnut 900 " 

Chester 500 " 

Carpenter 800 " 

Elm from railroad bridge 2,000 " 

Elm, north 2,150 " 

East High ■. 1,100 " 

Hancock 1,100 " 

Hooksett road 6,200 " 

Harrison 900 " 

Hanover 1,000 " 

Hall 2,000 " 

Kennard road 2,000 " 

Laurel 2.S00 " 

Lowell 1,800 " 

Lake avenue 500 " 

Lincoln ; 900 " 

Merrimack .J, 700 " 

Manchester 1,500 " 

Maple 2,600 " 

Maple : 1,560 " 



68 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Mitcliell 800 feet 

Myrtle 1.220 " 

Milton 300 " 

Mead 300 " 

Malvern 900 " 

Nutt road 2,500 " 

Orange 1,900 " 

Oak 850 " 

Pearl 1,500 " 

Prospect 1,800 " 

Pine 2,000 " 

Prescott 200 " 

Porter 200 " 

Pennacook 400 " 

Eiver road, south 2,000 " 

Eiver road, north 12.800 " 

Kussell 1,800 " 

Smith road 6,000 " 

Salmon 500 " 

Trenton 1,000 " 

Union 13,200 " 

Valley 2,000 " 

Willow 1.500 " 

Welch avenue ." 300 " 

Webster 4,300 " 

Wilson 2.400 " 

Walnut 700 " 

Total 120,530 feet 

Total tumpiked, 126,530 feet, or 23.96 miles. 

There were 700 loads of gravel used in connection with turnpikino- 
above streets. Labor for this work charged to repairs of hiiih\va,\s. 

STREETS GRAVELED. 

Amherst 550 feet 

Beech 220 " 

Chester 200 " 

Ea.st High 500 " 

Laurel 500 " 

Lowell 1,000 " 

Lincoln 300 " 

Maple 710 " 

Manchestt^r 950 " 

Merrimiu'k 600 " 

Orange .'!00 " 

Pearl 200 " 

Pro.spcct 400 " 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



69 



Eussell 200 feet 

Wilson 1,150 " 

Total 7,780 feet 

In repairing above streets 1,500 loads of stone chips were used in 
connection with tlie gravel. 

Labor charged to repairs of highwaj^s. 

* CULVERTS REPAIRED. 

Arah street $21.50 

Beech, south of French cemetery 30.50 

Grove, south, near Beech street 40.50 

Maple, near Portsmouth railroad 70.00 

Smyth road 39.70 



$202.20 



East Spi-uce, near Beacon 40 feet 

Elm and Valley 345 " 

Hanover, west Mammoth road 440 " 

Kennard road 96 " 

Liberty 616 " 

North Union 192 " 

Pine, between Salmon and North 538 " 

Eussell, between Gore and Sagamore 618 " 

Salmon 550 " 

Total 3,455 feet 

Labor charged to repairs of highways. 

NEW HIGHWAYS. 



Location. 


Length in 
feet. 


Cut or fill. 


Labor. 




450 
350 
70 
125 
360 
500 
400 


Cut. 

Ledge. 
Cut.^ 

Both. 


$469.60 
602.50 




Beecli, north from Salmon 


m.oz 


Liberty, south of Salmon 

Pine, Valley south .. ... 


Ul 40 
670.60 




294.10 




110.00 






Total 


2,255 




S2 735 73 









70 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
MACADAMIZING. 



LOCATIOK. 


Length 
in feet. 


Square 
yards. 


Crushed 
stone. 


Other 
stone. 


Labor. 




1,850 
600 
250 
700 
1,300 
1,356 
550 


6,989 
2,267 
945 
2,800 
3,965 
4,218 
2,322 


400 
460 




81,404.79 

1,310.93 

366 "1 








4 cars. 




230 

1,297 

949 


561.47 






1,886.60 
3,293.40 






West Cedar, Elm to Canal (new) 


34 cars. 


716 26 




«2,000.00 












Total 


6,606 


23,506 


3,336 


38 cars. 


$11.639.6.') 







SUHMAEY, MACADAMIZING. 



Labor, division No. 2 

division No. 7 

division No. 10 

Stone chips 

Repairs on ernsliers, I'oad rollerf. 

Forcite for blasting 

Coal, coke, wood, oil 

Freight 

Water-works 

Incidentals 



Total 



$6,359.65 

1,886.60 

:!,293.40 

715.74 

1,773.06 

780.98 

456.70 

70.41 

70.00 

305.71 

$15,712.25 



4,594 loads of stone crushed at the city ledge on Lowell street this 
season. 1,500 loads of stone chips scraped up and used in patching. 

•Includes cost of crushing stone for Massabesic street, 
flncludes new boiler and engine. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
GRADE FOR CONCRETE. . 



71 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Width 
in feet. 



Cut or 
fill. 



Labor. 



Auburn, east of Beech 

Brook and Pine 

Belmont, near Central. . . . . 
Beech and Salmon (ledge) 

Bridge, near Beacon 

Brown avenue 

Central, east of Chestnut. . 

Elm, north of Trenton 

Gore, east of Maple 

Harrison, Hall west 

Hall, north of Pearl , 

Hanover and Ashland 

H anover 

Haj'ward 

Jane 

Lowell 

Lake avenue and Pine — 

Maple, near Brook 

Maple 

Mead 

Nutt road 

Orange, near Hall 

Pine, north of Sagamore.. 

Prospect 

Pine, Valley south 

Pearl, east of Hall 

Silver 

Union, south of Webster... 

Walnut, near North 

Walnut, near Sagamore 

Walnut, south of Salmon. . . 
Welch avenue 

Total 



50 
225 
100 



50 
'400 
135 
250 
300 
300 
150 
300 
150 
100 
310 
50 
400 
1.50 



50 
400 

50 
950 
100 
300 
100 
200 
100 



Cut. 
Kill. 
Cut. 

Fill. 

Both. 

Fill. 

Cut. 

Fill. 

Both. 

Fill. 

Both. 

Fill. 

Both. 

Cut. 
Fill. 
Both. 



Fill. 

Both. 

Cut. 



S9.00 
22.69 
12.10 
62 50 
17.20 
50.00 

5.00 
26.50 
10.. 50 
11.50 
48.75 
36.10 
17.00 
27.25 
15.00 
10.00 
18.50 

8.50 
31.50 
15.00 
150.00 

6.00 
14.00 

6.00 
33.20 
10 00 
134.00 
11.00 
26.00 
14.00 
32.50 
10.00 



S901.29 



PAVING STREETS. 

The paving- of Elm street, which, was commenced in 1897, when an 
appropriation of $10,000 was made, was continued this year with the 
same amount of appropriation. The old square blopk was removed 
and used in the paving Amherst south back street from Nutfield lane 
to Chestnut street, and Nutfield lane from Hanover to south of Man- 
chester street. After the old paving was removed the roadbed was 
treated in the same manner as last year, viz.: the soil was taken out 
to a depth of fourteen inches and a bed of concrete was laid, and the 
small block paving laid by expert pavers and filled with Portland 
cement. 

The work was continued from the north side of ^Manchester street to 
the south side of ^Merrimack street, and from the south side of Me- 
chanic street to the north side of Stark street. 

Total number of yards laid, 4,923.6, at a cost of $13,154.7;{; cost per 
square yard, $2.67. Of this amount the Manchester Street Railway 
company paid $2,799.39. 



Summary. 



Labor ^ 

Sand, gravel, crushed stone. 



$1,415.26 
273.00 



72 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Cement $258.50 

Flagging- 385.35 

Paving stones 7,279.96 

Laying paving and cement 3,542.66 

Total $13,154.73 

HANOVER STKEET. 

A petition was presented to the common council, signed by nearly' all 
the abutters on Hanover street, requesting that concrete be used on 
the street instead of block paving. After considering the matter the 
commissioners decided to pave a gutter three and one half feet wide 
with small block paving in the same manner that Elm street was paved. 
The roadwaj' was put down with concrete with cement bottom and 
asphalt top, guaranteed for a term of five years. 

The contract price for the work was $1.25 per square yard, the total 
number of yards laid was 1,634.48 square yards of concrete and 457.3 
square yards of block paving. 

Summary. 

Labor $335.51 

Cement 117.50 

Paving stones 762.08 

Concrete paving 2,095.86 

Putting down block paving 342.98 

Lumber 2.01 

Total $3,655.94 

Average cost per square yard, $1,668. 

NORTH AND SOUTH MAIN STREET. 

The paving of South Main street from School street to the North 
Weare railroad, where 2,817.36 square yards were laid; also North Main 
from north side of Marion to Putnam street, 3,100.5 square yards, were 
put down practically the same waj' as was Granite street last year; a 
four-coat concrete was laid with asphalt top. The work is guaran- 
teed for a term of five years. The total cost was $7,545.24, there being 
5,918 square yards, and the average cost jjcr square yard was $1,275. 

The city did all the excavating and set the curbing on each side of 
the street, which was charged to this a]iiiropriation. The Manchester 
Street Jfailway coiiipaiiy ])aid as their share $1,845.24. 

Sin)nn(inj. 

Labor $473.75 

Concrof iiig 7.071.49 

Total $7,545.24 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



73 



COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 

It has been the policy of the commissioners to pave with cobble 
paving" stones the gutters of the streets located upon the hills, as far 
as possible with the appropriation made by the city councils for this 
purpose. By this sj'stem of paving the streets are in a much better 
condition to withstand the heavy rainfalls. 

There has been laid in division No. 2, 4,570 square yards, division No. 
7, 1,044 square yards, and division No. 10, 2,460 square yards, equal to 
24,000 linear feet, or nearly four miles. 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Number 

loads 
of stone. 


Labor. 




175 
78 
719 
39 
88 
88 
39 
120 
554 
39 
195 
121 
86 
87 
30 
78 
408 
583 
15G 
369 
184 
334 


IS 
9 
40 
4 
9 
9 
5 
13 
57 
4 
20 
12 
9 
9 
2 
8 
42 
62 
20 
38 
19 
40 


850.75 




16.40 




64.60 


Hall anil Bridge 


27.10 




20.50 




28.68 




22.60 


Lake avenue, between Chestnut and Pine — 
Maple near Lowell . 


32.75 
146.00 




24.75 


Manchester and Hall 


49.90 




42.00 




33.20 


Prospect between Beech and Ash 


20.50 


Pine south of Valley 


7.00 


Pearl and Rn«sell 


16.22 




131.00 


Silver east of Lincoln 


131.22 




81.75 


Walnut between Salmon and North 


115.00 




71.50 




125.00 








4,570 


449 


31,258.42 







PAVING BELAID. 



Hanover, east of Ashland, 58 square yards; labor, $24.50. 
^Manchester south back, from Chestnut east and west, 552 square 
yards; labor $165.60. (Work by Soule, Dillingham & Co.) 

EDGESTONES RESET. 

Cedar, between Elm and Chestnut 475 feet 

Elm and Stark 208 " 

Hanover, between Elm and Chestnut 400 " 

Maple, between Bridge and East High 67 " 

West Cedar 200 " 

Total 1,350 feet 

Labor, $50.50. 



74 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
EDGESTONES SET. 



Number of 
feet. 



Amherst and Button 

Ash and Prospect 

Ash and Harrison 

v» uburn, east of Beech 

Ashland and Pearl 

Amherst and Elm 

Aubuin, between Pine and Union 

Amherst and Beech 

Adams and Carpenter 

Beech and Harrison 

Beech and Prospect 

Bay and Salmon 

Bay east back and Salmon 

Belmont and Central 

Brown avcinue and Cilley Place 

Beech and Sprnce 

Brook and Pine 

Beech and Merrimack 

B ridge and Ash , 

Beech and Amherst 

Beech, between Gore and Sagamore 

Bridge near Beacon 

Brook and Pine 

Carpenter and Elm 

Central, near Chestnut 

Chestnut and Salmon 

Cedar, near Elm .. 

Concord and Belmont 

Cedar, between Elm and Chestnut 

Central and Beech 

Chestn ut and Auburn 

Central, near Cass 

Elm and Salmon 

Elm, near Dean avenue 

Elm and Webster 

East Spruce, between Pine and Union. .. 

Elm, near Depot street 

Elm and S,ilmon 

Gore and Majile 

IInno\ci', l)ct ween Union and Pine 

Hall and I'rosix'ct '. . . 

Hall ;ind Harrison 

Uanison aiul Clicstnut 

Hall, between Pearl and Bridge 

Hanover, between Elm and Chestnut 

Hanover and Belmont 

Hall and Lowell 

Hanover and Ashland 

Lake avenue, west of Maple 

Lake avenue and Wilson 

Lake avenue and Behnont 

Lak(! avenue and Chestnut 

Lincoln and Silver 

Lake avenue between Cass and Beacon 

Manchester and Belmont 

Maple and East High 

Merrimack and Beech 

Maple and Prospect 

Peail avcnuf! 

Saguiiiorc. No. 208 

Salmon and Beech 

Union and Hanover 

Vallev and Pine 

West ('cdar 

Walnut and North 

Wilson and Hall 

Walnut and .Sagamore 

Webster and Union 

Wilson and Merrimack 



53 
50 
16 
3 

no 

19 
180 
39 
20 



17 
49 
IS 
20 
20 
18 
58 
43 
18 

433 
50 
38 
25 
3 

441 
17 
19 
60 
54 

240 
28 
25 
50 
22 

100 
16 
40 
18 
52 
16 
59 

100 
18 
41 
50 
17 
3 
75 
31 



2.75 
11.25 
3. .50 



24 


2.00 


52 


4.00 


IS 


6^ 


74 


5.00 


102 


6.00 


123 


7.00 


50 


6.50 




2.00 


17 


3 00 




2.00 


17 


2 76 


3,726 


J37C.15 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
CONCRETE WORK. 



76 



Location. 



Price per 
yard. 



Square 
yards. 



Auburn and Beech 

Ashland and Amherst 

Ashland and Hanover 

A ubuDi and Hall 

Arlington and A shland 

Auiory and Rinimon 

Amherst and Elm 

No. 319 Auburn 

Amherst and Dutton 

Amherst and Dutton 

No. 410 Relmont 

Bowman and Milford 

Bay and Salmon ... 

Bridge, west Boston & Maine Railroad 

Beauport and Putnam 

Beech, between Lowell and Bridge 

Beauport and Wilton 

Beech and Lake avenue 

Beech and Central 

Beech and Laurel 

Beech and Merrimack 

Beech and Manchester , 

Belmont and Massabesic 

Bowman and Milford , 

Brook and Pine 

Beech and Auburn 

Beech and Auburn 

Chestnut and North 

Central and Beech 

Cedar and Hall 

Cedar and Chestnut 

Coolidge avenue and Amory 

Canal and Bridge 

Concord and Elm 

Coolidge avenue and Amory 

Cedar, Elm to Chestnut 

Cedar and Hall 

Conant and North Main 

Cypress and Massabesic 

Conant and Beauport 

Dutton and Amherst 

Dearborn and Summer 

Dubuque and Green 

Elm and Salmon 

Elm and Salmon 

Franklin and Pleasant 

Franklin and West Central 

Gore and Walnut 

Grove and Union 

George and Milford 

Granite street, lower end 

Hanover, Beech to Union 

Hanover and Ashland 

Hay ward 

Hay ward 

Hanover and Nutfleld lane 

Hall and Summer 

Hay ward and Jewett 

Kidder Court , 

Laurel and Beech 

Lake avenue, Chestnut to Pine 

Merrimack, Beech to Maple 

Merrimack and Milton 

Milford and B 

Merrimack and Beech 

Manchester and Beech 

Massabesic and Taylor 



Amount carried forward , 



SO. 50 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.50 
.45 
.75 
.45 
.50 
.45 
.75 
.35 



.75 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.50 
.45 
.60 
.50 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.35 
.50 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.35 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
1.00 
.50 
.45 
.40 
.50 
.40 
.75 
.75 
.35 
.50 
.45 
.50 
.75 
.75 
.50 
.50 
.75 



27.73 

29.06 

30.36 

39.74 

28.97 

29.95 

10.50 

49.00 

25.42 

3.64 

3.97 

80.69 

65.23 

61.81 

29.99 

25.53 

30.04 

21.33 

24.65 

45.01 

25. 5S 

22.17 

46.57 

54.. ^3 

27.46 

29.75 

9.91 

16.06 

76.32 

43.55 

35.30 

27.08 

49.60 

22.31 

29.12 

128.28 

1.62 

5.67 

32.78 

18.08 

56,88 

23.11 

22.36 

58.43 

17.77 

36.11 

40.14 

30.75 

8.08 

23.28 

63 39 

7.30 

15.86 

21.32 

19.12 

18.89 

30.22 

7.46 

35.41 

61.76 

238.84 

16.88 

17.33 

28.58 

2.27 

18.17 

28.00 



813. 80 
21.80 
22.76 
29.81 
21.7.3 
22.46 
5.25 
22.05 
19.06 
1.63 
1.99 
36.31 
48.92 
21.63 
22.46 
19.14 
22.53 
10.66 
12.32 
22., 50 
12.79 
11.08 
34 93 
32.12 
20.59 
14.87 
4.46 
8.03 

32;66 

26.47 

20.31 

17.36 

11.15 

13.10 

57.72 

.73 

4.26 

24.59 

13. .56 

42.66 

17.33 

16.76 

43.83 

6.22 

27.08 

30.10 

23.06 

6.06 

17.47 

63 39 

3.65 

7.14 

8.53 

9.58 

7.55 

22.66 

5.60 

12.39 

30.88 

107.48 

8.45 

12.99 

21.43 

1.13 

9.38 

21.00 



76 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
CONCRETE WORK.— Continued. 



Price per 
yard. 



Square 
yards. 



Total cost. 



Amount brought forward 

Nelson and Jones 

Nutti<il(l Lane, Hanover to Amherst. 

Noitli Miiiii and Wilton 

North Main 

Koith Main 

North Main and Pntnam 

Nortli Main and Putnam 

Putnam and North Main 

Pearl and Beech 

Pearl and Hall 

Prospect and Russell 

Pine and Brook 

llimmon and Wayne 

Salmon and Bay 

Second and School 

Second and Bath 

South Main, School to Ferry 

Salmon and Chestnut 

Spruce and Hall 

Spruce and Massabesic 

State and Granite 

Spruce and Beech 

Valley and Jewett 

West Cedar 

West Cedar and Elm 

Walker and Third 

Wayne and North Main 

Wilton and Beauport 

Passenger station at north end 

Patching sundry places 



50.75 
.50 
.75 
.40 
.25 
.50 

1.00 
.50 
.75 
.75 
..50 
.75 
.75 
.35 
.50 
.50 
.40 
.75 

!75 
.50 
..50 
.75 
.45 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
1.00 
.45 



,312.07 
30.40 
169.88 
16.66 
234.34 
1.75 
22.69 
4.19 
3.70 
28.17 
13.06 
35.70 
27.55 
30.44 
37.26 
154.40 
254.84 
41.96 
23.89 
30.22 
43.47 
9.93 
29.83 
5.41 
46.66 
19 99 
25.66 
12.57 
30.17 
73.43 
6.35 



3,776.19 



51,381.66 
22.80 
84.94 
12.50 
93.74 
.43 
11.34 

4.19 

1.88 
21.13 

9.79 
17.85 
20.66 
23.83 
13.04 
77.20 
127.42 
16.79 
17.92 
22.66 
32.60 

4.96 
14.66 

4.06 
21.00 
14.99 
19.24 

9.42 
22.63 
73.43 

2.84 



52,200.60 



SCAVENGER SERVICE. 



The question of the disposal of the waste collected by the scavenger 
teams is still in an unsatisfactory condition. The commissioners are 
doing- the best they can with the means at hand. We have tried to 
keep the "dumps" in as good condition as possible. We recognize the 
fact that the present method is not the best, but are powerless to 
change it with the funds at our disposal. The remedy for this lies 
with the city government.- 

The following summary shows how the cost for scavongor service 
has been divided: 

Labor $12.30:}. 46 

City farm 2,500.00 

licpairs of carts, liarnesses, etc 2(59. 19 

Total $l.-),l(i2.65 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
HKl'AIllED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 


No. 


Cost of 
material. 


Labor. 




1 
1 
2 

1 


S5.23 
4.19 
6.32 
3.01 

8.77 


S2.00 


l.iiK'ol!) ■uhI sillver 


2 00 




8 iiO 




3.. 50 












6 


128.41 


S20.50 





KEW SKWERS. 

There is still a large and pressing demand for new sewers. The four 
steam drills in connection with the Carson trench machine owned by 
the citj^ have been in almost constant use for the past season. 

The extension of the IS^orth Elm street sewer from Trenton street 
northerly about 500 feet, where the average cut Avas sixteen and one 
half feet, nearly- all ledge, was built for $7.36 per linear foot. Other 
trunk sewers were as follows: 

Beech street, from Silver to Somerville, 306 feet; Beech street, from 
Silver to Harvard, 378 feet; Beech street, from Harvard northerly, 190 
feet; Cedar street, east of Wilson, 419 feet; Harvard street, from Beech 
easterly, 528 feet; Lowell street, Belmont to Beacon, 504 feet; Maple 
street, north of Harvard to Hayward, 556 feet; Old Falls road, from 
Spruce to Haj-es avenue, 703 feet; Kiver road, from Clarke northerly, 
893 feet; Union street, from Silver to Somei-ville, 324 feet. 

Also on the west side the folloAving trunk sewers were constructed: 
Amherst road, south from Charleston avenue to Milford street, 839 feet; 
Bartlett street, from Wayne to Putnam, 712 feet; Milford street, from 
Amherst road to Bismarck street, 485 feet; Wayne street, from Whipple 
to Bartlett, 500 feet; Whipple, from Putnam to Wayne, 536 feet. 

The average cost per linear foot was $1,496, compared with $1.75 for 
1897 and $2.50 for 1896. 19,837 feet, or about four miles, of sewers were 
laid this j^ear. 

The oldest settled part of the city, situated on the west side of the 
Merrimack river in Amoskeag, is without sewers. The council, in mak- 
ing up the appropriations for the jear 1899, should take this under 
consideration and relieve this much needed want in this section of the 
city. 

At the present time there are 29,890 feet of sewers in different sec- 
tions of the city, ordered in by the city government, which, for lack of 
appropriations, have not as yet been built. 

The following table gives the street, location, material, price of 
sewers, length in feet, manholes, lampholes, y's, total cost, average cost 
per foot, when started and when finished, average cut in feet, and 
nature of excavation of each sewer constructed. 



78 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



1 


1 "^ 
.£-5 


Length i 
feet, n 


Akron 


10 
8 
10 


98 
232 




15 


324 




i 15 


306 




i 15 


378 




i 10 


196 




1 12 






10 






10 


200 




10 


419 




12 


226 




15 


496 




12 






10 


262 




10 


400 




8 


248 




10 


200 




10 


528 




12 


200 




12 


2-8 




10 


250 




12 


321 




12 


400 




12 






10 


604 




10 


498 




8 


54 




15 


556 




10 


132 




12 1 






10 j 







15 


70". 




12 





Amherst south back. 

Arlington. 

Beacon 

Beech 

Beech 

Beech 

Beech 

Beech east back... 
Beech east back... 

Bell 

Cedar 

Elm 

Elm 

Elm east back 

Elm west back 

Foster avenue 

Garland avenue . . . 

Hanover 

Harvard 

Harvard 

Hu,yes avenue 

Hay ward 

Hayward 

Jones east back — 
Laurel south back. 

Lowell 

Mammoth road .... 

Maple 

Maple 

Milton 

Mj'rtle south back. 
Myrtle south back. 

Old Falls road 

Orange 



Beech east back easterly 

Russell easterly 

Amherst northerly 

Silver to Somerville 

Silver to Harvard 

Harvard northerly 

North of Gore northerly 

Amherst southerly 

Amherst southei-ly 

Wilson easterly 

East of Wilson to east of Hall. 

South of Shasta southerly 

Trenton northerly 

Orange to Myrtle south back. 
North of Dean northerly 

Valley southerly 

Cypress westerly 

Ea.st of Nutfleld lane easterly.. 

Beech easterly 

Maple easterly 

Old Falls road northerly 

Ainsworth avenue westerly. .. 

Jewett to Riley avenue 

Nelson northerly 

Union to Maple 

Belmont to Beacon 

Wayhmd avenue northerly — 

Gore southerly 

North of Harvard to Ilayward. 

Merrimack northerly 

Elm cast back to Chestnut 

Chestnut to Union 

Spruce to Hayes avenue 

lOliM to Klni «ust back 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



79 



IN 189S.— EAST SIDE. 



at 

^1 


03 
1 

1 


i 

p. 

a 


I'i 


1 


ft 

1 


Cm 


1 

.-.a 


« 

< 


1 
1 

Nature of excavation. 


90 




1 


2 




873.68 


$0.81S 


Apr. 27 


Apr. 29 


6.S 


Gravel. 






1 


2 




112.59 


1.148 


Nov. 22 


Nov. 23 


7.C 


Gravel and boulders. 
Gravel and boulders. 






1 


5 




149.25 


0.643' 


May 14 


May 17 


8.0 




1 




8 




310.78 


0.960 


Aug. 29 


Sept. 3 


9.0 


Sand. 




1 




7 




609.81 


1.992 


July 27 


Aug. 7 


15.5 


Sand. 




1 




12 




486.13 


1.285 


Nov. 14 


Nov. 21 


12.0 


Sand. 






I 


8 




162.34 


0.828 


Oct. 24 


Oct. 27 


7.5 


Gravel and stone. 


156 


1 


1 


2 




91.60 


0.580 


Apr. 25 


Apr. 28 


6.0 


Gravel. 


70 






2 




51.03 


0.730 


" 25 


" 28 


6.0 


Gravel. 




1 


1 


4 




2C0.41 


1.002 


Oct. 10 


Oct. 14 


8.0 


Stony gravel. 




1 


1 


9 


2 


228.27 


0.545 


July 1 


July 5 


8.0 


Sand. 






1 


8 


I, 


221.24 


0.979 


May 17 


May 21 
Sept. 15 


9.5 


Sand. 




2 




9 


5 


3,653.99 


7.366 


June 6 


16.5 


Ledge and bard gravel 


144 


1 




2 


.. 


158.00 


1.097 


June 23 


July 11 


9.5 


Sand. 




1 




1 




207.17 


0.786 


June 20 


June 23 


6.0 


Gravel. 




1 




14 




363.43 


0.908 


May 25 


" 8 


9.0 


Gravel. 








6 




41.08 


0.166 


Aug. 10 


Aug. 10 
" 25 


4.5 


Gravel. 
Sand. 




2 






4 


201.06 


1.005 


" 23 


6.0 




1 




22 


2 


376.98 


0.714 


" 2 


" 7 


8.0 


Sand. 






1 


3 




112.50 


0.563 


June 18 


June 20 


8.0 


Sand. 




1 




10 




524.25 


1.850 


Dec. 5 


Dec. 20 


15.0 


Hard gravel and ledge. 




1 




9|3 


205.92 


0,824 


July 7 


July 11 


7.5 


Sand and water. 








el 


674.89 
182.74' 


2.102 


May 2 
Aug. 21 


June 11 
Aug. 26 


9.5 


Gravel and ledge. 
Wet sand and gravel. 





1 




16 




0.457 


4.5 


1,056 


3 


1 


47 


7 


905.56 


0.857 


May 2 


May 13 


9.0 


Sand and gravel. 




1 




8 


1 


554.97 


1.101 


" 20 


June 3 


9.0 


Gravel. 








4 


g 


167.47 
10.08 
681.04 


0.336 


Apr. 19 

June 21 

" 13 


Apr. 23 

June 21 

" 20 


3.0 


Sand. 












0.200 
1.225 






2 




13 


1 


12.0 


Sand. 




1 




I 




444.15 


3.305 


Apr. 29 


May 13 


5.5 


Ledge. 


489 


2 




13 


2 


537.00 


1.098 


June 23 


July 11 


10.0 


Sand. 


812 


2 




27 


7 


605.69 


0.802 


" 23 


" 11 


9.0 


Sand. 




3 




17 


3 


• 1,593.48 


2.266 


sept. 17 


Nov. 21 


13.5 Gravel and boulders. 


142 


1 






1 


156.00 


I.ICO 


June 23 


July 11 


9.0 


Gravel. 



80 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SEWERS BUILT IX 1898. 



Pine east back . • . 

Preseott 

Riley avenue 

River road.... 

Russell 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Taylor 

Union .. 

Union east back.. 

Valley 

Walnut east back 
Wilson 



Salmon southerly , 

Wilson easterly 

Hay ward southerly 

Clarke northerly 

North of Harrison 

Union to Beech 

Union to Beech 

Union to Beech 

Beech easterly 

Wilson to Hall 

Valley northerly 

Silver to Somerville 

Salmon southerly 

Jewett to Foster avenue 

North of Salmon southerly . . 
South of Silver to Somerville 



90 
274 
154 



198 
136 
516 
350 
324 
214 
243 
112 



12,500 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



81 



EAST SIDE.— Contimied. 



§:- 



C en 



> C 



Nature of excavation. 



1 .. 

1' 

4 
15 



2,959 4714 399 57 §20,594.90 



829.53 
392.07 

32.24 

1,659.11 

8.65 

363.40 

66.00 
199.27 
154.00 
633.76 
246.15 
745.43 
160.32 
238.88 
200.10 
411.41 



$0,328 
1.434 
0.210 
1.857 
0.197 
1.540 
1.138 
1.006 
1.132 
1.228 
0.703 
2.301 
0.750 
0.982 
1.787 
1.652 



June 1 

" 14 

Aug. 2 

July 10 

Sept. 2 

Aug. 10 

" id 

" 10 

" 10 

2 

June 9 

Aug. 6 

June 1 

May 19 

Oct. 13 

July 25 



June 4 

June 28 

Aug. 6 

July 27 

Sept. 2 

" 1 

" 1 

" 1 

Aug. 21 
June 13 
Aug. 19 
June 4 
May 23 
Oct. 19 
Aug. 2 



Sand. 

Gravel. 

Sand. 

Sand and gravel. 

Gravel. 

Gravel. 

Gravel and ledge. 

Gravel and ledge. 

Sand. 

Hard gravel. 

Sand. 

Sand and boulders. 

Gravel. 

Gravel. 

Gravel and boulders. 

Hard gravel. 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 







i 


« 




Street. 


Location. 




1 




Amherst road 


South of Charleston avenue to Milford. . . 


Akron 


24 


839 




Mast southerly . .... .... .... 


„ 


10 


24 




He vey t o He ve v east back 




10 


130 


Bartlett 




" 


15 










15 




Bremer north back.. 


Coolidge avenue west back westerly 




10 


186 


Cartior east back .... 






10 


284 
















20 


485 


Putnam 


Bow to Whipple 

North of Milford to Bowman place 

Whipple to Bartlett 




24 


164 


Til ton . 


" 


10 
20 


186 




500 


"Whinnlp 


Putnam to Wayne 


" 


20 


536 










4,084 



Length of sewers, east side, division No. 2 9,956 feet 

Length of sewers, east side, division No. 7 5,503 " 

Length of sewers, west side, division No. 10 4,378 " 



Total 19,837 feet 



Ck)st of sewers, east side, division No. 2. 
Cost of sewers, east side, division No. 7. .. 
Cost of sewers, west side, division No. 10. 



Total 



Average cost per foot, east side, division No. 2. . . 
Average cost per foot, east side, division No. 7. . . 
Average co.st per foot, west side, division No. 10. 
Average total cost i^er foot, $1.49G. 



$14,458.45 
6,136.45 
9,098.13 

$29,693.03 

$1,452 
1.115 
2.078 



STEEET AND PARE COMMISSIONERS, 



83 



IN 1898.— WEST SIDE. 





1 

2 

c 

03 


i 

o 
a 
B 

si 


III 


t 

a 


1 


3 

am 


13 


3 
«. 

la 

< 


Nature of excavation. 




4 


» 


27 


1 
2 
1 
4 
3 

2 
6 

4 

2 
26 


»2,317.S0 

27.00 

108.01 

1,265.75 

158.82 

190.53 

1-29.61 

29.60 

905.84 

454.21 

626.14 

1,359.82 

1,525.00 


$2,762 
1.125 
0.831 
1.777 
0.510 
1.024 
0.456 
0.778 
1.869 
2.770 
3.366 
2.719 
2.845 


May 5 

" 5 

" 2 

Oct. 28 

Auk. 15 

Oct. 11 

Aug. 23 

May 2 

Sept. 21 

June 13 

Oct. 18 

Junell3 

" 13 


June 11 
" 11 
May 6 
Nov. 21 
Aug. 22 
Oct. 14 
Aug. 27 
May 6 
Oct. 3 
Sept. 20 
Nov. 7 
Sept. 20 
'• 20 


14.0 
5.0 
8.0 

10.5 
8.5 
8.0 
7.0 
8.0 

10 

10.0 
6.5 
9.5 

10.0 


Sand. 
Sand 




1 
2 

1 

1 
1 
2 
2 

17 






Sand 


294 


•• 


26 
9 

2 

13 

4 
13 
19 

121 


Sand and muck. 

Sand. 

Sand and ledge. 

Sand. 

Sand. 

Stone and gravel. 

Sand and water. 

Ledge and sand. 

Ledge and muck. 

Muck and ledge. 


294 


$9,098.13 











SUMMARY. 

Total appropriation for new sewers $34,500.00 

Amount brought forward from 1897 439.51 

Total $34,939.51 

Expended, new sewers, east side $20,594.90 

new sewers, west side 9,098.13 

134 new cesspools 3,012.54 

On hand, supplies at city yard 1,825.19 

appropriation for new sewers 408.75 

Total $34,939.51 

The following table shows how the cost for new sewers has been 
divided: 



84 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



oo 


o 
§ 




84 06 
5,220.99 
0,540.76 
6,2S1.75 
7,407.70 
3,403.95 
1,526.00 
3,422.74 
636.79 


8 
S 


i 










i S i ^ S 1 ! s 

: S - - " - '^ - 




^6 
I- 3 

1 • 

a 

5 


2 




: 1 1 2 § 1 g 


i 2 s ' r^ 










: S S S ^ 
: o ^ CO .4 






: 1 

; 1 


Freight 
charges. 


8 






: S. g 8 g S § g 
S gi S gS S ;:i g 






1 

s 

6 










m eo .-( ct M .-1 

* 


i 

to 


L 

o * 


s 






S S 18 S § " " " 


i 


i 










^ S ^ 2 i 

B_ 1 s g "i 


i2 




i 


Castings, 
repairs, 
black- 
smithing. 


s 
S 






S S {5 S? S 2 § 

i i s i ^ § ^ 




1 


1 








1 i g 2 i i ^ g i i 

.- .- „- .- . „- .r 1 g 


H 

s 





f. 




-•1 




. 1 






1 


1 

5 


1 

E 

4 

c 


E 

1 




^ 





STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



85 



Location. 



No. 



Cost of 
material. 



Arlington and Russell , 

Ai^h and IliirrUon 

ATulierst :in<l DuUon 

Applet on and Adams 

Apple tuu, ne;ir Elm 

Ash and Prospect 

Amherst 8t)nth back, corner of pine 

Beccb and Merrimack 

Blodgett, near Chestnut 

Beech and Harrison 

Bridge, between Maple and Ash 

Brook, east of Elm 

Canal and Granite 

Central, near Union 

Cedar, between Elm and Chestnut 

Elm, between Clark and Monroe 

Elm, near Merrimack 

Elm, between Concord and Amherst 

Elm and Salmon 

Elm and Merrimack 

Elm and Amherst 

Elm, between Stark and Mechanic 

Grove and Beech 

Hanover, between Elm and Chestnut 

Harrison and Beech 

Hall and Myrtle 

Hall and Prospect 

Lincoln and Silver 

Laurel and Wilson 

Lake avenue near Beech 

Lincoln and Chester 

Maple, between Spruce and Lake avenue , 

Munroe 

Merrimack, near Elm 

Milton and Merrimack 

Maple and East High 

Manchester, near Chestnut 

Maple and Nashua , 

Maple and Ashland 

Maple and Manchester 

North and Walnut 

North Elm, near Trenton 

Pearl and Russell , 

Prospect and Maple 

Prospect, near Linden 

Russell and Bridge 

Salmon, near Bay 

Stark, near Elm 

Spruce and Wilson 

Salmon and Liberty 

Union, between Harrison and Prospect . . . 

Union and Appleton 

Union and Merrimack 

Union and Salmon 

Wilson and Central 

W ilson and Lake avenue 

West Cedar 



847.82 
56.44 
26.08 
37.07 
30.42 
27.21 
12.07 
12.14 
12.66 
12 50 
13.23 
13.81 
14.35 
13.99 
47.34 
13.23 
44.45 
14.94 
26.62 
15.25 
14.94 
25.06 
9.60 
97.55 
12.14 
30.62 
27.38 
14.12 
39.52 
28.50 
38.80 
60.20 
14 31 
12.72 
52.19 
26.44 
15.25 
12.68 
12.68 
36.16 
26.30 
74.29 
13.76 
27.21 
W.99 
10.78 
14.12 
13.86 
27.38 
13.76 
14.67 
13.04 
25.54 
26.80 
13.98 
13.22 
48.44 



$34.00 
41.25 
16.75 

i7.eo 

14.50 
14.85 
7.00 
6.00 
11.90 
8.00 
8.00 
7.00 
6.00 
10.25 
20.40 
9.50 
27.80 
8.00 
9.50 
7.60 
7.00 
13.00 
9.90 
46.20 
4.60 
13.00 
16.00 
7.00 
30 00 
24.50 
20.00 
23.80 
11.75 
7.00 
29.50 
16.60 
7.75 
5.50 
S.'iO 
35.00 
30 00 
100. 0« 
8.00 
14.85 
8.60 
8.25 
7.00 
6.50 
25.00 
8.50 
12.50 
8.60 
16.50 
30.00 
9.00 
12.00 
24.00 



«947.70 



86 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Report of Division No. 10. 



George P, Ames, Agent, 
general repairs. 

Patched with gravel and stone chips: 

Boy nton road, labor 

Eddy road, labor 

Front street, labor 

Marion street, labor 

Putnam street, labor 

Sullivan street, labor 

I'hornton street, labor 

Wilton street, labor 

Sundry places, labor 

Cut trees, Granite street, labor 

Mast road, labor 

North Main street, labur 

Fencing, Bartlett street, labor 

Railroad street, labor 

Whitewashing tree boxes, labor, and materials 

Cleaned gutters, repaired culverts, scraped crossings, etc. 

Total 

STIiEETS GRAVELED. 



$32.25 

66.25 

23.75 

5.00 

3.00 

3.00 

16.50 

15.50 

30.50 

64.00 

7.50 

15.00 

4.00 

29.47 

40.00 

318.36 



$674.08 





Width In 




feet. 


feet. 


Labor. 


290 


20 


S31.72 


2.^0 


10 


61.25 


1,475 


16 


60.00 


414 


16 


32.25 


400 


10 


22.00 


755 


16 


36.76 


475 


17 


37.60 


200 


20 


18.25 


200 


16 


23.76 


UO 


22 


19.75 


1,025 


16 


133.37 


200 


18 


35.00 


125 


20 


15.00 


180 


26 


10.00 


6.099 




S6.36.69 



Amherst road — 
Boynton street. . 
Bean port street. 
Coolidge avenue 

C street , 

Conant street — 
Mil ford street... 
Marion street — 
Old Mast road — 

Prince .street 

River road 

Sullivan street... 
Wallter street . . . 
Wayne street — 

Total 



In some cases crushed stone was used instead of gravel. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS, 
STREETS TOF-DRESSED WITH CRUSHED STONE. 



87 



Location. 



Eddy hill.... 

Ferry 

McGregor. . . 
North Main*. 
West Bridge 

Total.... 




if 1,850.00 



« Labor includes crushing of 500 loads of stone now on hand. 
TURNPIKING. 

The first of the spring- the road-machine was used on all the streets 
in divisions 10 and 11; turnpiked, 94,200 feet. 

In the fall the road-machine was used on the following streets: 

A street 300 feet 

Bowman 600 " 

C street 300 " 

Conant 900 " 

Cartier 500 " 

Cartier back 300 " 

Eddy road 2,100 " 

Front 300 " 

Milford 5,600 " 

Second 5,500 " 

South Main 3,000 " 

Total 19,400. feet 

Total turnpiked, 113,600 feet, or 21.51 miles. 
Labor, $325.89. 

NEW HIGHWAYS. 



Location. 


Length in 
feet. 


Cut or fill. 


Labor. 




680 
370 
180 


Both. 
Cut. 


5:64.82 


Conant street 


79.00 




70.75 






Total 


1,136 




?214.57 









MACADAMIZING. 

Second street, from School to the railroad, 4,218 square yards. 
949 loads of crushed stone; labor, $3,293.40. 



Used 



»» ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORT. 

The jjortable i-riisher Avhit-h was set \ip last year at the Anioske:vg 
company's li'di^e was used in crushing' all Ihe stone. The labor on above 
street includes the cost of crushiiij^- 400 loads of stone which was used 
in division No, 2. 

COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



J^OCATION. 



Number 
Square loads 

yaiils. of stone. 



Conant . . . 
Edily hill 
Ferry. . . . 
Hevey . . . . 
Prince .... 
Rimnion. , 
Second .. . 
Wayne . .. 
Wilton.... 



276 


33 


S90.87 


631 


107 


252.00 


200 


31 


97.12 


154 


17 


46.50 


273 


32 


101.25 


K! 


3 


5.00 


733 


100 


323.60 


33 


4 


10.00 


144 


17 


66.75 



8992.99 



PAVING KELAID. 

Doug-las 'I" sq. yds. 

Milford and Bowman 33 

Milford 208 

McGregor and North Main 6 " 

North Main SO 

Parker ^1 

Wayne 56 " 

. Total 451 sq. yds. 

Labor, $i:i;i.87. 



GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 



Location. 


Length 
in feet. 


Width 
in feet. 


Cut or 

fin. 


Labor. 


Bath 


100 
400 
400 
200 
200 
100 
325 
190 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 

Both. 

Fill. 

Cut. 


S4.00 




10.26 




1.5 60 




4.00 


MUfni-fl . 


7.00 




10.00 




63.00 




14.60 






•|<0{|^] 


1,916 






S118.2S 











STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 89 

EDGESTONES SET. 

Amory 50 feet- 
Bath and Second 67 " 

Beauport and Wilton 19 " 

Clinton and JNIain 35 " 

Conant .and Eimmon 25 " 

Conant and Hevey 17 " 

Doug-las C)2 " 

Dubuque and I'utnam 50 " 

Ferry and Tliird 20 " 

Ferry and Second 77 " 

Ferry and ]S[ain 14 " 

Milfoi'd and George 39 " 

Marion and North ]Main 30 " 

Milf ord and Bowman 36 " 

North Main 163 " 

Putnam and Beauport 15 " 

Sullivan and Beauport 16 " 

South Main 176 " 

School and Main 19 " 

School and Second 37 " 

Second and Walker 72 " 

Wilton back 32 " 

Walker and Third 7 " 

Walker and Main 30 " 

W^ayne and North Main 46 " 

Total 1,154 feet 

Labor, $257.75. 

EDGESTONES RESET. 

Main and Conant 54 feet 

North Main 375 " 

Walker and Third 20 " 

Total 449 feet 

Labor, $71.50. 



90 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



Number. 



Co3t of 
materials. 



Amherst and Mast roacl 

Amory , 

Amory and Hevey 

Conant and Rimmon 

Clinton 

earlier east back , 

Cartier and Wayne 

llevey and Conant 

Hancock 

Milford 

Milford and Amherst .., 
Milford and Bowman . . 

North Main 

North Main and McGreg 
Nortli Main and Wayne 
Prince and Koynton. . . . 

Second and Ferry 

Second and Walker . — 

Second 

South Main and Ferry . 
South Main and Parker 

South Main 

Third and Ferry 

Walker and Second 

Wilton and Main 

Wilton and Beauport . . 

Total 



S29.81 
16.28 
38.. 30 
11.49 
10 90 
25.0-2 
12.50 
25.91 
12.74 
28.02 
22.99 
10.32 

131.84 
13.94 
17.56 
11. S5 
47.81 
24.14 
24.00 
15.43 
15.30 
64.76 
11.62 
11.62 
11.62 
11.98 



S25.00 
20.87 
22.50 
13. .50 
•6.50 
10.. 50 
15.50 
19.00 
11. OO 
31.47 
48-99 
20.60 
94.75 
16.75 
27.50 

7.00 
31.75 
25.75 
15.00 
15.00 
16.50 
53.25 
10.25 
10.00 
10.00 

7.50 



8578.90 



REPAIRED SEWERS AND CESSPOOLS. 



Cost of 
materials. 



Amory 

Baldwin's yard 

Beanport, sewer 

Clinton 

Conant 

Ferry and Fourth 

Milford and George. 

North Main 

Second and Batli 

Walker and P'ourth . 

Wayne 

Cleaned cesspools. .. 



80.15 
2.82 
3.29 
.29 
1.65 



1.65 
1.29 
.59 



812.84 



81.00 
1.00 

142.00 
6.50 
1.50 
1.75 
1.50 
1.50 
3.60 
6.00 
2.00 

336.97 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
NEW SEAVERS. 



91 



LOCATION. 


Length In 
feet. 


Total cost. 


Amherst road, south of Charleston avenue to Milford .. . 


839 
24 
130 
712 
294 
186 
284 
38 
485 
164 
186 
500 
536 


$2,317.80 
27.00 




108.01 


Bartlett Wayne to south of Putnam 


1,265.75 




158 82 


Bremer north back, Coolidge avenue w'st back westerly 


190.53 
129.61 




29.60 




905.84 




454.21 




626.14 


VViftiP Wliii-inlp tr> Tiirtlpft 


,1,359.82 




1,525.00 






Total 


4,378 


89,098.13 







For further details on sewers see sewer table in. division No. 2 report. 



REPORTS FROM HIGHWAY DIVISIONS. 



Division No. 4. 
Byron E. Moobe, Agent. 

The usual amount of work has been done in this division during the 
past year. All the roads in my charge have been turnpiked and top- 
dressed with clay or gravel wherever necessary. The bushes have been 
cut throughout the division and all roads broken out after each snow- 
storm, and kept open for public travel. 

Total amount expended for labor during the year, $G47.87. 



Division No. 5. 

Mark E. Harvey, Agent. 

Number of feet of roads graveled, 4,130. 
Number of feet of roads turnpiked, 982. 
Number of feet of new railing built, 256. 
Laid 118 feet of 10-inch Akron pipe as side culverts. 
Widened Goffe's Falls and Center roads, 26 cubic yards. 
Widened Merrill road, 37 cubic yards. 
Widened Londonderry road, 235 cubic yards. 
Graded by cut, Goffe's Falls and Center roads, 502 cubic yards. 
Graded by cut, Merrill road, 52 cubic yards. 
Graded by fill, Merrill road, 28 cubic yards. 

A new bridge has been built across Cohas brook on Nutt road, 32 
feet in length, with a roadway 20 feet and 6 inches. 



92 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Bushes hare been cut on IV2 miles of road, loose stones removed from 
all roads once a month during the season; all roads broken out after 
each snowstorm; general repairs made throughout the division. 

Total amount expended for labor, $758.65. 



Division No. 6. 

Daniel H. Dickey, Agent. 

The road -machine has been used on the following roads: Dickey 
road, Lake Shore road, Webster road, and Canal road. Mowed bushes 
on all the above roads. Laid over 5 culverts. Built 2,7G3 feet fencing 
on Dickey road. General repairs attended to throughout the division. 

Total amount expended for labor, $431.82. 



Division No. 7. 

CiFAKLES Francis, Agent. 

Turnpiked, Somerville street 1,300 feet 

Maynard avenue 400 " 

Knowlton street .')50 " 

Total 2,050 feet 

Graveled, Auburn, west from Belmont fiOO " 

Ainsworth avenue 470 " 

Cedar, from Wilson to Hall 450 " 

Summer, from Belmont to Massabesic 000 '* 

Valley, from Wilson east 2.000 " 

Total 4,120 feet 

Repaired bridges, ISfammoth road, 12 feet x 16 feet. 
Repaired bridges. Hospital road, 11 feet x 34 feet. 

Repaired culverts, Taylor and Somerville streets, 50 feet x 1 foot 
X 1 foot. 

Repaired culverts, Taylor and Somerville streets, 50 feet x 1 foot. 
Repaired culverts, Taylor and Vinton streets, 50 feet x 1 foot. 

NEW streets IU'ILT. 

Jones, from NeLson north 400 feet 

Nelson, from Hall road east 300 " 

Silver, from Wilson east 500 " 

Vinton, from Taylor C50 " 

Cedar, from Wilson east 450 " 

Total 2,300 feet 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 93 
GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 

Cedar 700 feet 

Hayward 200 " 

Hall road 17") " 

Jones 050 " 

Massabesic 500 " 

Mammoth road 112 " 

Nelson 725 " 

Silver : 500 " 

Valley 150 " 

Vinton, from Taylor east 600 " 

Total 4,312 feet 

GUTTERS PAVED. 

Cedar 900 feet 

Dearborn and Snmmer 100 " 

Hayward, near Jewett 100 " 

Massabesic 1,435 " 

Valley 150 " 

Total 2,685 feet 

EDGESTONES SET. 

Auburn back street near Hall 16 feet 

Cj'press at Eailroad 16 " 

Cypress and Massabesic 58 " 

Dearborn and Summer 16 " 

Falls road and Massabesic 42 " 

Hayward 40 " 

Hall and Summer 15 " 

Hall and Cedar * 32 " 

Hall back street 7 " 

Hospital road and ]\Iassabesic 34 " 

Hall and Nelson 17 " 

Jones back street 31 " 

Jewett and Hayward 35 " 

Mammoth road and Nelson 40 " 

Massabesic 16 " 

Nelson and Jones 26 " 

Spruce and Hall 15 " 

Taylor and ^Massabesic 38 " 

Woodland avenue 19 " 

Total 513 feet 

Macadamized ]\Iassabesic street, fi-om the Portsmouth railroad to 
the junction of Old Falls road and Massabesic street, 3,965.91 square 
yards, using 1,297 loads of stone; labor, $1,886.60 (does not include cost 
of crushing stone). 



94 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



No. 



Cost of 
material. 



Aiiiswortli avenue and Hayward . . 

Cedar, at Wilson 

Cypress, at railroad track 

Dearborn and Snmner , 

Foster avenue and Hayward 

Hall and Cedar 

Hayward, near Ainsworth avenue 

Jewett and Hayward 

.Jewel t and Valley 

Mainniotli ro.ad 

Massabesic 

Prescott '. 

Spruce and Massabesic 

Taylor and Vallej'^ 

Valley 

Wilson and Sonierville 

Total 



§10.01 


SIO.OO 


12.17 


12.00 


2-2 68 


20.00 


ll.t<l 


12.00 


20.96 


18.00 


11.22 


8.00 


21.72 


19.00 


24.26 


20.00 


10. cs 


10.00 


19.71 


12.00 


09.99 


83.00 


10.68 


12.00 


7.81 


15.00 


22 67 


18.00 


12.12 


10.00 


25.74 


20.00 



8314.23 



5299.00 



NEW SEWERS. 



Location. 




Bell, Wilson easterly 

Cedar, from east of Wilson to east Hall 

Foster avenue, valley southerly 

Garland avenue 

Hayward, Ainsworth avenue west 

Hayward, .Jewett to Riley avenue 

•Jones east back'. Nelson northerly 

Mammoth road, Wayland avenue north 
Old Falls road, Si)rucc to Hayes avenue 

rrescott, Wilson easterly 

Riley avenue, Hayward south 

Somerville, Wilson to Hall 

Taylor, Vallej' northerly 

Valley, Jewett to Foster avenue 

Wilson, south Silver to Somerville 

Hayes avenue, Old Falls road northerly 

Total 



Division No. S. 



Ckoikik H. Penniman, .\oicnt. 



S200.41 
228.27 
363.43 

41.08 
205.92 
674.89 
182.74 
167.47 
1,593.48 
392.07 

32 24 
633.76 
246.15 
238.88 
411.41 
5-24 25 



S6.136.45 



For further details see sewer table, division 2 ropurt. 
Total amount exj)ended for labor, $11,104.18. 



Tiinij)iked 'A')', rods. 

Graveled .'{"(i yards and patched roads in sundry places, using' 600 
loads of gravel taken from schoolhouse bank. 222 jards of sidewalks 
have been Imilt to grade; lowered gutter near blaeksinitli shop, 225 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 95 

feet in length and 1 foot wide. Built one new culvert 90 feet in length, 
and relaid 329 feet of culverts. Also laid 128 feet of 10-inch Akron pipe 
for drainage purposes. Laid 64 jjerch of stone for bank wall and 
stone filled 459 yards. 

Built railing 200 feet in length, using iron posts; also, 450 feet of 
fencing. 

60 loads of cobble stone were taken from the schoolhouse gravel 
bank and hauled to the crusher on Lowell street to be crushed. 

All minor repairs have been attended to and all roads broken out 
after each snowstorm. 

Total amount expended for labor, $2,002.78. 



Division No. 9. 

Lester C. Paige, Agent. 

The culvert which drains the gravel bank on Cohas avenue was taken 
up and lowered three feet, thus draining off the surplus water and 
giving an opjiortunity to obtain some good gravel. Over 500 loads 
were taken from this bank. 990 loads of gravel and claj^ have been 
used during the season. 

Graveled Cohas avenue, 75 rods. 

Graveled Derry road, 147 rods. 

Graveled Mammoth road, 60 rods. 

Graveled Conant road, 53 rods. 

Dickey road and Conant road were also widened and filled. 

Bushes have been cut throughout the entire division. Three cul- 
verts were taken up, cleaned and relaid. Small stones were removed 
from the roads several times, and all general repairs attended to. The 
roads have been broken out after each snowstorm and kept in passable 
condition during the winter. 

Total amount expended for labor, $736.12. 



Division No. 12. 
Eugene G. Libbey, Agen^. 

Turnpiked about four miles of road with road-machine, repaired cul- 
verts on Bald hill road, and made general repairs upon the roads 
throughout the division wherever needed. All roads were broken out 
after snowstorms and kept in good condition during the winter 
months. 

Total amount expended for labor, $342. 

PARKS AND COMMONS. 

The appropriation for parks and commons this year would not ad- 
mit of manj- permanent improvements. 



96 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORT. 

TOTAL COST OF ALL WORK DONE 





s 

s 
a 
ej 

•-5 


February. 
March. 


< 


^ 

s 


street and park cominiss'rs. 


S119.00 
88.74 
32.40 

1,628.07 
42.13 
49.27 


SI Of) 40 
44.20 
40.50 

4,613.33 
33.70 
33.14 
82.48 


5.583.75 

573.52 

32.40 

1,364.59 


8126.29 

1,221.23 

38.98 

107 .IS 


Sl.59.95 
2,739 58 




184 00 








59.16 1 112.52 


270.86 




144.18 
15.12 


24.54 
322.65 
57.76 
1,305.28 
455.83 
175.85 


1,094.73 




2,451.60 






1,124.62 




1,109.97 
435.32 


1,112.71 

883,57 


1,248.84 
545.24 
159.65 
12.30 


903.31 




559.49 




100.80 




5.67 
100.02 
89.61 


6.55 


252.19 




84.06 
283.57 


5.226.99 




10.74 


80.65 


653.39 




1,146.83 




























343.62 
2.37 
1.50 


287.78 
30.87 


192.71 

39.00 
2.25 


294.05 
60.59 
79.75 
33.00 


270.88 




.345.50 




81.78 


















" Barry " playgrounds 























Total 





















* Includes §2,799.39 paid the city by Manclicster .Street Railway Co. 
t Iiicliidos 81,845.24 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
DURING THE YEAR 1898. 



97 



c 

3 
»-5 






1 
1 


S 

1 


1 

3 

o 
!i5 




"3 


8592.25 


S115.1C 


51C0.78 


$596.65 


S135.45 


1134.25 


5627.65 


S3,516.G8 


3,285.6^ 


4,923 39 


4,180.09 


3,308.80 


1,426.05 


2,249.37 


493.59 


24,534.18 


1,052.35 


660.35 


822.93 


295.50 


241.44 


942.11 
49.10 


182.65 
2,434 58 


4,525 61 
10,197.22 


540.70 


830.64 


654.21 


672.54 


231.22 


125.93 


10121 


. 3.674.82 


2,372.71 
3,133.28 














6.313.72 


2,303.16 


1,376.79 


1,887.88 


2,249.63 


1,833 52 


66.14 


15,712.25 


662.53 


1,033.58 


585.93 


499 26 


34212 


626.96 


260.64 


5,193.40 


1,462.67 


1,378.83 


1,572.06 


1,243.20 


1,075.28 


1,401.15 


1,289.35 


15,162.65 


510.54 


736.34 


527.34 


499.91 


1,103.95 


280.75 


39.03 


6,577 31 


228.20 


283.47 


348.52 


289.37 


240.47 


307.14 




2,13.3.47 


150.27 


106.55 


11.75 


293.00 


26.75 


242.17 


180.91 


1,288.11 


6,540.76 


6,281.75 


7,407.70 


3,403.95 


1,526.00 


3,422.74 


536.79 


34,530.76 


462.16 


533.56 


703.64 


457.51 


492.32 


629.34 


104.15 


4,500.64 


4,912.28 


7,095.62 
























3,655.94 
7,545.24 


235.00 


2,500.00 


2,341.62 


85.50 


2,383.12 






627.63 


188.41 


1,027.92 


292.60 


308.04 


591.13 


251.29 


4,676.06 


217.25 


186 83 


197 62 


171.00 




37.97 




1.289.00 


131.24 


40.75 


106.25 


47. G2 


57.83 






548.97 










2.64 






35.64 














160.00 




22.00 


78.79 






































$169,027 .0» 



















98 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Weston observatory was opened in April and closed the 9th of Novem- 
ber. A building- 20 feet by 50 feet was built at Derrj-field park for stor- 
age purposes, and fifteen shade trees set out. Also the grounds on 
Oak Hill were improved by removing the stone and seeding down 
to grass. Four acres in Stark park were improved and fertilized, and 
twelve shade trees set out. One man was employed during the season 
in caring for the i^lants and shrubberj'. 

The best of care has been taken of our public squares; 820 feet of 
edgestone has been reset on Concord square, and twenty-four shade 
trees have been set out in the different squares of the city. 

summakV cojimons. 

Labor $3,154.08 

Water-works 724.00 

Trees, shrubs 289.05 

Grass-seed, dressing, etc 105.00 

Incidentals 200.05 

Hardware 99.56 

Lights 36.00 

Paint 31.82 

Seats 36.50 

Total $4,676.06 

SUMAfARY STARK AND DERRYl'IELD PARKS. 

Labor, Derryfield park $1,055.61 

Labor, Stark park 526.34 

Repairs at Weston Observatory 37.97 

Building on Oak hill 87.63 

•Grass-seed, dressing, etc 80.00 

Trees, shrubs 20.75 

Hardware 19.57 

Incidentals 10.10 

Total $1,837.97 

In closing, we desire to thank His Honor the Mayor and the members 
of the city government for courtesies granted. We also wish to ex- 
press our apiireciation of the faithful and efficient services rendered 
this department bj' the city engineer and his assistants, and to all 
our assistants, whatever their station, we also extend thanks for the 
ability and interest they have shown in the work of the various de- 
part nicnls. 

Respectfully submitted. 

HOKACIC P. SlMPwSON, 
GEOIUJK H. STKARNS. 
PVRON WORTHE.N, 

]{<Hinl of Stnct and Park Cotmni'^sioncis. 
.lanuary 1, lS9y. 



EEPOET 

OF THE 

ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Office of the City Engineer. 
Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1898. 
To the EonoraUe Mayor and City Councils: 

Gentlemen, — The twentieth annual report of the City Engineer is 
herewith submitted, showing the expenditures and operation of the 
engineer's department for the year ending December 31, 1898. 

Office. 

Five assistants have been employed in this department during the 
year 1898: Harrie M. Young, George W. Wales, Harry J. Briggs, Alfred 
T. Dodge, Ella Barker Davis, stenographer and typewriter. 

Financial. 

w. D, henry & CO. 
1897. 

Oct. 30. To l^ ream letter typewriter paper $0.90 

1 ream cop. typewriter paper 1.00 

^2 ream cop. typewriter paper .75 

Nov. 29. 1/2 M. No. 10 white envelopes 1.25 

1/2 M. No. 10 Manila envelopes .75 

$4.65 

KIMBALL & HOBBS. 

Dec. 27. To 11/2 lbs. rubber bands @ $2 3.00 

W. H. BENNETT. 
1898. 
Jan. 25. To 10 days making inventory and finishing city 

report 40.00 

A. C. WALLACE. 

Feb. 28. To 5,000 grade stakes 2:5.75 

THE HEAD & DOWST CO. 

Mar. 9. To 1 piece mahogany $0.25 

working same .10 

1 hour labor .20 

.55 

101 



102 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

KIMBAXL & HOBBB. 

Mar. 11. To 1% doz. chair tips @ 40c $0,67 

AMERICAN EXPRESS CO. 

Mar. 8. To 1 box to Buff & Berger, Boston $0.45 

16. 1 box to Buff & Berger, Boston .20 

18. 2 boxes to Engineer's Dept., city .40 

April 1. 2 boxes to Troy, N. Y 1.10 

June 29. bundle from New York to Engineer's 

Department .45 

extra charges to Lancaster .50 

3.10 

C. H. WOOD. 

Uax. 14. To shellacing 3 inst. boxes and tripods. 2.00 

BUFF & BERGER. 

M:ix. 17. To 12 hours labor repairing transit $7.20 

1 packing piece 1.50 

1 new tripod head 3.50 

1 new foot plate 2.00 

1 new vernier glass .60 

repairing and adjusting 1 Wye level 

telescope 3.30 

18.10 

W. F. HUBBARD. 

June 1. To 250 spruce stakes 48 in. long, 2 in. x 2 in 10.00 

JOHN B. VARICK CO. 

June 2. To 1 bunch lines $0.10 

3 hanks Sampson No. 4 cord @ 15c. . . .45 

.55 

FROST & ADAMS, BOSTON. 

June 15. To 500 rivets for tape $1.00 

postage .04 

July 15. 1 Chesterman steel tape 10th 100 feet 9.50 

Dec. 24. 1 Boston level rod 14.00 

24,54 

E. G. STOLTMAN, NEW YORK. 

June 17. To 1 roll 36-inch blue print paper $2.50 

Nov. 3. 2 25-yard rolls 48-inch blue print pa- 
per @ $4.25 8.50 

2 25-yard rolls 48-inch blue print 

cloth @ $8.95 17.90 

$28.90 
Cr. by extra express to Lancaster .50 

28.40 



$5.50 



REPORT OF TUE CITY ENGINEER. 103 

W. P. GOODMAN. 

July 28. To 1 qt. Stafford's ink $0.65 

Aug. 4. 1 doz. Dixon pencils .50 

Nov. 2. 1 doz. pencils .50 

Dec. 24. 2 doz. drawing pencils @ 50c 1.00 

1 box drawing pens, No. 170 .70 

1 box engrossing pens 05 

^ 1 brush and comb 1-00 

1/2 doz. clips .50 

J. B. MCCRILLIS & SON. 

Sept. 9. To repairs on typewriter $12.25 

Paid express and carting .55 

12.80 

C. L. BERGER & SON. 

Nov. 26. To repairing, cleaning, and adjusting 1 B. & B. 

engineers' leveling instrument 6.60 

JOHN J. HOLLAND. 

Dec. 20. To 1 doz. toilet soap 1.00 

R. K. HORNE. 

Dec. 23. To 1 duster $1.75 

2 brushes .30 

1 brush .25 

2 cuspidors @ 50c 1.00 

1 nappy .38 

l^ doz. glasses .30 

3.98 

THOMAS A. LANE CO. 

Dec. 24. To 2 green cone shades and holders @ 50c 1.00 

UNION MFG. CO. 

To 15 doz. IV2 in. house numbers @ 50c. . $7.50 

July 27. 8 doz. iy2-in. house numbers @ 50c. . 4.00 

Oct. 31. 6 doz. IVg-in. figures @ 50c 3.00 

Nov. 12. 4 doz. li/a-in. figures @ 50c 2.00 

16.50 

GEORGE P. WALLACE. 

April 13. To 2 doz. sheets carbon paper 1.00 

MANCHESTER HARDWARE CO. 

April 25. To 2/3 doz. sash fasts @ $2 $1.33 

Aug. 12. 5 lbs. nails, 12d. com. Dodge .15 



1.48 



104 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

TEMPLE & FARRINGTON. 

April 25. To 6 field books, No. 5260, @ 75c 

JOHN B. CLARKE CO. 

May 12. To 100 reports, 68 pages, @ 37.4c $25.53 

Dec. 24. binding 2 typewritten books @ 75c. . 1.50 

PAIGE & MYRICK. 

Jan. 13. To repairing 2 stamps $0.40 

20. 1 autograph stamp 1.50 

GEORGE \V. WALES. 

July 23. To 5 carfares $0.25 

Aug. 27. cash paid for binders .30 

Sept. 24. 2 carfares .10 

supplies .50 

Oct. 22. 16 carfares .80 

HARRIE M. YOUNG. 

July 23. To 8 carfares 

E. R. COBURX CO. 

Feb. 9. To 200 cards $0.45 

17. 20 sheets cardboard 1.00 

20 sheets cardboard, cutting .25 

May 4. cardboard 1.30 

cutting .25 

16. 1 bottle glue .10 

1 bottle paste .25 

April 25. 3 erasers .24 

May 24. 2 reams No. 9 legal typewriter paper. 3.50 

2 reams No. 10 letter typewriter 

paper 2.70 

2 boxes envelopes .50 

1 pencil pointer 3.00 

Sept. 29. 50 manuscript covers .25 

Oct. 14. 2 boxes 9% typewriter i)a|)er 2.00 

28. 1 note book .10 

Dec. 1. 100 envelopes .20 

Va doz. erasers .25 

23. 500 envelopes printed 1.85 

24. 3 rubber penholders .75 

1 bottle paste .25 

1 bottle red ink .80 

1 box typewriter, 2 pencils 1.46 

$21.65 

Cr. bv merchandise retiirned .35 



$4.50 



27.03 



1.95 
.40 



21.30 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 105 



NEW ENGLAND TEL. & TEL. CO. 

Dec. 24. To rent of telephone for 1 year @ $3 per 

month $36.00 



$30.00 



GEORGE W. WALES. 

Dec. 24. To 313 days' semice @ $2.75 per day $800.75 

HARRIE M. YOUNG. 

Dec. 24, To 312 days' service @ $2.75 per day 858.00 

HARRY J. BRIGGS. 

Dec. 24. To 312 days' service @ $2.50 per day 780.00 

ALFRED T. DODGE. 

Dec. 24. To 312 days' service @ $2 per day 624.00 

ELLA M. BARKER AND ELLA B. DAVIS. 

Dec. 24. To 300 days' service @ $1.25 per day 375.00 



3,497.75 



SAMUEL J. LORD. 

Dec. 24. To salary 1 year $1,200.00 



Appropriation for the year 1898 $5,000.00 $5,000.00 

ORDERS. 

Number of orders for surve3's, street lines, and g-rades 510 

for sewer grades 81 

for paving grades 48 

for gutter grades 86 

for curb grades 46 

for Pine Grove cemetery grades 48 

for Valley cemeterj' grades 2 

for profile levels 48 

Total number of orders 869 

FIELD WORK. 

Levels for profiles for establishing grades (length in feet) . . . 61,635 

for sewer profiles (length in feet) 4,746 

for center profiles (length in feet) 8,500 

Other levels (length in feet) 23,822 

Total length of levels in feet 98,703 

Cross section levels, Pine Grove cemetery (area in sq. ft.) ... . 45,000 

Ash-street school yard (area in sq. ft.).. 57,5.10 

Barry playground (area in sq. ft.) 220,000 

Total area of cross section levels in sq. ft 322,530 



106 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Surveys of streets and street lines (length in feet) 40,424 

for street numbers (length in feet) 11,653 

in Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 898 

miscellaneoiis (length in feet) 7,853 



Total length of surveys in feet 60,828 

Street lines marked on ground (length in feet) 12,344 

Lot and avenue lines, Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 7,694 

Lot and avenue lines. Valley cemetery (length in feet) 200 

Lines for gutters (length in feet) 33,865 

Lines for curbs (length in feet) 6,590 

Lines for sewers (length in feet) 21,810 

Other lines (length in feet) 9,400 

Total length of lines in feet marked on the gi'ound 91,903 

Grades set for sidewalks (length in feet) 23,670 

for gutters (length in feet) 33,865 

for curbs (length in feet) 6,590 

for sewers (length in feet) 21,810 

for street railway (length in feet) 2,250 

for paving streets (length in feet) 10,302 

for building streets (length in feet) 12,880 

for Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 4,608 

in Valley cemetery (length in feet) 183 

miscellaneous (length in feet) 2,920 

Total length in feet of grades set 119,078 

Number of old lots restaked in Pine Grove cemetery 47 

New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery 115 

Old lots restaked in Valley cemetery 2 

Old lots restaked in Merrill yard 2 

Total number of cemetery lots staked out 166 

Batters set for the Amoskeag schpolhouse. 
Batters set for a bank wall in Liberty east back street. 
Batters set at/ A. Blood tomb. Valley cemetery. 
Batters set, 19,837 feet of sewers. 

Office Work. 

planb and profiles made foh sidewalk grades. 

Adams, Ray brook to north of Clarke. 
Clinton, Main to West. 
Cedar, Elm to Canal. 
Total plans and profiles, 3. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 107 



SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Beacon, Hanover to Bridge. 

Belmont, Valley to Clay. 

Canal, Granite to Central. 

Cedar south back. Pine to Union. 

Central south bade. Canal to Franklin west back. 

Everett, Clarke to Waldo. 

Granite, Main to Granite bridge. 

Hall, Prospect to Harrison. 

Harrison, Hall easterly. 

Harrison, Linden westerly. 

Harvard, Wilson to Belmont. 

Laurel, Beech to Maple. 

Linden, Prospect to Harrison. 

Maple, Valley to Silver. 

Merrimack, Belmont to Beacon. 

Pine, Auburn to Cedar south back. 

Silver, Lincoln to Belmont. 

Somerville, Cypress to Young. 

Somerville, Wilson to Belmont. 

Sullivan, Beauport to Cartier east back. 

Union, Valley to Silver. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 21. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Benton, Hall road to Mammoth road. 

Bremer, Coolidge avenue westerly. 

Chase avenue, Hayes avenue to Hospital road. 

Hall road, Massabesic northerly. 

Hayes avenue. Chase avenue to Old Falls road. 

Jones, Nelson to Benton. 

Mammoth road, Cilley road to Benton. Five plans. 

Mast, Amherst road westerly. Three plans. 

Monroe, Eiver road easterly. 

Nelson, Hall road to Mammoth road. 

Schiller, Merrimack river to Main. Two plans. 

Total numbering plans, 18. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. ^ 

Amory, Columbus avenue, and Bartlett, land of D. C. Whittemore. 
Copy. 

Ash, Maple, Prospect, and Harrison, plan of Mitchell land. Copy. 
Ashland and Amherst, land of Mrs. Cutler. Copy. 

Baker and Boston & Maine Railroad, land of T. H. McKenzie. Copy. 
Beech, Shasta, and Cilley road, land of Weston, Shirley & Bell. Copy. 
Belmont, Hall, Amherst, ajid Concord, land of S. B. Stearns. Copy. 
Belmont, land of Josejih Quiriii. Copy. 



108 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Bowman and Milford, land of C. S. Fisher. Copy. 

Bridge, Nashua, and Arlington, land of James F. Briggs. Copy. 

Byron, Josselyn, Hadley, Kennedj^ and Marshall, Kennedy Land Co. 
Copy. 

Cilley road and Lincoln, land of Thomas Chilcott. Cop3\ 

Cilley and ]\Iammoth roads, land of George F. Sargent. Copy. 

Concord, Lowell, and Belmont, land of Cassidy & Libby. Copy. 

Dix, Howe, and Belmont, land of Mrs. Agnes T. Phillips. Copy. 

Elm, West Appleton, and Webster, land of Frank W. Fitts. Copy. 

Elm and Trenton, land of George E. Gould. Copy. 

Frederick, South Main, and Wheelock, land of N. H. Improvement Co. 
Copy. 

Hall road, Massabesic to Mammoth road, location. 

Hancock and Brown aAcnue, land of Daniel Connor. Copy. 

Hanover, Central, and Hall road, land of Frederick Allen. Copy. 

Harrison, Linden, Hall, and Prospect, land of John. T. Spofford. Copy. 

Harvard and Taylor, land of Eliza J. Young. Copy. 

Harvard, Silver, Lincoln, Wilson, and Hall, land of Queen City Land 
& Building Association. Copy. 

Hayward and Taylor, land of S. G. Fletcher. Cop}\ 

Jones, Benton, and Nelson streets. Hall and Mammoth roads, land of 
Dr. C. M. Dodge. 

Manchester, Merrimack, Milton, and Beacon, land of C. C. Hayes. 
Copy. 

Manchester, west of Wilson, land of A. A. Wells. Cop3^ 

Maple and Lowell, land of Mercy Winkley. Copy. 

Maple and Amherst, land of A. J. Sawyer estate. Copj". 

Massabesic, land of James H. Reynolds. Copy. 

Massabesic and Belmont, land of Joseph Quirin. Copy. 

Massabesic lake, land of Lawrence Dowd. Copy. 

Mast, Bowman, and Marlborough streets and Bowman place, land of 
E. W. Brigham. Copy. 

Mast, Dunham, McClintock, Coffran, Head, and Wason streets, land of 
Caroline S. Head. Copy. 

Mast road, Austin, Stewart, Warren, and Kingston, land of Carroll 
& Davis. Copy. 

Merrimack and Laurel, land of Horace 'M. Hurd. Copy. 

Milford, and Old Bedford road, land of Margaret Coney. Copy. 

Milford, Forest, Mast, and old Amherst road, land of Brooks & Brock. 
Copy. • 

Milford, land of Kimball and Cavanaugh. Copy. 

Near Campbell and Hooksett road, land of State Kol'orm School. 
Copy. 

Oak, Gore, and Brook, land of Willis Cogswell. Copy. 
Oakland and Revere avenues and Mammoth road, land of A. \V. I'al- 
mer. Copy. 

Old Mast and Shirley hill roads, land of Frank J. Brendle. Copy. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 109 

Old iVrast road, land of W. IT. Goodwin. Copy. 

Palos, Isabella, Christopher, and Chicago, land of John II. Groux. 
Copy. 

Riley avenne, Hayward and Young, land of Philip Eiley. Copy. 

River road, land of J. Otis Clark. Copy. 

Silver a^ad Somerville, land of Bixby and Osborne. Copy. 

Somerville, Maple, and Boston & Maine Railroad, land of C. A. Flint. 
Copy. 

Somerville and Cypress, land of Horace H. Young. Copy. 

South Main, Woodburj^ and Frederick, land of N. H. Improvement 
Co. Copy. 

Taylor, Cj^press, Ilowe, Clay, and Dix, land of Merrifield and Wilson. 
Copy. 

Taylor, land of Stevens and Moore. Copy. 

Walker and Second, land of Joseph Burkhardt. Copy. 

West Hancock, Second, and Colby, land of West Side Co. Cop3\ 

Weston, Nutt, and Huse road, location. 

WTieelock, South Main, and Goffe, land of N. H. Improvement Co. 
Copy. 

Wilkins and ]Mast road, land of B. Bresnahan. Copy. 

Young, Somerville, Clajs Jewett, and Mason, land of Horace H. 
Young. Copy. 

Young and Cypress, land of Augusta S. Hall. Copy. 

Young, Wilson, and Hall, land of Elliott INIfg. Co. Copy. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 61. 

-WORKING PLANS. 

Amherst, Mammoth road to Salisbury. Profile. 
Amherst road, Mast to Milford. Proiile. 
Amory, Coolidge avenue. Profile. 
Amoskeag bridge, north pier. Four plans. 
Ash-street school lot. Cross section. 
Ash-street school lot. Profile. 
Ashland, Hanover to Amherst. Profile. 
Barry playground. Contour plan. 
Bridge, Belmont to Beacon. Profile. 
Canal, Granite to Auburn. Profile. 
Canal, Granite to Auburn. Cross section. 

Elm, Manchester, and Merrimack, sketch showing street lines for 
chief of police. 

Elm and Mitchell, sketch showing intersection. 

Elm, Stark to Water. Profile. 

Elm east back, Orange to Myrtle south back. Sewer profile. 

Elm west back, Market to Mechanic. Profile. 

Garmon, Hanover to Amherst. Profile. 

Gertrude, Hanover to Amherst. Profile. 

Gore, Maple to Oak. Profile. 



110 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Hanover, Elm to Chestnut. Profile. 
Harrison, Hall to Belmont. Profile. 

Lake ^Slassabesic, location of \)rook for proposed change. Two plans. 
Main, Wayne to Putnam. Sketch for aldermen. 
Main, Waj-ne to south of Putnam. Profile. 
Main, Marion to Wayne. Profile. 
Mammoth and Candia roads. Sketch for city clerk. 
Massabesic, Taylor to Cypress, east side. Profile. 
Myrtle south back, Elm east back to Union. Sewer profile. 
Nutfield lane, Hanover to Manchester. Profile. 
Orang-e, Elm to Elm east back. Sewer profile. • 
Pine Grove cemeterj^ lot 2620, for A. H. Daniels. 

Pine Grove cemetery, proposed lay-out of Acacia lawn. Eleven plans. 
Salisbury, Hanover to Amherst. Profile. 
Silver, Wilson to Hall. Profile. 

Somerville and Belmont, land taken from Muir and Murraj'. Two 
plans. 

South Main, School to Manchester & North Weare Railroad. Profile. 
Total working- jilans, 51. 

TRACINGS. 

Amoskeag bridge pier. Four plans. 

Amoskeag school lot. 

Bridge and Nashua, part of plan 580 for register of deeds. 

Boynton, Huntress, and McDuffie, land of A, H. Huntress. 

Canal, land of Amoskeag Mfg. Co. 

Christian brook sewer, right of way. 

Detail plan of grade stak;es. 

Elm, computation of paving. 

Main and Ferrj', detail of corner curbstone. 

Massabesic, J. Hall road. Nelson and Benton, Jones and Mammoth 
road, proposed routes for sewers. 

Massabesic lake, showing location of pipe culvert. 

Merrimack, Granite, Franklin, and Canal, square bounded by. Two 
plans. 

New !Mast road, old Mast road northerly-. 

Oak hill, chart showing direction of prominent points. Two plans. 

Pearl-street schoolhouse, changes in plumbing. Four plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Acacia lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Pine lawn. 

Total trat'ings, 25. 

I5LIE PRINTS. 

Amoskeag bridge pier. Four prints. 

Amoskeag schoolhouse. Twenty prints. 

Amoskeag school lot. 

Boston & Maine l{ailroad, loc.ition of tracks, etc. Two prints. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. Ill 

Brooks and Brock's land, house for architect. Two prints. 

Canal, land of Amoskeag- Mfg. Co. 

Christian brook sewer, right of way. Three prints. 

City sewer maps, east side. Three prints. • 

City sewer maps, west side. Two prints. 

Dickey land. West Manchester. Two prints. 

Elm, computation of paving. Three prints. 

Merrimack, Granite, Franklin, and Canal, square bounded by. 

Oak hill, chart showing direction of prominent points. Five prints. 

Pearl-street schoolhouse, changes in plumbing. Twenty-four prints. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Riverside lawn. Two prints. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Pine lawn. Two prints. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Chapel lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Acacia lawn. Four prints. 

Sagamore, land of Brown, Burgess, and [Magoon. Two prints. 

Walnut hill, land of Joseph E. Weston. 

Total blue prints, 85. 

Four sheets of plans have been made in the new sewer books. 

Six plans have been made in the city treasurer's book of cemetery 
lots and one plan in city clerk's deed book. 

Total of all plans made, 275. 

Fifty old j)lans, that have been superseded by new plans, have been 
destroyed. 

Twelve plans are under way, which will be completed during the 
year. 

Six tracings and six blue prints showing city sewers have been 
brought up to date. 

Maps brought up to date, 5. 

Sewer plans brought up to date, 25. 

Numbering sheets brought up to date, 3. 

Plans lettered and finished, 58. 

Maps lettered and finished, 6. 

Plans made for establishing of grade on laid-out streets, 15,538 feet. 

Plans made for the establishing of grade on streets not laid out, 
5,800 feet. 

Total, 21,338 feef. 

Lot owners looked up, 10,560 feet. 

SEWER LICENSES. 

At a meeting of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen, November 19, 1897, 
the city engineer was instructed "to examine the books in his office 
and present to said board a list of property owners who had neglected 
to pay the license fee required by the city laws and ordinances for en- 
trance to the city sewers." 

The records were examined and a list compiled giving the name of 
the property owner, the location of the lot, the street frontage, and the 
license fee due upon each and every piece of occulted property within 
one hundred feet of a jjublic sewer. 



112 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

The said list was given in hand to the city clerk, as clerk of the 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

The list comprised 1,049 names, and a notice was sent each one by the 
citvy clerk. A summarized statement of the ground covered follows, 
viz.: 

Whole number of names 1,049 

Total number of licenses paid 277 

Granted free entrance bj' Board of flavor and Al- 
dermen 76 

Paid but not located January 1, 1898* 181 

Licenses taken out but unpaidf 32 

Eequested further time 180 

Not heard from 303 

1,049 1,049 

*Paid but not located January 1, 189S 181 

Located during 1898 60 

Paid but not located January 1, 1899 121 

181 1.81 

fLicenses taken out but unpaid 32 

Not connected 1 

Paid previously 3 

Paid in part 1 

Covered by old permit 1 

Not recorded as paid, but receipts shown 5 

Marked paid, but no record of cash received 2 

Claims to have been paid, no record 1 

Licenses taken out, not paid 18 

32 32 

Number of licenses granted delincjuent sewer enterers 277 

of free licenses granted delinquent sewer enterers.. 76 

of licenses granted new sewer enterers 106 

of free licenses granted new sewer enterers 6 

Total number of licenses granted during 1898 465 

Amount of money recorded as collected from 277 delinquent 

sewer enterers $ f,12 (.67 

Amount of money recorded as collected from 106 now sewer 

enterers 1,604.85 

Total moneys recorded as collected $5,729.02 

All moneys are collected by the city clerk. 

STREET SIONS. 

Old street signs on hand January 1, 1898 72 

Old street signs put up during 1898 42 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 113 

Old street signs on hand January 1, 1899 30 

Street signs ordered during- 1S9S 367 

Street sig-ns put up during 1898 358 

Street signs on hand (of those ordered in 1S9S) 9 

439 439 

Street signs (boards) on hand January 1, 1898 17 

Street signs (boards) ordei-ed during 1898 350 

Street'signs (boards) ordered painted during 1898. . 367 

367 367 
SIGNS PUT UP. 

Ward 1 14 Ward 6 128 

Ward 2 84 Ward 7 8 

Ward 3 36 Ward 8 47 

Ward 4 43 Ward 9 32 



Ward 



Total signs put up. 



Street signs (boards) 45 @ 6%c $3.00 

Street signs (boards), 305 @ 7e 21.35 

Painting 367 street signs @ 35c 128.45 

Ten lbs. wire nails @ 2140 .25 



Total cost street signs $153.05 

The expense of street signs is charged to the appropriation for inci- 
dental expenses. The bills are approved by this department. 

STREET NUMBERS. 

Figures on hand January 1, 1898 469 

used during 1898 589 

ordered during 1898 396 

on hand January 1, 1899 276 

865 865 

Street numbers replaced during 1898 45 

Street numbers given out during 1898 174 

Total street numbers used in 1898 -19 

The expense of street numbers is charged to the ai^propriatiou for 
the Engineer's Department. 

Following is a tabiilated statement giving the location, number of 
square yards, price per square yard, total cost, and date when meas- 
ured, of all stone block paving, street crossings, street crossing repairs, 
sidewalks, sidewalk repairs, street paving, street paving repairs, drive- 
ways, and some miscellaneous work done by Soule, Dillingham & Co., 
The C. H. Robie Concrete Co., and the Manchester Concrete Co. All 
work was measured, the bills made out, and certified to by this depart- 
ment. 
8 



114 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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126 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PIPE REMOVED WHERE SEWERS HAVE BEEN RELAID. 



Amherst south back Beech east back easterly . 



Beaupoit 

Beech east back . . . 

Elm east back 

Laurel south back. 
Laurel south back. 
Myrtle south back. 



Wilton to Adams 

Amherst southerly 

Orange to Myrtle south buck. 

Union to Maple 

Union to Maple 

Elm east back to Union 



Cement. 
Akron.., 
Cement 
Cement 
Akron... 
Cement 
Cement 



75 
294 
226 
144 
135 
921 
1,301 
3,096 



SEWERS BUILT IN 1898. 

Feet. 

Akron pipe, 24-inch 1,003 

20-inch 1,770 

15-inch 5,222 

12-inch 4,307 

10-inch 6,679 

8-inch 856 

Total 19,837 

MATERIAL, SIZE, AND LENGTH OF SEWERS, JANUARY 1, 1899. 

Feet. 

Akron pipe, 6-inch 70 

8-inch 10,935 

10-inch 85,976 

12-inch 85,927 

15-inch 35,900 

18-inch 3,964 

20-inch '. 13,769 

2 f-inoh 8,801 

Total Akron pipe (4G.4GG iniles) 245,342 

Feet. 

Portland pipe, old, 8-inch 90 

12-inch 3,990 

18-inch 770 

Total Portland ])ipp, old (O.!)]!) miles) 4.8r)0 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 127 

Feet. 

Portland pipe, new, 10-inch '. . . 7,605 

12-inch 4,526 

15-inch 4,518 

IS-inch 395 

20-inch 3,345 

24-inch : . . 3,284 

Total Portland pipe, new (4. 183 miles) 23,673 

Feet. 

Cement pipe, 9-inch 8,392 

12-inch 18,367 

15-inch 490 

IS-inch 860 

24-inch 735 

16 X 24 inches 1,697 

Total cement pipe (5.S79 miles) 31,041 

Feet. 

Earthen pipe, 10-inch 1,175 

12-inch 2,545 

Total earthen pipe, (0.704 miles) 3,720 

Feet. 

Brick sewers, 18-inch ' 5,532 

24-inch 1,900 

29-inch 1,600 

36-inch 506 

42-inch 446 

44-inch 1,195 

57-inch 1,400 

60-inch 285 

17 X 26 inches 1,506 

20 X 30 inches 1,197 

22 X 33 inches 849 

24 X 36 inches 11,051 

2B X 39 inches 514 

2914 X 44 inches 4,530 

30 X 46 inches 1,360 

32 X 48 inches 3,279 

36 X 54 inches 1,067 

38 X 57 inches 4,388 

40 X 44 inches 790 

42 X 63 inches 3,104 

50 X 75 inches 712 

Total brick sewers (S.041 miles) 47,211 



128 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Feet. 

Cast-iron. pipe, 8-inch 24.0 

10-inch 66.0 

12-inch .34.0 

14-incli 24.0 

20-inch 158.0 

24-inch 24.0 

36-inch 277.5 

Total cast-iron pipe (0.115 miles) 007. 5 

Feet. 

Steel-riveted pipe, 24-inch 67 

36-inch 39 

48-inch 372 

Total steel-riveted pipe (0.09 miles) 478 

Total length of sewers, 356,922.5 feet, or 67.599 miles. 

SUMMARY OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM SINCE 1880. 



YEAR. 


Miles con- 

structed 

during 

year. 


Miles con- 
struoted 
to date. 


House con- 
nections 
recorded 
during 
year. 


House con 
nections 
recorded 
to date. 


Cost of 
sewers. 


Average 

cost per 

mile. 




1 62 
2.18 
3.37 
2.54 
1.73 
1..56 
2.15 
1.44 
1.73 
2.66 
1.81 
3.08 
3.13 
3.31 
2.91 
3.98 
4.71 
*3.93 
*3.76 


18.66 
20.84 
24.21 
26.75 
28.48 
30.04 
32.19 
33.63 
35.36 
38.02 
39.83 
42.91 
46.04 
49.35 
.52.26 
56.24 
60.95 
64.42 
67.61 






$19,919.40 
23,895.12 
24,148.13 
21.452.05 
21,548.00 
28,122.84 
44,479.15 
19,893 92 
31,154.19 
27,513.73 
39,297.97 
55,409.73 
39,724.65 
51,392.15 
46,116.01 
71,859.36 
66,408.87 
36,258.41 
34,939.51 


812,295.92 
10,961.06 
7,165.65 








lago 












8,445.69 


IfiBl 






12,455.84 








18,027.46 
20 687.97 














13,815.23 

18,(08.20 
10,343.51 












2,003 
2,067 
2,220 
2,434 
2,625 
2,883 
3,138 
31375 
3,658 
41178 




64 
153 
214 
191 
258 
255 
237 
283 
520 


21,711..'>8 


1891 


17,990.17 




12,691 .i8 


1893.... .... 


15,526.33 




15.847 42 


] 895 


18,055.1 1 


1896 


14.099.3.i 


1897 


9,226.05 


1898 


9,292.42 
















8703,533.79 

















Total cost for 19 years, $703,533.79. 
» Includes old sewers relaid. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 129 



ABSTKACT REPOi^T OF THE JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON 
SEWERS AND DRAINS FOR THE YEAR 1898. 

PERSONNEL OF THE COMMITTEE. 

Alderman from ward 7, John F. Frost, chairman. 
Alderman from ward 8, Gillis Stark. 
Councilman from ward 1, William Watts. 
Councilman from ward 9, Joseph D. Masse. 
Councilman from ward 1, Murdock A. W'eathers. 
Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

The following- tables have been compiled to be used in the annual re- 
port of the Eng-ineer's Department in lieu of citing- the records of the" 
joint standing committee on sewers and drains in detail. The tables 
give all the necessary information pertaining to the petitions, orders 
for sewers passed by the city councils, sewers built and not built up to 
January 1, 1899. 

Table I. is a list of all the petitions that have been acted upon during- 
the year, also the manner in which and date when each petition was 
acted upon and disposed of by the committee. 

Table II. is a list of sewers ordered in up to January 1, 1898, giving 
the distances built, distances built in excess of order, distances ordered 
that are unnecessary, and the distances remaining unbuilt up to Jan- 
uary 1, 1899. 

Table III. is a list of sewers ordered built in 189S, giving the dis- 
tances built, distances built in excess of order, distances ordered that 
are unnecessary, and the distances remaining unbuilt up to January 1, 
1899. 

Table IV. is a list of sewers built in 1898, not ordered, by the city 
councils. 

Table V. is a list of sewers relaid, giving the distance removed, the 
distance relaid, and the distance laid in excess of that removed. 

Table VI. is a list of sewers ordered in, but not built up to January 
1, 1899. This table is compiled from the first, second, fourth, and 
eighth columns of Tables II. and III. 

Table VII. is a list of sewers ordered in up to January 1, 1899, giving 
the distances that are unnecessary to biiild. 
Distances are given in feet. 
Table VII. is not included in Table VI. 



130 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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July 16 
Dec. 2 
June 23 
July 15 
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June 1, 1896 
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Mar. 30, 1898 

30, 1898 
" 30. 1898 

30, 1898 
May 16, 1898 

16, 1898 

16, 1898 
April 8, 1898 
June 2,'i, 1898 

25, 1898 
Nov. 29, 1897 

29, 1897 
Snpt 1."), 1898 
July 15,1898 
July 28, 1898 

28, 1898 

Oct. 1, 1897 

Jan. 4, 1898 

4, 1898 

Jun. 31, 1898 

June 7, 1898 

7, 1898 

7, 1898 

" 7, 1898 

Feb. 7, 1894 

Oct. 31, 1898 

Jan. 4, 1898 

4, 1898 

April 8, 1898 

June 25, 1898 

25, 1898 

Mar. 30, 1898 

" 30, 1898 

30,1898. 

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June 18,1898 


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132 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 






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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



133 



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Pept. 3, 1895 
Oct. 5, 1897 
Sept. 7, 1897 
Nov. 2,1897 
" 10, 1S96 
" 10, 1896 
Dec. 3. 1895 
Nov. 2, 1897 
Jiin. 7, 1896 
Sept. 7, 1--97 
June 4, 1895 
Julj' 2, 1895 
Sept. 7, 1897 
3, 1895 
Aug. 6, 1895 
Jan. 4, 1897 
Nov. 7, 1893 
July 14, 1896 
June 29, 1897 
Nov. 10, 1896 
Oct. 5, 1897 
Sept. 4, 1894 
5, 1895 
Oct. 5, 1897 
Aug. 7,1894 






160 
164 

1,40U 

1,450 
148 
850 
160 
510 
110 
400 
233 

1,700 
192 
20 
50 
133 

4,040 
243 
105 
200 
500 
226 
400 
.'.36 
249 


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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



135 



TABLE IV. 
SEWERS BUILT IN 1898 WITHOUT AN ORDER. 



Amherst road I Mast southerly * 

Hevey to Hevey east back.*. .. 

Russell easterly 

VViiyne to south of Putnam 

North of Gore northerly 

Wilson easterly 

North of Dean northerly 

Garland avenue ' Cypress westerly f 

Hanover street East of Nutfleld lane easterly 



A mory street 

Arlington street 
Bartlett " . 
Beech " 

Bell " . 

Elm west hack street. 



Harvard 

Hayes avenue 

Hevey street 

Jones east back street 

Mammoth road 

Maple street 

Milton " 

Old Falls road 

Orange street — 

Pine east back street 

Riley avenue Hay ward southerly 

Union east back street Salmon southerly . . 



Maple easterly. 

Old Falls road northerly J 

Amory northerly * 

Nelson northerly 

Wayland avenue northerly §. 

Gore southerly 

Merrimack northerly 

Spruce to Hayes avenue 

Elm to Elm east buck 

Salmon southerlj' 



24 
130 

98 
713 



248 
200 
200 
278 
38 
400 
498 

133 

703 
143 
90 
154 
214 



* For cesspools, 
face water. 



t Laid by private parties. t Order pending. § For sur- 



TABLE V. 
SEWERS RELAID DURING 1898. 



LOCATION. 


Limits. 


u 

.Is 
02 


C w 

p 


i 






75 

294 

226 

144 

1,056 

1,301 


90 

294 

226 

144 

1,056 

1,3C1 


15 








Beech east back street. . 


Amherst southerly .•• 











Myrtle south back street 












2,096 


3,111 


- 



136 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE VI. 
SEWERS ORDERED IN BUT NOT BUILT TO JAN. 1, 1899. 



Location. 



Amherat st leet 

Amory " 

Auburn " 

Auburn south back street. 

Beacon street 

Beech " 

Belmont " 

Blaine " 

Bremer north back street 
Cedar south back " 
Central street 



Chestnut 
Concord 
Dover 
Elm 



Essex " 

Foster avenue 

Front street 

Grove south back stiect . . 



Hall road ". 

Hale street 

Hanover street 

Harrison " 

Harvell " ...'. 

Hay ward " 

Hevej' east back street. 



Jones street 

Lake avenue 

Mammoth road ... 
Massabesic street 
Milford 



Nelson " 

Orange " 

Prospect " 

Rimraon east back street 

Hiver road north 

Sagamore street 

Schiller " .« 

Second " 

Somerville" 

Spruce " 

Union " 



Union east back street 
Valley street 



Walnut " 

Walnut east back street. . 

West street 

^Vent worth street 

Young •' 



Union to Ashland 

Alsace easterly 

East of Canton easterly 

Hall easterly 

An)herat to Concord 

Harvard to Hay ward 

Old Bridge to Bridge 

Second to Hiram 

Coolidge ave. w b. to Rimmon . . . . 

Beech westerly 

Belmont to Milton 

Milton to Beacon 

Clarke northerly 

Hall easterly 

Clintomnortherly 

Shasta to Baker 

Railroad bridge to Elm avenue. . . 

Monroe south back to Clarke 

Trenton to Kowell 

Amory southerly 

Valley to Hayward 

Eddy to north of hotel 

Kast of Union to Beech 

Wilson easterly 

Massabesic to Kelson 

Schiller southerly 

East of Alfred to Highland 

Belmont -westerly 

Hale to South Main 

Ainsworth avenue to Cypress 

Wayne northerly 

South of Aiiiorv to Columbus ave 

Nelson to lU'iitun 

Ea.st of ('anion to Hall road 

Xel.son northerly 

.Jewett to Hall road 

Amherst road to Sylvester 

Amherst road easterly 

Hall load to Miuumoth road 

Belmont westerly 

Hall easterly 

Kelley to Mason 

Cliuk to P.irlv avenue (prop.) 

Lin I Ion westerly 

Hale to South .■\iaiii 

South of Schiller to Harvell 

Union to Mai)le 

East of Canton easterly 

Clarke to Trenton 

Noith of I'rcseott to Hayward 

Silver to rhiinincr 

South ot Christian brook south... 

Cypres.s westei'ly 

Elm to Wilson 

Salmon southerly 

Salmon northeily 

' lint on nort heily 

Schiller northerly 

Belmont westerly 



2,G00 
200 
90 
1,^0 



17.5 
242 
311 
750 
200 
160 
106 

1,373 
851 
448 
560 
140 

2,800 
302 
■JOO 
601 
450 
134 
65 
700 
148 
146 
396 
550 
.')77 
500 

1,120 
66 
175 
670 
65 
100 

1,4U0 
557 
14S 
850 
160 
512 
110 

1,700 
192 
L'6 
50 
133 

4,04>i 
1U5 
88 
226 
400 
150 



May 

sept. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

May 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Dec. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

May 

May 

June 

i-eb. 

Aug. 

July 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Aug. 

Jan. 

July 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug, 

Jan. 

Nov. 

June 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



137 



TABLE VII. 

SEWERS ORDERED IN UP TO JAN. 1, 
NOT NECESSARY. 



), NOT BUILT AND 



Location. 

>* 


Limits. 


s 
s 
5 


Date of 
order. 






122 
50 
47 
6 
16 
50 




Taylor " 


Valley northerly 


Sept. 7, 1897 


Tilton •' 


South of Milford to Bowman pi. . . 


Cedar " . . 


June 7 1898 


Russell " 


North of Harrison northerly 






Sept. «, 1898 








291 





SUMMARY. 



Table II, column 3 (ordered in to Jan. 1, 1898) 32,196 

Table II, column 5 (built) 8,981 

Table II, column 6 (built in excess of order) 101 

Table II, column 7 (unnecessary) 219 

Table II, column 8 (not built) 23,097 

Table III, columns (ordered in in 1898) 2,528 

Table III, column 5 (built) 2,772 

Table III, column 6 (built in excess of order) 109 

Table III, column 7 ^unnecessary) 72 

Table III, column 8 (not built) 6,793 

41,934 41,934 

Sewers built in 1898, of those ordered in up to Jan 1 , 1899 (feet) 11,753 

Sewers built without orders (feet) 4,973 

Sewers relaid (feet) 3,111 

Total length of sewers laid in 1898 (feet) 19,837 



138 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ABSTEACT REPOKT OF THE JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON 
STEEETS FOE THE YEAR 1898. 

PERSONNEL OF THE COMMITTEE. 

Alderman from ward 6, John T. Gott, cliairmaoi. 

Alderman from ward 4, Charles E. Cox. 

Councilman from ward 2, De Lafayette Eobinson. 

Councilman from ward 3, Edmond Pinard. 

Councilman from ward 8, James F. Wyman. 

Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

The following tables have been compiled to be used in the annual 
report of the Engineer's Department in lieu of citing the records of 
the joint standing committee on streets in detail. The tables give all 
the necessary information pertaining to the petitions that have been 
acted upon by the committee during the year 1898, also the highways 
laid out and highways widened by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen 
during the year. 

Table VIII. is a list of the petitions for new highways that have been 
acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table IX. is a list of the petitions for establishing grade that have 
been acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table X. is a list of miscellaneous petitions acted upon by the com- 
mittee during the year. 

Table XI. is a list of highways that have been laid out during the 
year by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Table XII. is a list of highways widened and straightened during the 
year by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Table XIII. is a list of highway grades established by the city coun- 
cils during 1898. 

Distances are given in feet. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



139 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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144 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

To His Honor the Mayor, the Board of Aldermen, the gentlemen of the 
Common Council, and the various committees with -whom it has been 
my pleasure to come in contact, I v/ish to express my appreciation of 
the valued assistance and support you have rendered me during the 
year. 

My acknov?ledgments are due to the gentlemen of the Street and 
Park Commission, for their courtesy, consideration, and co-operation in 
matters in which we were mutually concerned. 

SAMUEL J. LORD, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



EEPORT OF FIEE ENGINEER. 



Chief Engineeb's Ofeice, 
Central Station, No. 8 Vine Street. 

Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1898. 
To His Honor, Willmm C. Clarke, Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Council: 

In compliance vrith. the Laws and Ordinances of the city of Man- 
chester. I herewith submit my twentieth annual report, it being the 
fifty-third of this city, for the year ending December 31, 1898. 

We have had, during the year, seventj'-eight (78) bell and one hun- 
dred and nine (109) still alarms, making a total of one hundred and 
eightj'-seven (187). At two of the foregoing bell alarms, the second 
alarm has been pulled, once for the Varick fire, boxes 5 and 6, Sunday, 
May 22, and once, box 313, for the Dana & Woodbury and the Miville 
blocks in the dreaded flat-iron district in McGregoiT'ille, Friday, Decem- 
ber 16. A special call was sent in Saturday, August 27, from box 314, 
for an additional engine, for the fire in the P. C. Cheney Co.'s waste- 
house in Amoskeag. 

Two of the still alarms were in response to telephone messages for 
assistance from out of town, — one, ^March 27, from Auburn, for the 
burning of the cottage house and barn of William Neal, to which en- 
gine No. 3, and hose wagon, with a detail of men, responded, being 
drawn over the road by horses, a distance of four miles, and reached the 
scene of fire in season to save surrounding buildings; and one, July 2, 
from Epping, for which engine No. 1 and hose wagon and horses were 
quickly loaded upon the Boston & Maine cars, but word was received 
before starting that the fire was under control, and we returned to 
quarters. 

The value of property endangered by fire where losses have occurred, 
as near as could be ascertained, with the insurance carried and the 
amount of losses paid, is as follows: 

Value of buildings $408,300.00 

Value of contents 101,224.37 

$509,524.37 

Insurance on buildings $239,703.00 

Insurance on contents 59,350.00 

$299,053.00 

147 



148 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Damage to buildings $34,993.63 

Damage to coutents 68,710.93 

$103,704.56 

Insurance paid on buildings $30,210.63 

Insurance paid on contents 57,011.90 

87,222.53 

Net loss uncovered by insurance $16,482.03 

I have endeavored to get the foregoing figures as exact as possible, 
by sending out blanks to interested parties to fill out (with prepaid 
reply), but in some instances the losers utterly refuse to give the 
desired information, such as the law requires this office to return to 
the state insurance commissioners, and in such cases we giiess as /near 
as we can. 

THE MANUAL FORCE 

Of the department is one hundred and sixty (160) men, consisting of 
one hundred and twenty-seven (127) call and thirty-three (33) per- 
manent men, and is divided as follows: 

Per- 
Call. manent 

1 Chief Engineer , 1 

4 Assistant Engineers 4 

Engine Co. No. 1 11 3 

Engine Co. No. 2 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3 15 5 

Engine Co. No. 4 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 5 16 4 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 6 16 4 

Hose Co. No. 1... 11 1 

Hose Co. No. 2 11 1 

Hose Co. No. 3 6 2 

Aerial Truck No. 1 12 3 

Chemical No. 1 3 2 

Spare driver 1 

127 33 

THE BUILDINGS, 

Aside from the Central station on Vine street, are in fair condition. 
This station, being the oldest, has been patched up times without 
number, and not onlj^ needs repairs "from cellar to garret," but even 
above "the garret." The roofing is old and leaky, so that nearly every 
storm water comes through to the ceiling in several places. The stable 
floor in the rear of Engine No. 1 and Hose No. 1 is rotten and unsafe, 
and a portion of it fell through nearly two years ago and has not been 
repaired. 

The stjibles at Engine and Ladder Nos. .'> ;ind C) are so crowded that 
when ahorse is sick there is not room enough to properly care for him, 
and box stalls should be made at each place. Some suitable arrange- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 149 

ment should be made whereby the exercise wagon of Hose No. 3 could 
be kept under cover when not in use. 

THE APPARATUS 

Of the department consists of 2 first size, 3 second size, and 1 third 
size Amoskeag engines, 4 hose carriages with reels, 5 hose wagons (one 
of which has ladders attached), 4 hook and ladder trucks, 1 of which 
is an eighty-tive-foot aerial truck carrying other ladders, 2 hose car- 
riages in outlying districts, with independent companies attached, 2 
hose carriages withoiit companies, 1 supply wagon, 7 exercise wagons, 
located as follows: 

2 first size steam fire-engines, with three-horse hitch, at Central sta- 
tion, each with one-horse hose wagon attached. 

1 second size steam fire-engine, three-horse hitch, with 1 two-horse 
hose wagon, North Main street. 

1 second size steam fire-engine and 1 two-horse hose wagon, at cor- 
ner Lake avenue and Massabesic street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 third size steam fire-engine and one-horse hose carriag'e, at comer 
of Webster and Chestnut streets. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 second size steam tire-engine and one-horse hose carriage on Rim- 
mon street, corner of Amory street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 one-horse hose carriage, corner Maple and East High streets. 

1 two-horse combination hose wagon, So. Elm street. (Bakersville.) 

1 aerial hook-and-ladder truck at Central station (three-horse-hitch). 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) chemical engine at Central station. 

1 supplj^ wagon at Central fire station. 

1 steam fire-engine (reserve) at station of Engine No. 2 (of but little 
use for fire purposes). 

1 four-wheeled hand-hose carriage (with shafts) at junction of Old 
Falls road and Front street, Amoskeag. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, Devonshire Mills, Goffe's Falls. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage in basement of stable of W. P. Farmer 
at junction of Candia road and Hanover street. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, junction Mammoth road and Massa- 
besic street (Hallsville). 

7 exercise wagons, 1 at Central fire station, 1 at Engine No. 2, 1 at 
Engine and Ladder No. 3, 1 at Engine and Ladder No. 5, 1 at Engine 
and Ladder No. 6, 1 at Hose No. 2, 1 at Hose No. 3, 1 repair wag-on for 
fire alarm telegraph. 

Engine No. 6 is at present undergoing repairs at the Manchester 
Locomotive works, having a new boiler (the old one being in service 
about twenty-two years), new composition pumps, and the machinery 
and running gear thoroughly overhauled, so that when it comes from 
the shop it will be comparatively as good as new. We expect it to be 



150 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

completed within a few weeks. In the mean time we have one in ser- 
vice loaned by the locomotive works. 

The boiler of engine No. 1, which has been in service about the same 
length of time, may have to be replaced during the year and its machin- 
ery overhauled. 

A new and enlarged body has been put on the running gear of the 
fire-alarm, repair wagon. 

FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

The long sought for and much needed storage batteiy has taken the 
place of the old style gravity battery, and was put in operation on the 
24th day of September. Through the courtesy of Mr. J. Brodie Smith, 
general manager of the Manchester Electric Co., the city is to receive 
gratis, the current for charging the batteries. 

About the middle of November, a new eight-inch steam gong was set 
up at the gas works and connected into No. 7 circuit, ^Ir. Walter G. 
Africa, superintendent of the People's Gas-Light Co., kindly offering to 
furnish steam for the blowing of said gong. This is an important 
addition to the fire-alarm service and can be distinctly heard and 
counted for a long distance. 

During the year 20 "Tappers" have been changed, set 19 new poles, 
reset 8, put up 6 single, 9 two-pin and 5 four-pin extensions, put on 
75 two-pin and 20 four-pin cross arms, and changed a large amount of 
wire from old to new telephone and electric light poles, run 1 mile of 
insulated wire and 2 miles of bare wire, and taken down about 1 mile 
of old wire. We have about 43 miles of main line and 38 miles of 
"Tapper" line wire. 

THE HORSES. 

There are 42 horses at present the property of this department. One 
pair recently bought are now "hardening up" with the view to putting 
them on Ladder No. 3 if they prove satisfactory for the place. 

A few changes should be made the coming j-ear by buying new ones. 

It would not only be beneficial to this department, but economical to 
the city if the horses could be used either on the streets or soqie con- 
stant work for at least a year before assigning them to fire service." 

CASUALTIES. 

Death has entered our ranks and taken, in the prime of manhood, 
one of our number who was one of the original inonibers of Hose Co. 
No. 3. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



151 



WILLIAM 


EDWIN PIERSON. 1 


Hoseman of Hose No. 3. 1 


Born at Wilton, 


N. H., September 24, 1852. 




Died at 


Manchester, 


N. H., April 26, 1898, 


Ag-ed 46 years 


, 7 months, and 2 days. 



His funeral was held at his late residence on Willow street, on Fri- 
day, April 29, and was attended by a detail of men from the several 
companies of this department. 

Thursday, May 12, at the fire in the boarding--house. No. 1161 Elm 
street, kept by J. Miner Sargent, Mr. John Concannon, one of the 
roomers, was so overcome bj' smoke as to be unable to get out of the 
building and lost his life. 

Saturday, December 24, Mrs. Margaret Griffin, living at No. 416 Laurel 
street, was so severely burned bj^ dropping a lighted lamp that she died 
shortly afterwards from injuries received. 

firemen's relief association. 

This local relief association, in which every member of the depart- 
ment is entitled to membership upon the payment of one dollar, was 
organized- January 13, 1873, and the funds of same are deposited in one 
of the savings banks of our city and can be withdrawn only upon the 
signatures of the president and treasurer. 

The following is the financial statement of the same: 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand annual meeting, February 8, 1898... $3,943.38 

Dividends on deposits 136.70 

Assessments 14.00 

Membership fees 7.50 

Donation of a lady friend 100.00 

owners of Music Hall block 25.00 

Clarence M. Edgerly 10.00 

Jeremiah Hodge 10.00 

$4,246.58 

Expenditures. 

Paid J. E. Merrill, salary for 1 year $25.00 

Mrs. W. E. Pierson, funeral benefit 50.00 

C. H. Gile, benefit 4.00 

Jeremiah Lane, benefit 90.25 

Nate M. Kellogg, benefit, (doctor's bill) 5.00 



152 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

raid William G. Fraser, benefit $7.00 

George Taylor, benefit 38.00 

for postal cards and printing 2.20 

$221.45 

Balance in treasury $4,025.13 

CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION. 

A custom has been in vogue with the water-works department that 
appears to be a very dangerous one, of shutting off a portion of the 
water supply to the West Side, without having taken the necessary pre- 
caution of having some person or persons to be on hand in case of a 
fire in that locality to let on a supply. The danger of such neglect 
was very apparent at the fire in the flatiron district, on the 16th of 
December, where, for an hour or more, while the fire was at its height, 
the fire department was seriouslj^ handicapped for want of water. 

I cannot refrain from again recommending what I consider an urgent 
necessitj',— a chemical engine for the West Side. 

Our double companies (Engine and Ladder Nos. 3, 5, 6) should be 
increased four men each. Experience has shown us that at alarms 
from boxes to which only one truck responds, our ladder service is 
deficient. 

I would recommend that the three-horse-hitch we now have in reserve 
be attached to Ladder Truck No. 3, and said truck be drawn by three 
horses instead of two. This company responds to boxes where the 
streets are sandy as well as the eastern section of the city known as 
Wilson hill, and with three horses could be rendered much more effi- 
cient. I would also recommend putting two horses on Hose Carriage 
No. 2, so that it could reach the same locality easier. 

1 would recommend a readjustment of salaries now paid the per- 
manent captains. Their services in that position certainlj' entitle them 
to receive as much as or more than other permanent men, and I would 
again recommend the appointment of permanent captains to all the 
remaining companies, that now have call captains. 

The discipline of the department has been excellent through the 
year, the officers and men have been faithful and attentive to their 
duties, always ready at a moment's warning to respond to the call for 
active services, and I desire to acknowledge my appreciation for the 
assistance rendered. 

To His Honor :Mayor Clarke and the committee on fire department 
for the interest they have always manifested, and to the police depart- 
ment for their valuable assistixnce at fires, 1 desire to return my sincere 
thanks. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 
CJiirf of Fire Department. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 153 

Number and Location of Fire Alarm Boxes and Keys. 

A KEY IS ATTACHED TO EACH Box, and can be had by breaking the 
glass. 

No. 3. Blood's lower shop. Keys at offices of gas-works, county jail, 
Manchester Coal & Ifte Co.'s sheds, and Charles H. Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. Corner Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel Oxford, L. B. 
Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, Street Eailway stables, and office 
of Blodgett & Young's block. 

No. 5. Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at Tebbetts & 
Soule's and Hanscom's drugstores, Manchester House, and J. W. Hill 
Co.'s store. 

No. 6. City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Thurston's drugstores, J. 
A. Riddle's office, and residence of J. L. Brock, 21 Amoskeag Corpora- 
tion. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of Manchester and Chestnut streets. 
Keys at chief of police's office and with all police officers. 

No. 8. Corner of Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Dante Smith's and 
Gadbois's drugstores, and Partridge Bros.' grain store. 

No. 9. Comer of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at residences of 
Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, Dr. E. Fritz, and station of 
Engine No. 5. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at residences of 
John. Mooar, George Emerson, Walter A. Green, and O. D. Knox. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at residences 
of Welcome Jencks and ^Mrs. Lewis Simons, No. 1 Senter's block, and 
Hartshorn's grocery store. 

No. 14. Comer of Prospect and Union streets. Keys at residences 
of Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. George W. Riddle, D. J. Adams, A. H. Olzen- 
dam, and Mrs. Thomas Morgan. 

No. 15. Comer of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys at residences of 
Willam B. Corey, Henry W. Shannon, and J. Fred Chalker. 

No. 16. Comer of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at residences of 
Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley and E. R. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Kej's at residences 
of :Miss Mary A. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. Comer of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys at residences 
of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and William Perkins' estate. 

No. 21. Comer of Merripack and Pine streets. Keys at A. D. Smith's 
drugstore, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. L. Walker's office and resi- 
dence of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys at residences of 
Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3 house, corner of Massabesic 
street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. AL Goodwin and sta- 
tion of Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

No. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at residences 



154 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, the late Horace Stearns, the late 
Horace Gordon, and James R. Straw. 

No. 26. Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys at McCrillis's 
carriage shop and John X. Foss's stable. 

No. 27. Comer of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys at residences 
of H. M. Tarbell, E. S. Fletcher, Willam Carr, a-nd Mrs. George H. 
Hubbard. 

No. 28. Comer of Merrimack and Beacon streets. Keys at residences 
of A. L. Garmon, and the late A. G. Fairbanks. 

No. 31. Corner of Canal and Hollis streets. Blood's shop. Keys at 
ofBce, Amory Mills, Langdon Mills watchrooms. 

No. 32. Langdon Mills block, comer of Canal and Brook streets. 
Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Company's mill, Langdon watchroom, 
and Electric Light station. 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Keys at watchroom and pumping station. 

No. 35. Stark Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 36. Amory Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 39. Hillsborough county jail. Keys at office. 

No. 41. Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 42. Manchester Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 43. Olzendam's Mill. Kej's at watchroom. 

No. 45. The S. C. Forsaith Co.'s shops. Kejs at freight depot and 
S. C. Forsaith Co.'s office. 

No. 51. Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys at stores of F. 
Riedel and William Weber. 

No. 52. Barr's brick block, West ^Manchester. Keys at Fradd ct 
Co.'s and A. N. Clapp's stores, Merrimack House, and Engine No. 2 
house. 

No. 53. Wallace's steam mill. Keys at Wallace's office, I. R. Dewey's 
tenement block, and Ranno's harness store. 

No. 54. Corner of A and South Main streets. Kej's at residences of 
Lord sisters, Neil Fullerton, and George W. Davis's store. 

No. 56. Baldwin's bobbin shop. Keys at Baldwin's office and resi- 
dences of J. C. Smith, E. P. Littlefield, and with watchman at works. 

No. 57. Corner Mast road and D street. Keys at residences of Allen 
E. Eaton and C. IL George, and F. W. Towle's store. 

No. 61. Corner of River road and Hancock street, Bakersville. Keys 
at True W. Jones Co.'s brewery, store of John A. Kane, and Hose 3. 

No. 62. Gerrish Wool & Leather Co.'s, Riv^r road. Keys at tannery, 
the Edwin Kennedy house, and Hose 3. 

No. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at residences of T. 
Collins, Daniel Shechaii. Tlionias J. Smith. Simon M«('artliy. an. I J. J. 
Twomey. 

No. 72. Corner of Lake nvenue and Lincoln street. Keys at resi- 
dences of the late Austin Jenkins, James Briggs, and Clarenct- 1). 
Palmer. 

No. 73. Corner of Beech .and Cedar streets. Keys at residences of 
Rev. J. A. Chevalier and Timothy Carr. 



REPORT OF TUE FIRE ENGINEER. 165 

No. SI. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at all the engine 
rooms. 

No. 82. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Church streets. Keys at 
Syndicate Furniture Co.'s, Lowell-street stable, and Fames Bros.' drug- 
store. 

No. 91. Corner of Webster and Beech streets. Keys at Children's 
Home tnd E. N. Foster's residence. 

No. 112. Comer of Sagamore,and Union streets. Kej^s at residences 
of W. T. Stevens, W. A. Clarkson, M. D. Johnson, Charles F. Chase, and 
William H. Drury. 

No. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys at residences of 
Mrs. William B. Abbott, W. N. Johnson, and E. M. Topliff. 

No. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at residences of Mrs. 
A. P. Olzendam, G. A. Olzendam, W. S. Shannon, and John J. Bennett. 

No. 115. Corner of Gore and Ash streets. Keys at residences of 
James A. Rogers and Cj^ren Bixby. 

No. 212. Shoeshop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of the shoe factory 
and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn, Mrs. Milton A. 
Abbott, M. V. B. Garland, and Walter Cody's block. 

No. 213. Sash and blind factory, South Beech street, junction of 
Portsmouth Eailroad. Keys at offices of Manchester Sash & Blind 
Co. and Dana & Provost. 

No. 214. Elliott silk mill, corner of Wilson and Valley streets. Keys 
at office and watchroom of mill. 

No. 215. Hoyt & Co.'s shoeshop, corner of Lincoln and Silver streets. 
Keys at offices of shoeshop and Kimball Carriage Co. and boarding-house 
opposite. 

No. 216. Jewett and Somerville streets. Keys at residences of G. H. 
Hill, 140 Jewett street, and W. B. Brown, 128 Jewett street. 

No. 217. Corner Candia road and Massabesic street. Keys at resi- 
dences of L. M. Streeter, William Gadbois, and Charles P. Still. 

No. 261. Pearl-street grammar school. Keys at schoolroom and resi- 
dences of C. E. Rose, S. W. Bascom, and Charles W. Cheney, Jr. 

No. 312. Comer of Putnam, Main, and McGregor streets. Keys at 
residences of James Spence (309 Main street), Thomas Bolton, and gate 
No. 11 mill. 

No. 313. Comer of Amory and Main streets. Keys at residences of 
Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Potvin & Co.'s drugstore, Miville 
& Co.'s drugstore, gate of No. 11 mill, and station of Engine and Lad- 
der No. 6. 

No. 314. P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper mill. Keys at office and Riverside 
Hose house. 

' No. 315. Old Brick Store, 'Skeag. Keys at Greer's store. Riverside 
Hose house, and D. L. Robinson's residence. 

No. 321. Corner Beauport and Wayne streets. Keys at Holy Angels 
Convent, the Brothers' School, and residences of E. H. Doherty and 
Rev. Father Hevey. 



156 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 323. Cornier of Putnam and Bartlett streets. Keys at Albert 
Oliver's store, P. J. Archambeault's bakery, and residence of Officer 
Lewis Clement. 

No. 324. Amory and Laval streets. Key at residence of Desire Mar- 
tin, No. 494 Amory street. 

No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at residences 
of Amelia Da^is, William A. Tufts, and James Kearns. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Kejs at residences 
of J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Elizabeth Ward. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular police. 

The true time will be given at precisely 12.30 p. M. from Charles A. 
Trefethen's jewelry store, and will be denoted by one stroke of the fire 
bells. 



Telephone Calls. 

ISTEW ENGLAND TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE CO. 

Chemical Engine, Central Station 64 — 3 

Engine No. 2 64 — 2 

Engine & Ladder No. 3 64 — 5 

Engine & Ladder No. 5 64—6 

Engine & Ladder No. 6 64 — 7 

Hose No. 2 116—4 

Hose No. 3 25—2 

Chief Engineer Lane's office 64 — 3 

Chief Engineer Lane's house • 64 — t 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's house 39 — 4 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's office 73 — 3 

Assistant Engineer Merrill's office 212 — 3 

Assistant Engineer Frisselle's house 175 — 2 

Two long rings, twice, all talce down telephones. 

MANCHESTER TELEPHONE CO. 

Chemical Engine, Central Station 120 — 2 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's office SO — 2 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's house SI — 2 

Assistant Engineer ^lerrill's office 162 — 2 



Instructions to Keyholders and Citizens. 

L Upon the discovery of a. fire, notice slioiild be iniin(>(liati'ly com- 
municated to the nearest alarm box, the key of uliicli is in a circular 
box attached to right-hand side of the fire-:il;inn box. Keys ;irc also 
in the hands of all regniar |)()licc, and generally of ])crsons at tiie cor- 
ner or nearest house. 

2. Key-holders, upon the (liscov(>rv of a fire, or positive information 
of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook once as far as it will go 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 167 

(without jerking), and then let go. Sliut the door, but do not try to 
remove the key, as it is locked in by a trap lock, and can only be re- 
moTcd with a release key, which is carried by each of the engineers, 
and they will, as soon as convenient, release and return it. 

3. All persons gi%'ing fire alarms are requested to remain by the 
box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull again; if you 
still hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box and give an alarm from 
that. * 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never touch the box 
except to give an alarm of fire. Give an. alarm for no cause other than 
actual fire. Don't give an alarm for a chisiney fire. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless called for by 
the chief engineer. If you change your residence or place of business, 
where the keys are k-ept, return the keys to the same office. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to inform them- 
selves of the location of alarm boxes near their property; also all places 
where the keys are kept. Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly 
given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the city, and 
the number of the box wall be given thus: Box 6, six blows, 2^2 seconds 
apart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, pause of 614 seconds, 
one blow, same pause, and two blows, 2 — 1 — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the bells at 
any time; and in case of testing the boxes, each test will be preceded 
by one stroke of the bells. 



158 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 

SHOAVING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON 
FIRST, SECOND, AND THIRD ALARMS. 



First Alarm. 



Engine. 



Second alarm. 



Third alarm. 



II 



1st R. 3 

1st R. 2-3 

1st R. 2-3 

1st & 2cl R. 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2a R. 5 

1st R. 5 

5 

1st R. .5 

1st R. 5 

1st &2dR. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

IstR. 3 

3 

1st R. () 

1st R. 5 

1st & 2(1 R. 5-6 

1st & 2(1 R. 5-6 

1st & 2a R. 5-6 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2d R. 2-3 

1st & 2a R. 2-3 

1st R. 2-3 

1st & 2d R. 2-3 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2a R. 

Ist & 2d R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st 11.5 

1st K.5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 5 

Isl R. 3 

1st K. 3 

1st It. 3 

1st R 3 

Isl R.3 

Ist R. 3 

Isl R 3 

1st 11. 2-6 

1st R. 2-6 

&-6 

5-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

a-6 



2d R. ! 
2d R. 
2d R. 
2-3 
2d R. 
3 

2d R. 
1st R. 
2d R. 
2d R. i 
3 

2dR. ! 
2d R. I 
2d R. 
2d R : 
2d R. 
2d R. 
2d R. 
2d R. i 
2d R. 
1st R. 
2dR I 
2d R. ( 
2-3 
2-3 
2-3 

2d R. : 
b-G 
5-6 

2dR. ( 
5 

1st R. 
IstR. 
1st R.- 
1st R. 
IstR.: 
6 

lid R. '. 
2d R. '. 
2d R. 
2(1 R. 
2d R. 
5 

3-6 
2a R. 
2(1 R. 
2(1 R. 
2a l{. & 
M R. 
2(1 R. 
2d R. 
2(1 R. 
2d R. 
Sd R. 
2d R. 
2(1 R. J 
2a R. r 
2.1 R. E 
iHt R. ', 
1st R. 
1st K. £ 

Isl n.i 

Isl K.C 
1st R. 
1st R. 



5-6 

5-6 

5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2-3-6 

2d R. 2-3-6 

2d R. 2-3-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

3-5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

2d R. 2-5-6 

2-3 



5-6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

3-€ 

3-6 

3-6 

3-6 

6 



6-6 
6 

5-6 
6-6 
5-6 
1-6 
5-6 
1-5-6 



6 

2d R. 5 

2d R. 5 

2(1 R. 5 

2d R. 3-5 

2d R.5 

1st & 2d R. 

5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2 

2-3-6 

2 3-6 

2-3-6 

2-6 

2-3-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-0 

2-5-6 

2-6 

3 

3 

2d R. 3 

2d R. 2-3 

2(1 R.3 

2d R. 3 

2(1 R. 3 

2d R.J-B 

2d U. 3-6 



6-2 



2-3 



6-6 
6 

1-5 

1-5 

1-5 

2-3 1-3-5 

2 I 1-5 

2-3 1-3-6 

2 ! 1-6-6 

1-6-6 

5-6 

5-6 

5-6 

6 . 



3-6 
3-6 
1-6 
1-6 
3-6 
6-6 
6-5 
5-6 
6-6 
6-6 
6-6 
3-6 
3-5 
3-5 
1 3 
1-3 
3-5 

1-3-5 
1-3 
1-6 

I-S-6 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 159 

Rules and Regulations in regard to responding to Fires 
and Alarms, etc. 

The follo-oing rules have been adopted by the board of engineers, 
and the fire department will strictly comply until otherwise ordered, 
and ■will attend alarms of fire as per "official running card." 

RUNNING RULES. 

"V^Tienever an alarm is sounded, the members of all companies not 
called to that box will report to their respective company quarters, 
and there remain until dismissed by the signal on the bells or by an 
engineer in charge. 

In case companies on their first run have responded to an alarm, 
companies on their second run to the box from Avhich the alarm has 
been sounded will answer all first-run boxes of the absent companies; 
and in case engines are out that would respond to another box, then 
third alai-m companies will respond. In case of an alarm from a box 
that does not call for a third alarm, companies on their sec6nd run 
will then answer to all other boxes. 

Whenever two trucks answer to first alarm, the other truck will 
answer to all other boxes. 

At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, hose carriage, 
or truck that leaves the house first will have the right to lead to the 
fire. WTienever a horse lags or gives out, drivers should then give 
others the right of way, so as not to delay the rest of the apparatus. 

XO RUNNING BY WILL BE ALLOWED, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDER 
PENALTY OF DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

The drivers shall not permit persons not connected with the depart- 
ment to ride upon their apparatus, and in muddy weather or heavy 
wheeling they shall not permit any one to ride upon their apparatus 
when returning from fires. 

Drivers will take the following routes in responding to alarms on 
the West Side: For crossing Amoskeag bridge, take Elm street to 
Salmon, down Salmon street and across the bridge. For crossing Mc- 
Gregor bridge take Elm street to Bridge street, down Bridge street and 
across the bridge. For crossing Granite bridge take Elm street to 
Granite, down Granite and across the bridge. 

Use gongs freely to clear the streets and when nearing crossings. 

Engineers of steamers will not run over eighty (80) pounds of water 
pressure, except when orders are received from a member of the board 
of engineers or of the officer in command of the compan3^ 

Captains, or commanding officers, upon return from alarms will 
report to headquarters immediately^ personally or bj- telephone, after 
apparatus is "made up" and ready for duty. 

third alarm. 

Ox THIRD alarm all apparatus will respond. 



160 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



GENERAL ALARM. 

In the event of a fire of such magnitude that second and third alarms 
are needed, a general alarm will be given by striking ten blows, in 
which case all companies will respond. 

SPECIAL CALLS ON FIRE ALARM. 

When more apparatus is wanted without giving a second or third 
alarm, the following special calls will be given: 
2 — 1 for Engine 1. 1 — 1 — 1 for Aerial Truck. 
2—2 for Engine 2. 3—3 for Truck 3. 
2—3 for Engine 3. 3—5 for Truck 5. 
2 — 4 for Engine 4. 3—6 for Truck 6. 
2 — 5 for Engine 5. 4 — 1 for Hose 1. 
2 — 6 for Engine 6. 4 — 2 for Hose 2. 
4—3 for Hose 3. 
Companies answering "special calls" will wait thirty seconds before 
leaving quarters, to prevent mistakes. 

OUT OF TOWN CALL. 

For a fire out of the city 2 — 2 — 2, in which case all companies •will 
assemble at their respective quarters and await orders. 

ALL OUT SIGNAL. 

Two blows on the bells, which dismisses all members at company 
quarters. 

This signal will be given after companies working at a fire have re- 
turned to quarters, "made up," and are ready to respond to another 
alarm. 

TEST SIGNAL. 
One blow at 12.30 noon. 

SCHOOL SIGNALS. 

1 — 1, with fifteen seconds between blows, closes primary and middle 
schools. 

2 — 2, with fifteen seconds between the 2's, closes all the schools. 
Time for giving same, 7.30 A. M., 11.30 A. M., or 1.15 p. m. 

MILITARY CALL. 

12 blows twice. 



Rules for Exercising Horses. 

It shall be the duty of the drivers of engines, hose carriages, hose 
wagons, hook-and-ladder trucks, and all other apparatus connected 
with this departyient, to exercise the horses every day, wejither per- 
mitting, except Sunday, with the exception of engines having "first" 
and "second runs," and in such cases must exercise on days of "second 
run," the sajne to be done within tlie following limits: 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 161 



CENTKAt STATION. 

North to Pearl street. East to Union street. 

South to :Merrimack street. West to Chestnut street. 

NORTH MAIN-STREET STATION. 

North to Adams street. East to ^lain street. 

South to Granite street. West to Dubuque street. 

LAKE AVENUE STATION. 

North to Manchester street. East to Belmont street. 

South to Summer street. West to Maple street. 

MAPLE-STREET STATION. 

North to IMyrtle street. West to Union, street. 

South to Hanover street. East to Linden street. 

WEBSTER-STREET STATION. 

North to Clarke street. East to Union street. 

South to Pennacook street. West to Elm street. 

RIMMON-STREET STATION (MCGREGORVILLE). 

North to Kellej'^ street. East to Beauport street. 

South to Wayne street. West to Rimmon street. 

BAKERSVILLE STATION. 

North to bridge over B. & M. E. R. East to Calef road. 
Soxith to Baker street. West to Brown avenue. 

Drivers must confine themselves to the above, and in no case take 
their horses beyond the prescribed limits, except for shoeing and in 
case of fire, without permission from the chief or an assistant engineer. 

In exercising, care must be taken to avoid colliding with other team^ 
In approaching corners, crossings, street-car tracks, and in going down- 
grades the speed of the horses must be checked. 

In case of an alarm use gong freely while returning to quarters. 

Any driver violating these rules will be liable to suspension or dis- 
charge. 



Stations and Sleeping Rooms. 

All stations of this department will be open from 7 a. m. until 9 p. M., 
and the members at the several stations will receive visitors and citi- 
zens courteously, answer all questions in a gentlemanlj'^ manner, and 
give any proper information. 

No political or religious discussions will be allowed in anj' of the 
houses of this department or by the officers or men when on duty. 

No permanent member of the department shall attend a caucus or 
political convention as a delegate, distribute tickets at any election, 
11 



162 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

or take any part whatever in political matters other than to exercise 
his right of suffrage. 

Gambling of anj' kind shall not be done or permitted in or about any 
of the houses or premises occupied bj' the department. 

Stations to be closed at 10 o'clock p. m. 

All games must cease at 10 o'clock p. M., and the stations be closed at 
that hour, to permit the permanent men, and those detailed to sleep 
in the station, to retire undisturbed. 

None of the stations will be open after the above hour (excepting in 
case of an alarm of fire) without permission of the chief or a member 
of the board of engineers, although stations may be kept open on 
Saturday evenings until 11 o'clock. 

No spirituous or malt liquors shall be allowed in or about any of the 
fire stations, and any member of the fire department seen intoxicated 
at any fire or alarm of fire, or who shall be known to frequent places 
where liquors are sold, during the progress of a fire, or whenever in 
uniform, shall be subject to reprimand, or dismissal, as the board of 
engineers may determine. 

Any permanent member visiting any liquor saloon in imiform, ex- 
cept in the performance of his duty as a member of the fire depart- 
ment, or who is intoxicated or visits places where intoxicating liquors 
are sold, while on duty, shall be suspended, or discharged, as the board 
of engineers may determine. 

Any violation of these rules will subject the offender to reprimand 
or dismissal, and commanding officers of companies having knowledge 
of the violation of the foregoing rules will suspend the offender, and 
report the same to the chief, or board of engineers. 

The permanent men shall exercise a careful supervision over the 
sleeping apartments, see that the rooms are put in order and the beds 
made as early as 11 o'clock A. M., and that the bedding is changed at 
suitable intervals. The occupants of each bed will be held responsibh^ 
for the cleanliness of the same, and held strictly accountable for any 
damage to either bed or bed clothing through carelessness. After 10 
p. M, occupants shall refrain, from loud talking or in any manner dis- 
turbing the rest of any who have retired. 

Any member of the department not complj-ing with the above rules 
shall be liable to suspension or expulsion from the department. 



Absent from City or Station. 

No permanent member shall leave his station to visit any section of 
the city without permission of the chief or an assistant engineer, or 
leave the city, or be granted leave of absence, without notifying the 
chief engineer and procuring a substitute to his acceptance, and the 
substitute shall be on duty before the applicant leaves his post, exce])t 
on his regular "day olT." 

Any call mcuihrr cxpcrtiiitj to be absent from the ritij shall notify the cap- 
tain of his eompanii. and before leaving the city shall procure a substitute 
satisfactory to said captain. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 
DAYS OFF. 



163 





NAME. 


Company. 


-A 
1^ 


Name. 


Company. 


1 

1 1 Ilnll 


Engine 1. 
1. 


17 


Porter 


Engine & Ladder 3. 
Hose 2. 


2 


Harvey 


18 


Seaward..... 


3 


Barker 


1. 


19 


Morse 


Engine & Ladder 5. 


4 


Parsons* 


Hose 1. 


20 


Smith 


" " 5. 


6 


Gould 


Engine 4. 
4. 


21 


Cann 


" " 5 


6 


Cann 


22 


Hubbell 


" " 5. 


7 


Rowe 


4. 


23 


Morrill 


Engine 2. 


8 


Dyer 


Truck 1. 


24 


Lane 


" 2 


9 


Denyou 


1. 


25 


Whitcomb... 


2. 


10 


Pherson 


1. 


26 


Edgar 


Engine & Ladder 6. 


11 j Porter 


Chemical 1. 


27 


Foster 


" " 6. 


12 


Richardson.. 


1. 


28 


Jenne 


6. 


13 


Walker 


Engine & Ladder 3. 


29 


Crosby* 


" " 6. 


14 


Piper 


" " 3. 


30 


Rogers* 

Sloan* 


Hose 3 


15 


Wheeler 


3. 


31 


" 3. 


16 


McLeod 


3. 


• 







*In February Crosby will take the 16th, and Rogers the 26th; in July Parsons will 
take the 14th; and in February, April, June, September, and November, Sloan will 
take the 27th. 

The hour of leaving will be 7 o'clock A. M., and members will not 
leave their station until the annval of the spare driver. They must 
report promptly at 7 o'clock the following- morning for duty. 

Those whose breakfast hour is 6 o'clock will remain at station until 
7 o'clock on the date of their "day off." 

Should a fire be in progress at the hour of changes, men will remain 
on duty until the "all out" is given, except permission is obtained of 
the chief, or engineer in charge of fire, to retire. 

Should a "general" or third alarm be rung in while members are in 
town, they will be expected to report for duty. 

On the "day off" of the engineer of a steamer, the assistant engineer 
shall, on his arrival at the fire, act as engineer. 

The time of change from first and second run will be made at 7 o'clock 

A. M. 

All hose companies are instructed not to enter anj-- building with a 
line of hose unless the stop nozzle is closed, except in cases where they 
can see the fire, and when their streams will reach it without damage 
to other property. 

Steamer companies are not to enter a building with a line of hose 
without orders, unless fire can be seen, due care being exercised as to 
whether their services are needed. 



164 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 
Engine No. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag' steamer $4,000.00 

1 one-horse wagon 400.00 

3 gray horses for steamer 600.00 

1 gray horse for hose wagon 200.00 

4 swing-ing harnesses 200.00 

1 pair double exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 single exercise harness 40.00 

2,650 feet fabric hose 1,192.50 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Tools, furniture, and fixtures 200.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 200.00 

Total amount $7,162.50 



Engine No. 2. 

LOCATED AT NORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQUOG. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $4,000.00 

1 hose wagon 600.00 

1 exercise wagon, poles, shafts, and three-horse hitch 340.00 

3 bay horses for steamer 600.00 

1 pair gray horses for hose wagon 400.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $40, 1 at $20 100.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

1 double sled 60.00 

3,300 feet fabric hose 1,485.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 94.00 

Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc 466.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

Total amount $8,545.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CORNER MASSABESIC STREET. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

1 two-horse hose wagon 400.00 

1 two-hor.se truck and equipments 1,700.00 

1 three-horse hitch attachment (extra) 200.00 

1 pair black horses for steamer 250.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 165 



1 pair bay horses for liose wag-on $400.00 

1 pair black horses for truck 300.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $50, 1 at $40 140.00 

6 swinging- harnesses 300.00 

3,600 feet fabric hose 1,620.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc 575.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 200.00 

1 exercise wagon 292.50 

Total amount $9,957.50 



Engine No. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer $4,200.00 

1 hose wagon 400.00 

3 horses for steamer 600.00 

1 horse for hose wagon 150.00 

3 exercise harnesses 60.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

3,050 feet fabric hose 1,372.50 

Hall furniture, beds, bedding, etc 275.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 75.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

Total amount $7,482.50 



Engine and Ladder No. 5. 

LOCATED ON WEBSTER STREET, CORNER CHESTNUT. 

1 third-size Amoskeag steamer $3,600.00 

1 two- wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage 600.00 

1 steel frame ladder truck 1,650.00 

1 pair bay horses for steamer 400.00 

1 pair bay horses for truck 400.00 

1 bay horse for hose carriage 200.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

1 double sled 50.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2 pairs exercise harnesses 100.00 

2,400 feet fabric hose 1,080.00 

Bedding, furniture, tools, etc 247.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 90.00 

Firemen's suits, badges, etc 200.00 

Total amount $9,192.00 



166 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Engine and Ladder No, 6. 

LOCATED AT CORNER AMORY AND RIMMON STREETS. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

1 hook-and-ladder truck (with Bangor extension) 1,680.00 

1 one-horse carriage 600.00 

2 gray horses for steamer 300.00 

2 bay horses for truck 267.00 

1 gray horse for hose carriage 150.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 900.00 

Hall furniture, carpets, beds, bedding, etc 375.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 85.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 187.00 

1 exercise wagon 290.50 

Total amount $8,584.50 



Hose No. 1 . 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage $600.00 

2 horses 300.00 

2 single harnesses 70.00 

1 single sled 40.00 

1 hose sled 20.00 

2,200 feet fabric hose 990.00 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding, etc 60.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 120.00 

Total amount $2,450.00 



Hose No. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST IIIGH. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage $600.00 

1 bay horse ] 50.00 

1 exercise harness 30.00 

1 swinging harness 50.00 

1 exercise wagon :;2,">.00 

1,850 feet fabric hose S32.50 

150 feet leather ho.se 60.00 

Furniture and fixtures 100.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 120.00 

Total amount $2,267.50 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 167 

Hose No. 3. 

LOCATED ON SOUTH ELM STREET, BAKERSVII.LE. 

1 combination hose ^Yag•on (with ladders) $1,000.00 

1 pair gray horses 300.00 

1 pair swinging harnesses 100.00 

1 pair exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 exercise wagon 50.00 

2,200 feet fabric hose 990.00 

Furniture, fixtures, bedding, etc 85.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 65.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 80.00 

Total amount $2,720.00 



Hook and Ladder No. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 aerial hook-and-ladder truck. $4,200.00 

3 horses 600.00 

3 exercise harnesses 50.00 

3 swinging harnesses 150.00 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 360.00 

7 rubber blanket covers 168.00 

Furniture and fixtures ; 200.00 

Beds, bedding, and furniture 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 60.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

Total amount $6,013.00 



Chemical Engine No. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINTE STREET. 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) engine $2,250.00 

1 pair black horses 300.00 

1 pair exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 pair swinging harnesses 100.00 

Furniture and fixtures 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 35.00 

Total amount $2,860. OCV 



168 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Supply Wagon. 

1 supply wagon, with boxes and engineers' lanterns $250.00 

Spare Hose. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

200 feet leather hose $100.00 

500 feet fabric hose (for re-lining) 125.00 

1,100 feet fabric hose (new) 605.00 

Total amount $830.00 



Exercise Wagon. 

AT CENTKAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

J. four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole, shafts, three-horse 
hitch, and coal boxes $350.00 



E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine. 

STORED AT SHEDS OF ENGINE NO. 2. 

Old U tank Amoskeag engine (may be worth for exchange) $250.00 



Engineer's Department. 

5 engineers' white rubl>er coats $37.50 

5 engineers' lanterns 20.00 

Furniture and fixtures 150.00 

Total amount $207.50 



Riverside Hose Co. No. 5. 

LOCATED AT CORNER OK OLD 1 ALLS ROAD AND IKONT STUKET. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage $400.00 

800 feet leather hose 240.00 

800 feet fabric hose 300.00 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc 40.00 

Furniture and fixtures 10.00 

Total amount $1,050.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 169 

Hallsville (Independent) Hose. 

LOCATED AT CORNER OF MAMMOTH ROAD AND ifASSEBESIC STREET. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriag-e $30.00 

500 feet leather hose 150.00 

Nozzle, wrenches, etc 15.00 

Total amount $195.00 

Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage $30.00 

400 feet fabric hose 160.00 

2 hose-pipes 10.00 

Total amount $200.00 



Pond Road Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED IN BASEMENT OF W. T. FARX[ER'S BARN. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriag-e $30.00 

500 feet leather hose 150.00 

Total amount $180.00 



Sleeping Hall. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

€ beds, bedding-, wardrobes, etc $260.00 

Extra Horses. 

1 st^el gray horse $150.00 

1 pair black horses 300.00 

Total amount $450.00 

Fire Alarm Telegraph. 

At cost, including- additions $21,000.00 

Remodeling in 1885 6,000.00 

"Individual tapper" system 4,000.00 

Storage battery (in 1898) 1,850.00 

Steam gong (in 1898) 500.00 

Wire, brackets, and tools 250.00 

Repair wagon 150.00 

$34,750.00 



170 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Recapitulation. 



Engine Co. No. 1 $7,162.50 

Engine Co. No. 2 8,545.00 

Engine and I/adder Co. No. .'5 9,957.50 

Engine Co. No. 4 7,482.50 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 5 9,192.00 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 8,584.50 

"Harrington" engine (old) 250.00 

Hose Co. No. 1 2,450.00 

Hose Co. No. 2 2,267.50 

Hose Co. No. 3 2,720.00 

Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 (aerial) 6,013.00 

Chemical Engine Co. No. 1 2,860.00 

Supply wagon (Central station) . 250.00 

Exercise wagon (Central station) 350.00 

Spare hose 830.00 

Engineers' department 207.50 

Eiverside Hose No. 5 1,050.00 

Hallsville Hose 195.00 

Goffe's Falls Hose 200.00 

Pond Koad Hose 180.00 

Sleeping hall 260.00 

Extra horses 450.00 

Fire alann telegraph 34.750.00 

Total $106,207.00 



List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 1898, 
with Losses and Insurance. 

Still. Saturdaj^ January 1, 4.56 p. m. Chimnej'^ fire in four-story 
Avooden block, 223 Manchester street, owned by Greenough Sanborn, 
and,occupied by J. IMartin and others. No damage. Used two charges 
of Pony. 

Still. Sundajs .January 2, 2.20 p. M. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden tenement block, 66 Concord street, owned by heirs of S. W. 
I'arsons. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Monday, January 3, 4.30 p. m. Three-story wooden ti>nement 
block, 329 Chestnut street, owned by heirs of Moultou Knowles. and 
occupied by several families. The fire originated from a defective 
chimney in the tenement of Mm. liilla Harvey, and fire was confined 
wholly to this tenement. Chemical engine responded. Value of build- 
ing, $6,000; damage, $41.17; insurance, .$3,600; insurance p:ii(l. $41.17. 
No damage to contents. 

Box 23. Monday, January 3, 5.53 p. M. Lauij) exploded in two-and- 
half-story house, 243 Lake avenue, owned by .lames Conwav, and occu- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 171 

pied by him and Thomas Meehan. Box pulled by Michael Murry. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 
Value of building, $3,000; damage, $71.50; insurance, $2,050; insurance 
paid, $71.50. No damage to contents. 

Still. Wednesday, January 5, 11.45 a. m. Chimney fire in two-and- 
half-story house, 100 Lake avenue, owned by Peter J. Gibbin, and occu- 
pied by C. Healey. No damage. 

Box 62. Sunday, January 9, 8.10 a. m. The Upton and Monadnock 
block, 1148 Elm street, owned by Manchester Savings bank and Hall 
and Clough, and occupied by Mrs. K. A. Turgeon, in whose millinery 
store the fire started, and others as stores, hotel, and lodging-rooms. 
Cause of fire unknown. Box pulled bj" Capt. E. A. Sears. Companies 
responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of 
building, $75,000; damage, $8,192.50; insurance, $47,550; insurance paid, 
$8,192.50. Mrs. E. A. Turgeon: Value of contents, $3,500; damage, 
$3,500; insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, $2,500. Hub Clothing store: 
Value of contents, $6,000; damage, $2,200; insurance, $3,000; insurance 
paid, $2,200. Fred Cotton: Value of contents, $7,000; damage, $1,009.21; 
insurance, $5,500; insurance paid, $1,009.21. Paris Trembly: Value of 
contents, $8,000; damage, $998; insurance, $7,000; insurance paid, $998. 
J. G. Plante: Value of contents, $1,000; damage, $150; insurance, $500; 
insurance paid. $95. Other losses, $3,000, Avith no insurance. 

Sttll. Monday,- January 10, 12.30 a. m. Two-story dwelling-house, 
91 Pearl street, owned by the Mack heirs, and occupied by John Hunter. 
Fire in wood-box. Damage slight. Chemical engine responded. Used 
one charge of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, January 11, 7.50 p. ii. Chimney fire in two-and-half- 
story wooden house, owned by Mrs. Dolber, and occupied by John Sulli- 
van. No damage. Chemical engine responded. Used one charge of 
Pony. 

Still, Saturday, January 15, 10.08 p. m.; Box 82, Saturday, January 
15, 10.15 P. M. Chemical engine was called to 41 Lowell street, and on 
its arrival, the fire having gained such headwaj-, the box was pulled 
by the chief engineer. The fire Avas in ]Mechanics Hall building, owned 
by heirs of Aretas Blood, and occupied by Mrs. C. E. Cobb as lodging- 
house. Cause unknown. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $6,000; damage, 
$750; insurance, $4,000; insurance paid, $750. Value of contents, $3,000; 
damage, $300; insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $250. 

Still. Sunday, January 16, 10.19 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 17 Amherst street, owned by William T. Stevens, and occupied 
by John Bourgeois. No damage. Chemical responded. Used one 
charge of Pony. 

Still. Monday, January 17, 1.50 a. m. Tenement house rear of 8 
Washington street, owned by heirs of Michael Lane, and occupied by 

Champagne. Chemical called by Officer Butler. Damage slight. 

Used one charge of Pony. 



172 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Monday, January 17, 5.55 p. M. Chimney fire in two-and-half- 
story house, 605 Union street, owned by heirs of Georg'e A. French. 
No damage. 

Box 25. Tuesday, Januarys 18, 12.13 p. M. Harrison D. Lord, at 387 
Hanover street^ was smoking* a ham in box in yard adjoining- his house, 
some one seeing smoke pulled a needless alarm. No damage. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical. Hose 1, 2. Truck 3. 

Box 52. Friday, January 21, 8.04 A. M. Two-and-half-story dwelling, 
25 Parker street, owned by James F. W^yman, and occupied by I. M. 
Harvey and William Sullivan. Grape basket of kindling-wood caught 
fire from some unknown cause. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sp>onding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. No damage. 

Still. Friday, Januarj^ 21, 9.22 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 49 Central street, owned by Philip Riley. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Box 91. Wednesday, January 26, 6.43 p. M. Cottage house at 948 
Union street, owned and occupied by Philip H. Greuier. Fire started 
in closet in L part. Cause unknown. Box pulled by Thomas Taggart. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 5, Chemical, Ho.se 1, Truck 5. Value 
of building, $2,500; damage, $925; insurance, $2,000; insurance paid. 
$925. Value of contents, $600; damage, $162.50; insurance, $500; insur- 
ance paid, $162.50. 

Box 23. Thursday, January 27, 11.18 p. M. Two-and-half-story 
wooden tenement house, 272 Manchester street, owned by Carl Roth, 
and occupied by Sarah M. Laroche, who was awakened by the bed being 
on fire. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $2,500; damage, $100; 
insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $75. Value of contents, $600; dam- 
age, $25.50; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $25.50. 

Box 21. Saturday, January 29, 11.10 A. M. Three-story bloi-k. 2S2 
Pine street, owned by Mrs. Ellen Kearns, and occupied by John Mc- 
Grath. Cause, thawing water pipes. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Dam- 
age to building, $25; insurance paid, $25. 

Box 82. Saturday, January 29, 11.15 A. M. While a portion of the 
department was at an alarm from Box 21, one came from this box, for 
thawing water pipes in store of Dumas Bros., 1182 Elm street. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies resiwnding: Engines 1. 2, 5. 6. Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 5. Damage, $5.00; fully insured. 

Still. Saturday, January 29, 0.45 p. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
block, 42 Bridge street, owned by Walter Green, and t)ccui)iiHl by M. 
Currier. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Saturday, Januaiy 29, 8.40 p. M. Same chimney as above. 
No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Sunday, January 30, 10.25 A. M. Chimney fire in L of three- 
story wooden block, 64 Concord street, owned by heirs of S. W. Parson.s. 
and occupied by several families. A defeclivc cliinmey caused wood- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 173 

work to ig-nite, and fire spread to blind attic. Extinguished by Chem- 
cal engine. Value of building, $3,500; damage, $26.28; insurance, 
$2,500; insurance paid, $26.28. No damage to contents. 

Box 82. Sunday, Januarj^ 30, 10.37 A. m. Some crazy-headed person, 
seeing the smoke and steam from above fire, pulled the box after the 
fire was wholly under control by Chemical Co. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 4, 5, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Services not needed. 

Still. Monday, January 31, 5 a. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden block, 234 Pine street, owned by the heirs of Thomas Wheat. 
No damage. Used one charge of Ponj'. 

Still. Monday, January 31, 6.15 A. m. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block, 22 Concord street, owned by Henry and George B. Chan- 
dler. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Mondaj^ Januarj^ 31, 7.25 p. m. Chimnej^ fire in tenement, 
rear of 150 Manchester street, occupied by John White. No damage. 
Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 7. Tuesday, February 1, 4.33 p. M. A smoking oil stove at 104 
Manchester street, caused a needless alarm. No damage. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Tuesday, Februar\^ 1, 10.55 p. m. Chimney fire at 478 North 
Main street, in house owned and occupied by Richard Conley. No dam- 
age. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. Used one charge 
of Pony. 

Still. Wednesday-, Februarj- 2, 5.23 p. M. Chimney fire in two-and- 
half-story wooden tenement house, 60 Manchester street, owned by 
"William P. Merrill, and occupied by J. O. Cormier. No damage. Used 
one charge of Pony. 

Box 21. Saturda3% February 5, 7.52 A. M. Small bam in rear of 201 
Hanover street, owned by John T. Moore, and occupied by Philippe A. 
Dulude. Caused by a match dropped in hay. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of building. $300; damage, $10; no insurance. 

Box 54. Sunday, February 13, 3.32 A. M. Cottage house, 576 South 
Main street, owned by Edward Wagner, and occupied by George H, 
Wilson. The fire originated from a defective chimney. Box pulled by 
Officer Nixon. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Truck 
6. Value of building, $900; damage, $500; insurance. $800; insurance 
paid, $500. Value of contents, $500; damage, $100; insurance, $450; 
insurance paid, $100. 

Still. Sunday, February 13, 8.25 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 41 Orange street. Chemical engine responded, but services 
not needed. No damage. 

Box 56. Tuesday, February 15, 6.13 p. M. Two-story brick dry-house 
on Mast street, owned and occupied by the James Baldwin Co., and 
used for drjdng spool and bobbin stock. Cause unknown. Box pulled 
by man at the works. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, 



174 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, $750; damage, $30; no insurance. 
Value of stock, $1,200; damage, $250; no insurance. 

Still. Wednesday, February 16, 8.12 A. M. Chimnej^ fire in tene- 
ment house at 452 Chestnut street, owned by heirs of S. W. Parsons, 
and occupied by several families. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, February 16, 7.10 p. m. Chimney fire in two-and- 
half-story wooden tenement house, 54 Pennacook street, owned by 
Charles Williams, and occupied by several families. Members of Engine 
and Ladder 5 responded. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, February 16, 8.29 p. M. Chimney in four-storj- 
tenement block, 203 Merrimack street, owned by Dr. J. A. Jackson, 
and occupied by several families. No damage. Used one charge of 
Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, February 16, 8.50 p. M. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block, 106 Pearl street, owned by David H. Young, and occupied 
by several families. Chemical engine responded. Used one charge of 
Pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, Febmary 18, 2.15 p.^ M. Cottage house, 4 Dutton 
street, owned and occupied by L. J. Flint. Through carelessness, hot 
ashes were deposited against the outside of the L part of the house, 
and burned through into the partition. Damage slight. Chemical 
engine reponded. Value of building, $1,500; damage, $35; insurance, 
$800; insurance paid, $35. No damage to contents. 

Still. Monday, February 21, 6.34 p. u. Chimney fire in two-story 
brick dwelling at 4 Boyden street, owned by Amoskeag Land and 
Water Power Co., and occupied by John Tate. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 73. Tuesday, February 22, 9.40 P. M. Two-and-half-story 
wooden tenement house at 234 East Spruce street, owned by Mrs. 
Hannah Daley, and occupied by Charles Bowen and Daniel Murphy. 
The fire was discovered in Murphy's tenement in a basket of clothes. 
Cause unknown. Box pulled by Charles Bowen. Comiianies respond- 
ing: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. Value of building, $4,000; 
damage, $30; insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $30. No damage to 
contents. 

Still. Wednesday, February 23, 2.25 p. M. Four-story brick block 
owned by Odd Fellows' lodges. Electric wire cross in store of E. K. 
Barry caused slight fire. Members of Cliemical respoudod. No dam- 
age. 

Still. Saturday, February 26, 2 P. M. Lace curtains in dwelling- 
hoiise, 430 Bimmon street, owned and occupied by M. Potvin. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Co. 6 responded. ITsed one charge of Pony. 

Box 21. Wednesday, March 2, 3.0() v. m. 'I'wo-and-half-story wooden 
tenement house, 59 Laurel street, owned hy Dr. Pettengill of Amherst, 
occupied by Mrs. John Garvey. A bed in liic attic caught fire from 
some unknown cause, and was ext inguislifd with Chemical engine. 
Box pulh'd by fitizon. Com|)anics responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemi- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER, 175 

cal, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. No damag-e to building. Value of contents, 
$000; damage, $5; no insurance. 

Box 8. Thursday, March 3, 4.36 A. m. The wooden "ten-footei^" at 
corner of Elm street and Winter Place, owned by Moore & Preston, and 
1342 Elm street, ocupied by Zibbie Marcotte as a cobbler's shop. The 
fire undoubtedly originated from hot ashes in a wooden box. Box 
pulled by Charles Ferren. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5; 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2; Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $1,200; damage, 
$100; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, $100. Value of contents, $200; 
damage, $50; no insurance. 

Still. Thursday, ]\Iarch 3, 1.35 p. m. Two-story wooden tenement 
house, 182 Manchester street, owned by James Gilroy and occupied by 
William Patneau. An old pipe caused slight damage. Chemical engine 
responded. Sers'ices not needed. 

Box 73. Saturday, March 5, 2.24 p. u. Cottage house, 267 Cedar 
street, owned by Mrs. Mary Mullen, and occupied by Edmund Gelinas. 
Caused by live coals from stove put on back steps. Box pulled by 
Timothy Carr. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 

1, Truck 3. Damage slight. 

Still. Monday, March 7, 8.15 p. M. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block, 59 Hanover street, owned by Brown sisters, and occupied 
by Fred L. Wallace. Used three charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Thursdaj^ March 10, 11.49 A. M. Chimney fire in two-story 
wooden house, 149 Manchester street, owned and occupied by J. 
Vaughan. Chemical engine responded. Services not needed. 

Box 13. Monday, March 14, 11.14 a. m. Cottage house, 31 Blodget 
street, owned by estate of Anna M. Leavitt, and occupied by Charles 
M. Warner. Fire originated in a bed up-stairs by stepping on a snap 
match. Extinguished by Chemical engine. Box pulled by A. N. 
Clough. Companies responding: Engines 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Truck 5. Value of building, $2,000; damage, $12.84; insurance, $1,700; 
insurance paid $12.84. Value of contents, $1,100; damage, $75; insur- 
ance, $500; insurance paid, $60. 

Still. Monday, March 14, 11.49 a. m. Chimney fire, 2? Amherst 
street. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, March 15, 11.10 A. m. Chimnej^ fire in tenement, 19 

Cedar street, owned by Blodgett, and occupied by Dennis Griffin. 

Chemical engine responded. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 4. Friday, March 18, 9.56 A. M. Cottage house, 22 Cedar street, 
owned by James Hayes, and occupied by John B. Cassey. Fire origin- 
ated in a bed. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 

2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $300; dam- 
age, $15; no insurance. Value of contents, $100; damage, $20; no 
insurance. 

Still. Sunday, March 20, 1.20 p. m. Three-story brick block, 897 
Elm street, owned by heirs of J. A. Weston, and occupied by Mrs. J. A. 
Pogee as millinery rooms. The cause of fire is unknown, but is sup- 



176 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

posed to be from carelessness in smoking-. Chemical engine responded, 
and by using Ponj^ and Chemical tanks, together with stream from 
stand-pipes, the fire was extinguished with but little damage to the 
building. Value of building, $40,000; damage, $149.50; insiirance, 
$20,000; insurance paid, $149.50. Value of contents, $2,000; damage, 
$457; insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $457. 

Box 214. Sundaj', March 20, 2.25 P. M. Pile of railroad ties on Valley 
street, belonging to Dodge & Barnard of Goffstown. Set by boys. 
Damage slight. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: En- 
gines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. 

Box 62. Sunday, March 20. 2.54 P. M. Grass fire oh Brown avenue 
cau.sed a needless alarm. No damage. Box jjulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 2. 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 1. 

Box 212. Tuesday, March 22, 7.42 p. M. Lace curtain at 368 Massa- 
besic street, in tenement block owned by Chai'les Fleteher, and occu- 
pied by K. B. Currier. Damage, $2.50. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. 

Still. Friday, March 25, 6.35 p. M. Owing to closing the di-afts in 
chimney of boiler room of A. C. Wallace's sawmill, large volumes of 
.smoke came out the boiler-house. Members of Engine 2 responded 
with hose wagon. Xo damage. 

Box 113. Saturday, March 20, 11.28 A. M. Grass fire on land of O. F. 
Bartlett on Harrison street. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 2, Tinick 5. 

Box 71. Sunday, March 27, 10.02 A. M. One-story wooden carriage 
and blacksmith shop, rear of 128 Auburn street, owned by A. Doville, 
and occupied by Frank X. Chenette. Fire started in the carriage part, 
from the stove. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. Value of building, $300; dam- 
age, $75; no insurance. Value of contents, $500; damage, $150; no 
insurance. 

Still. Sunday, March 27, 7.20 p. m. Out of town. Word was tele- 
phoned from Lake View house of fire in cottage of William Neal, at 
Massabesic, in Auburn. Engine 3, with hose carriage and detiiil of 
men responded, arrivng there a little past 8 o'clock. The house and 
buildings connected were too far consumed to save, but prevented tlie 
burning of other buildings near by. 

Still. Wednesday, March 30, 4.50 p. m. Grass firo on land owned by 
VV. J. Allen at 668 Lake avenue. Hose carriage of Engine and Ladder 3 
responded. No damage. 

Still, Wednesday, March 30, 0.22 p. M. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement house, rear of 142 Manchester street, owned by Mrs. S. D. 
Lord, and occupied by Octave Godette. CluMuii'iil engine rt'sponded. 
.\o damage. ITscd two charges of Pony. 

Box 71. Saturday, April 2, 1.53 p. M. Two-story (IwfUiiig-lioiise, 247 
Pine street, owned by Mi-s. John J. Sullivan, and occupied by her, and 
Cornelius Murjdiy. Cause, defective flue. Box jiulled by Patrick Dowd. 
Comjjanics responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Host' 1, Truck 3. Value 



REPOl.T OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 177 

of building, $2,500; damag-e, $224.10; insurance, $2,000; insurance paid, 
$224.10. No damage to contents. 

Box 5. Saturday, April 2, 11.13 p. M. One-story wooden building, 
corner Franklin and Central streets, owned by Mrs. Mary Fitzgerald, 
and occupied by Wesley J. Smith as laundry. Cause unknown. Box 
pulled by Officer Brown. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $450; damage, $400; 
insur^ce, $300; insurance paid, $300. Value of contents, $1,400; dam- 
age, $1,400; insurance, $600; insurance paid, $600. 

Box 15. Sunday, April 3, 9.02 A. M. Two-and-half-story house, 101 
Pearl street, owned by Edmond Pinard, and occupied by him and 
Frank Lessier. Cause, defective flue in closet in tenement occupied by 
Mr. Lessier. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $2,000; dam- 
age, $112.50; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, $112.50. No damage i/y 
contents. 

Still. Sunday, April 3, 11 A. m. Chimney fire in house owned by 
Joseph Quirin, 36 Amory street. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 
responded. No damage. Used three charges of Pony. 

Still. Friday, April 8, 12.37 p. m. Grass fire at corner of Chestnut 
and Sagamore streets. No damage. Members of Engine and Ladder 
5 responded with hose carriage. 

Box 217. Saturday, April 9, 10.47 A. M. Grass fire on land of C. S. 
Magoon on Candia road. No damage. Box pulled by Frank Rust. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. 

Box 217. Saturday, April 9, 10.24 p. M. Two-story dwelling-house 
on Haj'ward street, owned by Mrs. Lora A. Woodman, and occupied by 
W. B. Danforth. Children upset a lamp, causing a slight fire which 
was extinguished with Pony. Box pulled by Arthur Atwood. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. Value of 
building, $1,500; damage, $65; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, $65. 
Value of contents, $100; damage, $15; no insurance. 

Box 53. Sunday, April 10, 4.10 p. ii. Grass fire, corner West Hancock 
and Second streets. Needless alarm. No damage. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Box 54. Wednesday, April 13, 3.53 p. M. Grass fire on land of Mrs. 
Mary A. Hartshorn, on Boynton street, near Bedford line. No damage. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, 
Truck 6, 

Still. Wednesday, April 13, 9.04 p. m. Sparks from chimney of the 
S. C. Forsaith Co. Chemical engine responded. No damage. 

Still. Thu^rsday, April 14, 1.35 p. M. Chimney fire in two-story 
tenement house, 47 Church street, owned by Tom W. Robinson, and 
occupied by Dennis Murphy. Chemical responded. No damage. Used 
one charge of Pony. 

Box 21. Monday, April 18, 8.31 p. M. Two-and-half-story tenement 
house, 59 Laurel street, owned by Dr. Pettengill of Amherst, and occu- 
pied by Mrs. Mary Welch and Mrs. Mary Garvey. Rubbish in attic 



178 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

caught fire from pipe smoking. Damage slight. Box pulled by Officer 
Hampston. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Tuesday, April 19, 6.35 p. m. Three-story brick block owned 
by Mrs. E. W. Bartlett, and occupied by W. Briggs. Slight fire in closet. 
No damage. Chemical responded. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Thursday, April 21, 10.20 p. M. Chimney fire in two-tenement 
house, 142 Manchester street, owned by Mrs. George C. Lord, and occu- 
pied by Edward Foster. Chemical engine responded. No damage. 

Still. Friday, April 22, 9.30 A. M. Chimney fire in tenement block, 
21 Wayne street, owned by Robert Leggett. Members of Engine and 
Ladder 6 responded. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Monday, April 25, 11.58 p. m. Tenement house owned by 

Hoyt, and occupied by Mrs. Mandei-ville. Fire start-ed in pile of old 
rags in wood-shed connected. Chemical responded. Extinguished 
with few pails of water. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, May 1, 10.30 A. m. Three-and-half-story brick block, 
31 Manchester Corporation, owned by the Manchester Mills, and occu- 
pied by William Wolcott. Fire originated in a bed lounge from some 
unknown cause. Chemical responded. Damage, $15; fully insured. 

Still. Wednesday, May 4, 8.48 a. m. Three-and-half-story wooden 
block, 38 Church street, owned by A. H. Weston, and occupied by S. 
Bernard and others. Fire entire length of chimney on inside. No 
damage. Used three charges of Pony. 

Still. W^ednesday, May 4, 6.15 p. m. Five-story stone block, "The 
Kennard," 1020 Elm street, owned by the New Hampshire Trust Co., 
and occupied by Allen & Kimball, clothiers. Cause, electric light wire. 
No damage. 

Box 82. Thursday, May 5, 10.46 P. M. Four-story brick block, owned 
by Mrs. D. Flanders, and occupied as apartment house. Snapping of a 
"parlor match" ignited lace curtain in room 50, occupied by !Miss Elizar 
beth Messer. Extinguished with line of hose from standpipes in block. 
Box pulled by Napoleon Voyer. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 
5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $25,000; damage, 
$30; insurance, $18,000; insurance paid, $30. Value of contents in the 
room, $100; damage, $25; no insurance. 

Still. Sunday, May 8, 9 a. m. Grass fire near t^nnnerj' on Brown 
avenue. No damage. Members of Hose 3 responded. 

Still. Tuesday, May 10, 1.23 p. M. Brush fire on Webster street ex- 
tension. Members of Engine and Ladder 5 responded. Out 314 hours. 
No damage. Used six charges of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, May 10, 3.15 p. m. Ash box in rear of four-story 
brick block, 15 Concord street. Chemical engine responded. No dam- 
age. 

Still. Tuesday, May 10, 8.55 p. m. Rubbish in yard, rear of George 
F. Elliott's, 342 Bridge street. Chemical engine responded. Used one 
tank and one charge of I'ony. No damage. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 179 

Still. Thursday, May 12, 1.30 a. m. Slight fire on the roof of brew- 
ery on Hajicock street, owned and occupied by True W. Jones Co. 
Hose Co. 3 responded with carriage. Used two charges of Pony and 
line of 200 feet hose from hydrant. 

Box 82. Thursday, May 12, 2.03 P. M. Three-and-half-story wooden 
block, 1161 Elm street, owned by Weston, Gage & Connor, and occupied 
by J. Miner Sarg-ent as lodging-house, and several parties as stores. 
The fire originated on second floor in water-closet from some unknown 
cause. John Concaxinon, a roomer, was overcome by the smoke so that 
he could not find his way out; was consequently suffocated. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $6,000; damage, $1,585; insur- 
ance, $5,500; insurance paid, $1,585. Value of Sargent's contents, 
$2,000; damage, $498.85; insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $498.85. 
Value of Snelling & Woods's contents, $4,000; damage, $245; insurance, 
$3,000; insurance paid, $245. Value of Pinard's contents, $4,000; dam- 
age, $402; insurance, $3,800; insurance paid, $402. 

Box 82. Tuesday, May 17, 8.01 P. M. Two-story brick block, 1076 
Elm street, owned by heirs of A. B. Story, and occupied by Mrs. L. P. 
Gregoire, as millinery store. Fire started in closet from some un- 
known cause, but was discovered before doing much damage. Extin- 
guished by Chemical engine. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of 
contents, $1,200; damage, $275; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, $275. 
No damage to building. 

Stlll. Friday, May 20, 12.15 p. M. Three-story wooden furniture 
factory in South Manchester, owoied and occupied by Josselyn & Read 
Co. Sparks ignited roof. Hose Co. 3 responded with carriage. Value 
of building, $12,000; damage, $75; insurance, $9,000; insurance paid, $75. 

Box 4. Friday, May 20, 6.26 p. M. Chimney fire in rear of 38 Lake 
avenue. Needless alarm. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. No damage. 

Box 21. Saturday, May 21, 9.30 P. M. Two-story wooden tenement 
house, 191 Merrimack street, owned by E. E. Smith, and occupied by 
Rose Douglas and others. During a drunken row, some one threw a 
kerosene lamp and broke it, doing no other damage. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding. Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 
1, 3. 

Box 5. Box 6, Second Alarm, Sunday, May 22, 10.35 a. m. Five-story 
brick block, 809-811 Elm street, owned by the John B. Varick Co., and 
occupied by them as a wholesale and retail hardware store. The fire 
originated from spontaneous combustion near the elevator well, but 
that being closed with automatic shutters, the fire went up the light 
well, through the five stories. The entire building was filled with 
dense smoke, and it was with difficulty that the fire was reached. Six- 
teen lines of hose were laid. Box pulled by citizen. Second alarm by 
Assistant Engineer Merrill. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, 
4, 5, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 3, Trucks 1, 3, 5. Value of building, $30,000; 



180 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

damag-e, $5,000; insurance, $25,000; insurance paid, $5,000. Damage, 
$39,000; insurance paid, $39,000. 

Box 8. Friday, May 27, 8.21 P. M. Ash box in rear of Bean, Carpen- 
ter, and Hall's block, 1394-1404 Elm street. Cause, hot ashes. No 
damage. Box pulled by Mrs. Battles. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Saturday, May 28, 12.05 a. m. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block, 9 Concord street, owned by John D. Bean heirs. Chemical 
engine responded. No damage. 

Box 15. Wednesday, June 1, 8.04 p. jr. Two-and-half-story house, 
144 Pearl street, owned by Mrs. S. C. Harrington, and occupied by Leo- 
pold Trudell. Children playing caught napkin on fire. Damage slight. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Eng'ines 1, 4, 5, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 16. Monday, June 6, 4.06 A. M. Two-and-half-story wooden 
house, 555 Union street, owned by Manchester Savings bank, and occu- 
pied by George E. White as a boarding-house. The fire originated in a 
"blind attic" over the kitchen; caused by "rats and matehes." Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $4,500; damage, $509; insur- 
ance, $4,000; insurance paid, $509. Value of contents, $1,000; damage, 
$50; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $50. 

Still. Thursday, June 9, 1.15 p. M. Two-story brick tenement block, 
11 Boyden street, owned by Amoskeag Corporation, and occupied by J. 
Merchant. Oil stove upset. No damage. Chemical engine responded. 

Box 82. Tuesday, June 14, 10 A. M. Tar kettle in wood-yard in Kid- 
der court, owned and occupied by J. ;Masse. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 52. Saturday, June 18, 2.15 p. m. One-story wooden "ten-foot- 
er," 15 North Main street, owned by Gordon Woodbury, and occupied 
by J. A. Ricard as bicycle repair shop. Gasoline exploded in enameling 
closet. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, $3,500; damage, $75; 
Insurance, $3,000; insurance paid, $75. Value of contents, $1,000; dam- 
age, $70; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $56.80. 

Still. Sunday, June 19, 8.05 A. m. Chimney fire in two-and-half- 
Btory house, 123 Amherst street, owned by Fi-ank Eaton, and occupied 
by M. O'Brien. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Box 17. Sunday, June 19, 11.40 a. m. Three-story brick block. 329 
Amherst street, owned by Frank 1'. Dickey, and occupied by Charles B. 
Clarkson and others. Slight fire in barrel of rubbish in cellar, causing 
no damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 

Box 8. Sunday, June 26, 9.40 p. M. Three-story wooden tenement 
block, 43 Orange street, owned by heirs of Joseph B. Clark, and occu- 
pied by Eusebe Marcott<>, and others. Children in Mareotte's tenement 
tipped over kerosene lanif), doing little danuige. Box pulled by boy. 
C<)mpanieH responding: Engines J, 4. 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 181 

Still. Saturday, July 2, 11.40 a. m. Out of town. A telephone call 
came from Epping-, N. H., for assistance. Took Engine 1 and Hose 
carriage with horses to railroad station, and loaded them on cars, but 
before st^irting, word came of "fire under control," so unloaded appa- 
ratus and horses and returned to quarters. 

Box 18. Sunday, July 3, 12.22 A, M. Wagon shed in rear of 3821/2 
Merrimack street, o^\^led and occupied by Whitford heirs. Accidental 
dropping of matches in straw, caused slight fire, and no damage. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 

Box 8. Sunday, July 3, 10.40 P. M. Wooden shed in rear of 1358 Elm 
street. Old mattress, used by boys in playing, caught fire from some 
\inknown eaiise. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Engines 1, 4, 5, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Tuesday, July 5, 12.15 P. M. Tenement house, 393 Dubuque 
street, owned by James Leggett, and occupied by several families. Oil 
stove exploded. No damage. Engine and Ladder 6 responded with 
steamer and hose carriage. 

Still. Tuesday, Julj- 5, 12.35 p. m. Two-story brick block. 21 Kidder 
street, owned by Amoskeag Corporation, and occupied by John Bolsom. 
Chimney fire. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Thursday, July 7, 3.05 p. m. Boys set rubbish on fire in wood- 
yard, rear of 55 Amherst street. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, July 7, 7.18 p. m. Manchester Mills waste room, 
sponta^neous combustion in waste-bin on second floor. Chemical engine 
responded. No damage. 

Box 26. Friday, July 8, 4.24 p. m. Cottage house, 23 Eussell street, 
owned by John Fulleiixjn, and occupied by G. W. Spaulding. Cause, 
kerosene stove in L part used as shed, and fire was confined to this 
part of house. Box pulled by Wallace Belcher. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 5. Value of building, 
$2,000; damage. $155; insurance, $1,500: insurance paid, $155. No dam- 
age to contents. 

Box 15. Sunday, July 10, 2.12 p. m. Two-and-half-story dwelling- 
house, 502 Chestnut street, owned by Mrs. E. A. Kimball, and occupied 
by Mrs. E. M. Foster, as boarding and lodging-house. The fire started 
in the cellar, and went to second story through box about the soil 
pipe, doing but little damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of 
building, $4,200; damage, $143; insurance, $3,300; insurance paid, $143. 
Value of contents, $1,500; damage, $25; insurance, $1,250; insurance 
paid, $25. 

Box 4. Tuesday, July 12, 3.35 p. xr. Barn in rear of 56 Spruce street, 
owned by Bartholomew Bresnahan, and occupied bj' Martin Mclntire. 
A horse, carriage, sleigh, and other articles were burned. The fire 
damaged adjoining barn of Timothy A. Kenney, and cottage north 
owned by Thomas Stewart. Cause unknown. Box pulled by Timothy 



182 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

A. Kenney. Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of Bresnalian's barn, $200; damage, $150; insur- 
ance, $100; insurance paid, $100. Value of Stewart's cottage, $1,200; 
damage, $40; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, $40. Value of Kenney's 
barn, $600; damage, $40; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $40. Value 
of Mclntire's contents, $270; damage, $270; no insurance. 

Still. Wednesday, July 13, 10.08 A. m. Chimney fire in Pearl street 
block, 61 Pearl street. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Friday, July 15, 3.15 p. m. Chimney fire at 4 Ferry street, in 
house oAvned and occupied by Mrs. Mary Fetier. Xo damage. Mem- 
bers of Engine 2 responded. Used two charges of Pony. 

Still. Sunday, July 17, 8.15 a. m. Chimney fire in two-and-half- 
storj^ dwelling, 310 Hanover street, owned and occupied by H. B. Neal. 
Member of Chemical responded. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, July 19, 8.15 p. u. Three-story' brick block, 32 Am- 
herst street, owned by Lawrence Dowd, and occupied bj^ Patrick Man- 
ning. Cause, lamp explosion. Chemical engine and Truck 1 responded. 

Still. Wednesday, July 20, 9 p. M. Chimnej'^ fire in tenement house, 
20 Nashua street, owned by A. D. Kichards, and occupied by G. Lang- 
maid. Members of Hose 2 responded. No damage. Used one charge 
of Pony. 

Still. Saturday, July 23, 9.57 a. m. Three-story wooden block, 66 
Concord street, owned by heirs of S. W. Parsons. Slight fire in parti- 
tion in L part, occupied by Mrs. Margaret Dunn. Cause, defective 
flue. Chemical responded. Value of building, $3,500; damage, $15.54; 
insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, $15.54. No damage to contents. 

Still. Tuesday, July 26, 2.45 p. m. Chimney fire in cottage house, 
316 Manchester street, owned, and occupied by A. D. Hunkins. Members 
of Chemical responded. No damage. Used two charges of Pony. 

Still. Sunday, July 31, 8.45 p. m. Chimney fire in two-and-half- 
story house, 443 Chestnut street, owned by J. F. Kennard heirs, and 
occupied by George W. Kied. No damage. Member of Chemical 
responded. 

Box 81. Monday, August 8, 9.54 p. M. Two-story brick building. 
Central Fire station, 12 Vine street. Match thrown among pine wood 
by tramps, caused slight fire in basement. Box pulled by Charles Gil- 
lette. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 
1, 5. Value of building, $30,000; damage, $15. 

Still. Thursday, August 11, 10.32 A. M. Chimney fire at 167 Central 
street. Members of Chemical responded. No damage. Used Iwo 
charges of Pony. 

Box 15. Monday, August 15, 2.45 r. ii. A wood-shed adjoining the 
tenement block, 540 Chestnut street, owned by Mrs. Ella J. Boyd, and 
occupied by several parties. Cause of fire unknown. Box pulled by 
F. W. Griifin. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 
1, 2, Tnicks ], 5. Value of building, $2,500; damage. $75; insurance, 
$2,000; insurance i)aid, $75. >,'o damage to contents. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 183 

Still. Monday, August 22, 6.50 A. m. Oil stove tipped over in three- 
story wooden block, 21 Concord street, owned by Stark Mills, and occu- 
pied bj' several families. No damage. 

Box 31. Tuesday, August 23, 7.47 A, M. One-and-half-story wooden 
dwelling, 1 Kidder street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., and 
occupied by John Fitzmaurice. Cause unknown, but probably was 
matches in clothes. Box pulled by citizen. Extinguished by Chemical 
engine. Companies responding: Engines 4, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 
1, 5. Damage $25; fully insured. 

Box 4. Friday, August 26, 12.50 p. M. Some straw in rear of barn 
owned by James Burns, 67 Lake avenue, caught fire from some un- 
known causfe. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. No damage. 

Box 314. Saturdaj^ August 27, 12.03 p. M. Barn situated on Mill 
street, Amoskeag, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., and occii- 
pied by P. C. Cheney Co. as a storehouse for waste. Cause of fire 
unknown. Box pulled by employee of paper mill. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 5, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 5. Special call, Engine 
1 and Truck 1 responded. Value of building, $750; damage, $750; insur- 
ance paid, $240. Value of contents, .$2,404.37; damage, $2,404.37; insur- 
ance, $1,750; insurance paid, $1,750. 

Still. Wednesday, August 31, 2.30 p. m. True W. Jones Co.'s brew- 
ery. Sparks from chimney set fire to shingles on roof. Hose Co. 3 
responded. Flames extinguished and damage slight. 

Box 53. Friday, September 2, 1.50 P. M. Brick boiler-house at 153 
South Main street, owned and occupied by Col. A. C. Wallace. Caused 
by back draught under boiler igniting shavings. Box j)ulled by citi- 
zen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Box 52. Friday, September 2, 7.13 p. m. During a severe thunder 
storm, lightning- entered the grocery store of Allen N. Clapp, corner of 
Granite and ]\Iain streets, and burned out an electric motor. Box 
pulled by Frank Sullivan. Owing to crossing of wires, only Engines 
1, 6, and Truck 6 responded. Value of building, $12,000; damage, $8.53: 
insurance, $8,333; insurance jjaid, $8.53. Value of motor, $25; damai;e, 
$5; no insurance. 

Still. Sunday, September 4, 9 a. m. Chimney' fire in Avoodeu tene- 
ment block on McGregor street, owned by Gordon Woodbury. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. No damag-e. Used two 
charges of Pon3\ 

Still. Wednesdaj^ September 7, 2.55 p. m. Two-story house and 
barn, 332 Belmont street, owned and occupied by Joseph Quirin. 
Struck by lightning. No damage by fire. Engine 3 aaid hose carriage 
responded. 

Box 25. Thursday, September 8, 5.45 p. M. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 323 Concord street, owned by S. S. Piper, and occupied by 
several families. A wood-box in shed of tenement occupied by J. A. 
Swanton was set on fire by boys playing with matches. Extinguished 
without damage before arrival of department. Box pulled by Arthur 



184 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

(Caswell. Companies responding-: Engines ri, 4, Chemieal, Hose 1, 2, 
Truck 6. 

Still. Saturday, September 17, 3 p. M. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 58 Old Falls road, owned by Capt. F, S. Sloan, and occupied by 
O. If. Coleman. Members of Engine and Ladder .'5 responded. No 
damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

J{ox 21 T). Wednesday, September 21, 1.19 A. m. The coal in shed con- 
nected with the F. M. Iloyt shoe shop, comer of Lincoln and Silver 
streets, ignited spontaneously, causing but little damage. Box pulled 
by watchman fit factory. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemi- 
cal, Hose 2, 3, Truck 6. Damage slight, and no insurance claimed. 

Still. Friday, September 23, 11.25 a. m. Two-and-half-story dwell- 
ing-house, 143 Cedar street, owned and occupied by John Haley. No 
daniJige. Used one crharge of I'ony. 

Still. Thursday, September 29, 5.30 p. m. Chimney fire at 478 North 
Main street. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. No dam- 
age. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 24. Tuesday, October 4, 3 A. M. Cottage house and barn on 
(East) Hanover street about three miles from city hall, owned and 
occupied by Eugene F. Wilson. Fire originated in barn from some 
unknown cause, and was discovered by passers by, who drove to Lake- 
avenue Engine house and pulled the box. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $3,000; 
damage, $2,400; insurance, $2,200; insurance paid, $2,000. Value of con- 
tents, $1,000; damage, $500; insurance $800; insurance paid, $500. 

liox 312. Thursday, October 6, 9.50 A. M. Two-story house, 362 
North Main street, owned by Patrick Flaherty, and occupied by 
Michael Gallagher. Slight fire in bed. No damage. Box pulled by 
c'itizen. Companies i-esponding: Engines 2, 4, 0, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Truck 6. 

Still. Thursday, October ]3, 10.30 p. M. Six-story stone building. 
"The Kennard," lOKi Elm street, owned by Mead, Mason & Co., and 
occupied by Allen &. Kimball as clothing store. A cross of electric 
light wires caused a slight fii*e, to which the Chemical engine resjionded. 
Extinguished before its arrival. No damage. 

Still. Friday, October 14, 5.40 p. M. Members of Engine and Ladder 
No. 3 were called to 457 Milton street for an overdose of smoke from 
new furnace. 

Hox 31.3. Friday, Octolx r I 1. (l.ns i>. m. Three-story wooden block, 
r>:;\ North Main street, owned by F. C. and N. E. Miville, and occupied 
i)\ .loc St. Yves as dry and fancy goods store. Fire caught from gas 
jcl ill window drapery, and was mostly confined to the window. Box 
piill(M| hy J[. A. Noell. (;om|)anies responding: Engines 2, 4, G, Chemi- 
cal, Hose 1, Truck G. Value of building, $10,000; damage, $150; insur- 
ance, $7,000; insurance i)ai(l, $150. Value of cont^-nts, $5,000; damage, 
$7.00; insurance, $3,000; Insurance paid. $G.44. 

Stilt.. Sal unlay. Oclohcr 15. 7 A. m. Two-story brick building, 
Ward room, .•oiimt l,ak<' a\ciiiic and Massahcsic sln-cts, owiu-.l and 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 185 

occupied by the city. Cigar stub thrown in sawdvisl on the floor. 
])amage slight. Members of Engine and Ladder li responded. Used 
one charge of Pony. 

Still. Sundaj-, October 16, 8.25 A. M. Chimney fire in two-and-half- 
iitorj^ dwelling-house, 99 Cedar street, owned and occupied by Mrs. 
Abbie Ililey. No damage. Chemical engine responded. Used one 
charge of I'ony. 

STiii,. Sunday-, October Ifi, 8.30 A. M. Chimney fire in four-tenement 
block, 34 Lowell street, owned by John McCabe, and occupied by James 
Millway. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 82. Tuesday, October 25, 1.37 a. m. Two-and-half-story wooden 
house, 81 Lowell street, owned by heirs of S. W. Parsons, and occupied 
by Mrs. Mary Manning. Cause, a broken kerosene lamp in room occu- 
pied By Julia Kichards. Extinguished with Chemical engine. Box 
pulled by officer. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $3,000; damage, $10; insur- 
ance, $2,500; insurance paid, $10. Value of contents of room, $50; dami- 
age, $35; no insurance. 

Still. Thursday, October 27, 2.25 a. m. Two-and-half-story tene- 
ment house, 103 Central street, owned by H. D. Lord, and occupied by 
S. Lovering. Chimney fire. Chemical responded. Used one charge of 
I'ony. 

Box 36. Friday, October 28, 1.27 A. M. Wood-shed in rear of 21 Kid- 
der street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., and occupied by 
John Bolsaver. Cause unknown. Box pulled by watchman of Amory 
Mills. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $100; damage, $25; no insurance. No 
damage to contents. 

Still. Wednesday, November 2, 6.56 p. m. Two-and-half-story tene- 
ment house, 103 Central street, owned by Harrison D. Lord, and occu- 
pied by S. Lovering. Cause, defective flue. No damage. Used one 
charge of Pony. 

Still. Tuesdaj-, November 8, 6 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 18-20 Nashua street, owned by A. D. Richards, and occupied by 
G. Langmaid. Members of Hose 2 responded. No damage. Used one 
charge of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, November 8, 11.15 p. m. One-storj- wooden building, 
41 Amherst street, owned by Mrs. John Kearns, and occupied by John 
Kearns as pool room. Sawdust on fioor ignited, probably from cigar 
stub. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 91. Wednesday, November 9, 11.20 A. M. Barn of Bay Brook 
(iarden Co., 969 Union street. Cause unknown. Box iiuUed bj^ boy. 
Companies responding: Engines 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 5. Value 
of building, $1,000; damage, $1,000; insurance, $350; insurance paid, 
$350. Value of contents, $1,000; damage, $500; insurance, $700; insur- 
ance paid, $250. 

Box 27. Thursday, Nov. 10, 12.44 A. M, Small barn, corner of Am- 
herst and Milton streets, owned by Sallie W. Andrews, and occupied 



186 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

by James Taj'lor. Cause unknown. Box pulled by William Lang. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3: Ee- 
call at 2.52 A. m. Value of building, $200; damage, $200; insurance, 
$150; insurance paid, $150. Value of contents, $150; damage, $91.60; 
insurance, $100; insurance paid, $91.60. 

Still. Monday, November 14, 10.53 A. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 30 Birch street, OAvned by Frederick Smj^th, and occupied by 
several families. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, November 15, 5.48 p. M. Two-story tenement block, 
94 Concord street, owned by Gordon Woodbury, and occiipied by James 
Pixley. An old lounge in shed set on fire by careless boys. No dam- 
age. Chemical engine responded. 

Box 24. Tuesdajs November 22, 3.32 a. m. Barn on Hanover street 
(Pond road), two miles from city hall, belonging to Henry B. Fair- 
banks. Owing to distance from the city the barn and contents were a 
total loss. Cause unknown. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4,* 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck :>. All apparatus except Engine and Ladder 
3 ordered back before reaching the fire. Box pulled by Sergeant Ma- 
goon. Value of building, $650; damage, $650; insurance, $350; insur- 
ance paid, $350. Value of contents, $953; damage, $953; insurance, $450; 
insurance paid, $450. 

Box 71. Wednesday, November 23, 10.44 A. M. Three-story wooden 
block, 130 East Spruce street, owned by Edward Leveen, and occupied 
by Mrs. Mary Kehoe. The fire originated in the cellar from some 
imknown cause, and went up through the partitions to the roof. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Truck 3. Value of building, $3,000; damage, $375; insurance, 
$2,500; insurance paid, $375. Value of contents, $300; damage, $10; 
no insurance. 

Still. Fridaj^ November 25, 9.55 A. M. Chimney fire at 4 Ferry 
street, owned and occupied by Mary Vetter. Hose wagon of Engine 
2 responded. No damage. U.sed three charges of Pony. 

Still. Friday, November 25, 5.15 p. M. Chimney fire in foui'-t-ene- 
ment block, 66 Concord street, owned by heirs of S. W. Parsons. No 
damage. 

Box 5. Sunday, November 27, 8.20 A. M. Thi'ee-story wooden block, 
33-39 Central street, OAvned by John Ferguson, and occupied by several 
families. The fire started on second floor from some unknown cause, 
and soon communicated to blind attic. The furniture was damage<i, 
mostly by water. Box pulled by 'SI. Anielotte. Companies responding: 
P^ngines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, ilo.se J. Tiucks I. .1. Value of building. 
$15,000; damage, $825; insurance, $6,000; insurance paid, $S25. Value 
of contents, $3,000; damage, $200; no insurance. 

Still. Sunday, November 27, 9.06 p. M, Chimney fire in four-st<iry 
brick block, 64 Merrimack street, owned by heirs of John C. Young. 
No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 212. Sunday, November 27, 9.39 p. M. One-story wooden build- 
ing, 342 Cypress street, owned and occupied by Blake & Sanborn as 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 187 

grocery store. The fire started in rear room of store from some un- 
known cause. Box pvilled by Officer Welch. Companies responding: 
Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $1,300; 
damage, $531.72; insurance, $1,200; insurance paid, $531.72. Value of 
contents, $2,000; damage, $1,750; insurance, $1,200; insurance paid, 
$1,000. 

Box 8. Monday, November 28, 7.28 p. M. Two-story tenement block, 
1289 Elm street, owned by Gordon Woodbury, and occupied by several 
families. A broken kerosene lamp in room occupied by the Fitzgerald 
sisters caused the alarm. Extinguished before arrival of apparatus. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemi- 
cal, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Stili,. Tuesday, November 29, 5.20 A. M. Ash can contents, in Mon-is 
block, corner Elm and Hanover street, ignited, filling hall with smoke. 
Chemical responded. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, November 30, 5.35 a. m. Chimney fire in three- 
story wooden tenement block, comer Pearl and Elm streets, owned by 
Ramsey heirs, and occupied by several families. No damage. Chemi- 
cal responded. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 6. Saturdaj^ December 3, 11.24 p. m. Four-story brick building 
(Manchester opera house), owned by W. M. Parker and Harrington 
heirs, and occupied by S. Archambeault & Co. as millinery store. The 
fire started in the rear of the store from some unexplained cause, and 
the stock was nearly ruined. Box pulled by D. J. Jones. Companies 
responding: Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 3. Value of 
building, $50,000; damage, $400; insurance, $25,000; insurance paid, $400. 
Value of contents, $1,300 ; damage, $927; insurance, $1,000; insurance 
paid, $927. 

Still. Monday, December 5, 4.45 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 154 McGregor street, owned by Gordon Woodbury, and occupied 
by several families. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. 
Used seven charges of Pony. 

Still. Thursday, December 8, 3 p. M. Chimney fire in house at 242 
Bridge street, owned and occupied by Mrs. William E. Boyd. Members 
of Hose 2 responded. No damage. 

Still. Friday, December 9, 6.30 A. M. Chimney fire in wooden tene- 
ment house, 415 Granite street, owned by Mrs. I. W. French and A. N. 
Clapp. No damage. Members of Engine Co. 2 responded. Used four 
charges of Pony. 

Still. Friday, December 9, 11 a. m. Chimney fire in two-story tene- 
ment house, 596 North Main street, owned by Dr. J. A. Jackson, and 
occupied by several families. No damage. Members of Engine and 
Ladder 6 responded. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 6. Saturday, December 10, 3.59 A. M. Three-and-half-story brick 
block, owned by Walter M. Parker and Manchester National bank, and 
occupied as offices and stores. The fire originated in the photographic 
rooms of Fred N. Wilson, on third floor. Box pulled by Officer Farrell. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 3. 



188 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Value of building-, $10,000; damage, $745; insurance, $7,000; insurance 
paid, $745. F. N. Wilson: Value of contents, $600; dagame, $400; insur- 
ance, $300; insurance paid, $300. C. :M. Edgerly: Value of contents, 
$1,000; damage, $100; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $100. F. C. Dow 
Co.: Value of contents, $12,000; damage, $200; insurance, $7,000; insur- 
ance paid, $150. Love joy & Stratton: Value of contents, $5,000; dam- 
age, $100; insurance, $2,000; insurance paid, $75. 

Stiix. Tuesday, December 13, 5.25 p. u. Chimney fire at 235 Man- 
chester street, owned bj' Mrs. David J. Clark. No damage. Used one 
charge of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, December 13, 6.15 p. m. Chimney fire in house, 855 
Valley street, owned by Tilton Seminary, and occupied by Charles F. 
Slayton. No damage. Members of Engine and Ladder 3 responded. 
Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, December 14, 6.45 a. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment, 452 Chestnut street, owned by Parson heirs. Chemical responded. 
No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, December 14, 12.45 p. M. Slight fire in partition 
of tenement, 352 Pine street, owned bj' W. S. Kendall. Chemical re- 
sponded. Damage slight. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 45. Wednesday, December 14, 5.38 p. u. Four-story brick build- 
ing, corner Franklin and Auburn streets, owned by the S. C. Forsaith 
Co., and occupied by several parties for manufacturing purposes. A 
broken kerosene lamp in the room occupied by the Manchester Harness 
Fastener Co. caused the alarm. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 313. Friday, December 16, 12.42 A. M. Second alarm, 12.48 A. M. 
Fire was discovered between the two blocks of F. C. Miville and Dana & 
Woodbury, situated on Amory street, 42 to 58, and had gained such 
headway that a second alarm was immediately sounded. During the 
progress of the fire there was a scarcity of water, occasioned by one 
of the sources of supply to the West Side being shut off, and no one 
connected with the water works department being present to remedy 
the difficulty. The two blocks were occupied as stores and tenements. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 4, 5. 6, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1. G. F. C. and N. E. IMiville: Value of 
building, $7,000; damage, $3,090.45; insurance, $5,000; insurance paid, 
$3,000.45. Dana & Woodbury: Value of building, $8,000; damage. 
$4,000; insurance, $2,000; insurance paid, $2,000. J. H. Wilson: Value 
of contents, $3,872; damage, $2,500; in.surance, $2,000; insurance paid, 
$1,650. E. Marchland: Value of contents, $600; damage, $500; insur- 
ance, $500; insurance paid, $500. U. Messier: Vahio of contents, $2,000; 
damage, $227; insurance, $1,200; insurance paid, $227. Other tenants: 
Value of contents, $4,500; damage, $2,500; no insurance. 

Still. Saturday, December 17, 12.58 p. M. Four-story brick building 
known as Old City hotel, 1103 Elm street. Slight fire around register, 
wliicli was fxtingiiislu'd bv two charges ol" l'i)nv, witli slight damage. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



189 



Still. Monday, December 19, 11.55 A. if. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 29 Marion street, owned and occupied by Thomas Stewart. 
Members of Engine and Ladder 2 responded. No damage. Used three 
charges of Pony. 

Box 21. Friday, December 23, 8.30 P. M. Two-story wooden tene- 
ment house, 173 Manchester street, owned by xV. W. Prescott, and occu- 
pied by Moses Gingras. A snapping match set fire to lace curtain. 
Box pulled by Oflicer Hampston. Companies responding: Engines 3, 
4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $2,000; damage, 
$30; insurance, $1,200; insurance paid, $30. Value of contents, $500; 
damage, $6; no insurance. 

Box 2S. Saturday, December 2-t, 5.18 p. M. A kerosene lamp was 
broken at 416 Laurel street in house owned by George Manning, and 
occupied by Frant E. Brooks and Mrs. Margaret Griffin. Mrs. Griffin 
fell, while in a fainting spell, breaking the lamp, the oil of which 
burned her severely, but no damage was done to the house. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, Chemical, Hose 3, 
Truck 3. 

Still. Wednesday, December 28, 6.20 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 32 Concord street, occupied by J. Trudell. No damaere. 

Still. Wednesday, December 28, 7.55 P. m. Chimney fire in house 
owned by Demas Dwinell, 407 Belmont street. No damage. Members 
of Engine and Ladder 3 responded. Used one charge of Pony. 

COMPANIES RESPONDING. 



January ... 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October — 
November. 
December . 



190 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



1= 


Name. 


' Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 




Chief 






? 




Asst. and clerk. . 
Assistant 


Machinist ... 

Supt. Elec. Light.. 

Grain dealer 

Editor 


102 Orange. 
No. River road. 
414 Merrimack. 
58 Myrtle. 


4 
5 
3 


Eugene S. Whitney 

Clarence R. Merrill 

Frank M. Frisselle 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, 28 Vine Street. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



7 


Charles F. McCoy 




Machinist 








Paper hanger 

Tinsmith 


48 Opera block. 
21 Market. 


18 


James L. Brock 


Clerk, 






Engineer 

Asst. engineer . . 
Driver engine.. . 




28 Vine. 


14 


Edgar A . Young 


Clerk 


369 Merrimack. 


11 


Frank H. Harvey 


Teamster 


28 Vine. 


1?, 






« 


28 Vine. 


43 








14 Mechanic. 


15 


Thomas J. Wyatt 






"6 Mechanic. 




,. 


.. 


295 Laurel. 






,. 




Hi Prospect. 


17 


Melvin Walker 


„ 








.. 




9 Mechanic. 






.< 




1937 Elm. 











REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



191 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 2. 
House on North Main Street, 'Squog. 



d>5 


NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


71 


Buel G. Manning . 


Captain 




55 Douglas. 
210 No. Main. 
210 No. Main. 

53 Beauport. 

55 Douglas. 
151 Douglas. 
86 School. 
86 School. 
Williams. 
151 Douglas. 

56 No. Main. 

54 Douglas. 
278 Douglas. 
431 Granite. 


68 


George P. Ames 


Lieutenant 

Clerk and driver 

of engine 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer... 

Driver of hose.. 

Hoseman 




Supt. streets 


76 


Jeremiali Lane 


19,0 


Henry C. Morrill 




119 






69 


Arthur W. Whitcomb .... 
Samuel A. Hill 




7?i 




75 


Robert J. Hill 




77 


Daniel E. Emery 


Machinist 


73 
74 


Charles S. -Cousins 


Harness-maker . . . 

Wool sorter 

Wool waste sorter 
Clerk, B.&M.R.E. 
Truckman 


66 




70 
67 


Chas. M. Tewksbury 







192 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 3. 
House on Lake Avenue: corner Massabesic. 





NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


86 


Frank F Porter 


Captain ... 


Manufacturer . 


330 E. Spruce. 
372 Lake ave 


97 


Edwin C Paul 


Lieut, of engine. 


Collector . 


98 




Overseer 








Clerk 


Clerk 








Engineer 

Asst. engineer.. . 
Driver of engine 


Machinist 


403 Hall. 




George B. Forsaith 

George H. Wheeler 

William S. McLeod 






87 




384 E. Spruce. 




82 


Driver of truck . 


Dresser 


398 Merrimack. 


114 






Carpenter 


354 E. Spruce. 
331 Merrimack. 


110 


Albert W Smith 




Clerk 


80 


Clarence Hackett 


.. 


Launilrynian 


414 Lake ave. 


85 


Tr»hn W 'Finn 


" 


Paintpr ... 


501 Wilson 










78 


George Dunnington 


" 


Harness-maker . . . 


401 Manchester. 


79 


Louis N. Duf rain 


„ 


Plumber 


373 Hall. 


89 




„ 


Grain dealer 

Manufacturer 


422 Merrimack. 


153 


Edson F. Wymau 


382 Lake ave. 


105 




„ 


Clerk 


310 Central. 


84 




" 




375 Lake ave. 











REPORT OF TUE FIRE ENGINEER. 



193 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 4. 

House, iYo. 20 Vine IStrett. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



•i^O 


Lucius B. Snelling 

John H. Wales, Jr 








28 


Lieutenant 


Brick mason 


2 M.S. B. 


33 


Thomas W. Lane, Jr 


Clerk 


Electrician 


1937 Elm. 


?1 


Joseph H. Gould 


Engineer 

Asst. engineer... 
Driver of engine 
Driver of hose.. 
Hoseman 


Machinist 


OQ Vine 


?7 


Edward Sargent 




20 Vine 


SI 


Jesse W. Truell 




20 Vine. 
20 Vine. 


IB 


Ellsworth V.Rowe 

Walter A. Clarkson 




22 


Carpenter 


Walnut. 


25 


Frank B. Stevens 


» 


Clerk 


20 Gore. 


'>3 


George Thompson 

Harvey E. Harris 


„ 






24 





Laundryman 


249 Concord. 


32 


Luther A Knight. . . . 






16 Stark. 
20 Vine 


30 


James C. Newton 

Alfred Gustafson 





Machinist 


76 




20 Vine 









194 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 5. 
House, No. 44 'Webster Street. 



•s^ 



Bank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



49 


Charles W Brown 


Cnntnin 


Clerk 




161 










163 


George N. Burpee 


Lieut, engine . . . 


Electrician 


136 Sagamore. 




Woodbury Davison 










Engineer 

Asst. engineer . . 
Driver engine... 
Driver truck . . . . 




64 Appleton. 
1419 Elm 


42 


Daniel W. Morse 




125 


Emil H. Smith 


Teamster 


44 Webster 


124 


Benjamin C. Cann 




44 Webster. 


S3 


Ernest E. Hubbell 


Driver hose 


,, 


44 Webster. 


47 


Russell I. Cilley 


Hoseman . . . 


Clerk 


Rfi'i Phpqtniit 


9S 


Edward H. Clough 








126 


Alvin McLane 






15 Liberty. 
72 N. Adams. 


108 


Edward L. Towle 


„ 


Clerk 


1'>3 


Charles H. Gile 


„ 


Carpenter 


896 Union 


W 


Will G. Eraser 


,j 






41 


Frank A. Kinne 


„ 


Machinist . 


75 Sagamore. 
55 Pennacook. 


160 


George E. Badger 


" 


Steam fitter 


158 


Andrew S. Fantom 


■ " 


Cigar-maker 


1443 Elm. 


1=)1 


John B. Eraser 


„ 


Blacksmith 




101 


Charles W. Warner 




Electrician 


31 Blodget. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



195 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 6. 

House on Amory and Bimmon Streets. 



1° 


NAME. 




Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


140 


Frank W. Tebbetts 


Captain 




312 Cartier. 


147 


James A. Farley 


Lieut, engine ... 


Machinist 


385 Dubuque. 
15 Beauport. 
258 Beauport. 
Engine-bouse. 
516 Beauport. 


142 


Frank St. John 


Marble finisher 


138 


Thos. F. Fitzsimmons . 


Clerk 


Painter 


132 


Charles Edgar 


Engineer 

Asst. engineer . . 
Driver engine... 




133 






134 






135 George A Cann 


Steam flttei* 


Engine-bouse. 
Engine-house. 
624 N Main 


136 ' Henry C Crosby 




Teamster 


129 ' John Martin 


HOSei"nn 


Machinist .... 


i41 ; .TnhTi .T f!r>iirnv... 






Blacksmith 


268 Beauport. 
393 Hevey. 
516 Beauport. 


243 


Henry Stein 








144 




















131 


John C. Gemmell 






Laborer 


71 Conant. 










Clerk ". 
















146 


Richard F. Galway 






Cigar-maker 


460 N. Main. 


130 












137 


Wm. T. Lockhead 






Molder 














196 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOSE COMPANY No. 1. 
House, No. 26 Vine Street. 



r 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


36 


Joseph E. Merrill 

Charles B. French 

Albert A. Puffer 


Captain 


Currier 


21 Ash 


'^9 


Lieutenant 

Clerk 




39 M. S. B. 


48 






V 


Henry C. Parsons 

Samuel W. Patten 






16 Prospect. 
3 M. S. B. 
28 M. S. B. 


35 


Hoseman 


Belt maker 

Electrician 

Clerk 


51 


Edwin W. Merrill 

Charles J. Wiley 


21 Ash. 


34 


Brakeman 


1023 Elm. 


50 


Andrew S. Heath. 


Clerk 


383 East High. 
373 Bridge. 
100 Brook 


39 


George \V. Snadden 

Will H. Nelson 




38 


Gas-works emp ... 


53 


Albert W.Tucker 


535 Granite 









HOSE COMPANY No. 2. 

House on Maple Street, corner East High 





NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. Residence. 


54 








55 


Revilo G. Houghton 

Joseph W. Batchelder .. . 


Lieutenant 

Clerk ^ 




288 Bridge. 
521 Maple. 
621 Maple. 
35 Dutton. 
540 Maple. 
255 Bridge. 
Clay street. 
761 Beecb. 


59 




57 






f.? 


Julien B. Huntley 

Charles W. Powell 

Addison Seaward 

Arthur B. Merrill 

James A. Rogers 


Hoseman 




fin 




61 


<t 


')0 




v>^ 


„ 


65 


John M. Emerson 

Thomas Smith 


Plujnber 


19 Russell. 


68 


Cari)entcr 


24 South. 


64 


Melvln W. Worthen 




22 Jane. 









RKPORT OF THE FIKE ENGINEER. 



197 



HOSE COMPAJry No. 3. 
House, South Elm Street. 



¥ 


NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


159 




Captain 


Fireman 


23 Elm. 














Charles H. Rogers 

James H. McKenzie 

William P. Hall 








153 
154 


Hoseman 


Sash-maker 

Gas-maker 

Yardbrakeman... 
Clerk 


Elm. 
39 Elm. 


156 
157 


Henry O. FoUansbee 

Frank D Hardy 


20 Welch ave. 
20 Cheney pic. 
43 Welch ave 


156 


Celon D. Stevens 









HOOK AND LADDER COItfPANY No. 1. 

House, 18 Vine Street. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Clerk . . . . 
Driver ... 
Fireman . 



Roscoe Dyer Captain 

Oscar P. Stone i Lieutenant. 

Fred W. Bond 

Charles M. Denyou . . . 
Jerome J. Lovering . . 

Harrison H. Cole 

George M. Jones 

Henry Heap 

Charles H. Laxon 

Henry Johnson 

Charles A. Butterfield 

Frank A . Pherson 

Benjamin F- Marsh . . . 

Louis F. Kettle 

John Short 



Machinist 

Clerk 

V 

Loom-fixer . . . 

Teamster 

Carpenter . . . . 

Gardener 

Manufacturer 

Carpenter 

Steam-fitter . . 
Carpenter — 

Machinist 

Carpenter — 

Clerk . . 



40 Market. 

312 Manchester 

46 Stark. 

18 Vine. 

175 Hanover. 

883 Union. 

23 Myrtle. 

18 Vine. 

16 M. S. B. 

316 Walnut. 

970 Elm. 

18 Vine. 

1408 Elm. 

40 Orange. 

1037 Elm. 



198 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, 8 Vine Street. 



Occupation. 



115 


Edward A Scars .... 


Captain 


Electrician 


247 Concord. 


IIR 


Clarence D. Palmer 


Clerk 


Marble dealer 


301 Lake ave. 


103 


Benjamin R. Richardson 
George H Porter 


Driver 


Machinist 


548 Lincoln. 


117 


Pipeman .... 


Carpenter 


279 Laurel. 


44 


Asa W Gaere * 




15 Nashua. 













RIVERSIDE HOSE No. 5,— (Volunteer Company.) 
House, Front Street, Amoskeag. 



¥ 


Namk. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


m 






Superintendent. . . 
Milkman 






George Lawrence 








Clerk 




Ryderville rd. 




Edward C. Manley 






135 




Milkman 


Front. 


139 


Andrew J. Moynih{(n.... 




Blood's Loc. Wks. 


Front. 


140 


Leroy O. Balch 




Meat cutter 


Goffstown rd. 


137 


Sherman L. Flanders 





Grocer 


Front. 


147 


Charles Linen 


,> 


Blood's Loc. Wks 


Front. 






„ 
















138 


Joseph Stocks 


" 


Second-hand 


Dean. 


145 


Fred H. Balch 


.. 


Meat cutter 


Front. 


142 


Sherman L. Greer 




Grocer 


Goffstown rd. 









Mill hand 




141 


Arthur Moon 


Blacksmith...'. 


Second. 



Detailed as driver of supply wagon. 



REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



EEPOETOF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



To the School Board, th€ City Councils, and tlie Citizens of Mancliester : 

The following: is presented as the fifty-second annual report of the 
public schools of the city of Manchester, the same also being the forty- 
third report of the superintendent of public instruction, and the final 
school report for the year 1898: 

ORGANIZATION OF THE DAY SCHOOLS. 

The average number of day schools for the school year ending July 
1, 1898, was 121, reckoned as follows: the equivalent of 12 rooms of 
high-school grade, 3 more than last year; 29 grammar-school divisions; 
27 middle schools, 2 more than last year (1 of them in the Straw school 
and the other in the Parker school) ; 44 primary schools, 1 more tlian 
last year (in the Wilson school); 2 partially gi^aded schools; 5 un- 
graded schools, and 1 manual training school; also 2 extra schools dur- 
ing the spring term, reckoned together as equivalent to 1 school for 
the year (1 of them of grammar grade in the Lincoln-street school- 
house, taught by Miss Annie W. Patten, and the other of primary grade 
in the Spring-street schoolhouse, taught by Miss Florence Richardson). 

There were employed for the care of the 121 day schools,* through- 
out the jear; seven male principals of large schools; a lady principal 
and a general assistant (2)t for the care of the Training school for 
teachers; 116 class-room teachers,$ of whom 11 ladies and 1 gentleman 
were also principals; and 3 special teachers of music and drawing; or, 
in all, 128 teachers for the entire year, — 7 more than for the year pre- 
ceding. 

The total enrollment of different pupils in all our public schools for 
the school year ending July 1, 1898, was 5,802, — a gain of 301 upon the 
enrollment of the preceding year, an average of 43 pupils for each of 
the seven additional teachers employed. Of the 301 gained, 83 pupils 
represent the increase in the High school, — necessitating the employ- 
ment of three additional teachers in this school; 20 pupils of the 218 
remaining increase entered the grammar grades; 75, the middle 
schools; and 123, the primary schools, — necessitating the employment 
of four additional teachers in the elementary schools. 
♦Manual Training School included. 

t Aided by young ladies constituting the sub-teachers' classes, who had charge 
of the several classrooms. 

t Of these 116, six are males,— three sub-masters in the High school, the princi- 
pal of the Rimraon school, the teacher at Toungsville, and the teacher of the man- 
ual training school. 

201 



202 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SCHOOLHOTJSES. 

The city councils have this year well filled the long^-felt need of a 
new schoolhoiise at Amoskeag". The building- contains four good 
schoolrooms, ample hallways, and commodious basements with modem 
heating and sanitary appliances. This schoolhouse is a credit to Man- 
chester, and will prove a great convenience and advantage to the peo- 
ple of Amoskeag. 

Half of the city's twenty-four schoolhouses are comparatively new, 
and buildings in which the city may justlj^ take much pride. The 
dozen best houses are as follows: the high-school building, Lincoln- 
street, Ash-street, Webster-street, Varney, TIallsville. Wilson, Straw, 
Pearl-street, llimmon, Parker, and Amoskeag. Nine of these school- 
houses, all of the twelve except the Lincoln-street. Ash-street, and 
Webster-street, have been built since 1890. Most of the other twelve 
schoolhouses are in either good or fair condition except in the matter 
of ventilation, Avhich is so deficient in several that improvements should 
be eflPected. 

Notwithstanding the erection of the Wilson schoolhouse, and the 
organization of three primary schools there, which are crowded full, 
an overcrowded condition still prevails in the lower-grade schools at 
both the Lincoln-street and Training-school buildings. Here are 
])upils of primary grade who must be housed in the immediate vicinity 
of the two schools last named; and, I am sure, no location could bo 
found that would prove so satisfactory to all concerned as one close 
by the Lincoln-street building. A schoolhouse of four or six room.s 
in this locality' will be urgently' needed by the time it can be secured. 
There will, indeed, be need of two additional rooms for schools in this 
vicinity as earlj^ as next April; and, in the absence of them, there \\i\\ 
be necessity of again placing a school on the third floor of the Lincoln- 
street house during the spring term (as there was this year), and a 
continuance of the great inconvenience and impropriety of overcrowded 
rooms at the Training school. 

The following figures indicate the enrollment, this fall, in the three 
lower-grade rooms of the several schools named: Wilson school, 53, 49, 
■>4; Lincoln school, 51, 54, 52; Training school, 50, 52, 65. These rooms 
have been relieved, temporarilj', by placing children into other schools 
out of their school precinct; but all the rooms in question will be a.s 
badly overcrowded as ever next April, wlun beginners will again be 
allowed to enter the schools. 

UEPAIR.S OF SCIIOOLIIOVSES. 

The coniniittee on repairs of schoolhouses have expended the ajjin-o- 
priation this year as follows: 

At the High school, there was large expense incurred in fitting up 
the physical laboratory, the drawing room, the armory, and lunch 
tables; also in changes of boys' urinals, which had jjroved faulty. 

The roofs of the I'ranliliii-st rect. Straw, and llakcrsvillc schools were 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 203 

repaired; also the tower roof and weather vane on the Lincoln-street 
schoolhonse. 

At the Varney school a new bulkhead was made, with a porch over it. 
Other porches were built over bulkheads at the Spring-street and Main- 
street schoolhouses. One at Bakersville was also repaired. 

At the Pearl-street schoolhouse two storm porches were built over 
doors on the north side of the house; and the sanitary arrangements 
were entirely changed over, at much expense. This, however, was done 
by a joint committee of the board and city councils, out of a special 
appropriation. 

At Hallsville the inside walls of four rooms were painted in colors, 
outside windows provided, and the front doors remodeled. 

Slate blackboards were furnished two rooms in the Main-street house, 
and one room in each of the following schoolhouses: Ash-street, Spring- 
street, Lincoln, Goffe's Falls, and Webster's Mills. 

Kalsomining of walls in tints was done in eight rooms in the Lin- 
coln and Main-street houses, in the assembl}^ hall at Ash-street, and in 
one room at Goffe's Falls. 

Whitewashing of ceilings, in either rooms or basement, was done to 
a greater or less extent in nearly every one of the twenty-four school- 
houses. 

A new fence was built on two sides of the Franklin-street lot; a new; 
floor laid in the basement of Training school; and pupils' desks changed 
for other sizes at Harvey district; also in two or three rooms of other 
houses. 

Many other minor repairs were also made on doors, locks, windows, 
umbrella racks, etc. 

Steam boilers and other heating apparatus Avere inspected by the 
master mechanic of the Amoskeag Co., and necessary repairs thereon 
were made under his supervision, — which is sufficient guarantee that 
the work Avas thoroughly done. 

THE HIGH SCHOOI.. 

Principal Albert Somes took charge of our public High school ten 
years ago. He is therefore familiar with its growth and the character 
of its work during the last decade, and some of the statements which he 
submitted to the school board last month are worthy of permanent 
record, for thej- embody important historical facts. Among other 
things, Principal Somes wrote as follows: 

"Ten years ago there were in the school one hundred and eighty- 
seven pupils; this term there have been four hundred and forty-seven 
pupils, an increase in number of one hundred and forty-four per cent. 
This is three times as fast as the population of the city has increased 
in the same time. 

"High schools generally in New England having four hundred and 
fifty piipils have at least twenty teachers. We have twelve. To have 
large classes is a disadvantage to both poor and good scholars; but 
there is another reason, besides injustice to the pupils, why we should 



204 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

have more teachers. The school has g-ained an enviable reputation 
among New England colleg'es for doing excellent preparatory work, 
but with so large classes as we have it will be very difficult to maintain 
our present high standard. 

"Some colleges will admit students without examination if they 
bring the principal's certificate from a school whose methods of instruc- 
tion and course of study are satisfactory to the college. 

"The certificate of the principal of the Manchester High school will 
admit students without examination to Dartmouth, Amherst, Williams, 
Brown university, Wellesley, Vassar, Smith, and Mount Holyoke. Per- 
mission to send students on certificate is granted with the understand- 
ing that it will be continued only so long as the graduates of the school 
maintain a creditable standing in college. From time to time, in re- 
cent years, I have taken pains to learn how our graduates have stood 
in college, and have asked colleges where our graduates have entered 
to criticise our preparatory work, and make known how it could be 
improved. I have not received any suggestions for improving our work, 
but I have received many commendations of it. 

"Harvard, Eadcliffe, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and 
Yale will not admit students from any school without an examination, 
but our graduates have passed examinations at all these institutions 
with success. Ten years ago it was considered impossible for a boy to 
prepare for Harvard in our schools in four years, and a fifth year was 
added to the course of study to give opportunity to prepare those who 
might wish to enter Hai-vard. No scholar has ever taken the fifth year 
to prepare, but several have entered Harvard from our school after tak- 
ing our four years' course, and the record they have made at the Har- 
vard examination would be creditjible to any school. 1 have the record 
of seven of our graduates who have taken examinations at Har%'ard or 
Radcliffe since 1895. They have been examined in English, Latin, 
Greek, French, historj% algebra, geometry, and physics. When a can- 
didate at these examinations receives a mark sufficiently high he is 
entitled to a 'crexlit,' and our graduates have received three credits in 
Greek, three credits in Latin, one in English, and one in algebra. 

"Scholars who are fitting for college in our school recite in the same 
classes and receive the same instruction as those who do not expect 
to enter college, and the success of our graduates in college is an indi- 
cation that our instruction is good and our methods correct. If we 
are to maintain the standing we have gained it will be necessary to 
have smaller classes, and to have smaller classes we must have more 
teachers. 

"It may be that there is no money at your disposal to pay additional 
teachers, but I believe teachers may be obtained who will do satis- 
factory work without expense to tlie city. 

"In cities in various parts of the country volunteer teachei-s are em- 
ployed in the High school. In one school near Boston eight volunteer 
teachers are employed besides twenty-three regular teachers. There 
are in that school six hundred and twenty-five pupils. These volimteer 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 205 

teachers are college graduates who have passed the examinations re- 
quired for teachers in the city where they teach, and who give their 
services for the experience they gain. Working under the direction of 
the principal, they gain experience that will enable them to secure a 
more desirable situation, and, as the work they do in school can be 
accommodated to their training, their services are valuable to the city. 
"There are in Manchester several j'oung men and women who are 
graduates of college and graduates of our high school, Avho have made 
an excellent record in the school and in college, whom I would be glad 
to recommend for character and scholarship, and who, I believe, would 
make excellent teachers. I believe some of them would be glad to 
teach in our High school as volunteers. 

"This is not an experiment. It has proved a success in other places, 
and would be a success in Manchester. I recommend that not more 
than five 'volunteer teachers' be employed in our High school. They 
can be given classes immediately without disturbing the daily program 
or causing confusion in the arrangements of the school." 

The foregoing quotations set forth facts in regard to certain needs 
of the High school which have been known to the school authorities 
all along; but, for lack of sufficient salary appropriation, it has not 
been thought possible to afford the High school the number of instruct- 
ors deemed necessarj'; and, for this reason, the board has been obliged 
to refrain from introducing a proposed commercial course, a course in 
German, and otherwise improving the High-school course of study. 

The plan proposed by Principal Somes for supplying the High school 
with more teachers is one which he, in common with the school com- 
mittee, must recognize as a makeshift to which the Manchester High 
school ought not to be subjected. The school has more than once con- 
siderably suffered from the employment of teachers neither experi- 
enced nor specially trained. To put into the High school at one time 
three or four such teachers, I deem likely to prove highly detrimental 
to the interests of the high-school pupils; for pupils in the lower 
high-school classes, coming fresh from the tuition of strong and highly 
efficient teachers in the grammar schools, if placed in charge of inex- 
perienced and imtrained teachers in the High school, cannot feel the 
continued uplift of which thej' should be conscious; and, failing in this, 
they will neither be satisfied with results nor able to regard the High 
school as foremost among our schools. On the other hand, if pupils 
in the more advanced high-school classes shall be put into the hands 
of untrained beginners in teaching, after having been instructed a year 
or two by the stronger high-.school teachers, it is doubtful whether 
even the momentum thus acquired would be sufficient to keep the bet- 
ter scholars of the higher classes in the school long enough to complete 
the course of study. In other places where volunteer teachers, begin- 
ners in teaching, are claimed to have rendered satisfactory service, 
such report must be understood to mean "satisfactory for beginners," 
unless the vohmteers in question had been specially trained for the 
teacher's vocation, or those selected largely proved to be born teach- 



206 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ers, — a wonderful selection, indeed, since not one teacher in ten is a 
"bom teacher." 

However, the high-school sub-committee, not able to act in this 
matter upon the generally accepted educational theory (because of 
failure to secure salary appropriations sufficient to employ an ade- 
quate number of experienced teachers for service in the High school), 
have concluded that conditions at the High school demand a larger 
corps of teachers, and that under existing circumstances they have no 
alternative except to try as an experiment the emploj-^ment of volun- 
teer teachers according to the plan suggested by Principal Somes. 

Heartily wishing the experiment may prove entirely satisfactory, I 
nevertheless deem it wise to advise the board of school committee to 
continue its efforts to secure sufficient salary appropriation to render 
possible the employment in the High school of a sufficient number of 
experienced or specially trained teachers, — certain, as I am, that the 
citizens of Manchester, whose children may attend the High school, will 
be far better satisfied to have their children permanently placed in 
charge of such teachers rather than in the charge of less efH.cient ones 
who will serve only for short and varying periods of time. 

The high-school course of study should be so modified as to require 
every pupil in the school to pursue a course in the study and use of 
the English language, from the day of his entrance to the day of his 
graduation or withdrawal; and, in order that the High school may 
more broadly prepare its pupils for the various every day business 
vocations of life, the so-called "Business Course" should be made more 
distinctive, and include stenography and typewriting, for which a spe- 
cial teacher would be needed. The opportunity to acquire in our High 
school this limited business training would, doubtless, bring into the 
school many pupils who graduate from the grammar schools, and, not 
attracted to further study, largely waste two or three years while wait- 
ing for the biisiness opportunity they seek, because thej' cannot ^ee in 
our High school such a course as seems designed to prepare them espe- 
cially well for business life, — the kind of life upon which they most 
desire to enter. 

TRAINTNa SCHOOL FOH TEACHEI5S. 

The city Training school for teachers has done more than an average 
amount of good work during the year. The jirincipal has been much 
helped by the unusual efficiency of the senior class,* and has therefore 
succeeded more easily in keeping the several schools under her charge 
in good working order, notwithstanding their overcrowded condition. 

It has been a disajipointment that the new Wilson scliool lias not 
made it possible more largely to relieve the Training school of its sur- 
plus of pupils. The fact is, however, that the training-school building 
has not sclioolroonis enough properly to accommodate the pupils who 
reside in its immediate vicinity. This renders the building unfit for 
•Gradimtert .Tuiin 24, 1898. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 207 

training--school purposes, because those Avho are beginners in the work 
of learning how to teach should not at the outset be confronted with a 
school so large and poorly accommodated for lack of sufficient space 
that only the most competent of experienced teachers might be ex- 
pected fully to succeed. Under the circumstances, it is a great compli- 
ment to Miss Wing, the principal of the Training school, that she has 
been able to do efficient work with sub-t«achers and at the same time 
keep four large schools in good trim, and doing work equal at least to 
the average of similar grades in other schools under teachers more or 
less experienced. 

It has long been felt bj-- different sub-committees of the Training 
school that it should have grammar-school grades connected therewith, 
for the better preparation of those sub-teachers who by nature are 
better adapted to these grades and therefore secure them as soon as 
possible. About one fifth of the graduates of the Training school have 
been teachers in our grammar schools, and for the most part they have 
there done fairlj' well at the outset; and in many instances they have 
in a few jears ranked as best of the lady teachers in the grammar 
grades. But it would be more i^rofitable for all concerned, if those 
graduates of the Training school Avho would become grammar-school 
teachers could first have such training in the work of the grammar 
schools as would enable them to do superior work in these grades at 
the outset, or at least very early in their course of teaching. 

When it shall be determined to build another schoolhouse, it will be 
well to consider whether it maj^ not be located and constructed in a 
place and way that would make it available for the use of the Training 
school, and admit of the school's improvement by affording opportu- 
nit^• to train a portion of its sub-teachers in grammar-school work. In- 
deed, the opportunity seems to be at hand, and that too without greater 
expense than will be necessary for properly housing the surplus of 
pupils in the Lincoln and Training school precincts, as hereinbefore 
set forth under "Schoolhouses." 

By transferring the Training school to a new house (which could be 
specially arranged for its much better accommodation) near the Lin- 
coln-street schoolhouse, together with pupils from the present training- 
school building sufficiently to relieve it of its surplus pupils, and by 
thus also relieving the Lincoln-street school of its surplus pupils, the 
new training-school building and the Lincoln-street house could to- 
gether be used for training-school purposes under present principals 
in a way that would afford piipil-teachers the requisite training in all 
grammar as well as primarj^ and middle-school grades. 

MANUAX, TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Manual training constitutes a highly important part of the work of 
the public schools. The following three reasons will here suffice for 
justification of this statement. 

First. Education consists not so much in storing up information by 



208 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the mere acquirement of facts, as in so exercising the mind as to pro- 
mote its general growth and development and specifically to train its 
various faculties; because such discipline gives a person power most 
comprehensively to apprehend whatever he fixes his attention upon. 
The desired discipline of the young mind can often be best effected, 
and always greatly aided, bj^ affording it concrete material for its 
exercise. No better material can be afforded for the purpose in ques- 
tion than such tools as are used in the more prominent mechanical 
trades; for in the learning of the proper use of these tools there is 
involved a high order of mental discipline because of the necessity for 
concentration of attention and definiteness of thought, and hence man- 
ual training affords far more intellectvial discipline than some of the 
subjects usuallj^ taught in the schools. The manual training school is 
not therefore any more a special school than is the high .school, nor so 
much a one as is the training school for teachers; and the utility and 
consequent stability of the manual training school will yet be regarded 
as unquestioned as is the usefulness of these other schools, because its 
special province is so to train the muscles through the intellect as to 
give the hand and eye the dexterity and intelligent use which is the 
foundation of all mechanical trades and the various forms of manual 
labor, — vocations, indeed, by which the masses of the common people 
earn their living. 

Second. Deftness and .skill acquired in the use of any set of tools 
will afford ability speedily to learn the use of other kinds of tools, 
and such ability is of great value in every department of life. Boy.n 
who take a course at the manual training school and enter upon their 
life work without taking a high-school course are especially benefited 
b^- the course in manual trainiTig. From tliis coiir.sc, also, all obtain 
such an insight into both the material and moral effect of hand labor 
upon the artisan as will result in a high appreciation of his efforts and 
due respect for the dignity of labor. 

Third. Boys are so delighted with the work of the manual training 
school that in many instances they obtain tools of their own for home 
work, and by its fascinations they are kept from idleness and the evil 
influences of the street, while also they frequently construct articles 
of much utility for their own use or the use of the family. 

Our ])ublic manual training school was organized in the fall of 189.'?, 
and during its first term averaged 143 pupils. For the year 1894 the 
average was 1G6; for 1895, IGO; for 1S9G, 105; for 1897, 177; for 1898, 201. 
The present enrollment is 177, and after the first of February', when 
promotions will next be made, there will be about :i5 more; and such 
an increase will make the nuinual training school larger than ever. 

This school is quite simply equipped, and because of its limited 
capacity the character of its work is through necessity of a very ele- 
mentary kind; but this is not as was intended for a longer period than 
the first year of the .school's existence. At the time of the school's 
organization it was equipped as follows: twenty-three benches, four- 
teen of which arc in the Lowell-street schoolhouse, five in the Vamey 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 209 

school, and four in the Hallsville school. Each bench is supplied with 
a 20-inch jointer, 15-inch fore-plane, 8-inch smoothing'-plane, 7-inch 
block-plane, 24-inch splittijig-saw, 22-inch panel-saw, 10-inch back-saw, 
6 chisels (sizes, 14-inch, %-inch, 14-inch, %-inch, 1-inch, 1 V2"iiich), a 
marking- gaug"e, a No. 12 hammer, a (5-inch tri-square, a 6-inch T bevel- 
square, a Xo. 110 SpolTord bit-brace, an oil-stone and can, a screw 
driver, mallet, and rule. There is also a siifficient number of drawing- 
boards and T squares for the accommodation of the school. Blue prints 
are nS&de and mounted on cardboard for each piece of work to be 
executed, as fast as needed. 

By all who understand the limited capacity of such an equipment, 
it will readily be seen that boj^s who have had a year's training in the 
use of such tools must have a more extended set if due progress is to 
b^ made. 

The immediate need of the manual training school is, as was said in 
the school report of 1897, "an equii^ment of three or four wood-turning 
lathes and a band saw, with electrical or other power. Wood-turning 
is one of the very best features which can be introduced into this line 
of school work. It is of a character which brings a pupil to the neces- 
sity of thought and study; it teaches self-reliance, and trains the eye 
to see and the hand to perform difficult work with precision. Pattern 
making affords excellent training; it has a practical bearing, al^o, 
upon the industries, and will be undertaken when proper facilities are 
granted." 

Now that the salary of the teacher of the manual training school is 
by vote of the board to be paid out of the appropriation for teachers' 
salaries, as that of other special teachers has been, so small an appro- 
priation as $600 for the manual training school for next year will equip 
it with the needed appliances, above recited, and also furnish the 
lumber necessary for use in the work of the school. 

Boys doing the last two years' work of the grammar schools are 
allowed to attend the manual training school; also those in the High 
school to extent of the training school's accommodations for them. 
The average attendance upon this school for the past five years has 
been 174, and by boys whose ages chiefly ranged from thirteen to 
seventeen years. There is no other period of life when a facile and 
skilful use of tools can so well be acquired, because the muscles can at 
this time be most easily and effectivelj^ trained to speedy and exact 
action. The manual training school, therefore, not only admirably sup- 
plements the mental and moral training- afforded in the public schools 
by extending and emphasizing such training, but also by furnishing a 
healthy and practical form of phj^sical training that leads pupils to 
scorn idleness, seek profitable emplojment, and rejoice in the emolu- 
ments of its results. It is therefore confidently hoped that the city 
council will grant the appropriation of $600 necessary for the proper 
and much needed improvement of the manual training school. The 
cost of desired equipment is insignificant as compared with its value 
to the hundreds of boys who in years to come would be benefited by 

its use. 
14 



210 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TEXT-BOOKS AND OTHEK FKEE SUPPLIES. 

By legislative enactments, cities and towns of this state were re- 
quired, in 1890, to furnish pui^ils in the public schools with free text^ 
books and other necessary supplies. This requirement cost Manchester 
(in 1890) $9,005.11, though the schools were then but partially supplied. 
The cost for equii^ping the schools in full, and for furnishing text- 
books and other free supplies to replace those worn out in subsequent 
years, may be seen in the fourth column of the following table: 



YEAR. 


Appropri- 
ation ex- 
pended. 


Relumed 
to treas- 
urer from 

sale of 
text-books 


Cost. 


Average 
number 
of pupils. 


Cost per 
pupil. 


1891. 


$3,210.73 
3,4S9 31 
4,456.68 
4.4S4.36 
4,915.3.1 
5,058.42 
6,320. 3G 
6,328.98 


$150.33 


$3,060.40 

.qSOf? 77 


2,940 $1.04 


1892 


1893 


233.23 4,223.45 
229.79 1 4,254.57 
202.66 4,712 69 
216.43 4,841 99 
20« 68 6,111.68 
178.23 1 6,150.76 


3,425 1.23 
3,662 1.16 
3,817 1.23 
3,999 1.21 
4,213 1.46 
4.425 1.39 


1894 


1895 


1896 









Etght years' annual average, 81 22 per pupil. 

The marked increase in the cost per pupil for the last two years is 
chargeable, in 1897, to an increase of 28 pupils in the High school, over 
the previous year, and unusual expenditures for cj'clopedias and new 
music readers for other schools; and, in 1898, the increased rate is 
largely due to a gain of 83 jiupils in the High school, over the number 
enrolled in 1897. Text-books for pupils in this school are quite costly. 

The annual expenditure for text-books and other free supplies in 
this city, since their inauguration in 1890, has averaged but $1.22 per 
pupil; and said expenditure has been found in the aggregate to be 
divided in about the proportion of three to one, or $:? for text-books as 
often as $1 for other free .supplies. These other supplies in the main 
■consist of blank books (for written spelling, composition, and other 
language exorcLses, bookkeeping, etc.), paper (in both sheet and tablet 
form, for various pui'iioses), slate and lead pencils, crayon, pens. ink. 
penholders, erasers, etc. 

Text-books are sold to parents or pupils at the oiliee of the superin- 
tendent of schools substantially at cost. It is therefore somewhat sur- 
prising, in view of the comparatively small expense for text-books, 
that many more jjarents do not purchase them for their children to use 
and own. — csjjecially becatisc of the advantages and satisfaction derived 
ill later year.s from llic jiossossion of books u.sod at school, to saj- noth- 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 211 

ing- of possible risks of contracting contag-ious diseases from the hand- 
ling of books and other free supplies more or less promiscuously used. 
Greatest danger in this respect exists in the primary and middle 
schools, but so much precaution is taken by all our teachers it is not 
believed that disease has often been propagated in our schools by the 
handling of free supplies. 

The schools wei-e this year considerably embarrassed bj' reason of 
failure to receive necessary books and other supplies at the opening • 
of th^ fall term, consequent upon the insufficiency of the text-book 
appropriation made at the opening of the year. Now it has been seen 
that a lack of sufficient funds definitely in the hands of the school 
board early in the j^ear may seriously embarrass the schools, because 
the board cannot fully plan for their proper conduct without a suffi- 
cient and assured appropriation earh' in the year, it is hoped that future 
city councils will see that the school board has in due season, annu- 
ally, appropriations sufficient for the necessary' and proper conduct of 
the schools. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The average attendance upon the evening schools for the past ten 
years has been 168. Last year, under the inauguration of the plan of 
requiring an entrance fee (to be returned at the end of the term for 
satisfactory attendance, as explained in my last report), the average 
evening attendance was 177; and for the latest school year, ending 
August, 1S98, the average evening attendance was 195. 

The evening schools have done more profitable work and at less 
expense under the plan of of)eration tried the past two years, notwith- 
standing a contrary impression, — which has been doubtless based upon 
the size of aggregate enrollments, of which the representatives did not 
in due proportion formerly attend the evening schools for a sufficient 
part of the term to make their attendance reasonably profitable. 

OTHER SCHOOLS AND THEIR TEACHERS. 

If I should write extendedly of the grammar, middle, and primary 
schools, — as well as of their teachers, including all the special teach- 
ers, — I should need to repeat in substance what was said of them in my 
annual report of last year; for similar efforts and successes have been 
predominant this J'ear, and these schools and their teachers are still 
worthy of all the praise bestowed upon them a year ago. 

Good as these schools are, however, I will endeavor to indicate two 
or three waj^s, within the easy reach of the board, whereby I think 
several of them might be considerably improved. A large majority of 
the vacancies in our corps of teachers have for years been filled by 
choice from the graduates of our city Training school for teachers, and 
in many instances it has hapi^ened that when a teacher's vacancy has 
occurred in a lower-primary school none of the training-school grad- 
uates awaiting positions were as well adapted to the teaching of a 
lower-primary grade as a school of higher grade; nor was the lower- 



212 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

primary the school of their choice, but they would take it lest they 
mi^ht liave to wait too long for a higher grade. For similar reasons 
others have taken a middle-school or lower-grammar grade when they 
would have preferred a lower-primary school, and would have done 
better in it. 

Again, some teachers of lower-primary schools, who could do best 
work in-that grade of school, have sought and obtained appointments 
in higher grades apparently in order that they might have smaller 
schools and less nerve exhausting work; and while they might not in 
some cases be blamed for seeking such change, they have of course 
lessened their efficiency as teachers. Such changes should not be coun- 
tenanced except for special and sufficient reasons. A remedy for the 
apparently growing tendency to secure such changes might be found 
in making the maximum salary of lower-primary school teachers the 
same as that of masters' assistant, for the former position is as much 
worth the salary as the latter position; and it is quite as difficult to 
find the right teacher for a lower-primary school as for any 'other 
grade. Moreover, it is of greater importance that teachers in the lower- 
primary schools should be first-class than in any other grade; for it 
is in the lower-primary school that love for school life is formed, or a 
dislike for it is so established that its embarrassments are felt for 
several terms, at least, even under subsequent favorable conditions. 

The remedy for misfits of teachers, in grades to which they were 
assigned by virtue of there being no more suitable candidates available 
when appointments were originally made, is to make such a readjust- 
ment of teachers (at the annual election) as will place them respectively 
in grades where they can individually render best service. The annual 
election of teachers occurs in June; and, if in April requested to do so, 
I will in Ma3^ submit a plan for attempting a readjustment of misfit 
teachers, for the good of both teachers and schools. 

A second suggestion, for improving our elementary schools, is so to 
provide that pupils while passing through the seven schools below the 
first-division grammar grade will have but three difTerent teadiers 
instead of seven different ones, — as they now have, — a change wliich 
can be easily effected, to quote from my annual report for 1S92, as fol- 
lows: 

"Annually at the close of the spring term, advance both classes in 
each room to the room of the grade next higher and so change the posi- 
tion of all teachers between the lower-primary grade and tlie first-divi- 
sion grammar that the higher-primary and the middle school teachers 
shall go round with their pupils from school to school, stiirting with the 
higher primary and ending with the higher middle; and, likewise, 
have the grammar-school assistants perform the circuit of the three 
lower divisions of the grammar school with their pupils. 

"Under the present system, there is a great waste of the best efforts 
of both teacher and pupil; for in many instances thei-e is not for sev- 
eral months after a puj)il conu's under the tuition of a new teacher a 
realization of the outmost limit, and just that, of the knowledge from 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 213 

which the pupil is actually prepared to advance, nor an adequate under- 
standing of his abilities or power to accomplish results, — to say nothing" 
of the teacher's lack of acquaintance with the disposition of pupils, of 
which a full knowledge is so necessary for obtaining best results in the 
most agreeable manner. On the other hand, the pupil suffers in the 
meantime because of the feeling that he is not appreciated; and, in 
consequence, his confidence, cooperation, and love are tardily won." 

In short, it takes about one third of the j^ear during which pupils are 
now with individual teachers to come to such a mutual understanding 
as is necessary for the attainment of best results. Hence it is not too 
much to claim that under the plan proposed more work could be much 
better done, in either of the three-year periods indicated, than can be 
accomplished under the existing an-angement; and such claim has, 
indeed, been a full}' realized fact by manj' teachers whose experience 
has at different times given them charge of pupils for both the long 
and short periods of time in question, — one year, in accordance with 
the usual plan of the graded school sj^stem, and three j'cars as sug- 
gested for its improvement. 

A third waj' of improving the schools would be to extend the author- 
itj- of supervising masters, bj" making them principals of those schools 
whose higher classes are chiefly advanced to the larger schools now in 
charge of grammar masters; as, for instance, make the master of the 
Ash-street school principal of the Pearl-street school; the master of 
the Lincoln-street school, principal of the Wilson school; the master of 
the Varney school, principal of the Parker school, etc. 

Six years ago, the grammar m.asters were made supervisors of the 
•work in all the schools in their respective buildings; and the improve- 
ment thereby afforded has ampl}^ justified the additional expense. 
Why not therefore further utilize in the same direction the supervisory 
powers of the grammar masters in the other schools that are special 
feeders of their own higher grades? The grammar masters now have 
their present schools so well in hand that they could also efficiently 
perform the duties of supervising principals of additional schools in 
another building conveniently near bj'. 

It is a great stimulus to a school if the teacher and pupils feel sure 
their work will be inspected by an authority competent properly to 
judge it and advise for its betterment as often as once or twice a week, 
and this is at least four times as often as it is possible for the superin- 
tendent to do it. Under a proper amendment of the rules governing 
their services, the grammar masters would doubtless be willing to act 
in this larger capacity without increase of salary; for it would broaden 
their experience, and give them greater repute as educational leaders. 

In attempting the improvement last suggested, it would be unwise 

■ to impose a less efficient head teacher upon the Pearl-street, Wilson, or 

Parker school because of the appointment of a supervisory principal; 

for the duties of the head teacher would in no way be diminished 

thereby, and the salary in such schools should be maintained. The 



214 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

position is worth, and the efficiency of these schools demands, the best 
head teacher who can be procured for as much salarj'^ as is now paid 
the head of these schools. 

SCHOOL SAVINGS BANKS. 

A method of training public school pupils in monetary frugality, for 
many years practiced in Belgium and France, was introduced in this 
country at Long Island City in 1885, and it is now operated in the pub- 
lic schools of about seventy cities and villages of the United States, 
with apparently great satisfaction to the school authorities and to 
citizens. The plan is known as the school savings-bank system, 
whereby pupils are taught the valvie of their pennies and encouraged 
to save them. Pupils intrust their savings weekly to their teacher, 
who deposits them to the account of individual pupils in a local savings 
bank selected by the school authorities. A system of bookkeeping has 
been devised which, it is claimed, will enable teachers to take jjroper 
charge of the matter at an expenditure of but little time. 

It would here require too much space fully to set forth the merits of 
the system, the plan of its operation, and the good results it has accom- 
plished. Personally, I am satisfied of the utility and practicability of 
the school savings-bank system as a proper and desirable adjunct of 
the public school. I therefore recommend it for investigation and 
adoption. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, it only remains for me again to thank you, gentlemen 

of the Manchester school board, for your cordial support, efficient aid, 

and general courtesies. I also heartily thank all the teachers of our 

public schools for their continued cooperation and friendship, as well 

as for the generous assistance afforded for the proper discharge of our 

common duties. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 



I. POPTJLATION, ETC. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

in. Schools. 

rv. Teachers. 

V. Attendance Tables. 

VI. Truancy. 

Vn. Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1897-1898. 

IX. High School Graduating Class. 

X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

XI. Organization of Committees, 1898-1S99. 

XIL List of Teachers, 1899. 

Xni. School Year, 1898-1899. 



APPENDIX. 



STATISTICS. 

1.— Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1S90 43,983 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 



II.— School houses. 

Number of schoolhouses in use 24 

Number of schoolhouses not in use 

Number of school rooms used for daj^ schools *122 

Number of rooms used for High-school classes 12 

Number of rooms used for Grammar schools 29 

Number of rooms used for Middle schools 27 

Number of rooms used for Primary schools 44 

Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools 2 

Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools 5 

Number of rooms used for Manual Training schools 1 



III.— Schools. 

(All fl)!' botll 9CX0S.) 

Number of High schools (buildings) ' 1 

Number of combined Grammar and lower grade (Middle and Pri- 
mary) schools 12 

Number of combined Middle and Primary schools 5 

Number of schools all Primary grade 1 

N mil ber of Ungraded schools 5 



IV.— Teachers. 

Male Icachers in llic High school 

Female teachers in the High school 

Female teacliers in the Training school 

Male leacliers in the Grammar scliools 

* An average of 121 for the entire year. 

210 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 217 

Female teachers in the Grammar schools (a)29 

Female teachers in the Middle schools (ft) 26 

Female teachers in the Primary schools ('')41 

Female teachers in the Partially Graded schools 2 

Male teachers in the Ung-raded schools 1 

Female teachers in the Ungraded schools 4 

Male teachers in Manual Training school 1 

Special teachers 3 

Average number of male teachers (c)15 

Average number of female teachers (c)113 

Total average number of teachers in daj- schools 128 

Male teachers in the evening schools 8 

Female teachers in the evening schools 4 

Average number of male teachers in the evening schools 5 

Average number of female teachers in the evening schools 3 

Male teachers in the evening Drawing schools 2 

Average number of male teachers in the evening Drawing schools 2 

(a) Six of the 29 are masters' assistants. 

(6) One of the 27 iniclcUe schools and three of the 44 primaries were in the training 
school. They had no regular teachers, being taught by sub-teachers under the 
direction of the principal and her assistant. 

(c; Including special teachers. 



218 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT 



THE SUPERINTENDENT OF BCHOOLS. 



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220 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPOllT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 
DAY SCHOOLS. 



223 



Sinnmari/ of attendance upon the several grades of public day schools for 
the year 1S97-1898. 



Whole number of 
different pupils. 



Boys. 









«t»« 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Partiallj? graded 
Ungraded 

Totals, 1898 . . 

Totals, 1897.. 



171 


240 


. 378 


613 


668 


1,104 


617 


585 


1,031 


1,422 


1,301 


1,772 


35 


36 


61 


.54 
2,913 


60 
2,890 


79 
4,425 


2,799 


2,702 


4,213 



358 

1,025 

957 

1,609 

66 

65 

4,070 

3,826 



94.7 
92.8 
92.8 
90.8 
91.8 
83.3 
92.0 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Summary of attendance upon the several grades of public evening schools for 
the year 1S97-1S98. ' 



Schools. 


Whole number of 
different pupils. 


si 

li 

< 


1 

< 


It 

«83 




Boys. 


Girls. 




■City Hall 


126 


97 


80 
84 
35 
20 
13 


. 66 
74 
28 
17 
10 


82 6 


Franklin street ... 


94 5 


Main Street . . 


50 

38 
26 


80 






85 


Drawing schools 




76.9 








Totals 1898 


240 
237 


97 
153 


232 
201 


195 
177 


84 


Totals, 1897 









Evening School Teachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal at Citj^ hall, for boys. 
Assistants— A. W. Ro^Yell, W. W. Forbes, E. R. Wood, and L. H. Car- 
penter. 

Honorie J. Crough, principal of Franklin-street school, for girls. 
Assistants — Maggie Linen, Mary E. Paige, and Mathel C. Henr3\ 



224 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Arthur W. Morgan, principal of Main-street school, for both sexes. 
Assistants — William J. Mooar and Julius Ilegewald. 

Evening Drawing-School Teachers. 
John M. Kendall and Henry W. Allen. 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 



Sept., '97. 



Feb., 



June, 



Sub-teachers. 
Florence L. Abbott. Ja 
Lillian F. Crowther. 
Winnifred W. Hall. 
Florence Richardson-. 
Gertrude Adams. 
Annie B. Angell. 
Mary E. McLaren. 
Grace A. Phillips. 
Ede B. Quimby. " " 

Flora M. Walker. 
Elizabeth F. Walsh. 

GENERAL SUMMARY. 

The folloioing table presents the main features of interest pertaining to the 
attendance upon the public schools for the last ten years. A similar report 
for twenty years may be found in report for 1896. 



Sub-teachers. 
Florence H. iMooar. 
Ethel A. Nicholson. 
Sarah Price. 
Annie E. Walsh. 
Mathel C. Henry, 
Mae L. Lovejoy. 
Kathryn IMcKeon. 
Florence M. Ward. 



Years. 


1 

d 

"A 


2 

1 


•sl 


o 
.a 

1 


.•3 
t3 


"a 


= c 

be 


i 

60 

li 


" so 


91 


ed from high 

No. belong'g 
school. 








y 












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It 




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< 


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< 


< 


^ 


< 


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Oi 


M 


j< 


1889 


77 


76 


3,787 


2,801 ' 2,581 


92.2 


,77 


101 


96 


73 


6S 


181 


1890 


77 


76 


3,814 


2,795 ! 2,536 


90.7 


141 


121 


114 


83 


33 


184 


1891 


84 


83 


4,071 


2,940 2,689 


91.5 


166 


120 


101 


69 


26 


317 




89 


89 


4,298 
4,775 
4,975 


3,130 5.837 


90.6 


174 


116 


103 


67 


4^ 


??.A 


1893 


96t 
101 




3,425 


3,111 
3,336 


90.8 


194 


129 


127 


78 


41 


?S7 


1894 


107 


3,662 


91.1 


153 


175 


162 


112 


63 


261 


1895 






5,206 
5,382 
5,501 


3,817 


3 4f»0 


91.7 


238 


168 


156 


112 


40 


?4.S 


189G 


108 


115 


3,999 3,'i51 
4,213 3,826 


91.3 


140 


138 


130 


119 


4» 


270 


1897 


114 


121 


90.8 


177 


215 


212 


157 


62 


290 


1898 


121 


128 


5,802 


! 
4 405 i n7n 


02.0 


195 


200 


191 




61 


378 






■ 





•Including special teachers, principals, assistants, etc. 
t And the A clusa In suburban soliools. 

X Also a manual training school tor one term, wliicli is included in the number of 
schools the next live years. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



225 



VI.— WORK OF TRUANT OFFICER. 



Absentees 

reported 

from 






No. volun- 
tarily re- 
turned to 



No. reported 

caused to 

attend 



5 



II 






September. 
October . . . . 
November . 
December . 
January . . . 
February . . 

Marcb 

April 

May 

June 

Totals. . 



71 


16 


18 


6 


46 


8 


103 


76 


11 


7 


76 


53 


97 


47 


9 


7 


62 


39 


21 


17 






IS 


13 


99 


44 


9 


10 


40 


22 


97 


59 


22 


7 


47 


34 


97 


27 


10 


17 


69 


10 


86 


39 


7 


6 


57 


32 


108 


60 


23 


10 


53 


38 


80 


34 


12 


43 


8 


16 


859 


419 


121 


113 


471 


255 



No. truants 

caused to 

attend 



5 



o-o 
. « 



CttP, 



sl 



September 
October. .. 

November 
December 
January. . . 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Totals 



15 


5 


35 


24 


19 


18 


9 


5 


34 


21 


18 


11 


14 


9 


48 


27 


20 


17 


12 


5 


224 


142 



40 
203 
173 
147 

247 



250 
190 

1,771 



197 
224 
127 
34C 
200 
197 
197 



2T 
343 



15 



226 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

VII.— Finances.— 1897. 



Items of Account. 


Resources from 
appropriations 
and transfers. 


Expenditures. 


Salaries of teachers 


872,943.02 
34.25 
6,328.98 
1,516.31 
4,444 58 
6,483.77 
7,948.95 

302.77 
2,226.03 
1,169.90 

360.06 
1,091.85 


872,943.02 
34.25 






6,328.98 




1,516.31 




4,444 58 




6,463.77 


Fuel 


7,948.95 


Printing and aclvBrtising 


302.77 


Contingent expenses .... 


2,226.0? 






Evening drawing schools 


360 06 


Manual training 


1 091 85 






Totals 


8104,850.47 


8104,660.47 





COST OF CITY SCHOOLS. 

Expenditures, as above specified $1*04,850.47 

Salaries. 



Members of the school board. 

Clerk of the board 

Superintendent of schools... 
Truant oflicer 



$190.00 
150.00 

2,300.00 
750.00 



Total $108,240.47 

Receipts on Accoxint of Sclwols. 

Literary fund $3,490.80 

Non-resident tuition* 722.44 

Sale of text-book.s 178.23 



4,397.47 

Net taxation for schools $103,843.00 

Net amount raised by taxation for schools $103,843.00 

The city valuation for 1898 is $30,988,488, and hence the rate of school 
tax for the year is $103,843 divided by $30,988,488, or .0034+. Last 
year the rate was .0035. 



School tax from Londonderry included, 854.24. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 227 

VIll. -School Year, 1897-1898. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 13, 1897; closed De- 
cember 17. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened January 3, 1898; closed March 
25, 1898. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 11, 1898; closed June 24, 
1898. Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above by the school 
board, 185. 

Average number of days the schools were taught, 175. 

(Being closed several holidays, days of "Teachers Institutes," and 
half -days on account of bad weather or insufficient heat.) 



IX.— High School Graduation. 

PKOQRAM. 

Salutatory. "Through Trials to Triumph." Halsey M. Borthwick 

Chorus. "When the Eosy Morn" Easydenham 

Class History Florence Mabel Francis 

Class Poem. "A Song of June Mary Louise Cheney 

Chorus. "The Lawn Party" Chas. Lecocq 

The Class. 

Oration. "The Future of the Anglo-Saxons." Lynn B. Hammond 

Piano Solo. "Soirees de Vienne" Fr. Liszt 

Clara Belle Couch, Class Pianiste. 

Prophecy Grace Lydia Morrison 

"The Toy Symphony" Joseph Hayden 

(a) Allegro. , (1732-1809) 

(6) Menuetto. 

(c) Finale. 

The Class. 

Valedictory. "Woman's Opportunities." Minnie Alice Stevens 

Award of Diplomas Hon. William C. Clarke 

The Ode. 



The Class of '98. 

ENGLISH COURSE, THREE YEARS. 

Bertha Ainsworth Allen. Everett Perry Gleason. 

Franklin Edward Campbell. Lynn B. Hammond, 

Byron Chandler. Harry Sherman Holbrook. 

Ida May Crowther. Hattie Livonia Hutchinson. 

Evangeline Dorion. Martha Jane Kennedy. 

Ferdinand B. Edgerly. Ethel May Rundlett. 
Clara Menona Wallace. 



228 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ENGLISH COURSE, FOtHR YEAKS. 

Elfleda Lillian Lamb. Harry Wadsworth Spaulding. 

Florence Josephine Walsh. 

CLASSICAX COURSE. 

Walter S. Abbott. Clara May Gove. 

Arthur Dean Benton. G. Irving Haselton. 

Arthur M. Brown. Eobert Douglas Hazen. 

Edgar Simons Carbee. Frank Dudley Heath. 

Mary Louise Cheney. Alfred Stanley Hoyt. 

Clara Belle Couch. Lewis Bertram James. 

Amy Eldora Davison. Edith Bryant Johnston. 

Marguerite Drew. Linda Hunter Mooar. 

Mabelle Florence Flint. Grace Lydia JNIorrison. 

Florence Mabel Francis, Florence Reynolds Norton. 

Bertha Viola Franks. . Gertrude Mae Porter. 

Leonora Estella Gilmore. Minnie Alice Stevens. 
Bessie Carroll White. 

COLLEGE COURSE. 

Halsey M. Borthwick. Helen Florence Dearborn. 

Edith Amelia Murphy. 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Albert Goodman. Minnie Jane Libbey. 

TWO years' CERTIFICATE. 

James Harvey Darrah. John Howe Colby. 

F. Eugene Burbank. • Albert M. Tuson. 

Henry Selden Whitney. 

HONOR SCHOLARS. 

English Course Elfleda Lillian Lamb 

Classical Course Minnie Alice Stevens 

College Course Halsey M. Borthwick 



X.— Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, FEHHUARY 3, 1898. 



First prize, $17, Miss Mollie G. A. Murphy. 
Second prize, $13, Miss Anna E. Martin. 
Third prize, $10, Byron O. Smith. 
Fourth prize, $8, Miss Lizzie E. DcMoulpiod. 
Fifth prize, $6, Arthur lloyal Burns. 
Sixth prize, $4, Clinton Howard Cheney. 
Seventh prize, $2, Miss Amy Nora Willey. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 229 

XI.— Organization, 1898-1899. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 

GEORGE B. ROGERS, '98; HARRY T. LORD, '99, 

President of Common Council, ex officio. 



Ward 1. 


Elliott C. Lambert. 




Walter B. Heath. 


Ward 2. 


Charles H. Manning. 




Augustus P. Home, '98. 




Elmer W. Nutting, '99. 


Ward 3. 


George D. Towne. 




Louis E. Phelps. 


Ward 4. 


Nathaniel L. Colby. 




Henry D. Soule. 


Ward 5. 


John T. Kelley. 




James P. Slattery, '98. 




Daniel J. INk-Auliffe, '99. 


Ward 6. 


Henry I. Haselton, '98. 




Herbert E. Richardson^ 




Eugene B. Dunbar, '99. 




Harry L. Davis, '99. 


Ward 7. 


Edward B. Woodbury, 




Edson S. Heath. 


Ward 8. 


Ned T. Wallace. 




Luther C. Baldwin, '98. 




Frank A. Cadwell, '99. 


Ward 9. 


R. Emmet Walsh. 




Henry I. Lemay, '98. 




Joseph A. Boivin, '99. 



VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

GEORGE D. TOWNE. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

EDWARD B. WOODBURY. 

rPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 
superintendent's clerk. 
FANNIE L. SANBORN. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

CURTIS W. DAVIS. 



230 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

1899. 

Finance. Mayor Clarke and Messrs. Lord, Woodbury, Wallace, and 
Nutting. 

Salaries. Messrs. Woodburj^ W. B. Heath, and Davis. 

Text-Books. Messrs. Towne, Lambert, and Phelps. 

Music. Messrs. Walsh, Phelps, and W, B. Heath. 

Drawing. Messrs. Towne, Nutting, and Wallace. 

Manual Training. Messrs. Phelps, Kelley, and Towne. 

Ewaminaiion of Teachers. Messrs. Colby, Lambert, and Woodbury. 

Fuel and Heating. Mr. Soule, Mayor Clarke, Messrs. Lord, Mannings 
and Boivin. 

Repairs. Messrs. Manning, Phelps, and Cadwell. 

Attendance. Messrs. E. S. Heath, Lambert, and McAulifle.' 

Health. Messrs. Dunbar, Boivin, and Towne. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. Messrs. Manning, Towne, Phelps, Lambert, Walsh, and 
Soule. 

Franklin-street. Messrs. Woodbury, Lambert, and Davis. 

Spring-street. Messrs. W. B. Heath, Boivin, and Nutting. 

Lincoln-street and Youngsville. Messrs. Colby, Cadwell, and Soule. 

Ash-street and Webster's Mills. Messrs. Phelps, McAuliffe, and Cad- 
well. 

Webster-street and Stark. Messrs. Towne, Manning, and Kelley. 

Bakersville and Mosquito Pond. Messrs. Kelley, Davis, and W. B» 
Heath. 

Yamey. Messrs. Wallace, Kelley, and E. S. Heath. 

Hallsville and Harvey. Messrs. Walsh, Dunbar, and Colby. 

Rimmon and Amoskeag. Messrs. Boivin, E. S. Heath, and Colby. 

Training School. Messrs. Lambert, Walsh, and Woodbury. 

Main-street. Messrs. Dunbar, Nutting, and Lambert. 

Parker. Messrs. Cadwell, Woodbury, and McAuliffe. 

Lowell-street. Messrs. McAuliffe, Soule, and Towne. 

Pearl-street. Messrs. Nutting, I'helps, and Dunbar. 

Wilson and Goffe's Falls. Messrs. Davis, Dunbar, and Wallace. 

Straw. Messrs. E. S. Heath, Wallace, and Manning. 

Evening Schools. Messrs. Soule, W. B. Heath, and Boivin. 



XII.— List Of Teachers, 1899. 



HIGH SCHOOI.. — HE.ECII STIIKET. 



Master. Albert Somes. 
Sub-Master. Ceoi-ge I. Hopkins. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 231 

Assistants. Harry N. McLaren. 
Hiram A. Stearns. 
Nellie Pickering. 
Florence M. Locke. 
Theresa B. Stanton. 
Mary J. Wellington. 
Sara Hunt. 

Annie W. Colby. i 

Mary H. Dowd. 
Helen S. Smith. 

FRANKLIN-STEEET SCHOOL. 

Master. Isaac Huse, Jr., Grammar grades. 
Master's Assistant. Alice C. Taggart. 
Assistants. Carrie E. Hoit. 

Carrie E. Head. 

Nellie C. Parker. 
Higher Middle. Alice M. Lamprey. 
Lower Middle. Amy K. Northmp. 
Higher Primary. Flora M. Walker. 
Lower Primary. Susie L. Dodge. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Master. Fred L. V. Spaulding, Grammar grades. 
Master's Assistant. (Vacancy.) 
Assistants. Belle R. Daniels. 

Mabel J. Brickett. 

Mary F. Barnes. 
Higher Middle. Etta L. Steams. ' 

Lower Middle. Bessie E. Dodge. 
Higher Primary. Theodora Richardson. 
Lower Primary. Hulda C. Graupner, 

ASH-STREET SCHOOL. 

Master. Charles W. Bickford, Grammar grades. 
Master's Assistant. Mabel Ruth Brown. 
Assistants. Amelia L. Graupner. 

Emma L. McLaren. 

Ellen E. Connor. 
Higher Middle. Emma J. Cooper. 
Lower Middle. Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primarj% May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOL. 

Master. John Gault, Grammar grades. 
Master's Assistant. Helen E. Frost. 



232 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Assistants. Luna A. Whitloek. 

Alta C. Willand. 

Eva F. Tuson. 
Higher Middle. Edith L. Hammond. 
Lower Middle. Jean Gillan. 
Higher Primary. Mary E. Murphy. 
Lower Primary. Ora E. Goodwin. 

VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Master. George Winch, Grammar grades. 
Master's Assistant. Rosabelle M. Franklin. 
Assistants. Esther M. Dickey. 

Ellen E. McKean. 

Millie S. Morse. 
Higher ]\Iiddle. Mary J. Walsh. 
Lower Middle. Marcia M. Moore. 
Higher Primar3^ Gertrude Adams. 
Lower Primary. Effie M. Philbrook. 

HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Master. William H. Huse, Grammar grades. 
Master's Assistant. Ella F. Barker. 
Assistants. Olive A. Eowe. 

Katie E. Batchelder. 
Higher Middle. Susie G. Woodman. 
Lower Middle. Mary L. Ayer. 
Higher Primary. Bertha L. Kemp. 
Lower Primary. E. Alfreda Hall. 
Lower Primary. Annie R. Corson. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns, Grammar grades. 
Assistant. Lelia A. Brooks. 
Mixed Middle. Cora M. Farmer. 
Higher Primary. Augusta S. Downs. 
Mixed Primary. S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. Mary L. Heath. 

RIMMON SCHOOL. 

Principal. Louis H. Bailey, Grammar grades. 
Assistant. Lillian F. Crowther. 
Mixed Middle. Mary A. Seavoy. 
Higher I'rimary. Hattie S. Tuttle. 
Lower Primary. Blanche E. Ilicken. 

WILSON SCHOOL. 

Principal. Barbara B. Joj^ Grammar grades. 
Assistant. Hellen Morison. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 233 

Higher IMiddle. Cora B. Gilford. 
Lower Middle. Harriet H. Richardson. 
Hig-her Primary. !M. Clara Hawks. 
Lower Primary. Florence L. Abbott. 
Lower Primary. Bessie A. Cochran. 

STRAW SCHOOL. 

Principal. Lizzie P. Gove, Grammar grade. 
Higher Middle. Gertrude H. Brooks. 
Lower Middle. Lettie M. Smith. 
Higher Primary. Nellie ^M. James. 
Lower Primary-. Edith M. Stebbins. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Principal. Caroline E. Wing. 
Head Assistant. Grace A. Phillips. 

The principal is also assisted by the sub-teachers, i. e., members of 
the training class. The school embraces the first four years of school 
work, in the following grades: Lower Primary, Higher Primary, and 
Lower Middle. There are four rooms, two of lower-primary grade. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Annabel Emerson, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. Nellie I. Sanderson. 
Mixed Primary. Lura B. Gage. 
Lower Primary. Lizabell Savorj'. 
Lower Primary. Florence Richardson. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary W. Mitchell, Higher ISIiddle. 

Lower Middle. Mary A. Clement. 

Lower Middle. Lottie IM. Clement. 

Higher Primary. M. jNIinnie Sturtevant. 

Higher Primary-. Hattie O. AYilland. 

Lower Primarj*. Kate T. Clarke. i 

Lower Primary. Mabel F. Robinson. 

PEARL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary G. T3'nan, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. Nellie M. Smith. 
Higher Primary. Ella Hope. 
Lower Primarj-. Georgia !^L Cheney. 

PARKER SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary E. Moulton, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. Lois M. Magoon. 



234 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Higher Primar3\ Delle E. Haines. 
Lower Primary. Blanche M. Folsom. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Helen M. Morrill, Higher Primary. 
Lower Primary. Mary S. Kichardson. 
Lower Primary. Katharine A. Frain. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. Mary A. Buzzell, Grammar and ]Middle. 

Middle and Primary. Clydie M. Flanders. 

LoAver Primar3\ Marion F. Partridge. 

Goffe's Falls. Percy N. Folsom, Grammar and Middle. 

Mixed Primary. Maud ]M. Greaney. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

Stark. Inez M. Warren. 
Harvey. Emma J. Ela. 
Youngsville. Lura K. Kimpton. 
Webster's Mills. Josephine L. Riddle. 
Mosquito Pond. Nellie M. Atwood. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. Fred B. Bower. 
Assistant. Jenny C. Heath. 
Drawing. J. AVarren Thyng. 
Manual Training. Fred E. Browne. 

JANITORS. 

High School. 

Charles F. Jack. Engineer, David T. Robinson. 

Franlclin-strect and Training Schools. 

Vamiim H. Hill. 

Lincoln -St tret School. 

William Stevens. 

Ash-street and Pcarl-strect Schools. 

John S. Avery. 

Weister-strcet and Straw Schools. 

William J. Powers. 

Yarnvii and Parker Schools. 

Robert Cook. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 235 

HalUville School. 

William H. Newry. 

BaJcersville School. 

Edwin N. Baker. 

Ri7nmo)i and Main-street Schools. 

WilUam F. Conner. 

Wilson School. 

J. S. Washburn. 

Spring-street and Lowell-street ScJwols. 

S. H. Batchelder. 

AmosTceag School. 

Frank D. Hanscom. 



XIII.— School Year, 1898-1899. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 12, 1898; closed De- 
cember 16, 1898. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 2, 1899; closes March 24, 
1899. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 10, 1899; closes June 23, 1899. 
Vacation of eleven weeks. 



EEPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRAIiT. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY 
LIBRARY, 



To tlw City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

The Trustees of the Citj^ Library herewith respectfully present their 
forty -fifth annual report of the affairs of the library, and with the same 
the report made to them by the treasui-er of the board, containing a 
statenaent of the sums received and the expenditures raade by him in 
behalf of the board from the funds under the control of the trustees; 
and also the report of the librarian made to the board, giving in detail 
the statistics of the operation of the library during the past year. 

The report of the treasurer shows that during the year the sum of 
twelve hundred and ten dollars and seventy-three cents has been ex- 
pended for the purchase of books, and the sum of one hundred and 
seventy-six dollars and ninety-six cents for the purchase of periodicals, 
a total expenditure for both these purposes of thirteen hundred and 
eighty-seven dollars and sixty-nine cents. Of the amount expended 
for the purchase of books, the sum of two hundred and thirty-two dol- 
lars and seventy-nine cents was taken from the income of the Dean 
fund and used for the purchase of books for that department of the 
library. Exclusive of the amount taken from the Dean fund the sum 
expended for the purchase of books was nine hundred and seventy- 
seven dollars and ninety-four cents, leaving a balance in the hands of 
the treasurer at the close of the year, of the amount appropriated by 
the city councils for the purchase of books, of one thousand and thirty- 
five dollars and eighteen cents. 

The balances of the accumulated income at the close of the year, of 
the several funds under the control of the trustees were as follows: 

Dean fund $8,006.34 

Mary E. Elliot fund 1,407.88 

Eliza A, Eaton fund 590.15 

During the j-ear one hundred and twenty-one volumes were purchased 
from the income of the Dean fund, at a cost, as previously stated, of 
two hundred and thirty-two dollars and seventy-nine cents. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the past year have been 
four thousand and sixty-four dollars and fiftj'-two cents, included in 
which amoimt is the sum of seven hundred dollars and twenty cents, 
expended on account of re-classification of the books in the library and 

239 



240 ANNDAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

additions to the card catalogaie. The items that make up the amount 
of these incidental expenses will be found in detail in the annual report 
of the city, the bills for the same having- been, paid by the city treas- 
urer from the sum appropriated for the library upon their approval by 
the trustees. 

The librarian reports that the librarj'^ has been open for the delivery 
of books during- the past year, three hundred and six daj-s, during which 
time the number of books delivered for home use was eighty thousand 
four hundred and thirty-six, or an average of over two hundred and 
sixty-two per day. In addition to this number delivered for home 
use, nineteen thousand and thirtj^ books were delivered for use in the 
reading room, an average of about sixty-two per daj'. The total num- 
ber of books delivered during the year for both these purposes was 
ninety-nine thousand four hundred and sixty-six, an average of over 
three hundred and twenty-five per da3\ As compared with the previous 
year, the circulation for home use shows an increase of two thoiisand 
two hundred and ninety-five, and the number delivered for use in the 
reading-room an increase of two thousand two hundred and seventeen. 
The total circulation was four thousand fi^ve hundred and twelve greater 
than the j-ear preceding, and while the net gain is not so large as in the 
year 1897, the total circulation was the largest of any year since the 
library was established. 

The number of books withdrawn from circulation during the j'ear, 
on account of their worn and defaced condition, was eighty. None of 
these have as yet been rei^laced, but it is the intention of the trustees 
to replace the same as opportunity offers. 

Eight,y-six different periodicals have been regularly received at the 
library during the year, fifty-seven bj' purchase and twenty-nine by 
gift, and at the completion of the several volumes they have been bound 
and placed upon the shelves for general circulation. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the last report, 
including maps and pamphlets, was forty-one thousand seven hundred 
and twelve. During the year there have been added seven hundred and 
seventy -seven volumes by purchase, two hundred and sixty-one vol- 
umes by donation, and ninety-three volumes of periodicals have been 
bound, a total of eleven hundred and thirty-one. making the number 
of bound volumes in the library at the close of the year, forty-two 
thousand one hundred and twenty-five, and the total number, including 
sixteen maps and seven hundred and two ])aniplilc1s. forty-two thou- 
sand eight hundred and forty-three. 

The work of re-classifying and re-cataloguing the books of the 
library has been continued during the year, and the librarian reports 
the number of volumes re-cla.ssified as three thousand seven hundred 
and forty, and the number re-catalogued as three thousand six hun- 
dred and ninety-six. The libi-arian and her assistants arc now engaged 
in classifying aiul cataloguing the subjects of Social and Political Sti- 
cnce, and the iil)rjirian i-cports that when these subjccis arc finished 
only .\Ic(ii<-iiH- :iii<l liu- I'lil.lic Documents will rcnKiiu to he coniiilctcd. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 241 

During the year a new system of delivering- and charging- the books 
given out for circulation -was inaugurated, permitting t-wo books to be 
taken upon one card, provided only one of the same should be a work 
of fiction. Although the change at first was attended Avith some incon- 
venience to patrons of the library, the system is now in successful ope- 
ration and apparently satisfactory to the public. 

The trustees respectfullj' call the attention of the cit^- councils to the 
request contained in the report of the librarian for repairs upon the 
library building. These repairs are urgently needed, and for the pre- 
ser\-ation of the property should be made as soon as practicable. 

Following the report of the librarian will be found a list of the names 
of the persons who have made donations of books to the library during 
the year, with the number presented by each person. The trustees 
have caused due acknowledgment to be made in behalf of the city to 
all who have thus contributed to the increase of the librarj'. 

The trustees are not aware that any circumstance has occurred dur- 
ing the year to disturb the harmonious operation of the library. The 
librarian. Miss Florence E. Whitcher, has discharged the duties of her 
position with conscientious effort and fidelity, and to the satisfaction 
of the trustees. 

The trustees return their acknowledgments to the members of the 
citj-^ councils, and particularly to the committee on lands and buildings, 
for the courtesj' and consideration with A^hich their sug-gestions relat- 
ing to the librarj^ have been received. 

Maech 21, 1899. 
In board of trustees read and approved, and ordered to be signed by 
the chairman and clerk of the board, and transmitted to the city coun- 
cils. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 

Mayor. 

N. P. HVNT, 

Clerk. 



TEEASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library: 

The treasurer of the board submits the following- account of the re- 
ceipts and expenditures by the board of the funds received on account 
of the librarj^: 

1898. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropriation $930.06 

July 1. appropriation for books for 1898.... 1,000.00 

Dec. 20. Florence E. Whitcher, catalogues 

sold 16.80 

Florence E. Whitcher, books lost. . .. 9.13 

Florence E. Whitcher, balance of 

fines 234.09 

$2,190.08 

Jan. 1. To balance of income of Dean fund $7,731.07 

income of Dean fund (coupons) .... 90.00 

July 1. income of Dean fund (coupons) .... 90.00 

interest on accumulation of income 
to July 1, 1898, Manchester Savings 

Bank, Book No. 16445 95.58 

interest on accumulation of income 
to July 1, 1898, 'Manchester Savings 

■ Bank, Book No. 24442 146.58 

Oct. 1. income of Dean fund, Guai'anty Sav- 
ings Bank, Book No. 4078 73.50 

interest on accumulation of income 
to Oct. 1, 1898, Guaranty Savings 
Bank, Book No. 4557 12.40 

S.239.13 

Jan. 1. To Mary E. Elliot fund..^ $2,000.00 

balance of interest, Maiy E. Elliot 

fund 1,340.98 

Oct. 1. interest on Mary E. Elliot fund to 

Oct. 1, 1898, Guaranty Savings 

Bank, Book No. 2009 ' 70.00 

interest on accumulation of income 
to Oct. 1, 1898, Guaranty Savings 
Bank, Book No. 2010. 46.90 

;?.4.-)7.SS 

242 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 243 

Jan. 1. To Eliza A. Eaton fund $:3,000.00 

balance of interest, Eliza A. Eaton 

fund 468.77 

Oct. 1. interest on Eliza A. Eaton, fund to 

Oct. 1, 1898, Guaranty Savings 

Bank, Book No. 4327 105.00 

interest on accumulation of income 
to Oct. 1, 1898, Guaranty Savings 
^ Bank, Book No. 4328 16.38 



$3,590.15 



$17,477.24 
' 1898. Cr.. 

Jan. 21. Paid New England News Co., periodicals $10.94 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books 5.27 

Little, Brown & Co., books 3.50 

Publishers' Weekly, periodicals 8.00 

George H. Policy & Co., periodicals 6.00 

Feb. 3. New England News Co., periodicals 13.89 

21. Granite Monthly Co., books 2.50 

Boston Society Natural History, 

periodicals 4.00 

23. Boston Book Co., periodicals 5.00 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books 147.18 

Little, Brown & Co., books 4.25 

De Wolfe, Fiske & Co., books 13.34 

Mar. 2. New England News Co., periodicals 13.04 

5. W. B. Clarke & Co., books 58.95 

April 6. New England News Co., periodicals 11.22 

7. W. B. Clarke & Co., books 142.99 

9. W. B. Clarke & Co. (Dean fund), 

books 37.09 

21. Little, Brown & Co., books 11.00 

De Wolfe, Fiske & Co., books 39.27 

May 4. New England News Co., periodicals 15.12 

20. L. A. Morrison, books 3.00 

21. Little, Brown & Co., books 2.00 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books 2.06 

Publishers' Weekljr, periodicals. . . . 3.50 

23. Helman-Taylor Co., books 5.00 

June 3. New England News Co., periodicals 11.71 

21. D. Appleton & Co., books 5.00 

28. Library Bureau, books 2.00 

29. Little, Brown & Co., books 4.50 

July 6. New England News Co., periodicals 11.36 

13. Little, Brown & Co., books 1.50 

Aug. 4. New England News Co., periodicals 15.31 

20. W. B. Clarke & Co., books 225.82 



244 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Aug. 26. Paid Frank Frisselle, 1>ooks $0.50 

Sept. 6. Little, Brown & Co., books 4.25 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books 4.65 

13. New England News Co., periodicals 12.17 

Oct. 11. New England News Co., periodicals 10.26 

17. George C. Gilmore, books 1.00 

20. Little, Brown & Co., books 2.00 

21. Lawyers' Co-operative Publishing 

Co., books •. . 5.00 

29. Sampson, Murdock & Co., books.. 2.00 

Nov. 11. New England News Co., periodicals 12.66 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books 10.34 

21. Boston Book Co., books 9.00 

Dec. 6. Little, Brown & Co., books 3.50 

10. New England News Co., periodicals 12.78 

13. Little, Brown & Co., books 1.50 

28. W. B. Clarke & Co., books 255.07 

W. B. Clarke & Co. (Dean fund), 

books 195.70 

$1,387.69 

Dec. 31. Paid balance of appropriation 1,035.18 

balance of Dean fund income 8,006.34 

balance of Elliot fund and interest 3,457.88 

balance of Eaton fund and interest 3,590.15 

$17,477.24 
The expenditures for incidental expenses of the library for the year 
ending December 31, 1898, the bills for which have been paid through 
the office of the city treasurer upon the approval of the committee on 
accounts of the board of trustees, the items of which may be found in 
the annual report of the city, are as follows: 

Services of librarian ' $808.34 

Services of assistants to librarian 1,025.40 

Fuel 416.90 

Gas 9.52 

Electricity 335.19 

Insurance 125.00 

Binding 119.15 

Kebinding 189.65 

Supplies 214.37 

Ke-classification and cataloguing 700.20 

I'rinting (trustees' report, etc.) 21.75 

Water 16.00 

Newspapers 6.00 

Incidentals 77.05 

$4,064.52 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 245 

RECAPITULATION. 

Balance December 31. 1897 $3,071.2S 

Appropriation for 1898 4.0OO.00 

$7,071.28 

Paid trustees for purchase of books $1,000.00 

Incidental expenses 4,064.52 

Balance of appropriation December 31, 1898 2,006.76 

$7,071.28 

Respectfully submitted. 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasura' of Trustees of City Library. 

December 31, 1898. 
We have examined the foregoing* report and find the same correctly 
cast and properlj^ vouched. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 
WALTER M. PARKER, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 

December 31, 1898. 
I certify that I have examined tJfie several items of receipts and ex- 
penditures embraced in the foregoing report of the treasurer of the 
trustees of the city library, and find the same correctly cast and prop- 
erly vouched. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRAKIAN'S EEPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Manchester City Library: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit the forty-fifth annual report of the 
city library: 

"Whole number of accessions December 31, 1897 41,712 

Added during the year 1898: 

By purchase 777 

By gift •. 261 

Periodicals bound 93 

1,131 

Whole number at present 42,843 

Including: 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets 702 

Bound volumes 42,125 

42,843 

Number of periodicals regularlj' received: 

By purchase 57 

By gift 29 

Number of days the library was open for reading and dis- 
tribution of books 306 

Number of volumes delivered for home use 80,436 

Average per day , 263 

Largest number any one day 594 

Largest number any one month 7,626 

Smallest number any one month 5,313 

Number of volumes delivered in the reading-room 19,030 

Average i)er day 62 

Total circulation for 1898 99,466 

Number of cards used on deposit 8 

Number of cards issued during the year 567 

Whole number issued since new registration 12,262 

Postals sent to delinquents 387 

Worn-out books removed from circulation 80 

Number of volumes lost or injured anil paid for 4 

Number of volumes repaired at bindery 922 

Number repaired and covered at the library 14,439 

Amount received from June 1 to December 31, 1897: 

For fines $143.66 

catalogues 6.20 

books lost and paid for 3.38 

$153.24 

i'4(; 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 247 

Amount received from January 1 to December 1, 1898: 

For fines $219.19 

catalogues 10.60 

books lost and paid for 5.75 

$235.54 

$388.78 
Amount paid for expressage and incidentals: 

From June 1 to December 31, 1897 $39.77 

January 1 to December 1, 1898 88.99 

$128.76 

Paid to X. P. Hunt, treasurer, December 20, 1898 $260.02 

The circulation for 1898 has been 80,436, an increase of 2,295 over that 
of 1897. This gain is not so large as that of the previous j^ear, but 
looking back for a few years an increase is seen for each j-ear. 

Tear. Circulation. Increase. 

1894 55,054 

1895 59,495 4,441 

1896 66,488 6,993 

1897 78,141 11,653 

1898 80,436 2,295 . 

Total increase since .1894 25,382 

During the year an account of the circulation of books in the differ- 
ent departments of the library has been kept, and the following statis- 
tics may be of interest as showing the proportionate use of the differ- 
ent classes: 

No. vols. Percent. 

Periodicals 2,989. 4 

Philosophj^ and Religion 780 1 

Biography 1,632 2 

History 2,489 3: 

Description and Travel 1,559 2 

Social and Political Science 664 1 

Useful Arts 2,234 3 

Fine Arts 597 1 

Literature 1,920 2 

Fiction 65,571 81 

The reading-room cii-culation continues to increase, and at times the 
accommodations of the room are taxed to the utmost. It seems as if 
the only remedy would be to provide a place for the children that we 
welcome so gladly. 

The new delivery system, allowing two books to be taken on one 
card, provided only one is a work of Fiction, seems now to be running 
smoothly. The large number of borrowers, who have already asked 
for the second book, would show that the time had come when such a 
privilege was needed. This change was naturallj^ attended by some 



248 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

delays and discomfort to those using the library, but every effort was 
made by the assistants to render the friction as slight as possible, and 
borrowers have seemed to appreciate the difficulties, and by their cheer- 
ful co-operation have made the change less trying for the attendantvS. 

The work of classifying and cataloguing the library is still going on. 
During the year 3,740 books have been classified and 3,696 catalogued. 
Philosophy, Religion, and Church History have been completed, and 
now the work of arranging the divisions of Social and Political Sci- 
ence is being carried on. When this is finished there will remain only 
Medicine and the Public Documents to be done. 

Only four books were unaccounted for at the annual examination of 
the library. All of these were in Fiction. One book was found that 
was unaccounted for at the examination in 1897. 

Eighty books were withdrawn from circulation during the year, hav- 
ing become so worn that they could neither be repaired nor rebound. 

The number of new books added to the library in 1898 has been 1,131, 
of which number 656 were purchased from the general fund, 121 from 
the Dean fund, 93 volumes of periodicals have been bound and placed 
on the shelves, and 261 books have been donated. 

There are some repairs on the building which are necessary, and it 
is hoped they will be made before long. The halls need attention to 
make them neat and attractive, as the paint is peeling off, and the plas- 
tering is badly broken. The need of new step ladders is even more 
pressing than last year, for many of those now in use are unsafe, and 
are gradually dropping to pieces in spite of constant repairing. The 
concrete walk, leading from the side door to Dean avenue, is very much 
broken, and is dangerous walking in icy weather. The roof still leaks 
a little, and should be attended to as soon as possible. One of the most 
urgent needs of the library is a room where the children and young 
people can be suitably accommodated. At times the reading-room is 
very much crowded, and neither the children nor the older people using 
the room can be comfortable. A room needs to be fitted up where the 
children's magazines can be placed on tables for their use, and tJie 
juvenile books arranged on shelves, so that the attendant who has 
charge of the room can issue them there, and thus relieve the work of 
those at the general delivery desk. The present reading-room is so 
small that an arrangement of this kind would add greatly to the com- 
fort of those who come there for reading or study, besides offering a 
place where the children may feel that they are welcome, and where the 
books so liberally provided for them may be more readily brought to 
their attention. The children's room has been very successful wherever 
one has been opened, and it is hojjcd tliat the time is not far distant 
when the children of Manchester will have this privilege otTcrcd for 

their pleasure and instruction. 

Respectfully submitted. 
FLORENCE E. WHITCHER. 

Librarian. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF TUE CITY LIBRARY. 249 

Donations to the Library. 

Book3. Pamphlets. 

Aguilar Free Library, New York City 1 

Alexander, D. S 1 

Amherst College 1 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massa- 

chiisetts 1 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Massachusetts.. 2 

Arlington Mills 1 

Ji. F. Sturtevant Co 1 * 

Baltimore, Md. — Enoch Pratt Free Library 1 

Bartlett, C. H 1 

F.igelow Free Public Library', Clinton, Mass 1 

Bingham, H 1 

Birmingham, Eng. — Free Libraries Committee 1 

Boston, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Brigham, H 1 

Brookline, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Brooklyn, N. Y". — Librarj^ 1 

Cambridge, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburg, Pa 1 

Carvelle, H. DeW 5 

Channing, W 3 

Chase, W. G 2 

Children's Aid Society, New \"ork 1 

Chicago, 111. — Public Library 1 

Civil Ser^'ice Eef orm Association 2 

Clarke, Arthur E 6 4 

Clarke, William C 1 

Concord, N. H. — Public Library 1 

" " Water Commissioners 6 

Cornell University 1 

Dartmouth College 2 

Detroit, Mich.— City Clerk 1 

" . " Public Library 1 

Dodge, J. E 1 

Dodge, T. H 1 

Dover, N. H. — Public Library 1 

Evanston, 111. — Free Public Library- 1 

Everett, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Pa 1 

Fall River, Mass. — Public Libraries 2 

Fitz Public Library, Chelsea, Mass 1 

Fletcher, G. R 1 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt 1 

Forbes Library, Northampton, Mass 1 

Free Religious Association 1 



250 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Friend .; 

Galling-er, J. H 2 

General Federation of Women's Clubs 1 

Gilmore, G. C 1 

Green, S. S 1 

IIar\'ard University 2 

Holt, D. G 1 

Indianapolis Monetary Convention 1 

Iowa Masonic Library 1 

Jersey Citj% N. J. — Free Public Library 1 

Jewish Foster Home and Orphan Asylum 1 

King, H. C 1 

Lake ^Mohonk Conference on International Arbitration 1 

Lawrence, Mass. — Free Public Library 1 

Library Company of Philadelphia 2 

Los Angeles, Cal. — Chamber of Commerce 1 

Lynn, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Maimonides Free Library, New York City 2 

Maiden, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Manchester, Eng. — Public Free Libraries 1 

Manchester, N. H. — Chief Engineer of Fire Department 1 

" " Engineer's Department 1 

Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass 1 

Morse Institute Library, Natick, Mass 1 

" " Public Library ;'. 

Minneapolis, Minn. — Park Commissioners 1 

Medford, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Milwaukee, Wis. — Public Library 1 

Melro.se, Ma.ss. — Public Library 1 

" " Street and Park Commission 1 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2 

Nashiia, N. H. — Public Library 1 

New Hampshire. — Insurance Commissioner 1 

State Board of Health 

" " State Normal School 1 

" " ^Voman^s Cliristian Tempera iicc 

Union I 

New Haven, Conn. — Free Public Library 1 

New York City. — Free Circulating Library 1 

" " Mercantile Library 2 

New "N'ork .State 1 

" " Commissioners of I'lslierics 1 

State Hotanist 1 

State Library, Albany i, ;{ 

Newark, N. J.— Free I'ublic Library 1 

Ni'wberry Library, Cliicago, 111 2 

Newton, Mass. — Free Li lira rv I 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY, 251 

Olmstead, D. H 1 

Palmer, Mrs. C. F 1 

Parsons, C. L 1 

Parsons, J. R., Miller, L., Steward, J. F 1 

Paterson, N. J. — Free Public Library 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md 

Pennsylvania Colleofe of Dental Surgery .j. . . 

Peoria, 111. — Public Library 

Perce, W. R... 1 

Perkins Institution and ^Massachusetts School for the 
Blind 

Philadelphia, Pa. — Free Library 

Porter, E. G 

Portland, Me. — Public Library 

Princeton University 

Providence, R. I. — Public Library 

Richards, L. S 

Robbins Library, Arlington, Mass 

Robinson, C, and S. T. D 1 

Rochester, N. H. — Public Library 

Rollins, Mrs. S. W 1 

Rowell, R 1 

Sadler, R 1 

St. Giles Public Library, London, Eng 

St. Louis, Mo. — Mercantile Librarj' 

" " Public Free Library 

Salem, Mass. — Public Library 

Scranton, Pa. — Public Library' 

Simms, J 1 

Society for the Promotion of Engineering Education . . 

Somerville, Mass. — Public Library 

Sound Currency Committee 1 

Southbridge, Mass. — Public Library 

Spofford, C. B 

Springfield, Mass. — City Library Association 

Syracuse, X. Y. — Central Library 

Tonge, T 

Towle Manufacturing Co 1 

United States. — Agricultural Department 15 

" Bureau of Education 1 

" Civil Service Commission 2 

" " Fish Commission 2 1 

" " Interior Department 4 31 

" " Labor Department 1 6 

" " Smithsonian Institution 6 4 

" " Superintendent of Documents 152 181 

Treasury Department 3 



252 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

United States. — War Department 14 

University of California 1 

University of Chicago 1 

University of Pennsylvania 1 

University of Tennessee 3 

UrugTiay 1 1 

Washington City Free Library 1 

Wells College 1 

Westborough, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Whitefield, N. H.— Public Library 2 

Whittier, J. H 2 

Wilmington, Del. — Institute Free Library 2 

Wobum, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Worcester, Mass. — Free Public Library 1 



Periodicals Presented. 

Le Bulletin. 

Bulletin of Bibliography. 

Case and Comment. 

Catalogue of United States Public Documents. 

Derry Times. 

Father Matthevp Herald. 

Guidon. 

Holy Cross Purple. 

Home Market Bulletin. 

L. A. W. Bulletin and Good Roads. 

Manchester. — Advertiser. 

Echo (High School). 

" Emerald. 

" Union. 

Weekly Budget. 
Manifesto. 

Monthly Bulletin Bureau of American Republics. 
New Earth. 
New Philosophy. 

Official Gazette of United States Patent Office. 
Plymouth Record. 
Tablet. 
Temple. 

Tennessee University Magazine. 
Travelers' Record. 



EEPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



EEPOET OF BOAED OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor: 
The Board of Health submits the following report for the year 1898: 
AV. K. Robbiiis was appointed to succeed himself as a member, and 

the board organized by electing J. C. Bickford president, and W. K. 

Ivobbins, clerk. 

EXPENDITUKES. 

Salaries $550.00 

Labor 2,711.70 

Office furniture 25.55 

Printing, advertising, and postage 192.23 

Traveling expenses (teams and carfare) 112.29 

Express 4.80 

Telephone service 36.40 

Gas 5.60 

Legal expenses 3.20 

24 samples water analyzed 20.00 

Antitoxine 32.50 

Laboratory 149.21 

Diphtheria examinations 52.50 

Disinfectants 252.78 

Aid given families quarantined 305.60 

Board, fuel, etc., for pest-house 64.36 

Sundries 37.40 

$4,555.12 

Most of the ordinary expenses have been lower this year than last. 
The increase which overbalances this comes from the item of labor and 
aid given to quarantined families. The labor amounts to almost ex- 
actly what we had expected when two health inspectors are employed 
contiivuoiisly. The hard times have placed many people in circum- 
stances such that their income is barelj^ sufficient for dailj"^ support, 
and quarantine caused immediate need for aid. Two hundred and 
ninety-one cases of scarlet fever, diphtheria, and membranous croup 
were quarantined during the year, being a larger number than for 
several years past, hence the large expenditure in aid of these families. 

The other item of unusual expense was the fitting up of a bacteri- 
ological laboratory at a cost of $149.21, a lower figure than we had 
anticipated for the excellent outfit which was secured, so that in total 
we did not expend the whole amount of the appropriation, and $209.34 
was turned over to the reserve fund. 

255 



256 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



MEETINGS. 

The regular weekly meetings have been continued, being held on 
Tuesday evenings at seven o'clock. Since the public have become more 
accustomed to this, almost the entire business is transacted at these 
meetings, leaving fewer special meetings than ever. The total num- 
ber of meetings for the jear was fifty-one. The number of trips of 
inpection also grows less as we approach the completion of forcing out 
the privy vaults, amounting this year to eight. 

INSPECTORS. 

The same employees, C. O. Seaman, plumbing, J. F. Looney and W. 
B. Blake, general health inspectors, and Miss M. Alma Fracker, oflfice 
clerk, have been retained as last year. All having become thoroughly 
familiar with their duties, the work is carried on without friction, 
and in a very efficient manner. 

A card index of the records and all other information pertaining to 
the oflfice was begun last year, and has progressed so well that only a 
comparatively small portion of the work remains to be completed. 
This has not cost the city anything but the cards and cases to hold 
thein, as Miss Fracker, the clerk, has done the work in connection with 
the routine work of the office. The convenience and usefulness of this 
index exceeds our fondest expectations. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 

In accordance with the plans held Avhen the appropriations for the 
year were made, a small room has been fitted up in the office, with an 
incubator with automatic gas regulator, a microscope of high magni- 
fying power, and the usual accessories in the way of stains, mounting 
mediums, s-lides, etc., for making bacteriological examinations for 
diphtheria, tuberculosis, glanders, venereal diseases, etc. 

The culture media for growing the organisms can now be bought 
ready prepared, though a large part, and that producing the finest 
growths, has been prepared by W. K. Eobbins of the board. The 
sterile swabs for taking the ciiltures are funiished the physicians, with 
full directions for obtaining the growths from the patient. The swab 
is then returned to this office. A ciilture tube is at once inoculated 
and ])]aced in the incubator. After twelve hours the growth i» ready 
for microscopic examination. Thus the i-esults of cultures brought in 
before Tj v. m. may bo known by nine o'clock the following morning. 
Where so much can be done by the regular help in the oflRce, it is found 
best not to employ a bacteriologist regularly, but as there are several 
physicians in the city who are familiar with the work, one is called in 
when a microscopical examination is to be made. Some of the advan- 
tages of doing the work in this manner are that we get the work done 
much cheajjcr, and obtain the results much earlier than woiild be 
possible if we were compelled to send to out-of-town parties. The 
whole ■exix'tise is l)oriu' by the hoard of health, and pliysicians are 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 257 

invited to t«ke cultures from all diplitlu-ritic j>atieiit.s, especially before 
discharging them as recovered. 

We have only a part of a year's observation upon this work, and 
alreadj' quite a number of suspected cases have proved to be diseases 
other than diphtheria, and the families spaied the expense and incon- 
venience of quarantine. When physicians become accustomed to the 
advantages thus at hand, and more fully avail themselves of them, we 
shall be able to render the ]niblie great service, both in the way of pro- 
tection against the disease and in avoiding unnecessary quarantine. 

ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

We would again earnestly invite your attention to the immediate 
need of an isolation hospital. We are more impressed every year with 
the fact that the city contains a very large number of people who are 
practically homeless. — people who live at boarding-houses, or who earn 
their living at domestic service. They are comfortable in health, but 
when overtaken by sickness they have no place to go, and can demand 
of no one the attention they need. With ordinary sickness they can 
go to one of the several hospitals in the city, but when sick with a 
contagious disease, the hospitals Avill not take them on any condition, 
and being a menace to public health it devolves upon the board of 
health to jjrovide for them. The only shelter we can oflfer is the old 
pest house, located in Derryfield park, which Avas hastily erected many 
years ago as a refuge for smallpox patients. It is not properly lo- 
cated nor suitably constructed, and is very much out of repair. It 
costs the city about $400 per year to care for it, with extra expense 
when used. What we think the city actually needs, and needs now, 
is a small and inexiDcnsive building, fairly- centrally located in the city, 
and so constructed as to make a safe and suitable place of refuge for 
persons sick with dii^htheria and scarlet fever, each in entirely sep- 
arate quarters, with conveniences for proper care and nursing. We 
believe such a structure, including the laud, can be provided for about 
eight thousand dollars, and through 30U, we request of the city govern- 
ment that such a sum be appropriated and set apart for such purpose. 

GARBAGE AND KEFUSE. 

We are able to state that the compact part of the city is now free 
from newly made, offensive rubbish heaps, known as the city dumps. 
This results from a decree of the supreme court of Jime 20, 1898, en- 
joining the street and park couDuission from building them anywhere 
inside the special sanitary limits, but they are not entirely eradicated, 
nor have they ceased to endanger the city, since at least two cases of 
diphtheria have been claimed to originate from a dump just outside 
the limits. There remains still the same need for sj'stematic collection 
and sanitarj- disposal of the city wastes as in former years, and we 
would still urge upon tlje city councils the need of some means of burn- 
ing this refuse. We do not feel that a large plant for buiniug every- 



258 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

thing, inc-lncling wet swill, is at i)resent needed, but rather one that 
will take care of the general, perishable rubbish, including but a small 
portion of swill, and so designed that increase of capacity may be 
added when a systematic trial has demonstrated just the amount that 
it is necessary to burn. Since swill is an article of commerce to some 
extent, it would not all be burned, even though we had a crematory 
of ample capacity, because the neighboring farmers find it a proiitable 
feed for swine, and if collected while fresh and cooked before feeding, 
it is a sanitarj^ disposal of the material and probablj'^ not dangerous to 
public health. 

Seeing then that this method of disposal will remain whether a cre- 
matory is erected or not, there will also remain the necessity of estab- 
lishing some regulations concerning its collection. We would there- 
fore renew our request, in which we were joined by the street and 
park commissioners, that the city government j)rovide for the licens- 
ing of private swill gatherers, and j)rescribe reasonable regulations 
for the conduct of their business, just as we now license vault cleaners 
and regulate the conduct of that business. 

CITY WATER SUPPLY. 

As in j)revious years, an inspector has been on. duty at Lake ^Massa- 
besic some portion of every day during the summer season, when peo- 
ple go there in considerable numbers, and everything has been done 
within the authority of this board to protect the purity of the water. 
The principal source of danger is the locality about the front pond, 
located in the town of Auburn, where only advisory action is avail- 
able. Here are located a number of public houses, saloons, and refresh- 
ment stands, some quite on the waters edg-e; others are very near. 
While their general manageinent is such that legal action would not 
probably hold, j^et there is so much of filth of vai-ious kinds about the 
places that no person of ordinarily cleanlj'- habits would think of 
drinking the wat^er of the lake which might be dijiped up in that 
vicinity. Then there is a large boat, the "Winnie L," which has a privy 
so arranged that all droppings go directly into the water; repeated 
protests from the inspectors have not availed to have this discontin- 
tu'd or changed to a dry closet so that the contents might be deposited 
well back from the shore. A considerable ])ortion of the seavson par- 
ties have lived alioard this boat, and no evidence has ever been found 
that any of the waste incidental to such living has been disposed of 
on .shore, while there is every reason to believe th;\t it all went into the 
lake. In connection witli tlic running oT tins Itoat. a hotel has been 
erected at Mountain (irovc to acconnnodalc a hiri^c number of guests. 
No .sanitary system lias l-ccn ('slal)lisiic(l. inul the di-ainai^f must go 
directly into a brooldct wliidi jiasscs almost iindrr tlic i-car of the 
building and (Mnptics into tlie lake which is but a short distiince away. 
JJatiiing in the lalve is still practiced in the front pond, and it seems 
quite impossible to pnnisii the ])artics for doing so, owing to the tech- 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 259 

nicalities of procedure necessary to secure action by the Auburn 
authorities. A favorite ruse is to put on bathing- trunks and go out 
ostensibly for a row in some sort of boat, then manage to be upset 
into the water for a swim. If caug-ht the claim is made that it was 
accidental. The board of health of Auburn has the same regulations 
which we have, and we have reason to believe that they are in full 
sympathy with our efforts to maintain the purity of the water. In 
view of these facts and conditions it is evident that the only safe sani- 
tary control of the lake and its surroundings lies in the passage of 
specific laws by the legislature, putting full authority of enforcement 
in the hands of the community using the water. 

THE PLITMBING RULES. 

These regulations for house drainage, enforced by a skillful plumber 
as inspector, are giving such good results, and meeting with such gen- 
eral approval, that we begin to wonder how Ave ever got along without 
them. Besides this many of our citizens are beginning to realize how 
beneficial it is to have the privilege, without money and without price, 
of consulting wdth a disinterested and practical plumber before pro- 
ceeding to install or rearrange a system of house drainage. 

It is still sometimes necessary to permit the setting of closets out 
of doors, or in cellars, but the number of such grows ^rapidly less, as 
non-freezing closets are being perfected. 

VACANT TENEMENTS. 

During the year a large number of tenements have been vacant, and 
several cases of diphtheria and tj^phoid fever have occurred where fam- 
ilies had recently moved into a jDreviously idle tenement. Investiga- 
tion disclosed the fact that the water had evaporated from the traps 
in sinks, water-closets, etc., and the rooms had been saturated with 
sewer gas for weeks while unoccupied. Since noticing this the ex- 
planation is easy why vacant houses so soon acquire a disagreeable 
odor. The remedy is very simple and cheap. When a tenement or 
house is to stand any considerable length of time without use of the 
plumbing fixtures, the water should be drawn from all traps and fluid 
oil poured in to make the seal. It will stay indefinitely, and be easily 
washed out when fixtures are again used. 



260 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. 1. 





Membra- 
nous 
croup. 


Diph- 
theria. 


?e?4°i^ Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Vario- 
loid. 


Total. 


MONTHS. 


o 


00 

.a 
1 


O 


1 


o 


Deaths. 
Cases. 


1 




1 


5 


2 
1 


1 


1 
1 


January 






15 

9 


4 


2 
8 

65 

19 

12 

13 

145» 


1 
1 



1 


48 
25 
2 

1 

2 


1 


21 

12 

12 

4 

5 

3 

5 

14 

33 

45 

21 

25 


2 
2 




88 
52 
-b 
12 




February ... 
Marcb 


1 
1 

1 


1 
1 






1 


1 




April 


2 
2 
1 
t 
6 
9 
9 
15 
5 

81 


1 
1 
2 
2 
6 
1 










May 


1 


.... 




10 
13 
8 
28 
109 
74 
49 








July 








August 






1 
2 
2 














September. . 
October 


2 


1 














1 




1 
3 










1 
3 


1 
4 






IS 




2 


9 


2 
3 






55 
524 






9 


— 








10 


17 


14 


88 


200 


47 






1 





TABLES OF CONTAGIOUS AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 

By inspection of tables 1 and 2 we notice a decrease to about theusual 
number of cases of measles, also a decrease of almost half the number 
of cases of diphtheria reported last year, with a fatality of about 
twenty per cent of cases reported. This is larger than it ought to be, 
or would have been, had parents recognized the illness and called phy- 
sicians early. We cannot feel but that several of these lives might 
have been saved had the physicians been called before the disease had 
progressed too far for remedial treatment. Antitoxine is quite gen- 
erally iised by the profession, and where professional aid ha.s been 
summoned early, the percentage of deaths is very low. 

The number of cases of scarlet fever is very large. Tliis is partly 
the result of the non-reporting of several cases which occurred early 
in the fall, partly owing to neglect of physicians, who claimed when 
(|uestioned that the cases were very mild and could not be positively 
identified as scarlet fever, and partly because many cases were so mild 
that no physician was called. In some instances children were sent 
to schopl while in the state of desquamation, and so many cases oc- 
curred which could be traced so nearly to school communication that 
during the Christmas recess of the schools, the llalisvillc and RimVnon 
schoolhouses were disinfected and the books fumigated. With this 
• Fifty-two cases of typhoiil fever were soldiers in the hospitals. 



REPORT OF THE P.OARD OF HEALTH. 



261 



TABLE No. 2. 



Membra- ^j , 



03 



Typhoid 
lever. 



Scarlet 
fever. 



Vario- 
loid. 



« 


18 


* 


9 


73 


17 


126 


30 


79 


23 


41 


9 


21 


2 


26 


5 


7 


1 


42 


11 


47 


11 


103 


28 


148 


29 


81 


17 



done, and a verj' exacting- quarantine maintained, the disease was 
brought under controL There is no doubt that our system of formal- 
dehyde fumigation aided materially in this, since no re-infection has 
occurred in houses which were fumigated. A verj^ large proportion of 
the cases have been traced to previous cases, where for one reason or 
another the disease was not isolated. 

There is also noticeable a large increase in the number of cases of 
typhoid fever. Fifty-two of these were soldiers returning from the 
south, and others were no doubt caused by infection brought home 
with the soldiers. When the soldier train stopped at ^Manchester it 
was boarded by the health inspectors and placed under quarantine. 
It was discovered that the highly infectious discharges from all the 
patients had been throAvn overboard through the closets without any 
attempt whatever to disinfect them, and that this had been done all 
the way from Chickamauga. With the hearty cooperation of the rail- 
way authorities, the cars were most thoroughly cleansed, disinfected, 
and fumigated. If there is prevalence of this disease throughout the 
country another year there will be no cause for surprise. It is diffi- 
cult to understand why this distribution of infectious material was 
permitted by the army authorities, and why such distribution was not 
vigorously protested against by the officials of the states throug-li 
which the train jiassed. 



262 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. 3.— DEATH RETURNS. 

TABLE SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES AND 
BY MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1898. 



Causes of Death. 




(A 

1 


1 


< 


^ 

s 


e 

c 
a 


3 


a> 

3 
be 

s 
< 


.a 

1 

1 


« 

.a 
o 


1 
i 

> 

o 


s 
s 


•3 

1 
























1 






" cerebral .. 










1 


























1 




























1 




























1 
2 






1 










1 
1 








1 
1 


2 








































1 


1 














1 

2 




























2 








1 


1 










2 


















1 
3 
























7 


2 
1 


2 


.... 


1 


3 
1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


1 


25 


Appendicitis ... 














1 




















1 






1 




















1 














1 


























1 




























1 


























1 




1 




















1 


































1 












1 




















1 




















1 


1 








1 


































* 




1 
1 


1 
2 

1 








Bronchitis 


3 

1 


6 


3 

1 


5 

2 
2 


2 




1 
1 
1 
1 


2 

1 


1 

3 


3 
2 


29 
12 






i 






1 








1 




1 


.... 












1 

1 






1 






2 
































1 
















1 
1 
1 
















.... 




























































1 

1 
2 


















2 




2 

1 





1 
1 
1 


.... 
2 


1 
4 

1 


1 


1 




1 


10 




































1 


.... 




Chicken-pox and convulsions. 
Cholera infantum 


.... 


1 






















.... 




1 


33 


47 

1 
3 

1 
1 


27 

'a 


11 
.... 


1 


1 


123 










1 


1 






1 
1 












1 






























1 










1 






















1 
1 
1 
1 










Convulsions 


1 


4 


2 


.... 

1 


6 

1 

"i' 

1 
1 


2 


2 


1 


3 
1 


1 
1 


2 

1 
1 


24 
















.... 


1 










1 










.... 


1 
3 


1 
2 
2 












Debility 


1 


1 


2 
4 


2 


3 

1 

2 
3 
3 


7 


2 


1 


SS 








1 


1 
1 








1 














1 










1 
1 






4 






1 


1 


2 


6 








2 


..!. 




2 


9 


Dysentery 


1 




1 


2 


.... 


2 


8 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF UEALTU. 263 

TABLE No. S.~ Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


5 

1-5 


>> 


1 


1 




i 

3 


3 

1-5 


1 
bo 

3 

< 




% 


I 


53 

I 

> 




1 

« 
1 



























1 




1 


Embolus, cerebral 












1 

1 










1 
















1 












Enceplialocele 




1 
















1 




1 


1 
1 










2 
2 


.... 


1 


2 




g 


" pastro . . 


1 






1 


7 












1 
1 






Epilepsy 







1 
















2 








1 








1 


Erysipelas h 






1 

2 




1 














2 








1 
1 






1 




" malarial .... 




















1 


*' puerperal 




1 




















1 




2 


.... 

1 




1 


.... 


.... 


"l 


■•2 


1 

2 


3 

4 


"2' 


9 


" typhoid 


14 










) 


Gangrene 






1 
1 






1 
1 












2 


Gastritis . . 




3 


2 




1 






1 


1 




10 


" chronic 


2 






2 




1 
1 






















1 


Heart, cardiac insuflSciency of 
























1 




















1 
2 


2 




1 


6 


1 


.... 


2 


2 


2 


3 

1 


1 


2 


24 












1 
















1 


2 












1 




1 
1 




























1 






1 
















1.... 


















1 
1 






ll... 




"" valvular disease of .... 


1 


1 1 1 


1 






2 


3 


1 
1 


13 














Hemorrhage bronchial 














1 






....].... 


1 
























^ 




" follow'gopera'n 

" pulmonary 

Hepatitis chronic 


1 






.... 




1 






















1 


















1 








1 


" tubercular 




1 






■ 














2 


" and splenitis 


















1 
























1 




" unreduced, umbilical 


















1 






J 






2 












1 




























1 










2 
o 




G 


3 
1 


2 


2 


3 

1 


i 


2 


I 

1 


26 

(J 




1 


Intestines, volvulus of 












1 


1 










1 








1 








<> 


La grippe 


1 
1 




1 














.... 


2 












' 












" cirrhosis of. 


1 










2 




1 
1 




"2' 




g 










3 
1 


" fatty degeneration of.. 








1 
















1 


2 








1 


i 


2 


4 
.... 


1ft 


" disease of 














" inflammation of 


1 


















2 


Malformation and tumors of 
























Malformation with gangrene . 


1 






















.| 












1 
3 












Marasmus 




2 




1 


: 




1 


3 




2 


2 
2 


18 




1 

1 
3 






1 
1 




















2 


Meningitis 

" cerebral 




4 
2 


1 
.... 




1 
1 
1 


4 
"2 






2 

1 
1 
1 


2 

1 
1 


16 


3 




7 


" cerebrospinal 


1 


.... 


12 


tubercular 







5 



264 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE No. •.'i.— ContinuPil. 



C'AOSKS OF Death. 



i: 

c. 

3 

a 

OS 




o 


2. 




i 1 .^ 

a s 


•5 


1 
1 

a. 


o 


1 
> 

1 


1 
i 
1 



Mitral stenosis and prostatic 
abscess 














1 
1 

3 

1 


1 










, 


Myelitis 






.■.'.'■.I.::: 






1 












Nephritis .... 


1 


3 


1 1 1 


2 

1 


4 

1 
1 






3 

1 


.... 


2 

'3' 


2( 




1 






" interstitial 






! 9. 








] 














Old age 


2 
4 




2 


2 
2 


2 


1 
4 


1 


1 
1 


1 
2 


i' 

1 


2 
2 






2\ 3 




Paramenia 










....|... 








1 


.... 


.... 








1 


'.*!"..!. 




1 
1 






Pericarditis 












3 




.... 1 


1 




2 

.... 


} 

I 




1 


1 
1 




" metro 




1 










1 












Pertussis 








1 
9 
1 






1 
9 






Phthisis pulmonalis 


6 


8 


5 


5 


7 


4 


3 


4 


6 


7 
1 




Placenta previa 








1 
4 
3 


1 
8 

1 






















g 
3 


4 
3 


6 

1 


3 


1 


4 


.... 

1 

1 
1 


2 

1 


6 
2 


1 


















" pi euro 


..... 


1 














1 












1 
















Poisoning, alcoliolic ... 






1 


.... 


1 


.... 












1 










" uraemic .. . 




1 
3 

1 
























2 


2 


1 


4 


1 


3 


2 




1 


2 


3 




Pulmonary congestion and 




Pyemia 








1 








































1 






2 




1 






1 


1 








1 












1 






Skull fracture of 


2 


1 










1 


1 






















1 
8 










6 
1 


1 


9 


4 


7 


4 


4 


8 


1 


8 


6 




Stomach ulceration of 




SulTocation, by being buried 
in clay bank ... . 








1 
1 










Suffocation, by smoke from 


























Suicide '.. 






•2 




2 

1 




2 




1 


1 






Sunstroke . . . 




















1 








1 










Tabes mesenterica 


1 




1 




1 


i' 




Tetanus 












1 


"i" 








1 








2 


2 


3 
1 










1 










1 
































1 




















1 

1 




















Ulceration of uterus and 
ovaritis. 






























1 
81 
























86 


96 


80 


IT 


"sT 


115 


lie" 


ioTi 

1 


"ts" 


IT 


^ 


1,073 







REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH, 



265 



o" —1 






g P 



O -H — oo 



) Tf* C5 O lO *# f-< C^ 



§S' 



o lo 



) — t^ I- rH c; ec c 



00 cs CO oin co«o«o-4<oo><oiO'4if-iiHe« 



O lO 050S 

■■5 m o 



•«< t- C4 m lo 00 m 



3 g s s: 
§ r: 2 & g 2R '^J 



><g«;2t 



I 'J' M <o lo '■'; e^ o 






55 § 3 

2 S 5 "SS 






i [ § s 



o ;? t- m o 



s § 



O <-lr 



00 to 00 

"'^ J2 ^ °°?2 «3 oo 25 lo t- 05 ffl «; ^ I-. 00 rH 



la Tj4 OS o^ 1-1 « eo •* >-i 






O t- . ?1 10 CO 



IS § S 2 2 






g a O 



Ill-Ill 






5 a5 o S *j ■£ '5 ii §•,£• " « ' 






266 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

We are impressed to siibstontially repeat our remarks of last year, 
that the death rate of children is much higher than it should be, since 
it results from cholera infantum and other diseases which are so 
largely preventable by proper care and food. 

The death rate from consumx^tion (various forms of tuberculosis) is 
still too high, but we are practicallj^ without power to reduce it until 
we can reach those who suffer from it and instruct them and their 
associates how to avoid spreading it. This we have attempted by 
requesting the physicians to report cases of consumption to the board 
of health, as is required in many states by law. Only a single case has 
been reported during the j'car, yet seventy-five deaths have occurred 
from the disease during that time. We are provided with information 
upon the subject, which every patient and all those associated wdth 
consumptive patients would find interesting and very beneficial. 

We hope that a law may be passed at the present session of the 
legislature, making the reporting of tuberculosis obligatory upon phy- 
sicians. 

Herewith is included the report of the health inspectors and plumb- 
ing inspector. 

In conclusion, we would express our gratitude to your Honor and 
the city councils, as well as many citizens, who have given us much 
encouragement and valuable assistance. 

Respectfully submitted. 
JOHN C. BICKFORD, 
WILLIAM K. ROBBINS, 
WILLIAM M. PARSONS, M. D., 

Board of Health. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Eealth: 

We beg leave to submit the following" as the report of the sanitary 
inspectors for the year 1898: 

Vaults and privies inspected 375 

Vaults inspected after cleaning 203 

Water-closets inspected ( 2,669 

Yards and alleys inspected 1,872 

Cellars inspected 3,389 

Barns and outbuildings inspected 331 

Tenements inspected 2,332 

Barn cellars inspected , 569 

Latrines inspected 36 

Teams and riggings of excavators inspected 15 

Soaperies, slaughter-houses, etc., inspected 16 

Cleaning or repairs were ordered as follows: 

Vaults and privies clea,ned 131 

Yards and alleys cleaned 417 

Cellars cleaned 486 

Bam cellars cleaned 82 

Sheds, etc., cleaned 34 

Tenements cleaned 238 

Water closets cleaned or repaired 635 

Vault covers repaired 11 

Leaky drainpipes repaired 165 

Houses within 100 feet of a piablic sewer and not connected there- 
with, 37. 

Openings other than leaks in the drainage system were found in 147 
places, and same were closed by order of the department. Two thou- 
sand six hundred and ninety sinks have been examined, and 872 have 
been ordered trapped. 

Bathtubs inspected, 92; ordered trapped, 3. 

Sewage was found running on the surface of the ground in 81 places, 
and such nuisances were abated either by entering the sewer or carry- 
ing away in some manner not offensive. 

In doing the work of the department it has been necessary to make 
3,130 calls, and to write 743 letters. 

Three hundred and seventy-four complaints hfive been investigated. 
In 238 cases the inspectors have been able to give relief, and in 36 cases 
it was found that no cause existed, or that same was bejond the con- 
trol of the department. 

267 



268 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Thirty-one dead animals have been properly disposed of. 

One hundred and forty-seven hens and small animals have been re- 
moved from cellars. 

Two hundred and eight swine and cows have been discovered being- 
kept within the sanitarj^ limits of the city, without licenses. Same 
were ordered removed or licenses procured. 

Seventy-six complaints were made against the scavenger service; in 
each case the proper parties were notified and relief afforded. 

Fifty-five persons were discovered throwing garbage in the back 
streets and lake, and were warned against the ijractice. 

Private swill collectors have been warned 110 times to be neater in 
their work. 

Twenty-eight catch-basins or street cesspools have been flushed or 
repaired by order of this department. 

Eighty notices have been prepared and served, and proper returns 
roade. 

A sanitary inspection has been made of 31 bakeshops. 

Five schoolhouses have been inspected. 

Theatres were inspected 13 times; ordered cleaned and put into 
proper sanitary condition 3 times. 

The dumps have been inspected 40 times. 

One hundred and fifteen nuisances not otherwise classified have been 
abated through the efforts of this department. 

Householders have been given 21 permits to clean their own vaults. 

Permits to the number of 1,557 have been granted for the burial or 
removal of dead bodies, and the returns forwarded to tlie city registrar. 

A statement of mortality has been prepared each month, and copies 
sent to over two hundred other towns and cities, to local iihj-sicians, 
etc. 

Contagious and infectious diseases have been reported as follows: 
Measles, 88; diphtheria, 81; typhoid fever, 145; scarlet fever, 200; mem- 
branous croup, 10; varioloid, 0; total, 521. Four hundi-ed and forty- 
nine of these cases wex'e reported by j^hysicians, 5 by householders, 36 
were discovered bj-^ the inspectors, and 53 cases were reported from the 
different hospitals. The inspectors were unable to trace the cause in 
210 ca.ses; in 254 cases the connection with some ])revious case was 
clearly traceable. Colds were jirobably the occasions in 30 ca.ses; 6 
cases were contracted outside of the city; and in 12 cases it was reason- 
able to attribute the cause to insanitary surroundings. 

In 147 oases disinfectants were being used. The inspectors ordered 
their use in 286 cases. At most of these latter places instructions were 
given as to their u.se, and in many cases the department furiiislied the 
disinfectants. 

Bedding V)uriic(l for conlagious diseases 4 limes. 

In 89 cases jjaliciits wore found well isolated, and in 201 ca.ses in- 
spectors were obliged to order isolation. In nearly all of these cases 
it was necessary' for the iiisix-ctors 1o give iiisl ructions as to the steps 
to be taken. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTU. 269 

Ht)iises were Matched to see that the rules of isolation were com- 
plied with; and 14 funerals were attended to prevent a too public ob- 
servance of the same. 

Eig-ht hundred and sixteen rooms and 2 i-ailwaj- cars where disease 
had existed were fumigated by the inspectors. 

Two hundred and twenty-two children who were attending scliool, 
and 148 people who were working' and living in houses where conta- 
gious disease existed, were either restrained from attending school and 
employment, or instructed as to thorough isolation from the disease 
until all danger from contagion had passed. 

Six cases have been cared for at the contagious disease hospital. 

Three hundred and thirt3-one houses have been pla*carded, and the 
placards removed at the termination of the disease. 

About 3,000 pamphlets issued by the State Board of Health have been 
distributed in the localities where contagious disease existed. 

Weekl}- reports of contagious and infectious diseases have been sent 
to the State Board of Health, Concord, and the United States Marine 
Hospital service, Washington, D. C. 

The inspectors have each in turn patroled the shores of Lake Massa- 
besic, Sundays, holidays, and parts of every other day from June 1 to 
October 1. 

Sixty-five people who were found bathing in .the lake were driven out 
and warned not to enter it again. 

Urinals and slophoppers inspected, 47. 

Found unsanitary, 5. 

Steamboats inspected 60 times. 

Foimd swill and other refuse close to cottages 56 times. 

Persons were warned as to the disposal of sink-water. 

Two parties were caught washing clothes in the lake, and one throw- 
ing washing water in the lake. Both were reprimanded and warned. 

Nuisances to the number of 51, not otherwise classified, were abated. 

Several picnics and band concerts were attended, to prevent the care- 
less disposal of waste and rubbish in the lake or on its shore. 

Banana skins, sawdust, tin cans, paper, and rubbish of all sorts, have 
been removed whenever found. 

PLUMBING INSPECTIONS MADE. 

Number of plumbing notices filed 566 

tank water closets 769 

Kelley and other frost-proof closets 20 

sinks 462 

bath-tubs 337 

wash-bowls 269 

wash-trays ' 64 

urinals 15 

Other fixtures not classified above 32 

Total number of fixtures put in 1,968 



270 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The pipe put in was tested with water in 451 places. At 18 places 
where water was not accessible, the smoke test was used in place of 
water. 

A total of 1,855 inspections were made of the work during its prog- 
ress and after its completion. 

At 388 places work was found defective. In all such cases the de- 
fective work was removed and proper work substituted therefor. 

In several cases plumbers were found trying to deceive the inspector, 
but in most cases the work has been more expertly done than in previ- 
ous years, as several parties who were inclined to be dishonest, or were 
incompetent from lack of knowledge and experience, have discon- 
tinued the occupation. 

An inspection of the sanitary condition of the plumbing at the 
United States postoffice, the State Industrial School, the county jail, 
and the police station has been made, and the different officials in 
charge have been notified of the result and recommended to make 
changes when necessary. An inspector was sent here by the treasury 
department at Washington, and in company with your inspector made 
a thorough investigation of the plumbing arrangements at the post- 
office building, with the result that the entire sj^stem of plumbing has 
been put into the best possible condition. The water-closets have 
been changed to jet siphon closets, and a new and larger sewer has 
been run to the main sewer in the street; also back-water valves have 
been placed ui)on the basement fixtures to prevent the sewerage from 
backing into the basement. At the county jail repairs were made at 
once, and the plumbing arrangements greatlj'^ improved by changing 
pressure water-closets to tank closets, and providing traps for several 
fixtures which were found without them. The state legislature has 
been asked for an appropriation with which to remodel the entire 
system of plumbing at the State Industrial School. 

The inspector has been to some trouble to secure from his reports 
the following statistics as to new buildings, which he thinks may be 
interesting: 

Total number reported 146 

Single tenement buildings 71 

Two-tenement buildings 20 

Three-tenement buildings 4 

Four-tenement buildings 2 

Eight-tenement , buildings 1 

Residences 32 

The new buildings include St. Mary's church, Amoskeag school, 
Cedar-street school, St. George's school, Inio Wrajiper Co.'s mill, 5 
blocks, and 5 Icn-footers. Total number of now buildings, 14tJ; esti- 
mated vahie over $750,000. 

The inspectors desire to express their thanks to the honorable board 
who have so ably directed their efforts; also to all who have aided them 
in the work of tlie dfjiartnu'iit. 

WILLIAM B. BLAKE. 

JOHN F. LOONEY. 

CAUL O. SEAMAN. 



REPORTS 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES AND 
CEMETERY FUNDS. 



REPORTS OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES 
AND CEMETERY FUNDS. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

To the Trustees of Cemeteries and to the City Councils: 

The sub-trustees of the Pine Grove cemetery report as follows for the 
year 1898: 

The same policy has been continued in conducting this cemetery 
and the Merrill j'ard, and they have been under the same management 
as for several years past; and the usual amount of labor and care have 
been expended upon the ordinary needs of the grounds. The Pine 
Grove cemetery improves in appearance each year, and the addition of 
shinibbery and flowers in different sections, following out the plan 
adopted some years since, constantly adds to its beauty. 

South of Riverside lawn a new plot with 131 lots was this year com- 
pleted and put upon the market at twenty-five cents per square fopt. 
This plot is known as Acacia Lawn, and the lots therein were all 
graded with clay and loam and laid out without paths between them, 
under so-called lawn restrictions. They are of various sizes, and with 
the exception of about a dozen scattered lots in the southeasterly sec- 
tion, which are sold at twenty cents per square foot, these lots on Aca- 
cia Lawn are the only ordinary lots that are not under perpetual care, 
which are for sale. There are in all 124 of such ordinary lots unsold. 

During the year the lots on that part of Pine Lawn, under perpetual 
care, which was graded, were jiut upon the market and a number have 
been sold. It is intended the coming season to finish the rest of this 
lawn. There are now ninety-two lots unsold on Chapel, Riverside, and 
Pine Lawns, all under perpetual care. Those on Chapel Lawn sell for 
one dollar per square foot; the others for seventy-five cents. During 
the year twenty-two lots were sold under perpetual care and forty-four 
ordinary lots. 

An addition on the south of the "Field of Manesquo" was completed, 
and a section adjoining was graded ready for top dressing. Consider- 
able labor has been expended in removing stumps in the northern por- 
tion of the grounds. Water pipe to the amount of 923 feet was laid 
for the accommodation of Acacia Lawn. 

With the co-operation of the trustees of the cemetery fund one thou- 
sand six hundred and sixty square yards of macadamizing were laid in 
the avenues around Landscape and Swedish Lawns. Crushed stone 

273 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

\vas used, and the results so far furnish ample reward for the expense, 
and it is hoped that similar work may be continued until all the ave- 
nues not concreted shall receive the same covering. 

During- the year two hundred and fifty-one bodies were buried and 
twenty others removed. The expenses have been kept well within the 
appropriation made by the city government. The current receipts for 
interments, water rents, labor on lots, etc., amount to three thousand 
one hundred sixty-six and fifteen one-hundredths dollars ($3,166.15), 
while about four hundred eightj^-two dollars ($482), due for such 
things, remain as yet uncollected. This sum has been paid into the city 
treasury. From the sale of lots there was received the sum of two 
thouf^and eight hundred sevent^^-two and seventeen one hundredths 
dollars ($2,872.17). 

Generally speaking, the conduct of the cemetery has been in accord 
with the views of the sub-trustees, and the absence of complaints to 
them leads them to hope that the management has also been satis- 
factory to the public. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 
For the ,'^uh-Trustees of Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Valley Cemetery. 

In behalf of the trustees of the Valley cemetery I wish to make the 
following report for the year ending December 31, 1898: 

The work has been carried on under the same plan and good man- 
agement of Superintendent C. H. G. Foss as in former years. A few 
substantial improvements have been made. The bank on the west 
side of the valley, which has been in a rough and \insightly condition, 
has been improved b^' grading and seeding down the material used, of 
which the following is the amount: Sand, 200 loads; gravel, 07 loads; 
loam, 97 loads. On the north, side there. have been a number of lots 
lowered and graded and trees removed, which makes a decided improve- 
ment. The bank walls have been repaired and there have been 118V4 
yards of concrete put down, this being the only way to save the walks 
on the banks from washing. The chapel has received a new coat of 
paint that has improved the looks ver^^ much. 

Number of bodies in tomb 76 

i iiterments 05 

removals 9 

CASH RFXEIPTS. 

For care of lots and Avater $1,119.73 

tomb 2.J7.75 

sundries 233.57 

interments 160.00 

removals 23.00 

$1,800.05 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 275 

Cash paid city treasurer $1,800.05 

Transferred to reserve fund 291.95 

$2,092.00 

Actual exi>ense to the city 908.00 

Appropriation for 1898 $3,000.00 

Respectfully submitted. 

S. P. CANNON, 
"• Clerk. 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the Anioskeag- cemetery present the follo\\'lng 
report: 

Of the appropriation for the year of $150 there has been expended 
for labor, $93; painting, $17.50; water, $12; hose, $11.50; making a 
total of $134, and leaving a balance of $1G. 

There have been eleven burials in the yard during the j'ear, all being 
removals from other yards, ten from a private lot on this side of the 
river, and one from the Valley cemeterj-. Two bodies have been re- 
moved to the Pine Grove cemetery. 

The superintendent of the cemetery, Mr. George C. Harsvood, has 
taken good care of the j^ard, having mown the grass more times than 
has ever been done before, and having been exceptionally painstaking 
in his work. 

During the year one of the trustees, Mr. A. D. Maxwell, died, after 
atout a year of faithful work on the board, leaving a vacancy that has 
not yet been filled. 

The board would again recommend that the work of enclosing the 
yard with an iron fence be continued as fast as can be done that it may 
have a substantial and unifonn enclosure about it. 

WILLIAM H. HUSE, 

For the Trustees. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

To the Trustees of Cemeteries: 

GENTLEME^',^ — I herewith present to you the annual report of the 
money received during- the year ending December 31, 1898: 
Number of deeds delivered during the j^ear, sixtj'-five. 

To cash received for the same $2,849.09 

interest received for the same 23.08 

cash received from superintendent 3,166.15 

Cash on hand December 31, 1897 174.04 

$6,212.36 

Cr. 

By treasurer's receipts $3,046.21 

superintendent's receipts 3,166.15 

$6,212.36 



Valley Cemetery. 

To cash received from superintendent $1,800.05 

Cr. 

By superintendent's receipts $1,800.05 

Respectfull.y submitted. 

FitED L. ALLEX, 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 
I hereby certify that I havp examined the accounts of Fred L. Allen, 
treasurer of the trustees of cemeteries, and find that the same are cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched for. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

Citii Auditor. 

To tlie Trustees of the Ceuwtern Fund: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith siilunit lo yon ilu- sixtt-onth aunual report 
of the funds received and cxnciisrs [)n'n[ to Dcfemher ;!1, IS'.IS: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of ])ennanent I'iitkI on li.ind .laiiiKiry 1. JSDS $37,666.37 

Receipts during the Vfar: 

From Mary ]•:. J larvcy $159.70 

George A. Leigh t^m 91.90 

Asa \V. llawcs 142.14 

270 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 277 

From Alpheus Bodwell $2:u.00 

Gust Foster ' 170.11 

Mary S. J. Lane 141.73 

Nellie C. Eastman 129.C5 

D. S. Adams 109.28 

Charles E. Dodge 262.2.-) 

Robert Eenker 87.43 

iQpnvin A. Webb 106.09 

Hattie E. Owen 165.00 

Georg-e W. Vickery 129.60 . 

George H. Stearns and Frank P. Chenej^ 375.00 

Albert H. Daniels 105.35 

H. A. Hooper 112.00 

Charles B. Sturtevant 338.81 

A. P. and A, L. Home 104.40 

Meribah F. Stanton 82.50 

Mary M. Varick 240.00 

D. T. Martin 280.75 

Rufus Wilkinson 88.02 

George H. Holbrook 184.39 

J. C. Ray estate 165.00 

Robert Heath 86.62 

Martha N. StraAV and James E. Cuirier 182.46 

Alphonse Wells 134.80 

Mrs. E. R. Giddings 186.00 

Frank D. Goodrich 84.56 

$4,682.50 

Total permanent fund December 31, 1898 $42,348.90 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1898 $35,200.00 

Bonds bought during the year 850.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898 6,298.90 

$42,348.90 

IXCOME ACCOUNT. 

Income on hand January 1, 1898 $3,487.69 

from interest on bonds 1,798.33 

from savings bank deposits 196.08 

$5,482.10 

Expenses paid during the year: 

Accr^aed interest on bonds $38.95 

John B. Varick Co 131.78 

Kimball & Hobbs 89.00 

B. A. Stearns, superintendent 930.00 

Roderick Carroll 6.29 

Pay-roll, macadamizing 278".50 

Charles A. Bailey 230.61 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898 3,770.97 

$5,482.10 



278 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Valley Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January 1, 1898 $13,892.05 

Receipts during the year: 

From William H. Plumer, executor $500.00 

Moses W, Oliver and Mrs. Abbie A. Williard. 140.00 

Mrs. John M. Hill 200.00 

S. P. Chase and F. P. Sargent 122.40 

B. F. Ayer 138.00 

estate of Frank W. Daniels 288.00 

1.388.40 

Total permanent fund December 31, 1898 $l-).280.45 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1898 $13,500.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898 1,780.45 

$15,280.45 

IXCOME ACCOUNT. 

Income on hand January 1, 1898 $1,434.37 

from interest on bonds 675.00 

from interest on bank deposits i . 69.94 

$2,179.31 

By expenses paid during the year: 

Palmer & Garmon $21.00 

Stark Mills 23.40 

C. H. G. Foss • 338.07 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898 1,796.84 

$2,179.31 

GALE FUND, VAXLEY CEMETEKY. 

Income on hand January 1, 1898 $110.65 

from fund 10.60 

from savings bank deposit 3.77 

$125.02 

Cr. 

By ca.sh paid C. H. G. Foss $15.05 

Ca.sh on hand December 31, 1898 109.97 

$12-..02 



Merrill Cemetery. 

Amount of pormanont fund on hand January, 1898 $487.89 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1898 $450.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898 37.89 

$487.89 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 279 



INCOME ACCOUNT. 

Income on hand January 1, 1898 $68.75 

from interest on bonds 22.50 

$91.26 

Ck. 

By cash on hand December 31, 1898 $91. 2S 

Respectfully submitted. 
* FRED L. ALLEX, 

Treasurer Cemetery Fund. 

This is to certify tliat I have examined the books of accounts of Fred 
L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the cemetery funds, embracing 
the receipts and expenditures for the year 1897, and I find the same 
correct and properly vouched. I have also examined the securities in 
which said fund is invested and find as follows: 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. II.: 

5 per cent, 1913 $15,000.00 

5 per cent, 1942 21,050.00 

Cash on hand 0,298.90 



Total amount of bonds and cash December 31, 1S9S $42,348.90 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H.: 

5 per cent, 1913 $4,800.00 

5 per cent, 1942 8,700.00 

Cash on hand 1 ,780.45 



Total amount of bonds and cash December 31, 1898 $15,280.45 

MERRILL CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of ^Manchester, N. H.: 

5 per cent, 1913 $200.00 

5 per cent, 1942 250.00 

Cash on hand 37.89 

Total amount of bonds and cash December 31, 1898 $487. S9 



Total permanent fund December 31, 1898 $58,117.24 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



280 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The Piscataquog' Cemetery association having been appointed by the 
probate court trustee of the funds now in the possession of the city 
of .Alanchester, left to said city of Manchester, in trust, by the will of 
Mary P. Harris, and given to said city, in trust, in their lifetime by Gil- 
man Riddle and Sarah P. Gage, all being trusts relating to the Piscata- 
quog cemeterj^ or to lots therein; and the said city of ;Manchester, by 
vote of its city councils, having resigned said trusts and authorized 
the city treasurer to pay over all of said funds to the trustee appointed 
by the probate court, now the said Piscataquog Cemetery- association 
hereby acknowledges the payment to it of the following sums: 

Harris fund, $852.38; Riddle fund, $279.54; Gage fund, $126.35; in all, 
$1,258.27, the same being in full settlement and discharge of the said 
city of ;N[anchester as said trustee. 

TRUSTEES OF PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY ASSOCTATIOX. 
By Charles K. Walker, President. 
John K. McQuesten^, Treasurer. 
Approved. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 

This is to certify that I have received from Fred L. Allen, treasurer 
of cemetery fund, the sum of fifty-two dollars and thirty-two cents 
($52.32), in full payment of funds deposited by Charles K. Walker for 
care of the Harriet K. Walker lot in the Piscataquog cemeterjs and the 
city of Manchester having by vote of the city councils declined to con- 
tinue the trust, the city of Manchester is herebj' discharged as trustee 
of said fund. 

CHARLES K. WALKER. 
Approved. 

JAMES E. DODGE. 

City Auditor. 



EEPOET 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING 
FUND. 



Manchester, N. H., January 10, 1890. 
To th€ City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

GENTLEiiEN, — As required by chapter 37, section 2, of the City Ordi- 
nances of Manchester, the trustees of the sinking- funds of the city of 
Manchester herewith report the condition of the several funds Jan- 
uary 1, 1899, Avith receipts and payments for the year ending December 
31. 1898. 

H. P. SIMPSON, 

ALPHEUS GAY, 

FEED L. ALLEN, 

Trustees of the Sinking Fund. 



TREASUKEE'S REPORT. 

To the City Councils of the City of Manchestei': 

Genti.emex, — I herewith transmit to you my report as treasurer of 
the Trustees of the Sinking Fund for the year ending December 
31, 1898: 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1898, for the pay- 
ment of improvement bonds $55,040.15 

Appropriation for 1898 20,000.00 

Income received from interest on bonds 1,700.00 

Income received from savings bank deposit 24.22 

$76,764.37 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1898 $55,000.00 

Bonds bought during the year ' 19,000.00 

Premium paid for bonds 1,805.00 

Accrued interest on bonds 159.47 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898 799.90 

: $76,764.37 

283 



284 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1898, for the pay- 
ment of water bonds $82,149.64 

Water-works hydrant service, 1898 17,675.00 

Appropriation for 1898 5,000.00 

Income received from interest on bonds 2,945.00 

Income received from savings bank deposit 113.36 

$107,885.00 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1898 $79,000.00 

Bonds bought during- tlie j^ear 23,000.00 

Premium paid for bonds 2,323.50 

Accrued interest on bonds 142.58 

C. S. Byington 1.50 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898 3,417.42 

$107,885.00 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1898, for the pay- 
ment of school bonds $2,000.00 

Appropriation for 18.98 2,000.00 

Interest on bonds 40.00 

$4,040.00 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1898 $2,000.00 

Bonds bought during the j^ear 1,000.00 

Premium on bond 92.50 

Accrued interest • 8.07 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898 939.43 

$4,040.00 

Respectfully submitted. 

FRED L. ALLEX, 
Treasurer Sinl-ing Fund. 



This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts of Fred 
L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the sinking fund, embracing the 
receipts and expenditures for the year ending December 31, 1898, and 
find the same correct and properly vouched. I have also examined the 
securities in which said fund is invested, and find as follows: 
For the payment of improvement bonds. 

Bonds of the city of :Manchest«r, N. H.: 

4 per cent, 1900 $15,000.00 

4 per cent, 1908 10,000.00 

4 per cent, 1913 5,000.00 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 285 

4 per cent, 1914 $0,000.00 

4 per cent, 1915 23,000.00 

4 per cent, 1917 16,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898 799.90 



$74,799.90 



For the paj^ment of water bonds. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H.: 

4 per cent, 1900 $2,000.00 

4 per cent, 1909 10,000.00 

4 per cent, 1910 6,000.00 

4 per cent, 1913 10,000.00 

4 per cent, 1914 18,000.00 

4 per cent, 1915 17,000.00 

4 per cent, 1916 11,000.00 

4 per cent, 1917 22,000.00 

United States bonds: 

5 per cent, 1904 6,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898. 3,417.4S 

For the payment of school bonds. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H.: 

4 per cent, 1914 $2,000.00 

4 per cent, 1916 1,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898 939.43 



$105,417.42 



$3,939.43 



Total amount of sinking fund December 31, 1898 $184,156.75 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the City Councils: 

I hereby submit my report as Citj^ Solicitor for 1898: 

The same cases in court, with the exception of those mentioned here- 
after, are still pending- and in the same condition as at the time of the 
report for 1897. 

During the year, C. C. Ilarriman entered suit for alleged damages to 
his real estate occasioned by a change of grade of Lake avenue. 

The Amoskeag Manufacturing Company fded a petition for an abate- 
ment of a part of the taxes assessed upon its property for the year 1898. 

The case of the same company for abatement of a part of its taxes 
for 1897 was tried before Messrs. Bellows, Batchellor and Kivel, to 
whom it had been referred by the court, a jury trial not being per- 
mitted by law. After a trial which occupied most of the summer, a 
report was made by the referees, in which it was found that the com- 
pany's property, as conapared with the assessment of other property, 
had been over assessed by almost $2,000,000. The report was made to 
the court and transferred to the law term, where it is now awaiting a 
decision by the full bench xipon certain questions of law raised at the 
trial. 

The case against M. J. Jenkins was tried in December before T. D. 
Luce, the referee, whose report has not jet been filed. 

Xo other trials were had during the year, but the ordinary duties 
of the office Avere as numerous and varied as ever, and were all per- 
formed to the best of my ability. 

Extending my thanks to the maj'or and city councils for their confi- 
dence and kind treatment, and expressing my obligations to all the 
other city officials for their uniform courtesy, I submit this report, 
and, with it, lay down the responsibility which I have borne for the 
past twelve years, in mj- continuous service as solicitor, for which posi- 
tion I am not to be again a candidate. During all those years I have 
labored earnestly and con,scientiousl3% and constantly endeavored to do 
what I believed to be for the best interests of the city. And, now, in 
retiring from the office, my only hope is that the public may realize 
the sincerity of my efforts and give to my labors the credit of having 
been not wholly unsuccessful. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

City Solicitor. 

December 31, 1898. 

19 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



EEPOET OF OVERSEEES OF THE POOE. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

In compliance with the 'ordinance of said city, the Overseers of the 
Poor herewith present their annual report for the year 1898: 

The whole number of families that have received more or less assist- 
ance off the farm during the j^ear has been one hundred and sixtj-, 
consisting of four hundred and seventj'^ persons, all of whom have a 
settlement in this city, except those people whom the overseers of the 
poor found in a destitute condition on account of a fire in a block on 
Amory street, Avard 9, which compelled the occupants to leave their 
tenements in their night clothes. These were all poor people, some of 
whom had lived in this city but a few days, and did not have a settle- 
ment in this city or county. The amount allowed for this emergency 
was one hundred and fifty dollars and forty-five cents. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the county farm during 
the year has been -nine, more or less of the time at a cost of two dol- 
lars per week for each person. Eight of them are insane and incurable. 

The whole number of minor children supported at the State Indus- 
trial School during the year has been one, at a cost of one dollar and 
fifty cents per week. 

In compliance with sections 1 and 2, chapter 116, Public Statutes of 
New Hampshire, passed at the January session, 1895, in relation to 
dependent minor children having a settlement in cities and towns, the 
minor children having a settlement in this city are supported as 
follows: At St. Patrick's Orphans' Home, two at a cost of one dollar 
and twenty-five cents per week for each child. The said minor children 
have educational advantages. 

The overseers of the poor have given ten hundred and thirtj'-one 
orders to the paupers off the farm during the j-ear. The said orders 
were chiefly for groceries, fuel, medicine, board and clothing, care, 
and emergencies. 

The whole amount allowed to the several persons who applied for 
assistance from the several wards of the city during the j'ear was as 
follows: 

Ward 1 $204.75 

Ward 2 350.95 

Ward 3 578.62 

Ward 4 215.17 

293 



294 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Ward 5 $2,452.02 

Ward 6 795.82 

Ward 7 107.00 

Ward 8 728.52 

Ward 9 1,844.52 

$7,277.37 

MISCELLAlSnEOUS BILLS ALLOWED. 

Printing and stationery $6.70 

State Industrial School, board of inmates 1,663.73 

1,670.43 

Total amount allowed $8,947.80 

Cash received from county of Hillsborough for board of in- 
mates of State Industrial School 1,611.66 

Total cost to the city $7,336.14 

There are uncollected bills due the city amounting to three hundred 
and seventy-one dollars and seventy-nine cents. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 
D. G. ANDREWS, 

B. F. GARLAND, 

C. B. CLARKSON, 
PATRICK COSTELLO, 
CHARLES FRANCIS, 
WILLIAM MARSHALL, 
C. S. McKEAN, 
THOMAS C. STEWART, 

Overseers of tlie Poor for the City of Manchester. 
A true copy of records. Attest: 

WiLLLiAM H. Maxwell, 

Cleric of the Board. 



Aid to Soldiers, Sailors, and their Dependent Families. 
To the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

In compliance with sections 1 and 2, chapter 81, Laws of the state of 
New Hampshire, passed at the June session, 1881, in relation to indi- 
gent soldiers and sailors of the Civil War, the overseers of the poor 
herewith present their annual report under the head, "Aid to soldiers 
and sailors and their dependent families for the year 1898." 



KEPOKT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 295 

The wholfe number of indigent soldiers and sailors who have had 
more or less assistance during the j^ear has been one, who has a settle- 
ment in this city, at a cost of $98.25. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 
DANIEL G. ANDREWS, 
BENJAMIN F. GARLAND, 
CHARLES B. CLARKSON, 
^^ PATRICK COSTELLO, 

CHARLES ERANCIS, 
AVILLIAM MARSHALL, 
CHARLES S. McKEAN, 
THOMAS C. STEWART, 
Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 
A true copy of records. Attest: 

William H. Maxwell, 

Clerk of the Board. 



EEPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 

N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit the following report for the 
department of inspection of milk and butter for the j^ear 1898: 

I inspected 94 samples of milk, and the result (with the exception of 
a few cases) was quite satisfactory. 

Number of licenses issued to dealers conveying milk by carriages 
and othem'ise for purposes of sale, 124. 

Amount of money received and turned over to the city treasurer, $62. 

Property of the city held by the inspector at present is as follows: 

City records, milk grip, 10 pint cans, thermometer, 2 glass cylinders 
for cream tests, etc., 1 package filter paper, 2 specific gravity scales, 1 
pipette, and 3 odd pieces of chemical apparatus. 

ARCHIE F. PRECOURT, 

Inspector of Milk. 



299 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELEC- 
TRIC LIGHTS. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC 
LIGHTS. 



Gas Lights in Use. 



Clarke and Chestnut. 

Appleton, west end. 

Salmon, between Elm and Canal. 

Blodget and Chestnut. 

Orange and Chestnut. 

Orange, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Bridge, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Pearl and Walnut. 

Orange and Walnut. 

Orange and Beech. 

Pearl and Maple. 

Arlingixjn and INIaple. 

East High and Maple. 

Lowell and South. 

Concord and Belmont. 

Amherst and Belmont. 

Concord and Beacon. 

Lowell and Beacon. 

East High and Belmont. 

East High and Hall. 

Belmont and Central. 

Willow and Merrill. 

Auburn and Franklin. 

One light on State. 

Eiver, near Turner Hall. 

Milford and Bowman. 

Milford and B. 

Eiver and Douglas. 

Dover and Granite. 

303 



304 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Oil Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Adams. 

Pearl and Linden. 

Canal, near Amoskeag bridge. 

Merrimack and Beacon. 

Hanover and ^lammoth road. 

Lake avenue and Hall road. 

Elm and Shasta. 

Elm and Baker. 

One light on Baker. 

Douglas and West. 

Douglas and Quincy. 

Granite and Quincy. 

Mast road and Riddle. 

Carroll. 

Bowman. 

A and B streets. 

Light near the Huntress gardens. 

^Mammoth road and Cohas avenue. 

Mammoth road and Island Pond road. 

Mammoth road and Cillery. 

Mammoth road and Young. 

Massabesic and Hall road. 

Massabesic and Taylor. 

Belmont and Green. 

Valley and Taylor. 

Valley and Cj^press. 

Cypress and Prout avenue. 

Jewett and Young. 

Young and Taylor. 

Three lights on Eiver road, south of Blue store. 

Ten lights in Goffe's Falls. 

Three lights in Youngsville. 

One light on Candia road, near Noah Reed'e. 

One light on Candia road, near Walter Cody's house. 

One light at junction of Lake avenue and Hanover. 

One light on Island Pond road, Mill-Dam house. 

Amherst and Beacon. 

One light at junction of Ainswortli avenue and Young road. 

One light at junction of Ainswortli avenue and Young street. 

One light on Taylor, near Byron Stearns's house. 

One liglit on Taylor, near Gilmore's house. 

One liglit on Valley, near Eastman's store. 

One light on Candia road, at P. Rogers's. 

One liglit on Candia road, at l)j:n Cronin's. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 305 

One light on Candia road, at G. Bean's. 

One light on Candia road, at C. Francis's. 

One light on Candia road, at S. Mead's. 

One light on Candia road, at Claflin's. 

One light on Hanover, at Sam Page's. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Page. 

One light at Brown's. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Proctor. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Candia roads. 

One light at junction of Proctor and Candia roads. 



Electric Lights in Use. 

No. 1. A near B, arm. 

2. A and South Main, " 

3. Adams and Cartier. pole. 

4. Amherst and Elm, arm. 

5. Amherst and Vine, " 

6. Amherst and Chestnut, " 

7. Amherst and Pine, " 

8. Amherst and Union, " 
'J. Amherst and Beech, " 

10. Amherst and Ash, " 

11. Amherst and Maple, " 

12. Amherst and Lincoln, " 

13. Amherst and Ashland, " 

14. Amherst and Hall, " 

15. Amory and Main, pole. 

16. Amory and Beauport, 

17. Amory and Rimmon, 

IS. Amory and Amory street extension, arm. 

19. Amory, near IMontgomerj^ 

20. Amory and Alsace, 

21. Amory and Essex, 

22. Amory and Morgan, 

23. Amoskeag bridge, west, pole. 

24. Amoskeag bridge, east, 

25. Amoskeag and Front, 

26. Appleton and Elm, . arm. 

27. Appleton and Xorth Adams, pole. 

28. Appleton and Union. arm. 

29. Arlington and Eussell, 

30. Arlingtoit and Warren, 

31. Arlington and Ashland, 
20 



306 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. ;J2. Auburn and Elm, arm. 

33. Auburn and Chestnut, " 

34. Auburn and Pine, " 

35. Auburn and Union, pole. 

36. Auburn and Beech, " 

37. Auburn and Maple, " 

38. Auburn and Wilson, arm. 

39. Auger avenue and Nutt road, " 

40. Baker and Brown avenue, " 

41. Balcer aftd Elm, " 

42. Bath and Second, pole. 

43. Beech and Portsmouth Kailroad, arm. 

44. Beech and LaAvrence Eailroad, " 

45. Bell and Wentworth, " 

46. Blaine and Main, " 

47. Blaine and Second, " 

48. Blaine and Third, " 

49. Blodget and Elm back street," " 

50. Blodget and Pine, " 

51. Blodget and Union, " 

52. Blodget and Walnut, " 

53. Blodget and Ash, 

54. Bow and Bartlett, pole. 

55. Bojnton, arm. 

56. Bowman place and Tilton, " 

57. Bowman, near Milford, " 

58. Bremer and Dubuque, " 

59. Bridge and McGregor, " 

60. Bridge and Canal, " 

61. Bridge and Elm, " 

62. Bridge and Chestnut, " 

63. Bridge and Pine, " 

64. Bridge and Union, " 

65. Bridge and Walnut, " 

66. Bridge and Beech, " 

67. Bridge and Ash, 

68. Bridge and Maple, " 

69. Bridge and Nashua, " 

70. Bridge and Linden, 

71. Bridge and Hall, 

72. Bridge and Belmont, 

73. Bridge and Highlands, 

74. Brown avenue and 101m, 

75. Brown avenue, near Tanner}', 

76. Brook and Elm. 

77. P.rook :iih1 ('licsliuit, 

78. Brook Mild i'ii.r, 

79. ]{i-ook and liri/cl. lH)le. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 307 

No. 80. Brook and Union, ariQ. 

81. Brook and Beech, 

82. Brook and Maple, pole- 

83. C and B, 

84. Candia road and Mammoth road, arm. 

85. Carpenter and Elm, 

86. Carpenter and Union, 

87. Cedar and Canal, 

88. Cedar and Elm, 

89. Cedar and Chestnut, 

90. Cedar and Pine, 

91. Cedar and Union, 

92. Cedar and Beech, 

93. Cedar and Lincoln, 

94. Cedar, near JSIaple, 

95. Central and Bedford, 

96. Central street hill, pole. 

97. Central and Elm, arm- 

98. Central and Chestnut, 

99. Central and Pine, 

100. Central and Union, 

101. Central and Beech, 

102. Central and Maple, 

103. Central and Lincoln, 

104. Central and Wilson, 

105. Central and Hall, 

106. Central, near Cass, 

107. Charles, 

108. Charleston avenue and Carroll, 

109. Chestnut and Bay Brook, pole. 

110. Clarke and Eiver road, arm. 

111. Clarke and Elm, 

112. Clarke and Union, 

113. Clinton and Dover, 

114. Conant and Beauport, 

115. Conant and Rimmon, po^^- 

116. Conant and Montgomery, arm. 

117. Concord and Vine, 

118. Concord and Chestnut, 

119. Concord and Pine, 

120. Concord and Union, 

121. Concord and Walnut, 

122. Concord and Beech, 

123. Concord and Maple, 

124. Concord and Dntton, 

125. Concord and Derry, Po'^- 

126. Concord and Ashland, ^^™- 

127. Concord and Hall, 



308 j ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 128. Concord Square, east, pole. 

129. Concord Square, west, " 

130. Coolidge avenue, near Kelley, arm. 

131. Dean and Canal, pole. 

132. Dean and Elm, arm. 

133. Dean avenue and Elm west back, " 

134. Dearborn and Taylor, " 

135. Depot and Canal, pole. 

136. Depot and Franklin, arm. 

137. Derryfield Park, " 

138. Douglas and Railroad, pole. 

139. Douglas and Barr, arm. 

140. Douglas and West, pole. 
341. Douglas and Main, arm. 

142. Dunbarton road and Front, " 

143. East High and Nashua, " 

144. East High and South, " 

145. East High and Malvern, '• 

146. East High and Ashland, " 

147. East High and Hall, " 

148. East High and Buzzell, " 

149. East Spruce and Barry avenue, " 

150. East Spruce and Union, " 

151. East Spruce and Beech, " 

152. East Spruce and ]\Iaple, " 

153. East Spruce and Lincoln, '' 

154. East Spruce and Wilson, 1- 

155. East Spruce and Beacon, " 

156. Elm and Ray Brook, -'- 

157. Elm, below Railroad bridge, " 

158. Elm avenue and Elm, " 

159. Elm and Portsmouth Railroad, pole. 

160. Ferrj' and Main, arm. 

161. Ferry and Third, " 

162. Ferry and Turner, '" 

163. Front. Anioskeag, pole. 
104. Gates and Dubuque, " 

165. Cloffstown road and Front, " 

166. Grove and Pine, arm. 

167. Grove and Union, " 
108. Grove and Beedi, " 

169. Grove and Belmont, " 

170. Granite and Green, ' " 

171. Granite and West, 

172. Granite and Main, 

173. Granite and Second, " 

174. Granite bridge, west, pole. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 309 

No. 175. (iranito bridge, center, pole. 

176. Granite bridge, cast, 

177. Granite and State, arm. 

178. Granite and Bedford, 

179. Granite and Canal, pole. 

180. Granite and Franklin, arm. 

181. Green and Elm, 
*• 182. Green and Pine, 

183. Green and Beech, 

184. Hancock and Brown avenue, pole. 
. 185. Hanover square, 

186. Hanover and Nutfield lane, arm. 

187. Hanover and Chestnut, 

188. Hanover and Pine, 

189. Hanover and Union, 

190. Hanover and Beech, 

191. Hanover and ]\Iaple, 

192. Hanover and Lincoln, 

193. Hanover and Ashland, 

194. Hanover and Hall, 

195. Hanover and Belmont, 

196. Hanover and Beacon, 

197. Hanover and Highlands, pole. 

198. Hanover and Grant, arm. 

199. Hanover and Page, 

200. Harrison and Elm, 

201. Harrison and Chestnut, 

202. Harrison and Pine, 

203. Harrison and Hazel, 

204. Harrison and Walnut, 

205. Harrison and Beech, 

206. Harrison and Ash. 

207. Harrison and Maple, 

208. Harrison and Oak, 

209. Hari-ison and Paissell, 

210. Harvell and South Main, 

211. Hayward and Beech, 

212. Hayward and Cypress, 

213. High and Chestnut, ' " 

214. High and Pine, 

215. Hig-h and Union, 

216. Hollis and Canal, pole. 

217. Hospital avenue and Massabesic, 

218. Kelley and Rimmon, arm. 

219. Kellej^ and Cartier, 

220. Kelley and Alsace, 

221. Kidder and Bovden, pole. 



310 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 222, Kidder and Whitney, pole. 

223. Kidder and Elm, arm. 

224. Lake avenue and Elm, ** 

225. Lake avenue and Chestnut, " 

226. Lake avenue and Pine, " 

227. Lake avenue and Union, " 

228. Lake avenue and Beech, '* 

229. Lake avenue and Maple, " 

230. Lake avenue and Lincoln, " 

231. Lake avenue and Wilson, " 

232. Lake avenue and Alassabesic, " 

233. Lake avenue and Beacon, " 

234. Lake avenue, near Cass, " 

235. Lake avenue and Cass, pole. 

236. Lake avenue and Canton, " 

237. Lake avenue and Hall road, " 

238. Langdon and Canal, arm. 

239. Langdon, pole. 

240. Laurel and Laurel avenue, arm. 

241. Laurel and Pine, " 

242. Laurel and Union, " 

243. Laurel and Beech, " 

244. Laurel and Maple, " 

245. Laurel and Lincoln, " 

246. Laurel and W^ilson, " 

247. Laurel and Hall, " 

248. Laurel and Belmont, " 

249. Laurel and Milton, " 

250. Laurel and Beacon, " 
251. 

252. Liberty, below W'cbster, " 

253. Lowell south back and Nutficld lane, " 

254. Lowell and Elm, " 

255. Lowell and Birch, " 

256. Lowell and Chestnut, " 

257. Lowell and Pine, " 

258. Lowell and Union, " 

259. Lowell and Walnut, " 

260. Lowell and Beech, " 

261. Lowell and Ash, " 

262. Lowell and Nashua, " 

263. Lowell and :Malvcrn, " 

264. Lowell and Ashland, " 

265. Lowell and Hall, " 

266. Lowell and Belmont, " 

267. Mancliestcr and l']lm, " 
208. Mancliestcr iind Cii.-.stnut, • " 



QAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LICIITS. 311 

No. 269. Manchester and Pine, arm. 

270. Manchester and Union, " 

271. ]\ranchester and Beech, " 

272. Manchester and Maple, " 

273. Manchester and Lincoln, " 

274. Manchester and Wilson, " 

275. Manchester and Hall, ■ " 
^70. Manchester and Milton, pole, 

277. Marion and Main, " 

278. Marion and lyfcGregor, arm. 

279. Market and Canal, 

280. Market and Franklin, " 

281. Market and Elm, " 

282. Massabesic and Belmont, pole. 

283. Massabesic and Old Falls road, " 

284. Massabesic and Cypress, arm. 

285. Massabesic and Hall road, " 
280. Mast and Main, pole. 

287. Mast and Bowman, arm. 

288. Mast and Riddle, ' pole. 

289. Mast and New Mast road, arm. 

290. Mast and Forrest, " 

291. McGregor and Main, pole. 

292. McGregor bridge, west, " 

293. McGregor bridge, east, \ 

294. Mechanic and Canal, arm. 

295. Mechanic and Elm west back, " 

296. • Merrimack and Canal, " 

297. Merrimack and Franklin west back, " 

298. Merrimack and Franklin, " 

299. Merrimack and Elm, 

300. Merrimack and Chestnut, 

301. Merrimack and Pine, 

302. Merrimack and Union, 

303. Merrimack and Beech, 

304. Merrimack and Maple, 

305. Merrimack and Lincoln, 

306. Merrimack and Wilson, 

307. Merrimack and Hall, 

308. Merrimack and Belmont, 

309. Merrimack and Beacon, i 

310. Merrimack, east of Beacon, 

Jill. Merrimack sqiiare, west, pole. 

312. Merrimack square, east, 

313. Middle and Canal, arm. 

314. Middle and Franklin west back, 

315. Milford, near cemetery, 



312 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

"N'o. aiC). ^Slilford and r.ismarck. arm. 

317. Milford and Carroll, " 

.118. Milford and Kiddle, " 

.319. Milford and ]Main, " 

'iiZO. Mitchell and Beech, " 

321. Monmouth and McGregor back street, pole. 

322. Monroe and liiver road, arm. 

323. Myrtle and Elm east back, " 

324. Myrtle and Chestnut, " 

325. Myrtle and Pine, " 

326. Myrtle and Union, " 

327. Myrtle and Walnut, 

328. Myrtle and Beech, " 

329. Mj^rtle and ]\Iaple, " 

330. Myrtle and Russell, " 

331. Myrtle, near Belmont, " 

332. Myrtle, near Hall, 

333. New INIast road and D, " 

334. New IMast road and AVilkins, pole. 

335. North and River road, , arm. 

336. North and Elm, 

337. North and Bay, " 

338. North and Chestnut, 

339. North and Pine, pole. 

340. North and Union, arm. 

341. North and Walnut, 

342. North Main in Eddy, pole. 

343. North Adams and Ray Brook, arm. 

344. Nuffield lane, rear Central fire station, '* 

345. Nutt road and Beech, " 

346. Nutt road and Portsmouth Railroad, pole. 

347. Orang-e and Elm, arm. 

348. Orange and Pine, " 

349. Orange and Union, " 

350. Orange and Ash, " 

351. Orange and Oak, " 

352. Orange and Linden, " 

353. Orange and Hall, pole. 

354. Page and Portsmoutli Raihoad, arm. 

355. Park square, pole. 

356. Parker and West, arm. 

357. Pearl and Elm east back, 

358. Pearl and Chestnut, " 

359. Pearl and T'ine, " 

360. Pearl and Union, " 

361. Pearl and Beech, " 

362. Pearl and Oak, " 



IAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 



313 



No. 303. Pearl ami Ifusscll. «i™- 

364. Tearl and Linden, 

365. Pearl and IMorrison, pole. 

366. Pearl and Belmont, arm. 

367. Pennacook and Canal, -pole. 

368. Pennacook and Elm, arm. 

369. Pennacook and Chestnut, pole. 

370. Pennacook and Pine, arm. 
3'?!. Pennacook and Union, 

372. Pleasant and Franklin, 

373. Prescott and "Wilson, 

374. Prince and Boynton, 

375. Prospect and Elm east back, 

376. Prospect and Chestnut, " 

377. Prospect and Pine, 

378. Prospect and Union, 

379. Prospect and Ash, 

380. Prospect and Oak, 

381. Prospect and Linden, 

3S2. Prospect, near Hall, " 

383. Putnam and Main, " " 

384. Putnam and Cartier, " 

385. Putnam and Bartlett, pole. 

386. Rowell and Kiver road. arm. 

387. River road, near Otis, " 

388. River road and Stark ]iark. " 

389. Sagamore and Pine, " 

390. Sagamore and \Yalnut, " 

391. Salmon and Canal, pole. 

392. Salmon and Elm, arm. 

393. Salmon and Chestnut, pole. 

394. Salmon and Pine, " 

395. Salmon and Union, " 

396. Salmon and Beech, arm. 

397. School and Turner, " 

398. School and Third, " 

399. Schiller and Second, " 

400. Schuyler and Main, pole. 

401. Shasta and Elm, arm. 

402. Silver and Union, " 

403. Silver and Beech, " 

404. Silver and Lincoln, " 

405. Silver and Wilson, " 

406. Somerville and Jewett, " 

407. Spring and Canal, " 

408. Spring and Elm west back, " 

409. Spruce and Elm, ** 

410. Spruce and Chestnut west back. 



314 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 411. Spruce south back aud Elm east l>ack, pole. 

412. Stark and Canal, arm. 

413. Stark and back street, " 

414. Summer and State, pole. 

415. Thornton and Sullivan, arm. 

416. Tremont square, pole. 

417. Union, near Campbell, arm. 

418. State east back, " 

419. State, south of Granite, 

420. State, north of Granite, " 

421. Sullivan and Beauport, pole. 

422. Sullivan and Main, " 

423. Summer and Dearborn, arm. 

424. Summer and Hall, " 

425. Valley and Elm, 

426. Valley and Pine, pole. 

427. Valley and Union, arm. 

428. Valley and Wilson, " 

429. Valley and Belmont, ' " 

430. Valley and Taylor, " 

431. Valley and Cypress, " 

432. Valley and Jewett, pole. 

433. Vinton and Taylor, arm. 

434. Walker and Main, " 

435. Walker and Fourth, 

436. Walker and Second, " 

437. Walker and Turner, pole. 

438. Washington and Church, arm. 

439. Water, 

440. W^ater and Elm, 

441. Wayne and McGregor, pole. 

442. Wayne and IMain, arm. 

443. Wayne and Beauport, pole. 

444. Wayne and Dubuque, arm. 

445. Webster and Tliver road, pole. 

446. Webster and Elm, arm. 

447. W^ebster and Chestnut, " 

448. W'ebster and Tine, ** 

449. Webster iind Walnut. pole. 

450. Welch avcnm- and Caicf road. 

451. West Hancock and Second, " 

452. West Hancock and Dartmouth, arm. 

453. West Hancock and South Main, " 

454. Whitford and Union, " 

455. Wilton and Main, " 

456. Winter, 

457. Winter and I'arkcr, 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 315 

No. 458. Winter place and Elm west back, arm. 

459. Young- and Taylor, *' 

460. Young and Ainsworth avenue, ** 

461. Young and ilammoth road, " 



. REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To the City Councils: 

Gentlemen,— The auditor herewith submits to j'our honorable body 
his annual report. 

WORK OF THE OFFICE. 

There have been made during- the year the usual annual exami- 
nationfe of the accounts of the treasurer, city clerk, water-works, 
superintendents of Pine Grove and Valley cemeteries, tax collector, 
superintendent of city farm, superintendent of schools; monthly ex- 
amination of the accounts of city weig-her, quarterly examination of the 
accounts of chief of police, semi-annual examination of the account of 
the clerk of the police coiirt;. and compilation and superintendence of 
the publication of the annual report. 

About six thousand bills against the city have been examined and 
certified as correct. All the pay-rolls for the street and park commis- 
sion, schools, fire department, water-works, police department, ceme- 
teries, city farm, and city oificials, have been examined and certified to. 

Twelve monthly drafts, amounting in the aggregate to $1,277,690.80, 
have been drawn on the city treasury. 

Accounts have been kept with all the appropriations, with the treas- 
urer, and tax collector. 

The auditor would recommend an increase of the appropriation for 
this department this year, to enable him to purchase for his office a 
fire-proof safe. There is no safe belonging to the office, at the present 
time, in which to preser^-e valuable books and records against damage 
by fire and water. 

EXPENDITURES. 

The amount of appropriation for auditor's department was $2,000.00 

Expended for salaries $1,860.00 

Expended for supplies 89.01 

Balance transferred to reserved fund 50.99 



$2,000.00 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAIMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



819 



KEPORT OF THE CITY TREASUKER. 



Dr. 

To Manchester National Bank, temporary loan $85,000.00 

Amoskeag- National Bank, temporary loan 75,000.00 

F. S. Moseley & Co., temporary loan 50,000.00 

Georg-e IVIixter, temporary' loan 100,000.00 

George Mixter, temporary loan 50,000.00 

E. C. Smith, city hall receipts 30.00 

E. C. SmitJi, sewer licenses 4,782.06 

E. C. Smith, show licenses 642.00 

E. C. Smith, rent of tenements 215.38 

E. C. Smith, billiard and pool licenses 330.37 

E. C. Smith, dog licenses 1,000.85 

E. C. Smith, lunch cart licenses 53.00 

M. J. Healy, police department 54,679.66 

John C. Bickford, police department ■ 1,164.14 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer. Pine Grove cemetery 3,046.21 

B. A. Steams, superintendent Pine Grove cemetery... 3,166.15 

C. H. G. Foss, Valley Cemetery 1,800.05 

county of Hillsborough; paupers off the farm 1.611.66 

A. F. Precourt, milk licenses 59.00 

A. B. Eaton, city scales 348.40 

William E. Buck, tuition 668.20 

William I-]. Buck, free text-books 178.23 

George E. Morrill, collector, taxes of 1898 545.376.15 

George E. Morrill, collector, taxes of 1897 45.964.98 

George E. Morrill, collector, taxes of 1893 170.00 

George E. Mon-ill, abatement of taxes of 1897 .")9x:.96 

George E. Morrill, abatement of taxes of 1898 1,041.18 

George E. Moriill, old taxes 347.42 

George E. ^rorrill, int«'rest on taxes 1,383.47 

(Jeorge K. .Morrill, taxi's sold 5.134.99 

W. II. ('oi)iirri, ovcnlralt 102.00 

street and park coniniission 96.84 

Thomas ('. SU-wart 12.00 

jSfanchcstfr .National Bank, interest on dci)osits 153.03 

Amoskcag National Bank, interest on deposits 153.65 

'I'lie X:itioiial Science club r..00 

( '. M. iJI-crly ;i2.S5 

•'<'l". A. .Si.cciian 41.04 

320 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 321 

To Stark & Blanchet $12.32 

Jones & Perry 12.33 

state of New Hampshire 10.40 

Henry A. Kent, overdraft 1.00 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, insurance tax 3,159.7.5 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, railroad tax 30,205.44 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, savings bank tax.... 48,198.15 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, literary fund 3,496.80 

Manchester Street Railway Co., paving Elm and Gran- 
ite streets 4,644.63 

Board of Health 6.10 

county of Hillsborough 26.00 

George E. Mon-ill, collector, interest on bank deposits 149.16 

George E. Morrill, redemption of taxes, 1892-1895 333.77 

George E. Morrill, redemption of taxes, 1896 1,086.30 

George E. Morrill, redemption of taxes, 1896 552.17 

George E. Morrill, redemption of taxes, 1897 331.88 

George E. Morrill, redemption of taxes, 1897 1,820.44 

Charles K. Walker, superintendent of water-works, 

receipts 131,184.08 

Eugene Libby, city farm 4,332.22 

Total receipts for year 1898 $1,270,845.91 

Cash on hand January 1, 1898 140,376.17 

Unpaid bills December 31, 1898 13,212.23 

$1,424,434.31 

Cr^ 

By January draft $33,080.86 

February draft 44,550.30 

March draft 41,344.51 

April draft 127,786.6^ 

May draft 67,867.40 

June draft 92,864.90 

July draft 62,659.98 

August draft 225,921.36 

September draft 49,864.27 

October draft 54,799.01 

November draft 164,157.07 

December draft 312,794.49 

Total drafts of year 1898 $1,277,690.80 

Unpaid bills January 1, 1898 18,323.80 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898 128 419.71 

$1,424,434.31 
Respectfully submitted. 

FRED L. ALLEN, 

City Treasurer. 



322 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

To the City Councils of the City of Manchester, N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — I have examined the accounts of Fred L. Allen, city- 
treasurer, for the year ending December 31, 1898, and find proper 
vouchers for all payments, and all receipts duly accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January 1, 1898, was $122,052.37 

Eeceipts during the year ; 1,270,845.91 

Total $1,392,898.28 

Amount of drafts during the year $1,277,690.80 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1898 115,207.48 

Total $1,392,898. 28 

The cash balance taken December 31, 1898, I find to be as follows: 

Deposited in Suffolk National Bank $20,874.00 

Deposited in Amoskeag National Bank 10,040.02 

Deposited in Manchester National Bank 12,470.09 

Deposited in office safe, checks 80,239.29 

Deposited in office safe, currency 4,796.31 

Gross amount of cash on hand $128,419.71 

Deduct amount of bills unpaid 13,212.23 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1898 $115,207.48 

Respectfully submitted, together with a tabular statement of the 
receipts and expenditures of the city for the year 1898. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDI- 
TURES OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER 
FOR THE YEAR 1898. 

Receipts. 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Ileceived from: 

Direct city taxes $598,627.08 

Cost and interest on taxes 1,383.47 

$600,011.15 

Licenses to enter sewer $1,782.06 

to keep dog 1,900.85 

to sell milk 59.00 

to keep billiard and ikjoI tables, and 

lunch carts . 383.37 

to shows and exhibitions 642.00 

$7,767.28 

Kents $245.38 



RECEIPTS. 323 

SUNDRIES. 

Eeceived from: 

City scales $348.46 

Miscellaneous sources 357.87 

$706.33 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Eeceived from text-books and tuition $846.43 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Eeceived from fines and costs $55,843.80 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Eeceived from: 

Pine Grove cemetery $6,212.36 

Valley cemetery 1,800.05 

$8,012.41 

WATER-WORKS. 

Gross receipts $131,184.08 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Eeceived from: 

City farm $4,332.22 

Hillsboroug-h county, boarding paupers and 

Industrial School inmates 1,611.66 

$5,943.88 

miscellaneous! 

Eeceived from: 

Interest $455.84 

Land redeemed from tax sale 4,124.56 

Manchester Electric Eailway, on account of 
paving- 4,644.63 

$9,225.03 

Total ordinary receipts during- the year 1898 $819,785.77 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Eeceived from loans in anticipation of tax of 1898 $260,000.00 

STATE. 

Eeceived from: 

Insurance taxes $3,159.75 

Eailroad taxes 36,205.44 

Savings banlc taxes 48,198.15 

Literary fund 3,496.80 

$91,060.14 



324 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

DEBT. 

Eeceived from notes sold $100,000.00 

Gross receipts $1,270,845.91 

Net cash on hand January 1, 1898 122,052.37 

$1,392,898.28 



Expenditures. 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Paid interest on water bonds $39,682.50 

interest on city bonds 38,602.00 

interest on cemetery bonds 2,495.83 

interest on temporary loan, anticipation 

tax, 1898 5,272.86 

Paid city hall $3,445.05 

printing- and stationery 2,145.42 

incidental expenses 5,482.86 

mayor's incidentals 294.50 

city officers' salaries 21,416.72 

auditor's department 1,949.01 

sinking fund trustees 22,000.00 

file and index system 7G2.75 

land sold for taxes 5,185.02 

STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Paid street and park commission $3,516.58 

snow and ice 10,197.22 

repairs of highways 24,534.18 

new highways 4,525.61 

land taken for highways 1,329.50 

watering streets 3,674.82 

paving streets 6,313.73 

macadamizing streets 15,712.25 

grading for concrete 5,193.40 

scavenger sei^vice 15,162.65 

street sweeping 2,133.47 

lighting streets 54,871.91 

bridges 1,288.11 

city tcam.s 6,577.31 

repairs of sewers 4,500.64 

new sewers 34,091.25 

bicycle pat h 35.64 



$86,053.19 



$62,681.33 



EXPENDITURES. 325 

Faid River-road and Elm-street sewer $439.51 

South Manchester playground 100.79 

sidewalk north side Park common 160.00 

paving" Elm street 13,154.73 

paving Hanover street 3,655.94 

paving North and South Main street 7,545.24 

$218,714.47 

engineer's department. 

Paid engineer's department $5,000.00 

he^vlth department. 
Paid health department $4,565.66 

SCHOOL department. 

Paid repairs of schoolhouses $4,444.58 

fuel 7,948.95 

furniture and supplies 1,516.31 

books and stationery 34.25 

printing and advertising 302.77 

contingent expenses 2,226.03 

care of rooms 6,483.77 

evening schools 1,169.90 

teachers' salaries 72,943.02 

evening school, mechanical drawing 360.06 

free text-books 6,328.98 

manual training 1,091.85 

$104,850.47 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid city library $5,064.52 

FIRE DEPARTJrENT. 

Paid fire department $63,092.58 

fire alarm telegraph 4,205.68 

hydrant service 17,675.00 

$84,973.26 

POLICE DEPARTMEJSTT. 

Paid police station $2,932.72 

police court 3,684.98 

police commission 39,369.99 

$45,987.69 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Paid repairs of buildings $3,543.07 

new schoolhouse, Amoskeag 7,942.42 

Pearl-street schoolhouse repairs 629.45 

new schoolhouses 2,624.01 

1-:^ $14,738.95 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WATER-WORKS. 



Paid water-works $66,550.06 

water-works sinking fund 17,675.00 

$84,225.06 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Paid commons $4,676.06 

land on 'Squog river 1,750.00 

Stark park 548.97 

Derryfield park 1,289.00 

Pine Grove cemetery 8,356.24 

Valley cemetery 2,708.05 

Amoskeag cemetery 134.00 

Merrill yard 4.90 

$19,467.22 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Paid paupers off the farm $8,910.07 

city farm 9,018.25 

indigent soldiers 98.25 

Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Sacred Heart hospital 300.00 

free beds, Elliot hospital 300.00 

Emergency ward, Elliot hospital 300.00 

free beds, Notre Dame de Lourdes hospital 300.00 

decoration of soldiers' graves 385.94 

militia 1,000.00 

band concerts 368.73 

$21,281.24 

ABATEMENTS. 

Paid abatement of taxes $1,642.64 

Total of ordinary municipal expenditures $759,245.70 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Paid loan made in anticipation of tax for 1898 $250,000.00 

BONDED DEBT. 

Paid school bonds $10,000.00 

bridge bonds 25,000.00 

notes 100,000.00 

$135,000.00 

STATE AND COUNTY TAXES. 

Paid state tax $57,991.25 

county tax 75.453.85 

$133,445.10 

Grand total of expenditure during the year $1,277,690.80 



PAYMENT OF FUNDED DEBT. 327 

Cash on hand December 31, 1898 $128,419.71 

Less unpaid bills 13,212.23 

Net cash on hand $1 15,207.48 

$1,392,898.28 



Interest. 



Appropriation $46,500.00 

Transferred from water-works account 39,682.50 

$86,182.50 



Expenditures. 
Amoskeag National Bank: 

Discount on $25,000 note, 2 months, 1 day $124.96 ; 

Interest on $50,000 note, 6 months 875.00 

Manchester Savings Bank: • ., 

Discount on $25,000 note, 4 months, 24 days.. 291.00 ") 

Interest on $50,000 note, 6 months 875.00 ^: 

Discount on $10,000 note, 1 year, 1 month 379.17 '« 

F. S. Moseley & Co., discount on $50,000 note, '-^ 

6 months, 18 days 1,072.50 

George Mixter: 

Negotiating loan $100,000, 5 months, 22 days 1,285.23 

Discount on $50,000 notes, 3 months 370.00 

Coupons on bridge bonds 2,392.00 

Coupons on Granite bridge bonds 4,280.00 

Coupons on improvement bonds 15,680.00 

Coupons on water bonds 39,682.50 

Coupons on school bonds 8,800.00 

Coupons on security- bonds 1,250.00 

Coupons on city bonds 6,200.00 

Coupons on cemetery bonds 2,495.83 

Total expenditures i $86,053.19 

Transferred to reserved fund 129.31 



$86,182.50 



Payment of Funded Debt. 

Appropriation $35,000.00 

Received from Amoskeag and Manchester Na- 
tional banks 100,000.00 



$135,000.00 



328 REPORT OF TIJE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. "■ 

Second National Bank, note of $100,000 $100,000.00 

School loan bonds 10,000.00 

Granite bridge bonds 25,000.00 

$135,000.00 



Sinking Fund. 
Appropriation $22,000.00 

EXPKXDITUEES. 

Trustees of sinking- fund $22,000.00 



Reserved Fund. 

Balance from last year unexpended $2,939.52 

Appropriation 10,000.00 

Transferred from the following- accounts: 

Interest 129.31 

City hall 54.95 

Land sold for taxes 814.98 

City officers' salaries 83.28 

Mayor's incidentals 5.50 

Auditor's department 50.99 

Street and park commission 83.42 

Repairs of highways 567.82 

New highways 474.39 

Watering streets 1,325.18 

Street sweeping 866.53 

Bridges 711.89 

Scavenger service 337.35 

Repairs of sewers 499.36 

New sewers 408.75 

Lighting streets 428.09 

Paving Hanover street 344.0(5 

Health department 209.34 

"Repairs of schoolhouses 1,055.42 

Furniture and supplies 483.69 

Books and sUitioncry 65.75 

Care of rooms 16.23 

Evening schools 330.10 

Evening drawing school 39.94 

Manual training 108.15 

Free text^books 71.02 



RESERVED FUND. 



329 



Police court $215.02 

Police commission 605.01 

Pearl-street schoolhouse repairs 13C.80 

Stark park 251.03 

Valley cemetery 291.95 

Amoskeag- cemetery 16.00 

Pine Grove cemetery 143.76 

Merrill yard 95.10 

Paupers off farm 589.93 

Indigent soldiers 51.75 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 14.06 

Abatement of taxes 357.36 

Free cash in treasury in excess of appropria- 
tions 9,415.30 

Expenditures. 

Transferred to the follovi^ing accounts: 

Sidewalk for Park common $160.00 

South Manchester playground 120.66 

Paving North and South Main streets 2,700.00 

Fire alarm telegraph 2,205.68 

Paving Hanover street 2,000.00 

Paving Elm street 355.34 

Pearl-street schoolhouse repairs 800.00 

Macadamizing streets 3,712.25 

Band concerts 68.73 

Free text-books 3,400.00 

Printing and stationery 145.42 

Incidental expenses 482.86 

Snow and ice 2,197.22 

Land taken for highways 2,686.27 

Paving streets 1,313.72 

Grading for concrete 193.40 

City teams 77.31 

Fuel 717.11 

Contingent expenses 526.03 

Teachers' salaries 7,111.62 

Fire department 92.58 

Police station 132.72 

Eepairs of buildings 1,166.00 

New schoolhouse, Amoskeag 837.08 

Commons 176.06 

Derryfield park 289.00 

City farm 1,018.25 

Printing and advertising 2.77 



$34,688. 



$34,688.08 



330 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Temporary Loan. 
Receipts. 

Amoskeag- National ]5ank, on note of $2.>,000, 
dated October 4, 1898 $25,000.00 

^Manchester Savings Bank: 

On note of $25,000, dated July 14, 1898 25,000.00 

On note of $10,000, dated November 5, 1898... 10,000.00 

Suffolk National Bank, on note of $50,000, dated 
May 17, 1898 50,000.00 

The New England Trust Co.: 

On note of $50,000, dated August 30, 1898 50,000.00 

On notes for $100,000, dated Jime 15, 1898 100,000.00 



Expenditures. 

Paid of above notes $250,000.00 

Balance to new account 10,000.00 



$260,000.00 



$260,000.00 



City Hall. 
Appropriation .'. $3,500.00 



Expenditures. 

FUEL AND lights. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 60 tons of coal $360.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 16.50 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 111,250 lbs. coal 301.46 

Manchester Electric Co., electric lights 148.25 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 127.06 

Union Electric Co., electric lighl.s 215.41 



WATER AND TELEPHONE. 



Manchester Water- Works, use of water $494.70 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., u.se 

of telephones 51.45 



CLEANING OFFICES, ETC. 



Clarke M. Miiilc.v. toilet paper 

John IT. Cole, janitor 

.7ohn B. Hall, toilet p:ipor, Koa]>, etc 
T. F. Ilaniiafonl, hromns 



$7 


■.0(1 


4S 


;.00 


3 


;.50 


4 


.10 



$1,169.58 



$546.15 



CITY IIALL. 331 

J. J. Ilollaml, soap $0.75 

Manchester Mills, 650 lbs. soap 11.75 

Mary Nolan, labor cleaning offices 314.00 

Oscar Perkins, janitor 636.00 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., soap, matches 1.80 



FURNITURE, FIXTURES, SUPPLIES. 

Beacon Lamp Co., lamps $8.67 

Brown & Burpee, 1 thermometer .75 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice daily June 26 to Octo- 
ber 16 5.52 

James W. Hill Co., flags, rope, etc *. . 46.25 

James W. Hill Co., repairing awnings, etc 38.30 

James W. Hill Co., new awnings 158.23 

Keystone "Wire Matting Co., 2 mats 6.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., chisel, padlock 1.00 

Manchester Electric Co., lamps 3.00 

John B. Varick Co., casters, bolts, dusters, 

sponge, etc 17.45 

INCIDENTAL REPAIRS. 

J. J. Abbott, paint, glass, labor , $75.73 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., lumber and labor 3.30 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electrical labor .78 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., repairing chair .25 

George Holbrook, lumber and labor 16.25 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 13.52 

Thomas A. Lane Co., plumbing material, labor 20.51 
Thomas A. Lane Co., labor on telephone and 

electric lights 5.70 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor 12.69 

B. F. Shepard, repairing locks 4.10 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks 3.25 

C. L. Wolf, material and labor 17.50 



SUNDRIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice daily, June 27 to Octo- 
ber 31 $6.24 

A. Elliott & Co., insurance premium 55.93 

C. M. Edgerly, insurance pi-emium 100.00 

Charles Harmon, insurance premium 30.00 

John B. Hall, vaccine points .50 



$1,026.90 



$285.17 



$173.58 



332 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Kimball & Hobbs, rubber mittens $1.00 

John A. Sheehan, insurance premium 50.00 



$243.67 



Total expenditures $3,445.05 

Transferred to reserved fund 54.95 

$3,500.00 



File and Index System.— City Clerk's Office. 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Florence A. Rol)inson $220.00 

SUPPLIES. 

Library Bureau, card index case $200.00 

Library Bureau, special table 45.00 

Library Bureau, cards 132.75 

A. J. Smith, Hammond typewriter 100.00 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing- Co., document 

case G5.00 

$542.75 

Total expenditures $762.75 

Transferred to new account 237.25 

$1,000.00 



Purchase of Land Sold for Taxes. 
Appropriation $6,000.00 

Expenditures. 

George E. Morrill $5,185.02 

Total expenditures $5,185.02 

Transferred to reserved fund 814.08 

$(■..000.00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 333 



Printing and Stationery. 



Appropriation $2,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 145.42 



Expenditures, 
assessors and inspectors. 



The John B. Clarke Co., advertising $12.80 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing lists of voters 363.25 

Temple & Fan-ington Co., stationery, blank book 17.45 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks, tax 

bills $33.00 

W. D. Henry & Co., book 1.50 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., envelopes 21.80 

CITY CLERK. 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing lists, certifi- 
cates, pay-rolls, etc $153.00 

W. r. Goodman, stationery 11.65 

W. D. Henry & Co., stationery 14.30 

Novelty Advertising Co., printing notices 7.50 

Temple & Farriugton Co., paper 2.00 

AUDITOR. 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing: 

Blanks $23.75 

800 reports 1,031.80 

Lettering reports 7.80 

Binding 150 reports 150.00 

Wrapping 150 reports 3.00 

CITY TREASURER. 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks $4.50 

Daniels & Downs, typewriting 3.00 

W. P. Goodman, stationers' 3.15 

The J. C. Hall Co., engraving checks 21.50 

W. D. Henry & Co., 1 cash book 4.90 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing postals, receipts, 

notes 9.50 

A. E. Martell & Co., 1 letter book 3.50 

Novelty Advertising Co., check protector 1.75 

Temple & Fai-rington Co., stationerj^- 10.35 



$2,145.42 



$393.50 



$56.30 



$188.45 



$1,216.35 



$62.15 



334 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



MAYOR. 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing- message $10.00 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing slips 2.00 

E. K. Coburn Co., stationery 1.95 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 10.86 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 19.96 



CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks, ballots, 
postals, letter headings, etc $73.20 

The John B. Clarke Co., advertising sundry pro- 
posals 49.20 

Union Publishing Co., advertising sundrj' pro- 
posals 58.89 



Incidental Expenses. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 482.86 



Expenditures, 
births, marriages, deaths. 

0. D. Abbott, M. D $7.00 

D. S. Adams, M. D 2.00 

L. P. Beaudet, M. D 2.50 

E. Bernier, M. D .50 

J. C. Bickford 1.25 

II. T. Boutwell, M. D .25 

H. W. Boutwell, M. D 7.00 

A. A. E. Brien, M. D 26.50 

J. F. Brown, M. D 1.75 

J. S. Brown, M. D 1.00 

Lillian G. Bullock, M. D .25 

1. L. Carpenter, M. D 15.75 

Charles Chirurg, M. D 4.50 

James M. Cullity, M. D 14.00 



$44.77 



$181.29 



SUNDRIES. 

E. E. Coburn & Co., stationery, city weigher $2.61 



Total expenditures $2,145.42 



$5,482. 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 335 

Kev. Andreas Carlsson $1.7") 

Eev. J. A. Chevalier 14.75 

Eev. N. L. Colby 8.00 

Eev. T. E. Clapp 2.75 

Eev. H. E. Cooke 2.75 

Eev. C. K. Crossett 1.00 

Eev. A. C. Coult .25 

Eev. A. A. V. Binnington .75 

Eev. H. J. Bellefleur 2.00 

Mary S. Danforth, M. D 9.50 

G. M. Davis, M. D 8.25 

E. H. Dillon, M. D 7.00 

Charles E. Dodge, M. D 8.25 

Clarence M. Dodge, M. D 7.75 

John F. Dowd, M. D 1.00 

Henry Duchene, M. D 5.00 

E. B. Dunbar, M. D . 11,50 

Eev. I. H. C. Davignon 18.00 

Eev. Charles W. Doekrill 1.25 

Eev. Thomas Dorion 3.75 

John Ferguson, M. D 12.25 

John Ferguson, Jr., M. D 2.25 

C. F. Flanders, M. D 38.50 

Arthur Fournier, M. D 6.00 

George Frechette, M. D 19.00 

L. M. French, M. D 8.00 

E. N. Fugere, M. D 30.75 

S. J. Girouard, M. D 4.00 

J. H. Gleason, M. D 6.25 

Moise Guerin, M. D 14.75 

M. S. Guggenheim, M. D 2.00 

N. E. Guillet, M. D 1.00 

Eev. Uldoric Godin 3,00 

Thomas C. Hill, M. D 3.00 

George C. Hoitt, M. D 5.75 

G. W. Hazelton, M. D 1.25 

B. F. Hodsdon, M. D 1.25 

Eev. C. E. Hennon 20.00 

Eev. P. Hevey 4.00 

J. A. Jackson, M. D 14.50 

N. P. Kidder .50 

M. E. Kean, M. D 20.75 

P. G. Laberge, M. D 13.75 

J. E. Larochelle, M. D 19.75 

J. E. A. Lanouette, M. D 27.25 

J. E. Lemaitre, M. D 7.25 



336 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

J. D. Lemay, M. D $12.75 

H. D. Lord 4.50 

Rev. P. Lawrence 1.00 

Eev. J. J. Lyons 5.25 

Eev. B. W. Lockhart 12.00 

Eev. W. C. Lindsey .50 

J. W. D. MacDonald, M. D 10.00 

C. A, Manning, M. D .50 

J. W. Mooar, M. D ' .75 

G. B. Morey, M. D 2.50 

M. V. B. Morse, M. D 1.00 

Rev. Edwin Morrell .50 

Eev. W. H. Morrison 9.50 

Rev. E. A. Nelson .75 

Clara Odman 5.00 

Rev. O. D. Tatch 1.25 

W. M. Parsons, M. D 1.25 

C. A. Palmer, M. D 2.25 

W. H. Pattee, M. D 4.00 

Frederick Perkins, M. D G.25 

Anna Pollmcr 15.25 

J. F. Robinson, M. U 5.25 

C. S. Rodier, M. D 21.25 

J. E. E. Roy 3.75 

W. M. Richardson, M. D .50 

Rev. J. A. Roy .25 

Rev. C. W. Rowley 11.75 

E. C. Smith 552.05 

V. N. Sikorsky, M. D .50 

Serville St. Pierre, :M. D 14.25 

Gillis Stark, M. D 17.25 

F. C. Steuart, M. D 7.75 

A. G. Straw, M. D 1.50 

Zatae L. Straw, M. D 11.25 

J. Sullivan, M. D 3.50 

C. B. Sturtevant, M. D 3.75 

Emil Sylvain, M. D 10.75 

W. F. Templeton, M. D 1.75 

A. J. Todd, M. D 2.75 

E. C. Treniblay, M. ]) 50.25 

George D. Towne, M. D 0.50 

Ellen A. Wallace, M. D 1.50 

George M. Watson, M. D 2.75 

Henry P. Watson, M. D 2.25 

G. L. Wakefield, M. 1) 1.75 

A. F. Wheat, M. D C..50 



$1,333.30 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 337 



DAMAGES AND JUDGMENTS. 

Harris Adier, full settlement of claim $25.00 

James H. Haughey, full settlement of claim... 200.00 

Andrew Leckie, full settlement of claim 50.00 

LEGAL EXPENSES. 

O. E. Branch, professional services $50.00 

Louise B. Foster, 4 hours dictation 4.00 

Louise B. Foster, 44 pages ribbon copy 7.92 

Louise B. Foster, 88 pages carbon copy 3.96 

Dana W. King, copying deeds, etc 9.84 

A. W. Morgan, services and expenses summon- 
ing witnesses, Amoskeag tax case 10.66 

Fremont E. Shurtleff, taking notes and tran- 
scribing notes in Amoskeag Llanufacturing 

Co. V. City 346.92 



CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

Fred L. Allen, expenses to Boston and Concord $24.22 

Boston Engraving Co., cut of high schoolhouse 3.75 

J. E. Bernier & Co., advertising proposals 16.00 

The John B. Clarke Co., advertising bids 10.50 

City Government Publishing Co., 2 subscrip- 
tions to "City Government" 6.00 

O. D. Knox, expenses of insurance committee 

to Boston 19.01 

O. D. Knox, jKJstmaster, postage stamps 55.00 

E. J. Knowlton, postmaster, stamps 155.00 

E. J. Knowlton, postmaster, postals 13.00 

Gelinas & Comeau, advertising bids 6.10 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 36.75 

Union Publishing Co., advertising sundry no- 
tices 76.02 

TEAMS FOR COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

George W. Bailey $51.50 

Boyd Brothers 33.00 

J. P. Brown & Co 20.00 

Henry Cote 5.00 

W. J. Freeman 53.00 

Charles S. Fifield _ 25.00 

A. L. Gadbois " 10.00 

D. N. Gove 10.00 

22 



$275.00 



$433.30 



$421.35 



338 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Fred E. James $54.50 

Kean Bros. & Sheehan 5.00 

Manchester Street Kailway 120.00 

John F. Murphy 10.00 

C. C. Perry 5.00 

George W. Eeed 55.00 

C. H. Simpson 20.00 

George E. Wheeler & Son 20.00 

$497.00 

CITY LIBRARY. 

John A. Barker, care of boiler $137.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., scoops, barrow 7.85 

$145.35 

STREETS. 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., sign boards $i;!.50 

K. G. Chase & Co., nursery stock 37.50 

Adam Dickey, guide posts 5.60 

D. Juneau, setting trees 12.50 

Joseph St. Laurent, 40 tree boxes CO. 00 

C. H. Wood, painting- signs 50.22 

$179.32 

CITY SCAXES. 

Charles B. Clai'kson, weighing coal $142.00 

E. W. Foore, wood and coal 8.00 

L. M. Wason, wood and coal 25.00 



MAYOR. 



E. Ti. Cobiirn Co.. paper, typewiiter ribbons.... $().01 

John B. Hall, soap, paper, chamois skin 2.00 

A. J. Lane Co., services of stenographer 1.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., paj)er and envelopes 2.50 



TAX COI.I,ECTOB. 

.Tames M. Al)bot1, labor in ollice $10.00 

Fred \V. Cliambcrliii, writing tax bills i7.r,0 

The John B. Clarke Co., advertising notice 78.75 

Harriett 10. Daniels, typewriting -,.00 

George E. Morrill, di.stributing tax bills 101.25 

Rei)ublican J're.ss Associatioii, advertising notice 7.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 2.50 



$175.00 



$11.51 



$222.56 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 339 

CITY CLERK. 

W. p. Goodman, 1 inkstand $1.75 

Novelty Advertising Co., 1 stamp 1.00 

Charles A. Trefethen, repairing" clock 1.00 

John B. Varick Co., drawer locks, etc 1.08 



^ CITY TREASURER. 

F, L. Allen, blotting pad, penholders, etc $1.70 

F. L. Allen, express, and revenue stamps 6.80 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., making pay-box 5.90 

E. E. Coburn Co., 1 book to order 6.50 

Curtis, Guild & Co., "The Commercial Bulletin," 

one year to August 27, 1899 4.00 

Louis Gross, pencils 1.10 

E. J. Knowlton, postmaster, stamped envelopes 22.52 

O. D. Knox, postmaster, stamps and postals 27.00 

A. E. Martell & Co., bank deposit slip books, 

to order 1.50 

A. G. Moore, pens 1.00 

Star Stamp Co., stamp and dater 1.35 

COURT HOUSE. 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., labor and material $0.95 

D. J. Adams, repairing lawn mowers 2.00 

Hillsborough county, balance due on one half 

cost of coal for 1S97 61.50 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co.. 43 tons, 2,060 pounds 

coal 266.60 

Timothy P. Shea, services as janitor 525.00 

Timothy P. Shea, cash paid for pitcher, key, etc. .25 

John B. Varick Co., 1 mop handle .10 



$4.83 



$79.37 



$856.40 



SCHOOLS. 

Madden & Sargent, 27 shade trees $25.00 

ASSESSORS. 

John F. Gillis, furnishing transfers of real 

estate $12.00 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on lights 1.20 

B. W. Robinson, use of horse delivering inven- 
tory blanks 3.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank books 71.50 

$87.70 



340 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

ELECTION EXPENSES. 

L. M.Aldrich & Co., material and labor, ward 6 $14.50 

Aretas Blood estate, use of room 3.00 

Aretas Blood estate, use of Mechanics hall, 

ward 3 50.00 

Boyd Brothers, use of teams 2.00 

James Brig-gs & Son, smoke pipe, cleaning sink, 

etc 8.60 

E. R. Cobum Co., books and stationery 22.63 

Charles B. Clarkson, erecting voting booths 7.19 

W. J. Freeman, use of team 2.50 

W, E. Goodwin, labor and material, ward 2 6.43 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 15.85 

Head & Dowst Co., labor on voting booths and 

lights 8.35 

George Holbrook, labor on ballot boxes 7.25 

John F. Kane, labor on booths, etc 14.65 

H. F. W. Little, labor and material, ward 3, vot- 
ing booths 5.22 

C. S. McKean, material and labor, ward 8 8.55 

J. Y. McQueston Co., furniture 9.50 

A. J. Peaslee, use of team 15.00 

Harry A. Piper, stationerj^ etc 3.20 

George Reed, use of teams 10.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper and pencils... 2.55 

G. H. Warren, receiver, sawdust .75 

J. H. Wales, 2 lamps and oil .60 



SUNDRIES. 

American Express Co., express on reports .$6.22 

Amoskeag National Bank, rent of safe deposit 

box 25.00 

John A. Barker, 1 table 1.00 

John A. Campbell, iise of water 1 year 3.00 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., appraising, examining and 

burying animals 13.00 

First Light Battery, firing salute July 4 44.00. 

W. P. Goodman, directories 75.00 

George C. Gilmore, 1 book 1 .00 

John B. Hall, supplies for city physician 16.05 

Hardy & Folsom, cheese cloth, cotton l..")0 

E. M. Hawes, trucking .25 

A. J. Lane Co., bonds furnished city ollicials.. 195.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., nails .25 

C. A. Palmer, M. I)., attending sundry persons 

during absence of city physician 9.00 



.$218.32 



CITY officers' salaries. 341 

A. J. Precourt, supplies for physician $0.05 

Oscax Perkins, cleaning Blodg-et-street school- 
house 2.00 

E. C. Smith, return and recording names of 

children 109.25 

Town of Goffstown, taxes 2.32 

Pike & Heald Co., clamps, bolts, labor .56 

Webster & Camier, burning sheep 12.00 

Prank P. Wiggin, team from lake to police 

station .50 

$517.55 

Total expenditures $5,482.86 



City Officers' Salaries. 
Appropriation $21,500.00 



Expenditures. 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 



William C. Clarke, mayor $1,800.00 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer 1,200.00 

Edwin P. Jones, solicitor 800.00 

Edward C. Smith, clerk 900.00 

George L. Stearns, clerk of common council. . . 200.00 

Thomas VV. Lane, building inspector 100.00 

Asa B, Eaton, weigher ". 400.00 

John A. Barker, messenger 700.01 

J. K. Rhodes, messenger 27.50 

Archie F. Precourt, milk inspector 300.00 

Blanche E. Bullock, treasurer's clerk 540.00 

Florence M. Kidder, city clerk's clerk 520.00 

Maude Young, mayor's clerk 520.00 

CITY PHYSICIAN AND OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Irving L. Carpenter, M. D., city physician $600.00 

W. H. Maxwell, ward 1 25.00 

Heirs of Thomas L. Quimby, ward 2 4.16 

D. G. Andrews, ward S 20.80 

Benjamin F. Garland, ward 3 25.00 

Charles B. Clarkson, ward 4 25.00 

Patrick Costello, ward 5 25.00 

Charles Francis, ward 6 25.00 

William Marshall, ward 7 25.00 



$8,007.51 



342 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Charles McKean, ward 8 $25.00 

Thomas C. Stewart, ward 9 25.00 

William C. Clarke, chairman ex officio 25.00 

W. H. Maxwell, clerk 100.00 

Judith Sherer, matron pest-house 360.00 

SCHOOL OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

W. E. Buck, superintendent of schools $2,300.00 

Curtis W. Davis, truant officer 750.00 

E. B. Woodburjs clerk of board 150.00 

W. C. Clarke, chairman ex officio 10.00 

George B. Rogers, president of common coun- 
cil, ex officio 10.00 

Walter B. Heath, ward 1 10.00 

Elliott C. Lambert, ward 1 10.00 

Charles H. Manning, ward 2 10.00 

George D. Towne, ward 3 10.00 

Louis E. Phelps, ward 3 10.00 

Henry D. Soule, ward 4 10.00 

Nathaniel L. Colby, ward 4 10,00 

James P. Slattery, ward 5 10.00 

John T. Kelley, ward 5 10.00 

Henry I. Haselton, ward 6 10.00 

Herbert E. Richardson, ward 6 10.00 

Edson S. Heath, ward 7 10.00 

Edward B. Woodbury, ward 7 10.00 

Luther Bakhvin, ward 8 10.00 

Ned T. Wallace, ward 8 10.00 

Robert E. Walsh, ward 9 10.00 

Henry I. Lemay, ward 9 10.00 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

Henrj' E. Lewis, ward 1 $155.00 

John E. Stearns, ward 2 253.00 

David O. Fernald, ward 3 970.00 

Harrison D. Lord, ward 4 375.00 

George F. Sheohan, ward 5 170.00 

George H. Dudley, ward 6 522.50 

Robert Leggett, ward 7 142.50 

Eugene W. Brigham, ward 8 577.50 

John T. Hannigan, ward 9 115.00 

Albert T. Barr, assistant 65.00 

Frederick Allen, assistiint 89.00 

John Cay/.cr, a-ssistnint 42.50 

Charles B. Clarksou, assistant 42.50 



$1,309.96 



$3,390.00 



auditor's department. 343 

Isaac Whittemore, assistant $114.50 

Henry F. Stone, assistant 67.50 

L. S. Boivin, interpreter 42.50 

Loiiis Comeau, interpreter 65.00 

Jean B. Rejimbal 74.00 

Amede Dubec, interpreter 9.00 

H. L, Currier, clerical seiTices 187.50 

N. Nichols, clerical services 227.50 

Arthur W. Eowell, clerical sei-\'ices 225.00 

$4,5.32.00 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid George E. Morrill: 

Salary balance for year 1897 $850.00 

Commission on old taxes 24.00 

Salary year ending- November 80, 1898 800.00 

$1,674.00 

MODERATORS, 1897 AND 1898. 

As per pay-roll $135.00 

WARD CLERKS, 1897 AND 1898. 

As per pay-roll $180.00 

INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LTSTS, 1897 AND 1898. 

As per pay-roll $1,423.25 

SELECTMEN, 1897 AND 1898. 

As per pay-roll $405.00 

ELECTION INSPECTORS, 1897 AND 1898. 

As per pay-roll $360.00 

Total expenditures $21,416.72 

Transferred to reserved fund 83.28 

' $21,500.00 

Auditor's Department. 
Appropriation $2,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR, 

James E. Dodge, salary as auditor $1,200.00 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, services as clerk 660.00 

$1,860.00 



.344 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUPPLIES. 

D. J. Adams, sharpening- shears • $0.30 

Lizzie ^I. Cogswell, ca.sh paid for ohaniois, 

postals, paper, rubber bands, etc 5.70 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, laundry 2.65 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing bill heads, en- 
velopes, letter headings 32.75 

Daniels & Downs, paper 8.00 

James E. Dodge, paid for express and deliver- 
ing reports 1.65 

A. M. Finney, cleaning carpet .88 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 4.50 

Hale & Whittemore, 1 picture .40 

E. K. Home, jjitcher and flower pot .63 

Manchester HardAvare Co., twine and pail .70 

Manchest^er postoffice, stamps 1.00 

Star Stamp Co., 1 pad .35 

Temple & Fan'ington Co., 100 filing envelopes. . 9.00 

Temple & Fai-rington Co., 8 blank books 16.00 

Temple <Sr Fai-rington Co., stationery .65 

John B. Varick Co., cord, tacks, twine .35 

George P. Wallace, carbon jiaper 3.50 

$89.01 

Total expenditures .* $1,949.01 

Transferred to reserved fund 50.99 



$2,000.00 



Mayor's Incidentals. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

Boyd P>rothcrs. u.se of teams $55.00 

G. W. Bailey, use of hack 5.00 

William C. Clarke, team hire 195.75 

William C. Clarke, incidentals 16.75 

W. ,T. Freeman, use of hack 5.00 

C. H. Simpson, use of hack 5.00 

A. M. Wincliester, entertiiiimitril of Lowell city 

Oflicials 12.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to reserved fund 



$300.00 



$294.50 



$294.50 
5.50 



$300.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 345 

Street and Park Commission. 

Appropriation $3,600.00 

Expenditures. 

salaries. 

H. P. Simpson, chairman $600.00 

Georg-e H. Stearns 600.00 

Byron Worthen 600.00 

$1,800.00 

CLERICAL SER\aCES. 

Julia Stearns Frost $523.32 

George H. Stearns 468.00 

.$991.32 

USE OF TEAMS. 

H. P. Simpson $150.00 

George H. Stearns 150.00 

Byron Worthen 150.00 

$450.00 

OFFICE SUPPLIES. 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing: 

Blanks $5.50 

200 reports 25.65 

13 plates and inserting 20.50 

Bates ^Manufacturing Co., repairing- machine. . 1.75 

The Nate Kellogg Co., printing bills 11.25 

O. D. Knox, postmaster, stamped envelopes 21.80 

L. T. Mead, envelopes .30 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone ' 38.45 

Rumford Printing Co., 11 half tones 31.90 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co., No. 2 machine, 

less old machine and special agreement 55.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and stationery 41.16 

$253.26 

SUNDRIES. 

H. P. Simpson, expenses commission to Boston $10.50 

G. H. Stearns, expenses commission to Boston. . 10.50 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clock 1.00 

$22.00 

Total expenditures $3,516.58 

Transferred to reserved fund 83.42 

$3,600.00 



346 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Repairs of Highways. 

Appropriation $20,000.00 

Appropriation, resolution October 4, 1898 5,000.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January ■ $5.22 

March 140.05 

April 502.90 

May 988.51 

June 1,445.02 

July 1,772.22 

August 2,127.38 

September 1,796.83 

October 790.78 

November 1,259.59 

December 13.05 

Division No. 4: 

June $138.50 

August 104.00 

September ' 233.12 

November 51.25 

December 43.00 

Division No. 5: 

May $124.75 

June 83.00 

July 2H.r.0 

August 192.13 

September 100.00 

October 81.00 

■ December 59.14 

Division No. 6: 

May $89.50 

July 21.12 

August 39.12 

September 44.37 

November 47.50 

December 55.82 



$25,000.00 



$10,841.55 



$569.87 



$668.52 



$297.43 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



347 



Division No, T.- 
March .$52.00 

April 177.01 

May 501.24 

June 303.62 

July 561..37 

August 369.23 

September 90.12 

October 74.36 

November 56.15 

$2,185.10 

Division No. 8: 

April $32.37 

May 262.44 

June 377.22 

July 180.74 

August 340.46 

September 238.57 

October 79.00 

November 202.42 

December 118.33 

$1,831.55 

Division No. 9: 

July $266.37 

August 72.75 

September 278.50 

December 51.00 

$668.62 

Division No. 10: 

January $83.52 

February 43.07 

March ; 279.97 

April 394.25 

May 544.91 

June 877.19 

July 1,644.88 

August 545.75 

September 250.67 

October 213.11 

November 284.53 

$5,161.85 

Division No. 12: 

July $342.00 

LUMBKR. 

Head & Dowst Co $225.97 

A. C. Wallace 18.12 

David Wells 120.48 

$364.57 



348 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

A. N. Clapp $2.98 

J. nadlock 38.50 

Manchester Hardware Co 22.71 

John B. Varick Co 438.82 

$503.01 

BLACKSMITHING AND REPAIRS. 

James H. Cram, sharpening tools $15.80 

Thomas A. Lane Co., repairing- fountains 4.43 

R. W. Flanders, sharpening tools 2.05 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing fountains 2.65 

C. H. Eobie Co., concreting 306.74 

Sinclair & Dow, sharpening tools 1.77 

$333.44 

STONE, GRAVEL, CLAY. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., clay $0.27 

Charles A. Bailey, stone 207.00 

G. W. Campbell, gravel 12.00 

W. H. Coburn, gravel 127.50 

Mark E. Harvey, gravel 14.90 

John Lovering, gravel 22.70 

Frank Libbey , gravel 49.10 

N. W. Paige, gravel 30.90 

R. P. Stevens & Co., stone chips 9.00 

Mrs. C. C. Webster, clay and gravel 6.00 

$479.37 

SUNDRIES. 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight $7.70 

L. B. Bodwell & C^., 51,850 pounds ice 77.73 

James Briggs & Son, iron and labor 4.95 

John Driscoll Co., dippers, brass wire, etc 35.75 

J. W. Fiske, 1 dog basin for fountain 1.25 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice for foiintain.... 53.40 

Henry Parker,- lime and salt 3.55 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paint, etc .97 

$185.30 

Total expenditures $24,432.18 

Transferred to reserved fund 567.82 



$25,000.00 



SNOAV AND ICB. 349 

New Highways. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $32.40 

February 40.50 

March 32.40 

April 38.98 

May 39.00 

June 873.18 

July 618.35 

August 751.18 

September 36.00 

October 108.07 

November 819.61 

December 31.05 

$3,420.72 

Division No. 7: 

May $14«.00 

September 259.50 

October 133.37 

November 29.70 

$567.57 

Division No. 10: 

June $179.17 

July 42.00 

August 71.75 

November 92.80 

$385.72 

Warren Harvey, stone and building culvert 151.60 

Total expenditures $4,525.61 

Transferred to reserved f iind 474.39 



$5,000.00 



Snow and Ice. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund. 



f8,000.00 
2,197.22 



$10,197.22 



350 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $1,001.03 

February 2,618.63 

March 964.00 

April 107.55 

November 18.00 

December 1,569.28 

$6,278.49 

Division No. 4: 

January $22.00 

February 56.00 

$78.00 

Division No. 5: 

January $8.38 

February 81.75 

$90.13 

Division No. 6: 

January $26.85 

February 86.42 

March 21.12 

$134.39 

Division No. 7: 

January $156.75 

February 313.55 

March 80.62 

December 160.73 

$711.65 

Division No. 8: 

Jantiary $31.82 

February * 80.17 

March 49.24 

$161.23 

Division No. 9: 
February $67.50 

Division No. 10: 

Jaiuiai y $360.51 

February 1.27S.26 

March 237.74 

November 21.85 

December 661.49 

$2,559.85 



WATERING STREETS. 351 



SUPPLIES AND MISCELLANKOITS. 

A. N. Clapp, salt $0.95 

Austin Goings, sand 3.87 

Manchester Hardware Co., shovels 3.90 

John B. Varick Co., shovels, scoops, picks, etc.. 107.26 

$115.98 

Total expenditures _^ $10,197.22 



Damage of Land taken for Highways. 

Appropriation $1,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 2,686.27 



EXPENDITUBES. 

Mrs. Celia Cotter $353.35 

William Cooper 75.00 

C. G. Hasting-s 16.15 

Head & Dowst Co 475.00 

Fred S. Lewis 110.00 

Rowena L. H. Walker 300.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $30.55 

February 12.95 

March 33.39 

April 71.62 

May 195.69 

June 410.70 

July 534.60 



$4,186.27 



$1,329.50 



Total expenditures $1,329.50 

Transferred to new account 2,856.77 



$4,186.27 



Watering Streets. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 



352 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

August $471.92 

September 504.54 

October 133.14 

November 4.92 

December 36.45 

Division No. 10: 

March $24.22 

April 23.30 

May '...<.. 72.50 

June 130.00 

July 205.00 

August 158.75 

September 168.00 

October 82.25 

November 113.65 



SUPPLIES, REPAIRS, ETC. 

J. J. Abbott, paint $30.85 

John T. Beach, repairing carts 115.87 

James Briggs & Son, repairing sprinkler .50 

G. A. Durgin, repairing cart. 7.50 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 21.11 

Kimball Carriage Co., leather spouts, etc 10.25 

Thomas A. Lane Co., material and labor 8.42 

Lessard & Heve3% coupling and labor 5.25 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 56.93 



Paving Streets. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 1,313.72 



EXPENDITUKES. 
I^BOR. 

Division No. 2: 

April $12.39 

May 35S.13 

June 757.28 



$2,440.47 



$977.67 



$256.68 



Total expenditures $3,674.82 

Transferred to reserved fund 1,325.18 

$5,000.00 



$6,313.72 



PAVING ELM STREET. 353 

July $124.00 

August 231.16 

September 37.09 

October 73.17 

November 34.67 

$1,627.89 

Division No. 7: 

May $94.50 

July 100.97 

September 37.75 

November 43.88 

$277.10 

Division No. 10: 

January $49.27 

February 33.14 

March 144.18 

April 12.15 

May 394,00 

June 470.95 

July 329.04 

August 109.61 

September 10.75 

October 44.12 

November ' 75.66 

$1,672.87 

Soule, Dilingham & Co., labor paving back streets 971.81 

PAVING STONE, GEAVEL, ETC. 

Charles A. Bailey, paving stone $464.72 

W. H. Coburn, paving stone 157.25 

F. M. Goings, paving stone 82.50 

Warren Harvejs edgestone, flagging, etc 445.79 

C. H. Robie Co., sand 125.00 

$1,275.26 

CONCRETING. 

C. H. iRobie Co $488.79 

Total expenditures $6,313.72 



Paving Elm Street. 

Appropriation $10,000.00 

Eeceived from Manchester Street Railway 2,799.39 

Transferred from reserved fund 855.34 

$13,154.73 

23 



354 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

May $888.33 

June 526.93 

$1,415.26 

Soule, Dillingham & Co., paving 3,542.66 

STONE, GRAVEL, CEMENT, SAND. 

Charles A. Bailey, paving stone $7,279.96 

Brown & Titiis, cement 258.50 

Warren Harvey, flagstone 385.35 

C. H. Robie Co., sand and gravel 273.00 

$8,196.81 

Total expenditures $13,154.73 



Paving North and South IVIain Streets. 

Appropriation $3,000.00 

Received from Manchester Street Railway 1,845.24 

Transferred from reserved fund 2,700.00 

$7,545.24 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 10: 

August $158.12 

September 85.50 

October 230.13 

$473.75 

SUNDRIES. 

Brown & Titus, cement $282.00 

C. H. Robie Co., paving and concreting 6,789.49 

$7,071.49 

Total expenditures $7,545.24 



Paving Hanover Street. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 2,000.00 

$4,000.00 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 



855 



EXPENDITUEES. 
LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

August '. $179.01 

September 156.50 

$335.51 

t^ . CEMENT, LUMBEE, GKAVEL. 

Brown & Titus, cetoent $117.50 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 2.01 

C. H. Eobie Co., gravel 40.00 

$159.51 

CONCRETING AND PAVING. 

Charles A. Bailey, stone $762.08 

C. H. Eobie Co., concreting 2,055.86 

Soule, Dillingham & Co., paving '. , . 342.98 

$3,160.92 

Total expenditures $3,655.94 

Transferred to reserved fund 344.06 



$4,000.00 



Macadamizing Streets. 

Appropriation $12,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 3,712.25 



$15,712.25 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

February $16.80 

March '. 1.46 

May 408.60 

June 307.81 

July 768.70 

August 1,243.85 

September 711.22 

October 1,683.35 

November 895.21 



$6,037.00 



356 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Division Ts'o. T.- 
September $1,004.69 

October 263.49 

November 618.42 

Division No. 10: 

May $538.39 

June . 2,357.41 

Cedar street: 

April $322.65 

May 397.60 

FUEX, FREIGHT, WATEE. 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight $70.41 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 38.84 

F. X. Chenette, wood 63.05 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., coal 86.70 

Manchester Water-Works, use of water 70.00 

Moore & Preston, coal 97.15 

People's Gas-Light Co., coke 142.00 

TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Manchester Hardware Co $25.24 

B. H. Piper Co 9.78 

John B. Varick Co 792.18 

LABOR, CASTINGS, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., labor and mater- 
ial, crusher $6.05 

A. B. Black, supplies for road-machine 67.95 

Boston Belting Co., leather belting 180.99 

Climax Boad-Machine Co., crushing plates 45.00 

Farrel Foundry & Machine Co., swing jaw and 

shaft 82.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., repairing crusher. . 2.40 

Bead & Dowst Co., timber and shingles 69.72 

C. H. Hutchinson, labor on crusher, drills, etc . . 193.65 

Tlie Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., drills, etc 171.41 

Kimball & llobbs, leather belting 2.07 

Tliomas A. Lane Co., repairs, pipe, etc 80.18 

Til<e & Heald Co., labor on crusher 13.46 

B.C. Banno & Son, snaps .20 

0. W. Eief, belt dressing 0.75 



$1,886.60 



$2,895.80 



$720.25 



$568.15 



$827.! 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 357 

Union Eoad-Maeliine Co., stone, screen, engine 

and boiler $1,000.72 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil 28.9G 

$1,951.51 

STONE. 

Charles A. Bailey, 736 tons stone (Cedar street) $699.20 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 1 stone 10.00 

Brooks & Brock, pavers 16.54 

$725.74 

SUNDRIES. 

Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & Insurance Co., insur- 
ance policy $100.00 

Total expenditures $15,712.25 



Grading for Concrete. 



Appropriation $5,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 193.40 



$5,193.40 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

April 

May * 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Division No. 7: 

May 

June 

July 

August 

November 



$57.76 
366.43 
305.27 
280.45 
161.13 
93.50 
58.81 
144.31 



$17.00 

241.56 

19.50 

49.02 

5.40 



$1,467.66 



$332.48 



358 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Division No. 10: 

May $102.60 

June 115.70 

July 51.87 

August 52.99 

September 29.13 

October 231.88 

November 35.15 

$619.32 

STONE, GRAVEL, CONCRETE. 

Warren Harvey, edgestones, circles, etc $1,366.76 

Manchester Concrete Co., concrete 78.69 

C. H. Robie Co., gravel 75.00 

C. H. Eobie Co., concrete 1,219.13 

$2,739.58 

SUNDRIES. 

Palmer & Garmon, stone cutting $30.61 

John B. Varick Co., wire, fuse, caps, etc 3.75 

$34.36 

Total expenditures $5,193.40 



Scavenger Service. 
Appropriation $15,500.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $636.77 

February 656.95 

March 800.70 

April 842.33 

May 516.19 

June 977.21 

July 789.75 

August 817.94 

September 666.97 

October 581.12 

November 834.20 

December 762.35 



$8,882.47 



SCAVENGER SERVICE. 



359 



Division No. 7: 

January $45.50 

February 53.25 

March 41.25 

April 54.25 

May 49.25 

June 62.50 

July 49.50 

August 55.13 

September .* 45.50 

October 58.75 

November 70.85 

December 71.05 

$656.78 

Division No. 10: 

January $198.30 

February 172.12 

March 193.25 

April 193.25 

May 156.00 

June 183.75 

July 321.75 

Augaist 489.50 

September 310.37 

October 225.00 

November 273.07 

December 137.85 

$2,854.21 

CONTRACT. 

City Farm, scavenger service $2,500.00 

TOOLS AJVD HARDWARE. 

John B. Varick Co $108.84 

LUMBER AND REPAIRS. 

John T. Beach, repairing carts $60.33 

J. A. Ballou, harness repairs 7.45 

Oliver Comire, harness repairs 3.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 6.43 

H, C. Eanno & Son, harness repairs 2.00 

A. C. Wallace, lumber 3.57 

$82.78 



SUNDRIES. 



A. F. Abbott, V. S., professional attendance. 
Eager & Co., salt and soap 



$15.90 
1.50 



360 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Gage & IMcDougall, hay, straw, corn $58.17 

C. H. Simpson, use of team 2.00 

$77.57 



Total expenditures $15,162.65 

Transferred to reserved fund 337.35 

$15,500.00 



Street Sweeping. 

Appropriation $3,000.00 

Expenditures. 

I.ABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

March $77.04 

April 131.55 

May 73.55 

June 178.32 

July 245.34 

August 304.90 

September 262.06 

October 231.47 

November 257.88 

$1,762.11 

Division No. 10: 

March $61.63 

April 34.50 

May 27.25 

June 49.88 

July 35.63 

August 26.12 

September 27.31 

November 31.76 

$294.08 

REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight $0.80 

Hickory Broom Fibre Co., filling broom 17.50 

John B. Yarick Co., brooms, paint, alcohol 23.98 

John y. Wartli, refilling brooms 35.00 

$77.28 

Total cNjioiKlitnrpR $2,133.47 

Transfcrrcnl to reserved fund 866.53 

$3,000.00 



BRIDGES. 361 

Bridges. 
Appropriation $2,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Ij\.BOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $5.67 

March 4.30 

April 12.30 

May 18.38 

June 134.02 

July 8.68 

October 12.00 

November 191.34 

December 4.88 

$391.57 

Division No. 10: 

March $2.25 

August 11.75 

October 14.75 

$28.75 

Head & Dowst Co., building bridge $293.00 

LXrSIBER, STONE, ETC. 

Warren Harvey, stone, cement, labor $155.13 

Head & Dowst Co., plank 350.13 

$505.26 

HARDWARE. 

Manchester Hardware Co , $13.65 

John B. Varick Co 10.83 

$24.48 

SUNDRIES. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., iron and repairs $14.65 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 19.20 

G. H. Warren, receiver, sawing plank ».... 11.20 

$45.05 

Total expenditures $1,288.11 

Transferred to reserved fund 711.89 



$2,000.00 



36*2 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

South Manchester Playground. 

Transferred from reserved fund $120.66 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

July $22.00 

August 71.00 

$93.00 

John B. Varick Co., chain, tubing, wire 7.79 



City Teams. 

Appropriation $6,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 77.31 



Total expenditures $100.79 

Transferred to nevv^ account 19.87 



$120.66 



$6,577.31 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Commons pay-roll: 

June $50.00 

July 350.49 

August 29.00 

September . 75.00 

November 130.25 

$634.74 

Division No. 2: 

January $242.43 

February 190.30 

March 249.90 

April , 224.55 

May 109.94 

June 17S.38 

July 141.75 

August 211.18 

September 130.75 

October 170.38 

$1,915.56 

Division No. 10: 

January $20.25 

February 15.75 

March 35.12 



CITY TEAMS. 



368 



April $17.50 

May 19.00 

June 19.25 

July 10.50 

August 21.00 

September 43. .25 

October 44.75 

November 2G.21 

GRAIN, HAY, STRAW. * 

Adams Brothers $8.00 

Ame & Co 62.50 

Brown & Titus 66.90 

W. H. Boynton 144.30 

H. M. Clough 24,24 

Gage & McDougall 935.20 

John P. Griffin 61.91 

C. H, Harvey 10.50 

J. B. Huse 113.36 

M. F. mil 33.69 

H. Hoyt 63.76 

C. E. Merrill 34.00 

John McAllister 83.84 

Partridge Brothers 48.80 

State Industrial School 110.88 

D. T. Twombly 10.00 

C. D. Welch 98.14 

HARNESSES AND REPAIRS. 

John A. Ballon $249.00 

Kimball Carriage Co 5.00 

H. C. Eanno & Son 31.65 

C^\JIRIAGE REPAIRS. 

John T. Beach $13.25 

George A. Durgin 83.00 

A. Filion 3.00 

HARDWARE. 

Manchester Hardware Co $11.73 

John B. Varick Co 320.47 

HORSES, VETERINARY EXPENSES. 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., attendance and medicine... $50.65 

F. L. Eodwell, V. S., dressing teeth 25.00 



$272.58 



$1,910.03 



$285.65 



$99.25 



$332.20 



364 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Cavanaugh Brothers, horses $280.00 

E. H. Currier, medicine .50 

J. L. Golden, V. S., liniment 8.00 

F. K. Hubbard, medicine 2.35 

Humphrey's Homeopathic Medicine Co., 1 veteri- 
nary stable case 26.00 

W. B. Mitchell, liniment, etc 8.30 

$400.80 

WATER, GAS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Boisclair & Eaiche, coal $6.25 

Manchester Water- Works, use of water 68.00 

New Eng-land Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 72.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 149.10 

J. F. Wyman, coal 13.00 

$308.35 

LUMBEE, REPAIRS, ETC. 

J. J. Abbott, paint $6.02 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 1 casting .57 

D, J. Adams, making keys .50 

James Baldwin Co., 96 feet maple 3.84 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 184.30 

C. H. Hutchinson, castings and labor 2.60 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor 8.67 

Lessard & Hevey, pipe .27 

John C. IMitchell Co., brooms 8.25 

Henry W. Parker, lime .95 

Pike & Heald Co., brass covers, pipe, iron 21.29 

G. W. Rief, lumber and labor 5.87 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paint and glass 1.60 

$244.73 

SUNDRIES. 

C. M. Bailey, brooms, dippers, waste $7.40 

A. N. Clapp, salt, sandpaper, oil, glass 38.08 

Carpenter & Willey, burying horse 4.00 

Eager & Co., soap 3.85 

W. P. Goodman, books and stationery 0.05 

Knight & Thomas, fire extinguishers 28.00 

C. H. Simpson, use of teams 65.00 

Temple & ]'':irrington Co., blank books 10.55 

J. W. Wilson & Son, 2 plates 9.00 

G. E. Wheeler, use of team 1.50 

$173.43 

Total e.vpenditures $0,577.31 



REPAIRS OF SEWERS. 365 

Repairs of Sewers. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $39.88 

March 74.65 

April 176.67 

May 388.31 

June 288.91 

July 251.58 

August 416.70 

September 291.73 

October 295.75 

November 421.94 

December 49.55 

$2,695.67 

Division No. 10: 

January $49.73 

February 9.00 

March 6.00 

April 42.75 

May 196.76 

June 132.00 

July 140.25 

August 266.03 

September 113.13 

October 154.37 

November , 178.43 

$1,288.45 

MATEEIAX, LABOR, ETC. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., repairing pipe.. $42.20 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight 6.12 

Coleman Sewer Trap Co., traps 29.99 

John Driscoll Co., dippers 12.00 

Warren Harvey, stone 329.55 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 25.45 

Manchester HardAvare Co., hardware 5.00 

H. W. Parker, cement 16,50 

Pike & Heald Co., dippers 1.74 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing pipe 23.25 

Johii B. Varick Co., hardvvrare 14.90 

G. H. Warren, receiver, lumber 9.82 

$516.52 

Total expenditures $4,500.64 

Transferred to reserved fund 499.36 

$5,000.00 



3G6 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

New Sewers. 

Approi^riation $30,000.00 

Appropriation, resolution October 5, 1898 4,500.00 

$34,500.00 

EXPENDITL-RES. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

May $1,470.97 

June 1,441.67 

July 2,457.00 

Augnist 3,101.67 

September 931.61 

October 191.54 

November 531.05 

$10,185.51 

Division No. 7: 

April $59.87 

May 443.75 

June 977.49 

July 275.11 

Aug-ust 887.31 

September 431.10 

October 214.28 

November 732.54 

December 499.81 

$4,521.26 

Division No. 10: 

May $806.12 

June 1,100.37 

July , 949.51 

Aug-ust 1,414.14 

September 305.74 

October 788.84 

November 1,112.23 

$6,476.95 

HARDWARE AND TOOLS. 

Manchester Hardware Co $180.38 

B. H. Piper Co 24.84 

John B. Varick Co 1,006.70 

$1,217.92 

SEWER PIPE. 

Thoma.s A. Lane Co $5,517.95 

MATERIAL, LABOR, ETC. 

Clark M. Bailey, lanterns and wicks $12.45 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 25 tons 200 lbs. coal 94.08 



BICYCLE PATH. 367 

James Brigrgs & Son, dipper $0.84 

Carson Trench Machine Co., cable-way sheaves, 

bolts, etc 9.25 

Charles W. Cheney, 2 jacks 50.00 

G. B. Cressey, glass and setting 1.25 

A. N. Clapp, oil 22.52 

W. P. Farmer, rubber boots 6.00 

Hartwell Foundry Co., traps, maj;Lliores, etc.... 1,367.22 

C. H.' Hutchinson, labor on drills, bolts 18.63 

L. W. Howard & Co., glass 2.50 

The Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., blasting ba1> 

terjs hose, etc 58.60 

The Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., supplies 106.41 

Kimball & Hobbs, hose, etc 40.52 

Lessard & Hevey, pipe, etc 4.92 

Manchester Locomotive Works, manholes, traps, 

covers, pins, etc 196,50 

Manchester Heating & Lighting Co., repairing 

magnets .50 

Moore & Preston, 25 tons, 1,200 lbs. coal 103.40 

Moore & Preston, wood 104.63 

G. W. Kief, belt dressing and labor 3.60 

Vacuum Oil Co., cylinder oil 39.80 

Wingate & Gould, rubber boots 21.60 

C. B. Wingate & Co., rubber boots 5.00 

$2,270.22 

CEMENT, BBICK, LUMBEB, FREIGHT. 

Brown & Titus, cement $1,668.97 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 189.31 

Cavanaugh Brothers, brick 69.62 

W. F. Head & Son, brick 1,165.13 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 298.77 

Kimball Carriage Co., brick 126.50 

Soule, Dillingham & Co., cement 5.14 

$3,523.44 

Total expenditures $33,713.25 

Transferred to appropriation for Elver road, Clarke, and 

Elm-street sewer 378.00 

Transferred to reserved fund 408.75 

$34,500.00 



Bicycle Path, 
Balance from last year unexpended $35.64 



368 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 

I^BOB. 

Division No. 7: 

April $23.00 

October 2.64 

Division No. 8: 
April • 

Total expenditiires 

River Road, Clarke, and Elm Street Sewer. 

Balance from last year unexpended $439.51 

Transferred from new sewers appropriation .... 378.00 



$25.64 
$10.00 
$35.64 



$817.51 



Expenditures. 

I^BOR. 

Division No. 2: 
June 

Total expenditures 

Concreting Lake Avenue Sidewalk. 

Appropriation, resolution October 5, 1898 

Expenditures. 

Pay-roll, Division No. 2, September $52.52 

C. H. Eobie Co., concreting 107.48 

Commons. 

Appropriation $4,000.00 

Appropriation, resolution October 4, 1898 500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 176.06 



$817.51 
$817.51 



$160.00 



$160.00 



$4,676.06 



COMMONS. 



369 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Januarj- 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

PLANTS, ETC. 

Clark & Estey, rose bushes 

A. G. Hood, plants 

J. S. Holt & Co., ashes 

The Kirby Floral Co., plants 

F. A. Koerner, plants 

Manchester Hardware Co., seed 

Ray Brook Garden Co., plants 

E. P. Eichardson, bulbs 

F. S. Worthen & Son, plants 

WATER AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Manchester Water-Works, use of water 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 

REPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSKS. 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., filing saws, etc 

J. J. Abbott, paint 

D. J. Adams, making keys 

John T. Beach, 1 wagon 

John T. Beach, repairs 

A. F. Davis, pine boughs 

Eager & Co., salt 

John Fullerton, lawn mower and scythe 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 

C. H. Hutchinson, repairing scrapers, etc 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

Thomas A. Lane Co., pipe, dippers, labor 

Manchester Hardware Co., tools and hardware 
24 



$312.50 
280.62 
168.37 
245.25 
204.00 
276.08 
149.25 
283.63 
267.23 
291.54 
485.37 
190.24 



$6.05 
70.00 
70.00 
60.00 
20.00 
14.57 
89.00 
9.00 
35.00 



$724.00 
36.00 



$11.80 

31.82 

.25 

55.00 

18.50 

34.00 

1.00 

3.00 

26.43 

51.25 

19.29 

13.65 

26.61 



$3,154.08 



$373.62 



$760.00 



370 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

New Hampshire College, analyzing- water $2.50 

P. O'Riorden, teaming- cannons 20.35 

Pope & Trudell, sharpening tools 15.00 

Leander Pope, sharpening- tools 7.45 

G. W. Eief, lumber and labor 3.75 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repairs 2.05 

John B. Varick Co., tools and hardware 43.41 

R. M. West, 1 ladder 1.25 

$388.36 

Total expenditures $4,676.06 



Stark Park. 

Appropriation $800.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January $1.50 

March ■ 2.25 

April 79.75 

May 66.75 

June 126.89 

July 40.50 

August 106.25 

September 44.62 

October 57.83 



TOOLS, HARDWARE, REPAIRS, ETC. 

William Corey Co., pins for hay caps $3.00 

J. A. Chamberlin, trees 1.50 

Thomas A. Lane Co., material and labor 5.60 

John B. Varick Co., tools and hardware 12.53 



Derryfield Park. 

Appropriat ion $1,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund .289.00 



$526.34 



$22.63 



Total expenditures $548.97 

Transferred to re.sei-ved fund 251.03 

$800.00 



$1,289.00 



LIGHTING STREETS. 371 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January $2.37 

February 30.87 

March 38.50 

April 58.25 

May 246.25 

June 217.25 

July 93.50 

August 197.62 

September 171.00 

$1,055.61 

TOOLS, HARDWARE, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Thomas Adams, trees $4.00 

D. J. Adams, fitting- and making- keys 1.50 

W. M. Darrah & Co., g-ravel roofing 52.83 

C. W. & G. A. Farmer, boards 18.00 

O. Hardy, trees 15.25 

J. S. Holt & Co., ashes 80.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 16.80 

Thomas A. Lane Co., labor at Weston observa- 
tory 37.97 

John B. Varick Co., tools and hardware 7.04 

$233.39 

Total expenditures $1,289.00 



Lighting Streets 
Appropriation $55,300.00 



Expenditures. 

ELECTRIC lights. 

Manchester Electric Co.: 

Cbarges. Discounts. 

January $4,350.83 $26.94 

February 4,350.83 25.00 

March 4,350.83 12.49 

April 4,350.83 9.07 

May 4,350.83 14.81 

June '4,350.83 5.54 

July 4,350.83 4.16 

August 4,350.83 4.41 

September 4,350.83 9.40 

October 4,350.83 9.37 



372 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

November $4,350.8:5 $11.21 

December 4,3r,0.83 20.70 

$52,209.96 $153.10 

Less discount 153.10 

GAS. 

People's Gas-Lig-ht Co.: 

January $51.80 

February 51.80 

March 42.42 

April 42.56 

May 37.94 

June 34.44 

July 31.08 

August 32.20 

September 33.46 

October 37.94 

November 46.48 

December 49.70 

CARE OF GAS A:ND OIL LAMPS. 

William Brooks $222.88 

E. P. Cog-swell 291.72 

Frank W. Elliott, to January 1, 1899 15.34 

Joseph Goodwin 1,316.00 

Mary E. Eeed, to December 1, 1898 8.25 

SUPPLIES. 

A. N. Clapp, kerosene $34.85 

A. N. Clapp, g-asoline 10.76 

A. N. Clapp, naphtha 151.79 

A. N. Clapp, burners, chimneys, etc 12.10 

Thomas A. Lane Co., 1 torch (i.OO 

Noah B. Reed, oil and supplies 6.00 

Standard Oil Co., 2 tanks 20.00 

John B. Varick Co., g'lobes, glass, etc 20.56 

W. A. Wood & Co., naphtha 48.99 

C. L. Wolf, lamps and labor setting up 93.60 

ST'NDKlI>i. 

Boston & Maine Kailroad, freight $ t.<)4 

J. P. Brown & Co., use of tc.inis ■>.()() 

C. S. Fifield, use of teams 5.00 

Henry Kent, drawing oil 1.50 

Thomas A. Lane Co., repairing lorth .40 



$52,056.86 



$491.82 



$1,854.19 



$404.65 



engineer's department. 373 

C. C. Perry, use of teams $10.00 

Joseph St. Laurent, lumber and labor 16.85 

John Smith, moving and repairing lamps 10.00 

C. L. Wolf, repairing lamps 11.00 

$64.39 

Total expenditures $54,871.91 

Transferred to reserved fund 428.09 

$55,300.00 



Engineer's Department. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Samuel J. Lord, engineer $1,200.00 

Harrie M. Young 858.00 

George W. Wales 860.75 

Harry J. Briggs 780.00 

Alfred Dodge 624.00 

Ella Barker Davis 375.00 

SUPPLIES AND OFFICE EXPENSES. 

American Express Co., express $3.10 

Buff & Berger, repairing transit 18.10 

W. H. Bennett, making inventory, etc 40.00 

C. L. Berger & Sons, repairing instruments 6.60 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing 100 reports.. 25.53 

The John B. Clarke Co., binding books 1.50 

E. E. Coburn Co., stationery 21.30 

Frost & Adams, rivets, tape, level rod 24.54 

W. P. Goodman, ink, pencils, pens, etc 5.50 

W. D. Heni-y & Co., paper and envelopes 4.65 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber .55 

W. F. Hubbard, 250 stakes 10.00 

J. J. Holland, soap 1.00 

R. K. Home, duster, brushes, glasses, etc 3.98 

Kimball & Hobbs, rubber bands, tips 3.67 

Thomas A. Lane Co., shades and holders 1.00 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairing typeA\'riter 12.80 

Manchester Hardware Co., sash fasts, nails 1.48 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 36.00 



$4,697.75 



374 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paige & Myi-ick, 1 stamp and repairs $1.'.)() 

E. G. Soltmann, blue print paper 28.40 

Temple & Farringion Co., 6 books 4.50 

Union Manufacturing Co., house numbers 16.50 

John B. Varlck Co., cord .55 

George Wales, cash paid for supplies .80 

G. P. Wallace, carbon paper 1.00 

A. C. Wallace, stakes 23.75 

C. H. Wood, painting boxes 2.00 

$300.70 

SUNDRIES. 

G. W. Wales, carfare $1.15 

Harrie M. Young, carfare .40 

$1.55 

Total expenditures $5,000.00 

Health Department. 

Appropriation $4,775.00 



Expenditures, 
services. 

John C. Bickford, salary as member of board of 
health, year ending February 1, 1S98 

W. M. Parsons, M. D., salary nine months as 
member board of health, year ending Febru- 
ary 1, 1898 

W. K. Bobbins, salary as member board of 
health, year ending Februarj^ 1, 1898 

W. B. Blake, sanitary inspector 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector 

Carl O. Seaman, sanitary inspector 

M. Alma Fracker, clerk 



$200.00 



200.00 
7G1.15 
744.75 
780.00 
410.00 



$3,251.90 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



The John B. Clarke Co., print iiig bullctin.s, 

blanks, cards, circulars 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing 300 reports... 

E. R. Cob\irn Co., stationery and books 

W. P. Goodman, ink 

Library Bureau, index cards 



$1C)7.I0 

20.13 

8.50 



$199.28 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



375 



TEAMS. 

G. W. Bailey, use of teams 

VV. B. Blake, car fares 

W. B. Blake, job teams 

J. P. Brown & Co., use of teams 

F. X. Chenette, use of teams 

C. S. f ilield, use of teams 

Fred E. James, use of teams 

John F. Looney, car fares 

John F. Looney, job team 

G. W. Eeed, iise of team 

PESTHOUSE. 

Judith Sherer, board of sundry persons 

G. W. Whitford, coal 

SUPPLIES FOR ISOLATED FAMILIES. 

Barlow & Nye, groceries 

W. B. Blake, wood and medicine 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

Napoleon Bournival, groceries 

John Cashman & Son, groceries 

J. B. Cavanaug-h, agent, rent 

F. X. Chenette, wood 

T. F. Fifield, groceries 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries 

Granite State Grocery Co., groceries 

Hannah Greene, food 

John B. Hall, medicine 

Mary Hayes, groceries 

John F. Healy, groceries 

O. D. Knox & Co., groceries 

John F. Looney, groceries, meat, wood 

M. Mclntlre, groceries 

Moore & Preston, wood 

M. C. Paige, milk 

Carl O. Seaman, groceries, wood 

Summer Street Market, groceries 

E. V. Turcotte, wood 

N. Verrette, groceries ' 

OFFICE EXPENSES AND SUPPLIES, 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., material and labor 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., microscope, etc... 
Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., incubator, ther- 
mometer, test tubes, etc 



$3.50 

34.15 
3.00 
7.00 

13.50 
7.50 
6.00 

29.10 
1.00 
5.00 



$43.86 
20.50 



$10.18 

7.68 

11.30 

9.62 

17.47 

10.00 

1.00 

8.72 

15.48 

13.09 

• 3.11 

1.55 

18.75 

18.49 

17.47 

4.32 

6.78 

4,00 

• 3.00 

1.50 

103.22 

3.00 

9.77 



$3.90 
81.17 



$109.75 



$64.36 



$299.50 



376 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Barton &: Co.; rod, cambric, etc $1.46 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and ice 4.34 

W. B. Blake, express, disinfectants, etc 5.00 

Frank Chapman, labor on desk 2.00 

Frank Chapman, lumber and labor 12.68 

]\r. Alma Fracker, express and postage 6.90 

M. Alma Fracker, laundr3% matches, soap 2.05 

J. P. Finn, glass and labor 2.97 

John B. Hall, antitoxine 18.90 

J. J. Holland, antitoxine, etc 10.40 

John F. Looney, express, disinfectants, etc 2.20 

Thomas D. Luce, entrjs etc., Bickford v. Simp- 
son 3.20 

Thomas A. Lane Co., pipe, burner, tube, etc... 1.75 

]\ranchester Mills, 205 gallons wood spirits 153.75 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 36.30 

New Hampshire College, analyzing samples 

water 20.00 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe, pan, dish, repairs 1.76 

Parke, Davis & Co., culture tubes, etc 7.15 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 5.04 

People's Gas-Light Co., radiator and tubing 3.20 

Carl O. Seaman, gas lamps, tubing, paint, ex- 
press, etc '''•06 

The Sulpho-Napthol Co., sulpho-napthol 15.00 

Fred Thurston, antitoxine 10.00 

John B. Varick Co., wood alcohol 82.88 

John B. Varick Co., thermometer, paint 2.75 

$550.22 

SUNDRIES. 

W. B. Blake, expenses to State Board of Health $6.00 

J. S. Brown, M. D., bacteriological examination 1.50 

Arthur K. Day, M. D., diphtheria cultures 18.00 

Carpenter & Willcy, removing dead horses 10.00 

John F. Looney, expenses to New Boston 1.54 

J. W. D. McDonald, M. D., bacteriological ex- " 

aniinations 2 1 .00 

A. G. Straw, M. D., bacteriological examination 6.00 

Carl O. Seaman, expenses to Concord 4.41 

G. L. Tatro, u.se of steamboat. . . 8.00 

F. L. Wallace, use of ambulance 3.00 

Lynn Electric Novelty Co., 1 torch 4.30 

•' ■ $90.65 

Total expenditAircs $4,565.66 

Transferred to resemed fund 209.34 

$4,775.00 



REPAIRS OF SCIIOOLHOUSES. 



377 



Repairs of Schoolhouses. 
A])propriation $5,500.00 

EXPENDITrRES. 
MASONWORK. 

B. W. Robinson $476.86 

Z. B. Stuart 42.45 

$519.31 

PAINTING AND GLAZING. 

J. J. Abbott $30.90 

J. A. Avery .70 

John Bryson 131.17 

Joel Daniels & Co 4.23 

E. J. Ela .50 

John A. Sargent 613.33 

J. A. Smith .15 

W. H. Sullivan 197.50 

L. & W. T. SeiberUch .35 

$978.83 

WOODWORK. 

■G. H. Dudley $834.78 

Head & Dowst Co 2.85 

$837.63 

PLUMBING, IRONWORK, AND REPAIRS. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., material and 

labor testing and repairing boilers, etc $153.55 

S. C. Austin & Co., repairing lightning rods... 27.60 

Brodie Electric Co., repairs .65 

F. W. Blood Roofing Co., repairing roofs 40.01 ' 

F. S. Bodwell, steps and setting 51.50 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric supplies and labor 64.54 

C. W. Anderson, repairing clocks 6.50 

A. B. Colby, repairing pokers, etc 1.00 

Robert Cook, repairing pipes, etc 3.50 

Peter Harris, kejs, etc 2.90 

J. Hodge, window sashes 12.20 

R. D. Jenkins, reseating chairs 3.50 

H. I. Lemay, repairing clocks 10.25 

H. J. Lawson, repairing finials, roofs, etc 154.80 

Thomas A. Lane Co., plumbing and electrical 

material and labor 540.31 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 16 grates 19.59 

Manchester Sash & Blind Co., windows 79.00 

Merrill & Laird, repairing chimneys 22.38 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing materials and labor 501.31 

B. F. Shepard, repairing pencil sharpeners 0.30 



378 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

II. Stratton, pipe and labor $1.93 

Standard Electric Time Co., labor 13.00 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing- clocks 16.00 

A. C. Wallace, posts • 2.40 



Fuel. 



Appropriation $8,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 717.11 



Expenditures. 

COAL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 577 tons, 342 lbs $2,458.07 

J. H. DeCoiircy & Co., 24 tons, 950 lbs 151.76 

Manche.ster Coal & Ice Co., 852 tons, 780 lbs 4,564.73 

Moore & Preston, 107 tons, 225 lbs 515.64 

D. M. Poore, 22 tons 132.50 

J. F. Wyman, 8 tons 48.00 

WOOD. 

L. B. Bwhvell & Co $2.75 

W. E. Dunbar & Son :.*2.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co 5.50 

J. F. Moore 5.50 

Moore & Preston 10.50 

D. M. Poore 13.00 

J. F. Wyman 15.00 



$1,734.72 



CONCRETING. 

C. H. Eobie Co $246.35. 

SUNDRIES. 

Hale & Whittemore, reg-ilding frame, etc $22.10 

C, F. Jack, paid for sawdust, fixing- lawns, etc. . 14.50 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning- pianos 22.50 

Kimball & Hobbs, hose, packing-, etc 17.34 

Byron E. Moore, g-rading j^ard 7.50 

Pay-roll, Division No. 2, December 25.80 

D, T. Eobinson, paid for repairing heating 
apparatus 2.50 

Edwqrd Sears, reefing flag ropes 15.50 

$127.74 

Total expenditures $4,444.58 

Transferred to reserved fund 1,055.42 

$5,500.00 



$8,717.11 



$7,870.70 



$74.25 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 379 

SUNDRIES. 

Moore & Preston, moving coal to Straw school $4.00 



Total expenditures $7,948.9.5 

Transferred to new account 768.16 



$8,717.11 



Furniture and Supplies. 
Appropriation $2,000.00 



Expenditures. 

physical and chemical apparatus, supplies, etc. 

Tebbetts & Soule $143.66 

HARDWARE. 

Manchester Hardware Co., shovels, brooms, 

bells, thermometers, etc $11.99 

John B. Varick Co., brooms, dusters, pails, 

glass, etc 269.28 

$281.27 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Boston School Supply Co., reading chart $7.00 

E. E. Coburn Co., rulers '. .50 

W. P. Goodman, ink, pens, etc 2.54 

J. L. Hammett Co., maps and globes 38.50 

W. D. Henry & Co., inkstands 4.00 

Alfred Mudge & Son, questions for teachers' 

examinations 8.50 

New England Publishing Co., subscription for 

"Journal of Education," two years 3.00 

Perry Picture Co., pictures 1.42 

George P. Wallace, ribbon and paper 2.00 

$67.46 

FURNITURE, ETC. 

J. J. Adams & Co., brushes $4.22 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.: 

4 tables with anvils 75.00 

Flag-pole irons, wrench, labor 5.50 

Oil and lamps 48.98 

L. A. Bums, piano cover 1.00 

Bobrick Furniture Co., 6 No. 1 desks 18.90 

E. E. Babb & Co., 2 pencil sharpeners 6.00 



380 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

O. D. Case & Co., slate blackboards $135.29 

Hardy & Folsom, cloth 4.40 

James W. Hill Co., flags and repairing 87.23 

James W. Hill Co., duck, labor, etc 13.08 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., desks, chairs, settees, etc.... 50.92 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., use of chairs 19.75 

Heyward Bros. & Wakefield Co., ink-wells 10.50 

Josselyn & Read Co., tables 7.50 

Kimball & Hobbs, hose, cloth 19.05 

Manchester Heating & Lighting Co., lamps 2.00 

F. E. Nelson, cups, basins, water cooler 8.84 

J. M. Olcott, 6 dozen ink-wells 4.50 

George S. Perry & Co., 2 rattan mats 9.45 

George S. Perry & Co., ink-wells 34.70 

George S. Perrj^ & Co., pencil sharpeners, disks 7.65 

People's Gas-Light Co., 1 stove 2.50 

Pike & Heald Co., cups, poker, shovel, coal hod 1.90 

The Keyless Lock Co., 72 locks 49.85 

$628.71 

SUNDRIES. 

Barton & Co., bunting $1.50 

W. B. Corey, trucking 2.50 

P. C. Cheney Co., mop waste 5.50 

Daniels & Downs, engrossing diplomas, etc.... 40.25 

Joel Daniels & Co., paint 6.98 

John Driscoll Co., mop wringer 1.00 

T. F. Fifield, salt, oil, etc 4.46 

Frank W. Fitts, ribbon for diplomas 21.19 

T. F. Hannaford, brooms .95 

Peter Harris, iitting keys 1.00 

J. Hodge, walnut molding .30 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 274.97 

C. F. Jack, paid for making covers, etc 2.75 

J. G. Jones, trucking 4.15 

Kasson & Palmer, subscription to "I']ducation," 

to January 1, 1899 3.00 

C. H. Kimball, cord .50 

Manchester Mills, soap, rags 19.25 

I'alnior, Parker & Co., material for manual 

training 4.96 

$395.21 

Total expenditures $1,516.31 

Transferred to resei*ved I'lmd 483.69 

$2,000.00 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 381 

Printing and Advertising. 

Appropriation $;j00.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 2.77 

$:!02.77 

Expenditures. 

SUNDRIES. 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing: 

Cards, lists, circulars, programs $237.38 

400 reports and plate 50.80 

Binding and repairing 14.59 

$302.77 

Total expenditures $302.77 



Bootes and Stationery. 

Appropriation $100.00 

Expenditures. 

sundries. 

E. E. Coburn Co., paper, cardboard $10.20 

Cutter, Tower & Co., paper 1.50 

Educational Publishing Co., subscription to 

"Primary Education," to Januarj' 1, 1899.... 1.00 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., stamps, postals 5.00 

O. D. Knox, P. M., stamps and postils 10.00 

George P. Wallace, carbon paper .50 

E. B. Woodbury, stationery, postals, etc 6.05 

$34.25. 

Total expenditures $34.25 

Transferred to reserved fund 65.75. 



$100.00' 



Contingent Expenses. 

Appropriation $1,700.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 526.03 

$2,226.03 

Expenditures. 

freight and cartage. 

W. B. Corey $2.50 

J. G. Jones G3.92 

$66.42 



382 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Manchester Electric Co., electric lights $38.85 

People's Gas-Lig-ht Co., gas" 330.82 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 222.54 

Water Commissioners, use of water 1,005.85 

$1,598.06 

SUNDRIES. 

J. J. Abbott, painting signs $3.00 

Nellie M. Atwood, paid for carrying water. . . . 12.50 

W. E. Buck, use of horse and carriage 65.00 

W. E. Buck, paid freight, express, etc 21.92 

Louis Bailey, paid for carrying water 13.50 

C. W. Davis, use of team 150.00 

E. J. Ela, paid for carrying water 18.50 

Ervvin Greenleaf, cleaning vaults 25.00 

S. B. Hope, transportation of special teacher of 

music to suburban schools 88.50 

George Holbrook, removing snow 3.50 

Percy N. Folsom, carrying water 7.00 

C. F. Jack, paid for shoveling snow 78.75 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., stamps, and cards 10.00 

Mrs. Byron Moore, water furnished school 6.00 

I'ay-roll, division No. 2 10.38 

riper & Mclntire, rent of piano 21.00 

I'iper & Mclntire, moving piano to and from 

High school 4.00 

Inez M. Warren, paid for carrying water 15.50 

Annie D. Wilson, engrossing diplomas 7.50 

$561.55 

Total expenditures $2,226.03 



Expenditures. 

JANITORS OF SrHOOLIIOlTSES. 

John S. Avery $600.00 

Nellie M. Atwood 37.00 

Ix)uis Bailey 11.00 

S. H. i{at<-lH"I(l(r 399.96 

Edwin N. Baker 350.04 

William Cash 12.00 

Ida K. Coniing 23.00 



Care of Schoolrooms. 
Appropriation $6,500.00 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 383 

'William F. Conner $500.04 

Robert Cook 541.69 

Kmma J. Ela 47.80 

Hose Elliott 14.00 

Tercy N. Folsom 14.00 

Varnum H. Hill 500.04 

F. D. Hanseoni 170.04 

C F. Jack 600.00 

W. H.- Newry .399.96 

Fred Perron 55.50 

W. J. Powers 600.00 

D. T. Robinson 600.00 

William Stevens 399.96 

J. S. Washburn 350.04 

Inez M. Warren 43.00 

$6,269.07 

SUNDRIES. 

Nellie M. Atwood, paid for cleaning $2.50 

Louis H. Bailej', paid for cleaning- 3.00 

Mrs. E. W. Corning-, cleaning school-rooms 2.00 

E. J. Ela, paid for cleaning 2.00 

C. F. Jack, paid for cleaning 175.50 

F. D. Hanscom, moving books, cleaning, etc 24.70 

Mrs. Amelia Martsch, cleaning 5.00 

$214.70 

Total expenditures $6,483.77 

TransfeiTed to reserved fund ; 16.23 



$6,500.00 



Evening Schools. 
Appropriation $1,500.00 



Expenditures. 

salaries. 

Annie B. Angell . $59.00 

t}eorge F. Buck .". 15.00 

L. H. Carpenter 67.00 

Mrs. M. F. Chasse 6.00 

Charles E. Cochran 142.00 

Honorie J. Crough 138.00 

W. W. Forbes 67.00 

Julius Hegewald 25.00 

Margaret G. Linen 67.00 



384 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

W. J. Mooar $58.00 

A. W. Morgan 128.00 

•Mary E. Paige 59.00 

A. W. Rowell 70.00 

Carlena A. Savory 59.00 

Elizabeth Walsh 44.00 

SUNDRIES. 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., lumber and labor $2.15 

John B. Clarke Co., printing cards 6.75 

V. H. Hill, services as janitor 47.50 

.\. P. Hunt, trustee, rent of hall 105.00 

J. G. Jones, trucking 4.50 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to reserved f vind 



$1,004.00- 



$165.90 

$1,169.90 
330.10 

$1,500.00 



Evening School.— Mechanical Drawing. 
Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

salarie^s. 

H. W. Allen '. $153.00 

John M. Kendall 165.00 

SUNDRIES. 

E. R. Coburn Co., paper, etc $32.28 

K. J. McCulloch, lumber and labor 9.78 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to reserved fund 



$400.00 



$318.00 



$42.06 



$360.06 
39.94 



$400.00 



Teachers' Salaries. 



Ajjpropriatlon 
'i'raiislcrrcd fn 



,000.00 
,111.62 



$81,111.62^ 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 385 

EXPENDITUKES. 
SAXARFES. 

January $7,934.76 

Februarj^ 7,984.56 

March 8,173.87 

April 7,812.64 

May = • . 8,325.60 

June- 8,201.12 

September 7,872.55 

October 8,193.96 

November •. 8,443.87 

$72,943.02 

Total expenditures $72,943.02 

Transferred to new account 8,168.60 

$81,111.62 



Free Text-Books. 

Appropriation $3,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 3,400.00 



$6,400.00 



Expenditures. 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 



Allyn & Bacon $82.77 

American Book Co 808.07 

E. E. Babb & Co 418.46 

Boston School Supply Co 162.97 

The Clark Manufacturing Co 39.90 

T. H. Castor & Co 69.06 

Joel Daniels & Co 4.35 

Dodd, Mead & Co 57.00 

Earle Ink Co 28.00 

N. H. Earle & Co 3.50 

W. H. Elliott 1.47 

E. C. Eastman 1.20 

Eagle Pencil Co 23.50 

W. P. Goodman 38.18 

Ginn & Co 1,074.09 

D. C. Heath & Co 116.94 

J. L. Hammett Co 342.38 

W. D. Henry & Co 1.75 

Holden Patent Book Cover Co 146.90 

25 



386 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



King-Kichardson Publishing Co $702.74 

G. F. King & Co 341.61 

Kimball & Hobbs .70 

C. H. Kimball 1.00 

Library Bureau 12.00 

Lee & Shepard 16.92 

Longmans, Green & Co 21.85 

Leach, Shewell & Co 30.00 

Maynard, Merrill & Co 27.78 

The Morse Co 3.60 

New England Publishing Co .70 

Novelty Advertising Co 1.40 

G. S. Perry & Co 2.35 

The Prang Educational Co 457.51 

Silver, Burdett & Co 392.71 

B. H. Sanborn & Co 12.50 

Charles Scribner's Sons 1.00 

Temple & Farrington Co 1.90 

Thompson, BrowTi & Co 31.75 

University Publishing Co 9.75 

^Yerner School Book Co 6.72 

William Ware & Co 301.03 

Wadsworth, Hov^land & Co 24.97 

$5,828.98 

SUNDRIES. 

Fannie L. Sanborn, clerk in superintendent's office $500.00 

Total expenditures $6,328.98 

Transferred to reserved fund 71 .02 



$6,400.00 



Manual Training. 

Appropriation $1,200.00 

Expenditures. 

Fred E. Browne, teacher $921.82 

Mrs. J. W. Davis, laundry 1.50 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 136.12 

W. F. Hubbard, lumber 10.00 

Palmer, I'arker & Co., gumwood 3.70 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 18.71 

$1,091.85 

Total expenditures $1,091.85 

Transferred to reserved fund 108.15 



$1,200.00 



CITY LIBRARY. 387 



City Library. 



Balance from last j-ear unexpended $2,663.08 

Appropriation 4,000.00 



Expenditures. 
^ librarian and assistants. 

Florence E. Whitcher, librarian $808.34 

G. R. Fletcher 133.00 

A. H. Fletcher 100.00 

Carl C. Eraser 163.75 

Varnum Hill 2.25 

L. B. James 197.70 

G. W. SAvallow 366.25 

W. C. Swallow 49.50 

Eay Stearns 12.95 



CATALOGUE AND CATALOGUE SUPPLIES. 

Library Bureau, books to order $17.00 

Library Bureau, cards 33.75 

Louise E. Newell,, copyist 300.60 

Edith O. Simmons, copyist 399.60 

Temple & Earring-ton Co., paper slips, cards..." 118.30 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper, envelopes, pens 7.22 

Temple & Farrington Co., postals and printing 5.75 

BINDING, REBINDING, AND RESEWING. 

Boston Bookbinding Co $123.92 

Temple & Farrington Co 196.12 

WATER, LIGHTS, FUEL, INSURANCE. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood $18.25 

Clarence M. Edgerly, insurance premium 125.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 147,115 lbs. coal 398.65 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 9.52 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 335.19 

Water Commissioners, use of water 16.00 



$6,663.08 



$1,833.74 



$882.22 



$320.04 



$902.61 



NEW BOOKS. 

Trustees of library $1,000.00 



388 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice during 1S97 and 1898., $12.45 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing- HOO reports 1").25 

The John B. Clarke Co., Daily Mirror, one year 6.00 

C. F. Livingston, printing covers 23.71 

Lovejoy & Stratton, repairing clock 2.50 

Med ford Public Librai-y, blocks for charging 

case 1.65 

M. R. Warren Co., mucilage 2.25 

Florence E. Whitcher, paid for cleaning 62.10 



Fire Department. 

Appropriation $63,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 92.58 



EXPENDITtJRES. 
SERVICES. 

Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer $1,300.00 

Fred S. Bean, assistant , 175.00 

Frank M. Frisselle, assistant 175.00 

Eugene S. Whitney, assistant 175.00 

Clarence K. Merrill, assistant 175.00 

Fred S. Bean, clerk 25.00 

teamsters' and engineers' pay-roix. 

January $2,331.18 

February 2,342.56 

March 2.27S.S9 

April 2, 307. 50 

May 2,263.14 

June • 2.:!01.43 

July 2,30S.43 

August 2,440.68 

September 2.414.39 

October 2,393.18 

November 2,338.18 

December 2,268.39 



$125.91 



Total expenditures $5,064.52 

Transferred to new account 1,598.56 

$6,663.08 



$63,092.58 



$2,025.00 



$27,988.01 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 389 



CALL MKMBEHS. 

Engine Co. No. 1 , for 1898 $1,090.00 

Eng-ine Co. No. 1, extra labor 8.00 

Engine Co. No. 2, for 1898 1,680.00 

Engine Co. No. 2, extra labor 8.00 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3, for 1898 2,285.00 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3, extra labor 8.00 

Engine Co. No. 4, for 1898 1,690.00 

Engine Co. No. 4, extra labor 8.00 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 5, for 1898 2,449.15 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 5, extra labor 8.00 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 6, for 1898 2,449.99 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 6, extra labor 8.00 

Chemical Engine Co. No. 1, for 1898 475.00 

Chemical Engine Co. No. 1, extra labor 4.00 

Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1, for 1898 1,820.00 

Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1, extra labor 8.00 

Hose Co. No. 1, for 1898 1,685.00 

Hose Co. No. 1, extra labor 8.00 

Hose Co. No. 2, for 1898 1.6S5.00 

Hose Co. 2, extra labor 8.00 

Hose Co. No. 3, for 1898 910.00 

Hose Co. No. 3, extra labor 8.00 

LABOR AS SPARE DRIVER, ETC. 

F. O. Bartlett $51.00 

J. N. Brown 2.25 

Oscar Beneau 16.50 

Calvin Brinn 1.50 

Robert Edgar 2.00 

John W. Finn 31.50 

Charles Gillette 21.00 

L. F. Kettle 63.00 

F. O. Moulton 3.00 

J. H. McCabe 10.50 

John Eegner 114.00 

Thomas Smith 62.25 

M. W. Worthen 21.00 



$18,903.14 



$399.50 



LAUNDRY. 

Mrs. Charles Cutler $22.38 

Mrs. M. H. Hulme 48.63 

L. A. Lamson 11.04 

Mrs. Margaret Powers 55.79 

Mrs. F. F. Porter 29.00 



390 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Mrs. Susie Reed $6.00 

L. A. Sawyer 18.25 

Mrs. C. C. Tinkham 19.32 

$210.41 

FURNITURE, ETC. 

Barton & Co., pillow slips, cotton $26.88 

James W. Hill Co., crash, pillow slips, etc 23.70 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., matting, stool, cuspidors 81.70 

$132.28 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing- 1,000 envelopes. $23.50 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing- 400 reports... 42.63 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 2.20 

Nate Kellogg- Co., printing envelopes, cards, etc. 41.40 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and stationery 15.38 

Aerial Truck Co. No. 1 10.00 

Engine Co. No. 1 10.00 

Engine Co. No. 2 10.00 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 3 10.00 

Engine Co. No. 4 10.00 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 5 10.00 

Engine and Ladder Co. No. 6 10.00 

Chemical Engine Co. No. 1 10.00 

Hose Co. No. 1 10.00 

Hose Co. No. 2 10.00 

Hose Co. No. 3 10.00 

$235.11 

WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, TELEPHONE. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones $259.41 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 920,22 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 58.01 

Water Commissioners, use of water 490.67 

$1,728.31 

FUEL. 

Oscar Beneau, sawing and splitting wood $5.00 

Moses Beneau, splitting wood 2.00 

Fletcher Brown, wood 23.50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 44.00 

L. B. Bodwoll A- Co., charcoal 1.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 82 tons, 1,960 lbs. coal 503.28 

Alfred Delisle, sawing and splitting wood 4.00 

J. E. French, wood 17.50 

Manchester Coal & Tee Co., 216 tons, 275 lbs. coal 1,309.05 
Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 3 tons, 1,500 lbs. 

cannel coal 56.25 

$1,965.58 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



391 



FREIGHT AND TRrCKAGE. 

John W. Wilson 

Boston & Maine Railroad 

SUPPLIES. 

Henry K. Barnes, hose washers 

Boston Beltino- Co., hose 

Clark ^I. Bailey, waste 

Crosby Steam Gag-e & Valve Co., gages 

Cornelius Callahan Co., Boston pipes and nozzles 
Cornelius Callahan Co., rubber coats, repairs on 

hose, etc 

Daniels-Cornell Co., soapine 

Eagle Oil & Supply Co., solarine 

T. F. Fifield, oil, tank, matches, etc 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., sawdust 

H. Fradd & Co., oil 

Holcomb & Hoke Manufacturing Co., 1 brush.. 

S. F. Hayward & Co., 2 acid receptacles 

T. F. Hannaf ord, brooms 

Arthur Leonard & Co., extension ladder 

W. B. Lane & Brother, 25 coal bags 

Thomas A. Lane Co., gas stove, tubing, lamps.. 

Lynn Electric Novelty Co., 1 torch 

Manchester Sash & Blind Co., shavings 

Manchester Locomotive Works, grates, jjacking, 

bell 

C. H. W. Moulton, 1 fire extinguisher 

Pike & Heald Co., pail, cover, water pot, etc 

People's Gas-Light Co., iriantles and chimneys 

C. N. Perkins & Co., hose, etc 

F. O. Pierce Co., bicarbonate of soda 

Plumer & Holton, jackets 

A. J. Smith, valves 

D. B. Vaniej% castings 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools 

John B. Varick Co., hose 1 

Welch & Hall, 1 horse 

N. J. Whalen, soap 

PLUMBING, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 

John Harrigan, electric switch and labor 

H. J. Lawson, copper and labor 



,$10.49 
4.20 



$3.14 
35.88 
29.78 
16.00 
49.50 

643.24 

24.00 

30.00 

11.01 

.90 

.90 

15.00 

30.00 

7.00 

24.00 

21.25 

4.07 

5.00 

.60 

99.89 

22.50 

5.31 

1.20 

16.50 

40.00 

40.75 

1-40.00 

2.50 

262.40 

100.00 

140.00 

1.50 



$14.69 



$2,823.82 



$28.82 
2.14 
3.05 
5.98 



S92 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Thomas A. Lane Co., material and labor $51.78 

Manchester Locomotive Works, repairing- en- 
gines, etc 313.31 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing hose, etc 1.21 

Scrannage Brothers, bottles and repairs 35.38 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks 8.00 

Union Electric Co., lamps, wiring, etc 21.00 

D. B. Varney, repairing tank 5.50 

VETERINARY SERVICES AND MEDICIXES. 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., ser^aces and medicine $80.60 

N. Chandler, ointment 4.50 

E. H. Currier, medicine 3.60 

Z. F. Campbell, medicine 2.64 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., services and medicine 16.60 

Dyer & Chipman, medicine 1.55 

John B. Hall, medicine 2.50 

E. F. Rowell, ointment 3.00 

A. D. Smith, medicine 12.95 

Snelling & Woods, medicine 17.38 

C. A. Williams, medicine .75 

CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

Couch & McDonald $0.60 

Manchester Locomotive Works 14.70 

J. B. McCrillis & Son 226.12 

BLACKSMITIIING. 

F. L. Bodwell $12.00 

Cressey & Colby 85.45 

A. B. Colby 84.40 

Thomas Hickey ' 19.25 

Mahaney & McSweeney 248.25 

John McSweeney 55.00 

J. O. Tremblay 136.50 

J. O. Tremblay Horseshoeing Co 9.25 

L. r. Tremblay S7.00 

Vezina ' «fe Stack 4.00 

John F. Woodbury Co 119.25 

HAY, GRAIN, ETC. 

Adams Brothers $85.07 

Brown & Titus 226.13 

G. W. Butterlicki 50.21 

City Fiirm 40.00 



$476.17 



$146.07 



$250.42 



$860.35 



FIRE-ALARxM TELEGRAPH. 393 

H. A. Fuller $27.41 

Gage & McDougall 772.06 

E. E. Harvey 9.35 

C. R, Men-ill 3,201.96 

J. K. McQueston 12.21 

Partridge Brothers 16.30 

Wilbur Seed Meal Co 2.50 

$4,443.20 

HARNESS REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 

W. H. Adams $128.65 

The Fred Allen Co .60 

Charles E. Berry 37.50 

H. B. Fairbanks '. 15.90 

W. E. Greeley 2.00 

H. C. Eauno & Son 144.93 

$329.58 

SUNDRIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice, 1895-1899 $22.50 

E. W. Bunton, reseating chair 1.00 

F. X. Chenette, removing dead horse 5.00 

W. B. Corey, use of horses 28.00 

Cavanaugh Brothers, use of horse 60.00 

A. M. Finney, cleaning carpets 9.99 

C. S. Fifield, use of team 5.00 

W. F. Hubbard, sawdust .45 

Thomas W. Lane, paid for postage, cartage, etc 15.70 
Harriet F. ]\IcKeon, rent of stable to December 

11, 1897 4.00 

G. W. Reed, pasturing horse 4.00 

E. H. Sears, reeving rope 5.00 

G. H. Warren, receiver, sawdust .30 

$160.94 

Total expenditures $63,092.58 



Fire-Alarm Telegraph. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 2,205.68 

$4,205.68 



EXPENDITU-RES. 
LABOR. 



January $52.00 

Februaiy 46.00 



3^4 REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR, 

March $54.00 

April 52.00 

May 52.00 

June 52.00 

July 52.00 

August 54.00 

September 52.00 

October 52.00 

November 52.00 

December 54,00 

Oscar Beneau $4,50 

E. A. Sears 5.00 

SUPPLIES. 

American Electrical Works, wire $159.82 

Anchor Electric Co., supplies 9.78 

James Baldwin Co., pins, etc 6.65 

Brodie Electric Co., supplies and repairs 95.68 

J. H. Bunnell & Co., electric supplies 61.05 

James R. Carr Co., paint 55.51 

John W. Clark estate, stock and labor 19.81 

W. E. Decrow, supplies 26.40 

W. E. Decrow, installing storage battery plant. . 1,850.00 

W. E. Decrow, whistle machine and setting up o85.00 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 52.51 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 113.90 

John B. Hall, glass tube, etc .45 

Josselyn & Head Co., stock 1.50 

Kimball & llobbs, gloves 2.25 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe and labor 98.88 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs 65.00 

N. E. Gamewell Co., repairing indicator, etc.... 17.15 

F. O. Pierce Co., vitriol 173.46 

C. A. Trefethen, oil .75 

John B. Varick Co., paint and hardware 46.27 

D. B. Varney, zinc castings 135.30 

Washburn & Moen Manufacturing Co., wire.... 170.72 



SUNDRIES. 



Nate Kellogg Co., printing $8.00 

J. W. Wilson, freight and cartage 16.34 



$624,00 



$9.50 



$3,547.84 



$24.34 



Total e.xpeiiditurcs $4,205.68 



POLICE STATION. 



395 



Hydrant Service. 
Appropriation $17,675.00 

EXPENUITtnRES. 

Water Conunissioners, rent of hydrants '. $17,675.00 



Police Department.— Station. 

Appropriation $2,800.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 132.72 



$2,932.72 



EXPENDITXIRES. 
SEE VICES. 

Frank P. Wig-gin, janitor $638.75 

WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, EUEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 65 tons coal $389.70 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 2 cords slabs 9.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 181,500 lbs. coal 491.83 

Manchester Water-Works, use of water 288.79 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 56.28 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 603.68 

$1,839.28 

LAUNDRY, ETC. 

Clark M. Bailey, toilet paper, brooms, etc $12.83 

Mary Bartlett, cleaning 2.32 

Mrs. A. M. George, washing floors, etc 14.50 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap 10.00 

J. N. Lacourse, soap 1.00 

John Morley, cleaning paint, windows, etc 77.65 

Mrs. J. F. Wiggin, laundry work 63.31 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., soap 4.50 

$186.11 

SANITARY. 

John B. Hall, medicine $0.40 

The Sulpho-Napthol Co., sulpho-napthol 15.00 

F. H. Thurston, Germol, etc 27.88 

$43.28 



396 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

REPAIRS, ETC. 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., lumber and labor $4.93 

James E. Carr Co., paint and labor 8.55 

M. J. Coleman, plumbing repairs 29.84 

George Holbrook, labor and material 6.75 

Thomas A. Lane Co., pjumbing repairs 29.45 

Pope & Trudell, material and labor 1.00 

Pike & Heald Co., dippers, tin, labor 6.40 

Edward Sargent, repairing lock .60 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, glass and labor 2.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., repairing clock 2.00 

John B. Varick Co., screws, pails, dusters 18.73 

SUNDRIES. 

W. B. Corey, trucking safe $31.50 

T. F. Fifield, oil .60 

James W. Hill Co., awnings, crash, blankets, etc. 39.46 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., oil cloth and laying 20.33 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice to November 1.. 8.75 
New England Telephone & Telegrajih Co., use 

of telephones 14.41 



EXPENDITOIES. 
SERVICES. 



John C. Bickford, clerk $600.00 

Isaac L. Heath, police justice 1.500.00 

George Prescott, associate justice 300.00 



$110.25 



$115.05 



Total expenditures $2,932.72 



Police Department.— Court. 
Appropriation $3,900.00 



$2,400.00 



CONVEYING PRISONERS. 

Healy and Cassidy ■ $800.00 

PRINTING, STATIONERY, ADVERTISING. 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing dockot.s. etc $140.50 

The Jolin B. Clarke Co., printing blanks 24.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 1.75 

$166.25 



POLICE COMMISSION. 397 



StTNDRIES. 



M. J. Healy, paid for witness fees, etc $291.98 

Charles Noll, 100 boxes • 25.00 

Star Stamp Co., repairing seal 1.75 



$318.73 



Total expenditures $3,684.98 

Transferred to reserved fund 215.02 

$3,900.00 



Police Department. — Cominiss.on. 
Appropriation $39,975.00 

EXPENDITTJRES. 
SERVICES. 

Michael J. Healy, chief of police. $900.00 

John F. Cassidy, deputy chief 800.00 

Harry Loveren, chairman of commission, salary 150.00 

N. S. Clark, commissioner, salary 100.00 

F. P. Carpenter, commissioner, salary 100.00 

A. B. Brown, police matron 422.00 

C. B. Hildreth, private detective 33.75 

Eegular patrol .» 20,864.57 

Extra time 1,068.48 

Special patrol 12,079.40 

$36,518.20 

FEEDING PRISONERS. 

Hannah W. Greene $304.40 

J. O. Tremblay & Co 23.43 

$327.83 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

The John E. Clarke Co., printing slips, blank 

book, etc $26.75 

W. P. Goodman, stationery and books 47.43 

Temple & Farrington Co., pay-roll sheets 32.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 2.20 

$108 38 

PATROL SYSTEM F.XPENSES. 

Automatic Time Stamp & Register Co., ribbons $12.00 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., pulleys, collars.. .66 

American Electrical Works, vitriol 23.25 



398 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



A. F. Abbott. V. S., serivces and medicine 

Adams Brothers, straw 

Ame & Co., Standard food 

Brown & Titus, hay, corn, oats, etc 

E. M. Bryant & Co., labor and material 

N. Chandler, hoof ointment 

Eichard Ebbitt, V. S., services and medicine 

A. L. Franks & Co., lamps and shades 

Gordon Battery Co., material and labor 

Gage & McDougall, oats 

J. J. Holland, medicine 

Head & Dowst Co., material and labor 

J. Hodg-e, 82 arms 

J. Hodge, lumber 

Kimball & Hobbs, pistol holsters, etc 

Arthur Leonard & Co., extension ladder 

Thomas A. Lane Co., 6 gravity coppers 

Lynn Electric Novelty Co., searchlights and 

batteries 

Manchester Hardware Co., handcuffs, clubs, 

revolvers 

Clarence R. Merrill, oats, straw 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., rent 

of private line and instruments 

Pettingell-Andrews Co., electrical supplies 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor 

Charles E. Perry & Co., register pai^er 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repairs .- 

D. B. Varney, copper 

N. J. Whalen, harness supplies and repairs 

John F. Woodbury Co., horseshoeing 

Ziegler Electric Co., labor and material 

HARDWARE AND REPAIBS. 

J. J. Abbott, paint 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., lumber and labor 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., labor and material. . 

T. A. Lane Co., lamps, etc 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 

Leander Pope, blacksmithing 

Union Manufacturing Co., brass 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 

G. H. ^Var^en, receiver, lumber and castings.... 

TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 

Western Union Telegraph Co., telegrams 



$5.50 
1.54 
3.25 

98.08 

18.00 
5.25 
5.00 
2.00 

64.00 

32.20 
4.15 
5.64 

39.42 
4.08 

11.16 

5.60 

.60 

21.00 

745.05 
96.80 

380.00 

106.05 

3.82 

67.68 

63.75 

1.00 

34.00 

46.00 

80.98 



$6.14 
2.12 
2.20 
2.90 

46.92 

2.35 

.40 

5.85 

6.55 



$216.03 
14.68 



$1,987.51 



$75.43 



$230.71 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 399 

SUNDRIES. 

O. D. Abbott, M. D., medical services $5.00 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight : .54 

L. M. Colby, photographing- criminals 56.25 

J. G. Ellinwood, photographs 2.00 

John B. Hall, bandages and chin splint 2.35 

Kimball Sz Hobbs, hose, gum tissue, matting.. 11.65 

A. J. Precourt, prescriptions filled .80 

Frederick Perkins, M. D., medical services 30.00 

John W. Wilson, freight and cartage 8.09 

Frank P. Wiggin, labor at river, searching for 

dead body 5.25 

$121.93 

Total expenditures , . . . $39,369.99 

Transferred to reserved fund 605.01 

$39,975.00 



Repairs of Buildings. 

Balance from old account $1,042.06 

Appropriation 2,500.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 1,166.00 



Expenditures. 

CITY riBKAHT. 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., labor getting off snow $3.00 

J. J. Abbott, glass and setting 1.25 

G. W. Hamlin, repairing roof 6.55 

George Holbrook, carpenter work 3.50 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on electrics and water pipe 4.04 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing repairs 10.34 

C. L. Wolf, cleaning boiler, etc 4.10 



$4,708.06 



$32.78 



POLICE STATION. 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., lumber and labor $7.24 

W. E. Goodwin, putting in new water pipe 16.75 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., iron beds, mattresses, etc.... 21.50 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing repairs 1.95 

Joseph St. Laurent, repairing stalls 91.67 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing material and labor 7.62 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing material and labor 123.14 



$269.87 



400 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



ENGINE HOUSES. 

Brown & Titus, lime 

James R. Carr Co., paint, glass, labpr 

Alonzo Day, frame and window 

W. M. Darrah & Co., roofing material and labor 
A. L. Franks & Co., electrical supplies, labor. . 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., chairs 

J. B. Huntley, plumbing 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

George Holbrook, lumber and labor 

W. G. Landry, bank wall, etc 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing material and labor 

F. B. Perkins, boards 

James A. Scully, oil cloth and laying 

Shirley & Smith, masonwork 

Thomas Smith, labor and lumber 

Joseph St. Laurent, lumber and labor 

C. L. Wolf, steam heater, etc.. South Manchester 
C. L. Wolf, plumbing, etc 

COURT HOUSE. 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., labor on windows 

Joseph St. Laurent, labor and material 

John B. Varick Co., phosphate 

SCHOOLS. 

Joseph St. Laurent, material and labor 

Pike & Heald Co.. changing pipe 

C. H. Robie Co., patching basement 

BATTERY BUILDING. 

Joseph St. Laurent, lumber and labor 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing material and labor 

SI'NTIRTKS. 

James TJ. Carr Co., jjiiint, Iribor, \v:ii-(l :.* ward- 
room 

C. S. Fifield, u.se of hack 

C. A. Hoilt & Co., chairs and tables, ward 2 
ward-room 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on gas pipe 

Manchester Water- Works, use of water 

C. E. Palmer, solder and labor 

C. C. Perry, u.se of liat-ks 



$0.95 

298.89 

.'5.25 

11. S9 

2S.95 

7.87 

29.0.3 

9.11 

7.25 

50.00 

43.51 

5.00 

16.20 

4.75 

10.50 

747.50 

335.00 

195.11 



$1.25 

20.85 

2.63 



$351.34 
5.14 
7.00 



$174. <?5 
33.75 



$07 


.24 


•' 


.00 


9'. 


.18 


10. 


.'.>(■. 




.•'8 


1, 


.:?5 


20.00 



$1,806.76 



$24.73 



$363.48 



$208.60 



AMOSKEAG SCIIOOLHOUSE. 



401 



G. W. Reed, use of liacks $20.00 

C. H. Robie Co., concreting sidewalks 164.40 

C. H. Simpson, use of hacks 20.00 

Joseph St. Laurent, lumber and kibor 15.09 

Shirley & Smith, kalsomining 45.00 

C. A. Trefethen, care city clocks 333.25 

John K. Wilson,. labor and material 5.00 

$836.85 

'Total expenditures $3,543.07 

Transferred to new account 1,164.99 

$4,708.06 

New Schoolhouses. 
Balance from last year unexpended $2,624.01 

Expenditures. 

high school. 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., furniture $1,172.47 

Head & Dowst Co., material and labor 285.03 

Head & Dowst Co., bookcases 250.00 

T. A. Lane Co., making changes and extras.... 916.51 

$2,624.01 

Total expenditures $2,624.01 



Amoskeag Schoolhouse. 

Appropriation $8,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 837.08 

$8,837.08 

EXPENDITUKES. 

ARCHITECT. 

Chickering & O'Connell, plans and specifications, on 
account $191.38 

CONTRACT. 
J. H. Mendell «fe Co $7,651.00 

ADVERTISING. 

The John B. Clarke Co $23.13 

J. E. Bernier & Co 5.00 

Union Publishing Co 21.48 

$49.61 

26 



402 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., lumber and labor $4.48 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., desks and chairs 34.05 

H. I. Lemay , clocks 12.00 

$50.53 

Total expenditures $7,942.42 

Transferred to new account 894.66 



$8,837.08 



Pearl-Street Schoolhouse Repairs. 
Transferred from reserved fund 

Expenditures. 

James K. Carr Co., paint and labor $20.98 

Manchester Heating & Lighting Co., plumbing 440.00 

J. H. Mendell & Co., material 168.47 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to reserved fund 

Transferred to new account 



$800.00 



$629.45 

$629.45 

136.80 

33.75 

$800.00 



Water-Works. 

Balance from last year imexpended $26,651.56 . 

Cash received from water rents 131,184.08 



Expenditures. 
i:abor. 

January $1,784.37 

February 1,558.25 

March 1,359.95 

April 1,323.24 

May 2,416.72 

June 2,890.65 

July 2,303.00 

August 2,836.64 

September 1,904.48 

October 1,478.32 

November 2,012.04 

December 1 ,697.08 



$157,835.64 



$23,565.34 



WATER-WORKS. 



408 



W. G, Sanborn, labor on Hunter house $14.10 

Bartlett & Gay, setting bounds 24.90 

Dudley & Doherty, setting bounds 5.00 

GENERAL EXPENSES. 

Harry Clifton Co., dinners, June 9 $16.25 

W. C. Clarke, 16 meetings of board 64.00 

Henry Chandler, 29 meetings of board 116.00 

Henry Chandler, salary as clerk •'. . . 100.00 

Alpheus Gay, 27 meetings of board 108.00 

Charles H. Manning, 12 meetings of board 48.00 

Charles T. Means, 14 meetings of board 56.00 

Harry T. Parker, 15 meetings of board 60.00 

George L. Tatro, use of steamboat 6.00 

A. C. Wallace, 16 meetings of board 64.00 

C. K. Walker, salary as superintendent 1,999.93 

C. K. Walker, gas 22.50 

C. K. Walker, express and telegrams 6.75 

C. K. Walker, postage 24.50 

C. K. Walker, lunch for commissioners 7.00 

C. K. Walker, sundries 31.50 

PRINTING, ADVERTISING, STATIONERY. 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 18,000 bills $24.00 

E. E. Cobum Co., books and stationery 21,88 

The John B. Clarke Co.: 

Books, postals, bills, etc 85.25 

650 reports 47.15 

Plates and half tones 31.75 

Advertising 8.50 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 7.25 

TEAMS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 34 tons coal , . . . $239.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 52,640 lbs. coal 171.08 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 25.75 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, wood 7.00 

C. S. Fifield, use of teams 8.00 

Fred E. James, use of teams 20.50 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 102.00 

J. A. & A. W. Walker, 372 tons, 270 lbs. coal 1,095.89 



$44.00 



$2,730.43 



$225.78 



$1,669.22 



404 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



LAND. 

Charles E. Cox, land and buildinos $950.00 

Charles A. Currier, land and buildings 500.00 

A. D. Gooden, land and buildings 1,600.00 

G. F. Hamblett, land and buildings 1,500.00 

Julian B. Huntley, laud and buildings 500.00 

Amos Latuch, land 100.00 

Frank Opelt, land and buildings 800.00 

Sarah A. Palmer, land and buildings GOO. 00 

LEGAL SERVICES. 

J. A. Brodericlc, summoning witnesses, etc $0.25 

Drury & Peaslee, services 106.95 

Dana W. King, recording deed 1.13 

DAMAGES. 

Benjamin Boothroyd, repairing chimney and 

plaster, Caswell residence $3.00 

Melissa L. Claflin, settlement of suit 61. SO 

C. M. Dodge, damage in full, water in cellar. . . 127.08 

Mrs. S. F. McDonald, hanging paper 9.25 

HARDWARE, BLACKSMITHING, FREIGHT. 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight $356.98 

A. B. Colby, sharpening tools 198.67 

Cressey & Colby, sharpening tools 111.53 

James H. Cram, sharj^ening tools 3.43 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 78.55 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 410.25 

SUPPLIES. 

Adams Brothers, cement $10.40 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., pipe, etc 171.10 

Buffalo Meter Co., meter 8.35 

Builders' Iron Foundry, offsets, branches 145.01 

Boston Lead Manufacturing Co., 102 lbs. solder 32.42 

Boston Belting Co., hose, etc 78.87 

Burditt & Bynner, fire clay 10.00 

A. N. Clapp, oil 29.51 

Coffin Valve Co., 5 gates 48.75 

Chad>vick Load Works, lead pipe 405.15 

Chapman Valve Manufacturing Co., 6 gates and 

bell 125.54 

P. C. Cheney Co., waste 3.75 



$6,550.00 



$114.33 



$201.13 



$1,159.41 



WATER-WORKS. 



406 



E. R. & W. P. Coburn, frame $2.00 

M. T. Davidson, casting, valves 156.80 

Dickey & Woodman, manure 119.25 

Eager & Co., soap, matches, etc 7.25 

Edson Manufacturing Co., standard, socket, 

hose, coupling 28.28 

A. L. Franks & Co., battery, zincs, etc .90 

Garlock Packing Co., packing 34.20 

Glauber Brass Manufacturing Co., curb stops. . 733.00 

J. Hodge, meter boxes ....*.' 105.00 

Hays Manufacturing Co., curb boxes 240.00 

Knowlton Packing Co., packing 11.04 

Kimball & Hobbs, hose, gaskets, packing 40.65 

Thomas A. Lane Co., valves, unions, L's 127.25 

C. C. Litchfield, pipe covering 11.06 

Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co., pipe 209.09 

Leonard & Ellis, oil 94.59 

Ludlow Valve Manufacturing Co., gates, valves, 

etc 330.94 

Manchester Locomotive Works, sleeves, cast- 
ings, labor 643.73 

McNeal Pipe & Foundry Co., pipe 14,559.60 

S. E. McAlman, fence wire, stakes 7.71 

National Valve & Lining Co., pipe, couplings, 

etc 1,103.20 

National Meter Co., meters 291.75 

Norwood Engineering Co., hydrants, posts.... 616.82 

Neptune Meter Co., meters 559.00 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe and labor 86.94 

Eichards & Co., lead 914.89 

Rensselaer Manufacturing Co., iron valves 97.00 

Thomson Meter Co., meters 473.00 

Union Water IMeter Co., meters 501.77 

D. B. Varney, brass covers, etc 11.37 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., soap 7.68 

W^alworth Manufacturing Co., solder, etc 6.25 

Henrj' R. Worthington, pump, floats, etc 40.70 

W. A. Wood & Co., waste, oil 38.89 

EEPATKS. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., repairing engines $380.47 

J. J. Abbott, paper and molding 20.37 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric supplies and labor 8.12 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 4.77 

Head & Dowst Co., brick, lumber, labor 163.89 

Hersey Manufacturing Co., repairing meters... 8.10 

National Meter Co., repairing meters 121.00 



,310.45 



406 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

W. 6. Sanborn, shingling house $20.40 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paint and labor 525.24 

Ira F. Sturtevant, lumber and labor 85.76 

C. J. Shanessy, labor on truck 37.45 

P. D. St. Germain, repairing harness 2.50 

Thomson Meter Co., repairing meters 7.10 

Union Water Meter Co., repairing meters 132.80 

H. R. Worthington, repairing engines 11G.29 

$1,634.26 

SUNDRIES. 

Town of Auburn, taxes on propertji- $156.32 

I. M. Barnes & Co., carriage repairs 9.65 

Dudley & Doherty, engineering services 15.25 

J. G. Ellinwood, photographs 8.00 

C. M. Edgerly, insurance premium 18.75 

E. Hecker, blasting for pipe 26.03 

Sarah C. Pennock, quarterlj- payments. Auburn 

residence 50.00 

Charles Spofford, labor 12.56 

Sinking Fund Commissioners, sinking fund on 

water bonds 5,000.00 

John Smith, cleaning vault 3.00 

Trustees of Sinking Fund, hydrant rentals 17,675.00 

G. W. Townsend, services as diver 46.15 

$23,020.71 

Total expenditures $84,225.06 

Transferred to interest account 39,682.50 

Transferred to new account 33,928.08 

$157,835.64 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Appropriation $8,500.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Januar>^ $159.76 

February' 207.70 

March 1 58.76 

April 305.51 

May 448.30 

June 583.00 

July 640.79 

August 682.45 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 407 

September $548.68 

October 402.14 

November 253.45 

December 220.02 



William Favro $28.50 

Frank Jameson 1G.87 

FranJl^ Young 13.46 

PLANTS, LOAM, ETC. 

James A. Colby, 169 loads loam $253.50 

Colby & Smith, 418 loads loam 627.00 

A. G. Hood, plants 203.99 

Manchester Slaughtering & Rendering Co., 

fertilizer 20.00 

Joseph Poor, gravel 38.55 

James Thompson, 165 loads loam 247.50 

Mrs. C. C. Webster, 444 loads clay 444.00 

E. E. Wilson, 11 loads loam 14.50 

WATEK, TELEPHONE, INSURANCE, FUEL. 

L. B, Bodwell & Co., 2 tons coal $14.00 

Everett & Scott, insurance premium 18.75 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 54.94 

Water Commissioners, use of water 405.00 

E. E. Wilson, 3 tons coal 21.00 

Wilson & Bryant, coal 26.00 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing notices, cards, 

blanks, etc $15.65 

W. P. Goodman, books and stationery 3.30 

E. J. Knowlton, P. M., stamped envelopes 2.16 

O. D. Knox, P. M., stamped envelopes 2.18 

W. E. Moore, printing books, note heads, etc . . . 7.75 

Union Publishing Co., advertising notice 2.73 

REPAIRS AND UrPROVEilENTS. 

J. J. Abbott, paint, glass, labor $9.71 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., material and labor 2.65 

John Driscoll Co., dippers, wire, etc 2;75 

Richard Evans, whitewashing 5.25 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 30.39 

J. Hodge, lumber, stakes, windows 33.50 



$4,610.56 



$58.83 



$1,849.04 



$539.69 



$33.77 



408 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing repairs, etc $38.08 

J, H. Mendell & Co., lumber and labor 188.38 

Palmer & Garmon, setting over stones 9.48 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe, valves, domes, labor... 340.70 

Z. B. Stuart, masonwork 2.10 

B. A. Stearns, 1 can 2.75 

John B. Yarick Co., hardware, tools, seed 324.05 

$989.79 

TEAJI EXPENSES. 

Adams Brothers, corn, oats $19.15 

Brown & Titus, oats 6.80 

John T. Beach, 1 dump cart 100.00 

John T. Beach, carriage repairs 2.80 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., veterinary services 2.00 

George Dunnington, harness dressing .50 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., sawdust 1.00 

Thomas Hickey, shoeing horse 7.00 

J. F. Moore, sawdust 1.75 

Partridge Brothers, hay, feed • 81.06 

Thomas Stewart, sawdust 1.00 

J. O. Tremblay Horseshoeing Co., shoeing 4.00 

I. S. York, blankets, and repairs on same 11.90 

$239.56 

SUXDKIES. 

Erwin Greenleaf , cleaning vault $5.00 

E. F. Jones, services as clerk of sub-trustees. . . . 25.00 

Frank Kussell, cleaning vault 5.00 

$35.00 

Total expenditures $8,356.24 

Transferred to reserved fund 143.76 



EXPENDITVnKS. 
I.AIiOU. 

January $59.75 

February 76.00 

March 61.62 

April 152.48 



$8,500.00 



Valley Cemetery. 

Appropriation $3,000.00 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 409 

May $212.39 

June 262.04 

July 218.35 

August 269.69 

September 211.79 

October 184.04 

November • 203.35 

Decemfcer 63.20 

$1,974.70 



B. F. Bascom $31.50 

F. M. Goings 86.00 

S. A. Worthley 8.00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



WATER AND TELEPHONE. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone $36.00 

Water Commissioners, use of water 25.65 



LOAM, PLANTS, ETC. 

B. F. Bascom, loam, manure $99.00 

F. X. Chenette, sand 13.20 

J. Francis, plants 54.00 

F. M. Goings, loam 8.00 

Addison Gray, gravel 2.80 

A. G. Hood, plants 20.75 

W. A. Ingram & Co., flowers 2.00 

J, H. Johnston, loam 8.50 

Mead, Mason & Co., filling 29.78 



E. J. Knowlton, P. M., stamped envelopes $1.09 

O. D. Knox, P. M., envelopes 2.16 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and stationery 3.55 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Adams Brothers, cement $2.75 

F. S. Bodwell, pointing wall 25.00 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., rug and cushion 7.50 

T. A. Lane Co., hose, labor on water pipe 53.64 

C. R. Merrill, cement 4.60 

Palmer & Garmon, setting stones. . .' 21.55 

Pike & Heald Co., hose, pipe, etc 55.19 

C. H. Robie Co., concreting 41.47 

Stark Mills, duck 3.60 

W. H. Tebbetts, material and labor, painting. . 32.69 

John B. Varick Co., hardware, seed, etc 40.10 



$125.50 



$61.65 



$238.03 



$6.80 



$288.09 



410 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

S. P. Cannon, clerk for sub-trustees $10.00 

C. H. G. Foss, expenses to Concord 1.12 

C. H. G. Foss, postage 2.16 

$13.28 

Total expenditures $2,708.05 

Transferred to reserved fund 291.95 

$3,000.00 

Amoskeag Cemetery. 
Appropriation $150.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

G. C. Harwood $93.00 

SUNDRIES. 

G. W. Hamlin, painting fence $17.50 

Kimball & Hobbs, hose 11.50 

Water-Works, use of water 12.00 

$41.00 

Total expenditures , $134.00 

Transferred to reserved fund 16.00 



$150.00 



Merrill Yard. 



Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 
Mark E. Harvey .* 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to reserved fund 



$100.00 



$4.90 



$4.90 
95.10 



$100.00 



Appropriation 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 

Paupers off Farm. 



411 



$9,500.00 



EXPENDITUBES. 
GROCERIES AND MEATS. 

Annis & Co $2.00 

H. H. Alton & Co 24.00 

M. E. Anderson 6.00 

J. B. Belanger 70.00 

Barlow & Nj^e 64.00 

A. N. Clapp 20.72 

C. H. Clark 10.00 

John F. Cahill 20.00 

E. C. Eastman & Co 30.00 

A. M. Eastman 11.00 

T. F. Fifield 8.00 

H. Fradd & Co 38.00 

Forest Brothers 6.50 

Carl Friborg- 10.00 

Griffin Brothers 1,011.47 

Joseph Huard 266.00 

John F. Healy 152.00 

O. D. Knox & Co 180.00 

Austin J. Kearns 10.00 

A. Lambert 15.00 

J. N. Lacourse & Co 6.00 

Lamoreaux Brothers 92.00 

G. C. Lord * 5.00 

P. D. Lynch 336.00 

T. H. Mahoney 96.00 

Ulric Messier 159.00 

McQuade's Market 289.00 

Edward F. Murray 7.00 

E. Marchand 81.50 

A. W. Morse 138.00 

G. F. Nelson 20.00 

Noyes & Prince 82.00 

N. W. Paige 30.00 

Edmond Pinard 38.00 

D. M. Poore & Son 233.00 

F. X. Parent 131.00 

Parnell Brothers 60.00 

E. W. Perkins 21.10 

Eugene Quirin 319.50 

Joseph Quirin 42.00 



412 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Queen City Market 

Sheer & Kenker 

Swinston & Robinson 

Trahan & Co 

J, O. Tremblay & Co 

H. A. Tirrell 

J. O. Turcotte 

M. Verrette, Jr 

Calixte Vigneault 

G. F. Whittier 

FUEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co 

Joseph Breault & Son 

Charles Boisclair & Co 

S. A. Blood 

F. X. Chenette 

T. Courtmache 

Henry Carter 

J. H. DeCourcy Co 

W. E. Dunbar & Son 

Philias Graveline 

Joseph Masse 

A. D. Maxwell 

Manchester Coal & ice Co 

Moore & I'reston 

C. E. Pollard 

People's Gas-Light Co 

O. Pepin 

J. P. Russell & Co 

C. H. Reynolds 

Gideon Richard 

Louisa Schink 

E. V. Turcotte 

A. C. Wallace 

J. F. Wyman 

G. H. Warren, receiver S. C. Forsaith Machine 
Co 

BOARD, CAUE, AND KENT. 

C. M. Bennett 

County of Hillsborough 

Mary Cox 

Alfred Dancause 

W. IL (iilniore 

Mrs. Florence Uardy 



$52.00 

.-3.00 

15.00 

99.00 

10.00 

8.00 

S.OO 

120.00 

120.00 

10.00 



$11.00 

27.25 

95.80 

9.13 

4.40 

2.75 

11.00 

13.50 

18.50 

18.75 

9.50 

84.00 

7.00 

25.25 

11.00 

4.00 

17.50 

104.15 

3.00 

6.50 

7.00 

5.50 

9.00 

IS.SS 



$48.00 

S7C).52 

34.00 

lOt.OO 
0.00 



$4,585.79 



$527.36 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 



413 



Thomas Kelley $84.00 

C. S. McKean 1.75 

Notre Dame Hosi)ital 85.30 

Notre Dame Ori)hanag-e 20.00 

James Orr 20.00 

Mary J. Eiley 130.00 

State Industrial School 1,015.30 

St. Patrick's Orphans' Home 110.00 

Lonis» Schink 68.26 

Women's Aid Home 25.50 

Fred Weissbach 45.08 

Mrs. A. L. White 2.15 

CLOTHING, ETC. 

A. T. Beanmier $21.00 

Burke Brothers 4.50 

E. C. Brigham 1.50 

C. N. Cote 22.50 

Dodge & Straw 6.00 

Hoffman Brothers 15.00 

Lane & Dozois 5.50 

William Marcotte & Co 10.00 

M. A. McDonoug-h 2.00 

John Montplaisir & Co 4.75 

New Hampshire Asylum for Insane 2.75 

Joseph Nightingale 26.92 

P. F. O'Toole 13.00 

Gideon Richard 3.00 

O. G. Trudeau 5.75 

C. B. Wingate & Co 2.75 

MEDICINE, MEDICAL SERVICES, FUNERAL EXPENSES. 

F. X. Chenette, burial sundry persons $35.00 

Thomas F. Collins, burial, John Conner 25.00 

H. D. W. Carvelle, M. D., professional services.. 8.00 

John B. Hall, medicine, etc 85.40 

J. J. Holland, medicine.... 11.44 

G. W. Hazelton, M. D., consultation with Dr. 
Carpenter 3.00 

Kean & Sheehan, burial sundry persons 75.00 

W. B. JNIitchell, medicine 4.30 

M. Potvin, medicine 4.85 

C. A. Palmer, M. D., assisting Dr. Carpenter... 3.00 

A. J. Precourt, medicine 16.45 

E. V. Turcotte, burial sundry persons 40.00 

A. E. Morse, burial outfit 26.00 



$3,278.61 



$146.92 



414 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



A. D. Smith, medicine 

Frank L. Way, prescriptions filled. 



SUNDRIES. 



$o.-.-j 

3.30 



$341.49 



Boston & Maine Eailroad, transportation sun- 
dry persons $11.87 

E. R. Cobum Co., stationery 3.70 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing- notices 3.00 

C. B. Clarkson, convejang Mary Heath to Insane 

Asylum 7.10 

C. S. McKean, transportation F, Underhill to 

Grasmere, and use of telephone 4.23 

$29.90 

Total expenditures $8,910.07 

Transferred to reser\^ed fund 589.93 



$9,500.00 



City Farm. 

Appropriation $8,000.00 

Transfeired from reserved fund 1,018.25 

Expenditures. 

E. G. Libbe3^ superintendent $500.00 

Mrs. Annie Libbey, matron 300.00 

HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 

January $145.52 

February 181.89 

March " 129.19 

April 142.89 

May 151.79 

June 200.88 

July 142.r.G 

Aug-ust 19r).()7 

September 107.92 

October 107.92 

November 194.48 

December 172.02 



$9,018.25 



$800.00 



$2,003.73 



CITY FARM, 415 

Mary Burke $7.29 

Mrs. Thomas Campbell 27.00 

Mrs. John Campbell 5.00 

Lizzie Delaney 5.57 

Maria Harris 1.00 

C. P. Hazen 10.67 

Hannah Hackett 4.50 

Lucinda Patt«n 5.00 



FUEL. 



L. B. Bodwell & Co., IGi/g tons coal $96.85 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 131,300 pounds coal 371.47 

Fred S. Lewis, 5534 cords wood 170.25 

A. W. Prescott, wood 91.50 



CLOTHING, DRY GOODS, ETC. 

Barton & Co., cotton, towels, etc $18.32 

Gideon Belisle, boots and shoes 25.15 

Besse, Eldredge & Co., clothing 11.87 

Clark & Estey, hose, spectacles, rubbers, etc 13.05 

F. C. Dow, shoes 9.40 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., boots and shoes 43.80 

W. P. Farmer, boots and shoes 16.18 

Charles Floyd, clothing 3.25 

James W. Hill Co., cotton, thread, towels, etc.. 104.09 

F. W. Leeman, cotton, crash, gingham, etc 4.81 

Miville & Deschenes, handkerchiefs, needles, etc. 2.56 

H. M. Moody, clothing 9.00 

W. W. Partridge, clothing 31.06 

Plumer & Holton, underclothing.. 8.35 

Eobitaille, LaFlamme & Co., caps, mittens, etc. . 13.39 



MEATS AND PROVISIONS. 

S. F. Adams $1.28 

Barlow & Nye 312.55 

F. J. Bixby 17.05 

Baker & Allen 128.00 

L. Belli 14.24 

C. H. Clark 7.03 

Dodge & Laing 29.25 

Daniels-Cornell Co 590.43 

C. H. Durgin 4.37 

Gage & McDougall 70.00 

J. J. Grenier 2.76 

Gray & Waugh 4.58 



$66.03 



$730.07 



$314.28 



416 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Granite State Grocery Co 

Henry C. Hall 

John Hamilton 

Daniel Jameson 

D. Johnson 

W. D. Ladd & Co 

Manchester Beef Co 

Manchester Provision Co ' 

Edward F. Murray 

Horace ^Marshall 

Thomas H. Mahoney 

J. G. McGovern 

Nelson, Morris & Co 

E. S. Newton 

Parnell Brothers 

H. W. Parker 

Eugene Quirin 

Joseph Quirin 

Tom W. Robinson 

Summer Street Market 

J. E. Towle & Co 

J, O. Turcotte 

J. M. Woodbridge 

J. H. Wiggin & Co 

FURNITURE AND KITCHEN UTENSILS. 

Clark M. Bailey, brooms, clothes pins, etc 

E. K. Home, crockery, tinware 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., tinware, glass, oilcloth 

F. E. Nelson, tinware, glass, etc 

James A. Scully, iron beds, etc 



$2.70 

1.52 

4.35 

5.00 

4.30 

17.16 

25.62 

125.76 

20.32 

25.71 

9.00 

28.02 

52.99 

64.79 

166.43 

301.62 

8.00 

17.11 

15.88 

70.06 

113.91 

25.52 

3.72 

38.28 



$15.80 

21.67 

12.40 

6.52 

42.10 



$2,329.31 



$98.4& 



MEDICINE, VETERINARY SEI^\^CES. 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., professional attendance and 

medicine $1.20 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., professional services 14.25 

John B. Hall, medicine, etc 10.15 

George Hook, castrating pigs 10.00 

F. K. Hubbard, medicine 2.35 

C. W. Lerned & Co., disinfectant 12.50 

E. C. Smith & Co., medicine 1.95 

A. G. & Z. L. Straw, medicine .35 

F. H. Thurston, medicine 5.05 

C. A. Williams, medicine 2.75 



$60. 5S 



CITY FARM. 



417 



BLACKSMITHIXG, IIARXESSES, ETC. 

J. A. Eallon, repairing- harnesses, ete $8.75 

Thomas Hickey, horseshoeing- 1G.74 

Kimball & Hobbs, duck horse covers 10.00 

Dennis Kervvin, repairing harnesses 3.20 

J. O. Tremblay, horseshoeing 42.05 

L. P. Tremblay, shoeing- 35.40 

J. O. Tremblay Horseshoeing- Co., shoeing 4.75 

X. J. "Whalen, repairing harnesses, etc 27.85 

CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

John T. Beach $0.25 

Couch & McDonald 26.20 

Kimball Carriag-e Co 65.00 

Donald McDonald 19.55 

J. B. McCrillis & Son 12.28 

James Murphy 23.00 

Sanborn Carriage Co 1.25 

HAY, GRAIN, AJ«D OTHER FEED. 

Adams Brothers $222.05 

Annis Flour & Grain Co 39.00 

Brown & Titus 163.19 

Gage & McDougall 311.13 

A. H. Hill 7.38 

C. E. Merrill 60.45 

HARDWARE, FERTILIZERS, ETC. 

Manchester Hardware Co $61.33 

John B. Yarick Co 311.02 

PREMIUM ON INSURANCE POLICIES. 

John Dowst $17.50 

A. Elliott & Co 52.50 

John A. Sheehan 122.50 

PRINTING, ADVERTISUNG, STATIONERY, TELEPHONE. 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing- cards, etc., 

and advertising notice $11.05 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 3.15 

Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 45.68 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., 1 directory- 2.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 2.56 

27 



$148.74 



$147.53 



$803.20 



$372.35 



$192.50 



$64.44 



418 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMEXTS. 

J. J. Abbott, paint and brushes $12.65 

Adams Brothers, lime 4.50 

A. A. Amlaw, repairing- pipes 1.25 

Brown & Titus, lime 5.70 

A. M. Finney, repairing- loung-e 2.75 

Peter Harris, keys, etc .50 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 147.31 

J. Hodge, lumber, doors, etc 21.97 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., paper 2.36 

T, A. Lane Co., plumbing material and labor. . . 4.50 

F. X. Laflamme, labor on door 3.50 

Manchester Sash & Blind Co., lumber 5.96 

Pike & Heald Co., tea kettle, faucets, cans, re- 
pairing baker 39.08 

C. L. Wolf, labor and material on range 8.50 

SUNDRIES. 

American Express Co., express $0.75 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice, and cutting ice 10.00 

Blaekstone & Fisher, extracting teeth 1.50 

J. E. Buerk, 1,000 dials 3.60 

A. N. Clapp, kerosene 45.67 

Walter R. Cox, clipping horse 5.00 

C. A. Eastman, pasturing cattle 17.50 

C. S. Fifield, use of teams 30.00 

Alfred Firth, oil 8.50 

W. H. Griffin, grinding corn 15.25 

C. S. Hall, 1 pair beef cattle 136.00 

William Hayes, barrels 9.00 

Marshall Hutchins, bluing .50 

Albert Kidder, subscription to "New England 

Homestead" to January 1, 1899 2.67 

Knight & Thomas, fire extinguishers 86.00 

Kimball & Hobbs, shoemakers' supplies 15.67 

Edward Lynch, scythes and snaths 1.50 

E. (J. Libbey, "Daily Mirror" f,.00 

E. G, Libbey, postage, box rent, barrels, boxes.. 9.03 

Manchester Water Commissioners, use of water 168.15 
Manchester Shiughtcring & Bendering Co., 7 

hogs drcs.sed 3.50 

James McSvvceney, 1 wagon 14.00 

C. H. IVixon, expenses capturing prisoners 3.06 

L. M. Pike, sawdust G.OO 

Smilli & Merrill, making cider 3.r,5 

G. E. Wheeler & Son, hacks 25.00 

Total cxpciuliturcs 



$200.53 



$9,018. 



EMBRQENCY WARD, ELLIOT HOSPITAL. 419 

Indigent Soldiers. 
Appropriation $1 r)0.00 

Expenditures. 

grocebies. 

D. M. Poore & Son $66.00 

FUEL. 

A. D. Maxwell $20.00 

C. E. Pollard 6.00 

D. M. Poore 6.25 

$32.25 

Total expenditures $98.25 

Transferred to reserved fund 51.75 

$150.00 
Women's Aid Home. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
Mrs. Aretas Blood, treasurer, amount appropriated $300.00 

Free Beds, Elliot Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
A. M. Heard, treasurer, amount ajipropriated $300.00 

Emergency Ward, Elliot Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
Cora M. Dearborn, treasurer, amount appropriated $300.00 



420 REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

Sacred Heart Hospital. 
Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
Patrick J. Sullivan, amount appropriated $300.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital. 
Appropriation $300.00 

EXPENDIXrRES. 

Xotre Dame de Lourdes Hospital, amount appropriated... $300.00 



Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 



Appropriation 



$400.00 



Expenditures. 
Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. R 



Total expenditures 

Transferred to reserved fund. 



$38r).94 

$385.94 
14.06 

$400.00 



Appropriation 



Militia. 



$1,000.00 



Expenditures. 



-Amoskeag- Veterans 

Co. C, First Reg-iment, N. II. N. G. 
Co. F, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 
Co. IT, First RpRiment, N. H. N. fJ 
Co. L, First Regiment, N. IT. N. G 

Fir.st Ro{,>-iment Rand *. . . . 

.Joseph Fresclil Post No. 01, (!. .\. 

Louis Pell Po.st No. 3, G. .\. R 

-Manehester Cadets 

Manchester War Veterans 



$100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 



$1,000.00 



STATE TAX. 421 

Band Concerts. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 68.73 

$368.73 

Expenditures. 

First Keg-iment Band $150.00 

Manchester City Band 150.00 

Pay-roll, commons 8.73 

$308.73 



Purchase of Swift Land. 

Appropriation $1,750.00 

Expenditures. 
G. F. & E. C. Swift $1,750.00 



Abatement of Taxes. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Sundry persons on taxes abated $1,642.64 

Total expenditures $1,642.64 

Transferred to reserved fund 357.36 

$2,000.00 



County Tax. 

Appropriation $75,453.85 

Expenditures. 
Hillsborough County $75,453.85 

State Tax. 
Appropriation $57,991.25 

Expenditures. 
State of New Hampshire $57,991.25 



422 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Resolution Raising Money and Making Appropriations 

for the Year One Thousand Eight Hundred and 

Ninety-Eight. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
^Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 
That the sum of six hundred thousand six hundred twenty and ten 
one hundredths dolliirs ($000,020.10) be raised for the use of the city for 
the year one thousand eight hundred and ninetj'-eig-ht (1898) by tax on 
the polls and estates liable to be taxed thereon, which sum, with such 
unappropriated money as may now be in the city treasury, or may 
hereafter come into it, shall be appropriated as follows, viz.: 

CE^'TRAT. DEPARTMENT. 

Interest $46,500.00 

Reserved fund 10,000.00 

City hall expenses ,3.500.00 

File and Index System, city clerk's office 1,000.00 

Printing- and stationery 2,000.00 

Incidental expenses 5,000.00 

Purchase of land sold for taxes 6,000.00 

Mayor's incidentals ."^00.00 

City officers' salaries 21,500.00 

Sinking fund 22,000.00 

Payment of funded debt 35,000.00 

Auditor's department, salaries and expenses 2,000.00 

engineer's department. 
Salaries and expenses ' $5,000.00 

STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Paving Elm street $10,000.00 

Paving North and South Main streets 3,000.00 

Paving Hanover street. Elm to Chestnut 2,000.00 

Board of Street and Park Commissioners, salaries and 

expenses 3,000.00 

Repairs of highways 20,000.00 

Building new highways 5.000.00 

Land taken for new higliways 1,500.00 

Watering streets 5,000.00 

Paving streets 5,000.00 

Macadamizing streets ($2,000 of which to be used on West 

Cedar street from Canal street easterly) 12.000.00 

Crading for concrete 5.000.00 

Scavenger teams 15,500.00 

Street sweeping 3.000.00 

IJghling streets 55,300.00 

Repairs of bridges 2.000.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 423 

City teams $0,500.00 

Repairs of sewers 5,000.00 

New sewers 30,000.00 

Removal of snow and ice 8,000.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Repairs of schoolhouses $,5,.'500.00 

Fuel 8,000.00 

Furniture and supplies 2,000.00 

Books and stationery 100.00 

Printing- and advertising- 300.00 

Contingent expenses 1 ,700.00 

Care of rooms 6,500.00 

Evening- schools 1.500.00 

Teachers' salaries 74,000.00 

Evening- school, mechanical draAving- 400.00 

Free text-books 3,000.00 

Manual training- 1,200.00 

New schoolhouse in Amoskeag- 8,000.00 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Salaries and expenses "... $4,000.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries and general expen.ses $63,000.00 

Fire-alarm telegraph 2,000.00 

Hj'drant service 17,675.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries and expenses of commission and force $39,975.00 

Expen.ses of conrt 3,900.00 

Care and maintenance of station 2,800.00 

HE^VLTII DEPARTME?yT. 

Salaries and expenses $4,775.00 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Repairs of buildings $2,500.00 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Care of commons $ 1,000.00 

Care of Stark park 800.00 

Care of Derryfield park 1.000.00 

Care of Pine Grove cemetery 8,500.00 

Care of Valley cemetery 3.000.00 

Care of Amoskeag cemetery ] 50.00 

Care of Merrill yard 100.00 

Purchase of Swift land to meet city note 1,750.00 



424 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

PATKIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PinLANTIIROPIC. 

Support of paupers off the city farm $9,500.00 

Maintenance of city farm 8,000.00 

Support of indigent soldiers . 150.00 

Bed for city patients, Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Bed for city patients, Elliot Hospital 300.00 

Bed for city patients, Sacred Heart Hospital 300.00 

Bed for city patients, Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital... 300.00 

Support of city patients, Emergency ward, Elliot Hospital 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 400.00 

Militia armories 1,000.00 

Jiand concerts 300.00 

TAXES. 

Abatement of taxes $2,000.00 

State tax 57,991.2.-> 

County tax 75,453.85 

Total amount of appropriations $785,620.10 

Amoimt t© be raised by taxation 600,620.10 

Passed March 18, 1898. 



AMOUNT OF TAXATION. 



425 



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426 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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VALUATION AND TAXES. 427 



Assessors' Oath. 

We, the Assessors of the City of Manchester, do solemnly swear that 
in making the invoice for the purpose of assessing the foregoing taxes, 
we appraise all taxable property at its full value, and as we would 
appraise the same in payment of a just debt due from a solvent debtor. 
So help tts God. 



Valuation and Taxes. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on the real and per- 
sonal estate, within the city of Manchester, N. H., for the year 1898, 
was as follows: 

Valuation. Rate. Tax. 

Eeal estate $26,265,034 $19.50 $512,172.22 

Personal property 3,442,654 " 67,132.50 

$29,707,688 $579,304.72 

No. of polls, 12,S0S 1,280,800 19.50 24,975.85 

Totals $30,988,488 $604,280.57 

The share clistributed to Manchester of the amount 
of tax assessed, as per returns made by the corj^orations 
to state treastirer: 

On railroads $36,205.44 

On savings banks. : 48,198.15 

On insurance companies 3,159.75 

On literary fund 3,496.80 

Grand tax total $695,340.71 

For further information in relation to taxes collected by the state, 
see State Treasurer's report. 



428 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 





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51,205.71 

1,264.85 

1,163.94 

1,580.13 

1,397.03 

1,687.08 

1,908.41 

2,587.00 

4,096 98 

3,531.85 

5,138.38 

5,247.10 

( 68,737.42 ) 
1 590.90 ( 

604,280.57 






81,205.71 
1,264.85 


Ta-ir#»a nf I8.SR 






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1,163.94 
1,530.13 
1.395.13 


TuYoQ nf 1SRR 










S1.90 


Tq-v-oo nf 18Qft 




1,6S7.08 
1,966.63 






1.78 






2,587.00 






1.S5 

10.68 

110.58 

214.63 

51,099.97 

545,376.15 


4,095.13 




3,621.17 


Tn^pt! nf ISO'S 




5,021.80 


Tnvp«nflfiOR . 


£592.96 
1,041.18 


5.032.47 




17,635.39 


Taxes of 1898 


57,863.24 








§704,477.35 


S1,634.U 


?596,623.54 


§106,019.67 







TAX VALUATIONS, ETC., FROM 1890 TO 1898. INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. polls. 


Pnii tnv 1 Valuation 
Poll tax. 1 of j,Q,i 


1890 


S24,207,74O 
24,872,492 
25,932,044 
27,439,742 
28,391,710 
28,801,122 
29,443,068 
30,486,946 
30,088,488 


$402,869.17 
443,541.76 
506,465.17 
507,040.68 
506,372.44 
502,183.02 
647,651.50 
634,127.80 
604,280.57 


9,723 
10,367 
10,673 
11,835 
12,103 
12,244 
12.683 
12,921 
12,808 


SI. 91 
1.78 
1.96 
1.85 
1.7S 
1.74 
1.86 
2 08 
1.95 


SlOO 










1893 


100 


1894 


10(1 


1895 




1896 


100 


1897 




1898 









For years prior to 1890, see reports of 1890 and 1891. 



ACCOUNT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



429 



Settlement of account of George E. Morrill, Tax Col- 
lector for City of Manchester, N. H., June 1, 1898. 



Tax list, 1885 $1,205.71 

1886 1,2G4.85 

1887 1,163.94 

1888 1,580.13 

1889 1,397.03 $1.90 

1890 1,687.08 

1891 1,968.41 1.78 

1892 2,587.00 

1893 4,096.98 1.85 

1894 3,531.85 10.68 

1895 3,528.93 116.58 

1896 5,247.10 214.63 

Amount collected $347.42 

Ci'edited by cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 97 347.42 

Interest collected $1,383.47 

Credited by cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 96 1,383.47 



1897. Dr. 
June 1. Balance due on settlement of 1893 list 

1S98. Cr. 

April 14. By cash paid treasurer per receipt No. 40 

June 1, 1898, due on 1893 list 

1897. Dr. 

To -warrant resident list $632,471.20 

warrant non-resident list 1,656.60 

voluntary list 590.90 



205.71 
264.85 
163.94 
580.13 
395.13 
687.08 
,966.63 
,587.00 
,095.13 
,521.17 
;,412.35 
,032.47 



$4,174.48 



170.00 



$4,004.48 



$634,718.70 



1897, 1898. Cr. 

By cash paid treasurer, per vouchers Nos. 95, 
130, 149, 157, 178, 198, 208, 238 in year 1897 ;_ and 

receipts Nos. 30, 66, 99, in year 1898 $627,772.73 

By abatements, vouchers Nos. 70, 226 1,145.77 

By unpaid taxes, June 1, 1898 5,800.20 



$634,718.70 



430 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manchester to George E. iroRRiLL. 

Dr. 

To .salary for year ending- June 1, 1898 $1,050.00 

commission on old taxes 24.00 



Cr. 

By cash paid by treasui'er, on account of salary $800.00 
balance paid bj- treasurer, as per bill S74.00 



$1,674.00 



$1,074.00 



Manchestek, N. H., Jul3' 1, 1898. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George E. 
Morrill, tax coleetor of said Manchester, and find the same correct, as 
above stated. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

C'tty Auditor. 



Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions from 
Taxation. 

Constitution of New Hampshire, Article 82, Page 38, Public 
Statutes. 

encouragement of literature, etc. 

Article 82. "Knowledge and learning generally diffused through 
a community being essential to the preservation of a free govern- 
ment, and spreading the opportunities and advantages of education 
through the vai-ious parts of the country being highly conducive to 
promote this end, it .shall be the duty of legislators and magistrates, 
in all future periods of this government, to cherish the intei'est of 
literature and the sciences, and all seminaries and public schools; to 
encourage ])rivate and ])ublic institutions, rewards, and immunities 
for the promotion of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, 
manufactures, and natural liistory of the country; to count^Miance and 
inculcate the principles of humanity and genei'al benevolence, i)ublic 
and ])rivate charity, industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, 
sincerity-, sobriety, and all social atTections and generous sentiments 
among the peoi)le; provided, nrrcrthrlrss, that no money raised V)v 
taxation shall ever be granted or applied for llic use of schools or 
institutions of any religious sect or (ii-noniiiiat ion." 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. ' 431 

I'uBLic Statutes, Chapter 55. 

Section 2. "lieal estate, whether improved or unimproved, and 
whether owned by residents or others, is liable to be taxed, except 
houses of public worship, twenty-five hundred dollars of the value of 
parsonag-es owned by religious societies and occupied by their pas- 
tors, schoolhouses, seminaries of learning, real estate of the United 
States, state, or town used for public i^urposes, and almshouses on 
county faiTiis." 

Section 11. "Towns may by vote exempt from taxation for a term 
not exceeding- ten years any manufacturing establishment proposed 
to be erected or put in operation therein, and the capital to be used 
in operating the same, iinless such establishment has been previously 
exempted from taxation by some town." 

OPINION OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

58 N. H. Eep. page 623. "The exemijtion in each case is limited to 
ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole power of taxation 
would be the destruction of government; and the dangerous tendency 
of legislation suspending any part of that power, for any period, is 
manifest. P. Bank v. Billiufjs, 4 Pet. 514, 5G1. So long as the existing 
laws remain unrepealed, and the constitutional construction hereto- 
fore adopted remains unchanged, contracts hereafter made under these 
laws and that construction will be valid. If the legislature for any 
reason wish to prevent the making of any more such contracts, their 
object can be accomplished by a repeal of the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective charters 
as "being of the nature of a public charity," as follows: 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute Women, N. H. Laws of 1SS9, 
chapter 199. 

Elliot Hospital, IV. H. Laws of 1881, chapter 178. 

Manchester Women's Aid and Relief Society, organized in January, 
1875, N. H. Laws, 1891, chapter 283. 

Orphanage and Home for Old Ladies (Catholic) on Hanover street, 
K. H. Laws, 1883, chapter 50. 



Schedule of Property used for Religious, Charitable, 
and Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Taxa- 
tion by Law, not including that Owned by the City of 
Manchester. 

Convent, Sisters Jesus Mary, French Catholic; East Spruce 
street, near Beech: 

Building $10,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 2,600.00 

$12,600.00 



432 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Convent, Sisters of Mercy, Catholic; 415 Union street, 
corner Laurel: 

Building $30,000.00 

12,600 square feet of lantl . . . G.riOO.OO 

Mount St. Marj's' Academy, Catholic; from convent lot 
east to Beech street: 

Building $2.-),000.00 

31,500 square feet of land 9,450.00 

Lot south side of Laurel street, corner Union street, Cath- 
olic; McDonald school: 

Building $35,000.00 

10,800 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' Home, Cath- 
olic; Amherst and Hanover streets: 

Building $14,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 30,375.00 

St. Patrick's Orphan Asylums, Catholic; 184 Hanover 
street: 

Building $47,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 40,500.00 

St. Joseph's High School, Catholic; Lowell street, corner 
of Birch: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

Union-.street school, Catholic; corner Union and Laurel 
streets: 

Building $4,000.00 

5,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

St. Agnes' school. Catholic; corner Cedar and Pine streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

20,000 square feet of land 3.200.00 



$36,300.00 



$34,450.00 



$40,000.00 



$44,375.00 



$87,500.00 



$20,000.00 



$6,500.00 



$15,200.00 



St. Joseph's school for girls, Catholic; (orncr Pine and 
Lowell streets: 

Building $10,000.00 

Land included in cathedral lot $10,000.00 

Convent of Holy .Angels, French Catholic; Beaiiport street, 
corner Wayne, AVest Manchester: 

Building $15,000.00 

22,500 square feet of land 4,500.00 



$10,500.00 



PROrERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION, 433 

Orphanapfe school, Beaiiport, Wayne, and Putnam streets; 
Freneh Catholic: 

Building $25,000.00 

30,000 square feet of land 6,000.00 



St. Aug-ustine's academy, French Catholic; corner Beech 
and Spruce streets: 

Building- 6,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 4,.500.00 

St. Mary's parochial school, French Catholic; corner Wayne 
and Cartier streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

25,000 square feet of land 2,000.00 

TJesidence priest St. Augustine's church, French Catholic; 
No. 383 Beech street: 

Building $6,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 1,875.00 

$7,875.00 
Orphan children's school, parish St. Augustine; 251, 253 
Lake avenue: 

Building $12,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Residence priest St. Anne's church, Catholic; No. 231 Mer- 
rimack street: 

Building $5,000.00 

8,820 square feet of land 2,646.00 

$7,646.00 
Residence Catholic bishop; No. 145 Lowell street: 

Building $40,000.00 

24,000 square feet of land 12,000.00 

$52,000.00 
Residence priest St. George's church, French. Catholic; 
Orange street, corner Pine: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,000 square feet of land 4,000.00 

$6,500.00 
Residence priest St. Mary's church, French Catholic; 376 
Beauport street, West Manchester: 

Building $2,500.00 

5,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$3,500.00 



$31,000.00 



$12,500.00 



$14,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$17,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500 GO 



$2,500.00 



434 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. Anne's t-hurcli. Catliolic: Union stifet, corner Merri- 
mack: 

Building $:{0,()0().00 

10,180 square feet of land 5,090.00 

St. Augiistine's church, French Catholic; Beech street, 
comer East Spruce: 

Building $28,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land .3.250.00 

St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel, Catholic; Pine street, 
corner Lowell: 

Building $70,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land U0,:j75.00 

St. Mary's chiirch, French Catholic; Beauport street, cor- 
ner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building .$25,000.00 

70,000 square feet of land 14.000.00 

St. Raphael's church and school, German Catholic; Third 
street, corner Ferry, West Manchester: 

Building .$35,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 3,400.00 

St. George's church. French Catholic; Pine street, corner 
Orange: 

Building $75,000.00 

18,690 square feet of land 7,()14.00 

St. Patrick's church and school. Catholic; Kelley street, 
Cartier street, and Coolidge avenue: 

School building .$20,000.00 

50,281 square feet of land 4,502.00 

First Baptist church; Union street, corner Concord: 

Building $28,000.00 

11,250 square feet of land (),750.00 

First Freewill Baptist church; Merrimack strt'cl, corner 
Chestnut: 

Building $12.4(10.00 

12,(100 square feet of land 12.()()().00 

Second Haptist church; Merrimack street, near Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

9,450 s(iiiarc feet of land 3,780.00 

J'eople's Baptist church; Chestnut stn'ct, corner Concord: 

Ihiilding : . $s,()(io.O() 

3,200 square feet of land 2,000.00 



$35,090.00 



$31,250,00 



$100,375.00 



$39,000.00 



$38,400.00 



$82,614.00 



$24,502.00 



$::4. 7.-0.00 



$12,780.00 



$10,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 435 

First Congreg-ational church; Hanover street, corner 
Union: 

Building $:?0,000.00 

43,200 square feet of land 34,560.00 



Second Congregational church; Market street, corner 
Franklin: 

Building $25,000.00 

M»,000 square feet of land 19,000.00 

Third Congregational church; South Main street, corner 
Milford, West Manchester: 

Building $8,000.00 

23,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

First M. E. church; Valley street, comer Jewett: 

Building $8,000.00 

11,400 square feet of land 1 ,000.00 

St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, comer Amherst: 

Building $25,000.00 

10,010 square feet of land 6,000.00 

Trinity !M. E. church; School street: 

Building $2,000.00 

12,176 square feet of land 3,000.00 

St. James M. E. church; Penacook street, corner Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

11,000 square feet of land 2,200.00 

Grace church. Episcopal; Lowell street, corner Pine: 

Building $20,000.00 

9,300 square feet of land 6.975.00 

First Unitarian church; Concord street, corner Beech: 

Building .$24,000.00 

13,500 square feet of land . 6,000.00 

First Universalist church; Lowell street, near Elm: 

Building $17,000.00 

10.000 square feet of land ; 15,000.00 

Christian church, Protestant; Pine street, corner Merri- 
mack: 

Building $6,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 6,700.00 



$64,560.00 



$44,000.00 



$9,000.00 



$31,000.00 



$5,000.00 



$11,200.00 



$26,975.00 



$30,000.00 



$32,000.00 



$12,700.00 



436 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

First Presbyterian church, German; Second street, corner 
Bath, West Manchester: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Swedish Lutheran church, Protcstiint; Sagamore, corner 
Pine: 

Building $7,500.00 

10,950 square feet of land 2,000.00 

Swedish Evangelical Mission; Pine street, corner Orange: 

Building $6,500.00 

Land 4,100.00 

Swedish Baptist church; Arlington street, near Maple: 

Building $5,000.00 

4,432 square feet of land 1,100.00 

Second Advent church; Amhei'st street, between Pine and 
Union : 

Building $5,100.00 

4,500 square feet of land 3,375.00 

City Mission chapel, Protestant; Merrimack street, corner 
Beech: 

Building $7,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6.000.00 

Westminster I'resb.yterian church; Brook street, corner 
Hazel: 

Building • $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2.500.00 

South Manchester Union cliapci. Protestant; Elm street, 
south: 

Bnildi7ig $2,500.00 

10,747 square feet of land 1.000.00 

E])i.scopal Mission church; Xorth Mnin street, corner 
School, West Manchester: 

Building $:{. 500.00 

19,412 .square feet of land 4.000.00 

Residence jjasloi- SI. Paul's M. !•:. eh unit; In ion street, 
near Amherst: 

Thiilding $t.000.00 



$5,500.00 



$9,500.00 



$10,600.00 



$6,100.00 



$8,475.00 



$13,000.00 



$17,500.00 



$:!. 500.00 



$7,500.00 



$2,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROiM TAXATION. 437 

Residence pastor First Congreg-ational church; No. 500 
Beech street, near Bridge: 

Building $.->, 000.00 

8,100 square feet of land 2,400.00 



$7,400.00 
Kesidence pastor Grace Episcopal church; comer of Harri- 
son and Union streets: 

:Suilding $(),ono.OO 

15,000 square feet of laud 3,750.00 

$9,750.00 
German School Society; Third, Bath, and Ferry streets: 

Building $4,500.00 

10,187 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Elliot Hospital, Protestant; East Manchester: 

Building $23,000.00 

Land 7,000.00 

Elliot Hospital lot; Hanover street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $3,000.00 

Land 13,000.00 

Elliot Hospital: 

Land and buildings. Main street $4,000.00 

Land and buildings, Quincy street 2,500.00 

Women's Aid Home, Pearl street, comer Beech: 

Building $15,000.00 

57,530 square feet of land 10,000.00 

Manchester Children's Home; Webster street: 

Building $20,000.00 

55,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Residence pastor Swedish Lutheran church; Sagamore 
street, comer Pine: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,200 square feet of land 1,020.00 

$4,020.00 
Gale Home: 

One half Manchester Bank block. Elm street $38,000.00 

One half Martin's block. Elm street 25,000.00 

Land and building. Pearl street, corner Ash 25,000.00 

EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 

Church property, Catholic $351,231.00 

Convent property. Catholic 68,400.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$7,000.00 



$30,000.00 



$16,000.00 



$6,500.00 



$25,000.00 



$22,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$88,000.00 



438 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR.. 

Parochial residences, Catliolic $12,500.00 

Parochial schools. Catholic 200,050.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions 131.875.00 

$704,050.00 

Church property, Protestant $441,040.00 

Parochial residences. Protestant 10.000.00 

Pri\*ate school property, I'rotestant 7,000.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions 188,000.00 

$040,640.00 

TAXABLE. 

Land and buildings. Catholic $05,021.00 

Laud and buildings, I'rotestant 14,170.00 

$70,101.00 

Total exempt and taxable $1,490,487.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 



439 



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440 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT, CITY OF MANCHES- 
TER, N. H., DECEMBER 31, 1898. 





V 

ft 

'Pi 
« = 


'-I u 

|i 




At four and a half 
per cent, water 
• bonds. 


H 
1" 


870,000 issued Oct. 
31, 1863. 850,000. 
issued July 1, 
1864. Six percent 
to fund debts. 


Issued July 1,1881, 
four per cent, to 
build McGregor 
bridge. 


"1? 


1890 .... 


§400,000 
400,000 
300.000 
300,000 
300,000 
200,000 
2C0,000 
100,000 
100,000 


$200,000 
200,000 
300,000 
300,000 
350,000 

■ 500,000 
500,000 
600,000 
600,000 






$13,850 
18,850 
20,000 
26,000 
31,000 
30,250 
42,250 
50,000 
50,000 


$120,000 
120,000 
120,000 
120,000 
50,000 


$00,008 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60.000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 


$155,000 








155,000 








155,000 


1S94 .... 


1 1 '5 { 1 ! 


$100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 


155,000 
155,000 
l.'=5,000 






155.000 






155,000 















~ a 
So, 

li 


« p 
oo 

1 ° • 

its 


a » 

ill 


o ^ V 


Amount of six 
per cent bonds 
refunded at four 
per cent. 


log 


Amount of six per 
cent city bonds 
on which inter- 
est has ceased, 
not j'el present- 
ed for payment. 


Amount of six per 
cent water bonds 
on which inter- 
est has coascd, 
not yet presc^nt- 
ed for payment. 








$99,900 

100 

99,900 

65,500 

50,000 


$100,000 


$948 850 




SitX) 








953,850 
955,000 
1,195.600 
1,296,000 
1,571,250 
1 91" 2.')0 












100,000 




• 100 


$100,000 
200 000 






$4,500 


100 










300,000 


$20,000 
230,000 
220,000 
210,000 




100,000 


i 


400,000 
400,000 


$130,000 
105,000 
80,000 










1,890,000 
1,855,000 


1 


400,000 






1 






1 



BONDED DEBT. 



441 







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442 REPORT OF THR CITY AUDITOR. 

Rejiarks. — The city g-iiarantees the perjietual <aro of lots in the 
cemeteries of the city to parties who pay $100 and uijward. There are 
$50,000 in cemetery bonds, so called, not negotiable, in the hands of 
the city treasurer, which are included in the $1,855,000. 

Total amount of bonded debt, inchidins^ cemetery bonds $1,S55,000.00 
Net indebtedness for water pui-poses , . . . 900,000.00 

Net debt after deducting water debt $955,000.00 

As shown in the assessors' books for the year 1898: 

The assessed value of personal property, including poll 

tax $4,72.3,454.00 

The assessed value of real estate 2(),265,0;i4.00 

Total value for taxation $.30,988,488.00 

Tax rate, 1.95 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 3.404 

Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 6.387 

Population, census of 1890 43,983 

Population, census of 1880 32,458 

Increase of population in ten years 11,525 

Increase of ])0])uIation since 1890 (estimated) , ir>,017 

No is.sue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been promptly paid at maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being ])ayable in gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

A sinking fund was established in 1893. 

Total amount of sinking fund December 31, 1898, $184,15(1.75. 

The power of the city to bon-ow money in relation to the water- 
works is limited to the sum of $000,000 by section 0, chapter 70, Ne\\- 
Hampshire Laws of 1871, entitled "An act to enable the city of Man- 
chester to establish water-works," exc(>pt as further extended an 
amount of $;{00.00(). hy laws of Is'.M, cliaptei- ;.'C.: and $:.'()().i)(l(), l)y laws 
of 1895, chapter 17:.'. 



BONDED DEBT. 



443 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE BONDED DEBT. 



Six 
per ct. 
water 
bonds. 



Four 
per ct. 
water 
bomli 



• 


I 


i 


1890.... 


$27,000 


§6,000 


1891.... 


24,000 


8,000 


1892.... 


18,000 


12,000 


1893.... 


18,000 


12,000 


1894... 


18,000 


14,000 


1895.... 


18,000 


14,000 


18%.... 


12,000 


20,000 


1897. . . . 


9,000 


22,000 


1898... 


6,000 


24,000 



Four 
and a 

half 
and 5 
per ct. 
water 
bonds. 



Five 
per ct, 
ceme- 
tery 
bonds. 



Six 
per ct 

to 
fund 
debt. 



Four 

per ct. 
to bl'd 

Mc- 
Gregor 
bridge. 



Four 
per ct, 



fund 
debt. 



Four 

P-,,. I per ct. 

bridge. 



Total 

of 
annual 
interest. 



89,500 
9,5C0 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 



S623.75 
813.92 
1,000.00 
1,041.66 
1,550.00 
1,812.50 
2,112.50 
2,500.00 
2,500.00 



$7,200 
7,200 
7,200 
7,200 



§2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 



§6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 



§8,000 
12,000 
16,000 
16,000 
16,000 



§4,800 : 

14,400 
13,000 
13,000 



§49,423 76 
48,613.92 
46,800.00 
46,841.66 
59,650.00 
68,712.50 
82,612.50 
80,(100.00 
79,000.00 



SUMMARY OF CITY DEBT. 

Amount of bonded debt January- 1, 1S9S $1,890,000.00 

Accrued interest on bonded debt 3.3,350.00 

Amount of temporary note or bond 



$1,923,350.00 
110,000.00 



Amount of bonded debt i^aid in 1898 

Total indebtedness December 31, 1898. 



$2,033,350.00 
35.000.00 



$1,998,350.00 



AVAILABLE ASSETS. 



Net cash on hand December 31, 1898 $115,207.48 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1898 57,863.24 

Stock of Suncook Valley Railroad, estimated value 14,500.00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1898 184,156.75 



BONDED DEBT. 



Decrease 



$371,727.47 



Total net indebtedness January 1, 1898 $1,697,761.61 

Total net indebtedness January 1, 1899 1,626,622.53 



$71,139.08 



444 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



S if 

O ^ 
O 

o 

o 



% 


Battery occupies first and second floor 

and basement. 
Guards occupy third floor. 
Ward meetings are licld in battery 

room on second floor. 


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VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY CITY. 445 

Valuation of Real Estate Owned by the City. 

High School, Beech street, corner Lowell: 

Building $170,000.00 

59,400 square feet of land 17,820.00 

$187,820.00 

Franklin-street school, Franklin street, corner Pleasant: 

Building $1(1,000.00 

19^00 square feet of land 19,200.00 

$:?5,200.00 

Spring-street school. Spring street: 

Building $13,000.00 

13,600 square feet of land 13,600.00 

$26,600.00 

Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, corner Merrimack: 

Building $45,000.00 

40.000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

$53,000.00 

Ash-street school. Ash street, corner Bridge: 

Building $50,000,00 

57,537 square feet of land 17,262.00 

$67,262.00 

Main-street school, Xorth Main street. West Manchester: 

Building $6,000.00 

40,293.4 square feet of land 10,073.00 

$16,073.00 

Webster-street school, Webster street: 

Building $39,000.00 

55,714% square feet of land 13,928.00 

$52,928.00 

Blodget-street school, Blodget street: 

Building $1.. 500.00 

9,000 square feet of land 3.(')()0.00 

$5,100.00 

Lowell-street school, Lowell street, comer Chestnut: 

Building $1,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 9,000.00 

$10,000.00 

Merrimack-street school, Merrimack street, corner LTnion: 

Building $15,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 

$21,300.00 

Parker school. South Main street, West Manchester: 

Building $20,000.00 

13,650 square feet of land 2,047.00 

$22,047.00 

Bakersville school. Elm street, south: 

Building $10,000.00 

24,184 square feet of land 3,628.00 

$13,628.00 



446 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Stark District school, River road, north: 

Building- $1,000.00 

43,5f)0 square feet of land 100.00 

Amoskeag- school. Front street, Amoskeag: 

i'.uilding $S.()()0.00 

6,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

Rimmon school, comer Amory and Duliuque streets: 

Building- $17,400.00 

1G,G00 square feet of land 2.490.00 

Goffe's Falls school, Goffe's Falls: 

Building $4,000.00 

47,916 square feet of land 250.00 

HarA-ey District school, Nutt road: 

Building $2,000.00 

21,780 square feet of land 100.00 

Webster Mills school, Webster :Mills: 

Building $400.00 

5,445 square feet of land 100.00 

Old Hallsville school, East Manchester: 

Building ■ $500.00 

30,075 square feet of land 3,008.00 

Youngsville school, Youngsville: 

Building $500.00 

51,228 square feet of la nd lOD.OO 

Mosquito Pond school. Mosquito Pond: 

Building $400.00 

10,890 square feet of laud 100.00 

Pearl-street school: 

Building $18,700.00 

Land 3.200.00 

Variu'v school, Bowman street, corner Mast. West ^lan- 
chestcr: 

Building $43,750.00 

Land tl, 700.00 

New Ilallsvilli' .school, Jcwt'tt street, corner Young, East 
Manchester: 

Building $29,800.00 

44.000 square feet of land 3,300.00 



$1,100.00 



$9,000.00 



$19,890.00 



$4.2.50.00 



$2,100.00 



$500.00 



$3,.508.00 



$600.00 



$500.00 



$21,900.00 



$50,450.00 



$33,100.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY CITY. 44 



Straw school, Chostmit street, corner Harrison: 

Buildiug .$;i(),000.()0 

32,400 square feet of land 10,200.00 

$46,200.00 

New Wilson school, Wilson, Cedar, and Auburn streets: 

Building- $30,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land. 5,000.00 

$35,000.00 

$739,056.0f 
ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Engine-house and stable. Central station. Vine street: 

Building $31,800.00 

21,718.86 square feet of land 25,438.00 

$57,238.00 

North Main-street engine-house. North Main street. West 

Manchester: 

Building $18,000.00 

11,819 square feet of land 2,955.00 

$20,955.00 

Webster-street engine-house, Webster street, corner 

Chestnut: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,510 square feet of land 2,180.00 

$14,180.00 

Merrimack engine-house. Lake avenue: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

$18,000.00 

Hosehouse and cottage, Maple street, corner East High: 

.Building $3,000.00 

18,330 square feet of land 3,660.00 

$6,666.00 

Engine-house and wardroom, ward 9. Kimmon and Amorj' 

streets. West Manchester: 

Building $22,755.00 

6,000 square feet of land 870.00 

$23,025.00 

South Manchester hosehouse: 

Building $4,200.00 

4,278 square feet of land 684.48 

$4,884.48 

$145,548.48 
OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City library. Dean avenue, corner Franklin street: 

Building $ ;5,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 30,000.00 

$65,000.00 



448 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City hall, Kim street, corner Market: 

' Building- $20,000.00 

100.000 square feet of laiui l.'.O.OOO.OO 

$170,000.00 

City farm, Mammoth road: 

Building- $5,000.00 

46.66 acres, west ;Mammoth road 70.000.00 

81.55 acres, east ^Mammoth road ! 65.240.00 

$140,240.00 

Court house, Franklin street, corner West Merrimack: 

Building $20,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 57.000.00 

$77,000.00 

Battery building, Manchester street: 

Building $13,000.00 

3,400 square feet of land 5,100.00 

$18,100.00 

Police station, Manchester street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $40,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 15,000.00 

$55,000.00 

Slayton lot, Manchester street: 

Police patrol stable $4,000.00 

Building 300.00 

2,908 square feet of land 4.700.00 

$9,000.00 

City stable and other buildings. Franklin street: 

Building $15,950.00 

44,656 square feet of land S9,.'n2.00 

$105,262.00 

City stable, district No. 10 $1,000.00 

City scales, Franklin street: 

Building ; $300.00 

Gravel lots, Goifstown: 

2 acres $400.00 

Police station. Clinton stiTct. West .Manclu-slcr: 

Building $ {.."OO.OO 

3,790 square feet of land 1 000.00 

$4,500.00 

Gravel lot, district No. 10, bought of Brooks & Brock (city 

has right to remove gravel until August 25, 1903): 

1 ' ;., acres $500.00 

\\anl 5 wardroom. l.ai<c avcnnc: 

Hnilding $l,.-00 00 

l-'ind 1,000.00 

$5,500.00 

$651,802,00' 



auditor's office. 44f> 



PEUSOXAI. PROPF.HTY OWNKD HY TIIK CITY. 

j'ropeity in care city eng-ineer $1,149. 00 

in care chief engineer fire department 107,177.50 

in care street and park commission 28,920.10 

in i-are snperintendeiit of scliools .'>(>, 7.)."). 00 

ill care city messenger .'i,000.0O 

in care city marshal and janitor 7,2.50.00 

^ in care superintendent of city farm 12, .'544. 87 

in care trustees city library ."JO.OOO.OO 

in care superintendent of Pine Grove cemetery.. 248.35 

in care superintendent Valley cemetery 106.00 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad, in care of city treasurer 50,000.00 

Personal property in care city weig-her 1,000.00 

$278,150.82 

Uncollected taxes in 1898 $57,86.3.24 

Net cash in the trea.sury, December 31, 1898 115,207.48 

$173,070.72 
OTHER REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE OWNED BY" THE CITY. 

Soldiers' monument $25,000.00 

Permanent inclosure of commons 10,200.00 

Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 25,000.00 

Fountains and water-troughs on streets and commons 3,600.00 

City tomb 10,000.00 

McGregor bridge 90,000.00 

Granite bridge 130,000.00 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 28,450.00 

Second-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 52,036.06 

Print-Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 5,000.00 

Two bridges in highway district No. 9 ' 2,000.00 

One bridge at Golfe's Falls 1,000.00 

Expended on construction of sewers 659,194.98 

$1,041,481.04 
PARKS AND CEMETERIES. 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres $200,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery, about 06 acres 46,700.00 

Amoskeag cemetery, 1.23 acres 4,340.00 

Stark park, 28 acres 9,000.00 

Derryfield park, 76 acres 25,000.00 

Concord common, 4.48 acres 200,000.00 

Tremont common, 2.25 acres 40.000,00 

Hanover common, 3 acres 100,000.00 

Park common, 3.49 acres 60,000.00 

Merrimack common, 5.89 acres 200,000.00 

Wagner's park, 9.85 acres 12,000.00 

Land on Piscataquog river 3,500.00 

$900,540.00 
29 



450 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WATER-WORKS. 

Real estate and personal property of water-works, at cost 

price .$1,464,20.3.84 

RECAPITULATION. 

Real estate owned by the citj', schoolhouses $739,0.56.00 

Real estate owned by the city 651,802.00 

Real estate owned by the citj', engine-houses 145,548.48 

Water-works at cost price 1,404,20.3.84 

Personal property owned by the city 278,150.82 

Uncollected taxes and cash 173,070.72 

Other real and personal property 1,041,481.04 

Parks and cemeteries 900,540.00 

$5,393,852.90 
PROPERTY ACCOUNT. 

Inventory of assets, Deceniber 31, 1898 $5,393,852.90 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1897 5,350,967.11 

Gain in valuation $42,885.79 



Auditor's Office. 

City hall biiiklinor. Open from 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5 p. m.; 7 to 
P. M. on Thursday. 

In every bill presented to the city auditor for his approval, the fol- 
lowing points will be considered and passed upon. 

1. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination within the 
scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on the city govern- 
ment? 

2. Is the bill certified by the ])arty legally authorized to make the 
contract, or cause the expenditure to be made? 

3. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, and 
is there a balance unexpended suflReient to pay this bill? 

4. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measurements either 
of dimensions, quantities, or weights correctly and fully stated, and 
is the proof of the deli\ery to the city of the \vhole ani(i\iiit cliargcil 
sufficient? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely in 
excess as to require the attention of the city couiumIs to be called to 
the same? 

0. Is the hill wriltcn in a fair Ifgiltle liaiid. correctly cast, and on 
paper of siiHici.Mit length ami width to luiniit of its pi-oper hacking 
and filing? 

7. If the bill is in j)arl payment of a con(ra<'t, tlie date and the 
total amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the amount of 
the work not yet completed, and the jjcr cent retained, if any, sliould 
be stated in 1h.- hill. 



auditor's office. 451 

8. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which affect the 
question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for further information or 
correction as the circumstances of each case may require. 

COURT DECISIONS,. LEGAL POINTS AND RULES, RELATING TO THE AP- 
PROVAL OR DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITV. 

No bill or account shall be paid by the citj' treasurer until the audi- 
tor has approved it as correct. 

Public trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the citj- coun- 
cils cannot be delegated to others. DiUon''s Municipal Corporations, 
section 96, volume 1. 

No member of either branch [of the city councils], except the mayor, 
shall receive any compensation for his services, or shall hold any office 
or ag-ency created during his continuance in office. General Laics, 
chapter 46, section 13. 

The executive powers of the city, except where vested in the mayor, 
shall be exercised by the mayor and aldermen. General Laics, chapter 
46. section 14. 

The mayor and aldermen have all the powers and authority of se- 
lectmen of towns unless it is otherwise provided bj- law. General Laics, 
chapter 46, section 14. 

Joint standing committees have advisory powers only; they can- 
not legally be endowed Mith executive or legislative powers by ordi- 
nance or resolution of the city councils, as no by-law or ordinance 
shall be repugnant to the constitution or laws of the state. 

No member of either branch of the city councils can enter into any 
verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to, or do anj^ work for 
the city. Any firm of which a member is also a member of the city 
councils is included in this prohibition. 

No citj' official, or department, or board of officials having legal 
power to expend money for the benefit of the city, can purchase of 
or contract with themselves, with any one of the board, or with any 
firm of which one of said officials is a member. Dillon's Mnnicipal 
Corpoi-ations, volume 1, page 436, section 444. 

Every bill against the city shall siiecify the particular appropria- 
tion to which the same should be charged, and the moneys paid will 
be charged to such appropriations onlj'. 

He who is intrusted with' the business of others cannot be allowed 
to make such business a source of profit to himself. 

All orders passed by the city councils authorizing a ministerial act 
to be performed by its agent or agents must be strictly construed, 
and the act to be done must be specifically stated. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. (General 
Laics, chapter 106, section 11.) They have no power confeiTed upon 
them by law or ordinance to purchase new apparatus of any kind. 

The joint standing committee on fire department have advisory 
powers only. 



452 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

The laws and ordinances require the city auditor to withhold his 
signature from all bills against any appropriation where the amount 
of the appropriation is expended, until the city council shall have pro- 
vided the means of paying the same. Section 4, chapter 3 of the City 
Ordinances, and section 4, ordinances relating to the duties of the city 
auditor, approved January 7, 1890. 

The power of towns to raise and appropriate money is derived solely 
from statutory provisions, which restrict the power to certain speci- 
fied objects and other necessary charges. ' 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those pre- 
scribed by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, and gen- 
erally will not be permitted, to carry such votes into effect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discretion of 
towns to vote gifts or to select donees; their chai-ity is a dutj- defined, 
commanded, enforced, and regulated, and the objects of it are desig- 
nated by law. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a minority in an un- 
limited manner. Gore v. Epping, 41 N. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to make 
expenditures, within the scope of their powers, for their respective 
departments: For fire department and fire-alarm telegraph, the chief 
engineer, to be submitted monthly to the approval of the board of 
engineers; for police department, mayor and police commission; for 
police court, police judge; for water-works department, superintend- 
ent, subject to tlie rules of the board of commissioners and ordinances 
relating thereto; for city farm, superint-endent; for overseers of the 
poor, each overseer, subject to the rules of the board of overseers, and 
their monthly review and approval; for schools, superint<»ndent, or 
such person as the board of school committee may designate, bills to 
be approved by the board monthly; for streets, sewers, and other work 
under these departments, street and park commissioners; for city 
clerk's office, treasurer's office, tax collector's office, assessor's office, 
auditor's office, incidental expenditures, city physician, city messen- 
ger, city solicitor, city engineer, — mayor; for cemeteries, superin- 
tendents, subject to board of trustees (to consist of citizens not mem- 
bers of the city councils); for health department, board of health, 
subject to approval of mayor; city library, board of trustees or person 
designated by them. It may be stated as a general rule, that all 
subordinate officials are under the supervision and control of tlie 
mayor, subject to such limitations and restrictions as the board of 
aldcrnu'u, acting as a board, may require. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES, 
PASSED IN 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

liESOLUTiON exempting the property of the Imo Wrapper Co. from 
taxation to the amount of ten thousand dollars for the term of ten 
years. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, the Imo Wrapper Co. has been organized as a corporation 
with its principal place of business in this city and with a capital of 
ten thousand dollars, and purposes to erect a mill and equip it with 
machinerj^ and engage in the manufacture of ladies' wrappers, night- 
robes, and similar goods, therefore 

Resolved, that if said Imo Wrapper Co. shall erect a mill and begin 
the manufacture of such articles as are above named on or before 
July 1, 1898, the real estate and machinery of said Imo Wrapper Co. 
shall be exempted from taxation for the term of ten years from De- 
cember 1, 1897, to the amount of its capital stock, viz.: to the amount 
of ten thousand dollars. 

Passed January 4, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
Eesolution relating to Insurance Eates. 

Ji'fSoUed by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
Manchester, in Citj^ Council assembled, as follows: 

That a committee of five, consisting of two aldermen and three 
councilmen, be appointed to investigate the matter of insurance rates 
for the city of Manchester, and see if lower rates cannot be secured 
for said city. 

Passed February 1, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

liESOLUTiON making a Temporary Loan in anticipation of Taxes for the 
Year 1898. 

Rtsolied by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city as may 
fall due before the fifteenth day of December, 1898, the city treasurer 

455 



45G REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

be and hereby is authorized to make such temporary loans from time 
to time for the use of the city, of sums not exceeding the amount of 
two hundred thousand dollars, being in anticipation of the taxes of 
the present year; giving for the same the notes of the city signed by 
the treasurer and countersigned by the mayor. 
Passed March 30, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

liESOLUTiON provi'ling for a loan of One Hundred Thousand Dollars 
($100,000). 

i?rso/(«7 by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
]\Ianchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of paying certain indebtedness of the city now 
outstanding, and providing for depositories of the moneys and funds 
of the city, the notes of the city be issued to the amount of one hun- 
dred thousand dollars ($100,000), payable in one year from the first 
day of A])ril. 2SU8, at the rate of ;!'/> ])cr cent per annum, interest pay- 
able semi-annually; that one of said notes for the sum of fifty thous- 
and dollars ($50,000) be made to the order\of the Amoskeag National 
bank of ^Manchester and one of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) to the 
order of the Manchester National bank; that the moneys of the city 
be deposited from time to time as nearly equally as may be with said 
Amoskeag National bank and Manchester National bank, agreeably to 
the offers of said banks to pay interest upon daily balances at the 
rate of ly.. per cent per annum. 

Resolved, that said notes be signed by the mayor and countersigned 
by the city treasurer. 

Resolved, that the money received upon said notes be applied to the 
paj'ment of the amount that will be due upon the bond of the city of 
^Manchester, payable to the Second National bank of Manchester only, 
on the first day of April, 1898, for the sum of one hundred thousand 
dollars ($100,000), and for no other purpose whatever. 

Resolved further, that these resolutions take effect on their passage. 

ra.ssed March :^0, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

llESor.tTioN n-laling lo llic TrMiistVr of the [•'iiiuls for llic can- of 
i'iscataciMo- (cuictcry, known as ilie Harris, Walker. Kiddlr. and 
Gage funds. 

Rfsoind by llic Alayoi-. Ahh-i-nicn, and Connnon Conncll of tin- Cily of 
-Maiicliester, in Cily Council a.s.seniblcd, as follows: 

That the city of Manchester resign its position as trustee of the 
funds for the car*' r)f l'iscataf|UOg ccnioti'ry. known as tlie Harris, 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 4o / 

Walker, Eiddle, and Gage funds; that said resignation be made to the 
probate court for the county of Hillsborough, and the city treasurer 
is hereby authorized to settle the account of the city as such trustee 
in said court, and he is hereby authorized to turn over the balance of 
such funds remaining in his hands at the time of the settlement to 
such successor as may. be appointed by said court. 
Passed April 8. 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
Kfsohtiox relating to Erook .\vcuue. 

Rcftiihrd by the Mayor. Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
^lanchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That that part of Elm east back street, between Blodget street and 
Brook street, be and the same is hereby named Brook avenue. 
Passed June 7, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

IlE^OLtxioN relating to Exemption from Taxation of the George E. 
Greeley Co. 

J^c-Sdlral by the Mayor, Aldermen, and (oninion Council of the City of 
Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Wheeeas the George E. Greeley Co., a corporation established by 
law, with a capital stock of thirty thousand dollars ($30,000), desires 
to locate their business, and to carry on the manufacture and sale of 
their own product of shoes and other articles in the city of Man- 
chester, providing sufficient inducements are given said company by 
said city of Manchester; therefore. 

Resolved, that the capital of the George E. Greeley Co., aforesaid, 
its machinery, materials, raw and in process of manufacture, and other 
property necessary in conducting its business, shall be exempt from 
all taxation for a period of ten jears from the first day of Jul}', A. 
D. 1898. 

Passed June 7, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution exempting the Imo Wrapper Co. from taxation to the 
amount of Twenty Thousand ])ollars for the term of Ten Years. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of tlie City of 
Manchester, in Citj' Council assembled, as follows: 

That the property of the Imo Wrapper Co., a corporation organized 
under the laws of the state of New Hampshire and doing business in 
said city of Manchester, be and hereby is exempt from taxation, for 



458 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

the period of ten years from the first day of April, 1898, to the amount 
of its capital stock actually subscribed and paid in, not exceeding 
in amount the additional sum of twenty thousand dollars. 
Passed June 7, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

Kesolutiox in regard to the Employment of Laborers on the City 
Ledges. 

licsolvcd by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That in view of the fact that there are at the present time in our 
city a large number of laborers who are 'unemployed, we would re- 
spectfully suggest to the members of the street and park commission 
that it would, in our opinion, be far better to hire the unemployed 
labor of Manchester in working the city ledges and crushers, which 
have furnished up to the present time all of the broken stone neces- 
sary for macadamizing our streets, instead of procuring the stone of 
parties outside of the citj-, as has been done in the repair of Cedar 
street. We believe that home labor should be employed to the fullest 
extent in all municipal enterprises. 

Passed June 7, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

riEsoLUTiON making a Temporary Loan in anticipation of Taxes for the 
Year 1898. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city as may 
fall due before the twenty-third day of December, 1898, the cjty treas- 
urer be and herebj^ is authorized to make such temporary loans from 
time to time for the iise of the city, of sums not exceeding the amount 
of one hundred thousand dollars, being in anticipation of the tiixes 
of the present year; giving for the same the notes of the city signed 
by the treasurer and countersigned by the mayor. 

Passed August 5, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

JiESOLUTiON declining to act as Trustee iiiulfi- tiie will of .Nancy i'.arr, 
for the care of a Lot in the risc:it;i(|iiiij^- ( eiuetery. 

J!rsolir(l by Die -Mayor, Ahlcrnien, and C.innnon C'onncil (if the City of 
-Manchester, in City Council as.semhled, as follows: 

Whereas the city of Manchester, by vote of the city councils, has 
resigned all tnist-s connected with the care of burial lots in the I'is- 
catafjuog cemetery, and whereas a < oi-porat ion has been ortrani/ed 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 459 

under the name of The Piscataquog' Cemetery association, for the care 
of said cemetery, and has been appointed by the court of probate 
trustee to carry out all the trusts heretofore resigned by the city; 
and whereas Nancy Barr, lately deceased, by her will left to the city 
of Manchester four hundred dollars ($400) in trust for the care of her 
lot in said Piscataquog cemetery, which sum has not yet been paid to 
the city; and whereas the said Piscataquog Cemetery association is 
willing to accept said trust in common with the others; therefore, 

liesdlird by the board of mayor and aldermen and the common coun- 
cil of the city of Manchester in city council assembled, that the city 
of Manchester decline to act as trustee under the will of Nancy Barr, 
and recommend to the court of probate the appointment of The Pis- 
cataquog Cemetery association as such trustee; and that the mayor 
be authorized to sign all papers necessary and proper to carry this 
vote into effect. 

Passed September 6, 1898. 



City of Manchestek. 

KESOLrxiON trausfc]'ring the new Amoskeag Schoolhouse to the care 
of the School Board. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
^Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas a new schoolhouse has been erected and completed in that 
part of the city of Manchester known as Amoskeag, and is now ready 
for occupancy and use as a school; therefore be it 

Resolved bj^ the board of mayor and aldermen and common council 
of the city of Manchester, in city council assembled, that the said 
Amoskeag schoolhouse be and the same hereby is transferred to the 
care and control of the school committee of said city of Manchester. 

Passed October 4, 1898. 



City of Manchesteh. 

Kesolution authorizing a Temporaiy Loan of Ten Thousand ($10,000) 
Dollars for Street and Sewer Department. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
^lanchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of completing needed work under the street 
and park commission, and for the purpose of giving emploj-ment to 
those who would other\vise become objects of charitj', that the mayor 
be authorized to make a temporary loan of ten thousand dollars 
($10,000), giving for the same the note of the city signed by the mayor 
and countersigned by the city treasurer, and payable December 5, 1899. 

Resolved further that said sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) be 
appropriated as follows: 



460 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Five thousand dollars for the repairs of highways; forty-five hun- 
dred dollars for new sewers; and five hundred dollars for commons. 
Passed October 4, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the Final Transfers for the Year l^'.i:. 

Ordered, If the Eoard of ]Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make the following trans- 
fers, to wit: 

To reserved fund: 

From interest $990.46 

printing and stationery 264.10 

city hall 1.050.0.1 

maj^or's incidentals 19.50 

auditor's department 79.35 

street and park commission 172.09 

land taken for highways 4,088.00 

watering streets 1,237.36 

macadamizing streets 527.26 

street sweeping 681.78 

bridges 592.48 

scavenger service 739.15 

new sewers 4.301.71 

lighting streets 1,110.27 

health department 33.15 

fire department 188.72 

fire alarm telegraph 82.65 

police station 273.43 

police court 269.06 

Weston observ'atory 2.06 

dedication of Weston observatory 2.10 

dedication of liigii sciiool hiiildiiig r..-,.2.'i 

Parker school lot 12.26 

Valley cemetery 2.60 

Amoskeag cemetery 12.94 

Pine Grove cemet<?rv. . ., 195.13 

lucl 1.371.74 

furniture and supplies 548.16 

books and stationery 40.87 

care of rooms 279.72 

evening schools 111.85 

evening school, mechanical drawing 35.64 

manual training 129.14 

care of Merrill yard 42.47 

])anp('i-s oflf llic fiiiiu 2.1f^0.79 

indigent soldiers 268.26 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 461 

From decoration of soldiers' graves $0.4') 

abatement of taxes 547.57 

Total $22,549.59 

From reserved fund: 

To incidental expenses $167.71 

city officers' salaries 17.18 

Repairs of highwaj's 1,698.08 

snow and ice 489.33 

new highways 1,999.49 

paving streets 2,031.79 

grading for concrete 450.96 

city teams 223.94 

repairs of sewers 830.46 

paving Elm and Granite streets 495.31 

engineer's department 280.91 

police department, commission 584.90 

commons 26.80 

Stark and Derryfield parks 3.70 

repairs of schoolhouses 2,872.74 

contingent expenses 1,411.94 

printing and advertising i 4.43 

teachers' salaries 3,037.17 

free text-books 1,320.36 

city farm 486.55 

repairs of buildings 1,031.07 

new schoolhouses 2,599.89 

Total $22,064.71 

Passed January 4, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the Appropriation for the Years 1S9G, 1897, and 

1898. 

Ordered, If the Board of [Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
city clerk be authorized to prepare a comparative list of the appro- 
priations for the years of 1896, 1897, and 1898, and a copy of each be 
sent to each member of the city government as soon as the finance 
committee shall have made up the list of appropriations for the pres- 
ent year. 

Passed Januarv 4, 1898. 



462 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CiTV OF Manchester. 

Ax Okdf.r lor the Sale of a part of the Land purchased from Cliarles 
Bunton, October 25, 1895. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur: That the board of 
Avater commissioners be and they are hereby empowered to neg-otiate 
a sale of so much of the land in Auburn, purchased by them October 
25, 1895, of Charles Bunton, and described in the deed of Charles Bun- 
ton to the citj- of Manchester, dated October 25, 1895, and recorded in 
Rockingham county Registry of Deeds, vol. 549, page 217, as in the 
opinion of said board can be sold without prejudice to rights of the 
city of ^Manchester in the waters of Lake ]\Iassabesic and without 
danger to the puritj^ of the water supplj^ therefrom, at a price not less 
than eighteen hundred and fifty dollars, and the mayor is hereby 
authorized to make, execute, and deliver for and in the name of the 
city of Manchest.er, a warrantee deed of such land to the purchaser, 
and the proceeds of said sale shall be credited to the water-works 
and used in such manner as the board of water commissioners shall 
deem proper. 

Passed January 4, 1S9S. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Print the Fifty-Second Annual Report of the Receipts and 
Expenditures of the Cit}' of Manchester. 

Ordered. If the Board of ]\Iayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
joint standing committee on finance be and they hereby are author- 
ized to procure, for the use of the inhabitants of said city, the print- 
ing of the fifty-second annual rei>ort of the receipts and expenditures 
of the city of Manchester, including the reports of the joint standing 
committee on finance, the city auditor, the school board and superin- 
tendent of schools, superintendent of water-works, water commis- 
sioners, engineer of fire department, police commissioners, overseers 
of the poor, trustees, librarian, and treasurer of the city library, com- 
mittee on cemeteries, joint standing committee on city farm, city 
physician, city solicitor, city engineer, street and park commissioners, 
and such other matters relating to city affairs as said finance com- 
mittee may direct, the expense thereof to bp charged to the appropria- 
tion for printing and stationery. 

Passed March 1, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

An ()ui)!;i; i-clating lo llio Ivcinoval of l.am|) IN.sts. 

()nlin<l. ir 111.- Moanl of Mjivor and AI.I.miih'u coiicnr: 'I'liat tiic 
board of street aiul j)ari< coniniissioiuTs be and tlu'y hereby are in- 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 463 

structed to remove from the public hig-hways of the city of Manchester, 
on or before June first, eig-hteen linndred and ninety-eight, all hxmp 
posts which were formerly used for lighting- the streets and which 
are not now used for such jjurpose, and to dispose of the same in such 
manner as they deem best. 
Passed March 15, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
Ax Order relating to a File and Index System for City Clerk's Office. 

Ordered. If the Eoard of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
city clerk be and is hereby authorized to expend a sum not exceeding 
one thousand dollars ($1,000) in installing in the office of city clerk, 
a card index and file sj'stem; the expense thereof to be charged to the 
special appropriation for file and index system for city clerk's oflRce. 

Passed March 15, 1898. 



City of MxVXCh ester. 
An Order to repair Public Buildings. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur: That the mayor 
and joint standing committee on lands and buildings be and are hereby 
authorized to make necessary repairs in and upon the public build- 
ings, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for re- 
pairs of buildings. 

Passed March IS, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

An> Order authorizing the Committee on Setting Trees to expend 
Two Hundred Dollars ($200) for Trees and Tree Boxes. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
committee on setting trees be authorized to expend two hundred dol- 
lars ($200) for shade trees and tree boxes, the expense thereof to 
be charged to the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed March 30, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Four-Eoom Schoolhouse in Amoskeag. 
Ordered, If the Board of ]\[ayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings be and 
they are hereby authorized and instructed to obtain plans and esti- 
mates for building, completing, and equipping a four-room school 



464 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

building-, to be located on the lot of land owned by the city of Man- 
chester on Front street in Amoskeapr. at an expense not exceeding' 
eight thousand dollars ($8,000), the same to be charged to the appro- 
priation for new Amoskeag- schoolhouse. And said mayor and joint 
standing- committee are authorized to do any and everything- neces- 
sary to complete said building and to equip at least three school- 
rooms. 

Passed April 5, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
An Ordek relating- to the r.onds of City Officials in City Hall. 

Ordrnd, If i he l>card of ]\Iayor and Ahlermen concur: That the 
mayor be authorized to procure at the expense of the city of Man- 
chester the bonds required for city officials in city hall as follows: 
City treasurer, tax collector, city clerk, and city auditor, from such 
Fidelity company as he shall approve; and the expense thereof to be 
charged to incidental expenses. 

Passed April 5, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

Ax Order relating to Concreting- the Sidewalks on Wilton and Conant 

streets on the north and south side of the North Main-street school 

respectively. 

Ordered, If the I'oard of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings be author- 
ized and empowered to concrete the sidewalks on Wilton and Conant 
streets, on the north and .south side of the North Main-street school 
respectively, and do other necessary concrete work around said school; 
the ex])ense tliereol' to Ix' cliargt'd to tin- a|)|)ro])riation for lands and 
buildings. 

Passed April 8, 1898. 



City ok Manchester. 
An Oi:1)i;i! Io luiild a Cei-tain Sewn-. 

nnhr<il. ir the ll.iiinl of Mayor nni\ A Mermen eoneiir: Tliat the 
board f)f street and park commissioners he and are hereby autluiri/cd 
to build a cerlain sewer as follows: 

Commencing at the manhole in llic present sewer at the intersec- 
tion of Cedar street and Wil.son east back street, and flienee in an 
easterly direction in Cedar street •12.'> feet to a manliole. 

And the expense thereof to be cliarged to tlie a|)|)ro|u-iat ion for new 
sewers. 

I'assed June 7, 1898. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 465 

City of Manchester. 
An Orpku to purclia.se Hose for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and .\klernien concur: That the 
mayor and joint standing- committee on fire department be authorized 
to purchase two thousand feet of fire hose for use in fire department, 
the expense thereof to be charged to tlie appropriation for fire 
depai'tment. 

Passed June 7, 1S9S. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase Horses for use in the Fire Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of !Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
maj-or and joint standing committee on fire department be authorized 
to purchase four horses for use in the fire department, the expen.se 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire department; and 
to dispose of, by sale or trade, four horses now in use that have 
become unfit for service. Price not to exceed $150 each. 

Passed June 7, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order in relation to the Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 

Ordered, If the Board of ^Mayor and Aldermen concur: That Louis 
Bell post No. 3, G. A. K., under the direction of the mayor, be author- 
ized to decorate the soldiers' graves upon Memorial day, and that the 
expenses incurred be charged to the appropriation for decoration of 
soldiers' graves. 

Passed June 7, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to the purchase of Two Oil Tanks. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayoi- and Aldermen concur: That the 
chairman of the joint standing committee on lighting streets be 
authorized to procure two oil tanks with storage of gasoline, the same 
not to exceed in cost $25.00. 

Passed June 7, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to Concreting the Sidewalk on Lake Avenue on the 
north side of Park Common. 

Ordered, If the Beard of Mayor and Aldermen coiicur: That the 
mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings be author- 



466 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

ized and empowered to concrete the sidewalk on the north side of 
Park common from Chestnut street to Pine street; and that there be 
appropriated for that purpose the sum of one hundred sixty dollars 
($160), and that said sum of one hundred sixty dollars ($1G0) be 
transfen'cd from the reserve fund and known as the appropriation 
for concreting- the sidewalk on Lake avenue on the north side of Park 
common. 

Passed July 5, 1898. 



City of Makchestek. 
An Order relating to the Joint Standing Committee on Public Health. 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur: That the joint 
standing committee on public health be instructed to investigate the 
garbage system instituted in large municipalities and the expense 
thereof to be charged to the incidental expenses. 

Passed July 5, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to a Playground in the Southern Part of the City. 

Ordered, If the Poard of Common Council concur: That the board 
of street and park commissioners be instructed to expend the sum of 
one hundred dollars ($100) for the purpose of establishing a play- 
ground in the southern part of the city, and that said sum of one 
hundred dollars ($100) be transferred from the reserve fund, and be 
known as the appropriation for playground at the south end. 

Passed July 5, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build a certain sewer a.s follows: Coinmencing at the manhole in 
the present sewer at the intersection of Silver street and Union street, 
and thence .southerly in Union street to a manhole at the intersection 
of Somerville street and Union .street, and thence easterly in Somer- 
ville street to a manhole at the intersection of Maple street and Somer- 
ville street. 

And the expens(> tliereof he charged to the api)roj)riat ion for new 
sewers. 

Passed August 2, 1898. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 467 

City or ^^fANCiiKSTER. 
An Order relating- to ravins' North and South ^lain Streets. 

Ordered, If the Ecard of Common Council concur: That the board 
of street and park commissioners be instructed to expend the sum of 
seven hundred dollars ($700) for the purpose of completing the con- 
crete paving- on South Main street, and that said sum of seven hundred 
dollars be transferred from the resei^ed fund to the appropriation for 
paving North and South Main streets. 

Passed August 2, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
Ax Order to extend the Somerville-Street Sewer. 

Ordered, If the Beard of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
sewer now being built in Somerville street be extended from the end 
of the present location to a point 160 feet east of the east line of 
Beech street, and the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation 
for new sewers. 

Passed August 5, 1898, 



City of Manchester. 
Ax Order relating to Paving Hanover Street. 

Ordered, If the Board of ]Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
city clerk be and is hereby authorized to make a transfer of two 
thousand dollars ($2,000) from the appropriation for reserve fund to 
the special appropriation for paving Hanover street. 

Passed August 5, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, If the Board of ^Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build a certain sewer as follows: Commencing at the manhole at 
the intersection of Milford street and the old Amherst road, and 
thence in a westerly direction in Milford street to a manhole at the 
intersection of Milford street and Sylvester street. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed August 5, 1898. 



468 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of ^Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build certain sewers as follows: Commencing at the present sewer 
at ^Massabesic and Jewett street, thence in an easterly direction in 
Massabesic street to J. Hall road; thence northerly in Hall road to 
Nelson street; thence "easterly in Nelson street to Mammoth road; 
thence in a northerly direction in Mammoth road about 500 feet to a 
manhole. 

Commencing at the proposed sewer in Nelson street at Jones street, 
and thence in a northerly direction to Benton street in Jones street. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed August 5, 1S98. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build a certain sewer as follows: 

1st. Commencing at the present sewer in Wayne street at the inter- 
section of Cartier east back street; thence in a southerly direction 
one hundred and seventy-five feet in Cartier east back street. 

2d. Commencing at the manhole at the intersection of Amory and 
Essex streets; thence in a southerly direction five hundred and sixty 
feet in Essex street. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed August 5, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the Purchase of the Gamewell Storage Battery 
System. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
mayor and joint standing committee on fire department be and are 
hereby authorized and empowered to purchase the Gamewell Storage 
Battery sy.stem for use in the fire department, at a cost not exceeding 
eighteen hundred and fifty dollars ($1,850), and that there be trans- 
ferred for that pni-pose the sum of eighteen hundred and fifty dollars 
($1,850) from llic reserve fund to the approjiriation for fuv-alarni tele- 
graph. 

Pa.ssed August 5, 1898. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 469 

City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to Paving North Main Street. 

Ordcml, If the Board of ^Mayor and Aldeinien concur: That the 
sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000) be and the same is hereby trans- 
ferred from the appropriation for reserve fund to the appropriation 
for paving North Main and South Main street, viz.: 

That the city clerk transfer said sum as above stated and the same 
be used in completing the work of concrete paving on North Main 
street. 

Passed August 5, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the establishment of a Water System of Closets at the 
Pearl-Street School Building. 

Ordered, If the Board of Maj'or and Aldermen concur: That the 
mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings be author- 
ized to remove the dry closet plant at the Pearl-street schoolhouse, 
and install in its place a water system of closets. 

Ordered further, that said committee be authorized to take all steps 
and do all things necessary to the establishment of said system, the 
expense of the same not to exceed the sum of eight hundred dollars, 
and to be charged to a special appropriation to be known as an appro- 
priation for the Pearl-street schoolhouse. 

Ordered furtlier, that the city clerk be and lierebj^ is authorized to 
make a transfer of eight hundred dollars from the appropriation for 
the reserve fund to the special appropriation, for the Pearl-street 
schoolhouse. 

Passed August 5, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to the Purchase of a Steam Gong. 

Ordered; If the Board of ^Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
mayor and joint standing committee on fire department be and are 
hereby authorized and empowered to purchase a steam gong to be 
located at the gas works, the cost not to exceed five hundred dollars 
($500) ; and the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for fire department. 

Passed September 6, 1898. 



City of ;MLa.nchesteb. 

An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of !^rayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build certain sewers as follows: 



470 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

1st. Commencing' at tlie manhole at the intersection of Belmont 
street and Young street; thence in a westerly direction in Young" 
street one hundred and fifty feet. 

2d. Commencing at the manhole three hundred and eighty-five feet 
easterly from Canton street in Lake avenue; thence in an easterly 
direction to J. Hall road in Lake avenue. 

3d. Commencing at a proposed manhole at the intersection of Cen- 
tral and Milton streets; thence in an easterly direction to Beacon 
street in Central street. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed September 6, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
Am Order relating to the Transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000) be and the same is hereby 
transferred from the reserve fund to the appropriation for macadam- 
izing streets; and that said sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000) 
be used to complete the macadamizing of Massabesic street from the 
junction of said street and Old Falls road to Cypress street. 

Passed October 4, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to the Transfer of Money. 

Ordered, If the Board of ^Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
sum of thirty-four hundred dollars ($3,-400) be and the same is hereby 
transferred from the appropriation of reserve fund to the appropria- 
tion, for free text-books; and the city clerk be and hereby is author- 
ized to make the above transfer. 

Passed October 4, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
Ax Ohdkr relating to the Transfer of Money. 

Ordrnil ir \\n< I'.oaid of M;iv<.r niul A l.lriiiicn (•..lu-iir: That llie 
sum of three liiMidred dollars ($;;()U) be and the same is hereby trans- 
ferred from the resene fund to the a])|)roiu-iation for grading for 
concrete; and the sjiid sum of three hundred dollars ($;!00) l)e used 
to build a sidewalk on the north side of Hall street from the junction 
of Hall and Bridge streets to the Mammoth road. 

Passed October 4, 1S98. 



RESOLUTIONS,'^OUDER?, ORDINANCES.. 471 

City of Manchester. 
An Okder relating to the Transfer of ^Nfonoy. 

Ordrtrd. If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
city clerk be and hereby is authorized to transfer from the reserve 
fund to the appropriation for band concerts the sum of sixty-eight 
dollars and seventy-three cents ($08.7.1). 

Passed October 4, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the Appropriation for Militia Armories. 

Ordered, If the Board of Major and Aldermen concur: That the 
one thousand dollars ($1,000) appropriated for militia armories be 
appropriated as folloAvs: 

$100.00 to band, First Regiment N. H. N. G. 

$100.00 to Co. C, First Regiment N. H. N. G. ^ 

$100.00 to Co. F, First Regiment N. H. N. G. 

$100.00 to Co. H, First Regiment N. H. N. G. 

$100.00 to Co. L, First Regiment X. H. N. G 

$100.00 to Manchester War Veterans. 

$100.00 to Amoskeag Veterans. 

$100.00 to Manchester Cadets. 

$100.00 to Louis Bell Post G. A. R. 

$100.00 to Joseph Freschl Post G. A. R. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
militia armories. 

Passed October 4, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Maj^or and Aldermen concur: That the 
board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build certain sewers as follows: 

1st. Commencing at the manhole at the intersection of Harvard and 
Beech streets; thence through Beech street to Hay ward street. 

2d. Commencing at the northern terminus of the present sewer in 
Russell street; thence northerly through Russell street 60 feet. 

3d. Commencing at the manhole at the intersection of Coolidge 
avenue west back street and Bremer north back street; thence through 
Bremer north back street to Rimmon street. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed October 4, 1898. 



472 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manchester. 
An Ordek to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordciril, If the Board of ]Mayor and Aldermen concur: 'I'hat the 
board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to Iniild a certain sewer as follows: 

Commencing- at the manhole in Somerville street, at Beech street, 
and thence northerly in Beech street to Silver street; and the expense 
thereof be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed December 6, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to Ijuild a certain sewer as follows: 

Commencing at the manhole in Clarke street at Chestnut street, and 
thence in a noi-therly direction in Chestnut street 750 feet; and the 
expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed December 6, 1898. 



City of LfANCHESTEK. 

An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, If the Board of [Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to build a certain sewer as follows: 

Commencing at the manhole at the intersection of ISIilford street 
and old Amherst road; thence in an easterly' direction in Milford street 
aboiit 175 feet; and the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for new sewers. 

Passed December fi, 1898. 



City of Manchester. 
An OnDKi! rclaliiig to the Translcr ol' ]\l()ncy. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
sum of three hundred dollars (.$;!00) be and the same is hereby trans- 
ferred from the reserve fmul to the appropriation for grading for 
concrete; and the said sum of I luce hundred dollars be used to build 
a sidewalk on the north side of old Bridge street from Belmont street 
east to the Afammoth road. 

Pa.ssed Dcccniber G, 1898. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 473 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight. 

An Ordinance relating to Pawnbrokers. 

Be it ordained by tli-e Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Coiuu-il of the 
City of Manchester in City Conncils assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. No person shall carry on the business of a pawnbroker 
within the citj^ of Manchester, unless he is duly licensed therefor by 
the board of mayor and aldermen. Said board of maj^or and alder- 
men shall upon application issue license to do business as pawnbrok- 
ers to such persons as said board deem proper; and such licenses shall 
be for one year from their issue, but ma^^ be revoked at anj^ time by 
said board of maj-or and aldermen, whenever in their opinion the imb- 
lic good requires; such licenses shall designate the place where the 
person licensed may carry on his business, and he shall not carry on 
the business at anj- other place within the city; and the fee for such 
license shall be fifty dollars per year. 

Sect. 2. Every person licensed as aforesaid shall keep a book or 
record at his place of business in which he shall enter in English at 
the time of receiving the same, a minute description of anj^ article 
left for pawn, particularly mentioning any prominent or descriptive 
marks on the same, with the name, age, and residence, giving the street 
and number when possible, of the person from whom he received it, 
noting also the day and hour and the amount paid or loaned thereon; 
and such book or record and the articles left for pawn shall at all 
times be open to the inspection of the chief of police or of any per- 
son authorized by him. No person licensed as aforesaid shall, directly 
or indirectly, receive any article in pawn from any minor, knowing or 
having reasonable cause to believe him to be such, without the con- 
sent in writing of the parent or guardian of such minor. And all 
persons so licensed, when requested so to do by the chief of police, 
shall make a daily statement to him of the articles left with them for 
pawn. 

Sect. ?,. If any person shall do business as a pawnbroker without 
obtaining such license, or if any person licensed as aforesaid shall 
violate the other provisions of this ordinance, or any of them, he shall 
be punished therefor by a fine not exceeding twenty dollars for each 
offense. 

Passed to be ordained April 5, 1898. 



INDEX. 



INDEX. 



Abatement of taxes 421 

Assets, statement and inventory of 445 

Annual interest charge on bonded debt 443 

Auditor, city, report of 313 

Auditor's department 343 

Appropriations for 1S9S by city councils 422 

Appendix, school 215 

Amoskeag cemetery 410 

Amoskeag schoolhouse 401 

B 

Band concerts 421 

Bicycle path 367 

Bridges 361 

Books and stationery 381 ■ 

Buildings, repairs of 399 

public, occupied by private parties 444 

Board of water commissioners, organization of 28 

report of 29 

health, report of 255 

Bonded debt, tabular statement of 440 

detailed statement of, for 1S9S 441 

annual interest charge 443 

c 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax ;.. 431 

City hall 330 

officers' salaries 341 

teams 362 

officials, list of 3-18 

engineer, report of 101 

solicitor, report of 2S9 

auditor's report 319 

treasurer's report 320 

councils, orders, ordinances 455 

auditor's department 343 

farm 41 1 

library 387 

report of trustees of 239 

treasurer's report 242 

librarian's report 246 

donations to 249 

477 



478 INDEX. 

Contingent expenses 381 

Care of rooms 382 

Commons 368 

Cemetery, Pine Grove 406 

Valley 408 

Amoslceag 410 

report of sub-trustees of Valley 274 

Pine Grove 273 

Amoskeag 275 

Cemeteries, treasurer of 276 

treasurer of fund 276 

County tax 421 

D 

Debt, payment of funded 327 

bonded, statement of 441 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 420 

Derryfield and Stark parks 370 

E 

Engineer's department 373 

Expenses, incidental 334 

mayor's 344 

contingent 381 

Evening schools 383 

school, mechanical drawing 384 

Electric lights, location of 305 

Elliot Hospital 419 

Emergency Ward 419 

Exempted from tax, property 431 



F 



Fund, reserved 328 

Fuel 378 

Furniture and supplies 379 

Free text-books 385 

Fire department 388 

report of chief engineer 147 

value of personal property 164 

names and residences of members 190 

location fire-alarm boxes 153 

Fire-alarm telegraph 393 

Farm, paupers off 411 

city 414 

File and index system 332 

G 

Grading for concrete 357 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 420 

Gas-lights, location of 303 



II 



Highways, new 349 

land taken for 351 



INDEX. 479 

Highways, watering 351 



paviug 



352 



macadamizing 355 

grading for concrete on 357 

scavenger service 358 

sweeping 360 

lighting 371 

bridges 361 

city teams 362 

repairs of 346 

Health department 374 

board of, report of 255 

Home, Women's Aid 419 

Hospital, Elliot, free beds 419 

Sacred Heart 420 

Notre Dame de Lourdes 420 

Hydrant service 395 

I 

Inaugural address 21-30 

Interest 327 

annual charge, bonded debt 443 

Incidental expenses 334 

Indigent soldiers 419 

Inventory of assets 445 

L 

Laws relating to exemptions 430 

Lake avenue sidewalk, concreting of 368 

Loan, temporary 330 

Land in West Manchester 421 

taken for highways 351 

Lighting streets 371 

Library, city 387 

Legal points and rules relating to claims against the city 449 

M 

Manual training '. 386 

Mayor's incidentals 344 

Macadamizing streets 355 

Merrill yard 410 

Militia 420 

Milk inspector, report of 299 

Municipal receipts and expenditures 322 

Manufacturing property exempt from taxation 439 

N 

New highways 349 

schoolhouses 401 



480 



O 



Order in relation to decoration of soldiers' graves 465 

relating to committee on health 466 

relating to playground 466 

relating to File and Index System 463 

to purchase horses for fire department 463 

to build certain sewers 464, 466, 407, 468, 409. 471, 472 

for paving North and South Main streets 467 

to extend Somerville-street sewer 467 

relating to the final transfers for 1897 460 

relating to transfers of money 470, 471, 472' 

relating to paving Hanover street 467 

to repair public buildings 463 

to build new schoolhouso 463 

relative to appropriation for years 1890, 1897, and 1898 461 

relating to bonds of city officials ". 414 

to remove lamp posts 462 

to sell Bunton land 462 

relating to concreting sidewalks 464 

to establish water-closets at Pearl-street schoolhouse 469 

to print fifty-second report 462 

to purchase hose for fire department 465 

to purchase oil tanks 465 

relating to pay of militia 471 

for paving North Main street 469 

to concrete sidewalk. Park common r 465 

to purchase trees 463 

Ordinance relating to pawnbrokers 473 

Ordinances, orders, resolutions ! 453 

Organiz;ation of school board for 1<S9S 229 

Overseers of the poor, report of 293 

Oil lamps, location of 304 



Parks— Derryfield and Stark 370 

Parsonages, valuation of, exempt from taxation 440 

Paupers off the farm 411 

Paving streets 352 

Elm street 353 

North and South Main streets 354 

Hanover street 354 

Payment of funded debt 327 

Pine Grove cemetery 406 

Police department, station 395 

court 396 

commissslon 397 

Printing and stationery 333 

and advertising 381 

Property account, real and personal.. 445 

Public buildings occupied by private parties 444 

Pearl-street schoolhouse repairs "102 

Purchase of land sold for taxes 332 



Reserved fund 328 

Repairs of schoolhousoK 377 



of bulldingH. 
of highways. 



INDEX. 481 

Rooms, care of 382 

Resolution relating to Urook avenue 4i.7 

exempting George E. Greeley Co 457 

in regard to laborers on city ledge 458 

relating to will of Nancy Barr 4E8 

transferring cemetery funds 45G 

transferring Amoskeag schoolhouse to school board 459 

relating to insurance rates 455 

raising money and making appropriations for 1898 423, 

Resolutions, orders, and ordinances 455 

exempting Imo Wrapper Co 455,457 

making temporary loans 455, 456, 458, 459 

Report of Board of Water Commissioners 29 

Superintendent of Water-Works 31 

City Engineer 101 

Chief Engineer Fire Department 147 

Trustees of City Library 239 

Sub-Trustees of Valley cemetery 274 

Pine Grove cemetery 273 

Amoskeag cemetery 275 

Treasurer of cemeteries 276 

Treasurer of Cemetery Fund 276 

Treasurer of Sinking Fund 283 

Overseers of the Poor 293 

Street and Park Commission '. 65 

Committee on Sewers and Drains 129 

City Solicitor .289 

School Superintendent 201 

Board of Health 255 

City Auditor '. 319 

City Treasurer 320 

Real and personal estate owned by the city 445 

property, exempt from taxation, other than public property 431 

Rules, etc., relating to bills against the city (auditor's department) 449 

Receipts and expenditures, 1898 322 

River road, Clarke, and Elm street sewer 368 

s 

Sacred Heart Hospital ' . . 420 

Salaries of city offlcials 34I 

Salaries, teachers' 334 

Scavenger service 353 

School department, organization of 229 

evening, mechanical drawing 334 

superintendent's, report 201 

Schoolhouses, new 40j 

repairs of 377 

Sewers, repairs of 355 

new 3(55 

Sinking fund 328 

Treasurer's report 283 

Snow and ice 349 

Soldiers, indigent 419 

Solicitor, city, report of 289 

South Manchester playground 362 

Stark and Derryfleld parks 37O 

Statement of bonded debt 441 

public buildings occupied by private parties 443 



482 INDEX. 

state tax 421 

Street and park commission 345 

report of 65 

Street sweeping 360 

T 

Tabular statement of taxation by Board of Assessors 425-426 

Taxes, abatement of 421 

due and uncollected 428 

Tax, state 421 

county 421 

valuations 428 

Taxation, appropriations for 1898 - 422 

exemption 431 

settlement of account tax collector 429 

Teachers, list of 230 

Teachers' salaries 384 

Teams, city 362 

Temporary loan 330 

Text-books, free 385 

Training, manual 386 

Treasurer, city, report of 320 

V 

Valley cemetery 408 

Valuation and taxes, 1898 427 

w 

Watering streets 351 

Water-works, superintendent's report 31 

commissioner's report 29 

expenses 402 

Women's Aid Home 419