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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

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FIFTY -FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



City of Manchester 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



POR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1899. 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO 
THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. 

PRINTED BY THE JOHN B. CLARKE COMPANY. 
1900. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 
1899. 



Mayor. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE Office, City Hall 

Chosen at biennial election in November, 1898. Salary, $1,800 per 
annum, payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1848, section 1. Chapter 223, 
Laws of 1883. Public Statutes, chapter 47.) Telephone at house and 
oflice. 



Aldermen. 

Act of June, 1848, section 1. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 

Ward 1. John P. Mullen, 12 Whitney street. 

Ward 2. De Lafayette Robinson, 255 Front street, Amoskeaj 

Ward .]. William F. Elliott, 194 Concord street. 

Ward 4. George H!. Phinney, 133 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. Richard J. Barrj% 232 Lake avenue. 

Ward (■). Samuel M. Couch, 382 East Spruce street. 

Ward 7. John F. Frost, 11 West ISlerrimack street. 

Ward 8. Gillis Stark, 42 School street. 

Ward 9. Frank T. Provost, 21 Amory street. 

Ward 10. Eus-ene E. Reed, 636 Soraerville street. 



President of the Common Council. 
Harry T. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 



Members of the Common Council. 

Act of .January, 1897, chapter 198. 

Ward 1. 

Abner J. Sanborn, 31 IMarket street. 

Frederick W. Bond, 46 Amoskeag Corporation, Stark street. 

George H. Knowlton, 1436 Elm street. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNxMENT. 



Waijd :*. 

Herman F. Straw, <i07 Chestniit street. 
Kobert It. Chase, S41 Union street. 
Elijah M. Topliff, 1!)2 l»rospeot .street. 

Ward :i. 

A. Gale Straw, G27 Union street. 
Job J. Grenier, .341 Orange street. 
Charles H. Clark, 17 Malvern street. 

Waud 4. 

Aimer D. Gooden, 4GG Hanover street. 
Harry T. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 
William G. Garmon, 4G0 Manchester street. 

Wabd 5. 

George A. Doherty, 222 Central street. 

liryan Connors, 14G Cedar street. 

John F. Harrington, 14.") East Spruce street. 

Ward G. 

Henry I. Haselton, 404 Lake aveune. 
Walter ^r. Lang, 719 Summer street. 
Smith Dodge, 427 Central street. 

Ward 7. 

Frank W. Stone, 7 West Merrimack street. 
Alexander Knight, 50 West INferrimack .street. 
Hanson K. Armstrong, 41 West Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. 

James E. McDonald, 41 Parker street. 
Andrew Xetsch, 20 Tilton street. 
Waller J',. Mitchell, 2!) Tiiird street. 

Waiu) '.I. 

Ilfiiry (). Hill, :!()2 ^fain street. 
Charles J. Uiitict. 4U() Carticr street. 
Moise l^esscllc, noi Aiiiory street. 

\Vaim> 10. 

Xcl.sc.n W. Paige, Man.nu.th n.ad. 
Frank A. Emerson, C)0 Cleveland street. 
Eli Walker, 14G Jewett street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 5 

Clerk of Common Council. 

George L. Stearns, 129 Salmon street. 

Salary, $200. .(General Laws, chapter 46, sections 7-9. City Laws 
and Ordinances, page 33, chapter 6, section 11.) 



City Clerk. 

Edward C. Smith Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350. Chosen in Januarj', bienniallj^ by boai'd of aldermen. 
Residence, 900 Union street. 



City Auditor. 

James E. Dodge Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Appointed by mayor and ajiproved by board of alder- 
men in January, annually. (Laws of 1889, chapter 287. City Ordi- 
nances, pages 44, 71, 83-88, 173.) Residence, Eiver road north. 



Auditor's Clerk. 

Lizzie ^L Cogswell Auditor's Office, Cily Hall 

Residence, CO Walnut street. 



City Treasurer. 

Fred L. Allen Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350. Elected by board of aldermen in January, bien- 
nially. (Act of January, 1897, chapter 198.) Residence, 33 Walnut 
street. 



Treasurer's Clerk. 
Blanche E. Bullock Treasurer's Office, Citv Hall 



Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350 and fees. Elected by mayor and aldermen before May 
1, biennially. (Act of July, 1851. Act of" June, 1859, section 0. Act of 
1897, chapter 198. Public Statutes, chapter 43. City Laws and Ordi- 
nances, chapter 33.) Residence, 740 Chestnut street.' 



6 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Deputy Collector of Taxes. 

Edwin C. Paul Collector's Office, City Hall 

Salary, $800. Appointed by tax collector with approval of mayor and 
aldermen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 33, section 3.) Kesi- 
dence, 416 Central street. 



City Solicitor. 

George A. Wagner Office, Kennard, Koom 014 

Salary, $800. Elected by board of aldermen in January biennially. 
(Act of 1897, chapter 198.) Residence, 332 Orange street. 



City Messenger. 

John A. Barker Office, City Hall 

Salarj', $700. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6.) Residence, 49 Appleton 
street. 



Standing Committees. 

On Finance. — The Maj^or and Aldermen Frost and Provost. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Provost, Couch, and Robinson. (Meets 
Wednesday succeeding the 24th of each month. All bills must be left at 
the city auditor's office, properlj^ approved, not later than the 20th of 
each month.) 

On Claims. — Aldermen ]\Iu]len, Barry, Provost, and Elliott. (Meets 
third Friday in each month.) 

On Streels. — Aldermen Robinson, Barry, and Alullen. 

On Sencrs and Z)7-ai«.s.^Aldermen Frost, Stark, and Couch. 

On L'uihH)i(j /S7r(T^s-.— Aldermen Barry, Phinney, and Frost. 

On Lands and JiuUdinijs, — Aldermen Elliott, Provost, and Mullen. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Phinney, Stark, and Elliott. 

On Commons and Ctnietcries, — Aldermen Stark, Phinney, Elliott, 
Couch, and Robinson. 

On City Farm and Jlonsr of Cornel 'K>n . -AMlcrmL'u Couch, Robinson, 
and Mullen. 

On Militarii .4 /r« /Vs.— Aldermen Coiali. .Mulliu, jmd Barry. 

On Public //((J////.— Aldermen Stark, Elliott, and I'rovost. 

On Fnrollmenf.- Aldermen Elliott, Barry, and Phinney. 

On Jiills on Sn-ond 7iVO(H7if/.— Aldermen IMiinuey, Stark, and Frost. 

On 7>irrH.sr.s-.^ Aldfrnien Frost, JSarry, and Elliott. 

On Stiliiiif IriiK. \li|MniH'ii i'rnxost, Mullen, and Robinson. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 7 

Common Council. 

STAA'DING COMMITTEES 

Xo. 1. Central, Aii(litor''s, ami Engiiwer's Departments and Department 
of Taxes. — Messrs. Lord, Grenier, Connors, McDonald, and Haselton, 

2Vo. I. Street ami Seiccr Department. — Messrs. H. F. Straw, Garmon, 
Stone, Clark, Doherty. 

No. S. School Department. — Messrs. Topliff, Mitchell, Kuight, Lord, 
Knowlton, and Lang. 

No. Jf. Fire Department. — Messrs. Gooden, Emerson, Armstrong, 
Chase, Untiet, and Dodge. 

No. 5. Puhlic Buildings and Places Department. — Messrs. Sanborn, 
Knight, Chase, Bessette, and Paige. 

No. 6. Lihrary, Police, Health, and Charitable Departments. — Messrs. 
A. G. Straw, Gooden, Bond, Netsch, and Hill. 

No. 7. Lighting Streets Department.— Messrs. Clark, Garmon, Paige, 
Mitchell, and Harrington. 

Finance Committer. — Messrs. Lord, H. F. Straw, Toxjliff, Gooden, iV. G- 
Straw. Sanborn, and Clark. 



City Pliysician. 

Frederick Perkins Office, 895 Elm street 

Salary, $600. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(Act of 1897, chapter 198. City Ordinances, chapter 9, sections 29, 30.) 
Residence, .52 Clarke street. 



City Engineer. 

Samuel J. Lord Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350. Chosen by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(City Ordinances, chapter (3, sections 33, 34.) 



Water Commissioners. 

(Chapter 70, Laws of 1871. City Ordinances, chapter 30. and Laws of 
1891, chapter 20, page 319, act approved March 31, 1891. Chapter 183, 
Laws of 1893.) One commissioner elected annually b,v mayor and 
aldermen, in the month of September, for a term of six years. Office 
at court house, corner Franklin and West Merrimack streets. Tele- 
phone at off.ce and at pumping station. 

The Mayor, ex officio. 

Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1901. 
Frank Dowst, term expires January, 1900. 
Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1905. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1904. 



8 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Harry E. Parker, term expires .Jauuary, 190:j, 
Charles T. Means, term expires Januarj', 1902. 
Alpheus Ga3', chairman. 

Henry Chandler, clerk. Salary, $100. Chosen by the board of com- 
missioners. 



Superintendent of Water-Works. 

Charles K. AValkcr Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $2,000. CJiosen by water commissioners annually. Ilesi- 
dence, 68 South Alain street. West Manchester. 



Clerk of the Water-Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns Ottice, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $1,500. Chosen by water commissioners annually. Eesi- 
dence, 421 Hanover street. 



Engineer at Old Pumping Station. 
Josiah Laselle. Salarj', $700, rent, fuel, and use of land. 
Chosen bv water commissioners annually. 



Engineer at New Pumping Station. 
Henr3' A. Donawaj'. Salary, $:.'.50 per day, rent and fuel. 



Justice of tine Police Court. 

Isaac L. Heath, court room at police station, corner Manchester and 
Chestnut streets. 

Salary, $1,500. Appointed by the g-ovenior \\itii the advice of the 
council. (General Laws, chajiler :.'15: chapter Ki:!. sections 17, 18, 10, 
of the Laws of 1878, as amended by chapter l.'.iC, Laws of ]SS1. rul)lic 
Statutes, chapter 211.) 



Associate Justice of the Police Court. 

Ceor^'c W. ]'rcscol). Salary. $:!()0 ]nv aiinuin. 

Ap[)ointed by the R'overnor, with the advice of the council. (Chai)lcr 
2ir>, CJcneral Laws, sections 2-11. IMiblic Statutes, chapter 211. Chftp- 
ter 20r,, Laws of ISO.-?.) 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 'J 

Clerk of the Police Court. 

John C. IJic-kford. Salary, $(>00. 

Appointed by the justice of the police court. (Chapter 163, sections 
17-19, General Laws,' amended by cliapter 236, Laws of 1881. Public 
Statutes, chapter 211.) Residence, lo Ash street. 



Police. 



The members of the police are appointed by the police commission- 
ers, and hold their commissions during good behavior. Thej' are, by 
virtue of their appointment, constables and conservators of the peace, 
and their jurisdiction extends throughout the city. (Chai^ter 253, sec- 
tion 5, General Laws; chapter 303, Laws of 1887; chapter 202, Laws of 
1S93.) Police station, at the corner of Chestnut and ^Manchester streets. 



Police Commissioners. 

See chapter 202, Laws 1893. 

l^oah S. Clark, clerk, term expires January, 1904. 
Frank P. Carpenter, term expires Januarj', 1902. 
Harry E. Loveren, chairman, term expires January, 1900. 



Chief of, Police. 

Michael J. Healy Office at Police Station 

Salarj', $2,000. Eesidence, 304 Central street. Telephone at house 
and office. 



Deputy Chief of Police. 

John F. Cassidy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $1,.500. Residence, 415 Manchester street. 



Captain of the Watch. 

Thomas E. Steele. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 5G Nashua 
street. 



Sergeants. 



Leon E. ;Magoon. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 355 East Spruce 
street. 
John T. O'Dowd. Salary. $2.50 per day. Residence, 90 Adams street. 



10 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Patrolmen, 



Archanibeaiilt, Joso]) 
Badger, John C. 
Bean, Handall W. 
Bourassa, Frank E. 
Brown, John G. 
Burns, Henry A. 
Butlei', James S. 
Callaghan, Peter. 
Connor, John J. 
Coolidg-e, Edgar L. 
Dustin, Frank J. 
Farrell, Joseph A. 
Hamijston, James S. 
Hampston, Patrick. 
Healy, John D. 
Ilutchins, Dexter B. 
Love joy, George A. 



MahtT. William. 
,\Iarden, Frank W. 
.McQuade, Edward H. 
Moore, Frank P. 
Xixon, John T. 
O'Malley, John F. 
I'armenter, Wallace C. 
Poehlman, O.scar 11. 
Proctor, Levi J. 
Rainville, Frank. 
]ting, Olof. 
Pvussell, Albert. 
Homers, Elmer E. 
Sullivan, Florence. 
Sweeney, James. 
Welch, John T. 
Wheden, Eben E. 



Colburu, Everett E. 
Kearns, Timothj'. 



Special Patrolmen. 

Lynch, John J. 
Sullivan, Tiraothv. 



Frank P. Wiggin. 
street. 


Sak 
Sak 




$1.7.-, per 


Miss A. B. Brown, 
mack street. 


Matron. 

$11.-. per ;, 



Janitor of Station. 

JJesidenee, 255 Auburn 



Ivosidonco. 277 ^Nferri- 



School Committee. 

Chosen at the biennial election in November, 1S98; mayor and presi- 
dent of the common council members rx officio. The board of school 
committee chcjose the clerk of the boartl, the superintendent of ]ml)lie 
instruction, the truant otticer, and the teachers in the public schools, 
and determine their .salaries. They have charge of the repairs of 
schoolhouses, to a limited extent, and tiie i)urchase of free text-books 
and other su]>plies, and are limited by Hie appi-opriations of the city 
eoUMciis. Tiif salar\- of Ihr <-(>inniitte'e is $10 each. 



Walt.T i;. Ileatl 



\V.\1!1» 1, 
IHlii 



Ai C. Land. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



11 



Elmer W. Xuttiug. 



Georq-e D. Towue. 



Johu H. Puedell. 



Daniel J. McAuliflfe. 



Eugene B. Dunba] 



Edson S. Heath. 



Frank A. Cadwell. 



Robert E. Walsh. 



Mark E. Harvey. 



Wakd 2. 

Charles H. Manning. 
^YAI{D 3. 

Louis E. Phelps. 
Wakd 4. 

Nathaniel L. Colby. 
AVard 5. 

John T. Kelley. 
Ward 6. 

Harry L. Davis. 
Ward 7. 

Edward B. Woodbury, 
Ward 8. 

Ned T. Wallace. 
Ward 9. 

Joseph A. Boivin. 
Ward 10. 

Harry H. Burpee. 



William C. Clarke, ex officio chairman. 
Harry T. Lord, ex officio. 
George D. Towne, vice-chairman. 
Elliott C. Lambert, clerk. 



Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

William E. Buck Office, City Hall 

Salary, $2,300. Re.sidence, 324 ;Nryrtle street. 



Superintendent's Clerk. 

Fannie L. Sanborn Residence, IGl Hanover street. 

Salary. $oOO. 



12 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Truant Officer. 

Curtis W. Davis Office, City llall 

Salary, $7.J0. Itesidence, 849 Chestnut street. 



Assessors. 

One assessor from each ward chosen at the biennial election in No- 
vember. Paid $2.r)0 each for each daj^ while employed in the assess- 
ment and abatement of taxes. Oflfice, City Hall. (Charter, section 25. 
Public Statutes, chapter 48, section 1; chapter 50, section 4; chapter 
49, sections 10, 11, 12. City Ordinances, chapter G, section 26.) Assist- 
ant assessors, not exceeding six, chosen by the city councils. 

Henry Lewis, 32 Amoskeag Corporation. 
John K. Wilson, 67 Blodget street. 
David O. Fernald, 384 Lowell street. 
Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 
George F. Sheehan, 85 Cedar street. 
Leroy M. Streeter, Mammoth road. 
Kobert Leggett, 50 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Eugene W. Brigham, 6 Marlboro street. 
John T. Hannigan, 159 Cartier street. 
Henry Horton, Mammoth road. 



Ward 


1. 


Ward 


2. 


Ward 


3. 


Ward 4. 


Ward 


5. 


Ward 


6. 


Ward 


7. 


Ward 


8. 


Ward 


9. 


Ward 


10. 



CHAIRMAN OF ASSESSORS. 



David O. Fernald, 



.Office, City Hall 



Cr.ERK OF ASSESSORS. 



Eugene W. Prigliani Office, City Hall 



Inspectors of Check-Lists. 

One in each ward, chosen at the biennial election in November. Com- 
pensation, $2.25 per day for each day actually employed. Office. City 
Hall. (Laws of 1878, chapter 163. sections 5. 6. ~ " '" " '" "" " 
16, and City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) 



9, 10. 11. 12. 13, 14. 



Ward 1. Oeorge C. Kemp, 40 Machine Shop block- 
Ward 2. Charles B. Tucker, 777 Union street. 
Ward .'!. William B. Corey, 88 Pearl street. 
Ward 4. .\lbert T. Barr, 336 Merrimack street. 
Ward 5. Daniel A. Murphy, 246 Auburn street. 
Ward G. George Taylor, 480 Lake avenue. 
Ward 7. .Joseph A. Foster, 42 .Amoskeag Corpor: 
Ward s. Cliarh's C. Tinkham, 9 Parker avenue. 
Ward 9. Leander S. Boivin. :'. ^fonmouth sired. 
Wan! 10. .lohii C 1 1 iitchinsoii. 9:;9 lla vward si rc( 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 13 

Overseers of the Poor. 

One in oat-h ward, chosen at biennial election in November. The 
mayor is a member i;v officio. Comiiensation, $25 per annum, each; 
clerk of the board, $100 per annum, determined by City Ordinances, 
chapter 14, section IS. as amended by Ordinance of Auo-ust 5, 1890. 
Meet third ^Vednesday of each month in City Hall building'. 

AVard 1. William H. :Maxwell, clerk, 20 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Ward 2. Daniel (.i. Andrew.s, 777 Union street. 
Ward :!. Benjamin F. Garland, 28 Linden street. 
Ward 4. Charles B. Clarkson, 249 Concord street. 
Wai-d Tj. Patrick Costello, 106 East Spruce street. 
- Ward G. Charles Francis, Candia I'oad. 

Ward 7. William Marshall, 72 Amoskeag- Corporation. 
Ward S. Charles S. McKean, 495 Granite street. 
Ward 9. Joseph Doucet, 2 Monmouth street. 
Ward 10. William Glover, Ferry road. 
William C. Clarke, e.i; officio, Office, City Hall. 



Board of Health. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 1885, 
chapter 165; Laws of 1887, chapter 227; Public Statutes, chapters 108, 
109, 110.) One member appointed by the mayor in January of each 
year, to hold othce for a term of three years. Salary, $200 each per 
annum. Office, Court House, West Merrimack, corner of Franklin 
street. 

John C. Bickford. Term expires first Monday in February, 1900. 
William K. Eobbins. Term expires first Monday in Februarj% 1901. 
W'illiam :M. Parsons."-* Term expires first Monday in February, 1899. 

William B. Blake, sanitary inspector, Hanover-street road. Office, 
Court House, ^lerrimack, corner of Franklin street. 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, IMerrimack, 
corner of Franklin street. 

Carl O. Seaman, sanitarj'- insi^ector. Office, Court House, Merrimack, 
corner of Franklin street. 

if. Alma Fracker, office clerk. 



Fire Department. 

The chief engineer and four assistant engineers are chosen annually 
in the month of January, by a majority of the city councils in con- 
vention. The salary of the chief engineer is $1,300 per annum; the 
assistant engineers, each $125 per annum. They exercise the powers 
and perform the duties of firewards. The said engineers constitute 
the board of engineers, and elect a clerk whose compensation is $25 a 
* Reappointed. 



14 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT, 

year. The annual comijensatiou of the call nieiubers of the several 
hook-and-ladder, hose, steam fire engine, and chemical eng-ine com- 
panies is as follows: Captains, each $1(J5; lieutenants, each $lt30; clerks, 
each $160; assistant eng-ineers, each $100; all other members, each $150; 
payable in equal semi-annual payments, on the first of January and 
July. (Laws of 1S70, chapter 91). (ieneral Laws, chapter lOG. City 
Ordinances, chapters 6 and 12.) Six members are iiermanentlj' em- 
ployed as engineers at $70.25 per month each, and twenty-one as driv- 
ers at $68,331/5 per month each, six other permanent men at $65 per 
month each, and receive no compensation as call members. Members 
and officers of each company are appointed bj' the board of engineers. 



Chief Engineer. 

Thomas W. Lane Office, Central Station, Vine street 

Residence, 1937 Elm street. Telephone at house and office. 

Frank M. Frisselle, 58 JNIyrtle street. 

John Montplaisir, 252 Coolidge avenue. 

Eugene S. Wliitnej', River road north, corner West Xorth street. 

Clarence R. ISIerrill, clerk, 418 Merrimack street. 

For further information see chief engineer's report. 



Trustees of City Library. 

(Laws of 1854, chai^ter 15SS. See contract with Manchester Athe- 
neum, printed on pages 107 and lOS of City Report for fi.scal year end- 
ing January 31, 1855.) Board of seven trustees, one of whoin is elected 
by aldermen and board of trustees in joint convention in September, 
annually. Term of service, seven years; no salary. Two additional 
trustees, maj'or, and president of common council, ex officio. 

Frank P. Carpenter, term expires October 1, 1902. Elm, corner West 
iSiorth street. 

A'athan P. Hunt, terra expires October 1, 1901. 747 Union street. 

Herman F. Straw, term expires October 1, 1900, 607 Chestnut street. 

Walter M. Parker,* term expires October 1, 1899, 1883 Elm street, 
corner Webster. 

Roger G. Sullivan, term expires October 1, 1905, 168 Walnut street. 

John C. French, term expires October 1, 1904, 129 Bay street. 

C. D. McDulfie, term ex])iros October 1. 1903. Ash street, corner 
Myrtle. 

William ('. Clarke, ex officio. 

Harry 'J\ Lord, ex officio. 



Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 

The city councils in joint convention, biennially, elect one member 
of said board for a term of six years. Not more than two members 
• Kcap|)ointO(l. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 15 

can be of tlie same political party. Said board, consislini;- of tliree 
members, lias full charge, management, and control of the building', 
constructing, repairing, and maintaining of all the streets, highways, 
lanes, sidewalks, bridges, public sewers and drains, and public jiarks 
and commons. (See Laws of 1893, chapter 264.) Office, City Hall 
building. Open from S to 12 a. m., 2 to 5 P. M. Eeg'ular meeting of the 
board at 2 o'clock r. M. each da.v. Salary of each member, $600 per 
j^ear, jmyable quarterly, and each is allowed $150 annually for horse 
hire. 

George H. Stearns, clerk, term expires 1904. 
jiorace P. Simpson, chairman, term expires 1900. 
Byron Worthen, term expires 1902. 



Assistant Clerk. 
Julia F. Stearns. 



City Weigher. 

Gilbert Lj'^ons. Office, city scales; residence, 64 Bridge street. 

Elected biennially in board of aldermen. Salary, $400 per annum; 
all fees for weighing returned monthlj' to city treasurer with sworn 
statement. Stationed at citj' scales on Frankiin street. 



Sealer of WeigFits and Measures. 

Charles B. Clarkson. 

Elected bienniallj' in .January by board of aldermen. Paid by fees. 
(Section 25, chapter 43, Public Statutes, and chapter 125, Public 
Statutes.) 



Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39. sections 1, 2, 3, 4.) Two trustees elected 
by board of aldermen in .January, annualh', for the term of four years. 
Sub-trustees appointed bj' board of trustees. 

J. Adam Graf,""' 10 Middle street, term expires Januarj-, 1S99. 
William II. Huse,* Mammoth road, term expires 1899. 
John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street, term expires 1902. 
Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street, term expires 1902. 
Stillman P. Cannon, 99 Lowell street, term expires 1901. 
Charles E. Stearns, 329 Front street, term expires 1901. 
Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street, term expires Januarj% 1900. 
John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street, term expires January, 1900. 
Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer, 6 Linden street. 

* Reappointed. 



16 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Sub-Trustees of Cemeteries. 

VAI.I.KY CKMKTKIJY. 

Alclerinen George H. Phinney and De Lafayette Rol)inson; .lolin L. 
Sanborn, liuslirod W. Hill, and Stillman P. Cannon. 

riNE OROVE CEMETERY. 

Aldermen Gillis Htark and William Y. Elliott: .1. Adam Graf. .John T. 

"Vouiiii-. and luhviii F. .Jones. 

AilQ^lKEAG CEMETiasY. 

Aldei-nian Sanuicl M. C'oueli; Charles E. Stearns and William 11. Huse. 
SUrERIXTEXDEXT OF TINE GROVE CEJlIETERY. 

IJyron A. Stearns. Office and residence at the cemetery. Telephone. 

SUPEROTE?\'0ENT OI-' A'ALLEY CEMETERY. 

Charles H. G. Fo.cs. Office at the cemetery; residence, :2l)7 Lake 
a^•enue. 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY' FUXDS. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 25 High street. 
Otis Barton, 122 Orange street. 
William C. Clarke, ex officio. 

Inspector of Milk. 

Joseph H. Geisel TtlT Lnion street 

Term expires February 1, biennially. (Public Statutes, chapter 127.) 
Appointed by mayor and aldermen. Salary, .$300 jjer annum. 



Inspector of Buildings. 

Lyman M. Aldridi Ollicc. liiy Hall 

Residence, 375 Lake avenue. Appointeil by board of mayor and alder- 
men, biennially, in l-Vbruary. Salary, $SUO per annuin. (City Ordi- 
nances, ehai>t(r J."). Laws of ISS.'}, chapter 94.) 



Inspectors of Oil. 

.7osei)li 1!. I'.Miil W lUidge street 

.loliu Cav /ti- ::s:! Granite street. 

(I'liblic St.ilutis, ciuipttT i:.".). sections :.':.-:!l. City Ordinances, chap- 
ter ;.'.■).) I'aid by I'.-cs, '/, of 1 percent per gallon. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



Moderators. 



!-:iec-te(l bk-imially. ((ii-neral Laws, cliapter :n, sections :;, '.>; cliajiter 

:{t). st'ftioii 11: chaijtiT 44, section 7. City Ordinances, page is. Sc« 
I'ublic Statutes relatini^- to towns and cities.) 

Ward. 1. Ai)ial W. Kastnian. 

Ward :.'. William .M. J'.iitterfield. 

Ward ,i. Alfred K. Hobbs. 

Ward 4. Stephen B. Stearns. 

AVard .">. .\ratthew Malioney. 

Ward C. Herbert S. Clougli. 

Ward 7. J. Adam Graf. 

Ward 8. Frank O. Clement. 

AVard 'J. John Montplaisir. 

Ward 10. William li. r.uri)ee. 



Ward Clerks. 

Kleeteil biennially, ((leneral Laws, chapter 44, sections K), 12. City 
Ordinances, pai^e IS. I'ublic Statutes relating- to towns and cities.) 

Ward 1. Frank X. Foster. 

Ward 2. William H. IMaxwell. 

Ward 3. AVilliam li. Eaton. 

Ward 4. George il. Currier. 

Ward 5. Daniel F. O'Neil. 

Ward (). Harrj- A. Piper. 

Ward 7. Charles E. IJartlett. 

Ward 8. William (i. AVhite. 

Ward '.). :Michael .1. Connelly. 

Ward 10. William 1'. Hall. 



Selectmen. 



Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 1, section 27; chapter 12, 
section 6; chapter 40, sections 2, 3; chapter 109, section 27; chapter 213, 
section 1. Citj^ Ordinances, pag-e 18. Public Statutes relating to towns 
and cities.) 

Ward 1. 

.Fohn ir. Wales, .Jr. .lolin V. I'.randt. 

.Tohn 1{. Hickey. 

Ward 2. 

I- red K. TJamsey. Silas K. Wallace. 

.Tames E. Orrill. 



18 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Waiji) :;. 

Walter 11. NVriglit. \"ietf)r C. Jolmsoii. 

Fred W. Shontell. 

Wai:i) I. 

Aiftor L. Diihiiimc. Cliarh-s U. Hodge. 

Joseph E. Merrill. 

Ward 5. 

Stephen Mak>iiey. .lames L. (Ilyim. 

William MeCjinniii. 

Ward G. 

Samii.'l M. Wortlilcy. .loliii ('. Ferf^iisoii. 

Edward T. Cogswell. 

Ward 7. 

]\k)ses Sheriff. Xol.'^oii C. \an Dyke. 

Kobert Leggett. 

Ward S. 

Eiehard 1'. (irossinan. Ijlward 1,. 'I'inkham. 

William K. IJIakeiy. 

Ward 9. 

Alfred Hebert. Osear Oiiellette. 

Miehacl J. IJradley. 

Ward 10. 

Tg-natiiis T. Webster. Patriek II. O'Malley. 

John W. Mellor. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



INAUfiUEAL ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City CoidicUs: 

Two years ag-o in my inaugural address to the city councils I entered 
very fully into a consideration of the condition and needs of the 
various city departments, and as I find no reason now for changing 
any of the views then expressed it is not mj purpose to occnpj' your 
time and attention with an extended message. Furthermore, under 
the terms of a new citj' charter, which goes into effect at the opening 
of this administration, the customarj' detailed inaugural address seems 
to me imcalled for. By this charter all the powers now vested by law 
in the mayor and aldermen and the common council and the city coun- 
cils jointly and severally are vested in the board of mayor and alder- 
men, excepting and reserving to the common council the sole and 
highly i-esponsible power and authority to consider and decide upon 
the amount of money to be raised b.y taxation in each and every year, 
and the objects and purposes for which the taxes of the city shall be 
raised under the laws of the state and the ordinances of the city, loan 
or otherwise. The board of mayor and aldermen, I might add, has 
no right to make contracts for the expenditure of money-not properly 
appropriated bj- the common council. Therefore, whatever I may have 
to advise regarding the affairs of the city will for the most jiart be 
communicated, as occasion may seem to demand, to the board of which 
I have the honor of being a member. 

It may not be out of place, however, for me on this occasion to 
touch briefly upon a few of the most important matters that concern 
us at this time. Unquestionabh', one of the most important is that 
relating to the assessment of taxable property. Two years ago in my 
inaugural address to the city councils I said: 

"It is the belief of a large number of the taxpayers of Manchester 
that the present method of assessing taxable property is attended by 
great injustice, and that the system should in some way be changed. 
This opinion is shared bj' me; but so long as a board of assessors is 
chosen as the present board is chosen, I see no reason to expect imme- 
diate change or improvement. The responsibilitj^ of assessing the 
many millions of dollars worth of propertj^ that should properly be 
assessed in a city like ^Manchester should be entrusted only to men of 
fairness, peculiar abilitj', sagacity, and unswerving honestj', and even 
Avith these qualifications, if they did not possess complete and accu- 
rate knowledge of the present values of propertj', and had not the 



22 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT, 

courage and backbone to assess thcin upon a basis of strict equality, 
they would do no better than the present or past boards have done: 
and 1 believe that the^' have acted honestly and to the best of their 
ability while in office. In seeking for a remedy to elevate the standard 
and increase the efficiency and favor of this department I would look 
to a judiciously selected board of well qualified men chosen in some 
manner that would insure a wise and proper selection, and that they 
be paid an ample salary for the work they are called upon to perform. 
So long as the present method of assessment is pursued, so long will 
inequalities and injustice continue." 

In the light of events that have since taken place I think 1 am 
justified in again urging upon the attention of the Manchester mem- 
bers of the incoming legislature the imperative necessity of securing' 
legislation that will thoroughly revise present methods and afford 
the city a more equitable and efficient sj-stem. The subject of the 
assessment of taxes has been altogether too lightly considered in the 
past, but the time has now come when the great mass of the people 
are prepared to welcome a change in the old and unsatisfactory 
methods still in vogue; and, further than this, I believe thej' demand it. 

What ix)sitiou the council will take in shaiiing a financial policy 
for the year 1899 I cannot say, but I sincerely hope that it will not 
attempt to alter the one that has been in operation the past two j'ears. 
That practice, as most of you are aware, has been opposed to the 
issuance of bonds and the borrowing of money for any purpose what- 
ever unless demanded by an emergeucj', and it is this kind of a polic}', 
I am satisfied, that is the wise one for the future. Current exi^enses 
should be met by current receipts alone unless great necessity arises 
for different financial action. It costs a great deal of money to cover 
the necessary expenses of a city like Manchester and nieet the public 
demand for permanent impi'ovements, and an experience of four years 
as executive officer has convinced me that the}- cannot be met under a 
"pay as j'ou go" policy by a tax rate much below two per cent, certainly 
not under the present valuation ot property; while on the other hand 
a tax rate exceeding two per cent should be discountenanced. 

I know that economy is never agreeable, either to the individual or 
to the municipality, but it is generally salutary in its effect upon both. 
Vet, view this as you may, the iilaiii, iiiisjnnished truth is that even 
with strict economj^ you will be no hkut tli;m able to make both ends 
meet at the end of the year. 

Following is the official slatcnii-iit dl' llic city aiidilor ailcr :iii exam- 
ination of the accounis of the citv licasiirir lor tin- year iMuling 
December 111, J.S9S: 

Net cash on liaiid .lamiary I. ls'.i-< $l:>;2,052.37 

Hcccipis .Iming tin- year I.;i70,845.91 



T<.l.il $1,392,898.28 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 23 

Amount of ilralts duviiii^' the year $1,277,090.80 

N.t. c-asli on haiid Deeember 31, 1898 11-),207.4S 



Tottil $l,:}9:>.s;»s.2s 

Casli balanee taken Deeember 31, 1898: 

neposhecl in Sutrolk National Bank $:.'0,s74.on 

Deposited in Anioskeag National Hank .... 10,040.0:2 

Deposited in ifanchester National I'.ank .... 12,470.00 

Deposited in ottice safe 8.>,0:{.j.G0 

(iross amount of cash on hand $128,419.71 

Deduct amount of bills unpaid 1:5,212.2:! 



Net cash on hand December ;il, 1898 .... .$115,207.48 

During- the past two years the sinking fund dejiosits of the city hav<; 
nearly doubled, the fund for the liquidation of Avater-works bonds 
having increased from $59,422.59 to $104,824.04, while the fund for the 
liqviidation of city improvement bonds has increased from $:55.222.65 
to $79,040.15. The total sinking fund to the credit of the city now 
amounts to $184,156.75. 

Aside from the public demand for a continuance of the good roads 
movement that has been so favorably indorsed during the jaast two 
years, I am not now informed of any special demands for large expen- 
ditures of money during the year 1899. The work of repaving li^lm 
street should be prosecuted this year and everj' year until it is com- 
pleted and .such other permanent paving laid in the most traveled busi- 
ness streets as our means will allow. The demand for new sewers is 
anntially' a large one, and as the ijublic health is one of vital concern 
to all a liberal appropriation will be required for this ckiss of work. 
The efficiency of the public schools and the fire department should be 
maintained, and as these, together witli the street and park depart- 
ment, are the sources of the greatest expend itni-es, it is these and their 
requirements that the new financial agents of the citj^ will need to 
most thoroughly investigate. The police deijartment is under the man- 
agement of a board of commissioners appointed by the governor and 
council, and aside from appropriating money for its maintenance, 
neither branch of the citj^ councils has any jurisdiction over it. The 
compensation of the members of the department, under a special act 
l)assed by the last New Hampshire legislature, will hereafter be estab- 
lished by the commission and not by the city councils, as formerly. 
The force now numbers thirty-three regular officers and ten special 
officers and is a great credit to the city. The receipts of the depart- 
ment for 1898 were $55,:!87.74, or $8,712.74 in excess of its appropria- 
tion for the year. 

The report against the city in the suit of the Amoskeag Comjjany 
for an abatement of $41,357.5:{ of its taxes for the year 1897, with inter- 
est from December 1, 1897, probablj'^ Ijlaces a new financial burden 



24 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

ii|K)ii the city tlwit may liavc to be jjiovided lur this \car. ami il m. it 
is for tlie eouiu-il to say how this shall be done. A similar case cover- 
inf>- the taxes of the company for ISI'8 is now in the covirts. 

The litigation to which the city is now a party is mainly divided into 
tliree classes: (1) Water-works eases which are in the control of the 
board of water commissioners: (2) the two cases of the Amoskeag- 
Mannfacturins- Company for abatement of a part of its taxes for the 
years 1897 and 1898; (3) and a number of cases for damages for per- 
sonal injuries received by employees of the board of street and park 
commissioners, in which it is believed the court will hold that the 
city is not liable. Aside from these there are but few cases, mostly 
for damages to real estate by change of grade of highways, and peti- 
tions for new highways which the boai'd of luayor and aichMincn have 
refused to lay out. 

In each of m\- previous inaugural addresses 1 have urged upon the 
city councils the importance of appointing a building inspector, under 
new and judiciously rstalilished regulations, and such an amendment 
to the ordinances should, in my opinion, be prepared and introduced 
as will at ou((^ gi\c the city the services of a competent and trust- 
worthy otliciai, w lin shall he required to devote his entire time and 
attention to the duties of his ottice at a fixed salary. This I believe to 
be one of the pressing- needs of the hour. 

Another urgent need at this time is a new edition of the City Ordi- 
nances. Since 1891^, when the last revision was made, numy changes 
have ari.sen, not only in the ordinances themselves, but in the public 
statutes upon which they are based, until now with the adoption of 
u new <'ity charter the edition in use is pi'actically worthless. This 
w(,rl< should be carefully .-ind iiccui-atcly couductcd. and 1 would sug- 
gest to the council that in making up the appropriations I'of the year 
1809, it set aside a suihcicnt sum of money to secure a tiu)rough com- 
pilation, and that such : miici- ol coiiies be ])riutcd as are requisite 

for the use of the cit3'. 

During the year the city has hccu i)rought lace to face, as it never 
has been before, with the ])roblein ot garliagc disposal, and the open- 
ing of a new year iinds the problem still unsolveil. Much instructive 
information has been acf|uiicd by those who.se duty it became to inves- 
tigate tin- mclliods cmployctl iu other cities, w hcri' tlu- nuisances of 
public dumps liavt- btcn succicdcd by some one of the modern pro- 
cesses of infiueraticMi or n<lu<li<Mi Inr l ln' liandling of garbage^in large 
quantities. So far as my own oIimtn al ions go 1 am led to believe that 
while much prog-ress has been made duiiug the j)ast few years in the 
vai'ioiis pi"occsses of garbage dis])osal, the woric is to some extent still 
in the e\j)crimcntal stage. I''ven in the most successful j)lants the 
op< ratois admit that improvements and alterations are nct'cs.sary. IJut 
whati'\cr jiroccss is employed the fact remains that the handling of 
garbage in large (piantities is attended by (-ertain object ioiuible fea- 
tures, chit-lly the production of olVensive and unsanitary odors. This 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 25 

prc-cliules tli<> coiu-eiit rat ion of any <-<)iisi(lcral)lc amount of iiarl)ajit'. 
<-ither for sliipniont or treatiiuMit. in tlic \i(init\ of liiiman habitations. 
Yvi while authorities diflPer in the opinions they iiold rehitive to the 
comparative merits of the numerous systems now in use, it is g-ener- 
aliy admitted that the most practical method is to collect the g'arbage 
and jroneral refuse at one time and ashes at another. "The ideal sj's- 
tem of follcction and disjjosal," says Dr. Woodward, health officer of 
the District of Columl)ia, "will ])robably l)e the collecting- in a cart 
body and ti-ansporting- by rail outside the city, and until the chemist 
;ind the engineer have impro\ed present methods I do not believe any- 
body will make a. fortune out of garbage reduction." It is not improper 
to state that the local board of health favors the process of simple 
cremation. At all events the subject is a most important one, and 
whatever steps the city may take in the future in regard to it should 
be on very conservative lines. If the time has come Avhen Manchester 
must build a crematory to take cai-e of its refuse and garbag-e, in order 
to protect the public health, none but the most successful and satis- 
factory as well as the most economical system should be adopted. I 
am informed that the board of street and park commissioners will 
ask the common council for an aj)]iropriation for installing- a garbag-e 
tlisposal plant this year. 

In a general way I can say that the public buildings owned by the 
city are, in the main, in good condition and in need of no more than 
ordinary attention. There have been erected during- my two terms as 
mayor, to meet the urgent demands for additional jjublic school accom- 
modations, five new school buildings, yet so great is the increase qf 
children seeking- an education in our public schools that the school 
board informs this city g-overnmcut that there is occasion for still 
another schoolhouse in the Lincoln school district. The attendance at 
nearly all of the schools is in advance of any former years and some 
of the buildings are today overcrowded. Since the new hig-h school 
building- was opened in September, 1897, the attendance has increased 
from ?y-2H to 447, a grain of 119 in one year and one term, while six extra 
teachers have been added to its corps. The total attendance in all of 
the public schools of the city is fully (i.OOO, an increa.se of nearly 2,000 
since 1890, when free text-books were first placed in the schools. 

The city library building- is, perhaps, the most poorly adapted for 
the uses to which it is jiut of any that the city has under its sui>er- 
vision, yet it seems to me that it would be a waste of money to attempt 
any large outlays in improving or enlarging- the present structure. 
Manchester has few calls for public inii)rovcnients as strong- as that 
for a new public library building-, modern in all respects, with a com- 
modious reading-room that should l)e kept o})en on Sundays as well 
as upon week days, and located ujwn a site where the best of light is 
afforded, as is far from being the case at the old building. Here, indeed, 
is an object worthy of the consitleration of citizens of large means and 
broad public spirit who can afford to employ their wealth for the bet- 
terment of the whole communitv. 



26 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

There is one iiiiittcr th;il li:is ht-fii siroiigly iini)resse(i ii])oii my 
;ittention (lurin<>- my exi)erieiu'e in the mayor's olhee as calling- for a 
reform, and that is the matter of the buyinf>- of horses for the use of 
the eity. 'J"he jiresent method is all wrong-, as every intelligent citizen 
conversant with it is aware. There shonld be a g-eneral ])urchasing- 
ayenl of liorses for all dI' 1 he city departments, and the buying- of hor.ses 
should be under his sole diiccl ion. As it is now and always has been, 
green hor.ses, as a rulf. Iia\t' been bought and placed in service in the 
tire department bclorc llit-x were properly acclimated and fit for duty, 
^[any a g-ood and valuable hoi-se has been ruined under this practice. 
In my judgment no horse should be assig-ned to active fire duty until 
he has been fully acclimated and conditioned by steady work in .some 
of the other v\\y (lc|)ai-tuu'uts. Tlure shoidd be several emerg-ency 
horses always ou hand i-cady to he transferred at immediate notice 
from either the street dcpai-l nicnt or the citj- farm to the fire depart- 
ment, and such authority slioiihi be lodg-ed in one responsibje head. 
.iikI that, head should lie tiic purchasing- agent. Monej' is annually 
lliiowu awa,\ l),\ the city (i T Manchester under the present system of 
horse buying- lor the lire depail uient. and it always will be imtil 
horses are seasoned ami h.n-dencd l)_\ iiKulcrate ^\■ork outside the de- 
partment before tliey are put into the rapid, exacting- labor of running 
to iires. And w hei-e\( r horses are assigned they shoidd remain until 
the judgment of the authority that jdaced them there sees fit to 
chang-e them. It docs not seeui to me necessary to go outside of offi- 
cial circles to secure a purchasing agent, or that the sele'ction of one 
sluadd cause any additional expense to the eit.\ . 

In entering- u|)ou the duti<'s of mayor lor a third term I am more 
dee|)ly impressed than exci- hetoi-e with the large responsibilities and 
exactions ujxni the time ;mi(I eonsidcral ion of the executive, and I can 
only .say that whatever 1 may have gained by experience and knowl- 
edge of municipal management during- the past four years will be as 
faithfully and conscientiously applied to the work of the future as my 
ability and strength will permit. I am in-ofoundly g-i-ateful for the 
reiH'Wcil ••oiitideuee ol the people in uiy stewai-dship, ami sincerely 
trust that 1 may prove worthy of the uncommon honor that has been 
• •<uirei-)-ed upon me. I w(nd(l like lo see the coming- two years the 
best two \cars in its historx lor the wellare of our heloxcd city, and I 
beseecdi Nonr ahh- and cordial co-operatioii in helping to make them 
so, in so I'ai-, at least, as the municipal life ol 1 he c(.mmunit\ is eon- 
(-.•riM-d. We ai-e at ail times the s.>r\ants of Ih,- whole people, and it is 
their interests that we should carefully and steadfastly guard despite 
anything else that ma\ arise lo s\\:i\ our opinions oi* judguu'ut. 
Heforc our term (jf (dlice e\pii-es the nineteenth century will have 
l)as.s-ed into history and the iwcnlieth cenlur\ will ha\e begun. .May 
we all unite our best ;in<l li-ucst elVorts to nndxc the advent of .so mem- 
orable an epoch on.' ,,( eredii nnd honor lor the eity of Man.-h.-ster. 
and ma\ her fair name stand unia rnislie.l ihiongh any oMieial acts of 
ours when we have linished our work. 

w II. I, I \\i ( . ( i.\i;k-i:. 



REPOKT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 1899. 



W[LLTA:\I C. CIj.WIKI:. Manor, ex officio. 

Ali'heus Gay, term expires Jamiary, lOO:,. 
Frank Dowst, term expires January, 1906. 
Harry E. Parker, term expires January, lOOD. 
Henry' Chandler, term expires January-, 1904. 
Charles H. Manning, term expires Januarj-, 1901. 
Charles T. jMeans, term expires Januarj-, 1902. 



OFFICERS. 



Alpheus Gay, PrcsMi'uf. 

Henry- Chandler, Clerk. 

Charles K. Walker, Superinlciidiiit. 

Arthur E. Stearj^js, Registrar. 

JosiAH Laselle, Engineer at Low Service Pnmiiiiig Station. 

H. a. Doxaway, Engineer at High Service Pumping Statimi. 



28 



EEPOET OF THE BOARD OF WATER COMMIS- 
SIONERS. 



To the Honorahle the Citij Councils of the City of Manchester, N. H.: 

Gextle-MEX, — The iManchester Water Board herewith present their 
twenty-eighth annual report for the year ending December 31, 1899, 
witli the detailed report of the superintendent during the same iieriod. 

FIXAXCIAL COXDITIOX. 

Receipts and expenditures for the year have been as follows: 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1898 $33,928.08 

Received from water rentals, etc .* 115,330.41 

Received from hydrant rentals 18,100.00 

Total $167,364.49 

Amount i^aid for current expenses $30,263.07 

Construction .* 20,396.06 

Interest on bonds, 1S'J9 39,551.00 

Hj'drant rentals set aside for sinking fund 18,100.00 

Set aside for sinking fund, for payment of water 

bonds, state law 5,000.00 

113,310.13 

Amount on hand December 3], 1899 $54,054.36 

Respectfully submitted. 

WiLLiAJi C. Clakke, ex officio, 
Alpheus Gay, 

CHARLE.S H. ;MaXXIXG, 

Charles T. Meaxs, 
Harry E. Parker, 
Fraxk Dowst, 
Hexry Chaxdler, 

Water Commissioners. 

29 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To Hie Hononihic Board of Water Commissioners of the City of Manchester, 
K. H.: 

Gextleme?;, — The following is the report of your superintendent for 
the year 1899: 

MASSABESIC LAKE. 

The amount of water in the lake was very much below the normal 
this fall, and is very low at the present time, much more so than it 
has ever been since the present superintendent has had charge. 
Thirtj'-three and one half inches below the dam was the lowest ijoint 
ever reached, and todaj- it stands at thirty-three and one quarter inches 
below. 

The low condition of the water in the lake has so affected the canal 
that the banks are mostly out of water, and an examination wan-ants 
the belief that the banks are in such firm condition that they will last 
for many years. 

No repairs of anj' amount were made at the dam. Screens were con- 
structed by the fish commissioners to prevent the fish from escaping 
from the lake into the brook at high water. 

OLD PUMPING STATION. 

No serious trouble has been experienced at the old pumping station 
so far as the working of the pumps is concerned. The arms to the 
bevel gear broke on February 8, but were replaced with a new gear 
and a new spider. Fortunately we had one on hand, which the Amos- 
keag Company fitted up and put onto the jackshaft at an expense of 
about $7.5. 

We have been short of power for pumping at this station since 
October 17. In the month of November, the power was sufficient to 
pump but a little over one half enough for the low service, and the 
balance was pumped by steam at the high-service station. In the 
niimfh of Dcccniber more was pumped by steam than by water-power. 

niGn-RicnviCE station. 

(^uitc .-111 outlay was made at this place for jiaintiiig. Tlu' dwelling- 
house, barn, and sheds were given two coats and the engine liouse was 
painted on the iufide. The Ifunter house, which is in connection with 

:\0 



liOAKI' OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



31 



^2f 



&q padmncl 



•uospiA'Ba 
Aq padiuncl 
euoiiBg ox 









o o ciooooS o^ 



Sil 



I0 03~ 






iS^Sf25S3§5S2|{ 



c« e^ (M e< e 



• o m t-; t-^ i-^o" 






•s 






S «c 



eJQ 



sis sr 






82 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ill is |)i()|)fit_v, was ij-iveii f\v(i coats of paint on the outside. A new 
ventilator was also constructed in the engine room, at an expense of 
.S:-Mi>. to cat T.v off the surplus heat from the pumping- room. 

The last of November, while tiie pnnijjs were pumping into the low 
and hig-h service, one of them stopped working. Realizing the neces- 
sity for immediate action, it was deemed advisable to send to the 
Wortinngton people, who manufactured the pumps, for an expert to 
niaUe an examination, which they did. lie immediately located the 
ditticulty and it was repaired in two days. The old air pump having 
become impaired, a new one was substituted and the old one sent to 
New York for repairs. The Worthington expert pronounced the pumps 
to be in good condition and to have been well cared for. 

In order to ])rovide for any contingency' which may possibly arise, 
why would it not be well to consider putting in a jiew pump, as our 
only dependence has been on the steam pumps since the 17th of 
October? It is true we have ijumped about one half the water from 
the old pumijing station, but that would not be enough to keep the 
reservoir full anil protect the city in case of tire. 

In connection with the low water, a coal famine seemed imminent 
at one time, but we were fortunate in getting enough to last tempora- 
rily, by paying a doidjle price over that ])aid one year ago. 

UKSKHVOIIJ. 

* The repairs at the old reservoir were as follows: Relaying part of 
the paving at the south end, top-dressing the banks, painting one lialf 
mile of fence, and rejiairing the screens, at a total expense of about 
$.")()(). Xo re])airs wt-re made at the high-servii-e resei-voir. 

A telegraph line was constructed from the high-service reservoir 
to the high-service inimping station, and a recording- gauge put in, 
to tell (lie height of the water in the reservoir at any time without 
goini; to i1. This gauge was made by the inventor; Mr. (jeorge 10. 
Winslow of Waltham, Mass. The poles were taken from the Ilaselton 
land, north of Deer Neck, being cut and delivered for setting at $1.0() 
jier i)ole. The line was put in by K. ^l. Bryant <fc Co., the whole outfit 
costing $],or)(). This will obviate the necessity of the engineer's, going 
to the reservoir, except occasionally, either in summer or winter. The 
working of this system fully meets th«; re(piirements which were e\- 
pected of il. 

The force mains re.piired alxnit, the same amount of attention, each 
having about twelve leaks npaired. 



I'ijx's were laid in t he following- st rcets: Central, ( illey road, ( y|)ress, 
Douglas, Dix, I-'alls avenue, Hanover, West Hancock, Oakland avenue, 
.\Iyslic, Kilcy, l.ongwood avenue. Keverc, and Merrimack, covering l.l:.' 
nules of extensions. Pipes were relaid in Auburn, IJeech, I'"lm, Cednr. 
Amherst. Brook, lUodgel. De|>o(, Central, Concord. Merrimnck, Man- 



BOARD OF WATER COMxMISSIONERS. 



33 



■puatlOHuiiiuiQ 



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p.duinclsuoinio 



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; 1^ o -< 00 00 lO CO — -* r- uo 

ICiC-l-MOI-Tj-COCO-^^CO 
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ScOOc2SS3§§5l£ct3 



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-ainnd bAv\) on 



linHyi^ii 



:34 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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S 


t- 


a 








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m 


1 


i 

55 

1 


11 


III 


3 


0-3 3 

pi 

(J 


is2 


1 


n so 

5.S 


15,313 
41,596 
61,220 

118,129 


Raising 

steam 

and- 

bank'g. 


III 


5 


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-lunu oSw.iaAV 






•eojio.ns 
joaoqiumi [ujox 


ill 


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i 


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O 

o 




. 


£ 
) c 


1 

I 





BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 35 

Chester, Hanover, Laurel, and Spruce streets, in all, 5,887 feet. There 
were laid over this jear in Elm street 1,9G1 feet of 14-inch cast-iron, so 
that Elm street is now all relaid with cast-iron pipe, and in Beech street 
2,94S feet of 12-inch pipe. There are today about five miles of cement 
pjpe, nearly four miles of it on the supply and force main, which is 
20-iuch' pipe. It will cost to relay this with cast-iron $00,000 or more. 
This year's supply of pipe was bought before the rise and the advance 
has since been about $8.00 per ton. The contract price this year was 
$19.80 per ton for 12 and 14-inch pipe, and $20.45 per ton of 2,240 pounds 
for G-inch pipe. 

A bad break occurred on Chestnut street, corner of Hanover, on 
March 27, causing damage to the ten-footers, which cost the water- 
works nearly $500 to settle for and make repairs. The break was in 
a piece of 4-inch cement pipe on Chestnut street, and the ground was 
frozen so hard the water did not come up in the street but found its 
way into cellars underneath the frozen ground. Fortunately, the 
leak was discovered and the water shut off before reaching the cellars 
on Elm street. 

As a whole, very little trouble has been had with the distribution 
pipe. There are about ninety miles of cast-iron pipe, which means 
about 45,000 lead joints, where leaks are most liable to occur, besides 
the services, which cause occasional trouble. 

As it will be twentj'-five years next March since your present super- 
intendent took charge of the water-works, perhaps it will be well to 
state the condition of the works at that time, and the changes that 
have since taken place. 

When I was elected, March 1, 1S75, I appeared before the water com- 
missioners, of whom there remains only the president, Hon. Alpheus 
Gay, and was told by them that the income of the water-works should 
be spent on extensions and keeping the works in repair, and that the 
city would take care of the interest. The next year, 1876, we paid 
$24,000 towards the interest, and from that time on have paid most of 
the interest, in addition to making the pipe extensions, improvements, 
and all repairs, without calling on the taxpayers for a single dollar. 

After having an introduction to Mr. J. T. Fanning, who was then the 
engineer, I was taken to the pumping station, where Mr. C. C. Cole 
was in charge. He was then pumping into the present reservoir and 
also letting water into the Amoskeag Company's reservoir, which was 
supplied by the city until the month of October, 1875; this being in 
compensation for water used by the citj^ from the Amoskeag Com- 
pany's reservoir. 

In 1875 the water pipes were laid to Piscataquog village. There 
were pumped that j^ear 1,100,000 gallons everj^ twenty-four hours, and 
until 1886 the average daily pumpage was not over 1,200,000 gallons. In 
the year 1886, we began to increase to 1,500,000 gallons daily, and in 
1898 to 2,500,000, in addition to 500,000 pumped daily into the high- 
service reservoir, making the daily average 3,000,000 gallons, which 
has been maintained during the year 1899. 



36 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

In 1S75, Cohas avenue was graded and there was no fence around the 
present reservoir. 

In that year we had 215 hydrants for which $60 per year was credited 
by the city to the water-works, amounting to $12,900. There were 675 
services and 23 miles of distribution pipes. These 215 hydrants weye 
the source of as much trouble as we have had with our hydrants in 
any year since. In the winter of 1874-75, which was an unusually 
cold winter, service pipes laid five feet deep were frozen and it cost 
about $1,100 to thaw them out. 

Today we have a little over ninety-five miles of distribution pipes, 
5,427 services, and 737 hydrants. 

In the year 1880 the water in Massabesic lake was so low that the 
flow was insufficient to keep the reservoir full and the channel was 
lowered at the outlet enough to draw the lake down one foot. This 
lowei'ing of the channel was supposed to be sufficient to give a contin- 
uous flow from the lake forever after, but the unexpected has happened 
and we are now confronted with the fact that water will not pass out 
from the lake in sufficient quantitj' to run the pumps and supply the 
needs at the old reservoir. 

In 1876 we began to lay cast-iron pipe. We had at that time a little 
over twenty-seven miles of wrought iron and cement pipe. Today we 
have about five miles of cement pipe, having replaced about twenty-two 
miles of cement pipe with cast-iron pipe. 

In 1881 water pipes were laid to Amoskeag. The water i-ates were 
revised in 1885. Hydrant rates were reduced to fifty dollars per 
hydrant and meter rates from twenty cents to fifteen cents per one 
hundred cubic feet. In ISSS hydrant rates were reduced to forty dol- 
lars per year. Since 1893 the city has credited the water-works with 
twenty-five dollars for each hydrant, which amount has been credited 
to the sinking fund for the redemption of water bonds at maturity. 

The pumps first put in by the water-works were made by the 
R. D. Wood Company, and used exclusively until 1886, when a new 
Davidson pump was added as supplementarj'^ power in case the Wood 
pump should become disabled. Both pumps are now in good condi- 
tion and doing good service, when there is sufficient water flowing in 
the canal to furnish power. You are aware that when there is a full 
head of water in the lake it requires about seven gallons to pump one 
into the reservoir. Under the i^resent low state of the water, it re- 
quires about twelve gallons to force one into the reservoir. 

In the year 1893 work was begun in the establishment of a high-ser- 
vice plant, which was completed in September, 1804, at which time 
water was pumped into the new high-service reservoir on Oak Hill and 
also into tlio old low-service reservoir, that being the year of limited 
waterfall, and the steam pumps saved the city from a water famine. 

Land bordering on the lake has been purchased at various times so 
that today the city owns about si.\ty-five per cent of the shore. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



37 



The above is a coudensed statement of the water-works from 1875 
to the present time. The various yearly reports show in full what has 
been done. 

Your superintendent is pleased to say that in all the years that have 
passed since his connection with this office he has had the undivided 
suppoM of the commissioners, for Avhich he is most thankful, and it 
will ever be remembered as one of the pleasant recollections in his 
connection with the water-works. 

RAINFALL AT HIGH SERVICE STATION, 1S99. 



Day. 


t 
1 


1 


1 
OS 


< 




a 

3 




< 


September. 
October. 


> 


1 

s 




1 


*.67 


*.02 














1.45 

4.38 

.05 

.07 




.80 
.09 




2 

3 


*.'47" 

*.14 

.68 




.79 








.11 






*.38 














.44 


.07 


5 












.08 


G 


*.51 






















*.14 


*.4S 
'*.Q2 


.02 




♦2C 


91 






.03 






8 









.12 




.01 


9 






.53 
.02 


.27 




10 


• 








.71 
.32 






11 










.08 












12 




•.03 

*.77 


.21 

.10 

*.02 

*.78 
.10 


♦.09 










^.73' 


.21 


13 








.11 





.12 




14 


*.88 


.17 


.11 


.02 
.36 
.15 








15 ... 











.06 j'".'57 


16 






*.51 




.71 









17 


.60 






::;:: 


1 










*.02 
.11 


' ' ."62' 
.52 
.17 


.06 






.56 




.02 

.07 


19 




.33 


.98 
*.18 


'.'os' 






20 








1.24 
..56 
.02 

-.oi- 


.23 




21 














2-2 





.03 


•.37 

*.82 








'".'os' 


.13 
















.06 
.03 


...... 


24 


*.44 














.06 
.21 


25 










.15 


'.i5 






26 




*.20 


.31 






.16 






27 




*.29 











28 








.33 

.07 


.51 
.43 








.10 
.07 






29 






.38 




.05 
.29 










30 








.12 






31 






*.06 








.02 






























3.32 


2.38 


5.99 


1.88 


1.65 


2.59 


3.95 


1.20 


8.30 


1.31 


2.25 


1.45 



J.27 inches. 



Total rainfall for year, 
*Snow melted. 

1895. Total rainfall, 42.06 inches. 

1S96. Total rainfall, 38.41 inches. 

1897. Total rainfall, 49.78 inches. 

1898. Total rainfall, 47.15 inches. 

1899. Total rainfall, 36.27 inches. 



The income from the sale of water for 1809 has been as follow; 

deceived for water bj' rate $28,063.34 

for water bv meter 85,764.80 



38 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Received for building purposes $246.80 

from fines 363. SO 

$114,438.74 

Eeceived for old cement pipe $141.00 

for labor and pipe sold 86.82 

from Manchester Mills, 6-inch pipe 106.50 

from Suncook Water Co., stop boxes... 9.20 

from Chadwick Lead Co. (freight bill) 6.97 
Manchester Street Railway, repairing 

hydrant 21.85 

from St. Marie church, service pipe, 2-in 28.25 

400.5& 

Received from sale of bananas (from water break) $45.50 

from N. H. Ins. Co., returned premium 11.25 

from Asa Haselton, rent of farm 50.00 

from S. F. McDonald, rent 84.00 

from Massabesic Grange, rent 8.33 

from V. Rosen, Currier & Cox building 35.00 

from sale of two sheds 1.00 

from sale of Gooden shed 2.00 

from S. G. Prescott, two buildings 210.00 

from Sarah Gilbert, rent of land 2.00 

from F. Brown, lease 1.00 

. from G. G. Griffin, lease 1.00 

from H. A. Boone, hay and building... 15.00 

from Charles Spofford, hay and apples 16.00 
from Charles Spofford, hay on Canfield 

farm 15.00 

497.08 

$115,336.41 
Eeceived from hydrant rentals 18,100.00 

Total received $133,436.41 

Abatements, $1,032.53. 

Amount on hand December 31, 1898 $33,928.08 

received for water, etc 115,336.41 

received from hydrant rentals 18,100.00 

Total $167,364.49 

Amount paid for current expenses $30,263.07 

paid for construction expenses 20,396.06 

Interest on bond.s, 1899 39,551.00 

Hydrant rentals set aside for sinking fund 18,100.00 

State Law, 1897, bonds set aside for sinking fund 5,000.00 

113.310.13 

Amount on hand December 31, 1899 $54,054.36- 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 3^ 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1899. 

Superintendence, repairs, 'and renewals $20,943.03 

Stationery and printing 224.93 

Office and incidental expenses 531.58 

Pumping expenses, low-service 1,902.63 

Pumping expenses, high-service 4,482.23 

Kepairs to dam, canal, and reservoir 771.94 

Repairs to buildings 1,406.73 

Total current expenses, 1899 $30,263.07 

Service pipes $1,926.38 

Distribution pipes 13,033.76 

Fire hj-drants and valves 1,145.66 

Meters 1,469.02 

Lands 1,625.00 

Pumping machinery and buildings 1,196.24 

20,396.06 

Total expenses, 1899 $50,659.13 

Sinking fund, fire hydrants $18,100.00 

Sinking fund, water bonds 5,000.00 

23,100.00 

$73,759.ia 
Construction Expenses. 

Land and water rights $150,409.00 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races 101,399.16 

Pumping machinerj', pump house, and buildings 177,568.43 

Distribution reservoir 117,697.90 

Force and supply mains 89,769.02 

Distribution pipe 608,187.19 

Fire hydrants and valves 61,583.78 

Meters and fixtures 57,766.32 

Service pipes 76,059.07 

Grading and fencing 17,470.39 

Tools and fixtures 10,649.35 

Boarding and store houses 919.36 

Koads and culverts 4,405.20 

Supplies 550.39 

Engineering 22,176.19 

Livery and traveling expenses 2,856.64 

Legal expenses 563.79 

Total $1,500,031.1& 

Current Expenses. 

Superintendence, collecting, and repairs $349,310.51 

Stationery and printing 7,696.34 



40 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Office and incidental expenses $:;3,955.91 

Pumping expenses at low-service 57,827.57 

Pumping expenses at high-service 23,082.19 

Repairs to buildings ■ 5,614. 8G 

Repairs to dam, canal, and reservoir 6,201.89 

Total $483,689.27 

Interest $40,678.51 

Highway expenditures 14,000.53 

54,679.04 

Total amount of bills approved to date $2,038,399.49 

Interest, discount, and labor performed on high- 
way, transferred, and tools and materials sold $71,007.99 
Current expenses to December 31, 1899 483,689.27 

554,697.26 

Total cost exclusive of interest and current expenses $1,483,702.23 

Interest and discount to December 31, 1898 $922,997.01 

Interest for 1899 39,551.00 

Total to December 31, 1899 $962,548.01 

AMOUNT OF WATEK BONDS ISSUED TO DECE5[BER 31, 1899. 

Iss'ied January 1, 1872, rate C per cent, due January 1, 1902 $100,000.00 

January 1, 1887, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1907 100,000.00 

July 1, 1890, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, 1910 100,000.00 

January 1, 1892, rate 4 per cent, dne January 1, 1912 100,000.00 

August 1, 1893, rate 5 per cent, due August 1, 1913.. 100,000.00 
November 1, 1893, rate 4yo per cent, due November 

1, 1913 100,000.00 

October 1, 1894, rate 4 per cent, due October 1, 1914 50,000.00 

July 1, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, 1915 100,000.00 

December 16, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due December 16, 

1915 50,000.00 

January 1, 1897, rate 4 per cent, duo January 1, 1017 100,000.00 

$000,000.00 
SINKING FUNIi. 

1893 $12,750.00 

1894 13,925.00 

1895 15,800.00 

1896 16.800.00 

1897 17.175.00 

1898 17,675.00 

1898 5,000.00 

1899 .- 5,000.00 

1899 18,100.00 

Total $122,225.00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



41 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 





t 


c 
1 


6 
2 

i 








.lis 


11 

m 




187-2 


§573.61 













§573 61 






1873 
1874 


2,097.60 




Sl,692.69 
7,987 27 


S190S4 
1.436.56 




314.00 
104.18 


200.07 




8 


32,154.07 


522,425.00 


$119.10 


699.85 




98 


1875 


29,223.60 


13,095.00 


10,292.13 


3,348.11 


122.13 


120.59 


2,245.64 




160 


1876 


39,028.47 


16,320.00 


15,900.63 


6,305.81 


72.32 


180.16 


849.55 




166 


1877 


43,823.30 


17,475.00 


18,064.51 


7,783.09 


1.36 10 


233.04 


131.56 




202 


1878 
1879 


48,874.20 
53,143.17 


17,970.00 


20,255.97 
21,610.13 


10,090.25 
12,732.93 


83.60 


232.82 


241.62 




226 


18,165.00 


81.60 


240.64 


303.87 




251 


18S0 


57,655.23 


18,300 00 


23,795.96 


14,794.34 


79.50 


210.39 


465.06 


SflO.OO 


280 


1881 


60,215.62 


18,780.00 


25,336 18 


15,554.98 


105.60 


223.99 


203.87 


11.00 


310 


1882 


67,630.13 


20,130.00 


26,803.06 


19,898.69 


146.65 


197.49 


443.24 


11.00 


371 


1883 


73,4.58.20 


20,520.00 


28,838.24 


23,431.20 


314.65 


208.04 


125.07 


21.00 


404 


1884 


75,580.08 


21,350 00 


31,724.07 


21,329.75 


.195.10 


231.96 


738.20 


11.00 


446 


1885 


80,404.12 


18,900.00 


33,597.02 


27,425.35 


103.50 


186.80 


181.45 


ll.OC 


486 


1886 


75,129.99 


19,750.00 


33,062.11 


21,573.45 


287.40 


130.80 


320.23 


6.0C 


613 


1887 


80,518.17 


20,437.50 


33,497.21 


25,277.09 


351.70 


119.20 


819.4- 


16.0C 


739 


1688 


85,643.82 


21,000.00 


33,804.78 


29,838.82 


543.SC 


149.80 


243.6-2 


3.0C 


842 


1889 


86,700.46 


18,240.00 


34,140.99 


33,596.05 


361.95 


153.20 

j 


155.2- 


53.0C 


951 


1890 


90,463.37 


19,880.00 


32,431.10 


37.009.80 


649.90 


' 151 80 


298.7- 


42.0C 


1,135 


1891 


76,605.23 


4,590.00 


30,588.79 


40,479.25 


494.8C 


160.40 


200. 9£ 


91 .OC 


1,313 


1892 


83,474.79 


5,000.00 


31,344.24 


46,139.35 


416.CC 


168.40 


139.8C 


! 267.0( 


1,608 


1893 


104,170.08 


12,750.0e 


' 32,603..59 


58,103.20 


1,033.7£ 


j 159.60 


339.3c 


180.5C 


1,895 


1894 


110,210.29 


13,925.0{ 


32,176.2b 


62,.501.35 


697.8C 


! 227.40 


334 85 


347.04 


2,182 


1893 


118,374.50 


15,800.0C 


' 32,903.99 

1 


67,465.90 


80S.2( 


30O 40 


768.1 


j 327.84 


2,520 


189C 


128,907.03 


16,800.0C 


32,540.03 

1 


j 77,610.10 


638.4S 


302.80 

1 


440.1'. 


575.5C 


2,865 


1897 


125,719.17 


17,175.0( 


■ 30,647.r 


\ 76,148.60 


331.se 


321.80 


6-27. OS 


y 467.6' 

1 


3,134 


189s 


131,184.08 


17,675.0( 


)' 29,409.5f 


80,643.30 


187.0C 


359.80 


441. 9( 


) 2,467 .5( 


3,340 


189^ 


; 133,4.36.41 


18,100.0( 


28,063.34 


' 85,764.80 


246.8C 


363. 8( 


1 400.5< 


y 497.0* 


3,502 



1878, meter rate was changed. 1884, hydrant rates reduced. 1886, meter and other 
rates reduced. 1889, hydrant rates reduced. 1891 and 1892, received only part of hy- 
drant rent, and nothing from water-troughs or street sprinklers. 1893, hydrant rent 
and water-closets rate reduced. 



42 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The folloAving amounts have been paid over to the city treasurer, 
and credited to the water-works: 

1S72, supplies and materials sold $573.61 

1873, supplies and materials sold 177.07 

accrued interest on water bonds sold 193.26 

accrued interest on state bonds sold 146.00 

Avater rents 1,920.53 

1874, supplies and materials sold 607.89 

March 12, highway expenditures transferred from 

water account 14,000.53 

March 17, interest and discount transfeired from 

water account 12,347.25 

September 1, interest and discount transferred from 

water account 22,361.74 

water and hydrant rent ~ 30,233.54 

December 29, interest transferred 4,566.25 

1875, water and hydrant rent 27,119.15 

sundry items 2,104.45 

1870, water and hydrant rent 38,879.47 

sundrj^ items 149.00 

1877, water and hydrant rent 43,691.74 

sundry items 131.56 

1878, water and hydrant rent 48,632.64 

sundry items 241.62 

1879, water and hydrant rent 52,839.30 

sundry items 303.87 

1880, water and hydrant rent 57,180.19 

sundry items 475.05 

1881, water and hydrant rent 60,000.75 

sundry items 214.87 

1882, water and hydrant rent 67,175.89 

sundry items 454.24 

1883, water and hydrant rent 73,312.13 

sundry items 146.07 

1884, water and hydrant rent 74,830.88 

sundry items 749.20 

1885, water and hydrant rent 80,211.67 

sundry items 192.45 

1886, water and hydrant rent 74,803.76 

sundry items 326.23 

1887, water and hydrant rent 70,682.70 

sundry items 835.47 

1888, water and hydrant rent 85,397.20 

sundry items 246.62 

1889, water and hydrant rent 86.492.19 

sundry items 208.27 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 43 

1S90, water and hydrant rent 90,122.00 

sundrj' items 340.77 

1891, water and hydrant rent 76,313.24 

sundry items 291.99 

1892, water and hydrant rent 83,067.99 

sundry items 406.80 

1893, water rents 90,900.14 

sundry items 519.94 

1894, water rents 95,602.83 

sundrj^ items 682.46 

1895, water rents 101,478.49 

sundry items 1,096.01 

1896, water rents 111,091.41 

sundry items 1,015.62 

1897, water rents 107,449.42 

sundry items 1,094.75 

premiums on bonds 6,248.00 

1898, water rents 110,599.68 

sundry items 2,909.40 

1899, water rents 114,438.74 

sundry items 897.67 

$2,040,724.26 
METEBS. 

The number of meters set during- the year has been one hundred 
sixty-two (162). 

Total number of meters now in use, thirtj^-five hundred two (3,502). 

The number of applications for water has been one hundred (100). 

Total number of applications to date, fifty-five hundred seventy- 
three (5,573). 

SERVICE PIPES. 

One hundred two (102) service pipes have been laid this j'ear, as 
follows: 
101 1-inch diameter 2,451.0 feet 

1 114-inch diameter 32.5 " 

102 

SER"\aCE PIPES EELAID. 

3 14 -inch diameter 56.3 feet to 1-inch diameter. . . 

93 %-inch diameter 2,567.9 " to 1-inch diameter 2,487.2 

to 1-inch diameter 

to 2-inch diameter 

to 2-inch diameter 

to 1-inch diameter 

to 6-inch diameter. . . . 



18 1-inch diameter 


673.0 " 


1 1-inch diameter 


17.5 " 


1 114-inch diameter 


17.5 " 


1 114-inch diameter 


58.3 " 


1 4-inch diameter 


61.0 " 


17 


3,451.5 feet 



2,483.5 feet 


55.0 feet 


2,487.2 




654.3 




18.0 




17.5 




61.0 




108.0 


' 


3,401.0 f 


eet 



44 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Fifty-four hundred sixteen (5,410) service pipes have been laid to 
December 31, 1899, as follows: 

20 i/o-inch diameter 412.6 feet 

1,333 %-inch diameter 

3,921 1-inch diameter 99,878.3 



19 li/i-inch diameter. 
26 11/2 -inch diameter. 
71 2-inch diameter. . . 

2 2 1/2 -inch diameter. 

5 3-inch diameter.. 
11 4-iuch diameter... 

8 6-inch diameter. 



5,416 

26.2 miles of service pipe. 

The following streets are wtiere cement-lined pipe was taken out and 
relaid with cast-iron: 



33,725.3 


<i 


99,878.3 


" 


800.2 


" 


837.5 


" 


2,249.0 


«« 


63.0 


" 


89.8 


" 


244.5 




138,300.2 


feet 





LENGTH IN FEET. 


GATES. 




Street. 


-* 


2 


00 


•| 


5 


Location. 










46 
57 
8 
97 
37 
45 


1 


















2,948 


37 








1 

1 

1 

1 












































2 
2 












47 
22 






277 
1,951 








Elm 






i 


Depot to VaUey. 








67 
67 
40 

47 
37 
57 












1 
2 
2 


Corner Bcecli. 




















Corner Beecli. 


Maiicliester 








Cornel" I'ine. 


Mcrrliniick . . . 








2 


Corner Beech. 


Spruco .... 








Corner Iteccli. 










10 


















2,228 


2,948 


37 


674 


18 





Total, 6,887 foot, or 1.11 niilos. 

300 feet cinch reltiUl with .slnch east-hon. 

374 feet inch rcliild with inch cast-iron. 



BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 45 

PIPES LAID AND GATES AND IIYDKANTS SET IN isoy. 



PIPE LAID 
NO. FEET. 



GATES SET. 



Beech 

Central 

Cilley 

Cypress 

Dix 

Douglas 

Elm 

Hancock, West. .. 

Hanover 

Longwood 

Laurel 

Merrimack 

Merrimack 

Mystic 

Oakland 

Old Falls avenue 

Orange 

Revere 

Riley 

Spruce 

Turner 

Valley 

Woodbine 



Garden, bet. Laurel 
and Merrimack ... 



763 5.158 1 



South side Manchester, north 

and south side Lake ave. 
East of Beacon. 

West of Mammoth (3-inch 

connection). 
South ol Lake ave. 

East of Taylor. 

Corner Turner. 

North side Auburn. 

East of shoe shop. 

East of Merrimack. 

West of Woodbine. 

Corner Belmont. 

East of No. 538. 

West of Hanover. 

West of Beech. 

West of Revere. 

North of Old Falls road. 

West of Belmont. 

Oakland to Longwood. 

Southward. 

Coi'ner Cypress. 

Opposite new Print Works. 

Corner Elm. 

North to Longwood. 



Total feet laid, 5,921, or 1.1-2 miles. 



46 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



47 



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48 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



49 



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50 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COiMMISSIONERS. 



51 



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inmocDC5co-<J<cooo>9<co 



^ ^ fe fc< 



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p., Ph 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



53 



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64 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



55 







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56 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



57 



" 






::::::::::::::::::::: 


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2727 
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58 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COxMMISSIONERS. 59 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBEK ;]I, 189!). 



Size of pipe. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast iron pipe. 


Gates. 




20,367 feet. 

524 " 
4,408 " 


24,671) feet. 
15.632 " 
26,713 " 
27,'214 •• 
68,282 " 
292,869 " 
20,140 " 


18 








30 








104 feet. 
633 " 
202 " 


98 




620 




60 








20,238 feet. 


475,529 feet. 


893 



Cement-lined pipe 
Cast-iron pipe 



Total pipe 
737 hydrants. 
893 gates. 
12 air valves. 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN 1899. 



4.97 miles 
90.06 " 

95.03 miles 



Cypress street, corner Cedar. 

Douglas street, corner Turner. 

West Hancock street, near Harvey road. 

Hanover street, near 685 Hanover. 

Laurel street, corner Belmont. 

Longvs'ood avenue, corner Kevere. 

Merrimack street, corner Hanover. 

^Merrimack street, near 567 Merrimack. 

Oakland avenue, corner Eevere. 

Old Falls avenue, corner Old Falls road. 

Old Falls avenue. 

Kiley street. 

Spruce street, corner Cypress. 



Uses for which water is supplied. 

■WATER FIXTL-RES, ETC. 

11,991 Families, 129 boarding-houses, 15,365 faucets, 4,441 wash-bowls, 
3,835 bath-tubs, 11,350 water-closets, 736 set tubs, 213 urinals, 4,001 
sill-cocks, 2,771 horses, 173 cattle, 737 hydrants, 30 watering-troughs, 
8 drinking fountains, 51 standpipes, 2 public urinals. 



60 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1>UBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail, 30 churches, 1 court house, 10 hose comijanies, 6 fire engines, 
2 hook-and-ladder, 3 opera houses, 4 convents, 4 city hospitals, 4 ceme- 
teries, 1 orphanage, 1 post-office, 1 citj- librarj', G banks, 9 hotels, 1 
Masonic hall, 1 Odd Fellows' hall, 3 halls. Children's Home. 



58 Barber, 10 wheelwright, 20 blacksmith, 10 carpenter, 2 tinsmith, 
1 copper, 3 currying, 20 plumber and gas and water pipe, 14 paint, 3 
gunsmith. 

STORES. 

4 Auction, 35 drug, 22 jewelrj^ 1 fur, 3 house-furnishing goods, 20 
fancj' goods, 1 wholesale ^laper, 5 wholesale lii'oduce, 24 dry goods, 12 
candy, 1 cloak, 16 millinerj', 3 tea, 9 furniture, 1 wholesale grocer, 107 
grocery, 6 meal, 3 hardware, 34 boot and shoe, 11 stove, 17 gents' fur- 
nishing goods, 7 book, 1 leather and shoe-finders, 3 music, 3 uphol- 
steiy, 9 undertakers, 5 sewing-machine, 1 feather-cleaner, 1 rubber. 



16 Dining, 7 billiard, 47 liquor. 

MISCEIJLANEOUS. 

G Clubrooms, 3 bleacheries, 35 laundries, 4 ice-houses, 10 photog- 
raphers, 1 Mercy Home, 2 old ladies' homes, 1 soldiers' monument, 1 
Turner hall, 4 fountains, 2 trust companies, 1 city farm, 3 depots, 9 
greenhouses, 2 bandrooms, 26 bakeries, 2 waste, 2 business colleges, 
34 schoolhouses, 1 battery building, 1 kitchen, 3 ward-rooms, 1 gym- 
nasium, 2 police stations. 

■MANUFACTURING ESTAIlLISIIXrENTS. 

1 Hosiery mill, 1 silver-plating, 2 iron foundries, 2 dye-houses, 5 
machine shops, 6 clothing manufactories, 9 harness shops, 1 cornice 
works, 1 brush shop, 9 carriage shops, 12 cigar factories, 1 brass and 
copper foundry, 1 locomotive works, 1 grist-mill. 1 silk-mill, 3 granite 
works, 1 electric light station, 4 sash and blind shops, 1 brewery, 7 
shoe shops, 1 gas works, 4 slaughter-houses, 1 soap factory, 4 needle 
manufactories, 6 beer-bottling, .! book-binderies, 1 pajior-niiil. 2 box- 
makers, 1 i)aper-box manufactory. 

MARKETS. 
5 Fish, 12 meat and iisli, I meat wholesale. 

STABLE*;. 
22 Livery, i cU-ctric railroad. 1,164 private. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 61 



21 Dentists, 1 telephone, 2 telegraph, 17 coal, 1 gas, 2 express, 19 
printing. 



Material on Hand. 

PIPE. 

24 feet 24-inch. 9.504 feet 20-inch. 720 feet 14-inch, 7,224 feet 12-inch, 
.KiU feet 10-inch. 1.2o0 feet 8-ineh, 10,230 feet G-inch, .^GO feet 4-inch. 



.") 12-inch, 4 lO-inch bell, IS 6-inch spigot, 1 14-inch, 5 S-inch bell, 1 
4-inch bell. 

BRANCHES. 

1 single 4 on 10, 10 single 6 on 6, 11 single 6 on S, 15 single on 10, 
8 single on 12, 23 single 8 on S, 1 single 8 on 10, 2 single 10 on 10, 2 
single 14 on 14, 2 single 10 on 20, 5 double 4 on 4, 1 double 6 on 6, 7 dou- 
ble 8 on 8, 1 double 12 on 12, 20 double 8 on 6, 1 double 14 on 8, 7 dou- 
ble 10 on 6, 5 doxible 12 on 6, 1 double 14 on 6, 1 double 20 on 6. 

PLUGS. 
32 4-inch, 19 6-inch, 35 8-inch, 20 10-inch, 20 12-inch, 4 14-inch. 

CLAMP SLEEVES. 

S 4-inch, 130 6-inch, 36 S-ineh, 9 14-inch, 123 10-inch, 18 12-inch. 

SLEEVES. 
18 4-inch, 8 6-inch. 4 S-inch, 7 10-inch, 6 12-inch, 8 14-inch, 2 20-inch. 

REDUCERS. 

1 20-inch to 14-inch. 2 14-inch to 10-inch, 2 14-inch to 12-inch, 2 12-inch 
to 6-inch. 2 10-inch to 6-inch, 8 S-inch to G-inch, 6 10-inch to S-inch, 2 
6-inch to 4-inch. 

TURNS. 

3 20-inch Y's -f 1 12-inch turn, 2 10-inch offsets, 7 8-inch offsets, 11 
6-inch offsets, 1 12-inch croolc, 1 20-inch croolc, 1 6-inch crook, 1 4-inch 
1-4, 2 6-inch 1-4. 

255 pigs of lead. 

172 curb boxes. 

2,100 feet 1-inch lead-lined pipe. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



SEVENTH ANNUAL EEPOET OF THE STREET 
AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of Manchester, N. H.t 
Gextlemex,— The seventh annual report of the Board of Street and 
Park Commissioners is herewith submitted, showing the work of this- 
department during the year JS99. 

OFFICE. 

The usual amount of work has been done in the office. The following 
gives the receipts and expenditures for the j-ear 1899: 

Receipts. 

Received from sundry sources $290.07 

Deposited with city treasurer $280.02 

Cash paid for express, etc 10.05 

Total $290.07 

Appropriation '. $3,500.00 

Expenditures. 

Commissioners' salaries .* $1,800.00 

Clerical services 988.00 

Carriage allowance 450.00 

Office supplies, books, etc 102.30 

Telephone 36.90 

Incidentals 44.80 

Total $3,422.00 

Transferred to reserve fund 78.00 

$3,500.00 



Inventory of City Property. 

Office, including typewriter, furniture, etc $331.30 

Division No. 2, including horses, dumpcarts, sp'rinklers, 

crushers, tools, etc 29,651.56 

City stables, storage shed, shops 15,950.00 

Lot of land on Franklin street 89,312.00 

65 



€6 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I'ipe on hand $1,G22.0S 

Division No. 4 3.95 

Division No. o 26.58 

Division No. C 22.25 

Division No. 7 139.76 

Division No. 8 39.60 

Division No. 9 16.35 

Division No. 10 1,7:50.69 

Stable and lot in West Manchester 1,200.00 

Commons 5j6.90 

Total $140,603.02 



List of Appropriations. 

Street and park commission $.J, 500.00 

Repairs of highway's 21,000.00 

New highways 4,500.00 

Snow and ice 10,000.00 

Watering streets 4,000.00 

Paving streets 5,000.00 

Macadamizing streets 10,000.00 

Grade for concrete 5,000.00 

Scavenger teams 17,500.00 

City teams 7,000.00 

Street sweeping 2,500.00 

Bridges 2,500.00 

New sewers 20,000.00 

Repairs of sewers 5,000.00 

Commons 4,000.00 

Stark and Dinr.vlicld i)arks 1,500.00 

Soutii iOiid j)lay-^ round 100.00 

Total $123,100.00 



Contracts. 



Akron sewer pipe, Thomas A. Lane Company. 

llott'man cement. Brown & Titus. 

Sewer brick, ^Villiam V. Head & Son. 

Sewer and l)ridgc i)lank, A. (". Wallace estate. 

Sewer castings, Hartwell Foundry Company. 

raving Idocks, Charles A. Bailey. 

Edgcst(jn»'s, cesspool stones, Warren Harvey. , 

Concreting Hanover street, Kobie Consolidated Concrete Company, 

|{cl)uildiuL; bridsjts over Colias brook, Head & Dowst Company. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 67 

Report of Division No. 2. 
George W. Cheney, AGErrr. 

SNOW AND ICE ACCOUNT. 

Appropriation $10,000.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Labor, January' $1,377.07 

Februaiy 3,242.61 

March 1,580.31 

April 1,115.61 

September 23.56 

October 26.82 

November 73.47 

December 169.64 

Supplies 118.54 

Total $7,727.63 

Transferred to reserve fund 2,272.37 

$10,000.00 

STREETS AND ROADS. 

The work done upon the streets and roads will be found in detail 
in the tables following. 

The road machine has been used where such use Avould result in a 
saving to the city, and 147,078 feet, or about 28 miles, has been turn- 
piked in the several divisions of the citj^; 26,444 feet of streets and 
roads have been repaired with) gravel or stone chips; 9,270 feet, or 1.75 
miles, of new highways have been built during the season; 17,176 
square yards of macadam roadways built; 18,779 feet of new side- 
walks have been graded for concrete; 7,696 square yards of cobble 
gutter paving has been laid; 5,733 feet of edgestones set and reset; 
5,857 feet of fencing built along embankments in dangerous places. 

There have been 154 new cesspools built in the different sections of 
the city and 8,144 feet, or 1.54 miles, of new sewers built. 

STREETS TURNPIKED WITH ROAD MACHINE. 

Beech, north and south 4,500 feet 

Baker 800 " 

Brown avenue 900 " 

Byron 1,000 " 

Clarke 400 " 

Chestnut 2,200 " 

Everett 350 " 

Elm 1,900 " 

Hooksett road 7,000 " 



68 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Hancock 1,000 feet 

Liberty 800 " 

Merrill 250 " 

Nutt road 4,000 " 

North 400 " 

Pine 2,000 " 

Pennacook 600 " 

Eiver road, north and south 5,000 " 

IJowell 600 " 

Sagamore SOO " 

Salmon 1,000 '" 

Trenton 1,200 " 

Titus avenue 500 " 

Union, north and south 7,700 " 

Walnut 1,500 " 

Willow 400 " 

Webster 1,200 " 

Total 48,000 feet. 

Total turnpiked, 48,000 feet, or 9.09 miles. 

Labor charged to the appi'opriation for repairs of higliAvays. 

Repaired culvert on Old Bridge street; labor, $25. 

STREETS REPAIRED. 



Number | Number 
of loads stone 

feet. oigiaTe). 



Auburn 

Amherst 

Kyron 

Baker 

Beech 

Carpenter 

Elm, south 

Franklin 

Hancock 

Hooksett road.... 

Jane 

Manchester 

Market 

Monroe 

Pleasant 

Uiver road, north 

Silver 

Stark 

Union 

Totals 



400 
150 
200 
200 
!,800 
200 
500 
300 
!?00 
200 
400 
400 
150 
225 
100 
500 



9,675 



Labor charged to repairs of highways. 

SIDEWALKS GllADKI). 

Auburn 

Beech 



:!00 feet 
450 " 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



69 



Brook 100 feet 

Byron 800 " 

Chestnut 75 " 

Clarke :.. 500 " 

Elm, south ." 600 " 

Hancock 400 " 

Maple 100 " 

Myrtle 200 " 

Nutt road 150 " 

Pine 50 " 

River road, north 1,000 " 

Silver 150 " 

Union 250 " 

Total 5,125 feet 

Labor charged to repairs of highways. 

FENCING. 

Auburn, between Lincoln and Maple 350 feet 

Ash, between Blodget and Salmon 470 " 

Beech, between Sagamore and Webster 203 " 

Elm, near railroad bridge 338 " 

Kennard road 250 " 

Lake«avenue and Belmont 220 " 

Merrimack and Hanover 254 " 

Pennacook 550 " 

River road, near cemetery 645 " 

Webster, west of Smyth road 1,200 feet 

Total 4,485 feet 

Labor, $174.60. 

NEW HIGHWAYS. 



Length 
in feet. 



Cut or 
fill. 



Ash, Brook to Blodget 

Auburn, Maple east 

A Ibert, Harrison to Brook 

Ash, Blodget to Salmon 

Bay, between Carpenter and Clarke 

Ehn, south 

Hall, Bridge north 

Harrison, between Russell and Oak 

Merrimack, top of hill east 

Mitchell, Calef road to Beech 

Orange, east of Hall 

Salmon, Ash to Beech 

Union, easterly * 

Totals 



500 , 


Fill. 


3210.00 


500 


Both. 


204.00 


300 1 




138.00 


700 : 


" 


150.00 


300 


'• 


74.00 


300 


'< 


282.20 


300 


Cut. 


80.68 


200 


" 


88.70 


1,300 , 


Both. 


294.44 


1,600 ' 




173.00 


150 


Cut. 


110.00 


300 


Both. 


105.00 


400 


Fill. 






6,850 




?1,910.02 





Labor on this street charged to scavenger service. 



70 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
MACADAMIZING. 



LOCATION. 


Length 
in feet. 


Square 
ya^rds. 


Loads of 

ci-ushed 

stone. 


Labor. 


Auburn, Franklin to Elm 


250 
300 
500 

1,100 
850 

1,900 


888 
1,066 
1,889 
3,178 

6,755 


80 
90 
300 
550 
480 
650 


S130.00 
316.00 
5^o 50 




Chestnut Merrimack to Central . 




1,351.25 
1,338.38 
2,257.03 


Pearl Chestnut to Union .... 






Totals 


4,900 


17,176 


2,150 


S5,974.1t5 





MACADAMIZING EEP AIRED. 



Loads 

of crushed 

stone. 



Maple, Amherst to Concord 


168 
303 
120 
70 
120 

250 


S130..'iO 




190.00 


lUerrimack Mai)le to Lincoln 


90.75 




90.0U 






Maple, Bridge to Kast High. . ] 
Laurel, Maple to Lincoln .... 


32t.0O 


Walnut, Amherst to Bridge.. 
Myrtle, Chestnut to Walnut. . J 






1,031 


S818.25 





"Expense lor repairing these streets caused hy the laying of water pipe by the 
Manchester Water-Works. 



• SUMilAUY, MACADAMIZING. 

Labor on streets and running' crusher $8,453.93 

Manchester Water- Works, for water 70.00 

Repairs on crusher, road roller, etc 291.54 

Incidentals ST. 79 

Forcite 072.03 

Coal, coke, wood, etc 171.06 

Freight 6.17 

Cement 179.55 

Oil 79.53 

Ilanovor-stroet roadway 1,070.16 

Tr)tal $n,.'18S.75 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



71 



GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 



Length Width 
in feet, in feet. 



Cut or 
All. 



Ashland, Amherst north 

lielinont and Laurel (ledge) 

Blodget and Ash 

Elm, railroad bridge south . 

Elm, north of Clarke 

Elm and Valley 

Elm, Trenton north 

Harrison and Maple 

Hanover and Hubbard 

Hall, south of Pearl 

Lake avenue, oast Canton . . 
Merrimack and Hanover . . . 

Orange, east of Hal 1 

Russell, south Blodget 

Sagamore and Russell 

Union and Carpenter 

Union, near Xorth 

Totals 



100 
:oo 

150 
1,000 
75 
200 
400 
234 
200 
50 
200 
2,0(0 
400 
60 
500 
200 



Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 

Cut. 
Both. 
Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 

Cut. 
Both. 
Cut. 

Both. 
Cut. 
Fill. 



S6.00 
110 00 
23.00 
14.25 
16.00 
43.80 
n.50 
32.50 
16.50 
11.50 
50.00 
80.00 
27.50 

6.00 
50.50 
81.60 

6.00 



COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Xumber 

loads 
of stone. 



Square 
yards. 



Amherst, near Lincoln 

Appletoii, easterly 

Adams and Clarke 

Bay, between Salmon and Sagamore 

Clark, Adams easterly 

Carpenter 

Elm, north of Clarke 

Elm, south of Carpenter 

Elm, near Hutchinson's 

Harrison and Maple 

Hall, Manchester to Hanover 

Hall and Manchester 

Jane 

Lake avenue, Lincoln east 

Lake avenue, between Cass and Canton 

Maple, Concord to Amherst 

Market and Franklin 

Prospect, Elm to Chestnut 

Pearl, Chestnut to Walnut 

Salmon and Beech 

Salmon and Bay 

Sagamore, easterly 

Union, near Carpenter — 

Union, Manchester to Merrimack 

Total 



9 


SI. 50 


759 


1S8 50 




24.00 


34 


6.50 


39 


11.00 


34 


6.40 


25 


8.50 


39 


12. SO 


500 


• 125.50 


76 


35.00 


67 


20.40 


38 


5.50 


130 


23 25 


98 


28.25 


330 


100.80 


233 


50.80 


34 


7.00 


447 


110.00 


700 


178.00 


51 


39.00 


34 


5.00 


4S7 


164.20 


109 


27.20 


146 


27.50 


4,502 


S1,2I2.60 



PAVING HANOVEB STREET. 



A much-needed improvement was made in paving Hanover street 
from Chestnut to Pine street. After the old roadbed had been removed 
to a depth of twelve inches a bed of concrete consisting- of one part 



"72 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

cement, two parts sand, and three parts crushed stone was then laid 
five inches deep, and a fom--inch coat of concrete was laid under con- 
tract with Itobie Consolidated Concrete Co., and guaranteed for a term 

of five years. The gutters were paved three and one half feet wide 
w-ith granite block paving bedded in Portland cement. 

The total cost was $1,9G5, there being 1,156 square yards, including 
both concrete and block paving; average cost per square yard, $1.70. 

EDGESTONES SET. 

Auburn, between Lincoln and Maple 50 feet 

Amherst and Maple 21 

Beech and Salmon 17 

Blodget and Ash 20 

Beech and Sagamore 2.17 

Brook and Pine 20 

Beech, near Blodget ". 5S 

Beech, between Blodget and Sagamore GO 

Concord and Maple 9.3 

Central, between Pine and Union 22 

Chestnut and Mj'rtle 50 

Concord, near Maple 200 

Carpenter 1:20 

Clarke and Elm ,10 

Chestnut and Orange 08 

Chestnut and Central 105 

Chestnut and North 50 

Elm, north of Clarke 75 

Elm, near Lake avenue 50 

Elm and Granite 19 

Elm and Readey 24 

Franklin and Middle 19 

Grove, between Beech and Union 50 

Harrison and Maple .• 2.'{7 

Harvard and Elm 40 

Hanover, between Chestnut and Pine 100 

Hall and Mead 20 

Hanover, near Pine 40 

Hall and Manchester S7 

Liberty, between Webster and North 77 

Jjincoln and Manchester 19 

Lincoln and Hanover SO 

Maj)le and Hanover 74 

Myrtle, between Linden and Hall 75 

Maple and Brook 21 

;M:in(l.cster and IClni back street 17 

M vrt le and Walnut 59 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 76 

North and Walnut 21 feet 

Pine and Concord 151 " 

Prospect and Elm 21 " 

Prospect and Chestnut 38 " 

Pearl, east of Chestnut 237 " 

Pearl, east of Union 16 " 

Sagamore and Eussell IT " 

Spruce, between Elm and Chestnut , 50 " 

Salmon and Ray 100 " 

Spruce and Union 50 " 

Union, near Carpenter 158 " 

Union and Green 29 " 

Union, between Manchester and Merrimack 17 " 

Union and North 21 " 

Valley and Elm 53 " 

Wilson and Hanover 32 " 

Waldo and Everett 20 " 

Total 3,435 feet 

Labor, $430.40. 

EDGESTONES RESET. 

Amherst, near Vine 75 feet 

Auburn, near Beech 100 " 

Concord, between Maple and Nashua 30 " 

Hanover, between Pine and Chestnut 50 " 

Maple and Concord 195 " 

Myrtle and Elm 160 " 

Market and Franklin 128 " 

Prospect and Chestnut 100 " 

Union and Pearl 160 " 

Total 998 feet 

Labor, $56.40. 

SCAVENGER SERVICE. 

This board is still using the old method for the disposal of the 
waste accumulation collected bj- the street department, by dumping 
the same in various parts of the city, outside the limits prohibited by 
the board of health. The same objection arises and more or less oppo- 
sition is made to the new dumping-ground as was made when the old 
method was in use, bj^ filling streets and low places in the central part 
of the city. Although everything possible is done, at large expense, 
to keep the "dump" covered with fresh sand daily, still the whole sys- 
tem is wrong, and some other means should be adopted for the disposal 
of the citj^ garbage. 

We hope the city council will make an appropriation sufficient to 
erect a building for the purpose of burning the city waste. 



74 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following siiiinnary shows how the cost for scavenger service has 
been divided: 

Labor $15,041.82 

Citj^ farm 2,459.58 

Repairs of carts and harnesses 131.89 

Total $17,633.29 

The following concrete work was by the Robie Consolidated Concrete 
Company: 

NEW CROSSINGS. 



Location. 


Price per 
yard. 


Square 
yards. 


Total cost. 




§0.75 
.75 
.75 

.85 
.85 
.85 
.85 
.85 
.85 
.75 
.85 
.65 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.85 
.85 
.85 
.85 


30.13 
30.09 
29.69 
23.11 
24.27 
28.58 
22.84 
19.55 
18.98 
30.22 
30.60 
24.11 
117.02 
49.77 
25.66 
37.03 
35.03 
25.52 
28.09 
31.11 
16.88 






22.56 






Canton and Sprnce . 


19 64 


Canton and Lake avenue .... 


20 63 


Chestnut and I'rospect 


24.29 






Elm and Myi'tle 


16 13 






Ferry and Third . . 


26 05 






Hanover and Lincoln . 


87 76 








19 24 






Myrtle and Chestnut 


26 "7 


Pearl and Chestnut 


•'1.68 






Third and Ferry 


'^6 45 




14 35 






Totals . .. . 




678.34 


3533.25 







REPAIRED CROSSINGS. 



Price per 
yard. 





§0.60 
.60 
.35 
.85 
.25 
.50 
.85 
.70 
..35 
.85 
.50 
.75 
.85 
.60 


60.30 
25.64 
13 61 

7.11 

9.43 
17.11 

5.51 
114.00 
73 68 

4.67 

17. el 
38.49 
42.22 


536.16 
16.38 






4.76 


Hell luid W ilson 

Kasl lUiih 


6.04 
2. 16 
8.55 




4.08 




79.80 




25.79 




3.97 


OriiiiKc itiiil I'lio.stnut 

IMn<! utKl Miiiiov.T 

Walnut nn<l .Myrtle 

West, iiorlli l>i>iii<las . 


44.46 
13 21 
32.72 
21.11 






TotalH . 




518.80 


8299.00 







STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
CONCRETE ROADWAYS REPAIRED. 



75 



Location. 



Price per 
j-ard. 



Square 
yards. 



Amherst, Beech to Union 

Hanover, at postofflce 

Hanover and Chestnut 

Hanover and Chestnut 

North Main, opposite engine-house 

Union and Concord 

Union and Lake avenue 

Hanover, Chestnut, Merrimack, Union, Con- 
cord, sundrj- places 



80.60 
.75 
.60 
.40 
.50 
.75 
.50 



1,446.67 
17. OG 
68.94 
31.65 
144.81 
29 28 
. 151.51 



S86S.00 
12.79 
41.36 
12.66 
72.41 
21 96 
75.75 

200.00 



gl,304. 



SIDEWALKS REPAIRED. 



Price per 
yar 



trS' 



Square 
yards. 



Amoskeag, near bridge . . . 

Chestnut and Myrtle 

Chestnut and Orange 

Dean avenue 

Elm and Merrimack 

Granite, near city stables. 

Hanover, near Pine 

Hanover, near Pine 

Lake avenue and Elm 

Massabesic and Cypress . . 

Pine and Hanover 

Prospect and Chestnut — 
South Main and Milford... 
Union and Manchester — 



36.43 


16.39 


106.49 


26.62 


51.04 


12.76 


40.06 


20.03 


12.07 


5.43 


20.28 


15.21 


1.09 


.48 . 


54.59 


21.84 


8.83 


3.97 


34.05 


15.32 


2.84 


1.28 


2.33 


.70 



REPAIRED CES.SPOOLS. 



Location. 


No. 


Cost of 
material. 


Labor. 






S5.20 
6.70 
4.92 
1.56 
3.90 

14.04 
3.96 
5.65 
5.16 
2.44 

11.56 

23.16 
1.44 
3.97 


86.00 
8 50 


Central and Canal .... 


Chestnut and Appleton .. . 


400 




3.00 


Green (sewer) . ... 


48,00 




\ 












Higli and Union .... 


7.50 










Union and Pearl 


10 50 








3.50 








17 


893.65 


8114.75 





76 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



No. 



Cost of 
material. 



Appleton and Union 

Appleton and Elm] 

Adauis and Clarice 

Auburn north back 

Blodget and Oak 

Bridge, between Maple and Nashua 

Blodget and Ash 

Beech and Blodget 

Brook, near Union 

Church and Washington 

Clarke and North River road 

Carpenter and Union 

Chestnut and Blodget north back 

Clarke and Elm 

Central north back, near Wilson 

Dean and Elm 

Elm west back, south Bridge 

Elm east back, between Concord and Amherst. 

Elm avenue 

Franklin 

Grove and Pine 

Harrison and Maple 

Hanover, east of Chestnut 

Hanover and Maple 

Harvarii and Beech 

High and I'ine 

Lake avenue, east Cass 

Lincoln and Central 

l.,ake avenue, near Belmont 

Lake avenue and Cypress 

Merrimack and Chestnut 

Manchester and Elm 

Market and Franklin 

Merrimack, east of Beacon 

Pearl, between Pine and Union 

Peail and Chestnut 

Pearl and Morrison 

Pearl and Union 

Soniervillc and Beech 

Sagamore 

Spruce, between Lincoln and Wilson 

Sagamore and Maple 

Union, between Auburn and Grove 

Union and Concord 

Valley, near Elm 

Wrtln'tit and Orange 

Walnut and North 

Wilson, bit ween Laurel and Central 

Webster, lu-sii' Kay 

Webster and L'nion 



$15.99 
15.27 
15.99 
19.% 
15.09 
15.09 
21.45 
20.32 
17.26 
13.29 
17.61 
15.27 
15.99 
35.27 
13.93 
16.35 
19.96 
20 19 
30.36 
13.29 
36.59 
29.90 
94.73 
14.73 
24.78 
15.99 
47.97 
32.93 
20.14 
15.09 
20.19 
9.35 
3076 
29.28 
61.21 
27-12 
14.55 
13.83 
48. 99 

106.41 
31.26 
28.38 

136.16 
27.38 
46.62 
14.56 
17.43 
15.45 
16.35 
34.32 



37.50 
10.25 
9.50 
7.00 
8.00 
8.50 
7.50 
7.50 
13.50 
7.50 
10.80 
22.00 
7.50 
21.70 
6.50 
8.60 
6.50 
6.50 
15.00 
6.50 
15.00 
24.50 
49.60 
7.00 
28.00 
9.00 
28.00 
14.50 
7.50 
10.20 
8.75 
9.50 
28.50 
10.00 
29.50 
18.50 
8.50 
9.50 
15.00 
66.40 
15.50 
21.00 
86.S0 
10.00 
18.76 
6.50 
8.50 
6.50 
9.00 
18.50 



«1,420.37 $786.75 



NEW SEWERS. 



It is iinj)()ssil)lc for this board to satisfy the deniaiid for new sewers 
with the a])i)ropriation given for building new sewers. 

Tlie section in East Manchester, known as the Spruce-street sewer, 
is not large enough to carry oflf the sewage running into it from 
the Old Falls road, Massabesic street, Belmont street, and Wilson street. 
The size of the sewer .should be increased to at least three times its 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 77 

present size, which is now only a 20-inch pipe, its entire distance of 
upwards of four thousand feet, from Lincoln to Pine streets. 

There should be an appropriation of $10,000 made to relieve the village 
of Amoskeag, while the older section of the city is without sewerage of 
anj- kind. 

The Massabesic-street sewer should be extended to accommodate that 
part of the citj, which is rapidly increasing in population. 

The following important sewers have been built the past year: 
The River-road sewer, north from Wheeler street to Cloyde street, a 
distance of 257 feet, nearly all ledge, at a cost of $5,275 per linear foot; 
Massabesic-street sewer, from Jewett street easterly 498 feet, at a cost 
of $6,426 per linear foot. This sewer was cut through ledge its entire 
length, from six to twelve feet in depth, the average cut being on an 
average of eighteen and one half feet deep of sand and ledge. Blodget 
street, from Maple to Oak street, 560 feet; Granite street, from Frank- 
lin easterly to Spruce, and Elm east back street to Central south back, 
a distance of 940 feet at a cost of $4.67 per foot; Cypress south of East 
Spruce street, 600 feet; Jewett to Cypress, 523 feet; Cleveland, Merri- 
mack river to Second street, 598 feet; Rimmon east back, from Kelley 
northerly 542 feet; Sylvester, from Milford westerly 202 feet, and Wilr 
liams street, from Milford northerly 448 feet. At the present time some 
seven miles of sewers are ordered built by the city government, the 
building of which has not yet been commenced. 

The folloAving table gives the street, location, material, price of 
sewers, length in feet, manholes, lampholes, Y's, total cost, average 
cost per foot, average cut in feet, and nature of excavation of each 
scAver constructed: 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



^EWEUS BUILT 



Asb east back 

Beecb 

Blodget 

Central 

Clay 

Concord 

Concord , 

Cypress 

Elm , 

Elm east back 

Granite 

Green south back . . . 

Hanover 

Hayes avenue 

Massabesic 

Merrimack 



Concord southerly 

North of Blodget northerly 

Maple to Oak 

Beacon easterly 

Wilson easterly 

Union westerly 

East of Hall easterly 

East Spruce to south of Auburn . 

Granite to Spruce 

Spruce to Central south back .... 

West of Franklin to glm 

Beecb westerly 

Chestnut easterly 

East of INIassabesic easterly , 

West of Jewett to east of Jewett 
East of Beacon easterly 



Oak I Blodget southerly 



Rivtir road 

Russell 

Spruce , 

Wilson 

Young 

Young 



Wheeler to Cl05'de 

North of Harrison northerly 

Elm to Elm east back 

Somerville to Clay 

Belmont to Mitchell avenue . 
Jewett to Cypress 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
IN 1899,— EAST SIDE. 



79 









0? 


o 


c 

JS 

g- 




fH 






3 




a 


a 


o 


s 



Nature of excavation. 





1 


1 


.i. 




1 




3 







2 




12 


1 




1 
1 




10 
3 


„ 




1 




2 


2 




1 


.... 


4 






3 




20 


2 


270 


2 
4 




15 
3 


1 


100 



















3 




1 




2 




194 


2 




6 
3 
4 


3 
2 




2 


1 
1 


10 

1 


.... 




2 




2 




.... 


1 




6 






1 




2 






2 




13 




564 


31 


3 


121 


17 



$109.21 
150.52 
451.41 
528.00 
260.69 
173.83 
97.17 
654.82 
505.00 

1,953.50 

1,422.00 
57.00 
113.84 
100.14 

3,200.00 
128.72 
239.36 

1,323.98 
24.42 
514.50 
455.70 
129.21 
608.98 



$13,202.00 



«0.563, 


3.0 


1.871 


8.0 


1.254 


8.5 


2.901 


7.0 


0.958 


11.0 


0.756 


8-0 


0.852 


6.5 


1.091 


10.0 


4.715 


16.0 


4.669 


16.0 


4.677 


14.0 


0.570 


7.0 


0.647 


6.0 


1.788 


10.0 


6.420 


18.5 


1.035 


5.5 


0.950 


10.0 


5.275 


9.7 


0.488 


2.0 


4.677 


16.0 


1.823 


10.5 


0.784 


7.5 


1.164 


7.0 



Sand. 

Gravel and boulders. 

Stony gravel. 

Sand and ledge. 

Hard gravel and boulders. 

Sand. 

Sand and gravel. 

Sand and boulders. 

Gravel and clay. 

Sand and clay. 

Sand and clay. 

Street scrapings. 

Sand. 

Gravel and boulders. 

Ledge and sand. 

Gravel. 

Stony gravel. 

Ledge and gravel. 

Gravel. 

Gravel and clay. 

Hard gravel. 

Sand. 

Gravel and ledge. 



80 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HEWERS BUILT 




McGregor weii>terly 

Merrimack river to Second 
Merrimack river to Second 

Amory southerly 

West westerly 



Amory south back 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Douglas 

Milford j Bismarck easterly.... 

Rimmon east back.. . | Kelly northerly 

School south back. . . Turner westerly 

Second \ Cleveland to Blaine . 

Sylvester | Milford westerly 

Walker East of Main easterly 

Williams Milford northerly . . . . 



Akron. 

Iron. 

Akron. 



542 
172 
2« 
202 
142 
448 



2,576 



Length of sewers, east side, division No. 2. . 
Length of sewers, east side, division No. 7 . . . 
Length of sewers, west side, division No. 10. 




Total S,144 feet 



Cost of sewers, east side, division No. 2. 
Cost of sewers, east side, division No. 7. . . 
Cost of sewers, west side, division No. 10. 



Total 

Average cost per foot, east side, division No. 2. . . 
Average cost jjer foot, east side, division No. 7. . . 
Average cost per foot, west side, division No. 10. 
Average total cost per foot, $2.04S. 



$7,792.46 
5,409.54 
3,481.39 

$16,683.39 

$2,551 

2.283 

i.2sa 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
IN 1S9!>.— WEST .SIDE. 



81 



•6 

If 


i 
1. 

S! 
<A 


m 

O 

a 
S 




1 
1 


Total cost. 


Cost per foot. 


1 

< 


Nature of excavation. 


52 


2 

1 

1 


1 

1 

.... 


2 

20 

6 
2 

1 
21 


2 

2 
2 

1 

2 

1 
4 


862.87 





8.0 Clayey loam. 

12 5 .«?5inrl 


94 


884.10 
64.72 
116.80 
132.00 
923.88 
98.81 
403.86 
348.00 
189.00 
256.75 


1.478 
0.376 
1.242 
2.357 
1.704 
0.576 
1.661 
1.725 
1.331 
0.573 


12.5 
8.0 
9.5 
8.0 

12.5 
5.5 
9.5 
8.0 
9.0 
7.0 


Sand. 

Sand. 

Clayey gravel . 

Stony gravel . 

Sand. 

Clayey loam. 

Sand. 

Stony gravel. 

Stony gravel. 

Sand. 




2 


.... 


7 
7 
6 
15 


146 


12 


' 


87 


16 


83,481.39 





SUilMARY. 

Total appropriation for new sewer.s $20,000.00 

To transfer from reserve fund 416.66 

Total • $20,410.66 

Expended new sewers, east side $13,202.00 

new sewers, west side 3,481.39 

new cesspools 1 ,009.89 

On hand, supplies at citj^ yard 2,663.38 

Total 20,416.60 

The following table shows how the cost of new sewers has been 
divided: 



82 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Total 
cost. 


i 






? 


2^ g 


-» 
5 


3 


S 


? 
■» 


V 




1 
1 












S g .? f. 

s Is ^ ^ 




g 




it 










1 g g ? P - " ^ 


i 


3 












1 g 










1 


li 

9 S 












1 d i i s 1 s 1 


s 

i 










S g g iS s 

§ S !■ s ^ 








1 


P 










g S S§ 5 § £ 

ej o - M CJ 1- 






» 


aj 

.liil 






















S SS § 12 g S g 

s 1 s 1 S § 2 




i 


1 

5 


2 

i 




" 1 I ?- 1 1 1 s i 


2 


a. 


1 


! 1 
I ' 


.1 7 




^ 5 


t Z 

3 - 


fc 

7 


- 


\ 

1 

4 


> 
J 

£ 






1 


1 





STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. • 83 



Quite extensive repairs should be made to the Amoskeag- bridge the 
coming- season. The roof needs to be reshingled, and a portion of the 
roadwaj' replanked. 

The McGregor bridge will have to be replanked its entire length. 
Owing to the large amount of travel over this bridge it is necessary 
to remove the top course each year, while the bottom course needs 
renewing ever^- three years. The annual cost of the maintenance is 
$2,000. 

Granite-street bridge is in good condition and not one dollar has 
been expended in repairs since its completion in 1896. 

Two new Avooden bridges have been built over Cohas brook, one on the 
Derry road and one on the Mammoth road, to replace two old bridges 
considered dangerous to the public travel, at a cost of $415 and $472.90, 
respectively. 

Steps have already- been taken to replace the old wooden bridge over 
the Portsmouth & Lawrence Eailroad, at the south end of Elm street, 
with a new steel bridge thirty feet wider than the old bridge, which 
has a roadway onlj' thirtj'^ feet in width. The new structure, when 
completed, will better accommodate the increased travel in that sec- 
tion of the city. 



Report of Division No. 10. 
George P. Ames, Age>-t. 

GEKERAL, EEPAIKS. 

The following streets have been patched with gravel or stone chips: 
Amory, A, Amherst road, Amoskeag, Bartlett, Blaine, Beauport, 
Cartier, Conant, Dubuque, Eddy hill, Goffstown road. Granite, Gates, 
Hevej-, Jones hill, Joliette, Eimmon, South Main, AYinter. 

Labor $402.33 

Top-dressed sidewalks on Dover and Green streets, labor.. 4.00 

Whitewashed tree boxes, fences, etc., labor 38.20 

Cut trees on Granite, Green, Douglas, South Main, Turner, 

and Dover streets, labor 218.12 

Keplanked bridge on Parker street with 3,591 feet plank, 

labor 17.25 

Cleaned gutters, scraped crossings, etc 267.00 

Total $946.?)0 



84 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CULVERTt>. 



Length in 
feet. 



Goffstown road, wood ' 3C $5.75 

Ilooksett road, " 32 10.50 

Kockland avenue, " *2 i 6. .50 

Front street, " ' 59 ' 9.10 

Goffstown road, " 32 3.00 

Front street, repaired I 5.1'2 

Totals I 191 I 840.57 

1-EXCING. 

Aiiiorv street ."»6 feet 

Colby street 4S " 

Jlooksett road G76 " 

Goffstown road 12S *' 

Log- street 320 " 

Total 1,228 feet 

Labor, .$Sa.2.j. 

STKKKTS TtniNPIKFD WITH ROAD MACHINE. 

Alsace 520 feet 

A 728 '• 

Adams 490 " 

Aniory 1,820 " 

Beauport 3,G20 " 

Bowman G44 " 

Boynton 518 '• 

Barr 2oO " 

Conaiit 025 " 

Dunbartoii road 10,r):50 " 

Dartmouth 980 " 

Doi-^Ias 1,035 " 

I)id)uqiie 5G0 " 

Dover 2S0 "' 

Eddy road 4,494 " 

Ferry 500 •' 

Fourth 4:>0 " 

Front 1,750 " 

(Jreen 250 " 

Granite 1,470 " 

Jlooksett road 12,014 " 

Hancock 1 200 " 

•<''l.v 4,20S " 

Aloninout li 230 " 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 85 

Xortli 3ilain 1,SS0 feet 

Parker 9:58 " 

Quincj' 350 " 

Rimmon 1,060 " 

South Main 8,716 " 

Second* 6,790 " 

Straw road 6,300 " 

Third 1,470 " 

Turner 2,280 " 

Walker 1,120 " 

West 700 " 

Wilton 168 " 

Winter 560 ." 

Total 81,918 feet 

Total, 81,918 feet, or 15.51 miles. 

In some cases the road machine has been iised twice during the sea- 
son on the above streets. Labor, $387.02. 

STREETS TOP-DRESSED. 



Number 
of feet. 



Beauport 

Boynton 

Bath 

Cartier 

Douglas 

Duhuque* 

Front 

Granite 

HackettHill 

North Main 

Second 

I 

Totals 




$124.87 
25.75 
55.25 
(iO.25 
56.50 



423.97 
185.75 
97.25 
56.12 
96. .50 



$1,182.21 



Labor charged to appropriation for new highwaj's. 
NEW HIGHWAYS. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Bartlett 

Dubuque 

Green 

Kelly 

Rimmon back street 

Totals 



150 


SI2.95 


1,650 


334.75 


150 


17.00 


350 


82.67 


120 


4.48 



2,420 



$451.85 



86 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Length 
in feet. 



Labor. 



Ban- 200 

Reaupoit i 500 

Bowman 310 

Bath 220 

Cartier 355 

Douglas 500 

Green 100 

(Tvanite 1,"00 

Uimmon '250 

Totals i 4,135 



11 


$21.50 


13 


49.63 


11 


68.30 


12 


31.21 


16 


54.25 


19 


91.00 


4 


15.00 


30 


189.00 


10 


35.13 


132 


$555.02 



TAVING KELAID. 



Length 
in feet. 



Amory | 100 

Coolidge avenue 210 

Conant 

Clinton J^S 

Dorer i 70 

Eddy road 1 5'2 

Front (rim rows) 14" 

Granite 90 

Hancock 

Milford i 125 

North Main i 100 

Parker 

Putnam 

Second 

South Main '270 

Totals I 1,240 



$5.00 

10.35 
2.37 
6.87 
8.87 
3.50 
8.25 

12.60 
2.00 

13.76 
5.37 
3.62 
1.87 
3.75 

83.13 



(171.20 



GRADE FOR CONCl^ETE 



Location. 


Cut or 
All. 


Number of 
feet. 


Labor 




Cut. 
Fill. 

Cut. 
Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 

Cut. 
Kill. 


100 
200 
13.'. 
200 
100 
40<) 
110 
4,SliO 
200 

i;<5 

l'26 
100 


$.V75 


Ijarr 


4.00 






Bath.... . 


7 80 




7.50 




9.12 




6.50 




11.74 




7.15 




13.6'2 




.3.60 


W illiimis . .... .... 


;{.0() 






TotalH 




0.106 


$115.68 









STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



87 



REPAIBS OX SOUTH MAIN STREET. 

477 feet x 14 feet, new paving. 

100 feet X 141/2 feet, relaicl paving. 

Used 2,840 blocks of paving, labor, .$433.37. 

* EDGESTOXES SET. 



Ban* and Douglas... 
Beauport and Wayiie, 
C'artier and Conant . . 
Dover and Granite. . . . 
Douglas and Green... 

Dover and Granite 

Granite and Barr 

Granite and Main.... 

Marion 

Quiney and Douglas. . 

South Main 

Sullivan and Cartier.. 
West a^id Granite 



136 feet 
263 

28 

34 

IS 

40 
100 

27 

69 

30 
]93 

19 



Total 

Labor, $147.94. 



1,035 feet 



NEW CESSPOOLS. 



, 1 Cost of 
Number, material. 



Barr and Douglas — 
Barr 

Bath 

Cartier «.. 

Cartier and Conant. . . 
Dover and Granite . . 
Douglas and Quiney . 
Douglas and Green... 

Daittnouth 

Granite and Dover . . . 

Granite 

North Main 

Quincj' 

South Main 

Second 

Wayne and Beauport 

Williams 

West and Granite — 

Totals 



2 


$24..S1 


$13.37 




17.56 


12.50 




10.29 


21.00 




28.90 


14.75 




14.25 


6.25 




29.69 


14.12 




29.36 


20.00 




9.87 


10.00 




17.20 


10.75 




28.51 


12..50 




77.09 


52.95 




12.16 


10.00 




9.39 


8.88 




19.71 


6.-5 




14.32 


6.2.-) 




14.42 


7.12 


1 


12.16 


5.25 


3 


39.01 


29.00 


29 


$414.20 


$267.44 



88 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
HEl'AIREI) CE8SP00LS. 



Location. 



Cost of 
materials. 



P.caupoit east back SI. 10 i S1.75 

Cartier back street 10.50 1 .62 

Douglas and Quincy 8.29 4.25 

Douglas .30 1.7.5 

G veen and Douglas 5.60 8.75 

Granite... .89 2.00 

Green 1.94 , 2.00 

Granite 1.62 

Granite and Barr 2.30 1 6.24 

Nortl) Main 2.28 | 3.75 

.Second .29 1 1.62 

Wayne and Beauport .84 \ 2.00 

Uinter 2.12 ! 3.50 

•Joliette (flushed sewer) | 48.60 

Walker (flushed sewer) ' 4.75 

Cleaned cesspools 330.37 

Totals £36.45 I 8424.67 



NEW SEWERS. 



Length in 
feet. 



Aniory south back, McGregor westerly. 
Cleveland, Merrimack river to Second.. 

Columbus, Amory southerly 

Douglas, West westerly 

Milford, Bismarck easterly 

IJimmon cast l)ack, Kelly northerly... . 

.School soiitl) biick, Tmiier westerly 

Sccoiiil.cicvcland lo Bhiiiio 

Sylvolci, -Milford wc.-^terlv 

Walker, easl of ISIain easterlv 

Williams, Milford northerly 

Totals 



52 


862.87 


598 


884.10 


172 


64.72 


94 


116.80 


56 


1.S2.00 


542 


•)23.&> 


172 


9S.S1 


243 


403. SO 


202 


348.60 


142 


189.00 


448 


2.56.75 



93,481.39 



For further details on sewers, see sewer table. 

REPORTS FROM HIGHWAY DIVISIONS. 
Division No. 4. 

i;vi:()\ !•:. .\l()()i!i:, .\(ii:.M. 

'Plic ro.id.s hfiiio- in <^()0(l conditioii in this division little work ha.s 
Ijcrn doni' upon tlicin dmiiii.; tlic past year. Throe hnndrod rods of 
new roads \\:\\v liccn hnilt. and alK)ut .'!50 rods repaired with gfravel, 
etc. lUisln's liavi' hecn cut t liroMfjlumt Iho division and ;ill roads 
))rokrn ont after snowstorms. 

Total amfumt cxpt-nded for labor during- tin- \r,ii-. Si.",i',. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 89 

Division No. 5. 
jMat^k E. Hara'ey, Agent. 

Xiimber of feet of roads graveled, 3,450. 

Turnpiked with I'oad machine, 3^4 miles. 

Xumb«r of feet of fence built at dangerous places, 144. 

Weston road widened 15 feet for 118 feet in length, 301 cubic yax'ds. 

Weston road graded bj" cut, 325 cubic yards. 

Laid 110 feet 10-incli Aki'on pipe as a side culvert in front of soliool- 
house. 

Eeplanked one lialt' of l)ridge over Cohas brook on Mill road and the 
bridge over Coburn brook on the South road. 

Cut bushes on two miles of roads. 

JJemoved small stones from all roads several times during the season. 

All roads broken out after snowstorms and kept in condition for 
public travel. 

Total amount expended for labor during- the year, $614.02. 



Division No. 6, 

Sajiuel Webster, Agent. 

The usual amoiint of work has been done upon the roads in this divi- 
sion during the year. Folir culverts were taken up, cleaned, and relald, 
and three culverts repaired. Built 144 feet of new fencing on Island 
Pond road, and dug- 09 rods of ditch on Cohas avenue. The bridge on 
Island Pond road was replanked, 45 feet x 18 feet. Small stones have 
been removed from all roads once a month, and the roads throughout 
the divison have been broken out after snowstomns. 

Total amount expended for labor during the year, $323.35. 



Division No. 7. 

Charles Francis, Agent. 

NEW IIIGinVAYS. 

Belmont, Vallej- to 175 feet south of Young road. 

Candia road, widened. 

Cypress, Lake avenue to Spruce. 

Foster avenue. 

Falls road. 

Hayward, Valle}' easterly. 

Mammoth road. Lake gvenue to railroad. 



90 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



GKAVELED. 

Belmont, Lake avenue to 8pruc-e 400 feet 

Foster avenue 400 '* 

Silver, ^Yilson to Hall 450 " 

Summer, Belmont to Ilall 400 " 

Total 1,740 feet 

EDGKSTONES SET. 

Belmont and Ha5fward 14 feet 

Belmont and Spruce 11 " 

Falls road and Spruce 25 " 

Hayward and Eiley 22 " 

Hall and Silver 21 " 

Harvard 44 '" 

Lake avenue and Canton 20 " 

Lake avenue and Belmont 18 " 

Spruce and Canton 20 " 

Wilson and Silver 40 " 

Total 265 feet 

GRADE ECU CONCRETE. 

Belmont, Lake avenue to Sjn-uce 200 feet 

Deai'born tJO " 

.Jewett 50 " 

Spruce, Avest of Cypress 150 " 

Spruce and Beacon 200 " 

Silver, Wilson to Hall 450 " 

Somerville, Wilson to Hall 450 " • 

Total 1,5G0 feet 

GUTTERS PAA'EO. 

Belmont, from A'alley south 1.038 feet 

Belmont, Lake avi'iiue to Spruce 470 " 

Falls road 905 " 

Hay ward, east of Belmont 175 " 

Lake avenue, east of Canton 50 " 

Spruce, east of Cfyiton 100 " 

Spruce, east of Falls road :{50 " 

Spruce, Massabesic to Belmont 100 " 

Silver, Wilson to Hall DOO " 

Massabcsic and Jcwett repaired. 

'i'utal 4,748 feet 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



91 



r.uilt new sidewalks on Hospital roatl, from ^fassabosic- street 
easterly. 

Turnpiked Belmont, Clay to DIx (new street). 

Turnpiked Clay, Wilson to Hall (new street). 

Used road machine on all outside roads; cleaned out g-utters and cess- 
pools: kept roads and walks in passable condition during- the winter 
months. 

NEW CESSPOOLS.' 



Location. 


No. 


Cost of 
materials. 


Labor. 




1 816.81 

2 37.44 
1 ' 17.84 

1 1S.07 

2 10.42 

1 17.48 

2 35.46 


312.50 


Cypress and Lake avenue 

Jewett and Somerville 

Jewett at Flint's : 

Lake avenue and Canton, repaired 

Spruce and Canton . . 


24.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
12.50 




20.00 


Spruce and Beacon repaired 


1 9.47 

2 1 40.02 


5.00 


Spruce and Belmont 


20.00 




3 


51.58 
23.18 
37.10 


33.00 


Valley and Belmont 


15.00 




20.00 • 






Totals 


.0 


$314.93 


$194.00 









XEW SEWERS. 



LOCATIOX. 



Length in 
feet. 



Clay, Wilson easterly 

Cypress, East Spruce to south of Auburn 
Hayes avenue, east Massabesic easterly . 

Massabesic, west of Jewett 

Wilson, Somerville to Clay 

Young, Belmont to Mitchell avenue 

Young, Jewfctt to Cj'press 

Totals 



600 


654.82 


50 


100.14 


498 


3,200.00 


250 


455.70 


170 


129.21 


523 


608.98 



$5,409.54 



For further details on sewers see sewet table. 



Division No. 8. 

Steakns Smith, Agent. 

Graveled Uanover .street, using- 820 loads of gravel. 
Graveled Candia road, using 340 loads of gravel. 
Graveled Proctor road, using 20 loads of gravel. 
Graded sidewalks on Candia road. 

Cleaned out culvert and relaid ]20 feet on Candia road, also 20-foot 
culvert on Lake Shore road relaid. 



92 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I ill i it a 14-foot plank culvert on Morse road. 
]'>uilt a driveway- on Hanover street, using 12 feet of iron pipe. 
I'.uilt a driveway on Candia road, using 12 feet of iron pi^ie. 
All the roads in this division have been broken out after snowstoi-ms 
and kept in good condition for public travel. 
Total amount expended for labor during the year, $1,410.22. 



Division No. 9. 

Lester C. Paige, Agent. 

The road machine was xised on the following roads: Derry road, 
Cohas avenue, Webster road, Paige road, ^Mammoth road, and Dickej' 
road. 

Derry road was i)lowed and turnpiked 1j rods and graveled 113. 
Moorsville road was widened and filled a distance of 5 rods, using fif- 
teen loads of cobblestone and twelve loads of gravel. The culvert on 
Soiith road was taken up, cleaned, and relaid, and one on Derry road 
was lengthened and relaid. Fort^-eight loads of sand « were used on 
this road for widening and filling. Deri-y road, near Cohas brook, was 
widened for a distance of 10 rods and a covered ditch laid on the south 
side to accommodate the water which continually overflowed the road 
during the winter and spring months. The large culvert on ^Mammoth 
road Avas lengthened four feet and a retaining wall built on the west 
side. 

The three bridges on the Little Cohas brook were replanked and new 
stringers put in on two. One of the abutment walls which was in a 
dangerous condition was taken down entirely and relaid; railings were 
repaired and 2rJ4 feet of new fencing put up. All general repairs have 
been attended to, and all the roads have been broken out and kept in a 
pas.sable condition during the winter months. 

Amount e.\-pended for labor duriiii^- the year, $();;4. 



Division No. 12. 

Eugene G. Liiuiv. Afii.xT. 

The roads throughout the division have been graded witii stone and 
giavel. About three hundred feet of fence has been liuilt on liaid Hill 
road, in naiTOW and dangerous places, the road machine has been used 
over the entire length of this road, stones taken out and low places 
tilled. Afammoth road has liecn widened for two hundred feet in the 
sw.imp near the Smyth lojid. wliich is a great improvement and gi\t's 
teams a chance to pass each other. 

IJridgc-street extension has been graveled and is in good repair for the 
winter months. The hill in front of liio I'ogg house recpiires a good 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. yd 

deal of attention on account of the water that washes from Bridge 
street and the Mammoth road. The J. Hall road, on the hill near Han- 
over street, has been widened bj' plowing out the center of the road and 
filling in with stones from the sides of the highway. Tlie Rob. Neil 
road, so called, has had the usual amount of work and is in good repair. 

Culverts have been cleaned and ditches kept open, and I consider 
that the'highway in division Xo. 12 will compare favorably with any of 
the outlying divisions in the city. 

Amount expended for labor during the j'Car, $4G1.2T. 



Parks and Commons. 

JOIIX FtXLERTOX, AGEXT. 

The public squares of the city have received the usual amount of 
careful attention. The same number of flower beds were set out as 
last season, and several trees i)lanted to replace those that were found 
dead. Much-needed improvements were made in recovering old worn- 
out walks, and new concrete walks were laid on the east side of Merri- 
mack square and on the east side of Park square at a cost of $637.94 for 
repairing and building the new walks. Seven new cesspools and two 
hundred feet of Akron pip^ were put in to drain the low places. Owing 
to the low state of the water-supply the flooding of the squares for 
skating purposes was dispensed with. The appropriation of $1,500 for 
the care of Stark and Derryfield parks was not sufficient for the board 
to make any extensive permanent improvements. About eight acres 
of rough and unproductive land in Derryfield park was plowed up and 
•sowed down to grass. About thirty tons of hay was cut on the parks, 
which was used at the city stables. There should be an appropriation 
made for a building for the storage of hay on both of the parks. 

The "Weston Observatory was open from April to November. This 
is quite an expense to the citj^ and should be considered by the city 
councils when the approi^riations are made. 

The board has sought to make the money appropriated for the pur- 
pose go as far as possible in securing that which would make the pleas- 
ure grounds attractive and comfortable. 

We believe the money has been wisely spent, and hope the city coun- 
cils will be liberal as well as just in the appropriations for parks and 
commons for the coming year. 



94 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SUMMARY COMMONS. 

Labor $2,551.67 

Water-works 350.00 

(irass-seed, fertilizers, etc 142.17 

Concrete wallcs 037.94 

Incidentals : 206.01 

Shrubs, flowers 298.00 

Lumber 64.98 

Hardware 71.82 

Lights 36.00 

Total i?4,358.59 

SUMMARY ST^U?K AND DERRYI'IEI.D PARKS. 

Labor, Derryfield park $931.86 

Labor, Stark park 463,00 

Hardware 67.63 

AVater-worlis 40.50 

Incidentals 24.33 

Shrubs 12.00 

Horseshoing- S.OO 

Insurance 5.00 

Total $1,552.32 

SUMMARY SOUTH END rLAYGROU.XD. 

Labor $70.99 

Swings, etc 42.83 

Total $113.31 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS, 95 

CONCIfETK W(^Klv OX COMMpXS.-SIDEWAf.KS. 



Location. 


Price 
per yd. 


Square 
yards. 


Total cost. 




.25 


324.94 $81.24 




420.08 105.02 




.40 
.45 
.25 
.4.1 
.45 
.25 
.40 
.25 


554.68 142.90 




30.60 i 1S.77 




909.64 227.38 




585.00 
329.73 
619.30 
76.15 . 
5. 89 


263.25 


Pine, north side of Park common 


148.38 




1.54.82 


Tremont common . . . 


30.46 




1.47 












3,855.91 81.168 69 











$530.75 of the expense carried forward to the January draft, 1900. 



96 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

TOTAL COST (JF ALL WOKK DONE 



Street and parkcommiss'ners 

Repairs on liigh ways 

New highways 

Snow and ice 

Watering streets — 

Paving streets 

Alacadamizing streets 

Grade for concrete 

Scavenger teams 

City teams 

Street sweeping 

Repairs of bridges 

New sewers 

I^epairs of sewers 

Commons 

Stark park 

Derry rteld park 

South End playground 



$120.27 
32.55 
107.20 

1,380.07 
12.56 



$132.60 
.30 

74.43 
3,242.61 

160.00 



1,164.72 
393.44 



1,444.68 
626.41 



33.13 
29.12 
350.91 



72.60 
300.78 



Total . 



$572.50 
1.00 



1,580.31 
84.62 



126.61 

26.49 

1,177.90 

514.7S 



12.73 
244.10 



$126.50 
7-29.31 
41.00 

1,116.61 
34.85 
24.00 
64.37 



1,973.18 
537.12 
145.19 



12.50 
168.27 
194 45 
24.50 
C.60 
5.75 



$185..V> 

3,823.75 

96.07 



810.89 
595.49 
488.96 
603.67 

2,206.15 
876.66 
337.28 
25.88 

2,067.18 
620.19 
374.37 
104.50 
409.42 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
DURING THE YEAR 1890. 



97 



i 

3 


July. 


09 

3 

< 


1 

s 

1 


1 


a 

> 


1 

a 

1 




$575.27 


$113.50 


$132.50 


$679.80 


$113.65 


$190.76 


$579.20 


$3,422.00 


4,523.33 


2,746.91 


3,010.76 


1,. 581. 99 


2,114.58 


2,129.48 


1,452.63 


22,146.59 


1,022.63 


956.62 


928.82 


581.68 


287.47 


1,021.78 


415.71 


5,562.66 


3.33 






23.66 


26.82 


164.10 


185.22 


7,727.63 


713.49 


582.04 


693.13 


382.50 


102.41 


26.33 


111.13 


3.713.96 


1,253.97 


454.93 


241.79 


1,41400 


79.63 


764.10 


509.73 


5,337.04 


1,974.07 


1,969.71 


2,433.90 


12.50 


1,787.28 


1,681.21 


822.73 


11,387.75 


268.90 


216.31 


519.36 


69.88 


406.65 


611.29 


391.17 


3,113.72 


1,380.53 


1 330.10 


1,513.11 


1,381.62 


1,110.47 


1,716.32 


1,234.51 


17,633.29 


469.18 


550.26 


802.64 


1,240.37 


271.90 


760.73 


309.27 


7,352.76 


272.31 


265.74 


302.29 


210.99 


274.13 


241.98 


200 51 


2,2.'i0.42 


747.99 


1,145.22 


357.94 


60.46 


47.55 


70.12 


2.50 


2,527.27 


3,829.52 


2,141.14 


4,758.64 


3,463.45 


1,481.93 


1,813.17 


826 00 


20,416.66 


470.13 


355.60 


290.74 


265.04 


1,072.66 


725.69 


404.77 


4,477.54 


486.04 


209.23 


560.10 


172.81 


279.19 


582.52 


604.09 


4,3.58.59 


67.50 


72.38 
131.02 


127.77 
105.00 


51.86 
82.12 


18.C0 
43.18 


52.00 
47.62 




518 51 


159.20 


3.00 


1,033.81 




77.07 


6.87 






21.87 


2.25 


























$123,094.60 

















In clo.sing we desire to thank His Honor the Mayor and each member 
of the city government, as Avell as the city engineer and assistants, 
and all persons whatever their station, for the willing and hearty co- 
operation in carrying out the work of the department. 

liespectfullj^ submitted. 

HORACE P. SIMPSON, 
GEORGE H. STEARNS, 
BYRON WORTIIEN, 
Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 
January 1, 1900. 



KEPOET 



ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEERS DEPARTMENT. 



Office of the City Engineer, 
Manchester, N. H., December 30, 1899. 
To the Honorable Mayor and City Councils: 

Gentlemen, — The twenty-first annual report of the City Engineer 
is herewith submitted, showing the expenditures and operations of the 
engineer's department for the year ending December 31, 1899. 

Office. 

Five assistants have been employed in this department during the 
year 1899: Harrie M. Young, George W. Wales, Harry J. Briggs, Alfred 
T. Dodge: Ella Barker Davis, stenographer and tj'pe writer. 

Financial. 

E. G. SOLTMANN, new YORK, 
1899. 

April 4. To 1 Buck 100-foot tape and reel $13.50 

50-yard roll blue print cloth 11.25 

50-j'ard roll blue print paper 2.50 

24-yard roll par. ex. cloth 5.35 

1 stick India ink 1.67 

2 par. en, rubbers @ 30c .60 

express on goods returned ,60 

$35,47 
By value of goods returned 13.20 

$22,27 

May 5. To 1 T, A, protractor in case $30.75 

1 curve tracer 1.44 

1 border pen 2.40 

1 bottle cryst. ink .15 

1 T. A. railroad pen 3.15 

1 case victor pens 3.50 

1 set crj-st. lettering- angles 1.80 

2 horn centers (a 40c .80 

1 section liner 7.50 

1 rod level 3.00 

express .71 

$55.20 

101 



102 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



June 3. To 1 lilnmb bob and 3 steel straight edges cleaned 

and nickel plated 

Oct. 13. 20-yard roll 4;2-inch coronet paper $2.48 

20-yard roll 42-inch tracing paper 1.20 

50-yard roll 40-inch detail paper 2.40 

G dozen kohinoor pencils 5.00 

1 little, victoria tape 3.95 

3 par. ex. pencil holders @ 10c .30 

1 cryst. angle, 30° — 60°, 15-inch 1.56 

1 cryst. angle, 30° — 60°, 11-inch .67 

1 cryst. angle, 30° — 60°, 8-inch .45 

1 cryst. angle, 45°, 12-inch 1.32 

1/2 dozen imperial crayons .38 

2 bottles Higgins ink @ 25c .50 

3 Alteneder pens @ $1.58, $1.80, $2.03. . 5.41 

$25.62 
By 3 victor pens, @ $1, 85c., 75c., returned 2.60 

MORGAN, CKOSSMAN & CO., SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

April S. To 1 facsimile stamp from cut, Buck's patent 

Sept. 12. repairing Bates numbering machine 

and 1 No. 1 bottle ink $2.50 

1 No. 8 ex. pad .50 

4 ounces ink (black) .50 

KIMBALL CARRIAGE, COMPANY. 

1898. 
Nov. 2. To repairing blanket 

1899. 
Dec. 2. To repairing blanket 

C. H. WOOD. 

July 19. To varnishing tripod 3 coats .• 

Sept. n. .staining and varnishing 1 si)line and weight box 

rNION MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

Aiay 5. To 28 dozen 1 Vy-inch nickel figures (jf? 50c 

Sept. 21. 24 dozen 1',/.-incli iiickcl tigures @ 50c 

Dec. 23. 3S dozen 1 y.-\m-h nickel figures @ 50c 

W. F. HUBBARD. 

-Aug. 1. To 5,000 grade stakes 2 feet long 

Sept, 30. 250 grade stakes 4 feet long, 2-inch x 2-inch.. 



$6.25 



$23.1 



$1.25 



$3.50 



$0.75 
.50 



$0.50 
.75 



$14.00 
12.00 
19.00 



$30.00 
12.50 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 
W. P. GOODMAN. 

Mar. 2. To 1 box 20-pound tyi^ewriter paper 

May 25. 1 box typewriter paper, 16-pound $0.90 

1 box typewriter paper, 12-pound .75 

Oct. 9. 3 memorandum books 

Nov. 16. 1 box tj^pewriter paper 

Dec. 13. 2 boxes typewriter paper @ $1 $2.00 

1 box typewriter paper @ 75c .75 



103 



$1.00 



$1.65 
.24 
.90 



THE JOHN B. CLABKE COMPANY. 

^laj- 16. To printing 150 reports, 46 pages and cover, @ 40c. 

JOHN^. VARICK COMPANY. 

Sept 27. To 1 dozen French ven. craj^ons 

MANCHESTER HARDWARE COMPANY. 

Mar. 30. To 1 pound paraffine wax 

April 25. 1 paper copper tacks, 1-inch 

Sept. 21. IV2 pounds flour of emery @ 10c 

Dee. 2. lax $0.75 

1 ax 1.00 

PIKE & HEALD COMPANY. 
1898. 

Nov. 25. To bench marks on 50 hydrants @ 20c 

1899. 

Dec. 12. To 102 i/i-inch plugs .$0.82 

28 hours' labor, Tangney, @ 331/30 9.33 

23. putting plugs in hydrants as per contract.... 

E. R. COBURN COMPANY. 

Feb. 10. To erasers 

April 7. 1 typewriter ribbon, blue Underwood 

12. 1 note book 

20. 1 memorandum 

May 11. 100 envelopes 

12. 25 envelopes 

June 14. 1 thousand envelopes printed 

16. 3 pencils @ 10c 

Jul}' 26. 1 set knives for pencil pointer 

Dec. 18. 6 erasers 

23. 1 thousand envelopes 

26. 6 erasers 



$18.80 



$0.42 



$0.12 
.30 
.15 



$1.75 



$10.00 



$10.15 
79.85 



50.50 

1.00 

.50 

.10 

.30 

.08 

3.10 

.30 

.50 

.50 

3.10 

.43 



104 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

KKriM.L &'eSSEI{ CO.MrA.XY, NEW YORK CITY. 

May 15. To 1 only slide rule, 1749-2 $10.00 

Aug. 7. 1 set splines and spline weights, 21')0 .$10.00 

1 only adjustable curve ruler, 217(3, 

repaired .GO 

express charges from Manchester. ... .30 

cxpressage .G.") 

$11..1.> 

Dec. 5. 1 only leveling rod. No. 625G 15.00 

26. 1 set paragon scales 11.00 

J. G. JONES. 

May 12. To tiling cabinet, freight $0.18 

advance charges .50 

exj)ress charges t .25 

$0.93 

TREWORGY INK MANUFACTURING CO., HOLYOKE, MASS. 

Sept. 5. To 2 bottles ink (a 75c $1.50 

DODGE & STRAW. 

Nov. 4. To 1 i^air storm king boots $3.75 

JOHN WILEY & SONS, NEW YORK CITY. 

Dec. 23. To 1 Johnson stadia table 50'/- $0.40 

postage .04 



$0.44 



YAWMAN & ERI5E MANUFACTURING CO., ROCHESTER. N. Y. 

May 9. To 1 15-drawer Shannon cabinet, oak, 3 x 

5, with acme lock $30.50 

1 S. & G. lock on private drawer .50 

$31.00 
12. By freight and cartage .93 

G. W. DODGE SHOE COMPANY. 



$30.07 



Nov. 1. To 1 pair nicu's rubber Ijoots $3.50 

Dec. G. 1 iKiir nun's rubber boots 3.50 

H. K. IIORNE. 

Sept. 21. To 1 rcfrigcrab.r pan $0.38 

'I UK LYON ri.AIIM M I'LN CO., MOW YORK CITY. 

Aug. 9. 'J'o 1 gross plat iniiiu pens (rii $1.50 $fi.00 

THE carter's 1.\K COMPANY, UOSTON, MASS. 

Oct. n. 'J'o '/;; dozen coui)on book No. 4SG7, good for G ideal 

ril.hoiis $4.50 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 105 



KMIM.K J*: lAKUINGTOX COMPANY, 



Mar. 6. To .")() sheets paper, 8 x lO'/v $1.40 

9. 151 sheet.s parchment deed, 19 x 24 11.25 

20. 1 bottle IIisj>ins drawing- ink $0.25 

500 sheets typewriter paper .7: 



$1.00 

May 11. 1 (luire paper .38 

July 26. 12 bhml-c books No. 5549 9.00 

Dec. 2G. binding 1 lot plans $3.00 

making" 1 folio for plans 4.00 

making' 2 folios for plans (a. $2.50 5.00 

$12.00 



W. & L. E. GURLEY, TROY, X. Y. 

April 8. To 1 No. 376 20-inch Y level and extension 

tripod $115.00 

B}^ old transit and tripod in ex- 
change $32.00 

old level and tripod in ex- 
change 28.00 



60.00 



July 1. To express on level. June 15 $0.70 

express on tripod, June 29 .40 

repairing- and readjusting level, re- 
pairing* spindle and socket, tangent, 
slides, pinions, and Y's, box and new 

strap 20.00 

repolishing and bronzing 12.00 

prepaid express .90 



AMERICAN EXPRESS COMPANY. 



April 


10. 


May 


16. 


June 


5. 


Sept. 


13. 


Oct. 


14. 


Dec. 


6. 



$34.00 



To exiDress on two boxes from Troj% N. Y $1.15 

express on bundle from New Y'ork Citj' , .40 

transportation of bundle from New York .40 

express on bundle from Springfield.. .$0.25 

express on package to Springfield .25 



.50 

express on package from New York .70 

express on bundle fi'om New York .55 

HARRIE M. YOUNG. 

Sept. 16. To carfare to Nashua and return $0.78 

dinner at Nashua .75 

$1.53 



NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY. 

Dec. 30. To rent of telephone for 1 year $44.47 



106 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



GEORGE W. WALES. 

Dec. 30. To 325 tlay.s 6% hours service (a $2.7.") per 

day $895.99 

By 16% days service @ $2.75 per day 

(Dorr's pond siirvey) deducted 46.06, 

$849.93 

IIARRIE M. YOUNG. 

Dec. 30. To 273 days 314 hours service ((i $2.75 per 

day $751.92 

By 4 days 3% hours service (a $2.75 

})er di'.v (Dorr's poud survey) deducted 12.37 

$7.39.55 

HARRY J. BRIGGS. 

Dec. 30. To 325 days li/g hours .service (a $2.50 per 

day $812.95 

By 151/0 days service @ $2.50 per day 

(Dorr's pond survey) deducted ....... 38.75 

$774.20 

ALFRED T. DODGE. 

Dec. 30. To 317 days 2V4 hours service @ $2 per day $634.61 
By 51/2 days service @ $2 per day (Dorr's 

pond siirvev) deducted 11.00 

$623.61 

ELLA B. DAAIS. 

Dec. 30. To 78 days service (a $1.25 per day $97.50 

228 days service (o) $l.(iO ]wr dav 33G.24 

$463.74 

SAMUEL J. LORD. 

Dec. 30. To first quarter's salary $300.00 

second quarter's salary 300.00 

third quarter's salary 300.00 

fourth quarter's salary 337.50 

$1,237. .50 
By 14'/;, days service on Dorr's pond sur- 
vey, deducted on the basis of $1,350 per 
year, 30 days per month, $3.75 per day 54.38 

$1,183.12 

Total expense engineer's dei)arlnifnt for 1S99 $5,249.98 

SUMMARY. 

Approprinlcd lo tlic cnyiiu'cr's depart ini'nt for year 

1899 $5. 40(1. 00 

Kxpen.se of enf>-incer's d(|.:iit intiil lor \ car ls!)<.» $5,249.98 

Balance iinexj)endcd 150.02 

$5,400.(10 $5,400.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 107 

During- a part of the month of December, 1899, this department was 
engaged surveying a tract of land surrounding Dorr's pond to ascertain 
if said section was desirable for a fair-ground site. Upon completion 
of the field work claims were made that the department had not the 
right to charge the expense of the work to the city.. Accordingly the 
time was deducted (as set forth in the foregoing financial report), 
which is as follows: 

Dec. 30. To G. W. Wales, I634 days at $2.75 per day .$4G.0G 

H. M. Young, 41/0 days at $2.75 per day ]2.37i/. 

H. J. Briggs, 151/2 days at $2.50 per day 38.75 

A. T. Dodge, 5Va days at $2 per day 11.00 

S. J. Lord, 14% days at $3.75 per day 54.371/2 

Total $102.56 

The above sum of $102. 5G was paid by Mayor William C. Clarke, 

January 1, 1900. 

Orders. 

Number of orders for: 

Surveys, street lines, and grades 267 

Sewer grades 49 

Paving grades 4 

Street railway grades 5 

Gutter grades 77 

Curb grades 78 

Pine Grove cemetery grades 41 

Valley cemetery grades 2 

Profile levels 61 

Petitions 124 

Crematory committee 6 

Sewers and drains committee 6 

Street committee 6 

Road hearings 12 

Board of aldermen 6 

Board of examiners of plumbers 13 

Setting stone bounds 89 

Total number of orders 855 

Field Work. 

Levels for profiles for establishing grades (length in feet) . . . 123,600 

for sewer profiles (length in feet) 14,502 

for establishing new bench marks (length in feet)... 142,000 

Other levels (length in feet) 17,523 

Total length of levels in feet •. 298,285 

Cross section levels. Pine Grove cemetery (area in sq. ft.). . . . 47,200 

city farm for proposed fair-ground 3,600,000 

Total area of cross section levels in square feet 3,()47,200 



108 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Surveys of streets and street lines (leng-th in feet) 55,000 

for street numbers (length in feet) 11,604 

miscellaneous (length in feet) 5,580 

Total length of surveys in feet 72,134 

Street lines marked on ground (length in feet) 31,770 

Lot and avenue lilies, Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) . . 7,074 

Lot and avenue lines, Valley cemetery (length in feet) 238 

Lines for gutters (length in feet) 21,665 

Lines for curbs (length in feet) 5.110 

Lines for sewers (length in feet) 8,705 

Lines for street railroad (length in feet) 2,227 

Other lines (length in feet) 7,080 

Total length of lines in feet marked on the ground 83,878 

Grades set for sidewalks (length in feet) 46,348 

gutters (length in feet) 21,665 

curbs (length in feet) 5,119 

sewers (length in feet) 8,705 

street railway- (length in feet) 1,934 

paving streets (length in feet) 520 

building streets (length in feet) 18,482 

Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 4,000 

other purposes (length in feet) 2,S30 

Total length in feet of grades set 109,663 

Number of old lots restaked in Pine Grove cemetery 22 

New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery 105 

Old lots restaked in Valley cemetery 3 

Total number of cemetery lots staked out 130 

Soundings taken for sewer trench (length in feet) 3,673 

Stone bounds set 85 

Office Wokk. 

PLANS AM) IMtOKILES MADE I'Olt SHiKWALK ClIiADES. 

lligli. Cliestniit to I'nion. 

si;\vi;i{ iM.ANs AM) ri:oi ii.ils. 

licccli, lljiywiiid ti. S(.mci-\illf. 

iJcccii east hack. Anilicrst to Hanover. 

Kiiu cast back. Orange to Myrtle soulli l);uk 

Foster avenue, \'alley to I lay ward. 

HanoNcr, K\m 1o ( hcstnut. 

Harvard, licech lo l>iiic..lii. 

Hayes avenue. Old l''alK loail to Cliast a\iiiue. 

Laurel .south I)ack. P.cccli to .Maple. 

I>()\v<'ll, H.^lmont to l!r:icon. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 109 

Myrtle south back, Elm east baek to Union. 
Ol'.l Falls road, Spruee to Hayes avenue. 
Orange, Elm to Elm east back. 
Kiley avenue. Hay ward to Yonng. 
lliver road, Clarke to north of Thayer. 
Sonierville, Union to Maple. 
Taylor, Vallej' to (irove. 
Union, Harvard to Sonierville. 
Total sewer plans and profiles, 17. 

nuaihering plans. 

Derryfield lane, Nutfield lane to Pine, 
(iore (changed to Rlodget). Two plans. 
Knowlton, Young to Hayward. 
Mast road. Mast street to north of D. 
Porter, Cillej' road to ^lassabesic. Two plans. 
Waldo, Elm to Everett. 

Woodbine avenue, Candia road to Concord & Portsmouth Railroad. 
Two plans. 

Total numbering- plans, 10. 

jriSCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Amoskeag lot book, 14 full sheets, 9 part sheets. Copy. 

Avon, Clement, Mast, and Jngalls, land of Adam Dickey. Copy. 

Raker and Calef road, land of Waterman Smith. Copy. 

Bridge-street extension, land of H. M. Tarbell. Copy. 

Bridge, East High, and Beacon, land of G. W. Butterfield. Copy. 

Calef road and ;Manchester & Lawrence Eailroad, land of Manchester 
Gas Company. Copy. 

Dix, Howe, Shasta, Lincoln, Wilson, Hall, Harvard, Silver, Somerville, 
and Clay, land of F. M. Hoyt and Greeley Company. Copy. 

Harvard and Beech, land of Miirphy and Collins. Copy. 

Holly avenue and Taylor, land of Cynthia C. Kennedy. Copy. 

Kennard and Smyth roads, land of H. B. Sawyer. Cop3^ 

Lowell, East High, Ashland, and Malvern, land of William Stark 
heirs. Copy. 

Massabesic, Taylor, and Dearborn, land of M. C. Paige. Copy. 

Old and Xew Mast roads, land of Charles Blood. Copy. 

I'ine Grove cemetery, citj^ treasurer's book, 2 sheets. Cop5\ 

Railroad, land of C. C. Koehler. Copy. 

Taylor and Valley, land of S. G. Fletcher. Copy. 

Wilson, Hall, Central, and Laurel, land of Mary Wilson. Copy. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 40. 

WORKING PLANS. 



Albert, Harrison to Brook. Profile. 

Amherst, Mammoth road to Salisbury. Profile. 



110 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Ash, Sagamore to Salmon. Profile. 

Ash, Blodget to Sagamore. Profile. 

Ash east back. Concord southerly. Profile. 

Ashland, Hanover to Amherst. Profile. 

Auburn, Maple to Wilson. Profile. 

Beech, Blodget to Salmon. Profile. 

Beech, Pearl to Orange. Profile. 

Belmont, Lake avenue to Spruce. Profile. 

Blodget, Maple to east of Oak. Profile. 

Brook, Elm to Chestnut. Profile. 

Cartier, Kelley to Coolidge avenue. Profile. 

Chestnut, Concord to Lowell. Profile. 

City farm, cross section for proposed fair grounds. 

Clay, Taj'lor to Jewett. Profile. 

Cleveland, Third to Merrimack river. Sewer profile. 

Colby, West Hancock to Log. Profile. 

Columbus, Amory southerly. Profile. 

Concord, Chestnut to Pine. Profile. 

Cypress, Clay to Howe. Profile. 

Cypress, Howe to Cilley road. Profile. 

Depot, Elm to west of Franklin. Profile. 

Dix, Taylor to Cypress. Profile. 

Dix, Cypress to Jewett. Profile. 

Elm east back, Spruce and Granite. Three sewer profiles. 

Foster avenue, Valley to Hayward. Profile. 

Garmon, Hanover to Amherst. Profile. 

Gertrude, Hanover to Amherst. Profile. 

Granite, Dover to Barr. Profile. 

Granite, Barr to Quincy. Profile. 

Granite bounds. Detail plan. 

Hall, Harvard to Clay. Profile. 

Hanover, Maple to Wilson. Profile. 

Hanover, Mammoth road to east of Salisbury. Profile. 

Hanover, Chestnut to Pine. Profile. 

Hanover, I'ine to Union. Profile. 

Harrison, Hall to Belmont. Profile. 

Harri.son, Elm to Chestnut. Profile. 

Harrison, Maple to Oak. Profile. 

Hayes avenue, Old Falls road to Chase avenue. Profile. 

Hiram, Jilaine to Cleveland. Sewer profile. 

Howe, Taylor to Cypress. Profile. 

Jane, Lowell to Nashua. Profile. 

Manchester south back. Elm east hack to e;ust of Chestnut. Profile. 

Maple, Pros])e<'t to Harrison. Profile. 

Massabesic, .Jewett to Mammoth road. Two sewer profiles. 

.Merrill, .lewett easterly. J'rofile. 

Mitchell, Beech to Calef road. Profile. 



REPORT OF TH-E CITY ENGINEER. Ill 

Myrtle. L'nion to Walnut. Two profiles. 

North, Union to Beech. Profile. 

Oak, Prospect to Blodg-et. Profile. 

Oakland avenue, Mammoth road to Revere avenue. Profile. 

Old Falls road. Spruce to Massabesic. Profile. 

Oneida, South Main to Harriman. Profile. 

Orange. Walnut to Beech. Profile. 

Pearl, Chestnut to Walnut. Profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Linden, Cedar, and Walnut avenue. Three 
profiles. 
' Porter, Massabesic to Maynard avenue. Two profiles. 

Prospect, Elm to Chestnut. Profile. 

Keadey, Elm to River road. Profile. 

River road, Cloyde street, Whitney lot, and Stark park. Sewer 
profile. 

Russell, Blodget to Sagamore. Profile. 

Salisbur3', Hanover to Amherst. Profile. 

Salmon, Beech to Maple. Profile. 

Second, Cleveland to W^alker. Profile. 

Silver, Wilson to Hall. Profile. 

SomervUle, Wilson to Cypress. Two profiles. 

South Main, Manchester & North Weare Railroad to bridge. 

Taylor, Somerville to Cilley road. Profile. 

Union, Manchester to Merrimack. Profile. 

Union, Clarke to Trenton. Two profiles. 

Walnut, ^Ijrtle to Prospect. Profile. 

Walnut, Pearl to Orange. Profile. 

West Appleton, Ellm westerly. Profile. 

William, Mast to Milford. Profile. 

Total working plans, 85. 

TRACINGS. 

Detail plan of granite bounds. 

Glenwood, with additions. 

GofP.stown village. Two plans. 

Manchester and Auburn town V\fie. 

Manchester, west of Elm street. 

Manchester, east of Elm street. 

Manchester, east of Merrimack river. 

Manchester, west of Merrimack river. 

Manchester, north of Clarke. 

Manchester Street Railwa3-, showing lines. 

Mast road, South ^lain to New Hampshire Central House. 

Proposed track to the Cheney Paper Mill. 

Title, sewerage system, east and west. Two plans. 

Title, electric street lights. 

Title, Manchester, N. H., west of Elm street, for Boston & Maine office. 



112 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Title, citj-'of Manchester, niaj). 
Whittemore land (west side). 
Total tracing's, 19. 

BI.XE PRINT.S. 

Currier section. Two prints. 

Detail plan granite bounds. Nine prints. 

Manchester and Auburn town line. One print. 

Manchester, west of Elm street. Eleven prints. 

Manchester, east of Elm street. Five prints. 

Manchester, north of Clarke. Six prints. 

Manchester Heights. Eleven prints. 

Mast road. South Main to GofPstown village, for street railway. 

Osborn's map, showing New Hampshire mountains. Three prints. 

Pine Grove eemeterj', Chapel lawn. Four prints. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Pine lawn. Four prints. 

Title, electric street lights. Two prints. 

Title, city of Manchester, maj). Seven ])rints. 

Total blue prints, 6G. 

104 sheets have been made for the new sewer books and 17 plans in 
the city clerk's book of records. 

Total of plans made, 359. 

Six tracings and six blue prints showing city sewers have been 
brought up to date. 

Maps brought u]) to date, 5. 

Plans brought up to date, 56. 

Numbering sheets brought up to date, 10. 

Plans made for establishing of grade on laid out streets, 01,210 feet. 

Plans made for establishing of grade on streets not laid out, 5,070 feet. 

Total, 82,:i71 feet. 

Lot owners looked up, 79,778 feet. 

Sewer Licenses. 

At a meeting of <he board of mayor and aldermen, November 19. 
1897, the city engineer was instructed "to examine the books in his 
office and present to said board a list of property owners who had neg- 
lected to pay the license fee required by the city laws and ordinances 
for entrance to the city sewers." 

The records were examined and a list compiled giving the name of 
the property owner, the location of the lot, the street frontage, and 
the license fee due upon each and every piece of occuijied i)roi)erty 
within one hundred feet of a public sewer. 

The said list was given in liand to the city clerk, as clerk of llie board 
of mayor and aldermen. 

The list comprised 1,017 names and a notice was sent each one by the 
city clerk. A summarized stalcnienf of the ground covered to Jan- 
uary 1, 1900, follows, viz.: 



RKPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 113 

Number of iiainos .laimary ], 1S9S 1,017 

raid during- 1S'.»8 277 

Granted free duriuLj- 1S!)8 TO 

raid prior to 18<)S, located during- year 121 

Paid during- 1S'.)<) 24 

(]lrante4 fi'<-^e during- ]S',)9 12 

Not conneeted 1 

Paid prior to 1S9S, not located GO 

Paid previously :! 

Paid in part 1 

Covered by old perinit 1 

Not recorded paid, receipts shown ") 

Keeorded paid, no record of cash received 2 

Claims to have been paid, no record 1 

Licenses taken out, not paid IS 

Not heard from 415 [ 

Total number not settled .lanuarv 1, 1900 500 



1,017 1,017 

Number of licenses granted delinquent sewer enterers during- 

1S99 24 

Number of free licenses g-ranted delinquent sewer entei'ers 

during- 1899 12 

Number of licenses granted new sewer enterers during- 1899 SO 

Number of free licenses g-ranted new sewer enterers during- 1899 3 

Total number of licenses granted during 1899 119 

Amount of money recorded as collected from twenty-four 

, delinquent sewer enterers $3GG.OO 

Amount of money recoi-ded as collected from new sewer 

enterers during 1899 1.172.98 

Amount of money recorded as collected on note due in 1898. . 15.00 



'i'otal amount of money recorded as collected during- 1899 $1,553.98 
All moneys are cc.llected by the city clerk. 

Street Signs. 

Street signs on liaiid .January J, 1S99 :i9 

Street signs (metal) ordered during- 1S99 12 

Street signs (black, white letters) ordered during 1899 6 

Street signs (white, black letters) ordered during 1899 51 

Street signs j)ut up during 1899 

Street signs on hand January ], 1900 



Street signboards crdt-red liuriiig ]899... 
Old signboards used over during 1899... 
Signboards ordered iiainted during 1899. 





GS 




40 


108 


105 


64 






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69 


69 



114 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

COST OF STREET SIGNS. 

L. M. Aldrich d- Compciuy. 
1899. 
April 18. To 12 street sig-n boards (To 6V4c $0.75 

Hanif A. I'iim: 

May 19. To 50 street sig-nboards (a 7c $3.50 

Aug-. 19. 2 street signboards (a, v'/oC .1,"» 

Oct. 7. sig-n hooks . . .- .80 

4y., hours' kibor l.O.". 

Metal 8ta»iitin[i Company. 

April 15. To 12 street signs (metal) @ 2;Jc $2.70 

Manchester Hardware Comiiany. 

Jan. 21. To nails lor putting- up street signs $0.25 

Sept. 12. nails for putting up street signs .38 

Georye W. Reed. 
1898. 
Dec. 2, 3. To use of jmng in ])utting up street signs $1.50 

Charles H. ^Yood. 
1899. 

May 15. To painting 12 street sig-nboai-ds @ 10c $1.20 

May 27. painting 3 street signs @ 35c 1.05 

July 19. painting 3 street signs ((? 35c 1.05 

Sept. S. painting 12 street signs (fj^ 35c 4.20 

Sept. 13. ])ainting 4 street signs (black, w. letters) (fp 55c. 2.20 

Oct. 13. j)ainting 2 street signs (black, w. letters) @ 55c. l.W 

jiainting 2 street signs @ 35c .70 

Nov. 25. painting 31 street signs (g' 35c 10.85 

Total cost of street signs for year 1809 $34.37 

The expense of street signs is charged to tlic appropriation for inci- 
dental expenses. The bills are certitted to by this department. 

StUEET NUMBEIIS. 

Figures on hand .lanuarj' 1, 1899 27t) 

Figures ordered during year 1899 •. l.OSO 

Figures used duriui^' isou 715 

Figures on iiaiid .hiiuiary 1, I'.ton tUl 

1;35G 1,35() 

Street numbers replaced (liiiiiig isD'.t CO 

Street numbers given out during 1899 19(i 

Total numbcrd used during 1S99 250 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 115 

The expense of street numbers is charged to the appropriation for 
the Engineer's Department. (See Union Manufacturing Company's 
financial report.) 

Stone Bounds. 

Stone bounds ordered during year 1899 110 

Stone bounds set during year 1899 S5 

Stone bounds on hand January 1, 1900 25 

110 110 

COST OF STONE BOUNDS. 

Frank 8. Bodicell. 

June 1. To oO stone bounds @ $1.65 $82.50 

Oct. 19. GO stone bounds @ $1.40 84.00 

Maxiine G-uiUeinette. 

Dec. 2,!. To 4 days labor (setting bounds) @ $1.63 $6.52 

Total cost stone bounds for 1899 $173.02 

The expense of stone bounds is charged to the appropriation for 
incidental expenses. The bills are certified to by this department. 

Coal-Tar Concrete Work. 

Following is a tabulated statement, giving the location, number of 
square yards, price per square J'ard, total cost, and date when meas- 
ured of all coal-tar concrete work, as follows: Table No. 1, street cross- 
ings (new) ; Table No. 2, street crossings (repairs) ; Table No. 3, side- 
walks (new); Table No. 4, sidewalks (repairs); Table No. 5, driveways 
(new and rejiairs) ; Table No. 6, street paving (new); Table No. 7, street 
paving (repairs); Table No. 8, street crossings (new); Table No. 9, 
stimmary of Tables Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 0, 7, and 8. All bills are made out 
and certified to by this department. The work in Tables Nos. 1, 2, 3, 
4, 5, 6, and 7 was done by the Robie Consolidated Concrete Company, 
and that in Table No. 8 b3' the Manchester Concrete Company. 



IIG 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 123 

Seweij^vc.e System. 

Table No. 10 g-ives the location, material, size, and length of sewers, 
together with the number of manholes, lampholes, house Y's, and 
cesspool Y's, built during the year IS'Ji). 

Table No. 11 gives the material, size, and length of all ])ublic sewers 
in the city of Manchester, January 1, 1900. This table further gives the 
total length (in feet) of each size of sewer and the number of manholes 
on each size, also the total length (in feet and miles) of each material. 

Table Xo. 12 gives the location, size, material, and length of pipe re- 
moved, where sewers have been relaid during the year 1S99. 

Table Xo. 13 is a summary of the sewerage system by years, from 
January 1, 1880, to January 1, 1900. It gives the length in miles con- 
structed and cost each year, also the average cost per mile for each 
year. The third column gives the number of miles constructed to 
date, each j-ear. It will be noted that January 1, 1880, there were 17.06 
miles constructed, the cost not being- recorded. January- 1, 1890, there 
were recorded 2,003 house connections. Beginning with this date, col- 
umns four and five give the number of connections recorded each year 
and the total number recorded to date each year. 



124 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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125 



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126 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORT.S. 

TABLE No. 12. 
PIl'E HKMOVKI) WHERE SEWEH.S HAVE BEEN IJELAID. 



Limits. 






Amory south back 

Douglas 

Elm east back — 

Green south back 
Massabesic 



McGregor westerly ' Akron. .. 

West westerl3' " 

Spruce to Lake avenue south back ... " 

Lake avenue to Central soutli back . . Cement.. 

Beech westerly Akron . . . 

Jewett westerly Portland. 



TABLE No. 13. 
SUMMAUV OF SEWERAGE SYSTJi:M SINCE 18S0. 



Ykak. 


' House con- 
Miles con- Miles con- nections 
structed 1 structeil recorded 
rlurmg to date. during 
year. I ■ year. 


House con- 
nections 
recorded 
to date. 


Cost i Average 

of cost 

sewers. per mile. 




1.62 1 18.66 
2 18 1 20.84 
3.37 1 24 21 
2.54 20.75 
1.73 28.48 
1.50 ! .•50.04 






S19,919.40 
23,895.12 
24,148.13 
21,452.05 
21, .548.60 


512,295.92 
10,961.06 
7,166.65 


1881 












18«3 ' 






»,445.09 


1884 






1'>.445S4 


1885 






28.122.84 1 i8,627.4(! 
44,479.15 20,687.97 
19,893.92 i 13.815.22 
31,154.19 18,008.20 
27,513.73 ' ]0,:«3..51 
39,297.97 21,711.58 
55,409.73 17,990.17 
.•59,724.05 12,691. 5.S 
51,3'J2.16 15,.V26.33 
46,116.01 1 l.'..847.42 
71,859.36 1 18,0.V).lt 
66,408.87 ! 14.099.33 
30,258.41 9,226 06 
34,939.51 9,292.42 
16.683.39 10,819.31 






1887 j 1.44 33.63 

1888 1 1.73 35.36 












2,003 
2,067 
2:220 
2,434 
2,625 
2.883 
3,138 
3,375 
3,658 
4,178 
4,386 


1890 

1891 

1S92 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1890 

1897 

1898 

1899 

Total 


1.81 i 39 83 
3.08 1 42.91 
3.13 1 46 04 
3.31 ' 49.35 
2.91 1 52.26 
3.98 56.24 
4.71 60.95 
*3.93 i 64.42 
•3.76 1 67.60 
♦1.54 09.01 


64 
153 
214 
191 

258 
255 

SS 

.520 
208 








$720,217. ISf 


- 











• Includes old sowers rclald. 
f Total cost for 19 years. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 127 



Ar.sTi;.\( p i;i:i*()i;'r of the committee on sewers and 

I)I{A1XS FOU THE YEAH 1899. 
VKIJSONNEr, OF THE COMMITTEE. 

Aldei'Tiwin from ward T. .lohu F. Frost, chairman. 

Alderman fioin ward (>, Samnel M. Conch. 

Alderman from ward S. (iillis Stark. 

Alderman from ward 10, Eng-ene E. Eeed. 

Clerk of the committee, Samnel J. Lord. 

The followino- tables have been compiled to be nsed in the annual 
report of the Eng-ineer's Department in lien of citing" the records of 
the committee on sewers and drains in detail. The tables give all the 
necessary information ]M?rtaining- to the petitions, oi'ders for sewers 
passed by the city councils, sewers bnilt and not bnilt np to Jannary 
1, 1900. 

Table I is a list of all the petitions that have been acted npon during 
the year, also the manner in which, and date when, each petition was 
acted upon and disposed of by the committee. 

Table 11 is a list of sewers ordered in np to January 1, 1899, giving" 
the distances built, distances bnilt in excess of order, distances ordered 
that are nnnecessarj-, and the distances remaining unbuilt up to Jan- 
uary 1, 1900. 

Table III is a list of sewers ordered built in 1899, giving the distances 
built, distances built in excess of order, distances ordered that are 
tinnecessary, and the distances remaining unbuilt np to January 1, 1900. 

Table IV is a list of sewers bnilt in 1899, not ordered by the board 
of mayor and aldermen. 

Table V is a list of sewers relaid, giving he distance removed and the 
distance relaid. 

Table VI is a list of sewers ordered in, but not built up to January 1, 
1900. This table is compiled from the first, second, fourth, and eighth 
columns of Tables II and III. 

Table VII is a list of sewers ordered in up to January 1, 1900, giving 
the distances that are unnecessary to build. , 

Table VIII is a list of sewers bnilt during 1898, pending the passage 
of orders in 1899, giving the distances built and date of order. 

Table VII is not included in Table VI. 

All distances are given in feet. 



128 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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129 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



131 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 






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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



133 



TABLE IV. 

;EWEUS lU ILT IX 180!) WITHOUT AN ORDER. 



Limits. 



■Central street 

Clay street. — 

Hanover street* 

Merrimack street 

School south back street* . 

Walker street 

Wilson street 



Beacon easterly 

Wilson easterly.' 

Chestnut easterly 

East of Beacon easterly 

Turner westerly 

East of Main easterly.. 
Somerville to Clay 



272 
176 



173 
142 



*■ For cesspools. 



TABLE V. 

8EWER8 RELAID IN ISitl). 









§. 


Location. 


Limits. 


§1 


§s 






.2 2 
Q 


■ .2^ 



Amory south back street, 

Douglas street 

Elm east back street 

Oreen south back street. . 
Massabesic street 



McGregor westerly 

West westerly 

Spruce to Ct ntral south back 

Beech westerly 

Jewett westerly 



52 
94 

270 
100 
194 



TABLE VL 
SEAVEKS ORDERED IN. BUT NOT BUILT TO JAN. 1, I'.XM). 



Amherst street 

Amory street 

Auburn street 

Auburn south back street, 
Beacon street 

Beech street 

Belmont street 

Blaine street 

Bremer north back street 

Bridge street 

Cedar south back street . 



Union to Ashland, 

Alsace easterly 

Cypress easterly 

East of Canton easterly . . . 

Hall easterly 

Amherst to Concord 

Bridge southerly . . 

Harvard to Hayward 

Old Bridge to Bridge 

Second to Hiram 

Coolidge avenue w. b. to Rimmon 

Beltnont to Beacon 

Beech westerly 



i 






s 


Date of 


lo 


order. 


Q 






2,600 


'May 


2,1893 


200 


Sept. 


7, 1897 


300 


May 


2, 1899 


90 


Nov. 


•J, 1894 


1^ 


.Ian. 


7, 1896 


71 


Nov. 


10, 1896 


200 


Oct. 


3,1899 


272 




4, 1898 


200 


Jan. 


7,1896 


400 


Dec. 


6, 1892 


89 


Oct. 


4, 1898 


510 




3. 1899 


175 


May 


5, 1896 



134 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE \l.— Co7iliune(l. 
.SEWEJtS OliDKKEI) IN, BUT NOT BUILT TO -JAN. 1. VM»i 




Central street. 



Chestnut street.. 
Columbus street. 
Concord street... 



Cypress street. 
Dover street — 
Elm street 



Essex sti'cet 

Foster avenue 

Frederick street 

Front street 

Grove south back street. 



Hall road 

Hale street 

Hanover street. 
Harrison street . 



Harvell street 

Hayes avenue 

Hayward street 

Hevey east back street. 



.)ones street 

Lake avenue... 
Mammoth road. 



Massabesic street. 



Mil ford street | 

Nelson street 

Orange street 

Pine street 

" east back street — I 

Plummer street ] 

I'rospect street ] 

Himmon east back street., 

lliver road 

Russell street 

.Snganiore street 

Schiller street 

Second street 



.Somerville street 

Spruce street [ 

.Summer south back street 

Sylvester street 

Union street 



TTnion east back street....! 

Vttllev street i 

i 

Wahnit street • 

Walnut east back street...! 

West street 

'Wentwf)rtli street 

William street 



Belmont to Milton 

Milton to Beacon 

Clarke northerly 

Amory southerly 

Pine east back to Union 

Hall easterly 

Young southerly ' 

Clinton northerly ' 

Shasta to Baker i 

Railroad bridge to Elm avenue...! 

Jfoiiroe south back to Clarke 

Trenton to Rowell | 

Amory southerlj' 

Valley to Hayward i 

Second easterly 1 

Eddy to north of hotel I 

East of Union to Beech | 

Wilson easterly | 

Massabesic to Nelson 

Schiller southerly 

East of Alfred to Highland 

Maple to Oak 

Belmont westerly 

Hale to South Main 

Old Falls road to Chase avenue 
Ainsworth avenue to Cj'press.. 

Wayne northerly j 

S. of Amory to Columbus avenue! 

Nelson to Benton I 

Fast of Canton to Hall road ] 

Massabesic to Nelson 

Nelson northerly 

Jewett to Hall road | 

Hall road tn Mammoth road 

Andierst road easterly 

Hall road to Mammoth road 

Belmont westerly 

Silver to Plummer i 

.South of Concord to Concord | 

Pine to Union 

Hall easterly 

Kclley to Mason 

('larkV to I'ark avenue 

South ot i;i()<l°fet to Sagamore... 

Linden \Toterlv 

Hah' to South Main 

North of Frederick to Frederick 

South of Schiller to Harvell 

[I II Ion to Maple. 

East of Canton easterly 

Wilson to Hall 

Mllfoid to Avon 

Clarke to Trenton 

North of I'leseott to Hayward... 

Silv.r to niiiiiiii.T 

South of Chi i^^tiull brook south.. 

Cypress westerly 

Elm to iVilson 

Salmon southerly 

Siiliiion northerly 

Clinton northcrlv 

Sehlller northerly 

Mllfoid to Mast 



242 
311 

750 
128 
l.')2 

86 

4,T() 

160 
1()6 

1,373 
861 
448 
560 
140 
175 

2,800 
302 
200 
601 
450 
134 
.350 
65 
700 
206 
148 
146 
396 
560 

1.166 
5«0 
816 
934 
175 
570 
65 
447 
160 
510 
100 
800 
306 
770 
148 
850 

lis 

160 
512 
110 
512 
646 
1,700 
192 
26 
60 
133 
4,040 
1(16 
88 
226 , 



Nov. 2, 1897 
Sept. C, J 898 
Dec. 6, 1898 
July 26, 1899 
Sept. 12, 1899 
6,1887 



May 
Sept. 
.>Iay 

.lune 
Feb. 

Allg. 

July 14, 



Sept. o! 1893 
1897 



9. 

4. 1894 
6, 1890 
6, 1890 
4, J 895 

4, 1896 

5, 1898 



Nov. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Jan. 



2. 1897 
5,1898 

n, mn 

4, 1897 

3, 1S99 

1, 1896 
9,1894 

2, 189U 
7, 1897 
7, 



■July 10, i89;i 



Aug 
f-ept. 
May 
Aug. 

May 
Dec. 
Aug. 
Feb. 
Oct. 



5, 1898 
. 1898 
, 1899 
1898 
1898 
1899 



6. 

5, 1898 
4, 1896 
3. 1899 
Sept. 12. 1899 
Oct. H. 1M9 



Sept. 

Nov. 
Oct. 
Nov. 

July 
Dec. 
Aug. 
•Ian. 
Oct. 
July 

Sept 



3, 1896 
7, 1897 

2. 1897 

3, 1899 
10, 1S96 
10. 18P6 
2fi, 18J» 

3. 1895 

2. 1898 
7, 1896 

3. 1899 
26, 1899 

2. 1R96 



.-^22 



30,671 



3. 1895 
Aug. fi, 1895 
Jan. 4,1897 
Nov. 7, 189S 
June 29, 1897 
Nov. 10, 1896 
Sept. 4. 1894 
•' 5. 1896 
Oct. 3, 1899 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



135 



TABLE VII. 

SEWERS OHDEHEI) IN IP TO JAX. 1, 1899, NOT lUILT AND NOT 
XECESSAKY. 



Location. 


Limits. 


i 

s 


.Date of 
order. 


Ash east back street 

■Rpprh strppt . 




20 
112 

68 
58 


July 26.1899 
" 11, 1899 


Sagamore southerly 






" 26, 1899 




Bremer southerly . 


Sept. 7, 1897 








258 





TABLE VII L 
SEWERS BUILT IN 1898 PENDING PASSAGE OF ORDER IN 1899. 



Location. 



Date of 
order. 



Beech street j Silver to Somerville 

" •' North of Blodget northerly 

Hayes avenue I Old Falls road to Chase avenue. . 

Old Falls road* Spruce to Haj^es avenue 



Jan. 2,1899 
July 11,189!) 
Jan . 3, 15)99 



Order refused passage by board of mayor and aldermen. 



SUMMAKY. 



Tablell. columns (ordered in to Jan.], 1S99) 29,906 

Table II, columns (built) 1,4S7 

Table II, column G (built in excess of order) 54 

Table II, column 7 (unnecessary) 58 

Table II, column 8 (not built) 28,415 

Table 111, column 3 (ordered in in 1899) 13,919 

Table III, column 5 (built) 4,899 

Table III, column G (built in excess of order) 134 

Table III, column 7 (unnecessary) 998 

Table III, column S (not built) 8.156 

44,013 44,016 

Sewers built in 1899 of those ordered in up to Jan. 1, 1900 (feet) 6,113 

Sewers built in 1899 without ordeJs (feet) 1,318 

Sewers relaid in 1899 (feet) 710 

Total length of sewers laid in 1899 (feet) 8,144 



136 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ABSTRACT EEPOItT OF THE COMMITTEE ON STREETS FOR 
THE YEAR 1899. 

PEKSONNEL OF THE COMllllTEE. 

Alderman from v.'Ui'cl 2, De Lafayette Robinson, chairman. 

Alderman from ward 1, John P. !Mullen. 

Alderman from ward 5, Richard J. Harry. 

Alderman from ward 10, Eug-ene E. Reed. 

Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

The following- tables have been compiled to be nsed in the annual 
report of the Engineer's T)e])artment in lieii of citing- the records of 
4he committee on streets in detail. The tables give all the necessary 
information pertaining to the ijetitions that have been acted upon by 
l^lie committee during- the year 1S99, also highways laid out, highways 
nvidened, and highways discontinued bj^ the board of mayor and alder- 
men during the year. 

Table IX is a list of the ])etitions for new highways that have been 
iicted uj)on by the committee during- the jear. 

Table X is a list of the iietitions for establishing grade that have 
been acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table XI is a list of miscellaneous jjetitions acted upon by the com- 
mittee during the year. 

Table Xll is a list of liigliways that Innc Itecn laid out during the 
year bj" the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Table XIII is a list of highways widened and straightened during 
tlie year by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Table XIV is a list of highways discontinued during tlic year by the 
3)oard of mayor and aldermen. 

Distances are "i\en in feet. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



137 






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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF TUE CITY ENGINEER. 



139 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 143 

Ar.STKACT I^Kl'OKT OF TIIK I?OARD OF EX A:\riNERS OF 
I'LU^fBEKS. 

]n accordance Avilh an act (chapter 55, Laws of 1899) passed by the 
rsew Hampshire state legislature, entitled "An act authorizing the ex- 
juniuatioi*.of plumbers and regulating the practice of plumbing and 
house draining," a board of examiners of plumbers was appointed by 
His Honor Mayor AVilliam C. Clarke of Manchester, N. H., as follows: 
William K. Eobbins of the board of health. Christian L. Wolf, a master 
plumber, and Samuel J. Lord, city engineer. (William K. Robbins, 
jiresidLMil; Samuel J. Lord, clerk.) 

Following is a btatement of the expenditures of the board for the 
\ear 1S99: 

KATE KEr.r.OGG COMPANY. 

1S90. 
Aug. 18. To ptg. 250 master plumbers' certificates. . $6.75 
ptg. 250 joxxrneymen plumbers' certifi- 
cates 5.25 

ptg. 300 master iilumbers' applications 6.75 
ptg. 300 journeymen plumbers' applica- 
tions 5.50 

Oct. 5. ptg. 200 plumbei-s' applications 6.50 

?s'ov. 10. ptg. 250 master ijlumbers' licenses 6.00 

ptg. 250 journeymen plumbers' licenses 4.75 



CARL O. SEAMAN. 



$41.50 



Oct. IS. To plumbing material and tools for board of 

plumbing examiners $2.35 

PIKE & IIEALD COMPANY, 

Oct. 19. To 1 fire pot $5.50 

1 4-inch lead pot .50 

4OV2 pounds lead pipe @ 6%c 2.73 

4 4-inch brass ferrules, E. H., @ 50c 2.00 

13 pounds wiping solder 3.25 

14-16 pound stick solder @ 28c .25 

17 pounds block lead («: 5 V2 .94 

2 gallons gasoline @ 20c .40 

21/2 gallons tar J .75 

5 pounds putty (g/ 4c .20 

6 sheets sandpaper (cL 2c .12 

1 pound sheet lead .08 

4 pieces 4-inch soil pipe St. 12 inches long, 

with hub, @ 32 1.28 



144 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Oct. 10. To 4 ])ieces 1-inch soil pipe 1:.' inc-lics long', 

less liiihs $0.2S 

2 feet 4-iiic'li soil pipe, less hubs, (a 2Sc.. ..JG 

1 pound oaknni .10 

$18.94 

JOllX B. CI.AKKE LOMI'A-W. 

Oct. 24. To '/o expense ptg. GOO rules iind regulations .i^ii.^.i 
i/u expense binding- 100 rules and regula- 
tions, leather 2.7G 

$6.59 

PIKE & IIKALD COMPAXY. 

^'ov. 29. To 1% pounds stick solder @ 2Sc $0.49 

V-i pound brimstone .0.5 

$0.54 

SAMl'EL J. LOKD. 

Dec. 19. To expenses of board of examiners of plumbers to 

• Concord and return, paid by S. J. Lord $2.94 

GEORGE W. -WALES. 

Dec. 20. To express on box to state board of health. . $0.3G 
21. express on box from state board of health .35 

$0.71 

TEMPLE & FARKIXCiTOX. 

Dec. 26. To 1 record book No. 5G4G $9.00 

binding- 2 books @ $1.50 3.00 

4 boxes letter paper @ $1 4.00 

$16.00 

PIKE & IIEALD COMPAXV. 

Dec. 2G. To 19% pounds wiping- solder @ 25c $4.92 

2 pounds fine solder @ 2Sc .56 

4 feet 4-inch lead pipe and 10 feet 114-inch 

lead pipe, 51 pounds C, @ 6%c .3.45 

4 feet 4-ineh soil pipe, less hub, @ 20c. ... .80 

1 pound oakum .10 

2 2-inch Ijrass ferrules (a ;U)c .60 

• $10.43 

$100.00 

■.Sl'iMM.\l!V. 

Ap])ropriated to the board of examiners of ])liiuihers 

for tlie year 1S99 $100.00 

Expenses of the board during- the year 1S99 $100.00 

$100.00 $100.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 145 

Fees received for 100 plumbers' certificates @ $1 (a fee of $1 

per certificate is required by state law) $100.00 

Pees received for 3 plumbers' licenses @ $1 (required by law) . . 3.00 

Paid to the city clerk (the state law requires all fees to be 
paid into the city treasury) $103.00 

Table XV gives the name, address, and number of the application 
of each and every person making application to the board for a 
plumber's certificate. This table also gives the class of certificate 
applied for (master or journeyman), the number of the certificate, date 
of issue, and expiration of said certificate, also the fee paid by the 
applicant. 

Table XVI gives the name, address, and number of the application 
of each and every person making application to the board for a 
plumber's license during the year 1899. This table also gives the class 
of license applied for (master or journeyman), the number of the 
license granted, date of issue, and expiration of said license, also the 
fee paid bj-- the applicant. 

Table XVII is a summary of Tables XV and XVI. 



146 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

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150 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Rules of Procedure adopted by the Board of Examiners 
of Plumbers, Manchester, N. H. 

ARTICLE I. 

Section' 1. The board shall hold their regular meetings upon the 
first Friday of each month, at 7.30 o'clock p. M., at their office in the 
Engineer's Department, City Hall, Manchester, X. 11. 

Sect. 2. The oflficers shall consist; of a president and clerk, elected 
annually at the regular meeting in August. 

Sect. 3. The x^resident shall call all meetings, preside and assume 
the direction of the Board; the clerk shall keeiJ all records. The presi- 
dent may call a meeting of the Board at any time by notifying the 
clerk; the clerk shall then notify the other members of the Board. The 
clerk shall also give notice of the regular meetings. 

ARTICLE IL 

Section 1. Applications for examinations will be received at any 
regular meeting. 

Sect. 2. Applications must be made out in full upon application 
blanks furnished by the Board. Each application must be accom- 
panied by the fee of $1.00 (required hy law) before being received by 
the Board. 

Sect. 3. The examination shall consist of written, oral, and prac- 
tical exercises of such character to fairly test the fitness and qualifica- 
tions of the applicant for the trade, business, or calling of plumbing. 

ARTICLE III. 

Section 1. In the practical examination each applicant will be re- 
quired to make at least three diflforent kinds of wiped joints and calk 
one joint in cast-iron soil pipe. 

Sect. 2. Each wiped joint shall be marked according to the follow- 
ing schedule (the niimber of points as set forth opposite each item 
being the maximum, the minimum being 0): 

points ron wiped joints. 

No. 1. For strength 5 

2. For shape 3 

3. For smoothness inside ])i])e at joint 3 

4. If no solder runs inside ])ipe 3 

5. If a small amount of solder runs in 3 

0. For snu)()fhness ontsiile or uncracked joint 4 

7. For straightening and dressing |)ii)e 1 

8. For tem])ering solder 1 

9. For straight instTting ami ])ici)iniiig eiids of i)ipe 2 

10. For sctliiig tip W(irl< 1 

Total 25 



REPORT OF TUE CITY ENGINEER. 151 

If a hole is burnt in pipe, deduct Xos, 1, 2, 3, 4, and r>. If much 
solder runs in, deduct Xos. 4 and 5. 

Each calked joint shall be marked according to the following 
schedule (the number of points as set forth opposite each item being 
the maximum, the minimum being 0): 

I'OINTS rOU CALKED JOINTS, HORIZONTAL. 

No. 1. For rolling oakum, and tamping even thickness 3 

2. For calking lead withoiit cracking hub 2 

3. For running molten lead with one pour 3 

4. For waiting for lead to cool 1 

".. For trimming off surplus lead 1 

0. For calking lead home 3 

7. If no oakum shows inside pipe, or no lead runs in 5 

8. If calked joint stands the water test 5 

9. If joint is full and even all Avay round 2 

10. If lead is calked without being all hacked up 1 

Total 25 

If the hub is cracked by calking the lead or oakum improperly, 
deduct Nos. 2, 6, 8, and 9. 

The total number of points for all joints shall be added, multiplied 
by four, and divided by the number of joints made. This result shall 
be the standing or per cent obtained in the practical examination on 
the basis of 100 per cent for a perfect examination. 

Sect. 3. The written examination shall consist of at least twenty 
questions for an applicant for a journeyman plumber's license, and at 
least thirty questions for an applicant for a master plumber's license. 
The written examination shall be marked 100 i^er cent for a perfect 
paper, each question having equal weight. 

Sect. 4. The oral examination shall consist of questions asked by 
the members of the Board, and the inspection of such charts i^ertaining 
to plumbing sj-stems as the Board may submit. The applicant shall be 
marked 100 per cent, for a perfect oral examination. 

Sect. 5. The applicant (if for a journeyman plumber's license) shall 
not fall below 70 per cent in the practical examination, 40 per cent in 
the written examination, and ;jO per cent in the oral examination. 

Sect. G. The applicant (if for a master plumber's license) shall 
not fall below 70 per cent in the practical examination, 70 per cent in 
the written examination, and 70 per cent in the oral examination. 

Sect. 7. The standing or per cent obtained in the practical, writ- 
ten, and oral examinations shall in all cases be added together and 
divided by three, this result being credited as the standing obtained by 
the applicant. 

Sect. 8. The standing of each and every applicant shall be at least 
70 per cent; otherwise the api)licant shall be refused a license and his 
fee of $1.00 returned to him. 



152 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Sect. 0. Falsehood or t'laiid iu the application or examination shall 
be cause for dismissal of the application and refusal of a license. 

Sect. 10. When an applicant fails to pass the requisite examination 
he shall not be entitled to undergo another examination for a period 
of one year. 

Sect. 11. The names and standing- of all persons examined shall be 
formally entered upon the records of the Board. 



To His Honor the Maj'-or, the Board of Aldermen, the gentlemen of 
the Common Council, and the various committees ^vith whom it has 
been my pleasure to corne in contact, I wish to express my appreciation 
of the valued assistance and support you have rendered me during 
the year. 

My acknowledgments are due to the gentlemen of the Street and Park 
Commission, for their courtesj% consideration, and co-operation in 
matters in which we were mutually concerned. 

SAMUEL J. LORD, 

City Engineer. 



EEPOKT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIEE DEPAETMENT. 



REPORT OF FIRE ENGINEER. 



Chief Exgineeb's Office, 
Central Station, No. 8 Vine Street. 

Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1890. 

To His Honor, William C. Clarice, Mayor, and Gentlemen of tlie City 

Council: j 

In compliance with the Laws and Ordinances of the city of Man- 
chester, I herewith submit my twenty-first annual report, it being the 
fiftj'^-fourth of this city, for the year ending December 31, 1899. 

During the year just closed we had one hundred ninety (190) alarms, 
consisting of seventy-four (74) bell alarms and one hundred sixteen 
(116) still alarms. There were four "second alarms," each of which is 
reckoned as an alarm in the foregoing list, and one was an "out of 
town" call for a brush fire in Amoskeag, on the Goffstown road. 

One of the second alarms, box 217, January 2, was needless and pulled 
by a person not connected with the department; one from box 4, 
July 6, when the tenement district of Spruce street and Lake avenue 
was threatened with a conflagration; one from box 21, October 30, for 
wood yard and tenement blocks at No. 168 Lake avenue; the fourth 
from box 21 for fire in tenement block at the corner of Pine and Cen- 
tral streets. 

Notwithstanding the number of alarms has been greater than last 
year and the amount of property endangered larger, the net losses are 
only $7,912.09 over and above the insurance paid. 

The following is a summary of the value of property endangered 
where the department has been called (not including value where 
merely chimney fires have occurred), amount of insurance carried, 
amount paid, and net losses: 

Value of buildings $503,850.00 

Value of contents 179,208.00 

$083,058.00 

Insurance on buildings $324,250.00 

Insurance on contents 105,450.00 

$429,700.00 

155 



156 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Damage to buildings $29,075.07 

Damage to contents 30,255.88 

$59,330.95 

Insurance paid on buildings $27,218.55 

Insurance jiaid on contents 24,200.31 

51,418.86 

Net loss uncovered by insurance $7,912.09 

TUE MAI^UAL FOKCE 

Of the department remains unchanged from last year and consists of 
one hundred sixty (160) members, including one hundred twentj'-seven 
(127) call and thirty-three (33) permanent men, and is divided as 
follows: 

Per- 
Call. manent. 

1 chief engineer 1 

4 assistant engineers 4 

Engine Company No. 1 11 3 

Engine Company No. 2 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 15 5 

Engine Company No. 4 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 10 4 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 16 4 

Hose Company No. 1 • 11 1 

Hose Company No. 2 11 1 

Hose Company No. 3 6 2 

Aerial Truck No. 1 12 3 

Chemical No. 1 3 2 

Spare driver 1 • 

127 33 
THE BUILDINGS 

Are in fair I'epair. The repairs during the year have been promptly 
made by the committee on lands and buildings, and to such an extent 
as the appropriations would allow, although none of the additions 
recommended for the past two years for box stalls at Engine and Ladder 
Nos. 5 and 0, nor storage shed for Hose No. 3 have received any atten- 
tion, simply for "lack of funds." 

THE APPARATUS 

Of the department consists of 2 first si/.o, 3 second size, and 1 third 
size Amoskeag engines, 4 ho.se carriages with reels, 5 hose wagons (one 
of which has ladders attached), 4 hook and ladder trucks, 1 of which 
is an eighty-fivc-foot aerial truck carrying other ladders, 2 hose car- 
riages in outlying districts, with independent companies attached, 2 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 157 

hose carriages without companies, 1 supply wag-on, 7 exercise wagons, 
located as follows: 

2 first size steam fire-engines, with three-horse hitch, at Central sta- 
tion, each with one-horse hose wagon. 

1 second size steam fire-engine, three-horse hitch, with 1 two-horse 
hose wagon. North Main street. 

1 second size steam fire-engine and 1 two-horse hose wagon, at cor- 
ner Lake avenue and Massabesic street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 third size steam fire-engine and one-horse hose carriage, at corner 
of Webster and Chestnut streets. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 second size steam fire-engine and one-horse hose carriage on Rim- 
mon street, corner of Amory street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 one-horse hose carriage, corner Maple and East High streets. 

1 two-horse combination hose wagon. So. Elm street. (Bakersville.) 

1 aerial hook-and-ladder truck at Central station (three-horse hitch). 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) chemical engine at Central station. 

1 supply wagon at Central fire station. 

1 steam fire-engine (reserve) at station of Engine No. 2 (of but little 
use for fire purposes). 

1 four-wheeled hand hose carriage (vcith shafts) at junction of Old 
Falls road and Front street, Amoskeag. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, Devonshire Mills, GofPe's Falls. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage in basement of stable of W. P. Farmer 
at junction of Candia road and Hanover street. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, junction Mammoth road and Massa- 
besic street (Hallsville). 

7 exercise Avagons, 1 at Central fire station, 1 at Engine No. 2, 1 at 
Engine and Ladder No. 3, 1 at Engine and Ladder No. 5, 1 at Engine 
and Ladder No. 6, 1 at Hose No. 2, 1 at Hose No. 3, 1 repair wagon for 
fire alarm telegraph. 

Engine No. 6, that was undergoing repairs at the time of my last 
report, has been supplied with a new boiler, new and improved compo- 
sition pumps, and is really in better working condition than ever before. 

Engine No. 1 has undergone some repairs which will probably 
lengthen its time of service before more extensive repairs will be 
required. 

FIEE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

The storage battery has proved a success as Avell as an economical 
investment. Its current is strong and steady and can be easily con- 
trolled at the switch-board. 

A portion of the mechanical work of the Myrtle-street tower striker 
has been replaced with modern appliances, insuring more accuracy 
in its working. 



158 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

On the 20th of July, box 241 was connected in No. circuit, on Lake 
avenue hill, near Canton street. 

We have run about 3 miles of new wire, set 13 new poles, changed 
wire in many places to new telephone and electric light jioles, put up 
lOo cross-arms, 30 extension arms. We have about 40 miles of main 
line and 38 miles of "Tapper" line wire. 

THE HORSES. 

Thirtj'-nine (39) horses are required for active service on the appara- 
tus, with one "spare," whose services ai"e required most of the time in 
place of horses disabled, and several times during the year other horses 
had to be hired for the same purpose. 

,We now have several horses unfitted for fire duty by long and con- 
tinued service, and several should be rcj^laced by sound and younger 
ones. 

CASUALTIES. 

No fatal accidents have occurred to members of this department, 
but two citizens have lost their lives from burns received. April G, 
.Mr. John C. McKeon was so severely burned at a fire in his house that 
he died early the following morning. November 15, Mr. John Morrison, 
a boarder at No. 144 Central street, died from effects of burns and suffo- 
cation the afternoon of the same day. 

At an alarm from box 25, on IMarch 3, for a fire in a house owned bj' 
the heirs of Horace Stearns, a hot-air explosion occurred, hurling sev- 
ei'al firemen out through the doors and windows, but fortunately no 
one was seriously injured. 

March 14, at an alarm from box 17, for a fire in the barn of Michael 
Connor, 500 Beech street. Fireman Herbert E. ]3unbar of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 3 was thrown from the truck, receiving injuries 
restraining him from work three weeks. 

July 4, at an alai'm from box 52, for a fire in tenement house Nos. 
22 and 24 Dover street, Henry C. Morrill, engineer of Steamer No. 2, 
fractured the bones of one leg, confining him to the house several 
weeks. 

In the forenoon of the same day, at an alarm from box 10, for fire in 
tenement house No. 413 Pine s'treet, Will G. Eraser, fireman of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 5, fell from the roof of building to the 
ground, receiving a general shaking \ip but no serious injuries, re- 
straining him from work three weeks. 

I'lREME^'S RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

Through the liberality of citizens, the amount iu the treasury has 
exceeded the drafts made upon it for the jjayment of benefits to 
members for injuries received while on dutj' at fires. 

The financial condition is as follows: 



REPORT OF TUE FIRE ENGINEER. 159 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand annual meeting, Februarj^ 14, 1899 $1,025.13 

Ii'eceived froni dividends on deposits $140.35 

Ivcceived from new members 4.00 

Donation^ 

E. M. Slay ton 50.00 

Mead, Mason & Companj' 25.00 

Josiah Carpenter, for Second National Bank.. 25.00 

William H. Hard 25.00 

Br. A. B. StorN^ heirs (two donations of $10) . . . 20.00 

Chandler Brothers (George B. and Henrj-) 10.00 

Steamer Company No. 5 10.00 

Jeremiah Ilodge 10.00 

Clarence E. Merrill 10.00 

Manchester Heating & Lighting Company 10.00 

J. B. Varick Company 10.00 

Edward L. Kimball 10.00 

James W. Hill Company' 10.00 

Seaver & Sheehan 5.00 

374.35 

$4,399.48 
Expenditures. 

Baid J. E. Merrill, secretarj-'s salary' one J'ear.... $25.00 

postal cards and printing 2.10 

benefit Herbert E. Dunbar 24.00 

James C. Newton 5.50 

Capt. E. A. Sears 16.00 

Will G. Eraser 21.00 

Henry C. Morrill 97.00 

$190.60 

Balance in treasury $4,208.88 

The association is under obligations to Dr. Daniel S. Adams for ser- 
vices rendei-ed at different times to members receiving injuries while 
in the discharge of their duties. 

CONCLUSION. 

In closing this report I desire to sincerely thank His Honor, Mayor 
Clarke, for the interest he has ever maintained and his endeavors to 
assist in keeping the department to a high standard of efficiency, as 
well as to such members of the city councils as have manifested their 
interest in its welfare; to the police department for their co-operation 
in protecting property from loss at fires; to the assistant engineers 
and other officers and men of the department, who by their prompt- 
ness and zeal have served the citv faithfully and well. 



160 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The needs of the department, as referred to in mj^ two previous 
reports, are well understood, and as they have received so little atten- 
tion a repetition at this time is unnecessary. 

Eespectfullj^ submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 
CJdef Engineer Fire Department. 



Number and Location of Fire Alarm Boxes and Keys. 

A KEY IS ATTACHED TO EACH BOX, and can be had by breaking the 
glass. 

No. 3. Blood's lower shop. Keys at offices of gas-works, county jail, 
Manchester Coal & Ice Company's sheds, and Charles 11. Hutchinson's 
shop. 

No. 4. Corner Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel Oxford, L, B. 
Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, street railwaj^ stables, and office 
of Blodgett & Young's block. 

No. 5, Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at Tebbetts & 
Soule's and Hanscom's drugstores, Manchester House, and J. W. Hill 
Company's store. 

No. 6. City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Thui'ston's drugstores, J. 
A. Eiddle's office, and residence of .7. L. Brock, 21 Amoskeag Corpo- 
ration. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of ^Manchester and Chestnut streets. 
Keys at chief of police's office and with all police officers. 

No. 8. Corner of Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Dante Smith's and 
Gadbois's drugstores, and Partridge Brothers' grain store. 

No. 9. Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at residences of 
Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, Dr. E. Fritz, and station of 
Engine No. 5. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at residences of 
John Mooar, George Emerson, Walter A. Green, and O. D. Knox. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at residences 
of Welcome Jencks and Mrs. Lewis Simons, No. 1 Senter's block, and 
Hartshorn's grocery store. 

No. 14. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys at residences 
of Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. (jeorge W. Piddle, D. J. .\dams, A. H. Olzen- 
dam, and Mrs. Thomas Morgan. 

No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut .streets. Keys at residences 
of Henry W. Shannon and J. Fred Chalker. 

No. IG. Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at residences of 
Pt. Rev. Bishop liradley and P. P. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys at residences 
of Miss Mary A. Watts and IMichael Connor. 

No. 18. Corner of [Manchester and Maple streets. Keys at residences 
of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and William Perkins's estate. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 161 

No. 21. Corner ol' Mcnimiick and ]'ine streets. Keys at A. D. 
Smitli's drug-store, J. MeJveoii's grocery store, A. L. Walker's office, 
and residence of James F. CJillis. 

No. :2.!. Corner of Central and lieech streets. Keys at residences of 
Kben 'V. .lanies and Mrs. .losiah Stevens. 

No. 24. J^ngine and i^adder Conijiany No. 15 house, corner of iSIassa- 
besic street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of 1). M. Goodwin and 
station of Engine and Ladder No. :>. 

No. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at residences 
of George F. Lincoln, A. 13. Gooden, the late Horace Stearns, the late 
Horace Gordon, and James ]{. Straw. 

No. 2(i. Corner of ]?ridg-e and Ivussell streets. Ke\s at McCrillis's 
carriag-e shop. 

No. 27. Corner of IJeiniont and Anilierst streets. Kejs at residences 
of H. y\. TarlielL E. S. Fletcher, William Carr, and Mrs. George H. 
Hubbard. 

iSo. 2S. Corner of ^ferrimack and ]5eacon streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of A. L. Gannon and the late A. G. Fairbanks. 

No. ;>1. Corner of Canal and Hollis streets. Blood's shop. Keys at 
office, Amory Mills, Langdon ISlills watehrooms. 

No. 32. Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and Brook streets. 
Keys at the Amoskeag' Paper Company's mill, LaJigdon watchroom, 
and Electric Light Station. 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Keys at watchroom and pumping- station. 

No. 35. Stark !Mills. Kejs at watchroom. 

No. 36. Amory ^Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 39. Hillsborough county jail. Keys at office. 

No. 41. Amoskeag- ^Mills. Kejs at watchroom. 

No. 42. Manchester ;Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 43. Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 45. The S. C. Forsaith Company's shops. Keys at freight depot 
and S. C. Forsaith Company's office. 

No. 51. Corner of Walker and Second streets. Kej's at stores of 
F. Tliedel and Henrj' Weber. 

No. 52. Barr's brick block, AYest INfanchester. Kej's at Fradd & 
Co.'s and A. N. Clapi)'s stores, Merrimack House, and Engine No. 3 
house. 

No. y.>. Wallace's steam mill. Keys at Wallace's office, I. K. Dewey's 
tenement block, and Ranno's harness store. 

No. 54. Corner of A and South 'Slain .streets. Keys at residences of 
Lord sisters, Neil Fullerton, and George W. Davis's store. 

No. 5C. Baldwin's bobbin shop. Keys at Baldwin's office and resi- 
dences of J. C. Smith, E. P. Littlefield, and with watchman at works. 

No. 57. Corner Mast road and D street. Keys at residences of Allen 
E. Eaton and C. H. George, and F. W. Towle's store. 

No. 61. Corner of River road and Hancock street, Bakersville. Keys 
at True W. Jones Company's brewery, store of John A. Kane, and 
Hose 3. 
11 



162 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 62. Gerrish Wool & Leathei* Company's, Kiver road. Keys at 
tannery, the Edwin Kennedy house, and Hose 3. 

No. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at residences of T. 
Collins, Daniel Sheehan, Thomas J. Smith, Simon McCarthy', and J. J. 
Twomey. 

No. 72. Corner of Lake avenue and Lincoln street. Kej-s at resi- 
dences of the late Austin Jenkins, James Briggs, and Clarence D. 
Palmer. 

No. 73. Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Kej's at residences of 
IJev. J. A. Chevalier and Timothj^ Carr. 

No. 81. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at all the engine 
rooms. 

No. 82. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Church streets. Keys at 
Lowell-street stable and Eames Bros.' drugstore. 

No. 91. Corner Webster and Beech streets. Keys at Children's 
Home and R. N. Foster's residence. 

No. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. Keys at residences 
of W. T. Stevens, W. A. Clarkson, M. D. Johnson, Charles F. Chase, and 
William H. Drury. 

No. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys at residences of 
Mrs. William B. Abbott, W. N. Johnson, and E. :M. ToplifP. 

No. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at residences of Mrs. 
A. P. Olzendam, G. A. Olzendam, W. S. Shannon, and John J. Bennett. 

No. 115. Corner of Gore and Ash streets. Kej's at residences of 
James A. Rogers and Cyren Bixby. 

No. 212. Shoeshop, Hallsville. Ke3S at the office of the shoe factory 
and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn, Mrs. Milton A. 
Abbott, M. V. B. Garland, and Walter Cody's block. 

No. 213. Sash and blind factory, South Beech street, junction of 
Portsmouth Railroad. Keys at offices of Manchester Sash t'Cr Blind Com- 
pany and Dana & Provost. 

No. 214. Elliott silk mill, corner of Wilson and Valley streets. Keys 
at office and watchroom of mill. 

No. 215. Hoyt & Co.'s shoeshop', corner of Lincoln and Silver streets. 
Keys at offices of shoeshop and Kimball Carriage Company and boai'd- 
ing-house opposite. 

No. 21(>. Jewett and Somciv ille sti-eets. Keys at residences of G. H. 
Hill, 140 Jewett street, and W. !'.. Brown, 128 Jewett street. 

No. 217. Corner Candia road and Massabesic street. Kejs at resi- 
dences of L. M. Streeter, William Gadbois, and Charles P. Still. 

No. 241. Lake avtiiuo hill. Keys at resiliences of G. L. Drake and 
Cliarles Davis. 

No. 2G1. Pearl-street graniiuar .school. Kt'vs at schoolroom anil 
residences of ('. 10. Rose, S. W. Basconi, and Charles W. Cheney, Jr. 

i\o. 312. Coniir of I'utnani, Main, and McOregor streets. Keys at 
residences of .lauiis Spcnce (30'.t Main street), Thomas Bolton, and gate 
No. 11 mill. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 163 

Xo. ?>1?.. Corner Amory and Main streets. Keys at residences of 
Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Potvin & Co.'s drugstore, Miville 
& Co.'s drugstore, gate of No, 11 mill, and station of Engine and Lad- 
der No. G. 

No. 314. P. C. Chenej' Company's paper mill. Keys at office and 
Riverside Hose house. 

No. 315. Old Brick store, 'Skeag. Keys at Greer's store, Kiverside 
Hose house and D. L. Robinson's residence. 

No. 321. Corner Beauport and Wayne streets. Keys at Holy Angels 
Convent, the Brothers' School, and residences of E. H. Doherty and 
Rev. Father Hevey. 

No. 323. Corner of Putnam and Bartlett streets. Keys at Albert 
Oliver's store, P. J. Archambeault's bakery, and residence of Officer 
Lewis Clement. 

No. 324. Amory and Laval streets. Key at residence of Desire Mar- 
tin, No. 494 Amory street. 

No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at residences 
of Amelia Davis, William A. Tufts, and James Kearns. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Keys at residences 
of J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Elizabeth Ward. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular police. 

The true time will be given at precisely 12.30 p. M. from Charles A. 
Trefethen's jewelry store, and will be denoted bj' one stroke of the fire 
bells. 



Telephone Calls. 

Chemical Engine, Central Station 64 — 3 

Engine No. 2 64 — 2 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 64 — 5 

Engine and Ladder No. 5 64^-0 

Engine and Ladder No. 6 64 — 7 

Hose No. 2 116 — i 

Hose No. 3 102—4 

Chief Engineer Lane's office 64 — 3 

Chief Engineer Lane's house 64 — 4 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's house 377 — 2 

Assistant Engineer Whitney's office 263 

Assistant Engineer Merrill's office 212 — 3 

Assistant Engineer Frisselle's house 175 — 2 

Two long rings, twice, all take down telephones. 



Instructions to Keyholders and Citizens. 

1. L'pon the discovery of a fire, notice should be immediately com- 
municated to the nearest alarm box, the kev of which is in a circular 



164 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

box attached to the rifi^ht side of the fire-alarm box. Keys are also 
in the hands of all regular police, and generally of persons at the cor- 
ner or nearest house. 

2. Key-holders, uix)n the discovery of a fire, or positive information 
of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook once as far as it will 
go (without jerking), and then let go. Shut the door, but do vot try 
to remove the kej% as it is locked in by a trap lock, and can only be 
removed with a release kej', which Is carried by each of the engineers, 
and thej' will, as soon as convenient, release and return it. 

3. All persons giving- fire alarms are requested to remain by the 
box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull again; if you 
still hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box and give an alarm 
from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never touch the box 
except to give an alarm of fire. Give an alarm for no cause other than 
actual fire. Don't give an alabh for a chimney fire. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your jiossession unless called for by 
the chief engineer. If you change your residience or place of business, 
where the keys arc Icept, return the keys to the same office. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to inform them- 
selves of the location of alarm boxes near their property; also all 
l)laces where the kej's are kept. 15e sure the alarm is promptly and 
])roperl3^ given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded, upon all the fire-bells in the citj% and 
the number of the box will be given thus: Box 6, six blows, 21/3 seconds 
ajiart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, pause of GVi seconds, 
one blow, same pause, and two blows, 2 — 1 — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the bells at 
any time; and in case of testing the boxes, each test will be preceded 
by one stroke of the bells. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



165 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON 
FIRST, SECOND, AND THIRD ALAIJMS. 



First alarm. 



62. 

71. 

72. 

73. 

SI. 

82. 

91. 
112. 
113. 
114. 
115. 
312. 
213. 
214. 
215. 
216. 
217. 
241. 
261. 
312. 
313. 
314. 
315. 
321. 
323. 
3-24. 
511. 
513. 



1st R. 3 

1st R. 3-3 

1st R. 2-3 

1st & 2d R. 

IstR. 3 

1st & 2d R. 5 

1st R. 5 

5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st & 2d R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

IstR. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

3 

1st R. 6 

1st R. 5 

1st & 2d R. 5-6 

1st & 2d R. 5-6 

1st & 2d R. 5-6 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2d R. 2-3 

1st & 2d R. 2-3 

1st R. 2-3 

1st & 2d R. 2-3 

2-6 

2-6 



1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2d R. 

1st & 2d R. 5 

1st R. 5 

IstR. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 3 

Ist R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

lslR.3 

Ist R. 3 

3-6 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 2-6 

1st R. 2-6 

5-6 

5-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 



SECOND 


ALARM. 








« 




ss 


























63 


K 


as 



Third Alarm. 




5-6 

5-6- 

5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2-3-6 

2d R. 2-3-6 

2d R. 2-3-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

2d R. 2-6-6 

2-3 

2-3 



5 

6 

2d R. 5 

2d R. 5 

2d R. 5 

2d R. 3-5 

2dR.5 



5-6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

3-6 
3-6 
3-6 
3-6 
6 
6 

3-6 
5-6 
6 > 
5-6 
6-6 
5-6 
1-6 
5-6 
1-5-6 



2-3 1-3-5 

2 I 1-5 



1st & 2d R. 3-5 2-3 1-3-6 



5-6 




2 


1-5-6 


5-6 




2 


1-5-6 


2-5-6 






5-6 


2-5-6 






5-6 


2-5-6 






5-6 


2-6 






6 


3 








2-3-6 




3-R 


2-3-6 






3-6 


2-3-6 






•?-6 


2-6 






1-6 


2-3-6 






3-6 


2-5-6 






iv« 


2-5-6 






(i-5 


2-5-6 






5-6 


2-5-6 






5-6 


2-5-6 






5-(i 


2-5-6 






5-6 


2d R. 


2-5-6 




6-6 


2-6 






3-6 


3 , 






3-5 


3 






s-n 


2d R. 


z 


n 


1-3 


2dR. 


2-3 


1-3 


2d R. 


3 


2-3 


3-5 


2dR. 


3 


2-3 


1-3-5 


2dR. 


3 


3-2 


1-3 


2d R. 


S-5 


2-3 


1-6 


2dR. 


3-6 


2-3 


1-3-5 



166 . ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Rules and Regulations in regard to responding to Fires 
and Alarms, etc. 

The following- rules have been adopted by the boai'd of engineers, 
and the fire department -will strictly comply until otherwise ordered, 
and will attend alarms of fire as per "official runniis-q card." 

EUNXI>'G RULES. 

Whenever an alarm is sounded, the members of all companies not 
called to that box will report to their resjiective company quarters, 
and tJiere remain until dismissed by the signal on the bells or by an 
engineer in charge. 

Tn case companies on their first run have responded to an alai'm, 
companies on their second run to the box from which the alarm has 
been sounded will answer all first-run boxes of the absent companies; 
and in case engines are out that would respond to another box, then 
third alarm companies will resjwnd. In case of an alarm from a box 
that does not call for a third alarm, companies on their second run 
will then answer to all other boxes. 

Whenever two trucks answer to first alarm the other truck will 
answer to all other boxes. 

At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, hose carriage, 
or truck that leaves the house first will have the right to lead to the 
fire. Whenever a horse lags or gives out, drivers should theii give 
others the right of way, so as not to delay the rest of the apparatus. 

No RUNNING BY WILL BE ALLOWED, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDER 
PENALTY OK DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

The drivers shall not ]3ermit persons not connected with the depart- 
ment to ride upon their apparatus, and in muddy weather or heavy 
wheeling- they shall not permit any one to ride upon their apparatus 
when returning- from fires. 

Drivers will take the following x'outes in responding to alarms on 
the West Side: For crossing Amoskeag bridge, take Elm street to 
Salmon, down Salmon street and across the bridge. For crossing Mc- 
(Jregor bridge take Elm street to Bridge street, down Bridge street and 
across the bridge. For crossing (Iranite bridge take Elm street to 
Granite, down Granite and across the bridge. 

Use gongs freely to clear the streets and when nearing crossings. 

Engineers of steamers will not run over eighty (SO) pounds of water 
pressure, except when orders are received from a nu-mher of the board 
of engineers or of the oflicer in comnumd of the (-ompany. 

Captains, or conimanding oHiccrs, upon return from alarms will 
report to headquarters imiin(li:it(l,v. ix-isonally or liy tcU-plioiu-. after 
apparatus is "made ui)";i ml icatly for duty. 

IMIUI) AI AltM. 

On TIIIUI) afaum all :ii)i)iiratus will respond. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 167 



GENERAL ALAllM. 

In the event of a fire of such magnitude that second aud third alarms 
are needed, a general alarm will be given by striking ten blows, in 
which case all comi^anies will respond. 

SPECIAL CALLS OX ElBE ALARM. 

When more apparatus is wanted without giving a second or third 
alarm, the following special calls will be given: 

2 — 1 for Engine 1. 1 — 1 — 1 for Aerial Truck. 

2 — 2 for Engine 2. 3 — 3 for Truck 3. 

2—3 for Engine 3. 3—5 for Truck 5. 

2—4 for Engine 4. 3—6 for Truck (3. 

2 — 5 for Engine 5. 4 — 1 for Hose 1. 

2—6 for Engine 6. 4 — 2 for Hose 2. 
4 — 3 for Hose 3. 

Companies answering "si^ecial calls" will wait thirty seconds before 
leaving quarters, to prevent mistakes. 

OUT OF TOWX CALL. 

For a fire out of the citj' 2 — 2 — 2, in which, ease all companies will 
assemble at their respective quarters and await orders. 

ALL OUT SIGNAL. 

Two blows on the bells, which dismisses all members at company 
quarters. 

This signal will be given after companies working at a fire have re- 
turned to quarters, "made up," and are ready to resjiond xo another 
alarm. 

TEST SIGNAL. 

One blow at 12.30 noon. 

SCHOOL SIGNALS. 

1 — 1, with fifteen seconds between blows, closes primary and middle 
schools. 

2 — 2, with fifteen seconds between the 2's, closes all the schools. 
Time for giving same, 7.30 A. IL, 11.30 A. M., or 1.15 p. M. 

MILITARY CALL. 

12 blows twice. 



Rules for Exercising Horses. 

It shall be the duty of the drivers of engines, hose carriages, hose 
wagons, hook-and-ladder trucks, and all other apparatus connected 



168 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

with this department, to exercise the horses ever}- daj', weather per- 
mitting, except Sundaj', with the exception of engines having "first" 
and "second runs," and in such cases must exercise on days of "second 
run," the same to be done within the following limits: 

CENTRAL STATIOX. 

North to Pearl street. East to Union street. 

South to Merrimack street. West to Chestnut street. 

XORTH MAIX-STREET STATIOX. 

North to Adams street. East to Main street. 

South to Granite street. West to Dubuque street. 

LAKE AVEXXJE STATIOX. 

North to Manchester street. East-to Belmont street. 

South to Summer street. West to Maple street. 

MAPLE-STREET STATION. 

North to Myrtle street. West to Union street. 

South to Hanover street. East to Linden street. 

WEBSTER-STREET STATIOX. 

North to Clarke street. East to I'nion street. 

South to I'ennacook street. West to Elm street. 

RIMMOX-STREET STATIOX (MCGREOORVILLE). 

North to Kelly slroot. East to I'.eauport street. 

South to AVayne street. AVest to irmimoii street. 

IIAKKRSVILT.K ST.\T1()X. 

North to bridiie. over r.oston A- .Maine IJailroa.l. Soutli to I'.aker street. 
East to CaU'f road. West to i'.rowii avenue. 

Drivers must eoiiMne tlienisehes to the above, iind in no ease take 
their horses beyond the prescribed limits, exeejit tor sl\oeing and in 
case of tire, without ]>erniission Irom tlie eliiel' or ;in assistant engineer. 

In exercising, care must be t:iken to avoid i-olli(bny with otiier teams. 
In a])])roaehing corners, crossings, street ear tracks, and in going down 
grades the speed of the horses must In- <-lieeked. 

In ca.se of an alarm use gong freely while n>tiirning to quarters. 

Any driver violating tiu-.se rules will be liable tt) suspension or dis- 
charge. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 169 



Stations and Sleeping Rooms. 

All stations of this depiirtinent will l)c open from 7 A. M. nntil 9 P. M., 
and tlie members at the several stations will receive visitors and citi- 
zens eourteonsly, answer all questions in ii ••entlenianly maimer, and 
give any proper information. 

Xo ])oiitical or j-elipions disenssions ^vill be allowed in any of the 
liouses of this department or by the ofHet>rs or men when on duty. 

Xo permanent member of the department shall attend a caucus or 
jjolitieal convention as a delegate, distribute tickets at any election, 
or take any part whatever in iiolitieal matters other than to exercise 
his right of suffrage. 

Gambling of any kind shall not be done or permitted in or about anj' 
of the houses or premises occupied by the department. 

Stations to be closed at 10 o'clock p. m. 

All games must cease at 10 o'clock P. M., and the stations be closed at 
that hour, to pei-mit the permanent men, and those detailed to sleep 
in the station, to retire undisturbed. 

Xone of the stations will be o^jen after the above hour (except in 
case of an alai-m of fire) without permission of the chief or a member 
of the board of engineers, although stations may be kept open on 
.Saturday evenings until 11 o'clock. 

X"o spirituous or malt liquors shall be allowed in or about anj^ of the 
tire stations, and any member of the fire department seen intoxicated 
at any tire or alarm of fire, or who shall be known to frequent places 
where liquors are sold, during the progress of a fire, or whenever in 
uniform, shall be subject to reprimand, or dismissal, as the board of 
engineers may determine. 

Any iiermanent member visiting any liquor saloon in uniform, ex- 
cept in the performance of his duty as a member of the tire depart- 
ment, or who is intoxicated or visits places where intoxicating liquors 
are sold, while on dut^', shall be suspended or discharged, as the board 
of engineers maj' determine. 

Any violation of these rules will subject the otfender to reprimand 
or dismissal, and commanding officei's of companies having knowledge 
of the violation of the foregoing rules will suspend the offender, and 
report the same to the chief or board of engineers. 

The i)ermanent men shall exercise a careful supervision over the 
sleeping apartments, see that the rooms are put in order and the beds 
made as early as 11 o'clock a. m., and that the bedding is changed at 
suitable intervals. The occuj)ants of each bed will be held responsible 
for the cleanliness of the same, and held strictly accountable for any 
damage to either bed or bed clothing through carelessness. After 10 
]•. M. occupants shall refrain from loud talking or in any manner dis- 
turbing the rest of any who have retired. 

Any member of the department not com|)lying with the above rules 
-hall be liable to suspension or expulsion from the department. 



170 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Absent from City or Station. 

No per-juaneiit member shall leave bis station to visit any section of 
the city without pei'uiission of the ohief or an assistant engineer, or 
leave the city, or be granted leave of absence, without notifying the 
chief engineer and ^jrocnring a substitute to his acceptance, and the 
substitute shall be on duty before the applicant leaves his post, e-^cept 
on his regular "day off." 

A)tii call mcmhcr expectiiifj to he absent fro)u the city shall notify the cap- 
tain of Itis company, and before leavinfi the city shall procnre a snbstitute 
satisfactory to said captain. 

DAYS OFF. 



^5 



Hall 

Harvey 

Barker 

Parsons* 

Goukl 

Cann 

Howe 

Dyer 

Denyou 

Pliersoii .... 

Porter 

Rioliardaon. 
Walker .... 

Piper 

Wheeler .... 
McLeocI 



Engine 1. 
" 1. 
" 1. 
Hose 1. 
Engine 4. 
4. 
4. 
Truck 1. 
" 1. 
" 1. 
Chcnucal 3. 
1. 
Engine I'c LaiUler :5. 
'• 3. 



Porter 


Engine & 


Seaward 


Hose 2. 


Morse 


Engine & 


Smith 


" 


Cann 


„ 


Hubbell 




Morrill 


Engine 2. 


T anp 


I. .> 


Whitcomb. . . 


""■ 


Edgar 


Engine & 


Foster 


" 


Jenne 


'• 


Crosby* 


" 


Rogers* 


Hose 3. 


Sloan* 


•' 3. 



Ladder 5. 

" 5. 

5. 



♦In February Crosby will take the 16th, and Rogers tho 2(Uh; in .Inly Parsons 
will take tlie 14th; and in Kclirnary, .\prll, June, September, and November, Sloan 
Will take the 27th. 

The lioiir of leaving will be 7 o'clock .\. M., and mcnilicrs will not 
leave their station nnlil tiic arrival of llie spare tlii\. r. 'liny must 
reTport ])ro)npt I y at 7 o'chul: the following morning lor duty. 

Those whose breakfast hour is O o'clock will remain al slalinn until 
7 o'clock on Ihe date of tlieir "ilay off." 

Should .1 liic lie iii,pi'()gres.s at 1 lie hour ol' clKiiiges. men will remain 
on duly iinlil Ihe "all (uit" is given, except iicnnission is obtained of 
the ehiff, or engineer in eliarge ol" lire, to ictire. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 171 

Should :i "general" or third alarm be rung- in while members are in 
town, they will be expected to report for dut3% 

On the "dayoff" of the engineer of a steamer, the assistant engineer 
shall, on his arrival at the fire, act as engineer. 

The time of change from first and second run will be made at 7 o'clock 

A. M. 

All hose comiianies are instructed not to enter any building with a 
line of hose unless the stop nozzle is closed, except in cases where they 
can see the fire, and when their streams will reach it without damage 
to other property. 

Steamer companies are not to enter a building" with a line of hose 
without orders, unless fire can be seenC, due care being exercised as to 
whether their services are needed. 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 
Engine No. 1, 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer $4,000.00 

1 one-horse Avagon 400.00 

3 gray horses for steamer GOO.OO 

1 gray horse for hose wagon 200.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

1 pair double exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 single exercise harness 40.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 900.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Tools, furniture, and fixtures 200.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 125.00 

Total amount $6,795.00 



Engine No. 2. 

LOCATED AT NORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQL'OG. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $4,000.00 

1 hose wagon 600.00 

1 exercise wagon, poles, shafts, and three-horse hitch 250.00 

3 horses for steamer 600.00 

1 pair horses for hose wagon 400.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $40, 1 at $20 100.00 



172 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

5 swinging' liarnesses $250.00 

1 double sled 60.00 

3,200 feet fabric hose 1,440.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 94.00 

Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc 466.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 125.00 

Total amount $3,385.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

LOCATED OX LAKE AVEXUE, CORNER MASSABESIC STREET. 

1 .second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

] two-horse hose wagon 400.00 

1 two-horse truck and equipments 1,700.00 

1 three-horse hitch attachment (extra) 200.00 

1 pair black horses for steamer 250.00 

1 pair bay horses for hose wagon 400.00 

1 i^air black horses for truck 300.00 

:{ exercise harnesses, 2 at $50, 1 at $40 140.00 

6 swinging harnesses 300.00 

3.G00 feet fabric hose 1,620.00 

vStable hxtures, blankets, etc SO.OO 

I'.eds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc 575.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

1 exercise wagon 250.00 

Total amount $9,865.00 



Engine No. 4. 

LOCATED OX VIXE STREET. 

1 first-size Anioski-ag stcanicr $4,200.00 

1 hose w^agon 400.00 

:! horses for steamer 600.00 

] horse for hose wagon 150.00 

.'} exercise harnesses 00.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

2,350 feet fabric lio&e 1.047.50 

Hall fnniitiirc, beds, bedding, etc 275.00 

Stable fixtmcs and Idankets 75.00 

Fireincn's .suits and badges 125.00 

'J'otiii amomit $7,132.50 



REPORT OF TUE FIRE ENGINEER. 173 

Engine and Ladder No. 5. 

LOCATED ON WEBSTER STREET, CORJNER CHESTNUT. 

1 third-size Amoskeag- steamer ."f.l.GOO.OO 

1 two-wheeled Amoskeag; hose carriage GOO.OO 

1 steel frame ladder truck 1,650.0U 

1 pair bay horses for steamer 400.00 

1 pair bay horses for truck 400.00 

1 bay horse for hose carriage 200.00 

1 exercise wagou ,')25.00 

1 double sled 50.00 

o swinging- harnesses 250.00 

2 pairs exei'cise harnesses 100.00 

2,150 feet fabric hose 967.50 

Bedding, furniture, tools, etc 247.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 90.00 

Firemen's suits, badges, etc 150.00 

Total amount $9,029.50 



Engine and Ladder No. 6. 

LOCATED AT CORJs'ER AMORY AND RIMMON STREETS. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

1 hook-aud-ladder truck (with Bangor extension) 1,GSO.OO 

1 one-horse carriage GOO.OO 

2 gray horses for steamer 300.00 

2 bay horses for truck 267.00 

1 graj' horse for hose carriage 150.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 900.00 

Hall furniture, carpets, beds, bedding, etc 375.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc * 85.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

1 exercise wagon 290.50 

Total amount $8,547.50 



Hose No. 1 . 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage $600.00 

2 horses 300.00 

2 single harnesses 70.00 



174 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1 single sled $40,00 

1 hose sled 20.00 

2,550 feet fabric hose 1.147.50 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding, etc 60.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 100.00 

Total amount $2,587.50 



Hose No. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST IirGH. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage $600.00 

] bay horse 150.00 

1 exercise harness 30.00 

1 swinging harness 50.00 

1 exercise wagon , 325.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 900.00 

]50 feet leather hose 60.00 

Furniture and fixtures 100.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 100.00 

Total amount $2,315.00 



Hose No. 3. 

LOCATED ox SOUTH ELM STREET, BAKERSVILLE. 

] combination hose Avagon (with ladders) $1,000.00 

] pair gra J' horses 200.00 

1 pair swinging harnesses 100.00 

] pair exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 exercise wagon 50.00 

;.'.200 feet fabric ho.se 990.00 

I'urniture, fixtures, bedding, etc 85.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 65.00 

I'lremen's suits and badges 80.00 

Total amount $2,620.00 



1 aiirial liool^ 
•1 hor.ses 



Hook and Ladder No. 1 

i.ui AiKi) its vim: sti!Ki:t. 
■ladder I nick 



$4,200.00 
600.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 175 

.; swino-inc.- Imrnesses $50.00 

;; -cwinging harnesses 150.00 

2 extra Bangoi* extension latklers 360.00 

7 rubber blanket eovers 108.00 

Furniture and fixtures , 200.00 

Beds, beddins>-, and furniture 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 60.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

Total amount $6,013.00 



Chemical Engine No. 1. 

LOCATED OX VINE STREET. 

1 double tank ((iO gallons each) engine $2,250.00 

1 pair black horses 500.00 

1 iiair exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 pair swinging harnesses 100.00 

Furniture and fixtui-es 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 35.00 

Total amount $3,060.00 



Supply Wagon. 

1 supply wagon, with boxes and engineers' lanterns $200.00 



Spare Hose. 

AT CEXTUAL STATIOX,, VIXE STREET. 

200 feet leather hose $100.00 

1,500 feet fabric hose (for re-lining) 375.00 

300 feet fabric hose (new) 135.00 

Total amount $610.00 



Exercise Wagon. 

AT CEXTRAL STATIOX, VIXE STREET. 

1 four-Avheeled exercise wagon with ])ole, shafts, three-horse 
hitch, and coal boxes $250.00 



176 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine. 

STOKED AT SHEDS OF ENGINE NO. 2. • 

Old U tank Amoskeag- engine (may be Avoi'th for excliange) $250.00 



Engineers' Department. 

5 engineers' white rubber coats $37.50 

:> engineers' lanterns 20.00 

Furniture and fixtui-es 150.00 

Total amount $207.50 



Riverside Hose Co. No. 5. 

LOCATED AT CORJsKH OF OLD FALLS KOAD AND FKONT STKEET. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage $400.00 

800 feet leather hose 240.00 

SOO feet fabric hose 360,00 

2 hose-pipes, spannei's, etc 40.00 

Furniture and fixtures 10.00 

Total amount $1,050.00 



Hallsville (Independent) Hose. 

LOCATED AT COK^EK OF MAMMOTH ItOAD AND MASSAltESIC STREET. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage $30.00 

500 feet leather hose 150.00 

Nozzle, wrenches, etc 15.00 

Total amount $195.0li 

Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSIUKK MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriag-e $30.00 

400 feet fabric hose 160.00 

2 hose-pipes 10.00 

Tola! amount $200.00 

Pond Road Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED I.\ HASKMKXT Ol- \V. 1'. lAKM Klj's JtAKN. 

1 two-uliccled hose carriag-o $30.00 

500 feet Icaflicr hose 150.00 

Total amount $180.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 177 

Sleeping Hall. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 
6 beds, bedding-, Nvardrobes, etc .$200.00 

Extra Horses. 
1 steel gray horse $1 50.00 



Fire Alarm Telegraph. 

At cost, including additions $21,300.00 

Eemodeling- in ISSo 0,000.00 

"Individual tappet-" system 4,000.00 

Storage battery (in 1S9S) 1,850.00 

Fire-alarm box and extensions (in 1S99) 250.00 

Wire, brackets, and tools 250.00 

Repair wagon 150.00 

$34,000.00 



Recapitulation. 

Engine Company Xo. 1 $6,795.00 

Engine Company Xo. 2 8,385.00 

Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 3 9,865.00 

Engine Company Xo. 4 7,132.50 

Engine and Ladder Comj^any Xo. 5 •. . , 9,029.50 

Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 6 8,547.50 

The "Harrington" steamer (old) 250.00 

Hose Company Xo. 1 2,587.50 

Hose Company Xo. 2 , 2,315.00 

Hose Company Xo. 3 2,020.00 

Hook and Ladder Company Xo. 1 (aerial) 0,013.00 

Chemical Engine Company Xo. 1 3,060.00 

Supply wagon (Central station) 200.00 

Exercise wagon (Central station) 250.00 

Spare hose 610.00 

Engineers' department 207.00 

Riverside Hose Xo. 5 1,050.00 

Hallsville Hose 195.00 

Coffe's Falls Hose 200.00 

Pond Road Hose 180.00 

Sleeping hall 200.00 

Spare horse 150.00 

Fire alarm telegraph 34,000.00 

Total $103,902.00 

12 



178 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 1899, 
with Losses and Insurance. 

Box 71. Sunday, January 1, 12.13 p. M. Two-and-half story wooden 
dwelling-, 193 Cedar street, owned by Edward Murphy and occupied 
by James Sheehan and Mrs. McDermott. Chimney fire. No damage. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding-: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Truck 3. 

Box 73. Monday, January 2, 1.41 P. M. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, corner Cedar and Beech streets, owned by Peter Rogers 
and occupied by several families. Fire originated in a closet in tene- 
ment occupied by William Foye, from hot ashes. It spread to blind 
attic and was soon extinguished. Box ijulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. Value of build- 
ings, $14,000; damage to buildings, .$225; insurance on buildings, $5,000; 
insurance paid, .$225. Value of contents, $1,000; damage to contents, 
$40; no insurance. 

Box 217. Monday-, January 2, 2.30 p. M. Second alarm from same 
box six minutes later. A small cottage house on Highland avenue, 
near Eaton Heights, owned and occupied by William E. Warren. Fire 
originated in the second story from some unknown cause. Box was 
I)ulled for a second alarm by some person "rather rattled," causing 
the entire department to respond, but all second and third alarm appa- 
ratus was sent back before reaching the fire. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 0, Chemical, Hose 1, 2. 3. Trucks 1, 3, 5, (i. ^'alue 
of building, $1,800; damage to building, $550; insurance on building, 
$1,000; insurance ^laid, $550. Value of contents, $G00; damage to con- 
tents, $120; insurance on contents, $300; insurance paid, $129. 

Box 8. IMonday, Januarj"" 2, 6.32 P. M. A one-story wooden building 
at 1180-1182 Elm street, owned by Orrin E. Kimball and occupied by 
I{. H. Wood, barber, and William E. Ward, bicjcles. Cause unknown. 
Box pulled by Zepherin Bivard. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 
5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 1, 5. Value of building, $500; damage, 
$250; no insurance. Value of Wood's contents, $800; damage, $400; in- 
surance, $(K)0; insurance paid, $370. ^'alue of Ward's contents, $1,500; 
damage, $1,200; insurance, $900; insurance paid, $518. 

IU)X 51. Tuesday, January 3, 2.53 p. M. Three-story wooden lone- 
mcnt block, 109-171 Second street, owned by Mrs. Henriette Sdilaugh 
and occujjied by Alex AIcDonald and C. Wolfe. Fire was caused by 
thawing out water pipes with lamp. Box pulled by A. J. McDonald. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, fi. Chemical, Truck G. Value of 
l)ui!(ling, $4,000; damage, $15; insurance, $1,000; insurance iiaid, $15. 
No damage to contents. 

Still. Tuesday, January 3, 7.13 v. m. Cliiniiuv liic in (cncmeut 
block, 237 Manchester street, owned by (lark heirs and oecupit-il by 
several families. Used two charges of Pony. .No damage. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 179 

Box 21.'. Tuesday, January 10, 8.56 v. m. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 48 Somerville street, owned and occupied by Norrie Dubois. 
Box pulled by citizen. Xo damage. Companies responding: Engines, 
3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, .3, Ladder 3. 

Still. Wednesday, January" 11, 7.00 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 61 Pearl street. Chemical engine responded. Used one charge 
of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, January 11, 7.2.5 a. ji. Eubbish in basement of 
Crafts & Green's three-storj' brick shoeshoii. Members of Engine 2 
responded with hose wagon. Extinguished before their arrival. Xo 
damage. 

Still. Wednesday, January 11, 6.03 p. M. Two-and-half-story 
wooden house, 156 Concord street, owned and occupied by the X'ew 
Hampshire Catholic Club. Defective chimney caused fire in partition. 
Chemical engine responded. Used 3 charges of Ponj*. Value of build- 
ing, $3,000; damage, $20.05; insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, $20.05. 
Xo damage to contents. 

Box 313. Wednesday, January 11, 0.45 P. Jr. Chimney fire in ten- 
ement block, 36 Amor.y street, owned by Joseph Quirin and occiipied 
by several families. X'^o damage. Box pulled bj- Officer X'^ixon. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Used 
three charges of Pon5\ 

Box 324. Saturday', January 14, 5.59 p. M. A small barn in rear of 
22 Laval street, owned and occupied by J. B. Favreau. Cause, bojs 
with matches. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
2. 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, $150; damage, $44; 
insurance, $50; insurance paid, $44. Value of contents, $100; damage, 
$30; insurance, $50; insurance paid, $30. 

Still. Tuesday, January' 17, 3.57 a. ji. Awning over store of the 
Centennial Tea Company, 1075 Elm street. Caused by electric light 
wires. Damage slight. L^sed one charge of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, January 17, 5.35 p. M. Electric wire sagged so as 
to come in contact with ridge of P. W. Dickej^'s barn, 356 Lake avenue, 
causing it to "spark." Xo damage. Members of Engine and Ladder 
3 responded. 

Box 212. Wednesday, January 18, 12.53 p. M. Barn and vegetable 
storehouse attached to house, 951 Hayward fetreet, owned and occupied 
by Daniel Allen. The fire originated in the storehouse. Cause, an oil 
stove. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. 
Value of building, $2,500; damage, $400; insurance, $1,600; insurance 
paid, $400. Value of contents, $800; damage, $200; insurance, $500; 
insurance paid, $200. 

Box 6. Wednesday, January 18, 5.01 p. M. Four-story brick block 
(Opera House block), owned by Harrington heirs and Parker. The fire 
was in a show window of shoestore of Bolander & Johnson, and was 
caused by dropping a match in the window. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 1, 3. 



180 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No damage to builcling-. Value of contents, $0,200; damage, $70; insur- 
ance, $4,200; insurance paid, $70. 

Still. Saturday, January 21, 3.48 a. m. Chimney- fire in tenement 
block, 27 Bridge street, owned by Tom W. Eobinson, and occupied by 
several families. Xo damage. Chemical engine responded. 

Box 323. Wednesday, January 25, 9.11 P. M. Two-story dwelling 
house on Groux's island, west side of 'Squog river, owned and occupied 
by John H. Groux. The fire was caused by a defective chimney. 
Engine 6 was stationed on east side of river and hose was carried 
across in rowboats. Used 2,250 feet of hose. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, G, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value 
of building, $1,200; damage, $1,000; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, 
$1,000. Value of contents, $500; damage, $200; Insurance, $100; insur- 
ance paid, $100. 

Still. Friday, January 27, 8.48 a, m. Chimney fire in two-and-half- 
story tenement house, 99 Cedar street, owned and occupied by Mrs. 
Abbie Riley. Used two charges of Ponj'. Chemical engine responded. 
No damage. 

Box 4. Friday, January 27, 2.38 p. M. Three-story wooden block, 
36 Lake avenue, owned by D. A. Shanahan and occupied by him as a 
grocery store on first floor, and Jere. Kane and Charles McCarty as 
tenements. The fire originated in upper story from some unknown 
cause. Box pulled by Hoseman A. W. Tucker. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of build- 
ing, $4,000; damage, $300; insurance, $3,000; insurance paid, $300. 
A'ahie of contents, $1,500; damage, $42; insurance, $1,000; insuraxice 
paid, $42. 

Still. Monday, January 30, 6.15 P. M. Grass fire on land of Boston 
«fc Maine Bailroad, near foot of Hancock street. Hose Company 3 re- 
sponded. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still, Monday, January 30, 12 midnight. Oily waste in basement 
of gas office on Hanover street. Cause, spontaneous combustion. 
Damage to building, $10; fully insured. 

Still. Tuesday, January 31, 9.50 A. M. Chimnej' fire in four-tene- 
ment block, 22 Birch street, owned by Charles C. Hayes. Used one 
charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, February 1, 8.10 a. m. Chimncj' fire in house, 
419 Lake avenue, owned and occupied by Margaret Crouin. Members 
of Engine and Ladder 3 responded. I'sed two charges of Pony. No 
damage. 

Still. Wednesday, February 1, 6.10 p. m. Chimney fire in cottage 
house on Baker street, owned and occupied by Joseph Johnson. Mem- 
bers of Hose 3 responded. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, February 2, 7.48 a. m. Burning chimney in four- 
tenement block, rear of 131 Amherst street, owned by Dr. J. A. Jack- ■ 
son. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box G. Saturday, February 4, 8.33 p. m. Five-story brick block. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 181 

corner Klin and llaiiuver streets, owned by John A. Iliddle and occupied 
as stores, offices, and tenements. The fire was between the third floor 
and ceiling- and was caused by a defective chimney in the office of Dr. 
Ames. Damage was mostly by water. Extinguished with Chemical 
engine. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks, 1, 3. Value of building, $20,000; damage, 
$7."); insurance, $15,000; insurance paid, $75. Value of contents, L. T. 
Meade's news agency, $4,000; damage, $75; insurance, $3,000; insurance 
paid, $75. 

Still. Sunday, February 5, 11.35 p. u. Chimney fire in eight-tene- 
ment block, 21 Orange street, owned by heirs of Joseph B. Clark, and 
in tenement occupied bj' J. Carter. Used one charge of Pon3^ No dam- 
age. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Thursda3\ February 9, 9.48 P. M. Chimney fire in two-and- 
half-story wooden house, 108 Hanover street, owned by the Elliot 
Hospital and occupied hy H. G. Brown as a boarding-house. No dam- 
age. Members of Chemical Company responded. 

Still. Friday, February 10, 1.48 A. m. Chimney fire in two-and- 
half-story wooden tenement block, 30 Church street, owned and occu- 
pied by John Cashman. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. Mem- 
bers of Chemical Company responded. 

Still. Friday, Februarj^ 10, 2.55 p. M. Three-story brick block on 
Bridge street, owned by Frederick Smyth. Cause, thawing water 
pipes. Chemical engine responded. No damage. 

Still. Friday, February 10, 3.15 p. ir. Four-story brick block, "The 
Bedford," 1373 Elm street. Burning chimney. No damage. Members 
of Chemical and Engine 4 responded. 

Still. Friday, February 10, 6.13 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 182 East Spruce street, owned by Gideon Flanders and occupied 
by Patrick Donald. Members of Engine and Ladder 3 responded with 
hose carriage. Used three charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, February 14, 8.40 p. M. Chimney fire in dwelling 
house, 239 Central street, owned and occupied by Mrs. J. M. Gauvreau. 
^Members of Engine and Ladder 3 responded. No damage. 

Box 15. Thursday, February 16, 3.27 a. m. One-story sheds in rear 
of 30-32 Bridge street, owned by Joseph W. Fellows and occupied by 
several families. Cause unknown. Box pulled by Officer Connor. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 
1, 5. Value of building, $150; damage, $75; insurance, $100; insurance 
paid, $75. No damage to contents. 

Still. Sundaj% February 19, 3.30 a. m. Four-story brick block, 37 
Manchester street, owned by William Starr and occuijied by Napoleon 
Jaurdonnais & Company as a liquor saloon. Fire was caused bj- a 
cigar stub in wooden spittoon. Burned a hole through the floor. 
Chemical engine responded. Used one tank. Value of building, 
$15,000; damage, $5; insurance, $7,000; insurance paid, $5. No dam- 
age to contents. 



182 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Stilx. Frida5\ February 24, 9.51 A. M. Chimney fire in two-and-half- 
story brick dwellins-, 267 Chestnut street, owned and occupied by Maj. 
P. A. Devine. No damage. Members of Chemical responded. 

Still. Saturday, Februarj'^ 25, 5.15 p. m. Chimney fire in Merrimack 
Hotel, 17 South Main street, owned by heirs of Daniel Connor and occu- 
pied by A. A. Lamprey. Members of Engine 2 responded. Used four 
charges of Pony. 

Still. Sunday, February 26, 7.35 P. M. Chimney fire in four-tene- 
ment house, 32 Amorj-^ street, owned by Joseph Quirin and occupied 
by several families. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. Xo 
damage. 

Box 71. Wednesday, March 1, 7.55 P. 31. Four-story wooden block, 
110 East Spruce street, owned by William Hayes and occupied by 
Thomas H. Mahoney as a grocery store on first floor and upstairs by 
him and John McLaughlin. Caused by a lamp. Box pulled bj' D. 
King. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. 
Value of buildings, $5,500; damage, $800; insurance, $4,000; insurance 
paid, $330. Value of Mahoney's contents, $1,800; damage, $322.49; in- 
surance, $1,000; insurance paid, $322.49. 

Box 25. Friday, March 3, 11.48 P. ^. Two-story double tenement 
house, 421-423 Hanover street, owned by Charles H. Farnham and 
Horace Stearns heirs and occupied by Charles A. Trefethen and Arthur 
E. Stearns. Cause of fire unknown. Started near the center of main 
part and quickly communicated through the partitions to all parts of 
the house. An explosion of hot air hurled a number of firemen out of 
doors, seriously injuring none. Box pulled hy Arthur E. Stearns. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 
Value of building, $6,500; damage, $4,000; insurance, $4,000; insurance 
paid, $4,000. Value of Trefethen's contents, $3,700; damage, $1,500; 
insiiranoo, .$S0(); insurance paid, $800. Value of Stearns's contents, 
$1,000; damage, $700; no insurance. 

Box 7. Tuesday, March 7, 12.06 A. M. Four-storj' wooden tenement 
block, 331 Chestnut street, owned by heirs of Moulton Knowles and 
occupied by Ralph McCabe as a boarding-house. The fire originated 
in the L part, and was caused by an overheated chimnej'. Box pulled 
by Officer Butler. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 
1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $4,500; damage, $51.72; insurance, 
$3,600; insurance paid, $51.72. No damage to contents. 

Still. Tuesday, ]March 7, 11.20 p. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
house, 509 Beech street, owned and occupied by Michael J. Connor. 
Cliemical engine responded. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, iMarch 12, 10.45 a. m. Chimney fire in wooden tene- 
ment block, 30 Washington street, owned by Chirk heirs and occupied 
by several families. Members of Chemical Coiupanj'^ responded. Used 
one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box 21. Tuesdaj', March 14, 6.48 p. M. False alarm caused by a 
young man shouting fire to attract the attention of a young lady, and 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 183 

hearing- the cry some one pulled the box. Companie.s respondiiiar: En- 
gines, 1, ,3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Tuesday, :March 14, 8.20 p. ir. Chimney fire in house, .372 
Granite street, owned by Horatio Fradd and occupied by Chris Seifort. 
Members of Engine 2 responded. Used four charges of Ponj'. 

Box 17. Tuesday, March 14, 10.25 p. M. Barn in rear of .')09 Beech 
street, owned and occupied by Michael Connor. The fire started in 
hayloft, from some unknown cause, and was confined to that portion 
of the building. Box pulled by Walter Connor. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, :>, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $G00; 
damage, $250; insurance, $3,500; insurance paid, $250. Value of con- 
tents, $260; damage, $60; insurance, blanket policy; insurance paid, $60. 

vStill. Wednesday, March 15, 6.43 p. M. Chimney fire in wooden ten- 
ement block, 68 Concord street, owned by Parsons and Bicker heirs. 
Members of Chemical Companj- responded. Used one charge of Pony. 
Xo damage. 

Still. Fridaj% March 17, 6.35 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
368 Bartlett street, owned by K. N. Whittemore and occupied by J. Ryan 
and P. LaPIante. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 resj)onded. Used 
four charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 313. Tuesday, March 21, 6.21 A. M. Two-story wooden dwell- 
ing, 165 Kelly street, owned by Henry Martin and occupied by Joseph 
Ward. Cause, defective chimney. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 1, 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of build- 
ing, $900; damage, $30; no insurance. No damage to contents. 

Still. Friday, March 24, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
wooden tenement house, 73 Amherst street, owned by John H. McCabe 
and occupied by J. Guillette. Members of Chemical responded.. Used 
one charge of PonJ^ No damage. 

Still. Friday, March 24, 9.25 p. M. Chimney fire in house, 80 Dover 
street, owned by S. W. McElroy and occupied by M. E. Griflfin. Set fire 
to partition, doing slight damage. Members of Engine 2 responded. 
Used three charges of Pony. No damage to contents. Value of build- 
ing, $1,000; damage, $15; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $15. 

Still. Wednesday, March 29, 7.05 p. m. Chimney fire in Webster 
block, 1294 Elm sti-eet. Chemical engine responded. Used two charges 
of Pony. No damage. 

Still. W^ednesday, March 29, 10.41 p. M. Chimney fire in two-story 
wooden block, 29 Washington street, owned b3' Dr. J. A. Jackson and 
occupied by several families. Members of Chemical responded. Used 
one charge of Pony, No damage. 

Box 72. Thursday, April 6, 8.18 p, M. Two-and-half-story dwelling, 
279 East Spruce street, owned and occupied by John E. McKeon. Fire 
originated in sitting-room from some unknown cause, near bow win- 
dow and where Mr. McKeon was sitting. He was badly burned and 
died the following morning. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. Value of building, 



184 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

$»',oOO; damage, $i;iO; insurance, $2,000; insurance paid, $130. Value 
of contents, $600; damage, $69.50; insurance, $300; insurance paid, 
$69.50. 

Stiix. Fridaj', April 7, 8.50 A. M. Three-story wooden block, 57 
Central street, owned by heirs of S. D. Greene and occupied by Tele- 
sphere Cote. Chimney fire. Chemical engine responded. Used one 
charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, April 7, 9.27 A. M. Chimney fire in rear of 44 Merri- 
mack street, in cottage owned by Knights of Pj-thias associates and 
occupied by Clara Dearborn. Members of Truck 1 responded. Used 
two charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 21. Mondaj^ April 10, 4.06 P. M. Shed in rear of 121 Merrimack 
street, adjoining L of house owned bj' Peter liogers and occupied by 
Khoderick Carroll and others. Caused bj' hot ashes in wooden barrel. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies resi^onding: Engines '.'>, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $6,000; damage, $350; insurance, 
$4,000; insurance paid, $350. Value of contents, $300; damage, $100; no 
insurance. 

Still. Tuesday, April 11, 9.10 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
478 North Main street, owned by Mary Connelly and occupied by her 
and other tenants. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. Used 
two charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday', April 12, 11 a. u. A kettle of lard boiled over 
and caught fire in house occupied by James B. Thurston, 89 North 
Adams street. Members of Engine and Ladder 5 responded with hose 
carriage. No damage. 

Still. Satui-daj-, April 15, 12.25 p. m. Brush fire on the Bedford 
road on land belonging to Huntress heii's and others. Members of 
Engine Company 2 responded with hose wagon. Used four charges of 
Pony. No damage. 

Box 13. Saturday, April 15, 8.14 p. M. Three-story dwelling, 1602 
Elm street, owned and occupied by Edward M. Slayton. Fire origi- 
nated in the cellar among shavings and wood from some unknown 
cause, and was confined wholly to basement, although the entire house 
was filled with smoke. Box pulled by Fireman .11. H. Cole. Com- 
I)anies responding: Engines 3, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 5. Value 
of building, $15,O0Q; damage, $1,200; insurance, $11,000; insurance paid, 
$1,2U0. Value of contents, $12,000; damage, $450; insurance. $11,000; 
insurance i^aid, $450. 

Still. Monday, April 17, 12 m. Brush fire on land owned by Amos- 
kcag Manufacturing Company, corner Uevey and Wayne streets. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company G resiiondcd with hose carriage. 
No damage. 

Box 217. Tuesday, April 18, 12.12 P. M. Grass fire on Oakland 
avenue, near Mammoth road. Needless alarm. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Comi)anles responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3, 
No damage. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 185 

Still. Tuesday, April IS, 8.05 r. M. Three-story wooden tenement 
block, 10 Clark avenue, owned by estate of Joseph B. Clark and occu- 
jjied by several families. Overheated chimney ignited woodwork in 

tenement occupied by Eli . Chemical engine responded. Value of 

building, $3,500; damage, $20; insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, $20. 
Xo damage to contents. 

J?ox 7. AVednesday, April 10, 10.53 A. M. Brick ash pit, rear of Han- 
over Flats, 235 Hanover street, owned by E. U. James, Mrs. Mary J. 
James, and ]\Irs. Snsie Larabee and occupied by several families. Box 
pulled by Oflficer Hildreth. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $40,000; damage, $20; in- 
surance, $20,000; insurance paid, $20, No damage to contents. 

Box 15. Thursday, April 20, 8.24 A. M. Ash box in rear of 28 Clarke 
avenue. Cause, hot ashes. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 3, 5. 

Box 212. Saturday, April 22, 3.02 p. M. Grass fire on the land of the 
Elliot Hospital, east of Massabesic street. Needless alarm. No dam- 
age. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 1. 

Box 261. Saturday, April 22, 3.58 p. M. Brush fire in Derryfield Park 
on Oak Hill. Set by boys. No damage. Companies responding: En- 
gines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 1. 

Still. Saturday, April 22, 5.15 p. M. Grass fire on land of Henry A. 
Farrington,' near corner Clarke and Chestnut streets. No damage. 
Members of Engine and Ladder 5 responded with hose carriage. Used 
one charge of Pony. 

Still. Mondaj-, April 24, 1.30 P. u. Grass fire on land of F. G. Stark, 
on West Hancock street. Members of Engine 2 responded. Used two 
charges of Ponj\ No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, April 25, 2.47 p. M. Brush fire on Goffstown road, 
near buildings of George E. Jackson. Members of Engine Company 2 
responded with hose carriage. Used two charges of Pon}^ No damage. 

Box 82. Friday, April 28, 11.05 A. M. Three-story brick block owned 
by Story heirs, 1082 Elm street, and occupied by Manchester Heating 
<S- Lighting Company. Fire caught from forge in basement. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $12,000; damage, $300; insur- 
ance, $4,000; insurance paid, $300. Value of contents, $25,000; damage, 
$524.27; insurance, $10,500; insurance paid, $524.27. 

Box 114. Friday, April 28, 12.26 p. M. Brush fire on Oak Hill, ad- 
joining Derryfield park. Box jjulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 5. 

Still. Fridaj', April 28, 2.30 p. M. Grass fire at corner of Putnam 
and Dubuque streets on land owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded with hose carriage. 
No damage. 

Box 8. Mondaj', Maj- 1, 1.34 p. M. A spark from chimney ignited 
the shingles on roof of building, 1205 Elm street, owned by E. L. Kim- 



186 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ball and occupied b}' G. N. Waterman as a laundrj'. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 5. No damage. 

2 — 2 — 2. Thursday, May 4, 7.50 P. M. Brush fire in Amoskeag, near 
liock JMmmon. Delegations from Engines 5 and G responded. Xo 
damage. 

Box S. Monday, May 8, 9.24 A. M. A spark from the chimney of 
G. H. Waterman's laundry, in block owned by Kimball & Hobbs, 1205 
Elm street, set fire to the shingles. Damage slight. Companies re- 
responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of 
building, $3,500; damage, $10; insurance, $3,000; insurance paid, $10. 
No damage to contents. 

Box 82. Saturday, May 13, 11. IG r. M. In two-and-half-story house, 
114 Concord street, owned by Mrs. John D. Bean and occupied by sev- 
eral families, a lounge caught fire from some unknown cause. Dam- 
age slight. Box pulled by officer. Companies responding: Engines 1, 

4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 1, 5. 

Box 81. Sunday, May 14, 12.18 A. ir. Five-story stone building (The 
Kennard), 1008 Elm street, owned by Mead, Mason & Comjiany and occu- 
pied as stores and offices. The fire originated in the basement or stair- 
way connected with the Hub Clothing Comj^any (A. Custen, treasurer), 
and obtained a good headway before it was discovered. Cause im- 
known. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 

5, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $175,000; damage, 
$0,750; insurance, $127,000; insurance paid, $9,750. Value of contents, 
$50,400; damage, $12,815.22; insurance, $37,300; insurance paid, $11,990.22. 

Still. Monday, May 15, 1 p. ir. Hot coke in the coke shed of the 
People's Gas Comjjany caused a slight blaze. Hose Company 3 re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Still. Monday', ^fay 15, G.50 p. M. A telephone message was sent to 
Central Station saying "Send Chemical at once for a fire on Hayward 
street." Chemical engine responded but no fire could be found. 

Still. Thursdaj^ May 18, 5.54 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
415 Granite street, owned by Clapp & French, and occupied b.v several 
families. Members of Engine 2 responded. Used two charges of Pony. 

Box 81. Thur.sday, May 18, 11.59 P. yi. Chimney fin- in tenement 
block, 93-95 Amherst street, owned by estate of .lolm D. rallt'rson. 
No damage. Box jiulled by ofticcr. C()m])anios rfspoinliiig: l]ngiiu>s 
1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 'I'riick I. 

Still. Tuesday, May 23, 8.10 a. m. Chiiuiu'v iiic in two-tenement 
house, 354 Amherst street, owned by !Mrs. Martin, ^fembers of Chem- 
ical Company responded. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 82. Thursday, May 25, 7.0G ]•. >r. 'I'wo-and-half story wooden 
tenement l)]ock, S ]?ridge street, owned hy C handler Brothers and occu- 
pied In- William Cote ,111(1 otheis. A bed in Cote's tenement caught fire 
from some unUiiown cause. Itox pulled by Officer Moher. Coni|)anies 
responding: JOngines I, t, ."., Cheinical, Hose 1, :.', 'I'l iiei<s 1, 5. AO dam- 
age to buil<ling. Dain.ige to contents slight. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 187 

Box 17. Thursday, May 2',, 7.32 P. M. Two-.story dwellinf? at 509 
Beech street, owned and occupied by Michael Connor. Fire started in 
closet in L part from some unknown cause. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding-: Eng-ines 1, 3, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 
Value of building-, $5,000; damage, $300; insurance, $2,800; insurance 
paid, $200. Value of content.s, $1,500; damage, $150; no insurance. 

Still. Friday, May 2G, 9.20 a. m. Chimney fire in eight-tenement 
block, 40 Orange street, owned by heirs of Joseph B. Clark. Used one 
charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Fridaj% ^lay 20, 11 A. M. Rimmonville shoeshop, occupied by 
H. B. Reed & Company, on Kelly street. Slight fire in partition. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. 

Still. Monday, May 29, 8.20 p. m. Chimney fire at 193 Lake avenue, 
in two-and-half-story wooden house, owned by heirs of J. Donovan, 
and occupied by John Kelley. Chemical engine responded. Used one 
charge of Pony. 

Still. Thursday, June 1, 2.30 a. m. Two-story wooden tenement 
block, 363 Chestnut street, owned by Isaac Huse and occupied by sev- 
eral families. A sawdust spittoon caused a slight fire and considerable 
smoke in the carpenter shop of Theop Manda. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. 

Still. Wednesday, June 7, 3.45 p. m. Railroad ties on Boston & 
Maine Railroad, near Bj'ron street. Hose Company 3 responded. 

Still. Thursday, June 8, 10.30 p. M. Burning paper in cellar of 
Tewksbury block, under American Express Company. No damage. 
Members of Chemical Company responded. 

Still. Saturday, June 10, 8.40 a. m. Barn in rear of 55 Pennacook 
street, owned by Mrs. Charles F. Senter and occupied by Samuel Gag- 
non. Rubbish in cellar caught fire from cigarette stub. Chemical 
engine responded. 

Still. Saturday, June 10, 9.30 p. m. Tenement house, 11 Nashua 
street, owned by William Corey and occupied by George E. Whittemore. 
Kerosene lamp tipped over. No damage. Members of Hose 2 re- 
sponded. 

Box 15. Monday, June 12, 10.31 A. ii. Ash box in rear of 28 Clark 
avenue, owned by Clark heirs. No damage. Box jjulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Monday, June 12, 8.43 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement house 
at 143 South Main street, owned by George S. Eastman and occupied by 
several families. Members of Engine Companj'^ 2 responded. Used two 
charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Monday, June 12, 10.20 p. ir. Same place as above. Soot col- 
lected in an old fireplace which had been bricked up; the woodwork 
became ignited, ifembers of Engine Company 2 responded. Used 
six charges of Pony. Value of building, $1,800; damage, $35; insur- 
ance, $1,200; insurance paid, $35. No damage to contents. 

Still. Tuesday, June 13, 8.50 A. M. Chimney fire in eight-tenement 



188 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

block, 251 Chestnut street, owned by the John Sweeney estate. Mem- 
bers of Chemical Company' responded. Used one charg-e of Pony. No 
damage. 

Box 5. Thursday. June 15, 3.03 A. ^r. Three-story buikling-, 65 Cen- 
tral street, owned and occupied by James Lynch as a liquor saloon. 
Cause, cigar stub in sawdust spittoon. Jkirned a small hole in the 
floor. Box pulled by a boj'. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $4,500; damage, $25; 
insurance, $4,000; insurance paid, $25. No damage to contents. 

Box 39. Sundaj^ June 18, 4.31 p. m. Lumber yard of the S. C. For- 
saith Compan.y, corner Vallej' and Pine streets. Caught from burning 
grass set by boys. Box pulled by Jailer Wadsworth. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Tuesda3% June 20, 4.45 p. m. Lightning struck the four-ten- 
ement hotise, 440 Belmont street, owned by Mrs. Joseph Steuber. ^lem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder 3 responded. Used one charge of Ponj'. 
No damage from fire. 

Box 212. Tuesday, June 20, 8.40 p. M. Cottage house, 29 Jones 
street, owned by Dr. C. M. Dodge and occupied by C. E. Pickering. Fire 
evidently was caused by lightning entering the building on electric 
wires. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $2,500; damage, $650; 
insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $C50. Value of contents, $1,000; dam- 
age, $475; insurance, $700; insurance jiaid, $475. 

Box 4. Wednesday, June 21, 6.20 A. m. Three-story house, 45 Spruce 
sti'eet, owned by Mary Willis and occupied by John Glavin. Fire 
caught in woodbox from sparks from chimney. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Companies resjionding: ]<]ngines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $2,000; damage, $40; insurance, $1,500; 
insurance ])aid, $40. No damage to contents. 

Box 4. Wednesday, June 21, 5 p. M. Chimney lire in the one-storj' 
brick building, 383-389 Elm street, owned by the Head & Dowst Com- 
pany and occupied by Charles Noll. Needless alarm. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical. Hose 1, 3, 
Trucks 1, 3. 

Box G. Thursday, June 29, 8.50 i-. m. iMxir-slory brick block, 33 
Hanover street, owned by Harrington heirs and occu|)ied by K. Co- 
daire & Com])any as millinery store. Cause of lire, gas jet igniting cur- 
lain. Box j)idicd l)y Ofliccr Cooledge. Comiianies responding: Engines 
1, 4, Chemical, llo.se 1, 2, Trucks ], 3. Value of building, $28,000; dam- 
age, $553; insurance, $2S,(K)0; insurance paid, $55:'.. Value of coulculs, 
$(>.5()0; danuige, $3.5()(): insui-aucc, $2,500; insurance paid, $2,500. 

Box 4. Saturday. .Inly I. l.:!5 a. m. One-story brick storehouse, 375 
Elm street, owned by I lie Head & Dowst Com])any, and occupied by 
llic .[nliii !'.. \ari(k (Oiupany as a sloreliousc. Cause unknown. Box 
pulled hy eili/en. Companies resi>onding: lOugiiu's 1, 2, 3, Chemical, 
Hose ], 3, Truei<s 1, 3. \ aiiie of l)iiiiding, $><.()n(): damage, $300; iusur- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 189 

ance, $2,000; insurance paid, $300. Value of contents, $8,24"j; damage, 
$3,051.78; insurance, $8,000;^ insurance paid, $3,051.78. 

Still. Saturday, July 1, 7.35 a. m. A slight fire in shed in rear of 
61 Amherst street, caused by boys playing with matches. Used one 
charge of Pony. Hose Company 1 responded with hose carriage. No 
damage. 

Box 21. Sundaj', July 2, 11.15 A. ir. Kerosene stove, at 159 Central 
street, house owned by Patrick Kean and occupied by ]Mrs. Bertha 
Palmer, Needless alarm, as stove was thrown out the window. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Hose 1, Trucks 
1, 3. 

Still. Sunday, July 2, 1.45 p. m, A pot of brimstone, in .shop of 
Joseph A. Eicard, 150 North Main street, in block owned by Gordon 
Woodbury, caught fire from some unknown cause, filling the shop 
•with smoke, but causing no damage. Members of Engine 2 responded. 

Still. Monday, July 3, 11 a. m. Grass fire on land of George E. 
Hall, River road north. Members of Engine and Ladder 5 responded. 
Used two charges of Pony. 

Box 15. Monday, July 3, 10.49 P. u. A slight fire in some rubbish 
in grocery store of Baron & Charpentier, at 60 Pearl street, in four-story 
wooden block owned by Charles C. Hayes. No damage. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 
1, 2, Truck 5. 

Box 52. Tuesday, July 4, 8.02 A, M. Two-and-half-story wooden ten- 
ement house, 22-24 Dover street, owned by Henry E. Burnham and 
occupied by Antoine Sharkey, Edward Garon, and Joseph Guarry. 
Cause of fire unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 2, 0, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, $1,500; 
damage, $300; insurance, $1,000; Insurance paid, $293.48. Value of con- 
tents, $400; damage, $25; no insurance. 

Box 16. Tuesday, July 4, 10.11 a. h. Two-story wooden tenement 
house, 413 Pine street, owned by Connor heirs and G. E. Gage and 
occupied by Edwin Gowette as a boarding-house. Cause of fire, defec- 
tive chimney. Bo::? pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $2,500; dam- 
age, $267; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, $267. Value of contents, 
$600; damage, $20; no Insurance. 

Still. Tuesday, July 4, 3.50 p. m. Two-and-half-story wooden ten- 
ement building, rear of Lake avenue, owned by D. A. Shanahan and 
unoccupied. Cause of fire, crackers. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Tuesday, July 4, C.31 P. M. Three-story wooden tenement 
block, 66 Concord street, owned by S. W. Parsons heirs. Slight fire 
in rubbish in cellar. No damage. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Thursday, July 6, 10.45 a. m. Grass fire on farm of Alonzo 
Elliott, on River road north. Set by locomotive on Boston & Maine 
Railroad. Members of Engine 5 responded with hose carriage. Used 
two charges of Pony. 



190 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Thursday, Jul}- 6, 11.03 A. M. Grass fire on Otis Clark farm 
on Kiver road north. Set by locomotive on Boston & Maine Railroad. 
Members of Enf,''ine and Ladder 5 responded with hose carriag'e. 

Box 4. Thursday, July 6, 1.16 p. m. Second alarm immediately' fol- 
lowed. Fire was discovered in wood yard of Henry St. C'yr, in rear of 
60 Spruce street, which rapidly spread to the two-and-half-story houses 
of Catherine Connor, No. 60, Bartholomew Bresnahan, No. 56, Timothy 
Kenney, No. 50, Martin O'Mallej', No. 46, James ilcSweeney, No. 62, all 
of which were considerably damaged by fire and water. Owing to a 
high wind at the time, and the buildings being extremely dry, the 
result of a long drought, sparks and cinders ignited many other build- 
ings, and at one time twenty -two buildings were on fire at one and the 
same time. A second alarm was pulled immediately on the arrival 
of the first piece of apparatus, and an alarm from box 21 for a fire 
from sparks was pulled soon afterwards by a citizen. Companies re- 
sponding to box 4: On first alarm. Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 3; on second alarm, Engine 4, Hose 2, Truck 5. 

Box 21. 1.58 P. M. During the progress of the above fire, a citizen 
pulled box 21 for the spreading of the fire, calling Engines 5, 6, Truck 
6, thus bringing out every piece of apparatus. Value of buildings, 
$14,300; damage, $2,788; insurance, $8,900; insurance paid, $2,763. Value 
of contents, $1,200; damage, $600; no insurance. 

Still. Wednesday, July 12, 8.20 p. M. Soot in the large chimney 
of the Kimball Brothers' shoeshop, corner Massabesic and Cypress 
streets. Members of Engine and Ladder 3 responded with hose car- 
riage. No damage. 

Still. Frida.y, July 14, 10.30 p. M. Electric car "burn-out" while on 
the street railway track, corner Lake avenue and Wilson street. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder 3 responded. 

Still. Saturday, July 15, 12.50 p. m. Cottage house, 116 Auburn 
street, owned by Catherine O'Neil and occupied by Timothy O'Neil. 
Smoke from some unknown cause was the cause for calling the Chem- 
ical engine. 

Still. Monday, July 24, 3.15 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
267 Cedar street, owned by Mrs. Kennedy and occupied by several fam- 
ilies. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box 8. Friday, August 4, 3.01 A. M. Two-story addition to the 
New City Hotel, rear 1138 Elm street, owned bj' Clough iSI- Hall, William 
IL Hurd, and occupied by him as kitchen and serving room to the 
hotel. Cause of fire iinknovvn. Box pulled by Olliccr Parmenter. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 
Value of building, $20,000; damage. $800; insurance, .$4,000; insurance 
paid, $796. Value of contents, $15,000; damage, $1,191.62; insurance, 
$10,000; insurance paid, .$995.62. 

Still. Saturday, August 5, 7.35 p. m. Awning on the Konnard, 1008 
Elm street, caught fire from a cigar stub. ^Members of Chemical re- 
sponded. Used one charge of I'ony. Damage slight. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENQINEEK. 191 

Still. ^Ionda3% August 7, 1.45 p. M. Chimney fire in brick tenement 
block, 50 Mechanic street, owned by Araoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany and occupied by Charles F. McCoy. Members of Chemical re- 
sponded. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Friday, August 11, 11.45 A. M. Chimney fire in two-tene- 
ment house, 249 Cedar street, owned by Mrs. Thomas Frain and occu- 
pied by J. G. Brown. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box 7. Mondaj-, August 14, 2.30 P. M. Two-story five-tenement 
house, 123 Hanover street, owned bj^ George F. Bosher and occupied 
by H. Halverson, Fred Wolf, J. D. Nichols, Frank Moreau, and Louis 
Krowadz. Cause of fire, defective chimnej'. Box pulled bj- Deputy 
Chief Cassidy. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $1,000; damage, $75; insurance, $500; 
insurance paid, $74. Damage to contents slight. 

Still. Tuesdaj-, August 15, 10.20 A. M. Chimney fire at 8 Laurel 
street, in twelve-tenement block, owned by heirs of E. W. Bartlett. 
Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box 71. Tuesday: August 15, 4.39 p. jr. A twelve-tenement brick 
block, 184 Chestnut street, owned bj' GriflBn Brothers and occupied by 
Thomas King, in whose tenement the fire originated. Cause unknown. 
Box pulled by James Dowd. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $15,000; damage, 
$263; insurance, $8,000; insurance paid, $263. Value of contents, $250; 
damage, $150; no insurance. 

Still. Monday, August 21, 2 p. ir. Brush fire on land of Sullivan 
and Sheehan, corner Lafajette and Amory streets. Members of Engine 
and Ladder 6 responded with hose wagon. No damage. 

Box 8. Saturday, August 26, 9.52 P. Jr. Chimney fire in brick block, 
13 Hollis street, owned bj' W. F. Hubbard and occupied by Ludger 
Turcotte. Used two charges of Pony. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Wednesday, August 30, 5.35 a. ji. Tenement block, 5 Marion 
street, owned by Gordon Woodbury and occupied by several families. 
Burning chimne3\ Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. Used 
three charges of Pony. 

Box 51. Friday, September 1, 4.34 A. M. Two-story wooden build- 
ing on Blaine street owned and occupied by the Beethoven Singing 
Club and used by them as a clubhouse. Cause, cigar stub. Box pulled 
by James Thompson. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, 
Truck 6. Value of building, $1,200; damage, $115; insurance, $1,200; 
insurance paid, $115. 

Still. Monday, September 4, 6.40 p. jr. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 143 McGregor street, owned by C. Senter and occupied by several 
families. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. No damage. 
Used three charges of Ponj'. 

Still. Thursday, September 7, 2.18 P. M. Sparks from a brush fire 
at Derryfield park ignited shingles on roof of shed connected with the 



192 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

city pesthonse. Chemical engine and Hose 2 responded. No damapfe. 
Still. Friday, September 8, 12.10 p. M. "Wooden "ten-footer" on 
West Central street, connected with Kimball Carriag'e Company. 
Loose paper canght from some unknown cause. Chemical eng-ine re- 
sponded. No damag'e. 

Still. Monday, September 11, 1.45 p. m. Cottage house with barn 
connected, on IJald Hill road (two miles from Elm street), owned and 
occupied bj' (Jeorge Booth. Cause unknown. Chemical engine and 
Hose Company 2 responded. Used three tanks of Chemical and one 
charge of Pony. Value of building, $900; damage, $900; insurance. 
$800; insurance paid, $800. Value of contents, $1,100; damage, $2j0; 
no insurance. 

Box 73, Sundaj^ September 17, 8.52 p. 5r. Two-and-half-story house. 
241 East Spruce street, owned by Michael Hackett and occupied by hini 
and Alfred Firth. A lace curtain in Firth's tenement came in contact 
with gas jet. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. Value of building, $2,800; damage. 
$12.50; insurance, $2,200; insurance paid, $12.50. Value of contents. 
$1,000; damage, $8; insurance, $700; insurance paid, $8. 

Still. Tuesday, September 19, 5.50 p. M. Fire in woods in rear 
of Mrs. Charles S. Kidder's, North Union street. No damage. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder 5 responded. 

Still. Tuesday, September 19, 9.25 p. m. One-story wooden build- 
ing, 16 Prospect street, owned by Gordon Woodbury and occupied by 
J. AVesley Smith as laundry. Fire originated under the boiler, from 
defective construction. Chemical engine responded. Value of build- 
ing, $700; damage, $10; no insurance. Value of contents, $000; dam- 
age, $34; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $34. 

Box 15. Thursday, September 21, 7.59 p. M. A slight tire in tene- 
ment of Joseph Chainey, 39 Pearl street. Cause unknown. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Ho-se 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 5. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, September 23, 12.55 p. M. Tenement house, 410 
Dubuque street, owned by Mr. Holley and occupied by Thomas Francis. 
Explosion of gasoline stove. Damage slight. Members of Engine and 
Ladder G responded. 

liox 15. Monday, September 25, 0.40 a. jr. Chininoy fire in four- 
story wooden block, 8 Clark avenue, Pearl street. No damage. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Cliemical. 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

JJox 71. Saturday, September 30, 0.15 p. ^r. Tlircc-story tenement 
block, 240 Chestnut street, owned by Thomas Wlieat licirs and occu- 
])i('d ])y Samuel ICe.ster. Sliglit fire in pile of rags in cellar. No dam- 
age. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Ho.se 1, Truck 3. 

Box 4.. Saturday, Octo])cr 7, f..03 p. M. Chimney fire at 07 Spruce 
street, in housi; owned )>y Henry I- Hasclton. No damage. Box pulled 



REPORT OP THE FIRE ENGINEER. 193 

by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Wednesday, October 11, 6.30 p. m. LamiJ exploded in tene- 
ment house, 31 Nashua street, owned bj' H. B. Sawyer and occupied by 
Mrs. Gavin. Members of Hose 2 responded. Value of building, $6,000; 
damage, $45; insurance, $4,500; insurance paid, $45. 

Box 82. Sunday, October 15, G.21 r. M. Three-story brick block, 
1054 Elm street, owned bj' heirs of A. B. Story and occupied by 
DeMoulpied & Gresley as furniture store. Fire originated in bulkhead 
tilled with excelsior and packing boxes. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 
Value of building, $15,000; damage, $55.50; insurance, $10,000; insur- 
ance paid, $55.50. Value of contents, $18,000; damage, $193; insurance, 
$5,000; insurance paid, $193. 

Still. Monday, October 16, 8.50 p. M. Two-story wooden block, 21 
Amherst street, owned by Mr. Thompson and occupied by John Fri- 
berg as cobbler shop. Kerosene lamp exploded. Used one charge of 
Pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, October 21, 7 p. m. Chimnej^ fire in brick tenement 
block, 14 Arlington street, owned by the Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company. No damage. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Monday, October 23, 12.05 p. M. Slight fire in cellar of cot- 
tage house, corner Chestnut and North streets, ow^ned by George E. 
Kendall and occupied by Edward L. Kimball. Chemical engine and 
hose carriage of Engine and Ladder 5 responded. Used one charge of 
Pony. No damage. Cause, children with matches. 

Still. Wednesday, October 25, 2.16 p. m. Chimney fire in house at 
336 Beech street. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Thursday, October 26, 5.50 p. m. Kerosene lamp exploded in 
house, 400 Dubuque street, owned and occupied by John Martin. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder G resi^onded. No damage. 

Box 31. Saturday, October 28, 0.07 P. M. One-story brick building, 
Manchester Locomotive Works. Slight fire caused by careless use of 
benzine. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, C, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 21. Monday, October 30, 12.26 a. m. Second alarm pulled imme- 
diately. A fierce fire was discovered in the wood-yard, rear of 168 
Lake avenue, owned and occupied by Edmond Bourque. It quickly 
spread to adjoining buildings and the second alarm was pulled in. 
Cause unknown. Box pulled by Officer O'Malley. Companies respond- 
ing: On first alarm. Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3; on 
second alarm. Engines 1, 2, Hose 2, Truck 5. Value of buildings, $5,000; 
damage, $361.80; insurance, $2,600; insurance paid, $361.80. Value of 
conteoits, $1,975; damage, $935; insurance, $1,550; insurance paid, 
$050.43. 

Box 21. Monday, October 30, 5.12 A. M. Rekindling of previous fire 
in the coving of the L, rear of 168 Lake avenue. No damage. Box 
13 



194 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 0, 4, Chemical. 
Jlose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Friday, A'ovember .'!, 2.09 r. M. Four-storj' wooden block 192 
Merrimack street, owned by Terry A. Eaton and occupied by several 
families. Fire originated in basement from overheated chimney. 
Members of Chemical responded. Used one charge of Pony. No dam- 
age to contents. Value of building,*- $5,000; damage, $25; insurance, 
$1,000; insurance paid, $25. 

Still. Tuesday, November 7, 5.37 p. M. Chimney fire in two-and- 
half-story dwelling, at 388 Manchester street, owned and occupied by 
Roper heirs. Chemical engine responded. No damage. 

Still. Friday, November 10, 2.15 p. m. Brush fire between Sag- 
amore, liussell. Oak, and Gore streets, set bj^ boj^s. Hose carriage from 
Engine and Ladder 5 responded. No damage. 

Box 213. Monday, November 13, 8.48 A. M. A small cottage house 
on Beech street, south of Portsmouth Eailroad, owned by Frank X. 
Chenette and occupied by Thomas Tierny. Cause of fire unknown. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Hose 2, 3, 
Trnck 3. Value of building, $650; damage, $50; insurance, $300; insur- 
ance paid, $50. 

Still. Tuesdaj', November 14, 10.30 A. M. Chimnej^ fire in brick 
block, 1087 Elm street, owned by A. F. Perry and occupied by Miss M. 
Jones as dressmaker. Members of Chemical responded. Used one 
charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box 21. \Yednesday, November 15, 3.50 a. h. Second alarm, 4.05 a. m. 
Three-story wooden block, 142-144 Central street, corner Pine, owned 
by Nason Hall and occupied by J. N. DesGroseilliers on first floor as 
grocery store, and) second and third floors bj' John W. Coffeiy as a 
boarding-hou.se. The fire started in the third story in room occupied 
by John Morrison, who was so nearly suffocated that he died in the 
afternoon of the same day. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: On first alarm. Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3; 
on second alarm, Engines 1, 2, Hose 2, Truck 5. Cause of fire unknown. 
Value of building, $3,500; damage, $475; insurance, $1,500; insurance 
paid, $475. Value of contents, $3,500; damage, $397; insurance, $2,000; 
insurance paid, .$397. 

Still. Saturday, November 18, 9 p. M. Four-story brick block 
(Webster House), 130G Elm street, owned by Simons, Fi-ench, Connor, 
and others, and occupied by Orville C. McColley as a hotel. Fire caught 
under the range from careless construction and ignited floor boards 
and timbers underneath. Chemical engine responded. Used oiu- 
charge of Pony. Damage, $8; fully insured. 

Still. Monday, November 20, 0.23 p. M. Tenement block. conuT 
(iranile and West streets, owned by Clapp and French and occupied 
by several families. Officer saw dense smoke on roof and telephoned 
for help. Members of Engine and Ladder 2 responded. No fire dis- 
covered. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 195 

Still. Thursday, November 23, 5.55 A. Jr. Chimney fire in three- 
story wooden block, 43 Central street, owned by Philip Rilej^ and occu- 
pied b\- Louis Cardinal and others. Used one charge of Ponj". No 
damage. Chemical engine responded. 

Box 21. Thursday, November 23, 12.30 p. m. Three-story wooden 
block, 118 Central street, owned bj' Patrick A. Devine. Slight fire in 
a FBck of wall pajier, which was thrown out of store before arrival of 
department. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Friday, November 24, 3 r. jr. Chimnej' fire in three-story 
wooden block, 142-144 Central street, corner Pine. Members of Chem- 
ical responded. Used one charge of Ponj-. No damage. 

Still. Friday, November 24, 8,15 p. si. Sawdust in the unoccupied 
shed connected with the residence of the late Gov. E. A. Straw. Prob- 
ably set by boys. Chemical responded. 

Still. Saturday, November 25, 4.15 p. jr. Sawdust in shed of late 
Gov. E. A. Straw estate, again started. Members of Engine and Lad- 
der 5 responded with hose carriage. Used one charge of Pony. No 
damage. 

Still. Saturday, November 25, 4.55 p. jr. Chimney fire in eight- 
tenement wooden block, 21 Clark avenue, ovA-ned by Charles C. Hayes 
and occupied by several families. Members of Chemical responded. 

Still. Saturdaj-, November 25, 6.45 p. Ji. Chimney fire in four-tene- 
ment wooden building, 141 Manchester street. Used one charge of 
Pony. No damage. 

Box 21. Tuesdaj-, November 28, 7.22 p. Jr. Some excited person saw 
smoke and, imagining there was a fire, pulled the box. No fire was 
discovered. Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 3, 

Still. Friday, December 8, 9.40 p. ji. Four-tenement block, 42 
Church street, owned by A. H. Weston and occupied by several fam- 
ilies./ Chimney fire. Chemical engine responded. Used one charge of 
Pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, December 9, 10.10 A. Jr. Chimney fire in two-and- 
half-story house, 84 Auburn street, owned and occupied by Bridget 
Langley. Chemical engine responded. Used one charge of Pony. No 
damage. 

Still. Saturday, December 9, 8.45 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 39 Winter street, owned by Charles M. Floyd and occupied bj^ 
several families. Members of Engine Company 2 responded. Used 
three charges of Ponj'. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, December 12, 3.40 p. jr. Chimnej' fire in cottage 
house of George Young, on Bridge street extension (two and one half 
miles from City Hall). Chemical engine responded but was stopped 
at Stevens's pond and sent back. Used one charge of Pony. No 
damage. 

Still. Wednesday, December 13, 7.05 p. ji. Three-story brick block, 



196 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

081-985 Elm street, owned by J. A. Weston heirs and occupied by F. W. 
Woohvorth & Company as a 5 and 10 cent store. Fire originated on 
some shelves of toys in rear part of store and was extinguished with 
but little damage. Value of buildings, $4,500; damage, $10; insurance, 
$1,000. 

Box 45. Thursday, December 14, 12.11 A. M. One-story wooden 
building, corner Granite and Canal streets, owned by Mrs. Antoinette 
Hill and occupied by the Drew Machinerj- Agency, for the sale of 
various kinds of machinery. Cause, spontaneous combustion. Box 
pulled by Chandler Clough. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $1,500; damage, 
$30.50; insurance, $1,200; insurance paid, $30.50. Value of contents, 
$3,000; damage, $45; insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, $45. 

Box 312. Friday, December 15, 1.13 a. m. A pile of empty "car-boy" 
boxes in yard of Print Works laboratory, corner Turner and Douglas 
streets, ignited from spontaneous combustion. Xo damage. Box 
pulled by Officer Rainville. Companies responding: Engines 2, 4, 6, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Thursday, December 14, 5.30 p. M. Basement of No. 4 West 
Cedar street, used as an "image" shop. Lamp explosion. Chemical 
engine responded. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, December 14, 0.40 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 47 Church street, owned by Tom W. Robinson. Used one charge 
of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, December 17, 5.40 p. h. Two story wooden house, 
104 Auburn street, owned and occupied by W. J. McLaughlin. Chimney 
fire. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box 18. Monday, December IS, 8.27 p. M. Barn in rear of 375 Man- 
chester street, owned by George F. Bosher and occupied by David 
Ingalls and Aaron Gray. Cause of fire unknown. Box pulled by Wil- 
liam A. Crowther. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical. 
Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $3,500; damage, $450; insurance, 
$2,500; insurance paid, $450. Value of contents. $298; damage, $2G3; 
insurance, $100; insurance paid, $100. 

Still. Tuesdaj', December 19, 2.45 p. m. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement block, 148 ^fcCiregor street, owned by Ciordon Woodbury. 
Members of Engine and Ladder (i responded. No daniaiif. 

Box 112. Wednesday, December 20, 12.34 p. M. Cottage house. 27S 
Walnut street, owned by I. G. Kowell of Sutton and occupied by A. P. 
('r)fTi!l and S. O. Rogers. The tire started in partition downstairs and 
went to an open attic in the L. Cause, plumbers thawing water pipes. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 2, Truck ".. \ aine of building, $2,800; damage. $135; insurance. 
$1,500; insurance paid. $135. Value of contents. $1,000; damage, $25; 
insurance, $350. 

Still. Friday, Dcccniber 22, ().40 a. ^r. Cliiuuifv lire in three-tene- 
iiicnt block, rear 22 Wavnc street, owned l)v Kiitc Ciillitv. .Mcniljcrs of 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



197 



Engine and Ladder O i-esponded. Used three oharg-es of Pony. No 
damage. 

Still. Sunday, December 24, 7.47 r. M. Two-storj' tenement house, 
57S Beech street, owned by L. W. Pag-e and occupied by H. B. Cloug-h. 
Fire caug-ht from gas jet in bathroom, doing- slig-ht damag-e to the 
house. Chemical engine responded. Value of building-. $4,000; dam- 
age, $100; insurance, $3,000; insurance paid, $100. 

Still. Saturday, December ."50, 7.54 p. H. Two-£ind-half-story block, 
1129 Elm street, owned by Chadwick and Kennard heirs and occupied 
by Arthur Dumas as jewelry store. Cause, thawing- water pipes. 
Members of Chemical responded. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, December 31, 1.30 p. iL Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 20 Nashua street, owned bj^ Alonzo D. Richards and occupied by 
Oilman Langmaid. Members of Hose Company 2 responded. Used 
one charge of Pony. No damage. 

COMPANIES RESPONDING. 





ENGINES 






1 

s 


HOSE. 




TRUCKS 


















, 










1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 <^ 


1 


.|s 


1 


3 


5 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


2 


5 


16 


; 9 




4 


4 




2 


5 
















o 














5 


1 . 


4 


2 






8 


« 






2 






1 


6 




6 


7 


5 




13 


9 


8 


.... 


6 




3 




C 




1 


5 


4 




8 


6 




1 


5 




4 




6 


3 


5 


3 


1 




9 


6 




3 


6 




1 




.5 


3 


3 


2 


3 




8 


7 




2 


5 




3 


2 


3 




2 


3 


2 


.... 


4 


4 






4 




2 




3 


1 


•2 


3 


2 




9 


4 






2 




2 


1 


3 


•2 


3 


4 


1 




7 


5 




1 


5 




3 




3 


? 


4 


o 






- 


3 


9 


1 


3 




1 




1 




2 


4 


1 




10 


3 


2 




1 




1 


1 


49 


20 


38 


43 


21 


12 


104 


64 


39 


12 


45 


43 


23 


10 



January . . . 
February. . 

Alarcli 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

.September 
October — 
November . 
December. 



Total 49 



198 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation . 


Residence. 




Thomas W. Lane 

Eugene S. Whitney 

Clarence R. MerriJl 

Frank M. Frisselle '. 

John Montplaiser. 


Chief 




1937 Elm. 


i 

5 


Assistant 


Supt. Elec. Light. 
Grain dealer 


No. River road. 
414 Merrimack. 
58 Myrtle. 
Cooliclge ave. 


5 


Grocer 



SPARE DRIVER. 

Fred S. Morrill, teamster, 53 Beauport street. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, 28 Vine Street. 



Occupation. 



Charles F. McCoy . 
Frank E. Stearns.. 
James L. Brock... 
Charles F. Hall.... 
Edgar A. Young... 
Frank H, Harvey . . 
Artemas C. Barker 
Frank B. Marston. 
Thomas J. Wyatt . 
Lewis G. Bryant .. 

Fred A. Lang 

Melvin Walker.... 
Charles H. Fraser. 
Nate M. Kellogg .. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer . . 
Driver engine . . . 

Driver hose 

Hoseman 



Machinist .... 
Paper hanger 
Tinsmith . .... 

Engineer 

Clerk 

Teamster 

Carpenter — 

Coal dealer. . . 
Machinist — 
Carpenter — 

Printer 



50 Mechanic. 
48 0perablock. 
21 Market. 
28 Vine. 
369MerrinKick. 
28 Vine. 
28 Vine. 
1 Canal. 
26 Mechanic. 
423 Central. 
IGM. S. B. 
6 Canal. 
3G3 Concord. 
1937 Elm. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



199 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 2. 
House on North Main Street, \Squor/. 



m 



Occupation. 



71 


Ruel 6. Manning .... 


Captain 




55 Douglas. 
210 No. Main. 


08 






Sup. streets 


76 


Jei'emiali Lane 


Clerk and driver 

of engine 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer .. 


210 No. Main. 


1?0 


Henry C. Morrill 




53 Beauport. 
55 Douglas. 
35 No. Main. 


lis 






69 


Arthur W. Whitcomb .... 




7" 


Samuel A Hill 






86 School. 


75 


Robert J. Hill 






86 School. 


77 


Daniel E. Emerj- 





Machinist 


Williams. 


73 


Charles S. Cousins 




Harness-maker . . . 


151 Douglas. 






„ 




56 No. Main. 


66 


Joseph H. Alsop 




Wool waste sorter 


54 Douglas. 


70 


Chas. M. Tewksbury 


<• 


Clerk, B.&M.R.R. 


278 Douglas. 


67 


Janies Ried 







431 Granite. 











200 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 3. 
House on Lake Avenue, corner Massahesic. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 











330 E. Spruce. 
372 Lake avc. 






Lieut, of engine. 
Lieut, of truck. 




98 


John N.Chase 


Overseer 


462 Belmont. 






Clerk 


Clerk 


386 Central. 






Engineer 

Asst. engineer.. . 
Driver of engine 
Driver of hose. .. 




403 Hall. 




George B. Forsaith 

George H. Wheeler 

William S. McLeod 










.384 E. Spruce. 
419 Lake ave. 


SI 




83 


Lyman W. Piper 


Driver of truck.. 


Dresser 


393 Merrimack. 


114 


John Wilson 


Fireman .... 


Carpenter 


19 Warren 


110 


Albert W. Smith 




Clerk 


331 Merrimack. 


80 


Clarence Hackett 


'. 


Laundrymau 


672 Auburn. 


S5 


John W. Finn 


„ 


Painter 


501 Wilson. 


88 


George Taylor 


.. 


Mechanic 


382 Lake ave 


78 


George Dunnington 





Harness-maker . . . 


401 Manchester. 


79 


Louis N. Dufrain 


« 




473 Hall. 




Parker R. Brown 








153 


Edson F. Wyinan 


" 


Manufaclurer 


382 Lake ave. 


10F> 


Herbert E. Dunbar 

Harry A. Piper. 


" 


Clerk 




84 




375 Lake ave 











REPORT OF TUB FIRE ENGINEER. 



201 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 4. 

House, No. 20 Vine Street. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Lucius B. Snelling... 

John 11. Wales, Jr. . . , 

Thomas W. Lane, Jr, 

Joseph H. Gould 

Edward Sargent 

George A. Cann 

Ellsworth V. Rowe . . 

Walter A.Clarkson.. 
•25 Frank B. Stevens .... 
23 ! George Thompson ... 



Harvey E. Harris . 
Luther A. Knight. 
James C. Newton . 
Alfred Gustafson . 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer . . 
Driver of engine 
Driver of hose... 
Hoseman 



Pharmacist .- 
Brick mason 
Electrician . . 
Machinist ... 

Teamster — 

Carpenter . . . 
Clerk 

Laundryman 

Engineer 

Machinist — 



103 Walnut. 

2 M.S. B. 

1937 Elm. 

20 Vine. 

20 Vine. 

20 Vine. 

20 Vine. 

301 Walnut. 

144 Blodget. 

215 Salmon. 

249 Concord. 

16 Stark. 

[Pine 
Concord, cor. 



202 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY Xo. 5. 

House, No. 44 Webster Street. 





¥ 


NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


49 


Charles W. Brown 


Captain 


Clerk 


95 Harrison. 


161 










162 


George N. Burpee 


Lieut, engine . . . 


Electrician 


136 Sagamore. 


46 


Woodbury Davison 


Clerk 


Carpenter 


817 Union. 


in-^ 


Engineer 

Asst. engineer . . 
Driver engine... 
Driver truck .... 




54 Appleton. 
1419 Elm 


4" 


Daniel W. Morse 




1"=) 


Emil H. Smith 


Teamster 


44 Webster. 


124 


Benjamin C. Cann 




44 Webster. 


83 


Ernest E. Hubbell 


Driver hose 


„ 


44 Webster. 


47 


Russell L Cilley 




Clerk • i . 


863 Chestnut 


95 


Edward H. Clough 






859 Chestnut. 


108 


Edward L. Towle 


.. 




72 N. Adams. 


!"« 


Charles ir. Gile 


„ 




896 Union. 


99 


Will «. Fraspv 


„ 






160 George E. Badger 





Steam fitter 


55 Pennacook. 


168 


Andrew S. Fantom 





Cigar-maker 


1443 Elm. 


159 


John B. Eraser 


« 




Blacksmith 


53 Pennacook. 


101 


Charles W. Warner 




Electrician 


31 Blodget. 


126 


Edwin M. Dorney 


<> 


Tinsmith 


254 Walnut. 


41 


Max Hawkins 


•' 


Clerk 


73 Appleton. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



203 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. G. 
House on Ainory and Bimmon Streets. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



140 Frank W. Tebbetts 

147 James A. Farley 

142 Frank St. John 

138 Tbomas F. Fitzsimnions 

132 Charles Edgar 

133 Alcide Provencher 

134 Alphonso E. Foster 

135 Herbert Jeune 

136 - Henry C. Crosby 

129 i John Martin 

141 JohnJ. Conroy 

143 I Henry Stein 

\U Arthur Provost 

145 [ John E. Herring 

131 John C. Gemmell 

128 , John H. McCabe 

139 Gideon Bel isle 

146 ! Richard i'. Galway 

130 Qalvin Brinn 

137 Wm. T. Lockhead 



Captain 

Lieut, engine ... 

Lieut, truck 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer . . 
Driver engine. .. 

Driver hose 

Driver truck] 

Hoseman 



Loom-fixer — 

Machinist 

Marble finisher 

Painter 

Engineer 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Teamster 

Machinist 

Blacksmith 

Wool sorter ... 

Loom-fixer 

Laborer , 

Clerk 

Cigar-maker .. 

Loom-fixer 

Molder 



312 Cartier. 
385 Dubuque. 
15 Beauport. 
258 Beauport. 
Engine-house. 
516 Beauport. 
Engine-house. 
Engine-house. 
Engine-house. 
624 No. Main. 
268 Beauport. 
393 Hevey. 
516 Beauport. 
402Rimmon. 
71 Conant. 
310 No. Main. 
370 Cartier. 
460 No. Main. 
386Rimmon. 
71 Conant. 



204 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 
House, 8 Vine Street. 



Detailed driver of supply wagon. 

HOSE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, No. 26 Vine Street. 



^6 
lS5 


NAME. 


1 
Rank. Occupation. 

1 


Residence. 






Captain F.lPrtiir>ian 




116 


Clarence D. Palmer 

Benjamin R. Richardson 


Clerk 


Marble dealer 


301 Lake ave. 














279 Laurel. 










26 Vine. 













Occupation. 



<5fi 


Joseph E. Merrill 

Charles B. French 

AlhArl- A PnffAi- 


Captain 


Currier 


21 Ash. 


52 


Lieut .... 




39 M. S. B. 


4A 


Clerk 




499 Beech. 


37 


Henry C. Parsons 

Samuel W. Patten 






16 Prospect. 
3M. S. B. 


35 


Hoseman 


Belt maker 


45 


George I. Aver 


.. 


Electrician 


28 M. S. B. 






,, 


Clerk 


21 Ash. 


50 
39 

38 


Andrew S. Heath 

George W. Snadden 

Will U.Nelson 


„ 




27 Russell. 






373 Bridge. 


,. 


Gas-works cinji. .. 


100 Brook. 


53 


Albert W. Tucker 






535 Granite. 


.. 


Machinist 


26 Vine. 











REPORT OF TUE FIRE ENGINEER. 



205 



H08E COMPANY No. 2. 

House on Maple Street, corner East High 



HOSE COMPANY No. 3. 

House, South Elm Street. 



|6 
5Z 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


t4 








27 Warren. 
288 Bridge. 
521 Maple. 
521 Maple. 
ogg Pine 


55 


Revilo fi. Hmiorht.nn 


Lieutenant 

Clerk 


Gas-fitter 


59 Joseuh W. Ratchelder. .. 


Carpenter .. . 


"iT 








6? 


Julien B. Huntley 

Charles W. PoweU 

Addison Seaward 

Arthur B. Merrill 

James A . Rogers 


Hoseman 

.. 




Plumber. 


60 


Carpenter . 


510 Maple. 
296 Orange. 
Clay street. 

761 'R(><>r>)i 


61 




'yd 


„ 


63 




65 


John M. Emerson 

Thomas Smith 






58 


Carpenter . 


04 South 


64 


Melvin W. Worthen 

















! 
NAME. 1 Rank. 

i 


Occupation . 


Residence. 


no 


FredS. Sloan 

Frank D.Hardy 

Elmer R. Laing 

Charles H. Rogers 

James H. McKenzie 

William P. Hall 


Captain ....' Firpmnn 


03 Elm 


T>7 




Yard brakeman . . . 


20 Cheney pic. 


lil 


Clerk 


152 


Driver 




23 Elm 


153 
154 


Hoseman 


Sash-maker 

Gas-maker 

Clerk 


Elm. 
39 Elm 


155 

156 


Henry O. FoUansbee 

Celon D. Stevens .. 


26 Welch ave. 
im Wf>l(>h Rvp 











206 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



IIOUK AND LADDER COMPANY No. ]. 

House, 18 Vine Street. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 







Captain 




40 Market. 


9-? 




Clerk 


312 Manchester 


a'? 


Fred W.Bond 


Clerk 


Loom-fixer 


46 Stark. 


94 


Charles M. Denjou 

Jerome J. Lovering 

Harrison H. Cole 






18 Vine. 


qj 








104 






883 Union. 










23 Maple. 
18 Vine. 






., 












16 M. .S. B. 
















„ 






90 


Frank A. Pherson 


„ 


Machinist 


18 Vine. 




Benjamin F. Marsh 


,, 












40 Orange. 
1037 Elm. 


100 


John Short 




Clerk 









REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



207 



RIVERSIDE HOSE No. 5.— (Volunteer Company.) 
House, Front Street, Amoskeag. 







Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 








Superintendent. . . 
Milkman 




rd 




George Lawrence 




349 Front. 




148 
143 
135 
139 


Clerk 


Meat cutter 


85 Omega. 
460 Front 








Mill hand 




Charles E. Stearns 

Andrew J. Mojnihan .... 


lloseman 




Milkman 


329 Front 




Blood's Loc. Wks. 


450 Front. 




140 


Lcroy O. Balch 




Meat cutter 


126 Goffsto'n 


rd 


147 


Charles Linen 


„ 


Blood's Loc. Wks 


298 Front. 




140 


Clarence H. Stearns 






421 Front 












138 


Joseph Stocks 


i> 


Second-hand 


3 Dean. 




145 j Fred H. Balch 





Meat cutter 


228 Goffsto'n 


rd 


142 Sherman L. Greer 





Grocer 


218 Goffsto'n 


rd 




„ 








151 Edward C. Manley 

141 Arthur Moon 













Blacksmith 


36 Second. 






(, 








William \lsey 




Clerk 


389 Front. 




1 S'amuel Montplaiser 


" 


Blacksmith 


25 Second. 





EEPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OE SCHOOLS. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



To the School Board, the City Councils, and the Citizens of Mancliester: 

The following is presented as the fifty-third annual report of the 
public schools of the city of Manchester, the same also being the forty- 
fourth report of the superintendent of public instruction, and the final 
school report for the year 1899: 

ORGANIZATION OF THE DAY SCHOOLS. 

The average number of day schools for the school year ending July 
1, 1899, was 123, reckoned as follows: the equivalent of 12 rooms of 
high-school grade; 32 grammar-school divisions, 3 more than last year 
(the additions being the highest grade at Amoskeag, likewise the high- 
est at the Parker school, and an extra division at the Rimmon school); 
28 middle schools, 1 more than last year (which is the additional school 
established at Amoskeag, upon occupancy of the new sclioolhouse 
there); 44 jirimary schools; 1 partially graded school, 1 less than last 
year (that at Amoskeag having become a grammar division) ; 5 un- 
graded schools, and 1 Manual Training school. 

There were employed for the care of the 123 day schools,* through- 
out the year: 7 suijervising male principals of large schools; a lady 
principal and a general .assistant (2)t for the care of the Training 
school for teachers; 118 class-room teachers.t of whom 9 ladies and 2 
gentlemen were also principals; and 3 special teachers of music and 
drawing; or, in all, 130 teachers for the entire year, — 2 more than for 
the 3'ear pi-eceding (one for the additional grammar division at the 
Rimmon school, and the other for the additional school at Amoskeag). 

The total enrollment of difPerent pupils in all our public schools for 
the school year ending July 1, 1899, was 5,717, — a loss of 85 upon the 
enrollment of the preceding year. This loss may be properly ex- 
plained as follows: The school enrollment of 1898 was greater than 
that of 1897 by 301 pupils, and this was due to the fact that a consider- 
able number of pupils attended school last year simplj-- because they 
could not obtain work, on account of the "poor times"; but finding 
work more plentiful this year, it is not surprising that as many as 85 

* Manual Training school included. 

t Aided by young ladies constituting the sub-teachers' classes, who had charge of 
the several classrooms. 

JOf these 118, six are males,— three sub-masters in the High scliool, tlie principal 
of tlie Kimmon scliool, the principal at GofTe's Falls, and the teacher of the Manual 
Training scliool. 

211 



212 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

should withdraw. It is in evidence, too, that the larger part of them 
are over sixteen j'ears of age and from the lower grades of school, — 
which facts show they are of the class that withdraw from school 
whenever allowable to seek regular employment. 

CHABACTEK OF SUBJECTS AND QUALITY OF INSTEUCTION. 

The Manchester iiublic schools are veritable workshojis. The begin- 
ner, at the age of five years, timidly approaches the teacher; but being 
met with smiles, an assuring voice, and an extended hand that tenderly 
guides him to a seat, he speedily becomes accustomed to his surround- 
ings. He notices that his companions have seats similar to his own, 
that most of them (being former j)upils) appear to be without fear, 
and that, though quiet, they exercise a certain freedom of movement. 
He therefore examines his seat, and begins to look about the room. 
Observing pretty pictures upon the walls, and colored drawings upon 
the blackboards, he points to some of them and smiles as he turns the 
attention of other pupils thereto. The pleasant voice of the teacher, 
liowever, early arrests the attention of all; for she gently leads them 
in song, simple Scripture readings, and the prajer of the Elder Brother 
of mankind. Strange as the opening exercises may ap^iear to some of 
the begimiei-s, the hearts of all now go out to the teacher; and aitei- 
another song or two, they look for the teacher's further direction. 
Now is the turning point; she will be weighed even by the beginners, 
and without their knowing it. Has she good judgment and much 
tact, or a lack of them that shows she is found wanting? Does she 
discourse upon the proprieties of school life, and at length set forth 
rules and directions till her pu])lls have long*slnce ceased to listen to 
what thej^ could not understand, and are therefore already meddling 
with one another? No; nothing of the sort, if she is a teacher. 

The beautiful Avords of the song are promptly followed by a move- 
ment of the teacher that calls the attention of her pupils to a simple 
drawing upon the blackboard. "Children," says she, "how many of 
you would like to make a picture like this for me?" An affirmative 
answer comes in various forms, for all have not yet learned to raise 
the hand. "Well, then, I'll give you paper and pencil and let j'ou do it, 
and if you have your picture finished before I come to see it, yoir may 
make it over again and better. Then you may make this one and 
this one," pointing to other forms upon the blackboard. "I shall come 
to your seat to have a little talk with every one of you this morning, 
and I want to see you all working until I can come to you and have 
my talk." 

The teacher then proceeds to take the name, ago, and residence of 
each pupil; but finding, before she gets half tlirough the registration, 
that several pupils are no longer interested in ])icture making, she 
leaves her work, quickly inspects the efforts of all, gives them proper 
commendation and material that will again interest and profit them, 
while she proceeds wilii the registration. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 213 

Thus it is that the beoinner upon public school life is on his first 
day's attendance all unconsciously performing duties of the highest 
importance in school life; for the foregoing outline of his first day's 
partial experience is designed to be typical of his whole school career, 
in so far at least as to indicate that the character of the work assigned 
a pupil should ever be adapted to his capacity, that all subjects should 
be so presented and diversified as to awaken and promote the pupil's 
interest, sufficient collateral work being arranged to keep the brightest 
pupils busj', and that the quality of the instruction afforded should 
be such as to inspire courage, persistencj' of effort, and determination 
to overcome all difficulties. 

Teachers who have a right comprehension of their duties, and the 
ability practically to discharge them in accordance with the general 
principles just briefly outlined, are not of the kind ever moralizing 
for the sake of hearing themselves talk, or otherwise wasting words to 
the exclusion of the pupil's opportunity to do his share of the talk- 
ing, — which is rightfully an increasingly larger portion, after his first 
year at school. Pupils must be trained to think and work for them- 
selves; hence it is not to their advantage to have teachers pluck for 
them the fruit of the tree of knowledge, but they may sometimes need 
downward to bend its boughs in order that the fruit may be within 
the possible reach of pupils, who should then be allowed the satis- 
faction of plucking the fruit for themselves as a reward for the effort 
made to grasp it. A wise teacher will refrain from affording other 
aid than encouragement when pupils can attain proper results without 
greater assistance. Only the wisest of teachers can properly discrim- 
inate when to afford and when to withhold direct assistance to pupils, 
and determine when it is afforded to what extent and in what way. 

Now it is because of the high average fitness of our teachers for their 
work, and because they are themselves good workers, that the schools 
of Manchester are, as I have before said, veritable workshops, in which 
(for the most part, at least) progress, pleasure, and nobleness of pur- 
pose are combined. 

Would that our citizens in general as fully understood this, fi-om per- 
sonal visitation and inspection, as the success of the schools warrant. 
Because they do not, however, and because only a few, comparativel\' 
speaking, have anything more than an imaginative idea of the work- 
attempted in the various grades of school, I propose to set forth their 
work somewhat in detail, in order, if possible, to induce parents more 
generally to visit the schools and see in what manner the work is done. 
Xo work, I am sure, is anywhere done that is more interesting or im- 
portant than that performed in the iiublic schools; and if parents 
and citizens in general adequately realized the work of the schools, 
and the manner of its presentation, they could at least talk with their 
children about the schools much more intelligently and helpfully. 

An outline of the work of the schools is presented in the earnest 
hope that a perusal of it will lead many citizens frequently to visit 



214 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the schools and observe the manner of presenting the subjects taught, 
as well as the treatment of pupils. Much mutual benefit would be 
derived from such a visitation; for parents and citizens would be highly- 
enlightened in regard to what the schools are accomplishing, and both 
teachers and pupils would be greatl3' encouraged and inspired to 
attain still better results. 

THE WOEK OF THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

"Reading is the key to all knowledge," hence the proprietj^ of giving 
this key to pupils as earlj' in school as i)Ossible. During the first few 
days of the child's attendance at school, the teacher gains the confi- 
dence of pupils by conversational exercises in regard to familiar 
objects,— ^animals, pictures, sports; things perceived bj* the senses; 
articles of clothing or furniture; stories, etc. 

\^1len confidence has been gained and pupils become free to express 
their thoughts and feelings, reading from the blackboard is com- 
menced. Only script letters are iised. The meaning of words is 
taught by use of objects, pictures, drawings, actions, stories, etc., 
then the visible s-gns (written Avords) are placed upon the board, 
singly or combined in sentences, as the purpose may be best attainetl; 
lastly, the oral signs (pronounced words) are given. Articles, prepo- 
sitions, conjunctions, and other unimportant words are first taught 
in sentences. It is designed that puiiils shall not be permitted to read 
aloud until the meaning of what they are to express is first clear to 
them. Naturalness of expression is thus attained. 

The work of the beginners' class is first to master in script all the 
words in the first half of the Primer, taught from the blackboard and 
slate according to the mctliod above described; then the ])rinted forms 
of the same words are taught while nppliod in reading the first half 
of the Primer, in print, from itself. 

The Primer is finished by the end of the first year, and the First 
Reader by the end of the lower primary course. The Second and Third 
Readers will also be completed within the higher primary course. 
Extended readings are also niadi' from naders supplementary to the 
regular readers in all prima ly classts, as well also as in all higher 
classes to the end of tlic i^iainniar school course. 

Pupils are greatly aided in their endeavors to express the thoughts 
of others in reading U'ssons if they are required to express thoughts 
by reading language which they have themselves written. Hence 
there is great advantage in having ]iui)ils able to write as early as 
possible. There are also other advant;iges derived fi<nn teaching 
penmanship in connection with reading. 

At first, pupils imitate the teacher's writings (upon the board) of 
those words which they have had as reading lessons; aiul it is sur- 
prising how soon some of them a((|uire the ability to write quite 
legibly. They are also early tanglit to write their own names and 
other sjx'eial words. Individual htters are also given, in suitably 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 215 

g-raded lessons, for such practice and drill as is designed to cause 
pupils to acquire perfection of form. 

Spelling is taught during the tirst year by sound, as an aid in teach- 
ing reading. In the second year spelling is taught by letter, Avords 
being selected from those in common use by young childi'en.and from 
reading lessons. The spelling book is introduced in the third (or last) 
year of the primarj' school, and its use is continued in all classes to 
the end of the grammar school course. 

Language is undoubtedly the most important of all the subjects 
taught in the schools, for it includes reading, writing, spelling, and, 
in short, all written and spoken s]3eech. The grammar of a language 
is the science which treats of its x^rinciples, a knowledge of which will 
furnish one with a criterion for determining the correctness of his 
use of language. A good use of language, however, is not best taught 
by the study of grammar, but by imitation and by drill in properly 
graded exercises. The study of grammar comes much later, begun 
in the seventh year of our schools; and a knowledge of it is afforded 
in order that its mastery may serve the place of a ci'itic teacher all 
through life. 

Language instruction in the primary schools has for its chief objects 
(1) freedom in talking; (2) correctness in talking, involving- a knowl- 
edge of common forms of speech and the avoidance of common errors; 
(3) the enlargement of the child's vocabulary, and the training which 
teaches him to connect thought and speech. 

Language exercises at the outset are of the simplest kind, not de- 
signed to make the transition from home to school abrujit or startling. 
The tendency to utter incomi^lete sentences is gradually overcome, 
by requiring pupils fully to express what they mean. Written exer- 
cises, in which pupils are expected to express their ideas of what they 
have been previously taught, greatly aid in securing a complete expres- 
sion of thought; and, in due time, much and varied written work is 
performed, including writing from dictation and letter writing, in the 
higher primary classes. 

Arithmetic is commenced by application of the well-known Grube 
system of teaching number, which involves almost simultaneous in- 
struction in the four fundamental principles of arithmetic. The first 
year's instruction is chieflj' aiforded and illustrated by use of objects 
in the hands of the children, who stand around a table for convenience 
in handling the material. Number cards are then used, which contain 
simple problems in ever varying form and are designed to afford proper 
practice in early operations with number. The Elementary Arithmetic 
is commenced by the highest class of the j)rimary grade. This book 
affords in another form an admirable review of, and some advancement 
upon, the work in arithmetic previouslj- done. 

Oral instruction is also afforded to all the primary classes (of a 
nature and to an extent adapted to the degree of pupils" advancement) 
upon such subjects as plant and animal life, coloi-, the human body, 



216 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

its proper cai'e, and the injurious effects of stimulants and narcotics. 
I'he cardinal points of the compass, size, place, direction, and distance 
are also taught in the higher primary classes, preparatory to the stud^' 
of geography in the middle school. Special outlines have been fur- 
nished teachers for giiidance in affording instruction in Bird Life and 
Nature Studies. 

Oral instruction is given tliroughout all our grades below the High 
school, but to a decreasing extent in the higher classes, because the 
older pupils should be taught to obtain knowledge from books. 

Music and drawing are begun in the lower primarj"^ grades, and both 
subjects are well taught tliroughout all our schools, for the teaching 
of them is directed and closely supervised bj- special and highly eflB- 
cient instructors. 

Much might be said of the utility, in various ways, of the instruc- 
tion afforded in our schools through oral lessons and the teaching 
of music and drawing, but the aesthetic culture thus afforded is every 
way paramount and of incalculable worth. It reaches deeply into the 
souls of pupils and there effects a humanizing, if not a divine, influence 
that will ever abide for the good not only of the recipients themselv^ 
but also of all with whom they may have to do. 

THE WORK OF THE MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

Each grade of the two middle schools, known as lower and higher, 
covers a pei'iod of one year. The work of the middle schools is to ad- 
vance pupils in a knowledge of all the subjects taught in the primary 
.schools, with geography added, and the more advanced knowledge ex- 
pected is acquired by greater study of the printed page, and with less 
dependence upon oral instruction, though this is continued. 

In the lower middle school, the Advanced Third Keader is read. A 
greater number of applied problems in arithmetic are solved, simple 
fractions and mixed numbers being also taught. In language, the 
<iiaracter of sentences and tlieir ])rineii)al parts are tlistinguished, the 
uses of capital letters, abbrev iations, dates, margins, hyi)liens, contrac- 
tions, and punctuation being taught by well graded exercises in 
tlie vvi'iting of letters, stories, descriptions, and writings at dicta- 
lion. Frye's rriniary ( Jcogi-.-iphy is begun, and more tlian Inilf con>- 
)tlfted. This book is a wide and desiral)ie (K'i)artnie I'loni the former 
way of presenting the snlijcct. It first jjrojHM-ly treats largely of the 
jihysical features of the earth, and through numerous ])ietures, true 
to nature, tlie author makes I lie meaning of liis book clear to children 
of iniddle-scliool age. In a(hlilion to the natural features of the con- 
tinents, tliere is stinlied in tliis giach- liu- geograj)hy of tiu> United Stat«'s 
in general and of New Kngiand in partienhir. Parents will do well to 
examine this iiook, which nniy be horrowi-d of the teaeher. through 
their children. 

In tho lii-h.i- middle school, easy fourth 
IChMncntary A lit lim.t ic is <-oin|)leted, so, also, 



Icrs 


are 


read. 


The 


indr 


cd , 


lages ( 


.)f the 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 01' SCHOOLS. 217 

Second Book, the subjects tauglit being- United States money, accounts 
and bills, easy fractions and denominate numbers. In language, pre- 
vious topics are amplitied, common and ^iroper names exemiilified, and 
plurals, simple verb forms, adjectives, quotations, reiiroduetions, stories 
from outlines and geographical subjects are also treated. The Primary 
Geography is completed and Frye's Complete Geographj' begun. lu 
the Primary Geograiihy, used by the lower class of this grade, the 
peoples of the earth and plant and animal life are studied; also the 
g-eneral geogTaphy of all the continents. The Complete Geography is 
commenced by the higher class of the higher middle school; and while 
most of its first topics are similar to those usuallj' found in the first 
part of a large geography, their treatment by Frye is quite different, — 
particularly because of the emphasis g-iven j)hysical features and tlie 
forcible presentation of them by the aid of an abundance of pictures 
and relief maps of superior quality. Tlie authors treatment of geog- 
raphy has wi'ought a great and desirable change in the study of this 
subject. Nature is so effectually brought to the attention of the pupil 
that he becomes a close observer of lier varied forms, and his study 
of geography from then onward is to a limited degree after the manner 
of that of the original investigator; and it is a great gain to pupils so 
early to have acquired such a habit in any study, for it connects lan- 
guage and thoug-ht as no other experience can, and will awaken an 
interest in the study of other subjects greatly to the advantage of the 
learner. 

THE WORK OF THE GRAMSIAH SCHOOLS. 

Instruction begun in the jirimary and middle schools in reading, 
writing, spelling, nature topics (assigned for oral instruction), music, 
drawing, arithmetic, language, and geography are continued through- 
out the grammar-school course of four years. To these subjects are 
added the history of the United States and in the last two years of the 
coiirse, manual training, book-keeping, and civil govei'nment; but all 
of the foregoing studies are not taken during every term, — it being 
so arranged that individual pupils have but three main subjects of 
>tudy at one time. 

Tlie work of the grammar schools is apportioned to four distinct 
grades of school, known as the first, second, third, and fourth divisions, 
each division having two classes and covering a year's work. 

The so-called "Fourth Division" is the lowest of the grammar-school 
grades, and its main studies are arithmetic, language, and geography. 
The arithmetical topics of the fourth-division grade are factors, com- 
mon fractions, and decimal fractions. In language, the varied written 
exercises of the middle schools are much extended and made the basis 
of literary criticism. A simple treatment of the forms and variations 
of the different parts of speech is also afforded. The geographical 
topics of this grade are the leading physical features of Noi'th and 
South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia; also, briefly, the 
races of meu and their religions and g'overnments, plant and animal 



218 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

life, commerce, railroads, and a review of the geography of the United 
States and the other countries of North America. 

The arithmetical topics of the Third Division are compound numbers, 
mensui'ation of surfaces and solids, and percentage. In language. 
Part I of Metcalf's English Grammar is taken, and this is supplemented 
by a continuation of written exercises designed to afford further in- 
struction in arrangement of margins, paragraphing, punctuation; in 
the use of capital lettei"s, abbreviations, contractions^ quotations, 
marks of correction; and in writing letters, formal notes, descriptions, 
the reproduction of stories, narrations, biographical sketches, also 
sketches upon other subjects,— geographical, historical, etc. Frye's 
Com]jlete Geographj- is finished by the lower class of this grade, and 
the topics are the geography of the countries of all the continents 
except those of North America. This class also reviews the essentials 
of the entire book. The higher class begins the historj' of the United 
States. It studies the development of the thirteen original English 
colonies, — which has chiefly to do with their settlement, civilization, 
and the so-called Intercolonial Wars. 

The arithmetic topics of the Second Division are interest (with its 
variously applied jaoblems), bank discount, proportion, })artnership, 
involution, evolution, and square root. In language, about fifty pages 
of Part II of ]\[etcalf's English Grammar are taken, supplemented by 
written exercises similar in nature to those required in the Third 
Division, though somewhat more complex. The history of the United 
States is completed in this grade, the following topics being studied: 
The American Kevolutlon, the development of the states (or the presi- 
dential a(hninistra1i()ns till isci). tiu' Civil AVar. rt-construction, subse- 
quent adininistral ions, ;is well as ])assiiig cvi'iits. 

The mathematical to])ics indicated in Ihc course of study for the 
First Division are, during the fail Icnii. mensuration (or practical 
geometry) as found in the latter part of the arithmetic, and algebra is 
proposed for the winter and spring terms. Book-keeping is taught 
during Iho last half of the school year. In language, Metcalfs Gram- 
mar is continued, com])lcte(l, and tlif cnlirc book reviewed. Civil 
government is taught during llie first hall of tiie school year, and dur- 
ing the last half of it geography (finished in the third division, two 
years ])i-eviously) is wholly revii-wed. 

I have now presinted. in Inief. the sulijeets or to|)ies of study re- 
(inired to hi- taught in all the ditVerent grades of school l)elow the 
High school. This has heen done for the purpose of informing all 
interested ])er.sons. soniewiial detinitely. in regard to the work of 
the schools; and in the hope of inducing i)arents. and citizens in gen- 
eral, much more niitnerousiy to visit the schools and witness the 
manner and methods of presenting the subjects taught, and the kind 
of treatment accorded pupils. I'roin the outlines given, intending vis- 
itors are. directed to the gra<les u( school in which they may (ind those 
topics taught that most inti-rcsl them. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 219 

The human body is lifeless without the inward breathing- spirit; so 
is a course of study likewise dead matter till animated by the spirit 
intended to give it life, — the teacher. It therefore follows that no due 
estimate of the value of the work of the schools can be made by any 
one who does not somewhat frequently visit them, and therein per- 
sonally observe how their work is performed. 

Frequent visitation of the schools would be welcomed by the teachers 
and result in much profit, for both pupils and teachers would thereby 
be greatlj' encouraged and inspired to higher attainments; while vis- 
itors of schools which are skillfully managed would be well entertained 
and have revealed to them much merit that is generallj'^ unknown, 
because discoverable only bj^ personal inspection. Indeed, it may be 
safely said that pupils become successful men and women through 
the influence of the schools more because of the attendant training, in- 
struction, and inspiration afforded by a good teacher, than because 
of the mere mastery of the book knowledge indicated in the course of 
study. Parents should therefor^ inspect the work of the teacher, in 
order that from an understanding of her spirit and methods they may 
best know how to co-operate for the good of their own children. 

It will not be practicable to present the topics of study taken hy 
each of the high-school classes; so I submit the bare outline of the gen- 
eral subjects as pi-e.sented in the revised form of the high-school course 
of study, which will become operative the last day of next month (Jan- 
uary 31, 1900). 

MAXCIIESTEK, X. H., HIGH-SCHOOL COrKSE OF STUDY. 

Fourth (or Begimicf's^) Class. 
I. English (4). 
11. xVlgebra (5). 

III. Physics (5). 

IV. General History (3) and Composition (2). 
V. Latin (5). 

VI. Declamation. 
VII. Drawing. 
Vin. Music. 

Scholars of this class must take I, II, III, and also either IV or V. 
They may also take any or all of VI, VII, VIII. 

Third Class. 
I. English (4). 
II. Geometry (5). , 

III. Arithmetic (5), first semester; Book-keeping (5), second 

semester. 

IV. Physiology, or Zoology (5), first semester; Botany (5), second 

semester. 
V. English History (4). 
VI. Latin (5). 



220 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

VII. French (5), German (.")), Greek (5). Any one, only. 

VIII. Declamation. 
IX. Drawing-. 

X. Music. / 

Scholars of this class must take I, and either II or III,* and also any 
l\\o of IV, V, VI, and VII. They may also take anj^ or all of VIII, 

IX, X. 

Second Class. 
I. English (4). 
11. Solid Geometry (5), first semester; Trigonometry (5), second 
semester. 

III, Book-keeping (5), first semester; Typewriting and Stenography 

(5), second semester. 

IV. Chemistry (5). 

V. American History and Government (3) and Political Economy 
(3). 
VI. Latin (5). 
VII. French (5), German (5), Greek (5). Any two, onh\ 
VIII. Grecian History (3), English (2). For college division. 
IX. Advanced Physics (5). 

X. Declamation. 
XL Music. 

Scholars of this class must take I, and also any three of II, III, IV, 
V, VL VII, VIII, and IX. They may also take either or both of X and 
XL 

First Class. 

I. Rhetoric and English Literature (5). 
11. Algebra, reviewed (5), first semester; Geometry, reviewed (5), 
second semester. 

III. Typewriting and Stenography (5). 

IV. Astronomy (5), first semester; Physical Geography with Ele- 

nJents of Geology (5), second semester. 

V. Latin (r,). 

VI. French (5), German (5), Greek (.">). Any two, only. 

VII. Roman History (3), English (2). For college division. 

^'^IT. English (Jraniniar, reviewed (")), first semester. 

IX. Declamation. 
X. Music. 

Scholars of this class must take L aiul also any tlireo of II, 111. IV, 
V, VL VII. aiKl VIII. Tii.y may also take either or both of IX and X. 

X. 15. Al'lcr . I line, I'.mki, t lie high-school dijiloina will be awarded 
only for sat islii<-t<ji y coniplft ioii of the fiil! course as required for all 
the classes. 

Ft will 1)1' ol)sfrvtMl tliMt. the new higli-schooi i-oiirso of study is not 
sub-dividfd into dilVcreiit tiivisions, as heretofore, and tliat there is 

♦ II lidlh I I ;iii<l III l.f tiiUi'ii. tiiilv one of IV, \'. \l, :in.l \ II ii.'cl I..' tiiUcii. 



REPORT OF THE SUl'ERINTENDEJ^T OF SCHOOLS. 221 

a much wider choice of optional studies, typewriting", stonogi-aphy, 
and German being also added to the list of subjects taught. Parents 
should be able to select, from the studies offered, such a course of in- 
struction for their children as Avill Avell meet their several needs; for 
nearly every subject usuallj' taught in high schools is presented, and 
the larger portion of these subjects is made elective. Pupils who design 
to prepare for college should, however, consult the principal of the 
school with reference to what line of studies had best be taken a.s 
preparation for the particular college which each designs to attend. 
It is likely that when this course is printed for the use of pupils it 
will be accompanied bj^ explanations designed to aid them in their 
effort to make a wise selection of studies. 

Under the new course of study, the least period of time allotted any 
subject is half a year, instead of a term, as heretofore. Promotions 
from class to class should in future be made in the High school semi- 
annuallj^ as they are in all our other schools. 

There is occasionally a pupil in the High school who, for days, and 
sometimes weeks at a time, is not able to make any kind of a recita- 
tion in one or more of his studies. He makes only the invariable reply, 
"I don't know," to all of his teacher's questions. Such negligence, per- 
mitted, is thoroughly demoralizing- not only to the participant but 
quite likely also to a few of those witnessing the misconduct, whether 
performed in a spirit of meekness or of bravado to give it the appearance 
of smartness. If promotion in the High school from class to class con- 
tinues to be based upon a standing of at least sixtj^ -per cent in everj' 
study, and promotions be made as often as every six months, there 
would be much less likelihood of contagion from such cases of miscon- 
duct as I have cited. But the cases themselves should be curecj, and to 
this end I recommend that the high-school teachers be empowered to 
require any pupil esteemed unduly negligent about the preparation 
of a lesson, or its recitation, to report himself to his teacher at the High 
schoolhouse for the proper recitation of said lesson, as a condition of 
his continuance in the class, at such time in the afternoon as may be 
determined by the principal of the school. This plan would eifectuallj' 
reform, or eliminate from our High school, the few who are there only 
because their ambition is seemingly to live for the purpose of mere 
existence rather than to serve any good purpose. 

High-school teachers should also be empowei'ed to require the after- 
noon presence in special session of pupils who refuse properly to utilize 
their study periods, and then and there they should be required to 
inake good their loss of time in school hours; likewise, also, should 
pupils unnecessarily- tardy be required to make good their loss of time 
from school. In short, if the high-school teachers shall be empowered 
to require the afternoon special session for the correction of all such 
abuses as make it justifiable for teachers of all our other grades to 
require pupils to remain after school, there would result a greater 
improvement in the condition of our High school than anything else 
could produce of which I now think. 



222 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

There is another service which the high-school teachers can per- 
form for their pnpils, -which would, I'm sure, prove of great general 
advantage. It is that each of these teachers be at the schoolhouse 
regularly one afternoon every week, from 3 till 4 o'clock, for the pui*- 
lK)se of aiding pupils who need assistance about their lessons and 
would gladly go for it if it were understood thej^ could feel free to do 
so. There are fifteen teachers in the High school; and if the board 
should require that onlj' three of them be present at the same time, 
as above si^ecified, pupils could apply any afternoon of a school day 
for needed assistance and get it from some one of the three teachers 
present, if, with the end in view, they be grouped in accordance with 
their ability to meet expected conditions. I do not think teachers 
would regard such a requirement a hardship, for doubtless they are 
nearly all there about as often as once a week and not far from the 
hour specified, though not regularlj% nor in accordance with any sys- 
tematized plan that has been open and helpful to all alike. Teachers 
should, indeed, cheerfullj' meet such a requirement, for they would be 
compensated by more satisfactory results from i:)upils and the gener- 
allj" improved condition of the school. 

It should not be inferred from the foregoing that any new or 
unusual laxity has occui'red in the High school during the past school 
year, for it is not so. The difficulty in question began with the 
inauguration of the one session plan. Then that class of pupils who 
are not inclined to make the most of their opportunities began to take 
advantage of conditions which practically debarred teachers from 
detaining" pupils after school to make up lesson deficiencies. For this 
reason, the neglect properlj' to j)repare lessons soon became more ex- 
tended. Such neglect, on account of its baneful influence, though the 
fault of only a few pupils, is a great evil in any school and especially 
when deliberatelj' intended. Nearlj' all the disturbances occurring 
in the High school in I'ecent years have originated with pupils in 
attendance upon the school for other purposes than a proper discharge 
of duty. Teachers have contended with the evil as best they could, 
under existing conditions; and now, for somewhat more than a year, 
they have so far held the wrongly inclined in check that the school 
has had a period of quiet and successful effort. But the accomplish- 
ment has been at the sacrifice of nerve power that would have other- 
wise enabled the teachers to do much more and better for the school. 
Hence my recommendation that teachers bo not longer left single- 
handed to cope with an evil and influence so injuriou.s as that effected 
by pu])ilK of the high-sdiool grade whose main ])urpose apjiarentl^' is to 
remain in school to escape work elsewhere, and do as little as possible 
of it in school. 

Till: TItAlNlNCi S( IIOOI, KOU TKACIl I.ltS. 

Ill I'liriiu I- ii'iKnIs ! Iia\i' set forth (he :iilvaii1agcs derived from the 
liaiiiiiig MlVonlcd In I his scliool, in tiu" way of riirnishing substitute 
teachers fully (•(iiiipclciil to carry on the work of regular teachers 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 223 

)i-mpovaiily absent, instaiu-es of which are of almost daily occurrence; 
and I have also repeatedly expressed the opinion, which I still enter- 
tain, that the average s'raduates of the Training school elected to per- 
manent teacherships in our schools have j)roven themselves more sat- 
isfactory and better teachers than the avei'age of those elsewhere 
obtained. At the })resent time three fourths of the ladies in our cori)s 
of teachers are o-raduates of our Ti-aining school for teachers, and I do 
not hesitate to say that were they all to withdraw the vacancies could 
not be filled by their equals at the salaries paid. 

Since the organization of this school, in 18G9, several changes have 
been made for its betterment, and, as a consequence, the school, years 
ago, became quite popular and so many candidates sought admission 
that its classes were enlarged. Until i-ecently, however, graduates have 
generally obtained teacherships without much delay, but now there are 
twelve without permanent positions, some of these having been grad- 
uated two years ago. The training-school committee, now seeing the 
supply greater thai- the demand, deem the time opportune for effect- 
ing another improvement by adding five months to the school's course 
of stud.y and training, in future graduating a class annually instead 
of every six months. I heartily appprove the proposed plan, for it 
would afford graduates a superior preparation for teacliing, and be 
likely to keep the supph' about equal to the demand. 

Being pressed for time, the principal of the Training school has been 
obliged to unite classes that should have been kept apart, one being 
five months ahead of the other and capable of doing more work, were 
the opportunity afforded. ^Moreover, the time allotted some subjects 
has been much too little, and far better results could be attained by 
the proposed two years' course. 

Miss Caroline E. Wing has been principal of the Training school 
twelve years and one term. She has staid faithfully by the school, 
declining now and then an offer (one this year) to take charge of a 
similar school elsewhere at an increase of salary and under other 
tempting conditions, but her abiding interest in our school, through 
satisfaction of improved conditions and faith in its future, has caused 
her yearly to renew her efforts for its betterment, and the results of 
ihe past 5'ear again attest her success. Miss Wing greatly desires the 
adoption of a longer course of study, that our school may in this 
resjject have the advantage enjoyed by similar schools in other places. 

MANUAL TRAIXIXG SCHOOL. 

This school is no longer a new feature in our school sj-stem. It was 
organized in 1893, and it has annually increased in numbers and popu- 
laritj', — deservedly, too, for it affords a training of as much importance 
in its entirety as any one of our public schools. This is a strong state- 
ment, but I believe it true, for reasons set forth in my annual report 
of 1898 and former reports. 

The Manual Training school has been much improved during the year. 



224 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

There have been added to its equijniient five wood-turning lathes, their 
accompanying- shafting-, and a Three-horse power electrical motor. 
The city purchased but one of the five lathes. The others and all the 
shafting were furnished either from funds donated the board or front 
material afforded by friends of the school. 

The work benches have been brought from the Varney and llallsville 
schools to the Lowell-street schoolhouse, corner of Lo^yell and Chest- 
nut streets, where all manual training instruction is now afforded, in 
order that all the pupils may have use of the lathes. Boys in the 
higher classes of our nine grammar schools attend the Manual Train- 
ing school at their option; so, also, an afternoon class from the High 
school. The enrollment of pupils is larger than ever before; and so 
large that pupils from the smaller schools have to be united in a way 
That will afford an average of about twenty-four pupils each lesson 
]ieriod, in order to accommodate all who elect this course. There are 
ten lessons a week, a half day being devoted to each class. The in- 
struction afforded is almost wholly individual and in the form of draw- 
ing, bench Avork, and lathe turning. The instructor's time is fully 
utilized and often voluntarily much extended beyond i-equired limits. 

The school is in need of drawing tables, a small engine lathe for 
working forms in iron, — in order that further instruction may be 
aftorded in ihe fundamentals of mechanics, — also ordinary supplies 
and matei-ial for pupils' use. 

The comniittee estimate that for the proper conduct of this school 
during the coming year there will be needed an appropriation of $600. 

While the boys are receiving instruction at the Manual Training 
school the girls belonging to their classes (in other studies) have been 
instructed to some extent in sewing, by the masters' assistants, and 
the results have been very creditable to both teachers and pupils; but 
for the lack of material, instruction in sewing has been irregular, too 
limited, and not attempted in some schools. There seems to be no 
good reason why the girls in question should not have sewing material 
furnished them bj- the city, to a reasonable extent, for time is at their 
disposal for lessons in sewing and the instruction may be afforded 
without additional (?ost. Moreover, instruction in sewing is highly 
important and most greatly needed by the very ones who can least 
afford to purchase lesson material for themselves, and it is because of 
this that more extended instruction in sewing has not been afforded. 
1 therefore recommend an api)roprialion of $2."jO for the ])urchase of 
material for the use of the more than two hundred girls who would 
receive instruction in sewing if material shall be furnished. 



I'l-oiii what has already been said, it may be riglit fully inferred that 
I regard our public schools, ns a whole, in very good ct)ndition. Most 
of them, I am hapjiy to say, may be properly designated as either good 
or exccllcnl, ollii is fair, and but a few as unlinary or poor. My which- 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 225 

ever one of these tt-rins, however, it is right to characterize the work 
and behavior of any one of the one hundred and twenty-tliree scliools, 
by that same term is it right to characterize the efficiency of the 
teacher of that particular school, for "as is the teacher so is the school," 
however trite the saying; and because the statement Avill forever 
reinain true, all school authorities must know the one and only thing 
to be done in order to produce a school of a given type. 

The chairman of the committee on Training School for Teachers, 
and likewise the chaii-man of the committee on evening schools, each 
deserve special mention for unusual frequency of visits to respective 
schools, and consequent favorable I'esults therefrom. 

DONATION.* 

It may be well here to indicate what has thus far been done with 
the special fund donated the school board and by said board placed at 
the disposal of a special committee for expenditure. Amount of dona- 
tion to date, $()25. Expended for two lathes and their equipment, 
furnished the ^lanual Training school, $140.82; for a barometer, a 
three-horse power electrical motor, and a inachine for the development 
of statical electricity, furnished the high-school physical laboratory, 
$158.97; for six solar lanterns and three hundred and sixty slides, fur- 
nished the six larger grammar schools, $195.95; (Principals C. W. 
Bickford and W. H. Huse are entitled to many thanks for voluntary 
l^ersonal services rendered in the production of the lanterns and slides, 
which greatly reduced their cost) ; for a rotary neostyle furnished the 
office of superintendent of schools, $60. Total, $555.74. 

EEPAIBS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 

The committee on repairs has utilized its ajjpropriation as follows r 

At the High school, the furniture was revarnished; steam heat put 
into the teachers' toilet rooms, to keep the water pipes from freezing;, 
and ''kick i^lates" placed upon the doors. 

At the Franklin school, the annex was found in a verj^ unsanitary- 
condition. It was iH-actically rebuilt and provided with new water- 
closets, the old ones being entirely worthless. The boiler firebox was 
rebuilt and steam heat carried to the annex, necessitating extensive 
repairs on the heating apparatus. 

At the Lincoln school, the roof was extensively repaired; clock 
weights were rearranged; more steam heat was provided one of the 
rooms; the woodwork painted; and the concrete walks were repaired. 

At the Ash-street school, the furniture was repaired and revarnished; 
the basement walls and ceilings were whitewashed. 

At the Webster school, furniture was scraped and varnished; wood- 
work in basement painted; and extensive repairs were made iipon the 
ceiling which was torn down by fall of the tower clock weights. These 
Avere put in another place for future safety. The change involved a 

•Donation by Supt. Buck of S125 per <|uaiter, in commemoration of aiul during his 
twelfth biennial term of service, 1898-1900, amounting in all to .fsi.OOO. 
15 



226 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

replacement of the sinks, and considerable expense for procurement 
of required ventilation therefor. 

At the Varney school, the furniture was repaired and varnished; 
furnaces and electric bells were repaired. 

At the Hallsville school, the walls of all rooms on the first floor were 
tinted with oil colors; window sash repaired. Internally the house is 
very attractive, but the outside woodwork should be repainted. 

At the Bakersville school, drinking- water was carried to the third 
floor; a fence built on the noi'th side of the lot; outside woodwork of 
the entire schoolhouse repainted, and the roof extensively repaired. 

On the third floor of this house are two schools, which have been 
there several y^ars, and they are likelj'' to be continued for a long 
time to come. There is but a single stairway to these schools, and a 
narrow one at that. In case of fire the danger would be great, and 
the loss of life imminent. I therefore recommend that a suitable fire 
escape be jjrovided as soon as it can be jjrocured. 

At the Rimmon school, the furniture was revarnished; walls of one 
room were tinted; outside doors painted; doorsteps and concrete 
Avalks repaired. 

At the Wilson school, all the schoolroom walls were tinted; furnaces 
and electric bells repaired. 

At the Straw school, walls were tinted; ceiling and basements white- 
washed; furnitui-e revarnished. The hallway walls and ceilings of this 
house need improving. 

At the Training school, a new steam-heating boiler was furnished; 
l)asements were whitewashed; and furniture revarnished. 

At the Sj)ring-strcet school, the boiler was repaired, and the furniture 
jcvarnished. 

At the Main-street school, extensive repairs were made \ipon the roof; 
;i new steam-heating boiler was provided; portions of basements were 
replastered; south-side yard was graded; and the concrete walks were 
repaired. 

At the I'cari-slrt'ct school, slate roofs were repaired and snow guards 
furnished; extended repairs were made upon one of the furnaces; and 
the furniture revarnished. 

At the Parker school, the basement plastering was repaired and 
whitewashed; connections for electric appliances were also nuide. 

At the Lowell-street school, considerable alterations in rooms were 
made for accommodation of the Manual Training school; the walls and 
ceilings were al.so whitewashed. The fence on the east side of the 
lf)t is much out of repair, the committee failing to arrange terms with 
the abutter for its repair. 

At the Ainoskeag scluxd, an Mllic floor was laid; bookcases were re- 
paired; sill cocks provided; and new grate bars furnished the boiler. 

At (jolTe's Falls school, the ceilings were repaired and whitewashed. 

At the Stark District school, old-fashioned long desks were converted 
into single ones and revarnished; a new fciu-e was also built on north 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 227 

side of the lot. The well is worthless, and a new one should be pro- 
vided. 

At the Harvey District school, the walls and ceiling- were white- 
washed. The well should be redug- or a new one provided, the present 
one jdelding- only surface water. 

At the Youngsviye school, the outhouse was repaired and the ceil- 
ing" of the schoolroom whitewashed. Other minor repairs were also 
made. 

At the Webster's Mills school, rearrangement was made of the furni- 
ture, better to accommodate children of varjing- height. 

At the Mosquito Pond school, the outside of the schoolhouse was 
repainted, and a few minor repairs were also made. 

The foregoing but briefly outlines the principal repairs made at the 
various schoolhouses. ]More or less minor repairs have been made at 
each house, which in the aggregate have involved considerable expense. 
It is generally recognized that the recent movement toward ornament- 
ing the walls of schoolrooms is eminently proper, on account of the 
educative value; and in order to encourage and facilitate the movement 
without necessitating injury to the walls of the schoolrooms, the re- 
pairs committee have quite properly furnished picture moldings 
wherever applied for, — the committee having suggested that teachers 
make application whenever moldings would be needed to prevent the 
defacement of schoolroom walls. 

As one knowing to the personal attention and expert services 
devoted (at a sacrifice of much valuable time) by the chairman of the 
committee having in charge the direction and supervision of repairs 
of schoolhouses, I deem it quite proper to make mention of the fact that 
the city has been saved many dollars by reason of said chairman's 
several years' gift of his services while annually acting in the capacity 
named; and it may also be said that the generally good condition of 
our schoolhouses is largely due to his special ability in this direction, 
for it has frequently offset in a measure the too small appropriation 
for repairs. 

The committee estimate that for the coming year the appropriation 
for the general repair of schoolhouses should be $6,000, and tfiat there 
should also be a special appropriation sufficient to effect necessary 
:irrangements for the proper ventilation of the Lincoln, Franklin, and 
Ash-street schoolhouses. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, I again embrace this opportunity to express my 
gratitude to the members of the school board, the teachers of our 
public schools, as well as numerous citizens, for expressions of kindly 
consideration, direct aid, and timely' suggestions. 

KespectfuUy submitted. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

Superintendent. 
Decembek 20, 1899. 



APPENDIX. 



I. Population, etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

m. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 

V. Attejntdance Tables. 

VI. Truanct. 

Vn. FnfANCE. 

VIII. School Year, 1S9S-1S99. 

IX. High School Graduating Class. 

X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

XL Organization of Committees, 1899-1900. 

XII. List of Teachers, 1900. 

Xni. School Year, 1899-1900. 

229 



APPENDIX. 



STATISTICS. 

I.— Population. 

Population of the city b}' last census, 1S90 43,985 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 



11.— School houses. 

Number of schoolhouses in use 24 

Number of schoolhouses not in use '0 

Number of school rooms used for day schools *124 

Number of rooms used for Ilig'h-school classes 12 

Number of rooms used for Grammar schools 32 

Number of rooms used for Middle schools 28 

Number of rooms used for Primary schools 44 

Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools 1 

Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools 5 

Number of rooms used for Manual Training schools 1 



III.— Schools. 

(All for both sexes.) 

Number of High school buildings 1 

Number of combined Grammar and lower grade (Middle and Pri- 
mary) schools 12 

Number of combined Middle and Primary schools 5 

Number of schools all Primary grade 1 

Number of Ungraded schools 5 



IV.— Teachers. 

Male teachers in the High school 4 

Female teachers in the High school 8 

Female teachers in the Training school » 2 

Male teachers in the Grammar schools 7 

• Au average of 123 for the entire year. 

230 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 231 

Female teachers in the Grammar schools (o)31 

Female teachers in the Middle schools (b)27 

Female teachers in the Primary schools (6)41 

Male teachers in the Partially Graded schools 1 

Female teachers in the Ungraded schools 5 

Male teachers in Manual Training school 1 

Special teachers •• 

Average number of male teachers (c) l-> 

Avei'age number of female teachers (c)115 

Total average number of teachers in daj' schools 130 

Male teachers in the evening schools 8 

Female teachers in the evening schools 6 

Average number of male teachers in the evening schools fi 

Average number of female teachers in the evening schools 5 

Male teachers in the evening Drawing schools 2 

Average number of male teachers in the evening Drawing schools 2 

(a) Six of the 31 are masters' assistants. 

(/>) One of the 28 middle schools and three of the 44 primaries were in tlic Training 
school. They had no regular teachers, being taught by sub-teachers under the direc- 
tion of the principal and her assistant. 

(<■) Including special teachers. 



232 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



•90UT5 

JO juao .I8J 



« s ■ • ■ 

UUJU , 

"SS >.= 05 4J ■m.S J. s 

5 . ei.Sl'5 0^«3 b fl cS o 



2..- 



03 « r^ S3 
SS eS eS O 






£3 SaJ' 



5g 






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si 83§Sg 



O CO ei M rH CI 

a oS od O) Od I c) 



8SS I S 



•oouBpna^j'B 

;ClIBp 9SB.I8AV 



52 <-i<N-; to OS oooo< 



•Su^Saoiaq 
•ox aSBjaAV 



5f5 



•paiio.iua 
laquuiu aioiiAi 



1 


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2 


:5 


5^^ 


g 


S S?5? 


1 


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1 


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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



233 



« « "H S * 
te-2 cj g o 
c SS 32 
o o . :: — 








1 ^ 


2<! 


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234 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 



JO 1 u 80 ja J 












i--^J:?=ll^l<l5-: 






o oS 



•aDuupuojiB 

iSlIUp 9SB.18AV 



SiiiSuoiaq 

•ox 8SBJ9AV 



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50(Nepoocoe 









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pailo.Tiia .laq 
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= ^'^'*S5 



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« -^ -5 .= f" ^JsH. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDEMT OF SCHOOLS. 



235 



s s 



_; en « <j 



C ^ eS £, 
.- d . 

02^ = 









i-'^*^'^ 



_;r^i;--_;.^®- 












,■351 






« M .* (M "3 



8^ 


94.0 
88.9 
94.8 
90.2 

84.2 
92 3 
89.7 
92.3 
93.5 
88.9 
87.5 
86.0 
86.0 
83.7 
93.0 
87.8 
91.5 
91.3 
86.4 
90.4 
89.7 
88.6 
93.3 
83.7 
SS.3 


88.6 
88.6 
85.3 
87.9 
85.3 
93.0 
87.0 
95.0 
94.7 
94.7 
86.1 
89.2 
88.4 
84.2 


§i? 


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KKSsS?5S§gSS5i§5§5§JgSS§?§S5§g 


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SSS^ 


s^sssj;;ssssss3:s832g§s^ssgssgs;g5;§S2?5S£;^55 



•::'^SI'S°S'''SS?'S?t:S5t::®2r'^^<ooooi-m-*o»-iMOiooor^TKt~eot^>n'*3Srtoo 
Ot-wo5-»i<xt^;st-cst-v»50i:-ojt-Qot^t-.t,oeot-t~ooot-c-t-mo505<-c<a<owi^t-.cot- 



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8 £ = 

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= Q -> 

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236 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOliTS. 



•80UU 

JO a U80 .laj 

^IiBp aSB.iaAV 

•SuiSuoioq 
•ojj aSB.iOAv 



2-2 Sb 
^s5 



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noo CO lO t 



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be ST 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



23r 



DAY 8CHOOL8. 

iCununa)'!/ of lUtemJance vpon the several grades of public dot/ sriiools for 
(Ite year 1898-1899. 



Wliole number of 
different pupils. 



Boys. 



c 


■fs 


•^bD 






&■§• 


If 


25 








>a 


< 


< 



1-S o 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primar J' 

Partially graded 
I'ngraded 

Totals, 1899 . . 

Totals, 1898 .. 



169 


623 


587 


1,382 


19 


62 

2,842 


2,912 



705 
579 
1,227 
23 
61 
2,875 



409 
1,141 
1,041 
1,694 



4,399 
4,425 



1,048 
941 

1,507 
32 
07 



3,978 
4,070 



00.4 
88.9 
91.4 
84. S 



90.4 
92.0 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

iSummary of attendance upon the several grades of public evening schools for 
the year 1898-1899. 



Schools. 


Whole number of 
different pupils. 


o . 

« tD 

2| 

< 


II 

> c3 

< 


H 

•M 0) 

Si 




Boys. 


Girls. 


IH 

^^^ 



Weston block. . 
Franklin street 
Kimmon 



Drawing scliools 



( Architectural 



Totals, 1899 , 
Totals. 1898 . 



62 


50 


47 


45 


34 


29 


23 


IS 


5 
171 


4 
146 


232 


195 



SO. 6 
95.7 
85.3 
78.3 
80.0 
85.4 
84.0 



Evening School Teachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal at Weston block, for boys. 
Assistants — A. W. Rowell, W. W. Forbes, L. 11. Carpenter, and Annie 
B. Angell. 

Honorie J. Croiigh, principal of Franklin-street school, for girls. 



!38 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Assistants — Maggie Linen, Elizabeth F. Walsh, and Carlena A. 
Savory. 
Arthur W. !Morgan, principal of Einimon school, for both sexes. 
Assistants — William J. Mooar, Julius Hegewald, and Marj' E. Paige. 

Evening Draiciny- School Teachers. 

John M. Kendall and Henry W. Allen. 



TRAINING SCnOOL. 



feub-teachers. 
Annie B. Angell. 
;Mary E. McLaren. 
Grace A. Phillips. 
Ede B. Quimby. 
riora M. Walker. 
Elizabeth F. Walsh. 
Florence H. Mooar. 
Ethel A. Nicholson. 
Sarah Price. 
Annie E. Walsh. 
Mathel C. Henry. 
Afae L. Lovejoy. 
Kathryn McKeon. 
Plorence M. Ward. 



Graduated. 
June, '98. 



Jan. 27, '99. 



June, '99. 



Sub-teachers. 
Bertha A. Allen. 
Edna M. Barr. 
Bertha V. Franks. 
Lora E. Hill. 
Gertrude Porter. 
Amy E. Davison. 
Lizzie M. Flanders. 
Edith A. Murphy. 
Carlena A. Savory. 
Grace Whittemore. 
Florence M. Francis. 
Martha J. Kennedy. 
Anabelle Landers. 
Maude E. Winegar. 



Entered. 
Sept., '93. 



Feb.. '99. 



Sept. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



239 



GENERAL SUM3IAKV. 

The folloioing table presents the main features of -interest pertaininri to the 
attendance upon the public schools for the last ten years. A similar report 
for tioenty years may bejound in report for 1896. 



% 


1 


2 




bO 

§ 

9) 




"3 


i. 

■o o 


s 

be 




ti o 


S 
o 

h 




Years. 


6 

to 


It 


=1 

5S 


P, 

6 

1. 


'o3 

W)cS 


If 


^2 


11 


§1 

•^ 3 

95 


S)0 




ir. 




p >> 1 HSC 


J5 c 








Sci 


■ca 


J tD 




t 


tz 


cs 


ta 


tSi 


7.^ 


p. «j 


e3 g 


'^^^ 


cM 


2^ 


t>.5 




< 


< 


w 


< 


< 




< 


o 




H 


a 


<J 


1S90 


TT 


76 


3,814 


2,795 


2,536 


90.7 


141 


121 


114 


83 


.%3 


184 


1S91 


S4 


83 


4,071 


2,940 


2,689 


91.5 


166 


120 


101 


69 


2fi 


217 


1892 


89 


89 


4,298 


3,130 


2,837 


90.6 


174 


116 


103 


67 


42 


226 


1S93 


96t 


101 


4,775 


3,425 


3,111 


90.8 


194 


129 


127 


78 


41 


237 


1S94 


101 


107 


4,975 


3,062 


3,336 


91 1 


liiS 


175 


162 


112 


63 


251 


1895 


105 


111 


5,206 


3,817 


3,499 


91.7 


238 


168 


156 


112 


40 


243 


1890 


108 


115 


5,382 I 3,999 


3,651 


91.3 


140 


138 


130 


119 


43 


270 


1897 


114 


121 


5,501 4,213 


3,826 


90.8 


177 


215 


212 


157 


.5'>, 


290 




121 


128 


5,802 4,425 


4,070 


92.0 


195 


200 


191 


145 


■51 


,S7R 


1^99 


123 


130 


5 717 i ^m 


3,978 


90.4 


146 


180 


168 


134 


73 


409 






' 





* Including special teacljers, principals, assistants, etc. 
t And the A class in suburban schools. 

* Also a manual training school for one term, which is included in the number 
of schools tlie next five jears. 



240 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



^'I.- AVOllK OF TRUANT OFl- ICEK. 





Absentees 

^To^iif" 


No. volun- 
tarily re- 
turned to 


No. reported 

caused to 

attend 


■5 

1 


11 


i^ 


"2 


Date. 


1 


if 

V 


1 

3 


-1 

V 


1 


11 

Si 


No. moved 
the city. 

No. found si 
unable to e 

No. otherwi 
avoidab 1 3 
tained. 




t 

c 

6 
2; 


September 

Octobei' 


87 
98 
35 
84 
70 
93 
100 
96 
75 


33 

56 
.i3 
20 
37 
40 
38 
39 
42 
40 


12 
13 
3 
13 

21 
18 
11 
10 


9 
10 
11 

n 

14 
10 
10 

7 
IS 


! . .^)4 24 
52 .".1 


3I , 

3 ! 15 


9 

15 

27 
31 
6 


; 


N'ovember 

Uecelnber 

•January 

February 

March 


i 49 
19 
42 
22 
49 
43 
54 
50 


14 
1 

10 
24 
19 

18 1 

17 ; 

15 


5 
2 
V 
6 
5 

•2 
4 


43 

8 
16 
21 
14 
15 
13 
12 


?■ 


April ... 




"May 


3 










Totals 


820 


398 


115 


m 


434 


1S2 


« 


166 


162 


n 





|| 


No. truants 

caused to 

attend 


5li 







U 

'A 


fel 


Date. 


'5 


31 

ll 

.2 


No of scho 
found on b 
in school 

No. of n a r 
vl3ite<l. 

No. tempo 
confined 
police sta 






50 
47 
38 
11 
42 
21 
28 
80 
19 
20 

350 


18 
19 
20 

7 
25 
12 
18 
34 

8 
10 


32 
28 
18 

4 
17 

9 
10 
46 
11 
10 


' 178 181 
198 1 209 


i 




October 


1 


27 




208 
100 
229 


197 
89 

000 






1 


]7 








32 




150 
180 


icn 






»•> 


March 


..,. 






o.» 


April 

Muv . . 


195 ISl 






48 


lOS ' 246 
176 "t^ 






40 




1 




23 












171 


185 


1.790 


1.870 


3 


321 











REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

VII.— Finances — 1 899. 



241 



Items of Account. 



Resources from 

appropriations Expenditures, 
anil transfers, i 



Salaries of teacbers 

Books and stationery 

Free text-books and supplies. 

Furniture and supplies 

Repairs 

Care of rooms 

Fuel 

Printing and advertising 

Contingent expenses 

Evening common schools — 

Evening drawing scbools 

Manual training 



Totals 



$89,440.81 


889,440.81 


48.45 


48.45 


4,995.65 


4,995.05 


1,436.29 


1,436.29 


7,299.57 


7,299.57 


6,380.25 


6,380.25 


7,563.18 


7,563.18 


267.88 


267.88 


2,687.54 


2,687.54 


1,181.65 


1,181.65 


190.72 


190.72 


600.00 


600.00 


$122,091.99 


8122,091.99 



COST OF CITY SCHOOLS. 

Expenditures, as above specified $122,091.90 

Salarws. 



Members of the school board. 

Clerk of the board 

Superintendent of schools 

Truant oflBcer 



$205.8.'3 
150.00 

2,300.00 
750.00 



■ Total $125,497.82 

Receipts on Account of City Schools. 



Literary fund . . . . 

Tuition* 

Sale of text-books 



$3,352.74 
941.21 
1SG.66 



$4,480.61 



Net amount raised by taxation for schools $121,017.21 

The city valuation for 1899 is $31,491,784, and hence the rate of school 
tax for the year is $121,017.21 divided by $31,491,784, or .0034+. Last 
year the rate was .0034. 

* School tax from Londonderry, Bedford, and Goffstown, included, $136.56. 
16 



242 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Vlll.-School Year, 1 898-1899. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 12, 1S9S; closed De- 
cember 16. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened January 2, 1S90; closed March 
24, 1899. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April lU, 1899; closed June 2o, 
1899. Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above b^^ the school 
board, 185. 

Average number of days the schools were taught, 1~'>. 

(Being closed several holidays, days of "Teachers' Institutes," and 
lialf-days on account of bad weather or insufficient heat.) 



IX.— High School Graduation. 

i'U()(;iiA.\r. 

Salutatory. "Voices of the Woods" Mabel Darrah 

Chorus. "Stars and Stripes Forever" John Philip Sousa 

History IClisabeth Kiedell 

Chorus. "Over the Dancing Soa'' Ivoeckel-Veazi 

I'rophecy ^lae Eloise Osgood 

Chorus. "In Praise of the Walt/." lames M. ^McLaughlin 

Oration. "Recent Developments in the lOasI". . Leojiold Theodore Togus 

Presentation ICninia Frances Jeffers 

Cantata. "Violet in Fairyland" Koeckel 

Violet, Dorothy Witter Branch; fairy (|iut'ii, Maude l']vel3'n Brown; 
fairy walchmnii. Addle Louise Forrest. 

^Valedictory I'red Wilson Cook 

Award of Diplomas Kcv. Natlianiel L. Colby 

Singing of tlic OiK-. 

The Class of '99. 

CLASSICAI, coiusi:. 

I'c.'it rice I'.iiUfofd |!ac(ui. Fdna Louise Driscoll. 

Maude l']\(l\ii Mrown. Cora Weltlia Dustin. 

Bertha ( ai|.< iitcr. Crace Belle Fogg. 

I'.rniicc F.sirWv ( 'l.:i(l \\ irk . St.-lla May Kraiicis. 

Ltiicl DruMisoii CliaiHJI.T. .loliu Langdoii Ibullry. 

Carrie Heile Clement. .Mary Klizaheth Mall. 

Fred Wilson Cook. Jennie Barnes Harmon. 

Waiter AiHJtvw Ci-oucll. Ktlicl Kli/al.etli llarwood. 

Mal.rl I'.l.iiiclir Ciinicr. i:iiuna iM-aiins .IrlVers. 

• Kxcused. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



243 



Nina Ethel Johnson. 
Eva Gertrude Jones, 
dertrude Lee. 
Lena Maud ^Mallard. 
Martha Belle Marden. 
Nellie Auffosta Moulton. 
Mertie Ethel Newell. 
Mae Elolse Osgood. 
Florence Helen Patten. 
Florence Eva Pettiffrew, 



Fannie May Sanborn. 
Grace Mabel Sanborn. 
Hay Stearns. 
Edith Lacie Taplin. 
Welling-ton Andrew Thompson. 
Helen Campbell Townsend. 
Blanche Pearl Varnum. 
Jessie Mae Walker. 
Harriet Williamson. 
Bertha Grace Wright. 



FOUR YEAES ENGLISH COURSE. 



Florence Barr. 
Florence Currier. 
Florence Mae Henderson. 
Arthur Parker Higgins. 
H. Augustus Hill. 



Charles Henry McGee. 
Mary Louise JSIooar. 
Edith Myra Sargent. 
Carl Weslej- Spence. 
William Clarence Swallow. 



Edith Mabel Vaughan. 



COLLEGE COURSE. 



Dorothy Witter Branch. 
Ethel Chandler Brooks. 
Edward Kimball Burbeck. 
Helen Maria Chandler. 
^Mabel Da r rah. 



Bertha Carrie Folsom. 
Bertha Lueva Martin. 
Elisabeth Riedell. 
Leopold Theodore Togus. 
Annie E. Waring. 



THREE years' ENGLISH COURSE. 



Eva ^latie Brown. 
Alva Emma Bullis. 
Archie S. Coldwell. 
Edward Clayton Coiey 
Annie Mae Danforth. 
Ludger J. Deschenes. 
Addie Louise Forrest. 



Goldie Ann Huntress. 
Maurice L. Katz. 
Anabelle Frances Landers. 
Arthur Clayton Read. 
Waldo F. Sturtevant. 
Edward A. Watson. 
Maude Ethel Winegar. 



Lotta Clifford. 



TWO years' CERTIFICATE. 

William B. Pierson. 



HONOR SCHOLARS. 

English course Anabelle Frances Landers 

Classical course Fred Wilson Cook 

College course Mabel Darrah 



244 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

X.— Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, MAKCII 8, 1899. 



First prize, $25, Annie Charlotte Kelty. 
Second prize, $20, xVgnes M. Shea. 
Third prize, $10, Mary Milbnrn. 
Fonrtli prize, $5, Margaret E. Douglass. 



XI.— Organization, 1900. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

WILLTA:\r C. CLAUKE, :N[ayor, Chairman, ea.- offxcuK 

HAIJRY T. LORD. President of Common Council, ex officio. 

Ward 1. Elliot C. Lambert. 

Walter B. Heath. 
Ward 2. Charles H. Manning. 

Elmer W. Nutting. 
Ward 3. George D. Towne. 

Louis E. Phelps. 
AVavd 4. Nathaniel L. Colby. 

John IL Eiedell. 
Ward 5. John T. Kelley. 

Daniel J. McAuliffe. 
Ward f). Eugene B. Dunbar. 

Harry L. Davis. 
AVard 7. Edward B. Woodbury. 

Edson S. Heath. 
Ward 8. Ned T. Wallace. 

Frank A. Cadwell. 
AVard 9. K. Emmet Wal.sh. 

.)i)st'j)h A. Boivin. 
Ward 10. Mark K. Harvey. 

Jlaiiy II. r.iirpee. 

vici:-ciiAii;\iAN oi' the hoard. 
(iEOKCK I). TOAVXi:. 

CLERK OF IIIK HOARD. 

KMJOT c. i.ami:i:kt. 

SUPERINTK.NDF.NT OK IMHI.IC INSTRICTION. 

WlLLU.Ar E. BUCK. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 245 

superintendent's clerk. 
FANNIE L. SANBORN. 

w TRUANT OFFICER. 

CURTIS W. DAVIS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. Mayor Clarke and Messrs. Lord, Woodbury, Wallace, and 
Nutting-. 

Salaries. ^Messrs. Woodbury, W. B. Heath, and Davis. 

Text-Books. Messrs. Towne, Lambert, and Phelps. 

Music. Messrs. Walsh, Phelps, and W. B. Heath. , 

Draicing. Messrs. Towne, Nutting-, and Wallace. 

Manual Training. Messrs. Phelps, Kelley, and Towne. 

Examination of TeacMrs. Messrs. Colby, Lambert, and Woodbury. 

Fuel and Heating. ;Mayor Clarke, Messrs. Lord, Manning, Boivin, 
Riedell, and Harvej-. 

Repairs. Messrs. Manning, Phelps, and Cadwell. 

Attendance. Messrs. E. S. Heath, Lambert, McAuliffe, and Burpee. 

Health. Messrs. Dunbar, Boivin, and Towne. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. Messrs. Manning, Towne, Phelps, Lambert, Walsh, and 
Riedell. 

Franklin-street. Messrs. Woodbury, Lambert, and Davis. 

Spring-street. Messrs. W. B. Heath, Boivin, Nutting, and Burpee. 

Lincoln-street and Yovng&viUe. Messrs. Colby, Cadwell, Riedell, and 
Harvey. 

Ash-strcet and Webster's Mills. Messrs. Phelps, ilcAuliffe, and Cadwell. 

Webster-street and Stark. Messrs. Towne, Planning, and Kelley. 

Bakersville and Mosquito Pond. Messrs. Kelley, Davis, W. B. Heath, 
and Harvej\ 

Vurney. Messrs. Wallace, Kelley, and E. S. Heath. 

Hallsville ami Harvey. Messrs. Walsh, Dunbar, Colbj^ and Burpee. 

Rimmon and Amoskeag. Messrs. Boivin, E. S. Heath, and Colby. 

Training ScJwol. Messrs. Lambert, Walsh, and Woodbury. 

Main-street. Messrs. Dunbar, Nutting, and Lambert. 

Parker. ^Messrs. Cadwell, Woodbury, and McAuliffe. 

Lo^oell-strect. Messrs. ^McAuliffe, Riedell, and Towne. 

Pearl-street. Messrs. Nutting, Phelps, and Dunbar. 

Wilson and Goffe's Falls. Messrs. Davis, Dunbar, and Wallace. 

Stixiw. Messrs. E. S. Heath, Wallace, and Manning. 

Evening Schools. Messrs. W. B. Heath, Boivin, and Riedell. 



246 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

XII.— List of Teachers. 

HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 

Master. Albert Somes. 
Sub-Master. George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. Harry N. McLaren. 

Hiram A. Stearns. 

Nellie Pickering. 

Florence M. Locke. 

Theresa B. Stanton. 

Mary J. Wellington. 

Sara Hunt. 

Annie W. Colby. 

Mary H. Dowd. 

Helen S. Smith. 

Grace M. Page. 

Winona M. Martin. 

Elsie D. Fairbanks. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. . Isaac Huse, Jr. 

Master's Assistant. Alice C. Taggart. 

Assistants. Carrie E. Hoit. 

Carrie E. Head. 

Nellie C. I'arker. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Alice M. Lamprey. 
Lower Middle. Amy K. Northrup. 
Higher Primary. Flora M. Walker. 
Lower Primary. Susie L. Dodge. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. Fred L. V. Si)aulding. 
Master's Assistant. Annie W. Patten. 
Assistants. Pelle Jt. Daniels. 

Mabel J. PiicUctf. 

Mary F. Hiniu-s. 

lAnrcr Grades. 

• Higher Middle. Etta L. Stearns. 
Lower Middle. Pessie E. Dodgt-. 
Higher Primary. Theodora IJicliardson. 
Lower Prinmiy. Ilulda ('. (;ran|)nor. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 247 

ASU-STREET SCHOOL. 

Gramnwr Grades. 

Master. Charles W. Bickford. 

Master's Assistant. Mabel Euth Brown. 

Assistants. Amelia L. Graupner. 

Emma L. McLaren. 

Ellen E. Connor. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher ^Middle. Emma J. Cooper. 
Lower Middle. Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primar3'. May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTEB-STREET SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. John Gault. 

Master's Assistant. Josephine W. Page. 

Assistants. Luna A. Whitlock. 

Alta C. Willand. 

Eva F. Tuson. 

Lower Grades. 



Higher Middle. Edith Hammond. 
Lower Middle. Jean Gillan. 
Higher PrimarJ^ Mary E. Murphy. 
Lower Primary. Mathel C. Henry. 

VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. George Winch. 

Master's Assistant. Rosabelle M. Franklin. 

Assistants. Esther ^f. Dickey. 

Ellen E. ]McKean. 

Millie S. Morse. 

Loicer Grades. 

Higher Middle. Mary J. Walsh. 
Lower Middle. Marcia !M. Moore. 
Higher Primary. Gertrude Adams. 
Lower Primary. Annie E. Walsh. 



248 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

IIALLSVILI.E SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. William H. Huse. 
Master's Assistant. Ella F. Barker. 
Assistants. Olive A. Rowe. 

Kate E. Batchelder. 

Loicer Grades. 

Higher Middle. Susie G. Woodman. 
Lower Middle. Mary L. Ayer. 
Higher Primary. Bertha L. Kemp. 
Lower Primary. E. Alfreda Hall. 
Lower Primary. Annie E. Corson. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns. 
Assistant. Lelia A. Brooks. 

Loicer Grades. 

Mixed Middle. Cora M. Farmer. 
Higher Primary. Augusta S. Downs. 
Mixed Primary. S. Izetta Ldcke. 
Lower Primary. Mary L. Heath, 

ItlMMON SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

I'rincipal. Louis IT. Bailey ((irammar classes). 
Assistant. Lillian F. Crowthcr. 

Lower Grades. 

Mixed ^Middle. !Mary A. Seavey. 
Higher Prinu'uy. Ilattic S. Tuttlc. 
Lower Triniary. Blanche K. lliekcn. 

WII.SOX SCHOOL. 

drdiiiiiKir (Iradi'K 



Principal. Barbara B. Joy. 
Assistants. IFellcn Morison. 
Cora B. (lilford. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 249 

Loictr ilrades. 

Higher Middle. Harriet 11. rachardson. 
Lower iNIiddle. Fk^rence liiehardsoii. 
Higher rriniary. :M. Clara Hawks. 
Lower Primary. Florence L. Abbott. 
Lower Priniary. Bessie Cochran. 

STRAW SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grade. 

Princii)al. Lizzie P. Gove. 

Lotrrr Grades. 

Higher :Middle. Gertrude H. Brooks. 
Lower Middle. Lettie ^l. Smith. 
Hig^her Primary. Xellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. Florence H. ^loore. 
Lower Primary. Edith if. Stebbins. 

TRAIXIXG SCHOOL. 

JNferrimack street, corner L^nion. 

Principah Caroline E. Wing. 
Head Assistant. Grace A. Phillips. 

The pi'incipal is also assisted bj- the snb-teachers, i. e., members of 
the training- class. The school embraces the first four years of school 
Avork, in the following* g'rades: Lower Primarj^ Higher Primary, and 
Lower ^liddle. There are four rooms, two of lower primary grade. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Annabel Emerson. Higher Middle. • 
Lower Middle. Fannie D. ^lonlton. 
Higlier Primary. Xellie I. Sanderson. 
Mixed Primary. Lura B. Gage. 
Lower Primary. Lizabell Savory. 

maix-strei:t school. 

Principal. :Nrary W Mitchell. Higher ^^liddle. 
Higher ^liddle. iNIary A. Clement. 
Lower ^liddle. Lottie 'M. Clement. 
Higher Priniary. 'M. Minnie Sturtevant. 
Higher Primary. Hattie O. Willand. 
Lower Primary. Kate T. Clarke. 
Lower Primarv. Mabel F. Robinson. . 



250 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PEARL-STREET SCHOOL. 



Principal. :Mary G. Tynan, Higher Middle. 

Lower Middle. Nellie M. Smith. 

Higher Primary. Ella Hoi>e. 

Lower Primary. Georgia ;M. Cheney. 

PARKER SCHOOL. 

Princi])al. ]Mary E. ]\Ioulton, Grammar and Middle. 
Lower Middle. Lois M. Magoon. 
Higher Primarj'. Delle E. Haines. 
Lower Primary. Blanche ]\I. Folsom. 

I.OWELL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Helen 'SI. ]\Foiril]. lliijher Primary. 
Lower Primarj'. Katharine A. Frain. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. ]Mary A. Bnzzell, Grammar and ^Middle. 

Middle and Primary. Clydie M. Flanders. 

Lower Primary. Marion F. Partridge. 

Goffe's Falls. Percy N. Folsom, Grammar and Middle. 

Mixed Primary. Mand 'SI. Greaney. 

^•XGRADED SCHOOLS. 

Stark. Inez M. Warren. 
Harvey. Emma J. Ela. 
Yonngsville. Lnra K. Kimpton. 
Webstei''s Mills. Josephine L. Riddle. 
Mosquito Pond. Nellie M. At wood. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. Fred Ti. Bower, Florence Dow. 
Drawing. J. Warren Thyng. 
Manual Ti'aining. Fred E. r.rowiu'. 

JAXITORS. 

Ilii/Ji >^ch(iol. 

Charles F. .lack. Kn-iiiccr, George II. .lack. 

Fraiihlin-stn( t (iiul Trainiii;/ Srhitols. 

Vanuim IF. Hill. 

l/nirohi-stm t mill Wilson Srlinols'. 

^VilIi.•ml ir. Xcwry. 

Asli-slirit mill l'<iirl-slnrf Nc/(oo/.v. 

.loliii S. Avcrv. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 251 

Webster-street and Straw Schools. 

William J. Powers. 

Spring-street and Lowell-street Schools. 

S. H. Batchelder. 

Hallsville School. 

William Stevens. 

Bakersville School. 

Edwin N. Baker. 

Varncy School. 

Robert Cook. 

Main-street and Parker Schools. 

William F. Conner. 

Rimmon School. 

(Vacancy.) 
Amoskeag School. 
Charles H. Corey. 



Xlll.— School Year, 1899-1900. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened Sejatember 11, 1S99; closed De- 
cember 15, 1S99. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 1, 1900; closes March 23, 
1900. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 9, 1900; closes June 22, 190a 
Vacation of eleven weeks. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



EEPOET OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY 
LIBRARY. 



To tJif C'ltij CoiDicils of the Citij of Mniichcsta- : 

The trustees of the City Library respectfully submit their forty-sixth 
annual report of the affairs of the library, and, accompanying the same, 
the report made to them by the treasurer of the board, giving an 
account of the sums received and the expenditm-es made by him in 
behalf of the board from the funds in their possession and nnder their 
control: and also the report of the librarian, made to the board, giving 
in detail the statistics of the operation of the library- during the past 
year. 

From the report of the libi-arian it appears that the library has been 
open for the deliverj' of books, during- the past year, three hundred 
and five days, during" which time seventy-seven thousand one hundred 
and fifty-nine books were delivered for home use, an average of two 
huiulred and fifty-three per day. In addition to the above number 
delivered for general circulation, seventeen thonsand three hundred 
and ninetj-nine books were delivered for use in the reading room, an 
average of fifty-seven per day. The total number of books delivered 
for general circulation and for nse in the reading room was ninety- 
four thonsand five hundred and fifty-eight, an average of three hun- 
dred and ten per day. 

As compared with the year preceding the circulation for home nse 
shows a decrease of three thonsand. two hundred and seventy-seven 
and the number delivered for use at the reading room a decrease of 
sixteen hundred and thirtj'-one. The total circulation was four thou- 
sand nine hundred and eiglit less than the previous year. The recoi'd 
kept at the library shows that this decrease in circulation is confined 
entirely to the department of fiction, the percentage of circulation in 
this class dro^jping off from SI to 77 ])er cent of the total circulation. 
All the other classes show quite an increase in circulation over that 
i-ejiorted for the previous j-ear. 

The number of periodicals regularly- received at the library during 
the year was eighty-six, of which number fiftj'-seven were purchased 
and twenty-nine were donated. On the completion of the varioxis vol- 
umes they have been bound and placed upon the shelves for general 
circulation. 

The number of volumes in the librai-y at the date ol' the last report, 
including maps and pamphlets, was fifty-two lliousaud eight hundred 
and forty-three. During the year there have beeii added l)y jjurchase 

255 



25G ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

six hundred and ei{j;ht volumes, by donation four hundred and ninetj-- 
nine volumes and ninety-seven volumes of periodicals have been bound, 
a total of twelve hundred and four, making the niunber of bound vol- 
umes in the librarj- at the close of the .year, forty-three thousand three 
liundred and twenty-nine, and the total number, including sixteen 
maps and seven liundred and two pamiihlets, forty-four thousand and 
fort^-seven. 

One hundred and seventy-six volumes were withdrawn from circu- 
lation during the year, having become too much worn and def.iced to 
be fit for further use. Of these and of others retired from circulation 
in former years for like reason, one hundred and fifty-two volumes 
have been replaced at a cost of one hundred and twenty-six dollars 
and twenty-six cents. • 

The re-classifying and re-cataloguing of the library has been contin- 
ued during the year, and the librarian reports the number of volumes 
re-classified as five thousand and eighty-six, and the number re-cata- 
logiied as five thousand one liundred and thirty-six. The public docu- 
ments and newspapers still remain to be catalogued, as well as the 
])ain])hlets and some miscellaneous sections of the library. When 
these departments are finished, it will be necessary to still further 
extend the cataloguing in anals/.ing subordinate snlgects in order to 
make the card catalog\ie more coiniilete and useful. 

Accompanying' the rejiort ol' tlie lilirarian will be found the names 
of i^ersons making donations lo tiie library during the year, with the 
number of books or periodicals presented by each ])erson. Due 
acknowledgment has been made in behalf of the trustees to all who 
have in this manner shown tlieir interest in the increase and pros- 
jierity of the library. 

The attention of tlie city ((imu'ils is called to the suggestions con- 
tained in the present repoit ot 1 lie librarian, as also in the report of the 
previous year, relative to a reading room for children at the library. 

The report of the treasurer sliows that during the year the sum of 
thirteen hundred antl fifty-two dollars and seventy-nine cents has 
been expended forthe ])ureliase ol books, and the sum of three hundred 
and sixty-three dollars and si\ty-l'our cents for the purchase of period- 
icals, nuikiug a total expenditure for both of these purposes of seven- 
teen hundred and sixteen dollars and forty-three cents. Of the amount 
expended tor the iiurehasi' of l)ooks, the sum of one liundred and 
twenty-six dollars and l\\(iilv-si\ cents was used for the purchase of 
hooUs to rrplaec those worn (Mit and withdrawn from circulation, and 



liie sum 


ol' six 


hniMlre.l 


and s. 


•venl.v -liiree 


• lollars an 


d sixteen c 


cut 


was tak- 


en I'nnn 


the in( 


•onie ol 


r tin- Mean 


I'nnd and 


appli<'d to 


Xh< 


increase 


of that 


.lepar.n 


lent of 


Ihe lihrarv 


. I'.x.dusiv 


e of these 


tw< 



ileiiis. Ihe Slim expended for the purchase of new hooks was live hun- 
dif.l and tiriy-threc dollars and t iiirtv-scvi'n cents, leaving a balance 
in I he hands of the treasurer, at. the close of the year, of the anu)unt 
appropri.il.-d l.\ the city councils for the i)ureliase of books, of twelve 
Inindrrd and lift. 'en .hdlars and ten eents. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 257 

The amount ])aid for periodicals includes periodicals purchased for 
the past j-ear and also for the coming year, the trustees having dis- 
continued the purchase of the same monthly from the news companies 
and subscribed direct from the publishers. 

The balances at the close of the year of the accumulative income of 
the several funds under the control of the trustees were as follows: 

Dean fund ; $7,829.94 

Mary E. Elliot fund '. 1,578.88 

Eliza A. Eaton fund 715.79 

During the ^ear two hundred and thirteen volumes were purchased 
from the income of the Dean fund, at a cost, as above stated, of six 
hundred and seventy-three dollars and sixteen cents. 

The incidental expenses of the librarj- for the past year have been 
four thousand three hundred and thirty-three dollars and fortj'-eight 
cents. The items that make up this amount will be found in detail 
in the annual report of the city, the bills for the same having been paid 
bj- the city treasurer from the sum appropriated by the citj^ council.s, 
for the library, upon their approval by the trustees. 

The librarian. Miss Florence E. Whitcher, has continued to fulfil 
the duties of her position with the same conscientious effort and fidel- 
ity as heretofore, and to the satisfaction of the trustees. 

The trustees return their acknowledgments to the members of the 
city councils, and particularly to the committee on lands and buildings, 
for the courtesy and consideration with which their suggestions relat- 
ing to the affairs of the library have been received and carried out. 

Maech 23, 1900. 
In board of trustees read and approved, and ordered to be signed by 
the chairman and clerk of the board, and transmitted to the city 
councils. ■ 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 

Mayor. 
N. P. Hunt, 
Clerk. 

17 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of tlie City Libfary: 

The treasurer of the board submits the following account of the 
receipts and expenditures by the board of the funds received on account 
of the library: 

1899. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropriation $1,035.18 

July 1. appropriation for books for 1S99 1,000.00 

Florence E. Whitcher, books lost... 2.37 

Florence E. Whitcher, catalogues sold 6.20 

Florence E. Whitcher, balance of fines 214.62 



$2,258.31 



Jan. 1. To balance of income of Dean fund $8,006.34 

income of Dean fund (coupons) 90.00 

July 1. income of Dean fund (coupons).... 90.00 

interest on accumulation of income 
to July 1, 1899, Manchester Savings 

Bank, Book No. 16445 91.08 

interest on accumulation of income 
to July 1, 1899, Manchester Savings 

Bank, Book No. 24442 142.44 

Oct. 1, income of Dean fund, Guarantj'- Sav- 
ings Bank, Book No. 4078 73.50 

interest on accumulation of income 
to Oct. 1, 1899, Guaranty Savings 
Bank, Book No. 4557 9.74 

Jan. 1. To Mary E. Elliot fund $2,000.00 

balance of interest, Mary E. Elliot 

fund 1,457.88 

Oct. 1. interest on Mary E. Elliot fund to 

Oct. 1, 1899, Guaranty Savings 

Bank, Book No. 2009 70.00 

interest on accumulation of income 
to Oct. 1, 1899, Guaranty Savings 
Bank, Book No. 2010 51.00 

J:ni. 1. To Kliz.i A. Eaton fund $3,000.00 

balance iiilort-st. Hli/a A. Eaton fund 590.15 

258 



3,578.88 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 259 

Oct. 1. To interest on Eliza A. Eaton fund to 
Oct. 1, 1S99, Guaranty Savings 

Bank, Book No. 4327 $105.00 

interest on accumulation of income 
to Oct. 1, 1899, Guaranty Savings 

Bank, Book No. 4328 20.64 

$3,715.79 



$18,056.14 



1899. Cr. 

Jan. 2. Paid New England News Co., periodicals $13.28 

7. Boston Book Co., periodicals 5.00 

9. Publishers' Weekly, periodicals... 8.00 

Feb. 3, New England News Co., periodicals 9.94 

21. Cliarles W. Smilejs periodicals 4.00 

George H. Policy & Co., periodicals 6.00 

22. W. B. Clarke Co., books 1.35 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books 12.25 

Mar. 3. New England News Co., periodicals 12.60 

10. D. L. Brownell, books 2.50 

18. Little, Brown & Co., books 3.75 

22. Publishers' Weekly, books 3.50 

23. New England Historical & Gen- 

ealogical Societj', periodicals.... 1.50 

April 4. New England News Co., periodicals 12.41 

Little, Brown & Co., books 2.00 

7. W. B. Clarke Co., books 102.68 

Little, Brown & Co., books 1.50 

17. Publishers' Weekly, books 3.00 

IS. George C. Gilmore, books .50 

May 3. New England News Co., periodicals 14.35 

6. W. B. Clarke Co., books 25.91 

8. Publishers' Weekly, books 3.50 

15. Helman-Taylor Co., books ■ 5.00 

22. Granite Monthly Co., books 1.25 

23. George E. Littlefield, books 4.05 

31. D. Appleton & Co., books 5.00 

June 3. New England News Co., periodicals 13.25 

5. W. B. Clarke Co., books 2.34 

July 11. New England News Co., periodicals 10.30 

12. Little, Brown & Co., books 4.25 

Aug. 5. New England News Co., periodicals 13.58 

Little, Brown & Co., books 1.50 

W. B. Clarke Co., books ..;. 242.7G 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books 268.68 



260 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Sept. 5. Paiil New England News Co., periodicals $12.90 

(i. W. B. Clarke Co., books (replaced) 116.66 

12. Little, Brown & Co., books 3.50 

IS. Boston Book Co., books (replaced) 9.60 

Oct. 2. Little, Brown & Co., books 3.50 

4. New England Xews Co., periodicals 13.36 

Nov. 4. New England News Co., periodicals 10.19 
W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books 240.81 

11. W. H. Guild & Co, periodicals 191.30 

14. Lawj'^ers' Co-operative Publishing 

Co., books 5.00 

24. W. B. Clarke Co., books 97.86 

25. John W. Congdon, books 5.25 

Dec. 4. New England News Co., periodicals 11.68 

7, W. B. Clarke Co., books 15.92 

iv. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books 151.42 

15. Little, Brown & Co., books (5.00 

$1,710.43 

Dec. 31. Bj' balance of appropriation 1,215.10 

balance of Dean fund income 7,829.94 

balance of Elliot fund and interest 3,578.88 

balance of Eaton fund and interest 3,715.79 

$18,056.14 

The expenditures for incidental expenses of the librarj- for the year 
ending December 3], 1899, the bills for which have been paid through 
the office of the city treasurer, upon the approval of the committee on 
accounts of the board of trustees, the items of which may be found 
in the annual rejjort of the city, are as follows: 

Services of librarian $900.00 

Services of assistants to librarian 1,125.82 

Fuel 309.01 

Gas •'■••■IS 

Electricity .^33.46 

Insurance 125.00 

Binding 139.03 

Kebinding 386.00 

Supplies 165.27 

Printing 34.25 

Water 16-00 

Newspapers 6.00 

Beclassification and cataloguing 707.25 

Incidentals, cleaning 80.89 

$4,333.48 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 261 



RECAPITULATIOX. 



Balance December 31, 1898 $2,006.76 

Appropriation for 1899 5,000.00 



Paid trustees for purchase of books $1,000.00 

Incidental expenses 4,333.48 

Balance of appropriation December 31, 1899 1,673.28 



$7,000.76 



7,006.76 



Respectfully submitted. 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 

December 30, 1899. 
We have examined the foregoing i-eport and find the same correctly 
cast a'bd properlj^ vouched. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, 
WALTER M. PARKER, 
Committee on Accounts of City Libra/ry. 

December 30, 1899. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of receipts and ex- 
penditures embraced in the foregoing report of the treasurer of the 
trustees of the citj' library, and find the same correctly cast and 
properly vouched. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Manchester City Library: 
Gentlemen, — I lierewith submit the forty-sixth annual report of 

the city library: 

Whole number of accessions December 31, 1898 42,843 

Added during the year 1899: 

'Bj purchase 608 m 

By gift 499 

Periodicals bound 97 

1,204 

Whole number at present 44,047 

Including: 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets 702 

Bound volumes 43,329 

44,047 

Number of periodicals regularly received: 

By purchase 57 

By gift 29 

Number of days the library was open for reading and distri- 
bution of books 305 

Nvimber of volumes delivered for home use 77,159 

Average per day 253 

Largest number any one day 610 

Largest number any one month 8,315 

Smallest number any one month 5,367 

Number of volumes delivered in the reading room 17,399 

Average per day 57 

Total circulation for 1899 94,558 

Number of cards used on deposit 6 

Numbfer of cards issued during the year 458 

W^hole number issued since last registration 12,720 

Postals sent to delinquents 462 

Worn-out books removed from circulation 176 

Number of volumes replaced 152 

Number of volumes lost or injured and ])ai(l for 6 

Number of volumes repaired at bindery 1,289 

Number of volumes rei)aired and covered at llio library 14,373 

Number of volumes issued to teachers 876 

262 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 263 

Amount received froiu December 1, 1898, to December 1, 1899: 

For fines $296.98 

catalogues G.20 

books lost and paid for 2.37 

$305.55 

Amount paid for expressage and incidentals 82.36 

Paid to N. P. Hunt, treasurer, December 28, 1899 $223.19 

OIRCULATIOX. 

The circulation of books for home use during the year shows a 
falling oft" of 3,277. A similar loss has been experienced by other 
libraries and varioiisly accounted for by the interest in the daily news 
for the past two years, the increased interest in out-of-door amuse- 
ments, the exceptionally pleasant summer and fall, and other causes. 
While the Manchester library had a slight gain in the circulation last 
year, many others lost, and this year, while losing something in the 
number of books taken out, a comparison of the number of books 
drawn in the various classes of literature, with the number drawn last 
year, will show that the loss has all been in the use of fiction, all the 
other classes showing- a gain over last year, and the percentage of 
fiction falling- from 81 to 77. While considering that it is better to 
read anj- good work of fiction than to read nothing at all, it is gi-ati- 
fying to feel that the more solid reading is gaining in favor with the 
public. Following is a statement of the circulation hy classes, with 
the percentage of each: 

No. Per 

Vols. Cent 

Periodicals 3,763 5 

Philosophy and Religion 866 1 

Biography 1,912 3 

History 2,598 4 

Geography and Travel 1575 2 

Social and Political Science 742 1 

Science and Useful Arts 2.4G1 3 

Fine Arts 1,021 1 

Literature 2,400 3 

Fiction 59,761 77 

The number of. books issued for home use was 77,159, for use in the 
reading room was 17,399, making a total of 94,558. The number used 
by teachers Avas 876. _ These figures do not include a large number of 
books used for reference, of which no record can be kept. 

There have been 176 worn-out books withdrawn from circulation 
this year, "and many more are in nearly as bad condition. One hun- 
dred and fifty-two have been replaced by new copies. 

EXAMIXATION. 

At the annual examination of the library, seven books were un- 
accounted for. Four were works of fiction. Of the others, two were 



264 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

classed as literature, aiul one as medieiiie. One additional book was 
lost by the removal from the eity of the pei'son to whom it was 
charged. No address having- been left, it was found impossible to 
trace it. 

BUILDING. 

Tlianks are due to the committee on lands and buildings for their 
response to the request for repairs on the building. The floor of the 
reading room, and of many of the alcoves of the bookroom, has been 
covered with linoleum, which has partially removed a source of great 
injury to the books, in the dust arising from the old floor, which had 
become so worn that it could not be properly cleaned, and also lessen- 
ing the noise of passing and repassing, which cannot be avoided by 
the present arrangement of the reading room. The roof has been 
repaired. The halls, which were so nnsighth' with broken iilaster, 
and badly in need of paint, have been repaired and neatly iiainted. A 
new walk has been laid fi-om the side door to Dean avenue, and the 
concrete in that passage itself renewed. Many smaller repairs and im- 
provements have also been made, which greatly improve the general 
appearance of the library. 

The need of new stepladders is even more pi'cssing tlwxn for several 
years. A number of those now in use are unsafe, and as there are. not 
enough now it is hardly possible to give them up. The demand for 
more reading room space is more ui'gent than ever before, and it is 
hoped that the city will second the efforts of the ladies to fit up a room 
suitable for the use of the children, and so advance the work of train- 
ing the j^oung in lines of usefulness and a broader culture, besides 
making the present room more available for others wishing to use 
the library. 

CATALOGUE. 

The work on tlio catalogue is progressing. \\'ry uiucli has been 
accomplished during this year. Five thousand anil eighty-six books 
have been classified, and r),i:Ut have been catalogued, practically com- 
pleling the work upstairs, with the exception of the pamphlets, bound 
and unbound. wSocial and Political Science and Medicine have been 
completed, the miscellaneous set of Public Documents have nearly all 
been done, but there still remains the regular set downstairs to be 
done. Several parts of divisions were left over as the ditYerent classes 
have been done. All these sect-ions have been finished, except the 
Newspapers, which still remain to be arranged. 

Of course there is stilt much analyzing nt'ces> 
cataloguing is comi)letcd, in order to make tiu 
highest point of usefulness, l)ut tins cannot hi 
regular work is finished. 

The list of scientific l)ooks, known as the \)v:i 
ready to [)rint, and it is hoped to liave it in jues: 

Ah the worU progressed, and no pernKinent pi; 
the diirerent ehisses as they liad been -lone, it xv 



ry a 


fter 


thi 


^ regular 


cata 


log, 


le reach the 


atte 


nipt 


ed 1 


until the 


Coil 


eetii 


on. 


is nearly 


be to 


re 1( 


•ng. 




•e h: 


id i> 


ecu 


assigned 


s foi 


Uld 


nee( 


I'ssary to 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 265 

rearrange the books on tlio shelves. Miieh thoiiglit ami eare were put 
iuto Ihis ehange, not only to make the classes follow one another in 
the natural order of the classification, but to effect the moving- with as 
little confusion as possible to the attendants with its consequent 
delay to the public, and also to avoid moving one set of books to a 
temporary resting place, in oi'der to put np another set, thus necessi- 
tating a second moving of the same set of books. Great credit for the 
successful completion of this change is due to the i^atience and ready 
assistance of the desk attendants, who accomplished this work in 
addition to their regular duties. As all the books except those in 
Fiction, Travels, and a ])art of Literature had to be moved, it will 
be seen that the task was not a small or easy one. 

ACCESSIONS. 

New books to the number of 1,204 have been added during the year, 
60S by purchase, 49!t by gift, and 97 volumes of periodicals have been 
bound, and form a valuable addition to the library-. Among the books 
received maj'^ be mentioned 213 purchased for the Dean Collection. 
These Include many valuable and useful books on electricity, beside 
many scientific and technical works of permanent value. It is our 
purpose to keep in touch with the progress of the daj' in science and 
the arts, beside adding those books of a popular nature whicli appeal 
to a large portion of the community. 

Lists of the new books have been printed in the dail.y papers from 
time to time throughout the year, as they were added to the library. 
The courtesy of the papers in printing these lists free of charge, as well 
as special lists which have been j^repared as they were needed, is grate- 
iuUy acknowledged. Among these lists may be mentioned those on 
Botany, Birds, and Insects, prepared for the use of the members of 
the Institute interested in those particular lines of study. 
Eespectfully submitted. 

FLORENCE E. WHITCHER, 

Lihrarian. 



Donations to Library. 

Books. Pamphlets 

Abbot Public Library, Marblehead, Mass 1 

Aguilar Free Library, New York City 1 

American National Red Cross Relief Committee 1 

American Swedenborg Printing & Publishing Society. . 6 

Amherst College 1 

Amherst College Librar\^ 1 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massa- 
chusetts 2 

Ancient Free and Accepted ^fasons of Massachusetts.. 1 

Apprentices' Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa 2 

Armstrong, 0. W 1 



266 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

B. F. Sturtevant Co 1 c 

Uaillie's Inst. Free Library, Glasgow 2 

Bigelow Free Public Library, Clinton, Mass 1 

Boston, Alass. — Public Library 2 

Bradley, Denis M., Bishop 1 

Bridgeport, Conn. — Public Library , 1 

Brookline, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Brooklyn, N, Y. — Library 3 

Bureau of American Republics 3 

Burlington, Iowa. — Free Public Library 1 

Cambridge, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburg, Pa 1 

Carvelle, H. DeW 15 

Chicago, 111. — Public Library 1 

Cincinnati, O. — Public Librarj'^ 1 

Civil Service Reform Association 1 

Clarke, Arthur E 35 

Cleaves, George P 1 10 

Concord, Mass. — Free Public Libi*arj' 1 

Concord, N. H. — Public Library 1 1 

Cook, F, 1 

Cornell University 1 

]3artmouth College 2 

Depew, C 1 

District of Columbia Public Library I 

Dodge, J. E 19 

Dodge, T. H 1 

Dover, N. H.— Public Library * 2 

Drummond, J. H 2 1 

Enoch I'ratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md 1 

Evanston, 111. — Free Public Library 1 

Everett, Mass. — Public Library l 

Fairmount Park Art Association, PhiliuU'lpliia. Pa i 

Fall River, !Mass. — Public Library 1 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt 1 

Forbes Library, Northampton, Mass 1 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Pa 1 

Gallinger, J. II.. 1 

CJrand Rapids, Mich. — Public Library :. 

Hall, Mrs. M 1 

Hall, W. S 1 

TIarrison, C. II 1 

Harvard University 1 2 

lli'leiui, Montana. — I'nblic l-ihrary 2 

Holy Cross College 1 

Honghton, Mifllin & Co 1 1 

Hunt, C. W 1 

Indian l!i"-hls Ass.H-ialion ^ 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 267 

Intercontinental Railway Commission 7 2 

Interstate Commerce Commission 1 

Jersej' Citj-, N. J. — Free Public Library 1 

Lake Mohonk Conference on International Arbitration 1 

Lamb, F. W 2 

Larned, C. W 1 

Lawrence, Mass. — Free Public Library 1 

Lawyers' Co-operative Publishing Co 6 

Lynn, Mass. — Public Library 2 

Lytle, John J 16 

Maimonides Free Library, New York City 

Maiden, Mass. — Public Library 

Manchester, N. H. — Chief Engineer of Fire Department 

" " City Engineer 

" " Engineer's Department 

" " Street and Park Commissioners... 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Medford, Mass. — Public Library 

Melrose, Mass. — Public Library 

Melville, George W 10 

Minneapolis, Minn. — Public Library 

Missouri Botanical Garden 

Nashua, N. H. — Public Library 

National Civil Service Reform League 

New Hampshire. — Centennial Home for the Aged. ;. . . . 

" " Insurance Commissioner 1 

" " Librarj'^ Commission 

" " Railroad Commission 1 

" " Secretary of State 3 

New Haven, Conn. — Free Public Library 

New Yt)rk City. — Mercantile Library 

New York State.— State P.otanist 

Newark, N. J. — Free Public Library 

Newberry Library, Chicago, 111 

Newton, Mass. — Free Library 

Norman, L 

Norwich University, Northfield, Vt 

Ohio Wesleyan University 

Paterson, ik^. J. — Free Public Library 

Peabodj^ Institute, Baltimore, 'Md 

Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery 

Peoria, 111. — Public Library 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the 
Blind 

Philadelphia, Pa. — Free Library 

Porter, Edward G 

Portland, Me. — Public Library 

Princeton University 



ZbO ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Providence, R. I. — Public Library 1 

Piiget Sound Bureau of Information I 

Reinstein, J. B 2 

Richards, L. S 2 

Richardson, W. A 1 

St. Giles Public Library, London, Eng 1 

St. Louis, Mo. — Mercantile Library' 1 

Salem, Mass. — Public Library 1 l 

Scranton, Pa. — Public Library 2 

Slayton, E. M 1 

Society of Colonial Wars, Washington, D. C 1 

Somerville, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Southbridge, Mass. — Public Library I 

SpofEord, C. B 1 

Staples, Carleton A 1 

Syracuse, N. Y. — Central Library 1 

Taylor, C. F 2 

Tucker, C 1 1 

United States. — Agricultural Department 4 

" " Bureau of Education :? 1 

" " Civil Service Commission 2 1 

" " Fish Commission 2 

" " Interior Department 2 22 

" " Labor Department 3 9 

" " Smithsonian Institution 5 

" " Superintendent of Documents 147 190 

" " Treasury Department 2 2 

" " War Department 8 4 

University of Chicago 5 

University of Pennsylvania 1 

University of the State of New York 2 4 

Unknown 4 

Uruguay 12 

Vedanta Society, N. Y 1 

Wells College 1 

Westboro, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Wilmington, Del. — Institute .1 

Woburn, Mass. — Public Library 3 

Worcester, Mass. — Free Public Library 1 



Periodicals Presented. 

liook Reviews. 

Bulletin, Le. 

Bulletin of Bibliography. 

Case and Comment. 

Catalogue of rnilcd States Public Dooimcnts. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 269 

Chicago Banker. 
Christian Science Journal. 
Christian Science Sentinel. 
Derry Times. 

Elliott's Mag-azine. (L. A. W. Bulletin.) 
Holy Cross Purple. 
Home Market Bulletin. 
Manchester. — Emerald. 
" Union. 

Weekly Budget. 
Manifesto. 
New Earth. 
New PhilosophJ^ 

Official Gazette of the Patent Office. 
Protectionist. 
Plymouth Eecord. 
Skandinavia. 
Sound Currency. 
Sunset. 
Tablet. 

Tennessee University Magazine. 
Travellers' Record. 
Washington News Letter. 
Woman's Home Companion. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor: 
The Boai'd of Health submits the following report for the year 1899: 
Dr. William M. Parsons having been appointed to succeed himself 
there was no change in the membership of the board, and the organi- 
zation has been the same, viz.: John C. Bickford, president, and Wil- 
liam K. Itobbins, clerk. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Salaries $600.00 

Labor 2,733.65 

Office furniture 55.32 

Printing, advertising, and postage 127.83 

Traveling expenses (teams and carfare) 209.41 

Express 3.17 

Telephone service 64.65 

Water and milk analyses 15.60 

Legal expenses 

Antitoxine 25.80 

Laboratory- 6.91 

Diphtheria examinations 65.00 

Disinfectants 265,45 

Aid given families quarantined 255.55 

Board, fuel, etc., for pest-house 75.60 

Gas and incidentals 46.43 

$4,550.37 

The expenditures, as will be seen by the above list, were very nearly 
the same as last year. There being fewer cases of diphtheria and scar- 
let fever than the average of past years, the expenses for antitoxine and 
aid to quarantined families was less than we expected, and the appro- 
priation allowed us was not all used, $214.92 being turned over to the 
reserve fund. 

MEETINGS. 

The regular weeklj- meetings have been continued on Tuesday even- 
ings at 7 o'clock. Fort^^-seven such meetings were held, and eleven spe- 
cial meetings for trips of inspection, etc. Fewer trips of inspection 
■were made than would have been had not the inspectors been kept so 
busy with other work that -no house to house insiiections were made. 
18 

273 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



INSPECTORS. 

The same employees have been retained at the office as hist year, viz.: 
Carl O. Seaman, inspector of plumbing, J. F. Looney and William B. 
Blake, general health inspectors, and Miss M. Alma Fracker, office 
<.'lerk; and it is due to their efficiency and experience that the large vol- 
ume of business going through the department has been properly 
cared for. 

The 1,026 cases of contagious and infectious diseases reported during 
the year means that nianj' more than that number of visits must be 
made to put up cards, obtain information regarding the case, and make 
sanitary inspection of the premises. One hundred and thirty of these 
cases were scarlet fever, and each case occasions about twenty subse- 
quent visits to guard the quarantine, and also to do erx-ands for the 
family', making 2,600 more. The fifty-six cases of diphtheria and mem- 
branous croup each require an average of ten subsequent visits attend- 
ing upon quai-antine, or 560 trips. The 762 cases of measles require 
each one trip to remove card. The 186 cases of membranous croup, 
diphtheria, and scarlet fever require so many fumigations, and each 
requires two trips, or 372. So the contagious diseases alone required 
5,:320 visits by the inspectors. Add to this the number of days spent 
at the lake, the barn cellars and vaults inspected, and responses to 
general complaints, and it will be vmderstood these me'n ri>ally have 
.something to do. 

BACTEKIOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 

During the year forty-seven examinations for diplithoria have been 
made, and two for,the germs of tuberculosis. This enables the board to 
give the public better protection against the disease, and yet often 
enables them to liberate a suspected patient who, but for this test, 
would have to endure the hardship of quarantine. The expense of 
maintaining this department is very small. Of the forty-seven diph- 
theria examinations twenty were positive and twenty-seven negative. 
Of these fifteen were examinations for the discharge of i^atient. 

GARBAGE AND REFUSE. 

The manner of disposal of garbage and refuse remains the same as 
last year. Tlie dumping places are outside the city sanitary limits, 
and have lieen better kept than for many years. Wherever they are and 
however kept they are a nuisance and injurious to the public health, 
and should not be tolerated. That burning is feasible is shown by the 
fact tliat ])arties have olVered to contract under bontis to do llie work 
of colleedng and bui-ning for a less sum per year tiian it now costs the 
city to pile it iij. in heaps to rot. 







sniooLHor.sKs. 








From fre(|ucnt 


ins|)ect 


ions of sehoolliouses. 


Ave 1 


l>eli 


e\e the floors and 


'sks slionld he i 


n(.re frc 


(|nently waslied; <'ert: 


linly 


as 


often as onee each 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 275 

niotilli: that all books should be covered, and the covers changed at 
each pi-oiuotion, or every time the books are assigned to different 
pupils. 

ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

We would again call your attention to the need of an isolation hos- 
pital, and would refer to our report of last j^ear upon the subject, which 
it seems scarcely worth while to repeat. Conditions therein described 
still remain, and as time is fast demolishing the old pest-house, the 
need of proper accommodation grows more urgent. During the past 
year there was much less than the usual amount of the more dan- 
gerous contagious diseases, and the lack of accommodation has not 
been so severely felt, but anything in the nature of an epidemic would 
find the city poorly provided to meet it. 

SMALL CEME,TERIES. 

There are several small cemeteries about the city whore there is no 
superintendent, and in these burials sometimes take place without the 
permit required by law because there is no one to demand it. Two 
bodies were so buried at Stowell cemetery during the .year b}' under- 
takers from other towns. We found that they had burial permits 
issued by their own town, and they considered they had done what 
wag right and> proper. Tt will be seen that in this waj'^ bodies are 
interred in Manchester, and yet the citj^ registrar has no record to 
show where they are. Indeed, the body of a murdered person might 
be so interred, and the fact not be known. We would, therefore, sug- 
gest that some person be designated to act as .superintendent of each 
of the following cemeteries: Amoskeag, Goffe's Falls, Manchester Cen- 
ter, Merrill, Piscataquog, Stowell's, and the one on Young road near 
Jewett street. 

STREET CATCII-BASINS. 

Complaint is frequently made at this office of the bad odors rising 
from street catch-basins. The complaints are usually well grounded, 
since most of the basins are not properly trapped. The trouble from 
these odors is often increased by workmen cleaning them out and 
leaving them open until the next rain. 

When several of these are in close proximity (as, in one case, eight 
within a radius of one hundred feet) the odors arising become a serious 
menace to the health of those living near by. The remedy is to be 
found in providing a proper trap, and clean out below the frost line 
in every catch-basin where odors of sewer gas become noticeable. 

UNOCCUPIED BUILDINGS. 

We would again invite the attention of the public to the fact that 
when a building remains long unoccupied the water evaporates from 
the traps of the plumbing fixtures, and thus gives free admissio) of 



276 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

sewer gas, and all doors and windows being closed, the house becomes 
saturated with the filthy gas. We often find diphtheria and kindred 
diseases in such houses when first reoccupied. It may be doubted 
\vhether sewer gas causes such diseases, but it certainly promotes their 
development. The remedy is simple and cheap: In every house not to 
be occupied even for a short time, the water should be drawn from 
the traps of the plumbing fixtures and replaced by some fluid, oil or 
glycerine. Kerosene answers very well. 

THE PLUMBING LAW. 

During the year a new plumbing law has gone into effect, which 
requires every plumber, master or journeyman, to register as such 
])efore September 1, lSi)<», and such as did not register, or who came to 
the city after that date, to be examined and licensed. This city was 
the first in the state to make full compliance with the state law. The 
mayor appointed the board of examiners in good season, and on the 
first of September all plumbers of the city were registered, and the 
board in readiness to give written, oral, and practical examinations to 
any w-ho might apply for license and examination. 

A list of all licen.sed plumbers has been furnished this board for the 
use of the plumbing inspector, together with the request that anj' vio- 
lation of the state plumbing law be reported to the board of examiners 
of plumbers. 

Besides inspecting the jjlumbing work in progress in the city, the 
inspector has made manj- inspections of old work in public buildings, 
factories, stores, and private dwellings. His judgment in the matter 
of establishing or remodeling drainage systems has been frequently 
sought, :iii(l with niiicli l)enetit to the parties and protection to the 
public. 

The State Industrial School is a particular instance, and as now 
remodeled the drainage of that institution is most excellent, and the 
work wa.s done cheaply and with expedition. 

The inspector re])()rts that there are in use in the city pn)l)ably 
3,000 of the old-fashioned water-closets that are flushed by direct pres- 
sure. The supply pipes to these are small and the valves poor, so they 
are seldom found to be clean and sanitary, and are usually in a leaking 
condition, i)ermitting much Avat.i- to run to waste. I'robably 2,000 of 
the.se closets are in service Avitlioiit iiH-teis. so the waste of water is 
consideral)le. A decision by the Ixiaid of water commissioners to re- 
quire meters in all cases w lu ic diicct |)ressure closets are used would 
do much toward eradicating these nuisances, and ;it tlic same time 
pi-ovc a great saving to the city's supply. 

Miriv SI I'lT.Y. 

• citv continues to be distressingly large, 
>f il results from cholera infantum and 
ite .1 safe presumption that the milk used 



Th. 


■ infant, nu 


)r1ality o 


an(V i 


IS the gr«'; 


iter port 


other 


i)owel (lis. 


•ases. it i 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 277 

is responsible for most of these sad results. There is no doubt that 
much of the milk is damaged by improper care and handling on the 
part of consumers, yet it is also quite certain that a considerable por- 
tion of it is sjioiled and unfit for food when delivered. 

The trouble with the consumer is lack of intelligent cleanliness in 
the care of vessels in which the milk is kept, and the feeling of econ- 
omy, — false economy, — in saving a few cents which ought to be paid 
for ice, and paying out dollars to doctors and undertakers, to say 
nothing of the loss of time and discomfort of having sickness in the 
home. With ice so cheap and readily delivered in all parts of the 
cit}', no family-, however poor, wherein there are small children to 
feed, can afford to be without it. 

On the other hand, more stringent measures should be taken to 
secure to the consumer jiure, clean, sweet milk which, with jiroper 
care, will keep until used. This he has a right to expect. 

Just what proxjortion of ignorance and willfulness there is on the 
part of milkmen and farmers, which results in spoiled milk, may ■ 
never be determined, but that both exert their influence is beyond 
doubt. When a man simply doesn't know enovigh about the business 
to keep his cans clean and his milk cool (and such we have found) he 
must be ignorant; and when another smells of a can that emits an odor 
which would insult a green fly, and then says "That is clean euoiigh," it 
may be ignorance, but it may also be a feeling that some one else will 
drink from that can and he does not care. But when a man who does 
not keep a cow puts out to his customers a fourth more milk than he 
gets from his producers, there is no doubt of there being something 
deliberate in the transaction. 

Having found a number of cases of typhoid fever on one milk route, 
the inspectors were instructed to investigate the source of the milk. 
The milkman was found to know little or nothing about the business 
he followed, and at the farm of one of his producers it was found that 
the cans were washed with water from a well that subsequent examina- 
tion showed to be contaminated with the germs of typhoid fever. The 
board forbade the sale of milk from that farm, ajid requested the state 
board of health to close the well, it being outside of our jurisdiction. 

Three times during the year the inspectors have traced scarlet fever 
back to the milkman or farmer. Several places have come to the notice 
of the board during the year, where milk is mixed and recanned for 
distribution in horse stables where contamination with fermenting 
organisms is almost certain to take place. 

As to the use of preservatives, the watering and adulteration of 
milk, we have made no investigations, leaving that field to the city 
milk inspector. Of this official we have no disposition to complain, 
but would rather commend him for what is done under the circum- 
stances. Yet it is only justice to the i>ublic, and especially to the 
infant portion of it, to say that the inspection of milk in this city 
falls far short of what the public have a right to expect. 



278 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

To begin with, the milk inspector is not chosen for the work because 
of his knowledge of the milk business, or of sanitation, nor yet because 
of special ability to inspect, test, or analyze the milk. He has no 
bureau or department to direct his efforts or sustain his decisions; 
neither has he any funds or resources at his disposal with which to 
bring" offenders to justice. Thus isolated and handicapped, there is 
no reason to hope that the service can ever be really efficient. 

This work pertains wholly to the piiblic health, and the health de- 
partment are often criticised for not doing more in this direction. In 
view of these circumstances, we invite your serious consideration as 
to whether some change cannot be effected that will give the i)eople 
more efficient service in this branch of the public sei'vice. 

FOOD INSPECTION. 

Several times during the year we have been confronted with the 
problem of food inspection. 

We are well aware that much green and partially rotten fruit is sold, 
more often to small children who cannot be expected to judge of the 
wholesomeness of food, and there is reason to believe that many cases 
of spasms and bowel troubles result therefrom. 

During the past-summer an outbreak of what was, by the physicians, 
called ptomaine poisoning occurred in a boarding-house. This, of 
course, resulted from consuming partly decayed food. Investigation 
showed that this might easily enough have happened at that place, 
from the uncleanly manner in which the foods were handled, but the 
plumbing was also found to be very defective, and the exact responsi- 
bility could not be ijlaced. We are pleased to sa3% however, that when 
the defective condition was brought to the attention of the owners 
of the building it was iiroinjitly rejiairod and jmt in a sanitary con- 
dition. 

The last of November, when much poultry was in the market for the 
Thanksgiving trade, the weather was warm and we were satistied that 
much of this poultry spoiled and was sold when untit for human food. 
In tlicse cases no effective action can be taken, becau.sc the statutes 
do not empower any one to condemn or eonliscate sueh goods, and 
there is scarcely any hope of seciiring a eonvifHon on the charge of 
"keeping or exposing" for sale. 

\v.\Ti;ii-sri'i'LY. 

Few people realize the numy .sources of containlnation of our natu- 
rally excellent water-supply, .-ind many liavc IIk- feeling that where 
there is so much water a small Minoimt of filth will not be noticeable. 
A considerable number Imvc ;i xciy [licc way of saying that it is under- 
stood that "water will jxirify ils«'lf in rnnuing four mih-s." 

There was formerly a feeling among .scifntitic men lluit waler 
becomes jmrcr by rniming a coMsidfrahlc distance, and it is a proven 
fact that a li.'a\il\ iKilliited water will cnnlain a smaller anionnt of 



REPORT OF TUE BOARD OF HEALTH. 279 

pollution after flowing in a good stream well exposed to sunlight, but 
such does not make it necessarily, or even probably, pure. Indeed, 
the science of bacteriology has made it certain that no distance of 
running can be depended upon to render water pure from any given 
kind of bacteria, especially those of the disease producing kinds. 

It is "well known that the germs producing typhoid fever and choleru 
not only continue to live in water, but grow and multiply. Therefore, 
the only proper way is to take every possible precaution to keep every- 
thing out of the lake that could possibly carrj^ organisms into it, or that 
will add to the organic matter present upon which they subsist. This 
is the aim which the board of health has in view. 

For years we have been handicapped in our efforts bj^ the need of 
proper legislation. The last legislature passed a laAv empowering the 
state board of health to make regulations governing- bodies of water 
used for domestic supply. Accordingly, after conference with the 
boards of health of this city and the town of Auburn, the state board 
adopted a set of rules which went into effect June 8, 1899. If courts 
shall sustain these rules, which the police court of Auburn has done 
in two instances, we shall be able to secure a good degree of protection 
to the water. 

During the past season Lake Massabesic has been very low, and for 
the first time in many years several of the boggy places along the shore 
became dry land, and also banks of sawdust were left out of the water. 
We believe that such exposed material of a perishable nature should be 
removed w^henever circumstances render it possible. Xot that any i)ar- 
ticular source of danger exists in them, but because perishable matter 
may at any time become a source of danger. The dried-up bogs could 
have been cleared u\) and burned over at a very moderate expense. In- 
deed, the water commissioners cleared up a small bog near Deer Neck 
bridge, and it is much to be regretted that a good beginning was not con- 
tinued. Such opportunities do not often occur, and we would express 
the hope that another such will not be allowed to pass without every 
boggy place about the lake being cleared of all vegetable growth of 
every kind. It would help the water directly by decreasing, if not en- 
tirely removing, the disagreeable taste and odor which are noticeable 
at some seasons of the year, and indirectly by setting an example of 
enterprising cleanliness which the public would tend to follow. 



280 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. 1. 





Membra- 
nous 
croup. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. Sca^t I Var^. 


Totals. 


Months. 


Cases. 
Deaths. 


<» 


1 


Cases. 
Deaths. 


1 


Deaths 
Cases. 
Deaths. 


5 


1 


1 


1 


January — 


1 ' 


3 
5 

5 
3 

8 
3 
6 
1 
2 
4 
3 
7 

50 










3 

1 

6 


8 
4 
1 

12 
3 
1 
2 
4 

15 
9 

17 
2 

78 


2 

4 

1 

1 

3 



12 


19 1 ! 13 

19 : in 


1 


.... 




44 
38 
6S 

33 
44 
103 
121 
36 
89 
145 






1 


34 1 

7 1 

11 ! 

aj ' 2 
101 

28 1 

08 1 
124 '■■ 

"9 1 
189 1 

762 '• 


15 

8 








April 


3 ' 2 

2 1 

1 




















10 
12 
3 
4 
8 


1 
























1 












■ 








I 













10 
11 

130 




109 






1 




209 
1.026 


H 


Totals . . 


1 

c ■' 


— — 


f9 



















REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 281 



COXTAGIOrS AND IXFKCTIOUS DISEASES. 

The total of 1,026 cases of contagious and infectious diseases is not 
so impressive as it first seems when -sve remember that 762 of these are 
measles. That the disease gained such a start is probably due more 
than anything else to negligence in regard to reporting the cases in 
the beginning of the outbreak, for we are satisfied that a great many 
cases were not reported. Later on, householders became aware that 
they are reqiiired to report where no i)hysician is called, and the cases 
are much more fully reported. 

It is a relief to know that the mortality has been very low, — about 
SVa per cent. 

There have been comparatively few cases of diphtheria and scarlet 
fever, the fatality of the latter being very low, a little over 2 per cent. 
The fatality in diphtheria has been verj^ low, only 12 per cent, while with 
membranous croup 50 per cent of the cases died. This shows the value 
of early recognition. Both of these diseases are considered to be 
caused by the same organism, but with croup the onset is so light and 
gradual that the disease is not usually recognized until the last stage, 
when it is too late for any effective treatment. 

It cannot be too strongly impressed upon the public mind that where 
even a small throat difficulty is accompanied bj' fever, professional 
aid should be called at once to make sure that if it is diphtheria it may 
be early recognized and promptly treated. If this is done in every case, 
there need be but little fear of fatal results. 



282 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. 2. 





Membra- 
nous 
croup. 


Dipb- 
theria. 


T^^pboid Measles. 


Scarlet Varlo- Total 
fever. , loid. , ^°'*'- 


Years. 


(0 

5 




1 


i 


ill 

5 1 Q 


1 


1 


IB 

Si 

6 


If 


1 


i 

5 





1885 


* 

* 

• 
12 
17 
17 
14 
10 

6 




* 

73 

126 
79 


18 

17 
30 


28 
35 


20 
12 


ol 


5 
4 

1 

5 


* 

187 
54 


36 
5 

9 
9 

4 
6 

11 

2 
8 

1 
1 

n 


* 




392 
4-28 
438 
211 
554 
408 
418 
260 
763 
681 
624 
1,026 


79 








12 j 44 

16 : 259 

17 ! 63 

18 25 
11 44 
15 110 
21 i 67 

21 ; 55 

20 j 500 
11 387 
14 ; 88 




1889 




















* ; 21 

* ! 26 

12 42 
11 47 
14 103 
10 148 
4 81 
3 fai 


5 
1 


76 
33 

70 










1892 

1893 


3 


451 
212 






09 






0<{ 


1894 .... 


11 1 74 






"i^ 


1895 

1896. 


11 

28 
29 
17 
6 


73 
81 

78 
146 
78 


4 ! 68 
3 61 
3 54 
3 ''00 


1 

.... 




48 
66 


1897. .. . 


*)! 


1898. 


47 


1899 


























1 ■■ 





The above table gives comparison of statistics of contagious and 
infectious diseases for the past fifteen years. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



283 



TABLE No. 3.— DEATH RETURNS. 

TABLE SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES AND 
BY MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 189i). 



Causes of Death. 


oj 
S 


1 


.a 


•"5 
p. 
■< 


03 


o 

c 
s 


3 


1 

to 

a 


1 

a 

a 

CO 


1 


5 

a 
1 


1 

a 

1 


1 




' 




















j 




*' of head 
















1 
1 




....1 










































1 






















1 




















I 

1 


















1 






\ 






















1 


1 






















1 


5 














1 




1 


1 
1 


2 


........ 
















1 




























1 
























1 


1 








1 


1 


i .... 














1 




















1 


















1 
1 












. .. . 
































2 


1 


2 


4 


1 


3 


2 


1 


4 


4 

1 
1 


1 
.... 

1 


29 
















I 










1 


































1 












1 






1 






















1 


































1 




















1 
















1 








1 










































1 












1 
































1 
2 
2 

1 












Bronchitis 


6 
2 

1 


1 

2 


2 


6 


2 

1 


3 
3 


2 


2 
1 

1 


4 
3 


1 

2 


3 
3 


38 




21 




















1 




Cancer .... 


1 










3 


1 


1 


1 


1 




























1 


















1 


















•* nf Hvr>r 


1 










1 


























1 






















^- 






























1 




1 


... 










1 
































1 


"i' 


1 




















1 




K 










1 
1 


















2 


6 
1 

1 


25 


21 


16 


78 


















" 








1 
1 


' 










1 










2 






1 










1 
































1 


■'i' 




" hypostatic 
































1 
3 

1 


"l 


1 
8 










Convulsions . 


6 




1 


1 


4 


..... 3 


1 


2 


32 












1 
























9 


1 


















2 
3 


.... 


1 
2 








1 
6 

1 


"f 2 
....; 1 


"5' 


1 
3 

1 




Debility 

Dentition 


' 


3 


I 


3 
2 


36 
8 



284 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. Z.— Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


p 

c 

03 


g 

.a 


1 


p. 
< 


^ 

S 


c 


3 
•-s 


a 
to 

s 

< 


1 

1 


1 

2 
o 


1 

e 

>■ 

o 


1 

s 










1 






1 


1 


.... 


1 
2 


















3 






















3 




2 


1 










1 






2 


















1 




























1 


1 










Dyspepsia chronic 




1 




























1 




1 






... 








Encephalitis.... 








1 








1 
1 
















1 
2 


.... 




Enteritis 


2 

1 








1 
4 








1 
1 






1 




1 


"i 


2 


1 


14 












2 


























1 






1 








1 












1 
























1 
.... 
















" puerperal 








1 


.... 


















1 
2 










1 




" typhoid 


1 
1 


1 


1 


* 






1 




3 


12 


























^ 


'' 








Gastritis ... 


1 






1 


' 


.... 


1 




.... 


1 




Grtstrorrhagia 




1 




















1 














" dilatation ol 






















1 

3 




" diseaseof 

" mitral regurgitation of. 


1 
1 


3 


2 


.... 


2 


3 


4 


5 

1 


4 


1 


8 


81 










































1 


















1 




















1 














1 








" strain 


1 
2 






























3 


2 


4 


1 


8 


1 


IB 


Hemiplegia 










1 












1 


















" of bowels 












I 




























.... 






1 


.... 




Hepatitis 






1 












1 


















1 






Hip, fracture ol, and old age. 




1 






















1 












2 




'. 


1 




H vdropneumothorav 






1 












IchorliM'inia and heart disease 






1 
4 














4 


I mini t ion 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


8 


.... 


2 


S 








2 


1 
























1 


8 








1 


.... 


1 






.Jiuindlce 










1 


1 


1 






4 

1 
1 


6 


4 


2 


1 










IG 


Laryngitis. (iMlenialous 

Liver, amyloid degencral'n of 
" atropliv of 


1 


.... 


" 


.... 
























1 




1 










1 

1 












" cirrhosis of 


2 


1 








1 
2 


1 


.... 


1 




" disease of 






1 






2 






.... 


1 


1 


■'i" 








" (itdema of 












1 


















Miilniitritlon 




1 






















2 


1 




1 


"i 

1 
1 

2 

1 


1 


.... 


8 

1 


1 
.... 

3 

1 


1 

'1 




13 


McuslcH 




Meningitis 




t 
1 


2 

"i 


8 
2 


2 

"i 


..!. 




U 


" cerebral 






1 


15 


cerebrospinal 

" tubercular 


1 
1 


10 


3 




5 



REPOKT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 285 

TABLE No. .i.—CoHtinued. 



Causes of Death. 


1 


2 

1 


i 


1 


§■ 
g 


\ 


i 

s 


1 
s 


1 

1 


li 


S 
« 

1 


.a 

a 


1 


Metrorrhagia 

Myelitis 


1 






1 


1 1 


















1 












1 








Neglect 
















1 
1 


i 

1 


'i 
.... 

1 


Nephritis 




2 

2 
5 

1 
1 


2 

1 
2 
3 


1 I 


I 

2 
2 

1 


2 
2 

2 

1 


1 


5 




" chronic, interstitial. 


1 


Old age 


2 


2 


3 

1 


3 
1 




3 








Paresis 


1 
1 
3 
S 
1 
IS 






1 
2 

5 

1 
6 


1 

"i 
5 

"2 

1 


i 
3 

7 

1 

8 


1 

' i' 
2 

1 

3 

1 


1 
1 












5 


1 
2 
14 


1 1 
"5 


15 


' i 

9 

5 

1 


3 
'io" 

1 






Pleurisy.. 


5 
3 
1 


12 

.... 


5 

1 


4 


3 

2 


" broncho 






" croupous 














" pleuro 

'' typhoid 




1 


1 


1 














1 




1 








1 


Poisoning, accidental 




2 
















" alcoholic .. 


1 






1 




























1 
2 










Premature birth . . . 


2 


2 


1 


7 


5 


1 


1 
1 


2 


4 


3 


5 
















1 












Purpura hemorrhagica 










1 
1 








































Rachitis 












1 


















2 
















1 


Rlieumatism 










1 




1 
















1 






SepticiBmia 






1 






1 
1 








3 


1 












Shock, following operation.. . 








1 






1 


"i 




.... 


.... 






1 


1 






1 


Spina bifida 




























1 




Stenosis, valvular .... 












1 
1 












7 


3 


7 


5 


5 

1 


7 


5 


3 


6 


6 


4 


Stomach ulceration of 


















1 
















1 




















1 
1 




1 


1 




























shooting 

Syncope . . . 












1 
1 

1 










1 












Tabes naesenterica... .... 
















1 




















1 


. 


1 






Tubercular disease of spinal 












' 


1 












2 


i 






I 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 




Tumor, multilocular, cj'Stic .. 
" ovarian 




1 










1 










1 


Ulcer, malignant 






1 


























1 










; 


2 

78 


1 
1 

100 




1 


1 






1 
1 

87 


1 


2 






1 1 
111 








1,127 




82 


~92 


^ 


121 


97 


90 


88 


jioT 





286 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 

SOME COMrARISONS OF \ I'lAL .-TATISTICS 



1885. 



1886. 



1887. 



Population estiniiited 3^ 

Number of deaths, exclusive of stillbirths 

Deaths, per thousand of population 

Deaths of children under Ave years 

Katio, deaths of children to total deaths, 
pur cent 

Deaths of children per thousand of popu- 1 
lation 1 

Deaths from zymotic diseases 



Deaths from zymotic diseases per thou- 
sand of population 

Cholera infantum 



Consumption 

Croup 

Diphtheria 

Bronchitis, all forms 

I'neumonia, all forms 

Heavt disease, all forms 

Scarlet fever 

Typhoid fever 

Measles 

W hooping cough 

Smallpox 

IJirths reported 

Births per thousand of popuhition 
Marriages reported 



,884 
733 
19.35 
312 
42. S6 
8.24 
231 
G.IO 
S9 



11 

3 

,10G 

29.19 
404 



39.033 
25 



1,215 
798 



42,689 
764 



18.57 


19.84 


20..ii» 


17.9<) 


313 


35« 


397 


353 


43.17 


44.61 


AC.rA 


46.20 


8.02 


8.85 


0.58 


8.27 


205 


256 


OOT 


199 


5.25 


0..37 


5.4S 


4.(K3 


115 


14S 


115 


86 


109 


93 


109 


79 


21 


25 


24 


25 


9 


17 1 


30 


23 


11 


29 


37 


35 


26 


39 


4.^1 


3S 


37 


45 


■23 


47 




4 1 
17 


12 


5 


12 


16 


5 


s 


9 


4 


3 


1 


.') 


6 


1,207 


1,391 j 


♦830 


•872 


30.92 


34 .'i9 






451 


m 


■139 


506 



•The returns are manifestly incomplete. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

No. 4. 

F01{ THE LAST FIFTEEN YEAliS. 



281 



1S90. 


1891. 


1S92. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1890. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


44,12G 


45,5* 


48,000 


50.000 


55,000 


55,000 


56,000 


60,000 


60,000 


60,000 


901 


880 


963 


971 


977 


1,020 


1,051 


1,018 


1,001 


1,068 


20.40 


1!)..34 


20.06 


19.42 


17.7G 


18.54 


18.77 


16.97 


16.68 


17.80 


434 


3% 


500 


527 


546 


549 


531 


631 


521 


541 


48.17 


44 .6(; 


51.92 


50.02 


55.89 


53.82 


50.52 


61.98 


52.04 


50.65 


9.87 


S.G4 


10.42 


10.54 


9.91 


9.98 


9.48 


10..50 


S.68 


9.01 


252 


181 


153 


137 


» 


213 


227 


226 


254 


203 


5.7-2 


3.9S 


3.18 


2.74 


3.80 


3.97 


4.05 


3.77 


4.23 


3.38 


141 


122 


103 


S9 


40 


146 


129 


110 


122 


78 


94 


84 


SO 


79 


74 


76 


112 


^ 


73 


91 


15 


7 


3 


4 


24 


14 


20 


14 


10 


10 


9 


2 


5 


' 


11 


10 


28 • 


29 


17 


6 


38 


38 


39 


44 


50 


59 


51 


86 


45 


65 


68 


72 


39 


53 


81 


86 


77 


105 


72 


113 


43 


3S 


48 


46 


52 


75 


77 


04 


50 


57 


3 




2 


5 


3 


4 


1 


1 


9 


3 


17 


18 


11 


15 


8 


21 


19 


12 


14 


12 


6 


^ 


11 


2 


4 


1 


3 


3 


3 


5 


4 


5 




2 




2 


3 


13 


2 


15 










*9C5 


*985 


1,178 


1,491 


1,247 


1,440 


1,714 


1,614 


1,500 


1,489 


463 


549 


037 


650 


610 


« 


652 


634 


665 


583 



288 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Tabic So. 3 gives the total deaths during the year and the causes 
assigned therefor. We solicit a careful perusal of this, and Table No. 4, 
which compares the vital statistics for the past fifteen years. Much 
valuable information may be thus derived, the kind depending upon the 
subject most interesting to the reader. 

It will be noticed that the various diseases which affect the lungs 
cause about one third of all the deaths. It may also inspire some one 
to be more careful of children afflicted with whooping cough to notice 
that there were fifteen deaths from that disea.se (pertussis) in 1899, 
while croup, diphtheria, and scarlet fever altogether caused only twelve 
deaths. Again, there were during the j'ear thirty-two deaths from con- 
vulsions. As this results more often from acute indigestion than other 
causes, we are impressed with the importance of care in feeding. In 
this way many other useful bits of information are to be discovered 
In these tables. 

In conclusion, we wish to express our hearty thanks to the mayor 
and the members of both branches of the city councils for encourage- 
ment and valuable assistance in the discharge of our duties. 

We would also thank the members of the board of health of the town 
of Auburn for their kind co-operation and prompt assistance in our 
efforts to maintain the purity of the waters of Lake Massabesic. 
JOHN C. BICKFORD, 
WILLIAM K. ROBBINS, 
WILLIAM yi. PARSONS, M. D., 

Board of flcalth. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT, 



(ientlemen of the Board of Health: 

We beg leave to submit the following- as the report of the sanitary 
inspectors for the year 1899: 

Vaiilts and privies inspected 197 

Vaults inspected after cleaning 134 

Water-closets inspected 2,244 

Urinals inspected 28 

Yards and alley's inspected 2,217 

Cellars inspected 2,261 

Barns and outbuildings inspected 216 

Tenements inspected oo 4 

Barn cellars inspected 191 

Latrines inspected 31 

Teams and riggingt- of excavators inspected 20 

Soaperies, slaughter-houses, etc., inspected 7 

Cleaning or repairs vpere ordered as follows: 

Vaults and privies cleaned 12 i 

Yards and alleys cleaned 497 

Cellars cleaned 359 

Barn cellars cleaned 43 

Sheds, etc., cleaned 17 

Tenements cleaned 123 

Water-closets cleaned or repaired 1,274 

Leaky drainpipes repaired 41 

Houses within 100 feet of a jnililic sewer and not connected there- 
with, 20. 

Openings other than leaks in the drainage system were found in 138 
places, and same were closed by order of the department. One thou- 
sand and eighty-seven sinks have been examined, and 281 have been 
ordered trapped. 

Bathtubs inspected, 125; ordered trapped, 4. 

Sewage was found running on the surface of the ground in 69 places, 
and such nuisances were abated either by entering the sewer or carry- 
ing away in some manner not offensive. 

In doing the work of the department it has been necessary to make 
."..785 calls, and to write 740 letters. 

Four hundred and twenty-seven complaints have been investigated. 
In 352 cases the inspectors have been able to give relief, and in 75 cases 

289 



290 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

it was fomicl that no cause existed, or tliat same was beyond the con- 
trol of the department. 

The Wilson school was disinfected, on account of an epidemic of 
scarlet fever which broke out there. 

Twelve milk farms were inspected while tr\inf; tf) trace the cause of 
several cases of typhoid fever. 

An inspection was made of one farm from wliich butter and produce 
were brought into the citj- and sold. 

Cemeteries were inspected six times to see that bodies were beinij 
properly buried. 

Sixty-one dead animals have been pi-operly disposed of. 

One htindrcd and fifteen hens and small animals have been removed 
from cellars. 

Eighty swine and cows ha\e been discovered being kept within the 
sanitary limits of the city, without licenses. Same were ordered re- 
moved or licenses procured. 

Twenty-three complaints wei'e made against the scavenger service; 
ill each case the proper parties were notified and relief afforded. 

Eighty-two persons were discovered throwing garbage in the back 
streets and lake, and were warned against the practice. 

I'rivate swill collectors have been warned of times to be neater in 
their work. 

Seventy-three catch-basins or street cesspools have been inspected, 
aiid thirtj'-nine have been flushed or repaired by order of this depart- 
ment. 

•Sixty-eight notices have been prepared and served, and proper returns 
made. 

A sanitary inspection has been made of .';.') bakeshops. 

Seven schoolhouses have been inspected. 

Theatres wei-e inspected 12 times; ordered cleaned and put into 
])roper sanitary condition .'J times. 

The dumps have been ins])ected 2.J times. 

One hundred and ninety-four nuisances not otherwise classified have 
been abated thi'ough the efforts of this depai-tment. 

Jlouseholders have been given 2.'! permits to clean their own vaiilts. 

F'ermits to the ntimber of i,')2S have been granted for the burial or 
removal of dead bodies, and the returns frnw anlcd to the lity registrar. 

A statement of mortality has l)een pnpaitd t>.icli numfh. and copies 
sent to over luo liiindreil other towns and cities, to local plixsicians, 
ofc. 

Contagious and infectious diseases have l)cen reported as follows: 
Measles, 71)2; tliphtheria, oO; typhoid fever, 7S; scarlet fever, l.iO; mem- 
branous crouj), (■>; varioloid, 0; total. 1.02r). l-^ight hundred and thirty- 
eight, of these cases were reported l)y [)hysicians, (>."> b_\ householders, 
ll.'i were discovered by the inspectors, and 10 cases were reported from 
llic difl'erent hospitals. The inspectors were unable to trace the cause 
in tir» cases; in TifiH cases the connection with some |>rcvious ease was 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 291 

clearly traceable. Colds were probably the occasion in 28 cases; 5 
cases were contracted outside of the city; and in 10 cases it was reason- 
able to attribute the cause to unsanitary surroundings. 

In S."> cases, disinfectants were being used. The inspectors ordered 
their use in 179 cases. At most of these latter j)laces instructions were 
given as ip their use. and in many cases tlie department furnished the 
disinfectants. 

Bedding burned for contagious diseases twice. 

In 160 cases patients were found well isolated, and in 104 cases in- 
spectors were obliged to order isolation. In nearly all of these cases 
it was necessary for the inspectors to give instructions as to the steps 
to be taken. 

Houses Mere watched to see that the rules of isolation were com- 
plied with, and 'lO funerals were attended to prevent a too public ob- 
servance of the same. 

Six hundred and eleven rooms where disease had existed were fumi- 
gated by the inspectors. 

One hundred and seventeen childi-en who wei-e attending school, and 
11.5 people who were working and living in houses where contagious 
disease existed, were either restrained from attending school and 
employment, or instructed as to thorough isolation from the disease 
until all danger from contagion had passed. 

Six eases have been cared for at the contagious disease hospital. 

Nine hundred and fifty-two houses have been placarded, and the 
placards removed at the termination of the disease. 

About 3,000 pamphlets issued by the State Board of Health have been 
distributed in the localities where contagious disease existed. 

Weekly reports of contagious and infectious diseases ha%'e been sent 
to the State Board of Health, Concord, and the United States Marine 
Hospital Service, Washington, D. C. 

The inspectors have each in turn patroled the shores of Lake Massa- 
besic, Sundaj's, holidays, and parts of every other day from June 1 to 
October 1. 

Four ice fields from which ice was being cut were inspected. 

Seven horse races were attended to prevent the pollution of the water 
and ice at the lake. 

Two parties were prosecuted and fined for violation of the health 
laws at the lake. 

Steamboats inspected 60 times. 

Pei'sons were warned as to the disposal of sink water. 

Nuisances to the number of IS, not otherwise classified, were abated. 

Several picnics and band concerts were attended, to prevent the care- 
less disposal of waste and rubbish in the lake or on its shores. 

Hanana skins, sawdust, tin cans, paper, and rubbish of all sorts, have 
l)een removed whenever found. 



292 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



XEW BUrLDINGS. 

The jjliimbinfi- inspector, in making" up his annual report, has noted 
the number and kind of new buildings reported at this office, and as a 
building- inspector has been appointed, this part of the annual report 
will probably be omitted after this-year, as the report of the building 
inspector should give the following information in a more complete 
form. 

A'ew buildings reported: 

Kesidences 12 

Cottage houses or dwellings 87 

Two-tenement houses 21 

Three-tenement houses 15 

Six-tenement houses .' 1 

Eight-tenement houses 2 

Business blocks, etc 11 

Total number new buildings reported 149 

Estimated value, about $C):)n,()00. 

Plumbing fixtures set: 

Number of tank water-closets 703 

frost-proof water-closets, Kelly A: MeCullock 21 

sinks 497 

bathtubs 289 

Avashbowls 262 

wash trays 119 

urinals 17 

Other fixtures not classified above 68 

Total number of fixtures i)ut in 1,976 

Number of plumbing notices filed 547 

water tests made 453 

smoke tests made 13 

* defects found 403 

A total of 1,918 inspections was nuule of the work during its progress 
and after its completion. 

WIIJJ.\.M ]?. BLAKE. 
JOHN F. r.OONEY. 
(AIM. (). SKA.M.W. 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Manchester, N. II., Uecember :n, 1S99. 
Ti) Hi.'a Honor WiUidin C. Vhirhr, Mayor, and Gciitlfniru of tlir CiU) 

C oil lie Us: 

In compliance Avilli the ordinance of said city, the overseers of tlie 
poor herewith present their annual report for the j'ear 1S99: 

The whole nvimber of families which have received more or less 
assistance off the farm during the year has been one hundred and 
twelve, consisting- of two hundred persons, all of whom have a settle- 
ment in this cit3\ The whole number of paupers supported at the 
county farm during the year has been ten more or less of the time, 
at a cost of two dollars per week for each person, all of whom are insane 
and incurable. 

The whole number of minor children supported at the State Indus- 
trial School during the year has been one, at a cost of one dollar and 
fifty cents per week. 

In compliance with sections 1 and 2, chapter 116, Public Statutes of 
New Hampshire, passed at the Januarj* session, 1895, in relation to 
dependent minor children being supported at almshouses, the said 
minor children having a settlement in this city are supported as fol- 
lows: At St. Patrick's Orphans' Home, five. The said minor children 
have educational advantages. 

The overseers of the poor have given ten hundred and fifty orders 
to the paupers oft" the farm during the year. The said orders consisted 
chiefly of orders for groceries, fuel, medicine, board and clothing, care, 
and emergencies. The whole amount allowed to the several persons 
who applied for assistance from time to time from the several wards 
of the city, during the year, was as follows: 

Ward 1 $l.-)4.00 

Ward 2 556.81 

Ward y, :i80.49 

Ward 4 310.93 

Ward 5 2,4.56.41 

Ward G -62.45 

Ward 7 121.83 

Ward 8 591.78 

Ward 9 1,350.75 

Ward 10 296.88 



.$6,582.33 



295 



296 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

MISCELLANEOUS BILI^ ALLOWED. 

Vaccinating seventy-five persons $:1.i..j5 

W. P. Goodman, office supplies .31.:5.t 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing 10.00 

State Industrial School, board of inmates l,:!0B.7"i 



$l,.S82.62 



Total amount allowed .$7,964.93 

Cash received from the county of Hillsborough for board of 
inmates' of State Industrial School, not having a settlement 
in this state 1,2(i4.78 



Total cost to the city $6,700.17 

There are uncollected bills due the city amovinting to .$297. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Ward 1. WILLIAM H. MAXWKI.L. 
Ward 2, D. G. ANDREWS. 
Ward 3. B. F. GARLAND. 
Ward 4, CHAKLKS 15. CL.MJKSON. 
Ward .-,, PATRICK COSTELLO, 
Ward 6, CHAKLKS FRANCIS. 
Ward 7, WILLIAM MARSHALL. 
Ward 8, C. S. McKEAX. 
Ward 9. JOSEPH DOICET. 
Ward 10. WILLIAM CLOX'ER. 
Orrrsrns of (lie I'oor fnr the ritii nf \linirhistrr. 
A true copy of iin-ords. Attest: 

\Vii.r.i.\M If. Maxwki.i.. 

(•Ink III the lioanf. 



Aid to Soldiers, Sailors, and their Dependent Families. 

To llir Mlll/nr (111(1 (llllthllirii nf III,- Ciljl Cniiiicils: 

In .•oiiipliiiticc will) srcfi(.i)s 1 and 2. fli:! |)t rr M. L:in\> .-f tlu- state of 
New Maiupshire. pas.s.-d at the June scs.siou. ISM, in relation to indi- 
gent soldiers and sailors of tin- War of the Rebellion, the overseers 
nf the |)oor herewith present their aninuil report uiuler the head "Wid 
to Soldiers and Sailors and tlirir I).'|.cn.leiit l"Mn.ilies.- for lh(> year 1S99. 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 297 

The whole number of indigent soldiers and sailoivs who have had 
more or less assistance during the year has been one, at a cost of $107.25. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 
D. G. ANDIIEWS, 
B. F. GARLAND, 
CHARLES B. CLARKSON, 
PATRICK COSTELLO, 
CHARLES FRANCIS, 
WILLIA]\I MARSHALL, 
JOSEPH DOUCET, 
AVILLIAM GLOVER, 
Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 
A true copy of records. Attest: 

William H. Maxwell, 

Clerk of the Board. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 



-Maxchestkr, N. H., December :)0, 1899. 
To the Hoiionthle Undid of Maijor and Aldrrmni. of the City of Manchester: 

I herewith sxibniit my i-eport for the portion of the year that I have 
occupiecl the office: 

When I was chosen to this ottice, on ]\lay 2 last, I found no Ijiiihling 
rules and it was necessary to formulate a set of rules, which 1 did, 
after getting what information I could. I also procured the necessary 
blanks for doing business and granted the first permit May 17, but it 
was Julj^ 11 when the building rules were finally approved by your 
honorable body. It was then necessary to have them printed in a 
handy little book and distribute them among the builders, so it was 
about July 20 when I was really armed with the proper authority tp 
enforce mj' building rules. 

It has been my aim to establish such rules as would conduce to the 
protection and safety of life and limb and lessen the chances of tires 
as much as possible, and also to secure a uniformity in building so 
that all interested may have an equal chance. 

There has not been a large amount of building owing in some 
measure to the greatly increased price of all kinds of material. I have 
granted 208 permits in all, to the close of the year. Of these 111 were 
for new buildings of all kinds and 97 were for alterations and repairs. 
Some of the jobs under the latter head were quite extensive, notably 
the street railway car sheds and the Stark Mills storehouse. In the 
remodeling of buildings there have been added 16 tenements, and in 
others 8 have been done away with, malcing a net gain in old buildings 
of 8 tenements. Of the new buildings 72 have been tenement blocks 
and houses and dwellings, divided as follows: 

8-tenement block 1 

4-tenement block , ' 1 

3-tenement houses 4 

2-tenenient houses 15 

1-tenement houses 51 

Making 105 tenements in new buildings and adding S in old buildings, 
making an increase of 113. 

The other buildings erected may be ciassitied as follows: 

Stores 2 

Lunch room 1 

301 



302 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Slorajie and work i-c.om 1 

Offices 2 

Laboratory 1 

Dry-house 1 

Creamery 1 

Shoe factory 1 

Print works 1 

J'uritier and* meter room 1 

Greenhouse 1 

The other 38 were barns, slieds, and outbuildings of various kinds 
and of minor importance. 

The Amoskeag" Manufacturing' Company has erected a mill lOli/i x 
4l>.'2 feet, five stories in height above the basement, and is to add to it 
a section 96 x 153 1/, feet. This takes the phice of two mills that have 
been demolished and makes an increase in spindles. The Manchester 
Corporation has erected a new briclv laboratory- on the west side of 
the river and has the foundation well under way for a large print 
works, south of Granite street, which, when completed, will be at 
least double the capacity of the old one, after which the space now 
occupied by the Pi-int Works will be used for the manufacture of 
cloth. 

There were quite a number of new buildings started in tlie spring 
that were not included in m.y list, one of the most important of 
which was the A. D. Gooden block on Elm street south of Central street. 
It is a substantial three-story brick building and is a great ini])rove- 
ment over the wooden buildings "which were torn down to make room 
for the new one. 

I found on coming into this office (liat people were constantly violat- 
ing the Ordinances in what is called Ihe "Fire district." I have also 
found a great many places where the woodwork was too near the 
stovepipe, etc., and am having those things remedied as rapidly as 
possible. I have ordered some old buildings repaired and others torn 
down that 1 considered dangerous. 

I have met with some opposition in my work, as there are always 
some people who will object to the introduction of anything that is 
new. Others have an idea that a man should be allowed to build 
what he likes on his own land, not realizing that he might endanger 
his neighbors' property by so doing. However, 1 have found most 
])eople in favor of a strict enforcement of tlie rules. 

Thanking you for every courtesy, and the counsel and advice you 
lia\c ac<'or(if(l nu>, 1 am, 

\crv respc(( t'uliy, 

[.. M. .\LI)!:i(H. 

liisiurtur iif Ihiihliiifjs. 



REPORTS 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES AND CEM- 
ETERY FUNDS. 



REPORTS OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES 
AND CEMETERY FDxNDS. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Ti) tin- 'I'nist'.cx ijf'Ccnictnit'.s hikI flic Citi/ < 'u unci In: 

In behalf of the sub-trustees of the Pine Grove cemetery T suljniit 
tlie following- report for the year 18i)<J: 

.\o eiiaiiije in the general management of this cemetery was made 
duriny the year. The work has been condncted on the same genera! 
])lan and under the same superintendence as for a nuniht'i- of years 
last [)assed. Everything", so far as possible, was done ^\itll an eye to 
permanent improvement, and the sub-trustees feel that the contlition 
and appearance of the grounds are being constantly bettered. 

During- the year 282 bodies were buried and 22 were removed from 
one part of the grounds to another. Sevent3^-seven lots were sold dur- 
ing the year, for which $3,497.17 were jjaid to the city treasurer and 
covered into the treasury with other miscellaneous receipts. In addi- 
tion to this sum $4,045.43 were paid by the pui'chasers of lots under 
l)erpetiuil care into the fund for the care of such lots, and this sura 
was turned over to the trustees of the cemetery fund aud by them in- 
vested as the law requires. Also, $749.90 were paid during the year by 
owners of common lots to secure perpetual care for the same, and were 
turned over to the aforesaid trustees. The receipts from interments, 
removals, water, and labor on common lots were $3,1 40.29, which also 
went into the citj^ treasury- as current receipts. The total expended 
appropriation for 1899 was $8,538.09, which was the sum paid by the 
city for all expenses during- the year. Against this sum should be 
crdited the amount the city received from the sale of lots, $3,497.17; 
and for water, labor, and interments, $3,140.29; amounting- in the 
ag-greg-ate to .$6,()37.46, thus leaving the net actual expense to the 
city for the year the sum of $1,900.03. 

The demand for lots under perpetual care still continues, and the 
sub-trustees have met this by grading- and finishing the remainder of 
I'ine Lawn, which contained seventy-four lots, which are .sold for 
seventy-five cents per square foot, and by completing- an addition of 
twenty-nine lots to Chapel Lawn, of which the price is one dollar per 
s(|uare foot. The lots on Pine Lawn are smaller than those on the 

305 



806 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

other lawns iimler [)eipi't iial care and are bein<^- (luite rapidly sold. 
No section of eomnion lots, not under perpetual care, was prepared 
during- the past ^ear, as there are still enou<^h of suc-h lots unsold to 
answer to the demand for them. 

An extension of fiftj' feet to the south was made to the public ground 
or "Field of Manesquo." A considerable length of border was finished 
in the section just north of the west gate, which was one of the greatest 
single improvements of the jear. The bushes in the woods north of 
the open part of the cemetery were cleared away and a good deal of 
filling done in the section to the north of the east gate. Some repairs 
were made at the supei'intendenfs house and the same was painted. 
All tlie iron fence, .some of which had never been painted since it was 
built, was given two coats of paint, lead and oil. This was quite an 
expensive piece of work, but it was a neces.sary one in order to pre- 
serve the fence, which was rusting rapidly, and the change in The 
appearance of the fence is veiy marked. 

Daring the year the trustees of the cemetery fund co-operated with 
the sub-trustees in the work of macadamizing certain avenues near 
the lawns under perpetual care. Avenues to the extent of 2,42S square 
jards were thus i)uilt of crushed stone and this improvement will be 
of lasting benefit. To this work the aforesaid trustees contributed 
from the fund in their hands the sum of $.iOO. They also purcha.sed 
shruV)s to the amount of $100. While these contributions are in the 
line of expenditure for which the cemetery fund was created, the sub- 
trustees are deeply grateful to the trustees for their assistance, and 
doubt not that the public will appreciate their willingness to help 
along such permanent improvements. 

At the .Merrill yard little was done beyond keeping the grass cut 
and preserving a general cleanly- appearance. The ap|)ropriation was 
too small tor any extended work and the ordinary expen.ses at this 
yard arc light. A new fence is much needed here, but it can only be 
built when a larger appropriation is made. 

Altogether the sub-trustees deem that the work of ISiiO has been 
well done, and hope that the opinion of the public may coincide with 
their belief. Certainly this largest of all our cemeteries was never 
in a better general condition than now, and our people may well take 
pride in the Pine drove eenietcry so long as its appearauct- continues 
as good as it is today. 

ifespoctfully submitted. 

KDWIN l\ .10Ni:S. 
Chrh- for tlir Siih-Tnisfrrs. 



Valley Cemetery. 

Ill behalf of tlie sub-trustees of the N'alley cemetery I wish to make 
the folkiwing report for the year ending December ill. IS'.t'.t: 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 307 

Tlie work lias been carried on under the same good management of 
Superintendent C. H. G. Foss as in years past. Improvements have 
been made as follows: 

The two bridges and the summer hon.ses have been paiiitt'd one coat. 
The iron fence around the cemetery has been painted, a part of it 
two coak>. 

The grading of the bank on the west side of the valley has been 
continued. 

One hundred thirty yards of concrete have been laid. 
One hundred feet of twelve-inch drain pipe has been laid. 
Material used: Loam, S6 loads; gravel, 80 loads: manure, 4 cords. 
Number of bodies in tomb, 82; number of interments, 69; number of 
removals, 5. 
Cash receipts for: 

Care and water $1,101.25 

Sundries 183.25 

Tomb 344.25 

Interments 162.50 

Uemovals 9.00 

Paid city treasurer $1,800.25 

The appropriation for year ending December 31, 1S99 $3,000.00 

Transferred 75.27 

$3,075.27 
Respectfully submitted. 

S. P. CAXXON. 

Ch'rk. 



Amoskeag Cemetery, 

The sub-trustees of Amoskeag cemetery present the following report 
for the year 1899: 

There have been six burials in the yard the i^ast year. During this 
period three bodies have been removed. 

Twelve trees have been pui'chased and set out the past season. Six 
are Carolina poplars and six flowering crabs. This is the first that 
has been done in this direction to beautify the grounds. ,\ft)re in this 
line should be done the coming spring. 

Besides the regular work of keeping the cemetery in a neat, becom- 
ing condition, which has been faithfully done by the superintendent, 
Mr. George C. Harwood. all the wooden fence has been painted except 
that on the north side. This fence was not considered worth repair- 
ing or painting and it is the opinion of the sub-trustees that it should 
be replaced by new fence this season. It is several yeai"s since a 
beginning was made in replacing the old wooden fence with one of 
iron. Now that there is more fence that needs replacing something 
more should be done. The common council has been asked for an 
appropriation of a thousand dollars, which is none too much for the 
work that should be done before another winter. 

W. H. HUSE, 

Cl4;rk. 



TREASUREK'S REPORT. 



Tfi the Tnoitrfs of Cemeteries: 

(iEXTi.EMKX, — I lu'vewith present to yo>i the annual report of the 
moju-.v received (liirinj^- tlie year ending- December iiO. 1S99: 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

'i"o cash received for tlie sale of lots from the following- jiersons. to 
whom deeds have been delivered: 

Interest. Price of 
lot. 

Charles P. Still SO..-]? $50.01 

Israel Dow i;.9(', IGG.Gl 

Sylvander S. Davis estate 2;i.4(> 

Frederick Heine .(',.") (il.!).") 

Ivobert Anderson JT.GO 

J. Albert Phillips ..-,C. 28.07 

.lames K. Pollard .O.j :!1.74 

Anna. Williams l.Sil 28.20 

Ifenrv Ileathcote :;2.4'.> 

.(ohii (!. Hutchinson 7.00 ;;:'..(>.") 

I);iiiicl i:. (irant 'n.f.O 

.liilia l-:ita Lawrence :\UV.\ 

Isabella .Mcn/ies 44.").'1 

Albina .Ifjnes 43.!)") 

J.iz/ie M. ( lai-k :{2.2S 

Luther (ainphcll f.O.OO 

Frank F. N'oight 24.()<.t 

.lames .M. Hoone 7.:{.") 22. .')0 

Mai-y F. Simmons 48.90 

Marg-ant MarUgr.-if 112.80 

William ir. Hal.' 7.1.91 

Mary I-:. I..hI.I i;!.r,0 

.lennie I'. Doe .{0.90 

Almiis \V. Mor.se 1-j :!4..!2 

Marg-arct Sawyer .17 4;t.:{2 

Uillian. Watts fi.OO 

II. and .1. I!. Fradd .-.C, 95..1S 

Orpha K. WillMir :1S..M 

.Irliliic M(l,i;iii .71 .".T.CO 

308 



REPORT OK THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 309 

Annie MK'anley $0.1:.' $.;',».:!:. 

Miuirioe Hoffman .(14 2S.7'.» 

John Hunter .21 P.1.72 

Frank W. Tebbetts SO.S'.t 

Franklin F. Sullivan heirs ..•)<( 57.G0 

(leorov B. Shaft uik .l'> .'iO.OO 

Ida M. Smith .22 4:!.1 1 

Mrs. X. J. Darrah .1)2 18.48 

.M. C. Badger. Fanny l'.adi>er. and S. A. iJadger .!(tl 82.91 

L. II. Danforth .77 51.88 

L. G. Smith .4:; 28.00 

A. H. Hale 4:; 28.00 

A. F. Emerson .4:: 28.00 

John Torrance .11 .'J2.82 

Irad Taggart 74.57 

Frank W. Kimball .04 U.?,0 

William H. Adams .(iO 44.59 

Mrs. Lucy M. Dustin .25 .37.40 

W. H. Hayes 40.95 

(ieorge H. Wells .29 29.:J0 

^frs. James ('oll)y .58 57.00 

Lillian M. Small .20 27.95 

T. K. Hall .42 44.30 

Charles Reuben Bailey .12 44.25 

Cyrus L. Austin .44 44.29 

Mrs. Fanny E. Brooks .12 27.00 

Louis Week .00 57.60 

Mrs. Christof Ei-verwin 43.55 

Frank A. DocUham .50 44.25 

Mary A. Farmer 95.47 

Albine Jones and F. A. Buswell 30.00 

Jonathan C. Quimby 00.00 

Estate of John Denuison 30.75 

Lois E. Parsley 19.19 

Ella McClary Annis 60.00 

Martha E. Alton .4(1 30.54 

M ary Moir 2.()0 20.00 

i:ben Ferren 125.00 

i:mma J. Peck 42.21 

I'red A. Sweatt 45.20 

William F. Schonland .60 53.00 

Frank X. Foster 53.77 

William F. Henderson 44.29 

Oscar Knoettner 57.60 

B. Frank Felch .48 44.29 

I'dwin F. Jones 60.00 

James Lightbody .'5.70 



Totals $40.79 $3,456.38 



310 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REP0KT6. 

Interest $40.79 

Total receipts $3,497.17 

From B. A. Stearns, superintendent, t(j cash received for 

care of lots 3,140.29 

$C),G37.46 

Cr. 

By treasurer's receipts .$3,492.17 

superintendent's receipts 3,140.29 

cash on hand December 30, 1S09 .5.00 

$0,037.46 

Note. — There has been received from lot owners in this cemetery, in 
addition to the regular receipts of Pine Grove cemetery, as shown in 
this report, the sum of $749.90 for perpetual care of lots, also the sum 
of $4,045.43 for lots sold on the different lawns. These receipts are 
credited to the trustees of the cemetery fund, an itemized account of 
wliicli appears in their annual report. 



Valley Cemetery. 

To (-ash received from C. H. G. Foss, superintendent, for 

care of lots $1,800.25 

Cr. 

By superintendent's recei]>ts $1,800.25 

Note. — There have been no lots sold in the Valley cemetery durinsr 
the past year, and the recei]its of this cemeterj", outside of the money 
received by the superintendent for the care of lots, have been limited 
to the funds received by legacy and lot owners for the perpetual care 
of lots. 

The amount received from this st)nrco is $3,283.20. and has been paid 
1(1 the trustees of the cemetery fund. 

Respectfully submitted. 

FRED L. ALLEN, 
Trcanurrr of Hie Trusfers nf Cemeteries. 

I hercl)y ccitify lliat I have examined tlie arcuuuts of Fred L. .Mien, 
treasunr of tlic trustees of cemeteries, and lind the same are correctly 
cast and lu-operlv vouched for. 

JAMKS F. DOIIC^K. 

Citt/ iudiliir. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



311 



To the 'J' iKut ('(■-! of Hie ('(iiictcrif Fund: 

llF.NTi.iLMEX, — 1 lu're\vith submit to you the seventeenth muiual re])orf 
of the funds received and expenses paid to December :J0, 1899: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of ])ernianen1 fund on hand January 1, 1S99 $42,.']48.90 

liEOEIPTS DUKING THE YEAR. 

From James A. Erigham $144.00 

Mary Simmons 134.48 

-Margaret ^farkgraf 338.59 

Luther Campbell 1G5.00 

Frank E. Yoight t)7.90 

H. L. Clough, administrator 133.42 

H. & J. R. Fradd 286.14 

George B. Shattuek 82.50 

Mrs. Douglass Mitchell 129.60 

L. R. Danf orth 1 32.68 

A. F. Emerson, A. H. Hale, and L. (J. Smith. . 231.00 

Cyrus L. Austin 100.00 

Israel Dow 4.-)8.17 

R. J. Stevens and A. A. Ramsej', executors 

estate of Charles Young 100.00 

Inez G. Fletcher 142.88 

Charles P. Still 137.54 

estate of S. S. Davis 04.46 

estate of John Dennison 84.56 

Lois E. Parsley 52.76 

Ella McClary Annis 105.00 

Martha E. Alton 84.00 

Eben Ferren 375.00 

Fred A. Sweatt 124.30 

William H. Hale 203.24 

Jennie F. Doe 84.97 

Frances E. Brooks 74.25 

Mary A. P'armer 286.39 

Albina Jones and F. P. P.uswell 82.50 

J. C. Quimby 105.00 

Edwin F. Jones 105.00 

$4,795.33 

Total $47,144.2.3 

Or. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1899 $36,050.00 

bonds bought during the year 6,000.00 

cash on hand December 30, 1899 5,094.23 

$47,144.2S 



312 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



INtO.Mh; ACCOr.NI. 

Ineoine on hand .Jiiimary 1. ISltll $:i.T70.;(7 

from coupons on bonds 1,907.50 

from savings bank deposits :j:>.").:i() 

Expenses paid during the year: 

L. B. Bodwell S: Company $51.:)4 

A. K. Hobbs (iO.2 J 

W. J. Hayes 6: Son, accrued interest and prcmiuin 

ou bonds purchased April 24, 1809 40:!.41 

George W. Bailey .j.OO 

Labor macadamizing, as per pay-roll 1SS.2."> 

Charles A. Bailey, crushed stone for nuuvuhmiizing :;11.7.j 

Trustees of Pine (irove cemetery 100.00 

15- A. Stearns, superintendent 1,067.00 

Gash on hand December .iO, 1899 3,726.(i7 



$.>,013.67 



$5,91.:.G7 



Valley Cemetery. 

Amount ()f pcrinanciit linn! on Intiul .Iannai\ 1. IS'.i9 $15,280.45 

Keceipts during the year: 

From Fanny B. Pen nock $100.00 

Mrs. J. Schaetfer 100.00 

:Mrs. Aretas P.lood 1.000.00 

Mrs. S. >r. Langmaid 102.00 

Charles if. I'.artlctt. cxi-cutor of cstati' of 

Mary M . Wells 500.00 

Austin M. Kvcrett 115.20 

Nancy P.. Powell 104.80 

Ilattie i:. Daniels 1 10.40 

Frardv E. (Incn, cxccnior 100.00 

,1. r.. .Mooac 104.80 

Mrs. Hannah A. ( iniicr 500.00 

I". ( . Livingston, executor of i-state of .Mary 

.1. Ilaynes 200. Ot) 

Mrs. ii. II. I'ipcr 120.00 

Aniui Custer, executor 120.00 

■ .1,2S:L20 

Total $1S,5C3.(>5 

in. 

By bonds on hand.Iannary 1, 1899 $i;!,500.00 

bonds purchased during year 2,000.00 

cash ou huud December 30, 1899 3,063.65 

$lS.,'>(i3.f.5 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 313 



INtOMK AfCOlNT. 

Income on hand January 1, 189<t $l,7'.t(i.!!i4 

from coupons on bonds 710,00 

from intei'est on bank dt'ijosils 12;5.05 

Kxpt-nses paid iliiriny the year: 
W. J. ilayes & Son, aeeruecl interest and |)reniiiini 

on bonds purchased April 2S, IS'.d) .$140,31 

B, F. & R. W. Welch 5.00 

C, H, G, Foss, superintendent ;!61.50 

Cash on hand December 30, 1899 :.M2:].08 

■ $2,629.89 

OALE I TM). VALLEY CK.Xf ETEHY. 

Income January 1, 1899 $109.97 

Interest from savings bank 3.90 

Interest from fund 10.64 

$124.51 

Ck. 

By cash paid C. H. (J. Foss $6.00 

cash on hand Decemlier 30. IS99 118.51 

$124.51 



Merrill Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund .January 1, 1899 $487,89 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1899 $450,00 

cash on hand December 30, 1899 37.89 

$487,89 

INCOME ACCOLXT. 

Income on hand January 1, 1899 .$91.2() 

on savings bank deiiosit 8.46 

Interest on bonds 22,50 

$122.22 

Ck. 

By cash on hand December 30, 1899 $122.22 

Kespectfnllj^ submitted. 

" FRED L. ALLEX, 
Trriisiirfr of the TrKSfccs of Cvmctenj Funds. 



This is to certify that I iiavc examined the books of accounts of 
Fred L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the cemetery funds, em- 
bracing; the receipts and expenditures for the year 1899, and I find the 
same correct and properly vouched. T have also examined the securities 
in which said fund is invested and find as follows: 



314 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

IMNK (;l{OVK CEMETERY. 

20 city of Mjiiiflioster '> jier cent l)oii(ls (Xos. I. 2. :5, 
.-), 0, S. '.), 10, n, 1.!. 14. !.->. 1(), 17. IS, 22, 2:!, 24); 
due in 1!)42; {lenomination. .$1,000 each $20,000.00 

2 cit3' of Manchester '> ])er cent bonds (Nos. 1. :i); 

due in ]!)42; denomination, .$.")00 each 1.000.00 

1 cilN of Manchester .") per cent bond (No. '.',) .".0.00 

14 city of .Manchester '> per cent bonds (Nos. 2, ?>, 4. 
.-., G. 7. S, '.), 10, U, 14, I."). Ki. 17); due in lOK!; de- 
nomination, $1,000 eacli 1 4,000.00 

1 city of .Manclicster ."> per cent bond (No. :.'); due in 

I'j 1 :: .■>oo.oo 

5 city ol Manchester ."> per cent bonds ( Xos. 1, :.*, :i, 

9, 10); due in 19i:!; denomination, $100 each .".00.00 

6 citj' of Mancliester .;••.' P^^' <'Pnt bonds (Xos. 94, 
9."), 9(j, 97. 98, 99); due in 1919; denomination, 

$1,000 each 0,000.00 

— $42,0.-)0.00 

Cash on dejjosit in Mancliester Saviuiis i'.ank, I'.ook 

No. .".0220 $.".,298. ."..') 

Casii on (le])Osit in .Mechanics Savings I'.aid<. Hook 

No. :!4i:! :],o22.;i5 

'i'otal cash income and permanent tiind 8,820.90 

iotal p.i-nianent liind and income. December .U), 189<.»... $.".0,870.90 

A'Al.I.EY CEilETERY. 

4 city of .Mancliester .". per cent bonds (Xos. 1. (>, 11, 

IS); i\^u- ill I'.ti:;; denomination, $1,000 each $4,000.00 

1 city of .Mancliester .". per cent bond (No. 1); due 

in I'.n.;; (lenoininalion. $.".00 .".00.00 

:; .'ity of .Manchestci- .". per cent bonds (.Nos. C. 7. 8); 

due in I'.ii:;; denominat ion, $100 each :;00.00 

■- (it \ of .Manchester ."> j)er cent bonds (Nos. 4. 7, 12, 

P.). 20. 21. 2.".. 27); (bie in 1942; (h-nominat ion. 

$1,000 each s.uno.oo 

2 city of Manclu-stcr .". pci- cent bonds (.Nos. :.'. I); 

due in P.) 12: denomination, $.')0 ejicii 100.00 

.' <ity (d .Manchester .i'/. ])er cent bonds (Nos. si, 

100): due in lUlii; dei inat ion, $1,000 eadi 2,000.00 

fi city of .Manchestci :, pei- cent bonds (Nos. ::, 4, 

■<, <i. 7, 8); ibic in I'.tl:.'; denomination. $UIO each.. f.OO.OO 

(.'asli on dejjosit in (!naianl\ Sa\ini;s i'.anl<. i'.ook 

No. 42.".7 .■..I.S(;.7:{ 

Total peiinanent fund and inconu-, December:;!), 1S'.»9 .$20,GSG.7.T 



RKPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEiMETERlES. 31 



MKKRILL CEMKTKUY. 

2 city of Manchester o jier cent bonds (Nos. •>, 5); 

due ill I'.iKJ; denomination, $100 each $200.00 

2 city of -Mancliester '> per cent Ijonds (Nos. 1, 2); 

due in l'J42; denomination, $100 each 200.00 

1 city of Manchester ."< jjer cent bond (No. 1); due 

in 11)42; denomination, $."jO 00. oo 

Cash on deposit in Guaranty Savings Bank, Book 

Xo. .-.110 100.11 

Total amount of fund and income, December 30, 1800.... .$010.11 

r.AI.E FUKD. 

Cash on hand in Amoskeag- Savings Bank. Book No. :i4108... $118.51 

Total amount of permanent fund and income on hand 

December .30, 1899 $72,280.25 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING 
FUND. 



MA^■<'HEs^l;I;, X. II.. J;intiai\\- l.'j, JiiOO. 

To the Cihi CoiiiicHs of Ihr City uf Maiiclicstrr: 

C!knti-EMEX, — As required by chapter l!7, seel ion 2. of t^lic City Ordi- 
iiances of Manchester, the trustees of the sinkiiiy funds of the city of 
^lanchester here-with report the condition of the several funds January 
1, moo, with receipts and payments for the year ending- December 30, 
IS'JO. 

H. P. SIMPSON, 
ALPHEUS (iAY. 
FPvED L. ALLi^LX. 
Triixtics of the Siiil{iii<j I'lnid. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

'I'd Ihr ('ill/ Coinicih uf the Cifji of Munchcstcr : 

(iE.\TLEMP:.\, — ] iierewith transmit to you my report as treasurer of 
the sinking- fund for the year ending- December .JO. hsuO; 

impkove.mext t.oax. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund .Fanuary 1. 1S90, for tiu' pay- 
ment of improvement bonds $74,799.90 

Appropriation for 1899 20,000.00 

Income from interest on bonds 'i.9T7.."fi 

Income from savings bank deposit M.sJ 

$97,822.2 f 

Cr. 

I!y bonds on hand January 1. Is9'.) $74,000.00 

Honds boug-ht during tlie year 19.000.00 

Accrued interest and premium for same 1. ."..">."). 07 

319 



320 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Keeiie National Bank, balance paid for premium 
and interest for exchange of $15,000 of city of 
Manchester 4 ])er cent bonds, due JUI3', 1900, 
for .$15,000 of city of Manchester .31/0 per cent 

bonds, due Ai)ril 1, 191!) $1.041. .5.3 

Cash on h:iiul December :;0, 189'.i 2,425.04 

$97,822.24 

watf.k i.oax. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund .January 1. ls9!). for the pay- 
ment of water bonds $] 05.417.42 

Water-works, hydrant service. 1S99 ]S,1 00.00 

.Appropriation, 1899 5.1)00.00 

Income from jnterest on bonds 4,245.00 

income from savings bank deposit 79. oG 

$1.32.841.78 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1899 $102,000.00 

Bonds bought during the year 23,000.00 

Premium and interest for .same 1,013.81 

Cash on liaiid December 30, 1899 0,227.97 

$1.32.841.78 

school i,0.\x. 

Dr. 

Total aiuoiint of fund .lanuary, 1899 .$3,939.43 

Appiopiiation. 1S'.)9 2,000.00 

hitcrcst on bonds " 140.00 

• $0,079.43 

(H. 

Donds on hand Deceini)er 30. 1S99 $3,000.00 

Cash on liand .3,079.43 

— — ■ $(),079.43 

licsijcct fully submitted. 

FllVA) I.. Al.l.KX. 
'I'mi-'oin r siiiLiini I'innl. 



This is to certify that I have i>\auiiiied the Ixioks of iieeonnts of Fred 
b. Alien, treasur«'r of tlie Dustees of the siidviiii^' fund, embracing the 
receipts and expenditures for the yejir endiui^- Deeenilter .Id, isu'.i, miu! 
find the same (•(ureet and prnperlv xoncdied. I li;i\e nlso examined the 
s<-enri1ies in which fund is invested, iind liud ,is fnllc.ws: 

For the payment of improvement bonds. 
I'.onds of the city of .M.ineluster, N. 11.: 

4 per «-ent. due ]9()s $10, 000. (10 

■I jjer c<Tit. dne 191.3 5,000.00 

I |)e|- eent, <lne I'.H I 5.000.00 

1 per cent, due l'.(15 •.'.!, 000. uO 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 321 

4 por cent, due 1!M7 $lf),0()O.On 

31/2 per cent, due 1919 34,000.00 

Cash on hand December liO, 1S99 2,425.64 

.$95,425.64 

For the payment of ^vater bonds. 

Bonds of the city of ^lancliester, N. II.: 

4 per cent, due 1900 $2,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1909 10,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1910 6,000.00 

4 per cent, due 19i:5 10,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 18.000.00 

4 per cent, due 1915 17,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1916 11,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1917 22,000.00 

.■51/2 per cent, due 1919 23,000.00 

United States bonds, 5 per cent, due 1904 6,000.00 

Cash on hand December 30, 1S99 6,227.97 

$131,227.97 

For the payment of school bonds. 

Bonds of the city of jNIanchester, X. H.: 

4 per cent, due 1914 .$2,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1916 ■ 1,000.00 

Cash on hand December 30, 1899 3,079.43 

.$6,079.43 

Total amount of bonds and ea.sh in sinking fimd Decem- 
ber 30, ] 899 $232,733,04 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Avuitor. 

21 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELEC- 
TRIC LIGHTS. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC 
LIGHTS, 



Gas Lights in Use. 

Ko. 1. Clarke and Chestnut. 

2. Appleton, west end. 

3. Blodget and Chestnut. 

4. Orange and Chestnut. 

5. Orange, between Chestnut and Elm. 

6. Bridge, between Chestnut and Elm. 

7. Pearl and Walnut. 

8. Orange and Walnut. 

9. Orange and Beech. 

10. Pearl and Maple. 

11. Arlington, near Maple. 

12. Lowell and South. 

13. Concord and Belmont. 

14. Amherst and Belmont. 

15. Concord and Beacon. 

16. Lowell and Beacon. 

17. East High and Belmont. 

18. East High and Maple. 

19. Belmont and Central. 

20. Willow and Merrill. 

21. Auburn and Franklin. 

22. One light on State. 

23. Turner, near Walker. 

24. Milford and Bowman. 

25. Milford and Williams. 

26. Douglas. 

27. Dover and Granite. 

28. Mechanic, near Elm. 

29. Blodget, near Elm. 

30. Monroe, near Elm. 

31. Manchester and Belmont. 

32. Summer and Belmont. 

33. Ainsworth avenue and Hayward. 

34. Jewett, near Hayward. 

35. Jewett, near Young road. 

325 



326 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

36. Hancock. 

37. Hancock, near Brown avenue. 

38. Brown avenue and Shasta. 

39. Brown avenue and Bjron. 

40. A and B streets. 

41. (Jeorge, near Milford. 

42. Alast road, near Riddle. 

43. Granite and Quincy. 

44. Douglas and Quincy, 

45. Douglas and Dover. 

46. Douglas and Turner. 

47. Pleasant, near Canal. 

48. Pleasant, near Franklin. 

49. Amherst and Dutton. 

50. Walnut, near Bridge. 

51. Nutfield and Londonderry lanes. 

52. Nutfield and Derryfield lanes. 



Oil Lights in Use 

Gofle's Falls, 17 lights. 

Beacon street, 1 light. 

Massabesic street, 1 light. 

Taylor street, 3 lights. 

Young road, 1 light. 

Mammoth road, 3 lights. 

Candia road, 16 lights. 

Pond road, 4 lights. 

Hanover street, 4 lights. 

Total, 49 lights. 



Electric Lights in Use. 



No. 



1. 


A, near B, 


2. 


A and South Main, 


3. 


Adams and Cartier, 


4. 


Amherst and Kim, 


5. 


Amherst and Vine, 


6. 


Amherst and Chestnut, 


7. 


Amherst and Pine, 


8. 


Amherst and Union, 


9. 


Amherst and Beech, 


10. 


Amherst and Ash, 


11. 


Amherst and Maple, 


12. 


Amherst and Lincoln, 


13. 


Amherst and Ashland, 



pole. 



GAS LIOIITS, OIL LAMPS. AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 327 

No. 14. Amherst and Ilall, arm. 

35. Amory and Main, pole. 

16. Anioi'v and Ijeanport, " 

17. Amory and lUmnion, " 

18. Amory and Amory .street extension, arm. 

19. Amorj', near Montgomery, " 

20. Amorj^ and Alsace, • " 

21. Amory and Essex, " 

22. Amorj' and Morgan, " 

23. Amoskeag- bridge, west, pole. 

24. Amoslceag bridge, east, " 

25. Amoskeag and Front, " 

26. Appleton and Ehn, arm. 

27. Appleton and North Adams, pole. 

28. Aj)pleton and Union, arm. 

29. Arlington and Ivnssell, " 

30. Arlington and Warren, " 

31. Arlington and Ashland, " 

32. Auburn and Elm, " 

33. Auburn and Chestnut, " 

34. Auburn and Tine, " 

35. Auburn and Union, pole. 

36. Auburn and Beech, " 
37.. Auburn and Maple, , " 

38. Auburn and Wilson, arm. 

39. Auger avenue and Nutt road, " 

40. Baher and Brown avenue, " 

41. Baker, and Elm, " 

42. Bath and Second, pole. 

43. Beech and Portsmouth Railroad, arm. 

44. Beech and Lawrence Eailroad, " 

45. Bell and Wentworth, 

46. Blaine and Main, " 

47. Blaine and Second, ^ " 

48. Blaine and Third, " 

49. Blodget and Elm back street, " 

50. Blodget and Pine, 

51. Blodget and Union, " 

52. Blodget and Walnut, " 

53. Blodget and Ash, " 

54. Bow and Partlett, pole. 

55. Boynton, arm. 

56. Bowman place and Til ton, " 

57. Bowman, near Milford, " 

58. Bremer and Dubuque, " 

59. Bridge and McGregor, " 

60. Bridge and Canal, " 



328 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Xo. (JJ. 


]!ri(l{^e and Elm, 


62. 


bridge and Chestnut, 


G3. 


r.ridg-e and Pine, 


64. 


Bridge and Union, 


65. 


Bridge and Walnut, 


60. 


Bridge and Beech, 


67. 


Bridge and Ash, 


68. 


Bridge and Maple, 


69. 


Bridge and Nashua, 


70. 


Bridge and Linden, 


71. 


Bridge and Hall, 


72. 


Bridge and Belmont, 


73. 


liridge and Highlands, 


74. 


Brown avenne and Elm, 


75. 


Brown avenue, near Tannery 


70. 


Brook and Elm, 


77. 


Brook and Chestnut, 


78. 


Brook and Pine, 


79. 


T.roolv and Hazel. 


80. 


ISroolv and L^nion, 


81. 


Brook and Beech, 


82. 


Brook and Maple, 


83. 


C and P., 


84. 


Candia road and Mammoth r 


85. 


Carpenter and Elm, 


86. 


Carpenter and Union, 


87. 


Cedar and Canal, 


88. 


Cedar and i:ini. 


89. 


Cedar and Clu-stniit, 



polo, 
arm. 

pole. 



90. Cechir and rinc. 

91. Cedar and Ituon, " 

92. Cedar and I'.eech, 

9.'i. Cedar and Lincoln, '* 

94. Cechir, near Maple, " 
9.-,. ?'enfra! and lli-dlnnl, 

90. Central street hill, pole. 

97. Central and Kim, arm. 

95. Central and ClicstMiit, 
99. (■.•Ill rat and I'in.', 

101). (■.•ntral and I'nion. " 

101. ( rnlial an.) i;cc(di, " 

l(r.'. ( Vnlial and Maple. " 

lo::. ( .i.lral and l.in.M.ln. 

101. ( enl lal ami Wilson, ** 

10.-,. ( enlial and Hall, 

KKi. Cent ral, ni-ar Cass, 

107. Charles. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAiMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 329 

MIS. (liarlestoii avenue and C a noil. arm. 

lO'.t. Chestnut and Kay Brook. 

110. Clarke and River road, " 

111. Clarke and Elm, 

112. Clarke and Union, 

113. 'Vriinton and Dover, 

114. Conant and Beauport, 

11"). Conant and Rimmon, • pole. 

llCt. Conant and Montg-omery. arm. 

117. Concord and Vine. " 

lis. Concord and Chestnut. " 

119. Concord and Pine. " 

120. Concord and Union, " 

121. Concord and Walnut. " 

122. Concord and Beech, " 
12.3. Concord and Maple, " 

124. Concord and Dutton, " 

125. Concord and Derry, pole. 

126. Concord and Ashland, arm. 

127. Concord and Hall, 

128. Concord square, east. pole. 

129. Concord square, west, " 

130. Coolidg-e avenue, near Kellj-. * arm. 

131. Dean and Canal, pole. 

132. Dean and Elm, arm. 

133. Dean avenue and Elm west back, " 

134. Dearborn and Taylor, '• 

135. Depot and Canal, ])ole. 

136. Depot and Franklin, arm. 

137. Derryfield Park, 

138. Douglas and Railroad. pole. 

139. Douglas and Barr, arm. 

140. Douglas and West, pole. 

141. Douglas and Main, arm. 

142. Dnnbarton road and Front, " 

143. Ea.st Pligh and Nashua, 

144. East High and South, 

145. East High and ^Malvern. " 

146. ICast High and Ashland, 

147. East High and Hall, 

148. East High and Buzzell, 

149. East Spruce and Barry avenue, 

150. East Spruce and Union, 

151. East Spruce and Beech, '' 

152. East Spruce and Maple, " 

153. East Spruce and Lincoln, 

154. East Spruce and Wilson, 



330 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. lo"). East Spruce and Beacon, arm. 

loC. Elm and Kay Brook, 

157. Elm, below Kailroad bridge, " 

158. Elm avenue and Elm. " 

159. Elm and rortsniouth Kailroad. ))ole. 
IGO. Ferry and Main. arm. 

161. Ferry and Third. 

162. Ferry and Turner, " 

163. Front, Amo.skeag-, jiole. 

164. Gates and Dubuque, 

165. Goffstown road and Front, 

Kid. Grove and Pine, arm. 

1()T. Grove and Union, '' 

168. Grove and Beech, " 

IGi). Grove and Belmont, " 

170. Granite and (ireen, " 

171. Granite and West, 

172. Granite and Main, 

173. Granite and Second, 

174. Granite bridge, west, pole. 

175. (iranite bi-idge, center, 
17G. Granite bridge, east, 

177. Granite and State, arm. 

178. Granite and Bedford, 

179. Granite and Canal, pole. 

180. Granite and Franklin, arm. 

181. Green and Elm, " 

182. Green and Pine, 

183. Green and Beech, 

184. Hancock and Brown avenue, pole. 

185. Hanover .scpiare, 

1S(;. Hanover and Xuttield lane, arm. 

187. Hanover and Cliestniit. 

188. Hanover and I'ine, 

189. Hanover and Union, 
I'.M). Hanover anil Beech, 
lit I. Hanover and Maple. 
l'.)2. Hanover and Lincoln. 
193. Hanover and Ashland. 
]!)4. Hanover and Hall, 
]'.i5. Hanover anil Belmont, 
I'.Mi. Hanover and Hcacon, 

J97. Hanover and Highlands, pole 

IDS. Hanover aniUirant, arm. 

I'.l'.i. Hanover and Page, 
:.M)(). Ilanison and Kim, 
l:oI. Harrison and Cheslnnl, 
i-'O-. Harrison .in. I Tine, 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 331 

No. 20;;. Harrison and Ha/el, •"•^■m- 

204. Harrison and Walnut, 

205. Harrison and Beech, 

206. Harrison and Ash. 

207. Harrison and ]\Iaple, 
SOS." Harrison and Oak, 

209. Harrison and Eiisseii, 

210. Harvell and South ]\rain, 

211. Hayward and Beech. 

212. Hayward and Cypress, 

213. High and Chestnut, 

214. High and Tine, 

215. High and Union, " 

216. Hollis and Canal, ' pole. 

217. Hospital avenue and Alassabesic, " 

218. Kelly and Rimmon. arm. 

219. Kellj' and Cartier, 

220. Kelly and Alsace, " 

221. Kidder and Boyden, pole. 

222. Kidder and Whitney, " 

223. Kidder and Elrn, arm. 

224. Lake avenue and Elm, " 

225. Lake avenue and Chestnut, 

226. Lake avenue and Pine, " 

227. Lake avenue and Union, " 

228. Lake avenue and Beech, " 

229. Lake avenue and Maple, •' 

230. Lake avenue and Lincoln, " 

231. Lake avenue and Wilson, 

232. Lake avenue and iMassabesic, '" 

233. Lake avenue and Beacon, " 

234. Lake avenue, near Cass, '• 

235. Lake avenue and Cass, pole. 

236. Lake avenue and Canton, " 

237. Lake avenue and Hall road, " 

238. Langdon and Canal, arm. 

239. Langdon, pole. 

240. Laurel and Laurel avenue, arm. 

241. Laurel and Pine, " 

242. Laurel and L'nion, 

243. Laurel and Beech, 

244. Laurel and Maple, 

245. Laurel and Lincoln. 

246. Laurel and Wilson, 

247. Laurel and Hall, 

248. Laurel and Belmont, " 

249. Laurel and Milton, 



332 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



s'o. r.'.")!). 


l-:inrcl mikI IJeacoii. 




251. 






252. 


Liberty, below Webster. 




25;:. 


Lowell south back and Xutfiekl 


lane, 


254. 


Lowell and Elm, 




255. 


Lowell and Birch, 




25(>. 


Lowell and Chestnut, 




2.57. 


Lowell and Pine, 




258. 


Lowell and Union. 




25!). 


Lowell and Walnut, 




2(i(). 


l^owell and Beech, 




2C1. 


Lowell and Ash, 




262. 


Lowell and Nashua, 




263. 


Lowell and Malvern. 




264. 


Lowell and Ashland, 




265. 


Lowell and Hall, 




266. 


Lowell and Belmont. 




267. 


jVIanchester and Elm, 




268. 


Manchester and Chestnut, 




269. 


Manchester and Pine, 




270. 


]Manchester and Union, 




271. 


Manchester and Beech, 




272. 


Manchester and ]\[aple. 




27.3. 


^Manchester and Lincoln, 




274. 


]Nranchester and Wilson, 




275. 


Manchester and Hall. 




276. 


Manchester and Milton, 




277. 


Marion and Main, 




278. 


Clarion and ^IcGreoor. 




279. 


Market and Canal. 




280. 


Market and Franklin, 




281. 


Market and Elm, 




282. 


Ma.s.sabesie and I'-i'linoiit. 




28:i. 


Ma.s.sabesic and Old Falls road. 





pole. 



pole. 
Falls road. 

284. Mas.sabesic and ('.\ pivss, arm. 

285. Massabesic and Hall road. 

280. Mast and .Main, jiole. 

287. Masi and I'.ownian, arm. 

28S. .\lasl and b'iddlc, lH)le. 

289. Mast and Xcw .M.isi road, arm. 

290. Mast and For rcsl, 

291. McCJrefifor and .Main, pole. 

292. Mctirofior bridf^e, west. " 
29!!. Mc(;ref>or bridf^c, east, 

294. MiTJianic and Canal, arm. 

295. Mcciianic and lOIni west back. 
.'29(1. Merrimack and (anal, 

297. M.Mfiinack and FiaidJin west back. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 333 

No. 298. :MeiTini;u"k ;nul Fr;inklin. arm. 

299. ^rerrimaek and Elm, " 

300. Merrimack and Chestnut, 

301. Merrimack and Pine, " 

302. Merrimack and Union, 
303.,,:Merrimack and Beech, 

304. Merrimack and Maple, " 

305. Merrimack and Lincoln, 
30(i. Merrimack and Wilson, 

307. Merrimack and Hall, 

308. Merrimack and Belmont. "' 

309. ^Merrimack and Beacon, " 

310. Merrimack, east of Beacon, 

311. Meri-imack square, west, pole. 

312. Merrimack square, east, " 

313. Middle and Canal, arm. 

314. Middle and Franklin west back, 

315. ;Milford, near cemetery, 

316. Milford and Bismarck. 

317. Milford and Carroll, " . 

318. Milford and Riddle. 

319. Milford and Main, 

320. Mitchell and Beech. 

321. Monmouth and ^McGrcijor back street, pole. 

322. Monroe and River road, arm. 

323. Mjrtle and Elm east back, 

324. Myrtle and Chestnut, 

325. Myrtle and Pine, 

326. Myrtle and Union, 

327. Myrtle and Walnut, " 

328. Myrtle and Beech, 

329. Myrtle and Maple, '' 

330. Myrtle and Russell, 

331. Myrtle, near Belmont, 

332. Myrtle, near Hall, 

333. New Mast road and D, " 

334. New Mast road and Wilkins, pole. 

335. North and River road, arm. 

336. North and Elm, 

337. North and Bay, 

338. North and Chestnut, 

339. North and Pine, pole. 

340. North and Union, ' arm. 

341. North and Walnut, 

342. North Main in Eddy, pole. 

343. North Adams and Ray Brook, arm. 

344. Nuffield lane, rear Central fire station, 

345. Nutt road and Beech, 



334 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 340. Xutt road and Portsinonth Railroad. pole. 

347. Orange and Elm. arm. 

348. Orang-e and Pine, " 

349. Orange and Union, " 

350. Orange and Ash, 

351. Orange and Oak, " 

352. Oi-ange and Linden, " 

353. Orange and Hall, pole. 

354. Pag-e and Portsmonth IJailroad, arm. 

355. Park square, ])ole. 

356. Parker and West, arm. 

357. Pearl and ]"]lm east back, •' 

358. Pearl and Chestnut, 

359. Pearl and Pine, " 

360. Pearl and Union, " 

361. Pearl and Peeeh, 

362. Pearl and Oak, 

363. Pearl and Russell, 

364. Pearl and Linden, 

365. Pearl and Morrison, pole. 

366. Pearl and Belmont, arm. 

367. Pennacook and Canal, • pole. 

368. Pennacook and Elm, arm. 

369. Pennacook and Chestnut, jiole. 

370. Pennacook and I'ine, arm. 

371. Pennacook and Union, 

372. Pleasant and Franklin, 

.'!7:!. j'rescott and Wilson, " 

374. Prince and Poynton, " 

375. I'rospect and Elm east back, " 

376. Prospect and Chestnut, " 

377. Prosjoect and I'ine, 

378. Prospect and I'nion, " 

379. I'rospect and .\sh, 

380. Prospect and Oaiv, 

381. Pros])ec1 and Linden, 

382. I'rospc.'t, near Mall, 

383. I'lilnain aiul Main. 
'3H4. I'utiiaiii and (aiticr, 

3S5. I'nlnani and I'-arllcft, I'olc. 

386. Kc.wcll and l!i\cr road, arm. 

387. i;i\cr i()a<l. n.^ar Otis, 

388. Ifivfr road and Stark park, 

389. Sagamore and i'ine, 

390. Sagamore and Walnnt. 
.391. Salmon and (anal, 
392. Salmon ami hlhn. 

;!9:!. Salmon ami Clicstiint. ]>"'»'• 



pole. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 335 

Xo. :i!)4. Sahiioii iiiid J'iiu". pole. 

395. Salmon and rnioii. " 

39(J. Salmon and IJeecli, arm. 

397. School and Turner. " 

398. School and Third. '• - 

399. ^Schiller :,nd Second. 

400. Schnyler and Main. 

401. Shasta and Ehn, 

402. Silver and Union. " 

403. Silver and Beech, " 

404. Silver and Lincoln. " 
40,-). Silver and WiLson. «' 
400. Somerville and Jewett. «' 

407. Spring: and Canal. «• 

408. Spring- and Elm west l)ack. " 

409. Spruce and Elm, 

4 10. Spruce and Chestnut west back. " 

411. Spruce south hack and Elm east back, pole. 

41:.'. Stai'k and Canal, arm. 

413. Stark and back street. 

414. .Summer and State. pole. 
41."). Thornton and Sullivan. arm. 
41(i. Tremont square. ])ole. 

417. Union, near Campbell. arm. 

418. State east back, 

419. State, south of Granite, " 

420. State, north of Granite, " 

421. Sullivan and Beanport, pole. 

422. Sullivan and Main, 

423. .Summer and Dearborn, arm. 

424. Summer and Hall, 

42."). \'alley and Elm. '* 

42(). \'alley «ind Pine, pole. 

427. A'alley and Union, arm. 

425. Aalley and Wilson. " 
429. Valley and Belmont, 

43(1. N'ailey and Taylor, " 

431. \'alle\' and Cj'press. ' " 

432. \alley and Jewett. pole. 

433. \inton and Taylor. arm. 

434. Walker and Main. " 
43.-,. Walker and Fourth. 

43(). Walker and Second. " 

43>7. AValker and Turner, pole. 

435. \Vashington and Chni-ch. arm. 
4:!9. Water, " 

440. Water and Elm. " 

441. \Vaync and McCIreg-or, pole. 



336 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 442. Wayne and Main, arm. 

443. Wayne and Beauport, pole. 

444. Wayne and Dubuque, arm. 

445. Webster and Kiver road, pole. 
44C. Webster and Elm, arm. 

447. Webster and Chestnut, " 

448. Webster and Pine, " 

449. Webster and Walnut, pole. 

450. Welch avenue and Calef road, " 

451. West Hancock and Second, '* 

452. West Hancock and Dai'tniouth, arm. 

453. West Hancock and South Main, " 

454. Whitford and Union, 

455. Wilton and Main, ** 

456. Winter, " 

457. Winter and Parker, " 

458. Winter place and Elm west back, " 

459. Young and Taylor, " 

460. Young- and Ainsworth avenue, " 

461. Young- and Mammoth road, ** 

462. Cedar and Franklin, "' 

463. Laurel north back and rnion, 

464. Clarke and North Adams, 
4(),"). lM-()si)ect and IJecch, 

4t)(). McDuttie and Huntress, 

467. Hanover and Alfred, 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR, 



REPOET OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



To His Tlonor the Mai/or and Board of Aldcnneit of the Citi/ of Manchester, 

N. H.: 

In comijliance with the ordinance of said city the niilk inspector 
herewith presents his annual report for the year ending- Jannary 31, 
1900: 

I have inspected 115 samples of milk and in most cases fonnd them 
to be up to the standard, viz., 13 per cent milk solids. 

The dealers whose milk did not prove satisfactory I immediately 
notified, calling- their attention to the same, and found on later inspec- 
tion a noticeable improvement in the quality of milk sold by them. 

Number of licenses issued to dealers conveying- milk by carriage and 
otherwise for purposes of sale, 121. 

Amount of nionej' received and turned over to the city treasurer, 
$60.50. 

Property of the city held by the inspector at present is as follows: 
City records, milk grip, 10 pint cans, 1 lactoscope, 1 thermometer, 
2 glass cylinders for cream tests, etc., 2 specific gravity scales, 1 pipette, 
and odd pieces of chemical apparatus. 

JOSEPH H. GEISEL, 

Inspector of Milk. 

339 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the City CouncUs: 

I beg- to submit my report as solicitor for the year 1899: 

The cases of Fletcher and of Wilkins against the city, claims for 
damages, caused by the laying out of Cypress street, have been settled. 

Cross against the city has also been settled. 

Home against ^Manchester was taken from the docket. 

The cases of Boire, Bresnehan, Greaney, Kendrigan, Sheehan, Stan- 
ton, and Turcotte, counsel having withdraAvn, have also been taken 
from the docket. 

Hill against Manchester was heard before Mr. George C. Gilmore as 
referee, and judgment against the city was rendered upon his re]X)rt. 

During the year the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company- filed a 
petition for an abatement of part of the taxes assessed upon its prop- 
erty for the 3'ear 1899. 

Levi Page entered suit for alleged damages to his real estate, 
caused by laying out Readey street. 

P. E. Sheehan entered an action for dainages caused by alleged 
defect in highway. 

C. F. Lambert also brought action to recover alleged danvages for 
sheep killed hy dogs. 

The Amoskeag tax case of 1897 is still peiuling before the full bench 
of the supreme court upon questions of law. 

GEORGE A. WAGNEE, 

City Solicitor. 
Januamv 2, 1900. 

343 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To the Board of Mayor mid Ald'ermeit : 

Gentlesien, — The auditor herewith submits to your honorable bodj' 
his report, giving a tabular statement of the receipts and expenditures 
for the year 1899, and a detailed statement of the expenses of each 
appropriation during the year. 

llesiiectfullj-, 

JAMES I-:. DODGE, 

City Avtlifor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 

Dk. 

To Dunscomb & Jcnnison, temporary loan $50,000.00 

New England Trust Companj^ temporary loan 150,000.00 

W. J. Hayes & Son, city funding loan bonds 100,000.00 

W. J. Hayes & Son, premium on bonds (%031.00 

E. C. Smith, rent of city hall 16.00 

E. C. Smith, sewer licenses 1.954.49 

E. C. Smith, show licenses 770.00 

E. C. Smith, dog licenses 1,471.75 

E. C. Smith, rent of tenements .''.43.89 

E. C. Smith, billiard and pool licenses 222.S5 

E. C. Smith, lunch cart licenses • 18.00 

E. C. Smith, fees, marriage licenses 582.00 

E. C. Smith, fees, mortgages 198.28 

E. C. Smith, fees, sales 132.25 

E. C. Smith, fees, miscellaneous i-ecords 19.25 

E. C. Smith, fees, partnerships 7.75 

E. C. Smith, fees, corporations 20.50 

E. C. Smith, fees, writs 37.00 

M. J. Healy, iDolice department .".4,449.01 

John C. Bickford, police department 1,401.84 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer, Pine Grove cemetery 3,492.17 

B. A. Stearns, superintendent Pine Grove cemetery.. 3,140.29 

C. H. G. Foss, superintendent Valley cemetery 1,800.25 

George E. Morrill, collector, old taxes 501.38 

George E. Morrill, collector, taxes of 1898 52,294.66 

George E. Morrill, collector, taxes of 1899 5.52,759.54 

George E. Morrill, collector, abatement of taxes, 189s 437.59 

347 



348 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

To Ceorge K. .Morrill, collector, abatement of taxes, 1S91I $1,464.81 

George E. Morrill, collector, interest on taxes, 1898 1,381.85 

George E. Morrill, redemption of land sold for taxes. 

1896 1,566.48 

George E. Morrill, redemption of land sold for taxes, 

IvSOT 1 ,649.65 

George E. Morrill, redemption of land sold for taxes, 

189S 1 ,:i95.75 

George E. Alorrill, final payment of interest from Com- 
monwealth Bank, account deposits in 1893 107.10 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, insurance tax 3,137.25 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, railroad tax 29,832.61 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, savings bank tax 48,880.91 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, literary fiiiul 3,352.74 

A. F. Precourt, milk licenses 11.50 

A. 15. Eaton, cily scales 58.48 

(ieorge Kain, city scales 165.70 

Gilbert Lyons, city scales 129.65 

W. E. Buck, tuition 735.35 

W. E. Buck, free text-books 186.66 

Charles K. Walker, superintendent water-works 133,436.41 

E. C. Libbey, superintendent city farm 4,752.95 

count J' of Hillsborough, paupers oft" farm 1,264.51 

Manchester National Bank, interest on deposits.... 155.65 

Amoskeag National Bank, interest on deposits 154.97 

First National Bank, interest on deposits 722.82 

George E. Morrill, collector, interest on deposits 642.50 

town of Londonderry, school tax 50.24 

county of Hillsborough, coal for court house 32.71 

John B. Varick Co 3.65 

J. S. Holt & Co., overdraft .50 

Frank O. Day, fire deparlmenl, horse, "Cox" 60.00 

board of health 4.00 

John B. Varick Co., overdraft 43.17 

street and i)ark commission B73.02 

Manchester Wat er-Works 7.00 

J{rown & Titus, overdraft 101.88 

trustees of cemetery fund 100.00 

Miville & Deschenes, overdraft 3.85 

JJoston Book Binding Comj>an3', ovcrdral'l 20.54 

Commonwealth National Bank, final i)ayiiiciil , liihMvst 590.85 

M. W. F. Club, use of lights, High school 6.00 

Total receipts for year 1899 $1,218,485.45 

Cash on liand January 1, 1899 128,419.71 

Unj);ii(l 1)11 Is December 30, 1899 19,726.35 

$1,366,631.51 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 340 

Cr. 

By Jaiuiary draft $ ir).()OO..i:i 

February draft 44,412.21 

March draft 4r),354.21 

April draft i:i9,174.11 

May draft 4fi,838.,30 

June draft 73,401.86 

July draft lir),342.2.1 

August draft 64,716.04 

September draft 13;),108.9t 

October draft 78,756.09 

November draft 339,242.24 

December draft 61,424.49 

Total drafts for year ISO!) $1,188,461.05 

Unpaid bills January 1, 18!)<.) 13,212.23 

Cash on hand Deccniber 30, 1S<)9 164,958.23 

$1,366,631.51 



Kespeetfully submitted. 

FRED L. ALLEN, 

Citi/ Treasurer. 



To the City Councils of the Viltj of Maiicliester, N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — I have examined the accounts of Fred L. Allen, city 
treasurer, for the year ending December 30, 1899, and find proper 
vouchers for all payments, and all receipts duly accounted for. 

The net cash on hand Januai\y 1, 1899, was '. $115,207.48 

Receipts during the year 1,218,485.45 

Total $1,333,692.93 

Amount of drafts during the year $1,188,461.05 

Net cash on hand December 30, 1S99 145,231.88 

Total $1,333,692.93 

The cash balance taken December 30, 1899, I find to be as follows: 
Deposited in Suffolk National Bank, coupon interest account $20,036.00 

Deposited in First National Bank 135,963.42 

Deposited in office safe 8,958.81 

Gross amount of cash on hand December 30. 1899 $164,958.23 

Deduct amount of bills un^jaid 19,726.35 

Net cash on hand December 30, 1899 $145,231.88 

Respectfully submitted, together with a tabular statement of the 
receipts and expenditures of the city for the j-ear 1899. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



360 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDI- 
TURES OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER 
FOR THE YEAR 1899. 

KKCKII'TS. 
CEXTUAr- DKPAKTMENT. 

Keceived from: 

Direct city taxes $607,457.98 

Cost and interest on taxes 1,381.85 

— $608,839.83 

Licenses to enter sewer $1,954.40 

to keep dog 1 ,471.75 

to sell milk 11.50 

TO keep billiard ami pool tables, and 

hincli carts 240.85 

to shows and exhibitions 770.00 

Fees 1 roni citv clerk 997.03 

■ .$5,445.62 

J^ents $359.89 

SUXDHIKS. 

Received from: 

City scales $353.83 

Miscelhineoiis sources 436.6:2 

$790.45 

SCIIOOI, |)i;i'.\Kl'MKNT. 

Received from text-books and tuilion $922.01 

I'OI.ICK KKl'AliTMKXT. 

Received from fines and costs $55,850.85 

rriti.ic ri.ACKS. 
Received from: 

Pine Grove cemetery $6,632.46 

Valicv eemeterv 1,800.25 

$8,432.71 

\VAri:u-\vouKs. 

(iross receipts $133,436.41 

ciiAuiTAni,!;, rAri!H)ri(', and imiiian rnitoru'. 
Ueeeived from: 

City farm $ 1.752.95 

inilsboroiigh county, boardinf,"- pauju-rs and 

Industrial School inmates 1,264.51 

.$6,017.46 



RECEIPTS. 351 

MISOELr.AXEOUS. 

Received i'loiu: 

Interest. $2,373.89 

Laud redeemed li-om tax sale 4,511.88 

Trustees cemetery i luid 100.00 

Overdrafts 169.94 

$7,155.71 

Total ordiuarj' receipts during- the year 1899 $827,250.94 

TKMPOBARY LOAK. 

Received from loans in anticipation of tax of 1899 $200,000.00 

STATE. 

Received from: 

Insiirauce taxes $3,137.25 

Railroad taxes 29,832.61 

Savings bank taxes 48,880.91 

Literary fund 3,352.74 

$85,203.51 

DEBT. 

Received from: 

Bonds sold $100,000.00 

I'reminms on bonds sold 6.031.00 

$106,031.00 

Gross receipts $1,218,485.45 

Net cash on hand January ], 1899 115,207.48 

$1,333,692.93 

Expenditures. 

central, department. 

Interest on water bonds $39,55] .00 

on city bonds 39,688.00 

on cemetery bonds 2,500.00 

on temporary loan, anticipation tax, 

]S99 2,862.28 

$84,601.28 

City hall $3,850.94 

Printing- and stationerj'^ 1,565.21 

Incidental expenses 5,971.99 

iNfayor's incidentals 256.30 

City officers' salaries 19,956.54 

Auditor's department 1,960.72 

Sinking fund trustees 22,000.00 

File and index system 044.74 

Land sold for taxes 6,176.95 

— $02,389.39 



852 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STREET AND SEWEU DEPAKT.ME.NT. 

Street aud park commission $3,422.00 

Snow and ice 7,727.63 

Repairs of hig-hways 22,146.59 

New highways 5,562.66 

Land taken for highways 5,124.52 

Watering streets :j,713.95 

Paving streets 5,337.64 

Macadamizing streets 11,394.75 

Grading for concrete 3,113.72 

Scavenger service , 17,633.29 

Street sweeping .' 2,250.42 

Lighting streets 55,649.58 

Bridges 2,527.27 

City teams 7,352.76 

Repairs of sewers 4,579.42 

New sewers 20,416.66 

Soutli Manchester playground 133.68 

$178,036.54 

EXi;iXEE14"S })EPAKTMENT. 

Engineer's department $5,249.98 

IIEAETJI DEPAIJTMETS'T. 

Healtli department $4,594.25 

SClIOOl- DEPARTMENT. 

Repairs of schoolhouscs $0,499.57 • 

Fuel 7,563.18 

Furniture and supplies 1,258.29 

Books and stationery 48.45 

Printing and advei'tising 267.88 

Contingent expenses 2,687.54 

Care of rooms 6,380.25 

Evening schools 1,181.05 

Teachers' salaries S9, 440.81 

Evening school, mecliaiiical drawing 190.72 

Free text-books 4,995.65 

Manual training 600.00 

New boih'rs. Training school aiid Miiiii-sl reet 800.00 

Furnishing room High school 178.00 

$122,091.99 

< rrv i.iiiKAuv. 

City library $5,354.03 



EXPENDITURES. 353 



FIRJ3 DEPARTMENT. 



Fire department $65,087.58 

Fire-alarm telegraph 1,136.44 

Hjdrant service 18,100.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Police station $2,484.34 

Police court 2,938.94 

Police commission 39,003.87 



PUBLIC BriLDINGS. 

Repairs of bnilding.s $5,084.48 

New schoolhouse, Amoskeag 894.66 

Pearl-street schoolhouse repairs 33.75 

Board of plumbing examiners 100.00 

WATEK-WORKS. 

Water-works $50,659.13 

Water-works sinking fund 23,100.00 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Commons $4,358.59 

Stark park 518.51 

Derryfield park 1,033.81 

Pine Grove cemeterj' 8,638.09 

Valley cemetery 3,075.37 

Amoskeag cemetery 202.65 

Merrill jard 5.75 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILA'J^THROPIC. 

Paupers off farm $7,956.49 

City farm . ; 8,302.74 

Indigent soldiers 110.50 

Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital 300.00 

Free beds, Elliot Hospital 300.00 

Emergency ward, Elliot Hospital 75.00 

Free beds, Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital . . . 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 368.40 

Militia 900.00 

Band concerts 377.01 



$84,324.02 



$44,427.15 



$6,112. 



$73,759.13 



$17,832.77 



$19,290.14 



364 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

ABATEMENTS. 

Abatement of taxes $1,902.40 

Total of ordinary municipal expenditures $710,015.95 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Temporary loan made in anticipation of tax for 1899.... $200,000.00 

BONDED DEBT. 

School bonds $10,000.00 

Bridg-e bonds 25,000.00 

Notes 110,000.00 

$145,000.00 

STATE AND COUNTY TAXES. 

State tax $57,991.25 

Countv tax 75,453.85 

$133,445.10 

Grand total of expenditure during the year $1,188,461.05 

Cash on hand December 31, 1899 $164,958.23 

Less unpaid bills 19,726.35 

Net cash on hand 145,231.88 

$1,333,692.93 



Interest. 

Appro])riat ion $45,500.00 

TraiisrciTcd from \vater-w()rlvs account 39,551.00 

$85,051.00 

Expenditures. 

Anioskeag National Bank, interest on $50,000 

note, six months $875.00 

Dunscomb &. Jennison, discount on two notes 

of $25,000 each 014.37 

Manchester Savings l?ank, interest on $:)(T.00o 

note, six months S75.00 

New England Trust Company, discounl on 

$1.50,000, five montlis, twenty days 1,947.91 

Cou])ons on city bonds t), 742. 50 

(^oujjons on city funding bonds 1.207.50 

Coupons on cemetery bonds 2.500.00 

Coupons on (Jranitc-bridge bonds 3.020.00 ^ 

Coui)ons on improvement bonds 10,200.00 



UNAPPROPRIATED MONEY. 355 

Coupons on McGregor bridg-e bonds $2,408.00 

Coupons on schoolhouse bonds 8,360.00 

Coupons on water bonds 39,551.00 

Total expenditures $84,601.28 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 449.72 

$85,051.00 



Payment of Funded Debt. 

Appropriation $45,000.00 

Received from sale of bonds 100,000.00 



Expenditures. 

Amoskeag- National Bank $50,000.00 

Manchester Saving-s Bank 50,000.00 

Manchester National Bank 10,000.00 

Bridge bonds 25,000.00 

Schoolhouse bonds 10,000.00 



$145,000.00 



$145,000.00 



Sinking Fund. 
Appropriation $22,000.00 

Expenditures. 
Trustees of sinking- fund $22,000.00 



Unappropriated Money. 

Appropriation $21,000.00 

Transferred from the following- accounts: 

Interest 449.72 

Printing and stationery 434.79 

City officers' salaries 2,043.46 

Mayor's incidentals 43.70 

Auditor's department 33.28 

Street and park commission 78.00 

Snow and ice 2,272.37 

Watering streets ' 286.05 

Street sweeping 249.58 



356 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Grading for concrete $1,886.28 

Repairs of sewers 522. 4G 

Engineer's department 150.02 

Health department 214.92 

Fire department 912.42 

Fire-alarm telegraph 363.56 

Police .station 315.66 

Police commission 996.13 

Furnishing rooms at High school 172.00 

Merrill yard 44.25 

Repairs of schoolhouses .43 

Fuel 2,004.98 

Furniture and supplies 41.71 

Books and stationery 51.55 

Printing and advertising 32.12 

Contingent expenses 12.46 

Care of rooms 119.75 

Evening schools 18.35 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 209.28 

Free text-books 4.35 

Paupers off farm 1,043.51 

Indigent soldiers 39.50 

Emergency ward, Elliot Hospital 125.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 31.60 

Abatement of taxes 97.60 

Band concerts 22.99 



EXPENDITIKKS. 

Transferred to the following accounts: 

City hall $1,350.94 

Land sold for taxes 976.95 

Incidental expenses 471.99 

Repairs of highways 2,146.59 

New highways 1,062.66 

Land taken for highways 2,267.75 

Paving streets :!37.64 

Macadamizing streets 1,387.75 

Scavenger service 2,633.29 

Bridges 27.27 

City teams 852.76 

New sewers 416.66 

Lighting streets 74.58 

8tark park 18.51 

Dcrryficld park 33.81 

Soutli Manchester playground 13.81 

Commons 358.59 

Police court 38.94 



$36,323.83 



CITY HALL. 357 

Repairs of buildings $419.49 

Valley cemeterj'' 75.37 

Amoslceag cemetery 2,G5 

Pine Grove cemeterj' :]8.09 

Teachers' salaries 272.21 

City farm 298.89 

State tax .25 

Garbage incineration 293.85 

Contingent expenses 1,700.00 

Fire alarm telegraph. 500.00 

Board of plumbing examiners 100.00 

Eepairs of schoolhouses 1,000.00 

Balance carried to new account 17,152.54 

$36,323.83 



Temporary Loan. 

Receipts. 

Dunscomb & Jennison $50,000.00 

New England Trust Company 150,000.00 



$200,000.00 



Expenditures. 

First National Bank, note due December 6, 1899 $50,000.00 * 
New England Trust Company, notes due De- 
cember 12, 1899 150,000.00 



$200,000.00 



City Hall. 

Appropriation $2,500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 1,350.94 



Expenditures. 

fuex and lights. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood $4.50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 136,080 lbs. coal 331.09 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 42 tons, 275 lbs. coal 242.25 

Manchester Electric Co., electric lights 176.55 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 121.10 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 292.13 



$3,850.94 



$1,107.62 



358 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WATER AND TELEPHONE. 

Manchester Water- Works, use of water $597.73 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 72.00 

CLEANING OFFICES, ETC. 

T, F. Hannaford, brooms $3.50 

Mary Nolan, cleaning offices ull.OO • 

Oscar Perkins, janitor 624.00 

Timothy P. Shea, janitor public comfort 440.00 

John B. Varick Co., mop stick, waste, etc 4.77 

FUBNITURE, FIXTURES, SUPPLIES. 

Clark M. Bailey, toilet paper $3.50 

R. D. Gay, 1 fixture .50 

James W. Hill Co., bunting, shades 34.67 

James W. Hill Co., hanging and repairing 

awnings 31.70 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 1 desk, inspector of buildings 25.00 
C. A. Hoitt & Co., 1 pedestal and jardiniere, 

mayor S.50 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., mat, chairs, tables, etc 15.89 

Kimball & Hobbs, hose 2.50 

Manchester Electric Co., lamps 10.25 

Manchester Mills, soap 7.00 

G. E. Wentworth, sweepers 9.00 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., matches, soap 4.00 

INCIDENTAL REPAlR.s. 

J. J. Abbott, paint, glass, labor $45.32 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., lumber and labor 13.20 

E. M. Bryant & Co., switch, labor 1.98 

E. W. Hunton, seating chairs 6.50 

]Iead & Dowst Co., labor, etc 4.06 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., repairing chair .50 

George Ilolbi-ook, lejniiring door, damaged by 

runaway horse 22.00 

George Holbrook, niaUriiil :nHl labor 7.50 

T. A. Lane Co., j)hiinhing, i-lcctric- light re- 
pairs, etc 43.82 

C. S. McKcan, repairing chairs, etc 16.10 

Pike & ilcald Co., j)lunil)ing repair.s, etc 9.20 

Pike & He:ild Co., taking down awning.s, etc. 10.33 

Harry A. i'iper. niatfiial :ind labor 11.67 



$669.75 



$1,383.27 



• $152.51 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 369 

B. F. Shepard, repairing- locks $2.0") 

Byron Smith, caning- chairs 2.00 

T. P. Shea, repairing key .10 

Sanborn Carriage Co., 1 slide bar bhuU" 1.00 

Stendoi*fer Bronzing Co., bronzing- radiators, 

etc. . . .T 119.00 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clock 1.00 

.fohn B. Varick Co., shovel, dustpan, steel, etc. 2.76 

John Iv. Wilson, lumber and labor 5.10 

C. L. Wolf, j)lumbing- repairs 12.90 

$338.59 

SUNDBIES. 

W. G. Berry, insurance premium $32.45 

John A. Sheehan, insurance premium 50.00 

Stark & Blanchet, insurance premium 30.00 

F. H. Thurston, jjaste and germol 26.75 

$139.20 

Total expenditures $3,850.94 



Printing and Stationery. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 



EXPENT>ITURES. 
ASSESSORS AND INSPECTOH 

John B. Clarke Co., printing postals, circu- 
lars, checklists 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising notice 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank books, pen- 
cils, etc 

Union Publishing Co., advertising notice 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

E. E. Coburn Co., receipts $8.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing tax bills 45.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., book and stationery 1.76 



584.75 


17.00 


74.05 


14.09 



$189.89 



CITY CT.EHK. 



John B. Clarke Co., i^rinting ballots, blanks, etc. $81.95 

John B. Clarke Co., printing blank books 31.50 

John B. Clarke Co., binding manuals 52.50 



360 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

E. li. Coburn Co., envelopes $2.00 

Nate Kellog-g Co., printing receipts 2.00 

Noveltj' Advertising Co., printing postals, etc. 5.00 

Novelty Advertising Co., rubber stamps 2.90 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 5.00 

AIIDITOK. 

John Vj. Clarke Co., printing blanks and bill- 
heads $21.50 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 800 reports 711.55 

John B. Clarke Co., printing, binding, letter- 
ing 150 reports 207.40 

CITY TllEASrUEK. 

John r.. Clarke Co., printing blanks $G.OO 

John B. Clarke Co., binding xiay-rolls 4.00 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing resolution, i^eceipts 5.75 

Temple & Farrington Co., 50 ruled sheets 3.00 

MAYOK. 

John B. Clarke Co., jjrinliiig ])aniphlets and 

slips $20.75 

John B. Clarke Co., postals and notices 6.00 

E. R. Coburn Co., stationery 6.95 

Nate Kellogg Co., order books 7.25 

Temple iS: Farrington Co.. stationery 15.25 



CITY tOl N('I1,S AN'I) CO.M.MITTKKS. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks, envelopes. 

permits, aj)iilications, etc $99.:! I 

W. E. Moore, printing brief. Anioskeag Manu- 
facturing Companj' v. City is.oo 

J. Artliur ^Yillian^s, pi-inting V)lanks I.T.") 



$182.85 



$940.45 



$18.75 



$50.20 



$119.06 



SINPIJIKS. 

i;. Be<-liar(l, print iiig blanks, weigher $3.00 

Total .xpciKlitiircs $1,. '565.21 

Ti-ansffiTcd to iniaiipi-opriatcd money account 4.14.79 

$2,000.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



361 



Incidental Expenses. 

Appropriation $:>,r)00.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money ac- 
count 471.90 



$-,.971. 



Expenditures, 
births, marriages, deaths. 

0. D. Abbott, M. 13 

D. S. Adams, M. D 

E. B. Aldrich, M. D 

H. W. Boutwell, M. D 

A. A. E. Brien, M. D 

J. F. Brown, M. D 

J. S. Brown, M. D 

F. A. Babbitt, M. D 

Lillian G. Bullock, M. D 

H. W. Bnrnham, M. D 

Rev. C. A. Bidwell 

Rev. F. S. Bacon 

Rev. Charles R. Bailey 

Rev. M. W. Borthwick 

Rev. Andreas Carlsson 

Rev. J. A. Chevalier 

Rev. K L. Colby 

Rev. T. E. Clapp 

Rev. C. R. Crossett 

Rev. ^fatthew Creamer 

1. L. Carpenter, M. D 

Charles Chirurg', M. D 

James M. Collity, M. D 

Charles Core,y, M. D 

Mary Danforth, M. D 

G. M. Davis, M. D 

R. H. Dillon. M. D 

Charles E. Dodge, M. D 

Clarence ^1. Dodge, jM. D 

John F. Dowd, M. D 

Henry Duchene, M. D 

E. B.^ Dunbar, M. D 

J. A. DeGross, M. D 

Rev. I. H. C. Davig-non 

Rev. Charles W. Dockrill 

Rev. Thomas Dorion 

John Ferguson, M. D 

John Ferguson, Jr., M. D 



$5.00 

4.00 

, .2,5 

4.2.') 

21.. 50 
1.50 
2.50 



.50 

1.00 

2.75 

11.50 

13.50 

1.25 

1.00 

1.25 

9.00 

2.50 

11.00 

..50 

5.25 

4.25 

fi.25 

4.00 

7.00 

1.75 
8.75 

.25 

18.25 

1.00 

.50 
4.75 
2.25 



362 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

C. F. Flanders, M. ]) $2.'). 50 

George Frechette, :M. I) 4.00 

L. M. French, M. D 3.50 

E. N. Fug-ere, M. D 18.25 

Emdon Fritz, M. U .50 

S. J. Girouard, M. D 4.75 

J. H. Gleason, M. D 4.75 

Moise Guerin, M. D .' . 3.50 

M. S. Guggenheim, :M. J) 1.25 

Rev. Uldoric Godin 2.00 

Rev. C. R. Hennon 1<».50 

Rev. P. llevey 8.75 

Thomas C. Hill, M. D 1.50 

G. W. Ha^elton, :S[. D .25 

B. F. Hodsdon, M. D 1.50 

J. A. Jackson, M. D 7.00 

Rev. W. N. Jones 3.00 

M. E. Kean, J»I. D S.25 

P. G. Laberge, M. D 11.25 

J. E. Larochelle, M. D 21.75 

J. E. A. Lanouette, M. D 18.50 

J. E. Lemaitre, M. D 10.50 

J. D. Lemay, M. D 11.00 

H. D. Lord 4.25 

Rev. P. Lawrence 3.00 

Rev. J. J. Lyons j.OO 

Rev. B. W. Lockhart 3.25 

J. W. D. MacDonald, .M. J) 20.25 

J. W. Alooar, M. D .50 

G. B. Morey, M. D 3.50 

M. V. B. Morse, M. D .75 

J. T. Murray, M. D 3.50 

Mrs. S. :Modin .25 

Rev. Edwin Morrell 1.25 

Rev. W. II. :Morrison 7.00 

Rev. W. C. McAllister 4.50 

Rev. E. A. Nelson .75 

Clara Odnian 3.25 

William :SL Parsons, .M. 1) 1.00 

C. A. I'almer, M. I) .50 

W. H. Pattee, M. J) 2.()(i 

Frederick I'erkins, M. I ) 7.00 

Anna I'ollraer 8.75 

Rev. O. D. Patch 1.25 

J. F. Robinson, M. I) 3.25 

C. S. Jtodicr, M . 1 ) 20.00 

J. E. K. Kov, M. I) 2.50 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



363 



William Richardson. M. 1). 

Rev. C. W. Rowley 

Rev. J. A. Roy 

Rev. C. J. Staples 

Serville St. Pierre, M. J) 

Gillis Stark, M. D 

F. C. Steuart, M. D 

A. G. Straw, M. D 

Zatae L. Straw, M. D 

C. B. Stiirtevant, M. D 

J. Sullivan, M. D 

Emile Sylvain, M. D 

E. C. Smith 

Rev. Irad Taggart 

W. F. Templeton, :Nr. D 

A.J. Todd, M. D 

George U. Towne, M. D 

E. C. Tremblay, M. D 

L. Tremblay, M. D 

G. M. Watson, M. D 

H. P. Watson, M. D 

G. L. Wakefield, ^L D 

A. F. Wheat, M. D 

Kev. E. C. Zimmermann. . . , 



$1.00 
(i.OO 

.:)0 

15.50 

];i.50 

5.00 

.75 

(3.50 
4.50 
2.75 
i).75 
J!)6.25 
1.00 

1.25 
1.75 
.•]5.00 
1.00 
5.25 
2.50 
2.00 
5.00 
1.25 



.$1,092.75 



DAMAGES AND JUDGMENTS. 

Florence G. Everett, one half cost fence be- 
tween land and Pearl-street schoolhouse lot 

John H. Riedell, settlement of suit 

Gustave Theuner, damage caused by drainage 

Mary Cressey and Hannah Young, damage 
caused by water from highway 

LEGAL EXPENSES. 

Dana W. King, copying deeds 

Edwin F. Jones, time, services, and expenses, 
preparation argument at Concord before 
committee on apportionment, on matter of 
doomage 

Thomas D. Luce, printing argument, certify- 
ing appeals, etc 



$23.80 

3.02 

250.00 



$1.6^ 



100.00 
13.00 



$114.62 



CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 



Fred L. Allen, expenses to Concord. Boston, 

New York $35.87 

Fred L. Allen, telegrams, express, stamps 7.15 



364 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



American P.ank Note Co., engraving and print- 
ing bonds $7."j.00 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising notices and 

proposals 29.33 

Daniels & Downs, typewriting 11. .'SO 

James E. Dodge, expenses to Boston, deliver- 
ing bonds 2.50 

A. J. Lane Co., bonds for city officials 361.25 

A. J. Lan6, revenue stamps 2.00 

Union Publishing Co., publishing notices 79. 49 

TEAMS FOK COUNCILS ANT) COMillTTEES. 

G. W. liailey $ < 0.00 

J. P. Brown «fc Co 30.00 

J. P. Brown 5.00 

Boyd Brothers 16.50 

Thomas Brown 5.00 

Joseph Breault 5.00 

Henry Cote 15-00 

W. J. Freeman 30.00 

C. S. Fifield 45.00 

A. L. Gadbois «& Co 10.00 

Fred E. James 50.50 

Kean & Sheehan 20.00 

Manchester Street Pailway, 47 book tickets 117.50 

John F. Murphy :50.00 

C. C. Perry 15-00 

G. W. Reed 35.75 

C. H. Simpson 15-00 

B. F. & R. W. Welch 32.50 

G. E. Wheeler 2 0.00 

CITY LUmATtY. 

John A. Barker, care of boiler $81.00 

J. K. Rhodes, care of boiler 50.25 

STREETS. 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., signs $11.00 

F. S. Bodwell, stono bounds S2.50 

R. G. Cha.se & Co., trees 57.35 

D. .luneau, .setting trees 2r).25 

Joseph St. Laurent, 35 tree boxes*. 52.50 

Metal St:ini])ing Co.. signs 2.7G 



$(304.09 



$5r>7.7: 



$131.25 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



365 



Harry A. Piper, signs 

C. H. Wood, painting signs 

CITY SCALES. 

C. B. Clarkson, weighing coal 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., cuspidors 

E. W. Poore, wood and coal 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and stationery 

C. A. Trefethen, 1 clock 

John B. Varick Co., 1 ax and handle 



$9.58 
lOG.OO 



$8.00 

1.30 

12.00 

16.03 

2.25 

.90 



$348.54 



$40.48 



MILK INSPECTOK. 



John B. Clarke Co., advertising notice 

W. P. Goodman, books 

MAYOR. 

E. R. Coburn Co., stationery 

W. C. Clarke, 1 pad 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 

W. P. Goodman, directories 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., chimneys 

The Smith Preinier Typewriter Co., 1 type- 
writer, less discount and old machine re- 
turned 

The Smith Premier Typewriter Co., 12 ribbons 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and stationery 



$12.25 
1.35 



$3.00 

.50 

8.60 

50.00 

.20 



52.75 
7.00 
1.05 



$13.60 



$123.10 



TAX COLLECTOR. 



Blanche E. Bullock, 6 days' labor $15.00 

E. R. Coburn Co., books 2.50 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising notice 23.02 

John B. Clarke Co., 1,000 wrappers 10.00 

Co-operative Printing Co., stamp, ink 1.65 

Grace E. Downer, typewriting 3.00 

"Independent Statesman," advertising notice.. 6.75 

O. D. Knox, postmaster, stamped envelopes 63.60 

George E. Morrill, distributing tax bills 88.65 

Margie H. Stevens, 12 days' labor 30.00 



$244.17 



S66 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY CLEIiK. 

John V,. Clarke Co., binding marriage cer- 
tificates .$,-.4.25 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 2.75 

E. E. Cobiirn Co., books, cards, ribbon 40.25 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 26.70 

E. C. Smith, obtaining and inserting names 

of C'liildren omitted from records 4.34.50 

E. C. Smith, office supplies, v 33.25 

A. J. Smith, typewriter ribbons 4.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank books 13.20 

C. ir. Wood, lettering box .50 



CITY TKEASURE-R. 

Amoskeag National Bank, safe deposit box... 

D. J. Adams, 1 seal 

T. S. Buck, 1 stamp 

Alvah Bushnell Co., 12 wallets 

Curtis, Guild & Co., one month's subscription, 

"Commercial Bulletin" 

Grace E. Downei-, typewriting 

W. P. Goodman, books and stationery 

The J. C. Hall Co., checks 

A. E. Martell & Co., letter and deposit book. . . . 
Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 



coirRT iiorsE. 

Clark M. Bailey, brooms $2.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 72,090 lbs. coal 175.35 

P. IT. Ililey, janitor 498.00 

B. F. Shepard, sharpening mower, fixing keys. 

etc 4.45 

Timothy P. Rlu-a. ianitnr 45.00 



$25.00 


.3.00 


1.55 


1.40 


.40 


4.30 


21.93 


18.25 


8.50 


4.36 



ASSESSORS. 



John F. Gillis. fiiniisliiiig transfers of real 

.'Stale $12.00 

People's (;as l/ight Co., 1 maul If .4,^ 

Temple &■ Farrington Co., l)ool<s and stationery 14.59 



$609.40 



$724.80 



$27.04 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



367 



SUNDRIES. 

American Expi-ess Co.. express on reports 

L. M. Aldrioh, stationery and postasre 

L, M. Aklrich, expenses to Worcester 

L. M. Aldrich, nse of team eight months 

W. G. Eerry, insurance premiiim 

F. S. Bodwell, stone bounds 

Charles Boisclair, labor, pencils, etc., election. . 

E. R. Coburn Co., stationery, supervisors' check- 
lists 

City Government Publishing- Co., subscriptions 
to "City Government" 

B. A. Callaghan, typewriting- for building- in- 
spector 

Orin T. Clark, sheep killed by dogs 

C. B. Clarkson, weighing coal 

L. M. Cogswell, paid for postage 

J. X. Duval, hens and chickens killed by dogs 

Arthur B. Dickey, supplies as w'ard clerk 

Louise B. Foster, typewriting, solicitor 

Archie Falconer, hens and chickens killed by 

dogs 

First Light Battery, firing national salute. 

July -i 

First Light Battery, firing salute. New York 

reception to Admiral Dewey 

First Light Battery, firing salute. Admiral 

Dewey passing through city 

Town of GofFstown, taxes 

W. P. Goodman, record book, ward 10 

William P. Hall, jury box, ward 10 

W. F. Hart, music furnished Sheridan Guards' 

recept ion 

John H. Hajes, supplies furnished as ward clerk 

O. D. Knox, postmaster, stamps 

David Lovering, chickens killed by dogs 

W. E. Lovering, sheep killed by dogs 

J. H. iMendell & Co., lumber and labor, ward 2 
Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 

F. Morin, use of hall, ward 10 election 

Stephen Maloney, erecting voting booths. 

ward 'i 

Moore & Preston, wood, ward 2 ward room. . . . 
New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 

Edward N. Pearson, engrossing act 



$5.70 

7,13 

3.24 

100.00 

84.60 

84.00 

3,65 

1.62 

G.OO 

2.10 
11.20 
.jS.OO 

4.30 
16,20 

5,82 
,25 

7.95 

44.12 

27,25 

27.25 
1.94 
3.50 
2.00 

55.00 

5.25 

185.60 

13.50 

:u.oo 

3.54 

83 

15.50 

2.00 
12.00 

36.65 
1.50 



368 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

(.1. W. Keed, use of pung, engineer $1.50 

Gillis Stark, M. D., visits, sundry persons, police 

station 24.00 

E. C. Smith, expenses, 2 days in Boston 7.00 

E. C. Smith, freight and transportation, card 

inde.x 4.5S 

Ezra S. Stearn.s, engi'ossing acts, etc 10.25 

Silas I. Spragne, chickens killed bj^ dogs 2.00 

John l^. Varick Co., brooms, shovels 2.25 

G. A. Wagner, expenses to Concord 8.9" 

John M. Woodbridge, chickens killed by dogs. . 10.40 

■ • $941.14 

Total expenditures $5,971.9'.> 



City Officers' Salaries. 

Appropriation $22,000.00 

Expenditures. 

CETs^TKAI. DErARTXIENT. 

William C. Clarke, mayor $1,800.00 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer 1,237.50 

Edward C. Smith, clerk 1.012.50 

George A. Wagner, solicitor 800.00 

George L. Stearns, clerk common council 200.00 

Thomas W. Lane, building ins])ector 25.00 

L. M. Aldrich, building inspector 533.32 

John A. IJarker, messenger (599.98 

Archie F. Precoui't, milk inspector 25.00 

J. H. Geisel, milk inspector 275.00 

Asa B. Eaton, weigher 33.33 

George Kain, weigher 204.44 

Gilbert Lyons, weigher 144.44 

Blanche E. Bullock, treasurer's clerk 540.00 

Florence Kidder Everett, city clerk's clerk.... 470.00 

Alaude Young, mayor's clerk 544.50 

Florence A. Bobinscn, city clerk's clerk 40.00 

Florence .Tames, tem])orary clerk for mayor... 7.00 

Mabel Tolles, temporary cUik for ni;i.v..r 15.00 

Florence Walsh, temporary cIciU for ni;.y..r... 25.50 

A. ,]. Lane Co., services of stenographer, mayor !..')() 

W. C. Clarke, liaid for stcnograijher's services L5() 

$8,f)35.51 



CITY OFFICERS SALARIES. 



369 



CITY niYSICIAN AND OVEPSEEES OF THE POOR. 

Frederick Perkins, M. D., city phj'sician $000.00 

W. H. Maxwell, ward 1 25.00 

D. G. Andrews, ward 2 2;j.00 

Benjamin F. Garhmd, ward :i 25.00 

Charles "B. Clarkson, ward 4 25.00 

Pati-ick Costello, ward 5 25.00 

Charles Francis, ward 25.00 

William :Marshall, ward 7 , 25.00 

Charles S. McKean, ward 8 25.00 

Joseph Doucet, ward 9 25.00 

William Glover, ward 10 16.16 

William C. Clarke, chairman ex officio 25.00 

W. H. Maxwell, clerk 100.00 

Judith Sherer, matron pesthouse .360.00 



$1,326.16 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



W. E. Buck, superintendent of schools $2,300.00 

Curtis W. Davis, truant officer 750.00 

E. B. Woodbury, clerk of board • 50.00 

Elliott C. Lambert, clerk of board 100.00 

W. C. Clarke, chairman ex officio 10.00 

Harry T. Lord, president of common council, 

ex officio 10.00 

Walter B. Heath, ward 1 10.00 

Elliott C. Lambert, ward 1 10.00 

Charles H. Manning, ward 2 10.00 

Elmer E. Nutting-, ward 2 10.00 

George D. Towne, ward 3 10.00 

Louis E. Phelps, ward 3 10.00 

T\athaniel L. Colby, ward 4 10.00 

John H. Riedell, ward 4 4.17 

John T. Kelly, ward 5 10.00 

Daniel J. McAuliffe, ward 5 10.00 

Eugene B. Dunbar, ward 6 10.00 

Harry L. Davis, ward 10.00 

Edson S. Heath, ward 7 10.00 

Edward B. Woodbury, ward 7 10.00 

Frank A. Cadwell, ward 8 10.00 

Ned T. Wallace, ward 8 10.00 

Robert E. Walsh, ward 9 10.00 

Joseph Boivin, ward 9 10.00 

M. E. Harvey, ward 10 5.83 

Harry Burpee, ward 10 5.83 

26 



$3,405.83 



i70 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



iiOARIJ Ol' ASSESSORS. 

Ilcnry E. Lewis, ward 1 

John E. Stearns, ward 2 

John K. Wilson, ward 2 

David O. Fernald. ward 3 

Harrison D. Lord, ward 4 

George F. Sheehan, ward 5 

Henry A. Horton, ward 6 

Kobert Leggett, ward 7 

Eugene W. Brigham, ward 8 

John T. Hannigan, ward 'J 

L. M. Streeter, ward 10 

Frederick Allen, assistant 

C. W. Brown, assistant 

G. H. Dudley, assistant 

Robert Edgar, assistant 

E. C. Smith, assistant 

H. J. Woods, assistant 

H. L. Currier, clerical services 

J. M. Abbott, clerical services 

A. W. Rowell, clerical services 

Albert T. Barr, clerical services 

Fred Currier, clerical ser\'ices 

H. F. Stone, clerical services 

J. Z. W. Bernard, interpi-eter 

Louis Comeau, interpreter 

Joseph Lemyre, interpreter 

Jean B. iicjimbal, interpreter 

TAX COLLECTOK. 

George E. ]\lorri)l. balance of salary for 1898. . 

George E. Morrill, salary for year 1899 

George E. Morrill, commission on old taxes. . . 



$i::i7.50 

165.50 

5.00 

930.00 

496.00 

117.50 

J51.00 

152.50 

685.50 

135.00 

122.50 

88.50 

67.50 

262.50 

62.50 

68.50 

65.00 

327.50 

15.00 

292.50 

75.00 

212.50 

80.00 

52.50 

47.50 

25.00 

76.00 



$850.00 

600.00 

27.4:i 



$4,916.00 



I.VSPECTOKS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

John (I. Hutchinson, .'Jl days $69.75 

John G. Hutchinson, use of team 5.50 

J)aniel A. Murph3% 17 days 38.25 

C. C. Tinkham, 16 days 36.00 

(icorge Taylor, 20yo days 46.12 

I'otal cxiJOiKliturcs 

TraiislVrrcd to unappropriated money account 



$195.62 



$19,956.54 
2,043.46 



$22,000.00 



auditor's department. 371 

Auditor's Department. 
Appropriation $2,000.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

James E. Dodge, salary as auditor $1,200.00 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, services as clerk GGO.OO 

SUPPLIES. 

E. E. Babb & Co., pencil sharpener $3.00 

Barton & Co., cheese cloth, enamel cloth .83 

Clark M. Bailej% paper .78 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, cash paid for laundry- 2.85 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, postals, stamps, paper, type- 
writer ribbon " 11.25 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, sharpening knives, express, 

etc 3.01 

E. K. Coburn Co., blotting paper .50 

John B. Clarke Co., printing letter-heads, bills 23.75 

Daniels & Downs, paper 10.40 

James E. Dodge, paid for cleaning, delivering 

reports, express 2.40 

W. P. Goodman, books and stationery 8. 85 

Hale & Whittemore, frame and mat 1.35 

K. K. Home, water cooler 3.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., 1 brush 1.65 

Harry A. Piper, repairing doors, making shelf, 

platform 12.40 

Pike & Heald Co., 1 dish .40 

A. J. Smith, oil 1.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank books, bind- 
ing books 7.76 

John B. Varick Co., paper and twine 1.74 

George P. Wallace, carbon paper 3.25 



$1,860.00 



$100.67 



SUNDRIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice $6.05 



Total expenditures $1,966.72 

Transferred to unappropriated monej' account 33.28 

$2,000.00 



372 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Mayor's Incidentals. 
Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

W. C. Clarke, team hire $190.00 

W. C. Clarke, incidentals 58.55 

W. .J. Freeman, use of teams 7.75 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 

Street and Park Commission. 
AiJ])ropriation 

EXPEXDITURES. 
SALARIES. 

H. P. Simpson, chairman $000.00 

G. n. Stearns GOO.OO 

"Byron Worthen 600.00 

CLERICAL SERVICES. 

.Tiilia Stearns Frost $520.00 

George II. Stearns 4GS.00 

I'SE or TEAMS. 

If. IV Simpson $150.00 

<;. If. Stearns 150.00 

J'.yron Wortlien 150.00 

Ol rU'K SI PPI.IES. 

.lolm i:. ( larke Co.. piiiil iiij^' reports $:^r..:}0 

.l>'lm r,. Clarke Co., envelopes, bill heads, etc. ;J5.:{5 

\V. I'. Goodman, books and stntionerj' 4.35 

M()r;,'aii. Grossman & Co., stamps Ci.OO 

Temple A- l"\'irrington Co., books and statioiiciy I2.'.i5 



$300.00 



$256.30 
43.70 



$300.00 



$3,500.00 



$1,800.00 



$9SS.00 



$150.00 



REPAIRS OF IIKJnWAYS. 

SUNDRIES. 

C. S. McKean. repairing- chairs $!.■;.;},") 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone 36.90 

H. P. Stfupson, expenses of commission to 

Boston 7.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to nnapprojiriated money account 

Repairs of Highways. 

Appropriation $20,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 
account 2,146.59 



373 



$39.15 



$3,422.00 
78.00 



$3,500.00 



$22,146.59 



Expenditures. 

L.=VBOR. 

Division No. 2: 

April 

May 

June 

July 

Aug-ust 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 4: 

May 

June 

July 

Division No. '>: 

April 

May 

June 

Aug^ust 

September 

November 

December 



$467.44 
2,177.00 
1,523.49 
1,651.76 
1,464.92 
761.67 
1,152.11 
1,352.23 
1,051.33 



$113.25 
186.00 



$15.25 
196.25 
117.62 
166.00 
28.12 
5.00 
7.50 



$11,601.95 



$386.00 



$535.74 



374 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Division Xo. fi: 

April $32.37 

May 19.50 

Jjime 17.00 

Augrrist 34.00 

October 11.75 

December 32.87 



Division Xo. 7: 

January $14.60 

April 02.99 

May 325.35 

June 153.02 

July 115.75 

August 156.62 

September 178.00 

October 154.13 

November 78.03 

December 18.00 



Division Xo. 8: 

April $10.50 

May 9.88 

June 480.75 

July 467.59 

August 310.37 

September 14.10 

October 5.75 

December 21.50 



Division Xo. 9: 

April $42.:-'.-> 

May 68. .-.0 

Juno 167.00 

September Io0.2.') 

Xovembcr 71.25 



Division Xo. 10: 

April $52.25 

May 736.87 

June 484.13 

July 385.43 

August 796.53 

Scptenib.T 376.19 

Oclobcr 33S.S0 

Xovcm l)cr 519.17 

Drr.-iul.ir 231.90 



$147.49 



$1,286.38 



$1,320.84 



$499.25 



$3,921.38 



RRPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 375 

Division No. l:.': 

September $10.00 

October 284.20 

December 34.20 

$:i2S.40 



LUMBER, ETC. 

Adams Brothers, cement $0.00 

George H. Brown, jiosts 18.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 23.70 

David Wells, posts 87.48 

A. C. Wallace estate, lumber 214.42 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

A. X. Clapp $3.26 

J. Hadlock 33.50 

Manchester Hardware Co 18.91 

John B. Varick Co 139.71 



BLACKSillTHING AND REPAIRS. 

James Benson, sharpening- tools $2.93 

James H. Cram, sharpening tools 24.75 

Peter Duval, tHing" saws 10.40 

Wallace Laird, repairing- culvert and wall 50.00 

T. A. Lane Co., repairing- fountains 28.40 

C. S. [McKean, filing saws, etc ().40 

Pike & Heald Co., labor on pipes 15.19 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., repairs 915.J3 

C. L. Wolf, rei3airing watering-trough .50 



STONE, GRAVEL, CLAY. 

G. W. Campbell, gravel $8.50 

J. H. Coburn, stone 28.00 

W. H. Colby, gravel 5.25 

Byron Corning, gravel 21.00 

E. O. Dodge, gravel ' 1.30 

Mark E. Harvej', gravel 19.50 

Frederick Heine, gravel 25.00 

John Lovering, gravel 1 5.00 

Frank Libbey, gravel S.80 

Byron E. Moore, clay 7.50 



$344.20 



$195.33 



$1,054.38 



$139.83 



376 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SL.NDIIIES. 

James Briggs & Son, dippers $0.30 

A. B. lilack, agent, 1 Climax road machine 235.00 

J. H. Campbell, use of water one year 3.00 

Jdhn DriscoU Co., dippers and labor 38.50 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice for fountain 67.02 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 22.00 

Henry W. Barker, salt and lime 2.78 

Kobie Consolidated Concrete Co., repairing 

sidewalks 16.75 



New Highways. 

Appropriation $4, .500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 1,062.66 



Expenditures. 



$385.35 



Total expenditures $22,146.59 



$5,562.66 



Division No. 2: 
January 


T.ABOK. 


$107.20 




February 




74 43 




March 




29 25 




April 




41 00 




May 




245 38 




June 




48 57 




July 




185 75 








771.35 








581.68 




October 




287.47 




November 




342.74 
108.10 










$2,822.92 


Division No. 7: 
Mav 


$47.50 


June 




722.50 




July 




770.87 




August 




130 50 




November 




464.89 




December 




82.88 










$2,219.14 



SNOW AND ICE. 377 

Division No. 10: 

J line $.")4.75 

August 24.37 

November 214.15 

December 224.73 

$518.00 

TOOLS AND HAKDWAKE. 

John B. Varick Co $2.60 

Total expenditures $5,562.66 

Snow and Ice. 

Aiipropriation $10,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Commons: 
April $76.63 

Division No. 2: 

January $755.09 

February 1,881.94 

March 973.57 

April 707.24 

September 23.56 

October 26.82 

November 51.53 

December 92.64 

$4,512.39 

Division No. 4: 
February $70.00 

Division No. 5: 

January $11.00 

February 49.75 

March 18.13 

$78.88 

Division No. 6: 

January $28.87 

February 101.99 

March 20.25 

• $151.11 

Division No. 7: 

January $88.97 

February 259.55 

March 108.80 

April • 9.00 

$466.32 



378 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Division No. 8: 

Jannarj- $17.25 

February 02.90 

March 15.23 

$95.38 

Division No. 9: 

February $74.25 

Divi.sion No. 10: 

January $343.02 

February 742.23 

March 444.33 

April 322.74 

November 21.94 

December 77.00 

$1,951.26 

Division No. 12: 

January $132.87 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

G. H. Brown, wood $9.00 

Brooks & Brock, sand 83.20 

Austin Goings, sand 3.33 

Head & Dowst Co., material and labor 9.69 

John B. Varick Co., iron and steel 13.32 

$118.54 

Total expenditures $7,727.63 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 2,272.37 

$10,000.00 



Damage of Land Taken for Highways. 

Balance from last year unexpended $2,S.'»r).77 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 2,2G7.75 

■ $.-.124.52 

ExrENBITURES. 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., building fence for J. II. 

Kcynolds $50.00 

Anioskcag Manufacturing Co., castings 34.38 

Levi Dodge 12.15 

(Jcnrge S. Eastman 238.93 

Frank M. Goings 100.00 

Atidi.son Gray 800.00 

Head & Dowst Co., labor at Mitchell place 780.00 

Head & Dowst Co., labor at West .Manchester. . . 356.00 



WATERING STREETS. 379 

^raiK'liester Conci'ete Co., concreting- $106.82 

John Muir 729.51 

C. II. Robie Co., concreting- OOO.OG 

C. A. Shannon 200.00 

Joseph Wilkins 1,116.G7 

Total expenditures $5,124.52 



Watering Streets. 

Appropriation $4,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

Jan\]ary $11.76 

March 47.00 * 

April 24.25 

May 615.37 

June 547.99 

July 446.04 

^Viigust 498.06 

September 276.00 

October 74.28 

November 22.44 

December 55.50 

$2,618.69 



Division No. 10: 

May $172.00 

June 103.50 

July 136.00 

August 180.25 

September 106.50 

October 26.00 

November 3.25 

December 6.75 



SUPPLIES, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Abbott-Downing Co., 2 sprinkler tubs $160.00 

A. K. Hobbs, hose 8.80 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, labor 19.82 

Pike & Heald Co., repairs, labor on hydrants. . 11.59 

J. L. & H. K. Potter, washers, etc 8.00 

John E. Varick Co., hardware 89.00 



$794.25 



380 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



C. L. Wolf, pipe SI. 80 

J. \V. Wilson & Son, castings 2.00 

Total expenditures 

Ti'ansf erred to unapjiropriated money account 



$301.01 

$3,713.95 
286.05 

$4,000.00 



Paving Streets. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from 
account 



unappropriated money 



55,000.00 
337.64 



$5,337.64 



EXPEN-DITURES. 
% LAUOK. 

Division No. 2: 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 7: 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 10: 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



$375.02 

414.49 

225.56 

165.20 

31.13 

15.75 

50.38 

113.52 

$24.00 
18.00 

158.00 
45.00 
12.00 



159.75 
92.98 

$54.31 
197.56 
181.37 
59.18 
54.25 
10.01 
40.05 
49.96 



$1,391.05 



$566.85 



$646.69 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 



381 



PAVING STONE. 

C. A. Bailey $1,089.03 

W. H. Coburn 218.75 

A. G. Graj- 3.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Boston Jc Maine Eailroad, freight .$2.00 

Head & Dowst Co., himber and labor 1.41 

J. Hodge. 1 maul, lumber 2.84 

IkObie Consolidated Conerete Co., concreting. . 816.02 

Total expenditures 



$1,910.78 



$822.27 
$5,337.64 



Macadamizing Streets. 

Appropriation $10,000.00 

Received from water-works 7.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money . 

account 1,387.75 



Expenditures. 



$11,394.75 



LABOR. 

Division Xo. 2: 

March $43.30 

April 38.00 

May 283.00 

June 1,632.82 

July 1,684.41 

August 2,068.67 

October 483.49 

November • 1,543.32 

December C61.17 

Division No. 10: 
June 

FUEL, FRETGHT, WATER. 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight .$6.17 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 90.84 

F. X. Chenette, wood 75.75 

Manchester Water-Works, use of water 70.00 

Moore & Preston, coal 186.47 



$8,438.13 
$15.75 



382 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



People's Gas Light Co., coke $44.00 

J. P. Ptussell & Co., coal 30.00 

TOOLS AND HARDWAP^E. 

Manchester Hardware Co $123.72 

B. H. Piper Co 27.78 

John B. Varick Co 651.65 

IIATEEIAL, KEPAIES, ETC. 

Brown & Titus, cement $179.55 

A. B. Black, ag-ent, crusher plates, etc 61.82 

John Driscoll Co., dippers 1.20 

The Farrel Foundry & Machine Co., jaw plates, 

toggles, cheeks, etc. .' 52.49 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 5.96 

C. H. Hutchinson, labor on crushei', castings. . . 84.03 

The Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., supplies 47.45 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, burners, etc 29.70 

G. W. Paef, material and labor 16.05 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete, 

Hanover street 1,076.16 

N'acuum Oil Co., oil 79.53 

SUNDRIES. 

Daniels-Cornell Co., 1 hogshead 

Total expenditures 

Grading for Concrete. 

Appropriat Idii 

EXPENDITITBES. 

LABOR. 
Division No. 2: 

March $26.49 

May 217.37 

June 77.99 

July 163.81 

August 94.12 

September 34.57 



$503.23 



$302.15 



$1,633.94 



$1.50 



$11,394. 



$5,000.00 



SCAVENGER SERVICE. 383 

tk'tober $34.00 

November 111.80 

December 45.86 



Division No. 7: 

Maj' $:;i.00 

June 17.00 

September 16.38 

October 24.75 

Division No. 10: 

May $32.62 

June 51.13 

July 52.50 

August 70.63 

September 18.93 

October 12.37 

November 18.11 

December 19.35 



t STONE AND CONCRETE. 

C. A. Bailey, stone steps $33.00 

Warren Harvey, stone 688.16 

Manchester Concrete Co., concrete 52.50 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete 1,154.98 



SUNDRIES. 

Manchester Hardware Co., forcite $11.50 

Palmer & Garmons, cutting stone 2. SO 



Scavenger Service. 

Appropriation $15,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 2,633.20 



$806.01 



$89.13 



$275.04 



.928.64 



$14.30 



Total expenditures $3,113.72 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 1,880.28 



$5,000.00 



$17,633.29 



384 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



EXPENDITUKES. 



I^VBOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $679.43 

February 828.06 

Marcli 688.67 

April 1,191.58 

May 1,321.94 

June 702.90 

July 605.25 

August 737.36 

September 757.11 

October 5S6.92 

November 871.55 

December 648.95 

Division No. 7: 

January $68.10 

February 41.45 

:March 60.75 

April 97.75 

May 72.00 

June 55.63 

J uly 48.50 

August 59.12 

September 45.50 

October 58.25 

November 74.95 

December 93.53 

Division No. 10: 

January $166.47 

February 333.78 

March 212.82 

April 467.63 

May 600.63 

June 413.67 

July 466.88 

August 508.30 

September 361.12 

Octoljcr 254.00 

November 537.44 

December 323.83 

coNTnArr. 
Citv farm. scivt'iif'T service 



$9,619.72 



$4,646.5" 



STREET SWEEPING. 



385 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

John B. Variek Co $86.47 

LUMBER AND REPAIRS. 

Head iS: Dowst Co., lumber and lubor $6.37 

T. A. Lane Co., cutting- pipe .25 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor 15.30 

$21.92 

SUNDRIES. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing circulars, French and Engflish $23.50 

Total expenditures $17,633.29 

Street Sweeping. 

Appropriation $2,500.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

April $98.94 

May 311.53 

June 195.93 

July 243.74 

August 255.66 

September 185.99 

October 274.13 

November 222.93 

December 197.70 

$1,986.55 

Division No. 10: 

April $16.75 

May 25.75 

June 41.38 

July 22.00 

August 46.63 

September 10.00 

November 19.05 

December 2.81 

$184.37 



386 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUPPLIES. 

Hickory Broom Co., brooms and refilling- 

brooms $64.50 

H. Thompson, brooms 15.00 



Bridges. 

Appropriation $2,500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 27.27 



$79.50 



Total expenditures $2,250.42 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 249. 5S 



$2,500.00 



$2,527.2^ 



EXPENinTlRES. 
LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

May $S.6.1 

June SS.S."? 

July 224.72 

Auft-ust 63.44 

vSeptember 55.39 

October 30.75 

November 66.07 

December 2.50 

$540.33 

Division No. 6: 
June iF24.75 

Division No. 9: 
July $60.50 

Division No. 10: 

May !f 17-25 

ir. W. Harvey, lahoi- rcpairlno- stone ])itM-, .\nioskcat;- hridjro $132.25 

irMlUnt. ll.VKDWAliK. TAINT, ETC. 

Cavanau^li P.rothers. oak plank $69,61 

James 1'. i'"inii, ])aiiil and labor 85.51 

Warren llarvcy, iron wedpes, rods, etc 9. SO 

Head ,K- Dowst Co., lumber 121.19 

Head & 13o\vRt Co.. luiildiii^- and iiainlin-r 

bridges, Mosquito poiul S51.45 



CITY TEAMS. 

Oolin J'.. Varick Co., liardw ;iie .$(50.22 

A. C. Wallace estate, lumber 548.41 

Total expenditures 

South Manchester Playground. 

Balance from last year unexpended $19.87 

Appropriation 100.00 

Transferred from uuappiopriated money 

account 13.81 

• 

ExrENDITUBES. 
LABOR. 

Commons: 

April $3.00 

J uly 39.25 

Aug-ust 6.87 

November 21.87 

SUNDRIES. 

D. E. Guiney, re^iairing pumjDs $5.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 32.14 

John B. Varick Co., hardware, swings 25.55 

Total exj)enditures 

City Teams. 

Appropriation .$0,500.00 

Transferred from unapproin-iated monej" 

account 852.70 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $217.70 

February ! 248.30 

March 204.10 

April 213.75 



387 



$1,752.19 

$2,527.27 



$133. 



$70.99 



$62.69 



$7,352.70 



388 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

^lay $1(;9.00 

June 129.12 

July 11S.82 

Avigust 1G0.50 

October 144.50 

Xovember 191.99 

Division Xo. 10: 

Januarj' $21.00 

Februaiy 22.40 

March 19.72 

April 17.50 

May 18.25 

June 14.00 

July 18.00 

August 69.25 

September 17.25 

October 22.50 

Xovember 19.25 

December 19.25 

Commons: 

J une $U!9.i:i 

July 127.50 

August 100.72 

October S.75 

Xovember 8.75 

December 179.76 



(iRAIN, HAY, SIHAW. 

Ame & Co $30.00 

Adams Brothers 20.75 

Brown & Titus ],34n.57 

W. ir. IJoynton 200.04 

William Cleveland c^ Son 122.65 

Cage * McDougall 100.2:5 

J. V. Grant 16.:?0 

M. II. Cniy 1ST.50 

1{. Holhrook 11.65 

I. Jfuse 71.22 

Jonathan McAllister 67.24 

Partridge Brothers 94.02 

A. v. I'atten 8.;">2 

Joseph (,>uirin 45.28 

Tom W. I{.)l)ins()n 104.92 

v.. V. AVel.li 168.25 



$1,791 



$278.37 



$564.61 



$2,592.14 



CITY TEAMS. 889 
HARNESSES AND EEPAIRS. 

J. A. Ballou $128.55 

Kimball Carriage Co 104.50 

H. C. Eanno & Son 36.45 

John Silverg 5.50 

$275.00 

CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

Jolin T. Beach $100.25 

HARDWARE. 

A. N. Clapp $1.06 

Manchester Hardware Co .05 

John B. Varick Co 428.71 



HORSES, VETEBINARY EXPENSES. 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., attendance and medicine.. $72.95 

F. L. Bodwell, V. S., dressing- teeth 26.00 

Cavanaug-h Brothers, 2 horses 375.00 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., attendance and medicine.. 2.50 

J. L. Golden, V. S., liniment 12.00 

F. K. Hubbard, medicine 18.00 

W. B. Mitchell, medicine 7.40 

Tebbetts & Sonle, medicine, etc 2.25 



WATER, GAS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 7 tons coal $39.50 

Manchester Water- Works, use of water 84.42 

Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 75.00 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 153.93 

James Wvman. coal 19.00 



LUMBER, REPAIRS, ETC. 

James Briggs & Son, repairing sprinkler, etc. $2.89 

Hartwell Foundry Co., castings 21.60 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 82.71 

C. H. Hutchinson, labor on castings 5^5 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, etc 34.55 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe 1.54 

G. W. Kief, lumber and labor 6.34 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., concreting. . 20.03 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paint, glue, etc 9.11 

G. H. Warren, assignee, lumber 14.40 



$429.82 



$516.10 



$371.85 



$198.52 



390 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 

W. C. Bedell, harness riveter $1.00 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 72.00 

A. N. Clapp, oil 2S.G.J 

A. N. Clapp, matches, baskets, etc 2.71 

Eager & Co., soap 2.20 

People's Gas Light Co., 1 stove 1.40 

E. D. Rogers, axle paste 5.50 

C. H. Simpson, use of teams 3G.0O 

The Siilpho-Napthol Co., sulpho-napthol 15.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank books 2.36 

G. E. Wheeler & Son, use of teams 1.50 

Total expenditures 

Repairs of Sewers. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Overdraft, Brown & Titus 101.88 



$168.32 



$7,352.76 



$5,101.SS 



EXPEJfDITURES. 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 10: 

Marcii 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 



$23.48 

64.01 

9.23 

66.75 

274.92 

379.01 

228.82 

72.04 

141.92 

113.76 

5S3.34 

151.81 



$3.50 

6.50 

285.87 

91.12 
125.88 

87.00 
123.12 



$2,109.09 



NEW SEWERS. 



391 



October $50.63 

November i26.58 

December 40.12 

MATERIAL, IIAKDWABE, ETC. 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight $11.20 

Brown & Titus, cement 241.84 

Boston Belting Co., hose 610.G5 

A. N. Clapp, saw, nails .71 

John Driscoll Co., cesspool dippers 7.50 

Warren Harvey, stone 199.80 

W. F. Head & Son, brick 285.60 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe 155.64 

Palmer & Garmons, cutting stone .90 

C. H. Thayer, rubber boots 6.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 7.67 

C. L. Wolf, scoops 2.50 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$940.32 



$1,530.01 



$4,579.42 
522.46 



New Sewers. 



$5,101.88 



Appropriation $20,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 
account 416.66 



$20,416.66 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

May $336.20 

June 815.08 

July 37.15 

August 2,087.95 

September 1,471.99 

October 761.40 

November 9.02 

December 102.50 



$5,621.2' 



392 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Division No. 7: 

January $33.13 

April 12.50 

May 406.00 

June 215.89 

July 697.54 

Aug-ust 1,034.43 

September 068.50 

October 32.50 

November 512.30 

December 428.85 



Division No. 10: 

May $540.87 

June 347.99 

Aug-ust 194.38 

September 769.88 

October 378.97 

November 166.59 

December 105.49 



IIARX»WA1?E, TOOLS, SEWER PIPE. 



Adams Brothers, pipe $3.19 

A. N. Clapp, hardware 5.80 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe 1,820.44 

John B. Yarick Co., hardware and tools 575.32 



MATERIAL, LABOR, ETC. 

Carson Trench Machine Co., grates $9.50 

A. N. Clapp, oil 9.13 

W. I'. Fanner. nil.luT hoots 11.0(1 

Hartwell Foundry Co., g-rates, covers, traps, 

etc 1,246.06 

C. II. Hutchinson, labor on drills, etc 5.18 

The Ingersoll-Serg-eant Drill Co., supplies 222.04 



CEMENT, HRTCK, Ll'MBER. 

lirown & Titus. ciMnont .$791.85 

\V. F. Head & Son, bric-k 606.90 

Head & Dowst Co., Inmbcr 23.63 

Kimball Carriage Co., brick 150.45 

A. C. "Wallacf estate, liMnhcr 780.20 



$4,031.64 



$2,504.17 



$2,404.75 



$1,502.91 



$2,353.03 



COMMONS. 



393 



SUNDRIES. 

Amory ^Maiinlactury Co., sackiiiji- $2.r>2 

JSoston i*t Maine Kailroad, Ireifjlit 1,771.95 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 21.G6 

A. K. llobbs, leather, etc 1.95 

Moore & Preston, coal 89.50 

D. M. Poore, coal 50.04 

Luther Proctor, wood 4.00 

S. 15. Stearns, insurance ijolicy 50.00 

G. H. Warren, assignee, 1 cap for barrel .50 

C. ]j. Wing-ate, rubber boots G.75 

Total expenditures 

Commons. 

xVijpropriation $4,000.00 

Ti-ansferred from unappropriated money 

account 358.59 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

vSeptember 

October 

November 

December 

PLANTS, ETC. 

J. Chamberlen. tree 

A. F. Davis, pine brush 

A. G. Hood, plants 

Frank A. Koerner, plants 

The Kirby Floral Co., plants 

Lowell Fertilizer Co., fertilizer 

Manchester Hardware Co., seed 

Kay Brook Garden Co., plants 



$322.24 
271.25 
202.13 
182.99 
196.25 
184.49 
185.38 
196.81 
ir)4.50 
1 S9.00 
272.01 
184.02 



$1 .00 
11.00 
85.00 
20.00 
80.00 
84.00 
58.17 
101.00 



$1,998.87 



$20,416.66 



$4,358.59 



il.67 



$440.17 



394 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

WATER AM) KLECTKIC EIGHTS. 

Manchester Water-Works, vise of water $350.00 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 36.00 

EEPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., glass, puttj-, labor $3.6.) 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 5.05 

John T. Beach, 1 diimpcart 75.00 

D. F, Cresse3% blacksmith work 11.38 

A. N. Clapp, oil 5.29 

J. B. Corbiere, sharpening tools 2.3a 

W. P. Farmer, rubber boots 21.00 

Hartwell Fonndrj' Co., flanges 1.29 

C. H. Hutchinson, repairs 13.24 

J. Hodge, lumber 4.50 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 41.28 

T. A. Lane Co., labor and material, fountains. 

etc 34.29 

H. F. W. Little, keys and fitting- .75 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 4.30 

Harry A. Piper, filing- saws, etc 5.27 

Leander Pope, sharpening- tools 5.15 

Bobie Consolidated Concrete Co., repairs (537.94 

John B. Yarick Co., tools and hardware 67.52 

A. C. Wallace, labor sawing- and planing- lumber 19.20 

N. J. Whalen, harness leather l.oii 

Wing-ate & Co., rubber boots 2.75 

C. B. Wingate, rubber boots 14.55 



Stark Park. 

Appropriation :<:>()(). no 

Transferred fi-o7ii iiiiaiiproiii-i.ilfd inoiu-y 

account IS. 51 

lOxi'KNunrHEs. 

I,.\»OR. 



Ai>i-il 
]\ray 



$14.00 
104.50 



$386.00 



$970. 



SUNDRIES. 

Parnell Brothers, barrels $4.00 

Total expenditures .$4,358.59 



$518.51 



DERRYFIELD PARK. 



395 



June $00.00 

July 72.00 

August 90.r>0 

September .^1.50 

October 18.00 

November 52.00 

SINDKIES. 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on fenc-e .$20.77 

Manchester Water-Works, use of water 16. ,50 

John B. Yarick Co., hardware, etc 18.24 

Total expenditures 



$46:3.00 



$55..51 



$518.51 



Derryfield Park. 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 33.81 



EXPEXDITCRBS. 
LABOR. 

January $29.25 

February 12.50 

April 6.50 

May 384.00 

June 115.50 

July 130.75 

August 81.00 

September 82.12 

October 42.62 

November 47.62 

SLNDRIE.S. 

W. G. Berry, insurtmce premium $5.00 

A. S. Chadbourn, trees 12.00 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening tools 8.00 

D. E. Guiney, repairing pump 3.00 

H. F. W. Little, labor on observatory .56 

Manchester Water- Works, use of water 24.00 

John B. Yarick Co., hardware 49.39 

Total expenditures 



$1,033.81 



$931.86 



$101.95 



•396 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Lighting Streets. 



Aiipropriatioii $."):i,.")7o.00 

Ti'iiiisfen'ed from iin;i]i]iro]5riatcd iiionex' 

ac'cotint 74.58 



EXPENDITIRES. 
ELECTRIC LTGIITS. 

I^fanclipster Klectric. Co.: 

Cliarges. 

Jaimary $4. ;!."):!. ,1.") 

February 4.407.02 

^farch 4,408.3.'] 

April 4.408.33 

May 4,408.33 

Jnne 4,408.33 

July 4.408.33 

August 4.408.33 

September 4.408.33 

October • 4.408.33 

Kovember 4,408.33 

December 4,408.33 

$52,844.27 
Loss (lis.-omit 106.42 

G.v.«;. 
People's (ias Light Co.: 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

Seplfinhcr 

Oclolxr 

Xovcrnh.M- 

Dcccnili.'r 

( AKi: OK CAS .\M> on, l.AMI" 

William i'.rooUs 

K. I'. Cogswell 

Frank \V. IMllott, to .l.inn.iiy 1, luon 

Josej)!! Coodwiii 

Mary K. ]{ee(l. to DiMt-nilxr 1, IS'.in 



.$55,049.53 



niscounts. 


$9.77 


14.40 


8.03 


8.46 


3.46 


1.64 


5.26 


8.35 


8.68 


11.54 


16.38 


10.45 



$100.42 



$51.. -.2 
40.00 
.•!7.00 

:ir.i3 

31!. 25 

:{).25 

27.00 
28.00 
.•'.0.00 
33.00 
40.50 
4.;. 2 5 



$229.80 

343.68 

15.48 

1.:M2.00 

9.00 



$52. 



4;;o.90 



$1,900.96 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 



397 



SUPPI.IIiS. 

Clark M. I5ailey. founts. Avicks $2.50 

A. X. CLtpp, naplitha :J77.77 

A. X. Chipp, oil and chimneys 23.81 

Mary 4;]. Heed, oil, etc 6.00 

John 15. Varick Co., glass, matclics, etc 20.29 

C. L. Wolf, labor and stock, gasoline lanterns. . 89. .50 

SIMJIUES. 

Henry Cote, use of teams $10.00 

W. J. Freeman, use of teams JO.OO 

C. H. Simpson, use of teams 5.00 

Total expenditures 



$519.87 



$45.00 



$55,649.58 



Ap])rn]iriati( 



Engineer's Department. 



KxriCXDITlRE- 



$5,400.00 



I-ABOR. 

Samuel J. Lord, (engineer $1,183.12 

Harry J. Briggs 774.20 

Alfred Dodge 023.61 

George W. Wales 849.93 

Harrie ^M. Young- 739.55 

Ella Barker Davis 4(i:!.74 

SUPPLIES AND OFFICE EXPENSES. 

American Express Co., express ,. $3.70 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing- 150 reports.. 18.80 
Carter's Ink Co., coupon book for- typewriter 

ribbons 4.50 

E. R. Coburn Co., stationery 10.41 

Dodge <$: Straw, rubber boots 3.75 

(i. W. Dodg-e Shoe Co., rubber boots 7.00 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 6.54 

W. & L. E. Gurley, balance on exchange of 

tripods 55.00 

W. & L. E. (iurley. supplies 34.00 

K. K. Home, 1 pan .38 

W. F. Hubbard, grade stakes 42.50 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage .93 

Kenrt'el c<: Esser Co.. su|)piies 47.55 



$4,634.15 



398 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Kimball C'arria{>'e Co., repairing- blanket $1.25 

The Lyon I'latinum Pen Co., pens 6.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 2.32 

Morgan, Crossman ct Co., stamp, pad, ink, etc. 4.75 
New Eng-Iand Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 44.47 

E. a. Soltmann, tape, blue print, etc 106.74 

Treworgy Ink Manufacturing- Co., ink 1.50 

Temple ct Farring-tou Co., stationery 35.03 

Union Manufacturing- Co.. numbers 45.00 

John 15. Varick Co., crayons .42 

C. H. AVood, varnishing- tripod, etc 1.2.") 

John Wiley & Sons, 1 table .44 

Yawnian t\L- Erbe Manufacturing Co., 1 Shannon 

cabinet :!0.07 

SrXDKIES. 

Pike iS: IlcaUl Co., bench marks on hydrants, 

etc $100.00 

ITarrie M. Young-, expenses to Nashua and re- 
turn 1.53 



i:.\ri:M)iTruKs. 

SKKVICKS. 

John C. P.ickford, salary as nu-mbcr of board, 

y.-ar i-nding February I. IMi'.i $-J00.00 

W. M. Parsons, M. D.. salary as nuMuber of 

iM.anl. year ending l-\'l)ruary 1, IS'J'.i ;.Mt0.00 

\V. K. IJdbbins, salary as member of board. 

year cmling- February 1. IS'.tO 200.00 

\V. 1!. lUakc, sanitary inspector 76:>.no 

John l-\ bouncy. saiiitar\ ins|)cct()r 744.75 

Carl (>. Seaman, pbimbing inspector 7S0.00 

M. Alma Fracker. clerk 416.00 



$514.30 



$101.53 



Total expenditures $5,249.98 

Transferred to una])pro|)riated money account * 150.02 

$5,400.00 



Health Department. 

Appro])riatii)n $4,766.00 

Overdraft, .lolni li. \ari(k Co 43.17 



$4,809.17 



$3,305.75 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 399 

1'J{1.\ IIN«; AM) STATIONKHY. 

A. S. Campbell «Sr Co., 200 notices , $2.00 

.John 15. Clarke Co., i)riiitin,y bulletins H().00 

John 15. Clarke Co., .iOO reports l'.).GO 

Jolin^I}. Clarke Co., circulars and blanks 64.72 

E. 11. Coburn Co., stationery and books 7.00 

$129.32 



TEAMS. 

W. C. Blake, car fares $40.25 

W. 15. IMake. job teams 6.25 

J. P. Brown & Co., use of teams 42.00 

F. X. Chenette, use of teams 7.50 

C. S. Fitield, use of teams 6.00 

F. E. James, use of teams :].00 

John F. Looney, ear fares 29.05 

Carl O. Seaman, car fares .70 

B. F. & K. W. 'Welch. use of teams :i.50 



PESTHOrSE. 

Judith Sherer, board, sundry ])ei's()iis $41.76 

<1. W. Whitford, wood and coal 10.00 



si I'PLIES FOR ISOLATED FAMILIES. 

W. B. r.lake. wood and medicine $5.90 

Thomas E. Barr, milk ,3.30 

J. IT. DeCourcy Co.. coal 1.50 

J. B. l)aii>Te, i^roceries 15.89 

Besrochers & T'oirier, groceries 19.93 

firanite State (irocery Co., groceries 3.49 

L. K. Ciauvin, groceries 13.43 

John F. Looney, wood and groceries 4.80 

A. W. ]\rorse, groceries 3.78 

Xoyes &' Prince, g-roceries 6.31 

Parnell P.rothers, groceries 19.76 

11. B. Beynolds, board, room, etc 21.35 

T. F. Sheehan, g-roceries 7.50 

Summer Street Market, groceries 41.52 

Schricker l>rothers, g-roceries 10.98 

F. H. Thurston, prescriptions 1.18 

Calixte Vig-neaidt, groceries 14.29 

Henry AVeber, groceries 11.33 

C. A. Williams, medicine 33.90 

Mrs. J. A. Westover, board. Adelaide Church 

and nurse 10.26 

IX A. Watson, coal 9.25 



$138.25 



$51. 



$259.65 



400 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



OFl'ICR lOXPEXSES AND SIPPI.IES. 

P.atiseh t^^- Lomb Optical Co., cedar oil, supplies $3.82 

W. r>. r>lako, paid for express and telephone.. 1.42 

Carter. Kice & Co., gummed paper 4.05 

Alma Fracker, paid for laundry 2.20 

Alma Fracker, express, keys, stamjis 7.65 

John B. Hall, antitoxine 8.80 

C. A. lioitt & Co., repairing chair .25 

J. F. Looney, iiaid for express, tacks, etc .')() 

Library lUireavi, 1 oak card index 15.00 

Library Bureau, 1 oak case 27.50 

Manchester Mills, wood alcohol ;];5.75 

Manchester Telephone Co., use of telephone. . . . 22.50 
New England Telephone & Telegraiih Co., use 

of telei>hone 41.05 

Parke, Davis & Co.. culture tubes .').:)(> 

Harry A. Piper, labor on lock .50 

Rhode Island Label Works, gumnu-d i)apci- 1.60" 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 8.28 

Carl O. Seaman, matches, mantles, cliimney 1.40 

F. H. Thurston, antitoxine 17.00 

John P.. A'arick Co.. wood alcohol 265.97 

John I!. \"arick Co., paper, lock, scissors 2.47 



SIX DRIES. 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., 1 visit 

L. M. Aldrich & Co., taking off wiiulows 

\V. B. lilake, disinfecting \Yilson schoolrooms 

W. B. P)lake, expenses at lake, etc 

James S. I'.rown. .\I. I)., (Ii|)hthevia exaniinatinu 
Alfred lleaiiclicsiu'. burying dogs 

C. E. Crombie, removing and biiiying deer.... 

D. F. Cressey, repairing grapple 

F. X. Chenette, piini|)ing cellar 

John F. Looney, cliloridc of liuic, hnisli. hnry- 

'"«• tlog 

New Hamjjshire College, analyzing water 

Cliarli s L. I'arsons, analyzing samples 

I'ik.' A II. 'aid Co., pipe, (lanipcrs. r\r 

W. K. i;()l)l)ins, exp.tiscs atteiiiliiig nu-etiiig of 

A ri.-.in I'uhli,- llralth Associal ion 

W. K. K'ul.l.illS. MICMlh.Tship W'C 

A. (i. Striw. M. I)., diplilhcria examination 

Carl (). Seaman, expenses to Concord - 



$2.50 


1.75 


2:!.75 


13.14 


1.50 


2.00 


3.00 


1.05 


18.00 


2.47 


10.00 


5.00 


20.22 


58.50 


5.00 


61.00 


3.66 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 



401 



Carl O. Seaman, 7 keys $1.2.') 

G. L. Tatro, use of boat 5.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$239.39 

$4,.594.25 
214.92 

$4,809.17 



Repairs of Schoolhouses. 

Appropriation $5,500.00 

Transferred from unai)i)ropriated money 

account 1,000.00 



Expenditures. 



$6,500.00 



MASONWOEK. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing- Co $41.98 

D. McAuliffe & Sons 150.91 

B. W. Eobinson 474,39 

Z. B. Stuart 411.35 

PAINTING AND GLAZING. 

J. J. Abbott $219.21 

J. A. Avery 9.20 

W. J. Powers ,50 

W, H. Sullivan 198,56 

John A, Saro-ent 655.44 



PLUMBING, IRONWORK, REPAIRS, 

Amoskeag Manufacturing- Co., material and 

electric work $27,78 

Carl W, Anderson & Co,, repairing clocks 4,75 

American Ghie Co., indurine 3,00 

S. C. Austin & Co., repairing lightning rods... 20.00 

F, S, Bodwell, stone and labor 10,60 

C, B, Brown, roofing material and labor 151,62 

Burlington Venetian Blind Co,, 12 pairs hangers ,75 

Brodie Electric Co., electrical repairs 23.20 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electrical supplies and labor 37,78 

W, M, Darrah & Co., material and labor 7.28 

G, H. Dudley, material and labor 577.83 

Head & Dowst Co., fittings for physical labor- 
atory 600.00 



$1,078.63 



$1,082.91 



402 REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, glass, labor $237.89 

J. Hodge, molding, blinds, etc 53.28 

James W. Hill Co., repairing shades 1.75 

C. H. Hutchinson, repairing grates 28.22 

R. D. Jenkins, repairing chairs 1.35 

Thomas A. Lane Co., plumbing material and 

labor ' 784.79 

H. J. Lawson, material and labor 31.05 

Manchester Heating & Lighting Co., mantles, 

etc 2.10 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware .30 

Mendell & Co., material and labor 21.55 

Palmer & Garmons, stone cutting l.GO 

Pike & Heald Co., ijlumbing, cleaning stove 

pipes 362.35 

B. F. Shepard, repairing locks, etc 6.85 

G. E. Spaulding, plumbing 983.71 

Standard Electric Time Co., repairs, expenses 

of man from Waterbury, Conn 27.58 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks 9.50 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing 3.07 

John B. Varick Co., rope, etc .SO 



$4,028.33 



CONCRETING. 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co $230.91 

SUNDRIES. 

C. F. Jack, paid for cutting grass $9.75 

J. G. Jones, freight .29 

Pay-roll, commons, Ma,y 15.00 

Pay-roll, commons, August 12.87 

Pay-roll, commons, November 7.00 

Frank Russell, cleaning vaults 25.00 

Edward Sears, reevmg ropes for flags 8.88 

$78.79 

Total expenditures $6,499.57 

Transferred to unappropriated money account .43 

$6,500.00 



Printing and Advertising. 
Appropriation 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 403 

Expenditures, 

sundries. 

K. Bechard, printing placards $5.00 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing- postals, etc 8.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing- cards, lists, blanks 254.88 

Total expenditures ' $267.88 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 32.12 

$300.00 



Books and Stationery. 

Appropriation $100.00 

Expenditures. 

sundries. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks, circulars $21.25 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 6.30 

O. D. Knox, postmaster, stamps and cards 15.00 

Star Stamp Co., 1 stamp , .50 

E. E. Stockbridge, envelopes 5.40 

Total expenditures $48.45 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 51.55 

$100.00 



Furniture and Supplies. 

Appropriation $1,300.00 

Expenditures. 

physical and cheincal apparatus, supplies, etc. 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co $97.11 

Tebbetts & Soule 144. f.9 



HARDWARE, ETC. 

E. M. Bryant & Co., labor and material $41.20 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 22.38 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing repairs 14.81 

Manchester Hardware Co., shovel, cord, etc... 6.10 

B. W. Robinson, masonwork 13.75 

John B. Varick Co., hardware, sponge, brooms, 

etc 244.22 



.$241.80 



$342.46 



$17.00 


56.00 


6.75 


1.35 


15.35 


74.35 


78.60 



404 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 

BOOKS A^'D STATIONERY. 

American Book Co 

E. E. Babb & Co 

Milton Bradley Co 

E. R. Cobiirn Co 

Earle Ink Co , 

W. P. Goodman 

B. F. King & Co 



FURXITUBE, ETC. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., oil, jioker $10.83 

Barton & Co., curtains 2.67 

F. W. Blood Roofing Co., 1 mop wringer 2.50 

P. C. Cheney Co., mop waste 9.25 

A. B. Colby, pokers, etc 1.25 

G. W. Davis, oil .50 

Nelson H. Earle & Co., ink 4.85 

T. F. Fifield, oil 4.24 

A. L. Franks & Co., bell 2.00 

E. D. Cay, shades, fixtures, etc 11.85 

W. H. Huse, 1 ladder 1.30 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., desk, chairs, tables, etc 32.64 

A. K. Hobbs, piano covers, cloth, pegs 15.93 

A. K. Hobbs, hose and lawn sprinklers 24.50 

A. C. Hovey, mop wringers 10.00 

T. F. Hannaford, brooms 4.80 

J. L. Hammett Co., map, flag 9.40 

James W. Hill Co., flags, bunting, etc 28.95 

C. F. Jack, paid for curtains and making 1.88 

Kimball & Hobbs, chair tips 20.77 

G. F. King & Co., rulers, globes, bells 7.20 

Manchester Heating & Lighting Co., fire tools 7.40 

F. E. Nelson, basins, cups, water cooler 7.70 

Pike & Heald Co., mat, broom, cups, etc 25.00 

G. S. Perry & Co., mat, brush, bell, etc 15.61 

The Prang Educational Co., solids, sticks, boxes S.05 

Henry A. Parker, soap 2.50 

People's Gas Light Co., stove, tubing, etc 3.10 

Rand, McNally & Co., maps 39.50 

Edith M. Stebbins, sash curtains 2.18 

G. E. Wentworth, 2 sweepers 2.25 

F, W. Woolworth & Co., brush, jug, etc .30 

Watertown Thermometer Co., 24 thermometers 10.00 



$249.40 



$330.90 



FUEL. 



405 



SUNDRIES. 

A. X. Clapp, seed, oil $1.00 

A. F. Davis, shrubs 3.00 

Joel Daniels & Co., brushes 1.90 

C. F, Jack, paid fox- sash curtains, etc 2.05 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos 11.25 

Florence H. James, 13 daj-s' labor 9.75 

E. D. Jenkins, reiiairing- chairs 2.55 

J. G. Jones, cartag-e 3j50 

A. Z. Jenkins, pitch loi^jes 2.63 

C. H. Kimball, repairing drum 2.35 

Kasson & Palmer, subscription to "Education," 

1 year 3.00 

Manchester Mills, soap 6.00 

Eead Holliday Sons, disinfectants 15.00 

C. A. Trefethen, repaii'ing clocks 12.25 

F. H.'Thurston, germol 17.50 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$93.73 



$1,258.29 
41,71 



$1,300.00 



Fuel. 



Balance last jear unexpended 
Appropriation 



$768.16 
8,800.00 



$9,568.16 



Expenditures. 



COAI,. 

Boisclair & Eaiche, 15 tons , $86.25 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 185 tons, 210 lbs 1,694,53 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 463,545 lbs 3,140.30 

W. E. Dunbar & Son 11.50 

J. H. DeCourcy Co., 30 tons 172.50 

Flint, Haskell & Flint, 20 tons 115.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 51 tons, 1,925 lbs. 246.75 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 36,555 lbs 32.54 

Moore & Preston, 123 tons, 375 lbs 574.25 

D. M. Poore, 42 tons, 930 lbs 245.17 

J. P. Eussell & Co., 10 tons 57.50 

J, F, Wyman, 10 tons 57.50 

Wilson & Bryant, 63 tons 318.60 



$6,752.39 



406 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WOOD. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co $2.00 

J. M. Clark 132.01 

W. E. Dunbar & Son 401.62 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co 5.50 

J. Perham 265.15 

Wilson & Bryant 2.25 

SUNDRIES. 

A. B. Fellows, sawing wood 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappi'opriated money account 



$S0S.J4 



$7,563.18 
2,004.98 



Contingent Expenses. 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated mone.y 

account 1,700.00 

Expenditures. 

freight and cartage. 

F. P. Colby $7.50 

J. G. Jones . . . .- 54.58 

"WATER, GAS, EXECTRIO LIGHTS. 

:Manchester Electric Co., electric lights $42.75 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 276.19 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 184.68 

Water commissioners, use of water 1,132.00 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Amoslceag Manufacliiriug Co., drawing boards. 

lumber $<'-t.79 

■Nellie M. Atwood, ])ai(l lor carrying water 18.50 

W. E. Buck, use of team 76.00 

Boston Music Co., music 16.64 

Boston Bank Note Co., dii)loinMs 212.10 

James Cash, carrying water 7.00 

E. K. Coljiini Co.. statioiicrv 2.00 



$2,700.00 



$62.08 



$1,635.62 



CARE OF SCHOOLROOMS. 



407 



Oliver Ditson Co., music $20.82 

Daniels & Downs, engrossing diplomas 48.50 

Clarence I. Drayton, carrying water 9.00 

Curtis W. Davis, use of team 150.00 

Emma J. Ela, paid for carrying water 3 8.50 

Frank W. Fitts, ribbon for diplomas 18.95 

Percy Folsom, carrying water 2.50 

Ginn & Co., music 28.61 

John Gault, expenses to Portsmouth 3.00 

James W. Hill Co., repairing flags 1.75 

George Holbrook, clearing snow off roof 3.00 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., use of chairs 11.80 

S. B. Hope, carrying music teacher to suburban 

schools 90.00 

C. F. Jack, paid for shoveling snow ' 80.55 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning- pianos 10.25 

G. M. Morse, carrying water 7.00 

W. J. McGuiuess, tuning pianos 5.50 

Manchester Mills, soap 8.00 

Byron E. Moore, carrying water 3.00 

Piper & Mclntire, rent of piano 25.00 

Pay-roll, division No. 2, January 12.38 

Paj'-roll, division No. 2, March 8.00 

Silver, Burdett & Co., music 3.20 

Darwin A. Simons, use of chairs 12.00 

Inez M. Warren, jiaid for carrying water 11.50 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unapprojiriated money account 



$989.84 



$2,687.54 
12.46 



Care of Schoolrooms. 



$2,700.00 



Appropriation 



.$0,500.00 



Expenditures. 

jat^itoks of schoolnouses. 

John S. Avery $600.00 

Nellie M. Atwood 37.00 

Edwin N. Baker 349.99 

S. H. Batchelder 441.61 

Robert Cook 537.50 

William F. Conner 499.99 

Charles H. Corev 70.80 



408 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



James Cash $13.25 

Fred W. Gate 40.20 

Clarence I. Drayton 17.25 

Emma J. Ela 40.00 

Rose Elliott 14.00 

Percy N. Folsoni 5.00 

Alfred M. Hueber 21.00 

F. D. Hansconi 99.19 

Varnum If. Hill 499.99 

Charles F. Jack 600.00 

George H. Jack 166.66 

Walter F. Knowlton 3.00 

W. H. H. Nichols 57.20 

W. H. Xewry 472.51 

W. J. Powers ' 600.00 

Fred E. Perron 34.50 

Josie L. Piddle # 23.00 

D. T. Pobinson 350.00 

William Stevens 399.96 

Jason{ N. Whitcomb 41.66 

Inez M. Warren 37.00 

J. S. Washburn 204.19 

SUNDRIES. 

Nellie M. Atwood, paid for cleaning $2.50 

Irving M. Corning, labor cleaning 18.00 

Rose Elliott, cleaning 2.00 

C. F. Jack, ijaid for cleaning 81.30 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$6,276.45 



$103.80 



$6,380.25 
119.75 



Evening Schools. 



$6,500.00 



Appropriation 



$1,200.00 



ExrKXDITUHES. 



SALARIES. 

Annie I!. Angell $56.00 

Florence Abbott 27.00 

L. ir. Carpenter 21.00 

J. B. Cavanaugh 56.00 

Herbert S. Clough 48.00 

Charles E. Cocliran 114.00 



EVENING SCHOOL. 



409 



Honorie J. Croiigh $120.00 

W, W. Forbes , 56.00 

Margaret G. Linen 59.00 

Mae L. Lovejoy 59.00 

William J. :Mooar • 59.00 

A. W. Morgan 118.00 

Margaret E. McDermott 49.00 

W. II. II. Nichols 14.00 

M. E. Paige 57.00 

A. W. Eowell 56.00 

Elizabeth F. Walsh 59.00 

SUNDRIES. 

T. P. Burke, janitor $7.00 

F. W. Gate, janitor 9.20 

Varnum H. Hill, janitor 47.20 

J. G. Jones, truckage 5.05 

T. A. Lane Co., lamps 3.20 

Oscar Perkins, janitor 30.00 

Union Electric Co., lights 52.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$1,028.00 



$153.65 



$1,181.65 
18.35 



$1,200.00 



Evening School.— Mechanical Drawing. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

salaries. 

H. W. Allen $72.00 

John M. Kendall 75.00 

SUNDRIES. 

E. Pv. Coburn Co., paper $35.00 

W. E. Goodwin, bicycle hub 2.00 

John P. Varick Co., triangles 6.72 

Total e-spenditures 

Transferi'ed to unappropriated money account 



$400.00 



$147.00 



$43.72 



$190.72 
209.28 



$400.00 



410 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Teachers' Salaries. 

Balance from last year iinexpeiiflecl .*S,10S.OO 

Appropriation 81,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 272.21 

.$89,440.81 

Expenditures. 

salaries. 

December, 1898 $8,1G8.G0 

January 8,142.45 

February 8,09f)..jl 

March 8,429.00 

April 8,181.88 

May S,2o0.0G 

June 8,354.28 

September 6,72.'].91 

October 9,110.85 

November 9,10)1.50 

December 0,81 5.71 

Total expenditures $89,440.81 

Free Text-Books, 

Appropriation . $5,000.00 

ExPENDITUREvS. 

FREE TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

American Book Co $488.02 

Allyn & Bacon 81.90 

E. E. Babb & Co ; 420.02 

Boston School Supply Co 402.75 

T. H. Ca.stor & Co 54.97 

John B. Clarke Co .- 22.30 

The Crimson & White 8.50 

Eaf?le Pencil Co 20.00 

Kd>u;ational I'ublisliinp;- Co 1.00 

r:Mi-lf Tnk Co 27.40 

I'rost A- Adams Co 1.32 

\V. P. Coodnian 20.15 

(iinn iK: Co 990.11 

.1. L. Tlaninictt Co .' 143.35 

I) C. IlfMlli A- Co 98.71 



MANUAL TRAINING. 



411 



a. F. King & Co $490.31 

King-Richardson rnblishing Co 117.41 

Longmans, Green & Co 1,80 

Charles E. Lauriat Co 2.00 

IMaynard, :Merrill & Co 39.28 

New England Publishing Co 3.00 

Perry Picture Co 1.40 

Prang Educational Co 371.33 

Eand, McNally & Co 112.11 

Sibley & Ducker 28.81 

Benjamin H. Sanborn & Co 95.61 

Silver, Burdette & Co 41.76 

Thompson, Brown & Co 331.68 

University Publishing Co 18.30 

John B. Varick Co 6.80 

SUNDRIES. 

W. E. Buck, express, freight, etc $21.37 

J. G. Jones, truckage 13.52 

Fannie L. Sanborn, clerk in superintendent's 

office 500.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated monej' account 



Manual Training. 



Appropriation 



$4,460.76 



$534. 



$4,995.65 
4.35 



55,000.00 



).00 



EXPENDITXJEES. 



SUNDRIES. 

F. E. Brown, paid for repairs $3.20 

Chandler & Farquehar, lathe 65.00 

E. R. Coburn Co., paper 1.40 

Mrs. N. J. Davis, laundry 2.00 

W. F. Hubbard, lumber sawed and planed 45.70 

A. K. Hobbs, leather belting 19.60 

J. Hodge, lumber 84.93 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage 8.65 

T. A. Lane Co., labor, electrics and gas 46.13 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 3.50 

Manchester Electric Co., 1 motor, etc 196.41 

Palmer. Parker & Co., gumwood 3.08 



412 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

W. C. Toles & Co., vises $87.75 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 32.65 

New Boiler, Training School. 

AiJXJropriation 

Expenditures. 

Leach & Mattoon, freight $20.70 

Edward McCabe, 1 boiler 325.00 

B. W. Eobinson, work on boiler v 53.80 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to new boiler, Main-street account 

New Boiler, Main Street. 

Appropriation $400.00 

Transferred from new boiler, Training- school 

account .50 

Expenditures. 

Leach & Mattoon, freight $21.20 

Edward McCabe, 1 boiler 340.00 

B. W. Robinson, labor on boiler 39.30 

Total expenditures 

High School Furniture. 
Ai)[)ropriation 

KXI'ICNDITUHES. 

Hey wood Bros. & Wykefield Co., desks and seats 

Transferred lo unappropriated money account 



$400.00 



$399.50 
.50 



$400.00 



$400.50 



$400.50 



$:;50.oo 



$178.00 
172.00 



$«50.00 



CITY LIBRARY. 413 



City Library. 



Balance from last year unexpended $1,598.56 

Appropriation 5,000.00 

Overdraft, Boston Bookbinding- Co 20.54 



Expenditures. 



LIBRARIAN AND ASSISTANTS. 



Florence E. AYhitclier, librarian $900.00 

Carl C. Eraser 143.50 

Clinton C. Ilosmer 76.05 

L. B. James 333.36 

Ray Stearns 14.25 

Mills G. Sturtevant 20.10 

Frank Pherson 1,20 

W. C. Swallow 30.55 

George W. Swallow 448.86 

Albert J. Towne 57.95 



$0,619.10 



$2,025.82 



CATALOGUE AND CATALOGUE SUPPLIES. 

Librarj^ Bureau, index cards, paper, binders.. $14.65 

Louise E. Newell, copyist 303.00 

Edith O. Simmons, copyist 404.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., cards, slips, paper 35.59 

M. li. Warren Co., mucilage 1.50 

BINDING, REBINDING, AND RESEWING. 

F. J. Barnard & Co $90.87 

Boston Bookbinding Co 107.28 

Temple & Farrington Co 351.49 

WATEH, LIGHTS, FUEL, INSURANCE. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood $2.25 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 120,080 lbs. coal 300.76 

Clarence M. Edgerly, insurance premium 125.00 

Manchester water commissioners, use of water 16.00 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 5.48 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 333.46 



NEW BOOKS. 

Trustees of citv library $1,000.00 



.99 



$555.64 



414 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDKIES. 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing- 300 reports.. $11.05 

The John B. Clarke Co., "Daily ]Mirror," 1 year 6.00 

N. P. Hunt, postage 1.40 

C. F. Livingston, printing covers 125.93 

Temple & Farrington Co., envelopes .75 

Florence E. ^Vllitcller, cash paid for cleaning. . 7'J.49 

$224.62 

Total expenditures $5,354.02 

Transferred to new account 1,265.0S 



$6,619.10 



Fire Department. 



Appropriation 



$66,000.00 



Expenditures. 



SERVICES. 

Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer $1,300.00 

Frank M. Frisselle, assistant 175.00 

Clarence R. Merrill, assistant 175.00 

John Montplaisir, assistant 175.00 

Eugene S. Whitney, assistant 175.00 

teamsters' and engineers' pay-roll. 

January , $2,283.06 

February 2,283.43 

March 2,288.89 

April 2,288.93 

May 2,332.18 

June 2,346.14 

July 2,364.43 

August 2,452.68 

September 2,437.14 

October 2,360.93 

November 2,383.68 

December 2,333.14 

CALL MK.NinEltS. 

Engine Company No. 1 $1,600.00 

Engine Com])any No. 1, ext ra lalior 8.00 

Engine Company No. 2 1,680.00 

Engine Company No. 2,' extra labor 8.00 



$2,000.00 



$28,154.63 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



415 



Engine & Ladder Company No. li $2,285.00 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 3, extra labor 8.00 

Engine Company No. 4 1,G90.00 

Engine Companj'- No. 4, extra labor 8.00 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 5 2,441.66 

Engiiie et Ladder Company No. 5, extra labor. . 8.00 

Engine & Ladder Companj' No. G 2,450.00 

Engine & Ladder Comjjany No. 6, extra labor. . 8.00 

Chemical Engine Company No. 1 475.00 

Chemical Engine Company No. 1, extra labor. . 4.00 

Hook & Ladder Company No. 1 1,820.00 

Hook & Ladder Company No. 1, extra labor. . . . 8.00 

Hose Company No. 1 1,685.00 

Hose Company No. 1, extra labor 8.00 

Hose Company No. 2 1,685.00 

Hose Companj^ No. 2, extra labor 8.00 

Hose Company No. 3 , 920.00 

Hose Company No. 3, extra labor 8.00 

OTHER LABOR. 

F. O. Bartlett $90.75 

Peter Burke 2.50 

Irving Bryant 21.00 

Herbert E. Dunbar 103.50 

John W. Finn 1.50 

Alfred Firth 21.00 

Charles Gillette 3.00 

Louis F. Kettell 9.00 

Eomeo Lemay 4.25 

A. Laberge • 2.00 

Alcide Provencher 6.75 

F. W. Tebbetts 42.00 

Thomas Smith 66.00 

LAUNDRY. 

Mrs. J. E. Cutler $5.42 

Mrs. Charles Cutler 14.66 

Mrs. M. H. Hulme 49.28 

L. A. Lamson 18,17 

Mrs. F. F. Porter 28.00 

Mrs. Margaret Powers 59.22 

Mrs. S. E. Reed 5.40 

;Mrs. L. A. Sawyer 18.55 

Mrs. C. C. Tinkham 28.26 



$18,905. 



$373.25 



$226.96 



416 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



fi:r^-iture, etc. 

James W. Hill Co., pillow slips, satine, etc. 

labor 

A. C. Hovej', mop wringer, pail 

C. A. Iloitt & Co., bedding, furniture 



$38.00 

,j.30 

81.90 



$125.26 



PKINTIXG AND STATIOXEKY. 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing 400 reports 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 

The Nate Kellogg Co., printing cards, circu- 
lars, etc 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 

Chemical Engine Company No. 1 

Engine Company No. 1 

Engine Company No. 2 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 3 

Engine Companj^ No. 4 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 5 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 6 

Hose Company No. 1 

Hose Company No. 2 

Hose Company No. 3 

Aerial Truck Company No. 1 



;3S..50 
4.95 



4.23 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

io.oo 

10.00 
10.00 



$189.93 



WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, TELEPHONE. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of tele])hones $2.")7.C1 

People's Gas Liglit Co., gas TT0.07 

Union Electric Co., lights 70.43 

Water commissioners, use of water .■>r)0.7j 

FUEL. 

Annis Flour & Grain Co., wood $10.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 42 tons coal 330.r,0 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 489,220 lbs. coal 1,190.29 

Fletcher Brown, wood 1">.00 

S. L. Flanders, wood 9.75 

1 REIGHT AMI CARTAtlE. 

Loadi & Mattoon $t'.7G 

J. W. Wilson A Sr)n 1.00 



$1,G04.8G 



$l.r)01.54 



$8.36 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 417 

SUPPLIES. 

Amoskeag- .Manufacturing- Co.. 4 steel bars.... $8.50 

IJoston Belting- Co., hose 63.30 

Clark M. Bailey, waste 32.64 

Cincinnati liegalia Co., 50 hatbands 5.40 

Cavanaiigh Brothers, 5 horses 1,000.00 

Cornelius Callahan Co., hydrant gate 35.00 

Cornelius Callahan Co., bottles, straps, sponges, 

Boston pipe, etc 210.57 

W. E. Decrow, adjusting- striking- machine... 10.00 

Baiiiels-Cornell Co., soap 24.00 

L. G. Flanders, matches 2.40 

S. L. Flanders, oil, etc 3.15 

T. F. Fifield, oil, sugar 5.10 

H. Fradd & Co., oil ' 1.00 

D. W. Fisher & Co., dusters 10.00 

T. F. Hannaford, brooms 4.75 

Kimball & Hobbs, i^acking- .10 

T. A. Lane Co., lamps and chimney 2.00 

^Manchester Locomotive Works, valves, iron, etc. 16.57 

Pike & Heald Co., copjjer, measure, tank, etc. 4.15 

Plumer & Holton, reefers, overalls, jackets 198.75 

C. N. Perkins & Co., hose, etc 17.35 

F. O. Pierce Co., bicarbonate of soda 34.00 

Stark Mills, duck .48 

Stovene Manufacturing Co., metal polish 12.00 

Sulpho-Xapthol Co., sulpho-napthol 24.00 

Talbot Dyewood & Chemical Co., soda 19.27 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil 6.50 

•John B. Yarick Co., hardware 246.37 

X. J. Whalen, soap 1.00 

LI. F. Whittier, oil 1.00. 

$1,999.35 



PLUMBING, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Brodie Electric Co., repairing Instruments, etc. $29.71 

Boston Belting Co., repairing hose 3.50 

(i. B. Forsaith, labor and material, hose 4.04 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 7.41 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 11.98 

C. H. Hutchinson, castings 3.25 

T. A. Lane Co., lamps, sockets, switches, etc... 50.68 

H. F. W. Little, filing saws .50 

^Manchester Locomotive Works, repairs 28.40 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor on lights, 

ete 5.10 

Edward Sargent, repairs on Chemical .70 



418 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

C. A. Trefethen. repairing- flocks, ilask $2.00 

I'liion Manufacturing- Co., plating .50 

D. B. Varney, castings, sawdust 2.80 

VETKinXARY SERVICES AM) MEDICINES. 

A. F. Abi)ott. \'. S., services and medicine $134.6.") 

J. Alexander, V. S., liniment 6.00 

C. M. Bailey, V. S., services and medicine.... 18.50 

Frank J. Clark, tixing horses' teeth 2.50 

Cavanaugh Brothers, horses and care 2S().10 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., services and medicine :!1.55 

Dyer & Chi]iman, medicine, etc 9.08 

Lamprey & Dow, alcohol and witch ha/.el 15.60 

A. D. Smith, medicine 11.9;> 

Snelling & Woods, medicine, etc 15.45 

F. L. Way, witch hazel 1.75 

CAinUAdR liEPAinS. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., iron shafts and 

truck castings $1 .2:5 

John E. Hobbs, set runners for hose carriage 75.00 
Manchester Locomotive Works, repairing en- 
gines 2,20;!.95 

Donald McDonald, repairs and material 239.75 

,1. i;. McCrillis & Son, repairs .'5:39.27 

1 ;. \'. Kowe, cash paid for material for sled 14.48 

Sanl)oni Carriage Co., repairs ll.:50 

lU.ACKSMlTIIINO. 

,r. M. liiouillcttc $12.50 

A. 15. Colby ]8;!.-l'> 

Connor & Grossman 14.00 

Tliomas Ilickey > 32.50 

.John McSweency 2:S5.25 

John N. Peavey 20.50 

.1. (). 'ri-cmi)hiy lliirscslioeiug Co 117.25 

1,. I', -rn'u. l.h.y li'^-OO 

.loliti F. Wocdhury Co 107.00 

MAY, (;l!.\l.V, ETC. 

.\d:iuis iiiollicrs $94.94 

llrnu., .V iilus- 422.2S 

A.lMiu Di.Ur.N 72.93 

Cage iV McDougall 1,2 17. (u 



$150.57 



$521.11 



$2,884.98 



$890.45 



FIRE-ALAKM TELEGRAPH. 419 

C. R. Merrill $2,<)?.2.43 

Jonathan McAllister 27.46 

J. F. McCannon 20. Gl 

Partridg-e Brothers 224.59 



^ HARNESS REPAIRS AND SIPI'LIES. 

W. H. Adams $123.40 

J. A. Ballon 12.15 

Charles E. Beri-y 8.53 

J. Hurd Brown 3.25 

W. E. Greeley 1.80 

H. C. Eanno & Son , . . . 83.46 



SUNDRIES. 

James Baldwin Co., sawdust $0.40 

W. B. Core}', use of horses 111.75 

Cavanang'h Brothers, use of horse 19.50 

E. H. Holmes, use of horse 10.00 

John Horrigan, switch and labor 1.27 

T. W. Lane, paid for express, etc 6.85 

Edward Sears, reeving- ropes 5.00 

Edward Sargent, repairing hose .40 



Fire-Alarm Telegraph. 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 500.00 



EXPENDITIRES. 
LABOR. 

January $52.00 

February 48.00 

[March 54.00 

April 50.00 

May 54.00 

June 52.00 

Julv 48.00 



$5,042.91 



$232.59 



$155.17 



Total expenditures $65,087.58 

Transferred to unappro]Driated money account 912.42 

$66,000.00 



$1,500.00 



420 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

August $.54.00 

September 52.00 

October 52.00 

November 52.00 

December 4G.00 

$014.00 

E. A, Sears $8.50 

SUPPLIES. 

American Electrical Work.s, wire $95.69 

Anchor Electric Co., supplies 33.54 

James Baldwin Co., brackets 1.14 

I?rodie Electric Co., rewinding- ticker magnet. . 2.45 

Fletcher Brown, poles 37.50 

James J{. Carr Co., paint 6.79 

W. E. Decrow, supplies 255.85 

J. Hodge, lumber 25.51 

C. H. Hutchinson, hooks, iron, st-rcws 1.2.> 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on pipe 1.79 

Morgan, Crossman & Co., stamp .t)5 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 1 set 

"Come-alongs" 5.55 

Edward Sargent, keys .30 

John n. Varick Co., hartiware 33.9S 



SIN OKIES. 

W. B. Corey, cartage $S.50 

Leach <Sr Mattoon, cartage 2.85 

John W. \Yilson & Son, cartage .60 



'i'olal expcTuiitures 

Transleired to mi:ii)i)r()i)riate(l money aeeonnt 



$501.99 



$11.9; 



$1,500.00 



Hydrant Service. 

Ap|)r<)priat ion '<'1^-1"000 

l':\rF.Nl)ITll!KS. 

AVater commissioners, n-nt of hydrants $1S.100.00 



Police Department. --Station. 

A|.|.n>inialion 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



421 



Expenditures, 
services. 
Frank P. Wiggin, janitor 

WATER, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, FUEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 20 tons coal $11;-). 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 182,230 lbs. coal 443.37 

F. X. Chenette, wood 14.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 10 tons coal 57.50 

Manchester Water- Works, use of water 175.92 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 48.22 

E. Y.'Tureotte, 1 cord slabs 4.50 

Union Electric Co., electric lights 607.88 

J. F. Wj'man, 2 tons coal 13.50 

LAUNDRY, SANITARY, ETC. 

Maiy Barrett, cleaning $4.05 

Mary Bartlett, cleaning 3.86 

Clark if. Bailej', pails, dusters, matches, etc... 15.87 
John Driscoll Co., wash boiler, mop handles, 

ash barrels, etc 10.45 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap 12.50 

J. X. Lacourse & Co., soap 1.00 

Lavasa ^Manufacturing Co., 1 barrel Lavasa.... 6.42 

John Morley,. cleaning 90.80 

Joseph Sikes, cleaning 15.30 

F. H. Thurston, germol 17.50 

F. H. Thurston, medicine 16.55 

John B. Varick Co., dustpans, brooms, etc.... 1.78 

Mrs. J. F. Wiggin, washing 62.36 

REPAIRS. ETC. 

J. J. Abbott, paint $12.71 

E. M. Bryant & Co., washers, switch .70 

D. F. Cressey, repairing chains, bunks, etc.... 13.01 

E. E. Coburn Co., 24 flags 1.00 

W. E. Dealand, repairing clocks 3.00 

James W. Hill Co., felt, towels 7.54 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., repairing chairs. 1 mirror. . . 1.60 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing, etc 35.28 

B. F. Shepard, repairing lock, elc .50 

Harry A. Piper, labor and material 1.13 

Temple & Farrington Co., repairing clock 1.50 

G. E. Wentworth, brushes 5.55 

C. L. Wolf, cleaning stoves and pipes 5.30 



$638.75 



$1,479.89 



$258.44 



$88.82 



422 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

L. B. BocUvell & Co., ice $7.44 

T. F. Fifield, oil 1.10 

W. D. Ladcl & Co., crackers 4.90 

Edward Sears, reeving- ropes 5.00 



Total cxixMnlitm 



$18.44 



Total expenditures $2,484.34 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 315.611 

$2,800.00 



Police Department.— Court. 

Appropriation $2,900.00 

Transferred from im:i|)|)ro|)riatc(l money 

account 38.94 

.$2,938.04 



KXPENDITIRES. 
SERVICES. 

John C. Bickford, clerk $000.00 

Isaac L. Heath, police justice 1,500.00 

Georffe Prescott, associate justice 300.00 

$2,400.00 

rRINTINd AM) STATIONKRY. 

A. S. ('anii)lH'll & Co.. ])riiitin<^- civil dockets, etc. $10C).00 

John B. Clarke Co., ])rintin<^- blanks 12.00 

W. P. Goodman, stationery .85 

Tcnit)lc & Farrinffton Co.. stationery 2.13 

' $120.98 

SINDRIES. 

Ilcalv and Cassidv, coiivcyiiii;' |)risoncrs .$25.00 

M..K Ilcalv. i>ai.l\vitnc.ss* Ices, etc 392.90 

• ' $417.9fi 



$2,938.94 



Aiipropriati 



Police Department.— Commission. 

$40,000.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 423 



Expenditures. 



SERVICES. 



Michael J. Healy. chief of police $2,000.01 

John F. Cassidy, deputj- chief 1.500.00 

Harrl? Loveren, chairman of commission, salary 150.00 

F. P. Carpenter, commissioner, salary 100.00 

X. S. Clark, commissionei", salary 100.00 

\. B. Brown, police matron 423.00 

Kegular patrol 29,982.13 

Extra time 56.82 

Special patrol 2,779.79 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



FEEDING, PKISONERS. 

Hannah Green $284.40 

W. D. Ladd & Co 20.80 

Joseph Quirin 17.70 



John B. Clarke Co.. printing' envelopes, head- 
ings $10.50 

E. K. Coburn Co., stationery 3.50 

W. P. Goodman, books and stationeiy 44.95 



PATROL SYSTEil EXPENSES. 

A. F. Abbott, V. S.. attendance and medicine.. $6.00 

Ame & Co., Standard Food 9.75 

W. H. Adams, repairing- harnesses 9.10 

American Electrical Works, vitriol, wire 25.48 

Antomatic Time Stamp & Register Co., ribbons 12.00 

E. M. Bryant & Co., 1 spring .15 

Clark & Estey, chamois, etc 3.85 

William Corej', boarding horse 16.00 

City farm, carrots 15.00 

The Electric Gas Lighting Co., snpplies 2.28 

Gordon Battery Co., glass cells, recharges 151.30 

Kimball Carriage Co., repairing harnesses 13.40 

T. A. Lane Co., 1 roll tape .25 

Love joy & Stratton, badges 8.50 

Municipal Signal Co., 1 circuit closing (iroji 10.00 

C. E. Merrill, hay, straw 304.08 

W. F. Xye, harness dressing 10.20 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., rent 

of private line to November 30, 1900 114.00 

Pettingell-Andrews Co., electric supjilies 118.55 



$37,091.75 



$322.90 



$58.95 



424 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repairs $58.50 

J. F. Woodbury Co., horseshoeing- 68.05 

N. J. Whalen, repairing halter .35 

Ziegler Electric Co., supplies 71.74 

IIARDWAKE AND KEPAIKS. 

J. J. Abbott, paint $20.32 

Amoskeag' Manufacturing* Co., repairing- elec- 
tric plate 1.25 

E. M. Br^-ant & Co., material aiul labor 4.96 

G. B. Forsaith, labor 2. SO 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 18.11 

T. A. Lane Co., socket, plug, etc .85 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 71.36 

Pike & Heald Co., rubber bulb, making box... 2.82 

John B. Yarick Co., hardware 4.97 

D. B. Varney, lumber l.OS 

G. H. Warren, lumber 4.64 

TEr.EPlIONK AND TKLECiKAlMl. 

Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones $233.50 

Western Union Telegraph Co., telegrams 9.20 

IJU-YCI^E KEl'AlliS. 

John C. r>adger $7.50 

EdgaF L. Cooledge 8.25 

D. B. Hutehins 12.00 

Leon E. Magoon , .... 8.10 

John Nixon 12.25 

E. E. Whrdon 11..50 

STNDRIES. 

r.oston A- Maim- Kailroad. In-ight $0.48 

V. C. CluMic.v Co., waste 8.80 

l.yman \V. (olhy. piiotograjiliing criiuiiials. . . 47.00 

J. C. Kllinwdod, photograpliing criminals 4.00 

A. K. lIol)l)s. washers .10 

Kinil)all & Uobbs, rnbber and cement 2.00 

I', ir. 'i'liiirslon. iir»scrii)1ions lillc.l l.sO 

( liinn M;Miiir:ictiM-iiig Co., iii.-k<'l plating .10 



$1,028.53 



$244.70 



$59.60 



$64.28 



Total cxprnditiin's $39,003.87 

'I'ransfcn-cil lo nnappropriatcd money acconnt 996.13 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 425 

Repairs of Buildings. 

Balance from last year imexpeiulfd $1,104.99 

Approi)riati()ii ;i, .500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 419.49 

• $5,084.48 



EXPENDITX'RES. 
CITY I.rBI{.\RY. 

D. .T. Adams, repairinij- door check $2.00 

J. J. Abbott, glass and setting 3.25 

James Briggs & Son, hose and ash barrels.... 10..50 

C. B. Brown, roofing material 47.96 • 

]]arton & Co., linoleum 216.25 

E. M. Bryant & Co., lamps 17.74 

F. W. Blood Booting Co., repairing roof 7.8.3 

James R. Carr Co., kalsomine and labor 2.89 

W. M. Darrah & Co., material and labor 5.44 

A. L. Franks & Co., lamps 28.89 

(ieorge Holbrook, removing snow, lumber, jetc. 50.40 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing repairs, etc 5.45 

J. Y. McQueston Co., chair and tables 14.00 

I'ike & Heald Co., repairing radiator, gas pipes 22.29 

Harry A. Fiper, sash and labor 1.85 

Bobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concreting. . 39.38 

Joseph St. Laurent, lumber and labor 32.60 

Z. B. Stuart, mason work 25.55 

B. F. Shepard, repairing locks, etc 12.65 

W. H. Sullivan, paint and labor 41.17 

J. Tremblay, rei^airing* rod 1.00 

John B. Varick Co., wringer 2.00 

'- $591,09 

I'Or.ICE STATION. 

C. B. Brown, roofing material $50.30 

Joel Daniels & Co., paint 13..39 

Eastman Brothers, masomvork, repairing locks 4.20 

(Jeorge Holbrook, repairs 2.75 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing repairs 1()1.59 

Manchester Concrete Co.. concreting wagon 

room 130.67 

C S. McKean, repairing chairs, etc 67.17 

]\rerrill & Laird, repairing steam boiler, locks. 

etc 77.36 

Stendorfer Bronzing Co., bronzing radiators.. 68.00 

Joseph St. Laurent, laying floors, etc 233.37 

B. A. Simons, duck, excelsior, labor 5.94 

John B. Varick Co., oil 1.50 

$816.24 



426 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



ENGINE lIOrSES. 

C. B. Brown, roofing material, etc $55.0!) 

J. F. Burton, 1 chimney caj) 9.00 

James R. Carr Co., painting, glazing, etc 64.65 

Joel Daniels & Co., setting glass 14..30 

W. M. Darrah & Co., material and labor 11.82 

A. L. Franks & Co., lamps, labor 1.3.70 

G. B. Forsaith, grates 103.30 

W. E. Goodwin, plumbing, etc 47.89 

George Holbrook, material and labor 3.25 

J. Hodge, glass, etc 1.20 

James W. Hill Co., 3 shades 2.65 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 1.53 

J. B. Huntley, plumbing, etc 41.73 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on steam pijjcs, etc 58.80 

F. S. Lewis, repairing roof 5.68 

J. H. Mendell & Co., clai)boards and lalior 6.66 

Charles F. :McI)onald, ])himbing material and 

labor 33.70 

Merrill & Laird, repairing chimney 27.24 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing material and lal)or 128.62 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co.. concrcling.. 79.20 

John A. Sargent, paint and labor 18.26 

James A. Scully, matting, etc 86.58 

Joseph St. Laurent, lumber and labor 1,145.79 

John H. ^'arick Co., ])aint. screen cloth 22.60 

C. L. Wolf, phiuibing material and labor 221.57 

(■OUKT HOUSE. 

J. J. Ai)l)()1l. whiU-wash, l)rush. etc $1.85 

James Briggs & Son, i-cpairing gralc .85 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.. 1 gralc and labor 46.20 

G. B. Forsaith, labor on grates 2.00 

A. K. Hobbs, hose and red fi.25 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing material and labor 16.30 

Manchester Hardware Co., lawn rake .70 

Merrill & Laird, repairing steam boiler 25.76 

Joseph St. Laurent, lumber ami labor 4.75 

John J?. Varick Co., tools and hardware 10.22 

SCHOOLS. 

Chi.kcring .^;- ()•(• icll, bronze tablet $36.00 

John Cainpl..-ll, |.osts ]0.00 

Ilobie Consolidated ( oncrctc Co., rcjiairs 23.59 

J. F. Seaward. Iciicc, one lialf cost 15.3.3 

Jo.seph St. Laurent, carpenter work, etc 121.59 



$2,204. 



$114.SS 



$206.51 



AMOSKEAG SCHOOLIIOUSE. 



427 



BATTERY BUILDING. 

James E. Can- Co., paint and labor $120.43 

J. B. Huntley, plumbing- material and labor. . . 49.4,3 

H. J. Lawsou, iron, solder, nails, labor 19.64 

Johu ^v. Wilson, material and labor 20.41 

SrXDRIES. 

John Bryson, paint and labor, city hall $29.87 

James Briggs & Son, furnace grate and labor, 

ward 5 ward room 11.00 

James R. Carr Co., paint and labor 53.91 

Connor Brothers, plumbing-, ward 5 ward room 47.79 
John Driscoll Co., labor on furnace, ward 5 

ward room 12.00 

W. A. Elliott, labor at ward 2 ward room 2.83 

P. Fifty, paint, glass, labor 11.11 

James P. Finn, labor at pesthouse 8.64 

W. E. Goodwin, gas piping-, ward 2 ward room ' 13.67 
Head & Dowst Co., material and labor, sundry 

places 72.09 

James W. Hill Co., duck, etc 1.54 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing, citj^ hall .25 

Merrill & Laird, repairing chimney, city scales 8.45 

C. C. Perry, use of team 5.00 

G. W. Reed, use of hack ; 5.00 

Joseph St. Laurent, bookcase, engineer 45.50 

Joseph St. Laurent, lumber and labor, sundry 

places 178.30 

James A. Scully, 14 chairs 17.74 

C. A. Trefethen, care of tower clocks 345.30 

C. A. Trefethen, changing weights, sundry 

schoolhouses 51.50 

John P.. Varick Co., screen cloth, etc 4.78 

John K. Wilson, plank, spikes, labor 12.84 

Total expenditures 

Amoskeag Schoolhouse. 

Balance from last year unexpended 

EXPEXDITURES. 
ARCHITECT. 
Chickering & O'Connell 



$209.90 



$941.11 



$5,084.48 



$894.66 



$214.2.-^ 



428 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDIUES. 

J. H. :MeiKlcll & Co., extras and grading $580.75 

JNIanchester Concrete Co., concreting 99.(38 

$080.43 

Total expenditures $894. 6<') 

Pearl-Street Schoolhouse Repairs. 

Balance from last year unexpended $33.75 

EXPENDITTRES. 

Manchester Concrete Co., labor, basement $33.75 

Water-Works. 

Balance from last year unexpended $33,928.08 

Cash received from water rents 133,436.41 

$167,364.49 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

.January ' $1,384.82 

February 1,687.20 

March 1,437.71 

April 1,306.85 

May 2.203.51 

June 1,988.34 

July 1.861.72 

August ~.~1 ^-"^^ 

September ^ ,723.24 

October 1.S02.30 

November 2.198.81 

December l.i.!,!.19 

$21,546.12 

E. J. Daniels, lalx.r *:>2.10 

Kobert I. Stevens, labor and t.ani "-.OO 

Street and park commissioners, lepairiii^- r.t"fcii 

street '^■^^ ^ „ ,« 

$42.10 



(!Km;i!AI. km'F.nsk 

Henry Cliaiuller. salary as clerk of Ix-ani, 
Ib-nry Chamller, 17 meetings of l.oani 



$100.00 
68.00 



WATER-WORKS. 



429 



William C. Clarke, IS meetings of board $72.00 

Frank Dowst, 14 meetings of board oO.OO 

F. AY. Elliott, dinners for help repairing gears 17.00 

Alphens Ciay, 27 meetings of board 108.00 

Charles H. -Manning, IG meetings of l)oard.... 64.00 

Charles T. .Means, 17 meetings of board 68.00 

Harry E. Parker, 17 meetings of board 68.00 

C. A. Scarbor, supper and lunches 63.50 

li. L. Tatro. use of boat 10.00 

A. C. "Wallace estate, 1 meeting of board 4.00 

(;. W. Wales, dinners 4.00 

C. K. Walker, salary as superintendent 1,999.99 

C. K. Walker, gas 21.46 

C. K. Walker, express and telegrams 15.68 

C. K. Walker, postage 20.00 

C. K. Walker, sundries 21.32 



$2,780.95. 



PRINTINO, STATIONEKY, ADVERTISING. 

John ]'.. Clarke Co., printing bills, blanks, 

notices $100.90 

John ]i. Clarke Co., printing (i'jO reports and 

plates 49.00 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising 1 line 19 times 4.75 

E. E. Coburn Co., stationery 9.43 

ilumford Printing Co., 2 half-tones 4.99 

Stewart, W'arren & Co., day and meter books 56.60 
Union Publishing Co., advertising 1 line 17 

times 4.25 

TEAMS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 40 tons, 1,270 lbs. coal.. .$254.06 

Fred E. James, use of teams liJ>0 

.Mitchell Coal & Coke Co., 65,900 lbs. coal 85.34 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 112.22 

J. A. & A. W. Walker, 235 tons, 1,800 lbs. coal. . 826.40 

LAND. 

Estate of J. F. Cahill. land $175.00 

Ellen M. Tyrrell, land and buildings ^,250.00 



$229.9S 



$1,289.52 



$1,425.00 



LEGAL SERVICE.S. 

W. H. Drurv. making deeds, etc $15.00 

Dana W. King, recording deeds 1.85 

William Morrill, recording deeds, etc 2.90 



$19. 



430 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



DAMAGES. 

Barlow & Nye. daning-e to floods from water. . .$28.9.1 

E. R. Barry, dainafire to g-oods from water 6.5. OS 

E. Booth, damage to fruit from water 98.40 

Ada Cro.ss, final .settlement of claim for dam- 
ages for death of Bert S. Cross 2,")0.00 

E. Dordoni, damage to fruit from water 1.50.00 

Eastman B.rothers, repairing brick wall, cel- 
lar under W. A. Ingram & Co.'s store 11.2.5 

Tilton F. Fitield, damage to goods from water 27.00 
W. A. Ingram & Co., damage to goods from 

^vater 10.00 

M. F. Sherry, damage to goods from water. . . . 40.00 

BLACKSMITIIING, FHEIGHT, HARDWAKE. 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight $1,65.3.1.1 

A. B. Colby, sharpening tools, etc 5.50 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening tools 207.59 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 43.65 

John B. A'arick Co., hardware 516.98 

SUPPLIES. 

J. J. Abbott, 12 rolls paper $3.00 

Adams Brothers, cement and linic ;',4.95 

American Steam Ciauge Co., suj)i)lies 122.00 

Boston Lead Manufacturing Co., solder 17.34 

Builders' Iron Foundry, branches, reducers, etc. 206.01 

Chadwick Lead Works. ])ii)c 33.23 

A. X. Cla})p, kerosene 42.15 

Chapuian Naive Maiuitact iiring Co., gear, spiu- 

(II. ■, etc 25.44 

1*. C. Cheney Co., waste 4.1.'. 

S. P.. Dickey, manure S(i.25 

ICdson Manufacturing Co., puiu]) lu>ad. socket 4.9(1 

(iarlock Backing Co., packing 5.92 

Claiiber lirass .Maiiufact ui'ing Co., curl) stojis. 

nipples, etc ;!;;o.90 

ll;i\s Mi lactui-iiig Co.. stop boxes 220.00 

(. II. Iliilcliiiisoii, I Mm.' cleaner 2.50 

Ih^ad iV- Ddwsl Co., liiniUcr 54. S9 

.). ilodgc, meter boxes, Inuibcr 70. 61 

A. K. Ilobbs, ])ackiug 26. 5S 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., steam drill 194. SO 

Ingersoll-Scrgcaiit Drill Co.. supplies 20.00 

Kiniiiall A- ll.ibbs, w.islicrs 2.25 



$680.66 



.$2,426.85 



WATER-WOKKS. 431 

1\ M. Kemp Maniifnetiiriii'^- Co., ratt-liol stocks $12.80 

T. A. Lane Co., washers, g-lasses, ete 25.53 

Lead Lined Iron Tipe Co.. pipe 1,051.58 

J^eonard «Sr Ellis, oil 48.48 

Lndlow Valve ^fannfaetiiriiifi- Co., i^ates, etc.. 264.95 

J.,ynn Electric Xoveltj- Co., searchlights 7.20 

-Manchester Locomotive Works, castings, labor, 

etc ;i92.32 

-Mc>seal i'ipe cV: Foundry Co., pipe 7,879.06 

Flora A. Miller, dressing 107.25 

Neptune Meter Co., meters, couplings, etc 283.95 

ISJorwood Engineering Co., hydrants, etc 722.65 

National Meter Co., meters 241.22 

I'erry Oil Co., oil 106.97 

Pratt & Cady Co., pipe 6.25 

Tike & Heald Co., valves, ells, unions, etc 30.09 

Rensselaer Manufacturing Co., gates 200.00 

Rice & Co., pipe 18.89 

Richards & Co., lead 1,853.38 

C (I. Stevens, manure 81.00 

L F. Stnrtevant, lumber 19.30 

Taunton Locomotive Manufacturing- Co., cast- 
ings 3.96 

Thomson Meter Co., meters 376.20 

I'nion Water Meter Co., meters 630.14 

I'. S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co., offsets 23.03 

D. B. Varney, covers 2.00 

(j. R. Vance, dippers, pails, etc 6.95 

A. C. Wallace estate, lumber 96.48 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., soap 3.84 

G. E. Winslow, indicating and receiving appa- 
ratus 175.00 

G. C. Whorf & Co., washers 1.75 

Henrj' R. Worthington, valves, floats, springs 367.43 

W. A. Wood & Co., waste 44.16 



TJEPAIRS. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., material and 

labor changing gears $52.80 

John T. Beach, repairing skids 2.75 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electrical work 724.60 

Head & Dowst Co., material and labor 246.25 

C. H. Hutchinson, repairs 10.20 

Hersey Manufacturing Co., repairing meters.. 35.56 

E. A. G. Holmes, labor and material 92.16 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on lights, etc 7.93 

Manchester Concrete Co., concreting 36.20 



$16,585.72 



432 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

National ^Nleter Co., repairing- meters $119.87 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor 2.61 

C. H. Eobie Concrete Co., concreting- 246.00 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concreting-.. 142.77 

A. & E. E. Keed, masonwork I.'J.OO 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paint and labor 787.62 

Gustav and Henrietta Schlaugk, rig-ht of way to 

lay and maintain water pipe in their land. . . . 100.00 

B. F. Shepard, repairing locks 2.20 

Thomson Meter Co., repairing- meters .39.46 

Union Water Meter Co., repairing- meters 287.16 

Sl'NDRIES. 

Town of Auburn, taxes $17.'}. 97 

Dudley & Dougherty-, plans and estimates 21.00 

J. G. Ellinwood, 12 photographs 9.00 

Fred L. Follansbee, moving- buildings 7,"). 00 

Amos Latuch, drawing wood 41. .38 

L. D. McDonald, cutting and delivering- poles.. I.jO.00 

Sarah C. Pennock, taxes, etc 105.40 

Putney & Wallace, board of diveis 11.50 

Sinking fund commissioners, amount of sink- 
ing fund 5,000.00 

Sinking fund commissioners, hydrant service 18,100.00 

Ci. W. Townsend, services as diver 86.55 

J. W. Wilson & Son, work at station 9.00 



?2,949.74 



$23,782.80 



Total expenditures $73,759.13 

Transferred to intiTcst account 39,551.00 

Transferred to neu- account 54,054.36 



$167,364.49 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

.\|)pro])riati()n $8,500.00 

i;ecei\("(l from t ruslccs of cenietery tiiml 300.00 

'i'ransfcrrcil Irom nnappropriatcd ni(ine\' 

account 3S.09 



l-:xri:M>iTruES. 

i..\noK. 

.la una i-y $155.26 

l-".hi-nary 209.70 

March 154.76 



i;S,03S.09 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



433 



April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

Septembei" 

October 

November 

December 

PLANTS, TREES, LOAM, ETC. 

Brown Brothers Co., trees 

A. S. Chadboiirn, trees 

R. G. Chase Co., ornamental trees 

City farm, lawn dressing 

A. G. Hood, lawn dressing, plants, etc 

Joseph Poor, gravel 

James Thompson, 690 loads loam 

John B. Varick Co., seed 

Mrs. C, C. Webster, 429 loads clay 

Wilson & Bryant, Icam 



.$20.1.01 


807.44 


722.97 


49.->.2a 


• 04-)..^! 


.537..'50 


.352.75 


579.25 


154.76 



$16.00 

7.50 

20.00 

16..50 

321.37 

8.80 

1,035.00 

11.90 

429.00 

93.00 



$5,079.94 



$1,959.07 



WATER, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Manchester water commissioners, use of water 
New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 

Wilson & Bryant, coal ^. 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing receipts, etc 

E. E. Coburn Co., stationery 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 

O. D. Knox, postmaster, envelopes 

W. E. Moore, printing circulars, etc 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

John Driscoll Co., dippers 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 

Hampden Corundrum Wheel Co., 1 sharpener.. 

3\. K. Home, flower pots 

C. H. Hutchinson, labor on fence, etc 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe and labor on water pipes 
Palmer & Garmons, repairing and setting stones 
28 



$692.70 



51.99 
25.00 




$2.75 
7.09 

14.55 
4.15 
1.70 

23.51 

24.25 
5.00 



$769.69 



$23.18 



434 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Pike & Ileald Co., dippers and repairing stove 

J, F. Seaward, lumber and labor 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, whitening ceilings 

C. H. Eobie Concrete Co., repairs 

G. R. Vance, iron and nails 

Jolin B. Varick Co., hardware and tools 

C. L. Wolf, pipe, labor, etc 

TEAM EXPENSES. 

Adams Brothers, oats, hay 

Brown & Titus, grain 

George Dunnington, harness repairs 

Partridge Brothers, grain 

J. O. Tremblay Horseshoeing Co., shoeing horse 



$2.7.5 


92.75 


6.60 


93.57 


1.01 


226.95 


159.31 



$49.11 

12.05 

5.90 

19.55 

13.00 



$665.94 



$99.61 



SUNDRIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice .' $12.66 

F. X. Chenette, cleaning vault 3.00 

E. F. Jones, services as clerk of trustees 25.00 

Total expenditures 



$40.66 



$S,63S.09 



Valley Cemetery. 

Appropriation $3,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 75.37 



$3,075.37 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January 

February 

March ' 

Al.ril 

May 

June 

July 

August 

Si'i)tcml)cr 

Oclober 

November 

December 



$58.47 

77.42 

62.60 

99.-02 

277.32 

216.14 

20S.32 

25S.7S 

203.9S 

200.11 

176.99 

87.05 



— $1,926.20 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 435 



B. F. Bascomb $141.13 

F. Goings 36.00 



WATER AND TELEPHONE. 

Water commissioners, use of water $79.35 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 36.00 



PLANTS, TEEES, LOAM, ETC. 

B. F. Bascomb, loam, etc $40.50 

A. S. Chadbourn, trees 7.50 

A. G. Graj-, gravel 7.70 

Frank Goings, loam 20.00 

J. Francis, plants 55.11 

A. G. Hood, lawn dressing, plants 88.25 

W. A. Ingram, 1 bouquet 2.00 

Thomas Mason, sand 3.25 

Ray Brook Garden Co., tulips 3.50 



PRINTING AND STATIONEKY. 



O. D. Knox, postmaster, envelopes $2.12 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery and books 4.73 



$177.13 



$115.35 



$177.§1 



$6.85 
REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Adams Brothers, lime $1.80 

F. C. Dow Co., rubber boots 2.18 

C. H. G. Foss, keys .60 

G. B. Forsaith, castings, labor on fence 40.62 

Hampden Corundrum Wheel Co., 1 sharpener.. 2.10 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 33.91 

A. J. Knight, lumber and labor 4.95 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe 25.50 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor, repairs 63.22 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete 56.00 

Tibbetts & Newell, painting 266.82 

W. H. Tibbetts, labor on fence 14.65 

J. R. Turcotte, repairing picks .50 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools 131.68 

R. M. West, ladders 5.00 

$649.53 

SUNDRIES. 

S. P. Cannon, services as clerk of trustees $10.00 

C. H. Wood, lettering signs 12.50 

$22.50 

Total expenditures $3,075.37 



436 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Amoskeag Cemetery. 

Appropriation $200.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 2.65 

EXPEJ^'DITUKES. 

A. S. Chadbourn, trees $12.50 

George Harwood, labor 155.95 

Manchester Hardware Co., paint, etc 11.05 

Manchester Water-Works, use of water 12.00 

J. H. Wilson, paint 11.15 

Total expenditures 

Merrill Yard. 
Appropriation 

EXPEXDITUEES, 

Frank A. Emerson, labor $3.75 

Mark Harvey, labor ' 2.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$202.C5 



$202.65 



$50.00 



$5,75 
44.25 

$50.00 



Paupers Off Farm. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

groceries and meats. 

H. H. Alton $2.00 

Barlow &, Nye S.OO 

J. B. Belanger HO. 00 

A. N. Clapp 22.23 

A. H. Gate 27.00 

C. H. Clark 7.00 

A. M. Eastman 10.00 

S. L. Flanders 7.00 

Carl A. Friborp 8.00 

H. Fradd & Co 42.50 

T. F. Fjfield 6.3.00 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 437 



Griffin Brothers , 


$878 ''I 




A L. Gndbois 


7 00 




J. J. Grenier 


11 00 




Gfi""ne Crotliei's 


10 00 




B. F. & S. L. Greer 

B. L. Hartshorn 

John F. Healy 


96.00 

26.00 

150 00 






113.00 




0. D. Knox & Co 


129.50 




A. Lambert & Co 


85 47 




P. D. Ljnch 


173.90 




Thomas H. Mahoney , . 


20.00 

138 00 




McQuade's Market 

Ulric Messier 


216.00 

165 50 




A. W. Morse 


62 00 




E. F. Murray 


' 3.00 

70 00 




J. X. Lacourse & Co 


11 00 




Xoves & Prince 


78 00 




0. H. Nourry & Co 


80 00 




F. X. Parent 


72.00 




E. W. Perldns 


54.00 




D. M. Poore & Son 


37.12 






8 00 




Edmond Pinard 


10 00 




Eugene Quirin 


93 00 




Joseph Quirin 


. . . . 25 00 




W. M, Eobinson 


140 00 




Swinston & Eobinson 


42.00 




H. A. Tirrell 


52 00 




Trahan & Co , 


101 00 




J. 0. Turcotte , 

Calixte Vigneault 


24.00 

179 00 




M. Verrette, Jr 


209 SO 








$3,799.23 


FUEL 

S. A. Blood 


$9^) 


L. B. Bodwell & Co 

Peter Beauchamp 

Charles Boisclair & Co 

Joseph Breault & Son 


29.25 

3.00 

, 9.25 

24.00 




Boisclair & liaiche 


72 25 




Caron & Son 


9 50 




F. X. Chenette 


29 10 




J. 11. DeCourcv Co 


18 00 




W. E. Dunbar & Son 


28.00 





438 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Joseph Dunn 

G. W. Flint 

Flint, Haskell & Flint 

Philias Graveline 

B. F. & S. L. Greer 

Gilbert Gonyeaii 

Alphonse Laberge 

A. D. Maxwell estate 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co 

Moore & Preston 

D. M. Poore 

E. W. Poore 

J. P. Eussell & Co 

Mrs. August Schink 

E. V. Turcotte 

J. F. Wyman 

A. C. "Wallace estate 

BOARD AKD CAKE AKD EEXT. 

C. M. Bennett 

J. F. Clough 

County of Hillsborough 

Mts. Martha McFarland 

Thomas Fitzgerald 

Clara E. French 

W. H. Gilmore 

Mrs. Matilda Hood 

Florence Hardy 

Thomas Kelley 

Marj' A. Eiley 

State Industrial School 

Ellen Stevens 

Mrs. August Schink 

Sacred Heart Hospital 

St. Patrick's Orphans' Home 

Women's Aid Home 

BOOTS, S}IOES, CLOTHING. 

A. T. Deaumier 

Burke Brothers 

John Cayzer 

Lane & Duzois 

M. A. McDonoiigh 

Joseph St. Yves 

P. F. Toole 



$6.00 

3.00 

2.00 

21.75 

15.50 

2.00 

6.40 

81.12 

16.50 

35.88 

21.76 

6.00 

171.30 

15.13 

22.25 

8.25 

10.00 



$48.00 
18.12 

751.39 
16.00 
10.00 
34.70 

104.00 
52.00 
72.00 
70.00 
7S.00 

,249.72 

6.00 

95.38 

25.00 

155.00 
72.00 



$5.25 
4.00 
1.75 

IS.OO 
2.00 
5.00 

20.25 



$676.44 



$2,857.31 



$56.25 



CITY FARM. 



439 



MEDICINE, FUNERAL EXPENSES. 

Z. F. Campbell, medicine .$3.00 

T. F. Collins, burial outfit 12.00 

F. X. Chenette, burial outfit 10.00 

A. L. Gadbois & Co., burial, outfit 8.00 

Johri*B. Hall, medicine 8.10 

Kean & Sheehan, burial outfit 25.00 

F. H. Thurston, medicine .341.23 

E. V. Turcotte, burial outfits 60.00 

F. L. Way, medicine 3.15 

F. L. Wallace, burial outfit 25.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Boston & Maine Railroad, tickets $13.36 

John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks, postals, 

etc 19.00 

W. P. Goodman, stationery and directories.... 31.35 
William Glover, conveying Thomas Winn to 

asylum 1.83 

M. J. Healy, conveying J. Farley to asylum.. 3.75 

B. F. & E. W. Welch, use of team 2.50 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$495.48 



$71.79 



$7,956.49 
1,043.51 



),000.00 



City Farm. 

Appropriation $8,000.00 

Overdraft, Miville & Deschenes 3.85 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 298.89 

Expenditures. » 

E. G. Libby, superintendent $500.00 

Mrs. Annie Libby, matron 300.00 

HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 

January $126.66 

February 175.19 

March 131.86 

April 126.96 

Mav 183.72 



$8,302.74 



$800.00 



440 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

June $1(12.04 

July 162.63 

August 175.22 

September 120.00 

October 136.86 

November 164.56 

December 131.86 



Margaret Fraizier $9.43 

Lizzie Flanders 7.50 

Clara S. Heath 3.00 

John Marshall 20.53 

Charles II. Nixon 5.19 

Joseph Shaw S.07 

Fannie Tennev ] .07 



CLOTHING, DRY GOODS, ETC. 

Allen & Kiniljall, clothing 

Clark & Estey, socks 

Charles Coe & Co., boots 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., shoes and rubbers 

W. P. Farmer, boots and shoes 

A. <fe W. S. Heath, boots and shoes 

James \V. Hill Co., gingham, cotton, hose, etc. 

F. W. Leeman, shirting and linings 

William Marcotte & Co., caps and overall.s 

Miville & Deschenes, dry goods 

H. M. Moody, clothing 

D. F. Shea, boots and shoes 

George Portei*, shoes 

E. C. Wescoft, merchandise 



.MK.VTS AND TKOVISIOXS. 



Bartlett & Thompson, 

Barlow & Nye 

L. Ik'lli 

F. L. Bi.vby 

W. C Connor 

0. H. Clark 

Danicls-C(jrnfll Co. . . 



FUEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., lei/g tons coal $04.10 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 59,740 lbs. coal 152.56 

A. W. Prescott, wood 93.00 



$S.44 


4.35 


54. S4 


52.40 


S.25 


40.85 


119.30 


3.70 


12.55 


39.72 


41.25 


7.00 


1.00 


11.83 


$1.73 


:tsi.60 


10.22 


1.65 


2..50 


26.60 


330.3S 



$1,798.16 



$54.79 



$339.66 



$405.48 



CITY FARM. 



441 



C. 11. Duvgin $2.50 

Dodge & Laing- 16.28 

(Jranite State Grocery Co 2.40 

D. Johnson 7.90 

W. D. Lack! & Co 10.32 

E. G.^ibbey 2.80 

Manchester Provision Co 196.89 

Horace Marshall 49.24 

Manchester Beef Co , 27.12 

Thomas H. Mahoney , 15.88 

E. S. Newton 99.17 

Nelson, Morris & Co 26.03 

Parnell Brothers 159.21 

Henry W. Parker 386.80 

Eugene Quirin 39.65 

Fred Eay 14.82 

Swift Provision Co 13.75 

E. G. Sullivan 46.04 

John E. Towle & Co 28.68 

J. O. Turcotte 13.20 

Henry Weber 10.00 

G. F. Whittier 13.29 

J. H. Wiggin «fe Co 14.79 

John M. Woodbridge 1.14 

FURNITURE AND KITCIIEX UTENSILS. 

Clark M. Bailej^ chimneys, brushes, etc $17.00 

G. F. Bosher, furniture and crockery 37.56 

James Briggs & Son, dish washer, etc 7.85 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., carpets, shades, crockery, etc. 76.89 

E. K. Home, pails, glass ware 11.18 

Charles Noll, boxes 2.50 



MEDICINE, VETERINARY SERVICES. 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., attendance and medicine.. $25.00 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., attendance and medicine. . . . 14.85 

F. H. Fames, ointment, etc ] .45 

John B. Hall, medicine .25 

Eobert Heath, "Bug Death" 20.00 

F. K. Hubbard, X-ray medicine 6.00 

Gillis Stark, M. D., visits 7.50 

A. D., Smith, oil cedar 4.00 

A. G. and Zatae L. Straw, medicine 7.05 

F. H. Thurston, medicine 12.55 



$1,961.67 



$152.98 



$98.65 



442 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

BLACKSMITIIIXG, HARNESSES, ETC. 

J. A. Ballon, harness repairs and sui^plies $28.05 

L. P. Trembla3', horseshoeing 20.55 

J. O. Tremblay Horseshoeing Co., horseshoeing 16.35 

N. J. Whalen, harness repairs and supplies .35.60 

CARBIAGE REPAIRS. 

John T. Beach $1.60 

Donald McDonald 102.70 

Kimball Carriage Co 21.19 

Manchester Locomotive Works 5.58 

J. B. McCrillis & Son 8.39 

James Murphy 24.00 

Sanborn Carriage Co 29.60 



HAY, GRAIN, AND OTHER FEED. 

Adams Brothers $100.22 

Brown & Titus 429.42 

Gage & McDougall 80.00 

C. E. Merrill 220.85 

Partridge Brothers 117.50 

HARDWARE, FERTILIZERS, ETC. 

Adams Brothers $55.20 

J. J. H. Gregory & Son 15.83 

Peter Henderson & Co 20.80 

Manchester Hardware Co 152.97 

John B. Varick Co 275.47 

PREMIT-M ON IXSrn^VXCE POEICIES. 

W. G. Berry $35.00 

Robert R. Chase 17.50 

John Dow.st 17.50 

Everett & Scott 26.25 

John A. Sheehan 116.25 

ADVERTISING, STATIONERY. TEEEPHONE. 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising $2.85 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 1-65 

IS'cw England Telephone &' Telograi)h Co., use 

of tclf'plionos 44.88 

Union Piil)lisliiiiir Co.. advertising 2.88 



$100.55 



$193.06 



$953.99 



$520.27 



$192.50 



$52.26 



CITY FARM. 443 



BEPAIES AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



$235.24 



A. A. Amlaw, repairing pijies. $.}.98 

J. J. Abbott, paint 1.45 

E. W. Bunton, repairing- chairs 3.75 

James Briggs & Son, phimbing 81.55 

A. S. Chadbourn, trees 21.00 

W. M. Darrah & Co., roofing material and labor S.IO 

W. E. Dealand, repairing clock 1.50 

J. Hodge, lumber 13.44 

J. B. Huntley, pipe and labor 7.19 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 73.73 

Kimball & Hobbs, shoemakers' supplies 3.71 

T. A. Lane Co., cutting and fitting pipes 1.77 

Pike & Heald Co., repairs 12.07 

SUNDRIES. 

American Express Co., express $1.06 

G. W. Bailey, use of hack 5.00 

George Butterfield estate, shovel, chain, plow 5.80 

Brown & Titus, grinding 3.80 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., cutting ice 10.00 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight 1.87 

C. W. Clement, extracting teeth 1.50 

C. A. Eastman, pasturing cattle 28.00 

Clinton French, 1 cow 43.00 

C. S. Fifield, use of teams 15.00 

E. A. Hannum, cockroach powder 7.50 

William Haj'cs, polish 2.50 

A. K. Hobbs, cement, needles, rubber bands 4.28 

Manchester Slaughtering & Rendering Co., 8 

hogs dressed 4.00 

H. W. Moore, 1 cow 45.00 , 

jSTew England Homestead, 1 year's subscription 

to paper 1.00 

F. M. Pettengill, 1 bull 25.00 

Samjjson, Murdock & Co., 1 directory 2.00 

D. B. Varney , sawdust .50 

Manchester Water-Works, use of water 179.55 

Manchester Oil Co., oil 55.00 

H. Pariseau, 29 boxes .87 

John E. Towle & Co., 1 barrel 1.25 

$443.48 

Total expenditures $8,302.74 



444 



Appropriation 



REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

Indigent Soldiers. 



$150.00 



Expenditures. 

GROCERIES. 

B. L. Hartshorn $6.00 

O. D. Knox & Co 12.00 

D, M. Poore & Son 48.00 

FUEL. 

Moore «&; Preston $6.50 

A. D. Maxwell estate 31.75 

D. M. Poore 6.25 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$66.00 



$44.50 



$110.50 
39.50 



$150.00 



Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 

Transferred from unappropriated money account 

EXPENTilTURES. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing $6.59 

Nate Kellogg' Co., printing 41.50 

Samuel J. Lord, expenses of examiners to Con- 
cord and return 2.94 

Pike & Ileald Co., supplies 29.91 

Carl 0. Seaman, material and tools 2.35 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and paper 10.00 

G. W. Wales, express .71 



$100.00 



$100.00 



File and Index System. 



Balance from last year unexpcndt 
Appropriation 



$237.25 
f.00.00 



$837.25 



NOTRE DAME DE LOURDES HOSPITAL. 445 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Florence A. Robinson $384.00 

SUPPLIES. 

Carter, Rice & Co., envelopes $11.50 

E. R. Coburn Co., cards and index 50.00 

Tablet & Ticket Co., supplies 14.24 

The Elliott & Hatch Book Typewriter Co., 1 

typewriter % 175.00 

.$250.74 

SUNDRIES. 

Stark & Blanchet, insurance premium $10.00 



Total expenditures $644.74 

Transferred to new account 192,51 



$837.25 



Emergency Ward, Elliot Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Emergency Ward $75.00 

Total expenditures $75.00 

Transferred to appropriation for band concerts 100.00 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 125.00 

$300.00 



Free Beds, Elliot Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
Amount appropriated $300.00 



Notre Dame de LourdeslHospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
Amount appropriated $300.00 



446 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Sacred Heart Hospital. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 
Amount appropriated 

Women's Aid Home. 
Appropriation ' 

Expenditures. 
Amount appropriated 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. 11 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$300.00 



$300.00 



$300.00 



$300.00 



$400.00 



$368.40 



$368.40 
31.60 



$400.00 



Militia. 



Appropriation 



Expenditures 



Company C, First Regiment, N. 11. N. G 
Company F, First Kegiment, N. H. N. G 
Company II, First Kegiment, N. H. N. G 
Company L, First Kegiment, N. H. N. G 

First Kegiment Band, N. II. N. G 

Joseph Fre.schl Post No. 94, G. A. \l... 

Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. K 

Mancliester Cadets 

Manchester War Veterans 



$100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 



$900.00 



$900.00 



STATE TAX. 447 



Band Concerts. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Transferred from Emergency Ward, Elliot Hos- 
pital account 100.00 

$400.00 

Expenditures. 

City Band $150.00 

First Eegiment Band 150.00 

Paj'-roll, commons, June 12.38 

Pay-roll, commons, July 34.25 

Paj^-roll, commons, August 30.38 

Total expenditures $377.01 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 22.99 

$400.00 



Abatement of Taxes. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Expenditubes. 

Sundry persons on taxes abated $1,902.40 

Total expenditures $1,902.40 

Transferred to unappropriated mone}^ account 97.60 

$2,000.00 



Purchase of Land sold for Taxes. 

Appropriation $5,200.00 

Transferred from unappropriated mouej' 

account 976.95 

$6,176.95 

Expenditures. 

George E. Morrill, taxes sold and purchased by city $6,176.05 



State Tax. 

Appropriation .$57,991.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account .25 

$57,901.25 



448 REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 
State of New Hampshire $57,991.25 



County Tax. 

Appropriation $7o.453.S5 

Expenditures. 

Hillsborough conntj- $7."). 453. 85 



Resolution Raising Money and Making Appropriations 

for the Year One Thousand Eight Hundred and 

Ninety-nine. 

Re.srjlred by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of six hundred thirteen thousand dollars (.$013,000) be 
raised for the use of the city for the year 1899, by tax on the polls 
and estates liable to be taxed thereon, which sum, with such unap- 
propriated money as may noAV be in the city treasury, or may hereafter 
come into it, shall be appropriated as follows: 

CENTRAL, DEPARTMENT. 

Interest $45,500.00 

City hall expenses ;?.500.00 

Incidental expenses ., 5,500.00 

Mayor's incidentals 300.00 

Sinking fund 22.000.00 

Printing and stationery 2.000.00 

Land sold for taxes 5,200.00 

City oificer.s' salaries • 22,000.00 

Payment funded debt 45,000.00 

File and Index System, city clerk's ollice liOO.OO 

auditor's DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries and expenses $2,000.00 

ENGINEFJl'S DEi'ARTMENT. 

Salaries and expenses $5,400.00 

DEPARTMENT OF TAXES. 

Abatement of taxes $2,000.00 

County tax 75,453.85 

State tax 57.991.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 449' 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMKNT. 



Board of street and park commissioners, salaries and 

expenses $3,500.00 

Eepairs of highways 20,000.00 

Watering- streets 4,000.00 

Macadamizing streets • 10,000.00 

Building new highways 4,500.00 

Paving streets 5,000.00 

Grading for concrete 5,000.00 

Scavenger teams 15,000.00 

Eepairs of bridges 2,500.00 

Eepairs of sewers and drains 5,000.00 

Eemoval of snow and ice 10,000.00 

Street sweeping 2,500.00 

City teams 6,500.00 

New sewers 20,000.00 

To be hereafter appropriated 21,000.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Eepairs of schoolhouses $5,500.00 

Fuel 8,800.00 

Furniture and supplies 1,300.00 

Books and stationery 100.00 

Printing and advertising 300.00' 

Contingent expenses 1,000.00 

Care of rooms 6,500.00 

Evening schools 1,200.00 

Teachers' salaries , 81,000.00 

Evening schools, mechanical drawing 400.00 

Free text-books 5,000.00 

Furnishing two rooms at High school 350.00 

Manual training 600.00 

New boiler at Training school 400.00 

New boiler at Main-street school 400.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Fire department $06,000.00 

Fire-alarm telegraph 1,000.00 

Hydrant service 18,100.00 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 

Eepairs on public buildings $3,500.00 

PUBLIC PLACES DEPARTMENT. 

Care of commons $4,000. oa 

Care of Stark park 500.0a 

29 



450 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Care of Derryfield park $1,000.00 

Care of Pine Grove cemetery 8,500.00 

Care of Valley cemetery 3,000.00 

Care of Amoskeag cemetery , 200.00 

Care of Merrill yard 50.00 

Playground, South End 100.00 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Salaries and expenses $5,000.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries and expenses of commission and force $40,000.00 

Expenses of court 2,900.00 

Care and maintenance of station 2,S00.00 

PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Supiiort of paupers off the city farm $9,000.00 

Maintenance of city farm 8,000.00 

Support of indigent soldiers 150.00 

Bed for city patients, Women's Aid Home noO.OO 

Bed for city patients, Elliot Hospital 300.00 

Bed for city patients, Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital 300.00 

Bed for city patients, Emergency Ward, Elliot Hospital 300.00 

Decoration soldiers' graves 400.00 

Bed for city patients. Sacred Heart Hospital 300.00 

Company C, First Kegiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company F, First Kegiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company H, First Kegiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company L, First Kegiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Band, First Kegiment, N. H. X. G 100.00 

Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. K 100.00 

Loui's Bell Post, G. A. K .-. 100.00 

^Manchester War Veterans 100.00 

Manchester Cadets 100.00 

Band concerts 300.00 

HEALTH DEPART.MENT. 

Salaries and expenses , $ i.TtUi.OO 

LKillTINC; STREETS. 

l.iglit ing streets $55,57.5.00 

I'assed ('oiiiiiiuii Coiiiicil Ai)i-il 5, 1S99. 



AMOUNT OF TAXATION. 



451 






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452 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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S 2 



VALUATION AND TAXES. 453 



Assessors' Oath. 



We, the Assessors of the city of Manchester, do solemnly swear that 
in making- the invoice for the purpose of assessing- the foregoing taxes, 
we appraise all taxable property at its full value, and as we would 
apprafse the same in payment of a just debt due from a solvent debtor. 
So help us God. 



Valuation and Taxes. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on the real and per- 
sonal estate, within the city of Manchester, N. H., for the year 1899, 
was as follows: 

Valuation. Rate. Tax. 

Real estate $25,595,943 $19.50 $499,128.04 

Personal property 4,582,141 19.50 89,351.74 

$30,178,084 $588,479.78 

Number of polls, 13,137 1,313,700 19.50 25,617.15 

Totals $31,491,784 $614,096.93 

The share distributed to Manchester of the amount of 
tax assessed, as per returns made by the corporations 
to state treasurer: 

On railroads $29,832.61 

On savings banks 48,880.91 

On insurance companies 3,137.25 

On literary fund 3,352.74 

Grand tax total $699,300.44 

For further information in relation to taxes collected bj^ the state, 
see State Treasurer's report. 



454 report of the city auditor, 

tablp: of taxks dup: axd uncollected. 



c^ 



S-7 
Sec 

c 



Taxes 
Taxes 
Taxes 
Taxes 
Taxes 
Taxes 
Taxes 
Taxes 
Taxes 
Taxes 
Taxes 
Taxes 
Taxes 



of 1885. 
Of 1886 
Of 1887. 
of 1888. 
Of 1889. 
of 1890. 
of 1891. 
Of 1892.. 
of 1893. 
of 1894. 
of 1895. 
of 1896. 
of 1897. 



Taxes of 1898. 

Taxes of 1899. 

Totals 



$1,205.71 
1,264.85 
1,163.94 
l.-oSClS 
1,395.13 
1,687.08 
1,906.63 
2,587.00 
4,095.13 
3,521.17 
5,021.80 
5,032.47 
5,800.20 
810.66) 
57,863.24 ) 
614,196.93 





















«4 gs 








5.34 
9.92 







8709,192.07 



§437.59 
1,464.81 



81,902.39 



27 45 
453.79 

52,294.66 

552,759.54 



S605,655.58 



$1,205.71 
1,264.85 
1,163.94 
1,580.13 
1,395.13 
1,687.08 
1,966.6^ 
2,582.1* 
4,095.13 
3,515.8a 
5,011.88 
5,005.02 
6,346.41 

5,941.66 

69,972 oS 



$101,734.09 



TAX VALUATIONS, ETC., FROM 1890 TO 1899, INCLUSIVE. 



YEAR. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. polls. 


Poll tax. 


Valuatlott 
of poll. 


1890 


524,207,740 
24,872,492 
25,932,044 
27,439,742 
28,391 710 
28,861,122 
29,443,668 
30,486,940 
30,988,488 
31,491,784 


S462,869.17 
443,541.76 
506,465-17 
507,640.68 
606,372.44 
502,183.02 
547,661.60 
6:{4,127.80 
004,280.57 
014,090.93 


9,723 1 SI. 91 
10',367 1.78 
10,673 1.95 
11,S;J5 1.85 


$100 


1S91 


100 


lgf)0 


100 


1893 


100 


1894 


12,103 
12,244 
li:,683 
12,921 
12,808 
13,137 


1.78 
1.74 
1.86 
2.08 
1.95 
1.95 


100 


]g96 


100 




100 


1897 




1898 


100 


1899 


100 







For years prior to 1890, ace reports of 1890 anil 1891. 



ACCOUNT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 455 

Settlement of Account of George E;. Morrill, Tax Col- 
lector for City of Manchester, N. H., June 1, 1899. 

Amount out- 
standing June 
1, 1898. 

Tax list, 1SS.5 $1,205.71 

1SS6 1,264.85 

1887 1,163.94 

1888 1,580.13 

1889 1,395.13 

1890 1,687.08 

1891 1,966.63 

1892 2,587.00 

1893 4,095.13 

1894 3,521.17 

1895 5,021.80 

1896 5,032.47 

1897 5,800.20 

Amount collected $501.38 

Credit by cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 168 501.38 

Interest collected $1,381.85 

Credit bj- cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 167 1,381.85 



Collected. 


Balance out- 
standing June 

1, 18'J9. 




$1,205.71 




1,204.85 




1,163.94 




1,580.13 




1,395.13 




1,687.08 




1,966.63 


$4.88 


2,582.12 




4,095.13 


5.34 


3,515.83 


9.92 


5,011.88. 


27.45 


5,005.02 


453.79 


5,346.41 



1898. Dr. 
June 1. Balance due on settlement of 1893 list $4,004.48 

To warrant resident list $602,750.71 

warrant non-resident list 1,529.86 

voluntary list 810.66 



$605,091.23 



1898, 1899. Ck. 

By cash paid treasurer, per vouchers Nos. 105, 
114, 125, 143, 165, 169, 176, 198, in year 1898; 
and receipts Nos. 31, 115, 117, 169 in year 1899 $597,670.81 

By abatements, vouchers Nos. 190 in 1898, and 

75 and 110 in 1899 1,478.77 

By unpaid taxes, June 1, 1899 5,941.65 



$605,091.23 



City oi'' Manchester to George E. Morrill. 
Dr. 

To salary for year ending June 1, 1899 $1,650.00 

commission on old taxes 27.42 



$1,077.42 



456 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Cr. 



By cash paid by treasurer, on account of salary $800.00 

balance paid by treasurer, as per bill 877.42 

$1,077.42 



Manchestek, N. H., July 1, 1899. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George E. 
Morrill, tax collector»of said Manchester, and find the same correct, as 
Above stated. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions from 
Taxation. 

COXSTITUTIOX OF NeW HAMPSHIRE, ARTICLE 82, PaGE 38, PUBLIC 

Statutes. 

encouragemeis't of literature, etc. 

Art. 82. "Knowledge and learning generally diffused through 
a community being essential to the preservation of a free govern- 
ment, and spreading the opportunities and advantages of education 
through the various parts of the countrj^ being highly conduciva to 
promote this end, it shall be the duty of legislators and magistrates, 
in all future periods of this government, to cherish the interest of 
literature and the sciences, and all seminaries and public schools; to 
encourage private and public institutions, rewards, and immunities 
for the promotion of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, 
manufactures, and natural historj' of the country; to countenance and 
inculcate the principles of humanity and general benevolence, public 
and private charity, industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, 
sincerity, sobriety, and all social affections and generous sentiments 
among the people; prorUlrd, iicrcrthclesft, that no money raised by 
taxation shall ever be granted or applied for the use of schools or 
institutions of any religious sect or denomination." 

I'uBLic Statutes, Chapter oj. 

SiccT. 2. "Keal estate, whether improved or unimproved, and 
whether owned by residents or others, is liable to be taxed, except 
liouses of public worship, twenty-five hundred dollars of the value of 
par.sonages owned by religious societies and occupied by their pas- 
tors, schoolhonscs, seminaries of learning, real estate of the United 
States, .state, or town used tor piiljlic iniriioscs. and alnishousos on 
•county farms." 

Sect. 11. "Towns may by vote exempt from taxation for a term 
not exceeding ten years any manufacturing establishniciit proposed 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 457 

to be erected or put in operation therein, and the capital to be used 
in operating" the same, unless such establishment has been previously 
exempted from taxation by some town." 

OPINION OF THE SUPRKIIE COUHT. 

58 4^ H. Rep., page 623. "The exemption in each case is limited to 
ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole power of taxation 
would be the destruction of government; and the dangerous tendency 
of legislation suspending any part of that power, for any period, is 
manifest. P. Bank v. Billinys, 4 Pet. 514,561. So long as the existing 
laws remain unrepealed, and the constitutional construction hereto- 
fore adopted I'emains unchanged, contracts hereafter made under these 
laws and that construction will be valid. If the legislature for any 
reason wish to prevent the making of any more such contracts, their 
object can be accomplished bj- a repeal of the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective charters 
as "being of the nature of a public charity," as follows: 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute Women, N. H. Laws of 1889, 
chapter 199. 

Elliot Hospital, X. H. Laws of 18S1, chapter 178. 

Manchester Women's Aid and Relief Society, organized in January, 
1875, N. H. Laws, 1S91, chapter 283. 

Orphanage and Home for Old Ladies (Catholic) on Hanover street, 
N. H. Laws, 1883, chapter 56. 



Schedule of Property used for Religious, Clnaritable, 
and Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Taxation 
by Law, not Including that Owned by the City of Man- 
chester. 

Convent, Sisters Jesus Marj-, French Catholic; East Spruce 
street, near Beech: 

Building $10,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 2,600.00 

$12,000.00 

Convent, Sisters of Mercy, Catholic; 415 Union street, 

corner Laurel: 

Building $30,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 

$36,300.00 

Mount St. Mary's Academy, Catholic; from convent lot 

east to Beech street: 

Building $25,000.00 

31,500 square feet of land 9,450.00 

$34,450.00 



458 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Lot south side of Laurel street, corner Union street, Cath- 
olic; McDonald school: 

Building $:! j.000.00 

10,800 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' Home, Cath- 
olic; Amherst and Hanover streets: 

Building $1 1,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 30,375.00 

St. Patrick's Orphan Asylums, Catholic; 184 Hanover 
street: 

Building $47,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 40,500.00 



St. Joseph's High School, Catholic; Lowell street, corner 
of Birch: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

Union-street school, Catholic; corner Union and Laurel 
streets: 

Building $4,000.00 

5,000 square feet of land 2.500.00 

St, Agnes' school. Catholic; corner Cedar and Tine streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

20,000 square feet of land 3,200.00 

St. Joseph's school for girls. Catholic; corner Pine and 
Lowell streets: 

Building $10,000.00 

Land included in cathedral lot. 

Convent of Holy Angels, French Catholic; Beauport street, 
corner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building $15,000.00 

22,500 square feet of land 4.500.00 

St. George's school, French Calholic; corner Pine and 
Orange streets: 

Building $30,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Home, Sisters of the Precious P.lood; 555 Union street: 

Building $2,500.00 

n,750 square feet of land 2,025.00 

Orphanage school. I'.fMiiport, Wayne, and Futnam streets; 
French Catholic: 

Building $25,000.00 

30.000 squaiT f.i-t of land fi.OOO.OO 



$40,000.00 



$i4,375.00 



$87,500.00 



$20,000.00 



$6,500.00 



$15,200.00 



$10,000.00 



$19,500.00 



$35,000.00 



$1,525.00 



$31,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROiM TAXATION. 459 

St. Augustine's academy, French Catholic; corner Beech 
and Spruce streets: 

Building $8,000.00 

15,000 square feet of laud 4,500,00 

$12,500.00 



St. !Mfry's parochial school, French Catholic; corner Wayne 
and Cartier streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

25,000 square feet of laud 2,000.00 

Residence priest St. Augustine's church, French Catholic; 
No. 383 Beech street: 

Building $6,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 1,875.00 

$7,875.00 
Orphan Children's school, parish St. Augustine; 251, 253 
Lake avenue: 

Building $12,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Schoolhouse, north side of Cedar street: 

Building $8,750.00 

2,500 square feet of land 1,250.00 

Eesidence priest St. Anne's church, Catholic; No. 231 Mer- 
rimack street: 

Building . $5,000.00 

8,820 square feet of land 2,640.00 

$7,646.00 
Eesidence Catholic bishop; No. 145 Lowell street: 

Building $40,000.00 

24,000 square feet of land 12,000.00 

$52,000.00 
Eesidence priest St. George's church, French Catholic; 
Orange street, corner Pine: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,000 square feet of land 4,000.00 

$6,500.00 
Eesidence priest St. Mary's church, French Catholic; 376 
Beauport street. West Manchester: 

Building $2,500.00 

5,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$3,500.00 



$14,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$17,000.00 



$10,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



460 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. Anne's church, Catliolic; Union street, corner Merri- 
mack : 

Building $:]0,000.00 

10,180 square feet of land 5,090.00 

St. Augustine's church, French Catholic; Beech street, 
corner East Spruce: 

Building $28,000.00 

13,000 .square feet of land 3,250.00 

St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel. Catholic; Pine street, 
corner Lowell: 

Building $70,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 30,375.00 

St. Marj-'s church, French Catholic; Beauport street, cor- 
ner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building $25,000.00 

70,000 square feet of land 14,000.00 

St. Raphael's church and school, German Catholic; Third 
street, corner Ferrj', West Manchester: 

Building $35,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 3,400.00 

St. George's church, French Catholic; Pine street, corner 
Orange: 

Building $75,000.00 

18,690 square feet of land 7,614.00 

St. Patrick's church and school. Catholic; Kelly street, 
Cartier street and Coolidge avenue: 

School building $20,000.00 

56,281 square feet of land 4,502.00 

First Baptist church; Union street, corner Concord: 

Building $28,000.00 

11,250 square feet of land 6,750.00 

First Freewill Baptist church; ]\rerrimack street, corner 
Chestnut: 

Building $12,400.00 

12,600 square feet of land 12,600.00 

Second Baptist church; Merrimack street, near Vine: 

Building $9,000.00 

9,450 square feet of land 3,780.00 

People's Baptist church; Chestnut street, corner Concord: 

Building $8,000.00 

3,200 square feet of land 2,000.00 



$35,090.00 



$31,250.00 



$100,375.00 



$39,000.00 



$38,400,00 



$82,614.00 



$24,502.00 



$:54,750.00 



$25,000.00 



$12,780.00 



$10,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 461 

First Congregational church; Hanover street, corner 
Union: 

Building $30,000.00 

43,200 square feet of land 34,560.00 



Second Congregational church; Market street, corner 
Franklin: 

Building $25,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 19,000.00 

Third Congregational church; South Main street, corner 
Milford, West Manchester: 

Building $8,000.00 

23,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

First M. E. church; Valley street, corner JeAvett: 

Building $8,000.00 

11,400 square feet of land 1,000.00 

St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, corner Amherst: 

Building $25,000.00 

10,010 square feet of land 6,000.00 

Trinity M. E. church; School street: 

Building $2,000.00 

12,176 square feet of land 3,000.00 

St. James M. E. church; Pennacook street, corner Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

11,000 square feet of land 2,200.00 

Grace church, Episcopal; Lowell street, corner Pine: 

Building $20,000.00 

9,300 square feet of land 6,975.00 

First Unitarian church; Concord street, corner Beech: 

Building " .$24,000.00 

13,500 square feet of land 6,000.00 

First Universalist church; Lowell street, near Elm: 

Building $17,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 15,000.00 

Christian church, Protestant; Pine street, corner Merri- 
mack: 

Building $6,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 6,700.00 



$64,560.00- 



$44,000.00 



$11,000.00 



$9,000.00 



.$31,000.00 



$5,000.00 



$11,200.00 



$26,975.00 



$30,000.00 



$32,000.00 



$12,700.00 



462 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

First Presbj'terian church, German; Second street, corner 
liath, West Manchester: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Swedish Lutheran church, Protestant; Sagamore, corner 
Pine: 

Building $7,500.00 

10,950 square feet of land 2,000.00 

Swedish Evangelical Mission; Pine street, corner Orange: 

Building $6,500.00 

Land 4,100.00 

Swedish Baptist church; Arlington street, near Maple: 

Building $5,000.00 

4,432 square feet of land 1,100.00 

Second Advent church; Amherst street, between Pine and 
Union: 

Building $5,100.00 

4,500 square feet of land 3,375.00 

Cit3' Mission chapel, Protestant; Merrimack street, corner 
Beech: 

Building $7,000.00 

12,000 square feet of land 0,000.00 

Westminster Presbyterian church; Brook street, corner 
Hazel: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

South ^Manchester Union chapel, Protestant; Elm street, 
south: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,747 square feet of land 1,000.00 

ICpiscopal Mission ehurcli; North Main street, corner 
School, West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

I'J, 112 square feet of land 4,000.00 

Kesidcnce i)astor St. I'aul's M. E. church; Union street, 
near Amherst: 

Building $3,000.00 



$5,500.00 



$0,500.00 



$10,600.00 



$6,100.00 



$8,475.00 



$13,000.00 



$17,500.00 



$:»,500.00 



$7,500.00 



$2,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 463 

Residence pastoi- First Congregational church; No. 590 
15eech street, near Bridge: 

Building $5,000.00 

8,100 square feet of laud 2,400.00 



$7,400.00 
Eesidehce pastor Grace Episcopal church; corner of Harri- 
son and Union streets: 

Building $0,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 3,750.00 

$9,750.00 
German School Society; Third, Bath, and Ferry streets: 

Building $4,500.00 

10,187 square feet of laud 2,500.00 

Elliot Hospital, Protestant; East Manchester: 

Building $23,000.00 

Land 7,000.00 

Elliot Hospital lot; Hanover street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $3,000.00 

Land 13,000.00 

Elliot Hospital: 

Land and buildings. Main street $1,000.00 

Land and buildings, Quincy street 2,500.00 

"Women's Aid Home; Pearl street, corner Beech: 

Building $15,000.00 

57,530 square feet of land 10,000.00 

"Women's Aid Home; Bridge street, corner Chestnut: 

Buildings $9,000.00 

6,037.5 square feet of land 3,000.00 

Manchester Children's Home; Webster street: 

Building $20,000.00 

55,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Eesidence pastor Swedish Lutheran church; Sagamore 
street, corner Pine: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,200 square feet of land 1,020.00 

$4,020.00 
Gale Home: 

One half Martin's block, Elm street $25,000.00 

Land and building, Pearl street, corner Ash 25,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$7,000.00 



$30,000.00 



$10,000.00 



$6,500.00 



$12,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$814,181.0(> 



464 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 

Church property, Catholic $351,231.00 

Convent property. Catholic 72,925.00 

Parochial residences, Catholic 12,500.00 

Parochial schools, Catholic 245,650.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions 131,875.00 

Church property, Protestant $441,640.00 

Parochial residences, Protestant 10,000.00 

Private school i^roperty, Protestant 7,000.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions 162,000.00 

$620,640.00 

TAXABLE. 

Land and buildings. Catholic $65,021.00 

Land and buildings, Protestant 14,170.00 

$79,191.00 

Total exempt and taxable $1,514,012.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 



465 



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REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 













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468 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT, CITY OF MANCHESTER. 
N. II., DECEMBER .31, l.s99. 



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»70,000 issued Oct. 
31, 1803, tf50,000 
issued .July 1, 
1864. six percent, 
to fund debts. 


ill 


(1 April 1, 
(our iier cent 
If^iili three and 
half percent 
nd debts. 









1890 


$400,000 
400,000 
300.000 


$200,000 
200,000 
300,000 
300,000 







$13,850 
18,850 
20,000 


$120,000 
lOQ 000 


$60,000 
60,000 
60,000 


JH .- ,-1 « 


1S91 




1S92 .... 


1 


120,000 
120,009 


1S93 


300,000 


$100,000 


$100,000 


26,000 


60,000 


1S94 .... 


300,000 


350,000 


100,000 


100,000 


31,000 


50,000 


60,000 


155,000 


1895 .... 


200.000 


500,000 


100,000 


100,000 


36,250 




60,000 
60,000 


1.^5,000 


1896 .... 


■nil 


500,000 
600,000 
600,000 
600,000 


100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 


100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 


42,250 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 




1897 .... 




155,000 
155,00*" 
255,000 






60,000 
60,000 


1899 .... 









Four per cent 
improvemcBt 
bonds. 




Four per cent 
Granite-street 
bridge bonds. 

Amount of six 
per cent bonds 
due and paid. 


Amount of six 
per cent bonds 
refunded at four 
per cent. 


is 


A mount of six per 
cent city bonds 
on which inter- 
eat has ceased, 
not yet present- 
ed for payment. 


Amount of six per 
cent waterbonds 
on whicl) inter- 
est has ceased, 
not yet present- 
ed for payment, 








$99,900 

100 

99,900 

65,.'>00 

50,000 


$100,000 


$948,850 
953,8.M) 
9.'-.5,000 
1,195.000 
1,296,000 
1,571,250 
1,917,250 
1,890,000 
1,85.\000 
1,920,000 




$100 
















100,000 




100 
inn 


.^14)0 (KX) 






$4 500 


2()D 000 










300.000 
400,000 
400,000 
400,000 


$20,000 
230,000 
220,000 
210,000 
200,000 




100,000 


i 


$130,000 
105,000 
80,000 

.1'. fVWl 




















400,000 


1 



















BONDED DEBT. 469 

Rdmabks. — The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the 
cemeteries of the city to parties %vho pay $100 and upward. There are 
$50,000 in cemetery bonds, so called, not negotiable, in the hand of 
the city treasurer, which are not included in the $1,870,000. 

Total amount of bonded debt, including cemetery bonds $1,920,000.00 
N^ indebtedness for water purposes 900,000.00 



'Set debt after deducting water debt $1,020,000.00 

As shown in the assessors' books for the year 1S99: 

The assessed value of personal property, including poll 

tax $5,895,841.00 

The assessed value of real estate 25,595,943.00 

Total value for taxation $31,491,784.00 

Tax rate, 1.95 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 3.239 

Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 6.097 

Population, census of 1890 43,983 

Population, census of 1880 32,458 

Increase of population in ten years 11,525 

Increase of population since 1890 (estimated) 16,017 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been promptlj^ paid at maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being payable in gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

A sinking fund was established in 1893. 

Total amount of sinking fund December 31, 1899, $232,733.04. 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the water- 
works is limited to the sum of $600,000 by section 6, chapter 70, New 
Hampshire Laws of 1871, entitled "An act to enable the city of Man- 
chester to establish water-works," except as further extended an 
amount of $300,000, by laws of 1891, chapter 26; and $200,000 by laws 
of 1895, chapter 172. 

SUMMART OF CITY DEBT. 

Amount of bonded and temporary debt January 1, 1899.. $1,965,000.00 
Accrued interest on bonded debt 32,650.00 

$1,997,650.00 
Amount of bonded and temporary debt paid in 1899 45,000.00 

Total indebtedness December 31, 1899 $1,952,650.00 



470 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1899 $145,231.88 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1899 59,972.58 

Stock of Suncook Vallej' Railroad, estimated value 14,500.00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1899 232,733.04 

$452,437.50 
bo:mded debt. 

Total net indebtedness Januarj^ 1, 1S99 $1,626,622.53 

Total net indebtedness January 1, 1900 1,500,213.50 

Decrease $126,409.03 

STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CIIAKC.E_()X THE BONDED 
DEBT. 



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1 

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1 


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if 

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V V r. 

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Hit 


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3 

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1S93 


. . . 827,000 


86,000 




$623 75 87 200 


82,400 
2,400 
2,400 


86 200 


] 


849,423.75 
48,613.92 
46,800.00 
46.841.66 
59.650.00 


1891 


. . . 24,000 1 


8,000 




813.92 7,200 


6,200 






l.W 


... 18,000 


12,000 




1,000.00 7,200 


6,200 






1893 


. . . 18,000 


12,000 




1,041.66 7,200 


2,400 


6,200 






1894 


. . . 18,000 


14,000 


19,500 


1,650.00 


2,400 


6,200 


$8,000 




1S95 


. . . 18,000 1 


14.000 


9,500 


1,812.50 


2,400 


6,200 


12,000 


$4,800 


68,712.50 


189G 


. . . 12,000 


20,000 


O.-WO 


2,112.50 


2,400 


6,200 


16,000 


14,400 


82,612.60 


1S97 


... 9,0C0' 


22,000 


9,500 


2,500.00 


2,400 


6,200 


16,000 


13,00') 


80,600.00 


1898 


... 0,000 


24.000 


9,500 


2,500.00 


2,400 


6,200 


16.000 


13,000 


79,000.00 


1899 


. . . 6,000 


24,000 


9,500 


2,i500.00 

1 




2,400 


6,200 


19,6C0 


11,400 


81,500.00 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



471 



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472 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Valuation of Real Estate Owned by the City. 

High school, Beech street, corner Lowell: 

Building- $170,000.00 

59,400 square feet of land 17,820.00 

$187,820.00 

Franklin-street school, Franklin street, corner Pleasant: 

Building $16,000.00 

19,200 square feet of land 19,200.00 

$35,200.00 

Spring-street school, Spring street: 

Building $13,000.00 

13,600 square feet of land 13,600.00 

$26,000.00 

Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, corner ^Merrimack: 

Building $45,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

$53,000.00 

Ash-street school, Ash street, corner Bridge: 

Building $50,000.00 

57,537 square feet of land 17,262.00 

$67,262.00 

INfein-street school, North Main street. West Manchester: 

Building $6,000.00 

40,293.4 square feet of land 10,073.00 

$16,073.00 

Webster-street school, Webster street: 

Building $39,000.00 

55,714% square feet of land 13,928.00 

$52,928.00 

Blodget-street school, Blodget street: 

Building $1,500.00 

9,000 square feet of land 3,600.00 

$5,100.00 

Xiowell-street school, Lowell street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $1,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 9,000.00 

$10,000.00 

Merrimack-strect school, Alerrimack street, corner Union: 

Building $15,000.00 

12,000 square feet of land 6,:;00.00 

$21,300.00 

Parker school. South Main street, West Manchester: 

Building $20,000.00 

13,650 square feet of land 2,047.00 

$22,047.00 

Bakersvillc school, Elm street, south: 

Building $10,000.00 

24,181 square feet of liuid 3,628.00 

$13,628.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 473 

Stark District school, River road, north: 

Building $1,000.00 

4:;, 500 square feet of land ^ 100.00 

^ $1,100.00 

Amoskeag- school, Front street, Amoskeag: 

%iilding $8,000.00 

0.000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$9,000.00 

Rimmon school, corner Amory and Dubuque streets: 

Building $17,400.00 

l(j,600 square feet of land 2,490.00 

$19,890.00 

Goffe's Falls school, Goffe's Falls: 

Building $4,000.00 

47,916 square feet of land 250.00 

» $1,250.00 

Harvey Difetrict school, Nutt road: 

Building $2,000.00 

21,780 square feet of land 100.00 

$2,100.00 

Webster Mills School, Webster Mills: 

Building $400.00 

0.445 square feet of land 100.00 

$500.00 

Old Hallsville school, East Manchester: 

Building $500.00 

.00,075 square feet of land 3,008.00 

$3,508.00 

Youngsville school, Youngsville: 

Building $500.00 

51,228 square feet of land 100.00 

$600.00 

Mosquito Pond school, Mosquito Pond: 

Building $400.00 

10,890 square feet of land 100.00 

$500.00 

Pearl-street school: 

Building $18,700.00 

Land 3,200.00 

$21,900.00 

Varney school. Bowman street, corner Mast, West jNIan- 

chester: 

Building $43,750.00 

Land 0,700.00 

$50,450.00 

New Hallsville school, Jewelt street, corner Young, East 
Manchester: 

Building ,. $29,800.00 

44,000 square feet of land '. 3,300.00 

$33,100.00 



474 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Straw school, Chestnut street, corner Harrison: 

Building $;{0,000.00 

32,400 square feet of land 16,200.00 

$4r,,:.'00.00' 

New Wilson school, AVilson, Cedar, and Auburn streets: 

Building $30,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

$35,000.00 

$739,056.00 
ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Engine-house and stable. Central station. Vine street: 

Building $31,800.00 

21,718.86 square feet of land 25,438.00 

$57,238.00- 

Xorth ]\Iain-street engine-house, North Main street. West 

Manchester: ' 

Building $18,000.00 

11,819 square feet of land 2,955.00 

$20,055.00' 

Webster-street engine-house, Webster street, corner 
Chestnut: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,510 square feet of land 2,180.00 

$11,180.00 

M-errimack engine-bouse, Lake avenue: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

■ $1S.OOO.OO 

Hosehouse and cottage, Majjle street, corner East High: 

Building $3,000.00 

18,330 square feet of land 3,6()G.OO 

$6,t)66.00 

Engine-house and ward room, ward 9, JUmnion and Amory 

streets. West Manchester: 

Building $22,755.00 

6,000 square feet of land 870.00 

$23,625.00 

South Manchester hosehouse: 

Building $4,200.00 

4,278 square feet ol' la ml 6S4.4S 

$4,884.48 

$145,548.48 
O'JIIKU ri lU.K' Ul'U.DliMiS AND LOTS. 

City library, Dean avenue, cdrner Franklin street: 

Building $35,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 30,000.00 

$65,000.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 475 

City Hall, Elm street, corner Market: 

Building $20,000.00 

100,000 square feet of land 150,000.00 

$170,000.00 

City farm, Mammoth road: 

Building $5,000.00 

46.'86 acres, west Mammoth road 70,000.00 

81.55 acres, east Mammoth road 65,2^0.00 

$140,240.00 

Court house, Franklin street, corner West Merrimack: 

Building $20,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 57,000.00 

$77,000.00 

Battery building, Manchester street: 

Building $13,000.00 

3.400 square feet of land 5,100.00 

$18,100.00 

Police station, Manchester street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $40,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 15,000.00 

$55,000.00 

Slay ton lot, Manchester street: 

Police patrol stable $4,000.00 

Building 300.00 

2,908 square feet of land 4,700.00 

$9,000.00 

City stable and other buildings, Franklin street: 

' Building $15,950.00 

44,656 square feet of land 89,312.00 

$105,262.00 

City stable, district No. 10 $1,000.00 

City scales, Franklin street: 

Building $300.00 

Gravel lots, Goffstown: 

2 acres $400.00 

Police station, Clinton street, West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

3,790 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$4,500.00 

Gravel lot, district No. 10, bought of Brooks & Brock (city 

has right to remove gravel until August 25, 1903) : 

IVs acres $500.00 

Ward 5 ward room. Lake avenue: 

Building $4,500.00 

Land 1,000.00 

$5,500.00 

$651,802.00 



476 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 

Troperty in care city engineer $1,149.00 

in care cLief engineer fire department 107,177.50 

in care street and park commission 29,711.02 

in care superintendent of schools 36,755.00 

in care city messenger 3,000.00 

in care city marshal and janitor 7.250.00 

in care superintendent of city farm 12,544.87 

in care trustees city librarj' 30,000.00 

in care superintendent of Pine Grove cemetery.. 248.35 

in care superintendent of Valley cemetery 106.00 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad, in care of city treasurer 50,000.00 

Personal property in care city weigher 1,000.00 

$278,941.74 

Uncollected taxes in 1899 $59,972.58 

Net cash in the treasury, December 31, 1899 145,231.88 

$205,204.46 

OTHEK REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE 0WNT:D BY THE CITY. 

Soldiers' monument $25,000.00 

Permanent inclosurc of commons 10,200.00 

Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 25,000.00 

Fountains and water-troughs on streets and commons 3,000.00 

City tomb 10,000.00 

McGregor bridge 90.000.00 

Granite bridge 130,000.00 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 28,450.00 

Second-street bridge, over Piscataquog river ,"2.036.00 

Print-Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 5,000.00 

Two bridges in highway district No. 9 :.',000.00 

One bridge at GotTe's Falls 1,000.00 

Expended on consl ruction of sewers 079,611,64 

$1,001,897.70 
PARKS AND CEMETERIES. 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres $200,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery, about 90 acres 40,700.00 

Amoskeag cemetery, 1.23 acres 4,340.00 

Stark park, 28 acres 9,000.00 

Dcrryfield park, 76 acres 25,000.00 

('•.ncord coninion, 4.48 acres ;.'00,000.00 

Tremont common, 2.25 acres 40,000.00 

Hanover common, 3 acres 100,000.00 

Park common, 3.49 acres 00.000.00 

Mfiriniark coiiinion, 5. 89 acres 200,000.00 



auditor's office. 477 

Wagner's park, 9. So acres $12,000.00 

Land on Piscataquog river 3,500.00 

$900,540.00 

WATER-WORKS. 

Real estate and personal propertj^ of water-works, at cost 

priceT $1,483,702.23 

EECAPITULATIOX. 

Real estate owned bj' the city, schoolliouses $739,056.00 

Real estate owned by the city 651,802.00 

Real estate owned by the city, engine-houses 145,548.48 

Water-works at cost price 1,483,702.23 

Personal pi'operty owned by the city 278,941.74 

Uncollected taxes and cash 205,204.46 

Other real and personal property 1,061,897.70 

Parks and cemeteries 900,540.00 

$5,466,692.61 
PROPERTY ACCOr^"T. 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1899 $5,466,692. 6i 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1898 5,393,852.90 



Gain in valuation , . . $72,839.71 



Auditor's Office. 

City hall building. Open from 8 to 12 A. jr., 1.30 to 5 p. m.: 7 to 9 
p. M. on Thursday. 

In every bill presented to the citj- auditor for his approval, the fol- 
lowing points will be considered and passed upon: 

1. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination within the 
scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on the citj- govern- 
ment? 

2. Is the bill certified by the party legally authorized to make the 
contract, or cause the expenditure to be made? 

3. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, and 
is there a balance unexpended sufficient to pay this bill? 

4. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measurements either 
of dimensions, quantities, or weights correctly and fully stated, and 
is the proof of the delivery to the city of the whole amount charged 
sufficient? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely in 
excess as to require the attention of the city councils to be called to 
the same? 



478 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

G. Is the bill written in a fair legible hand, correctly cast, and on 
paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its proper backing 
and filing? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and the 
total amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the "amount of 
the work not j-et completed, and the per cent retained, if any, should 
be stated in the bill. 

8. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which affect the 
question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for further information or 
correction as the circumstances of each case may require. 

COLRT DECISIONS, LEGAL POINTS AND BULES, REXATING TO THE APPROVAL 
OR DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

No bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until the audi- 
tor has approved it as correct. 

Public trusts or powers. devolved by law or charter on the city coun- 
cils cannot be delegated to others. Dillon's Municipal Corporations, 
section 96, vc^Iiiinc 1. 

No member of either branch [of the city councils], except the mayor, 
shall receive any compensation for his services, or shall hold any office 
or agency created during his continuance in office. General Laws, 
chapter 4G, section 13. 

The executive powers of the city, except where vested in the mayor, 
shall be exercised by the maj^or and aldermen. General Laws, chapter 
4C, section 14. 

The maj'or and aldermen have all the powers and authority of se- 
lectmen of towns unless it is otherwise provided by law. General Laws,* 
chajjter 46, section 14. 

Joint standing committees have advisory jiowers only; the}' can- 
not legally be endowed with executive or legislative powers by ordi- 
nance or resolution of the city councils, as no by-law or ordinance 
shall be repugnant to the constitution or laws of the state. 

No member of either branch of the city councils can enter into anj' 
verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to, or do any work for 
the city. Any firm of which a member is also a member of the city 
councils is included in this prohibition. 

No city official, or department, or board of olVuials having legal 
power to expend money for the benefit of the city can purchase of 
or contract with themselves, with any one of the boanl, or with any 
lirni with which one of said officials is a member. Dillon's Municipal 
('(jrjjorations, volume 1, page j:!6, section 444. 

i:\cry bill against the city shall specify the i)arlicular ajipropria- 
tioii to wliicli Ihe same should be charged, and tlio moneys paid will 
be cluirged 1u snch appropriations only. 

lie who is intrusted with Ihe business of others cannot be allowed 
to make such business a source of profit to himself. 



auditor's office. 479 

All orders passed by the cit^^ eoiiiu-lls authorizing- a ministerial act 
to be performed by its agent or agents must be strictly construed, 
and the act to be done must be specifically stated. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. (General 
Laws, chapter 106, section 11.) Thej"^ have no power conferred upon 
them by law or ordinance to purchase new apparatus of any kind. 

The^oint standing committee on fire department have advisory 
powers only. 

The laws and ordinances require the city auditor to withhold his 
signature from all bills against any appropriation where the amount 
of the appropriation is expended, until the city council shall have pro- 
vided the means of paying the same. Section 4, chapter 3 of the City 
Ordinances, and section 4, ordinances relating to the duties of the citj' 
auditor, approved January 7, 1890. 

The power of towns to raise and appropriate monej' is derived solely 
from statutory provisions, which restrict the power to certain speci- 
fied objects and other necessary charges. 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those pre- 
scribed bj- statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, and gen- 
erally Avill not be permitted, to carry such votes into effect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discretion of 
towns to vote gifts or to select donees; their charity is a duty defined, 
commanded, enforced, and regulated, and the objects of it are desig- 
nated hj law. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a minority in an un- 
limited manner. Gove v. Epping, 41 N. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to make 
expenditures, within the scope of their powers, for their respective 
departments: For fire department and fire alarm telegraph, the chief 
engineer, to be submitted monthly to the approval of the board of 
engineers; for police department, mayor and police commission; for 
police court, police judge; for water-works department, superintend- 
ent, subject to the rules of the board of commissioners and ordinances 
relating thereto; for city farm, superintendent; for overseers of the 
poor,' each overseer, subject to the rules of the board of overseers, and 
their monthly review and approval; for schools, superintendent, or 
such person as the board of school committee may designate, biljs to 
be approved by the board monthlj'; for streets, sewers, and other work 
under these departments, street and park commissioners; for citv 
clerk's office, treasurer's ofiice, tax collector's office, assessor's office, 
auditor's office, incidental expenditures, city physician, city messen- 
ger, city solicitor, city engineer, — mayor; for cemeteries, superin- 
tendents, subject to board of trustees (to consist of citizens not mem- 
bers of the city councils); for health department, board of health, 
subject to approval of maj'or; city librar}-, board of trustees or person 
designated bj' them. It may be stated as a general rule, that all 
subordinate officials are under the supervision and control of the 
mayor, subject to such limitations and restrictions as the board of 
aldei-men, acting as a board, may require. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 



EESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES, 
PASSED IN 1899. 



City of Manchestek. 

Resolution relating" to appropriating $300 for Investigating the Gar- 
bage Question. 

Resolved, Tliat the sum of three hundred dollars ($300) be and hereby 
is placed at the disposal of the) inayor to be used at his discretion to 
investigate the garbage question. 

Passed February 15, 1899. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution' relating to the issuance of $100,000 of City Bonds to fund 
the $100,000 Notes due April 1, 1899. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of ^Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of obtaining one hundred thousand dollars 
($100,000) with which to pay the one hundred thousand dollars ($100,- 
000) of temporary notes now outstanding, which come due April 1, 
1899, there be issued the bonds of the city of Manchester to the amount 
of one hundred thovisand dollars ($100,000), said bonds to be dated 
April 1, 1899, and paj^able to bearer twenty (20) years from the date 
thereof; said bonds to bear the city seal, to be signed by the mayor and 
countersigned by the city treasurer, and to bear interest at the rate 
of three and one half (3Va) per cent per annum, from date, and to have 
coupons attached bearing the facsimile ciignature of the city treasurer 
for the payment of said interest, at said rate, semi-annuallj% on the 
first days of April and October of each year; and the city treasurer is 
authorized to fix the place of payment of interest and principal of said 
bonds, and is hereby authorized to sell said bonds, and do all things 
necessary and proper to complete and carr.y into eiTect the issue of 
said bonds; said bonds to be issued in accordance with an act of the 
legislature of New Hampshire, passed at the January session, 1895, 
entitled, "An act to authorize municipal corporations to issue bonds." 

This resolution shall take etTect upon its passage. 

483 



484 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Resolved, further, That for the purpose of paying- the interest and 
principal of. said bonds as the same shall become due, there shall be- 
annually raised by tax by the common council in the years 1899 to 
1918, inclusive, such sum of money as shall be sufficient to meet the 
interest upon the bonds each j^ear outstandingr; and a further sum of 
five thousand dolhirs ($5,000) each year for a sinking- fund for the pay- 
ment of the principal of said bonds as it shall become due, until a 
sufficient sinking- fund has been so raised, the same to be turned over 
to the board of sinking fund commissioners created by ordinance of 
November 17, 1893, and applied to the payment of said bonds. 

Resolved, further. That the city treasurer be and herebj' is instructed 
and authorized to advertise for bids for sale of said bonds, and that a 
committee of three councilme-n be ai:)pointed to be present at the 
opening- of the bids with power to accept or reject the same. 

Passed February 17, 1899. 



City of Manchestei?. 

RESOLtTiojs making- a Temporarj^ Loan of Three Hundred Thousand 
Dollars. 

Resolved bj- the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in Citj' 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city as may 
fall due before the twenty -first day of December, 1899, the city treas- 
urer be and hereby is authorized to make such temporary loans from 
time to time, for the use of the city, of sums not exceeding the amount 
of tliree hundred thousand dollars, being in anticipation of the taxes 
of the present year, giving for the same the notes of the city, signed 
by the city treasurer and countersigned bj' the mayor. 

Passed February 25, 1899. 



City of [Manciiester. 

Ki;.soi.UTio.\ relating to the Exemption from Taxation of H. B. Kccd 
& Co. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldornien of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

WuERKAS, ir. B. Reed & Co. desire to locate their business and carry 
nn the manufacture and sale of their own product of shoes and other 
articles in McCregorville, in the city of Manchester; therefore, 

Resiilvcil, 'I'hat H. B. Beed & Co. aforesaid, their machinery, mate- 
rials, raw and in ])rocess of manufacture, and other jiroperty neces- 
sary ill ( tliKting said business be and hereby are exempt from all 

taxation lor :i period of ten years from the first day of April, A. D. 1899. 

I'assed March 7, 1S99. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 485 

City of JManciiestek. 

Kesolution relating to Interest on Deposits of the City of Manchester. 

Resolved by the Mayor- and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
Citj' Council assenabled, as follows: 

That the moneys of the city of Manchester be deposited in such 
bank or banks as shall pay the largest rate of interest to said city of 
Manchester upon daily balances in said bank or banks from the first 
day of April, 1899, to the first day of April, 1900; and that the city 
treasurer be and hereby is instructed to advertise for bids from the 
banks of the city of Manchester by sending to each of said banks a 
copy of this resolution; the city of Manchester, by its agents, the treas- 
urer of said city, reserving* the right to reject any or all bids and call 
for such other bids as may be necessarj^ to carry out the intent of 
this resolution; and the mayor and the treasurer of said citj^ of Man- 
chester are hereby authorized and empowered to accept such bid or 
bids as will give the citj^ of Manchester the largest rate of interest 
upon the daily balances on deposits of the moneys of said city of 
Manchester in said bank or banks from the first day of April, 1899, to 
the first day of April, 1900. 

Passed April 4, 1899. 



City of Manchestek. 

Eesolution relating to the Transfer of Money. 

Resolved b^- the Common Council of the City of ^Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to transfer the sum 
of twelve hundred dollars ($1,200) from the appropriation known as 
"To be hereafter appropriated," to the appropriation known as contin- 
gent fund of the school board. 

Passed June 16, 1899. 



City of ISIanchester. 

RESOLtiTiON relating to a Transfer of Money. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk transfer the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) 
from the appropriation for bed for city patients. Emergency Ward, 
Elliot Hospital, to the appropriation for band concerts, and that the 
mayor be and hereby is authorized and empowered to expend said 
sum of one hundred dollars ($100) for open air band concerts in addi- 
tion to the sum of three hundred dollars ($300) already appropriated 
for the year one thousand eight hundred and ninetj-nine. 

Passed June 16, 1899. 



486 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manchestek. 

KesolijTIOX relating to a Transfer of Money. 

Resolved by the Common Count-il of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and herebj^ is authorized to transfer from the 
appropriation known as "To be hereafter appropriated" the sum of 
eleven hundred fifty-one and 8-100 dollars to the appropriation to be 
knoAvn as landl taken for new highways, the same to be used to pay 
the following claims: 

Levi Dodge, damages widening and straightening South 

Main street $12.15 

George S. Eastman, damages Avidening and straightening 

South Main street 238.93 

Prank M. Goings 100.00 

Addison G. Gray, damages occasioned by building Titus 

avenue 800.00 



$1,151. 



Passed June Ki, 1S99. 



City of Manchester. 

RES-sOLfTTOX relating to the Bequest of ^Nfary D. C. Perkins to the 
City of Manchester. 

Resolves bj'' the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

WiiEHEAS, Mary D. C. Perkins, late of Manchester, N. H., deceased, 
by her last will and testament, dated April 2r>, 1894, gave and be- 
queathed to the city of Manchester, in trust, the sum of two hundred 
dollars, the annual income thereof to be expended for keeping in proper 
condilion lot No. .^00 in the Valley cemetery, so called, and formerly 
owned by William Dinsmore, and now by his heirs; and, 

WiiEHiOAs, said Perkins, afterwards in her lifetime, made other pro- 
vision for said purpo.se, and i):ii(l u]um the tliird day of April, lS9f>, the 
sum of outi hundred dollars to said city for said i)urpose; therefore, 

UvHolrvd, That said city hereby waives all right to the said bequest 
and legacy, and assigns and releases 1o the executor of said will all 
claims against llic estate of said Maiy D. ('. I'niiins, under said will 
or otherwise. 

Passed Jiilv 11, ]h99. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 48T 

City of Manciiestee. 

Eesolution relating to the Transfer of Monej'. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That in view of the fact that the appropriation for citj^ hall expenses 
for the 3'ear 1899 was fixed at a sum one thousand dollars less than 
was absolutely necessary to meet ordinary running- expenses; be it 
herewith 

Resolved, That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make the 
following transfer: From the appropriation known as money "To be 
hereafter appropriated" to the appropriation for citj'- hall expenses, the 
sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000). 

Passed August 7, 1899. 



City of ISIanchester, 

Eesolution relating to the Transfer of $250. 

Resolved by the Board of Common Council of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Whebeas, Gustav Theuner of said Manchester has petitioned the 
board of mayor and aldermen of said city, as required by the public 
statutes of the state of New Hampshire, to assess the damages to a 
certain tract of land containing two and one half acres, owned by the 
said Theuner, situate on the east side of Railroad street, so called, 
in said Manchester, near the southerly terminus of Bartlett street, 
a public highway laid out by the board of mayor and aldermen 
of said city August 31, 1893, occasioned by surface water and drainage 
on said Bartlett street gathering and turning in a body over and upon 
said land stones, gravel, sand, sticks, and other materials, rendering 
a large part of said land unfit for cultivation; and. 

Whereas, several hearings were held upon said petition; and. 

Whereas, said iiremises wei'e viewed by said board of maj-or and.' 
aldermen; and, 

Whereas, at a meeting of said board of mayor and aldermen, Fri- 
day, August 25, 1899, said Theuner was awarded the sum of two hun- 
dred and fifty dollars ($250) for all damages and all future damages 
which may be occasioned by the same cause; therefore be it 

Resolved, that the city clerk ti'ansfer from the appropriation '"To be 
hereafter appropriated" to the appropriation for incidental expenses, 
for the purpose of paying said claim, the sum of two hundred and fifty- 
dollars ($250). 

Passed September 23, 1899. 



488 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manchestee. 

Eesolution ia regard to Block Paving upon Elm Street. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the business interests of ]\ranchester would be the better 
served by the further extension of the block paving upon Elm street 
rather than by the construction of a crematory at this season of the 
year, and they M'ould recommend that the provisional appropriation 
made at the beginning of the present year be transferred so as to allow 
of the extension, in the interests of good roads, of the block paving 
upon our principal business thoroughfare. 

Passed September 5, 1899. 



City of ^Maxchestee. 

Eesolution recommending to the Board of Common Coiincil Certain 
Transfers of Money. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is instructed to prepare and pre- 
sent to the board of common council, as recommendations from the 
board of mayor and aldermen, resolutions transferring from the appro- 
priation known as "The appropriation to be hereafter appropriated," 
to the appropriation for repairs on public buildings, the sum of three 
hundred dollars and fifty-eight cents ($300.58), and to the appropri- 
ation for incidental expenses the sum of fifty-four dollars and fifty 
cents ($54.50), for the purpose of paying the following-named claims: 
Joseph St. Laurent, $13.61; Joseph St. Tyauront, $222.03; C. A. Trefethen, 
$51.50; John IT. Wilson, $12.84; N. H. Light Battery, $54.50. 

Said claim of $300.58 contracted by changing clock weights in the 
following-named places: Lincoln-street school, $75.85; Webster-street 
, school, $97.24; City Hall, $101.04; Fire King engine-house, $13.61; 
]{akersville schooUiouse, $12.84. 

Said claim of $54.50 contracted by firing salute of seventeen guns 
Friday, October 13, 1899, in honor of Admiral Dewey. 

Passed October 24, 1899. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 489 

City of Manchester. 

liESOLVTiON discontinuing- a I'ortion of a Highway claimed to have 
been laid out by tlie Selectmen of Bedford in 1S3S. 

Resolved by the Majoi* and Aldermen of the Citj' of ^Manchester, as 
follows: 

"WiiEKEAS, tliere is in the city of Manchester a certain existing high- 
way known as the New Mast road, extending in a northerly direction 
from Mast street to the old town line between Bedford and Goffstown, 
Avhich highway has been used as such for more than thirty years; 
and on September 29, 1899, this board voted, on the petition of H. S. 
Hoitt and others, to widen and straighten said existing highwaj'^ and 
established therefor certain definite bounds and lines; and, 

Wheijeas, it is claimed by some owners of land abutting on said 
existing highwaj' that, in 1838, the selectmen of Bedford (this part of 
Manchester then being a part of Bedford), on the petition of William 
P. Riddle and others, laid out a highway which included the existing 
highway, but the legal laying out of such highway by said selectmen 
of Bedford is disputed and denied by other abutting owners, and the 
bQ.unds and lines of such highways as the selectmen of Bedford under- 
took to lay out are now unknown, and it is now imj)Ossible to cor- 
rectly locate them; and. 

Whereas, in the opinion of this board, the existing highway as 
widened and straightened by said vote of September 29, 1899, is ample 
and sufficient for the accommodation of the public travel; 

Resolved, That in order to settle all disputed questions arising out of 
the alleged laying out of a highAvay by the selectmen of Bedford and its 
relations to and with the existing highwaj% all portions of the said 
highway laid out by the selectmen of Bedford on December 8, 1838 (if 
any there was legallj^ laid out bj^ them), which lie outside of the bounds 
and lines of New Mast road as fixed by the vote of this board on Sep- 
tember 29, 1899, be and the same are hereby discontinued, and each 
owner of land abutting on said New Mast road, throughout the length 
of this discontinuance, be and hereby- is awarded one cent as damages 
therefor. 

Passed October 24, 1899. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesolt'tion relating to Certain Transfers of ISIoney. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to transfer from 
the appropriation known as "The appropriation to be hereafter appro- 
priated" to the appropriation known as appropriation for repairs of 
highways, one thousand dollars ($1,000); to the appropriation known 



490 REPORT OF rilE CITY AUDITOR. 

as appropriation for citj- teams, five luiiulred dollars ($oOO); and to the 
appropriation known as ajiproiiriation for scavenger service, twenty- 
five hundred dollars ($2,500). 
Passed November 10, 1899. 



City of Maxchesteh. 

RESOLrTiON relating to the Transfer of $100. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of ^Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to transfer from 
the appropriation known as "To be hereafter appropriated" to the 
appropriation to be known as the appropriation for the board of ex- 
aminers of plumbers, the sum of one hundred dollars ($100). 

Passed Xovember 10, 1899. 



City op Manchester. 

Resolution relating to a Certain Transfer of Money. 

Resolveil by the Board of Common Council of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to transfer from the 
appropriation known as "The apiH-opriation to be hereafter appro- 
priated" to the appropriation known as fire-alarm telegraph the sum of 
five hundred dollars ($500). 

Passed November 10, 1S99. 



City of :Nr.\NCHi;sTEi?. 

KesoLUTION relating to a CiMt;iin TrMiisfcr of Money. 

Resolved by the Board of Common Council of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council asscml)led, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to transfer from the 
appropriation known as "The approjirialion to be hereafter apjn'opri- 
ated," to the approj)riation known as the ap]>ro|)riation for re]>airs on 
public buildings, the sum of tlirce hundred dolhns and iifty-cight 
cents ($300.58); and that said sum of three hundred dollars and fifty- 
eight cents ($:!00.58), being contracted by the conmiittee on lands and 
buildings by changing the clock weights in certain buildings (Lincoln- 
street school, .$75.85; Webster-street school. $97.24; City Hall, $101.04; 
Bakersville school, $12.8-1; Fire King engine-house, $i;i.r)l), be used 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 491 

to paj' the following- claims: Joseph St. Laurent, $13.61; Joseph St. 
Laurent, $222.63; C. A. Trefethen, $51.50; John H. Wilson, $12.84; total, 
$300.58. 

Passed November 16, IS'JO. 



"* City of JNIanchestek. 

Resolution to Transfer $1,500. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Alanchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to transfer from 
the appropriation known as "The appropriation to be hereafter appro- 
priated" the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) to the appropriation 
known as repairs of schoolhouses, and also the sum of five hundred 
dollars ($500) to the contingent fund of the school board. 

Passed November 16, 1899. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesoltjtion relating to a Certain Transfer of Money. 

Resolved by the Board of Common Council of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to transfer from 
the appropriation known as "The appropriation to be hereafter appro- 
priated" to the appropriation known as the appi'opriation for inci- 
dental expenses, the sum of fifty-four dollars and fifty cents ($54.50); 
and that said sum of fifty-four dollars and fifty cents ($54.50), being 
contracted by the firing of a salute of seventeen guns Friday, October 
13, 1899, in honor of Admiral Dewey, be used to pay the following 
claim: N. H. Light Battery, $54.50. 

Passed November 16, 1899. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution relating to the Pay of the Employees of the Street and 
Park Commissioners. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, the time of the employees of the street and park commis- 
sion has been reduced from ten hours a day to nine hours, and their 
pay fixed by the hour, thus reducing their w^ages; therefore, be it 



492 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Resolved; That we earnestly recommend tliat the street and park 
commission fix the pay of their employees at the same price per day 
for nine hours' work as they have been paying- during the summer for 
ten hours' work. 

Passed December 8, 1899. 



City of Manchestee. 

An Ordek to erect Six Electric Lights. 

Ordei'ed, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
joint standing" committee on electric lights be authorized to order in 
the following electx'ic lights: 

Corner Bartlett and Amory streets. 
Corner Alsace and Amory streets. 
Corner Coolidge avenue and Bremer street. 
Corner Brown avenue, near tannery. 
Corner Mammoth road and Cilley street. 
Corner Mitchell and Beech streets. 
Passed January 2, 1899. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to Sleds for Fire Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
mayor and joint standing committee on fire department be and is 
hereby authorized to purchase, for use in the fire department, one pair 
of sleds, now located in the central fire station, the price of said sleds 
not to exceed the sum of seventy-five dollars ($75), in full payment 
therefor, and that said sum of seventy-five dollars ($7o) be charged to 
the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed January 2, 1899. 



City of Manciiesteh. 
An OrdI':r to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
board of street and park coniniissioners be and are hereby' authorized 
to build certain sewers, as follows: 

1st. Commencing at tlie manhole at the intersection of Hayes 
avenue and Old Falls road; tln'iici« in an oastoriy tlirocfion in Hayes 
avenue to Chase avenui'. 

2d. Commencing at the manhole at the intersection of Silver street 
with Beech street; thence in a southerly direction in Beech street, to 
the manliole at the intersection of Beech street and Somerville street; 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed January 2, 1899. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 493" 

City of Manchestetr. 
Ax Order relating to the Transfer of Monej-. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That there 
be appropriated the sum of fifty-five dollars ($35) for the purpose of 
paying" W. F. Hart for the services of band at the reception tendered 
the Sheridan Guards on their return from United States service. And 
the mayor is herebj- authorized to pay said bill out of the foregoing- 
appropriation, and said sum of fifty-five dollars ($55) is hereby trans- 
ferred from the appropriation for reserve fund to the appropriation to 
pay said band. 

Passed January 2, 1S99. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to the Final Transfers for the Year 1S98. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That the 
citj' clerk be and hereby is authorized to make the following- transfers: 

To reserved fund: 

From interest $129.31 

city hall 54.95 

land sold for taxes 814.98 

city officers' salaries 83.28 

mayor's incidentals 5.50 

auditor's dejiartment 50.99 

street and park commission 83.42 

repairs of highways 567.82 

new highways 474.39 

watering streets 1,325.18 

street sweeping 866.53 

bridges 711.89 

scavenger service 337.35 

repairs of sewers 499.36 

new sewers 408.75 

lighting streets 438.09 

paving Hanover street 344.06 

health department 209.34 

repairs of schoolhouses 1,055.42 

furniture and supplies 483.69 

books and stationery 65.75 

care of rooms 16.23 

evening schools 330.10 

evening drawing school 39.94 

manual training 108.15 

free text-books 71.02 

police court 215.02 

police commission 605.01 



494 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

From Pearl-street schoolhoiise repairs $136.80 

Stark park 251.03 

Valley eemeterj^ 291.95 

Amoskeag cemetery 16.00 

Pine Grove cemeterj' 143.76 

Merrill yard 95.10 

paupers oft" farm 589.93 

indigent soldiers 51.75 

decoration of soldiers' graves 14.06 

abatement of taxes 357.36 

free cash in treasurj* in excess of appropriations. . . . 9,405.30 

$21,748.56 
From reserved fund: 

To printing and stationery $145.42 

incidental expenses 482.86 

snow and ice 2,197.22 

land taken for highways 2,686.27 

paving streets 1.313.72 

macadamizing streets 1,712.25 

grading for concrete 193.40 

city teams 77.31 

paving Elm street 355,34 

fuel 717.11 

contingent expenses 526.03 

teachers' salaries 7,111.62 

fire department 92.58 

fire alarm telegrapli 355.68 

police station 132.72 

repairs of buildings 1,166.00 

new schoollioxise, Ani()si<cag. . . 837.08 

commons 176.06 

Derryfield park 2S9.00 

South Manchester ])hiygr()un(l 20.66 

city farm 1,018.25 

printing and advertising..*. 2.77 

I $21,609.35 
I'assed January 2, 1S99. 



CiTV OK Manchkstkr. 

An OiiUKit 1() print 11i<- I'ift \-t liinl AdmiimI iJcporl of the Kcccipls and 
Kxpcnditiircs of (lu- Lily of MaiKlustcr. 

Onlnid, 'I'liat l^c coniniittoo on finance be and are hereby aiilhori/ed 
to procure for llie use of llic iiiliabitants of said city the jirinting of 
the fifty-third annual report of tiie receipts and expenditures of the 
city of .Manchester, inelnding the reports of the joint standing com- 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 495 

mittee on finance, the citj- auditor, the school board and superintend- 
ent of schools, supex'intendent of water-works, water eommissioners, 
engineer of fire department, police commissioners, overseers of the 
poor, trustees, librarian and treasurer of the city librarj^ committee 
on cemeteries, joint standing committee on city farm, city physician, 
city solicitor, city engineer, street and iDark commissioners, and such 
other matter relative to city affairs as said finance committee may 
direct; and also to procure the printing of the maj-or's inaugural 
address of January 3, 1899; the exi>enses thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for printing and stationery. 
Passed February 14, 1899, 



City of ^Manchester. 
Ax Order relating to Claims and Suits against the City, 

Ordered, That the major and the city solicitor be authorized to dis- 
pose of suits against the citj-, now i)ending in court, or which may be 
entered in court during the ensuing two j-ears, as they deem best, 
and that they be a special committee to consider claims against the 
city, with authoritj' to settle such claims as they deem proper when 
the amount involved in such settlement does not exceed two hundred 
and fifty dollars ($250), 

Passed February 14, 1899, in Board of ^Mayor and Aldermen. 



City of Maxciiestek. 
Ax Order changing the Location of Electric Arc Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized and empowered to change the location of such electric arc 
lights as they may deem necessary to better light the streets of the 
city. 

Passed !March 7, 1S99, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



City of Maxciiester. 

Ax Order authorizing the Committee on Setting Trees to expend Two 
Hundred Dollars ($200) for Trees and Tree Boxes. 

Ordered, That the committee on setting trees be authorized to expend 
two hundred dollars ($200) for shade trees and tree boxes, the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for incidental expenses, 

Passed*^rarch 14. 1>^90, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



196 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of ^Manchestee. 
An Order relating to the Garbage Question. 

Ord'ercd, That the sum of three hundred dollars ($300) be and the 
same is hereby' placed at the disposal of the mayor to be used at his 
discretion to investigate the garbage question; the said sum of three 
hundred dollars ($300) to be charged to the appropriation passed by 
the board of common council Februarj- 14, 1899, and approved hy t^e 
mayor. 

Passed March 14, 1S99, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to the Election of Oflficials in Ward No. 10. 

Ordiii-cd, That a special election in ward No. 10 be held May 23, 1899» 
to fill such offices in said ward as required by an act passed by the 
legislature of 1899, entitled, "An act in amendment of an act in rela- 
tion to the citj^ of iSIanchester, Session Laws of 1878, chapter 163," and 
that the city clerk of the city of Manchester be instructed to notify 
the selectmen of said ward of such election, and this order to fill the 
same, by giving to them an attested copy of this order. 

Passed April 4, 1899, in Board of ]\rayor and Aldermen. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the J?nnds of Certain Officials of the City of 
]\[anchester. 

Onli^rrd, Tlint whereas it has been the custom of cortaiu banhs of 
the city of Manchester to furnish bonds of certain officials of the city 
of Manchester in return for the money in the custody of said ofiicials 
being deposited in said banks; and whereas said banks do not now 
furnish said bonds; and whereas said city receives monthly interest 
on deposits of said officials; and whereas said interest amounts to more 
1li,iii llic iirciniiim of s.iiil bonds; llierefore. be it ordered as follows: 
Thiit liic niavor he and luTchy is authorized and empowered to pro- 
cnic, at till" expense of tlie city of Manchester, bonds required of 
certain city officials of the city of ^randiester, namely, city treasurer, 
tax collector, city clerk, and city auditor, from such Fidelity Company 
as lie shall apjirove; the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for incidental exix-nses. 

Passed May :.'. 1S'.I9. in i'.oanl of Mayor and Aldrrnicn. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 497 

City oi-- Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to bnild a certain sewer, as follows: 

Cojnmencino- in Spruce street at Cypress street, and thence in a 
southerly direction in Cypress street to Auburn street, and thence in 
an easterly direction in Auburn street 300 feet; the expense thereof 
to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed Maj- 2, 1S99, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



City of ^Manchestek. 
Ax Ordek to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That 'the board of street and park commissioners be and 
herebj" are authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencinj^ in Massabesic street at the James Hall road, and thence 
in a southeasterly direction in ^lassabesic street to the ^Mammoth road, 
and thence in a northerly direction in the Mammoth road to Nelson 
street in said city; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for new sewers. 

Passed Maj- 2, 1899, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



City of Manchester, 

An Order relating to the purchase of Horses for use in the Fire- 
Department. 

Ordered, That the mayor and standing committee on fire department 
be authorized to purchase seven horses for use in the tire department; 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire depart- 
ment. 

Passed May 9, 1S99, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



City of Manchester. 
An OiiDER to repair Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the mayor and standing committee on lands and build- 
ings be and are hereby authorized and empowered to make such neces- 
sary repairs in and upon the public buildings of said city as shall not 
exceed the sum of one thousand dollars (.$1,000); and that said sum of 
one thousand dollars be charged to the appi-opriation for repairs on 
public buildings. 

Passed May 9, 1S99, in Board of Mayor and .Mdermen. 



498 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manciiestei{. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing' at the manhole at the intersection of Elm east back 
street with the Central south back street; thence in a southerly direc- 
tion in Elm east back street to Spruce street; thence in a westerly 
direction in Spruce street to Elm street; thence in a westerly direc- 
tion in Elm street to Granite street; thence in a westerly direc- 
tion in Granite street to west of Franklin street; the expense thereof 
to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers, or the repairs of 
sewers, or both. 

Passed May 9, 1S99, in Hoard of ^ifayor and Aldermen. 



City or Manciikstek. 
Ax OitDKR to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordnrd, That the 1)()aid of street and ])ark commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers, as follows: 

Commencing- at the manhole at the intersection of Jewett street with 
Young- street, and thence in a westerly direction in Young- street to 
Cypress street, and thence in a southerly direction in Cypress street 
450 feet; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed May 9, 1899, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to Band Concerts. 

Ord<rr('d, That tlic mayor be and hereby is authorized and empowered 
to expend such sum or sums the present year for o|)en air band con- 
certs as shall not exceed the sum of three liniidi-cd dollars; and that 
said sum of three hundred dollars l)e charged to tlu- appropriation for 
band concerts. 

I'assed May 9, 1.S99, in I'.oanI of Mayor and Aldcnucu. 

City of Mancmfster. 
.\n Oki.ki' ill i-flalioii lo tlic Dfcoiatioii of Soldifrs" (li-avcs. 

nnlrnil. Tliat tin- I is I'.cll I'ost No. ::, C. A. 11.. under tlu- diriM-tion 

of tlir iiia.vor, 1... :iiitlioii/c.l lo drcora t c I lie soldiers' i^ravcs ujion 
.Mciiioi-iai l)a\: ainl tliat tlic fX|M-iisc IliriTof lie cliargcd to tlu- appro- 
I>rialioii for d.-coiMt ion of soldi. -rs' gra\fs. 

I'ass.'d May 9, Is'.i'.i, in i;o;.i-d of Mavor and AM.m-iii.mi. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 499 

City of Manchester. 
Ax Ordeu to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park coininissioners be and 
are herebj- authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing- at the manhole in Beech street, north of Blodget street, 
and thence in a northerly direction to Sagamore street in Beech street; 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed Jul}- 11, 1899, in Board of ^Maj'or and Aldermen. 



City of Manchester. • 

An Order relating to the erection of a Fire-Alarm Box. 

Ordered, That a fire-alarm box be erected at the corner of Lake avenue 
and Canton streets, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for fire department. 

Passed July 11, 1899, in feoard of Mayor and Aldermen. 



City' of ^Maxchestek. 

Ax Order to erect Three Electric Lights with proper fixtures for main- 
taining same. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets are hereby ordered 
to erect three lights, with proper fixtures for maintaining same, at 
the corner of North Adams and Clarke streets, Laurel north back street 
and Union street, and Cedar and Franklin streets. 

Passed July 26, 1899, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



City of Maxchester. 
Ax Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing at Amory street and thence in a southerly direction in 
Columbus street 300 feet; the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed July 26, 1899, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



500 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manciiestek. 
Ax Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordet'Cd, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing at the present terminus of the sewer in Second street 
(which is about 175 feet north of Frederick street) ; thence in a south- 
erlj^ direction to Frederick street, and thence in an easterh' direction 
in Frederick street 175 feet; the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed July 26, 1899, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



City of :Manchesteb. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordei'cd, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing at Blaine street and thence in a southerh' direction to 
Cleveland street in Second street, and thence in an easterly direction 
in Cleveland street to the Merrimack river; the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed July 2G, 1S99, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereb3^ authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing at Concord street and thence in a southerly direction 
in Ash east back street to the end of said back street; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the expense of new sewers. 

Passed July 2G, 1899, in Board of .Mayor ami Aldcrmon. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sower. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing at ^faj)le street and Ihenco in an easterly direction to 
Oak street in Blodget street, and tiuMice in a soiitlierly direction in 
Oak street to Brook street; tlic .-ximmis.' Ilu-n-of to he charged to the 
api)r()j)i'iat idii for new sewers. 

I'a.ssed .Iiilv :JC., 1S99, in BoanI of Mayor and Ald.Tincn. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 501 

City of Manchesteb. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
■are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing- at Milford street and thence in a northwesterly direc- 
tion to Avon street in Sylvester street; the expense thereof to be 
xjharged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed July 26, 1S99, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect One Electric Light with proper fixtures for main- 
taining- same. 

Ordered, That the Board of Maj'or and Aldermen concur that the 
committee on lighting streets are hereby authorized to cause to be 
erected one electric light, with proper fixtures for maintaining same, 
at the corner of Prospect and Beech streets. 

Passed August 11, 1899, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



City of ^Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are herebj'' authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing at the terminus of the present sewer in Pine east back 
street, between Amherst and Concord streets, and thence in a northerly 
-direction to Concord street in Pine east back street, and thence in an 
easterly direction in Concord street to Union street; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed September 12, 1899. 



City of iMANCHESTER. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing at Milford street and thence in a northerly direction 
to Mast street in William street: the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed October 3, 1899. 



502 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of MANCiiEsxEnt. 
Ak Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Onhra}, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing- at Maple street and thence in an gasterly direction in 
Harrison street to Oak street, meaning- to lower and relay the present 
sewer; the expense thereof to be charg-ed to the appropriation for ne-w 
sewers, or to the repairs of sewers, or both. 

Passed October 3, 1899. 



City of Maxciiester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing- at Sag-amore street, thence in a southerlj' direction in 
Eussell street to a point 230 feet south of Blodget street; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed October 3, 1899. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing- at Silver street and thence in a southerly direction in 
Pine street to Plummcr street, and thence in an easterly direction in 
Plummer street to Union street; the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed October 3, 1899. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordrred. That the boiii-d of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby aufhori'/ed lo Imild a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing at Wilson strti-t .■md thence in an easterly direction in 
Snmmer sonth back sti-cit to Iliiil street; the expense thereof to be 
charged to tlic ai)i)ropri:it ion for new sewers. 

I»asscd OctoluT .!, ISO'.). 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 503 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Colhmencing- at Belmont street, thence in an easterly direction in 
Bridge street to Beacon street, and thence in a southerly direction in 
Beacon street 200 feet; the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for new sewers. 

Passed October 3, 1S99. 



City of Manchester. 
Ax Order to erect Two Gasoline Lights at Goffe's Falls. 

Ordered, That committee on lighting streets be authorized to erect 
two gasoline lights with proper fixtures for maintaining same, loca- 
tions to be designated by committee, at Goffe's Falls. 

Passed October 3, 1899. 



City of Manchester, 

An Order to erect Six Electric Lights with proper fixtures for main- 
taining same. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets are hereby author- 
ized to erect six electric lights with proper fixtures for maintaining 
same at the following locations: 

Corner Huntress and Prince sfreets. 
Corner Hanover and Alfred streets. 
Corner Sagamore and Russell streets. 
Corner Old Falls road and Spruce street. 
Corner Summer and Belmont streets. 
Cornev Mammoth road and Nelson street. 
Passed November 21, 1S99. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order allowing the Inspector of Buildings the sum of One Hundred 
and Fifty Dollars per annum for Horse Hire. 

Ordered, That the inspector of buildings, being compelled in the per- 
formance of his duties to cover the whole of the territory within the 
limits of the said city of Manchester, be allowed the sum of one hun- 
dred and fiftj- dollars ($150) annually for horse hire. 

Passed December 8, 1899. 



504 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of ^Manchester. 

An Order relating to a Contract with the American Welsbach Street 
Lighting Company. 

Ordiered, That the mayor and the committee on lighting streets be 
and are hereby authorized to enter into a contract with the American 
Welsbach Street Lighting Company for sixty-five or more sixty-candle 
power Welsbach lights, the same to be in accordance with a report sub- 
mitted this day to said board of mayor and aldermen by the committee 
on lighting streets. 

Passed December 12, 1S99. 



City of [Manchesteh. 

rn the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine. 

An Ordinance changing the Names of Certain Streets. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That the names of certain streets in said city be changed 
as follows: That the name of the street known as Gore street, begin- 
ning at Union street and' continuing easterly, be changed to Blodget 
street. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained February 14, 1S99. 



City of Manchester. 

IN the YK \R one TIIOISANU KUniT HINDRED AND NINETY-NINE. 

Ax Oki)IN.\xck (lumping the Names of Certain Streets. 

lie it orddiiird by llic Miiyor and Aldci-incn of the City of Manchester, 
in City Couneil assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. Tlial Ihe names of certain streets in said city be changed 
as follows: West Milford street, running from the junction of Amherst 
road and Milford street to the Bedford town line, to Donald street 

Sicc;t. 2. This ordinance shall take etVcct u|)t.n its passage. 

I'assed to be ordained March 7, 1899. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 505 

City of RLa.nciiester. 

in the year oke thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, 

An Ordinance relating- to an Inspector of Buildings. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council a.ssembled, as follows: 

Section 1. The board of maj'or and aldermen shall, on the first Tues- 
day of February, 1S99, and biennially thereafter, elect an inspector of 
buildings. 

As soon as convenient after the passage of this ordinance, said board 
of mayor and aldermen shall fixl the salary and elect an inspector of 
buildings, who shall continue in office until the first Tuesday of Feb- 
ruary, 1901, or until his successor is elected; removable, however, at 
the pleasure of the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 2. The inspector of buildings shall be a competent person, 
and shall be an experienced architect, builder, or civil engineer, and 
shall not be interested directly or indirectly in any building contract, 
or in furnishing material for the same. 

Sect. 3. The inspector of buildings may, from time to time, make 
such rules and regulations for the conduct of the office as shall be 
approved by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 4, This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage, and all 
ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with this ordinance 
are hereby repealed. 

Passed to be ordained May 16, 1899. 



City of ^La.nchesteb. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine. 

An Ordinance changing the Names of Certain Streets. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That the names of certain streets in said city be changed 
as follows: That the name of the street known as Amherst south back 
street, running from Nutfield lane easterly to Pine street, be changed 
to Derryfield lane. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained September 5. 1899. 



506 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of ^Lanchester. 

in the year one thousand eight iiundbed' and ninety-nine. 

An Ordinance changing the Names of Certain Streets. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That the names of certain streets in said city be changed 
as follows: That the name of the street known as Old Amherst road, 
from Mast street to Milford street, be changed to Eochelle avenue. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained September 5, 1899. 



City of Manchester. 

IN THE year one THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NTNEfTY-NlNE. 

An Ordinance changing the Names of Certain Streets. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of ^Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That the names of certain streets in said city be changed 
as follows: Chestnut west back street, extending from Bridge street 
south to Lowell south back street on the north, to Bridge place; Elm 
east back street, extending from Bridge street north to Myrtle street, 
to North Church street. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained September 5. 1899. 



City of ;NrANCHESTER. 

IN THE YEAK ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDREI> AND NINETY-NINE. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Chapter 14 of the City Laws and 
Ordinances. 

Be it 01-dainrd by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of ^^anchcste^, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. The fire limits of the city of ^fauchcstcr shall include 
all that part of the city bounded northerly by Harrison street, easterly 
by Pine street, southerly by Auburn street, and westerly by "Rim west 
back street; also what is known as the "flatiron district" in McC.regor- 
villc, bounded nn the north by .\mory street. snnnioMst by 'Nfcnregor 
street, and west by Main street. 

Tt shall be the duly f)f said inspector to oxaniinc the condition of all 
buildings undci<,'^oing aitcralicuis or being erected within the city 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 507 

limits, and to serve notice in writinpf upon the builders, owners, or 
architects of such structures as he deems to be unsafe or insecure, by 
reason of tlie mode or manner of construction or the material used in 
the construction tliereof, and shall order such changes in the mode or 
manner of construction thereof and the materials used as he shall 
d^m necessary for public safetj-. 

The said inspector is hereby empowered to, and whenever in his judg- 
ment occasion 'may require shall, enter into and upon anj' existing 
building, any premises, staging, or other structure, for the purpose of 
examining the same in reference to its safety, and attending to the per- 
formance of his duties as required bj- law, and shall order the same 
altered to his reasonable acceptance at the expense of the ownet 
thereof, or of the owner of the land upon which the same is located. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained October 3, 1899. 



City of Manchestkb. 

in the year one thousand eight hundked and ninety-nine. 

An Ordinance changing the Xames of Certain Streets. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That the names of certain streets in the city of Manches- 
ter be changed as follows: Elm west back street, from Auburn street to 
Spring street, to Hampshire lane; Manchester south back street, from 
Xutfield lane to Lincoln street, to Monadnock lane; Lowell south back 
street, from Nutfield lane to LTnion street, to Seneca lane; Hanover 
south back street, from Nutfield lane to Maple east back street, to 
Londonderry lane. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained October 31, 1S99, 



City of Manchester. 

IN THE year one THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-NINE. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Sections 4, 8, 16, and 34 of Chapter 6 
and Section 1 of Chapter 15 of the City Laws and Ordinances of the 
Cit}- of Manchester. 

Be it ordained by the [Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend section 4, chapter 6 of the city Laws and Ordi- 
nances, in the third line of said section, by .striking out in said line, 
after the word "of," the words "nine hundred." and inserting in place 



508 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

thereof the words "thirteen hundred and fifty,"' and in the fonrth line 
of said seetion, after the word "payments," by striking out the words 
"and all fees appertaining to his office," so that said section, as 
amended, shall read: "Sect. 4. The city clerk shall receive for his 
services, and all the duties connected with his oflRce, the sum of thir- 
teen hundred and fift}- dollars per annum, to be paid in equal quarterly' 
payments." 

Amend section 8, chapter G of the city Laws and Ordinances, in the 
third line of said section, by striking out in said line, after the word 
"office," the words "twelve hundred," and inserting in place thereof the 
words "thirteen hundred and fifty," so that said section, as amended, 
shall read: "Sect. 8. The city treasurer shall receive in full for his 
services, and all the duties appertaining to his office, thirteen hundred 
and fifty dollars per annum, to be paid in equal quarterly payments." 

Amend section 16 of chapter 8 of the city Laws and Ordinances b.v 
striking out the entire section and inserting in place thereof the fol- 
lowing section: "Sect. 16. The collector of taxes of the city shall 
receive in full for his services for collecting all the taxes of each year, 
and for performing all the duties appertaining to his office, the sum of 
thirteen hundred and fifty dollars, pajable in equal quarterly paj'^ments. 
His official year shall end on the first daj' of June, at which time he 
shall surrender to his successor in office all moneys, books, papers, 
including the list of uncollected taxes, and other property pertaining 
to his office. The deputy collector of taxes shall receive in full for his 
services the sum of eight hundred dollars, payable in equal quarterly 
payments." 

Amend section 34 of chapter of the city Laws and Ordinances in the 
second line of said section by striking out in said line, after the word 
"services," the word "twelve," and inserting in place thereof the words 
"thirteen hundred and fifty," so that said .section, as amended, shall 
read: "Sect. 34. The civil engineer of the city shall receive in full for 
his services thirteen hundred and fifty dollars per annum, payable in 
<iuarterly payments." 

Amend section 1 of chapter IT) of the city Laws and Ordinances, in 
the fifth line of said section, by striking out in said line, after the word 
"shall," the words "fix the salary and," and adding to said section the 
words, "He shall receive in full for his services, and for all the duties 
appertaining to his office, the sum of eight hundred dollars per annum, 
to l)e paid in equal monthly payments," so that said section, as 
amended, shall read: "Section' 1. The board of mayor and aldermen 
shall, on the first Tuesday of February, IS'.K), and biennially thereafter, 
elect an insjjector of buildings. As soon as convenient after the pas- 
sage of this ordinance, said board of mayor and aldermen .shall elect 
an inspector of buildings who shall continue in otlice until the first 
'J'uesday of Feljruary, lOOl, or until his successor is elected, removable, 
liowcvcr. at tiic plcasun- of 1 lie l)()ar<l ..I' mayor and aldermen. He 
shall receive in lull lor liis services, and for all llir duties apiiertainiiig 
to his olliee, the sum of eii^lit Iminlie.l dollars." 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 509 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force as of the 
first Tuesdaj' of January in the year one thousand eig-ht hundred and 
ninety-nine, and all ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are liereby repealed, and all ordinances in the hands of 
the committee on bills on second reading relating to city oilicials' sal- 
ar^s are herebj^ dismissed, the intent of this ordinance being to super- 
sede all others. 

Passed to be ordained November 7, 1899. 



City of Manchestek. 

IX the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine. 

An Ordinance changing the Names of Certain Streets. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That the names of certain streets in said city be changed 
as follows: That ths highway now known as Ryderville road and Goflfs- 
town back road, beginning at the Goffstown road, so called, opposite 
the rujrtherly terminus of Coolidge avenue produced, according to 
Amoskeag Company's plan, and extending in a northerly direction to 
a iJoint on Front street, so called, about one hundred and Mty feet 
south of Black brook, so called, be changed to Omega street. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained December 12, 1899. 



City of Manchester. 

IN THE YEAR ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NT^NETY-NINE. 

An Ordinance relating to the Pay of Ward Oflficers at Special Elections 
holden in the City of Manchester in the Year of 1899. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That for the purpose of this ordinance sections 21 and 
22 of chapter 6 of the city Laws and Ordinances, as amended December 
1, 1896. be amended so that the moderators, clerks, selectipen, and ballot 
inspectors in wards Nos. 5, 6, and 8 shall receive for their services at the 
special elections holden in said wards during the present year in addi- 
tion to their respective salary as such ward officer, the sum of five 
dollars; that the moderator, clerk, selectmen, and ballot inspectors 
in ward No. 10 .shall receive for their services at the election holden 
in said wai-d ^fay 23, 1S09. in addition to their respective salary as such 
ward officer, the sum of ten dollars. 



510 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

The intent of this ordinance being to pay all ward officers for ser- 
vices rendered at special elections holden in the several wards in the 
city of Manchester in the year of 1899. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained December 12, 1899. 



INDEX. 



INDEX, 



A 

Abatement of taxes 447 

Amoskeag cemetery 436 

Ampskeag schoolhouse 427 

Annual interest charge on bonded debt 470 

Appropriations for 1899 by city council 448 

Appendix, school 230 

Assets, statement and inventory of 472 

Auditor, city, report of 347 

Auditor's department 371 



B 



Band concerts 447 

Board of water commissioners, organization of 28 

report of 29 

health, report of 273 

Bonded debt, tabular statement of 466 

detailed statement of, for 1S99 467 

annual interest charge 470 

Books and stationery 403 

Bridges 386 

Buildings, repairs of 425 

public, occupied by private parties 471 

c 

Care of rooms 407 

Cemetery, Pine Grove 432 

Valley 434 

Amoskeag 436 

report of sub-trustees of Valley 306 

Pine Grove 305 

Amoskeag 307 

Cemeteries, treasurer of 308 

treasurer of fund 311 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax 457 

City auditor's department 371 

auditor's report 347 

councils, orders, ordinances 483 

engineer, report of 101 

513 



514 



INDEX. 



City farm 439 

hall 357 

library 413 

report of trustees of 255 

treasurer's report 258 

librarian's report 262 

donations to 265 

officers' salaries 368 

officials, list of 3-18 

solicitor, report of 343 

teams 387 

treasurer's report 347 

Commons 393 

Contingent expenses 406 

County tax 448 

D 

Debt, payment of funded 355 

bonded, statement of ^ 467 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 446 

Derryfleld and Stark parks 395 

E 

Electric lights, location of 326 

Elliot Hospital 445 

Emergency Ward 445 

Engineer's department 397 

Evening schools 408 

school, mechanical drawing 409 

Exempted from tax, property ; 457 

Expenses, incidental 361 

mayor's 372 

contingent 406 

F 

Farm, paupers off 436 

city 4^9 

File and index system 444 

Fires, list of 178 

Fire department 414 

report of chief engineer 155 

value of personal property 171 

names and residences of members 198 

location lire-alarm boxes If.O 

Fire-alarm telegraph 419 

Fn.'O text-books 410 

Fuel 405 

Furniture and supplies 403 

G 

Gas-lights, location of 325 

Grading for concrete 382 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 446 



INDEX. 515 



Health department 393 

board of, report of 273 

inspectors of, report of 289 

HiKliways, new ;{7r, 

land taken for :-7S 

watering ;{7!) 

paving 380 

macadamizing 381 

grading for concrete on 382 

sweeping 385 

lighting , 396 

repairs of 373 

High school furniture 412 

Home, Women's Aid 445 

Hospital, Elliot, free beds 445 

Sacred Heart 446 

Notre Dame de Lourdes , 445 

Hydrant service '. 42o 



Inaugural address 21 

Incidental expenses 361 

Indigent soldiers 444 

Inspector of buildings, report of 301 

Interest : 354 

annual charge, bonded debt 470 

Inventory of assets 472 



Land taken for highways 378 

Laws relating to exemptions 4^6 

Legal points and rules relating to claims against the city 477 

Lighting streets 396 

Library, city 413 

Loan, temporary 357 

Macadamizing streets 381 

Manual training 4U 

Manufacturing property exempt from taxation 4ti5 

Mayor's Incidentals » 372 

Merrill yard 436 

Militia • 446 

Milk Inspector, Teport of 339 

Money unappropriated 355 

Municipal receipts and expenditures 350 

N 

New highways 376 

boiler, training school 412 

Main-street school 412 



516 INDEX. 

o 

Order in relation to decoration of soldiers' graves 498 

relating to contract with Welsbach Street Lighting Company 504 

to purchase horses for flre department 497 

to build certain sewers 492, 497. 49S, 499, 500, .^01. 502, 508 

relating to the final transfers for 1898 • 493 

relating to transfers of money 493 

to repair public buildings 497 

relating to bonds of city officials 496 

to print fifty-third report 494 

to erect electric lights 492, 409, 501, 503 

relating to sleds for fire department 492 

relating to claims and suits 495 

changing electric lights 495 

relating to garbage question 496 

relating to election of officials 496 

relating to band concerts 498 

relating to erection of fire-alarm box 499 

relating to inspector of buildings.. 503 

to purchase trees 495 

Ordinance changing name of streets i 504, 505. 50&, 507, 509 

relating to inspector of buildings 605 

amending chapter 14 506 

amending chapters 6 and 15 507 

relating to pay of ward officers 609 

Ordinances, orders, resolutions 481 

Organization of school board for 1899 244 

Overseers of the poor, report of 295 

Oil lamps, location of 326 



Parks, Derryfleld and Stark § 395 

Parsonages, valuation of, exempt from taxation 457 

Paupers off the farm 4^6 

Paving streets 380 

Payment of funded debt 355 

Pine Grove cemetery 432 

Plumbing examiners, report of 143 

rules of 150 

expenses •. 444 

Police department, station 420 

court 422 

commission 422 

Printing and stationery 359 

and advertising 403 

Property account, real and personal 472 

Public buildings occupied by private pwrtlcs 471 

Pearl-street schoplhouso r(>i)alr8 428 

Purchase of land sold for taxes 447 

R 

Rciiulrs of sell 111] 111 (i\isoH 401 

of bulldlMK.s 425 

of hlgliwiiys 373 



INDEX. 517 

Rooms, care of 407 

Resolution relating to interest on deposits 485 

exempting H. B. Reed & Company 484 

in regard to city laborers 491 

relating to garbage question 483 

transferring money 485. 4SG, 487, 488, 489, 490, 491 

relating to bequest of Mary Perkins 486 

* in regard to paving Elm street 488 

discontinuing highway 489 

relating to issuance of bonds 483 

raising money and making appropriations for 1899 448 

Resolutions, orders, and ordinances 481 

making temporary loan 484 

Report of Board of Water Commissioners 29 

Superintendent of Water- Works 30 

City Engineer 101 

Chief Engineer Fire Department 155 

Trustees of City Library 255 

Sub-Trustees of Valley cemetery 306 

Pine Grove cemetery 305 

Amoskeag cemetery 307 

Treasurer of Cemeteries 308 

Treasurer of Cemetery Fund 311 

Treasurer of Sinking Fund 319 

Overseers of the Poor 295 

Street and Park Commission 65 

Committee on Sewers and Drains 127 

Committee on Streets 136 

City Solicitor 343 

School Superintendent 211 

Board of Health 273 

City Auditor 347 

City Treasurer 347 

Real and personal estate owned by the city 472 

property, exempt from taxation, other than public property 457 

Rules, etc., relating to bills against the city (auditor's department) 477 

Receipts and expenditures, 1899 350 



Sacred Heart Hospital 445 

Salaries of city ofBcials 3C8 

Salaries, teachers' 410 

Scavenger service .■!83 

School department, organization of 244 

evening, mechanical drawing 409 

superintendent's report 211 

Schoolhouses, repairs of 401 

Sewers, repairs of 39q 

new 391 

Sinking fund 355 

treasurer's report 319 

Snow and ice 37Y 

Soldiers, indigent 444 

Solicitor, city, report of 343 

South Manchester plaj'ground 3^7 

Stark and Derryfield parks 395 



518 INDEX. 



Statement of bonded debt 466 

public buildings occupied by private parties 471 

State tax 447 

Street and park commission 372 

report of 65 

Street sweeping 385 

T 

Tabular statement of taxation by Board of Assessors 451 

Taxes, abatement of 447 

due and uncollected 454 

Tax, state 447 

county 448 

valuations 454 

Taxation, appropriations for 1899 ^448 

exemption 457 

settlement of account tax collector 455 

Teachers, list of 246 

Teachers' salaries 410 

Teams, city 387 

Temporary loan 357 

Text-books, free 410 

Training, manual 411 

Treasurer, city, report of 347 

Y 

Valley cemetery 434 

Valuation and taxes, 1899 453 

w 

Watering streets 379 

Water-works, superintendent's report 30 

commissioner's report 29 

expenses 428 

Women's Aid Home 446