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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

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FIFTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



City of Manchester 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1900 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO 
THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. 

PRINTED BY THE JOHN B. CLARKE CO. 
I 9 O I. 



N 

; c\ r-. r-^ 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

1900. 



Mayor. 

WILLIAM C. CLAEKE Office, City Hall 

Chosen at biennial election in November, 1898. Salary, $1,800 -per 
annum, payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1S48, section 1. Chapter 223, 
Laws of 1SS3. Public Statutes, chapter 47.) Telephone at house antl 
office. 



Aldermen. 

Act of June, 1848, section 1. Public Statiites, chapter 48. 

Ward 1. John P. [Mullen, 12 Whitney street. 

Ward 2, De Lafayette Eobinson, 255 Front street, Amoskeag. 

Ward 3. William F. Elliott, 194 Concord street. 

Ward 4. George H. Phinne3', 133 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. Eichard J. Barry, 232 Lake avenue. 

Ward 6. Samuel M. Couch, 382 East Spruce street. 

Ward 7. John F. Frost, 11 West INIerrimack street. 

Ward S. Gillis Stark, 42 School street. 

Ward 9. Frank T. Provost, 21 Amory street. 

Ward 10. Eugene E. Eeed, 63G Somerville street. 



President of the Common Council. 

Ilarrv T. Lord, 387 Hanover. 



Members of the Common Council. 

Act of January, 1S97, chapter 19S. 

Ward 1. 

Abner J. Sanborn, 31 Market street. 

Frederick W. P>ond, 46 Amoskeag Corporation, Stark street. 

George H. Knowlton, 1436 Elm street. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Waed 2, 

Herman F, Straw, 607 Chestnut street. 
Eobert K. Chase, S41 Union street. 
Elijah M. ToplifE, 192 Prospect street. 

Ward 3. 

A. Gale Straw, 627 Union street. 
Job J. Grenier, 341 Orange street. 
Charles H. Clark, 17 Malvern street. 

Ward 4. 

Aimer D. Gooden, 466 Hanover street. 
Harry T. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 
\Yilliam G. Garmon, 460 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. 

George A. Doherty, 222 Central street. 

Bryan Connors, 146 Cedar street. 

John F. Harrington, 145 East Spruce street. 

Ward 6. 

Henry I. Haselton, 404 Lake avenue. 
Walter M. Lang, 719 Summer street. 
Smith Dodge, 427 Central street. 

Ward 7. 

Frank W. Stone, 7 West ]\Ierrimack street. 
Alexander Knight, 50 West Merrimack street. 
Hanson 11. Armstrong, 41 West :Merrimack street. 

W^ARD 8. 

James E. McDonald, 41 Parker street. 
Andrew Netsch, 20 Tilton street. 
Walter E. Mitchell, 29 Third street. 

Ward 9. 

Henry O. Hill, 302 Main street. 
Charles J. Untiet, 490 Cartier street. 
Moise Bessette, 501 Amory street. 

Ward 10. 

Nelson W. Paige, Mammoth road. 
Frank A. Emerson, 50 Cleveland street. 
Eli Walker, 146 Jewett street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. & 

Clerk of Common Council. 

(jeorg-e L. Stearns, 129 Salmon street. 

Sa]arj-, $200. (General Laws, chapter 46, sections 7-9. City Laws 
and Ordinances, page 33, chapter 6, section 11.) 



City CIerl<. 
Edward C. Smith Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350. Chosen in January, biennially, bj' board of aldermen. 
Eesidence, 900 Union street. 



City Auditor. 

James E. Dodge Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Appointed by niaj'or and approved by board of alder- 
men in .Tanuarj', annually. (Laws of 1SS9, chapter 287. City Ordi- 
nances, pages 44, 71, 83-88, 173.) Eesidence, Eiver road north. 



Auditor's Clerk. 

Lizzie M. Cogswell Auditor's Office, City Hall 

Eesidence, 60 \Yalnut street. 



City Treasurer. 

Fred L. Allen Office, City Hall 

Salarj', $1,350. Elected by board of aldermen in January, bien- 
nially. (Act of January, 1897, chapter 198.) Eesidence, 33 Walnut 
street. 



Treasurer's Clerk. 

^rabel L. How Treasurer's Office, City Hall 



Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350 and fees. Elected bj- mayor and aldermen before May 
1, biennially. (Act of .Tnly, 1851. Act of June, 1859, section 6. Act of 
1897, chapter 198. Public" Statutes, chapter 43. City Laws and Ordi- 
nances, chapter 33.) Eesidence, 740 Chestnut street. 



b MAyCEISIZr. CITX GOVERSMEXT. 

Deputy Collector of Taxes. 

Edrtin C. Paid C. Hector s OSee, C:tv Hill 

Salary. SSOO. Appointed by tax collector Trith approTal of mayor and 
aldennen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 33, section 3.) Besi- 
deiiee, 416 Central sTreet. 



City Solicitor. 

# 

Gecige A. Wagner Omee, Kennard, Boom 614 

Salary. S5C0. Elected by board of aldermen in Janaary, biennially. 
(Act of 1SS7, chapter 195.) Besidence^ 332 Orange street.' 



City Messenger. 
Office, Cirr Hall 



Salaiy, SZHKk Elected by boaxd of aldermen in Jannary, biennially. 
<C3TT Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4. 6.) Besidenee, 49 Appleton 
street. 



Standing Committees. 

Om Fim^mff. — ^The IMayor and Aldermen Frost and Provost. 

On AttosutM. — Aldermen Provost, Conch, and Bobinson. (Meets 
Wednesday succeeding' the 24th of each month. ATI bills mnst be left 
at the ctty anditor's office, properly approved, not later than the 20Ui 
of each month.) 

Ou Claimus. — Aldermen Mnllen. Barry, Provost, and Elliott. (Meets 
third Friday in each month.) 

Om Streets. — Aldermen Bobinson, Barry, MnHen, and Beed. 

On Sewert CMl DrBius. — ^Aldermen Frost. Staii. Conch, and Beed. 

Ob LigktiM§ Streits. — Aldermen Barnr. Phinney, and Frost. 

On LamdM amd Bwnldimgs. — Aldermen Elliott, Provost, and MnUen. 

O* Fire Dfpa rtm at. — Aldermen Phinney, Stark, and Elliott. 

Ou CoamMMW amd Ctmeteries. — Aldermen Stai^ Phinney, ElHott, 
Ccnch, and Bobinson. 

On Ciljr Farmi amd Hom^ of Correetiom. — Aldermen Conch. Bobinson, 
and MnHen. 

On MHitarg Affairs. — Aldermen Conch, Mnllen, and Barry. 

Om PitUvp Htalik. — Aldermen Stark, EUiott, and Provost. 

Om Emrotlmemi. — Aldermen Elliott, Barry, and PMnney. 

Om BHU om Seamd Beadimg. — Aldermen Phinney, Stark, Frost, and 
Beed. 

Om Liif^m^est. — Alirm-- Tr:-*. Barry, EIKott, and Beed. 

Om Seilimg Trt**. — . 7r:xost, Mnllen, Bobinson, and Beed. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 7 

Common Council. 

STXSDTSG COMilTTTEXS. 

So. 1. Central, Auditor's, and Engineer's Departments and Department 
of Taxes. — ^Messrs. Lord. Grenier, ConDors, McDonald, Haselton. and 
Walker. 

JVo. 2. Street and Seicer Department. — ifessrs. H. F. Straw. Gannon, 
Stone, Clark, Doherty. 

yo. 3. School Department. — Messrs. Topliff, ilitchelL Knight, Lord, 
Knowlton, and Lang. 

Xo. 4- Fiff Department. — Messrs. Gooden, Emerson, Armstrong. 
Chase, Untiet, and Dodge. 

Xo. 5. Puilic Buildings end Places Department. — ^Messrs. Sanborn, 
Knight, Chase, Bessette, and Paige. 

Xo. 6. Library. Police, Healfh, and CTiaritahle Departments. — Me^rrs. 
A. G. Stra^v, Gooden, Bond, Xetsch, and TTin- 

Xo. 7. Lighting Streets Deportment. — Messrs. Qark, Garmon, Paige, 
Mitchell, and Harrington. 

Finance Committee. — ^Messrs. Lord. H. F. Straw, Topliff, Gooden, A. G. 
Stra-w. Sanborn, and Clark. 



City Physician. 
Frederick Perkins OSBce, S95 THtti street 

Salary. S600. Elected by board of aldermen in Jannary. biennially. 
(Act of 1S97, chapter l&S. City Ordinances, chapter 9, sections 29, 30.) 
Kesidence. 52 Clarke street. 



City Engineer. 
Samuel J. Lord Office, City TTan 

Salary, Sl.SoO. Chosen by board of aldermen in Jannary, biennially. 
(City Ordinances, chapter 6. sections 33. 34.) 



Water Commissioners. 

(Chapter 70. La^vs of 1>71. City Ordinsnces. chapter 36. and Laws of 
1591. chapter 26, page 319. act approved March 31. 1S91. Chapter 1S3, 
La^vs of 1S93.) One commissioner elected annnally by mayor and 
aldermen, in the month of September, for a term of sis years. Office 
at conrt honse, comer Franklin and West Merrimack streets. Tele- 
phone at office and at pnmping station. 

The Mayor, ex oificio. 

Charles H. INtanning. Term expires .Tannary. ii«jl. 
Frank Dowst. Term expires January. 15C6. 
Alphens Gay. Term expires Jannary. 1905. 



8 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Henry Chandler.* Term expires January. 1904. 
Edgar J. Knowlton. Term expires January. 1904. 
Harry E. Parker. Term expires January, 1903. 
Charles; T. Means. Term expires January, 1902. 
AJpheus Gay, chairman. 

Henry Chandler, clerk. Salary. §100. Chosen by the board of com- 
missioners. 



Superintendent of Water-Works. 
Charles K. Walker OfSce, Court Honse, Franklin street 

Salary. $2,000. Chosen by water commissioners annually. Eesi- 
dence, 6S South Main street, "West Manchester. 



Clerk of the Water-Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $1,500. Chosen bv water commissioners annually. 



Engineer at Old Pumping Station. 
Josiah LaseUe. Salary, $700. rent, fuel, and use of land. 
Chosen bv water commissioners annually. 



Engineer at New Pumping Station. 
Henry A. Donaway. Salary, $2.50 per day, rent and fuel. 



Justice of the Police Court. 

Isaac L. Heath, court room at police station, corner Manchester and 
Chestnut streets. 

Salary, §1.500. Appointed by the governor with the advice of the 
council. (General Laws, chapter 215: chapter 163. sections 17, IS. 19. 
of the Laws of 1S7S. as amended by chapter 236, Laws of ISSl. Public 
Statutes, chapter 211.) 



Associate Justice of the Poiice Court. 

George W. Prescott. Salary. S300 per annum. 

Appointed by the governor, with the advice of the council. (Chapter 
215. General Laws, sections 2-14. Public Statutes, chapter 211. Chap- 
ter 296, Laws of 1S93.) 

•Chandler deceased: Knowlton elected to vacancy. 



LIST OF OFFICEPwS. 9 

Clerk of the Police Court. 

John C. Bickford. Salarj", $600, 

Appointed by the justice of the police court. (Chapter 103, sections 
17-19, General Laws, amended by chapter 236, Laws of ISSl. Public 
Statutes, chapter 211. > Kesidence, 15 Ash street. 



Police. 



The members of the police are appointed by the police commission- 
ers, and hold their commissions during good behavior. They are, by 
virtue of their appointment, constables and conservators of the peace, 
and their jurisdiction extends throughout the city. (Chapter 253, sec- 
tion 5, General Laws; chapter 303, Laws of 1SS7; chapter 202, Laws of 
1S93.) Police station, at the comer of Chestnut and Manchester streets. 



Police Commissioners. 

See chapter 202. Laws of 1S93. 

Xoah S. Clark, clerk, term expires .January, 1904. 
Frank P. Carpenter, term expires January, 1902. 
Edward B. Woodbury, chairman, term expires January, 1906. 



Chief of Police. 

Michael J. Healy Office at Police Station 

Salary, ?2,000. Eesidence. 304 Central street. Telephone at house 
and office. 



Deputy Chief of Police. 

John F. Cassidy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $1,500. Eesidence, 415 Manchester street. 



Captain of the Watch. 

Thomas E. Steele. .Salary. S2.50 per day. Eesidence, 56 Xashua 
street. 



Sergeants. 



Leon E. Magoon. Salary, S2.50 per day. Eesidence, 355 East Spruce 
street. 

John T. O'Dowd. Salary. .$2.50 per day. Eesidence, 90 Adams street. 



10 



MANCHESTER CITl GOVERNMENT. 



Patrolmen. 



Arohanibeault, Joseph. 
Badger, John C. 
Bean, Randall W. 
Boarassa, Frank E. 
Brown, John G. 
Butler, James S. 
Callaghan, Peter. 
Connor, John J. 
Coolidge, Edgar L. 
Dustin, Frank J. 
Farrell, Joseph A. 
Hampston, James S. 
Hampston, Patrick. 
Hayes, Robert J. 
Healy, John D. 
Hildreth, Clifton B. 
Hntchins, Dexter B. 
Lovejoj', George A. 



Lynch, John J. 
Maher, William. 
Marden, Frank W. 
McQuade, Edward B. 
]\Ioore, Frank P. 
Kixon, John T. 
0':\ralley, John F. 
Parmenter, Wallace C. 
Poehlman, Oscar R. 
Proctor, Levi J. 
Eainville, Frank. 
Ring-, Olof. 
Russell, xVlbert. 
Somers, Elmer E. 
Snllivan, Florence. 
Sweeney, James. 
^Velch, John T. 
Wheden. Eben E. 



Colburn, Everett E. 



Special Patrolmen. 

Kearns, Timothy. 
Snllivan, Timothy. 



Janitor of Station. 

Frank P. Wiggin. Salary, $1.73 per day. Residence, 255 Auburn 
street. 



Matron. 



Miss A. B. Brown. Salary, $415 per annum. Residence, 277 Merri- 
mack street. 



School Committee. 

Chosen at the biennial election in November, 189S; mayor and presi- 
dent of the common council members c.r officio. The board of school 
committee choose the clerk of the board, the superintendent of public 
instruction, the truant officer, and the teachers in the public schools, 
and determine their salaries. They have charge of the repairs of 
schoolhouses, to a limited extent, and the purchase of free text-books 
and other supplies, and are limited by the appropriations of the city 
councils. The salary of the committee is $10 each. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 11 

Ward 1. 
Walter B. Heath. Elliott C. Lambert. 

Ward 2. 
Elmer W. Nutting. Charles H. Manning. 

Ward 3. 
George D. Towne. Louis E. Phelj^s. 

Ward 4. 
John H. Eiedell. Nathaniel L. Colby. 

Ward 5. 
Daniel J. McAuliffe. John T. Kelley. 

Ward 6. 
Eugene E. Dunbar. Harry L. Davis. 

W'ARD 7. 
Edson S. Heath. Edward B. Woodbury. 

Ward S. 
Frank A. Cadwell. Ned T. Wallace. 

Ward 0. 
Kobert E. Walsh. Josej^h A. Bolvin. 

Ward 10. 

Mark E. Harvey. Harry H. Burpee. 

^"\'illiam C. Clarke, ex officio chairman. 
Harr^' T. Lord, ex officio. 
George D. Towne, vice-chairman. 
Elliott C. Lambert, clerk. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

WMlliam E. Buck* Office, City Hall 

Charles AV. Bickford Office, City Hall 

Salary, $2,300. 

Superintendent's Clerk. 

Fannie L. Sanborn Eesidence, 161 Hanover street 

Salary, $500. 
* Buck's term expired July 1, 1900; Bickford elected. 



12 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Truant Officer. 

Curtis W. Davis Office, City Hall 

Salary, $750. Kesidence. S49 Chestnut street. 



Assessors. 



One assessor from each ward chosen at the biennial election in Xo- 
vembex". Paid $2.50 each for each day while employed in the assess- 
ment and abatement of taxes. Oflice, City Hall. (Charter, section 25. 
Public Statutes, chapter 48, section 1; chapter 50, section 4; chapter 
49, sections 10, 11, 12. City Ordinances, chapter 6. section 26.) Assist- 
ant assessors, not exceeding six, chosen by the city councils. 

Ward 1. Henry Lewis, 32 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 2, John K. Wilson, 67 Blodget street. 

Ward .". David O. Fernald, 384 Lowell street. 

Ward 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. George F. Sheehan, 85 Cedar street. 

Ward 6. Ijcroy if. Streeter, Mammoth road. 

Ward 7. Kobert Leggett, 50 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 8. Eugene W. Brigham, 6 Marlboro street. 

Ward 9. John T. Hannigan, 159 Cartier street. 

Ward 10. Henry Horton, Mammoth road. 

CHAIRMAN OF ASSESSORS. 

David O. Fernald Office, City Hall 

CI.KRK OF ASSESSORS. 

Eugene W. Brigham Office. Citv Hall 



Inspectors of Check Lists. 

One in each ward, chosen at the biennial election in November. Com- 
pensation, $2.25 per day for each day actually employed. Office, City 
Hall, (Laws of 187S, chapter 163, sections 5," 6, 7, 9, 'lO, 11, 12. 13. 14. 
16, and City Ordinaii'Oes, chapter 14, sectiom 9.) 

Ward 1. George C, Kemp, 40 Macliine Shop block. 

Ward 2. Charles B. Tucker, 777 Union street. 

Ward 3. William B. Corey, 88 Pearl street. 

Ward 4. Albert T, Barr, 336 Merrimack street. 

Ward 5. Daniel A. Mnrpliy, 246 Anburn street. 

Ward 6. George Taylor, 480 La&e avenue. 

Ward 7. Joseph A, F'oster, 42 Amoskeag Corporation, 

Ward 8. Charles C. Tinkham, 9 Parker avenue. 

Ward 9. Leander S. Boivin, 3 Monmouth street. 

Ward 10, John G, Hutchinson, 939 Havward street. 



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14 . MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

panies is as follows: Captains, each $165; lieutenants, each $160; clerks, 
each $160; assistant engineers, each $153; all other members, each $150; 
payable in equal semi-annual payments, on the first of January and 
July. (Laws of 1870, chaj)ter 99. General Laws, chapter 106. City 
Ordinances, chaj)ters 6 and 12.) Six members are iDcrmanently em- 
ployed as engineers at $76.25 per month each, and twenty-one as driv- 
ers at $68,331/3 per month each, six other iDermanent men at $65 per 
month each, and receive no compensation as call members. iMembers 
and officers of each companj^ are appointed by the board of engineers. 



I 

Chief Engineer. 

Thomas W. Lane Office, Central Station, Vine street 

Residence, 1937 Elm street. Teleiihone at house and office. 

Frank M. Frisselle, 58 ISIyrtle street. 

John Montj)laisir, 252 Coolidge avenue. 

Eugene S. Whitney, Eiver road north, corner West North street. 

Clarence E. Merrill, clerk, 418 Merrimack street. 

For further information see chief engineer's report. 



Trustees of City Library. 

(Laws of 1854, chapter 1588. See contract with Manchester Athe- 
neum, printed on pages 107 and 108 of City Eeport for fiscal year end- 
ing January 31, 1855.) Board of seven trustees, one of whom is elected 
by aldermen and board of trustees in joint convention in September, 
annually. Term of service, seven years; no salary. Two additional 
trustees, maj^or, and jiresident of common council, ex officio. 

Frank P. Carpenter, Elm, corner West Xorth street. Term expires 
October 1, 1902. 

Nathan P. Hunt, 747 Union street. Term expires October 1, 1901. 

Herman F. Straw, 607 Chestnut street. Term expires October 1, 1907. 

Walter M. Parker, 1883 Elm street, corner Webster. Term expires 
October 1, 1906. 

Eoger G. Sullivan, 168 Walnut street. Term expires October 1, 1905. 

Henry W. Boutwell, 587 Union. Term expires October 1, 1904. 

C. D. McDuffie, Ash street,, corner Myrtle. Term expires October 1, 
1903. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio. 

Harry T. Lord, ex officio. 

Nathan P. Hunt, clerk. 



Board of Street and Parl< Commissioners. 

The city councils in joint convention, biennially, elect one member 
of said board for a term of six years. Not more than two members 
can be of the same political party. Said board, consisting of three 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 15 

members, has full charge, management, and control of the building, 
constructing, repairing, and maintaining of all the streets, highways, 
lanes, sidewalks, bridges, public sewers and drains, and public parks 
and commons. (See Laws of 1893, chapter 264.) Office, City Hall 
building. Oi^en from S to 12 a. 5[., 2 to 5 p. m. Eegular meeting of the 
board at 2 o'clock p. m. each day. Salary of each member, .$1)00 per 
year, payable quarterly, and each is allowed $150 annuallj' for horse 
hire. 

George H. Stearns, clerk. Term expires 1904. 
Horace P. Simpson, chairman. Term expires 1906. 
Eyron "Worthen. Term expires 1902. 



Assistant Clerk. 

Bertha F. \Vhitnev. 



City Weigher, 

Gilbert Lyons. Office, city scales; residence, 64 Bridge street. 

Elected biennially in board of aldermen. Salary, $400 per annum: 
all fees for weighing- returned monthly to city treasurer with sworn 
statement. Stationed at citv scales on Franklin street. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Charles B. Clai-kson. 

Elected biennially in January by board of aldermen. Paid by fees. 
(.Section 25, chapter 43. Public Statutes, and chapter 125, Public 
Statutes.) 



Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39, sections 1, 2, 3, 4.) Two trustees elected 
by board of aldermen in January, annually, for the terin of four years. 
Sub-trustees appointed by board of trustees. 

J. Adam Graf, 10 Middle street. Term expires January, 1901. 
William H. Huse, Mammoth road. Term exjaires 1903. 
John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street. Term expires 1902. 
Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street. Term expires 1902. 
Stillman P. Cannon, 99 Lowell street. Term expires 1901. 
Charles E. Stearns, 329 Front street. Term expires 1903. 
Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street. Term expires Januarj^ 1904. 
Harrie M. Young, 33 Dutton street. Term expires January, 1904. 
Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer, 33 Walnut street. 



16 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Sub-Trustees of Cemeteries. 

VALLEY CEilETEKY. 

Aldermen George H. Phiniiey and De Lafayette Eobinson; John L. 
Sanborn, Enshrod W. Hill, and Stilhnan P. Cannon. 

PINE GKOVE CEjrETERY. 

Aldermen Gillis Stark and William F. Elliott; J. Adam Graf, Harrie 
M. Yonng, and EdAvin F. Jones. 

AMOSKEAG CE^METERV. 

Alderman Samuel M. Conch; Charles E. Stearns and William H. Huse, 

SUPERI^'TEXDEXT OF PIXE GROVE CEJFETERY. 

John Erskine. Office and residence at the cemetery. Telephone. 

SUPE1?INTENPEST OF VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Charles H. G. Foss. Office at the cemetery; residence, 747 Summer 
street. 

TRUSTEES OF CEJIETERY FUNDS. 

Xorwin S. Bean. 

Otis Barton, 61 Walnut street. 

William C. Clarke, ex ofllcio. 



Inspector of Milk. 

Joseph H. Geisel 767 Union street 

Term expires February 1, biennially. (Public Statutes, chapter 127.). 
Ai)i)ointed hj mayor and aldermen. Salary, $300 per annum. 



Inspector of Buildings. 

Lyman :M. Aldrich Office, City Hall 

Besidence, 375 Lake avenue. Appointed by board of mayor and alder- 
Tnen, biennially, in February. Salary, $800 per annum. (City Ordi- 
nances, chapter 15. Laws of 1883, chapter 94.) 



Inspectors of Oil. 

Joseph B. Baril 99 Bridge street 

John Cavzer 383 Granite street 

(Public Statutes, chapter 129, sections 25-34. City Ordinances, chap- 
ter 25.) Paid by fees, ^^ of 1 per cent per gallon. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 17 

Moderators. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 31, sections 3, 9; chapter 
36, section 9; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordinances, page IS. See 
Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 



Ward 1. 


Abial W. Eastman. 


Ward 2. 


William M. Butterfield. 


Ward 3. 


Alfred K. Hobbs. 


Ward 4. 


Stephen B. Stearns. 


Ward 5. 


Matthew irahoney. 


Ward G. 


Herbert S. Clough. 


Ward 7. 


J. Adam Graf. 


Ward 8. 


Frank 0. Clement. 


Ward 9. 


John ,Monti)laisir. 


Ward 10. 


William B. BurxJee. 



Ward Clerks. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chai^ter 44, sections 10, 12. City 
Ordinances, page IS. Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Ward 1. Frank X. Foster. 

Ward 2. Willia "I. Maxwell. 

Ward 3. George W. Cooke. 

Ward 4. George M. Currier. 

AVard 5. Daniel F. O'Neil. 

Ward 6. Harry A. Piper. 

Ward 7. Charles E. Bartlett. 

Ward 8. William G. White. 

Ward 9. Michael J. Connelly. 

Ward 10. William P. Hall. 



Selectmen. 



Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 1, section 27; chapter 12, 
section 6; chapter 40, sections 2, 3; chapter 109, section 27; chapter 213, 
section 1. Citj^ Ordinances, page IS. Public Statutes relating to towns 
and cities.) 

Ward 1, 

John H. Wales, Jr. John Y. Brandt. 

John E. Hickey. 

Waed 2. 

Fred K. Ramsey. Silas E. Wallace. 

Daniel G. Andrews. 
2 



18 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 
WaPiD 3. 



Walter H. Wriffht. 



Victor C. Johnson. 



Fred W. Shontell. 
Ward 4. 

Joseph E. Merrill. 
Ward 5. 

William McGinnin. 
Ward 6. 

George M. Bean. 
Ward 7. 

Robert Leggett. 

Ward 8. 

Richard P. Grossman. Edward L. Tinkham. 

William R. Blakely. 



Victor L. Duhaime. 



Stephen Maloney. 



Samuel M. Worthley. 



Moses Sheriff. 



Charles R. Hodge. 



James L. Glynn. 



John C. Ferguson. 



Nelson G. Van Dyke. 



Alfred Hebert. 



Oscar Ouellette. 



Ward 9. 

Michael J. Bradley. 
Ward 10. 



Ignatius T. Webster. Patrick II. O'Malley. 

Frank A. Emerson. 



REPORT OF THE AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemet^, — The auditor herewith submits to your honorable body 
his report, giving a tabular statement of the receipts and expenditures 
for the year 1900, and a detailed statement of the expenses of each 
appropriation during the year. 

Eespectfully, 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER FOR THE YEAR 

1900. 

Temporary loans: Dr. 

New England Trust Co $75,000.00 

Eogers, Newman & Tolman 150,000.00 

Second National Bank 33,000.00 

$258,000.00 

E. C. Smith, city clerk: 

Dog licenses $1,709.84 

Sewer licenses 934.56 

Lunch cart licenses 10.00 

Kent of city hall 38.00 

Eent of tenements 41.65 

Show licenses 60.00 

Pool licenses 135.84 

Fees, intentions of marriage 615.00 

mortgages 167.88 

conditional sales 145.73 

corporations 14.50 

miscellaneous records 14.50 

writs 32.20 

discharges 18.00 

$3,937.70 

Police department: 

M. J. Healy $53,096.20 

John C. Bickford 1,107.82 

$54,204.02 

21 



22 EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Pine Grove cemetery: 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer $4,066.77 

John H. Erskine, superintendent 3,541.54 

"B. A. Stearns, sviperintendent 144.50 

$7,752.81 

Merrill yard cemetery: 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer $2.40 

John H. Erskine, superintendent 3.50 

$5.90 

George E. Morrill, collector of taxes: 

Taxes of 1900 $555,313.10 

Land sold for taxes May 16, 1900 6,856.72 

Taxes of 1S99 46,000.00 

Taxes of 1898 208.41 

Taxes of 1897 22.46 

Eedemption of land sold for taxes, 1897 1,386.57 

Eedemption of land .sold for taxes, 1898 1,539.87 

Eedemption of land sold for taxes, 1899 1,220.21 

Abatement of taxes, 1899 365.56 

Abatement of taxes, 1900 880.25 

Interest on taxes, 1899, ending May 31, 1900 1,534.67 

Costs on taxes, 1899, ending May 31, 1900... 1,512.00 

$616,839.82 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer: 

Insurance tax $3,160.50 

Eailroad tax 36,688.11 

Savings bank tax 49,490.76 

Literary fund 2,642.00 

$91,981.37 

City farm: 

E. G. Libbey, superintendent $4,044.95 

City scales: 

Gilbert T. Lyons $253.50 

Water-works department: 

Charles K. Walker, superintendent $138,241.94 

Paupers off the farm: 

County of Hillsborough $1,541.31 

W. H. Maxwell 1.66 

$1,542.97 

Valley cemetery: 

C. H. G. Foss, superintendent $1,700.25 

Tuition: 

V\'illiam E. Buck, superintendent $464.60 

Charles W. Bickford, superintendent 309.60 

$774.20 

Milk licenses: 

J. H. Geisel $60.50 



REPORT OF CITY TREASURER. 23 

Street and park commissioners: 

Byron Worthen $37.50 

Amount received from sundry persons 3,294.50 

• $3,332.00 

Interest on bank deposits: 

First National Bank $1,144.75 

Second National Bank 626.61 

George E. Morrill, collector 724.34 

$2,495.70 

Miscellaneous receipts: 

William C. Clarke $24.00 

Herrick Brothers (overdraft) .20 

C. E. Newcomb (overdraft) 15.86 

John B. Clarke Co. (overdraft) 80.00 

Amoskeag" Manufacturing- Co. (old boiler) . . 50.00 

$170.06 



Total receipts for year 1900 $1,185,337.69 

Cash on hand January 1, 1900 164,958.23 

Unpaid bills December 31, 1900 25,677.68 

$1,375,973.60 



Cr. 

By drafts during the year $1,185,053.85 

Unpaid bills January 1, 1900 19,726.35 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 171,193.40 

$1,375,973.60 



Eespectfully submitted. 

FEED L. ALLEN, 

City Treasurer. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchesta': 

Gentlemen, — I have examined the accounts of Fred L. Allen, city 
treasurer, for the year endingf December 31, 1900, and find proper 
vouchers for all payments, and all receipts duly accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January 1, 1900, was $145,231.88 

Receipts during the year 1,185,337.69 

Total $1,330,569.57 

Amount of drafts during the year $1,185,053.85 

Net cash on hand December 30, 1900 145,515.72 

Total $1,330,569.57 



24 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

The cash taken December 31, 1900. I find to be as follows: 

Deposited in Second National Bank $162,492.07 

Deposited in Suft'olk National Bank 2S9.90 

Deposited in office safe 8,411.43 

Gross amount of cash on hand December 31. 1900... $171,193.40 
Deduct amount of bills unpaid 25,677.68 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1900 $145,515.72 

Respectfully submitted, together with a tabular statement of the 
receipts and expenditures of the city for the year 1900. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER FOR THE 

YEAR 1900. 

Eeceipts. 

central department. 
Keeeived from: 

Direct city taxes $609,646.50 

Cost and interest on taxes 3,046.67 

. $612,693.17 

Licenses to enter sewer $934.56 

to keep dog 1,709.84 

to sell milk 60.50 

to keep billiard and pool tables and 

lunch carts 145.84 

to shows and exhibitions 60.00 

Fees from city clerk 1,007.81 

$3,918.55 

Eents $79.65 

Sr>"DRIES. 

Received from: 

City scales $253.50 

Miscellaneous sources 75.66 

$329.10 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Eeceived from tuition $774.20 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Eeceived from fines and costs $54,204.02 



RECEIPTS. 25 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Eeceived from: 

Pine Grove cemeterj- $7,752.81 

Yallej^ cemetery 1,700.25 

Merrill cemetery 5.90 

$9,458.96 

WATER-WOBKS. 

Gross receipts $138,241.94 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Keceived from: 

City farm $4,044.95 

Hillsborougii county, boarding paupers and 

Industrial School inmates 1,541..31 

$5,586.26 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Eeceived from: 

Interest $2,495.70 

Land redeemed from tax sale 4,146.65 

Overdrafts 96.06 

Manchester Street Eailway, on account of 

paving 2,679.61 

Street and j)ark commission, sale of pipe, etc. 652.39 

$10,070.41 

Total ordinary receipts during the year 1900 $835,356.32 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Eeceived from loans in anticipation of tax of 

1900 $225,000.00 

Eeceived from loan to pay Amoskeag tax case 33,000.00 

$258,000.00 

STATE. 

EeceiA'ed from: 

Insurance taxes $3,160.50 

Eailroad taxes 36,688.11 

Savings-bank taxes 49,490.76 

Literary fund 2.642.00 

$91,981.37 

Gross receipts $1,185,337.69 

Xet cash on hand January 1, 1900 145,231.88 

$1,330,569.57 



26 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

EXPEJ^DITUKES. 
CEJTTKAL DEPAETJIEMT. 

Interest on water bonds $39,534.50 

on city bonds 38,660.00 

on cemeterj' bonds 2,500.00 

on teraporarj^ loan, anticipation tax, 

1900 3,170.82 

$83,865.32 

City hall $3,719.63 

Printing and stationer}^ 1,750.60 

Incidental expenses 5,222.18 

Mayor's incidentals 269.00 

City officers' salaries 26,313.23 

Auditor's department 1,932.76 

Sinking fund trustees 27,000.00 

File and index system 192.51 

Land sold for taxes 6,856.72 

$73,256.63 

STKEET AND SEiWEE DEPAKTMENT. 

Street and park commission $3,351.47 

Snow and ice '. 6,615.92 

Kepairs of highways 26,436.20 

New highways 4,106.32 

Land taken for highways 5,237.66 

Watering streets 4,649.03 

Paving streets 4,604.96 

Macadamizing streets 3,959.17 

Grading for concrete 3,048.58 

Scavenger service 17,118.86 

Street sweeping 2,443.75 

Lighting streets 57,339.68 

Bridges 9,297.26 

City teams 8,020.07 

Eepairs of sewers 3,771.76 

New sewers 17,329.54 

Paving Elm street 12,774.76 

$190,104.99 

engineer's DEPARTMENT. 

Engineer's department $6,546.24 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Health department $8,224.73 



EXPENDITURBB. 27 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Repairs of schoolhouses $6,549.41 

Fuel 8,168.92 

Furniture and supplies 1,288.78 

Books and stationery 46.78 

Printing and advertising- 286.48 

Conting-ent expenses 2,483.04 

Care of rooms 6,378.24 

Evening- schools 1,187.35 

Teachers' salaries 86,126.18 

Evening- school, mechanical drawing- 234.40 

Free text-books 5,016.16 

Manual training- 470.23 

Furnishing room, Parker school 294.00 

Painting- outside of schoolhouses 999.83 

Sewing material for girls 237.28 

$119,667.08 

CITY LIBRARY. 

City library $5,371.15 

FIRE DEPARTMET^T. 

Fire department $63,299.08 

Fire-alarm telegraph 1,326.99 

Hydrant service 18,425.00 

$83,051.07 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Police station $2,648.50 

Police court 2,893.66 

Police commission 41,765.13 

$47,307.29 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Repairs of buildings $5,221.73 

Board of plumbing examiners 72.70 

, $5,294.43 

WATER-WORKS. 

Water-works $49,400.88 

Water-works sinking fund 18,425.00 

$67,825.88 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Commons $4,434.35 

Stark park 476.12 

Derryfield park 634.91 



28 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Pine Grove cemetery $8,976.39 

Vallej^ cemetery 3,093.96 

Amoskeag cemetery 349.17 

Merrill cemetery 119.04 

South Manchester playground 95.45 



$18,179.39 



CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILAJSTTHROPIC. 

Paupers off farm $9,716.63 

City farm 8,513.74 

Indigent soldiers 133.25 

Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Free beds, Elliot Hospital 300.00 

Free beds, Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital... 300.00 

W. C. T. U. Mercy Home 300.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' g-raves. : 359.62 

Militia 800.00 

Band concerts 408.00 

Garbage investigation 293.85 

$21,725.09 

ABATEMENTS. 

Abatement of taxes $34,309.24 



Total of ordinary municipal expenditures $764,728.53 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Temporary loan made in anticipation of tax of 1900 $225,000.00 

BONDED DEBT. 

School bonds $10,000.00 

Bridge bonds 25,000.00 



STATE AND COUNTY TAXES. 



State tax $63,869.00 

County tax 96,456.32 



$35,000.00 



$160,325.32 



Grand total of expenditures during the year $1,185,053.85 

Gash on hand December 31, 1900 $171,193.40 

Less unpaid bills 25,677.68 



Net cash on hand 145,515.72 



$1,330,569.57 



SINKING FUND. 29 



Interest. 

Appropriation $44,000.00 

Transferred from water-Avorks account 39,534.50 

Transferred from unappropriated money 330.83 

$83,865.32 



Expenditures. 

Coupons on water bonds $39,534.50 

Coupons on improvement bonds 16,140.00 

Coupons on school bonds 8,040.00 

Coupons on city bonds 6,200.00 

Coupons on bridge bonds 2,400.00 

Coupons on Granite bridge bonds 2,380.00 

Coupons on city funding bonds 3,500.00 

Coupons on cemetery bonds 2,500.00 

New England Trust Co., discount on notes, 

$75,000, 7 months 4 days 814.02 

Kogers, Newman & Tolman: 

Discount on $100,000, 5 months 17 days 1,438.05 

Discount on $50,000, 3 months 437.50 

Second National Bank, discount on $33,000, 

5 months 481.25 



3,865.32 



Payment of Funded Debt. 

Appropriation $35,000.00 

EXPENDITUBES. 

Schoolhouse bonds $10,000.00 

Bridge bonds 25,000.00 

$35,000.00 



Sinking Fund. 

Appropriation $27,000.00 

EXPEXDITUEES. 

Trustees of sinking fund $27,000.00 



30 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Unappropriated Money. 

Balance from last year unexpended $17,152.54 

Transferred from the following accounts: 

Printing and stationery 329.40 

Incidental expenses 277.82 

Mayor's incidentals 31.00 

Street and park commission 148.53 

Snow and ice 384.08 

Land taken for highways 527.60 

Watering streets 350.97 

Paving streets 395.04 

Macadamizing streets 6,040.83 

Street sweeping 56.25 

Grading for concrete 1,951.42 

Scavenger service 881.14 

Repairs of sewers 1,228.24 

New sewers 3,052.26 

Commons 65.65 

Stark park 23.88 

South Manchester playgpround 4.55 

Lighting streets 160.32 

Engineer's department 155.92 

Fuel 631.08 

Furniture and supplies 11.22 

Books and stationery 28.22 

Printing and advertising 13.52 

Contingent expenses 16.96 

Care of rooms 221.76 

Evening schools 12.65 

Manual training 129.77 

Fire department 1,701.12 

Police court 6.34 

Police commission 1,834.87 

Furnishing room, Parker school 6.00 

Sewing material for girls 12.72 

Painting outside schoolhouses .17 

Valley cemetery 6.04 

Amoskeag cemetery .83 

Pine Grove cemetery 23.61 

Merrill cemetery 80.96 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 40.38 

Abatement of taxes 690.76 

Board of plumbing examiners 27.30 

Unappropriated receipts 2,532.71 



$41,246.43 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 31 

Expenditures. 

Transferred to the following- accounts: 

Land taken for highways $765.26 

Interest 330.S2 

City hall 219.63 

Land sold for taxes 856.72 

City officers' salaries 1,813.23 

EeiJairs of highways 6,436.20 

New highways 106.32 

Bridges 6,297.26 

City teams 1,520.07 

Paving Elm street 95.15 

Derryfield park 134.91 

Health department 3,508.87 

Eepairs of schoolhouses 549.41 

Teachers' salaries 126.18 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 9.40 

Free text-books 16.16 

Fire-alarm telegraph 126.99 

Police station 148.50 

Eepairs of buildings 246.73 

Paupers off farm * 1,716.63 

City farm 13.74 

Indigent soldiers 8.25 

Transferred to ajixDropriations for 1900 16,000.00 

Balance carried to new account 200.00 



Temporary Loan. 

Eeceipts. 

New England Trust Co $75,000.00 

Suffolk National Bank 150,000.00 

Second National Bank 33,000.00 

Expenditures. 

New England Trust Co., 3 notes due Decem- 
ber, 1900 $75,000.00 

Suffolk National Bank, 5 notes due Decem- 
ber, 1900 150,000.00 

Transferred to abatement of taxes account. . . 33,000.00 



$41,246.43 



$258,000.00 



$258,000.00 



32 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City Hall. 

Appropriation $3,500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 219.63 



Expenditures, 
euetl and lights. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co.: 

Wood $20.50 

Coal 607.86 

Charles Boisclair & Co., wood 10.80 

Manchester Electric Co., lights 161.70 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 139.66 

Eaiche & Laf orce, wood 45.00 

Union Electric Co., lights 278.05 

WATEE AND TEIEPIIONE. 

Water Commissioners, xise of water $320.85 

Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 81.19 

CLEANING OFFICES, ETC. 

Clark M. Bailey, toilet paper $15.45 

Barton & Co., cheesecloth .25 

Joseph Boisclair, janitor 14.00 

Cauldfield, English & Co., polish 4.00 

James W. Hill Co., towels 1.50 

Manchester Mills, soap 11.10 

Mary JS'olan, cleaning offices 313.00 

Oscar Perkins, janitor 136.00 

J. K. Ehodes, substituting for T. P. Shea 29.02 

Alphonse St. John, janitor 6.00 

Frank St. John, janitor 544.00 

Timothy P. Shea, janitor public comfort 470.70 

The Talbot Co., "Tabo" 13.50 

The Sulpho-Napthol Co., sulpho-napthol 15.00 

F. H. Thurston, soap .60 

John B. Varick Co., duster, pail, brush, etc.... 6.55 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., matches, soap, etc 6.00 

FURNITURE, FIXTURES, SUPPLIES. 

E. M. Bryant & Co., lamps and repairs $10.75 

E. D. Gay, awnings and putting up 95.00 



$3,719.63 



$1,263.57 



$402.04 



$1,586.67 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 33 

James W. Hill Co., flags $13.25 

J. J. Holland, soap, chamois skin, maj'oi- 4.25 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., chairs and tables 7.75 

T. A. Lane Co., lamps 2.30 

^Manchester Electric Co., lamps 3.00 

^lanchester Hardware Co., shovel, sponges, 

brooins, etc 20. SG 

$157.16 

INCIDEJ^TAL EEPAIKS. 

J. J. Abbott, paint, setting glass, labor $81.12 

D. J. Adams, fitting keys .50 

Robert Bunton, reseating chairs 5.00 

Head & Dowst Co., material and labor 10.27 

James W. Hill Co., repairing flags, awnings, 

shades > 13.47 

George Holbrook, work on storm doors, etc .... 9.75 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., repairing chair .25 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on plumbing, gas, steam, 

electric lights 63.37 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing material and labor 38.05 

Harry A. Piper, repairs 30.97 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., repairs, base- 
ment 9.73 

B. F. Shepard, repairs 5.50 

C. H. Wood, painting 2.50 

SUNDRIES. 

W. G. Berry, insurance premium $32.45 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 15 lbs. ice daily 7.26 

$39.71 

Total expenditures $3,719.63 



$270.48 



Printing and Stationery. 
Appropriation $2,000.00 

Expenditures, 
assessors and inspectors. 

John B. Clarke Co.: 

Advertising notice $19.00 

Printing ward lists 356.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 4.96 



$379.96 



3 



34 REPORT OF CITY AUDITOR. 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

D. J. Adams, repairing machine $2.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing- receipts and tax 

bills 45.10 

E. A. Stratton, books and tablets 2.80 

Temple & Farrington Co., books, pencils 1.3:3 

CITY CLERK. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks, rosters, 

manuals, etc $78.75 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 5.70 

Novelty Advertising Co., jirinting- 24.75 

AUDITOR. 

R. Bechard, printing statements, bills .' $14.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing: 

600 reports 651.92 

Billheads 80.75 

Binding, stamping, and lettering reports.... 222.90 

CITY TREASURER. 

W. P. Goodman, stationery $17.90 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing receipts 2.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., pay-roll sheets, books 16.10 

J. A. Williams, postals and printing 11.00 



$51.2S 



$109.20 



$969.57 



$47.00 



MAYOR. 

E. R. Coburn Co., paper $2.80 

CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing blanks, etc $41.25 

Advertising proposals 38.31 

Union Publishing Co., advertising proposals.. 6.54 

$80.10 

BUILDING INSPECTOR. 

John B. Clai-ke Co., printing envelopes, letter headings.. $8.25 

SUNDRIES. 

W. E. Moore, printing brief $16.50 

Total expenditures $1,670.60 

Transferred to unapj^ropriated money account 329.40 

$2,000.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



35 



Incidental Expenses. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 
bikths, marriages, deaths. 

0. D. Abbott, M. D $4.75 

D. S. Adams, M. D 3.00 

E. B. Aldrich, M. D .50 

V. Boisvert, M. D .35 

Mrs. L. E. Blauey .25 

F. A. Babbitt, M. D .25 

H. W. Boutwell, M. D 5.75 

A. A. E. Brien, M. D 33.25 

J. F. Brown, M. D 2.00 

J. S. Brown, M. D 2.00 

Ellen V. Burr .50 

Lillian G. Bullock, M. D .25 

H. B. Burnham, M. D .25 

1. L. Carpenter, M. D 8.50 

Charles Chirurg-, M. D 3.50 

James M. Collity, M. D 12.75 

E. H. Currier, M. D 1.00 

Walter T. Crosby, M. D .75 

Rev. C. A. Bidwell 1.25 

Rev. F. S. Bacon 2.75 

Rev. Charles R. Bailey .25 

Rev. Claudius Bryne 7.50 

Rev. A. Eugene Bartlett 1.00 

Rev. J. H. Brennan 21.25 

Rev. Christophe O. Bauer 1.25 

Rev. John S. Curtis .25 

Rev. C. R. Crossett 1.00 

Rev. Andreas Carlsson 3.50 

Rev. J. A. Chevalier 17.25 

Rev. N. L. Colby 12.25 

Rev. Matthew Creamer 1.00 

Mary Danforth, M. D 8.0O 

G. M. Davis, M. D 9.00 

R. H. Dillon, M. D 14.00 

Charles E. Dodge, M. D 11.00 

Clarence M. Dodge, M. D 5.75 

John F. Dowd, M. D 3.00 

E. B. Dunbar, M. D 10.50 

J. A. Degross, M. D 4.00 

Rev. I. H. C. Davignon 12.75 



$5,500.00 



36 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Eev. C. W. Dockrill $3.50 

Rev. T. A. Dorion 1.25 

John Ferguson, M. D 1.50 

John D. Ferguson, M. D 7.75 

C: F. Flanders, M. D 31.00 

George Frechette, M. D S.25 

L. M. French, M. D 1.75 

E. N. Fugere, M. D 20.75 

N. E. Guillet, M. D .25 

S. J. Girouard, AI. D 2.50 

J. H. Gleason, M. D 5.75 

Moise Guerin, M. D 20.25 

M. S. Guggenheim, M. D 2.75 

Eev. J. W. Goodwin .50 

Eev. P. Hevey 9.25 

Thomas C. Hill, M. D S.OO 

B. F. Hodsdon, M. D 6.75 

J. A. Jackson, M. D 11.75 

Eev. W. N. Jones 2.25 

M. E. Kean, M. D 18.75 

G. Lafontaine, M. D 7.75 

P. G. Laberge, M. D 16.50 

J. E. Larochelle, M. D 30.25 

J. E. A. Lanouette, M. D 21.00 

J. E. Lemaitre, M. D 11.75 

J. D. Lemay, M. D 11.50 

H. D. Lord 7.00 

Eev. P. Lawrence 1.75 

Eev. B. W. Lockhart 3.50 

Eev. J. B. Lemon .25 

Eev. J. J. Lyons S.OO 

J. W. D. MacDonald, M. D 42.75 

J. W. Mooar, M. D .25 

G. B. Morey, M. D 3.25 

M. V. B. Morse, M. D 3.25 

J. T. Murray, M. D 4.75 

Mrs. S. Modin 1.75 

M. W. Munroe, M. D .25 

Eev. S. J. McLaughlin 4.50 

Eev. Edwin Morrell 1.75 

Eev. J. N. Nelson .75 

Clara Odman 4.25 

William Parsons, M. D .75 

W. H. Pattee, M. D 6.00 

Frederick Perkins, M. D 11.50 

Anna Pollmer 13.75 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



37 



Rev. O. D. Patch 

J. F. Robinson, M. D 

C. S. Rodier, M. D 

J. E. E. Roy, M. D 

William Richardson, M. D 

Serville St. Pierre, M. D 

Gillis Stark, M. D 

F. C. Steuart, M. D 

A. G. Straw, M. D 

Zatae L. Straw, M. D 

C. B. Sturtevant, M. D 

Anna Schelzel 

J. Sullivan, M. D 

Emile Sylvain, M. D 

N. Sasseville, M. D 

W. H. Sikorsky, M. D 

Rev. C. J. Staples 

E. C. Smith 

Rev. C. N. Tilton..... 

W. F. Templeton, M. D 

A. J. Todd, M. D 

George T>. Towne, M. D 

E. C. Tremblay, M. D 

L. Tremblay, M. D 

Ellen A. Wallace, M. D 

G. M. Watson, M. D 

H. P. Watson, M. D 

G. L. Wakefield, M. D 

A. F. Wheat, M. D 

R. W. Weeks, M. D 

Rev. E. C. Ziinmermann 

DAMAGES AND JUDGMENTS. 

Seth T. Hill, judgment 

John F. Mellady, damage caused by brook 
overflow 

LEGAL EXPENSES. 

S. H. Baker, W. C. Brown, B. G. Herrick, com- 
missioners' report 

W. C. Berry, services and money paid for forty 
witnesses 

J. B. Cavanaugh, legal services 

S. W. Emery, fee in Amoskeag tax case, 1898 

S. D. Felker, fee in Amoskeag tax case, 1898.. 



$1.50 
6.00 

24.75 
3.75 
1.00 

22.75 

12.75 
9.25 
2.00 

11.00 

2.25 

.50 

4.50 

22.50 
6.00 
.50 
2.25 
8.25 
1.50 
1.75 
4.00 
5.75 

52.00 

.25 

1.25 

10.50 

5.75 

.50 

5.25 

.50 

.75 



303.82 
80.00 



$68.20 

83.81 
15.00 
82.25 
81.44 



$842.50 



$383.82 



58 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



E. F. Jones, legal services $39.00 

T. D. Luce, certifying appeals and copies 2.60 

G. x\. AVagner, expenses to Concord, Nashua, 

etc 27.10 



$399.40 



CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

Fred L. Allen, expenses to Boston and Concord $21.72 

W. E. Moore, printing brief 5. .50 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone, messenger 25.19 

TEA.MS FOR CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

G. W. Bailey $43.00 

Thomas Brown 30.00 

J. r. Brown & Co 25.00 

Joseph Breault 10.00 

Boyd Brothers 12.00 

H. Cote 40.00 

C. S. Fifield 20.00 

W. J. Freeman 30.00 

A. L. Gadbois & Co 15.00 

Kean & Sheehan 10.00 

Manchester Street Eailway 132.50 

John F. Murphy 25.00 

C. C. Perry 5.00 

G. W. Reed 35.00 

C. H. Simpson 35.00 

B. F. & R. W. Welch 21.50 

G. E. Wheeler 15.00 

PREMIUM ON INSURANCE POLICIES. 

W. G. Berry $35.40 

Robert R. Chase 30.00 

DeCourcy & Holland 30.00 

John Dowst 30.00 

C. M. Edgerly 30.00 

Everett & Scott 30.00 

C. L. Harmon 30.00 

E. P. Richardson 30.00 

J. A. Sheehan <)0.no 

Stark & Blanchet 30.00 



$52.41 



$504.00 



$335.40 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 39 



CITY LIBRARY. 



Flint, Haskell & Flint, wood $4.50 

J. K. Eliodes, care of boiler 133.00 

John B. Variek Co., sharpening- mower, etc.... 1.75 



STTtEETS. 

Maxime Guillemette, setting stone bounds.... $6.52 

A. & E. Eeed, whitewashing tree boxes 32.70 

C. H. Sargent, trees and loam 80.00 

Joseph St. Laurent, 30 tree boxes 45.00 

C. H. Wood, painting signs 5.85 

CITY SCALES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co.: 

Coal $220.90 

Wood 5.00 

C. B. Clarkson, testing scales 3.35 

W. P. Goodman, book 6.00 

D. M. Poore, wood 1.00 

E. W. Poore, wood 2.00 

B. F. Shepard, repairing and adjusting scales 10.10 

Temj)le & Farrington Co., blocks .50 

John B. Variek Co., brooms .80 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

Felt & Tarrant Manufacturing Co., 1 coupon 

cutter $60.00 

C. L. Harmon, 3 days' labor 10.00 

"Independent Statesman," advertising tax list 8.25 

O. D. Knox, iDostmaster, stamped envelopes.. 21.20 



$139.25 



$170.07 



$250.05 



MILK INSPECTOR. 

J. H. Geisel, postal cards, lactoscope $3.80 

MAYOR. 

W. C. Clarke, express on typewriter $1.15 

J. G. Ellinwood, photographs 2.50 

W. P. Goodman, New Hampshire registers.... 1.00 

Hale & Whittemore, regilding frames, etc .... 6.75 
Smith Premier Tj'pewriter Co., retyping- 

machine 15.00 

E. A. Stratton, 6 note books .25 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 8.01 

■ $34.66 



40 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

G. E. Morrill: 

Express $1.00 

Distributing tax bills 93.00 

The Novelty Co., ribbon, etc 1.25 

Francis Pratt, Jr., jjens 2.50 

E. A. Stratton, tax book and ink 8.65 



CITY CLKEK. 

Elliott & Hatch Book Typewriter Co., ribbons $1.50 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 3.50 

G. C. Gilmore, 25 copies "Manchester in Civil 

War," 1 set reports 45.00 

Hale & Whittemore, framing inap 2.00 

J. J. Holland, chamois .50 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., stamps. 9.15 

E. L. Sibley, eyelet punch 3.00 

A. J. Smith, ribbon 1.50 

r. S. Webster Co., ribbons 2.00 



COI^RT HOITSE, 



CITY TREASURER. 

Boston News Bureau, subscription to Boston 

News Bureau $12.00 

E. M. Bryant & Co., 1 lamp 5.25 

E. E. Coburn Co., 1 book 6.00 

Daniels & Downs, tyjiewriting 6.50 

W. P. Goodman, stationery .90 

J. C. Hall Co., bank cheeks 20.50 

O. D. Knox, postmaster, cards and envelopes.. 22.50 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., stamp 1.50 

E. M. Treworgy, ink .75 

Temple & Farrington Co., pens, paj'-rolls 7.25 



D. J. Adams, repairing mower $1.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal. 195.00 

P. H. Riley, janitor 585.00 

John B. Varick Co., sharpening mower 2.00 



ASSESSORS. 

John F. Gillis, furnishing real estate transfers $12.00 

R. K. Horne, cuspidors 2.00 

People's Gas Light Co., 1 mantel .45 

E. A. Stratton, stationery and books 40.00 

Temple & Farrington Co.: 

Blank books 72.00 

Stationery 23.37 

Union Publishing Co., advertising notices.... 22.78 



$205.85 



$68.15 



$83.15 



$783.00 



$172.60 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 41 



SOLICITOR. 

Daniels & Downs, typewriting- $2.50 

M. McDermott, typewriting 1.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 43.87 

EJLECTIOiN' EXPETSrSES. 

D. G. Andrews, work and sawdust, ward 2 $8.00 

Aretas Blood estate, use of Mechanics' Hall... 60.00 

Henry Cote, use of team 5.00 

W. F. Connor, cleaning ward 8 wardroom 5.00 

J. H. DeCourcy Co., wood, ward 8 l.OO 

D. O. Femald, storage voting booths 12.00 

William Flanagan, changing railing and 

booths 0.00 

W. J. Freeman, use of team 1.25 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 18.91 

W. P. Hall, postage, stationery, ward 10 5.00 

Head & Dowst Co., labor and material 5.01 

John F. Kelley, labor, ward 5 6.00 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on lights, ward 7 2.60 

H. F. W. Little, labor and material, ward 3 31.10 

J. E. ^Merrill, cleaning wardroom, wood 8.00 

F. E. Nelson, lamps, oil, etc 1.32 

D. F. O'Neil, postage, stationery, 1899 3.65 

People's Gas Light Co., gas, ward 2 10.13 

H. A. Piper, booths and cleaning, ward 6 12.00 

J. Simard & Son, use of store and lights, 

ward 10 27.00 

E. A. Stratton, stationery 3.43 

G. E. Wheeler estate, use of team 5.00 



SUNDRIES. 

Adams Brothers, lime $0.20 

D. J. Adams, fixing kej'^ .15 

American Express Co., express on reports 6.37 

Amoskeag National Bank, safety deposit vault 25.00 

Boyd Brothers, use of team to hospital 1.50 

City Government Publishing Co., two subscrip- 
tions to magazine 6.00 

C. B. Clarkson, weighing coal 79.00 

John B. Clarke Co., binding books 9.26 

Mrs. Herbert Crosby, ducks killed by dogs 3.25 

George Danforth, poultry killed by dogs 16.25 

H. B. Dunton, V. S., destroying glandered horse 12.00 



$47.37 



$237.40 



42 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

J. G. Ellinwood, photographs $8.50 

First Light Battery, firing national salute, 

July 4 4,3.86 

Town of Goffstown, tax on land 2."^6 

\Y. P. Goodman, directories 87.50 

Herrick Brothers, killing and burying horse... 16.00 

O. D. Ivnox, postmaster, stamps 100.00 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on gas. Battery building .25 

Moore & Preston, wood, ward 2 wardroom 21.50 

G. E. Morrill, duplicate and over-valued taxes.. 13.83 

S. F. McDonald, chickens killed by dogs 15.00 

Stone & Forsyth, boxes 26.72 

Temple & Farrington Co., 100 boxes, auditor.. 4.50 

W. E. Warren, goat killed by dogs 5.00 

John B. Yarick Co., locks and hasps for jury 

boxes 4.80 



City Officers' Salaries. 

Appropriation $24,500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 1,813.2:; 



EXPENUITUEES. 
CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

William C. Clarke, maj^or $1,800.00 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer 1,462.50 

Edward C. Smith, clerk 1,687.50 

George A. Wagner, solicitor 800.00 

George L. Stearns, clerk common council 200.00 

L. M. Aldrich, building inspector 950.00 

Gilbert Lyons, weigher 400.00 

John A. Barker, messenger 700.00 

J. H. Geisel, milk inspector 300.00 

J. K. Rhodes, temporary messenger 24.00 

Frank St. John, temporary messenger _ 24.00 

Samuel J. Lord, engineer 112.50 

Blanche E. Bullock, treasurer's clerk 402.50 

Mabel L. How, treasurer's clerk 122.50 



$508.70 



Total expenditures $5,222.18 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 277.82 



.$5,500.00 



$26,313.2: 



CITY officers' salaries. 43 

Florence A. Robinson, city clerk's clerk $520.00 

Maude E. Soule, maj^or's clerk 561.00 

Margaret H. Stevens, labor in collector's office 34.00 

• $10,100.50 

CITY PHYSICIAN AJMD OVERSEERS OF POOR. 

Frederick Perkins, M. D., city physician $600.00 

Gillis Stark, M. D., temporary city physician.. .31.50 

\V. H. Maxwell, ward 1 25.00 

D. G. Andrews, Avard 2 25.00 

B. F. Garland, ward 3 25.00 

Charles B. Clarkson, ward 4 25.00 

Patrick Costello, ward 5 25.00 

Charles Francis, Avard 6 25.00 

William Marshall, ward 7 25.00 

Charles S. McKean, ward 8 '. 25.00 

Joseph Doucet, ward 9 25.00 

William GloAer, ward 10 25.00 

William C. Clarke, chairman ex officio 25.00 

W. H. :Maxwell, clerk 100.00 

Judith Sherer, matron pesthouse 360.00 

$1,366.50 

SCHOOL OFiaCERS AKD BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

W. E. Buck, suiaerintendent of schools...'. $1,150.00 

Charles W. Bickford, superintendent of schools 1,150.00 

Curtis W. Davis, truant officer 850.00 

E. C. Lambert, clerk of board 100.00 

W. C. Clarke, chairman ex officio 10.00 

Harry T. Lord, president of common council, 

ex officio 10.00 

Walter B. Heath, ward 1 10.00 

Elliott C. Lambert, ward 1 10.00 

Charles H. Manning-, ward 2 10.00 

Elmer E. Nutting-, ward 2 10.00 

George D. Towne, ward 3 10.00 

Louis E. Phelps, ward 3 10.00 

Nathaniel L. Colby, ward 4 10.00 

J. H. Eiedell, ward 4 1 0.00 

John T. Kelley, ward 5 10.00 

D. J. McAulift'e, ward 5 10.00 

Eug-ene B. Dunbar, ward G 10.00 ■ 

Harry L. Davis, ward 6 10.00 

Edson S. Heath, ward 7 10.00 

E. B. Woodbury, ward 7 10.00 

Frank A. Cadwell. ward S 10.00 

Ned T. Wallace, ward 8 10.00 



44 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Robert E. Walsh, ward 9 $10.00 

Joseph Boivin, ward 9 10.00 

M. E. Harrey, ward 10 10.00 

ITarry Burpee, ward 10 10.00 

Estate of Henry D. Soiile, ward 4 5.83 

BOARD Of ASSESSORS. 

Henry E. Lewis, ward 1 $150.00 

John K. Wilson, ward 2 204.50 

David O. Fernald, ward 3 945.00 

Harrison D. Lord, ward 4 451.00 

George F. Sheehan, ward 5 145.00 

L. M. Streeter, ward 6 277.50 

Robert Leggett, ward 7 155.00 

E. W. Brigham, ward 8 647.50 

John T. Hannigan, ward 9 140.00 

C. W. Brown, assistant 117.50 

Robert Edgar, assistant 82.50 

G. H. Dudlej^, assistant 194.50 

Eugene C. Smith, assistant 12.50 

H. B. Neal, assistant 72.50 

H. J. Woods, assistant 42.50 

A. T. Barr, assistant and clerical services 75.00 

H. L. Currier, clerical services 347.50 

John Cayzer, clerical services 42.50 

Fred Currier, clerical services 232.50 

H. F. Stone, clerical services and use of team.. 51.50 

Arthur W. Rowell, clerical services 307.50 

J. Z. W. Benard, interpreter 44.50 

Thomas Champa, interpreter 26.00 

Louis Comeau, interpreter 52.50 

J. B. Rejimbal, interpreter 81.00 



TAX COLLECTOR AND DEPUTY TAX COLLECTOR. 

George E. Morrill, collector: 

Salary for 1900 and balance salary for 1899.. $2,037.50 

Use of team 187.50 

Edwin C. Paul, deputy, salary for 1900 and 

balance salary for 1899 1,251.28 

ELECTION OFFICERS. 

Pay-roll, special elections, 1899: 

Ward 5 $35.00 

Ward 6 25.00 

Ward 8 40.00 

Ward 10 90.00 



$3,475.83 



$4,898.00 



$3,476.28 



$190.00 



auditor's department.. 45 

Inspectors of check-lists $1,016.12 

Election inspectors 390.00 

Moderators 150.00 

Ward clerks 200.00 

Selectmen 450.00 

$2,800.12 

Total expenditures $20,313.23 



Auditor's Department. 
Appropriation $2,000.00 

EXPENDITTJKES . 
LABOR. 

James E. Dodg-e, salary as auditor $1,200.00 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, services as clerk 600.00 



SUPPLIES. 

Barton & Co., towels $0.50 

Lizzie M. Cogswell: 

Cash paid for laundry 3.35 

Paper, postals, stamps, chamois, etc 14.95 

James E. Dodg'e, expenses to Boston, deliver- 
ing reports, etc 5.00 

W. P. Goodman, tablets, etc 1.55 

Tv. K. Home, flower pots .12 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage .50 

T. A. Lane Co., 1 lamp 4.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., twine and holder. . .45 

F. E. Nelson, flower pots .14 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., 1 numbering ma- 
chine and ink 12.55 

E. A. Stratton: 

Basket .60 

Dictionary stand, stationery 6.10 

Star Stamp Co., stamp and pad 1.20 

D. A. Simons, 1 stand .75 

Temple & Farrington Co.: 

6 blank books 10.00 

Stationery 2.25 

John B. Varick Co., sweeper, reading glass, 

step-ladder, paper 5.75 

George T. Wallace, carbon paper 3.00 



$1,860.00 



$72.76 



Total expenditures $1,932.76 

Transferred to new account 67.24 

$2,000.00 



46 REPORT OF THE CITY AUJJITOR. 

Mayor's Incidentals. 

Apj)ropriatioii $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Boyd Brothers, use of teams $60.50 

W. C. Clarke, team hire 101.50 

W. C. Clarke, incidentals 107.00 

$369.00 

Total expenditures $269.00 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 31.00 

$300.00 

Street and Park Commission. 
Appropriation $3,500.00 

EXPENDITUEES. - 

SALARIES. 

H. p. Simpson, chairman $600.00 

Georg-e H. Stearns 600.00 

Byron Worthen 600.00 

$1,800.00 

CLERICAL SEHVICES. 

Julia Stearns Frost $180.00 

George H. Stearns 468.00 

Bertha F. Whitney 301.50 

$949.50 

USE OF TEAMS. 

H. P. Simpson $150.00 

G. H Stearns 150.00 

Byron Worthen 150.00 

$450.00 

OFFICE SUPPLIES. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing- 150 reports $21.60 

City Government Publishing Co., one year's 

subscription 3.00 

J. G. Ellinwood, photographs of flood 2.50 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 48.36 

E. A. Stratton, 1 filing cabinet 45.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 16.68 

John B. Varick Co., whisk brooms .33 

$137.47 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



47 



SUNDRIES. 

Lovejoy & Stratton, repairing clock $1.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., wedges 1.70 

G. H. Stearns, expenses of commissioners to 

Boston and return 11. SO 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to lanappropriated money account 



$14.50 

$3,351.47 
148.53 

$3,500.00 



Repairs of Highways. 



Appropriation $20,000.00 

Transferred from unapprojiriated money 

account 6,43G.20 



$26,430.20 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January .••... $91.13 

February 223.96 

April 93S.76 

May 1,572.20 

June 781.33 

July 2,143.96 

August 2,630.78 

September 332.21 

October 1,671.88 

November 1,560.75 

December 293.67 

Division No. 4: 

April $78.00 

May 170.75 

June 172.12 

July 52.75 

August 139.49 

September 218.62 

October 51.75 

December 60.00 



$12,240.62 



$943.48 



48 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

DiTision No. 5: 

April $9-87 

May 98.37 

June 46.12 

August 88.62 

September 6-00 

Division No. 6: 

April $37.87 

May 191-12 

June 515.72 

August 11-00 

November 50. 6« 



Division No. 7: 

April $182.35 

May 580.84 

June 187.86 

July 208.22 

August 624.75 

September 171.12 

October 181.50 

November 173.12 

December • • • 110.87 



Division No. 8: 

April $8.00 

May 162.75 

June 207.12 

July 275.87 

August 69.62 

September 10.74 

October 9.75 

November 136.50 

December 7.0O 



Division No. 9: 

April $109.50 

June 138.87 

July 362.75 

August 194.00 

October 232.25 

November 58.50 



Division No. 10: 

January $58.25 

February 90.75 

March 43.25 

April 306.87 



$248.98 



$806.33 



$2,420.63 



$887.35 



$1,095.87 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 49^ 

May $780.37 

June 578.61 

July 503.73 

August 648.48 

September 204.74 

October 291.55 

November 570.24 

December 172.93 

$4,249.77" 

Division No. 12: 

December $334.56 

LUMBEB AND OTHEK MATEKIAL. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., iron $2.45 

Brown & Titus, lime and cement 239.73 

Davis & Farnum Manufacturing Co., pipe 137.20 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, etc 119.30 

A. Laberge, 1,008 posts 120.96 

L. C. Paige, pine sticks 10.00 

Nelson T. Paige, pine stringers 15.00 

Soule, Dillingham & Co., cement 39.20 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

A. N. Clapp $1.17 

Manchestet Hardware Co 24.70 

C. H. W. Moulton 13.20 

John B. Varick Co 70.95 

BLACKSiCITHING AND KEPAIES. 

J. J. Abbott, paint $5.30 

James Cram, sharpening tools 12.40 

Peter Duval, filing- saws 6.80 

D. E. Guiney, repairing pipe 2.35 

Warren Harvej", stone and repairing culvert.. 193.62 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on fountains, etc 4.26 

C. S. McKean, filing saws .40 

Pike & Heald Co., naaterial and labor on 

fountains 12.32 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repairs 4.25 

STONE, GRAVEL, CLAY, ETC. 

Charles A. Bailey, stone $452.50 

Brooks & Brock, gravel 49.40 

Boyce & Merrill, gravel 2.90 

Byron Corning, gravel 3.20 

E. O. Dodge, gravel 8.40 

Mark E. Harvej^ gravel 9.00 

4 



$683.84 



$110.02 



.$241.70 



50 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Frederick Heine, gravel $30.00 

John Lovering, stone and gravel 5.90 

F. H. Libbey, gravel 3.90 

Byron Moore, clay 7.50 

N. W. Paige, gravel 18.50 

L. C. Paige, gravel 13.50 

Wilson & Bryant, sand 5.00 

SUNDKIES. 

■John H. Campbell, use of water $3.00 

John Driscoll Co., dijjpers, M'ire, etc 19.25 

Wallace Laird, building culvert 110.00 

Moore & Preston, coal 19.50 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telej)hones 46.70 

X. C. Paige, carrying workmen to and from 

bridge 30.75 

H. A. Piper, glass and setting .40 

Pobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete 210.00 

F. S. Bodwell, building culvert 1,123.75 

Total expenditures 



$609.70 



$1,563.35 
$26,436.20 



New Highways. 

Appropriation $4,000.00 

Transferred froiu unappropriated money 

account ' 106.32 



EXPEjSTDITUKES. 
LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 



$55.89 

.37.50 

36.00 

36.00 

184.76 

997.13 

80.76 

2.43 

630.95 

139.43 



$4,106.32 



$2,200.90 



SNOW AND ICE. 61 

Division No. 7: 

May $446.06 

June 198.50 

Jnly 60.00 

Angust 71.75 

September 18.50 

$794.81 

Division Xo. 10: 

May $80.12 

June 103.00 

Jnly 280.87 

Aug-ust 177.50 

September .87 

November 66.75 

$709.11 

TOOLS, HAEDWAEE, STONE. 

C. A. Bailey, stone $385.00 

JTolin B. Varick Co., tools and hardware 16.50 

$401.50 

Total expenditures $4,106.32 



Snow and Ice. 
Appropriation $7,000.00 

EXPEWDITUBES. 
LABOR. 

Commons: 

February $13.50 

Division No. 2: 

January $1,087.84 

February 1,384.85 

March 958.72 * 

April 367.77 

July 25.63 

August , 2.25 

November 10.13 

December 55.11 

$3,892.29 

Division No. 4: 

February , $42.00 

Division No. 5: 

February $20.88 

March 12.25 

$33.13 



52 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Division No. 6: 

February 

Division No. 7: 

January $101.49 

February 284.57 

March 138.93 

April 25.25 

Division No. 8: 

February $13.00 

March 56.75 

Division No. 9: 

Februai'y 

Division No. 10: 

January $411.25 

February 528.74 

March 432.81 

April 91.38 

November 59.62 

December 3.50 

Division No. 12: 

December 

SUNBlilES. 

John T. Beacli, repairs $7.10 

Brooks & Brock, sand 80.00 

James Baldwin Co., plank. 9.92 

Daniels-Cornell Co., salt 28.33 

Austin Goings, sand 5.66 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 16.74 

Donald McDonald, sleds 85.00 

Moore & Preston, coal 13.00 

Pike (% Heald Co., labor on steam pipe 9.20 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., sand 40.00 

John B. Varick Co., shovels, hardware 74.17 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$46.2S 



$550.23 

$69.75- 
$51. 2S 



$1,527.30 
$21.10 



$369.12 

$6,615.92 
384.08 



$7,000.00 



WATERING STREETS. 



53 



Damage of Land Taken for Highways. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 765. 2G 

Expenditures. 

Oilman Clough, land $200.00 

Inez G. Fletcher et al., judgment 1,492.11 

N. M. Foster et al., judgment 50.86 

K. M. Foster, judgment 28.17 

M. E. & J. L. Golden 265.26 

Horace P. Hurd 676.26 

Frank Preston, changing grade 1,850.00 

True J. Perry, widening road 25.00 

Harvey B. Sawyer, changing grade 400.00 

Hodney N. Whittemore 125.00 

Pay-roll, Division No. 2, May 125.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$o,765.2'> 



$5,237.66 

$5,237.66 
527.60 

$5,765.26 



Watering Streets. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 
Division No. 2: 

January 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 5. . 

October 

November 

December 



$41.13 

68.56 

407.38 

532.14 

612.49 

472.37 

407.62 

84.11 

41.51 

27.37 



$5,000.00 



$2,694.68 



54 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Division No. 10: 

March $3.75 

April • • • • 22.12 

May 156.62 

■ June ". 181.50 

July ...• 226.75 

August 205.25 

September o . . . 149.50 

October 25.25 

December » 4.37 

SUPPLIES, EEPAIES, ETC. 

Abbott-Downing Co., 2 sprinklers $620.00 

A. B. Black, 1 set axles. 35.00 

John T. Beach, repairs .12.00 

G. W. Cheney, cash paid for express 5.30 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber. 24.88 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, etc 12.95 

Pike & Heald Co., repairs sprinklers, fountains 21.85 

J. L. & H. K. Potter, sprinkling attachments.. 170.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware, paint, etc 77.26 



$975.11 



$979.24 



Total expenditures $4,649.0S 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 350.97 

$5,000.00 



Paving Streets. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Expenditures. 

I.ABOB. 

Division No. 2: 

April $6.00 

May 428.22 

June ^. 411.99 

July 7. 266.00 

August 8.37 

September 19.50 

October 72.50 

November 56.99 

$1,269.57 



PAVING ELM STREET. 

Division No. 7: 

May $104.00 

June 361.09 

July 121.98 

September 12.75 

Division No. 10: 

January , $09.00 

February 28.50 

May 271.25 

June 283.16 

July 114.62 

August o . 87,37 

September 1.75 

October 5.00 

November 25.75 

Soule, Dillingham & Co., paving. 

STONE, GEAVEX., CONCRETE. 

C. A. Bailey $580.80 

Broolcs & Brock 163.80 

Kobie Consolidated Concrete Co 539.68 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



5& 



$599.82 



$S86.4a 
$564.89 



$1,284.28 

$4,604.96 
395.04 

$5,000.00 



Paving Elm Street. 

Appropriation $10,000.00 

Eeceived from Manchester Street Railway 2,679.61 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 95.15 

EXPENDITUEES . 
LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

May $711.88 

June 280.67 

July 37.30 

Soule, Dillingham & Co., paving 



$12,774.76. 



$1,029.85 
$3,758.72 



56 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STONE, SAND, CEMENT, ETC. 

C. A. Bailey $6,662.07 

Brooks & Brock 852.00 

Brown & Titus 472.12 

Total expenditures 



$7,986.19 
$12,774.76 



Appropriation 



Macadamizing Streets. 



EXPEOVDITURES. 



$10,000.00 



JLABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

May $374.25 

June 1,558.57 

July 605.12 

November 1.75 

Division No. 10: 

May $16.75 

June 2.00 

July 4.00 

August 8.50 

FUEL AND WATEK. 

Eugene Libbey, wood $127.75 

Moore & Preston, coal 123.56 

People's Gas Light Co., coke 16.00 

Water commissioners, use of water 70.00 

TOOLS AND HABDWABE. 

J. Hadlock $79.40 

Manchester Hardware Co 29.43 

B. H. Piper Co 11.25 

John B. Varick Co 463.73 

CASTESrCS, EEPAIES, ETC. 

Bucklin & Chamberlain, repairs and material 

for crusher $33.77 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 70.14 

A. K. Hobbs, packing, etc 5.54 

C. H. Hutchinson, repairing crusher and drills 68.51 
The Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., supplies 15.00 



$2,539.69 



$31.25 



$337.31 



$583.81 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 

T. A. Lane Co., valves, tapes, bands, etc $10.77 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., paving stone 

pockets 148.16 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil 65.22 

SUNDRIES. 

S. B. Stearns, premium on insurance 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated monej- account 



67 



$417.11 

$50.00 

$3,959.17 
6,010.83 

$10,000.00 



Grading for Concrete. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

May $164.76 

June 382.59 

July 279.21 

August 139.56 

September 60.01 

October 103.69 

November 64.56 

December 46.14 

Division No. 4: 

August 

Division No. 7: 

August 

Division No. 10: 

May $280.99 

June 48.49 

August 91.75 

October 33.11 

November 83.00 

December 38.50 

STONE AND CONCRETE. 

F. S. Bodwell $2.80 

H. W. Harvey 420.68 



$3,000.00 



$1,240.52 

$125.00 
$4.50 



$575.84 



68 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Warren Harvey $79.80 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co 475.31 

SUNDRIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice for fountain $124.07 

J. B. AlcCrillis & Son, sliari^ening drills .06 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unaj)propriated money account 



$978. 5» 



$124.13 

$3,048.58 
1,951.42 

$5,000.00 



Appropriation 



Scavenger Service. 



EXPEjVDITUEES. 



$18,000.00 



LABOR. 

Division Xo. 2: 

January $804.82 

February 618.06 

March 737.67 

April 855.39 

May 1,204.93 

June 721.97 

July 640.56 

August 742.79 

September 722.39 

October 940.62 

November 656.55 

December 713.15 

Division No. 7: 

January $118.13 

February 76.75 

March 89.87 

April , 113.62 

May 89.75 

June 21.48 

July 69.00' 

August 80.25 

September 74.50 

October 89.99 

November 69.00 

December 69.00 



$9,358.90 



$961.34 



STREET SWEEPING. 59 

Division No. 10: 

January • $343.50 

February 247.25 

March 235.00 

April 327.00 

May 615.12 

June 342.49 

July 312.63 

August 3S4.13 

September 340.50 

October 484.11 

Xovember 259.00 

December , 252.38 

$4,143.10 

CONTEACT. 

Cit}^ farm, scavenger service. $2,499.96 

TOOLS AND HAEDWAEE. 

John B. Varick Co $76.87 

LTJMBEK AND EEPAIES. 

John T. Beach, carriage repairs $10.55 

J. A. Ballon, repairing" harnesses 41.95 

Head & Dovs^st Co., lumber, etc 3.84 

H. C. Eanno & Son, repairing harnesses 4.10 

X. J. Whalen, repairs 3.25 



SUNDRIES. 



F. S. Bodwell, iise of piiDe and siphon $10.00 

.F. C. Kellogg, plants destroyed by teams 5.00 



$63.69 



$15.00 



Total expenditi^res $17,118.86 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 881.14 

$18,000.00 



Street Sweeping. 

Appropriation $2,500.00 

EXPENDITUEES. 
LABOE. 

Division No. 2: 

Januarys , $34.15 

April 111.04 



60 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



May $252.14 

June 253.93 

July 299.30 

August 293.57 

. September 256.11 

October 398.96 

November 225.88 

December 60.80 

Division No. 10: 

March $25.25 

April 4.25 

June 20.12 

July 35.62 

August 23.13 

September 6.25 

SUPPLIES, ETC. 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight $3.35 

New England Bi'oom Co., brooms and refilling 65.50 

H. Thompson, brooms 16.50 

William Churchill Oastler, refilling brooms 31.50 

John B. Varick Co., brooms 26.40 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$2,185.88 



$114.62 



$143.25 

$2,443.75 
56.25 

$2,500.00 



Bridges. 



Appropriation $3,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 6,297.26 



EXPEHDITUKES. 



$9,297.26 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $2.44 

April 10.00 

May , . 12.29 

Jwne 97.99 

July 73.35 

August 401.72 



BRIDGES. 

September ^350.68 

October • 286.32 

„ , 15.88 

]S ovember 

December ^^'^^ 

Division No. 5: 

October $55.75 

November ^^-^^ 



61 



CONTBACT. 



American Bridge Co $2,350.00 

Groton Bridge Co 300.00 



$1,288.73 



$144.00 



Division No. 9: 
November $80.00 

Division No. 10: 

April $1-^^ 

August • ^'^^ 

September 98.50 

October • 9^-50 



$196.38 



$2,650.00 



LUMBER, HAEDWABE, ETC. 

G. P. Ames, lumber $35.00 

J. J. Abbott, paint and labor 120.49 

John T. Beach, machine work .60 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freig'ht 3.22 

L. Boisclair, stone 6.00 

A. N. Claijp, nails, matches, pails 3.38 

Mrs. George Clement: 

Oil and lighting lanterns 8.00 

Filling 18.70 

Mrs. C. J. Clement, gravel 8.00 

B^'ron Corning, stone 15.00 

C. W. Farmer, stone 2.00 

Warren Harvej': 

Stone abutments and retaining wall for two 

bridges 545.12 ' 

Stone, etc., Cohas brook 566.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 3,244.24 

Manchester Hardware Co., nails 58.85 

Donald McDonald, sharpening tools 14.42 

National Paint & Varnish Co., paint 31.23 

N. W. Paige, stone and gravel 119.40 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools 139.50 

C. B. Wingate, rubber boots 9.00 

$4,938.15 

Total expenditures , $9,297.26 



62 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR 

South Manchester Playground. 

Appropriation , 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Commons: 

June $43.50 

August 24.50 

October 16.00 

SUNDRIES. 

D. E. Guiney, repairing pump $6.35 

John B. Variek Co., hardware 5.10 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 

City Teams. 

Appropriation $6,500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 1,520.07 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Commons: 

January $30.62 

February 15.25 

March 18.50 

May 15.50 

July 224.01 

September 23.50 

October 10.75 

November 26.25 

Division No. 2: 

Jan.uary $303.06 

February 224.50 

March 195.12 

April 210.75 

May 185.25 

June 92.15 



$100.00 



$84.00 



$11.45 

$95.45 
4.55 

$100.00 



$8,020.07 



$364.38 



CITY TEAMS. 



63 



July 




$149.88 






156.75 






154.28 






168.03 








Division ]Xo. 10: 


$27.50 






14.00 






10.50 






24.00 


May 




20.75 






14.00 


July 




14.00 


Auoust 




37.37 






14.00 


December 




23.50 




GRAIN, HAY, STRAW. 




Adams Brothers 

Brown & Titus 


$1.30 
678.81 


G. M. French 




163.86 


Gage & McDougall . . . 
Granite State Grocery 
D. Hammond & Son.. 


Co..... 


659.89 
13.00 
27.60 


E. K. Home 




80.07* 


C. R. Merrill 




61.60 


Jonathan ^IcAllister . 




195.56 


Partridg'e Brothers . . . 




1,192.53 
127.46 


Michael Prout 




Eodnev Whittemore . 




25.11 




HARNESSES AND REPAIRS. 




J. \. Ballon 


$109.25 


Kimball Carriage Co.. 
H. C. Banno & Son 




55.40 
70.05 


E. D. Eogers 




5.50 


X J Whalen 




•5 70 




CARRIAGE REPAIRS, ETC. 




John T. Beach 


$67.82 


Donald ^IcDonald . . . . 


HARDWARE AND TOOLS. 
Co 


85.00 


Manchester Hardware 
John B. Varick Co. . . . 


$20.66 
500 19 









$1,839.77 



$199.62 



$3,226.79 



$245.90 



$152.82 



$520.8- 



64 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



HOKSES, VETERINARY EXPE3SrSES. 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., attendance and medicine.. $57.80 

Joseph Breault, difference in horses 125.00 

.A. L. Dodge, V. S., attendance 27.00 

G. A. Hanscom, carbolic acid -25 

W. B. Mitchell, liniment 4.65 

G. H. Simpson, 1 horse 130.00 

G. W. 0. Tebbetts, syringes, nitre, etc 2.95 

WATER, GAS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal $85.64 

J. H. DeCourcy Co., coal 6.75 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones • • • ■ 75.12 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 144.67 

Water commissioners, use of water 98.09 

J. F. Wyman, coal 10.50 

LUMBER, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Adams Brothers, lime $0.95 

James Briggs & Son, iron .91 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 115.01 

J. Hodge, 1 threshold .60 

C. H. Hutchinson, iron 2.36 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, etc 15.13 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concreting 

basement wagon shed 340.15 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paint, etc 2.24 

A. C. Wallace estate, lumber .79 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing repairs 70.76 

G. W. Ivief, carpenter work 13.80 

SUNDRIES. 

Burton Oil Co., oil $6.00 

A. N. Clapp, matches, salt, oil 28.18 

Eager & Co., soap , 3.90 

Hardy & Folsom, pins .09 

C. J. Hadlej', receiver, storage 10.00 

D. L. Robinson, pasturing horse 6.00 

C. H. Simpson, use of teams , 67.00 

Sulpho-Napthol Co., sulpho-napthol 15.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and pencils.. 2.15 

G. R. Vance, 1 tunnel .50 

Total expenditures 



$347.65 



$420.77 



$562.70 



$138.82 
$8,020.07 



REPAIRS OF SEWERS. 



65 



Appropriation 



Repairs of Sewers. 



$5,000.00 



EXPEISTDITUKES. 
LABOR. 

Division Xo. 2: 

January $61.68 

February 16.49 

March 9.87 

April 41.87 

June 574.95 

July 278.85 

August 333.27 

September 90.70 

October 134.33 

November 582.14 

December 104.58 

Division Xo. 10: 

Februarj^ $55.50 

March 24.25 

April 19.50 

May 24.75 

June 93.00 

July 82.56 

Aug-ust 122.87 

September 66.81 

October 250.15 

November 222.12 

December 21.43 

MATEKIAL, HARDWAKE, ETC. 

Boston Belting Co., hose $209.57 

Brown & Titus, cement 162.40 

H. W. Harvey, stone 136.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 5.95 

Pike &: Heald Co., pipe, leather, etc 21.57 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 24.11 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$2,228.72 



$982.94 



$560.10 

f3,771.76 
1,228.24 



$5,000.00 



66 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



New Sewers. 

Appropriation $20,000.00 

Eeceived from Manchester Street Railway 172.20 

Eeceived lor sewer pipe sold 209.60 



$20,381.80 



EXPENDITXJBES. 
LABOK. 

Division No. 2: 

April ,•••• $322.13 

Mav ^^^-^^ 

June 100-00 

July 830.95 

Angust 113.99 

September 844.85 

October 888.44 

Nqvember '• 711.65 

December 934.21 

Division No. 7: 

April $7.00 

June 133.27 

July 557.00 

August 923.25 

September 466.12 

Division No. 10: 

April $90.75 

May 119.36 

June 703.03 

July 131.63 

August 84.00 

September 401.85 

October 67.13 

November 22.75 

December 828.99 

HARDWARE, TOOLS, SEWER PIPE. 

Coleman Sewer Trap Co., pipe $90.00 

A. N. Clapp 2.8S 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe 1,886.96 

J. H. Major, pipe 2.86 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 162.05 

B. H. Piper Co., tools 15.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools 561.06 



$5,720.18 



$2,086.64 



$2,449.49 



$2,720.81 



COMMONS. 



67 



MATERIAL, FREIGHT, LABOR, ETC. 

Boston & Maine llailroad, freight $793.12 

Boston Belting Co., hose 58.25 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 175.69 

Bucklin & Chamberlain, drills, etc 1.50 

Carson Trench Machine Co., grates for engine. . 9.50 

Petel- Duval, filing saws 3.80 

A. K. Hobbs, rubber boots and hose 5.98 

C. H. Hutchinson, grates, traps, etc 1,745.69 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., supplies 126.60 

Moore & Preston, coal 19.50 

Manchester Locomotive Works, grates 5.50 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe and labor 42.48 

Swan & Finch Co., oil 11.33 

C. B. Wingate, rubber boots 22.50 

CEMENT, BRICK, LUMBER. 

Brown & Titus, cement $422.37 

W. F. Head & Son, brick 616.00 

Head & Dowst Co., cement and lumber 149.63 

Mead & Mason, brick 50.40 

SUNDRIES. 

Amory Manufacturing Co., sacking $2.93 

A. N. Clapp, oil 25.00 

F. X. Chenette, boarding horses 12.00 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, coal 6.60 

W. J. Freeman, boarding horses ; . . 12.35 

J. A. Goodrich Co., oil and salt 5.95 

William Hayes, boarding horses 15.00 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., burlap 4.00 

D. M. Poore, coal 2.75 

Moses Tremblay, boarding horses 6.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



5,021,44 



$1,238.40 



$92.58 

$17,329.54 
3,052.26 



$20,381.80 



Commons. 



Appropriation 



$4,500.00 



68 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

J"iy 

August 

SeiDtember 

October 

November 

December 

PLANTS, ETC. 

N. J. Bixby, plants 

A. F. Davis, pine boughs 

A. G. Hood, plants 

F. A. Koerner, plants 

The Kirby Floral Co., plants 

Eay Brook Garden Co., plants 

WATER AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Union Electric Co., lights 

Water commissioners, use of water 

REPAIRS AND GENEP.AL EXPENSES. 

J. J. Abbott, paint and lettering signs 

D. J. Adams, making keys, etc 

Bucklin & Chamberlain, drilling blades 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening tools 

A. N. Clapp, oil 

J. Hodge, lumber 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

C. H. Hutchinson, labor 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., burlap ^^ 

T. A. Lane Co., supplies 

Manchester Hardware Co., tools and hardware 

Parnell Brothers, barrels 

Harry A. Piper, filing saws 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concreting... 
John B. Varick Co., paint, hardware, tools 



$172.88 
188.75 
130.87 
217.00 
256.50 
206.99 
161.61 
278.13 
229.23 
339.47 
261.25 
214.87 



$50.00 
8.00 
75.00 
32.00 
62.20 
75,00 



$36.00 
700.00 



$9.86 

1.75 

4.00 

28.02 

6.17 

28.62 

29.18 

34.41 

3.00 

2.97 

24.45 

4.00 

7.06 

376.99 

171.18 



2,657.54 



$302.20 



$736.00 



DERRYFIELD PARK. 

G. E. Vance, stove funnel $1.20 

C. B. Wingate, rubber boots 5.75 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 

Stark Park. 
Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOB. 

February $3.50 

March 1^-50 

April 67.75 

May 'J'2.50 

June 70.75 

July 87.00 

August 115.12 

September 14.00 

SUNDRIES. 

J. A. Chamberlain, trees $12.00 

John B. Yarick Co., tools 4.00 

"Water commissioners, use of water 12.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 

Derryfield Park. 

Appropriation $500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

account 134.91 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January $6.75 

February U 25 



69 



$738.61 

$4,434.35 
65.65 

$4,500.00 



$500.00 



$448.12 



$28.00 

$476.12 
23.88 

$500.00 



$634.91 



70 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

March $22.12 

April 15.87 

May 113.25 

June 166.13 

July 76.87 

Aug-ust 17-00 

September 47.87 

$477.10 

SUNDRIES. 

W. G. Berry, insurance premium $5.00 

A. S. Chadbourne, trees 11.59 

D. E. Guiney, repairing pump 5.75 

Head & Dowst Co., material and labor 103.03 

Harry A. Piper, filing saws, etc 1.10 

John B. Varick Co., tools and hardware 7.35 

Water commissioners, use of water 24.00 

$157.81 

Total expenditures $634.91 



Lighting Streets. 
Appropriation $57,500.00 

Expenditures. 

Charges. Discounts. 
Manchester Electric Co.: 

January $4,408.33 $13.17 

February 4,408.33 13.23 

March 4,862.49 12.96 

April 4,513.75 12.75 

May 4,513.75 18.03 

June 4,513.75 17.86 

July 4,532.15 33.36 

August 4,523.33 52.74 

September 4,523.33 37.08 

October 4,530.26 51.98 

November 4,539.21 48.13 

December 4,552.08 60.86 

$54,420.76 $372.14 

Less discount 372.14 

$54,048.62 

GAS. 

People's Gas Light Co $68.88 

Welsbach Street Lighting Co 2,917.10 

$2,985.98 



engineer's department. 71 

CARE OF GAS AND OIL LAMPS. 

William Brooks $57.25 

E. P. Cogswell 29.35 

F. W. Elliott 15.35 

Joseph Goodwin 96.00 

Mrs. M. E. Eeed, to December 1, 1900 9.00 



SUNDRIES. 

C. M. Bailej', chimneys, matches, etc $8.25 

A. N. Clapp, naphtha, oil 39.88 

Henry Cote, use of teams 5.00 

W. J. Freeman, use of teams ; 15.00 

J. F. Murphy, use of hacks . ••• 10.00 

G. W. Reed, use of teams 10.00 

Mrs. Mary E. Reed, oil to September 1, 1900. .. 6.00 

C. L. Wolf, burner and labor 4.00 



$206.95 



$98.13 



Total exijenditures $57,339.68 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 160.32 



$57,500.00 



Engineer's Department. 

Appropriation $6,702.16 

Expenditures. 

I.ABOR. 

Samuel J. Lord: 

Engineer $1,350.00 

Team hire 150.00 

Harry J. Briggs 774.12 

Alfred Dodge 661.03 

James Looney 33.00 

Charles Sargent 310.63 

G. W. Wales 907.27 

Henry Worthen 94.50 

Harrie M. Young 872.30 

Ella Barker Davis, stenographer 472.00 

$5,624.85 



72 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUPPLIES AND OFFICE EXPENSES. 

American Express Co., express $1.25 

Theo. Altender &. Sons, eng-ineer's supplies 49.50 

C. L. Berger & Sons, instruments, etc 272.70 

John B. Cloi-ke Co., printing- 500 reports 26.10 

E. II. Cobum Co., paste -25 

A. T. Dodge, carfares, oil, flannel .45 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 11-66 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 1 chair 4.00 

W. F. Hubbard, stakes, supplies 47.91 

Head & Dowst Co., plank .60 

J. Hodge, repairing drawing board 1.20 

A. K. Hobbs, rubber bands, etc 2.63 

Kimball Carriage Co., repairing field glass case .25 

Keutfel & Esser Co., supplies 66.54 

F. S. Lewis, stakes 20.00 

S. J. Lord, expense to Boston to purchase level 4.19 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 4.69 

Nicholson & O'Neil, canvas case, table cover... 3.25 
New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 37.36 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor 31.23 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., holder, ink, pads.. 1.86 

B. F. Shepard, repairing tools .90 

E. G. Soltmann, drawing materials 53.49 

E. A. Stratton, stationery 7.70 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery, blank 

books 29.85 

Union Manufacturing Co., figures 18.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 8.24 

G. W. Wales, express, soaj), etc 4.37 

C. H. Wood, painting 4.75 

F. Weber & Co., supplies 33.75 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., cabinets 

and cards 121.27 

Harrie M. Young, carfares, express, etc 4.85 

SUNDRIES. 

City farm, boarding horse $11.43 

E. K. Home, 1 can .25 

E. G. Libby, pasturing horse 9.82 

Manchester Street Railway, tickets 15.00 

D. McDonald, steel and labor 10.10 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unapproj)riated money account 



r4.79 



$46.60 

$6,546.24 
155.92 



$6,702.10 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 73 

Health Department. 

Appropriation $4,700.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money ac- 
count 3,508.87 

$8,208.87 

EXPENDITXTIES. 
SERVICES. 

John C. Bickford, salary as member of board. . $200.00 
W. M. Parsons, M. D., salary as member of 

board 200.00 

W. K, Bobbins, salary as member of board.... 200.00 

W. B. Blake, sanitary inspector 773.25 

Adam Bruner, sanitary inspector 26.00 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector 784.50 

Alphonse Regnier, sanitary inspector 9.00 

Carl 0. Seaman, plumbing inspector 787.50 

M. A. Fracker, clerk 424.00 

$3,404.25 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing cards, blanks, etc $155.45 

Printing 300 reports 16.10 

E. E. Coburn Co., stationery 3.70 

E. A. Stratton, stationery 3.48 

Temple & Farrington Co., iDamphlet laws 4.00 

$182.73 

TEAMS, ETC. 

W. B, Blake, car fares $38.25 

J. P. Brown cfe Co 32.00 

G. W. Bailey 3.50 

Adam Bruner, car fares 1.60 

F. X. Chenette 11.00 

C. S. Fifield 2.00 

J. F. Looney, car fares 34.15 

Alphonse Eegnier, car fares .35 

C. O. Seaman, car fares .20 

$123.05 

PESTHOUSE. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal $21.50 

Mrs. A. S. Cross, cook 97.50 

James W. Hill Co., sheets, comforters, towels.. 25.54 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., furniture, crockery 87.11 



74 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Carrie M. Joiee, nurse 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing repairs 

Jiidith Sherer, board of sundry persons 

A. D. Sherer, nurse 

Mrs. A. D. Sherer, labor 

D. A. Simons, chairs 

G. W. ^Vhitford, wood 

W. M. Parsons, M. D., attendance . on smallpox 

patients 

SUPPLIES FOR, ISOLATED FAMILIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

W. B. Blake, wood, medicine, etc 

Charles Boisclair, wood 

Adam Bruner, labor 

Joseph Bienvenue, groceries 

G. W. Clark, groceries 

Domestic Bakery, food 

W. M. iplames Drug Co., vaccine 

T. F. Fifield, groceries 

C. M. Floyd, clothing 

L. G. Gilman, medicine 

J. A. Guay, groceries 

A. L. Gadbois & Co., groceries 

Hotel Oxford, board and care 

George Harris, labor 

John B. Hall estate, medicine 

P. D. Lynch, groceries 

T. J. Labrecque, groceries 

John F. Looney, sundry supplies 

A. W. Morse, groceries 

C. E. Newcomb, groceries 

Partridge Brothers, hay and grain 

E. W. Poor, wood 

Pay roll, j)olice officers watching quarantined 

houses: 

July 

August 

December 

Parnell Brothers, groceries 

H. Pariseau & Co., groceries 

Joseph Pepin, labor 

M. C. Paige, milk 

Mrs. Agnes P. Eobinson, nurse 

Eaiche & Laforce, wood 



$45.00 

16.69 

298.79 

200.00 

85.00 

9.75 

.36.25 

950.00 



$6.00 

18.35 

4.00 

19.00 

3.99 

16.92 

2.75 

13.00 

3.57 

7.50 

2.10 

97.29 

16.86 

2.50 

14.00 

24.70 

16.57 

68.61 

9.06 

4.54 

22.04 

2.47 

5.00 



225.08 

72.06 

184.57 

61,23 

128.78 

6.00 

2.10 

30.00 

3.20 



$1,873.13 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



75 



Summer Street market, supplies 

Carl O. Seaman, supplies 

Kose SifF, nurse 

F. H. Thurston, medicine 

G. W. O. Tebbetts, supplies. 

William Yojer, labor 

Calixte Vigneault, groceries 

G. F. Wbittier, groceries 

G. W. Whitf ord, wood 

OFFICE EXPENSES AND SXJPPLIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 

W. B. Blake, express, brush, disinfectants, etc. 

Brodie Electric Co., drilling plate, etc 

Carter, Eice & Co., gummed paper 

Cutter, Tower & Co., Franklin typewriter 

Alma Fracker, laundry, express, soap, etc 

J. J. Holland, antitoxine, vaccine 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 1 chair 

John B. Hall estate, medicine, vaccine, etc 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co., chloride of platinum 
John F. Looney, disinfectants, tacks, cloth.... 

J. Y. McQueston Co., 1 table 

Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 

Parke, Davis & Co., culture tubes 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor 

Koessler & Hasslacher, formaldehyde 

Carl O. Seaman, mantles, chimneys, etc 

A. H. Sanborn, photographs 

Star Stamp Co., badges, pad 

E. A. Stratton, stationery 

F. H. Thurston, antitoxine, vaccine 

John B. Varick Co., w^ood alcohol, etc 

Williams & Co., plates for fumigating lamp 



SUNDRIES. 

James S. Brown, M. D., diphtheria examination 
W. B. Blake, burying dogs; expense to lake, 

Exeter, Hooksett, etc 

F. X. Chenette, removing dead dogs 

I. L. Carpenter, ^I. D., inspecting smallpox cases 
J. G. Ellinwood, photographs 



$53.49 

.66 

42.00 

3.75 

5.35 

3.00 

1.18 

24.53 

4.90 



$2.98 

3.27 

1.15 

14.56 

60.00 

10.70 

6.35 

4.50 

18.75 

5.70 

3.30 

2.00 

33.17 

9.17 

2.40 

4.47 

9.90 

.70 

9.50 

5.40 

3.35 

106.50 

209.70 

1.80 



$3.00 

17.53 
2.00 

50.00 
3.00 



$1,232.70 



$529.32 



76 . REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

J. G. Lussier, M. D., consultation with Dr. 

Parsons in smallpox case $3.00 

Prof. F. W. Morse, analysis of water 2.50 

L. V. Morrill and H. H. Brown, cremating horse 20.00 

New Hampshire College, analysis of water 5.00 

Frederick Perkins, M. D., vaccinations 568.00 

Frederick Perkins, M. D., inspecting smallpox 

cases, 2 nights 50.00 

W. K. Bobbins, traveling expenses, attendance 

upon American Public Health Association... 57.50 

W. K. Robbins, annual dues 5.00 

Carl O. Seaman, expense to Concord and dues 

for year Board of Health Association 5.66 

A. G. Straw, M. D., diphtheria examinations . . . 46.50 

G. M. Watson, M. D., inspecting smallpox cases 25.00 

$863.69 

Total expenditures $8,208.87 



City Library. 

Balance from last year unexpended $1,265.08 

Appropriation 5,350.00 



EXPENDITTJKES. 
LIBBAEIAN AND ASSISTANTS. 

Florence E. Wliitcher, librarian $412.50 

Harold L. Bacon 19.40 

Roland K. Crafts 25.90 

A. H. Fletcher 37.50 

Arthur Holland 39.00 

Clinton C. Hosmer 287.50 

L, B. James 53.75 

Charles S. Morgan 147.00 

Ralph M. Page.. 155.00 

Frank Pherson 10.20 

G. W. Swallow 133.50 

Mills G. Sturtevant 27.95 

Albert J. Towne 5.25 



$6,615.08 



$1,354.45 



ClXr LIBRARY. 77 

CATALOGUE AND CATALOGUE SUPPLIES. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 1,000 scientific and 

technical catalog-ues $341.96 

Library Bureau, cards 17. SI 

Louise E. Newell, copyist 371.00 

A. L. A. Publishing Section, printing catalogue 

cards 10.63 

Edith O. Simmons, copyist 516.45 

Temple & Farrington Co., cards, envelopes, etc. 35.13 

$1,292.98 



BINDING, EEBINDING, EESEWING. 

F. J. Barnard & Co $435.06 

Temple & Farrington Co 182.02 



WATER, LIGHTS, FUEL, INSURANCE. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co.: 

Wood $5.75 

Coal 302.86 

C. M. Edgerly, insurance premium 125.00 

Flint, Haskell & Flint, wood 10.00 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 26.40 

Union Electric Co., lights 388.38 

Water commissioners, use of water 16.00 

SUNDRIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice $9.75 

John B. Clarke Co.: 

"Mirror" one year 6.00 

Printing 300 reports 11.70 

X. P. Hunt, postage and check stamps 3.56 

C. F. Livingston, printing covers 113.68 

Edith O. Simmons, paid for cleaning 40.06 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper, postals, etc. . . 9.45 

Trustees of library, new books 1,000.00 

F. E. Whitcher, paid for cleaning 37.25 

M. E. Warren Co., mucilage .80 



$617.08 



$874.39 



$1,232.25 



Total expenditures $5,371.15 

Transferred to new account 1,243.93 

$6,615.08 



78 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Fire Department. 

Appropriation $65,000.00 

Expenditures. 

services. 

Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer $1,300.00 

Frank M. Frisselle, assistant 175.00 

Clarence K. Merrill, assistant and clerk 200.00 

John Montplaisir, assistant 175.00 

Eugene S. Whitnej', assistant 175.00 



TEAIISTERS AND ENGINEERS PAY-ROLL. 

January $2,286.10 

February 2,276.85 

March 2,351.20 

April 2,297.18 

May 2,303.93 

June 2,350.64 

July 2,363.32 

August 2,469.71 

September 2,406.64 

October 2,385.93 

November 2,319.31 

December 2,325.14 

CALL MEMBERS. 

Engine Company No. 1 $1,690.00 

Engine Company No. 1, extra labor 8.00 

Engine Company No. 2 1,680.00 

Engine Company No. 2, extra labor 8.00 

Engine Company No. 3 2,278.76 

Engine Company No. 3, extra labor 8.00 

Engine Company No. 4 1,690.00 

Engine Company No. 4, extra labor 8.00 

Engine & Ladder Companj^ No. 5 2,450.00 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 5, extra labor. . 8.00 

Engine & Ladder "Company No. 6 2,450.00 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 6, extra labor. . 8.00 

Chemical Engine Company 475.00 

Chemical Engine Company, extra labor 4.00 

Hook & Ladder Company No. 1 1,820.00 

Hook & Ladder Company No. 1, extra labor S.OO 



$2,025.00 



$28,135.95 



CITY LIBRARY. 79 

Hose Company No. 1 $1,685.00 

Hose Company No. 1, extra labor 8.00 

Hose Company No. 2 1,685.00 

Hose Company No. 2, extra labor 8.00 

Hose Company No. 3 920.00 

Hose Comjaany No. 3, extra labor S.OO 



OTHEE LABOR. 

r. 0. Bartlett .$10.50 

Herbert E. Dunbar 124.50 

Louis F. Kettle 24.00 

A. Laberge 2.00 

F. W. Tebbetts 99.75 

LAUNDRY. 

Mrs. Helena Cutler $2.09 

Mrs. C. E. Cutler 5.46 

Charles Edg-ar 15.62 

Mrs. M. H. Hulme 48.23 

L. A. Lamson 18.38 

Mrs. F. F. Porter 29.50 

Mrs. Marg-aret Powers 59.67 

Mrs. Susie Reed 4.00 

Mrs. E. H. Smith ; 17.63 

Mrs. L. A. Sawyer 18.30 



$18,907.76 



$260.75 



$218.88 



FURNITURE, ETC. 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., bedding and furniture $41.80 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing 400 reports „ $39.20 

Binding reports 3.00 

City News Co., stationery 1.12 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing 30.35 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 5.08 

Chemical Engine Company No. 1 10.00 

Engine Company No. 1 10.00 

Engine Company No. 2 10.00 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 3 10.00 

Engine Company No. 4 10.00 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 5 10.00 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 6 10.00 

Hook & Ladder Company No. 1 10.00 



80 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Hose Company No. 1 $10.00 

Hose Company No. 2 10.00 

Hose Company No. 3 10.00 

WATER, LIGHTS, TELEPHONE. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones $251.71 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 738.46 

Union Electric Co., lights 86.61 

Water commissioners, use of water 543.78 

FUEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co.: 

Coal $1,439.80 

Wood 23.20 

Fletcher Brown, wood 20.00 

A. F. Davis, wood 21.00 

B. F. & S. L. Greer, wood 7.13 

Moore & Preston, wood 5.00 

Alexander Perron, sawing wood 2.00 

A. D. Sweet, splitting wood 1.25 

• FBEIGHT AND CARTAGE. 

Leach & Mattoon $0.61 

H. Mattoon 1.66 

SUPPLIES. 

American Electrical Works, wire $3.42 

Clark M. Bailey, waste 60.40 

J. W. Batchelder, ice tank 2.25 

Boston Belting Co., washers, packing 6.01 

Burton Oil Co., oil 4.00 

C. W. Buck, firemen's coats 51.95 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice , 9.48 

Cavanaugh Brothers, 5 horses 1,410.00 

Cornelius Callahan Co., globes, nozzle, sponges 87.10 

A. B. Gushing, bicarbonate of soda 10.00 

Crosby Steam Gage & Valve Co., 1 gauge 5.10 

Joel Daniels & Co., moulding ' 2.32 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., supplies 53.84 

Eagle Oil & Supply Co., solarine 30.00 

T. F. Fifield, sugar, oil. . . , 10.70 

H. Fradd & Co., oil 1.20 



$188.75 



$1,620.56 



$1,519.38 



$2.27 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



81 



C. H. Grant & Co., ladder hooks 

B. F. & S. L. Greer, oil, etc 

Haseltine & Co., metal polish 

A. C. Hove3', mop wringer 

James W. Hill Co., bedding- 

J. Hodge, lumber 

A. K. Hobbs, mats, bulbs 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, hose, etc 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 

Miville & Deschenes, 2 awnings 

C. N. Perkins & Co., hose, nozzle, etc 

Pike & Heald Co., pail, dishes. 

Plumer & Holton, overalls and reefers 

People's Gas Light Co., mantle, chimnej^ 

Stuart-Howland Co., electric supplies 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 

D. B. Varney, sawdust 

U. S. Gutta Percha Paint Co., soda 

PLUMBING, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Brodie Electric Co., electrical labor, etc 

O. H. Coleman, reseating chairs 

James E. Carr Co., painting 

A. M. Finney, cleaning carpets 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, etc 

J. Hodge, sheathing 

H. J. Lawson, repairing lamp 

T. A. Lane Co., electrical labor, etc 

Manchester Locomotive Works, repairs on 

engine 

Pike & Heald Co., repairs 

Union Manufacturing Co., nickel plating 



$10.00 

3.60 

9.76 

2.50 

29.83 

4.10 

3.00 

20.98 

29.57 

10.50 

10.50 

1.25 

144.50 

.55 

11.37 

5.50 

224.78 

5.85 

9.38 



$11.72 
1.70 
1.25 
1.49 
7.97 
3.17 
2.05 
7.68 



.50 

.87 



$2,285.29 



$47.15 



VETEEINAKY SERVICES AND JIEDICLNES. 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., attendance and medicine... $142.20 
Charles M. Bailej', V. S., attendance and medi- 
cine 14.50 

Z. F. Campbell, medicine 4.90 

Frank J. Clark, medicine, etc 9.75 

A. L. Dodge, Y. S., attendance and medicine... 13.00 

H. B. Dunton, V. S., attendance and medicine.. 23.50 

F. H. Fames, medicine .95 

Lamprey & Dow, arnica, Avitch hazel, etc 1.80 

W. B. Mitchell, medicine 4.75 

F. H. Thurston, medicine, etc 2.15 



$217.50 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CAKKIAGE REPAIKS. 

John T. Beach 

JSIanchester Locomotive Works 

J. B. McCrillis & Son. . . . .' 

.Sanborn Carriage Co 

BLACKSMITHING. 

J. M. Brouillette 

Boisclair & Eaiche 

C. C. Boisclair 

A. B. Colby 

Connor & Grossman 

H. H. Gerward 

Herrick Brothers 

Donald McDonald 

John McSweeney 

John Peavey 

John E. Eeagan 

J. O. Tremblay 

L. P. Tremblay .* 

John F. Woodburj" Co 

HAY, GRAIN, ETC. 

Adams Brothers 

Brown & Titus 

Arthur S. Brown 

Gage & McDougall 

H. C. Horton 

D. Hammond & Son 

C. E. Merrill 

Partridge Brothers 

J. W. Eand 

HARNESS REPAIRS AND SXTPPLIES 

W. H. Adams 

J. A. Ballou 

W. E. Greeley 

H. C. Eanno & Son 

N. J. Whalen 

SUNDRIES. 

Cavanaugh Brothers, use of horse 

C. S. Fifield, keeping horse 



$57.66 

226.75 

310.84 

2.90 



$15.50 

3.25 

2.00 

109.90 

41.00 

13.25 

.20 

42.30 

220.75 

31.00 

10.15 

186.50 

206.50 

143.00 



$114.66 

249.97 

14.00 

725.48 

18.00 

15.00 

4,255.92 

146.21 

43.60 



$112.20 


16.45 


1.90 


111.65 


.25 



$598.15 



$1,085.30 



$5,582.84 



$242.4^ 



$213.00 
16.00 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



83. 



T. W. Lane: 

Postage, express, cartage $11.20 

Expenses to Charleston, S. C, attendance at 

International Association Fire Engineers.. 71.40 

F. H. Thurston, "Germol" ■ 7.50 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$319.10 

$63,298.88 
1,701.12 

$65,000.00 



Fire Alarm Telegraph. 

Appropriation $1,200.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money ac- 
count 126.99 



EXPEK^DITITUES. 
LABOR. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Alexander McDonald 

E. A. Sears 

SUPPLIES. 

American Electrical Works, wire . . 

Brodie Electric Co., repairing alarm boxes. . . . 

James R. Carr Co., paint 

Joel Daniels & Co., painting alarm boxes 

W. E. Decrow, supplies and repairs 

J. Hodge, lumber 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor 

J. B. Prescott & Son, battery zincs 

Stuart-Howland Co., electrical supplies 

Talbot Dyewood & Chemical Co., battery fluid. 
John B. Varick Co., paint and hardware 



$54.00 
48.00 
54.00 
50.00 
54.00 
52.00 
52.00 
54.00 
50.00 
56.00 
52.00 
52.00 

$3.50 
11.50 



$67.20 

41.54 

6.18 

80.00 

309.80 

41.20 

5.85 

14.07 

17.23 

47.57 

3.36 

45.82 



$1,326.99 



$628.00 
$15.00 



$679.82 



84 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDEIES. 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight $0.72 

Leach & Mattoon, freight and cartage .60 

C. H. Leach, freight and cartage .50 

H. F. W. Little, filing saws .15 

H. Mattoon, freig'ht and cartage 2.20 

Total expenditures 

Hydrant Service. 

Appropriation 

EXPENDITXIRES. 

Water commissioners, use of hydrants 

Police Department. —Station. 

Appropriation $2,300.00 

Transferred from imappropriated money ac- 
count 14S.50 

EXPEXDITXTRES. 

SEEVICES. 

Frank P. Wiggin, janitor $632.75 

Thomas Shaughnessej', temporary janitor 68.00 

■\VATEE, GAS, EXECTRIC LIGHTS, rXIEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co.: 

Coal $667.89 

Wood 7.50 

W. E. Dunbar, wood 16.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., coal 70.05 

Moore & Preston, wood 8.50 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 52.07 

D. M. Poore, coal and wood 69.00 

Union Electric Co., lights 606.00 

Water commissioners, use of water 136.27 

LAUNDRY, SA^'ITARY, ETC. 

C. M. Bailej-, paper, duster, etc $13.84 

Daniels-Cornell Co., paper, brooms, brushes 10.95 

T. F. Fifield, soap 4.50 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap 8.81 



$4.17 
$1,326.99 



$18,425.00 



$18,425.00 



$2,648.50 



$700. 



$1,633.88 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 85 

J. X. Lacourse, oil, soap $1.80 

John Morley, cleaning 49.40 

Joseph Sykes, cleaning* 41.30 

The Sulpho-Xapthol Co., sulpho-napthol 20.00 

F. H. Thurston, "Germol," etc 22.85 

John B. Varick Co., brush, etc 1.62 

Mrs. J. F. Wigg"in, laundry work 58.23 



REPAIKS, ETC. 

M. J. Coleman, plumbing- repairs $34.55 

D. F. Cressey, repairing- bunk chains 1.75 

A. M. Finney, renovating pillows, etc 5.20 

James W. Hill Co., crash, sheets, etc 6.46 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., repairing chair 1.50 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing repairs 20.35 

B. F. Shepard, keys 1,30 

John B. Varick Co., shovels 2.71 

SUNDRIES. 

W. D. Ladd & Co., crackers $5.25 

F. H. Thurston, medicine 1.50 



Expenditup.es. 
services. 



John C. Bickford, clerk $600.00 

Isaac L. Heath, police justice 1,500.00 

George Prescott, associate justice 300.00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



John E. Clarke Co., printing and binding $37.75 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing- 71.85 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 docket, etc 4.20 



$233.30 



$73.82 



$6.75 



Total exj)enditures $2,648.50 



Police Department.— Court. 

Appropriation , $2,900.00 



$2,400.00 



$113.80 



86 EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOK. 



SUJOJEIES. 



The Globe-Wernicke Co., 1 cabinet $14.24 

M. J. Heal}', paid for witness fees, etc .3(33.62 



$379.86 



Total expenditures ." $2,893.66 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 6.24 

.$2,900.00 



Police Department. — Commission. 

Appropriation $43,600.00 

Expenditures. 

services. 

Michael J. Healy, chief of police $1,999.92 

John F. Cassidy, deputy chief 1,500.00 

E. B. Woodburj^ chairman of commission, 

salary 150.00 

E. P. Carpenter, commissioner, salary 100.00 

N. S. Clark, commissioner, salary lOO.OQ 

A. B. Brown, police matron 423.00 

Eegular patrol 31,853.11 

Special patrol 1,306.38 

$37,432.41 

FEEDING PRISONEES. 

Hannah W. Greene .$249.80 

W. D. Ladd & Co 20.70 

.$270.50 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

E. E. Coburn Co., stationery $1.25 

John B. Clarke Co., printing- circulars, etc 79.00 

W. P. Goodman, stationery and books 56.70 

E. A. Stratton, ink, mucilag-e 1.25 

Temple & Farringfton Co., books 14.70 

$152.90 

PATROL SYSTEM EXPENSES. 

W. H. Adams, repairing- harnesses $12.35 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., attendance and medicine. . . 12.10 

Ame & Co., Standard Food. 3.23 

The Automatic Time Stamp & Register Co., 

ribbons, etc 5.00 

American Electrical Works, wire 43.21 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 87 

Cavanaiigh Brothers, 1 horse $165.00 

C. E. Merrill, grain, etc 337.49 

X. Chandler, hoof ointment 1.50 

Joel Daniels & Co., paint and varnish 3.74 

H. B. Dunton, V. S., attendance and medicine. . 6.50 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., battery, etc 10.40 

Gordon Batterj^ Co., recharging batteries 27.50 

J. J. Holland, sulphur, salts, acids, etc 2.00 

Kimball Carriage Co., whip, cover, etc 4.50 

T. A. Lane Co., cord .53 

Pettingell-Andrev^^s Co., supplies 127.70 

Charles E. Perry & Co., paper rolls 60.00 

Sanborn Carriage Co., carriage repairs 120.25 

United States Fire & Police Telegraph Co., 

repairs 16.20 

John F. Woodbury Co., horseshoeing 78.25 

Ziegler Apparatus Co., repairs 30.30 



ALLOWANCE FOR CLOTHING AND BICYCLE EEPAIKS. 

J. J. Archanibeault $50.00 

J. C. Badger 57.00 

K. W. Bean 50.00 

F. E. Bourassa 50.00 

J. G. Brown 50.00 

J. S. Butler 50.00 

H. A. Burns 25.00 

Peter Callaghan 50.00 

J. J. Connor 50.00 

E. L. Cooledge 60.00 

J. F. Dunn 50.00 

F. J. Dustin 50.00 

J. A. Farrell 50.00 

P. F. Hampston 50.00 

J. S. Hampston 50.00 

R. J. Hayes 57.15 

J. D. Healy 50.00 

C. B. Hildreth 50.00 

D. B. Hutchins 60.00 

G. A. Lovejoy 50.00 

J. J. Lynch 50.00 

Leon E. Magoon 56.50 

F. W. Marden 50.00 

William Moher 50.00 

F. P. Moore 50.00 

E. H. McQuade 50.00 

J. T, Nixon 62.00 

J. T. O'Dowd 50.00 

J. F. O'Malley 50.00 



$1,067.V. 



88 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



W. B. Parmentei' 

O. E. Poehlman 

L. J. Proctor 

Olaf Eing- 

Frank Eainville 

Albert Eussell 

E. E. Somers 

Florence Sullivan 

T. E. Steele 

James Sweeney 

J. T. Welch 

E. E. Wheedeu 

HARDWARE AXD REPAIRS. 

Amoskeag- Manufacturing Co., castings 

J. J. Abbott, gasoline 

E. M. Bryant & Co., cord, sockets, etc 

Bucklin & Chamberlain, making screw 

D. F. Cressey, fixing hook, etc 

George Holbrook. lumber and nails 

C. H. Hutchinson, material and labor 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

J. Hodge, lumber 

John Horigan, extension cord 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 

Pike & Heald Co., luaterial and labor 

H. A. Piper, filing saws, lumber 

B. F. Shepard, keys 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 

D. B. Varney, lumber. 

TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co.: 

Use of telephones 

Eent of private line and instruments 

Western Union Telegraph Co., telegrams 

SUNDRIES. 

Boston & Maine E. E., freight 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 

P. C. Cheney Co., waste ; 

Estate L. W. Colby, photographs. 

G. H. Emery, photographs 

William Hanael, photographs 

J. M. Knowles, rent of stable to Oct. 1, 1900 

Gillis Stark, M. D., visits at station 



$57.00 
50.00 
50.00 
25.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
63.25 



.$0.84 

.60 

3.35 

.35 

1.25 

i.oa 

4.60 

1.55 

.65 

1.25 

54.33 

8.13 

1.35 

.40 

.36 

2.85 



$281.61 

114.00 

5.93 



$3.52 

9.73 

4.00 

22.00 

17.00 

2.00 

202.50 

4.50 



$2,072.90 



$82.86 



^01.54 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 89 

George D. Towne, M. D., examination of Maggie 

Leach $15.00 

F. H. Thurston, medicine 4.00 

$284.25 

Total expenaitnres $41,765.13 

Transferred to unapprojiriated money account 1,834.87 



Repairs of Buildings. 

Appropriation $4,975.00 

Transferred from unappropriated naoney ac- 
count 246.73 



ENGINE HOUSES. 



EXPENDTTirRES. 
CITY LIBRARY. 

J. J. Abbott, glass $0.50 

Joel Daniels & Co., paint and labor 12.23 

George Holbrook, clearing snow off roof 7.50 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor 10.90 

C. P. McDonald, plumbing G.S5 

Joseph St. Laurent, lumber and labor 16.49 

John B. Varick Co., shovel, broom .95 



POLICE STATION. 

C. B. Brown, material and labor $3.55 

Joel Daniels & Co., paint and labor 286.32 

Eastman Brothers, repairing locks, etc 4.01 

E. & T. Fairbanks, 1 scale with measure rod.. 29.00 

A. K. Hobbs, hose and reel 8.13 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 2.20 

Manchester Hardware Co., mop wringer 2.00 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing 6.84 

Joseph St. Laurent, lumber and labor 139.80 

John B. Varick Cb., paint, brush, duster 1.99 

C. L. Wolf, material and labor on roof 22.25 



Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 13 trucks $1.98 

Barton & Co., shades, matting, etc 27.98 

C. B. Brown, roofing material and labor 36.49 



$43,600.00 



,221.73 



$55.42 



$506.15 



90 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

John Bryson, paint and labor $101.84 

James K. Carr Co., iDaint, labor 47.24 

Fred C. Darrah, covering and repairing roofs.. 227. S6 

Joel Daniels & Co., setting glass, etc 274.64 

E. D. Gay, shades 7.45 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 24.96 

G. W. Hamlin, paint and labor 39.1.3 

C. H. Hutchinson, grates and castings 1.20 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., tables 4.00 

J. B. Huntley, plumbing material and labor. . . . 13.35 

Merrill & Laird, repairing boiler 31.18 

C. P. McDonald, plumbing repairs 38.03 

Manchester Hardware Co., paint, varnish 11.92 

Manchester Locomotive Works, castings, etc... 42.48 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing and roofing repairs 298.96 

H. A. Piper, fence 7.15 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concreting... 85.85 

J. A. Scully, matting 8.11 

Joseph St. Laurent, lumber and labor 771.86 

John A. Sargent, paint and labor 257.04 

Z. B. Stewart, mason work 18.90 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 21.25 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing 3.50 

$2,404.35 

COURT HOUSE. 

Fred C. Darrah, repairing roof $13.48 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on radiator .40 

Merrill & Laird, repairing fire-box 6.93 

Manchester Locomotive Works, boiler repairs.. 13.85 

Manchester Hardware Co., 1 wringer 2.00 

H. A. Piper, labor .63 

Joseph St. Laurent, labor on windows 9.80 

John B. Varick Co., brooms, Avaste, etc 9.29 

$56.38 

SCHOOLS. 

Joseph St. Laurent, fire bell weights $1.50 

BATTERY BUILDING. 

G. B. Cressey, paint and labor $155.44 

H. J. Lawson, tinning shutters 28.70 

Herman Maynard, glass and labor 2.40 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete 16.24 

Joseph St. Laiirent, lumber and labor. ; 21.69 

$224.47 



WATER-WORKS. 91 

SUJsDRIES. 

Adams Brothers, lime, salt $0.60 

Bo3'd Brothers, use of hack 5.00 

John Bryson, paint and labor, ward 5 ward- 
room 26.16 

Joel Daniels & Co., painting, papering, etc., city 

hall 121.68 

W. M. Darrah & Co., roofing material, citj^ farm 11.04 

A. K. Hobbs, hose, etc 33.75 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 19.36 

George Holbrook, one half expense of water 

closet, Manchester street . 1.25 

H. J. La^vson, copper, labor, etc., city hall 3.30 

W. B. Orrill, fire extinguishers 40.50 

C. C. Perry, use of teams 10.00 

Pike & Heald Co., repairs at pest-house 8.34 

G. W. Keed, use of teams 15.00 

A. & E. Keed, plastering, city hall 35.65 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., sidewalk 

repairs 27.59 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, glass and setting .80 

Z. B. Stewart, mason work, city hall 14.70 

Joseph St. Laurent, lumber and labor, sundry 

places 1,086.08 

C. A. Trefethen, care of clocks 325.00 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing repairs, city farm 187.60 

$1,973.46 

Total expenditures $5,221.73 



Water-Works. 

Balance from last year unexpended $54,054.36 

Cash received from water rents 138,241.94 



$192,296.30 



EXPENDITUKES. 
LABOR. 

January $1,771.00 

February 1,433.68 

March 1,464.41 

April 1,411.40 

May 2,276.46 

June 2,022.29 

July 1,963.11 

August 2,393.21 



92 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



September $1,939.72 

October 2,490.92 

November 1,826.09 

December 1,753.85 

GEWEKAL EXPENSES. 

Henry Chandler estate: 

Services as clerk of board $83.33 

13 meetings of board 52.00 

W. C. Clarke, 14 meetings of board 56.00 

Frank Dowst, 15 meetings of board 60.00 

Alpheus Gay, 25 meetings of board 100.00 

E. J. Ivnowlton, 3 meetings of board 12.00 

C. H. Manning, 15 meeting-s of board 60.00 

C. T. Means, 15 meetings of board 60.00 

Harry E. Parker, 14 meetings of board 56.00 

Piitnej^ & Wallace, board of two divers 4.00 

C. A. Scarbor, dinners at lake 47.25 

C. K Walker: 

Superintendent, salary' 2,399.99 

Paid for gas 23.10 

Express, teleg'rams, xiostage 30.12 

Sundries 55.78 



$22,746.14 



$3,099.57 



PKIXTING, ADYERTISIXG, STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co.: 

Advertising $6.00 

Printing 650 reports 48.00 

Bills, notices, etc 86.52 

E. R. Coburn Co., stationerj^ and books 4.39 

Eumford Printing Co., half tones 9.36 

E. A. Stratton, stationery. 1.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertising ; . . . . 5.25 

Dennison & Sons, 1 book 12.25 

TEAMS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

G. W. Bailey, use of team $1.50 

T. F. Brown, use of hack 5.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 369.85 

Fletcher Brown, wood 16.00 

M. L. Cobb, coal 1,384.55 

C. S. Fifield, use of teams 10.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 117.71 

J. A. & A. W. Walker, 214 tons, 240 pounds, coal 914.26 



$172.77 



$2,818.87 



WATER-WORKS. 



93 



LAND. 

Enterprise Boat Club $400.00 

S. G. Prescott 900.00 

E. M. Tophtf 600.00 

LEGAL SERVICES. 

Edwin F. Jones 

DAMAGES. 

James Richards, horse and carriage 

BLACKSMITHING, FEEIGHT, HARDWARE. 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight $570.56 

D. F. Cressej^ sharpening tools 310.17 

Couch & McDonald, blacksmithing 18.81 

Manchester Hardware Co., tools 17.05 

John B. Varick Co., hardw^are and tools 330.39 

SUPPLIES. 

Adams Brothers, cement, lime, salt $36.65 

American Steam Gauge Co., 1 spring 3.75 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., springs, stand, 

wrench 41.05 

Boston Lead Manufacturing Co., solder 21.00 

Builders' Iron Foundry, reducers, bends, etc... 236.48 

Boston Belting- Co., packing . 23.12 

E. M. Bryant & Co., battery, etc 2.30 

P. C. Cheney Co., waste 21.60 

Joseph M. Clarke, boat and boiler. 20.00 

A. N. Clapp, oil 66.97 

S. B. Dickey, dressing 192.00 

M. T. Davidson, valves 129.60 

Eager & Co., soap, matches, salt, etc 7.97 

Edson Manufacturing Co., bolts, nuts, etc 11.25 

The Farmers' Handy Wagon Co., 1 wagon, 

freight on same 50.10 

Glauber Brass Co., curb stops, cocks, etc 467.39 

A. K. Hobbs, packing, gaskets 120.61 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., lamp, bracket, chimneys 7.15 

J. Hodge, meter boxes, lumber - 70.17 

Head & Dowst Co. : 

Material and labor, new station 5,003.10 

Lumber and brick 98.84 

The Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., supplies 18. .'i2 

Amos Latuch, manure 29.25 

Leonard & Ellis, oil 34.13 



$1,900.00 



$94.4J 



$11.50 



$1,246.98 



94 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Ludlow Valve Manufacturing- Co., gates $156.15 

Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co., pipe 574.44 

Libbey, Parker & Co., washers 11.25 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe. 92.33 

Municipal Supply Co., packing 57.48 

Mowry & Phillips, lead 365.63 

National Meter Co., meters, etc 634.50 

National Paint & Varnish Co., paint 34.45 

Norwood Engineerijig Co., hydrants, etc 383.10 

NeiDtune Meter Co., meters, etc 295.33 

Perry Oil Co., oil 104.66 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe, etc 142.05 

Perrin, Seaman & Co., blocks 17.10 

Eensselaer Manufacturing Co., 1 gate 129.30 

Sewall-Day Cordage Co., packing 26.00 

Sumner, Goodwin Co., couf)lings, ni]os, etc 22.61 

Thomson Meter Co., meters 728.83 

Union Water Meter Co., meters 285.40 

G. R. Vance, dippers, pails, etc 6.55 

D. B. Varney, 52 caps 20.80 

Henry E. Worthington, valves, rods, etc 112.38 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., soap 3.84 

Manchester Locomotive Works, washers, bolts IBS. 33 



KEPAIRS. 

E. M. Bryant & Co., repairs and supplies $5.70 

Bucklin & Chamberlain, repairing drill 8.73 

Chapman Valve Manufacturing Co., repairing 

valve 3.51 

F. C. Darrah, slating material and labor 39.34 

H. H. Gerward, repairing and painting wheel. . 3.80 

C. H. Hutchinson, labor on shaft and rod 2.25 

E. A. G. Holmes, labor 96.01 

Hersey Manufacturing Co., repairing meters... 2.32 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on boiler, etc 21.73 

Manchester Locomotive Works, repairs 14.28 

National Meter Co., repairing meters 100.90 

Pennichuck Water-Works, labor, etc 7.85 

H. C. Eanno & Son, repairing harness. -. 1.30 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete 231.01 

Thomson Meter Co., repairing meters 7.17 

Union Water Meter Co., repairing meters 205.13 

Walworth Manufacturing Co., rejjairing ratchet 1.60 

W. A. Wood & Co., waste 35.09 

H. E. Worthington, repairing air compressor.. 39.89 



$11,103.50 



$827.61 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



95 



SUNDRIES. 

Town of Auburn, taxes $167.24 

S. B. Dickey, use of barge 5.00 

J. G. Ellinwood, photographs. 13.00 

New Hampshire Fire Insurance Co., insurance 

premium 12.50 

H. W. Sawyer, surveying 29.20 

Sinking fund commissioners, amount of sinking 

fund 23,425.00 

Charles Spofford, dinners and surveying 5.00 

Sarah C. Pennock, rent of house 100.00 

G. W. Townsend, services and expenses 46.55 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to interest account 

Transferred to new account 



$23,802.49 

$67,825.88 
39,534.50 
84,935.92 

$192,296.30 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Appropriation 



EXPESDITLTRES. 



$9,000.00 



LABOR. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

PLANTS, LOAM, ETC. 

City farm, manure 

A. G. Hood, plants 

A. P. Home & Co., plants 

Kirby Floral Co., plants 

E. G. Libbj^ manure 

Donald McDonald, loam 



$186.70 
156.01 
122.41 
270.12 
577.31 
508.76 
606.38 
646.55 
730.36 
528.70 
350.01 
204.63 



$3.06 
206.00 
63.00 
53.09 
10.50 
174.00 



$4,887.94 



96 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Herman L. Neal, ashes $0.00 

Joseph Poor, gravel l.SO 

Eay Brook Garden Co., i)lants 73.60 

James Thompson, loam 709.50 

. Mrs. C. C. Webster, clay 370.00 

WATER, TEXEPHONE, EXJEIL. 

New England Telei)hone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones .$70.S4 

Wilson & Bryant, coal 55.00 

Water commissioners, use of water 1,191.75 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing $13.60 

J. H. Erskine: 

Stamped enveloiies 2.12 

Book 7.50 

O. D. Knox, P. M., envelopes 4.24 

W^ P. Goodman, stationerj- 6.44 

John Potter, printing receipts 1.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., books 8.75 

J. A. Williams, cards 1.00 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEilENTS. 

J. J. Abbott, paint $11.44 

C. A. Bailey, stone 117.55 

Biinton & Bernard, material and labor 66.18 

F. X. Chenette, cleaning vaults 3.00 

Casket Lowering Co., cables 4.00 

The Chelmsford Foun,dry Co., lot markers 90.00 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., lamp and rug 3.50 

J. Hodg'e, lumber 17.38 

Head & Dowst Co., plank 4.00 

C. H. Hutchinson, labor on lawn mower 2.60 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on fountains, etc 15.07 

Manchester Hardware Co., mowers, pawls 15.30 

Marston & Gates, mason work 39.05 

National Burial Device Co., 1 device 85.00 

W. M. Robinson, brooms, mops, soap, sulphur. . 2.15 

W. L. Eoper, whitewashing 2.50 

Palmer & Garmon, bounds, setting stones 132.00 

B. A. Stearns, fence and labor, awnings, etc. . . . 63.00 

W. H. Sullivan, painting and kalsomining 36.75 

G. E. Vance, 1 hod .40 

John B. Varick Co.,. seed and hardware 118.50 



$1,670.55 



1,317.59 



$44.90 



$829.37 



VALLEr CEMETERY. 



97 



TEAM EXPENSES. 

Adams Brothers, grain $88.47 

Byroia Stearns, hay 90.00 

J. 0. Tremblay, horseshoeing 11.30 

I. S. York, blanket, whip, grease, etc 4.75 

SUNDRIES. 

American Express Co., express $0.30 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight 1.02 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 5.20 

E. F. Jones, clerk of sub-trustees 25.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unapproi^riated money account 



$194.52 



$31.52 

$8,976.39 
23.61 

$9,000.00 



Valley Cemetery. 

Appropriation 

EXPENDITUEES. 
LABOE. 

January $78.35 

February 62.51 

March 65.19 

April 143.73 

May 255.42 

June , 207.90 

July 270.61 

August 276.62 

September 199.34 

October 219.19 

November 148.97 

December 105.45 

B. F. Bascomb $167.29 

Frank Goings 2.00 



.$3,100.00 



$2,033.28 



$169.29 



WATER AND TELEPHONE. 



New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones $48.83 

Water commissioners, use of water 141.90 



$190.73 



98 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



PLAKTS, LOAM, TREES, ETC. 

B. F. Bascomb, loam $20.85 

Frank Cole, trees 5.00 

S. B. Dickey, loam 6.50 

J. Francis, j)lants 60.80 

A. G. Gray, gravel 9.80 

Frank Gowing, loam and sand 95.48 

A. G. Hood, plants 20.05 

F. X. Laflamme, dirt 4.50 

Kay Brook Garden Co., plants 18.40 

PEIXTING AND STATIOXEEY. 

O. D. Knox, P. M., stamped envelopes $3.71 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 3.90 

REPAIRS AND lilPROVEMENTS. 

F. S. Bodwell, gravel $46.60 

F. M. Goings, concrete 39.16 

C. H. Hutcliinson, labor on pattern .25 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe ll.SS 

John Mooar, repairing clock 1.00 

National Burial Device Co., 1 device 85.00 

W. B, Orrill, fire extinguisher 15.50 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor 82.95 

Tibbetts & Newell, painting fence 43.88 

Palmer & Garmon, cutting stone 7.00 

John B. Varick Co., tools 107.18 

SUNDRIES. 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight $1.02 

S. P. Cannon, clerk for trustees 10.00 

J. G. Jones, cartage .25 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$241.38 



$7.61 



$440.40 



$11.27 

$3,093.96 
6.04 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 



$3,100.00 



Appropriation 



$350.00 



MERRILL YARD. 



99 



EXPEXDITUEES. 

A. S. Chadbourn, trees $10.00 

G. C. Harwood, labor 151.15 

Head & Dowst Co., fence rails 4.75 

W. F. Hubbard, pickets 9.00 

Donald McDonald, material, labor, building- 

tool-house 123.02 

John Perrin, stone 2.40 

C. S. Pollard, posts 4.32 

John B. Varick Co., paint, etc 32.53 

Water commissioners, use of water 12.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated monej' account 



$349.17 

$349.17 
.83 

$350.00 



Merrill Yard. 



Appropriation 



$200.00 



EXPEXDITUEES. 

LABOR. 

June $16.00 

July 4.50 

August 2.75 

November 61.75 

Warren Harvey 

SrXDRIES. 

F. H. Libby, gravel $3.40 

Palmer & Garmon, repairing gate 3. Go 

H. A. Piper, tool chest 12.00 

John B. Varick Co., tools 7.99 

B. F. & E. W. Welch, use of team 2.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated monej* account 



$85.00 
$5.00 



.$29.04 

$119.04 
80.96 



$200.00 



100 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Repairs of Schoolhouses. 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

Transferred from iinapproj)riated monej' ac- 
count 549.41 



EXPENDITUKES. 
MASONWORK. 

Amoskeag' Manufacturing Co $5.00 

D. McAuliffe 84.25 

B. W. Robinson 446.35 

Z. B. Stewart 359.84 



PAINTIXG AXD GLAZING. 

J. J. Abbott $170.46 

J. S. Avery 6.25 

Joel Daniels & Co 1.05 

W. H. Kewry 4.65 

W. J. Powers 5.25 

John A. Sargent 189.43 



PLUMBING, IRONWOPiK, EEPAIKS. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing- Co., bolts, weig'hts, 

repairing batteries, boilers $1,234.81 

C. W. Anderson & Co., repairing clocks 16.80 

S. F. Adams, repairing lightning rods 5.50 

S. C. Austin & Co., repairing lightning rods 19.70 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric supplies and labor 21.25 

Brodie Electric Co., supplies and labor 45.22 

C. B. Brown, roofing material and labor 64.73 

Burlington Venetian Blind Co., blinds 7.50 

F. S. Bodwell, post and labor 4.25 

Fred W. Cate, 1 handle .75 

O. D. Case & Co., blackboards 135.77 

G. H. Dudley, lumber and labor 1,053.70 

A. L. Franks & Co., lamps and labor 6.07 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 130.89 

J. Hodge, lumber 40.98 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co., repairing barometer 2.70 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing material and labor. . . 827.97 

W. P. Merrill, 1 faucet 1.50 

C. R. Merrill, cement 3.50 

C. H. Manning, paid for freight 14.04 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor 165.21 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concreting... 239.75 



$6,549.41 



$895.44 



$377.09 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



101 



B. F. Shepard, repairing locks, etc $5.45 

W. L. Spaulding-, plumbing- repairs 2.10 

G. E. Spaulding, plumbing repairs 1,113.97 

C. A. Trefetlien, repairing clocks 28.75 

C. L. Wolf, putting in sill cocks 3.00 

SUNDRIES. 

John T. Gott, cleaning vaults $25.00 

J. G. Jones, cai'tage 11.15 

Edward Sears, reeving flag ropes 19.25 

Pay roll Division Xo. 10, August 25.62 

Total expenditures 



$5,195.86 



$81.02 
$6,549.41 



Painting Outside of Schooli^ouses. 



Appropriation 



$1,000.00 



Expenditures. 

J. J. Abbott $323.43 

John A. Sargent 676.40 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$999.83 

$999.83 
.17 

$1,000.00 



Printing and Advertising. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

J{. Bechard, printing placards $5.00 

John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing circulars, blanks 236.40 

500 reports 45.08 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$300.00 



$286.48 

$286.48 
13.52 

$300.00 



102 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Books and Stationery. 

Apiiropriation $75.00 

EXPENDITUEES. 

Daniels & Downs, paper $0.50 

O. D. Knox, P. M., stamps and cards 20.00 

E. C. Lambert, envelopes, stamps, jjostals 24.68 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper 1.60 

$46.78 

Total expenditures $46.78 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 28.22 

$75.00 



Furniture and Supplies. 

Appropriation $1,300.00 

EXPEWDITUEES. 
PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL APPARATUS, SUPPLIES, ETC. 

Tebbetts & Soule $50.08 

G. W. 0. Tebbetts 87.93 

$138.01 

HABDWARE, ETC. 

Amoskeagf Manufacturing- Co., oil $9.10 

Manchester Hardware Co., pail, pulley block. . 1.85 

John B. Varick Co., brushes, dusters, etc 216.42 

BOOKS AND STATIONEEY. 

E. E. Babb & Co., blackboard liners $18.00 

Department of Interior, 5 maps 4.00 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 1.20 

Neostyle Co., paper, pads 2.60 

Eand, McNally & Co., maps 23.10 

E. A. Stratton, book rack .70 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper, etc .78 

G. P. Wallace, carbon paper 1.50 

EUEXITURE, ETC. 

Chandler Adjustable Chair & Desk Works, 48 

desks $153.60 

Daniels & Downs, paper .50 



$227.37 



$51.88 



SEWING MATEiaALS. 103 

W. H.- Elliott, piano covers $8.00 

11. D. Ga3-, shades and fixtures 6.00 

J. L. Hainruett Co., globes, paper, sharpener. . . 16.20 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., tables, desks, chairs 55.44 

James W. Hill Co., flags and repairing flags. . . . 41.07 

A. K. Hobbs, hose, pegs, etc 2.93 

A. C. Hovey, mop wringer 2.50 

E. K. Home, dipper .15 

C. F. Jack, cloth 2.93 

J. Y. McQueston Co., chairs 40.02 

F. E. Nelson, cups, etc 5.30 

G. S. Perry & Co., mats and brushes. 110.32 

Pike & Heald Co., supplies and rejpairs 21.14 

Piper & ilclntire, piano stool and cover, rope., 6.75 

George E. Eeed Co., table 3.00 

Eichardson & Co., chart stands 3.50 

D. A. Simons, curtains 23.40 

M. Steinert & Sons Co., piano 100.00 

L. L. Sweet, piano 77.00 



STJNDEIES. 

D. J. Adams, making keys $0.50 

C. W. Anderson & Co., repairing clocks 2.00 

J. J. Abbott, setting glass 5.50 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electrical supplies and 

labor 62.28 

C. B. Brown, roofing material and labor 8.88 

A. N. Clapp, oil 1.20 

T. F. Fifield, oil 2.2S 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 41.44 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage 13. S4 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on gas, bells, electric 

lights 48.10 

A. W. Morse, oil .05 

People's Gas Light Co., tubing, etc 1.25 

B. F. Shepard, rex>airing locks, etc 2.25 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing- clock 1.00 



$680.35 



$191.17 



Total expenditures $1,288.78 

Tran.sferred to unaj^propriated money account 11.22 

$1,300.00 



Sewing Materials. 

Appropriation $250.00 



104 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



EXPENDITITRES. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing- Co., ging-ham $6.44 

Elliott Manufacturing- Co., cotton webbing-.... 5.00 

Frank W. Fitts, li/g pounds zephyr .3.00 

James W. Hill Co., needles, thread, etc 140.84 

Annie W. Patten, services as teacher 40.00 

John B. Varick Co., scissors 42.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$237.28 

$237.28 
12.72 

$250.00 



Fuel. 



Appropriation 



$8,800.00 



EXPENDITXJEES. 



COAL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co $6,170.29 

J. H. DeCourcy Co., 15 tons 97.50 

Flint, Haskell. & Flint, 10 tons 67.50 

Joseph Masse, 10 tons 67.50 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 30 tons 202.60 

Moore & Preston, 40 tons 260.00 

L). ivi. Poore, 35 tons 227.50 

J. P. Russell & Co., 4114 tons 241.25 

J. F. Wyman, 45 tons 292.50 

Wilson & Bryant, 10 tons 68.00 

, WOOD. 

Charles Boisclair $13.50 

W. E. Dunbar & Son 434.03 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co 6.50 

Moore & Preston 5.00 

E. V. Turcotte 8.25 

J. F. Wyman 6.50 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$7,094.54 



$474.38 

$8,168.92 
631.08 

$8,800.00 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 105 

Contingent Expenses. 

Appropriation $2,500.00 

EXPEXDITURES. 
FREIGHT AND CARTAGE. 



F. P. Colby $1-50 

J. G. Jones 27.12 

WATER, GAS, AXD ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Nellie iM. Atwood, carrying water $18.50 

Emma J. Ela, carrying water 18.50 

W. L. McPherson, water 11.50 

G. M. Morse, water 18.50 

Mrs. Byron E. ]Moore, water rent 9.00 

Manchester Electric Co., lights 33.15 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 282.07 

Union Electric Co., lig'hts 269.75 

Water commissioners, use of water 1,094.45 

MISCELLANEOUS. , 

D. J. Adams, keys $0.50 

C. W. Bickford, express, use of team 49.45 

J. A. Boivin, services typewriter 3.48 

W. E. Buck: 

Use of team 50.00 

Freight, express, telegrams 9.01 

P. C. Cheney Co., waste 13.74 

C. L. Downs, engrossing diplomas 61.35 

A. F. Davis, pine boughs 4.00 

Daniels-Cornell Co., soap 2.25 

C. W. Davis, use of team 150.00 

E. J. Ela, paid for setting glass .15 

Frank W. Fitts, ribbon 22.66 

H. W. Foster, expenses visiting ^Manchester at 

call of committee 24.65 

A. M. Finney, cleaning rug .38 

Ginn &: Co., music 28.77 

Oliver Ditson Co., books 31.26 

Hale & Whittemore, oak frame, etc 2.C15 

S. B. Hope, use of team 83.50 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., use of chairs, etc 23.92 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos. 17.25 

W. J. McGuiness, tuning pianos 8.00 

Manchester Mills, .soap, etc 17.78 



$28.62 



$1,755.42 



106 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Ne^v England Publishing Co., subscriptions 
'•Journal of Education," "American Primary 

Teacher" $3.00 

Piper & Mclntire, use of piano 25.00 

Pay roll. Division Xo. 2: 

January 17.38 

February 16.12 

March 7.75 

November, commons 6.75 

Star Stamp Co., stamp .45 

D. A. Simons, use of chairs S.-IO 

E. A. Stratton, ribbon for typewriter 1.00 

Silver, Burdett & Co., books 8.00 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clock 1.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unajipropriated money aceoimt 



$699.00 

$3,483.04 
16.96 



$2,500.00 



Appropriation 



Care of Schoolrooms. 



$6,500.00 



Expenditures. 



JAJSriTOES. 

John S. Avery $600.00 

Nellie M. Atwood 37.00 

S. H. Batchelder 499.92 

Edwin N. Baker 349.92 

Robert Cook 470.80 

W. F. Conner .502.92 

C. H. Corey 169.92 

Fred M. Cate 40.00 

J. B. Chalifour. . ; 172.10 

Emma J. Ela 37.00 

Rose Elliott 23.00 

Charles Edgar 3.28 

V. H. Hill. . ._ 4.99.92 

Alfred M. Hueber 34.50 

Charles F. Jack 600.00 

George H. Jack 520.77 

W. L. McPherson 22.25 

W. H. Xewry 600.00 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



107 



W. J. Powers $600.00 

Josephine L. Riddle 14.00 

William Stevens 399.96 

William Shagnon 4.48 

Henry Theiss 21.00 

Inez Warren 37.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Nellie M. Atwood, paid for cleaning rooms $2.00 

Eose Elliott, cleaning rooms 2.00 

Scott Flanders, cleaning rooms 5.50 

Mrs. Mertsch, cleaning rooms 9.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 



$6,259.74 



$18.50 

$6,278.24 
221.76 

$6,500.00 



Appropriation 



Evening Schools. 



$1,200.00 



ExPENDITrEES. 



SALAUIES. 



Annie B. Angell 

S. H. Batclaelder 

Xazaire Biron 

J. N. Boddy 

C. E. Cochran 

Honorie J. Crough . . . 

W. W. Forbes 

Albert E. Herrick 

Margaret G. Linen... 

Mae L. Lovejoj- 

Margaret McDermott. 

Ivathrj-n McKeon 

W. J. Mooar 

A. W. Morgan , 

Mary E. Paige 

S. J. Price 

A. W. Eowell 

Minnie Sullivan 

Mary B. Thompson.. 



$58.00 
29.50 
56.00 
48.00 

118.00 

118.00 
58.00 
45.00 
59.00 
51.00 
35.00 
27.00 
58.00 

118.00 
58.00 
21.00 
58.00 
34.00 
54.00 



$1,103.50 



108 REPORT OF THE CITT AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

Joseph Chalifour, services as janitor $29.00 

V. H. Hill, services as janitor 48.00 

J. G. Jones, cartage 2.25 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on gas 4.60 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to iinapijropriated monej' account 

Evening School, Mechanical Drawing. 

Aj)propriation $225.00 

Transferred from unapj)i'opriated money ac- 
count 9.40 

Expenditures. 

salaries. 

H. W. Allen $108.00 

Jolin M. Kendall 114.00 

SUJS^DBIES. 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper $2.50 

John B. Yarick Co., drawing materials 9.90 

Total expenditures 

Teachers' Salaries. 

Appropriation $86,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money ac- 
count 126.18 

Expenditures. 

salaries. 

January $9,047.41 

February 9,221.11 

March 9,268.98 

April 6,927.97 



$83.85 

$1,187.35 
12.65 

$1,200.00 



$234.40 



$222.00 



$12.40 



$234.40 



$86,126.18 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 



109 



May $9,223.83 

June 9,402.37 

September 6,976.83 

October 9,508.36 

November 11,818.96 

December 4,730.36 

Total exj)enditui'es 



$86,126.18 



$86,126.18 



Free Text-books. 

Appropriation 

Transferred from unapprojiriated money ac- 
count 

EXPEXDITXJEES. 



P5,000.00 
16.16 



$5,016.16 



TEXT-BOOKS AXD SUPPLIES. 

American Book Co $282.43 

Allyn & Bacon 113.94 

E. E. Babb & Co 656.48 

Boston Scliool Supply Co 208.75 

F. J. Barnard & Co 1.90 

E. K. Coburn Co. 4.50 

T. H. Castor & Co 88.26 

Joel Daniels & Co 17.10 

A. Da Prato & Co 5.00 

Earle Ink Co 24.00 

Educational Publishing Co 41.84 

Ginn & Co 564.60 

W. P. Goodman .• 84.03 

J. L. Hammett Co 350.17 

D. C. Heath & Co 428.30 

W. E. Jenkins 5.61 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co 102.68 

G. F. King & Co 365.95 

E. L. Kellogg & Co 1.50 

Kasson & Palmer 3.00 

G. S. Perry & Co 25.59 

Prang Educational Co 518.62 

Eichardson & Co 34.85 

Eand, McXally & Co 40.80 

Silver, Burdett & Co 122.25 

Sibley & Ducker 19.28 

E. A. Stratton 36.15 



110 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Thompson, Brown & Co $297.99 

D. Van Nostraud 5. SO 

John B. Varick Co 6.26 

Wm. Ware & Co 13.20 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co 10.34 

SUNDRIES. 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage $34.99 

Fannie L. Sanborn, superintendent's clerk 500.00 

Total expienditures 



$4,481.17 



$534.99 
$5,016.16 



Manual Training. 



Appropriation 



$600.00 



EXPENDIXrRES. 
SUNDRIES. 

H. W. Allen, instruction in drawing $21.00 

Mrs. N. J. Davis, laundry, repairing aprons 3.25 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage 3.80 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 1 stool 3.00 

J. Hodge, lumber 46.38 

W. F. Hubbard, lumber 172.28 

John M. Kendall, instruction in drawing 15.00 

T. A. Lane Co., electric lamps, etc 7.65 

Manchester Electric Co., running motor one 

year 65.00 

Palmer, Parker & Co., wood 10.35 

E. A. Stratton, pajDer, tracing cloth 2.15 

W. C. Tolles & Co., vises 58.50 

John B. Varick Co., hardware, etc 61.87 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unapprojpriated monej' account 



$470.23 

$470.23 
129.77 

$600.00 



Furnishing Room, Parlor School. 



Appropriation 



$300.00 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 
EXPEXDITUKES. 

George S. Perry & Co., S-l desks 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to nnaj)proj)riated monej^ account. 



Ill 



$294.00 

$294.00 
6.00 

$300.00 



Playground, Amoskeag School. 



Appropriation 



$480.00 



EXPENDITUBES. 



Transferred to new account. 



$480.00 



Paupers off Farm. 

Appropriation $8,000.00 

Transferred from vinapiaroi^riated money ac- 
count 1,716.63 



ExPEXDixrRES. 



$9,716.63 



GROCERIES AND :MEATS. 

Barlow & Xye $21.00 

C. H. Clark 23.00 

A. H. Cate 4.30 

A. M. Eastman 7.00 

E. A. Eastman 7.00 

Eag-er & Co 24.00 

T. F. Fifield 43.21 

H. Fradd & Co 23.00 

A. L. Gadbois 8.00 

Gagne Brothers 10.00 

Griffin Brothers 1,090.35 

B. F. & S. L. Greer 66.00 

B. L. Hartshorn 22.39 

Harbour & Co 7.00 

John F. Healy 41.00 

Johnson & McDuffie 258.30 

0. D. Knox & Co 7.00 

G. C. Lord 67.15 

P. D. Lj-nch 200.00 



112 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Lanioreaiix Brothers 

J. X. Lacourse 

E. Marchaud 

McQuade's market 

U Iric Messier 

Noyes & Prince 

O. H. ^Tourry & Co 

F. T. Parker 

Edmond Pinard 

Frank I. Paige 

E. W. Perkins 

F. X. Parent 

Eugene Qnirin 

W. M. Robinson 

H. B. Sawyer 

Swinston & Eobinson 

Swanson & Josef son 

Trahan & Co 

J. O. Turcotte 

H. A. Tirrell 

Moise Verrette, Jr 

Calixte Vigueault 

FUEL. 

Peter Beanchamp 

Boisclair & Raiclie ' 

L. B. Bodwell & Co 

Joseph Breanlt & Son , 

Charles Boisclair 

F. X. Chenette 

J. H. DeCourcy Co 

Flint, Haskell & Flint 

G. W. Flint 

Philias Gravelin 

B. F. & S. L. Greer 

Joseph Laf orce 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co 

Moore & Preston 

A. D. Maxwell estate 

D. M. Poore 

J. P. Russell & Co 

E. V. Turcotte 

J. F. Wyraan 

BOARD, CARE, A>'D RENT. 

Victoria Akey 

C. M. Bennett 



$95.50 

46.00 

174.00 

232.00 

117.40 

86.00 

194.00 

12.00 

30.00 

36.00 

68.00 

211.00 

235.00 

428.00 

83.00 

21.00 

64.90 

173.00 

88.00 

5.00 

172.50 

425.87 



$3.00 
23.00 

7.00 

7.90 
31.50 

2.50 
28.00 

9.00 
15.00 

4.50 
19.25 

3.50 

47.75 

47.50 

130.50 

2.00 

149.70 

24.38 

26.10 



$12.00 
36.00 



$4,927.87 



$582.08 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 



113 



County of Hillsborough $745.75 

Clara E. French 26.00 

W. H. Gilmore 104.00 

Florence Hardy 66.,00 

G. V. Hamlin 5.00 

A. J. Lane Co 15.00 

Mrs. Marg-aret McFarland 24.00 

Moses B. Moulton 32.00 

Mrs. G. H. Riley 47.81 

Mrs. August Schink 17.70 

St. Patrick's Orphans' Home 425.00 

State Industrial School 1,781.09 

Henry Yolkmann 54.56 

'Women's Aid Home 92.00 

BOOTS, SHOES, CLOTHING. 

A. T. Beaumier, boots and shoes $4.50 

Dodge & StraAv, boots and shoes , 7.40 

Dodge & Dodge, shoes 26.00 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., boots and shoes 2.00 

W. P. Farmer, boots and shoes 2.50 

A. & W. S. Heath, boots and shoes 5.00 

H. M. Moody, clothing 2.00 

J. L. Niven, clothing 9.50 

Joseph Quirin, shoes 2.00 

Daniel Shea, shoes 3.00 

P. F. Toole, shoes. 3.75 

ilEDICIXE, FUXEPAL EXPE:>fSES. 

F. X. Chenette, burial outfits $35.00 

T. F. Collins, burial outfits 35.00 

W. M. Fames Drug Co., 1 truss 5.00 

F. H. Fames, medicine .85 

A. L. Gadbois, burial outfits 50.00 

J. J. Holland, medicine 3.80 

McDonough & Shea, burial outfits 50.00 

W. B. Mitchell, medicine 1.00 

F. C. Steuart, M. D., 1 visit 1.00 

Dante Smith, medicine 1.70 

A. D. Smith, medicine 7.65 

F. H. Thurston, medicine 294.80 

E. Y. Turcotte, burial outfits 82.50 

F. L. Wallace, burial outfit 25.00 

Frank L. Way, medicine 2.55 

8 



$3,483.91 



)7.65 



$595.85 



114 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDKIES. 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, tickets $4.90 

John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks, etc 11.20 

C. B. Clarkson, conveying sundry persons from 

insane asylum to county farm 11.00 

W. P. Goodman, stationer}' 5.58 

Pike & Heald Co., stove, putting in water pipe 23.59 

B. F. & E. W. Welch, use of team 3.00 



City Farm. 



Appropriation $8,500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money ac- 
count 13.74 



Expenditures. 

E. G. Libby, superintendent $500.00 

Mrs. Annie Libby, matron 300.00 

HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 

January — $151.73 

February 116.67 

March 131.86 

April 144.39 

May 199-09 

June 154.66 

July 162.55 

August 212.62 

September 175.00 

October 212.48 

November 157.13 

December 144.06 

Ida Cox $8.64 

Clarence O'Connell 6.00 

Effie Megin 5.14 

Chester Maynard 15.13 

Harry F. Moore 1.87 

David B. Murphy 20.53 



$59.21 



Total expenditures $9,716.63 



.$8,513.74 



$800.00 



$1,962.24 



$57.31 



CITY FARM. 



115 



FUEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

Davis & Eodgers, wood 

A. W. Prescott, wood 

CLOTHXXG, DRY GOODS, ETC. 

Allen & Kimball, clothing 

Barton & Co., dry goods 

Clark & Estej", hose, handkerchiefs, etc 

G. AY. Dodge Shoe Co., boots and shoes 

C. M. Floyd, clothing 

James W. Hill Co., cambric, cotton, curtains, etc 

A. & W. S. Heath, boots and shoes 

Wm. Marcotte & Co., clothing 

H. M. Moody, clothing 

Miville & Deschenes, dry goods 

W. W. Partridge, mittens, jumpers 

ilEATS AND PROVISIONS. 

Barlow & Xye 

C. H. Clark 

C. H. Durgin 

Daniels-Cornell Co 

H. Fradd & Co 

T. F. Foley 

Granite State Grocery Co 

John T. Gott 

D. Johnson 

E. D. Jameson 

E. G. Libby 

W. D. Ladd & Co 

Horace Marshall 

Manchester Provision Co 

Manchester Beef Co 

McQuade's General Store 

Nelson Morris & Co 

Maynard & Dupont 

E. S. Xewton 

Parnell Brothers 

Henry W. Parker 

Joseph Quirin 

C. D. Steele & Co 

E. G. Sullivan 

Summer Street market 



$332.72 
73.50 

83. C3 



$18.48 
26.00 
11.12 
31.24 

174.12 
65.02 
3.55 
10.80 
20.88 
5.21 
30.66 



$316.59 

8.61 

3.47 

343.02 

9.33 

1.20 

20.40 

1.25 

3.50 

10.87 

1.00 

12.01 

5.65 

192.83 

37.21 

13.79 

20.94 

18.46 

65.37 

140.14 

303.14 

33.11 

10.12. 

20.33 

114.29 



$489.85 



$397.08 



$2.80 


34.51 


16.74 


91.63 


$38.49 


42.43 


S.04 


9.54 


1.50 



116 REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

W. F. Schonland 

John E. Towle & Co 

J. O. Turcotte 

J. H. Wia-ffin & Co 



FTXRNITURE AND KITCHEN UTENSILS 

C. M. Bailey, brooms, brushes, chimneys, etc. 
C. A. Hoitt & Co., glass, crockery, etc 

E. K. Home, tinware, glass, crockery 

F. E. Nelson, tinware, crockery 

Pike & Heald Co., oil cans 



irEDICINE, VETEKINARY SEETICES. 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., attendance and medicine. 
J. J. Holland, medicine 

F. K. Hubbard, medicine 

G. A. Hanscom, medicine 

Gillis Stark, M. D., visits 

A. D. Smith, cedar oil 

F. H. Thurston, medicine 



BLACKSMITHING, HARNESSES, ETC. 

J. A. Ballon, harness repairs and supplies $17.70 

Donald McDonald, blacksmithing 38.90 

E. D. Eogers, axle grease. 1.50 

G. Silberg, whips 2.50 

J. O. Tremblay, horseshoeing 32.65 

L. P. Tremblay, horseshoeing 2.00 

N. J. Whalen, repairing harnesses, etc 71.10 



$9.00 


9.70 


4.00 


3.00 


3.00 


4.00 


3.70 



CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

J. B. McCrillis & Son $12.00 

D. McDonald 44.70 

James Murphy 20.00 



HAT, GRAIN, AND OTHER FEED. 

Adams Brothers $129.30 

Ame & Co 7.50 

Arthur S. Brown 27.24 

Brown & Titus 203.90 

C. R. Merrill'. 160.16 

Partridge Brothers 162.75 



$1,852.31 



$100.00 



$36.40 



$166.35 



$76.70 



$690.85 



CITY FARM. 



117 



HARDWAEE, FERTILIZEKS, ETC. 

James J. H. Greg-ory 

Manchester Hardware Co 

John B. Yarick Co 

PREillUM OX IXSURAJVCE POLICIES. 

W. G. Berry 

Eobert E. Chase 

John Dowst 

Everett & Scott 

Stark & Blanchet 

John A. Sheehan 



$23.59 

55.26 

33C.41 



$52.50 
17.50 
17.50 
26.25 
17.50 
61.25 



PRESTTING, ADVERTISING, STATIONERY, TELEPHONE. 

John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing bill heads, etc $7.25 

"Daily Mirror" subscription 6.50 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 5.60 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone , 36.15 

Union Publishing Co., advertising notice .88 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

J. J. Abbott, paper $10.63 

D. J. Adams, fitting keys .80 

A. A. Amlaw, repairing pipe, etc 27.86 

James Briggs & Son, hinges and labor ; . . . 1.75 

E. M. Bryant & Co., batteries and bell 6.10 

A. B. Gushing, paint 19.51 

Cavanaugh Brothers, picks, shovels, etc 9.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 89.56 

J. Hodge, lumber and shavings 37.30 

A. K. Hobbs, enamel cloth, shoemaking supplies 29.51 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 12 cuspidors 5.00 

T. A. Lane Co., fixing pump 16.06 

Clarence R. Merrill, cement and lime 8.40 

C. W. H. Moulton, ladder 2.50 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor 229.25 

C. A. Trefethen, clock .90 

C. L. Wolf, stoves, pipe, and labor 41.16 

Young Brothers, ladders 7.90 



$415.26 



$192.50 



$56.38 



$543.19 



118 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

American Express Co., express $0.S0 

Boston Oil Co., oil 6.00 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight 1.39 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., filling ice house 10.00 

Arthur S. Brown, grinding corn 3.20 

Cavanaugh Brothers, 1 horse 175.00 

W. M. Eames Drug Co., sulpho-napthol, etc. .. . 10.90 

C. A. Eastman, pasturing cattle 42.00 

C. S. Fifield, use of team 5.00 

Sarah E. Fracker, 1 cow 34.00 

Hillsborough county farm, 1 pig 15.00 

Wm. Hayes, barrels 50.00 

E. G. Libby: 

Paid for grass 8.50 

P. O. box rent, stamps 6.00 

Expenses, escaped prisoners 3.32 

Albert Kidder, subscription to "N. E. Home- 
stead" 1.00 

Manchester Oil Co., oil 63.00 

Manchester & Concord Express Co., express. . . . .30 

Norfolk Manufacturing Co., soap 14.00 

Sinclair & Fellows, making cider 27.66 

George P. Prescott, pigs 24.00 

James Smith, pigs 10.00 

Water commissioners, use of water 164.25 

WTieeler & Wilson Manufacturing Co., repair- 
ing machine 2.00 

$677.32 

Total expenditures $8,513.74 



Indigent Soldiers. 

Appropriation $125.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money ac- 
count 8.25 



EXPE>T)ITL'RES. 
GROCEBIES. 

Johnson & McDufBe $24.00 

D. M. Poore & Son 54.00 



$133.25 



$78.00 



FILE AND INDEX SYSTEM. 
FUEL. 

Moore & Preston $15.00 

A. D. Maxwell estate 40.2o 

Total expenditures 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 

Api)ropriation 

EXPETSTDITIIRES. 

W. p. Goodman, stationery $2.60 

O. D. Knox, P. M., stamps 5.00 

Pike & Heald Co., solder, gasoline, putty, etc.. 1.49 

C. O. Seaman, plumbers' tools 1.00 

E. A. Stratton, paper 2.80 

Union Publishing Co., advertising notice 5.79 

John B. Varick Co., plumbers' supplies 13.72 

C. L. Wolf, supplies 40.30 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 

File and Index System. 

Balance from last j'ear unexpended 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Anna S. Smith 

supplies. 

E. E. Coburn Co., cabinet and cards $14.00 

H. A. Cobb, 1 cabinet 25.00 

Stark & Blanchet, insurance premium 10.00 

Total expenditures 



119 



$55.25 
$133.25 



$100.00 



$72.70 

$72.70 
27.30 

$100.00 



$192.51 



$143.5] 



$49.00 
$192.51 



120 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Free Beds, Elliot Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

EXPENDITimES. 

Elliot Hospital $300.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

EXPENDITXJEES. 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital $300.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

EXPE^N^DITURES. 

Sacred Heart Hospital $300.00 

Women's Aid Home. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
Women's Aid Home $300.00 

W. C. T. U. Mercy Home. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
W. C. T. U. Mercy Home $300.00 

Decoration of Soldiers' Craves. 

Appropriation $400.00 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 121 

Expenditures. 
Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. R $359,62 



Band Concerts. 

Appropriation $400.00 

Free contribution from mayor 8.00 



EXPEA'DITURES. 

City Band $150.00 

Manchester Cadet Band 50.00 

Manchester Military Band 150.00 

Turner Band 50.00 

Pay roll, commons, Julj' 8.00 



Abatement of Taxes. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Transferred from temporary loan account 33,000.00 



Total expenditures $359.62 

Transferred to nuajaproxiriated money account 40.38 



$400.00 



Militia. 

Appropriation $800.00 

EXPE^NTDITUEES. 

Company C, First Eeg-iment, N. H. N. G. $100.00 

Company F, First Eeg-iment, X. H. X. G 100.00 

Company H, First Eeg-iment, X. H. N. G 100.00 

Company L, First Eeg-iment, N. H. X. G 100.00 

Joseph Freschl Post Xo. 94, G. A. E 100.00 

Louis Bell Post Xo. 3, G. A. E 100.00 

Manchester Cadets ■. 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans 100.00 

$800.00 



$408.00 



$408.00 



Total expenditures $408.00 



$35,000.00 



122 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 

Sundry persons on tax abated $1,245.81 

Amoskeag- Manufacturing Co 33,063.43 



$34,309.24 

Total expenditures $34,309.24 

Transferred to unappropriated money account 690.76 



Purchase of Land Sold for Taxes. 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

Transferred from tinaiipropriated money ac- 
count S56.72 



$35,000.00 



$6,856.72 

Expe::^ditures. 
George E. Morrill, taxes sold and purchased by city $6,856.72 



State Tax. 

Appropriation $63,869.00 



Expenditures. 
State of New Hampahire $63,869.00 



County Tax. 

Appropriation $96,456.32 



Expenditures. 
County of Hillsborough $96,456.32 



Garbage Incineration. 

Transferred from unappropriated money account $293.85 



APPROPRIATIONS. 123 

EXPENDITUEES. 

Wm. C. Clarke: 

Transportation of 11 men to Montreal and 

return, including fare for sleeping- car $132.00 

Board and incidental expenses 155.85 

J. B. Thurston, searching records regarding- 

crematory patents 6.00 

$293.85 



Resolution Raising Money and Making Appropriations for 
tlie Year One Thousand Nine Hundred. 

Resolved by the Common Council of Manchester, in City Council 

assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of six hundred and twentj^ thousand dollars ($620,000) . 
be raised for the use of the city for the year 1900, by tax on the polls 
and estates liable to be taxed thereon, which sum, together with such 
unappropriated money as may now be in the city treasurj', or may 
hereafter come into it, shall be appropriated as follows: 

CENTRAL DEPART3IENT. 

Interest $44,000.00 

City hall 3,500.00 

Printing and stationerj^ 2,000.00 

Incidental expenses 5,500.00 

Land sold for taxes ' 6,000.00 

Mayor's incidentals 300.00 

Sinking fund 27,000.00 

City officers' salaries 24,500.00 

Payment of funded and temporary debts 35,000.00 

auditor's DEPARTMEIMT. 

Salaries and expenses $2,000.00 

engineer's DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries and expenses $6,702.16 

DEPARTMENT OF TAXES. 

Abatement of taxes $2,000.00 

State tax 63,869.00 

County tax 96,456.32 

Total for this department $318,827.48 



124- REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SEWER AND STREET DEPARTiIE>'T. 

Board of street and park commissioners, salai'ies and 

expenses : $3,500.00 

Eepairs of highways 20,000.00 

Building- new hig'hways 4,000.00 

Land taken for highways 5,000.00 

Watering streets 5,000.00 

Macadamizing streets 10,000.00 

Grading for concrete 5,000.00 

Scavenger service 18,000.00 

Street sweeping 2,500.00 

Eepairs of bridges 3,000.00 

Paving streets 5,000.00 

City teams 6,500.00 

Eepairs of sewers 5,000.00 

.New sewers 20,000.00 

Eemoval of sno^v and ice 7,000.00 

Paving Elm street 10,000.00 

Total for this department $129,500.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Eepairs of schoolhouses $6,000.00 

Fuel 8,800.00 

Furniture and supplies • 1,300.00 

Printing and advertising 300.00 

Books and stationery 75.00 

Contingent expenses 2,500.00 

Care of rooms 6,500.00 

Evening schools 1,200.00 

Teachers' salaries 86,000.00 

Evening schools, mechanical drawing 225.00 

Free text-books 5,000.00 

Manual training 600.00 

Sewing material for girls 250.00 

Furnishing room, Parker school 300.00 

Painting outside of schoolhouses 1,000.00 

Total for this department $120,050.00 

FIRE DEPARTIIEKT. 

Fire department $65,000.00 

Fire-alarm telegraph 1,200.00 

Hydrant service , 18,425.00 

Total for this department $84,625.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



125 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND PLACES. 



Eepairs of building's $4,975.00 

Care of commons 4,500.00 

Care of Stark park 500.00 

Care of Derryfiekl park 500.00 

Care of Pine Grove cemetery 9,000.00 

Care of Valley cemetery 3,100.00 

Care of Amoskeag cemetery 350.00 

Care of Merrill yard 200.00 

Playground, South End 100.00 

Playground, Amoskeag school 480.00 

Total for this department $23,705.00 

CITY LIBEAKY. 

Salaries and expenses $5,350.00 

POLICE DEPAKTMETs'T. 

Salaries and expense of commission and force $43,600.00 

Court, expenses 2,900.00 

Station, care and maintenance 2,500.00 

Total for this department $49,000.00 

PATKIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHBOPIC. 

Support of paupers off the city farm $8,000.00 

Maintenance of city farm 8,500.00 

Support of indigent soldiers 125.00 

Bed for city patients. Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Bed for city patients, Elliot Hospital 300.00 

Bed for city patients. Sacred Heart Hospital 300.00 

Bed for city patients, Notre Dame des Lourdes Hospital.. 300.00 

Mercy Home 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 400.00 

Health Department, salaries and expenses 4,700.00 

Militia armories: 

Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. E 100.00 

Louis Bell Post, G. A. E 100.00 

Company C, First Eegiment, N. H. K G 100.00 

Company F, First Eegiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company H, First Eegiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company L, First Eegiment, X. H. N. G 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans 100.00 

Manchester Cadets 100.00 

Board plumbing inspectors 100.00 

Band concerts 400.00 

Total for this department $24,525.00 

LIGHTING STEEETS DEPARTMENT. 

Lighting streets $57,500.00 

Passed March 12, 1900. 



126 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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128 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Assessors' Oath. 

We, the Assessors of the city of Manchester, do solemnly swear that 
in making the invoice for the purpose of assessing the foregoing taxes, 
we appraise all taxable property at its full value, and as we would 
appraise the same in payment of a just debt due from a solvent debtor. 
So help us God. 



Valuation and Taxes. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the jjoIIs and on the real and per- 
sonal estate, within the city of !\[anchester, X. H., for the year 1900, 

was as follows: 

Valuation. Rate. Tax. 

Eeal estate $26,033,838 $19.00 $494,642.31 

Personal property 5,297,05G 19.00 100,644.06 

$31,330,894 $595,286.37 

Number of polls, 13,759 1,375,900 19.00 20,142.10 

Totals ?32,706,794 $621,428.47 

The share distributed to Manchester of the amount of 
tax assessed, as per returns made by the corporations 
to state treasurer: 

On railroads $36,688.11 

On savings banks 49,490.76 

On insurance companies 3,100.50 

On literary fund 2,642.00 

Grand tax total $713,409.84 

For further information in relation to taxes collected by the state, 
see State Treasurer's report. 



TAXATION. 



129 



TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



Tear. 


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Taxes of 1885 


$1,205.71 
1,264.85 
1,163.94 
1,580.13 
1,395.13 
1,687.08 
1,966.63 
2,582.12 
4,095.13 
3,515.83 
5,011.88 
5,005.02 
5,346.41 
5,941.65 
( 427.96 1 
( 59,972.58 ] 
621,428.47 






$1,205.71 
1,264.85 
1,163.94 
1 580 13 


Taxes of 1886 






Taxes of 1887 






Taxes of 1888 






Taxes of 1889 






1 395 13 


Taxes of 1S90 






1,687.08 
1 966 63 


Taxes of 1891 






Taxes of 1892 






2,582.12 
4,095.13 
3 515 83 


Taxes of 1893 






Tii"5es of 1S94 






Taxes of 1895 






5,011.88 
5,005.02 
5,323.95 
5,733.24 

6,550.73 

65,235.12 


Taxes of 1S96 






Taxes of 1897 




$22.46 
208.41 

53,486.20 

555,313.10 






Taxes of 1899 

Taxes of 1900 


$363.61 
880.25 




Totals 


$723,590.52 


$1,243.86 


$609,030.17 


$113,316.49 







130 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

TAX VALUATIONS, ETC., FROM 1890 TO 1900, INCLUSIVE. 



Tear, 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. polls. 


Poll tax. 


Valuation 
of poll. 


1890 .. 

1891 


S24,207,740 
24,872,492 
25,932,044 
27,439,742 
28,391,710 
28,861,122 
29,443,668 
30,486,946 
30,988,488 
31,491,784 
32,706,794 


8462,869.17 
443,541.76 
506,465.17 
507,640.68 
505,372.44 
502,183.02 
547,651.50 
634,127.80 
604,280.57 
614,096.93 
621,428.47 


9,723 
10,367 
10,673 
11.835 
12.103 
13,244 
12,583 
12,921 
12,808 
13,137 
13,759 


81.91 
1.78 
1.95 
1.85 
1.78 
1,74 
1.86 
2.08 
1,95 
1,95 
1.90 


8100 
100 


1892 


100 


1893 


100 


1894 


100 


1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 


100 
100 
100 
100 


1899 


100 


1900 


100 







For years prior to 1890, see reports of 1890 and 1891. 



Settlement of Account of George E. Morrill, Tax Collector 
for City of Manchester, N. H., June 1, 1900. 

Amount out- Balance out- 
standing: June Collected, standing .June 
1, 1899. 1, 1900. 

Tax list, 1885 $1,205.71 . $1,205.71 

1886 1,264.85 1,264.85 

1887 1,163.94 1,163.94 

1888 1,580.13 1,580.13 

1889 1,395.13 1,395.13 

1890 1,687.08 1,687.08 

1891 1,966.63 1,966.6:! 

1892 2,582.12 2,582.12 

1893 4,095.13 4,095.13 

1894 3,515.83 3,515.83 

1895 : 5,011.88 5,011.88 

1896 5,005.02 5,005.02 

1897 5,346.41 $22.40 5,323.95 

1898 5,941.65 208.41 5,733.24 

Amount collected $230.87 

Credit by cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 175 230.87 

Interest collected $1,534.67 

Credit by cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 104 1.534.67 

Cost collected $1,512.01 

Credit by cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 105 1,512.01 



EXEMPTION FROM TAXATION. 1*31 

1899. DK- 

June 1. Balance due on settlement of 1893 list $4,004.48 

To warrant resident list $612,803.04 

warrant non-resident list 1,430.45 

voluntary list 391.40 



$614,624.89 



1899, 1900. Cr. 

By cash paid treasurer, per vouchers Nos. 118, 
133, 147, 151, 191, in year 1899; and receipts 
Nos. 36, 106, 176, in year 1900 $606,245.74 

By abatements, vouchers Nos. 144 in 1899, and 

36 in 190O 1,828.42 

By unpaid taxes, June 1, 1900 6,550.73 



$614,624.89 



AIanchestee, N. H., July 1, 1900. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the account of Georg-e E. 
Morrill, tax collector of said Manchester, and find the same correct, as 

above stated. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Aiiditor. 



Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions from 

Taxation. 

CoxsTiTunoN OF New Hampshire, Article 82, Page 38, Public 

Statutes. 

ENCOURAGEMENT OF T ttERATURE, ETC. 

Art. 82. "Knowledge and learning- g'enerally diffused throug-h a 
community being essential to the preservation of a free government, 
and spreading the opportunities and advantages of education through 
the various parts of the country being highly conducive to promote this 
end, it shall be the duty of legislators and magistrates, in all future 
periods of this got-ernment, to cherish the interest of literature and 
the sciences, and all seminaries and public schools; to encourage pri- 
vate and public institutions, rewards, and immunities for the promotion 
of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures, and 
natural history of the country; to countenance and inculcate the prin- 
ciples of humanity and general benevolence, public and private charity, 
industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, sincerity, sobriety. 
and all social affections and generous sentiments among the people; 
provided, nevertfieJess, that no money raised by taxation shall ever be 
granted or applied for the use of schools or institutions of any reli- 
gious sect or denomination." 



132 REPORT OF TUE CITY AUDITOR. 

Public Statutes, Chaptek 55. 

Sect. 2. "Eeal estate, whether improved or unimproved, and whether 
owned by residents or others, is liable to be taxed, except houses of 
public worship, twenty-five hundred dollars of the value of parsonages 
owned by religious societies and occupied by their pastors, school- 
houses, seminaries of learning, real estate of the United States, state, 
or town used for public purposes, and almshouses on county farms." 

Sect. 11. "Towns may by vote exemipt from taxation for a term 
not exceeding ten years any manufacturing establishment proposed 
to be erected or put in operation therein, and the capital to be used 
in operating the same, unless such establishment has been previously 
exempted from taxation by some town." 

OPINION OF the supreme COL^RT. 

58 N. H. Eep., page 623. "The exemption in each case is limited to 
ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole power of taxation 
would be the destruction of government; and the dangerous tendency 
of legislation suspending any part of that power, for any period, is 
manifest. P. Bank v. BiUimjs, 4 Pet. 514, 561. So long as the existing 
laws remain unrepealed, and the constitutional construction hereto- 
fore adopted remains unchanged, contracts hereafter made under these 
laws and that construction will be valid. If the legislature for any 
reason wish to prevent the making of any more such contracts, their 
object can be accomplished by a repeal of the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective charters 
as "being of the nature of a jjublic charity," as follows: 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute Women, N. H. Laws of 1889, 
chapter 199. 

Elliot Hospital, N. H. Laws of 1881, chapter 178. 

Manchester Women's Aid and Relief Society', organized in January, 
1875, N. H. Laws, 1891, chapter 283. 

OrxDhanage and Home for Old Ladies (Catholic) on Hanover street, 
N. H. Laws, 1883, chapter 56. 



Schedule of Property used for Religious, Charitable, 
and Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Taxation 
by Law, not Including that owned by the City of Man- 
chester. 

Convent, Sisters Jesus Mary, French Catholic; East Spruce 
street, near Beech: 

Building $10,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 2,600.00 

$12,600.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 133 

Convent, Sisters of Mercy, Catholic; 415 Union street, 
corner Laurel: 

Building $30,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 



Mount St. Mary's Academy, Catholic; from convent lot 
east to Beech street: 

Building $25,000.00 

31,500 square feet of land 9,450.00 

Lot south side of Laurel street, corner Union street. Cath- 
olic; McDonald school: 

Building $35,000.00 

10,800 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' Home, Cath- 
olic; Amherst and Hanover streets: 

Building $14,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 30,375.00 

St. Patrick's Orphan Asylums, Catholic; 184 Hanover 
street: 

Building $47,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 40,500.00 

St. Joseph's High School, Catholic; Lowell street, corner 
of Birch: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

Union-street school. Catholic; corner Union and Laurel 
streets: 

Building $4,000.00 

5,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

St. Agnes' school. Catholic; corner Cedar and Pine streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

20,000 square feet of land 3,200.00 

St. Joseph's school for girls. Catholic; corner Pine and 
Lowell streets: 

Building $10,000.00 

Land included in cathedral lot. 

Convent of Holy Angels, French Catholic; Beauport street, 
corner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building $15,000.00 

22,500 square feet of land 4,500.00 



$36,300.00 



$34,450.00 



$40,000.00 



$44,375.00 



$87,500.00 



$20,000.00 



$6,500.00 



$15,200.00 



$10,000.00 



$19,500.00 



134 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. George's school, French Catholic; corner Pine and 
Orange streets: 

Building $30,000.00 

10,000 square feet of laud 5,000.00 

Home, Sisters of the Precious Blood; 555 Union street: 

Building $2,500.00 

6,750 square feet of land 2,025.00 

Orphanage school, Beauport, Wayne, and Putnam streets; 
French Catholic: 

Building $25,000.00 

30,000 square feet of land 6,000.00 

St. Augustine's academy, French Catholic; corner Beech 
and Spruce streets: 

Building $8,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 4,500.00 

St. Mary's parochial school, French Catholic; corner Wayne 
and Cartier streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

25,000 square feet of land 2,000.00 

Kesidence priest St. Augustine's church, French Catholic; 
383 Beech street: 

Building $6,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 1,875.00 

$7,875.00 
Orphan Children's school, parish St. Augustine; 251, 253 
Lake avenue: 

Building $12,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Schoolhouse, north side of Cedar street: 

Building $8,750.00 

2,500 square feet of land 1,250.00 

Eesidence priest St. Anne's church. Catholic; 231 Merri- 
mack street: 

Building $5,000.00 

8,820 square feet of land 2,646.00 

$7,646.00 
Eesidence Catholic bishop; 145 Lowell street: 

Building $40,000.00 

24,000 square feet of land 12,000.00 

$52,000.00 



$35,000.00 



$4,525.00 



$31,000.00 



$12,500.00 



$14,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$17,000.00 



$10,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 135 

Kesidence priest St. Georg'e's church, French Catholic; 
Orange street, corner Pine: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,000 square feet of land 4,000.00 



$6,500.00 
Residence priest St. Mary's church, Frencli Catholic; 376 
Beauport street, West Manchester: 

Building $2,500.00 

5,000 square feet of land. 1,000.00 

$3,500.00 
St. Anne's church. Catholic; Union street, corner Merri- 
mack: 

Building $30,000.00 

10,180 square feet of land 5,090.00 

St. Augustine's church, French Catholic; Beech street, 
corner East Spruce: 

Building- $28,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 3,250.00 

St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel, Catholic; Pine street, 
corner Lowell: 

Building ' $70,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 30,375.00 



$2,500.00 



St. Mary's church, French Catholic; Beauport street, cor- 
ner \Yayne, West Manchester: 

Building $25,000.00 

70,000 square feet of land 14,000.00 

St. Raphael's church and school, German Catholic; Third 
street, corner Ferry, West Manchester: 

Building $35,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 3,400.00 

St. George's church, French Catholic; Pine street, corner 
Orange: 

Building $75,000.00 

18,690 square feet of land 7,614.00 

St. Patrick's church and school. Catholic; Kelly street, 
Cartier street and Coolidge avenue: 

School building $20,000.00 

56,281 square feet of land 4,502.00 

First Baptist church; Union street, corner Concord: 

Building $28,000.00 

11,250 square feet of land 6,750.00 



$2,500.00 



$35,090.00 



$31,250.00 



$100,375.00 



$39,000.00 



$38,400.00 



52,614.00 



$24,502.00 



$34,750.00 



136 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

First Freewill Baptist church; Merrimack street, corner 
Chestnut: 

Building- $12,400.00 

12,600 square feet of land 12,600.00 

Second Baptist church; Merrimack street, near Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

9,450 square feet of land 3,780.00 

People's Baptist church; Chestnut street, corner Concord: 

Building $8,000.00 

3,200 square feet of land 2,000.00 

First Congregational church; Hanover street, corner 
Union: 

Building $30,000.00 

43,200 square feet of land 34,560.00 

Second Congregational church; Market street, corner 
Franklin: 

Building $25,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 19,000.00 

Third Congregational church; South Main street, corner 
Milford, West Manchester: 

Building $8,000.00 

23,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

First M. E. church; Valley street, corner Jewett: 

Building $8,000.00 

11,400 square feet of land 1,000.00 

St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, corner Amherst: 

Building $25,000.00 

10,010 square feet of land .^ 6,000.00 

Trinity M. E. church; School street: 

Building $2,000.00 

12,176 square feet of land 3,000.00 

St. James M. E. church; Pennacook street, corner Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

11,000 square feet of land 2,200.00 

Grace Church, Episcopal; Lowell street, corner Pine: 

Building $20,000.00 

9,300 square feet of land 6,975.00 



$25,000.00 



$12,780.00 



$10,000.00 



$64,560.00 



$44,000.00 



$11,000.00 



$9,000.00 



$31,000.00 



$5,000.00 



$11,200.00 



$26,975.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 137 

First Unitarian church; Concord street, corner Beech: 

Building $24,000.00 

13,500 square feet of land 6,000.00 



First Universalist church; Lowell street, near Elm: 

Building $17,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 15,000.00 

Christian church, Protestant; Pine street, corner Merri- 
mack: 

Building $6,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 6,700.00 

First Presbyterian church, German; Second street, corner 
Bath, West Manchester: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Swedish Lutheran church, Protestant; Sagamore, corner 
Pine: 

Building $7,500.00 

10,950 square feet of land 2.000.00 

Swedish Evangelical Mission; Pine street, corner Orange: 

Building $6,500.00 

Land 4,100.00 

Swedish Baptist church; Arlington street, near Maple: 

Building $5,000.00 

4,432 square feet of land 1,100.00 

Second Advent church; Amherst street, between Pine and 
LTnion: 

Building $5,100.00 

4,500 square feet of land 3,375.00 

City Mission chapel, Protestant; Merrimack street, corner 
Beech: 

Building $7,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,000.00 

Westminster Presbyterian church; Brook street, corner 
Hazel: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 



$30,000.00 



$32,000.00 



$i2,';(!0.oo 



$5,500.00 



$9. ."00.00 



$10,600.00 



$6,100.00 



$8,475.00 



$13,000.00 



$17,500.00 



138 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

South Manchester Union chapel, Protestant; Elm street, 
south: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,747 square feet of land 1,000.00 

Episcopal Mission church; North Main street, corner 
School, West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

19,412 square feet of land 4,000.00 

Eesidence pastor St. Paiil's M. E. church; Union street, 
near Amherst: 

Building $3,000.00 

Residence pastor First Congregational church; 590 Beech 
street, near Bridge: 

Building $5,000.00 

8,100 square feet of land 2,400.00 

$7,400.00 
Eesidence pastor Grace Episcopal church; corner of Harri- 
son and Union streets: 

Building $0,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 3,750.00 

$9,750.00 
German School Society; Third, Bath, and Ferry streets: 

Building $4,500.00 

10,187 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Elliot Hospital, Protestant; East Manchester: 

Building .' $23,000.00 

Land 7,000.00 

Elliot Hospital lot; Hanover street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $3,000.00 

Land 13,000.00 



Elliot Hospital: 

Land and buildings. Main street $4,000.00 

Land and buildings, Quincy street 2,500.00 

Women's Aid Home; Pearl street, corner Beech: 

Building $15,000.00 

57,530 square feet of land 10,000.00 



.$3,500.00 



$7,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$7,000.00 



$30,000.00 



$16,000.00 



$6,500.00 



$25,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 139 

"Women's Aid Home; Bridge street, corner Chestnut: 

Buildings $9,000.00 

6,037.5 square feet of land 3,000.00 

$12,000.00 

Manchester Children's Home; Webster street: 

Building $20,000.00 

55,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

$22,500.00 

Eesidence pastor Swedish Lutheran church; Sagamore 
■ street, corner Pine: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,200 square feet of land 1,020.00 

$2,500.00 

$4,020.00 

Gale Home: 

One half Martin's block. Elm street. $25,000.00 

Land and building, Pearl street, corner Ash 25,000.00 

.$50,000.00 

EXEMPT FKOM TAXATION. 

Church property. Catholic $351,231.00 

Convent property, Catholic 72,925.00 

Parochial residences. Catholic 12,500.00 

Parochial schools, Catholic 245,650.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions 131,875.00 

$814,181.00 

Church property, Protestant $441,640.00 

Parochial residences, Protestant 10,000.00 

Private school property, Protestant 7,000.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions 162,000.00 

$620,640.00 

TAXABLE. 

Land and buildmgs. Catholic $65,021.00 

Land and buildings, Protestant 14,170.00 

$79,191.00 

Total exempt and taxable $1,514,012.00 



140 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT. 



143 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT, CITY OF MANCHESTER, 
N. H., DECEMBER 31, 1900. 



Yeak. 


^ 

a2| 


"1 

'So 
a^ 

£. zi 

< 


S C 

a.a 
< 


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fi'5 

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$70,000 issued Oct. 
31, 1863, $50,000 
i.ssued .July 1 , 
1864, six percent, 
to fund debts. 


Issued July 1, 1881, 
four per cent, to 
build McGregor 
brill ge. 


Is.sued April 1 , 
1895, four per cent, 
and 1899 three and 
one half per cent, 
to fund debts. 


1890 


£400,000 
490,000 
300,000 
300,800 
300,000 
200,000 
200,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 


5200,000 
200,000 
300,000 
300,000 
350,000 
500,000 
500,000 
600,000 
600,000 
600,000 
600,000 






?13,850 
18,850 
20,000 
26,000 
31,000 
36,250 
42,250 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 


8120,000 

120,000 

120,000 

120,000 

50,000 


560,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 
60,000 


S155,000 
155,600 
155,000 
155,000 
155.000 
155,000 
155 000 


1891. 






1892 






1893 

18&1.... 
1895 


3100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 


S100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 


189ri 




1897 




155,000 
155,000 
255,C00 
255,000 


1898 




1899 ... 




1900 









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^^ 




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intei 
easei 
osent 
ment 


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bond 
Intel 
eased 
•esent 
ment 


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s ;= 5 


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3 O 

75.0 


|55 


Amount o 
per cent 
due and p 


Amount 
per cent 
refund(!d 
per cent. 


Total amo 
bon d e d 
Dec. 31, 19 


Am't of s 
cent city 
on which 
est has c 
not yet pi 
<'.d for paj 


Am't of si 
cent wat'r 
on which 
est has c 
not yet pi 
cd for pay 









899,900 

100 

99,900 

65,500 

50,000 


glOO,000 


8948,850 
953,850 
955,000 
1,195,600 
1,296,000 
1,571,2.50 
1,917,250 
1,890,000 
1,855,000 
1,920,000 
1,885,000 




8100 


















100,000 




100 


5100,000 






84,500 


100 


200,000 










30o,oro 

400,000 


g20,000 
230,000 
220,000 
210,000 
200,000 
1 90 000 




100,000 






5130,000 

10.1,000 

bO,000 

55,000 

311,000 








400,000 
400,000 


















400,(100 
400,^00 




' 



























144 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Reimaeks. — The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the 
cemeteries of the city to parties who pay $100 and upward. There are 
$50,000 in cemetery bonds, so called, not negotiable, in the hand of 
the city treasurer, which are not included in the $1,835,000. 

Total amount of bonded debt, including cemetery bonds $1,885,000.00 
Net indebtedness for water purposes 900,000.00 

Net debt after deducting water debt $985,000.00 

Floating debt 33,000.00 

Total debt $1,918,000.00 

As shown in the assessor's books for the year 1900: 
The assessed value of personal property, including poll 

tax $(5,072,956.00 

The assessed value of real estate. 26,033,838.00 

Total value for taxation $32,706,794.00 

Tax rate, 1.90 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 3.113 

Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 5.864 

Population, census of 1900 56,987 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been promptly paid at maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being paj-able in gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

A sinking fund was established in 1893. 

Total amount of sinking fund December 31, 1900, $290,994.28. 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the water- 
works is limited to the sum of $600,000 by section 6, chapter 70, New 
Hampshire Laws of 1871, entitled "An act to enable the city of Man- 
chester to establish water-works," except as further extended an 
amount of $300,000, by laws of 1891, chapter 26; and $200,000 by laws 
of 1895, chapter 172. 

SVMMARY OF CITY DEBT. 

Amount of bonded and temporary debt January 1, 1900. . $1,952,650.00 

Accrued interest on bonded debt 31,950.00 

Notes issued during year. 33,000.00 

$2,017,610.00 
Amount of bonded and temporary- debt jjaid in 1900 35,000.00 

Total indebtedness December 31, 1900 $1,982,610.00 



STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT. 



145 



AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Ket cash on hand December 31, 1900 $145,515.73 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1900 65,235.13 

Stock of Suncook Valley "Railroad, estimated value 14,500.00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1900 290,994.28 • 

$516,245.13 
BONDED DEBT. 

Total net indebtedness January 1, 1900 $1,500,212.50 

Total net indebtedness January 1, 1901 1,466,365.00 

Decrease $33,847.50 

STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE BONDED 

DEBT. 



Year . 



o 




go 


g 

s 

1% 


o 

s 


per cent to 
d McGregor 
ge. 


o 
S . 


Four per cent ini- 
prcwem't bonds 
and SVa per cent 
city bonds. 


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O ci 
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3 O 


o 5 ^ 




.si 


s s ^ 


3 5 


m 



1890.. 
1S91... 
1892 . 
1893.. 
1894. . 
1895.. 
1896 . . 
1897.. 
1898 . . 
1899.. 
1900.. 



127,000 

24,000 

18,000 

18,000 

18,000 

18,000 

12,000 

9,000 

6,000 

6,000 

6,000 



S6,000 
8,000 
12,000 
12,000 
14,000 
14,000 
20,000 
22,000 
24,000 
24,000 
24,000 



8623.75 

I 813.92 

1,000.00 

[1,041.66 

S9,500 1 1,550.00 



9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 



1,812.50 
2,112.50 
2,500.00 
2,500.00 
2,500.00 
2,500.00 



S7,200 
7,200 
7,200 
7,200 



$2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 



S6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 



S8,000 
12,000 
16,000 
16,000 
16,000 
19,500 
19,500 



84,800 
14,400 
13,000 
13,000 
11,400 
10,520 



149,423.75 
48,613.92 
46,800.00 
46,841.66 
59,650.00 
68,712.50 
82,612.50 
80,600.00 
79,000.00 
81,500.00 
80,620.00 



146 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 






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VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY CITY. 147 

Valuation of Real Estate Owned by the City. 

High school, Beech street, corner Lowell: 

Building $170,000.00 

59,400 square feet of land. 17,820.00 

$187,820.00 

Franklin-street school, Franklin street, corner Pleasant: 

Building $16,000.00 

19,200' square feet of land 19,200.00 

$35,200.00 

Spring-street school. Spring street: 

Building $13,000.00 

13,600 square feet of land 13,600.00 

$26,600.00 

Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, corner Merrimack: 

Building $45,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

$53,000.00 

Ash-street school, Ash street, corner Bridge: 

Building $50,000.00 

57,537 square feet of land 17,262.00 

$67,262.00 

Main-street school. North Main street. West Manchester: 

Building $6,000.00 

40,293.4 square feet of land 10,073.00 

$16,073.00 

Webster-street school, Webster street: 

Building $39,000.00 

55,714% square feet of land 13,928.00 

$52,928.00 

Blodget-street school, Blodget street: 

Building $1,500.00 

9,000 square feet of land 3,600.00 

$5,100.00 

Lowell-street school, Lowell street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $1,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 9,000.00 

$10,000.00 

Merrimack-street school, Merrimack street, corner Union: 

Building $15,000.00 , 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 

$21,300.00 

Parker school, South Main street. West Manchester: 

Building $20,000.00 

13,650 square feet of land 2,047.00 

$22,047.00 

Bakersville school. Elm street, south: 

Building $10,000.00 

24,184 square feet of land 3,628.00 

$13,628.00 



148 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Stark District school, Eiver road, north: 

Building- $1,000.00 

43,560 square feet of land 100.00 

Amoskeag school, Front street, Amoskeag: 

Building $8,000.00 

6,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

Kimmon school, corner Aniory and Dubuque streets: 

Building $17,400.00 

16,600 square feet of land 2,490.00 

Goffe's Falls school, Gofee's Falls: 

Building $4,000.00 

47.916 square feet of land 250.00 

Harvej' District school, Nutt road: 

Building $2,000.00 

21,780 square feet of land 100.00 

Webster Mills school, Webster Mills: 

Building $400.00 

5,445 square feet of land 100.00 

Old Hallsville school, East Manchester: 

Building $500.00 

30,075 square feet of land 3,008.00 

Youngsville school, Youngsville: 

Building $500.00 

51,228 square feet of land 100.00 

Mosquito Pond school. Mosquito Pond: 

Building $400.00 

10,890 square feet of land 100.00 

Pearl-street school: 

Building $18,700.00 

Land 3,200.00 

Varnej' school, Bowman street, corner Mast, West Man- 
chester: 

Building $43,750.00 

Land 6.700.00 

New Hallsville school, Jewett street, corner Young, East 
Manchester: 

Building $29,800.00 

44,000 square feet of land 3,300.00 



$1,100.00 



$9,000.00 



$19,890.00 



$4,250.00 



$2,100.00 



$500.00 



$3,508.00 



$600.00 



$500.00 



$21,900.00 



$50,450.00 



$33,100.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY CITY. 149 

Straw school, Chestnut street, corner Harrison: 

Building $30,000.00 

32,400 square feet of land 16,200.00 

— $46,200.00 

New Wilson school, Wilson, Cedar, and Auburn streets: 

Building- $30,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

$35,000.00 

$739,056.00 
ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Eng-ine-house and stable. Central station. Vine street: 

Building $31,800.00 

21,718.86 square feet of land 25,438.00 

$57,238.00 

North Main-street engine-house. North Main street. West 

Manchester: 

Building $18,000.00 

11,819 square feet of land 2,955.00 

$20,955.00 

Webster-street engine-house, Webster street, corner 

Chestnut: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,510 square feet of land 2,180.00 

$14,180.00 

Merrimack engine-house. Lake avenue: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

$18,000.00 

Hosehouse and cottage. Maple street, corner East High: 
Building $3,000.00 

18,330 square feet of land 3,666.00 

$6,666.00 

Engine-house and ward room, ward 9, Eimmon and Amory 
streets, West Manchester: 

Building $22,755.00 

6,000 square feet of land 870.00 

$23,625.00 

South Manchester hosehouse: 

Building $4,200.00 

4,278 square feet of land . .• 684.48 

$4,884.48 

$145,548.48 
OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

Citj^ library, Dean avenue, corner Franklin street: 

Building $35,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 30,000.00 

$65,000.00 



150 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City Hall, Elm street, corner Market: 

Building $20,000.00 

100,000 square feet of land 150,000.00 

$170,000.00 

City farm, Mammotli road: 

Building $5,000.00 

46.66 acres, west Mammoth road 70,000.00 

81.55 acres, east Mammoth road 65,240.00 

$140,240.00 

Coiirt house, Franklin street, corner West Merrimack: 

Building $20,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 57,000.00 

$77,000.00 

Battery building, Manchester street: 

Building $13,000.00 

3,400 square feet of land 5,100.00 

$18,100.00 

Police station, Manchester street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $40,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 15,000.00 

— $55,000.00 

Slayton lot, Manchester street: 

Police patrol stable ." $4,000.00 

Building 300.00 

2,908 square feet of land 4,700.00 

$9,000.00 

City stable and other buildings, Franklin street: 

Building $15,950.00 

44,656 square feet of land 89,312.00 

$105,262.00 

City stable, district Xo. 10 $1,200.00 

City scales, Franklin street: 

Building $300.00 

Gravel lots, Goffstown: 

2 acres $400.00 

Police station, Clinton street. West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

3,790 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$4,500.00 

Gravel lot, district Xo. 10, bought of Brooks & Brock (city 

has right to remove gravel until August 25, 1903): 

11/3 acres $500.00 

Ward 5 ward room, Lake avenue: 

Building $4,500.00 

Land 1,000.00 

$5,500.00 



$652,002.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY CITY. 151 

Personal Property Owned by the City. 

Property in care citj' engineer $1,149.00 

in care chief engineer fire department 107,602.50 

in care street and park commission 35,091.09 

in care superintendent of scliools 37,049.00 

in care city messenger 3,000.00 

in care city marshal and janitor 7,250.00 

in care superintendent of city farm 12,544.87 

in care trustees city library 30,000.00 

in care superintendent of Pine Grove cemetery.. 248.35 

in care superintendent of Valley cemetery 106.00 

Stock in Snncook Valley Railroad, in care of city treasurer 50,000.00 

Personal property in care city weigher 1,000.00 

$285,040.81 

Uncollected taxes in 1900 $65,235.13 

Xet cash in the treasury, December 31, 1900 145,515.72 

$210,750.84 



Other Real and Personal Estate Owned by the City. 

Soldiers' monument $25,000.00 

Permanent inclosure of commons 10,200.00 

Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 25,000.00 

Fountains and water-troughs on streets and cominons.... 3,600.00 

City tomb 10,000.00 

McGregor bridge 90,000.00 

Granite bridge 130,000.00 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 28,450.00 

Second-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 52,036.06 

Print-Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 5,000.00 

Two bridges in highway district Xo. 9 2,000.00 

One bridge at Goff e's Falls 1,000.00 

Expended on construction of sewers 696,611.64 

$1,078,897.79 
PAUKS AND ce:metep.ies. 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres $200,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery, about 96 acres 46,700.00 

Amoskeag cemetery, 1.23 acres 4,340.00 

Stark park, 28 acres 9,000.00 

Derryfield park, 76 acres 25,000.00 

Concord common, 4.48 acres 200,000.00 

Tremont common, 2.25 acres 40,000.00 

Hanover common, 3 acres 100,000.00 

Park common, 3.49 acres 60,000.00 

Merrimack common, 5.89 acres 200,000.00 



152 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Wag-ner's park, 9.85 acres $12,000.00 

Land on Piscataquog* river 3..j00.00 



$900,540.00 

WATER-WORKS. 

Eeal estate and personal propertj' of water-woi'ks, at cost 

price $l,496,30S.r35 

RECAPITULATION. 

Keal estate owned b3^ the city, schoolhonses $739,056.00 

Eeal estate owned by the city 652,002.00 

Eeal estate owmed by the city, engine-houses 145,548.48 

Water-works at cost price 1.496,308.65 

Personal propert3' owned by the city 285,040.81 

Uncollected taxes and cash 210.750.84 

Other real and personal property 1,078,897.79 

Parks and cemeteries 900,540.00 



$5,508,144.57 

PROPERTY ACCOUNT. 



Inventory of assets, December 31, 1900 $5,508,144.57 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1899 5,466,692.61 

Gain in valuation $41,451.96 



Auditor's Office. 

City hall building-. Open from 8 to 12 A. M., 1.30 to 5 p. M.; 7- to 9 
P. M. on Thursday. 

In every bill presented to the city auditor for his approval, the fol- 
lowing points will be considered and passed upon: 

1. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination within the 
scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on the city govern- 
ment? 

2. Is the bill certified hj the party legally authorized to make the 
contract, or cause the exjoenditure to be made? 

3. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, and 
is there a balance unexpended sufficient to pay this bill? 

4. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measurements, either 
of dimensions, quantities, or weights, correctly and fully stated, and 
is the proof of the delivery to the city of the whole amount charged 
sufficient ? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely in 
excess as to require the attention of the city councils to be called to 
the same? 



auditor's office. 153 

6. Is the bill written in a fair legible hand, correctly cast, and on 
paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its proper backing 
and filing? • 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and the 
total amount of the coiitract, the amount already paid, the amount of 
the work not yet completed, and the per cent retained, if any, should 
be stated in the bill. 

8. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which affect the 
question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for further information or 
correction as the circumstances of each case may require. 

COURT DE'CISIOXS, LEGAL POINTS AND EVLES, RELATING TO THE APPROVAL 
OR DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

No bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until the audi- 
tor has approved it as correct. 

Public trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the city coun- 
cils cannot be delegated to others. Dillon's Municipal Corporations, 
section 96, volume 1. 

No member of either branch [of the city councils], except the mayor, 
shall receive any compensation for his services, or shall hold any office 
or agency created during his continuance in office. General Laws, 
chapter 46, section 13. 

The executive powers of the city, except where vested in the inayor, 
shall be exercised by the maj^or and aldermen. General Laws, chapter 
46, section 14. 

The mayor and aldermen have all the powers and authority of se- 
lectmen of towns unless it is otherwise provided by law. General 
Laws, chapter 46, section 14. 

Joint standing coinmittees have advisory- powers only; they cannot 
legallj' be endowed with executive or legislative powers by ordinance 
or resolution of the city councils, as no bj'-law or ordinance shall be 
repugnant to the constitution or laws of the state. 

Xo member of either branch of the city councils can enter into any 
verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to or do any work for 
the eitj'. Any firm of which a member is also a member of the city 
councils is included in this prohibition. 

Xo city official, or department, or board of officials having legal 
power to expend money for the benefit of the city can purchase of or 
contract with themselves, with any one of the board, or with any 
firm with which one of said officials is a member. Dillon's Municipal 
Corporations, volume 1, page 436, section 444. 

Every bill against the city shall specify the particular appropria- 
tion to which the same should be charged, and the moneys paid will 
be charged to such approimations only. 

He who is intrusted with the business of others cannot be allowed 
to make such business a source of profit to himself. 



154 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

All orders iDassed bj' the city councils authorizing a ministerial act 
to be performed by its agent or agents must be strictly construed, 
and the act to be done must be specifically stated. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. (General 
Laws, chapter 106, section 11.) They have no jDower conferred upon 
them by law or ordinance to purchase new apparatus of anj- kind. 

The joint standing committee on fire department have advisory 
powers only. 

The laws and ordinances require the city auditor to withhold his 
signature from all bills against any approiDriation where the amount 
of the ai^iiropriation is expended, until the citj' council shall have pro- 
vided the means of jDajdng the same. Section 4, chapter 3 of the City 
Ordinances, and section 4, ordinances relating to the duties of the city 
auditor, approved January 7, 1S90. 

The power of towns to raise and appropriate money is derived solely 
from statutory provisions, which restrict the power to certain speci- 
fied objects and other necessary charg'es. 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those pre- 
scribed by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, and gen- 
erally' will not be permitted, to carry such votes into effect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresx^onsible discretion of 
towns to vote gifts or to select donees; their charity is a duty defined, 
commanded, enforced, and regulated, and the objects of it are desig- 
nated by law. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a minority in an un- 
limited manner. Gove v. Eiipuig, 41 X. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to make 
expenditures, within the scope of their powers, for their respective 
dej)artments: For fire department and fire alarm telegraph, the chief 
engineer, to be submitted monthly to the approval of the board of 
engineers; for police department, mayor and police commission; for 
police court, police judge; for water-works department, superintend- 
ent, subject to the rules of the board of commissioners and ordinances 
relating thereto; for city farm, superintendent; for overseers of the 
poor, each overseer, subject to the rules of the board of overseers, and 
their monthly' review and approval; for schools, superintendent, or 
such person as the board of school committee may designate, bills to 
be approved by the board monthly; for streets, sewers, and other work 
under these departments, street and park commissioners; for city 
clerk's office, treasurer's office, tax collector's office, assessor's office, 
auditor's office, incidental expenditures, city ph^'sician, city messenger, 
city solicitor, city engineer, — mayor; for cemeteries, superintendents, 
subject to board of trustees (to consist of citizens not members of the 
city councils) ; for health department, board of health, subject to 
ajjproval of major; city library, board of trustees or person desig- 
nated by them. It may be stated as a general rule, that all subordi- 
nate officials are imder the supervision and control of the mayor, sub- 
ject to such limitations and restrictions as the board of aldermen, 
acting as a board, may require 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELEC- 
TRIC LIGHTS. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTEIC 
LIGHTS. 



Gas Lights in Use. 

No. 1. Clarke and Chestnut. 

2. Appleton, west end. 

3. Blodget and Chestnut. 

4. Orang-e and Chestnut. 

5. Orange, between Chestnut and Elm. 

6. Bridge, between Chestnut and Elm. 

7. Pearl and Walnut. 

8. Orange and Walnut. 

9. Orange and Beech. 

10. Pearl and Maple. 

11. Arlington, near Maple. 

12. Lowell and South. 

13. Concord and Belmont. 

14. Amherst and Belmont. 

15. Concord and Beacon. 

16. Lowell and Beacon. 

17. East High and Belmont. 
IS. East High and Maple. 

19. Belmont and Central. 

20. Willow and Merrill. 

21. Auburn and Franklin. 

22. One light on State. 

23. Turner, near Walker. 

24. Milford and Bowman. 

25. Milford and Williams. 

26. Douglas. 

27. Dover and Granite. 

28. Mechanic, near Elm. 

29. Blodget, near Elm. 

30. Monroe, near Elm. 

31. Manchester and Belmont. 

32. Ainsworth avenue and Hayward. 

33. Jewett, near Hayward. 

157 



158 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 34. Jewett and Young road. 

35. Hancock. 

36. Hancock, near Brown avenue. 

37. Brown avenue and Shasta, 

38. Brown avenue and Byron. 

39. A and B streets. 

40. Greorge, near Milford. 

41. Mast road, near Eiddle. 

42. Granite and Quincy. 

43. Douglas and Quincy. 

44. Douglas and Dover. 

45. Douglas and Turner. 

46. Pleasant, near Canal. 

47. Pleasant, near Franklin. 

48. Amherst and Dutton. 

49. Walnut, near Bridge. 

50. Nutfield and Londonderry lanes. 

51. Nutfield and Derryfield lanes. 

52. Bridge and Arkwright. 

53. Union and Summer. 

54. Union and Green. 

55. Monadnock and Nutfield lanes. 

56. Hanover, between Beech and Maple. 

57. Chestnut, between Clarke and Carxsenter, 

58. Salmon, west of Elm. 

59. Massabesic and Taylor. 

60. Amherst and Beacon. 

61. Hanover, between Ashland and Lincoln. 

62. Beech, between Lowell and Bridge. 

63. Appleton and Chestnut. 



Oil Lights in Use. 

Goife's Falls, 19 lights. 

Beacon street, 

Massabesic street, 

Taylor street, 

Young road, 

Mammoth road, 

Candia road, 

Pond road, 

Hanover street. 

Total, 



1 


light. 


1 

2 
1 
3 


light, 
lights. 

light, 
lights. 


16 


lights. 


4 


lights. 


4 


lights. 


51 


lights. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 159 

Electric Lights in Use. 

No. 1. A, near B, arm. 

2. A and South Main, 

3. Adams and Cartier, pole. 

4. Amherst and Elm, arm. 

5. Amherst and Vine, " 

6. Amherst and Chestnut, " 

7. Amherst and Pine, " 

8. Amherst and Union, " 

9. Amherst and Beech, " 

10. Amherst and Ash, " 

11. Amherst and Maple, " 

12. Amherst and Lincoln, " 

13. Amherst and Ashland, " 

14. Amherst and Hall, " 

15. Amory and Main, pole. 

16. Amory and Beauport, " 

17. Amory and Eimmon, " 
IS. Amory and Amory street extension, arm. 

19. Amory, near Montgomery, " 

20. Amory and Alsace, " 

21. Amory and Essex, " 

22. Amory and Morgan, " 

23. Amoskeag bridge, west, " 

24. Amoskeag bridge, east, " 

25. Amoskeag and Front, " 

26. Appleton and Elm, arm. 

27. Appleton and North Adams, pole. 

28. Api)leton and Union, arm. 

29. Arlington and Eussell, " 

30. Arling'ton and Warren, " 

31. Arling'ton and Ashland, " 

32. Auburn and Elm, 

33. Auburn and Chestnut, " 

34. Auburn and Pine, " 

35. Auburn and Union, pole. 

36. Auburn and Beech, " 

37. Auburn and Maple, " 

38. Auburn and Wilson, arm. 

39. Auger avenue and Xutt road, '• 

40. Baker and Brown avenue, " 

41. Baker and Elm, 

42. Bath and Second, pole. 

43. Beech and Portsmouth Railroad, arm. 

44. Beech and Lawrence Eailroad, " 



160 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

No. 45. Bell and Wentworth, ^^^- 

46. Blaine and Main, 

47. Blaine and Second, 

48. Blaine and Third, 

49. Blodeet and Elm back street, 

50. Blods-et and Pine, 

51. Blodo-et and Union, 

52. Blodget and Walnut, 

53. Blodget and Ash, 

54. Bow and Bartlett, Pol^- 

55. Boynton, . ^™- 

56. Bowman place and Tilton, 

it 

57. Bowman, near Milford, 

it 

58. Bremer and Dubuque, 

59. Bridge and McGregor, 

60. Bridge and Canal, 

61. Bridge and Elm, ^^™- 

62. Bridge and Chestnut, 

63. Bridge and Pine, 

64. Bridge and Union, 

65. Bridge and Walnut, 

66. Bridge and Beech, 

67. Bridge and Ash, 

68. Bridge and Maple, 

69. Bridge and N'ashua, 

70. Bridge and Linden, 

71. Bridge and Hall, 

72. Bridge and 'Belmont, 

73. Bridge and Highlands, 

74. Brown avenue and Elm, 

75. Brown avenue, near Tannery, 

76. Brook and Elm, 

77. Brook and Chestnut, 

78. Brook and Pine, 

79. Brook and Hazel, V°^^- 

80. Brook and Union, '^™- 

81. Brook and Beech, 

82. Brook and Maple, P°^^- 

83. C and B, 

84. Candia road and Mammoth road, ^.rm. 

85. Carpenter and Elm, 

86. Carpenter and Union, 

87. Cedar and Canal, 

88. Cedar and Elm, 

89. Cedar and Chestnut, 

90. Cedar and Pine, 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 161 

Xo. 91. Cedar and Union, arm. 

92. Cedar and Beech, " 

93. Cedar and Lincoln, " 

94. Cedar, near Maple, " 

95. Central and Bedford, 

9C. Central street hill, pole. 

97. Central and Elm, arm. 

98. Central and Chestnut, " 

99. Central and Pine, " 

100. Central and Union, " 

101. Central and Beech, " 

102. Central and Maple, " 

103. Central and Lincoln, " 

104. Central and Wilson, " 

105. Central and Hall, 

106. Central, near Cass, " 

107. Charles, 

lOS. Charleston avenue and Carroll, " 

109. Chestnut and 'Ra.y Brook, " 

110. Clarke and Eiver road, " 

111. Clarke and Elm, " 

112. Clarke and Union, " 

113. Clinton and Dover, " 

114. Conant and Beauport, " 

115. Conant and Eimmon, pole. 

116. Conant and Montgomery, arm. 

117. Concord and Mne, " 
lis. Concord and Chestnut, " 

119. Concord and Pine, " " 

120. Concord and Union, " 

121. Concord and Walnut, " 

122. Concord and Beech, " 

123. Concord and Maple, " 

124. Concord and Button, " 

125. Concord and Berry, pole. 

126. Concord and Ashland, arm. 

127. Concord and Hall, " 

128. Concord square, ensi, pole. 

129. Concord square, wesi, " 

130. Coolidge avenue, near Jieliy, arm. 

131. Dean and Canal, pole. 

132. Dean and Elm, arm. 

133. Dean avenue and Elm west back, " 

134. Dearborn and Taylor, " " 

135. Depot and Canal, pole. 

136. Depot and Erankliu, arm. 



162 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 



No. 137, Derryfield Park, 

138. Doriglas and Eailroad, 

139. Douglas and Barr, 

140. Doug-las and West, 

141. Douglas and Main, 

142. Dunbarton road and Front, 

143. East High and Xashua, 

144. East High and South, 

145. East High and Malvern, 

146. East High and Ashland, 

147. East High and Hall, 

148. East High and Buzzell, 

149. East Spruce and Barry avenue, 

150. East Spruce and Union, 

151. East Spruce and Beech, 

152. East Spruce and Maple, 

153. East Spruce and Lincoln, 

154. East Spruce and Wilson, 

155. East Spruce and Beacon, 

156. Elm and Ray Brook, 

157. Elm, below Eailroad bridge, 

158. Elm avenue and Elm, 

159. Elm and Portsmouth Eailroad, 

160. Ferry and Main, 

161. Ferry and Third, 

162. Ferry and Turner, 

163. Front, Amoskeag, 

164. Gates and Dubuque, 

165. Groffstown road and Front, 

166. Grove and Pine, 

167. Grove and Union, 

168. Grove and Beech, 

169. Grove and Belmont, 

170. Granite and Green, 

171. Granite and West, 

172. Granite and Main, 

173. Granite and Second, 

174. Granite bridge, west, 

175. Granite bridge, center, 

176. Granite bridge, east, 

177. Granite and State, 

178. Granite and Bedford, 

179. Granite and Canal, 
180.- Granite and Franklin, 

181. Green and Elm, 

182. Green and Pine, 



arm. 
pole, 
arm. 
pole, 
arm. 



p)ole. 
arm. 



pole. 



pole. 



pole, 
arm. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 163 

No. 1S3. Green and Beech, arm. 

184. Hancock and Brown avenue, pole. 

185. Hanover square, " 
ISG. Hanover and Xutfield lane, arm. 

187. Hanover and Chestnut, 

188. Hanover and Pine, 

189. Hanover and Union, i 

190. Hanover and Beech, 

191. Hanover and Maple, 

192. Hanover and Lincoln, 

193. Hanover and Ashland, 

194. Hanover and Hall, 

195. Hanover and Belmont, 

196. Hanover and Beacon, 

197. Hanover and Highlands, pole. 

198. Hanover and Grant, arm. 

199. Hanover and Page, " 

200. Harrison and Elm, " 

201. Harrison and Chestnut, " 

202. Harrison and Pine, " 

203. Harrison and Hazel, " 

204. Harrison and Walnut, " 

205. Harrison and Beech, " 

206. Harrison and Ash, " 

207. Harrison and Maple, " 

208. Harrison and Oak, " 

209. Harrison and Eussell, " 

210. Harvell and South Main, " 

211. Hayward and Beech, " 

212. Hayward and Cypress, " 

213. High and Chestnut, " 

214. High and Pine, " 

215. High and Union, " 

216. Hollis and Canal, pole. 

217. Hospital avenue and Massabesic, " 

218. Kelly and Kimmon, arm. 

219. Kelly and Cartier, " 

220. Kelly and Alsace, " 

221. Kidder and Boy den, pole. 

222. Kidder and Whitney, " 

223. Kidder and Elm, arm. 

224. Lake avenue and Elm, " 

225. Lake avenue and Chestnut, " 

226. Lake avenue and Pine, " 

227. Lake avenue and Union, " 

228. Lake avenue and Beech, " 



164 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Ko'. 229. Lake avenue and MajDle, arm. 

230. Lake avenue and Lincoln, " 

231. Lake aveniie and Wilson, " 

232. Lake avenue and Massabesic, " 

233. Lake avenue and Beacon, " 

234. Lake avenue, near Cass, " 

235. Lake avenue and Cass, pole. 

236. Lake avenue and Canton, ' " 

237. Lake avenue and Hall road, " 

238. Langdon and Canal, arm. 

239. Langdon, pole. 

240. Laurel and Laurel avenue, arm. 

241. Laurel and Pine, " 

242. Laurel and Union, " 

243. Laurel and Beech, " 

244. Laurel and Maple, " 

245. Laurel and Lincoln, " 

246. Laurel and Wilson, " 

247. Laurel and Hall, " 

248. Laurel and Belmont, " 

249. Laurel and Milton, " 

250. Laurel and Beacon, ' " 
251. 

252. Liberty, below Webster, " 

253. Lowell south back and Nutfield lane, " 

254. Lowell and Elm, 

255. Lowell and Birch, " 

256. Lowell and Chestnut, " 

257. Lowell and Pine, " 

258. Lowell and Union, " 

259. Lowell and Walnut, 

260. Lowell and Beech, " 

261. Lowell and Ash, 

262. Lowell and Nashua, '• 

263. Lowell and Malvern, '• 

264. Lowell and Ashland, " 

265. Lowell and Hall, 

266. Lowell and Belmont, " 

267. Manchester and Elm, " 

268. Manchester and Chestnut, " 

269. Manchester and Pine, " 

270. Manchester and Union, " 

271. Manchester and Beech, " 

272. Manchester and Maple, *' 

273. Manchester and Lincoln, " 

274. Manchester and Wilson, " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 165 

No. 275. Manchester and Hall, arm. 

276. Manchester and Milton, pole. 

277. !Marion and Main, " 

278. Marion and McGreg"or, arm. 

279. Market and Canal, " 

280. Market and Franklin, " 

281. Market and Elm, 

282. Massabesic and Belmont, pole. 

283. Massabesic and Old Falls road, " 

284. Massabesic and Cypress, ^ arm. 

285. Massabesic and Hall road, " 

286. Mast and Main, , pole. 

287. Mast and Bowman, arm. 

288. Mast and Eiddle, pole. 

289. Mast and New Mast road, arm. 

290. Mast and Forrest, 

291. McGregor and Main, pole. 

292. McGregor bridge, west, " 

293. McGregor bridge, east, " 

294. Mechanic and Canal, arm. 

295. Mechanic and Elm west back, " 

296. Merrimack and Canal, ' " 

297. Merrimack and Franklin west back " 

298. Merrimack and Franklin, " 

299. Merrimack and Elm, " 

300. Merrimack and Chestnut, " 

301. Merrimack and Pine, " 

302. Merrimack and Union, " 

303. Merrimack and Beech, " 

304. Merrimack and Maple, " 

305. Merrimack and Lincoln, " 

306. Merrimack and Wilson, " 

307. Merrimack and Hall, " 

308. Merrimack and Belmont, " 

309. Merrimack and Beacon, " 

310. Merrimack, east of Beacon, " 

311. Merrimack square, west, j)ole. 

312. Merrimack square, east, " 

313. Middle and Canal, arm. 
314.. Middle and Franklin west back, " 

315. Milford, near cemetery, " 

316. Milford and Bismarck, " 

317. Milford and Carroll, 

318. Milford and Eiddle, 

319. Milford and Main, " 

320. Mitchell and Beech, " 



166 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 321. Monmouth and McGregor back street, pole. 

322. Monroe and River road, arm. 

323. Myrtle and Elm east back, ' " 

324. Myrtle and Chestnut, " 

325. Myrtle and Pine, . " 

326. Myrtle and Union, " 

327. Myrtle and Walnut, 

328. Myrtle and Beech, " 

329. Myrtle and Maple, " 

330. Myrtle and Eussell, " 

331. Myrtle, near Belmont, " 

332. Myrtle, near Hall, " 

333. New Mast road and D, " 

334. New Mast road and Wilkins, pole. 

335. North and Eiver road, arm. 

336. North and Elm, . • " 

337. North and Bay, " 

338. North and Chestnut, " 

339. North and Pine, pole. 

340. North and Union, arm. 

341. North and Walnut, 

342. North Main in Eddy, pole. 

343. North Adams and Bay Brook, arm. 

344. Nutfield lane, rear Central fire station, " 

345. Nutt road and Beech, " 

346. Nutt road and Portsmouth Eailroad, pole. 

347. Orange and Elm, arm. 

348. Orange and Pine, 

349. Orange and Union, 

350. Orange and Ash, 

351. Orange and Oak, 

352. Orange and Linden, 

353. Orange and Hall, pole. 

354. Page and Portsmouth Railroad, arm. 

355. Park square, pole. 

356. Parker and West, arm. 

357. Pearl and Elm east back, " 

358. Pearl and Chestnut, " 
'359. Pearl and Pine, " 

360. Pearl and Union, " 

361. Pearl and Beech, " 

362. Pearl and Oak, " 

363. Pearl and Russell, " 

364. Pearl and Linden, " 

365. Pearl and Morrison, pole. 

366. Pearl and Belmont, ' arm. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 167 

jS'o. 367. "Pennacook and Canal, pole. 

368. Pennacook and Elm, arm. 

369. Pennacook and Chestnut, pole. 

370. Pennacook and Pine, arm. 

371. Pennacook and Union, 

372. Pleasant and Franklin, 

373. Prescott and Wilson, 

374. Prince and Boynton, 

375. Prospect and Elm east back, 

376. Prospect and Chestnut, 

377. Prospect and Pine, 

378. Prospect and Union, 

379. Prospect and Ash, 

380. Prospect and Oak, 

381. Prospect and Linden, 

382. Prospect, near Hall,' 

383. Putnam and Main, 

384. Putnam and Cartier, 

385. Putnam and Bartlett, pole. 

386. Powell and Eiver road, arm. 

387. River road, near Otis, " 

388. Eiver road and Stark i^ark, " 

389. Sagamore and Pine, " 

390. Sagamore and Walnut, " 

391. Salmon and Canal, " 

392. Salmon and Elm, " 

393. Salmon and Chestnut, pole. 

394. Salmon and Pine, " 

395. Salmon and Union, " 

396. Salmon and Beech, arm. 

397. School and Turner, 

398. School and Third, 

399. Schiller and Second, * " 

400. Schuj'ler and Main, pole. 

401. Shasta and Elm, arm. 

402. Silver and Union, 
403>. Silver and Beech, 

404. Silver and Lincoln, 

405. Silver and Wilson, 

406. Somerville and Jewett, 

407. Spring and Canal, 

408. Spring and Elm west back, 

409. Spruce and Elm, 

410. Spruce and Chestniit west back, 

411. Spruce south back and Elm east back, pole. 

412. Stark and Canal, arm. 



168 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 413. Stark and back street, arm. 

414. Summer and State, pole. 

415. Thornton and Sullivan, arm. 

416. Tremont square, I)ole. 

417. Union, near Campbell, arm. 

418. State east back, " 

419. State, south of Granite, " 

420. State, north of Granite, 

421. Sullivan and Beauport, l^ole. 

422. Sullivan and Main, " 

423. Summer and Dearborn, arm. 

424. Summer and Hall, " 

425. Valley and Elm, " 

426. Valley and Pine, ]Dole. 

427. Valley and Union, arm. 

428. Valley and Wilson, 

429. Valley and Belmont, " 

430. Valley and Taylor, 

431. Valley and Cypress, " 

432. Valley and Jewett, pole. 

433. Vinton and Taylor, arm. 

434. Walker and Main, " 

435. Walker and Fourth, " 

436. Walker and Second, " 

437. Walker and Turner, pole. 

438. Washington and Church, arm. 

439. Water, 

440. Water and Elm, " 

441. Wayne and McGregor, pole. 

442. Wayne and Main, arm. 

443. Wayne and Beauport, pole. 

444. Wayne and Dubuque, arm. 

445. Webster and River road, pole. 

446. Webster and Elm, arm. 

447. Webster and Chestnut, " 

448. Webster and Pine, " 

449. Webster and Walnut, jDole. 

450. Welch avenue and Calef road, " 

451. West Hancock and Second, ' " 

452. West Hancock and Dartmouth, arm. 

453. West Hancock and South Main, " 

454. Whitford and Union, 

455. Wilton and Main, " 

456. Winter, 

457. Winter and Parker, " 

458. Winter place and Elm west back, " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 169 

Xo. 459. Young and Taylor, arm. 

4C0. Young and Ainsworth avenue, " 

461. Young and Mammoth road, " 

462. Cedar and Franklin, " 

463. Laurel nortli back and Union, " 

464. Clarke and North Adams, " 

465. Prospect and Beech, " 

466. McDuffie and Huntress, " 

467. Hanover and Alfred, " 

468. Summer and Belmont, " 

469. East Spruce and Old Falls road, " 

470. Nelson and Mammoth road, " 

471. Sagamore and Eussell, " 

472. Hollis, west of Elm, " 

473. Hall and Somerville, 

474. Blodget and Oak, 

475. Blodget and Beech, " 

476. GofPstowm road and Omega, ' " 

477. Bridge and Mammoth road, " 
47S. Pleasant and Elm, " 

479. Hanover and Lake avenue, - " 

480. Elm and Thaver, 



EEPOET 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



BOAED OF WATER COMMISSIONEES, 1900. 



WILLIAMS! C. CLAEKE, .Mayor, ex officio. 
Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1905. 
Frank Dowst, term expires January, 1906. 
Hajrky E. Parker, term expires Januarj\ 1903. 
Henry Chandler.* 

Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1907. 
Charles T. Means, term expires January, 1902. 
Edgar J. Knowlton, term expires Janiiary 1, 1904. 



orncEES. 



Alpheus Gay, President. 

Henry Chandler,* Clerk. 

Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

Josiah Laselle, Engineer at Low Service Pumping Station. 

H. A. DoNAWAY, Engineer at High Service Pnmping Station. 

* Henry Cliandler died October 20, 1900. 



172 



i 



EESOLUTIONS ON THE DEATH OF HEMY CHANDLEK, 
WATEE COMMISSIONEE. 



Resolved, In the death of Henry Chandler this board has suffered an 
irreparable loss. He was not n^rely a member. He was clerk of the 
board and one of its agents in the purchase of the land needed to 
jDrotect our water supply, and in the discharge of all his duties he dis- 
played an intense, untiring, and unceasing devotion to the interests of 
the citj', unfailing judgment, unswerving integrity, and rare ability in 
producing results which were at once necessary to the public good and 
satisfactory to all who were parties to the many transactions which 
he patiently carried to a consummation. 

For what this board has accomplished in recent years the city is 
largely indebted to him, and his associates, who always found in him 
a delightful companion, a wise counselor, and an efficient helper, who 
appreciate as others cannot the value of his services, bear sincere testi- 
mony to his character as a man, a friend, and an official by j)lacing 
tapon their records this resolution and by furnishing- copies to his 
familj' and the press of this city. 

Kespectfully submitted. 

William C. Clabke, ex officio, 
Alpheus Gay, President, 
Charles H. Majs^ning, 
Chaeles T. Means, 
Haeey E. Pahkee, 
Feank Dowst, 

Water Commissioners. 



173 



EEPOET OF THE BOAED OF WATEE COMMIS- 

SIONEES. 



To the Honorable the City Councils of the City of Manchester, N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — The Manchester Water Board herewith x^resent their 
twenty-ninth annual report for the year ending December 31, 1900, 
with the detailed report of the superintendent during the same laeriod. 

FINAJSrCIAI. CONDITION. 

Receipts and expenditures for the year have been as follows: 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1899 $54,054.36 

Eeceived from water rentals, etc 119,816.94 

Received from hydrant rentals 18,425.00 

Total , $192,296.30 

Amount paid for current expenses $31,419.27 

Amount paid for construction expenses 12,981.61 

Interest on bonds, 1900 39,534.50 

Hydrant rentals set aside for sinking fund 18,425.00 

Set aside for sinking fund, for payment of water 

bonds, state law 5.000.00 

107,36l).3S 

Amount on hand December 31, 1900 $84,935.92 

Respectfully submitted. 

William C. Clause, ex officio, 
Alpheus Gay, President, 
Charles H. Manning, 
Chables T. Meajs^s, 
Harry E. Parker, 
Frank Dowst, 
Edgar J. Knowlton, 

Water Commissioners. 



174 



SUPEEINTENDENT'S EEPOET. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Commissioners of the City of Manchester: 
Gentlemen, — The following- is the report of 3-our superintendent for 
the year 1900: 

MASSABESIC LAKE. 

The water has been low at the lake this year and last. Never before 
since the water-works were constructed have there been two years in 
succession of extreme low water. The lowest point was reached Jan- 
uary- 11, the water then being thirtj^-three and three fourths inches 
below the dam. 

February 1 the water began to rise and pumjping by steam into the 
low service ceased. Todaj" the water is three feet three inches higher 
than one year ago. 

Water has been pumj)ed by steam every other day into the old reser- 
voir during the months of Januarj^ September, October, and November. 

There has never been less than five feet of water over the intake at 
the high service, and to take water any lower than it has been we 
should be obliged to rely entirely on steam power to keei3 up the 
sujDply for the city. 

A tract of land bordering on the lake about 2,000 feet with the build- 
ings thereon, known as the Leavitt place, was bought of E. M. Toj)lif[:. 
These buildings are of no great value. 

Land and buildings belonging to a boat club were also purchased; 
also the right to flow a cellar in Auburn village. 

About $400 wei-e siDent in cleaning around the lake, $300 of which 
was for clearing swamp land near Fletcher Brown's, the balance in 
cleaning- around the lake shore last summer when the water was low. 

Xo repairs were made on the dam, canal, or penstock. 

OLD PUMPING STATION. 

The pumps here have been doing their work without any extra re- 
pairs. They furnished all the water for the low sei'viee for eight 
months without any assistance from the high service steam pumps. 

Repairs at a small expense were made on the roof of this station. 
Repairs were also made on both force mains, the cement one of the 
low service and the iron one of the high service, caused bj' about the 
same number of joint leaks in both cases. 

HIGH SERVICE STATION. 

As so much water was pumped by steam into the high and low ser- 
vice it was thought best to add to the plant. July 27 it was decided to 

175 



176 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 

pvit in a new high duty vertical Snow pvinip, capable of pumiDing into 
the high service reservoir six million gallons per day, contract price 
to be $.50,000. 

The pumps now in pump three million gallons per day each; run 
together they will pump six million gallons per day into the low ser- 
vice, but they cannot be used toge-ther to pump into the high service. 

It is thought best in the future, in times of low water, to use the old 
j)umps for the low service and the new one for the high service. 

Five thousand dollars have been expended on the new building, plans 
for which were received the last of September. The building, which is 
thirty-five feet by forty-seven feet and forty-three feet hign, was com- 
menced October 2, and is now all covered in, which is good progress 
considering the time elapsed since the work was commenced. 

Six himdred dollars have been spent in digging for the foundations 
for the new pump and building, and work is now being done on the 
foundations for pump. 

"Wiien this pump is built and in running order the commissioners 
have no fears concerning" the water supply whatever happens to the 
old station, penstock, dam, pipe, or reservoir. 

EESEEVOIBS. • 

No repairs were made at the old reservoir or to the grounds around 
it. At the Weston reservoir the banks were top-dressed and slight 
rej)airs were made on the fence ■which during Xovember had partly 
blown down. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES. 

Xew pipes were laid in the following- streets: Auburn, Bedford, ^ 
Brennan, Cedar, Cypress, Cilley road. Canal, Chase, Dubuque, Erie. 
Fourth, Falls road, Goft'e, Gilford, Harriman, Hanover road, Harvell, 
Lake avenue. Log, Merrimack, South Main, Somerville, South Tilton, 
Woodbury, Walker, and Warner, — in all, 9,549 feet, at an expense of 
$10,642, or about one dollar and eleven cents per foot. 

Pipes were relaid in the following- streets: Ash, Beech, Birch, Central, 
Canal, Chestnut, Granite, Jane, Lowell, Pine, Nashua, Maple, Union, 
and Walnut, — in all, 3,703 feet, at an expense of $8,373, or about two 
dollars and twenty-five cents per foot. 

All the 12 and 14 inch cement pipe is now out. Nearly one mile of 
12-inch ijipe has been laid over in Beech and Lowell streets this year. 

There have been no damages caused by leaks in cellars or washouts 
in the streets. 

Trouble is looked for in the future with the pipes from electrolysis. 
Already -three services in Bridge street have been affected by it and 
have had to be relaid. 

Three hundred tons of pipe have been contracted for at $24.70 per 
long ton. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



177 



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178 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



179 



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180 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

RAINFALL AT HIGH SERVICE STATION, 1900. 



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10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
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17. 
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19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

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24. 
25. 
2G. 

27. 
28. 
29. 
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31. 



*.83 



.01 



*.03 

*1 40 

*.01 



.06 



*.86 



*.05 
*.35 



.29 
!53 

*.64 



*.34 
.08 



1.50 



5.54 



.32 

.66 



.06 
3.10 



1.47 
.12 



1.19 



*.79 
1 55 



.11 

*.38 
.29 



1.77 



.20 
.11 



.31 

.41 



.04 
.02 



9.32 5.13 



1.59 



.02 



1.25 
.12 
.08 



.07 
.05 



.05 

1.40 

.10 

.03 



■in 



.04 
.06 .21' 



.27 



.02 



3.39 1.39 



.23 



1.75 



.44 
.36 



.21 
.03 
.12 
.02 
1.32 



2.82 



1.13 



.32 



3.93 



.03 
.05 
.80 
.S3 
.29 
.71 



.30 
"63' 



3.49 



1.30 
1.53 



*.ll 
.25 

.18 
.14 



.19 



*.C3 

1.75 

.03 



*.07 
*.40 



6.58 



.56 
*1.71 



.44 



*.0'7 

.51 

2.96 



Total rainfall for year, 47.89 incliesi. 
* Snow melted. 



1895. Total rainfall, 42.06 inches. 

1896. Total rainfall, 38.41 Inches. 

1897. Total rainfall, 49.78 inches. 

1898. Total rainfall, 47.15 inches. 

1899. Total rainfall, 36.27 inches. 

1900. Total rainfall, 47.89 inches. 



The income from the sale of water for 1900 has laeen as follows: 

Eeceived for water by rate $27,868.85 

for water by meter 91,079.30 

for building purposes 95.80 

from fines 397.80 



Eeeeived for old cement pipes.... 
for labor and pipes sold. 



$122.50 
74.53 



$119,441.75 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 181 

Keceived from Suncook Water Co., pipe, etc... ■ $3.10 

for old boiler 20.00 

for lead 2.71 

for 6-inch pipe. People's Gas Lisfht Co. 9.75 

,$232.59 

Received from Fletcher Brown, lease $1.00 

from G. G. Griffin, lease 1.00 

from G. F. Hamblett, insurance 3.60 

from Sarah Gilbert, rent of land 2.00 

from Asa Hasellon, rent of land 50.00 

from Mell Hall, rent of land 10.00 

from S. M. McDonald 54.00 

from Mclntyre, grass 3.00 

from Charles Spofford 18.00 

142.60 



$119,816.94 
Eeceived from hj'drant rentals 18,425.00 

$138,241.^4 
Abatements, $701.89. 

Amount on hand December 31, 1899 $54,054.36 

Eeceived for water rent, etc., 1900 119,816.94 

from hydrant rentals 18,425.00 

$192,296.30 

Amount paid for current expenses $31,419.27 

paid for construction expenses 12,981.61 

Interest on bonds, 1900 39,534.50 

Hj'drant rentals set aside for sinking fund 18,425.00 

State Law, 1897, bonds set aside for sinking fund 5,000.00 

107,360.38 



$84,935.92 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOU^-TS FOE 1900. 

Superintendence, repairs, and renewals $21,730.63 

Stationery and printing 172.77 

Office and incidental expenses 595.00 

Pumping expenses, low service 2,127.80 

Pumping expenses, high service 6,312.96 

Eejjairs to dam, races, and reservoirs 272.75 

Repairs to buildings 207.36 

Total current expenses, 1900 $31,419.27 

Service pipes $1,624.58 

Distribution pipes 1,224.81 

Fire hydrants and valves 632.48 

Meters , 1,899.74 



182 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Lands $2,000.00 

Pumping machinery and buildings 5,600.00 

Total construction expenses, 1900 $12,981.61 

Total expenses, 1900 $44,400.88 

Sinking fund from fire hydrants $18,425.00 

Sinldng fund for water bonds 5,000.00 

23,425.00 

$67,825.88 

Construction Expenses. 

Land and water rights $152,409.00 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races 101,399.16 

Pumping machinery and buildings 183,168.43 

Distribution reservoir 117,697.90 

Force and supply- mains 89,769.03 

Distribution pipes 609,412.00 

Fire hj^drants and valves 62,216.26 

Meters and fixtures 59,666.06 

Service pipes 77,683.65 

Grading and fencing 17,470.39 

Tools and fixtures 10,649.35 

Boarding and storehouses 919.36 

Eoads and culverts 4,405.20 

Supplies 550.39 

Engineering 22,176.19 

Livery and traveling expenses 2,856.64 

Legal expenses 563.79 

Total $1,513,012.79 

Current Expenses. 

Superintendence, repairs, and collecting $371,041.14 

Stationery and printing 7,869.11 

Office and incidental expenses 34,550.91 

Pumping expenses at low service 59,955.37 

Pumping expenses at high service 29,395.15 

Eepairs to buildings 5.822.22 

Repairs to dam, canal, and reservoir 6,474.64 

Total $515,108.54 

Interest $40,678.51 

Highway expenditures 14,000.53 

54,679.04 

Total amount of bills approved to date $2,082,800.37 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 183 

Interest, discount, and labor performed on high- 
way, transferred, and tools, materials sold... $71,383.18 

Current expenses to December 31, 1900 515,108.54 

$586,491.73 

Total cost exclusive of interest and current expenses.. $1,490,308.65 

Interest and discount to December 31, 1899 $962,548.01 

Interest for 1900 39,534.50 

Total to December 31, 1900 $1,002,082.51 

AMOUNT OF WATER BOXDS ISSUED TO DECEMBER 31, 1900. 

Issued January 1, 1892, rate 6 per cent, due January 1, 1902 $100,000.00 

January 1, 1887, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1907 100,000.00 

July 1, 1890, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, 1910 100,000.00 

January 1, 1892, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1912 100,000.00 

August 1, 1893, rate 5 per cent, due August 1, 1913. . 100,000.00 
Xovember 1, 1893, rate 4l^ per cent, due November 

1, 1913 100,000.00 

October 1, 1894, rate 4 per cent, due October 1, 1914 50,000.00 

July 1, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, 1915 100,000.00 

December 16, 1895, rate 4 j^er cent, due December 

16, 1915 50,000.00 

January 1, 1897, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1917 100,000.00 

$900,000.00 
si:«fKiNG rr]srD. 

1893 $12,750.00 

1894 13,925.00 

1895 15,800.00 

1896 16,800.00 

1897 17,175.00 

1898 17,675.00 

1898 5,000.00 

1899 5,000.00 

1899 18,100.00 

1900 18,425.00 

1900 5^000.00 

Total $145,650.00 

Interest to date 13,818.83 

Total $159,466.83 



184 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



STATEMENT OF RECEPITS. 





Total. 


Hydrant 

rent. 


6 
3 


s 
s 


c 'J' • 





Labor, pipe, 
and inalo- 
riaLs sold. 


Rentals, and 
buildings 
sold. 





1872 


^573.61 
2,097.60 












§573,61 






1873 


c 


51,692.69 

7,987.27 


3190.84 




S14.00 


200.07 




g 


1874 


32,154.07 


I 322,425.00 


1,436.56 




3119.10 


104.18 


699.85 




98 


1875 


29,223.60 


13,095.00 


10,292.13 


3,348.11 


122.13 


120.59 


2,245,64 




160 


1876 


39,028.47 


16,320.00 


15,900.63 


6,305,81 


72.32 


180.16 


249,55 




166 


1877 


43,823.30 


17,'l 75.00 


18,064.51 


7,783.09 


130.10 


233.04 


131.56 





202 


1878 


48,874.26 


17,970.00 


20,255.97 


10,090.25 


83.60 


232.82 


241.62 




226 


1879 


53,143.17 


18,165.00 


21,610.13 


12,732.93 


81.60 


240.64 


303.87 





251 


1880 


57,655.25 


18,300.00 


23,795.96 


14,794.34 


79,50 


210.39 


465,06 


310.00 


280 


1881 


60,215.62 


18,780.00 


25,336.18 


15,554.98 


105.60 


223.99 


203.87 


11.00 


310 


1882 


67,630.13 


20,130.00 


26,803.06 


19,898.69 


146.65 


197.49 


443.24 


11.00 


371 


1883 


73,458.20 


20,520.00 


28,838.24 


23,431.20 


314.65 


208.04 


125.07 


21.00 


404 


1884 


75,580.08 


21,350.00 


31,724.07 


21,329.75 


195.10 


231.96 


7.38.20 


11.00 


446 


1885 


80,404.12 


18,900.00 


33,597.02 


27,425.35 


102.50 


186.80 


181.45 


11.00 


486 


1886 


75,129.99 


19,750.00 


33,002.11 


21,573.45 


287.40 


130.80 


320.23 


6.00 


613 


1887 


80,518.17 


20,437.50 


33,497.21 


25,277.09 


351,70 


119,20 


819.47 


16.00 


739 


1888 


85,643.82 


21,000.00 


33,864.78 


29,838.82 


543.80 


149.80 


243.62 


3.00 


842 


1889 


86,700.46 


18,240.00 


34,140.99 


33,596.05 


361.95 


153.20 


155.27 


53.00 


951 


1890 


90,463.37 


19,880.00 


32,431.10 


37,009.80 


649.90 


151.80 


298.77 


42.00 


1,135 


1891 


76,605.23 


4,590.00 


30,588.79 


40,479.25 


494.80 


160.40 


200.99 


91.00 


1,313 


1893 


83,474.79 


5,000.00 


31,344.24 


46,139.35 


416.00 


.168.40 


139.80 


267.00 


1,608 


1893 


104,170.08 


12,750.00 


32,603.59 


58,103.20 


1,033.75 


159,60 


339.38 


180.56 


1,895 


1894 


110.210.29 


13,925.00 


32,176.28 


62,501.35 


697.80 


227.40 


334.82 


347.64 


2,182 


1895 


118,374.50 


15,800.00 


32,903.99 


67,465.90 


808.20 


300,40 


768.17 


327.84 


2,.520 


1896 


128,907.03 


16,800,00 


32,540.03 


77,610.10 


638.48 


302.80 


440.12 


575.50 


2,865 


1897 


125,719.17 


17,175.00 


30,647.17 


76,148.60 


331.85 


321.80 


627.08 


467.67 


3,134 


1898 


131,184.08 


17,675.00 


29,409.58 


80.643.30 


187.00 


359.80 


441.90 


2,467.50 


3,340 


1899 


133,430.41 


18,100.00 


28,063.34 


85,764.80 


246.80 


363.80 


400.59 


497.08 


3,502 


1900 


138,241.94 


18,425.00 


27,868.85 


91,079.30 


95.80 


397.80 


232.59 


142.60 


3,667 



1878, meter rate was changed. 1884, hydrant rates reduced. 1886, meter.and other 
rates reduced. 1889, hydrant rates reduced. 1891 and 1892, received only part of hy- 
drant rent, and nothing from water-troughs or street sprinklers. 1893, hydrant rent 
and water-closets rate reduced. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



185 



The following- amounts have been paid over to the citj' treasurer, 
and credited to the water-works: 

1872, suj)plies and materials sold $,')73.61 

1873, supplies and materials sold 177.07 

accrued interest on water bonds sold 193.26 

accrued interest on state bonds sold 146.00 

water rents 1,920..'53 

1874, supplies and materials sold 607.89 

]^larch 12, highway expenditures transferred from 

water account 14,000.53 

March 17, interest and discount transferred from 

water account 12,347.2.5 

September 1, interest and discount transferred from 

water account 22,361.74 

water and hydrant rent 30,233.54 

Deceinber 29, interest transferred 4,566.25 

1875, water and hydrant rent 27,119.15 

sundry items 2,104.45 

1S76, water and hj'drant rent 38,879.47 

sundry items 149.00 

1877, water and hydrant rent 43,691.74 

sundry items 131.56 

1878, water and hydrant rent , 48,632.64 

sundry items 241.62 

1S79, water .and hydrant rent 52,839.30 

sundry items 303.87 

ISSO, water and nydrant rent 57,180.19 

sundry items 475.06 

1881, water and hydrant rent 60,000.75 

sundry items 214.87 

1882, water and hydrant rent 67,175.89 

sundry items 454.24 

1883, water and hydrant rent 73,312.13 

sundry items 146.07 

1884, water and hydrant rent 74,830.88 

sundry items 749.20 

1885, water and hydrant rent 80,211.67 

sundry items 192.45 

1886, water and hydrant rent 74,803.76 

sundry items 326.23 

1887, water and hydrant rent 79,682.70 

sundry items 835.47 

1888, water and hydrant rent 85,397.20 

sundry items ■ 246.62 

1889, water and hydrant rent 86,492.19 

sundry' items 208.27 



186 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1890, water and hydrant rent $90,123.60 

sundry items 340.77 

1891, water and hydrant rent 76,313.24 

sundry items 291.99 

1892, water and hydrant rent 83,067.99 

sundry items 406.80 

1893, water rents 90,900.14 

sundry items 519.94 

1894, water rents 95,602.83 

sundry items 682.46 

1895, water rents 101.478.49 

sundry items 1.096.01 

1896, water rents ; 111,091.41 

sundry items 1,015.62 

1897, water rents 107,449.42 

sundry items 1,094.75 

premiums on bonds 6,248.00 

1898, water rents 110,599.68 

sundry items 2,909.40 

1899, water rents 114,438.74 

sundry items 897.67 

1900, water rents 119.441.75 

sundry items 375.19 

$2,160,541.20 
METEES. 

The number of meters set during the year has been one hundred 
seventj^-three (173). 

Total number of meters in iise, thirtj'-six hundred and sixty-seven 
(3,667). 

The number of applications for water has been ninety-seven (97). 

Total number of applications to date, fifty-six hundred and seventy 
(5,670). 

SERVICE PIPES. 

Ninety-seven (97) service pipes have been laid, as follows: 

95 1-inch diameter 2,017.0 feet 

2 2-inch diameter 9.7 " 

97 2,626.7 feet 
SERVICE PIPES REEAID. 

89 %-inch services 2,259.4 feet to 1-inch diameter 2,208.3 feet 

10 1-inch services 276.8 feet to 1-inch diameter 232.3 " 

1 1-inch service 28.5 feet to IVs-inch diameter. .. . 26.0 " 

1 114-inch service 34.0 feet to 2-inch diameter 35.0 " 

1 2-inch service 33.0 feet to 2-inch diameter 28.0 " 

103 2,631.7 feet 2,529.6 feet 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



187 



SERVICE PIPES LAID TO DATE. 

20 i^'iiich diameter 

1,244 %-inch diameter 

4,104 1-inch diameter 

19 li^-inch diameter 

26 li/^-inch diameter 

74 2-inch diameter 

3 2y2-incli diameter 

5 3-inch diameter 

11 4-inch diameter 

S 6-incli diameter. 



412.6 feet 

31,465.9 

104,630.6 

800.2 

829.5 

2,288.7 

63.0 

89.8 

244.5 



140,824.8 feet 



5,513 

Equal to 26.67 miles. 

Fifty-fire hundred and thirteen (5,513) service pipes have been laid 
to December 31, 1900. 

The following streets are where cement-lined pipe was taken out 
and relaid with cast-iron pipe in 1900. 







LENGTH IN FEET. 




Street. 


14 in. 


12 in. 


8 in. 


6 in. 


4 in. 


Location. 


Ash 














Bedford 








24 
10 
25 


■ ^ 




Beech 




960 






Birch 








154 












72 
















115 














Corner Lowell. 

Corner Canal and Bedford. 

Elm to Jane. 

Corner Lowell. 

Corner Lowell. 

Corner Lowell. 

Corner Lowell. 

Corner Lowell. 




370 






127 
45 
29 


■■"57" 


Lowell 


3,448 


32 


Maple 




Nashua 








Pine 


















56 
14 


"'"36" 


Walnut 


















524 


4,408 


104 


321 


202 





Total of 5.559 feet taken out. 

65 feet 6-inch on Granite, corner Canal street, not rej)laced with cast- 
iron pipe. 

1 6-inch gate taken out on Ash, corner Lowell street. 

1 6-inch gate taken out on Bedford, corner Granite street. 

1 6-inch gate taken out on Granite, corner Canal street. 

1 6-inch gate taken out on Chestnut, corner Lowell street, 

2 8-inch gates taken out on Pine, corner Lowell street. 

1 6-inch gate taken out on Union, corner Lowell street. 
1 4-inch gate taken out on Walnut, corner Lowell street. 
1 6-inch gate taken out on Walnut, corner Lowell street. 



188 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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Location. 


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190 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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192 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



193 



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194 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 



195 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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197 



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198 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



199 



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200 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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256 
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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



201 



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202 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



203 



'DISTRIBUTIOX pipes AXD gates laid to DECEMBER 31, 1900. 



Size of pipe. 



Cement-linecl pipe. 



Cast-iron pipe. 



Gates. 



20-inch diameter . 
14-inch diameter. 
1'2-inch diameter , 
10-inch diameter , 

8-inch diameter . 

6-inch diameter . 

4-inch dianaeter . 



20,367 feet. 



312 feet. 



20,679 feet. 



24,719 feet. 
16.245 
31,663 
29,385 
70,820 
297,575 
20,648 



491,055 feet. 



19 
21 
39 
42 
100 
628 
61 



910 



Cement-lined pipe 3.91 miles 

Cast-iron pipe 93.00 

Total pipe 96.91 miles 

743 hydrants. 
910 gates. 
12 air valves. 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN 1900. 

Chase avenue. 

Gilford street, corner Oneida. 

Hanover road. 

South Main street, 70 feet south of Xo. 494. 

South Main street, opposite Xo. 569. 

Walker. 

Respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



Uses for which Water is Supplied. 

WATER FIXTtTRES, ETC. 

12,098 Families, 130 boarding-houses, 15,631 faucets, 4,609 wash-bowls, 
4,076 bath-tubs, 11,903 water-closets, 800 set tubs, 213 urinals, 4,131 
sill-cocks, 2,770 horses, 205 cattle, 743 hydrants, 30 watering-troughs, 
8 drinking fountains, 51 standpipes, 2 public urinals. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

1 Jail, 30 churches, 1 court house, 10 hose companies, 6 fire engines, 
2 hook-and-ladder, 3 opera houses, 4 convents, 4 city hospitals, 4 ceme- 



204 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

teries, 1 orphanage, 1 post-office, 1 city library, 6 banlvs, 9 hotels, 1 
Masonic hall, 1 Odd Fellows' hall, 3 halls. Children's Home. 

SHOPS. 

58 Barber, 11 wheelwright, 20 blacksmith, 10 carpenter, 2 tinsmith, 
1 copper, 3 currjdng, 20 plumber and gas and water pipe, 14 paint, 3 
gunsmith. 

STORES. 

5 Auction, 35 drug, 22 jewelry, 2 fur, 3 house-furnishing goods, 20 
fancy goods, 1 wholesale paper, 5 wholesale produce, 24 drj^ goods, 12 
candy, 1 cloak, 16 millinery, 3 tea, 9 furniture, 3 wholesale grocer, 107 
grocery, 6 meal, 3 hardware, 34 boot and shoe, 11 stove, 17 gents' fur- 
nishing goods, 7 book, 1 leather and shoe-finders, 3 music, 3 uphol- 
sterj^ 9 undertakers, 5 sewing-machine, 1 feather-cleaner, 1 rubber. 



16 Dining, 7 billiard, 47 liquor. 

MISCEILLAJSTEOUS. 

7 Clubrooms, 3 bleacheries, 35 laundries, 4 ice-houses, 10 photog- 
raphers, 1 Mercy Home, 2 old ladies' homes, 1 soldiers' monument, 1 
Turner hall, 4 fountains, 2 trust companies, 1 city farm, 3 depots, 9 
greenhouses, 2 bandrooms, 26 bakeries, 2 waste, 2 business colleges, 
34 schoolhouses, 1 battery building, 1 kitchen, 3 ward-rooms, 1 gym- 
nasium, 2 police stations. 

MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 

1 Hosiery mill, 1 silver-plating, 2 iron foundries, 2 dye-houses, 5 
machine shops, 6 clothing manufactories, 9 harness shops, 1 cornice 
works, 1 brush shop, 9 carriage shops, 12 cigar factories, 1 brass and 
copper foundry, 1 locomotive %vorks, 1 grist-mill, 1 silk-mill, 3 granite 
works, 1 electric light station, 4 sash and blind shoj)s, 1 brewery, 7 
shoe shops, 1 gas works, 4 slaug'hter-houses, 1 soap factory, 4 needle 
manufactories, 6 beer-bottling, 3 book-binderies, 1 paper-mill, 2 box- 
makers, 1 paper-box manufactory. 

MARKETS. 
5 Fish, 12 meat and fish, 4 meat, wholesale. 

STABLES. 

23 Livery, 1,171 private. 



24 Dentists, 1 telephone, 2 telegraph, 17 coal, 1 gas, 1 electric, 2 ex- 
press, 19 printing. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. ^05 

Material on Hand. 

PIPE. 

24 feet 24-inch, 8,520 feet 20-inch, 168 feet 14-inch, 2,904 feet 12-inch, 
48 feet 10-inch, 10,092 feet 8-inch, 7,104 feet 6-inch. 

GATES. 

2 12-inch, 2 10-inch bell, 9 0-inch spigot, 1 14-inch, 2 8-inch bell, 5 
4-inch bell, 2 14-inch. 

BRANCHES. 

1 single 4 on 10, 2 single 6 on 6, 8 single 6 on 8, 5 single 6 on 10, 
1 single 8 on 10, 1 single 10 on 10, 1 single 14 on 14, 2 single 10 on 20, 
1 single 4 on 12, 1 single 6 on 14, 1 single 10 on 14, 19 single 8 on 8, 
1 single 8 on 10, 1 single 10 on 10, 1 single 14 on 14, 2 single 10 on 20, 
4 double 4 on 4, 6 double 8 on 8, 1 double 12 on 12, 20 double 8 on 6, 

1 double 14 on 8, 7 double 10 on 6, 2 double 12 on 6, 1 double 14 on 6, 

2 double 20 on 6, 1 doiible 6 by 8 on 14, 2 double 10 on 10, 2 double 10 
on 20. 

PLUGS. 

32 4-inch, 19 6-inch, 35 8-inch, 20 10-inch, 20 12-inch, 4 14-inch. 

CEAMP SLEEVES. 

8 4-inch, 130 6-inch, 36 S-inch, 9 14-inch, 123 10-inch, 18 12-inch. 

SLEEVES. 

18 4-inch, 8 6-inch, 4 8-inch, 7 10-inch, 6 12-inch, S 14-inch, 2 20-inch. 

EEDUCEES. 

1 20-inch to 14-inch, 2 14-inch to 10-inch, 1 14-inch to 12-inch, 2 12-incll 
to 6-inch, 2 10-inch to 6-inch, 6 S-inch to 6-inch, 8 10-inch to S-inch, 
6 6-inch to 4-inch. 



2 20-inch Y's -f 1 12-inch turn, 1 10-inch offset, 4 8-inch offsets, 10 
6-inch offsets, 1 12-inch crook, 1 20-inch crook, 1 6-inch crook, 1 4-inch 
1-4, 2 6-inch 1-4, 1 12-inch 1-8, 2 14-inch 1-S, 1 20-inch 1-16, 2 10-inch 
1-8, 5 8-inch offsets. 

90 pigs of lead. 

18 curb boxes. 

450 feet 1-inch lead-lined pipe. 

275 feet %-inch lead-lined pipe. 



EEPOET 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



EIGHTH ANNUAL EEPOET OF THE STREET AND 
PARK COMMISSIONERS. , 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of Manchester, N. H.: 
Gentlemen, — The eighth Annual report of the board of Street and 
Park Commissioners is herewith submitted, showing the work of this 
department during the year 1900. 

OFFICE. 

The usual amount of work has been done in the offiee. The follow- 
ing gives the receipts and expenditures for the year 1900: 

Receipts. 

Eeceived from Manchester Street Eailway Co.. $2,679.61 

from Byron Worthen 37.50 

from sundry sources 623.31 

$3,340.42 

Deposited with city treasurer $3,332.00 

Cash paid for express and postage S.42 

Total $3,340.42 

Appropriation $3,500.00 

Expenditures. 

Commissioners' salaries $1,800.00 

Clerical services 949.50 

Carriage allowance 450.00 

Office supplies, books, etc 68.51 

Telephone 48.36 

Incidentals 35.10 

Total $3,351.47 

Transferred to reserve fund 148.53 

$3,500.00 

209 

14 



f210 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Inventory of City Property. 

Office, including tj'iDewriter, furniture, etc. $357.75 

Division No. 2, including- horses, dumpcart^, sprinklers, 

crushers, tools, etc 29,774.00 

City stables, storage sheds, shops 15,950.00 

JLot of land on Franklin street 89,312.00 

Pipe on hand 2,003.31 

Division No. 4 4.00 

Division No. 5 30.65 

Division No. 6 30.25 

Division No. 7 .• 320.68 

Division No. 8 39.60 

Division No. 9 25.00 

Division No. 10 ^ 1,948.95 

Stable and lot in West Manchester ' 1,200.00 

^Commons : 556.90 

Total $141,553.09 



Contracts. 



Akron sewer pipe, Thomas A. Lane Company. 

Cement, Brown & Titus. 

Sewer brick, William F. Head & Son. 

Sewer and bridge plank. Head & Dowst Company. 

Sewer castings, Charles H. Hutchinson. 

Paving blocks, Charles A. Bailey. 

Edgestones and cesspool stones, Harry W. Harvey. 

Stone work, 3 bridges over Cohas brook, W^arren Harvey. 

Building- bridge over Cohas brook, Groton Bridge Comj)any, 



List of Appropriations. 

Street and park commission $3,500.00 

Pepairs of highways 20,000.00 

New highways 4,000.00 

Snow and ice 7,000.00 

"Watering streets 5.000.00 

Paving streets 5,000.00 

Paving Elm street $10,000.00 

Heceived from Manchester Street Railway 2,679.61 

12,679.61 

Macadamizing streets , 10,000.00 

"Grade for concrete , 5,000.00 

Scavenger service 18,000.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 211 

City teams $6,500.00 

Kepairs of bridg-es 3,000.00 

Street sweeping , 2,500.00 

New sewers $20,000.00 

Transferred from office receipts 381.80 

20,381.80 

Eepairs of sewers 5,000.00 

Commons 4,500.00 

Starlv parli 500.00 

Derryfield park 500.00 

South End pla^-g-round 100.00 

Total $133,161.41 



Expenditures. 

Street and i^ark commission $3,351.47 

Eepairs of liig'hways 26,436.20 

New higliw' ays 4,106.32 

Snow and ice • , ' ' 6,615.92 

Watering streets 4,649.03 

Paving streets 4,604.96 

Paving Elm street 12,774.76 

Macadamizing streets 3,959.17 

Grade for concrete 3,048.58 

Scavenger service 17,118.86 

City teams 8,020.07 

Eepairs of bridges 9,297.26 

Street sweexsing 2,443.75 

New sewers 17,329.54 

Eepairs of sewers .' 3,771.76 

Commons . 4,434.35 

Stark park 476.12 

Derryfield park 634.91 

South End pla.yground 95.45 

Total $133,168.48 

Excess of expenditures over appropriation $7.07 



Report of Division No. 2. 

George W. Cheney, Agent. 

snow and ice account. 

Appropriation , $7,000.00 



212 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



EXPEKDITTJKES. 

Labor, January 

February 

Marcli 

April 

July 

August 

Supplies 

Total 

Transferred to reserve fund 



NEW SEWERS. 



$1,600.5S 

2,385.04 

1,599.45 

484.40 

25.63 

2.25 

253.28 

$6,350.63 
649.37 

$7,000.00 



Location. 



Ash, Pearl easterly 

Auburn south back 

Beacon, Bridge southerly 

Blodget, Elm" to Elm east back 

Blodget south back to Chestnut . 

Bridge, Belmont to East Beacon 

Cedar, Lincoln to Cemetery brook 

Central south back easterly 

Cypress, Young southerly 

Depot, Hampshire lane easterly 

Elm, Monroe south back northerly 

Elm east back southerly 

Grove south back easterly 

Lake avenue east of Canton easterlj"^ 

Lincoln, Spruce to Cedar 

Lake avenue south back, Union westerly 

Massabesic easterly 

Pine east back, Green to Summer south back 
Summer south back, Pine east back easterly . 

Totals 



Length in 
feet. 


Total cost 


148 


S201.13 


68 


103.11 


204 


211.12 


144 


228 13 


70 


100.42 


380 


405.68 


202 


262,16 


353 


405.68 


90 


265.18 


496 


1,171.32 


250 


205.42 


200 


ISO. 18 


66 


36.35 


144 


115.25 


126 


132.42 


250 


302.16 


342 


1,820.25 


243 


741.45 


92 


97.13 


275 


2,410.50 


144 


145.46 


425 


325.75 


4,712 


§9,866.25 



STKEETS EEPAIEED. 

Belmont, from Central to Laurel 300 feet 

Beech, from Bridge to Concord 550 " 

Beech, from Sagamore south 300 " 

Blodget, from Union west 400 " 

Beacon, from Laurel north 200 " 

Bridge, from Malvern to Hall 1,000 " 

Central, from Belmont to Milton 250 " 

Campbell, from Hooksett road west 400 " 

East High, from Hall west 200 " 

Elm, from Carpenter south 2,500 " 



STREET AND PABK COMMISSIONERS. 213 

Laurel, from Hall to Milton 550 feet 

Lowell, from Malvern to Jane 300 " 

Lincoln, from Hanover west 300 " 

Manchester, from Hall to ISIilton 600 " 

Pennacook, from Elm east 400 " 

Pearl, from Chestnut east 200 " 

Elver road, from Clarke to Monroe 300 " 

Eiver road, from Union to Hooksett line 1,700 " 

Eiver road, from Monroe to Clarke 800 " 

Webster, from Elm to Hooksett line 1,700 " 

Walnut, from Webster south 500 " 

Walnut, from Concord to Amherst 300 " 

Walnut, from Webster south 300 " 

Salmon, from Chestnut west 600 " 

Spruce, from Chestnut west 200 " 

Total 14,850 feet 

Labor charged to repairs of highways. 

STREETS TUKJN^PIKED WITH EGAD MACHINE. 

Amherst, from Beacon to Alfred 400 feet 

Alfred, from Hanover to Amherst 500 " 

Adams, from Carpenter north 500 " 

Beech, from Auburn to Young 1,500 " 

Beech, from Bridge south 900 " 

Beech, from Brook south 1,000 " 

Blodget, from Beech to Ash 300 " 

Belmont, from Pearl to Bridge 500 " 

Bay, from Carpenter south 400 " 

Chestnut, from Webster south 1,000 " 

Concord, from Belmont to Beacon 400 " 

Hooksett road, from Webster north 7,000 " 

Hanover, from Highland to Hall 1,000 " 

Highland, from Hanover north ^ 800 " 

Lowell, from Beacon to Highland 1,200 " 

Laurel, from Beacon to Cass 600 " 

Merrimack, from Beacon to Hanover 1,000 " 

Maple, from Auburn to Green 800 " 

North Eiver road, from Union north to Hooksett line 5,000 " 

Pine, from Webster south 1,500 " 

Pine, from Valley to Somerville 2,500 " 

Eay, from Trenton south 500 " 

Salmon, from Chestnut east 800 " 

Smyth road, from Blodget to Mammoth road 6,000 " 

Union, from "Webster south 1,200 " 

Webster, from Hooksett road to Elm 1,800 " 

Total 39,100 feet 

Total turnpiked, 39,100 feet, or 7.4 miles. 
Labor charged to repairs of highways. 



214 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
MACADAMIZING REPAIBED. 



Location. 



No. of Loads 
feet. stone. 



Labor. 



Hanover, from Maple to Ashlaml ) | ^ 3663 i 653 i 31,200.40 

Hanover, from Ashland to Hall ) I ' 



PAVING KELAID. 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Labor. 




G2 4-9 


$6.25 







FE^XING. 



Location. 



Beacon, near city ledge 
Campbell 



Length 
in feet. 



240 
125 



Totals. 



Cost of 
material. 



S8.07 
5.14 



$13.21 



Labor. 



812.95 
3.00 



S15.95 



The following- siimmary .shows how the cost foi" scavenger service 
has been divided: 

Labor $14,463.34 

City farm 2,499.96 

Repairs 155.56 



Total 



SUMMARY CITY TEAMS. 



Labor 

Hay and grain 

Concreting 

Hardware 

New harness and repairing old. 
Gas 



Lumber . . . 

Coal 

Plumbing . 
Ne%v sleds. . 
New horses 
Water 



$17,118.86 



.403.77 

,241.49 

340.15 

532.70 

240.40 

144.67 

129.60 

102.89 

85.89 

85.00 

255.00 

98.09 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



215 



Telephone $75.12 

Veterinary' services 92.65 

Wag-on repairs ". 70. TS 

Carriage hire G7.0O 

Oil 22.34 

Incidentals 32.53 

$8,020.0T 

Appropriation 6,o00.0a 

Overdrawn $1,520.01 

GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 



Location.; 



Length 
in fe»;t. 



Width 
in feet. 



Cut or 
All. 



Labor. 



Bay and Webster 

Central, near Cass 

Chestnut, between Webster and North. 

Elm, south of Carpenter 

Linden, corner of Prospect 

Lowell ami %yeston 

Meriiniack, near Union 

Maple, south of liarvard 

Xorth River road 

North River road, south of Clarke 

North and Walnut 

Prospect, near Linden 

Prospect, between Linden and Russell. 

Ray, north of Carpenter 

Thaj'er, corner of Elm 

Elm, near Thayer 

Union and Auburn 



Totals . 



275 
611 

100 

2,000 

50 

200 

100 



400 
900 
150 
25 
200 
150 
135 
210 
100 



5,0.55 



Fill. 
Both. 
Fill. 
Both. 



Both. 

Fill. 



Cut. 
Fill. 



Cut. 



$8.00. 
6.50- 
3.00" 

80.00- 
5.5ft 
4.00 

19.00 
218.62 

30.00 

21.00- 

15.25- 
3.50- 

12.50. 

10.50 
9.25- 
9.2.5. 
7.00 



COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Location. 



Number of 

loads 

of stone. 



Scj uare 
yards. 



Labor. 



Blodget, east of Maple 

Beech, south of Salmon 

Carpenter and Adams 

Cedar and Maple , 

Carpenter, east of Adams 

Elm, between Clarke and Carpenter ... 
Maple, between Hanover and Amherst. 

North River road 

Ray, north of Carpenter 

Union and Carpenter 

Union, north of Carpenter 

Wa'nut, between Bridge and Pearl 

Walnut, Irom Amherst, north 



Totals 



73 1-3 

25 

412-3 

47 
140 

816 2-3 
159 4-9 

•JO 

82 1-3 

53 1-3 

25 
107 
233 3-9 



1,824 1-9 



$12.20 
11.36 

5.75- 

10.50 

24.00 

124.00 

18.60 

4.00 
20.50 
10. OO- 
28.00 
16. 2,5- 
30.35 



J315.49 



216 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

PAVIXG EI.M STREET. 

An appropriation of $10,000' was made to continvie tlie work of paving- 
Elm street. The old square blocks were removed and used in paving 
Nutfield lane from Amherst street to Lowell street, Hampshire lane 
from Pleasant street to Central street, and Manhattan lane from Lake 
avenue to Spruce street. The cobble paving was used to pave the gut- 
ters in various parts of the city. After the old paving was removed 
the soil was taken out to the depth of fourteen inches; a bed of con- 
crete consisting of cement, sand, and coarse gravel was then laid four 
inches deep: on this solid foundation a cushion of sand was placed 
about two inches deep, and on this the small block paving was put in 
position by experienced pavers. The crevices between the blocks were 
then filled in with the best Portland cement. The work was contin- 
ued from the north side of Mechanic street to the north side of Water 
street, and from the south side of Merrimack street to the north side 
of Central street. 

Total amount of square yards laid, 5,011.6, at a cost of $12,774.76. 
Cost per square yard, $2.67. Of this amount the Manchester Street 
Railway Company paid $2,679.61. 

StCMMARY. 

Appropriated $10,000.00 

Manchester Street Railway , 2,679.61 

Transferred from reserve fund 95.15' 



Total 

Labor 

Sand and gravel 

Cement , 

Paving stones 

Laying paving and cement. 



$12,774.76 


$1,029.85 


852.00 


472.12 


6.662.07 


3,758.72 



Total $12,774.76 

EDGESTOXES SET. 

Auburn, between Beech and Maple 40 feet 

Beech,, near Blodget 58 

Blodget, east of Elm .'54 

Beech and Maple • 17 

Beech and Cedar 27 

Bridge and Malvern 23 

Back street, between Union and Walnut 17 

Clark avenue and Orange 26 

Chestnut and Laurel 100 

Elm, north of Central 464 

Elm and Carpenter 208 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



217 



Granite, north of Elm 116 feet 

Granite, east of Granite bridge 350 " 

Harrison and Union back 8 " 

Harrison and Walnut 21 " 

Hanover, east of Beech 50 " 

Laurel and Laurel avenue 20 " 

Manchester and Belmont 7 " 

Myrtle and Ash , 10 " 

Maple and Lowell 13 " 

Merrimack, near Union 75 " 

North and Walnut 16 " 

Oak and Salmon 64 " 

Prospect, betv^^een Union and Pine 50 " 

Prospect and Beech 30 " 

Raj', north of Carpenter 248 " 

Salmon, between Beech and Walnut 16 " 

Spruce and Union back 12 " 

Thayer and Elm 262 " 

Union, north of Carpenter 75 " 

Union and Auburn 23 " 

Union and Manchester 77 " 

Union and Pennacook. 23 " 

Webster and Bay 31 " 

Webster and Chestnut 16 " 

Webster and North 17 " 

Walnut and Prospect 17 " 

Total 2.661 feet 

Labor, $252.77. 

EDGESTOXES EESET. 

Carpenter and Adams 114 feet 

Cedar and Union 50 " 

Concord 35 " 

Elm, between Central and Merrimack 585 " 

Total 784 feet 

Labor, $43.25. 
■ Complete work by the Robie Concrete Comisany. 



218 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
NEW CROSSINGS. 



Location. 


Price per 
yard. 


Square 
yards. 


Total cost. 


Amhorst and Pine 


$0.75 
.T.") 
.7.1 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.75 


28 22 
30!04 
48.17 
13.07 
32.39 
31.20 
16.50 
19.65 
17.42 
24.11 
20.83 
22.. 59 
17.51 
47.29 
17.59 
3 1.22 
67.77 
33.70 
32.15 
28.08 
21.81 
17.35 
30.22 
17.06 
18.93 
18.60 
30.22 


$21.16 
22 53 


Ash and Brook 


Canal and Cedar *. 


36 13 


Chestnut east back and Laurel 

Cartier and Putnam 


9.80 
24 29 




23 40 




12.37 
14 73 


Dubuque east back and Aiuory 


Elm east back and Webster 


13 06 


Hampshire lane and Pleasant 


18 OS 


Hampshire lane and West Central 


15.62 


Hampshire lane and Depot 


16 87 


Harrison south back and ^ alnut 


13.13 


Massabesic and Summer 


35 46 




13.19 


North and Walnut 

Granite and Elm 


22.66 
50 83 


Pine and Amherst 


"5 27 


Putnam and Cartier 


24.11 


Prospect and Walnut 


21.06 


Riddle and Milford 


16 36 


Sagamore south back and Union 


13 01 


Salmon and Reech 


22 66 


Tilton and Milford 


12 80 


Union east back and Brook 


14.20 


Walnut south back and Salmon 


13.95 


Walnut and North 


22.66 


Totals 




732.69 


$549.39 







REPAIRED CROSSINGS. 



Location. 



Price per 
yard. 



Square 
5'ards. 



Total cost. 



Amherst and Pine 

Concord and Pine . , . , 

Conant and Main 

Central and I'ine 

George and Milford 

Hanover and Elm 

Lowell and Cliestnut 

Milford and Tillon 

Milford and Riddle 

Milford and Williams 

Monadnock lane and Chestnut - 

Pine and Amherst 

Pine and Central 

Williams and Milford 

Wilton and Main 

Wayne and Beauport 



Totals. 



21.15 
23.05 
2-1.42 
29.38 
5.86 
31. SI 
29.28 
13. .50 
1.77 
4.66 
22.40 
20.80 
28.66 
18.73 
30 48 
31.02 



337.06 



S10.57 
11.52 
18.32 
14.69 

4.40 

15.92 

10.25 

10.17 

.89 

3.50 

7.84 
11.40 
14.33 

9.37 
10.67 
15.51 



$169.35 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
SIDEWALKS REPAIRED. 



219 



Location. 



Price per 
yard. 



Square 
yards. 



Total cost. 



Ash and Myrtle 

Beauport and Wayne 

Central, near Elm 

Chestnnt and Lake avenue to Cedar 



Clark avenuG and Orange. 



Cedar and Pine 

Dubnque and Amory 

Elm and Central 

Elm and Merrimack to Central 

Elm and Pleasant 

Front of Rowell's block . 

Front of Elliott and Harrington's bl'k 

Kimball Carriage Co .' 

Lowell and Chestnut back 

Maple and .Mj'rile 

Merrimack common 

Milford and Tilton 

Milforil and Riddle 

Milforil and Williams 

Miltord and Riddle 

Nortli Main and Wilson 

Silver, at Kimball Carriage Co 

Spruce and Beacon 



Totals. 



go 



50 
35 
.45 
.45 
.35 
.25 
.45 
.45 
.25 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.25 
.45 
.50 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.45 
45 
.45 
.45 
.45 



10 13 
7 98 

10.20 
102 S2 

63.85 

226.23 

1.66 

.50 

7.97 

2.32 

25.97 
802.57 

SS.7S 

58. 9C 

67 29 

102. S2 

2.13 

5 86 

24.97 
9.81 
6.33 

15.31 
6.53 
3.11 

15.88 

57.70 



1,727.68 



S5.06 

2.79 

4.. 59 

46.27 

22.35 

56.56 

.75 

.22 

1.99 

1.04 

11.68 

361.16 

19.97 

13.26 

15.14 

7.40 

9.62 

2.93 

11.23 

4.41 

2.85 

6.88 

2 94 

1.40 

7.15 

25.96 



XEW CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



No. 



Cost ot 
material. 



Labor. 



Amherst and Maple , 

Amherst and Beech 

Beech and Blodget 

Brook and Pine 

Carpenter, between Adams and Ray 

Chestnut and Pearl , 

Clarke, between Elm and Union 

Central soi ith back, east of Beech 

Elm east back, south of Webster 

Elm east back, north of Spruce 

Elm west back, near water-works 

Elm, between INIeriimack and Central 

Elm, front of Merrimack common 

Elm, front of Kennard 

Elm and Manchester , 

Elm and Orange 

Hall and Orange 

Merrimack and Lincoln. .. . 

Nashua, between High and Bridge 

Pine and Hanover 

Liberty back 

Spvuce and Elm 

Silver, between Lincoln and Wilson 

Union, near Green 

Union, north of Raj' brook 

Union and Webster 

Webster, corner of Elm east back 

Walnut east back, nortii of Lowell 

"Walnut east back, between Lowell and Bridge 

Totals 



S15.70 
14.02 
18.22 
62.41 
19.72 
42.10 

122.72 
24.98 
25.78 
26 78 
21.88 

126. .iO 
60.04 
11.88 
9.02 
29.78 
54,41 
20.02 
16.02 
14.80 
16.82 
25.58 
38 64 
53.96 
18.62 
18.42 
19.22 
15.72 
22.82 



5967.18 



ss.oo 

12.20 

6.80 

25.50 

8.50 

11.00 

76.80 

7.00 

5.50 

6.25 

7.00 

40.00 

33.50 

10.20 

6.25 

12.50 

33.00 

8.50 

6.75 

7.50 

10.00 

8.50 

12.50 

13.. 50 

7.50 

8.50 

5.50 

5 50 

9 00 



S413.25 



220 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



No. 



Cost of 
materiaL 



Labor. 



Amherst and Walnut 

Cedar north back 

Franklin and Auburn 

Elm, between Merrimack and Central 

Elm,' corner of Merrimack 

Lowell and Union 

Lowell and Ash 

North River road 

Totals 



84.56 

67.66 

4.66 

17.92 

22.48 

1.98 

5.67 

6.16 



S14.00 
3.50 
6.00 
3.50 
5.25 
10.00 
12.20 
2.00 



?56.45 



KEW SEWEKS. 



The large and pressiBg demand for new sewers still continues. The 
steam drills and the Carson trench machine have been in constant use 
nearly the whole season. There has been laid 7,173 feet. Some of the 
most extensive jobs were situated as follows: Blodget and Blodget 
south back, 720 feet long; Bridge street, east of Belmont, and Beacon, 
south of Bridge, .557 feet; Cypress, from Young street south, 450 feet; 
Central south back, 496 feet; Pine east back and Summer south back 
to Union street, 569 feet; Bartlett, from Putnam to Sullivan, 316 feet; 
Donald, from Milford southerly, 488 feet; Essex, frona Amory to Mon- 
itor, 577 feet; George, from Milford northerly, 400 feet; Massabesic, 
east of Jewett easterly, 275 feet; Lake avenue, east of Canton easterly, 
342 feet. 

In the Massabesic-street sewer it was necessary to make a cut IS feet 
deep; of this from 12 to 15 feet deej) was in the solid ledge. This was 
done at a cost of .$8,765 per linear foot. The sewer on Lake avenue 
was laid in a trench, which was blasted to a depth of 7 to 13 feet in 
the ledge during almost its entire length. The cost per linear foot of 
this sewer was $5,322. Tbe water-works department bore a part of 
the expense necessary to jiut in the trench of the Lake-avenue sewer, 
and the water pipe was laid at the same time the sewer was built. 
After deducting the amount due from the water-works department 
the actual cost of the sewer to this deiiartment was $2.90 per linear 
foot, making the average cost per linear foot for the east side, $1.92. 

It is impossible to supply the demand for sewers Avith the appro- 
priations given by the city council. At the present time some six 
miles of sewer are ordered built by the city government, the building 
of which has not yet been begun. Most of the sewers now ordered 
built are located in the suburbs where the soil is filled with bowlders 
and ledges, making it very costly in the construction. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 221 

Length of sewers, east side, division No. 2 3,987 feet 

Length of sewers, east side, division No. 7 725 " 

Length of sewers, west side, division No. 10 2,461 " 

Total 7,173 feet 

Cost of sewers, east side, division No. 2 $7,069.78 

Cost of sewers, east side, division No. 7 2,796.10 

Cost of sewers, west side, division No. 10 3,882.53 

Total $13,748.41 

Average cost per foot, east side, division No. 2 $1,773 

Average cost per foot, east side, division No. 7 3.856 

Average cost per foot, west side, division No. 10 1.577 

Average total cost per foot, $1,917. 

SUMMARY. 

Total appropriation for new sewers $20,000.00 

To transfer from reserve fund 381.80 

Total $20,381.80 

Exiiended new sewers, east side -. $9,865.88 

new sewers, west side 3,882.53 

new cesspools 540.00 

On hand, supplies at city yard 3,041.13 

Transfer to reserve fund 3,052.26 

Total $20,381.80 

The following table shows how the cost of new sewers has been 
divided. 



222 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Location. 



Limits. 



r. , SZ V 



Ash 

Auburn south back.. 

Beacon 

Bloclget 

Blodget 

Bloclget south back.. 

Bridge 

Bridge 

Cedar 

Central south back.. 

Cypress 

Cypress 

Depot 

Elm 

Elm east back 

Grove south back — 

Lake avenue 

Lake ave. south back 

Lincoln 

Massabesic 

Pine east back 

Summer south back. 



Pearl northerly 

West of Maple easterly 

Bridge southerly 

Elm to Elm east back — 

Elm to Elm east back 

Elm east back to Chestnut 

Belmont to east of Beacon 

Belmont to east of Beacon — 

Lincoln to Cemetery brook 

Manhattan lane to Chestnut . .. 

Young southerly 

Young southerly 

Hampshire lane easterly 

Monroe south back northerly . 
Blodget to Blodget south back 

East of Union to Beech 

East of Canton easterly 

Union westerly 

Spruce to Cedar 

East of Jewett easterly 

Green to Summer south back . 
Pine east back easterly 



Akron, 



204 
144 
70 



202 

353 

90 



250 
200 

66 
144 
126 
250 
342 

92 
243 
275 
144 
425 

3,836 



496 



876 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



223 



IN 1900. — EAST SIDE. 



ft 
S 









^ 








o 




>* 


^ 


o 


03 

3 


o 
o 
ft 


o 

o 


ft 

-1-3 


O 


O 


o 


-M 


O 


H 


o 



^ I 



Nature of excavation. 





1 




§201.13 


§1.360 




2 




103.11 


1.516 




7 


2 


211.12 


1.034 




4 


1 


228.13 
100.42 
405.31 


1.584 
1.434 
1.066 




IS 


1 




6 


2 


262.16 


1.297 




12 


2 


405.68 

265.18 

1,171.32 


1.148 
2.946 
2.361 




42 


3 




9 


1 


205.42 


.821 




8 




180.18 
36.35 
115.25 


.900 
.550 
.800 




3 






4 




132.42 


1.050 




9 




302.16 


1.208 




9 




1,820.25 


5.322 




8 


1 


97.13 


1.054 






1 


741.45 
2,410.50 


3.051 

8.765 




5 








145.46 
325.75 


1.010 
.764 




7 


2 




154 


16 


19,865.88 


S2.093 



Nov. 22 
Dec. 1 
May 7 
Apr. 16 
Apr. 16 
Apr. 16 
Apr. 27 
Apr. 27 
May 11 
Sept. 10 
Sept. 10 
Sept. 10 
Oct. 10 
May 25 
Apr. 16 
July 17 
Oct. 22 
May 11 
July 5 
June 20 
Sept. 28 
July 17 



Nov. 28 
Dec. 4 
May 10 
Apr. 30 
Apr. 30 
Apr. 30 
May 10 
May 10 
May 14 
Sept. 27 
Sept. 22 
Sept. 22 
Oct. 12 
May 26 
Apr. 30 
July 23 
Oct. 27 
May 12 
July 18 
Sept. 10 
Oct. 10 
July 23 



8.0 

7.5 

10.0 

10.0 

10.0 

10.0 

9.0 

9.0 

9.0 

13.5 

7.0 

8.0 

7.0 

7.0 

10.5 

9.0 

10.0 

7.5 

12.0 

17.0 

10.0 

8.0 



Ledge gravel. 

Dump. 

Stony gravel. 

Sand and clay. 

Sand and clay. 

Sand and claj'. 

Stony gravel. 

Stony gravel. 

Sand. 

Sand and bog. 

Hard gravel, boulders. 

Hai'd gravel, boulders. 

Gravel. 

Sand . 

Sand and clay. 

Sand. 

Ledge. 

Sand. 

Sand. 

Gravel and ledge. 

Dump. 

Dump. 



224 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Location. 



Limits. 







^ 


-C 




fl 




83 


^ 


o 




C» 










■p 


^ 


*J 4) 


m| 


o 




6t»- 


Cj 


N 


01 


V 


s 


CO 


►^ 


h^ 



3*- o 



Bartlett.... 
Dartmouth 

Donald 

Essex 

George 

Milf ord . . . . 
Putnam. .. 
Putnam 



South of Putnam to Sullivan. 



North of Frederick to south of 

Frederick 

Milford southerly .... 



Amory to Monitor 

Milford northerly 

Rochelle avenue easterly — 
Whipple to east of Thornton 
Whipple to east of Thornton 



Akron, 



316 

202 

488 

577 
400 
ISO 
150 
148 




1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
2 


2,461 




1» 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



225 



IX 1900.— WEST SIDE. 







00 




o 


'6 


« 







« 
o 




o 


O 


o 

CM 

S 


3 


Jo 




Nature of excavation. 


a 




r;, 




p- 


d 


c ■" 


* JJ 




H 


3 


00 




4J 


o 


a 


O r; 




zi 






O 


o 










J • 


in 


o 


H 


o 


^ 


iS 


<! 






11 


2 


SS67.90 


S2.746 


Dec. 12 


Dec. 24 


14.0 


Sand. 


1 


6 
U 


2 
4 


198.20 
1,111.10 


.981 
2.276 


Aug. 20 
May 16 


Aug. 29 
June 9 


6.5 
11.5 






Sand and gravel. 


1 


23 


2 


550.25 


.953 


Sept. 10 


Sept. 26 


9.5 


Sand. 




10 


2 


430.16 


1.075 


June IS 


June 27 


8.5 


Sand and stones. 




5 


2 


233.22 


1.290 


Juno 11 


June 16 


8.0 


Sand and stones. 




6 


1 


247.50 


1.650 


Not. 22 


Dec. 12 


9.0 


Sand. 


1 


77 


2 


244.20 


1.650 


Nov. 22 


Dec. 12 


10.0^ 


Sand. 


3 


17 


S3, 882 .53 


SI. 577 





226 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

BRIDGES AKD CULVEETS. 

The j^ear 1900 ■will in many respects be a memorable one in the 
records of the Street and Park Commission, augmented by the fact 
that the damage occasioned by ■washouts to streets, bridges, and cul- 
verts in all parts of the city during the heavy rainfalls of the spring 
was extremely large and not provided for in the annual appropriations. 
For this reason it may be of interest to the citizens of Manchester to 
glance at the figures relating to this expenditure and learn the pre- 
dicament in ■which the commission may find itself at any time in the 
future: $4,100.12 for new bridges, $5,283.42 for new culverts, and $3,000 
for repairs on highways constitutes the record. 

Early in the spring when the freshets were working extensive dam- 
age in all parts of the city, especially in the outlying districts, two old 
bridges over Little Cohas brook on the Derry road were damaged 
beyond repair and preparations were immediately made to rejilace the 
old bridges with new steel structures. The stone work in the founda- 
tion was built at a normal expense and the cost of this part of the 
work was only $545.12. The bridges themselves cost $1,500, making an 
aggregate cost at these points of $2,045.12. Another bridge over the 
Cohas brook on the Mill road, renilered necessary by the freshet, was 
erected at a cost of $1,710. This bridge was of steel structure %vith a 
60-foot span, and the cost of the bridge itself was $1,150. The stone 
■work required an expenditure of $560. The old ■wooden bridge on the 
GofEstown road was another that was damaged beyond repair and a 
new wooden structure ■was erected in its place as quickly as the limited 
means at hand would permit. This was done at a cost of $345, includ- 
ing the stone foundation. These three bridges, which were not erected 
as permanent improvements, although they will serve as such, were 
undertaken from absolute necessity and required an expenditure of 
$4,100.12. 

The damage to culverts at this time was even more extensive, and 
for culverts alone $5,283.42 ■was expended. In many instances the 
washouts rendered it necessary to close the streets pending repairs, 
but everything was righted with all possible expedition and the city 
is today, as far as culverts are concerned, better off than ever before. 

The culverts in question are: Wilson street, Calef road. Elm street. 
North River road, Spruce and Beacon streets, Cypress street. Mast 
road, Boynton street, and several small culverts in the outlying dis- 
tricts. 

Added to this outlay for culverts and bridges must be considered 
$3,000, expended in repairs to highways occasioned by the disastrous 
storms. 

Another item which proved to be anything but insignificant, and for 
which no especial appropriation was made, was the repairing and 
replanking of the McGregor bridge. This was covered ■with two thick- 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 227 

nesses of three-inch planking, requiring- 196,753 feet of lumber, and 
the total cost was $3,004.2-1, exclusive of labor, and that required in 
addition $1,509.11. 

The commission wishes to call attention at this time to the condi- 
tion of this bridge, as it will continue a constant menace to the city 
treasury until replaced by a new one. The shaky condition of the 
structure and the heavy travel render it necessary to replank the 
floor every year. Four hundred forty-three dollars and seventy-nine 
cents was expended on Amoskeag bridge for repairs, and the cost of 
painting Second-street bridge was $240, making a total exiDenditure for 
bridges of $9,297.20. This aggregates for new bridges, culverts, and 
repairs of two old bridges and highways, in round numbers, $15,000. 

SUMMABY FOE BRIDGES. 

Appropriation $3,000.00 

Expended 9,297.20 

Expenditures in excess of appropriation 6,297.26 

Expense of culverts charged to repairs of highways 5,283.42 



Report of Division No. lO. 

George P. Ames, Agent. 

GENERAL REPAIRS. 

The following streets have been patched with gravel or stone chips: 
Amoskeag, Amory, Beauport, Bartlett hill, Eddy hill, Kelley, Front, 
Mast road, North Main, South. Main, Wayne Street hill, Eailroad. 

Labor $767.14 

Cut trees on Granite street 7.00 

Cleaned crossings 39.75 

Cleaned McGregor street and Eddy hill 47.00 

Cleaned gutters throughout the district 1,145.88 

Cleaned cesspools 604.34 

Total $2,611.11 

FEI^CING. 

Beauport east back street 50 feet 

Boynton street 160 " 

Goff stown road 200 " 

Goffe street 120 " 

Glenwood street 216 " 

Hooksett road ... " 

Mast road 558 " 

Omega street 48 " 

Total 1,352 feet 

Labor, $70.62. 



228 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



BRIDGES. 



Location. 



Cost of 
material. 



Labor. 



Front street, repaired . 
Dunbarton road, new .. 
Second street, painted. 



Totals 




S82.50 
83.50 
192.25 



§358.25 



STK^ETS TUENPIKED WITH EOAD MACHINE. 

Ainory 1 

A 1, 

Alsace 

Beauport 1, 

Bowman 

Boynton 1; 

Conant • • 

Dunbarton road 11, 

Dartmouth 1, 

Douglas 

Eddy road 3, 

Front 

Green 

Hooksett road IG, 

Hancock 1. 

Mast road 

Kelley 4, 

Hackett hill 1, 

Eiddle 

Second , 

South Main 

Schuyler , 

Turner 

Third 

Straw road 

Walker 



,545 feet 

,635 

490 

,610 

602 

,984 

924 

,016 

,680 

560 

336 

686 

210 

,856 

,190 

650 

,816 

,092 

476 

,090 

018 

280 

,240 

106 

264 

862 



Total 73,218 feet 

Total, 73,218 feet, or 13.86 miles. 

In some cases the road machine has been used twice during the 
season on the above streets. Labor, $353.00. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



229 



STREETS TOP-DRESSED. 



Location. 


Number of 
feet. 


Labor. 


Bowman 


150 
250 
350 
160 
8fi6 
450 


SI". 50 
10 50 


Goff e 


Joliette 


06.00 


Laval 


20 00 


Mast road 


131 12 


Milf Old 


293.75 






Totals 


3,226 


g53S.87 





RAYIXG RELAID. 





Location. 


Length In 
feet. 


Labor. 


Amor j^ 


100 


S5.00 


Clinton 


5-00 




240 


14.50 








Totals 


340 


§24.50 









COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Loads of 
stone. 



Labor. 



I 



B 

Conant . . 

Colby.... 

Ferry 

Milf ord . . 
Kelley.. . 
Tilton ... 

Third 

Wlliams , 



Totals 



375 

400 
276 



1,990 
ISO 
950 



650 



4,821 



27 



139 



$57. .50 
72.75 
77.36 



144.74 

43.38 

125.00 



92.75 



EDGEISTONES SET. 



Adams back , 

Beauport 

B and A 

Colby 

Conant and North Main. 

Dubuque east back 

Milf ord and Riddle 

Milf ord and Williams . . . . 



S 
50 
17 
15 
16 
16 
22 
23 



feet 



230 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Ferry 50 feet 

Sullivan 8 

Third 100 

Tilton 14 

Wayne and Beauport 16 

Williams and North Main 17 

Total 372 feet 

Labor, $89.00. 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Cut or 
fill. 



Labor. 



GoflFe 


250 
350 
150 
475 


Cut. 
Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 
Graded. 


$10.50 
400 00 


Joliette 


Putnam 


57 25 


Tilton 


59 00 


Williams 


47.45 








Totals 


1,225 




$574.20 







GEADE FOR CONCRETE. 



Location. 


Cut or 
fill. 


Number of 
feet. 


Labor. 


Conant 


Fill. 


50 
216 


Si). 75 


Colby 


36.50 


Putnam 


6.75 


Tilton 


Cut. 


150 


4.00 






Totals 




416 


$57.00 









NEW CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 




Cost of 
material. 



Labor. 



Adams 

Beauport and Wayne 

Conant 

Coolidge avenue and Amory 

Donald .. 

Dartmouth 

Kelley 

Miltord and Riddle 

Milford and Tilton 

McDutfee 

Second 

Putnam 

Williams 

Totals 



1 


$19.35 


$12.00 


1 


17.00 


11.00 


1 


17.62 


7.00 


1 


19.22 


20.00 


2 


4.'i.75 


21.75 


2 


39.74 


26 00 


1 


36.13 


50.62 


1 


13.02 


10.00 


1 


14.82 


10.00 


1 


19.00 


8.87 


1 


18.82 


16.50 


1 


12.82 


10.00 


1 


19.07 


10 00 


15 


$292.36 


$213.74 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



231 



Location. 



Cost of 
material. 



Labor. 



Beauport 

Baldwin's yarrl. 
C. 



Clinton 

Coolidge avenue 

Caitier east back 

Cartier east back and Sullivan 

Coolidge avenue 

Milford 

Milford and Williams 

McGregor 

North Main 

Parker 

Sullivan 

Turner 

Wayne and Main 

Wayne 

Waj'ne and Cartier 

Walker 

School 

Fourth 



Totals 



$13.26 



4.91 
5.59 



.35 

4.08 

36.04 

2.68 

.35 

7.92 

7.56 

12.79 

.85 

9.92 



$107.85 



$1.75 
2.50 
9.25 

20.00 
7.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.75 

13.50 
3.00 
1.75 

14.50 
5.50 

17.75 
1.50 
7.00 
4.50 
5.50 



4.25 



$125.00 



NEW SEWERS. 



Location. 




Total cost. 



Bartlett, south of Putnam to Sullivan 

Dartmouth, north of to south of Frederick 

Donald, Milford southerly 

Essex, Amorj' to Monitor 

George, Milford northerly 

Milford, Kochelle avenue easterly 

Putnam, Whipple to east of Thornton 

Putnam, Whipple to east of Thornton 

Totals 



316 


«S67.90 


202 


198.20 


48.S 


1,111.10 


.577 


5.50.25 


400 


430.16 


180 


2.33.22 


150 


247.. 50 


148 


244.20 


2,461 


$3,882.53 



REPORTS FROM HIGHWAY DIVISIONS. 

Division No. 4. 

Byeox E. Moore, Agent. 

Xew road built 

Road graveled 

Road tnrnpiked 

Sidewalk built 



250 rods 
300 " 
100 " 
•438 " 



232 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Paved gutter built 386 yds. 

Gutter made but not paved 75 " 

Bushes have been cut and railings repaired throughout the district. 
About 120 feet of culverts have been laid. 

Total amount expended for labor during the year, $1,110.48. 



Division No. 5. 

Mark E. Harvey, Agei^t. 

Number of feet of roads graveled, 2,975. 

Turnpiked by hand, 650 feet. 

Mill road widened 6 feet for 250 feet in length. 

Number of feet of fence built at dangerous places, 195. 

Took up, cleaned, and relaid 2 stone culverts. 

Cut bushes on II/2 miles of road. 

Graded, by cut. Mill road, 250 cubic yards. 

The freshet of last Februar}- carried aw^ay the old wooden bridge 
across Cohas brook on Mill road, which has been replaced by a new 
steel bridge, 60 feet long and 16 feet wide. Four hundred and fifty 
cubic yards of filling have been used at this place, making it passable, 
but more is needed to complete the work. 

Kemoved loose stones from all roads in the division once a month 
during the season. 

Eepaired all water bars and made all other general repairs through- 
out the division where needed. 

All roads broken out after each snowstorm, and kept in good condi- 
tion for travel during the Avinter months. 

Total amount expended for labor during the year, $426.11. 



Division No. 6, 

Samuel H. Webster, Agent. 

One new culvert, 65 feet long, has been built and 7 relaid. Graveled 
224 rods road and turnpiked 26 rods. Small stones removed where 
needed, roads broken out after each snowstorm, and all general repairs 
attended to. 

Total amount expended for labor, $852.58. 



Division No. 7. 
Charles Francis, Agekt. 

STREETS graveled. 

Belmont 475 feet 

Hall road 200 " 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 233 

Mammoth road 600 feet 

Somerville 450 " 

Valley 500 " 

Wilson 675 " 

Total 2,900 feet 

TURTv'PIKED. 

Hall, from Taj-lor 1,S50 feet 

Hall, east 250 " 

Total 2,100 feet 

EDGESTOXES SET. 

Hayward and Wilson 52 feet 

Harvard and Wilson 50 

Prescott and Wilson 19 

Somerville and Wilson 36 

Spruce and Belmont 19 

Total 176 fe-t 

EDGESTONES EESET. 

Massabesic and Belmont 232 feet 

Prescott and Wilson 130 

Total ' 362 feet 

GUTTERS PAVED. 

Belmont 950 feet 

Dearborn 100 " 

Hayward 400 " 

Spruce 100 " 

Somerville 900 " 

Spruce, Massabesic, and Belmont 200 " 

Wilson , 1,350 " 

Total 4,000 feet 



Division No. 8. 

Stearxs Smith, Agent. 

Graveled Hanover street, using 205 loads of gravel. 

Graveled Locke road, using 30 loads gravel, and turnpiked SO rods. 

Made 64 feet culvert on Turnpike, using 40 loads of gravel. 

Laid 56 feet drainpipe on Hanover street. 



234 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Used 97 loads of gravel on Candia road. 

Made 8 rods sidewalk. 

Moved 7 loads stone on Hanover street. 

Used 26 loads of gravel on Proctor road. 

Used 16 loads of gravel on Lake Shore road. 

Used 13 loads of gravel on Bridge street extension. 

Total amount expended for labor during the year, $957.10. 



Division No. 9. 

Lesteb, C. Paige, Ageivt. 

Plowed and turnpiked 60 rods on Mammoth road, and 50 rods on 
Paige road. Graveled 60 rods on Mammoth, 55 rods on Derry road, and 
55 rods on Conant road. Five hundred and sixty-five loads of gravel 
and clay have been used. 

One new culvert, 16x20 inches, was built on Conant road. Two on 
Derry road and one on Webster road were taken up, cleaned, and 
relaid. 

Bushes have been cut, small stones removed from road, fencing and 
railing repaired, and all general repairs attended to. 

Eoads were broken out after snowstorms and kept in a passable 
condition during the winter months. 

The freshet of last spring destroyed the abutments of the two 
bridges over Little Cohas brook on Derry road. These have been en- 
larged and replaced with substantial iron bridges and new abutments 
throughout; one was raised 3 feet and the other 2 feet, thus making 
ample room for any amount of water they may be required to accom- 
modate. About 100 perch of new stone were used in the construction 
of abutments and retaining walls. 

Amount expended for labor during the jear, $1,231.62. 



Parks and Commons. 

John Fullehton, Agent. 

The public squares of the city have received the usual amount of 
careful attention. The same number of flower beds were set out as 
last season and several trees planted to replace those that were found 
dead. Much needed improvements were made in repairing the old 
worn-out walk, and a new concrete walk was made on the west side of 
Merrimack square, 16 feet wide, its entire length, at a cost of $376.99. 

Three new cesspools and 190 feet of Akron sewer pipe were pint in 
to drain the low j)laces. 

Owing to the dry season the flower beds, shrubbery, and young 
trees had to be watered twice each week during the summer season. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 235 

The appropriation of $1,000 for the care of Stark and Derryfield 
parks "was not sufB.cient for the board to make any permanent im- 
provements. About five acres of Stark park were top-dressed with 
manure taken from the city stables, and 5 acres of Derryfield park 
were ]3lowed up and sowed down to grass. About thirty tons of hay 
were cut on the parks, which v^^as used at the city stables. 

An appropriation should be made for a building for storage pur- 
poses on both the parks. 

Weston Observatory was open from April to November. This is quite 
an expense to the city and should be considered by the city councils 
when the appropriations are made. The observatory was repaired at a 
cost exceeding $100. 

The board l^as soug"ht to make the money appropriated for these 
purposes go as far as possible in securing that which would make 
the pleasure groiands attractive and comfortable. We believe that the 
money has been wisely spent, and hope the city council will be liberal 
as well as just in the appropriation for parks and commons for the 
coming- year. 

SUMMARY COMMONS. 

Labor $2,657.54 

Water-works 700.00 

Grass seed, fertilizers, etc 12.05 

Concrete walks 376.99 

Incidentals 117.44 

Shrubs, flowers 294.20 

Lumber 56.55 

Hardware 183.58 

Lights 36.00 

Total $4,434.35 

SL'^XIMABY STARK AND DERRYFIELD PARKS. 

Labor, Derryfield park $477.10 

Labor, Stark park 448.12 

Hardware 10''-u2 

Water-works 36.00 

Shrubs 23.59 

Grass seed "^-^^ 

Insurance ^-^^ 

Incidentals ^-^^ 

Total $1,111.03 

STTMMARY SOUTH END PLAYGROUND. 

Labor $84.00 

Hardware ^-^^ 

Incidentals lO-^O 

Total $'J5.45 



236 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

We desire to thank His Honor Mayor Clarke and each member of the 
city councils, as well as others, for courtesies granted. To all those 
associated with us in carrjdng" on the work in the several departments 
we also extend our thanks for the ability and interest they have shown 
at all times. 

Respectfully submitted. 

HOEACE P. SIMPSON, 
GEORGE H. STEARNS, 
BYRON WORTHEN, 
Board of Street amd Park Commissioners. 
January 1, 1901. 



EEPOET 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF FIRE ENGINEER. 



Chief Engineer's Office, 
Central Station, No. S Vine Street. 

Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1900. 

To His Honor, WnViam C. Clarke, Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Cotawil: 

In coinpliance with the Laws and Ordinances of the citj' of Man- 
chester, I herewith submit my twentj^-first annual report, it being the 
iifty-fourth of this city, for the year ending December 31, 1900. 

The city has been particularly fortunate as to losses by fire during 
the year just closed, and while the total number of alarms has been 
eight (8) more than the previous year, the net losses have been re- 
markably small, and much less than any year since 1883. 

There have been sixty-two (62) bell alarms and one hundred and 
thirty -six (136) still alarms, making a total of one hundred and ninety- 
eight (198). 

Brush and grass fires have been more numerous than ever before 
known, — occurring every month except January and Februarj', and the 
department responded to forty-three (43) of them. 

The value of property endangered, amount of insurance carried on 
same, amount of insurance paid, and net losses at fires where portions 
of the department have responded (not including chimney or brush 
fires) aggregate as follows: 

Value of buildings $193,236.52 

Value of contents 35,777.00 

$229,013.52 

Insurance on buildings $158,910.00 

Insurance on contents 26,500.00 

$185,410.00 

Damage to buildings $7,170.60 

Damage to contents 5,706.58 

$12,877.18 

239 



240 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Insurance paid on buildings $6,368.58 

Insurance paid on contents 4,993.58 

■ • $11,362.16 

Net loss $1,515.02 

THE [MANUAL FOECE 

Kemains unchanged as to numbers, and consists of thirty-three (33) 
permanent and one hundred and twenty-seven (127) call men, making 
one hundred and sixty (160), assigned as follows: 

Per- 
Call. manent. 

1 chief engineer 1 

4 assistant engineers 4 

Engine Company No. 1 11 3 

Engine Company No. 2 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Comj)any No. 3 15 5 

Engine Company No. 4 " 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Com^jany No. 5 16 4 

Engine and Ladder Companj' No. 6 16 4 

Hose Company No. 1 11 1 

Hose Company No. 2 11 1 

Hose Company No. 3 6 2 

Aerial Truck No. 1 12 3 

Chemical No. 1 3 2 

Spare driver 1 

127 33 
THE BUILDINGS 

Have received as much attention- from the committee on lands and 
buildings as the funds at their disposal would permit, and yet was 
insufficient to make such permanent repairs as w-as necessary. The 
entire roof of the Central station ought to be re-graveled and other- 
wise repaired. The much needed box stall at Engine and Ladder No. 
6 has been constructed during the year. There is urgent need of one 
at Engine and Ladder No. 5, and I trust the appropriations the coming 
year will be suflBcient to allow the construction of one at this station. 

THE APPARATXrS 

Of the department consists of 2 first size, 3 second size, and 1 third 
size Amoskeag engines, 4 hose carriages with reels, 5 hose wagons (one 
of which has ladders attached), 4 hook and ladder trucks (1 of which 
is an eighty-five-foot aerial truck carrying other ladders), 2 hose car- 
riages in outlying districts, with independent companies attached, 2 
hose carriages without companies, 1 supply wagon, 7 exercise wagons, 
located as follows: 

2 first size steam fire engines, with three-horse hitch, at Central sta- 
tion, each with one-horse hose wagon. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 241 

1 second size steam fire engine, three-horse hitch, with 1 two-horse 
hose wagon, North Main street. 

1 second size steam fire engine and 1 two-horse hose wagon, at cor- 
ner Lalve avenue and Massabesic street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 thii'd size steam fire eng'ine and one-horse hose carriage, at corner 
of Webster and Chestnut streets. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 second size steam fire engine and one-horse hose carriage on Eim- 
mon street, corner of Amory street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 one-horse hose carriage, corner Maple and East High streets. 

1 two-horse combination hose wagon, S. Elm street. (Bakersville.) 

1 aerial hook and ladder truck, at Central station (three-horse hitch). 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) chemical engine at Central station. 

1 supply wagon at Central fire station. 

1 steam fire engine (reserve) at station of Engine Xo. 2 (of but little 
use for fire purposes). 

1 four-wheeled hand hose carriage (with shafts) at junction of Old 
Falls road and Front street, Amoskeag. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, Devonshire Mills, GofEe's Falls. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage in basement of stable of W. P. Farmer 
at junction of Candia road and Hanover street. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, junction Mammoth road and Massa- 
besic street (Hallsville). 

7 exercise wagoni, 1 at Central fire station, 1 at Engine No. 2, 1 at 
Engine and Ladder No. 3, 1 at Engine and Ladder No. 5, 1 at Engine 
and Ladder No. 6, 1 at Hose No. 2, 1 at Hose No. 3, 1 repair wagon for 
fire alarm telegraph. • 

The extra "three-horse-hitch"' at Lake avenue station will be attached 
to Ladder Truck No. 3 whenever the necessary alterations of the house 
and stable are made. This seems a necessity, as the most of the dis- 
trict covered by this truck is "heavy" traveling, either by sandy streets 
or hilly roads. 

FIEE ALABQI TELEGEAPH. 

The storage battery, which has been in operation about a year and 
a half, has proved all that was jjredicted for it, as to economy and 
reliability, and thus far is a perfect success. 

During severe thunder showers, July 12, fuses were "blown" on five 
circuits; July 25, fuses Avere blown on four circuits, and September 
12, magnet wires were burned off. 

During several storms and heavy winds "crosses" occurred with 
electric light wires, damaging the system considerably in each in- 
stance, and on Seiitember 18 an electric light cross nearly ruined the 
repeater at the Central ofiice, burning out all but two circuits. The 
"burnouts" were soon repaired and the repeater overhauled the fol- 
lowing day by the manufacturers. 
16 



242 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Imiiiediatel3" after the latter accident a heavy-current j)rotector- 
tooard was connected with the system, whicli will prevent the recur- 
xenctf of a similar accident to the apparatus. 

We have changed the location of quite a large amount of wire from 
telephtone poles to electric light poles and vice versa; have run 2^/3 
aniles of No. 9 iron wire and 2 miles of copper, and taken down 2 miles 
•of hard-drawn copper; put up 150 new cross-arms; set 14 new poles. 
We now have about 87 miles of wire. 

THE HORSES. 

It requires 39 horses in permanent use for duty in the department. 
"We have, in addition to the foregoing, 3 spare ones, one of which is 
amfitted for service from what appears to be an incurable lameness, 
and ought soon to be disposed of. 

The grey horses of Hose No. 3 and the blacks of Engine No. 3 have 
oiearly passed their usefulness in this department, and in all proba- 
•bility will have to be disposed of before long, and the latter without 
•doubt the coming year. Most of the others, barring accidents, will be 
able to perform the requirements of their positions. 

CASUALTIES. 

On the 25th of April, Mrs. Herman Koehler, residing at 38 North 
Main street, was fatalh' burned by the explosion of a kerosene lamp, 
•and died the following day. 

July 10, Mrs. Louis Albert, residing at 275 Auburn street, was so 
severely burned while filling a gasoline stove that she died the same 
<iay from result of her injuries. Her daughter, who went to her 
■assistance, was also burned but not fatally. 

January 21, ■while responding to an alarm from box 4, the streets 
being A'Cry icy. Hose Wagon No. 3 was overturned, breaking the driver's 
:seat, several spokes in the rear wheel, and springing the axles, and 
slightly injuring Fireman William P. Hall, who was riding on the 
"vvagon at the time. 

The aerial truck, in responding to the same alarm, slued against 
5in electric light pole, spraining the foot of Capt. Eoscoe Dyer, con- 
fining him to the house four weeks. 

September 30, John Martin of Engine,jind Ladder No. 6, while re- 
sponding to an alarm from box 36, in attempting to get upon the 
liose carriage, slipped and injured his foot slightly. 

Death has entered our ranks and the two following members have 
answered their last roll-call: 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 243 



GEORGE DUNNIXGTOX. 

Member of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3. 

Born at Eipon, Yorkshire, England, April 9, 1849. 

Died at 

Manchester, X. H., August 10, 1900, 

Aged 51 years, 4 months, 1 day. 





JOHN B. FEASER. 


i 


Member 


of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5. 1 


Born at 


Manchester, X. H., February 
Died at 


23, 1873. 


Manchester, X. H., September 17, 


1900. 


xVged 


27 years, 6 months, and 24 d 


ays. 



The department attended the funeral of each. 

THE FIEEaiEN'S EEI^IEF ASSOCIATION" 

Has been liberallj' remembered bj^ its friends, as will be seen by the 
following statement of the money in the treasury, which is deposited 
in the People's Savings Bank: 

Beceipts. 

Balance on hand annual meeting, February 13, 1900 $4,208.88 

Dividend on deposits 138.01 

Received from new members 2.00 

Donations: 

Mrs. Aretas Blood $1,000.00 

Mrs. Mary J, Chase's estate (by will) 300.00 

Honorarj^ Association, Steamer X"o. 1, by G. 

B. Chandler, treasurer 73.04 

Dodge & Dodge 15.00 

Jeremiah Hodge .-. 10.00 

George B, and Henry Chandler 10.00 

James W. Hill Company 10.00 

Fred C. Darrah 5.00 

Money order (from unknown friend) 1.00 

1,424.04 

$5,772.93 



244 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Expenditures. 

Paid Joseph E. Merrill, secretary, salary $25.00 

for postal cards and printing- 2.10 

benefit John B. Fraser (cold contracted last 

year) 91.00 

benefit Eoscoe D3-er, injury 26.65 

benefit John Martin, injury 3.00 

funeral benefit George Dunnington 50.00 

funeral benefit John B. Fraser 50.00 

funeral benefit Fred A. Lang 50.00 

$297.75 

Balance in treasury $5,475. IS 

I Avould recommend the early purchase of 2,000 feet of Knit Doiible 
Jacket hose. I would also recommend the changing of Hose Carriage 
Xo. 2 from a one-horse to a two-horse carriage, as its runs to the east 
and northeastern sections of the city could be made more expeditiously, 
thereby affording better protection for that territory. 

I would renew my recommendation, made several times before, for 
a chemical engine on the West Side. This part of the city far exceeds 
in population that of several of the cities of our state, and the urgent 
necessity of one in this locality is plainly evident, and I trust the 
incoming city councils will give the matter their early consideration. 

I would recommend that the fire alarm telegraph wires be placed 
underground in such sections of the citj' as conduits have been placed 
by the Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Company-, where they 
have in such eases left one for this purpose. 

This company have, or soon will have, most of their overhead wires 
in the thickly settled part of the city taken down; and the many 
"crosses" we have had with heavj^ current wires and the damage that 
our fire alarm system has suffered the past year from these "crosses" 
during heavy storms is a strong argument in favor of such a move- 
ment. The insulation on overhead wires carrying heavj' currents is 
a kind of "protection that doesn't protect," as the insulation soon 
becomes worthless, and they are a constant danger to life and prop- 
erty. Action should be taken to eventually cause the placing of these 
heavy current wires underground. 

COXCLUSION. 

In closing this report I wish to extend my thanks to His Honor 
Mayor Clarke and members of the city councils for the interest they 
have manifested in the w^elfare of the department; to the assistant 
engineers and officers and members of the several companies, who by 
their promptness in the discharge of their several duties have added 
much to the efficiency of the department; and to the police department 



REPORT OF TUE FIRE ENGINEER. 246 

for their co-operation, as well as their vig-ilance regarding the wires 
and boxes of the fire alarm telegraph. 

r.espectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 
Chief Engineer Fire Department. 



Number and Location of Fire Alarm Boxes and Keys. 

A KEY IS ATTACHED TO EACH BOX, and Can be had hy breaking the 
glass. 

Xo. 3. Blood's lower shop. Keys at offices of gas-works, county jail, 
Manchester Coal & Ice Companj^'s sheds, and Charles H. Hutchinson's 
shop. 

No. 4. Corner Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel Oxford, L. B. 
Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, street railway stables, and office 
of Blodgett & Young's block. 

No. 5. Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at Tebbetts & 
Co.'s and Hanscom's drugstores, Manchester Hoiise, and J. W. Hill 
Company's store. 

No. 6. City Hall. Kej's at Holland's and Thurston's drugstores, J. 
A. Eiddle's office, and residence of J. L. Brock, 21 Amoskeag- Corpo- 
ration. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of Manchester and Chestnut streets. 
Keys at chief of police's office and with all police officers. 

No. 8. Corner of Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Dante Smith's and 
Gadbois's drugstores, and Partridge Brothers' grain store. 

No. 9. Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Kejs at residences of 
Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, Dr. E. Fritz, and station of 
Engine No. 5. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Kej's at residences of 
John Mooar, George Emerson, Walter A. Green, and O. D. Knox. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at residences 
of Welcome Jencks and Mrs. Lewis Simons, No. 1 Senter's block, and 
Hartshorn's grocery store. 

No. 14. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Kej's at residences 
of Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. George W. Eiddle, D. J. Adams, A. H. Olzen- 
dam, and Mrs. Thomas Morgan. 

No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys at residences 
of Henry W. Shannon and J. Fred Chalker. 

No. 16. Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at residences of 
Et. Eev. Bishoii Bradley and E. E. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Ke3's at residences 
of Miss Mary A. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys at residences 
of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and William Perkins's estate. 



246 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

No. 21. Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys at A. D^ 
Sniitli's drugstore, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. L. Wallcer's office, 
and residence of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys at residences of 
the late Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 house, corner of Massa- 
besic street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. M. Goodwin and 
station of Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

No. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at residences 
of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, the late Horace Gordon, and 
James K. Straw. 

No. 26. Corner of Bridge and Kussell streets. Keys at McCrillis's 
carriage shop. 

No. 27. Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys at residences 
of H. M. Tarbell, E. S. Fletcher, William Carr, and Mrs. George Hi 
Hubbard. 

No. 28. Corner of Merrimack and Beacon streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of A. L. Garmon land H. B. Fairbanks. 

No. 31. Corner of Canal and Hollis streets. Blood's shop. Kej's at 
office, Amory Mills, Langdon Mills watchrooms. 

No. 32. Langdon Mills Block, corner of Canal and Brook streets. 
Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Company's mill, Langdon watchroom. 
and Electric Light Station. 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Kej's at watehroom and pumping station. 

No. 35. Stark Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 36. Amorj' Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 39. Hillsborough county jail. Keys at office. 

No. 41. Amoskeag IMills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 42. Manchester Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 43. Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 45. The S. C. Forsaith Company's shops. Keys at freight depot 
and S. C. Forsaith Company's office. 

No. 51. Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys at stores of 
F. Eiedel and Henry Weber. 

No. 52. Barr's brick block, West Manchester. Keys at Fradd & 
Co.'s and A. N. Clapp's stores, Merrimack House, and Engine No. 2 
house. 

No. 53. The Wallace steam mill. Keys at mill office, I. R. Dewey's 
tenement block, and Eanno's harness store. 

No. 54. Corner of A and South Main streets. Keys at residences of 
Lord sisters, Neil Fullerton, and George W. Davis's store. 

No. 56. Baldwin's bobbin shop. Keys at Baldwin's office and resi- 
dences of J. C. Smith, E. P. Littlefield, and with watchman at works. 

No. 57. Corner Mast road and D street. Keys at residences of Allen 
E. Eaton and C. H. George, and F. W. Towle's store. 

No. 61. Corner of Eiver road and Hancock street, Bakersville. Keys- 



1 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 24T 

at True W. Jones Company's breweiy, store of John A. Kane, and 
Hose 3. 

No. 62. Gerrish Wool & Leather Company's, Eiver road. Keys at 
tannery, the Edwin Kennedj^ house, and Hose 3. 

No. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Kej'S at residences of T_ 
Collins, Daniel Sheehau, Thomas J. Smith, Simon McCarthj', and J. J- 
Twomey. 

]So. 72. Corner of -Lake avenue and Lincoln street. Keys at resi- 
dences of the late Austin Jenkins, James Brig-gs, and Clarence D. 
Palmer. 

Xo. 73. Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys at residences of 
Rev. J. A. Chevalier and Timothy Carr. 

No. SI. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at all the engine 
rooms. 

No. 82. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Church streets. Kej's a^ 
Lowell-street stable and Eames Bros.' drugstore. 

No. 91. Corner Webster and Beech streets. Keys at Children'^. 
Home and R. N. Foster's residence. 

No. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. Keys at residences; 
of W. A. Clarkson, M. D. Johnson, and Charles F. Chase. 

No. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Kej's at residences of 
Mrs. William B. Abbott, W. N. Johnson, and E. M. Toplife. 

No. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at residences of 
Mrs. A. P. Olzendam, G. A. Olzendam, W. S. Shannon, and John J. 
Bennett. 

No. 115. Corner of Blodget and Ash streets. Keys at residences of 
James A. Rogers and Cj^ren Bixby. 

No. 212. Shoeshop, Hallsville. Keys at the ofBce of the shoe factory 
and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn, Mrs. ]Milton A^ 
Abbott, M. V. B. Garland, and Walter Cody's block. 

No. 213. Sash and blind factory. South Beech street, junction of 
Portsmouth Railroad. Keys at offices of Manchester Sash & Blinct. 
Company. 

No. 214. Elliott silk mill, corner of Wilson and Valley streets. Keys; 
at office and watchroom of mill. 

No. 215. Hoyt & Co.'s shoeshop, corner of Lincoln and Silver streets^ 
Keys at offices of shoeshop and Kimball Carriage Company and board- 
ing-house opposite. 

No. 216. Jewett and Somerville streets. Keys at residences of G. H.. 
Hill, 140 Jewett street, and W. B. Brown, 128 Jewett street. 

No. 217. Corner Candia road and Massabesic street. Keys at resi- 
dences of L. M. Streeter, William Gadbois, and Charles P. Still. 

No. 241. Lake avenue hill. Key at residence of Charles Davis. 

No. 261. Pearl-street grammar school. Keys at schoolroom ancF 
residences of C. E. Rose, S. W. Bascom, and Charles W. Cheney, Jr. 

No. 312. Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor streets. Kejs at 



248' ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

residences of James Spence (309 Main street), Thomas Bolton, and gate 
No. 11 mill. 

No. 313. Corner Amory and Main streets. Kej's at residences of 
Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Potvin & Co.'s drugstore, Miville 
& Co.'s drugstore, gate of No. 11 mill, and station of Engine and Lad- 
der No. 6. 

No. 314. P. C. Cheney Company's paper mill. Keys at office and 
Eiverside Hose house. 

No. 315. Old Brick store, 'Skeag. Keys at Eiverside Hose house and 
D. Jameson's residence. 

No. 321. Corner Beauport and Wayne streets. Kej^s at Holy Angels 
Convent, the Brothers' School, and residences of E. H. Doherty and 
Eev. Fatlier Hevey. 

No. 323. Corner of Putnam and Bartlett streets. Keys at Albert 
Oliver's store, P. J. Archambeault's bakery, and residence of Officer 
Lewis Clement. 

No. 324. x\mory and Laval streets. Key at residence of Desire Mar- 
tin, No. 494 Amorj^ street. 

No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at residences 
of Amelia Davis, William A. Tufts, and James Kearns. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Keys at residences 
of J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Elizabeth Ward. 
Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regvilar police. 
The true time will be given at precisely 12.30 P. M. from Charles A. 
Trefethen's jewelry store, and will be denoted by one stroke of the fire 
bells. 



Telephone Calls. 

Chemical Engine, Central Station C4— 3 

Engine No. 2 64—2 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 64 — 5 

Engine and Ladder No. 5 64 — 6 

Engine and Ladder No". 6 64 — 7 

Hose No. 2 116—4 

Hose No. 3 102—4 

Chief Engineer Lane's office 64 — 3 

Chief Engineer Lane's hotise 64 — 4 

Assistant Engineer Merrill's office 212 — 3 

Two long rings twice calls all stations on line. 



Instructions to Keyholders and Citizens. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be immediately com- 
municated to the nearest alarm box, the key of which is in a circular 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 249 

box attached to the right side of the fire-alarm, box. Keys are also 
in the hands of all regular police, and generally of persons at the cor- 
ner or nearest house. 

2. Kej'holders and others, iipon the discovery of a fire, or positive 
information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook once as 
far as it will go (without jerking), and then let go. Shut the dooi-, but 
do not try to remove the key, as it is locked in by a trap lock, and can 
only be removed with a release key, which is carried by each of the 
engineers, and they will, as soon as convenient, release and return it. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to remain by the 
box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull again; if you 
still hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box and give an alarm 
from that. 4 

4. Xever signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never touch the box 
except to give an alarm of fire. Give an alarm for no cause other than 
actual fire. Don't give Aj^ alarm for a chimney fire, 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless called for by 
the chief engineer. If yoti change your residence or place of business, 
where the keys are kept, return the keys to the same office. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to inform them- 
selves of the location of alarm boxes near their property; also all 
places Avhere the keys are kept. Be sure the alarm is promptly and 
properly given. 

7. AlariQS will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the city, and 
the number of the box will be given thus: Box 6, six blows, 2l^ seconds 
apart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, pause of 6I/4 seconds, 
one blow, same j)ause, and two blows, 2 — 1 — 2, repeated three times. 

S. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the bells at 
any time; and in case of testing the boxes, each test will be preceded 
by one stroke of the bells. 



250 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE 



SHOWIXG THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON 
FIRST, SECOND, AND THIRD ALARMS. 





First Alakm. 


Second Alakm. 


Third Alarm. 








So 






"2 ^ 

2 9J 




























00 


Engine. 




k'^ 


a 




^'B 


Engine. 




^■5. 








* 


to 




<^ 




tn 


OS- 


K 







OhJ 


c 





o>-? 







Oh^ 


« 






S 


W 


W 


rt 




a 


B 1 


3 

4 


1st R. 3 CI 
1st R. 2-3 


1 3 


1-3 


2d R. 2 






5-6 


•> 


5-6 

6 


1-3 


1-3 


2d R. 


2 


5 


5-6 




5 


1st R. 2-3 




1-3 


2d R. 


2-3 


5 


5-6 




6 


6 


1st «& 2cl R. " 


1-2 


1-3 


2-3 


3 


5 


5-6 




6 


7 


1st R. 3 




1-3 


2dR. 


2 


5 


2-5-6 


3 


6 


8 


1st & 2d R. 5 


1-2 


1-5 


3 




3 


2-6 


3 


6 


9 


1st R, 5 " 




5 


2d R. 


2 


1 


2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


12 

13 


5 " 




5 


1st R. 


2 


1 


2d R. 2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


lstR.5 " 


1-2 


5 


2dR. 




1 


2d R. 2-3-6 


8 


3-6 


14 


l9t R. 5 " 


1-2 


5 


2dR. 3 




1 


2-6 


3 


3-6. 


15 


1st & 2(1 R. 5 


1-2 


1-5 


3 




3 


2-6 


3 


6 


16 


IstR. 5 


1-2 


1-5 


2d R. 3 




3 


2-6 


3 


6 


17 


l3t R. 3 


1-2 


3 


2d R. 5 




1 


2-6 


3 


3-6 


18 


1st R. 3 


1-2 


3 


2d R. 




1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


oi 


1st R. 3 " 




1-3 


2d R, 2 


'i 


5 


5-6 


3 


6 


23 


Ist R. 3 


1-2 


3 


2d R. 




1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


04 


IstR. 3 " 


1-2 


3 


2dR. 




1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


25 

26 

27 

28 

31 

32 


1st R 3 " 


1-2 


3 


2d R. 




1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


IstR. 3 


1-2 


5 


2d R. 5 




3 


2-6 


3 


1-6 


IstR. 3 " 




3 


2dR. 


i 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


3 




3 


1st R. 


1 




2d R. 2-5-6 


3 


1-5-6. 


IstR 6 " 




1-5 


2d R. 5 


2 


6 


2-3 


3 


3 


1st R. 5 




1-5 


2d R. 6 


2 


6 


2-3 


3 


3 




lst&2clR. 5-6 
1st & 2(1 R. 5-6 
1st & 2(1 R. 5-6 




1 5 


2 3 




6-3 




3 




34 


- " 


1-5 


2 3 





6-3 




3 




35 




1-5 


2-3 


2 


3-6 




3 




36 

39 






1st R. 3 


1-3 


1-3 


2d R. 2 


2 


5 


5-6 




6 


1st & 2(1 R. 2-3 
1st & 2d R. 2-3 
IstR. 2-3 




1-3 


5-6 


'' s 


.5-6 








41 




1 3 


5 6 


■^ s 


5-6 








42 

4?} 




3 


2dR. 6 


2-3 


1 


5 




P-5 


45 

51 

52 

53 

B4 

5B 

57 

61 


1st & 2d R. 2-3 " 




1-3 


5 


2-3 


5 


6 




6 


2-6 
2 6 




6 
6 


IstR. 3 
1st R. 3 


1 

3 


3 
3 


2d R. 5 
2d R. 5 


6^2 
2 


1-5 
1-5 


2 6 " 




6 


1st R. 3 




3 


2d R. 5 


2-3 


1-5 


2-6 " 




6 


IstR. 


1 




2d R. 3-5 


2-3 


l-S-.'i 


2 6 •' 




6 


IstR. 3 


3 


3 


2d R. 5 




1-5 


2-3 " 




6 


6 


3 


3 


1st & 2d R.3-5 


2-3 


1-3-5 


IstR. 3 


1-3 


3 


2d R. 2 






5-6 


2 


1-5-6 


IstR. 3 

IstR. 3 


1-3 


3 


2d R 2 « 






5 6 


V, 


1 5-6 


62 

71 

72 

73 

81 


3 


2d R. 


2-3 


1 


2-5-6 




5-6 


1st R. 3 




3 


2d R. 


2 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


IstR. 3 




3 


2d R. 


2 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


1st & 2d R. 




1 


5 


2 


3-5 


2-6 


3 


6 




1st & 2d R. 5 

Ist R. 5 " 


1-2 


1-5 


3-16 




3 6 


2 






82 

,91 


5 


2dR. 


2 


1 


2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


IstR. 5 


2 


5 


2(1 R. 


1 


1 


2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


I1Q 


IstR. 5 


2 


5 


2dR. 


1 


3 


2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


ll4 


IstR. 5 


1-2 


5 


2d R. 3 




3 


2-6 


3 


1-6 


Il5 


1st R. 5 ,. 


2 


5 


2dR. 


i 


1 


2-3-6 


3 


3-6 


2i2 ...• 


1st R. 3 li 


2 


3 


2dR. 


1-3 


1 


2-5-6 




5-6 


213 


IstR. 3 ii 


2-3 


3 


2d R. 


1 


1 


2-5-6 


i 


6-5 


2i4 


1st R. 3 „ 


2-3 


3 


2dR. 




1 


2-5-6 


1 


5-6 


215 


1st R. 3 .. 


2-3 


3 


2d R. 


i 


1 


2-5-6 




5-6 


216 


Ist R. 3 


2 


3 


2dR. 


1 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


217 

241 • . . . 


1st R. 3 .1 


2 


3 


2dR. 


1 


1 


2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


3-6 


2 


3 


IstR. 


1 


1 


2d R. 2-5-6 


3 


5-6 


261 


1st R. 3 „ 


1-2 


3 


2dR. 5 




5 


2-6 




3-6 


312 


Ist R. 2-6 ., 


1 


6 


2d R. 5 


2 


1 


3 


3 


3-5 


313 

314 

315 

321...... 

323 

324 

,111 

513 


1st R. 2-6 .. 


1 


6 


2d R. 5 


2 


1 


3 


3 


3-5 


5-6 .. 


1 


5 


1st R. 2 




6 


2dR. 3 


2-3 


1-3 


6-S .1 




5 


IstR. 


i 


6 


2d R. 2-3 


2-3 


1-3 


2-6 >. 


1 


6 


1st R. 6 




1 


2dR. 3 


2-3 


3-5 


2-6 „ 


1 


6 


IstR. 5 




6 


2d R. 3 


2-3 


1-3-5 


2-6 <■ 


1 


6 


IstR 5 




5 


2d R. 3 


3-2 


1-3 


2 6 11 




6 


IstR. 


i 


3 


2d R. 3-5 


2-3 


1-5 


2-6 




6 


IstR. 


1 




2d R. 3 -5 


2-3 


l-3-l> 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 251 

Rules and Regulations in regard to responding to Fires 
and Alarms, etc. 

The following- rules have been adopted by the board of engineers^ 
and the fire department will strictly' comp)ly until otherwise ordered^ 
and will attend alarms of fire as per "official euntn^ing card." 

EU?vXI>-G RULES. 

"Whenever an alarm is sounded, the members of all companies not 
called to that box will report to their respective company quarters, 
and tJiere remain nntil dismisscil by the signal on the bells or by an 
engineer in charge. 

In case companies on their first run have responded to an alarm, 
companies on their second run to the box from which the alarm has 
been sounded will answer all first-run boxes of the absent companies; 
and in case eng-ines are out that would respond to another box, then 
third alarm companies will respond. In case of an alarm from a box 
that does not call for a third alarm, companies on their second run 
will then answer to all other boxes. 

Whenever two trucks answer to first alarm the other truck will 
answer to all oither boxes. 

At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, hose carriage, 
or truck that leaves the house first will have the right to lead to the 
fire. "Whenever a horse lags or gives out, drivers should then give 
others the right of Avay, so as not to delay the rest of the apparatus. 

XO RU>TiriNG BY WILL BE ALLOWED, EXCEPT LN CASE OF ACCIDEjS'T, LNDEIt 
PENALTY OF DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER, FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

The drivers shall not permit persons not connected with the depart- 
ment to ride upon their apparatus, and in muddy weather or heavy 
wheeling they shall not permit any one to ride upon their apparatus 
when returning from fires. 

Drivers will take the following routes in responding to alarms on 
the West Side: For crossing Amoskeag bridge, take Elm street to 
Salmon, down Salmon street and across the bridge. For crossing Mc- 
Gregor bridge take Elm street to Bridge street, down Bridge street and 
across the bridge. For crossing Granite bridge take Elm street to 
Granite, down Granite and across the bridge. 

Use gongs freely to clear the streets and when nearing crossings. 

Engineers of steamers will not run over eighty (80) pounds of water 
pressure, except when orders are received from a member of the board 
of engineers or of the officer in command of the company. 

Captains, or commanding officers, upon return from alarms will 
report to headquarters immediately, personally or by telephone, after 
apparatus is "made up" and ready for duty. 



252 ANNUAL OFflCIAL REPORTS. 



THIRD ALAItM. 

On third alabm all apparatus will respond. 

In the event of a fire of such magnitude that second and third 
alarms are needed, a general alarm will be given by striking ten blows, 
in which case all companies will respond. 

SPECIAL CALLS ON FIRE ALARM. 

When more apparatus is wanted, without giving a second and thixd 
-alarm the following special calls will be given: 

2—1 for Engine 1. 1—1—7 for Aerial Truck. 
2—2 for Engine 2. 3—3 for Truck 3. 
2 — 3 for Engine 3. 3 — 5 for Truck 5. 
2 — 4 for Engine 4. 3 — 6 for Truck 6. 
2 — 5 for Engine 5. 4 — 1 for Hose 1. 
2—6 for Engine 6. 4—2 for Hose 2. 
4—3 for Hose 3. 
Companies answering "special calls" will wait thirty seconds before 
leaving quarters, to prevent inistakes. 

OUT OF TOWN CALL. 

For a fire out of the citj^ 2 — 2 — 2, in which case all companies will 
assemble at their respective quarters and await orders. 

ALL OUT SIGNAL. 

Two blows on the bells, which dismisses all members at companj' 
quarters. 

This signal will be given after companies working at a fire have re- 
turned to quarters, "made up," and are ready to respond to another 
alarm. 

TEST SIGNAL. 

One blow at 12.30 noon. 

SCHOOL SIGNALS. 

1 — 1, with fifteen seconds between blows, closes primary and middle 
schools. 

2 — 2, with fifteen seconds between the 2's. closes all the schools. 
Time for giving same, 7.30 A. M., 11.30 A. M., or 1.15 p. M. 

MILITARY CALL. 

12 blows twice. 



Rules for Exercising Horses. 

It shall be the duty of the drivers of engines, hose carriages, hose 
wagons, hook-and-ladder trucks, and all other apparatus connected 
with this department, to exercise the horses every day, weather per- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 253'- 

initting, except Sunday, with the exception of engines having "first'* 
and "second runs," and in such cases must exercise on days of "second 
run," the same to be done within the following limits: 

CENTRAI. STATION. 

North to Pearl street. East to Union street. 

South to Merrimack street West to Chestnut street. 

NORTH MAIN-STREET STATION. 

North to Adams street. East to Main street. 

South to Gi'auite street. West to Dubuque street. 

LAKE XVENUE STATION. 

Noi'th to Manchester street. East to Belmont street. 

South to Summer street. West to Maple street. 

MAPLE -STREET STATION. 

North to Myrtle street. East to Linden street. 

South to Hanover street. West to Union street. 

WEBSTER-STREET STATION. 

Noi'th to Clarke street. East to Union street. 

South to Peunacook street. West to Elm street. 

RIMMON-STREET STATION (MCGREGORYILLE) . 

North to Kelly street. East to Beauport street. 

South to Wayne street. West to Eimmon street. 

BAKERSVILLE STATION. 

North to bridge, over Boston & Maine Eailroad. South to Baker street.^ 
East to Calef road. West to Brown aveuue. 

Drivers- must confine themselves to the above, and in no case take 
their horses beyond the prescribed limits, except for shoeing and in 
case of fire, without permission from the chief or an assistant engineer. 

In exercising, care must be taken to avoid colliding with other teams. 
In approaching corners, crossings, street car tracks, and in going down 
grades the speed of the horses must be checked. 

In case of an alarm use gong freely while returning to quarters. 

Any driver violating these rules will be liable to suspension or dis- 
charge. 



Stations and Sleeping Rooms. 

All stations of this department will be open from 7 a. ji. until 9 p. m., 
and the members at the several stations will receive visitors and citi- 
zens courteously, answer all questions in a gentlemanly manner, and 
give any proper information. 



254 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No political or religious discussions will be allowed in any of the 
houses of this department or by the officers or men when on duty. 

No permanent member of the department shall attend a caucus or 
political convention as a delegate, distribute tickets at any election, 
or take any part whatever in political matters other than to exercise 
his right of suffrage. 

Gambling of any kind shall not be done or permitted in or about any 
of the houses or premises occupied bj^ the dejjartment. 

Stations to be closed at 10 o'clock p. m. 

All games must cease at 10> o'clock p. m., and the stations be closed at 
that hour, to permit the permanent men, and those detailed to sleep 
in the station, to retire undisturbed. • 

None of the stations will be open after the above hour (except in 
■case of an alarm of tire) without permission of the chief or a member 
of the board of engineers, although stations may be kept open on 
■Saturday evenings until 11 o'clock. 

No spirituous or malt liquors shall be allowed in or about any of the 
fire stations, and any member of the fire department seen intoxicated 
■at any fire or alarm of fire, or who shall be known to frequent places 
where liquors are sold, during the progress of a fire, or whenever in 
unifom, shall be subject to reprimand, or dismissal, as the board of 
engineers may determine. 

Any permanent member visiting any liquor saloon in uniform, ex- 
cept in the performance of his duty as a member of the fire depart- 
ment, or who is intoxicated or visits places where intoxicating liquors 
are sold, while on duty, shall be suspended or discharged, as the board 
of engineers may determine. 

Any violation of these rules will subject the offender to reprimand 
or dismissal, and commanding officers of companies having knowledge 
of the violation of the foregoing rules will suspend the offender, and 
report the same to the chief or board of engineers. 

The permanent men shall exercise a carefvil supervision over the 
■sleeping apartments, see that the rooms are put in order and the beds 
made as early as 11 o'clock a. m., and that the bedding is changed at 
suitable intervals. The occupants of each bed will be held responsible 
for the cleanliness of the same, and held strictly accountable for any 
damage to either bed or bed clothing through carelessness. After 10 
p. M. occupants shall refrain from loud talking or in any manner dis- 
turbing the rest of any who have retired. 

Any member of the department not complying with the above rules 
shall be liable to suspension or exiKilsion from the department. 



Absent from City or Station. 

No permanent member shall leave his station to visit any section of 
the city without permission of the chief or an assistant engineer, or 
leave the city, or be granted leave of absence, without notifying the 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



255 



chief engineer and procuring- a substitute to his aecej)tance, and the 
substitute shall be on dutj^ before the applicant leaves his post, except 
on his regular "day off." 

Any call memher expecting to be absent from the city sliall notify the cap- 
tain of his company, and before leaving the city shall procure a substitute 
satisfactory to said captain. 

DAYS OFF. 



£ 1 
^c Name. 

^ 1 


Company. 


>.2 


Name. 


Company. 


1 


Hall 


Engine 1. 
1. 
1. 
Hose 1. 
Engine 4. 
" 4. 
" 4. 
Truck 1. 
" 1. 
" 1. 
Chemical 1. 
1. 
Engine & Ladder 3. 
3. 
" " 3. 
" " 3. 


17 
IS 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 


Porter 

Seaward 

Morse 

Smith 

Cann 


Engine & Ladder. 
Hose 2. 

Engine & Ladder 5. 
" " 5. 
" " 5. 


2 
3 
4 


Harvey 

Barker 

Parsons* 

Gould 

Cann 


fi 


Hubbell 

Morrill 


" " 5. 


7 


Rogers 


Engine 2. 


9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 


Denyou 

Pherson 

Porter 

liichardson. . 

Walker 

Piper 

Wheeler 

McLeod 


Whitcorab... 

Edgar 

Foster 

Rowe 

Crosby* 

Jenne* 

Sloan* 


" 2. 
Engine & Ladder 6. 
6. 
6. 
" " fj. 
Hose 3. 
" 3. 



*In February, Crosby will take the 16th and Jenne the 26th; in July, Parsons will 
take the 14th; and in February, April, June, September, and November, Sloan will 
take the 27th. 



The hour of leaving will be 7 o'clock A. ir., and members will not 
leave their station until the arrival of the spare driver. They must 
report promptly at 7 o'clock the following morning for duty. 

Those whose breakfast hour is 6 o'clock will remain at station until 
7 o'clock on the date of their "day off." 

Should a fire be in progress at the hour of changes, men will remain 
on duty until the "all out" is given, except permission is obtained of 
the chief, or engineer in charge of fire, to retire. 

Should a "general" or third alarm be rung in while members are in 
town, they will be expected to report for duty. 



256 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

On the "day off" of the engineer of a steamer, the assistant engineer 
shall, on his arrival at the fire, act as engineer. 

The time of change from first and second run will be made at 7 o'cloelc 

A. il. 

All hose companies are instructed not to enter any building with a 
line of hose unless the stop nozzle is closed, except m cases where they 
can see the fire, and when their streams will reach it without damage 
to other property. 

Steamer companies are not to enter a building with a line of hose 
without orders, unless fire can be seen, due care being exercised as ta 
whether their services are needed. 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 
Engine No. 1 . 

LOCATED ON VINE STEEET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer $4,000.00 

1 one-horse wagon 400.00 

3 gray horses for steamer 600.00 

1 gi'ay horse for hose wagon 200.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

1 pair double exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 single exercise harness 40.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 900.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Tools, furniture, and fixtures , 200.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 125.00 

Total amount $6,795.00 



Engine No. 2. 

LOCATED AT KORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQL'OG. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $4,000.00 

1 hose wagon 600.00 

1 exercise wagon, jjoles, shafts, and three-horse hitch 250.00 

3 horses for steamer 600.00 

1 pair horses for hose wagon 400.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $40, 1 at $20 100.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

1 double sle4. 60.00 

3,200 feet fabric hose 1,440.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 94.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 257 

Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc $4G6.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 125.00 

Total amount $8,385.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

LOCATED ON LAKE, AA'EXfE, CORA'ER. 5IASSABESIC STEEET. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

1 two-horse hose wagon 400.00 

1 two-horse truck and equipments 1,700.00 

1 three-horse hitch attachment (extra) 200.00 

1 pair black horses for steamer 250.00 

1 pair bay horses for hose wagon 400.00 

1 pair black horses for truck 300.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $50, 1 at $40 140.00 

6 swinging harnesses 300.00 

3,400 feet fabric hose 1,530.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Beds, bedding-, carpets, hall furniture, etc 575.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

1 exercise Avagon 250.00 

Total amount $9,775.00 



Engine No. 4. 

LOCATED OX VIXE STEEET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer $4,200.00 

1 hose wagon 400.00 

3 horses for steamer. . , 600.00 

1 horse for hose wagon 150.00 

3 exercise harnesses 60.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

2,350 feet fabric hose 1,047.50 

Hall furniture, beds, bedding, etc 275.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 75.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 125.00 

Total amount $7,132.50 

17 



258 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Engine and Ladder No. 5. 

LOCATED ON WEBSTEE STEEET, COEXEEl CHESTKUT. 

1 third-size Amoskeag steamer $3,600.00 

1 two-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage 600.00 

1 steel frarde ladder truck 1,650.00 

1 pair bay horses for steamer 400.00 

1 pair baj^ horses for truck 400.00 

1 bay horse for hose carriage 200.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

1 double sled 50.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2 pairs exercise harnesses 100.00 

2,150 feet fabric hose 967.50 

Bedding, furniture, tools, etc 247.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 90.00 

Firemen's suits, badges, etc 150.00 

Total amount $9,029.50 



Engine and Ladder No. 6. 

LOCATED AT C0B:XEB AMOBY A^•D EIMMOX STEEETS. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

1 hook-and-ladder truck (with Bangor extension) 1,680.00 

1 one-horse carriage 600.00 

2 gray horses for steamer 300. OU 

2 bay horses for truck 267.00 

1 gray horse for hose carriage 150.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 900.00 

Hall furniture, cai'pets, beds, bedding, etc 375.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 85.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

1 exercise Avagon , 290.50 

Total amount $8,547.50 



Hose No. 1 . 

LOCATED 0>- VIXE STEEET. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage $600.00 

2 horses 300.00 

2 single harnesses 70.00 

1 single sled -10.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 259 

1 hose sled $20.00 

2,550 feet fabric hose 1,147.50 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding, etc 60.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badg'es 100.00 

Total amount $2,587.50 



Hose No. 2. 

LOCATED ON JIAPLE STEEET, COK]NTEB EAST HIGH. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage $600.00 

1 bay horse 150.00 

1 exercise harness 30.00 

1 swinging harness 50.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 900.00 

150 feet leather hose 60.00 

Furniture and fixtures 100.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 100.00 

Total amount $2,315.00 



Hose No. 3. 

LOCATED ON SOUTH ELII STEEET, BAKEESVILLE. 

1 combination hose wagon (with ladders) $1,000.00 

1 pair graj- horses 200.00 

1 pair swinging- harnesses 100.00 

1 pair exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 exercise wagon 50.00' 

2,200 feet fabric hose 990.00 

Furniture, fixtures, bedding, etc 85.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 65.00 

Firemen's suits and badges. 80.00 

Total amount $2,620.00 



Hook and Ladder No. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STEEET. 

1 aerial hook-and-ladder truck $4,200.00 

3 horses 600.00 

3 swinging harnesses 50.00 



260 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

3 swinging harnesses $150.00 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 360.00 

7 rubber blanket covers 168.00 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding, and furniture 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 60.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

Total amount $6,013.00 



Chemical Engine No. 1. 

LOCATEiD ON VINE STREET. 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) engine $2,250.00 

1 pair bay horses ' 500.00 

1 pair exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 j)air swinging harnesses 100.00 

Furniture and fixtures 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 35.00 

Total amount $3,060.00 



Supply Wagon. 

1 supply wagon, with boxes and engineers' lanterns $150.00 



Spare Hose. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, A^INE STREET. 

200 feet leather hose $50.00 

1,500 feet fabric hose (for re-lining) 375.00 



Total amount $425.00 



Exercise Wagon. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole, shafts, three-horse 
hitch, and coal boxes $200.00 



E, W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine. 

STORED AT SHEDS OF ENGINE. NO. 2. 

Old U tank Amoskeag engine (may be worth for exchange) $250.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 261 

Engineers' Department. 

5 engineers' white rubber coats $37.50 

5 engineers' lanterns 20.00 

Furniture and fixtures 150.00 

Total amount $207.50 



Riverside Hose Co. No. 5. 

LOCATED AT CORA'ER OF OLD TALLS EOAD AMD FRONT STREET. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage $400.00 

800 feet leather hose 240.00 

800 feet fabric hose 3G0.00 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc ,. 40.00 

Furniture and fixtures 10.00 

Total amount $1,050.00 



Hallsville (Independent) Hose, 

LOCATED AT CORNEB, OF MAMMOTH EOAD AND JIASSABESIC STREET. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage $30.00 

500 feet leather hose 150.00 

Nozzle, wrenches, etc 15.00 

Total amount $195.00 



Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage $30.00 

400 feet fabric hose 160.00 

2 hose-pipes 10.00 

Total amount $200.00 



Pond Road Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED IN- BASEMENT OF W. P. FARMER'S BARN. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage $30.00 

500 feet leather hose 150.00 

Total amount $180.00 



262 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

Sleeping Hall. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 
6 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc $260.00 

Extra Horses. 

1 steel gray horse $150.00 

1 bay horse 100.00 

1 gray horse : 200.00 

Total amount $150.00 



Fire Alarm Telegraph. 

At cost, including additions $21,750.00 

Eemodeling in 1885 6,000.00 

"Individual tapper" system 4,000.00 

Storage battery (in 1898) 1,850.00 

Switch protector board 175.00 

Wire, brackets, and tools 250.00 

Eepair wagon 150.00 

Total amount $34,175.00 



Recapitulation. 

Engine Company No. 1 $6,795.00 

Engine Company No. 2 8,385.00 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 9,775.00 

Engine Company No. 4 7,132.50 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 9,029.50 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 8,547.50 

The "Harrington" Steamer (old) 250.00 

Hose Company No. 1 2,587.50 

Hose Company No. 2 2,315.00 

Hose Company No. 3 6,220.00 

Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 (aerial truck) 6,013.00 

Chemical Engine Company No. 1 3,060.00 

Supply wagon (Central station) 150.00 

Exercise wagon (Central station) 200.00 

Spare hose 425.00 

Engineer's department 207.50 

Riverside Hose No. 5 1,050.00 

Hallsville Hose 195.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 263 

Goffe's Falls Hose $200.00 

Pond Road Hose 180.00 

Sleeping Hall 260.00 

Fire alarm teleg-raph 34,175.00 

Extra horses 450.00 

Total $107,602.50 



List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 1900, 
With Losses and Insurance. 

Still. Monday, January 1, S.45 p. m. Chimney fire in eight-tene- 
ment block, 149 Central street, owned by John Piper. Members of 
Chemical responded. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Monday, January 1, 9.45 p. m. Two-story wooden block, 21 
Amherst street, owned by Benjamin E. Thompson of Deerfield and 
occupied by Friberg & Johnson as boot and shoe store. Fire orig- 
inated in back store (used for cobbling) from barrel of waste too near 
the stove. Chemical engine responded. Used one charge of Pony. 
Value of buildings, $5,000; damage, $30; insurance, $3,000; insurance 
paid, $30. Value of contents, $700; damage, $39; insurance, $600; in- 
surance paid, $39. 

Still. Wednesday-, January 3, 1.34 A. M. Chimney fire in four-story 
tenement block, 196 Merrimack street, owned by Perry A. Eaton and 
occupied by Joseph. Hook and others. Chemical engine responded. 
Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, January 3, 6.45 p. m. Chimney fire in two-and- 
half-story dwelling, 401 Hanover street, owned and occupied by Mrs. 
Horace Ggrdon. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 3 responded. 
Used two charges of Pon^-. No damage. 

Box 21. Fi'idaj', January 5, 4.10 A. ii. Two-and-half story wooden 
block, 346 Pine street, owned by Division 1, Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians, and occupied by Joseph Bryant and others. Cause, defective 
•jhimney. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of buildings, $2,000; damage, $50;, 
insurance, $2,000; insurance paid, $50. No damage to contents. 

Still. Tuesday, January 9, 8.55 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 60 Pearl street, owned by Charles C. Hayes, in tenement occu- 
pied by E. M. Dion. Members of Central station responded. Used two 
charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 7. Tuesday, January 16, 4.26 p. ii. Four-story block, 121 Han- 
over street, owned by G. F. Bosher. The fire originated in the pool 
room of Morgan J. Cronin, from the careless use of gasoline. The 
smoke completely filled the three stories above, used as lodging house. 
Box pulled by Bernard Wheeler. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $12,000; damage. 



264 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

$390.50; insurance, $12,000; insurance paid, $390.50. Value of Cronin's 
contents, $575; damage, $400; insurance, $300; insurance paid, $275. 
Value of Mrs. Miller's contents, $1,500; damage, $50; insurance, $1,200; 
insurance paid, $50. 

Still. Wednesday, January 17, 6.30 p. M. Steam issuing from a new 
block, corner of Spruce and Massabesic streets, owned by Henry Mara, 
caused some frightened person to call Engine and Ladder Company No. 
3. Cause, drying plastering. 

Still. Wednesday, January 17, S.33 p. ii. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, corner of Lake avenue and Pine street. Members from Central 
station responded. Xo damage. 

Box 17. Sunday, January 21, 1.41 a. m. Two-and-half-storj' dwelling- 
house, 304 Hanover street, owned and occupied bj' Jeremiah B. Jones. 
Fire originated in carriage shed from some unknown cause. Box 
pulled by Officer Sweeney. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $4,000; damage, $624; in- 
surance, $3,000; insurance x^aid, $624. Value of contents, $1,000; dam- 
age, $100; no insurance. 

Box 4. Sunday, January 21, 2.12 P. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 59 Cedar street, owned bj^ Jeremiah Murphj^ and occupied bj' 
Henry Helaire, E. Lapansee, and Dennis Cobray. Box pulled bj^ Officer 
Sullivan. Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Trucks 1, 3. Xo damage. 

Still. Friday, January 26, 6.10 p. m. Chimney fire at 152 Beaujjort 
street, in house owned and occupied by Entoine Sevigny. Members of 
Engine Companies 2 and 6 responded. L^sed three charges of Pony. 
Xo damage. 

Still. Friday, January 26, 10.24 p. ir. Chimnej' fire at 64 Concord 
street, in bloek owned by S. W. Parsons heirs and occupied by Joseph 
Rock. Members of Chemical Company responded. L'sed two charges 
of Pony, Xo damage. 

Still. Saturday, January 27, 10.18 a', m. Chimney fire at 7 Dean 
street, in brick block owned b^^ Bean and Blood heirs and occupied by 
Homer E. Slaek. Members of Chemical Company resiDonded. Used 
one charge of Pony. Xo damage. 

Box 51. Wednesday, January 31, 3.03 a. ji. Small switch house on 
Xorth Weare branch of Boston & ]Maine Bailroad at west end of rail- 
road bridge, at foot of Turner, street. West Manchester. Cause, over- 
heated stove. Box pulled by Officer Poehlman. Companies responding; 
Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Truck 6. Value of building, $106.02; damage, 
$106.02; insurance, $100; insurance paid, $100. Value of contents, $10; 
damage, $10; no insurance. 

Still. Monday, February 5, 12.57 p. si. Hot stovepipe in house, 414 
Belmont street, owned by Eliphalet Richards and occui)ied by JNIrs. 
Wm. Reed. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 3 responded. 
Xo damage. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 265 

Still. Tuesday, February 6, 11.20 a. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
block, 425 Chestnut street, owned bj^ J. D. Patterson heirs and occu- 
pied by Thomas Beauregard. Members of Chemical Company- re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Still. Tuesdaj', February 6, 8.30 p. m. Chimney fire in eight-tene- 
ment block, 148 Chestnut street, owned bj- Mitchell heirs. Chemical 
engine responded. No damage. 

Box 71. Thursday, February 15, S.05 A. Ji. Two-and-half-story 
dwelling, 115 Cedar street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Catherine 
Giblin. Clothes too near the stove caught fire. Damage slight. Box 
I^ulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical. 
Hose 1, Truck 3. 

Still. Friday, February 16, 7.55 p. m. Two-story block, 353 East 
Spruce street, owned by C. T. Whedon and occupied by E. M. Holmes 
as grocery store. Cause, matches. Members of Engine and Ladder 
3 responded. Used two charges of Pony. 

Box 25. Saturday, February 17, 10.50 a. m. Cottage house, 339 Con- 
cord street, owned and occupied by A. Frank Whittemore. A kettle of 
fat took fire, burning INIrs. Whittemore slightly. No damage to house. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 

Box 213. Sunda3% February IS, 6.58 p. jr. Unoccupied cottage house 
on Cillej^ road, owned by Thomas Chilcott. Cause, incendiary. Fire 
"svas started simultaneouslj'' in house and barn. The barn Avas a small 
structure and was nearly consumed before arrival of department, 
which was considerablj^ delaj'ed on account of heavy snowstorm and 
blizzard. There was but little furniture in the house at tim<e of fire. 
Box pulled b3^ citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. Value of buildings, $1,700; damage, $900; insur- 
ance, $1,000; insurance paid, .$900. Value of contents, $500; damage, 
$50; insurance, $300; insurance paid, $50. 

Still. Jtlondaj-, February 19, 6.30 p. M. Chimnej^ fire in two-and- • 
half-story tenement house, 67 Manchester street, owned by P. Collins. 
No damage. ^Members of Chemical Company responded. 

Still. Thursday, February 22, 6.20 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 14 Cedar street, owned by heirs of Wm. Blodgett. No damage. 
Used one charge of Pony. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Thursday, February 22, 6.50 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 22 Wayne street, owned by Kate Collity and occupied by several 
families. Members of Engine and Ladder Companj^ 6 responded. Used 
three charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 4. Sunday, February 25, 7.20 p. m. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block, 24 Granite street. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Monday, February 26, 8.55 p. m. Chimney fire in four-story 
wooden block, 196 Merrimack street, owned by Perry A. Eaton and 



266 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

occupied by Joe Bell and others. Chemical engine responded. Used 
one charge of Pony. !No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, February 27, 5.10 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 340 Merrimack street, owned by H. H. Dustin and occupied by 
Michael KelleJ^ Members of Engine and Ladder Company 3 resj)onded. 
Used two charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, Februar}- 2S, 1.40 p. M. Chimnej' fire in tenement 
house, 30 Second street (Amoskeag), owned by Amoskeag Manufac- 
turing Company and occupied by P. Sullivan. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company 5 responded with hose carriage. Used two charges 
of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, March 1, 3.10 A. ii. Three-story brick shoe-shop at 
corner Massabesic and Cypress streets, owned by East Manchester Shoe- 
Shop Company and occupied by Kimball Brothers. Poorly adjusted 
thermostat caused false alarm. Members of Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany 3 responded with hose carriage. 

Box 4. Thursday, March 1, 4.25 p. M. One-and-half-story wooden 
building, 43 Lake aveniie, owned by Patrick Harrington and occupied 
by T. Bouchard & Son as g-rocery store. Fire was caused bj^ breaking 
of a kerosene lamp in cellar near large kerosene oil tank. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Eng-ines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $3,500; damage, $60; insurance, $2,000; 
insurance paid, $60. No damage to contents. 

Still. Tuesday, March 6, 11.45 a. m. Three-story brick block, 732 
Elm street, owned by Oliver B. Green and occupied by K. B. Eeynolds 
as hotel. Slig-ht fire under boiler, caused by poor construction of 
boiler setting. Damage slight. Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 23. Thursday, March 8, 11.37 A. M. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 389 L'nion street, owned by Patrick Bean and occupied by 
several families. The fire originated from some unknown cause in 
tenement of Jeremiah Halej', where the fire was mostly confined. Box 
pulled by Thomas Bolton. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $9,000; damage, $500; in- 
surance, $8,000; insurance paid, $249.50. No damage to contents. 

Box 4. Friday, March 9, 5.35 P. M. One-story "wood office," 42 Cedar 
street, owned and occupied by Alexander Ferland. Cause, defective 
stovepipe. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $75; dam- 
age, $15; no insurance. 

Still. Sunday, March 11, 7.15 p. h. Chimney fire in four-tenement 
block, 126 Central street, owned by the estate of John Sweeney and 
occupied by Alfred Belmore and others. Chemical engine responded. 
Used one cnarge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Monday, March 12, 6.30 A. m. Chimney fire in four-tenement 
block, 22 Church street, owned by Charles C. Hayes. Chemical engine 
responded. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



267 



Still. Mondaj^ March 19, 5.20 p. ii. Fotir-story brick block, 294 
Pine street, owned bj' Mrs. E. W. Bartlett and occupied by Warren 
Brig'gs as a boarding-house. Clothes caught fire in a clothes shute 
from some unexplained cause, doing slight damage. Chemical engine 
responded. Extinguished by occupants. 

Still. Tuesdaj-, March 20, 6.20 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 58 Auburn street, owned by Mary Henderson and occupied by 
John Malcomb. Chemical engine responded. No damage. 

Box SI. Wednesday, March 21, 2.40 A. M. Three-and-half-story brick 
block, 990 Elm street, owned by Eowell, Kimball & Hobbs. Fire 
originated in the store of the New England Butter Company on the 
first floor, Avhere it was wholly confined, doing but little damage to 
building. Box pulled by Officer Wheeden. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. Value of building, $18,000; 
damage, $138; insurance, $11,000; insurance paid, $138. Value of con- 
tents, $3,404.89; damage, $548.77; insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, 
$548.77. 

Box 25. Saturday, March 24, 12.52 p. M. Cottage house, 399 Merri- 
mack street, owned and occupied by F. W. Blood. Slig-ht fire near hot- 
air radiator. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $2,500; damage, 
$55; insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $55. Value of contents, $1,000; 
damage, $12.75; insurance, $200; insurance paid, $12.75. 

Still. Sunday, March 25, 3.55 p. m. Grass fire on Calef road on land 
belonging to P. Harrington. Hose 3 responded with carriage. Used 
two charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, March 29, 7.10 A. ii. Sparks from chimney of 
Derryfield laundry, 1205 Elm street, ignited shingles on the roof. 
Chemical engine responded. Used one charge of Pony. No damag-e. 

Box 217. Thursday, March 29, 4.39 P. M. Grass fire on Hall road, 
East Manchester, Needless alarm pulled by Eugene H. Harris. Com- 
panies resiDonding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. No 
damage. 

Box 8. Thursday-, March 29, 8.57 p. ii. Four-story brick block, 1458 
Elm street, owned by John B. Smith, and occupied by George L. 
Lemaitre. Cause, dropping lighted match in window drapery. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $60,000; damage, $275; in- 
surance, $60,000; insurance paid, $275. Value of contents, $1,500; dam- 
age, $300; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, $282. 

Still. Sunday, April 1, 5.07 P. M. Grass fire on the John B. Clarke 
farm on Calef road. Set by boys. No damage. Hose Companj^ 3 
responded with carriage. Used two charges of Pony. 

Still. Thursday, April 5, 1.15 p. m. Grass fire in Amoskeag Com- 
pany's ravine, rear of E. M. Slayton's, corner Elm and Pennacook 
streets. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 5 responded with 
hose carriage. No damage. Used one charge of Pony. 



268 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Thursday, April 5, 9.15 p. ii. A smoking furnace in house 
of Mrs. M. S. J. Lane, 81 Sagamore street, filled house with smoke. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company 5 responded. Xo damage. 

Still. Friday, April 6, 11.55 a. m. Brush fire on land of Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company, corner of Kelly and Laval streets. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Compan3' 6 responded with hose wagon. Xo 
damage. 

Still. Saturday, April 7, 9.24 a. m. Chimney fire in rear of 149 
Manchester street. Chemical engine responded. Xo damage. Used 
one charge of Pony. 

Still. Saturday, April 7, 11.30 A. M. Grass fire on Beech street near 
Baker street. Hose Company 3 responded. L^sed one charge of Pony. 
Xo damage. 

Still. Saturday, April 7, 12.15 p. m. Orass fire, corner Shasta and 
Beech streets. Hose Company 3 responded. Xo damage. 

Box 312. Monday, April 9, 8.19 A. u. A wooden ash box in shed 
connected with tenement house, 146 Cartier street, took fire from hot 
ashes. Houses owned by H. E. Armstrong- and occupied by Phelix 
Proulx and E. Yadnias! Xo damage. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 2, 4, 6, Chemieal, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Monday-, April 9, 11.30 a. u. Brush fire, corner Shasta and 
Beech streets. Hose Company 3 responded. Xo damage. 

Box 212. Monday, April 9, 9.57 p. m. Three-story wooden factory on 
J. Hall road and corner Portsmouth Railroad, owned and occupied by 
the Manchester Garment Company. Cause unknown. Box pulled by 
citizen. Comimnies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 
3. Value of building, $10,000; damage, $515; insurance, $5,000; insur- 
ance paid, $515. Value of contents, $11,581; damage, $2,471; insurance, 
$11,000; insurance paid, $2,471. 

Still. Tuesday-, April 10, 1.30 p. ii. Grass fire on land of 'A. M. 
Eastman estate on Xorth Elver road. Set by sparks from Boston & 
Maine Eailroad locomotive. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 
5 resi)onded. Used two charges of Pon^'. 

Still. Tuesday, April 10, 9.15 p. M. Chimney fire in Cochrane's 
block, 286 Pine street. Chemical engine responded. L^sed one charge 
of Pon3^ Xo damage. 

Still. Sunday, April 15, 3.45 p. m. Grass fire in Stark park. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company 5 responded with hose carriage. 
Xo damage. 

Still. Sunday, April 15, 8.40 p. m. Five-story brick block, 1222 Elm 
street, owned by heirs of Frederick Smj'th and occupied by Leighton & 
Trudel as plumbers and bicycle dealers. Fire came from unprotected 
funnel hole in chimney. Chemical engine responded. Value of build- 
ing, $20,000; damage, $10.35; insurance, $13,000; insurance paid, $10.35. 
Value of contents, $2,600; damage, $20; insurance, $2,000; insurance 
paid, $20. 



i 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ' ENGINEER. 269 

Still. Monday, April 16, 2.35 P. M. Brush fire at corner Eimmon 
and Putnam streets, on land owned by Anioskeag ^Manufacturing Coni- 
jiany. Members of Engine and Ladder Comi>any 6 responded with 
hose carriage. ISTo damage. 

Still. Thursday, April 19, 3 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
S. H. Mead on Candia road. Members of Engine and Ladder 3 re- 
sponded with hose carriage. No damage. 

Box 321. Friday, April 20, 1.56 A. si. Cottage house, 524 Montgomery 
street, owned and occupied by Xavier Roberge. Caused by breaking a 
kerosene lamp. Box pulled by Alfred Lorandeau. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, $900; 
damage, $200; insurance, .$600; insui'ance paid, $195. Value of contents, 
$800; damage, $100; insurance, $400; insurance paid, $65. 

Still. Friday, April 20, 7.35 A. M. Chimney fire in brick cottage, 
143 Pearl street, owned and occupied bj' F. L. Gray. Chemical engine 
i-esponded. Used one charge of Pony. Xo damage. 

Still. Fridaj-, April 20, 9.15 a. m. Ash box in rear of Mercantile 
block, corner Concord and Elm streets. Members of Chemical Com- 
pany responded. Xo damage. 

Still. Tuesday, April 24, 11.45 A. M. Millinery store of Mary V. 
McGrail, 1003 Elm street. Some light fabrics caught fire from gas 
stove. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Tuesday-, April 24, 11.56 a. m. Small shed in rear of 169 Green 
street. Slight fire. No damage. Chemical engine responded. 

Box 15. Wednesday, April 25, 11.23 a. ii. Three-stoi\v wooden tene- 
ment block, 543 Chestnut street, owned bj^ Nason Hall and occupied 
by Mrs. G. E. Buck. Boy playing with matches set fire to skirt in 
room on third floor, doing slight damage. Box pulled by H. H. Scott. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5, 
Still. Wednesdaj-, April 25, 12.43 p. m. Electric light poles in yards 
of Manchester Electric Company, corner Pennacook and Canal streets. 
Cause, hot ashes near rubbish pile. Damage slight. 

Box 114. Wednesday, April 25, 8.54 p. m. Tenement block, 255 Pearl 
street, owned by C. D. Carpenter and tenement occupied by Thomas 
Fitzgerald. Four little children left alone in house; one tipj)ed over 
, kerosene lamp, setting fire to bedding. Neighbors threw the bedding' 
out of the window^ and extinguished the fire before arrival of depart- 
ment. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 4, 5, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 5. 

Still. Wednesday, April 25, 9.55 p. M. Explosion of kerosene lamp 
at 38 North Main street so seriously burned Mrs. Herman Koehler that 
she died the next daj'. I\o damage to building. Members of Engine 2 
responded. 

Still. Thursday, April 26, 1.20 p. si. Grass fire on land of Alonzo 
Elliott on North Eiver road. Caught from Boston & Maine Railroad 
locomotive. The fire spread rapidly to grove of pines not far from 



270 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

house, also to land of Mrs. A. M. Eastman. Members of Engine and 
Ladder 5 responded. Used two charges of Pony. 

Still. Thursday, April 26, 4.20 P. M. Chimney fire at 155 Pearl 
street. Members of Chemical Company resj)onded. No damage. 

Box 212. Friday, April 27, 5.27 P. M. Two-and-half-story dwelling, 
263 Massabesic street, owned by George W. Dearborn and occupied by 
Wilson F. Jordan and George Locke and daughter. Cause unknown. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 2, Truck €. Value of building, $3,700; damage, $28; insurance, 
$2,800; insurance paid, $28. Value of Locke's contents, $1,000; damage, 
$35; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $35. No damage to Jordan's con- 
tents. 

Still. Sunday, April 29, 11.30 A. M. Chimney fire in rear of tene- 
ment, 134 Manchester street, owned and occupied by Mrs. John Sul- 
livan. Members of Chemical responded. Used one charge of Pony. 
No damage. 

2 — 2 — 2. Monday, April 30, 1.45 P. M. Brush fire on Dunbarton road. 
Sent detail from different companies. On duty three and one fourth 
hours. 

Box 57. Monday, April 30, 4.25 P. M. Brush fire on Goifstown road 
near house of George E. Jackson. No damage. On duty three hours 
and fifty-five minutes. Box jDulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engine 2, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Tuesday, May 1, 11.25 a. m. Brush fire on Whittemore fiats 
in McGregorville. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded with 
hose carriage. 

2 — 2 — 2. Wednesday, May 2, 10.30 A ii. Brush fire on Goffstown road 
in rear of Frank D. Hanscom's residence. Sent delegation of men from 
different companies. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, May 2, 2.47 p. m. Brush fire on south side of 
Eock Eimmon. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. No 
damage. 

Still. Wednesday, May 2, 4.15 p.-m. Pile of old sleepers on Boston 
& Maine Eailroad at corner of Byron street, owned by Josselyn & Eeed, 
caught from sparks from locomotive. Hose Company 3 responded. 
On duty four hours. Ninety-seven cords consumed and re^Dlaced by 
railroad company. Loss, $145.50. No insurance. 

Still. Thursday, May 3, 12.30 A. m. Ee-kindling of sleepers at Jos- 
selyn & Eeed's. Hose Company 3 responded. 

Stiil. Monday, May 7, 12.35 p. m. Chimney fire at 371 Chestnut 
street. Chemical engine responded. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, May 9, 12.30 a. ar. Smoke in the hallways and 
rooms of south end of Merchant's Exchange, 839 Elm street, owned by 
Harrington heirs and others. Chemical engine responded. No damage. 

Still. Friday-, May 11, 1.55 P. M. Brush fire on North Eiver road 
on land owned and occupied by D. S. Kimball. Mem'bers of Engine and 
Ladder Companj^ 5 responded with hose carriage. No damage. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 271 

Still, Saturday, May 12, 2.45 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
154 Chestnut street, owned by John K. Butler and occupied hy Mary 
Shea. Chemical engine responded. No damage. 

2—2—2. Saturday, May 12, 3.28 p. ir. Brush fire in Derryfield park 
and on Bald Hill road. Detail of men went in exercise and supply 
wagon. 

Still. Sunday, May 13, 12.40 p. m. Forest fires of preceding day 
continuing on Bald Hill road to the Londonderry turnpike endangered 
several houses. Delegation from several companies responded. On 
duty seven hours. 

Still. Sunday, Maj- 13, 1.10 p. m. Brush fire on Xorth street exten- 
sion on land of Amoskeag ^Manufacturing Company. Set b3' boj^s. 
!Members of Engine and Ladder 5 responded. L'sed one charge of Pony, 
No damage. 

Still. Sunday, May 13, 4.35 p. m. Chimney fire in cottage house, 109 
Lowell street, owned by H. Bond and occupied by Mrs. S. E. Hallowell. 
Chemical engine responded. No damage. 

Still. Monday, May 14, 10.20 A. M. Chimney fire at 605 Merrimack 
street in house owned and occuiaied hy Henry Leonard. Assistant 
Engineer Merrill responded. L^sed one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, May IS, 10.10 p. ii. Chimney fire in tenement block, 
109 East Spruce street, owned by the heirs of E. W. Sargent. Members 
of Chemical Company responded. No damage. 

Still. Thursday-, May 31, 3 p. M. Large brush fire on south side of 
Bald Hill road extending to Bridg'e-street extension, covering a large 
area. Sent delegation of men in supply wagon. On duty five hours. 

Box 21. Thursday, May 31, 8.11 p. M. A needless alarm was pulled 
for a small chimney fire in rear of 115 Central street. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 
1, 3. No damage. 

2 — 2 — 2. Friday, June 1, 11.25 A. M. Ee-kindling of brush fire on 
Bridge-street extension, threatening houses in that vicinity. Detail of 
men sent over in supply wagon. 

Still. Friday, June 1, 2.30 p. m. Two-and-half-story tenement 
house. G2 Concord street, owned by Canadian L. & B. Company and 
occupied by E. Gagnon. Chimney fire. Members of Chemical Company 
responded. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box 53. Sunday, June 3, 11.27 p. ii. A pile of white birch plank at 
Baldwin's bobbin shop on Mast road, owned by U. S. Bobbin and 
Shuttle Company. Box pulled by Officer Poehlman. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of that pile 
of lumber, $260; damage, $65; insurance (blanket) on all lumber in 
yard, $2,470; insurance paid, $65. 

Box 73. Monday, June 4, 6.35 A. M. Two-and-half story house, 305 
Auburn .street, owned by Wm. Little heirs and occupied by J. A. Per- 
reault. Old rags caught fire from some unknown cause. No damage. 



272 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box pulled by citizen. Companies resiJonding: Engines 1. 3, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Truck 3. 

Box 21. Saturday, June 9, 11.27 A. m. The funnel fell out of chimney 
at cottage house, 187 Central street, tilling the ujjper part of the house 
with smoke, but causing- no damage. Building owned by Mrs. Connors, 
and occupied by Mrs. Bridget Silverthorne. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding-: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Sunday, June 10, 9.45 A. Ji. Boxes of rubbish in rear of 
Smith & Dow's block, Elm street. Chemical engine responded. No 
damage. 

Still. Monday-, June 11, 1.05 p. m. Brush fire in Amoskeag Com- 
pany's woods, corner Webster street and Hooksett road. Members of 
Engine and Ladder Company 5 resjjonded. Used two charges of Pony. 

Still. Monday, June 11, 1.35 p. ii. Two-and-half-storj^ tenement 
house, 127 Amherst street, owned by !Mrs. Sanborn and occupied by 
several persons. Cause unknown. Chemical engine responded. Dam- 
age slight. Used two charges of Pony. 

2 — 2 — 2. Monday, June 11, .3.30 p. M. Brush fire in Amoskeag Com- 
pany's woods on Hooksett road. Sent detail of men and Engine and 
Ladder Company 5. Laid 1,100 feet of hose and used six charges of 
Pony. Xo damage. 

Box 71. Sunday, June 24, 11 A. ii. Chimney fire in two-story dwell- 
ing at 160 Auburn street, occupied bj' Anna Flaherty. No damage. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Truck 3. 

Still. Thursday, June 28, 3.55 a. m. A defective electric light in 
store of Phenix market, 71 Hanover street, caused slight damage. 
Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Thursday-, June 28, 3 p. M. Chimney fire in dwelling- house, 
302 Cartier street, owned and occupied by Norbert Descotier. Members 
of Engine and Ladder Company 6 resj^onded. LTsed three charges of 
Pony. Xo damage. 

Still. Saturday, June 30, 6.40 p. M. Slight fire on jjlanking of Mc- 
Gregor bridge. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. Xo 
damage. 

Box 57. Sunday, July 1, 1.58 P. Ji. Brush and grass fire on Mast 
road near Shirley Hill road. Xo damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Comijanies responding: Engine 2, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Sunday, July 1, 4 p. M. Chimney fire in six-tenement brick 
block, 1287 Elm street, owned by Mrs. Aretas Blood and occupied by 
several families. Xo damage. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Sunday, July 1, 9.05 p. ii. Chimney fire in eight-tenement 
block, 412 Beech street, owned by C. D. Welch and occupied by James 
Burns and others. Used one charge of Pony. X'o damage. Chemical 
engine responded. 

Still. Tuesday, July 3, 4.25 p. m. Hay in barn cellar in rear of 
house on Kiver road north, owned by Alonzo Elliott and occupied by 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 273 

Mrs. "William Mack. Probable cause, fire-crackers. Used one charge 
of Pony. Xo damage. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 5 
responded with ho'se carriage. 

Box 6. Tuesday, July 3, 6.33 P. H. Four-story brick block, 895 Elm 
street, owned by Wm. H. Plumer and occupied by Plumer & Holton, 
Dr. Frederick Perkins, Nate Kellogg Company, and others. The fire 
originated in a closet at the head of the first flight of stairs, from 
spontaneous combustion. Box pulled bj- Harry Blanchard, conductor 
on the street railway. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $15,000; damage, $136; 
insurance, $15,000; insurance paid, $136. Value of Nate Kellogg Com- 
pany's contents, $3,500; damage, $25; insurance, $2,000; insurance 
paid, $25. 

Box 4. Wednesday, July 4, 11.15 A. 3i. Small bunch of rags in rear 
of 44-46 Lake avenue, in tenement occupied bj^ Charles Elfand, caught 
fire from some unexplained cause and were burned up before arrival 
of department. Needless alarm. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. No 
damage. 

Still. Wednesday, July 4, 2.21 p. si. Slight fire in planking on 
west end of McGregor Bridge. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 
responded with hose carriage. Cause, fire-crackers. No damage. 

Still. Wednesdaj-, July 4, 3.05 p. M. Slig-ht fire in another place 
about midway of McGregor bridge, caused by fire-crackers. Members 
of Engine and Ladder 6 responded with hose carriage. Used one 
charge of Pony and laid 800 feet of hose. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, July 5, 2.10 a. m. Three-story brick block, 79 Man- 
chester street, owned by Daley estate and occupied by Francois God- 
bout as saloon. Either a cigar stub or fire-cracker thrown through 
grating of cellar window ignited window frame, damaging it about 
$4; fully insured. Chemical engine responded. Used one charge of 
Pony. 

Still. Thursday, July 5, 1.40 p. M. Slight fire in planking on Mc- 
Gregor bridge. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 6 responded. 
Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, July 5, 7.55 p. m. Brush fire at corner Taj^lor 
street and Cilley road, on land of Baker & Tucker. Members of En- 
gine and Ladder 3 responded with hose carriage. Laid 700 feet of 
hose. No damage. 

Box 8. Tuesday, July 10, 8.50 A. Ji. One-story wooden lumber shed 
and stable in "Winter Place," between Hollis and Dean streets, owned 
and occupied by Wm. F. Hubbard. Cause unknown. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 3, 5. Damage to building, $5; no insurance. No damage to 
contents. 

Box 73. Tuesday, July 10, 12.50 p. 51. Two-and-half-storj^ dwelling, 
275 Auburn street, occupied by Louis Albert, whasa wife was filling a 
IS 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

gasoline stove which ignited, burning her severely and her daughter 
slightly. No damage to house or contents. Box jDulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. . 

Box 26. Thursday-, July 12, 1.25 P. M. Three-story wooden tenement 
block, 323 East High street, owned by Mrs. Joseph Hodgekinson and 
occupied by her and other families. The fire originated in a clothes 
closet of second story in tenement oecupied by Eugene Dow. Cause 
unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 
4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 5. Value of building, $3,700; damage, 
$276; insurance, $3,000; Insurance paid, $276. Value of contents, $700; 
damage, $23; insurance, $500; insurance iDaid, $23. 

Still. Saturday, July 14, 4.20 p. M. Ice house on North Union street 
hill, owned by Horace Willey. Members of Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany 5 responded with hose carriage. Value of building, $200; damage, 
$150; no insurance. Value of contents, $250; damage, $200; no insur- 
ance. 

Still. Tuesday, July 17, 10.05 a. u. Brush and grass fire on land 
owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company in McGregorville, south 
of Eock Eimmon. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 responded. No 
damage. 

Still. Wednesday, July IS, 5.55 p. M. Grass fire on land of Alonzo 
Elliott on North Eiver road. Set by Boston & Maine locomotive. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company 5 responded. 

Still. Thursday, July 19, 2.25 a. m. Liquor saloon, 87 Manchester 
street, in four-story brick block owned by John Collins and occupied 
by A. L. Duhaime. Cause, cigar stub on floor. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. 

Still. Thursday, July 19, 11.57 a. m. Brush fire at Glenwood on 
Bedford road, owned by A. J. Lane and others. Set by children. Mem- 
bers of Engine Company 2 responded with hose carriage. Used four 
charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, July 19, 3.50 p. m. Sparks from chimney of house, 
115 West street, owned by P. Harrington and occupied bj^ several fam- 
ilies, ignited shingles. Members of Engine Company 2 responded. No 
damage. 

Box 4. Monday, July 23, 7.45 p. 3i. Cottage house, 17 Cedar street, 
occupied by Thomas Eichards. Lace curtain set hy children playing 
with matches. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 28. Tuesday, July 24, 11.48 p. M. Small cottage house, 415 
Laurel street, owned and occupied by Herman A. Wheeler. Cause, 
breaking a lighted kerosene lamp on the stairs. Box pulled by Mr. 
Wheeler. Companies responding: Engine 3, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. 
Value of building, $1,400; damage, $1,056.36; insurance, $1,100; insur- 
ance paid, $1,056.36. Value of contents, $500; damage, $400; insurance, 
$300; insurance paid, $300. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 275 

Still. Sunday, July 29, 3.25 p. sr. Chimney fire in two-story house, 
80 Auburn street, owned and occupied by Michael Sullivan. Chemical 
eng^ine responded. No damage. 

Box 26. Wednesday, August 1, 12.20 P. M. One-story bake house, 85 
Nashua street, owned by H. G. Vaughan and occupied by Gustavus A. 
Berholtz as a baker's shop. Cause, kettle of fat boiling over. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Truck 5. Value of building, $S00; damage, $116; insurance, 
$400; insurance paid, $116. Value of contents, $300; damage, $38.94; 
insurance, $300; insurance paid, $38.94. 

Still. Thursday, August 2, 8.50 a. m. A wooden tenement block, 
€11 Elm street, owned by heirs of Daniel Connor and occupied by sev- 
eral families. The fire originated from a defective flue in tenement 
of Moses Verrette. Chemical eng'ine responded. Used one charge of 
Pony. Damage slight. 

2 — 2 — 2. Thursday, August 2, 3.25 p. ir. Brush fire in Dorr's pasture 
on Hooksett road, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. En- 
gine and Ladder Company 5 laid 1,450 feet of hose. Delegation from 
other companies also responded. 

Still. Sunday, August 5, 3.25 p. M, Brush fire on Xorth Union 
street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. Members of 
Engine and Ladder Company 5 responded with hose carriage. Used 
seven charges of Pon3\ 

Still. Monday, August 6, 10 a. m. Brush fire on North River road 
on land leased by Golf Club. Members of Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany 5 responded with hose carriage. Used two charges of Pony. 

BoK 71. Tuesday, August 7, 10 A. M. False alarm given by some boy 
breaking the glass and taking the \iey. Companies responding: En- 
gines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. 

Still. Sunda3', August 19, 3 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling house of 
Arthur and Trenie Giarson, 513 Silver street. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company 3 responded. L^sed two charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Monday, September 10, 10.20 p. m. A ,pile of sleepers on 
Portsmouth Eailroad near Kimball shoe-shop, Massabesic street. 
Members of Engine and Ladder 3 responded with hose carriage. Used 
two charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, September 13, 10.45 A. m. Woodshed in rear of 
boarding house, 28 Mechanic street, owned by Stark Mills. Cause, chil- 
dren with* matches. Chemical engine, Hose 1, and hose carriage from 
Stark Mills responded. Value of building, $600; damage, $25; blanket 
policy; no damage claimed. No damage to contents. 

Still. Friday, September 14, 3.20 a. m. Cottage house at 591 Cedar 
street, owned by L. W. and A.' A. Page and occupied by W. P. Silli- 
phant. Cause, match thrown in woodbox. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company 3 responded with hose carriage. 

Still. Friday, September 14, 11.15 a. m. Grass fire on land owned 
by E. S. Whitney on North Eiver road. Members of Engine and Lad- 



276 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

der 5 responded with hose carriage. Used two charges of Pony. No 
damage. 

Still,. Friday, September 14, 1.45 p. m. Brush fire on Smj'th road, 
north of Webster street. Detail from several companies responded. 
On duty five hours. 

2 — 2 — 2. Friday, September 14, 2.15 P. M. While working at the 
brush fire on Smyth road a second detail was made for a large forest 
fire on A'utt road, south of Nutt's pond. 

2 — 2 — 2. Saturday, September 15, 12.35 p. u. Ee-kindling of fire on 
Nutt road. Delegation from several companies responded. No dam- 
age and no need of call. 

Stlll. Saturday, September 15, 4.15 P. M. Brush fire on Hooksett 
road near Hooksett line, on land owned by H. Crosb3^ Members of 
Engine and Ladder Company 5 responded. Used one charge of Pony. 
No damage. 

Still. Friday, September 21, 8.50 p. m. Slight fire in stairway of 
tenement, 77 Nashua street, owned by heirs Obadiah Jackson and 
occupied by F. Provencher. Members of Hose Conixaany 2 responded. 
Used one charge of Pony. 

Box 511. Saturday, September 22, 1.15 A. ii. Dwelling house at 17 
Eimmon street, owned by Max Schwortzer and occupied by him and 
Max Zchernig and Eeinhart Erlemann. Fire started in the attic 
among some shoemaker's tools from some unknown cause. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Truck 6. 
Value of building, $3,500; damage, $900; insurance, $2,000; insurance 
paid, $700. Value of contents, $1,000; damage, $300; insurance, $500; 
insurance paid, $175. 

Box 82. Sunday, September 23, 11.55 A. M. Four-story brick block, 
3 Kidder court, owned by W. F. Hubbard and occupied by several fam- 
ilies. Oil stove in tenement of Leopold Turcotte caught fire and some 
one pulled a needless alarm; services not required. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Monday, September 24, 7.45 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 168 Chestnut street, owned by Thomas Mahoney. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, September 29, 1.30 p. m. Slight fire on shingles of 
roof of three-story wooden block, 150 Manchester street, leased by 
Harry A. Piper and occupied by several families. Chemical engine 
responded. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, September 29, 11.45 P. ii. Brick stable, 44 Manches- 
ter street, owned by James Brothers heirs and occupied by Charles W. 
Bailey. Smoke was discovered after turning off arc light but no cause 
found. Members of Chemical Company responded. 

Box 36. Sunday, September 30, 12.32 p. M. Stark Mills picker house 
on Bridge street at McGregor bridge. Cotton waste caught fire. Ex- 
tinguished by yard employees and services of department not required. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 5. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 277 

Still. Thursday, October 4, 9.04 a. m. Tenement house at 115 West 
street, owned by Peter Eiley and occupied by several families. Fire in 
partition around the chimnej'. Cause, defective flue. Members of 
Engine Company 2 responded with hose carriage. Used two charges 
of Pony. 

Still. Friday, October 5, 5.20 p. u. Tenement house at 115 West 
street, owned by Peter Eiley and occux>ied by several families. Slight 
fire on roof caused by defective chimnej'. Members of Engine Com- 
pany 2 responded with hose wagon. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Friday, October 5, 7.30 p. m. Four-story brick block, 550 
Elm street, owned by Blodgett heirs and A. J. Young. Chimney fire in 
room occupied by Arthur Demeule. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Saturday, October 6, 7.15 A. M. Tenement house, 115 West 
street, owned by Peter Eiley and occupied by several families. Boy 
reported fire to Engine Company 2 and they responded with hose car- 
riage, but found no fii'e. 

Still. Saturday, October 6, 12.35 p. M. Called again to 115 West 
street. Small fire on roof near chimney. Members of Engine Com- 
pany 2 responded. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, October 6, S.45 p. M. Wooden tenement block, 162 
Chestnut street, owned by Blodgett heirs and occupied by several 
families. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Sunday, October 7, 5.35 P. M. Brush fire at south end of 
Second street near Bedford line, on land owned by John K. McQuesten. 
Delegation from Engine Comj)any 2 responded with hose carriage. 
Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box 8. Monday, October 8, 4.40 p. M. Three-story brick block, 1307 
Elm street, Mj'rtle block, owned by James & Hoitt heirs and occupied 
by several families. Chimney fire. Used one charge of Pony. No 
damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 
4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Thursday, October 18, 10.30 A. M. Chimnej' fire in dwelling 
house at 21 Elm street, owned and occupied by Alfred Quimby. Mem- 
bers of Hose Company 3 responded. Used one charge of Pony. No 
damage. 

Still. Saturday, October 20, 1.20 p. m. Brush fire on North Adams 
street extension. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 5 re- 
sponded with hose carriage. Used nine charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, October 20, 5.48 p. M. Chimney fire in three-story 
tenement house, 119 Cedar street, owned by Patrick Harrington and 
occupied by several families. jMembers of Chemical Companj^ re- 
sponded. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

2—2—2. Monday, October 22, 6.49 p. M. Brush fire on Goffstown 
road near buildings of Charles F. Sheiaherd. Took delegation of men 
from Central station. Out one hour. 

Still. Tuesday, October 23, 12.10 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 23 Waj-ne street, owned by Eobert Leggett and occupied by 



278 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Eugene Provencher. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 6 
resjjonded. Used three charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 4. Wednesdaj-, October 24, 5.53 A. M. Barrel of tar belonging to 
W. F. Moulton, in rear of 500 Elm street. Needless alarm. No services 
required. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 
2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Thursday, October 25, 4.30 p. M. Brush fire on North Union 
street on Kidder-Parker land. Members lof Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany 5 responded with hose carriage. Used two charges of Pony. No 
damage. 

Still. Sunday, October 28, 9.30 A. M. Chimney fire in three-tene- 
ment house owned by C. S. Magoon and occupied by J. Polette, 677 
Elm street. Chemical engine responded. No damage. 

Still. Monday, October 29, 6.40 p. m. Two-and-half-story brick 
block, 19 Arkwright street, owned by the Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company and occupied by several families. Chimney fire in tenement 
of Wm. Eagan. Chemical engine responded. Used one charge of 
Pony. No damage. 

Box 54. Thursday, November 1, 7.58 A. M. Cottage house at 145 
BoyntoiL street, owned by B. J. Mack and occupied by Joseph Beau- 
dette. Cause, defective chimney. Box pulled by Officer Lovejoy. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Truck 6. Value of 
building, $1,500; damage, $59; insurance, $1,200; insurance paid, $59. 
Value of contents, $600; damage, $50; insurance, $500; insurance 
paid, $50. 

Still. Thursday, November 1, 8.30 a. m. Tenement house, rear of 
25 Amherst street, owned by John A. Riddle and occupied by several 
families. Cause, defective chimney. Members of Truck 1 responded. 
Damage! slight. 

Still. Sunday, November 4, 11.15 a. ir. Two-story wooden house, 
302 Pearl street, owned by Mrs. Trudel and occupied by John Osbrey. 
Slight fire in L part, in partition. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Monday, November 5, 1.30 P. M. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement block, 246 Douglas street, owned by Frank P. Johnson and 
occupied by several families. Members of Engine Company 2 re- 
sponded. LTsed one charge of Pony. 

2 — 2 — 2. Tuesday, November 6, 1.08 p. ii. Brush fire on London- 
derry turnpike in Hooksett. Sent delegation 'of twenty men from 
various companies. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, November 10, 11.18 A. jr. Chimney fire at 124 
Auburn street, in house owned and occupied by Patrick Brennan. No 
damage. 

Box 31. Sundaj', November 11, 4.24 p. M. False alarm. Box pulled 
by some unknown person. Companies responding: Eng-ines 4, 6, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 17. Mondaj^ November 12, 6.07 A. ir. Barn in rear of 293 Am- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 279 

herst sti-eet, owned by Mrs. Eosecrans W. Pillsbury and occnpied by 
Adams Brothers. Cause, overturning of kerosene lantern. Damage 
slight. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $600; damage, $2.73; 
insurance, $400; insiirance paid, $2.73. Value of contents, $250; dam- 
age, $10; insurance, $250; insurance paid, $10. 

Still. Tuesday, November 13, 6.05 p. si. Two-story vacant laundry 
building on Maple street near LoAvell, owned by Oscar B. Laport. 
Cause, boys with matches. Damage slight. Members of Hose Com- 
pany 2 responded with carriage. Used one charge of Pony and laid 
350 feet of hose. 

Still. Thursday-, November 15, S.50 p. ii. Chimnej^ fire in eight- 
tenement block, 22 Concord street, owned by heirs of John C. Young. 
Members of Chemical Company responded. Used one charge of Pony. 
No damage. 

Still. Saturday, November 17, 9.34 p. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
Avooden tenement house, 54 Cedar street, owned by Patrick Harring- 
ton and occupied by V. McBride and others. Members of Chemical 
Company responded. No damage. 

Box 82. Friday, November 23, 9.10 p. M. Four-story brick block, 15 
Bridge street, owned by Patrick Kearns and occupied hy several fam- 
ilies. The fire originated in the third story in room occupied bj' XaAier 
Pinaud in Josej)h Dubois's tenement. Cause unknown. Extinguished 
with Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, 
$10,000; damage, $172.50; insurance, $8,000; insurance paid, $172.50. 
A alue of contents, $1,200; damage, $160.50; insurance, $1,100; insur- 
ance paid, $160.50. 

Box 41. Saturday, December 1, 3.10 A. M. One-story attachment to 
Amoskeag Mills dye-house, used as indigo-mixing room. Fire started 
in small room adjoining, used for slacking lime, and the fire jjroo- 
ably started from the lime. Box pulled by mill watchman. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, 4, Chemical, .Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of building, $250; damage, $25; blanket insurance. No damage 
to contents. 

Box 82. Tuesday, December 4, 5.23 p. m. Three-story brick block, 
corner Bridge street and Bridge-street court, owned by estate of 
Frederick Smj^th. Needless alarm pulled in for smoke from wood 
put into the stove oven to dry. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Monday, December 10, 11.48 p. M. Two-story brick block 
known as Merchants Exchange, 841 Elm street, owned by Merchants 
National Bank, Harrington and Johnson heirs. Escaping steam mis- 
taken for smoke. Chemical engine responded. No dainage. 

Still. Wednesday, December 12, 1.15 p. m. Three-story brick block, 
4 Vine street, owned by heirs of Law-rence Dowd and occupied by 



280 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Mrs. Berry. Burning chimney. Used one charge of Pony. Xo dam- 
age. 

Still. Wednesday, December 12, 6.15 p. sr. Three-story briclv block, 
1177 Elm street, owned by George B. and Henry Chandler. Burning 
chimney. Used one charge of Pon3\ Xo damage. 

Still. Friday, December 14, 4.05 A. M. Wooden tenement block at 
472 Granite street, owned by James F. Wyman and occupied by several 
families. Chimney fire. Members of Engine Company 2 responded. 
Used two charges of Pony. Xo damage. 

Still. Friday, December 14, 7.25 p. m. Two-story brick residence, 
corner Elm and Webster streets, owned by Walter M. Parker. Coal gas 
explosion under boiler. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 5 
responded with hose carriage. Xo damage. 

Still. Friday, December 14, 11.50 p. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
tenement block, corner Chestnut and Amherst streets, owned by heirs 
of John D. Patterson. Used one charge of Pony. Xo damage. 

Still. Saturday, December 15, 7.02 P. ii. Chimney fire in three- 
story dwelling, 66 Spruce street, owned and occupied by, Thomas 
Mahoney. Chemical engine responded. Used one charge of Pony. Xo 
damage. 

Still. Sunday, December 16, 3.40 p. m. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement block, 60 Orange street, owned by estate of S. D. Green and 
occupied by Edward Agotte. Used one charge of Pony. Xo damage. 

Still. Monday, December 17, 7.35 p. ii. Chimney fire in Martin's 
block, corner of McGregor and Marion streets, owned by Gordon Wood- 
bury and occupied bj' several families. Members of Engine and Ladder 
Company 6 responded. 

Still. Tuesday, December IS, 9.20 p. M. Chimney fire in four-story 
w^ooden tenement block, 579 Elm street, owned by Michael Connor and 
occupied by several families. Chemical engine responded. 

Box 73. Friday, December 21, 5.58 A. ii. Two-story wooden building, 
368 Beech street, owned and occupied by Thomas F. Sheehan as a 
grocery store. Cause, hanging lamp dropped in back room of store. 
Box pulled by Mr. Sheehan. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. Value of building, $950; damage, $68; 
insurance, $750; insurance paid, $68. Value of contents, $1,000; dam- 
age, $302.62; insurance, $950; insurance paid, $302.62. 

Still. Friday, December 21, 5.20 p. ii. Heavy smoke from a chim- 
ney in Wells block, 1054 Elm street, owned by heirs of A. B. Story and 
occupied by DeMoulpied & Gresley as furniture store. Chemical engine 
responded. Xo services needed. 

Still. Sunday, December 23, 1.45 p. m. Three-story brick building, 
732 Elm street, owned by Oliver B. Green and occupied by E. B. Eey- 
nolds as hotel and boarding house. Cause, faiilty and dangerous con- 
struction of boiler. ■■ L^sed one charge of Pony. 

Box 323. Wednesday, December 26, 9.39 a. ji. Two-story dwelling 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



281 



house, 301 Thornton street, owned and occupied by Liboire Baribeau. 
Cause unknown. The fire was slight and confined wholly to an unfin- 
ished attic. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. No damage to building. Value of 
contents, $300; damage, $60; insurance, $100; insurance paid, $60. 

Box 261. Thursday, December 27, 1.54 p. M. Brush and grass fire 
in j-ard of Wm. E. Buck, 324 Myrtle street. Xo damage. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Truck 3. 

Still. Thursdaj', December 27, 2.30 p. m. Grass fire on Hevey street, 
set bj' boys while skating. Members of Engine and Ladder 6 re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Stlll. Thursday, December 27, 7.45 P. M. Chimney fire in eight- 
tenement block, 89 Orange street, owned by Nason Hall and occupied 
hy Charles Smart and others. Used one charge of Ponj'. No damage. 

ALAEMS BY MONTHS. 



Month. 


Bell. 


Still. 




5 
4 
7 
8 
3 
6 
8 
3 
5 
3 
5 
5 


10 




10 




s 


April 


23 




14 




7 


July 


15 


August 


4 




10 


October 


14 


November 


7 




14 








Total 


62 


136 









282 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
COMPANIES RESPONDING. 



Months. 



ENGINES. 



January .. . 
February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December . 



Total. 



17 



31 



29 



7 
7 

12 

13 
5 
7 

12 
3 
5 
6 
5 

11 



30 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS, 



9 

m 


Kame. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 




Chief 




1!*37 Elm. 


4 
5 
3 


Eugene S. Wbitney 

Clarence R. Merrill 

Frank M. Frisselle 

John Montplaisir 


Assistant 


Supt. Elec. Light.. 

Grain dealer 

Editor 


No. River road. 
414 Merrimack. 
58 Myrtle. 
Coolidge ave. 


5 









REPOKT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



283 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, 28 Vine Street. 



CQ 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



7 


Cbaries F. McCoy 

Frank E. Stearns 








8 


Lieutenant 


Paper hanger 


450 Merrimack. 


18 




Clerk 




21 Market. 


6 


Cliai'les F. Hall 






28 Vine. 


14 






Clerk 


369 Merrimack. 


n 


Frank H. Harvey 

Artemas C. Barker 


Di'iver engine... 
Driver hose 




28 Vine. 


12 




28 Vine . 


43 


Frank B. Mars ton 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


823 Union. 


15 


Thomas J. Wyatt 

Lewis G. Bryant 


,, 


i> 


26 Mechanic. 


9 


„ 


Coal dealer 


423 Central. 


10 




" 




16 M. S. B. 


17 






6 Canal. 


19 


Charles H. Fraser 


,, 




363 Concord. 


n 


Nate M. Kellogg 


'■ 


Printer 


1937 Elm 











284 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 2. 

House on North Main Street, ^ Squog. 





KAilE. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


71 

68 












Lieutenant 

Clerk and driver 

of engine 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer .. 

Driver of hose... 

Hoseman 


Supt. streets 

Teamster 


43 Cartier. 


76 
120 




"10 No. Main. 


Henry C Morrill 




53 Beauport. 
55 Douglas. 


119 






69 


Arthur W. Whitcomb — 
Samuel A. Hill 




35 No. Main. 


72 




86 School. 


75 


Robert J. Hill 




86 School. 


77 


Daniel B. Emery 


. 


117 Williams. 


73 

74 


Charles S. Cousins 

Thomas C. Foote 


Harness-maker . . . 

Wool sorter 

Wool waste sorter. 
Clerk, B. & M. B.R. 


151 Douglas. 
56 No. Main. 


66 




54 Douglas. 


70 

67 


Chas. M. Tewksbury 


•278 Douglas. 
431 Granite. 











REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



285 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 3. 

House on Lake Avenue, corner Massabesic, 



•3 O 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



97 

110 

148 

122 

121 

87 

81 

82 

114 

80 

85 

88 

79 

89 

153 

105 

84 



Frank F. Porter — 

Edwin C. Paul 

Albert W. Smith... 

Orren S. Coburn 

John P. Walker 

George B. Forsaith 
George H. Wheeler 
William S. McLeod 
Lyman W. Piper . . . 

John Wilson 

Clarence Hackett . . 

John W. Finn 

George Taylor 

liOuis N. Duf rain . . . 
Parker R. Brown . . . 
Edson F. Wyman . . 
Herbert E. Dunbar 

Harry A. Piper 

Samuel M. Couch . . 
George W. Albee ... 



Captain 

Lieut, of engine. 
Lieut, of truck. . 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer .. 
Driver of engine 
Driver of hose.. 
Driver of truck. 
Fireman 



Manufacturer 

Collector 

Clerk 



Machinist 
Engineer . 
Teamster. 



Dresser 

Carpenter ...., 
Laundryman. 

Painter 

Mechanic 

Plumber 

Grain dealer . 
Manufacturer 
Clerk 



Blacksmith. 
Clerk 



330 E. Spruce. 
372 Lake ave. 
340 Merrimack. 
386 Central. 
403 Hall. 
455 Hanover. 
384 E. Spruce. 
419 Lake ave. 
398 Merrimack. 
6 Linden. 



501 Wilson. 
382 Lake ave. 
473 Hall. 
422 Merrimack. 



310 Central. 
375 Lake ave. 
447 Spruce. 
271 Laurel. 



286 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 4. 

House, No. 20 Vine Street. 






Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



20 




Captain 


Pharmacist 


103 Walnut. 


28 


John H. Wales, Jr 


Lieutenant 


Brick mason 


2 M. S. B. 


38 


Tbomas W. Lane, Jr 


Clerk 


Electrician 


1937 Elm. 


21 




Engineer 




20 Vine. 


27 






20 Tine. 


31 




Driver of engine 






29 






oQ Vine. 


'>f?. 


Walter A. Clarkson 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


301 Walnut. 


?5 


Frank B. Stevens 




Clerk 


144 Blodget. 


23 


George Tliompson 

Harvey E. Harris 


,, 






24 


•' 


Laundryman 


249 Concord. 


32 




,( 




16 Stark. 


30 




^j 




101 Bridge. 


26 


Alfred Gustaf son 


" 











REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



287 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 5. 

House, No. 44 Webster Street. 



S5^ 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



49 


Charles W. Brown 




Clerk . . . 


95 Harrison. 
884 Union. 
136 Sagamore. 


161 


Irving S. Bryant 






162 


George N. Burpee 


Lieut, engine ... 


Electrician 


4R 


Woodbury Davison 

Walter Morse 


Clerk 




772 Beech. 
54 Appleton. 
1419 Elm. 
44 Webster. 
44 Webster. 


10?! 


Engineer 

Asst. engineer.. 




41J 


Daniel W. Morse 


Engineer 


T^S 




Driver engine . . 
Driver truck — 


Teamster 


124 


Benjamin C. Cann 








83 


Ernest E. Hubbell 


Driver hose 


11 


44 Webster. 






47 


Russell Li Cilley . 




Clerk 


863 Chestnut. 


95 


Edward H. Clough 












108 


Edward 1^. Towle 


" 


" 


72 N. Adams. 


1''S 


Charles H Gile 


I, 


Carpenter 


896 Union. 
53 Pennacook. 


9fl 


Will G. Eraser 


" 


Electrician 






160 


George E. Badger 





Steam fitter 


37 Pennacook. 


1.58 


Andrew S. Fantom 





Cigar-maker 


1443 Elm. 


101 


Charles W.Warner 





Electrician 


75 Sagamore. 


126 


Edwin M. Dorney 

Max Hawkins 


,, 




''54 Walnut 


41 


ij 


Clerk 


73 Appleton. 
10 N. Adams. 


159 


Charles H. Longa 


" 





288 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 6. 
House on Amory and Bimmon /Streets. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


140 


Frank W. Tebbetts 

James A. Farley 


Captain 


Loom-tixer 

Machinist 


312 Cartier 


147 


Lieut, engine.... 

Lieut, truck 

Clerk 


385 Dubuque . 
15 Beauport. 
258 Beauport. 


142 


Marble finisher . . . 


138 


Thomas F. Fitzsimmons. 


132 


Engineer 

Asst. engineer . . 
Driver engine.. 

Driver hose 

Driver truek .... 
Hoseman 


Engineer 


T?*? 


Alcide Provencber 

Alpbonso E. Foster 

Herbert Jenne 




516 Beauport. 


^"'\ 




135 




Engine-house. 


136 


Henry C. Cr<>sDy 




129 






624 No. Main. 


143 




Blacksmith 

Wool sorter 

Loom-flxer 

Laborer 


393 Hevey. 
526 Beauport. 
402 Rimraon. 


144 
145 


Arthur Provost 


131 


John C. Gemmell 


27 Adams. 


128 


Clerk 


310 No. 3Iain. 


139 






47 Bremer. 


146 
130 


Eichard F. Galway 


Cigar-maker 

Loom-fixer 


460 No. Main. 
380 Rimmon. 


137 
141 


Wm. T. Lockheatl 

Mederique R. Maynard.. 






324 Dubuque. 







REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



289 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

Hozise, 8 Vine /Street. 



« 










be© 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 











115 j Edward A. Sears 

116 Clarence D. Palmer. 



103 
117 
ii 



Benjamin R. Richardson 

George H. Porter 

Asa W.Gage* 



Captain. 

Clerk.... 
Driver . . 
Pipeman 
Fireman 



Electrician . . . 
Marble dealer 

Macliinist 

Carpenter . . . 
Lineman 



247 Concord. 
301 Lake ave. 
548 Lincoln. 
279 Laurel. 
26 Vine. 



* Detailed driver of supply wagon. 



HOSE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, No. 20 Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. i Residence. 

! 


36 


Joseph E. Merrill 

Charles R. French 

Albert A. Puffer 


Captain 




21 Ash 


5'- 


Lieutenant 

(jlerk 


Carpenter 


39 M. S B 


4S 




499 Beech. 
16 Prospect. 
3 M.S. B. 
28 M. S B. 


S7 


Henry C. Parsons 

Samuel W. Patten 

George I. Ayf^r 






35 

45 


Hoseman 


Belt maker 

Electrician 

Clerk 


51 


Edwin W. Merrill 

Andrew S. Heath 

George W. Snadden 

WillH. Nelson 


21 Ash. 


50 




27 Russell. 


39 




373 Bridge. 
100 Brook. 
535 Granite. 
26 Vine. 


38 


Gas-works emp ... 
Collector 


53 

34 


Albert W. Tucker 









19 



290 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOSE COMPANY No. 2. 
House on Maple Street, corner East High. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


54 


John F. Seaward 

Eevilo G. Houghton 

Joseph W. Batchekler .. . 








■55 


Lieutenant 

Clerk 


Gas-fltter... . 


502 Chestnut 


59 
57 


Carpenter 


521 Maple. 
521 Maule. 




■62 


Julien B. Huntley 

Charles W. Powell 

Addison Seaward 

Arthur B. Merrill 


Hoseman 




1103 Elm. 


•60 
«1 
56 
«>3 




540 Maple. 
296 Orange. 
867 Clay. 
761 Beech 




,. 


,, 


€5 


John M. Emerson 




19 Russell. 


68 


Carpenter 


24 South. 


64 


Melvin W. Wprthcn 




507 Maple. 





HOSE COMPANY No. 3. 

House, South Elm Street. 



PQ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation . 


Residence. 


150 








23 Elm. 


157 

151 


Frank D. Hardy 


Lieutenant 

(jlerk 


Yard conductor .. . 
Teamster 


15 Elm. 


152 


Charles H. Rogers 

James H. McKenzie 

William P Hall 






23 Elm. 


153 

154 


Hoseman 


Sash-maker 

Gas-maker 

Clerk 


Elm. 
39 Elm. 


155 
156 
149 


Henry O. Follansbee — 

Celon D. Stevens 

Fred S. Morrill* 


44 Elm. 

43 Welsh ave. 




53 Beauport. 











* Detailed for department spare driver. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



291 



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY No. 1. 
House, 18 Vine Street. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Ill 


Roscoe i)yer 


Captain 


Machinist 


40 Market. 


m 


Oscar P. Stone 


Lieutenant 


Clerk 


313 Manchester 


93 


Fred W. Bond 


Clerk 




46 Stark 


94 


Charles M. Denyou 

Jerome J. Lovering 






18 Vine. 

175 Hanover. 


91 


Fireman 


Carpenter 


104 


Harrison 11. Cole 




„ 


893 Union. 


\m 




29 Myrtle. 
18 Vine. 
16 M S B 


107 


H<»T11'T7 Wtfinl"! 


,j 




113 ] Charles H. Laxon 






112 Henrj' Johnson 




Sleam-fltter 


316 Walnut. 


118 nimrl/os A Riit-tPi-fiAlrl 


<t 






90 




,, 




18 Vine 


lOf) 


Benjamin F. Marsh 






1408 Elm 


9fi 


1^ 




40 Orange 


ino 


John Short 




Clerk 


1037 Elm. 









292 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



RIVERSIDE BOSE No. 5.— (Volu>'teer Company.) 

House, Front Street, Amoskeag. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



133 
136 
148 
141 
135 
189 
147 
140 
146 
138 
145 
142 
137 
151 
149 
143 



Thomas Hamilton — 
George Lawrence — 

Perley O. Balcli 

Eben Hayes 

Charles E. Stearns . . . 
Andrew J. Moynihan 

Charles Linen 

Clarence H. Steai-ns.. 

Wm. F. Stearns 

Joseph Stocks 

Fred H. Balch 

Sherman L. Greer — 

Joseph Clegg 

Edward C. Manley . . . 

William Akey 

Samuel Montplaisir . 



Captain 

Lieutenant. 

Clerk 

Steward . . . . 
Hoseman .. . 



Superintendent. . . 

Milkman 

Meat cutter 

Teamster 

Plating works 

Blood's Loc. Wks. 
Blood's Loc. Wks. 

Ice-man 

Mechanic 

Second-hand 

Meat cutter 

Carpenter 

Mill hand 

Teamster 

Clerk 

Blacksmith 



160 Goflfsto'n rd 
349 Front. 
85 Omega. 
176 Front. 
329 Front. 
450 Front. 
298 Front. 
421 Front. 
411 Front. 
3 Dean. 

228Goffsto'n rd. 
Salmon. 
381 Front. 
411 Front. 
389 Front. 
25 Second. 



REPORT 



ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 



I 



EEPOET OP THE ENGINEER'S DEPAETffiNT. 



Office of the City Engineer, 
Manchesteb, N. H., December 31, 1900. 

To the Honorahle Mayor and City Councils: 

Gentlemen, — The twenty-secoBd annual report of the city engineer 
is herewith submitted, showing the expenditures and operations of the 
engineer's department for the year ending December 31, 1900. 

Office. 

Five assistants have been employed in this department during the 

year 1900: Harrie M. Young, George W. Wales, Harry J. Briggs, Alfred 

T. Dodge; Ella Barker Davis, stenographer and typewriter. Three 

temporary assistants have been employed in this department a part 

of the year 1900: Charles Sargent, Henry A. Worthen, and James 

Looney. 

Financial. 

e. k. cobltin company. 
1900. 
Jan. S. To paste $0.25 

KEUFFEL & ESSER COMPANY, NEW YOEK CITY. 

Jan. 10. To 1 set of 8 12-inch flat Paragon scales, 
div. 10, 20, 30', 40, 50, 60, SO, 100 parts, 

in mahogany case, to order $13.00 

expressage .25 

$13.25 

By cash received from city of Manchester 11.00 

$2.25 

Feb. 21. To 1 only K. and E. pocket rule 1730, 

4-foot, ivorine $0.75 

1 only 100-foot Chesterman steel tape 

repaired .45 

1 only angle target for Philadelphia 

rod, heavy, in exchange for regular 

target 1.00 

$2.20 

295 



296 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

To 1 onl3' Paragon scale, 1621 P $2.50 

in sheath .25 

1 only Paragon scale, 1633 P 6.50 

in sheath .50 

f , $9.75 

Less 20 per cent 1.95 

: $7.80 

To 1 Eensselaer excelsior steel tape, 6542, 

100 feet $11.40 

1 only spring handle, 6598, for 100 feet 

tape 2.50 

$13.90 
Less 10 per cent 1.39 

.$12.51 

Dec. 19. To American Express, prepaid to S. J. Lord, city 

engineer $0.50 

10 per cent 1 only map measurer, 1692 $3.20 
10 per cent 1 only steel triangle, 2002, 

15-inch 6.50 

10 per cent 1 only steel triangle, 2003, 

12-inch 6.50 

10 per cent 1 only steel straight edge, 

2022, 96-inch 24.00 

20 per cent 1 only paper cutter, 2701.. .50 

10 per cent 1 only rod level, 6299 3.00 

net 1 only Crane's sewer slide rule, 

4132 2.00 

$45.70 

Less 10 per cent on $43.20 $4.32 

20 per cent on $0.50 .10 

— 4.42 

$41.28 



$41.78 
MANCHESTER HAEDWAKE COMPANY. 

Jan. 1. To 1 6-inch round file $0.12 

Mar. 19. 1 brush $0.10 

1 can Star polish .40 

21. 1 dozen brass screw hooks .15 

1 dozen brass screw eyes .07 

i/o jiound cotton rope, %-inch, @ 25c.. .13 

22. 1 jDair 7x9 jap. brackets .15 

29. 1 dozen 214 — 12 screws .06 

1 dozen sand paper .10 

April 6. 1/, dozen Xo. 12 harness hooks @ $1.00 .50 

$1.66 



REPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 297 

May 3. To 3 pairs No. 3 lig-ht strap hinges, Scr., 

@ 6c $0.12 

5, 1 dozen 5-S to 3-16 F. H. stove bolts. . . .OS 

10. 6 pounds seal paper .21 

14. 14 dozen Xo. 10 Fiteli sash fasteners 

@ 65c .16 

15. 1 ratchet bit brace 1.25 

1 file .15 

1 brush .08 

1 8-inch mill file .15 

IS. 2 keys @ 10c .20 

$2.40 

May 28. 1 ball mat. cord .25 

July 31. 1% pounds manila rope, %-inch, @ 15c .26 

C. II. WOOD. 

Jan. 20. To polishing old Gurley level box $0.35 

polishing B. & B. 30-inch level box .40 

painting 7 transit rods @ 50c 3.50 

$4.25 

May 29. varnishing 2 tripods @ 25e ^ .50 

ALFRED K. HOBBS. 

Feb. 15. To 1 dozen chair tips • $0.50 

19. 4 ounces rubber bands @ 25c 1.00 

20. 414 ounces rubber bands @ 25c 1.13 

$2.63 

J. HODGE. • 

Feb. 6. To 3 hours labor repairing drawing board $1.20 

JOHN B. VAUICK C01IPA:^fY. 

Feb. 13. To 1 dozen rings $0.25 

Sept. 13. 1 box Venetian craj^ons .50 

Nov. 5. 9 pounds mall, iron @ 9c $0.S1 

1 line cleat .10 

1 link .20 

8. 21/2 pounds %-inch manila rope @ 12c. .30 

2 dbl. pulley blocks, 2y2-inch, @ 45c. . .90 

3 post spoon handles @ 42c 1.26 

1 piece chain and hook .45 

1 chisel ' 1.00 



Nov. 19. 1 post spoon » $1.25 

Dec. 8. 1/2 dozen 84 special rule @ $2.43 1.22 



$5.02 
$2.47 



298 



Feb. 21. 

May 15. 

16. 

24. 

July 12. 
Sept. 14. 



Nov. 12. 
Dec. 21. 



April 3. 
May 26. 

28. 



Mar. 30. 



April 14. 



Mar. 21. 
May 15. 
June 16. 
July 19. 
Aug. 16. 

Dec. 22. 



Mar. 30. 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

W. P. GOODMAN. 

To 1 box typewriter jaaper 

1 blank book $0.10 

3 blank books .24 

1 time book .15 

3-10 K O. E. envelopes 2.00 

1 cash book $0.85 

% dozen erasers, large .60 

^2 dozen erasers, small .30 

Vs dozen pencil protectors .18 

1/4 dozen blank books 

typewriter and copy paper 

AilERICAN EXPRESS COilPANY. 

To express on bundle from New York 

express on 3 boxes from Boston, Mass 

transportation of package from Boston, Mass., 
shipped by Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Company. . 

HEAD & DOWST COJIPANY. 

To sapling pine plank 

FEED S. LEWIS. 

To 2,000 grade stakes and 1,000 chestnut hubs 

PIKE & IIEALD COMPAKY. 

To hair felt 

asphaltum, paint ■ 

asphaltum 

1 machine tool and repairing the same 

repairs to reamer 

91 hours labor, "Worthen, on hydrants, @ 30c.. 
1 plan case 

PNEUMATIC HAND STAMP COilPANY, BOSTON, MASS. 

To 3 line holder for A 39 iigures. $0.95 

1 ounce opaque ink .50 

1 special set pads for oj)aque ink .30 

$1.75 
mail expenses .11 



$1.00 



$2.49 



$1.93 

.24 

6.00 



$0.60 
.50 

.15 



$0.60 



$20.00 



$0.18 

.10 

.10 

1.00 

.80 

27.30 

1.75 



$1.8S 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



299 



B. F. SHEPAT5D. 

Mar. 21. To repair tripods 

22. repair target 

E. G. SOLTIIAIS'T^, KEW YOEK. 

April 2. To 24-yard roll 40-inch tracing- cloth 

50-yard roll 36-inch blue print paper. . 

1 dozen "Kohinoor" pencils 

1 note book 

Sept. 1. 50-yard roll blue print paper 

25-yard roll blue print cloth 

50-yard roll Victor detail paper 

express prepaid 

Oct. 16. 1 100-foot Phevin steel tape 

1 tally reg-ister 

1 stick Chinese ink 

3 dozen "Kohinoor" pencils 

1 dozen Siberian pencils 

1 dozen Oriole pencils 

3 bottles Higgins' ink @ 25c 

expressage 

Dec. 18. 1 roll 37-inch par. en. cloth 

2 rolls 42-inch regent tracing paper 
@ $1.20 

2 pounds stake tacks @ 45c 

1 pocket scale in case 

1 45° crystalline angle, each: 

14-inch, $1.75; 10-inch, $0.80; 8-inch, 
$0.60; 6-inch, $0.44; 4-inch, $0.28.. 
1 30° crystalline angle, each: 

4-inch, $0.20; 6-inch, $0.32; 12-inch, 

$0.80; 14-inch, $1.32 

expressage 

TEMPLE & FABKINGTON COMPANY. 

1899. 

Dec. 5. To 1 quire paper 

1900. 

Mar. 27. To 500 sheets paper, SxlOVs 

28. putting flap and tapes on 1 folio 

April 14. putting flap and tape and repairing 1 

folio 

Credit goods returned 



$0.65 
.25 



$6.75 

2.50 

1.00 

.30 

$2.50 
5.95 
2.40 
1.00 

$5.95 

2.50 

1.67 

2.70 

.90 

.38 



$5.35 

2.40 
.90 
.20 



3.87 



2.64 
.56 



$0.25 

1.40 
1.75 

2.00 

$5.40 
.20 



$0.90 



$10.55 



$11.85 



$15.16i 



$15.92 



$5.20 



300 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

April 26. To 500 sheets paper, SxlOi/o $1.40 

July 11. binding 1 Vol. Eecords B. of Ex. Plumbers .75 

Dec. 17. 18 blank books, Xo. 5901 $13.50 

12 blank books, Xo. 5902 9.00 

$22.50 

KIMBALL CARRIAGE COMPA?sY. 

April 10. To repairing field glass case $0.25 

YAWMAN & ERBE MANUFACTURING CO., ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Mar. 14. To 1 X^o. 32 dr. Shan, cabinet, 4xS, oak, Avith Acme 

lock, in exchange for 1 X'o. 15 dr. cabinet. . . . $41.00 

Dec. S. 1 N^o. 16 dr. A card index cabinet with 

Acme lock F. K., 6x4 $35.00 

1 M Xo. 20O cards F. "R., 6x4, printed 
one side 17.77 

1 2 dr. A card cabinet F. E., 5x3 4.90 

2 M Xo. 200 cards F. R., 5x3, printed 

one side 5.10 

1 4 dr. wide Shannon base, oak 17.50 



JOHN B. CLARKE COMPANY. 



exchange service, including rental of 
telephone, for 6 months ending De- 
cember 31, 1900 $20.00 

for tolls, August, 65c.; September, 15c. .80 

C. L. BERGER & SONS, BOSTON, MASS. 

May 26. To 1 Precise engineer's wye leveling in- 
strument and accessories $200.00 

1 planimeter 28.00 

1 bottle oil to lubricate the level 
center -25 



$80.27 



To printing 22/27 city engineer's annual reports, 

44 pages (500 copies) @ 58c $26.10 

NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGItAPH COMPANY. 

June 23. To exchange service, including rental of 
telephone for 3 months ending March 

31, 1900 $10.50 

Credit account January rental paid at old 

rate, January 8, 1900, city engineer... 3.94 

$6.56 
To exchange service, including rental of 
telephone for 3 months ending June 
30, 1900 10.00 



$16.56 



$20.80 



May 26. 



June 27, 



Aug-. 2: 



Dec. 18. 



June 21. 



July 1. 
Dec. 21. 



July 5. 
Oct. 18. 



Aug. 8. 
Oct. 16. 
Dec. 22. 



June 1. 



Sept. 14. 
Oct. 3. 



Nov. 1. 



Dec. 18. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 

To 1 watei'proof bag to protect instru- 
ment $1.00 

3 packing boxes 1.50 

1 Van Orden level rod $20.50 

1 set rod levels 3.00 

cleaning and adjusting precise level.. $3.00 

express paia when received .35 

4 6-foot ranging poles, wood, @ $3, 
j)repaid express $12.00 

plumb bob No. 213, 11 ounce 2.50 

expressage .60 

W. F. HUBBARD. 

To 186 spruce stakes, 4 feet long, 2x2, at 6c 

NICIIOIjSON & O'l^EIL. 

To 1 canvas case 

4 drawing table dust covers 

X'NION JIAKUFACTL'RING COMPANY. 

To 6 dozen IV^-inch figures @ 50c 

30 dozen li/o-incli figures @ 50c 

E. A. STKATTON. 

To 1 ream typewriter paper, No. 27 

1 dozen 4 H "Kohinoor" pencils 

4 boxes typewriter paper @ $1.40 

K. K. HORNE. 

To 1 watering can 

MANCHESTER. STREET RAILWAY. 

To 100 street car tickets 

200 street car tickets 

DONALD MCDONALD. 

To 31 pounds Firth's cast steel $4.50 

14 hours labor on turning point pins 

@ 40c 5.60 

T. ALTENEDER & SONS, PHILADELPHIA. 

To 1 set No. 2127 $54.50 

Grad. beam eomp. like "B" .50 

$55.00 
Discount ] per cent 5.50 



301 



230.73 



$23.50 



.35 



$15.10 


$11.16 


$1.00 


2.25 


$3.00 


15.00 


$1.10 


1.00 


5.60 



$5.00 
10.00 



$10.10 



$49.50 



S02 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

•CITY FARM. 

To boarding city horse 5 5-7 weeks @ $2 $11.43 

C. A. HOITT & CO. 

To 1 typewriter desk chair $4.00 

W. F. HUBBAED. 

Mar. 26. To 1 rack in 4 sections with 12 rollers.. $4.50 

2 cleats and labor on draught board. . .75 

29. 2 racks for surveying instruments.... 2.50 

April 21. 1 box with j>artitions and 2 lids hinged 4.00 

5,000 grade stakes @ $5 per M 25.00 

— $36.75 

E. G. LIBBEY. 

To pasturing city horse 7 6-7 weeks @ $1.25 $9.82 

F. WEBER & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

Dec. 19. To 1 set 41 hard rubber raih'oad curves, 

5240 $30.00 

1 mahogany, ebony lines, Dean's pa- 
tent T square, 60-inch blade 3.75 



H. M. YOLTSTG. 



^3.75 



Aug. 25. To carfares for leveling party during August $2.25 

15. express on 2 bundles to C. L. Berger & Sons. . . .40 

Mar. 20. J. G. Jones, trucking cabinet from freight 

house to city hall. .35 

Aug. 29. street car fares .30 

30. street car fares .30 

Sept. 8. street car fares .20 

10. street car fares .30 

13. street car fares .45 

14. street car fares ^ .30 

G. AV. WALES. 

July — . To paid express on level rod $0.23 

paid express on book .15 

paid express on package .15 

sharpening shears .10 

$0.65 

Aug. 24. express on box from C. L. Berger & Sons, 

Boston .25 

Dec. 22. soap ..-. $1.50 

car fares .15 

expressage paid 1.82 

$3.47 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 303 

A. T. DODGE. 

Dec. 22. To car fares $0.10 

oil for steel tape .10 

red flannel .10 

repairing- rubber boot .15 

$0.45 

G. W. WALES. 

Dec. 22. To 150 days service @ $2.75 per day $112.50 

156 days service @ $3.12 per day 4SG.72 

22 hours extra service @ 362,(.c. per hour 8.05 

H. M. YOtTNTG. 

Dec. 22. To 150 days -service @ $2.75 per day $412.50 

143 days service @ .$3.12 per day 446.16 

3714 hours extra service @ 36%c. per hour.... 13.64 

H. J. BRIGGS. 

Dec. 22. To 150 days service @ $2.50 per day $375.00 

138 days service @ $2.84 per day 391.80 

22 hours extra service (cl 33y^c. per hour 7.32 

A. T. DODGE. 

Dec. 22. To 150 days service @ $2 per day $300.00 

156 days service @ $2.27 per day 354.12 

26 hours extra service @ 26'-/oC. per hour 6.91 

CHARLES SjVRGENT. 

Oct. 5. To 121 days service @ .$2.50 per day $302.50 

32 hours extra service @ 3114c. per hour 8.13 

JAMES LOOXEY. 

Sept. 14. To 66 days service @ 50c. per day $33.00 

HE^sTlY WORTIIETf. 

Dec. 22, To 61 days service (a) $1.75 per day $94.50 

E. B. DATIS. 

Dec. 22, To 295 daj-s service @ $1.60 per day $472.00 

S. J. LORD. 

May — . To expenses to C. L. Berg-er & Sons, Bos- 
ton, purchasing- precise level and 
accessories $4.19 



304 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Dec. 31. To first, second, third, and fonrtli quar- 
ters, team hire $150.00 

first, second, third, and fourth quar- 
ters, salary 1,350.00 

$1,-504.19 

Total expense engineer's department for 1900 $6,546.24 

SUMMAEY. 

Appropriation to the engineer's department for the 

3'ear 1900 $6,702.16 

Expense of engineer's department for year 1900.... $6,546.24 

Balance unexpended 155.92 

$6,702.16 $6,702,16 
Ordees. 

Xumber of orders for: 

Surveys, street lines, and grades 207 

Sewer grades 45 

Paving grades ■ 20 

Street railway grades 6 

Gutter grades 39 

Curb grades 40 

Pine Grove cemetery grades, levels, and surveys 32 

Valley cemetery grades 4 

Amoskeag cemetery grades 3 

Merrill yard grades 3 

Profile levels 72 

Petitions 139 

Sewers and drains committee 4 

Street committee 3 

Claims committee 1 

Road hearings 14 

Board of aldermen 4 

Board of examiners of plumbers 15 

Setting stone bounds 113 

Total number of orders 764 

Field Woek. 

Levels for profile for establishing grades (length in feet) .... 110,966 

for sewer profiles (length in feet) 30,058 

for establishing new bench marks (length in feet) 486,400 

in Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 8,450 

in Amoskeag cemetery (length in feet) 19,400 

in Merrill yard (length in feet) 11,600 

Other levels (length in feet) 11,599 

Total length of levels in feet 650,573 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 305 

Cross section levels, Pine Grove cemetery (area in sq. ft.) . . 32,160 

Surveys of streets and street lines (length in feet) 28,119 

for street numbers (length in feet) 8,386 

in Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 418 

miscellaneous (length in feet) 3,700' 

Total length of surveys in feet 40,623. 

Survey of Amoskeag cemetery (area in sq. ft.) 54,303 

Street lines marked on ground (length in feet) 45,284 

Lot and avenue lines. Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) . . 2,527 

Lot and avenue lines. Valley cemetery (length in feet) 756 

Lot and avenue lines, Amoskeag cemetery (length in feet).. 750 

Lot and avenue lines, Merrill yard (length in feet) 514 

Lines for gutters (length in feet) 16,896 

Lines for curbs (length in feet) 3,446 

Lines for sewers (length in feet) 7,269 

Lines for street railw^ay (length in feet) 2,812 

Other lines (length in feet) 300 

Total length of lines in feet marked on the ground 80,554 

Grades set for sidewalks (length in feet) 11,251 

gutters (length in feet) 16,896 

curbs (length in feet) 3,446 

sewers (length in feet) 7,269 

street railway (length in feet) 2,812 

paving streets (length in feet) 5,084 

building streets (length in feet) 16,844 

Pine Grove cemetery (lengrth in feet) 5,501 

Valley cemetery (length in feet) 221 

Amoskeag cemetery (length in feet) 750 

Merrill yard (length in feet) 514 

other purposes (length in feet) 1,606 

Total length in feet of grades set 72,194 

Number of old lots restaKed in Pine Grove cemetery 40 

Number of old lots restaked in Valley cemetery 27 

Total number of cemetery lots staked out 67 

Soundings taken for sewer trench (length in feet) 3,280 

Stone bounds set 113 

BATTERS SET. 

Cypress street, culvert at Cemetery brook. 
Derry road, bridge at Manter brook, two. 
Mast road, culvert at Mast brook. 
Mill road, bridge at Cohas brook. 
Spruce street, culvert at Cemetery brook. 

20 



306 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Office Work. 

plans and profiles made for sidewalk grades. 

Beacon, Hanover to Bridg-e. 
Bridge, Belmont to Weston. 
Total plans and j)rofiles, 2. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Ash, Pearl to Orang-e. 

Blodget, Elm to Elm east back. 

Blodg-et south back, Elm east back to Chestnut. 

Bodwell's, sewerage at coal sheds. 

Central south back, Manhattan lane to Chestnut. 

Cleveland, Third to Merrimack river. 

Clay, Wilson to Hall. 

Columbus, Amory southerly. 

Concord, Hall to Belmont. 

Concord, Pine to Union. 

Cypress, Lake avenue to south of Auburn. 

Elm east back, Blodget to Blodget south back. 

George, Milford northerly. 

Granite, Elm to west of Franklin. 

Hanover, Chestnut to Pine. 

Hiram, Cleveland to Blaine. 

Manhattan lane. Spruce to Central. 

Oak, Blodget to Harrison. 

Pine east back. Green to Summer south back. 

Putnam, Bartlett to Bow. 

Kimmon east back, Kelley to Bremer. 

Second, Cleveland to Walker. 

Spruce, Elm to Manhattan lane. 

Summer south back. Pine east back to east of Union. 

Walker, Main to Merrimack river. 

William, Milford to Mast. 

Young, Belmont westerly. 

Young, Cypress to Jewett. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 28. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Boynton, Hartshorn's to town line. Four plans. 
Cypress, Massabesic to Lake Avenue. Two plans. 
Dix, Lincoln to Cypress. Four plans. 

Duubarton road. Front westerly. Two plans. 

Front, Mill to Dunbarton road. Four plans. 

Goffstown road, Front westerly. Three plans. 

Howe, Lincoln to Cypress. Four plans. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 307 

Manhattan lane, Auburn to Central. Two plans. 

Mast road, D to Shirley Hill road. Two plans. 

Mill, Second to Third (Amoskeag). 

Mj-stic avenue, Candia road to C. & P. Railroad. Two plans. 

Old Falls avenue, Old Falls road to Cemetery brook. 

Omega, Front to Goffstown road. 

Wilkins, Mast road to Kockland avenue. Two plans. 

Total numbering plans, 34. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Arlington. Ashland, and Bridge, land of J. T. Underhill. Copy. 

Bald Hill road, land of Xoah B. Reed. Copy. 

Beech, Xutt road, and Holly avenue, land of Groves Brown estate. 
Copy. 

Birch, location of Kate Tooher accident. Coi^y. 

Boynton, Huntress, and McDuffie, land of A. H. Huntress. Copy. 

Brook, Harrison, Elm, Albert, and Chestnut, land of E. A. Straw 
estate. Copj-. 

Brown avenue, Boston & Maine Railroad, and Merrimack river, land 
of William J. Coughlin. Copy. 

Candia road, land of G. W. and X. T. Platts. Copy. 

Candia road and Lake Shore road, land of Southard & Crombie. Copy. 

Candia road and Bald Hill road, land of Henry Allen. Copy. 

Candia road, land of Henry F. Thompson. Copy. 

Candia road and Bridge street, land of Wm. P. Farmer and others. 
Copy. 

Candia road, land of John C. Gallagher. Copy. 

Candia road and Bridge street, land of John H. Proctor. Copy. 

Candia road and Lake Shore road, land of John H. Proctor. Copy. 

Candia road at Pavilion, land of Manchester Street Railway. Copy. 

Candia road and Lake Shore road, land of F. W. Southard. Copy. 

Candia road and Groveland avenue, land of Wm. J. Coughlin. Copy. 

Dunbarton road and Concord road, land of G. A. Farmer. Two 
plans. Copy. 

Glenwood and additions. Copy. 

Hall and Somer^ille, land of F. M. Hoyt. Copy. 

Hanover and Bridge, land of John A. Walker. Copy. 

Harvard and Maple, land of Plamondon. Copy. 

Kelley and adjacent territory. Copy. 

Lake Shore road, land of Oilman Cloug-h. Copy. 

Mammoth road and Derry road, land of L. C. Paige. Copy. 

Manchester, location of Beauvais accident. Copy. 

Maple, Lincoln, Howe, and Shasta, land of F. M. Hoyt. Copy. 

Massabesic and J. Hall road, land of C. E. Hodgdon. Copy. 

Massabesic and Spruce, land of Mrs. Morrison. Copy. 

Massabesic and Dearborn, land of Mrs. M. V. Chandler. Copy. 



308 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Massabesic and Clifford court, land of C. C. Clifford. Copy. 

Massabesic, Porter, and Mammoth road, land of Lucie A. Clougb.. 
Copy. 

Mast and Main, land of I. E. Dewey. Copy. 

Merrimack, land of Bodwell and Balch. Copj^ 

Milford and Cross road, land of M. V. B. Kinne. Copy. 

Mitchell and Beech, land of Mrs. Mary F. Eyder. Copy. 

Monument square and siirrounding streets. Copy. 

New Mast. Old Mast, and Shirley Hill road, land of J. P. Brock. Copy^ 

Nutt road. Holly avenue, and Vinton, land of Brown estate. Copy. 

Oakdale avenue. Maple and Lincoln, land of E. P. Stevens. Copj^ 

Old Falls road, land of Frank M. Goings. Copy. 

Sagamore, Eussell, and Smyth road, land of Brown, Burgess, and 
Magoon. Copy. 

Sagamore, Walnut, and Oak, land of Upton, Harvey, and Weston. 
Copy. 

Union, Beech, and Walnut Hill avenue, land of Joseph E. Weston.. 
Copy. 

Weston and Huse roads, land of Fred S. Lewis. Cop3\ 

Total miscellaneous plans, 47. 

WORKING PLAKS. 

Adams, Clarke to Carpenter. Profile, 

Amory, Columbus to Moore. Profile. 

Amory, Main to Beauport. Profile. 

Amory, Main to Coolidge avenue. Profile. 

Amoskeag cemetery, avenue. Profile. 

Ashland, Bridge to Pearl. Profile. 

Auburn, Beech to Maple. Profile. 

Beauport, Amory to Coolidge avenue. Profile. 

Birch, Bridge to Lowell. Two profiles. 

Bremer, Coolidge avenue to west of Montgomery. Proiile.. 

Bridge street road, Hall to Belmont. Profile. 

Brock, Mast to Charleston avenue. Two profiles. 

Brown avenue at Goffe's Falls. Two profiles. 

Calef road. Baker southerly. Profile. 

Carpenter, Elm to Union. Profile. 

Cass, Laurel to Central. Profile. 

Chandler, North to Webster. Profile. 

Coolidge avenue, Amory to Kelley. Three profiles. 

Coolidge avenue at Kelley. Details of corner stone. 

Elm west back. Dean to Langdon. Profile. 

Elm, Manchester to West Central. Three profiles. 

Elm, Granite to West Cedar. Profile. 

George, Milford to top of bluff. Profile. 

Granite, Elm to Franklin. Profile. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 309 

Orove, Belmont to Taylor. Profile. 

Hampshire lane, West Merrimack to Pleasant. Profile. 
Joliette at Kelley, proposed sewerage to shoe shop. Sewer profile. 
Kelley, Beauport to Lafayette. Three profiles. 
Log-, South Main to Colby. Profile. 
Manhattan lane, Central to Spruce. Two jirofiles. 
Massabesic, soundings to Maiumoth road. Two profiles. 
Mast road, new lay-out to Jackson's house. Profile. 
Mast, at ^last brook. 
Mead, Hall to Belmont. Profile. 
Merrill yard, avenues. Profile. 
Merrimack, Union to Beech. Profile. 
Milford, Eochelle avenue to Sylvester. Profile. 
Mill, BroAvn avenue westerly. Profile. 
Mystic, Beech westerly. Profile. 
Xorth Main, Marion to Amory. Profile. 
Korth Main, Amory southerly. Profile. 
Nuffield lane, Amherst to Lowell. Profile. 
Pennacook, Pine to L^'nion. Profile. 
Pennacook, Elm to Canal. Profile. 
Pine, Amherst to Concord. Profile. 
Pine Grove cemetery. Sewer profile. 
Pine Grove cemetery, Woodside avenue. Profile. 
Pine Grove cemetery, avenues. Three profiles. 
Pine Grove cemetery, lawn east of Landscape. 

Pine Grove cemeterj', lawn east of Landscajje. Cross section wnd 
profile. 

Prospect, Oak to Eussell. Profile. 

Prospect, Union to Walnut. Profile. 

Eay, Trenton to Carpenter. Profile. 

Elver road, West Clarke northerly. Profile. 

Eiver road, West Clarke southerly. Profile. 

Eockland avenue. Mast to town line. Four profiles. 

Schuyler, Xorth Main to Dubuque east back. Profile. 

Spruce, Belmont, and Massabesic. Detail of corner stone. 

Sylvester, Milford to Mast. Two profiles. 

Union, Carpenter ta north of Trenton. Profile. 

Walnut, Amherst to Concord. Profile. 

Walnut, Bridge to Pearl. Profile. 

Walnut, Prospect to Harrison.. Profile. 

Welch avenue, Elm to Calef road. Profile. 

Young, Jewett to Cj'press. Sewer profile. 

Total working plans, S3. 



310 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KE.PORTS. 

TRACINGS. 

Elm, Carpenter, Clarke, and Chestnut, square bounded by. 

Elm, at Eailroad bridge, showing grades. 

Mast, at Mast brook, plan showing culvert. 

Milford, Eochelle avenue to Sylvester, for street railway. 

Rockland avenue. Mast to town line, for street railway. Three plans. 

Sylvester, Milford to Mast, for street railway. 

Town of Suncook. 

Total tracings, 9. 

BLfE FEINTS, 

Amoskeag Company's land at Garvin's Falls. Four prints. 

Amoskeag Company's land at Bow. Four prints. 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers. Eight prints. 

Central Park, Hoyt shoe shop section. 

City of Manchester, for hydrant benches. Two prints. 

Elm at Eailroad bridge, showing grades. Two prints. 

Examination sheet. Board of Examiners of Plumbers. Three prints. 

Mast, at Mast brook, plan of culvert. Tw-o prints. 

Milford, land of Walker and Plastridge. Five prints. 

Milford, Eochelle avenue to Sylvester, for street raihvay. Two prints. 

Osborne's Map of New Hampshire. Eleven prints. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Pine lawn, for superintendent. 

Pleasant Hill, Adam Dickey section. Five prints. 

Eockland avenue, iMast to town line. Four px'ints. 

Sj'lvester, Milford to Mast. Two prints. 

Town of Pittsfield. 

Town of Suncook. Eight prints. 

Total blue prints, G5. 

StrMMAKY. 

Plan and profiles (grade) 2 

Plan and profiles (sewer) 28 

Numbering plans 34 

Miscellaneous plans 47 

WoTking plans S3 

Tracings 9 

Blue prints 65 

Sew^er book (sheets) 12 

Sew^er book (part sheets) 25 

City clerk's book 32 

Total 337 

Six tracings and six blue prints showing eitj' sewers have been 
brought up to date. 

Maps brought up to date, 5. 
Plans brought up to date, 207. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 311 

Plans made for establishing of grade on laid-out streets, 67,220 feet. 
Plans made for establishing of grade on streets not laid out, 13,850 
feet. 

Total, 81,070 feet. 

Lot owners looked up, 83,635 feet. 

Sewer Licexses. 

At a meeting of the board of mayor and aldermen, November 19, 
1897, the city engineer was instructed "to examine the books in his 
office and present to said board a list of property pawners who had 
neglected to pay the license fee required by the city laws and ordi- 
nances for entrance to the city sewers." 

The records were examined and a list compiled giving the name of 
the property owner, the location of the lot, the street frontage, and 
the license fee due upon each and every piece of occupied property 
within one himdred feet of a public sewer. 

The said list was given in hand to the city clerk, as clerk of the 
board of mayor and aldermen. 

The list comprised 1,017 names, and a notice was sent each one by 
the citj^ clerk. A summarized statement of the ground covered to 
January 1, 1900, follows, viz.: 

Number of names January 1, 1S9S 1,017 

Paid during 1898 277 

Granted free during 1898 76 

Paid prior to 1898, located during j-ear 121 

Paid during 1899 24 

Granted free during 1899 12 

Paid during 1900 2 

Not connected 1 

Paid prior to 1898, not located 60 

Paid previously 3 

Paid in part 1 

Covered by old permit 1 

Not recorded paid, receipts shown 5 

Recorded paid, no record of cash received 2 

Claims to have been paid, no record. 1 

Licenses taken out, not paid 18 

Not heard from 413 

Total number not settled January 1, 1900 504 

1,017 1,017 

Number of licenses granted delinquent sewer enterers during 

1900 2 

Number of free licenses granted delinquent sew^er enterers 

during 1900 



312 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Number of licenses granted new sewer enterers during 1900... 73 

Number of free licenses granted new sewer enterers during 1900 

Total number of licenses granted during 1900 75 

Amount of money recorded as collected from two delinquent 

sewer enterers during 1900 $28.50 

Amount of money recorded as collected from new sewer 

enterers during 1900 1,105.21 

Amount of money recorded as collected on note given in 1899, 

due in 1900 12.00 

Total amount of monej' recorded as collected during 1900 $1,145.71 
All moneys are collected by the city clerk. 

Street Signs. 

Street signs on hand January 1. 1900 40 

Street signs (white, black letters) ordered dviring 1900 14 

Street signs (double size, black letters) ordered during 

1900 1 

Street signs put up during 1900 13 

Street signs on hand Januarj' 1, 1901 42 

55 55 

COST OF STREET SIGNS FOE 1900. 

C. E. Wood. 
1900. 

Jan. 20. To painting 2 streets signs @ 35c $0.70 

June 1. painting 4 street signs @ 35c 1.40 

July 16. painting 5 street signs @ 35c 1.75 

Aug. 8. 1 double signboard .25 

painting 1 double sign .70 

Oct. 25. painting 3 street signs @ 35c 1.05 

• Total cost of street signs for 1900 $5.85 

The expense of street signs is chai'ged to the apjiropriation for inci- 
dental expenses. The bills are certified to by this department. 

Street Numbers. 

Figures on hand January 1, 1900 641 

Figures ordered during year 1900 432 

Figures used during year 1900 514 

Figures on hand January 1, 1901 559 

1,073 1,073 

]N umbers assigned during 1900 153 

Numbers replaced during 1900 23 

176 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 313 

The expense of street numbers is charg-ed to the appropriation for 
the engineer's department. (See financial report under Union Manu- 
facturing Company.) 

Stone Bounds. 

stone bounds set in 1898. 

Clinton street and South Main street, southwest corner 1 

Clinton street and South Main street, northwest corner 1 

Massabesic street, easterly line, at junction of Old Falls road.. 1 

Massabesic street, northerlj^ side, opposite Taylor street 1 

Massabesic street and Cypress street, northwest corner 1 

Massabesic street and Cj-press street, northeast corner 1 

' Massabesic street, north side, first angle east of Cj-press street 1 

Massabesic street, south side, first angle east of Cypress street 1 

Massabesic street, north side, first angle west of Cypress street 1 

Milton street and Merrimack street, southwest corner 1 

Old Falls road, westerly' line, at junction of 3*Iassabesic street.. 1 

11 

STONE BOUNDS SET IN 1899. 

Auburn street and Hall street, southwest corner 1 

Barr street, center line at angle between Douglas and Conant 1 

Barr street and Conant street, at intersection of center lines.. 1 

Belmont street and Somerville street, northeast corner 1 

Belmont street and Somerville street, southeast corner 1 

Belmont street and Somerville street, northwest corner 1 

Belmont street and Dix street, northeast corner 1 

Belmont street and Dix street, southeast corner 1 

Belmont street and Dix street, southwest corner 1 

Belmont street and Dix street, northwest corner 1 

Belmont street and Howe street, northeast corner 1 

Belmont street and Howe street, northwest corner 1 

Brook street and Albert street, southwest corner 1 

Clay street and Cypress street, northwest corner 1 

Clay street and Cypress street, southwest corner 1 

Cypress street and Hay ward street, northeast corner 1 

Cj-press street and Hay ward street, southeast corner 1 

Dix street and Cypress street, northwest corner 1 

Dix street and C.ypress street, southwest corner 1 

Dix street and Taylor street, northeast corner > i 

Dix street and Taylor street, southeast corner 1 

Douglas street and Barr street, intersection of center lines 1 

Foster avenue and Valley street, southwest corner 1 

Foster avenue and Valley street, southeast corner 1 

Foster avenue, first angle south of Valley street 2 

Foster avenue and Hay ward street, northwest corner 1 

Foster avenue and Hayward street, northeast corner 1 



314 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. ' 

Green street and Hall street, southwest corner 1 

Green street and Hall street, northwest corner 1 

Grove street and Hall street, southwest corner 1 

Hall street and Bell street, northwest corner 1 

Harrison street and Ash street, southeast corner 1 

Harrison street and Maple street, southwest corner 1 

Harrison street and Albert street, northwest corner 1 

Harrison street and Albert street, northeast corner 1 

Hayward street and Jewett street, northeast corner 1 

Hayward street and Jewett street, southeast corner 1 

Hayward street and Jewett street, southwest corner 1 

HayAvard street and Jewett street, northwest corner 1 

Howe street and Cypress street, northwest corner l' 

Howe street and Cypress street, southwest corner 1 

Howe street and Taylor street, northeast corner 1 

Howe street and Taylor street, southeast corner 1 

Jewett street and Merrill street, northeast corner 1 

Jewett street and Merrill street, southeast corner 1 

Lake avenue and Wilson road, northwest corner 1 

Maple street and Prospect street, northwest corner 1 

Mast road and Mast street, north corner 1 

Mast street and Mast road, west corner 1 

Mast road, first angle northwest from Mast street 2 

Mast road, second angle northwest from Mast street 2 

Mast road, third angle northwest from Mast street 2 

iNCast road, fourth angle northwest from Mast street 2 

Merrill street at east end 2 

Old Falls road, first angle south of Si^ruce street 2 

Old Falls road, second angle south of Spruce street 2 

Old Falls road, third angle south of Spruce street 2 

Old Falls road, fourth angle south of Spruce street 2 

Prospect street and Ash street, northeast corner 1 

Eeadey street and Elm street, northwest corner 1 

Readey street and River road, northeast corner 1 

Salmon street and Beech street, southeast corner 1 

Silver street and Hall street, southwest corner 1 

Silver street and Hall street, northwest corner 1 

Somerville street and Hall street, northwest corner 1 

Sonier\ille street and Taylor street, northeast corner 1 

Somerville street and Taylor street, southeast corner 1 

Somerville street and Cypress street, northwest corner 1 

Somerville street and Cypress street, southwest corner ] 

South Main street and Winter street, northwest corner 1 

Spruce street, center line at foot of Beacon street 1 

Spruce street and Old Falls road, southwest corner 1 

Summer street and Hall street, northwest corner 1 

Valley street and Cypress street, southeast corner 1 

85 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 315 

STONE BOUNDS SET IN 1900. 

Auburn street and Wilson street, northwest corner 1 

Auburn street and Wilson street, southwest corner 1 

Avon street and Ingalls street, northeast corner 1 

Avon street and Ing-'alls street, northwest corner 1 

Beech street and Pearl street, northeast corner 1 

Beech street and Orange street, southeast corner 1 

Beech street and North street, northeast corner 1 

Beech street and Webster street, southwest corner 1 

Belmont street and Summer street, southeast corner 1 

Buzzell street and East High street, southwest corner 1 

Buzzell street and East High street, southeast corner 1 

Dearborn street and Summer street, south corner 1 

Dickey street and Avon street, northwest corner 1 

Dickey street, west end of 2 

Forest street and Ing-alls street, northwest corner 1 

Front street and Omega street, northwest corner 1 

Front street and Omega street, southwest corner 1 

Grove street and Belmont street, southeast corner 1 

Grove street and Belmont street, northeast coimer 1 

Grove street and Hosley street, northwest corner 1 

Grove street and Hosley street, northeast corner 1 

Grove street, first ang-le west of Taylor street 2 

Grove street, second angle west of Taj'lor street 2 

Hall street, first angle south of Howe street 2 

Hall street, west line, second angle west of Howe street 1 

Hall street and Holly avenue, northeast corner 1 

Hall street and Holly avenue, southeast corner 1 

Hall stree.t and Yinton street, northeast corner 1 

Hall street and Vinton street, northwest corner 1 

Hayes avenue and Chase avenue, southwest corner 1 

Holly avenue and Cypress street, northeast corner 1 

Holly avenue and Cypress street, southeast corner 1 

Holly avenue and Cypress street, southwest corner 1 

Holly avenue and Cj'press street, northwest corner 1 

Hosley street and Summer street, southwest corner 1 

Hosley street and Summer street, southeast corner 1 

Ingalls street, west end of 2 

Laurel street and Cass street, northeast corner 1 

Laurel street and Cass street, northwest corner 1 

Laurel street and Cass street, southeast corner 1 

Laurel street and Cass street, southwest corner 1 

Lowell street and Buzzell street, northwest comer 1 

Lowell street and Buzzell street, northeast corner 1 

Maple street and Auburn street, southwest corner 1 

Massabesic street and Summer street, south corner 1 



S16 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Massabesic street and Hospital avenue, northeast corner 

Mast street and Brock street, southwest corner 

Mast street and Brock street, southeast corner 

Merrill yard 

Merrimack street and Cass street, southeast corner 

Merrimack street and Cass street, southwest corner 

Old Falls road and Hayes avenue, northeast corner 

Omega street, first angle west from Front street 

Omega street, second angle west from Front street 

Omega street, third angle west from Front street 

Orange street and Ash street, southwest corner 

Pearl street and Ash street, northwest corner 

Eockland avenue, at first angle northerly from Mast street 

Eockland avenue, at second angle northerlj' from Mast street.. 
Kockland avenue, at third angle northerly from Mast street. . . 
Eockland avenue, at fourth angle northerly frona Mast street.. 
Eockland avenue, at fifth angle northerly from Mast street. . . . 
Eockland avenue, at sixth angle northerly from Mast street. . . 
Eockland avenue, at seventh angle northerly from ^Mast street 

Somerville street and Young street, west corner 

South Main street and Log street, northeast corner 

South Main street and Log street, southeast comer 

Spruce street and Belmont street, northwest corner 

Spruce street, north line at angle north of Old Falls road 

Spruce street and Old Falls road, southeast corner 

Spruce street, south line at angle south of Beacon street 

Summer street, northerly line, first angle east of Belmont street 

Sylvester street and Ing-alls street, northeast corner 

Sylvester street and Ingalls street, northwest corner 

Sylvester street and Ingalls street, southwest corner 

Sylvester street and Avon street, south corner 

Sylvester street and Avon street, east corner 

Sylvester street and Avon street, west corner 

Sylvester street and Avon street, intersection of center lines... 

Sylvester street and Dickey street, northeast corner 

Sylvester street and Dickey street, northwest corner 

Sylvester street and Dickey street, southwest corner 

Sylvester street and Mast street, southeast corner 

Sylvester street and Mast street, southwest corner 

Union street and North street, northeast corner 

Vinton street and Cypress street, northwest corner 

Vinton street and Cypress street, northeast corner 

Vinton street, sovith line, Cypress, east line 

Vinton street, south line, and Hall street, west line 

Vinton street, first angle west of Hall street 

Vinton street and Lincoln street, northeast corner 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 317 

Yinton street and Lincoln street, northwest corner 1 

Walnut street and North street, northeast corner 1 

Young street and Hall street, northeast comer 1 

113 
Coal Tar and Stone Block Paving. 

TABLES NOS. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10. 

Following is a tabulated statement giving the location, number of 
square yards, price j)er square yard, total cost, and date when meas- 
ured of all coal-tar "concrete" work and stone block paving, as follows: 
Table No. 1, street crossings (new) done by the Robie Consolidated 
Concrete Company; Table No. 2, street crossing's (repairs) done by the^ 
Eobie Consolidated Concrete Company; Table No. 3, sidewalks (new) 
done by the Eobie Consolidated Concrete Company; Table No. 4, side- 
Avalks (repairs) done by the Eobie Consolidated Concrete Company; 
Table No. 5, driveways (new and repairs) done by the Eobie Consoli- 
dated Concrete Company; Table No. 6, sidewalks (new) done by the- 
Goings Concrete Company; Table No. 7, summary of Tables Nos. 1, 2, 3, 
4, 5, and 6; Table No. S, street paving (stone block) done by Soule, 
Dilling'ham & Co.; Table No. 9, street paving, done by Soule, Dilling- 
ham & Co.; charged to the Manchester Street Eailway and the New 
England Telephone & Telegraph Companj-; Table No. 10, summary of 
Tables Nos. 8 and 9. 

ABSTEACT EEPOET OF THE COMMITTEE ON STEEETS FOE THE 

YEAE 1900. 

PEBSONXEL OF THE COilMITTEE. 

Alderman from ward 2, De Lafayette Eobinson, chairman. 
Alderman from ward 1, John P. Mullen. 
Alderman from ward 5, Eichard J. Barry. 
Alderman from ward 10, Eugene E. Eeed. 
Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

Tables Nos. 11, 12, and 13 have been compiled to be used in the 
annual report of the engineer's department in lieu of citing the records 
of the committee on streets in detail. The tables give all the necessary 
information pertaining to the petitions that have been acted upon by 
the committee during the year 1900, also highways laid out and high- 
ways widened by the board of mayor and aldermen during the year. 

Table No. 11 is a list of the petitions for new highways that have 
been acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table No. 12 is a list of the petitions for establishing grade that have 
been acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table No. 13 is a list of highways that have been laid out or widened 
and straightened during the year by the board of mayor and aldermen.. 

Distances are given in feet. 



^18 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ABSTEACT EEPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OX SEWERS AND 
DRAINS FOR THE YEAR 1900. 

PEBSOXNEL OF THE COMMITTEE. 

Alderman from ward 7, John F. Frost, chairman. 
Alderman from ward 6, Samuel M. Conch. 
Alderman from ward S, Gillis Stark. 
Alderman from ward 10, Eugene E. Reed. 
Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

Tables Nos. 14, 15, 16, 17, IS, 19, 20, 21, and 22 have been compiled to 
be used in the annual report of the engineer's department in lieu of 
citing the records of the committee on sewers and drains in detail. 
The tables give all the necessary information pertaining to the peti- 
tions, orders for sewers passed by the city councils, sewers built and 
not built up to January 1, 1901. 

Table No. 14 is a list of all the petitions that have been acted upon 
during the year, also the manner in which, and date when, each peti- 
tion was acted upon and disposed of bj^ the committee. 

Table No. 15 is a list of sewers ordered in up to January 1, 1900, 
giving the distances built, distances built in excess of order, distances 
ordered that are unnecessary, and the distances remaining unbuilt up 
to January 1, 1901. 

Table No. 16 is a list of sewers ordered built during 1900, giving the 
distance built, distance built in excess of order, distances ordered that 
are unnecessary, and the distances remaining unbuilt iip to January 
1, 1901. 

Table No. 17 is a list of sewers built in 1900 not ordered by the board 
of mayor and aldermen. 

Table No. IS is a list of sewers relaid, giving the distance removed 
and the distance relaid. 

Table No. 19 is a list of sewers ordered in, but not built up to Jan- 
uary 1, 1901. This table is compiled from the first, second, fourth, and 
eighth columns of Tables Nos. 15 and 16. 

Table No. 20 is a list of sewers ordered in up to January 1, 1901, 
giving the distances that are unnecessary to build. 

Table No. 21 is a list of sewers built during 1899, pending the passage 
of orders in 1900, giving the distances built and date of order. 

Table No. 20 is not included in Table No. 19. 

Table No. 22 is a summary of Tables Nos. 15 and 16. 

Distances are given in feet. 

SeWEEAGE SYSTEil. 

Table No. 23 gives the location, material, size, and length of sewers, 
together with the number of manholes, lampholes, house Y's, and cess- 
pool Y's. built during the year 1900. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 319 

Table Xo. 24 gives the material, size, and length of all public sewers 
in the city of Manchester, January 1, 1901. This table further gives 
the total length (in feet) of each size of sewer and the number of 
manholes on each size, also the total length (in feet and miles) of each 
material. 

Table No. 25 gives the location, size, material, and length of pipe 
removed, where sewers have been relaid during the year 1900. 

Table Xo. 26 is a summary of the sewerage system by years, from 
January 1, 1880, to January 1, 1901. It gives the length in miles con- 
structed and cost each year; also the average cost per mile for each 
year. The third column gives the number of miles constructed to 
date, each year. It will be noted that January 1, 1880, there were 17.06 
miles constructed, the cost not being recorded. January 1, 1890, there 
were recorded 2,003 house connections. Beginning with this date, 
columns four and five give the number of connections recorded each 
year and the total number recorded to date each year. 

ABSTRACT EEPORT OF THE BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 

PLUMBERS. 

In accordance with an act (chapter 55, Laws of 1899) passed by the 
New Hampshire state legislature, entitled "An act authorizing the 
examination of plumbers and regulating the practice of plumbing and 
house draining," a board of examiners of plumbers was appointed by 
His Honor Mayor William C. Clarke of Manchester, N. H., as follows: 
William K. Robbins of the board of health, Christian L. Wolf, a master 
plumber, and Samuel J. Lord, city engineer. (William K. Robbins, 
president; Samuel J. Lord, clerk.) 

Following is a statement of the expenditures of the board for the 
A-ear 1900: 

UNIO>' PVBLISHI^'G COMPA>'y. 

1899. 
Aug. 23. To notice to plumbers, I14 inches, 9 times $5.79 

JOHN B. CLARKE COMPANY. 

To printing 5/27 city engineer's annual reports, 

10 pages, @ 5Sc. per page $5.80 

W. p. GOOI»rAN. 

June 2. To 150 catalogue envelopes $1.00 

19. 1 lot envelopes .60 

$1.60 

Dec. 20. 1 box typewriter paper 1.00 



320 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



O. D. KNOX. 

1900. 
June 14. To 250 2-cent stamps for the board of examiners 
of plumbers 

PIKE & HEALD COMPAjVY. 

Sept. 13. To 31/2 pounds fine solder @ 26c $0.91 

1 4-incli soil clami^ .10 

2 gallons gasoline @ 20c .40 

2 laounds putty @ 4'C .08 

C. L. WOLF. 

Dec. 13. To 1 box wood dresser $0.85 

1 grease box 1.25 

1 Vand. joint runner 2.25 

. 2 sets ticking wiping cloths 1.50 

1 4-inch ladle .55 

1 Vand. lead pipe cutter 1.25 

1 No. 2 hatchet copper .90 

1 yarning iron .85 

1 114 wire bender 1.50 

2 Med. turn pins .50 

2 4-inch Fers. plugs 3.00 

3 11^ Dufr. plugs .60 

1 oval shave hook .30 

1 tap borer .45 

5 wheels for Vand. pipe cutter .25 

2 bolts for Vand. pipe cutter .10 

2 packing irons 1.00 

2 right and left caulking irons 1.00 

$18.10 

1 Vanderman No. 4 tool chest 21.50 

$39.60 

freight .70 

JOHN B. VAEICK COMPANY. 

Dee. 18. To 1 machinist hammer $0.30 

1 machinist hammer .60 

1 screw driver .25 

2 cold chisels @ 25c .50 

1 pair dividers .20 

1 pocket knife .50 



$5.00 



$i.4a 



$40. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



321 



To 1 12-inch Sc. wrench $0.75 

1 2-foot rule .35 

1 pair cutting pliers, cy^ 1.00 

1 ly^ Firmen gauge .62 

1 pair gas pliers .40 

1 pointing trowel .20 

1 lead pipe saw .50 

1 rasp .35 

2 solder copj)er .75 

1 hammer .50 

1 duster .50 

1 10-inch Stilson wrench 1.00 

1 ]N"asher cutter .40 

steel .15 

$9.82 

Dec. 20. To 1 bit brace $1.00 

1 expansive bit 1.25 

1 bit .22 

1 14 -inch B. S. drill .19 

1 3/g-inch B. S. drill .30 

1 bolt, 61/0x1/2 .04 

1 oil stone .90 

$3.90 

C. O. SEAMAN. 

Dec. 19. To plumbers' tools $1.00 

E. A. STRATTON. 

Dec. 21. To 2 boxes typewriter paper $2.80 

$78.50 

SUMMARY. 

Appropriated to the board of examiners of plumbers for the 

year 1900 $100.00 

Expenses of the board during year 1900 $78.50 

Balance unexpended 21.50 

$100.00 $100.00 
Renewal fees received for 93 plumbers' certificates @ $0.50 
(a renewal fee of $0.50 per certificate is required by state 

law) $46.50 

Renewal fees received for 3 jilumbers' licenses @ $0.50 (re- 
quired by law) 1.50 

Paid to the citj treasurer (the state law requires all fees 

to be paid into the city treasury) $48.00 

21 



322 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Table No. 27 gives the name, address, and number of the application 
of each and every person making rene%val application to the board 
for a plumber's certificate. This table also gives the class of certificate 
applied for (master or journeyman), the number of the certificate, 
date of renewal and expiration of said certificate, also the renewal fee 
paid by the applicant. 

Table Xo. 28 gives the name, address, and number of the application 
of each and every jDerson making renewal application to the board for 
a plumber's license. This table also gives the class of license applied 
for (master or journeyman), the number of the license granted, date 
of renewal and expiration of said license, also the fee paid by the 
applicant. 

Table No. 29 is a summary of Tables No. 27 and No. 28. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 



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538 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. 17. 
SEWERS BUILT IN 1900 WITHOUT AX ORDER. 



Location. 



Limits. 



Distance. 



Auburn south back 

Bartlett 

Blodget* 

Dartmouth 

Depot 

Elm east back* 

Lake avenue south back. 

Lincoln f 

Putnam 



West of Maple easterly 

South of Putnam to Sullivan 

Elm to Elm east back 

North of Frederick to south of Frederick. 

Hampshire lane easterly 

Blodget to Blodget south back 

I'nion westerly 

Spruce to Cenietery brook 

Whipple to east of" Thornton 



68 
316 
214 
20-2 

66 
126 

92 
333 
298 



1,715 



Supersedes cross lot sewer. t Overflow for Spruce street sewer. 

TABLE No. 18. 
SEWERS RELAID IN 1900. 



Location. 



Limits . 



Distance 
removed. 



Distance 
built. 



Blodget south back. . 
Central south back.. 



Total. 



Elm east back to Chestnut . . 
Manhattan lane to Chestnut. 



380 
496 



876 



380 
496 



TABLE No. 19. 
SEWERS ORDERED IN BUT NOT BUILT TO JAN. 1, 1901. 




Amherst street — 
Amory street 

Auburn street 

Auburn s. b. street. 

Beacon street 

Beech street 

Belmont street 

Blaine street 

Bremer n. b. street 
Cedar s, b. street. . . 
Central street 

Chestnut street 

Clay street 

Columbus sti'eet .. 



Union to Ashland 

Alsace easterly 

Essex to Morgan 

Cypress easterly 

East of Canton easterly 

Hall easterly 

Amherst to "Concoi'd 

Harvard to Hay ward 

Bridge to Orange 

Old Bridge to Bridge 

Amherst southerly 

Second to Hiram 

Coolidge ave. w. b. to Rimmon 

Beech westerly 

Belmont to Milton 

Milton to Beacon 

Clarke northerly 

Wilson to Hall 

Amory southerly 



2,600 
200 
702 
300 

90 
150 

71 
272 
629 
200 
150 
400 

89 
175 
242 
fSll 
750 
240 
128 



May 
Sept. 

May 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Dec. 

Oct. 

May 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Dec. 

June 

July 



2, 1893 
7, 1897 
4, 1900 
2, 1899 
9, 1894 
7, 1896 
10, 1896 
4, 1898 
4, 1900 
7, 1896 
4, 1900 
6, 1S92 

4, 1898 

5, 1896 
2, 1897 

6, 1898 
6, 1898 
5, 1900 

26, 1899 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 
TABLE No. 19.— Continued. 



339 



Location. 




Distance. 



Date of 
order. 



Concord Street Pine e. b. to Union 

" ! Hall easterly 

Dover street 

Elm street 



Foster avenue . . . 
Frederick street. 

Front street 

George street — 
Grove s. b. street 

Hall road 

Hale street 

Hanover street . . 
Harrison street . . , 



Harvell street 

Hayes avenue 

Hayward street. . . 
Ilevey e.b. street. 



Jones street — 
Lake avenue... 
Mammoth road 



Massabesic street. 



Mast road 

Merrill street 

Merrill s. b. street . . 

Nelson street 

Xutt road 

Orange street , 

Pine street 

Pine e. b. street 

Plummer street , 

Prospect street 

Rimmon e. b. street.. 

River road 

Russell street 

Sagamore street 

Schiller street 

Second street 



Somerville street — 

South Main street 

Spruce street 

Summer s. b. street., 

Sylvester street 

Taylor street 



Union street 



Union e. b. street. 
Valley street 



Walnut street 

Walnut e. b. street. 

West street \ CHntoii uortherlv 

Wentworth street. . . . ; Schiller northerlj' 
William street \ Milf ord to Mast . . 



Clinton northerly 

Shasta to Baker 

Railroad bridge to Elm avenue 

Monroe s. b. to Clarke 

Trenton to Rowell 

Vallej- to Hayward 

Second easterly 

Eddy to north of hotel 

Milfm-d northerly 

Wilson easterly.". 

Massabesic to Nelson 

Schiller soutlierly 

East of Alfred to Highland 

Maple to Oak 

Belmont westerly 

Hale to South Main 

Old Falls road to Chase avenue 

Ainsworth avenue to Cypress 

Wayne northerly 

So. of Aniovy toColumbus avenue. . 

Kelley northerly 

Nelson to Benton 

East of Canton to Hall road 

Massabesic to Kelson 

Nelson northerly 

Jewett to Hall road 

Hall road to Mammoth road 

Mast to Old Bedford-Goffstown line 

Jewett easterly 

Pine to Union 

Hall road to Mammoth road 

Silver to Baker 

Belmont westerly 

Silver to Plummer 

South of Concord to Concord 

Pine to Union 

Hall easterly 

Kelley to Mason 

Clarke to Park avenue 

South of Blodget to Sagamore 

Linden westerly 

Hale to South Main 

North of Frederick to Frederick 

South of Schiller to Harvell 

Union to Maple 

Cypress westerly 

Schiller to Allen 

East of Canton easterly 

Wilson to Hall " 

Milford to Avon 

Valley southerly 

South of Valley southerly 

Clarke to Trenton .' 

North of Prescott to Merrill s. b 

North of Prescott to Hay ward 

Silver to Plummer 

South of Christian brook southerly. 

Cypress westerly 

Elm to Wilson 

Salmon southerly 

Salmon northerlv 



Total. 



15-2 

86 
160 
lOfi 

1,373 
707 
448 
140 
175 

2,S00 
40 
200 
601 
450 
134 
350 
65 
700 
206 
14S 
146 
396 
175 
550 
23.5 

1,166 
500 
541 
934 

1,470 
366 
500 
570 

1,635 
65 
447 
160 
510 
100 
800 
306 
770 
148 
850 
118 
160 
512 
450 

1,340 
110 
512 
546 
225 
150 

1,700 

337 

192 

26 

50 

133 

4,040 
105 
88 
226 
400 
522 



Sept. 



May 

June 
Feb. 
July 

Sept. 

June 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

July 

June 

Aug. 

Sept. 

May 

Aug. 

May 
Mar. 
June 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Nov. 
Oct. 
Nov. 

July 
Dec. 
Aug. 
Dec. 

Jan. 
Oct. 
July 

Sept. 

Oct. 

July 

June 

Sept. 

Aug. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Sept. 

Oct. 



12, 1899 
6. 1887 
4, 1894 
6, 1890 

6, 1890 

4, 1895 
4, 1896 

14, 1896 
26, 1899 

5, 1893 
5, 1900 

2, 1897 
5, 1898 
9, 1894 

4, 1897 

3, 1899 

1, 1896 
9, 1894 

2, 1899 

7, 1897 
7, 1896 

10, 1893 

5, 1900 

5, 1898 

6, 1898 
2,1899 
5, 1898 
5, 1898 

2, 1899 

13, 1900 
5, 1900 
5, 1900 
5, 1898 

4, 1900 
4, 1896 

3, 1899 
12, 1899 

3, 1899 
3, 1895 

7, 1897 

2, 1897 

3, 1899 
10, 1896 
10, 1896 
26, 1899 

3, 189.1 
2, 1898 

4, 1900 
4, 1900 
7, 1896 
3, 1899 

26, 1899 

4, 1900 
2, 1900 

2, 1895 

5, 1900 
7, 1897 

3, 1895 

6, 1895 

4, 1897 

7, 1893 
29, 1897 
10, 1896 

4, 1894 

5, 1895 
3, 1899 



340 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. 20. 



SEWERS ORDERED IN UP TO JAN. 1, 1901, NOT BUILT AND NOT 
NECESSARY. 





Location Limits. 


Distance. 


Date of 
order. 


Ash street 




2 

52 


Dec. 4, 1900 


Grove s. b. street .... 




Sept. 7, 1897 








Total 


54 











TABLE No. 21. 
SEWERS BUILT IN 1899. PENDING PASSAGE OF ORDER IN 1900. 



Location. 



Limits. 



Distance. 



Date of 
order. 



Clay street... 
Wilson street 



Total. 



Wilson easterly . . . 
Somerville to Clay 



272 
250 



June 5, 1900 
" 5, 1900 



TABLE No. 22. 
SUMMARY. 



Table 15, 
Table 15, 
Table 15, 
Table 15, 
Table 15, 
Table 16, 
Table 16, 
Table 16, 
Table 16, 
Table 16, 
Table 16, 
Table 16, 



column 3, ordered in to January 1, 1900 

column 5, built 

column 6, built in excess of order 

column 7, unnecessary 

column 8, not built 

column 3, ordered in in 1900 

column 3, t t< built without orders in 1S99 

column 3, *, see table 18, sewers relaid in 1900. 

column 5, built 

column 6, built in excess of order 

column 7, unnecessary 

column 8, not built 



36,571 



10,921 



47,676 



2,977 



52 
33,613 



522 

496 

1,605 



8,409 



Sewers built in 1900 of those ordered in up to January 1, 1901, feet 4,582 

Sewers built in 1900 without orders, feet 1,715 

Sewers relaid in 1900, feet 876 

Total length of sewers laid in 1900, feet 7,173 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



341 



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7,010 

105,757 

114,5(14 

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41,159 

12,527 

17,384 

16,857 

1,697 

1,600 

822.5 

446 

1,195 

373 

1,400 

285 

1,506 

1,197 

849 

11,051 

514 

4,530 

1,300 

3,279 

1,007 

4,388 

790 

3,104 

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506 

440 

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1,197 

840 
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1,360 
3,279 
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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



343 



TABLE No. 25. 
PIPE REMOVED WHERE SEWERS HAVE BEEN RELAID. 



Location. 


Limits. 


Material. 


DO 


5 « 

h-5-' 


Blodget south back. 
Central south back.. 




Cement. 
Akron. 

Cement. 


9 
15 

9 


380 


Manhattan lane to Chestnut 


496 


Cross lot (at 15. F. 
Martin's) 




270 






1,146 



TABLE No. 26. 
SUMMARY OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM SIXCE 1880. 



Tear. 



Miles con- 
structed 
during 
year. 



Miles con- 
structed to 
date. 



House con- 
nections 
recorded 
during 
year. 



House con- 
nections 
recorded 
to date. 



Cost 

of 

sewers. 



Average 

cost 
per mile. 



1880.. 
1881. . 
1S82. . 
1883.. 
1SS4. . 
1S85.. 
1886.. 
1S87.. 
l^SS. . 
18S9.. 
1S90.. 
1891. . 
18;>2. . 
1893. . 
1894. . 
1895. . 
1896. . 
1897.. 
1898.. 
1899 . 
1900. . 



1.62 
2.18 
3.37 
2.54 
1.73 
1.56 
2.15 
1.44 
1.73 
2.66 
1.81 
3.08 
3.13 
3 31 
2.91 
3.98 
4.71 
»3.93 
*3.76 
*1.54 
*1.14 



18.66 
20.84 
24.21 
26.75 
28.48 
30.04 
32.19 
33.63 
35.36 
38.02 
39.83 
42.91 
46.04 
49.35 
52,26 
56.24 
60.95 
64.42 
67.60 
69.01 
70.15 



64 
L53 
214 
191 
25S 
255 
237 
283 
520 
208 
231 



2,003 
2,067 
2,220 
2,434 
2,625 
2,883 
3,138 
3,375 
3.658 
4,178 
4,386 
4,617 



$19,919.40 
23,895.12 
24,148.13 
21,452.05 
21,548.60 
28,122.84 
44,479.15 
19,893.92 
31,154.19 
27,513.73 
39,297.97 
5.1,409.73 
39,724.65 
51,392.15 
46,116.01 
71,859.36 
66,408.87 
36,258.41 
34,939.51 
16,683.39 
13,748.41 



Total..! $720,217. 18t 



$12,295.92 
10,901.06 
7,165.65 
8,445.69 
12,445.84 
18,027.46 
20,687.97 
13,815.22 
18,008.20 
10,343.51 
21,711.58 
17,990.17 
12,691.58 
15,526.33 
15,847.42 
18,055.11 
14,099.33 
9,226 05 
9 292 42 
10',819!31 
12.091.53 



♦Includes old sewers relaid. 
t Total cost for 21 years. 



344 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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345 



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348 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

To His Honor the Mayor, the Board of Aldermen, the gentlemen of 
the Common Council, and the various committees with whom it has 
been my pleasure to come in contact, I wish to express my apprecia- 
tion of the valued assistance and support j^ou have rendered me during 
the year. 

My acknowledgments are due to the gentlemen of the Street and 
Park Commission, for their courtesy, consideration, and co-operation 
in matters in which we were mutually concerned. 

SAMUEL J. LORD, 

City Engineer. 



EEPOET 

OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



EEPOET or TEE SUPEEINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



To the School Board, the City Councils, and the Citizens of Manchester: 

The following- is presented as the fifty-fourth annual report of the 
public schools of the citj' of Manchester, the same being also the 
forty-fifth report of the suiierintendent of public instruction and the 
final school report for the year 1900. 

The statistics and figures given in this report are for the school 
year beginning with August, 1899, and closing Avith July, 1900. 

During this past year there hav6 been in session 128 different schools, 
the number for the entire year averaging 126. These have been 
divided as follows: The equivalent of 15 rooms of high school grade; 
33 rooms of grammar grade; 30 middle schools; 41 primary schools; 
1 partially graded, 5 ungraded, and 1 manual training school. These 
figures show an increase of 3 schools over the number reported for 
last year. This gain has occurred in the high school, in the grammar, 
and in the middle schools, which have increased hy 6 rooms, while the 
primary schools have lost 3, giving a net gain of 3 rooms for the year. 

The gain in the high school is due to the increase of the teaching 
force by the permanent emploj-ment of three of the former volunteer 
teachers. The loss in the primary rooms may be accounted for by the 
closing of rooms in the Spring-street and Lowell-street schools. "While 
the grammar grades have increased by but 1 room, the average num- 
ber of pupils belonging has increased by 62, and the average daily 
attendance bj' 65. This increase in daily attendance has occurred 
chiefly in the Hallsville and Ash-street schools, where the gains have 
been, respectively, 21 and 40. The middle schools, which show an in- 
crease of 2 rooms, have for the average number belonging 1,263 pupils, 
an increase of 97; the average daily attendance, however, has increased 
but 47. The 2 additional rooms in these grades were opened in the 
Straw and Wilson schools. 

The whole number of pupils belonging to the primary schools was 
2,278, as compared with 2,609 for the preceding year, a decrease of 331. 
The average number belonging was 1,615. as compared with 1,694 for 
the preceding year, a decrease of 79. The average daily attendance 
was 1,449, as compared with 1.507 for the preceding year, a decrease of 
58 pupils. These figures — 2,278 pupils registered this year with aver- 

351 



I 



352 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

age niimber belonging of 1,615, and 2,609 registered last year with an 
average number belonging of 1,694 — show that of all pupils entering 
the primary schools five and one half per cent more remained in school 
this year than last, or a larger per cent was advanced to the middle 
schools than in the year preceding, while the number entering these 
schools was smaller than last year. This is corroborated by the in- 
crease of middle schools. The loss for the year in average number 
belonging was but 79. 

The total enrollment of pupils was 5,461, of whom 2,764 were boys 
and 2,697 were girls; 5,284 attended two weeks or more, leaving 177 — 
a trifle more than three per cent — who failed to remain in school for 
that period of time. Of the number attending two weeks or more, 
355 were over sixteen years of age, 565 were under six, and 4,364 were 
between the ages of six and sixteen. 

Th number enrolled, 5,461, is smaller than for the three years jire- 
ceding-; the average number belonging, however, is but 11 less than 
last year, and the average daily attendance is 20 greater than for last 
year, which would seem to show that the schools have partially made 
up the loss which occurred when rooms in the Spring-street and Low- 
ell-street schools were closed. This average daily attendance has been 
exceeded but once in the history of our schools, and that in 1897-98, 
when, in the fall of 1897, many children over sixteen years of age were 
attracted to school because of inability to obtain employment. 

There have been employed to instruct in the various schools, 135 
teachers for the entire year. Seven of these are supervising male 
principals of large buildings; 2, a lady principal and assistant, care 
for the training school; 121 are class-room teachers, and of these 9 
ladies and 2 gentlemen are principals of buildings; 3, 1 lady and 2 
g'entlemen, are special teachers. This is an increase of 5 over the 
number emploj^ed last year, 3 in the high school and 2 in the eleinen- 
tary schools. 

eve:^ing schools. 

The enrollment in the evening schools for the j^ast year shows a 
material increase over that of last year, and the average daily attend- 
ance a slight increase over the average for the preceding ten j^ars. 
The experiment of opening- these schools early in the year has been 
tried for the second time this past fall. Taking the average for ten 
years — 168 — as a basis for comparison, the result the first year was an 
increase in daily attendance of 11, the result the second year a decrease 
of 12. No material advance, therefore, has been made by the adoption 
of the plan. A majority of the pupils attending these schools are 
unable to read and write the English language. They attend for the 
purpose of learning this. The method employed, that of dividing the 
school into a number of small classes and allowing one teacher to 
devote himself to this section, is most advantageous and produces the 
best results. The pupils are earnest and studious. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 353 

CHANGES IX CORPS OF TEACHERS. 

The past year has been marked by few changes in onr corps of 
teachers. Mr. Albert Somes, master of the high school, resigned at 
the close of the school year, and Mr. George H. Libby of Lewiston was 
elected to manage the school. The high school. teaching- force has also 
been increased bj' three members. Miss Grace M. Page, Miss Winona M. 
Martin, and Miss Elsie D. Fairbanks. Miss Annie Patten has resumed 
her position as master's assistant at the Lincoln-street school. Four 
teachers, iMiss Bessie Cochran, Miss Mabel Ruth Brown, Miss Bessie E. 
Dodge, and Miss M. Clara Hawkes, have resigned to enter into the 
holier relations of matrimony. Miss Susie G. Woodman of the Halls- 
ville school and Miss Clydie M. Flanders of the Amoskeag have resigned 
because of ill health. The closing of some schools and the opening of 
others, together with these resignations, have necessitated some read- 
justments in different schools. Miss Lora E. Hill has been elected to 
the third division of the Ash-street school; Miss Elizabeth Walsh to the 
Main-street; Miss Florence M. Ward to the Parker school; Miss Flor- 
ence H. Moore to the Straw school; Miss Winnifred Hall to the Halls- 
ville school; and Miss Mary S. Eichardson to the Amoskeag school. 
Miss Ethel Nicholson and Miss Annie B. Angell have taught extra 
rooms for a portion of the year. 

A statement of the crowded condition of several schools having been 
made and the attention of the board having been directed to the need 
of increased school accommodations in certain quarters, a special com- 
mittee was appointed to investigate and report. The report made at 
the December meeting is here reproduced: 

"The committee appointed to investigate the over-crowded condition 
of certain schools having- made a personal investigation of the matter, 
beg leave to report as follows: 

"At the Hallsville school they found that every room was well filled, 
and that the lower grades were crowded; that while at the present 
time it is barely possible to get along under the existing circumstances, 
with the increase which will come in Ajiril and September it will be 
impossible to accommodate all of the scholars in the district in the 
j)resent quarters. On the east end of the lot there is ample room to 
build on a four-room addition to this building; this will be economy 
from the fact that no additional land will have to be jjurchased, and 
also from the fact that the new schools established in this addition will 
be under the supervision of the present principal. Your committee, 
therefore, recommend that the school board ask the city government 
lo aiopropriate $10,000 for the purpose of building- this four-room addi- 
tion to the Hallsville school. 

"The conditions at the Kimmon school are similar. There is at pres- 
ent a four-room building-, the three higher rooms of which are not 
over-crowded in point of numbers, but it is necessary in the principal's 
room, for instance, to have five classes; in the lower grade, in a room 
23 



S54 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

which was built to accommodate forty-eig'ht there are seventy-three 
small j)upils crowded; extra seats and extra chairs have been used to 
accommodate them; they are divided into six classes, and there are 
two teachers in this room; when we entered the room the two teachers 
•were busy hearing their respective classes recite, one in one corner of 
the room, and the other in another corner, at a great disadvantage. 
The difficulty at this school can be remedied by building a two-room 
addition on the north end of the lot, and your committee recommend 
the school board to ask the city government to appropriate $6,000 for 
the purpose of building a two-room addition to this school. 

"x\t the Parker school all the rooms were found to be well filled, 
and it is necessary to utilize a small anteroom for the purpose of 
"hearing recitations. The upper story of this building- is in an unfin- 
ished condition, and the condition of the Varney and Parker schools 
makes more room necessary. Your committee, therefore, recommend 
".that the school board ask the city government to appropriate $2,000 
Ho finish off one or two rooms in the second story of the Parker school. 
^'The situation at the Bakersville school has been discussed so much 
during- the past two years that the board is probablj^ more or less 
familiar with the situation there. The building Avas designed for a 
four-room structure; two additional rooms have been provided by put- 
ting a temporary partition throug-h the hall; these rooms are directly 
under the slate roof; in summer time the heat is oppressive; in the 
winter time it is almost impossible to warm the rooms, and practically 
impossible to ventilate them. A canvass of the remote part of this 
school district shows that there are from thirtj^ to forty pupils who 
have to travel from a mile and a half to two miles in order to attend 
school; they are compelled to bring" their dinners, and in the winter 
time to be locked up in the school building during the noon hour. 
The situation in this section of the city demands a new school build- 
ing, and your committee would recommend the school board to ask 
the city government to appropriate the sum of $10,000 for the partial 
erection of aia eight-room school biiilding in South ^lanchester. 

"Eespectfully submitted. 

"HARRY T. LORD. 

"EDSON S. HEATH. 

'•ELLIOT C. LAMBERT." 

ilAXUAL TBAIXIXG SCHOOL. 

The need of an additional teacher in the manual training school has 
already been presented to the board. The best results in this school 
are to be obtained in divisions of fifteen. All of Mr. Browne's classes, 
w^ith one exception, exceed this number; the majority of them exceed 
twenty. The enrollment at the next semi-annual promotion will be 
two hundred and sixty, an increase of thirty-six. This will necessi- 
tate the equipiueut of another room or the shortening of the course 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 355 

by the exclusion of pupils entitled to begin the work at that time. 
The extension rather than the eurtailment of this form of school work 
is to be desired. The course, by vote of the board, has been made com- 
pulsory during the year. The school needs a small eng-ine-lathe for 
"working- in iron, in addition to the ordinary supplies and materials 
for pupils' use. 

At the opening of the fall term, last past, sewing was introduced 
into the eighth and ninth years of the grammar school curriculum. 
The course is but partially- formulated, and will be presented to the 
full board as soon as completed. It remains for the school board to 
take one additional step and teach cooking in our public schools. In 
ninetj- per cent of the households in this country, the wife and mother 
performs this most important duty of preparing the food for the table. 
Such a course of training" as will give some knowledge of food values 
and of the proper and economical preparation of diiferent common 
foods ■svould be of inestimable value to the coming generation. 

RETIEEME?\T OF MR. WILLIAM E. BL'CK. 

The schools and community have, with regret, noted the withdrawal 
of Mr. Buck from the active work of education in this city. Born in 
the town of Hampstead and educated in the institutions of this state, 
he was truly a son of New Hampshire. After teaching in Illinois, in 
Pennsylvania, and in Massachusetts, he was called to this city to pre- 
side over the Intermediate school, then located on Manchester street; 
thence he was transferred to the North Grammar, now the Spring- 
street, and afterwards was placed at the head of the Ash-street school, 
from which position he was elected to the responsible and honorable 
position of superintendent of schools. This oflfice he filled with fidelity 
and zeal for twenty-three years, until compelled to relinquish its duties 
by failing health. Under his administration the schools doubled in 
number and progressed immeasurably. Mr. Buck w-as respected and 
honored by all with whom he came in contact. A most skilled in- 
structor, his clear insight into childish character and soimd judgment 
in school matters made him a tower of strength to teachers and pupils. 
The advancement and the betterment of the schools in his charge were 
his sole desire, and with single-heartedness of purpose he dedicated 
himself to their serA-ice. In details of administration he was unex- 
celled and in matters of broad policj^ foremost among the citizens of 
the community. 

READING. 

The importance of reading in our school curriculum can hardly be 
overestimated. It is the key to the thought of the great minds of all 
countries and every age. Literature has been defined as "The written 
record of valuable thought having other than practical use." In addi- 
tion to this form of literature there is a vast accumulation of what 



356 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

may be called technological matter, writing jDertaining- to different arts, 
trades, or pursuits, that is having practical use and relating immedi- 
ately to man's capacity to earn wages. This art is constantly em- 
ployed by all civilized peoples, and the history of education bears 
witness to its importance, when we recall the fact that reading was 
the first study generally taught. It then stands first in importance 
in our school curriculum, and deserves a somewhat greater emphasis 
and attention than it has received. Reading is the "gathering of 
thought from the written or printed page," and the acquisition of 
this power at the very earliest period consistent with the child's pow- 
ers should be the principal aim of our primary schools. Accompany- 
ing tnis acquisition of ideas from the jarinted page are certain requi- 
sites which characterize good reading. The child must be taught to 
use his lips, tongue, and vocal organs correctly, that articulation may 
be distinct and clear. The failure to open the mouth and enunciate 
words distinctly is in many cases an evidence of imperfect perception 
of the elements of the word. A correct position is an antecedent pre- 
requisite for the best results. Good expression is attained only as 
the pupil clearly apprehends the idea of the sentence. The halting-, 
expressionless reading is an evidence of non-comprehension, and shows 
that the child is absorbed in the endeavor to master that one word 
upon which his eyes dwell, that he does not perceive quickly, that his 
mind is lost in the maze of characters which compose the word. The 
training of the eye to apprehend quickly and accurately the characters 
oomjiosing- a word, and consequently the idea which it represents, is 
indispensable to the most rapid advancement in learning to read. In 
the lower grades, a re-reading of lessons is to be deprecated as a seri- 
ous injur3^ The selections are designed only to give practice in the 
recognition of words, and those words representing- such ideas as are 
easily comprehended by the child and such as he has probablj^ used, 
but with whose written form he is not familar. The review lesson in 
reading is, then, injurious because the pupil's memory, to a large 
extent, takes the place of his eyes and a habit of carelessness in 
observation is the result. So one class should not read a book which 
has been ijreviously read in its hearing in the schoolroom. The pre- 
sentation of new matter at each lesson not only continually develops 
and quickens the power of observation but also gives added interest, 
and interest and power go hand in hand. Power fails to grow when 
there is no interest. 

The beginners in our schools learn during- the first half year sixty- 
eight words; during the second half year they learn from two to four 
hundred additional words. The minimum number of words learned, 
then, is two hundred and sixty-eight; the maximum, five hundred. 
During a recent visit to a neighboring town, at the end of the eleventh 
weeic of the term, two weeks of which had been lost by an epidemic of 
scarlet fever, the teacher was asked how many words the pupils had 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 357 

learned. The answer was, "Over three hnnclred." A question as to 
the number taught during the year elicited the fact that over three 
thousand were read by the first-year pupils. An ex-superintendent 
informs me that his first-year pupils read in various primers and 
nature readers over thirteen hundred pages. The methods employed 
in the two cities Avere different, and it may be the cases are extreme. 
These facts give us food for reflection and are worthy of investigation. 
Children learn to read by reading. The necessity of providing supple- 
mentary reading to a much greater extent than that to which it is 
furnished should be apparent to you. In many neighboring com- 
munities, ten or twelve sets of books are read while we are reading 
one and one half sets, and this with no greater expenditure of labor 
and time than on our own part. President Eliot, in an address on 
"The Average Grammar School," makes some pertinent observations 
in regard to the quantity of reading done during the last six years of 
school life. He "procured two careful estimates of the time it would 
take a graduate of a high school to read aloud consecutiveh' all the 
books which are read during six years, including the history, the 
reading lessons in geograjohy, and the book on manners. The esti- 
mates were made by two persons reading aloud at a moderate rate 
and reading everything that most of the children read during- the entire 
course of six years. The time occupied in doing this reading was 
fortj-six hours, or an average of one minute and sixteen seconds a 
day. This test of the quantity of work performed in a grammar 
school is of course a very rough and inadequate one. It does not 
represent at all the labor of the childish mind; it does not represent 
the labor of the teacher; but it gives some clue to the very limited 
acquaintance with literature which the children get in the entire course 
of six years." Let us assume that Ave have double the reading matter 
of this average grammar school, Ave shall then furnish A\'hat vAdll 
average tAvo and one half minutes per day of reading during the 
middle and grammar school years. Furthermore, aa^c habitually under- 
estimate rather than OAerestimate the poAvers of our pupils. Breadth 
rather than depth is to be striven for in the earlier years of school 
life. The more impressions stored aAA-ay in the brain the more mate- 
rial there is for apperception and consequently greater depth at a 
later day. 

Through the poAA-er to read early acquired is to come to a great 
extent this early breadth. Of one method of teaching reading by 
which many AA'ords are learned the first year a special committee of 
the Providence school board, appointed to investigate the matter of 
reading, says, "The rapid acquirement of a large and varied vocabulary, 
and the poAver of rapidly and easily recognizing old Avords and analyz- 
ing into their component sounds and correctly pronouncing ncAV 
words are so remarkable that they cannot be properly appreciated 
until they are seen. The collateral improA-ement in the spelling. 



358 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

writing, and other correlated studies is also most noticeable. The 
children seem to increase in mental strength and brightness in many 
ways." 

I recommend that the committee on text-books amd course of study 
be authorized to investigate this matter of reading with a view to the 
betterment of the same. 

Respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES W. BICKFORD, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 



I. Population, etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOrSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 

Y. Attenda>xe Tables. 

YI. Trlaxcy. 

YII. FiXAXCE. 

YIII. Approprl\tio:xs for Elevex Yeaes. 

IX. Expenditures for Eleven Years. 

X. Table of Cost Per Pupil and Tax Eate for Eleven Years. 

XI. Table Showing Cost of Free Text-Books for Eleven Years. 

XII. School Year, 1899-1900. 

XIII. High School Graduating Class. 

XIY. Winners of Clabke Prizes. 

XY. Organization of Committees, 1900-1901. 

XYI. List of Teachers, 1901. 

XYII, School Year, 1900-1901. 

359 



I 



APPENDIX. 



STATISTICS. 

I.— Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1900 56,987 

Leg-al school age, 5 to 21. 

II.— School houses. 

Number of schoolhouses in use 24 

Number of schoolhouses not in use 

Number of schoolrooms used for clay schools *12S 

Number of rooms used for High-school classes 15 

Number of rooms used for Grammar schools 33 

Number of rooms used for Middle schools 30 

Number of rooms used for Primarj^ schools ; 41 

Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools 1 

Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools 5 

Number of rooms used for Manual Training schools 1 



III.— Schools. 

(All for botb sei'es.) 

Number of High school buildings 1 

Number of combined Grammar and lower grade (^Middle and Pri- 
mary) schools 13 

Number of combined Middle and Primary schools 4 

Number of schools all Primary grade 1 

Number of Ungraded schools 5 



IV.— Teachers. 

Male teachers in the High school 4 

Female teachers in the High school 11 

Female teachers in the Training school 2 

* An average of 126 for the entire j-ear. 

360 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 361 

Male teachers in the Grammar schools 7 

Female teachers in the Grammar schools (fl)32 

Female teachers in the Middle schools (b)30 

Female teachers in the Primarj'^ schools ('0^1 

Male teachers in the Partially Graded schools 1 

Female teachers in the Ungraded schools 5 

Male teachers in ]Nrannal Training school 1 

Special teachers 3 

Average number of male teachers (c)15 

Average number of female teachers (c) 120 

Total average ntimber of teachers in day schools 135 

Male teachers in the evening schools 8 

Female teachers in the evening schools 8 

Male teachers in the evening Drawing schools 2 

Average number of male teachers in the evening Drawing schools 2 

(a) Six of the 31 are master's assistants. 

ih) One of the 28 middle schools and three of the 44 primaries were in the Training 
school. They had no regular teachers, being taught bj' sub-teachers under the 
direction of the principal and her assistant. 

('•) Including special teachers. 



362 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REOORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



363 






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364 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



'S 



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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



365 






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366 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Q.< 5 



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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



367 



DAY SCHOOLS, 

Summary of attendance upon the several grades of public day schools for the 

year 1899-1900. 



Grades. 



Whole number 

of different 

pupils. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



o o - 






High ... 167 

Grammar 651 

Middle 651 

Primary I 1,220 

Partially graded 16 

Ungraded 59 

Totals, 1900 I 2,764 

Totals, 1899 2,842 



285 
670 
612 
1,058 
22 
51 



2,697 
2,875 



• 380 
1,203 
1,085 
1,615 
30 
75 



4,388 
4,399 



359 
1,113 

988 
1,449 



3,998 
3,978 



S4.5 
92.6 
91.1 
89.6 
95.3 
81.3 



91.8 
90.4 



EVENrNG SCHOOLS. 

Summary of attendance upon the several grades of public evening schools Jor 
the year 1899-1900. 



SCHOOLS. 


Whole number 

of different 

pupils. 


Average num- 
b e r belong- 
ing. 


Average dailj^ 
attendance. 






Boys. 


Girls. 


Per c 

d a i 
tend 



City hall 

Franklin street 
Rimmon 



Drawing schools 

Totals, 1900 . 
Totals, 1899 . 



r Mechanical.. 1 
(Architectural ) 



232 
168 



103 
74 



77 
61 
65 

33 



230 
171 



179 
146 



77.2 
89.7 
60.2 

82.4 



75.8 
85.4 



368 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Evening School Touchers. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal at City Hall, for boj^s. 

Assistants— A. W. Eowell, W. W. Forbes, W. F. Forbes, J. B. Cava- 
naugh, Annie B. Angell, and Florence Abbott. 

Honorie J. Crough, principal of Franklin-street school, for girls. 

Assistants — Maggie Linen, Elizabeth F. Walsh, Mae Lovejoy, and 
Margaret McDermott. 

Arthur W. Morgan, princijjal of Eimnion school, for both sexes. 

Assistants — William J. Mooar, H. L. Clongh, and Mary E. Paige. 

.Evening DraioingSehool Teachers. 
John M. Kendall and Henry W. Allen. 

TBA^^'I^'G school. 



Graduated. 
Annie B. Angell. 
Mary E. McLaren. 
Grace A. Phillips. 
Ede B. Quimby. 
Flora M. Walker. 
Elizabeth F. Walsh. 
Florence H. Mooar. 
Ethel A. Nicholson. 
Sarah Price. 
Annie E. Walsh. 
Mathel C. Henry. 
Mae L. Lovejoy. 
Kathryn McKeon. 
Florence M. Ward. 
Bertha A. Allen. 
Edna M. Barr. 
Bertha V. Frank.s. 
Lora E. Hill. 
Gertrude Porter. 



June, '98. 



Jan. 27, '99. 



June, '99. 



June, '00. 



Entered. 

Amy E. Davison. Feb., '99. 

Lizzie M. Flanders. " " 
Edith A. Murphy. 

Carlena A. Savory. " 

Grace Whittemore. " 

Florence M. Francis. Sept., '99. 
]Martha J. Kennedy. 

Anabelle Landers. " 

Maude E. Winegar. " 

Lena M. Crough. Sept., '00 

Bertha M. Fogg. " 

Flora B. Phinney. " 

Marjorie S. Woodbury. " 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



369 



GENERAL .SUMMARY. 

The foUoicing table presents the main features of interest per 
attendance upon the public schools Jor the last eleven years, 
port for ticenty years may be found in report for 1896. 



taining to the 
A similar re- 



Yeaks. 



cS O 

P- to 



ei o 
S m 

< 



g 

13 . 
bJD.5 

u 



c3 
>. 

o5 

O 

SCoS 

is c 
< 



aS^ 






> « 






=* be 

a" 

5 22 

cj m a! 



2+7 
O tn 

!W O 



P 3 o 



ri o SI.:: o 

3 O cS M)0 

So® ©"o 
O <1 



1890. , 
1891 . . 
1892. . 
1S93. 
1894.. 
1895. . 
1896.. 
1897. . 
1898.. 
1899. . 
1900.. 



77 


76 


3,814 


2,795 


2,536 


90.7 


141 


121 


114 


83 


33 


.84 


83 


4,071 


2,940 


2,689 


91.5 


166 


120 


101 


69 


26 


89 


89 


4,298 


3,130 


2,837 


90.6 


174 


116 


103 


67 


42 


mt 


101 


4,775 


3,425 


3,111 


90.8 


194 


129 


127 


78 


41 


101 


107 


4,975 


3,662 


3,336 


91.1 


153 


175 


162 


112 


63 


105 


111 


5,206 


3,817 


3,499 


91.7 


238 


168 


156 


112 


40 


108 


115 


5,382 


3,999 


3,651 


91.3 


140 


138 


130 


119 


43 


114 


121 


5,501 


4,213 


3,826 


90.8 


177 


215 


212 


157 


.02 


121 


128 


5,802 


4,425 


4,070 


92.0 


195 


200 


191 


145 


51 


123 


130 


5,717 


4,399 


3,978 


90.4 


146 


180 


168 


134 


73 


126 


135 


5,461 


4,38S 


3,998 


91.8 


179 


225 


214 


152 


72 



184 
217 
226 
237 
251 
243 
270 
290 
378 
409 
380 



* Including special teachers, principals, assistants, etc. 
t And tlie A class in suburban schools. 

t Also a manual training school for one term, which is included in the number 
of schools the next seven years. 



370 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



VI.— Work of Truant Officer. 



Date. 



Absentees 

repoited 

from 



^ c 
o o 



No. volun- 


No. reported 


CM 

o 


■Cr-j 




tarily 


caused to 


5 s 


5* 


returned to 


attend. 


s 
o 


.2 >> 






to 


d-^ 


I "^ 


.So 


0) P», 


tf) Q 


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o 


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o 


.= o 


O o 




5S ii 


^1 

5 


3 " 


>>1 


Oh 


9 0^ 


1^ 


op.S 



September 
October ... 
November . 
December . 
January . . . 
February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Totals .. 



123 

114 

72 

50 

92 

59 

75 

216 

113 

93 



1,007 



45 
63 
58 
37 
38 
35 
43 
27 
67 
47 



461 



19 


16 


10 


6 


7 


10 


10 


3 


8 


14 


7 


7 


5 


10 


37 


34 


14 


13 


7 


3 


124 


116 



34 
69 
40 
19 
43 
25 
40 
79 
59 
36 



29 
20 
32 
21 
10 
10 
18 
24 
23 
16 



203 



12 


29 


30 


8 


27 


35 


2 


14 


25 


1 


12 


21 


5 


22 


24 


4 


24 


14 




24 


21 


6 


20 


46 


5 


36 


27 


6 


35 


37 


49 


243 


280 



Date. 



so 

1^ 


No. truants 

caused to 

attend 


« Uj 3 


oa 

S 


3«2 


3R 






-goiJ 
d ^ <» 


o 
o 


.So 

A c 


III 

6S.= 


03 

6> 


£t5 S 

o « P< 


o5 
.o « 

c5S 


H 


5 


fr< 


;z; 


1^ 


2; 


^ 



S » 03 

O- " 
^ C 4) 

ogg 



September 
October ... 
November . 
December . 
January . . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Totals. 



35 

45 I 

42 

18 

30 

35 

22 

23 

33 

37 

319 



12 
24 
18 
10 
16 
20 
15 
14 
14 
10 

153 



26 

21 

24 

8 

14 

15 

7 

9 

IS 

27 

166 



169 
237 
181 
130 
330 
185 
190 
95 
196 
203 

1,916 



249 
197 
2S0 
160 
217 
227 
140 
256 
319 
247 

2,192 



70 
29 
20 
19 
31 
28 
58 
50 
41 
30 

376 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

VII.— Finances.— 1 900. 



371 



Items of Account. 



Appropriations. Expenditures 



Salaries of teachers 

Books ami stationerj'' 

Free text-books and supplies 

Furniture and supplies 

Repairs 

Care of rooms 

Fuel 

Printing and advertising 

Contingent expenses 

Evening common schools 

Evening drawing schools 

Manual training 

Furnishing rooms Parker school , 

Sewing material 

Painting outside schoolhouses ... 



sse.ooo 00 

75.00 

5,000.00 

1,300.00 

7,000.00 

6,500.00 

8,800.00 

300.00 

2,500.00 

1,200.00 

225.00 

600.00 

300.00 

2.i0.00 

1,000.00 



Totals 



8121,0.50.60 



886,126.18 

46.78 

5,016.16 

1,288.78 

6,549.41 

6,278.24 

8,168.92 

286.48 

2,483.04 

1,187.35 

234.40 

470.23 

294.00 

237.28 

999.83 



S119,667.08 



COST OF CITY SCHOOLS. 

Expeuditui-es, as above specified $119,667.08 

Salaries. 



Members of the school board. 

Clerk of board 

Superintendent of schools.... 
Truant officer 



220.00 

150.00 

2,300.00 

850.00 



Total $123,187.08 

Receipts. 



Literary fund. 
Tuition* , 



$2,642.00 
920.95 



Xet amount raised bv taxation. 



$3,562.95 
$119,624.13 



The city valuation for 1900 is .$32,706,794, and hence the rate of school 
tax for the year is $119,624.13 divided by $32,706,794, or .0036+. Last 
year the rate was .0038+. 

* School tax from Londonderry, Bedford, and Goffstown included, $146.75. 



372 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



P3 
tJ 

1-3 
O 

o 

H 
t— I 

O 
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Oh 
P-i 
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I 



■noia 
■BT.i(Io.iddi3 iBioads 



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lO O 00 CC 00 — 
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_ o t^ 



Ci oa CI c^ -<ii 



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m ^H c-i oj 



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I-. <M r-l 1-1 ^ 



C>l »c -^ 



r-^ <M » 

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CO <M CO 



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O ■^ CO 
CO (N -^ 



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CO 


o 


o 


OS 


CI 


s 


§ 

CO 


o 


^ 


o 



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if^ CO w to t— 5^ 

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t-1 .-4 o 00 r^ CO 

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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



373 



pi 



oi 

H 

l— < 

Q 



y. 



1 
-'Bi.ido.iclcli? iBioa'clg 






















CJ_ 


1 
















00 

c; 

CO 


•iJHun-B.H iBtiuBK 






1 


s 

^ 


1,349.10 
1,403.29 
1,370.86 
1,091.85 
600.00 
470.23 


•IBIOX 


CO 15 

i i 
i 2" 


01 10 

cq 

CO C-. 

IS 5 


CJ 

CD 




94,434.25 
102,5.59.91 
109,0-29. ,52 
104,850.47 
122,091.99 
119,667.08 


1 

1 -sroonos 

SUTM.'B.ip SaiU9Aa 


C5 C<j . 

00 t-. 


i 


co 


■* 

^ 

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5= 


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CT 
3 


CO 

g 

0" 


CI 

I- -* 


■ -siooqos 
uoTOiaoD StiinaAa 


5» 






5 


e 




1,169.90 
1,181.65 
1,187.35 


1 -sas 




CO 


^ 

8 


C 


CJ 
CO 

cf 




1 


l„5-20.07 
1,8.57.79 
3,111.94 
2,220.03 
2,687.54 
2,483.04 


•019 'Sunin.i J 


10 ,-H 

•-; 
CO 

CO CO 


t- 

C' 




CO 

5 


c 

CO 


3,58.23 
429.56 
304.43 
302.77 
267.88 
286.48 


•I9nj 


CO >C 

CO co' 


c 
c 




i 


ci 


5,718.06 
6,784.03 
6,628.26 
7,948.95 
7,563.18 
8,168.92 


•SIUOO.I JO 9.1'BO 


10 "-0 
CD 10 
CO t^ 

CO CO 




C2 
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as 


4,728.82 
5,031.56 
5,720.28 
6,483.77 
6,380.25 
6,278.24 


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9* 


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374 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



X.— TABLE 

Showinff total expenditures, the averarje number of imp Us, the cost per pupil, 
and the tax rate for school purposes for the period 1890-1900, inclusivt. 



1 

YEARS. 


Total ex- i 
pencled. 


Number 
of pupils. 


Cost per 
pupil. 


Rate. 


1890 


57-2,515.16 
71,827.65 
78,355.22 
88,100.59 
90,381.12 
97,830.92 
105,959.91 
113,119.52 
108,240.47 
125,497.82 
123,187.08 


2,795 
2,940 
3,130 
3,425 
3,662 
3,817 
3,999 
4,213 
4,425 
4,399 
4,388 


S25.94 
24.46 
25.03 
25.72 
24.68 
25.63 
26.49 
26.85 
24.45 
28.52 
28.07 


00279 


1891 


00265 


1S92 


.00276 
.00220 


1893 


1894 


00290 


1895 


00320 


1896 


00340 


1S97 


.00350 


1898 


00340 


1899 


.00380 


1 900 


.00360 







XL— TABLE 

Showing the amount expended for free text-books, the average number of pupils, 
and the cost per pupil for free text-books for the period 1890-1900, inclusive. 



YEARS. 



Amount ex- 
pended for free 
text-books. 



Average 

number of 

pupils. 



Cost per 
pupil for 
free text- 
books. 



1890 
1891. 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 



S9,005.11 
3,210.73 
3,489.31 
4,456.68 
4,484.36 
4,915.35 
5,058.42 
6,320.36 
6,328.98 
4,995.65 
5,016.16 



2,795 
2,940 
3,130 
3,425 
3,662 
3,817 
3,999 
4,213 
4,425 
4,399 
4,388 



S3. 22 
1.09 
1.11 
1.30 
1.22 
1.28 
1.26 
1.50 
1.43 
1.13 
1.14 



The average cost for the past ten years has been SI. 246. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



375 



XII.— School Year, 1899-1900. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 11, 1S99; closed De- 
cember 15, 1899. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened January 1, 1900; closed March 
23, 1900. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 9,- 1900; closed June 22, 
1900. Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, 185. 

Average number of days the schools were taught, 169.5. 



XIII.— High School Graduation. 



PROGRAM. 

Salutatory. "A Glance Backward*' Margaret Mary McCoy 

Valedictory. "A Glance Forward" Marjorie Stone Woodbury 

nv.^^ arru ai • r,- -171 T " S Fred E. Bullard 

Lhorus. The Sleighing Frolic w^ tit u 

*= "^ ( Grace Mayhew 

Sung by the young women of the class. 

Solo bj^ Miss xVnnie Louise Gillis. 

Trio by Miss Gillis, Miss Beatrice J. Barrett, 

and Miss Amy W. Hutchinson. 

An Address. "The Difference between a Boy and a Man." 

Prof. George H. Palmer of Harvard University 

Cantata. "The Village Blacksmith." \ Words by Henry W. Longfellow 
'=' ( Music by Charles F. jNoyes 

Sung by the Class of 1900, 

Assisfed by Miss Mary Spofford and Mr. Fred Cook. 

Directed by Professor Fred Bower. 

Solos by Miss Gillis and Edward James MacDonald. 

Claude Crafts, Class Pianist. 

Award of Diplomas Principal Albert Somes 

Singing of the Class Ode .The Class of 1900 



The Class of 1900. 

CLASSICAL COL'ESE. 



Willis F. Avery. 
George W. Ayer. 
Margaret Clement Brophy. 
X. Blanche Brown. 
Alice Marion Chase. 
Bernice N. Clough. 



Ber'tha K. Cornish. 
Julia Theresa Cotter. 
Claude Milton Crafts. 
Lena Mae Crough. 
Ethel Florence Currier. 
Ralph A. Drake. 



376 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Luther Gould Eastman. 
William Lamson Fitts. 
Florence Estelle Fletcher. 
Ethel Isabel Fracker. 
Amy Riddle French. 
Annie Louise Gillis. 
Ethel M. Hatch. 
Margaret Mary McCoy. 
Janet Fulton Mills. 



Laurence P. Carr. 
Harry Boynton Preston. 
Hallet Eice Eobbins. 



Etta Marie Morrissey. 
Mabel Louise Murdoch 
Lula Maude Xorthrup. 
Edwin Hemphill Place. 
Ethel Maude Proude. 
Helen Frances Riordan. 
Dana Willard Stockbridge. 
Alice Agatha Walsh. 
Marjorie Stone Woodbury*. 



COLLEGE COtTESE. 



Helen Dodge Somes. 
Mills Gove Stnrtevant. 
Irma Blanche True. 



Mary E. Currier. 
Grace Ethelvn Hull. 



ENGLISH COURSE, EOVR YEARS. 

.\my W. Hutchinson. 
]\rattie ]\rae ]McCreedj'. 
Flora Belle Phinnev. 



ENGLISH COURSE, THREE YEARS. 



Frank Tilden Bagley. 
Beatrice Jane Barrett. 
Ida Ma.y Dunnington. 
Carroll C. Ferguson. 
Claude Leonidas Fullerton. 
Elizabeth E. Gilmore. 
Bessie Leighton Howe. 
Belle Pickering Johnston. 

Edward 



Howard Baldwin Josselyn. 
Charles Roland Leckie. 
Nora INIary McQuade. 
Hattie E. Robinson. 
Lester Lyman Sargent. 
Ida Arlene St. Germain. 
Clara Umantilla Stiles 
Allice X. Varney. 
Aaron Weinstein. 



TWO years' ceutificate. 



Francis C. Batchelder. 
Frank Willard Bodwell. 
Minnie Alice Brown. 
Maude Shepard Critcherson. 
Mary Eleanor Dignam. 
William C. Ela. 
Chai'les Sumner Heath. 



Lester P. Home. 

Edith R. Jewett. 

Ethel Brown Lane. 

Edwin Langley. 

Edward James MacDonald. 

Attie Perry. 

Edward Iv. Potter. 



Margaret Louise Rugar. 



HONOR SCHOLARS. 

Classical course Marjorie Stone Woodbury 

College course Irma Blanche True 

English course Mary E. Currier 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. oii 

XIV.— Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

FOR EXCELLENCE LX ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, JANUARY 31, 1900. 

First prize, $25, Hazel Mae Wlieeler. 
Second prize, $20, Xina E. Spaulding. 
Third prize, $10, Frederick W. Branch. 
Fourth iH-ize, $5, Hazel Dell Chandler. 



XV.— Organization, 1900. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

WILLIA:\r C. CLAEKE, Mayor. . Chairman, c.r officio. 

HARRY T. LORD. President of Common Council, ex officio. 

Ward 1. Elliot C. Lambert. Ward 6. Eugene B. Dunbar. 

Walter B. Heath. Harry L. Davis. 

Ward 2. Charles H. Manning. Ward 7. Edward B. Woodbury. 

W^alter H. Lewis. Edson S. Heath. 

Ward ?>. George D. Towne. Ward S. AYalter B. Mitchell. 

Louis E. Phelps. • Benjamin Price. 

Ward 4. Nathaniel L. Colb^-. Ward 9. Henrj- I. Lemay. 

G. Fred Soule. Sabin Nourry. 

Ward 5. John T. Kelley. Ward 10. Mark E. Harvej-. 

Daniel J. iMcAuliife. Harry H. Burpee 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

GEORGE D. TOWXE. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

ELLIOT C. LAMBERT. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

CHARLES W. BICKFORD. 

superintendent's clerk. 
FAXXIE L. SAXBOEX. 

TRL'ANT OFFICER. 

CURTIS W. DAVIS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance— Mayor Clarke and Messrs. Lord. Lambert, Woodbury, and 
Soule. 



Salaries. — Messrs. Harvey, Davis, and Xourry. 
Te.it-Bofjks. — Messrs. Towne, Lambert, and Phelps. 
il/».s/e.— Messrs. Lewis, W. B. Heath, and Burpee. 



378 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Drawing. — Messrs. McAuliffe, Davis, and E. S. Heath. 
Manual Training. — Messrs. Phelps, Dunbar, and McAuliffe. 
Examination of Teachers. — ^Messrs. Colby, Burpee, and Woodbury. 
Fuel and Heating. — ]Mr. Manning, Mayor Clarke, ]Messrs. Lord, Har- 
vey, and Kelley. 
Repairs. — Messrs. Manning, Mitchell, and Lemay. 
Attendance. — Messrs. E. S. Heath, Price, and McAuliffe. 
Health. — Messrs. Dunbar, Towne, and Kelley. 

SfB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, Towne, Phelps, Lambert, and Wood- 
bury. 

Franklin-street. — Messrs. Woodbury, Lambert, and Davis. 

Spring-street. — Messrs. JNIitchell, Buri>ee, and Soule. 

Lincoln-street and Youngsville. — Messrs. Colby, Harvey, and W. B. 
Heath. 

Ash-street and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Phelps, Kellej% and E. S. 
Heath. 

Webster-street and Stark. — ]Messrs. Towne, ^Manning, and ]\IcAulift'e. 

Bakersville and Mosquito Pond. — Messrs. Kelley, Davis, and Price. 

Yarney. — Messrs. W. B. Heath, Mitchell, and Lema3\ 

HaUsville and Harvey. — Messrs. Davis, Colby, and Lewis. 

Rimmon. — Messrs. Lemay, E. S. Heath, and Manning. 

Training School. — Messrs. Lambert, Woodbury, and Phelps. 

Main-street. — Messrs. Xourry, Dunbar, and Harvey. 

Parker. — Messrs. Price, Soule, and Dunbar. 

Wilson. — Messrs. Dunbar, Lewis, and Kelley. 

Stratv. — Messrs. E. S. Heatli, ISIcAuliffe, and Mitchell. 

Amoskeag. — Messrs. Lewis, Lemay, and Burpee. 

Goffe's Falls. — Messrs. Harve3% Phelps, and Nourry. 

Lowell-street. — Messrs. McAuliffe, Price, and Colby. 

Pearl-street. — Messrs. Burpee, Lewis, and Kelley. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Soule, Xourry, and Towne. 



I 



XVI.— List of Teachers. 



HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 



Master. George H. Libby. 
Sub-Master. George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. Harry N. McLaren. 

Hiram A. Stearns. 

Nellie Pickering. 

Florence M. Locke. 

Theresa B. Stanton. 

Mary J. Wellington. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 379 

Assistants. Sara Hunt. 

Annie W. Colby. 
IMary H. Dowd. 
Helen S. Smith, 
Grace M. Page. 
Winona M. Martin. 
Elsie D. Fairbanks. 

FRAXKLIX-STREET SCHOOL. 

Grainiiiar Grades. 

Master. Isaac Huse, Jr. 

Master's Assistant. Alice C. Taggart. 

Assistants. Carrie E. Hoit. 

Carrie E. Head. 

Xellie C. Parker. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Alice ^M. Lamprej-. 
Lower Middle. Amy K. Xortlirup. 
Higher Primary. Flora M. Walker. 
Lower Primary. Susie L. Dodge. 

LIXCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. Fred L. V. Spaulding. 
Master's Assistant. Annie W. Patten. 
Assistants. Belle E. Daniels. 

Mabel J. Brickett. 

Mary F. Bai'nes. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Etta L. Stearns. 

Lower ]\Iiddle. Bertha A. Allen. 

Higher Primar3-. Theodora Richardson. 

Lower Primarj-. Hulda C. Graupner. 

Lower Primary (Temporary). Ethel A. Nicholson, 

ASH-STREET SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. Edgar D. Cass. 

Master's Assistant. Amelia L. Granpner. 

Assistants. Emma L. McLaren. 

Lora E. Hill. 

Ellen E. Connor. 



380 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Loicer Grades. 

Higher Middle. Emma J. Cooper. 
Lower Middle. Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. May F. Niitt. 
Lower Primary. Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. John Ganlt. 

Master's Assistant. Josephine W. Page. 

Assistants. Luna A. Whitlock. 

Alta C. Willand. 

Eva F. Tuson. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Edith Hammond. 
Lower Middle. Jean Gillan. 
Higher Primary. Mary E. INIurphy. 
Lower Primary'. ]\Iathel C. Henry. 

A'ARNEY SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. George Winch. 

Master's Assistant. Rosabelle M. Franklin. 

Assistants. Esther M. Dickey. 

Ellen E. McKean. 

Millie S. Morse. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Mary J. Walsh. 
Lower Middle. Marcia M. Moore. 
Higher Primary. Gertrude Adams. 
Lower Primary. Annie E. Walsh. 

HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. William H. Huse. 
Master's Assistant. Ella F. Barker. 
Assistants. Olive A. Eowe. 

Kate E. Batchelder. 

Lower Grades. 
Higher Middle. Mary L. Ayer. 
Lower Middle. Winnifred W. Hall. 
Higher Primary. Bertha L. Kemp. 



RKPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 381 

Lower Primaiy. E. Alffeda Hall. 

Lower Primarj'. Annie E. Corson. 

Lower Primary (Temporary). Clara V. Clement. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns. 
Assistant. Lelia A. Brooks. 

Lower Grades. 

Mixed !Middle. Cora M. Farmer. 
Higher Primar3^ Augusta S. Downs. 
IMixed Primary. S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. Mary L. Heath. 

KIMMOX SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Principal. Louis H. Bailey (Grammar classes). 
Assistant. Lillian F. Crowther. 

Lower Grades. 

;Mixed Middle. Mary A. Seavey. 
Higher Primary. Hattie S. Tuttle. 
Lower Primar3'. Blanche E. Hicken. 
Lower Primarj'. Katherine A. Frain. 
Lower Primary'. Sarah Price. 

WILSOX SCHOOL. 

Grammar drades. 

Princijjal. Barbara B. Joy. 
Assistants. Hellen Morison. 
Cora B. Gilford. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher [Middle. Harriet H. Richardson. 
Lower Middle. Florence Eichardson. 
Higher Primary. Mary E. McLaren. 
Lower Primary. Florence L. Abbott. 
Lower Primary. Gertrude !M. Porter. 

STRAW SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grade. 

Principal. Lizzie P. Gove. i 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. G<_rirude H. TBrooks. 
Lower Middle. Lettie M. Smith. 



382 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Higher Primary. Xellie 'SI. James. 
Lower Primary. Florence H. Moore. 
Lower Primary. Edith M. Stebbins. 

TRAIXrXG SCHOOL. 

Merrimack street, corner Union. 

Principal. Caroline E. Wing. 
Head Assistant. Grace A. Phillips. 

The principal is also assisted by the sub-teachers, i. e.. members of 
the training class. The school embraces the first four years of school 
work, in the following grades: Lower Primary, Higher Primary, and 
Lower Middle. There are four rooms, two of lower priinary grade. 

SPKIXG-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Annabel Emerson, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. Xellie I. Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. Lizabell Savory. 

MAIX-STEEET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary W. Mitchell, Grammar Grade. 
Higher Middle. Mary A. Clement. 
Lower IMiddle. Lottie !Nr. Clement. 
Higher Primary. M. iMinnie Sturtevant. 
Hig-her Primary. Hattie O. Willaud. 
Lower Primary. Kate T. Clarke. 
Lower Primary. Mabel F. Robinson. 
Lower Primary. Elizabeth F. Walsh. 

PEAEL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary G. Tynan, Higher ^Middle. 
Lower Middle. Xellie M. Smith. 
Higher Primary. Florence Abbott. 
Lower Primary. Georgia M. Cheney. 

PAEKER SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary E. Moulton, Grammar and Middle. 
Higher Middle. Florence M. Ward. 
Lower Middle. Lura B. Gage. 
Higher Primary. Delle E. Haines. 
Lower Primary. Blanche M. Folsom. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Helen M. Morrill, Higher Primary. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 383 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag-. ISIary A. Biizzell, Grammar and Middle. 

Middle and Primar5^ Mary S. Richardson. 

Lower Primary. Marion F. Partridge. 

Goffe's Falls. Percy X. Folsom, Grammar and INIiddle. 

Mixed Primarj'. Maud M. Greaney. 

VXGRADED SCHOOLS. 

Stark. Inez M. Warren. 
Harvey. Emma J. Ela. 
Yonngsville. Lura K. IvimjDton. 
Webster's Mills. Josephine L. Eiddle. 
Mosquito Pond. Xellie M. Atwood. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. Fred B. Bower, Florence Dow. 
Drawing. J. Warren Thyng. 
Manual Training. Fred E. Browne. 

JANITORS. 

High School. 

Charles F. Jack. Engineer, George H. Jack. 

Franklin-street and Traininp Schools. 

Yarnum H. Hill. 

Lincoln-slrect School. 

William Stevens. 

HaUsviUe and Wilson Schools. 

William H. Xewry. 

Ash-strect and Pearl-street Schools. 

John S. Avery. 

Webster-street and Strair Schools. 

William J. Powers. 

Sprinf/street and Lore ell -street Schools. 

S. H. Batchelder. 

Bal-ersville School. 

Edwin X. Baker. 

Tarncy School. 

iiJobert Cook. 



384 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Main-Street and Parker i^chools. 
William F. Conner. 

Rimmon ScJiool. 
Joseph Chalifoux. 
Amoskeag School. 
Charles H. Corey. 



XVll.— School Year, 1900-1901. 

Fall term opened September 10, 1900; closed December 14, 1900. 
Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens December 31, 1900; closes March 
22, 1901. Vacation of two weeks. 

Sjpring term opens April 8, 1901; closes June 21, 1901. Vacation of 
eleven weeks. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



EEPOET OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor: 

The Board of Health submits the following- rei^ort for the year 1900: 
Mr. John C. Bickford having been reappointed* to succeed himself 

there was no change in membership, and at the annual meeting the 

oiBcers of the previous year were re-elected, namely: John C. Bickford, 

president, and William K. Eobbins, clerk. 

expe:n-ditubes. 

Salaries $600.00 

Labor 2,726.25 

Office furniture 84.43 

Printing, advertising, and postage 179.40 

Telephone service 33.87 

Express 3.72 

Water analysis 7.50 

Legal expenses 

Antitoxin 19.75 

Disinfectants 237.11 

Diphtheria examinations 49.50 

Quarantined families 374.66 

Traveling expenses (teams and carfares) 195.49 

Fuel and board at pest house 73.97 

Supplies for laboratory 8.70 

Gas and incidentals 58.78 

$4,653.13 
We herewith give a list of extraordinary expenses incurred on 
account of smallpox. 

EXPENDITXTRES FOR SMALLPOX EPIDEMIC. 

Labor $645.50 

Quarantined families 358.40 

Board of patients at pest house 239.12 

Supplies for pest house (bedding and furniture) 177.39 

Police service for quarantined houses 481.78 

Medical attendance (Dr. Parsons) 950.00 

Vaccination 703.62 

Incidentals 30.35 

$3,586.09 

387 



388 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The regular expenses have been very nearly the same this year as 
last, the increase of $119.11 paid for supplies to quarantined families 
being larger than the total increase for the year, which is $102.76. 
Since it has become known that the board must take care of families 
quarantined by them, the people are more ready to ask for assistance, 
and do so now, where they formerly ran in debt for their living during' 
such a sickness. The supplies furnished are only medicine and actual 
necessaries of life for the time quarantined. 

The extraordinary expenses have been incurred on account of small- 
pox in the city. Separate accounts have been kept of the disburse- 
ments on account of this disease, as far as could be done, the items 
being classified in the above list. In this no account has been made 
of a very large amount of vpork done by the regular inspectors, such 
as attending to the wants of quarantined families, fumigating houses, 
and investigating suspected cases. There should be added to this 
total, the sum of $750 for physicians' bills inciirred but not paid before 
December 31, 1900. The State Board of Health has also been to a very 
considerable expense for our assistance in this matter. 

MEETINGS. 

The regular weekly meetings have been continued on Tuesday even- 
ings. Forty-five such meetings were held and twenty-one special 
meetings for trips of inspection and such other business as required 
immediate attention. Our appropriation did not warrant the employ- 
ment of extra help, and the inspectors were too busy with regular 
work to make house to house inspections; for that reason and the fact 
that the city is almost free from privy vaults that are within one 
hundred feet of a public sewer, the trips of inspection have been fewer 
than usual. 

rNSPECTORS. 

The same inspectors have been employed as last year, namely: Carl 
0. Seaman, inspector of plumbing, and John F. Looney and Wm. B. 
Blake, health inspectors. Miss M. Alma Fracker has also continued as 
clerk in the office. Besides these a number of others have been em- 
ployed at times to assist in handling the increased volume of work 
occasioned by the smallpox. "While all have been faithful and efficient, 
it is fitting that special mention be here made of Messrs. Blake and 
Looney. These men have been in the employ of the board for several 
years and their experience has been of great value to the city. 

When smallpox broke out they assumed and performed their duties 
as readily as though it had been one of the common contagious dis- 
eases which they attend every day in the year. Perfectly fearless, 
while appreciating the danger, and always cheerfully ready, they have 
scarcely known mealtime or bedtime for several months past, and 
the best testimonial to the care and thoroughness of their work is the 
fact that no disease has ever been carried to their homes, where they 
both have small children. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 389 

BACTERIOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 

The services of this department have been convenient and valuable 
as in past years. Thirty-six examinations for diphtheria have been 
made, of which fourteen were positive or true diphtheria, and twenty- 
two were negative. Five of the latter were for the discharge of cases. 
Three examinations were made for the germs of tuberculosis. The 
cultures are all grown in the office, and the microscopical examina- 
tions are made by A. Gale Straw, M. D. The expenses of this depart- 
ment are very small, and the results very valuable, for a single 
examination may mean freedom from the hardships of a two weeks' 
quarantine, or the taking of such precautions as would avoid many 
exposures to a very dangerous disease. 

SCHOOLHOUSES. 

The schoolhouses of the city were examined by the plumbing in- 
spector, by order of the board, at the beginning of the summer vaca- 
tion, and his recommendations in regard to them were transmitted 
to the school board, where they were promptly considered, and the 
needed repairs executed. 

ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

The time has come when the public is fully aware of the need of 
a good isolation hospital, and our recommendations of previous years 
need not be repeated. The want of such an institution was felt most 
keenly at the time of the appearance of smallpox on November 15, 
when a case of diphtheria was being treated at the Oak Hill hospital, 
and the condition of the patient was such that removal would have 
endangered life. This deprived us of the use of the premises for small- 
pox patients for more than a week, when by the kindness of the man- 
agement of the Sacred Heart hospital some unoccupied rooms were 
placed at our disposal, which we fitted up for the diphtheria patient. 
But for this temporary accommodation we would have been deprived 
of the use of the Oak Hill hospital for at least two weeks longer, 
which would have greatly increased expenses, as well as the danger of 
more exposure to smallpox. 

For the accommodation of the smallpox patients the old building 
has been temporarily repaired, and has been in use to its fullest 
capacity. We are gratified with the degree of comfort which has been 
given the patients in it, and for this we are greatly indebted to Miss 
Judith Sherer and Mr. A. D. Sherer, who are in charge. They have 
cheerfully and most satisfactorily' discharged their duties, under very 
trying circumstances. It is remarkably fortunate that we have had 
but few cases of the other contagious diseases, and that circumstances 
have favored home treatment of them. 



390 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SlIAXLPOX. 

On the 4th day of June a case of smallpox was reported to this 
board from West Manchester, being discovered in a physician's office, 
■where the patient, a man of twenty-one years, had gone for treat- 
ment. Three physicians made very careful examination and agreed 
in the diagnosis of smallpox. The patient was escorted to his near-by 
home by a health inspector, and the physician's office fumigated. The 
home was at once quarantined and that night the patient slept at the 
isolation hospital at Oak Hill. Investigation was at once begun as to 
the source of the infection, and it was soon discovered that the patient 
above reported was the tenth in a series of peculiar sicknesses, the 
jBrst being diagnosed by a physician on April 2, as chicken-pox. 

Very credible reports have come to this office that the physician had 
called it smallpox at first. Between June 4 and June 29 nine cases 
were discovered and taken to Oak Hill. Spread of the infection by 
intimate association of relatives and friends was traced without diffi- 
culty. It should here be remembered that there were those who 
doubted the diagnosis and claimed that there was no smallpox in the 
city, one physician taking the liberty to break the quarantine of the 
first case, by going uncalled, examining the patient and publishing at 
once that it was only chicken-pox. Accordingh% in response to our 
request for expert examination, the State Board of Health sent Dr. 
George Cook of Concord, who, with Dr. Watson, secretary of the State 
Board, agreed with Dr. Wm. M. Parsons and others of this city in the 
diagnosis of smallpox in mild form. One of the first questions to be 
decided at the outbreak of the disease was that of emplojdng a physi- 
cian to take charge of the patients. At a meeting of the board, at 
which the maj'or, Hon. Wm. C. Clarke, and a representative of the state 
board were present, it was decided that Wm. M. Parsons, M. D., of the 
local board, in view of his long practice and ample experience with 
smallpox in previous epidemics, should be asked to take charge of the 
cases. With a realization of the magnitude of the undertaking, espe- 
cially for a man of his years, he reluctantly consented to do the work, 
and has since had entire charge of the afflicted, serving also as expert 
in examining suspected cases. 

The general policy of procedure from the beginning has been to 
remove all cases as soon as discovered to Oak Hill, fumigate the apart- 
ment so occupied, vaccinate all persons exposed to the disease, and 
keep them under observation for two weeks. When for any reason it 
has been necessary to treat the patients at home, and where suspects 
have been quarantined, the people have been supported by the board 
of health, and cared for in other ways, with a constant mindfulness 
that they were unfortunate in their disagreeable condition. 

When nine cases, four of varioloid and five of smallpox, had recov- 
ered and been discharged, on June 29, the city was supposed to be 
free from the disease. Two days later, however, another case was dis- 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 391 

covered. Our records showed that this could not have been con- 
tracted from any of the cases previously known. The patient seemed 
at first unwilling to give any information as to where he might have 
been exposed to the disease, but it developed later that he did not 
really know where he was exposed. This ease confirmed the previous 
suspicions that the disease was being deliberately concealed, for from 
such a case, this one must have been contracted. 

As all the cases so far discovered had been traced to one locality in 
the city, it seemed that if that locality could be cleared from the hid- 
den infection, the disease would soon be stamped out. It was there- 
fore decided, after consultation with the State Board of Health, that a 
personal inspection of that locality should be made. Accordingh% on 
the night of July 20, with the assistance of Drs. Perkins and Carpenter 
and a detail of police, a house to house personal inspection was made 
of the district between Elm and Chestnut streets and from [Myrtle to 
Pearl streets, between the hours of 11 p. ii. and 4 a. 3X. The night 
time was chosen because only during that time could there be any 
assurance that all of the people would be found at home. During the 
night a patient was found in a well developed stage of the disease, 
and the family prepared to take the child to Canada the following 
evening. Another like inspection of the district between Pearl and 
Bridge streets, which was made a few days later, failed to find any 
case of the disease. A few days later a child, evidently previously 
exposed and living" in the inspected district on Clark avenue, came 
down with the disease. This made the third case in this series, and 
when these three were discharged, on July 16, the city -was again free 
from all known cases of the disease, with what appeared a good pros- 
pect of remaining so. 

Again on October 18, a resident of Hooksett came into a local phy- 
sician's office for treatment, and was found to be suffering from a 
mild case of varioloid. In an hour he was comfortably located at Oak 
Hill. This was case number thirteen, and was so evidently contracted 
at Pittsfield, N. H., that no concern was felt for our citj'', except that 
we found ourselves taking care of a case which would have been cared 
for in Hooksett, if the physician who examined him there had recog- 
nized the disease. When this case was discharged on November 3, it 
seemed very probable that the city was really free from the disease, 
which was a very gratifying hope in view of the approaching winter, 
w^hen it is more difficult to handle. But we were not to be so for- 
tunate. On Xovember 15, a case was discovered in a familj^ where 
several cases had just recovered. Soon other cases were discovered, 
and from thati time until the end of the year, the hospital was con- 
stantly occiipied by from one to twenty-six patients, seventeen being 
there on December 31. Thus in all, during the time from June 4 to 
December 31, 1900, fifty-two cases of smallpox and ten of varioloid, 
had been cared for and ten others had very probably had the disease 



392 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

and recovered before being' discovered. There has been no death from 
the disease in a I'ecognized case, but the death of a child just previous 
to the first outbrealv, and for which chicken-pox and pneumonia was 
g-iven as the cause, it is thought might have been caused by smallpox, 
because another child of the family was soon after afflicted with it and 
cared for at Oak Hill. The mother said that so far as she could tell 
the two had the same s^-mptoms. The fact that none have died and 
that the disease in known cases was so perfectlj' controlled, led many 
persons to give credence to the claims made at the first outbreak that 
the disease was not smallpox. As many laj-men and not a few physi- 
cians of the city had never seen smallpox, and much speculation was 
being indulged in, several cases have been photographed and half-tone 
reproductions of these are herewith published with full and free con- 
sent of the patients. It may not be out of place in this connection 
to mention some of the difficulties under which the board of health 
has labored in trying to rid the city of smallpox. First, and most 
important of all, is the concealment of cases. The mildness of the 
disease has conduced to this, as the patients could be treated at home 
with little risk of fatal results, and usually without the assistance of 
a physician. In many instances the concealment has been cunning 
and willful, has been covertly counseled by some physicians, and pub- 
licly encouraged by at least one newspaper, that j)ersistently insisted 
that there Avas nothing worse than chicken-pox in the city. Thus the 
greater part of our work has been investigating suspected cases and 
tracing exposed persons. The care of known cases and the maintain- 
ing of effective quarantine, has been a comj)aratively easy task under 
a previously established system of procedure, and there has been no 
spread of the disease after it was once known to the board. Hence, if 
we had at any time known the location of every case, we could have 
had the' hospital fumigated and declared the city free from the dis- 
ease in three weeks from that time. The same is equally true today. 
There has never been a time when we had the least fear of the dis- 
ease getting beyond our control, and the public had at all times a full 
knowledge of all important facts, which were never of a nature to 
cause alarm. At several times the newspapers have published street 
speculations upon the subject that have had that effect, and the mer- 
chants have suffered on account of it. Another regrettable feature of 
the present smallpox visitation is that so verj^ few of our regular 
physicians have availed themselves of the opportunity to become ac- 
quainted with the sj'mptoms and characteristics of this disease, by 
inspection of the patients at the hospital, to the end that they might 
be able to recognize a case, should one occur in their regular prac- 
tice. There are good reasons to believe that several cases were treated 
and not recognized, just previous to the discovery of the disease last 
June. It was excusable then, to a degree, because many had had no 
opportunity to see or study smallpox; but after a number of cases 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 393 

were easih' accessible for observation no such excuse exists. We must 
depend upon j)hysicians to report contagious diseases in order to pro- 
tect the public against them, and yet there are physicians of large 
practice and good repute who say they would not know a case of 
smalljiox if they should see one and do not want to. 

VACCrNATION. 

As soon as smallpox was discovered this board took steps to encour- 
age and facilitate vaccination. The board of mayor and aldermen 
appointed City Physician Perkins as agent, to do free vaccination, under 
the direction of the board of health, and announcements were made 
in the daily papers, that all who felt that they could not afford to 
paj- for it might, upon application at the office of the board, receive a 
card entitling them to the free services of Dr. Perkins. In pursuance 
of this arrangement, some fifteen hundred persons were given cards, 
and no one was refused. After the rush was over Dr. Parsons, at 
stated times, did vaccination free at the office. Indeed, there has been 
no time since when a person could not receive free vaccination during 
any business hour in the day, at the office of the board. 

Besides this the board has furnished vaccine virus free to schools, 
hospitals, and other institutions, where the vaccinating would be done 
without charge, so that since the 6th day of June, there has been no 
excuse on pecuniary grounds for any person remaining unvaccinated 
in this city. The large manufacturing concerns have also done a large 
amount of free vaccination; in several it has been made a condition of 
continued employment. And yet we are finding smallpox and unvac- 
cinated persons up to the close of the year. The unvaccinated must 
have remained so from choice or negligence, probablj' in most cases 
the latter, because when exijosed persons have been told that they 
must be vaccinated, no single one has yet interposed the slightest 
objection. 

There are doubtless a few who object to vaccination, claiming either, 
that it offers no protection against the disease, or that the danger of 
being inoculated with some other disease is as great as that of having 
smallpox. ,To those inclined to accept the first statement, it may be 
stated that the protective value of vaccination has been proven quite 
to the point of mathematical demonstration. If vaccination be not a 
protection, then the proportion of vai'ioloid (smallpox in vaccinated 
persons) to smallpox should be the same as that of vaccinated to 
unvaccinated persons. In this city it is safe to estimate two of the 
latter to one hundred and twenty of the former, whence we should 
expect to find only one case of smallpox in the sixty-two cases dis- 
covered. Again, the only physician known to be exposed without vac- 
cination contracted the disease, while more than a dozen vaccinated 
physicians have been exposed without effect. Dr. Wm. M. Parsons 
has treated several hundred cases in five different epidemics, and has 



394 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

been exposed probably more than three thousand times this season. 
These instances are mentioned on account of their local acquaintance 
and application to the present situation. All public and medical libra- 
ries abound in statistics which establish the protective value of vac- 
cination beyond question. The fear of other diseases and septic arms 
is without doubt the most potent influence against vaccination, and 
is operative to a great extent among those who realize the protective 
value of the operation. 

The old fashioned "dry points" are made by dipping quills, or bits 
of ivory, into the virus as taken from the calf. When dry, these j)oints 
are put up and distributed much the same as ordinary merchandise, 
thus giving many opportunities for contamination before use. No 
modern surgeon would think for a moment of operating with an in- 
strument so exposed and handled, without first sterilizing it. 

At a meeting of the Chicago Medical Society, held May 20, 1S95, 
Dr. Gustave Futterer gave the results of his examination of seventy- 
five specimens of the vaccine jjoints in common use. Of these, fifty- 
five, or more than two thirds, were found to be infected with staphy- 
lococci-pus organisms and ten with the streptococci of erysipelas and 
phlegmonous inflammation. These examinations were subsequently 
repeated on a large scale in the Chicago Health Laboratory, specimens 
of all products in the Chicago market being subjected to examination, 
and Dr. Futterer's results were fully corroborated. 

The science of bacteriology has demonstrated that, with the best 
possible scientific control, it is not possible to obtain from the calf 
virus that is reliably free from other organisms, and that virus which 
has been mixed with a certain proportion of glycerine and allowed to 
stand from fifty to sixty days no longer contains living organisms of 
any known kind. Virus so treated is found to retain its full activity 
for a period of six months, and even longer, and being put up for 
distribution in sealed glass tubes, it is not susceptible of contamina- 
tion until the tube is opened for use. 

This so-called glycerinated lymph has been in use several years, by 
New York, Chicago, and other boards of health, and the best sani- 
tarians throughout the country. The claims made in its favor are 
reliable activity, small scars, and great freedom from septic arms. 
This virus is made by several reliable firms, and it is this that we 
have used and recommended. 

A recent number of the Monthly Bulletin issued by the Chicago 
Board of Health has the following: "After nearly two years personal 
use, and supervision of the use of more than two hundred thousand 
tubes of this lymph, the veteran vaccinator and smallpox expert, Dr. 
Garrott, wrote: 'I have never found any vaccine that was so promptly 
and uniformly successful in producing typical results. I have noted 
in using the fiuid vaccine a diminution of the usual inflammatory 
areola surrounding the vaccine vesicle, less constitutional disturbance. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 395 

freedom from suppurating sores, inflamed glands, and lymph vessels, 
and it produces a more active and typical vesicle than occurs with 
virus dried upon an ivory quill or point, resulting in regular, uniform, 
typical cicatrices.' At the close of 1900 upwards of eight hundred 
thousand tubes of glycerinated vaccine had been used by the public 
vaccinators of the department, vsdth results fully justifying Dr. Gar- 
rett's statements. Every installment of lymph is tested as soon as 
received, first, bacterially in the Municipal Laboratory, for the pres- 
ence of pyogenic organisms, and next, clinically, as to its potency." 

Eecent investigations have shown that vaccine virus is much more 
sensitive to heat than was formerly supposed, a temperature of ninety 
to one hundred degrees being sufficient to destroy its activity in a few 
hours. This applies alike to dry points and glycerinated lymph, and 
doubtless this fact explains the lack of activity sometimes observed. 
This would be more noticeable with tubes, as no result would follow 
their use, but with the dry points a sore might easily result from 
organisms not affected by moderate warmth, and such a sore may be 
mistaken for a successful vaccination. 

CITY WATEK SUPPLY. 

The waters of Lake Massabesic have been guarded as usual during 
the season. The regulations of the State Board of Health have been 
fairly well complied with, there being but very few objectionable places 
now on the shores. Some clandestine bathing has been indulged in 
during the summer, but three successful prosecutions for taking ani- 
mals upon the ice this winter have resulted in the cleanest ice ever 
known. During the summer the water in the lake was very low, and, 
acting upon suggestions from this board, Superintendent Walker caused 
the removal of a large amount of decaying sawdust and other objec- 
tionable matter from the exposed shores, with much improvement to 
the appearance as well as real benefit to the purity of the warer. 

PLUilBrNG KEGULATIONS. 

The regulations in regard to plumbing and house drainage have been 
well enforced, and with very little friction, during the year; and there 
is very little doubt that the law requiring all plumbers to be registered 
or examined has been a considerable help towards this end. This law 
has been in efliect only a little over a year, and in that short time has 
noticeably decreased the number of incompetent workmen in the city. 
This benefits the plumbers by acting as a check to underbidding by 
incompetent and irresponsible parties, and the citizens by securing to 
them better workmanship for the money expended. 

It may be well in this connection to explain that, in the nature of 
the case, the plumbing regulations must be made so as to pass the 
lowest grade of work that is compatible with sanitary drainage, and 
therefore there is much room left for strength, smoothness, and ele- 



396 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



gance of the work, and some extra precautions that must be taken 
where the nicest and best job is desired, but which could not be 
made a requirement in all cases. Thus tenement house plumbing 
would pass the regular inspection in a fine residence, but would be out 
of place and unsatisfactory. The plumbing inspector will, however, 
see that such ^work is done according to the plans of the architect and 
vouch for the same to the owner. 

COXTAGIOUS AND INFECTIOrS DISEASES. 

As Avill be seen in Table Xo. 1 the total number of cases of these 
diseases during the year is 1,102, with 32 deaths. These high figures 
include 827 cases of measles, being the remainder of the epidemic which 
was in progress at the close of last year. 

Diphtheria and membranous croup have furnished a less number of 
cases than last j'ear, but a greater actual mortality, the deaths from 
diphtheria, being 16.8 per cent and of membranous croup 62.5 per cent 
of the cases respectively. Again, it has been observed this year, that 
the cases of these diseases which have been recognized and treated 
early have recovered well, the mortalitj^ usually resulting where treat- 
ment came late in the disease. 

Typhoid fever has been more prevalent and fatal than usual, but the 
most careful investigations have failed to reveal any source of the 
infection. 

TABLE Xo. 1. 





Membra- 
nous 
croup. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Vario- 
loid. 


Small- 
pox. 


Totals. 


Months. 


OP 


2 


a? 
O 


33 

Q 


in 

OJ 

a 


O 


V 
01 

e3 


® 
Q 




Q 


o 


a 




05 

Q 




s 

Q 


January — 
February... 


1 
1 
1 


1 

1 
1 


3 
6 

5 
1 
4 
5 

1 


1 

1 

2 


1 
3 
2 

1 

4 
5 
4 
2 
10 
10 
19 


2 

1 


300 
238 
162 
68 
41 
23 
5 


1 


9 
5 
3 
3 
11 
12 
10 
15 
8 
2 

13 
11 












314 
253 
173 
63 
61 
53 
24 
20 
10 
16 
S3 
77 


3 


1 
1 










5 










^ 


April 












May 


1 




1 

1 
1 

1 










1 




4 




6 
3 




4 


July 






1 


August 


• 1 


1 






? 






















October 


1 


1 


2 
3 

8 


2 

1 
1 


2 

1 
5 








1 








5 








12 
32 







December . . 


2 










5 




c 








Totals... 


8 


5 


38 


8 


65 


11 


827 


1 


102 


6 


10 




52 




1,102 


32 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



397 



TABLE No. 2. 

CO]MPARISON OF STATISTICS OF CONTAGIOUS AXD INFECTIOUS 
DISEASES FOR THE PAST 16 YEARS. 



Years. 



Membra- 
nous 
croup. 



Diph- 
theria. 



Typhoid 
fever. 



Measles. 



Scarlet 
fever. 



Vario- 
loid. 



Small- 
pox. 



Total. 



1885. 
18S6. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892, 
1893. 
1894 
1895 
1896. 
1897 
1898 
1899, 
1900 



12 
17 
17 
14 
10 



12 

11 

14 

10 

4 

3 

5 



♦ 


18 


* 


« 


9 


« 


73 


17 


28 


126 


30 


35 


79 


23 


36 


41 


9 


36 


21 


2 


76 


26 


6 


33 


7 


1 


79 


42 


11 


74 


47 


11 


73 


103 


28 


81 


148 


29 


78 


81 


17 


145 


50 


6 


78 


38 


8 


65 



94 
44 
259 
63 
25 
44 

no 

67 
55 
500 

387 

88 

762 

827 



« 


79 


» 


26 


* 


48 


392 


52 


428 


48 


438 


35 


211 


22 


554 


29 


408 


23 


418 


55 


260 


48 


763 


66 


681 


54 


524 


47 


1,026 


29 


1,102 


32 



398 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. 3.— DEATH RETURNS. 

TABLE SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES AND 
BY MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1900. 



Causes of Death. 


s 

p 
a 


>> 

eS 

p 

s 


o 
5 


P. 

< 


^ 

^ 


03 


s 
•-5 


CO 

< 


<o 
.a 

s 

V 

p. 

CO 


,a 





.a 
S 




u 

B 
« 




■5 
















1 














1 
















1 

1 










1 


























1 










1 
1 






1 
1 
1 










2 












2 


3 










7 


« fall 






1 








1 


3 


** killed by electricity 

*' railroad 

*' run over by team. . 










2 


1 








3 


1 
1 


1 










1 


"i' 


2 

"'1' 

2 


5 
















2 






1 


1 
2 
2 












3 


















1 


1 


4 






1 




2 

1 
8 








1 


8 










"'3' 






3 








3 


3 


.... 


1 


3 


4 


3 


6 
3 

"i" 


31 








7 


















1 
2 


1 












1 


1 






1 




6 










1 






1 














1 


1 










2 
















1 








1 
















1 










1 




1 








1 
1 


2 












4 












1 




1 

2 


"i' 




3 


** inflammation of 


1 








1 


1 


6 






2 


1 


3 


















1 
3 

1 






1 




3 
2 


5 
1 


1 
2 

1 


5 

1 


2 
2 


1 

1 






1 


2 
2 


1 
2 

1 
1 


24 




1 


1 

1 


16 




3 






















I 








1 
















1 
1 


2 






1 
















2 














1 
3 








1 




1 




1 














1 


1 


7 






1 










1 






















1 




1 














1 


1 


.... 


1 

1 

22 

4 

1 


1 


4 


















1 






1 


"i' 


1 




4 


32 
3 


29 
1 


21 

1 
1 


6 
1 


3 


119 






11 










1 




3 






1 
3 












1 




5 


2 


3 


4 


2 


5 






3 


1 


2 


30 






1 
1 




















1 

1 


1 
1 










1 
1 


1 


1 










5 
















1 














1 
2 
3 










2 

1 
4 


3 




3 

2 


1 
3 


1 
2 


"2 


1 


1 








2 


12 




1 
1 


2 
2 


2 


21 




3 








1 


2 


2 


1 




1 

1 




1 
1 
1 
1 


8 














2 










2 




1 
2 


1 






5 






1 
1 


1 






2 

1 


1 


8 










1 
1 


3 


Dysentery 


1 




1 






1 


2 


1 




7 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 
TABLE No. S.— Continued. 



399 



Causes of Death. 





























.o 


-^ 


,D 










1?; 


S 


1 


q 


s 


>> 




>. 


s 
to 

s 


2 

A 


o 


< 


S 


1-5 


•-5 


<5 


W 


O 


2; 



Dyspepsia 

Eclampsia, puerperal 

Embolism 

Empyema 

Emphysema, pulmonary, 

Endocarditis 

Enteritis 

" gastro 

'• tubercular 

Fever, bilious 

" brain 

" puerperal 

" rheumatic 

'• scarlet 

" typhoid 

Fistula, anal 

Fracture of femur 

Gallstones 

Gangrene ■. 

Gastritis 

Hematemesis 

Heart, disease of 

'♦ dilatation of 

" fatty degeneration of.. 

" liypertrophy 

" mitral insufHciency of 

" " regurgitat'n of 

" . neuralgia of 

" paralysis of 

" valvular disease of.... 

Hemiplegia 

Hemoptysis 

Hemorrhage, cerebral 

" internal 

" intestinal 

" pulmonai-y 

Hemorrhagicus pemphigus. . . 

Hepatitis 

Hernia, strangulated [ 

Hydrocarditis 

Hydrocephalus 

Indigestion 

Influenza 

Intestinal obstruction 

La grippe 

Laryngitis 

Liver, cirrhosis of 

" hypertrophy of 

Lungs, congestion of 

" CEdenia of 

Lymphangitis 

Malnutrition 

Marasmus 

Measles 

Meningitis 

" cerebral 

" cerebro-spinal . 

" spinal 

tubercular 



Myelitis... 
Nephritis , 



1 
1 
3 
9 
17 
2 

1 
1 
1 
I 
6 
12 
1 
1 
1 



1 

33 

4 

1 

2 

3 
4 
3 
3 
24 
2 

1 
6 
3 
1 
1 
1 
5 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
4 
2 
4 
1 
1 
3 
1 
I 

45 
1 

33 
6 
5 
7 
9 
2 

21 



400 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

TABLE No. Z— Continued. 



Causes or Death. 



& 
















t^ 




3 

B 


■3 


p. 


% 


® 

a 


"5 


s 

if 


a 




s 

> 



u< 


^ 


< 


s 


i-s 


i-s 


•< 


CC 





^ 



Kepliritis.clironic, interstitial 

Neuritis, multiple 

Occlusion of gall duct by 

scinhus 

Old age 

Paralysis 

Paramenia 

Paresis 

Pericarditis 

Peritonitis 

" puerperal 

" purulent 

" tubercular 

Pertussis 

Phthisis pulmonalis 

Pleurisy 

Pneumonia 

" broncho 

" catarrhal 

" croupous 

" pleuro 

" static 

" typlioid 

Poisoning, lead 

Premature birth 

Prostatitis, acute .^ . • • 

Pulmonary lesions 

Pyemia 

Rachitis 

Rheumatism 

Rupture of intestines 

" of varicose vein 

Sclerosis, posterior, spinal . . . 

Septlcfemia 

Shock from severe burns 

" surgical operation 

Skull, fracture of 

Spasm, glottis 

Spina bifida 

Stenosis, mitral 

Stillborn 

Stricture of oesophagus 

Suicide, by poisoning 

" by shooting 

Suppuration ot knee joint — 

Tabes, dorsal is 

'' mesenterica 

Thigh, fracture of 

Thrombosis, cerebral 

Toxiumia 

Tuberculosis 

Ulcers, of stomach 

" of varicose 

Unknown 

Urajmia 

Uterine fibroid 

Varicella and pneumonia 



Total 



11 9 



12 17 
2 3 

1 1 



14 



105 88 100 118 98 74 120 103 103 116 83 119 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 401 

Table Xo. 3 gives the total deaths for the year, with the various 
causes assigned therefor. We solicit a careful perusal of this table, 
and also Table Xo. 4, which compares the vital statistics for the last 
sixteen years. Much valuable information may be obtained by a study 
of these tables, the particular kind depending upon the subject most 
interesting to the reader. As an instance, a review of the causes of 
deaths of infants will prove instructive and perhaps suggestive. 



402 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 
SOME COMPARISONS OF YITAL STATISTICS 



1886. 1887. 1888. 1S89. 1890 



Population, estimated 37,884 



Number of deaths, exclusive of 
stillbirtlis , . . . 

Deaths, per thousand of popula- 
tion 

Deaths of children under five 
years 

Eatio, deaths of children to total 
deaths, per cent 

Deaths of children per thousand 
of population 

Deaths from zymotic diseases . . . 

Deaths from zymotic diseases 

per thousand of population 

Cholera infantum 



Consumption 

Croup 

Diphtheria 

Bronchitis, all forms — 
Pneumonia, all forms . . . 
Heart disease, all forms 

Scarlet fever 

Typhoid fever 

Measles 

Whooping cough 

Smallpox 

Births reported 



Births per thousand of popula- 
tion 

Marriages reported 



39,032 40,215 41,433 43,689 44,126 



733 

19.35 
312 

42.56 

8.24 
231 

6.10 
89 

93 

12 

18 

29 

42 

40 

5 

20 

36 

11 

3 

1,106 



29.19 

404 



18.57 

313 

43.17 

8.02 
205 

5.25 
115 

109 

21 

9 

11 

26 

37 



1,207 



30.92 
451 



19,84 

356 

44.61 

8 85 
256 

6.37 
148 

93 

25 

17 

29 

39 

45 

4 

17 



1,391 



34.59 
473 



853 

20.59 
397 

46.54 

9.58 
227 

5.48 
115 

109 

24 

30 

37 

45 

23 

1 
12 

9 

5 



*830 



439 



764 

17.90 
353 

46.20 

8.27 
199 

4.66 
86 

79 

25 

23 

35 

38 

47 

5 
16 

4 



506 



901 

20.40 
434 

4S.17 

9.87 
25'2 

5.72 
141 

94 

15 

9 
38 
58 
43 

3 
17 

6 

4 



*965 



463 



* The returns are manifestly Incomplete. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



•403 



No. 4. 

FOR THE LAST SIXTEEN YEARS. 



1891. 


1892. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


45,500 


48,000 


50,000 


55,000 


55,000 


56,000 


60,000 


60.000 


60,000 


56,987 


880 


963 


971 


977 


1,020 


1,051 


1,018 


1,001 


1,068 


1,167 


19.34 


20.06 


19.42 


17.76 


f8.54 


18.77 


16.97 


16.68 


17.80 


20.47 


396 


500 


527 


546 


549 


531 


631 


521 


541 


561 


44.66 


51.92 


50.62 


55.89 


53.82 


50.52 


61.98 


52.04 


50.65 


48.07 


8.64 
181 


10.42 
153 


10.54 
137 


9.91 
209 


9.98 
213 


9.48 
227 


10.50 
226 


8.68 
254 


9.01 
203 


9.84 
244 


3. 98 
122 


3.18 
103 


2.74 
89 


3.S0 
40 


3.97 


4.05 
129 


3.77 

no 


4.23 
122 


3.38 

78 


4.28 
119 


84 


89 


79 


74 


76 


112 


88 


73 


91 


100 


7 


3 


4 


24 


114 


20 


14 


10 


10 


6 


2 


5 


1 


11 


10 


28 


29 


17 


6 


8 


38 


39 


44 


56 


59 


51 


86 


45 


65 


40 


72 


39 


53 


81 


86 


77 


105 


72 


113 


118 


38 


48 


46 


52 


75 


77 


64 


50 


57 


77 




2 


5 


3 


4 


1 


1 


9 
14 


3 
12 


6 
12 


18 


11 


15 


8 


21 


19 


12 


2 


11 


2 


4 


1 


3 


3 


3 


5 


1 


5 




2 




2 


3 


13 


2 


15 


3 


*985 


1,178 


1,491 


1,247 


1,440 


1,714 


1,614 


1,500 


1,489 




549 


637 


650 


616 


599 


652 


634 


' ' '565 " ' ' 


583 









404 ' ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The foregoing table gives comparison of statistics of contagious 
infectious diseases for the past sixteen years. 

We deem this a proper place to express our hearty thanks to the 
mayor and the members of both branches of the city councils, for 
encouragement and timely assistance in the discharge of our duties. 
We also wish to thank the members of the Board of Health of the 
town of Auburn for assistance in caring for the purity of the waters of 
Lake Massabesic. We would also record our hearty thanks to the 
many citizens who appreciated the difficulties of our very unusual 
task, and by word and deed encouraged and assisted us. The State 
Board of Health, it must here be recorded, has, during this season, 
rendered timely and most valuable assistance to las and to the city. 
It has been in constant touch with our work through its secretary. 
Dr. Irving A. Watson, who has been at all times helpful and encour- 
aging. 

JOHN C. BICKFORD, 

WILLIAM K. ROBBIXS, 
WILLIAM M. PAESONS, M. D., 

Board of Health. 

The undersigned feel that they would be remiss in their oblig-ations 
as men and officials, if they failed to express in some manner in this 
report their appreciation of the services rendered by their colleague, 
Dr. Wm. M. Parsons, in the epidemic of smallpox hereinbefore men- 
tioned, and with which we are still contending. 

At an age and in circumstances where he might well decline dis- 
agreeable and arduous duties, he has labored with all the vigor and 
enthusiasm of one reaching out and struggling for a professional 
record. Day and night, with unfaltering zeal, he has performed a duty 
which many younger physicians would have declined. His devotion to 
the welfare of the city and to the afflicted cannot be overestimated, 
and -R'ords of ours can but feebly express our gratitude to him, or 
the commendation due for his work. 

JOHN C. BICKFORD, President. 
WILLIAM K. ROBBINS, Cleric. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of HeaUli : 

We beg leave to submit the following as the report of the sanitary 
inspectors for the year 1900: 

Vaults and privies inspected 105 

Vaults inspected after cleaning 84 

Water-closets inspected 1,431 

Urinals inspected 28 

Yards and alleys inspected 1,561 

Cellars inspected 1,219 

Barns and outbuildings inspected 108 

Tenements inspected 253 

Barn cellars Inspected 191 

Latrines inspected 21 

Teams and riggings of excavators inspected 16 

Soaperies, slaughter-houses, etc., inspected 7 

Cleaning or repairs were ordered as follows: 

Vaults and privies cleaned 85 

Yards and alleys cleaned 306 

Cellars cleaned 215 

Barn cellars cleaned 22 

Sheds, etc., cleaned 11 

Tenements cleaned 81 

Water-closets cleaned or repaired 879 

Leaky drainpipes repaired 88 

Houses within 100 feet of a public sewer and not connected there- 
with, 10. 

Openings other than leaks in the drainage sj'stem were found in 125 
places, and same were closed by order of the department. Seven hun- 
dred and nineteen sinks have been examined, and 179 have been ordered 
trapped. 

Bathtubs inspected, 115; ordered trapj)ed, 4. 

Sewage was found running on the surface of the ground in 51 places, 
and such nuisances were abated either by entering the server or carry- 
ing away in some manner not offensive. 

In doing the work of the department it has been necessary to make 
8,784 calls, and to write 594 letters. 

Three hundred and fifteen complaints have been investigated. In 201 
cases the inspectors have been able to give relief, and in 39 cases it 

405 



406 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

was found that no cause existed, or that same was beyond the control 
of the department. 

Cemeteries were inspected 14 times to see that bodies were being 
properly buried. 

Fifty-one dead animals hare been properly disposed of. 

One hundred and twelve hens and small animals have been removed 
from cellars. 

Thirty-nine swine and cows have been discovered being kept within 
the sanitary limits of the citj', without licenses. Same were ordered 
removed or licenses procured. 

Twenty-eight complaints were made against the scavenger service; 
in each case the proijer parties were notified and relief afforded. 

Eighty-five persons were discovered throwing garbage in the back 
streets and lake, and were warned against the practice. 

Private swill collectors have been warned 35 times to be neater in 
their work. 

Thirty-nine catch-basins or street cesspools have been inspected, and 
25 have been flushed or repaired hy order of this department. 

Forty-five notices have been jjrepared and served, and proper returns 
made. 

A sanitary inspection has been made of 41 bakeshops. 

Twenty-three schoolhouses have been inspected. 

Theatres were inspected 17 times; ordered cleaned and put into 
proper sanitary condition 3 times. 

The dumps have been inspected 41 times. 

One hundred and sixty-two nuisances not otherwise classified have 
been abated through the efforts of this department. 

Householders have been given 16 permits to clean their own vaults. 

Permits to the number of 1,582 have been granted for the burial or 
removal of dead bodies, and the returns forwarded to the citj^ registrar. 

A statement of mortality has been prepared each month, and copies 
sent to over two hundred other towns and cities, to local physicians, 
etc. 

Contagious and infectious diseases have been reported as follows: 
Measles, 827; diphtheria, 38; typhoid fever, 65; scarlet fever, 102; mem- 
branous croup, 8; smallpox, 52; varioloid, 10; total, 1,102. Eight hun- 
dred and ninety-two of these cases were reported by physicians, 72 by 
householders, 130 were discovered by the inspectors, and 8 cases were 
reported from the different hospitals. The inspectors were unable to 
trace the cause in 402 cases; in 642 cases the connection with some 
previous case was clearly traceable. Colds were probably the occasion 
in 32 cases; 7 cases were contracted outside of the city; and in 9 cases 
it was reasonable to attribute the cause to unsanitary surroundings. 

In 76 cases, disinfectants were being used. The inspectors ordered 
their use in other cases. At most of these places instructions were 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 407 

given as to their use, and in many cases the department furnished tlie 
disinfectants. 

In some cases patients were found well isolated, and in the other 
cases inspectors were obliged to order isolation. In nearly all of these 
cases it was necessary for the inspectors to give instructions as to the 
steps to be taken. 

Houses were watched to see that the rules of isolation were com- 
plied with, and 10 funerals were attended to prevent a too public 
observance of the same. 

Nine hundred and eleven rooms where disease had existed were fumi- 
gated by the inspectbrs. 

Five hundred and twenty-one children who were attending school, 
and 309 people who were working and living in houses where con- 
tagious disease existed, were either restrained from attending school 
and employment, or instructed as to thorough isolation from the 
disease until all danger from contagion had passed. 

Sixty-three eases have been cared for at the contagious disease hos- 
pital. 

About 3,000 pamphlets issued by the State Board of Health have been 
distributed in the localities where contagious disease existed. 

"Weekly reports of contagious and infectious diseases have been sent 
to the State Board of Health, Concord, and the United States Marine 
Hospital Service, Washington, D. C. 

The inspectors have each in turn patroled the shores of Lake Massa- 
besic, Sundays, holidays, and parts of every other day from June 1 to 
October 1. 

Eight ice fields from which ice was being cut were inspected. 

Five horse races were attended to prevent the pollution of the water 
and ice at the lake. 

Four parties were prosecuted and fined for violation of the health 
laws at the lake. 

Steamboats inspected 42 times. 

Persons were warned as to the disposal of sink water. 

Nuisances to the number of 41, not otherwise classified, were abated. 

Several picnics and band concerts were attended, to prevent the care- 
less disposal of waste and rubbish in the lake or on its shores. 

Banana skins, tin cans, paper, and rubbish of all sorts, have been 
removed whenever found. 

PLUMBING nsrSPECTOR'S EEPOET, 

Plumbing fixtures set: 

Niimber of tank water-closets 549 

frost-proof water-closets, Kelly & McCullock 19 

sinks 404 

bathtubs 257 

washbowls 199 



408 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Number of wash trays 121 

urinals 7 

refrigerators 9 

slophoppers 5 

cellar drains 4 

Other fixtures not classified above 39 

Total number of fixtures put in 1,658 

Number of plumbing notices filed 456 

water tests made 365 

smoke tests made 23 

defects found 400 

complaints investigated 102 

fixtures and pipes found unserviceable and repaired 264 

plumbers found working without a license 5 

consultations with owners, tenants, agents, plumb- 
ers, etc 209 

A total of 2,004 inspections was made of the work during its progress 
and after its comiDletion. 

WILLIAM B. BLAKE. 
JOHN F. LOONEY. 
GAEL O. SEAMAN. 



EEPOEX 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



4 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY 
LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

The trustees of the City Library liereAvith respectfully present their 
forty-seventh annual report of the atfairs of the library, and with the 
same the report made to them by the treasurer of the board, contain- 
ing a statement of the sums received and the expenditures made by 
him in behalf of the board from the funds under the control of the 
trustees, and also the report of the librarian made to the board, giving 
in detail the statistics of the operation of the library during the year. 

From the report of the treasurer it appears that during the j'ear the 
sum of one thousand and sixty-two dollars and forty-nine cents has 
been expended for the purchase of books, and the sum of two hundred 
and thirtj-four dollars and seventeen cents for the purchase of peri- 
odicals, making a total expenditure for both of these purposes of 
twelve hundred and ninety-six dollars and sixty-six cents. « 

Of the amount expended for the purchase of books the sum of 
sixty-five dollars and seventy-five cents was expended to purchase 
books to replace those worn out and withdrawn from circulation, and 
the sum of one hundred and thirteen dollars and seven cents was 
taken from the income of the Dean fund and used for the purchase of 
books for that department of the library-. Exclusive of these two 
items the sum expended for the purchase of new books was eight hun- 
dred and eighty-three dollars and sixty-seven cents, leaving a balance 
in the hands of the treasurer at the close of the year of the amount 
appropriated by the city councils for the purchase of books of twelve 
hundred and thirtj'-seven dollars and twelve cents. 

The balances of the accumulative income of the several funds under 
the control of the trustees at the close of the year were as follows: 

Dean fund $3,136.76 

Mary E. Elliot fund 1,589.60 

Eliza A. Eaton fund 726.93 

During the year thirtj'-seven volumes were purchased from the in- 
come of the Dean fund, at a cost, as above mentioned, of one hundred 
and thirteen dollars and seven cents. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the past year have been 
four thousand three himdred and seventy-two dollars and fifteen cents. 
The items that make up the amount of these incidental expenses may 

411 



412 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

be found in detail in the annual report of the city, the bills for the 
same having been paid by the citj- treasurer upon their approval by 
the trustees, from the sum appropriated for the library. 

The librarian reports that during the past year the library has been 
open for the delivery of books three hundred and six days, during 
which time the number of books delivered for home use was seventy- 
one thousand four hundred and fifty-five, being an average of two 
hundred and thirty-four per day. In addition to this number delivered 
for general circulation, nineteen thousand and ninetj'-three books 
were delivered for use at the reading room at the librarj', an average 
of sixty-three per day. The total number of books delivered during the 
year for both these purposes was ninety thousand five hundred and 
forty-eight, an average of about two hundred and ninety-six per day. 
As compared with the previous year the circulation for home use shows 
a decrease of five thousand seven hundred and four, and the number 
delivered for use at the reading room shows an increase of sixteen 
hundred and ninety-four. The total circulation was four thousand 
and ten less than the previous j'ear. 

The number of books withdrawn from circulation during the year 
on account of their worn and defaced condition was two hundred and 
seventy-three. Of this number, and of others retired from circulation 
i?i previous years for the same reason, eighty-three have been replaced 
at a cost of sixty-five dollars and seventy-five cents. 

Ninety-six different periodicals have been regularlj* received at the 
library during the year, of which number sixty-five were purchased 
and thirty-one were donated, and on the completion of the various 
volumes they have been bound and placed on the shelves for general ■ 
circulation. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the last report, 
including maps and pamphlets, was fort3'-four thousand and forty- 
seven. During the year there have been added by purchase seven hun- 
dred and twenty-two volumes, bj^ donation nine hundred and seventy- 
five volumes, and one hundred and twenty-one volumes of periodicals 
have been bound, making the number of bound volumes in the library 
at the close of the 3'ear fortj'-five thousand one hundred and forty- 
seven, and the total number, including sixteen maps and seven hundred 
and two pamphlets, forty-five thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. 

Among the donations to the library during the year was a collec- 
tion of five hundred and thirtj' volumes of works of standard authors, 
many of which Avere finely illustrated and expensively bound, be- 
queathed to the library hy the late Mrs. Sarah S. Reynolds of this city, 
as a memorial of her husband. The trustees accepted this legacy in 
behalf of the city and by vote directed that the collection be ^Dlaced 
and arranged in an alcove at the library by itself, and designated as 
the William Eeynokls donation, in accordance with the terms of the 
will of Mrs. Eeynolds. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 413 

The work on the card catalogue has been continued during the 3-ear 
by the librarian and her assistants, and has progressed so far that 
there now remains to be catalogued only the government documents 
■and the unbound pamphlets, so that now the card catalogue prac- 
tically contains a complete list of the books in the library. Much, 
however, remains to be done in analyzing and expanding subordinate 
subjects in order that the catalogue may be made more complete and 
useful. 

In the early part of the year, a catalogue of the scientific and tech- 
nical books contained in the Dean fund purchase, prepared by the 
librarian and the assistant cataloguers, was printed for the use of the 
patrons of the library. The publication of this catalogue has proven 
of great service to those who have desired to make practical use of 
this department of the library. 

In August last the Library Bulletin Com]3any of Boston made a 
proposition to the trustees to publish, without expense to the city, a 
monthly bulletin containing a catalogue of new books added to the 
library. The trustees accepted the proposition made, and in the four 
numbers of the bulletin already published have appeared not only 
lists of monthly accessions made to the library, but also special read- 
ing lists upon various subjects. Although the preparation of material 
for the bulletin has involved considerable extra labor upon the part 
of the librarian and her assistant cataloguers, the same has been cheer- 
fully rendered. The trustees believe that the j)ublication of the bulle- 
tin has been of special benefit to the patrons of the library and has 
been greatly appreciated. 

The librarian, Miss Florence E. Whitcher, although compelled by ill 
health to be absent from the library for a portion of the year, has 
nevertheless discharged the duties of her position with fidelity and 
conscientious efforts for the best interests of the library. 

The trustees desire to renew their acknowledgments to the members 
of the city councils, and jDarticularly to the committee on lands and 
buildings, for the courtesy and consideration with which their sug- 
gestions relating to the librarj' have been received and carried out. 

March 2S, 1901. 
In board of trustees read and approved, and ordered signed by the 
chairman and clerk of the board, and transmitted to the city councils. 

WILLIAM C. CLAEKE, 

Mayor. 
X. P. HrxT, 
Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library: 

The treasurer of tlie board submits the following account of the 
receipts and expenditiares by the board of the funds received on ac- 
count of the library: 

1900. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropriation $1,215.00 

Aug. IS. approi)riation for books for 1900.... 1,000.00 

Dec. 29. Florence E. Whitcher, balance of fines 1S9.42 

Florence E. Whitcher, catalogues sold 8.40 

Florence E. "Whitcher, books lost 7.79 

$2,420.71 

Jan. 1. To balance of income of Dean fund $7,829.94 

income of Dean fund (coupons) 90.00 

July 2. income of Dean fund (coupons) 90.00 

interest on accumulation of income 
to July 1, 1900, Manchester Savings 
Bank, Book No. 16445 93.84 

interest on accumulation of income 
to July 1, 1900, Manchester Savings 

Bank, Book No. 24442 138.79 

Oct. 1. income of Dean fund, Hillsborough 

County Savings Bank, Book Xo. 102 6.29 

interest on accumulation of income 
to Oct. 1, 1900, Hillsborough County 

Savings Bank, Book Xo. 103 .97 

$8,249.83 

Jan. 1. To Mary E. Elliot fund $2,000.00 

balance of interest, Marj' E. Elliot 

fund 1,578.88 

Oct. 1. interest on Mary E. Elliot fund to 

Oct. 1, 1900, Hillsborough County 

Savings Bank, Book Xo. 104 6.00 

interest on accumulation of income 
to Oct. 1, 1900, Hillsborough County 
Savings Bank, Book Xo. 105 4.72 

$3,589.60 

414 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 415 

Jan. 1. To Eliza A. Eaton fund $3,000.00 

balance of interest, Eliza A. Eaton 

fund 715.79 

Oct. 1. interest on Eliza A. Eaton fund to 

Oct. 1, 1900, Hillsborough County 

Savings Bank, Book No. 106 ' 9.00 

interest on accumulation of income to 
Oct. 1, 1900, Hillsborough County 

Savings Bank, Book Xo. 107 2.13 

$3,726.92 

$17,987.06 
1900. Cr. 

Jan. 1. Paid Eumford Printing Co., books $5,00 

Florence E. '\Maitcher, books 3.50 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., books... 2.00 

6. W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books 88.40 

Boston Book Co., periodicals 5.60 

George E. Littlefield, books 7.02 

8. New England News Co., periodicals 12.34 

29. W. B. Clarke Co., books 62.46 

Boston Society Natural History, 

periodicals 4.00 

Feb. 2. T. P. W. Rogers, books 20.00 

12. New England News Co., periodicals .68 

Mar. 16. Little, Brown & Co., books 3.50 

Publishers' Weekly, books 3.50 

W. B. Clarke Co., books 181.70 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books .90 

April 9. W. B. Clarke Co., books 31.77 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books 7.67 

May 5. W. B. Clarke Co., books 3.40 

\Y. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books 3.50 

7. Little, Brown & Co., books 4.25 

18. Little, Brown & Co., books 1.50 

June S. Helman-Taylor Co., books 5.00 

W. J. Campbell, books 2.00 

11. Publishers' Weekly, books 3.50 ' " 

15. W. B. Clarke Co., books 99.74 

W. B. Clarke Co., replaced books... 65.75 

July 9. Little, Brown & Co., books 2.00 

16. W. B. Clarke Co.. books 12.82 



416 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

July 16. Paid W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books $1.80 

Aug. 2. Little, Brown & Co., books 1.50 

8. D. Appleton & Co., books '... 5.00 

17. W. B. Clarke Co., books 3.84 

23. ' Warren Brown, books 2.00 

Sept. 6. W. B. Clarke Co., books 76.81 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books 10.80 

21. Warren K. Moorehead, books 2.30 

Little, Brown & Co., books 3.75 

Oct. G. W. B. Clarke Co., books 6.85 

Little, Brown & Co., books 5.00 

15. Little, Brown & Co., books 6.00' 

31. Sampson, Murdock & Co., books... 2.00 

Nov. 1. Boston Book Co., periodicals 10.00 

15. Wm. H. Guild & Co., periodicals... 191.55 

W. B. Clarke Co., books 177.01 

19. Granite Monthly Co., periodicals. . . 10.00 

23. H. W. Wilson, books 3.00 

H. W. Wilson, books 14.00 

Dec. 10. Little, Brown & Co., books 2.0O 

15. John Scales, books 5.00 

18. George E. Littlefield, books 3.15 

W. B. Clarke Co., books 109.80 

$1,296.66 

Dec. 31. By balance of appropriation 1,237.12 

balance of Dean fund income 8,136.76 

balance of Elliot fund and interest 3,589.60 

balance of Eaton fund and interest 3,726.92 



$17,987.06 



The expenditures for incidental expenses of the library for the year 
ending December 31, 1900, the bills for which have been paid through 
the office of the city treasurer, upon the approval of the committee 
on accounts of the board of trustees, the items of which may be found 
in the annual report of the city, have been as follow^s: 

Services of librarian $412.50 

Services of assistants to librarian 942.95 

Fuel 318.61 

Gas '. 26.40 

Electricity 388.38 

Insurance 125.00 

Binding 178.77 

Eebinding s 438.31 

Printing trustees' report and Dean catalogue 353.66 



REPORT 01 THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 417 

Supplies $187.50 

Eeclassificatioii and cataloguing 887.45 

Water '. 16.00 

Newspapers 6.00 

Cleaning 77.31 

Incidentals 13.31 

$4,372.15 
KECAPITTTLATIO^^. 

Balance December 31, 1899 $1,673.28 

Appropriation for 1900 5,350.00 

$7,023.28 

Paid trustees for purchase of books $1,000.00 

Incidental expenses 4,372.15 

Balance of appropriation December 31, 1900 1,651.13 

$7,023.28 

Kespectfully submitted. 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 

Decembeb 31, 1900. 
We have examined the foregoing re^Dort, and find the same correctly 
cast and iiroiDerly vouched. 

WILLIA]\r C. CLAEKE, Mayor, 
WALTEK M. PARKEK, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 

December 31, 1900. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of receipts and 
expenditures embraced in the foregoing report of the treasurer of the 
trustees of the city library, and find the same correctly cast and 

properly vouched. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



27 



LIBEAEIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library: 

GENTLEiiEW,- — I herewith submit the forty-seventh annual rej)ort of 

the city library: 

Whole number of accessions December 31, 1899 44,047 

Added during the year 1900: 

By purchase 722 

By gift 975 

Periodicals bound 121 

1,S18 

Whole number at present 45,865 

Including: 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets 702 

Bound volumes 45,147 

45,865 

Number of periodicals regularly received: 

By purchase 65 

By gift 31 

Niimber of days the library was open for reading and distri- 
bution of books 306 

Number of volumes delivered for home use 71,455 

Average per day 234 

Largest number any one day 560 

Largest number any one month 7,565 

Smallest number any one month 5,128 

Number of volumes delivered in the reading room 19,093 

Average per day 63 

Total circulation for 1900 90,548 

Number of cards used on deposit 12 

Number of cards issued during the year 432 

Whole number issued since last registration 13,152 

Postals sent to delinquents 471 

Worn-out books removed from circulation 273 

Number of volumes replaced 83 

Number of volumes lost or injured and paid for 10 

Number of volumes repaired at bindery 1,822 

Number of volumes repaired and covered at the library 14,585 

Number of volumes issued to teachers 966 

418 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTE^ES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 419 

Amount received from December 1, 1S99, to December 1, 1900: 

For fines $278.10 

catalogues 8.40 

books lost and paid for 7.79 

$294.29 

Amount paid for.expressag-e and incidentals 88.68 

Paid to N. P. Hunt, treasurer, December 29, 1900 $205.61 

The number of books taken from the library for home use during 
the year 1900 was seventy-one thousand four hundred and fifty-five, 
^nd the number of books used in the reading room was nineteen 
thousand and ninety-three. This number does not include a great 
many books consulted by students and others in search of informa- 
tion covering a great variety of subjects. It would be impossible 
to make a record of the books wsed for this purpose without taking 
time Avhich can be more profitably employed in other ways to increase 
the usefulness of the library-. Following is a statement of the cir- 
culation by classes, with the percentage of each: 

No. Vols. Per ct. 

Periodicals 3,422 5 

Philosophy and Eeligiou 832 1 

Biography 1,743 3 

History 2,423 3 

Geography and Travel 1,569 2 

Social and Political Science 479 1 

Science and Useful Arts 2,374 3 

Fine Arts 1,040 1 

Literature 2,134 3 

Fiction 55,438 78 

We are indebted to the State Library for the loan of twenty-five 
volumes and four pamphlets for the use of patrons of the library. 

This year two hundred and seventy-three books have been with- 
drawn from circulation, being too badly worn for further service. 
Ninety-three have been replaced. 

At the annual examination of the library seven books were unac- 
counted for, — two each of fiction and literature, and one each of bi- 
ography, church historj', and social science. During the examination 
three books which were missing at the examination the year before 
were found on the shelves. 

The library building shows more clearly every year its inadequacy 
to the growing needs of the city. The reading room is so small and 
so situated that it is very difficult and at times well nigh impossible 
to maintain the quiet needed for reading or study. The great need 
of a reference room is more evident every year, that students may find 
the books needed for consultation, ready at hand, without having to 
vrait for them to be brought from the shelves. The children, too, 



420 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

need a room where they will be welcome, and may find books suited 
to their age and need, without being made to feel that they are dis- 
turbing others, or occupying seats needed by their elders. The imme- 
diate need of step-ladders is pressing, as many of those now in use 
are very much out of repair, and are no longer safe, but owing to 
the limited number cannot be given up. 

The work on the catalogue has progressed until onlj- the regular 
set of government documents and the unbound pamphlets remain to 
be done; so that the card catalogue is practically a complete list of 
all the books in the library. Now there still remains much to be done 
in the way of analysis, in order to make the catalogue more useful. 
This, of course, is a matter of time, and will be carried on as fast as 
the regular v^^ork will allow. During the year twenty-three hundred 
books have been classified and twenty-five hundred and forty-four have 
been catalogued. In addition a catalogiie of the scientific books in- 
eluded in the Dean collection has been printed, which, it is hoped, will 
meet the long-felt need of those interested in that line of study. A 
monthly Bulletin has been issued since SeiJtember, in which the lists 
of new books have appeared, as well as special reading lists, which 
have been on timely or much called for topics. There have already* 
appeared a reference list on Mineralogy, pre^Dared for the benefit of 
the members of the Manchester Institute; a Thanksgiving list, and 
also one on Christmas. It is hoped that the two latter will prove 
helpful to the teachers and pupils of the schools. 

The number of new books purchased in 1900 was seven hundred and 
twentjM.wo. Of this number thirty-seven were added to the Dean col- 
lection. Gifts to the number of nine hundred and seventy-five have 
been received, and one hundred and twenty-one volumes of periodicals 
have been bound. 

The library has been enriched this year by the gift bequeathed to 
the library by the will of Mrs. Sarah S. Eeynolds, late of this city. 
This gift includes five hundred and thirty volumes, many of these 
being de luxe editions, finely illustrated, and beautifully bound, of 
well-known authors. Among these are the works of Shakesjaeare, 
Dickens, Thackeray, Lowell, Whittier, Holmes, Emerson, Hawthorne, 
Scott, Longfellow^, Irving, and George Eliot. Besides these are his- 
tories by Duruy, Rollin's Ancient History, a set of Harper's maga- 
zines, as well as some large illustrated w^orks, including Dante's 
Divine Comedy, illustrated by Dore, and the Turner Gallery. The col- 
lection, which includes, besides those mentioned, some miscellaneous 
books, has been arranged in an alcove by itself, and will be known as 

the William Reynolds Donation. 

Respectfully submitted. 

FLORENCE E. WHITCHER, 

Librarian. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 421 

Donations to Library. 

Books. Pamphlets 
Abbot Public Librarj-, Marblehead, [Mass 1 

Acker, F 1 

American Union League Society 1 

Amherst College 2 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massa- 
chusetts 1 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Massachusetts. . . 5 

Balch, E. S 1 

Balch, T. W 1 

Barton, W. E 4 

Batchellor, A. S 2 

Bigelow Free Public Library, Clinton, Mass 1 

Birmingham, Eng. — Free Libraries 1 

Boston, Mass. — Public Librar}- 1 

Bridgeport, Conn. — Public Library 1 

Bronson Library Fund, Waterbury, Conn 3 

Brookline, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Brooklyn, N. Y. — Librarj^ 1 

Bulfinch, E. S 1 

Bureau of American Eepublics 1 

Burnet, J., Company 1 

Burnham, E. J 2 

Cambridge, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburg, Pa 1 

Carvelle, H. DeW 51 

Chandler, W. E 3 

Chicago, 111. — Public Library 1 

Children's Aid Societj^ 2 

Cincinnati, O. — Public Library 1 

Civil Service Eef orm Association 3 

Concord, Mass. — Free Public Library' 2 

Concord, N. H. — Public Library 1 

Cornell University 1 

Craig, A 1 

Cross, D 1 

Currier, Mrs. M I 

Daniels, W. C 1 

Dartmouth College 1 2 

Depew, CM 1 

Detroit, Mich. — Public Library 2 

Dickey, Mrs. S. E 1 

District of Columbia Public Library 1 

Dodge, J. E 22 

Dodge, J. H 2 



422 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Dodge, T. H 1 

Dover, N. H. — Public Libraiy 2 

Eastern States Mission 4 

Elkins, W. P 5 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md 1 

Evanston, 111. — Free Public Library 1 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Pa 2 

Fall Eiver, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Fidelity and Casualty Company 1 

Fitz Public Library, Chelsea, Mass 2 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt 1 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Pa 1 

Friends of Sociological Study 1 

Fnllerton, A 1 

Gallinger, J. H 1 

Gould, S. C 13 

Hall, W. S 1 

Harvard University 3 1 

Heginbottom Free Librarj', Ashton-under-Lyne, Eng... 1 

Hillsborough County Commissioners 1 

Howard Memorial Librarj% Xew Orleans, La 1 

Huse, W. H 9 

Indian Eights Association 1 

Interstate Commerce Commission 1 

Ipswich Historical Society 1 

Jenkins, H. M 1 

Jersey City, N. J. — Free Public Library 1 

Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Kailway 1 

Lancaster, Mass. — Town Library 1 

Lamb, F. W 6 

Lawrence, Mass. — Free Public Library 1 

Love, J , 1 

Lynn, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Lytle, J. J 1 

McMillan, J 1 

Maimonides Free Library, New York City 1 

Maiden, Mass.— Public Library ' 1 

Manchester, Eng. — Public Free Libraries 2 

Manchester, X. H. — Board of Water Commissioners 1 

City Clerk 2 

" " City Engineer 1 

" " Street and Park Commission...:.. 1 

Manchester Institute of Arts and Sciences 1 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 3 

Medford, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Milwaukee, Wis. — Public Library 2 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 423 

Minneapolis, Minn. — Park Commissioners 1 

" " Public Library 1 

^Montana. — Bureau of Agriculture, Labor, and Industry 1 

Morse Institute Library, Natick, Mass 1 

Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass 1 

Murray, T. H 1 

Nashua, N. H. — Public Library 1 

Nevins Memorial Library, Methuen, Mass 1 

New Hampshire. — Centennial Home for the Aged 1 

" " Insurance Commissioner 1 

Secretary of State 1 1 

State Library 2 

New Haven, Conn. — Free Public Library 1 

New York City. — Mercantile Library 2 

New York State. — State College of Forestry 1 

" " State Library 3 

Newark, N. J. — Free Public Library 4 

Newton, Mass. — Free Library 1 

Oakland, Cal. — Free Library 1 

Parlin Memorial Library, Everett, ]\Iass 1 

Paterson, N. J. — Free Public Library 1 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md 1 

Peoria, 111. — Public Library 2 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the 

Blind 1 

Philadelphia City Institute 1 

Philadelphia, Pa. — Free Library 1 

Pillsbury Free Library 1 

Portland, Me. — Public Library 1 

Portland, Ore. — Library Association 1 

Providence, R. I. — Public Library 2 

Punch 1 

Eeynolds, Mrs. S. S 530 

Eobbins Library, Arlington, Mass 1 

Rochester, N. H. — Public Library 2 

St, Giles Public Library, London, Eng 1 

St. Louis, Mo. — Mercantile Library 1 

Salem, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Seattle, Wash. — Public Library 3 

Sheppard and St. John 1 

Smiley, A. K 1 

Somerville, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Southbridge, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Sturtevant, B. F., Co 4 

Sweetser, M. F 1 

Towle Manufacturing Company 1 



424 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Tucker, C 1 

Underwood, H. S 1 

United States. — Ag-ricultural Department 35 

" " Bureau of Education 2 

*' " Civil Service Commission 1 

*' " Commission to Paris Exposition 2 1 

" " Interior Department 1 24 

*' " Labor Department 1 6 

" " Library of Cong-ress 2 7 

" " Smithsonian Institution 4 

" " Superintendent of Documents 256 202 

" " Treasury Department 2 1 

" " War Department 7 

University of Calif oi*nia 1 

University of Illinois 1 

Universitj^ of Pennsj'lvania 2 2 

LTniversitj' of the State of New York S 4 

Unknown 1 2 

Vandegrift Land and Improvement Comj)any 1 

Westboro, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Wilcoc, C. F 1 

Wilmington, Del. — Institute Free Library 1 

Woburn, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Woodbury, F. D 2 

Worcester, Mass. — Free Public Library 1 



Periodicals Presented. 
Book Notes. 
Book Reviews. 
Bulletin of Bibliography. 
Case and Comment. 

Catalogue of United States Public Documents. 
Chicago Banker. 
Christian Science Journal. 
Christian Science Sentinel. 
Elliott's Magazine. 
Father Matthew Herald. 
Herald of the Golden Age. 
Holy Cross Purple. 
Ladies' Review. 
Legal Bibliography. 
Manchester. — -Emerald. 
Budget. 
" Union (daily and week! 3'). 

Nature Study. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 425 

New Earth. 

Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office. 

Pljmouth Eecord. 

Protectionist. 

Skandinavia. 

Sound Currency. 

Sunset. 

Tennessee University Magazine. 

Travellers' Eecord. 

Universalist Leader. 

Wall Street Journal. 



Library Publications Received. 

Amherst College. — Library Bulletin. 

Boston Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Brookline Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Dover Public Librar3^— Bulletin. 

Helena Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Iowa Masonic Library. — Bulletin. 

Jersey City Free Public Library-. — Librarj^ Eecord. 

Lawrence Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Library Company of Philadeli)hia. — Bulletin. 

Lynn Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Minneapolis Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Kashua Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Kew Hampshire Library Commission. — Bulletin. 

Kew Haven Free Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Portland (Ore.) Library Association. — Our Library. 

New York Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Providence Libraries. — Bulletin. 

Salem Public Library. — Bulletin. 

United States, Department of Agriculture. — Library Bulletin. 

WTiitefield Public Library. — Bulletin. 



I 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



EEPOET OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Maxchestek, X. H., December 31, 1900. 
To His Honor William C. Clarice, Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Council: 

In compliance with the ordinance of said city, the overseers of the 
poor herewith present their annual report for the year 1900: 

The number of families which have received more or less assistance 
off the farm during the year has been 120, consisting of 220 persons, 
all of whom have a settlement in this city. The number of paupers 
supported at the county farm during the year has been 9 more or less 
of the time, at a cost of two dollars per week for each person, all of 
w^hom are insane and incurable. 

The number of children supiJorted at the State Industrial School 
during the year has been 1, at a cost of one dollar and fifty cents per 
week. 

In compliance with sections 1 and 2, chapter 116, Piiblic Statiates of 
New Hampshire, passed at the January session, 1895, in relation to 
dependent minor children being supported at almshouses, the said 
minor children having a settlement in this city are supported as fol- 
lows: At St. Patrick's Orphans' Home, 10, at a cost of one dollar and 
twenty-five cents per week for each child. The said minor children 
have educational advantages. 

The overseers of the poor have given 1,018 orders to the pauj)ers off 
the farm during the year. The said orders consisted chiefly of orders 
for groceries, fuel, medicine, board, clothing, care, and emergencies. 
The whole amount allowed to the several persons who applied for 
assistance from time to time from the several wards of the city during 
the year was as follows: 

Ward 1 $109.15 

Ward 2 861,48 

Ward 3 506.41 

Ward 4 477.96 

Ward 5 2,951.37 

Ward 6 49.45 

Ward 7 202.00 

Ward 8 476.11 

Ward 9 1,404.26 

Ward 10 753.20 

$7,791.39 

429 



430 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

MISCELLANEOUS BILLS ALLOWED. 

The Jolin B. Clarke Co., printing $11.20 

State Industrial School, board of inmates 1,619.31 

, Vaccinating poor children 14.65 

Conveyance of Lottie Weeks to town of Grafton.., 1.66 

$1,646.82 

Total amount allowed $9,438.21 

Cash received from Hillsborough county for board 
of inmates of State Industrial School, not having 

a settlement in this city $1,541.31 

Cash from town of Grafton for conveyance of Lot- 
tie Weeks 1.66 

$1,542.97 

Total cost to the city $7,895.24 

There are uncollected bills due the city amounting to $440.78. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Ward 1, WILLIAM H. IVIAXWELL, 
Ward 2, DANIEL G. ANDKEWS, 
Ward 3, BENJAMIN F. GAELAND, 
Ward 4, CHAELES B. CLAEKSON, 
Ward 5, PATEICK COSTELLO, 
Ward 6, CHAELES FEANCIS, 
Ward 7, WILLL\M MAESHALL, 
Ward 8, CHAELES S. McKEAN, 
Ward 9, JOSEPH DOUCET, 
Ward 10, WILLL^M GLOVEE, 
Overseers of the Poor for tlie City of Manchester. 

A true copy of record. Attest: 

William H. IMaxwell, 

Clerk of the Board. 



Aid to Soldiers, Sailors, and Their Dependent Families. 

To His Honor William C. Clarke, Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Council: 

In compliance with sections 1 and 2, chapter 81, Laws of the state of 
New Hampshire, passed at June session, 1881, in relation to indigent 
soldiers and sailors of the War of the Eebellion, the overseers of the 
poor herewith present their annual report under the above head for 
the year 1900: 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 431 

The number of soldiers and sailors who have had more or less 
assistance during the yeai- has been one, at a cost of $133.25. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Ward 1, WILLIAM H. IMAXWELL, 
Ward 2, DANIEL G. ANDREWS, 
Ward 3, BENJAMIN F. GARLAND, 
Ward 4, CHARLES B. CLARKSON, 
Ward 5, PATRICK COSTELLO, 
Ward 6, CHARLES FRANCIS, 
Ward 7, WILLIAM JMARSHALL, 
Ward 8, CHARLES S. McKEAN, 
Ward 9, JOSEPH DOUCET, 
Ward 10, WILLIAM GLOVER, 
Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 
A true copj- of record. Attest: 

WiLLIAJI H. ]\Iaxwell, 

Clerk of the Board. 



REPORTS 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES AND 
CEMETERY FUNDS. 



EEPOETS OP THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES 
AND CEMETEEY FUNDS. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

To the Trustees of Cemeteries and the Board of Mai/or and Aldermen: 

By instruction of the sub-trustees of the Pine Grove cemetery I 
herewith submit the following report for the year 1900: 

At the beginning of the year a chang'e was made in the management 
of the Pine Grove cemeterj'. Mr. Byron A. Stearns, who had for over 
nineteen years been superintendent, retired from the position, and Mr. 
John H. Erskine, who had for several years served as assistant, was 
chosen superintendent, and Mr. Eugene C. Smith was appointed assist- 
ant superintendent. The trustees believe that under the new manage- 
ment no backward step has been taken, but the work has gone on 
harmoniously' and efPectiveh'. The grounds have been well cared for, 
manj' siibstantial improvements have been made, and the general ap- 
pearance of the grounds was never better. 

The "Field of Manesquo" was extended by an addition of fifty feet 
to the south. A large section of border south of the east entrance was 
graded and grassed, and a jiart of the plot east of Landscape Lawn 
was graded and will be laid out into lots ready for sale the coming 
spring. All of the unsold unrestricted lots were regraded and five of 
them were sold, leaving but four unsold, which are scattered in various 
parts of the j'ard. There are now no lots for sale which have not 
been properly graded and put .into good condition. Excepting the four 
just mentioned all lots are in lawns, and all the later lawns have grass 
walks between the lots. During the last year a number of gravel 
paths in older portions of the grounds have been filled and grassed, 
and it is hoped that by a continuance of this kind of work the checker- 
board look of a large part of the cemetery can be done away with and 
the general appearance vastly improved. 

During the year new borders have been laid in several sections. Over 
thirty-two hundred square yards of avenues have been built of crushed 
stone. The lots on Riverside and Pine Lawns have been marked with 
slate corner bounds, and six hundred iron markers with which to 
number lots have been purchased. A new and improved machine for 
lowering a casket into a grave has been added to the appliances. One 
hundred and fiftj' rose bushes and a large amount of shrubberj' were 
planted. 

435 



436 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

The amount of work grows each year. In 1900, in addition to the 
borders, flower jilots, and unsold lots, which must be cared for with- 
out pay, 425 private lots and 328 lots under perpetual care were taken 
care of, watered, and clipped, for all of which $2,950 was paid into the 
city treasury by the owners and the trustees of the cemetery fund. 
Owing" to the extreme dryness of the season the ■svater bill was un- 
usually large. The city water-works were paid $1,191.75 for water used 
during- the year. 

In 1900 there were 276 interments and 31 bodies were removed from 
one grave to another. Ninety lots, of which 31 were on joerpetual care 
lawns, were sold. There now remain unsold 36 lots on Riverside Lawn, 
27 on Chapel Lawn, 67 on Pine Lawn, all under perpetvial care; 28 on 
Acacia Lawn, and 4 scattered lots. The need of a new section of lots 
not imder perpetual care is plainly to be seen, and will be met the 
coming- year by the development of the plot just east of Landscape 
Lawn. It would be a great benefit to the cemetery if all lots could be 
sold at such a price that the city could afford to keep them watered 
and the grass properly cut. But with the appropriations no larger 
than they are, and with all the receipts going, as they do, into the city 
treasury for the payment of current expenses, it is difficult to devise a 
plan which shall accomplish this end. 

If all the money received by the city from the sale of lots, espe- 
ciallj^ all in excess of the actual cost of the land and grading, could be 
paid over to the trustees of the cemeterj^ fund, it would not be many 
years before all parts of the grounds not under perpetual care could be 
reasonably cared for. As it is now, when lots are sold, the purchase 
price goes into the city treasury, as also does all that paid by owners 
■ and the trustees of the cemetery fund for the care of lots. So that, 
although the appropriation in 1900 was $9,000, the actual cost of the 
cemetery to the taxpayers was $1,249.79, the current receipts being 
$7,750.21. In years to come if the sale of lots should diminish the 
annual cost must necessarily be greater, and as there are always many 
lots whose owners cannot or will not pay for care, these neg'lected lots 
will constantly mar the general appearance, unless some arrangement 
can now be made while the real expense is so small. Some such plan 
as has been suggested would avoid the difficulty and at the same time 
would entail no hardship on the city. 

The sub-trustees are indebted to the trustees of the cemetery fund 
for the donation of $800 for general improvements. Of this sum, $500 
went to the jDurchase of crushed stone for the avenues, $200 for filling 
and grassing gravel paths, and $100 for the purchase of shrubbery and 
flowers. The sub-trustees sincerely appreciate the assistance, and de- 
sire to make public announcement of the gift, which will doubtless 
gratify- all interested citizens. The money came from the unexpended 
income of the perpetual care fund, and was used in accordance Avith 
the provisions of the contracts under which that fund has grown, it 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 437 

being provided that for permanently improving and beautifying the 
grounds the trustees maj' in their discretion use the surplus income 
which remains after the jjayment of all jiroper expenses of the lots 
under perpetual care. 

At the Merrill yard, beyond the ordinary work of cutting the grass, 
cleaning walks, graveling drives, and trimming trees, little was done 
except to repair the wall. 

The sub-trustees hope that the management has been satisfactory to 
the public, and the total lack of complaint to 'them during the past 
year encourages this hope. 

All of which is respectfullj^ submitted. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 
For tlic Siih-Triistecs of the Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Valley Cemetery. 

In behalf of the sub-trustees of the Valley cemeter.v I wish to make 
the following report: 

The work at the cemetery has been under the same management of 
Mr. C. H. G. Foss as in years past and the work done has been up to 
the standard of j^ears past. Substantial progress has been made in 
filling and grading the banks and building walks on the west bank. 
The fill at the southwest corner of the grounds is so far advanced that 
it is ready for the fence in the spring. The grading on the north end 
of the grounds has been completed, and has made a great improvement. 
Material used: Gravel, 98 loads; loam, 97 loads; sand, north bank, 
267 loads; sand, south bank, 264 loads. Concrete walks laid, 98 yards. 
Number of bodies in tomb, 54; number of interments, 61; number 
of removals, 4. 
■Cash receipts for: 

. Care of lots and water $1,103.75 

Sundries 214.00 

Interments 172.50 

Tomb fees 194.50 

Removals 15.50 

Cash paid city treasurer $1,700.25 

Actual expense .' $1,399.75 

Appropriation for 1900 3,100.00 

S. P. CANNON, 

Clerk. 



438 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Amoskeag Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of Amoskeag cemetery present the following report 
for the year 1900: 

There have been thirteen persons buried in this cemetery during the 
past year. Besides the regular work of mowing the grass, watering 
the lots, raking oft: the leaves in the autumn, and other general work 
that is always needed, and which has been well attended to by the 
superintendent, George C. Harwood, a number of things that improve 
the yard have been done. Twelve trees have been purchased and set 
out. The fence on the north side has received new posts and rails. 
All the fence has been thoroughly painted with two coats. A drive- 
way has been built along the west end of the cemetery, thereby improv- 
ing its looks and efficiency. A tool-house has been built for use by 
the superintendent. 

The cemeterj^ is in better condition than ever before, but much 
remains to be done to make it as attractive in appearance as it should 
be. Steps should be taken in the immediate future to increase its size 
by the purchase of more land, as j)ractically every lot is occupied at 
present. 

SAMUEL COUCH. 

W. H. HUSE. 

CHAELES E. STEARNS. 



TREASUEEE'S EEPOET. 



To tJie Trustees of Cemeteries: 

GEXTLEiiEJN', — I herewith present to you the annual report of the 

money received during the year ending December 31, 1900: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Interest P^^<^^ of Permanent ,p^ > 

inteiesr. ^ot. Fund. -lotai. 

Otto K. Ehamstrom $0.18 $22.27 $22.45 

Myra L. Dougan 30.00 .$82.50 112.5Q 

Emma L. Drew 28 47.51 130.66 178.45 

Isabella C. Campbell 14 22.40 61.57 84.11 

Mrs. A. A. Downs and F. O. Parnell .88 62.36 171.44 234.68 

Maude McPherson .45 37.74 38.19 

J. H. Fullerton 19 43.84 44.03 

Clara E. Webster 39 36.69 37.08 

Lavinia A. Philbrick 42 38.69 39.11 

Charles F. Flanders 65 89.31 267.90 357.86 

Charles and H. L. Davis 40 72.00 198.00 270.40 

John Robertson 24 30.00 82.50 112.74 

Juliette B. Hall 59.70 179.09 238.79' 

Catherine McCullough 42.16 42.16 

Martha Kidd 38.83 38.83 

Emma L. Nesmith 69 62.62 172.23 235.54 

Annie M. Perkins 39.05 39.05 

Horace W. Page 57.60 57.60 

Bertha George 44.34 44.34 

Kate Foster 78.85 78.85 

W. H. Potter 42.39 42.39 

Herman Greager 46.05 46.05- 

Herman Koehler 48.64 48.64 

Joseph A. Jackson 109.14 327.41 436.55 

E. C. E. Dorion 18 30.00 82.50 112.68 

Mary F. Pike 16 41.50 41.66 

C. H. and H. A. Berger 45.20 45.20 

Charles E. Glidden 30.75 84.56 115.32 

F. H. Challis 2.47 32.21 88.58 123.26 

Mrs. George H. Bagley 40.73 40.73 

Emma Sandberg 36.90 36.90 

439 



440 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Margaret McClure $0.21 

Olof P. Xyberg 

Gertrude E. Platts 

Moses Sheriff 

■ George H. Warren 

Martha Keeler 

Mrs. Helen M. Hatch 

Delia A. Phippin 5.44 

Horace J. Holmes .34 

Albert E. Xace 66 

Mrs. M. A. Horton 71 

Melvin ]N[. Halen 40 

Guj T. Robinson .53 

C. F. Grinnell, S. H. Burbank, and 

Mrs. E. A. Burbank 76 

George W. Dearborn 

Walter J. French 

Annie J. Bagley .54 

H. L. Battle and G. E. Harwood. . .39 

Lizzie Gray 

Abbie C. Kenney 23 

M. Jennie Thompson, admx .17 

M. Jennie Thompson 

Frank W. Jardine .49 

Clarence E. Eose .14 

Etta A. Bean 14 

^lary J. Morrill 

Harry T. Lovering .48 

R. Codaire 23 

Ernestine Schmalf uss 

Katherine Eschelmuller .15 

Lorinda Burnham 

J. Hodge 1.77 

W. H. Behlman and Xancy C. 

Savory 30 

Emma Larson 

Ellsworth M. Magoon 

Xorwin S. Bean 

Walter E. Dustin 

Mary E. Fifield 

Estate George Dunnington .58 

Emily E. Killey 

Warren H. Gould 1.20 

George W. Cheney 

Gertrude Hallowell 70 

F. A. Hawlev 



$45.24 




$45.45 


22.83 




22.83 


30.00 


$82.50 


112.50 


30.00 


82.50 


112.50 


30.00 


82.50 


112.50 


22.34 


61.45 


83.79 


46.25 




46.25 


19.48 




24.92 


31.18 


85.74 


117.26 


54.16 




54.82 


57.60 




58.31 


39.30 




39.70 


40.63 




41.16 


78.88 




79.64 


85.22 


255.68 


340.90 


43.97 




43.97 


40.66 




41.20 


36.65 


100.78 


137.82 


13.51 


37.18 


50.09 


25.70 


70.66 


96.59 


10.68 


29.37 


40.22 


10.68 


29.37 


40.05 


44.29 




44.78 


21.82 




21.96 


19.22 


52.84 


72.20 


45.36 




45.36 


43.34 




43.82 


45.71 




45.94 


45.69 




45.69 


40.21 




40.36 


41.12 




41.12 


118.20 


354.61 


474.58 


54.29 




54.59 


22.28 




22.28 


45.60 




45.60 


120.60 


361.82 


482.42 


54.00 




54.00 


72.00 


198.00 


270.00 


64.22 


176.61 


241.41 


72.00 


198.00 


270.00 


54.00 




55.20 


72.00 


198.00 


270.00 


23.74 


62.79 


87.23 


30.55 


84.02 


114.57 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 441 

Augusta J. and Harry E. Wheeler $91.80 $91.80 

Eliza Schink $0.30 45.50 45.86 

Charles Cooler 22.54 $61.99 84.53 

Sarah J. Rowley 

George K. Brock 

Warren Harvej' (Merrill yard) . 

Etta H. Cunningham 

Improved Order Red Men 

Edna and E. W. Mead 

Clara Kraut 



.80 


65.02 


178.82 


244.64 


.75 


56.15 


154.44 


211.34 




2.40 




2.40 


.39 


29.56 


81.29 


111.24 




199.80 




199.80 




54.29 




54.29 


.18 


45.68 




45.86 



Total $26.70 $4,037.47 $5,009.90 $9,074.07 

Cash on hand January 1, 1900 5.00 



$9,079.07 

From B. A. Stearns, care of lots $144.50 

J. H. Erskine, care of lots 3,541.54 

J. H. Erskine (Merrill yard) 3.50 



Ck. 



$12,768.61 



By amount paid the cemetery fund $5,009.90 

treasurer's receipts 4,069.17 

superintendent's receipts, B. A. Stearns 144.50 

superintendent's receipts, J. H. Erskine 3,541.54 

superintendent's receipts, J. H. Erskine (^Merrill yard) . . . 3.50 



$12,768.61 



Valley Cemetery. 

To cash received from C. H. G. Foss, superintendent, for care 

of lots $1,700.25 

Cr. 

By superintendent's receipts $1,700.25 

Respectfully submitted. 

FRED L. ALLEX, 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 



I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of Fred L. Allen, 
treasurer of the trustees of cemeteries, and find the same are cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched for. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



TEEASUEER'S EEPOET. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit to j-ou the eighteenth annual report 
of the funds received and expenses paid to December 31, 1900: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January 1, 1900 $47,144.23 

Eeceipts during the Yeah. 

From George S. Smith ^ $108.00 

Mrs. B. H. Piper 100.00 

James Fullerton, administrator 100.00 

Robert Anderson 115.20 

George W. Quimby 144.00 

E. B. Jacobs 100.00 

Lucretia Campbell 120.00 

F. C. Livingston, administrator of estate of 

Mary J. Chase 200.00 

George D. Towne - 107.72 

Mrs. L. W, Colby 108.00 

E. A. Brown, administrator of estate of Ida 

E. Kendrick 100.00 

Augusta J. and Harry E. Wheeler 145.72 

To amount received from F. L. Allen, treasurer of 
the trustees of Pine Grove cemetery, for lots sold 
on the lawns under perpetual care for the year 
ending December 31, 1900 •. 5,009.90 

6,458,54 

Total amount of fund $53,602.77 

Ce. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1900 $42,050.00 

Bonds bought during the yeax 6,000.00 

Cash on hand in savings banks December 31, 1900. . 5,552.77 

$53,602.77 

Ixcome Account. 

Income on hand January 1, 1900 $3,726.67 

442 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 443 

Interest coupons on bonds $2,252.50 

savings banks deposits 216.98 

Income for the year $2,409.48 

Total $6,196.15 

EXPE^'SES PAID DURIXG THE YEAE. 

A. Elliott, accrued interest and premium on bonds 

purchased March 1, 1900 $529.00 

Manchester Slaughtering and Eendering Co 20.00 

John B. Varick Co 32.00 

John B. Varick Co 6.00 

A. K Hobbs 52.50 

A. K. Hobbs 7.50 

J. P. Brown Co 5.00 

C. S. Fifleld 5.00 

A. G. Hood 50.00 

A. G. Hood 66.00 

Pay-roll for grading paths 44.25 

James Thompson 150.00 

C. A. Bailey 486.00 

John H. Erskine, superintendent 1,194.00 

A. P. Home & Co 34.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 3,514.90 

$6,196.15 

Valley Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January 1, 1900 $18,563.65 

Eeceipts during the Year. 

From Esther A. Parker and Henry E. Burnham, 

executors estate of Charles F. Warren $500.00 

Harvey Huse 102.00 

Smith H. Xutter, executor estate of F. C. 

Lougee 100.00 

E. H. Currier, administrator estate of Rich- 
ard Flanders 100.00 

Frank E. Green 125.00 

William H. Hurd 138.00 

Mrs. Rachel Bullard 108.00 

Susan N. Xeal,, William H. Bailey, Clark M. 
Bailey, Charles M. Bailey, Sarah J. Jen- 
kins, George W. Bailey 100.00 

Mrs. Permelia J. Page 104.80 

Charlotte A. Holmes 115.20 

Mrs. E. G. Sullivan - 104.80 

.$1,-597.80 

$20,16145 



444 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. - 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand . . .- $15,500.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 4,661.45 

$20,161.45 

Income Accorxx. 

Income on hand January 1, 1900 $2,123.08 

Interest from coupons on bonds 745.00 

Interest from savings banks deposits 13.42 

$2,881.50 

EXPENSES PAID DUKING THE YEAR. 

C. H. Simpson . $5.00 

George W. Bailey 5.00 

Boyd Brothers 5.00 

C. H. G. Foss, superintendent 388.75 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 2,477.75 

$2,881.50 

Gajle FtTS'D, Valley Cemetery. 

Income on hand January 1, 1900 $118.51 

Interest from savings bank 3.49 

Interest from fund 9.08 

— $131.08 

Cr. 

By cash paid C. H. G. Foss $6.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 125.08 

$131.08 



Merrill Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund January 1, 1900 $487.89 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand $450.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 37.89 

$487.89 

Income Account. 

Income on hand January 1, 1900 $122.22 

Interest on bonds 22.50 

$144.72 

Cr. 

By cash paid J. B. Varick Co '. . . $1.55 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 143.17 

$144.72 

Respectfully submitted. 

FEED L. ALLEX, 
Treasurer of the Trustees of Cemetery Funds. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 445 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts of 
Fred L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the cemetery funds, em- 
bracing the receipts and expenditures for the year 1900, and I find the 
same correct and properly vouched. I have also examined the securi- 
ties in which said fund is invested and find as follows: 

PiXE Grove Cemetery. 

20 city of Manchester 5 jjer cent bonds (Nos. 1, 2, 3, 
5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, IG, 17, 18, 22, 23, 24); 
due in 1942; denomination, $1,000 each .$20,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 1, 3) ; 

due in 1942; denomination, $500 each •. IJDOO.OO 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond (Xo. 3) 50.00 

14 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 2, 3, 4, 
5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17); due in 1913; de- 
nomination, $1,000 each 14,000.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond (Xo. 2) ; due 

in 1913 500.00 

5 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Xos. 1, 2, 3, 

9, 10); due in 1913; denomination, $100 each 500.00 

6 city of Manchester 31/0 x^er cent bonds (Xos. 94, 
95, 96, 97, 98, 99); due in 1919; denomination, 

$1,000 each 6,000.00 

6 city of Manchester 4 per cent bonds, due 1900 6.000.00 

• $48,050.00 

Cash on deposit in Manchester Savings Bank, Book 

Xo. 50420 $2,290.47 

Cash on deposit in Mechanics Savings Bank, Book 

Xo. 3413 6.777. 20 

Total cash income and xiermanent fund $9,067.67 



Total iierniauent fund and income December 31, 1900.... $57,117.67 

Valley Ce:metery. 

4 citj' of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Xos. 1, 6, 11, 

18); due in 1913; denomination, $1,000 each $4,000.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond (Xo. 1) ; due 

in 1913; denomination, $500 500.00 

3 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Xos. 6, 7, S) ; 

due in 1913; denomination, $100 each ' 300.00 

8 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Xos. 4, 7, 12, 

19, 20, 21, 25, 27); due in 1942; denoniiination, 

$1,000 each 8,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Xos. 2, 4); 

due In 1942; denomination, $50 each 100.00 



446 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

2 city of Manchester Si/o per cent bonds (Xos. SI, 

100); due in 1919; denomination, $1,000 each $2,000.00 

6 city of Manchester 5 i^er cent bonds (Nos. 3, 4, 5, 

6, 7, 8); due in 1942; denomination, $100 each 600.00 

Gash on deposit in Guaranty Savings Bank, Book 

No. 4257 3,630.71 

Cash on deposit in Amoskeag Savings Bank, Book 

No. 68808 3,508.49 

Total permanent fund and income December 31, 1900 $32,639.20 

jSIeeeill Cemetery. 

2 citj' of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 4, 5) ; 

due in 1913; denomination, $100 each $200.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 1, 2); 

due in 1942; denomination, $100 each 200.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond (No. 1); due 

in 1942; denomination, $50 50.00 

Cash on deposit in Guaranty Savings Banlv, Book 

No. 5116 112.07 

Cash on deposit in Amoskeag Savings Bank, Book 

No. 69517 68.99 

Total amount of fund and income December 31, 1900 $631.06 

Gale Fund. 
Cash on hand in Amoskeag Savings Bank, Book No. 3410S $125.08 

Total amount of iiermanent fund and income on hand 

December 31, 1900 $80,513.01 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING 

FUND. 



Maxchester, X. H. 
To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

Gentlemen, — As required by chapter 37, section 2, of the City Ordi- 
nances of Manchester, the trustees of the sinking- funds of the city of 
Manchester herewith report the condition of the several funds January 
1, 1901, with receipts and payments for the year ending December 
31, 1900. 

II. P. SIMPSON, 
ALPHEUS GAY, 
FEED L. ALLEX, 
Trustees of the Sinking Fund. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

Gextlemex, — I herewith transmit to you my report as treasurer of 
the sinking fund for the year ending- December 31, 1900: 

improvement j.oan. 

Dr. 

Total amount of- fund January 1, 1900, for the 

l^ayment of imxarovement bonds $95,425.64 

Appropriation for 1900 20,000.00 

Income from interest on bonds 3,890.00 

Income from savings bank deposit 5.28 

.$119,320.92 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1900 $93,000.00 

Bonds bought during the year 12,000.00 

Accrued interest and premium for same 886.06 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 13,434.86 

$119,320.92 

water loan. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1900, for the 

payment of water bonds $131,227.97 

Water-works, hydrant service, 1900 18,425.00 

Appropriation, 1900 5,000.00 

Income from interest on bonds 5,365.00 

Premium received on bonds sold 990.00 

Income from savings bank deposit 106.96 

$161,114.33 

449 



450 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Ck. 

Premium and interest paid for bonds bought 

during- the year $1,648.10 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1900 137,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 22,466.83 

$161,114.93 

school loan. 

De. 

Total amount of fund Januar.y 1, 1900 $6,079.43 

Appropriation, 1900 2,000.00 

Interest on bonds 240.00 

Interest from savings banlc deposits 18.15 

$8,337.58 

Ck. 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1900 $6,000.00 

Premium and interest j)aid for bonds bought 

during the year 264.50 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 2,073.08 

$8,337.58 

city funding loan. 

De. , 

To appropriation, 1900 $5,000.00 

Cr. 

By cash on hand December 31, 1900 $5,000.00 

Eespectfully submitted. 

FEED L. ALLEN, 
Treasurer Sinldng Fund 



This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts of 
Fred L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the sinldng fund, embracing 
the receipts and expenditures for the year ending December 31, 1900, 
and find the same correct and properly vouched. I have also exam- 
ined the securities in which the fund is invested and find as follows: 

Bonds of the city of Manchester for the payment of im- 
provement bonds: 

4 per cent, dne 1907 $9,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1908 10,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1909 1,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1913 5,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 5,000.00 



IIEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 451 

4 per cent, due 1915 25,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1917 16,000.00 - 

31/2 per cent, due 1919 34,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 13,434.86 

$118,434.86 

Bonds of the city of Manchester for the payment of water 

bonds: 

6 per cent, due 1902 $1,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1907 6,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1909 22,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1910 6,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1913 11,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 18,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1915 17,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1916 11,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1917 : 22,000.00 

31/2 per cent, due 1919 23,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 22,466.83 

$159,466.83 

Bonds of the city of Manchester for the payment of school 

bonds: 

4 per cent, due 1909 $3,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 2,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1916 1,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 2,073.08 

$8,073.08 

For the paj-ment of city funding bonds: 

Cash on hand $5,000.00 

Total amount of bonds and cash in sinking fund De- 
cember 31, 1900 $290,974.77 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 



EEPOET OF INSPECTOE OF BUILDINGS. 



Ma>'Chest:ejr, N. H., December 31, 1900. 

To Eis Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen of the City of Man- 
chester: 
Gentlemen, — I would herewith submit my second annual report of 

the work done in this office during the year 1900: 

I have granted 111 permits for new buildings and 120 for alterations 

and additions. Of the new buildings, 64 were dwelling houses and 

tenement blocks, as follows: 

9-tenement blocks 2 

6-tenement blocks 1 

4-tenement blocks 2 

3-tenement houses 2 

2-tenement houses 11 

Dwellings for one family 4(> 

Making a total of 106 tenements. 

There has been a gain of 8 tenements by altering old buildings, 
making a net gain of 114 in all. Among the other i^rincii^al buildings 
may be mentioned the following: 

Bobbin mill : . 1 

Church 1 

Cotton . f actor.y 1 

Ice house 1 

Harness factory 1 

Laundry 1 

Pump house 1 

Sub-electric station 1 

Slaughter house 1 

Sausage factory 1 

Monastery 1 

Telephone exchange 1 

Stores 4 

The other 31 were mostly barns, sheds, etc. 

The report would indicate but a small growth of the city during the 
past year as comjaared with previous j-ears, but no doubt the building 
of tenement houses for the purpose of renting has been overdone in 

the past few years. 

« 

455 



456 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The year has been quite a busy one with some of the manufacturing 
corporations. The Amoskeag corporation have finished their large mill, 
which was partlj^ built in 1899, and have added a story to their long 
•larick storehouse on the west side of the river, while the Manchester 
Mills Conajjany have erected their immense print works south of Gran- 
ate street, the foundation for which was commenced in 1899. It is now 
j)ractically done outside, though there is a vast amount of work j-et 
tto be done before it is ready for occupancy. With these substantial 
grains on the corporations I think we may reasonably expect a like 
improvement outside in the near future. 

Wiih thie&e few remarks I will subscribe myself. 

Yours very respectfully, 

L. M. ALDRICH, 
j; ;" Inspector of Buildings. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



EEPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 



To the Honorable Board of Mayor ■and Aldermen of the City of Manchester : 

GEXTLEiiE:sr, — I have the honor to submit the following report for the 
department of inspection of milk for the year 1900: 

The result of the inspection of milk for the year ending January 31, 
1901, has, on the whole, been satisfactory. 

I have inspected 140 samples of milk brought to my office or taken 
from the teams of dealers conveying milk within the limits of the city. 
It has given the department a good understanding of how the work 
should be conducted, and the result of the inspection for the coming 
year will be as good as the present law will allow. 

The number of licenses issued to dealers conveying milk by car- 
riages or otherwise for the purpose of sale was 103; amount of money 
received for same and turned over to the city treasurer, .$51.50. 

The property of the city held by this department at present is as 
follows: City records, milk grip, ten pint cans, evaporating dishes, one 
case containing lactoscope and glass cylinder for cream test, and three 
odd pieces of chemical apparatus. 

JOSEPH H. GEISEL, 

Inspector of Milk. 

Manchestee, X. H., February 1, 1901. 



459 



EEPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the City Councils: 

I herewith submit my report as solicitor for the year 1900. In the 
ease of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company ag-ainst Manchester, 
the city secured a reduction of about thirteen thousand dollars from 
the sum abated by the referees in the 1897 tax case, which was decided 
in favor of the plaintiff by the supreme court. A hearing was had in 
the 1898 tax case between the same parties before the board of ref- 
erees appointed by the court; said board reported adversely to the 
city and the case is now before the law term on exceptions taken by 
the city. A partial hearing was had in the case of McCrillis against 
the city — a land damage case. Several minor claims for damages 
caused by change of grade have also been brought against the city; 
otherwise the status of the eases in which the city is a party remain 
substantially the same as a year ago. 

GEOEGE A. WAGNER, 

City Solicitor. 



463 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES, 
PASSED IN 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

An Okder to erect an Electric Light, 

Ordered, If Mayor and Aldermen concur: That committee on lighting 
streets be authorized to erect an electric light at Hollis and Kidder 
Court street. 

Passed Januarj^ 19, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to print the Fifty-fourth Annual Eeport of the Eeceipts 
and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, That the standing committee on finance be and they are 
hereby authorized to procure, for the use of the inhabitants of said 
city, the printing of the fifty-fourth annual report of the receipts and 
expenditures of the city of Manchester, including the reports of the 
standing- committee on finance, the city auditor, the school board and 
superintendent of schools, superintendent of water-works, water com- 
missioners, engineer of fire dejiartment, police commissioners, over- 
seers of the poor, trustees, librarian, and treasurer of city library, 
committee on cemeteries, standing committee on city farm, citj' phy- 
sician, city solicitor, city engineer, street and park commissioners, 
and such other matters relating to city affairs as said finance com- 
mittee may direct, the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for printing and stationerj^ 

Passed March 6, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for installing an Electric Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets are requested to 
install an electric light at the corner of Somerville and Hall streets. 
Passed March 6, 1900. 

467 



468 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

City of Manchester. 
An Obdeb, relating- to Band Concerts. 
Ordered, That the mayor be and hereby is authorized and empowered 
■ to expend such sum or sums the present year for open air band con- 
certs as shall not exceed the sum of four hundred dollars; and that 
one hundred dollars of said svmi of four hundred dollars be divided 
between the Turner Brass Band and the Cadet Band, and three hun- 
dred dollars of said sum of four hundred dollars be divided between 
the City Band and the Manchester Military Band; and that said sum 
of four hundred dollars be charged to the appropriation for band 
concerts. 
Passed June 5, 1900. 



City of Manchesteb. 

An Order to build a certain sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and j)ark commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Beginning at the sewer in Mast street, and thence in a northwesterly 
direction to the old Bedford-Gotifstown town line in the Mast road; 
the expense thereof to be charged to the approjDriation for new sewers. 

Passed March 13, 1900. 



City of ;Manchester. 

An Order to buy Horses for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen agree: That the com- 
mittee on the fire department are hereby ordered to purchase from 
eight to ten horses for use the coming year. 

Passed March 13, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
authorized to build certain sewers, as follows: 

Beginning at Somerville street and thence in a southerly direction 
to Clay street in Wilson street, and thence in an easterly direction to 
Hall street in Clay street; beginning at the sewer in Green street, at 
Pine east back street, and thence in a northerly direction to Summer 
south back street in Pine east back street, and thence in an easterly 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 469 

direction about 400 feet in Summer south baclv street; beg-inning at 
the sewer in Keller street at Hevey east back street, and thence in a 
northerly direction 175 feet in Hevey east back street; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed June 5, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to repair Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the mayor and standing committee on lands and 
buildings be and are empowered and authorized to make such neces- 
sarj- repairs in and upon the public buildings of said city as shall not 
exceed the sum of four thousand nine hundred and seventj-five dol- 
lars ($4,975) ; and that said sum of four thousand nine hundred and 
seventy-five dollars ($4,975) be charged to the appropriation for re- 
pairs on public buildings. 

Passed April 13, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order in relation to the Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 

Ordered, That the Louis Bell Post Xo. 3, G. A. E., under the direc- 
tion of the mayor, be authorized to decorate the soldiers' graves upon 
Memorial Day; and that the expense thereof be charged to the ap- 
propriation for decoration of soldiers' graves. 

Passed April 13, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the Committee on Setting Trees to expend 
Two Hundred Dollars for Trees and Tree Boxes. 

Ordered, That the committee on setting trees be authorized to 
expend two hundred dollars for shade trees and tree boxes; the ex- 
pense thereof to be charged . to the appropriation for incidental 
expenses. 

Passed April 13, 1900. 



City of ^Ianchester. 
An Order to build Certain Sewers. 
Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers, as follows: 



470 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Beginning at the present sewer in Milford street, and thence in a 
northerly direction to a point 440 feet northerly from the north line 
of Milford street in George street; beginning at the present terminus 
of the sewer in Union street north of Prescott street, and thence in a 
northerly direction to Merrill south back street in Union street, thence 
in a westerly direction to Pine street in Merrill south back street; 
beginning at the sewer in Jewett street, and thence in an easterly 
direction 366 feet in Merrill street; beginning at the junction of 
Eochelle avenue and Milford street, and thence in a southwesterly 
direction about 400 feet to a point opposite or near the residence of 
Charles !Mahan on Donald street; and the expense thereof be charged 
to the approj^riation for new sewers. 

Passed June 5, 1900. 



City of ^Manchester. 

An Order to erect an Electric Light, with fixtures for maintaining 

the same. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets are authorized to 
erect an electric light, wath fixtures for maintaining the same, at the 
corner of Omega street and Goffstown road. 

Passed July 3, 1900. 



City of Mancpiester. 

An Order for the erection of a Welsbach Gas Light and fixtures for 
maintaining the same. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets are authorized to 
erect a Welsbach gas light midway between Clarke and Carpenter 
on Chestnut street. 

Passed July 3, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect a Welsbach Gas Light and fixtures for maintaining 

the same. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets are authorized to 
erect a Welsbach gas light upon Hanover street, midway between 
Beech and Majale streets. 

Passed July 3, 1900. 



KESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 471 

City of Manchestee. 

An Ordek for the erection of an Electric Light and fixtures to main- 
tain the same. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets are authorized to 
erect an electric light, with fixtures for maintaining the same, at 
the corner of Blodget and Oak streets. 

Passed July 3, 1900. 



City of ISIanchestee. 

An Ordek to buy Twenty-five Copies of "Manchester in the Eebellion," 
and a Complete Set of City Eej)orts. 

Ordered, That the mayor be authorized to procure twenty-five copies 
of "Manchester in Civil War," and a complete set of City Eeports, the 
same not to exceed forty-five dollars in total expense, and the same 
to be charged to appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed August 7, 1900. 



City of Majstchestee. 

An Order to erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, That a committee on lighting streets be ordered to erect 
an electric light at the corner of Laurel and Cass streets. 

Passed September 4, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect a Welsbach Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be ordered to erect 
a Welsbach light between Bridge and Lowell on Beech street. 

Passed September 4, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
hereby are authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Beginning at the terminus of the present sewer in Amory street at 
Essex street, and thence in a westerly direction to the sewer line of 
Morgan street in Amory street, and the expense thereof be charged to 
the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed September 4, 1900. 



472 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

City of Maaxhestee. 
An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be' and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

Beginning- at the sewer line at Chestnut street, and thence in a 
westerly direction to the sewer line of Manhattan lane, in Central 
south back street; commencing at the sewer in Valley street at 
Taylor street, and thence in a southerly direction in Taylor street 
225 feet; and the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation 
for new sewers. 

Passed September 4, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Certain Sewer. 

Ordered, That the board of street and jjark commissioners be and 
are herebj^ authorized to build a certain sewer, as follows: 

Commencing at the terminus of the sewer in Taylor street, as 
ordered bj' the board of mayor and aldermen Sei^tember 4, 1900, and 
thence in a southerlj' direction in Taj'lor street 150' feet; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed October 2. 1900. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to ei-ect a Welsbach Gas Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
aiithorized to erect a Welsbach gas light on Parker street, between 
West street and the bridge across the North Weare Railroad; the 
expense thereof to be charged to the apjiroxDriation for lighting streets. 

Passed October 2, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect Electric Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect an electric light on Hanover road, near Cemetery 
brook, also one at the corner of Mammoth road and Bridge street, 
with projjer fixtures for maintaining the same; the expense thereof 
to be charged to the api^ropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed October 31, 1900. 



EESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 473 

City or ISIaxchesteb. 
An Order to erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect an electric light at the south end of Eimmon 
street, near Wayne street, also one at the ^vestern extremity of Eim- 
mon street, with proper fixtures for maintaining the same; the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed November 13, 1900. 



City of IMaxchesteb. 

An Order to erect a Welsbach Gas Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect a Welsbach gas light at the corner of West Han- 
cock and Wentworth streets, with proper fixtures for maintaining 
same; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
lighting streets. 

Passed November 13, 1900. 



City of ^Maxchesteb. 

Ax Order to erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect an electric light on Eockland avenue, near Gotfs- 
town line, with proper fixtures for maintaining' same; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation fo^; lighting streets. 

Passed December 4, 1900. 



City of Maxchester. 
Ax Order to erect Electric Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect electric lights as follows: 

At the corner of Elm and Pleasant streets; on Eussell street near 
Blodget street; on the Bedford road, near the toji of the hill leading 
to the Plains, so called, with proper fixtures for maintaining the 
same; the expense thereof to be charged to the apj)ropriation for 
lighting streets. 

Passed December 4, 1900. 



474 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

City or MA>"cnESTER. 

Ax Order to erect a Welsbach Gas Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
.authorized to erect a Welsbaeh gas light at the corner of Chestnut 
and Appleton streets, with jjroper fixtnres for maintaining same; 
the expense thereof to be charged to the api^ropriation for lighting- 
streets. 

Passed December 4, 1900. 



City of IManchester. 
An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers, as follows: 

Commencing at the present sewer in Somerville street at Cypress 
street, and thence in a westerly direction 450 feet in Somerville street; 
commencing at the present sewer in Xutt road, at Silver street pro- 
duced, and thence in a southerly direction to Baker street in Nutt 
road; commencing- at the northerly' line of Pearl street, and thence in 
a northerlj^ direction 150 feet in Ash street; commencing at the sewer 
line of Schiller street, and thence in a southerly direction to the sewer 
line of Allen street in South Main street; commencing at the sewer 
line at Bridge street, and thence in a northerly direction to the sewer 
line at Orange street in Beech street; commencing at the present sewer 
in Amherst street, and thence in a southerly direction in Belmont 
street 150 feet; and the expense thereof be charged to the appropri- 
ation for ne"\v sewers. 

Passed December 4, 1900. 



City of Ma>'chestee. 

An Order to erect a Welsbach Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect a Welsbach light at the corner of Wilson and 
Grove streets; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for lighting streets. 

Passed December 14, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to erect Welsbach Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect the following W^elsbach gas lights, with proper 
fixtures for maintaining- the same: 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 475 

At the corner of Belmont and Hayward streets; at the- corner of 
Clay and Wilson streets; at the corner of Mill and Second streets; on 
Lake Shore road, opposite the residence of W. H. Leavitt; on J. Hall 
road, abont 200 feet north of Portsmouth Kailroad, near the corner of 
Nelson street; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for lighting streets. 

Passed December 14, 1900. 



City of Manchestee,. 
An Order to erect Electric Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect the following electric lights, with proper fixtures 
for maintaining the same: 

At the corner of Birch and Bridge streets; at the corner of Spruce 
and Hall streets; at the corner of Elm and Thayer streets; the ex- 
pense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed December 14, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect a Welsbach Gas Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect a Welsbach gas light at the corner of Waldo 
and Elm streets, with proper fixtures for maintaining same; the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for lighting 
streets. 

Passed December 31, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect an electric light at the corner of Kocldand avenue 
and Wilkins street, with proper fixtures for maintaining same; the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for lighting 
streets. 

Passed December 31, 1900. 



476 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

City of Manchester. 

Eesolution relating to a certain Transfer of $265.26. 

lie-solved hj the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in City 
•Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be authorized to transfer from the aiapropriation 
"To be hereafter apipropriated" to the aiapropriation known as the 
appropriation for land taken for new highways, the sum of two hun- 
dred sixty-five dollars and twenty-six cents ($265.26) ; said sum of two 
hundred sixty-five dollars and twenty-six cents ($265.26) to be used 
for the purpose of jiaying M. E. and J. L. Golden certain land damages 
awarded by vote of the board of mayor and aldermen at a meeting 
holden Tuesday, November 7, 1899, by reason of the extension of Bel- 
mont street from Clay street to Howe street, a plan of which is 
hereto annexed. 

Passed January 2, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesoll'Tion relating to Claims of certain City Officials. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council asseinbled, as follows: 

Whereas, There is a difference of opinion as to the time when the 
ordinance relating' to the city officials' salary shall take effect; 
therefore. 

Resolved, That the committee on claims be einpowered to confer 
with the auditor and city .solicitor and adjust and approve their bills 
Avhere there is any disi^ute. 

Passed January 2, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesoli'TION making a Temporary Loan of Three Hundred Thousand 

Dollars. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city as may 
fall due before the twentieth day of December, 1900, the city treasurer 
be and hereby is authorized to make such temporary loans from time 
to time, for the use of the city, of sums not exceeding the amount of 
three hundred thousand dollars, being in anticipation of the taxes of 
the present year, giving for the same the notes of the city, signed 
by the city treasurer and countersigned by the mayor. 

Passed January 12, 1900. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 477 

City of Manchestee. 
Resolution relating to the Transfer of One Hundred Dollars. 

RiHolvcd by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to transfer from 
the appropriation known as the approjoriation "To be hereafter appro- 
priated" the sum of one hundred dollars ($100), and that the said sum 
be applied to the payment of the claim of Harvey Goodwin, for chang- 
ing grade of Nashua street and damage for land taken on Nashua 
street, corner of Bridge. 

Passed January 12, 1900. 



City of ]\Iaxchester. 
Resolution relating to the Transfer of Four Hundred Dollars. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to transfer from 
the appropriation known as the appropriation "To be hereafter appro- 
priated" the sum of one hundred dollars ($100), and that the said sum 
be applied to the payment of the claim of H. B. Sawyer for changing 
grade Prospect street. 

Passed January 12, 1900. 



City of [Maxchester. 

Resolution relating to the Final Transfers for the Year 1S99. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the Citj' of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make the fol- 
lowing transfers, to wit: 
To money unai)proj)riated: 

From appropriation for interest $449.72 

printing and stationery 434.79 

city officers' salaries 2,043.46 

mayor's incidentals 43.70 

auditor's department 33.28 

street and park commission 78.00 

snow and ice 2,272.37 

watering streets 2S6.05 

street sweejjing 249.58 

grading for concrete 1,886.28 

repairs of sewers 522.46 



478 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



From appropriation for engineer's department $150.02 

health department 214.92 

fire department 912.42 

fire-alarm telegraph 363.56 

police station 315.66 

police commission 996.13 

furnishing rooms, high school.... 172.00 

Merrill yard 44.25 

repairs of schoolhouses .43 

fuel 2,004.98 

furniture and supplies 41.71 

books and stationery 51.55 

printing and advertising 32.12 

contingent expenses 12.46 

care of rooms 119.75 

evening schools 18.35 

evening school, mechanical draw- 
ing 209.28 

free text-books 4.35 

paupers off farm 1,043.51 

indigent soldiers 39.50 

emergency ward, Elliot Hospital 125.00 

decoration of soldiers' graves 31.60 

* abatement of taxes 97.60 

band concerts 22.99 

$15,323.83 
From money unappropriated: 

To appropriation for citj' hall $350.94 

land sold for taxes 976.95 

incidental expenses 167.49 

repairs of highways 1,146.59 

new highways 1,062.66 

land taken for highways 1,116.07 

paving streets 337.64 

macadamizing streets 1,387.75 

scavenger service 133.29 

bridges 27.27 

city teams 352.76 

new sewers 416.66 

lighting streets 74.58 

Stark park 18.51 

Derryfield park 33.81 

South Manchester playground 13.81 

commons 358.59 

police court 38.94 

repairs of buildings 118.91 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINAKCES. 479 

To appropriation for Valley cemeterj' $75.37 

Amoskeag cemeterj' 2.65 

Pine Grove cemetery 38.09 

teachers' salaries 272.21 

city farm 298.89 

state tax .25 

g'arbase incineration 293.85 



$9,115.13 
Passed January IS, 1900. 



City of Makchestee. 
RESOLrxiox relating to a Eeading-Eoom in the City Library. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 

City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the common council be requested to appropriate a sum not 
exceeding- five hundred dollars ($500) to be exi^ended in fitting up a 
reading room in the city library, in accordance with plan projiosed 
by Women's Federation of Clubs. 

Passed Januarj- 16, 1900. 



City of JNIanchestee. 
Eesolution relating to the Extension of Block Paving in Elm Street. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the common council be requested to appropriate such sums 
of money as may be necessai\y for extension of block paving upon 
Elm street, from Mechanic to Lowell street and Merrimack to Central 
street. 

Passed January 16, 1900. 



City of JMaxchestek. 

Eesolution relating to the Duplicate Karnes of Streets, Eoads, Ave- 
nues, etc. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the Citj^ of Manchester, in 
Citj' Council assembled, as follows: 

Wheeeas, There are eighty or more streets, roads, avenues, etc., 
in the city of Manchester, of which there are two or more bearing 
the same name: therefore, be it 



480 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

Resolved, That the mayor and committee on streets be instructed to 
prepare an ordinance changing the nftmes of duplicate streets, roads, 
avenues, streets and roads, roads and avenues, streets and avenues, 
when and wherever duplicate names exist, and present the same to 
the board of mayor and aldermen for the consideration of the board. 

Passed March 6, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 
Eesolvtiojv relating to Horse Hire for the Collector of Taxes. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 

City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars ($150) 
be allowed the collector of taxes of the city of Manchester annually 
for horse hire. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its jjassage. 

Passed March 13, 1900. 



City of [Manchester. 

Eesoli.'TION relating to the Pay of City Laborers in the Employ of 
the Street Department. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That it is the sense of this board that the street and park commis- 
sioners should continue during the summer months the hours under 
which the laborers of the street department have Avorked during the 
winter months. 

Passed April 3, 1900. 



City of ilANCHESTER. 

Eesoi.utign relating to the Increase in City Telephone Eates. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 

City Council assembled, as follows: 

That a committee of three aldermen be appointed by the mayor 
to consider the reason for the recent increase in the rates charged 
for the use of telephones used by the city departments, and that the 
committee be authorized to ascertain if other cities of a like popula- 
tion as Manchester pay the same rate; the committee to report the 
result of their investigation back to the board. 

Passed April 3, 1900. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 481 

City of ]\Ianchestek. 

Resolxjtiox relatiDg to securing Counsel to defend the City of ^lan- 
chester iu the Amoskeag Tax Case. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 

Citj- Council assembled, as follows: 

That inasmuch as the j)etition of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany against the city of Manchester for an abatement of taxes as- 
sessed for the year 1898 is soon to be heard before a new board of 
referees; and, 

Whereas, Prejjarations for presenting the case for the city must 
be made as soon as possible; 

Resolved, That the mayor and city solicitor be and hereby are given 
sole authority to engage such counsel as they may deem necessary 
to assist them in the preparation and conduct of said case. 

Passed April 3, 1900. 



City of Maxchestek. 
Hesolution relating to Interest on Deposits of the City of Manchester. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 

City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the moneys of the city of Manchester be deposited in such 
bank or banks in said city as shall pay the largest rate of interest to 
said city of Manchester upon daily balances in said bank or banks 
from the first day of May, 1900, to the first day of May, 1901, and that 
the city treasurer be and hereby is instructed to advertise for bids 
from the banks of the city of Manchester by sending to each of 
said banks a copy of this resolution; the city of Manchester, by its 
agent, the treasurer of said city, reserving the right to reject any 
and all bids and call for such other bids as may be necessary to carry 
out the intent of this resolution; and the mayor and the treasurer 
of said city of Manchester are hereby authorized and empowered to 
accept such bid or bids as will give the city of Manchester the largest 
rate of interest upon the daily balances on dejjosits of the moneys of 
said city of ^Manchester in said bank or banks, from the first day of 
May, 1900, to the first day of :May, 1901. 

Passed April 13, 1900. 



City of Manchestee. 

RESOLrTiON relating to a Loan of Thirty-three Thousand Dollars, 
in relation' to the Amoskeag Tax Case of 1897. 

Resolved by the Board of Common Council of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 
That for the purjjose of satisfying the judgment obtained by the 



482 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Company against the city of Manchester 
in the 1897 tax case, the mayor and city treasiirer be authorized to 
make a temporary loan of thirty-three thousand dollars ($33,000), 
giving for the same the note of the citj', signed by the mayor and 
countersigned by the city treasurer and payable May 1, 1901. 

Passed April 20, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesolijtiox relating to removing the Top of Amoskeag Bridge. 
McsoJred by the Mayor and Aldernaen of the Citj' of Manchester, in 

City Council assembled, as follows: 

Wheeeas, The public Avould be greatlj^ accommodated if the top be 
removed from the Amoskeag bridge, so called, in said city; and. 

Whereas, The present condition of said bridge is such that it is 
imperative that a large outlay of money be expended the j^resent 
year patching and reshingling the same; and 

Wheeeas, The expense of removing the top of said bridge would 
not exceed the cost of making the necessary repairs upon the same; 
and, 

Wheeeas, Oiien bridges having proven by usage to be more desirable 
than covered ones; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby aiithorized and requested to remove the top of said bridge, 
the same to be done at their earliest convenience. 

Passed April 27, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

IN THE Y'EAR one THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 3, Chapter 12 of the City Laws 
and Ordinances of the City of Manchester. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 

in City Council assembled, as follows: 
• Section 1. Amend section 3 of chapter 12, in the fourth line of said 
section, after the word "engineers," by adding the words "annually 
in the month of February and confirmed by the board of mayor and 
aldermen," so that said section as amended shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 3. Each of said companies shall have a foreman, assistant 
loreman, clerk, and steward, and such other officers as may be neces- 
sary, to be appointed by the board of engineers annually in the month 
-of February, and confirmed by the board of mayor and aldermen. It 
shall be the duty of the foreman, and in his absence of the assistant 
foreman, to direct the time and place of drill, to see that the engines 
and other apparatus, together with the buildings entrusted to their 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 483 

care, are kept clean and in order for immediate use, to preserve order 
and discipline at all times, and to require and enforce a strict com- 
pliance with the rules, regulations, and orders of the board of engi- 
neers. It shall be the duty of the clerks of the respective companies 
to keep an exact roll, specifying the time of admission and discharge 
of each member of their companies, also to record the name of each 
member ^vho is absent from or does not perform duty at all fires, 
and report the same to the chief engineer once in three months. It 
shall be the duty of the steward to keep clean the house, hose, 
machines, and all other apparatus belonging to the company, to 
clean the snow from the sidewalks during the winter, and at all 
times to see that the engine and other apparatus are tit for use; and 
they shall cause their respective engines and other apparatus when 
returned from any tire to be well cleansed, washed, oiled, and securely 
housed." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force on and 
after its passage. 

Passed to be ordained January 2, 1900. 



City of Ma^'chester. 

in 1he year one thousand nine hundred. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 7 of Chapter 14 of the City 
Laws and Ordinances of the City of Manchester. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 

in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That section 7 of chapter 14 of the city Laws and Ordi- 
nances of the city of Manchester be amended so as to allow Gordon 
Woodbury to erect in the rear of IS'o. 52 Myrtle street a wooden build- 
ing measuring twelve feet by twentj'-six feet, and eighteen feet high, 
so that it shall correspond in height to the buildings now on the 
premises. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained July 3, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

IN the year one thousant) nine hundred. 

An Ordinance changing the IVames of Certain Streets. 

Be it ordiiined by the Maj'or and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 



484 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Section 1. That the names of certain streets in said city be 
changed as follows: 

Elm east back street, from Central street to Auburn street, to Man- 
hattan lane, 
• Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained July 3, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

IN the year one thousand nine hundred. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 20 of Chapter 6 of the City 
Laws and Ordinances of the City of Manchester. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of ^Manchester, 

in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend section 20 of chapter 6 of the Laws and Ordi- 
nances of the city of Manchester, in the first line of said section, 
by striking out the word "shall," and inserting in place thereof the 
word '"may," so that said section as amended shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 20. The board of overseers may appoint one of their number 
clerk of the board, whose duty it shall be to record all the proceedings 
of the board, to make a record of all bills passed by the board, to 
notify all towns which may have paupers assisted by the city, to col- 
lect all bills due from such towns to the city, to arrange the county 
pauper bills, with a catalogue of the same to be presented to the 
judges of the court at each term, and to make a copy of such cata- 
logue to be kept with the records of the board. He shall receive in 
full for his services the sum of one hundred dollars per annum, to 
be paid in equal semi-annual payments." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take efCect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained September 4, 1900. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand nine hundred. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 24, Chapter 6, of the Laws 
and Ordinances of the City of Manchester. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 

in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend section 24 of chapter 6 of the Laws and Ordi- 
nances of the city of Manchester by adding to said section the fol- 
lowing words: "Whenever the captains of any of the fire companies, 
consisting of twelve or more men, of the fire department of the city 
of Manchester shall be employed as permanent men, the pay of such 



RESOLUTIONS, OJIDERB, ORDINANCES. 485 

captains shall be seventy-five dollars a month, payable monthly," so 
said section as amended shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 24. The annual compensation of the members of the several 
hook-and-ladder, hose, .steam tire engine, and chemical engine com- 
panies, who shall personally perform all the duties required by law, 
shall be as follows: Drivers, each, sixty-eight and one third dollars per 
month; permanent engineers of tire steamers, each, seventy-six and 
one fourth dollars per month; other permanent men, each, sixty-five 
dollars per month, all payable monthly; foremen, each, one hundred 
and sixty-five dollars; assistant foremen, each, one hundred and sixty 
dollars; clerks, each, one hundred and sixty dollars; call engineers 
of steamers, each, one hundred and eighty-five dollars; call assistant 
engineers, each, one hundred and fifty-five dollars; all other members, 
each, one hundred and fifty dollars; all payable in equal semi-annual 
payments on the first of January and July. Whenever the captains 
of anj^ of the fire companies, consisting of twelve or more men, of 
the fire department of the city of Manchester, shall be employed as 
permanent men, the pay of such captains shall be seventy-five dollars 
a month, payable monthly." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take, 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained October 2, 1900. 



INDEX. 



INDEX. 



Abatement of taxes 121 

Amoskeag cemetery 98 

Amoskeag schoolhouse Ill 

Annual interest charge on bonded debt 145 

Appropriations for 1900 by city council 123 

Appendix, school 360 

Assets, statement and inventory of 147 

Auditor, city, report of 21 

Auditor's department 45 

B 

Band concerts 121 

Board of water commissioners, organization of 172 

report of 174 

health, report of 385 

Bonded debt, tabular statement of 143 

detailed statement of, 1900 141 

annual interest charge 145 

Books and stationery 102 

Bridges 60 

Buildings, repairs of 89 

public, occupied by private parties 146 

c 

Care of rooms 106 

Cemetery, Pine Grove 95 

Valley 97 

Amoskeag 98 

report of sub-trustees of Valley 437 

Pine Grove 435 

Amoskeag 438 

Cemeteries, treasurer of 439 

treasurer of fund 442 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax 132 

City auditor's department 45 

auditor's report 21 

engineer, report of 295 

farm 114 

hall 32 

library 76 

report of trustees of 411 

treasurer's report 414 

librarian's report 418 

donations to 421 

489 



490 INDEX. 

City officers' salaries 42 

officials, list of 3-18 

solicitor, report of 463 

teams 62 

treasurer's report , 21 

Commons 67 

Contingent expenses 105 

County tax 122 

D 

Debt, payment of funded 29 

bonded, statement of 143 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 120 

Derryfleld and Stark parks 69 

E 

Electric lights, location of 159 

Elliot Hospital 120 

Engineer's department 71 

Evening schools 107 

school, mechanical drawing 108 

Exempted from tax, property • 132 

Expenses, incidental 35 

mayor's 46 

contingent 105 

F 

Farm, paupers off Ill 

city 114 

Pile and index system 119 

Fires, list of .- 263 

Fire department 78 

report of chief engineer 237 

value of personal property 256 

names and residences of nlembers 283 

location of fire-alarm boxes 245 

Fire-alarm telegraph 83 

Free text-books 109 

Fuel 104 

Furniture and supplies 102 

G 

Garbage incineration 122 

Gas-lights, location of 155 

Grading for concrete 57 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 120 

H 

Health department 73 

board of, report of 385 

inspectors of, report of 405 



INDEX. 491 
50 



lighting 



Hydrant service 



I 



53 



Highways, new 

land taken for 

53 
watering 

paving • 

macadamizing ^ '■ 

grading for concrete on 

sweeping 

70 



47 



repairs of 

Home, "Women's Aid ■'''*' 

Hospital, Elliot, free beds 120 

Sacred Heart 120 

Notre Dame de Lourdes 120 

84 



Incidental expenses ^^ 

Indigent soldiers H^ 

Inspector of buildings, report of 455 

Interest 29 

annual charge, bonded debt 14o 

Inventory of assets 14" 

L 

Land taken for highways ^^ 

Laws relating to exemptions 131 

Legal points and rules relating to claims against the city 152 

Lighting streets 70 

Library, city "^6 

Loan, temporary 31 

M 

Macadamizing streets 56 

Manual training 110 

Manufacturing property exempt from taxation 140 

Mayor's incidentals 46 

Mercy Home 120 

Merrill Yard 99 

Militia 121 

Milk inspector, report of 459 

Money unappropriated 30 

Municipal receipts and expenditures 24 

New highways 50 



Order in relation to decoration of soldiers' graves 469 

to purchase horses for fire department 468 

to build certain sewers 468, 469, 471, 472, 474 

to repair public buildings 469 



492 INDEX. 

Order to print fifty-fourth report 467 

to erect electric lights 467,470,471,472.473,475 

to erect Welsbach lights 470, 471, 472, 473, 474, 475 

to buy copies of "Manchester in thei Rebellion" 471 

to purchase trees '. 469 

Ordinance changing names of streets , 483 

amending chapter 12 482 

amending chapter 14 483 

amending chapter 6 484 

Ordinances, orders, resolutions 465 

Overseers of the poor, report of 429 

Oil lamps, location of 158 

P 

Parks, Derryfleld and Stark 69 

Parker school 110 

Parsonages, valuation of, exempt from taxation 312 

Paupers oC the farm Ill 

Paving streets ■■■■ 54 

Elm street 55 

Payment of funded debt 29 

Pine Grove Cemetery 95 

Plumbing examiners, report of 319 

expenses 119 

Police department, station ' 84 

court 85 

commission 80 

Printing and stationery 33 

and advertising 10". 

Property account, real and personal 147 

Public buildings occupied by private parties 146 

Purchase of land sold for taxes 122 

R 

Repairs of schoolhouses 100 

of buildings 89 

of highways 47 

Rooms, care of 106 

Resolution relating to interest on deposits 481 

claims of certain city officials 476 

a reading-room in the city library 479 

duplicate names of streets 479 

horse hire for tax collector 480 

telephone rates 480 

counsel in Amoskeag tax case 481 

removing top of Amoskeag bridge 482 

in regard to city laborers 480 

transferring money 476, 477 

in regard to paving Elm street 479 

raising money and making appropriations for 1900 123 

Resolutions, orders, and ordinances 465 

making temporary loan 476,481 

Report of Board of Water Commissioners 174 



INDEX. 493 

Report of Superintendent of Water-Works 173 

City Engineer 295 

Chief Engineer Fire Department 237 

Trustees of City Library 411 

Sub-Trustees of Valley Cemetery 437 

Pine Grove Cemetery 435 

Amoskeag Cemetery 438 

Treasurer of Cemeteries 439 

Treasurer of Cemetery Fund 442 

Treasurer of Sinking Fund 449 

Overseers of the Poor 429 

Street and Park Commission 209 

Committee on Sewers andi Drains 318 

Committee on Streets 317 

City Solicitor 463 

School Superintendent 351 

Board of Health .' 385 

City Auditor 21 

City Treasurer 21 

Real and personal estate owned by the city 147 

property, exempt from taxation, other than public property 132 

Rules, etc., relating to bills against the city (auditor's department) 152 

Receipts and expenditures, 1900 24 

s 

Sacred Heart Hospital 120 

Salaries of city officials 42 

Salaries, teachers' 108 

Scavenger service 58 

School department, organization of 377 

evening, mechanical drawing 108 

superintendent's report 351 

Schoolhouses, repairs of 100 

painting outside of lOI 

Sewersi repairs of 65 

new 66 

Sewing materials 103 

Sinking fund 29 

treasurer's report 449 

Snow and ice 51 

Soldiers, indigent 118 

Solicitor, city, report of 463 

South Manchester playground 62 

Stark and Derryfield parks 69 

Statement of bonded debt 141 

public buildings occupied by private parties 146 

State tax 122 

Street and park commission 46 

report of 209 

Street sweeping , 59 

T 

Tabular statement of taxation by board of assessors 451 

Taxes, abatement of 121 

due and uncollected 129 



494 INDEX. 

Tax, state 122 

county 122 

valuations 130 

Taxation, appropriations for 1900 123 

exemption 132 

settlement of account tax collector ■ 130 

Teachers, list of 37S 

Teachers' salaries 108 

Teams, city 62 

Temporary loan 31 

Text-books, free 109 

Training, manual 110 

Treasurer, city, report of 21 

V 

Valley Cemetery 97 

Valuation and taxes, 1900 128 

w 

Watering streets 53 

Water-works, superintendent's report 175 

commissioner's report 174 

expenses 91 

Women's Aid Home 120