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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

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City of Manchester, I 

^few Hampshire^ 




Annual Reports for the Year 



Fifty-Seventh Annual Report 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



City of Manchester 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FOR THE FISCAL TEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1902 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING 
TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. 
REMY BECHARD, <s^^^ UNION PRINTER. 

19 3. 



2>SZ.01 
1902 



Manchester City Government. 
1902. 



Mayor. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE Office, City Hall 

Chosen at biennial election in November, 1900. Salary, $1,800 per 
annum, payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1848, section 1. Chapter 223, 
Laws of 1883. Public Statutes, chapter 47. 



Aldermen. 

Act of June, 1848, section 1. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 
Ward 1. John P. Mullen, 12 Whitney street. 

Fred K. Ramsey, 916 Chestnut street. 

William F. Elliott, 194 Concord street. 

Charles J. Darrah, 484 Maple street. 

Daniel A. Murphy, 416 Beech street. 

Samuel M. Couch, 447 East Spruce street. 

Samuel F. Davis, 57 West Merrimack street. 

G. Walter Taylor, 23 Boynton street. 

Mederique R. Maynard, 324 Dubuque street. 

Eugene E. Reed, 636 Somerville street. 



Ward 2. 
Ward 3. 
Ward 4. 
Ward 5. 
Ward 6. 
Ward 7. 
Ward 8. 
Ward 9. 
Ward 10 



President of the Common Council. 

Harry T. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 



Members of the Common Council, 

Act of January, 1897, cha^jter 198. 

WapvD 1. 

Frederick W. Bond, 46 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Frank L. Danielson, 13 Lowell street. 
Joseph E. Pellerin, 16 Whitney street. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Ward 2. 

Silas E. Wallace, 66 Brook street. 
Charles E. Chase, 381 Walnut street. 
Charles E. Stearns, 329 Front street. 

Ward 3. 

John L. Eydin, 9 Jane street. 

Thomas Smith, 24 South street. 

A. Gale Straw, M. D., 627 Union street. 

Ward 4. 

George E. Smith, 461 Hanover street. 
Eugene B. Worthen, .515 Hall street. 
Harry T. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. 

John A. Connelly, 180 Chestnut street. 
George P. Eiordan, 86 Auburn street. 
Nicholas Sasseville, M. D., 671 Elm street. 

Ward 6. 

Charles G. Hastings, 581 Lake Avenue. 
Harry A. Piper, 112 Manchester street. 
Walter M. Lang, 719 Summer street. 

Ward^7. 

Eobert Edgar, 70 West Merrimack street. 

Joseph L. Simpkins, 16 Manchester Print AVorks Corporation. 

Frank W. Stone, 7 Manchester Corporation, West Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. 

Henry A. Caswell, 107 Boynton street. 
Joseph Vogel, 46 Manchester street. 
John K. McQuesten, 723 South Main. 

Ward 9. 

Joseph Eicher, 533 Main street. 
Arthur Provost, 526 Beauport street. 
Peter M. Gunderman, 280 Main street. 

Ward 10. 

Harry E. Blake, Xorfolk street, Eural Eoute 5. 
Frank A. Emerson, Brown Avenue. 
Samuel J. Marsh, 957 Somerville street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 5 

Cleffc of Common Council. 

Harry A. Piper, 112 Manchester street. 

Salary, §200. (General Laws, chapter 46, sections 7-9. City Laws 
and Ordinances, page 33, chapter 6, section 11.) 



City Clerk. 
Edward C. Smith Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350. Chosen in January, biennially, by board of aldermen. 
Kesidence, 900 Union street. Also clerk of all committees of the board 
of aldermen ; salary, $200. 



City Clerk's Clerk. 
Florence A. Robinson City Clerk's Office, City Hall 



City Auditor. 

James E. Dodge Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Appointed by mayor and approved by board of alder- 
men in January, biennally. (Laws of 1889, chapter 287. City Ordi- 
nances, pages 44, 71, 83-88, 173.) Residence, River road north. 



Auditor's Clerk. 
Lizzie M. Cogswell Auditor's Office, City Hall 



City Treasurer. 

Fred L. Allen Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(Act of January, 1897, chapter 198.) Residence, 33 Walnut street. 



Treasurer's Clerk. 
Mabel L. How Treasurer's Office, City Hall 



Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350, fees, and allowance for horsehire. Elected by mayor 
and aldermen before May 1, biennially. (Act of July, 1851. Act of June, 
1859, section 6. Act of 1897, chapter 198. Public Statutes, chapter 43. 
City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 33.) Residence, 740 Chestnut street. 



6 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Deputy Collector of Taxes. 

Edwin C. Paul Collector's Office, City Hall 

Joseph A. Guevin Collector's Office, City Hall 

Salary, $800. Api^ointed by tax collector with approval of mayor and 
aldermen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 33, section 3.) 



City Solicitor. 

George A. Wagner Office, Pickering- Building 

Salary, §800. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(Act of 1897, chapter 198.) Residence, 332 Orange street. 



City Messenger. 
John A. Barker Office, City Hall 

Salary, §700. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6.) Residence, 49 Appleton 
street. 



Standing Committees. 

BOARD OF AT.DEKMEN. 

071 Acco^^nts. — Aldermen Mullen, Ramsey, and Darrah. 

On Bills on Second Beading. — Aldermen Ramsey, Darrah, and May- 
nard. 

On City Farm and House of Correction. — Aldermen Couch, Taylor, and 
Murphy. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Davis, Murjjhy, and Reed. 

On Cemeteries. — Aldermen Darrah, Ramsey, Couch, Taylor, and Elliott. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Davis, Murphy, and Elliott. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Aldermen Elliott and Ramsey. 

On Fire Depart7nent.^-A\derm.en Taylor, Couch, and Elliott. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Elliott, Mullen, and Davis. 

071 Licenses. — Aldermen Murphy, Davis, and Maynard. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Reed, Mullen, and Darrah. 

On Jlilitari/ Affairs. — Aldermen ]Mayuard, Couch, and Reed. 

On Public Health. — Aldermen Taylor, Reed, and Mullen. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Mullen, Taylor, and Reed. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Maynard, Couch, and Murphy. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Ramsey, Maynard, and Davis. 
Member first named is chairman of respective committee. 
Clerk of committees, city clerk. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



COMMON COLTNCir. 



yo. 1. Central., Auditofs, and Engineer's Departments and Department 
of Taxes. — Messrs. Straw, Lang, Giinderman, yimpkins, and Danielson. 

No. 2. Street and Sewer Department. — Messrs. Bond, Smith, Caswell, 
McQuesten, and Provost. 

No. 8. School Department. — Messrs. Hastings, Stone, Worthen, Lord 
and Marsh. 

No. 4. Fire Department. — Messrs. McQuesten, Edgar, Smith, Lang, and 
Riordan. 

No. 5. Public Buildings and Places Department — -Messrs. Wallace, 
Emerson, Blake, G-underman, and Connelly. 

No. 6. Health, Police, Public Library, Patriotic, Charitable, and Philan- 
thropic Departments. — Messrs. Chase, Stearns, Sasseville, Richer, and 
Rydin. 

No. 7. Lighting Streets Department. Messrs. Worthen, Stone, Pellerin, 
and Vogel. 

Member first named is chairman of respective committee. 



Finance Committee. 

President of the Common Council Harry T. Lord, chairman ex ojlicio, 
and the chairman of the different committees named above : Dr. Amos 
Gale Straw, Frederick W. Bond, Charles G. Hastings, .John K. McQuesten, 
Silas R. Wallace, C. Edwin Chase, and Eugene B. Worthen. 



City Physician. 
Frederick Perkins - . . . . Office, Pickering Building- 
Salary, §600. Elected by board of aldermen in .January, biennially. 
(Act of 1897, chapter 198. City Ordinances, chapter 9, sections 29, 30.) 
Residence, 62 Clarke street. 



City Engfineef. 
Samuel J. Lord Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350 and allowance for horsehire. Chosen by board of alder- 
men in January, biennially. (City Ordinances, chapter 6, sections .S3, 34.) 

engineek's assistants. 

Harrie M. Young. Harry .J. Briggs. 

George M. Wales. Alfred T. Dodge. 

Henry A. Worthen. 



STENOGRAPHER. 



Ella B. Davis. 



8 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Water Commissioners. 

(Chapter 70, Laws of 1871. City Ordinances, chapter 36, and Laws of 
1891, chapter 26, page 319, act approved March 31, 1891. Chapter 183, 
Laws of 1893.) One commissioner elected annually hy mayor and 
aldermen, in the month of September, for a term of six years. Office at 
court house, corner Franklin and West Merrimack- streets. Telephone at 
office and at inimping station. 

The Mayor, ex officio. 

Charles H. Manning. Term expires January, 1907. 
Frank Dowst. Term expires January, 1906. 
William Corey. Term expires January, 1905. 
Edgar J. Knowlton. Team expires January, 1904. 
Harry E. Parker. Term expires January, 1903. 
Charles M. Floyd. Term expires January, 1908. 
Charles H. Manning, chairman. 



Superintendent of Water-Works. 

Charles K. Walker Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $2,400. Chosen hy water commissioners annually. Residence, 
68 South Main street. West Manchester. 



Clerk of the Water- Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $1,800. Chosen by water commissioners annually. 



Engineer at Old Pumping; Station. 

Josiah Laselle. Salary, $700, rent, fuel, and use of land. 
Chosen by water commissioners annually. 



Engineer at New Pumping Station. 

C. A. Whitney, $2.50 per day, rent, and fuel. 



Justice of the Police Court. 

Isaac L. Heath, court room at police station, corner Manchester and 
Chestnut streets. 

Salary, $1,500. Appointed by the governor with the advice of the 

council. (General Laws, chapter 215: chapter 163, sections 17, 18, 19, 

of the Laws of 1878, as amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1881. Public 
Statutes, chapter 211. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. ' 9 

Associate Justice of the Police Court. 

George W. Prescott. Salaiy, •'feSOO iier annum. 

Appointed by the governor, with the advice of the council. (Chapter 
215, General Laws, sections 2-14. Public Statutes, chapter 211. Chapter 
296, Laws of 1893.) 



Clerk of the Police Court. 

John C. Bickford. Salary §600. 

Appointed by the justice of the police court. (Chapter 163, sections 
17-19, General Laws, amended by chapter 236. Laws of 1881. Public 
Statutes, chapter 211.) Residence, 15 Ash street. 



Police. 

The members of the police are apjiointed by the police commissioners, 
and hold their commissions during good behavior. They are, by virtue 
of their appointment, constables and conservators of the peace, and their 
jurisdiction extends throughput the city. (Chapter 253, section 5, Gen- 
eral Laws ; chapter 303, Laws of 1887 ; chajiter 202, Laws of 1893.) 
Police station at the corner of Chestnut and Manchester streets. 



Police Commissioners. 

See chapter 202, Laws of 1893. 

Noah S. Clark, clerk. Term expires January, 1904. 

Frank P. Cheney. Term expires January, 1908. 

Edward B. Woodbury, chaii'man. Term expires January, 1906. 



Chief of Police. 

Michael J. Healy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $2,000. Residence, 304 Central street. Telephone at house and 
office. 



Deputy Chief of Police. 

John F. Cassidy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $1,500. Residence, 569 Hanover street. 



Captain of the Watch. 



Thomas E. Steele. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 253 Walnut 
street. 



10 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Ser§:eants. 

Leon E. Magoon. Salary, ."j;2.50 per day. Residence, 261 Blodget 
street. 

John T. O'Dowd. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 90 Adams street. 



Adler, Leonard J. 
Arcliambeault, Joseph. 
Badger, John C. 
Bean, Randall W. 
Bourassa, Frank E. 
Brown, John G. 
Butler, James S. 
Callaghan, Peter. 
Connor, John J. 
Coolidge, Edgar L. 
Dunn, James F. 
Dustin, Frank J. 
Farrell, .Joseph A. 
Foye, William F. 
Hampston, James S. 
Hampston, Patrick F. 
Healy, John D. 
Heneault, Edward 
Hildreth, Clifton B. 
Hutchins, Dexter B. 



Patfolmem 



Lovejoy, George A. 
Lynch, John J. 
Marden, Frank W. 
McQuade, Edward H. 
Moher, William. 
Moore, Frank P. 
Moriarty, Mortimer J. 
Nixon, John T. 
O'Malley, John F. 
Parmenter, Wallace C. 
Poehlman, Oscar R. 
Proctor, Levi J. 
Rainville, Frank. 
Russell, Albert 
Somers, Elmer E. 
Sullivan, Florence. 
Sweeney, James. 
Tilton, Asa N. 
Welch, John T. 
Wheden, Eben E. 



Frank P. Wiggin. 

street. 



Janitor of Station. 

Salary, $2.00 per day. Residence, 156 Merrimack 



Miss A. B. 
mack street. 



Matron* 

Brown. Salary, ."MIS jjer annum. 



Residence, 228 Merri- 



School Committee. 

Chosen at the biennial election in November, 1900 ; mayor and j)resi- 
dent of the common council members ex officio. The board of school 
committee choose the clerk of the board, the superintendent of public 
instruction, the truant officer, and the teachers in the public schools, 
and determine their salaries. They have charge of the repairs of 
schoolhouses, to a limited extent, and the purchase of free text-books 
and other supplies, and are limited by the appropriations of the city 
councils. The salary of the committee is $10 each- 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 
WAiti) 1. 



11 



Walter B. Heath. 



Charles H. Mannino-. 



George D. Towne. 



Nathaniel L. Colby. 



John T. Kelley. 



Eueene B. Dunbar. 



Edward B. Woodbury. 



Walter B. Mitchell. 



Sabin Tl^ourry. 



Mark E. Harvey. 



Wakd 2. 



Ward 3. 



Wakd 4. 



AVakd 5. 



Ward 6. 



Ward 7- 



Ward 8. 



Ward 9. 



Ward 10. 



Elliot C. Lambert. 
Will C. Heath. 
Louis E. Phelps. 
George F. Soule. 
Daniel J. McAulift'e. 
Harry L. Davis. 
Edson S. Heath. 
Benjamin Price. 
Henry I. Lemay. 
Harry H. Burpee. 



William C. Clarke, ex officio chairman. 
Harry T. Lord, ex officio. 
George D- Towne, vice-chairman. 
Elliot C. Lambert, clerk. 



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Charles W. Bickford Otlice, City Hall 

Salary, §2,300. 



Fannie L. Sanborn 
Salary, S500. 



Superintendent's Clerk. 

Residence, 161 Hanover street 



12 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Traant Officer, 

Curtis W. Davis Office, City Hall 

Salary, $850 and allowance for horsehire. Residence, 849 Chestnut 
street. 



Assessors. 

One assessor from eacli ward chosen at the biennial election in No- 
vember. Paid $2.50 for each day while employed in the assessment and 
abatement of taxes. Office, City Hall. (Charter, section 25. Public 
Statutes, chapter 48, section 1; chapter 50, section 4; chapter 49, sections 
10, 11, 12. City Ordinances, chapter 6, section 26.) Assistant assessors, 
not exceeding six, chosen by the city councils. 

Ward 1. .John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street. 

Ward 2. John K. Wilson, 67 Blodget street. 

Ward 3. David O. Fernald, 384 Lowell street. 

AVard 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. George F. Sheehan, 85 Cedar street. 

Ward 6. Leroy M. Streeter, Mammoth Road. 

Ward 7. Robert Leggett, 50 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 8. Eugene W. Brigham, 6 Marlboro street. 

Ward 9. Denis Vigneault, 564 Cartier. 

Ward 10. Albert J. Peaslee, Cohas avenue. 

CHAIRMAN OF ASSESSORS. 

David O. Fernald Office, City Hall 

CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 

Eugene W. Brigham Office, City Hall 

ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Charles W. Brown. Harry J. Woods. 

Robert Edgar. Henry F. Stone. 

Clarence M. Woodbury. Asa B. Eaton. 



Inspectors of Check-Lists. 

One in each ward, chosen at the biennial election in November. Com- 
pensation, $2.25 per day for each day actually employed. Office, City 
Hall. (Laws of 1878, chapter 163, sections 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 
and City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) 

Ward 1. Frank X. Foster, 1382 Elm street. 

Ward 2. Charles B. Tucker, 777 Union street. 

Ward 3. William B. Corey, 88 Pearl street. 

Ward 4. Albert T. Barr, 336 Merrimack street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 13 



Ward 5. Patrick E. Daley, 188 Chesliuit street. 
Ward 6. George Taylor, 480 Lake avenue. 
Ward 7. Joseph A. Foster, 42 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Ward 8. Charles C Tinkham, 9 Parker avenue. 
Ward 9. Norbert Descoteau, 302 Cartier street. 
Ward 10. John G. Hutchinson, 939 Hayw^ard street. 



Overseers of the Poor. 

One in each ward, chosen at biennial election in November. The 
mayor is a member ex officio. Compensation, $50 per annum, each ; clerk 
of the board, $125 per annum, determined by City Ordinances, chapter 14, 
section 18, as amended by Ordinance of August 5, 1890, and July 2, 1901. 
Meet third Wednesday of each month in City Hall building. 

Ward 1. George E. Davis, 40 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 2. Daniel G. Andrews, 777 Union street. 

Ward 3. Benjamin F. Garland, 28 Linden street. 

Ward 4. Charles B. Clarkson, 329 Amherst street. 

Ward 5. Thomas F. Sheehan, 364 Beech street. 

Ward 6. Charles Francis, Candia road. 

Ward 7. William Marshall, 80 Amoskeag Corporation. > 

Ward 8. Henry Lein, 118 Third street. 

Ward 9. Thomas C. Stewart, 584 Main street. 

Ward 10. James H. McKenzie, 72 Elm street. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio. Ofhce, City Hall. 

William H. Maxwell, clerk. 



Board of Health. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 1885, 
chapter 165; Laws of 1887, chapter 227; Public Statutes, chapters 108, 
109, 110.) One member appointed by the mayor in January of each year, 
to hold office for a term of three years. Salary, $200 each per annum. 
Office, Court House, West Merrjuiack, corner of Franklin street. 

John C. Bickford. Term expires first Monday in Felnuary, 1903. 

William K. Robbins. Term expires first Monday in February, 1904. 

William M. Parsons. Term exjiires first Monday in February, 1905. 

William B. Blake, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, Merrimack, 
corner of Franklin street. 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, Merrimack, 
corner of Franklin street. 

Carl O. Seaman, sanitary inspector. Office, Court Hoiise, Merrimack 
corner Franklin street. 

M. Alma Fracker, office clerk. 



14 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Fire Department. 

The chief engineer and foui- assistant engineers are chosen biennially 
in the month of June, by a majority of the city councils in convention. 
The salary of the chief engineer is $1,500 per annum; the assistant 
engineers, each $250 per annum. They exercise the powers and perform 
the duties of firewards. The said engineers constitute the board of 
engineers, and elect a clerk whose compensation is .$25 a year. The 
annual compensation of the call members of the several hook-and-ladder, 
hose, steam fire engine, and chemical companies is as follows: Captains, 
each $165; lieutenants, each $160; clerks, each $160; call engineers, each 
$185; assistant engineers, each $155; all other members, each $150; pay- 
able in semi-annual ijayments, on the first of January and July. (Laws 
of 1870, chapter 99. General Laws, chapter 106. City Ordinances^ 
chapters 6 and 12.) Six members are permanently employed as engineers 
at $76.25 per nionth each, and twenty-one as drivers at $68.33 1-3 per 
mouth each, six other permanent men at $65 per month each, permanent 
captains, $75 per month each, and receive no compensation as call mem- 
bers. Members and oflicers of each company are appointed by the board 
of engineers. 



Chief Engineer, 

Thomas W. Lane Office, Central Station, Vine street 

Residence, 1937 Elm street. Telephone at house and office. 

Fred S. Bean. 
John F. Seaward. 
John Montplaisir. 
Clarence R. Merrill, clerk. 
■ For further information see chief engineer's report. 



Trustees of City Librafy. 

(Law of 1854, chapter 1588. See contract with Manchester Atheneum, 
printed on pages 107 and 108 of City Report for fiscal year ending Jan- 
uary 31, 18.55.) Board of seven trustees, one of whom is elected by alder- 
men and board of trustees in joint convention in September, annually. 
Term of service, seven years, no salary. Two additional trustees, mayor, 
and president of common council, ex officio. 

Frank P. Carpenter, Elm corner West North street. Term expires 
October 1, 1907. 

Nathan P. Hunt, 747 Union street. Term expires October 1, 1908. 

Herman F. Straw, 607 Chestnut street. Term expires October 1, 1907. 

Walter M. Parker, 1883 Elm street, corner of Webster. Term expires 
October 1, 1906. 

Roger G. Sullivan, 168 Walnut street. Term expires October 1, 1905. 

Henry W. Boutwell, 587 Union street. Term expires October 1, 1904. 

Joseph W. Fellows, 186 Lowell street. Term expires October 1, 1903. 

William C Clarke, ex officio. 

Harry T. Lord, ex officio. 

Nathan P. Hunt, clerk. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 15 

Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 

The board of Aldermen, biennally, elect one member of said board for 
a term of six years. Not more than two members can be of the same 
political party. Said board, consisting of three members, lias full charge, 
management a~nd control of the building, constructing, repairing, and 
maintaining of all the streets, highways, lanes, sidewalks, bridges, public 
sewers and drains, and puldic parks and commons. (See Laws of 1893, 
chapter 204.) Office, City Hall building. Open from 8 to 12 A. m., 2 to 5 
p. M. Eegular meeting of the board at 2 o'clock p. m. each day. Salary 
of each member |600 per year, payable quarterly, and each is allowed 
$150 annually for horse-hire. 

George H. Stearns, clerk. Term expires 1904. 
Horace P. Simpson, chairman. Term expires 1906. 
Byron Worthen. Term expires 1908. 



Assistant Clerk. 

Bertha F. Whitney. 



City "Weigher. 

Gilbert Lyons. Office, city scales. 

Elected biennally in board of aldermen. Salary, $400 per annum; 
all fees for weighing returned monthly to city treasurer with sworn 
statement. Stationed at city scales on Franklin street. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Charles B. Clarkson. 

Elected biennally in .January by board of aldermen. Paid by fees. 
(Section 2-5, chapter 43, Public Statutes, and chapter 125, Public Statutes. 



Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39, sections 1, 2, 3, 4.) Two trustees elected 
by board of aldermen in January, annually, for the term of four years. 
Sub-trustees appointed by board of trustees. 

J. Adam Graf, 10 Middle street. Term expires January, 1905. 
William H. Huse, Mammoth road. Term expires 1903. 
John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street. Term expires 1906. 
Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street. Term expires 1906. 
Stillman P. Cannon, 99 Lowell street. Term expires 1905. 
Charles E! Stearns, 329 Front street. Term expires 1903. 
Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street. Term expires January 1904. 
Harrie M. Young, 33 Diitton street. Term expires January 1904. 
Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer, 33 Walnut street. 



16 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Sob-Trustees of Cemeteries. 



VALLEY CEMETEKY. 



Aldermen Fred K. Ramsey and Samuel M. Couch ; John L. Sanborn, 
Bushrod W. Hill, and Stillman P. Cannon. 

PINE GROVE CEMETEKY. 

Aldermen Charles J. Darrah and William F. Elliott; J. Adam Graf , 
Harrie M. Young, and Edwin F. Jones. 

AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

Alderman G. Waller Taylor; Charles E. Stearns and William H. Huse. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

.John Erskine. Office and residence at the cemetery. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Charles H. G. Foss. Office at the cemetery; residence, 747 Summer 
street. 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUND. 



Norwin S. Bean. 

Otis Barton, 61 Walnut street. 

William C Clarke, ex officio. 



Inspector of Milk. 

Joseph H. Geisel. 

Term expires February 1, biennally. (Public Statutes, chapter 12T.) 
Appointed by mayor and aldermen. Salary, ^300 per annum. 



Inspector of Bui)ding;s. 
Lyman ]SI. Aldrich Office, City Hall 

Residence, 375 Lake avenue. Appointed by board of mayor and alder- 
men, biennally, in February. Salary, .$800 per annum and an allowance 
for horsehire. (City Ordinances, chapter 15. Laws of 1883, chapter 94.) 



Inspectors of Oil. 

J. Oscar Burbank. 

John Cayzer, 383 Granite street. 

(Public Statutes, chapter 129, sections 25-34. City Ordinances, chapter 
25.) Paid by fees, 1-4 of one per cent per gallon. 



LIST OF OFFICEKS. 



17 



Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 

Appointed by the mayor. 

William K. Robbins. Samuel J. Lord. 

Christian L. Wolf. 

William K. Robbins, president. 
Samuel J. Lord, clerk. 



Sinking Fund Commissioners. 



Horace P. Simpson, chairman. 
Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer. 
Charles H. Manning:. 



Moderators. 

Elected biennally. (General Laws, chapter 31, sections 3, 9 ; chapter 
36, section 9; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordinances, page 18. See 
Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 



Ward I. Abial W. Eastman. Ward 6. 

Ward 2. Robert R. Chase. Ward 7. 

Ward 3. George E. Prime. Ward 8. 

Ward 4. William H. Morgan. Ward 9. 

Ward 5. Martin J. Whalen. Ward 10. 



Harry L. Davis. 
Johann A. Graf. 
Charles G- Ranno. 
Walter M. Fulton. 
William B. Burpee. 



Elected biennally. 
Ordinances, page 18. 



Ward Clerks. 

(General Laws, chapter 44, sections 10, 12. 
Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 



Ward 1. Charles D. Sumner. Ward 6. 

Ward 2. William H. Maxwell. Ward 7. 

Ward 3. George W. Cook. Ward 8. 

Ward 4. Herman W. Colby. Ward 9. 

Ward 5. Daniel F. O'Neil. Ward 10. 



Leslie M. Dolloff. 
Charles E. Bartlett. 
Robert A. Leckie. 
Rudolph Desfosses. 
William P. Hall. 



City 



Selectmen. 

Elected biennally. (General Laws, chapter 1, section 27; chapter 12, 
section 6; chapter 40, sections 2, 3; cha])ter 109, section 27; chapter 213, 
section 1. City Ordinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns 
and cities.) 



Alexander Hanna. 



Ward 1. 



John R. Hickey, 



Byron H. Smith. 



18 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 
Ward 2. 



Joseph F. Marsh. 



Walter H. "Wright. 



George M. Currier. 



Edward T. Allen. 



Andrew B. Bunton. 



Henrv W. Allen. 



Adam Ewerwin. 



Arthur J. Provost. 



Ignatius T. Webster. 



Fred K. Ramsey. 
Ward 3. 

Joel S Daniels. 
Ward 4. 

Joseph E. Merrill. 
Ward 5. 

Joseph Geoffrion. 
Ward G. 

John Heron. 
Ward 7. 

Edgar A. Thayer. 
Ward 8. 

William R. Blakely. 
Ward 9. 

Fraok J. Hanel. 
Ward 10. 

Joseph Gosselin. 



Daniel G. Andrews. 



Victor C. Johnson. 



Moses D. Allard. 



William M. Walker. 



George M. Bean. 



Alexander Knight. 



Osman W. Pettengill. 



William Broderick. 



Patrick H. O'Malley. 



REPORT OF THE AUDITOR, 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen : 

Gentlemen, — The auditor herewith submits to your honorable body 
his report, giving a tabular statement of the receipts and exjienditures 
for the year 1902, and a detailed statement of the expenses of each 
appropriation during the year. 

Eespectfully, 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

C'iti/ Auditor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER FOR THE YEAR 

J 902, 

Temporary loans : Db. 

New England Trust Co §75,000.00 

Edgerly & Crocker 50,000.00 

Merrimack River Savings Bank 50,000.00 

First National Bank 25,000.00 

Loring, Tolman & Tupper 25,000.00 

Manchester National Bank 15,000.00 



$210,000.00 



E. C. Smith, city clerk : 

Dog licenses S872..57 

Sewer licenses 1,475.00 

Rent of tenements 56.00 

Show licenses 300.00 

Pool licenses 355.09 

Fees, intentions of marriage 636.00 

mortgages 146.35 

conditional sales 111.25 

corporations 20.50 

miscellaneous recoi-ds 11.50 

writs 26.20 



Police department : 

M.J. Healy $4,678.76 

John C. Bickford 1,172.36 



$4,010.46 



$5,851.12 



22 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Pine Grove cemetery : 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer $2,714.33 

John H. Erskine, superintendent •• 4,284 82 

§6,999.15 

Merrill Yard : 
Jolm H. Erskine, superintendent .$10.00 

George E. Morrill, collector of taxes : 

Taxes of 1902 §(350,212.73 

Taxes of 1901 52,335.36 

Old taxes 280.65 

Land sold for taxes May 20, 1902 7,711.75 

Abatement of taxes, 1901 467.37 

Abatement of taxes, 1902 1,199.90 

Redemption of land sold for taxes May 16, 1901, 

for taxes 1900 3.129.10 

Redemption of land sold for taxes May 16, 1900, 

for taxes 1899 3,070.83 

Redemption of land sold for taxes May 1902, 

for taxes 1901 3,295.79 

Interest on taxes 1901 1,827.81 

Costs on taxes 1901 ■ 1,748 50 

§725.279.79 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer : 

Insurance tax $3, 157.50 

Railroad tax 41,206 87 

Savings bank tax 57,512.95 

Literary fund 2,834.50 

.$104,711.82 

City farm : 
E. G. Libbey, superintendent $4,447.10 

City scales ; 
Gilbert Lyons 346.36 

Water-works department : 
Charles K. Walker, superintendent §134,331,48 

Valley cemetery : 
C. H. G. Foss, superintendent : §1,700.52 

Street and park commission : 

Manchester Street Railway .$76.36 

W. J. Moyes 125.00 

Mancliester Traction, Light & Power Co 4,534.86 

Pike & Heald Co 104.25 

T. A. Lane Co 43.21 

Sundry persons 2,486.00 

§7,369.68 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 23 

Interest on bank Deposits : 

First National Bank §920.80 

Merchants' National Bank 010.95 

Geora:e E. Morrill, collector 829.83 

.$2,3(11.58 



Miscellaneous receipts : 

State of New Hampshire §7.00 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., overdraft 5.00 

Amesbury File Works, overdraft 6.50 

County of Hillsborough : 

Onedialf coal supplied court holise 401.50 

G. Lein & Sons, overdraft 1.00 

William E. Buck, land bought of city ; 

By Mack estate. 100.00 

Swift Brothers & Co 21 .54 

S. J. Lord, plumbers' licenses 25.00 

J. O. Robitaille, overdraft 5.25 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Co. : 

Abatement of rents of telephone 27.97 

Infants' Asylum, overdraft 4.00 



.§(104.76 



Milk licenses : 

J; H. Geisel §47.00 

Board of health 471.50 

§518.50 

Tuition : 
Charles W . Bickford, superintendent §1,388.35 

Free text books : 
E. C. Lambert, clerk $200.00 

Bonds: 

W. S. Hayes and Sons §80,000.00 

Premiums 3,020.00 

Accrued interest 155.56 

§83,175.56 



Trustees of sinking fund : 
For the payment of water bonds $100,000 .00 



Total receipts for year 1902 $1,423,306.23 

Cash on hand January 1, 1902 176,279.57 

Unpaid bills December 31, 1902 26,170.39 

§1,626,056.19 



24 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Cr. 

Drafts paid during the year $1,430,752.15 

Unpaid bills January 1, 1902 24,660.90 

Cash on hand December 31, 1902 170,643.14 



$1,626,056.19 



Eespcctfully submitted. 

FEED L. ALLEN, 

City Treasurer. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen,^! have examined the accounts of Fred L. Allen, city 
treasurer, for the year ending December 31, 1902, and find proper vouchers 
for all payments, and all receipts duly accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January 1, 1902, was §151,918.67 

Receipts during the year 1,423,306 23 

Total !51, 575. 224.90 

Amount of drafts during the year §1,430,752.15 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1902 144,472.75 

Total $1 575,224.90 

The cash taken December 31, 1902, I find to be as follows: 

Deposited in Suftblk National Bank $24, 184.46 

Deposited in Merchants' National Bank 107,313.12 

Deposited in office safe 39,145.56 

Gross amount of cash on hand December 31, 1902 $170,643.14 

Deduct amount of bills unpaid 26,170.39 

Net amount of cash on hand December 31, 1902 §144,472.75 

Respectfully submitted with a tabular statement of the receipts and 
expenditures of the city for the year 1902. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 25 

STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF THE 
CITY OF MANCHESTER FOR THE YEAR 1902. 

Receipts, 
central department. 

Received from: 

Direct city taxes §712,207.76 

Cost and interest on taxes 3,576.31 

$715,784.07 

Licenses to enter sewer $1,475.00 

to keep dog 872.57 

to sell milk 518.50 

to keep billiard and pool tables and 

lunch carts 355.09 

to shows and exhibitions 300.00 

Fees from citv clerk 951.80 

$4,472,96 

Rents §56.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Received from : 

City scales f346 36 

Free text books 200.00 

Tuition 1,388.35 

Miscellaneous sources 1-84..51 

62,119.22 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Received from costs and fines .$5,851.12 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Received from : 

Pine Grove cemetery $6,999. 15 

Valley cemetery 1 , 700 52 

Merrill cemetery 10.00 

■ $8,709.67 

WATER-WORKS. 

Gross receipts #134,331.48 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Received from : 

City farm $4,447.10 

Hillsborough county, coal for court house 401.50 

$4,848.60 



26 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Received from : 

Interest $2,517.14 

Land redeemed from tax sale 9,i95.72 

Overdrafts 21.75 

Plumbers' certificates 25.00 

Street and park conimission, sale of pipe, etc. 2,806.82 

Manchester Street Eailvvay, paving 4,534.86 



.$19,401.29 



Total ordinary receipts during the year 1902 8695,574.41 



TEMPORARY LOAN AND BONDS SOLD. 

Received from : 

Loan in anticipation of tax of 1902 .«240,000.00 

Bonds sold 80,000.00 

Premium on lionds 3,020.00 

*323. 020.00 

Received from sinking- fund trustees $100,000.00 

STATE. 

Received from : 

Insurance taxes *3, 157.50 

Railroad taxes 41,206.87 

Savings-bank taxes 57,512.95 

Literary fund 2, 834. .50 

«104,711.82 

Gross receipts $1,423,306.23 

Net cash on hand January 1, 1902 151,918.67 



$1,575,224.90 



Expenditures. 



CENTRAL department. 



Interest on water bonds $36,313.00 

on city bonds 35,203.00 

on cemetery bonds 2,500.00 

on temporary loans 3,619.60 

on Amoskeag tax suit 678.98 



.$78,314.58 



KECEIPTS AND EXPENDITLTfeES. 



27 



City hall $3,994.59 

Printing and stationery 1,913.45 

Incidental expenses 8,042.57 

Mayor's incidentals 257. 2o 

City officers' salaries 28,274.41 

Auditor's department 2,311.24 

Sinking fund trustees 27,000.00 

File and index system • 203.50 

Land sold for taxes 7,711.75 

$79,708.70 

STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Street and park commission $3,391.01 

Snow and ice . . 4,595.89 

Repairs of highways 29,494.49 

New highways 4,795.26 

Land taken for highways 100.00 

Watering streets 3,142.76 

Paving streets 5,268.58 

Macadamizing streets 6,415.39 

Grading for concrete 4,889.37 

Scavenger service 17,231.02 

Paving Elm street 16,534.08 

Paving Canal street 4,221.57 

Street sweeping • 3,232.21 

Lighting streets 60,656.69 

Bridges 6,258.38 

City teams 6,990.76 

Eepairs of sewers 5,744.44 

New sewers 24,443.69 

$207,405.59 

engineer's department. 
Engineer's department $6,948.03 

HEALTH DEPARTilENT. 

Health department $7,490.25 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Repairs of schoolhouses $9,996.66 

Fuel -.. 10,304.02 

Furniture and siipplies 1,187.38 

Books and stationery . . 44.66 

Printing and advertising . 283.18 

Contingent expenses 2,507.19 



28 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Care of rooms 6.522.13 

Evening schools 1,1.55.3.5 

Teachers' salaries 93,779.80 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 252.00 

Free text-books 6,160.77 

Manual training 498.02 

Sewing materials for girls 250.00 

$132,941.16 

CITY LIBRAKY. 

City library $6,246.55 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Fire department $70,357.96 

Fire-alarm telegraph 1,837.08 

Hydrant service 18,800.00 

$90,995.04 

POLICE DEPAliTMEXT. 

Police station $2,390.66 

Police court 2,870.78 

Police commission 43,028.02 

$48,289.46 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Repairs of buildings $4,786.97 

Board of plumbing examiners 28.86 

South Beech street schoolhouse 11, 962. .50 

Isolation hospital 6,167.38 

Wilson Hill engine house 1,850.50 

$24,796.21 

WATER- WORKS. 

Water- works $72,196.26 

Water-works sinking fund 23,800.00 

$95,996.26 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Commons $4,258.13 

Stark park 1,020.91 

Derryfield park 589.65 

Pine Grove cemetery 9,948.51 

Valley cemetery 3,090.71 

Amoskeag cemetery 248.90 

Merrill cemetery 19.47 

South Manchester playground 40.10 

$19,216.38 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 29 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Paupers off farm $12,466..53 

City farm 8,56-5.12 

Indigent soldiers 117.00 

Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Elliot Hospital 300.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital .300.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital 300.00 

W. C. T. U. Mercy Home 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 400.00 

Militia 700.00 

Band concerts 400.00 

$24,148.65 

ABATEMENTS. 

Abatement of taxes $84,295.23 

Total of ordinary municipal expenditures $906,792.15 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Temporary loan $255,709.00 

BONDED DEBT. 

School bonds $10,000.00 

Water bonds 100,000.00 

$110,000.00 

STATE AND COUNTY TAXES. 

State tax $63,869.00 

County tax 94,382.00 

$158,251.00 

Grand total of expenditures during the year $1,430,752.15 

Cash on hand December 31, 1902 .$170,643.14 

Less unpaid bills 26,170.39 

Net cash on hand 144,472.75 

$1,575,224.90 



Interest. 

Appropriation $42,000.00 

Transferred from water-works account .... 36,313.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money . . . 1.58 



$78,314.58 



30 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

EXPEXDITUKES. 

Coupons on water bonds -$36,314.00 

Coupons on improvement bonds 16,000.00 

Coupons on school bonds 7,220.00 

Coupons on bridge bonds 2,402.00 

Coupons on city bonds 6,080.00 

Coupons on city funding bonds 3,500.00 

Coupons on cemetery bonds 2,500.00 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., interest on 

judgment 678.98 

Edgerly & Crocker, discount on notes .... 900.12 

First National Bank, discount on note .... 234.38 

Loring, Tolman & Tupper, discount on note . . 330.08 

Manchester National Bank, discount on note 59.38 
Merrimack River Savings Bank, discount on 

notes 705.01 

New England Trust Co., discount on notes . . 1,390.63 



Total expenditures $78,314.58 



Payment of Funded Debt. 

Appropriation $10,000.00 

Received from sinking fund trustees 100,000.00 



.^110.000.00 



Expenditures. 

Water bonds $100,000.00 

Schoolhouse bonds 10,000.00 



8110,000.00 



Sinking Fund. 
Appropriation $27,000.00 



Expenditures. 
Trustees of sinking fund $27,000.00 



UNAPPROPRIATED MONEY 



31 



Unappropriated Money. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Transferred from the following- accounts: 

Incidental expenses 457.43 

Mayor's incidentals 42.75 

Auditor's department 188.76 

Street and park commission 108.99 

Snow and ice 1,904.11 

New highways 2,204.74 

Watering streets 1,557.24 

Paving Elm Street .78 

Macadamizing streets 3,584.61 

Scavenger service 768.98 

Lighting streets 343.31 

City teams 9.24 

Commons 241.87 

South Manchester playground 9.90 

Board of plumbing examiners 71.14 

Repairs of schoolhouses 3.34 

Furniture and supplies 12.62 

Books and stationery 30.34 

Printing and advertising 16.82 

Evening schools 44.65 

Free text-books 39.23 

Manual ti-aining 1.98 

Police commission 571.98 

Police station 109.34 

Police court .... 29.22 

Pine Grove cemetery 51.49 

Valley cemetery 9.29 

Amoskeag cemetery 1.10 

Merrill cemetery 80.53 

City farm 34.88 

Indigent soldiers 13.00 

Abatement of taxes 724.77 

Unappropriated receipts 8,822.01 



$27,090.44 



Expenditures. 



Transferred to the following accounts : 

Interest $1.58 

Repairs of buildings 161.97 

City hall 194.59 

Isolation hospital 265.39 



32 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Printing and stationery 63.46 

South Beech street schoolhouse 1,962.50 

City officers' salaries 374.41 

Paupers off farm 2,566.53 

Repairs of highways 4,191.14 

Land sold for taxes 911.75 

Land taken for highways 5,008.08 

Paving streets 768.58 

Grading for concrete 1,389.37 

Street sweeping 732.21 

Bridges 258.38 

Repairs of sewers 744.44 

Paving Canal street 221.57 

New sewers 1,940.22 

Stark park 20.91 

Derryfield park • 89.65 

Engineer's department 73.30 

Health department 690.25 

Fuel 1,504.02 

Contingent expenses 7.19 

Care of rooms 22.13 

Teachers' salaries 2,779.80 

Evening school, mechanical drawing .... 2.00 

Fire department 7.96 

Fire-alarm telegraph 137.08 



$27,090.44 



Temporary Loan* 

Appropriation $15,709.00 

New England Trust Co 75,000.00 

Edgerly & Crocker 50,000.00 

First National Bank 25,000.00 

Loring, Thomas & Tupper 25,000.00 

Manchester National Bank 15,000.00 

Merrimack River Savings Bank 50,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Edgerly & Crocker .$50,000.00 

First National Bank 25,000.00 

Loring, Thomas & Tupper 25,000.00 

Manchester National Bank 15,000.00 

Merrimack River Savings Bank 50,000.00 

New England Trust Co 90,709.00 



$255,709.00 



$255,709.00 



CITY HALL. 33 



City HalK 



Appropriation $3,800.00 

Transferred from unapproijriated money . . . 194.59 



Expenditures. 



FUEL AND LIGHTS. 



L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal $210.00 

C. H. Bodwell, wood 38.50 

Manchester Coal and Ice Co., coal 44.61 

Manchester Traction, Light and Power Co., 

lights - 587.60 

A. D. Maxwell estate, wood 8.25 

Moore & Preston, Welsh coal 309.26 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 102.14 

D. M. Poore, Welsh coal 271.89 

Eaiche & Laforce, wood 56.50 



WATER AND TELEPHONE. 



FIXTURES AND SUPPLIES. 



New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones $62.89 

Water Commissioners, use of water 279.50 



CLEANING OFFICES, ETC. 

Gedeon Lesage, services as janitor $28.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., rope, dusters, 

brooms, sponges, etc 22.90 

Plate glass shelves 16.00 

Sarah Minton, cleaning 313.00 

J. K. Rhodes, janitor public comfort 130.66 

Henry 8hea estate, services as janitor .... 14.67 

Timothy Sullivan, janitor public comfort . . . .836.00 

Frank St. John, janitor 755.00 

The Talbot Co., disinfectant 18.00 

John B. Varick Co., pail, sponges, hammer, etc. 3.25 

J. H. WigginA Co., matches 1.60 



E. M. Bryant & Co., lamps $1.00 

James W. Hill Co., flag, cheese cloth, etc. . . . 9.25 

A. K. Hobbs, hose 2.75 



$3,994.59 



$1,628.75 



$342.39 



$1,639.08 



34 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



E. D. Gay, shades, putting up and taking down 
awnings, etc 

W. P. Goodman, directories, diaries 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 
lam^js • 

People's Gas Light Co., mantles, gas stove . . 

John B. Varick Co., water cooler, thermometer 



$86.91 


68.00 


4.26 


3.80 


4.85 



$180.82 



INCIDENTAL KEPAIKS. 

J. .J. Abbott, paint, glass, labor 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electrical repairs .... 

Pinney & Parker, reseating chair 

James W. Hill Co., repairing flags 

George Holbrook, taking off and putting on 

doors 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor on electric 

lights and plumbing 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing awning frame . . 
Harry A. Piper, table, etc 

B. F. Shepard, sundry repairs 

C. A. Trefethen, pulley for clock 

C. H. Wood, painting and varnishiHg .... 



$75.18 

2.25 

.75 

9.75 

3.50 

58.98 
1.49 
2.70 
3.95 
5.00 
3..50 



$167.05 



SUNDRIES. 

W. G. Berry, insurance premium . . . • 
Total expenditures 



$36.50 



$3,994.59 



Printing and Stationery. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from vinapi)ropriated money 



Expenditures. 



$1,8.50.00 
63.45 



$1,913.45 



ASSESSORS AND INSPECTORS. 



John B. Clarke Co., printing circulars, blanks, 

check-lists, etc $401.75 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 20.86 



$422.61 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 35 



TAX COLLECTOE. 



John B. Clarke Co., printing- notices $1.50 

Independent Statesman, advertising tax list- . 12.00 

A. E. Martell & Co., books 7.50 

Temi)Ie & Farrington Co., stationery and books 2.08 



CITY CLERK. 



MAYOR. 



-John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks, etc. . . . $14.75 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 9.25 

Novelty Advertising Co., license blanks . . . 7.75 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper 4.00 



CITY AUDITOR. 

John B. Clarke Co. : 

Printing 500 reports $998.58 

Binding reports, 1900 86.25 

Binding reports, 1901 207.25 

Lettering reports 6.30 

J. A. Williams, printing bonded debt statements 5.00 



CITY TREASURER. 

American Bank Note Co., 80 lithographed 

bonds $70.00 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 1.15 

E. A. Stratton, book and pai^er 1.65 

J. A. Williams, printing circulars, postals . . 7.75 



W. P. Goodman, diaries, stationery $3.83 

E. A. Stratton, carbon paper 1.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 8.25 



CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 



$23.08 



$35.75 



$1,303.38 



$80.55 



$13.08 



John B. Clarke Co., printing notices, statements $22.00 

W. P. Goodman, stationery .50 

Novelty Advertising Co., printing reports, 

blanks, etc 12.50 

$35.00 

Total expenditures $1,913.45 



36 



Appropriation 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Incidental Expenses. 



$8,500.00 



Expenditures, 
births, maeeiages, deaths. 

0. D. Abbott, M. D $2.25 

T>. S. Adams, M. D 2.50 

John C. Bickford, coroner 1.00 

H. T. Boutwell, M. D .25 

H. W. Boutwell, M. D 5.25 

A. A. E. Brien, M. D 25.75 

J. F. Brown, M. D 1.25 

J. S. Brown, M. D 4.00 

L. G. Bullock, M. D 1.75 

H. B. Burnliam, M. D .25 

1. L. Carpenter, M. D 7.26 

Charles Chirurg, M. D 4.50 

Herman Christophe, M. D 3.00 

J. M. Collity, M. D 21.75 

Walter T. Crosby, M. D 3.00 

E. Hv Currier, M. D 8.25 

Mary Danforth, M. D 8.50 

G. M. Davis, M. D 7.75 

J. H. Degross, M. D 5.00 

E. H. Dillon, M. D 9.75 

H. H. Diusmore, M. D .25 

C. E. Dodge, M. D 4.25 

C. M. Dodge, M. D 6.00 

John F. Dowd, M. D 3..50 

E. B. Dunbar, M. D 13.00 

John D. Ferguson, M. D 8-75 

C. F. Flanders, M. D 25.50 

George Frechette, M. D , 13.75 

L. M. French, M. D , . . 1.25 

E. N. Fugere, M. D ' 32.75 

John H. Gleason, M. D 3.00 

Moise Gvierin, M. D 18.25 

Noel E. Guillet, M. D 1.25 

Max Guggenheim, M. D 1.00 

J. A. Harlan, M. D .25 

Thomas C. Hill, M. D • 12.00 

B. F. Hodsdon, M. D 9.75 

George B. Hoitt, M. D 1.50 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 3'7 

J. A. Jackson, M. D $8.25 

M. E. Keaii, M. D 15.25 

J. J. A. Labrecque, M. D. . • 2.00 

P. G. Laberge, M. D 42.-50 

Gustave Lafontaine, M. D 22.50 

J. E. A. Lanouette, M. D 36.75 

E. Larochelle, M. D 43.25 

J. E. Lemaitre, M. D 8.50 

J. D. Lemay, M. D 11-75 

J. G. Lussier, M- D 6.00 

H. D. Lord, coroner 6.25 

J. D. W. McDonald, M. D 43.25 

G- B- Morey, M- D 3.00 

Jacob W- Mooar, M. D .25 

M. V- B. Morse, M. D 2-00 

John T- Murray, M. D • 6.00 

Mrs. S. Modin 1-50 

Clara Odmau . 6-50 

W. H- Pattee, M. D 6.75 

Frederick Perkins, M. D 6-00 

AnnaPollmer 19.00 

Wm. Richardson, M. D -50 

J- F. Eobinson, M. D 3-25 

C. S. Eodier, M- D 8-25 

J. E. E. Eoy, M. D 1-25 

Nicholas Sasseville, M. D lO-.OO 

Annie Schelzel .75 

Vladimir Sikorsky, M. D .25 

Servule St. Pierre, M. D 15.25 

Gillis Stark, M. D 8.00 

F. C. Stuart, M- D &-0a 

A. G- Straw, M- D L25 

Zatae L- Straw, M- D • 12.50 

C- B- Sturtevant, M. D 2.25 

Emile Sylvain, M. D 25.00 

James Sullivan, M. D 2.25 

E. B. Swett, M. D -25 

Joseph Taylor, M. D 6.50 

A- J. Todd, M. D 3-00 

George B. Towne, M. D 5.00 

E. C. Tremblay, M. D .75' 

Ellen A. Wallace, M. D .75 

E. W. Weeks, M. D 2.25 

G. M. Watson, M. D- - - . • • 26.25 

H. P. Watson, M- D 3. 00 

Maurice Watson, M- D .75 

G- L. Wakefield, M. D .50 



38 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Arthur F. Wheat, M. D. . 
H. A. White, M. D. . . . 
Rev. C. A. Bidwell . . . . 
Eev. A. E. Bartlett . . . 
Rev. C. R. Bailey . . . . 
Eev. James H. Brennan . . 

Eev. J. X. Bjork 

Rev. T. J. Campbell . . . 
Rev. Andreas Carlsson . . 
Rev. Thomas Chalmers . 
Rev. J. A. Chevalier . . . 

Eev. N. L. Colby 

Eev. Matthew Creamer . . 
Rev. I. H. C. Davignon . 
Rev. William Diehl . . . 
Eev. Chas. H. Farnsworth 
Eev. G. A. Guertin . . . 
Rev. J. W. Goodwin . . . 
Rev. Arthur Halfmann . . 

Rev. P. Hevey 

Rev. William Hutchins . 
Eev. N. E. Johnson . . . 
Eev. W. N. Jones .... 
Eev. John Kamm .... 

Rev. J. J. Lyons 

Rev. P. Lawrence .... 

Rev. J. B. Lemon 

Rev. B. W. Lockhart . . . 
Rev. D. J. Many, Jr. . . . 
Rev. S. J. McLaughlin . . 
Eev. Edwin Morrell . . . 
Eev. E. J. Palisoul . . . 
Eev. O. D. Patch .... 
Eev. Samuel Eussell . . . 
E. C Smith, city clerk . . 
Eev. C. J. Staples .... 
Rev. C. ?i. Tilton .... 



$5.25 

6.75 

2.50 

3.00 

2.00 

19.00 

.50 

.25 

1..50 

1.50 

15.25 

12.. 50 

1.00 

17.25 

.25 

2.00 

1.25 

.50 

1.25 

11.25 

.25 

1.25 

3.00 

1.00 

7.50 

3.75 

4.00 

2.00 

.50 

6.00 

1.00 

.50 

l.,50 

1.75 

7.00 

1.00 

1.25 



§877.00 



DAMAGES AND JUDGMENTS. 

James F. Baldwin $178-36 

Mary Cahill 95.00 

James A. Colby 100,00 

Frank I. Paige 25.00 

James M. Smith 5.50 

Arthur J. Todd, M. D 75.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 39 



W. E. Warren. <>;uardian S>5.25 

F. W. & W. D. Walcott 75.00 



LEGAI. EXPENSES. 

John A. Barker, serving legal notice $ 2.00 

Brown, Herrick & Cochran, services and ex- 
penses, McCrillis v. City 127.80 

Arthur O. Fuller, services, Amoskeag Manu- 
facturing Co. V. City 1,840.70 

Edwin F. Jones, services 307.00 

Dana W- King, recording deeds, examining 

records 2.79 

Henry N. Hurd, taking depositions, Gibbs v 

City 10.00 

Thomas D. Luce, copies of record 8-90 

John F. Madden, stenographer, Gibbs v City . 3.00 



CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

F. L. Allen, expenses to Boston, Concord . . . §27.27 

John B. Clarke Co. , advertising notices . . . 33.38 

Printing postals, notices, etc 4.50 

Manchester News Co. , advertising notice, dog 

licenses 29.25 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co , use 

of telephone 19.18 

Union Publishing Co., advertising notices . . 36.06 



PREMIUM ON INSURANCE POLICIES. 

W. G. Berry $60.00 

George Blanchet 30.00 

Eobert R. Chase 60.00 

DeCourcy & Holland 60.00 

John Dowst 60.00 

C. M. Edgerly 120.00 

Everett & Scott 60.00 

Fred R. Stark 30.00 

John A. Sheehan 180.00 



TEAMS FOB COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

G. W. Bailey .$31.50 

Boyd Brothers 15.00 

J. P. Brown & Co 15.00 



$878.86 



^2,302.19 



.Sl.50.24 



.$660.00 



40 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

J. P. Brown $5.00 

H. R. Dow & Co 64.00 

C. F. Fifield lO.oO 

W. J. Freeman 20.00 

A. L. Gadbois & Co 3,5.00 

Harry F. Hull 5.00 

Kean & Sheehan 5 00 

Manchester Street Railway 137.50 

G. W. Reed 10.00 

C. H. Simpson 15.00 



CITY LIBRARY. 



CITY SCALES. 



Pike & Heald Co., 1 flue brush $0.55 

J. K. Rhodes, care of boiler 138.50 



C. H. Bodwell, wood $0.69 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood and coal 20.25 

W. E. Woodward, wood 25 



MAYOR. 

J. J. Holland, soaj) $0 65 

John B. Hall Co., thermometer 1.75 

Pears' soap .75 

E. A. Stratton, paper 3. ,5.5 

Temple & Farrington Co , pamphlet laws ... 1.00 

rubber bands .25 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

E. H. Clough, envelopes $21.20 

John B. Clarke Co., advertisiug "non-resident 

sale" 27.41 

Printing bills and receipts 62.50 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 2.40 

George E. Morrill, paid for delivering tax bills 73.50 

Novelty Advertising Co., ribbons for stamp . . .75 

Star Stamp Co., handle, pad .75 

E. A. Stratton, book, fountain pen 11 00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 copy interest 

tables 1.00 

Stationery 1.46 



$368.00 



$139.05 



$21.19 



$7. 



$201.97 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 41 

CITY CLERK. 

Elliott c% Hatch Book Typewriter Co., ex- 
change on typewriters $75.00 

Ribbons 9 25 

Hammond Typewriter Co., ribbon 1.50 

Herbert Marr, ink set 1.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co,, use 

of telephone 15.33 

Temple & Farrington Co , books and stationery 43.75 

G. P. Wallace, ribbon 1.00 

Whiting & Thomson, 1 brush 2 50 

$149.33 



CITV TKEASUBEK. 

Boston News Bureau, subscription to magazine 

to December 13, 1902 $18.40 

W. p. Goodman, books and stationery .... 7.90 

The J. C. Hall Co., lithographed checks . , . 15.00 

Ideal Desk Extension Co., 1 desk extension . . 4.55 

C A. Hoitt & Co , chaii's and cushions .... 10.50 

A. E. Martell & Co., 1 letter book 3.50 

Francis Pratt, pens 3.00 

E. A. Stratton, books and stationery 26.50 

Temjile & Farrington Co., covers .90 

Wyckoff, Seamanstt Benedict, typewriter, chair, 

cabinet, ribbon 124.10 



COURT HOUSE. 

C. H. Bodwell, wood $30.25 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 34.00 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, wood 4.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., coal 145. .33 

Moore & Preston, Welsh coal 257.28 

P. H. Riley, services as janitor 600.00 

John B. Varick Co., shariiening lawn mower 3.00 



ASSESSORS. 

John B.Clarke Co., advertising . .$20.00 

Printing lists 10.75 

John F. Gillis, real estate transfers 18.00 

Pike & Heald Co., mantles . . .• 2.10 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and stationery 86.82 



$214.35 



.$1,073.86 



$137.67 



42 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SOLICITOR. 



Little, Brown ct Co., municii^al law books . . $24.00 
New England Telephone & Telegrapli Co.. use 

of telephone 24.33 

George A. Wagner, exi^enses, sundry places . . 10.28 



ELECTION EXPENSES. 

D. G. Andrews, material and labor, w^ard 2 . . $12.50 
O. F. Bartletttt Co., putting up stove, gas pipe, 

etc., ward 2 10.88 

Boyd Brothers, use of hack 5.00 

Bunton & Bernard, setting up booths and rails, 

ward 6 22.00 

C. B. Clarkson, cleaning ward room, oil, sta- 
tionery, ward 4 3.80 

W. B. Corey Transfer Co., trucking booths . . 3.00 
Connor Bi'others, putting up voting booths, 

etc., ward 5 16.86 

L. W. Dolloff, trucking ballots, postage, ward 2.50 

G. H. Dudley, board for check-lists 3.00 

D. O. Fernald, storage of booths two years, 

ward 3 12-.00 

W. J. Freeman, use of team, ballots for ward 5 1.00 

A. L. Gadbois »t Co., use of hack 5.00 

W. P. Goodman, stationery, etc 17-95 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor, wards 2, 

5, 7 40.73 

H. F. W. Little, material and laber on booths, 

ward 3 9.82 

J. Y. McQueston Co., rent of tables and chairs 1.00 

E. H. Nutting, use of Mechanics' hall .... 100.00 

G. W. Reed, use of hack 5.00 

E. A. Stratton, books and stationery 36.23 

David Wadsworth, rent wardroom, ward 10 . . 35.00 



SUNDRIES. 

A. F. Abbott, V. S., examining glandered 

horses $5.00 

American Express Co., express on reports . . 5.48 
Amoskeag National Bank, rent, safety deposit 

box 25.00 

E. H. Clough, postage stamps 50.00 

Orin T. Clark, sheep killed 15.40 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., examining glandered horse 2.00 

J. G. Ellinwood, photographs 5.00 



$58.61 



$843.27 



CITY officers' salaries. 43 

First Light Battery, firing salute, July 4 . . . $3^.25 

, e 1 4.00 

M. Hoben, rent of barn ^ 

O. D. Knox, postage stamps ''^• 

E. F. McQuesten, I M. D., examination and 

court attendance, Sheelian v. City .... 7o.00 

Walter M. Parker, refund on sewer license, 

paid by Carl Roth ^'^'^^^ 

Frederick Perkins, M. D., examination and 

J.J 1 . . 40.00 

court attendance 

Georoe D. Towne, M. D., examination and 

court attendance 

Town of Goffstown, taxes 

H. H. Young, sheep and hog killed by dogs . ^O-'^O ^^^^ ^^ 

,.^ .... $8,042..57 

Total expenditures 4.57 43 

Transferred to unappropriated money . ' ' ' 

$8,500.00 



City Officers' Salaries. 

. ,. , ... $27,900.00 

Appropriation • n 

Transferred from unappropriated money . . 374.41 



EXPEXDITUKES. 
CENTBAI. DEPARTMENT. 

William C. Clarke, mayor $1,800.00 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer I,3.o0.00 

Edward C. Smith : i -sm oo 

City clerk 1,3.j0.0U 

Clerk of committees 200.00 

George E, Morrill : 

Tax collector I'^SO.OO 

Team l^O-^O 

E. C. Paul, deputy collector 799.96 

Jean B. Guevm, deputy collector 799.96 

George A. Wagner, solicitor ......... 800.00 

Harry A. Piper, clerk common council . . . 200.00 

L. M. Aldrich, building inspector 950.00 

J. H. Geisel, milk inspector ^^^!!? 

John A. Barker, messenger 

Gilbert Lyons, city weigher 



700.00 
400.00 



5,274.41 



44 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



C. B. Clarkson, weigher 

Mabel L. How, treasurer's clerk .... 
Florence A. Robinson, city clerk's clerk 
Maude E. Soule, mayor's clerk . . . • 
S. Louise Hill, labor in collector's office 
Lilla Eiley, labor in collector's office . 



$13.30 
598.75 
520.00 
572.00 
2.50 
38.43 



$12,969.90 



CITY PHYSICIAX AXD OVERSEERS OF POOR. 

Frederick Perkins, M. D., city physician . . $600.00 

George E. Davis, ward 1 5O.00 

Daniel G. Andrews, ward 2 5O.00 

B. F. Garland, ward 3 50.00 

Charles B. Clarkson, ward 4 5O.00 

Thomas F. Sheehan, ward 5 ,50.00 

Charles Francis, ward 6 • • . . . 50.00 

William Marshall, ward 7 5O.00 

Henry Lain, ward 8 • • , 50.00 

Thomas C. Stewart, ward 9 .... - 50.00 

J. H. McKenzie, ward 10 50.00 

W. H. Maxwell, clerk 125.00 

William C. Clarke, chairman ex officio .... .50.00 



§1,275.00 



SCHOOI. OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL C 

Charles W. Bickford, school superintendent . $2, 

Curtis W. Davis, truant officer 

E. C. Lambert, clerk of board 

William C. Clarke, chairman, ex officio .... 

Harry T. Lord, president of common council, 

ex efficio 

E. C. Lambert, ward 1 

Walter B. Heath, ward 1 

Charles H. Manning, ward 2 

Will C. Heath, ward 2 

Louis E. Phelps, ward 3 

George D. Towne, ward 3 

Nathaniel L. Colby, ward 4 

George F. Soule, ward 4 

John T. Kelley, ward 5 

D. A. McAuliffe, Ward 5 

Eugene B. Dunbar, ward 6 

Harry L. Davis, ward 6 

Edson S. Heath, ward 7 . . . . • 

E. B. Woodbury, ward 7 

Walter B. Mitchell, ward 8 



OMMITTEE. 

300.00- 

850.00 

150.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 



CITY officers' salaries. 



45 



Benjamin Price, ward 8 . . 
Sabin Nourry, ward 9 . . . 
Henry I. Lemay, ward 9 . 
Harry H. Burpee, ward 10 
Marie E. Harvey, ward 10 . 



$10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



$3,520.00 



BOAKD OF ASSESSORS. 

John L. Sanborn, ward 1 

John K. Wilson, ward 2 • 

D. O- Fernald, ward 3 

Harrison D. Lord, ward 4 

George F. Sheehan, ward 5 

Leroy M Streeter, ward 6 . 

Robert Leggett, ward 7 

Eugene W- Brigham, ward 8 

Denis Vigneault, ward 9 

Albert J. Peaslee, ward 10 

C. W- Brown, as*sistant 

Asa B. Eaton, assistant 

Robert Edgar, assistant 

Henry F. Stone, assistant 

C M. Woodbury, assistant 

H. J- Woods, assistant 

Harvey L. Currier, clerical services 

Fred Currier, clerical services 

G. H. Dudley, clerical services ■ . 

Arthur W- Rowell, clerical services 

George Taylor, clerical services 

W. E. Bernard, interi:)reter 

J. Z. Y. Bernard, interpreter 

C. D. Gadbois, interi^reter 

J. B. Rejimbal, interpreter 



$132.50 

214.. 50 

975.00 

446.50 

2:30 00 

297 75 

137.50 

820.00 

150-00 

199.50 

137 -.50 

67.50 

72.50 

72.50 

72.50 

72.50 

265.00 

237.50 

87.50 

380.00 

75.00 

57.50 

81.50 

35.00 

104.00 



.$5,421.25 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

John P. Mullen, ward 1 $200.00 

Fred K. Ramsey, ward 2: 

1901 14.00 

1902 174.00 

William F. Elliott, ward 3 200.00 

Charles J. Darrah, ward 4 200-00 

D. A. Murphy, ward 5 200.00 

Samuel M- Couch, ward 6 200-00 

Samuel F. Davis, ward 7 200.00 



46 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



G. Walter Taylor, ward 8 ' . $200.00 

Mederique R. Maynard, ward 9 200.00 

Eugene E. Reed, ward 10: 

1901 . . . : 9.00 

1902 171.00 



ELECTION EXPENSES. 

Inspectors of Check-lists $1,913.76 

Election inspectors 400.00 

Moderators 1.50,00 

Ward clerks 200.00 

Selectmen. 446.50 

Alfred Paquette, Jr., interpreter 10.00 



EXPENDITUEES. 



LABOR. 



James E. Dodge, salary as auditor $1,200.00 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, services as clerk 662. .50 



SUPPLIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice $7.80 

Clark Brothers, 1 cabinet 2.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing letter headings, 

etc .... • 4.00 

Lizzie M. Cogswell: 

Laundry 3.O0 

Stationery, express, postage, postals, etc . 15.63 
James E. Dodge, paid for delivering reports, 

expenses to Boston, fountains for pens . . . 6.00 

A. L. Franks & Co., 1 lamp ,5.95 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 8.05 

A. K. Hobbs, oil cloth .13 

O. D. Knox, postal cards 2.00 



$1,968.00 



$3,120.26 



Total expenditures ^28 274.41 



Auditor^s Department. 
Appropriation #2,500.00 



$1,862.50 



AUDITOR S DEPARTMENT. 



47 



T. A. Lane Co., 1 Kiiismann lamp 18.00 

Municipal Journal and Engineer, 1 subscrip- 
tion to December 1, 1902 3.00 

The Novelty Co., repairing stamp 1.4.5 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., 1 stamp .... 1.09 

E. A. Stratton, 1 book case 9.25 

E. L- Sibley, eyelet press and eyelets .... - 7.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and paste . 25.86 
John B • Varick Co • : 

Pail, door caps, etc 1-03 

2 Morris-Ireland safes 330.00 

G. P. Wallace, carbon paper 3.00 

Wbiting & Thomson, 1 brush 2.50 

J. A. Williams, printing 1.50 

C A. Wood, varnishing cabinet ....... .50 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$448.74 

12,311.24 

188.76 



Mayor^s Incidentals. 



$2,-500.00 



Appropriation 



$.300.00 



EXPEDITUEES. 



William C Clarke, incidentals 
Chas. S. Fifield, use of team . 



$205.00 
5.00 



$210.00 



president's RECEPTION. 

G. W. Bailey, use of team $2.50 

J. p. Brown & Co., use of team 2.50 

Boyd Brothers, carriage and horses 11.65 

H. R. Dow & Co , use of team 2.50 

L. J. Farrell, use of horse 3.00 

W. J. Freeman, use of team 2. .50 

First Light Battery, firing salute 7.60 

A. L. Gadbois & Co, use of team 2.50 

Harry F. Hull, use of team 2.50 



48 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



G. W. Keed, use of team 

C. H. Simpson, use of team 

E. V. Turcotte, use of teams 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money . 



12.50 
2.50 
5.00 



$47 25 

#257.25 
42 75 



#300.00 



Street and Park Commission. 



Appropriation 



.f 3. .500. 00 



Expenditures. 

salaries. 

H. P. Simpson, chairman 

G. H. Stearns 

Byron Worthen 

CLERICAL SERVICES. 

Ethel Nicholson 

G. H. Stearns 

Bertha Whitney 

USE OF TEAMS. 

H. P. Simpson 

G. H. Stearns 

Byron Worthen 

OFFICE SUPPLIES. 

Barton & Co., portiere, pole, etc 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 1.50 reports . . 
E. R. & W. P. Coburn, frames and hooks . . 

Head & Dowst Co., pine 

O. D. Knox, stamped envelopes 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing orders 

Municipal Journal & Engineer, subscription 
to March, 1903 



$600.00 
600.00 
600.00 



$18.00 
468.00 
471.50 



$150.00 
150.00 
150.00 



$3.55 
6.75 

18.60 

2.90 

,18 

21.20 

.2.50 

3.00 



$1,800.00 



.$957.50 



.$450.00 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



49 



New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone $19.70 

H. A. Pii)er, material and labor 28.80 

James A. Scully, 1 rug 15.00 

E. A. Stratton, books 1.10 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and 

stationery 58.48 

G. P. Wallace, typewriter ribbon 1.00 

F. J. Walker, repairing desk .75 

$183.51 

Total expenditures $3,391.01 

Transferred to unappropriated money 108.99 



$3,500.00 



Repairs of Hi§;hways» 



Appropriation 

Cash received from sundry persons . . . 
Transferred from unappropriated money 



$25,000.00 

303.35 

4,191.14 



$29,494.49 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Division No. 2: 
January . . 
March . . . 
April . . . 
May . . . . 
June .... 
July .... 
August . . 
September . 
October . . 
November . 

Division No. 4: 
March ... 
May .... 
November . 



.$24.00 

503.98 
1,294.22 
1,717.38 
2,095.27 
2,604.16 

968.99 
1,141.88 

947.30 
1,0.55.51 



$60.37 

166.37 

82. .50 



$12,352.69 



$309.24 



50 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Division No. 5 : 

March $19.50 

April 10.5.50 

May 105.24 

June 46.50 

July 12.50 

August 62.37 

September 105.62 

November .... 25.75 



Division No. 7 : 

January $26.00 

March 99.62 

April 798.50 

May 679.52 

June 618.08 

July 564.24 

August 759.32 

September 760.77 

October 176.75 

November . '. 152.37 



Division No. 8 : 

March $66.74 

April , . 57.24 

May .324.13 

June 513.22 

July 388.25 

August 260.00 

September 193.26 

October 285.50 

November 72.63 



Division No. 9: 

April §93.75 

May 85.25 

June 114.75 

August .75 

October 188..50 



Division No. 10: 

January $92.87 

February- 25.75 

March 286.25 



$482.98 



$4,635.17 



$2,160.97 



$483.00 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



51 



April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

LUMBER. 

Head & Dowst Co 

Jolin St. Francis • . . . . 

West Side Lumber Co 

TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

J. Hadlock 

Manchester Hardware Co 

John B. Varick Co 



$973.12 
1,069.92 
1,031.23 
829.83 
468.87 
389.49 
444.86 
460.21 



$31.06 
196.00 
218.46 



840.60 

.70 

130.15 



$6,072.40 



$445.52 



$171.45 



BLACKSMITHING AKD REPAIRS. 



John T. Beach, repairs 

James H. Cram, blacksmithing . . . 
T. A. Lane Co., material and labor . 
Pike ct Heald Co., material and labor 
Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., repairs 
C. L. Wolf, repairing railing, etc ... . 



$34.05 

9.23 

76.94 

12.22 

2,079.71 

6..50 



f2, 218.65 



GRAVEL, CLAY, ETC. 



Leon B. Annis, gravel . 
L. B. Bodwell, gravel . . 
Boyce & Merrill, gravel . 
Byron Corning, gravel . 
Mark E. Harvey, gravel 
Eugene Libbey, gravel . . 
John Lovering, gravel . 
James M. Lurvey, gravel 
J. F. Moore, clay .... 
Henry W. Parker, lime . 
L. C. Paige, gravel . . • 
N. W. Paige, gravel . . 



$9.90 

6.00 

.70 

10.30 

11.00 
7.70 
6.80 
2.50 
4.00 
2.85 

28.80 
4.10 



$94.65 



52 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 



J. H. Campbell, use of water .$3.00 

Mrs. Samuel Caldwell, 17 dinners 6.80 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 36.13 

Wiggin-Young Co., wicks and oil 21.84 

Total expenditures 



$67.77 



),494.49 



New Highways. 



Appropriation 



$7,000.00 



Expenditures. 



Division No. 2 : 
April 

June .... 
July .... 
August . . 
September 
October . . 
November . 
December . 

Division No. 7: 
May .... 
June ... 
July .... 

Division No. 10: 
July .... 
August . . . 
September . 
October . . 
November . 



$627.52 

392.10 

624.12 

" 539.35 

687.51 

97.36 

92.28 

10.13 



.$148.50 
452.51 
517.22 



$106.00 

61.12 

263.50 

66.00 

77.00 



$3,070.37 



$1,118.23 



$573.62 



SNOW AND ICE. 



53 



SUNDRIES. 



L. B. Bodwell *.t Co.,fcoal $12.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 21.04 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unai^propriated money 



$33.04 

$4,795.26 
2,204.74 



Snow and Ice. 



$7,000.00 



Appropriation 



$6,500.00 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Division No. 2: 

January 811.98 

February 596.10 

March 411.51 

June 63.62 

September 19.00 

November 54.75 

December 513.87 

Division No. 4: 

February 

Division No. 5 : 

January $2.00 

February 34. .50 

December 6.00 

Division No. 7: 

January $107.37 

February 1.S6.12 

March 149.50 

December 59.87 



$2,470.83 
$34.50 



$42.50 



$452.86 



54 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Division Xo. 8: 

January §3.50 

February 32.50 

December ^9.50 

Division No. 9: 

February S58.00 

December 52.75 

Division No. 10: 

January $329.24 

February 318.73 

March 300.48 

April 3.25 

November 14.75 

December 31H.93 

SUNDRIES. 

A. B. Black, runners for road machine .... $50.00 

Daniels-Cornell Co., salt 6.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor, snow 

plows 12.86 

John B. Varick Co., scoops, shovels, etc. . . . 64.80 

Wiggin- Young Co., glass, salt, matches, nails 1.91 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 

Damage of Land Taken for Highways. 

Transferred from unappropriated money account 

EXPENDITITEES. 

Harvey Goodwin, settlement of claim 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to new account 



§65.50 



^110.75 



$1,283.38 



$133.57 

$4,595.89 
1,904.11 

$6,500.00 



$5,008.07 



$100.00 

$100.00 
4,908.07 



$5,008.07 



Appropriation 



WATERING STREETS. 

Watering- Streets. 



55 



$4,700.00 



Expenditures. 



Division No. 2: 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 10: 

January 

February 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . ' 

October 

November 

December 

SUPPLIES AND EEPAIKS. 

Jolin T. Beach, repairs 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe and labor 

J. L. & H. K. PotteV, washers, valves, etc. . . 
Sullivan & McGovern, granite fountain base 
John B. Varick Co., paint, hardware .... 



$139.43 

•38.5.67 

317.87 

412.. 50 

429.88 

325.74 

74.75 

1.63 

33.50 



.$14..50 
6.75 

90.00 
179.31 
122.75 
144.50 
138.00 
143.25 

32. .50 
5.25 

11.12 



$71.80 

20.44 

4.44 

17.00 

20.18 



$2,120.97 



$887.93 



Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$133.86 

13,142.76 

1,557.24 



$4,700.00 



56 



REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paving Streets. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



$4,500.00 

768.58 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2 : 

March $9.13 

April : 218.38 

May 273.39 

June 460.42 

July 513.75 

August 140.88 

September 140.75 

October 70.12 

November 47.25 

Division No. 7: 

April ■ . . . . $47.75 

May 90.61 

June • . 82.25 

July 75.64 

August 7.00 

November 11.31 

Division No. 10: 

April $59.37 

May 502.06 

June 430.61 

July 500.60 

August 163.86 

September 103.50 

October • 7.37 

Soule, Dillingham & Co • • • 

STONE AND CONCRETE. 

Brooks and Brock, stone $8.50 

James M. Lurvey, stone 5.00 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete . . 342.87 

Total expenditures 



$5,268.58 



$1,874.07 



$314.56 



$1,767.37 
$956.21 



$356.37 



$5,268.58 



PAVING ELM STREET. 

Paving: Elm Street. 

Appropriation §12.000.00 

Eeceived from Manchester Street Railway . . 4,534.86 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2 : 

May $371.95 

June 453.88 

July 524.29 

August 101.22 

September 213.00 

Division No. 10: 

May §97.58 

June 121.49 

July 142.47 

Soule, Dillingham & Co 

STONE AND CEMENT. 

C. A. Bailey, stone $9,741.55 

Head & Dowst Co., cement 1,376.64 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 

Paving Canal Street. 

Appropriation $4,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money . . . 221.57 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2 : 

August 

Cavanaugh Brothers 



57 



$16,534.86 



$1,664.34 



$361.54 
^3,390.01 



$11,118.19 

.$16,534.08 

.78 

$16,534.86 



$4,221.57 



$156.05 
S497.74 



58 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Charles A. Bailey . . . 
Total expenditures 



$3,567.73 



$4,221.57 



Macadamizingf Streets. 



Appropriation 



EXPENDITUEES. 
LABOR. 

Division 'No. 2: 

July $814.02 

August 946.28 

September 202.61 

Division No. 7 : 

November • 

Division No. 10: 

July • .... .$5.50 

August 113..50 

September 732.10 

Soule, Dillingham & Co 

FUEL, FREIGHT, VTATER. 

C H. Bodwell, wood $396.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 13. .50 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 2.98 

People's Gas Light Co., coke 9.00 

Water Commissioners, use of water 70.00 

TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

John B. Varick Co 

CASTINGS, REPAIRS, ETC. 

C. A. Bailey, paving stone $464.64 

A. B. Black, sujjplies for road machine .... 316.61 

C. A. Chamberlain, repairing steam drill . . . 2.80 



$10,000.00 



$1,962.91 

$1.75 



$851.10 
$96.78 



§491.48 



$435.42 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



59 



A. K. Hobbs, packing, tacks, cement $41 AM 

Inoersoll-Sergoant Drill Co., supplies 38.65 

T. A. Lane Co., plugs, couplings, etc - 6.03 

Pike & Heald Co., repairs 13.80 

G. W. Kief, belt dressing 2.50 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete . . 1,684.25 

E. P. Stevens Co., stone chips 4.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$2,575.95 

§6,415.39 
3,584.61 



.$10,000.00 



Grading for Concrete. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



$3,500.00 
1,389.37 



$4,889.37 



Expenditures. 



Division No. 2: 
April . . . . 

May 

June .... 

J"'y 

Aiigust . . . 
September . . 
October . . . 
November . . 

Division No. 7: 
April .... 

May 

December . . 

Division No. 10: 
April . . . . 

May 

June .... 



$19.53 
34.08 
268.05 
252.66 
107.08 
174.27 
132.07 
174.10 



J13.50 

25.25 

2.50 



81.00 

53.38 



$1,161.84 



$41.25 



^0 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



July . . . 
August . 
September 
October . 
^""ovember 



$128.24 

14.37 

44.00 

19.25 

7613 

So„le, DH,i„gh„. .. Co. 7777 f^2 



STONE, CONCRETE, ETC. 

^rtTl'V""^ ^1'200.00 

J. W. Fiske Iron Works, 1 fountain 13(5.33 

H. W. Harvey, stone 

Warren Harvey, stone 

T. A. Lane Co., iron fence, Gofe's Falls . 
Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete 



Total expenditures- 



Scavenger Service. 



786.65 
78.30 
55.00 

621.93 



Appropriation . . . 






Division No. 2 : 
January 


Expenditures. 

LABOR. 


$974.86 
785.71 


February 




March 




April 




840.30 

1,040.46 

721.20 


May 




June 




July 




691.94 


August 




832.81 
631.64 
744.20 
609.62 
634.98 
982.30 


September 




October 




November 




December 





$2,878.21 
§4,889.37 



$18,000.00 



$9,390.02 



SCAVENGER SERVICE. 



61 



Division No. 7: 
January . . • 
February . . 
March .... 
April . . . • 

May 

June .... 

July 

August . . . 
September . . 
October . . . 
November . . 
December . . 

Division No, 10: 
January . . . 
February . . 
March .... 
April .... 

May 

June .... 

July 

August . . . 
September . 
October . . . 
November . . 
December . . 



.$104.25 
87.00 
87.00 
86.50 
51.77 

. 62.00 
70.05 
74.75 
83.25 
61.75 
67.25 
114.00 



$384.13 
294.25 
193.50 
394.50 
183.25 
287.75 
342.54 
359.85 
270.75 
202.25 
269.25 
423.87 



$958.57 



$3,605.89 



CONTRACT. 



City farm 

SUNDRIES. 

A. S. Brovrn, oat^ and corn $602.25 

John T. Beach, carriage work 21. 00 

Head and Dowst Co., lumber and labor . . . 14.74 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools . . . 129.39 

N. J. Whalen, harness repairs, etc 9.20 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$2,499.96 



.$776.58 

$17,231.02 
768.98 



$18,000.00 



62 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Street Sweeping. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



Expenditures. 



$2,500.00 
782.21 



S3. 232. 21 



I.ABOE. 

Division No. 2: 

January ^74 93 

February 23 38 

^^ai'fli 184.99 

^P"l 313.56 

'^^^y 178.60 

J"'^e 285.55 

'^"^y 324.87 

A^iS"st 207.48 

September 491.72 

Of^tober 278.02 

November 227.25 

December 69.05 

Division No. 7: 
September 

Division No. 10: 

^^^^■^•1^ ■ $36.00 

^1"'" 45.00 

J"^y 37.00 

^^-^gnst 42.00 

September 77 12 

October • 59 88 

November j-j^w qq 

December ^5 



$2,659.40 



$26.50 



$414.75 



SUNDRIES. 



C. A. Chamberlain, repairing sweeper . . 
H. Thompson, brooms and refilling brooms 
John B. Varick Co., tools 



$2.68 

116.25 

12.63 



$131.56 



Total expenditures 



5,232.21 



BRIDGES. 
Bridges. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



#0,000.00 
258.38 



63 



$6,258.38 



ExPEiSfDITirKES. 



Division No. 2: 
January . . . 
February . • 
April .... 

May 

June .... 
July .... 
August . . . 
September 
October . . . 
November . . 
December . . 

Division No. 7: 

May 

June . . . . 
July . . . . 
September . . 

Division No. 10: 
Marcli . . . . 
April . . . . 
May . . . . 
June . . . . 



$17.50 

6.75 

13.87 

2.00 

48.12 

209.54 

511.67 

585.47 

56.49 

59.25 

4..50 



$40.12 
34.24 
14.50 

100.00 



$1.50 
66.75 
16.00 
19.75 



$1,515.16 



$188.86 



$104.00 



COXTJJACT. 

The United Construction Co 

STONE, LUMBER, HARDWARE, ETC 

Warren Harvey, stone work * . . $254.80 

Head ct Dowst Co., lumber 832.86 

Manchester Hardware Co., nails 41.90 



$1,375.00 



64 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



John B. Varick Co., hardware f98.75 

West Side Lumber Co., lumber 1,847.05 

Total exjsenditures 



$3,075.36 



$6,258 38 



Appropriation 



City Teams. 



$7,000 00 



EXPENDITUKES. 



LABOR. 

Commons: 

January 

February 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Division No. 2: 

January 

February 

March 

April . . . . : 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 7: 

May 

June 

July 

September 

October 

November 

December 



$41.99 

7.25 

242.37 

111.75 

52.75 

30.75 

6.75 



$270.75 
234.85 
253.92 
195.32 
145.25 
149.51 
173.43 
144..53 
161.11 
140.75 
183.88 
221.25 



$25.00 
12.50 
12.50 
12. .50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 



$493.61 



J,274.55 



$100.00 



CITY TEAMS. 



65 



Division No. 10: 
January . . • 
February . . 
March . . . . 
April .... 
May .... 
June .... 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October . . . 
November- . . 
December • . . 



126.12 
80.62 
21.00 
21.00 
24.00 
19.2.5 
79.75 
56.84 
21.00 
21.88 
23.63 
21.00 



$366.09 



GRAIN, HAY, STKAW. 



Adams Brothers . . 

Ame et Co 

Arthur tS. Brown 
W. H. Boynton . . 

C. H. Darrah . . . 
Gage & McDougall 

B. F. Greer .... 
W. H. Hammond . 

D. Hammond & Son 
Mark E. Harvey . . 
J. B. Huse .... 
Mrs. J. E. Kimball . 

C. R. ]Merrill . . . 
Walter McQuestion 
Joseph Quirin . . . 

E. P. Tilton .... 
M. A. Wason . . . 
B. F. Welch .... 



129.60 

46.50 

1,151.02 

149.92 
95.35 
97.43 
42.96 
33.20 
27.56 
59.85 

135. .55 

5.49 

30.00 

205.28 

21.20 

8.06 

13.68 

83.16 



J,235.81 



HARNESSES AND REPAIRS. 



J. A- Ballou . . . 
Mugridge & Bennett 
H. C. Ranno & Son 
N. J. Whalen . . . 



$53.35 
136.85 

62.98 
18.05 



$270.33 



66 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 



John T. Beach, lumber and labor 



$101.40 



HARDWARE AND TOOLS. 



Manchester Hardware Co. 
John 13. Yarick Co. . . . 



VETERINARY EXPENSES. 



$1.06 

373.56 



A. L. Dodge, V. S., attendance and medicine 
H. B. Diinton, V. S., attendance and medicine 
J. L. Golden, V. S. , liniment 

F. K. Hubbard, medicine 

W. B. Mitchell, medicine 

G. W. O. Tebbetts, medicine 



WATER, GAS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Moore & Preston, coal 

Kew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 

Eaiche & Laforce, coal 

Water Commissioners, use of water 

J. F. Wyman, coal 



LUMBER, REPAIRS, ETC 



$47.35 

12.00 

, 12.00 

6.00 

3.65 

.40 



#18.90 

43.99 

149.93 

15.00 

101.57 

7.25 



$374.62 



$81.40 



$336.64 



T. J. Briggs, stove pipe, repairing boiler . . . $0.90 

Concord Foundry Co., branding irons .... 6.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 220.74 

A. K. Hobbs, belt leather 2.25 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing repairs, etc 3.15 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe and labor 7.19 

G. W. Eief, labor 4.70 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paint and labor .... 3.79 

West Side Lumber Co. , lumber .91 



$249.63 



REPAIRS OF SEWERS. 



67 



SUNDRIES. 



Daniels-Cornell Co., salt, soap $4.25 

E. D. Rogers, paste 5.50 

C. H- Simpson, use of teams 62.00 

Wiggiu-Young Co. , salt, matches, brooms, nails 34.93 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$106.68 

$6,990.76 
9.24 



Repairs of Sewers. 



$7,000.00 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



15,000.00 
744.44 



.$5,744.44 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2 : 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October . 

November 

Division No. 10: 

January 

February 

March 

Ajiril 

May 

June 

July 



$18.37 
223.17 
207.68 
514.10 
151.19 
294.28 
295.58 
284.81 
175.44 
429.22 
485. .55 



$36.74 
89.50 
123.12 
167.75 
171.24 
98.50 
129.24 



$3,079.39 



68 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

August $27.50 

September 148.12 

October 180.62 

November .839.85 



HAKDWARE AND FREIGHT. 



Boston & Maine E. R., freight 146.18 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 5.60 

John B. Yarick Co.^ hardware 24.13 



MATERIAL, LABOR, ETC 

American Locomotive Co., grates $2.50 

Amory Manufacturing Co., sacking 4,98 

Bucklin & Chamberlain, repairs 10. .50 

Concord Foundry Co., traps, grates, etc. . . . 153.62 

G. "W. Dodge Shoe Co., rubber boots 15.00 

H. W. Harvey, stone 109. .50 

W. F. Head & Son, brick 218.75 

Head & Dowst Co., cement, brick, etc. .... 312.25 

A. K. Hobbs, oil suits, hose, repairs 55.34 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor 5.29 

Moore & Preston, coal 12.00 

Pike & Heald Co., dippers, pipe, repairing 

fountains 116.56 

Wiggin-Young Co., oil, nails 16.82 

West Side Lumber Co., lumber 31.85 

C B. Wingate, rubber boots 12.00 



New Sewers. 

Appropriation $20,000.00 

Received for sewer pipe sold 2,503.47 

Transferred from unappropriated money . . . 1,940.22 



11,512.18 



175.91 



$1,076.96 



Total expenditures $5,744.44 



$24,443.69 



NEW SEWERS. 



69 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January . : 

February .- 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 7: 

May 

September 

October 

December 

Division No. 10 : 

January 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 



$77.99 

180.85 

49.24 

1,754.65 

1,574.85 

732.11 

669.43 

1,539.96 

1,433.70 

25.30 

9.00 



$217.12 


21.87 


37.75 


7.25 



568.95 
678.48 
707.95 
1,039.35 
1,096.91 
430.54 



^,047.08 



*283.99 



f 5, 377. 14 



PIPE AND HARDWARE. 

Concord Foundry Co., grates, traps, castings 

J. A. Colby, pipe 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe 

Pike & Heald Co. , pipe 

Portland Stone Ware Co., pipe 

John B. Varick Co., liardware and tools . . . 



$965.55 

15.60 

480.66 

3,371.01 
498.00 
920.61 



6,251.43 



MATERIAL, FREIGHT, ETC 

Boston & Maine E. R, freight ........ 

Carson Trench Machine Co. , grates 

Harry G. Clough, blasting poles 



$588.41 
19.00 
10.00 



70 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



■fl4.00 


14.21 


11.40 


65.00 


171.68 


.55 


25.38 



W. H. Coburn, oak butts 

C. A. Chamberlain, making bolts, fitting plates 
Drew Machinery Agency, material and labor . 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., hose 

Supplies 

Pike & Heald Co., stove pipe 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil 



CEMENT, STONE, BKICK, LUMBER. 

Brooks & Brock, stone . $1.50 

Head & Dowst Co., cement 1 .373.78 

W. F. Head & Son, brick . 1 046.50 

"West Side Lumber Co. , lumber 753.94 



SUNDRIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal §144.99 

Silas H. Burbauk, 1 light glass .7.5 

Peter Duval, filing savps g.OO 

Moore & Preston, coal 148.83 

Palmer & Gannon, use of truck 10.00 

People's Gas Light Co., coke I3..5O 

S. B. Stearns, premium on insurance 50.00 

Wiggin- Young Co., salt, oil, glass 12.63 



#919.63 



S3. 175. 72 



S388.70 

Total expenditures . .• $24 443.69 



Commons. 
Appropriation $4,500.00 

Expenditures. 



January $298.50 

February 205.12 

March 139.00 

April 260.12 



May . ■ ■ 
June . • 

July . 
August . ■ 
September 
October . 
November 
December 



COMMONS. 


•1184.01 




186.25 




29.5.87 




202.24 




218.75 




175.75 




319.37 




293.87 


PLANTS, ETC. 





71 



$2,778.85 



F. J. Bixby, plants • 

James Fullerton, pine boughs 

A. G Hood, plants 

Kirby Floral Co., plants 

Frank A. Koerner, plants 

Kay Brook Garden Co., plants 

John B. Varick Co., phosphate and grass seed 



$60.00 
8.00 
75.00 
80.00 
26.00 
86.80 
76.05 



.$411.85 



WATEJl, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS. 



Manchester Traction, J^ight ct Power Co., elec- 
tric lights 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 

Water Commissioners, use of water 



$36.00 

7.42 

736.00 



$779.42 



KEPAIKS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 



J. J. Abbott, paint 

Adams Brothers, lime and salt 

E. M. Bryant & Co., lamp and labor 

D. F. Cressey, making irons, etc 

F. C Darrah, roofing material and labor . . . 

W. P. Farmer, rubber boots 

Globe & Amesbury File Works, files 

Head & Dowst Co., plank 

J. Hodge, lumber 

T. A. Lane Co., dippers, material and labor . . 
Manchester Hardware Co., paint and hardware 

Parnell Brothers, barrels 

Harry Piper, filing saws, lumber and labor . . 
Pike & Heald Co., repairing closet 



$2.66 

.45 

.60 

.95 

9.45 

3.00 

1.71 

4.26 

21.54 

21.35 

25.90 

4.00 

.54.12 

.40 



?'3 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

John B. Varick Co., tools and hardware . . . 898.07 

F. J. Walker, filing saws .40 

Wiggin-YoungCo., oil 22.6.5 

C. B. Wingate, rubber boots 16.50 



Stark Park. 

Appropriation .$1,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money . . . 20.91 



Expenditures. 



LABOK. 



March $55. .50 

^Pi'il 146.50 

May 102.00 

June 65.25 

July 74.63 

August 116,50 

September 279.00 

October 169.61 



Derryfield Park. 

Appropriation $500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money . . . 89.65 



§288.01 



Total expenditures $4,258.13 

Transferred to unappropriated money 241.87 

$4,500.00 



$1,020.91 



$1,008.99 



SUNDRIES. 

John B. Varick Co., seed, powder and fuse .$11.92 

Total expenditures §1 020.91 



$589.65 



SOUTH MANCHESTER PLAYGROUND. 
EXPENDITUKES. 



73 



$4.25 

January "• 

February ^-''^ 

March -^l-^-^ 

April 15^-2-^ 

May • l^^-''« 

June 184.74 

November l^-*^'^ 

SUNDRIES. 

W. G. Berrv, insurance premium 16.25 

D. E. Guiney estate, repairing pump '^■•^^ 

T. A. LaneCo , labor on pump and fountain . 9.41 

H. A. Piper, repairing swing 2.00 

Total expenditures 



•1569.49 



$20.16 



$589.65 



Sovth Manchester Playground. 



Appropriation 



$.50-00 



EXPEXDITUBES. 
SUNDKIES. 

Adams Brothers, lime ^^.60 

Pay-roll, commons: 

July ■ • =52-^-5 

October '^■'^^ 

John B. Varick Co., line marker 2.00 

Total exjienditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$40.10 

$40.10 
9.90 

$50.00 



"^4 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Lighting: Streets. 



Approi)riation 



•$61,000.00 



Expenditures. 

Charges. Discounts. 



Manchester Electric Co. : 

J«"^^^iT 14,676.67 

February 4,676.67 



142.53 

^^'"'''^ 4,676.67 31.18 

^l"''^' 4.676.67 20.22 

^^^y 4,680.44 18.04 

"^""•^ 4,695.83 11.79 

'^"^y 4,695.83 18.97 

"^"S"^* 4,695.83 18.55 

September 4,695.83 11.29 

^(^^oher. ., 4,695.83 30.02 

November 4,695.83 11 71 

December. ~. . . . 4,727-95 31.71 



GAS. 

Welsbach Street Liahtino- Co 



SUNDRIES. 



$56,290.05 $283.81 

Less discount 283 81 



Mrs. F. W. Elliott, filling and lighting lamp to 

May 7, 1902 :.-... ^13.10 

C. S. Fifield, use of team 5 Oo 

W. J. Freeman, use of team 5 00 

Mrs. Mary E. Reed : 

Lighting lamp to December 1, 1902 .... 9.00 

Oil for lamp to December 1, 1902 6.00 



$56,006.24 



14.612.35 



$38.10 



Total expenditures .§60,656.69 

iransferred to unappropriated money 343 31 



$61,000.00 



engineer's department. 
Engineer's Department. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



if(),874.78 
73.. -50 



75 



.!;6,948.03 



Expenditures. 



Samuel J. Lord, engineer: 
Services and team liire • 

Harry J. Briggs 

Alfred T. Dodge 

Hallet R. Robbins ..... 

G. W. Wales 

Henry Wortlien 

Harrie M.Young 

Ella B. Davis, stenographer. 



,550.00 
830.61 
683.70 
152.59 
992 45 
603.71 
936.60 
499.41 



$6,249.07 



SUPPLIES, OFFICE EXPENSES. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 1 brass mould . 

J. J. Abbott, sbellac 

Frank S. Bodwell, stone bounds 

C. L. Berger & Sons, supplies and repairs . . 
John B. Clarke Co. : 

Printing 300 reports 

Binding 8 books 

Eugene Dietzgen Co., blue print paper . . ■ 
David Flanders, figures and nickeling .... 

A. L. Franks & Co., 1 electric fan 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 

W. A' L. E. Gurley, tripod points and express . 

E. k. Home, cuspidores 

A. K. Hobbs, rubber 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and grade sticks . 
C. A. Hoitt & Co., blacking cabinet and 

brushes 

J. G. Jones, cartage 

Keystone Blue Paper Co., supplies . . . . • . 

Keuffel & Esser Co., 1 scale 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 



§4.95 

.75 

140.00 

67.65 

33.80 
4.00 
4.81 

42.63 
5.00 
6.45 
3.25 
2.00 
2.25 

.53.06 

2.95 

.35 

4.35 

2.12 
1.83 



76 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



New England Telephone &. Telegraph Co., use 

telephone §25.15 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., stamps ..... 3.40 

Pike & Heald Co., Hydrant plugs and labor . I4.0I 

E; A. Stratton : 

Stationery g g- 

Bookcases 16 00 

Star Stamp Co., stamp and ink l.OO 

D. F. Shea, rubber boots . 3 59 

E. G. Soltmann. paper, pencils, ink 9.II 

Carl Strauss, 1 pencil pointer 7. 50 

Temple A Farrington Co., binding book . . . 7.00 

Union Manufacturing Co., figures I..50 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools . . . 24.48 

G. W. Wales, carfare, express, lime, etc. . . . 4.99 

H. A. Worthen, telephone and string .... 40 
C.H.Wood: 

Painting signs I4 40 

Varnishing box and rods 2.00 

J. A. Williams, printing cards, blanks, etc . . 19.50 

Wyckoft', Seamans &: Benedict : 

Typewriter tabulator 23.50 

Supplies g 9g 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., filing 

cases, cards, etc . . 77.53 

Harrie M. Young, carfare, express, paper, 

glue, etc -j_g5 



SUS^DRIES. 

Harry L. Gould, weekly bench mark report . $18.00 

H. C. Eanno & Son, repairing harness .... 2.43 

C. H. Simpson, use of horse 21 days 21.00 



Health Department. 

Appropriation 86,800.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money . . . 690.25 



•f657.53 



•W1.43 



Total expenditures .jg 948.03 



$!7,490.25 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. '^'^ 
Expenditures, 
services. 

John C. Bickford, salary as member of board . $200.00 

W. M. rarsons, M. D., salary as member ot ^^^ ^^ 

board ' ' ,^n^ .^ 

W. K. Eobbins, salary as member of board . • 200.00 

W. B. Blake, sanitary inspector ai^'-iS 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector » • - ^ 

Carl O. Seaman, plumbing inspector 'i^^m 

M. Alma Fracker, clerk '___ .13,,564.77 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co. : 

Printing bulletins, cards, etc. ••;•;•• ^^"^'^ 

300 reports ■ ' ^ ^^ 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing tags ... 

E. A. Stratton, stationery 



15.71 

2.2.5 



J. Arthur Williams, printing licenses ^ $197.51 



TEAMS, ETC. 



•$7.50 

10.00 



G. W. Bailey 

J.P.Brown. ,^^^ 

J. P. Brown ct Co 

W. B. Blake, carfares, etc 

H. K. Dow& Co 



37.00 

2.00 

4.00 
D. N. Gove . . • • ^_ ^^ 

John F. Looney, carfares "^^ 

Carl O. Seaman, carfares ^ ,$110.75 



OFFICE EXPENSES AND SUPPLIES. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., oil vitriol . . . $310 

W. B. Blake, express, telephone, key, etc ... l- -J 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., supplies for milk 

laboratory 

Z. F. Campbell, antitoxine 

The Chemical Publishing Co., 1 " Chemistry of 

Dairying" 

Cai-ter, Rice & Co., gummed paper 



7.28 
13.25 

1.50 
12.60 



^^ REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

J. Doucet & Co., antitoxine $4 00 

James P. Finn, repairing screens 3 57 

T. F. Fifield, soap, lime, soda '93 

General Electric Co., scaling tools and wire . . ' 6-51 

M. A. Fracker, laundry, express, telegrams 

P"^'*^^^ ' 20.90 

James W. Hill Co., cotton 3 3q 

Henry Heil Chemical Co., apparatus and sup- 
plies for milk inspection »jg 3g 

John B. Hall Co., antitoxine, vaccine 27.10 

E. K. Home, pan and pail j ^-^ 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 1 rug ... i'-n 

l^ibrary Bureau, index cards 3 qq 

H. K. Mulford Co., antitoxine 33^75 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone ' ' 22:^8 

Parke, Davis & Co., culture tubes . ...... 594 

Potvin & Co., antitoxine 166 02 

People's Gas Light Co., gas . ^^[^^ 

A. D. Smith, formaldehyde gj'jg 

F. H. Thurston, antitoxine, vaccine § 53 

G. W. O. Tebbetts, atomizers, plaster 2.95 

John B. Varick Co., paper, baskets, cloth, twine, 26.94 



1524.31 



PESTHOUSE. 



W. B. Blake, 1 shirt 

Hardy & Folsom, 3 comforters 

John B. Hall Co., antitoxine, vaccine, etc . . . 

E- K. Home, glasses, foot bath 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone 

W. M. Parsons, M.D., services 

Judith yherer, services 

board of sundry persons 

A. D. Sherer, services 

use of team 

Mrs. A D. Sherer, services 

D. A. Watson, wood 

Water Commissioners, labor and pipe 

Use of water 

W. E Woodward, wood .... 



$0.50 
3.75 

29.87 
1.95 

20.62 

975.00 

360.00 

132.40 

181.00 ■ 

700 

89.00 

22.50 

54.60 

9.88 

5.25 



•11,892.82 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



79 



ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 



JohnC. Bickford, expenses to Newton hospital 
expenses to Boston, purchasing furniture . . 

AV. B. Blake, medicine, salt 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

Robert E. Chase, insurance premium 

C. G. Dunnington, medicine 

W. F. Elliott, expenses to Newton to inspect 

isolation hospital ■ " 

Henry M. Farrell, plumbing 

Girardin & Tardivel, insurance premium . . . 

Hardy tt Folsoni, sheets 

John B. Hall Co., medicine and supplies. . . . 
C. A. Hoitt ct Co., commode and shade .... 

A. K Hobbs, rubber sheeting 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on boiler and leaks . . . 
Manchester Traction, Light and Power Co. : 

lights 

Maggie McDonald, services as nurse '• 

John P. Mullen, expenses to Newton to inspect 

isolation hospital 

Mrs. Eva M. Nute, services as matron 

board, sundry persons 

1 stove . . - 

New England Telephone ct Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 

M. Parkins, services as nurse 

Pike & Heald Co., charcoal, filter 

Water Commissioners, use of water 

John B. Varick Co., 1 letter l)0x 

D. A. Watson, wood 



$3.50 
5.80 

.80;, 
.53.75 
37.50 

.95 

4.00 
35.60 
37..50 

2.70 

67.10 
4.15 
3.00 

7.08 

3.90 
39.00 

4.00 
64.00 
54.67 
25.00 

4.35 
6.00 
.62 
4.75 
2.00 
.54.75 



$526.37 



SUPPLIES FOR ISOLATED FAMILIES. 

Joseph Archambeault, quarantine officer. . . . 

Leon J. Adler, quarantine officer 

W. B. Blake, medicine 

P. Bellefeuille, groceries 

Charles Boisclair & Co., wood 

A. A. E. Brien, M. D., medicine 

George Boisvert, groceries 

James Cavanaugh, quarantine officer 

Cote Brothers, bread 

J. B. Daigle, groceries 

J. H. DeCourcy Co., coal 



•fLOO 
1.00 
1.35 
3.51 
3.71 
2.20 
7.21 
7.00 
1.38 
5.96 
3.13 



80 



REPORT OE THE CITY AUDITOR. 



H. Fradd & Co., groceries 

Thomas M. Freeman, quarantine oiiicer . 

J. J. Grenier, groceries 

Gilbert Gonyeau, wood 

J. A. Guay, groceries 

Mary Hayes, groceries 

John B. Hall Co., medicine, etc 

J. J. Kelly, quarantine officer 

Lamoureux Brothers, groceries 

^ohn F. Looney, wood, milk 

P. D. Lynch, groceries 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., wood . . . 

Maynard & Dupont, groceries 

Samuel McCarthy, quarantine officer . . 

O. H. Nourry, groceries 

Frank I. Paige, groceries 

H. Pariseau, groceries 

F. X. Parent, groceries 

Eugene Quirin, groceries . . 

Eaiche & Laforce, wood 

Alphonse Eegnier, quarantine oiiicer . . 

Schricker Brothers, groceries 

Summer Street Market, groceries .... 

J. J. Splane, groceries 

Joseph Trahan, groceries 

F. H. Thurston, antitoxine 

S. M. Wheeler, wood 



•S5.95 
3.00 

46.83 
3.00 
3.10 

11.60 

56.55 

26.00 

11.12 
1.38 

30.01 
1.00 
8.50 
4.00 
9.48 
2.65 
6.99 

70.77 
6.70 
1.75 
4.00 

19.56 
9.13 

14.29 
7.75 
5.75 
1.00 



§409.31 



SUNDRIES. 



AY. B. Blake, expenses to State board of health 
meeting, milk samples, burying dead ani- 
mals, etc $8.42 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 9.11 

A. L. Gadbois & Co., burial outfits 26.00 

John B. Hall Co., medicine 3.20 

John F. Looney, milk samples, burying dead 

animals, etc 32.96 

J. G. Lussier, M. D., services 3.00 

Carl O. Seaman, testing milk, supplies, etc. . . 34.91 

A. D. Smith, formaldehyde 34.31 

Gillis Stark, M. D., services 13.00 

A. G. Straw. M. D., diphtheria examinations. . 99.50 

Total expenditures 



§264.41 



r,490.25 



ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

Isolation Hospital. 



Balance from last year unexpended . . 

Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



(12,901.90 

3,000.00 

265.39 



81 



,167.38 



EXPENMTUKES. 

L. M. Aldrich, expenses to Newton, blue print- 
ing plans 

r. S. Bodwell, steps 

L. B. Bodwell <fe Co., coal 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electrical supplies and 

labor 

Codraan ct Shurtleff, 4 bleached gowns .... 

Joel Daniels, setting glass 

Henry M. Farrell, brass pipe, cement, labor . . 

A. L. Franks & Co., wiring hospital 

Fire sets 

Gazaille & Co., blankets, sheets, etc 

Head c't Dowst Co., lumber 

James W. Hill Co., sheets, towels, spreads, 

blankets 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., shades, matting, pillows . . 
R. K. Home, crockery, glass, tinware .... 

Frank Kennedy, paint and labor 

E. G. Libbey, use of teams 

C. H. Leach, freight and cartage 

T. A. Lane Co., steam heating 

Starting boiler, repairing leaks 

Manchester Dry Goods Co., blankets, towels, 

spreads 

Donald McDonald, blacksmithing 

Pay roll : May 

June 

July 

August 

October 

November 

Harry A. Piper, labor and material 

Screens 

70 loads dirt 

The Putnam Co., furniture 

B. W. Robinson, cementing cellars, etc. . . • 
James A. Scully, chairs, desk, crib, etc. . • - 



89.50 
45.00 

19.88 

63.02 
10.00 
2.35 
7.32 
65.00 
11.00 
11.94 
16.73 

48.76 
47.94 
35.57 
47.00 
19.50 
5.71 
668.00 
31.57 

22.05 

9.04 

46.13 

92.83 

154.12 

79.35 

41.62 

30.75 

1,466.90 

44.00 

28.00 

152.48 

90.90 

43.23 



82 REPOET OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Street & Park Commissioners, blasting rock . . $17-00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware, clothes reel, etc. 34.77 

Water Commissioners, blasting stone 24.75 

F. J. Walker, labor and material 2,200.00 

W. C. Wilson, building addition, horse shed, etc. 415.46 

Cyrus Whittemore, masonwork 8.24 

$6,167.38 

Total expenditures $6,167.38 



City Library. 

Balance from last year unexpended $2,419.79 

Appropriation 6,200.00 



EXPENDITUKES. 



LIBKAKIAN AND ASSISTANTS. 



F. Mabel Winchell, librarian $900.00 

Thomas Ayer 11.60 

Charles S. Morgan • • • 400.50 

Thomas F. Nolan ; . . 41.25 

K. M. Page 62.50 

A. P. Keed 160.55 

H. C. Rogers 172..50 

George A. Teeling 149.25 



CATALOGUE AND CATALOGUE SUPPLIES. 

A. L. A. Publishing Board, cards $0.40 

Library Bureau, book, index cards 22.00 

Louise E. Newell, copyist 428.80 

Edith O. Simmons, copyist 498.60 

Temple & Farrington Co., cards, i:)Ockets, sta- 
tionery 175.54 

F. M. Winchell, paid for catalogue cards . . . 10.00 



$8,619.79 



$1,898.15 



$1,135.34 



CITY LIBRARY. 83 

BINDING, KEBINDING, RESEWING. 



F. J. Barnard ct Co -^34.05 

Temple &: Farrington Co 121.50 



SUNDRIES. 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric labor $1.40 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 5.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 300 reports . . . 13.00 

"Daily Mirror" one year 6.00 

Mrs. Mary Higgins, cleaning 39.68 

Charles F. Livingston, printing covers .... 161.65 

Manchester Hardware Co., water cooler . . . 2.00 

John B. Varick Co., waste baskets 2.72 

F. M. Winchell, paid for cleaning 6T.16 



$555.55 



WATER, LIGHTS, FUEL, INSURANCE. 

C. H. Bodwell, wood $93.50 

Clarence M. Edgerly, insnrance premium . . . 125.00 

Manchester Coal and Ice Co., coal 47.93 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., lights 471.30 

Moore & Preston, coal 257.94 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 67.28 

Water Commissioners, use of water 16.00 

$1,078.95 

NEW BOOKS. 

Trustees of library $1,000.00 

SUNDAY OPENING. 

Peter Callaghan, police service $23.75 

Charles S. Morgan, labor 62.50 

E. M. Page, labor 12.00 

A. P. Reed, labor 38.70 

Edith O. Simmons, labor 143.00 



$279.95 



$298.61 



Total expenditures $6,246.55 

Transferred to new account • • • 2,373.24 

$8,619.79 



84 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Fife Department. 



Appropriation -$70,350.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money . . . 7.96 



EXPENDITUEES. 
SERVICES. 

Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer $1,500.00 

Fred S. Bean, assistant 231.25 

Clarence R. Merrill, assistant and clerk .... 256.25 

John Montplaisir, assistant 231.25 

John F. Seaward, assistant 231.25 



teamsters' and engineers' PAl-ROLL. 

January $2,372.68 

February 2,349.93 

March 2,337.89 

April : • • • 2,339.43 

May 2,331.93 

June 2,327.39 

July 2,400.60 

August 2,406.68 

September 2,395.14 

October 2,320.69 

November 2,324.18 

December 2,351.64 



$70,357.96 



$2,450.00 



$28,258.18 



CALL MEMBERS. 

Engine Company No. 1 $1,698.00 

Engine Company No. 2 1,688.00 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 2,293.00 

Engine Company No. 4 1,698.00 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 2,458.00 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 2,458.00 

Chemical Engine Company 437.75 

Hook & Ladder Company No. 1 1,828.00 

Hose Company No. 1 1,693.00 

Hose Company No. 2 1,677.16 

Hose Company No. 3 928.00 



$18,856.91 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 85 



OTHER LABOK. 



F. O. Bartlett $21.75 

Oscar Bineau 138.50 

Fletcher Brown 38.50 

John Biiswell 5.94 

H. E. Dunbar 180.00 

Julian B. Huntley 21.00 

C. F. Kemp 174.75 

John H. McCabe 42.00 

Frank H. Paige 1.50 

E. A. Sears 41.25 



LAUNDRY. 

J. E. Cheney $22.35 

S. P. Dickey 15.87 

Domestic Laundiy Co 8.30 

Eagle Hand Laundry 3.60 

H. E. Harris 12.40 

M. H. Hulme 47.50 

L. A. Lamson 21.42 

N. H. Towel Supply Co. 39.00 

Margaret Powers 55.10 

Susie E. Reed 7.00 

A. W. Smith 14.10 



FURNITURE, ETC. 

C- A. Hoitt vfe Co., comforters, springs, mat- 
tresses, wardrobe, etc $34.25 

James W. Hill Co., cotton, pillow slips, crash, 
etc 31.74 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co. : 

Printing 400 reports $38.50 

Envelopes 22.80 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing 44.70 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery .... 12.74 
Engine and hose companies, allowance for 

printing and stationery 110.00 



$665.19 



$241.64 



$228.74 



86 REPOET OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

WATEB, LIGHTS, TELEPHONE. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone $150.74 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., lights 57.00 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 884.61 

Water Commissioners, use of water 451.01 



C. H. Bod well, wood -1228.25 

L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

Coal 411.64 

Wood 35.50 

S. L. Flanders, wood 6.00 

Moore & Preston : 

Coal 649.33 

Wood 3.90 

D. M. Poore, coal 406.94 

John P. Russell, coal 393.82 



FREIGHT AND CARTAGE. 

Boston & Maine Railroad . •112.00 

E. H. Holmes 9.12 

H. Mattoon 3.42 



SUPPLIES, ETC. 

C. P. Anderson, 1 search light •$1..50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 5.60 

Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co., hose . . . 737.70 

Cavanaugh Brothers, 9 horses 2,067.50 

Cornelius Callahan Co., sponge, chamois, pipes, 

washers, etc 184.42 

Eldredge Electric Manufacturing Co., 1 battery 

voltmeter 4.00 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., supplies 65.25 

S. L. Flanders, oil, broom, chimneys 2.00 

Henry A. Glazier: 

Patent collar and hames 50.00 

Links 5.50 



$1,543.36 



$2,135.38 



$24..54 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



87 



Globe Manufacturing Co., 18 fire coats .... 
Globe Suspender Manufacturing Co., horse 

brushes 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

A. K. Hobbs, polish, matting 

J. Hodge, sheathing 

A- C. Hovey, wringer 

T. A. Lane Co., hose, mantles, flue cleaner, etc. 
Manchester Hardware Co., hardware, tools . . 

Mathieson Alkali Works, soda 

New England Fire Supply Co., 1 pipe .... 

E. S. Ormsby, oil . . . 

Paige * Myrick, 1 stencil 

People's Gas Light Co., 1 stove 

C. N. Perkins c^- Co. : 

1 combination wagon 

Supplies 

Red Cross Chemical Co.. disinfectant 

Star Stamp Co., ink and pad 

C. D. Steele & Co., oil 

D. A. Simons, chair seats 

Smith Box & Lumber Co., sawdust 

A. J. Smith, rubber rings 

Swinston & Robinson, soap 

S. E. Spender Co., 1 badge 

Stark Mills, waste 

Talbot Dyewood ct Chemical Co., bicarbonate 

of soda 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 



!?67.50 

18.00 

17.3.5 

4.88 

4.64 

2.50 

733.60 

100.69 

16.36 

10.00 

2.35 

.54 

3.00 

1,700.00 

372.40 

6.00 

.80 

1.20 

1.10 

3.75 

2.00 

22.15 

2.00 

.66 

9.80 

5..50 

252.86 



sg'6,485.10 



PLUMBING, KEPAIRS, ETC. 

Boston Belting Co., repairing hose 

Brodie Electric Co., repairs, gas and electric 

lights • 

E. M. Bryant & Co., supplies and labor . . . 

Harry Bernard, bracing chairs 

T. A. Lane Co., repairs, plumbing, etc. . . . 

H. J. Lawson, solder, copper, labor 

C. F. McDonald, plumbing 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing lantern, etc. . . 

Edward Sargent, repairing lock 

A. J. Smith, rubber rings 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks 



$5.30 

26.12 

48.30 

13.40 

.55.43 

5.93 

7.62 

2.95 

.40 

1.00 

6..50 



$172.95 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



VETEEIXAKY SERVICES AND MEDICINES. 



A. W. Baker, V. S., dentistry .$14.00 

C. M. Bailey, V. S., attendance and medicine . 15.00 

N. Chandler, hoof ointment 4.50 

Frank J. Clark, dentistry 3.00 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., attendance and medicine . 61-75 

H. B. Dunton, Y. S., attendance and medicine 50.50 

L. G. Gilman, medicine 3.20 

John B. Hall Co., medicine ......... .25 

W. B. Mitchell, medicine, etc 1.58 

Snelling & Woods, medicine 13.25 

Witch Hazel Tonic Co., witch hazel tonic . . 1.75 



CAKfilAGE KEPAIRS. 

American Locomotive Co $247.22 

J. B. McCrillis & Son 237.71 

Sanborn Carriage Co 8.90 

Edward Sargent 5.15 

Joseph Vogel & Son 29.20 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Connor & Grossman $40.25 

H. J. Dexter 106.35 

Henry Gaudreault .75 

T. Hickey & Co 12.00 

Donald McDonald 173.49 

John McSweeney 257.60 

John Reagan 91.10 

J. O. &. L. P. Tremblay 256.25 

G. F. Wenzel 33.30 

John F. Woodbury 235.25 



HAY, GKAIN, ETC. 

Adams Brothers $222.61 

Arthur S. Brown 512.89 

C. M. Denyou 32.00 

Gage tt McDougall 1,037.25 

C. R. Merrill 4,535.29 

Partridge Brothers 510.85 



$177.78 



$528.18 



$1,206.34 



$6,850.89 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



89 



IIAKNK8S 14KPAIKS AMD HUPPMKS. 



W. H- Adams . . . 
F. J. Dustin . . . • 
W. E. Greeley . ■ • 
H. C. Kanno & Son 
Joseph Vogel «fe Son 
N. J. Whalen . 



..$72.10 

6.00 

4. .50 

KW.OO 

l-j.l.'j 

2. .50 



•S263.a5 



8UNI>RIES. 



E. K. Barry, lunch furnished Nashua firemen, 
" Kennard fire " 

Cavanaugh Brothers, use of horse . . • 

William Corey, hoarding horses .... 

n. R. Dow & Co., use of team 

J. G- Ellinwood, i)ictures 

W J. Freeman, use of hack 

J. H. Fitzgerald, lunch served Concord fire- 
men, " Kennard fire " 

Harriett Gannon, stenographer services, type- 
w^ritten transcription, "Kennard fire" hear- 



ing 



Kennard fire" 



Harry F. Hull, use of hack . . 

W. H. Hurd, suppers, firemen, 

T. W. Lane : 

Expenses committee, sundry places .... 

Express, freight, postage • 

Expenses attending International Associa- 
tion Fire Engineers, New York City . . • 

F. H. Thurston, "Germol" 



m.2b 

15.00 

21.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 



21.75 

5.00 

19.00 

38.35 

12.25 

m.M 

7.70 



.S202.94 



Total expenditures 



870,357.96 



Fire Alarm Telegraph. 



ApiJiopriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



.^1, 700. 00 
137.08 



>i,lMl.()S 



90 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 
Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

E. A. Sears 

Oscar Bineau 



SUPPLIES. 

American Electrical Works, wire . . . . 
Brodie Electric Co., material and labor . . 
James K. Carr Co., paint and brush . . . 

Couch & Seeley, clamps, cord 

W. E. Decrow, signal boxes, gong, etc. . . 
Electric Gas Lighting Co., supplies . . . 
Head & DoAvst Co., lumber and labor . . 

J. Hodge, lumber 

T. A. Laue Co., switches, etc 

H. F.W. Little, tiling saw- 

New England Bolt & Nut Co., arm braces . 

Pike & Heald Co., gasoline 

John B. Varick Co., hardware - . 



SUNDRIES. 



$54.00 
48.00 
54.00 
52 00 
54.00 
50.00 
54.00 
56.00 
52.00 
54.00 
52.00 
54.00 

$4.00 
17.00 



•181.74 

35.58 

11.95 

.43 

610.02 

188.22 

1.37 

168.50 

4.95 

.15 

24.75 

.95 

47.01 



1634.00 



$21.00 



$1,175.62 



E. H. Holmes, freight and cartage 
Total expenditures 



$6,46 



$1,837.08 



Appropriation 



HYDRANT SERVICE. ''^ 



Hydrant Service. 

.118,800.00 



Expenditures. 
Water Commissioners, use of liydrants . . 



$18,800.00 



Police Department.— Station. 
Appropriation 



.$2,5f90.00 



Expenditures. 

JANITOK. 

Frank P. Wiggin 

WATER, LIGHTS, FUEL. 

171.50 
C. H. Bodwell, wood ^ ^^ 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, wood ^^ ^^ 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., coal . . • • • • • • 

Manchester Traction,Light& Power Co., lights, 600.(0 

Moore & Preston : ^^2 y^ 



Coal 



26.50 



$3.55 

6.00 

72.60 
Joseph Sykes, cleaning ^^ ^^ 

Mrs. J. E. Wiggin, washing 



H. Fradd & Co., pail, broom, brush, etc. 
J. S. Holt & Co., soap 



$730.00 



Wood gg 5g 

People's Gas Light Co., gas ^^^'^^ 

Water Commissioners, use of water ^ ^^ 

W. B. Woodward, wood '^ $1,381.81 



LAUNDRY, ETC. 



$130.20 



^^ REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPAIRS, ETC. 

J. J. Abbott, glass and setting 

D. F. Cressey, repairing chains ][] 

Peter Harris, repairing safe 

Head & Dowst, lumber and labor 

T. A. Lane Co., lamps, etc., labor on pipe . . '. 53 4^^ 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, setting glass 315 

JohnB. VarickCo., dusters, matches, etc. '. '. 13*55 

C. L. Wolf, cleaning stove and pipes 4*85 



.$1.95 
1.50 
1.00 
7.50 



SUNDRIES. 



James W. Hill Co., crash 
J. J. Holland, medicines, etc. 



Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money. 



•f6.34 
55.40 



Police Department.— Court. 
Appropriation 



Expenditures, 
services. 

$600.00 



John C. Bickford, clerk 

Isaac L. Heath, police justice I'sOO^OO 

George W. Prescott, associate justice .... .800.00 



SUNDRIES. 



A. S. Campbell & Co., printing $152.50 

W. H. Campbell, boxes 17 *gQ 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 22 25 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage ... 



$2,900.00 



$2,400.00 



50 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. — COURT. 

M. J. Healy, Witness fees, etc i"nn 

Thomas D. Luce, certifying appeals 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use ^^ ^^ 

of telephone ' 

Temple &Farrington Co., stationery "'^^ 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



93 



$470.78 

!, 870.78 
29.22 

$2,900.00 



Police Department.— Commission. 



Appropriation 



143.600.00 



EXPENDITUKES. 



SERVICES. 



Michael J. Healy, chief of police 

John F. Cassidy, deputy chief 

E. B. Woodbury, chairmau of commission, 

salary 

N. S. Clark, commissioner, salary 

Frank P. Cheney, commissioner, salary . . . • 

A. B. Brown, police matron 

Regular patrol 



$1,999.92 
1,. 500. 00 

1.50.00 
100.00 
100.00 
42().00 
33.804 19 



.$38,080.11 



FEEDING PKISONEKS. 



W. D. Laddct Co 
S. J. Latlamme . 



.$2fi.35 
148.00 



$174.35 



PKINTING AND STATIONERY. 



John B. Clarke Co., printing .... 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 

E. A. Stratton, books and stationery 



$18.00 
13.00 

85.65 



$116.65 



94 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

PATKOL SYSTEM EXPENSES. 



W. H. Adams, harness repairs 

Ame & Co., food 

American Electrical Works, wire 

J. J. Abbott, turpentine and gasoline 

Automatic Time Stamp Co., ribbons 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric supplies and re- 
pairs 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight on wire, etc.. 

Brodie Electric Co., supplies 

Oscar Bineau, labor, line work 

Boyd Brothers, clipping horse 

James Coakley, assistance of linemen running 
new wires for signal system, account of fire . 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 

H. B. Dunton, V.S., visits and medicine 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., vitriol, batteries, etc. 

A. Filion, repairing wagon 

A. K. Hobbs, oil cloth 

J. M. Knowles, rent of stable 

T. A. Lane Co., electric supplies 

C. R. Merrill, grain 

John McNaughton, labor, line work ...... 

Municipal Signal Co., supplies 

James Murphy, varnishing patrol wagon . . . 

W. F. Nye, oil 

Patrick O'Brien, cleaning stable cellar 

Charles E. Perry & Co., paper 

Pettingell-Andrews Co., electric supplies. . . . 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repairs 

Timothy Shea, hay 

J. O. & L. P. Tremblay, horseshoeing 

J. F. Woodbury, horseshoeing 

W. W. Williamson, labor, line work 

Ziegler Apparatus Co., supplies 



•!il3.75 

6.50 

57.32 

.77 

4.00 

12.06 

3.94 

17.40 

27.00 

2.00 

9.80 

3.50 

16.00 

71.83 

20.35 

.40 

60.00 

12.22 

290.03 

4.00 

11.50 

15.00 

3.90 

.60 

33.00 

121.80 

20.90 

139.00 

4.25 

70.00 

15.00 

93.67 



•$1,161.49 



ALLOWANCE FOR CLOTHING AND BICYCLE EEPAIRS. 



Robert J. Hayes . . 
William F. Morang 
Pay-Roll 



$12.50 

12.50 

2,000.00 



$2,025.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. — COMMISSION. 



95 



HARDWAIJE AND EEPAIKS. 



Head c% Dowst Co. lumber 

J. Hodge, lumber 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 
B. F. Shephard, repairing locks, etc. 
John B. Varick Co., hardware . . . . 



15.38 

1.56 

101.12 

1.10 

1.50 



$110.66 



TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH. 



New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 

rent of private line and instruments 

"Western Union Telegraph Co., telegrams . . . 



$150.36 

114.00 

4.20 



$268.56 



SUNDRIES. 

George H. Bingham, legal services $^23.75 

Burnham, Brown & Warren, legal services . . 350.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice for 1901, 1902 11.98 

N. S. Clark, stationery and typewriting .... 2.37 

G. H. Emery, photographing criminals .... 34.00 
W. J. Freeman, 2 saddle horses for President's 

parade 4.00 

M. E. Kean, M.D., visits at station 21.00 

Gillis Stark, M. D., examination, Margaret 

Burke, and visits 18.00 

George D. Towne, M.D., examination, Margaret 

Burke lo-OO 

F. H. Thurston, medicine 3.85 

Watts Brothers, 1 chair 1-25 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$1,091.20 

$43,028.02 
571.98 

$43,600.00 



Repairs of Buildings. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



$4,625.00 
161.97 



$4,786.97 



96 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Expenditures. 

city library. 

J. J. Abbott, glass, paint $3.25 

Barton & Co., linoleum 2.48 

E. M. Bryant & Co., switcb and labor .... 1.40 

Joel Daniels, making and lettering signs . . . 2.00 

Fred C. Darrah, repairing roof 5.41 

A. L. Franks: 

Lamps, etc 75.04 

Electrical supplies and labor 127.07 

A. K. Hobbs, hose, rubber mats 20.25 

George Holbrook, clearing snow oE roof . . . 13..50 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing rejiairs, etc .... 53.46 

Manchester Hardware Co., 1 axe 1.00 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., lamps 2.04 

J, y. McQuestonCo., 1 desk 9.50 

Harry A. Piper, material and labor 15.82 

John B. Varick Co., liose, steps, brooms, etc. . 45.43 



POLICE STATION. 

F. C. Darrah, roofing material and labor . . . §7.03 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on sewer, waste pipe . . 2. 85 

H. A. Piper, material and labor 111.49 

F. T. Provost, lumber and labor 1.15 

John Wheeler, masonwork 3.85 

C. L. Wolf, grate for boiler 37.51 



ENGINE HOUSES. 

Barton & Co., shades and rollers $7.22 

C. B. Brown, roofing material and labor . . . 7.21 

Joel Daniels, setting glass, paint and labor . 60.19 

Fred C. Darrah, roofing material and labor . . 14.16 

W. E. Goodwin, plumbing 126.05 

Gronvald Coal Saver Co., 1 attachment . . . 100.00 
T. A. Lane Co- : 

New tubes in boiler 112.25 

Steam heating per contract 182.48 

Labor and material 4.90 

H. J. Lawson, material and labor 50. 92 

C. F. McDonald, plumbing repairs 294.09 



$377.65 



■$163.88 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 97 

N. W. Paige, floor boards and labor $9.28 

Harry A. Pijier, repairs 1,028.94 

Pike it Ileald Co., plumbino- repairs 67.98 

F. T. Provost, lumber and labor 35.5.66 

Kobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete . . 19.91 

John A. Sargent, paint and labor 106.56 

James A. Scully, matting, linoleum 23.29 

Z. B. Stewart, masonwork 30.65 

John K. Wilson, lumber and labor 6.94 

John AVheeler, masonwork 50.82 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing repairs 52.75 

.52,712.25 



BATTERY BUILDING. 



CITY HALL. 

Joel Daniels, paint, paper, etc 

F. C- Darrah, roofing material and labor . 

T. A. Lane Co., repairs 

Harry A. Piper, labor and material . . . 
Z. B. Stewart, masonwork 



$10.87 


1.05 


13.34 


5.65 


3.53 



COURT HOUSE. 

Joel Daniels & Co., paint and labor 

W. E. Goodwin, labor on steam valves .... 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on boiler 

F. T. Provost, taking off and putting on win- 
dows 

.John B. Varick Co., hardware 



William Brush, removing and repairing statue 

of Aljraham Lincoln $45.00 

William C. Clarke, paid for telegrams .... 1.26 

Head ifr Dowst Co., teaming. Library to High 

school . . 5.10 

W. H. Hurd, 1 day^s board, Wm. Brush . . . 2.00 



Joel Daniels, paint and glass $105.51 

Z. B. Stewart, masonwork 35.60 



$282.60 


3.07 


.60 


81.32 


11670 



$34.44 



$53 36 



$141.11 



.$484.29 



98 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WAKD FIVE WARDROOM. 



Joel S. Daniels, paint and labor 
Z. B. Stewart, mason work . . . 



SUNDRIES. 



S74.22 
47.30 



fl21.52 



D. G. Andrews, labor, ward 2 wardroom . . . $6.00 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight .50 

J. P. Brown & Co., use of hack 5.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal - 56.44 

r. A. Dustin, 1 heater, city scales 5.00 

Empire Palm Oil Co., floor polish 76.40 

W. F. Elliott, freight on oil .50 

A. M. Finney, seating chair 1.25 

W. E. Goodwin, plumbing 62.38 

The Gibson Soap Co., soap polish 12.00 

Head & Dowst Co., 1, lettered, marble tablet, 

erected, Highland schoolhouse 85.00 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., 3 chairs 4.26 

A. K. Hobbs, hose 2.50 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage 1.14 

E. Landers, repairing roof, ward 5 wardroom . 29.60 
Manchester Heating & Lighting Co., pipe and 

fittings 6.75 

Harry C. Morrill, brass castings, etc 1.47 

Harry A. Piper, lumber and labor 18 63 

G. W. Reed, use of hack 5.00 

Shaughnessey & Holland, removing booths 

and cleaning wardroom, ward 5 18.65 

C. A. Trefethen, care of tower clocks .... 300.00 

Total exj^enditures 



$698.47 



$4,786.97 



New Schoolhouse^ South Beech Street* 



Appropriation $10,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money . . . 1,962.50 



$11,962.-50 



WILSON HILL ENGINE HOUSE. 99 

EXPENBITUKES^ 

Chickering & O'Conaell, architects, services. . $404.50 

Head ct Dowst Co., building, per contract . . 11,558.00 

$11,962.50 



Wilson Hill Engine Howse. 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

EXPEXDITURES. 

Chickering & O'Connell, drawings and speci- 
fications -IISO.SO 

C. N. Perkins & Co., 1 combination wagon . . 1,700.00 

' $1,850.50 

Total expenditures $1,850.50 

Transferred to new account 4,149.50 

$6,000.00 



Playgffound, Amoskeag Schoolhoose. 
Appropriation . • §480.00 

Expenditures. 
Transferred to new account $480.00 

Water-Wotks. 

Balance from last year unexpended $104,823.19 

Cash received from water rents 134,331.48 

$239,154.67 



100 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



LABOll. 



January $1,634.08 

February 1,349.60 

March 1,363.89 

April 1,969.01 

May 1,762.05 

June 1,746.72 

July 2,065.67 

August 1,736.32 

September 2,071.52 

October 1,387.55 

November 1,371.03 

December 1,664.61 

E. A. G. Holmes 



$20,122.00 

$588.13 



GENERAI. EXPENSES. 

William C. Clarke, 4 meetings of board . . . . $16.00 

William Corey, 10 meetings of board ..... 40.00 

Frank Dovvst, 19 meetings of board 76.00 

Charles M. Floyd, 12 meetings of board .... 48.00 

Aljiheus Gay, 7 meetings of board 28.00 

Edgar J. Knowlton, 11 meetings of board . . . 44.00 

Charles H. Manning, 24 meetings of board . . 96.00 

Harry E. Parker, 13 meetings of board .... 52.00 

City of Manchester, electric light bill 4.20 

John T. Levasseur, use of steamboat 5.00 

C. A. Scarbor, dinners 37.50 

C. K. Walker, siiperintendent, salary .... 2,400.00 

Paid for lights 73.25 

Express, telegrams, postage 39.25 

Sundries 36.74 



$2,995.94 



PRINTING, ADVERTISING, STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing notices, etc. . . . $97.75 

printing 650 reports 35.00 

advertising and binding 6 books 11.10 

Manchester News Co., notices .60 

E. A. Stratton, stationery 2.13 

Temple ct Farrington Co., books and stationery. 21.58 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 6.00 



$174.16 



WATER-WORKS. 101 



TEAMS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 



L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal S81.36 

M. L. Cobb, 841-5 tons coal 324.17 

H. R. Dow & Co., teams 20.00 

C. S. Fifield, teams 8.00 

William A. Jepson, coal 1,718.42 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telejjhone .50.84 

J. A. & A. W. Walker, coal 281.08 

Wilson & Brvant. coal 10-5.00 



LAND. 

Mark E. Harvey Sl.50.00 

Mrs. Fannie Merrill 1,500.00 

James W. Merrill 1..500.00 

Mrs. Elvira .S. Smith 3.200.00 



LEGAL SERVICES. 



SUPPLIES. 

Adams Brothers, lime, salt, cement S19.24 

American Locomotive Co., steel plates, leather 

valves 75.80 

Barton & Co., matting 3.47 

Builders Iron Foundry, bends, branches, 

reducers, etc 141.38 

Chapman Yalve Manufacturing Co., 1 rod . . . 1.49 

Chadwick-Bost on Lead Co.. solder 17.42 



82.588.87 



§6,350.00 



E. F. .Tones s394.28 

DAMAGES. 

C. C. Babbitt, damage to wall and land by leak. 810.00 

BLACKSMITHING, FP.EIGHT, HARDWAP.E. 

John T. Beach 83.50 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 329.00 

D. F. Cressey. sharpening tools, etc 319.86 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 76.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 266.46 

$994.82 



102 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Coffin Valve Co., 1 hydrant $34.75 

Charles A. Claflin & Co., 1 pipe cutter 39.00 

Fred C. Darrah, tar .53 

Drew Machinery Agency, 2 rods for drill .... 2.00 

M. T. Davidson, supplies 119.21 

Eager & Co., soap, matches, etc 3.96 

Edson Manufacturing Co., valves, bolts, etc . . 11.61 
Glauber Brass Manufacturing Co., curb stops, 

nips, etc 329.27 

Hays Manufacturing Co., rods and covers . . . 298.88 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, brick, cement . . . 1,466.06 

Hersey Manufacturing Co., rotary spindle .... .20 

J. Hodge, meter boxes 90.65 

A. K. Hobbs, packing, etc * 30.06 

C. H. Hutchinson, castings 154.97 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, etc 509.97 

Lamb & Ritchie, pipe 182.50 

Leonard & Ellis Dep't., oil _ 25.20 

Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co., pipe 61000 

Ludlow Valve Manufacturing Co., gates, caps, 

valves, etc 309.00 

Manufacturing & Selling Co. of America, 1 

search light 2.00 

Mowry & Phillips, lead 1,055.44 

National Meter Co., meters 656.80 

Neptune Meter Co., meters 548.25 

Norwood Engineering Co., hydrants, cases . . . 359.25 

Olmsted & Tuttle Co., waste • • 7.15 

Palmer & Garmon, marble slab 4.00 

Perry Oil Co , oil 83.06 

Pike & Heald Co., packing, valves, etc 56.50 

G. W. Eief, lumber 121.66 

Snow Steam Pump Works, on account, steam 

pump 20,000.00 

Harvey Scribner Estate, wood cogs 59.08 

Charles Spofford, jiosts 25.35 

Standard Oil Co., oil 10.75 

Sumner & Goodwin Co., nips and couplings . . 48.04 

Sweet & Doyle, gates 237.60 

Thomson Meter Co., meters 686.52 

Tragle Cordage Co , packing 122.36 

U. S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co., pipe . . . 5,771.68 

Valvoline Oil Co., cylinder oil 34.45 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., soap 4.50 

W. A. Wood Co., waste 32.53 

Geo. Woodman Co., nips 25.99 



.$34,429.58 



WATER- WORKS. 103 



J. J. Abbott, paper $1.56 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., labor on pat- 
terns, boilers, etc 650.10 

E. M. Bryant & Co. repairs 13.32 

James P. Finn, paint and labor 25.00 

Hersey Manufacturing Co., repairing meters . 10.82 

T. A. Lane Co. material and labor 10.44 

National Meter Co. repairing meters 130.75 

Neptune Meter Co., repairing meters 3.55 

Thomson Meter Co., repairing meters .... 4.84 

Union Water Meter Co., repairing meters . . 307.40 

$1,157.78 



SUNDRIES. 

Town of Auburn, taxes 1202.75 

A. W. Dudley, surveying 25.00 

Sarah C. Pennock, rent of house 100.00 

Street and Park Commission, material and blast- 
ing trench 2,062.95 

Trustees of Sinking Fund: 

For payment of water bonds 5,000.00 

Hydrant rental 18,800.00 



■«!26,190.70 



Total expenditures $95,996.26 

Transferred to interest account 36.313.00 

Transferred to new account 106,845.41 

.$2,39,154.67 



Pine Grove Cemetefy. 

Appropriation $10,000.00 

Expenditures. 



January $204.45 

February 171.01 



104 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



March $179.01 

April 519-15 

May 558.91 

June 565.58 

July 651.04 

August 559.59 

September 688.32 

October 431.98 

November 397.33 

December 308.49 



PLAXTS, LOAM, ETC. 

A. P. Home & Co., plants §93.61 

A. G. Hood, plants 190.00 

Peter Henderson Co., plants 2.25 

J. G. Johnson & Co., Japan iris 7.68 

Kirby Floral Co., plants 73.20 

J. L. Poor, gravel 4.50 

Eay Brook Garden Co., plants 73.60 

The Russia Cement Co-, dressing 8.90 

James Thompson, loam 1,155.00 

John B. Variek Co., seed 33.88 

E. H. Whitney, dressing 7.25 

Mrs. C. C. Webster, clay 592.00 



VFATER, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones $45.88 

Union Coal Co., coal 18.00 

Water Commissioners, use of water 251.20 

Wilson c% Bryant, coal 7.50 



PRINTING AND STATIONEKY. 



$5,234.86 



$2,241.87 



.$322.58 



John B. Clarke Co., printing $13.95 

E. H. Clough, envelopes 8.48 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 4.30 

O. D. Knox, cards and envelopes 2.92 

Temple & Farrington Co., record book. . . . 1.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertising notice . . . 1.50 



$32.15 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



105 



REPAIRS AXD IMPROVEMENTS. 

J. J. Abbott, paint §1.24 

C. W. Anderson tt Co., repairing clocks ... 1.00 

C. A. Bailey, crushed stone 16.50 

C. S. Bauo's. plumbing reiJairs ■. 303.16 

William Corey, 7 sashes 3.50 

James A. Colby, labor grading 12.00 

John T. Gott, cleaning vaults 5.00 

Head & Dowst Co., brick and cement .... 11.80 

J. Hodge, lumber 24.49 

J. J. Holland, sulpho-napthol 1.25 

C. H. Hutchinson, fence 756.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., tools 6.83 

J. Y. McQueston Co., repairing chairs .... 4.00 

F. E. Nelson, dippers 1.20 

Palmer & Garmon, slate bounds 264.78 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe and cess-pools .... 140.93 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete . . 204.43 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools . . . 105.16 

Joseph Vogel & Son, harness repairs .... .95 

G. E. Whittemore, painting, papering, etc. . . 37.02 



TEAM EXPENSES. 



$1,901.24 



John T. Beach, painting dump-cart, repairs 

C. R. Merrill, grain 

J. O. & L. P. Tremblay, horseshoeing . . . 
Joseph Vogel & Son, harness repairs . . . . 



$10.25 

128.15 

22.35 

9.50 



$170.25 



SUNDRIES. 



L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice . . ., $4.56 

Edwin F. Jones, services as clerk of trustees . 25.00 

J. H. Erskine, expenses, Boston, Convention 
of American Cemetery Superintendent's 
Association ' 16.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$45.56 

),948.51 
51.49 



$10,000.00 



106 



REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Valley Cemetery. 



Appropriation 



J,100.00 



EXPENDITDKES. 



January $79.19 

February 65.77 

March 74.21 

April 240.19 

May ., 213.68 

June ." 212.17 

July 266.89 

August 208.81 

September 266.98 

October 209.92 

iSTovember 178. .52 

December 105.38 



WATER AND TELEPHONE. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone S34.86 

Water Commissioners, use of water ...... 37.75 



PLANTS, LOAM, ETC. 

B. F. Bascom, loam $30.50 

Frank Bodwell, sand 3.60 

S. B. Dickey, loam and turf 43.70 

J. Francis, plants ". . 60.13 

F. M. Goings, loam and sand 99.80 

Ray Brook Garden Co., pinks 1.00 

John B. Varick Co., seed 20.75 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY, 



J,121.71 



$72.61 



$259.48 



C. H. G. Foss, envelopes $3.18 

Temple & Farrington Co., book and stationery 4.22 



$7.40 



AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 107 

KEPAIKS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Atlains Brothers, cement -11.50 

B. F. Bascom, use of team and labor 1.50.40 

C. N. Baker, repairing and painting fence . . 9.30 

Frank Bodwell, stone 5-00 

S. B. Dickey, use of team 39.00 

F. M. Goings, use of team 24.00 

Fence 140.63 

Palmer & Garmon, setting over stones .... 14r.Q5 
Pike & Heald Co., material, repairs, piping 

lots 149.03 

Walter Roper, whitewashing vault 12.15 

John A. Stacy, cleaning monument 5.00 

R. P. Stevens Co., stone work 1-33 

W. H. Tibbetts, paint and labor 9.75 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 52.77 

Young Brothers, ladders 5.00 



Expenditures. 



SUNDRIES. 



A. S. Chadbourne, trees . '. $18.04 

G. C Harwood, labor 196. .50 

A. G. Hood, tulips 15.00 



§619.51 



SUNDRIES. 

S. P. Cannon, services as clerk of trustees $10.00 

Total expenditures $3,090.71 

Transferred to unappropriated money 9.29 

$3,100.00 



Amoskeag Cemetety. 
Appropriation $250.00 



108 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Manchester Hardware Co., wire, seed .... $7.36 

Water Commissioners, use of water 12.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$248.90 

$248.90 
1.10 



Merrill Yard. 



$250.00 



Appropriation 



$100.00 



EXPENDITUEES. 



SUNDRIES. 



Joseph Therrien, labor $3.75 

Payroll: June 4.00 

August 11.72 

Totel expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money • 



$19.47 

$19.47 
80.53 



Repairs of Schoolhouses. 



$100.00 



E. W. Corning . . . . , 


EXPEXDITURES. 
MASONWOEK. 


$5.15 
129.25 

549 77 


F. O. McAuliffe . . . 
B. W. Robinson . . . . 




Z. B. Stewart .... 




431 65 


C. W. Whittemore . . 




509 86 









$10,000.00 



$1,625.68 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 
PAINTING AND GLAZING. 



109 



J. J. Abbott 1298.16 

J. S. Avery ■ 8.60 

H. Desfosses & Co 399.-53 

W. J. Powers 1..50 

John A. Sargent 800.1.5 

L. * W. T. Seiberlicb 2.50 



PLUMBING, IKONWOKK, REPAIRS. 



$1,510.44 



Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., material and 

repairs $739.99 

E. M. Bryant & Co., lamps, repairs, supplies . 61.00 

O. F. Bartlett &: Co., plumbing repairs .... 91.65 

Brodie Electric Co., motor, repairing machine 22.40 
Chandler Adjustable Chair and desk Works, 

inkwells 4.99 

Robert Cook, repairing bars 1.75 

Derryfield Co., 4 doors 7.00 

George H. Dudley, lumber and labor 1,137.37 

Byron E. Finney, caning chairs 1.30 

Scott Flanders, labor 11.50 

R. D. Gay, shades, fixtures 41.92 

J. L. Hammett Co., slate 13.02 

Hammond Typewriter Co., supplies 2.05 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 665.99 

electric wiring and fixtures 196.35 

plumbing bill 152.30 

J. Hodge, rail, molding, lumber 24 05 

C H. Hutchinson, grates and repairing boiler. 199.30 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., chairs and table .... 20.-50 
T. A. Lane Co., labor, water pipes, cleaning 

stove pipes, electric batteries, bells, etc . . 774.01 

H. ,J. Lawson, repairing roofs, etc 676.93 

-J. F. Marchand, plumbing re]3airs 6.35 

Manchester Hardwar-e Co., glue and oil . . . . 3.50 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing repairs, etc. . . . 1,230.34 
Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., filling and 

grading, concreting 628.13 

B. F. Shepard, repairing locks, etc 8.75 

-John B. Varick Co., hardware 20.87 

C. F. -Jack, repairing flag pole 6.10 

A. A. .Jenkins, electric supplies and labor . . . 42.25 



.$6,791.66 



110 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 

T. F. Fifiold, oil $1.56 

John T. Gott, cleaning vaults 25.00 

J. Gr. Jones, freight and cartage 13.92 

Masury, Young & Co., " Nodusto" 26.00 

John W. Regner, reiving flag ropes 1..50 

Wiggin-Young Co., oil, broom .90 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$68.88 

$9,996.66 
3.84 



Printing and Advertising. 



$10,000.00 



Ai)proi)riation 



.1300.00 



Expenditures. 

John 13. Clarke Co. : 

printing blanks, cards,' reports, etc $232.08 

])rinting .500 reports 46.06 

Union Publishing Co., advertising examinations 5.04 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$283.18 

$283.18 
16.82 



$300.00 



Books and Stationery. 

Appropriation . . . • • 

Expenditures. 

C. W. Bickford $10.00 

W. P. Goodman 12.34 



$75.00 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



Ill 



E. C. Lambert §3.18 

Sinclair Manufacturing Co 3.20 

E. E. Stockbridge .3.94 

Temple & Farrington 12.0() 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$44.m 

844.06 
30.34 



Furniture and Supplies. 



•S75.00 



Appropriation 



-Sl,2fXJ.00 



Expenditures. 

rilVSICAL AXX> CHEMICAL SUPPLIES, ETC. 



L. E. Knott Apparatus Co 
G. W. O. Tebbetts .... 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



•SIOO.OO 

26.94 



•S186.94 



.J. L. Hammett Co. books 

Hammond Tyi»ewriter Co., typewriters 

supplies and repairs 

A. K. Holibs, rubber bands 

Prang Educational Co., compasses . . . 
Wadsworth. Howland & Co., paints . 



850 17 


zm.m 


.5.7.5 


.20 


6.15 


7.37 



$425.64 



FUIiSITLTJE, ETC. 

Cabinet Letter Press Co.. letter press .... 815. OfJ 

Eagle Pencil Co., comi>asfees 7.95 

8. A. Felton & Co., brushes 72.WJ 

W. F. Hart, drum and sticks 5. .50 

.James W. Hill Co., flags 21.75 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., chairs and desks .35.50 

A. K. Hobbs, toilet paper, rubber mats, pegs . 28.93 



112 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Keniiey Brothers & Wolkins, ink-wells, pitcli 

pijies $34.45 

Andrew J. Lloyd & Co., microscopes 118.13 

Manchester Hardware Co., bell, etc .35 

J. Y. McQueston Co., chair .75 

F. E. Nelson, basins .87 

Olmsted & Tuttle Co., maps . ". 1.20 

People's Gas Light Co. stove, tubing 3.10 

Pike & Heald Co., cups, can, etc 5.44 

Red Cross Chemical Co., disinfectant .... 6.60 

Richardson, Smith & Co., music chart stands . 2.25 
John B. Yarick Co., brooms, brushes, dusters, 

etc 143.78 

J. A. Whitney, 1 brush 2.50 



$506.05 



SUNDRIES. 



E. M. Bryant & Co., electric supplies and labor $40.60 

Eimer & Amend, charcoal 1.40 

Finney & Parker, reseating chairs 1.70 

R. D. Gay, webbing, cord, labor 23.95 

Wiggin-Y^oungCo., oil 1.10 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



168.75 

1,187.38 
12.62 



Sewingf Materials. 



$1,200.00 



Appropriation 

EXPENDITUKES. 

S. D. Angell, long cloth $25.85 

James W. Hill Co., gingham, thread, needles 110.10 

Annie W. Patten, services as teacher .... 100.00 

John B. Yarick Co., scissors 14.55 

Total expenditures 



$250.00 



$250.00 



$250.00 



FUEL, AND CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 113 

F«eL 



Appropriation $8,800.00 

Transferred from unapproprialed money . . . 1,-504.02 



Expenditures. 



COAL AND COKE 



L. B. Bodwell & Co $2,093.29 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co 333. 75 

Moore & Preston 6,870.82 

John P. Eussell 135.00 



WOOD. 

C. H. Bodwell 1371.25 

L. B. Bodwell & Co 3.00 

A. D. Maxwell estate 434.51 

W. E. Woodward 14.00 



SUNDRIES. 

C. S. Fifield, use of team -"12.00 

E. Lavigne, sawing wood 9.00 

Milton S. Leeds, sawing wood 33.50 

W. J. Powers, setting glass 3.00 

Josephine Riddle, paid for cutting wood ... .90 



$10,304.02 



$9,432.86 



•$822.76 



•$48.40 



Total expenditures -$10,304.02 



Contingfent Expenses. 

Appropriation $2,500.00 

Trau'sf erred from unappropriated money . . . 7.19 

•$2,. 307.19 

Expenditures . 

freight and cartage. 

J. G. Jones $38.39 



114 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WATEII, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS- 

Emma J. Ela, paid for carrying water .... $11.60 

Liira K. Kimpton, paid for carrying water . . 19.00 

G. M. Morse, carrying water 19.00 

Mrs. Byron Moore, carrying water 6.00 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., elec- 
tric lights 399.20 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 305.26 

Arabella Eickaby, carrying water 7.50 

Water Commissioners, use of water 950.45 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



$1,718.01 



C. A. Anderson, repairing clocks $9.00 

C. \V. Bickford, use of team 124 00 

Maude Brown, use of team 80 00 

Walter Cody, rent of store for school 100.00 

C. W. Davis, use of team 1.50.00 

Oliver Ditson Co., miisic 20.52 

H. E. Dow & Co-, use of team 5.00 

C L. Downs, engrossing diplomas 49.75 

Ginn & Co., music 34.63 

Hardy & Folsom, ribbon 21.02 

S. B. Hope, use of team . , 41.50 

George Holbrook, removing snow 14.50 

C. A. Hoitt et Co., use of chairs 20.05 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos 20.25 

T. J. Lemay, repairing clocks 3..50 

Manchester Mills, soap 19.50 

E. Mahoney, mowing and cleaning yard . . . ..50 

J. Y. McQueston Co., rent of chairs 5.10 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

or telephone 19.00 

Perry Picture Co., subscrii^tion to magazine . 1.00 
Pay-Eoll Division No. 2 : 

February 8.81 

jMarch 6.25 

December 16.06 

D. A. Simons, rent of chairs 6.00 

Silver, Burdett & Co., books 1.15 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks 23.70 

Total expenditures 



1750.79 



$2,507.19 



CARE OF SCHOOLROOMS. 

Care of Schoolrooms. 



115 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unapi^ropriated money . 



,500.00 
2:^.13 



5,522.13 



Expenditures. 



JANITORS. 



Jolin S. Avery . . . 
William Barry . . . 
Edwin N. Baker . . 
S. H. Batclielder . . 
Joseph H. Buffum . 
Charles Corey . . . 
J. B. Chalifoux . . 
Robert Cook .... 
William F. Connor . 
Emma J. Ela . . . 
Anabelle Flanders . 

V. H. Hill 

Charles F. Jack . . 
George H. Jack . . 
Lura K. Kimpton . 
Edward Kennedy . 
W. H. Newry . . . 
W. J. Powers . . . 
Josephine Riddle . 
Annabelle Rickaby 
William Stevens . . 
Inez M. Warren . . 



SUNDRIES. 



$600.00 

89.78 

349.92 

499.92 

41.66 

199.92 

249.96 

458.26 

520.77 

23.00 

23.00 

486.06 

649.92 

549.96 

36.50 

22. .50 

645.00 

600.00 

40.00 

15.00 

399.96 

3"8.00 



16,489.09 



Fi'ancois Bouchard, cleaning .S14.04 

C. W. Bickford, paid for cleaning 10.00 

Mrs. Kennedy, cleaning 4.00 

A. N. Nettel, cleaning 3.00 

Inez M. Warren, paid for cleaning ...... 2.00 

Total expenditures 



•$33.04 



•>i6,522.13 



116 



Appropriation 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Evening Schools. 



$1,200.00 



EXPENDITUKES. 



SALARIES. 

C. E. Cochran $116.00 

Honorie J. Crougii 116.00 

MariannaFitts 43.00 

Irving Forbes 58.00 

Margaret Linen 58.00 

Julia McNamara 34. 00 

William J. Mooar 58.00 

Myra Moore 58.00 

A. W. Morgan 116.00 

Adelia Murphy 47-00 

Endie Kourry 58.00 

Mary E. Paige 58.00 

Arthur W. Rowell . . • 58.00 

Minnie Sullivan 58.00 

Dora B. Tusou 58.00 

Mary A. Walker 49.00 

SUNDRIES. 

S. H. Batchelder, janitor $29.00 

John B. Clarke Co. , printing placards .... 7.00 

Joseph Chalifoux, janitor 29.00 

V. H. Hill, janitor 46.40 

T. A. Lane Co., mantles, etc .95 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$1,043.00 



$112.35 

$1,155.35 
44.65 



$1,200.00 



Evening School^ Mechanical Drawing. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



$250.00 

2.00 



$252.00 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS, 

EXPENDITUKES. 



117 



SALAKIES. 



H. W. Allen $126.00 

John M. Kendall 126.00 

Total expenditures 



$252.00 



•$252.00 



Teachers' Salaries. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



EXPENDITUEES. 



SALARIES. 



•1*91,000.00 

2,779.80 



.$93,779.80 



January .$9,816.89 

February 9,637.46 

March 10,175.06 

April 7,086.79 

May 10,030.44 

June 10,166.99 

September 7,166.62 

October 9,868.36 

November 9,919.39 

December 9,911.80 

Total expenditui-es 



.$93,779.80 
$93,779.80 



Free Text-Books. 



Appropriation 

Received from sale of books 



1,000.00 
200.00 



$6,200.00 



118 



REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 
Expenditures. 



TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

Allyn & Bacon 

American Book Co ■ 

D. Appleton & Co 

Atkinson it Mentzer 

E. E Babb ct Co 

F. J. Barnard & Co, 

Boston School Supply Co 

T. H. Castor & Co 

Cosmos Picture Co 

H. Dangel & Co • . . . . 

Joel Daniels & Co. ... 

DeWolfe, Fiske & Co 

Oliver Ditson Co 

Educational Publishing Co 

N. H. Earle & Co 

Herman Goldberger 

W. P. Goodman 

Ginn c% Co 

Gregg Publishing Co 

J. L. Hammett Co 

D. C Heath & Co. . . 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co 

Holden Patent Book Cover Co 

Journal of School Geography 

i?r. F. King et Co 

E. L. Kellogg & Co 

Kenney Brothers & Wolkins 

Lee & Shepard 

Maynard, Merrill & Co 

G. & C. Merriam Co. 

F. E. Nelson 

The Palmer Co 

G. S. Perry & Co 

Prang Educatibnal Co 

Richardson, Smith & Co 

Sibley & Ducker 

Charles Scribner's Sons 

Silver, Bxirdett »t Co 

Sinclair Manufacturing Co 

E. A. Stratton 

Thompson, Brown & Co 

University Publishing Co 

AVadsworth, Howland & Co 



•$112.25 

502 46 

3.00 

81.95 

664.21 

182.95 

22.12 

49.60 

1.09 

11.00 

3.90 

2.83 

4.20 

15.97 

38.50 

3.40 

40.35 

893.39 

60.50 

371.06 

405.86 

19.45 

15.00 

1.50 

254.16 

1.00 

97.82 

10.15 

3.60 

8.65 

6.38 

3.00 

38.25 

489.29 

127.04 

7.27 

20.81 

362.52 

39.14 

14.65 

472.99 

38.70 

9.74 



MANUAL TRAINING. 



119 



William Ware & Co. 
W. H. Wheeler Co. 



$46.75 
19.48 



•'=;.5,.577.84 



SUNDRIES. 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage S82.93 

Fannie L. Sanborn, sui)erinteudent"s clerk . . .500.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated mone-y 



8582.93 

86,160.77 
39.23 

•S6.200.00 



Manual Training^. 



Appropriation 



Expenditures. 



SUNDRIES. 



.$500.00 



Fred E Browne, supplies 85.80 

Chandler & Farquhar, supplies 7.50 

W. F. Chickering, lathe 2.55 

Mrs. N. J. Davis, repairing and washing aprons 4.25 

Drew Machinery Agency, wood pulleys ... ' 7.50 

J. L. Hammett Co., paper 6.00 

A. K. Hobbs, belting, etc 2.25 

J. Hodge, lumber 26.10 

W. F. Hubbard, lumber 121.48 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage 3.24 

Manning, Maxwell ».% Moore : 

Lathe 210.00 

Supplies 22.-53 

Palmer, Parker >.<: Co., lumber 7.24 

Star Stamp Co., numbei'ing machine 8.10 

E. A. Stratton, blue print 1.65 



120 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Temple & Farrington Co., paper, cardboard . . -$4.00 

John B. Vaiick Co., hardware .57.83 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



S498.02 

8498.02 
1.98 



Paupers off Farm. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



EXPENDITUKES. 



GROCERIES AND MEATS. 



■$9,900.00 
2,566.53 



.$500.00 



$12,460.53 



F. W. Barlow $18.00 

George Boynton 23.70 

George Boisvert 27.00 

L. P. Chandonnet 15.97 

C. H. Clark 21.00 

County & Dahlberg . 3.00 

H. F. Colburn & Co 3.00 

Desrochers & Poirier 69.00 

Eager & Co. 44.00 

C. A. Friborg 8.00 

T. F. Fifield 81.00 

Arthur Gagne " 8.00 

P. F. Grenier 7.00 

J. J. Grenier 8.00 

Felix Harbour 6.00 

B. L. Hartshorn 54.96 

Mrs. Mary Hayes 243.00 

J. F. Healy -297.25 

Pveinhardt Hecker . 19.00 

John A. Kane 112.00 

N. S. LaSalle & Co 116.05 

J. N. Lacourse 700 

G. Lein A- Son 1,154.09 

Lindquist Brothers 92.00 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 



121 



p. U. Lyueli 

G. C Lord 

Maynard it Dupont . . . 
M. R. Maynard it Co . . 

E. J. Madden 

T. H. Mahoney 

Oscar McDuffie 

Martin Mclntire . . . • 
Ulric Messier & Co . ■ • 
A. W. Morse 

E. F. Murray 

North End Provision Co 

O. H. Nonrry 

John W. Nye • • • . . 
Parnell Brothers . . . . 
Frank I. Paige 

F. X. Parent 

E. W. Perkins 

Edmond Pinard .... 

F. H. Poore 

Eugene Quirin 

M. Peloquin & Co . . . 
W. M. Robinson .... 
J. O. Robitaille .... 

M. A. Sheehan 

Splane & Messier . . . 

Eugene Sigrist 

Swinston & Robinson . 
Guy T. Robinson . . . . 
A. L. Robitaille & Co . 

W. J. Price 

Trahan & Co 

Joseph Trahan .... 

Aime Trottier 

Vermont Butter Co . . 
Calixte Vigneault . . . 
Wallace & Knox . . . . 
E. L: White 



|!()03.00 
^4.00 
591.00 
284.00 
222.57 
217.50 
05.00 
64.00 
14.00 
10.00 
35.00 
34.00 
110.00 
13.00 
30.00 
16.00 
38.00 
12.00 
57.00 
25.00 
875.00 
52.00 
44.90 
135.25 
989.50 
2.48 
20.00 
6.00 
30.00 
25.11 
13.00 
8.00 
40.00 
125.00 
1.00 
19.00 
209.00 
1.80 



,.500.13 



P. Beauchamp & Son . 
Charles Boisclair & Co 
Charles H. Bodvvell . . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co . . 



$2. .50 

46.15 

252.32 

15.13 



1^2 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Edward Bourque $19.00 

J. H. DeCourcy Co 57. 26 

W. E. Dunbar & Son 3.75 

Alexis Ferland • . • 38.00 

C. A. & A. W. Flint 58.40 

August Gellricb 15.00 

Philias Graveline 15.50 

E. C. Haskell & Son 9.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co • 130.40 

J. Masse 4.75 

A. D. Maxwell estate 138.25 

Moore & Preston 70.50 

People's Gas Light Co 37.25 

Omar Pepin 39.25 

D. M. Poore 7.50 

E. W. Poore 31.00 

Raiche & Laforce 19.30 

Mrs. August Schink 9.05 

E. V. Turcotte 20.50 

Albert Warren 7.50 

Henry Weber 10.75 

W E. Woodward ' 125.00 



BOARD, CARE, AND RENT. 

Mrs. Olive Auger -figS.OO 

Gideon Belisle 44.00 

Mrs. C. M. Bennett 30.00 

Kate Burton • . ■ 5.00 

• Catherine Clancy 72.00 

Eugene Collity 72.00 

Adelard Dumas 24.00 

Mrs. Theodore Dupont 10.00 

Margaret Eagan 20.00 

W. H. Gilmore 104.00 

Florence Hardy 72.00 

Hillsborough County 808.61 

Mark F. Hill ,60.00 

Henry Hitschfeld 10.00 

Infant Asylum 133.00 

W. H. Maxwell 115.00 

Mrs. Kate McKenna 40.00 

Margaret McFarland 16.00 

N. H. State Hospital .57 

Notre Dame Orphanage 60.00 

Notre Dame Hospital 42.00 



L, 183.01 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 



123 



James Oir 

Mrs- Alvina Pohlman . . 
Sacred Heart Hospital • 
State Industrial School . 
St. Joseph's Boys' Home 
St. Joseph's Orphanage . 
St. Patrick's Orphanage . 

John Sweeney 

Mrs. Ellen Sullivan . . . 

Ellen Shughriie 

Henry Volkmann . . . . 

Mrs. C. Waters 

Women's Aid Home . • • 



$40 00 
8.00 
68.50 
88.92 
10.00 
35.00 

125.00 
10.00 

100.00 

12.00 

80.00 

6.00 

1.52.00 



.$2,571.60 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 



E. C Brigham . . . . 
J. W. Campbell . . . 

John Cayzer 

E. C. Chagnon & Co. • 
Patrick Costello . . . 
Costello Brothers . . 
Dodge & Dodge . • • 
G. W. Dodge Shoe Co. 
W. P. Farmer . . . . 
J. T. Lemire & Co. 
Pellerin ife Simard . 
Patrick Power . . . . 
Gideon Richard . . 
Barney Salner . . . . 

D. F. Shea 

Swanson & Co. ■ • 



$2.00 
14.25 
5.15 
5.00 
6.25 
63.35 
11.55 
8.00 
13.40 
6.15 
23.25 
5.25 
5.00 
1.75 
37.60 
37.00 



.$244.95 



CLOTHIXG. 



Besse, Eldridge & Co. . 

C. M. Floyd 

Hardy & Folsom . . . 
William Marcotte & Co. 
M. A. McDonough . . . 
Joseph Nightingale . 
Joseph St. Yves & Co. 



$23.51 
7.50 
3.00 
5.75 
16.80 
20.50 
10.00 



$87.06 



12^ REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

MKDICIXE, MEDICAL SERVICES, FUNERAL EXPENSES. 

H. D. W. Caivelle, M.D., surgical and special 

treatment ^ 

T? V ni, x^ n $62.50 

i^.X. Chenette, burial outfits gO qo 

H. H. Dinsmore, M.D., assisting Dr. Perkins' . 5 OO 

A. L. Gadbois & Co., burial outfit 25.00 

J- J. Holland, medicine jr q_r 

M. E. Kean,.M.D., medical services ' . . ... 300 

McDonough & Shea, burial outfit 25 00 

M. Potvin & Co., medicine 2 00 

Gillis Stark, M.D., medical services .... 1.50 

F. H. Thurston, medicine 475 79 

George D. Towe, M.D., medical services . . . s.'oo 

E. Y. Turcotte, burial outfits gOOO 

F. L. Wallace, burial outfit 2500 

F. L. Way, medicine \.^ 

H. J. Woods', malted milk ^\q 



SUNDRIES. 



Boston & Maine Railroad, tickets |9.3g 

C. B. Clarkson, paid conveyance to N. H. Hos- 
pital 

John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks 

W. P. Goodman, directories and stationery . . 31 qq 

H. F. Hull, use of team 4 qq 

Henry Lein, conveyance seven people to 

^«^«" 2.76 

E. G. Libbey, use of hack 5 qq 

Manchester Street Railway, tickets ' 30*00 

T. F. Sheehan, expenses to Concord with in- 
sane person ., ^_ 



Total expenditures 



City Fai-m. 

Appropriation 



4.05 
21. .50 



.34 



$110.44 



$12,466.53 



$8,600.00 



CITY FARM. 
Expenditures. 



125 



E. G. Libbey, sviperintendent 
Mrs. E. G. Libbey, matron . . 



1500.00 
300.00 



S800.00 



HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . 

October 

November 

December 

Walter Baird 

Harry Burroughs 

Etta Gleve 

David Hunter 

Sylvester Kelleher 

Frank P. Kenerson 

H. J. Paish 

Maggie Twoomey 

Edward Welch 



$176.43 
123.31 
96.66 
170.64 
144 50 
153.92 
195.89 
160.50 
191.48 
151.89 
143.76 
195.23 

$3.67 
4.66 
5.50 
2.00 
6.00 

18.00 
4.00 

10.39 
4.66 



$1,904.21 



$58.78 



C. H. Bodwell, wood $255.50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 95.00 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, coal 10.00 



$360.50 



CLOTHING, DRY GOODS, ETC. 

Barton it Co., cotton, hose, gingham, etc. . . $31.85 

Besse. Eldridge & Co., clothing 22.75 

A. L. Dyer, shoes 11.40 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., rubber boots 15.30 

W. P. Farmer, boots and shoes 10.50 



126 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



C. M. Floyd, clothing •$ 3*7.00 

James W. Hill Co., dry goods 41.79 

H. M. Moody, clothing 12.00 



MEATS AND PKOVISIONS. 

C. A. Allen $15.87 

F. W. Barlow 30.31 

E. Booth 9.55 

Bruno Brothers 18.75 

J. Bruno 9.50 

C. H. Clark 69.49 

Daniels-Cornell Co 126.99 

C. H. Durgin 15.89 

Eager & Co 11.08 

A. M. Eastman 61.36 

T. F. Fifield 52.62 

T. J. Foley & Co 33.60 

D. A. Gallagher 8.p0 

Granite State Beef Co 2.47 

Granite State Grocery Co 10.92 

Ernest W. Hardy 4.08 

H. A. Horton 4.80 

D. Johnson 6.80 

W. D. Ladd&Co 13.12 

Lang & Euiter 50.00 

Manchester Beef Co 14.0(5 

Manchester Provision Co 244.79 

T. H. Mahoney 20.50 

Horace Marshall . . . • • • 8.09 

Maynard & Dupont 25.42 

M. R. Maynard & Co 179.17 

Nelson Morris & Co 24.07 

J. W. Nye ...••• 114.58 

Ocean Fish Market 41.34 

Henry Parker 307.94 

Parnell Brothers 252.42 

C. B. Perkins 11.49 

Rogers, Perley & Ferguson 97.04 

E. M. Slayton Co 19.00 

W. F. Schonland 10.35 

John P. Squires & Co 15.71 

Summer Street Market 175.26 

J. O.Turcotte 4.58 

J. H. Wiggin & Co 59.45 



CITY FARM. 

FUKXITUKE, KITCHEN UTENSILS. 



127 



C. A. Hoitt & Co., spring, couch, curtains, 

dishes, etc 

K. K. Home, crockery and tinware 

F. E. Nelson, crockery and tinware 



$37.32 

18.05 

4.45 



$59.82 



MEDICINE, MEDICAL AND VETERINARY SERVICES. 



H. H. Dinsmore, M. D., assisting Dr. Perkins 
A. L. Dodge, V. S., visits and medicine . . . 

J. J. Holland, disinfectant 

F. K. Hubbard, medicine 

Marshall & Knowlton, medicine 

Gillis Stark, M. D., 1 visit 

F. H. Thurston, druggists' sundries 

A. F. AVheat, M. D., medical attendance . . . 



$5.00 
4.00 
4.25 
4.00 
.25 
1.50 

34.65 
5.00 



$58.65 



BLACKSMITHING, HARNESSES, ETC 



W. G. Berry, 1 lap robe 

W. E. Greeley, repairing harness 

A. K. Hobbs, harness, leather, buckles, etc. . 
Kimball Carriage Co., harness supplies. Peel's 

Food 

Harry Lambert, horseshoeing 

J. fi. May, brushes 

Donald McDonald, blacksmithing 

ir. C. Ranno & Son, bridle fronts 

J. O. & L. P. Tremblay, horseshoeing .... 
Joseph Vogel & Son, repairing harnesses . . . 

N. J. Whalen, repairs and supplies 

.John F. Woodbury, horseshoeing 



$4.00 

2.00 

■ 4.84 

56.75 

1.65 

6.75 

102.55 

2.10 

114.65 

6.10 

50.72 

26.00 



$378.11 



CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 



J. B. McCrillis & Son . 
Donald McDonald . . 
Sanborn Carriajie Co. 



$33.18 
39.60 
39.80 



$112.58 



128 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

HAY, GRAIN, ETC. 

Adams Brotliers $47.25 

A. S. Brown 405.15 

C. R. Merrill 801.24 



HARDWARE AND FERTII.IZERS. 



Manchester Hardware Co $20.15 

James J. H. Gregory & Son 18 69 

John B. Varick Co 815.10 



PREMIUM ON INSURANCE POLICIES. 



$52.50 


8.75 


21.88 


1750 


26.25 


61.25 


8.75 



W. G. Berry . . . 
George Blanchet . 
Robert R. Chase . 
John Dowst . . . 
Everett & Scott . 
John A. Sheehan 
Fred R. Stark . . 



PRINTING, ADVERTISING, STATIONERY, TELEPHONE. 

City News Co., stationery $1.25 

W. P. Goodman, book and stationery 14.10 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 25.42 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., 1 directory 2.00 

E. A. Stratton, tags .35 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 1.24 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

J. J. Abbott, paint, glass, etc $41.88 

Harry Benard, braces on chairs 4.60 

Thomas Briggs, repairing can and tank . ... 1.00 

Fred C. Darrah, roofing material and labor . . 15.27 

Drew Machinery Agency, repairing boiler . . . 4.53 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 71.57 

J. Hodge, lumber, etc 22.79 

A. K. Hobbs, leather, etc 12.33 



$1,253.64 



$353.94 



$196.88 



$44.36 



INDIGENT SOLDIERS. 129 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing and electric material 

and labor $63.62 

electric fan 13.00 

Pike & Heald Co., coal hods, dippers, repairs . 12.96 

Harry A. Piper, material and labor 17.60 

J. A. Rose, lumber • 13.44 

Harriet B. Varney, sawdust 8.00 

F. T. Provost, lumber and labor 27.10 

$329.69 



SUNDKIES. 

American Express Co., express 10.30 

Ira Barr, 1 heifer 5.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., filling ice house 10.00 

John B. Clarke Co., "Daily Mirror" 7.00 

H. R. Dow & Co., use of hacks 15.00 

Globe Suspender Manufacturing Co., hair 

brushes 3.75 

Kean & Sheehan, use of hack 5.00 

King Dental Co., extracting teeth 1.00 

E. G. Libbey, stamps, etc 7.66 

Manchester & Concord Express Co., express . . .30 
Manchester Employment Agency, furnishing 

cook • -50 

Manchester Slaughtering & Rendering Co., 

dressing hogs 2.00 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., elec- 
tric lights 103.96 

H. J. Marsh, pasturing cattle 26.50 

N. P. Stevens, labor on road machine 6.75 

E. F. Tuson, keys -25 

A. A. Warren, oil 4.90 

Water Commissioners, use of water 90.20 

Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Co., needles . .75 



$290.82 



Total expenditures $8,565.12 

Transferred to unappropriated money 34.88 

$8,600.00 



Indigent Soldiers. 
Appropriation $130.00 



130 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

EXPEXDITUKES. 
GKOCEEIES. 

North End Provision Co $7.00 

Fred H. Poore 70.00 

FUEL. 

A. D. Maxwell estate $33.00 

Moore & Preston 7.00 

Total expenditures 

Ti'ansferred to unappropriated money 

File and Index System. 
Balance from last year unexpended 

ExPENUITrRES. 

E. A. McMillin, document binded $3.50 

Anna S. Smith, labor 200.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to new account 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 
Appropriation 



$77.00 



$40.00 

$117.00 
13.00 

$130.00 



$410.00 



$203.50 

$203.50 
206.50 

$410.00 



$100.00 



BAND CONCERTS. 



131 



Expenditures. 



J. ,J. Abbott, paint, bruslies, etc $6.34 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 300 reports . . . 3.25 

T. A. Lane Co., gasoline, brass 1.15 

Pike & Heald Co., gasoline, lead, solder, etc. . 4.17 

K. M. Starbuck,- charts, questions, etc 11.75 

E. A. Stratton, paper 2.20 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



71.14 



Band Concerts. 



$100.00 



Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

Manchester Cadet Band $100.00 

Manchester City Band ~ 100.00 

Manchester Military Band 100.00 

Turner Band 100.00 

Total expenditures 



$400.00 



$400.00 



$400.00 



Militia. 



Appropriation 



$800.00 



Expenditures. 



Company C, First Eegiment, N. H. N. G. • 
Company F, First Eegiment, N". H. IST. G. . 
Company H, First Eegiment, N. H. N. G. . 
Company L, First Eegiment, N. H. N. G. . 
Louis Bell Post, No. 3, G. A. E • 



$100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 



132 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Joseph Fresclil Post, No. 94, G. A. E $100.00 

Manchester War Veterans 100.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to new account 

Decoration of Soldiers^ Graves. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. E . $100.00 

Louis Bell Post, No. 3, G. A. E 300.00 

Total expenditures 

Purchase of Land Sold for Taxes. 

Appropriation $6,800.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money . . . 911.75 

Expenditures. 

Georf>e E. Morrill, purchased for city 

Total expenditures 

Abatement of Taxes. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Received from bonds sold 80,000.00 

Premium on bonds sold 3,020.00 



$700.00 

$700.00 
100.00 

$800.00 



$400.00 



$400.00 



$400.00 



$7,711.75 



$7,711.75 



$7,711.75 



$85,020.00 



STATE TAX. 133 

Expenditures. 

Amoskeao- :N[aiiufacturino: Co. : 

Judgment, 1898 $19,334.66 

Judoment, 1899 18,654.66 

Judgment, 1900 19,825.00 

Judgment, 1901 24,765.96 

H. H. Dustiu, taxes bought 22.18 

George E- Morrill, sundry persons 1,692.77 

$84,295.23 

Total expenditures -$84,295.23 

Transferred to unappropriated money 724.77 

$85,020-00 

State Tax. 

Appropriation •^^'^3^869.00 

EXPENDITUKES. 

State of New Hampshire $63,869.00 



County Tax. 

Appropriation 

EXPENDITUKES. 

County of Hillsborough 

Elliot Hospital. 
Appropriation 

Expenditures. 
Elliot Hospital, amount appropriated .... 



$94,382.00 



$94,382.00 



$300.00 



$300.00 



134 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital, amount appropriated . . $300.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital. 

Appropriation . . • $300.00 

Expenditures. 
Sacred Heart Hospital, amount appropriated $300.00 

Women^s Aid Home. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
Women's Aid Home, amoiint appropriated $300.00 

W. C. T. U. Mercy Home. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
W. C T. U. Mercy Home, amount appropriated $300.00 



Resolution Raisingf Money and Making Appropriations for 
the year Nineteen Hundred and Two. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Manchester in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of seven hundred thirty-eight thousand three hundred 
sixty-nine dollars and forty-six cents, ($738,369.46) be raised by tax on the 



APPROPRIATIONS. 135 

polls and estates liable thereon, for the use of the city for the year 1902, 

which sum, together with such unappropriated money as may now be in 
the city treasury, or may hereafter come into it, shall be appropriated as 
follows: 

centratj department. 

Interest $42,000.00 

Sinking Fund, trustees 27,000.00 

City Hall 3,800.00 

Printing and stationery 1,850.00 

Incidental expenses ' 8,500.00 

Land sold for taxes 6,800.00 

Mayor's incidentals 300.00 

City officers' salaries 27,900.00 

Payment of funded debt 10,000.00 

Temporary loan 15,709.00 

Auditor's department 2,500.00 

Engineer's department 6,874.73 

Abatement of taxes 2,000.00 

State tax 63,869.00 

County tax 94,382.00 

STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Street and park commissioners 13,500.00 

Repairs of highways 25,000.00 

New highways 7,000.00 

Watering streets 4,700.00 

Macadamizing streets 10,000.00 

Grading for concrete 3,500.00 

Scavenger service 18,000.00 

Street sweeping 2,500.00 

Bridges 6,000.00 

City teams 7,000.00 

Repairs of sewers 5,000.00 

New sewers 20,000.00 

Snow and ice 6,500.00 

Paving Elm Street 12,000.00 

Paving Canal street 4,000.00 

Paving streets 4,000.00 

Unappropriated money 5 000.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Repairs of schoolhouses $10,000.00 

Fuel 8,800.00 



136 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Furniture and supplies $1,200.00 

Printing and advertising 300.00 

Books and stationery 75.00 

Contingent exiienses 2,500.00 

Care of rooms 6,500.00 

Evening schools 1,200.00 

Teachers' salaries 91,000.00 

Evening schools, mechanical drawing 250.00 

Free Text-Books 6,000.00 

Manual training 500.00 

Sewing material 250.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Fire department $70,350.00 

Fire-alarm telegraph 1,700.00 

Hydrant service 18,800.00 

Wilson Hill engine house and combination chemical . . . 6,000.00 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Repairs of buildings $4,625.00 

Commons 4,500.00 

Stark park 1,000.00 

Derryfield park 500.00 

Pine Grove cemetery 10,000.00 

Valley cemetery 3,100.00 

Merrill Yard 100.00 

Plumbing inspectors 100.00 

South Beech street schoolhouse 10,000.00 

South Manchester playground -. . 50.00 

Amoskeag cemetery 250. 00 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Health department $6,800.00 

Isolation hospital 3,000 00 

CITY LIBRARY. 

City library $6,200.00 

PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Paupers off farm $9,900.00 

City farm 8,600.00 



APPROPKIATIONS. 137 

Indigent soldiers $130.00 

Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Elliot hospital 300.00 

Sacred Heart hospital 300.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes hospital 300.00 

Mercy home 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 400.00 

Co. C, First Regiment, K H. N. G 100.00 

Co. F, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Co. A, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Co. L, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. R 100.00 

Louis Bell Post, G. A. R 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans 100.00 

Spanish War Yeterans 100.00 

Band concerts 400.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Police commission • $43,600.00 

Police court 2.900.00 

Police station 2,500.00 

LIGHTING STREETS. 

Lighting Streets $61,000.00 

Passed February 11, 1902. 



138 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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140 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

'Assessors' Oath. 

We, the Assessors of tlie city of Manchester, do solemnly swear that in 
making the invoice for the purpose of assessing the foregoing taxes, we 
appraise all taxable property at its full value, and as we would appraise 
the same in payment of a just debt due from a solvent debtor. So help 
us God. 



Valuation and Taxes. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on the real and personal 
estate, within the city Of Manchester, N. H., for the year 1902, was as 
follows: 



Real estate $26,383,283 

Personal property 



Valuation. 
$26,383,283 
5,253,151 


Rate. 

122.50 

22.50 

22.50 


Tax. 

1593,623.88 
118,195.90 


$31,636,434 
1,407,900 


$711,819.78 
31,677.75 


$33,044,334 


$743,497.53 



Number of polls, 14,079 .... 

Totals 

The share distributed to Manchester of the amount of 
tax assessed, as per returns made by the corporations to 
state treasurer : 

On railroads $41,206.87 

On savings banks 57,512.95 

On insurance companies 3,157.50 

On literary fund 2,834.50 

Grand tax total ; $848,209.35 

For further information in relation to taxes collected by the state, see 
State Treasurer's report 



TAXATION. 



141 



TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



2§ a 






Taxes of 1SS5 
Taxes of 1886 
Taxes of 18S7 
Taxes of 1888. 
Taxes of 1889. 
Taxes of 1890. 
Taxes of 1891. 
Taxes of 1S92. 
Taxes of 1893. 
Taxes of 1894. 
Taxes of 1895. 
Taxes of 1896. 
Taxes of 1897. 
Taxes of 1898. 
Taxes of 1899. 
Taxes of 1900. 
Taxes of 1901. 
Taxes of 1902. 

Total... 



.•»!l,20r>.71 

1,264.85 

1,163.94 

1,580.13 

1,395.13 

1,687.08 

1,966.63 

2,582.12 

4,095.13 

3,514.05 

5,008.40 

5,001.30 

5,311.47 

5,658.46 

5,828.18 

5,393.84 

675.99 ) 
66,206.-53 ) 

743,497.53 



$467.37 
1,199.90 



8863,036.47 



$1,667.2' 



.§ 3.48 

3.72 

10.40 

15.00 

51.22 

196.23 

00,047.11 

650,212.73 



$710,540.49 



$1,205.71 
1,264.85 
1,163.94 
1,580.13 
1,395.13 
1,687.08 
1,966.63 
2,582.12 
4,095.13 
3,514.05 
5,004.92 
4,997.58 
5,301.07 
5,642.86 
5,776.96 
5,197.61 
6,368.04 

92,084.90 

$150,828.71 



142 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

TAX VALUATIONS, ETC., FROM 1890 TO 1902 INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 



Valuation. 



Taxes. 



No. polls. 



Poll tax. 



Valuation 
of poll. 



1890 . 

1891 . 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895 . 
1896. 
1897 . 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901, 
1902 . 



$24,207, 
24,872, 
25,932, 
27,439, 
28,391, 
28,861, 
29,443, 
30,486, 
30,988, 
31,491, 
32,706, 
33,041, 
.33,034, 



740 
492 
044 
742 
710 
122 
668 
,946 
,488 
,784 
,794 
112 
,334 



$462,869.17 
443,541.76 
506,465.17 
507,640.68 
505,372.44 
502,183.02 
547,G51..50 
634,127.80 
604,280.57 
614,096.93 
621,428.47 
654,214.00 
743,497. .53 



9,723 
10,367 
10,673 
11,835 
12,103 
12,244 
i2,.583 
12,921 
12,808 
'13,137 
13,7.59 
13,976 
14,079 



$1.91 
1.78 
1.95 
1.85 
1.78 
1.74 
1.86 
2.08 
1.95 
1.95 
1.90 
1.98 
2.25 



$100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



For years prior to 1890, see reports of 1890 and 1891. 



Statement of Account of George E. Momll, Tax Collector 
for the City of Manchester, N. H.Jwne J, 1902. 



Tax list, 1885 . 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896- 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 



Balance 




Balance 


outstanding 




outstanding 


June 1, 1901. 


Collected. 


June 1, 1902. 


$1,205.71 




ftl,205.71 


1,264.85 




1,264.85 


1,163.94 




1,163.94 


1,580.13 




1,580.13 


1,395.13 




1,395.13 


1,687.08 




1,687.08 


1,966.63 




1,966.63 


2,582.12 




2,582.12 


4,095.13 




4,095.13 


3,514.05 




3,514.05 


5,008.40 


•|i3.48 


5,004.92 


5,001.30 


3.72 


4,997.58 


5,311.47 


10.40 


5,301.07 


5,658.46 


15.60 


5,642.86 


5,828.18 


51.22 


5,776.96 


5,393.84 


196.23 


5,197.61 



Amount collected 

Credit by cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 97. 



$280.65 
280.65 



EXEMPTION FROM TAXATION. 143 

Interest collected .$1,827.81 

Credit by cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 95.. 1,827.81 

Cost collected ^. $1,748.50 

Credit by cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 96- • 1,748.-50 

1901. Dit. 

June 1. To warrant resident list .1653,216.10 

warrant non-resident list 1,147.15 

voluntary list 526.74 

$654,889.99 



1901, 1902. Ck. 

By cash paid treasurer, per vouchers Nos. 81, 89, 
97, 120, 136, 142, 154, 166, 174 in year 1901 ; and 
receipts Nos. 31, 49, 94, 98 in year 1902 1647,182.04 

By abatements, vouchers Nos. 158 in 1901, and 93 
in 1902 1,339.91 

By unpaid taxes, June 1, 1902 6,368.04 



.$654,889.99 



Maxchestek, N. H., October 1, 1902. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George E. Morrill, 
tax collector of said Manchester, and find the same correct, as above 
stated. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions from 

Taxation. 

Constitution of New Hampshire, Article 82, Page 88, Public 

Statutes. 

encouragement of liteuature, etc. 

Art. 82. "Knowledge and learning generally diffused thi-ough a 
community being essential to the preservation of a free government, 
and spreading the opportunities and advantages of education through the 
various parts of the country being highly conducive to promote this end, 
it shall be the duty of legislators and magistrates, in all future periods of 



144 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

this government, to cherish the interests of literature and the sciences, and 
all seminaries and public schools; to encourage private and public in- 
stitutions, rewards, and immunities for the promotion of agriculture, 
arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures, and natural history of 
the country; to covmtenance and inculcate the principles of humanity 
and general benevolence, public and private charity, industry and econ- 
omy, honesty and punctuality sincerity, sobriety, and all social affections 
and generous sentiments among the people; provided, nevertheless, that no 
money raised by taxation shall ever be granted or applied for the use of 
schools or institutions of any religious sect or denomination." 

Public Statutes, Chapter 55. 

Sect, 2. "Real estate, whether improved or unimproved, and whether 
owned by residents or others, is liable to be taxed, except houses of 
public worship, twenty-five hundred dollars of the value of parsonages 
owned by religious societies and occupied by their pastors, school- 
houses, seminaries of learning, real estate of the United States, state, 
or town used for public purposes, and almshouses on county farms. 

Sect. 11. "Towns may by vote exempt from taxation for a term not 
exceeding ten years any manufacturing establishment proposed to be 
erected or put in operation therein, and the capital to be used in 
operating the same, unless such establishment has been previously 
exempted from taxation by some tosvn. 

OPINION OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

58 N. H. Rep., page 623. "Tlie exemption in each case is limited to 
ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole power of taxation 
would be the destruction of government; and the dangerous tendency of 
legislation svispending any part of that power, for any period, is manifest. 
P. Bank v. Billings, 4 Pet. 514, 561. So long as the existing laws remain 
unrepealed, and the constitutional construction heretofore adopted 
remains unchanged, contracts hereafter made under these laws and that 
construction will be valid. If the legislature for any reason wish to 
prevent the making of any more such contracts, their object can be 
accomplished by a repeal of the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective charters 
as "being of the nature of a public charity," as follows : 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute Women, N. H. Laws of 1889, 
chapter l'J9. 

Elliot Hospital, N. H. Laws of 1881, chapter 178. 

Manchester Woman's Aid and Relief Society, organized in January, 
1875, N. H. Laws, 1891, chapter 283. 

Orphanage and Home fur Old Ladies (Catiiolic) on Hanover street, N. 
H. Laws, 1883, chapter 56. 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 145 

Schedule of Property used for Religfious, Charitable and 
Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Taxation by- 
Law, not including: that owned by the city of Man- 
chester. 

Convent, Sisters Jesus Mary, French Catholic ; East Spruce 
street, near Beecli : 

Building §10,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 3,600.00 

-$12,600.00 



Convent, Sisters of Mercy, Catholic; 415 Union street, 
corner Laurel : 

Building $30,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 



Mount St. Mary's Academy, Catholic; from convent lot 
east to Beech street : 

Building • • • 125,000.00 

31,500 square feet of land 0,4.50.00 



Lot south side of Laurel street, corner of Union street, Cath- 
olic ; ^McDonald school : 

Building -$35,000.00 

10,800 square feet of land 5,000.00 



Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' Hojne, Cath- 
olic ; Amherst and Hanover streets : 

Building $14,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land ......... 30,375.00 



St. Patrick's Orphan Asylums, Catholic; 184 Hanover 
street : 

Building $47,000.00 

40,500 square feet land . . ; 40,500.00 



St. Joseph's High School, Catholic; Lowell street, corner of 
Birch : 

Building $12,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 



LTnion-street school. Catholic; corner of Union and Laurel 
streets : 

Building -$4,000.00 

5,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 



•$36,300.00 



$34,450.00 



$40,000.00 



$44,375.00 



$87,500.00 



$20,000.00 



$6,500.00 



146 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. Agnes' school, Catholic; corner Cedar and Pine streets: 

Building .$12,000.00 

20,000 square feet of land 3,200.00 

St. Joseph's school for girls. Catholic; corner Pine and 
Lowell streets: 

Building $10,000.00 

Land included in cathedral lot. 

Convent of Holy Angels, French Catholic ; Beauport street, 
corner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building $15,000.00 

22, .500 square feet of land 4,500.00 

St. George's school, French Catholic; corner Pine and 
Orange streets: 

Building $30,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Monastery of the Precious Blood ; 555 Union street : 

Building .$2,.500.00 

6,750 square feet of land 2,025.00 

Orphanage school, Beauport, Wayne, and Putnam streets; 
French Catholic : 

Building .$25,000.00 

:50,000 square feet of land 6,000.00 

St. Augustine's academy, French Catholic; corner Beech 
and Spruce streets : 

Building .$8,000 00 

15,000 square feet of land 4,500.00 

St. Marie's parochial school, French Catholic ; corner Wayne 
and Cartier streets : 

Building .$12,000.00 

25,000 square feet of land 2,000.00 

Kesidence priest St. Augustine's church, French Catholic; 
383 Beech street : 

Building .$6,000.00 

7,-500 square feet of land 1,875.00 

$7,875.00 



$15,200.00 



$10,000.00 



$19,500.00 



$35,000.00 



$4,.525.00 



$31,000.00 



$12,500.00 



$14,000.00 



$2,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 147 

Orphan Children's school, parish of St. Augustine; 251, 253 
Lake avenue : 

Building- 112,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 



Holy Rosary school, 30 Cedar street: 

Building $8,750.00 

2,500 square feet of land 1,250.00 

Residence priest St. Anne's church, Catholic; 231 Merri- 
mack street: 

Building $5,000.00 

8,820 square feet of land 2,646.00 

87,646.00 
Residence of Catholic bishop; 145 Lowell street: 

Building $40,000-00 

24,000 square feet of land 12,000.00 

$52,000.00 
Residence priest St. George's church, French Catholic; 
Orange street, corner Pine : 

Building $2,500.00 

10,000 square feet of land 4,000.00 

$6,500.00 
Residence priest St. Mary's church, French Catholic; 376 
Beaui^ort street. West Manchester: 

Building $2,500.00 

5,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$3,500.00 
St. Anne's church. Catholic; Union street, corner Merri- 
mack : 

Building $30,000.00 

10,180 square feet of land 5,090.00 

St. Augustine's church, French Catholic; Beech street. 
Corner East Spruce : 

Building $28,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 8,250.00 

St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel. Catholic; Pine street 
corner Lowell: 

Building $70,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 30,375.00 



$17,000.00 



$10,000.00 



$2,.500.00 



?2, 500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,-500.00 



$35,090.00 



$31,250.00 



$100,375.00 



148 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. Marie's church, French Catholic; Beauport street, cor- 
ner Wayne, West Manchester : 

Building §25,000.00 

70,000 square feet of land 14,000.00 

St. Raphael's church and school, German Catholic ; Third 
street, corner Ferry, West Manchester : 

Building •?35,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 3,4000.00 

St. George's church, French Catholic; Pine street, corner 
Orange : 

Building $75,000.00 

18,690 square feet of land 7,614.00 

St. Patrick's church and school, Catholic; Kelley street, 
Cartier street, and Coolidge avenue: 

School building $20,000.00 

56,281 square feet of land 4,502.00 

St. Antoine de Padoiie church. Catholic ; 260 Belmont 
street : 

Building -$4,000.00 

Residence priest St. Antoine de Padoue's church, Catholic; 
268 Belmont street: 

Building • $5,500.00 

Land 4,000.00 

9,500.00 
St. Hedwidge church, Polish Catholic ; Merrimack, corner 
Pine street: 

Building §3,000.00 

Land 6,000.00 

Residence priest St. Hedwidge church, same lot: 

Building $4,000.00 



First Baptist church; Union street, corner Concord: 

Building $28,000.00 

11,250 square feet of laud 6,750 00 

First Freewill Baptist Church ; Merrimack street, corner 
Chestnut : 

Building 812,400.00 

12,600 square feet of land 12,600.00 



839,000.00 



$38,400.00 



882,614.00 



824,502.00 



84,000.00 



82,500.00 



$9,000.00 
82,500.00 

834,750.00 
825,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 149 

Second Baptist chnrcli ; ]Meniniaek street, near Pine: 

Building !i;9,000.00 

9,450 square feet of land 3,780.00 



People's Baptist church; Chestnut street, corner Concord: 

Building $8,000.00 

3,200 square feet of land 2,000.00 

First Congregational church ; Hanover street, corner 
Union : 

Building iS30.000.00 

43,200 square feet of land 34,560.00 

Second Congregational church ; Market street, corner 
Franklin : 

Building .$25,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 19,000.00 

Third Congregational church; South Main street, corner 
Milford, West Manchester: 

Building 88,000.00 

23,000 square feet of laud 3,000.00 

First M. E. church; Valley street, corner Jewitt: 

Building $8,000.00 

11,400 square feet of land 1,000.00 

St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, corner Amherst: 

Building $25,000.00 

10,010 square feet of land 6,000.00 

Trinity M. E. church : School street : 

Building $2,000.00 

12,176 square feet of land 3,000.00 

St. James M. E. church; Pennacook street, corner Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

11,000 square feet of land 2,200.00 

Grace church. Episcopal; Lowell street, corner Pine: . 

Building $20,000.00 

9,;300 square feet of land 6,975.00 

First Unitarian church: Concord street, corner Beech: 

Building $24,000.00 

13,500 square feet of land 6,000.00 



$12,780.00 



$10,000.00 



$64,560.00 



$44,000.00 



$11,000.00 



$9,000.00 



$31,000.00 



$5,000.00 



$11,200.00 



$26,975.00 



$30,000.00 



150 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

First Universalist churcli; Lowell street, near Elm: 

Building- $17,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land • • • 15,000.00 

Christian church, Protestant ; Hall street, corner Merrimack: 

Building $9,000.00 

Land 1,000.00 

First Presbyterian church, German ; Second street, corner 
Bath, West Manchester: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Swedish Lutheran church, Protestant; Sagamore, corner 
Pine : 

Building $7,500.00 

10,950 square feet of land 2,000.00 

Swedish Evangelical Mission; Pine street, corner Orange: 

Building $6,500.00 

Land 4,100.00 

Swedish Baptist church; Arlington street, near Maple: 

Building $5,000.00 

4,432 square feet of land 1,100.00 

Second Advent church : Amherst street, between Pine and 
Union : 

Building $5,100.00 

4,500 square feet of land 3,375.00 

City Mission chapel, Protestant; Merrimack street, corner 
Beech: 

Building $7,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,000.00 

Westminster Presbyterian church ; Brook street, corner 
Hazel : 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

South Manchester Union chapel, Protestant; Elm street, 
south : 

Building 12,500.00 

10,747 sciuare feet of land 1.000.00 



$32,000.00 



$10,000.00 



$5,500.00 



$9,500.00 



$10,600.00 



3,100.00 



$8,475.00 



$13,000.00 



$17,500.00 



$3,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 151 

First Church of Christ, Scientist; Harrison street, corner 
Albert: 

BiTildinj? $14,000.00 

Land 5,000.00 



Episcopal Mission church ; North Main street, corner 
School, West Manchester: 

Building 13,500.00 

19,412 square feet of land 4,000.00 

Residence pastor St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, 
near Amherst : 

Building .$:3,000.00 



Residence pastor First Congregational church ; 590 Beech 
street, near Bridge : 

Building .$5,000.00 

8,100 square feet of land 2,400.00 

f 7,400. 00 
Residence pastor Grace Episcopal church ; corner of Harri- 
son and Union streets: 

Building .$6,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land .3,7.50.00 

§9,750.00 
German School Society ; Third, Bath and Ferry streets : 

Building $4,-500.00 

10,187 square feet of land 2,-500.00 

Elliot Hospital, Protestant; East Manchester: 

Building .$23,000.00 

Land 7,000.00 

Elliot Hospital lot; Hanover street, corner Chestnut: 

Building -$3,000.00 

Land 13,000.00 

Elliot Hospital: 

Land and buildings. Main street -$4,000.00 

Land and buildings, Quincy street 2,-500.00 

Women's Aid Home; Pearl street, corner Beech: 

Building $15,000.00 

57,.530 square feet of land. 10,000.00 



-$19,000.00 



$7,-500.00 



$2,-500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$7,000.00 



$30,000.00 



$1(5,000.00 



■$6,500.00 



$25,000.00 



152 REPORT OF THE CITY AL'DITOR. 

Women's Aid Home: Bridge street, corner Chestnut: 

Buildings §9,000.00 

6,037.5 square feet of land 3,000.00 



Manchester Children's Home; Webster street: 

Building 820,000. 00 

55,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Residence pastor Swedish Lutheran church ; Sagamore 
street, corner Pine : 

Building §3,000.00 

10,200 square feet of land 1,020.00 

§4,020.00 
Gale Home : 

One half Martin's block, Elm street .... $25,000.00 

Land and building, Pearl street, corner Ash 25,000.00 



EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 

Church property, Catholic §36^,231.00 

Convent property, Catholic 72,925.00 

Parochial residences, Catholic 17,500.00 

Parochial Schools, Catholic 245,050.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions . . . 131,875.00 

Church property, Protestant 457,940.00 

Parochial residences, Protestant 10,000.00 

Private school property, Protestant 7,000.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions . . . 162,000.00 



TAXABLE. 

Land and Buildings, Catholic 73,521.00 

Land and Building.s, Protestant • 14,170.00 



1 



.$12,000.00 



•S22..500.00 



•$2,500.00 



§50,000.00 



832,181.00 



eG36, 940.00 



887,691.00 



Total exempt and taxable . . $1,556,812.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION, 



153 





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1^6 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Remarks.— The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the 
cemeteries of the city to parties who pay .$1Q0 and up>yard. There are 
§oO,000 in cemetery bonds, so called, not negotiable, in the hands of 
the city treasurer, which are not included in the $1,765,000. 

Total amount of bonded debt, including cemetery bonds -$1,815,000.00 
Net indebtedness for water purposes 800 000.00 



Net debt after deducting water debt -. . . . 1 



,015,000.00 



As shown in the assessors' books for the year 1902: 
The assessed value of personal property, including poll 

**^ $6,661,051.00 

The assessed value of real estate 26 383 283.00 

Total value for taxation ,. .$33,044,334.00 

Tax rate, 2.25 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 3 072 

Per cent of net indebtedness (including d«bt for water ' ' 

purposes) to assessed valuation 5 492 

Population, census of 1900 ' 56'987 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been promptly paid at maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being payable in gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

A sinking fund was established in 1893. 

Total amount of sinking fund December 31, 1902, ■?310,936.74 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the water- 
works is limited to the sum of -$600,000 by section 6, chapter 70, New 
Hampshire Laws of 1871, entitled "An act to enable the city of ' Man- 
chester to establish water-works," except as further extended an 
amount of -$300,000 by laws of 1891, chapter 26; and -$200,000 by laws 
of 1895, chapter 172. 

SUMMARY OF CITY DEBT. 

Amount of bonded debt January 1, 1902 $1,956 319.00 

Accrued interest on bonded debt 25 258.00 

Bonds issued during year gQ qqq qq 

■$2,061,577.00 
Amount of bonded and temporary debt paid in 1902 110,000.00 

Total indebtedness December 31, 1902 $1,951,577.00 



STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT. 



157 



AVAILABLE ASSETS. 



Net cash on hand December 31, 1902 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1902 

Stock of Suncook Valley Eailroad, estimated value 
Sinking fund December 31, 1902 



1144,472.75 

92,084.90 

14,500.00 

310,936.74 

1561,994.39 



15o:ni)ed debt. 



Total net indebtedness January 1, 1902 81,385,968.00 

Total net indebtedness January 1, 1903 1,389,582.00 

Increase 13,614.00 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE 
BONDED DEBT. 



Year. 


1 

S 
u 

.SB 




s S . 

>- OJ c 
1- 


6 
a 
S 

O 


EM 
O 

S 
o 

I . 


2 

ST 
" 3 

in iC 

1^ 


3 

o 
S 

5o 


a c^ 
5 S ^ 


o2 
.2; be 


EH 


1890 


.^27,000 

24,000 

18,000 

18,000 

18,000 

18,000 

12,000 

9,000 

0,000 

0,000 

(5,000 

G,000 

3,000 


$0,000 
8,000 
12,000 
12,000 
14,000 
14,600 
20,000 
22,000 
24,000 
24,000 
24,000 
24,000 
24,000 




$623.75 
813.92 
1,000.00 
1,041.06 
1.550.00 
1,812.50 
2.112.50 
2,5(10.00 
2,500.00 
2,500.00 
2,500.00 
2, .500. 00 
2,500.00 


^7,000 
7,200 
7,200 
7,200 


$2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2.400 
2;400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 


$6,200 
0,200 
6,200 
G,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 






$49,423.75 
48,613.92 
46,800.00 
46,841.66 
59,6.50.00 
(;S,712..50 
S". 01 2.50 


1891 








1892 .. 








1893 






1894 . 


S9,50'0 

9,r,oo 
9,r,no 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 


$8,000 
12,000 
16,(1(1(1 
10,(10(1 
16,000 
19,.500 
19,500 
19, .500 
20,850 




1895... 
1896... 




S4,S(I0 
14,4(l( 


1897... 




t::!,(.)00 80,000.00 
13,000 79,000.00 


1898... 




1899... 




11,400' 81,500 00 


1900... 




10,520 80,620.00 
8,800 78,900.00 
8,200! 76.fi.50.0n 


1901... 




1902... 













158 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 159 

Valuation of Real Estate Owned by the City. 

High school, Beech street, comer Lowell : 

Building $170,000.00 

59,400 square feet of land 17,820.00 

$187,820.00 

Farnklin-street school, Franklin street, corner Pleasant: 

Building $16,000.00 

19,200 square feet of land 19,200.00 

$35,200.00 

Spring-street school. Spring street: 

Building $13,000.00 

13,(300 square feet of land 13,600.00 

$26,600.00 

Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, corner Merrimack: 

Building $45,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

$53,000.00 

Ash-street school. Ash street, corner Bridge : 

Building .$.50,000.00 

57,537 square feet of land 17,262.00 

$67,262.00 

Main-street school. North Main street. West Manchester: 

Building $6,000.00 

40,293.4 square feet of land 10,073.00 

16,073.00 

Webster-street school, Webster street: 

Building . . . • $39,000.00 

55,714 3-4 square feet of land 13,928.00 

$.52,928.00 

Blodget-street school, Blodget street: 

Building 1,500.00 

9,000 square feet of land 3,600.00 

$5,100.00 

Lowell-street school, Lowell street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $1,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 9,000.00 

$10,000.00 

Merrimack-street school, Merrimack street, corner Union: 

Building ' $15,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 

$21,300.00 

Parker school, South Main street, West Manchester: 

Building $20,000.00 

13,6.50 square feet of land 2,047.00 

$22,047.00 



160 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Bakersville seliool, Elm street, south: 

Building .§10,000.00 

24,184 square feet of land 3,628.00 

Stark District school, Eiver road, north: 

Building $1,000.00 

43,560 s(]uare feet of land • 100.00 

Amoskeag school. Front street, Amoskeag: 

Building $8,000.00 

6,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

Eimmon bchool, corner Araory and Dubuque streets: 

Building .'ipl7,400.00 

16,600 square feet of land 2,490.00 

Goffe's Falls school, Goft'e"s Falls: 

Building .$4,000.00 

47,916 square feet of land 250.00 

Harvey District school, Nutt road: 

Building -$2,000.00 

21,780 square feet of laud 100.00 

Webster Mills school, Webster Mills: 

Building .$400.00 

5,445 square feet of land 100.00 

Old Hallsville school. East Manchester: 

Building .$500.00 

30,075 square feet of land 3,008.00 

Youngsville school, Youngsville: 

Building §.500.00 

51,228 square feet of land 100.00 

Mosquito Pond school, Mos(]uito Pond: 

Building 400.00 

10,890 square feet of land 100.00 

Pearl-street school : 

Building $18,700.00 

Land 3,200.00 



$13,628.00 



$1,100.00 



$9,000.00 



$19,890.00 



$4,250.00 



$2,100.00 



$500.00 



.$3,508.00 



$600.00 



$500.00 



$21,900.00 



REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 161 

Varney school, Bowman street, corner Mast, West Man- 
chester : 

Building $43,750.00 

Land 6,700.00 



New Hallsville school, Jewett street, corner Young, East 
■Manchester: 

Building $29,800.00 

44,000 square feet of land 3,300.00 

Straw School, Chestnut street, corner Harrison : 

Building .$30,000.00 

32,400 square feet of land 16,200.00 

New Wilson school, Wilson, Cedar, and Auburn streets : 

Building §30,000.00 

40,000 square feet of laud 5,000.00 

South Manchester school, Titus avenue : 

Building • $12,000.00 

48,400 square feet of land 1,000.00 



EXGINE-HOUSES. 

Engine-house and stable. Central Station, Vine street : 

Building $31,800.00 

21,718.86 square feet of laud 25,438.00 

North Main-street engine-house. North Main street. West 
Manchester : 

Building $18,000.00 

11,819 square feet of land 2,955.00 

AYebster - street engine-house, Webster street, corner 
Chestnut : 

Building $12,000.00 

8,510 square feet of land 2,180.00 



Merrimack engine-house. Lake avenue : 

Building 115,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 



$50,450.00 



$33,100.00 



$4(3,200.00 



$35,000.00 



$13,000.00 



$752,056.00 



$57,238.00 



$20,955.00 



— $14,180.00 



$18,000.00 



I 



162 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Hosehouse and cottage, Maple street, corner East High : 

Building $3,000.00 

18,330 square feet of land 3,666.00 

Engine-house and wardroom, ward 9, Rimmon and Amory 
streets, West Manchester : 

Building $22,755.00 

6,000 square feet of land 870.00 



•$6,666.00 



§23,625.00 



South Manchester Hosehouse : 

Building §4,200.00 

4,278 square feet of land 684.00 | 



OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City Library, Dean avenue, corner Franklin street : 

Building .§35,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 30,000.00 

City Hall, Elm street, corner Market : 

Building §20,000.00 

100,000 square feet of land 150,000.00 

City farm, Mammoth road : 

Building $5,(00.00 

46.66 acres, west Mammoth road 70,000.00 

81.55 acres, east Mammoth road 65,240.00 

Court house, Franklin street, corner West Merrimack : 

Building §20,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 57,000.00 

Battery building, Manchester street: 

Building §13,000.00 

3,400 square feet of land 5,100.00 

Police station, Manchester street, corner Chestnut : 

Building §40,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land . 15,000.00 



§4,884.48 



$145,548.48 



§65,000.00 



§170,000.00 



§140,240.00 



§77,000.00 



$18,100.00 



.$55,000.00 



REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 163 

Slayton Lot, Manchester street : 

Police patrol stable $4,000.00 

Building 300.00 

2,908 square feet of laud 4,700.00 

$9,000.00 

City stable aud other buildings, Franklin street ; 

Building $15,950.00 

44,656 square feet of land 89,312.00 

$105,262.00 

Police station, Clinton street. West Manchester : 

Building $3,500.00 

3,790 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$4,500.00 

Ward 5 wardroom. Lake avenue : 

Building $4,500.00 

Land 1,000 00 

$5,000.00 

City stable, district No. 10 .... • $1,200.00 

City scales, Franklin street : 

Building $300.00 

Gravel lots, Goffstown : 

2 acres $400.00 

Gravel lot, Youngsville : 

1 acre $500.00 

Gravel lot, district No. 10, bought of Brooks & Brock (city 
has right to remove gravel until August 25, 1903) : 
1 1-3 acres $500.00 



$652,502.00 



Personal Property owned by the City. 

Property in care city engineer $1,149.00 

in care chief engineer fire department 115,874.50 

in care street and park commission 28,787.67 

in care superintendent of schools 87,049.00 

in care of city messenger . 3,000.00 

in care city marshal and janitor 7,250.00 

in care superintendent of city farm 12,544.87 

in care trustees city library 30,000.00 



164 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



in care superintendent of Pine Grove cemetery . $248.35 

in care superintendent of Valley cemetery . . . 106.00 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad, in care of city treasurer 50,000.00 

Personal p roperty in care city weigher 1,000.00 

$287,009.39 

Uncollected taxes in 1902 192,084.90 

Net cash in treasury, December 31, 1902 144,472.75 



$236,557.65 



Other Real and Personal Estate owned by the City. 



Soldiers' monument 

Permanent inclosure of commons 

Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 

Fountains and water-troughs on streets and commons 

City tomb 

McGregor bridge 

Granite bridge 

Soiith Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river . . . 

Second-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 

Print-Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal . . . 

Two bridges in highway district No. 9 

One bridge at Goffe's Falls 

Expended on construction of sewers 



$25,000.00 

10,200.00 

25,000.00 

3,600.00 

10,000.00 

90,000.00 

130,000.00 

28,4.50.00 

52,036.00 

5,000.00 

2,000.00 

3,500.00 

737,594.00 

$1,122,380.00 



PAKKS AND CEMETERIES. 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres $200,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery, about 96 acres 46,700.00 

Amoskeag cemetery, 1.23 acres 4,340.00 

Stark park, 28 acres 9,000.00 

Derryfield park, 76 acres 25,000.00 

Concord common, 4.48 acres 200, 000. 00 

Tremont common, 2.25 acres 40,000.00 

Hanover common, 3 acres 100,000.00 

Park common, 3.49 acres • 60,000.00 

Merrimack common, 5.89 acres 200,000.00 

Wagner's park, 9.85 acres 12,000.00 

Land on Piscataquog river 3,500.00 



$900,540.00 



AUDITORS OFFICE. 



165 



WATEK-WORKS. 



Real estate and personal iiroperty of water-works, at cost 

price .$1,570,334.07 



RECAPITULATION. 

Real estate owned by the city, schoolhouses 

Real estate owned by the city 

Real estate owned by city, engine-houses . 

Water-works at cost price 

Personal property owned by the city 

Uncollected taxes and cash 

Other real and personal property . . 
Parks and cemeteries . 



$752,056.00 
652,502.00 
145,548.48 

1,570,334.07 
287,009.39 
236,557.65 

1,122,380.00 
900,540.00 

$5,666,927.59 



PROPERTY ACCOUNT. 



Inventory of assets, December 31, 1902 $5,666,927.59 

Inventory of assets, December 31. 1901 5,561,978.11 

Gain in valuation $104,949.48 



Auditor^s Office. 

City hall building. Open from 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5 p. m. ; 7 to 9 
p. M., on Thursday. 

In every bill presented to the city auditor for his approval, the follow- 
ing points will be considered and passed upon. 

1. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination within the 
scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on the city government ? 

2. Is the bill certified by the party legally authorized to make the 
contract, or cause the expenditure to be made ? 

3. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, and is 
there a balance unexpended sufficient to pay this bill ? 

4. Are the number of ai-ticles in the bill, or the measurements, either 
of dimensions, quantities, or weights, correctly and fully stated, and is 
the proof of the delivery to the city of the whole amount charged 
sufficient '? 



106 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely in 
excess as to require the attention of the city councils to be called to 
the same ? 

6. Is the bill written in a fair legible hand, correctly cast, and on 
paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its proper backing and 
filing? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and the total 
amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the amount of the 
work not yet completed, and the per cent retained, if any, should be 
stated in the bill. 

8. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which affect the 
question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for further information or 
correction as the circumstances of each case may require. 

COUKT DECISIONS, LEGAL POINTS AND KTJLES, RELATING TO THE APPROVAL 
OK DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

No bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until the auditor 
has approved it as correct. 

Public trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the city councils 
cannot be delegated to others, pillon's Municipal Corporations, section 
96, volume 1. 

The executive powers of the city, except where vested in the mayor, 
shall be exercised by the mayor and aldermen. General Laws, chapter 
46, section 14. 

The mayor and aldermen have all the powers and authority of selectmen 
of towns unless it is otherwise provided by law, General Laws, chapter 46, 
section 14. 

Joint standing committees have advisory powers only; they cannot 
legally be endowed with executive or legislative powers by ordinance or 
resolution of the city councils, as no by-laws or ordinance shall be 
repugnant to the constitution or laws of the state. 

No member of either branch of the city councils can enter into any 
verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to or do any work for the 
city. Any firm of which a member is also a member of the city councils 
is included in this prohibition. 

No city official, or department, or board of officials having legal power 
to expend money for the benefit of the city can purchase of or contract 
with themselves, with any one of the board, or with any firm with which 
one of said officials is a member. Dillon's Municipal Corporations, volume 
1, page 436, section 444. 

Every bill against the city shall specify the particular appropriation to 
which the same should be charged, and the moneys paid will be charged 
to such appropriations only. 



auditor's office. 167 

He who is intrusted with the business of others cannot be allowed to 
make such business a source of profit to himself. 

All orders passed by the city councils authorizing a ministerial act to 
be performed by its agent or agents must be strictly construed, and the 
act to be done must be specifically stated. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. (General Laws, 
chapter 106, section 11.) They have no power conferred upon them by law 
or ordinance to purchase new apparatus of any kind. 

The joint standing committee on fire department have advisory 
powers only. 

The laws and ordinances require the city auditor to withhold his signa- 
ture from all bills against any appropriation where the amount of the 
appropriation is expended, until the city council shall have provided the 
means of paying the same. Section 4, chapter 3 of the City Ordinances, 
and section 4, ordinances relating to the duties of the city auditor, 
approved January 7, 1890. 

The power of towns to raise and appropriate money is derived solely 
from statutory provisions, which restrict the power to certain specified 
objects and other necessary charges. 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those prescribed 
by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, and generally will 
not be permitted, to carry such votes into effect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discretion of towns to 
vote gifts or to select donees; their charity is a duty defined, commanded, 
enforced, and regulated, and the objects of it are designated by law. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a minority in an unlimited 
manner. Gove v. Eppiug, 41 N. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to make 
expenditures within the scope of their powers, for their respective depart- 
ment: For fire department and fire alarm telegraph, the chief engineers, 
to be submitted monthly to the approval of the board of engineers ; for 
police department, mayor and police commission; for police court, police 
judge; for water-works department, superintendent, subject to the rules 
of the board of commissioners and ordinances relating thereto ; for city 
farm, superintendent ; for overseers of the poor, each overseer, subject to 
the rules of the board of overseers, and their monthly review and approval ; 
for schools, superintendent, or such person as the board of school com- 
mittee may designate, bills to be approved by the board monthly; for 
streets, sewers, and other work under these departments, street and park 
commissioners; for city clerk's office, treasurer's office, tax collector's 
office, assessors' office, auditor's office, incidental expenditures, city 
physician, city messenger, city solicitor, city engineer, mayor; for ceme- 
teries, superintendents, subject to board of trustees (to consist of citizens 
not members of the city councils) ; for health department, board of health. 



168 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

subject to approval of mayor; city library, board of trustees or person 
designated by them. It may be stated as a general rule, that all subordi- 
nate officials are under the supervision and control of the mayor, subject 
to such limitations and restrictions as the board of aldermen, acting as a 
board, may require. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC 

LIGHTS. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 



Gas Lights in Use, 

1 corner State and Grove. 

2 Pleasant, between Franklin and Canal 
1 Franklin and Auburn. 

1 Elm. 

1 Elm, near Hutcliinson's Foundry. 

1 Elm. 

1 Mechanic. 

1 Hollis, corner Kidder court. 

1 Bridge and Arkwright. 

1 Bridge and Elm. 

1 Orange and Clarke avenue. 

1 Orange and Chestnut. 

1 Chestnut and Blodget. 

1 Blodget, near Elm. 

1 West Salmon. 

1 West Appleton. 

1 Monroe. 

1 Chestnut and Clarke. 

1 Chestnut, near Carpenter. 

1 Chestnut, near Appleton. 

1 Beech and Orange. 

1 Maple and Orange. 

1 Maple, between Bridge and Lowell. 

1 corner Walnut and Pearl. 

1 Walnut, between Bridge and Lowell. 

1 Ash, between Bridge and Lowell. 

1 Maple and Pearl. 

1 Arlington, near Swedish church. 

1 Maple and East High. 

1 Lowell, above Maple. 

1 Button and Amherst. 

1 Hanover, between Beech and Maple. 

1 Hanover, near Lincoln. 

1 Belmont and Amherst. 

1 Belmont and Concord. 

1 Belmont and East High. 

171 



^72 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1 Beacon and Lowell. 
1 Beacon and Concord. 
1 Beacon and Amherst. 
1 Belmont and Manchester. 
1 Belmont and Central. 
1 Massabesic and Taylor. 

1 Ainsworth avenue and Hayward. 

2 Jewett, between Young and Hayward. 
2 Union, near Auburn. 

1 Willow, near jail. 

2 Brown avenue. 
2 Hancock. 

1 Turner, near German hall. 

1 Milford and Bowman. 

1 Milford and Williams. 

1 A and B. 

1 George. 

1 Mast. 

1 Parker. 

1 Granite and Dover. 

1 Granite and Quincy. 

1 Quincy and Douglas. 

1 Douglas and West. 

1 Douglas. 

1 Douglas and Turner. 

1 Belmont and Hayward. 

1 Main. 

1 Prout avenue. 

1 Carroll. 

1 Waldo. 

1 Chestnut. 

I Walnut and Prospect. 

1 Boynton and C 

Total, 74 gas lights. 



Naphtha Lights in Use. 

1 Candia road, corner Orchard avenue. 

1 Mammoth road, corner Cilley road. 

1 Mammoth road, corner Island Eoad. 

1 Mammoth road, corner Island Pond. 

1 Young road, near Taylor. 

1 Taylor, between Young and Somerville. 

1 Wilson, corner Clay. 

1 Valley, east of Taylor. 

1 Taylor, between Valley and Railroad. 



No. 



GAS LIQHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 173 

1 Grove, near Eailroad. 

1 James Hall road, corner Hanover. 

1 Hanover, near Page. 

1 Hanover, east of Page. 

1 Hanover, corner Procter road. 

1 Hanover, corner Candia load. 

1 Hanover, near Sherburne. 

1 Hanover, near Lake Shore road. 

1 Hanover, corner Lake Shore road. 

1 Hanover, near Lake pavilion. 

1 Lake Shore Road, south of railroad track. 

1 Lake Shore road, opposite Proctor road. 

1 Lake Shore road, on road to pumping station. 

2 Lake Shore road. 

1 Candia road, at railroad crossing, Proctor road. 
6 Candia road. 
1 Candia road, corner Page. 
1 Candia road, between Page and Cody. 
1 Candia road, corner Cody. 
1 Nutt road. 
1 Benton and Jones. 
4 Calef road. 
17 Goffe's Falls. 
1 Nelson and Hall. 
1 James Hall road. 
1 Lincoln and Vailey. 
1 Maple and Valley. 
1 Haywood and Lincoln. 
1 Hanover, near Clough. 
Total, G3 lights. 



Electric Lights in Use, 



1. 


A, near B, 


2. 


A and South Main, 


3. 


Adams and Car tier, 


4. 


Amherst and Elm, 


5. 


Amherst and Vine, 


6. 


Amherst and Chestnut, 


7. 


Amherst and Pine, 


8. 


Amherst and Union, 


9. 


Amherst and Beech, 


10. 


Amherst and Ash, 


11. 


Amherst and Maple, 



174 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 12. Amherst and Lincoln, arm. 

13. Amherst and Ashland, " 

14. Amherst and Hall, " 

15. Araory and Main, pole. 

16. Amory and Beauport, " 

17. Amory and Rimmon, " 

18. Amory and Amory street extension, arm. 

19. Amory, near Montgomery, " 

20. Amory and Alsace, " 

21. Amory and Essex, " 

22. Amory and Morgan, " 

23. Amoskeag bridge, west, " 

24. Amoskeag bridge, east, " 

25. Amoskeag and Front, " 

26. Appleton and Elm, " 

27. Appleton and North Adams, pole. 

28. Appleton and Union, arm. 

29. Arlington and Russell " 

30. Arlington and Warren, " 

31. Arlington and Ashland " 

32. Auburn and Elm, " 

33. Auburn and Chestnut, " " 

34. Auburn and Pine, " 

35. Auburn and Union, pole. 

36. Auburn and Beech, " 

37. Auburn and Maple, " 

38. Auburn and Wilson, arm. 

39. Auger avenue and Nutt road " 

40. Baker and Brown avenue " 

41. Baker and Elm, " 

42. Bath and Second, ' pole. 

43. Beech and Portsmouth Railroad, arm. 

44. Beech and Lawrence Railroad, 

45. Bell and Wentworth, 

46. Blaine and Main, 

47. Blaine and Second, 

48. Blaine and Third, 

49. Blodget and Elm back street, 

50. Blodget and Pine, 

51. Blodget and Union. 

52. Blodget and Walnut, 

53. Blodget and Ash, 

54. Bow and Bartlett, pole. 

55. Boynton, arm. 

56. Bowman place and Tilton, " 

57. Bowman, near Milford, " 

58. Bremer and Dubuque, " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 175 

arm. 



1. 59. 


Bridge and McGregor, 


GO. 


Bridge and Canal, 


61. 


Bridge and Elm, 


62. 


Bridge and Cliestnut, 


63. 


Bridge and Pine, 


64. 


Bridge and Union 


65. 


Bridge and Walnut, 


66. 


Bridge and Beech, 


67. 


Bridge and Ash, 


68. 


Bridge and Maple, 


69. 


Bridge and Nashua, 


70. 


Bridge and Linden. 


71. 


Bridge and Hall, 


72. 


Bridge and Belmont, 


73. 


Bridge and Highlands, 


74. 


Brown avenue and Elm, 


75. 


Brown avenue, near Tannery, 


76. 


Brook and Elm, 


77. 


Brook and Chestnut, 


78. 


Brook and Pine, 


79. 


Brook and Hazel, 


80. 


Brook and Union, 


81. 


Brook and Beech, 


82. 


Brook and Maple, 


83. 


C and B, 


84. 


Candia road and Mammoth road. 


85. 


Carpenter and Elm, 


86. 


Carpenter and Union, 


87. 


Cedar and Canal, 


88. 


Cedar and Elm, 


89. 


Cedar and Chestnut, 


90. 


Cedar and Pine, 


91. 


Cedar and Union, 


92. 


Cedar and Beech, 


93. 


Cedar and Lincoln, 


94. 


Cedar, near Maple, 


95. 


Central and Bedford, 


96. 


Central street hill, 


97. 


Central and Elm, 


98. 


Central and Chestnut, 


99. 


Central and Pine, 


100. 


Central and Union, 


101. 


Central and Beech, 


102. 


Central and Maple, 


103. 


Central and Lincoln, 


104. 


Central and Wilson, 


105. 


Central and Hall, 



pole, 
arm. 

a 

pole. 



pole, 
arm. 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. - 176 

No. 106. Central, near Cass, arm. 

107. Charles, 

108. Charleston avenue and Carroll, 

109. Chestnut and Eay Brook, 

1 10. Clarke and Eiver road, 

111. Clarke and Elm. 

112. Clarke and Union, 

113. Clinton and Dover, 

114. Conant and Beauport, 

115. Conant and Eimmon, ■ ' pole. 

116. Conant and Montgomery, arm. 

117. Concord and Yine, " 

118. Concord and Chestnut, " 

119. Concord and Pine, " 

120. Concord and Union, " 

121. Concord and Walnut, " 

122. Concord and Beech, " . 

123. Concord and Maple, " 

124. Concord and Button, " 

125. Concord and Derry, " 

126. Concord and Ashland, " 

127. Concord and Hall, " 

128. Concord square, east, pole. 

129. Concord square, west, " 

130. Coolidge avenue, near Kelly, arm. 

131. Dean and Canal, pole. 
1.32. Dean and Elm, _ arm. 

133. Dean avenue and Elm west back, " 

134. Dearborn and Taylor, " 

135. Depot and Canal, pole. 

136. Depot and Franklin, arm. 

137. Derryfield Park, 

138. Douglas and Railroad, pole. 

139. Douglas and Barr, arm. 

140. Douglas and West, pole. 

141. Douglas and Main, arm. 

142. Dunbarton road and Front, " 

143. East High and Nashua, " 

144. East High and South, " 

145. East High and Malvern, 

146. East High and Ashland, " 

147. East High and Hall, 

148. East High and Buzzell, " 

149. East Spruce and Barry avenue, " 

150. East Spruce and Union " 

151. East Spruce and Beech, " 

152. East Spruce and Maple, " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 



177 



153. East Spruce and Lincoln, 

154. East Spruce and Wilson, 

155. East Spruce and Beacon, 
15(5. Elm and Kay Brook, 

157. Elm, below Railroad bridge, 

158. Elm avenue and Elm, 

159. Elm and Portsmouth Railroad, 

160. Ferry and Main, 

161. Ferry and Third, 

162. Ferry and Turner, 

163. Front, Araoskeag, 

164. Gates and Dubuque, 

165. Gort'stown road and Front, 

166. Grove and Pine, 

167. Grove and Union, 

168. Grove and Beech, 

169. Grove and Belmont, 

170. Granite and Green, 

171. Granite and West, 

172. Granite and Main, 

173. Granite and Second, 

174. Grau'te bridge, Avest, 

175. Granite bridge, center, 

176. Granite bridge, east, 

177. Granite and State, 

178. Granite and Bedford, 

179. Granite and Canal, 

180. Granite and Franklin, 

181. Green and Elm, 

182. Green and Pine, 

183. Green and Beech, . 

184. Hancock and Brown avenue, 

185. Hanover Square, 

186. Hanover and Nutfleld lane, 

187. Hanover and Chestnut, 

188. Hanover and Pine 

189. Hanover and Union, 

190. Hanover and Beech, 

191. Hanover and Maple, 

192. Hanover and Lincoln, 

193. Hanovor and Ashland, 

194. Hanover and Hall, 

195. Hanover and Belmont, 

196. Hanover and Beacon, 

197. Hanover Highlands, 

198. Highland and Grant, 

199. Hanover and Page, 



^ole. 
arm. 



pole. 



pole. 



pole, 
arm. 



pole. 



pole. 



178 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS 



No. 200. Harrison and Elm, 

20L Harrison and Chestnut, 

202. Harrison and Pine, 

203. Harrison and Hazel, 

204. Harrison and Walnut, 

205. Harrison and Beech, 

206. Harrison and Ash, 

207. Harrison and Maple, 

208. Harrison and Oak, 

209. Harrison and Russell, 

210. Harvel, and South Main, 

211. Hayward and Beech, 
312. Ha3'ward and Cypress, 

213. High and Chestnut, 

214. High and Pine, 

215. High and Union, 
21G. Hollis and Canal, 

217. Hospital avenue and Massabesic 

218. Kelly and Rimmon, 

219. Kelly and Cartier, 

220. Kelly and Alsace, 

221. Kidder and Boyden, 

222. Kidder and Whitney, 

223. Kidder and Elm, 

224. Lake avenue and Elm, 

225. Lake avenue and I'hestnut, 

226. Lake avenue and Pine, 

227. Lake avenue and Union, 

228. Lave avenue and Beech, 

229. Lake avenue and Maple, 

230. Lake avenue and Lincoln, 

231. Lake avenue and Wilson, 

232. Lake avenue and Massabesic, 

233. Lake avenue and Beacon, 

234. Lake avenue, near Cass, 

235. Like avenue and Cass, 

236. Lake avenue and Canton, 

237. Lake avenue and Hall road, 

238. Langdon and Canal, 

239. Langdon, 

240. Laurel and Laurel avenue, 

241. Laurel and Pine, 

242. Laurel and Union, 

243. Laurel and Beech, 

244. Laurel and Maple, 

245. Laurel and Lincoln, 

246. Laurel and Wilson, 



pole. 



pole. 



pole. 



arm. 
pole, 
arm. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 179 

No. 247. Laurel and Hall, arm. 

248. Laurel and Belmont, " 

249. Laurel and Milton, 

250. Laurel and Beacon, 

251. Lavirel and Cass, 

252. Liberty, below Webster, 

253. Lowell south back and Nutfield lane, " 

254. Lowell and Elm, 

255. Lowell and Birch, 

256. Lowell and Chestnut, 

257. Lowell and Pine, 

258. Lowell and Union, 

259. Lowell and Walnut, " 

260. Lowell and Beech, 

261. Lowell and Ash, 

262. Lowell and Nashua, 

263. Lowell and Malvern, 

264. Lowell and Ashland, 

265. Lowell aud Hall, " 

266. Lowell aud Belmont, 

267. Manchester and Elm, 

268. Manchester and Chestnut, 

269. Manchester and Pine, 

270. Manchester and Union, 

271. Manchester and Beech, 

272. Manchester and Maple, 

273. Manchester and Lincoln, 

274. Manchester aud Wilson, 

275. Manchester and Hall, 

276. Manchester and Milton, pole. 

277. Marion and Main, 

278. Marion and McGregor, ^^'^^ 

279. Market and Canal, 

280. Market and Franklin, 

281. Market and Elm, 

282. Massabesic and Belmont, pole. 

283. Massabesic and Old Falls road, 

284. Massabesic and Cypress, arm. 

285. Massabesic and Hall road, 

286. Mast and Main, pole. 

287. Mast and Bowman, f^i'i^i- 

288. Mast and Riddle, pole. 

289. Mast and New Mast road, *rm. 

290. Mast and Forrest, 

291. McGregor and Main, . pole. 

292. McGregor bridge, west, 

293. McGregor bridge, east, 



180 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



No. 294. Mechanic and Canal, 

295. Mechanic and Elm west back, 

296. Merrimack and Canal, 

297. Merrimack and Franklin west back, 

298. Merrimack and Franklin, 

299. Merrimack and Elm, 

300. Merrimack and Chestnut, 

301. Merrimack and Pine, 

302. Merrimack and Union, 

303. Merrimack and Beech, 

304. Merrimack and Maple, 

305. Merrimack and Lincoln, 

306. Merrimack and Wilson, 

307. Merrimack and Hall, 

308. Merrimack and Belmont, 

309. Merrimack and Beacon, 

310. Merrimack, east of Beacon, 

311. Merrimack square, west, 

312. Merrimack square, east, 

313. Middle and Canal, 

314. Middle and Franklin west back, 

315. Milford, near cemetery, 

316. Bismarck and Sylvester, 

317. Milford and Carroll, 

318. Milford and Riddle, 

319. Milford and Main, 

320. Mitchell and Beech, 

321. Monmouth and McGregor back street, 

322. Monroe and River road, 

323. Myrtle and Elm East back, 

324. Myrtle and Chestnut, 

325. Myrtle and Pine, 

326. Myrtle and Union, 

327. Myrtle and Walnut, 

328. Myrtle and Beech, 

329. Myrtle and Maple, 

330. Myrtle and Russell, 

331. Mead and Hall, 

332. Myrtle, near Hall, 

333. New Mast road and D, 

334. New Mast road and Wilkins, 

335. North and River road, 

336. North and Elm, 

337. North and Bay, 

338. North and Chestnut, 

339. North and Pine, 

340. North and Union. 



pole. 



pole, 
arm. 



pole, 
arm. 



pole, 
arm. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 181 

No. 341. North and Walnut, arm. 

342. North Main in Eddy, pole,. 

343. North Adams and Ray Brook, arm. 

344. Nutfield lane, rear Central fire station, .• " 

345. Nutt road and Beech, " 

346. Nvitt road and Portsmouth Railroad, pole. 

347. Orange and Elm, arm. 

348. Orange and Pine, 

349. Orange and Union, 

350. Orange and Ash, 

351. Orange and Oak, 
852. Orange and Linden, 

353. Orange and Hall, pole. 

354. Page and Portsmouth Railroad, arm. 
.355. Park square, pole. 

356. Parker and West, arm. 

357. Pearl and Elm east back, 

358. Pearl and Chestnut, 

359. Pearl and Pine, 

360. Pearl and Union, 

361. Pearl and Beech, 

362. Pearl and Oak, 

363. Pearl and Russell, 

364. Pearl and Linden, 

365. Pearl and Morrison, pole. 

366. Pearl and Belmont, arm. 

367. Pennacook and Canal, pole. 

368. Pennacook and Elm, arm. 

369. Pennacook and Chestnut, pole. 

370. Pennacook and Pine, arm. 

371. Pennacook and Union, " 

372. Pleasant and Franklin, " 

373. Prescott and Wilson, *' 

374. Prince and Boynton, " 

375. Prospect and Elm east back, " 

376. Prospect and Chestnut, *' 

377. Prospect and Pine, " 

378. Prospect and Union, " 

379. Prospect and Ash, " 

380. Prospect and Oak, " 

381. Prospect and Linden, " 

382. Prospect and Hall, *' 

383. Putnam and Main, " 

384. Putnam and Cartier, '* 

385. Putnam and Bartlett, pole. 

386. Rowell and River road, arm. 

387. River road, near Otis, " 



182 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



No. 388. Eiver road and Stark Park, 

389. Sagamore and Pine. 

390. Sagamore and Walnut, 

391. Salmon and Canal, 
.892. Salmon and Elm, 
393. Salmon and Chestnut, 
894. Salmon and Pine, 

395. Salmon and Union, 

396. Salmon and Beech, 

397. School and Turner, 

398. School and Third, 
.399. Schiller and Second, 

400. Schuyler and Main, 

401. Shasta and Elm, 

402. Silver and Union, 

403. Silver and Beech, 

404. Silver and Lincoln, 

405. Silver and Wilson, 

406. Somerville and Jewett, 

407. Spring and Canal, 

408. Spring and Elm west back, 

409. Spruce and Elm, 

410. Spruce and Chestnut west back, 

411. Spruce south back and Elm east back, 

412. Stark and Canal, 

413. Stark and back street, 

414. Summer and State, 

415. Thornton and Sullivan, 

416. Tremont square, 

417. Union, near Campbell, 

418. State east back, 

419. State, south of Granite, 

420. State, north of Granite, 

421. Sullivan and Beauport, 
. 422. Sullivan and Main, 

423. Summer and Dearborn, 

424. Summer and Hall, 

425. Valley and Elm, 

426. Valley and Pine, 

427. Valley and Union, 

428. Valley and Wilson, 

429. Valley and Belmont, 
. 430. Valley and Taylor, 

431. Valley and Cypress, 

432. Valley and Jewett, 

433. Vinton and Taylor, 
4.S4. Walker and Main, 



pole. 



pole, 
arm. 



pole, 
arm. 

pole, 
arm. 
pole, 
arm. 



pole. 



pole, 
arm. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 183 



No. 435. 


Walker and Fourth, 


436. 


Walker and Second, 


437. 


Walker and Turner, 


438. 


Washington and Church, 


439. 


Water, 


440. 


Water and Elm, 


441. 


Wayne and McGregor, 


442. 


Wayne and Main, 


443. 


Wayne and Beauport, 


444. 


Wayne and Dubuque, 


445. 


Webster and River road. 


446. 


Webster and Elm, 


447. 


Webster and Chestnut, 


448. 


Webster and Pine, 


449. 


Webster and Walnut, 


450. 


Welch avenue and Calef road, 


451. 


West Hancock and Second, 


452. 


West Hancock and Dartmouth, 


453. 


West Hancock and South Main, 


454. 


Whitford and Union, 


455. 


Wilton and Main, 


456. 


Winter, 


457. 


Winter and Parker, 


458. 


Winter place and Elm west back, 


459. 


Young and Taylor, 


460. 


Young and Ainsworth avenue, 


461. 


Young and Mammoth road. 


462. 


Cedar and Franklin, 


463. 


Laurel north back and Union, 


464. 


Clarke and North Adams, 


465. 


Prospect and Beech, 


466. 


McDuffie and Hvintress, 


467. 


Hanover and Alfred, 


468. 


Summer and Belmont, 


469. 


East Spruce and Old Falls"road, 


470. 


Nelson and Mammoth road. 


471. 


Sagamore and Russell, 


472. 


Hollis vrest of Elm, 


473. 


Hall and Somerville, 


474. 


Blodget and Oak, 


475. 


Blodget and Beech, 


476. 


Goffstown and Omega, 


- 477. 


Bridge and Mammoth road, 


478. 


Pleasant and Elm, 


479. 


Hanover and Lake avenue, 


480. 


Elm and Thayer, 


481. 


Bridge and Birch, 



pole, 
arm. 



pole, 
arm. 
pole, 
arm. 
pole. 



pole. 



184 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 482. Blodget and Russell, ^^.^ 

483. Rimmon, near Putnam, pole. 

484. Spruce and Hall, arm. 

485. Boynton and Grant, u 

486. Rockland avenue and Goffstown line, pole. 

487. Rockland avenue and Wilkins, arm. 

488. Somerville and Taylor, 

489. Concord and Ash, 

490. Sagamore and Elm, 

491. Webster and Beech, 

492. Lake Avenue and Belmont, 

493. Orange and Russell, 

494. Silver and Belmont, 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 1902, 



William C. Clarke, Mmjor, ex officio. 

Alpheus Gay, died April 21, 1902. 
Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1907. 
Charles T. Means, died January 25, 1902. 
Harry E. Parker, term expires January, 1909. 
Frank Dowst, term expires January, 1906. 
Edgar J. Knowlton, term expires January, 1904. 
Charles M. Floyd, term expires January, 1908. 
William Corey, term expires January, 1905. 



OFFICERS, 



Charles H. Manning, President. 

Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Eegistrar. 

Josiah Laselle, Engineer at Low Service Pumping Station. 

Charles A. Whitney, Engineer at High Service Pumping Station. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF WATER COM 
MISSIONERS, 



To the Honorable City Councils of the City of Manchester, X. H. : 

Gentlemen, — The Manchester Water Board herewith present their 
thirty-first annual report for the year ending December 31, 1902, with 
the detailed report of the superintendent during the same period. 

FINANCIAL CONDITION. 

Eeceipts and expenditures for the year have been as follows : 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1901 $104 823.19 

Received from water rentals, etc., 1902 115 .531.48 

Eeceived from hydrant rentals, 1902 Ig 800.00 

Total $239,1.54.67 

Amount paid for current expenses $24,261.58 

Amount paid for construction expenses 47,934.68 

Interest on water bonds, 1902 36,313.00 

Hydrant rentals set aside for sinking fund . . . 18,800.00 
Set aside for sinking fund for payment of water 

bonds, state law .5,000.00 

$132,309.26 

Amount on hand December 31, 1902 1106,845.41 

Respectfully submitted. 

William C. Clarke, ex officio, 
Charles H. Manning, President, 
Harry E. Parker, 
Frank Dowst, 
Edgar J. Kijowlton^, 
Charles M. Floyd, 
William. Corey, 

Water Comraissioners. 
January 1, 1903. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT, j 



To the Board of Water Commissioners of the Citu of Manchester : 

The Superintendent respectfully submits the following report for the 
year 1902 : 

The lake has been full this year, making two years of high water in 
succession. The water has been from four to thirty-two inches above the 
the dam the whole season. Today it stands 27 inches above. Fifteen 
hundred feet of land bordering on the lake shore has been added to the 
city's property at Severance's Beach. There have been no repairs at the 
dam. New flash boards were made, but on account of high water, were 
not put on. The Mill Dam House has been taken away and the grounds 
graded. The north side of the canal bank has been fenced, and the fence 
on the north and west side of the highw^ay repaired. About $700.00 
was expended from the dam to the old pumping station. On January 6th, 
electric lights were put in at the station. The small dam at the foot of the 
raceway was built over this fall, a new crossliead was put into one of the 
pumps, the disc was refltted on to the shaft, and new teeth put into 
one of the driving wheels. The chimney at the northwest corner of the 
building was built ovar so as to give more draft, which it did. 

Forty cords of hard wood were bought for $5.00 a cord to run the 
boiler for heating until we could get coal. The fence was repaired at the 
old reservoir, and nothing done at the new reservoir. 

The Worthington pumps are still supplying the high service reservoir 
and have done their work without any unusual repairs. The boilers have 
been repaired so that both are in good condition today. The cost of pump- 
ing has increased on account of the high price of coal which is nearly double 
what we have paid. "We have on hand nearly 200 tons which cost us $7.50 
a ton on the cars at Fletcher's Crossing. 

C. H. Whitney has had charge of this station for a year and eight months 
and gives satisfaction. 

The new pumps are now in place and will be ready to pump in a few 
weeks. 

The Snow Company has been paid $20,000. The contracted price was 
$50,000.00, all completed. 

THE FORCE AND SUPPI.Y MAINS. 

The work on these mains has been about the same this year as last. 
The old cement pipe on the low service still holds goods and may last a 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 191 

number of years yet. We hope it ■will, for it would cost today to relay it, 
$70,000.00. 

We have laid two miles of distributiou pipe at the expense of .$12,410.00 
including 15 hydrants and 17 gates, making 102 miles of distribution pipe 
in this city. 

The streets where new pipes were laid are the following : 

Brown Ave., Charlestown Ave , Canal St., C St., Clay, Central, and 
George Sts., Goffstown Road, Hall, Haywood, Mystic, McNeal, Merrimack 
Sts., Oakland Ave., Robie St., River Road, Sagamore St., Titus Ave., and 
Wilson St. 

We have put in 108 new services, and relaid about the same number. 
One service pipe on Bridge street was destroyed by electrolysis. 

The water rates were reduced, beginning July first. Whether or not it was 
a wise measure time will show. There is a great deal to be done to keep up 
the plant. You must bear in mind that three and one-half million gallons have 
to be pumped every day and the machinery have to be kept in repair. The 
force and supply mains on the low service are 20-inch cement pipes 
which Avill have to be renewed before many years. The rates have been 
as low in this city as in any city where the water has to be pumped. You 
can lower the rates without any trouble, but that they can never be 
raised, has been the experience of all New England cities. 



192 



ANNUA.L OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



195 



pooAV 
A({ paduind 

SUOUBO OX 



uospiA'BCT 
A(.{ padrai\(l 
saonBO OM 



!^^ g u s 



!^ S t, 3 









o^ 



rt Ci >-l 



■X C2 CO 
COO>-»" 

t-OOC-l 



1.0 L~ o o 
w cc C-. o 

io-<<'co' 

CI t^ O _ - 

!^iO^--^ CO 

T-frrc 



c-fc-f 



O cc 00 



-t< 00 C5 

.-rt-''co' 

LO CO iO 
CO__rH C0_ 

cc't-'i-i" 



-f 01 -f CO 

OC COOO 

p'"'-ricr-)<' 

S5 01 03 o 
CO X_^l>^»-^ 



CD C^ t^ CO L^ t^ t 



cTt-T 

rH CO 
C0-4<_ 

o'l-o" 



C5 O rH CO 



s ^ 



00 •# CO CO II 01-* CO o O 



i n^ 


■■? 


c3 2x 

-J Ol Tf 


*?o = o 


CD 'P 


? ol 


c5 


^?2g 


O rt LO CO 

cc CM c:i -o 

COOO t- CO 


CO O 


<N 


?> 


St- a; 


^ 0-- -K ^ 


O t- 



O t^ CO t- o 



3 »-t O O 00 00 ao 
CD C3 00 ■ "" 

c5 ccdd 



O i-H 






t--*t-C3 O O 



oqo-*i 

CO rt rH -^i ■# O H CO ci 



4 t*<N CO O 



CO C-J t~ CO 
t- -f O CD 



o o o 

O CO CO 

CC CO CO 



o c 



O O f-H O O LO LO o o 
ooo oooci -p -ti 



CO CO t- rt t- o • 

*1 tH ^ C 

< -f -f CO 



CO d <ZD 01 tH ^ CO 



. a a : a a a a -g a 
;ooo :ooco :oo 

.-_ ._ \ w^ 'Jl Ul ;aif»:fito :ccai 
cS^c«K:^c«°cec4cS-cioSc«c«°c«cS° 



;2 ^ 



i-s &^ 2 



acs 



O) a; 

^ o 

3 — a^ u o 41 

o<^-/}0 ;?;0 



^^' 



194 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

RAINFALL AT HIGH SERVICE STATION, 1902. 



Day of 
Month. 




hi 


9 


^ 


1 






& 

< 


o 


o 


s 

> 

1^ 


a 

o 
o 

0! 


1 




*.07 
*.G5 


1.24 
.45 




.22 




.50 






.14 




*.24 


2 










.16 






3 




.05 


.08 
.23 
.08 


1.11 








.63 


4 












.25 








5 










.44 


.10 




.30 

1.32 




«.70 


6 






*.90 




.84 
















.23 


.10 
.40 




.24 


.03 


18 


8 


*.05 










.10 






9 




*.C0 


2.45 
.43 
.13 














10 


*68 
'•.60 






.04 


.22 




.60 






*06 


11 








1.43 

.82 








12 










.55 


.09 
.18 
.04 


».07 


13 




.04 
.54 


.05 




.15 




.62 
.16 


*.60 


14 
















15 










.29 
.09 
.58 


.31 
.10 


.12 






IC 


















*.81 


17 




*.80 


.82 














*.66 


18 




















19 






.26 
.07 
.06 




.45 
.10 


.06 




.06 


.28 




.08 




20 








1.03 
.47 
.05 


.09 




21 








.56 
.06 


.47 






1.54 


22 


*.95 
















23 










.32 




.23 






24 










.04 
.37 
.02 
.53 
.31 
.03 












25 










.03 

.63 




.12 








».21 


26 




«.39 




.78 
.06 




.09 
.50 
.13 
1.55 
.16 




.26 
.07 


*.09 


27 


*.61 












28 .... 












3.49 




29 






.94 




.25 


.05 


.08 






30 






1.19 






*.14 


31 






.11 










































2.29 


1.91 


6.03 


5.09 


2.79 


3.63 


3.94 


4.36 


4.74 


G.12 


.75 


5.93 



Total rain for the year, 47.58 inches. 



189.5. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 



Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 
Total 



rainfall, 
rainfall, 
rainfall, 
rainfall, 
rainfall, 
rainfall, 
rainfall, 
rainfall. 



42.06 
38.41 
49.78 
47.15 
36.27 
47.89 
47.47 
47.58 



inches, 
inches, 
inches, 
inches, 
inches, 
inches, 
inches, 
inches. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 195 

The income from the sale of water for 1902 has been as follows: 

Received for water by rate $23,785.49 

for water by meter 90,479.10 

for building purposes 233.34 

from fines 434.00 



•f! 114, 931. 83 



Received for pipes and labor .50.85 

from F. O. Clement (old brass) 31.20 

from Stark Mills (sprinker pipe) 62.50 

from East Side Shoe Co , (sprinker pipe) 71.00 

from Manchester Mills, ]3ipe 20.80 

from City Hospital (drilling) 24.75 

from Oak Hill Hospital, pipe 54.20 

from Notre Dame Hospital-, 4 inch pipe 43.00 

from F. Brown, lease 1.00 

from G. G. Griffin, lease ,1.00 

from Grattan Cotton, Association, lease 22.00 

from F. H. Gilbert, rent of Brown land 4.00 

from H. A. Boone, rent of Harvey land 10.00 

from Asa Haselton, rent of land . . 50,00 
from Frank Mclntyre, rent of Reed 

land . . 3.25 

from Mell Hall, rent of Cochrane land . 10.00 

from S. M. McDonald, rent 60.00 

N. W. Paige (Mill Dam House) .... 60.00 
Charles Spofford, hay and fruit on 

Canfield and Hamblett farm .... 20.00 



$358.25 



$241.25 



$115,-531.48 
Received for hydrant rental 18,800.00 



Total $134,-331.48 

Abatements, $400.82. 



Amount on hand December 31, 1901 $104,823.19 

Received for water rent, etc., 1902 115,531.48 

Received for hydrant rentals, 1902 18,800.00 



.$239,1-54.67 



Amount paid for current expenses $24,261.58 

Amount paid for construction expenses 47,934.68 



196 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Interest on bonds $36,313.00 

Hydrant rentals set aside for sinking fund .... 18,800.00 
State Law, 1897, bonds set aside for sinking fund .5,000.00 



-$132,309.26 

Amount on hand December 31, 1902 $106,845.41 



CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS, 1902. 

Superintendence, repairs, etc $14,850. 98 

Stationery and printing 175.46- 

Office and incidental expenses 522.29 

Pumping expenses, low service . . . , 2,106.39 

Pumping expenses, high service 5,567 58 

Piepairs to buildings 260.98 

Repairs to dam, canal, races and reservoir 777.90 



Service pipes 1,628.86 

Distribution pipes 14,503.31 

Fire hydrants and valves 884.22 

Meters 1,887-66 

Land and water rights 6,725.00 

Pumping machinery and bviildings 22,305.63 

Sinking fund from fire hydrants •*S18,800.00 

Sinking fund for water bonds 5,000.00 



Construction Expenses. 

Land and water rights • • • . . -$159,234.00 

Dam, canal, penstock and races 101,399.16 

Pumping machinery and buildings 212,116.52 

Distribution reservoirs 117,697.90 

Force and supply main 89,769.02 

Distribution pipes 641,390.37 

Fire hydrants and valves 63,746.84 

Meters and fixtures 62,943.60 

Service pipes 82,384.64 

Grading and fencing 17,470.39 

Tools and fixtures 10,649.35 

Boarding and storehouses 919.36 

Roads and culverts 4,405.20 

Supplies 5.50.39 



-$24,261.58 



$47,934.68 

■$23,800.00 
$95,996.26 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 197 

Engineering $2'2,176.19 

Livery and traveling expenses 2,856.64 

Legal expenses 563.79 

Total Sl,590,273.36 

Current Expenses. 

Superintendance and repairs $402,867.74 

Stationery and printing 8,189.22 

Ofifice and incidentals expenses .35,689.42 

Pumping exijeuses at low service 64,639.08 

Pumping expenses at high service 39,801.42 

Repairs to bnildings 6,327.89 

Repairs to dam, canal and reservoirs 7,849.33 

Total §565.364.10 

Interest . $40,678.51 

Highway exijenditures 14,000.53 

$54,679.04 

$2,210,316.50 
Interest, discount, and labor performed on high- 
way, transferred, and tools and materials sold . 74,618.33 

Current expenses to December 31, 1902 565,364.10 

$639,982.43 

Total cost exclusive of interest and current expenses $1,570,3.34.07 
Interest and discount to December 31, 1901 . . $1,041,506.51 
Interest for 1902 36,313.00 

Total to December 31, 1902 $1,077,819.51 

AMOUNT OF WATER BONDS ISSUED TO DEC. 31, 1902. 

Issued January 1, 1872, rate 6 per cent, due January 1, 1932 $100,000.00 



Paid January 1, 1902. 

Issued January 1, 1887, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1907 $100,000.00 

July 1, 1890, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, 1910 . . . . 100,000.00 

January 1, 1892, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1912 100,000.00 

August 1, 1893, rate 5 per cent, due August 1, 1913 . 100,000.00 
November 1, 1893, rate 4 1-2 per cent, due November 

1, 1913 100,000.00 

October 1, 1894, rate 4 per cent, due October 1, 1914 50,000.00 



198 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

July 1, 1895, rate 4 per ceut, clue July 1, 1915 . . . ■'S100,000.00 

December 16, 1895, -1 per cent, clue December 16, 1015 50,000.00 

January 1, 1897, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1017 100,000.00 

Total '• • • $800,000 00 

SINKING FUND. 

1803 $12,750.00 

1894 13,925.00 

1895 15,800.00 

1896 16,800.00 

1897 ". 17,175.00 

1898.' ." .' 17,675.C0 

1898 ■ 5,000.00 

1899 5,000.00 

1899 ! . . . 18,100.00 

1900 18,425.00 

1900 5,000.00 

1901 5,000,00 

1901 18,575.00 

1902 .'.'.'....".' 18.800.00 

1902 5,000.00 

Total §193,025.00 

Interest to date 24,569.36 

Premium on bond sold and bought 1,279.42 

Total .$218,873.78 

Paid bonds due January 1, 1902 100,000,00 

On hand December 31, 1902 $118,873.78 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



199 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



d 
>* 


"3 ■ 

o 






Water by 
meter. 


in 

<u— p. 


5 


1-1 




ll 

la 

25 


1872 


§573.61 
2,097.6C 


1 










,?573.G1 
200.07 






187c 


( 


.§1,692.69 


$190.84 




.?14.00 


,s 


1874 


32,154.0- 


\ .'?22,425.C0 


7,987.27 


1,4:!6.50 


•SllO.K 


104.18 


G99.8r 




98 


187f 


29,223.6C 
39,028.47 

43,823.3f 
48,874.26 


13,09.5.00 
16,.320.00 
17,475.00 
17,970.00 


10,292.13 
15,900.63 
18,064..51 
20,2.55.97 


3,.348.11 

0,.3O5.81 

7,783.09 

10,090.25 


122.13 
72..32 

130, K 
83.60 


120.59 
180.16 
233.04 
232.82 


2,245.04 
249.. 5.^ 




100 


187( 




100 


1877 


131..50 
241.02 




202 


1878 




220 


1879 


53,143.17 
57,65.5.25 


18,165.00 
18,300.00 


21,610.13 

23,79.5.96 


12,732.93 
14,794.34 


81.60 
79..50 


240.64 
210..39 


.303.87 
405.06 




251 


1880 


$10.00 


280 


1881 


60,21.5.62 


18,780.00 


25,.330.18 


15,554.98 


105.60 


223.99 


203.87 


11.00 


310 


1882 


67,6,30.13 


20,130.00 


26,803.06 


. 19,898.09 


146.65 


197.49 


443.24 


11.00 


371 


1883 


73,458.20 


20,520.00 


28,838.24 


23,431.20 


314.05 


208.04 


12.5.07 


21.00 


404 


1884 


75,-580.08 


21,350.00 


31,724.07 


21,329.75 


195.10 


231.00 


738.20 


11.00 


440 


1885 


80,404.12 


18,900.00 


33,597.02 


27,425.35 


102..50 


1,80.80 


181.45 


11.00 


480 


1886 


75,129.99 


19,750.00 


33,062.11 


21,573.45 


287.40 


130.80 


320.23 


6.00 


013 


1887 


80,ijl8.17 


20,437.50 


.33,497.21 


25,277.09 


3,51.70 


119.20 


819.47 


16.00 


739 


1888 


85,643.82 


21,000.00 


33,804.78 


29,838.82 


543.80 


149.80 


243.62 


3.00 


842 


1889 


■ 86,700.46 


18,240.00 


34,140.99 


33,590.05 


301.95 


1,53.20 


1.55.27 


53.00 


951 


1890 


90,463.37 


19,880.00 


32,431.10 


37,009.80 


649.90 


151.80 


298.77 


42.00 


1,135 


1891 


76,005.23 


4,.590.00 


30,588.79 


40,479.25 


494., SO 


160.40 


200.99 


91.00 


1,313 


1892 


83,474.79 


5,000.00 


31, .344.24 


40,139.35 


410.00 


108 40 


139.,S0 


207.00 


1,008 


1893 


104,170.08 


12,7.50.00 


32,603.59 


.58,103.20 


1,033.75 


159.00 


339.. 38 


180.56 


1,895 


1894 


110,210.29 


13,92.5.00 


32,176,28 


02,.501.35 


097.80 


227.40 


334.82 


347.64 


2,182 


1895 


118,374.50 


15,800.00 


32,903.99 


07,465.90 


808.20 


300.40 


708.17 


327.84 


2,520 


1896 


128,907.03 


16,800.00 


32;.540.03 


77,610.10 


638.48 


302.80 


440.12 


575.50 


2,805 


1897 


125,719.17 


17,175.00 


30,047.17 


70,148.00 


331.85 


321.80 


627.08 


467.67 


3,134 


1898 


131,184.08 


17,675.00 


20,409..58 


80,643.30 


1S7.00 


359..S0 


441.;K) 


2,467.50 


3,340 


1899 


133,436.41 


18,100.00 


28,063.34 


85,764.80 


246.80 


303., SO 


400..59 


497.08 


3,502 


1900: 


138,241.94 


18,42.5.00 


27,868.85 


91,079.30 


95.80 


397., SO 


232.59 


142.00 3,667 


1901 ' 

1 


138,206.14 


18,575.00 

1 


26,954.99 


91,382.60 


220..30 


437.00 


410.90 


224.75 3,,S04 


1902 134,331.48 


18,800.00 


23,785.49 


90,479.10 


233.34 


434.00 


3.58.25 


241.25 3,9,S3 

1 



1878, meter rate was changed. 1884, hydrant rates reduced. 1880, meter and other 
rates reduced. 1,S89, hydrant rates reduced. 1891 and 1892, received only part of hydrant 
rent, and nothing from water-troughs or street sprinklers.. 1893, hydrant rent and 
water-closets rate reduced. July 1, 1902, rates reduced. 



200 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 



The following amounts have been paid over to the city treasurer, 
and credited to the water-works: 



1872, supplies aiid materials sold $573.61 

1873, supplies and materials sold 177.07 

accrued interest on water bonds sold 193.26 

accrued interest on state bonds sold 146.00 

water rents 1,920.53 

1874, supplies and materials sold 607.89 

March 12, highway expenditures transferred from 

water account 14,000.53 

. March 17, interest and discount transferred from 

water account 12,347.25 

September 1, interest and discount transferred from 

water account 22,361.74 

water and hydrant rent 30,233.54 

December 29, interest transferred 4,566.25 

1875, water and hydrant rent 27,119.15 

sundry items 2,104.45 

1876, water and hydrant rent 38,879.47 

sundry items • • 149.00 

1877, water and hydrant rent 43,691.74 

sundry items 131.56 

1878, water and hydrant rent 48,632.64 

sundry items • • 241.62 

1879, water and hydrant renl 52,839.30 

sundry items 303.87 

1880, water and hydrant rent 57,180.19 

sundry items 475.06 

1881, water and hydrant rent 60,000.75 

sundry items 214.87 

1882, water and hydrant rent _ 67,175.89 

sundry items 454.24 

1883, water and hydrant rent 73,312.13 

sundry items 146.07 

1884, water and hydrant rent , 74,830.88 

sundry items / 749.20 

1885, water and hydrant rent 80,211.67 

sundry items 192.45 

1886, water and hydrant rent 74,803.76 

sundry items 326.23 

1887, water and hydrant rent 79,682.70 

sundry items 835.47 

1888, water and hydrant rent 85,397.20 

sundry items 246.62 

1889, water and hydrant rent 86,492.19' 

sundry items 208.27 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



201 



1800, water and hydrant rent $90,122.60 

sundry items 340.77 

1891, water and hydrant rent 76,313.24 

sundry items 291.99 

1892, water and hydrant rent , 83,067-99 

sundry items 406.80 

1893, water rents 90,900.14 

sundry items 519.94 

1894, water rents 95,602.83 

sundry items 682.46 

1895, water rents 101,478.49 

- sundry items 1,096.01 

1896, water rents 111,091.41 

sundry items 1,015.62 

1897 water rents 107,449.42 

sundry items 1,094.75 

premiums on bonds 6,248.00 

1898, water rents 110,599.68 

sundry items 2,909.40 

1899, water rents 114,438.74 

sundry items 897.67 

1900, water rents 119,441.75 

sundry items 375.19 

1901, water rents • • • 118,995.49 

sundry items 635.65 

1902, water rents 114,93183 

sundry items 599.50 

$2,395,705.82 

SEKVICE PIPES. 



One hundred and eight (108) service pipes have been laid, as follows: 

106 1-inch diameter 2,553.6 feet 

1 4-iuch diameter 37.0 

1 6-inch diameter (sprinkler) 



108 



1 

78 

10 

1 

1 

91 



SEEVICE PIPES KELAID. 

1-2-inch service 17.7 feet to 1-inch diameter . . 

3-4-inch service 2,034.0 feet to 1-inch diameter . . 

1-inch service 257.0 feet to 1-inch diameter . . 
1-inch service 30.0 feet to 1 1-2-inch diameter 

1-inch service 29.3 feet to 2-inch diameter. . 

2,368.0 



2,590.6 


feet 


15.0 


feet 


2,013.0 


" 


235.0 


" 


30.0 


a 


25.0 


11 


2,318.0 


feet 



302 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
SERVICE PIPES LAID TO DATE. 



18 1-2-inch diameter 378.2 feet 

1,081 3-4-inch diameter 27 184.(5 " 

4,506 1-inch diameter . . .' 114 721.4 " 

19 1 1-4-inch diameter 800.2 " 

30 1 1-2-inch diameter 938.-5 " 

76 2-inch diameter 2 348.2 " 

2 2 1-2-inch diameter q3_0 " 

6 3. inch diameter 122.8 " 

12 4-inch diameter 281 5 " 

9 6-iuch diameter. 



^''^^^ . 146,838.4 feet 

27.81 miles of service pipe laid to December 31, 1902. 

Fifty-seven hundred and fifty-nine (5,759) service pipes laid to December 
31, 1902. 



METERS. 

The number of meters set during the year has been one hundred 
seventy-nine (179). 

Total number in use, thirty-nine hundred and eighty-three (3,983). 
The number of applications for water has been one hundred and 
four (104). M 

Total number of applications to date, fifty-nine hundred and ten (5,910). ' 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Brown avenue, corner Westland avenue. 

Brown avenue, near Locke Residence. 

C street. 

Canal street, south of Sagamore. 

Central street, south of Belmont. 

Central street, south of Milton. 

Central street, south of Beacon. 

George street, near Mase Residence. 

Hayward street, corner Lincoln. 

Hayward street, West Side Pipe Yard. 

Mystic street, corner Oakland. 

Xorth River Road, corner Salmon. 

Robie street, in yard. 

Titus street, corner Union. 

Walnut street, .500 feet north of Webster. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 203 

LOCATION OF GATES. 

Brown aveniie, 6-incli gate near hydrant. 
C street, 6-incli gate east side B street. 
Canal street, 8-inch gate North. 
Central street, 6-inch gate 60 feet west of Belmont. 
Central street, 6-inch gate 30 feet east of Milton. 
Central street, 6-inch gate east side of Beacon. 
Charleston street, 6-inch gate, east side of Carroll. 
Hall street, 6-inch gate, north side of Harvard. 
Hayward street, 6-inch gate west side of Lincoln. 
McNeil street, 6-inch gate east side of Second. 
Merrimack street, 6-inch gate west side of Beacon. 
Milford Lane, 6-inch gate south side of Milford. 
North River Road, 8-inch gate south side of North. 
Oakland avenue, 6-inch gate west side of Mystic. 
Oakland avenue, 6-inch gate east side of Revere. 
Eobie street, 6-inch gate south side of Donald. 
Titus street, 8-inch gate west side of Union. 
Walnut street, 6-inch gate north side of Webster. 






204 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES LAID, AND GATES AND HYDRANTS SET, 1902 



Streft. 


PIPE LAID, LENGTH IX FEET. 


GATES SET. 






Gin. 


8 in. 


10 in. 


to 


a 

00 


o 


Location. 


Browu ave 


30 

607 

7 

826 

260 

450 

43 

158 

16 

937 

206 

102 

232 

326 

4 

260 

836 

48 

9 

26 


973 




1 
1 

3 
1 






1 
1 
3 

1 

2 

1 
1 

i 


Southward to Locke 

Residence. 
Boynton to B. 

Salmon to Brook. 

454 Central to Beacon. 

George to Rochelle. 

West of Cypress. 

South of Charleston. 

Westward. 

Harvard to E. Side Co. 

West of WUson. 

East of Second. 

West of Beacon. 

South of MiLford. 

North of Oakland. 

North to Salmon. 

East of Mystic. 

South of Donald 


C 








Canal... . 


1,230 




1 




Central 


Charleston 










Clay 

George 


391 
922 




Goffstown 

Hall 




1 

1 
1 
1 

1 






Ha>-ward 




McNeal 










Merrimack 






Milford lane 






Mystic ave 






North River Ed. 


523 




2 
1 


1 




Oakland 




Robie 






Sagamore 










Near Swedish Church. 
Westward past School. 
North of Webster. 
Southward. 


Titus 


1,011 
522 




1 
15 


1 




1 
1 

15 


Walnut 


Wilson 


262 


3 


— 










5,383 


5,572 


202 





Total feet laid, 11,217 feet, or 2.124 miles. 



J 



206 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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Amherst 

Arlington 

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Baker 

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Beacon 

Bedford 

Beecli 

Bell 


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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



207 



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147 



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stnut 

cord 

roll 

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208 



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Dearborn 

Depot 

Derry 

Dix 

Dutton 

Elm 

East High 

Elm avenue 

Everett 

Foster avenue 

Franklin 

Glenwood 

Gore 

Granite 

Green 

Grove, M. corp 

Grove, E. Man 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



209 



IN 




CO 


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104 






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vard 

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el 

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ley 

ett 

elyn 

ler 

ler'.s court 




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210 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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364 

94 

95 
60 
4400 
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962 
350 
362 
788 

250 
768 
1354 
421 
370 


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Manchester 

Maple 

Market 

Massabesic 

Mead 

Meclianic 

Merrimack 

Merrimack to Laurel 

Middle 

Mitcbell 


6 c 
p .» 

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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



211 



p- 




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4319 
819 
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105 

81 

1384 

547 

850 

562 

338 

4039 

1095 

1653 

1570 

4076 

2089 

1076 

364 

318 


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212 



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313 

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3270 

1705 

3543 

1010 

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5953 

874 

877 

325 

1702 

4755 

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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



213 



t- -^ --I rH ir 


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214 



ANNUAL, OFFICIAL EFFORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



215 



ri rt CI : rH o ^ rt ^ c-1 t^ : 1-1 CI : i-H : ^ : r-i c^ ci --i 












c-i 71 Ti ; i-H : .1 1-H i-H 1-1 *-i -f : L. »-( : 1-1 ; c-i i-i i-t i-i i-i 




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790 
1482 
5C3 

283 

1791 
GG3 
7G9 
451 

2089 

3004 
1210 

GGG 

1554 
218 
223 
32 
477 
4 




253 
1140 

9G3 

435 

2345 
391 
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a. 
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c 


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ton 

y 

minis 

idge avenue 

^nt 

iberland 

tmouth 

ahoe 

aid 

glas 

er 

uque 

barton 

X 

y 

^st 

rth 

It 

rge 

ord 






-i — o c o 
O O O O U 



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f^ fa &H ci, 



216 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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: 't C-- : c- : rt ; ^ ^ ; ^ ^ oo : : 


saAi-BA jiy 














05 

05 

::5 


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2434 

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Glenwood 

GolTs 

Goffstown road 

Granite 

Green 


Hancock 

Harrinian 

Flevey 

Ilarvel.. 

Ilitrhland 


Hiram 

Huntress 

Joliette 

Kcarsarge 

Kelly 

Laval 

I'Og 

Log back street 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



217 



C-) 00 O U CO ; « O 



.-( n CO CI .-< ro T-i 



CO CO 

3 3 



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C-l CC 00 O rH 









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218 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



•s;uB.ip^H 


ClCOlOi-fi-Hi-it-l :COr-(C-l :'rt-frH^5i-t 


•saAiBA .XI Y 




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ft 

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2727 
995 

3379 
5GG 
215 
758 
429 
G54 
3G1 
442 
892 
110 
12 
SO 

1308 

12C5 
923 
837 


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1 2 = 5 ^ g s -^ 1 1 2 S £ 1 i ^ g 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



219 



rt i-H (N 



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s s ?^ 



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£- H 



230 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1902. 



Size of pipe. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20-inch diameter 


20,367 feet. 


24,719 feet. 
16,245 " 
33,446 " 
35,262 " 
28,996 " 
311,173 " 
20,017 " 




14-incli diameter 


19 


12-inch diameter 




21 


10-inch diameter 




39 


8-inch diameter 




46 


6-inch diameter 


234 feet. 


106 


4- inch diameter 


655 






60 


• — 


20,601 feet. 


519,858 feet. 


946 



Cement-lined pijje 
Cast-iron pijje . . 



Total miles 
768 hydrants. 
946 ^ates. 

12 air valves. 



3.90 miles 
98.46 miles 

102.86 miles 



Respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES K. WALKER. 



Uses for which Water is Supplied. 

WATEK FIXTURES, ETC. 

12,.560 families, 96 boarding houses, 16,218 faucets, 4,958 wash-bowls 
4,620 bath-tubs, 13,030 water-closets, 929 set tubs, 225 urinals, 4 464 sill- 
cocks, 3,045 horses, 221 cattle, 753 hydrants, 30 watering-troughs, 8 drink- 
ing fountains, 51 standpipes, 2 public urinals. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

1 Jail, 31 churches, 1 court house, 10 hose companies, 6 fire enoines 
2 hook-and-ladder, 3 opera houses, 4 convents, 4 city hospitals, 5 ceme- 
teries, 1 orphanage, 1 post-office, 1 city library, 6 banks, 9 hotels 1 
Masonic hall, 1 Odd Fellows' hall, 3 halls, Children's Home, Masonic 
Home. 

SHOPS. 

58 Barber, 11 wheelwright, 20 blacksmith, 10 carpenter, 2 tinsmith, 
1 copper, 3 currying, 20 plumber and gas and water pipe, 14 paint 3 o-un- 
smith. " 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 221 



5 Auction, 35 dnio-, 22 jewelry, 2i fur, 8 house-furnishing goods, 20 
fancy goods, 1 wholesale paper, 5 wholesale produce, 24 dry goods, 12 
candy, 1 cloak, 16 millinery, 3 tea, 9 furniture, 3 wholesale grocer, 107 
grocery, 6 meal, 2 hardware, 34 boot and shoe, 11 stove, 17 gents' fur- 
nishing goods, 7 book, 1 leather and shoe tinders, 3 music, 3 upholstery, 
9 undertakers, 5 sewing-machine, 1 feather-cleaner, 1 rubber. 



16 Dining, 7 billiard, 47 liquor 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

7 Clubrooms, 3 bleacheries, 35 laundries, 4 ice-houses, 10 photo- 
graphers, 1 Mercy Home, 2 old ladies' homes, 1 soldiers' monument, 1 
Turner hall, 4 fountains, 2 trust companies, 1 city farm, 3 depots, 9 
greenhouses, 2 bandrooms, 26 l)akerles, 2 waste, 2 business colleges, 
36 schoolhouses, 1 battery building, 1 kitchen, 3 wardrooms, 1 gym- 
nasium, 2 police stations. 

MAXUFACTURIXG ESTABLISHMENTS. 

2 Hosiery mill, 1 silver-plating, 2 iron foundries, 2 dye-houses, 5 
machine shops, 6 clothing manufactories, 9 harness shops, 1 cornice 
works, 1 brush shop, 9 carriage shops, 12 cigar factories, 1 brass and 
copper foundry, 1 locomotive works, 1 grist-mill, 1 silk-mill, 3 granite 
works, 1 electric light station, 4 sash and blind shops, 1 brewery, 8 shoe 
shops, 1 gas works, 4 slaughter-houses, 1 soap factory, 4 needle manu- 
factories, 6 beer-bottling, 3 book-binderies, 1 paper-mill, 2 box-makers, 
1 paper-box manufactory. 

MARKETS. 

5 Fish, 14 meat and tish, 4 meat, wholesale. 



22 Livery. 1345 private. 



23 Dentists 1 telephone, 2 telegraph, 31 coal, 1 gas 1 electric, 2 ex- 
press, 19 printing. 



222 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS 







Material on Hand. 








PIPE. 




BRANCHES. 


24 feet 24-iuch pipe. 3 doitb 


e 6 


on 10. 


8,500 " 


20 " 


5 


8 


" 8. 


140 " 


14 " 


18 


6 


" 8. 


1,140 " 


12 " 


3 


6 


" 6. 


1,320 " 


10 " ' 


4 u 


4 


" 4. 


8,088 " 


8 " 


1 


6x8 


" 14. 


1,944 " 


6 " 


' 2 singl 


3 10 on 20. 


1,068 " 


4 " 


1 " 


14 


" 14. 


743 " 


1 " 


1 " 


10 


" 14. 


263 " 


3-4 " 


1 " 


6 


•' 14. 




CI.AMP SLEE 


YES. 1 '' 


4 


" 12. 


16 12-inch. 


1 " 


4 


" 10. 


120 10 


' 


8 " 


6 


" 8. 


30 8 


' 


10 " 


6 


" 6. 


130 6 


( 


1 " 


12 


" 14. 


8 4 


u 


4 " 


6 


" 10. 




WHOLE SLEEVES. 3 " 


10 


" 10. 


2 20-inch. 


16 " 


8 


" 8. 


6 14 


' 


1 " 


4 


" 8. 


6 10 


( 




QUARTER TURNS 


8 8 


' 


4 8-inch. 




4 6 


' 


.5 10 ^ 






2 4 


BENDS. 


6 6 ' 
1 4 ' 






2 20-in 


ch Y. 






PLUGS. 


1 20 


' 1-16. 


2 14-inch. 




1 14 


' 1-8. 


15 10 ' 






1 12 


' 2-8. 


24 12 " 






2 10 ' 


' 1-8. 


27 8 ' 






5 8 ' 


' offsets. 


7 6 ' 






1 10 


1 u 


24 4 '' 






1 12 


' " 




REDUCERS. 


.5 


' " 


1 20-inch to 


14-inch. 




GATES. 


2 14 " 




12 " 


13 8-in 


ch bell. 


2 12 '■ 




10 " 


1 12 


'' 


8 10 " 




8 " 


3 10 ' 


; 11 


2 10 " 




6 " 


6 4 ' 


1 i( 


8 8" 




6 " 


8 6 ' 


' " 


4 6 " 




4 " 


1 14-in 


ch spigot. 


9 hydi 


•ants 




8 6 ' 


( 't 


414 pigs 


of lead. 




BRANCHES 


145 stop 


boxes. 


2 (loubl 


e 6 on 20. 


80 curb cocks. 


1 


8 " 14. 


70 1-2 corp cocks. 


1 


6 " 14. 


11(13-4 


^ 


" 



I 



i 



REPORT 



STREET ANDPARKCOMMISSIONERS 



TENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE STREEl 
AND PARK COMMISSIONERS, 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of Manchester, N. H. : 
Gentlemen, — The tenth annual report of the Board of Street and Park 
Commissioners is herewith submitted, showing the work of this depart- 
ment during the year 1902. 



The following gives the receipts and expenditures for the year. 

Beceipts. 

Receive;! from Manchester Traction, Light & 

Power Co., on account paving Elm street . . . -fi, 531,86 

Received from Manchester Water Works for 

work done on Central street sewer 2,062.95 

Received from sundry sources 759.63 

Deposited with City Treasurer $7,341.68 

Cash paid for express and postage 15.76 

Appropriation . . . • 

Expenditures. 

Commissioners' Salaries ijll, 800.00 

Clerical Services 957.50 

('arriage Allowance 450.00 

Oftice Supplies, books, etc 109.53 

Telephone 19.70 

Incidentals 54.28 

Transferred t3 reserve fund 



(',857.44 



.$7,357.44 



•^3,500.00 



$3,391,01 

108.99 

$3,500.90 



226 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Inventory of City Property. 

OflSce, including typewriter, furniture, etc $385.10 

Divison No. 2, including horses, dumpcarts, sprinklers, 

crushers, tools, etc 21,529.90 

City Stables, storeage sheds and shops 15,950.00 

Lot of land on Franklin street 89,312.00 

Pipe on hand • 1,101.96 

Division No. 4 10.00 

Division No. 5 25.00 

Division No. 7 • 303.88 

Division No. 8 39.85 

Division No. 9 22.10 

Division No. 10 4,812.38 

Stable, land, etc 2,150,00 

Commons 557. .50 

Total • $136,199.67 



List of Appropriations. 

Street and Park Commission -13,500.00 

Repairs of highways $25,000.00 

Repairs of highways, sundry sources 303.35 

25,303.-85 

New Highways 7,000.00 

Watering streets 4,700.00 

Paving streets 4,500.00 

Macadamizing streets 10,000.00 

Grading for concrete 3,500.00 

New sewers $20,000.00 

New sewers, Water works 2,062.95 

New sewers, pipe 195.82 

New sewers, boiler , 125.00 

New sewers, sundry sources 119.70 

22,-503.47 

Scavenger service 18,000.00 

City teams 7,000.00 

Snow and ice 6,500.00 

Bridges • 6,000.00 

Street sweeping 2,-500.00 

Repairs of sewers 5,000.00 

Commons 4,-500.00 

Stark Park 1,000.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 227 

Derryfield Park 500.00 

South End Playground 50.00 

Paving- Elm Street $12,000.00 

Pavino- Elm street, Manchester Street Kailway . 4,534.86 

16,534.86 

Paving Canal street 4,000.00 

Total $152,591.68 



Expenditures. 

Street and Park Commission $3,391.01 

Repairs of highways 29,494.49 

New highways 4,795.26 

Watering streets 3,142.77 

Paving streets 5,268.58 

Macadamizing streets 6,415.39 

Grading for concrete 4,889.37 

New sewers 24,442.69 

Scavenger service 17,231.02 

City teams 6,990.76 

Snow and ice 4,395.89 

Bridges • • 6,258.38 

Street sweeping 3,232.21 

Repairs of sewers 5,744.44 

Commons 4,258.13 

Derrvfield Park 589.65 

Stark Park 1-0^0.91 

South End Playground , ^^''^^ 

Paving Elm street 16,534.08 

Paving Canal street 4,221.06 

Total $152,-557.69 

Balance on hand $33.99 

STREETS AND KG ADS. 

A large amount of work was done in repairing the roads in the outlying 
districts. On Hanover road there was used 3,168 loads of gravel and stone. 
The Manchester Street Railway, bearing a portion of the expense. Over 
1,000 loads of gravel were used in repairing Brown avenue, and extensive 
repairs were made on the roads in East Manchester. Hooksett road was 
repaired its entire length and costly repairs were made on the streets and 
roads in West Manchester. The commissioners make the claim that the 



228 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



I 



roads in the suburban part of the city were never in better condition for 
the public travel than they are at the present time. 

Amherst street was macadamized from Maple to Hall, Central street 
from Beech to Maple and Amherst street from Pine to Beech. 

The following streets were re-covered with concrete: Amherst street, 
Elm street to Nuffield Lane, Amoskeag, west end of the bridge, Chestnut 
street from Manchester to Hanover, Hanover street from Union to Beech, 
Merrimack from Elm to Chestnut, Nuffield Lane from Hanover to Am- 
herst, Union from Lake avenue to Laurel, Union street from Hanover to 
Lowell, AVest Merrimack street from Elm to Hampshire Lane, West street 
north of Douglass and West Bridge street between McGregor bridge and 
Canal bridge. Total number of square yards re-covered, 5,410.86 at a cost 
of $2,686.76. 

New work was put down on Chestnut street from Concord to Lowell and 
on Marion street from McGregor to Main. Total number of square yards 
1,436,27 at a cost of •'Bl,077.20. The Marion street paving was put on a 
cement foundation similar to that used in the Elm street paving. 

The work done upon the street and roads will be found in detail in the 
tables following. 



Report of Division No. 2. 
George W. Chexey, Agent. 
snow and ice account. 
Appropriation 

EXPENDITURES. 

Labor, January 

February 

March 

April 

June 

September ■ . . . . 

November 

December 

Total 

Supplies 

Total 

Transferred to reserve fund 



■16,500.00 



$1,254.09 

1,210.45 

861.49 

3.25 

63.62 

19.00 

69.50 

978.92 

■$4,460.32 
135.57 

$4,595.89 
1,904.11 



•$6,500.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 229 

GITY TEAMS. 

Appropriation $7,000.00 

Paid for labor $3,234.2.5 

hay and grain 2,225.65 

hardware 418.76 

lumber . 230.65 

carriage hire 62.00 

new harnesses and repairing old . . . 270.33 

gas 143.30 

water 101.57 

coal 41.15 

telephone 43.99 

plumbing 10.34 

veterinary 81.40 

wagon repairs 92.40 

incidentals 34.97 

$6,990.76 

Transferred to reserve fund $9.24 

STREETS TURNPIKED WITH EGAD MACHINE. 

Auburn 1,100 feet 

Amherst 1,000 

Arlington 300 

Bridge 1,000 

Beacon 600 

Brown avenue 7,500 

Campbell 400 

Cass ;....• 300 

Central 1,100 

Cheney Place 400 

Derry 400 

East High 200 

Highland 200 

Hall 800 

Hooksett road 3,000 

Laurel 250 

Maple 400 

Malvern 500 

North Pdver road 5,600 

Union (north) 400 

Nashua 200 

Orange 1,000 

Pearl 900 



230 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Russell 300 feet 

South Beech 1,300 " 

Titus avenue 800 " J 

Webster 800 " f 

Total 30,750 feet 

Total 30,750 feet, or 5.8 miles. 

Labor charged to repairs of highways. 

NEW HIGHWAYS. 



Location. 



Length in 
feet. 



Cut or fill. 



Labor. 



AiilHirn, from Wilson west 

Bay, °rom Carpenter to Clarke 

Cedar, from Maple east 

Walnut, north of Cedar 

Totals 



300 
800 
500 
400 



Fill 
Cut 



.f75.00 
450.00 
126.36 
607.63 



$1,258.99 



COBBLE GUTTER PAVINGS. 



Location. 



No Toads 
stone. 



Square 
yartis. 



Labor. 



Arlington, Nashua to Russell 

Auburn, Chestnut to Beech 

Bridge from Beech west 

Beech, Salmon to Sagamore 

Brook, Oak to Maple 

Brook east of Chestnut 

Clark and Union 

Chestnut, Carpenter to Clark 

Chestnut, south of Carpenter 

Central, Belmont of Hall 

Central, Belmont to Milton 

Hooksett Rd. and Beech 

Hanover back, Ashland to Lincoln. 

Manchester south back 

Maple, Brook to Blodget 

Merrimack, east of Hall 

Nashua, Bridge to Pearl 

Prospect and Linden 

Pearl, Oak to Russell 

Prospect and Oak 

Russell, Orange to Myrtle 

Russell , Pearl to Arlington 

Orange and Russell 

Orange and Lin.len 

Sagamore and Beech 

Union and Sagamore 

Union, Manchester to Merrimack.... 

Walnut froiu Bridge south 

Webster and Walnut 

Walnut, Bridge to Lowell 

Webster, Walnut to Beech 

Webster from Adams south 

Webster, Liberty to Union 



16 

102 

8 

5 

13 
6 
5 
7 
4 

24 



531 



266 6-9 
995 5-9 
155 5-9 
116 6-9 
126 6-9 

50 

41 6-9 

64 

30 
233 3-9 
157 1-9 

41 6-9 

26 6-9 
159 

45 7-9 

48 5-9 
263 

35 3-9 
194 4-9 

77 7-9 
107 
188 

44 3-9 
389 
537 4-9 

48 5-9 

13 3-9 

50 

84 
466 6-9 
9 7-9 
308 
165 2 9 



5,541 



$21.00 

133.75 

15.61 

32.40 

26.50 

8.25 

5.25 

6.30 

11.60 

27.20 

27.20 

6.00 

3.50 

70.75 

6.25 

13.60 

25.25 

7.62 

25.25 

21.00 

6.87 

22.75 

8.75 

54.40 

95.20 

13.60 

4.00 

5.25 

10.20 

103.20 

3.25 

61.87 

22.75 



$906.37 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
PAVING RELAID. 



231 



Square yards. 



Elm south of Auburn 
Russell and Prospect.. 

Total 




$34 25 
51.50 



$85.75 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Length 
in feet. 



Ash and Blodget 

Auburn near Beech 

Ash between Sagamore and Blodget 

Amherst above Beacon 

Beech between Salmon and Sagamore 

Bay north of Clark 

BaV north of Clark 

Maple, Brook and Blodget 

Prospect below Russell 

Oak and Sagamore 

Union below Carpenter 

Walnut above Blodget 

Walnut corner Webster 

AVebster corner Walnut 

Total 



300 
.50 
200 
300 
100 
200 
200 
.550 
100 
200 
100 
75 
200 
200 



775 ft. 



Cut or 
fill. 



Cut 



Fill, 
and fill. 
Fill. 

Cut. 

Fill. 
Cut. 

Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 
Cut. 



Labor. 



10..50 
25.00 

9.75 
15.25 
17.30 
17.50 

9.25 
15.00 
28.00 
25.75 

6.00 

7.00 
11.25 



$206.; 



FENCES. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Cost of 
material. 



Beech and Sagamore 

Sagamore and Ash 

Sagamore from Chestnut to Elm 

Totals 



44 

44 
250 



338 ft. 



$1.18 
1.18 
6.75 



$3.00 
3.00 
9.80 



$15.80 



EDGESTONES SET. 



Amherst, Porter and Ashland 
Ash, Sagamore and Blodget . 

Adams and Webster 

Aubnrn and Beech 

Amherst and Belmont .... 
Beech north of Sagamore . . . 
Brook east of Chestnut . . . . 



42 
51 
34 
32 

223 
60 

144 



feet 



232 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Brook and Oak , 16 feet 

Belmont and Central 64 

Bridoe and Pine • • 64 

Bridge and Ash 165 

Bridge and Chestnut 16 

Bridge and Weston 169 

Beech and Salmon 252 

Chestnut, Carpenter and Clarke 92 

Chestnut near Carjienter 77 

Chestnut and Concord 22 

Central and Elm 24.5 

Cedar, Maple and Lincoln 56 

Central and Milton 48 

Canal and Granite 312 

Canal and Cedar 30 

Elm west back. Central and Depot 85 

Elm and Washington 66 

East High and Smith 23 

Grove and Union 24 

Harrison, Elm and Chestnut 14 

Hall and Central 17 

Harrison and Albert 14 

Harrison and Walnut 16 

Jane and Lowell 16 

Laurel and Beacon 15 

Liberty and Webster • • '47 

Lake avenue and Cypress 18 

Lincoln and Spruce ; 177 

Lowell and Hall 15 

Laurel and Chestnut 76 

Lincoln and Myrtle • 185 

Myrtle and Linden 17 

Merrimack and Hall 17 

Nashua 63 

Oak and Sagamore 153 

Orange and Beech 10 

Orange, Washington and Union 75 

Prospect and Linden 192 

Pine and Webster 33 

Pearl and Nashua 13 

Pearl and Oak , 15 

Pearl and Myrtle 15 

Prospect and Oak 15 

Piay and Webster 16 

River road and Webster 32 

Eussell and Prospect 277 

Sagamore and Oak • 17 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 233 

Summer and Beech 25 feet 

Sagamore, Russell and Smith 57 

Sagamore and Union 16 

Spruce, Union and Beech 50 

Spruce and Beech 50 

Union and Clarke 18 

Webster and Walnut 16 

Walnut, Brook and Harrison 61 

Walnut, Sagamore and Blodget 50 

Webster and Chestnut • • iq 

Walnut and Webster 16 

Wilson and Auburn 15 



4,362 feet 



Labor, |o29.49. 



EDGESTONES RE-SET. 



Merrimack between Elm and back street 

Ray and Carpenter 

Sagamore and Oak 



Labor $20.00. 



220 


feet 


220 


" 


44 


" 


484 


feet 



234 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
NEW CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



No. 



Cost of 
material. 



Labor. 



Amherst and Elm 


1 

2 

i 

4 

1 

3 
1 
2 
1 

1 
12 
1 
2 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 

i 

4 

2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
2 


$41.53 
28.94 
40.10 
17.49 
69.26 
27.47 
52.75 
20.19 
37.87 
16.88 
41.25 

265.52 
21.02 
39.97 

122.19 
41.53 
20.36 
19.76 
21.56 

113.83 
17.89 
12.79 
49.52 
19.29 
64.32 
31.09 
21.74 
20.19 
15.24 
16.89 
12.67 
14.09 
21.81 
65.47 
47.26 
26.43 


$13.20 


Brook and Union 


32.16 


Beeeli between Union and Webster 


38.50 


Bridge and Xaslma . ... 


8.50 


Bebuont and Central . 


30.00 


Brook and Maple 


8.90 


Blodget and Ash 


28.00 


Blodget and Maple 




Concord and Chestnut 


24.00 


Calef road near Clarke Farm 


9.00 


Canal near Depot 


14.00 


Elm between Concord and Bridge 


152.04 


Ebu east back, between Lowell and Concord 


7.50 


Ebu between Bridge and Lowell 


18.50 


Ebn between Lake avenue and Central 


30.00 


Elm and Merrimack 


9.90 


Elm east back, between Salmon and North 


8.50 


Elm west back south Granite 


20.50 


Lowell and Ebn 


5.25 


Liberty and Webster 


13.60 


Lake avenue and Beacon 


5.10 


Hanover, Lincoln to Wilson 


8.75 


Jane and East High 


55.75 


Merrimack and Hall 


9.00 


Milton and Central 


35.00 


Nashua and Arlington 


9.90 


Nashua and Bridge 


9.90 


Oak and Pearl 


7.00 


Pearl and Chestnut .' 


6.80 


River road and Webster .... 


6.00 


Sagamore west of Russell 


6.25 


Union and Amherst 

L'nion between Manchester and Merrimack ... 


9.00 
7.37 


Walnut and Webster 


38.50 


Webster and Beech 


39.00 


Webster between Pine and Union 


9.30 








72 


$1,516.19 


$746.57 



REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



Cost of 
material. 



Labor. 



Arlington and Russell 

Elm east back near Lake avenue 

Lincoln and Spruce 

Washington 



$19.09 

42.62 

3.96 

12.71 



878.38 



$10.20 
15.30 
3.50 

8.25 



$37.25 



SCAVENGER. 



This department is still using Putnam street for a clumping ground for 
the city waste. There is more or less complaint made notwithstanding 
the care taken to keep the dump covered with fresh sand daily. The con- 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 235 

clitiou in this respect is unsatisfactory, bnt it is tlie best that can be done 
under the circumstances. The long haul from the central portion of the 
city makes the service very expensive. 

SUMMARY. 

Appropriation $18,000.00 

Labor $13,594.60 

City Farm 2,499.96 

Repairs • 1,136.46 

§17,231.02 

Transferred to reserve fund $768.98 



Extensive repairs were made on the old Amoslieag bridge this year. 
New stringersof Georgia pine were put in place of the old ones, which had 
become weak from decay and the roadway was double planked its entire 
length. The roof is in need of repair and should be attended to the com- 
ing season. 

Extensive repairs were also made upon the roadway of McGregor bridge. 
The part treated with a concrete coating about two years ago has done 
good service. The board is of the opinion that the balance of the road- 
way should be covered with same material the coming year, thus pro- 
tecting the planking from the weather and traffic. 

A new steel bridge was erected upon new abutments over the stream 
near the mill dam on the Island Pond road to take the place of an old 
wooden structure, that had become unsafe for public travel. 

The board would recommend that a new steel bridge be contracted for 
this season to take the place of an old wooden bridge now standing over 
the Cohas brook in the Harvey District, also the abutments should be re- 
built as they show signs of danger. In the near future a new bridge 
should be built over the Portsmouth railroad at south Elm street. There 
also seems to be a demand for a new bridge at Granite street over the 
North Weare railroad track. 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

OverdraAvn 229.08 

$6,229.08 

American Bridge Co $1,375.00 

Lumber , . . . . 2,655.11 

Hardware 140.65 

Stone work 254.80 

Labor 1,803.52 

$6,229.08 



236 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

PAVING ELM STKEET. 

There was laid on Elm street, including sidewalks on both sides, 16 feet 
in width, 8,761,832 square yards granite block jjaving. 6,475,491 square 
yards was charged to Elm street paving and the balance 1,299.341 square 
yards to grading for concrete. 

The work was continued from the north side of Concord and Water 
streets to Bridge street and from the south line of Lake avenue to the 
north curb line of Central street at a total cost of ■?16,534.08. Of this 
amount the Manchester Street Railway Company paid $4,534.86. 

The old square block paving taken from Elm street was used in paving 
Nuffield Lane from Concord street to Lowell street, Church street, Lowell 
street to Bridge street and Bridge street to Pearl street, Monadnock Lane 
from Pine street westerly, Hampshire Lane, Depot street to West Central 
street and Manhattan Lane from Lake avenue to Central street, making a 
total of 3,090,387 square yards. 

SUMMAliY. 

Appropriation $12,000.00 

Manchester Street Railway 4,534.86 



$16,534.86 



Labor $2,025.88 

Cement 1,376.64 

Paving stones 9,741.55 

Laying paving and cement 3,390.01 

S16,534.08 

Transferred to reserve fund .78 

Canal street was paved and new curbing put in from Granite street to 
Cedar, making a mvich needed improvement in this section of the city. 
Total amount of square yards laid 1,886,155 at a cost of $4,221.57. 

SEWEKS. 

It is impossible for the commissioners to build the sewers demanded by 
the citizens of the city, with the appropriations made by the city council 
for this purpose. At the present time some over six miles of sewers are 
ordered built by the city government, the building of which is not yet 
begun. It would require at least $100,000 to complete this work. 

There has been laid this year 10,288 feet of new sewers, at a total cost 
of $20,973.08. Some of the most extensive jobs were situated as follows: 
Ash street south of Sagamore 380 feet ; Ash street Sagamore northerly 241 
feet; Pine and Blodgett streets 1,820 feet; Bridge to Weston 396 feet; 
Central, Hall to Milton, 435 feet; Maple street, Blodgett south, 240 feet; 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 237 

Summer south back street, Union east, 160 feet; Taylor, Hayward to 
Young, 298 feet ; Union, Carpenter northerly, 254 feet ; Union east back 
street from Harrison to Blodget, 724 feet; east of McGregor to Beauport 
street in Amory, 1,046 feet; Bartlett, Wayne to Amory, 524 feet; Cartier 
to Coolidge avenue, 520 feet; George north of Milford, 350 feet; Mast 
street Rochelle avenue west, 414 feet; Thornton, Putnam northerly, 854 
feet and Mast street, Clinton southerly, 194 feet. 

In the Central street sewer it was necessary to blast through solid ledge 
almost its entire length. The same condition was found in the Union 
street sewer north of Carpenter street. The Water Works department bore 
a part of the expenses necessary to put in the trench of the Central street 
sewer and the water pipe was laid at the same time the sewer was built, 
materially reducing the cost of the sewer. 

All the sewers north of Blodget street enter into a ten inch pipe and 
the result was that the street and cellars were flooded in times of a large 
rain fall. In order to relieve the situation, a large sewer of twenty-four 
inch pipe was connected with the Christian Brook sewer running south 
on Pine street to Blodget, then up Blodget street to Walnut, so now all 
the sewerage north of Blodget street is now diverted to the Christian 
Brook sewer. In time, when needed, the Pine street sewer can be ex- 
tended to Prospect street thus cutting all sewers north of said street. 

An important addition was made to the sewerage system of the city on 
the West Side, by building a twenty-four inch sewer from the Merrimack 
River at McGregor Bridge, up Amory street to Beauport street. This 
sewer taking in all the sewerage north of Amory street, formerly running 
into the Main street sewer and then to the Piscataquog river which is 
now diverted to the Merrimack river thus relieving the over-crowded 
Main street sewei'. 

The average cost per linear foot for the east side was $1,992 and $2,038 
per linear foot for the west side, an average total cost per foot of all 
sewers for 1902 of $2,101. 

Length of sewers, east side, division No. 2 5,914 feet 

Length of sewers, west side, division No. 10 4,374 " 

Total 10.288 feet 

Cost of sewers, east side, division No. 2 $11,783 56 

Cost of sewers, west side, division No. 10 9,189.52 

Total ■!;20,973.08 

Average cost per foot, east side, division No.2 1.992 

Average cost per foot, west side, division No. 10 2.101 

Average total cost per foot, §2.038. 



238 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS 

SUMMARY. 

Total appropriation for new sewers $20,000.00 

Overdrawn 1,940.2.5 

Received from Manchester Water- Works : 

Central street, sewer 1,314.00 

Work done • • 748.95 

Received from other sources 440.52 



$24,443.72 



Expended for new sewers, east side $11,783.56 

Expended for new sewers, west side 9,189.52 

Manchester Water-Works, work done 748.95 

Material sold 440.52 

Supplies on hand, city yard 2,281.17 

$24,443.72 

The following table shows how the cost of new sewers has been 
divided. 



240 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWEES BUILT 



Limits. 



n 






w 






A 




lA 








C 


^c , 


at 


r- 




a^ 


■~ 


ii^ 




N 




u 


m 


l-I 


hJ 



Albert 

Ash 

Ash 

Ash 

Ashland 

Blodget 

Blodget 

Bridge 

Bridge 

Carpenter 

Central 

Church, North 

Hall 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Manhattan lane 

Maple 

Merrimack ,. 

Pine 

Pine 

Summer south back. 

Taylor 

Union 

Union 

Union east back 

Union east back 



Harrison northerly 

Blodget to south of Sagamore 
Blodget to south of Sagamore 

Sagamore northerly 

East High northerly 

Pine to Walnut 

At Walnut 

Beacon to Weston 

Beacon to Weston 

At Union 

East of Hall to Milton 

Orange to Orange south back 

Lowell northerly 

Union to Union east back.. 

At Union east back 

Central south back northerly 

Blodget southerly 

East of Beacon easterly 

Christian Brook to Blodget... 
Christian Brook to Blodget... 

Un ion easterly 

Hayward to Young 

Clarke northerly 

Carpenter northerly 

Harrison to Brook 

Brook to Blodget 



Portland. 

Akron. 

Portland. 

Akron. 

Portland. 

Akron. 

Portland. 

Akron. 

Portland. 
Akron. 



Portland. 

Akron. 
Portland. 

Akron. 
Portland. 

Akron. 
Portland. 

Akron. 



10 
12 
12 
10 
10 
18 
12 
10 
10 
12 
10 
10 
10 

I.'-. 

12 
24 
10 
12 
24 
24 
10 
12 
10 
12 
12 
10 



74 
300 

SO 
241 
200 
C70 



•16i 

159 



.342 
102 
8C 
12G 



ISG 
120 
2G7 
22 
ICO 
208 
148 
254 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS, 
IN 1902— EAST SIDE. 



241 



ft 


J- 

o 


o 




3 
1 


§ 

ft 


o 


•6 
is 

1= 


4^ 

CB 9 


Nature of excavation. 




10 

(J 

1 




114.93 


1.283 






S.5 
8: 
7.5 
8.5 
8. 
10. 
9.5 
8. 
8. 
8. 
9.5 
9.5 

8.5 
8.5 
1G.5 
8. 
5.5 
10 5 
10.5 
G.5 
8.5 
8. 
85 
85 
95 


Sand and clay. 
Gravel and boulders 




.:! 








557.90 

310.77 

326.38 

1229.72 

7,.50 


1.4GS 
1.314 
1,G31 
1.541 
1.25 






Gravel and boulders. 








Gravel and ledge. 










Gravel. 




'-^ 






Sand. 










Muck. 






) 






Hard gravel. 




1 


„,! 


404.G7 
120.00 

2395. G7 
128.31 

. 123.32 
157..-.0 
4.5G 
272.28 
212.42 
128,15 


1.173 
3.00 

5..507 
1.258 
1.434 
1.25 
1.14 
4.120 
.889 
lOG 






Hard gravel 








Gravel and ledge. 
Ledge and gravel. 
Sand. 




14 
5 


4 




















Gravel. 




2 


2 






Sand and muck 








Sand 


1 


4 
7 
1 
5 
3 
3 
3 
4 
G 
7 








Sand 












1 








Gravel. 




!! 






Sand. 




2520.40 
113.97 
30G.37 
197.92 

1275.27 
514.80 
294.75 - 


2 481 
.713 
1.028 
1..337 
5.02 
1.10 
'l.l5 














Made ground. 
Gravel. 




G 
















1 
1 
3 






Ledge and gravel. 
























- 


03 


'JO 


11783..5G 


1.902 ■ 





242 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOETS. 



SEWEES BUILT 



Limits. 







■d 


«5 


^ 


rt 


o 






? 


•^ +3 








,. D 


a 












N 






a; 




ai 


iJ 


Hi 



Arnory 

Amory 

Amory 

Amory 

Bartlett 

Bartlett 

Bartlett.... 

Bartlett 

Bremer 

Bremer 

Bridge West 

Cartier 

Coolidge avenue 
Coolidge avenue 

Dubuque 

George 

Mast : 

Mast 

McGregor 

Thornton 

Thornton 

Thornton 

West 



McGregor to Wayne 

Main to Beauport 

Main to Beauport 

Alsace easterly 

Wayne to Amory extension. 
Wayne to Amory extension. 
Wayne to Amory extension. 
Wayne to Amory extension. 
Coolidge avenue westerly... 
Dubuque to Dubuque east back 

McGregor easterly 

Kelley to Coolidge avenue.. 

Cartier to Bremer 

Cartier to Bremer 

Bremer southerly 

North of Milford northerly.. 

Bochelle avenue westerly 

Rochelle avenue westerly 

West Bridge to Amory 

Putnam to Sullivan 

Sullivan southerly 

Sullivan southerly 

Clinton to Granite 



Portland. 

Portland. 

Akron. 

Portland. 

Portland. 

Akron. 

Portland. 

Akron. 

Akron. 

Portland. 

Portland. 

Akron. 

Akron. 

Akron. 

Portland. 

Akron. 

Akron. 

Akron. 

Portland. 

Portland. 

Portland 

Akron. 

Akron. 



24 
20 
18 
12 
15 
1,5 
12 
12 
10 
10 
24 
12 
12 
10 
10 
10 
IS 
15 
24 
12 
10 
10 
10 



475 
288 

40 
278 
125 
125 
137 
137 

32 

20 
125 
420 
100 
110 

32 
350 
209 
205 
112 
466 
194 
194 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
IN 1902.— WEST SIDE. 



243 



o 

a 


9 
o 


■Jl 


5 


1 
6 


a 


-a 
a> 

.a 
.2 

H 
tC 

c 


< 


Nature of excavation. 




2 




.^2,174.00 

950.40 

94.16 

351.00 


S4.577 
3.30 
2.047 
1.265 






8.5 

10. 

10. 
9. 
6.5 
6.5 
8.5 
8.5 
7.5 
8. 
9. 
9. 
5.5 
7. 
8. 
7.5 
9.5 
8.5 
7.5 

10. 
8.5 
8.5 
8. 


Gravel. 










Gravel and boulders. 












Gravel and boulders. 




11 
4 

5 
4 


4 

:i 






Sand 








Sand, muck and clay. 




612.50 


2.45 












11 11 << u 




492.38 


1.796 






tt It 11 11 








Sand 






88.85 
550.68 


1.708 
4.406 






Sand 




1 


1 






Gravel and ledge. 

Sand and made ground. 












728.00 
115.14 


1.40 

.815 














U ti u 






I 

2/ 






.. u 




10 
2 
6 


380.05 
4G8.00 
360.88 
SCO. 00 
506.60 


1.086 
2.2.38 
1.804 
4.464 
1.087 






Sand and tine gravel. 




2 
























16 
8 
8 

11 


3 


















411.86 
396.02 


1.061 
2.04 






(t u 








Sand . 












03 


32 


S9,189..52 


2.101 













244 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
SIDEWALKS REPAIRED. 



Location. 




Belmont and Ashland 


«0.75 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.25. 
.75 
.75 
.50 
.25 
.25 
.25 
.25 
.25 
.50 
.50 


27.8G 

2.11 

14.33 

2.33 

12.91 

1.94 

28.88 

28.00 

27.55 

30.17 

4.87 

1.62 

2.22 

5.87 

5.75 

10.66 

19.35 


$20.90 


Elm and Central 


Elm and Gale avenue 


7.16 
1.16 
6.46 


Elm and Lake avenue 


Elm and Depot 


Gates and Cartier 


Granite 


72.20 

21.00 

20.66 

1.5.08 

1.22 

4.05 

5..55 

1.47 

1.44 

5.33 

9.67 


Myrtle and Linden 


Pine and Bridge.. . 


West Bridge 


Webster and Chestnut.. .. 


Webster and Adams 


Webster and Adams.. . 


Webster and Pine 


Webster and Pine 


Webster and River road 


Sagamore 




Total 




226.42 


©201.87 








PAVING STREETS. 



LOC.VTIOX. 


Price per 
yard. 


Square 
yards. 


Total cost. 


Chestnut, Concord to Lowell 


S.75 
.75 


524.27 
912. 


$393.20 


Marion, McGregor to Main 






Total 




1,436.27 


SI 077 ''O 









PAVING REPAIRED. 



Location. 



Price per 
yard. 



Amherst, Elm to Nutfield Lane 

Amoskeag, west end of the bridge 

Chestnut, .Manchester to Hanover 

Hanover, Union to Beech 

Maple, Laurel southerly '. i 

jSIerrimack, Elm to Chestnut .....!^!!'!!'!^^ J 

Nutfield Lane, Hanover to Amherst 

I'nion, Lake avenue to Laurel !'^!'!!!'' 

Union, Hanover to Lowell '....^[J.]'.]'.'^." \ 

West Merrimack, Elm to Hampshire Lane ..!!!^^!!!!.!.''! 

West, north to Douglass j 

West Bridge, between end of McGregor briclge and' 
Canal bridge I 



$.60 
.50 
.50 
..50 
.50 
..50 
.35 
.50 
.50 
.60 
.35 



Square 
yards. 



210.80 
475.08 
564.61 
817.73 
11.11 
272.66 
413 15 
431.75 
1297.29 
302.67 
53.83 

560.28 



Total cost. 



$126.48 
237. f4 
282.30 
408.87 
5.56 
136.33 
144.60 
215.87 
648.64 
181.60 
18.84 

280.14 



$2,686.76 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



245 



NEW CROSSINGS. 



Location. 



Price per 
yard 



Square 
yards. 



Ash and Brook 

Adams 

Amory and Hevey 

Amory and Hevey 

Bcauport and Wilton 

Beauport and Wilton 

Brook and Ash 

Belmont and Hanover 

Central and Chestnut 

Chestnut and Central 

Carpenter and Kim 

Carpenter and Adams 

Cartier east back 

Coolidge avenue 

Coolidfre avenue and Kelley., 

Chestnut and Lowell 

Elm and Carpenter 

Fourth and School 

Gates 

Granite 

Hevey and Amory 

High and Union 

Hiffh, Pine and Union 

Kelley and Cartier 

Linden and Orange 

Orange and Linden 

River road and Webster 

Seneca lane and Chestnut 

School and Fourth 

Union and High 

Union and Green 

Wilson and Hanover 

Wilton and Beauport 



Totals . 



.50 
.75 
.50 
.75 
.50 
.50 



17.7S 
1(5. 07 
30. '22 
31.92 
30.44 
1G.S9 
30.00 

9.'25 
G3.'2S 
G4.40 
33.03 
31.20 
12.44 
34.83 
41.15 
19.41 
SS..^ 
33.24 
29.28 
18.91 
31.30 
21.95 
33.21 
30.22 
32.04 
29.67 
27.55 
34.84 
17.78 
43.02 
31.45 

2.22 
29.00 



^8.89 
12..'-)0 
22.07 
23.94 
22.83 
12.07 
22.50 

6.93 
31.04 
32.20 
25.22 
23.45 

9.33 
20.13 
30.87 
14.55 
60.38 
10.02 
21.90 

9.45 

lo.'bs 

10.01 
22.07 
24.03 

2o!go 

26.12 
8.89 

21.. 51 

23..58 
1.11 

21.75 



CROSSINGS REPAIRED. 



Location. 


Price 
per yard. 


Square 
yards. 


Total cost. 


Adams and Webster ... 


S0.65 
.75 
.75 
.75 
.50 
.50 
.65 
.50 
.75 
.75 
.50 
.35 
.05 
.75 
.75 
.50 
.75 
.65 
.65 


s.no 

22.98 

13.09 

5.33 

36.36 

16.53 

6.29 

6..58 

10.89 

16.95 

5..33 

10.44 

4.27 

23.97 

15.00 

27..50 

8.89 

0.25 

3.11 




Blodgett and Union 


17.''3 


Blodgett and Walnut 


10 "7 


Blodgett and Pine 


4 00 


Bridge and Pine 


18 18 


Central south back 


8 26 


Chestnut and Webster 


4 08 


Hevey and Amory 


3.29 


Kelley and Coolidge avenue 


8.17 


Lowell and Chestnut 


12 71 


McGregor and West Bridge 


2 07 


Nutfield lane and Amherst 


5 75 


Pine and Webster 


2 78 


Pine and Pennacook 


17.98 


Pine and Sagamore 


11 '^5 


Pine and Bridge 


13 78 


Union and Blodgett 


0.66 


Webster and Chestnut 


4 00 


Webster and Pine 


2.02 






Totals 




§254.92 


$158.80 







Complete works by the Robie Cousolidated Concrete Company. 



246 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Report of Division No. 1 0. 

George P. Ames, Agent. 

STREETS TURNPIKED WITH ROAD MACHINE. 

'^^^^ 280 feet. 

Bremier 350 '• 

Coolidge Ave 700 ' 

Cartier 392 'i 

Conant . . . • • 952 " 

Dunbarton Road 3,212 ' 

Dartmouth i 400 ' 

Douglass 224 ' 

Donald 840 " 

Eddy Road 4 974 

Greewood Ave ^-^ i 

Go«' 350 " 

Green ... 210 " 

Hancock 770 ' ' 

Kelley 1_932 <■ 

Mast Road . 1 225 " 

Mammoth 560 " 

Quincy 196 " 

Second ... • 9^239 " 

Schiller 238 " 

South Main 5,180 " 

Straw Road '. 5,250 " 

Schuyler 322 " 

Winter •. . . . 532 " 



Total, 39.707 feet, or 7.5 miles. 
Labor, .«!194.40. 



39,706 feet 



WHITEWASHING TREES AND FENCES. 



Lime . 
Labor 



§1.90 
73.50 

§75.40 



WORK AT GRAVEL BANK. 



Labor, May 
Labor, June 



170.00 
74.12 



$144.12 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



247 



CULVERTS. 



Built two on Hooksett Road 



Material. 
$165.73 



Labor. 
,$124.75 



FENCES. 



Location. 



Allen 

Amory 

Boynton^ 

Coolidge ATe 

Dunbarton Road 

Goffstown Road 

Hooksett Road 

.Janette Ave 

Mast Road 

Morgan 

North Main back street 

Straw Road 

Schuyler 

Winter 



No. feet. 



90 
37G 
190 
,008 
888 
1,032 
,408 
176 
33« 
896 

88 
224 
176 



7,974 feet. 



Cost of 
material. 



S2.82 

11.'77 

6.54 

29.54 

28.58 

63..57 

42.62 

5.93 

9.02 

26.97 

3.02 

9.19 

5.33 

3.02 



$247.95 



§5.00 

9.00 

12 CO 

20 25 

20.00 

45.75 

23.25 

4.75 

12.00 

24.00 

6.25 

12.00 

6.00 

4.50 



,«;334.75 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 

STREETS TOP-r>RESSED WITH GRAVEL AND STONE CHIPS. 



Location. 



Amory 

Amory and McGregor. 

Boynton 

Beauport 

Bedford 

Cleveland 

Donald 

Hooksett road 

Hevey 

Hackett Hill 

Milford 

Mast road 

North Main 

Rimmon and Kelley .... 

Rimmon 

Rochelle avenue 

Second 

South Main 

Sullivan 

Third 

Winter 

"Walker 



No. feet. 



No. Loads. 



200 
200 



100 



150 



250 
200 



100 

584 
500 



3,899 



132 
30 
346 

27 
43 
44 
76 
33 
24 
27 
17 
95 
19 
55 
43 
4 
39 
18 
189 
40 
6 



1,314 



Labor. 



S78.93 

36.00 

352.37 

5.00 

23.10 

19.00 

40.50 

110.00 • 

23.50 

26.62 

18.25 

15.00 

129.25 

24.87 

41.93 

1.50 

5.12 

53.00 

22.50 

201.00 

68.50 

6.15 



§1,296.09 



248 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
STREETS GRADED. 



Location. 



No. feet. 



Amory 

Amory [_ 

Boyntoij 

Cleveland 

Kelley and Cartier 
Mllford 

McDuflfy 

Rimmon 

Rimmon 



550 
225 
240 
200 
175 
750 
200 
140 
110 



2,590 



Cut or fill. 



Cut. 
Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 
Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 



Lal)or. 



$46.00 
48.94 

105.25 
19.00 
55.50 
G5.00 
27.87 
20.96 
20.97 



8409.49 



STREETS PATCHED. 



Amory 
Alsace 
B 




Blaine and Third 

Dubuque 

Joliette 

Kelley 

Mast road 

Milford 

Mast road 

Mill 

Riddle 

Railroad 

Sullivan ... 

South Main 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



LOC.A^TIOX. 


Length and width. 


Cut or fill. 


Loads. 


Labor. 


Brock 


S 350xl8x8-inches. 
1 300xlSx5-inches. 
( 225x28x3 feet. 
,5.50x8x2 feet. 
( 150x8x1 feet. 


Cut. 
Fill. 
Fill. 
Fill. 
Cut. 






Wentworth 


96 gravel. 


$60.37 












178.70 


Turnpiked, 400 feet 






1,575 feet. 




96 


$239.07 









I 



$165.00 
183.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 249 

CLEANING GUTTERS, CROSSINGS AND CESSPOOLS. 

April 

May 

June 163.50 

July 185.62 

August • • • • 110-00 

September 134.50 

October lOS'OO 

November 274.00 

11,321.62 

EDGESTONES SET. 

Amory and Hevey 

Amory 

Alsace • • • ■ • • • 

Amory and Alsace 

Amory and Rimmon 

Beauport and Button 

Beauport 

Brock 

Bartlett 

Cartier and Adams 

Cartier 

Dartmouth • • • • 

Hevey and Amory 

Joliette 

Kelley 

Putnam • • 

Eimmon 

Second and School 

School and Third 

Third and Bath • 

Third and Ferry 

Third and Walker 

Wayne and B 

Total . . . • ^1'567 feet 

Labor, $262.02. 



Bridge 200 feet 

Kelley and Cartier 1^ 



32 feet 


132 " 


142 " 


15 •' 


113 " 


23 " 


50 " 


79 " 


100 " 


35 " 


50 " 


15 " 


114 " 


153 " 


332 " 


8 " 


50 " 


15 " 


16 " 


31 " 


16 ,' 


38 " 


18 " 



215 



Labor, $15.25. 



350 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
BRIDGES. 




NEW CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



Number. 



Cost of 
material. 



Labor. 



Amory 


1 

2 

2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 

2 

4 
1 
2 
2 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
3 
2 


$19.35 
36.65 
41.85 
23.85 
18.72 
37.93 
37.90 
43.93 
40.28 
79.56 
10..38 
36.48 
32.70 
16.86 
78.29 
44.80 
18.64 
24.47 
.56.75 
33.93 


$10.50 
22..50 
24.25 
15.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
28.50 
51.25 
9.50 
20 00' 
13.00 
lO.OO 
17.00 
21.50 
18.75 
27..50 
34..50 
20.00 


Amory and Cartier 


Amory and Hevey .. . 


Amory and Rimmon 


Alsace and Kelley .. . 


Blaine 


Bremier 


Coolidge avenue 


Cartier... . 


Dubuque .. 


Kelley 


Mil ford and George . . 


Mast Road 


Montgomory 


Marion 


Rimmon 


Schuyler. . 


Sylvester 


Third : 


West 






38 


$738r.33 


§413.75 



REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



Number. 



Amory 

Blaine 

Beauport 

Milford ." 

Kelley and Cartier .... 
Second and School .... 
School and Turner 

Third 

Third and Walker 

Wayne and McGregor 



Labor. 




STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
PAVING. 



251 




Ainory west Rimmon 

Ainory west Jewett 

Ainory 

Alsace 

Adams 

Brock 

Blaine 

Boynton 

Car tier 

Dartmouth 

George 

Hevey 

Joilette 

Kelley 

Milford 

Rimmon 

Sylvester 

Third 

Wilton 

West Bridge 



Total 



GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Width 
in feet. 



Cut or 

mi. 



Labor. 



Amory and Hevey . 

Amory 

Amory 

Cartier 

Kelley and Cartier. 

Milford 

Milford 

Putnam 

Rimmon 

Sullivan 

Wayne 



225 
340 
1.50 
50 
250 
500 
240 
200 
100 
200 
200 



Cut. 
Cut. 
Fill. 
Cut. 
Cut. 
Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 
Cut. 
Fill. 
Fill. 



.«15.75 
42.75 
3G.00 

9.89 
16.00 
16.12 

5.38 



4.00 



*> 455 

Total -^' 



§145.89 



Division No. 4. 



Byron Moore, Agent. 

Roads have been kept in good condition and generally repaired 

throughout the district. , i ^^ 

The bridge over little Cohas Brook has been partly replanked. 
Total anTount expended for labor during year, 1293.74. 



252 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Division No. 5. 
Mark E. Hakvey, Agent. 

Eoad graveled • 3,100 feet 

Eoad turnpiked with road machine 2 1-2 miles 

Weston widened, 4 feet — 200 feet in length. 

Bridge across Cohas brook has been replanked. 

Repaired one stone culvert on Nutt road. 

Re-built two culverts on Weston road, 12 x 15. 

Dug 400 feet of ditch for drainage of Nutt road. 

Cut bushes on 1 1-2 miles of road. 

Removed all loose stones from roads once each month during the 
season. 

Repaired water bars and made all general repairs where needed. 

All roads broken out after each storm. 

Total amount expended for labor during the year, $525.48 



Division No. 8. 

A. J. Gale, Agent. 

Gi'aveled Candia and Hanover road, used 3,168 loads. 

Turnpike, graveled 15 loads used 

Bald Hill, graveled .- 6 " " 

Bridge Extension, graveled 30 " " 

Lock road, graveled 20 " " 

Proctor road, graveled 8 " " 

Total number loads of gravel used, 3,246 

Bridge street extension turnpiked 50 rods 

Lock road extension, turnpiked 10 " 

Bald Hill road, turnpiked 15 " 

Turnpike road, turnpiked 150 " 

Proctor road turnpiked 75 " 

Total 300 rods 

Hanover street, culvert cleaned and relaid 20 feet 

Candia road, culvert cleaned and relaid 180 " 

Lake Shore road, culvert cleaned and relaid . 65 " 

Turnpike road, 2 new culverts and one relaid 52 " 

Total 317 feet 

Laid 76 feet 12-inch pipe on Mammoth road in front of new house be- 
ing built for Robert Stevens. Fifty loads of gravel used for grading. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



253 



26 feet pipe laid on Paige street. 

General .repairs have been made throughout the district, small stones 
removad from roads, bushes cut and roads broken out after storms 
during the winter months. 

Total amount expended for labor during the year $2,226.47. 



Division No, 9. 

Lester C. Paige, Agent. 

Mammoth road graveled 29 rods. 

Derry road graveled 28 " 

Conant road, graveled 30 " 

Paige road, graveled . 16 " 

41 loads of filling was used on Mammoth road. 

1 Culvert on Morseville road 24x24-in. was taken up, cleaned, relaid 
and enlarged to 4x2-feet. 

1 Culvert on Webster road was taken up cleaned and relaid. 

90 loads of stone were dumped into Cohas Brook, to prevent it from 
undermining the road. Several loads of filling were then used and 8 
rods of fencing put up. 

Bushes were cut on Cohas avenue, Webster, Paige and Mammoth 
roads. 

Small stones were removed from roads and all general repairs attended 
to throughout the division". 

Eoads were broken out after snow storms and kept in a passable 
condition during the winter months. 

Total amount expended for labor during the year, •1593.00. 



Division No. 7. 

Chaijles FkanciS, Agent. 

NEW CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



Number. 



Cost of 
material 



Canton aiiil Cedar 

Canton and Cedar, manhole. 

Hospital avenue ." 

Taylor and Hayward 

Taylor and Toiing 

Spruce 

Valley at Shoe Shop 

Young at Taylor 




518.SO 

20,03 
26..5S 
39.10 
39.10 
18.09 
1S.09 
37.25 



254 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

GUTTERS PAVED. 



Location . 


No. feet. 


Canton from Cedar to Auburn 


450 

270 
800 
100 
4S0 




Hospital avenue 




Jones . . 




Silver west of Belmont 




Taylor 










2,100 





GUTTERS RELAID. 



Location. 


No. feet. 




Spruce west from Hall 


125 








125 









STREETS REPAIEED WITH KOAD MACHINE. 

Cilley Road, Highland Park avenue, Longwood avenue, Paige street, Revere 
avenue. 

NEW STREETS. 



Location. 



Length 
in feet. 



Cut or fill. 



Clay from Cypress west 

Dix'from Cypress to Taylor... 

Glenwood Ave 

Hospital Ave 

Mammoth Road 

Silver from Belmont to Hall 
Taylor 



375 ft. 



Cut. 



Cut and fill. 
Cut. 



Cut and fill. 



Bushes cut on : 

Cilley Road, Colias Ave., Huse Roaci, Porter St., Young St. 
Caudla Road "vvideued 



900 feet. 



CULVERTS 

Cohas Ave. at Dowuiug's 60 ft. 15 iu. pipe 

Claj' -west of Wilson 50" plank. 

Glenwood Ave 30 " 12 in. pipe 

Jewett, south Cilley Road 24 " 15 " 

Mammoth Rd. south Lake Ave 3-t " 12 " 

Tavlor at Somerville 22 " 10 " 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



255 



CULVERTS RE-LAID. 

Cilley Road 2 stoue culverts 

Candia " 3 " ■' 

Dickey " • . . . 1 '' " 

Mammoth " ... 1 " " 



EDGESTONES SET. 

Cautou and Cedar •. 

Hospital Ave. and Cypress 

Jones and Dodge . . • 

Silver and Wilson 

Spruce and Hall 

Jones 

Wilson and Silver 

Wilson and Belmont 



15 
30 

175 
75 
40 
27 

196 
15 



feet 



573 

BRIDGES. 

Hospital A^e ' Lengthened 12 s 12 

Mill Dam Replanked 100 x 18 

STREETS GRAVELLED. 

Candia Rd 800 feet 

Cohas Ave 360 " 

Mammoth Rd 1,900 " 

Pond Road 2,000 " 



5,060 feet 



Total amount expended for labor during the year, §8,121.74. 



Parks and Commons. 

John Fullerton, Agent. 

The public squares of the city have received the usual amount of 
careful attention. The seats were repaired and repainted and placed in 
position. The flower beds were renewed and shrubs and small trees set 
out to take the place of any that had died during the year. The small 
ponds were flooded and kept in good condition where the children enjoyed 
skating privileges. This latter takes the time of several men as the 
department maintain nine skating ponds or rinks, divided among the 



256 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

various commons as follows: Merrimack, three; Park and Tremont, two 
each ; Hanover and Concord, one each. Each pond has to be swept every 
day during the skating season and flooded often enough to 'keep the ice 
in proper shape. 

At Stark Park several extensive improvements were made. A roadway 
was built 625 feet in length by 18 feet in width connecting the upper side 
of the park with the lower side, thus completing the circle around the 
Gen. Stark burying ground. 

At Derryfield Park a drain 1,048 feet of sewer pipe was laid and two 
cesspools were built. 

With a knowledge that these places were and must be the poor people's 
pleasure grounds, this board has sought to make the money appropriated 
for the purpose go as far as possible in securing that which would make 
them attractive and comfortable. AVe believe that in the past the money 
has been well and wisely spent. In the days of "high taxation" we real- 
ize that economy, which would rob these citizens who are the workers in 
our city, of that which means so much to them would be a mistake if not 
a wrong and we ask the city councils to be liberal as well as just in this 
appropriation for i>arks and commons for the coming year. 

The following is a summary attending the j)arks and commons: 

COMMONS. 

Appropriation •$4,500.00 

Labor. . . • $2,811.66 

Water Works 736.00 

Grass seed 16.05 

Shrubs and flowers 335.80 

Lumber 22.30 

Hardware 183.97 

Lights 44.00 

Plumbing repairs 20.62 

Incidentals 87.73 

$4,258.13 

Transferred to reserve fund §241.87 

DEKEYFIELD PARK. 

Appropriation $500.00 

Overdrawn S9.u5 

S5S9.65 

Labor •$569.49 

Insurance 6.25 

Repairs 12.71 

-$589. 65 



1 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 257 



STARK PAKK. 



Appropriation • • $1,000.00 

Overdrawn 20.91 



Labor $1,008.99 

Grass seed 11.08 

Hardware . .84 



SOUTH END PI>AYGJ{OUNI). 



11,020.91 



$1,020.91 



Appropriation $50.00 

Labor $37.50 

Incidentals 2.60 

40.10 



Transferred to reserve fund , $9.90 

We desire to thank His Honor, Mayor Clarke and each member of the 
city government, as well as all others for courtesies granted. To all our 
assistants, whatever their stations, we also extend thanks for the ability 
and interest they have shown in the work of the department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HORACE P. SIMPSON, 
GEORGE H. STEARNS, 
BYRON WORTHEN, 

Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 
January 1, 1903. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT, 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 



Office of thk City Engineer, 

Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1902. 

To the Honorable Mayor and City Councils: 

Gentlemen, — The twenty-fourtli annvial report of the city engineer is 
herewith submitted, showing the expenditures and operations of the 
engineer's department for the year ending December 31, 1902. 

Office. 

Seven assistants have been employed in this department during the 
year 1902; Harrie M. Young, George W. Wales, Harry J. Briggs, Alfred 
T. Dodge, Henry A. Worthen, Ella Barker Davis, stenographer and 
typewriter. Hallet R. Bobbins from June 16 to September 24. 

Financial. 

WYCKOFF, SEAMANS & BENEDICT, BOSTON. 

1901. 

Feb. 28. To 1 typewriter tabulator 120.00 

1-2 dozen typewriter ribbons, (coupon 

book) 3.50 



1902. 

Feb. 6. 1 card cylinder 2.92 

1 cylinder stop spring -24 

1 line space guage • • -30 



123.50 



$3.46 



June 9. 1-2 dozen typewriter ribbons (coupon 

book) No. 1131 $3.50 

YAWMAN & ERBE MANUFACTURING COMPANY, BOSTON. 
1901. 

Aug. 23. To 1-24 drawer "A" card index cabinet, 

oak 6 X 4, F. R $54.00 

1 M No. 200 "B'" blue cards, 6 x 4, F. R. 6.70 



262 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Aug. 23. To 2 M No. 200 "B" salmon cards, 6 x 4, 

F. E. ... 6.70 

1500 No. 200 "B^^ buff cards, 6x4, 

F. E 5.35 

500 No. 200 "B" white cards, 6x4, 

F. E. plain 1.35 

1 M blank guides, 6 x 4, F. E. cut 4ths 7.00 

3 sets No. 20 buff guides, 6 x 4, F. E. .90 

1 set No. 40 buff guides, 6x4, F. E. ..50 

$82.50 
By cash January 7, 1901 62.77 

1901. 

Jan. 14. To 1 dozen No. 12 filing cases -$2.50 

1 dozen cabinet indexes 1.00 

1902. 
Jan. 4. 1500 No. 200 "B'' plain cards, 6 x 4, 

F. E $3.60 

Feb. 8. 3000 No. 200 "B" buff cards, 6x4, per- 
forated, horizontal ruling 7.20 

28. 250 blue guides, 6 x 4, F. E. cut 4tlis 

250 salmon guides, 6 x 4, F. E. cut 4ths 

500 buff guides, 6 x 4, F. E. cut 4ths . 7. -50 

Apr. 10. 1-36 drawer "A" oak cabinet with 

Acme lock and two sliding shelves 

6 x 4, F. E. (Spl) 76.00 

97.80 
Credit by 1-24 drawer "A" oak cabinet 

returned 40.00 



EUGENE DIETZEN COMPAXV, NEW YOEK. 
1901. 

Sept. 21. To 1-50 yard roll, 36-inch rapid blue 

print paper $5.50 

2 dozen No. 2364 thumb tacks .... 1.20 



20 per cent discount $1.34 

Credit by oveicharge .55 



6.70 



$1.89 



$19.73 



$57.80 



L81 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 263 

PIKE & HEAI,D COMPANY. 

1901. 

Nov. 9. To 28 1-4 inch plugs at 2 cents $0.56 

28 hours labor at 30 cents 8.40 



1902. 

July 16. 15 1-4 inch plugs at 1 cent ' $0.15 

14 hours labor, "VVorthen at 35 cents 4.90 



E. A. STRATTON. 

1901. 

Dec. 14. 2 reams No. 27 typewriter paper at SI. 10 . $2.20 

6 erasers at 15c .90 

1-2 dozen erasers .25 



C. H. WOOD. 

1901. 
Dec. 31. To painting one street sign William street $0.35 

1901. 

painting one street sign Cumberland 

street .35 



$5.05 



3.35 



1902. 

May 31. 2 reams typewriter paper 2.20 

Nov. 29. 2 D 12 1-4 units No. 298 book case 6.50 

2 D 10 1-4 units No. 298 book case 6.00 

2 D ex. tops 3.50 

16.00 



).70 



1902. 
Mar. 18. To painting two street signs, Massa- 

besic street, Spruce street .70 

painting and varnishing 5 transit rods $1.50 

1 transit box .50 



$2.00 

June 21. painting 25 street signs at 25c . . . 6.25 

Aug. 18. painting 10 street signs at 25c .... 2,50 

Dec. 27. painting 17 street signs at 25c .... 4.25 

J. ARTHUR WILLIAMS 

1902. 

Jan. 14. To printing 2,000 cards f3.00 

18. 1,500 blanks (3 lots) 3.75 

$6.75 



264 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Jan. 27. To 1,200 blank "bench mark" 2.75 

Feb. 20. printing 300 buff cards 3.00 

Mar. 20. 1,000 envelopes 3.00 

2 blank book ; 4.00 



H. L. GOULD. 

1902. 

Jan. 20. To weekJy hydrant bench mark report for 

six months ending January 1, 1902 . 

Dec. 27. To weekly hydrant bench mark jreport for 

12 months ending December 31, 1902 

D. F. SHEA. 

Jan. 22. 1 pair Storm King rubber boots . . . 

.TOHX B. VARICK COMPANY. 

1902. 

Jan. 22. To 2 handles at 33 cents $0.66 

1 Lt. Mai. ferules .08 

37. 1 1-2 Lt. Mai. iron at 8 cents .12 

2 N. H. handles at 8 cents .16 

2-36 inch Hick. S. H. handles at 1.5 

cents .30 

1-3 pound V. J. axe .60 

2 Ex. axe handles at 20 cents .40 

Feb. 5. 1-3 dozen No. 12 harness hooks at 

.$1.00 .33 

1-3 dozen No. 2 harness hooks at 

fLOO .33 

1-2 dozen No. 6. harness hooks at 

$1.50 .75 

1 gross 1 1 2 X 12 wood screws .... .24 
1-3 dozen door stops at 36 cents . ... ^ .12 

7. 1 wagon jack 1.25 

1 set 4-inch Hatfield sheaves 1.00 

13. 1-2 dozen No. 604 ice chest fasteners 

at $2.00 ••.... 1.00 

1 1-2 pairs 41-2x4 1-2 No. 731 buits at 

25 cents .38 

I No. 37 hitching ring .12 

12 foot Victor track at 4 cents .... .48 

14. 4 foot Victor track at 4 cents .... .16 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 2G5 

Feb. 23. Credit by 1 1-2 pairs 4 1-2 x 4 1-2 

No. 731 butts 10.38 

1 No. 37 liitcliing ring .12 

$0.50 

$7.98 

Feb. 25. 1 pound N. Castile soap 0.18 

May. 15. 1 1-2 pounds sheet lead at 7 cent . . . $0.11 

1 piece wire .05 

paper bags .05 

17. 1 metallic scale, $2.50 less 25 per cent . 1.87 

postage .16 

$2.24 

June IG. 1 dozen Venetian crayous .GO 

1-4 dozen blue leads at 75 cents .... .19 

$0.79 

July 1. tacks and screws .10 

Aug. 1. 1 gross blue Faber N. D. dragon chalk $4.00 

1 gross red Faber N. D. dragon chalk 4.00 

$8.00 

Sept. 17. 16 pounds 1 1-2 iuch copper nails at 27 cents . . 4.32 

Oct. 7. 2 drills and 1 punch .87 

STAR STAMP COMPANY. 

1902. 

Jan. 28. To 5 1-line stamps $0.75 

1 oz. black ink .25 

$1.00 

AMOSKEAG MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

Jan. 31. To 1 brass mould for weight $4.95 

THE JOHN B. CLARKE COMPANY. 

Jan. 31. To binding 8 typewritten books (4 records committee 

on streets, 4 records committee on sewers) . . 4.00 

Apr. 15. To printing 300 reports (Engineer's Dept.) 51 pages 

and cover at 65 cents per page 33.80 

C. L. BEEGEE & SONS, BOSTON, MASS. 

Feb. 12. To repairing, cleaning and adjusting one 
Berger & Sons Engineer's transit 
instrument as per memorandum en- 
closed, 24 1-2 hours labor at 60 cents $14.70 



266 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Feb. 12. To new transit box 7.00 

3 triijod caps 1.50 

bolt, nut and washer, like sample . . 1.30 

adjusting pin .15 

repairing, cleaning and adjusting Ber- 

ger level, 17 hours at 60 cents . . . 10.20 

2 adjusting pins .30 



u. K. nORNE. 



Feb. 5. 1 New York level rod 14.00 

21. 6 split legs for tripods 18.00 

box for packing .50 



$35.15 



$32,50 



Feb. 13. To 1-4 dozen cuspidors at $8.00 $2.00 



MANCHESTEi: HAP.DWARE COMPANY. 

Feb. 20. To 1 dozen wire coat and hat hooks ... $0.15 

1 dozen brass screws .17 

Mar. 6. 1-2 dozen brass screw hooks at 25 cents .13 

1-2 dozen brass screw hooks at 12 cents .06 

7. 1 dozen hooks .10 

17. 2-3 dozen snaps at 50 cents .33 

2 rings at 3 cents . . . .- .06 

2 rings at 2 cents .04 

1-4 lb. copper rivets .10 



$1.14 



Mar. 25. To 2 snaps .10 

1 sc. cord .07 

2 rings .02 

3 eyes .03 

1 ball twine .10 

$0.32 

Aug. 16. 4 lbs. seal brand paper at 3 1-2 cents .14 

Oct. 3. 1 B. S. drill 1-8-inch .23 



W. p. GOODMAX. 

Feb. 28. To 1 dozen erasers $0.60 

3 erasers .15 

1 box typewriter paper .90 



$1.65 



REPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 367 

Apr. 3. To 275 catalogue envelopes 1.65 

May 6. 1 typewriter ribbon .50 

Sept. 8. ' 1 box typewriter paper .90 

Oct. 8. 1 blank book .10 



Dec. 10. 1 box typewriter paper .90 

13. 1 gross falcon pens .55 

17. 1 bottle paste .20 



$1.00 



$1.65 



$11.84 



XEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY. 

To exchange service, including rental of 
telephone for 3 months ending March 

31, 1902 $9.50 

tolls, November and December, 1901, 
-January 1902 2.34 

rent for 3 months ending .June .80, 1902, 

at $38 ^ $9.50 

tolls for February, $3 00; "April, 40 
cents ; May, 15 cents ; June, .35 cents ; 
July, 15 cents ; August, 75 cents ; Sep- 
tember, $1.35 6.15 

^ 15.65 

By rent 1 month, June 1902, at $38 .... 3.17 

$12.48 

To tolls October and November .83 

W. & L. E. GURLEY, NEW YORK. 

Mar. 4'. To 6 tripods points $3.00 

prepaid express .25 

$3.25 

UNION MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

Mar. 31. To 3 dozen figures 6'snickle plated at 50c . $1.50 

H. C. RANNO & SON. 

Mar. 21. To repairing harness $0.80 

22 5 strai3S, slide loops and buckles .... 1.28 

, $2.08 

June 15. Harness leather and tacks for shafts . .35 



268 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

KEYSTONE BLUE PAPER COMPANY, PHILADELPHIA. 

Mar. 22. To 1-50 yard roll 36-incb Med. parchment . $3.60 

expressage .75 

A. K. HOBBS. 



DAVID FLAXDEES. 

Apr. 5. To nickeling 3 dozen street number figures 

at 21 cents 10.63 

May. 20. furnishing 100 dozen number figures 

at 42 cents 42.00 



KEUFFEL & ESSER COMPANY, NEW YORK. 

Apr. 9. To 1 only metal triangular scale No. 1642 . 12.05 

postage .07 



J. G. .JONEg. 



14.35 



11.06 



Mar. 22. To 3 yards corrugated rubber 18xl08-inches 

at 75c $2.25 



THE HEAD & DOW.ST COMPANY. 

Mar. 25. To 17 feet 1-2-inch whitewood at 40 cents . $0.68 

2 feet Michigan upper .18 

machine work .20 

July 19. 5000 grade stakes 2 feet long 

1000 grade stakes 1 foot and 6 inches 

long 

300 grade stakes 4 feet long $52.00 

E. G. SOLTMANN, NEW YORK. 

Apr. 2. To 1 roll 48-inch detail paper $2.80 

1-2 gross Kohinoor pencils 5.00 

1-2 dozen bottles Higgins ink 1.25 



$9.11 



$42.63 



$2.12 



Apr. 18. To delivering one filing cabinet .35 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 269 

PNEUMATIC HAND STAMP COMPANY, BOSTON. 

Apr. 26. To 2, 1-liue stamps at 30 cents -10.60 

1 1-liue stamp .40 

1 special stamp 2.25 

1 stamp from cut .55 

3.80 
less 25 per cent discount .95 

2.85 

routing wood cut . . . . » .25 

3 sorts metal B. type at 5 cents .... .15 

3.25 

Mailing expense .15 

"13.40 

TEMPLE A FARKINGTON COMPANY. 

Apr. 26. To binding one volume plans, 25 inch by 31 1-2 inch $7.00 

A. I.. FRANKS & COMPANY. 

1901. 
June 21. To 1 electric fan 15.00 

CHAS. A. HOITT & COMPANY. 

July 26. To 1 blacking cabinet 2.00 

2 brushes for cabinet .95 

$2.95 

.J. J. ABBOTT. 

Oct. 23. To 3-16 gallons shellac $0.75 

CARL STRAUSS, HOBOKEN, N. J. 

Oct. 25. To 1 German pencil pointer $7.50 

FRANK S. BODWELL. 

Nov. 22. To 100 stont bounds at $1.40 $140.00 



370 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



, CHAKLES II. SIMPSOX. 

Dec. 27. To use of horse 21 days to Dec. 9 at .$1.00 

HAKKIE M. YOUNG. 

1901. 

Dec. 2. To cloth $0.30 

glue . . . . ' .20 

16. paper .1,5 

21. street car fares 1.20 

31. note book .05 

1902. 

Feb. 5. To expressage $0.90 

12. expressage .25 

27. pasters ,10 

Mar. 1. expressage ■ .1.5 

12. mending boot .10 

May 8, street car fares ,20 

9. street car fares .10 

18, street car fares .20 

15. street car fares . .10 

22, street car fares ,20 

24, street car fares .60 

Aug. 12. street car fares .20 

18. street car fares .30 

16. telephone .05 

Sept. 27. street car fares 

Oct. 25. street car fares 

Nov. 22. street car fares .40 

plumb bob string .10 

GEORGE AV. WALES. 

1902. 

Feb. 22. Street car fares $0.75 

lime .10 

exi^ressage paid 1.00 

June 21. street car fares 81.90 

piece of brass .05 

July 26. street car fares .95 

rubber tijjs .24 



$21.00 



$1.90 



$1.50 



$1.40 



.55 
1.00 
1.00 



$0,50 



$1.85 



1.95 



1.19 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 271 



HEXKY A. W<)ETIlf:X. 



27. To plumb bob string 10.35 

telephone .05 



•'5!0.40 



HARRIE M. YOUNG. 



27. To 156 days service at 12.75 per day 1429.00 

159 days service at $.3.12 per day 496.08 

St 1-2 hours extra service at 36 2-3 cents per hour 11.52 



GEOKGE W. WALES. 



27. To 156 days service at $2.75 per day 1429.00 

162 days service at $3.12 per day 505.44 

158 1-2 hours extra service at 36 2-3 cents 

per hour 58.01 



HARRY ,J. BRIG6S. 



Dec. 27. To 150 days service at I2..50 per day $375.00 

158 days service at $2.84 per day 448-72 

21 hours extra service at 33 1-3 cents per hour . 6.89 



ALFRED T. DODGE. 

Dec. 27. To 156 days service at .$2.00 per day $312.00 

162 days service at $2.27 per day 367.74 

15 hours extra service at 26 2-3 cents per hour . 3.96 

HENRY A. WOETHEX. 

Dec. 27. To 156 days service at §1.75 per day $273.00 

6 days service at $1.98 per day 11.88. 

151 days service at $2.10 per day 317.10 

3 1-2 hours extra service at 20 cents per hour . . .70 

4 1-2 hoirrs extra service at 23 1-3 cents per hour 1.03 

IIALLET R. ROBBINS. 

Sept. 24. To 87 days service at $1.75 per day $152.25 

1 1-2 hours extra service at 23 1-3 cents per hour .34 



272 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ELLA B. DAVIS. 

Dec. 27. To 312 days service at fL60 per clay $499.20 

1 hour extra service at 21 1-2 cents per hour . . .21 

SAMUEL J. LOUD. 

Dec. 31. To first, second, third and fourth quarters, 

team hire -1200.00 

first, second, third, and fourth quar- 
ters' salary 1,350.00 

'- $1,550.00 

Total expense engineer's department for 1902 16,948.03 

SUMMARY. 

Appro^jriation to the engineer's department, for the 

year 1902 6,874.73 

Expense of the engineer's department for the year 1902 $6,948.03 

Amount overdrawn 73.30 

$6,948.03 $6,948.03 

Orders. 

Number of orders for : 

Surveys, street lines, and grades 254 

Sewer grades . 60 

Gutter grades 106 

Curb grades 67 

Corner curb grades 101 

Paving grades 49 

Pine Grove cemetery, grades, levels, and surveys ... 36 

Valley cemetery, levels, and surveys 5 

Merrill yard lines 1 

Stark Park grades, levels, ajid surveys 4 

Lafayette Park, cross section 1 

Pi-ofile levels 151 

Petitions . . 122 

Sewers and drains committee 9 

Street committee 13 

Special committees 5 

Road hearings 15 

Board of aldermen 14 

Board of examiners of jiluitibers 12 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 273 

Setting stone bounds 142 

Street signs 54 

Street numbers 518 

Highland school l»atters 1 

Wilson Hill engine house batters 1 

Island Pond road bridge 5 

Miscellaneous orders '21 

Total 1,353 

Field Work. 

Levels for profile for establishing grades (^length in feet) . . 288,364 

for sewer profiles (length in feet) 6,315 

in Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 1,895 

in Stark Park (length in feet) 5,245 

Other levels (length in feet) 10,579 

Total length of levels in feet 312,398 

Cross section levels, Lafayette park (area in sq. feet) .... 90,500 

Surveys of streets and street lines (length in feet) 47,153 

for street numbers (length in feet) 4,289 

in Stark park (length in feet) 3,666 

miscellaneous (length in feet) 2,483 

Total length of surveys in feet 57,591 

Survey of gravel bank, Rochelle avenue (area in sq. ft.) . . . 69,898 

Street lines marked on ground (length in feet) 19,253 

Lot and avenue lines. Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) . . 5,258 

Lot and avenue lines, Valley cemetery (length in feet 334 

Lot and avenue lines, Merrill yard (length in feet) 65 

Lines in Stark park (length in feet) 1,056 

Lines for gutters (length in feet) 31,737 

Lines for curbs (length in feet) .... 11,C60 

Lines for sewers (length in feet) 11,122 

Other lines (length in feet) 2,187 

Total length of feet in lines marked on the ground . . 82,072 

Grades set for sidewalks (length in feet) 22,712 

gutters (length in feet) 31,737 

curbs (length in feet) 11,060 

sewers (length in feet) 11,122 

building streets (length in feet) 26,107 

Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 2,968 

Stark park (length in.feet) 1,200 

other purposes (length in feit) I,t00 

Total length in feet of grades set 108,506 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Numbei- of new lots staked out in Pine Grove cemetery ... 28 

Number of ranges staked out in Pine Grove cemetery .... 16 

Number of old lots restaked in Pine Grove cemetery 38 

Number of old lots restaked in Valley cemetery 1 

ifumber of old lots restaked in Merrill yard 1 

Total number of cemetery lots staked out 84 

Stone bounds set 142 

BATTEES SET. 

Island Pond road, bridge over outlet to Lake. 

Titus avenue, Highland Scbool. 

Weston street, Wilson Hill Engine House. 

OFFICE WORK. 

PLANS AXD PROFILES. 

Beech, Salmon to Webster. 

Belmont, Hanover to Concord. 

Bridge, Belmont to east of Highland. 

Buzzell, Lowell to East High. 

Colby, West Hancock to Log. 

Cumberland, Monitor to Amory. 

Dartmouth, West Hancock to south of Frederick. 

Goffe, Wheelock to West Hancock. 

Hall, Green to Spruce. 

Hay ward, Jewett to east of Porter. 

High East, Ashland to Belmont. 

Hooksett road, Webster to town line. Three plans. 

Jewett, Somerville to Hayward. 

Kelley, Beaupoit to Laval. Two plans. 

Log, Colby to South Main. 

Lowell. Ashland to Hall. 

Milford, Rochelle avenue to Sylvester. 

Old Falls road. Spruce to Massabesic. 

Prospect, Ash to Maple. 

Rockland avenue, Mast to Town line. Two plans. 

Schuyler, Main to Beauport, 

Silver, Wilson to Hall. 

Somerville, Wilson to Young. Two plans. 

Spruce East, Cypress to Canton. 

Summer, Wilson to Hall. 

Sylvester, Milford to Mast. Two plans. 

Taylor, Young to Valley. 

Trenton, Elm to Union. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 275 

Union, North to AVebster. 
Walnut, Amherst to Concord. 
Warren, Bridge to Pearl. 
West Hancock, Second to Wentworth. 
Total plans and protiles, 38. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Chestnut, Clarke to Carpenter. 

Hevey east back, Kelley to Bremer. 

High East, Hall to Belmont. 

Main South, near town line. 

Milford, Eochelle avenue to Bismarck. 

Mill avenue, Brown avenue to Merrimack River. 

Montgomery east back, Kelley to Bremer. 

Plummer, Pine to Union. 

Rochelle avenue. Mast to Milford. 

Sylvester, Bismarck westerly. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 10. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Beech, Webster northerly 

Belmont, Harrison to Blodget. Two plans. 

Cass, Laurel to Merrimack. 

Glenwood avenue. Mammoth road to east of Lovering. Five plans. 

Hall, Harrison to Blodget. Two plans. 

Hubbard, Amherst to Concord. 

Revere avenue, Candia road to C. & P. R. R. 

Riley avenue. Young to Hay ward. 

Stewart, Kingston to Plymouth. 

Thornton, Wayne northerly. 

Total numbering plans, 16. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Bartlett, Thornton and Wayne, land of E. Rochelle and B. Janelle. 

Belmont, Dix and Howe, land of Agues J. Phillips. 

Bridge, location of gravel bank. 

Brown avenue, Concord railroad and Merrimack river, land of Addie 
M. Mitchell. 

Candia road, land of John N. Clafiin. 

Dickey road and Cohas avenue, land of Mary E. Dickey. 

Franklin, West Merrimack and Pleasant, showing trees planted in 
Court house yard, November, 1871. 

Goffstown road, Taggart and Maxwell, land of Taggart and Maxwell. 



276 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

Hanover, Haverhill, Frances, Garvin, Bridge, James, Pollard, Eaton, 
Goodbrie and Page, land of Samuel T. Page. 

Malvern, Lowell southerly, land of Elizabeth Jackson. 

Mammoth and Cilley roads, Page and Boston avenues and Francis and 
Lester streets, land of N. W. Paige. 

Massabesic station, land of Boston ct Maine railroad. 

Merrimack, Laurel and Cass, land of Welch, Dodge & Laing. 

Nutt road, Alpheus and Loring streets, land of Bodwell, Upton & 
Weston, for assessors. 

Nutt, Weston and Porter roads, home farm of James A. Weston. 

Pearl and Oak, land of Andrew Hood. 

Pine Grove cemetery, changes in Swedish section. Two plans for 
trustees. 

Plummer and Pine, estate of Andrew J. Young. 

Sagamore and Smyth road, land of H. B. Sawyer. 

Spruce East, land of Truman J. Perry. 

Valley, Merrill, Hayward, Young, Wilson, and Hall, land of Elliott 
Manufacturing Comijany. 

Young and Belmont, land of .James Lynch. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 23. 

AVOUKING PLANS. 

Adams, Beauport to Cartier. Profile. 

Alsace, Amory to Kelley. Profile. 

Amherst, Elm to Vine. Profile. 

Amory, McGregor to Beauport. Two profiles. 

Amory, Montgomery to Alsace. Profile. 

Arlington, west of Russell to Warren. Two profiles. 

Aubiirn, Chestnut to Maple. Three profiles. 

Auburn, Cypress to Canton. Profile. 

Bay, Clarke to Carpenter. Profile. 

Beacon, Lake avenue to Merrimack. Profile. 

Beacon, Manchester to Hanover. Profile. 

Beauport, Wayne to Amory. Profile. 

Belmont, Lake avenue to Laurel. Profile. 

Blaine, Second to Hiram. Profile. 

Blodget, Chestnut to Walnut east back. Sewer profile. 

Blodget, Ash to Russell. Two profiles. 

Bowman, A to Milford. Profile. 

Bridge, Elm to Pine. Profile. 

Bridge, Nashua to Warren. Profile. 

Bridge West, Elm westerly. Profile. 

Brook, Chestnut to Pine. Profile. 

Canal, West Auburn to Granite. Profile. 

Canton, Auburn southerly. Profile. 

Cartier, Kelley to Coolidge avenue. Profile. 



EBPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 277 

Cartier, east back, Amory to Kelley. Profile 

Cedar, Union to Beech. Profile. 

Cedar, Maple to Lincoln. Profile. 

Central, Elm to Union. Two Profiles. 

Central, Hall to Cass. Profile. 

Central south back, Manhattan lane to Chestnut. Profile. 

Charleston avenue, Rochelle avenue to Brock. Profile. 

Chestnut, High to Pearl. Profile. 

Chestnut, Prosjiect to Christian brook. Sewer profile. 

Chestnut, Penacook to Salmon. Profile. 

Chestnut, Carpenter to Trenton. Profile. 

Church, Lowell to Bridge. Profile. 

Church North, Bridge to Pearl. Profile. 

Dubuque, Kelley to Bremer. Profile. 

Elm, Central to Lake avenue. Profile. 

Elm, Concord to Lowell. Profile. 

Elm, Lowell to Bridge. Profile of east side. 

Elm, Spring to West Bridge. Profile of west side 

Granite, Franklin to Canal. Profile. 

Green, Union to Beech. Profile. 

Hall, Lake avenue to Manchester. Profile. 

Hampshire lane. West Central to Depot. Profile. 

Hampshire lane, Mechanic to Spring. Two profiles. 

Hanover, Milton to Hubbard. Profile. 

Harvard, Wilson to Belmont. Profile. 

Hevey, Wayne to Amory. Profile. 

High East, and South. Design for corner curb. 

High East, Maple to Ashland. Profile. 

Hospital avenue, Massabesic to Cypress. Profile. 

Huntress, Bank to Prince. Profile. 

Jane, Lowell to East High. Profile. 

Joliette, Amory to Kelley. Profile. 

Jones, Xelson to Benton. Profile. 

Kidder Court, Elm westerly. Profile. 

Lafayette park, cross section. 

Lake avenue south back, Manhattan lane to Chestnut west back. Pro- 
file. 

Laurel, Belmont to Cass. Profile. 

Lowell, Maple to Malvern. Profile. 

Liberty, Salmon south back to North. Profile. 

Lincoln, East Spruce to Lake Avenue. Profile. 

Linden, Prospect to Harrison. Profile. 

Main South, Woodbury southerly. Profile. 

Main West back, Wayne to Amory. Profile 

Mammoth i-oad, Concord & Portsmouth Railroadnortherly. Profile of 
west side. 

Mammoth road, Isolation hospital. Profile of driveway. 



378 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Manliattan lane, Central to Tiake avenue. Profile. 
Maple, Shasta to south of Holly avenue. Profile. 
Maple, Harrison to Blodget. Profile. 
Marion, McGregor to Main. Profile. 
Market, Elm to. Franklin. Profile. 
Merrimack, Hall to Belmont. Profile. 
Merrimack West, Elm to Franklin. Profile. 
Milton, Lake avenue to Laurel. Profile. 
Monadnock lane, Chestnut to Pine. Profile. 
Monadnock lane, Union easterly. Profile. 
Myrtle, Russell to Hall. Profile. 
Nashua, Bridge to Pearl. Profile. 
Nelson, Hall road to Mammoth road. Profile. 
Nutfield lane, Concord to Lowell. Profile. 
Oak, Pearl to Orange. Profile. 
Oak, Blodget to Sagamore. Profile. 
Orange, Union to Walnut. Profile. 
Orange, Beech to Ash. Profile. 
Pearl, Oak to Russell. Profile. 

Pearl south back. North Church to Chestnut. Profile. 
Pennacook, Chestnut to Pine. Profile. 
Pine, Central to East Spruce. Profile. 

Pine, Myrtle south back to Christian brook. Sewer profile. 
Pine Grove cemetery, Acacia avenue, Oxel to Woodside avenue. Profile. 
Pine Grove cemetery, Beech and Greeubush avenue. Sewer profile. 
Pine Grove cemetery, Oxel avenue, Roselund to Acacia avenue. Profile. 
Pine Grove cemetery, Eoselund avenue, Oxel to Woodside avenue. 
Profile. 

Prospect, Oak to Russell. Profile of curb. 

Prospect, Russell to Linden. Profile. 

Russell, Arlington to Pearl. Profile. 

Sagamore, Bay to Pine. Two profiles. 

Sagamore, Walnut to Beech. Profile. 

Second, Piscataquog river to M. & N. W. R R. Profile. 

Silver, Lincoln to Wilson. Profile. 

Silver, Hall to Belmont. Profile. 

South, Lowell to High. Profile. 

Spruce East, Pine to Belmont. Four profiles. 

Stark park, avenue south of monument. Profile. 

Taylor, Young to Somerville. Profile. 

Third, School to Walker. 

Thornton, south of Sullivan to Putnam. Profile. 

Titus avenue. Beech to Calef road. Profile. 

Union, Bridge to Pearl. Profile. 

Union, Harrison to Brook. Profile. 

Union, Blodget to Sagamore. Profile. 

Union east back, Harrison to Blodget. Sewer profile. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 379 

Walnut, Lowell to Bridge. Protile. 
Walnut, Webster northerly. Profile. 
Wayne, Main to Beauport. Profile. 
Webster, Chestnut to Union. Profile. 
Wentworth, West Hancock to Schiller. Profile. 
Weston, Concord to Bridge. Profile. 
William, Milford to Mast. Profile. 
Young, Taylor to Ainsworth avenue. Profile. 
Total working plans, 134. 

TRACINGS. 

Detail plan of grade stakes and hubs. 

Hooksett road, part 4. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots and avenues. Four plans. 

Total tracings, 6. 

BLUE PRINTS. 

City of Manchester, seven sewer maps, four sheets each. Twenty-eighc 
prints . 

City of Manchester, East side, sewer map. Two prints. 

City of Manchester, west side, sewer map. Two prints. 

City of Manchester, directory map. Three prints. 

Kennard estate, partition of, for Geo. H. Allen. Five prints. 

Old Grist Mill Park- 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots and avenues. Twelve prints. 

Total blue prints, 53. 

SUMMARY. 



Total ■ 

Six tracings showing city sewers have been brought up to date. 

Maps brought to date, 5. 

Plans brought up to date, 89. 

Plans made for establishing grade on laid out streets, 178,512 feet. 



Plans and profiles -^8 

Plans and profiles (sewer) 10 

Numbering plans 1*^ 

Miscellaneous plans ^-^ 

Working plans 1-^4 

Tracings " 

Blue prints ^'^ 

Sewer book (sheets) 22 

Sewer book (part sheets) . . . ." '34 

City treasurer's cemetery book 2 

City clerk's highway book 31 



369 



380 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

rians made for establishing grade on streets liot laid out, 15,328 feet. 

Total, 193,840 feet. 

Lot owners looked up, 45,874 feet. 

SEWER LICENSES. 

At a meeting of the board of mayor and aldermen, November 19, 1897, 
the city engineer was instructed "to examine the books in his office and 
present to said board a list of property owners who had neglected to pay 
the license fee required by the city laws and ordinances for entrance to 
the city sewers." 

The records were examined and a list compiled giving the name of the 
property owner, the location of the lot, the street frontage, and the license 
fee due upon each and every piece of occupied property within one hun- 
dred feet of a public sewer. 

The said list was given in hand to the city clerk, as clerk of the board 
of mayor and aldermen. 

The list comprised 1,017 names, and a notice was sent each one by the 
city clerk. A summarized statement of the ground covered to January 1, 
1908. follows, viz: 

Number of names January 1, 1898 1,017 

Paid during 1898 277 

Granted free during 1898 76 

Paid prior to 1898, located during year ... • 121 

Paid during 1899 24 

Granted free during 1899 12 

Paid during 1900 2 

Not connected 1 

Paid during 1901 2 

Granted free during 1901 1 

Paid during 1902 2 

Paid prior to 1898, not located 60 

Paid previously p, 

Paid in part 1 

Covered by old permit 1 

Not recorded paid, receipts shown 5 

Kecorded paid, no record of cash received ... 2 

Claims to have been paid, no record 1 

Licenses taken out, not paid ! . . . . 18 

Not heard from 408 

Total number not settled January 1, 1903 499 

1,017 1,017 
Number of licenses granted delinquent sewer enterers durino 



1902 



2 



Number of licenses granted new sewer enterers during 1902 ... 91 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 281 

Number free licenses g'ranted new sewer enterers during 1902 . . 6 

Total number of licenses granted during 1902 99 

Amount of money recorded as collected from two delinquent 

sewer enterers during 1902 $37.50 

Amount of money recorded as collected from new sewer 

enterers during 1902 1,455.78 

Amount of money recorded as collected on notes given in 1901, 

due in 1902 23.00 



Total amount of money collected during 1902 $1,516.28 

All moneys are collected by the city clerk. 



STKEET SIGNS. 



street signs on hand January 1, 1902 44 

Street signs ordered during 1902 . . • 54 

Street signs put up during 1902 47 

Street signs on hand .January 1, 1903 51 



The expense of street signs is charged to the apiiroi^riation for the 
engineer's department. (See financial report under Charles H. "Wood.) 

STREET NUMBERS. 

Figures on hand January 1, 1902 • . 287 

Figures ordered during 1902 1236 

Figures used during 1902 587 

Figures on hand January 1, 1903 936 

1,523 1,523 

Numbers assigned during 1902 • 196 

Numbers replaced during 1902 19 

Numbers changed during 1902 3 



218 
The expense of street numbers is charged to the appropriation for the 
engineer's department. (See financial report under Union Manufacturing 
Comi^any and David Flanders.) 

Stone Bounds Set in 1902. 

Adams street and Webster street, northwest corner 1 

Adams street and Webster street, northeast corner 1 



282 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Adams street and Appleton street, northwest corner 

Adams street and Appleton street, northeast corner 

Adams street and Appleton street, southwest corner, 

Adams street and Appleton street, southeast corner 

Amory stieet extension, flrst angle west of Amory street, north 

side 

Ashland street and Arling-toa street, southeast corner 

B stieet and Prince street, northwest corner 

B street and Prince street, northeast corner 

Bay street and Clarke street, northAvest corner 

Bay strett and Clarke street, northeast corner 

Bay street and Carpenter street, southwest corner 

Bay street and Carpenter street, southeast, corner 

Beech street and Titus avenue, northwest corner 

Beech street and Titus avenue, southwest corner 

Belmont street and Harvard street, northwest corner 

Belmont street and Harvard street, southwest corner 

Belmont street and Silver street, jiorthwest corner 

Belmont street and Silver street, southwest corner 

Belmont street and Amherst street, northeast corner 

Belmont street and LoAvell street, northeast corner 

Belmont street and Lowell street, sjuthwest corner 

Candia road, flrst angle east of Mammoth road, north side .... 

Canton street and East Spruce street, northwest corner 

Chestnut street and Trenton street, northwest corner 

Chestnut street and Trenton street, northeast corner 

Chestnut street and Trenton street, southwest corner 

Chestnut street and Trenton street, southeast corner 

Cypress street and Hospital avenue, northwest corner 

Cypress street and Hospital avemie, southwest corner 

Cypress street at angle near Auburn street, w^est side 

Everett street and Clarke street, northwest corner 

Everett street and Clarke street, northeast corner 

George street and Charleston avenue, northeast corner 

George street and Charleston avenue, southwest corner 

Granite street, tirst angle west of Second street, south side .... 
Granite street, second angle west of Second street, south side . . 

Hall street and Silver street, northeast corner 

HhII street and Harvard street, northwest corner 

Hall street and Harvard street, northeast corner 

Hall street and Harvard street, southwest corner 

Hall street and Harvard street, southeast corner 

Hall street and Bell street, northeast corner 

Hall street and Grove street, northwest corner 

Hall street and Grove street, northeast corner 

Hall street and Grove street, southeast corner 

Hall street and Green street, northeast corner 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



283 



Hall street and Green street, sonlheast corner . . , 
Hall street au:l Summer street, nortbeast corner , 
Hall street and Summer street, southwest corner . . 
Hall street and Auburn street, northwest corner . . 
Hall street and Summer street, southeast corner . . . 
Hall st-eet and Auburn street, northeast corner . . . 
Hall street and Anl)urn street, southeast corner . . . 
Hall street and Lowell street, northwest corner . . . 
Hall street and Lowell street, northeast corner .... 
Hall street and Lowell street, southwest corner . . . 
Hall street and Lowell street, southeast corner . . . 
Hooksett road, third angle north of Webster street . . 
Hooksett road, fourth angle north of Webster street, w 

Hospital avenue at angle south side 

Huntress street and Bank street, northeast corner . . 
Huntress street and Bank street, southeast corner . . 
Huntress street and McDuffie street, northeast corner 
Huntress street andMcDuffle street, southeast corner 
Pluntress street angle between Prince street and McDuffie 
Huntress street and Prince street, northeast corner 
Huntress street and Prince street, southeast corner 
Huntress street first angle north of Prince street, west side 
Huntress street second angle north of Prince street 
Joliette street and Kelley street, northwest corner . 
Lorraine street and Amoi-y street, northw; st corner 
Lincoln street and East Spruce street, southwest come 
Linden street and Myrtle street, southwest corner . 
Main South street, first angle north of Second street 
Main South street and School street, northeast corner 
Main South street and Granite street, southeast corner 
Mammoth road west side, center of Hayward street 
Mammoth road, angle near C. & P. R. R., west side . 
Maple street and Amherst street, northwest corner . 
Milford place and Milford street, southwest corner 
Milford place and Milford street, southeast corner . 

Milford place, Milford street southerly 

Parker street, first angle north of bridge, east sidel . 
Ray street and Webster street, northwest corner . . 
Ray street and Webster street, northeast corner . . 
Ray street and Appleton street, northwest corner . 
Ray street and Appleton street, northeast corner . 
Ray street and Appleton street, southwest corner . 
Ray street and Appleton street, southeast corner . . 
Rochelle avenue and Charleston avenue, northeast corner 
Russell street and Myrtle street, southeast corner . . 
Second street and South Main street, northeast corner 
Second street and South Main street, southeast corner 



side 



street 



284 



AXNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Taylor street and Young street, northwest corner 

Taylor street and Young street, northeast corner ...."...". 

Titns avenue, Highland school lot, northwest corner . 

Titus avenue, Highland school lot, northeast corner ....... 

Titus avenue, Highland school lot, southwest corner ....... 

Titus avenue, Highland school lot, soutiieast corner 

Union street and Titns avenue, northwest corner ' 

Union street and Titus avenue, northeast corner 

Union street and Titus avenue, southwest corner 

Union street and TitMS avenue, southeast corner 

Union street and Clarke street, northwest corner " ' .* 

Walnut street and Webster street, northwest corner ....... 

Walnut street and Webster street, northeast corner 

Walnut street and Webster street, southwest corner 

Walnut street and Webster street, southeast corner 

Weston street and Concord street, northwest corner 

Weston street and Concord street, northeast corner 

Weston street and Concord street, at angle south side 

Weston street and Concord street, at Engine house lot X. W. corner 

Weston street and Concord street, at Engine house lot?l. E. corner 

Weston street and Concord street, at Engine house lot S. E. corner 

Weston street and Lowell street, northwest corner 

Weston street and Lowell street, northeast corner 

Weston street and Lowell street, southwest corner 

Weston street and Lowell street, southeast corner 

Weston street and East High street, northwest corner 

Weston street and East High street, southwest corner 

Weston street and Bridge street, southwest corner 

Weston street and Bridge street, southeast corner 

Wilson street and Auburn street, northeast corner 

Wilson street and Auburn street, southeast corner 

Wilson street and Summer street, northeast corner 

Wilson street and Summer street, southeast corner 

Wilson street and Green street, northeast corner • . 

Wilson street and Green street, southeast corner 

Wilson street and Grove street, northeast corner 

Wilson street and Grove street, southeast corner 

Wilson street and Bell street, northeast corner 

Wilson street and Bell street, southeast corner 

Y^oung street, angle between Taylor street and Ainsworth avenue, 
north side 



142 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 285 

COAL-TAK PAVING. 

Tables numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 give the location, niimber of 
square yards, price per square yard, total cost and date when measured 
of all coal-tar "concrete" laid during the year, the work being done by 
the Eobie Consolidated Concrete Company, as follows: Table No. 1, street 
crossings (new); Table Xo. 2, street crossings (repairs); Table No. 3, 
sidewalks (new) ; Table No. 4, sidewalks (repairs) ; Table No. 5, street 
paving (new); Table No. 6, street paving (repairs) ; Table No. 7, gutters 
(new); Table No. 8, miscellaneous work; Table No. 9, summary of Tables 
1, 2,* 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8. 

GRANITE BLOCK PAVING. 

Tables numbers 10, 11, 12, 18, 14,1-5, 16, 17 and 18 give the location, 
square yards and date measured of all granite block paving laid during 
the year, the work being done by Soule, Dillingham S: Co., and Cavanaugh 
Bros., also the street paving charged to the Street Railway Company, as 
follows: Laid by Soule, Dillingham & Co., Table No. 10, cement joints, 
concrete foundation (new); Table No. 11, cement joints, concrete founda- 
tion (repairs); Table No 12, sand joints, sand foundation (new); Table No. 
13, sand joints, sand foundation (repairs); Table No. 14, gutters. Laid by 
Cavanaugh Bros. ; Table No. 1-5, sand joints, sand foundation. Charged to 
Street Railway Company: Table No. 1(3, cement joints, concrete founda- 
tion; Table No. 17, sand joints, sand foundation. 

Table No. 18 is a summary of Tables 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 1-5, 16 and 17. 

ABSTRACT REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON STREETS FOR 
THE YEAR 1902. 

PEKSONNEL OF THE COMMITTEE. 

Alderman from ward 2, Fred K. Ramsey, chairman. 
Alderman from ward 7, Samuel F. Davis. 
Alderman from ward 9, Mederique R. Maynard. 
Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

Tables Nos. 19, 20, 21, 22 and 23 have been compiled to be used in the 
annual report of the engineer's department in lieu of citing the records of 
the committee on streets in detail The tables give all the necessary 
information pertaining to the petitions that have been acted upon by the 
committee during the year 1902, also highways laid out and highways 
widened and straightened by the board of mayor and aldermen during 
the year. 



286 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Table No. 19 is a list of the petitions for new higliways that have been 
acted upon by the conimitte during the year. 

Table No. 20 is a list of the petitions for establishing grade that have 
been acted upon by the committe during the year. 

Table No. 21 is a list of the miscellaneous petitions that have been 
acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table No. 22 is a list of highways that have been laid out by the board 
of mayor and aldermen during the year. 

Table No. 23 is a list of the miscellaneous petitions that have been 
acted upon by the board of mayor and aldermen during the year. 

Distances are given in feet. 



ABSTRACT REPORT OF THE COMMFfTEE ON SEWERS AND DRAINS 
FOR THE YEAR 1902. 

PERSOXNET. OF THE COMMITTEE. 

Alderman from ward 9, Mederique R. Maynard, chairman. 
Alderman from ward 5, Daniel A. Murphy, 
Alderman from ward 6, Samuel M. Couch. 
Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

Tables Nos. 24, 2.5, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 and 33 have been compiled to 
be used in the a.nnual report of the engineer's department in lieu of citing 
the records of the committee on sewers and drains in detail. The tables 
give all the necessary information pertaining to the petitions, orders for 
sewers passed by the city councils, sewers built and not built up to 
January 1, 1903. 

Table No. 24 is a list of all petitions that have been acted upon during 
the year, also the manner in which and date when each petition was 
acted upon and disposed of by the committee. 

Table No. 25 is a list of sewers ordered in up to January 1, 1902, giving 
the distances built, distances built in excess of order, and the distances 
remaining unbuilt up to January 1, 1903. 

Table No. 26 is a list of sewers ordered built during 1902, giving the 
distances built, distances ordered that are unnecessary, and the distances 
remaining unbuilt up to January 1, 1903. 

Table No. 27 is a list of sewers built in 1902 not ordered by the board of 
mayor and aldermen. 

Table No. 28 is a list of pipe removed where sewers have been relaid. 

Table No. 29 is a list of sewers ordered in but not built up to January 
1, 1903. This table is compiled from thefirst, second, fourth and eighth 
columns of Tables Nos. 25 and 26. 

Table No. 30 is a summary of Tables Nos. 25 and 26. 

Distances are given in feet. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 287 

SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Table No. 31 gives the location, material, size and length, of sewers, 
together with the number of manholes, lampholes, house Y's and cesspool 
y's built during the year 1902. 

Table No. 32 gives the material, size and length of all public sewers in 
the city of Manchester, January 1, 1903. This table further gives the 
total length (in feet) of each size of sewer and the number of manholes 
on each size, also the total length (in feet and miles) of each material. 

Table No. 33 is a summary of the sewerage system by years, from 
January 1, 1880, to January 1, 1903. It gives the length in miles con- 
structed and cost each year, also the average cost per mile for each year. 
The third column gives the number of miles constructed to date each 
year. It will be noted that January 1, 1880, there were 17.06 miles con- 
structed, the cost not being recorded. January 1, 1890, there were recorded 
2,003 house connections. Beginning with this date, columns four and five 
give the number of connections recorded each year and the total number 
recorded to date each year. 

ABSTRACT REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 

PLUMBERS. 

In accordance with an act (chapter 59, Laws of 1899), passed by the New 
Hampshire state legislature entitled "An act authorizing the examination 
of plumbers and regulating the practice of plumbing and house draining," 
a board of examiners of plumbers was appointed by His Honor Mayor 
William C. Clarke of Manchester, N. H., as follows: William K. Robbins 
of the board of health. Christian L. AVolf, a master plumber, and 
Samuel J. Lord, city engineer, (William K. Robbins, president ; Samuel 
J. Lord, clerk.) 

Following is a statement of the expenditures of the board for the year 
1902. 

.J. .J. ABBOTT. 

Jan. 1. To 2 varnish brushes at 75 cents $1.50 

23. 3 3-4 lbs. paint .63 

3-4 lbs. bronze green .15 

1-16 gal. W. A. shellac .14 

1-8 gal. W. alcohol .19 

28. 12 1-2 lbs. lead . . . .88 

1 lb. Venetian red .15 

1-4 gal. turpentine -17 

1-4 gal. R. oil .17 

1 can Vermilion G. C. P -45 

31. 1 can Vermilion G. C. P .45 



288 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Feb. 12. To 1 can Vermilion G. C. P .45 

1-2 gal. turpentine .3.3 

3 3-4 lbs. asphaltum .75 

12 1-2 lbs. lead .88 

Feb. 13. To 1 lb. Indian red .25 

1-16 gal. Japan .08 

17. 1 can Vermilion G. C. P .45 

1-2 lb. lead .05 

$8.12 
Credit by 12 1-2 lbs. lead .88 

87.24 
Discount on paint .15 

$7.09 
Apr. 26. By brush .75 

PIKE A- UEALD COMPAXV. 

1902. 

Feb. 26. To 2 gals, gasoline at 20 cents 10.40 

23 lbs. block lead at 5 1-2 cents .... 1.27 

Apr. 11. 10 lbs. wiping solder at 20 cents 

July 10. 2 3-4 gals, gasoline at 18 cents 

THE .JOHN B. CLAKKE COMPANY. 

Apr. 13. To printing 300 reports (Eng. Deptartment) 5 pages 
report of Board of Examiners of Plumbers at 
65 cents 

R. M. STAKBUCK, HARTFOKD, CONN- 

June 24. To 1 set examination charts $8.00 

1 modern plumbing, illustrated .... 3.00 

1 questions and answers .75 

THOMAS A. LANE COMPANY. 

Nov. 26. To 3 gals, gasoline $0.60 

2 ft. 5-8 inch brass .55 



$6..S4 



$1.67 

2.00 

..50 



13.25 



11.75 



$1.15 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 289 



E. A. STJJATTON. 



Dec. 27. To 2 reams paper No. 27 at $1.10 $2 20 

SUJIMAKV. 

Appropriated to the board of examiners of i»lumbers for the 

year, 1002 lilOO.OO 

Expenses for the board during year 1902 •$28.8(5 

Balance unexpended 71.14 

1100.00 $100.00 
Renewal fees received for 74 plumbers' certificates at 50 cents 
(a renewal fee of 50 cents per certificate is re(iuired by state 

law) $37.00 

Renewal fees received for 7 plumbers' licenses at 50 cents, (re- 
quired by law) 3.50 

Examination fee for five plumbers' licenses (required by law) 5.00 

Paid to city treasurer (the state law requires all fees to be 

paid into the city treasury) $45.50 

Table No. 34 gives the name, address, and number of the application of 
each and every person making renewal application to the board for a 
plumber's certificate. This table also gives the class of certificate applied 
for (master or journeyman), the number of the certificate, date of renewal, 
and expiration of said certificate, also the renewal fee paid by the appli- 
cant. 

Table No. 35 gives the name, address, and number of the application of 
each and every person making renewal application to the board for a 
plumbers' license. This table also gives the class of license applied for 
(master or journeyman), the number of the license granted, date of re- 
newal and expiration of said license, also the fee paid by the applicant. 

Table No. 36 gives the name, address, and number of api^lication of 
each and every person making application to the board for a plumber's 
license. This table also gives the class of license applied for (master or 
journeyman), the number of the license granted, date of issue, and expir- 
ation of said license, also the fee paid by the applicant. 

Table No. 37 is a summary of Tables Nos. 34, 35 and 36. 



290 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 



297 



STREET PAVING LAID BY SOULE, DILLIXGITAM A CO. 

. Table No. 10. 

GRANITE BLOCKS, CEMENT JOINTS, CONCRETE FOUNDATION. 



Elm* 

Elm* 

Elm* 

Elm* 

Elm* 

Elmt 

Elm§ 

Elm 

Elm* 

Elm§ 

Elm§ 



Square yards. Measured. 



Lake avenue to Central 

Head of Depot :.... 

Foot of Lake avenue 

Foot of Central 

Head of West Central 

Concord and Water to Lowell 

Foot of Lowell 

Head of Spring- (flagging) 

Lowell to West Bridge 

Foot of Washington 

Head of Kidder court 



,298.820 
68.933 
G0.500 

00 444 
:,0r,9_300 

02.906 

61.790 
:,7G7.36.-) 

32.801 
G.533 



7,538.013 



Aug. 19 

Auji'. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 10 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 



*24 blocks per square yard. 
t35 blocks per square yard. 
§24 and 35 blocks per square yard. 

Table No. J I. 

GRANITE BLOCKS, CEMENT JOINTS, CONCRETE FOUNDATION. 

(Repairs). 



LOCATIOX. 


Limits. Square yards. Measured. 


Elm 


Central northerly 


131.718 
2.000 


Avxg. 19 


Elm 


South of Water 


Aug. 19 










133.718 





35 blocks per square yard. 

Table No. 12. 

GRANITE BLOCKS, SAND JOINTS, SAND FOUNDATION. 



Location. 



Central So. back 

Church 

Church 

Church North 
Hampshire lane 
Lake ave. S. back 
Manhattan lane 
Monadnock lane 
.Nutfleld lane, 
tearl south back 



Square yards. Measured 



Manhattan lane easterly 

Lowell to Washington 

Washiiiutcin to Bridge 

Bridge to Pearl 

Depot to West Central 

East of Manhattan lane easterly 

Lake avenue to Central 

Pine westerly 

Concord to Lowell 

North Church easterly 



23 063 
4.52.721 
345.411 
448.003 
333.646 
175.488 
398.045 
370.757 
4.55.775 

86.278 



Auo-. 26 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 26 

Aug. 26 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 



Old blocks taken from Elm street, 9 to the square yard. 



298 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Table No. 13. 

GRAXITE BLOCKS SAXD JOINTS, SAND FOUNDATION. (Repairs). 



Location. 



Depot 

Depot 

Elm ... 

Elm 

Washington 



Limits. 



Elm westerly, relaid 

Elm westerly, gutters relaid. 

South of Depot, west side 

South of Bridge, east side.... 
Elm easterly, relaid 



Square yards. 



20.936 
7.294 
13.201 
41.383 
14.1.55 



96.909 



Measured. 



Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 

Aug. 19 



Table No. 14. 

GUTTERS. 



Location. 


Ll.MITS. 


Square yards. Measured. 


Amherst* 


Elm to Nutfield lane 


78.108 
11,1.58 
77,272 
11.038 


Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 


Amherstt 


Elm to Nutfleld lane 


Merrimack, W* 


Elm to Hampshire lane 


Merrimack, Wt 


Ehn to Hampshire lane 








177.576 





♦Granite blocks, cement joints, sand foundation. 
tCobble paving, sand joints, sand foundation. 



STREET PAVING LAID BY CAVANAUGH BROS. 

Table No. J 5. 

GRANITE BLOCKS, SAND JOINTS, SAND FOUNDATION. 



Location. 
— a: 


Limits. 


Square yards. 


Measured. 


Canal 


Granite to south of West Cedar 


1,656.155 
3.000 


Sept. 20 
Sept. 20 


Canal 


Granite southerly, repairs 








1,659.155 





24 blocks per square yard. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENC4INEER. 299 

STREET PAVING CHARGED TO STREET RAILWAY CO. 

Table No. 16. 



GRANITE BLOCKS, CEMENT JOINTS, CONCRETE FOUNDATION. 



Elm* 
Elm* 
Elm* 
Elm* 
Elmt 
Elm§ 



*24 blocks per square yard. 
t35 blocks per square yard. 



Lake avenue to Central... 

Head of Depot 

Foot of Lake avenue 

Foot of Central 

Central northerly, repairs 
Water to West Bridge 



Square yards. Measured 



58G.711 
120.911 
G7.136 

88.G91 
131.718 

,185.058 



2,180.225 



Sept. 15 

Sept. 15 

Sept. 15 

Sept. 15 

Sept. 15 

Sept. 15 



§24 and 35 blocks per square yard. 



Table No. 17. 

GRA.NITE BLOCKS, S.IND JOINTS, S.\ND FOUNDATION. 



Location. 



Depot . 

Elm.... 



Elm westerly, relaid 

South of West Bridge, relaid. 



Square 
yards. 



20.936 
2.408 



23.344 



Measured. 



Sept. 15. 
Sept. 15. 



Table No. 18. 



SUMMARY OF TABLES 10 TO 17. 



Description. 



Total 
yards. 



Granite blocks, cement joints, concrete foundation 
Granite blocks, cement joints, concrete foundation, 

repairs • 

Granite blocks, sand joints, sand foundation, largo... 
Granite blocks, sand joints, sand foundation, repairs 

Gutters ■•--• 

Granite blocks, sand joints, sand foundation, small... 



7,538.013 

133.718 

3,090.387 

96.969 

177.576 
1,659 155 



12,695.818 



Paid by 
city. 



P'd by St. 
Railway. 



5,489.506 

2.000 

3,090.387 

73.625 

177.57G 

1,059.155 



10,492.249 



2,048.507 
131.718 
23.344 



2,203.569 



300 



AX^'UAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 

Table No. 27. 

SEWERS BUILT IN 1902 WITHOUT AN ORDER. 



311 



Location. 



Limits. 



Albert 

Amoi-y* 

Blodget* 

Bremerf 

Bremerf 

Bridge, West" 

Carpenter§ 

Cartiert 

Central 

Central§ 

Cburcli, North 

Coolidge avenuef 

Dubiiquet 

Harrison§ 

Manhattan lane§.. 

Maple 

McGregor* 

Merrimack 

Pine* 

Thornton 

Union east back§.. 



Harrison, northerly 

McGregor to Beauport 

Pine to Walnut 

Coolidge avenue, westerly 

Dubuque to Dubuque east back 

McGregor, easterly 

At Union 

Kelley to Coolidge avenue 

Belmont, westerly 

East of Hall, easterly 

Orange to Orange south back.. 

Cartier to Bremer 

Bremer, southerly 

Union to Union east back 

Central south back, northerly 

Blodget, southerly 

West Bridge to Amory 

East of Beacon, easterly 

Christian brook to Blodget 

Sullivan, southerly 

Harrison to Blodget 



74 
809 
804 

32 

20 
125 

40 
420 

90 

93 
102 
210 

32 
130 

6(5 
240 
112 
120 
,01G 
38S 
724 



5,653 



* Relief sewer. 
t For cesspools. 
§ Relaid. 



Table No. 28. 



PIPE REMOVED WHERE SEWERS HAVE BEEN RELAID. 



Location. 


Limits. , 


Material. 


Size in 
inches. 


Length 
in feet. 


Blodget 


Union east back to Walnut 


Akron 

Cement 


12 
8 
8 
12 
15 
8 
12 
12 
8 
12 
12 


153 






40 




East of Hall, easterly 


93 






4 






06 




Blodget, southerly 


54 




Pennacook S. B. to Sagamore S. B.... 

Salmon S. B. to Christian brook 

Sagamore to Salmon south back 


270 


Pine 


329 


Pine 


128 




754 


West 




194 










2,085 



ai2 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Table No. 29. 

.SEWERS ORDERED IX, BUT XOT BUILT TO JANUARY 1, 1903. 




Adams 

Amory 

Ash 

Auburn 

Auburn 

Auburn south back 

Beacon 

Beech 

Beech 

Behnont 

Behuont 

Bismarck 

Blaine 

BoTrman 

Bremer north back 

Bridge 

Buzzell 

Calef road 

Cedar south back 

Central 

Central south back 

Chestnut 

Columbus 

Concord 

Concord 

Dover 

Elm 

. Elm 

Elm 

Elm 

Falls avenue 

Foster avenue 

Frederick 

Front 

George 

Grove south back 

Hall road 

Hale 

Hall 

Hall 

Hanover 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Harvard 

HarveU 

Hayes avenue 

Ha Ward 

Hevey east back 

Hevey east back 

Hevev east back 

High^Easr 

Jones 

Main, South 

Mammoth road 

Mammoth road 

Massabe-^ic 

Massabesic 

Mast 

Mast road 

Merrill 

Merrill south back 

Montgomery east back 

Nelson 

Nutt road 

Orange 

Pine 

Pine east back 



Carpenter to Trenton 

Alsace to Joliette 

Sagamore to Salmon 

Cj"press, easterly 

East of Canton, easterly 

Hall, easterly 

Amherst to Concord 

Harvard to Hajward 

Bridge to Orange 

South of Somerville to Dix 

Old Bridge to Bridge 

Milford, "northerly 

Second to Hiram' 

Mast to Milford 

Coolidge ave. west back to Rimmon 

Beacon to Weston 

Lowell to East High 

Baker, northerly 

Beech, westerly! 

Milton to Beacon 

Chestnut to Union 

Carpenter to Trenton 

Amorj-, southerly 

Pine east back to Union 

Hall, easterly 

Clinton, northerly 

Shasta to Baker 

Railroad bridge to Elm avenue 

Monroe south back to Clarke 

Trenton to Rowell 

Old Falls road, easterly 

Valley to Has"\vard " 

Second, easterly 

"Eddy to north of hotel 

No. of Milford to Charleston -avenue 

Wilson, easterly 

Massabesic to Nelson 

Schiller, southerly 

Clay to Dix 

Lowell to East High 

East of Alfred to Highland 

Maple to Oak ; 

Belinont, westerlv 

East of Wifson to Hall 

Hale to South Main 

Old Falls road to Chase avenue 

Ainsworth avenue to CjTJress 

WaJ^le, northerly .'. 

So "of Amory to Columbus avenue 

Kellev to Bremer 

West'of Hall to Belmont 

Xelson to Benton 

Schiller to Allen 

Massabesic to Xelson 

Nelson, northerly 

Jewett to Hall road 

Hall road to Mammoth road 

Rochelle avejiue-to Brock 

Mast to old Bedford-Goffstown line 

Jewett. easterly 

Pine to Union 

Kelley to Bremer 

Hall road to Mammoth road 

Silver to Baker 

Belmont, westerly 

Silver to Plummer 

South of Concord to Concord 



.531 

252 

63 
300 

90 
150 

71 
272 
629 
441 
200 
800 
400 
843 

89 

iVi 
363 

49 
175 
307 
860 
531 
128 
. 152 

86 

leo 

lOG 

1,373 

707 

448 

345 

140 

175 

2,800 

52 

200 

601 

4.50 

2.o0 

143 

134 

350 

65 

*'*5'^ 

700 

206 

148 

146 

396 

3.50 

152 

.550 

1..^0 

1,166 

500 

541 

9*i 

176 

1,470 

366 

500 

504 

570 

1,635 

65 

447 

160 



Dec. 19, 
Oct. 7, 
.Julv 1, 
May 2, 
Nov. 9, 
Jan. 7, 
Nov. 10, 
Oct. 4, 
Dec. 6, 
June 4, 
.Ian. 7, 
July 25, 
Dec. 6, 
Oct. 7, 
Oct. 4, 
Julv 25, 
July 25, 
June 4. 
Mav 5, 
Sept. 6, 
Julv 9, 
Oct. 7, 
Julv 26, 
Sept. 12, 
Sept. 6, 
Sept. 4, 
May 6, 
May 6, 
June 4, 
Feb. 4, 
Nov 5, 
Julv 14. 
July 26, 
Sept. 5, 
Oct. 7, 
Nov. 2, 
Aug. 5, 
Nov. 9, 
Dec. 19, 
.July 25, 
Jan. 4, 
Oct. 3, 
Sept. 1, 
Oct. 7, 
Nov. 9. 
Jan. 2, 
Sept. 7, 
•Jan. 7, 
July 10, 
June 4, 
-A.ug. 30, 
iAug. 5, 
Dec. 4, 
Mav 2, 
Aug. 5, 
Aug. 5, 
Mav 2, 
Dec. 31. 
Mar. 13, 
.June 5, 
•June 5, 
Dec. 31, 
Dec. 31, 
Dec. 4, 
Feb. 4, 
Oct. 3, 
Sept. 12 



1902 
1902 
1902 
1899 
1894 
1896 
1896 
1898 
1900 
1901 
1896 
1902 
18;'2 
1902 
1898 
1902 
1902 
1901 
1896 
1898 
1901 
1902 
1899 
1899 
1887 
1894 
1890 
18;iO 
1895 
1896 
1901 
1896 
1899 
1893 
1902 
1897 
1898 
1894 
1902 
1902 
1897 
1899 
1896 
1902 
1894 
1899 
1897 
1896 
1S93 
1901 
1901 
1898 
1900 
1899 
1898 
1898 
1899 
1901 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1901 
1901 
1900 
1896 
1899 
1899 



p 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



313 



Table No. 29. — Continued. 
SEWERS ORDERED IX, BUT NOT BUILT TO JANUARY 1, 1903. 



Location. 



Distance. 



Date of 
order. 



Plummer 

Prospect 

Prout avenue 

Rimmon 

Rimmon east back 

River road 

Kussell 

Schiller 

Second 

Second 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Spruce 

Sylvester 

Taylor 

Taylor 

Taylor 

Union 

Union 

Union 

Union 

Union east back .... 

Valley 

Valley 

"Walnut 

"Walnut east back . 

"Wentworth ^.... 

"William 



Pine to ITnion 

Hall, easterly 

Haywaiil southerly 

South I'T Wavne to Putnam 

Kellcy td M:i"son. 

Clarkf To I'aik avenue 

Souili oi Jiloiltrc't to Sagamore 

Hale to South Main 

North of Frederick to Frederick 

South of Schiller to Harvell 

Union to Maple 

Hall to west of Cypress 

Cypress, westerly 

East of Canton, easterly 

Milford to Avon 

South of Valley southerly 

Hayward to Somerville 

Somerville to Dix 

Clarke to Trenton 

Trenton northerly 

No. of Prescott to Merrill south back 

North of Prescott to Hayward 

South of Christian brook, southerly... 

Cypress, westerly...-. 

Elm to Wilson 

Salmon, southerly 

Salmon, northerly 

Schiller, northerlV 

Milford to Mast 



60 
100 
516 
1G4 
800 
306 
770 
850 
118 
160 
512 

1,305 
240 
110 
546 
75 
942 
575 

1,462 
500 
337 
192 
50 
133 

4,040 

105 

88 

400 

.522 



Oct. 


3, 


Sept 


3, 


July 


25 


Aug. 


6, 


Sept 


7, 


Nov. 


2, 


Oct. 


3, 


Nov. 


10, 


Julv 20, 


Dec. 


S, 


Aug. 


2, 


Dec. 


19 


Dec. 


4 


Jan. 


7, 


July 


26, 


Oct. 


2 


Sept 


3, 


Dec. 


19, 


Julv 


2 


Oct. 


7, 


June 


5, 


Sept 


7, 


Aug. 


6, 


Jan. 


4, 


Nov. 


7, 


Jan. 


29, 


Nov. 


10, 


Sept 


5, 


Oct. 


3, 



1899 
1895 
1902 
1901 
1897 
1897 
1899 
1896 
1S99 
1895 
1898 
1902 
1900 
1896 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1895 
1902 
1900 
1897 
1895 
1897 
1893 
1897 
1896 
1895 
1899 



Table No. 30. 

SUMMARY. 

Table No. 25 column 3, (ordered In to January 1, 1902) 44,280 

Table No. 25 column 5, (built) 3,402 

Table No. 25 column 6, (built in excess of order) 43 

Table No. 25 column 7, (unnecessary) 160 

Table No. 25 column 8, (not built) 40,761 

Table No. 26 column 3, (ordered in in 1902) 8.527 

Table No, 26 column 5, (built) 1,233 

Table No, 26 column V, (unnecessary) 264 

Table No. 26 column 8, (not built) 7,030 

52,850 52,8.50 



Sewers built in 1902 of those ordered in up to January 1, 1903 (feet) 4,441 

Sewers relaid in 1902 of those ordered in up to January 1, 1903 (feet) 194 

Sewers built in 1902 without oi-ders (feet) 3,811 

Sewers relaid in 1902 without orders (feet) 1,842 

Total length of sewers built in 1902 (feet) 10,288 



314 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 






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316 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



317 



Table No. 33. 

SUMMARY OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM SINCE 1880. 



Year. 


Miles con- 
structed 
during 
year. 


Miles con- 
structed 
to date. 


House con- 
nections 
recorded 
during 
year. 


House con- 
nections 
recorded 
to date. 


Cost of 
sewers. 


Average 

cost 
per mile. 


1880 


1.02 

2.18 

3.37 

2.. 54 

1.73 

1..56 

2.15 

1.44 

1.73 

2.66 

1.81 

3 08 

3.13 

3 31 

2.91 

3.98 

4.73 

*3.93 

*3 76 

»1..54 

*1.14 

1.74 

*1.95 


18.60 
20.84 
24.21 
26.75 
28.48 
30 01 
32.19 
33.63 
35.36 
38.02 
39.a3 
42 91 
40 04 
49.35 
52 26 
56.24 
00.97 
04.44 
67.62 
69.03 
70.17 
71.91 
73.46 






.119,919.40 
23,895.12 
24,148.13 
21,4.52.05 
21,.W8 00 
28,122 84 
44,479.15 
19,893.92 
31,1.54.19 
27,513.73 
39,297.97 
.55,409.73 
39,724.65 
.51,392.15 
40,110.01 
71,859.36 
66,408.87 
36,258.41 
34,939.51 
16,683 39 
13,748.41 
14,724.39 
20,973.05 


,'i;l2,295.92 


1881 






10,901.06 


1882 






7,105.65 


1883 






8,445.69 


1881 






12,445.84 


1885 






18,027.46 


1886 






20,087 97 


1887 






13,815.22 


1888 






18,008 20 


1889 




2003 
2007 
2220 
24W 
2625 
2883 
3138 
3375 
3658 
4178 
4386 
4617 
4844 
5030 


10,343 51 


1890 


64 
153 
214 
191 

258 
255 
237 
283 
520 
208 
231 
227 
186 


21,711.58 


1891 


17,990 17 


1892 


12,091.58 


1893 


15,526.33 


1894 


15,847.42 


1895 

1896 

1897 


18,0.55.11 
14,099.33 
9,226.05 


1898 

1899 


9,292.42 
10,819.31 
12,091.58 

8,462.29 


1900 

1901 


1902 


10,755.41 


Total .. 










t$ 755,914.62 

















♦Includes old sewers relaid. 
tTotal cost for 23 years. 



318 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



319 



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330 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



321 




■ -MO OJ 



i to 2 < 



322 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

To His Honor the Mayor, the Board of Aldermen, the gentlemen of the 
Common Council, and the various committees with whom it has been my 
pleasvire to come in contact, I wish to express my appreciation of the 
valued assistance and support you have rendered me during the year. 

My acknowledgments are due to the gentlemen of the Street and Park 
•Commission for their courtesy, consideration and co-operation in matters 
in which we were mutually concerned. 

SAMUEL J. LORD. 

CiUj Engineer. 



REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



ORGANIZATION FOR t902. 



School Committee. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 

HARRY T. LORD, President of Common Council, ex officio. 

"Ward 1. Elloit C. Lambert. Wai:d G. Eugene B. Dunbar. 

Walter B. Heath. Harry L. Davis. 

Ward 2. Charles H. Manning, Ward 7. Edward B. Woodbury. 

Will. C. Heath. Edson S. Heath. 

Ward 3. George D. Towne. Ward 8. Walter B. Mitchell. 

Louis E. Phelps. Benjamin Price. 

Ward 4. Nathaniel L. Colby. AYard 9. Henry I. Lemay. 

G. Fred Soule, Sabin Nourry. 

Ward .5. John T, Kelley. ■ Ward 10. Mark E. Harvey. 

Daniel J. McAulifte. • Harry H. Burpee. 

Vice-Chairman of the Board. 
GEORGE D. TOWXE. 

Clerk of the Board. 
ELLIOT C. LAMBERT. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
CHARLES W. BICKFORD. 

Superintendent's Clerk. 
FAXNIE L. SAXBORX. 

Truant Officer. 
CURTIS W. DAYIS. 



326 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES, 

Finance.— Major Clarke and Messrs. Lord, Lambert, Woodbury and 
Soule. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Harvey, Davis, and Nourry. 

Text-Books. — Messrs. Towne, Lambert, and Phelps. 

Music. — Messrs. W. C. Heath, W. B. Heath, and Burpee. 

Drawing. — Messrs. McAuliffe, Davis, and E. S. Heath. 

Manual Training. — Messrs. Phelps, Dunbar, and McAuliffe. 
Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Colby, Burpee, and Woodbury. 
Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Manning, Mayor Clarke, Messrs. Lord, Harvey, 
and Kelley. 
Bepairs. — Messrs. Manning, Mitchell, and Lemay. 
Attendance. — Messrs. E. S. Heath, Price, and McAuliffe. 
Health, — Messrs. Dunbar, Towne, and Kelley. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High /S'c/ioo?.— Messrs. Manning, Towne, Phelps, Lambert, and Wood- 
bury. 

FranTflin-street. — Messrs. Woodbury, Lambert, and Davis. 

Spring -street. — Messrs. Mitchell, Burpee and Soule. 

Lincoln-street and Youngsville. — Messrs Colby, Harvey, and W. B. 
Heath. 

Ash-street and Webster's 3Tills. — Messrs. Phelps, Kelley, and E. S. 
Heath. 

Webster-street and Stcirk. — Messrs. Towne, Manning, and McAuliffe. 

Bakersville and Mosquito Pond. — Messrs. Kelley, Davis, and Price. 

Varney. — Messrs. W. B. Heath, Mitchell, and Lemay. 

Hallsville and Harvey . —Messrs. Davis, Colby, and W. C. Heath. 

Bimmon. — Messrs. Lemay, E. S. Heath, and Manning. 

Training School. — Messrs. Lambert, Woodbury, and Phelps. 

Main-street. — Messrs. Nourry, Dunbar, and Harvey. 

Parker. — Messrs. Price, Soule, and Dunbar. 

Wilson. — Messrs. Dunbar, W. C. Heath, and Kelley. 

Straxc. — Messrs. E. S. Heath, McAuliffe, and Mitchell. 

Amoskeag. — Messrs. W. C. Heath, Lemay, and Burpee. 

Goffe's Falls.— Messrs. Harvey, Phelps, and Nourry. 

Lowell- street. — Messrs. McAuliffe, Price and Colby. 

Pearl-street. — Messrs. Burpee, W. C. Heath, and Kelley. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Soule, Nourry, and Towne. 



1 
I 



In Board of School Committee. 

December 26, 1902. 

The Superintendent presented his annual report to the committee, and 
it was accepted. 

Voted, Thatihe report by the superintendent be accepted and adopted 
as the report of the board, and that it be transmitted to the city councils 
for publication in the annual City Keport. 

ELTJOT C. LAMBEET, 

Clerk. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT, 



r« the School Board, the Cittj Couueih, and the Citizens of Na itch ester : 

I have the honor of presenting the following report upon the condition 
of the puhlic schools of the city, for the school year 1901-1902. The report 
is the fifty-sixth annual, and the forty-seventh of a superintendent. 



There have been in session during the past year 2 manual training 
schools, 5 ungraded schools, 1 partially graded school, 46 rooms of primary 
grade, 28 of middle, 34 of grammar, and the equivalent of 15 rooms of 
high school grade. These give a total of 131 schools. The average number 
for the year, however, has been but 129. The average number last year 
was 127. Extra rooms have been opened as follows : a primary school of 
47 pupils in the Lincoln street building for one-half of the year, a lower 
primary school of 34 pvipils on Massabesic street in Hallsville for one term, 
a lower middle school of 31 pupils in the Parker building lor one-half of 
the year, a higher middle school of 23 pupils in the Ash street building 
for one term. In addition to these, many primary classes have been ac- 
commodated in middle schools. 

ENROI.LMENT AND ATTENDANCE. 

The total registration for the year has been 6,123 as against 5,808 for 
1901, an increase of 315. The average membership has been 4,876 as against 
4,552 for 1901, an increase of 324. The average daily attendance has been 
4,480 as against 4,127 for the preceding year, an increase of 353. The 
increases in average membership, i. e., of those who have been members 
of the schools every day of the school year, have been as follows in the 
various grades: in the high school 11, in the grammar schools 86, in the 
middle 26, in the primary 182, in all others 19. This year, as last, the 
greatest increase has been in the primary grades, where it has been 182 as 
against 163 for 1901. During the year 1902, the schools have increased in 
size by enough pupils to fill one eight-room building. During the preced- 
ing year they increased by enough to fill a four-room building. 

329 



330 ANxMUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

TEACHEKS. 

The average number of teachers employed for the year has been 142. 
This includes the special teachers of music and drawing. In 1890, 86 
teachers comprised the entire force. The increase in twelve years has 
been 65 1-10 per cent. In 1890-1891, the growth in teaching force was 
seven, the increase of pupils 257; in 1892-1893, the year of greatest 
expansion, the number of teachers increased by twelve, the pupils by 477. 
In general, an increase of about 40 pupils has required an additional teacher. 
The average membership in 1890 was 2,795 ; in 1902, 4,876, an increase of 
74.4 per cent. While the teaching force has increased by 65.1 per cent, the 
average membership of pupils has increased by 74.4 per cent. The 
average number of pupils per teacher has varied from 34 to 36 when the 
compvitation is based upon the whole number of teachers employed 
excluding special teachers and including supervising principals. The 
number of pupils per room has varied from 35 to 38, averaging 37. 
During the year just past the average has been highest, being 38. The 
major part of the schools, however, have had more than 38 pupils. The 
five suburban schools, with their small enrollment, and the high school, 
with its average of 25 pupils per teacher, cause the work of the grade 
teacher, as shown by number of pupils, to be much less onerous than it 
really is. 

Of our grammar schools, two have had an average membership of over 
50 pupils, eight others have averaged from 45 to 50, and seven others 
from 40 to 45 ; of the middle grades, eight have had from 45 to 50, and six 
from 40 to 45 pupils; of the primary schools, two have averaged over 60 
(with two teachers), twenty from 45 to 50, and thirteen from 40 to 45. A 
regulation limiting the number of pupils for any one teacher to 45 would 
greatly benefit the schools. 

CHANGES AXD TRANSFEKS. 

Our corps of teachers has suffered few losses. In October, 1901, Miss 
Florence Dow, special instructor in music, was compelled to relinquish 
her duties because of ill health. Miss Dow was a skilful teacher, enthus- 
iastic, talented, and devoted to her art. Her work has been of inesti- 
mable value to the schools of the city. The vacancy created by her 
retirement was filled by the election of Miss Maude E. Brown. At the ex- 
piration of the school year, three other vacancies were caused by the re- 
signations of Misses Winnifred Hall and Kate E. Batchelder of the 
Hallsville school, and Miss Grace M. Page of the High School, all expe- 
rienced and valued teachers. Miss Batchelder's school was filled by the 
promotion of Miss Mary L. Ayer, while Miss Clara Y. Clement was elected 
to the position vacated by Miss Hall, and Miss Annie M. Vose to that 
vacated by Miss Page. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 331 

Because of unusually large enrollments of pupils in different parts of 
the City the board during the year made transfers among, and additions 
to the forces in the various buildings as follows: 

At the Bakersville school, Miss Lelia A. Brooks was promoted from 
fourth to third division grammar grade. Miss Cora M. Farmer from middle 
to fourth grammar, Miss Mary L. Heath from lower primary to middle 
grade, and Miss Kathryn D. McKeon was employed as lower primary 
teacher. 

At the Websfter-street school. Misses Edith A. Murphy and Helen 
Townsend were employed for portions of the year as assistants in the 
lower primary room. 

At the Lincoln-street school, Mrs. Everett Hill was employed from the 
time of opening an extra room in that building, in February, till the end 
of the year. 

At the Wilson school, Miss Mary E. McLaren was promoted to be Miss 
Joy's assistant and Miss Bertha V. Franks was elected to the vacancy 
caused by Miss McLaren's promotion. 

At the Parker school, in February, Miss Elizabeth M. Flanders was 
promoted from lower primary to middle grade and Miss Maude E. Winegar 
was given charge of the lower primary. 

At the same time of the year. Miss Edith A. Murphy was employed as 
an additional teacher at the Goff's Falls school. 

At the opening of the spring term, in April, Miss Martha J. Kennedy 
was given charge of the new schoolroom opened on Massabesic street and 
Miss Gladys Baker succeeded Miss Kennedy as assistant in the Hallsville 
primary room, at the same time Miss Grace Whittemore was elected to 
teach the extra room at the Ash-street school. 

At the annual election of teachers, Miss Flora M. Wa,lker was trans- 
ferred from the higher primary school at the Franklin-street to the 
vacancy caused by the promotion of Miss Ayer at the Hallsville school ; 
Miss Whittemore was transferred from the temporary room at the Ash- 
street school to the higher primary at the Franklin-street; Miss Carlena 
Savory was placed in charge of the extra room at the Lincoln-street, vice 
Mrs. Everett Hill. Miss Marjory Woodbury was elected to the extra room 
at the Ash-street. 

Misses Amy E. Davison and Ethel A. Nicholson have since been 
employed as assistants in place of Misses Baker and Cleinent, respectively, 
at the Hallsville school. 

Edwin E. Crane, assistant at the manual training school, resigned in 
the month of November to become an instructor in St. Paul's school at 
Concord. This position has been filled by a substitute since that time. 

ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Of the twenty-four school buildings owned by the city, six may be 
classed as suburban. Five of these, the Stark, Toungsville, Webster's 
Mills, Mosquito Pond, and Harvey, afford ample accommodation for the 



332 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

present number of pupils. The sixth, the Goft"s Falls building, is already- 
full. This is a two-roomed structiire calculated to accommodate about 
eighty joupils. The i-ooms are of medium size. The registration al- 
ready exceeds the seating capacity of the two rooms, although extra seats 
have been placed in all the available space. A further Increase of pupils 
will necessitate the providing of additional room 

Of the other buildings, four, the Hallsville, Lincoln street, Ash street, 
and Rimmon are already overcrowded. The Hallsville building was de- 
signed to accommodate 384 pupils. The ventilating capacity of the build- 
ing is figured upon this basis. A number of pupils in excess of this is 
detrimental to the school both upon the score of health and instruction. 
There have been registered in this school during the past year 513 pupils, 
428 of whom have been constant attendants. The number present has, at 
times, exceeded this. This number, 428, is 44 greater than the capacity 
of the building. Upon the surface it would appear that there have been 
employed in this building, because of-a surplus of 44 i)upils, three addi- 
tional teachers. The six higher rooms, beginning with the first division, 
have today 40, 41, 43, 47, 44, 38 pupils, respectively; the two lower rooms 
59 and 63, and 34 pupils are accommodated in a rented room outside the 
building. The primary grades alone are crowded, five teachers are em- 
ployed to instruct 156 pupils, when, with adequate room, the work might 
easily be done by four. Three hundred and fifty dollars, the yearly pay 
of the extra teacher, plus one hundred and fifty dollars, the rent of the 
extra room, is the yearly income derived by the city from $22,222.22 
worth of taxable property with the tax rate at $2.25, or, it is the interest 
upon 110,000 at 5 per cent. The overcrowding of these lower rooms is a 
menace to the health of the children. The vitiated air renders them 
more susceptible to disease and impairs their mental vigor. But, aside 
from these last and more imijortaut considerations, and in view of the 
fact that it appears that there will be more children rather than fewer- in 
this district, good business calculation will show that it is economy to 
build an addition of at least two rooms to this building, when there can 
be saved, annualy, at least the interest upon the cost of construction. 

At the Lincoln street buiding, 49 pupils have been accommodated in a 
room partitioned from the hall, upon the third floor. The average mem- 
bership in this building has been 430 for the year. This is 46 in excess of 
the seating capacity of the building In a graded system, it is impossible 
to. arrange the classes so that every seat in a room shall be occupied. 
The pupils in the different rooms have been as follows fr^m the first 
division down, — 49, 44, 49, 54,49, 45,48, 47,45. Middle school children have 
been placed upon the third floor, as being able to endure the strain of 
additional stair climbing better than very young children, or than those 
somewhat older. The placing of children upon the third floor of the build- 
ing, as is done in this and in the Ash street school, is not desirable both 
from the point of view of health and of conduct of the school. The Wil- 
son school is well filled, the rooms averaging 42 pupils each. No relief 



I 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 333 

for the Lincoln street can be looked for in that quarter. The construc- 
tion of a primary school upon Wilson hill, with the consequent readjust- 
ment of school boundaries, could be made to relieve the Ash-street and 
the Lincoln-street schools. 

The Rimmon school remains as before, with two teachers occupying 
the lower primary room and another conducting- her recitations in a small 
room designed for the principal's office. 

There are since the transfer of the evening drawing school to the manual 
training building on Lowell street, eight unoccupied schoolrooms in the 
city, not including the new Highland building which has not yet been 
opened. Five of these — two in the Strawy two in the Parker building and 
one in Amoskeag — are modern, pleasant, well lighted and ventilated 
rooms. Three— in the Spring street biiilding — are, to say the least, not 
desirable. 

The new Highland school soon to be opened is a modern, four-room 
building, situated near the height of land in the southern part of the city, 
of which it commands a magnificient view. The site is healthful, tke sur- 
roundings pleasant, and the dwellers in this section of the city are to be 
congratulated upon the possession of such an edifice. 

The building is a four-i'oom, brick structure, trimmed with granite, 
64 feet by 42 1-2 feet, two stories in height. It is heated by both direct 
and indirect radiation, the surface of steam piping in the rooms being 
alone sufficient to heat the building. The ventilating flues are calculated 
to furnish 30 cubic feet of air jjer minute for each pupil, or to change the 
entire air contents of the room eight times per hour. 

The building was built by the Head & Dowst Co., from plans furnished 
by the architects, Chickering it O'Connell. 

The schools of the city, in the past, have increased on an average in 
daily attendance by about 175 pupils per yeai'. These would fill one four- 
room building. This fact being known, it would be wise for the city 
councils to take it into account in determining the amount of money to 
be raised each year, and to include a sum sufficient to cover the expense 
of erecting such a building, the same to be a sinking fund for the erection 
of new schoolhouses. 

Exclusive of the high school, the city has expended $100,000 for schools 
in the jjast eight years, an average of $12,500 per year. It will probably 
be necessary to build an eight-room building or its equivalent in smaller 
buildings and additions every four years. By providing a sinking fund 
to meet this requirement, the burden will fall less heavily upon the tax 
payers and needed school accommodations can be secured with greater 
readiness. 



TKANSPOKTATIO:^ OF PUPII^S. 

The average cost per pui^il in our schools for the year 1901 was $28.39. 
The city maintains five ungraded district schools. The cost of these five 



334 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

schools for instruction, free text-books and supplies, and janitor's service, 
omitting the expense of fuel and repairs was .f3, 147.20. The average 
membership in these schools was 80. The cost per pupil was, therefore, 
$39.33, 38.5 per cent more than the average for the whole city, which 
average is itself raised by the inclusion of the cost of these same schools. 
These are ungraded schools, they have from four to ten different classes, 
ranging from lowest primary to higher grammar grade. The recitation 
periods are short, too short to enable the teachers to do their work as 
they would. The pupils miss the stimulus that comes from class work, 
the attendance is irregular. The larger boys are often times unruly and 
the conditions leave much to be desired in the jireparation of these chil- 
dren for their life work. 

The most distant of these schools is less than two and one-half miles 
from the nearest graded school, and the most remote pupil lives not more 
than a mile beyond the schoolhouse. The transportation of these pupils 
to the nearest graded school would be of great advantage to them in every 
respect. They could be classified with others of their own age and capa- 
ablities, and for this reason would be better instructed; the attendance, 
judging from experience in other places, would be bettered, and last, and 
of least importance where human welfare is considered, the city could 
save at least a thousand dollars yearly. Some residents of these rural 
sections are already sending their children to the city schools, others 
object strongly to the discussion of any such scheme. 

The objections are of two sorts, based, the one upon property, the other 
upon sentiment. It is claimed that the closing of a rural school would 
cause property in that neighborhood to depreciate that people do not care 
to live where there are no school facilities. This objection is easily met. 
The transportation of children to a graded school at the public expense 
places in every man's door-yard the best public school in the city. So far 
from depreciating in value, property will rather increase and people will 
be glad to take up a suburban residence when their children are assured 
of all the advantages of a graded school. 

The objection upon the ground of sentiment is less easily met. It can 
only be urged that objectors set the good of the child over against the 
feeling of local pride and decide upon that basis. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

The continued advance of the high school in popular favor is most 
gratifying. This growth maybe traced partly to the business course, which, 
during the past year, has been extended so as to cover the entire four 
years. A pupil so desiring can now center his efforts upon arithmetic, 
book-keeping, typewriting and stenography throughout his entire period 
of stay in the school. The equipment of typewriting machines, however, 
is inadequate to meet the demands of the course and should be doubled. 

In the Supreme Court of the state of New Hampshire in June, 1896, in 



REPORT OP THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 335 

the case of Wheeler v the town of Alton, certain principles were enun- 
ciated by Chief Justice Carpenter in regard to school money raised by 
towns. Among them are these two: — "All money raised by a town for 
school puri)Oses must be paid over to the school board, who are alone 
responsible, under a heavy penalty, for its lawful expenditure," and, 
"Towns have no power to require that money raised by them for schools 
shall be applied to any special purpose. The appropriation of the school 
money rests exclusively with the school board." Should these hold true 
in regard to cities, a prohibition of the expenditure of money for type- 
writers by the Common Council is of no force and the board can purchase 
typewriters from any funds in its hands that it sees fit so to use. 

The advanced physics course has been greatly benefited by its recently 
secured apparatus. In last year's report a plea was made for an equip- 
ment sufficient to enable the fourth class in physics to do individual work. 
I desire again to bring this matter to your notice. If it is impracticable to 
fully equip this course at once, the purchase of from one to two hundred 
dollars' worth of apparatus each year for three or four years will soon 
place the course upon a proper footing. 



TRAINING SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS. 

I believe that the training school for teachers is doing the best work 
that has ever been done in our city in preparing its graduates for teacher's 
positions. 

It is the exemi^lar of primary and middle school work and can be 
visited often and profitably by every primary teacher. 

Here has been worked out to its great improvement the problem of 
primary reading. Here also in process of solution is the primary arith- 
metic problem. Upon these two depends to the greatest degree the 
betterment of all our higher grades. 

In this school is done the work of the first four years laid down in our 
course of study. Consequently the young ladies in training for the work 
of teaching gain experience in the two primary and the lower middle 
grades only. They cannot be said to be qualified for grammar school 
work except, in some cases, in scholarship. They have had no experience 
calculated to prepare them for this work. As a result, we graduate pri- 
mary grade teachers almost exclusively. 

The value of the school to the city can be greatly enhanced by either of 
two plans, — first, by enlarging the present building so as to include 
grammar grades, thereby relieving the overcrowded Lincoln street school 
and possibly the Ash street, or second, by transferring the school to a 
full grade building or to one having at least two grammar rooms — for 
instance to the Straw building. 

There the members of the training class can gain experience in the work 
of all grades, their fitness for particular work can be accurately deter- 



336 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. . 

mined and we shall have a school, which, in all grades, will be a model 
school. 

In such case the i^rincipal of the training school should be relieved of 
the necessity of supervising the play grounds, halls and basements of the 
building in which the school is located. 

We place in charge of this lady eight or ten young candidates for 
teachers' positions, expect her to supply deficiencies in their scholarship, 
closely supervise four rooms, each with an inexperienced teacher in 
charge, teach psychology, pedagogy, school management, history of 
education and conduct model classes in all subjects, as well as be respon- 
sible for the discipline of a whole building. 

She is given one skilled assistant. It is truly an Herculanean task, but 
the labors of Hercules produced a Hercules. 

There is need in this school of a further equipment of books and I trust 
that the needs of the school in this respect will be as readily met in the 
future as in the past. 

MANUAL TUAINIXG SCHOOL. • 

Three hundred and fourteen grammar school boys have had the advantage 
of manual training under Mr. Browne's direction. This is by far the largest 
enrollment the school has ever had. The course of drawing and wood- 
work has been slightly changed and some few additions have been made. 

The enlargement of the first division room has been a great improve- 
ment. This room's equipment has been increased by the addition of two 
engine lathes, one loaned l)y the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, the 
other purchased from the manufacturers. The new machine is a thirteen- 
iuch five-foot lathe of the F. E. Eeed manufacture. A course in ironwork 
is being formulated "vvhicli will include chipping and filing, fitting, scrap- 
ing, etc., with problems in lathe work, consistingof plain cylindrical turn- 
iog, taper turning, screw cutting, face plate work, boring and drilling, 
tapping, and cutting threads by hand. The course cannot be fully developed 
without a further equipment of a 16-incli or 20-inch drill press, and lathe and 
drill tools. These will entail a further outlay of about $250. The course 
Avillgo into operation early in the coming year. I do not need again to go 
into the matter of the importance of manual training as a force in char- 
acter building. It is one of the most, if not the most important factor in 
education and is slowly being ij;iven.its proper place in the scheme of 
instruction. 

CHANGKS IN RULKS. 

During the past year sections 8 and 9 of chapter 1 of the rules have been 
amended to read as follows : 

Section 8. Pupils attaining the age of tlve years before the first day 
of October may enter school at the opening of the fall term, and those 
attaining the same age before the first of March, niav enter at the time of 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 337 

the semi-annual promotions, about tlie first of February; but no pupil shall 
be admitted after the first four weeks of the fall term or later than the 
seventh week of the winter term, unless qualified to enter some exist- 
ing class. 

Section 9. The school year shall comprise thirty-eight weeks and be 
divided into three terms, as follows : A winter term of twelve weeks, fol- 
lowed by a vacation of two weeks, a spring term of eleven weeks, foUoAved 
by a vacation of ten weeks, and a fall term of fifteen weeks, followed by a 
vacation of two weeks. 

It is believed that the admission of pupils at the beginning of each half 
year instead of at the beginning of the spring term and in September as 
heretofore, will prevent the comgestion of pupils in the lower primary 
grades. Each entering child will have done a year or a half year of work, 
and will be prepared for the next class at promotion time. Formerly, the 
spring beginners have returned in the fall practically beginners, having 
lost during the summer a large part of what they had acquired in ability to 
read. This was lost because the spring term was too short for the acquir- 
ment of sufiicient reading ability to be carried through the summer. With 
the new arrangement, each beginner will have a full year or half year accord- 
ing as he enters in September or February, and there will be time enough 
to carry the reading beyond the mere vocabulary of 83 sight words, which 
was about all that could be done in the short spring term. The February 
entering classes will be small, particularly so in the coming February, and 
dissapointment will be experienced by some parents when it is learned that 
beginners will not be received in April. The great influx of children will 
probably occur in September when they can be most easily cared for. 
This arrangement will also probably reduce the total registration of pupils 
for the year by one or two hundred. The following year, however, should 
see a large increase. The second amendment was designed to give the 
pupils and teachers more time in which to do the work required in our 
schools. The school year was nominally thirty-seven weeks. As a matter 
of fact, because of inclement weather and holidays the actual number of 
weeks was about thirty four. It is hoped that the present arrangement 
will give about thirty-flve weeks of actual work. 

The course of study prohibits the assignment of any daily home study ia 
any of our schools below the high school. A large proportion of the pupils 
in the first divisions of the grammar schools upon graduation enter the 
high school. It is necessary in that institution for lessons to be studied at 
home. I believe that, as a matter of preparation for high school work, it 
would be wise to allow the first division teachers to require the learning of 
one lesson at home by their pupils. Besides serving as a preparation for 
hiijh school work, it will inculcate studious habits, and better the work in 
the last year of the grammar schools. 

CLEAN SCHOOI.HOITSES. 

The influences which surround children as well as adults and of which 
they are unconscious are most potent in the formation of character. 



338 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Among the virtues which the schools endeavor to inculcate is that of 
cleanliness. This is most easily done amid clean and attractive sur- 
roundings. The proposition that every schoolroom shall be kept clean, 
that the floors shall be washed with reasonable frequency, that the walls 
shall be dusted and the desks cleaned, that paper and refuse shall not be 
allowed to accumulate about the grounds and walks, that as pleasant and 
homelike an air as possible shall pervade the schoolhouse, will, I am sure, 
be assented to by all. All our buildings, so far as sweeping is concerned, 
are, I believe, well kept and many of them also as regards washing. In 
others, the woodwork and floors are cleaned but once a year, and then in 
a manner not satisfactory and not such as would be tolerated in our 
homes. A regulation requiring the washing of every schoolhouse floor at 
least twice in each term, the dusting of all the walls at least once a 
month, and the constant oversight of desks, particularly around the 
edges, where diit becomes gummed on from constant grasping by moist 
hands, would, I believe, meet the general approval of teachers, parents 
and children. A close espionage, especially, should be kept upon desks 
for they may become fruitful sources of contagion. 

HONORARY MENTION. 

The retention by the community of its representatives upon the school 
board for extended terms is a most wise practice, and one beneficial to 
the educational interests of the city. The school board is not and should 
not be a stepping stone to higher political preferment. To it are com- 
mitted the most sacred interests of the citizens of the City. A slowly 
changing body permits of adherence to a definite policy in educational 
affairs and the continuing of lines of work to definite results. The close 
of the present year marks the retirement of two members of the board 
who have served the educational interests of the city most faithfully for 
sixteen years, Mayor William C. Clarke and Captain Charles H. Manning. 

Mayor William C. Clarke first became a member of the Manchester 
school board in 1883, when he was elected with Col. Benjamin C. Dean to 
represent Ward Two. He remained continuously in office for eight years, 
at the end of that time declining a renomination. During these four 
terms of office he served upon the committees on text-books and supplies, 
examination of teachers, fuel and heating. Ash and Webster grammar 
schools and the evening schools. He was inaugurated mayor in 1895, 
and, having served in this capacity for a period of eight years, his term of 
service on the school board comprises sixteen years. As mayor he has 
served upon the committee on fuel and heating, and committee on finance, 
as well as chairman of the board. When Mayor Clarke first entered upon 
his duties as mayor he found an imperative demand for additional public 
school buildings to accommodate the increasing number of pupils. 
Under his administration six modern schoolhouses have been added to 
the city's equipment, as follows: High school, twenty-two rooms and 
assembly hall, cost $170,000; Straw school, eight rooms, cost $30,000; 



I 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 339 

Wilson school, eight rooms, cost $30,000; Amoskeag school, four rooms, 
cost $8,000; Parker school, eight rooms, cost $20,000; Highland school, 
four rooms, cost $12,000. The high school building is regarded by educa- 
tors as the finest high school building in New England for the amount of 
money expended. 

The six schools above mentioned comprise one-fourth of the city's 
present equipment. 

Captain Charles H. Manning was elected to the school board from Ward 
One, in April 1884, and continued to represent that ward until he removed 
from its precincts in 1892. In January 1895, he again resumed his place 
upon the board as a member from Ward Two, and has since continued to 
the present time. Mr. Manning has served upon the committees upon 
fuel and hea'ting, Webster and Blodget-street schools, evening schools, 
Straw school, Webster and Stark, Rimmon, repairs and High school. Of 
the last two he has been chairman during his entire term of service and 
of others for shorter periods. Upon several occasions he has prepared the 
aiinual report of this body to the City .Councils. Especially valuable to 
the city, has been his expert knowledge of construction and mechanics. 
Mr. Manning has served upon all the special committees appointed for the 
construction of the six buildings above mentioned. 

To Mayor Clarke and Mr. Manning the city owes a debt of gratitude 
both for their services to the material side of education and for their 
counsels, advice, and decisions in the conduct of other school matters. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

The high school course of study has been so modified that the business 
course now extends over the entire four years. A rearrangement of the 
Mstory schedule has also been made. 

In the grammar schools, the study of civil government has been limited 
to the last eight weeks of the winter term, and the study of physiology 
from a text-book will be undertaken during the entire spring term. The 
beginning of algebra in the grammar schools has borne good fruit. The 
high school teachers inform me that there is a marked improvement in 
tlie ability of the entering pupils to pursue this' study. The present 
grammar school course is so arranged that a foreign language, either 
ancient or modern, can at will be introduced as an elective in the last 
year. 

The improvement in primary reading is most noticeable. The first year 
pupils hav e read from eleven to three books each. These books have 
been within the child's comprehension and the reading of them has 
shown greatly increased i^ower in discovering new words. 

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS. 

Trom a physiological standpoint, education is the training of brain cells 
and the development of connecting fibres among the same, that relations 



340 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

may be quickly apprehended and all the power of all related cells ai^- 
plied at will to any purpose in hand. 

All knowledge is based upon the senses and is the product of the senses 
primarily, for without some one of these avenues to the exterior world no 
sensations can reach the brain and there can be no consciousness. Pri- 
marily, then, from sensations is built the structure which we call the 
intellect, and primarily from sensations do we grow to have will and 
moral and spiritual power. The gaining of sensations through hearing, 
seeing, feeling, smelling, tasting, touching and weighing gives us what we 
call experience, from the rudimentary percepts of the infant to the highly 
complex and intricate act of perception of the trained adult, where a 
glance, a word, a sensation will involve, instantly, far-reaching judg- 
ments based of course upon previous experience. That man is th e best 
educated who has had the broadest experience and is enabled to use all 
of his experience so far as it relates to the matter in hand. Ideas gained 
from words in books, unless they result in action of some kind, not im- 
mediate necessarily, do not educate symmetrically. The doing education 
and the book education should go hand in hand. 

The more accurate the senses the more truthful the individual, 
for his senses have taught him the truth and he has been guided by the 
truth. He who will not deceive himself will not deceive others. He 
sees true relations, infers correctly and his judgments are right. 

The beginning of school should be such an one as will tend to train 
sense perception. The more senses that can be brought to bear in appre- 
hending truth, the clearer the perception of that truth and consequently 
there is greater power to apprehend new truth. 

The kindergarten is a rational attempt to make use of the childish play 
instinct to train his perception. This is done by means of songs, employ- 
ment and games. It is not a play school. In it may be laid the foundation 
for the best after work. The child's butterfly interest is attracted, deepened 
and developed toward voluntary attention by the exercise of his normal 
activities, and this by the use of material objects, by dealing with things 
not with written symbols. Observe that I say written symbols. The 
kindergarten occupations and games may be regarded as highly symbolical. 
With what qualities the childish imagination invests objects cannot be 
told nor to what extent. Imagery is characteristic of this period. 

The kindergarten can no longer be regarded as an experiment. It has 
come to stay. Already other cities and towns in ISTew Hampshire have 
established schools of this kind. Manchester cannot afford to be behind 
hand. I urge- upon you, gentlemen, the serious consideration of incor- 
porating kindergartens into our public school system. 

One year ago I advocated the extension of manual training in our 
schools. The same arguments that support the kindergarten will, to a 
certain extent, support manual training. Power comes alone from accom- 
plishment. -^ man may theorize through all eternity and still be theorizing, 
and, unless he has done something, the world will be no better for his 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 341 

existence. Executive power is developed by manual training schools not 
only alona the line of work of tlie manual training school but also along 
other lines so far as the habit of doing is formed. I believe that the 
extension of manual training privileges to the third and fourth divisions 
of the orammar school would be a great benefit to pupils and the schools. 
In conclusion, the basis of a good school is a good teacher. President 
Garfield said that a college was Mark Hopkins on one end of a log and 
himself on the other end. Four-fifths of the success of a school is due to 
the personality of the teacher in charge. As is the teacher so is the 

school. , n , 4.1, 

The continued prosperity of our school system depends not upon the 
course of study, not upon accommodations, not upon homes, not upon 
pupils, but upon the character and fitness of those placed in charge of the 

pupils. 

To the oeneral high average of our teaching force is due the excellence 
of our system, and to maintain this high average is a solemn duty of all 

school officials. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES W. BICKFORD, 

Suj^erintendent. 



APPENDIX, 



I. Population, etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 

Y. AttejsDAXCe Tables. 

VI. Trua^^cy. 

VII. Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1901-1902. 

IX. High School Graduates. 

X. WiNNEits OF Clarke Prizes. 

XI. Organization of Committees, 1903. 

XII. List of Teachers, 1903. 

XIII. School Year, 1902-1903. 

XIV. High School Course of Study. 



343 



APPENDIX, 

STATISTICS. 
I. — Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1900 56 9^7 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 

II. — Schoolhouses* 

Number of schoolhouses in use 24 

Number of schoolhouses not in use q 

Number of schoolrooms used for day schools *131 

Number of rooms used for High-school classes I5 

Number of rooms used for Grammar schools 34 

Number of rooms used for Middle schools 128 

Number of rooms used for Primary schools +46 

Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools '. 1 

Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools 



III. — Schools. 



Number of rooms used for Manual Training schools 2 



(All for both sexes). 

Number of High school buildings j 

Number of combined Grammar and lower grade (Middle and Pri- 
mary) schools ^., 

Number of combined Middle and Primary schools 4 

Number of schools all Primary grade ' ' j 

Number of Ungraded schools . 



IV. — Teachers 

Male teachers in the High School 5 

Female teachers in the High school U 

Female teachers in Training school 2 

* Average of 29 for vear. 
t Average of 27 for vear 
$ Average of 45 for year. 

344 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OP SCHOOLS. 345 

Male teachers in the Grammar schools 7 

Female teachers in the Grammar schools (a) 35 

Female teachers in the Middle schools 28 

Female teachers in the Primary schools (b) 4G 

Male teachers in the Partially Graded schools . . • • • 1 

Female teachers in the Ungraded schools 5 

Male teachers in the Manual Training school 2 

Special teachers 3 

Average number of male teachers IT 

Average number of female teachers 125 

Total average number of teachers in day schools 142 

Male teachers in the evening schools 6 

Female teachers in the evening schools 11 

Male teachers in the evening Drawing schools 2 

Average number of male teachers in the evening Dravping schools . 2 

(a) Six of the 33 are master's assistants. 

(b) Average for year, 45. 



346 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 
DAY SCHOOLS. 



351 



Summar>j of <itton(lnnre iipon the several grades of public day schools for the 

year 1901-1902. 



Grades. 



Whole number 

of diUerent 

pupils. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



•rt'O 

<- te c 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Partially graded 
Ungraded 

Totals, 1902... 
Totals, 1901... 



193 
760 
G47 
1,420 
15 
78 



3,113 

2,918 



235 
781 
G24 
1,293 
17 
GO 



3,010 
2,890 



390 

1,306 

1,092 

1,960 

33 

95 



4,876 
4,552 



373 

1,218 

1,010 

1,768 

31 



4,480 
4,127 



95.6 
93.3 
92.5 
90.2 
93.7 
84.2 



91.9 
90.5 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Suramanj of attendance upon the several grades of piddic evening schools for 
the year 1901-1902. 



Schools. 


Whole number 

of different 

pupils. 


" i, 
< 




O 




Boys. 


Girls. 




Spring street 


102 




78 

67 

125 

33 


61 
GO 
102 


80.5 


Franklin street 


83 
49 


90.0 


Rimmon . 


105 

48 


81.6 


( Mechanical ) 

Drawing schools ] [ 

( Architectural ) 


82.4 






Totals, 1902 


315 
266 


132 
122 


303 
251 


250 

189 


82.5 


Totals, 1901 


75.3 







352 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 



Evening School Teachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal at Spring-street school, for boys. 

Assistants — A. W. Rowell, I. E. Forbes, Annie B. Angell, and Minnie 
Sullivan. 

Honorie J. Crough, principal of Franklin-street, for girls. 

Assistants — Maggie Linen, Margaret McDermott, Mary E. Paige, Mary 
A. Walker. 

Arthur W. Morgan, principal of liimmon school, for both sexes. 

Assistants — William J. Mooar, N. Biron, Mary B. Thompson, Ethel A. 
Nicholson, Maude Winegar, Bertha V. Franks. 

Evening Dravnnfj Teachers. 
John M. Kendall and Henry W. Allen, 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 



Graduated. 



Graduated. 



Annie B. Angell June, ' 

Mary E. McLaren, " 

Grace A. Phillips. " 

Ede B. Quimby. " 
Flora M. Walker. 
Elizabeth F. Walsh. 

Florence H. Mooar. Jan. 27, 

Ethel A. Nicholson. " 

Sarah Price. " 

Annie E. Walsh. " 

Mathel C. Henry. June, 

Mae L. Lovejoy. " 

Kathryn McKeou. " 

Florence M. Ward. " 



Bertha A. Allen. June, 

Eda M. Barr. 

Bertha V. Franks. " 

Lora E. Hill. 

Gertrude Porter. " 

Amy E. Davison. Jan., 

99. Lizzie M. Flanders. " 

Edith A Murphy. " 

Carlena A. Savory. " 

Grace Whittemore. " 

99 Florence M. Francis. June, 

]\Iartha J. Kennedy. " 

Anabelle F. Landers. " 

Maude E. Winegar. " 

Bertha M. Fogg. June, 
Marjorie S. Woodbury. 



00. 



01, 



OL 



02. 



Entered. 

Lena E. Bower. 
Ethel F. Currier. 
Helen F. Lyons. 
Ada B. Morse. 



Entered. 

Sept., '01 Bessie J. Bartlett. 
" " Mary E. Campbell. 
" " Nellie F. Duiinington. 

Alice B. Morrill. 

Agnes Shey. 

Agnes M. Woodbnrv. 



Sept., '02. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



353 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 

The foUovnng table ■presents the main features of inter 
attendance npon the public schools for the last fice >jears. 
he found in reports for 1S96 and 1901. 



est pertaining to the 
Similar tables may 



Years, 



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1898.. 
1899.. 
1900.. 
1901.. 

1902., 



121 


128 


5,802 


4,425 


4,070 


92.0 


195 


200 


191 


145 


51 


123 


130 


5,717 


4,399 


3,978 


90.4 


146 


180 


108 


134 


73 


120 


135 


5,462 ■ 


4,388 


3,998 


91.8 


179 


225 


214 


1.52 


72 


127 


137 


5,808 


4,552 


4,127 


90.5 


191 


189 


179 


137 


69 


129 


142 


6,123 


4,870 


4,480 


91.9 


250 


221 


211 


159 


62 



378 
409 
380 
379 
390 



*Inclu(11ng special teachers, principals, assistants, etc. 
fAud the A class in suburban scbools. 



354 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



VL— Work of Truant Officer. 



< - 



01? 



OO 



•s o s 






September 
'October .... 
November 
December 
January.... 
February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Totals 



316 
228 
176 

55 
120 
133 
123 
160 
110 

85 



1,515 



1-20 
27 
20 

8 
11 
10 

2 
10 
21 
10 



173 
113 
37 
G3 
71 
91 
109 



33 


17 


43 


6 


12 


10 


3 


18 


21 


2 


^ 


7 


4 


20 


19 


4 


12 


27 


1 


16 


12 


4 


9 


23 


2 


5 


12 


3 


4 


12 


62 


114 


186 



*And 1 suspended, .sentenced, 



Date. 


c a 

c ^ ■ 

^53 


No. of school 
age found on 
streets in 
School hours. 


P 

•-- 3 

or 


No. tempora- 
rily confined 
at "the police 
station. 


No. brought be- 
fore the court. 






33 
53 
27 
5 
27 
18 

n 

43 
10 
4 


100 
282 
203 
75 
146 
247 
1.51 
267 
140 


313 
297 
213 

51 
167 
100 
203 
231 
207 

C3 


1 
1 






































1 


1- 




1 
5 
3 




April 


2 


1 


Mav 




June 














Totals 


231 


1.680 


1,941 


11 


3 









REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 355 

VIL— FINANCES.— J902. 



Items of Account. 



Appropria- 
tions. 



Expendi- 
tures. 



Salaries of teachers 

Books and stationery 

Free text books and supplies. 

Ftirniture and supplies 

Repairs 

Care of rooms 

Fuel 

Printing and advertising 

Contingent expenses 

Evening common schools 

Evening drawing schools 

Manual training 

Sewing material 



Totals . 



$91,000.00 

75.00 

G,000.00 

1,200.00 

10,000.00 

6,500.00 

8,800.00 

300.00 

2,500.00 

1,200.00 

250.00 

500.00 

230.00 



$128,57.5.00 



$93,779.80 

41.66 

6,160.77 

1,187.38 

9,996.66 

6,522.13 

10,304.02 

. 283.18 

2,.507.19 

1,15.5.35 

252.00 

498.02 

250.00 



$132,941.16 



COST OF CITY SCHOOLS. 

Expenditures $132,941.16 

Salaries. 



Members of the school board 

Clerk of board 

Superintendent of schools . . 
Truant officer 



220.00 

150.00 

2,800.00 

850.00 



Total .1136,461.16 

"^fieipts. 



Literary fund 

Tuition and free text-books* 



2,834.50 
1,732.10 



Xet amount raised by taxation . 



4,566.60 



$131,894.56' 



The city valuation for 1902 is $33,044,334, and hence the rate of school 
1 ix for the year is $131,894.56, divided by $33,044,384, or .0039. Last year 
the rate was .0038. 

* School tax from Londonderry, Bedford, and Goffstown included, $143.75. 



356 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

VIIL— School Year, J 901 -1 902. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 9, 1901 ; closed De- 
cember 13, 1901. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened December 30, 1902; closed March 
21, 1902. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 7, 1902 ; closed June 20, 1902. 
Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Xumber of school days in the year, 185. 



IX* — High School Graduation. 

PROGKAM. 

Salutatory. "The place of the Historical Novel in Fiction" 
Emilie E. Goodale. 

Cantata. "The Old Clock on the Stairs" 

Words by Henry W. LonyfeJIoic. 
Music by Frederic II. Pease. 

Solos by Misses Colby and Prescott. 

Violin accompaniment. Miss Crombie. 

Class Pianist, Miss Kimball. 

Under the direction of Professor Eben F. Richardson. 

Class Prophecy Isabel Barlow 

Gii'ls' Chorus. "Song at Sunrise." 

Charles I'onteyn Manney. 
Solo, Miss Togus. 

Valedictory. "Home, Sweet Home." Alice Maude Togus 

Presentation of Diplomas. 

Class Ode. 

Class Ode. 

WORDS BY DAISY E. FI.AXDERS. 
MUSIC BY CHAKEES J. NOLL. 

We linger here in these dear halls 

Where fondest memories cling. 
With forward-looking thoughts to know 

What future days will bring. 
The years will come, the years will go, 

As years have done before. 
But nothing in the future can 

The pleasure here restore. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



357 



These four short years too soon have fled. 

If sweet the day, soon spent, 
But we can never once forget 

The joys these days have lent. 
And always through the coming years. 

We'll cherish these most dear 
By which we hold in closer grasp 

The friends we've smiled with here. 



Graduates. 



Isabel Barlow. 
Alice Leone Barnard. 
Bessie June Bartlett. 
Rena Pearl Bartlett. 
Florence Emma Blakeley. 
Mary Ethelreda Campbell. 
Elmer Augustus Campbell. 
Grace H. Chappie. 
Benjamin M. Chandler. 
Edith Williams Clark. 
Ruth Libby Clark. 
Emma Louise Clough. 
Ethel Louise Colby. 
Gertrude M. Connor. 
Margaret Cotter. 
Ida Crombie. 
Elizabeth E. DeMoulpied. 
Nellie Florence Dunnington. 
Lillian Pearl Durgin. 
Mary Abbie Durgin. 
Martin Parker Farmer. 
Ralph Corydon Fitts. 
Daisy Elvira Flanders. 
Annie Margaret Fradd. 
Alice Stetson Furber. 
George Choate Furness. 
Emile E. Goodale. 
Grace May Goodrich. 
Mary Louise Gray. 
Jennie Ethel Grundy. 
Marion Gertrude Hayes. 



Freeman Brackett Hazen. 
Arthur S. Healy. 
Harry Cecil Jones. 
Avis Mildred Kemp. 
Nancy B. Kimball. 
Elizabeth Moulton Langmaid. 
Harlan A. Marshall. 
Reginald H. Marston. 
Joseph Walter McElroy. 
Edna L. Merrill. 
Alice Bertha Morrill. 
Lucille W. Nicholson. 
Hardy Astor Nigo. 
Charles J. Noll. 
Ethel Evelyn Parmenter. 
Stephen Ward Pattee. 
Ula G. Perra. 
Philip Wilfred Place. 
Mary Carlena Prescott. 
Perley W. Royal. 
Walter Leslie Sawyer. 
William Bernard Severance. 
Eleanor Jane Singleton. 
Una J. Sleeper. 
Florence Marion Thayei'. 
Bernice Morrison Thompson. 
Alice Maude Togus. 
Lloyd P. Upton. 
Margareta Adelia Vittum.- 
John Joseph Walsh. 
Agnes McDuffie Woodbury. 



358 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

X, — Winners of Clarke Prizes* 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, JANUAKY 29, 1902. 

First prize, $25, Helen Kaymond Carter. 
Second prize, $20, Thomas A. Lane. 
Third prize, ^10', E. Louise Clough. 
Fourth prize, $5, Helen M. Vittum. 



XL — Organization, J 903. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

EUGENE E. REED, Mayok. Chairman, ex officio. 

E. EDWIN CHASE, President of Common Council, ex officio. 

Wakd 1. Elliot C. Lambert. Ward (5. Eugene B. Dunbar. 

Walter B. Heath. Harry L. Davis. 

Ward 2. J. W. Johnston. Ward 7. Edward B. Woodbury. 

Will C. Heath. Edson S. Heath. 

Wards. George D. Towne. Ward 8. Walter B. Mitchell. 

Louis E. Phelps. Benjamin Price. 

Ward 4. Nathaniel L. Colby. Ward 9. E. Emmet Walsh. 

I. N. Cox. Alaric Gauthier. 

Ward 5. John T. Kelley. Ward 10. Mark E. Harvey. 

John F. Lee. Harry H. Burpee. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

GEOEGE D. TOWNE. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

ELLIOT C. LAMBEET. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

CHAELES W. BICKFOED. 

superintendent's CLERK. 

FANNIE L. SANBOEN. 

truant officer. 
- CUETIS W. DAVIS. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 359 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — Mayor Reed, Messrs. Chase, Lambert, Woodbviry and Walsh. 
Salaries. — Messrs. Kelley, Cox and Burpee- 
Text Books. — Messrs. Towne, Phelps, Cox and Woodbury. 
Music. — Messrs. W. C. Heath, Price and Lee. 
Drawincj. — Messrs. E. S. Heath, Johnston and Dunbar. 
Manual Trainim/. — Messrs. Phelps, W. B. Heath and E. S. Heath. 
Examination of T'eachers. — Messrs. Colby, .Johnston and Mitchell. 
Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Burpee, Mayor Eeed, Messrs. Chase, Harvey, Lee. 
^epaii'S. — Messrs. Davis, Walsh and Gauthier. 
Attendance. — Messrs. Price, Gauthier and W. C Heath. 
Health. — Messrs. Dunbar, Davis and Mitchell. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

IIi(/h School. — Messrs. Towne, Phe Ips, Lambert, Walsh and W. B Heath* 

Franklin-street i — Messrs. Woodbury, Davis and Lee. 

Spring -street. — Messrs. Kelley, Dunbar and Woodbury. 

Lincoln-street and Youngsville. — Messrs. Colby, Lee and W. C Heath. 

Ash-street and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Phelps, W. C Heath and 
Gauthier, 

JVehster-street and Stark.- — Messrs. Buri^ee, Tovrne and Johnston. 

Bakersville and Mosquito Fund. — Messrs. W. B. Heath, Johnston and 
Mitchell. 

Varney. — Messrs. Mitchell, Walsh and Cox. 

RaUsville and Harveij. — Messrs. Davis, Harvey and Price. 

Bimmon. — Messrs. Gauthier, E. S. Heath and Towne. 

Training school. — Messrs, Lambert, Woodbury and Phelps. 

Main-street.— Mes,&vs. Walsh, W. B. Heath and Burpee. 

Parker, — Messrs. Price, Burpee and E. S. Heath. 

Wilson. — Messrs. Dunbar, Gauthier and Harvey. 

Straw. — Messrs. E. S. Heath, Kelley and Colby. 

Amoskeag. — Messrs. W. C Heath, Phelps and Kelley. 

(rof^s Falls. —Messrs. Harvey, Mitchell and Dunbar 

Pearl-street. — Messrs. Johnston, Cox and Walsh. 

Highland. — Messrs. Cox, Price and W. B. Heath. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Lee, Colby and Davis. 



XII. — List of Teachers. 

HIGH SCnOOI.. — BEECH STREET. 



Master, George H. Libby. 
Sub-Master. George I. Hopkins. 



360 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Assistants. Harry X. McLaren. 

Hiram A. Stearns. 

Allan E. Herrick. 

Nellie Pickering. 

Florence M. Locke. 

Theresa B. Stanton. 

Mary J. Wellington. 

Ethel I. Cummings. 
Sara Hunt. 
Annie W. Colby. 
Mary H. Dowd. 
Winona M. Martin. 
Elsie D. Fairbanks. 
Annie M. Vose. 
Edith M. Pierce. 

FEANKLIX-STP.EET SCHOOL. 

Crrammar Grades. 

blaster. Isaac Huse, Jr. 

Master's Assistant. Alice C. Taggart. 

Assistants. Carrie E. Hoit. 

Carrie E. Head. 

Nellie C. Parker. 

Lou'er Grades. 

Higher Middle. Alice M. Lami^rey. 
Lower Middle. Amy K. Northrup. 
Higher Primary. Grace M. Whittemore. 
Lower Pirmary. Susie L. Dodge. 

LINCOLN STEEET SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. Fred L. V. Spaulding. 
Master's Assistant. Annie W. Patten. 
Assistants. Belle R. Daniels. 

Mabel J. Brickett. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

Lover Grades. 

Higher Middle. Etta L. Stearns. 
Lower Middle. Bertha A. Allen. 



REPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 361 

Higher Primary. Theodora Richardson. 

Lower Primary. Hulda C. Graupner. 

Lower Primary (Temporary). Carlena A. Savory. 

; ASH STREET. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. Edgar D. Cass 

Master's Assistant. Amelia L. Graupner. 

Assistants. Emma L. McLaren. 

Lora E. Hill. 

Ellen E. Connor. 

Loirer Grad(fS. 

Higher Middle. Emma J. Cooper. 
Mixed Middle. Marjorie S. Woodbury. 
Lower Middle. Josephine C. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTEK-STEEET SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. .John Gault. 

Master's Assistant. Josephine W. Page. 

Assistants. Luna A. Whitlock. 

Alta C. Willand. 

Eva F. Tuson. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Edith Hammond. 
Lower Middle. Jean Gillan. 
Higher Primary. Mary E. Murphy. 
Lower Primary. Mathel C. Henry. 

VAENEY SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 
Master. George Winch. 
Master's Assistant. Florence M. Ward. 
Assistants. Esther M. Dickey. 

Ellen E. McKean. 

Millie S. Morse. 



362 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Loioer Grades. 

Higher Middle. Mary J. Walsh. 
Lower Middle. Marcia M. Moore. 
Higher Primary. Gertrude Adams. 
Lower Primary. Annie E. Walsh. 

IIALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. William H. Huse. 
Master's Assistant. Ella F, Barker. 
Assistants. Olive A. Rowe. 
Mary L. Ayer. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Flora M. Walker. 

Lower Middle. Clara V. Clement. 

Higher Primary. Bertha L. Kemp. 

Lower Primary E. Alfreda Hall. 

Assistant. Amy E. Davison. 

Lower Primary. Annie R. Carson. 

Assistant. Ethel A. Nicholson. 

Lower Primary. Martha J. Kennedy. (Cody's block). 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns. 
Assistants. Lelia A. Brooks. 
Cora M. Farmer. 

Lower Grades. 

Mixed Middle. Mary L. Heath. 
Higher Primary. Augusta S. Dowues. 
Mixed Primary. S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. Kathyrn D. McKeon. 

KIMMON SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Principal. Louis H. Bailey (Grammar classes). 
Assistant. Lillian F. Crowther. 



REPOKT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OP SCHOOLS. 



Lower Grades. 



Mixed Middle. Mary A. Seavey. 
Higher Primary. Hattie S. Tattle. 
Lower Primary. Blanche E. Hicken, 
Lower Primary. Katherine A. Fraiii. 

WILSON SCIIOOI.. 

Grammar Grades. 



Principal. 
Assistants. 



Barbara B. Joy. 
Mary E. McLaren. 
Helleu Morisou. 
Cora B. Gilford. 



Loifer Grades. 

Higher Middle. Harriet H. Richardson. 
Lower Middle. Florence Richardson. 
Higher Primary. Bertha V. Franks. 
Lower Primary. Florence L. Abbott, 
Lower Primary. Gertrude M. Porter. 

STKAW SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades, 
Principal. Lizzie P. Gove. 

Lover G'rades. 

Higher Middle. Gertrude H. Brooks. 
Lower Middle. Lettie M. Smith. 
Higher Primary. Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. Florence H. Moore. 
Lower Primary. Edith M. Stebbins. 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Merrimack street, corner of Union. 

Principal. Caroline E. Wing. 
Head Assistant. Grace A. Phillips. 

The principal is also assisted by the sub-teachers, i. e., members of the 
training class. The school embraces the first four years of school work, 
in the following grades: Lower Primary, Higher Primary, and Lower 
Middle. There are four rooms, two of lower primary grade. 



364 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SPRING-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Annabel Emerson, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. Fannie D. Moultou. 
Mixed Middle. Helen Morrill. 
Higher Primary. Nellie I. Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. Lizabell Savory. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary W. Mitchell, Grammar Grade. 
Higher Middle. Mary A. Clement. 
Lower Middle. Lottie M. Clement. 
Higher Primary. M. Minnie Sturtevant. 
Higher Primary. Hattie O. Willand. 
Lower Primary. Kate T. Clarke. 
Lower Primary. Elizabeth F. Walsh. 
Lower Primary. Sarah Price. 

PEARL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary G. Tynan, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. Nellie M. Smith. 
Higher Primary. Florence Abbott. 
Lower Primary. Georgia M. Cheney. 

PARKER SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary E. Moulton, Grammar. 
Higher Middle. Lura B. Gage. 
Mixed Middle. Elizabeth M. Flanders. 
Higher Primary. Eda M. Barr. 
Lower Primary. Blanche M. Folsom. 
Lower Primary. Maude E. Winegar. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. Mary A. Buzzell, Grammar and Middle. 

Middle and Primary. Mary S. Richardson. 

Lower Primary. Marion F. Partridge. 

Highland. Blanche L. Bachelder, Grammar and Middle. 

Goffe's Falls. Percy N. Folsom, Grammar. 

Middle Grades. Maud M. Greaney. 

Primary Grades. Edith A. Murphy. 

Primary Grades. Helen Townsend. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

stark. Inez. M. Warren. 
Harvey. Emma J. Ela. 
Youngsville. Lura K. Kimpton. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 3G5 

"Webster's Mills. Josephine L. Riddle. 
Mosquito Pond. Anabelle F. Landers. 

SPECIAL, TEACHERS. 

Music. Eben F. Richardson, Maude E. Broun. 
Drawing. J. Warren Thyng. 
Manual Training. Fred E. Browne. 
Assistant. Joseph F. Carter. 

■JANITORS. 

I{i'j}>..jSchnoJ. 
Charles F. Jack. Engineer,'- George H. Jack. 

FranMin-street and Training Schools. 
Charles H. Scoby. 

Lincoln-street Sf^hool. 
William Stevens. 

Hallsville and \]^ilson Schools. 
William H. Newry. 

Ash-street and Pearl-street Schools. 

John S. Avery. 

Webster-street and Straw Schools. 

William J. Powers. 

Spring-street and Loicell-street Schools. 

S. H. Batchelder. 

BakersviUe School. 

Edwin N. Baker. 

Varney Schoid. 

Joseph H. Buffam, 

Main-stre<d and Parker Schools. 

William F. Conno". 

Pimm 0)1 ScJidol. 

Joseph Chalifoux. 



366 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Amoskcng School. 

Charles H. Corey. 

Ilifjlilnnd and Goff's Falls School. 

H. F. Miller 



XIIL— School Year, 1 902-1 903. 

Fall term opened September 8, 191)2; closed December 19, 1902. Vaca- 
tion of two weeks. 

Winter Term of twelve weeks opened January 5, 1903, closes March 27, 
1903. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term opens April 13, 1903; closes June 2(J, 1903. Vacation of ton 
weeks. 



XVL — Hig^h School Course of Study* 

EXGI.ISH. 
FIRST YEAK. 

1. Scott & Denney to Chapter III. Read : Evangeline, Sketch Book, 
House of the Seven Gables, Miles Stanclish, Twice Told Tales, Gulliver's 
Travels. 

SECOXD YEAR. 

2. Scott 6c Denney from Chapter III. to end of book. Read : Merchant 
of Venice, Alhambra, Lady of the Lake Julius Caesar, Revolt of the 
Tartar Tribe, Ivanhoe, Woodstock, Life of Nelson, Last of the Mohicans 
Sir Roger de Coverly. 

2a. First Semester. — From college requirements for 1902-1905. Ivanhoe, 
The Vision of Sir Launfal, Sir Roger de Coverly Papers, Silas Marner, 
Julius Cicsar. 

Second Semester. Considerable collateral reading. Elementary English 
Composition, Scott & Denney. 

THIRD YEAR. 

3. Genung's Rhetoric, words and sentences. Read: Silas Marner, .V> 
You Like It. Marmion, David Copperfleld, Lowell's Poems, Idylls of the 
King, Vicar of Wakefield. 

3«. First Semester. — From college requirements. Read: The Vicar of 
Wakefield, Ancient Mariner, The Princess, The Merchant of Venice, Car- 
lyle's Essay on Bu-ns. 

Second Semester. — Considerable collateral reading, Conipnsition-Rliet- 
oric, Scott &: Denney. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 367 
FOURTH YEAR. 

4. Geiiuiig's Rhetoric completed, with additional study of paragraphs 
and figures. Read : Paradise Lost, Macbeth, Ancient Mariner, Chaucer, 
Sohralj and Rustum, Midsummer Night's Dream, FaerieQueen, The Princess, 
Burlie's Conciliation and Taxation, Rape of the Lock, Cotter's Saturday 
Night, Review of English Grammar last semester. 

ia. First Semester. — From college requirements. Read : Lycidas, Comus, 
L'.Vllegro, II Peuseroso, Burke's Speech on Conciliation, JMacaulay's Essaj^ 
on Milton and Addison, Macbeth. 

Second Semester. — Collateral Reading, Composition-Rhetoric, Scott ct 
Denney. 

Latin, 
first year. 

1. First Latin Book (Bennett's Foundations), Selections from easy Latin, 
Allen tVr Greenough's Giammar. 

SECOND YEAR. 

2. Caesar, Books I-IV, Prose Composition. 

THIIiD YEAR. 

;5. Cicero's Orations (6), Prose Composition. 

iia. College Oivison. Virgil, Book I, II, III, Mythology and Prosody, 
Cicero, four orations against Cataline, Prose Composition. 

FOUUXn YEAR. 

4. Virgil, six books. Mythology and Prosody. 

4ffl. College Division. Virgil, Books IV, V, VI, Mjthology and 
Prosody, Cicero's Orations, For the Poet Archias and the Manilian Law, 
Prose Composition. 

Sight work througliout the course. 

Greek, 
second year. 

1. White's First Greek Book, Goodwin's Grammar, sight reading. 

THIRD Y'KAR. 

2. Anabasis, Books I-IV, Woodruff's Greek Prose, sight reading. 

I'OURTH YEAR. 

o. Iliad, Books I-VI, f.iglit reading in Odyssey, Selections from 
Herodotus and from Xeuophon's Helleuica. 



368 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORT. 

French, 
second year. 

1. Super's Reader, LeRo}', Cbardenal's Grammar to Lesson 100, 
Guerber's Coutes et Legendes. Dictation, sight reading, recounting in 
Freucli. 

TIIIEU YEAR. 

2. Reading Frencii — Worman's Grammar — Tour du Monde, Mile, de 
la Seigliere, Le Cid, Poudre aux Yeux, Colomba, La Tulipe Noire, Le 
Bourgeois Gentilhomme, Athalie, Esther, La Belle Nivernaise, Evasion 
du Due de Beaufort. French Composition, based on some of these texts. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

3. Hennequin's Idioms, Fables of La Fontaine, Le Pecheur d'Islande, 
Les Miserables, L'Abbe Constantin, Abreges of Daily Lessons. 

Mathematics. 

first year. 

1. Algebra, Wells's. 

SECOND YEAR. 

2. Geometry — plane completed — solid commenced, Hopkins's Geome- 
try, Wells's Geometry. 

Second Semester. — Arithmetic. 

THIRD YEAR. 

3. Solid Geometry, completed. 

3ffl. Second Semester. — Plane Trigonometry, Wentworth's. Surveying, 
Went worth's. Field work with transit and measuring tape. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

4. Review of Plane Geometry, Review of Algebra, Review of Arith- 
metic. 

German. 

first year. 

1. Conversation based upon Bernhardt's " Deutsches Sprach und Lese- 
buch," with frequent repetition of easy colloquial sentences. A care- 
ful drill upon the rudiments of grammar, especially the inflection of 
nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and the more common verbs; the use of the 
common prepositions, and the general word order. Dictation of easy 
German. Reproduction of English into German, based on German 
alreadv read. Translations of 50 to 75 pages of German text. 



REPORT OF THE IJUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 309 



gPX'ONI) YEAR. 

2. Translation of good German literature in stories or plays — " Edel- 
steine," a collection of short stories by standard German authors; 
" Immensee," by Theodore Storm ; " Der Neffe als Onkel," by Frederich 
Schiller; " Der Fluch der Schonhert," byRiehl; Composition based on 
the texts, practice in relating in German what has been read, sight trans- 
lation. Part 1 of Joynes-Meissner'h German Grammar. 

Tnilll) YEAR. 

3. Translation continued— " Minna von Barnhelm," by Lessing ; A 
novelette by Riehl ; (perhaps) "Der stumme Ratsher"; " Aus den 
Staat Friedrichs der Grossen," by Freystag. A short course in German 
lyrics— Original composition. Part II of Joynes-Meissner's Grammar. 
Survey of German literature in the form of German lectures, with illus- 
trations from works of the authors considered. 

History. 

first year. 

1. Ancient History, Myers's. 

SECOND Y'EAE. 

2a. Medieval History, Myers's. 
2h. Modern History, Myers's. 

THIRD YEAR. 

3. English History, Montgomery's. 
3a. Grecian History, Myers's. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

4a. American History and Government or Political Economy, Mac- 
rane's Fiske's History. 
Ah. Roman History, Allen's. 

Commercial Course. 

second year. 

1. Second Semester. — Book-keeping, Office Routine. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Semester. — Book-keeping. Office Routine. 

-Z. Second ,S'eHifi*«':'r-.— Typewriting and Stenography. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Typewriting and Stenography. 

Physics. 



3^0 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

FIRST YEAB. 

1. This course gives the pupil knowledge of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism, and sound. 

Experiments are performed, and problems done to illustrate and em- 
phasize these elementary principles. The pupil keeps notes concerning 
the class-room work, and makes drawings of the apparatus. 

Text-book, Gage's Principles of Physics. 

Two hours a week are given to laboratory exercises, and three to 
recitations and lectures. The pupil performs his own experiments, and 
keeps a careful record of each one. The experiments and recitations 
pertain to such general subjects as mechanics, heat, light, magnetism, 
and electricity. 

This course fits for Harvard, or any college or technical school that 
requires Physics. 

Text-book, Hall and Bergen's Physics. 

TIIIKD YEAK. 

2. The Advanced Physics is a continuation and farther development 
of the Fourth Class Physics.- 

ZOOLOGY. 
SECOND YEAR. 

Needham's. Forty-five periods of laboratory work. 

Botany, 
second year. 
Second Semester. — Gray's Lessons, Coulter's Plant Relations, Bergen's 
Foundations of Botany. Forty-five periods of laboratory work. 

ClIEMISTJlY. 
THIRD YEAR. 

Eemsen's. Sixty periods of laboratory work. 

Astronomy, 
fourth year. 
First Semester. — Young's Elements. Weekly evening sessions for 
studying the constellations, and telescopic observations according to the 
aspect of the sky. 

Physical Geography, 
fourth yeat^. 
Second Semester. — Tarr's Elementary. It is also an introduction to the 
study of geology. 

Geology and Mineralogy. 

fourth year. 
Second Semester. — Dana's Geological Story Briefly Told, and Crosby's 
Tables for the laboratory determination of minerals. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER OF 
FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



REPORT OF FIRE ENGINEER, 



Chief Engineer's Office, 
Central Station, No. 8 Vine Street, 

Manchester, N". H., December 31, 1902. 

To His Honor, William C. Clarke, Maijor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Council : 

In compliance with the Laws and Ordinances of the city of Manchester, 
I herewith submit my twenty-fourth annual report, it being the fifty-sixth 
of this city, for the year ending December 31st, 1902. 

There have been one hundred and ninety-eight (198) alarms during the 
year consisting of one hundred and twenty-seven (127) still alarms, and 
seventy-one (71) bell alarms. Of these alarms, twenty of the stills have 
been for brush or grass fires, five of the bell alarms, (2-2-2 out of town 
calls), for the same cause, and some malicious person pulled in two false 
bell alarms. 

On the 14th of January, the most disastrous fire that has visited this 
city since July 8, 1870 occurred, destroying the finest and most expensive 
building "The Kennard" within the city limits. A general alarm was 
given for this fire, and assistance telephoned for from Concord and 
Nashua, both cities responding promptly, with engines, hose-carriages 
and delegations of firemen. The fire, however, was under control before 
their aiTival, and their apparatus was not used, although their firemen 
helped some of our men for a time. 

An inquest was held January 20th by the Board of Engineers, assisted 
by City Solicitor George A. Wagner and State Insurance Commissioner 
Col. John C. Linehan, of Concord, for the purpose of ascertaining the 
cause of this fire. Twenty-seven witnesses were examined, but the «c^«aZ 
cause was not obtained. After considering the evidence fully the Board 
of Engineers gave the following: "From the evidence concerning the 
"fire, we find nothing definite to settle, beyond a doubt the actual cause 
"of the fire, but from the evidence it is our opinion that it was caused by 
"electric wires." ' 

373 



374 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The value of property endangered, the amount of insurance carried on 
same, the amount of Insurance paid, and the net losses, as far as could be 
ascertained, (not including chimney or brush fires), aggregate as follows: 

Value of buildings $462,740.00 

Value of contents 223,072.00 

$685,812.00 

Insurance carjied on buildings $278,650.00 

Insurance carried on contents 83,450.00 

Damage to buildings $212,146.56 

Damage to contents 156,-572.08 

Insurance paid on buildings $144,688.80 

Insurance paid on contents 56,116,90 

200,804.70 

Net loss above insurance paid $170,014.70 



THE MANUAL FORCE. 



of the department consists of thirty-four (34) permanent men and one 
hundred and twenty-six (126) call men, assigned as follows : 



1 chief engineer 

4 assistant engineers ••••.... 

Engine Company No. 1 

Engine Company No. 2 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 

Engine Company No. 4 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 

Hose Company No. 1 

Hose Company No. 2 

Hose Company No. 3 

Aerial Truck No. 1 

Chemical No. 1 

Spare driver 

126 34 

The double companies, (particularly Engine and Ladder Company No. 6), 
who are located in a hazardous section are wholly inadequate to do efficient 
service, owing to lack of numbers, as twenty (20) men cannot properly 
handle steamer, ^hose carriage and truck to good advantage during 
a fire of much magnitude. 



3all. 


Perma- 
nent. 




1 


4 




11 


3 


11 


3 


15 


5 


11 


3 


16, 


4 


16 


4 


11 


1 


1ft 


2 


& 


2 


12 


3 


3 


2 




1 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 375 

THE 1JU1LDING8. 

No material change have been made in the buildings except at Hose No. 
2. There the floor timbei's of the apparatus room have been strengthened, 
two stalls put in, instead of one, and those moved nearer the front of the 
building, a room fltted up for an additional man and the whole fltted 
with steam heat. The gravel roof at Central station, alterations at Lake 
Avenue station for a three-horse hitch on truck No. 3, and a box stall at 
Engine and Ladder No. 5 have been alluded to several times, and should 
receive the attention of the incoming City Councils. 

THE APPARATUS. 

lu service, consists of 2 first size, 3 second size, and 1 third size Amoskeag 
steam fire engines, 3 hose carriages with reels, 6 hose wagons, (one a com- 
bination chemical and another carrying ladders). Four hook and ladder 
trucks, (one of which is an eighty-five foot aeriel truck carrying other lad- 
ders), 2 hose carriages in outlying districts, with volunteer companies at- 
tached, 2 hose-jumpers (with hose), but without men attached, 1 supply 
wagon, 1 exercise wagon, and 1 spare one-horse hose carriage, located as 
follows: 

2 first size steam fire engines, with three-horse hitch, at Central sta- 
tion, each with one-horse hose wagon. 

1 second size steam fire engine, three-horse hitch, with 1 two-horse com- 
bination chemcial and hose wagon. 

1 second size steam fire engine and 1 two-horse hose wagon, at corner 
Lake avenue and Massabesic street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 third size steam fire engine and one-horse hose carriage, at corner 
of Webster and Chestnut street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 second size steam fire engine, and one-horse hose carriage on Rimmon 
street, corner of Amory street. 

1 two-horse ladder truck at same station. 

1 two-horse hose wagon, corner Maple and East High streets. 

1 two-horse combination hose wagon. South Elm street, (Bakersville). 

1 aerial hook and ladder truck, at Central station (three-horse hitch). 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) cliemical engine at Central station. 

1 supply wagon at Central fire station. 

1 steam fire engine reserve, at station of Engine No. 2 of but little use 
for fire purposes. 

1 one-horse hose carriage at Central fire station. 

1 two-horse combination chemical and hose wagon (new) awaiting 
building of station on JVilson hill. 

1 four-wheeled hand hose carriage (with shafts) at junction of Old Falls 
road and Front street, Amoskeas;. 



376 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, Devonshire Mills, Goffe's Falls. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage in basement of stable of W. P. Farmer at 
junction of Candia road and Hanover streets. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, junction Mammoth road and Massabesic 
street (Hallsville). 

7 exercise wagons, 1 at Central Fire station, 1 at Engine No. 2, 1 at 
Engine and Ladder No. 3, 1 at Engine and Ladder No. 5, 1 at Engine and 
Ladder No. 6, 1 at Hose No. 2, 1 at Hose No. .3, 1 repay- wagon for fire 
alarm telegraph. 

In the early part of October, a new combination chemical and hose 
wagon built by C. H. Perkins & Co. of Lawrence, Mass., was put into ser- 
vice as "tender" to Engine No. 2, in place of the two-horse wagon, — the 
latter replacing the one-horse hose carriage at Hose No. 2, thus offering 
better fire protection in that section of the city. 

Another Combination Chemical and Hose Wagon was received from 
the same firm, the later part of November, to be placed on Wilson Hill, 
when the Station at corner of Weston and Concord streets is ready for 
its occupancy. 

The accommodations for the Chief Eagineer's horse (during the day) at 
the Central Station are iucouvenieut, and can be remedied at slight ex- 
pense. 

THE FIRE ALAEM TELEGRAPH. 

We had two serious burn-outs during the year, from Electric Light- 
Wires, July 28th and August 11th, that of July 28th "blowing" every 
fuse in the Central Office, except on one circuit, and damaging the 
Repeater considerably. As long as the Electric Light wires are allowed 
to be strung overhead, just so long should the Electric Light Company be 
required to pay all damages caused by their wires. 

A new Fire Alarm Box No. 512, corner of Beauport and Adams streets, 
(west side) has been added; about four miles of No. 9 galvanized iron 
wire has been put up and three miles of hard-drawn copper wire removed. 

THE HORSES. 

There are at present forty-three horses owned by this department, 
forty-one of which are permanently employed and two spare. 

The pair of grays on Hose No. 3 at Bakersville ought to be replaced by 
another pair. These horses are probably upwards of twenty years old, 
have seen considerable service, and are wholly unfit for the duties 
required of them. Those at Hose No. 2, Maple street, are hardly heavy 
enough for that wagon and those on Engine No. 6, are not the best of 
fire-horses. 

CASUALTIES. 

April 3rd John Martin of Engine and Ladder No. 3 was thrown from a 
adder, receiving a severe "shaking up," Daniel B. Emery of Engine No. 2, 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



377 



slight- injury to head by falling hose; Harrison H. Cole of Ladder No. 1, 
and George Taylor of Engine and Ladder No. 3, received sprained ankles; 
July 3rd Charles H. Gile of Engine and Ladder No. 5, injured finger, 
Thomas J. Wyatt of Engine No. 1, wrist badly cut with glass, Assistant- 
Engineer Clarence R. Merrill, severely sprained leg and crushed foot. 

On the 25th of May, Mrs. Sophia Eogella was slightly burned about the 
neck and head, and on the 16th of December a daughter of Thomas 
Bellmar, about six years old and a son about ten were severely burned 
by the explosion of Kerosene, that the daughter died within a few hours, 
while the son is still under treatment at the Notre-Dame Hospital. 

THE firemen's RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 



The financial condition of the Association is as follows : 

Balance on hand at annual meeting, February 11th, 1902 . . 

Membership fees 

Dividend on deposits in Savings Bank 

Donations : 

Clarence R. Merrill $25.00 

Hon. Perry H. Dow 15.00 

Mrs. C. S. Kidder 10.00 

Jeremiah Hodge 10.00 

James W. Hill Co 10.00 

James Lightbody 5.00 

Frank C. Livingston 5.00 



$5,342.70 

8.00 

160.60 



80.00 



$5,591.30 



Expenditures 



Paid Joseph E. Merrill, salary $25.00 

Postal cards and printing 2.10 

Daniel B. Emery, benefit 5.00 

Harrison H. Cole, benefit 18.00 

John Martin, benefit 52.00 

George Taylor, benefit 10.00 

Charles H. Gile, benefit 6.00 

Clarence R. Merrill, benefit 44.00 

Thomas J. Wyatt benefit, 30.50 

Henry Johnson, benefit 11.00 

Leaving a balance in treasurv of 



$203.60 



$5,387.70 



378 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I desire again to call the attention of the City Councils to the excessive 
rent charged by the Water Commissioners for hydrant service, and also to 
remonstrate against the rent of hydrants being charged up to the Fire 
Department expenses. It would seem as much justice to charge the 
street expenses to it because the apparatus used the streets to reach a 
fire. 

Whenever the new Combination Company is installed in the new 
station on Wilson Hill it will necessitate the purchase of two thousand 
feet of hose. 

I desire to express my personal thanks to His Honor Mayor Clarke and 
the Committee on Fire Department for the many courtesies received at 
their hands and for their official aid and encouragement, to the Police 
Department for the efficient manner of handling the crowds at fires, to 
the assistant engineers and officers and men of the department, for their 
promptness and willing assistance at all times rendered. 
Eespectfully submitted, 

THOMAS W. LANE, 

Chief of Department. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. d'7'^ 

Number and Location of Fire Alarm Boxes and Keys. 

A KEY IS ATTACHED TO EACH BOX, aud Can be had by breaking the 
glass. 

No. 3. American Locomotive Company's lower shop. Keys at oflBces 
of gas-works, county jail, Manchester Coal & Ice Company's sheds, and 
Charles H. Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. Corner Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel Oxford, L. B. 
Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, street railway stables, and office of 
Blodgett & Young's block. 

No. 5. Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at Tebbetts & Co.'s 
and Hanscom's drug stores, Manchester House, and J. W. Hill Com- 
pany's store. 

No. 6. City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Thurston's drugstores. J. A. 
Riddle's office, and residence of J. L. Brock, 21 Amoskeag Corporation. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of Manchester and Chestnut streets. 
Keys at chief of police's office and with all police officers. 

No 8. Corner of Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Dante Smith's and 
Gadbois's drugstores, and Partridge Brothers' grain store. 

No. 9. Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at residence of Mrs. 
H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, Dr. E. Fritz, and station of Engine 
No. 5. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at residence of Mrs. 
John Mooar, George Emerson, Walter A. Green and O. D. Knox. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at residence of 
Welcome Jencks and Mrs. Lewis Simons, No. 1, Senter's block, and 
Hartshorn's grocery store. 

No. 14. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys at residences of 
Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. George W. Riddle, D. J. Adams, A. H. Olzendam, 
and Mrs. Thomas Morgan. 

No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys at residences of 
Henry W. Shannon and J. Fred Chalker. 

No. 16 Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at residences of Rt. 
Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. R. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys at residences of 
Miss Mary A. Watts and Michael Connox. 

No. 18. Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys at residences 
of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and William Perkins's estate. 

No. 21. Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys at A. D. Smith's 
drugstore, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. L. Walker's office, and residence 
of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys at the residences 
of the kite Eben T. James, and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 house, corner of Massa- 
besic street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. M. Goodwin and 
station of Engine and Ladder No. 3. 



380 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 2.5. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at residences of 
George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, the late Horace Gordon, and .James E. 
Straw. 

No. 26. Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys at McCrillis's 
carriage shop. 

No. 27. Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys at residences 
of H. M. Tarbell, E. S. Fletcher, estates of George H. Hubbard, and 
William Carr. 

No. 28. Corner of Merrimack and Beacon streets. Keys at residences 
of A. L. Garmon and H. B. Fairbanks. 

No. 31. Corner of Canal and Hollis streets, American Tjocomotive 
Company's shop. Keys at oifice, Amoiy Mills, Langdon Mills watchrooms. 

No. 82. Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and Brook streets. Keys 
at the Amoskeag Paper Company's mill, Langdon watchroom, and Elec- 
tric Light Station. 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Keys at watchroom and pumping station. 

No. 3-5. Stark Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 36. Amory Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 39. Hillsborough county jail. Keys at ofiftce. 

No. 41. Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 42. Manchester Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 43. Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 4.5. The S. C. Forsaith Company's shops. Keys at freight dejiot 
and office in building. 

No. 51. Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys at stores of F. 
Eiedel and Henry Weber. 

No. 52. Barr's brick block. West Manchester. Keys at Fradd & Co.'s 
and Wiggin-Young Co.'s stores, Merrimack House, and Engine No. 2 
house. 

No. 53. The Wallace steam mill. Keys at mill office, I. E. Dewey's 
tenement block, and Eanno's harness store. 

No. 54. Corner of A and South Main streets. Keys at residences of 
Lord sisters, Neil Fullerton, and George W. Davis's store. 

No. 56. Baldwin's bobbin shop. Keys at Baldwin's office and resi- 
dences of J. C. Smith, E. P. Littlefield, and with watchman at works. 

No. 57. Corner Mast road and D street. Keys at residences of Allen E. 
Eaton and C. H. George, and F. W. Towle's store. 

No. 61. Corner of River road and Hancock street, Bakersville. Keys 
at True W- .Jones Company's brewery, store of John A. Kane, and Hose 3. 

No. 62. Gerrish Wool & Leather Company's. River road. Keys at 
tannery, the Edwin Kennedy house, and Hose 3. 

No. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at residences of T. 
Collins, Daniel Sheehan, Thomas J. Smith, Simon McCarthy, and J. J. 
Twomey. 

No. 72. Corner of Lake avenue and Lincoln street. Keys at residences 
of the late Austin Jenkins, and James Briggs. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 381 

No. 73. Corner of Beecli and Cedar streets. Keys at residence of Kev. 
J. A. Chevalier and Timothy .Garr., ., , 

No. 81. Central Fire Station, Vine srreet. Keys at all the engine 
rooms. . ,,.;-) ,.,.,■ .,,;,. '/; , 

No. 82. Old City Hotel,,, corner Lo\yell and Church streets. Keys at 
Lowell-street stable and Eames Bros.' drugstore. 

No. 91. Corner Webster and Beech streets. Keys at Children's Home 
and residences of George E. McClintock, Solomon Johnson, M. E.. Sanc- 
tuary. 

No. 92. Corner Union and Clarke streets. Keys at residences of Mrs. 
Julia B. Bradford and E. H. Nutting. 

No. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. Keys at residences of 
W. A. Clarkson, M. D. Johnson, and Charles F. Chase. 

No. 113. Corner of Oak and Prespect streets. Keys at residences of 
Mrs. William B. Abbott. W. N. Johnson and E. M. Topliff. 

No. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at residences of G. A. 
Olzendam, W. S. Shannon, and John J. Bennett. 

No. 115. Corner of Blodget and Ash streets. Keys at residences of 
James A. Rogers and Cyren Bixby. 

No. 212. Shoe shop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of the shoe factory 
and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn, Mrs. Milton A. 
Abbott, M. V. B. Garland, and Walter Cody's block. 

No. 213. Sash and blind factory. South Beech street, junction of 
Portsmouth Railroad. Keys at offices of Sash.& Blind Company. 

No. 214. Elliott silk mill, corner of Wilson and Valley streets. Keys 
at office and watchroom of mill. 

No. 215. Hoyt & Co.'s shoeshop, corner of Lincoln and Silver streets. 
Keys at offices of shoeshop and Kimball Carriage Company and work- 
shop opposite. 

No. 216. Jewett and Somerville streets. Keys at residences of G. H. 
Hill, 140 Jewett street, and W. B. Brown, 128 Jewett street. 

No. 217. Corner Candia road and Massabesic street. Keys at resi- 
dences of L. M. Streeter, William Gadbois and Charles P. Still. 

No. 241. Lake avenue hill. Key at residence of Charles Davis. 

No. 261. Pearl-street grammar school. Keys at schoolroom and resi- 
dences of C. E. Rose, S. W. Bascom, and Charles W. Cheney. 

No. 312. Corner of Putnam, Main and McGregor streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of James Spence (309 Main street), Thomas Bolton, and gate No. 
11 mill. 

No. 313. Corner Amory and Main streets. Keys at residences of Allen 
Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Potvin's drugstore, MivUle & Co.'s drug- 
store, gate of No. 11 mill, and station of Engine and Ladder No. 6. 

No. 314. P. C. Cheney Company's paper mill. Keys at office and 
Riverside Hose house. 

No. 315. Old Brick store, 'Skeag. Keys at Riverside Hose house and 
D. Jameson's residence. 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOETS. 

No. 321. Corner Beauport and Wayne streets. Keys at Holy Angels 

Convent, the Brothers' School, and residences of E. H. Doherty, and Rev. 

Father Hevey. 

No. 323. Corner of Putnam and Bartlett streets, Keys at Albert 

Oliver's store, P. J. Archambeault's bakery, and residence of Officer 

Lewis Clement- 
No. 324. Amory and Laval streets. Key at residence of Desire Martin, 

No. 494 Amory street. 

No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at residences of 

Amelia Davis, William A. Tufts, and James Kearns. 

No. 512. Corner Beauport and Adams streets, West Side. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Keys at residences of 

J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Elizabeth Ward. 
No. 711. Corner Union and Grove streets. 
Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular police 
The true time will be given at precisely 12.30 p. m. from Charles A. 

Trefethen's jewelry store, and will be denoted by one stroke of the fire 

bells. 



Telephone Calls. 

Chemical Engine, Central station 64 — 3 

Engine No. 2 tj4 — 2 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 . . ••..•• 64 — 5 

Engine and Ladder No. 5 64 — 6 

Engine and Ladder No. 6 64 — 7 

Hose No. 2 116 — 4 

Hose No. 3 102—4 

Chief Engineer Lane's Office " 64 — 3 

Chief Engineer Lane's house 64 — 4 

Assistant Engineer Merrill's office 212 — 3 

Assistant Engineer Bean's house 533 — 2 

Assistant Engineer Seaward's house 239 — 5 

Two long rings twice calls all stations on line. 



Instructions to keyholders and Citizens. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be immediately com- 
municated to the nearest alarm box, the key of which is in a circular 
box attached to the right side of the fire-alarm box. Keys are also in the 
hands of all regular police, and generally of persons at the corner or 
nearest house. 

2. Keyholders and others, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive in- 
formation of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook once as far 
as it will go (without jerking), and then lei go. Shut the door, but do 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 383 

not try to remove the key, as it is locked in by a trap lock, and can only 
be removed with a release key, which is carried by each of the engineers, 
and they will., as soon as convenient, release and return it. 

3. All persons giving tire alarms are requested to remain by the box 
a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull again; if you still 
hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box and give an alarm from 
that. 

4. Never signal for fire seen at a distance Never touch the box ex- 
cept to give an alarm of fire. Give an alarm for no other cause than 
actual fire. Don't give an ai-aum foK a chimney fire. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless called for by 
the chief engineer. If you change your residence or place of business, xohere 
the keys are kept, return the keys to the same office. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to inform them- 
selves of the location of alarm boxes near their property ; also all places 
where the keys are kept. Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly 
given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bellsin the city, and the 
number of the box will be given thus: Box 6, six blows, 2 1-2 seconds 
apart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, pause of 6 1-4 seconds, 
one blow, same pause, and two blows, 2 — 1 — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the bells at any 
time; and in case of testing the boxes, each test will be preceded by one 
stroke of the bells. 



38i 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON 

FIRST, SECOND AND THIRD ALALMS. 





First Alarm. 


Second 


Alarm. 


Third Alarm. 


0; 

o 

H 


Engine. 






Engine. 


6 

o 

w 




Engine. 







3 


1st R. 3 C. 1 

1st K.2-3 

1st K. 2-3 

1st & 2d R. 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2d R. 5 

1st R. 5 

5 

1st R. 5 

IstR. 5 " 

1st & 2d R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 " 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 " 

1st R. 3 

3 

1st R. 6 

1st R. 5 

ist & 2d R. 5-6 

1st & 2d R. 5-6 

1st & 2d R. 5-6 

1st K. 3 

1st & 2d R. 2-3 

1st &2dR. 2-3 

1st R. 2-3 

1st & R. 2d 2-3 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-5 

2-3 

1st R. 3 C. 1 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st * id R. 

1st & 2d R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 5 " 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 " 

1st K. 3 

1st R. 3 " 

3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 2-6 

1st R. 2-6 

5-6 C. 1 

5-6 

2-t) 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

1st R. 3 C. 1 


1-3 
1-3 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 

1-2 
1-2 
1-2 
1-2 

1-2 


1-3 
1-3 
1-3 
1-3 
1-3 
1-5 

5 

5 

1-5 

1-5 

3 

3 

1-3 

3 

3 

3 

5 

3 

3 

1-5 

1-5 

1-5 

1-5 

1-5 

1-3 

1-3 

1-3 

3 

1-3 

G 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

1 

1-5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

6 

6 

5 

5 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

3 


2d R. 2 

2d R. 

2dR. 

2-3 

2dR. 

3 

2dR. 

1st R. 

2dR, 

2dR. 3 

3 

2d R. 3 

2d R. 5 

2dR. 

2dR. 2 

2d R. 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2dR. 5 

2dR. 

istR. 

2d R. 5 

2d R. 6 

2-3 

2-3 

2-3 

2d R. 2 

5-G 

5-6 

2d R. 6 

5 

IstR 3C1 

lstR.3" 

lstR.3" 

IstR. •' 

lstR.3" 

6 " 

2dR. 2 

2d R. 2 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2dR. 

5 

3-G 

2d R. 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2dR. 3 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2dR. 

2d R. 

■id R. 

2d K. 

2d R. 

IstR. 

2d R. 5 

2d R.5C1 

2d K.5" 

lstR.2" 

IstR. 

lstR.5Cl 

IstR. 5" 

lstR.5" 

IstR. " 

IstR. " 

IstR. " 

2dR. 






5-6 

5-6 

5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-G 

2-3-6 

2d R. 2-3-G 

2-3-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-S-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2-5-6 

2d R. 2-5-6 

2-3 

2-3 


2 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


5-6 


4 

5 


2-3 
3 

"2 

"i" 
1 

2-3 
•3-3 
2-3 
2-3 
1 
3 

r 
3 
3 


r 

5 

3 
1 

1 
1 
1 

3 

1 
1 

1 
3 
1 
3 
1 


6 
6 


6 


G 


7 

8 


G 
G 


9 

12 


3-G 
3-6 


13 


3-6 


14 


3-6 


15 


6 


16 

17 


6 
3-6 


18 


5-6 


21 


6 


23. 


5-6 


24 

25 

26 


5-G 
5-6 
1-6 


27 .... 


5-G 


28 


1-5-G 


31 


6 

6 

3-6 

3-6 

3-6 

5 

5-6 

5-6 

1 

5 

3 

3 

3 


3 


32 


3 


34 




35 






36 






39 

41 


5-6 


6 


42 








43 


5 

6 

2d R. 5 

2d R. 5 

2d R. 5 

2d R. 3-5 

2d R. 5 

lst&2dR.3-5 

5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2 

2-3-6 

2-3-6 

2-3-6 

2-3-6 

2-6 

2-3-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2d R. 2-5-6 

2-6 

3 

3 

2d R. 3 

2d R. 2-3 

2d R. 3 

2d R. 3 

2d R. 3 

2d R. 3-5 

2d R. 3-S 

2d R. 3-5 

2-5-G 


2-3" 

2 

2-3 

2-3 

2 

2-3 

"3 
3 
3 


5-6 


45 


6 


51 


1-5 


52 




1-5 


53 


1-5 


54 


1-3-5 


56 


1-3 
1-3 

2 
1-2 

2 

2-3 
2-3 
2-3 

2 

2 


3 
3 


1-5 


57 


1-3-5 


61 


1-5-6 


62 






1-5-6 


71 


2-3 

2 
2 

2 

1 
1 

" i 

1-3 

1 

r 

1 
1 
1 

2 
2 

"i 

r 

"1" 

2 


1 

1 

1 

3-5 

3-6 

1 

1 

1 

3 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

5 

1 

1 

6 

6 

1 

5 

5 

3 

1 


5-6 


72 


5-6 


73 


5-6 


81 


6 


82 




91 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

' "1 

1 

■■3" 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

2-3 

2-3 

2-3 

2-3 

2-3 

2-3 

2-3 

2-3 

1 


3-6 


92 


3-G 


112 


3-6 


113 


3-G 


114 


1-G 


115 


3-G 


212 


5-6 


213 


5-6 


214 


5-G 


215 


6-5 


216 


6-5 


217 


5-G 


241 . . 


5-G 


261 

312 . . 


3-6 
3-5 


313 


3-5 


314 


1-3 


315 


1-3 


321 




1-3-5 


323 


3-5 


324 


1-3 


511 


1-5 


512 


1 


3-5 


513 


1-3-5 


711 


3 


1 


5-6 









REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 385 

Rules and Regulations in regard to responding to Fire 

Alarms, etc. 

The following rules have l)een adopted by the board of engineers and 
the fire depaatment will strictly comply until otherwise ordered, and will 
attend alarms of fire as per "offciai. running card." 

RUNNING RULES. 

Whenever an alarm Is sounded, the members of all companies not 
called to that box will report to their respective company quarters, and 
there remain until dismisml by the signal of the bells or by an engineer 

in charge. 

In case companies on their first run have responded to an alarm, com- 
panies on their second run to the box from which the alarm has been 
sounded will answer all first-run boxes of the absent companies; and in 
case engines are out that would respond to another box, then third 
alarm companies will respond. In case of alarm from a box that does 
not call for a third alarm, companies on their second run will then 
answer to all other boxes. 

Whenever two trucks answer to first alarm the other truck will an- 
swer to all other boxes. 

At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, hose carriage, 
or truck that leaves the house first will have the right to lead to the fire. 
Whenever a horse lags or gives out, drivers should then give others the 
right of way, so as not to delay the rest of the apparatus. No running 

BY AVILU BE ALUOW^EI), EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDER PENALTY 
OF DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

The drivers shall not permit persons not connected with the department 
to ride upon the apparatus, and in muddy weather or heavy wheeling 
they shall not permit any one to ride upon thier apparatus when return- 
ing from fires. 

Drivers will take the following routes in responding to alarms on the 
West Side: For crossing Amoskeag bridge, take Elm street to Salmon, 
down Salmon street and across the bridge. For crossing McGregor bridge 
take Elm street to Bridge street, down Bridge street and across the 
bridge. For crossing Granite bridge take Elm street to Granite, down 
Granite and across the bridge. 

Use gongs freely to clear streets and when nearing crossings 

Engineers of steamers will not run over eighty (80) pounds of water 
pressure, execept when orders are received from a member of the board 
of engineers or the otficer,in command of the company. 

Captains or ofiiceis commanding companies will see that the rules and 
regulations of this Department are adhered to; to report any inattention 
to duty or failure to comply with the rules, or any disobedience of 
orders and upon return from alarms will report to headquarters immedi- 
ately, personally or by telephone, after apparatus is "made up" and 
ready for duty. 



38G ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

THIIIB ALARM. 

On thikd alarm all apparatiis will respond. 

GENERAL, ALARM. 

In the event of a fire of such magnitude that second and third alarms 
are needed, a general alarm will be given by striking ten blows, in which 
case all companies will respond. 

special calls on fire alarm. 

When more apparatus is wanted, without giving second and third 
alarm the following specials calls will be given: 

2—1 for Engine 1. 1—1—1 for Aerial Truck. 

2—2 for Engine 2. 3—3 for Truck 3. 

2—3 for Engine 3. 3—5 for Truck 5. 

2—4 for Engine 4. 3—6 for Truck 6. 

2^-5 for Engine 5. 4 — 1 for Hose 1. 

2—6 for Engine 6. 4—2 for Hose 2. 
4 — 3 for Hose 3. 

Companies answering "special calls" will wait thirty seconds before 
leaving quarters, to prevent mistakes. 

OITT OF TOWN CALL. 

For a fire out of the city or brush fire 2 — 2 — 2, all companies will as- 
semble at their respective quarters and await orders. 

ALL OUT signal. 

Two blows on the bells, which dismisses all members at company 
quarters. 

The signal will be given after companies working at a fire have returned 
to quarters, "made up," and are ready to respond to another alarm. 

TEST signal. 
One blow at 12.30 noon. 

SCHOOL SIGNALS. 

1 — 1^ with fifteen seconds between blows, closes primary and middle 
schools. 

2 — 2, with fifteen seconds between the 2's closes all the schools. Time 
for giving same, 7.30 A. m., 11.20 A. m., or 1.15 p. m. 

MILITARY CALL. 

12 blows twice. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 387 

Rules for Exercisingf Horses* 

It shall be tlie duty of tlie drivers of engines, hose carriages, hose 
wagons, hook-and-ladder trucks, and all other apparatus connected with 
this department, to exercise the horses every day, weather permitting, 
except Sunday, with the exception of engines having "first" and "second 
runs," and in such cases must exercise on days of "second run," the 
same to be done within the following limits: 

CENTRAL STATION. 

North to Pearl street. East to Union street. 

South to Merrimack street. West to Chestnut street. 

NOKTH MAIN-STREET STATION. 

North to Adams street. East to Main street. 

South to Granite street. West to Dubuque street. 

LAKE AVENUE STATION. 

North to Manchester street. East to Belmont street. 

South to Summer street. West to Maple street. 

MAPLE-STREET STATION. 

North to Myrtle street. East to Linden street. 

South to Hanover street. West to Union steeet. 

WEBSTER-STREET STATION. 

North to Clarke street. East to Union street. 

South to Pennacook street. West to Elm street. 

KIMMON-STREET STATION (mCGREGORVILLE). 

North to Kelly street. East to Beauport street. 

South to Wayne street. West to Eimmou street. 

BAKERSVILLE STATION. 

North to bridge, over Boston & Maine Railroad. South to Baker street. 
East to Calef road. West to Brown avenue. 

Drivers must confine themselves to the above, and in no case take their 
horses beyond the prescribed limits, except for shoeing and in case of 
fire, without permission from the chief or assistant engineer. 

In exercising, care must be taken to avoid colliding with other teams. 
In approaching corners, crossings, street car tracks, and in going down 
grades the speed of the horses must be checked. 

In case of an alarm use gong freely while returning to quarters. 

Any driver violating these rules will be liable to suspension or dis- 
charge. 



388 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Stations and Sleeping Rooms. 

All stations of this department will be open from 7 A. m., until 9 p. m., 
and the members at the several stations will receive visitors and citizens 
courteously, answer all questions in a gentlemanly manner, and give any 
proper attention. 

No political or religous discussions will be allowed in any of the houses 
of this department or by the officers or men when on duty. 

No permanent member of the department shall attend a caucus or 
political convention as delegate, distribute tickets at any election, or take 
any part whatever in political matters other than to exercise his right of 
suffrage. 

Gambling of any kind shall not be permitted in or about any of the 
houses or premises occupied by the department. 

Stations to be closed at 10 o'clock p. m. 

All games must cease at 10 p. m., and the stations be closed at that 
hour, to permit the permanent men, and those detailed to sleep in the 
station, to retire undisturbed. 

None of the stations will be open after the above hour (except in case 
of an alarm of fire) without permission of the chief or a member of the 
board of engineers, although stations may be kept open on Saturday 
evening iintil 11 o'clock. 

No spirituous or malt lipuors shall be allowed in or about any of the fire 
stations, and any member of the fire department seen intoxicated at any 
fire or alarm of fire, or who shall be known to frequent places where 
liquors are sold, during the progress of a fire, or whenever in uniform, 
shall be subject to reprimand, or dismissal, as the board of engineers may 
determine. 

Any permanent member visiting any liquor saloon in uniform, except in 
the performance of his duty as a member of the fiie department, or who 
is intoxicated or visits places Avhere intoxicating liquors are sold, while on 
duty, shall be suspended or discharged, as the board of engineers may 
determine. 

Any violation of these rules will subject the oflender to reprimand or 
dismissal, and commanding officers of companies having knowledge of the 
violation of the foregoing rules will suspend the offender, and report the 
same to the chief or board of enginers. 

The permanent men shall exercise a careful supervision over the 
sleeping apartments, see that the rooms are put in order and the beds made 
as early as 11 o'clock a. ivr., and that the beddingr is changed at suitable 
intervals. The occupants of each bed will be held responsible for the 
cleanliness of the same, and held strictly accountable for any damage to 
either bed or bed clothing through carelessness. xVfter 10 p. m. occupants 
shall refrain from loud talking or in any manner disturbing the rest of any 
"who have retired. 

Any member of the department not complying with the above rules shall 
be liable to suspension or expulsion from the department. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



389 



Absent from City or Station. 

No permanent member shall leave his station to visit any section of 
the city without permission of the chief or an assistant engineer, or 
leave the city, or be granted leave of absence, without notifying the chief 
engineer and procuring a substitute to his acceptance, and the substi- 
tute shall be on duty before the applicant leaves his post, except on his 
regular " days off." 

Any call member expecting to be absent from the city shall notify the captain 
of his company, and before leaving the city shall procure a substitute satisfactory 
to said captain. 

Substitutes running for and answering the names of any call man 
shall be entitled to the same pay, pro rata, as the call man for whom they 
answer for the time they substitute, and the clerks of the several com- 
panies shall keep said substitutes' time and notify .the regular call man 
of the amount due from him and pay said amount to the substitute per- 
forming said service. 

Any member of the department not complying to the above rules shall 
be liable to suspension or expulsion from the department. 

DAYS OFF 



ca 



Company. 



Hall 

Harvey 

Barker 

Parsons* .... 

Gould 

Cann 

Rogers 

Dyer 

Gage 

Pherson 

Porter 

Richardson 

Walker 

Piper 

Dunbar 

McLeod 

Porter 



Engine 1. 
1. 
1. 
Hose 1. 
Engine 4. 
" 4. 
" 4. 
Truck 1. 
" 1. 
" 1. 
Chemical 1. 
1. 
Engine & Ladder 3. 
3. 
3. 
" " 3. 

3. 



pa 



Company. 



Rowe 

Worthen .. 

Morse 

Smith 

Cann 

Hubbell... 

Morrill 

Denyou 

Whitcomb 

Lane 

Edgar 

Foster 

Tebbets 

Crosby* 

Young* 

Smith* 



Hose 2. 

" 2 
Engine & Ladder 5. 
5. 
5. 

" 5. 



En, 



Eng 



ine 2. 
2. 



ine & Ladder G. 
6. 
6. 



Hose 3. 
" 3. 



* In February, Crosl>y will take the 16th 
take the 14th , and in February, April, June 
the 27th. 



and Young the 26th; in July, Parsons will 
, September, and November, Smith will take 



390 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

The hour of leaving will be 7 o'clock A. m., and members will not leave 
their station until the arrival of the spare driver. They must report 
promptly at 7 o''clock the following morning for duty. 

Those whose breakfast hour is 6 o'clock will remain at station iintil 
7 o'clock on the dates of their "days off." 

Should a fire be in progress at the hour of changes, men will remain on 
duty until the "all out" is given, except permission is obtained of the 
chief, or engineer in charge of fire, to retire. Should a "general" or third 
alarm be rung in while members are in town, they will be expected to 
report for duty. 



Entering; Bwilding with Line of Hose. 

All steamer and hose companies are instructed not to enter any build- 
ing with a line of hose unless the stop nozzle is closed, except in cases 
where they can see the fire, and when their streams will reach it without 
damage to other property, due care being exercised as to whether their 
services are needed. 

Extra care should be exercised by hosemen of steamer companies in 
using "shut-off" nozzels, shutting off to be slowly and gradually. 



List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During J 902 with 
Loss and Insurance. 

Still. Wednesday January 1, 9.30 a. m. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, No. 23 Wayne street, owned by David Labonte, and occupied 
by several families. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 6 responded, but 
could find no tire. 

Still. Wednesday, January 1, 11.15 a. m. Chimney Are in three-ten- 
ement block, No. 488 North Main street owned by Daniel Conner, and oc- 
cupied by three Families. Members of Engine and Ladder, No. 6 responded. 
Used one charge of Pony. 

Box. 15. Wednesday, January 1, 9.57 p. m. Chimney lire in four-story 
wooden tenement block, No, 12 Washington street, owned by Charles C. 
Hayes, and occupied by Elizabeth Foster, and others. Box pulled by cit- 
izen. Companies responding : Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 
1, 5. Used one charge of Pony and part of one Chemical Tank. No 
damage. 

Still. Thursday, January 2, 10.35 a. m. Chimney Are in dwelling- 
house. No. 47 Nashua street, owned by heirs of William H. Smith, and occu- 
pied by Peter Shannon. Members of Hose No. 2 responded. Used two 
charges of Pony, No damage. 

Box. 215, Friday, January 3, 5.22 p. m. Chimney lire in three-story 
wooden building, corner Lincoln and Silver streets, owned and occupied 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 39 L 

by the F. M. Hoyt Co. as an "annex" to their shoe factory. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies respondiug: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose, 2, 3, 
Truck 3. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, January 4, 4.14 p. m. Three-and-half story wooden ten- 
ement block, No. 68 Concord street, owned by heirs of Samuel W. Parsons, 
and occupied by several families. Thawing out water pipes filled the 
house with smoke. No. damage. 

Still. Saturday, January 4, 4.42 p. m. Chimney-flre in two-and-half 
story temement block. No. 353 Pine street, leased by Wm. M. Kendall, and 
occupied by several families. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday January 4, 10.25 p. m. Chimney fire in two-and-half 
story wooden teaeraent block, No. 21 Concord street, owned by Stark mills, 
and occupied by several families. Chemical engine responded. Used one 
tank and three charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, January 9, 2.10. p. m. Three story brick block, No. 

819 Elm street, owned by Roger G. Sullivan, and occupied by Henr,y J. 

Jennings. Cause, soot in Chimney. Used one charge of Pony. No 

damage. 

Box 81. Tuesday, January"14, 8.45 p. M. j ..,, .„, , „ *i,- i , 

Box 83. T-iesday, January 14, 9.05 p. m. } ^'^^ telephone for third alarm. 

The '■•Kennard," a six-story stone and brick building, 922-1020 Elm street,, 
owned by Mead, Mason & Company, and occupied by banks, stores and 
offices. This fire was discovered in the north-west corner of the building 
on Water street, by its bursting through a window in the clothing store 
of Allen & Kimball. The second alarm followed the first in seven min- 
utes, and balance of department called by telephone. Assistance was also 
telephoned for from Concord and Nashua, both cities sending delegations 
of men and apparatus. The re-call sounded Friday the 17, at 3.58 p. m., 
sixty-seven (67 ) hours from first alarm. 

The Kennard. Smyth's Block. 

Value of buildings $213,750 $20,000 

Damage 193,750 8,000 

Insurance 127,000 8,000 

Insurance paid 127,600 ..... 8,000 

Plate glass windows on opposite side of street. Value $1,500, damage 
$1,500, insurance $1,500, insurance paid $1,500. 

The Kennard. Smyth's Block. 

Value of contents $178,547 $5,000 

Damage 151,197 4,310 

Insurance 51,975 3,400 

Insurance paid 51,600 1,810 

Box 82. Wednesday, January 15, 9.08 a. m. Ash barrel in shed, rear 
of 61 Spring street, owned by the Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. No. 
damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 
4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 3, Trucks 1, 5. 



392 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Saturday, January 18, 12.08 a. m. Ruins of the Kennard started 
up. Hose Company 1 responded. Laid 300 feet of liose. On duty six 
hours. 

Still. Sunday, January 19, 7.30 a. m. Chimney fire in Smyth's Block, 
1032 Elm street, owned by heirs of Smyth & Williams. Used three 
charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, January 19, 1.30 p. m. Ruins of The Kennard started up. 
Hose Company 1 responded. Laid 300 feet of hose. On duty one hour. 

Still. Tuesday, January 21, 8.05 p. m. Chimney fire in Blodgett block, 
corner of Elm and Cedar streets, owned by Blodgett heirs, and occupied 
by ten families. IS^o damage. 

Box 71. Friday, January 24, 11.25 A. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
dwelling, 143 Cedar street, owned and occupied by John Healey. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 
1, Truck 3. No damage. 

Box 313. Saturday, January 25, 11.23 p.m. Two and a half story 
house with barn connected, 3 Monmouth street, corner North Main street, 
owned by W. E. Eagan and occupied by him and Misses Hannah and 
Catherine Shea, and the barn was occupied by Felix Breault. Fire started 
in the barn and gained considerable headway before the alarm was given, 
Breault first noticing it and notifying Officer Sweeney, who pulled the 
box. Comi^auies responding: Engines 2, 4, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. 
Yalue of building §3,000, damage $1,000, insurance, $2,600, insurance 
paid $967. 

Eagan. 

Value of contents .... .$500 . . 

Damage 207 . . 

Insurance 300 . . 

Insurance paid 207 . . 

Still. Sunday, January 26, 5.15 p. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
dwelling 610 Union street, owned and occupied by David H. Young. 
Chemical Engine responded. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, January 30, 12 m. Grass fire on North River Road 
owned and occupied by George Hall. Cause, sparks from locomotive on 
Boston & Maine Railroad. Members of Engine & Ladder Company 5 
responded. Used one charge of Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, February 5, 9.34 a. m. Two-story cottage at 267 
Lowell street, owned by William Moul of Martin's Ferry and occupied by 
John Akbled. Cause, defective chimney. Hose Companies No. 1 and 2 
responded. Used one charge of Pony and 150 feet of hose from hydrant. 
Value of building, $1,600, damage $125, insurance $1,000; insurance paid, 
$100. No damage to contents. 

Box 5. Saturday, February 8, 6.18 A. M. Four-story brick block, cor- 
ner Elm and Merrimack streets, owned by Dr. J. F. Brown, and Straw heirs, 
and occupied by Geo. W. O. Tebbetts as drug stores. Cause, spontaneous 



Shea. 


Breault. 


$600 . . 


. . $500 


150 . . 


. . 60 


None . . 


. . 300 


u 


. . 50 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER, 303 

combustion. Damage slight. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing : Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Sunday, February 9, 6.02 p. m, Chimney fire in four-tenement 
■wooden block, No. 202 Douglas street, owned by heirs of Edward Wyman, 
and occupied by several families. Members of Engine and Ladder com- 
panies No. 2 responded. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box 17. Monday, February 10, 4.55 a. m. Cottage house No. 10 Nashua 
street, owned by "William Corey and occupied by J. W. Robinson. Cause, 
breaking of a kerosene lamp. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond 
ing: Engines 1, 8, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. Va'ue of building $750; 
damage $18.75, insurance -$500, insurance paid $18.75. No damage to con- 
tents. 

Box 8. Tuesday, February 11, 3.50 a. m. Three-story brick block. No. 
14 Hollis street, owned ijy Willian F. Hubbard, and occupied by several 
families. The fire originated in the cellar under an unoccupied tenement, 
and was confined wholly to the basement. Cause unknown. Box pulled 
by Oftlcer James F. Dunn. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chem- 
ical, Hose I, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building $12,000; damage, $900; in- 
surance $2,500 ; insurance paid, $900. No damage to contents. 

Still. Tuesday, February 11, 5.55 p. m. Two-and-half story house 
21 Jane street, owned by William H. Hurd and occupied by George H. 
Nutting. Cause, roaring fire in stove. Members of Hose Company No. 
2 responded. 

Still. Tuesday, February 11, 5,15 p. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
wooden tenement block. No. 47 Church street owned by Tom W- Robin- 
son, and occupied by several families. Used two charges of Pony. No 
damage. 

Still. Tuesday, February 11, 8.50 r. m. Dwelling house at corner of 
Linden and Orange streets, owned by Mrs. Cora L. Brookbouse and occu- 
pied by George P. Wallace. Chemical Engine responded. No services 
required. 

Still. Wednesday, February 12, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement block, 44 McGregor street, owned by Spence & Leggett, and 
occupied by nine families. Meiubers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 
6 responded. Used two charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 4. Thursday, February 13, 1.33 A. m. Three-story wooden block 
55 Spruce street, owned by James Lightbody, and occupied by George 
Haskell and others. Fire originated in a storeroom on second floor occu- 
pied by Haskell. Cause, hot ashes in a wooden tub. Box pulled by 
John Broderick. Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 
1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building $3,600, damage $50. No insurance. 
No damage to contents. 

Still. Thursday, February 13, 6.30 p. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden block, 14 Cedar street, owned by Blodgett heirs, and occupied by 
Joseph Hart and others. Chemical Engine responded. Used one charge 
of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, February 16, 7.30 a. m. Chimney fire in cottage house 
at 169 Laurel street, owned by estate of Clark M. Bailey, and occupied 



394 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

by Arthur Graham. Used one charge ef Pony. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, February 19, 4.40 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling 
house, 162 Douglas street, owned by William McElroy, and occupied by 
Mrs. F. LaFrancois. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 2 
respoaded. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, February 23, 6.35 p. m. Chimney fire in two-tenement 
house, 220 Pine street, owned by James Marden, and occupied by A. 
Healy and Simeon Wadeau. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, February 23, 9.25 p. m. Chimney fire in two-tenement 
block, 4 Monmouth street, owned by G. A Sackett, and occupied by two 
families. Members of Engine & Ladder Company No. 6 responded. 
Used two charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 45. Friday, February 28, 6.11 p. m. Boiler room of the Forsaith 
Machine Company's works. Shavings in the ''well" caused from spark 
from boiler. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Wednesday, March 5, 9.30 A. m. Telephone call for a chimney 
fire in three-story wooden block at 197 Manchester street owned by Mrs. 
H. C. Joy, and occupied by several families. No services required. 

Box 51. Wednesday, March 5, 4.27 p. m. Cottage house, 94 Fourth 
street, owned by Elizabeth Noon, and occupied by John Haley. Fire 
started in woodbox in rear of stove. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Eligines 2, 6, Chemical, Truck 6. Yalue of building $2,000, 
damage $40, no insurance. No damage to contents. 

Still. Friday, March 7, 10.15 A. M. Chimney fire in brick block, 548 
Elm street, owned by Blodgett heirs, and occupied by W. F. Glancy as 
bottling works. Chemical Engine responded. 

Still. Wednesday, March 12, 10.38 A. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
tenement building, 96 Bridge street, owned by Freeman Higgins, and 
occupied by G. Dupont. Ignited woodwork around the chimney, doing 
slight damage. Chemical Engine responded. Used one charge of Pony. 
Yalue of building $5,000, damage $10, insurance $2,500, insurance paid 
$6. No damage to contents. 

Still. Wednesday, March 12, 5.35 p. m. A short circuit on private 
alarm from Piimmon Shoe Shop, occupied by H. B. Eeed & Co. Caused 
false alarm to which Engine & Ladder Company i^No. 6 responded with 
apparatus. 

Box 7. Monday, March 17, 7- 18 p. m. A kerosene lamp exploded in 
two-story tenement house, rear of 135 Manchester street, owned by Mrs. 
H. C. Joy. and occupied by Pierre Lefebvre. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines, 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. No 
damage. 

Box 82, MonRay, March 17, 11.28 p. m. Four-story brick block, 14 
Birch street, owned by E. S. Whitney, A. B. Merrill and M. Godfrey, and 
occupied by New England Telephone and Telegraph Co., as stockroom, 
and by several families. The fire originated in the basement and was 
wholly confined there. Box pulled by Officer John T. Nixon. Companies 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 395 

responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of 
building §10,000, damage $150, insurance |$7,500, insurance paid $150. 
Value of contents $1,500, damage $33.88, no insurance. 

Still. Sunday, March 23, 1.30 p. m. Grass fire in Amoskeag Manufac- 
turing Co.'s field on McGregor street opposite the residence of W. K. 
Eobbins. Detail of men from Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 re- 
sponded. 

Still. Sunday, March 23, 5 p. M. Grass fire on land owned by Amos- 
keag Manufacturing Co. south of Rock Rimmon, near city stone crusher. 
Caused by boys. Detail of men from Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 
responded. 

Still. Tuesday, March 25, 9.15 A. m. Four-story wooden building, 
owned by Rimmon Shoe Co., and occupied by H. B. Reed & Co. Cause, 
explosion of a naptha tank. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 
No. 6 responded. Extinguished by automatic sprinklers before the de- 
l^artment arrived. 

Still. Tuesday, March 25, 5.15 p. m. A shed used as store-room on 

Stevens street, owned by Bean. Cause, boys playing with matches* 

Hose Company No. 3 responded. Used 1 charge of Pony. 

Still. Wednesday, March 26. 4 15 p. m". Brush and grass fire on 
Hevey and Wayne streets, on land owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 
Cause unknown. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 re- 
sponded with hose carriage. Laid 350 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Tuesday, April 1, 2.30 p. m. Grass fire. South Elm street, west 
of chapel, on land owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. Caused by 
boys. Hose Company No. 3 responded. 

Still. Tuesday, April 1, 3.25 p.m. Slight fire in partition of house of 
Thomas F. Lannagan, 24 Auburn street. Chemical Engine responded. 

Still. Wednesday, April 2, 11.46 A. m. Dwelling house, 534 Granite 
street, owned by Mrs. E. B. Hull of Bedford, and occupied by William 
Arnold. House was filled with smoke, caused by poor draft of chimney. 
Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded. 

Still. Sunday, April 6, 2.30 p. m. Brush fire on Beech street near 
Webster. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded with 
hose carriage. 

Box 315. Wednesday, April 9, 8.44 A. m. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 476 Front street, owned by the Maxwell Ice Co. Box pulled by 
citizen. Fire extinguished before arrival of the Department. Comj^anies 
responding: Engines 5, 6, Chemical, Independent Hose No. 5, Ti'uck 5. 

Box 312. Friday, April 11, 5.25 A. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
block, rear of 21 Wayne street. Needless alarm. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Tuesday, April 15, 7.13 p. m. Chimney fire in two and a half 
story wooden block, corner Pearl and Chestnut streets, owned by estate 
of A. G. Dole. Used 1 charge of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, April 15, 7.30 p. m. Awning over store of Otis Bar- 
ton & Co., 853 Elm street. Chemical Engine responded. 



396 ANNUAL OFFICIAL R EPORTS. 

Still. Wednesday, April 16, 6.02 p. m. Two-story wooden building 
1205 Elm street, owned by E. L. Kimball and occupied by W. E. William- 
as a laundry. Slight Are on roof, caused by sparks from chimney ignit- 
ing shingles. Chemical Engine resjionded No damage. 

Still. Thursday, April 17, 11. 4.5 A. m. Grass fire on land of Amos, 
keag Manufacturing Co., South Elm street, west^ of Bakersville chapel. 
Set by boys. Hose Company No. 3 responded. No damage. 

2 — 2 — 2. Thursday, April 17, 1.52 p. m. Brush Are on wood land, south 
of Pine Grove Cemetery, nearly down to Goffe's Falls. Detail from 
different companies responded. Extinguished before arrival from Central 
Station. 

Still. Thursday, April 17, 2.58 p. m. Immediately after the return 
from foregoing tire, telephone message received of brush lire on laud of 
Perry H. Dow, about three miles out, on West side river road to Hooksett. 
Detail of men from Central Station responded. Returned at 6.40 p. m. 

Box 82. Thursday, April 17. 8.32 p. m. Ash-shute attached to the three- 
story brick block, rear of 1054-lOGO Elm street, owned by heirs of A. B. 
Story. Cause, hot ashes. Damage slight. Extinguished by Chemical 
Engine. Box pulled by Amos Gouin. Companies responding : Engines 1, 
4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

2 — 2—2. Saturday, April 19, 11.33 a. m. Grass and brush Are on Mam- 
moth Road, near Junction of the Weston Road. Detail from department 
responded. Extinguished without assistance of members of department. 

BoxllS. Monday, April21, 2.56 p. M. Dwelling house 621 Maple street, 
owned and occupied by Edward Wagner. Cause, plumber's torch melting 
off solder around coving. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding : 
Engines 4, 5 Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 5. Value of buildings §9,000; 
damage -$60, insurance §5,000, insurance paid -$60. No damage to con- 
tents. 

Box513. Monday, April 21, 11.17 P. M. Ahenhouseat 72 Bismark street, 
owned by John Dexter. Cause, lamp in incubator. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Truck 6. Loss $75, no in- 
surance. 

Still. Wednesday, April 23, 7.45 a, m. Chimney fire in two tenement 
house 322 Cartier street, owned by Gregory Koehler. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Co. No. 6 respo,nded. Used 2 charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 261. Wednesday, April 23, 9.09 p. m. False alarm pulled by some 
malicious person. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
2, Truck 3. 

Still. Saturday, April 26, 6.20 a. m. Some wood shavings in rear of 
405 Elm street, owned by Head & Dowst Co., and occupied by several 
firms. Cause, lime slacking. No damage. 

Still. Monday, April 28, 5.48 p. m. Brush fire on the Huse road, in 
woods owned by Isaac Huse. Delegation of 20 men from different com- 
panies responded. No damage. 

Still. Monday, April 28, 7.38 p. m. Chimney fire in two and half- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 397 

story brick block, 28 Arkwiight street, owned by Amoskeag Manufactur- 
ing Co. No damage. 

Box 215. Thursday, May 1, 3.17 P. m. Barn, connected with cottage 
house, 125 Belmont street, owned by J. K. Mitchell, and occupied by 
Louis B. Melvin. The lire originated in the barn chamber, and was con- 
lined wholly to that -building. Cause, boys with matches. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, 
Truck 3. Value of building, $150, damage, $90, no insurance. Value of 
contents |50, damage -foO, insurance paid 150. 

Stili.. Saturday, May 3, 3, 1.05 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling house, 
52 Rimmon street, owned and occupied by Jeremiah Connor. Members 
of Engine Company No. 2 responded with hose wagon. Used 1 charge of 
Pony. No damage. 

Stili.. Sunday, May 4, 11.37 A. m. Brush fire on Smyth road. De- 
tail of men from Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. Used 1 
charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, May 8, 9.05 p. m. Brush fire near corner of Cilley 
Road and Jewett street. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 
responded with hose carriage. No services required. 

Still. Saturday, May 10, 8.40 a. m. Cottage house, 462 Lake avenue, 
owned and occupied by Charles P. Chapman. Cause, soot in chimney. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No 3 responded. Used 1 
charge of Pony. 

Box 314. Monday, May 12, 9.39 A. m. Slight fire on roof of Amoskeag 
Bridge, caused by sparks from Locomotive of Boston it Maine railroad. 
Extinguished by Pony. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 5, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Damage slight. 

Box 45. Monday, May 12, 11.11 a. m. Four-story brick building, cor- 
ner Auburn and Canal streets owned by Gordon Woodbury and occupied 
by several firms. Cause, sparks from chimney blowing back into well 
for shavings. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Monday, May 12, 5.25 p. m. Small fire on roof in rear of 60 
Merrimack street. No damage. Chemical Engine responded. 

Box. 3. Tuesday, May 13, 7.37 a. m. Slight fire on roof of coal shed 
of Manchester Locomotive Works, corner Elm and Valley streets. Cause, 
sparks from locomotive of Boston S: Maine Railroad. Damage slight. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hosel, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 45. Tuesday, May 13, 5.10 p. m. Four-story brick building, cor- 
ner of Auburn and Canal streets, owned by Gordon Woodbury, and occu- 
pied by sundry firms. The fire was in the water tank tower on top of 
building, and caught from sparks from the boiler-room chimney con- 
nected with the works. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building 
$25,000, damage .fl50, insurance |20,000 (blanket policy), insurance paid 
$136,75. No damage to contents. 



398 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 8. Wednesday, May 14, 3.46, p. m. Four-story brick block, 1168 
Elm street, owned by Orrin E. Kimball, and occupied as Roll Skin Manu- 
factory. Cause unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building 
$20,000, damage $340, insurance $5000, insurance paid ^340. Value of 
contents $20,000, damage 1186.90, insurance $19,500, insurance paid 
$186.90. Extinguished by Chemical Engine. 

Box 72. Thursday, May 15, 1.32 a. m. Two-story house, 287 Lake 
avenue, owned by Mrs. Gideon Laville, and occupied by Richard J. 
Brickley and John Sullivan. Slight fire in basket of wood in cellar, 
started from some unknown cause. No damage. Box' pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. 

Still. Thursday, May 15, 11.30 A. m. Brush Are on Mammoth road. 
Responded to by delegation from Engine and Ladder Company No. 5. 
Used 4 charges Pony. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, May 15, 10.45 p. m. Three-story brick building, 
984 Elm street, owned by Kimball heirs and occupied by Daniel A. 
Gallagher as cigar store. Cause, gas jet. No damage. Chemical re- 
ponded. No services required. 

Still. Saturday, May 17, 6.05 a. m. Two-story wooden building, 
1205 Elm street, owned by E. L. Kimball, and occupied by Derryfield 
Steam laundry. Slight fire on roof. Chemical Engine responded. Used 

1 tank. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, May 17, 6.20 a. m. Four-story brick building, corner 
Auburn and Canal streets, owned by Gordon Woodbury, and occupied by 
sundry firms. Cause, sparks from chimney, igniting shavings in boiler 
room. Hose Company No. 1 responded. 

Still. Saturday, May 17, 7.15 A. m. Derryfield Steam Laundry. 
Slight fire on roof. Chemical Engine responded. Used 1 tank. 

Box 24. Saturday, May 17, 8 A. m. Cottage house, 496 Hall street, 
(while undergoing repairs). Cause unknown. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value of 
building $2,000, damage $139.50, insurance $1,500, insurance paid $139. 50. 
No damage to contents. 

Still. Saturday, May 17. 3.40 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
George S. Eastman on the Mast Road. Members of Engine Company No. 

2 responded with hose wagon. Laid 350 feet of hose from hydrant. 
Still. Sunday, May 18, 11.30 A. m. Brush fire on land owned by A. 

G. Gray on Calef road. Members of Hose Company No. 3 responded with 
wagon. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, May 18, 1.15 p. m. Brush fire on north Union street. 
Detail from Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. Used 5 charges 
of Pony. 

2-2-2. Sunday, May 18, 2.50 p. m. Brush fire in Lovell's grove, Massa- 
besic lake. Detail of men responded. Under control on their arrival. 

Still. Sunday, May 18, 4..30 p. m. Brush fire on Dunbarton road, on 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 399 

land owned by Maxwell, Boclair and Holbrook. Detail from Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 6, responded. On duty, 7 hours and 50 minutes. 

2-2-2. Sunday, May 18, 8.20 p. m. Sent delegation from Central 
station to assist at the above mentioned fire on Dunbarton road. 

2-2-2. Monday, May 19, 11.05 A. m. Brush fire on Dunbarton road. 
Responded to by delegation from Central station, and Engine and Ladder 
Companies 5, 6. 

Still. Friday May 23, 9.02 A. m. Slight fire on shingles of Derryfield 
laundry, 1205 Elm street. Chemical Engine responded. No damage. 

Still. Friday, May 23, 10.06 A. m. Brush fire on land of Perry H. 
Dow on River road. Delegation from Central station and Engine and 
Tiadder Company No. 5 responded. 

Box 8. Friday, May 23, 6.42 p. M. Three-story wooden block 1227 
Elm street, owned by Ramsey, Bailey & Drury, and occupied by Assad 
M. Baroody for the manufacture and sale of confectionery. Cause, boil- 
ing over of candy kettle. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical. Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building 
■$15,000, damage $100, insurance |5,000, insurance paid $100. Value of 
contents $1,000, damage $268, insurance $600, insurance paid $268. 

Still. Satu.rday, May 24, 7.20 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
58 Winter street, owned by James Leach of Bedford, and occupied by 
several families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded. Used 
2 charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 4. Sunday, May 25, 10.28 p. m. Three-story tenement block, 240 
Chestnut street, owned by heirs of Dr. Thomas "Wheat. Cause, breaking 
of kerosene lamp. No damage to building. Fire extinguished before 
arrival of department. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Mrs. Sophia Rogella 
slightly burned about neck and forehead. 

- Still. Wednesday, May 28, 1.40 p. m. Chimney fire in two-tenement 
wooden building, 382 North Main street, owned by Thomas Bolton, and 
occupied by Mrs. Mary Nolan. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 
No. 6 responded. Used two charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, May 28, 2.45 p. m. The foregoing fire ignited 
woodwork in partition, causing slight damage. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 6 -responded. Used two charges of Pony. 

Box 52. Saturday, May 31, 8.23 A. m. Two and a half-story double 
tenement house 26 North Main street, owned by Frank P. Johnson and 
occupied by Joseph Larime Cause, probably a smoker's pipe in clothing. 
Damage slight. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building $1,800, damage $20, 
insurance $600, insurance paid $20. Value of contents $150, damage 
$8.00. No insurance. 

Still. Saturday, May 31, 2.15 p. m. Three and a half-story brick 
block, 83 Hanover street, owned by I. O. O. F. and occupied by them and 
others. Explosion of gasoline caused slight damage. Chemical Engine 
responded. Services not required. 



400 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Tuesday, June 3, 9. .30 a. m. Two and a half story dwelling 232 
Lake avenue, owned and occupied by Richard J. Barry. Cause, explosion 
of gas from stove. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 
responded with hose carriage. Services not required. 

Box 4. Thursday, June 5, 8.31 p. m. Two and a half story tenement 
block, 77 Lake avenue, owned by William Plumer estate, and occupied 
by Martin Psaybyla as a Polish boarding house. Cause, breaking of a 
kerosene lamp in a room in second story. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1,3. 
Value of building -SljgOO, damage $416.50, insurance $800, insurance paid 
$416.50. Value of contents $600, damage $100, no insurance. 

Box 4. Tuesday, June 10, 9.02 A. m. Barn in rear of 558-562 Elm 
street, owned by B. W. and W. C. Blodgett and occupied by C. E. Xew- 
comb. Cause, hot ashes carelessly dumped from tenement adjoining. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Extinguished with pails of water, with little 
damage. 

Still. Friday, June 13, 8.05 p. m. Chimney fire in brick tenement 
block, 13 Boyden street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., and 
occupied by James Barry. Chemical engine responded. Used one charge 
of Pony. 

Box 4. Wednesday, June 18, 1.51 p. m. Small barn in rear of 54 
Cedar street, owned by Patrick Harrington, and occupied by Peter Beau- 
champ. Cause, children playing with matches. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of building $150, damage $80, insurance $100, insurance paid §80. 
Value of contents .S25, damage $5, no insurance. 

Box 82. Tuesday, June 24, 8.22 p. M, Four-stoiy brick block, 480 
Chestnut street, owned by Alonzo H. Weston, and occupied by several 
families. The breaking of a kerosene lamp in tenement of Cunningham 
sisters, caused the alarm. Fiie extinguished by occupants. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 5. No damage. 

Still. Friday, Jnne 27, 11.10 a. m. Two-stor}' wooden building, corner 
Amherst and Pine streets, owned by Rt. Rev. Bishop D. M. Bradley, 
and used by the Sacred-Heart Hospital as laundry. Cause unknown. 
Chemical engine responded. Value of buildings, $2,500 ; damage, $12.41 ; 
insurance $1,700; insurance paid $12.41. 

Still. Sunday, June 29, 9.10 a. m. Four-story brick block 4 Dean 
avenue, owned by heirs of W. S. James, and occupied by J. Arthur 
Williams, as printing office. Chemical engine responded. No services re- 
quired. 

Box 4. Tuesday, July 1, 3.39 p. m. Three-story wooden tenement block, 
70-72 Spruce street, owned by Wm. G. Cotter, and occupied by John F. 
Larkin, as a plumber's shop, and several families to wit: William G. Cotter, 
Andrew Mantres, Bridget Linnehan, Mary Sullivan. The Are originated in 
the plumber's shop, caused by a naptha ''blow stove." Box pulled by 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 40 L 

citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, Cbemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Trucks 1,3. Value of building $3,090, damage $1,156, insurance $3,000, 
insurance paid $1,155. Value of contents $500, damage $301, insurance, 
$500; insurance paid $301. 

Box 323. Friday, July 4, 5.23 p. m. A small hen house in rear of 386 
Bartlett street, owned by Leonard Greuier, and occupied by Harrie Bouclie*. 
Cause, lire crackers. Box pulled by Deslitt Pacjuette. Comp-uiies re- 
sponding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck G. Value of building 
$40, damage $10, no insurance. No damage to contents. 

Box 81. Monday, July 7, 3.17 P. M. Three two-and-a-half-story houses, 
120, 122 and 124 Concord street, owned by Mrs. John D. Bean, Mrs. Ellen 
Kerrins and Mrs. Nellie Kelleher. The Bean house was occupied by L. C. 
Fitzpatrick, Fred. Legrasse, Theo. Isabell and James Welch; the Kerrins 
house by Margaret Hixon and Axerd Doucette ; the Kelleher house by Gedeon 
Marracette and Edmund Hamlin. The tire originated in a quadrangular 
court in rear of all three buildings, from some unknown cause, and gained 
much headway before being discovered. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. Value of 
Bean's building $3,500, damage $1,487.75, insurance $2,500, insurance 
paid $1,487.75. VaUie of Kerrins's building $3,000, damage $300, no in- 
surance. Value of Kelleher heirs building $3,000, damage $17.50, insu- 
rance $2,000. 

Still. Friday, July 11, 12.05 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement block, 
19 Clinton street, owned by George S. Eastman and occupied by several 
families. Responded to by members of Engine No. 2 with hose carriage. 
Used 1 charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box 71. Saturday, July 12, 11.32 A. >r. False alarm. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. 

Still, Sunday, July 13, 7 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement block, T 
Laurel avenue, owned by Mrs. McAllister. Chemical Engine responded 
No damage. 

Box 31. Sunday July 13, 9 13 p. m. Three-story dwelling house, 34 
Concord street owned by John Mahaney, and occupied by Henri Ber- 
thiaume as boarding house. Cause, breaking of kerosene lamp. Box 
pulled by C. F. Kemp. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Truck 1. Damage to contents $600, no insurance. 

Still Monday, July 14, 11.22 p. m. During a severe thunder storm, 
the electric light transformer at residene of E. M. Slayton, 1602 Elm 
street, caught fire from the lightning. Chemical Engine responded. 
Services not required. 

Box 261. Tuesday, July 15, 6.02 p. ji. Two-story dwelling house, 356 
Orange street, owned by Eliza A. Turner of Candia, and occupied by Mrs. 
Fannie Spencer. Cause, kerosene stove. Mrs. Spencer was slightly 
burned about the head and neck. Box pulled by Joseph Durgin. Com- 
panies respondiug: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value 
of building $2,500, damage $138, insurance $2,000, insurance paid «138. 
Value of contents $500, damage 15, no insurance. 



402 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Tuesday, July 22, 1.23 p. m. Two and half-story wooden house 
owned by Mary A. Willis, and occupied by Patrick Hickey. Cause, 
burning chimney. Used 1 charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, July 27, 9.10 r. m. Four-story brick "Upton" block 
©wned by Manchester Savings Bank, and occupied by sundry persons. 
The fire originated from some unknown cause, in Room 2 on second floor, 
occupied by Philip F. Ouimettc. Chemical Engine responded. Yalue of 
building §30,000, damage S18, insurance §30,000, insurance paid -i^lS. 
Yalue of contents (room 2) $500, damage -$48.85, insurance 8400, insurance 
paid S48.85. 

Still. Saturday, August 2, 5.30 p. m. Brick foundry, on South Elm 
street, owned and occupied by American Locomotive Co. Cause, sparks 
on roof. Members of Hose Company Xo. 3 with carriage responded. 
Used 1 charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box 323. Wednesday, August 6, 12.04 A. m. Barn in rear of cottage 
bouse, 473 Bartlett street, owned and occupied by Napoleon Normand. 
Cause, unknown. Fire first discovered in hay-loft by Normand who 
pulled the box. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Truck 6. Value of building $3,000, damage $800, insurance $1,900, insur- 
ance paid ^800. Yalue of contents 12,300, damage 1725, insurance §1,475, 
insurance paid $725. 

Still. Thursday, August 7, 6.45 p. m. Tenement house, 127 Amherst 
street, owned by L. W. Sanborn, and occupied by John Seiner, Cause, 
rags in a closet from some unknown cause. Chemical Engine responded. 
Extinguished before their arrival. 

Still. Friday, August 8, 8.45 p. m. An oak tree and fence post on 
North River road on railroad bank, set fire by boys. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. Used 1 charge of Pony. 

Still. Sunday, August 10, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement block. 
88 Pearl street, owned by estate of David H. Young, and occupied by 
W. Smith. and others. Chemical Engine responded. No damage. 

Box 313. Tuesday, August 12, 8.55 p. m. Three and half-story wooden 
block, 485 North Main street, owned by estate of E. W. Sargent' and oc- 
cupied by H. Desrosciers and others. Cause, unknown. Fire was con- 
fined to a worthless couch in an unoccupied attic. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. No 
damage. Extinguished with Pony. 

Still. Sunday, Aug 17, 7.30 a. m. Sparks from furnace on roof of 
Iron Foundry of American Locomotive Company, at corner of Elm and 
Yalley streets. Members of Hose Company No. 3 responded with hose 
wagon. Used 1 charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Monday, August IS, 10.55 A. m. Ash box in rear of and attached 
to Well's Block, 1054-1068 Elm street, Chemical Engine responded. No 
damage. 

Still. Saturday, August 23, 6.55 p. m. Chimney fii-e in dwelling 
house, 53 Winter street, owned and occupied by Henry J. Hatch. Mem. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 403 

bers of Engine Couipuny Co. 2 responded. Used 1 cliarge of Tony. 
Ko damage. 

Still. Tuesday, August 26, 12.10 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, corner Spruce and Union street, owned by P. S. Conway, and occu- 
pied by H-. McDonough. Hose wagon of Engine and Ladder Company 
No. 3 responded. Used 3 charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 71. Monday, September 1, 4.18 p. m. Two and a half story tene- 
ment house at 178 Cedar street, owned by Patrick Kean and occupied by 
B. Cohen. Cause, tipping over kerosene stove. No damage. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engine 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Truck 3. 

Box 1.5. Wednesday, September 3, 6.56 p. m. Cottage house, 92 
Orange street, owned by Miss Abbie Gile, and occupied by Dr. Max S. 
Guggenheim- A couch in the front room upstairs ignited from spark 
from match. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 
4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Extinguished by Chemical 
Engine. Value of building $1,600,, damages $37.56, insurance $1,500, in- 
surance paid $37.56. Value of contents $1,000, damage $125, insurance 
$750, insurance paid $100. 

Still. Friday,^ September 5, 7.05 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 472 Granite street, owned by James F. Wyman, and occupied by 
several families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded. Used 
3 charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, September 13, 7.4<i A. m. An unadjusted Thermostat 
at the Kimmon Shoe Shop, occupied by H. B. Keed & Co., caused a false 
alarm on private line to Engine and Ladder Company No. 6. Members of 
that company responded with hose carriage. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday." September 16, 11.35 A. m. Wooden tenement block, 
56 Concord street, owned by Joseph Quirin and others, and occupied by 
several families. Cause, overheated chimney. No damage. 

Box 4. Wednesday, September 17, 12.50 A. m. Three tenement house. 
100 Lake avenue, owned by Peter J. Giblin, and occupied by him and 
John Currie and A. Albert. Cause, funnel from stove running through 
clothes closet. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building $10,000, 
damage $60, insurance $5,000, insurance paid $60. 

Still. Friday, September 19, 6.30 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
house 379 Manchester street, owned by J. Burgess and occupied by William 
Moore. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. 
Used 1 charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, September 26, 3.25 p. m. Tenement block, 423 Chestnut 
street, owned by heirs of John C Patterson, and occupied by Joseph 
Boisvert and others. Cause, soot in old fireplace. Used 1 charge of 
Ponv. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, September 27, 7.30 p. m. Slight fire in woodshed 
connected with residence of Arthur E. Clarke on North River Eoad. Hose 



404 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

carriage of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 respond-ed. Fire extin- 
guished before its arrival. 

Box 81. Sunday, October 5, 4.66 p. m. Three-story brick block at 986 
Elm street, corner Mechanic, owned by Kimball & Hobbs, and occupied 
(up-stairs where tire originated) by Nellie S. Post. Cause, spontaneous 
combustion of rags in closet. Damage slight. Box pulled by citizen. 
Compariies responding: Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. 

Still. Friday, October 10, 5. .58 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
563 North Main street, owned by Joseph Moreau, and occupied by Lewis 
Dennis. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded with 
hose carriage. Used 2 charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 4. Sunday, October 12, 8.42 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement block, 
525 Elm street, owned by E. M. Slayton, and occupied by Salem Samara and 
others. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding : En- 
gines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 4. Tuesday, October 14, 6.42 p. m. An over-turned lamp in tene- 
ment block, 585 Elm street, owned by Gordon "Woodbury, and occupied by 
several families, caused slight damage to building. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of building $3,000, damage $10, insurance 81,500, insurance paid $10. 
No damage to contents. 

Still. Friday, October 17, 7 a. m. Chimney lire in house, 36 Plummer 
street, owned by A. W. Kidder, and occupied by Leander L. Hall. Hose 
company 3 responded. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, October 21, 8.20 p. m. Chimney Are in dwelling bouse, 
203 Merrimack street, owned and occupied by Perry A. Eaton, Used 2 
charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, October 22, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 28 "Warren street, owned and occupied by Ralph Pearson. Chemical 
engine responded. Used 1 charge of Pony. 

Box 26. Thursday, October 23, 7.43 a.m. One-story wooden Ijuilding, 
277 Bridge street, owned by Mrs. Georgie A. "Williams, and occupied by N. 
J. Beaumie as a plumber's shop. Cause, match dropped in oakum. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding : Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 
2. Truck 5. Value of building $200, damage $25, no insurance. Value of 
contents $1,000, damage $47, insurance $1,000, insurance paid .$40.25. 

Still. Thursday, October 23, 6.50 p. m. Trolley car on Elm street, 
between Amherst and Concord streets, belonging to Manchester Street 
Railway. Cause, "short circuit." Chemical engine responded. Damage 
slight. 

Still. Saturday, October 25, 9.06 a. m. Coal-sheds of Moore & Preston, 
corner Beech and Valley streets. The "soft" coal in one of the bins ignited 
from spontaneous combustion. Hose Company No. 3 responded and Hose 
wagon from Engine and Ladder No. 3. No damage. 

Still. Friday, October 31, 9.45 p. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden block, 425 Chesnut street, owned by heirs of John D. Patterson, 
and occupied by William Maynard. No damag"^. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 405 

Still. Monday, November 10, 9.07 p. m. Rags in the cellar of cottage- 
house, rear of G4 Cedar street, owned by Hugh Kelley, and occupied by 
Mrs. Margaret Moriarty. Chemical Engine responded. No damage. 

Box 21. Tuesday, November 11, 3.01 p. m. Two-story dwelling-house 
rear of 184 Lake avenue, owned and occupied by Charles S. Hadley 
Cause, defective chimney. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building $1,500, 
damage $160, insurance $1,000, insurance paid $160. Value of contents 
$300, damage $10, insurance $200, insuranee paid $10. 

Still. Friday, November 14, 3.45 p. M. Chimney fire at 19 Elm ave- 
nue, owned and occupied by Charles Brighani. Hose Company No. 3 re- 
sponded. Used 1 charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, November 14, 10.15, p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 346 Pine street, owned by the Oriier of Hibernians, and occupied 
by Mrs. James Donohoe and others. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, November 20, 12.25 p.m. Electric light wire with in- 
sulation worn off, scared someone. No damage and no fire. Members of 
Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded with hose carriage. 
' Box 511. Friday, November 21, 1.35 p. m. Cottage house, 254 Doug- 
lass street, owne d by Mrs. William A. Chamberlin and occupied by Carl 
Peterson and Marie Holngrist. Defective flue caused partition to ignite 
and fire to spread to second floor. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 2, 6, Chemical, and Truck 6. Value of building 
$2,800, damage $54.25, insurance $1,500, insurance paid $54.25. No dam- 
age to contents. 

Still. Saturday, November 22, 1.09 p. m. Grass fire in Stark park. 
Set by locomotive of Boston & Maine railroad. Hose carriage from En- 
gine and Ladder No. 5 responded. 

Box 261. Monday, November 24, 5.13 p. m. Brush fire in the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Co.'s woods on Smyth road. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 

Still. Monday, November 24, 8.15 p. ji. Two and half-story house, 259 
East Spruce street, owned by Miss Lizzie Burrows, and occupied by two 
families. Cause, overheated stove. No damage. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 3 responded with hose carriage. 

Still. Wednesday, November 26, 6.03, A. M. Chimney fii"e in three 
tenement block, corner of Wayne and McGregor streets, owned by David 
Labonte, and occupied by several families. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 6 responded with hose carriage. Used 1 charge of 
Pony. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, November 26, 11.00 A. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block (rear), 185 Manchester street, owned by Platts Bros., and oc- 
cupied by John Norton. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, December 2, 6.10 r. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
brick house, corner Elm and Salmon streets, owned and occupied by Mrs. 
Frederick Smyth. Members of Engine and Ladder Comijany No. 5 re- 



406 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

sponded with hose carriage. Used 1 charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, December 2, 8.05 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling 
house, 520 Beech street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Lizzie Foster. No 
damage. 

Still. Thursday, December 4, 7.55 p.m. Chimneyfirein tenement house, 
266 East Spruce street, owned by David Labonte, and occupied by Jules 
Larivee. Chemical Engine responded. Used 1 charge of Pony. No 
damage. 

Still. Friday, December 5, 9.54 a. m. Chimney fire in dwelling 
house, 323 Prospect sti-eet, owned and occupied by J. A. Chamberlin. 
Members of Hose Company No. 2 res^jonded. Used 1 charge of Pony. No 
damage. 

Still. Friday, December 5, 9.56 A. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 57 Amory street, owned by Lawrence Connor, and occupied by 
two families. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 resjionded 
with Hose carriage. Used 2 charges of Pony. 

Still. Friday, December 5, 12.05 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, corner River road and Monroe streets, owned by Alonzo Elliott, 
and occupied by several families. Members of Engine and Ladder Com- 
panys responded with hose carriage. Used 4 charges of Pony. 

Still. Friday, December 5, 6.17 p. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
dwelling at 120 Auburn street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Bridget 
Britton. Used 1 charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, December 5, 6.20 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling 
house, 29 Winter street, owned and occupied by John Langau. Members 
of Engine Company No. 2 responded with combination. Used 1 charge 
of Pony. No damage. 

Box 216. Friday, December 5, 6.43 p. m. Needless alarm for chimney 
fire in cottage house 881 Somerville street, owned by R. J. Bennett and 
occvipied by William D. Howe. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. 

Still. Friday, December 5, 6.47 p. m. The chimney fire at 120 Auburn 
street required further attention and Hose Company No. 1 responded. 
Used 2 charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, December 6, 7.15 p. m. Two and a half story tene- 
ment house. 352 Dubuque street, owned by Louis Beaudoin, and occupied 
by two families. Cause, matches in pockets of clothes. Members of 
Engine and Ladder Comi^any No. 6 responded with hose carriage. L'sed 
1 charge of Pony and laid 150 feet of hose from hydrant." 

Still. Saturday, December 6, 9.15 p. m. Chimney fire in three-stor> 
tenement house, 196 Hanover street, owned by Smyth & Kendall heirs, 
and occupied by several families. Used one charge of Pony. No damage. 

Box 321. Monday, December 8, 9.03 a. ji. Four-story wooden building 
(Notre-Dame Hospital), corner of Beauport and Wayne streets, owned by 
the Notre-Dame Hospital Association (incorporated). Cause, electric 
wires. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 0, 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER, 407 

Chemical, Hose 1, Truck (1. Value of building' 840,000, damage §160. 
insurance '$30,000, insurance paid $\.Q0. 

Still. Monday, December 8, 10.15 a. m. Notre-Dame Hospital. A 
few sparks between the floors after the above-mentioned fire, called 
members from Engine & Ladder Company Xo. (3. Used 1 charge of 
Pony. 

Box 812. Monday, December 8, 6.40 p. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
tenement block, 23 Wayne street. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 1, 2, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 6. Used 2 charges 
of Pony. 

Box 52. Monday, December 8, 7.57 p. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
tenement block, 415 Granite street, owned by E. S. McDerby and occupied 
by several families. Box pulled by police officer. Comijanies responding: 
Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. Used 3 charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 26. Monday, December 8, 9.08 p. M. Cottage house, 260 Lowell 
street, owned by Mrs. George W. Morgan, and occupied by. Fred. M. 
Oliver. Cause, broken lamp. Box pulled by citizen. Companies res- 
ponding; Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 5. Value of building, 
$1,800, damage $400, iosurance $1,500, insm-ance paid $-100. Value of 
contents -$2,200, damage $50'J.15, insurance $1,000, insurance paid 
^509.15. 

Box 8. Tuesday, December D, 10.55 a. m. Wooden-tenement block, 9 
Kidder street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., and occupied by 
Dennis Sweeney. Cause, burning rags in cellar. No damage. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1,5. 

Still. Tuesday, December 9, 3.15 p. m. Chimney Are at 398 Union 
street, owned l)y Gordon Woodljury, and occupied by Ulric Bourgeois. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. Used 2 charges 
of Pony. 

Still. Tuesday, December 9, 4.46 p. m. Chimney lire in tenement block, 
9 Clark avenue, owned by Clark and Higgins heirs, and occupied by John 
Green and others. Used 3 charges of Pony. No damage. 

Box 321. Wednesday, December 10, 11.24 a. ji. Four-story wooden 
building, corner Wayne and Cartier streets, owned by lit. Rev. Bishop D. 
M. Bradley. Cause, spontaneous combustion of chemicals in book-case. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding : Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 
6. Value of contents §3,000, damage $209.75, insurance $2,000, insurance 
paid $209.75. 

Box 8. Thursday, December 11, 12.40 a. m. One-story wooden building, 
20 Pearl street, owned by George H. Dorr, and occupied by David S. Bei-ry. 
as a bicycle repair shop. Cause, gasoline torch thawing pipes. Box pulled 
by Officer Marden. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building $950, damage $211.33, insurance 
$950, insurance paid $211.33. Value of contents $900, damage $600, no in- 
surance. 

Still. Thursday, December 11, 5.35 r. jr. Three-story Avoodeu tene- 



408 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ment block, 059 Chestnut street, owned by Mrs. Charles J. Senter, and 
occupied by J. J. Noonan. Cause, clothes on stove. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 5 responded with hose carriage. 

Box 115. Friday, December 12, 4.31 p. m. Cottage house, 692 ISIaple 
street, owned by Mrs. Alma A. Piper, and occupied by A. H. Feltou. 
Cause, over-heated furnace, funnel too near wood-work. Box pulled by 
Charles Hammond. Companies responding: Engines 1, 5, Chemical, Hose 
1, Truck 5. Value of building $2,250, damage |75, insurance §1,500, insu- 
rance paid $50. No damage to contents. 

Still. Friday, December 12, 6.05 p. m. Chimney Are in tenement house 
131 Amherst street, owned by Dr. J. A. Jackson, and occupied by John 
Boisvert. Used 1 charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, December 12, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire in fiifteen tene- 
ment block, 172 McGregor street, owned by Pillsbiiry & Watts, and oc- 
cupied by several families. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 
No. 6 responded with carriage. Used 3 charges of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Monday, December 15, 8.10 p. m. Chimney fire at 193 Cedar 
street owned by Edward Duffie, and occupied by John Sullivan. Mem- 
bers of Chemical Company responded. No damage. 

Box 321. Tuesday, December 16, 10.41 A. m. Four-story tenement 
block, 22 Wayne street, owned by Kate X. Collity, and occupied by Thos. 
Bellman. Cause, child playing with kerosene can. No damage to build- 
ing. Two children were burned, one fatally. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Box 71. Tuesday, December 16, 7.03 p. m. A "cross" of an electric 
wire at corner of Beech and Lake avenue back street, was the cause of a 
foolish and needless alarm. Companies responding: Engines 1, 8, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, Truck 3. 

Box 21. Thursday, Dec. 18, 6.17 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 57 Central street, owned by Oliver B. Green, and occupied by 
Jerry Langley, John McLaughlin, and T. Cota. Box pulled by citizen. 
Comi^anies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 2, Trucks 1, 3. No 
damage. 

Still. Saturday, December 20, 10.45 A. m. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 831 Chestnut street, owned by J. B. Jones, and occupied by Jesse 
B. Nourse. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. 
Used 1 charge of Pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, December 20, 5.57 p. m. Chimney fire in Shea's 
block, corner Union and Bridge streets. No damage. No fire found. 
Members of Hose Company No. 2 responded. 

Still. Saturday, December 20, 9 p. m. Three-story tenement house, 
33 Cedar street owned, by Daniel Mahoney, and occupied by John Segelos 
and others. Slight fire near chimney in partition. Cause, rats and 
matches. Members of Chemical responded. 

Still. Monday, December 22, 10.08 a. m. Four-story brick block, 885 
Elm street, owned by John A. Riddle, and occupied by sundry persons. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 409 

Cause, clothes too near stove in room 34, occupied by Mrs. Harriet Short. 
Damage slight. Members of Chemical responded. 

Still. December 24, 10.20 A. m. Chimney fire in dwelling house, 318 
North Main street, owned by Nelson Duval, and occupied ',by James 
Duval. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with Combination 
Used 1 charge of Pony. No damage. 

Number of bell alarms 71 

Number of "still" alarms 127 

Total 198 

Aggregate losses for 1902 $370,819.08 

Amount of insurance paid 200,804.70 

Net losses uncovered by Insurance $170,014.38 



COMPANIES EESPONDING. 



Months. 


ENGINES. 


■3 


a 

2 
5 


HOSE. 


TRUCK. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 


2 


3 


1 


3 


5 


6 


January 


4 
4 

2 
4 

2 
4 
1 
2 

1 
1 

35 


3 
3 
1 
2 
4 
3 

1 

2 

1 

5 

29 


3 
4 
1 

1 
7 
3 
3 


5 
3 
1 
3 
9 
3 
3 


3 
1 

1 
3 
3 
1 


2 
3 

1 
2 


8 
7 
5 
9 
16 
7 
9 

3 

6 

4 

10 


7 
6 
2 

3 
11 

4 
6 

3 
4 
2 
11 

61 


4 
3 
1 
3 
4 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
5 

25 


3 
1 
1 

4 
3 
1 
2 

1 
4 
1 

1 

24 


3 
4 

1 

6 
4 
3 


3 

4 
1 

1 
•7 
3 
3 


3 
1 
1 
3 
3 
1 


? 


February 




March 


,, 


April 


.-, 


May 


1 


June 




July 


1 


August 

September 




2 
3 
2 
4 

33 


2 
3 

1 
3 

36 


1 


2 
3 

1 
32 


2 

3 
31 


1 
1 

4 

18 




October 




November 


3 
16 


1 
5 

18 


1 


December 


r, 






Total 


89 


16 







410 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 

Engine No. I. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer $4,000.00 

1 one-horse wagon 400.00 

3 gray horses for steamer 600.00 

1 gray horse for hose wagon 200.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

1 pair double exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 single exercise harness 40.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose- 900.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Tools, furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 125.00 



Total amount $6,795.00 



Engfine No. 2. 

LOCATED AT NORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQUOG. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $4,000.00 

1 Combination Chemical and Hose wagon 1,700.00 

1 iexercise wagon, poles, shafts, and three-horse hitch . . . 250.00 

3 horses for steamer 600.00 

1 pair horses for hose wagon 400.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at S40, 1 at $20 100.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

1 double sled 60.00 

3150 feet fabric hose 1,417.50 

Stable fixtures and blankets 94.00 

Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc. . • 466.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 125-00 



Total amount $9,462.50 



Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CORNER MASSABESIC STREET. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer 83,500.00 

1 two-horse hose wagon 400.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



411 



1 two-horse truck and equipments 1,700.00 

1 three-horse hitch attachment (extra) 200.00 

1 pair horses for steamer 250.00 

1 pair bay horses for hose wagon .' 400.00 

■ 1 pair black horses for truck 800.00 

8 exercise harnesses, 2 at '$50, one at $40 140.00 

6 swinging harnesses ... 800.00 

3,400 feet fabric hose 1,530.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. ... 80.00 

Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc 575.00 

Fii'emen's suits and badges 150.00 

1 exercise wagon 250.00 

Total amount $9,775.00 



Engine No, 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer $4,200.00 

1 hose wagon 400.00 

3 horses for steamer 600.00 

1 horse for hose wagon 150.00 

4 exercise harnesses 60.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

2,050feet fabric hose 922.50 

Hall furniture, beds, bedding, etc 275.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 75.00 

Firemen's siiits and badges • ■ 125.00 

Total amount 17,007.50 



Engine and Ladder No. 5. 



LOCATED ON AVEBSTER STREET, CORNER CHESTNUT. 

1 third-size Amoskeag steamer $3,600.00 

1 two-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage 600.00 

1 steel frame ladder truck 1,650.00 

1 pair bay horses for steamer 400.00 

1 pair bay horses for truck 400.00 

1 bay horse for hose carriage 200.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 



41:^ ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1 double sled 50.00 

5 swinging harnesses ■ . . 250.00 

2 pairs exercise harnesses 100.00 

2,350 feet fabric hose 1,057. .50 

Bedding, furniture, tools, etc 247.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 90.00 

Firemen's suits, badges, etc 150.00 

Total amount $9,119.50 



Engine and Laddet No. 6. 

LOCATED AT CORNER AMORY AND RIMMOX STREETS. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $.3,500.00 

1 hook-and-ladder truck, (with Bangor extension 1,680.00 

1 one-horse carriage 600.00 

2 gray horses for steamer 300.00 

2 bay horses for truck" 267.00 

1 gray horse for hose carriage 150.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2,200 feet fabric hose 990.00 

Hall furniture, carpets, beds, bedding, etc • . 375.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc ' 85.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

1 exercise wagon 290.50 

Total amount $8,637.50 



Hose No. I. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage $600.00 

2 horses 300.00 

2 single harnesses 70.00 

1 set Hobbs' Runners 90.00 

1 hose sled 20.00 

3200 feet of fabric hose 1,440.00 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding, etc 60.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 100.00 

Total amount $2,930.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



413 



Hose No. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER OF EAST HIGH. 

1 two-horse hose wagon -IGOO.OO 

2 bay horses 500.00 

2 swinging harnesses 100.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

2000 feet of fabric hose 900.00 

150 feet leather hose 60.00 

Furniture and fixtures, beds and bedding 150.00 

Firemen's suits and badges ••.... 100.00 

Total amount $2,735.00 



Hose No. 3. 



'LOCATED ON SOUTH ELM STREET, BAKERSVILLE 



1 combination hose wagon (with ladders) 

1 pair gray horses 

1 pair of swinging harnesses 

1 pair exercise harnesses 

1 exercise wagon 

2100 fe(5t of fabric hose 

Furniture, fixtures, bedding, etc . . . . 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$1,000.00 

100.00 

100.00 

50.00 

50.00 

. 945.00 

85.00 

65.00 

80.00 

$2,475.00 



Hook and Ladder Co. No. J< 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 aerial hook-and-ladder truck $4,2000.-00 

3 horses 600.00 

3 exercise harnesses 75.00 

3 swinging harnesses 150.00 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 360.00 

3 rubber blanket covers . . . • 72.00 



414 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

rurniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding and furniture 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets, ■ (50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

Total amount 85,942.00 

Chemical Engine No. J. 

LOCATED OX VINE STREET. 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) engine $2,2.50.00 

1 pair bay horses 500.00 

1 pair of exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 pair swinging harnesses 100.00 

Furniture and fixtures 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 35.00 

Total amount $3,060.00 



Supply Wagfon. 



1 supply wagon, with boxes and engineers' lanterns 



.3150.00 



Spare Hose Carriage and Hose. 

AT CENTKAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage 6400.00 

400 feet fabric hose 288.00 

1500 feet fabric hose (in process of re-lining) 280.00 

Total amount $968.00 



Exercise Wagon. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, A'INE STREET. 



1 four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole, shafts, three 
horse hitch, and coal boxes 



8250.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 415 

E. W* Harringfton Steam Fire Engine. 

STOKED AT SHEDS OF ENGIXE NO. 2. 

Old U. tank Amoskeag engine (wortli for excliange) . . . . -1200.00 



Eno^ineer^s Department. 

1 Bay horse #325.00 

5 engineers' wliite rubber coats , . . . . 37.50 

5 engineers' lanterns 20.00 

Furniture and fixtures 150.00 

Total amount 1532.50 



Riverside Hose Co. No. 5. 

LOCATED AT COKNER OF OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage -"^400.00 

800 feet leather hose 240.00 

800 feet fabric hose 320.00 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc . . , 40.00 

Furniture and tlxtures 10.00 

Total amount • $1,010.00 



Hallsville Hose Co. No. 6. 

LOCATED AT CORNER OF MAMMOTH ROAD AND MASSABESIC STREET. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage 330.00 

f)00 feet leather hose 150.00 

Nozzle, wrenches, etc 15.00 

Total amount §195.00 



416 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I 

Goffers Falls Hose Caffiagfe. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage $30.00 

400 feet fabric hose ••.... IGO.OO 

2 hose-pipes 10.00 

Total amount §200.00 



Pond Road Hose Camagfe. 

LOCATED IN BASEMENT OF ^\ . P. FARMER'S BARN. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage §30.00 

500 feet leather hose 150.00 

Total amount $180.00 



Sleeping; Hall. 

AT CENTRAL STATION. VINE STREET. 

5 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc $200.00 

Extra Horses. 

1 steel gray horse $150.00 

1 gray horse 225.00 

Total amount -$375.00 



Fire Alarm Teleg:raph. 

At cost, including aditions $22,250.00 

Remodeling in 1885 G,000.00 

"Individual tapper" system 4,000.00 

Storage battery (in 1898) 1,850.00 

Switch protector board 175.00 

Wire, brackets, and tools 250.00 

Repair wagon 150.00 

Total amount $43,G75.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



417 



Recapitulation. 



Eap;ine Company No. 1 

Engine Company No. 2 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 

Engine Company No. i 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 
Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 

The '^Harrington" Engine 

Hose Company No. 1 

Hose Company No. 2 

Hose Company No. 3 

Hoolc and Ladder Company No. 1 . 

Chemical Engine Company No. 1 . 

Supply wagon 

Exercise wagon (Central station) . 

Spare hose carriage and hose . . . 

Engineers' department 

Riverside Hose Company ..... 

Hallsville Hose Company 

Goffe's Falls Hose Company . . . 

Pond Road Hose Company .... 

Sleeping Hall (Central Station) . . 

Extra horses 

Fire alarm telegraph 

Total amount 



■.$6,795.00 
9,462.50 
9,775.00 
7,007.50 
9,119.50 
8,637.50 
250.00 
2,930.00 
2,735.00 
2,475.00 
5,942.00 
3,060.00 
150.00 
200.00 
968.00 
532.50 
1,010.00 
195.00 
200.00 
180.00 
200.00 
375.00 
43.675.00 



.$115,874.50 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS.. 



OJC.. 

1^ 


XAME- 


Rank. Occupation. 


Residence. 


J 




Chief 




1937 Eim. 






Assistant 


Grain dealer 


414 Merrimack. 


3 






Grocer 


Coolidge ave. 


4 


Frecl S Bean 


jj 


Foreman 


312 Pearl. 


5 




^j 


Carpenter 


27 "Warren. 











418 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, 28 Vine Street. 





Xame. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


7 


Charle.s F. McCov 


Captain 


Machinist 

Paper hanger 


50 Mechanic. 


S 


Frank E. Stearns 


Lieutenant 


450 Merrimack. 


18 


Clerk 


Tinsmith . 


21 Market 


G 


Cliarles F. Hall 


Engineer 

Asst. engineer ... 

Driver engine 

Driver hose.. 

Hoseman 


Engineer 


28 Vine 


14 


George B. Forsaith . . 


Machinist 

Teamster 


639 Chestnut 


11 


Frank H. Harvey 


28 Vine. 


12 


Artemas C. Barker 

Frank B. Marston 




28 Vine. 


43 


Carpenter 


823 Union. 


15 


Thomas J. Wyatt 




Coal dealer 


925 Hayward. 


9 




,, 


423 Central. 


17 




,1 


Carpenter 


C Canal 


19 




J, 




363 Concord. 


13 


Stanley H. Patten 


(( 


Tinsmith 


973 Elm. 


10 




,; 


Mill operative 


355 Amherst 













ENGINE COMPANY No. 2. 
House on North Main Street, Squo(j. 





Najie. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


71 




Crptain 


Carpenter 


55 Douglass. 


68 




Lieutenant 


Supt. streets 

Teamster 


43 Cartier. 


76 




Clerk and driver 
of engine 


210 No. Main. 




Henry C. IVlorrill 


Engineer 

Carpenter 

Teamster 




120 


Engineer 


53 Beauport 


119 


Stephen Thomes 


Asst. engineer.... 
Driver of hose.... 
Hoseman 


55 Douglas. 


69 


Arthur "W. Whitcomb 

Samuel A Hill 


35 No. Main 


Carpenter 


84 School. 


75 


Robert J Hill 






84 School. 




^^ 


Machinist 


117 Williams. 


73 


Charles S Cousins 


jj 


Harness -maker 

Wool sorter 

Waste sorter 


151 Douglas. ' 




jj 


56 No. Main. 






,, 


54 Douglas . 


70 


Charles M. Tewksbury 


" ! 


Clerk, B. ct M. R.R. 
Truckman 


278 Douglas. 
431 Granite. 













REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



419 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 3. 

House on Lake Avenue, corner 3Iassabesk. 



o 

be . 
■a o 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


Sfi 


Frank F. Porter 


Cap 

Liei 


tain 


Manufacturer 

Collector 


3.30 E. Spruce. 


<>7 


Edwin C. Paul 


It. of ena-ine 


84 


Harry A. Piper 


Lieut- of truck 


Contractor 




US 


Orren S. Coburn 


Clei 
Eng 

Ass 


k 


Clerk 


380 Central. 


TOO 


John P. Walker 


ineer 


Machinist 


403 Hall. 


OS 


Samuel M. Couch 


t. ene'ineer 


Blacksmith . 


447 Spruce. 


105 


Herbert E. Dunbar 


Driver of engine 
Driver of hose... 
Driver of truck 


Teamster 


310 Central. 


SI 


William S. McLeocl 

Lyman W. Piper 




419 Lake ave. 


S'^ 


,. 


39S Merrimack. 


114 


John Wilson 


Fireman 


Carpenter 


C Linden. 


SO 


Clarence Hackett 


, 




Laundryman 


335 E. Spruce. 


S5 


John W. Finn 




Painter 


501 Wilson. 


S8 


George Taylor 




Mechanic 


582 Lake ave. 


79 


Louis N. Dufrain 




Plumber 


473 Hall. 


S9 


Parker R. Brown 




Grain dealer 

Manufacturer 

Teamster 


422 Merrimack. 


153 


Edson F. Wyman 




368 E. Spruce. 


S7 


George H. Wheeler... 

George W. Albee .. . . 




384 E. Spruce. 


7S 




Clerk 


271 Laurel. 


150 


Frank S. Shirley 




Shoe cutter 


413 Manchester 




Arthur S. Brown 




Grain dealer 


422 Manchester 













420 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



EEGINE COMPANY No. 4. 
House, Xo. 20 Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


''S 


John H. Wales, Jr 


Captain 




2M. S. B. 


3S 


Thomas "W. Lane, Jr 


Lieutenant 

Clerk 


Electrician 


937 Elm. 


"3 


George Thompson 


Clerk 


85 Salmon. 


•>1 


Joseph H. Gould 


Engineer 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 


97 


Edward Sargent 


Asst. engineer... 
Driver of engine 
Driver of hose .... 
Hoseman 




20 Vine. 


31 


George A. Cann 


Teamster 


20 Vine. 


99 


Charles H. Rogers 




260 Pearl. 


99 


Walter A. Clarkson 


Carpenter 


301 Walnut. 


?5 


Frank B. Stevens 

Luther A. Knight 

James C. Newton 


Clerk 


144 Blodget. 
16 Stark. 


,3? 


Engineer 


.30 




Machinist 


408 Manchester 


''n 


Alfred Gustaf son 

Fred H. Gate 




20 Malvern. 


?o 




Clerk 


413 Merrimack. 


''4 


Albert M.'Tuson 




Book-keeper 


20 Vine. 


1 











REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



421 



ENGINE AND LADDER CIOMPANY No. 5. 
House, No. 44 Webster Street. 



bo • 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


49 




Captain 

Lieut, truck 

Lieut. Engine ... 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer... 
Driver engine ... 

Driver truck 

Driver hose 


Clerk 

Second hand 


65 Harrison. 


161 

162 
46 

102 
45 




884 Union. 




Electrician 


136 Sagamore. 


Woodbury Davison 




772 Beech 


Machinist 


54 Appleton 


Daniel W. Morse 


Teamster 


1419 Elm. 


125 

124 

83 


Emil H Smith 


44 Webster. 


Benjamin C. Cann 

Ernest E. Hubbell 


Clerk 


44 Webster. 
44 Webster. 


47 

lOS 




663 Chestnut. 


Edward L. Towle 




Carpenter 


72 N. Adams. 


123 
99 


• 


,, 


44 Webster. 


Will G Frazer 


,, 


Electrician 


53 Pennacook. 


158 
101 


Andrew S. Fantom 

Charles W. Warner 


" 




676 Maple 


Electrician 


75 Sagamore. 


126 
41 


" ..., 


Tinsmith 


254 Walnut. 




Clerk 


73 Appleton. 


159 






ION. Adams. 


160 




,, 


,, 


321 Walnut. 


95 


George H. Chadwick .... 


jj 


Electrician 


41 BlDdget. 











422 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 

House on Amory and Ttimmon Streets. 



P5 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


UO 


Frank W. Tebbetts.. . . 


Captain 


Looua-lixer 


312 Cartler 


147 


James A Farley 


Lieut, engine 

Lieut, truck 


Machinist 


385 Dubuque 


14^ 


Frank St. John 


Janitor 


76 Winter. 


138 


Thos F. iFitzsimmons... 
Charles Edgar 


Clerk 


Painter 


258 Beauport 


1.S? 


Engineer 


Engineer 


Engine-house. 


la.'? 


Alcide Provencher 


Asst. engineer .... 

Driver engine 

Driver hose 


Machinist 


49 Sullivan. 


134 


Alphonso E. Foster 


Teamster 


Engine-house. 


IS.") 


Charles M, Denyou 




Engine-house. 


13fi 


Henry C. Crosby 


Driver truck 

Hoseman 


,, 


Engine-house. 


IM 


John Martin 


Machiniat 


624 No. Main. 


143 


Henry Stein 




Blacksmith 


393 Hevey. 


144 


Arthur Provost 




Wool sorter 


526 Beauport. 


U.'S 






Loom-flxer 

Laborer 


402 Rlmnion. 


13> 


.Tnhn C. CrP.vnmf.U 




27 Adams. 


12S 


John H. McCabe 




Clerk 


310 No. Main. 


139 


Gideon Belisle 

Richard F. Galway 






47 Bremer. 


146 




Cigar-maker 


460 No. Main. 


230 






Loom-fixer 


174 Cartler. 


13T 


Wm. T. Lockhead 

Mederique Maynard 




Holder 


27 Adams. 


141 




Grocer 


324 Dubquue. 









CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, 8 Vine Street. 



o 
^ o 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


116 


Clarence D. Palmer 


Captain .. 


Marble dealer 


8 Vine. 


115 


Harvey E. Harris 

Benjamin R. Richardson.. 

George H. Porter 

John W. Regner* 


Clerk . . .. 


Laundry 


249 Concord. 


10S 


Driver 


Machinist 


21 Ash. 


117 


Pipeman 


Carpenter 


279 Laurel. 


44 


Fireman 


Lineman 


400 Merrimack. 









♦Detailed driver of supply wagon. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



423 



HOSE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, No. 26 Vine Street. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Joseph E. Merrill.. 
Edwin W.Merrill. 
Albert A. Puffer.... 
Henry C. Parsons.. 
Samuel W. Patten. 

George I. Ayer 

Andrews. Heath... 
George W. Snaden 

Will H. Nelson 

Albert W. Tucket.. 

Harry Barrett 

Charles H. French 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman ... 



Currier 

Clerk 

Teamster 

Belt maker 

Electrician 

Clerk 

Plumber 

Gas-work,s emp 

Collector 

Machinist 

Electrician 



370 Manchester 
370 Manchester 
499 Beech.i 

26 Vine. 

3 M. S. B. 
28 M. S. B. 

27 Russell. 

25 Nashua. 
100 Brook. 

IS Brown are. 

26 Vine. 
7 Water. 



HOSE COMPANY No. 2. 

House on Maple Street, corner East Hifjh. 





Namk. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


55 


Revile C. Houghton 


Captain 


Gas-filter 


337 Lowell. 


er>. 


Julien B. Huntley 

Joseph W. Batchelder 

Ellsworth V. Kowe 


Lieutenant 

Clerk 


Plumber 


1103 Elm. 


5<» 


Carpenter 

Teamster 

Carpenter 


521 Maple. 
521 Maple. 
&10 Maple. 
1087 Elm. 


57 


Driver 


fiO 


Charles W. Powell 


Hoseman 


fil 


Addison Seaward 


fi3 


James A.Rogers 




,, 


761 Beech. 


fio 


John M. Emerson 




Plumber 

Carpenter 


19 Russell 


58 


Thomas Smith 

Melvin W. Worthen 


24 South. 


M 




507 Maple. 


54 


Thoma.s P. Burnap 

Fred W. Corey 




,, 


15 Liberty. 


5fi 




Needle-maker 


497 Maple. 









424 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOSE COMPANY No 3. 

House South Elm Street. 



.1^ 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence 



110 
157 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
149 



Albert W. Smith 

Frank D. Hardy 

Elmer R. Laing 

Edgar A. Young 

James H. McKenzie... 

William P. Hall 

Henry O. FoUansbee. 

Celon D. Stevens 

Fred S. Morrill* 



Captain 

Lieutenant. 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman ... 



Driver 



Fireman 

Yard conductor 
Produce dealer . 

Teamster 

Box-maker 

Sash-maker 

Gas-maker 

Clerk 

Teamster •.... 



23 Elm. 

15 Elm. 

34 Brown ave, 

23 Elm. 

Elm. 

39 Elm. 

21 Elm. 

21 Elm. 

53 Beauport. 



♦Detailed for department spare driver. 



HODK AND LADDER COMPANY. No. 1. 

House, 18 Vine Street. 



1^ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


111 


Roscoe Dyer 


Captain 


Machinist 


40 Market. 


92 


C^car P. Stone 


Lieutenant . 


Clerk 


312 Manchester. 


93 


Fred W. Bond 


Clerk 


Loom-fixer 


46 Stark. 


94 


Asa- W. Gage 


Driver 


Teamster 


18 Vine 


104 


Harrison H. Cole 






883 Union. 


109 


George M. Jones 


,, 


Gardener 


23 Maple. 


107 




(, 


Manufacturer 


18 Vine. 


113 


Charles H. Laxon 


,, 


Carpenter 


16 M. S. B. 


112 


Henry Johnson 


jj 


Steam-fltter 


316 "Walnut. 


PO 


Frank A. Pherson 

Benjamin F. Marsh 

John Short 


jj 


Machinist 


18 Vine. 


lOfi 


,, 


Carpenter 


222 Laurel. 


100 


^j 


Clerk 


1037 Elm. 


96 


Frank H Cole ; 


,, 


Machinist 


45 M. S. B. 


IIS 


Hiram Wingate 

George H. Hammond 


(( 


Engineer 


33 Spring. 


91 


^^ 


Carpenter 


476 Maple. 









REPORT 



BOARD OF HEALTH, 



REPORT OF [HE BOARD OF HEALTH, 



To His Honor the Mayor : 

Tlie Board of Health submits the following report for the year 1902: 

Dr. William M. Parsons was reappointed to succeed himself, thus no 
change was made in the membership of the Board, and at the annual 

meeting the officers of the previous year were elected, namely : John C. 
Bickford, president, and Wm. K. Bobbins, clerk. 

TABLE OF EXPENDITURES. 

Salaries $600.00 

Labor 3,017.77 

Office furniture 12.87 

Printing, Postage and Stationery 184.40 

Telephone service 48.55 

Express 10.1.5 

Antitoxin 363.02 

Disinfectants • 103.45 

Diphtheria Examinations 99.50 

Quarantined families 329.06 

Carriage hire and car fares 120.81 

Instruments and supplies for laboratory 131.26 

Gas 17.41 

Incidentals 39.70 

Fuel for Isolation Hospital 108.50 

Board and nursing at Isolation Hospital 99.57 

Supplies for Isolation Hospital 122.73 

Salary of Matron at Isolation Hospital 64.00 

Fuel for pesthouse 27.75 

Board of patients at pesthouse 132.50 

Salary of matron at pesthouse 360.00 

Water supply and lighting for hospitals 72.63 

Milk samples 30.29 

Medical attendance of small-pox 991.00 

Labor and watching for small-pox 297.00 

Vaccination 21.00 

$7,404.82 

Charged to Health Department and not included above . . 85.43 

$7,490.25 



4:^8 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Inspection of the above figures will show that the regular exjienditures 
have been less than for several previous years. 

The item of labor is higher, but most of the expense of milk inspection 
is in labor which is charged to this account, whereas a separate item was 
made of it last year. The other decided increase is in the expense for 
diphtheretic examinations and for antitoxin, made necessary by the un- 
usual prevalence of diphtheria during the latter part of the year. There 
is a decided decrease in the items of disinfectants and aid to quarantined 
families. 

This showing we consider very favorable as the milk inspection has 
been done in addition to the other work. In other words, by careful 
economy, this work has been included without addition to the regular 
expense, and the fees for milk licenses turned into the city treasury 
during the year have amounted to $463.00. 

The city being free from small-pox at the beginning of the year no 
special appropriation was asked for, or made, for this disease, other than 
the $900 physician's bill which was left over from last year. 

The disease, however, appeared in August and the twenty-eight cases 
have cost the city $1,632.17, for which no provision was made. 

Of this $600 is for physician's bill which remained unpaid at the close 
of the year. 

It was on account of these expenses that the appropriation was over- 
drawn. 

MEETINGS. 

The regular weekly meetings have been continued on Tuesday evenings. 
Forty-six such meetings were held and six special meetings for trips of 
inspection, and such other business as required immediate attention. As 
will be seen by comparing this with previous reports, these special meet- 
ings continue to become fewer and fewer as the people become accus- 
tomed to depend upon the regular meetings for the transaction of such 
business as they may have with the Board. 

Another thing which decreases the necessity for special meetings is the 
thorough systematization of the business at the office, which being open 
during the regular business hours of other city offices, enables many 
questions to be settled there without the necessity of a meeting of the 
Board. 

INSPECTORS. 

The same inspectors have been employed as last year, namely : Carl 0. 
Seaman,' inspector of plumbing and milk, and John F. Looney and William 
B. Blake, health inspectors and collectors of milk samples. Miss M. Alma 
Tracker has continued as clerk in the office. All have been faithful aud 
prompt, and have continued to manifest that interest and enterprise which 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 429 

are the prime requisites of good work, and they are entitled to much credit 
for the efficiency of the worlv of the department. 

IJACTERIOLOGICAL LAHORATORY. 

This department has done much more worlv than was expected of it after 
the establishment of the State Laboratory at Concord. 

This happens for several reasons, first that many of the local physicians 
prefer the work at this office to that of the State Laboratory, and second 
because cases discovered in the evening or on Sundays can be decided here 
from twelve to thirty-six hours sooner than by sending to Concord, and 
third because there occurred during the latter part of the year a much larger 
number of cases of diphteria than usual, as will be seen in table No. 2. 

As usual the cultures are inoculated and incubated at the office and Dr. 
A. (t. Straw does the microscopic work. 

During the year IIG diphtheria examinations were made, of which fifty- 
four were positive, or true diphtheria, and sixty-two were negative; 
twenty-eight of the negative were examinations for the discharge of con- 
valescent patients. 

It is a source of regret that so many physicians do not avail themselves 
of this very important source of information. 

It costs nothing to them or to the patients, except the pains of taking the 
cultures, and the information thus gained, while not to be taken as always 
conclusive in itself, is so valuable that no physician who is up to date can 
aftbrd to go without it. 

INSPECTIOX OF MILK. 

The milk is sampled and collected by the health inspectors, sealed and 
placed upon ice, and these samples are tested by the milk inspector. 
The fat is determined by the Babcock test and the total solids estimated 
from the per cent of fat and the specific gravity, unless otherwise stated. 

The tests for color, preservatives, etc., are the usual chemical methods. 
Where preservatives or other adulterations are found, a sealed portion of 
the sample is sent to the State Laboratory for confirmatory examination. 

During the year, an analytical balance and some necessary chemicals 
were added to the equipment of the milk laboratory, including most of 
the needful apparatus for bacteriological examination of milk which 
we hope to do the coming season. 

During the year 1,111 samples of milk, skim milk and cream were 
tested. One hundred and thirty-seven of these were brought to the office 
by citizens and milk dealers^ and the remaining 947 were taken by the 
inspectors and paid for at retail rates. In twenty-four cases sealed dupli- 
cate samples were demanded and given, and receipts taken therefor. 

A complete record of all tests and other information pertaining to 
them is kept in a large book specially ruled and constructed for this 



4:30 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ofifice, on a system devised by Mr. Robbins of the Board and Milk Inspec- 
tor Seaman. 

Each and every milkman has a separate page whereon his record can be 
seen at a glance, and as the pages are removable, new ones may be added, 
and thus the alphabetical order is maintained. This arrangement with 
a card index of license numbers, enables any dealers record to be found 
in a moment. During the winter session of higher legal requirements, 
namely: October, T^ovember, January, February and March, 283 samples 
of milk taken, averaged 4 per cent of butter fat, with specific gravity of 
1.03119, and 22 were below the legal standard of butter fat. 

During the summer season of April, May, June, July, August and Sep- 
tember, 753 samples taken, averaged 3.878 per cent of fat, with specific 
gravity of 1.0308 per cent, and 12 samples were below the legal standard 
for butter fat. Of the entire 1,111 samples, 34 were below the legal 
standard. 

Twelve samples of skim milk were taken, and of 22 samples of cream 
tested, the fat varied between 17.5 per cent and 47.5 per cent, with an 
average of 32.11 per cent. 

Drying and weighing was resorted to twenty times as a check on the 
total solids as found by estimation from fat and specific gravity. In 
several cases the fat from cream was tested for volatile fat acids and 
specific gravity of fat, to make sure that it was real butter fat. The milk 
has also been tested for acidity, the Mann volumetric method of analysis 
being used. This was done to ascertain the condition of the milk being 
delivered to the public, and also to detect preservatives, as a high per- 
centage of acidity without any sour taste or smell, would indicate that 
boric acid or some similar preservative was used, while a low percentage 
of acidity would indicate that sodium was present. Four hundred and 
forty-three samples of milk which were tested for acidity, showed an 
average of .168 per cent . 

Almost every sample was tested for formaldehyde and many additional 
tests were made for boric acid, salicylic acid, carbonates, coloring matters 
and colostrum cells. 

Formaldehyde was suspected in five samples and proven in two cases, 
which were convicted in court of using preservatives. 

In two cases frozen milk was found to be below standard and one sam- 
ple was partly churned to butter fat. 

Two milkmen were found selling without a license and one license was 
revoked for cause. 

Twenty-two milk wagons were found to be incorrectly marked, and 
eleven without name or number of the dealer. 

Some difiiculty is experienced in getting all dealers to properly mark 
cans containing skim milk. Several milk dealers were discovered collect- 
ing swill in a small way and transporting it *n milk wagons. 

Sixty-two official letters have been written to dea;iers. 

On the whole a great majority of them manifest a disposition of hearty 
co-operation with the Board, and many dealers, and also raisers, come to 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 431 

the office for consultation in regard to mixing, handling, and general care 
of the milk. 

While no inspection can be certain to prevent all adulteration, we feel 
warranted in the statement that the richness and general cleanliness of 
the city milk supply has materially improved during the last year. 

PLUMBING INSPECTION. 

The enforcement of the plumbing regulations causes less and less 
friction as plumbers and householders gain by experience abetter under- 
standing of their aims and objects. As was mentioned in our last annual 
report, the privy vault nuisance is almost entirely confined to the premises 
not provided with public sewers which people can be compelled to enter, 
and we again call to mind the still more urgent need that the City Coun- 
cils provide such sewers. 

THE WATER SUPPLY. 

The waters of Lake Massabesic have been jealously guarded as usual, 
and the protection thus afforded is fair but not complete, the reason 
being that the authorities of the town of Auburn give only a perfunctory 
co-operation with this board. 

This is jjarticularly ajiijarent in the matter of preventing bathing and 
defiling the ice. 

BURIAL PERMITS. 

Very little difficulty has been experienced in regard to the burial of the 
dead. The undertakers are now i^ractically all licensed by the State 
Board of Health, and are painstaking about their business. They some- 
times have difficulty in obtaining the full information required by law, 
as well as the physician's signature to the cause of death. Experience 
has shown that the letter of the law, in regard to obtaining permits 
before burial, can be much more easily complied with than was supposed 
to be possible when this Board first took charge of the work, and insisted 
upon a strict compliance with the law. 

The physicians are more thoughtful than formerly in signing death 
returns, and the undertakers are usually very punctual about obtaining 
permits. The death returns are promptly countersigned and filed with 
the City Clerk, so that the history of all persons deceased is readily avail- 
able, and proves very convenient in the payment of insurance policies and 
the settlement of estates. 

GARBAGE AND REFUSE. 

The disposal of the garbage and refuse of the city has given the Board 
very little concern during the year. The method in vogfue is not an ideal 



432 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

one, and is very expensive owing to the long distance to which it is neces- 
sary to transport it, but the work is so well handled by the Street and Park 
Commissioners, that the danger of the dumping system is quite small, and 
complaints about the dumps are very few. 

In the way of flushing cesspools and facilitating sewer accomodations to 
parties in need thereof, the Commissioners have rendered this department 
valuable assistance, which we gratefully acknowledge. 

ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

The Isolation Hospital which was in process of erection at the time of 
writing our last report has been completed. It was ready for occupancy 
about the first of September, and has been in use a greater portion of the 
time since ; in fact the use of the scarlet fever ward Avas required before it 
was in complete readiness, the first patient being taken there on September 
6th. Since that time several others suflering from the disease have been 
cared for therein. 

The diphtheria ward has been almost constantly in use, either by patients 
for whom the Board has cared, or by those who were afliicted with that 
malignant disorder and preferred the safe, suitable and sunny accommo- 
dations of the hospital, to the inconveniences and danger of contagion to 
others, in their homes. 

The appropriation for building and furnishing the hospital was -$7,000, 
and the amount expended was §7,265.39. Of this sum, 8471.84 was expended 
in building a roadway around'the buildings and grading the grounds : 844 
was expended for screens for the windows : S98 for carrying the water 
from the Mammoth Road into the cellars, and 8415. 4G was expended in the 
erection of a shed and an addition to the administration building, which 
was found to be an absolute necessity after a few weeks experience. The 
roadway and grading was expensive, as at least a hundred feet of the 
former was through a ledge in some places four feet deep, while in other 
places it required a fill of from one to six feet. In giving the cost no 
account is made of services rendered by Superintendent Libbey of the City 
Farm, who furnished teams and help which, if hired, would have cost 
nearly, if not quite, 8100. The Board feels that the city is to be congra- 
tulated upon the possession of a hospital for the care of patients afflicted 
with diphtheria or scarlet fever, who heretofore could find no place other 
than such as their homes or boarding places afforded, and a place which is 
better than most homes for that purpose. We beleive it is the first of its 
kind to be established in the state, and its usefulness will be better appre- 
ciated as the people become better acquainted with its conveniences, sit- 
uated as it is upon high ground with au abundance of pure air, and so sit. 
uated that when the sun shines, its rays enliven the ward rooms during 
the entire day. 

The Board was fortunate in securing the services of Mrs. Eva M. Nute, 
as matron, who, though without previous hospital experience, has proved 
most capable and efticient for the place. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 433 

We believe that no money has ever been better expended by the city in 
tile interests of liumanity than in the establishment of this hospital. The 
institution furnished a new account in our expenses, and in so far as is 
practicable this is kept separate, ai d for the fraction of a year that ii has 
been in operation, has cost $390.80 as per detailed statement. 

SMALLPOX. 

For thirteen months the city was free from known cases of smallpox. 
The first cases to appear in August and September were easily proven to 
have been brought in froni Canada and other towns in the state. Later 
cases could not be traced outside the city and must have resulted from 
unreported, if not unknown cases, and they increased as the cold weather 
came on, occurring, as will be seen in table No. 1, August 1, September 2, 
October 8, November 4, and December 18, making twenty-eight cases 
in all. 

All were of the prevailing mild type except one, which was hemorrha- 
gic and decidedly severe. Fortunately no deaths have resulted. 

There is no doubl that much of the spread of the disease is due to ex- 
posure from willfully concealed cases. 

DIPHTHERIA. 

In April of this year ten cases of diphtheria, and one death occurred at 
the Industrial School. Several cases of sore throats occurred among the 
inmates before the disease was recognized as diphtheria, and, from the 
number of exi^obures, a serious epidemic was feared. 

Prompt measures were taken to fjrevent this by removing all patients 
to the hospital, taking cultures from all suspicious throats, and establish- 
ing a sirict quarantine. In this way the disease was stamped out in about 
six weeks time. 

Diphtheria began to be more than usually prevalent early in October, 
and at the same time became decidedly virulent. 

In many cases the disease was not recognized until the patient was in 
the croupous stages, and beyond reach of remedies. 

The weather conditions which prevailed at this time were very similar 
to those which occurred during the autumn of 1897, when we had our 
hardest previous fight with the disease, namely a very large proportion 
of mild, damp weatlier with very little sunshine. 

Then, as in the i:)resent instance, the prevalence of the disease increased 
until after the earth was well covered with snow, when there was a 
noticeable decrease in the number of cases, only persons who had been 
previously exposed, having the disease. 

Realizing from past exi^erience, what might be expected, extraordinary 
precautions were taken to avoid an epidemic. Many of the earlier cases 
occurred in families where the expensive antitoxin treatment would have 
been a hardship, and this Board furnished antitoxin free to such people. 
In this way we are convinced that twenty or more children were saved 
who must otherwise have died. As will be seen by our linancial state- 



434 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ment elsewhere, a large sum of money was expended for this remedy, but 
we feel that the expense was justified on the ground of common humanity, 
and also because of the protection which it afforded the public. 

The record of deaths in relation to the number of cases, is far from 
satisfactory, but it must be remembered that many of these croupous 
cases were beyond the reach of any treatment before a physician was 
called, and also that several cases absolutely hopeless under the old style- 
of treatment, made quick recovery with antitoxin, and 'that almost no 
death occurred where the disease was early recognized and as promiitly 
treated. 

The earlier cases were all traceable to the school connected with the 
Notre Dame Hospital, and this school was carefully inspected and the 
schoolroom found to be scrupulously clean and neat, and the sanitary 
conditions good. This led us to believe that the school itself was not a 
source of infection, bvitthat the children by coming into contact at school, 
transmitted the disease to each other. In order to prevent this, we ad- 
vised that the school be closed for two weeks, and the already clean 
rooms were re-cleaned and fumigated. After this no more cases were 
traceable to the school. 

It is but justice to say here that the authorities in charge of the school 
were ready and anxious to act upon any suggestion, and the hearty co- 
operation which they gave this Board was most gratifying to its members, 
who here record there appreciation and thanks. 

STAXrSTICAL, TABLES. 

Table No. 1 gives the number of cases of contagious diseases reported 
and the deaths resulting from them during the year. 

The total of 1026 cases and 44 deaths is large compared with former 
years, but in this, as in former years, the comparatively harmless measles 
numbers 764 casess and five deaths, leaving 261 cases and 41 deaths for all 
others. 

Of these cases, diphtheria furnished 135 cases and 22 deaths, the 
largest number since 1897. 

Scarlet fever during the year was less prevalent and less virulent than 
usual. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 435 

Table No I. 



MONTHS. 



Mem 


)ra- 


Diph- 


nous 


theria. 


croup. 




















X 

ci 


0) 


0) 


4J 



Typhoid 
fever. 



Meas 


les 




X 






q; 


a 


d 




O 


a 



Scarlet 
fever. 



Vario- 
loid. 



Small- 
pox. 



Totals. 



January 
February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October . .. 
November 
December . 

Totals 



15 

11 

1 

■1 

4 

13 

54 

39 

66 

1-11 

242 ♦ 

175 
















24 

15 

4 

20 

14 

18 

63 

54 

81 

196 

286 

257 




1 
3 


















































1 

3 
1 


1 


















1 

2 

3 

4 
18 




1 
4 
17 




















2 






7G5 


5 


33 


2 






28 




1,026 







436 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

Table Xo. 2 gives the total cases and deaths for the last eighteen years. 



Table No. 2. 

COMPARISON OF STATISTICS OF CONTAGIOUS AND INFECTIOUS 
DISEASES FOR THE PAST 18 YEARS. 





Membra- 
nous 
croup. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Meas 


e3. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Vario- 
loid. 


Small- 
pox. 


Total. 


Years. 




a 








■r. 

s 


ci 




73 

5 


0- 


'ti 

G3 


X 

3 


X 
X 

6 


X 

? 




a; 


1885 


* 

* 

* 

« 

« 

« 

* 

» 

* 

12 

17 

17 

14 

10 

6 

8 

3 

16 


* 
* 
# 
« 
* 
* 

* 

12 
11 
14 
10 
4 
3 
5 
3 
9 


* 

« 

73 

126 
79 
41 
21 
■26 
7 
42 
47 

103 

148 
81 
50 
38 
IS 

135 


18 
9 
17 
30 
23 
9 
2 

5 
1 
11 
11 
28 
29 
17 
6 
8 
3 


* 

« 

28 

a5 

30 
36 
76 
33 
79 
74 
73 
81 
78 
145 
78 
65 
55 
49 


20 
12 
18 
12 
16 
17 
18 
11 
15 
21 
21 
20 
11 
>14 
12 

n 

11 

8 


« 
* 
94 
44 
259 
63 
25 
44 

no 

67 

55 
500 
387 

88 
702 
827 

15 
765 


5 

4 
1 
5 
3 

5 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
5 
1 

5 


* 
« 

187 

54 

298 

89 

451 

212 

223 

68 

61 

54 

200 

130 

102 

48 

33 


36 
5 
9 
9 
4 
6 
2 

11 
2 
8 
1 
1 
1 
9 
3 
6 
9 
2 


» 








* 

# 

392 

428 

438 

211 

554 

408 

418 

260 

763 

681 

524 

1,026 

1,102 

333 

1.026 


79 


1886 








'^6 


1887 








48 


1888 










.5? 


1889 










48 


1890 










.35 


1891 










2'> 


1892 










29 


1893. 










23 


1894 










55 


1895 










48 


1?96 


1 








66 


1897 








.54 


1898 










'47 


1899 










90 


1900 

1901 

1902 


10 
16 




52 

178 
28 




32 
25 
46 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



437 



Table No. 3 gives detail of the causes of death during the year as as- 
signed by the death returns. Some very instructive lessons may be 
learned from this table. 

Table No. 3— DEATH RETURNS. 

TABLE SHOWINC^ THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES 
AND BY MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1902. 



Causes of Death. 




u 

B 




< 


s 


0) 

5 


►-5 


3 
Ml 

< 


S 


B 

o 
O 


a 

o 

12; 



5 



B 


H 












1 
1 


1 














1 
















2 

1 








1 


4 








1 














•) 




















1 
1 


' 1 

1 


, 1 
























] 
























] 








2 






1 

2 










1 


.■5 






1 


1 


r 










' 


•' fall 




1 
1 








1 




^ 


















1 
















1 


'"l" 


1 






2 
















1 






2 






1 
















■ 






















1 




: 
















i 








2 




1 








1 




2 


2 








11 










- 


Angina pectoris... 




2 




2 






1 






















1 

3 


3 


1 




3 




2 




3 


3 


1 


1 





4 


2.3 






















1 
1 








: 






1 


1 












1 


1 
1 


1 


f 




























1 


2 








' 




1 


















: 


Atheroma - 






1 


















; 


1 




1 




























1 

1 






] 












1 






1 
1 




1 




- 
















: 








1 










1 






1 
















1 

3 

1 








■ 




2 

2 


5 

"i" 


1 
3 

1 


3 
2 
1 


2 


6 

1 






3 


6 


4 


4C 




3 


1 
1 


Ic 




"l 


1 














1 

1 
1 




i 
























: 












1 


1 
















1 
































1 
1 
1 


: 


























1 




1 
1 






1 
1 


-,■■ 


1 
1 






2 

1 






( 








1 


■ 1 ■ 
30 

i 

3 






























1 


2 


29 
1 


18 
1 
1 
1 


14 


1 




9t 






















1 










1 
1 




















2 


2 


5 


6 


3 

1 


1 


3 


- 


- 


2i 




: 










1 

1 






1 


1 


1 


] 


4 

1 


c 






1 


r 
























1 








1 




1 


'- 


1 


2 






1 

'3" 
1 
1 


1 
2 
3 








1 


1 
4 
2 
2 


2 
1 


2 
4 


J 








4 


4 
1 


2 


3 

2 


2i 










J 








1 
1 


2 


3 


J 


Diabetes 




1 






1 







438 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Table No. 3. — Continued. 



Causes of Death. 






.a' 


P. 
< 




a 


1-5 


< 




© 
o 


s 

o 


S 

ID 


+3 

o 
H 














1 
2 
1 










!• 




1 


Diphtheria . 






1 


- 










8 


6 


3 
















1 




















1 

2 






1 


Dysentery 
















2 


3 


2 




9 








1 








1 
"l 


2 






1 






1 


1 










1 










1 










3 






1 
1 
















2 




2 














1 




1 

1 
1 

2 


1 
1 




P2nlargement of Prostate Gland 














1 




1 
1 


1 




1 


1 


""6 


1 


1 


2 








11 






1 






1 






•> 
















1 








1 


Erysipelas 


1 








1 














"> 
















1 








1 
























- 


"> 


" Typhoid 


1 


1 
1 




1 






1 




1 
1 


1 


2 


g 








2 














1 




1 


2 




4 
















1 




1 


" Dilatation of 


1 


1 

3 


1 


















3 


" Disease of 


•;.■■ 


1 


2 


- 


2 


1 


2 


5 


1 


21 






2 


" P'attv Intiltration of 




















1 




1 








1 
1 
















1 


" Mitral insufficiency of.. 






















1 


2 




1 














1 




1 
1 

i 












2 






1 


1 






















2 


" Valvular Disease of 

Hemiplegia 




1 


1 




1 


1 


4 




2 


- 


1 


15 
1 








1 

2 


















1 




3 

1 




2 








1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


12 


" Postpartum 








1 












3 


2 


1 








4 


Hydrocephalus 












1 
1 
1 
1 








3 


Indigestion, Acute 




















1 


Intestinal Obstruction 




















1 


1 


3 


Intersusception 




















1 


Jaundice 










2 










1 




3 


La Grippe 




















1 




















1 




1 


3 


Liver, Atrophy of 


1 
















1 


" Cirrhosis of 






1 
2 


1 


1 


1 
1 




1 


2 
2 








Lungs, Congestion of 






1 
1 


3 




14 


Malaria and Diarrhoea 




1 


Malformation of Intestines 
























1 


Mania, Acute 




1 
3 




















1 


Marasmus 


1 




- 


2 


1 


5 




7 


7 
3 


5 

1 


4 


46 


Measles 


5 


Melaenia Neonatorum. 










1 
1 






1 


Meningitis 


2 

2 


6 


4 


1 
1 


" 1 ' 


6 
1 
1 






2 


7 


2 
1 

i 


31 


" Cerebral 




1 
1 
1 


15 


" Cerebrospinal 




1 
1 


3 


" Tubercular 


2 
3 


1 

2 


1 










Myelitis 










3 


Nephritis .... 


1 


2 
1 

i 


1 
1 


1 


1 

1 
3 




1 


2 
1 
3 


1 


1 


16 


" Interstitial. 


6 


Old Age 


1 
3 


2 


"l 


2 

2 


1 
1 


10 


Paralysis 


2 


1 


- 


1 
1 


'-'r 

4 


Paresis 


Paraplegia 




1 
















1 


Peritonitis 


1 


2 


3 


2 




1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


3 


18 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OP HEALTH. 439 

TABLE No. 3 —Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


a 


S 




1^ 


>> 

rf 

s 


o3 


9 


1 
< 




(0 

.0 

s 



c 




a 

> 


a 



c 


"3 



Pertussis 


1 

.5 


1 








1 




1 








1 


fi 


Phlegmon of neck 














1 


Phthisis pulmonalis 

PI eur is V 


8 
1 
9 
1 

1 


10 


7 

10 

1 


1 

1 
1 


■4 

1 


G 

1 

1 


r^ 


6 


1 


1 


9 


GO 


Pneumonia . ... 


9 


1 


4 


9 
1 


1.3 

1 


19 


100 


" Broncho 


14 


" Catarrhal 




•' Pleuro 


1 












" 








,$ 


" Typhoid 




















1 
1 


1 


Poisoning by illuminating gas. 
















1 






1 


Ptomaine 














1 










1 


Pott's disease 








1 
















1 




2 


4 


7 


3 


1 


4 


i 




1 


3 


- 


29 


Pseudencephalus 


1 


Pyaemia 












1 














Rheumatism 










1 








1 






3 


Sarcoma of iaw 


















1 


1 


Sclerosis, arterio 




1 










1 
1 




1 




1 


4 














1 


Septicremia 








2 




1 




1 


1 
1 






5 


" puerperal 
















1 


Shock from parturition 








1 
















1 


Skull, fracture of 








2 


1 




1 
1 










4 




















1 


Stenosis, aortic 






















1 


1 


" mitral 


1 
12 


"'o' 


1 

12 
1 






















" 


11 
1 


2 


7 


8 


7 


7 


4 


7 


91 


Stomach, ulceration of 


•> 


Suicide, bv cutting throat 














1 






1 








1 


















1 


" l>y shooting 


1 




















1 








1 


















1 


Thrombi 


1 






















1 


Tonsilitis 












1 












1 


Tuberculosis 




1 
1 


3 


1 


2 


2 


- 




1 


- 


2 


18 






1 
























1 
1 


1 




1 
1 


2 










4 

1 




1 


1 
3 


2 


12 










1 


8 














1 


1 




























Totals 


88 


86 


97 


SG 


92 


G7 


127 


119 


88 


113 


m 


107 


1,183 



Thus tuberculosis or the various forms of consumption, caused 78 deaths, 
bronchitis 5.5, and pneumonia and congestion of the lungs 133, the total 
deaths from diseases of the respiratory organs being 270. Thus the 
dreaded consumption is almost equaled by brohchitis, and far surpassed 
by pneumonia. 

Cholera infantum and other diseases of the digestive system, claim 243 
deaths. The two classes caused 513 deaths, or more than one half of the 
total for the year. 

These diseases are all very largely preventable by hygenic living and 
care, and it is such care as only the individual or family can exercise, and 
which neither physicians nor health boards can materially effect in any 
direct way. Many other similar lessons may be drawn from this table. 

Table No. 4 gives comparisons of the total deaths from the various 
causes for the past eighteen years, and affords valuable comparisons. 



440 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Table 

SOME COMPARISONS OF VITAL STATITICS 



116. 



1888. 



1889. 



1890. 



1891. 



Population, estimated 

Nitmber of deaths, exclusive of 

stillbirths 

Deaths, per thousand of popula 

tion 

Deaths of children under live 

years 

Ratio, deaths of children to total 

deaths, per cent 

Deaths of children per thousand 

of population 

Deaths from zymotic diseases. 

Deaths from zj'motlc diseases per 

thousand of population 

Cholera infantum 

Consuni lotion 

Croup 

Diphtheria 

Bronchitis 

Pneumonia, all forms 

Heart disease, all forms 

Scarlet fever 

Typhoid fever 

Measles 

Whooping cough 

Smallpox 

Births reported 

Births per thousand of popula 

tion 

Marriages reported 



37,884 

733 

19.35 
312 

42.56 

8.24 
231 

6.10 

89 

93 
12 
18 
29 
42 
40 

5 
20 
30 
11 

3 
1,106 



29.19 
404 



725 

18.57 
313 

43.17 

8.02 
205 

5.2£ 
115 

109 

21 

9 

11 

26 

37 



30.92 
451 



40,215 

798 

19.84 
356 

44.01 

8.85 
256 



6.37 
148 



1,391 



.34.59 
473 



41,433 

853 

20.,59 
3 97 

46.54 

9.58 
227 

5.48 
115 

109 

24 

30 

45 
23 

1 
12 

9 

5 



42,689 

764 

17.90 
353 

46.20 

8.27 
199 



4.00 
86 



23 
35 
38 
47 
5 
16 
4 
6 



«872 



901 
20.40 
434 

48.17 

9.87 
252 

5.72 
141 

94 

15 

9 

38 

58 

43 

17 
;6 
4 



*965 



45,500 



3.i 
122 

84 

7 

2 

38 
72 
38 



*985 



549 



*The returns are manifestly incomplete. 



REPORT OP THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



441 



No. 4, 

FOK THE LAST EIGHTEEN YEARS. 



1892. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


48,000 


50,000 


55,000 


.55,000 


56,000 


60,000 


60,000 


60,000 


56,987 


56,987 


56,987 


;ti;3 


971 


977 


1,020 


1,051 


1,018 


1,001 


1,068 


1,167 


1,131 


1,092 


20.0G 


19.42 


17.76 


18.54 


18.77 


16.97 


16.68 


17.80 


20.47 


19.84 


19.12 


500 


527 


546 


549 


531 


631 


5.21 


541 


561 


554 


622 


51.92 


50.62 


55.89 


53.82 


50.52 


61.98 


52.04 


50.65 


48.07 


48.99 


,56.95 


10.42 
153 


10.54 
137 


9.91 
209 


9.98 
213 


9.48 
227 


10..50 
226 


8.68 
254 


9.01 
203 


9.84 
244 


9.71 

283 


10.91 

238 


:!.]8 

Iti:; 


2.74 

89 


3.80 
40 


3.97 
146 


4.05 
129 


3.77 
110 


4.23 
122 


3.38 

78 


4.28 
119 


4.96 
121 


4.17 

98 


s;i 


79 


74 


76 


112 


88 


73 


91 


100 


81 


78 


:; 


4 


24 


14 


20 


14 


10 


10 


6 


5 


12 


r, 


1 


11 


10 


28 


29 


17 


6 


8 


3 


22 


39 


44 


56 


59 


51 


86 


45 


65 


40 


38 


55 


39 


53 


81 


86 


77 


105 


72 


113 


118 


105 


120 


48 


46 


52 


75 


77 


64 


50 


57 


77 


75 


54 


2 


5 


3 


4 


1 


1 


9 


3 


6 


9 


2 


11 


15 


8 


21 


19 


12 


14 


12 


12 


11 


8 


11 


o 


4 


1 


3 


3 


3 


5 


1 








2 




2 


3 


13 




15 


3 


8 


5 


1,178 


1,491 


1,247 


1,440 


1,714 


1,614 


1,.500 


1,489 








037 


" 650 '"' 


■ '616" 


""5^ 


" "652 


" "634 


""""565 


"" 583 

















In closing, we wish to express our sincere thanlvs to the Mayor and 
both branches of the city government, for the confidence they have man- 
ifested in us, and the many ways in which they have given assistance 
and encouragement to the health department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOHN C. BICKFORD. 
WILLIAM K. ROBBINS. 
WILLIAM M. PARSONS. 



NSPECTORS' REPORT, 



Gentlcmi'U of the Board of Health : 

We beg leave to submit the following as the report of the sanitary in- 
spectors for the year 1901 : 

Vaults and privies inspected 162 

Vaults inspected after cleaning 128 

Water-closets inspected 1,254 

Urinals inspected 31 

Yards and alleys inspected 1,777 

Cellars inspected 1,280 

Barns and outbuildings inspected] 294- 

Tenements inspected 636 

Barn cellars inspected 190 

Teams and riggings of excavators inspected 15 

Soaperies, slaughter-houses, etc., inspected 12 

Cleaning or repairs were ordered as follows: 

Vaults and privies cleaned 33 

Yards and alleys cleaned 324 

Cellars cleaned 304 

Barn cellars cleaned 30 

Sheds, etc., cleaned 21 

Tenements cleaned 58 

Water-closets, cleaned or repaired 634 

Leaky drainpipes repaired 73, 

Houses within a 100 feet of public sewer and not connected ther- 
with, 30. 

Openings other than leaks in the drainage system were found in 42 
places, and same were closed by order of the department. Six hun- 
dred and forty sinks have been examined, 41 have been ordered trapped, 
and 31 repaired. 

Bathtubs inspected, 99. Washtrays inspected, 11. 

Sewage was found running on surface of the ground in 19 places, and 
such nuisances were abated either by entering the sewer or carrying 
away in some manner not offensive. 

In doing the work of the department it has been necessary to make 
3,492 calls, and to write 56 letters. 

Five hundred and eleven complaints have been investigated. In 457 
cases the inspectors have been able to give relief, and in 54 cases it was 
found that no cause existed, or that same was beyond the control of the 
department. 



444 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Fifty-six dead animals have been properly disposed of. 

One hundred and nineteen hens and small animals have been removed 
from cellars. 

Nineteen swine and cows have been discovered being kept within the 
sanitary limits of the city, without licenses. Same were ordered removed 
or licenses procured. 

Twenty-five complaints were made against the scavenger service; in 
each case the proper parties were notified and relief afforded. 

Eighteen persons were discovered throwing garbage in the back streets 
and lake, and were warned against the practice. 

Private swill collectors have been warned 21 times to be neater in 
their work. 

One hundred and ninety catch-basins or street cesspools have been 
inspected, and 28 have been flushed or repaired by order of this depart- 
ment. 

Twenty-three notices have been prepared and served, and proper 
returns made. 

A sanitary inspection has been made of 25 bakeshoi:)s. 

Sixty-three stores have been inspected. 

Theatres were inspected 5 times. 

The dumps have been inspected 27 times. Sausage factories inspected 
1.5 times. 

One hundred and thirty nuisances not otherwise classified have been 
abated through the efforts of this department. 

Householders have been given six permits to clean their own vaults. 

Permits to the number of 1,585 have been granted for the burial or 
removal of dead bodies, and the returns forwarded to the city registrar. 

A statement of mortality has been prepared each month, and copies 
sent to over two hundred other towns and cities, to local physicians, etc. 

Contagious and infectious diseases have been reported as follows: 
Measles 765, diphtheria 135, typhoid fever 49, scarlet fever 33, membra- 
nous croup 16, smallpox, 28, total 1026. Eight hundred and ninety-two 
of these cases were reported by physicians, 80 by householders, 
and 54 were discovered by the inspectors. The inspectors were unable 
to trace the cause in 335 cases; in 676 the connection with some previous 
case was clearly traceable. Seventeen cases were contracted outside 
of the city; and in 8 cases it was reasonable to attribute the cause to 
unsanitary surroundings. 

In some cases disinfectants were being used. The inspectors ordered 
their use in other cases. At most of these places instructions were given 
as to their use, and in many cases the department furnished the disin- 
fectants. 

In some cases patients were found well isolated, and in the other cases 
inspectors were obliged to order isolation. In nearly all of these cases it 
was necessary for the inspectors to give instructions as to the steps to be 
taken. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 445 

Houses were watched to see that the rules of isolation were complied 
with, and 24 funerals were attended to prevent a too public observance of 
the same. 

Eight hundred and sixty-four rooms where disease had existed were 
fumigated by the inspectors. 

Eighty-three children who were attending school, and seventy-seven 
people who were working and living in houses where contagious disease 
existed, were either restrained from attending school and employment, 
or instructed as to thorough isolation from the disease until all danger 
from contagion had passed. 

Forty-five cases have been cared for at the contagious disease hospitals. 

About 3,000 pamphlets issued by the State Board of Health have been 
distributed in the localities where contagious diseases existed. 

Weekly reports of contagious and infectous diseases have been sent to 
the State Board of Health, Concord, and the United States Marine Hos- 
pital Service, Washington, D C. 

The inspectors have euch in turn patroled ths shores of Lake Massa- 
besic, Sundays, holidays, and parts of every other day from June 1 to 
October 1. 

Ice fields from which ice was being cut were inspected. 

Horse races were attended to prevent the pollution of the water and 
ice at the lake. 

Steamboats have been inspected many times. 

Persons were warned as to the disposal of sink water. 

Several picnics and band concerts were attended, to prevent the care- 
less disposal of waste and rubbish in the lake or on its shores. 

Banana skins, tin cans, paper, and rubbish of all sorts, have been re- 
moved whenever found. 

pi.UMiiiXfi inspector's report. 



702 



Plumbing fixtures set: 

Number of tank water-closets 

frost-proof water-closets, Kelley it McCullock . . 8 

sinks 423 

bathtubs '-^^^ 

wasbowls o02 

Number of wash trays I'^l 

urinals " 19 

refrigerators 1* 

slophoppers ^ 

cellar drains '* 

other fixtures not classified above . 41 

Total number of fixtures put in 1,93(5 



446 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Number of plumbing notices tiled 411 

water tests of soil pipe made , . . . . 332 

stacks of soil pipe made 381 

smoke tests of soil pipe 11 

defects and leaks found 84 

complaints investigated 32 

fixtures and pipes found unserviceable andrei^aired 19 
consultations veith owners, tenants, agents, plumb- 
ers, etc 188 

A total of 2,004 inspections were made of the work during its progress 
and after its completion. 

JOHN F. LOONEY. 
CARL O. 8EAMAN. 
WILLIAM B. BLAKE. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY, 



REPORT OF THE THE TRUSTEES OF THE 
CITY LIBRARY, 



To the Citg Councils of the Cit'j of Manchester : 

The trustees of the City Library herewith respectfully present their 
forty-ninth annual report of the affairs of the library and, accompanying? 
the same, the report made to them by the treasurer of the board, contain- 
ing the statement of the sums received and the expenditures made by 
him in behalf of the board from the funds under the control of the 
trustees. 

The treasurer reports the amount expended for the purcLase of books 
during the past year to have been the sum of one thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-one dollars and seventy-eight cents and for the purchase of 
periodicals the sum of one hundred and ninety-five dollars and five cents, 
making a total expenditure for both of these purposes of two thousand 
one nundred and eighty-six dollars and eighty-three cents. 

Of the amount expended for the purchase of books, the sum of fifty- 
nine dollars and seventy-eight cents was expended for the purchase of 
books to replace those worn out and withdrawn from circulation, and the 
sum of seven hundred and fifty-five dollars and nine cents was taken from 
the income of the Dean fund and used for the purchase of books for the 
increase of that department of the library. Exclusive of these two items 
the sum expended for the purchase of new books was one thousand one 
hundred and seventy-six dollars and ninety-nine cents, leaving a balance 
in the hands of the treasurer at the close of the year of the amotmt ap- 
propriated by the City Councils for the purchase of books of nine hun- 
dred and seventy-one dollars and twenty-two cents. 

The balances at the close of the year of the accumulative income of the 
several funds under the control of the trustees were as follows: 

Dean fund $S,244.4() 

Mary E. Elliot fund 1,632.57 

Eliza A. Eaton fund .~ 823.44 

The incidental expenses of the library for the past year have been five 
thousand two hundred and forty-nine dollars and five cents. The items 
that go to make up the amount of these incidental expenses can be found 
in detail in the annual report of the city, the bills for the same having 
been paid by the city treasurer upon the approval by the trustees from 
tlie sum appropriated by the library. 



450 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

From the reijort of the librarian it appears that during the year the 
library has been open for the delivery of books three hundred and six 
days, during which time the number of books delivered for home use 
were seventy-six thousand, seven hundred and fifteen, an average of a 
little over two hundred and fifty per day. In addition to the number 
delivered for general circulation twenty-nine thousand six hundred and 
sixty-seven books were delivered for use at the reading room, an average 
of over ninety-six per day. The total number of books delivered durini; 
the year for general circulation and use at the reading room was on^ 
hundred and six thousand three hundred and eighty-two, an average of 
three hundred and forty-seven and two-thirds per day. The circulation 
for the past year was the largest since the library was established. As 
compared with the previous year the circulation for home use shows an 
increase of four thousand four hundred and seventeen, and the number 
delivered for use at the reading room an increase of one thousand two 
hundred and sixty-three while the total circulation shows an increase of 
five thousand six hundred and eighty. The increase in circulation of 
books used at the reading room for the year 1901, over the year 1900, was 
nine thousand three hundred and eleven, while the x>ast year the increase 
over 1901, as stated above, was one thousand two hundred and sixty-three. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the last report, 
including maps and pamphlets, was forty-seven thousand two hundred 
and seventy-eight. During the year there have been added by jiurchase 
nine hundred and seventy-two volumes, by donation four hundred and 
nine volumes, and one hundred and forty-one volumes of periodicals have 
been bound, making the number of bound volumes forty-eight thousand 
and eighty-two, and the total number, including sixteen maps and seven 
hundred and two pamphlets, forty-eight thousand eight hundred. 

The number of books withdrawn from circulation during the year on 
account of their worn and defaced condition was three hundred and 
fifteen. Of this number and of others retired from circulation in previous 
years for the same reason, or had been lost, seventy-three have been 
replaced during the yea,r at a cost, as previously stated, of fifty-nine 
dollars and seventy-eight cents. A large number of the books purchased 
in the first few years after the destruction of the library by fire in 1856 
have become very badly worn and must soon be withdrawn from circula- 
tion. The trustees have expended during the past ten years on the 
average about one hundred dollars per year to replace such of the books 
as they were compelled to retire from circulation as defaced and worn out 
from constant use. Of the annual appi'opriation of one thousand dollars 
made by the City Councils for the purchase of books and periodicals, 
nearly two hundred dollars is expended for periodicals. If in addition 
the trustees expend each year one hundred dollars to replace worn out 
books, only the sum of seven hundred dollars would remain for the 
purchase of new books for the increase of the library. The trustees res- 
pectfully submit for the consideration of the City Councils the propriety 
of a small increase in the approi)riation made for the purchase of. books 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 451 

and periodicftls, thereby enabling the trustees to more rapidly replace 
rhose worn-out books most constantly called for by the patrons of the 
library. 

One hundred and seventeen different periodicals have been regularly 
received at the library during the year, of which number sixty-seven were 
purchased and fifty were donated, and on the completion of the various 
volumes they have been bound and placed on the shelves for general circu- 
lation. 

The number of books reported lost during the year, forty in number, is 
largely in excess of any number reported lost in any previous year. It is 
dilticult to account for the loss of so large a number under the present 
system of delivering and charging books in use at the library. 

Whether the new arrangement introduced by tbe librarian of placing 
books for inspection in shelves, in the reading-room, outside the delivery 
desk was a contributing cause to any of these losses the trustees are not 
now able to state. 

In the last report of the trustees mention was made of the fact that the 
readiag room at the library had been open on Sundays during the months 
of October, November and December of that year. In continuance of the 
plan then outlined, the reading room at the library lias been open each 
Sunday during the past year, from eleven o'clock in the forenoon to five 
o'clock in the afternoon. The total cost, excluding lighting and heating, 
was two hundred and seventy-seven dollars and ninety-five cents. The at- 
tendance during the year has been only to a limited extent fi'oni those of 
our citizens whose employment precluded their use of the library on week 
days and to whom an opportunity for reading and study was intended to be 
given by the opening of tlie library on Sunday. The total attendance 
during the year was two thousand one hundred and twenty-three, of 
Avhich number four hundred and forty-eight were men and one hundred and 
fifteen were women ; the remaining number, fifteen hundred and fifty-nine, 
were classed as children, most of them being under the age of twelve 
years. The average attendance per Sunday was for men nearly forty-one, 
for women two and for children about thirty. 

It will be seen from the above statistics that nearly three quarters of the 
total atetndance was children. The attendance of so many children may 
account in part for the lack of attendance of adults, as the children, 
while not disorderly, are somewhat restless and noisy and more or less 
disturbing to the older people engaged in reading and study. It is pos- 
sible, that if the children could have a room by themselves, the attend- 
ance of adults might show an increase, l)ut unfortunately the library 
building has no room suitable to be used as a children's reading room. 

Some two or three years ago the Manchester Federation of Women's 
(Tubs offered to give to the city the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars, 
which sum had been obtained from a fair held by the Federation, towards 
the expense of fitting up a room in the basement of the library build- 
ing for a children's reading-room, suggesting that the room in the base- 
ment used for piiblic documents and newspapers might be taken for the 



452 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

purpose and another place be provided for the public; documents and 
newspapers. 

Thfe matter was taken under consideration by the committee on lands 
and buildings and a committee from the board of trustees, but it was 
found that the expense of making the necessary changes and fitting up of 
the two rooms was too great to warrant the undertaking without a special 
appropriation for the purjiose from the city councils. No appropriation, 
however, was made. 

During the past year the ladies connected with the Federation of 
Women's Clubs have suggested to the trustees that the money in their 
possession might be used in fitting up the gallery over the reading room 
at the library, for a children's room. The trustees, individually, ex- 
pressed thenaselves as willing to receive and use the money for the pur- 
pose desired, pi-ovided that the City Councils would appropriate a suffi- 
cient sura to pay for the services of a competent assistant to take charge 
of the room and direct the reading for the children, and that the subject 
of such appropriation would be brought to the attention of the City 
Councils before the beginning of the year. At a recent meeting of the 
trustees the matter of this appropriation was referred to the Chairman 
and Clerk of the board with authority to ask for the appropriation re- 
quired. 

The sum of five hundred dollars was decided upon to pay for the ser- 
vices of an attendant and the matter now rests with the City Councils. The 
trustees are of the opinion that an appropaiation for this purpose would 
materially assist in directing to right reading and thought the children 
who as adults will participate in the government of the city. 

In October last the publication of the Library Bulletin was discon- 
tinued, the Library Bulletin Company assigning as a reason for its dis- 
continuance that it failed to receive sufficient advertising patronage to 
warrant its further publication without serious financial loss to the com- 
pany. The trustees regret that the Bulletin Company felt obliged to 
take this action because for the time^^it was published, a little over a year 
it had proved to be of considerable benefit to the patrons of the library 
in giving information of recent accessions of books and furnishing lists 
as aids for reading on special subjects, and thus tending to increase the 
circulation of books from the library. 

The Card catalogue, work upon which has been in progress for several 
years, is now substantially completed, all the books and painphlets, with 
the exception of the government documents, having been classified and 
cata'ogued. There now remains the work of analyzing and expanding the 
subordinate subjects beyond the titles of the books in order to make the 
catalogue more useful and convenient to patrons of the library in finding 
subject matter sought. It is the intention of the trustees to print during 
the year one or more titles from the catalogue, similar to those alread.y 
issued. 

Accompanying this report will be foiyul the names of all those who have 
made donations to the library during the year, with the number of books or 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES' OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 453 

periodicals presented by each person. Due acknowledgement has been 
made in behalf of the city to all who have in this way manifested their in- 
terest in the increase and prosperity of the library. 

The new librarian Miss F. Mabel Winchell assumed her duties on the 
tirst of January, and has continued in the position throughout the year. 
Miss Winchell before coming to this city had considerable experience in 
library work as an assistant under Mr. C. A. Cutter, the librarian of the 
Forbes library at Northampton, Mass., and has during the j^ear m^ide con- 
scientious ettbrts to add to the circulation of the library and increase its 
usefulness to the public. 

The trustees desire to renew their acknowletlgemeuts to the members of 
the city councils, and particularly to the committee on lands and buildings 
for the courtsey and consideration with which their suggestions relating to 
the library have been received, and carried out. 

April 2, 1903. 
In board of trustees read and approved, and ordered to be signed by the 
chairman and clerk of the board, and transmitted to the city couucils. 

EUGENE E. REED, 

Mayor. 
N. P. Hunt, 

Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Citij Libranj : 

The treasurer of the board submits the following account of the receipts 
and expenditures by the board of the funds received on account of the 
library : 



1902. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropriation 81,159.56 

Aug. 15. appropriation for books for 1902 . . . 1,000.00 

Dec. 24. F. Mabel Winchell, balance of fines, etc. 220.6(5 

F. Mabel Winchell, catalogues sold . . 8.35 

F. Mabel Winchell, books lost .... 14.39 



Dit. 



$8,999.55 



.?2,402.9ft 

Jan. 1. To balance of income of Dean fund . . . $8,579.48 

income of Dean fund 90.00 

July 1. interest on accumulation of income . . 99.54 

interest on accumulation of income . . 148.17 

interest on fund 45.00 

Oct. 1. interest on fund , 31.49 

interest on accumulation of income . . 5.87 

Jan. 1. To Mary E. Elliot fund $2,000.00 

balance of interest, Mary E. Eiliot 

fund 1,627.47 

Oct. 1. interest on Mary E. Elliot fund . . . . 30.00 

interest on accumulation of income . 25.10 

Jan. 1. To Eliza A. Eaton fund $8,000.00 

balance of interest, Eliza A. Eaton 

fund 766.28 

Oct. 1. interest on Eliza A. Eaton fund . . . 45.00 

interest on accumulation of income . 12.21 

§3,823.44 

$18,908.52 

1902. , Cr, 

Jan. 29. Paid F. W. Houge, books $3.50 

30. Little, Brown & Co., books . . . . 6.00 
Lawyers' Co-operative Publishing- 
Co., books 5.00 

Feb. 6. W. B. Clarke Co., books 112.59 



18,682.57 



456 



ANXUAI. OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Mar. 7. Paid H. W. Wilson, periodicals 3.00 

Little, Brown & Co., books .... 2..50 

19. Little, Brown c% Co., books . . . 3.00 
24. Houghton, Mifflin A: Co., (Dean 

fund), books .300.00 

28. W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), books 22.20. 

Apr. 4. Little, Brown & Co , 2.00 

14. Essex Publishing Co o.OO 

15. George C. Gilmore, books 12.00 

16. Little, Brown & Co., books .... 3.75 

17. Publishers' Weekly, books 3.65 

May 10. George E. Littlefield, books .... 20-00 

28. George E. Littlefield, books .... 13.05 

June 3. Cumulative Index Co., books . . . 5.00 

4. W. B. Clarke Co., books . . ~. . . . 266.31 

W. B. Clarke Co., rei}laced books . 18.22 

16. Little, Brown c% Co., books .... 1.50 

21. W. B. Clarke Co., books 100.67 

July 9. Commonwealth of Massachusetts . . 29.25 

14. W. B. Clarke Co., books 69.06 

Aug. 22. Little, Brown & Co., books 3.50 

W. B. Clarke Co., replaced books . . 1.00 

W. B. Clarke Co., books 87.81 

Sept. 9. W. B. Clarke Co., replaced books . . 37-97 

13. W. B. Clarke Co., books 42.64 

20. W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), books 213.23 
Oct. 8. Little, Brown & Co-, books .... 1.50 

W. B. Clarke Co., books ...... 9.99 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), books 8.85 

11. W. B. Clarke Co , replaced books . . 1.92 
Nov. 13. George H. Policy iSr Co. (Dean fund) 

books 70.00 

21. F. Mabel AVinchell, books 5.10 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., books . . 2-00 

22. W. B. Clarke Co., books 120.00 

Dec. 2. George E. Littlefield, books .... .45 

15. William H. Guild & Co., periodicals 192.05 
20. A. L. A. Publishing Board, books . .74 

22. Little, Brown & Co., books 2.50 

W. B. Clarke Co., books 236.85 

W. B. Clarke Co., replaced books . . , .67 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), books 140.81 

$2,186.83 

Dec. 31. By balance of appropriation $971.22 

balance of Dean fund income 8,244.46 

balance of Elliot fun dand interest 3,682.57 

balance of Eaton fund and interest 3,823.44 



§18,908.52 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 457 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the library for the 
year ending December 31, 1902, the bills for which have been paid by the 
city treasurer, upon approval of same by the committee on accounts of 
the board of trustees, the detailed items of which will be found in the 
annual report of city, have been as follows: 

Services of librarian $900.00 

Services of assistants to librari-an 998.65 

Reclassification and cataloguino- • • 927.40 

Fuel 401.37 

Gas 67.28 

Electricity 471.30 

Insurance 125.00 

Binding 180.70 

Eebinding " 374.85 

Supplies 374.31 

Printing trustee's report 13.00 

Water 16.00 

Cleaning 108.84 

Newspapers ... . 6.00 

Incidentals 6.40 

Sunday opening of library 277.95 

$5,249.05 

RECAriTULATIOX. 

Balance December 31, 1901 32, 652.18 

Balance of appropriation for Sunday opening . . . 174.45 

.^2,826.63 

Appropriation for 1902 $6,036.00 

Appropriation for Sunday opening 164.00 

-$6,200.00 



89,026.63 

Paid trustees for the purchase of books $1,000.00 

Paid incidental expenses 5,249.05 

Balance of appropriation 2,717-08 

Balance of appropriation for Sunday opening .... 60.56 

89,026.63 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. P. HUXT. 
Treasurer of Tru!<.tees of the CiUj Lihrnrii. 

December 31, 1902. 
We have examined the foregoing report and find the same correctly 
cast and properly vouched. 

WILLIAM C. CLARKE, Mayor. 
WALTER M. PARKER, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 



458 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

December 31, 1902. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of receipts and expen- 
ditures embraced in the foregoing report of the treasurer of the trustees 
of the city library, and find the same correctly cast and properly 
vouched. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Triiatees of the City Library, 3Innchester, X. H. 

GiCNTLKMEN : — The forty-ninth annual report of the City Library is 
herewith presented. 

Our statistics for the year, which will be found tabulated at the end of 
this report and to "which I refer for more explicit details, show a gratifying 
increase over the preceding years. 

CIRCULATION, ETC. 

The total circulation, 106,382, is the largest ever reached in the history of 
the library, and each month of the year has shown an increase over the 
corresponding month of the previous year, while the percentage in the 
amount of tiction used has dropped from 79 to 73. Not only has there been 
a larger proportion of non-fiction read, but much of the tiction read has 
been of the best. 

OPEN SHELVES. 

The additional open shelves re'commended in the last report were granted 
and have been greatly appreciated as shown by the large number of 
borrowers who make their selections from them. On these shelves we 
have talien much pains to place the best of reading. 

A children's table has placed good reading also before the young people. 
The need for this was great, as many of the boys seemed to know no other 
authors than Alger, Ellis, Optic, and Castlemon. 

READING ROOM CIRCULATION. 

The books thus made available, have been much read in the library, as 
well as taken out for home use. Of those used in the reading room no 
record could be kept. Considering this fact and also that about fifty gift 
magazines have been placed in the reading room and used without record, 
it is somewhat remarkable that the recorded circulation is larger than for 
the previous year. 

WORN-OUT BOOKS. 

Notwithstanding the number of worn out books that have been discarded 
during the year there are yet upon our shelves many books that need to be 
replaced because they are so soiled, worn, and yellow with age, they are 
repellant instead of attractive. 



1 



460 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

* 

GOOD COPIES NEEDED. 

We lack copies that are even fairly good of manj* of the works of our 
standard American and English authors so that when a volume is called for, 
the only copy we can offer is so poor that the reader often turns to an 
inferior work because of the better print and cleaner leaves. The library 
should have attractive copies of all the standard works that we may 
encourage, not discourage the taste for good literature. To this end I 
most urgently request that an increase in the appropriation for books 
be obtained. 

CITY APPKOPRI.VTIOK. 

When the Manchester Athenaeum turned ovei its library to the city in 
1854:, the city agreed to appropriate not less than -fljOOO a year for the 
purchase of books and periodicals. During these forty-nine years the city 
has trebled in size while the appropriation for books has remained the 
same. It would seem quite evident that the growth and usefulness of the 
library cannot keep pace with the needs of the city without an increase in 
this appropriation. 

A MODEL LIBRARY. 

Manchester is the largest city in the state and its library should be a 
model to which the smaller libraries of the state could look for help and 
suggestion. 

NEW BUILDING NEEDED. 

Our greatest needs are a new building and a children's room. The 
necessity for a new building has long been apparent to the people of 
Manchester, the present edifice being quite inadequate in size, unsuitable 
in design, and very insufficiently lighted. It is greatly to be hoped that 
at no distant date the city of Manchester may be provided with a library as 
well adapted to its requirements as its admirable High School building is 
suited to the purposes of that institution. 

CHILDREN'S ROOM. 

The children's room we hope to see even sooner. It is thought by manj- 
that the gallery could be used for this purpose and, although it is not all 
that could be desired, it would be far better than nothing. It is understood 
that the ladies of the Women's Federation of this city stand ready to fit up 
this room, if the city will make an appropriation for a children's librarian. 
The need for a children's room with a trained assistant in charge is espe- 
cially great in this city, because there are so many boys and girls here who 
have no helpful home influences whatever, and if they are ever to form the 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 461 

reading habit it must be taught at the library or the school, and taught 
while they are youug. 

Of all our many needs we believe the children's room is most imperative 

REQUEST SYSTEJf. 

During the year a number of changes have been made, the first being 
the inauguration, on January 20th, of the request system. By this 
system any person desiring a book which is out, may leave his name for 
the book and have it reserved for him on its return to the library. If 
more than one request be left for the same book the requests are honored 
in the order of receipt. This system, so far as may be judged by the 
many expressions of appreciation which have come to us, has proved 
satisfactory to a large number of our l)orrowers. Thirty-nine requests 
were left the first day, and an average of about one hundred seventy- 
five are on file all the time. 

lilE^TIIDAY CELEBRATIONS. 

In February we began the custom of celebrating the birthdays of noted 
people, and days of general interest, such as the Foruth of July, Hallow- 
e'en, and Thanksgiving Day. A collection of the books appropriate to 
the occasion was gathered and placed where accessible to the public, 
with such pictures as we were able to obtain. These collections seem to 
have been enjoyed by our readers and especially by teachers and scholars 
who wished material for school use. More would have been done along 
this line had not the time of our assistants been so fully occupied with 
the routine work of the library. 

DATE OF RETVRN^ GIVEX. 

On March 1 we began to stamp the date of return instead of the date 
of issue on the books charged, believing that it would be more satisfac- 
tory to the borrower to know when a book was due then when it was 
taken out, thus saving all trouble of reckoning the date. 

REGISTRATION CARDS. 

On March (3 the large books which previously had been used for regis- 
tration were superceded by cards. 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CARDS. 

On July Id it was decided to try the catalogue cards issued by the 
Library of Congress. These cards have proved very satisfactory and 
have been a saving in time though they do not in the least do away with 
the need of a cataloguer. The time gained through their use may well 
be sjjent in the future in analyzing such books as require it. This analyz- 



462 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ing will greatly increase the usefulness of tlie books. Analytical work 
lias been done during the past year on the new books as received. For 
the accessions previous to 1902 it is yet to be done and' is likely to take 
many years unless our cataloguing force is increased, for the current 
work of the library requires all the time of the present corps of assis- 
tants and any time taken for back work is at the expense of our present 
needs. 

SATUKDAY TILL 9 P. >r. 

Lxider Hutliurity of the trustees the library has been hept open on 
Saturday evenings, since September' 25, until 9 p. M. This was tried as an 
experiment but the number who have visited the library between the 
hours of eight and nine, during the last two months of the year has fully 
justified the change. 

STUDY POCKETS. 

At the same time the trustees authorized the issue of additional vol- 
umes to borrowers when such volumes were wanted for purposes of study 
or research. The number of additional volumes to be allowed was left to 
the discretion of the librarian. Books issued in this way may be kept as 
long as needed without renewal, but after two Aveeks are subject to re- 
call if wanted by another person. During the three months of October, 
November, and December one hundred and eight people took advantage 
of this new privilege and expressed themselves as greatly pleased with 
the arrangement. 

PICTIKE EXHIBITS. 

A new feature of the work this year has been the picture exhibits. 
We have been fortunate in obtaining a number of loan collections all of 
which have been loaned to us without charge. 

The first of these was given in the spring and consisted of about one 
hundred miscellaneous pictures. These remained on view for a month 
or more and were enjoyed by many. The second exhibition was given in 
Xovember and consisted of thirty-two unusually fine photographs of 
landscapes and animals taken by the Rev. Wallace Nutting of Provi- 
dence, E. I. The third exhibit consisting of over two hundred v choice 
architectural views, was given in December. The last two collections 
were exhibited through the courtesy of the Soule Art Company, of 
Boston. 

The interest taken in these exhibitions of pictures leads us to exjjress 
the hope that the day is not far distant when the library will have a col- 
lection of its own. Pictures and music have come to be a recognized 
part of the modern city library and by many libraries are considered a 
most important feature. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 463 

r.II3i:AKV BXILLETIN. 

One chanoej much to be regretted, has taken i^lace during the year. I 
refer to the termination of the bulletin. The Library Bulletin Co. of Bos- 
ton that has published the bulletin free of charge, could not make it pay, 
and so felt obliged in October, to cease publication. This had served as 
a supplement to our printed lists and will be greatly missed by our 
patrons and by our library staff in their work. I would present for con- 
sideration the suggestion that we print a bulletin of our own. If a 
monthly should seem too expensive, a quarterly would serve our purpose 
Very well. 

KE-REGISTBATIOX. 

At this time I would urgently recommend that during the summer of 
1903 a new registration should be commenced. The present registration 
dates back to 1880, twenty-three years ago. This means that we have 
on onr lists the names of many who are no longer residents of Manches- 
ter. Their cards and pockets are taking room in the drawers that is 
needed for active borrowers. Either we must have additional drawers 
(for which we seem to have no room), or we must have a weeding out. 
Most city libraries have a re-registration every few years, and with the 
changing population of Manchester it would be well to have one at least 
every five years, perhaps oftener. 

JANITOR. 

I would also recoiumend the ap])ointment of a janitor to take care of the 
whole building. The present arrangement provides one man to care for 
the furnace, another to look after the outside steps and walks, while the 
assistants sweep and dust indoors and a woman cleans twice a week ; this 
arrangement is both expensive and unsatisfactory. 

SUNDAY OrENING. 

In regard to the Sunday opening I would state that from April 20 to the 
end of the year a record was kept of the number who used the room 
between the hours of 11 a. m. and 1 p. m. as well as the total number for the 
da}'. Tlie following figures show the results. 
Record kept for 35 Sundays. 

11 a. m. — 1 p. M. 
Men Women Children Total 

165 28 145 338 

Average attendance per Sunday. 

4.7 2.7 4.3 9.6 

Total for same Sundays. 

11 A. M. — 5 p. M. 

349 95 846 1290 

Percentage of use between 11 a. m. and 1 p. M. 

47 29 17 26 



464 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

From this it may be seeu that the total average attendance per Sunday 
between the hours of eleven and one is only about nine and one half 
persons. A small number in comparison with the afternoon when the 
seating capacity of the room is often taxed to its utmost. I would there- 
fore, recommend that the hours on Sunday be changed from 11a.m. - 5 p. m. 
to 1 - 5 p. M. 

The number of people, 2123, who have used the library on Sunday during 
the year would seem without qtiestion to justify the expense of keeping it 
open for a few hours on that day. A large part of those who visit the 
library on Sunday afternoon are boys who would probably be loafing on 
the street corners, if not in some worse place, were it not for the open 
reading room of the library. I believe the city does well to provide some 
place for them, where they may be surrounded by elevating influences. 
Doubtless more adults would come in the afternoon were there a place 
where they could have fairly good air and quiet. Though good order is 
kept in the room, the constant going and coming of the children is some- 
what distracting to grown people, and to properly ventilate the room is 
impossible. 

GIFTS — MAGAZINES. 

In the summer an appeal was made in the local papers and in our 
library bulletin for magazines, both current and back numbers. There- 
s]jonse to the api:)eal was most gratifying and the records show that 2,287 
numbers have been donated. From these we have been able to add to 
the library forty volumes which were wanted to complete our periodical 
sets or were needed duplicates. Of many of the standard periodicals it 
is advisable to have two sets so that one may circulate and the other 
always be found in for reference use. Of others it is well to have 
duplicate copies because they are so mvich used that they soon wear out. 

After the forty volumes referred to were bound there was still a large 
number of issues left. Part of these we have kept in the hope that future 
gifts or exchange may fill in the gaps and giveus yet other complete 
volumes to add to our shelves. 

PERIODICAL CLEANING-HOUSE. 

The remainder not being useful to us, was sent to the jjeriodical clean- 
ing-house at Concord. This cleaning-house is conducted by the State 
Library Commission in the interest of the New Hampshire libraries. 
From these we hope to receive in return periodicals which will add to 
the value and usefulness of our collection. 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AND APPEAL. 

To all who, during the year, have given us either books, pamphlets, or 
magazines, we extend at this time our hearty thanks, but, like Oliver 
Twist, we call for "more'". We would urge all to give to the library such 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 465 

books and magazines as they do not care to preserve. Allow us to decide 
whether or not they are worth keeping. We would especially solicit 
gifts of local interest. Any books, papers, pamphlets, or programs relating 
in any way to Manchester or vicinity, or books on any subject published 
here, will be most thankfully received. Also any curios or articles of 
historic interest. 

DEAX PURCHASE. 

The collection of scientific and technical works known as the Dean 
Purchase has been augmented this year by 139 volunies. 

Some very important accessions have been made both to the Dean 
Purchase and to the general library. 

INVENTORY. 

The inventory taken this year shows forty volumes missing. While we 
feel confident that some of these books will come to light, we regret that 
so many should remain as yet unaccounted for. The number is consider- 
ably larger than that of last year, but it is not large compared with other 
libraries. 

LIBRARY MEETINGS. 

Your librarian and Miss Newell attended the meeting of the American^ 
Library Association at Magnolia, Mass., June 14-20. Much inspiration is 
gained by heanng discussions upon library topics and by meeting other 
librarians, and it is believed that that the library would be fully repaid 
by better service should the assistants be granted time to attend State^ 
and National Library meetings. 

STAFF .MEETINGS. 

Weekly staff meetings have been held regularly throughout the year 
with the exception of the months of July and August. These meetings 
have helped in giving those among us who w^ere new to the work a better 
understanding of the scope and ideals of modern library methods, and 
have strengthened in us all that interest in our work and ardor for it 
which go so far towards making possible concerted action and success. 

PUPlE ASSISTANTS. 

Two pupil assistants have been allowed to enter the library during the 
year for the purpose of learning library work. Such assistants agree to 
give their services without remuneration for a certain number of months 
in return for the teaching which they receive. The first of these pupil 
assistants was Miss Grace W. Bushee of Merrimac, N. H., who stayed with 



466 ANNUAL OFFICIAL' REPORTS. 

us three months aud then left to enter the Amherst Summer School of 
Lihrary Economy. She is now an assistant in the library of the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, Boston. The second pupil assistant to 
come to us was Miss Alice S. Furber of West Manchester who is still 
with us. 

SUBSTITUTES. 

Several boys who wished to fit themselves for substitute work have 
also come to us in much the same way. While during the first of their 
apprenticeship they need considerable attention, later on they well re- 
pay us by the routine work which they laerform. In fact, they have done 
considerable work that otherwise would not have been done. 

My gratitude is due to the trustees for their kind permission to make_ 
several changes which were suggested. I wish also to express at this 
time my hearty thanks to the members of the staif for their faithful 
services and their cordial co-operation with all plans for the welfare 
of the library. 

Before closing this report I wish to say that many thanks are due to the 
local papers for their courtesy in publishing from time to time our 
various book lists and other notices. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. MABEL WINCHELL, 

Librarian. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 4(37 

APPENDIX I. 

Accessions. 

Increase by purchase 972 

by gift 409 

by binding periodicals 141 

Total accessions for the year 1,522 

Number of volumes in library as last reported 47,278 

Whole number of accessions 48,800 

Worn out volumes withdrawn from circulation 315 

Number of volumes replaced 73 

Number of volumes lost or injured and paid for 15 

Number of volumes lost and not yet paid for 20 

Number of volumes burned by the Board of Health on account 

of contagious diseases 3 

Number of magazines subscribed for 63 

Number of magazines given 42 

Number of newspapers subscribed for 4 

Number of newspapers given 8 

Total number periodicals received 117 



APPENDIX II. 

ClKCT3I>ATI0N AXD RKGISTKATIOX. 

Number of days I>ibrary was open 306 

KECOKO, UY CI.ASSES, OF VOLUMES ISSUED. 

No. vols. Per ct. 

General works 2,929 3.8 

Philosophy and Religion 1,292 1.7 

Biography 2,729 3.6 

History 2,605 3.4 

Geography and Travels 2,370 3.1 

Social Sciences '('■^S, 1.0 

Science and Useful Arts 3,327 4.3 

Fine Arts 1,371 1.8 

Literature 2,858 3.7 

Fiction 56,506 73.6 

Total vumber of volumes delivered for home use .... 76,715 

Average daily use (home) 251 

Largest number any one day 541 

Smallest number any one day 127 

Largest number any one month 7,505 

Smallest number any one month 5,320 

Number of volumes delivered in Reading Room 29,667 



468 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Average daily use 97 

Total circulation for 1902 106,382 

Number of volumes issued to teachers , 1,493 

Number of borrowers who have used study pockets. . . . 108 
(Study pockets were not granted until October 1.) 

KEGISTKATION. 



Number registered in 1902 612 

Whole number issued since beginning last registration, 1880 . . 14,273 

Number of borrowers on deposit . 18 



CIRCULATION FOR TWELVE TEARS. 



Library. 



TotaL 



1S91 


56,265 
55,874 
55,295 
55,054 
59,495 
G6,4S8 
78,141 
80,436 
77,159 
71,455 
72,298 
76,715 


8,270 

7,846 

8,203 

9,873 

10,934 

15,480 

16,813 

19,030 

17,399 

19.093 

28,4(14 

29,067 


04,535 


1892 


63,720 


1893 


63,498 


1894 


64,927 


1895 


70,429 


1896 


81,968 


1897 


94,9;J4 


1898 . 


99,466 


1899 


94,558 


1900 


90,548 


1901 


100,702 


um . .. 


106,382 







Circulation for previous ysars was given in the report for the year 1890. 



APPENDIX IIL 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS. 

Number of books classified 

Number of books catalogued 

Cards written for pamphlets catalogued (estimated) . . 

Number of volumes repaired at bindery 

Number of volumps repaired and covei-ed ar, tlie library. 

Postals sent to delinquents , . . 

Reserve notices sent 

Sunday Statistics. 

ATTENDANCE. 



1,290 
1,229 

1,800 
1,497 
:1.733 
o9(i 
1,00.5 





Men. 


Women. 


Chiliiren. 


Total. 


Average per Sunday. 


449 _ 115 
8.6 2.2 


1,.'').59 
30. 


2,123 

40.8 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OP THE CITY LIBRARY. 469 

CIRCULATIOK. 

General works 1,918 

Philosophy and Religion 105 

Biography 45 

History 74 

Geography and Travels , 55 

Social Sciences 67 

Science and Usefnl Arts 254 

Fine Arts • 63 

Literature 496 

Fiction 851 



Total 3,928 



APPENDIX IV. 

RECEIPTS FROM FINES ETC., FROM DECEMBER 1, 1901 TO DECEMBER 1, 1902. 

Received from fines $286.39 

" " catalogues sold 8.35 

" " books lost and paid for 14.39 

" " reserve notices 21.64 

" " miscellaneous sales 1.07 

— — 1331.84 

Paid for expressage and incidentals 88.44 

Paid to treasurer $243.40 



APPENDIX V. 
Donations to Librai-y. 

Books. Pam- Maga- 
phlets. zines. 

Abbott, Mrs. O. D 6 778 

Abbott Public Library, Marblehead, Mass 1 

Aberdeen, Scotland. — Public Library 1 

Adriance Memorial Library, Poughkeepsie, 'N. Y". . . 1 

Aguilar Free Library, New York City 1 

American Free Trade League 1 

American Institute of Instruction 1 

American Irish Historical Society 1 

Amherst College 1 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Massachusetts. 2 

Balch, E. S 1 

Barker, E. F 1 108 

Batchelder, N. J 5 



470 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Beard, M. E 25 

Berry, J. M 1 

Bigelow Free Public Library, Clinton, Mass 1 

Birmingham, Eng. — Free Libraries Committee . . . 1 

Boston, Mass. — Public Library 2 

Boston Musical Bureau 1 

Bronson Library, Waterbury, Conn. i. 1 

Brookline., Mass. — Public Library 1 

Brown University 3 

Browne, C W 1 

Burnham, E. J 1 

Cambridge, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Carpenter, F. P 3 

Carvelle, H. DeW 140 

Casco Bay Breeze Publishing Company 1 

Chicago, 111. — Public Library 9 "* 

Chicago and Northwestern Railway Company . ... 1 

Chicago Municipal Library 3 

Christophe, B. M 599 

Concord, Mass. — Free Public Library 1 

Concord N. H. — Public Library 1 

Cosmos Pictures Company, 12 pictures. 

Cross, D 1 

Currier, H. L 4 

Dartmouth College 1 

Davis, H. F 01 

Depew, C • • • 1 

Detroit, Mich. — Public Library 1 

Dodge, T. H 1 

Dover, N. H. — Public Library 1 

Dow, Mrs. H. M 1 

Eames, Mrs. W. M 112 

Ehrlich, F 1 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md 1 

Evanston, 111. — Free Public Library 1 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Pa. . 1 

Fitz Public Library, Chelsea, Mass 1 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt 1 

Forbes Library, Northampton, Mass. . . 1 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Pa 1 

Gallinger, J. B 1 

General Theological Library, Boston, Mass 1 

George, L. M 1 

Gloversville, N. Y. — Free Library 1 

Gould, S. C 3 

Grand Rapids, Mich. — Public Library 1 

Green, S. S 1 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



Hadley, C. J 

Hartford, Conn.— Bureau of Labor Statistics .... 1 

Harvard University ^ 

Helena, Mont.— Public Library 

Hillsborough County Commissioners 

Holland American Line 

Home Market Club 

Hubbard, M 

Hunt, G. F 

Hunt, N. P 

Huse, W. H 

Indian-Rights Association 

Iowa College ■ • 

Jay, W 1 

Jersey City, N. J.— Free Public Library 

Jones, Mrs. F. A 

K., J. M 

Kendall, Mrs. W. M -^ 

Lake Mohonk Conference on International Arbitra- 
tion 

Lawrence, Mass.— Free Public Library 

Lawson, T. W 1 

Leffingwell, A 1 

Library Company of Philadelphia 

Life Publishing Company. 1 picture 

Linehan, J. C 

Livingston, C. F •' 

Lubin, D ••.... 1 

Lynn, Mass. — Public Library 

Madison, Wis.— Free Library 

Maimonides Free Library, New York City 

Maiden, Mass.— Public labrary 

Manchester, N. H.— Board of Trade 1 

" City Engineer 

" Fire Department 

" Street and Park Commission . . 

Manchester Historic Association 

Manchester Institute of Arts and Sciences 

Manufacturers' and Mechanics' Library Association, 
Lewiston, Me 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Medford, Mass.— Public Library 

Minneapolis, Minn.— Public Library 

jSIorse Institute, Natick, Mass 

Mount Holyoke College 

Xautical Preparatory School 

New Bedford, Mass.— Free Public Library 



471 
23 



86 



9S 
42 



81 



472 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



New England "Catholic Historical Society 

New England Society of Cincinnatti 

New Hampshire — Insurance Commissioner 1 

" Secretary of State 8 

State Board of Health 2 

New Hampshire College of Agriculture 

New Hampshire Library Commission 

New Hampshire Pharmaceutical Association .... 

New Haven, Conn. — Free Public Library 

New Jersey — State Library ■ i 

New York City — Mercantile Library 

New York State — College of Forestry 

New York State — State Library 3 

New York School of Journalism 

Newark, N. J. — Free Public Library 

Newell, L. E.— .5 pictures 

Newington, N. H 

Newton, Mass. — Free Library 

North Dakota Agricultural College 

Page, Ralph M. — 2 pictures. 

Parlin. Memorial Library, Everett, Mass 

Paterson, N. J. — Free Public Library 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md 

Pennsylvania Prison Society 

Peoria, 111. — Public Library 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the 

Blind ■ 

Peterboro, N. H 

Philadelphia, Pa. — City Institute 

" Free Library 

Portland, Me.— Public Lib.ary 

Princeton University 

Providence, R. I. — Public Library 

Kandolph, L. V. F 1 

Rhode Island Normal School 

Richards, L. S 1 

Robbins Library, Arlington, Mass 

Robins, W. L 

Pochester N. H. — Public Library 

Rollins, F. W 1 

St. Louis, Mo. — Mercantile Library Association . . . 

St. Louis, Mo. — Public Library 

Salem, Mass. — Public Library 

Sanborn, Mrs. A. H 

Scranton, Pa. — Public Library 

Shakespeare Press 

Simmons, Mrs. E. E 



101 
3 

1 
1 

1 
3 



18 



34 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 473 

Smith, E. C 1 

Smyth, G. H 1 

Somerville, Mass. — Public Library 6 

Southbridge, Mass. — Library Committee 1 

Springfield, Mass. — City Library Association .... 1 

Sulloway, C A., map. 

Syracuse, N. Y. — Public Library 1 

Tolman, M. M 83 

Tuck, E ; 1 

United States. — Agricultural Department .... 

Bureau of Education 

Civil Service Commission 

Coast Survey 

Interior Department, 135 maps . . 

Interstate Commerce Commission 

Labor Department 

Library of Congress 

Smithsonian Institution 

Superintendent of Documents, 5 

atlases 155 163 

United States. — Treasury Department 3 

" " War Department 2 

University of Chicago 1 

University of Illinois 2 

University of Pennsylvania 1 

University of Tennessee 7 

Uruguay 2 1 

Westborough, Mass. — Public Library 1 

White, J. T., and Co 1 

Wilmington, Del. — Institute Free Library 1 

Winchell, F. M. — 1 picture. 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission 6 

Woburn, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Woodbury, F. D 4 

Worcester, Mass. — Public Library 1 



2 


3 


3 






2 


2 


30 


1 




1 


12 


5 


5 


2 


9 



Library Publications Received. 

Boston Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Brookline Public Library.— Bulletin. 

Cossitt Library, Memphis, Tenn. — Bulletin. 

Dover Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Holyoke Public Library. — Library Record. 

Iowa Masonic Library. — Bulletin. 

Jersey City Free Public Library. — Library Record. 

Lynn Public Library. — Bulletin. 



474 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Makleu Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Medford Public Library.— Bulletin. 

Nashua Public Library. — Bulletin. 

New Hampshire Library Commission. — Bulletin. 

New Haven Free Public Library. — Bulletin. 

New York Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Newark Free Public Library. — Library News. 

Providence Libraries. — Bulletin. 

Salem Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Springfield City Library. — Bulletin. 

United States Department of Agriculture. — Library Bulletin. 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission. — Bulletin. 



APPENDIX VI. 

List of periodicals for 1903 

Alpine Journal. 

American Engineer and Railroad Journal. 

American Historical RevieAv. 

American Journal of Science and Arts. 

American Monthly Review of Reviews. 

American Naturalist. 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Mass. Proceedings.— Gift. 

Architects' and Builders' Magazine. 

Arena. 

Art Journal. 

Association Review\ — Gift. 

Atlantic Monthly. 

Birds and Nature. 

Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine. — English Edition. 

Bookman. 

Boston Society of Natural History. Memoirs. 

Boston Society of Natural History. Proceedings. 

Brown Alumni Monthly. — Gift. 

Builder. 

Bulletin of Bibliography. — Gift. 

Case and Comment. — Gift. 

Century. 

Chamber's Journal. 

Chicago Banker. — Gift. 

Christian Science Journal. — Gift. 

City of Chicago Statistics. — Gift. 

Cornhill Magazine. 

Cosmopolitan. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 47; 

Critic. 

Cumulative Book Index. 

Cumulative Index to Periodicals. 

pjCletic Magazine. 

Edinburgh Review. — English P^diton. 

Educational Review. 

Electrical World. 

Father Matthew Herald.— Gift. 

Forum. 

Good Housekeeping. — Gift. 

Good Words. 

Granite Monthly. 

Harper's Monthly Magazine. 

Harper's Weekly. 

Herald of the Golden Age. — Gift. 

Holy Cross Purple. — Gift. 

Horseless Age. 

Independent. — Gift. 

.lournal of American Folk-Lore. 

Journal of Applied Microscopy. 

Journal of the Franklin Institute. 

Ladies' Review. — Gift. 

Lancet. 

Legal Bibliography. — Gift. 

Leisure Hour. 

Library Journal. 

Life. 

Lippincott's Magazine 

Literary News. 

Living Age. 

London Quarterly Review. 

Longman's Magazine. 

McClure's Magazine. 

Magazine of Art. 

Mount St. Mary's Record. — Gift. 

Nation. 

Nature Study. — Gift. 

New England Historical and Genealogical Register. 

New England Magazine. 

New Hampshire College of Agriculture. Bulletins. — Gift. 

Nineteenth Century. 

North American Review. 

Ofhcial Gazette of United States Patent Office. — Gift. 

Out West.— Gift. 

Outlook. 

Popular Science Monthly. 

Protectionist. — Gift. 



476 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Public Libraries. — Loaned. 

Publishers' Weekly. 

Punch. 

Qiiarterly Calendar of the American Institute of Sacred Literature. — Gift. 

Quarterly Pieview. — English edition. 

Railroad Gazette. 

St. Nicholas. 

Salvation. — Gift. 

Science and Industry. — Gift. 

Scientific American. 

Scientific American Supplement. 

Scribner's Magazine. 

Sound Currency. — Gift. 

Sunset. — Gift. 

Temple Bar. 

Traveler's Record. — Gift. 

United States Pulbic Documents Catalogue. — Gift. 

Universalist Leader. — Gift. 

University of Tennessee Record.— Gift. 

Westminster Review. — English Edition. 

Wide World Magazine. — Gift. 

Worcester Magazine. — Gift. 

World's Work.— Gift. 

Youth's Companion. 



Newspapers. 

Boston Weekly Journal. 

Daily Mirror and American. 

Emerald. — Gift. 

Manchester Budget.— Gift. 

Manchester Nevrs — ^Gift. 

Manchester Union. — Gift. 

Mirror and Farmer. — Gift. 

New Hampshire Farmer. — Gift. 

New Tork Times. Saturday issue. — Gift. 

New York Tri-Weekly Tribune. 

New York Tribune Weekly Review. — Gift. 

Plymouth Record. — Gift. 

Wall Street Journal. Daily.— Gift. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOUCITOR. 



Ai'iiir, 15, 1903. 
To the City CounciU : — 

I herewith snl)init my report as solicitor for the year 1902. 

The most important litigation to which the city was a party has been 
adjusted, viz: the tax cases brought against the city for an abatement of 
taxes by the Araoskeag Company for the years 1899, 1900 and 1901. The 
settlement inclnded a basis npon which the Company should pay its tax for 
the year 1902. 

The case of Sheehan v. Manchester, an action for damages caused by an 
alleged defective highway was tried by jury and a verdict found for the 
city. 

McCrillis against the city which has been pending before the court for 
many years was heard before the county commissioners and damages 
awarded to the plaintirt'. 

Several claimants who presented claims for damages were given leave to 
withdraw. 

Nnmeroiis small claims for damages caused by change of grade were 
settled. 

The Amory Manufactuiing .Company has brought suit against the city 
for an abatement of its tax for the years 1901 and 1902 which have not as 
yet been heard. 

Numerous other cases in which the city is an interested party are still 
pending. 

gp:orge a. wagneu, 

Cit'j Siilicitor. 



479 



REPORT OF THE BUILDING INSPECTOR. 



REPORT OF THE BUILDING INSPECTOR, 



Office of the Inspector of Buildings, 

Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1902. 
To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermtn. 

The fourth annual report of the Inspector of buildings is herewith 
submitted. 

There have been one hundred and twenty-eight (128) new buildings 
erected during the year as follows : 

Dwellings for one family 67 

Dwellings for two families 19 

3-tenement houses 18 

4-tenement block • 

6-tenement block 

Shoe factory 

Ice house 

Marble shed and office 

Masonic home 

Convent 

Church 

Brick blocks for stores and offices 

Weave shed '. 

Car barn 

Boiler house 

Seventy-five permits were granted during the year for altei-ation& an 
additions. Among the most extensive of these were a shoe factory 
aidition and brewery addition. 

Respectfully submitted. 

L. M. ALDRICH, 

Inspector of Buildings. 



483 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT OF THEOVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1902. 
To His Honor the Ma/jor and (hntlemen of the City Council : 

In compliauce with the ordinance of said city, the overseers of the poor 
herewith present their annual report for the year 1902. 

The number of families which have received more or less assistance off 
the farm during the year has been 250, consisting of 1300 persons, all of 
whom have a settlement in the city. The number of paupers supported at 
the Hillsborough county farm during the year has been 13, more or less of 
the time, at a cost of two dolhirs per week for each person, all of whom 
are insane and incurable. 

The number of children supported at the State Industrial School during 
the year has been two, at a cost of one dollar and fifty cents per week for 
each child. 

In compliance with sections 1 and 2, chapter 116, Public Statutes of 
New Hampshire, passed at the January session, 1895, in relation to the 
dependent minor children being supported at almshouses, the said minor 
children having a settlement in this city are supported as follows : at St. 
Patrick's Orphanage, eleven more or less of the time, at a cost of one dollar 
and tAventy-tive cents per week for each child. The said minor children 
have educational advantages. 

The overseers of the poor have given 1730 orders to the paupers off the 
farm during the year. Said orders consisted chiefly of orders for provi- 
sions fuel, medicine, board, clothing, shoes, and emergencies. The 
amount allowed by the overseers of the several wards from time to time 
to those applying for assistance are as follows : 

Ward 1 $999.05 

Ward 2 . * 1,081.34 

Ward 3 • 423.58 

Ward 4 939.63 

Ward 5 3,557.07 

Ward 6 182.13 

Ward 7 185.36 

Ward 8 1,823.37 

Ward 9 2,636.59 

Ward 10 407.65 

.$12,235.77 

Miscellaneous bills allowed for printing, stationery, conveyance, 

etc • 236.80 

Total amount allowed $12,472.57, 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 
GEORGE E. DAVIES. 
BENJAMIN F. GARLAND, 
DANIEL G. ANDREWS, 
CHARLES B. CLARKSON, 
THOMAS F. SHEEHAN, 
CHARLES FRANCIS, 
WILLIAM MARSHALL, 
HENRY LEIN, 
THOMAS C. STEWART, 
JAMES H. McKENZIE, 
Board of Overseers of the Poor. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES AND CEM- 
ETERY FUNDS. 



REPORTS OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES 
AND CEMETERY FUNDS. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

To the Tru^ti'es of Cemeteries and the Board of Meiijor and Aldermen : 

Gentlemen: — In accordance with the directions of the sub-trustees of 
the Pine Grove cemetery, I hereby submit their report for the year 
1902. 

The same board of sub-trustees as for the year 1901 were in control and 
they kept the same superintendent and assistants in charge of the grounds 
and followed the same general plan as for the preceding years. 

The abundant rains of last summer kept the lawns in unusally good 
condition, and we feel that the cemetery presented as good an appearance 
as ever before. New flower pots were planted, many additional trees and 
shrubs were set out, and all the grounds received careful attention. 

The section known as the Swedish Mission Lawn and the Swedish 
Baptist Lawn were graded and grassed, and a new section lying south of 
these were prepared to be sold in single graves, of which there are one 
hundred and twenty-eight on the plan. 

The price for a single grave including the burial of one body, has been 
fixed at $18-00 of which -$8.00 is jiaid to the trustees of the Cemetery Fund, 
thus insuring watering and clipping of the grass. 

Two adults or one adult and two children may be interred in any one 
grave, the i^rice of burial of the second adult being -$4.00, and of each 
additional child .$3.50.|t;i.The plan of having a section for single graves 
has been contemplated for some time, as in the past there has been quite 
a demand for them. The name of Woodside Lawn has been given to the 
section, and it will be managed under the same conditions as Hillside 
Lawn. 

On the East side of the cemetery two hundred and tifty-two feet of iron 
fence was constructed, and all of the original cemetery now has an iron 
fence along both the Calef road and Brown avenue. 

In several places in old portions of the grounds lots were re-graded, 
and the paths between the lots grassed over, and several pieces of border 
were smoothed. Over seven hundred and seventy feet of water pipe were 
laid; two standpipes and fifteen hydrants were erected; five hundred and 
forty-two feet of sewer pipe were laid, and two cesspools and two man- 
holes were built. Concrete driveways were top dressed to the extent of 
four hundred and eight square yards; and with the assistance of the 
trustees of the cemetery fund three thousand square yards of avenue were 



492 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

maoadamized. Slate bounds to mark the lots were set iu Acacia Lawn, 
and in the section east of Pine Lawn, and one thousand more bounds 
purchased to be used the coming year. The average number of men 
employed was twelve. During the year thirty-nine new monuments were 
erected. 

The total number of interments was two hundred and thirty-five, and 
of removals was twenty-one. 

In 1902 twenty-six lots under perpetual care were sold ; thirty-four 
under the new regulations which furnish water and keep the grass cut, 
four without care, and two single graves. There now remain, graded and 
unsold, twenty-eight lots on Riverside Lawn, twenty on Chapel Lawn, 
twenty-four on Pine Lawn, all under perpetual care, one hundred and 
thirty on Hillside Lawn under the new regulations, eight on Acacia Lawn 
and the single grave section which is known as Woodside Lawn. And 
after the eight on Acacia Lawn are disposed of, no lots will be sold 
except those which are under the provisions of the ordinance which puts 
a part of the purchase price into the hands of the Trustees of the Ceme- 
tery fund, and allows for the use of water and keeping the grass properly 
clipped. It is thus hojied and believed that in a short time the general 
■appearance of the grounds will be greatly bettered, and if the practice of 
the last three years of re-grading each year some section and doing away 
with the gravel paths between lots is followed, there will be a marked 
and decided improvement. 

The appropriation made by the city councils for the year was $10,000 of 
which 89, 948..51 were expended. From the sale of lots, the expense of 
grading which has been paid for in preceding years, from interment fees 
and from the lots whose owners paid for care and water the sum of 
$6,999.15 was received, which was all covered into the city treasury and 
used to pay current expenses, so that the total actual cost of the Pine 
grove cemetery for the year was $2,948.36. AVhen the results obtained 
are compared with the cost, the Sub-Trustees believe that the City's tax- 
payers will be well satisfied with the expenditure. During the year 
$4,449.75 were added to the Cemetery fund, the income of which will be 
available for the future care of lots. The Sub-Trustees are again indebted 
to the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund for the sum of $1,000, which was 
expended in macadamizing avenues, purchasing shrubs, and grading over 
old sections which much needed attention, and could get it no other way. 
Such expenditure is one purpose of the perpetual care fund, as the care 
of the lots under perpetual care by no means exhausts the income of the 
fund. However the Sub-Trustees are grateful to the Trustees of the 
fund for their assistance in the work, which is of a common interest to 
both boards. A matter will probably come before the new board of 
Mayor and Aldermen to which I deem it proper to refer at this time. I 
refer to the chapel, for which Miss Fannie E. A. Riddle left by her will a 
legacy, of $15,000 to the city. The legacy was, as we understand, accepted 
by the last city government, and doubtless the money will be available in 
the near future. The Sub-Trustees hope that in the plans for the chapel 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 493 

liioviskiii will be made for the office of the superintendent of the grounds. 

The present chapel and office building is greatly in need of repairs, but 
the sub-trustees deemed it best not to expend much money upon it during the 
past year, having in view the probable erection of a new and permanent 
structnie. The general arrangement of the chapel is tixed by the terms of 
the will of Miss Riddle, but it seems to us that, considering that the use of 
such a building for strictly chapel purposes is comparatively infrequent, it 
would be proper and fitting to combine with the chapel a Superintendent's 
office, and so make a building which would be highly useful as well as 
ornamental. The city would thus save the expense of a new adminis- 
tration building which must otherwise soon be built, and would seemin~f y 
carry out the testator's idea in making her gift, for she well knew the 
purposes for which the existing chapel is used and doubtless had in mind 
the erection of a Iniilding which would take its place both for religious and 
secular purposes. 

We submit ihis suggestion to the careful consideration of the Mayor and 
Aldermen. 

The Merrill Yard was looked after in the ordinary way. The expense 
was light theie, and the receipts were $10. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

Clerk of Suh-TruHtees. 



Amoskeag: Cemetery. 

The Sub-Trustees of Amoskeag Cemetery present the following report: 
During the summer of 1902 there were five burials in Amoskeag Ceme- 
tery. One body was removed to Woburn, Mass. A few trees were added 
to those already growing in the yard: These, with the flowers and orna- 
mental plants efficiently taken care of by the Superintendent, add much 
to the beauty of the grounds. The fence has been painted and all needed 
repairs have been done. The Cemetery is looking better than it ever did 
before, as well as it can be made to look with the limited appropriation 
that it receives. The lots are practically all occupied and the time will 
soon come when more land must be bought or burials there must cease. 

(Signed) G. WALTER TAYLOR, Chairman. 

WM. H. HUSE. 



Valley Cemetery. 

In behalf of the Trustees of Vallej^ Cemetery, I will make the following- 
report for year ending December 31, 1902. 

C- H. G- Foss, oar trusty Superintendent, has kept the grounds up to 
the former standard, and has improved the driveways and walks as far 
as our money would permit. 



494 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The rain last spring caused a washout on the bank in the valley which 
took a number of loads of sand, loam and turf to finish the work. The 
fence on the west side having become old and decayed a part of it has 
been replaced by new 

We are in hopes to extend the work this next year. 

MATERIALS USED. 

Sand ....••• 330 loads 

Loam 158 loads 

Turf • • • 1800 feet 

Manure • • • -^ cords 

Teams employed 56 1-2 days 

Cash receipts : 

For care and water for lots $1,080.15 

For sundries 245.87 

For tomb fees 183.50 

For interments 163.50 

For removals 28.00 

Paid city treasurer $1,700 52 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. P. CANNON, 

Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you the annual report of the money 
received during the year ending December 31, 1902 : 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Interest. 

Robert Wylie $1.44 

Maria Kratz 

Katie A. Marshall 53 

Mary E. Dearborn 

Ezra D. Clark 2.65 

Frank D. McLaughlin 

Mrs. Amanda Hulme 

Mrs. S. E. Stearns 1.58 

Erwin Alfred Hecker 1.20 

Mrs. John Steele .40 

William B. Stearns 

Henrietta Van Yliet 

Bertha H. Cook 

Edward F. Scheer .7(5 

Augusta Kebbou 

H. Frank Morse 

William G. Garmon 

Samantha B. Van Brocklin . . . 

Joseph Broughton 

Virtue M. Huskie 

Ernistine Kuhn . 

John M. Kendall .33 

Dora Boyle 

Edmund Kendall .37 

A. D. Scovell .39 

Charles P. Tuxbury .50 

Archibald McNay .75 

J. A. & H. S. Wilson 2.67 

Thomas W. Lane 

Est. Annie Hill 

Donald Mclntire .39 

Edwin S. Fletcher & Lizzie M. 
Derby 



Price 
of Lots. 


Permanent 
Fund. 


Total. 


146.14 




$47.58 


37.50 




37.50 


46.13 




46.66 


6.75 




6.75 


41.57 




44.22 


38.00 




38.00 


81.00 




81.00 


31.04 




32.62 


34.46 




35.66 


66.96 




67.36 


6.75 




6.75 


82.13 




82.13 


10.00 




10.00 


38.46 


$48.08 


87.30 


19.98 


24.98 


44.96 


50.40 


63.00 


113.40 


64.18 


80.22 


144.40 


15.32 


19.15 


34.47 


20.00 


25.00 


45.00 


20.00 


25.00 


45.00 


15.88 


19.85 


35.73 


23.80 


29.76 


53.89 


24.00 


30.00 


54.00 


24.00 


30.00 


54.37 


23.43 


29 30 


53.12 


20.00 


25.00 


45.50 


20.00 


■ 25.00 


45.75 


72.00 


90.00 


164.67 


82.71 


103.38 


186.09 


12.55 


15.69 


28.24 


20.00 


25.00 


45.39 



24.00 



30.00 



54.00 



496 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



William Scliolz 20.00 2.5.00 45.00 

John F. Cheney .50 20.74 25.93 47.17 

Henry C. Sacks .59 24.00 30.00 54.59 

Georgia A. Putnam tt Forest M. 

Laraba 46..S5 57.93 104.28 

Annie L. Alquist .85 32.60 40.75 74.20 

Hattie E. McCauley & Sarah D. 

Woodman 46.80 58^50 105.30 

Elizabeth Evans .15 20.00 ' 25.00 45.15 

Frederick S. Lewis 74.27 92.84 167.11 

Edwin W. Merrill 51.92 64.91 116.83 

Frank W- Stevens .53 20.00 25.00 45.53 

Mrs. F. S. Brunner 20.00 25.00 45.00 

Emil G. Dietch ..-••.... 10.00 8.00 IS.OO 

Lizzie Beverly 10.00 8.00 18.00 

William B. Marshall .50 29.56 81.29 111.35 

Eliza Creighton 4.20 28.98 79.71 112.89 

Charles Francis 60.00 165.00 225.00 

Winifred F. Thurston • 3.15 29.06 79.91 112.12 

Amos H. Stebbins 43.75 120.30 164.05 

Jennie Carpenter S17.00 836.52 $100.44 S153.96 

Charles J. Darrah 72. 00 198.00 270.00 

Lucretia L. Burleigh 34.50 94.87 129.37 

Leonard G. Smith and Mary L. 

AVaite 67.60 1^5.92 2.53.52 

C. B. Littlefield 3.39 30.00 82.50 115.89 

Mary E. Proctor and Nellie B. 

Proctor and Charles A. Hoitt . 3.22 • 85.80 257.40 346.42 

Helen A. Weston 33.36 91.75 125.11 

Elbertine M. Martin 30.00 82.50 112..50 

Estate Harrison Mitchell .... .89 49.50 136.13 186..52 

Mrs. Lucy E. Xorthrup 31.11 85.56 116.67 

Burton H. Avery 31.87 87-66 119.53 

Elthea M. Emerson 29.57 81.30 110.87 

Elbertine M. Martin 30.00 82. .50 112..50 

Estate Charles D. McDuffie . . . 129.08 387.25 516.33 

Charles H. Colburn •- . 30.00 82.50 112..50 

George H. Dudley 30.00 82..50 112.50 

Hattie M. Davis .82 28.82 79.26 108.90 

L. Francina Kennedy 2.45 33.36 91.25 127.06 

Katherine Eschelmuller .90 25.48 70.07 96.45 

William Cooper 30.25 83.20 113.45 

Joseph L. Hosmer 85.24 2.55.71 340.95 

Total receipts 853.10 $2,661.23 §4,449.75 87,164.08 

J. H. Erksine, superintendent 4,284.82 

J. H. Erksine, superintendent of Merrill yard 10.00 

811.458.90 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 497 

Ck. 

By amount transferred to Cemetery Fund $4,449.75 

Treasurer's Receipts 2,714.33 

Superintendent Receipts 4,284.82 

Superintendent Receipts, Merrill Yard 10.00 

$11,458.90 
Valley Cemetery. 

To cash received from C. H. G. Foss, sperintendent for care of 

lots $1,700..52 

Cr. 

By superintendent receipts $1,700.52 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED L. ALLEN. 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 



Ihereby certify that I have examined the accounts of Fred L. Allen,- 
treasurer of the cemerteries, and And the same are correctly cast and 
vouched for. 

JAMES E. DODGE. 

City Auditor. 



CEMETERY FUND, 



TREASURER'S REPORT, 



To the Trustees of the Cemetenj Fund. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit to you the twentieth annual report of 
the funds received and expenses paid to January 1, 1903. 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January 1, 1902 859,222.81 

Receii'ts during the Yeae. 

From Frank Babel $100.00 

Mary Dearborn 194.12 

Edwin Flanders, executor of the estate of L. A. 

Burns 19^.56 

D. (). Fernald and H. R. Philbrick 149.36 

P. R. Morse, executor of the estate of Mary 

Moore 100.00 

E. C. Sanborn, administrator of the estate of 
William Hulme 129.60 

Frederick AV. Cheney 112.00 

Mrs. Frank Schnauder 178.60 

A. J. Edgerly, administrator of the estate of 

Alfred Richards 144.00 

E. I. Kendall, administrator 100.00 

J. Lunette Colby 100.00 

Charles P. Porter 144.00 

Gilman Stearns 144.00 

To amount transferred from Pine Grove Cemetery 

far perpetual care lots 3,224.48 

Single Grave Section 16.00 

Partial Perpetual Care, Hillside Lawn 1,209.27 

$6,241.99 

Total amount of fund -' -865,464.80 

498 



REPORT OP THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 499 

Cu. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1902 ....•• 155,050.00 

bonds bought during the year 4,000.00 

cash on hand 6,414.80 

-$65,464.80 

INCOMii: ACCOUNT. 

Income on hand January 1, 1902 •$3,125.89 

Interest coupons 2,507.50 

Interest savings bank deposit • 247.70 

Interest savings bank, Hillside Lawn 7.35 



.$5,888.44 



EXPENSES PAID DUKING THE TEAR. 

A. G. Hood $39.50 

A. K. Hobbs .58.72 

Russia Cement Company 37-00 

George W. Bailey 5.00 

W. J. Hayes & Sons, Premium on bonds 216.07 

Pay-roll, macadamizing 276.00 

J. H. Erksine, superintendent 1,498.00 

Herman B. Neal 8.70 

Palmer & Gannon 7.24 

Charles A. Bailey 612.70 

Total expenses -$2,758.93 

Cash income on hand 3,129.51 



-$5,888.44 



Valley Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund January 1, 1902 -$21,989.07 

RECEIPTS DURING THE YEAK. 

From Louise S. Balch, administrator $157.00 

George A. Batchelder and James O. Lyford ex- 
ecutors of the estate, K. M. Batchelder . . . 300.00 

George I. McAllister, administrator of tlie es- 
tate of Eliza Ann Brooks 200.00 

Ada F. Daniels and B. S. Briggs, executors of 

the estate of Frank W. Daniels :il2.00 

Mrs. Dana C. Collins 100.00 



500 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

From Emma S. Kidder 100.00 

W. Farnham Smith L50.00 

Mrs. Sarah Gay 120.00 

Albert O. Brown, executor of estate of Lizzie C. 

Baker 100.00 

C. H. G. Foss 115.00 

Mrs. D. B. Varney 117.80 

W. H. Elliott 200.00 

Mrs. E. B. Holden 104.80 

Mrs. F. G. Chapman, (extra payment) 10.00 

Helen Congdon 175.00 

Martha R. Currier, executor of the estate of 

S. Josephine Butterfield, J. W. Joy lot.. . . 500.00 

Susan D. Palmer 124.00 

Susan D. Palmer 118.60 

$2,899.20 

Total amount of fund 24,888.27 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1902 . $18,500.00. 

bonds bought during the year 6,000.00 

cash on hand 388.27 



$24,888.27 



Income Account. 



Income on hand January 1, 1902 $2,587.97 

Interest coupons 865.00 

Interest from savings bank deposit 127.65 

Albert O. Brown, executor 7.00 

Martha R. Currier, execvitrix 166.50 



$3,754.12 



EXPENSES PAID DURING THE YEAR. 



C. H. G. Foss, superintendent $493.60 

W. J. Hayes & Sons, premium on bonds 324.10 

Cash income on hand 2,936.42 



Gale Fund, Valley Cemetery. 

Income on hand January 1, 1902 . $131.88 

Interest from savings bank 5.17 

Interest from fund 12. 12 



$3,754.12 



$149.17 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 501 

Ck. 



By cash jjaid C. H. G. Foss, superintendent §6.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1902 143.17 



$140.17 



Merrill Yard. 

Amount of fund January 1, 1902 S487.89 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand $450.00 

By cash on hand • • . . 37.89 

8487.89 

Income Accouxt. 

Income on hand January 1, 1902 $160.11 

Interest from savings bank 4.34 

Interest coupons 22.50 

$186.95 

Cr. 
By cash on hand $186.95 

Kespectfully submitted, 

FRED L. ALLEN, 

Treasurer of Trustees nf Cemetery Funds. 



This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts of Fred 
L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the cemetery funds, embracing the 
receipts and expenditures for the year 1902, and I find the same correct 
and properly vouched. I have also examined the securities in which said 
fund is invested and find as follows : 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

20 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 1, 2, 3, 
5,. 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 22, 23, 24, 26, 
28); due in 1942; denomination $1,000 each . . . $20,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 1, 3) ; due 

in 1942 ; denomination $500, each . . 1,000.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond (Xo. 3.) .... 50.00 



502 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

14 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5, 

6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17) ; due in 1913 ; denomi- 
nation S1,000 each 14,000.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond (No. 2) ; dvie in 

1913 500.00 

5 city of Manchester 6 percent bonds (Nos. 1, 2, 3, 9, 

10) ; due in 1913 ; denomination $100 each . . . • . .500.00 
11 city of Manchester 3 1-2 per cent bonds; due in 

1919; denomination $1,000 each 11,000.00 

6 city of Manchester 4 per cent bonds, due 1909 . . . 6,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 4 per cent bonds, due 1916 . . . 2,000.00 
4 city of Manchester 3 1-2 per cent bonds, due 1922 . 4,000.00 

$59,050,00 

Cash on deposit in Manchester Savings Bank, Book 

No. 50,420 .$588.85 

Cash on deposit in Mechanics Savings Bank, Book 

No. 3,413 7,722.84 

Cash on deposit in Mechanics Savings Bank, Book 

No. 4,407 1,216.62 

Cash on deposit in Mechanics Savings Bank, Book 

No. 4,522 16.00 

$9,544.31 

Total amount permanent fund and income, December 

31, 1902 68,594.31 

Valley Cemetery. 

4 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 1, 6, 11, 

18); due in 1913; denomination $1,000 each . . . . $4,000.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond (No. 1) ; due in 

1913 ; denomination $.500 500.00 

3 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 6, 7, 8) ; 

due in 1913 ; denomination $100 each 300.00 

8 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 4, 7, 12, 
19, 20, 21, 25, 27); due in 1942; denomination 
$1,000 each 8,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 2, 4) ; due 

in 1942 ; denomination $50 each 100.00 

3 city of Manchester 4 per cent bonds ; due 1916 . - . 3,000.00 
2 city of Manchester 3 1-2 per cent bonds (Nos. 81, 

100); due in 1919; denomination $1,000 each . . . 2,000.00 
6 city of Manchester 3 1-2 per cent bonds ; due 1922 . 6,000.00 
6 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 

7, 8) ; due in 1942 ; denomination $100 each .... 600.00 
Cash on deposit in Guaranty Savings Bank, Book No. 

4,2.57 2,074.70 

Cash on deposit in Araoskeag Savings Bank, Book 

No. 68,808 1,249.99 

Total permanent fund and income December 31, 1902 . . $27,824.69 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 503 

Merrill Cemetery. 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 4, 5) ; due 

in 1913; denomination 1100 each $200.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds (Nos. 1,2); due 

in 1942 ; denomination $100.00 each 200.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond (No. 1) ; due in 

1942, denomination 150.00 50.00 

Cash on deposit in Guaranty Savings Bank, Book No. 

5116 . 64.04 

Cash on de^josit in Amoskeag Savings Bank, Book 

No. 69,517 160.80 

Total amount of fund and income December 31, 1902 . . -$674.84 

Gale Fund. 

Cash on hand in Amoskeag Savings Bank, Book No. 

34,108 143.17 

Total amount of permanent fund and income on hand . . .$97,237.01 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



REPORF OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE 
SINKING FUND, 



Manchester, N. H. 
To the City Councils of the Cittj of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — As required by chapter 87, section 2, of the City Ordi- 
nances of Manchester, the trustees of the sinking funds of the City of 
Manchester herewith report the condtion of the several funds January 1, 
1903, with receipts and payments for the year ending December 31, 1902. 

H. P. SIMPSON. 
CHAS. H. MANNING. 
FEED L. ALLEN. 
Trustees of the Sinking Fund. 

To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you my report as treasurer of the 
sinking fund for the year ending December 31, 1902. 

improvement loan. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1902, for the pay- 
ment of imi^rovement bonds • • . #141,699.48 

Appropriation for 1902 20,000.00 

Income from interest on bonds 4,910.00 

Income from savings bank deposits 81.22 

1166,690.70 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand December 31, 1002 $155,000.00 

Accrued interest and premium 2,023.90 

Cash on hand December 31, 1902 9,666.80 

$166,690.70 

water loan. 

Dr 

Total amount of funds January 1, 1902, for the pay- 
ment of water bonds . $189,079.53 

Water-works, hydrant service, 1902 18,800.00 

507 



508 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Appropriation, 1902 ' . 5,000.00 

Income from interest on bonds 4,581.00 

Income from bank deposit 133.83 

Premium received for bonds sold 2,079.00 

$219,673.36 

Ce. 

City of Manchester, payment of Water bonds, due 

January 1, 1902 $100,000.00 

Premium and interest paid for bonds bought dur- 

the year 799.58 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1902 116,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1902 2,873.78 

$219,673.-36 

school loan. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1902 $10,005.00 

Appropriation, 1902 2,000.00 

Interest on bonds 360.00 

Interest from saving banks deposits 3.14 

$12,368.14 

CR. 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1902 $12,000.00 

Premium and interest paid for bonds bought dur- 
ing the year 76.31 

Cash on hand December 31, 1902 291.83 

$12,368.14 

city funding loan. 

Dr. 

Amount of fund January 1, 1902 $10,114.58 

Appropriation, 1902 5,000.00 

Interest on bonds 200.00 



$15,314.58 



Cr. 

Premium paid for bonds bought during the year. . 210.25 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1902 5,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1902 10,104.33 



$15,314.58 



Respectfully submitted. 

FRED L. ALLEN, 
Treasurer of Sinking Fund. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OP THE SINKING FUND. 509 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts of Fred . 
L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the sinking fund, embracing the re- 
ceipt and expenditures for the year ending December 31, 1902, and find the 
same correct and properly vouched. I have also examined the securities 
in which fund is invested, and find as follows: 

Bonds of the city of Manchester for the payment of im- 
provement bonds : 

4 per cent, due 1907 $9,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1908 10,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1909 11,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1910 10,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1913 • 15,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 • • • 5,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1916 27,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1917 16,000.00 

3 1-2 per cent, due 1919 34,000.00 

3 1-2 per cent, due 1922 18,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1902 ^'^"^^'^^ c.i«. «p« on 

Bonds of the city of Manchester for the payment of water 
bonds : 

4 per cent, due 1907 §6,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1909 12,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1910 • 6,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1913 1,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 18,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1915 17,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1916 11,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1917 22,000.00 

3 1-2 per cent, due 1919^ 23,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1902 ^''^'''^""^^ c-n o o^-a ^o 

Bonds of the city of Manchester for payment of school 
bonds : 

4 per cent, due 1909 -$3,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1910 2,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 2,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1915 2,000.00 

4 percent, due 1916 1,000.00 

3 1-2 per cent, due 1919 2,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1902 291.83 

•M2,2yi.oo 

For the payment of city funding bonds: 

3 1-2 per cent. City of Manchester bonds due 1922, §5,000.00 

PTsh oil band 10,104.33 

casn on nana .$15,104.:33 

Total amount of bonds in sinking fund . . . $288,000.00 

Total amount of cash in sinking fund .... 22,936.74 ^ 

■7310,936. (4 

•JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES, 
PASSED IN 1902, 



City of Manchester. 

Rksolution relating to an Appropriation for tlie Erection of a Seliool- 
lioiise on South Beech street. 

Be^nlved by the Mayor and Aldermen of tlie City of Manchester, In City 

Council assembled, as follows : 

That the land for a schoolhouse on South Beech street havins tieen 
purchased during the year 1901, and 

Whereas, The accomodation of the public demands that a schoolhouse 
be erected thereon during the ensning year : therefore, be it 

T?e!<oh-e(l, That a special appropriation of ten thousand d-oUavs by the 
common council is recommended ; said sum of ten thousand dollars to be 
used for the erection of a schoolhouse on South Beech street. 

Passed January 7, 1902. 



City of MA>rcHESTER. 

Eesoi.ution relating to a Side Track for the East Side Company across 

Valley street. 

Ecsnlved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

Besolved. That for the accomodation of the East Side Company leave ))e 
and hereby is granted the Boston A Maine P.. R. to build a side-track des- 
cribed as follows : 

Beginning at a point on the Concord and Portsmouth branch of the Boston 
& Maine Railroad about 112 feet easterly of the switch to the side-track 
leading to the Elliott Silk Mill, so called; thence westerly and southerly 
across Valley street by a curve of about 286 1-2 feet radius to the land of 
The East Side Company, measuring on the south line of Valley street about 
56 feet easterly of the east line of Hall street ; thence continuing on the 
same curve to a line parallel to Hall street and six feet easterly of the east 
line of Hall street; thence along said parallel line about 250 feet; said 
above-described line to be the center line of track and the gauge to be four 
feet eight and one-half inches. 

Passed January 7, 1902. 



514 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



City of Manchestek. 



Resolution amending a resolution Exempting from Taxation the Manu- 
facturing Establisliment proposed to be erected and leased by Tbe East 
Side Company. 
liesolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows : 

Whereas, Conditions exist which may prevent the shoe industry pro- 
posed by The East Side Company being in operation by the first day of 
April, 1902 ; therefore, be it 

BcKolvcd, That the resolution passed by the board of mayor and aldermen 
September 3, 1901, be amended in the twenty-tirst line thereof after the 
word "of", by striking out the Avord "April" and inserting in place thereof 
the word "June", so that said resolution as amended shall read as follows : 
"Whereas, It is provided by section 11, chapter 55, of the Public 
Statutes of the State of New Hampshire that "towns may by vote exempt 
from taxation for a term not exceeding ten years any manufacturing estab- 
lishment proposed to be erected or put in operation therein, and the capital 
to be used in operating the same, unless such establishment has been pre' 
viously exempted from taxation by some town", and 

Whereas, The East Side Company proposes to purchase land and erect 
thereon a manufacturing establisliment and operate or lease the same to be 
operated with machinery for manufacturing purposes, 

Ii'csolved, That the land to be acquired by the East Side Company and the 
manufacturing establishment pioposed to be erected thereon or put in 
operation therein, and the capital to be used in operating the same and the 
business connected therewith, by them or their lessees, be exempted from 
taxation for a period of ten years from the first day of April, 1902 : pro- 
vided, a shoe industry is conducted on said premise's during said period and 
is in operation on the tirst day of June, 1902; otherwise this resolution 
shall not be ert'ective." 
Passed Januarv 7, 1902- 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution relating to the Exemption from Taxation of the Manchester 
Stocking Company. 

Bc'solved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the city of Manchester in City 

Council assembled, as follows : 

Whereas, The Manchester Stocking Company desires to locate its 
business, and carry on the manufacture and product of stockings and other 
articles in the city of Manchester, therefore, 

Besulved, That the Manchester Stocking Company, aforesaid, its ma- 
chinery, materials, raw and in process of manufacture, and other property 
necessary in conducting said business, be and hereby is exempt from all 
taxation for a period of ten years from the first day of April A. 1). 1902. 

Passed January 7, 1902. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 515 

City of Manchkstek. 

Resoi.ution relating to Concreting a part of North Main, Marion, and 

Wayne Streets. 

licftol ff(J by the Mayor and Aldermen of the ('ity of Manchester, in ('ity 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the petition of Eugene Quirin at als. for concreting North Main 
street from Marion to Amory street ; Marion street from McGregor to 
North Main street and Wayne street from McGregor to North Main street ; 
be referred to the board of common council with the recommendation 
that the prayer of the petitioners be granted, and be it further 

Resolved., That a special appropriation of forty-tive hundred dollars is 
recommended; said sum of forty-live hundred dollars to be used in con- 
creting North Main, Marion, and Wayne streets as petitioned for in the 
petition of Eugene Quirin et als., under date of January 31, 1901. 

Passed January 7, 1002. 



City of MANCHESxpni. 

Resolution relating to an Appropriation for New Bridges at Granite 

Street. 
liesdlred by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, The accommodation of the public demands a bridge over 
the tracks of the Manchester and North Weare Railroad at Granite 
street; and 

Whekeas, the general tratlic requires a stronger and wider bridge over 
the canal at Granite street; therefore, be it 

Jieeolved, That an appropriation of ten thousand dollars by the board 
of common council is recommended; and that said sum of ten thousand 
dollars be used for a new bridge over the canal at Granite street, and a 
a bridge over the tracks of the Manchester and North Weare Railroad at 
Granite street. 

Passed January 7, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution relating to an Appropriation for Enlarging Culverts over 

Cemetery Brook. 

liesolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, Some relief should be given the residents of East Manchester 
by reason of the inadequate culverts over Cemetery Brook so called, in 
said Manchester; therefore, be it 

i?eso/ye'^ that a copy of the petition of Robert Kirk, e« «/s, under date 
of January 2, 1902, be referred to the board of common council with the 
recommendation that the prayer of the petitioners be granted; and be it 
further 



516 ■ ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Hesolved, That a special appropriation of ten tliousand dollars [(■'$10,000) 
by the board of commxan council be and is hereby recommended ; said 
sum of ten thousand dollars to be expended for enlarging- ^the culverts 
over Cemetery Brook in said Manchester. 

Passed January 7, 1902. 



City of Maxchester. 
Resolutiox relating to the Improvement of Wolf Park. 

Reaolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, Wolf Park, so called, situated in West Manchester in the 
said City of Manchester is in need of improvement; therefore, be it 

Besolved,- That the board of mayor and aldermen recommend to the 
board of common council that a special appropriation of five hundred dol- 
lars be passed; and that said sum of live hundred dollars be used to im- 
prove and beautify the said Wolf Park. 

Passed Januarv 7. 1902. 



City of Manchester. 
Resolution relating to the Final Transfers for the year 1901. 

Besolved by the Board of Common Council of the City of Manchester, in 

City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make the following- 
transfers, to wit : 

To money unappropriated: 

From interest 8681.90 

city teams 115.92 

repairs of Mill street 816.85 

mayor's incidentals 63.50 

auditor's department 1-65 

street and park commission 158.51 

macadamizing- streets 579-20 

watering streets 1,080.93 

street sweei^ing 21.61 

bridges 1,118.86 

scavenger service 542.39 

new sewers ' 5,275.61 

lighting streets 1,529.08 

grading for concrete 684.60 

health department 169.10 

repairs of schoolhouses -12 

furniture and supplies 141.75 

books and stationery 12.98 

care of rooms 76.70 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 



517 



evening schools 18.40 

evenino- drawing school 22.50 

manual training 3.67 

fuel 109.88 

contingent expenses 12.21 

teachers' salaries 7.62 

sewing materials " . 3.81 

police court 148.78 

police commission 1,220.36 

commons 392.17 

Valley cemetery 41.27 

Amoskeag cemetery 108.58 

Pine Grove cemetery .40 

Merrill cemetery 58.98 

indigent soldiers 14.50 

militia 100.00 

abatement of taxes 670.30 

board of plumbing examiners 18.38 

furnishing rooms, Parker school 5.23 

repairs of buildings 171.65 

schoolhouse lot, South Beech street 29.00 

wind break 10.00 

free cash in treasury in excess of appropriations . . . . 2,686.43 

$18,924.38 
From money unappropriated : 

To printing and stationery .$9.39 

incidental exjienses 1,080.26 

snow and ice 160.57 

land taken for highways 285.17 

paving streets 388.10 

repairs of highways 7,459.98 

new highways 2,485.11 

reiiairs of sewers 178.84 

city hall 472.67 

city officers' salaries 1,591.99 

printing and advertising 2.14 

fire department 1,908.76 

fire-alarm telegraph .....: 124.30 

police station 353.03 

land sold for taxes 359.23 

engineer's department 251.96 

Stark park 5.75 

Derrylield park 150.20 

Paupers off farm 1,919.89 

citv farm 37.04 



Passed January 6, 1902. 



|il9,124.38 



518 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

City of Manchester. 

Resolution making a Temporary Loan of Three Hundrerl Thousand 

Dollars. 

Rejoiced by the Common Council of the City of Manchester in City Council 
assembled, as follows : 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city .is may fall 
due before the twentieth day of December, 1902, the city treasurer be and 
hereby is authorized to make such temporary loans from time to time for 
the use of the city, of sums not exceeding the amount of three hundred 
thousand dollars, being in anticipation of the taxes of the present year, 
giving for the same the notes of the city signed by the treasurer and coun- 
tersigned by the mayor. 

Passed January 10, 1002. 



City of Manchestee. 

Resolution relating to Interest on Deijosits of the City of Manchester. 
Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester in City 

Council assembled, as follows : 

That the moneys of the city of Manchester be deposited in such bank 
or banks in said city as shall pay the largest rate of interest to said city of 
Manchester upon daily balances in said bank or banks from the first day 
of May, 1902, to the first day of May, 1903 : and that the city treasurer be 
and hereby is instructed to advertise for bids from the banks of the city 
of Manchester by sending to each of said banks a cojjy of this resolution ; 
the city of Manchester by its agent, the treasurer of said city, reserving 
the right to reject any and all bids and call for such other bids as may be 
necessary to carry out the intent of this resolution, and the mayor and 
the treasurer of said city of Manchester are hereby authorized and em- 
powered to accept such bid or bids as will give the city of Manchester 
the largest rate of interest upon the daily balances on deposits of the 
moneys of said city of Manchester in said bank or banks from the 
first day of May, 1902, to the first day of May, 1903. 

Passed April 15, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution relating to the Employment of Residents of the City of 

Manchester In and Upon the Public Works of said City and 

fixing the Hours of a Day's Labor in the City 

Departments of said City. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the heads of all departments of the city of Manchester be and 
hereby are instructed to employ only residents of the city of Manchester 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 51^ 

in and upon the public works of said city; and that a chiuse providing 
for the employment of said residents be inserted in all contracts for public 
works to which the city shall be a party, giving preference, as far as 
possible, to the said residents of said city; and be it further 

Besohied, That in all departments of said city excepting the tire and 
police departments a day's labor shall not exceed nine hours; and be it 
further 

IiesoIve(I, That this resolution shall take effect upon its jiassage. 

Passed April 1, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 

IlESOLrTiON regulating the Hours of a Day's Labor in the Police Depart- 
ment of the City of Manchester. 

Besolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the police commissioners of the city of Manchester be and hereby 
are reijuested to lix a day's labor in the police department of said city so 
as not to exceed nine hours. 

Passed April 1, 1902. 



City of Maxchestek. 

Resolution relating to Bonds of Telephone, Telegraph and Electric Light 
Companies indemnifying the city. 

Besiilved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, The proprietors of every line of wire strung in a highway 
shall indemnify the town against all damages, costs, and expenses to 
which it may be subjected by reason of any insufficiency or defect in the 
highway occasioned by the presence of the wires and their supports 
therein ; and 

Whereas, They shall also be responsible directly to any jjarty receiving 
injury in his person or estate from the wires or their supports, or from the 
use thereof by the proprietors ; therefore be it 

Resolved, That all telegraph, telephone and electric light companies 
now doing business in said Manchester be required to tile with the said 
city the bond as required by the Public Statutes. 

Passed May 6, 1902.- 



City of Manchester. 

Resolution authorizing the Mayor and City Solicitor to Adjust and Com- 
promise the Amoskeag Tax cases. 

Resolved, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the mayor and city solicitor be and hereby are authorized to 
adjust and compromise the suits of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 



520 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

pany against tlie city ou the following basis: The corporation to pay a 
tax of $100,000 a year for the years 1898, 1899, 1900 and 1901, the city to 
pay interest on the sum in excess of $100,000 for the several years above- 
mentioned at the rate of four per cent until paid, each party to pay its 
own costs. 

The corporation to pay upon 70 per cent of the selling price of its shares 
of stock reckoned upon a valuation of $7,600,000, or upon a taxable 
valuation of $5,320,000, for the year 1902. 

Passed May 6, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 

Eesoi.ution authorizing- the Mayor to Sign a Bond in behalf of the City 
to Indemnify the Plaintiff in the Gibbs suit, 

liemlvp.d, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the city of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the mayor be and hereby is authorized to execute and sign a bond 
in behalf of the city in the sum of one thousand dollars to indemnify the 
plaintiff' in the case of Elmer E. Gibbs against the city of Manchester in 
the event of the city being found liable for costs incurred by reason of 
Ijroceedings brought before the Superior court, whereby the plaintiff was 
enjoined from collecting an execution. against the city before the close of 
the May term of the Superior court for Grafton county. 

Passed May 16, 1902. 

City of Manchester. 
Resolution recommending an Appropriation for new Trees and Tree 

Boxes. 

Hesolred, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, It has been the custom of the city in past years to replace 
dead trees and to protect young trees by placing tree boxes about them, 
and to keep abreast with the times by planting new trees wherever in 
the opinion of the committee on setting trees the public good requires; 
therefore be it 

Besolved, That an appropriation of one hundred and five dollars is 
recommended to the board of common council, and that said sum of one 
hundred and five dollars be charged to the api^ropriation known as "to 
be hereafter appropriated ", and that said sum of one hundred and five 
dollars be used for new trees and tree boxes. 

Passed May 16, 1902. 

City of Manchester. 
Resolution relating to a Temporary Loan. 

Besolved, by the Board of Common Council of the City of Manchester, in 

City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of completing the new schoolhouse in South 
Manchester, the city treasurer be and hereby is authorized to make a 



RESOLUTIONS. ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 5:^1 

temporary loan not exceeding the sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000) 
giving for the same the note of the city of Manchester signed by the said 
treasurer and countersigned by the mayor of said city, and payable De- 
cember 5, 1902; said sum of two thousand dollars (•!!2,000) to be used for 
completing the new schoolhouse in South Manchester. 
Passed May 23, 1902. 



City of Maxchkster. 

Resolution relating to the Issuance of 880,000 of City Bonds to satisfy 

the Judgment obtained by the Amoskeag Manufacturing 

Company against the City of Manchester. 

Ri'SoUvd by the Common Council of the City of Manchester in City 

Council assembled, as follows : 

That for the purpose of obtaining eighty thousand dollars (§80,000) with 
which to pay the said judgment of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company 
there be issued the bonds of the city of Manchester to the amount of 
eighty thousand dollars, said bonds to be dated .July 1st, 1902, and paya- 
ble to bearer twenty years from the date thereof. 

Said bonds to bear the city seal, to be signedby the mayor and counter- 
signed by the city treasurer, and to bear interest at the rate of three and 
one-half per cent per annum from date, and to have coupons attached 
bearing the fac-simile signature of the city treasurer for the payment of 
interest at said rate, semi-annually, on the flrst days of January and July ' 
of each year ; and the treasurer is authorized to lix the place of payment of 
interest and principal of said bonds, and is hereby authorized to sell said 
bonds, and do all things necessary and proper to complete and carry into 
effect the issue of said bonds. 

Said bonds to be issued in accordance with an act of the legislature of 
New Hampshire, passed at the January session, 1895, entitled, "An act to 
authorize municipal corporations to issue bonds.'" 

Besolvetl, further. That for the purpose of paying the interest and 
principal of said bonds as the same shall become due, there shall be 
annually raised by tax by the common council in the years of 1903 to 1922, 
inclusive, such sum of money as shall be sufficient to meet the interest 
upon the bonds each year outstanding; and a further sum of four thou- 
sand dollars (-MjOOO) each year for a sinking fund for the payment of the 
principal of said bonds as it shall become due, until a sufficient sinking 
fund has been raised, the same to be turned over to the board of sinking 
fund commissioners created by ordinance of November 17, 1893, and 
applied to the payment of said bonds. 

J?esolvt'd, further, That the city treasurer be and hereby is instructed 
and authorized to advertise for bids for sale of said bonds, and that the 
finance committee of the common council be present at the opening of 
the bids with power to reject or accept the same. 

Resolved, further. That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed June 10, 1902. 



532 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

City of Manchestp:e. 
Resolution setting apart Land for the Location of an Engine House. 

Besolved loj the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That a certain tract of land, now a j^art of land known as the "city 
farm"' and hereinafter described, be and is hereby set apart for the 
purpose of erecting an engine house thereon, for the use of the lire 
department. 

Said tract is situate in said Manchester and is bounded and described 
as follows, to wit: 

"Beginning at a stake at the intersection of the northerly line of 
Concord street, proposed, with the easterly line of Weston street, pro. 
posed ; thence easterly on the northerly line of Concord street, jjroposed 
one hundred and twenty-five feet to a stake ; thence northerly at right 
angles to said northerly line of Concord street, proposed, one hundred and 
twenty feet to a stake ; thence westerly at right angles to the last men- 
tioned line one hundred and twenty-five feet to a stake on the easterly 
line of Weston street, proposed; thence southerly on the easterly line of 
Weston street, proposed, one hundred and twenty feet to the point of 
beginning, containing about fifteen thousand square feet. 

Passed July 25, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 
Resolution relating to a Park in McGiegorville. 

Whereas, The Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, through its treas- 
\irer, directors and agent, has offered as a gift to the city of Manchester a 
deed of the lot of land 500 feet by 181 feet on the east side of Beauport 
street, between Amory and Wayne streets, in West Manchester; 

Resolved By the Board of Mayor and Aldermen assembled ; That the offer 
be accepted and that this board place upon record its high appreciation of 
the generosity of the donors and that special thanks be extended to Mr. 
Herman F. Straw, agent of the Company, for his kindness and thought- 
fulness towards the residents of McGregorville in securing this valuable 
gift to the city ; 

Besolved, Further, That a copy of these resolutions be transmitted to the 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. 

Passed October 7, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 
Resolution relating to an Appropriation to pay Certain Land Damages. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

WiiEKEAs, in the laying out of Silver street from Hall to Belmont streets 
by the board of mayor and aldermen July 1, 1902, Jules Bourgeois W'as 
awarded the sum of six hundred dollars land damages, and 

Whekeas, in the laying out of Harvard street from Hall to Belmont 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 523 

streets by the board of mayor and aldermen July 1, 1902, Napoleon Bour- 
nival was awarded the sum of four hundred and eighty-three dollars and 
fourteen cents land daUiages, and 

Whereas, in the laying out of Harvard street from Hail to Belmont 
streets by the board of mayor and aldermen July 1, 1903, Joseph K. 
Mitchell was awarded the ?um of five hundred and eighty-five dollars and 
ninety nine cents laud damages, and 

Whekeas, in the laying out of Silver street from Hall to Belmont 
streets by the board of mayor and aldermen July 1, 1902, Joseph K. 
Mitchell was awarded the sum of six hundred dollars and seventy-three 
cents land damages, and 

Whereas, in the widening of Merrimack street between Hanover and 
Cass streets by the board of mayor and aldermen July 28, 1891, a certain 
strip of land now owned by John Ferguson was taken, and 

Whereas, at a meeting of the board of mayor and aldermen August, 22, 
1902, the said John Ferguson was awarded the sum of thirty dollars land 
damages, therefore be it 

Besolved, That an appropriation of two thousand two hundred and ninety 
dollars and eighty-six cents be and hereby is recommended to the board of 
common council; said sum of two thousand two hundred and ninety-nine 
dollars and eighty-six cents to be used to pay said awards. 

Passed November 11, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect an Electric Light at the corner of Elm and Sagamore 

streets. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and hereby are 
authorized to erect an electric light at the corner of Elm and Sagamore 
streets, as petitioned for in the petition of Chas. E. Green et als., with 
proper fixtures for maintaining same: the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for lighting streets. 

April 1, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect an Electric Light at the corner of Concord and Ash 

streets. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect an electric light at the corner of Concord and Ash 
streets, as petitioned for in the petition of J. E. Merrill et als., with 
proper fixtures for maintaining same ; the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for lighting streets. 

April 1, 1902. 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase Hose for the Fire Department. 
Ordered, That the mayor and standing committee on fire department be 
and are hereby authorized to purchase two thousand (2,000) feet of hose 



524 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

for use in the fire department of the city of Manchester, the expense 
thereof to' be charged to the appropriation for fire department. 
April 1, 1902. - 



City of Manchesteb. 
An Order relating to the Repairs on Public Buildings. 

Orderi-d, That the mayor and standing committee on lands and build- 
ings be (ind are hereby authorized and empowered to make such necessary 
repairs in and upon the jjublic buildings of said city as shall not exceed 
the sum of four thousand six hundred and twenty-five dollars; and that 
said sum of four thousand six hundred and twenty-five dollars be charged 
to the appropriation for repairs on public buildings. 

Passed April 1, 1902. 



City of Makchestee. 
An Order to buy Six Horses for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, That the mayor and standing committee on fire department be 
and are hereby authorized to purchase six horses for use in the fire 
department of the city of Manchester; the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed April 1, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Two Combination Chemical and Hose or Ladder 

Wagons. 

Ordered, That the mayor and standing committee on fire department be 
and are hereby authorized to purchase two combination chemical hose or 
ladder wagons for use in the fire department of the city of Manchester; 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for combination 
chemical for west side, and the appropriation for Wilson Hill engine 
house and combination chemical. 

Passed April 1, 1902. 

City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to Building a Fire Engine House on Wilson Hill. 

Ordered, That the mayor and standing committee on lands and build 
ings be and they are hereby authorized and instructed to build a fire 
engine house on Wilson Hill; the expense of the same to be charged to 
the appropriation for Wilson Hill engine house and combination chemical. 

Passed April 15, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order in relation to the Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 
Ordered, That the Louis BellPost, No. 3, G.A.R.,be authorized to expen^ 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 525 

the sum of three hundred dollars, and the Joseph Freschl Post, G.A.R. , be 
authorized to expend the sum of one hundred dollars, under the direction 
of the mayor, for the decoration of the soldiers' graves upon Memorial 
day ; and that said sum of three hundred dollars and one hundred dollars 
be charged to the appropriation for decoration of soldiers' graves. 
Passed April l.i, 1902. 



City of Manchestkk. 

An Okder to erect a Fire-alarm Box at the corner of Adams and Beauport 

streets. 

Ordered, That the committee on tire department be and are hereby author- 
ized to erect a fire-alarm box at the corner of Adams and Beauport streets 
in said city, with proper fixtures for operating the same, the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed April 15, 1902. 



City of Manchesteh. 
An Order relating to Baud Concerts. 

Ordered, That the mayor be and hereby is authorized and empowered to 
expend such sum or sums the present year for open air band concerts as 
sh:ill not exceed the sum of four hundred dollars; and the said sum of four 
hundred dollars be divided equally between the Turner brass band, Cadet 
baud, City band, and Manchester Military band; and that said sum of four 
hundred dollars be charged to the appropriation for baud concerts. 

Passed April 1.5, 1902. 



City o)' Manchester. 

An Order relating to the building of a uew Schoolhouse in South Man- 
chester. 

Ordered, That ths mayor and standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and they are hereby authorized and instructed to obtain plans and 
estimates for building, completing and equipping a four-room school 
building, to be located on the lot of land owned by the city of Manchester 
in South Manchester, bounded and described as is hereinafter mentioned, 
at an expense not exceeding ten thousand dollars ($10,000), the same to 1)6 
charged to the appropriation for South Beech-Street schoolhouse : 

Beginning at a stake on the northerly line of Titus Avenue 730.S3 feet 
westerly from the intersection of the northerly line of Titus avenue with 
the -vvesterly line of Beech street and measured on the northerly line of 
Titus avenue; thence in a westerly direction on the northerly line of Titus 
avenue 223 feet to a stake; thence in a northerly direction at light angles 
v.ith the northerly line of Titus avenue 220 feet to a .^take on the southerly 
line of Beech avenue, proposed; thence in an easterly direction on the 



O'Za ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

southerly line of Beech avenue, proposed; and parallel with the northerly 
line of Titus avenue 220 feet to a stake; thence in a southerly direction at 
right angles with the southerly line of Beech avenue proposed, 220 feet to 
a stake at the point of beginning, containing 48,400 square feet. 

And said mayor and standing committee are authorized to do any and 
everything necessary to complete said building, and to equip at least two 
school rooms and a teacher's room. 

Passed April 15, 1902. 



City of Manx'hkstek. 
An Ouder to build a certain Sewer in Ash street. 

Ordered., Tliat the board of street and park commissioners t)e and are 
hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows : 

Beginning at the sewer line of Sagamore street and thence in a northerly 
direction to the sewer line of Salmon street in Ash street; and the expense 
thereof be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed July 1, 1902. 



City of Manchf:ster. 
An Order discontinuing Three Welsbach Gasoline Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and hereby is author- 
ized to discontinue the Welsbach gasoline light located on Mill street in 
Amoskeag; the Welsbach gasoline light located on Weutworth street in 
West Manchester ; and the Welsbach gasoline light located on the Island 
Pond road near the Mill Dam House. 

Passed July 1, 1902. 



CiTV OF Mancuester. 
An Order to build Certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

Beginning at the present sewer in Hayward street at Prout avenue and 
thence in a southerly direction 516 feet in Prout avenue; beginning at 
the sewer line of Beacon street, and thence in an easterly direction to the 
sewer line of Weston street in Bridge street; beginning at the sewer line 
of Lowell street and thence in a northerly direction to the sewer line of 
East High street; beginning at the sewer line of East High street and 
thence in a northerly direction to the sewer line of Bridge street in Ash- 
land street; beginning at the sewer line of Milford street and thence in a 
northerly direction 800 feet in Bismarck street; beginning at the sewer 
line of East High street, and thence in a southerly direction to the sewer 
line of Lowell street in Buzzell street ; and the expense thereof be charged 
to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed July 25, 1902. ♦ 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES, 527 

ClT,Y OF MANCIIESTKK. 

An Ohdek to erect Four Welsbacli Gasoline Li<;hts. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect four Welsbach gasoline lights, with proper fixtures 
for maintaining the same, at the following locations: 

Corner of Lincoln and Valley streets, corner of Maple and Valley 
streets; corner of Hayward and Lincoln streets; and Hanover street oppo- 
site the Clough farm ; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for lighting streets. 

Passed September 2, 1902. 



City of Manchkster. 
Ax Okdf.r to build certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

Beginning at the manhole in Harvard street 260 feet east of the sewer 
line of Wilson street and thence in an easterly direction to the sewer line 
of Hall street in Harvard street; beginning at the sewer line of Carpenter 
street and thence in a northerly direction to the sewer line of Trenton 
street in Chestnut street; beginning at the sewer line of Mast street and 
thence in a southerly direction to the sewer line of Milford street in 
Bowman street; beginning at the sewer line of Trenton street and thence 
in a northerly direction 500 feet in Union street; beginning at the termi- 
nation of the sewer in George street as voted in June 5, 1930, and thence 
in a northerly direction to the sewer line of Charleston avenue in George 
street ; beginning at the sewer line of Alsace street and thence in a west- 
erly direction to the sewer line of Joliette street in Amory street; and 
the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed October 7, 1902. 



City of Manchestkr. 

Ax Order to erect a Fire-Alarm Box at the corner of Kelley and Dubu- 
que streets. 

Ordered, That the committee on tire department be and are hereby 
authorized to erect a tire-alarm box at the corner of Kelley and Dubiujue 
streets with proper fixtures for operating the same, as petitioned for in 
the petition of Joseph Trahan, et als; the exjiense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for tire department. 

Passed October 7, 1902. 



City of Maxchester. 
Ax Order to erect Three Electric Lights. 
Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby au- 
thorized to erect three electric lights with j)roper fixtures for maintaining 



528 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the same ; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation foi; 
lighting streets: said lights to be located as follows: corner of Hooksett 
road and "Webster street; corner of Belmont street and Lake avenue: 
corner of Russell and Orange streets, 
rassed October 11. 1902. 



City of Maxciiksteij. 
Asi Order to erect Four Welsbach Gas Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is hereby au- 
thorized to erect four Welsbach gas lights with proper fixtures for main- 
taining same, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
lighting streets; said lights to be located as follows: Corner of Boynton 
and C streets, corner of Beech street and Brown avenue ; on Elm street 
between Rowell and Trenton streets, on Candia road in front of John 
Proctor Place. 

Passed October 11, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 
Ax Order to erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, That the comimttee on lighting streets be and is hereby au- 
thorized to erect an electric light at the corner of Silver and Belmont 
streets, with proper fixtures for maintaining the same; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed October 14, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 
Ax Order to erect two Fire-Alarm Boxes. 

Ordered, That the committee on fire department be and is hereby au- 
thorized to erect a fire-alarm box oji Titus avenue near the Highland 
schoolhouse, as petitioned for by H. E. Blake, et als; and a fire-alarm box 
on Page street opposite the Eaton Heights shoe shop, as petitioned for 
by Grifiin and Cogswell, et als, with proper fixtures for maintaining the 
same, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire 
department. 

Passed December 19, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 
Ax Order to Purchase Three Horses for Fire Department. 

Ordered, That the mayor and committee on fire department be and are 
hereby atithorized to purchase three horses for use in the fire department, 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire depart- 
ment. 

Passed December 19, 1902. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDIIsTANCES. 529 

City op Manchester. 
An Obder to bviild certain Sewers. 

Orderpxl, That the board of street and park coniinissionerfs be and are 
hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: Beginning at the 
sewer line of Hall street and thence in an easterlj^ direction to the sewer 
line of Taylor street, in Somerville street; beginning at the sewer line of 
Taylor street and thence in an easterly direction to a point 450 feet west 
of the sewer line of Cypress street, in Somerville street; beginning at the 
sewer line of Clay street and thence in a southerly direction to the sewer 
line of Dix street, in Hall street; beginning at the sewer line of Carx)enter 
street and thence in a northerly direction to the sewer line of Trenton 
street, in Adams street; beginning at the sewer line of Somerville street 
and thence in a southerly direction to the sewer line of Dix street, in 
Taylor street ; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
new sewers. 

Passed December 19, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand nine hundred and two. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 24, Chapter 6 of the Ijaws and 
'Ordinances of the City of Manchester. 

Be it unjdini'd by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 

City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend section 24 of chapter 6 of the Laws and Ordinances 
of the city of Manchester, by striking out the remainder of said section, 
after the word " July " in the fifteenth line of said section, and inserting- 
in place thereof the following words: " Whenever captains of fire com- 
panies of the fire department of the city of Manchester shall be employed 
as permanent men, and whenever such captains shall be permanently 
employed on duty at the engine-houses in said Manchester, the pay of 
such captains shall be seventy-five dollars ($75.00) a month, payable 
monthly," so that said section as amended shall read as follows: 

'' Section 24. The annual compensation of the members of the several 
hook-and-ladder, hose, steam fire-engine, and chemical engine companies, 
who shall personally perform all the duties required by law, shall be as 
follows: Drivers, each, sixty-eight and one-third dollars per month; per- 
manent engineers of fire steamers, each, seventy-six and one-quai'ter 
dollars per month ; other permanent men, each, [sixty-five dollars per 
month; all payable monthly; foremen, each, one hundred and sixty- 
five dollars; assistant-foremen, each, one hundred and sixty dollars; 
clerks, each, one hundred and sixty dollars; call engineers of steamers, 
each, one hundred and eighty-five dollars; call assistant-engineers, each, 
one hundred and fifty-five dollars; all other members, each', one hundred 



530 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and fifty dollars. All payable in e<iual semi-annual payments on the first 
of January and July. 

AVhenever captains of flre companies of the fire department of the city 
of Manchester shall be employed as permanent men, and whenever such 
captains shall be permanently employed on duty at the engine-houses in 
said Manchester, the pay of such captains shall be seventy-five dollars 
($75.00) per month, payable monthly." 

Section 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained April 1, 1902. 



City of ISIanchestee. 

in thk year one thousand nine hundred and two. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 23 of Chajiter 6 of the Laws and 
Ordinances of the city of Manchester. 

He it onlnincd hy ihe Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 

City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend section 23 of chapter 6 of the Laws and Ordinances 
of the city of Manchester, in the eleventh line of said section, by striking 
out in said line after the word " of ", the words " one hundred and seven- 
ty-five", and inserting in place thereof the words "two hundred and 
fifty ", so that said section as amended shall read as follows: 

" Section 23. The chief engineer of the fire department shall have 
charge of all fire department apparatus, horses, stables, and property of 
every description belonging to the department; he shall care for and 
keep in good condition the fire-alarm telegrajjh, attend to all duties ap- 
pertaining to the fire department, and shall receive in full for his services 
the sum of fifteen hundred dollars per annum, to be paid in equal quar- 
terly payments. The assistant engineers shall oach receive the sum of 
two hundred and fifty dollars per annum, in full for his services, 
and for all duties pertaining to his office, to be paid in equal quarterly 
payments. They shall elect one of their number clerk, who shall record 
the proceedings of the board, and do such other things as shall be required 
of him by the board, and shall receive in full for his services as such 
clerk, twenty-five dollars per annum, payable at the end of his term of 
office. 

Passed to be ordained April 1, 1902. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 531 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand nine hundred and two. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 7, Chapter 14, and Sections 9 and 
10 of Chapter 15, of the Laws and Ordinances of the City of Manchester. 

Be it ordained by the' Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Cyuncil assembled, as follows : 

Section 1. That section 7, of chapter l-i of the Laws and Ordinances of 
the city of Manchester, passed June 4, 1901, shall not apply to any wooden 
building erected on the lot of land situated at the corner of Elm and 
Central streets in said city ; and bounded on the west by Elm street, sixty 
feet on the north by Central street, 100 feet, on the east by Manhattan lane, 
sixty feet, and on the south by the Gooden property ; provided, said building 
shall not exceed twelve feet in height between floor and ceiling. 

Section 2. That sections 9 and 10 of chapter 15, of the Laws and Ordi- 
nances of the city shall not apply to any wooden building erected on the 
lot of land described in section 1 hereof, provided said building shall not 
exceed twelve feet in height between floor and ceiling. 

Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained, April 1, 1902. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand nine hundred and two. 

An Ordinance relating to the Wetting down of Sidewalks. 

Be it ordained, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows : 

Section 1. That the wetting down of sidewalks in the irasiness sections 
of the city, between the hours of eight o'clock in the morning and eleven 
o'clock in the afternoon, is hereby prohibited. 

Section 2. Any person violating the provisions of this ordinance shall 
be deemed to be guilty of a nuisance and punished accordingly. 

Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage, and shall 
be in force from said date until the tlrst day of November, 1902, and there- 
after in each year from the first day of April until the first day of No- 
vember. 

Passed to be ordained, July 1, 1902. 



532 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand nine hundred and two. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 11, Chapter 6 of the Laws and 

Ordinances of the City of Manchester, relating to the Salary 

of the Clerk of the Common Council. 

Be it ordained hy the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend section 11, chapter 6 of the Laws and Ordinances 
of the city of Manchester, in the ninth line of said section, after the word 
" office ", by striking out the words " two hundred ", and inserting in 
place thereof the word "fifty" so that said section as amended shall 
read as follows: 

" Section 11. The clerk of the common council shall, in addition to 
his duties as clerk of that board, enter at length in a separate journal, to 
be kept for that purpose and provided with an index, all accepted reports 
of joint standing and special committees, and shall enroll all ordinances 
and resolutions that shall pass both boards of the city councils. He shall 
receive in full for his services, and for all the duties appertaining to his 
office, fifty dollars per annum, payable in equal quarterly payments. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force on and 
after the first Tuesday of January, 1903, and all ordinances and parts of 
ordinances inconsistent with this ordinance are hereby repealed. 

Passed to be ordained, December 2, 1902. 



INDEX. 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Aljatement of Taxes 132 

AiHoskeag cemetery 107 

Amoskeag schoolhouse play ground 99 

Annual interest charge on bonded debt . 157 

Appropriations for 1902 by city council 134 

Appendix, school ••.... 844 

Assets, statement and inventory of 165 

Auditor, city, report of 21 

Auditor's department 46 

B 

Band concerts 131 

Board of water commissioners, organization of 186 

report of 188 

health, report of 427 

Bonded debt, tabular statement of 154, 155 

detailed statement of, 1902 156 

annual interest charge 157 

Books and stationery 150 

Bridges 63 

Buildings, repairs of 95 

public, occupied by private parties 158 



Care of schoolrooms 115 

Cemetery, Pine Grove 103 

Valley 106 

Amoskeag 107 

report of sub-trustees of Valley 493 

Pine Grove 491 

Amoskeag 493 

Cemeteries, treasurer of 495 

treasurer of fund 498 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax 145 

City auditor's department 46 

auditor's report 21 

engineer, report of 261 

farm 124 

hall 33 

library 82 

535 



536 INDEX. 

City library, report of trustees of 447 

treasurer's report 456 

librarian's report 459 

donations to 469 

officers' salaries 43 

officials, list of 3, 18 

solicitor, report of 479 

teams • 64 

treasurer's report 21 

Commons 70 

Contingent expenses 113 

County tax 133 

D 

Debt, payment of funded 30 

bonded, statement of 154, 155 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 132 

Derryfield and Stark parks 72 



Electric lights, location of 173, 184 

Elliot Hospital 133 

Engineer's department 75 

Evening schools 116 

school, mechanical drawing 116 

Exempted from tax, i^roperty 150 

Expenses, incidental 36 

mayor's 47 

contingent 113 



Farm, paupers off 120 

city 124 

File and index system 130 

Fires, list of . . " 390 

Fire department 84 

report of chief engineer 373 

value of personal property 410 

names and residences of members 418 

location of tire-alarm boxes 379 

Fire-alarm telegraph 89 

Free text-books 117 

Fuel 113 

Furniture and supplies Ill 



Gas lights, location of 171 

Grading for concrete 59 

Graduates high school 357 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 132 



INDEX. 537 

H 

Health department '76 

board of, report of 427 

inspectors of, report of 443 

Highways, new ^^ 

land taken for 54 

watering 55 

paving 57 

macadamizing 58 



grading for concrete on 
sweeping 



59 
62 



lighting '4 

repairs of 49 

Home, Women's Aid 1^4 

Hospital, Elliot, free beds 133 

iSacred Heart 1^4 

Notre Dame de Lourdes 134 

Hydrant service -^1 



I 

Incidental expenses 36 

Indigent soldiers 129 

Inspector of buildings, report of 48 

Interest ^^ 

annual charge, bonded debt 157 

Inventory of assets 165 

Isolation Hospital '^l 



Land taken for highways 54 

Laws relating to exemptions 143 

Legal points and rules relating to claims against the city .... 165 

Lighting streets "4 

Library, city ^2 



M 

Macadamizing streets 58 

Manual training H^ 

Mayor's incidentals • f' 

Mercy Home 134 

Merrill yard ly^ 

Militia 131 

Money unappropriated pi 

Municipal receipts and expenditures 25 

N 

New highways 52 



538 INDEX. 

o 

Order to purchase horses for fire department 524, 528 

combination chemical wagons 524 

to build certain sewers 526, 527, 529 

to repair public buildings 524 

to discontinue lights 526 

to build new schoolhouse . . . : 525 

to build new engine house 524 

in relation to decoration of soldiers' graves 524 

to erect electric lights 523, 527, 528 

to erect Welsbach ligMs 527, 528 

to erect a fire-alarm box 525, 527, 528 

relating to band concerts 525 

to purchase hose 523 

Ordinance amending chapter 6 . 629, 530, 582 

amending chapter 14 and 15 531 

relating to wetting sidewalks 531 

Overseers of the poor, report of 487 

Oil lamps, location of 172 



Parks, Derryfield and Stark 72 

Parsonages, valuation of, exempt from taxation 145 

Paupers off the farm 120 

Paving streets 57 

Canal street 57 

Elm street 57 

Payment of funded debt 30 

Pine Grove cemetery 103 

Plumbing examiners, report of 287 

expenses 130 

Police department, station 91 

court 92 

commission 93 

Printing and stationery 34 

and advertising 110 

Property account, real and personal 163, 164 

Public buildings occupied by private parties 158 

Purchase of land sold for taxes 132 

R 

Kepairs of schoolhovises 108 

of buildings 95 

of highways 49 

Eesolution relating to interest on deposits . . _ 518 

a new schoolhouse 513 

side track for East Side Company 513 

concreting certain streets 515 

appropriation for new bridges 515 

culverts 515 

Wolf Park • • . 516 

employment of residents 518 

hours of day's labor 519 

bonds of telephone companies 519 



INDEX. 



539 



KcBolution relating to Amoskeag tax case 519 

Gibbs suit '^^" 

trees and tree boxes ^^^ 

Wilson Hill engine house o^^ 

Lafayette park ^^^ 

land damages ^^^ 

exemptions from taxation ^^* 

bonds g^Q 

transferring money I ' ' ' .' '■■nno ' " ^^d 

raising money and making appropriations for 1902 . . _i^4 

making temporary loan '^/^^ ^ 

Keport of Board of Water Commissioners 

Superintendent of Water- Works ^»^ 

City Engineer ^-o 

Chief Engineer Fire Department ^'^ 

Trustees of City Library J ' 

Sub-Trustees of Valley Cemetery ^^^ 

Pine Grove Cemetery *j*^ 

Amoskeag Cemetery 495 

Treasurer of Cemeteries -» • ' 

Treasurer of Cemetery fund *^° 

Treasurer of Sinking Fund ^"' 

Overseers of the Poor ° 

Street and Park Commission • • ^^' 

Committee on Sewers and Drains ^ ^o^ 

Committee on Streets * ^^^ 

City Solicitor oqg 

School Superintendent ^^ 

Board of Health • • ; *2i 

City Auditor ' ' 2i 



City Treasurer if^q ifi'-i 

Real and personal estate owned by the city ........ • / ■^^*'' |" 

property, exempt from taxation, other than public property 145 
Rules, etc., relating to bills against the city (auditors dept.) . • i^J 

Receipts and expenditures, 1902 



Sacred H-eart Hospital ^g 

Salaries of city officials ^^^ 

Salaries, teachers gQ 

Scavenger service ' ' ". 325 

School department, organization of ^^^ 

evening, mechanical drawing ^ 

superintendent's report '^^g 

Schoolhouses, repairs of gg 

Schoolhouse, Beech Street g^ 

Sewers, repairs of ' gg 

new JJ2 

Sewing materials ^q 

Sinking fund ^Q-y 

treasurer's report ^„ 

Snow and ice -1^29 

Soldiers, indigent ^^g 

Solicitor, city, report of . - • ■ ,^g 

South Manchester Playground ^2 

Stark and Derryfield parks 154 155 

Statement of bonded debt 



540 INDEX. 

statement of public buildings occupied by private parties .... 158 

State tax 133 

Street and park commission 48 

report of 225 

Street sweeping 62 



Tabular statement of taxation by board of assessors 138, 139 

Taxes, abatement of 132 

due and uncollected 141 

Tax, state 133 

county 133 

valuations 142 

Taxation, appropriations for 1902 134 

manufacturing property exempt from 150 

settlement of account tax collector 142 

Teachers, list of 359 

Teachers' salaries 117 

Teams, city 64 

Temporary loan 32 

Text-books, free 117 

Training, manual 119 

Treasurer, city, report of 21 



Valley cemetery 106 

Valuation and taxes, 1902 140 

w 

Watering streets 55 

Water-works, superintendent's report 190 

commissioner's report 189 

expenses 99 

Women's Aid Home 134 

Wilson Hill Engine House 99