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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

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FIFTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF MANCHESTER 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1903 



TOGETHER WITH 



Other Annual Reports and Papers Relating 
TO the Affairs of the City. 




iVlANCHESTER, N. H. 
Printed by The John B. Clarke Company 



1904 



hi 

190S 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 
1903. 



Mayor. 

EUGENE E. REED Office, City Hall 

Chosen at biennial election in November, 1902. Salary, $1,800 ])er 
annum, payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1S48, section 1. Chapter 22.-;, 
Laws of 1883. Public Statutes, chapter 47.) 



Aldermen. 



Ward 


1. 


Ward 


2. 


Ward 


3. 


Ward 


4. 


Ward 


5, 


Ward 


6. 


Ward 


7. 


Ward 


8. 


Ward 


9. 


Ward 


10. 


Salary 


, $3 



Charles F. Eead, 36 M. S. Block, Water street. 
Fred K. Ramsey, 916 Ches'tnut street. 
Alvin H. Keith,* 211 Bridge street. 
Charles H. Clark, 453 Maple street. 
Richard J. Barry, 232 Lake avenue. 
Rollin B. Johnston, 479 East Spruce street. 
Samuel F. Davis, 50 Middle street. 
G. Walter Taylor, 23 Boynton street. 
Mederique R. Maynard, 324 Dubuque street. 
William E. Dunbar, 1025 Hayward street. 
per meeting, amount not to exceed $200 annually. 



President Of the Common Council. 

Charles E. Chase, 384 Walnut street. 



Members of the Common Council. 

Act of January, 1897, chapter 198. 

Ward 1. 

Ernest W. Wiesner, 19 Market street. 
Alexander Hanna, 5 Boyden street. 
Frank L. Danielson, 3 Stark street. 
* Died December 5, 1903. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Ward 2. 



Charles E. Chase, 3S4 Walnut street. 
Silas E. W-allace, 66 Brook street. 
Frank B. Stevens, 144 Blodget street. 

Ward 3. 

Alfred L. Gadbois, 110 Bridge street. 
Thomas Smith, 24 South street. 
John L. Rj-din, 9 Jane street. 

Ward 4. 

Moses D. Allard, 34 Vine street. 
Stephen B. Stearns, 046 Am'herst street. 
Abraham L. Garmon, 517 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. 

Bryan J. Connor, 259 Cedar street. 
James Jennings, 21 Laurel street. 
Charles Kobitaille, 144 Cedar street. 

Ward 6. 

William H. Marshall, 425 Beacon street. 
G. Irving Haselton, 404 Lake avenue. 
Frank T. E. Richardson, 481 Lincoln street. 

Ward 7. 

Robert Edgar, 70 West Merrimack street. 

Dennis Breen, S West Merrimack street. 

Joseph L. Simpkins, 16 Manchester Print Works. 

Ward 8. 

Henrj' A. Caswell, 107 Boynton street. 
Israel H. Barnes, 170 Walker street. 
Richard A. Xeubert, 77 Cleveland street. 

W^ARD 9. 

Arthur Provost, 526 Beauport street. 
Treflfie Raiche, 436 Rimmon street. 
Christoph Reischer, 79 Conant street. 

Ward 10. 

Forrest E. Bean, Island Pond Road. 
George B. Merrow, 25 Elm street, 
(ieorge F. Tnxbury, 188 Wilson street. 
Xo salary. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 5 

Clerk of the Common Council. 

Harry A. Piper, 1112 Manchester street. 

Salary, $50. (General Laws, chapter 46, sections 7-9. Cit_y Laws and 
Ordinances, page 33, chapter 6, section 11.) 



City Clerk. 

Edward C. Smith Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350 and fees. (Laws, 1899, chapter 6.) Chosen in January-, 
biennially, by board of aldermen. Residence, 900 Union street. Also 
clerk of all committees of the board of aldermen; salary, $200. 

City Clerk's Clerk. 

Florence A. Robinson City Clerk's Office, City Hall 



City Auditor. 

James E. Dodge Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Appointed hj mayor and approved by board of alder- 
men in January, biennially. (Laws of 1889, chapter 287. City Ordi- 
nances, pages 44, 71, 83-88, 173.) Residence, River road' north. 



Auditor's Clerk. 
Lizzie M. Cogswell .Auditor's Office, City Hall 

City Treasurer. 

Fred L. Allen Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350. Elected by board of aldermen in Januarj^ biennially. 
(Act of January, 1897, chapter 198.) Residence, 33 Walnut street. 

Treasurer's Clerk. 

Mabel L. How Treasurer's Office, City Hall 

Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,3-50, fees, and allowance for horsehire. Elected by mayor 
and aldermen before May 1, biennially. (Act of July, 1851. Act"^ of 
June, 1859, section 6. Act of 1897, chapter 198. Public Statutes, chap- 
ter 43. City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 33.) Residence, 740 Chest- 
nut street. 



6 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Deputy Collector of Taxes. 

Edwin C. Paul Collector's Office, City Hall 

Joseph A. Guevin Collector's Office, City Hall 

Salary, $800. Appointed by tax collector with approvial of mayor and 
aldermen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter :J3, section 3.) 



City Solicitor. 

George A. Wagner Office, Pickering Building 

Salary, $S0O. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(Act of"'lS97, chapter 198.) Kesidence, 332 Orange street. 



City IVIessenger. 

John^A. Barker Office, City Hall 

Salary, $700. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6.) Kesidence, 49 Appleton 
street. 



Board of Aldermen. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



On Accounts. — Eead, Clark, Eamsey. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Eead, Taylor, Dunbar. 

On City Farm and Houf^e of Correction. — Johnston, Taylor, Keith. 

On Claims. — Davis, Johnston, Clark. 

On Cemeteries. — Dunbar, Eamsey, Taylor, Clark, Keith. 

On Enrollment. — Davis, Barry, Johnston. 

On Finance.— The Mayor, Dunbar, Clark. 

On Fire Depwrtment. — Barry, Johnston, Taylor. 

On Lwtids and Buildings. — Dunbar, Eead, Davis. 

On Licenses. — Keith, Davis, Barry. 

On Lighting Streets. — Eamsey, Barry, Keith. 

On Military Affairs. — Maynard, Eead, Keith. 

On Public Health. — Taylor, Eamsey, Davis. 

On Setting Trees. — Barry, Maynard, Dunbar. 

On Seicers and Drains. — Maynard, Eamsey, Eead. 

On Streets. — Clark, Maynard, Johnston, 

Member first named is chairman of respective committee. 

Clerk of Committees, Edward C. Smith. Salary, $200 annually. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



Common Council. 



No. 1. On Ventral Dciniiinicnt, Anditor''s, Enulnccr'a, and Dcinutnicnt of 
Taj^cs.— Simpkins, Kydin, Neubert, Garmon, Kaiche. 

JVo. 2. On Street and .S'cfrrr Deixirtment. — Caswell, Provost, Stevens, 
Haselton, Breen. 

No. 3. On School Dcpart'nicnt. — ^Garmou, Richardson, Wiesner, Chase, 
Reiseher. 

No. 4. On Fire UviKirtnicnt. — Merrow, Smith, Edguir, Eaiche, Jennings. 

No. 5. On Pnblic BuUdin<js and' Pnhlic P?«oe.s\— Wallace, Neubert, Dan- 
ielson, Roibitaille, Tuxbury. 

No. 6. On Health, Police DeiJartnient, Pnblic Library, Patriotic, Charita- 
ble and Philanthropic. — Stearns, Marshall, Allard, Connor, Haselton. 

No. 7. On Lighting Streets.— Gadhols, Bean, Smith, Barnes, Hanna. 



Finance Committee. 

President of the Common Council Charles E. Chase, chairman, e.r offi- 
cio, and the chairman of the different committees named above: Joseph 
L. Simpkins, Henry A. Caswell, Abraham L. Garmon, George B. Merrow, 
Silas R. Wallace, Stephen B. Stearns, and Alfred L. Gadbois. 



City PFiysician. 

John H. DeGross Oflfiee, Kennard Building 

Salary, $600. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(Act of 1S97, chapter 198. ' City Ordinances, chapter 9, sections 29, 30.) 
Residence, 52 Clarke street. 



City Engineer. 

Samuel J. Lord Office, City Hall 

' Salary, $1,350 and allowance for horsehire. Chosen by board of alder- 
men in January, biennially. (City Ordinances, chapter (5, sections 33, 
34.) 

enginee'r's assistants. 

Harrie M. Young. Harry J. Briggs. 

George M. Wales. Alfred T. Dodge. 

Henrv A. Worthen. 



Ella B. Davis. 



STENOGRAPHER. 



Water Commissioners. 



(Chapter 70, Laws of 1871. City Ordinances, chapter 3(3, and Laws of 
1891, chapter 26, page 319, act approved March 31, 1S91. Chapter 183, 



8 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Laws of 1893.) One commissioner elected annually b.y mayor and 
aldermen, in the month of September, for a term of six years. Oflfice at 
court house, corner Franklin and West Merrimack streets. Telephone 
at office and at pumping station. 

The Mayor, ex offlcw. 

Charles H. Manning. Term expires January, 1907. 
Frank Dowst. Term expires January, 1906. 
William Corey. Term expires January, 1905. 
Edgar J. Knowlton. Term expires January, 1904. 
Harrj' E. Parker. Term expires January, 1909. 
Charles M. Floyd. Term expires January, 1908. 
Charles H. Manning, chairman. 



Superintendent of Water-Works. 

Charles K. Walker Olfice, Court House, Franklin street 

Salarj-, .$2,400. Chosen by water commissioners annually. Eesi- 
dence, 68 South Main street. West Manchester. 



Clerk of Water-Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns Office, Court House, P^ranklin street 

Salary, $1,800. Chosen by water commissioners annuallj'. 



Engineer at Old Pumping Station. 

Josiah Laselle. Salary, $700, rent, fuel, and use of land. 
Chosen by water commissioners annually. 



Engineer at New Pumping Station. 

C. A. Whitney, $2.50 per day, rent, and fuel. 



Justice of the Police Court. 

Isaac L. Heath, court room at police station, corner Manchester and 
Chestnut streets. 

Salary, $1,500. A))pointed by the governor with the advice of the 
council. (General Laws, chapter 215; chajiter 163, sections 17, IS, 19, 
of the Laws of 1S7S, as amended by chapter 2;;6, Laws of ISSl. Tublic 
Statutes, chapter 211.) 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 9 

Associate Justice of tine Police Court. 

George W. Prescott. Salary, $;iOU per annum. 

Appointed by the governor, with the advice of the council. (Chapter 
215, General Laws, sections 2-14. I'ublic Statutes, chapter 211. Chapter 
296, Laws of 1893.) 



Clerk of the Police Court 

John C. Bickford. Salary, $600. 

Appointed bj^ the justice of the police court. (Chapter 163, sections 
17-19, General Laws, amended by chapter 236. Laws of ISSl. Public 
Statutes, chapter 211.) Residence, 15 Ash street. 



Police. 



The members of the police are appointed by the police commissioners, 
and hold their commissions during good behavior. They are, by virtue 
of their appointment, constables and conservators of the peace, and 
their jurisdiction extends throughout the city. (Chapter 253, section 5, 
General Law^s; chapter 303, Laws of 1S87; chapter 202, Laws of 1893.) 
Police station at the corner of Chestnut and Manchester streets. 



Police Commissioners. 

See chapter 202, Laws of 1893. 
Noah S. Clark, clerk. Term expires January, 1904. 
Frank P. Cheney. Term expires January, 1908. 
Edward B. Woodbury, chairman. Term expires January-, 1906. 



Chief of Police. 

Michael J. Healy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $2,000. Eesidence, 304 Central street. Telephone at house and 
office. 



Deputy Chief of Police. 

•John F. Cassidy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $1,500. Pvcsidence. 569 Hanover street. 



Captain of the Watch. 

Thomas E. Steele. Salary, $2.50 per day. Eesidence, 253 Walniit 
street. 



10 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Sergeants. 

Leon E. Magoou. Salary, $^!.50 per day. Residence, 261 Blodget 
street. 

John T. O'Dowd. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 90 Adams street. 



Adler, Leonard J. 
Archambeault, Joseph 
Badger, John C. 
Bean, Randall W. 
Bourassa, Frank E. 
Brown, John G. 
Butler, James S. 
Callaghan, Peter 
Connor, John J. 
Coolidge, Edg^r L. 
Dunn, James F. 
Dustin, Frank J. 
Farrell, Joseph A. 
Foye, William F. 
Hampston, James S. 
Hampston, Patrick F. 
Healy, John D. 
Heneault, Edward 
Hildreth, Clifton B. 
Hutchins, Dexter B. 



Patrolmen. 

Lovejoy, George A. 
Lj-neh, John J. 
Marden, Frank W. 
McQuade, Edward H. 
Moher, William 
Moore, Frank P. 
Moriarty, Mortimer J. 
O'Malley, John F. 
Parmenter, Wallace C. 
Poehlman, Oscar R. 
Proctor, Levi J. 
Rainville, Frank 
Russell, Albert 
Shea, Jeffrey 
Somers, Elmer E. 
Sullivan, Florence. 
Sweeney, James 
Tilton, Asa N. 
Welch, John T. 
Wheden, Eben E. 



Janitors of Station. 

Frank P. Wiggin. Salary, $2.00 per day. Residence, 15G Merrimack 
street. 

Charles H. Skinner. Salary, $2.00 per day. Residence, 335 East High 
street. 



Miss A. B. Brown. 
mack street. 



Sal; 



Matron. 

■y, $J25 per annum. 



Piesidence, 228 Merri- 



School Committee. 
Chosen at the biennial election in November, 1902; mayor and presi- 
dent of the common council members ex officio. The board of school 
committee choose the clerk of the board, the superintendent of public 
instruction, the truant officer, and the teachers in the public schools, 
and determine their salaries. They have charge of the repairs of 
schoolhouses, to a limited extent, and the purchase of free text-books 
and other supplies, and are limited by the apjn-opriations of the city 
councils. The salary of the committee is $10 each. 



LIST OK OFFICERS. 
Ward 1. 



11 



Walter B. Heath. 
John W. Johnston 
George D. Towne. 
Nathaniel L. Colby. 
John T. Kelley. 
Engene B. Dunbar. 
Edward B. Woodbury. 
Walter B. Mitchell. 
Alaric Gauthier. 



Ward 2. 



Ward 3. 



Ward 4. 



Ward 5. 



Ward 7. 



Ward S. 



Ward 9. 



Ward 10. 



Elliot C. Lambert. 



Will C. Heath. 



Loui.s E. I'helps 



Isaac N. Cox. 



:Mark E. Harvey. 

Eugene E. Keed, ex officio, chairman. 
Charles E. Chase, ex officio. 
George D. Towne, vice-chairman. 
Elliot C. Lambert, clerk. 



John F. Lee. 



Harry L. Davis. 



Edson S. Heath. 



Benjamin Price. 



Eichard E. Walsh. 



Harry H. Burpee. 



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Charles W. Bickford Oifice, City Hall 

Salary, $2,300. 



Superintendent's Clerk. 

Fannie L. Sanborn Residence, 161 Hanover street 

Salary, $500. 



Truant Officer, 
Curtis \Y. Davis Office. City Hall 

Salary, $S50 and allowance for horsehire. Residence, S19 Chestnut 
street. 



12 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Assessors. 

One assessor from each ward chosen at the biennial election in Xo- 
veniber. Paid $2.50 for each day while employed in the assessment and 
abatement of taxes. Office, City Hall. (Charter, section 25. I'nblic 
Statntes, chapter 48. section 1; chapter 50, section 4; chapter 49, sec- 
tions 10, 11, 12. Cit3' Ordinances, chapter G. section 26.) Assistant as- 
sessors, not exceeding six, chosen by the citj- councils. 

Ward 1. John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street. 

Ward 2. John K. Wilson, 67 Blodget street. 

Ward 3. David O. Fernald, 384 Lowell street. 

Ward 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. George F. Sheehan, 85 Cedar street. 

Ward 6. Leroy M. Streeter, Mammoth road. 

Ward 7. Kobert Leggett, 50 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 8. Eugene W. Brigham, 6 Marlboro street. 

Ward 9. Denis Vigneault, 564 Cartier street. 

Ward 10. George M. French. 



CHAIRMAN OF ASSESSORS. 

David 0. Fernald Offtce, City Hall 

CLEEK OF ASSESSORS. 

Eugene W. Brigham Office, City Hall 

AS'SISTAX'T ASSESSORS. 

Charles W^. Brown. Harry J. Woods. 

Eobert Edgar. Henry F. Stone. 

Clarence M. Woodbury. Charles D. Gadbois. 



Inspectors of Check-Lists. 

One in each ward chosen at the biennial election in November. Com- 
pensation, $2.25 per day for each day actually emploj'ed. Office, City 
Hall. (Laws of 1878, chapter 163, sections 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 
and Citjr Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) 

Ward 1. William F. Grauer. 

Ward 2. Charles B. Tucker. 

Ward 3. Arthur W. Kowell. 

Ward 4. Albert T. Barr. 

Ward 5. ^Lnrtin J. Whalen. 

Ward 6. George Taylor. 

Ward 7. Joseph A. Foster. 

Ward 8. Charles C. Tinkham. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 13 



Ward 9. Norbert Descoteau. 
Ward 10. John J. Connor. 
Charles C. Tinkham, chairman. 
Charles B. Tucker, clerk. 



Overseers of the Poor. 

One in each ward, chosen at biennial election in November. The 
mayor is a member ex officio. Compensation, $50 per annum, each; 
clerk of the board, $125 per annum, determined by City Ordinances, 
chapter 14, section 18, as amended by Ordinance of August 5, 1890, and 
July 2, 1901. Meet third Wednesday of each month in City Hall build- 
ing. 

Ward 1. George E. Davis, 40 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Ward 2. William H. Maxwell,* 345 Walnut street. 
Ward 3. Edward H. Holmes, 517 Chestnut street. 
Ward 4. Charles B. Clarkson, 329 Amherst street. 
Ward 5. Thomas F. Sheehan, 364 Beech street. 
Ward 6. Charles Francis, Candia road. 
Ward 7. William Marshall, 80 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Ward S. Henry Lein, 118 Third street. 
Ward 9. Thomas C. Stewart, 584 Main street. 
Ward 10. Moses C. Morey, 276 Nutt road. 
Eugene E. Eeed, ex officio. Oftice, City Hall. 
Thomas C. Stewart, clerk. 



Board of Health. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 1885, 
chapter 165; Laws of 1SS7, chapter 227; Public Statutes, chapters 108, 
109, 110.) One member appointed by the mayor in January of each 
year, to hold office for a term of three years. Salary, $200 each per 
annum. Office, Court House, West Merrimack, corner of Franklin 
street. 

John C. Bickford. Term expires first ^Monday in February, 1903. 

William K. Robbins. Term expires first Monday in February, 1904. 

William M. Parsons. Term expires first Monday in February, 1905. 

Joseph E. A. Lanouette. Term expires first Monday in February, 
1906. 

William B. Blake, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, Merri- 
mack, corner of Franklin street. 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, Merrimack, 
corner of Franklin street. 

Carl O. Seaman, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, Merrimack, 
corner Franklin street. 

M. Alma Fracker, office clerk. 

^Died October 9, 1903, and Daniel G. Andrews elected by board of Aldermen to 
fill the vacancy. 



14 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Fire Department. 

The chief engineer and foui- assistant engineers are chosen biennially 
in the month of January, by a majority of the citj- councils in conven- 
tion. The salary- of the chief engineer is $1,500 per annum; the assist- 
ant engineers, each $230 per annum. They exercise the powers and per- 
form the duties of firewards. The said engineers constitute the board 
of engineers, and elect a clerk whose compensation is $25 a year. The 
annual compensation of the call members of the several hook-and-lad- 
der, hose, steam fire engine, and chemical companies is as follows: Cap- 
tains, each $165; lieutenants, each $160; clerks, each $100; call engineers, 
each $185; assistant eng'ineers, each $155; all other members, each $150, 
payable in semi-annual paj-ments. on the first of January and Julj'. 
(Laws of 1870. chapter 99. General Laws, chapter 106. City Ordi- 
nances, chapters 6 and 12.) Six members are permanentlj- employed as 
engineers at $76.25 per month each, and twenty-one as drivers at 
$68.33 1-3 per month each, six other permanent men at $65 per month 
each, permanent captains, $75 per month each, and receive no compensa- 
tion as call members. Members and officers of each company are ap- 
pointed by the board of engineers. 



Chief Engineer. 

Thomas W. Lane Office. Central Station, Vine street 

Eesidence. 1937 Elm street. Telephone at house and office. 

ASSISTAiST EJXGIXEERS. 

Clarence E. ]\Ierrill. Fred S. Bean. 

John F. Seaward. Arthur Provost. 

Clarence R. Merrill, clerk. 



Trustees of City Library. 

(Law of 1854, chapter 15SS. See contract with ^lanchester Atheneum, 
printed on pages 107 and 108 of City Report for fiscal year ending Jan- 
uary 31. 1855.) Board of seven trustees, one of whom is elected b.y 
aldermen and board of trustees in joint convention in September, annu- 
ally. Term of service, seven years, no salary. Two additional trustees, 
mayor, and president of common council, r.r officio. 

Frank P. Carpenter. Elm. corner West Xorth street. Term expires 
October 1, 1909. 

Xathan P. Hunt, 747 Union street. Term expires October 1, 1908. 

Herman F. Straw, 607 Chestnut street. Term expires October 1, 1907. 

Walter M. Parker, 1883 Elm street, corner of Webster. Term expires 
October 1, 1906. 

Roger G. Sullivan, 168 Walnut street. Term expires October 1, 1905. 

Henrj' W. Boutwell, 587 Union street. Term expires October 1. 1904. 

Joseph W. Fellows, 186 Lowell street. Term expires Octolier 1, 1903. 

William P. Farmer, Candia Road. Term expires October. 1910. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 15 



Eugene E. lieed, cz' officio. 
Charles E. Chase, ex officio. 
Nathan P. Hunt, clerk. 



City Library. 

Franklin street, corner of Dean avenue. Open fi'om H) a. m. to 8 P. M. 
Saturdays to 9 p. m. Sundays, U a. m. to 5 p. m. 



Librarian. 



F. Mabel Winchell, 593 Union street. Salary, $1,000 annually. 
Elected by the trustees of library. 



Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 

The board of aldermen, bienniall.y, elect one member of said board for 
a term of six years. Not more than two members can be of the same 
political party. Said board, consisting of three members, has full 
charge, management and control of the building, constructing, repair- 
ing, and maintaining of all the streets, highways, lanes, sidewalks, 
bridges, public sewers and drains, and public parks and commons. 
(See Laws of 1893, chapter 264.) Office, City Hall building. Open from 
8 to 12 A. M., 2 to 5 p. M. Eegular meeting of the board at 2 o'clock 
p. M. each day. Salary of each member $600 j^er year, paj^able quarter- 
ly, and each is allowed $150 annually for horse'hire. 



George H. Stearns, clerk. Term expires 1904. 
Horace P. Simpson, chairman. Term expires 1906. 
Byron Worthen. Term expires 1908. 



Assistant Clerk. 

Bertha F. Whitney. 



City Weigher. 

Gilbert Lyons. Office, city scales. 

Elected biennially in board of aldermen. Salary, $500 per annum; 
all fees for weighing returned monthly to city treasurer with sworn 
statement. Stationed at city scales on Frankli'n street. 



Sealer of Weiglits and Measures. 

Charles B. Clarkson. 

Elected biennially in January by board of aldermen. Paid by fees. 
(Section 25, chapter 43, Public Statutes, and chapter 125, Public Stat- 
utes.) 



16 . MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39, sections 1, 2. 3, 4.) Two trustees elected 
by board of aldermen in .January, annually, for the term of four years. 
Sub-trustees appointed by board of trustees. 

J. Adam Graf, 10 Middle street. Term expires January, 1905. 
William H. Maxwell, 476 Front street. Term expires 1907. 
John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street. Term expires 1906. 
Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street. Term expires 1906. 
Stillman P. Cannon, 99 Lowell street. Term expires 1905. 
Charles E. Stearns, 329 Front street. Term expires 1907. 
Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street. Term expires January, 1904. 
Harrie M. Young, 33 Dutton street. Term expires January, 1904. 
Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer, 33 Walnut street. 



Sub-Trustees of Cemeteries. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Aldermen Fred K. Eamsey and Alvin H. Keith, John L. Sanborn, 
Bushrod W. Hill, and Stillman P. Cannon. 

PI>-E GROVi: CEMETERY. 

Aldermen William E. Dunbar and Charles H. Clark, J. Adam Graf, 
Harrie M. Young, and Edwin F. Jones. 

AifiOSKJEAG CESJCETERY. 

Alderman G. Walter Taylor; Charles E. Stearns and William H. ^lax- 
well. 

SUPERINTECN'DENT OF PINE GROVE CEMETERY'. 

.John Erskine. OlBce and residence at the cemetery-. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Charles H. G. Foss. Office at the cemetery; residence, 747 Summer 
street. 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUND. 

Xorwin S. Bean. 
Charles H. Anderson. 
Eugene E. Eeed, c.r offtr-io. 



Inspector of Buildings. 

Edwin S. Foster Office, City Hall 

Residence, 11 Linden street. Appointed by board of mayor and alder- 
men, biennially, in February. Salary, $S00 -per annum and an allowance 
for horsehire. (City Ordinances, chapter 15. Laws of 1883, chapter 94.) 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 17 

Inspectors of Oil, 

J. Oscar Burbank. 

John Cayzer, 383 Granite street. 

(Public Statutes, chapter 129, sections 2'5-34. City Ordinances, chap- 
ter 25.) Paid by fees, i/4 of one per cent per gallon. 



Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 



Appointed by the mayor. 

William K. Robbins. 

Samuel J. Lord. 

Christian L. Wolf. 

William Iv. Eobbins, president. 

Samuel J. Lord, clerk. 



Sinking Fund Commissioners. 



Horace P. Simpson, chairman. 
Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer. 
Charles H. Manning. 



Moderators. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 31, sections 3, 9; chapter 
36, section 9; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordinances, page 18. See 
Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Salary, $15.00, payable at expiration of term. 

Ward 1. Abial W. Eastman. 

Ward 2. William M. Butterfield. 

Ward 3. George E. Prime. 

W^ard 4. George H. Phinney. 

Ward 5. Owen Kenney, 2d. 

W^ard 6. Harry L. Davis. 

Ward 7. Johann A. Graf. 

Ward 8. John G. McAllaster. 

Ward 9. Desire Dusseault. 

Ward 10. William B. Burpee. 



Ward Clerks. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 44, sections 10, 12. City 
Ordinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Salary, $20.00, payable at expiration of term. 



18 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT 



Ward 1. Charles D. Sumner. 

Ward 2. Robert L. Manning. 

Ward 3. George W. Cook. 

Ward 4. Frank P. Collins. 

Ward 5. Frank M. Fox. 

Ward (K Leslie W. Dollofe. 

Ward 7. Charles E. Bartlett. 

Ward 8. Roibert A. Leckie. 

Ward 9. Eodolphe Desfosses. 

Ward 10. Orion A. Oviatt. 



Selectmen. 

Elected bienniallj-. (General Laws, chapter 1, section 27; chapter 12, 
section 6; chapter 40, sections 2, 3; chapter 109, section 27; chapter 213, 
section 1. City Ordinances, page IS. Public Statutes relating to towns 
and cities.) 

Salary, $15.00, payable at expiration of term.' 

Ward 1. 



Joseph Tait. 



James F. Marsh. 



Joel S. Daniels. 



Herman W. Colby. 
William M. Walker. 



Louis Sevanson. 
James N. Wigmore. 

Wakd 2. 

Charles E. Dustin. 
Samuel W. Shepard. 

Waud 3. 

Ludwig Lindquist. 
Edward St. Jean. 



Ward 4. 



Ward 5. 



Fred H. Cate. 



Thomas H. Craig. 



Edward T. Allen. 

Emilien Archambeault. 

Ward 6. 

John D. Woodbury 
Charles A. Merrill. 

Ward 7. 
Fred A. Montgomery. Alexander Knight. 

Franklin W. McKinleJ^ 

Ward 8. 

Fred W. HotTmau. 
George M. Miller. 



William E. Blakelev. 



LIST OF OFFICEKS. 19 

Ward 9. 

William Broderick. Artliur J. Provost. 

Frank J. Hanel. 

Ward 10. 

John S. Lovering. Matthew B. McGuinness. 

Leon L. Melntire. 



INAIIGUML ADDRESS. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



Mai\C'HE)SITei{, N. II., J ;i Hilary (i, l'.Hj:i. 
(lentlcmen of the City (JourK-iln of the City of Manchester: 

Conforming to the cii.stom of my predecessors in otfice it is a|)))ro()jl- 
ate at this tiine that I should comment briefly upon the condition of 
municipal affairs. 

We have 'been elected to perform certain duties connected with fhe 
government of the city of Manchester; we have taken oath to perform 
those duties faithfully, according to our respective offices, and now for- 
mally assume the re.siponsibility thereby imposed. First of all, let us 
remember that in the administration of offlce, we are the servants of 
the whole people, and it is their interest that we should cai-cruliy 
guard, without reference to our party afTlliations. 

OUTLINE OF POLICY. 

After four years' experience in the Board of Aldermen, I have formed 
the opinion that it is impracticable to definitely outline what should be 
done in city arfairs for the coming two years at the time of the inaugu- 
ration of a new city government. New conditions, which are always 
likely to arise and which cannot be anticipated, may make demands 
upon us entirely different from those of the present, and we will be 
more consistent if we content ourselves with the general promise, to 
meet each matter that comes before us, with a mind single to the re- 
quirements of economy and the highest standard of municipal business 
administration. 

However, there are certain specific things for which we ought to 
strive, and the one which stands out most prominently before the citi- 
zens, is the reduction of the tax rale; and another, of scarcely less im- 
portance, and which must have an important bearing in accompiishing 
such a reduction, is llie making of a favorable contract for miinicijjal 
lighting. 

A LOW TAX RATE. 

\ low tax rate is of the utmost importance in furthering the growth 
and prosperity of our city. It is one of the favorable conditions which 
induces the investment of outside capital and the extension of opera- 
tions on the part of business enterprises already located here. In our 
efforts to accomplish this most desirable result, we are limited in our 
field of endeavor. 



24 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Xo good citizen would counsel parsimony in dealing with the public 
schools. Their successful extension to meet all the requirements of 
liberal education is one of the foundation stones of civic virtue. 

THE FIRE DEPARTAIENT. 

No more could we recommend any cut in the appropriation for the 
fire department, if such a reduction would have a tendency to impair 
the hig-h standard of excellence which has been maintained by this de- 
partment. The appropriation for the year just closed was $90,850.00. 
This is a large sum of money, and it is dou'btful if any other city of this 
size appropriated as much for this purpose. It is also doubtful if any 
citj' of its size is so well protected and has so efficient a fire department. 

THE STUE[ET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Another large item in the budget is the appropriation for the street 
and sewer department, this last year amounting to $143,700. This ap- 
propriation included $12,000 for paving on Elm street and $4,000 
for paving on Canal street, which completed the work of paving Elm 
street in the busiest portion of this thoroug'hfare and also that part of 
Canal street that demanded immediate attention. Any further expendi- 
ture of money in this particular direction may well be suspended for 
the present; for, although much needed, these improvements have been 
made at the expense of the outlying districts, which have not received 
the attention they deserved. After the appropriations are made for 
this department, all responsibility for the character and, to a large ex- 
tent, the distribution of the work passes out of the hands of the city 
government. Under the provisions of the act creating the Street and 
Park Commission, autocratic power is given to this board. They are 
responsible to no one, and whatever measure of merit or demerit at- 
taches to the work, properly belongs to them. Before the creation of 
the Street and Park Commission, the Aldermen from the several wards 
made it their effort, each to obtain for his section a fair distribution of 
the money appropriated for needed improvements, and in this respect 
a better distribution was made of the public work than can be had 
under a commission composed of three men accountable to no one but 
themselves. 

THE CITY FARM. 

The appropriation for the city farm for the year just closed Avas 
$8,000. besides which we paid $9,000 for paupers off the farm. 
These figures would indicate, even when reduced bj^ such sums of 
money as are received from the city farm, that this institution was an 
expensive luxury, and it is the opinion of citizens, who have given this 
subject careful consideration, that here is an opportunity for retrench- 
ment. We are bound to do everything that becomes an enlightened 
comnninitv for this unfortunate class, but whatever is done, should be 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 25 

done in the best way, and above all, we should avoid extravagance. I 
will not, at this time, make any recommendations, but believe the sub- 
ject deserves careful consideration at the hands of this citj' government. 

APPROPRIATIONS FOR PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC PUR- 
POSES. 

Our appropriations for patriotic, charitable, and phihinthropic pur- 
poses cannot well be cut down. Hospitals, Grand Army Posts and pa- 
triotic bodies are rightfully provided for, and in my judgment, ought 
not to receive a smaller appropriation than we have been accustomed to 
make. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Another appropriation which must be made without curtailment is 
that of the health department. The work of this department, as con- 
ducted by the Board of Health, has been put to such a severe test dur- 
ing the last three years and the demands upon it have been met with 
such a degree of success that there can be no difference of opinion as 
to our imperative duty to support that work hy Whatever appropriation 
may be necessary. 

THE POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

The Police Department, which for a number of years prior to 1902 
had been self-supporting, is now, owing to circumstances, an item of 
expense upon the taxpayers of Manchester and is bound to cost us in 
the vicinity of $50,000 the coining year. The affairs of this depart- 
ment are entirely removed from the control of the taxpayers of this 
city, being albsolutely in the hands of a commission appointed by the 
governor, and supreme in their authority. We cannot be rightly 
charged with their omissions, nor in any way held responsible for 
their acts. x\ll that concerns us at this time, is the fact that the bill 
must be paid, and it cannot reasonably be expected that any considera- 
ble reduction in the appropriation will be made in this item. 

THE STREET LIGHTING DEPARTMENT. 

One large bill against the city last year was for the street lighting 
department. It amounted to $61,000. And this is a bill that has 
challenged much public attention. It has been freely asserted and is 
widely believed, that we are paying too much for what we receive, and 
the matter assumes additional importance in the minds of the taxpaj'- 
ers because the long term contract, under which we are bound, exjjires 
in June of this year. It must be conceded, that at the present time, 
Manchester is one of if not the best lig-hted city in New England, and 
I think we may assume that public sentiment will demand that nothing 
less be continued. It will be for this city government to make a new 
contract, and we may rest assured that the people will expect us to 
protect their interests by seciiring a substantial reduction from the 
present price. In the ten years that have elapsed, since the making of 



26 MANCHESTEK CITY GOYEE-NMENT. 

the present contract, the facilities and appliances for furnishing elec- 
tric lights have been greatly improved, and it is reasonably expected 
that we shall have no difficulty in obtaining fair concessions. However, 
in event of failure to secure such concession, we have always left to us 
the alternative of establishing a municipal lighting plant, and I would 
recommend, that we obtain authority from the legislature to issue 
bonds for this purpose, in case of need. 

In this brief review, which we have taken of the city's affairs, it will 
be seen that the reduction of the tax rate is no easy task. We find our- 
selves confronted by conditions which we did not make, all resulting 
in a tax rate of two dollars and twenty-five cents on the hundred. 

ADVERSE CONDITIONS. 

It is needless for me to say that this rate is altogether too hig"h. The 
problem for us to solve is how to reduce it. This is our business for 
the next two years. We bave no authority to make or annul tax laws.' 
We cannot control tfie assessors in making their invoices nor in fixing 
the valuation of the property liable to taxation. No more can we, as 
a board, go into the matter of enforcing the law which calls for a 
sworn inventory of taxable property on the part of taxpayers, a law 
which is generallj^ disregarded. There are thousands of dollars' worth 
of taxable j)roperty that hides and escapes taxation altogether, but I 
am unable to see how we can mend the matter. The legislature makes 
the tax laws and the assessors are elected by the people; but however 
that may be, it all results in a condition entirely unfavorable to the 
city of Manchester, the irrational nature of which is well illustrated in 
the recent 

AMOSKEAG TAX ABATEMENT CASES. 

First, comes the Amoskeag Manufacturing company and asks for an 
abatement on the ground that they are taxed more in proportion than 
other similar property. They appeal to the court, and the court de- 
cides in their favor. Then comes the board of equalization, another 
body created by the legislature in the make-up of which, by the way, 
Manchester has no representative, and decides that the court is wrong 
and that the Amoskeag Manufacturing company was not assessed 
enough, and in consequence, dooms us $500,000, from which we have 
no appeal. In view of all these things, all that we can do for the pres- 
ent, is to see to it that the strictest economy is observed in all matters 
under our control and the expenditure of the public money limited to 
the demands of public duty. 

FINANCIAL CONDITION. 

Our financial condition on January 1, 1903, as shown by the city audi- 
tor, is as follows: Bonded indebtedness, $1,S15,000; sinking fund, a 
little over $300,000; cash on hand, for all purposes, $190,943.14; bills 
approved and unpaid in hands of city treasurer, .$2(5,170.39; net cash on 
hand, $144,472.75. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. • 27 



Finally, gentlemen of the city councils, let us, as We go about our 
several duties, be not unmindful of the fact that the success of the ad- 
ministration of the public affairs entrusted to us, will be largely a mat- 
ter of individual fidelity, prudence, and honor. We cannot, to any great 
extent, be held responsible for the good or indifferent performance of 
duty by others, but we are responsible for our own acts; and as each 
matter of public duty comes before us, let us apply to its dispatch the 
same rules of prudence, economy, and honesty that would govern us in 

our private affairs. 

Respectfully, 

EUGENE E. REED, 

Mayor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: — The auditor herewith submits to your honorable body 
his report, giving a tabular statement of the receipts and expenditures 
for the year 1903, and a detailed statement of the expenses of each 
appropriation during the year. 

Eespectfullj', 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER FOR THE YEAR 
1903. 

Temporary Loan: Dk. 

New England Trust Co $130,000.00 

E. C. Smith, city clerk: 

Dog licenses $1,811.65 

Sewer licenses 1,407.37 

Rent of tenements 143.64 

Show licenses 207.00 

Pool licenses 252.40 

Eent of city hall 60.50 

Junk dealers' licenses 56.00 

Employment i bureau licenses 20.00 

Pawn brokers' licenses 20.00 

Lunch cart licenses 10.00 

Fees, intention of marriages 657.00 

mortg-ages 124.57 

conditional sales 111.25 

corporations 32.50 

miscellaneous records 9.50 

writs 37.20 

partnerships 5.50 

$4,972.08 

Police department: 

M. J. Healy $6,226.66 

John C. Bickford 1,086.22 

$7,312.88 

Pine Grove cemetery-: 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer $2,449.35 

John H. Erskine, superintendent 4,581.36 

$7,030.71 

31 



32 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Mei-rill yard: 

John H. Erskine, superintendent $25.50 

George E. Morrill, collector of taxes: 

Taxes, 1903 $614,622.83 

Taxes, 1902 57,226.88 

Old taxes 603.49 

Land sold for taxes, 1903, for taxes 1902 6,683.48 

Abatement taxes, 1902 383.76 

Abatement taxes, 1903 731.68 

Eedemption of land sold for taxes, 1S99, for 

year 1898 296.93 

Redemjition of land sold for taxes, 1901, for 

year 1900 1,485.42 

Eedemption of land sold for taxes, 1902, for 

year 1901 1,395.83 

Redemption of land sold for taxes, 1896, for 

year 1895 27.43 

Redemption of land sold for taxes, 1897, for 

year 1896 63.97 

Redemption of land sold for taxes, 1898, for 

year 1897 13.92 

Redemption of land sold for taxes, 1899, for 

year 1898 292.25 

Redemption of land sold for taxes, 1900, for 

year 1899 661.13 

Redemption of land sold for taxes, 1901, for 

year 1900 784.75 

Redemjition of land sold for taxes, 1902, for 

year 1901 805.22 

Redemption of land sold for taxes, 1903, for 

year 1902 931.68 

Interest on taxes, 1902 1,958.26 

Costs on taxes, 1902 1,709.00 

$690,677.91 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer: 

Insurance tax $3,000.75 

Railroad taxi 43,600.74 

Savings bank tax 60,232.30 

Literary fund 3,257.98 

— $110,091.77 

New Hampshire state license commission: 

Licenses issued for sale of liquor $40,978.09 

City farm: 

E. G. Libbey, superintendent $3,956.82 

City scales: 

Gilbert T. Lyons $381.99 



REPORT OF THE CITY TEEASUREU. 33 

Water works department: 

Charles K. Walker, superintendent $128,410.23 

Valley cemetery: 

C. H. G. Foss, superintendent $1,829.95 

Street and park commission: 

Sundry persons $310.88 

Interest on bank deposits: 

Merchants National Bank $2,339.08 

George E. Morrill, collector 591). 15 

$2,935.83 

Milk licenses: 

Board of health $346.00 

Tuition: 

Charles W. Bickford, superintendent $1,003.06 

Bequest left to city by Fannie E. A. Riddle 
for the building of a chapel at Pine Grove 
cemetery: 

Henry E. Burnham, executor $15,000.00 

Interest received on bank deposit 264.30 

$15,264.30 

Miscellaneous receipts: 

William Whitmore, board of Jennie Whit- 
more at state asylum $70.00 

S. J. Lord, plumbers' licenses 93.00 

Irving W. Forbes, overdraft 14.00 

Theodore Dupont, overdraft 10.00 

Clark & Estey, overdraft 2.03 

J. Doucet & Co., overdraft 4.00 

J. E. McDonald, overdraft 4.00 

A. G. Hood, overdraft 25.00 

Lands and building committee, sale of stone 2.00 

Bryon Worthen, edge stone at house 9.62 

Florian Widman, sale of chairs, etc., Spring- 
street school IS. 00 

Thomas W. Lane, old hose .95 

H. L. Davis, old iron, etc., schoolhouses .... 46.00 

New England Trust Co., premium on notes 10.00 

— ■ $308.60 

Fire insurance adjustment on account of fire at city hall: 

Royal Exchange Insurance Co $95.05 

Continental Insurance Co 190.10 

New Hampshire Insurance Co 316.81 

Hartford Insurance Co 316.81 

Sun Insurance Co 316.81 

Connecticut Insurance Co 190.10 

Niagara Insurance Co 316.81 

Agricultural Insurance Co 95.0'5 

$1,837.54 

3 



34 EEPOET OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Fire insurance adjustment on account of tire at city farm: 

Securitj-^ Insurance Co $26.75 

Granite State Insurance Co 53.50 

New Hampshire Insurance Co 26.76 

Ptiiladelphia Insurance Co 26.76 

Liverpool, London & Globe Insurance Co.. 40.13 

Niagara Insurance Co 26.75 

Concord Insurance Co 26.76 

New Hampshire Insurance Co 13. 3S 

New Hampshire Insurance Co 13.38 

British America Insurance Co 40.13 

$294.30 

Total receipts for the year $1,167,980.44 

Cash on hand January 1, 1903 170,643.14 

Unpaid bills December 31, 1903 52,392.91 

$1,391,016.49 

Cr. 

Total drafts $1,218,617.19 

Unpaid bills January 1, 1903 26,170.39 

Cash on hand December 31, 1903 146,228.91 

$1,391,016.49 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED L. ALLEN, 

City Treasurer. 



To the City Council of tlie City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen: — I have examined the accounts of Fred L. Allen, citj- 
treasurer, for the year ending December 31, 1903, and find proper \ ouch- 
ers for all pa3'ments, and all receipts duly accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January 1, 1903, was $144,472.75 

Receipts during the year 1,167,980.44 

Total $1,312,453.19 



Amount of drafts during the year $1,218,617.19 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1903 93,836.00 

Total $1,312,453.19 

The cash taken December 31, 1903, I find to be as follows: 

Deposited in Second National Bank $23,772.15 

Deposited in Merchants National Bank 115,811.23 

Deposited in office safe 6,645.53 

Gross amount of cash on hand December 31, 1903 $146,228.91 

Deduct amount of bills unpaid 52,392.91 

Net amount of cash on hand December 31, 1903 '$93,836.00 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 35 

Eespectfully submitted with a tabular .statement of tlie receipts and 
expenditures of the city for the year lOO^i. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

Citjj Auditor. 



STATEMENT OFTHE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER FOR THE 

YEAR 1903. 

Receipts. 

central depaktment. 
Received from: 

Direct city taxes $680,252.12 

Cost and interest on taxes 3,667.26 

$683,919.38 

Licenses to enter sewer $1,407.37 

to keep dog- 1,811.65 

to sell milk 346.00 

to keep billiard and pool tables and 

lunch carts 252.40 

to shows and exhibitions 313.00 

Fees from city clerk 977.52 

$5,107.94 

Rents $210.14 

SUNDRIES. 

Received from: 

City scales $381.99 

Tuition 1,003.06 

Miscellaneous sources 146.57 

— $1,531.62 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Received from costs and fines $7,312.88 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Received from: 

Pine Grove cemetery $7,030.71 

Valley cemeterj^ 1,829.95 

Merrill cemetery 25.50 

$8,886.16 

WATER-WORKS. 
Gross receipts $128,416.23 

CITY FARM. 

Received from city farm $3,956.82 



36 EEPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

INSURANCE. 

Received from: 

Fire loss, citj- hall $1,837.54 

Fire loss, city farm 294.30 

$2,131.84 

LIQUOR LICENSES. 

Eeceived from state liquor commissioners for licenses.... $40,978. 0& 

LEGACY. 

Received from: 

Estate Fannie E. A. Eiddle, bequest for 

chapel 

Interest on bequest 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Eeceived from: 

Interest 

Land redeemed from tax .«ale 

Overdrafts 

Plumbers' certificates 

Street and park commission, sale of pipe, etc. 

Total ordinary receipts during the year 1903 $907,S78.6'< 

TEJIPOKAKY LOAN. 

Received from: 

Loan in anticipation of tax of 1903 $150,000.00 

Premium on loan 10.00 



$15,000.00 




264.30 






$15,264.30 




$2,935.83 




6,758.53 




59.03 




93.00 




316.SS 






$10,163.27 





$150,010.00 



Received from: 

Insurance taxes $3,000.75 

Railroad taxes 43,600.74 

Savings Bank taxes 60,232.30 

Literary fund 3,257.98 



$110,091.77 



Gross receipts $1,167,980.44 

Net cash on hand January 1, 1903 144,472.75 



$1,312,453.19 



Expenditures. 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 



Interest on Avater bonds $33,780.00 

on citj' bonds 37,776.00 

on cemetery bonds 2,500.00 

on temporary loans 3,383.33 



$77,439.33 



KECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



37 



;79,90S.61 



City hall $.'],.57f).02 

Printing and stationery 1,294.78 

Incidental expenses 8,410.99 

Mayor's incidentals 222.10 

City otficers' salaries 20,004.72 

Auditor's department l,9.jo.02 

Sinking fund trustees 31,000.00 

File and index system 160.00 

Land sold for taxes 6,683.48 

STREET AND SEWER DEPAKTMENT. 

Street and park commission $3:325.75 

Snow and ice 4,736.45 

Repairs of highway's 26,091.21 

New highways 4,983.58 

Land taken for 'highway's 6,162.62 

Watering streets 4,012.38 

Paving streets 4,978.83 

Macadamizing streets 5,973.95 

Grading for concrete 4,065.12 

Scavenger service 18,288.45 

Street sweeping 3,039.34 

Lighting streets 55,360.08 

Bridges 6,809.48 

City teams 6,480.50 

Repairs of sewers 5,147.79 

ISew sewers 18,970.92 

'■ $178,426.45 

engineer's department. 

Engineer's department $6,835.00 

HEALTH DEPARTMEiNT. 

Health department $14,390.54 

SCHOOL DEPARTMEOMT. 

Repairs of schoolhouses $9,545.99 

Fuel 12,270.18 

Furniture and supplies 1,413.98 

Books and stationery 56.71 

Printing and advertising 279.48 

Contingent expenses 2,789.32 

Care of rooms 7,040.08 

Evening schools 1,184.00 

Teachers' salaries 94,584.94 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 289.35 



38 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Free text-books $5,822.32 

Manual training 490.75 

Sewing materials for girls 242.80 

New heating, Wilson school 2,544.00 

New heating, Ash-street school 782.50 

$139,336.40 

CITY LIBRARY. 

City library $6,310.11 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Fire department $67,666.97 

Fire alarm telegraph 1,442.56 

Hydrant service 19,200.00 

— - — — $88,309.53 

POLICE DEPARTilEMT. 

Police station $3,176.31 

Police court 2,794.09 

Police commission _ 42,188.60 

$48,159.00 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Repairs of buildings $7,882.62 

Board of plumbing examiners 49.84 

Wilson Hill engine house 4,811.07 

$12,743.53 

WATE.R-WORKS. 

Water-works $177,036.57 

Water-works sinking fund 24,200.00 

$201,836.57 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Commons $4,452.40 

Stark park 904.75 

Derryfield park 984.89 

Pine Grove cemetery 9,380.92 

Valley cemetery 3,597.07 

Amoskeag cemetery 195.95 

Merrill cemetery 47.90 

South Manchester playground 66.80 

Lafayette park 1,000.00 

North End playground 79.25 

Eiddle plaj-ground 50.00 

Amoskeag schoolhouse playground 400.80 

$21,160.73 



INTEREST. 39 

CIIAIUTABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTIIROPrC. 

Paupers ort' farm $11,339.83 

City farm 8,833.58 

Indigent soldiers 1J0.20 

Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Elliot hospital 300.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes hospital 300.00 

Sacred Heart hospital 300.00 

W. C. T. U. Mercy home 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves -100.00 

Militia 000.00 

Band concerts 400.00 

Kiddle chapel 301.40 

$23,787.01 

ABATEMElNTS. 

Abatement of taxes $1,723.38 

Total of ordinary municipal expenditures $900,366.19 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Temporary loan $150,000.00 

BONDED DEBT. 

School bonds $10,000.00 

STATE AND COUNTY TAXES. 

State tax $63,869.00 

County tax 94,382.00 

$158,251.00 

Grand total of expenditures during the year $1,218,617.19 

Cash on hand December 31, 1903 $146,228.91 

Less unpaid bills 52,.392.91 

Net cash on hand $93,836.00 

$1,312,453.19 



Interest. 

Appropriation ' $44,700.00 

Transferred from water-works account 33,780.00 

$78,480.00 

Expenditures. 

Coupons on bridge bonds $2,396.00 

Coupons on city bonds 6,260.00 

CouiDons on city funding bonds; 3,500.00 

Coupons on cemetery bonds 2,500.00 



40 



KEPOET OF THE CITY AUDITOE. 



Coupons on iiuiorovement bonds $16,000.00 

Coupons on municipal bonds 2,800.00 

Coupons on school bonds 6,820.00 

Coupons on water bonds 33,780.00 

New England Trust Co., discount on notes . . 3,383.33 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$77,439.33 
1,040.67 

$78,480.00 



Payment of Funded Debt. 



Appropriation 



$10.0(10.00 



Expenditures. 



School bonds 



$10,000.00 



Sinking Fund. 



Appropriation 



$:; 1.000.00 



EXPEXDITITRES. 



Trustees of sinkins; fund 



$31,000.00 



Unappropriated Money. 

Transferred from the following- accounts: 

Interest $1,040.67 

City hall 223.08 

Printing and stationery 305.22 

Auditor's department 44.38 

Mayor's incidentals 77.90 

Street and park commission 174.25 

Xew highways ". 16.42 

Paving streets 21.17 

Macadamizing streets 26.05 

New sewers 1,042.58 

Commons 103.60 

Stark park 95.25 

Derryfield park 15.11 

South Manchester playground 8.20 

Lig-hting streets 2,639.92 



UNAPPROPRIATED MONEY. 



41 



Fire alarm telegraj)!! $r;57.44 

Police commission 911.40 

Police court 10.1. <.)1 

Playground, Amoskeag school 79.20 

Pine Grove -cemeterj^ 619.08 

Valley cemetery 52.93 

Amoskeag cemeterj- 54.05 

Merrill cemetery 2.10 

Books and stationery 18.29 

Printing and advertising 20.52 

Free text-books 177.68 

Manual training 9.25 

Sewing material 7.20 

Evening schools 16.00 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 10.65 

New heating, Wilson school 106.00 

New heating, Ash-street school 17.50 

Indigent soldiers 14.80 

Board of examiners of plumbers .16 

Land sold for taxes 116.52 

Unappropriated receipts 40,960.34 



$49,490.82 



♦ Expenditures. 

Transferred to the following accounts: 

Incidental expenses $2,448.49 

City officers' salaries 304.72 

Repairs of highways = 843.83 

Snow and ice 236.45 

Land taken for highways 1,254.55 

Watering streets 12.38 

Grading for concrete 65.12 

Scavenger service 3,288.45 

Street sweeping 39.34 

Bridges 809.48 

City teams 480.50 

Eepairs of sewers 147.79 

North End playground 4.25 

Health department 4,390.54 

Fire department 1,801.97 

Police station 676.31 

Repairs of buildings 3,257.62 

Repairs of schoolhouses 1,499.99 

Furniture and supplies 213.98 

Fuel 3,470.18 

Contingent expenses 289.32 

Care of rooms 140.08 



42 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Teachers' salaries $384.94 

Paupers off farm 1,339.83 

Abatement of taxes 21,555.13 

City farm • 335.58 



$49,4110.83 



Temporary Loan. 

Appropriation, loan from >vew England Trust' Co $150,000.00 

Expe>;ditures. 
New England Trust Co $150,000.00 



City Hall. 

Appropriation $3,800.00 

ExrE^^QDITUEES. 
FUEL AST) LIGHTS. 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, coal $154.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., screening.s 19.77 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

lights 413.80 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 161.18 

Union Coal Co., coal 525.03 

$1,273.78 

WATER AND TELEPHONE. 

New England Telephone & TelegraiJh Co., use 

of telephones $12.00 

Water commissioners, use of water 384.50 

$39().50 

CLEANING OFFICES, ETC. 

James E. Dodge, paid for borax, ammonia, etc. $0.40 

Annie Finn, cleaning paint 1.80 

Hardy & Folsom, cheese cloth 2.07 

•James W. Hill Co., cloth, towels 5.00 

Delia Kenney, cleaning paint 4.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., brushes, mops, dus- 
ters, brooms, soap, etc 22.29 

Sarah Minton, cleaning 312.00 

Ellen O'Leary, cleaning 1.30 



CITY HALL. 43 

Charles Kobitaille, janitor $541.00 

Frank St. John, janitor 20:>.75 

Timothy Sullivan, janitor public comfort .... 480.00 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., soap, oil, matches 6. SO 



FIXTURES AND SUPPLIES. 



J. J. Abbott, painting sign $4.00 

C. Dean & Co., one clock* 5.00 

K. D. Gay, new awnings and putting up 75.50 

E. D. Gay, putting up and taking down awn- 



mgs 



12. 



Joihn B. Hall Co., one thermometer 1.25 

C. A. Hoitt Co., shades, making and hanging, 

chair, cuspidors, etc 14.57 

Lynn Incandescent Lamp Co., lamps 16.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., flag, sponges, 

hooks, wire, etc 14.56 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

lamps, etc 7.35 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 1.76 

INCIDENTAL KEPAIKS. 

J. J. Abbott, glass $2.25 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric repairs and sup- 
plies 4.S7 

Joel S. Daniels, repairing screens and screen 

doors • 24.7.3 

Cyrus Dean & Co., repairing clock 1.00 

James W. Hill Co., repairing flag 1.50 

George Holbrook, taking off storm doors 1.50 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor, lights, 

and plumbing- 55.10 

Harry A. Piper, lumber and labor S.21 

Pike & Heald Co., labor and material, changing- 

radiators 4.03 

B. F. Shepard, repairs, keys 4.30 

SUNDRIES. 

W. G. Berry, premium on insurance $36.50 

Arthur Gleno, reiving flag rope 5.00 

C. A. Hoitt Co., use of chairs 4.00 

G. Allen Putnam, premium on insurance 20.00 



$1,580.41 



$153.24 



$107.49 



$65.50 



Total expenditures $3,576.92 

Transferred to unappropriated money 223.08 

$3,800.00 



44 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

^ Printing and Stationery. 

Approjjriation 

Expenditures. 

assessors and inspectors. 

E. Bechard. printing names on blanks and 

check-list $11.00 

W. P. Goodman, paper and ink 1.80 

E. A. Stratton, pencils .50 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and covers . . 81.70 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 10.95 

Union Publishing Co.. publishing notice 1^.06 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing notices, blanks, 

receipts $80.75 

E. H. dough, postmaster, envelopes 21.20 

CITY CLERK. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks, etc $17.00 

Duren & Kendall, record ribbons 2.25 

W. P. Goodman, penholders .75 

Nutfield Press, printing petitions 7.50 

AUDITOR. 

Eemy Bechard, printing statements $6.50 

Eemj' Bechard, printing 500 reports 560.90 

Eemy Bechard, binding 150 reports 144.00 

John B. Clarke Co. 11,000 billheads 49.50 

CITY- TREASL-RER. 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing blanks, postals, 

■ receipts $6.50 

E. H. Clough, postmaster, envelopes 23.92 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 17.20 

E. A. Stratton. book, stationery 10.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., pay-roll sheets .... 8.50 

MAYOR. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing order blanks.... $5.50 

Albert Enemely, printing 400 copies mayor's 

inaugural address 16.50 



$119.01 



$101.95 



$27.50 



$760.90 



$66.3'; 



$22.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 
crrY COUNCILS and committees. 

Kemy IJechard, printing' postals, blanks $9.50 

W. P. Groodman, stationery 28.55 

The Nutfield Press, printing briefs 26.50 

Albert Euemely, printing manuals, reports, 

etc 68.85 

J. A. Williams, printing circulars, blanks 17.75 

BUILDING INSPECTOR. 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing permits, appli- 
cations, etc $27.50 

Albert Ruemely,, printing placards, envelopes, 

circulars 11.50 

J. A. Williams, printing envelopes 5.00 

CITY WEIGHER. 

W. p. Goodman, stationery $1.25 

E. A. Stratton, ink .65 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



45 



$151.15 



$44.00 



$1.90 



$1,294.78 
305.22 



$1,600.00 



Incidental Expenses. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unaj)proi3riated money 



$7,000.00 
2,448.49 



$9,448.49 



Expenditures. 

BIRTHS, marriages, DEATHS. 

D. S. Adams, M. D $1.75 

E. B. Aldrich, M. D .25 

F. X. Beardslee, M. D 3.25 

H. T. Boutwell, M. D .25 

H. W. Boutwell, M. D 4.25 

John C. Bickf ord .50 

A. A. E. Brien, M. D 19.25 

J. F. Brown, M. D 3.00 

J. S. Brown, M. D 4.75 

L. G. Bullock, M. D 1.50 

Eev. A. E. Bartlett 2.00 

Kev. C. R Bailey 1.00 



46 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Kev. D. C. Babcock $0.25 

Eev. C. A. Bidwell 2.7 J 

Rev. J. H. Brennan 19.50 

F. E. Campbell, M. D .50 

I. L. Carpenter. M. D 3.75 

Herman Christophe. M. D 3.25 

J. M. Collity, M. D 17.75 

E. H. Currier, M. D 2.00 

Walter T. Crosby, M. D 3.75 

Charles Chirurg, M. D 5.75 

Rev. T. J. Campbell .50 

Rev. Thomas Chalmers 2.75 

Rev. J. A. Chevalier 16.25 

Rev. N. L. Colby 12.50 

Rev. Matthew Creamer .75 

Mary Danforth, M. D 7.25 

G. M. Davis, M. D 11.25 

R. H. Dillon, M. D 2.75 

Charles E. Dodge, M. D 5.75 

C. M. Dodge, M. D 3.75 

E. B. Dunbar, M. D 9.00 

J. H. DeGross, M. D 6.50 

Rev. I. H. C. Davignon 17.25 

Rev. J. R. Dinsmore 1.00 

Rev. C. W. Dockrill 1.00 

John D. Ferguson, M. D 7.75 

C. F. Flanders, M. D 27.25 

George Frechette, M. D 14.25 

L. M. French, M. D .50 

E. N. Fugere, M. D 33.00 

C. A. Folsom, M. D 5.75 

Rev. C. H. Farnsworth 2.50 

Max Guggenheim, M. D 3.00 

Moise Guerin, M. D 27.00 

J. H. Gleason, M. D 3.50 

J. A. Harlan, M. D .25 

B. F. Hodsdon, M. D.' 10.00 

George B. Hoitt, M. D 3.25 

Augusta Hoflt'man .50 

Rev. Arthur Halfmann 1.50 

Rev. Pierre Hevey 12.75 

Rev. N. E. Johnson 2.00 

Rev. W. N. Jones 1.25 

J. A. Jackson, M. D 5.25 

M. E. Keah, M. D 12.00 

Rev. John Kamm 1.00 

Rev. N. E. Kron -75 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. i 47 

Eev. J. E. LeBosquet $0.50 

Eev. J. J. Lyons 7.00 

Eev. P. Lawrence 2.00 

Eev. J. B. Lemon 2.50 

Eev. B. W. Lockhart 2.00 

J. J. A. Lebrecqne, M. D G.75 

Gustave Lafontaine, M. D .-. 21.25 

P. G. Laberge, M. D 10.75 

E. Larochelle, M. D 35.75 

J. E. A. Lanouette, M. D : 43.25 

J. E. Lemaitre, M. D 6.75 

J. D. Lemay, M. D 12.50 

J. G. Lnssier, M. D 10.25 

Z. A. Lavoie, M. D 18.25 

H. D. Lord 5.00 

W. H. Lyons, M. D 5.00 

J. D. W. MacDonald, M. D 3.00 

G. B. Morey, M. D 2.50 

J. W. :\rooar, M. D 1.00 

M. V. B. Morse, M. D 1.50 

J. T. Mnrray, M. D 3.25 

Mrs. S. Modin 1.00 

J. B. Morse, M. D 1.25 

C. W. Mitliken, M. D .25 . 

J. B. Masse, M. D .75 

Eev. S. J. McLaughlin 4.25 

Eev. Joseph Miett 1.00 

Eev. C. C. Mitchell .50 

Clara Odman 1.25 

W. M. Parsons, M. D 1.00 

W. H. Pattee, M. D 6.25 

Anna Pollmer 12.50 

Frederick Perkins, M. D 7.50 

J. F. Eobinson, M. D 3.00 

Eev. E. J. Palisoul .50 

Eev. J. B. Puchala 4.00 

C. S. Eodier, M. D 2.50 

William Eichardson, M. D .25 

Herman Eodelsperger 1.00 

Eev. H. J. Ehodes ' 2.50 

Eev. Samnel Enssell 3.75 

Carl Eoth .50 

E. C. Smith 10.00 

Eev. C. J. Staples 1.25 

NicholasjSasseville, M. D 15.75 

Servnle St. Pierre, M. D 10.75 

Gillis Stark, M. D 7.50 



48 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



F. C. Steuart, M. D $9.00 

A. G. Straw, M. D .25 

Zatae L. Straw, M. D 13.00 

C. B. Sturtevant, M. D 3.25 

Emile Sylvaiii, M. D 33.00 

James Sullivan, M. D 4.25 

Annie Schelzel .25 

E. B. Swett, M. D .25 

C. A. Sargent, M. D .25 

Charlotte A. Stewartson, M. D .50 

Joseph Taylor, M. D 12.25 

A. J. Todd, M. D 2.75 

G. D. Towne, M. D 3.00 

E. C. Tremblay, M. D 9.50 

Joseph Theriault, M. D .75 

T. M. Togus, M. D .25 

Kev. C. S. Tilton .75 

Ellen A. Wallace, M. D 1.25 

G. M. Watson, M. D 40.25 

H. P. Watson, M. D 2.50 

^laiirice Watson, M. D .50 

G. L. Wakefield. M. D 1.00 

A. F. Wheat, M.- D 2.75 

E. W. Weeks, .M. D 3.50 

H. A. White, M. D 1.75 

George C. Wilkins, M. D 1.75 

Kev. G. A. Guertin 1.50 

DAMAGES AXD JUDGMENTS. 

George Clair $350.27 

John B. Clarke Co 159.80 

Eaton & Emerson 35.50 

A. L. Gadbois & Co 25.00 

William Marcotte & Co 215.00 

Carl S. & Charles E, Magoon 1.100.17 

Emma L. McLaughlin 175.00 

Melvin K. McLaughlin 175.00 

John H. Stone 50.17 

Grace E. Spaulding 150.00 

LEGAL EXPEJS'SES. 

W. C. Berry, services and fees paid $35.87 

L. C. B. Burke, services and fees paid, Ray 

Brook Garden Co. v. city 19.36 

Ivory C. Eaton, paid for witness, etc 4.41 

Arthur O. Fuller, services, Amory Manufactur- 
ing Co. tax suit 335.90 



$S25.7; 



$2,435.91 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 4:9 

II. N. Hall, appraisal real estate, Amory Man- 
ufacturing Co $75.00 

Head & Uowst Co., time and labor, examining 

Fellows building- 25.00 

A. G. Hood, service as expert witness, Ray 

Brook Garden Co. v. city 50.00 

Dana W. King, recording deeds 1.2G 

J. H. Mendell & Co., time and labor, examining 

Fellows building 35.25 

W. H. Morgan, appraising damaged stock, Wil- 
liam Marcotte & Co 5.00 

C. A. Perkins, interviewing witnesses and ex- 
penses 27.00 

Fred E. Stark, appraisal Amory Manufacturing 

Co. real estate 79.00 

Alfred N. Whiting, appraising Amory Manu- 
facturing Co. real estate, expenses 157.33 

Isaac F. Woodbury, appraising Amory Manu- 
facturing Co. property 200.00 



CITY COUNCILS AND COilillTTEES. 

F. li. Allen, expenses to Boston, Concord.... $11.77 

John B. Clarke Co., publishing ordinance 23.38 

W. P. Goodman, 1 gavel 2.00 

Manchester News Publishing Co., publishing 

ordinance 26.33 

Union Publishing Co., publishing ordinance, 

etc 29.83 



TEAIXS FOR COUNCILS ANT5 COitMITTEES. 

G. W. Bailey $61.50 

Boyd Brothers 31.00 

J. P. Brown 20.00 

Thomas F. Brown 15.00 

H. R. Dow & Co 5.00 

C. F. Fifield 40.00 

W. J. Freeman 60.00 

A. L. Gadbois & Co 50.00 

Harry F. Hull 15.00 

E. G. Libbey 35.00 

Manchester Street Railway Co 75.00 

G. W. Reed 20.00 

C. H. Simpson 15.00 



$1,050.38 



$442.50 



50 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Warren Harvey, wood $1 MO 

Manchester Hardware Co., shovel, lawn 

sprinkler 2.25 

J. K. Ehodes, care of boiler 143.50 



CITY SCALES. 

C. H. Bodwell, wood $2.05 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and wood 7.00 

T. J. Brig-gs, pipe, damper, labor 1.45 

Manchester Hardware Co., glass, pntty, broom .54 

Moore & Preston, coal 4.00 

W. E. Woodward, sawing wood 1.00 



$4.50 


2.S0 


75.00 


.65 


10.33 


2.00 


1.30 


1.40 


2.00 



MAY'OR. 

The Dodge Co., typewriter ribbons 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 

W. P. Goodman, directories 

John B. Hall Co., soap 

Hale & W^hittemore, framing and hanging pic- 
tures 

The Novelty Co., engraving autograph, 1 stamp 

Postal Telegraph-Cable Co., messages 

E. A. Stratton, ink, paste 

Temple & Farrington Co., N. H. Eegisters 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising non-resident 

sale $27.41 

E. H. Clough, postmaster, envelopes 21.20 

B. F. Cummings Co., 1 duplex dating receipting 

perforator 85.00 

May Davis, writing tax bills 46.57 

John F. Gillis, distributing tax bills 4.00 

Mabel L. How, writing tax bills, etc 55.00 

Independent Statesman, advertising non-resi- 
dent sale 9.00 

George E. Morrill, expenses to Nashua, Hills- 

boro, Boston, express 6.31 

George E. Morrill, paid for distributing tax 

bills 68.37 

Novelty Advertising Co., ribbons 2.50 

Minot T. Phelps, writing tax bills 17.50 

Mrs. Maude Soule, 1 day's labor 2.50 



$163.45 



$16.04 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 51 



E. A. Stratton, books and stationery $13.65 

Temple & Farrington Co., book and stationery 4.12 



6.75 


4.00 


19.15 


1.20 


.48 


1.00 


35.00 



CITY CLEEK. 

A Fine Pen Co., pens $1.75 

The Dodge Co., ribbon .75 

Duren & Kendall, ribbons 

Elliot & Hatch Book Typewriter Co., ribbons 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 

Hammond Typewriter Co., supplies 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., tolls 

E. C. Smith, ink 

Temple & Farrington Co., books, eyelets 

CITY TREASrEEK. 

Amoskeagi National Bank, rent of safety de- 
posit box $25.00 

A Fine Pen Co., pens . . .' 1.50 

E. H. Clough, postmaster, postal cards 1.00 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 6. SO 

J. C. Hall Co,, 1,500 checks and pad 20.00 

Ideal Stamp Co., stamps and repairs 2.10 

Pike & Heald Co., tin boxes 2.40 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., stamp and pad... .53 

F. Pratt, Jr., pens 1.25 

Eemington Typewriter Co., ri'bbon .75 

E. A. Stratton, books and stationery 17.45 

Toilet Supply Co., service, 13 weeks 3.25 



COURT HOUSE. 

C. H. Bodwell, wood $11.00 

E. M. Bryant & Co., socket and lamp .42 

Warren Harvey, wood 17.70 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., coal 33.72 

Manchester Hardware Co., brooms, soap, etc. 3.90 

Moore & Preston, coal 93.85 

P. H. Riley, janitor 167.33 

William Eeardon, janitor 433.33 

Union Coal Co., wood and coal 210.94 



ASSESSORS AND INSPECTORS. 



John B. Clarke Co., publi-shing notice $20.00 

John F. Gillis, real estate transfers IS. 00 

Manchester News Publishing Co., publishing 

notice 20.48 



$363.13 



$70.1 



$972.19 



52 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



E. A. Stratton, stationery 

Temple & Farrington Co., books, etc. 



CITY SOLICITOE. 



New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., tolls 
G. A. Wagner, expenses sundry suits, etc 



$2.20 
2.65 



$2.14 
17.91 



$63.33 



SPECIAL ELECTION. 

D. G. Andrews, labor at ward 2 wardroom 

0. F. Bartlett & Co., labor, ward 2 

J. P. Brown & Co., hacks 

E. M. Bryant & Co., wiring booths 

C. B. Clarkson, preparing ward 4 voting booths 
Connor Brothers, preparing ward 5 voting 

booths 

W. B. Corey Trucking & Transfer Co., trucking 

booths 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 

Margaret Hoben, storage of booths 

H. F. W. Little, labor, ward 3 

C. A. Merrill, truckage 

E. H. Nutting, use of Mechanics' hall 

Joseph Sykes, labor, ward 8 

Temple & Farrington Co., 10 indexes 

SUNDRIES. 

F. X. Chenette, killing and burying horse 

C. B. Clarkson, w eig'hing coal 

E. H. Clough, postmaster, stamps 

J. H. DeCourcy Co., coal, ward 8 wardroom . . 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., examining horse 

C. C. Hayes, premium on bonds 

W. P. Hall, postage and stationery 

H. W. Herrick, water color portrait ex-Mayor 

Clarke 

First Light Batterj', tiring Fourth of July 
salute 

J. E. Lemaitre, M. D., consultation, pesthouse 

Municipal Journal Publishing Co., 1 subscrip- 
tion to December, 1903 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 
of telephone, city jjhj'sician 

E. N. Pearson, engrossing acts 

F. R. Stark, insurance premium 



$3.75 
3.95 

15.00 
.50 
9.85 



9.00 


8.47 


1.50 


14.70 


3.00 


100.00 


8.80 


1.25 



$5.00 

94.75 

190.00 

1.75 

2.00 

340.00 

5.00 

8.00 

29.00 
5.00 



30.13 

2.50 

112.50 



$205.92 



CITY officers' salaries. 53 

B. F. Shepard, repairs $1.40 

Street & Park Commission, erecting and re- 
moving band stands 48.00 

E. C. Smith, return 2,400 names omitted from 

official returns four years previous COO. 00 

Town of Goffstown, taxes 2.91 

M. Watson, M. D., assisting city physician .... 5.00 

Caroline C. and E. A. Webster, award for use 

of water seven years 21.00 

$1,500.94 

Total expenditures $8,410.99 

Transferred to new account 1,037.50 



City Officers' Salaries. 

Appropriation $26,300.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money .... 304.72 



Expenditures. 

central department. 

Eugene E. Eeed, mayor , $1,800.00 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer 1,350.00 

Edward C. Smith, city clerk 1,350.00 

Edward C. Smith, clerk of committees 200.00 

George E. Morrill, tax collector 1,350.00 

George E. Morrill, team 150.00 

E. C. Paul, deputy collector 800.00 

Jean B. Guevin, deputy collector 800.00 

George A. Wagner, solicitor 800.00 

Harry A. Piper, clerk common council 50.00 

L. M. Aldrich, building inspector 21.00 

Edwin S. Foster, building inspector 929.00 

John A. Barker, messenger 700.00 

Gilbert Lyons', city weigher 470.80 

Walter Dee, weig-her 16.10 

Mabel L. How, treasurer's clerk 614.75 

Florence A. Robinson, city clerk's clerk 600.00 

Maude E. Soule, mayor's clerk 418.00 

Susie E. Wason, mayor's clerk , 154.00 



.$9,448.49 



$26,604.72 



$12,573.65 



54 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY PHYsaCIAN AND OVERSEEIKS OF POOR. 



John H. DeGross, M. D., city physician. 

George E. Davis, ward 1 

W. H. Maxwell, ward 2 

D. G. Andrews, ward 2 

Edward H. Holmes, ward 3 

Charles B. Clarkson, ward 4 

Thomas F. Sheehan, ward 5 

Charles Francis, ward G , 

William Marshall, ward 7 

Henry Lein, ward S 

Thomas C. Stewart, ward 9 

Moses C. Morey, ward 10 

Thomas C. Stewart, clerk , 

Eugene E. Eeed, chairman, ex offlcio . . , 



$600.00 
50.00 
41.66 
4.16 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
125.00 
50.00 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL COM^iIHTEE. 



Charles W. Bickford, school superintendent .. $2,300.00 

Curtis W. Davis, truant officer 850.00 

E. C. Lambert, clerk of school board 150.00 

Eugene E. Eeed, chairman, ex officio 10.00 

C. Edwin Chase, president of common council, 

ex officio 10.00 

E. C. Lambert, ward 1 10.00 

Walter B. Heath, ward 1 10.00 

John W. Johnston, ward 2 10.00 

William C. Heath, ward 2 10.00 

Louis E. Phelps, ward 3 10.00 

George D. Towne, ward 3 10.00 

Nathaniel L. Colby, ward 4 10.00 

Isaac N. Cox, ward 4 10.00 

John T. Kelley, ward 5 10.00 

John F. Lee, ward 5 10.00 

Harry L. Davis, ward 6 10.00 

Eugene B. Dunbar, ward 6 10.00 

Edson S. Heath, ward 7 10.00 

Edward B. W'oodbury, ward 7 10.00 

Walter B. Mitchell, ward 8 10.00 

Benjamin Price, ward 8 10.00 

Kichard E. Walsh, ward 9 10.00 

Alaric Gauthier, ward 9 10.00 

Harry H. Burpee, ward 10 10.00 

Mark E. Harvey, ward 10 10.00 



$3,520.00 



CITY OFFICERS SALARIES. 



55 



BOARD OK ASSES&OKS. 

John L. Sanborn, ward 1 $137.50 

John K, Wilson, ward 2 280.00 

D. O. Fernald, ward 3 937.50 

Harrison D. Lord, ward 4 441.00 

George F. Sheehan, ward 5 232.50 

Leroy M. Streeter, ward G 425.00 

Kobert Leggett, ward 7 142.00 

Eugene W. Brigham, ward S SIO.OO 

Denis Vigneault, ward 9 147.50 

George M. French, ward 10 196.50 

C. W. Brown, assistant 142.50 

Eobert Edgar, assistant 102.50 

C. D. Gadbois, assistant 45.00 

Henry F. iStone, assistant 70.00 

H. J. Woods, assistant 70.00 

Frederick Allen, clerical services - 42.50 

H. L. Currier, clerical services 272.50 

Fred E. Currier, clerical services 240.00 

G. H. Dudley, clerical services 70.00 

Arthur W. Eowell, clerical services 3S0.0O 

George Taylor, clerical services 75.00 

Moses D. Allard, interpreter 77.50 

W. E. Bernard, interpreter 07.50 

J. Z. W. Bernard, interpreter 92.00 

Thomas Champa, interpreter 12.50 

J. B. Eejimbal, interpreter S2.00 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Charles F. Eead, ward 1 

Fred K. Eamsey, ward 2, 1902 

Fred K. Eamsey, ward 2, 1903 

Alvin H. Keith, ward 3 

Charles H. Clark, ward 4 

Eichard J. Barry, ward 5 

Eollin B. Johnston, ward G 

Samuel F. Davis, ward 7 

G. Walter Taylor, ward 8 

Mederique E. MayTaard, ward 9 

William E. Dunbar, ward 10 , 

Eugene E. Eeed, ward 10, balance, 1902 

SPECIAL ELECTION EXPENSES. 

Inspectors of check-lists $727.25 

Moderators 100.00 

Ward clerks 150.00 



$200.00 
9.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
3.00 



$5,591.00 



$2,012.00 



56 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Selectmen $300.00 

Election inspectors 360.00 

Total expenditures 



$1,631 



Auditor's Department. 



Appropriation 



Expe:nditures. 

LABOR. 

James E. Dodge, salary as auditor $1,200.00 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, services as clerk 660.00 

SUPPLIES. 

Barton & Co., cheese cloth, towels, soap $1.2o 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 10.92 

Carter's Ink Co., ribbon 1.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing envelopes, postals 16.2.) 

L. M. Cogswell, laundry 3.15 

L. M. Cogswell, stationery, express, postals.. 9.30 
James E. Dodge, paid for delivering reports, 

lajang carpet, express 2.38 

W. P. Goodman, stationery and books 7.00 

Hale & Whittemore, 1 frame 1.00 

Munson Supply Co., 1 set keys 3.50 

Municipal Journal Publishing Co., subscrip- 
tion to November, 1904 3.00 

E. A. Stratton, bookcase 15.60 

E. A. Stratton, stationery 2.50 

B. F. Shepard, sharpening shears, erasers .25 

Temple & Farrington Co., draft books 6.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., binding books, 

paste, etc 5.75 

John B. Varick Co., duster, twine, screens 2.77 

George P. Wallace, ribbon, carbon paper 4.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$1,860.00 



$95.62 

$1,955.62 
44.38 

$2,000.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSION. 67 

Mayor's Incidentals. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

G. W. Bailey, use of team $2.00 

Eugene E. Eeed, incidentals 220.10 

$222.10 

Total expenditures $222.10 

Transferred to unappropriated money 77.90 

$300.00 



Street and Park Commission. 

Appropriation $3,500.00 

EXPENDITLTIES. 

SALARIES. 

H. P. Simpson, chairman $600.00 

George H. Stearns 600.00 

Byron Worthen 600.00 

$1,800.00 

CLERICAL SERVICES. 

George H. Stearns 477.00 

Bertha F. Whitney 492.00 

$969.00 

USE OF TEAMS. 

H. P. Simpson $150.00 

G. H. Stearns 150.00 

Byron Worthen 150.00 

$450.00 

OFFICE SUPPLIES. 

Eemj^ Bechard, printing 150 reports $28.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 5.95 

J. G. Ellinwood, photographs 2.50 

Charles A. Hoitt Co., cushions, caning and re- 
pairing chairs 12.85 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing bills 11.25 

Municipal Journal Publishing Co., 1 subscrip- 
tion 3.00 



58 KEPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Temple & Farriugton Co.. blank books, etc. $29.20 

George P. Wallace, repairing typewriter, 1 

ribbon 14.00 



Repairs of Highways. 

Appropriation $25,000.00 

Cash received from sundrj- persons 247.38 

Transferred from unappropriated monej' S43.S3 



EXPZXDITUKES. 
LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

February $158.48 

March 322.36 

April 644.43 

May 1,086.09 

.June 2,773.00 

July 1,227.83 

August 2,803.50 

September 1,942.57 

October 1,141.22 

November 399.20 

December 126.90 



Division Xo. 4: 

May $36.50 

July 39.00 



Division Xo. 5: 

March $9.75 

May 83.50 

July 41.00 

August 42.12 

September 197.00 



Division No. 7: 

January $4.25 

February .75 

March 116.75 

April 440.12 



$106. 



Total expenditures $3,325.75 

Transferred to unappropriated money 174.25 



$3,500.00 



$12,625.58 



$75.50 



$373.37 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



59 



May $383.50 

June 621.73 

July 713.86 

August 179.00 

September 182.11 

October 255.50 

Xovember 63.80 

December 65.50 

Division No. 8: 

March $13.00 

May 273.75 

June 28.75 

July 58.25 

August 14.00 

September 70.00 

Division No. 9: 

March $24.88 

May 46.75 

June 82.75 

August 50.50 

October 148.75 

Division No. 10: 

March $212.62 

April 725.85 

May 986.12 

June 1,058.97 

July 1,060.57 

August 1,042.42 

September 227.09 

October 353.87 

Noverujoer 350.36 

December 162.36 

Division No. 12: 

April 

City farm 

LUMBER, ETC. 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber $6.99 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., hoop iron 2.66 

David Wells, posts 87.25 

TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Manchester Hardware Co $36.24 

John B. Varick Co S4.91 



$3,026.87 



$457.75 



$353.63 



6,180.23 

$462.90 
$490.50 



$121.15 



60 



REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



BLACKSMITHIXG AND EEPAIBS. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., material and 

labor $:.02 

A. B. Black, supplies for road machine 98.00 

Concord Foundry Co., making patterns, etc.. IS. 50 

H. Dexter, sharpening drills 10.00 

John Hadlock, 1 casting 1.50 

T. A. Lane Co.. material and labor on foun- 
tains ;!9.40 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor on foun- 
tains, etc 32.42 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete 788. S9 

STONE AND GRAVEL. 

Charles A. Bailey, stone chips $10.50 

George W. Campbell, gravel 6.70 

Lawrence Connor, gravel 7.60 

William H. Colburn, gravel 14.30 

Mark E. Harvey, gravel 5.00 

Eugene Libbey, gravel 4.00 

John Lovering, gravel 4.20 

Oliver Merrill, gravel 7.30 

John K. McQueston, gravel 10.00 

L. C. Paige, gravel 18.20 

N. W. Paige, gravel 13.60 

Porter Brothers, gravel 67.10 

Robert I. Stevens, gravel 10.00 

E. P. Stevens Co., stone chips 21.50 

SUNDRIES. 

Adams Brothers, salt $0.75 

C. A. Bodwell, wood 313.50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice for fountains 60.69 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 33.53 

John H. Campbell, use of water 3.00 

J. W. Fiske Iron Works, 1 fountain 43.50 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice 55.50 

A. D. Maxwell estate, ice 24.41 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone 43.87 

People's Gas Light Co., coke 30.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., books 9.85 

Wiggin-Yonng Co., oil 12.50 

Total expenditures 



$995.73 



B200.00 



$631.10 



$26,091.21 



Appropriation 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 

New Highways. 



61 



$.5,000.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 
Division No. 2: 

April $562.91 

May 101.87 

September 752.00 

October " 540.40 

November S42.S2 

Division No. 4: 

November 

Division No. 5: 

November 

Division No. 7: 

May $238.25 

July 14.04 

September 196.00 

Division No. 8: 

April $228.38 

October 195.00 

November 11.50 

Division No. 10: 

July $101.50 

August 8.13 

September 418.00 

October 328.37 

November '113.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Brooks & Brock, grading $100.00 

James H. Cram, sharpening tools 8.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 85.58 

J. E. MacDonald, vrater barrel .75 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 5.08 

C. H. Wood, painting signs 3.50 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$2,800.00 
$107.25 

$21.25 



$448.29 



$434.88 



$969.00 



$202.91 



$4,983.58 
16.42 



$5,000.00 



62 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Snow and Ice. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



$4,500.00 
23G.45 



EXPEJS^DITURES. 
LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $1,113.15 

February 924.11 

March 173.53 

December 197.95 

Division No. 4: 

February 

Division No. 5: 

February 

Division No. 7: 

January $145.75 

February 135.25 

March 58.00 

December 6.00 

Division No. 8: 

March 

Division No. 9: 

March 

Division No. 10: 

January $643.37 

February 820.75 

March 204.36 

November ., 70.67 

December 95.87 

SUNDRIES. 

Daniels-Cornell Co., salt $13.50 

John B. Varick Co., steel and scoops 10.82 

Total expenditures 

Damage of Land Taken for Highways. 

Balance from last year, unexpended $4,908.07 

Transferred from unappropriated money .... 1,254.55 



$4,736.45 



$2,408.74 
$69.00 

$16.50 



$345.00 
$13.00 



$24.81 



$1,835.02 



$24.32 



$4,736.45 



$6,162.62 



WATERINCJ STREETS. 



63 



Expenditures. 

Jules Bourgeois $G00.00 

Napoleon Bournival 483.14 

John Ferguson 30.00 

Joseph K. Mitchell 1,186.72 

John A. McCrillis 2,608.21 

Joseph Quirin 293.51 

Frederick W. Traver 581.04 

Rodney N. Whittemore 380.00 

Total expenditures 



$6,162.62 



Watering Streets. 

Appropriation $4,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated monej' .... 12.38 



$4,012.38 



EXPENDITUEES, 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

February $26.62 

March , 1.63 

April 91.51 

May 588.36 

June 347.27 

July 535.75 

August 368.18 

September 562.04 

October 74.19 

Division No. 7: 

September 

Division No. 10: 

March $1.50 

April 65.13 

May 256.24 

June 209.50 

July 249.25 

.'\ugust 136.25 

September 230.87 

October 27.00 

November 7.25 



$2,595.55 



$4.00 



$1,182.99 



64 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUPPLIES AND REPAIRS. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., slats for grate, 

pipe, steel, etc $4.93 

C. A. Bailey, 1 base 18.50 

John T. Beach, repairing sprinkler 4.35 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe and repairs 96.05 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice 1902 67.41 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing sprinkler 1.31 

John B. Varick Co., paint and hardware 34.06 

C. L. Wolf, pipe and fittings 3.23 

Total expenditures 



$229.84 
$4,012.38 



Appropriation 



Paving Streets. 



$5,000.00 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Division No. 7: 

^lay 

June 

July 

September 

Division No. 10: 

January 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

November 

December 



$134.43 
367.94 
398.85 
408.49 
335.68 
498.23 
83.51 
28.75 



$59.25 
123.86 
149.00 
111.00 



$1.75 

12.12 

507.25 

291.62 

171.00 

46.25 

110.50 

2.25 

6.25 



$2,255.88 



$443.11 



$1,148.99' 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 



65 



STONE AND CONCRETE. 

C. A. Bailey, stone $323.18 

Head & Dowst Co., stone 17.00 

Osgood Construction Co., crossings 11.5.5 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete 774. :j2 

SUNDRIES. 

Wiggin-Young Co., oil 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated rooney 

Macadamizing Streets. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 
Division ]Vo. 2: 

May $4.50 

June 46.15 

July 2,176.26 

August 697.09 

Division Xo. 7: 

May $147.25 

June 172.50 

Division No. 10: 

June $39.00 

July 1,093.17 

August 31.37 

September 1.50 

FUEL, WATER. 

J. Doucet, wood $36.00 

People's Gas Light Co., coke 43.50 

Water Commissioners, use of water 70.00 

TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

B. H. Piper Co $7.50 

John B. Varick Co 598.11 

5 



$1,126.05 



$4.80 



$4,978.83 
21.17 



$5,000.00 



$6,000.00 



$2,924.00 



$319.75 



$1,165.04 



$149.50 



66 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CASTINGS, BEPAIKS, ETC. 



C. A. Bailey, broken stone 

Drew Machinery Agency, repairing road roller 

oil cups, oilers 

H. J. Dexter, sharpening tools 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., drill, supplies... 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, valves, clamps, etc 

Pike & Heald Co., 1 cup 

Time Manufacturing Co., rubber coating 



$438.90 

52.97 

26.80 

178.80 

57.13 

.20 

5.25 



SUNDRIES. 

S. B. Stearns, premium on insurance (stone crusher) . 



Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated mone.y 



$760.05 



$50.00 

$5,973.95 
26.05 

$6,000.00 



Grading for Concrete. 

Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



$4,000.00 
65.12 



$4,065.12 



Expenditures. 



Division Xo. 2: 
Januar3' .... 

April 

May 



June 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October . . 



Division Xo. 7: 

April 

May 

June _. . 

July 

September . , 



Division Xo. 10: 

March 

April 



$7.50 
382.12 
172.88 

65.87 
355.99 
147.40 
134.95 

95.00 



$12.75 

23.00 

40.37 

4.34 

65.00 



14.00 



$1,362.31 



$145.46 



SCAVENGER SERVICE. 



67 



May $95.85 

June 177.37 

July 272.99 

August 7.25 

September 67.25 

October 26.75 

November 94.71 

December 55.12 

STONE AND CONCEETE. 

Charles A. Bailey, stone steps $67.44 

H. W. Harvey, stone 798.34 

Hobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.... 874.53 

Total expenditures 



$817.04 



$1,740.31 
$4,065.12 



Scavenger Service. 

Appropriation $15,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 3,288.45 



$18,288.45 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 
Division No. 2: 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 7: 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



$694.38 
587.63 

1,090.91 
919.84 
799.46 
802.61 

1,089.49 
770.14 
887.69 
828.68 

1,102.35 

1,116.90 



$73.75 
74.00 
89.75 
93.00 
66.00 

103.50 



$10,690.08 



68 



EEPOKT OF THE CITV AUDITOR. 



■ July $92.00 

August 71.50 

September 92.00 

October 74.00 

November 73.00 

December 113.25 

$1,015.75 

Division No. 10: 

January $248.50 

February 145.00 

March 385.50 

April 396.63 

May 250.65 

June 248.37 

July 326.00 

August 282.50 

September 436.50 

October 286.62 

November 234.75 

December 355.12 

$3,596.14 

CONTRACT. 

City farm $2,124.93 

SUNDRIES. '' 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 1 steel scoop.. $2.50 

John T. Beach, repairing carts 33.30 

Arthur S. Brown, hay, straw, corn 327.60 

Cavanaugh Brothers, exchange of horses 269.25 

A. J. Peaslee, hay 88.30 

A. J. Smith, rye straw 23.84 

John B. Varicik Co., hardware and tools 116.28 

Wiggin-Young Co., salt, glass .48 

$861.55 

Total expenditures $18,288.45 

Street Sweeping. 

Appropriation $3,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 39.34 

$3,039.34 



dvision iNo. 2: 
March 


EXPKNDITURES. 
lABOB. 


$172.05 


April 




294.56 



BRIDGES. 69 

May $320.24 

June 219.20 

July 298.31 

August 250.55 

September 350.44 

October 370.25 

November 257.61 

December 85.11 

$2,618.32 

Division No. 10: 

March $23.25 

April 30.00 

May 24.00 

June 20.38 

July , 38.00 

August 28.63 

September 27.50 

October 24.75 

November 49.87 

December 5.25 

$271.63 

SXIPPLIES, ETC. 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight $1.09 

Harold L. Bond Co., brooms 11.50 

New England Broom Co., brooms 10.00 

H. Thompson, brooms and refilling 126.80 

$149.39 

Total expenditures $3,039.34 



Bridges. 



Appropriation $6,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 809.48 



EXPENDITUKES. 
LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

February $39.36 

March 113.15 

April 240.50 

May 4.50 

June 142.33 

July 2.00 

September 4.00 

October 146.83 



$6,809.48 



70 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

^'ovember $268.22 

December 712.49 

Division No. 9: 

May $16.00 

June 50.00 

Division No. 10: 

April $4.25 

June 1.50 

July 4.00 

September 12.50 



$1,673.38 



$66.00 



$22.25 



COKTRACT. 

United Construction Co $323.00 

STONE, LUMBER, HARDWARE, ETC. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., bags, bolts.... $14.10 

Charles A. Bailey, stone 287.30 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 58.62 

Couch & McDonald, iron work, etc 3.50 

W. P. Farmer, rubber boots 17.22 

Head & Dowst Co., repairing bridges, lumber, 

cement, etc 3,740.78 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe and labor .91 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 52.78 

Moore & Preston, coal 23.15 

Robic) Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete, 

McGregor bridge 472.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and paint 54.49 

$4,724.85 

Total expenditures $6,809.48 



City Teams. 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money .... 480.50 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $356.92 

Febriiary .- 126.13 

March 140.70 

April 158.63 



CITY TEAMS. 



71 



May 

September 

December 

Division No. 7: 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

July ' 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 10: 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

December 

Commons: 

January 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

GRAIN, HAY, STRAW. 

Adams Brothers 

Ame & Co 

Arthur S. Brown 

W. H. Boynton 

F. X. Chenette 

Gage & McDougall 

D. Hammond & Son 

M. E. Harvey 

Isaac Huse 

C. E. Merrill 

Partridge Brothers 

A. J. Peaslee 

Union Grocery Co 



$128.25 

3.45 

234.38 



$12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 



$19.25 
16.62 
20.38 
27.12 
21.00 
25.37 



$5.25 
71.50 
130.00 
42.50 
17.75 
10.50 
18.75 



$2.25 

15,00 

1,667.84 

149.48 

330.88 

101.64 

42.60 

93.48 

116.38 

3.60 

28.00 

27.94 

13.00 



$1,148.46 



$137.50 



$129.74 



$296.25 



$2,592.09 



72 EEPOET OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



HARNESSES AND REPAIRS. 

Kimball Carriage Co $S.OO 

Mugridge & Bennett S36.90 

H. C. Ranno & Son 49.75 

Eanno Saddlery Co 4.15 

Solshine ISIannfactnring Co 6.50 

N. J. Whalen 20.38 

$325.08 

CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

John T. Beach $11.10 

Sanborn Carriage Co 3.40 

$14.50 

HARDWARE AND TOOLS. 

Manchester Hardware Co $21.32 

John B. Varick Co 341.87 

$363.19 

LIVE STOCK, 'VETEKINAHY EXPENSES. 

Cavanaugh Brothers, horses $710.00 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., attendance and medicine.. 55.00 

J. L. Golden, V. S., liniment 8.00 

Jessie L. Hanscom, medicine .80 

F. K. Hubbard, X-ray medicines 20.00 

John G. Lesure, ointment 8.00 

W. B. Mitchell, medicine 6.75 

G. W. O. Tebbetts, medicine 2.50 

$811.05 

WATER, GAS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal $10.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., nse 

of telephones 42.21 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 135.81 

Union Coal Co., coal 70.13 

Water commissioners, use of water 83.38 

$341.53 

LUMBER, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Bruck Solidified Oil Co., axle oil $6.54 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 156.67 

T. A. Lane Co., 6 cocks 1.80 

Pike & Heald Co., 1 can, repairing stove pipe 16.99 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paint 2.76 

$184.76 



REPAIRS OF SEWERS. 



73 



SUNDRIES. 

C. D. Steele & Co., storing hay $25.00 

C. H. Simpson, use of teams 66.00 

Eager & Co., soap 5.40 

G. W. O. Tebbetts, napthaline .30 

A. ;M. Winchester, disinfectant 5.75 

Wiggin-Young Co., nails, oil, glass, etc 31.80 

Young Brothers, 1 ladder 1.50 

Total expenditures 



$135.75 
$6,480.50 



Repairs of Sewers. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



EXPE^^DITURES. 



$5,000.00 
147.79 



$5,147.79 



LABOB. 

Division Xo. 2: 

January $36.75 

February 62.75 

March 88.12 

April 213.92 

May 94.99 

June 561.80 

July 415.38 

August 473.08 

September 403.61 

October 322.43 

December 211. SS 

Division No. 7: 

May 

Division No. 10: 

March $13.00 

April 131.06 

May 99.50 

June 236.50 

July 257.12 

August 9.75 

September 251.63 

October 312. S9 

December 8.75 



B2,SS4.72 
$4.50 



$1,320.20 



74 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



HARDWARE AXD FREIGHT. 

Boston & Maine R. E.. freight $0.25 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 43.15 

MATERIAL, LABOR, ETC. 

Charles A. Bailey, stone $40.62 

Harold L. Bond & Co., scrapers, brass coup- 
lings 79.70 

A. S. Brown, cement 145.60 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., rubber boots 10.00 

Peter Duval, filing saws 7.80 

W. F. Head & Son, brick 1S9.00 

Head & Dowst Co., cement, lumber, etc 72.86 

H. W. Harvey, stone 145.25 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, etc 7.70 

New York Store Co., iron girders 6.00 

H. W. Parker, cement 77.00 

Pike & Heald Co., cesspool dippers 14.64 

D. F. Shea, rubber boots 7.00 

United Construction Co., contract, grate and 

fence. Christian brook culvert 75.00 

Wiggin-Young Co., oil 16.80 

Total expenditures 



$43.40 



$894.97 



$5,147.79 



New Sewers. 



Appropriation 

Received from sale of pipe 



$20,000.00 
13.50 



$20,01: 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $11.25 

February , 11.00 

March 211.68 

April 1,075.04 

May 2,021.71 

.June 967.52 

July 1,121.94 

August 110.95 

September 18.38 



NEW SEWERS. 



75 



October $16.00 

November 893.32 

December :317.02 

Division No. 7: 

January $12.00 

April 545.49 

May 370.50 

June 10.00 

July 67.37 

August 574.43 

September 587.23 

October . . .^ 611.41 

November 756.51 

December 475.99 

Division No. 10: 

May $0.75 

July 213.92 

August _ 285.50 

September 184.00 

November 40.06 

HARDWARE, TOOLS, SEWEB PIPE. 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, etc 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 

B. H. Piper Co., handles 

John B. Varick Co., tools and hardware 

MATERIAL, FREIGHT, ETC. 

Boston & Maine R. E., freight 

Harold L. Bond Co., hose 

W. H. Coburn, logs 

Concord Foundry Co., traps, grates, etc 

Drew Machinery Agency, 1 plate 

A. K. Forsaith, repairing magnets 

A. K. Hobbs, packing 

C. H. Hutchinson, castings and labor 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., supplies 

T. A. Lane Co., flue brush, packing, labor on 

boilers, etc 

C. W. H. Moulton, ladders 

National Separator & Machine Co., labor on 

screws, bolts, etc 16.45 

Swan & Finch Co., oil 11.11 

Springfield Separator Co., repairs on dynamo, 

etc 3.30 



$0,67(3.71 



$2,255.02 

126.24 

26.25 

957.29 



$926.05 

177.30 

32.00 

929.88 

.60 

1.00 

2.48 

15.86 

230.68 

45.85 
7.00 



$4,010.9c 



$724.83 



$3,364. 



76 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Vacuum Oil Co., oil $45.78 

C. B. Wing-ate, rubber boots 18.00 

Wlggin-Young Co., oil 29.83 

CEilEtNT, BEICK, LUMBEK. 

A. S. Brown, cement $213. GO 

Head & Dowst Co., brick, cement, lumber 101.25 

W. F. Head & Son. brick ToG.OO 

Sl^NDRIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal $390.11 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, coal 186.-^ 

Moore & Preston, coal 38.53 

Moore & Preston Coal Co., coal 13.50 

G. G. Skinner, water used for sewer purposes 1.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



Commons 



Appropriation 

Cash received, account of band concerts 



$4,500.00 
56.00 



$2,493.17 



$1,070.85 



$629.63 



$18,970.92 
1,042.58 



$20,013.50 



$4,556.00 



Expenditures. 



January $347.37 

February 158.99 

March 127.25 

April 184.24 

May 125.75 

June 196.50 

July 310.11 

August 238.49 

September 186.99 

October 126.25 

November 179.00 

December 193.13 



$2,374.07 



STAEK PARK. 



77 



PLANTS, ETC. 

F. J. Bixby, plants $95.00 

A. G. Hood, plants 75.00 

A. P. Home & Co., trees, plants 39.00 

Frank A. Koerner, plants 26.00 

Kirby Floral Co., plants 80.00 

Ray Brook Garden Co., plants 57.00 

WATEK, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., elec- 
tric lights $36.00 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 8.01 

Water commissioners, use of water 700.00 

REPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 

Adams Brothers, salt, lime $1.10 

A. S. Brown, grain, cement 75.21 

John Fullerton, horse, harness, sled, plow.... 73,00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 17.50 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 11.24 

C. A. Hoitt Co., burlap 1.80 

C. H. Hutchinson, knives, sharpening lawn 

mowers 81.29 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on electric lights, foun- 
tains, etc 53.04 

H. F. W. Little, filing saws 1.40 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware, etc 34.25 

McKelvie Brothers, stove and pipe 13.15 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.... 463.56 

John B. Varick Co., paint and hardware 124.30 

C. B. Wingate, rubber boots 11.48 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$372.00 



$744.01 



$962.32 

$4,452.40 
103.60 



$4,556.00 



Stark Park. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

April $50.75 

May 51.75 

June 67.50 



$1,000.00 



78 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



July $55.25 

August 43.50 

September 104.50 

Octoiber 113.25 

November 25.50 

December 2.75 

SUNDRIES. 

Head & Dowst Co., one-half bill for Derryfield 

park barn $378.00 

Water commissioners, use of water 12.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$514. 



$390.00 



$904.75 
95.25 



$1,000.00 



Derryfield Park. 

Appropriation 

EXPE^TDITURES. 
LABOR. 

February $3.25 

March 11.13 

April 61.88 

May 135.50 

June 66.13 

July 33.75 

August 24.87 

September 48.75 

October 46.75 

November 94.50 

December 41.12 

SUNDRIES. 

W. G. Berry, insurance premium $5.75 

Head & Dowst Co., one-half cost of barn 378.00 

Manchester Hardware Qo., seed 2.71 

John A. Sheehan, insurance premium 6.00 

John B. Varick Co., glass and putty .80 

Water commissioners, use of water 24.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unajipropriated money 



$1,000.00 



$567.63 



$417.26 



$984.89 
15.11 



NORTH END PLAYGROUND. 

Lafayette Park. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 10: 

March $45.50 

June 23.50 

July 2.62 

October S.12 

November 238.46 

SUNDRIES. 

H. W. Harvey, stone curbing- $321.20 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., sidewalks... 360.60 

Total expenditures 

South Manchester Playground. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Pay-roll commons: 

May $9.75 

August 8.75 

September 24.00 

October 4.00 

sundries. 

Adams Brothers, plaster $2.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 11.60 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 6.70 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 

North End Playground. 

Appropriation $75.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 4.25 



79 



$1,000.00 



$318.20 



$681.80 



$1,000.00 



$75.00 



$46.50 



$20.30 




$79.2; 



80 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

EXPEI^DITURES. 
LABOR. 

April $4.75 

Maj' GG.OO 

September S.50 

$79.25 

Total expenditures $79.25 



Riddle Playground. 
Appropriation $50.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 
Divtsion Xo. 10: 

August $50.00 

Total expenditures $50.00 

Lighting Streets. 

Appropriation $58,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Manchester Electric Co.: 

Charges. Discounts, 

January $4,734.10 $5.56 

February 4,734.16 6.96 

March 4,734.16 11.32 

April 4,734.16 15.31 

May 4,734.16 9.10 

June 466.83 2.10 

$24,137.63 $50.35 

Less discount 50.35 

$24,087.28. 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co.: 

June $3,409.91 $13.64 

July 3,752.45 12.84 

Augrust 3,780.44 6.78 ' 

September 3,812.94 21.67 

October 3,863.62 31.31 



engineer's DEPAllTMENT. 81 

Noveiiibei- $3,892.10 $12.03 

December 3,922.G4 8.04 

$26,434.10 $100.31 

Less discount 100.31 

$20,327.7& 

GAS. 

Wellsbach Street Lighting Co $4,885.01 

SUNDRIES. 

J. r. Brown, use of teams $40.00 

Boyd Brothers, use of hack 5.00 

Mary E. Eeed, filling and lighting lamp to 

December 1, 1903 15.00 

$60.00 



SUPPLIES, OFFICE EXPEiNSES. 

J. J. Abbott, paint, varnish $0.95 

F. S. Bodwell, stone bounds 140.00 

Remy Bechard, printing 350 copies city report 43.50 
C. L. Berger & Sons, repairing and adjust- 
ing leveling instrument 7.00 



Total expenditures $55,360.08 

Transferred to unappropriated money 2,639.92 

$58,000.00 



Engineer's Department. 
Apx^ropriation $6,835.00 

EXPENDITUEES. 
LABOR. 

Samuel J. Lord, engineer, services and team 

hire $1,500.00 

Harry J. Briggs 830.94 

Harold B. Cleworth 18.00 

Alfred T. Dodge 662.59 

Lawrence O'Connor 54.70 

Hallett E. Eobbins 162.71 

G. W. Wales 923.08 

Henry Worthen 565.30 

Harrie M. Young 773.64 

Ella B. Davis, stenographer 478.68 



$5,969.64 



82 KEPOET OF THE CITY AUDITOE. 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., rubber boots $7.25 

Alfred T. Dodge, carfare, express, etc 8.64 

Byron E. Finney & Co., caning chairs 3.23 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 33.07 

W. & L. E. Gurley, 1 telemeter 13.00 

Head & Dowst Co., grade stakes, lumber 40.79 

A. K. Hobbs, rubber tubing 1.00 

J. G. Jones, trucking cabinet .35 

H. D. Lord, use of horse 5.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., numbers, nails, cord 39.47 
New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 35.03 

Harry A. Piper, sign boards 16.00 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., stamp 1.37 

E. A. Stratton, bookcases, paper, etc 29.60 

Carl Strauss, wheel for pencil pointer 2.10 

E. G. Soltmann, paper and express 94.30 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and binding 69.43 

John B. Varick Co., supplies 95.38 

G. W. Wales, carfare, express, etc 19.03 

H. A. Worthen, express, carfare, soap, etc 3.23 

Whiting & Thomson, 1 brush 2.00 

J. A. Williams, cutting and blocking paper, etc 5.50 

C. H. Wood, painting signs 96.75 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 2,000 

cards 7.50 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., oak base 

for cabinet 17.50 

$843.99 

SUNDRIES. 

H. L. Gould, weekly hydrant bench mark re- 
port $12.00 

Pike & Heald Co., plugs, labor on hydrants. . . . 9.37 

$21.37 

Total expenditures $6,835.00 



Health Department. 

Appropriation $10,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 4,390.54 

$14,390.54 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 83 

Expenditures, 
services. 

John C. Bickford, salary as member of board. . $200.00 
W. M. Parsons, M. D., salary as member of 

board 200.00 

W. K. Robbins, salary as member of board.. 200.00 

W. B. Blake, sanitary inspector 785.26 

John F. Loonej', sanitary inspector 812.25 

Carl 0. Seaman, plumbing- and milk inspector 9.39.00 

M. Alma Fracker, clerk 514.50 

$3,651.01 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Remy Bechard, printing- 300 reports $18.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing- bulletins, blanks, 

etc 129.80 

E. A. Stratton, stationery 3.15 



TEAMS, ETC. 

W. B. Blake, carfares and teams $46.15 

J. P. Brown 90.00 

Thomas F. Brown 2.00 

F. X. Chenette 7.00 

James' Stable 23.00 

Hector Lamoureaux 1.50 

E. G. Libbey 20.00 

John F. Loonej', carfares 32.25 

G. W. Reed 2.00 



OFFICE EXPENSES AND SUPPLIES. 

Barton & Co., crash, robes $4.59 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., laboratory sup- 
plies 30.65 

W. B. Blake, teleg-rams, express, matches, etc. 2.61 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 11.04 

Carter, Rice & Co., gummed paper 12.60 

E. R. & W. P. Coburn, 100 frames for notices 20.00 

Dennison, Manufacturing Co., fumigating paper 30.00 

J. Doucet & Co., antitoxine 9.7o 

M. Alma Fracker, laundry, express, postage, 

etc 28.50 

John B. Hall Co., medical supplies 149.24 

James W. Hill Co., sheets, cotton cloth 16.58 

A. K. Hobbs, respirators, rubber gloves and 

sheeting, etc. 12.25 



$150.95 



$223.90 



84 REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDlTOrw 

C. A. Hoitt Co., matting, caning chairs $10.14 

A. Klipsteiu & Co., formaldehyde 34.38 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 3.54 

H. K. Mulford Co., antitoxine 213.01 

jN'ew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., tolls 2.1)0 

Parke, Davis & Oo., culture tubes 9.20 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 14.27 

M. Potvin & Co., antitoxine 9.26 

C. O. Seaman, mantle, plaster, photographs, 

etc 3. So 

A. D. Smith, formaldehyde 170.50 

Frederick Stearns & Co., antitoxine 15.53 

F. H. Thurston, vaccine, antitoxine, etc 72.90 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 26.03 



PESTHOrSE. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood $4.00 

Bunton & Bernard, repair.s on house 309.13 

Emma Burns, services as nurse 400.00 

Joel Daniels, labor 28.90 

C. DeMoulpied & Co., range and furnishings.. 45.00 

John DeGross, M. D., services 389.00 

Hardy & Folsom, netting .48 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 5.60 

C. A. Hoitt Co., chairs, tables, mirrors, etc 26.90 

J. E. A. Lanouette, M. D., services 265.50 

E. W. Lee, labor 40.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Oo., wood 25.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., paint, hardware... 41.23 

Moore & Preston Coal Co., coal 22.50 

McKelvie Brothers, stoves, pipe, etc 49.15 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 32.50 

F. E. Nelson, fumigating pans 2.00 

W. M. Parsons, M. D., services 1,725.00 

W. M. Parsons, M. D., coal 176.40 

Pike & Heald Co., grate for range .99 

Judith Sherer, services 360.00 

Judith Sherer, board of sundry persons 1,160.76 

Mrs. A. D. Sherer, services 284.00 

A. D. Sherer, services 603.76 

A. D. Sherer, use of team 164.00 

John B. Varick Co., wringers, chimneys, cards 5.75 

Maurice Watson, M. D., medical attendance... 379.25 

D. A. Watson, wood 112.50 

Water commissioners, use of water 5.64 



$915.32 



$6,665.44 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 85 



ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

Barton & Oo., 8 robes $5.50 

William Blake, medicine, etc 4.G5 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal ISn.OO 

E. M. Bryant & Co,, electrical material and 

labor .34.5.'^) 

Bunton & Bernard, fitting windows, screen 

doors, lumber, paint, labor 121.09 

Christina Cameron, services as nurse 80.00 

C. G. Dunning-ton, medicine S.oj 

0. P. Ellis, wood G.50 

A. L. Franks & Co., andirons and spark guard 5.00 

C. M. Floyd, shirts and bath robes 9.00 

Lewis G. Gilman, medicine 5.95 

James W. Hill Co., cheese cloth .50 

A. K. Hobbs, rubber sheeting 6.00 

Chas. A. Hoitt Co., chairs, trays, crockery- 14. GO 

J. J. Holland, medicine 1.85 

W. F. Hubbard, windows and screen doors.... 64. G5 

T. A. Lane Co., radiator, labor G.70 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., wood 40.75 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., elec- 
tric lights 40.65 

Moore & Preston Coal Co., coal 38.29 

Maggie McDonald, services as nurse 125.80 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 49.37 

Mrs. Eva M. Nute, services as matron 192.00 

Mrs. Eva M. Nute, board sundry persons 266.89 

Otilia Olsen, services as nurse 21.00 

W. M. Parsons, coal 137.34 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor 16.43 

Nellie M. Eugar, services as nurse 70.50 

Sacred Heart Hospital, nurse's services 30.00 

G. W. O. Tebbetts, supplies 9.53 

John B. Varick Co.. lawn mower, shears, hook, 

etc 9.33 

Water commissioners, use of water 17.88 

Watts Brothers, shovel and tongs 1.50 

D. A. Watson, wood 10.00 

SUPPLIES FOB ISOLATED FA:MILIES. 

John C. Bickford, paid for nursing $15.00 

W. B. Blake, medicine, milk, board sundry 

children 12.52 

C. Boisclair & Co.. wood 11.80 



$1,630.33 



86 EEPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

J. F. Briggs, milk $3.24 

F. X. Chenette, burial outfits 20.00 

Desrochers & Gauvin, bread , 1.44 

J. H. DeCourcy Co., wood ' 19.50 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries 12.48 

A. L. Gadbois & Co., burial outfits 25.50 

Arthur Gagne, groceries 5.15 

P. F. Grenier, g-roceries 2.49 

Elmer D. Goodwin, burial outfit 10.50 

Mary Hayes, groceries 12.57 

John B. Hall Co., medicine 5. So 

Patrick Healy, quarantine officer 52.00 

J. J. Holland, medicine .3.95 

P. Kelley, milk 1.56 

J. J. Kelley, quarantine officer 39.00 

C. F. Kemp, quarantine officer 4.00 

Lamoureaux Brothers, groceries 25.72 

C. H. Lee. quarantine officer 4.00 

J. J. Looney, medicine, groceries 8.07 

P. D. Lynch, groceries 21.25 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., coal and wood . . 13.25 

Daniel Manning, quarantine officer 21.00 

E. J. Madden, groceries 4.71 

W. B. Mitchell, medicine .70 

F. C. Miville, medicine 2.28 

Charles Xormand, groceries 5.78 

John O'Connell, quarantine officer 42.00 

H. Pariseau, groceries 35.42 

F. X. Parent, groceries 19.08 

F. T. Parker, groceries 8.28 

Frederick Perkins, M. D., services 3.00 

Potvin & Co., antitoxine 17.25 

A. J. Precourt, medicine 2.10 

W. H. Quinn, quarantine officer 30.00 

Queen City Coal Co., wood 2.00 

Alphonse Regnier, quarantine officer 25.00 

James Rourke, quarantine officer 101.00 

John J. Splane, groceries • 10.34 

Splane & Messier, groceries 4.92 

C. H. Sprague, quarantine officer 13.00 

A. D. Smith, medicine 2.50 

Charles Swinst'on, groceries 22.84 

Summer Street Market, groceries 40.25 

Josejih Trahan, groceries 33.59 

E. V. Turcotte, wood 9.26 

P. H. RilcA', quarantine officer 63.00 

Robert Wallace, groceries 5.10 

W. H. Walker, quarantine officer 50.00 



CITY LIBKAliY. 87 



SUNDRIES. 

W. B. Blake, burying animals $2.50 

W. B. Blake, expenses to Concord, express, 

milk samples, etc 5.TG 

M. Alma Tracker, cash paid for dues, Ameri- 
can Pviblic Health Association 5.00 

J. J. Looney, milk samples, burying animals, 

etc 21.0U 

Alphonse Eegnier, labor at Ash-street school 4.00 

A. G. Straw, M. D., diphtheria examinations . 200.00 

Dennis Vigneault, labor at Ash-street school 4.00 

$242.35 



Total expenditures $14,390.54 



City Library. 

Balance from last year unexpended $2,373.24 

Appropriation 5,S02.00 

EXPENDITUKES. 
LIBRARIAN AND ASSISTANTS. 

F. Mabel Winchell, librarian $1,000.00 

Thomas Ayer 11S.30 

E. H. Fletcher 41.40 

C. H. Jack 21.75 

Charles S. Morgan 41S.50 

Thomas F. :So\an 103.28 

H. C. Rogers 125.25 

Albro P. Reed 175.40 

Harry G. Williams 36.75 

CATALOGUE AND CATALOGUE SUPPLIES. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing deposit blanks. . . $1.75 

Library Bureau, cards, holders, etc 33.15 

Louise E. Newell, copyist 433.23 

Edith O. Simmons, copyist 454.80 

Temple & Farrington Co., supplies 43.15 

J. Arthur Williams, printing pockets, envel- 
opes, postals 15.50 

F. M. Winchell, paid for catalogue cards 20.00 



$8,175.24 



$2,040.63 



$1,001.55 



88 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOK. 



BINDING, REBIXDIXG, EESEWING. 

F. J. Barnard &- Co $357.35 

Temple & Farrington Co 157.60 

WATER. LIGHTS, FUEL, IXSUKANCE. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal $129.25 

Clarence M. Edgerly, insurance premium 125.00 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., elec- 
tric lights 52S.C0 

Moore & Preston, coal 117. OS 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 4.53 

Union Coal Co., coal 355.10 

Water Commissioners, use of water 13.02 

NEW BOOKS. 

Trustees of library 

SUNDAY OPENING. 

Peter Callaghan, police service $10.00 

Charles S. Morgan, labor 46.80 

Albro P. Reed, labor 46.80 

Edith 0. Simmons, labor 143.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Eemy Bechard, printing 300 reports $15.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 6.51 

Bridget Costigan, cleaning 40.84 

Hale & Whittemore, hanging pictures .75 

George Holbrook, blocks, trucking 16.09 

C. F. Livingston, printing covers 102.40 

Manchester Hardware Co., 1 broom .50 

John B. Varick Co., brushes 4.00 

F. M. Winchell. paid for cleaning 47.08 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to new account 



$514.95 



L.273.1S 



$1,000.00 



$246.60 



$233.17 

$6,310.11 
1,865.13 



Fire Department. 



$8,175.24 



Appropriation $65,805.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money . . 1,801.97 



FIRE DEPAIITMENT. 



89 



EXPENDITTRES. 
SERVICES. 

"Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer $1,5(10. 00 

Fred S. Bean, assistant engineer 250.00 

Clarence E. Merrill, assistant engineer and 

clerk 275.00 

John F. Seaward, assistant engineer 250.00 

Arthur Provost, assistant engineer 250.00 

teamsters' and engineeks' pay-roll. 

January $2,331.93 

February 2,332.93 

March 2,439.G4 

April 2,443.26 

May 2,4S0.C0 

June 2,509.31 

July 2,579.S9 

August 2,609.7() 

September 2,647.98 

October 2,605.51 

N'ovember 2,568.01 

December 2,567.48 

CALL MEMBERS. 

Engine Company No. 1 $1,698.00 

Engine Company No. 2 1,560.49 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 3 2,293.00 

Engine Company No. 4 1,698.00 

Engine & Ladder Oompany No. 5 2,458.01 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 6 2,458.00 

Chemical Engine Company No. 1 479.00 

Hook & Ladder Company No. 1 1,828.00 

Hose Company No. 1 1,693.00 

Hose Company No. 2 1,528.00 

Hose Company No. 3 928.00 

OTHER LABOR. 

F. O. Bartlett $7.50 

Oscar Beneau 84.00 

Joseph B'ooth * 21.00 

George Dalton 10.50 

George Gott 2.50 

C. F. Kemp 192.00 

John P. Stone 2.00 



$2,525.00 



$30,116.30 



$18,621.50 



90 KEPOllT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

A. E. Tuson $3(5.75 

Robert Turnbull 9.S0 

Charles J. Wiley 19.50 

C. A. Whitcomb l^T.M) 



J. E. Cheney $23.15 

Stella Dickey 17.05 

Domestic Laundry 15.35 

M. H. Hulme 30.77 

L. A. Lamson 22.99 

New Hampshire Towel Supply Company :;9.()0 

Oneeda Laundry 9.75 

Margaret Power 48.44 

Mrs. S. E. Eeed 12.20 

A. W. Smith 17.10 



1"UB^'1T^'EE, ETC. 

R. D. Gay, 1 awning- $5.80 

James W. Hill Co., bedding 47.S3 

C. A. Hoitt Co., bedding, furniture, matting, 

etc 126.59 

James A. Scully, shades and hanging 10.70 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Remy Bechard, printing 400 reports $52.50 

John B. Clarke Co., printing envelopes 23.00 

Engine and Hose companies, allowance for 

printing and stationery 110.00 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing rosters, cards, pos- 
tals, tags, etc 56.20 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 6.72 

WATER, I.KJHTS, TELEPHONE. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone, tolls $0.55 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., elec- 
tric lights 53.10 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 940.32 

Water commissi'oners, use of water 404.87 



FUEL. 

James Benson, wood .$4.00 

C. H. Bodwell, wood 22.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood and coal 363.75 



$573.05 



$235.80 



$190.93 



$248.42 



$1,398.84 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



91 



Fletcher Brown, wood .f^-^.uO 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, coal 101.7.3 

J. E. French, wood 15.00 

S. L. Flanders, wood 3.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., coal 38.10 

Moore & Preston, coal 380.46 

Union Coal Co., coal 1,7(50.30 

FKEIGHT AND CARTAGE. 

E. H. Holmes 

SUPPLIES, ETC. 

Boston Belting Co., h'ose $503.03 

Bruck Solidified Oil Co., axle oil 3.00 

Cornelius Callahan Co., breast plate snap 6.00 

Couch & Seeley Co., instrument, condensers.. 10.00 

Daniels-Cornell Co., soapine 39.75 

Samuel Eastman & Co., 1 deluge set, complete 180.00 
Eldredge Electric Manufacturing Co., 1 volt- 
meter 1.00 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., supplies 71.33 

Frank E. Fitts Manufacturing Co., waste 34.29 

H. Fradd & Co., oil 2.85 

S. L. Flanders, oil, chimneys, etc 4.65 

Globe Manufacturing Co., 30 fire coats 112.50 

A. W. Harris Oil Co., valve oil 6.80 

Hale & Whittemore, framing maps, etc 4.15 

A. K. Hobbs, washers .40 

J. Hodge, lumber 16.41 

A. C. Hovey, 1 wringer 2.50 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, etc. 5.09 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 27.41 

Mathieson Alkali Works, soda 7.84 

J. E. McDonald, brooms 8.00 

New England Bolt & Xut Co., braces 6.00 

Pike & Heald Co., pails, cans, etc 2.23 

C. N. Perkins & Co., hose, etc 67.15 

Stark Mills, canvas covers 2.50 

A. J. Smith, rubber rings 2.00 

Smith Box & Lumber Co., sawdust 2.25 

C. D. Steele & Co., oil, sugar, matches 3.95 

Talbot Dyewood & Chemical Co., bicarbonate 

of soda 37.38 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 251.80 

A. M. Winchester, disinfectant 31.50 



$2,710.36 



$15.81 



$1,453.76 



92 



EEPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPAIRS, ETC. 

Cornelius Callahan Co., repairing pipe, hose, 

and relining- hose $362.60 

Head & Dowst Co., boards 1.50 

J. Hodge, repairing sash, etc 2.07 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing repairs, etc T.65 

C. Ts^. Perkins & Co., repairs 30.00 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing water cooler, 

coiDper tank 2.80 

H. A. Piper, filing saws .60 

Edward Sargent, machine work 2.9.i 

S. Sandberg & Co.. lathe work 1.00 

Union Manufacturing Co., plating pliers, etc.. 2.2.5 

VETERINABY SERVICES AND MEDICINES. 

C. M. Bailey, V. S., attendance $6.00 

Caranaugh Brothers, horses 500.00 

Cavanaugh Brothers, visits and medicine IS. 00 

Z. F. Campbell, medicines 12.72 

Frank J. Clark, V. S., dentistry 10.00 

N. Chandler, ointment 4.50 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., visits and medicine 17.50 

H. B. Dnnton, V. S., attendance and medicine 40.50 

Dyer & Chipman, medicines 11.71 

L. G. Oilman, medicine 3.15 

A. D. Smith, liniment, ginger, powders, etc... 12.95 

CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

American Locomotive Co $103.00 

John T. Beach 5.40 

Couch & McDonald 109.35 

J. B. McCrillis & Son 309.69 

BLACKSMITHING. 

Connor & Grossman $40.00 

Couch & McDonald 101.10 

H. J. Dexter 108.40 

Joseph Marcoux 31.40 

John A. Mitchell 69.00 

John McSweeney 202.11 

J. F. Seaward 1.65 

J. O. & L. 1'. Tremblay 292.20 

G. F. Wenzel 65.20 

J. F. Woodbury 156.75 



$413.4'. 



$637.03 



$527.44 



FIKE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

HAY, GHAIX, ETC. 

Adams r.r'otliers $752.87 

Arthur S. Browu- 1,40(3.09 

Gage & McDougall G12.53 

Clarence R. Merrill 800.59 

Merrill & Laraba 1,269.27 

Partridge Brothers 1,735.18 

HARNESS KEPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 

W. H. Adams $80.10 

W. E. Greeley 2.05 

H. C. Eanno & Son 115.83 

Eanno Saddlery Co 50.70 

George Silberg 3.75 

Joseph Yogel & Son 31.50 

N. J. Whalen 12.55 

SUNDRIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice $6.95 

William Corey, keeping horse 13.50 

Thomas W. Lane, j)aid for express and cartage 6.45 

G. W. Reed, use of hacks for committees 10.00 

Maude E. Soule, stenographer, services Part- 
ridge fire hearing 21.60 



Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January $54.00 

February 4S.00 

March 52.00 

April 50.00 

May 56.00 

June 58.00 

July 56.00 

August 52.00 

September 54.00 

October 54.00 



$6,576.53 



$296.48 



$58.50 





$67,666.97 










Fire Alarm Telegraph. 


. . . $1 800 00 







94 EEPOET OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

November $52.00 

December 54.00 

SUPPLIES. 

American Electrical Works, wire $158.61 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., second hand 

structure for wires ' 22.00 

Brodie Electric Co., insulators, repairs 40.0S 

Couch & Seeley Co., induction coil .01 

W. E. Decrow, signal box, magnets, repairs 235.15 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., supplies 85.76 

Johnstone Gasoline Motor Co., drilling straps 1.20 

J. Hodge, arms, lumber 142.15 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, etc 5,18 

New England Bolt & Nut Co., arm braces 10.50 

Pike & Heald Co., gasoline, ladle .70 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 94.47 

SUNDRIES. 

E. H. Holmes, freight and cartage 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated mone.y 

Hydrant Service. 
Appropriation 

Expenditures. 
Water Commissioners, use of hydrants 



$640.00 



$796.71 



$5.: 



$1,442.56 
357.44 



,800.00 



$19,200.00 



$19,200.00 



Police Department.— Station. 

Appropriation $2,500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 676.31 

EXPEXDITITRES. 
SERVICES. 

Charles H. Skinner, janitor $528.00 

Frank P. Wiggin, janitor 202.00 



$3,176.31 



$730.00 



$2,216.58 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 95 



WATER. LIGHTS, FUEL. 

C. H. B'odwell, wood $71.50 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., elec- 
tric lights 600.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., coal 165.28 

Moore & Preston, wood 44.25 

Moore & Preston Coal Co., coal 196.37 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 82.17 

Union Coal Co., coal 893.74 

Water commissioners, use of water 163.27 

LAUNDRY, ETC. 

T. F. Fifield, oil $1.55 

James W. Hill Co., towels, crash, etc 6.75 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap 8.00 

J. J. Holland, soap, disinfectant, toilet paper 28.60 

J. X. Lacourse, soap 2.50 

Joseph Sykes, cleaning 49.80 

Mrs. J. F. Wiggin, washing 42.34 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., matches, soap 2.40 

REPAIRS, ETC. 

J. J. Abbott, paint $1.82 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 10.50 

D. F. Cressey, repairing chains .25 

M. J. Coleman, plumbing repairs 3.25 

C. A. Hoitt Co., repairing chairs 6.65 

A. K. Hobbs, toilet paper 4.75 

T. A. Lane Oo., lamps and repairs 25.57 

Lynn Incandescent Lamp Co., lamps 16.50 

Pike & Heald Co., repairs 1.43 

Temple & Farrington Co., repairing clocks 1.50 

John B. Varick Co., nails, bags, etc 15.57 



$141.94 



Total expenditures $3,176.31 

Police Department.— Court. 

Appropriation $2,900.00 

Expenditures, 
services. 

John C. Bickford, clerk $600.00 

Isaac L. Heath, police justice 1,500.00 

George W. Prescott, associate justice 300.00 

$2,400.00 



96 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

A. S. Campbell ct Co., printing $91.00 

J'ohn B. Clarke Co., printing- 12.75 

Globe-Wernicke Co., 1,000 cards 1.90 

M. J. Healy, witness fees, etc 21.3.49 

Thomas D. Luce, certifying appeals 1.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 71.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 2.70 



$394.0f> 



Total expenditures $2,794.09 

Transferred to unappropriated money 105.91 



.$2,900.00 



Police Department.— Commission. 
Appropriation $43,100.00 

EXPENDITUKES. 
SEE VICES. 

Michael J. Healy, chief of police $1,999.92 

John F. Cassidy, deputy chief 1,500.00 

E. B. Woodbury, chairman of commission, 

salary 150.00 

N. S. Clark, commissioner, salary 100.00 

Frank P. Cheney, commissioner, salary 100.00 

A. B. Brown, police matron 424.00 

Eegular patrol 33,926.15 

$38,200.07 

FEEDIXG PKISONERS. 

W. F. Elliott $19.30 

Samuel J. Laflamme 160.20 

National Biscuit Co 9.05 

$188.55 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing $68.25 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 10.35 

E. A. Stratfon, stationery and books 57.65 

$136.25- 

PATROL SYSTEM EXPENSES. 

W. H. Adams, harness repairs $4.25 

American Electrical Works, wire 70.81 

Ame & Co., "Standard Food" 9.75 



POLICE DEPARTMENT, 97 

J. J. Abbott, gasoline $0.-10 

Automatic Time Stamp Go., ribbons, etc *J.:J0 

Boston & Maine R. E., freight 4.28 

Boyd Brothers, clipping horse 2.00 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric supplies and re- 
pairs 4.02 

Cavanaugh Brothers, veterinary attendance 

and medicine 23.00 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 4.75 

James Coakley, labor on wires 6.00 

N. S. Clark, typewriting and stationery 5.25 

H. B. Dunton, V. S., attendance and medicine 19.00 

Electric Gas Lig-hting Co., batteries, jars.... 29.82 

A. Filion, repairing wagon, etc 57.85 

J. J. Holland, medicines 16.35 

J. Hodge, poles 1.04 

A. K. Hobbs, rub^ber cement .60 

Johnstone Gasoline Motor Co., labor on rollers 2.20 

Charles Kean, labor on wires 11.00 

J. M. Knowles, rent of stable 70.00 

Kimball Carriage Co, supplies and repairs .... 18.90 

Clarence E. Merrill, grain 107.77 

Merrill & Laraba, grain 236.81 

John Mitchell, horseshoeing 1.50 

James Murphy, varnishing wagons , 22.00 

William F. Nye, harness dressing 3.00 

Charles O'Day, labor 4.00 

Patrick O'Connor, labor 6.00 

Pettingell-Andrews Co., electric supplies 122.15 

Charles E. Perry & Co., paper 24.10 

Timothy Shea, hay 58.24 

B. F. Shepard, keys, etc .45 

J. 0. & L. P. Tremblay, horse shoeing 13.50 

U. S. Fire & Police Telegraph Co., repairs 11.50 

J. Vogel & Son, repairing harness 1.75 

N. J. Whalen, s'oap .15 

J. F. Woodbury, horseshoeing 49.50 

Ziegler Apparatus Co., repairs and supplies... 106.19 



allowaxce: for clothing and bicycle eepaibs. 

Joseph A, Farrell $29.17 

John T. Nixon 37.50 

Pay-roll 2,050.00 



$1,139.18 



$2,116.67 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



HARDWARE AND RErAIRS. 



Head & Dowst Co., himber $3.61 

ilancliester Hardware Co., hardware 60.3c 

John B. Yarick Co., hardware 14.31 



TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones $120.59 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., rent 

of private line and instruments 114.00 

JVestern Union Telegraph Co., telegrams 3. 82 

SUNDRIES. 

Oscar Bineau, labor $2.00 

Clark & Estej-, oilcloth, towels, etc 4.06 

Couch & McDonald, 1 grapple and hook 1.S3 

George H. Emery, photographing criminals . . 38.00 

W. J. Freeman, use of teams 15.00 

Charles A. Hoitt Co., mattress, blankets, etc... 4.19 

E. G. Libbey, use 'of teams 24.00 

Stark Mills, duck 2.00 



Repairs of Buildings. 

Appropriation .* $4,625.00 

Transferred from unapprojjriated money .... 3,257.62 



Expenditures. 

city library. 

M. Badger •& Co., paint, glass, labor $15.50 

C. S. Bangs, labor and material, repairing roof 92.48 

W. E. Darrah, roofing material 106.57 

Joel Daniels, setting glass 5.35 

Louis Dumas, labor 13.72 

Charles D. Dunbar, labor 8.12 

CJeorge H. Dunbar, labor 8.12 

James H. Griffin, loam and labor 27.00 

Head & Dowst Co., Inmlier 1.05 



(8.37 



$238.41 



$91.10 



Total expenditures ^ $42,188.60 

■Transferred to unappropriated money 911.40 



$43,100.00 



$7,882.62 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 99 

J. Hodge, lumber $10.47 

George Holbi'ook, removing snow 9.50 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor, gas, plumb- 
ing 54.6.") 

Manchester Traction, Light & Tower Co., 

lamps 4.25 

Granville jNlcClure, labor 6.1(5 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing ash cans l.ao 

George L. Read, labor 14.70 

A. & E. Reed, mason work 34.60 

William Smith, labor 13.72 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 6.55 

$433.81 

POLICE STATION. 

M. Badger, setting glass $2.75 

F. C. Darrah, ro'ofing material and labor .... 7.75 

Charles D. Dunbar, labor 

George H. Dunbar, labor 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 

C. A. Hoitt Co., shades and rollers 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on boiler and radiator 

Harrj- A. Piper, repairs 

Pike & Heald Co., repairs, etc 

George L. Read, labor 

A. & E. Reed, mason work 

Walter L. Roper, mason work 

Joseph Ro5% labor 

Joseph Sykes, clearing ice from roof 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 

C. L. Wolf, cleaning and repairing stove .... 

ENGINE, HOUSES. 

Melvin Badger Co., painting and glazing $190.89 

C. S. Bangs, plumbing repairs 5.99 

George B. Cressey, paint and labor 6.12 

Samuel Daniels, labor 36.43 

Joel Daniels, setting glass, etc 4.73 

F. C. Darrah, roofing material , . . , 44.53 

W. E. Darrah, roofing material and labor 125.56 

C. D. Dunbar, labor 73.72 

G. H. Dunbar, labor 76.24 

E. A. Dunbar, stone 20.50 

Louis Dumas, labor 112.56 

G. G. Dennis, labor 10.08 



11.48 


12.60 


20.51 


2.80 


15.15 


10.45 


3.18 


67.95 


1.50 


43.12 


4.00 


1.12 


2.00 


37.76 


4.65 



$248.' 



100 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Eastman Brothers, mason woi'k $11.10 

Charles A. Hoitt Co., shades, etc 7.92 

David P. Hunt, labor (34.12 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 357.64 

J. Hodge, lumber, etc 273.17 

Samuel Landry, rod.s, etc 3.70 

Richard Lacroix, labor IS. 00 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing and piping 266.41 

Granville McClure, labor 140.2S 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing and other repairs 111.09 

George L. Eead, labor 1S6.10 

A. & E. Eeed, mason work 36.59 

E'obie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete 12.09 

E. Eoy, labor 25.4S 

Joseph Eoy, labor 38.08 

T. Shea, labor 12.50 

John A. Sargent, paint and labor 8.27 

William Smith, labor 125.72 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 76.45 

West Side Lumber Co., lumber 94.31 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing 50.80 



COURT HOUSE. 

Melvin Badger Co., paint, glass, labor $202.02 

C. S. Bangs, roofing- material and labor 29.25 

F. C. Darrah, roofing material and labor .... 119.86 
Samuel Daniels, labor 14.17 

G. H. Dunbar, labor 21.28 

Charles D. Dunbar, labor 21.28 

Louis Dumas, labor 51.24 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 61.90 

J. Hodge, lumber, etc 57.39 

T. A. Lane Co., labor on boiler, steam pipes, 

etc 8.78 

Eichard Lacroix, labor 15.73 

Granville McClure, labor *. 68.04 

George L. Eead, labor 88.20 

E. Eoy, labor 7.56 

William Smith, labor 54.60 

John B. Varick Co., jiaint and hardware 7.47 

West Side Lumber Co., lumber 6.94 



CITY HALL. 

J. J. Abbott, painting signs, glass $103.00 

John A. Ballon, board of workmen, tilers 15.00 

E. L. Bryant & Co., rewiring 154.85 



$2,627.17 



$835.73 



KEEAIKS OP^ BUILDINGS. 101 

E. L. Bryant & Co., electric fixtures, etc $64.73 

Couch & McDonald, bolts, etc 2.55 

Joel S. Daniels, paint, paper, labor ?i81.67 

Samuel Daniels, labor 42.28 

Louis Dumas, labor 46.48 

Eastman Brothers, repairing plastering 24.41 

A. M. Finney, cleaning rugs 7.32 

A. L. Franks & Co., tile and express on same 178.75 

R. D. Day, 3 awnings 48.75 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, cement, glass .... 248.25 

J. Hodge, lumber, etc 267.96 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., paper, shades and fixtures 39.72 

T. A. Lane Co., labor, gas, and steam pipes, etc. 132.00 

Eichard Lacroix, labor 73.00 

Samuel Landry, sharpening bars, drilling, etc. 10.30 

Manchester Hardware Co., sponges 1.13 

Granville McClure, labor 14.00 

Murdock Parlor Grate Co., laying tile floor. . . . 49.48 
Pike & Heald Co., repairs, awning frames, 

pipes, etc 5.48 

Harry A. Piper, steel ceiling, aldermanic cham- 
ber 95.00 

Harry A. Piper, steel ceiling, mayor's office. . . . 60.00 

A. & E. Eeed, mason work and cement 168.22 

George L. Eead, labor 103.80 

E. Eoy, labor ' 59.08 

William Smith, labor 132.72 

John A. Stace3% cleaning stone work 15.65 

T. H. Stack, paper hanging 37.32 

W. H. Sullivan, paint and labor 157.89 

John B. Varick Co, hardware 21.73 

West Side Lumber Co., lumber 104.02 

$2,866.60 



SUNDRIES. 

D. G. Andrews, labor ward 2 wardroom $2.25 

Melvin Badger Co.. paint. Pine Grove cemetery 13.50 

T. F. Brown, use of hacks 10.00 

C. Dean & Co., care of city clocks 100.00 

Louisi Dumas, labor, Pine Grove cemetery 17.64 

W. J. Freeman, use of hacks 15.00 

F. M. Goings, grading Lowell-street school lot 132.45 

J. Hodge, lumber, Pine Grove cemetery 135.87 

Eansom Laird, trucking derrick 4.00 

Samuel Landry, blacksmithing 42.70 

Granville McClure, labor, Pine Grove cemetery 32.76 

H. A. Piper, material and labor 16.19 

George L. Eead, labor, Pine Grove cemetery.. 24.30 



102 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOK. 

A. & E. Eeed, mason work. Piue Grove ceme- 
tery $7.35 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete, 

Lowell-street school 20. S4 

William Smith, labor, Pine Grove cemetery... 5.04 

Ezra C. Tilton, labor, Pine Grove cemetery... S.OO 

C. A. Trefethen, care of tower clocks 103.75 

J. N. Tuck & Co., trucking 49.25 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 127.15 

John Winters, repairing grate 2.50 

$870.54 

Total expenditures $7,SS2.62 



Wilson Hill Engine House. 

Balance from last j'ear unexpended $4,149.50 

Appropriation 2,500.00 

$6,(349.50 

EXPENDITUBES. 
LABOR. 

June $48.92 

July 87.49 

August 22.05 

$158.46 

Pay-roll division >s'o. 2, December $41.00 

G. G. Dennis $29.12 

George L. Bead 39.15 

William Smith 30.24 

$98.51 

CONTRACT. 

J. H. Mendell & Co $4,000.00 

SUNDRIES. 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, coal $6.75 

James H. Griffin, grading lot 251.05 

Warren Harvey, stone, brick, etc 45.30 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, cement 31.55 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe 2.40 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 55.26 

West Side Lumber Co., lumber 120.79 

$513.10 

Total expenditures $4,811.07 

Transferred to new account $1,838.43 

$().649.50 



WATER- WORKS. 



103 



Playground.— Amoskeag School house. 

Balance from last year unexpended 

Expenditures. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing- Co., land 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$4«0.00 



$400.80 



$400.80 
79.20 



.$480.00 



Water-Works. 

Balance from last year unexpended $106,845.41 

Cash received for water rents. 128,416.2.3 

Balance overdrawn, transferred to new ac- 
count 354.93 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January 

February 

^larch 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

GENERAL EXPENSES. 

William C. Clarke, 1 meeting of board 

William Corey, IS meetings of board 

Frank Dowst, 46 meetings of board 

Charles M. Floyd, 35 meetings of board 

Edgar J. Knowlton, 12 meetings of board . . . 
Charles H. Manning, 34 meetings of board. .. 

Harry E.. Parker, 16 meetings of board 

Eugene E. Eeed, 8 meetings of board 

A. L. Gadbois & Co., hack 

Nate Kellogg Co., use of boat 



$1,341.40 
1,334.95 
1,340.64 
1,551.04 
1,456.52 
1,956.56 
1,691.15 
1,642.84 
1,708.24 
1,419.48 
1,483.04 
1,626.02 



$4.00 

72.00 

184.00 

140.00 

48.00 

136.00 

64.00 

32.00 

4.00 

8.00 



$235,616.57 



$18,551. 8S 



104 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



S. Sandberg & Co., use of boat $7.50 

C. A. Scarbor, dinners, annual inspection of 

lake 55.65 

C. K. Walker, superintendent, salary 2,400.00 

C. K. Walker, paid for lights 105.33 

C. K. Walker, express, stamps 46.30 

C. K. Walker, sundries 49.25 

PRIXTIXG, ADVEBTISIXG, STATIONERY. 

Eemy Bechard. printing 600 reports $35.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing bills, notices.... 101.95 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising and binding 8.95 

W. P. Goodman, books and stationery 7.50 

Manchester Xews Publishing Co., advertising 3.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertising notices.... 6.50 



$3,356.03 



$162.90 



TEAMS, TELEPHONE. FUEI,. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal $484.87 

M. L. Cobb, coal 355.27 

C. S. Fifield, use of teams 44.50 

James' stable, use of teams 139.00 

William A. Jepson, coal 526.97 

Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones 67.65 

Lester C. Paige, wood 200.00 

Union Coal Co., coal 40.00 

LAND. 

James F. Brown $4,000.00 

Gersang Verein Maennerchor 1,500.00 

Mrs. Juliet B. Hall 700.00 

Lester Hall 1,200.00 

Head & Dowst Co 700.00 

J. Hodge 1,600.00 

Mary J. James 2,400.00 

Alexander Knight 900.00 

Henry and Walter H. Lewis 375.00 

Morgan & Upton 1,100.00 

Frank T. E. Richardson 375.00 

Hazen Sanborn 3,000.00 

Alicei O. Sargent 2,750.00 

Charles A. Williams estate 85,000.00 

Joseph Quirin 450.00 



$1,858.26 



$10r),050.()0 



WATKK-WOllIvS. 



LEGAL SERVICES. 

Brown, Jones & Warren $209.96 

Georg-e E. Winslow 3.10 

HARDWARE. BLACKSMITHING, FREIGHT. 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight .$1,438.60 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening tools, etc 306.47 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 20.87 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 290.2.") 

SUPPLIES. 

Adams Brothers, lime, cement $6.5.'5 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., brackets, pipe, 

bolts, iron, etc 621.9.5 

American Steam Gauge & Valve Manufactur- 
ing Co., 2 springs 7.00 

J. J. Abbott, paint 5.95 

Harold L. Bond Co., picks and handles 30.15 

Builders' Iron Foundry, branches, reducers.. 70.88 

Chadwick-Boston Lead Co., pipe and solder... 57.66 

Chapman Valve Manufacturing Co., valves, etc. 20.73 
Philip Carey Manufacturing Co., covering pipe, 

etc 65.00 

Coffin Valve Co., hydrants 168.75 

Eager & Co., soap 1.10 

Edson Manufacturing Co., coupling 1.90 

Frank E. Fitts Manufacturing & Supply Co., 

1 emery grinder 6.50 

Glauber Brass Manufacturing Co.. supplies. . . . 364.11 

John D. Healy, castings 17.20 

Head & Dowst Co., cement, brick, lumber.... 524.66 

J. Hodge, meter boxes 60.00 

A. K. Hobbs, packing, etc 33.83 

C. H. Hutchinson, castings, etc 119.65 

Ingers'oll-'Sergeant Drill Co., hose, bolts, etc.. 49.55 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, etc 624.60 

Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co., pipe 952.80 

Libbey, Parker & Co., washers 2.50 

Ludlow Valve Manufacturing Co., gates 20.25 

National Meter Co., meters and couplings.... 308.00 

Neptune Meter Co., meters 190.50 

Norwood Engineering Co., hydrant heads .... 41.00 

Perry Oil Co., oil 178.80 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe, iron, couplings 21.42 

Sweet & Doyle, service boxes, gates 270.60 



$273.06 



$2,056.19 



106 



KEPOKT OF THE CITV AUDITOR. 



Snow Steam I'unip Works, final payment on 

contract $30,000.00 

Snow Steam Pump Works, supjilies 894.49 

Thomson Meter Co., meters 708.80 

Union Water Meter Co., meters 128.27 

U. S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co., pipe .. 5,745.40 

Valvoline Oil Co., kerosene oil 1.30 

Walworth Manufacturing Co., pipe 5.41 

J. H. W^ig-gin & Co., soap 4.50 

W. A. W^ood Co., waste 15. (■)8 

Henrj' E. Worthington, meter 8.40 



$42,355.84 



Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.. reiiairing boiler. 

testing pump, etc $84.45 

John T. Beach, wagon repairs 21.35 

F. J. Bixby, glass and setting 2.80 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric supplies and 

labor 363.44 

Joel S. Daniels, paint and labor 443.17 

H. C. Dimond Co., repairing stamp 1.75 

Drew Machinerj' Agencj% labor 4.30 

Head & Dowst Co., material and labor 4.85 

VJ. F. Henderson, repairing McDonald house.. 23.50 

Hersey Manufacturing Co., repairing meters.. 4.02 
John Jennings, stock, and repairing lightning 

rod on chimney, high service station 149.00 

T. A. Lane Co., labor and material 24.02 

J. H. Mendell & Co., material and labor 71.48 

McKelvie Brothers, repairing box .50 

jXational Meter Co., repairing meters 174.60 

Neptune Meter Co., repairs 36.67 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.... 459.12 

Thomson Meter Co., repairs 56.99 

Union Water Meter Co., repairs 96.98 

SUNDRIES. 

Town of Auburn, taxes $241.25 

Dean & Main, time and expenses, testing Snow 

engine 507.67 

Arthur W. Dudley, surveying, setting bounds 73.25 

New Hampshire Insurance Co., i)remium .... 15.00 

Sarah C. Pennock, rent of house 100.00 

Shamrock Boat Clnb. y^ tax on land 7.25 

Trustees of Sinking Fnnd, hydrant rental l'.),;i()0.00 



$2,022.99 



PINE GliOVE CEMETERY. 



107 



Trustees of Sinking Fund, for payment of 

water bonds $r>,()(j().(JU 

A. L. Waldron, services rendered at burned 

'wood lot o.OO 

$25,149.42 

Total expenditures $201,y:JG..J7 

Transferred to interest account 'S.iJSOM) 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Appropriation 



Expenditures. 



$235,(316.57 



LABOR. 

January $188.26 

February 194.51 

March 216.14 

April 552.61 

May 608.61 

June 749.53 

July 656.21 

August 636.99 

September 839.45 

October 484.41 

November 599.25 

December 440.28 

PLANTS, LOAM, ETC. 

F. J. Bixby, plants $39.60 

E. A. Dunbar, loam and dressing 126.00 

R. J. Farquhar & Co., flower seed 1.47 

A. G. Hood, plants 125.00 

A. P. Home & Co., plants 51.00 

Kirby Floral Co., plants 76.80 

A. F. Lenz, plants ; 2..ja 

Manchester Hardware Co., seed 1.00 

Eay Brook Garden Co., plants 71.00 

Schlegel & Fottler Co., flower seeds 1.15 

James Thompson, loam 291.00 

John B. Varick Co., seed 23.40 ■ 

Mrs. C. C. Webster, clay 145.00 

E. E. Wilson, dressing 12.00 



$6,166.25 



108 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WATER, TELEPHONE. FUEL. 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, coal $40.00 

Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone 35.11 

Water commissioners, use of water 511.00 

PRINTING, AD^T^BTISING, STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing $19.85 

E. H. Clough, postmaster, envelopes 10.60 

C. L. Fitzpatrick. printing 4.80 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and station- 
ery 27.09 

Union Publishing Co., advertising .'i.OO 

J. Arthur Williams, printing 6.00 

REPAIRS AND I.MPROVEMENTS. 

J. J. Abbott, paint $5.55 

C. S. Bangs, plumbing repairs 13.80 

Charles X. Baker, repairing gates 3.50 

Chelmsford Foundry Co., 200 grave markers 30.00 

F. X. Chenette, cleaning vault 3.00 

W. P. Farmer, rubber boots 3.00 

Head & Dowst Co., flag pole, sheathing, labor 27.18 

A. K. Hobbs, 'oil suit and hat 2.75 

J. Hodge, lumber, hot bed sash 70.03 

P. B. Kinsman, 1 typewriter 25.00 

H. J. Lawson, repairing key .50 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 27.74 

J. Y. McQueston Co., repairing rocker 2.25 

X'ational Burial Device Co., 1 device 71.25 

Palmer & Garmon, cutting numbers, slate 

bounds 547.44 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe, cesspool dipper, etc. 19.37 

Stark Mills, duck covers 12.70 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools 168.99 

West Side Lumber Co., lumber 6.00 

Y^'awman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., card cabi- 
net and cards 22.05 

TEAM EXPENSES. 

Cavanaugh Brothers, 1 horse $175.00 

S. P. Dodge Co., carriage repairs 18.25 

Kimball Carriage Co., 2 collars 8.00 

Clarence R. Merrill, grain 50.16 



$586.11 



$1,062.10 



VALLEY CEJNIETEIIY. 



109 



Merrill & Laraba, grain 

Ranno Saddlery Co., harness 

J. 0. & L. P. Tremblay, horseshoeing 

Joseph Vogel & Son, repairing harness, etc.. 



$ii;j.s;5 

4.J.U0 
10.70 
i;5.S5 



$434.79 



SUJNDRIEiS. 

American Express Co., express $1.05 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 5.21 

Boston & Maine E. E., freight 1.90 

J. H. Erskine, expenses to Eochester, N. Y., 
convention American Cemetery superinten- 
dents 51.00 

E. F. Jones, clerk for sub-trustees, services 25.00 

Manchester Street Eailway Co., tickets 7.50 

Winifred H. Whitcomb, typewriting 1.75 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$93.41 



$9,380.92 
619.08 



$10,000.00 



Valley Cemetery. 
Appropriation 

EXPENDITUEES. 
LABOR. 

Januarjr $59.75 

February 61.60 

March 64.36 

April 201.30 

May 216.84 

June 269.38 

July 205.21 

August 226.08 

September 278.07 

October , 207.10 

November 194.57 

December 131.69 

WATER AND TELEPHONE. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., use 

of telephone $31.25 

Water commissioners, use of water 47.00 



$3,650.00 



— $2,115.95 



$78.^ 



110 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



PLANTS, LOAM, ETC. 

Frank X. Chenette, dressing $18.50 

S. B. Dickey, loam and dressing 27.50 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, fertilizer 3.00 

John Francis, plants 69.06 

Frank Goings, loam and sand 30.20 

Eay Brook Garden Co., pinks 2.00 



REPAIRS AND IMPROYEJrENTS. 

Adams Brothers, cement $1.00 

B. E. Bascom, breaking roads, etc 33.00 

F. X. Chenette, sharpening tools 1.00 

S. B. Dickey, use of team 34.40 

F. C. Darrah, labor and material 3.25 

F. M. Goings, lumber, labor 28.80 

H. W. Harvey, building retaining wall 994.34 

Fritz Lenander, sharpening lawn mower .... 1.00 

Palmer & Garmon, cleaning monument, etc... 7.50 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe and labor, repairs 39.92 

W. H. Tibbetts, painting 29.50 

John B. Varick Co., tools and hardware 61.30 



SUNDRIES. 

S. P. Cannon, services as clerk for sub-trustees $10.00 

E. H. Clough, postmaster, envelopes 2.12 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and station- 
ery 5.48 



$150.26 



$1,235.01 



$17.60 



Total expenditures $3,597.07 

Transferred to unappropriated money 52.93 

$3,650.00 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 

Appropriation $250.00 

Expenditures. 

sundries. 

G. C. Harwood. labor $150.75 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 1.45 

A. K. Hobbs, duck 8.45 

A. G. Hood, plants 2.80 



HEPAIKS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 

E. G. Libbey, use of team $2.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., hose, seed, oil .... 7.50 

A. D. Maxwell estate, posts, team 11.00 

Water commissioners, use of water 12.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 

Merrill Yard. 
Appropriation 

EXPEXDITURES. 
LABOR. 

April $13.00 

May 10.50 

July 17.50 

August 6.90 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 

Repairs of Schooiinouses. 

Appropriation $8,000.00 

Cash received from sale of pipe 46.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money . . . 1,499.99 

Expenditures. 

jrASONAVORK. 

A. & E. Reed $530.97 

Z. B. Stewart 196.57 

PAINTING AND GLAZING. 

J. J. Abbott $390.48 

J. S. Avery 3.70 

W. F. Conner 1.05 

Joel S. Daniels 297.50 

H. Desfosses & Co 199.39 



111 



$195.95 

$195.95 
54.05 

$250.00 



$50.00 



$47.90 



$47.90 
2.10 



$50.00 



$9,545.99 



$727.54 



112 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



L. W. Howard 

W. J. Powers 

W. H. Quimby 

John A. Sargent 

T. H. Stack 

George S. Smith : 

W. H. Sullivan 

PLUMBING, IRONWORK, REPAIRS. 

S. F. Adams <t Co., lightning rods 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., grate bars, 

desk irons, etc 

Brodie Electric Co., repairing motor, etc.... 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electrical repairs 

Bunton & Bernard, building closets 

Bunton & Bernard, building and painting 

fence 

Timothy Carr, removing hedge 

M. J. Coleman, plumbing 

F. C. Darrah, roofing material 

W. E. Darrah, roofing material 

Mrs. N. J. Davis, repairing flag 

G. H. Dudley, lumber, hardware, labor 

C. Dean & Co., repairing clocks 

R. D. Gay, shades and fixtures, etc 

W. E. Goodwin, plumbing 

Hammond Tj pewriter Co., repairs 

E. M. Haskell, lumber and labor 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 

J. Hodge, sash, doors, etc 

C. H. Hutchinson, steel, poker, etc 

C. F. Jack, fixing boiler, etc 

A. A. Jenkins, carbons, zincs, tuning- pianos 

Samuel Landry, bolts 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor, electric 

lights and plumbing 

H. J. Lawson, repairing roofs 

Frank D. Leighton, plumbing repairs 

Manchester Hardware Co., poker and mop 

John T. McLaughlin, plumbing 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor 

H. A. Piper, lumber and labor 

D. F. Proctor, varnishing bookcase 

The Power Regulator Co., repairs 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., concreting 

basements 



$265.92 

4.35 

5.00 

362.93 

91.60 

1.20 

2(37.10 



$157.00 

80.71 
32.70 
60.21 
S6.00 

109.40 

3.00 

5.87 

9.56 

13.98 

.50 

41.75 

11.00 

61.70 

38.14 

5.17 

618.86 

83.36 

119.64 

2.40 

2.81 

19.95 

1.00 

175.94 

793.09 

358.99 

.85 

112.76 

1,243.53 

2,031.68 

2.05 

28.20 

317.68 



$1,890.22 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



113 



13. F. Shepard, repairs $7.40 

Street & Park Commission, cleaning: school 

yards 156.50 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks 3.75 

G. F. Wenzel, welding, etc 2.35 

$6,799.48 

SUNDKIES. 

Leon B. Annis, cutting grass $2.00 

C. W. Bickford, paid for reiving flag ropes. . . . 5.00 

F. X. Chenette, cleaning vaults 25.00 

Hartford Steam Boiler Insurance & Inspection 

Co., premium on policy 75.00 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage 1.25 

James Eeid, moving pianos 3.50 

Harry P. Eoberts, reiving flag ropes 12.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., order books 3.50 

J. Arthur Williams, postals 1.00 

$128.75 

Total expenditures $9,545.99 

Printing and Advertising. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures, 
sundries. 

Remy Bechard, printing 500 reports $40.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing cards, circu- 
lars, reports, etc 223.39 

Manchester News Publishing Co., publishing 

notice 4.05 

Union Publishing Co., publishing notices 12.04 

■—■ $279.4S 

Total expenditures $279.48 

TransferrecJ to unappropriated money 20.52 



$300.00 



Books and Stationery. 



Appropriation 



114 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

W. P. Goodman $7.23 

E. C. Lambert 45.00 

G. H. Libbey 1.48 

Eemington Typewriter Co 3.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated monej' 



$56.71 
18.29 



$75.00 



Furniture and Supplies. 

Appropriation $1,200.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 213.98 



EXPENDITUEES. 
PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL SUPPLIES, ETC. 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co $12.61 

J. J. Holland 17.65 

G. H. Jack 1.35 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co 124.44 

G. W. 0. Tebbetts 29.28 

BOOKS AND STATIONEKT. 

E. R. & W. P. Coburn, cardboard $0.70 

The Felix F. Daus Duplicator Co., 1 ribbon.. 1.00 

Ginn & Co., blocks 2.38 

W. P. Goodman, inkstands, bands 1.09 

H. Marr, typewriter ribbon .50 

Prang- Educational Co., spheres, etc 3.92 

Perry Picture Co., Perry magazine, one year 1.00 

Rand, McNally & Co., maps 20.17 

Lilla C. Riley, typewriter ribbons 2.33 

E. A. Stratton, ribbons, paper 1.20 

J. W. Thyng, color chart plate 4.80 

G. P. Wallace, ribbon 1.00 

FURNITURE, ETC. 

Atkinson & Mentzer, scissors $28.20 

E. E. Babb & Co., pencil sharpeners 6.00 

A. Eastman, drum heads, repairs 1.75 



$1,413.98 



$185.33 



$40.09 



SEWING MATERIALS, 115 

S. A. Felton & Son Co., dusters, floor brushes $88.50 

W. P. Goodman, letter press, dictionary stand 8.95 

J. L. Hammett Co., maps and globes 48.00 

Hammond Tj-pewriter Co., supplies 19. 3G 

James W. Hill Co., flags 23.38 

A. K. Hobbs, hose, tubing-, etc 13.60 

C. A. Hoitt Co., chairs, tables, desks, mats, 

etc 124.47 

Kenney Brothers & Wolkins, inkwells and 

covers 55.15 

J. Y. McQueston Co., desks 41.00 

J. E. McDonald, brooms 5.25 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware .15 

F. E. Nelson, 1 basin .19 

Olmsted & Tuttle Co., mops and waste 10.13 

Piper & Mclntire, pianos, stool, cover 178.50 

Pike & Heald Co., brushes, dippers, etc 3.04 

People's Gas Light Co., gas range 12.50 

C. A. Trefethen, 1 clock 3.50 

John B. Varick Co., brooms, brushes, dusters, 

cord, etc 302.32 

Whitall-Tatum Co., jars 6.75 



SUNDRIES. 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric repairs $21.29 

Daniels-Cornell Co., soap 15.83 

T. F. Fifjeld, oil, salt, matches, soap 5.57 

Hardy & Folsom, needles and cotton .28 

Warren Harvey, cutting stone 3.50 

J. J. Holland, disinfectant 12.50 

A. A. Jenkins, changing telephone batteries.. 1.25 

Manchester Mills, soap 5.70 

Masury, Young & Co., "Nodusto" 122.40 

J. Y. McQueston Co., use of chairs 6.50 

John F. Moore, pail, dippers .55 

A. W. Morse, oil .70 

F. H. Thurston, "Germol" 5.00 

A. M. Winchester, disinfectant 5.50 

Wiggin-Young Co., oil, pails, brooms 1.30 

Total expenditures 



$980.69 



$207.87 



Sewing Materials. 

Appropriation $250.00 



116 



REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR 



EXPEI^DITUKES. 
SUNDRIES. 

Elliott Manufacturing Co., waste $2.00 

Hardy & Folsom, emerys 1.08 

James W. Hill Co., gingham, etc 135.82 

Annie W. Patten, services as teacher 100.00 

John B. Varick Co., wax, scissors 3.90 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



Fuel. 



$2-12.80 



$242.80 
7.20 



$250.00 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unapprojjriated money 

Expenditures. 



$8,800.00 
3.470.18 



$12,270.18 



COAL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co 

W. E. Dunbar & Son 

J. H. DeCourcy Co 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co 

Moore & Preston 

Moore & Preston Coal Co 

D. M. Poore 

John P. Eussell 

Union Coal Co 

WOOD. 

C. n. Bodwell 

S. A. Blood 

W. E. Dunbar & Son 

Warren Harvey 

J. Hodge 

Moore & Preston 

SUNDRIES. 

Joseph H. Buffum, paid for sawing wood 

John H. Buzzell, sawing wood 

John Buswell, sawing wood 

C. B. Clarkson, weighing coal 



$464.89 

582.89 

37.16 

267.80 

3,103.59 

35.00 

133.60 

95.00 

6,266.45 



$595.38 

105.32 

4.50 

448.65 

4.25 

6.00 



$2.50 
3. CO 
4.50 

20.C0 



$10,986.38 



$1,164.10 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



117 



Ig-naoe Gravel, sawing wood $2.00 

M. S. L'eeds, sawing- wood 7.00 

Edward Moore, piling- wood 2.00 

Rop)ert Smith, .sawing wood 8.00 

W. E. Woodward, sawing and delivering wood 70.70 

Total expenditures 



$119.70 



$12,270.18 



Contingent Expenses. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money . 



$2,500.00 
289.32 



Expenditures, 
freight and caktage. 
J. G. Jones 

WATE,R, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., elec- 
tric lights $452.55 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 322.71 

Water Commissioners, use of water 951.03 

CARRYING WATER. 

Emma J. Ela $26.50 

Lura K. Kimpton 19.00 

Mrs. Byron E. Moore 3.00 

G. M. Morse : . . 19.00 

Arabella Eickaby 11.50 

SUNDRIES. 

E. E. Babb & Co., punches and eyelets $2.20 

C. W. Bickford, use of team 122.00 

Maude E. Brown, use of team 54.00 

Boston Bank Note Co., diplomas 205.10 

Walter Cody, rent of store for school 150.00 

C. W. Davis, use of team 150.00 

Joel iS. Daniels, brushes 9.60 

C. L. Downs, engrossing diplomas 48.40 

G. H. Dudley, labor on frame, etc 1.58 

Oliver Ditson Co., books 19.04 

E. A. Dunbar, grass seed, teams, labor 67.69 

Ginn & Co., music 39.84 

Hardy & Folsom, ribbon for diplomas 20.15 



.$12.72 



$1,726.29 



$79.00 



118 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Charles A. Hoitt Co., use ot chairs $1.00 

W. Heron, Jr., filling diplomas .60 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos 4.50 

Pay Roll Division No. 2, February 35.01 

Piper & Mclntire, rent of piano 25.00 

Ede B. Shand, labelling readers 2.00 

Silver, Burdett & Co., music books 1.20 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 leather case .... .90 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks 10.00 

Olmsted & Tuttle Co., mops .90 

Total expenditures 



$971.31 



Heating Plant.— Wilson School. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

sundries. 

Frank D. Leighton, heating, per contract. . . . $2,400.00 

Frank D. Leighton, extra charges 60.00 

Pike & Heald Co., drawing plans for heating S4.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$2,650.00 



$2,544.00 



B2,544.00 
106.00 



$2,650.00 



Extra Heating.— Ash-street School. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

SUNDRIES. 

W. E. Goodwin, heating, per contract $724.00 

W. E. Goodwin, repairing old boiler, etc 28.37 

Pike & Heald Co., plans and specifications 25.00 

Union Coal Co., labor of man and team 5.13 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$782.50 



$782.50 
17.50 



$800.00 



CAKE OF SCHOOLROOMS. 

Care of Schoolrooms. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



$6,900.00 
140.08 



119 



$7,040.08 



Expenditures. 

janitors. 

John S. Avery $600.00 

Edwin Baker 349.92 

Joseph Buffum 499.92 

S. H. Batchelder 499.92 

Joseph Chalifoux 270.81 

William F. Conner 549.96 

Charles H. Corey 199.92 

Emma J. Ela 53.00 

Percy N. Folsom 9.21 

James B. Hall 17.50 

Charles F. Jack 649.92 

Georg-e H. Jack 549.96 

Lura K. Kimpton 40.00 

H. T. Miller 107.36 

J. Frank Moore 109.35 

W. H. Newry 660.00 

Oscar Perkins 150.00 

William J. Powers 600.00 

W. L. Rhodes 121.01 

Ara'bella Eickaby 48.36 

Josephine L. Riddle 38.00 

Charles H. Seobey 158.61 

William Stevens 399.96 

Asa W. Smith 249.96 

Inez M. Warren 38.00 

SUNDRIES. 

C. W. Bickford, paid for cleaning $16.30 

Isaac Huse, Jr., paid for work 3.00 

Mrs. A. M. Oliver, cleaning 2.50 

Walter C. Partridge, assisting janitor 41.25 

Josephine L. Riddle, paid for cleaning 2.00 

John Stahl, cleaning 4.38 

Total expenditures 



$6,970.65 



$69.43 
$7,040.08 



120 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Evening Schools. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

salaries. 

Jennette M. Bartlett $53.00 

Lena Bower 5.00 

Charles E. Cochran 116.00 

Honorie J. Croug-h 116.00 

Ethel Currier 5.00 

Marianna Fitts 58.00 

Irving E. Forbes 46.00 

Margaret G. Linen 5S.00 

Myra Moore 58.00 

A. W. Morgan 116.00 

Ada B. Morse 33.00 

Adelia Murphy 58.00 

Ende Noury 58.00 

Arthur W. Eowell 58.00 

Ede B. Shand 51.00 

Minnie Sullivan 58.00 

Mary A. Walker 58.00 

John J. Walsh 31.00 

Maude E. Willand 38.00 

SUNDRIES. 

S. H. Batchelder, janitor $29.00 

Joseph Chalifoux, janitor 29.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing placards, etc.. 10.20 

Pike & Heald Co., Welsbach burners 12.80 

Asa M. Smith, janitor 29.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$1,200.00 



$1,074.00 



$110.00 



$1,184.00 
16.00 



$1,200.00 



Evening School.— r/lechanlcal Drawing. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

salaries 

H. W. Allen $120.00 

John M. Kendall 120.00 

$240.00 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 121 



.SUNDRIES. 



Charles A. Hoitt Co., stools $3.60 

E. A. Stratton, paper 40.00 

John B. Varick Co., triangles, curves, etc.... 5.75 



.$49.35 



Total expenditures $289.35 

Transferred to unappropriated money 10.65 



$300.00 



Teachers' Salaries. 

Appropriation $94,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 584.94 

$94,584.94 

Expenditures. 

salaries. 

January $9,657.39 

February * 9,799.30 

March 9,947.67 

April 4,918.34 

May 9,905.92 

June 12,485.09 

September 7,531.91 

October 10,097.35 

November 9,964.19 

December 10.277.78 

$94,584.94 

Total expenditures $94,584.94 



Free Text-Books. 

Appropriation $6,000,00 

Expenditures, 
text-books and supplies. 

Allyn & Bacon $10.92 

American Book Co 526.34 

Atkinson & Mentzer 40.00 

D. Appleton & Co 6.35 

Henry Amig-h 2.48 

E. E. Babb & Co 551.11 

Milton Bradley 29.67 



122 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOK. 



Boston School Supply Co $8.25 

Carter, Rice & Co 3.50 

T. H. Castor & Co 25.60 

Central School Supply House 100.00 

The Felix F. Daus Duplicator Co 5.50 

DeWolf e, Fiske & Co 5.35 

N. H. Earle & Co 27.50 

Eagle Pencil Co 15.60 

Educational Publishing Co 3.92 

Gregg Publishing Co 49.00 

Ginn & Co 692.75 

W. P. Goodman 54.30 

Herman Goldberger 11.65 

J. L. Hammett Co 436.09 

Hammond Typewriter Co 286.37 

John C. Haynes & Co 32.00 

D. C. Heath & Co 462.26 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co 27.59 

Kenney Brothers & Wolkins 190.39 

G. F. King & Co 52.26 

Andrew J. Lloyd & Co 6.30 

Lothrop Publishing Ca 6.49 

Maynard, Merrill & Co 198.33 

G. & C. Merriam Co 8.65 

W. L. Musick Publishing Co 43.20 

New England Publishing Co 6.00 

New England Reed Co 12.52 

The Palmer Co 3.00 

S. S. Packard 25.35 

Perry Magazine Co 1.00 

Prang Educational Co 422.82 

Rand, McNally & Co 50.00 

S. E. Robinson 20.70 

Sibley & Co 8.58 

Silver, Burdett & Co 391.36 

E. A. Stratton 10.45 

Thompson, Brown & Co 268.28 

University Publishing Co 8.80 

William Ware & Co 100.20 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co 21.18 

SUNDRIES. 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage $52.36 

Fannie L. Sanborn, superintendent's clerk.... 500.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unapjiroiDriated money 



$5,269.96 



$552.36 



$5,822.32 
177.68 



$6,000.00 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 123 

Manual Training. 

Appropriation $500.00 

EXPENDITUKES. 
SUNDRIES. 

Amoskeag- Manufacturing Co., iron and brass 

casting's, etc $12.35 

F. E. Browne, balance due 3.30 

Mrs. N. J. Davis, laundry and repairs 3.25 

Derryfield Co., lumber 254.83 

A. K. Hobbs, belt lacing, packing, repairs.... 10.19 

Manchester Hardware Co., vise and gauge.... 6.56 

Manning, Maxwell & Moore, tools and supplies 138.79 

E. A. Stratton, 1 roll blue print 1,65 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 59.83 

$490.75 



Paupers off Farm. 

Appropriation $10,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 1,339.83 



Expenditures. 

groceeies and meats. 

Charles Bete $20.00 

George Boisvert 117.00 

George Boynton 21.60 

P. J. Charron 72.00 

C. H. Clark 16.68 

Desrochers & Poirier 79.00 

Dumas & Prince 6.00 

T. F. Fifield 5.00 

H. Fradd & Co 16.00 

Arthur Gagne 110.95 

J. J. Grenier 28.00 

Felix Harbour 46.00 

B. L. Hartshorn 32.00 

Mrs. Mary Hayes 351.00 

J. F. Healy 266.00 



Total expenditures $490.75 

Transferred to unappropriated money 9.25 



$500.00 



$11,339.83 



124 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Reinhardt Heeker $35.00 

D. J. Hickey 39.22 

Patrick Kelley 9.45 

John A. Kane 228.00 

F. G. Kimball 1.20 

J. N. Lacourse 77.00 

T. J. Labrecque 540.64 

A. S. LaSalle 63.00 

Lamoureaux Brothers 5.00 

G. Lein & Son 748.00 

E. W. Lewis 21.00 

P. D. Lynch 485.00 

E. J. Madden 118.50 

T. H. Mahoney 54.00 

M. R. Maynard & Co 50.00 

Molleur, Noel & Messier 26.00 

A. W. Morse 65.31 

B. E. Murray 295.00 

Oscar McDuflfie & Co 22.00 

Martin Mclntire 98.00 

A. Nelson 18.00 

C. E. Newcomb 33.00 

North End Provision Co 8.00 

O. H. Nourry 24.00 

John W. Nye 1.00 

F. X. Parent 87.00 

E. W. Perkins 42.02 

Edmond Pinard 32.00 

W. J. Price 8.00 

M. Peloquin 24.00 

F. H. Poore 7.69 

Eugene Quirin 543.00 

J. O. Kobitaille 69.00 

G. T. Robinson 18.00 

M. A. Sheehan 1,006.00 

Charles Swinston 8.00 

Joseph Trahan 50.00 

Aime Trottier 227.00 

Caiixte Vigneault 12.00 

Wallace & Knox 31.00 

Robert Wallace 1.17 

S. M. Wheeler 48.00 



FUEL. 



$6,466.43 



P. Beauchamp & Co $0-50 

Charles Boisclair & Co 25.80 

C. H. Bodwell 494.66 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 



125 



Rdmond riourqiie 

D. F. Cronin 

W. E. Dunbar & Son 

Alexis Ferland 

C. A. & A. W. Flint 

Aug-ust Gellrich 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co 

A. D. Maxwell estate 

Moore & Preston 

People's Gas Lig-ht Co 

Omar Pepin , 

E. W. Poor 

Raiche & Laforce 

Henry Weber 

S. M. Wheeler 

W. E. Woodward 

BOARD, CARE, AND RENT. 

Mrs. Olive Auger 

Mrs. Frank Briggs 

George H. Brown 

J. H. Boone 

M. L. Boudreau 

Edward Boucher 

Michael Butler 

Hannah Callahan 

Mrs. Eliza Clair 

Eugene Collity 

Catherine Cunningham 

George A. Dolber 

Adelard Dumas 

Bridget Eagan 

Margaret Flanagan 

W. H. Gilmore 

Mrs. Wilfred Guevin 

Florence Hardy 

Eeinhardt Hecker 

Hillsborough County 

Infant Aslyum 

F. P. Johnson 

Patrick Lavery 

Marie Lynch 

W. H. Maxwell 

Thomas Mahoney 

Moses C. Morey 

New Hampshire State Hospital 

Notre Dame Hospital 



$15.25 
88.50 
18.50 
11.00 

8.00 

8.00 
45.65 
14.00 
64.50 

6.25 
20.25 

3.75 

20.65 

22.00 

25.00 

175.00 



$120.00 

2.00 

15.00 

12.00 

16.00 

30.00 

5.00 

8.00 

20.00 

126.00 

6.00 

2.00 

96.00 

30.00 

32.00 

104.00 

54.00 

72.00 

7.00 

839.01 

188.00 

12.00 

21.25 

26.00 

90.00 

30.00 

5.00 

201.77 

93.75 



$1,073.26 



126 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



James Orr $50.00 

Catherine Reagan 26.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital 35.00 

State Industrial School 172.28 

Andrew Schricker 1.5.00 

Mrs. Ellen Sullivan 20.00 

St. Joseph's Boys' Home 182.50 

St. Joseph's Orphanage 86.25 

St. Patrick's Orphanage 103.75 

Orphanut St. Pierre 40.00 

Henrj^ Volkmann 96.00 

Edward Weber 39.00 

Women's Aid Home 51.00 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

John Cayzer $16.05 ' 

Costello Brothers 26.25 

E. C. Chagnon 5.00 

Dodge & Dodge 1.95 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co 3.75 

W. P. Farmer 16.00 

J. T. Lemire & Co 18.00 

Pellerin & Simard 25.60 

P. G. Power 7.00 

D. F. Shea 3.75 

P." F. Toole 23.10 

CLOTHING. 

Besse, Eldridge & Co $12.94 

Charles M. Floyd 14.00 

Barnet Levine 29.00 

W. M. Marcotte & Co 9.00 

Joseph Nightingale 11.00 

MEDICINE. irE.DICAL SER^^CES', FUNEKAL EXPENSES. 

Charles Boiselair, burial outfit $10.00 

I. L. Carpenter. M. D., consultations with Dr. 

DeGross 6.00 

W. M. Fames Co., medicine 1.25 

A. L. Gadbois & Co., burial outfits 50.00 

John B. Hall Co., medicine 110.75 

J. J. Holland, medicine 2.75 

Kerwin & Sheehan, medicine, etc 14.05 

F. C. Miville, medicine 3.90 



$3,180.56 



$146.45 



$75. 



CITY" FARM. 



127 



Frederick Perkins, M. D., examination of in- 
sane person $8.00 

A. J. Preeonrt, medicine 10.00 

Moses Potvin, medicine 15.70 

F. H. Thurston, medicine 25.50 

E. V. Turcotte, burial outfits 25.00 

F. L. Wallace, burial outfit 25.00 

Frank L. Way, prescriptions filled 1.50 

SUNDRIES. 

Boston & Maine E. E., tickets $24.04 

Thomas E. Brown, use of team to Grasmere.. 6.00 

John B. Clarke Co., postals and printing .... 5.25 

J. J. Connor, storage of furniture 8.50 

W. J. Freeman, use of hack 5.00 

W. P. Goodman, books and stationery 26.75 

Edmond Renault, conveying insane person 

to Concord 2.25 

Kean & Sheehan, convejdng person to hospital 3.00 
Thomas Stewart, conveying insane person to 

Concord 2.25 

Thomas F. Sheehan, conveying insane person 

to Concord 3.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 copy Laws 1.25 

Total expenditures 



$309.40 



$87.79 



$11,339.83 



City Farm. 

Appropriation 


$8,500.00 
335.58 




Transferred from unappropriated money 


$8,835.58 




$500.00 
300.00 


Expenditures. 
Eu2"ene G. Libbey, superintendent 




Mrs. Eugene G. Libbey, matron 






$800.00 


HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 
January 


$150.42 
150.51 
139.60 
106.61 
108.03 
180.61 
135.42 






INIarch 








May 




June 




July 





128 



KEPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

W. H. Bean 

Annie Bennett 

William Copeland 

Ida Cox 

Eugene M. Dwyer 

Bert Fish 

Emma Fish 

Albert H. French 

Joseph Gagnon 

Nellie Hardy 

Chester Maynard 

L. B. Morse 

Albert McCarthy 

Charles McCarthy 

Christine McDonald 

Alice McLaughlin 

Mary O'Neil 

Alfred Peaslee 

J. Eowell 

Alfred Kainville 

Amos B. Russell 

Henry Spain 

Jennie Tracy 

Richard Webber 

FUEL. 

C. H. Bodwell, wood 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, coal 

Union Coal Co., coal 

CLOTHING, DRY GOODS, ETC. 

Barton & Co., dry goods 

Besse, Eldridge & Co., clothing 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., boiots and shoes 

W. P. Farmer, boots, shoes, rubbers 

C. M. Floyd, clothing 

James W. Hill Co., dry goods 

Heath's Shoe Store, shoes 

Manchester Dry Goods Co., dry goods 



.$135.85 
109.51 
146.92 
124.61 
132.33 

$8.07 

3.15 

4.03 

7.43 

3.66 

11.26 

2.09 

10.66 

23.33 

2.00 

12.66 

22.73 

35.00 

16.81 

9.71 

6.00 

3.25 

4.40 

S.07 

2.25 

21.00 

19.33 

6.28 

22.00 



.$246.80 

37.50 

74.50 

120.85 



$39.92 

7.18 

30.46 

39.10 

145.12 
77.71 
34.90 
11.82 



$1,620.42 



$265.17 



$479. 6S 



CITY FARM. 



129 



Williiini Marcotte & Co., clothin<>' 

11. M. Moody, clothing' 

P. L. Kyder, rubber boots 

J. Tattleman, socks 

Union Publishing Co., overalls and jumpers.. 

MEATS AND PROVISIOXS. 

C. A. Allen 

E. Booth 

C. H. Clark 

H. E. Chase 

C. H. Durgin 

Daniels-Cornell Co. ., 

Dodge & Laing 

Clarence Durgin 

T. F. Foley c& Co 

Granite State Beef Co 

Mark E. Harvey 

Manchester Beef Co 

Manchester Provision Co 

Manchester Tea Co 

Horace Marshall 

Maynard & Co 

T. H. Mahoney 

National Biscuit Co 

jVelson Morris & Co 

George E. Xoyes 

J. W. Xye 

J. H. Parmerter 

Parnell Brothers 

Henry W. Parker 

C. B. Perkins 

E. M. Slay ton Co 

Sinclair & Fellows 

John P. Squire & Co 

Summer Street Market 

W. F. Schonland 

Union Grocery Co 

Vermont Butter Co 

J. H. Wiggin & Co 

FUR>'ITURE, KITCHEN UTENSILS. 

C. A. H'oitt Co., reupholstering lounge, etc... 

C. A. Hoitt Co., beds and bedding 

E. K. Home, tinware and crockery 

Pike & Heald Co., pails 

9 



$35.52 

39.50 

30.60 

1.50 

34.50 



$3.95 

5.00 

187.96 

4.00 

2S.79 

207.44 

18.58 

26.73 

18.90 

32.18 

S.44 

4.75 

219.46 

S.53 

6.67 

34.98 

7.70 

16.71 

25.65 

13.25 

114.07 

18.85 

172.45 

474.02 

4.80 

82.06 

4.95 

22.97 

181.73 

40.36 

7.00 

3.38 

205.25 



$6.50 
18.50 
25.02 
4.80 



.$527.83 



$2,212.56 



$54.82 



130 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



MEDICINE, MEDICAL AXD VETERINARY SERVICES. 

N. Chandler, ointment $1.50 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., attendance and medicine . . 9.50 

John B. Hall Co., medicine 14.40 

J. J. Holland, medicine 2.25 

BLACKSillTHING, HARNESSES, ETC. 

Barton Oil Co., harness oil $4.50 

Hickej- & Tnohey, blacksmithing 15.00 

H. Lambert, blacksmithing ' 1.15 

J. O. & L. P. Tremblay, blacksmithing 133.50 

Joseph Yogel 6: Son, harness repairs and 

snpplies 8.15 

N. J. Whalen, harness supplies and repairs 39.30 

CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

Couch & McDonald $90.05 

W. H. Goodwin 7.75 

C. H. Hutchinson 3.7() 

Samuel Landry 1.35 

HAY, GRAIN, ETC. 

Annis Flour & Grain Co $39.15 

A. S. Brown 222.41 

Gage & McDougall 81.50 

C. R. Merrill 113.40 

Merrill & Laraba 129.03 

Titus Hay & Grain Co 257.25 

HARDWARE AND FERTILIZERS. 

E. G. Bodwell Nursery Co $5.00 

Manchester Hardware Co 34.86 

John B. Varick Co 282.70 

PREMIUM Ojr INSURANCE POLICIES. 

W. G. Berry $05.70 

George Blanchet 10.95 

Robert R. Chase 21.90 

John Dowst 21.87 

Everett & Scott 32.lS5 

Charles C. Hayes 21.90 

John A. Sheehan 54.75 

Fred R. Stark 10.95 



$27.65 



$201.60 



$102.91 



$842.74 



$322.56 



$240.87 



CITY FARM. 



131 



PRINTING, ADA-iRRTISINO, STATIONEUY, TELEPHONE. 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising- $1.4.5 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 2.86 

New Eng'land Telephone & Teleg-raph Co., n.se 

of telephone 34.19 

Novelty Advertising Co., .snpplies .3.8,') 

Albert Ruemely, printing tags 1.2,5 

Sampson, Murdbck & Co., 1 directory 2.00 

KEPAIKS AND IMPKOVEMENTS. 

J. J. Abbott, paper and hanging $17.97 

J. E. Bnerk, repairing clock, etc 5.75 

Thomas J. Briggs, repairs 13.29 

F. C. Darrah, repairing roof 14.65 

Peter Harris, key 1.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and shingles .... 90.56 

J. Hodge, lumber 16.74 

T. A. Lane Co., lamps, brush, plumbing 213.16 

Pike & Heald Co., tin, wire, repairs 4.91 

Harry A. Piper, labor 15.25 

Harry A. Piper, contract, fire damage 250.00 

A. & E. Reed, mason work 5.15 

John E. Shaw, ladders 3.30 

The Sherwin-Williams Co., paint 9.00 

D. T. Weir White Lead Co., white lead 27.50 

SUNDRIES. 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight $3.53 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., filling ice house 17.00 

F. S. Clark, threshing oats 24.00 

John B. Clarke Co., "Daily Mirror" 6.00 

C. W. Clement, pulling tooth .50 

H. R. Dow & Co., use of hack 5.00 

F. F. Fisher, extracting tooth .50 

W. J. Freeman, use of hacks 22.00 

E. A. Hannum, cockroach powder 3.75 

A. K. Hobbs, leather, oil suit, rubber boots, 

etc 31.98 

P. Harrington, casks 6.25 

Hubbard Cigar Store, tobacco 28.80 

Frank Jones' estate, 1 pig 10.00 

Albert Kidder, subscription to "New England 

Homestead" 2.00 

E. G. Libbej', paid for express, stamps, 

freight, berries, repairs 10.00 



$45.60 



$688.23 



132 REPOllT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Manchester Employment Agencj', help fur- 
nished $2.00 

Manchester Traction Light & Power Co., elec- 
tric lights 99.96 

G. W. Reed, use of hack 5.00 

A. A. Warren, oil 5.70 

Water commissioners, use of water 84.00 

\Miipple Farm, hogs , .35.00 

$402.97 

Total expenditures $8,835.58 



Indigent Soldiers. 

Appropriation $125.00 

EXPENDITXTRES. 

GROCEKIES. 

F. H. Poore ~ $83.70 

FUEX. 

A. D. Maxwell estate $17.50 

Maxwell Ice Co 7.00 

W. E. Woodward 2.00 

$26.50 

Total expenditures $110.20 

Transferred to unappropriated money 14.80 

$125.00 

File and Index System. 

Balance from last year unexpended $206.50 

Expenditures. 

Anna S. Smith, labor $160.00 

Total expenditures $160.00 

Transferred to new account 46.50 

$206.50 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 

Appropriation $50.00 



MILITIA. 

EXPENDlTtTJES. 
SUNDRIES. 

Remy Bechard, printing reports $5.25 

W. P. GooduKin, stationerj' 5.63 

Tike & Heald Co.; supplies 24.98 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and binding 13.98 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



133 



$49.84 



$49.84 
.16 



$50.00 



Band Concerts. 
Appropriation 

EXPENDITITIES. 

George's City Band $100.00 

Manchester Cadet Band 100.00 

St. Mary's Band 100.00 

Turner Band 100.00 

Total expenditures 



$400.00 



$400.00 
$400.00 



Militia. 



Balance from last year unexpended 
Approi^riation 



$100.00 
800.00 



$900.00 



EXPENDITTOES. 

Company C, First Eegiment, N. H. N. G $100.00 

Company F, First Eegiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company H, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company L, First Eegiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Camp Derwin, No. 184. Spanish-American War 

Veterans 200.00 

Joseph Freschl Post, No. 94, G. A. E 100.00 

Louis Bell Post, No. 3, G. A. E 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans 100.00 

Total expenditures 



$900.00 



134 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Decoration of Soldiers' Craves. 

Appropriation $400.00 

EXPENDITUKES. 

Louis Bell Post, No. 3, G. A. R $350.00 

Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. R 50.00 

$400.00 

Total expenditures $400.00 



Purclnase of Land Sold for Taxes. 

Appropriation $0,800.00 

EXPENDITUKES. 

George E. Morrill, purchased for city $6,683.48 

Total expenditures $6,683.48 

Transferred to unappropriated money 116.52 

$6,800.00 



Abatement of Taxes. 

Appropriation. $2,000.00 

Transferred from unapproj^riated money .... 21,555.13 

$23,555.13 

EXPENDITUKES. 

George E. Morrill, sundry persons $1,128.40 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co 594.98 

$1,723.38 

Total expenditures $1,723.38 

Transferred to new account 21,831.75 

$23,555.13 



State Tax. 

.\ppropriatron $63.s(i<.).oo 

Expenditures. 
State of New Hamp.shire .$63,869.00 



NOTRE DAME HOSPITAL. 135 

County Tax. 

Appropriation $'.)-l,:!S2.00 

Expenditures. 
County of Hillsborough $94,382.00 

Riddle Fund. 

Amount of bequest $l.i,000.00 

Interest on fund 264.30 

$15.2(54.30 

Expenditures. 

sundries. 

F. L. Allen, express on plans returned $1.40 

McFarland, Colby & McFarland, on account 

plans prepared for Ursula chapel 300.00 

$301.40 

Total expenditures $301.40 

Transferred to new account 14,962.90 

$1.5,264.30 



Revision of Ordinances. 

Appropriation ■: $600.00 

Expenditures. " 
Transferred to new account $600.00 

Elliot Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
Elliot Hospital, amount appropriated $300.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 



136 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

EXPEXDITURES. 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital, amount appropriated . . $300.00 



Sacred Heart Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

EXPE.XDITVRES. 

Sacred Heart Hospital, amount appropriated $300.00 

Women's Aid Home. 

Appropriation ■ $300.00 

Expenditures. 
■Women's Aid Home, amount appropriated $300.00 

W. C. T. U. Mercy Home. 
Appropriation $300.00 

EXPENDTTURES. 

W. C. T. U. Mercy Home, amount appropriated $300.00 



Resolution Raising Money and Making Appropriations 
for the Year Nmeteen Hundred and Three. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of six hundred eighty-seven thousand dollars ($687,000) 
be raised by the tax on the polls and estates liable thereon, for the 
use of the city for the year 1903, which sum, together with such unap- 
propriated money as may be now in the city treasury, or many here- 
after come into it, shall be appropriated as follows: 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Interest $44,700.00 

Sinking fund trustees 31,000.00 

City hall 3,800.00 

Printing and stationerj' l.GOO.OO 

Incidental expenses 7,000.00 

Land sold for taxes 6,800.00 



APPROPKIATIONS. 137 

Mayor's incidentals $300.00 

City oflRcers' salaries 2r,,?,00.00 

Payment of funded debt 10.000.00 

Revision of ordinances 000.00 

Engineer's department 0,835.00 

Anditior's department 2.000.00 

DEPARTMENT OF TAXES. 

Abatement of taxes $2,000.00 

State tax 03,869.00 

County tax 94.382.00 

STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Street and park commissioners $3,500.00 

Repairs of highways 25.000.00 

New highways 5.000.00 

Watering- streets 4.000.00 

Macadamizing streets 6,000.00 

Grading for concrete 4,000.00 

Scavenger service , 15,000.00 

Street sweeping 3.000.00 

Repairs of bridges 6.000.00 

City teams 6.000.00 

Repairs of sewers 5,000.00 

New sewers 20,000.00 

Snow and ice 4,500.00 

Paving Elm street 6,000.00 

Paving streets 5,000.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMEJS'T. 

Repairs of schoolhouses $8,000.00 

Fuel 8,800.00 

Furniture and supplies 1,200.00 

Printing and advertising 300.00 

Books and stationery 75.00 

Contingent exj)enses 2,500.00 

Care of rooms 6.900.00 

Evening schools 1,200.00 

Teachers' salaries 94,000.00 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 300.00 

Free text-books 6,000.00 

!Manual training 500.00 

Sewing materials 250.00 

New heating, Wilson' school 2,650.00 

Extra heating, Ash-street school 800.00 



138 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Fire department $65,8(55.00 

Fire-alarm telegraph 1,800.00 

Hydrant service 19,200.00 

PUBLIC BUIEDINGS. 

Kepairs of buildings $4,625.00 

Commons 4,500.00 

Stark park 1,000.00 

Derryfield park 1,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery 10,000.00 

Valley cemetery 3,650.00 

Amoskeag cemetery 250.00 

Merrill yard 50.00 

South End playground 75.00 

Lafayette park 1,000.00 

North End playground 75.00 

Completing Wilson Hill engine house 2,500.00 

Jiiddle i^layground 50.00 

Plumbing inspectors 50.00 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Health department $10,000.00 

CITY LIBRARY. 

City library $5,802.00 

PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE AND PHILANTHBOPIC. 

Paupers oil" farm $10,000.00 

City farm 8,500.00 

Indigent soldiers 125.00 

Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Klliot Hospital 300.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital 300.00 

Notre Dame Hospital 300.00 

Mercy Home 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 400.00 

Company C, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company F, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company A, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company L, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

IJand concerts 400.00 

Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. R 100. (JO 

Louis Bell Post, G. A. R 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans 100.00 

Spanish War Veterans ] 00.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 139 

rOLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Police commission $4.1,100.00 

Police court , 2,900.00 

Police station 2,500.00 

LIGIITIKG STREETS UERARTJIENT. 

Lio-hting- streets $.jS.O0O.OO 

Passed February 24, 190,3, in Board of Common Council. 
Geiitlciiien of the Common Council: 

The resolution of your honorable board, of February 24, 1903, relat- 
ing to receipts and expenditures of the city of Manchester for the pres- 
ent year, was received by me February 27, 1903, and I herewith return 
the same with my objections affixed thereto in writing. I wish to say 
that as a whole the resolution meets with my approval. I fully appre- 
ciate the able and conscientious manner in which this difficult financial 
problem has been handled by your honorable board, and I feel as- 
sured that the efforts you have made in the direction of retrenchment 
and curtailment of expenses will also meet with the entire approval of 
the taxpayers of Manchester. Under the provisions of this budget the 
tax rate will approach nearer to the tw>o per cent mark than many be- 
lieved possible. 

There is, however, one certain item of $6,000, viz.: "Paving Elm 
street," which I am constrained to veto, and for two reasons: First, 
by so doing we shall remain consistent in the policy which marks the 
rest of the appropriations, of cutting out everything that we do not 
consider great public necessities, and, secondly, by adding the sum to 
certain appropriations which are of the utmost importance, and which 
I fear have been crippled by reductions, we will make it possible to 
carry the work along more etiectually in those particulars. I refer 
to the items under the street and sewer department of removal of snow 
and ice, watering streets, and scavenger teams. 

I, therefore, herewith veto the appropriation of $6,000 for jjaving 
Elm street and respectfully recommend that the sum thereto appropri- 
ated be added to the appropriations for the removal of snow and ice, 
watering streets and scavenger teams, so that said items may read as 
follows: 

Kemoval of snow and ice $5,500.00 

Watering streets 5,500.00 

Scavenger teams 17,500.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUGEXE E. EEED, 
ilayor. 
Dated at Manchester, this 7th day of March, 1903. 

March 9, 1903. In Board of Common Council. Veto sustained, aiid 
recommendations of mayor not adopted. 



140 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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1 



142 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Assessors' Oath. 

We, the Assessors of the city of Manchester, do solemuly swear that 
in making the invoice for the purpose of assessing the foregoing taxes, 
we appraise all taxable propertj- at its full value, and as we would ap- 
praise the same in payment of a just debt due from a solvent debtor. 
So help us God. 



Valuation and Taxes. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on the real and i^er- 
sonal estate, within the city of Manchester, N. H., for the year 1903, was 
as follows: 

Valuation. Rate. Tax. 

Real estate $26,331,696 $21.00 $552,965.62 

Personal property 5.0-19,7o4 21.00 106,044.83 

$31,381,450 $659,010.45 

Number of polls, 14,384 1.438,400 21.00 30,206.40 

$32,819,850 $689,216.85 

Overlay .94 

Total tax levied ' $689,217.79 

The share distributed to Manchester of the amount of 
tax assessed, as per returns made by the corporations to 
state treasurer: 

On railroads $43,600.74 

On savings banks ' 60,232.30 

On insurance companies 3,000.75 

On literary fund 3,257.98 

Grand tax total $799,309.56 

For further information in relation to taxes collected by the state, see 
State Treasurer's report. 



TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 
TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



143 



YEAR. 


C ei ■ 
cS g 

ill 


^2 

= 

III 

Q '" 


1 


1 
« 

1" 


Taxes of 1885 


S^l,205.71 

1,264.85 

1,163.94 

1,580.13 

1,395.13 

1,687.08 

1,9)6.63 

2,582.12 

4,095.13 

3,514.05 

5,004.92 

4,997.58 

5,301.07 

5,642.86 

5,776.96 

5,197.61 

6,368.04 

( 886.71 ( 
\ 92,084.90 ) 

689,217.79 






81,205.71 
1,264.85 
1,163.94 
1,580.13 
1,395.13 
1,687.08 
1,966.63 
2,582.12 
4,095.13 
3,514.05 
5,004 92 
4,997.58 
5,296.91 
5,635.06 
5,690.69 
5,163.41 
6,129.04 

28,677.49 

73,863.28 


























" of 1S90 
























" of 1894 






" of 1895 






" of 1896 ... 






" of 1897 




$4.16 
7.80 
86.27 
34.20 
239.00 

63,910.36 

614,6-22.83 


" of 1898 
















Of 1902 

" Of 1903 


383.76 
731.68 




?840,933.21 


¥1,115.44 


3678,904.62 


S160,913.15 



144 REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

TAX VALUATIONS, ETC., FROM 1890 TO 1903, INCLUSIVE. 



Valuiitiou. 



Taxes. 


No. polls. 


Poll tax. 


Valuation 
of poll. 


#462,8(i9.17 


9,723 


SI. 91 


sioo 


443,541.76 


10,367 


1.78 


100 


506,465.17 


10,673 


1.95 


100 


507,640.68 


11,835 


1.85 


100 


505,372.44 


12,103 


1.78 


100 


502,183.02 


12,244 


1.74 


100 


547,651.50 


12,583 


1.86 


100 


634,127.80 


12,921 


2.08 


100 


604,280.57 


12,808 


1.95 


100 


614,096.93 


13,137 


1.95 


100 


621,428.47 


13,759 


1.90 


100 


654,214.00 


13,976 


1.98 


100 


743,497.53 


14,079 


2.25 


100 


689,217.79 


14,384 


2.10 


100 







1891 


24,872,492 
25,932,044 


1892 




27,439,742 
28,391,710 
28,861,122 
29,443,668 
30,486,946 


1894 


1895 


1896 


1897. 


1898 


30,988,488 




31,491,784 
32,706,794 


1900 




33,041,112 


1902 


33,034, .334 


1903 


32,819,850 



Statement of Account of George E. Morrill, Tax Collec- 
tor for the City of Manchester, N. H., June 1, 1903. 

Amount Balance 

outstanding Collected, outstanding 

June 1, 1902. June 1, 1903. 

Tax list, 18S5 .$1,205.71 $1,205.71 

1556 1,264.85 1,204.85 

1557 1,163.94 1,163.94 

1888 1,580.13 1,580.13 

1889 1,395.13 1,395.13 

1890 1,687.08 1,687.08 

1891 1,966.63 1,966.63 

1892 2,582.12 2,582.12 

1893 4,095.13 4,095.13 

1894 • 3,514.05 3,514.05 

1895 5,004.92 5,004.92 

1896 4,997.58 4,997.58 

1897 5,301.07 $4.16 5,296.91 

1898 5,642.86 7.80 5,635.06 

1899 5,776.90 86.27 5,090.69 

1900 5,197.61 34.20 5,163.41 

1901 6,368.04 239.00 0,129.04 

Amount collected $371.43 

Credit by cash, as lier treasurer's receipt No. 109 $371.43 



EXEMPTIONS FROM TAXATION. 146 

Interest collected $1,958.26 

Credit by cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 110 1,908.26 



Cost collected $1,709.00 

Credit by cash, as per treasurer's receipt Xo. Ill 1,709.00 



1902. Db. 

June 1. To warrant resident list $742,006.72 

' warrant non-resident list 1,642.56 

voluntary list 734.96 



'44,384.24 



1902, 1903. Cb. 

By cash paid treasurer, per vouchers Nos. 84, 
91, 107, 120, 124, 135, 138, 185 in year 1902; 
receipts Nos. 24, 34, 71, 112, 106 in year 1903 $714,123.09 

By abatements, vouchers Nos. 153, 176 in 1902, 

and 105 in 1903 1,583.66 

Bj^ unpaid taxes, June 1, 1903 28,677.49 



$744,384.24 

Manchester, N. H., August 1, 1903. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George E. Mor- 
rill, tax collector of said Manchester, and find the same correct, as 
above stated. 

JAMES E. DODGE. 

City Auditor. 

1893 List. 

Dr. 

1903. 
Jan. 1. Balance due on settlement of 1893 list $4,004.48 

Cr. 

Jan. 14. By cash paid treasurer per voucher No. 4 $232.06 



Due on 1893 list $3,772.42 



Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions from 
Taxation. 

coxstittttiox of new hampshire, article 82, page 38, public 

Statutes. 

excol'ragement of literature, etc. 

Art. 82. "Knowledge and learning generally diffused through a 
community being essential to the preservation of a free governnient, 
10 



146 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

and spreading the opportunities and advantages of education through 
the various parts of the country, being highly conducive to promote this 
end, it shall be the dutj' of legislators and magistrates, in all future 
periods of this government, to cherish the interests of literature and the 
sciences, and all seminaries and public schools; to encourage ]Drivate 
and joublic institutions, rewards, and immunities for the promotion of 
agriculture, arts, sciences, coiumerce, trades, manufactures, and natural 
history of the country-; to countenance and inculcate the principles ot 
humanity and general benevolence, public and private charity; industry 
and economy, honesty and punctuality, sinceritj^ sobriety, and all siociat 
affections and generous sentiments among the people; provided, iiercr- 
flidesn, that no monej- raised by taxation shall ever be granted or ap- 
plied for the use of schools or institutions of any religious sect or de- 
nomination." 

Px-BLic Statutes. Chaptee 55. 

Sect. 2. "Real estate, whether improved or unimproved, and whether 
owned bj' residents or others, is liable to be taxed, except houses of 
public worship, twenty-five hundred dollars of the value of parsonages 
owned by religious societies and occupied by their j)astors, school- 
houses, seminaries of learning, real estate of the United States, state, 
or town used for public purposes, and almshouses on county farms. 

Sect. 11. "Towns may by vote exempt from taxation for a term not 
exceeding ten years any manufacturing establishment proposed to be 
erected or put in operation therein, and the capital to be used in 
operating the same, unless such establishment has been previously 
exempted from taxation by some town. 

OPINION OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

58 X. H. Kep.. page C)2?,. "The exemption in each case is limited to 
ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole power of taxation 
would be the destruction of government; and the dangerous tendency 
of legislation suspending any part of that power, for any period, is man- 
ifest. P. Bn)i1c V. BiUirif/s, 4 Pet. 514, 561. So long as the existing laws 
remain unrepealed, and the constitutional construction heretofore 
adopted remains unchanged, contracts hereafter made under these laws 
and that construction will be valid. If the legislature for any reason 
wish to prevent the making of any more such contracts, their object 
can be accomplished by a repeal of the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective charters 
as "being of the nature of a jiublic charity," as follows: 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute Women, X. H. Laws of 1S'J9, 
chapter 199. 

Elliot Hospital, X. H. Laws of ISSl, chapter ITS. 

Manchester Woman's Aid and Relief Society, organized in January. 
1875, X. H. Laws, 1891, chapter 283. 

Orphanage and Home for Old Ladies (Catholic) on Hancver street, X. 
H. Laws, 1883, chapter 56. 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 147 

Schedule of Property used for Religious, Charitable and 
Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Taxation by 
Law, not including that owned by the city of Man- 
chester. 

Convent, Sisters Jesus Mary, French Catholic; East Spruce 
street, near Beech: 

Building $10,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 2,600.00 

■ ■ $i2,r.oo.oo 

Convent, Sisters of Mercy, Catholic; 415 Union street, cor- 
ner Laurel: 

Building $.';0,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 

.$.36,300.00 

Mount St. Mary's Academy. Catholic; from convent lot 

east to Beech street. 

Bnilding , $2o. 000.00 

31.500 square feet of land 9,450.00 

$34,450.00 

Lot south side of Laurel street, corner of Union street. 

Catholic; McDonald school: 

Building $35,000.00 

10,800 square feet of land 5,000.00 

$40,000.00 

Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' Home, Cath- 
olic; Amherst and Hanover streets: 

Building $14,000.00 

40.500 square feet of land 30.375.00 

$44,375.00 

St. Patrick's Orphan Asylums. Catholic; 184 Hanover street: 

Building $47,000.00 

40,500 sqnare feet land 40.500.00 

$87,500.00 

St. Joseph's High School, Catholic; Lowell street, corner of 

Birch: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,000 sqnare feet of land 8,000.00 

$20,000.00 

Union-street school. Catholic; corner of thiion and Laurel 
streets: 

Building $4,000.00 

5,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

$6,500.00 

St. Agnes' school. Catholic; corner Cedar and Pine streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

20,000 square feet of land 3,200.00 

$15,200.00 



148 EEPOirr or the city acditor. 

St. Joseph's school for girls, Catbolic; coruer Pine and 
Lowell streets: 

Building- $10,000.00 

Land included in cathedral lot. 

Convent of Hoh- Angels, French Catholic; Beauport street, 
corner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building^ $15,000.00 

22,500 square feet of land 4.500.00 

St. George's school, French Catholic; corner Pine and 
Orange streets: 

Building $n0.000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Monastery of the Precious Blood; 555 Union street: 

Building '• . . $2,500.00 

6,750 square feet of land 2,025.00 

Orphanage school, Beauport, Wayne, and Putnam streets; 
French Catholic: 

Building $25,000.00 

30,000 square feet of land 6,000.00 

St. Augustine's academy, French Catholic; corner Beech 
and Spruce streets: 

Building $8,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 4,500.00 

St. Marie's parochial school, French Catholic; corner Wayne 
and Cartier streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

25,000 square feet of land 2,000.00 

Kesidence priest St. Augustine's church, French Catholic; 
383 Beech street: 

Building $6,000.00 

7,500 square feet 'of land 1,875.00 

7,875.00 
Orphan Children's school, iDari-sh of St. Augustine; 251, 253 
Lake avenue: 

Building $12,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Holy Rosary school; 30 Cedar street: 

Building $8,750.00 

2,500 square feet of land 1,250.00 



$10,000.00 



$19,500.00 



$35,000.00 



$4,525.00 



,$31,000.00 



$12,500.00 



$14,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$17,000.00 



$10,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 149 

Eesidenoe priest St. Anne's chnrch, Catholic; 231 Merri- 
mack street: 

Bnilcling- $5,000.00 

8,820 square feet of land 2,()4C.OO 

$2,500.00 

$T,G4C.00 

Eesidence of Catholic bishop; 145 Lowell street: 

Building- .$40,000.00 

24,000 square feet of land 12,000.00 

$2,500.00 

$52,000.00 

Eesidence priest St. George's church, French Catholic; 
Orange street, corner Pine: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,000 square feet of land 4.000.00 

$2,500.00 

$6,500.00 

Eesidence priest St. Mary's church, French Catholic; 376 
Beauport street, West Manchester: 

Building $2,500.00 

5,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

■■ $2,500.00 

$3,500.00 

St. Anne's church. Catholic; Union street, corner Merri- 
mack: 

Building $30,000.00 

10,180 square feet of land 5,090.00 

$35,090.00 

St. Augustine's church, French Catholic; Beech street, 

corner East Spruce: 

Building $28,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 3,250.00 

$31,250.00 

St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel, Catholic; Pine street, 

corner Lowell: 

Building $70,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 30,375.00 

$100,375.00 

St. Marie's church, French Catbolic; Beauport street, cor- 
ner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building $25,000.00 

70,000 square feet of land 14,000.00 

$39,000.00 

St. Eaphael's church and school, German Catholic; Third 

street, corner Ferry, West Manchester: 

Building $35,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 3,400.00 

$38,400.00 



150 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. George's church, French Catholic; Pine street, corner 
Orange: 

Building $75,000.00 

18,690 square feet of land 7,614.00 

St. Patrick's church and school. Catholic; Kelley street. 
Cartier street, and Coolidge avenue: 

School building .$20,000.00 

56,281 square feet lof land 4,502.00 

St. Antoine de Padoue church. Catholic; 260 Belmont 
street. 

Building $4,000.00 



Residence priest St. Antoine de Padoue's church. Catholic; 
258 Belmont street: 

Building $5,500.00 

Land 4,000.00 

$9,500.00 
St. Hedwidge church, Polish Catholic; Merrimack, corner 
Pine street: 

Building $3,000.00 

Land 6,000.00 

Eesidence priest St. Hedwidge church, same lot: 

Building $4,000.00 

First Baptist church; Union street, corner Concord: 

Building $28,000.00 

11,250 square feet of land 6,750.00 

First Freewill Baptist church; Merrimack street, corner 
Chestnut: 

Building $12,400.00 

12,600 square feet of land 12,600.00 

Second Baptist church; Merrimack street, near Pine: 

Building .$9,000.00 

9,450 square feet of land 3,780.00 

PeojDle's Baptist church; Chestnut street, corner Concord: 

Building $8,000.00 

3,200 square feet of land 2,000.00 

First Congregational church; Hanover street, corner 
Union: 

Building $30,000.00 

43,200 square feet of land 34,560.00 



$82,614.00 



$24,502.00 



$4,000.00 



$9,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$34,750.00 



$25,000.00 



$12,780.00 



$10,000.00 



$64,560.00 



PiiOPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 151 

Second Congregational church; Market street, corner 
Franklin: 

Buiklino- $20,000.00 

19,000 sqnare feet of Land 19,000.00 



Third Congregational chnrch; South Main street, corner 
Milford, West Manchester: 

Building $8,000.00 

23,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

First M. E. church; Valley street, corner Jewett: 

Building $8,000.00 

11,400 square feet of land 1,000.00 

St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, corner Amherst: 

Building $25,000.00 

10,010 square feet of land 6,000.00 

Trinity M. E. church; School street: 

Building $2,000.00 

12,176 square feet of land , 3.000.00 

St. James M. E. church; Pennacook street, corner Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

11,000 square feet of land 2,200.00 

Grace church. Episcopal; Lowell street, corner Pine: 

Building $20,000.00 

9,300 square feet of land 6,975.00 

First Unitarian church. Concord street, corner Beech: 

Building $24,000.00 

13,500 square feet of land 0,000.00 

First Universalist church; Lowell street, near Elm: 

Building $17,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 15,000.00 

Christian church, Protestant; Hall street, corner Merrimack: 

Building $9,000.00 

Land 1,000.00 

First Presbyterian church, German; Second street, corner 
Bath, West Manchester: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 . 



$44,000.00 



$11,000.00 



$9,000.00 



$31,000.00 



$5,000.00 



$11,200.00 



526,975.00 



$30,000.00 



$32,000.00 



$10,000.00 



$5,500.00 



152 KEPOET OF THE CITV AUDITOE. 

Swedish Lutheran church. Protestant; Sagamore, corner 
Pine: 

Building- $7,500.00 

10.950 square feet of land 2.000.00 

Swedish Evangelical ^lission; Pine street, corner Orange. 

Building .$6,500.00 

Land 4,100.00 

Swedish Baptist church; Arlington street, near Maple: 

• Building $5,000.00 

4.432 square feet of land 1.100.00 

Second Advent church: Amherst street, between Pine and 
Union: 

Building $5,100.00 

4,500 square feet of land .3,375.00 

Cit.y Mission chapel. Protestant; Merrimack street, corner 
Beech: 

Building $7,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,000.00 

Westminster Presbyterian Church; Brook street, corner 
Hazel: 

Building $15,000.00 

10.000 square feet of land 2,500.00 



South ^lanchester Union chapel, Protestant; Elm street, 
south: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,747 .square feet of land 1.000.00 

First Church of Christ, Scientist; Harrison street, corner 
Albert: 

Building $14,000.00 

Land 5,000.00 

Episcopal Mission church; North Main street, corner 
School, West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

19,412 square feet of land 4,000.00 

Residence pastor St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, 
near Amherst: 

Building $3,000.00 



$9,500.00 



$10,600.00 



$6,100.00 



$8,475.00 



$13,000.00 



$17,500.00 



$3,500.00 



$19,000.00 



,500.00 



$2,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 153 

Residence pnstor First Conijre,yational chiircli; noo I'.eecli 
street, near Bridg-e: 

Building $.5,000.00 

8,100 square feet of land 2,400.00 



$7,400.00 
Kesidence pastor Grace Episcopal church; corner of Harri- 
son and Union streets: 

• Building $6,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 3,750.00 

$9,750.00 
German School Society; Third, Bath and Ferry streets: 

Building $4,500.00 

10,187 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Elliot Hospital, Protestant; East Manchester: 

Building- $23,000.00 

Land 7,000.00 

Elliot Hospital lot; Hanover street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $3,000.00 

Land 13,000.00 

Elliot Hospital: 

Land and buildings, Main street $4,000.00 

Land and buildings, Qulncy street 2,500.00 

Women's Aid Home; Pearl street, corner Beech: 

Building $15,000.00 

57,530 square feet of land 10,000.00 

Women's Aid Home; Bridge street, corner Chestnut: 

Buildings $9,000.00 

0,037.5 square feet of land 3,000.00 

Manchester Children's Home; Webster street: 

Building $20,000.00 

55,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Residence pastor Swedish Lutheran church; Sagamore 
street, corner Pine: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,200 square feet of land 1,020.00 

$4,020.00 
Gale Home: 

One half Martin's block. Elm street $25,000.00 

Land and building, Pearl street, corner Ash 25,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$7,000.00 



$30,000.00 



$16,000.00 



$6,500.00 



$25,000.00 



$12,000.00 



$22,500.00 



$2,500.00 



50,000.00 



154 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Masonic Home, Beech street. 

Building- $17,000.00 

.50,700 square feet of land 7,500.00 

$24,500.00 

One-half land and buildinos, 193 Pearl street $1,750.00 

One-half land and buildings, 266 Pearl street 900.00 

One-half land and building-s, 270 Pearl street 900.00 

One-half land and buildings, 274 Pearl street 900.00 
One-half five acres of land on North Union 

street .125.00 

$4,775.00 

EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 

Church property, Catholic $304,231.00 

Convent property, Catholic 72,925.00 

Parochial residences, Catholic 17,500.00 

Parochial schools, Catholic 245,650.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions 131, ."575. 00 

$832,181.00 

Church property, Protestant $457,940.00 

Parochial residences, Protestant 10,000.00 

Private school property, Protestant 7,000.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions 191,275.00 

$666,215.00 

Total $1,498,396.00 

TAXABLE. 

Land and Buildings, Catholic $73,521.00 

Land and Buildings, Protestant 14,170.00 

$87,691.00 

Total exempt and taxable $1,586,087.00 



PKOPEKTY EXEMPT FliOM TAXATION. 



155 





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156 



EEPOET OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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STATEMENT OF 150NDED DEBT, 



157 



1 


2 


At Suffolk Bank, Boston, Mass. 


^1 


1 




C^ CI 


2^ 

St 


April 1, 1911 

January 1, 1913 

April 1, 1914 

1, 1915 
1, 1916 

(110,000 July 1. 1904) 
\ an<lSlO,0()Oannu-[ 
( allytliereafter. ) 

July 1, 1916 
April 1, 1919 

July 1, 1923 


§ 
g 


S5,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 
100,000 

40,000 
80,000 

40,000 
100,000 

80,000 
«1,755,000 


3 
O 

•5 


$5,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 
100,000 

40,000 
80,000 

40,000 
100,000 

80,000 


■Hon 

•■Buiraouaa 


$1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 

1,000 


•.laquinK 


"= 8 8 88 ^S §8 g 


5 


City bonds, 
luiproveui't bonds. 

School bonds. 

City bonds. 
Municipal bond's. 




1^ 
P 


April 1, 1885 

July 1, 1893 

June 1, 1894 

April 1, 1895 
1, 1896 

July 1, 1S95 
1, 189* 

July 1, 1896 
April 1, 1899 

July 1, 1902 



168 UEPOHT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Remarks. — The city ptianintees the ])erpetu!il care iif lots in the 
cemeteries of the city to ])arties wlio pay $100 and upward. There are 
$.")0,00() in cemetery l)on(1.s. so caih'd, not ncf^'otiable, in the hands of 
the city treasurer, which are not included in the $1,755,000. 

Total amount of bonded debt, includinf>' ceincti-ry l)onds $1,805,000.00 
Net indebtedness for water |iur]ioses 800,000.00 

Net (Ici)t alter ilrii net iny- water debt $1,005,000.00 

As shown in the assessors' books for the year 190?,: 

The assessed value of personal property, including- poll tax $0,488,154.00 

The as.sessed value of real estate 2r.,:;.",l.(;'.l().0() 

Total value lor taxation $:i2,SU),85().00 

Tax rate, 2.10 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (cxclndin^- debt lor water 

purposes) to assessed valual ion ii.OGS 

Per cent of net indebtedness ( incliidin<;- del)1 lor water 

purjjo.ses) to assessed valuation 5.499 

Population, census of IHOO 50,987 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been proni])tly jiaid at maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as b(Mn<>- |)ayal)U' in f^-old. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

A sinkinjj' fund was established in 1893. 

Total amount of sinkin- fund December 31, 1903, $375,370.98. 

The ])()wer of the city to ixirrow money in relation to the water- 
works is limited to the sum of $('(00,000 by section (i, chapter 70, New 
Hampshire I.aws of 1871, entitled "An act to enable the city of Man- 
chester to establish water-works," except as further t'xtended an 
amouni of $:;(il),(iO() by laws of IS'jl, chapter ;2i;: and $;.'(1(),()0() by laws 
of 1895, chapter 17:.'. 

SlMMAliY OK CITY nE.RT. 

Amount of bonded debt .lannary 1. UKKl $1,815,000.00 

Accrued int.M-est on bonded debt. December:;!, IIIO!! 20,905.00 

$1,841,905.00 
Amount of bonded and temporary debt ])ai(l in 190:! 10,000.00 

Total inilehtedness December .'M, 190:i $1.8:11,905.00 

AVAlI.Ani.E ASSETS. 

Net cash on hand December:;!. I'.IO:; $93,830.00 

Taxes uncollected, list oT I'.io:; 73,803.28 

Stock of Snncook \alley kailroad. estimated value 14,500.00 

Sinking- fund December :;i. !'.)():; 375,37(i.98 

$557,57().2() 

nONDEI) DEnT. 

Total indebtedness December .;i. 190:; $1,8;!1,905.00 

Total available a.ssets Decembei- :;!. 19(i3 557,570.00 

Total net indebtedness December 31, 1903 $l,274,:i29.00 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST. 



159 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE 
BONDED DEBT. 



52 



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5? 


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1 

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$7,000 


82,400 


86,200 


7,200 


2,400 


6.200 


7,200 


2,401) 


6,200 


7 ^00 


2,400 
2,400 


6 200 




6,200 




2,400 


6,200 




2,400 


6,200 




2,400 


6,200 




2,400 


6,200 




2,400 


6,200 




2,400 


6,200 




2,400 


6,200 





2,400 


6,200 




2,400 


6,200 



'- ^ m 

gap. 






1890. . . 


.?27,000 


1891 . . . . 


24,000 


1892.... 


18,000 


1893... 


18,000 


1894... 


18,000 


1895 ... 


18,000 


1896... 


12,000 


1897.... 


9,000 


1898.... 


6,000 


1899. . . . 


6,000 


1900 ... 


6,000 


1901 ... 


6,000 


1902 ... 


3,000 


1903... 









S6,000 
8,000 
12,000 
12,000 
I 14,000 
j 14,600 
20,000 
22,000 
24,000 
24,000 
24,000 
24,000 
24,000 
24.000 



S9,.500 
9,500 
9,.500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 



S623 75 
813.92 
1,000.00 
1,041.66 
1,550,00 
1,812.50 
2,112.50 
2,500.00 
2,500.0oi 
2,500.00 
2,500.00 
2,500.00 
2,500.00 
2,500.00 











88,000 




12,000 


84,800 


16,000 


14,400 


16,000 


13,000 


16,000 


13,000 


19,500 


11,400 


19,500 


10,520 


19,500 


8,800 


20.850 


8,200 


22.300 


6,400 



$49,423 
48,613 
46,800 
46,841 
59,650. 
68,712 
82,612, 
80,600 
79,000, 
81,500. 
80,620. 
78,900, 
76,650 
73,300. 



160 



KEPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



3 


Battery occupies flrst and second floors and 

basement. 
Guards occupy third floor. 
Ward meetings are liekl in battery room on 

second floor. 


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Emmet Guards 


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VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 161 

Valuation of Real Estate Owned by the City. 

Hig-h school, Beech street, corner Lowell: 

Building- $170,000.00 

59,400 square feet of land 17,820.00 

$187,820.00 

Franklin-street school, Franklin street, corner Pleasant: 

Building- $16,000.00 

19,200 square feet of land 19,200.00 

$35,200.00 

Spring-street school, Spring- street: 

Building- $1.1,000.00 

13,600 square feet of land 13,600.00 

$26,600.00 

Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, corner Merrimack: 

Building $45,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

$53,000.00 

Ashrstreet school, Ash street, corner Bi'idge: 

Bi>ilding $50,000.00 

57,53T square feet of land 17,262.00 

• $67,262.00 

Main-street school, North Main street, West Manchester: 

Building- $6,000.00 

* 40,293.4 square feet of land 10,073.00 

$16,073.00 

Webster-street school, Webster street: 

Building $39,000.00 

55,71434 square feet of land 13,928.00 

$52,928.00 

Blodget-street school, Blodget street: 

Building $1,500.00 

9,000 square feet of land 3,600.00 

$5,100.00 

Lowell-street school, Lowell street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $1,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 9,000.00 

$10,000.00 

Merrimack-street school, Merrimack street, corner Union: 

Building $15,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 

$21,300.00 

Parker school, South Main street. West Manchester: 

Building $20,000.00 

13,650 square feet of land 2,047.00 

$22,047.00 

Bakersville school, Elm street, south: 

Building $10,000.00 

24,184 square feet of land 3,628.00 

$13,628.00 

11 



162 EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOK. 

Stark District school. Eiver road, north: 

Buikling ' $1,000.00 

43..560 square feet of land 100.00 

Amoskeag- school. Front street, Amoskeag: 

Buildino- $8,000.00 

6,000 sqnare feet of land 1,000.00 

Eimmon school, corner Amory and Dubuque streets: 

Building- $17,400.00 

16,600 square feet of land 2,490.00 

Goffe's Falls school. Goffe's Falls: 

Building- $4,000.00 

47,916 square feet of land 2.")0.00 

Harvey District school, Nutt road: 

Building- $2,000.00 

21,780 square feet of land 100.00 

Webster Mills school, Webster Mills: 

Building $400.00 

5,445 square feet of land 100.00 

Old Hallsville school. East Manchester: 

Building- $.500.00 

30,075 square feet of land 3,008.00 

Youngsville school, Youngsville: 

Building $500.00 

51,228 square feet of land 100.00 

Mosquito Pond school. Mosquito Pond: 

Building $400.00 

10,890 square feet of land 100.00 

Pearl-street school: 

Building $18,700.00 

Land 3.200.00 

Yarney school. Bowman street, corner Mast, West Man- 
chester: 

Building $43,750.00 

Land 6,700.00 

New Hallsville school. Jewett street, corner Young. East 
Manchester: 

Building $29,800.00 

44,000 square feet of land 3,300.00 



$1,100.00 



.$9,000.00 



$19,890.00 



$4,250.00 



$2,100.00 



$500.00 



$3,508.00 



$600.00 



$500.00 



$21,900.00 



$50,450.00 



$33,100.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 163 



Straw school, Chestnvit street, corner Harrison: 

P.uildins- $30,000.00 

32.400 square feet of land lfi,200.00 

.$40,200.00 

New Wilson school. Wilson, Cedar, and Auburn streets: 

Building- $30,000.00 

40.000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

.$35,000.00 

South Manchester school, Titus avenue: 

Building $12,000.00 

48,400 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$13,000.00 

$752,056.00 
ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Engine-house and stable. Central Station, Vine street: 

Building- $31,800.00 

21,718.86 .square feet of land 25,438.00 

$57,238.00 

Xorth Main-street eng-ine-house. North Main street, West 

Manchester: 

Building- $18,000.00 

11,819 square feet of land 2,955.00 

$20,955.00 

Webster-street engine-house, Webster street, corner 

Chestnut: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,510 square feet of land 2,180.00 

$14,180.00 

Merrimack engine-house, Lake avenue: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

$18,000.00 

Hosehouse and cottage, Maple street, corner East High: 

Building $3,000.00 

18.330 square feet of land 3,666.00 

$6,666.00 

Engine-house and wardroom, ward 9, Kimmon and Amory 

streets, West Manchester: 

Building $22,755.00 

6,000 square feet of land 870.00 

$23,625.00 

South Manchester Hosehouse: 

Building $4,200.00 

4,278 square feet of land 684.00 

$4,884.48 

$145,548.48 



164 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City Library, Dean avenue, corner Franlvlin street: 

' Building $35,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 30,000.00 

$65,000.00 

City Hall, Elm street, corner Market: 

" Building $20,000.00 

100,000 square feet of land 150,000.00 

■ $170,000.00 

Citj- farm, Mammoth road: 

Building $5,000.00 

46.66 acres, west Mammoth road 70,000.00 

SI. 55 acres, east Mammoth road 65,240.00 

$140,240.00 

Court house, Franklin street, corner West Merrimack: 

Building $20,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 57,000.00 

$77,000.00 

Batter^' building, Manchester street: 

Building $13,000.00 

3,400 square feet of land 5,100.00 

$18,100.00 

Police station, Manchester street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $40,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 15,000.00 

$55,000.00 

Slayton Lot, Manchester street: 

Police patrol stable $4,000.00 

Building 300.00 

2,908 square feet of land 4,700.00 

$9,000.00 

Citj- stable and other buildings, Franklin street: 

Building $15,950.00 

44,656 square feet of land 89,312.00 

$105,262.00 

Police station, Clinton street, West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

3,790 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$4,500.00 

Ward 5 wardroom, Lake avenue: 

Building $4,500.00 

Land 1,000.00 

$5,000.00 

City stable, district No. 10 $1,200.00 

City scales, Franklin street: 

Building $300.00 

Gravel lots, Goffstown: ^ 

~ at-'res $400.00 



REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 165 

•Gravel lot, Young-sville: 

1 acre $:)00.00 



$652,002.00 



Personal Property Owned by the City. 

Property in care city engineer $1,350.00 

in care chief engineer fire department 115,874.50 

in care street and park commission 32,724.42 

in care superintendent of schools 37,049.00 

in care of city messenger 3,000.00 

in care city marshal and; janitor 7,250.00 

in care superintendent of city farm 12,544.87 

in care trustees city library 30,000.00 

in care superintendent of Pine Grove cemetery 248.35 

in care superintendent of Valley cemetery 106.00 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad, in care of city treasurer 50,000.00 

Personal property in care city weigher 1,000.00 

$291,147.14 

Uncollected taxes in 1903 $73,863.28 

Net cash in treasury, December 31, 1903 93,836.00 



$167,099.28 



Other Real and Personal Estate Owned by the City. 

Soldiers' monument $25,000.00 

Permanent inclosure of commions 10,200.00 

Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 25,000.00 

Fountains and water-troughs on streets and commons . . 3,600.00 

City tomb 10,000.00 

McGregor bridge 90,000.00 

Granite bridge 130,000.00 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscaltoquog river 28,450.00 

Second-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 52,036.00 

Print-Wiorks bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 5,000.00 

Two bridges in highway district No. 9 2,000.00 

One bridge at Goffe's Falls 3,500.00 

Expended on construction of sewers 756,564.00 



$1,141,350.00 



166 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



PARKS AND CE.METEKIES. 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres $200,000.00 

Pine Grove cemeterj-, about 96 acres 46,700.00 

Amoskeag- cemeterj-, LSo acres 4,340.00 

Stark park, 28 acres 9,000.00 

Derryfield park, 76 acres 25,000.00 

Concord common, 4.48 acres 200,000.00 

Tremont common, 2.25 acres 40,000.00 

Hanover common, 3 acres 100,000.00 

Park common, 3.49 acres 60,000.00 

Merrimack common, 5.89 acres 200.000.00 

Wagner's park, 9.85 acres 12,000.00 

Land on Piscataquog river 3,500.00 

$900,540.00 
WATER-WORKS. 

Eeal estate and personal property of water-works, at cost 

price $1,722,700.00 

RECAPITULATION. 

Eeal estate owned by the city, schoolbouses $752,056.00 

Eeal estate owned by the city 652,002.00 

Eeal estate owned by city, eng-ine-houses 145,548.48 

Water-works at cost price 1,722,700.00 

Personal property owned by the city 291,147.14 

Uncollected taxes and cash 167,699.28 

Other real and personal property 1,141,350.00 

Parks and cemeteries 900,540.00 

$5,773,042.90 
PROPERTY ACCOUNT. 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1903 $5,773,042.90 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1902 5,666,927.59 

Gain in valuation $106,115.31 



Auditor's Office. 

City hall building. Open from 8 to 12 A. M., 1.30 to 5 P. M., 7 to 9 
P. M., on Thursday. 

In every bill presented to the city auditor for his approval, the follow- 
ing points will be considered and passed upon: 

1. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination within the 
scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on the city govern- 
ment? 



AUDlTOli'S OFFICE. 167 

2.' Is the hill certified by the party legally authurizt-cl to make the 
contract, or cause the expenditure to be made? 

;]. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, and is 
there a balance unexpended snflficient to pay this bill? 

4. Are the number lof articles in the bill, or the measurements, either 
of dimensions, quantities, or weights, correctly and fully stated, and is 
the proof of the delivery to the city of the whole amount charged 
suflficient? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely in 
excess as to require the attention cf the city councils to be called to 
the same? 

6. Is the bill ^written in a fair legible hand, correctly cast, and on 
paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its proper backing and 
firmg? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and the total 
amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the amiount of the 
work not yet completed, and the per cent retained, if any, should be 
stated in the bill. 

8. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which affect the 
question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for .further information or 
correction as the circumstances of each case may require. 

COX.'RT DECISIOXS, LEGAL POIjS^TS AND RULES, RELATING TO THE APPROVAL 
OR DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

No bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until the auditor 
has approved it as correct. 

Public trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the city coun- 
cils cannot be delegated to others. Dillon's Municixaal Corporations, 
section 96, volume 1. 

The executive powers of the city, except where vested in the mayor, 
shall be exercised by the maj'or and aldermen. General Laws, chapter 
46, section 14. 

The mayor and aldermen have all the powers and authority of select- 
men of towns unless it is otherwise provided by law, General Laws, 
chapter 46, section 14. 

Joint standing committees have advisory powers only; they cannot 
legally be endowed with executive or legislature powers by ordinance 
or resolution of the city councils, as no by-laws or ordinance shall be 
repugnant to the constitution or laws of the state. 

No member of either branch of the city councils can enter into any 
verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to or do any work for the 
city. Any firm of which a member is also a member of the city coun- 
cils is included in this prohibition. 

Xo city official, or department, or board of officials having legal power 
to expend money for the benefit iof the city can purchase of or contract 
with themselves, with any one of the board, or with any firm with 



168 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

which one of said officials is a member. Dillon's Municipal Corpora- 
tions, volume 1, page 436, section 444. 

Every bill against the city shall specify the particiilar appropriation 
to which the same should be charged, and the moneys paid will be 
charged to such appropriations only. 

He who is intrusted with the business of others cannot be allowed to 
make such business a source of profit to himself. 

All orders passed by the citj- councils authorizing a ministerial act to 
be performed by its agent or agents must be strictly construed, and the 
act to be done must be specifically stated. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. (General 
Laws, chapter 106, section 11.) They have no power conferred upon 
them by law or ordinance to purchase new apparatus of anj' kind. 

The joint standing committee on fire department have advisory pow- 
ers only. 

The laws and ordinances require the city auditor to withhold his 
signature from all bills against any appropriation where the amount 
of the aj^propriation is expended, until the city council shall have pro- 
vided the means of paying the same. Section 4, chapter 8 lof the City 
Ordinances, and section 4, ordinances relating to the duties of the city 
auditor, -approved January 7, 1890. 

The power of towns to raise and appropriate money is derived solely 
from statutory provisions, which restrict the power to certain specified 
objects and other necessary charges. 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those prescribed 
by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, and generally will 
not be permitted, to carry such votes into effect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discretion of towns 
to vote gifts or to select donees; their charity is a duty defined, com- 
manded, enforced, and regulated, and the objects of it are designated 
by law. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a minority in an un- 
* limited manner. Gove v. Epping, 41 N. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to make 
expenditures within the scope of their powers, for their respective de- 
partment: For fire department and fire alarm telegraph, the chief en- 
gineers, to be submitted monthly to the approval of the board of engi- 
neers; for police department, mayor and police commission; for police 
court, police judge; for water-works department, superintendent, sub- 
ject to the rules of the board of commissioners and ordinances relating 
thereto; for cit3' farm, superintendent; for overseers of the poor, each 
overseer, subject to the rules of the board of overseers, and their m'onth- 
ly review and approval; for schools, superintendent, or such person as 
the board of school committee may designate, bills to be approved by 
the board monthly; for streets, sewers, and other work under these de- 
partments, street and park commissioners; for city clerk's office, treas- 
urer's office, tax collector's office, assessors' office, auditor's office. 



auditor's office. 169 

incidental expenditures, city physician, city messenger, oity solicitor, 
city eng-ineer, mayor; for cemeteries, superintendents, subject to board 
of trustees (to consist of citizens not members of the city councils); for 
health department, board of health, subject to approval of mayor; city 
library, board of trustees or person designated by them. It may be 
stated as a general rule, that all subordinate officials are under the 
supervision and control of the mayor, subject to such limitations and 
restrictions as the board of aldermen, acting as a board, may require. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELEC- 
TRIC LIGHTS. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC 
LIGHTS. 



Gas Lights in Use. 

1 corner State and Grove. 

(2 Pleasant, between Franklin and Canal. 

1 Franklin and Auburn. 

1 Elm. 

1 Elm, near Hutchinson's Foundry. 

1 Elm. 

1 Mechanic. 

1 HoUis, corner Kidder court. 

1 Bridge and Arkwright. 

1 Bridge and Elm. 

1 Orange and Clarke avenue. 

1 Orange and Chestnut. 

1 Chestnut and Blodget. 

1 Blodget, near Elm. 

1 West Salmon. 

1 West Appleton. 

1 Monroe. 

1 Chestnut and Clarke. 

1 Chestnut, near Carpenter. 

1 Chestnut, near Appleton. 

1 Beech and Orange. 

1 Maple and Orange. 

1 Maple, between Bridge and Lowell. 

1 corner VValnut and Pearl. 

1 Walnut, between Bridge and Lowell. 

1 Ash, between Bridge and Lowell. 

1 Maple and Pearl. 

1 Arlington, near Swedish church. 

1 Maple and East High. 

1 Lowell, above Maple. 

1 Button and Amherst. 

1 Hanover, between Beech and Maple. 

1 Hanover, near Lincoln. 

1 Belmont and Amherst. 

1 Belmont and Concord. 

1 Belmont and East High. 

173 



174 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1 Beacon and Lowell. 
1 Beacon and Concord. 
1 Beacon and Amherst. 
1 Belmont and Manchester. 
1 Belmont and Central. 
1 Massabesic and Taylor. 

1 Ainsworth avenue and Hayward. 

2 Jewett, between Young and Hayward. 
2 Union, near Auburn. 

1 Willow, near jail. 

2 Brown avenue. 
2 Hancock. 

1 Turner, near German hall. 

1 Alilford and Bo^^^nan. 

1 Milford and Williams. 

1 A and B. 

1 George. 

1 Mast. 

1 Parker. 

1 Granite and Dover. 

1 Granite and Quincy. 

1 Quincy and Douglas. 

1 Douglas and West. 

1 Douglas. 

1 Douglas and Turner. 

1 Belmont and Hayward. 

1 Main. 

1 Prout avenue. 

1 Carroll. 

1 Waldo. 

1 Chestnut. 

1 Walnut and Prospect. 

1 Boynton and C. 

Total 74 gas lights. 



Naphtha Lights in Use. 

1 Candia road, corner Orchard avenue. 

1 Mammoth road, corner Cilley road. 

1 Mammoth road, corner Island Koad. 

1 Mammoth road, corner Island Pond, 

1 Young road, near Taylor. 

1 Taylor, between Y^oung and Somerville. 

1 Wilson, corner Clay. 

1 Valley, east of Taylor. 

1 Taylor, between Valley and Railroad. 

1 Grove, near Railroad. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAM1\S, AND ELECTEIC LIGHTS. 175 

1 James Hall road, corner Hanover. 

1 Hanover, near Page. 

1 Hanover, east of Page. 

1 Hanover, corner Proctor road. 

1 Hanover, corner Candia road. 

1 Hanover, near Sherburne. 

1 Hanover, near Lake bhore road. 

1 Hanover, corner Lake Shore road. 

1 Hanover, near Lake pavilion. 

1 Lake Shore Koad, south of railroad track. 

1 Lake Shore road, opposite Proctor road. 

1 Lake Shore road, on road to pumping station. 

2 Lake Shore road. 

1 Candia road, at railroad crossing. Proctor road, 
f) Candia road. 
1 Candia road, corner Page. 
1 Candia road, between Page and Cody. 
1 Candia road, corner Cody. 
1 Xutt road. 
1 Benton and Jones. 
4 Calef road. 
17 GofEe's Falls. 
1 Nelson and Hall. 
1 James Hall road. 
1 Lincoln and Valley. 
1 Maple and Valle^'. 
1 Haywood and Lincoln. 
1 Hanover, near Clough. 
Total, 63 lights. 



Fifteen Welsbach Lights Located as Follows : 

1 West end of Kidder court. 
1 corner of Jones and Nelson streets. 
1 on Lake Shore road, near the Luther Proctor house. 
1 on Calef road, in front of residence of Lizzie A. Burns. 
1 corner of Merrill and Nutt roads. 
1 corner of Mill and Harvey roads. 

1 corner of Nutt and Derry roads, beyond bridge over Cohas Brook. 
1 on Nutt road, opposite Mark Harvey's. 
1 on Nutt road, oj^posite Flanders and Marshall's. 
1 corner of Harvey and South roads. 
1 on Harvey road, on Dickey Hill. 
1 corner of Albert and Harrison streets. 
1 corner of River road and Thayer streets. 
1 on Chestnut street, between North and We^bster streets. 
1 on Lake Shore road, near residence of J. H. Paige. 
Total, 15 Welsbach lights. 



176 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



List of Electric Lights Used by the City of Manchester. 

No. 1. A street, opposite No. 73, arm. 

2. A and South Main, 

3. Adams and Cartier, " 

4. Amherst and Elm, " 

5. Amherst and Vine, " 

6. Amherst and Chestnut, " 

7. Amherst and Pine, " 

8. Amherst, ojoposite Y. M. C. A. Building, " 

9. Amherst and Union, " 

10. Amherst and Beech, " 

11. Amherst and Ash, " 

12. Amherst and Maple, " 

13. Amherst and Button, " 

14. Amherst and Lincoln, " 

15. Amherst and Ashland, " 

16. Amherst and Hall, " 

17. Amory and Morgan, " 
IS. Amory and Essex, " 

19. Amory and Alsace, " 

20. Amory, near Montgomerj^ " 

21. Amory and Amory street extension, " 

22. Amory and Eimmon, pole. 

23. Amory and Dubuque, " 

24. Amory and Beauport, " 

25. Amorj' and Main, " 

26. Amoskeag Bridge, west, " 

27. Amoskeag Bridge, east, " 

28. Amoskeag and Front, " 

29. Appleton and Elm, arm. 

30. Appleton and North Adams, pole. 

31. Appleton and Union, arm. 

32. Arlington and Russell, '" 

33. Arlington and Warren, " 

34. Arlington and Ashland, " 

35. Auburn and Elm, " 

36. Auburn and Chestnut, " 

37. Auburn and Pine, " 

38. Auburn and Union, pole. 

39. Auburn and Beech, " 

40. Auburn and Maple, " 

41. Auburn and Lincoln, arm. 

42. Auburn and Wilson, " 

43. Auburn and Canton, " 

44. Auger avenue and Nutt road, " 

45. Baker and Brown avenue, 

46. Baker and Elm, " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 177 

47. Baker and Calef road, arm. 

48. Bath and Second, pole. 

49. Beech and Portsmouth railroad, arm. 

50. Beech and Lawrence railroad, 

51. Bell and Wentworth, 

52. Bismark and Sylvester, pole. 

53. Blaine and :Main, arm. 

54. Blaine and Third, " 

55. Blaine and Second, 

56. Blodget and Elm east back, 

57. Blodget and Pine, 

58. Blodget and Union, " 

59. Blodget and Walnut, " 

60. Blodget and Beech, " 

61. Blodget and Ash, . " 

62. Blodget and Oak, " 

63. Blodget and Russell, " 

64. Bow and Bartlett, " 

65. B'oynton street, opposite No. 135, " 

66. Bowman place and Tilton " 

67. Bowman street, opposite No. 172, " 

68. Bremer and Dubuque, " 

69. Bridge and McGregor, " 

70. Bridge and Canal, " 

71. Bridge and Elm, " 

72. Bridge and Birch, " 

73. Bridge and Chestnut, - " 

74. Bridge and Pine, , " 

75. Bridge and Union, " 

76. Bridge and Walnut, ' " 

77. Bridge and Beech, " 

78. Bridge and Ash, " 

79. Bridge and Maple, " 

80. Bridge and Nashua, " 

81. Bridge and Malvern, " 

82. Bridge and Linden, " 

83. Bridge and Hall, 

84. Bridge and Belmont, " 

85. Bridge and Weston, " 

86. Bridge and Highlands, ' " 

87. Bridge and Mammoth road, " 

88. Brown avenue and Elm, " 

89. Brown avenue, opposite No. 445, , " 

90. Brook and Elm, » 

91. Brook and Chestnut, " 

92. Brook and Pine, , « 

93. Brook and Hazel, pole. 

94. Brook and Union, arm. 

95. Brook and Walnut, " 



178 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

96. Brook and Beech. arm- 

97. Brook and ^Sfaple, pole. 

98. C and B, " 

99. Campbell and Union, arm. 

100. Candia road and ]Mammoth road, " 

101. Carpenter and Elm, " 

102. Carpenter and Chestnut, " 
10?.. Carpenter and Union, 

104. Cedar and Canal, " 

105. Cedar and Franklin, pole. 

106. Cedar and Elm. arm. 

107. Cedar and Chestnut, 

108. Cedar and Pine, 

109. Cedar and Union, 

110. Cedar and Beech, 

111. Cedar and Maple, 

112. Cedar and Lincoln, 

113. Central and Bedford, 

114. Central street, opposite No. 74, pole. 
11.1. Central and Franklin, arm. 

116. Central and Elm, 

117. Central and Chestnut, 

118. Central and Pine, 

119. Central and Union, 

120. Central and Beech, 

121. Central and Maple, 

122. Central and Lincoln, 

123. Central and Wilson, 

124. Central and Hall, 

125. Central street, opposite No. 536, 

126. Charles street, 

127. Charleston avenue and Carroll, 

128. Chestnut .street, opposite No. 855, 

129. Clarke and River road, 

130. Clarke and Elm, 

131. Clarke and North Adams, 

132. Clarke and Union, 

133. Clinton and Dover, " 

134. Conant and Montg-omerj% " 

135. Conant and Rimmon. pole. 

136. Conant and Beauport, arm. 

137. Concord and 'SMne, 

138. Concord and Chestnut, 

139. Concord and Pine, 

140. Concord and Union, 

141. Concord and Walnut, 

142. Concord and Beech, 

143. Concord and Ash, 

144. Concord and Maple, 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 179 

145. Concord and Button, arm. 

146. Concord and Derry, " 

147. Concord and Ashland, " 

148. Concord and Hall, " 

149. Concord common, west, pole. 

150. Concord common, east, " 

151. Coolidge avenue and Beauport, arm. 

152. Coolidge avenue, near Kelley, " 

153. Coolidge avenue and Cartier, " 

154. Dean and Canal, " 

155. Dean and Elm, " 

156. Dean avenue and Hampshire lane, pole. 

157. Dearborn and Taylor, arm. 

158. Depot and Canal, pole. 

159. Depot and Franklin, arm. 

160. Derryfield park, " 

161. Donald street, near cemetery, " 

162. Douglas and railroad, pole. 

163. Douglas and Barr, arm. 

164. Donglas and West, pole. 

165. Douglas and Main, arm. 

166. Dunbarton road and Front, 

167. East High and Nashua, 

168. East High and South, 

169. East High and Malvern, 

170. East High and Ashland, 

171. East High and Hall, 

172. East High and Buzzell, 

173. Spruce and Chestnut west back, 

174. East Spruce and Barry avenue, 

175. East Spruce and Union, 

176. East Spruce and Beech, 

177. East Spruce and Maple, 

178. East Spruce and Lincoln, 

179. East Spruce and Wilson, 

180. East Spruce and Hall, 

181. East Spruce and Massabesic, pole. 

182. East Spruce and Old Falls road, arm. 

183. East Spruce and Beacon, " 

184. Elm street, opposite No. 1966, " 

185. Elm, below railway bridge, " 
1S6. Elm and railway bridge, pole. 

187. Elm avenue and Elm, axm. 

188. Ferry and Main, " 

189. Ferry and Third, " 

190. Ferry and Turner, pole. 

191. Front street, opposite No. 367, " 



180 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPOKTS. 

192. Gates and Dubuque, pole. 

193. Goffstown road and Front, 

194. Goffstown road and Omega, arm. 
196, Grove and Pine, 

196. Grove and Union, 

197. Grove and Beech, 

198. Grove and Belmont, 

199. Granite and Green, 

200. Granite and West, 

201. Granite and Main, 

202. Granite and Second, 

203. Granite bridge, west, pole. 

204. Granite bridge, center, 

205. Granite bridge, east, 

206. Granite and State, arm. 

207. Granite and Bedford, 

208. Granite and Canal, pole. 

209. Granite and Franklin, arm. 

210. Green and Elm, 

211. Green and Pine, 

212. Green and Union, 

213. Green and Beech, 

214. Grant and Boynton, 

215. Hancock and Brown avenue, pole. 

216. Hanover common, 

217. Hanover and Nutfield lane, arm. 

218. Hanover and Chestnut, • " 

219. Hanover and Pine, " 

220. Hanover and Union, " 

221. Hanover and Beech, " 

222. Hanover and Maple, " 

223. Hanover and Lincoln, ' " 

224. Hanover and Ashland, " 

225. Hanover and Hall, " 

226. Hanover and Belmont, " 

227. Hanover and Beacon, " 

228. Hanover and Alfred, " 

229. Hanover and Highlands, pole. 

230. Hanover and Grant, arm. 

231. Hanover and Lake avenue, pole, 

232. Hanover and Page, arm. 

233. Harrison and Elm, " 

234. Harrison and Chestnut, " 

235. Harrison and Pine, " 

236. Harrison and Hazel, " 

237. Harrison and Union, " 

238. Harrison and Walnut, ** 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 181 

239. Harrison and Beech, arm. 

240. Harrison and Ash, " 

241. Harrison and Maple, " 

242. Harrison and Oak, " 

243. Harrison and Russell, " 

244. Harrison street, opposite No. 329, " 

245. Harvell and South Main, " 

246. Hayward and Beech, " 

247. Hayward and Cypress, pole. 

248. Hayward and Riley avenue, arm. 

249. High and Chestnut, " 

250. High and Pine, " 

251. High and Union, " 

252. Hollis and Canal, " 

253. Hollis, below Elm west back, " . 

254. Hospital avenue and Massabesic, pole. 

255. Kelley and Rimmon, arm. 

256. Kelley and Cartier, pole. 

257. Kelley and Alsace, arm. 

258. Kidder and Boyden, pole. 

259. Kidder and Whitney, arm. 

260. Kidder and Elm, 

261. Lake avenue and Elm, " 

262. Lake avenue and Chestnut, " 

263. Lake avenue and Pine, " 

264. Lake avenue and Union, " 

265. Lake avenue and Beech, " 

266. Lake avenue and Maple, " 

267. Lake avenue and Lincoln, " 

268. Lake avenue and Wilson, " 

269. Lake avenue and Massabesic, " 

270. Lake avenue and Belmont, " 

271. Lake avenue and Beacon, " 

272. Lake avenue, opposite No. 529, " 

273. Lake avenue and Cass, pole. 

274. Lake avenue and Canton, " 

275. Lake avenue and J. Hall road, " 

276. Langdon and Canal, arm. 

277. Langdon and Elm west back, pole. 

278. Laurel and Laurel avenue, arm. 

279. Laurel and Pine, 

280. Laurel and Union, 

281. Laurel and Beech, 

282. Laurel and Maple, 

283. Laurel and Lincoln, 

284. Laurel and Wilson, 

285. Laurel and Hall, 



182 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

286. Laurel and Belmont, arm, 

287. Laurel and Milton, " 

288. Laurel and Beacon, " 

289. Laurel and Cass, " 

290. Liberty street, opposite No. 93, " 

291. Lowell. soi\tli back, and Nutfield lane, " 

292. Lowell and Elm, " 

293. Lowell and Birch, " 

294. Lowell and Chestnut, " 

295. Lowell and Pine, " 

296. Lowell and Union, "^ 

297. Lowell and Walnut, " 

298. Lowell and Beech, " 

299. Lowell and Ash, " 

300. Lowell and Nashua, "^ 

301. Lowell and Malvern, " 

302. Lowell and Ashland, " 

303. Lowell and Hall, " 

304. Lowell and Belmont, '* 

305. Manchester and Elm, " 

306. Manchester and Chestnut, " 

307. Manchester and Pine, " 

308. Manchester and Union, " 

309. Manchester and Beech, ' " 

310. Manchester and Maple, " 

311. Manchester and Lincoln, " 

312. Manchester and Wilson, " 

313. Manchester and Hall, " 

314. Manchester and Milton, pole. 

315. Market and Canal, arm. 

316. Market and Franklin, " 

317. Market and Elm, 

318. Marion and Main, pole. 

319. Marion and McGregor, arm. 

320. Massabesic and Belmont, pole. 

321. Massabesic and Old Falls road, " 

322. Massabesic and Cypress, arm. 

323. Massabesic north of Valley, " 

324. Massabesic and J. Hall road, " 

325. Mast and Main, pole. 

326. 'Mast and Bowman, arm. 

327. Mast and Eiddle, pole. 

328. Mast and New Mast road, arm. 

329. Mast and Forrest, " 

330. McGregor and Main, " 

331. McGregor bridge, west, pole. 

332. McGregor bridge, east, " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 183 



333. McDuflfie and Huntress, arm. 

334. Meade and Hall, 

335. Mechanic and Canal, 

336. Mechanic and Hampshire lane, 

337. Merrimack and Canal, 

338. Merrimack and Franklin back street, " 

339. Merrimack and Franklin, 

340. Merrimack and Elm, 

341. Merrimack and Chestnut, 

342. Merrimack and Pine, 

343. Merrimack and Union, " 

344. Merrimack and Beech, " 

345. Merrimack and Maple, " 

346. Merrimack and Lincoln, " 

347. Merrimack and Wilson, " 

348. Merrimack and Hall, " 

349. Merrimack and Belmont, " 

350. Merrimack and Beacon, " 

351. Merrimack street, opposite No. 532, " 

352. Merrimack common, west, pole. 

353. Merrimack common, east, " 

354. Merrimack south back and Union, arm. 

355. Middle and Canal, " 

356. Middle and Franklin west back, " 

357. Milford and Carroll, 

358. Milford and Eiddle, 

359. Milford and Main, " 

360. Mitchell and Beech, " 

361. Monmouth and McGregor back street, pole. 

362. Munroe and River road, arm. 

363. Myrtle and Elm, east back, " 

364. Myrtle and Chestnut, " 

365. Myrtle and Pine, " 

366. Myrtle and Union, " 

367. Myrtle and Walnut, " 

368. Myrtle and Beech, " 

369. Myrtle and Maple, " 

370. Myrtle and Eussell, 

371. Myrtle street, opposite No. 350, " 

372. Nelson and Mammoth road, " 

373. New Mast road and D, « 

374. New Mast road and Wilkins, pole. 

375. North and River road, arm. 

376. North and Elm, 

377. North and Bay, 

378. North and Chestnut, 

379. North and Pine, pole. 



184 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 

380. North and Union. arm, 

381. North and Walnut, 

382. North and Beech, 

383. North Main street in Eddy, pole. 

384. North Adams street, opposite No. 6:i, arm. 

385. Nntfield lane, rear Central Fire Station, " 

386. Nutt road and Beech, " 

387. Nutt road and Portsmouth railroad, pole, 

388. Nutt road and Willow, arm. 

389. Orange and Elm, " 

390. Orange and Pine, 

391. Orange and Union, " 

392. Orange and Ash, " 

393. Orange and Maple, '" 

394. Orange and Oak, " 
39.5. Orange and Eussell, " 

396. Orange and Linden, ' " 

397. Orange and Hall, " 

398. Page and Portsmouth railroad, " 

399. Park common. pole, 

400. Parker and West, arm, 

401. Pearl and Nutfield lane, " 

402. Pearl and Chestnut, " 

403. Pearl and Pine, " 

404. Pearl and Union, " 

405. Pearl and Beech. " 

406. Pearl and Oak. " 

407. Pearl and Eussell, " 

408. Pearl and Linden, " 

409. Pearl and Morrison, pole. 

410. Pearl and Belmont, arm. 

411. Pennacook and Canal, pole. 

412. Pennacook and Elm, arm, 

413. Pennacook and Chestnut, pole, 

414. Pennacook and Pine, arm, 

415. Pennacook and Union, 

416. Pleasant and Franklin, " 

417. Pleasant and Elm, 

418. Prescott and Wilson, 

419. Prince and Boynton, " 

420. Prince and B, " 

421. Prosjiect and Elm east back, " 

422. Prospect and Chestnut, " 

423. Prospect and Pine, 

424. Prospect and Union, " 

425. Prospect and Beech, " 

426. Prospect and Ash, 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGFTTS. 185 

427. Prospect and Oak, ''i™- 

428. Prospect and Linden, 

429. Prospect and Hall, 

430. Putnam and Bartlett, pole. 

431. Putnam and Cartier, <^^"^- 

432. Putnam and Main, 

433. Rowell and River road, 

434. Rimmon street, opposite No. 322, pole. 

435. River road and Otis, arm. 

436. River road and Stark park, 

437. Rockland avenue and Wilkins, 

438. Rockland avenue and Goffstown line, pole. 

439. Sag-amore and Elm, arm. 

440. iSag-amore and Pine, 

441. Sag-amore and Walnut, 

442. Sagamore and Maple, 

443. Sagamore and Russell, 

444. Salmon and Canal, 

445. Salmon and Elm, 

446. Salmon and Bay, 

447. Salmon and Chestnut, pole. 

448. Salmon and Pine, 

449. iSalmon and Union, 

450. Salmon and Beech, arm. 

451. School and Third, 

452. School and Turner, " 

453. Schiller and Second, " 

454. Schuyler and Main, pole. 
45'5. Shasta and Elm, arm. 

456. Silver and Union, " 

457. Silver and Beech, " 

458. Silver and Lincoln, " 

459. Silver and Wilson, " 

460. Silver and Belmont, " 

461. Somerville and Hall, " 

462. Somerville and Taylor, • " 

463. Somerville and Cypress, " 

464. Somerville and Jewett, " 

465. South Main street, opposite No. 520, " 

466. Spruce and Elm, " 

467. Spruce, south back, and Manhattan Lane, pole. 

468. Spring and Canal, arm. 

469. Spring and Hampshire lane, " 

470. Stark and Canal, 

471. Stark street, opposite No. 22, " 

472. State, east back, and private way 

473. State, north Granite, " 



186 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

474. State, south Granite, arm. 

475. Sullivan and Thornton, 

476. Sullivan and Beauport, , pole. 

477. Sullivan and Main, 

478. Summer and State, arm. 

479. Summer and Pine, 

480. Summer and Union, 

481. Summer and Hall, 

482. Summer and Dearborn, 

483. Summer and Belmont, 

484. Thayer and Elm, " 
• 485. Titus avenue and Beech, 

486. Tremont common, pole. 

487. Trenton and Union, arm. 

488. Vallej^ and Elm, 

489. Valley and Pine, pole. 

490. Valley and Union, arm. 

491. Valley and "Wilson, 

492. Valley and Belmont, " 

493. Valley and Taylor, " 

494. Valley and Cypress, " 

495. Valley and Jewett, " 

496. Vinton and Taylor, " 

497. Walker and Main, " 

498. Walker and Fourth, " 

499. Walker and Third, 

500. 'Walker and Second, " 

501. Walker and Turner, pole. 

502. Washington and Church, arm. 

503. Water street, opposite No. 22, '• 

504. Water and Elm, " 

505. Wayne and Dubuque, pole. 

506. Wayne and Beauport, " 

507. Wayne and Main, arm. 

508. Wayne and McGregor, pole. 

509. Webster and River road, " 

510. Webster and Elm, arm. 

511. Webster and Chestnut, " 

512. Webster and Pine, " 

513. Webster and Walnut, pole. 

514. Webster and Beech, arm. 

515. Welch avenue and Calef road, pole. 

516. West Hancock and South Main, arm. 

517. West Hancock and Dartmouth, " 

518. West Hancock and Second, pole. 

519. West Hancock and Wentworth, arm. 

520. Whitford and Union, 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTKIC LIGHTS, 187 

521. Wilton and Main, arm. 

522. Winter and Parker, " 

523. Winter street, opposite No. 62, " 

524. Winter place and Elm west back, " 

525. Young and Taylor, " 

526. Young- and Ain.sworth avenue, " 

527. Young- and Mammoth road, " 



EEPOET 



BOARD OP WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



BOAED OF WATEE COMMISSIONEES, 1903. 



Eugene E. Reed, Mayor, ex officio. 

Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1907. 
Harry E. Parker, term expires January, 1909. 
Frank Dowst, term expires January, 1906. 
Edgar J. Knowlton, term expires January, 1910. 
Charles M. Floyd, term expires January, 1908. 
William Corey, term expires January, 1905. 



OFFICEES. 



Charles H. Manning, President. 

Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

JosiAH Laselle, Engineer at Low Service Pumping Station. 

Charles A. Whitney, Engineer at High Service Pumping Station. 



EEPORT OF THE BOARD OF WATER COMMIS- 
SIONERS. 



To the Honorable City Covncils of the City of Manchester, N. H.: 

Gentlemen. — The Manchester Water Board herewith present their 
thirty-second annual report for the year ending- December 31, 1903, with 
the detailed report of the superintendent during the same period. 

FINANCIAL CONDITION. 

Eeceipts and expenditures for the year have been as follows: 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1902 $106,845.41 

Keceived from water rentals, 1903 109,216.23 

Eeceived from hydrant rentals, 1903 19,200.00 

Total $235,261.64 

Amount paid for current expenses $24,209.53 

Amount paid for construction expenses 153,427.04 

Interest on water bonds, 1903 33,780.00 

Hydrant rentals set aside for sinking fund . '. 19,200.00 
Set aside for sinking fund for payment of wa- 
ter bonds, state law 5,000.00 

$235,616.57 

Amount overdrawn December 31, 1903 $354.93 

Respectfully submitted, 

EuGEiNE, E. Reed, ex officio. 
Charles H. Manning, President. 
Harry E. Parker, 
Frank Dowst. 
Edgar J. Knowlton. 
Charles M. Floyd. 
William Corey. 



191 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPOET. 



To the Water Couminsioiiers of the City of Mavrhexter: 

I beg leave to make the following- report for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1903: 

MASSABESIC LAKE. 

We have had a lake full of water for three years in succession. There 
has been plenty of water to run the old pumps and supply the city ever 
since the contract was made for the new pump at the high service sta- 
tion three years ago the 31st of last July. 

The highest point reached this year was thirty-two and one^half 
inches above the dam, the lowest one and one-half inches below. It 
stands today five inches above. 

We had on hand one year ago today $100,000. The largest share of 
this money has been paid for laud about the lake. The city owns about 
five miles more of shore, making SO per cent of shore now controlled by 
the city. 

At the old station there have been very few repairs. You will see by 
the table that the water was pumped mostly by the Davidson pump, 
and not so much jjumped as last year. This is in consequence of run- 
ning the new pump at the high service station and letting the water 
run into the low. We estimate that about 12,000,000 gallons was so dis- 
tributed. 

iVEW HIGH SERVICE STATION. 

It is very gratifying to be able to report that the new pump is fin- 
ished and paid for. The connection to the pump well from the pump 
was made by the city; the pipe was cast by the Amoskeag corporation, 
and I feel much indebted to Col. C. H. Manning for the interest which 
he took in the matter, and it is through his efforts that we are able to 
say today that it is completed. 

The connection and suction pipe were put in on January 23, and we 
began to pump water the last of February. 

On March 6, the commissioners went out to the station and saw the 
pumps running, and voted to pay to the Snow Company $15,000 more. 

Dean & Main tested the pump the first of September and reported that 
it came up to the contract. 

On December 4 the last payment on the pump was made, and we 
consider it a first-class pump. It has been painted by the eity and is, 
all ready for business. A hard wood floor has been laid and an iron 
gallery has been put round by the windows, and the cellar and outside 
of the building have been graded and concreted. 

192 



BOAED OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



193 



In the old part slight repairs were made on the boilers and the top 
of the chimney, and the lightning rods were fixed. 

RESERVOIBS. 

One hundred dollars in labor and grass seed was expended upon the 
old reservoir banks. A weed which is called blue, or Canada vetch, got 
into the grass upon the banks and was killing it out. This has been 
brought there within the last two or three years through the top 
dressing and had to be dug out and carted off. This was done the first 
part of October. The high service reservoir needed no repairs. The 
force mains required about the same amount of repairing as was done 
last year. 

New pipes were laid in the following streets: Avon, Ash, Bay, Dickey, 
Goffstown road, Hayward street, Woodbine avenue, Somerville, Saga- 
more, State, and Trenton streets. 

Five hundred and ninety-four feet was moved on Coolidge avenue at 
an expense of about $700. A little less than one mile of new pipe was 
laid. Ledge w^as encountered in Trenton and Bay streets and a small 
amount in Dickey street. The expense of laying all the new pipe was 
a little over $6,000. 

It wiould be well before altering the grade or line of a street to 
consult the water department so as to know just where the water pipe 
laj's as to grade and pipe line, and what it would cost to move it. 
There were no repairs on the dam or canal. The penstock leaked a 
little within one hundred feet of the canal, where the grade begins to 
descend towards the station, and we dug down to it and repaired it 
with very little trouble. We found the penstock in good condition and 
it will probably last for a number of years. 



194 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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196 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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32S2SgS 






BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 
RAINFALL AT HIGH SERVICE STATION, 1903. 



197 



Day of 
Month. 


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*.53 


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6 

7 

8 


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.58 
.07 


.43 


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.58 

.25 
.14 










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.61 

.72 
.04 

.87 




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.31 
.13 

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10 














87 


11 


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39 




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.95 
.72 
.53 
1.57 
.08 










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13 














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15 . . 








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.25 
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«.70 






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.73 
.27 




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20 


















* 35 




.94 




.06 
.34 
1.10 
.26 
.03 






2.00 
1.20 


1.52 










22 




23 
















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.10 
























.15 




25 


*.04 








.34 
.05 




.95 
.13 




















27 






















.21 


.30 


•.29 




.19 




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.25 


".15 
.22 
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29 






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30 


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.17 


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.76 




















.67 
















3.09 


3.64 


5.20 


2.34 


8.42 


3.33 


2.96 


2.45 


3.62 


1.74 


3.14 



Total, 40.39 inches. 
* Snow. 

1895. Total rainfall, -12.06 inches. 

1896. Total rainfall, 38.41 inches. 

1897. Total rainfall, 49.76 inches. 

1898. Total rainfall, 47.15 inches. 

1899. Total rainfall, 36.27 inches. 

1900. Total rainfall, 47.89 inches. 

1901. Total rainfall, 47.47 inches, 

1902. Total rainfall, 47.58 inches. 

1903. Total rainfall, 40.39 inches. 

The income from the sale of water for 1903 has been a.s follows: 

Eeceived for water by rate $21,539.64 

for water by meter 85,954.05 

for building purposes 253.90 

from fines 407.00 

$108,154.59 



198 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Received for pipe, etc $84.85 

for pipe, Amoskeag corporation 27.79 

from Smith Box Co., repair to 

hydrant ~5-00 

$137.64 

Received from Asa Heselton, rent $50.00 

from Samuel F. McDonald, rent 96.00 

from Bo.ston & Maine R. R., damage 

to wood lot 700.00 

F. H. Gilbert, rent :3.00 

Frank Mclntyre, rent 5.00 

Mell Hall, rent 10.00 

E. H. Cavanaugh, lease 12.00 

Grattan Cot. association, lease 22.00 

J. J. Murray, lease 12.00 

J. C. Ferguson, lease 12.00 

Fletcher Brown, lease 1.00 

W. H. Griffin, lease 1.00 

$924.01) 

$109,216.23 
Received for hydrant rental 19,200.00 



$128,416. 2:' 



Abatements, $330.92. 

Amount on hand December 31, 1902 $106,845.41 

Received for water rent, 1903 109,216.23 

for hydrant rentals, 1903 19,200.00 

.$235,261.64 

Amount paid for current expenses $24,209.53 

paid for construction expenses 153,427.04 

paid interest on bonds 33,780.00 

flydrant rentals set aside for sinking fund... 19,200.00 

State law, 1897, bonds set aside for sinking 

fund 5,000.00 

.$235,616 57 

Amount overdrawn $354.95 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS, 1903. 

Superintendence, repairs, etc $15,364.18 

Stationery and printing 162.90 

Office and incidental expenses 907.30 

Pumping expenses, low service 2,260.22 

Pumping expenses, high service 4,813.46 

Repairs to buildings 170.86 

Repairs to dam, canal and reservoir 530.61 

$24,209.53 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIOxNEIJS. 199 



Service pipes $1,509.15 

Distribution pipes 9,943.62 

Fire hydrant and valves 309.74 

Meters 1,266.73 

Land and water rigiits 106,150.00 

rumping' machinery and buildings :i4,247.8D 



Sinking fund from fire hydrants $19,200.00 

Sinking- fund for water bonds 5,000.00 



Current Expenses. 

Superintendence and rej)airs $418,231.92 

Stationery and printing 8,352.12 

Office and incidental expenses 36,596.72 

Pumping- expenses at low service 66,899.30 

Pumping expenses af high service 44,614.88 

]\ej)airs to buildings 6,498.75 

Eei^airs to canal, dam, and reservoir 8,379.94 

Interest $40,678.51 

Highway expenditures 14,000.53 



$153,427.04 



$24,200.00 



Construction Expenses. 

Land and water rights $265,384.00 

Dam, canal, penstock, etc 101.399.16 

Pumping machinery and buildings 246,364.32 

Distribution reservoir 117,697.90 

Force and supply main 89,769.02 

Distribution pipes 651,333.99 

Fire hydrants and valves 64,056.58 

Meters and fixtures 64,210.33 

Service pipes 83,893.79 

(irading and fencing 17,470.39 

Tools and fixtures 10,649.35 

Boarding and storehouses 919.36 

Koads and culverts 4,405.20 

Supplies 550.39 

Engineering^ 22,176.19 

Livery and traveling exj)enses 2,856.64 

Legal expenses 563.79 



$1,743,700.40 



$589,573.63 



$54,679.04 



$2,387,953.07 



200 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Interest, discount, and labor performed on 
highway, transferred and tools and mate- 
rials sold $75,679.97 

Current expenses to December ?.l, 1903 589,573.63 

^ $665,253.60 

Total cost exclusive of interest and current expenses $1,722,700.47 
Interest and discount to December 31, 1902... $1,077,819.51 

Interest, 1903 33,780.00 

$1,111,599.51 

AMOn\-T OF WATER BONDS ISSUED TO DECEilBEE 31, 1903. 

Issued January 1, 1887, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1907 $100,000.00 

July 1, 1890, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, 1910 100,000.00 

January 1, 1892, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1912 100,000.00 

August 1, 1893, rate 5 per cent, due August 1, 1913 100,000.00 
November 1, 1893, rate 4^4 per cent, due November 

1, 1913 100,000.00 

October 1, 1S94, rate 4 per cent, due October 1, 1914 50,000.00 

July 1, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, ]S)15 100,000.00 

December 16, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due December 

16, 1915 50,000.00 

January 1, 1897, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 1917 100.000.00 

$800,000.00 
SIXKING FUND. 

1893 $12,750.00 

1894 13,925.00 

1895 15,800.00 

1896 16,800.00 

1897 17.175.00 

1898 17,765.00 

1898 5,000.00 

1899 5,000.00 

1899 18,100.00 

1900 18,425.00 

1900 5,000.00 

1901 5,000.00 

1901 18,575.00 

1902 18,800.00 

1902 5,000.00 

1903 5,000.00 

1903 19,200.00 

Total $217,225.00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 201 

Interest to date $28,788.0(3 

I'reiiiium on bonds bought and sold 632. ^'J 

$240,045.4.5 
raid .lanuarv 1, 1902 100.000.00 



On hand December 31, 1903 $140,045.45 



202 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



>• 


o 

H 




1) 

! ^ 


.a 


•2g 

|5a 


c 




•a ■ 


o 

l! 


1872 


S573.6] 












S573:61 






1873 


2,097.6C 


I 


§1,692.68 
7,987.2- 


$190.84 
1,436.56 




814.00 


200.67 




3 


1874 


32,154.0- 


I »22,426.0C 


3119.10 


104.18 


699 85 




98 


187S 


29,223.60 


13,095.0( 


10,292.13 


3,348.11 


122.13 


120.59 


2,245.64 




160 


1876 


39,028.47 


16,320.0( 


16,900.63 


6,305.81 


72.32 


180.16 


249.55 





166 


1877 


43,823.30 


17,475.0C 


18,06i.51 


7,783.09 


136.10 


233.04 


131.56 




202 


1878 


48,874.26 


17,970.0C 


20,255.97 


10,090.25 


83.60 


232.82 


241.62 




226 


1879 


53,143.17 


18,165.00 


21,610.13 


12,732.93 


81.60 


240.64 


303.87 




251 


1880 


57,655.25 


18,300.00 


23,795.96 


14,794.34 


79.50 


210.39 


465.06 


SIO.OO 


280 


1881 


00,215.62 


18,780.00: 25,336.18 


15,554.98 


105.60 


223.99 


203.87 


11.00 


310 


1882 


67,630.13 


20,130.00| 26,803.00 


19,898.69 


346.65 


197.49 


443.24 


11.00 


371 


1883 


73,458.20 


20,520.00 


28,838.24 


23,431.20 


314.65 


208.04 


125.07 


21.00 


404 


1884 


75,580.08 


21,350.00 


31,724.07 


21,329.75 


195.10 


231.96 


738.20 


11.00 


446 


1885 


80,404.12 


18,900.00 


33,597.02 


27,425.35 


102.50 


186.80 


181.45 


11.00 


486 


1886 


75,129.99 


19,750.00 


33,062.11 


21,573.45 


287.40 


130.80 


320.23 


6.00 


613 


188T 


80,518.17 


20,437.50 


33,497.21 


25,277.09 


351.70 


119.20 


819.47 


16.00 


739 


1888 


83,643.82 


21,000.00 


33,864.78 


29,838.82 


543.80 


149.80 


243.62 


3.00 


842 


1889 


86,700.46 


18,240.00 


34.140.99 


33,596.0^ 


361.95 


153.20 


155.27 


53.00 


951 


1890 


90,463.37 


19,880.00 


32,431.10 


37,009.80 


649.90 


151.80 


298.77 


42.00 


1,135 


1891 


76,605.23 


4,590.00 


30,588.79 


40,479.25 


494.80 


160.40 


200.99 


91.00 


1,313 


1892 


83,474.79 


5,000.00 


31,344.24 


46,139.35 


416.00 


168.40 


139.80 


267.00 


1,608 


1893 


104,170.08 


12,750.00 


32,603.59 


58,103.20 


1,033.75 


159.60 


339.38 


180.56 


1,895 


1894 


110,210.29 


13,925.00 


32,176.28 


62,501.35 


697.80 


227.40 


334.82 


347.64 


2,182 


1895 


118.374.50 


15,800.00 


32,903.99 


67,465.90 


808.20 


300.40 


768.17 


327.84 


2,520 


1896 


138,907.03 


16,800.00 


32,540.03 


77,610.10 


638.48 


302.80 


440.12 


575.50 


2,866 


1897 


125,719.17 


17,175.00 


30,647.17 


76fl48.60 


331.85 


321.80 


627.08 


467.67 


3,134 


1898 


131,184.08 


17,675.00 


29,409.58 


80,643.30 


187.00 


359.80 


441.90 


2,467.50 


3,340 


1899 


133,436.41 


18,100.00 


28,003.34 


85,764.80 


240.80 


363.80 


400.59 


497.08 


3,502 


1900 


138,241.94 


18,425.00 


27,868.85 


91,079.30 


95.80 


397.80 


232.59 


142.60 


3,667 


1901 


138,206.14 


18,575.00 


26,954.99 


91,382.60 


220.30 


437.60 


410.90 


224.75 


3,804 


1902 


134,331.48 


18,800.00 


23,785.49 


90,479.10 


233.34 


434.00 


358.25 


241.25 


3,983 


1903 


128,416.23 


19,200.00 


21,539.64 


85,954.05 


253.90 


407.00 


137.64 


924.00 


4,001 



1878, meter rate was changed. 1884, hydrant rates reduced. 1886, meter and other 
rates reduced. 1889, hydrant rates reduced. 1891 and 1892, received only part of hydrant 
rent, and nothing from water-trouglis or street sprinltlers. 1893, hydrant rent, and 
water-closets rate reduced. July l, 1902, rates reduced. Meter rate reduced October 
1, 1904. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 



203 



Tht' r()ll<)\vin<^' aiuouiits liiiv(> hc'ii paid over to Ihc city 
and crt'ditod to the water-works: 

1872, supplies and materials sold 

1873, supplies and materials sold 

accrued interest on water bonds sold 

accrued interest on state bonds sold 

water rents 

1874, supplies and materials sold 

March 12, highway expenditures transferred from 

water account 

March 17, interest and discount transferred from 

water account 

September 1, interest aiul discount transferred from 

water account 

water and hydrant rent 

December 29, Interest transferred 

1875, water and hydrant rent 

sundry items , 

1876, water and hydrant rent 

sundry items 

1877, water and hydrant rent 

sundry items 

1878, water and hydrant rent 

sundry items 

1879, water and hydrant rent 

sundry items 

1880, water and hydrant rent 

sundry items 

1881, water and hydrant rent 

sundry items 

1882, water and hydrant rent 

simdry items 

1883, water and hydrant rent 

sundry items 

1884, water and hydrant rent 

sundry items 

1885, water and h.ydrant rent 

sundry items 

1886, water and hydrant rent 

sundry items 

1887, water and hydrant rent 

sundry uems 

1888, water and hydrant rent 

sundry items 

18S9, w^ater and hydrant rent 

sundry items 



$573.61 
177.07 
193.26 
146.00 

1.920.53 
607.89 



12,347.25 

22,361.74 
30,233.54 
4,566.25 
27,119.15 
2,104.45 
38,879.47 

149.00 
43,691.74 

131.56 
48,632.64 

241.62 
52,839.30 

303.87 
57,180.19 

475.06 
60,000.75 

214.87 
67,175.89 

454.24 
73,312.13 

146.07 
74,830.88 

749.20 
80,211.67 

192.45 
74,803.76 

326.23 
79,682.70 

835.47 
85,397.20 

246.62 
86,492.19 

208.27 



204 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1890, water and hj'drant rent 
snndrj' items 

1891, water and hydrant rent 
sundry items 

1892, water and hydrant rent 
snndrj' items 

1893, water rents 

sundrj- items 

1894, water rents 

sundry items 

1895, water rents 

sundry items 

1896, water rents 

sundry items 

1897, water rents 

simdr^- items 

premiums on bonds . . . . 

1898, water rents 

sundry items 

1S99, water rents 

sundry items 

1900, water rents 

sundry items 

1901, water rents 

sundry items 

1902, water rents 

sundry items 

1903, water rents 

sundry items 



SERVICE PIPES. 

Eighty (SO) service pipes have been laid, as follows: 

79 1-ineh diameter 

1 2-inch diameter 



,$90 



,122.60 
340.77 
313.24 
291.99 
067.99 
406.80 
900.14 
519.94 
602.83 
682.46 
478.49 
.096.01 
091.41 
,015.62 
,449.42 
094.75 
,248.00 
,599.68 
,909.40 
,438.74 
897.67 
,441.75 
375.19 
,995.49 
635.65 
,931.93 
599.55 
,154.59 
,061.64 



$2,504,920.05 



2,077.1 feet 
3.0 feet 



2,080.1 feet 



SERVICE PIPES RELAID. 



1 i/g-inch service 

92 %-inch service 

13 1-inch service 

1 2-inch service 

107 



18.8 feet to 1-inch diameter 17.0 feet 

2,394.3 feet to l-inch diameter 2,399.3 " 

265.7 feet to 1-inch diameter 298.0 " 

9.0 feet to 2-inch diameter 25.0 " 



2,687.8 



2,739.3 feet 



BOARD OF WATKR COMMISSIONERS. 205 
SERVICE PIPES LAID TO DATE. 

17 1/,-inoh diameter ^50A feet 

089 %-inch diameter , 24,790.3 

4,678 1-ineh diameter 119,247.1 

19 li/i-inch diameter S00.2 

30 li/o-inch diameter 938.5 

77 2-inch diameter 2,367.2 

2 21/3-inch diameter 63.0 

6 3-inch diameter 122.8 

12 4-inch diameter 281.5 

y 6-inch diameter. 



28.21 miles of service pipe laid to December 
5,839 service pipes laid to December 31, 1903. 



148,970.0 feet 



The number of meters set during the year has been one hundred and 
thirty-three (133). 

Total number in use, forty hundred and one (4,001). 

Number applications for water have been eighty (SO). 

Total number applications to date, fifty-nine hundred and ninety 
(5,990). 



20G 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES LAID, AND GATES AND HYDRANTS 
SET, 1903. 



Streets. 


Length 


IN FEST. 


Gates. 


2 

a 




c 


c 


8 in. 
12 in. 


.5 


a 




Ash 




333 

272 

1,215 

44 






1 






North of Blodget. 
Southward to Dickey. 


Avon 








Bay 








3 




1 
1 

2 


Clarke to Carpenter. 
Corner Coolidge avenue. 
Corner Bremer 










Coolidge 










1 


Dickey 




891 






1 


Avon to Alpine. 
North to L. C. Page's. 
West to Mrs. Pickerings. 
Wilson to Hall 


Foster avenue 


60 






Goffstown road 


240 
457 
38 
196 






1 




1 
2 
1 


Green 












1 




Corner of Hall for hydrant. 
East of Chestnut. 
Westward near Lincoln. 
South of Storehouse. 
West of Union. 
North of Longwood. 










Sonierville 






111 


1 






State 




152 
18 
118 








1,192 




2 


2 


Woodbine 










1 


8 




10 




60 


3,974 


1,192 


111 


3 



5,337 feet laid, or 1.01 miles. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 207 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET, 1903. 

Bay street, 20 feet south of Carpenter street. 

Bremer, corner Oooliclge street. 

Dickey, corner Whittier. 

Dickey, corner Alpine. 

Goffstown road, near Mr. Pickering's residence. 

(Jreen, corner Wilson. 

Green, corner Hall. 

Hayward, corner Hall. 

Trenton, corner Union. 

Trenton, corner Chestnut. 

Hydrant on Coolidge avenue, corner Bremer, was taken out. 

LOCATION OF GATES SET, 1903. 

Ash street, corner Blodget, north side. 

Bay, north side Clarke. 

Bay, south side Carpenter. 

Baj', north side Dr. Carvelle's residence. 

Coolidge, south side Bremer. 

Dickey, west side Avon. 

Goffstown road. 

Hayward, west side Hall. ' 

State, south of boiler house. 

Trent'on, west side Union. 

Trenton, east side Chestnut. 



208 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 



•SJUBJpiCH 


cj 


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"^ 


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1308 
1G94 
4394 
17G5 
1253 


4104 
2G24 
2711 
1785 
792 
81 
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883 
01 


'<S 














o 
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o 

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2 2 






a 

o 


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25 










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s 










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ill 


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a. 


c 


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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



209 



f 


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o 


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M 


n 


05 


'^ 


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: '^ 


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: : 






















































































































1 


i : 












S 8 


3 










lis ii 2 


708 
52 
146 
771 
1404 

3C51 
6234 
500 

4689 
4396 




1949 
1823 
2300 




S 




S 


i 1 
S 5 


i I 








11 


III 


1 
























i 
















































i ; 
































; i 










































8 






















































































































































1 a 

2 r. 


3 
o 

i 

5 


a 


» 

a 
2 


3 


o 


1 


c3 - 


5 

2 


s 

5 
^ 




edar 

ential 


1 1. 
1 1 


3 


1 


2 


2 


1 


c4 


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P-«H 


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.s 


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1130 
1017 
1910 

832 
1377 

231 
1735 


c 




















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o 


























c 












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c 

i 






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cs 


























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c 
C 


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1 


1 




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1 1 


• s 
1 1 


: : 
1 S 


1 1 ^ 

! 1 ^ 


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c 


§ 1 

2 2 

c ;5 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



211 



m .-1 o 









Nr^-IMMOC^O-, 






: " : 












©1 












































































































„ 1 






























: ^ i ; 


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1597 
1118 
1181 
6291 
79 
4G82 
2148 
472 




1040 
756 
532 

527 
471 
539 
750 
57 

4329 
460 

5748 
657 


922 
1010 








: 1 ; 








: : 1 1 : 




































































: 1 : • : 


































: - : i ; 




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iroad 

icock 

lOver 

lover road — 

rison 


s 

^ 1 

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; 1 i J 


^ « ? 


' s i 


"} ,2 


der's court 

6 avenue 

gdon 

rel 

ei-ty 



KKSffiSaaaii; 



212 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



•siuuap.£H 


-. ; CJ ; CO -H C2 e 


i Ci ■ . c 


= 2 : <^' : ^ : 


•saAiBA .iiy 








1 

! ^ 


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5 

1 


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j4 


933 
364 
94 

95 
60 

4400 

1026 
962 
250 
362 
788 

6453 
250 
768 

1354 
421 
370 


a 


: ; « . 


o 




1 i i ; : ; 


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ill 


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Longwood 

Levering 

Lowell 

Malvern 


II 

ill 

s s ^ 


Market 

Massabesic ... 

Mead 

Meclmiiic 


1 


Merrimack to Laurel 

Middle 

Mitchell 

Monroe 

Morrison 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 



213 



oi n c> 



s s g 



O CO O CO -* CO 
iC O O O « M 



i s 



s s a ^ 



O O J3 S 

5 r t: ti 

« o o o 

:z; 125 z; iz; 



214 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



■siuBjpiSH 






• • ; 00 


-< •* in 


t- • n 


MM" 


•* .* 


e» 


•SaAIBA .11 V 












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1 
i 

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1 


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o 


484 
313 
593 
17 
750 
3466 
276 
1705 
3643 
1010 
97 
752 
5953 
874 
877 
325 
1702 
4755 
67 


d 






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2 










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2 


Riley 

Rowell 

Russell 


cl 1 ^ 


1 S = 

III 


Spruce 

Stark 

State 


5 S c 

^11 


■> 1 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



216 



— -< — I o . ei t- 



co c* 






0)0 



§ ?? 



2 i 



-* "M -O 

-" s s 

»1 <N 






5 ^ 



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216 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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c 


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1 

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18 

517 
3579 

326 

48 

1036 

1573 

835 
2287 

380 


242 
637 


a 

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1 


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t 


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BOARD OF WATEll COMMISSIONERS. 



217 















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790 
1482 
563 


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1791 
663 
769 
891 
451 
552 

2089 


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524 
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2734 
598 
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Ulram 

Huntress 

Joliette 




i 1 i 



BOARD OF WATEIl COMMISSIONERS. 



219 



in iM 00 lo o CO 



.-l(MCOCJrtCO.H0-)CO 



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283 
45 

290 
3849 
1821 

527 
2161 

206 

2849 
232 
504 


ii : ''^ 


g 8 


945 
2491 
836 








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220 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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285 
2727 
995 
3379 
566 
215 
758 
429 
654 
361 
442 
892 
110 
12 
80 
1308 
1265 






















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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



221 



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222 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1903. 



Size of pipe. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 




20,367 feet. 


24,719 feet. 
16,245 ■' 
33,557 " 
35,262 " 

80,188 " 
315,147 " 
23,077 " 


in 




21 






39 


10-incli diamete r 




46 
109 




234 feet. 


663 




60 










20,601 feet. 


525,195 feet. 


957 



Cement-lined pipe 
Cast-iron pipe . . . . 



Total pipe 
778 hydrants. 
957 gates. 
12 air valves. 



:!.90 miles 
99.47 miles 



103.37 miles 



EespectfuUy submitted, 

CHARLES K. WALKER. 



Uses for which Water is Supplied. 

WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 

12,696 families, 103 boarding houses, 16,397 faucets, 5,216 wash-bowls, 
4,852 bath-tubs, 13,203 water-clo.sets, 982 set tubs, 238 urinals, 4,620 sill- 
cocks, 3,006 horses, 235 cattle, 778 hydrants, 31 watering-troughs, 10 
drinking fountains, 51 standpipes, 2 public urinals. 

PUBLIC BUILDINOS. 

1 jail, 32 churches, 1 courthouse, 11 hose companies, 6 fire engines, 
2 hook-and-ladder, 3 opera houses, 4 cohvents, 4 city hospitals, 5 ceme- 
teries, 1 orphanage, 1 postoflfice, 1 city library, 6 banks, 9 hotels, 1 
Masonic hall, 1 Odd Fellows' hall, 3 halls. Children's Home, Masonic 
Home. 

SHOPS. 

58 barber, 11 wheelwright, 20 blacksmith, 10 carpenter, 2 tinsmith, 
1 copper, 3 currying, 20 plumber and gas and water pipe. 14 paint, 3 
gunsmith. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 223 



.'j auction, 35 drug-, 22 jewelry, 2 fur. .'i house-furnishing goods, 20 
fancy goiods, 1 wholesale paper, 5 wholesale produce, 24 dry goods, 12 
candy, 1 cloak, IG millinery, ."J tea, 9 furniture, 3 wholesale grocer, 107 
grocery, 6 meal, 2 hardware, 34 boot and shoe, 11 stove, 17 gents' fur- 
nishing goods, 7 book, 1 leather and shoe finders, 3 music, 3 upholstery, 
9 undertaker, 5 sewing-machine, 1 feather-cleaner, 1 rubber. 



17 dining, 7 billiard, G4 liquor. 

MISCEJLLANEOUS. 

7 clubrooms, 3 bleacheries, 35 laundries, 4 ice-houses, 10 photog- 
raphers. 1 Mercy Home, 2 old ladies' homes, 1 soldiers' monument, 1 
Turner hall, 4 fountains, 2 trust companies, 1 city farm, 3 depots, 9 
greenhouses, 2 bandrooms, 26 bakeries. 2 waste, 2 business colleges, 
36 schoolhouses, 1 battery building, 1 kitchen, .3 wardrooms, 1 gym- 
nasium, 2 police stations. 

MAXUFACTUEIXG ESTABLISHMENTS. 

2 hosiery mills, 1 silver-plating, 3 iron foundries, 2 dye-houses, 5 
machine shops, 6 clothing manufactories, 9 harness shojjs, 1 cornice 
works, 1 brush shop. 9 carriag-e shops, 13 cigar factories, 1 brass and 
copper foundry, 1 locomotive works, 1 grist-mill, 1 silk-mill, 3 granite 
works, 1 electric light station, 4 sash and blind shops, 1 brewery, 8 shoe 
shojDS, 1 gas works, 4 slaughter-houses, 1 soap factory, 4 needle manu- 
factories, 6 beer-bottling, 3 book-bind'eries. 2 box-makers, 1 paper-box 
manufactor3% 

MARKETS. 

5 fish, 14 meat and fish, 5 meat, wholesale. 

STABLES. 

IS livery, 1,358 private. 

OFFICES. 

23 dentists, 1 telephone, 2 telegraph, 31 coal, 1 gas, 1 electric, 2 ex- 
press, 19 printing. 

Materials on Hand. 

WHOLE SLEEVES. GATES. 

1 20-inch. 10 S-inch bell. 
6 14 " 3 10 " 

6 10 " 6 4 " 

2 8" 86" 

9 6" 1 14-inch spigot. 

2 4" S. 6 " " 



224 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



REDUCERS. 



24 


feet 


24- 


inch 


pipe. 


8,500 


" 


20 


'• 


" 


140 


" 


14 


" 


" 


1,140 


" 


12 


«' 


" 


1,320 


" 


10 


" 


" 


6,924 


" 


8 


" 


" 


9,764 


" 


6 


" 


" 


1,068 


" 


4 


" 


" 


1,330 


" 


1 


" 


" 


263 


" 


% 


" 


" 


3S 


" 


2 


" 


." 


31 


" 


IVa " 


" 






CLAMP 


SLEEV 


16 


12-i 


nch 






120 


10 


" 






30 


8 


" 






130 


6 


" 






8 


4 


" 












BRANCHES. 




double 


6 oi 


20. 






•' 


8 •' 


14. 






" 


6 " 


14. 








6 " 


10. 






" 


8 " 


8. 


23 




" 


6 •' 


S. 


14 




» 


6 " 
4 " 


6. 
4. 






" 6x8 ' 


14. 




single 


10 on 20. 






" 


14 


' 14. 






" 


10 


" 14. 






" 


6 


" 14. 






" 


4 


" 12. 






" 


4 


" 10. 


14 




" 


6 


" 8. 


10 




" 


6 
12 

6 
10 


" 6. 
" 14. 
" 10. 
" 10. 


17 




,, 


S 

4 


" S. 



1 20-inch to 14-incli. 

2 14 " " 12 " 
2 12 " " 10 " 
8 10 " " 8 " 

2 10 " " 6 " 
11 8 " "6 " 

4 6" " 4 " 

3 hydrants. 
315 pigs of lead. 
180 stop boxes. 

45 curb cocks. 

46 1-2 corp cocks. 
Ill 3-4 " 







PLUGS 


2 14- 


nch. 




15 10 


" 




27 12 


" 




12 S 


" 







BENDS 


2 20-inch 


Y. 


1 20 " 


1-16. 


1 14 " 


1-8. 


1 12 " 


2-8. 


4 8" 


offsets. 


1 10 " 


" 


1 12 " 


" 


13 6 " 


" 



QUARTER TURNS. 



2 S-inch. 
5 10 " 
25 6 " 
14" 



EEPORT 



STREET AND PAM COMMISSIONERS. 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE STREET 
AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of Manchester, N. H.: 
Gentlemen, — The eleventh annual report of the board of street and 
park commissioners is herewith submitted; showing the work of this 
department during the year 1903. 

OFFICE. 

The following gives the receipts and expenditures for the year: 

Receipts. 

Eeceived from school department $156.50 

Eeceived for use of band stand 48.00 

Eeceived from sundry sources 126.73 

$331.23 

Deposited with city treasurer $316.88 

Cash paid for express and postage 14.35 

$331.23 

Appropriation $3,500.00 

Expenditures. 

Commissioners' salaries $1,800.00 

Clerical services 969.00 

Carriage allowance 450.00 

Office supplies, books, etc 87.95 

Incidentals 18.80 

$3,325.75 

Transferred to reserve fund 174.25 

$3,500.00 



List of Appropriations. 

Street and Park commission $3,500.00 

Eepairs of highways $25,000.00 

Eepairs of highways, school department 156.50 

Repairs of highways, sundry sources 90.88 

25,247.38 

New highways 5.000.00 

Watering streets 4,000.00 

227 



228 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Paving streets $5,000.00 

Macadamizing- streets 6,000.00 

Grading for concrete 4.000.00 

New sewers $20,000.00 

New sewers, sundry sources 13.50 

20,013.50 

Scavenger service 15,000.00 

City teams 6,000.00 

Snow and ice 4,500.00 

Bridges and culverts 6,000.00 

Street sweeping 3,000.00 

Repairs of sewers 5,000.00 

Commons $4,500.00 

Commons, band stands 4S.0O 

Commons, sundrj' sources S.OO 

4,556.00 

Stark park 1,000.00 

Derryfield park 1,000.00 

South End playground 75.00 

North End plaj'ground 75.00 

Riddle playground 50.00 

Lafayette park 1,000.00^ 



$120,010.88 



Expenditures. 

Street and park commission $3,325.75 

Repairs of highways 26,091.21 

Xew highways 4,9S3.5S 

Watering streets 4,012.38 

Paving streets 4,978.83 

Macadamizing streets 5,973.95 

Grading for concrete 4,065.12 

New sewers 18,970.92 

Scavenger service 18,288.45 

City teams 6,480.50 

Snow and ice 4,736.45 

Bridges 6,809.48 

Sweeping streets 31,039.34 

Repairs of sewers 5,147.79 

Commons 4,452.40 

Stark park 904.75 

Derryfield park 984.89 

North End playground 79.25 

South End playground 66.80 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



229 



Eiddle playgroiiiid $50.00 

Lafayette park 1,000.00 

$124,441.84 
Transferred from I'eserve fund $4,424.00 



Inventory of City Property. 

Office, including- typewriter, furniture, etc 

Division No. 2, including horses, dumpcarts, sprinklers, 

crushers, tools, etc 

City stable and lot of land on Franklin street 

Sheds, shops, and tools 

I'ipe on hand 

Division No. 4 

Division No. 5 

Division No. 7 

I'ipe on hand 

Division No. S 

Division No. 9 

Division No. 10 

Stable, land, etc 

Pipe on hand 

Commons 



$399.80 

23,881.34 

91,312.00 

15,950.00 

1,145.34 

10.00 

25.00 

259.00 

63.15 

39.85 

22.10 

4,224.57 

1,050.00 

109.37 

544.90 

$139,63ro.42 



Report of Division No. 2. 

George W. Cheney, Agent, 
steeets and roads. 

The roads in the outljdng districts were repaired and put in good 
shape for the public travel. The following streets were graded, gutters 
paved and treated to a dressing of crushed stone: Cedar street from 
Beech to Lincoln, Auburn street from Beech to Maple, Hollis street 
from Elm to Canal, Chestnut street from Pennacook to Webster, Pine 
street from Pennacook to Brook, Valley street from Willow to Pine. 

The following macadamized streets were repaired and topdressed 
with crushed stone and put in good condition with the steam road 
roller: Lowell street from Elm to Chestnut, also Lowell street from 
LTnion to Beech, Bridge street from Ash to Maple, Central street 
from Elm to Franklin, Franklin street from Granite to Cedar, Granite 
street from Elm to Canal, Chestnut street from Central to Merrimack, 
also Chestnut street from Lowell to Brook, and Merrimack street from 
Chestnut to Pine. 



230 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



There was used in the above streets 1,769 loads crushed stone taken 
from the citj- ledge, also 1,161 loads taken from the surplus rock blasted 
from the trench while building the sewer in North Chestnut street, 
North Union street and Ba^- street. Besides there were used 874 loads 
of crushed stone in repairing the macadamized streets on the West 
Side, also upward of 2,000 loads of gravel were used in repairing other 
streets. 



STBEETS KEPAIRED WITH CRUSHED STONE. FROM CITY (LEDGE, PICKED UP 
WITH ROAD ROLLER AKD ROLLED DOWN. 

Auburn from Beech to Maple. 
Bridge from Ash to Maple. 
Cedar from Beech to Lincoln. 
Central from Elm to Franklin. 
Chestnut from Central to Merrimack. 
Chestnut from Lowell to Brook. 
Chestnut from Webster to Tennacook. 
Franklin from Cedar to Granite. 
Granite from Elm to Canal. 
Lowell from Elm to Chestnut. 
Lowell from Union to Beech. 
Pine from Brook to Pennacook. 
Valley from Elm to Pine. 

1.569 loads of stone used from city ledge. 

1.061 loads of stone used from North Union and Chestnut streets. 

2,630 loads, total amount of stone used. 

GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Location. 



Length in 
feet. 



Cut or 
All. 



Beech and Webster 

Bridge from Belmont east 

Bridge and Western 

Cedar between Maple and Lincoln 

Chestnut between Pennacook and Sahuon 

East High and Russell 

Lak« avenue near Hall road 

Masonic Home 

North Union between Clark and Carpenter 

Prospect ea.st of Russell 

Sagamore between Pine and Elm 

Valley from Pine east 

Valley from Pine west 

Total 



120 
800 
100 
550 
,600 
100 
100 
750 
370 
300 
200 
100 
300 



Cut. 
Fill. 



Fill. 
Cut. 



Fill. 
Cut. 



$20.40 
00.50 
10.00 
-10.00 
50.00 
12.00 
20.40 
50.00 
96.50 
58.30 
21.50 
38.00 
77.20 



STKEET AND PAliK COMMISSIUNEIIS. 
NEW HIGHWAYS. 



231 



Location. 


Length in 
feet. 


Cut or 
fill. 


Labor. 


Ash from Sagamore to Salmon 


400 
300 
200 
450 
225 


Cut and fill. 

Cut. 
Cut and fill. 

Fill. 

Cut. 


S225.00 
89.00 






Walnut from Webster southerly 


WJ.OO 










Xotal 


1,575 




$565.00 









COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Number 

loads 
of stone. 



Square 
yards. 



Auburn from Beech to Maple . . 

Amherst from Belmont to Milton 

Amherst from Maple to Ash 

Amherst from Concord to Lowell 

Auburn and Wilson 

Ash from Salmon to Sagamore 

Ash from Concord to Amherst 

Belmont from Amherst to Concord 

Bridge, Western westerly , 

Bridge from Ash to Maple 

Beech from Sagamore to Salmon 

Chester from Lincoln to Ashland 

Chestnut near Carpenter 

Cedar from Lincoln to Beech 

Chestnut from Salmon to Pennacook. . 

Hall from Bridge to East High 

Holllsfrom Canal to Elm 

Harrison back from Walnut to Beech 

Hanover near Alfred 

Linden south of Myrtle 

Myrtle west of Linden 

North from Walnut to Beech 

Prospect from Russell to Linden 

Prospect from Walnut to Beech 

Pine from Brook to Pennacook 

Prospect from Linden to Russell 

Salmon from Ash to Beech 

Valley from Elm to Pine 

Walnut from Webster to North 



478 3-9 
77 7-9 

136 

58 3-9 
48 5-9 

150 
30 

lib 

175 
150 

11 1-9 

25 

821 3-9 
486 1-9 
107 
223 6-9 

44 4-9 
280 

50 

50 
107 

91 6-9 

77 7-9 
321 
126 3-9 

97 2-9 
291 6-9 
645 5-9 



S72.00 
22.00 
20.50 
18.50 
IS. 00 
42.00 
8.50 
40.52 
30.24 
15.50 
42.00 
5.00 
4.50 
89.25 
68.80 
24.75 
34.00 
11.55 
41.00 
14.00 
14.00 
23.80 
17.00 
25.40 
40.80 
25.50 
23.00 
31.30 
60.20 



232 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



NEW EDGESTOiras SET. 

Ash and Sagamore 15 feet 

Ash, neai* Concord 23S " 

Auburn and Beecli 28 " 

Auburn and Wilson 14 " 

Amherst and Belmont 14 " 

Amherst, near Maple 500 " 

Beech and Cedar 30 " 

Beech and Merrimack 14 " 

Bridge, near Malvern 75 

Bridge and Union 163 " 

Bridge and Maple 30 " 

Bridge and Hall IC " 

Bridge from Western westerly 300 " 

Buzzell and East High 14 " 

Blodget and Ash 61 " 

Chestnut, near Carpenter 65 " 

Chestnut, between Webster and North 200 " 

Chestnut and Carpenter 15 " 

Chestnut, between Salmon and Pennacook 438 " 

Chestnut and Lowell 85 " 

Cedar and Maple 30 " 

Central, between Chestnut and Pine 25 " 

Central and Milton 14 " 

Elm back, near Concord 114 " 

Elm back, between Hanover and Amherst 50 " 

Harrison and Union 30 " 

Lowell and Maple 8 " 

Lowell and Chestnut 250 " 

Lake avenue east of Canton 165 " 

Lowell and Walnut 14 " 

Lowell and Pine 116 " 

Masonic Home 750 " 

Merrimack and Pine 14 " 

Maple and Auburn 28 " 

Oak and Prospect 15 " 

Orange and Pine 43 " 

Pennacook, between Chestnut and Pine 50 " 

Sagamore and Baj- 29 " 

Spruce and Lincoln 43 " 

Union and Lowell 25 " 

Valley, between Elm and Pine 420 " 

4,558 feet 
Labor, $533.17. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
EDGESTONES RESET. 



233 



Jtridge and Lowell 
Elm and Kidder . . 



100 feet 
100 " 



Labor, $18.80. 



NEW CESSPOOLS. 



200 feet 



Cost of 
material. 



Ash and Sagamore 

Auburn and Maple 

Belmont and Amherst 

Bridge and Ash 

Bridge and Hall 

Bridge and Western 

Beecli and Amlierst 

Cliestnut and Carpenter 

Chestnut between Pennacook and Salmon 

Cedar between Lincoln and Maple 

Elm back corner Central 

Hollis and Canal 

Hall and Spruce 

Lake avenue west of Cypress 

Lake avenue east of Beacon 

Lake avenue hetween Wilson and Hall 

Maple and Bridge 

Prospect and Walnut 

Pine and Pennacook 

Pine and Hanover 

Spruce and Belmont 

Spruce and Beech 

Sagamore and Salmon on Beech 

Salmon and Ash 

Union and Spruce 

Valley between Elm and Willow 

Total 



S19.75 
119.52 
1C.64 
18.85 
11.07 
70.53 
16.61 
40.74 
138.82 
90.75 
22.22 
46.65 
22.78 
21.88 
17.52 
20.90 
17.77 
43.00 
39.50 
20.60 

22! 78 
21.88 
35.80 
23.50 
45.88 



S13.60 
34.00 
9.00 
6.80 
6.00 
24.00 
7.36 
20.00 
68.00 
59.50 
5.50 
20.40 
9.00 
7.00 
6.25 
8.00 
6.40 
17.00 
15.30 
9.00 
9.50 
9.25 
5.50 
28.00 
9.25 
24.00 



8437.61 



REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Cost of 
material. 



Hanover between Beech and Maple §3.47 

Lowell between Wilson and Hall 2 04 

Pine and Central 2.04 

Wilson, near Lake avenue 9.65 

Totals 



§2.00 
3.50 
5.00 
3.00 



234 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
PAVING RELAID. 



LOCATIOX. 



Square 
yards. 



Hanover, Union to Pine 

Lake avenue, Cass to Beacon — 
Lake avenue, Wilson to Hall — 
Lake avenue hill east of Cass . . . . 
Lake avenue, Milton to Beacon , 

Orange, corner Elm 

Prospect, west of Kussell 

Sagamore and Bay 



58 6-9 
505 5-9 
311 1-9 



S17.00 
50.00 
57.75 
125.00 
10.20 
10.20 
4.75 
4.95 



There has been laid this year 7,416 feet of new sewers at a- total 
cost of $17,330.36. Some of the more extensive jobs were situated as 
follows: Bay street, north of Clarke street, 298 feet; Chestnut street, 
north of Carpenter street, 384 feet; Clarke street, east of Elm to Bay 
street, 328 feet; Hanover street, east of Hall street, 269 feet; Lowell 
street from Beacon to Weston street, 438 feet; Massabesic street, east 
of Jewett street, 644 feet; Merrill street, east of Jewett street, 332 feet; 
Merrill south back street from Pine to Union street, 506 feet; Prout 
avenue from Hayward street south, 462 feet; Uniion street south of 
Merrill south back street, 336 feet; Union .street, north of Clarke street, 
650 feet; Union street, north of Carpenter street, 376 feet; Western 
street, south of Lowell street, 240 feet; and Bismarck street from ^lil- 
ford street north, 975 feet. 

In the Chestniit and Bay street sewers it was necessary to blast 
through solid ledge almost their entire length. The same condition 
was found in the Union-street sewer north of Carpenter street, also in 
the Union-street sewer north of Clarke. 

The sewer on Massabesic street was laid in a trench, which was 
blasted to a depth of twelve to fifteen feet in solid ledge. The co.st 
per linear foot was $6,804. 

There is a section in East Manchester in the vicinity of Taylor street 
where sewers should be built the coming season. In order to reach 
the point a large sewer should be started from the Silver street sewer 
in Maple street going north in Maple street to Valley street, thence 
easterly in Valley to Weston street, thus diverting all the sewage 
south of Valley street to the Silver street sewer, thereby relieving the 
^overcrowded Spruce street sewer. This would require over 6,000 feet 
of sewer pipe at an estimated cost of $11,000. 

The board would recommend that the amount of $10,000 be added to 
the regular aj^propriation for new .sewers. 



STREET AND PAKK COMMISSIONERS. 235 

The average cost per linear foot for the east side was $2,531 and 
$1,184 per linear foot for the west side, an average total cost per 
linear foot of all sewers for 1903 of $2,337. 

Length of sewers, Division Xo. 2 4,184 feet 

Length of sewers, Division No. 7 2,161 " 

Length of sewers, Division No. 10 1,071 " 

7,416 feet 

Cost of sewers. Division No. 2 $9,682.54 

Cost of sewers. Division No. 7 6,379.31 

Cost of sewers, Division No. 10 1,268.47 

$17,330.32 

Average cost per foot. Division No. 2 $2,338 

Average cost per foot, Division No. 7 2.952 

Average cost per foot. Division No. 10 1,184 

Average total cost per foot, $2,337. 

SUIIMART. 

Total appropriation for new sewers $20,000.00 

Received from sundry sources 13.50 

$20,013.50 

Expended for new sewers, Division No. 2 $9,682.54 

Expended for new sewers, Division No. 7 6,379.31 

Expended for new sewers. Division No. 10 1,268,47 

Appropriation unexpended 1,042.38 

Supplies on hand, city yard 1,640.80 

$20,013.50 
The following tables show how the cost of new sewers has been 
divided. 



236 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Location. 



Ash 

Bay 

Buzzell 

Chestnut 

Clarke 

Hall 

Hall 

Havvard 

Lowell 

Lowell 

Massabesic .. 

Merrill 

Merrill S. B.. 

Pleasant 

Prout avenue 
Riley avenue 

Union 

Union 

Union 

Union 

Weston 



Salmon southerly 

Clarke northerly 

Lowell northerly 

Carpenter, northerly 

Elm to Bay 

Auburn to Cedar south back 

At 8pruce south back 

East of Wilson to Hall 

Beacon to Weston 

Beacon to Weston 

East of Jewett easterly 

Jewett easterly 

Pine to Union 

Franklin westerly 

Hay ward southerly 

South of Hay ward southerly 

South of Hay ward to Merrill S. B.. . 
South of Hayward to Merrill S. B.. . 

North of Clarke northerly 

No. of Carpenter to No. of Trenton 
Lowell southerly 



Portland 
Akron. .. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 237 

IN 1903. — EAST SIDE. 



1 

c 
cS 


1 




■S 
g 


1 






ii 

IB 
< 


Nature of excavation. 








2 


S95.68 
873.71 


$0,760 
2.931 


May 4 
May 9 


May 7 


5.0 


Gravel aud ledge. 


2 




8 




July 7 


8.2 


2 




S 




337.03 


1.178 


April 30 


May 4 


6.75 


Sand. 




1 


13 


1 


1,561.47 


4.066 


June 1 


July 29 


7.0 


Gravel and ledge. 






12 




865.61 


2.627 


May 9 


June 20 


9.0 


" 








4 


142.32 


.981 


Oct. 7 


Oct. 10 


6.75 Gravel. 










15.84 


2.640 


Nov. 6 


Nov. 6 


9.4 


Sand. 




■• 


10 


2 


345.65 


1.284 


Aug. 13 


Aug. 20 


9.0 








8 


2 


359.56 


1.618 


Nov. 12 


Nov. 28 


70 Gravel. 






6 


1 


350.52 


1.511 


Nov. 12 


Nov. 28 


7.0 






5 




4,482.04 


6.804 


Aug. 1 


Dec. 10 


17.0 Gravel and ledge. 






9 




619.12 


1.864 


May 8 


June 10 


7.2 


" 


2 




16 




511.52 


1.011 


April 1 


May 8 


9.0 


Sand. 


2 




1 




398.61 


1.443 


Nov. 3 


Nov. 10 


11.5 


Gravel and sand. 


3 




8 




652.33 


1.412 


Aug. 17 


Sept. 10 


7.7 


Gravel and ledge. 


1 




5 




137.85 


.444 


May 16 


May 31 






1 




6 




270.17 


1.406 


Apr. 25 


May 17 


11.1 


Sand. 


1 




3 




230.00 


1.597 


Apr. 25 


May 17 


10.0 




3 




22 




1,867.75 


2.873 


Apr. 15 


May 4 


6.75 


Gravel and ledge. 


2 


1 


11 




1,565.84 


4.164 


Mar. 16 


Apr. 23 


7.0 


" 


1 


1 


8 
159 


1 


379.27 


1.580 


Nov. 12 


Nov. 28 


10.0 


Gravel. 


31 


816,061.89 


S2.531 





238 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOETS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Location. 



Bismarck 

Bismarck 

Charleston avenue 
Charleston avenue, 

Huntress 

Walker 



Milford northerly 

Milford, northerly 

Kochelle avenue westerly 
Rochelle avenue westerly 

Prince southerly 

Turner westerly 



Akron. ... 


12 


162 


" 


10 


759 


■' 


12 


42 


" 


10 


12 


" 


10 


62 




10 


34 




1071 



STREET AND PAKK COMMISSIONERS. 



239 



IN 1903. — WEST SIDE. 



m 


i 


C/J 


M 




1 


■6 


1 


1 . 






2i 
2 

1 


2 

1 


O 


1 


o 






a 
Si 


11 
< 


Nature of excavation. 




1 




4 


2 


1240.00 


81.481 


July 18 


Sept. 2 


8.25 


Sand-gravel. 




5 




'11 




877.42 


1.156 


July 18 


Sept. 2 


8.25 






1 








39.38 


.938 


Aug. 6 


Aug. 8 


6.5 


" 




..• 








12.38 


1.03 


Aug. 6 


Aug. 8 


6.0 


" 






1 


1 




67.79 


1.093 


Sept. 3 


Sept. 10 


6.0 


Sand. 




1 








31.52 


.927 


Aug. 9 


Aug. 11 


8.0 


" 




8 


1 


32 




$1,268.47 


81.184 













240 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



BRIDGES AND CULVEKTS. 

Extensive repairs were made on the old Amoskeag bridge. The Robie 
Concrete company put down 944 square yards of concrete on AIcGreg- 
or bridge, and the tive steel bridges in the outlying districts were 
treated to two coats of paint. A new bridge or culvert with an open- 
ing of twelve by seven feet was built over the Cemetery brook in Hall 
street. The abutment was built of granite laid in the best of Port- 
land cement, Avhile the roadway was made of steel girders covered 
with sixteen inches of cement concrete, making the whole one solid 
mass lof iron, stone and cement. The foundation for a new bridge 
was built over Eay brook in Adams street all completed for the road- 
way which will be put on next spring. 

All the bridges of the city are in good condition excepting the old 
wooden bridge now standing over the Cohas brook in the Harvey dis- 
trict. The foundation is in a dangerous condition and should be re- 
built the coming season. 

Appropriation $(5,000.00 

Overdrawn S0«).4S 

$6,809.48 

Bridge company $323.00 

Lumber 3,404.78 

Hardware 107.27 

Stone work 287.30 

Iron work 3.50 

Cement 336.00 

Concrete 472.00 

Coal 81.77 

Labor 1,761.63 

Incidentals 32.23 

$6,809.48 
SCAVEiXGER SERVICE. 

The following is a summary account of scavenger service for the 
year: 

Appropriation $15,000.00 

Overdrawn 3,288.45 

$18,288.45 

Labor $15,301.97 

City farm 2,124.93 

Repairs 78.18 

Hay and grain 439.74 

Horses 269.25 

Incidentals 74.38 

$18,288.45 - 



STEEET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
SNOW AND ICE ACCOUNT. 



241 



Divisiox. 


>. 

s 
1 


1 


1 


1 

3 

o 


1 

s 

1 


5 

H 


niviainn "Vf> 9 


$1,113.15 


8924.11 
C9.00 
1C.50 
135.25 


8173.53 




8197.95 


$2,408.74 


" 4 










16 50 




145.75 


58.00 
13.00 
24. ST 
204.36 




6.00 


345.00 






13 00 














" " 10 


643.37 


820.75 


70.67 


95.87 


1,835.02 






Totals 


$1,902.27 


§1,965.61 


8473.76 


$70.67 


8299.82 


$4 71'' 13 







Appropriation 
Overdrawn . . . 



Labor . , 
Supplies 



$4,500.00 
236.45 

$4,736.45 

$4,712.13 

24.33 



$4,736.45 



242 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CONCRETE WORK DONE BY THE ROBIE CONSOLIDATED CON- 
CRETE COMPANY. 
Street Crossings (new). 



Square 
yards. 



^'yarcL^' Total cost. 



Albert and Harrison 

Auburn and Wilson 

Amory and Columbus 

Beecli and Salmon 

Brown avenue and Hancock 

Beech and Cedar 

Cartier and Adams 

Cedar and Beech 

Grove and Union 

Grove and Beech 

Hall and Merrimack 

Merriniai'k and Hall 

Maple and Lowell 

rrosiifct and Kussell 

rrosiifct and Oak 

Kus^i'll and I'rospect 

Saganiiin- and Beech 

Silver and I'.elmont 

I'nion anri (4i-ove 

Webster anil Walnut 

WeV)ster and Union 

Webster and Kay 

Walnut and Webster 

Total 



231 

802 

395 

222 

222 

311 

6 

3 

244 

933 
• 111 
.622 
.060 

.'244 
.400 

.880 



SO. 75 
.75 



$19,903 
25.50 
22.06 
19.998 

43.673 
23.101 
43.045 
22.665 
22.665 
14.48 
19.20 
24.225 
10.20 
19.32 
22.72 
17.331 
21.46 
22.998 
22.50 
21.933 
20.599 
23.164 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



243 



STREET CROSSINGS (Repaired). 



Square 
yards. 



Ash and Lowell 

Auburn and Wilson 

Bridge and Cliestnut 

Beecli and Mevninack 

Beech and Mcniniack 

Concord and l-:ini 

Chestnut and Hi,i;h 

Chestnut and Lowell 

Church and Lowell 

Central and Wilson 

Franklin Imck and West Central . 

Franklin and doiiot 

Fourth and V.'alkiM- 

Fourth and Walker 

George and Miliord 

Lowell and Church 

Lowell and Fine . . .- 

Marion and McGregor 

IMcrriniack and Pine 

INIirrimack and Pine 

INIevriniack and Union 

Me(4rcgor 

iNIanliattan Lane and Lake avenue 

Mcrrhuack and Beech 

K utiield Lane and Amherst 

Kntlield Lane and Manchester.. .. 

Pine and Orange 

Prospect and Oak 

Puie and Lowell 

Pine and Lowell 

Pine and Meriiniack 

Prospect and Russell 

Total 



.311 
.933 
.666 



Price per 
yard . 



$0-50 
.60 
.75 

.50 
.50 
.60 
.T5 
.50 
.60 
.50 
.60 
.50 
.75 
.50 
.00 
.75 
.75 
.50 
.75 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.75 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.75 
.50 



lj!2.408 
20.40 
3.24 
4.399 
10.577 
18.550 
17.493 
24.083 
0.527 
11.19 
8.00 
14.40 
8.666 
4.875 
3.35 
17.983 
4.37 
8.541 
3.333 
14.16 
12.666 
45.32 
1.90 
4.666 
5.90 
6.50 
12.288 
2.38 
4.73 
9.46 
12 48 
5.160 



NEW SIDEWALKS. 




Beech and Webster. 

Beech and Sagamore 

Dubuque back andAmory 

Prospect and Russell 

Prospect and Russell 

Prospect and Russell 

Russell and Prospect 

Russell and Prospect...'.. 
Union, No. 619 

Total 



75.518 


SO. 50 


,$37.76 


62.777 


.50 


31.38 


6.894 


.75 


5.16 


107.756 


.50 


53.87 


8.533 


.65 


5.54 


55.307 


.75 


41.47 


32.066 


.50 


16.03 


36.832 


.75 


27.62 


16.583 


.50 


8.29 


402.27 




$1227. 12 







244 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
SIDEWALKS REPAIRED. 



Square 
yards. 



Price per 
yard. 



Beauport aud Kelley 

Cartier, opposite Adams 
Columbus and Amory. . . 

Grove, No. 280 

Harrison and Ash 

Harrison and Beecli 

I^owi'llaiul Asli 

jNIaple and I'earl 

.MiUonl and McGregor ... 

Milford and George 

Pine and Bridge 

Pearl and Oak 

Prospect and Kussell — 
Prospect and Walnut . . . 
Prospect and Linden.... 

Prospect and Eussell 

Laurel, No. 81 

Kussell and Prospect... 
Kussell and Prospect — 
West Central and Canal. 
Webster and Ray 

Total 



$0.50 
.50 
.35 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.25 
.25 
.25 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.25 
.50 
.35 
.25 
.30 
.50 



§6.31 
1.04 



5.013 
6.596 
4.236 
.44 
1.05 
7.740 
3.111 

27.577 
5.436 

13.85 

6.25 

.44 

10.26 
1.06 

97.76 
1.66 



DRIVEWAYS (Repaired). 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Price per 
yard. 


Total cost. 


Prospect west of Russell, Dunlap and Edgerly. 


94.311 


$0.65 


§61.302 



STREET AND PAKK COMMISSIONERS. 
SIDEWALKS (repaired), COMMONS. 



245 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Per yard. 


Cost. 


MERKIMACK COMMON. 


337.2 
55.9 

181. 
43.43 
11.333 
5G. 

80.88 
692.611 
8.333 
101. 

55. 
104. 

227. G6 


TO. 25 

.25 

.25 
.25 
.25 
.25 

.25 
.25 
.25 
.25 
.25 
.25 

.25 


m.30 
13.97 




Mominient to Merrimack street, opposite Man- 
chester House 


45. "5 






Soutlieast corner 


2.83 




14.00 


PARK COMMON. 

Spruce street west gate easterly 


20.22 


Nortlieast corner to southeast corner 


148.15 




2.08 








13.75 


West side Spruce, towards soutlieast corner.. . . 

CONCORD COMMON. 

East side common, Amherst to Concord 


26.00 
56.91 


Total 


1,854.35 




I4C3 50 







STREET PAVING (uew). 



Square per yard, 
yards. ■' 



Chestnut and Bridge 

Marion, west of McGregor. 
McGregor bridge, west end 

Total 



59.910 
13.333 
944. 



844.931 

9.99 

472.00 



STREET PAVING (repairs). 



LOCATION. 


Square 
yards. 


Per yard. 


Cost. 




502.807 
556.666 
25.111 
1.333 
393.221 


S0.50 
.50 
.50 
.75 
.50 




Chestnut, from Hanover to Amherst 


278.33 


Lake avenue and Massabesic 


12.55 


A'ine, from Amherst to Concord 


196.610 






Total 


1,479.138 













246 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 
GUTTERS (new). 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Per yard. 


Cost. 


Prospect north side of Russell west 


39.533 


$0.35 


S13 84 







Report of Division No. lO. 

George P. Ames, Agent. 

REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 

STREETS TOP-DRESSED WITH GRAVEL AND STONE CHIPS. 



No. of feet. No. of loads. 



Amory 

Amory 

Beauport 

Blaine 

Clinton 

Coolidge avenue 

Douglas 

Dover 

Eddy Hill 

Fourth 

Goffstown road. 

Mast road 

McGregor 

North Main 

Railroad 

School 

South Main 

Third 

"Walker 

West Bridge 

Total 



350 
100 
225 
750 
370 
125 
150 
115 

[,200 
425 

!,450 
325 
138 

!,700 
200 
350 
900 
225 

!,160 



111 
15 
37 
217 
53 
29 
19 
16 
285 
126 
179 
47 
17 
229 



112 
646 
67 



S72.00 
34.40 
42.50 
294.25 
52.27 
26.50 
30.50 
26.00 
262.75 
116.50 
155.50 
54.50 
34.40 
425.90 
20.00 
40., 50 
156.50 
106.50 
604.90 
124.25 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
STREETS PATCHED. 



247 



Location. 



No. of 
loads. 



Ainory 

Aiiiory extension 

Adams and Beauport 

Beauport 

Boynton 

Cartier 

Clinton 

Donald 

Dubuque 

Granite 

Joliette 

Kelley 

Milford 

Mast road 

McGregor 

North Main 

Kiver 

Second 

South Main 

West Bridge 




STKEETS TUBNPIKED WITH EGAD MACHINE 



Bath 

Ban- 

Blaine 

Conant 

Dunbarton noad 

Dartmouth 

Donald 

Eddy road 

Goff 

Green 

Hancock 

Glenwood 

Hooksett road . , 

Mast road 

New Mast 

Kiver road 

Second 

Schiller 

Straw road 

South Main 

Turner 

Quincy 



238 feet 

23S " 



750 
910 
11,360 
910 
560 

3,918 
-162 
238 

1,400 
532 

7,140 
798 
560 
980 

9,194 
372 

5,110 

4,298 
740 



50,946 feet 



Total, 50,946 feet, or 9.64 miles. 
Labor, $232.50. 



248 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



■VMiitewashing trees and fences 

Cleaning crossings, picking stones 

Cleaning gutters 

Cutting brush 



$38.00 


261.25 


662.37 


47.12 


$1,008.74 



ilATERIALS USED ON STREETS. 

Gravel 1,139 loads 

Clay 874 " 

Crushed stone 874 " 

2.887 loads 

Expense of running crusher $1.16o.0.j 

NEW CESSPOOLS. 



Cost of 
material. 



Bath back street — 

Blaine 

Charleston avenue . . 
Dubuque and Bath .. 

Fourth 

Kelley and Dubuque 

ISIastroad 

South Main 

Walker and Turner . 
Walker and Fourth . 

Total 



39.22 
66.79 
91. 5G 
20.18 
21.44 
09.18 
38.82 
69.40 
86.15 



S90.50 
26.50 
46.50 

132.00 
18.75 
24.75 
45.00 
28.50 
56.50 
77.00 



REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Cost of 
material. 



Barr and Douglas . . 

Fourth 

Hancock and Kiver 
Joliette and Amory 

McGregor 

McGregor 

South Main 

Walker and Second 
Walker 

Total 



S2.45 
3.80 
2.00 
1.67 



12.29 
11.25 
19.60 



S2.50 
3.50 
4.25 
2.50 
2.50 
4.25 
5.00 
7.50 

12.50 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
NEW STREETS. 



249 



Location. 


Length. 


Cut or fill. 


Labor. 




100 X 18 s 1 
100 X 18 X 6 
187 X 8 X 1 
125 X C X 1 
100 X 6 X 1 
100 X 18 X C 
88 X 11 X 6 
45 X 40 X 10 


Fill. 

Top dress. 

Cut. 

Fill. 

Cut. 

Fill. 











!550.00 




20.00 










., 


40.7.T 








845 ft. long. 




§110.75 



GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 



Location. 


Length in 
feet. 


Width in 

feet. 


Cut or fill. 


Labor. 


Beauport 


350 

,s 

375 
114 
450 
150 
480 


11 
10 

8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


Fill. 

Cut. 
Fill. 

Cut. 
Fill. 


S78.00 




19.25 




7.00 




40.00 




10.00 




20.50 


Joliette 


16.00 
43.25 






Total 


2,102 






8240.00 











PAVING STREETS. 



Length in 
feet. 



Loads of 
stone. 



Beauport 

Boynton 

Charleston avenue 

Fourth 

Ferry 

George 

Green 

Joliette 

Kelley 

Mast road 

Walker 

Wayne 

Wheelock 

Total 



508 
53 
G14 
820 
250 
175 
110 
208 
220 
168 
2,158 
47 
40 



126.00 
46.50 
33.75 
18.50 
40.50 
37.00 
28.50 
36.00 
8.50 
16.12 



250 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
PAYING RELAID. 



Location. 



Length in 
feet. 



Amoiy 

Blaine 

Cartier 

Coolidge avenue , 

Granite 

McGregor 

North Main. . • 



Soutli ISIain 

Second 

Wayne 

Wallcerand South Main. 
Wilton 



150 
'204" 



Total. 



EDGESTONES SET. 



Amory 

Beauport 

Bremer 

Charleston avenue 

Coolidge avenue 

Cartier 

George 

Green and Conaiit 

Hancock and Wheelock 

Joliette 

Joliette and Amory 

Kelley and Dubuque — 

Prince and Boynton 

Prince and Boynton 

South Main 

Walker and Fourth 

Wayne 




EDGESTONES RESET. 



Location. 


No. of feet. 


Labor. 




50 
180 
30 


3:8.50 


North Main 


14.50 


Wayne 


4.00 








Total 


2G0 


827.00 







STREET AND PAKK COMMISSIONERS. 
CLF^VXI.XG CESSPOOLS. 

April 

June 

October 

December 

■ Total charged to repairs of sewers 

Eepaired watering trough on Mast road. 

Labor charged to watering streets 



251 



$1'.22.12 
io:i.'i.5 

2o0.()2 



$484.74 



$15.75 



Division No. 7. 

Charles Francis, Agent. 
GUTTERS PAVED. 



Location. Feet. 


Labor. 


Auburn from Wilson east 


1,220 
600 
820 
780 
300 
50 


S143.35 




70.50 




9G.00 


Sonierviile from .Jewett to Cypress 


88.65 




35.35 


Summer at Dearborn 


9.36 






Total . 


3,770 


8443.21 







EDGESTONES SET. 



Auburn from Wilson 

Massabesic street 

Massabeslc from Bosher 
Sumner and Dearborn . . 

Total 



160 
44 

100 
50 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



Location. 



Harvard from Hall to Belmont. 



252 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORT.S 
CULVERTS. 



Location. 


Kind. 


Length. 


Bell street 


1 pipe. 
1 stone 
1 pipe 


50 ft 12 in 















MACADAMIZING STREETS. 



Location. 


Length in 
feet. 


Width in 
feet. 


Bell from Wilson east 


360 
200 


28 


Wilson from Valley south .... 


16 






Total . . . 


5G0 


44 







CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 


No. 


Cost. 
Material. 


C5st. 
Labor. 


Belmont and Silver 

Hall and Auburn 


4 $86.56 
4 83.32 


«55.00 
45.00 




8 «il69.88 


$100.00 







STONES SET. 



Location. 





1 

2 
2 
2 

1 






14 " 


Jewett anil Soiiiervillo 


28 " 8 " 
28 " " 


Somerville and Belmout 


29 " 




14 " G " 






Totals 


10 


139 feet 7 inches. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



253 



The following shows the location, cost per average foot and total 
cost of the sewers built in East Manchester during the past year: 

SEWERS. 



Location. 


Length in 
feet. 


Cost per 
foot. 


Total cost. 


Hall, Auburn to Cedar south back 


144 

644 
332 
462 
310 


80.981 §142.32 
1.284 345.1;.-. 


Massabesic east of Jewett 


6.804 4.482.04 




1.864 

1.412 

.444 






652.33 


Riley avenue,' south of Hayward 


137.85 


Totals 


2,161 


S2.952 


$6,379.31 









Division No. 4. 
Byhon [MOORE, Agent. 

The bridge at Little Cohas brook has been replanked and put in good 
condition. 

There has been about thirty-five rods of fence built in the district 
during the year. 

The district has been repaired and kept free from stone. 

Total amount expended, $251.75. 



Division No. 5. 

Makk E. Harvey, AGE:jrT. 

Removed loose stones from all roads in the division once a month 
during the season. 

Repaired all water bars and made all general repairs where needed. 

Broke out all roads after each snowstrom. 

Rebuilt two plank culverts on South road, 15 x 15 inches. 

Cut bushes ion one and one-half miles of road. 

Turnpiked 9,000 feet of road. 

Graveled 3,150 feet of road. 

Total amount expended, $411.12. 



Division No. 8. 

A. J. Gale, Agent. 

Widened Page street from Hanover to Bridge-street extension. 
Blasted and lowered Page-street hill three feet. 

Dug out Proctor hill and filled with stone, 100 loads used for paving 
150 feet of gutters. 



254 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Graveled Hanover street and used 110 loads; Candia road, used 80 
loads, and Lake Shore road and used 10 loads. 

Ploughed and turnpiked Broadwa^y avenue from Hanover street to 
Sherburn. 

Cleaned and relaid Hanover-street culvert, and Bridge-street exten- 
sion culvert. 

Ploughed and turnpiked Bridge-street extensiion. 

Removed all small stones from roads. 

Roads broken out after storms during winter months. 

Total amount expended for labor during the year, $905. G3. 



Division No. 9. 
Lester C. Paige, Agent. 

Graveled 45 rods on Derry road. 

Graveled 90 rods ion Mammoth road. 

I'loughed and turnpiked 23 rods on Derry road. 

Ploughed and turnpiked 10 rods on Paige road. 

Used 367 loads of gravel during the season. 

The bridge over Cohas brook on Mammioth road was planked new 
throughout and the one on Derry road was patched. 

Bushes have been cut, stones removed from roads, culverts repaired 
and all general repairs attended to throughout the district. 

Roads have been broken out after snowstorms and kept in a passa- 
ble condition during the winter months. 

Total amount expended, $444.50. 



Division No. 12. 

ErcEjs^E Libbey, Agent. 

All general repairs attended to throughout the district. 
Total amovint expended during the year, $490.50. 



Parks and Commons. 
John Seastrom, Agent. 

The public squares of the city have received the usual amount of 
care. Additional seats Avere placed in position and the old seats re- 
paired and repainted. The flower beds were renewed and trees and 
shrubs set out to take the place of any that had died during the 
season. 

The small ponds were kept free from snow and flooded as often as 
necessary, where the children enjoyed good skating. The expense is 
small as the labor is done by the regular men emploj'ed in the parks 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONEIIS. 



255 



and comrmons. There are nine ponds maintained, situated as follows: 
IMerrimack, three; Park and Tremont, two each; Hanover and Con- 
ford, one each. 

Extensive improvements were niadi' at Lalayelto ])ark which came, 
into possession of the city throuf>h the <?enerosity of tlie Amoskeag 
Manufacturing company. Edgestiones were set, gutters paved and con- 
crete walks laid on the sides of the park and a commencement made in 
grading the same. Total amount expended, $1,000.00. 

.\t Derryfield park a new barn was erected for the storage of hay at 
a cosi of al)out $800, also the old pound was rebuilt, making the old 
landmark now presentable to those visiting the pai'k. 

There was 1,600 feet of cobble gutter laid in Stark ])ark and tiic I'oad- 
way was repaired so that now it is in good condition. 

COJIMONS. 

Appropriation $4,500.00 

Received for band stand and sundry sources 56.00 

$4,556.00 

Labor $2,374.07 

Water works 700.00 

Grass seed 10.99 

Shrubs and flowers " 372.00 

Lum))er 28.74 

Hardware 6;;.01 

Lights 44.01 

Plumliing' repairs 53.04 

Oil and paint 28.55 

Concrete 463.56 

Fertilizer 56.00 

General repairs 82.69 

Incidentals 175.74 

4,452.40 

Transferred to reserve fund $103.60 

DEEEYFIELD I'AKK. 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Labor $567.63 

Insurance 11.75 

Grass seed 2.71 

Repairs .80 

Water works 24.00 

One-half expense building bai-n 378.00 

984.89 

Transferred to reserve fund $15.11 



256 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

STAKK PAEK. 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Labor $514.75 

Water works 12.00 

One-half expense bnildino- barn 378.00 

904.75 

Transferred to reserve fnnd $95.25 

SOrXH END PLAYOKOUND. 

Appropriation $75.00 

Labor $40.50 

Hardware 6.70 

Lumber 11.60 

Incidentals 2.00 

(ili.SO 

Transferred to reserve fnnd $8.20 

NORTH EXD PLAYGKOXraD. 

Appropriation $75.00 

Labor 79.25 

Overdrawn $4.25 

LAFAYETTE PAEK. 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Labor $318.20 

Stone work 321.20 

Concrete 360.60 

$1,000.00 

RIDDLE PLAYGROUND. 

Appropriation $50.00 

Labor 50.00 

We desire to thank His Honor, Mayor Reed, and each member of the 

city government, as well as all others for courtesies granted. To all 

our assistants, whatever their stations, we also extend thanks for the 

ability and interest they have shown in the work of the department. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

HORACE P. SIMPSON, 
GEORGE H. STEARNS, 
BYRON WORTHEN, 
Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 
January 1, 1904. 



EEPOET 

OF THE 

ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEERS DEPARTMENT. 



Office of the City Engineee, 

Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1903. 
To the Honor ahle Mayor and City Councils: 

Gentlemen, — The twenty-fifth annual report of the city engineer is 
herewith submitted, showing the expenditures and operations of the 
engineer's department for the year ending December 31, 1903. 

Office. 

Nine assistants have been employed in this department during the 
year 1903: Harrie M. Young, George W. Wales, Harry J. Briggs, Alfred 
T. Dodge, Henry A. Worthen, Ella Barker Davis, stenographer and 
typewriter; Hallet E. Robbing from June 16 to September 26; Law- 
rence O'Connor from July 1 to September 5; Harold B. Cleworth from 
August 19 to August 22, from September S to September 16, and 
September 23. 

Financial. 

E. A. stratton. 
1902. 

Dec. 15. To 2 reams paper, No. 27 $2.20 

1903. 
Aug. 17. To 1 E 131/3 unit No. 298 Wernicke 

bookcase $4.50 

1 E 131/2 comb. No. 298 Wernicke 

bookcase 4.75 

1 D 1014 comb. Wernicke book- 
case 3.00 

1 D Ex. top Wernicke bookcase 1.75 

$14.00 

Dec. 23. 4 D I214 unit No. 298 Wernicke 

bookcase @ $3.25 $13.00 

bottle paste .40 

$13.40 

W. p. GOOPMAN. 
1902. 

Dec. 27. To 1 lot carbon paper $0.50 

1903. 

Jan. 24. To diary $1.00 

Feb. 2. 1 gross pens .90 

4 dozen typewriter covers .... .32 

17. 1/2 dozen erasers .25 

$2.47 

259 



260 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Mar. 30. To 1/2 dozen erasers $0.25 

June 25. 300 catalogue envelopes .90 

26. 1 copy Trautwine's Civil Engi- 
neer's pocket book 5.00 

$6.15 

July 21. 1 box typewriter paper .90 

Dec. 18. 1 box typewriter paper $0.90 

1 box typewriter paper .85 

pencil tips 1.50 

4 dozen carbon paper 1.80 

19. 1 box typewriter paper 1.50 

9 dozen Koh-i-noor pencils .... 9.00 

2 1/2 dozen Higgins drawing ink 7.50 



JOHN B. VAUICK CO. 



May 20. 1 103 D. steel tape $3.21 

2 pr. rings for tape @ 50c 1.00 

1 pr. rings for chain tape .50 



$23.05 



1902. 
Dec. 


30. 

31. 
23. 


To 


1 6 inch by 1/0 inch lag screw 


$0.03 
.08 






1 pair \o 7'J"-' 5x7 brackets. . . . 


$0.11 
$0.10 


1903. 
Jan 




April 


2% pounds cotton rope @ 20c. 
1 box No. 14 D. P. staple tacks 


$0.55 
.05 





$4.71 



1 tape repaired, no charge. 

Aug. 8. 1 fountain pen 3.50 

Nov. 17. 1/2 doz. No. 84 special rules @ $3.50 per doz. 1.75 

Dec. 17. 2 plumb bobs @ 38c $0.76 

2 plumb bobs @ $1.00 2.00 

1 plumb bob .90 

3 steel engineer's scales @ $2.00 6.00 

1 50-foot Lufkin tape 3.00 

15x7 kodak 35.00 

2 12 ex. films @ $1.00 3.20 

12 6 ex. films @ 80c 9.60 

1 developing machine 10.00 

1 tripod 2.00 

2 wheels for truck @ 25c .50 

1 store truck 1.25 

developing films .80 

24 prints 2.40 

18. 1 pantagraph 4.00 

beam compass bars 24 inch @ 
20c.; 36 inch @ 30c.; 48 inch 

@ 40c.; GO inch @ 55c 1.45 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 261 



Dec. 18. To 1 head for Deane No. 1 un- 
limited T square $1.75 



HAERISON D. LORD. 



Mar. 30. 500 blanks $1.25 

400-page copy book 2.00 

TEMPLE & FARRINGTON COMPANY. 
1903. 

Jan. 5. . To 1 sheet pulpboard $0.08 

16. binding- 1 vol. sewer committee 

reports, 1902 .85 

binding 1 time book, Eng. Dept., 

1901 .85 

binding 1 vol. street commis- 
sioner's report, 1902 .85 

Feb. 6. 1 Eng. Dept. order book, No. 

6591 * 8.50 

16. binding 1 vol. time book, Eng. 

Dept., 1902 ...; ..87 

Feb. 24. 250 sheets Weston Imp. @ $27.00 

per ream $14.06 

Mar. 3. binding 1 book .87 

May 5. 24 blank books, No. (5656, @ 75c. 18.00 

June 12. rebinding 2 transit field books, 

Nos. 1 and 2, @ 50c $1.00 

16. rebinding 2 transit field books, 

Nos. 3 and 4, @ 50c 1.00 

19. rebinding 2 transit field books, 

Nos. 5 and 6, @ 50c 1.00 

23. rebinding 2 transit field books, 

Nos. 7 and 8, @ 50c 1.00 



$84.61 



1901. 
June To use of horse, 5 days @ $1.00 per 

day $5.00 

Nov. By second-hand harness 5.00 

1903, 
June To use of horse. 5 days at $1.00 per day $5.00 

J. ARTHUR WILLIAMS. 
1903. 

Jan. To cutting and blocking paper $1.50 

Feb. cutting and blocking paper .75 



$2.25 



$3.25 



$12.00 



$32.93 



262 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOliT.S 

June 25. To rebinding 2 transit field books, 

Xos. 9 and 10, @ 50c $1.00 

29. rebinding 2 transit field books, 

Xos. 11 and 12, @ 50c 1.00 

July 2. rebinding 2 transit field books, 

Nos. 13 and 14, @ 50c 1.00 

23. rebinding 2 transit field boioks, 

Nos. 15 and 16, @ 50c 1.00 

25. rebinding 6 transit field books, 
Nos. 17, IS, 19, 20, 21, and 22, 
@ 50c 3.00 



Dec. 21. binding 1 vol. plans $6.50 

rebinding 2 books @ 50c 1.00 

6 loose calfskin covers @ $1.00 6.00 



5LANCHESTE.R HARDWARE COMPANY. 

1903. 

Jan. 7. To 6 awning cleats @ 5c $0.30 

11/2 lbs. sash cord. No. 7, @ 22c. .33 



Mar. 30. 1,200 brass N. P. numbers @ 

$3.10 per hundred $37.20 

April 2. 1 ball B. C. twine .10 



& L. E. GURLEY, NEW YORK. 



$11.00 



$13.50 



$0.63 



$37.30 

Oct. 17. 10 lbs. No. 16 wire nails @ Si/gC. per lb $0.35 

Nov. 25. 1 dozen brass .screw hooks, Vo. . . $0.10 

1 doz. brass screw hoicks, 1.... .15 
l^ doz. brass screws, assorted, 

11/4 and 11/2 .10 

Dec. 5. 1/2 <2oz. brass cup hooks. 11/2 @ 

20c .10 

1/2 doz. brass square bend hooks, 

11/2 @ 20c .10 

1/2 doz. brass square bend hooks, 

34 @ 12c .06 

1/2 doz. brass square bend hooks, 

1/2 @ 10c .05 

7. 10 lbs. 16 wire nails @ 31/26 .35 

17. 5 lbs. 16 wire nails @ 31/20 .18 



$1.19 



1903. 
Feb. 2. Ta 1 No, 514 14-foor telemeter $13.00 



1903. 




Feb. 


6. 


April 


6. 


1903. 




Feb. 


20. 



• REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 263 

GEORGE W. DODGE SHOE COMPANY. 

To 1 pair rubber boots $3.25 

1 pair storm rubber boots 4.00 

E. G. SOLTMANN, NEW YORK. 

To 2 4-pouncl boxes "Monarch" 

stake tacks @ $1.49 per box. . $2.98 

express .50 

27. 1 5U-yard roll "Dragon" blue 

print paper 4.25 

express .45 

$8.18 

Mar. 20. 50-yard, 3G-inch "Dragon" blue print paper 4.25 

April 3. 1 50-foot "Little Victoria" tape - $3.95 

1 100-foot "Phoenix" tape 5.95 

6 doz. "Koh-i-noor" pencils .... 5.06 

2 Higgins ink .50 



Dec. 18. 1 roll 37-iuch "Par Excellence" 

tracing cloth $5.70 

11 yards cross section paper... 2.97 

1 44-yard roll 57-inch "Monarch" 
tracing paper 3.50 

50 yards 48-inch "Victor" detail 

paper 2.80 

50 yards 40-inch "Victor" detail 

paper 2.40 

3 yard roll 72-inch "Par Excel- 
lence" drawing jiaper, mount- 
ed @ $3.20 6.60 

10 yards 36-inch "Congress" blue 

print paper 1.00 

10 yards 36-inch "Leo" blue 

print paper 1.20 

10 yards 36-inch "Dragon" blue 

print paper 1.10 

3 bottles crj'stalline ink @ 15c. .45 

5 yards photolene blue print 
paper 1.00 

1 "Mionarch" slate ink stone, 

5-inch .60 

2 "Monarch" slate ink stones, 

314 -inch, @ 30c .60 

1 stick "Atlas" Chinese ink 1.88 

1 bottle "Kej'stone" waterproof 
solution .25 



$15.46 



264 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Dec. IS. To 1 drawing- table, stand and 

board $35.00 

$i)T.03 
Discount 2 per cent on $32.05 .G4 



Oct. For exchang-e service, including rental of tele- 
phone for 3 months ending December 
31, 1903 

Nov. . tolls October, 1903 $0.42 

bill rendered August, 1903 .90 

exchange service, including 
rental of telephone for 3 
months ending INIarch 31, 1904 $6.25 

tolls .25 



PNEUiLA.TIC HAJVD STA3IP COMPANY, BOSTON. 
1903. 

Mar. 2. To 1 oval stamp, less 25 per cent 

discount $1.32 

mailing expense .05 



$66.41 



WHITING & THOMSON, BOSTON. 
1903. 

Feb. 21. To 1 cleantype brush $2.00 

NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPAI^T. 
1903. 

Mar. For exchange service, including rental of tele- 

phone for (S. J. Lord residence) 3 

months ending March 31, 1903 $6.25 

exchange service, including rental of tele- 
phone for 3 months ending June 30, 

1903 6.25 

Julj' 25. exchange service, including rental of tele- 

phone for 3 months ending September 

30, 1903 6.25 

July 31. tolls, city engineer's office .... $0.60 
tolls, city engineer's office, De- 
cember, 1902 .20 

tolls, city engineer's office, Feb- 
ruary, 1903 .15 

tolls, city engineer's office, 

March, 1903 1.36 

$2.31 
Julv 13. Rebate ion main .10 



$2.21 



$1.32 



$6.50 



$1.37 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 265 



J. J. ABBOTT. 
1903. 

Mar. 6 To 5 pound.s paste $0.15 

1 brush .25 

23. 1 can G. C. P. vcnnilion .45 

1-S gallon turpentine .10 

CARL STRAUSS. 
1903. 
Mar. 7. To 1 extra wheel for German pen- 
cil pointer $2.00 

mail .10 



Dec. 23. To 50 feet pine @ 35c $1.75 

16 feet whitewood @ 60c .96 

working- 1.20 



$2.10 



FRANK S. BODWELL. 
1903. 

April 25. To 100 stone bounds @ $1.40 ^140.00 

HEAD & DOWST COMPANY. 
1903. 
May 23. To 2,000 2-foot pine grade stakes @ 

$6.00 per M $12.00 

3,000 2-foot maple, birch grade 

stakes @ $6.00 per M 18.00 

300 4-foot spruce grade stakes 

@ $32.50 per M 9.75 

250 18-inch hubs @ $12.50 per M. 3.13 



$42.5 



$3.91 



YAWMAN & ERBE MANUFACTURING COMPANY, BOSTON. 
1903. 
June 16. To 2,000 Xo. 200 "B." buff, 6x4 cards, F. E.. ptd. $7.50 

22. 1 special oak base with lock 

(for card index cabinet) $20.00 

Bj' repairs to drawers 2.50 

$17.50 

ALFRED K. IIOBBS. 

1903. 
June 23. To 10 feet 5-16 heavy rubber tubing (for gas 

stove) @ 10c. per foot $1.00 

J. G. JONES. 
1903. 
July 7. To trucking card index cabinet base to city 

engineer's office from freight depot $0.35 



266 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

PIKE & HEALD COMPANY. 
1903. 

July 9, To 14 14 -inch plugs @ 2c $0.28 

14 hours labor on hydrants @ 
350 4.90 

Sept. 26. S 14-inch plugs @ 2c $0.16 

111/0 hours labor on hydrants @ 

35c 4.03 



$5.18 



$4.19 



REMY BECHAED. 

1903. 
July 11. To 58/65 of engineer's department reports (68 
pages including cover, 350 copies) @ 75c. 
per page $43.50 

C. L. BEEGEE & SONS, BOSTON. 

1903. 
July 16. To repairing, cleaning and adjust- 
ing one Berger engineer's 
leveling instrument, 11 hours' 

labor @ 60c. per hour $6.60 

express charges paid when re- 
ceived .40 

$7.00 

HARKY A. PIPER. 
1903. 

Aug. 5. To 150 street .signboards @ Sc $12.00 

Dec. 25. 50 street signboards @ Sc $4.00 

CHARLES H. WOOD. 
1903. 
April 25. To painting street signs, Beech street. Brown 

avenue @ 25c $0.50 

July 14. painting 43 street signs @ 25c 10.75 

Aug. 22. painting 72 street signs @ 25c IS. 00 

Oct. 24. painting ISS street signs (a 2oc 47.00 

Dec. 26. painting 82 street signs @ 25c 20.50 

H. L. GOULD. 
1903. 
Dec. 14. To weekly hydrant bench mark report $12.00 

BYRON E. FINNEY & COMPAJJY. 
1903. 

Nov. 27. To caning 1 office chair $0.75 

boring and caning 1 office chair 1.00 

boring and caning 1 office stool .75 

Dec. 1. caning 1 office chair .75 

$3.25 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 

GEORGE W. WALES. 
1903. 

Feb. 2. To pasters -10.30 

3. express -SS 

9. 1 map 1-48 

21. street car fares 1-30 

April 25. street car fares 

Sept. 26. street car fares, leveling party .$13.75 

2 pans for testing cement .50 

express paid -15 

ALFRED T. DODGE. 
1903. 

May 23. To street car fares 

June 27. street car fares .$1.45 

bread for cleaning maps .13 

July 25. street car fares $1.30 

ball of string .25 

express paid .50 

Aug. 22. street car fares $0.65 

note book .15 

repairs .50 

Oct. 24. street car fares • $1.80 

4 lbs. nails -16 

Nov. 21. street car fares 

HENRY A. WORTHEN. 
1903. 

Jan. 24. To oil $0.10 

strip of iron .10 

cloth .33 

Mar. 21. street car fares $0.30 

12 cakes soap .24 

wrapping- paper .20 

can glue .25 

express paid .50 

Dec. 26. street car fares $0.30 

2 brushes .46 

1 can G. C. P. vermilion paint .45 

HARRIE M. YOUNG. 

Dec. 26. To 132 days, 3 hours service @ $2.75 per day 

124 days, 4 hours service @ $3.12 per day 
501/2 hours extra service @ 362/3C. per hour 



267 



$3.63 
$1.00 



$14.40 



$0.60 



$1.58 



$2.05 



$1.30 



$1.96 
$1.15 



$0.53 



$1.49 



$1.21 

$366.84 

388.34 

18.46 



268 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



GEORGE W. WALES. 

Dec. 26. To 179 days service @ $2.75 per day $492.25 

123 days service @ $3.12 per day 383.76 

129 hours extra service @ 36%c. per hour 47.07 

HAKRY J. BRIGGS. 

Dec. 26. To 185 days service @ $2.50 per day $462.50 

126 days service @ $2.84 per day 357.84 

32 hours extra service @ 331/3C. per hour 10. CO 

ALFRED T. DODGE, 

Dec. 26. To 185 days service @ $2.00 per day ' $370.00 

126 days service @ $2.27 per day 286.02 

25 hours extra service @ 262/30. per hour 6.57 

HENRY A. WORTHEN. 

Dec. 26. To 183 days service (a $1.75 per day $320.25 

76 days, 41/2 hours service @ $1.98 per day 151.52 

42 days service @ $2.10 per day 88.20 

23 hours extra service @ 231/30. per hour 5.33 

HALLET R. ROBBINS. 

Sept. 26. To 55 days service @ $1.75 per day $96.25 

4 days service @ $1.87 per day 7.48 

30 days service @ 1.90 per day 57.00 

Si/o hours extra service @ 231/30. per hour 1.98 

LAWRENCE O'CONNOR. 

Sept. 26. To 22 days service @ $0.85 per day $18.70 

36 days service @ $1.00 per day 36.00 

HAROLD B. CLEAViORITII. 

Sept. 26. To 12 days service @ $1.50 per day $18.00 

ELLA B. DAVIS. 

Dec. 26. To 298 days, 1/0 hour service @ $1.60 per day $477.73 

41/2 hours extra service @ 21c. per hour.. .95 

SAMUEL J. LORD. 

Dec. 26. To 1 year's saLiry $1,350.00 

1 year's team hire 150.00 

$1,500.00 

Total expense enirineer's department for 1903 $6,835.00 



REPORT OF THE CITV ENGINEER. 26^ 



SUilMARY. 

Appropriation to the engineer's department 
for the year 1903 $r,,8:'.r).0n 

Expenses of the engineer's department for the 

year 1903 $6,835.00 

$6,835.00 $fi,P''.'.no 

Orders. 

Number of orders for: 

Surveys, street lines, and grades 187 

Sewer grades 46 

Gutter grades 79 

Curb grades 53 

Corner curb grades 78 

Pine Grove cemetery, grades, levels and surveys.... 21 

Valley cemetery, grades, levels and surveys 8 

Merrill yard lines 1 

Stark park grades 2 

Lafayette park, lines and grades 13 

Flowage suits, levels and surveys 5 

Profile levels .'. . . 79 

Petitions 151 

Sewers and drains committee 22 

Street committee 19 

Eoad 'hearings 11 

Board of aldermen 2 

Board of examiners of plumbers 10 

Setting stone bounds 93 

Street signs -124 

Street numbers 284 

Hall street culvert 4 

Adams street culvert 2 

State Union armory 6 

Miscellaneous orders 36 

Total 1,636 

Field Work. 

Levels for profile for establishing grades (length in feet) 150,740 

for sewer profiles (length in feet) 1,800 

in Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 800 

in Valley cemetery (length in feet) 265 

for benches (length in feet) 118,441 

Other levels (length in feet) 14,275 

Total length of levels in feet 286,321 



270 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Cross section levels, (area in sq. ft.) 38.250 

Surveys of streets and street lines (length in feet) 64,863 

for street numbers (length in feet) 22,991 

in Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 1,540 

miscellaneous (length in feet) 10,460 

Total length of surveys in feet 99,854 

Street lines marked on ground (length in feet) 25,507 

Lot and avenue lines, Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 4,189 

Lot and avenue lines, Valley cemetery (length in feet) .... 1,525 

Lot and avenue lines, Merrill yard (length in feet) .... 112 

Lines for gutters (length in feet) 27,505 

Lines for curbs (length in feet) 9,854 

Lines for sewers (length in feet) 8,315 

Other lines (length in feet) 1,384 

Total length of lines in feet marked on the ground . . 78,391 

Grades set for sidewalks (length in feet) 32,028 

gutters (length in feet) 27,505 

curbs (length in feet) 9,854 

sewers (length in feet) 8,315 

building streets (length in feet) 9,192 

Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) .... 2,875 

Valley cemeterj^ (length in feet) 500 

Stark park (length in feet) 800 

other purposes (length in feet) 5,550 

Total length in feet of grades set 96,619 

Number of new lots staked out in Pine Gnove cemetery 13 

Number of old lots restaked in Pine Grove cemetery 52 

Number of old lots restaked in Valley cemetery 1 

Number of old lots restaked in Merrill yard 2 

Total number of cemetery lots staked out 68 

Stone bounds set 93 

BATTEKS SET. 

Adams street, culvert at Ray brook. 
Central West street. State Union armory. 
Hall street, culvert at Cemeterj^ brook. 
Valley cemetery, bank wall. 

Office Work, 
plans and profiles. 



Walnut, Webster northerly. 
Weston, Concord to Bridge. 
Total plans and profiles, 2. 



IIEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 271 



SEWER PT.AXS AND PROFILES. 

Albert, Harrison to Brook. 

Ash, Blodget to Salmon. 

Bartlett, Wayne to Amor3^ 

Blodget, Pine to Walnut. » 

Bremer, Coolidge avenue, westerly. 

Bridge, Beacon to Weston. 

Cartier, Kelley to Coiolidge avenue. 

Coolidge avenue, Cartier to Bremer. 

Harrison, Union to Beech. 

Maple, Blodget to Harrison. 

Mast, Rochelle avenue to Brock. 

Pine, North of Salmon to Blodget. 

Tayl'or, Hayward to Young. 

Thornton, Putnam to south of Sullivan. 

Union, Carpenter northerly-. 

Union, Clarke to Carpenter. 

Total sewer plan and profiles, 16. 

NTJMBEEING PLANS. 

Bay, Clarke to Trenton. Two plans. 
Cilley road, Nutt road tio Mammoth road. Nine plans. 
Hampshire lane, x\ufeurn to Spring. Four plans. 
Longwood avenue. Mammoth road to Woodbine avenue. 
Taylor, Cilley road to Vinton. 
Vernion, Brown avenue to railroad. 
Waj'land avenue, Massabesic to Eevere avenue. 
Total numbering plans, 19.- 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Amory, east of Columbus, land of George Blanchet. 

Ashland, Wilson road, Lowell and Concord, land of L. P. Labonte. 

Beech, land of E. P. Stevens, Chenetteville. 

Bedford road and River road, plan made by George Stark. 

Black brook and Merrimack river, land of Fisk & Norcross. 

Boynton, land of Kennard estate. 

Boynton and River road, land of N. Bond. 

Bridge and Weston, land of L. M. Aldrich. 

Brown avenue and Calef road, land of Kennard estate. 

Brown avenue, Pine Island park, land of Manchester Traction, Light 
& Power companj-. Two plans. 

Brown avenue, Hamilton, Adams, Hancock, Jefferson and Madison, 
land of W. Smith estate. 

Brown avenue at Goffe's Falls, land of Louis Perron. ' 

Brown avenue at Goffe's Falls, land of William Brooks. 

Brown avenue at Goffe's Falls, land of Ira Mcore estate and Devon- 
shire mills. 



272 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Brown avenue at GofFe's Falls, land of Ira W. Moore. 
Calef road and M. & L. E. E., land of J. T. P. Hunt. 
Cedar, land of Edward McDutfy. 

Central, Depot, (iranite, Franklin. Elm and Canal, land around freight 
depot. 

Central, land of Edward McDonald. 

Chester old line and Candia road, lots in Gth division. 

Chester old line, land of Bodwell & Eager. 

Cilley road, land of Clark and Spear. 

Clarke, Elm and Chestnut, land of Henry Chandler. 
Conant road and Old ^lill road, land of M. C. Paige. 

Concord and Maple, land of John Lee. 

Concord railroad and Amoskeag Company's south line, land of Man- 
chester Car Company. 
. Concord & Montreal railroad, near Brewery, land of Waterman Smith. 

Dajs Eobie, Fellows, Brown, Bond, River road. Elm, Bay, Chestnut, 
Adams, Ray, View, and Union, land in Flatiron district. 

Baj, Knight, Traverse, Eiver road. Elm, Bay, Chestnut, Adams, Ray, 
View, and Union, land in Flatiron district. 

Derry old line, plan of lots in 6th division. 

Elm and River road, land of A. H. Stark. 

Elm, land of J. W. C. Pickering. 

Elm and Hampshire lane (Merrimack block), land of H. Foster estate. 

Elm, Market and Hamjishire lane, land of H. Foster estate. 

Hall, Harvard, Prescott and Young, land of Nap. Bournival. 

Hall, extension Central to Lake avenue. 

Hanover and Lake avenue, land of William Stark estate. 

Hanover and Merrimack, land of Elliott. 

High, land and buildings of John Hickey. 

High, land and buildings of John T. Moore. 

Huse road and Maynard avenue, land of Robert Heath. 

Lake Massabesic, land of Hunting. 

Lake Massabesic, land bought of A. F. Fox by city of Manchester. 
Two plans. 

Lake Shore road, land of E. W. Harrington. 

Land set off on execution, Daniel George, administrator, J. D. Riddle. 

Land of Cyrus Moore estate. 

Laurel, between Pine and Union, land of Thomas Shea. 

Laxson avenue, Nutt road. Wilson, Hall, Belmont, Taylor, and Cy- 
press, land of H. A. Laxson and T. L. Hoitt. 

Lincoln, Amherst and Chester, land of William O. Donnelly. 

Lowell, west of Chestnut, land of Kennard estate. 

Lowell and Wilson road, land of S. K. Hayes. 

Main, West Hancock and Log, land of Stark estate. 

Main and Milford, church lot. 

Main, land of Clapp and others. 

Mammoth road and Deiryfield park, land of Kennard estate. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 273 

Mammoth road and 'Smyth road, land of Frederick Smyth estate. 

Mammoth road, land of N. C. Hezelton. 

.Mammoth road and Chester road, land^ of J. T. P. Hunt. 

Mammoth road, land of Fred F. Hall. 

Massabesic and Old Falls road, I'and of Fred S. Sloan. 

Mast, land of Eastman & Stark. 

Mast road. River road, and Bedford road. Copy of plan made by 
George Stark. • 

Mast road and Rockland avenue, land of Hiram H. Gove. 

Milford, land of W. Q. Riddle. 

Nutt road and Beech, land of C. M. Thompson. 

Nutt road, Nutt woodlot. 

Piscataquog river. Copy of plan made by George Stark. 

Railroad, land of Mrs. Gemmel. 

Ray brook. River road to east of Union, showing size and location of 
culverts. 

Riddle and Tilton, land of Lorett Bartlett. 

River road to Hooksett, land sold by J. Harvey to I. Dow. 

River road, land divided between Samuel Hall and A. Robertson. 

Sampson, Dewey, Schley, Hampshire and Oak avenues, First, Second, 
Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth. Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Tenth streets 
and Pine court (Mammoth park), land of Harry W. Harvey. 

Taylor, land sold by Ferren to Prout. 

Thayer, Clarke, Elm, Everett, and River road, land of C. H. Thayer 
estate. 

Union north of Clarke, land of Kidder and Griffin. 

Union, Beech, Hayward, and Harvard, land of William B. Burpee. 

Union, part of Campbell estate. 

Valley, Massabesic, and Porter, land of D. H. Xutt. 

Wilson, Kingston, Lincoln, Silver, Harvard, and Young, land of Kim- 
ball Carriage company. 

Winter, land of Dr. James Sullivan. 

Wood lot, land of John Plummer. 

Wood lot, part of Blodgett farm, land of Kennard Brothers. 

Young road and C. & P. R. R., location of railroad corners. 
Total miscellaneous plans, 86. 

WORKING PLANS. 

Amherst, Beech to Maple. Profile. 
Ash, Amherst to Concord. Profile. 
Ash, Concord to Lowell. Profile. 
Ashland, East High to Bridge. Profile. 
Auburn, Wilson to Hall. Profile. 
Auburn, Hall to Belmont. Profile. 
Beacon, Lowell to Bridge. Profile. 
Beech, Summer to Cedar. Profile. 
Bell, Wilson to Amoskeag Company's line. Profile. 
18 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Belmout, Lowell to Bridge. 1 rotile. 

Belmont, Bridge to Pearl. Profile. 

Belmont, Amherst to Concord. Profile. 

Bismarck, Milford northerly. Profile. 

Bridge, Ashland to Belmont. 1 rofile. 

Canal, West Bridge to Dean. Profile. 

Cedar, Beech to Maple. Profile. 

Central West, Franklin to Canal. Profile. , 

Chestnut, Concord to High. Profile. 

Cleveland, Second to Blaine. Profile. 

Coolidge avenue, Kelley 1,118 feet northerly. Profile. 

Coolidge avenue, location of new line. 

Dickey, Sylvester to Alpine. Profile. 

Donald 595.33 feet south of Milford to Manchester-Bedford town line. 
Profile. 

Elm. Kidder to Mollis. Profile of west side. 

Fourth, Walker to Feri-y. Profile. 

Franklin west back. West Central to Pleasant. Profile. 

Green, Wilson to Hall. Profile. 

Hall. Concord to Lowell. Profile. 

Hall, Summer to Bell. Profile. 

Hall, Lowell to Bridge. Profile. 

Hanover, Beacon to Merrimack. Profile. 

Harrison, Union to Walnut. Profile. 

High East, Belmont to Weston. Profile. 

Hollis, Elm to CanaL Profile. 

Jewett, Haj-ward to Massabesic. Profile. 

Kidder, Elm to Elm west back. Profile. 

Lake avenue, AYilson to Hall. Profile. 

Lake avenue. Hall to Cass. Profile. 

Linden. Myrtle to Prospect. Profile. 

Lowell, Jiirch to Chestnut*. Profile. 

Lowell, Chestnut t.o Pine. Profile. 

Lowell, Belmont to Highland. Profile. 

Main. Mast to Milford. Profile. 

Main, A and I'ownian, Parker sclioo] lot and surrounding lots and 
buildings. 

Nashua, Ooncord to Lowell. Profile. 

North, Walnut to Beech. I'rofile. 

Orange, Chestnut to Pine. Profile. 

Pine, Brook to Sagamore. Profile. 

Pine, Lowell to High. Profile. 

Pleasant, Elm to Canal. Profile. 

Prospect, Walnut to Beech. Profile. 

Prout avenue, Haj-ward .southerl3'. J'rofile. 

Ray brook, Eiver road to L^nion, showing location of culverts. 

IJochelle avenue, Milford to Mast. Profile. 



EEPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 276 



Kochelle avenue niid Charleston avenue, detail of corner curb. 

Russell, Myrtle to Harrison. Profile. 

Sagamore, Beech to Oak. Profile. 

Spruce at J. W. Fellows' block, showing- amount walls are out of 
plumb. For Building Inspector E. S. Foster. 

Third, Piscataquog river to M. & N. W. E. 11. Profile. 

Union, showing location of brook at Ray brook gardens. 

Valley cemetery west side, Auburn southerly. Profile. 

Valley cemetery, plan, sections and elevation of bank wall on west 
line. 

Valley, Elm to Pine. Profile. 

Valley, Wilson to Taylor. Profile. ' 

Walker, Turner to South Main. Profile. 

Walnut, North to Webster. Profile. 
Total working plans, 66. 

TRACINGS. 

Detail plan of fountain casting for street and park commissioners. 
Main, A and Bowman, Parker school lot and surrounding lots and 
buildings. 

Spruce. J. W. Fellows' lilock. showing amount walls are out of 
plumb. For Building Inspector E. S. Foster. 

Valley cemetery, plan, sections, and elevation of bank wall on west 
line. 

Total tracings. 4. 

BLUE PRINTS. 

City of Concord, map for Telephone company. Three prints. 

Citv nf Manchester and vicinity, map for Telephone company. Two 
prints. 

City of Manchester map. Twenty-six prints. 

City of Manchester, west side. Four prints. 

City of Manchester, east side. Four prints. 

Detail plan of fountain casting for street and park commissioners. 

Detail plan of grade stakes. Eight prints. 

Main, A and Bowman. Parker school lot and surrounding lots and 
buildings. Ten prints. 

Spruce, J. W. Fellows' block, showing amount walls are out of 
plumb. For Building Inspector E. S. Foster. Three prints. 

State of New Hampshire, map. Nine prints. 

Walley cemetery plan, sections and elevation of bank wall west side. 
Three prints. 

Total blue prints. ~?>. 

SUMMAKY. 

Plans and profiles 2 

Plans and profiles (sewer) 16 



276 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Numbering plans 19 

Miscellaneous plans 86 

"Working' plans ^'^ 

Tracings "i 

Blue prints ~3 

Sewer book (part sheets) 10 

City clerk's highway book ^56 

Total -13 

Six tracings showing city sewers have been brought up to date. 

Maps broug-ht to date, 5. 

Plans broiig-ht up to date, 8S. 

Plans made for establishing grade on laid out streets, 67,312 feet. 

Plans made for establishing- grade on streets not laid out, 14,075 feet. 

Total, 81,387 feet. 

Lot owners looked up, .59,964 feet. 

Sewek Licenses. 

At a meeting of the board of mayor and aldermen November 19, 1897, 
the cit3' engineer was instructed "to examine the books in his office and 
present to said board a list of property owners who had neglected to 
pay the license fee required by the city laws and ordinances for en- 
trance to the city sewers." 

The records were examined and a list compiled giving the name of 
the property owner, the location of the lot. the street frontage, and 
the license fee due upon each and every piece of occupied property 
within one hundred feet of a public sewer. 

The said list was given in hand to the city clerk, as clerk of the board 
of mayor and aldermen. 

The list comprised 1,017 names, and a notice was sent each one by 
the city clerk. A summarized statement of the ground covered to 
January 1, 1904, follows, viz.: 

Number of names January 1, 1S<)8 1,017 

Paid during 1898 277 

Granted free during 1898 76 

Paid prior to 1898, located during year 121 

Paid during 1899 24 

Granted free during 1899 12 

Paid during 1900 2 

Not connected 1 

Paid during 1901 2 

Granted free during 1901 1 

Paid during 1902 2 

Paid during 1903 -.i 

Paid prior to 1898, not located 60 

Paid previously 3 

Paid in part 1 



KEPOltT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 277 

Covered by old permit 1 

Not recorded paid, receipts sliown o 

Recorded paid, no record of cash received 2 

Claims to have been paid, no record 1 

Licenses taken ont, not paid ««>■ 18 

Not heard from 405 

Total number not settled January 1. lUOl! 49(1 



1,017 1,017 
Number of licenses granted delinquent sewer enterers during- 

190;; ■> 

Number of licenses granted new sewer enterers during 1903.. 7(3 

Number free licenses granted new sewer enterers during 1903 4 

Total number of licenses granted during 1903 S:; 

Amount of money recorded as collected from three delinquent 

sewer enterers during 1903 $42.15 

Amount of money recorded as collected from new sewer en- 
terers during 1903 l,l,-,4.()2 

Amount of money recorded as collected on note given in 1902, 

due in 1903 15.00 



Total amount of money collected during 1903 $1,226.77 

All monej'S are collected by the city clerk. 

Street Signs. 

Street signs on hand Januar3' 1, 1903 51 

Street signs ordered during 1903 387 

Street signs put up during 1903 424 

Street signs on hand January 1, 1903, repainted 14 

438 438 

The expense of street signs is charged to the appropriation for the 
engineer's department. (See financial report under Charles H. Wood 
and Harry A. Piper.) 

Street Numbers. 

Figures on hand January 1, 1903 936 

Figures ordered during 1903 1,200 

Figures used during 1903 SIO 

Figures on hand January 1, 1904 1,326 

2,136 2,136 

Numbers assigned during 1903 248 

Numbers replaced during 1903 .34 

Numbers changed during 1903 2 



278 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The expense of street numbers is charged to the appropriation for 
the engineer's department. (See financial report under Manchester 
Hardware company.) 

Stoxe Bounds Set in 1903. 

A street and South Main street, northwest corner 

A street and Bowman street, northeast corner 

Amory street and Joliette street, northwest corner 

Ash street and Concord street, southeast corner 

Ash street and Blodget street, northwest corner 

Ash street and Sag-amore street, southeast corner 

Ash street and Salmon street, southwest corner 

Beacon street and East High street, northwest corner 

Beaeon street and East High street, northeast corner 

Beacon street and East High street, southwest corner 

Beacon street and East High street, southeast corner 

Beacon street and Bridge street, southwest corner 

Beaeon street and Bridge street, southeast corner 

Beauport street and Wayne street, northeast corner 

Beauport street and Amory street, southeast corner 

Belmont street and East High street, northwest corner 

Belmont street and East High street, northeast corner 

Belmont street and East High street, southeast corner 

Belmont street and Bridge street, northeast corner 

Belmont street and Bridge street, southeast corner 

Belmont street and Old Bridge street, northwest corner 

Belmont street and Mead street, southwest corner 

Blucher street and Sullivan street, northeast corner 

Blucher street and Sullivan street, southwest corner 

Blucher street, first angle south of Sullivan street 

Blucher street, second angle south of Sullivan- street, west side 

Blucher street, north end Montgomery street, west side 

Boynton street and Bank street, northwest corner 

Boynton street and Bank street, southwest corner 

Boynton street and Prince street, southwest corner 

Brock street and Charleston avenue, northeast corner 

Central West street. State Union armory lot, southwest corner 
Central West street, State Union armory lot, southeast corner 

Conant street and Green street, southwest corner 

Conant street and Green street, southeast corner 

Conant street and Quincy street, southwest corner 

Conant street and Quincy street, southeast corner . . . , 

Conant street and Montgomery street, northwest corner 

Conant street and Montgomery street, northeast corner 

Coolidge avenue, 55.5.55 feet north of Kelley street 2 

Coolidge avenue, 655.55 feet north of Kelley street 2 

Coolidge avenue, 68.3.(59 feet north of Kelley street, west side.. 1 



IIEPOIIT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. '2i 

Cooliflfje avenue and Bremer street, northwest corner 

Coolirlffe avenue and Bremer street, southwest corner 

Coolidge avenue, 758.69 feet north of Kelley street 

Coolidge avenue, 858.69 feet north of Kelley street 

Coolidge avenue, 918.06 feet north of Kelley street 

Coolidg-e avenue, 1,118.06 feet north of Kelley street 

Elm street and Stark avenue, southeast corner 

Harvard street and Belmont street, northeast corner 

Harvard street and Belmont street, southeast corner 

Harvard street and Taylor street, northwest corner 

Harvard, street and TayLor street, southwest corner 

High street and Pine street, northwest corner 

Highland avenue and Burbank avenue, northeast corner 

Highland avenue and Burbank avenue, southeast corner 

Highland avenue and Eimmon avenue, northeast corner 

Highland avenue and Rimnnon avenue, southeast corner 

Highland avenue and Fogg avenue, northeast corner 

Highland avenue and Fogg avenue, southeast corner 

Main South street, first angle north of A street 

yidin South street, second angle north of A street 

Merrimack street and Hall street, southeast corner 

Nashua street and Ash street 

Nashua street and Bridge street, northwest corner 

Nashua street and Arlington street, southeast corner 

Pearl street and W'arren street, southwest corner 

Pearl street and Warren street, southeast corner 

Pearl street and Linden street, southeast corner 

Pearl street and Morrison street, southwest corner 

Pearl street and Hall street, southwest corner 

Pearl street and Hall street, southeast corner 

Pearl street and Belmont street, southwest corner 

Pleasant street, State Union armory lot, nortliwest corner .... 
Pleasant street, State Union armory lot, northeast corner .... 
Eochelle avenue and Charleston avenue, southwest corner . . 

Sagamore street and Oak street, northwest corner 

Sagamore street and Beech street, northeast corner 

Sullivan street, south side, angle opposite east line of Whipple 

street 

Sullivan street, south side, angle west of Whipple street .... 
Valley cemetery, west side, 23 feet offset line 

9 
Coal Tar Paving. 

Tables Nos. 1, 2, o, 4, 5, 6, 7, S, and 9 give the location, number o 
square yards, price per square j'ard, total cost and date when measure 
of all coal tar "concrete" laid during the j^ear as follows: Table No. 
street crossings (new); Table No. 2, street crossings (repairs); Tab 



280 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Ko. 3, sidewalks (new); Table No. 4, sidewalks (repa.irs); Table No. 5, 
street paving (new); Table No. 6, street paving (repairs); Table No. 7, 
gutters (new); Table No. S, miscellaneous work; Table No. 9, summary 
of Tables 1. 2. ?,, 4. 5. 6, 7, and 8. 

ABSTRACT REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON STREETS FOR THE 
YEAR 1903. 

PERSONNEL OF THE COMMITTEE. 

Alderman from ward 4, Charles H. Clark, chairman. 

Alderman from ward 9, Mederique R. Maynard. 

Alderman from ward 6, Rollin B. Johnston. 

Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

Tables Nos. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 have been compiled to be used in 
the annual report of the engineer's department in lieu of citing the 
records of the committee on streets in detail. The tables give all the 
necessary information pertaining to the petitions that have been acted 
upon hy the committee during the year 1903, also highways laid out, 
widened and straightened, and grades established, by the board of 
mayor and aldermen during the year. 

Table No. 10 is a list of the petitions for new highways that have 
been acted upon by the committee during the j-ear. 

Table No. 11 is a list of the petitions for establishing grades that 
have been acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table No. 12 is a list of the miscellaneous petitions that have been 
acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table No. 13 is a list of highways that have been laid out by the 
board of mayor and aldermen during the j^ear. 

Table No. 14 is a list of the highway grades established by the board 
of mayor and aldermen during the year. 

Table No. 15 is a list of the miscellaneous petitions that have been 
acted upon by the board of maj-or and aldermen during the j-ear. 
Distances are given in feet. 

ABSTRACT REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SEWERS AND 
DRAINS FOR THE YEAR 1903. 

PERSONNEL OF THE COMMITTEE. 

Alderman from ward 9, Mederique R. Maynard, chairman. 

Alderman from ward 2, Fred K. Ramsey. 

Alderman from ward 1, Charles F. Reed. 

Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

Tables Nos. 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24 have been compiled to 
be used in the annual report of the engineer's department in lieu of 
citing the records of the committee on sewers and drains in detail. 
The tables give all the necessary information pertaining to the peti- 
tions, orders for sewers passed by the city councils, sewers built and 
not built up to January 1, 1904. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 281 

Table No. 10 is a list of all petitions that have been acted upon dur- 
inu- the year, also the manner in which and date when each petition 
was acted upon and disposed of by the committee. 

Table. No. 17 is a list of sewers ordered in np to January 1, 1903, giv- 
ing- the distances built, distances built in excess of order, and the dis- 
tances remaining- unbuilt up to January 1, 1904. 

T:ible No. 18 is a list of sewers ordered built during- 1903, giving the 
distances built, distances ordered that are unnecessary, and the dis- 
tances remaining unbuilt up to January 1, 1904. 

Table No. 19 is a list of sewers built in 1903 not ordered by the board 
of mayor and aldermen. 

Table No. 20 is a list of sewers ordered in but not built up to January 
]. 1904. This table is compiled from the first, second, fourth and 
eighth columns of Tables Nos. 17 and IS. 

Table No. 21 is a summary of Tables Nos. 17 and IS. 

Distances are given in feet. 

SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Table No. 22 gives the location, material, size, and length of sewers, 
together with the number of manholes, lampholes, house Y's and cess- 
pool Y's built during the year 1903. 

Table No. 23 gives the material, size, and length of all public sewers 
in the city of Manchester, January 1, 1904. This taWe further gives the 
total length (in feet) of each size of sewer and the number of man- 
holes on each size, also the total length (in feet and miles) of each 
material. 

Table No. 24 is a summary of the sewerage system by years, from 
January 1, ISSO, to January 1, 1904. It gives the length in miles con- 
structed and cost each year, also the average cost per mile for each 
year. The third column gives the number of miles constructed to date 
each year. It will be noted that January 1, 1S80, there were 17.06 miles 
constructed, the cost not being recorded. January 1, 1890, there were 
recorded 2,003 house connections. Beginning- with this date, columns 
four and five give the number of connections recorded each year and 
the total number recorded to date each year. 

A-BSTRACT EEPOKT OF THE BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 
PLUMBERS. 

In accordance Avith an act (chapter 55, Laws of 1S99) passed by trie 
New Hampshire state legislature, entitled "An act authorizing the ex- 
amination of plumbers and regulating the practice of plumbing and 
house drainage," a board of examiners of plumbers was appointed by 
His Honor Mayor William C. Clarke of Manchester, N. H., as follows: 
William K. Robbins of the board of health, Christian L. Wolf, a master 
plumber, and Samuel J. Lord, city engineer (William K. Robbins, presi- 
dent; Samuel J. Lord, clerk). 



282 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Following is a statement of the expenditures of the board for the 
year 1903: 

W. p. GOODMAN. 
1903. 

Jan. 23. To 1 M sheets typewriter paper .$1.S0 

Aug-. 28. 1 doz. carbon paper $0.-10 

Sept. 11. 1 box typewriter paper .90 

$1.30 

Xov. 11. 1 cash book $0.53 

1 box typewriter ]iaper .90 

Dec. 2. 1 box typewriter paper 1.10 

$2.53 

PIKE & HEALD COMPANY. 
1903. 

Feb. 0. To 27 lbs. block lead @ 514c $1.42 

151/2 lbs. wiping- solder @ 20c.. 3.10 

9. * 41 lbs. lead pipe @ (5y,c 2.07 

10. 2 gals, g-asoline @ 20c .40 

14. 331/2 lbs. lead pipe @ 6c 2.01 

191/2 lbs. wiping solder @ 20c.. 3.90 

$13.50 

May 14. 5 ft. 4 in. soil pipe @ 22c $1.10 

June 3. 2 gals, gasoline @ ISc $0.36 

1 12-inch hub end of 4-inch Lt. 

soil pipe .25 

2 IS-inch hubs end of 4-inch Lt. 

soil pipe @ 38c .76 

13 lbs. wiping solder @ 23c 2.99 

21 lbs. block lead @ oi/oC 1.16 

9 lbs. 4-inch lead pipe @ 6%c .61 

.$6.13 

July 3. J 1 qts. gasoline $0.35 

Sept. 1.5. IC, lbs. wiping solder @ 22e $3.52 

5 lbs. sheet lead @ 71/2C .38 

.$3.90 

TE-MPLE i»fc FARIUNGTON COMPANY. 

1903. 
Feb. 6. To binding 4 vols, records of board 
of examiners of plumbers @ 

S7c $3.48 

Mar. 21. 1 board of examiners record 

book, No. 661(i 9.50 

1 cash book 1.00 

$13.98 

KEMY BECHARD. 

1903. 

July 11. To 7/65 of engineer's department reports. (68 
pages including cover, 350 copies) @ 75c 
per page $5.25 



KEPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEElt. 283 



SUMMARY. 

Appropriated to the board of examiners of plumbers for 

the year 190P> $50.00 

Expenses of the board during year 190:! $49.84 

Balance unexpended -Hi 

$30.00 $50.00 

Kenewal fees received for ()8 plumbers' certificates @ 50c. 
(a renewal fee of 50c. per certificate is required by state 

law) $;;4.oo 

Renewal fees received for 12 plumbers' licenses @ 50c. (re- 
quired by law) <)-00 

Examination fee for 6 plumbers' licenses (required by law) 6.00 

Paid to city treasurer (the state law requires all fees to be 

paid into the city treasury) $46.00 

Table No. 25 gives the name, address, and number of the application 
of each and every person making renewal application to the board for 
a plumber's certificate. This table also gives the class of certificate 
applied for (master or journeyman), the number of the certificate, date 
of renewal, and expiration of said certificate, also the renewal fee paid 
by the applicant. 

Table No. 26 gives the name, address, and number of the application 
of each and every person making renewal application to the board for 
a plumber's license. This table also gives the class of license applied 
for (master' or journeyman), the number of the license granted, date 
of renewal and expiration of said license, also the fee paid by the appli- 
cant. 

Table No. 27 gives the name, address, and number of application of 
each and every person making application to the board for a plumber's 
license. This table also gives the class of license applied for (master 
or journeyman), the number of the license granted, date of issue, and 
expiration of said license, also the fee paid by the applicant. 

Table No. 28 is a summary of Tables Nos. 25, 26, and 27. 



284 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPOKTS. 



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301 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



303 



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304 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

TABLE No. 19. 



SEWERS BUILT IN 1903 WITHOUT AN ORDER. 



Charleston avenue *. 

Hall* 

Hall 

Pleasant 

Riley avenue 

Walker* 



Rochelle avenue, westerly — 
Auburn to Cedar south back . 

At Spruce south back 

Franklin, westerly 

South of Hay ward, southerly 
Turner, westerly 



For cesspools. 



REPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



305 



TABLE No. 20. 
SEWERS ORDERED IN, BUT NOT BUILT, TO JANUARY 1, 1904. 



Date of 
order. 



Amherst. 
Ailams .. . 
Amory... 
Auburn .. 



Auburn south back. 

Bay 

Beacon 

Beech 



Belmont 



Blaine 

Bowman 

Bremer north back. 

Bridge 

Calef road 

Cedar south back. . . 



Central , 

Central south back 

Chestnut 

Clarke 

Clay 

Columbus 

Concord 



Dover. 
Elm... 



Falls avenue 

Foster avenue — 

Frederick 

Front 

George 

Grove south back 

Hall road 

Hale 

Hall 



Hanover . 
Harrison 



Harvell 

Hayes avenue 

Hay ward 

Hevey east back. 



High East . 



Hosley 

Huntress , 

Jones 

Main South 

Mammoth road , 



Maple 

Massabesic. 

Mast 

Mast road . . 
Merrill 



Union to Ashland 

Carpenter to Trenton 

Alsace to Jolietle 

Cypress, easterly 

East of Canton, easterly. 

Hall, easterly 

Clarke to Carpenter 

Amherst to Concord 

Harvard to Hayward 

Bridge to Orange 

South of Sonierville to Dix 

Old Bridge to Bridge 

Second to Hiram 

Mast to Milford 

Coolidge ave. west back to Rimmon 

Beacon to Weston 

Baker, northerly 

Beech, westerly 

Maple to Lincoln 

Milton to Beacon 

Chestnut to Union 

Carpenter to Trenton 

Elm to Chestnut 

Cypress to Je wett 

Amory, southerly 

Pine east back to Union 

Hall, easterly 

Clinton, northerly 

Shasta to Baker 

Railroad bridge to Elm avenue 

Monroe south back to Clarke 

Trenton to Rowell 

Old Falls road, easterly 

Valley to Hayward 

Second, easterly 

Eddy to north of hotel 

No. of Milford to Charleston ave — 

Wilson, easterly 

Massabesic to Nelson 

Schiller, southerly 

Clay to Dix 

Lowell to E:i.'<t High 

East of Alfred to Highland 

Maple to Oak 

Belmont, westerly . . 

Hale to South Main. 

Old Falls road to Chase avenue 

Ainsworth avenue to Cypress 

Wayne, northerly 

So. of Amory to Columbus avenue. . 

Kelley to Bremer 

West of Hall to Belmont 

Belmont to Beacon 

Grove to Summer. 

Prince to McDuffle 

Nelson to Benton 

Schiller to Allen 

Massabesic to Nelson 

Nelson, northerly 

Cedar to Cedar south back 

Hall road to ISIammoth road 

Rochelle avenue to Brock 

Mast to old Bedford-Goffstown line. 
Jewett, easterly 



531 

252 
800 

90 
150 
910 

71 
272 
629 
441 
200 
400 
843 



175 
600 
307 
860 
147 
290 
439 
128 
152 
86 
160 
106 

1,373 
707 
448 
345 
140 
175 

2,800 
52 
200 
601 
450 
250 
143 
134 
350 



148 
146 
396 
350 
152 
550 
540 
163 
550 
1,340 



May 2, lf93 

Dec. 19, 1902 

Oct. 7, 1902 

May 2, 1899 

Nov. 9, 1894 

Jan. 7, 1896 

AprU 14, 1903 

Nov. 10, 1896 



Oct. 
Dec. 
June 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Oct. 



.Tuly 
June 
May 



4, 1898 

6, 1900 
4, 1901 

7, 1896 

6, 1892 

7, 1902 
4, 1898 

26, 1902 

4, 1901 

5, 1896 
13, 1903 

Sept. 6, 1898 
July 9, 1901 
Oct. 7, 1902 
April 14, 1903 
June 26, 1903 
July 26, 1899 
Sept. 12, 1899 
Sept. 6, 1887 
" 4, 1894 
May u, 1890 

6, 1890 
June 4, 1895 
Feb. 4, 1896 
Nov. 5, 1901 
July 14, 1896 

" 26, 1899 



5, 1893 
7, 1902 
2, 1897 
5, 1898 
9, 1894 



Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Dec. 19, 1902 

July 25,1902 

■Ian. 4, 1S97 

Oct. 3, 1899 

Sept. 1, 1896 

Nov. 9, 1894 

•Ian. 2,1899 



Sept. 



7, 1897 
7, 1896 
July 10, 189S 
June 4, 1901 
Aug. 30, 1901 
July 31, 1903 
June 26, 1903 
Nov. 3, 1903 
Aug. 5,1898 
Dec. 4, 1900 
May 2, 1899 
Aug. 5, 1898 
May 13, 1903 
2, 1899 
Dec. 31, 1901 
Mar. 13, 1900 
iJune 5, 1900 



20 



306 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE No. 20.— Continued. 



Date of 
Older. 



Montgomery east back. 

Nelson 

Nutt road 

Orange 

Pine 

Pine east back 

Plummer 

Prescott 

Prospect : 

Rimmoii 

Rimmon east back 

Biver road 

Russell 

Sagamore 

Scbiller 

Second 



Soraerville . 



pruce.. . 
ylvester 
Taylor.. . 



Union east back 
Valley 



Walnut 



" east back. 

Wentworth 

Weslon 

William 



Kelley to Bremer 

Hall road to Mammoth i-oad 

Silver to Baker 

Belmont, westerly 

t-ilver to Plummer 

South of Concord to Concord 

Pine to Union 

Maple, easterly 

Hall, easterly 

South of Wayne to Putnam 

Kelley to Mason 

Clarke to Park avenue 

South of Bloilget to Sagamore 

Chestnut to Pine 

Hale to South Main 

North of Frederick to Frederick.. . 

South of Schiller to Harvell 

Union to Maple 

Hall to west of Cypr'^ss 

Cypress, westerly 

East of Canton, easterly 

Milford to Avon 

Souih of Valley, southerly 

Hayward to Som<?rville 

Somerville to Dix 

Clarke to Trenton 

Trenton, northerly 

South of Christian brook, southerly 

Cypress, westerly 

Elm to Wilson 

Salmon, southerly 

Webster, northerly 

Salmon, northerly 

Schiller, northerly 

Concord to Lowell 

Milford to Mast 



219 

100 
164 
800 
30fi 
770 
362 
850 

lis 

160 
512 
1,305 
246 
110 
546 

75 
94-2 
575 
180 
401 

50 
133 
4.040 
105 
500 

88 
400 

72 
522 



Dec. 31, 1901 
31, 1901 
4, 1900 
Feb. 4,1896 
Oct. 3, 1S99 
Sept. 12, 1899 
Oct. 3, 1899 
June 26, 1903 
Sept. 3, 1895 
Aug. 6, 1901 
Sept. 7, 1897 
Nov. 2, 1897 
Oct. 3, 1899 
.July 31, 1903 
Nov. 10, 1896 
uly 26, 1899 



Dec. 
Aug. 
Dec. 

.Jan. 



3, 1895 
2, 1898 

19, 1902 

4, 1900 
7, 1896 

.July 26,1899 
Oct. 2, 1900 
Sept. 3, 1901 
Dec. 19, 1902 
July 2, 1895 
Oct. 7, 1902 



1897 



Aug. 6, 
Jan. 
Nov. 7, 1893 
Jan. 29, 1897 
July 31, 1903 
Nov. 10, 1896 
Sept. 5, 1895 
July 31,1903 
Oct. 3. 1899 



TABLE No. 2L 



SUMMARY. 

Table No. 17, column 3, (ordered in to January 1, 1903) 47,918 

Table No. 17, column 5, (built) 

Table No. 17, column 6, (built in excess of order) 144 

Table No. 17, column 7, (unnecessary) 

Table No. 17, column 8, (not built) 

Table No. 18, colunm 3, (ordered in in 1903) 0,147 

Table No. 18, column 5, (built) 

Table No. 18, column 8, (not built) 

.51,200 

Sewers built in 1903 of those ordered in up to January 1, 1904 (feet) 

Sewers built in 1903 without orders (feet) 

Total length of sewers built m 1903 (feet) 



149 
42,429 



54,209 
6,668 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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12,607 

7,616 

118,623 

118,760 

24 

43,249 

14,020 

17,672 

20,508 

1,697 

1,600 

446" 
1,195 

372 
1,400 

285 
1,506 
1,197 

849 
11,051 

514 
4,530 
1,360 
3,279 
1,067 
4,388 

790 
3,104 

712 


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1,360 
3.279 
1,067 
4,388 

790 
3,104 

712 


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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



309 



TABLE No 24. 
SUMMARY OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM SINCE 1880. 



Year. 


Miles con- 
structed 
during 
year. 


Miles con- 
structed 
to date. 


House con- 
nections 
recorded 
during 
year. 


House con- 
nections 
recorded 
to date. 


Cost Of 

sewers. 


Average 

cost 
per mile. 


1880 


1.62 

2.18 

3.37 

2.54 

1.73 

1.56 

2.15 

1.44 

1.73 

2.66 

1.81 

3.08 

3.13 

3.31 

2.91 

3.98 

4.73 

*3 93 

*3.76 

*1.M 

*1.14 

1.74 

*1.95 

1.41 


18.66 
20.84 
24.21 
26.75 
28.48 
30.04 
32.19 
33.63 
35.36 
38.02 
39.83 
42.91 
46.04 
49.35 
52.26 
56.24 
60.97 
64.44 
67.62 
69.03 
70.17 
71.91 
73.46 
74.87 






£19,919.40 
23,89.5.12 
24,148.13 
21,452.05 
21,548.60 
28,122.84 
44,479.15 
19,893.92 
31,154.19 
27,513.73 
39,297.97 
55,409.73 
39,724.65 
51,392.15 
46,116.01 
71,859.36 
66,408.87 
36,258.41 
34,939.51 
16,683.39 
13,748.41 
14.724.39 
20,973.05 
17,330.32 


812,295.92 
10 961 06 


1881 






1882 






7,165.6e 
8,445.69 
12,445.84 
18,027.46 
20,687.97 
13,815.22 
18,008.20 
10,343.51 
21,711.58 
17,990.17 
12,691. .58 
15,526.33 
15,847.42 
18,055.11 
14,099.33 
9,226.05 
9,292.42 
10.819.31 
12,091.58 
8,462.29 
10,756.41 
12,291.00 


1883 






1884 






1885 












1887 






1888 










2,003 
2,067 
2,220 
2.434 
2,625 
2,883 
3,138 
3,375 
3,658 
4,178 
4,386 
4,617 
4,844 
5,030 
5,220 


1890 

18S1 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 


64 
153 
214 
191 
258 
255 
237 
283 
520 
208 
231 
227 
186 
191 


Total.. 










tS786,993.35 

















* Includes old sewers relaid. 
t Total cost for 24 years. 



310 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 





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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



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314 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

To His Honor the Mayor, the board of aldermen, the gentlemen of 
the common council, and the various committees with whom it has 
been my pleasure to come in contact, I wish to express my appreciation 
of the valued assistance and support you have rendered me during the 
year. 

My acknowledgments are due to the gentlemen of the street and 
park commission for their courtesy, consideration, and co-operation in 
matters in which we were mutually concerned. 

SAMUEL J. LORD, 

City Engineer. 



EEPOET 

* 

OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



Ix Board of School Committee. 

December 29, 1904. 
The Superintendent presented his annual report to the committee, 
and it was accepted. 

Voted, That the report by the superintendent be accepted and adopted 
as the report of the board, and that it be transmitted to the city coun- 
cils for publication in the annual City Report. 

ELLIOT C. LAMBEET, 

Clerk. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



Organization for 1903. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



EUGENE E. REED, :\[ayor, 

C. EDWIN CHASE, 

Waed 1. Elliot C. Lambert. 

Walter B. Heath. 
Waed 2. J. W. Johnston. 

Will C. Heath. 
Ward 3. George D. Towne. 

Louis E. Phelps. 
Ward 4. Nathaniel L. Colby. 

I. N. Cox. 
Ward 5. John T. Kelley. 

John F. Lee. 



Chairman, ex officio. 
President of Common Council, ex officio. 



Ward 6. 



Waed 7. 



Waed 



Ward 9. 



Ward 10. 



Eugene B. Dunbar. - 
Harry L. Davis. 
Edward B. Woodbury. 
Edson S. Heath. 
Walter B. Mitchell. 
Benjamin Price. 
E. Emmet Walsh. 
Alaric Gauthier. 
Mark E. Harvey. 
Harry H. Burpee. 



VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

GEORGE D. TOWNE. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

ELLIOT C. LAMBERT. 

SUPERIKTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

CHARLES W. BICKFORD. 

superintendent's clerk. 

FANNIE L. SANBORN. 

truant officer. 

CURTIS W. DAVIS. 

STANDING committees. 

Finance. — ^Mayor Reed, Messrs. Chase, Lambert, W^oodbury, and Walsh. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Kelley, Cox, and Burpee. 

Text-Books.— Messrs. Towne, Phelps, Cox, and Woodbury. 

Mmsic. — Messrs. W. C. Heath, Price, and Lee. 

Drawing. — Messrs. E. S. Heath, Johnston, and Dunbar. 



317 



318 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Motiual Training.— Messrs. Phelps, W. B. Heath, and E. S. Heath. 
Examination, of Teachers. — Messrs. Oolby, Johnston, and Mitchell. 
Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Burpee, Mayor Eeed, Messrs. Chase. Harvey, 
and Lee. 
Repairs. — Messrs. Davis, "Walsh, and Gauthier. 
Attendmice. — Messrs. Price, Gauthier, and W. C. Heath. 
Health. — Messrs. Dunbar. Davis, and Mitchell. 

SUB-€OMiIITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Towne. Phelps. Lambert, Wa'sh, and W. B. 
Heath. 

Franklin-street. — Messrs. Woodbury, Davis, and Lee. 

Spring-street. — Messrs. Kelley, Dunbar, and Woodbury. 

Lincoln-street and Tonngsville. — Messrs. Colby, Lee, and W. C. Heath. 

Ash-street and Webster^s Mills. — Messrs. Phelps, W. C. Heath, and 
Gauthier. 

Webster-street and Stark. — Messrs. Burpee, Towne, and Johnston. 

Bakersville and Mosquito Pond. — Messrs. W. B. Heath, Johnston, and 
Mitchell. 

Tarney. — Messrs. Mitchell. Walsh, and Cox. 

HnlUville and Harvey. — Messrs. Davis, Harvey, and Price. 

Rimmon. — Messrs. Gauthier, E. S. Heath, and Towne. 

Training School. — Messrs. Lambert, Woodbury, and Phelps. 

Main-street. — Messrs. Walsh, W. B. Heath, and Burpee. 

Parker. — Messrs. Price, Biirpee, and E. S. Heath. 

Wilson. — Messrs. Dunbar, Gauthier, and Harvey. 

Straw. — Messrs. E. S. Heath, Kelley, and Colby. 

Amoskeag. — Messrs. W. C. Heath, Phelps, and Kelley. 

Goffe's Falls. — Messrs. Harvey, Mitchell, and Dunbar. 

Pearl-street. — Messrs. Johnston, Cox, and Walsh. 

Highland. — Messrs. Cox, Price, and W. B. Heath. 

Evening Sehools. — Messrs. Lee, Colby, and Davis. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Board, the City Councils, and the Citizens of Manchester: 

The following statistics, record of accomplishments, and suggestions 
for the good lof the public schools are presented as the annual report 
for the year 1902-1903. The report is the fifty-seventh annual and the 
forty-eighth of a superintendent. 



One hundred thirty-one different schoolrooms have been in use during 
the entire j'ear. This is an increase of two over the number for the 
year 1901-1902. 

These rooms are classified as follows: Fifteen rooms of high school 
grade, thirty-three of grammar grade, twenty-seven of luiddle grade, 
forty-seven lof primary grade, two partially graded, five ungraded, and 
two manual training schools. 

These figures show a decrease of one grammar room and increases 
of two and one primary and partially graded rooms resj)ectively, a net 
increase of two rooms for the year, both being in the new Highland 
school. 

There have been variations in the gi'ading of the different rooms as 
follows: The Wilson liost one grammar and gained one primary room by 
reclassification of pupils. The Spring-street gained one grammar and 
lost one middle. The jNIain-street gained one middle and lost one gram- 
mar room. In addition to these changes, one new primary room and 
one room classified as a partially graded school were opened in the new 
Highland school. 

In cases of the Eini'mon primary and grammar schools, two teachers 
keeping separate registers occupy one room. These, therefore, are to 
be reckoned as separate schools and the number of ro^oms occupied is 
not a criterion as to the number of schools or as to the number of grade 
teachers in the city. To illustrate: Thirty-three rooms were occupied 
by grammar school pupils. In these thirty-three rooms thirty-four reg- 
isters were kept and there were thirty-six teachers in charge, not in- 
cluding supei-vising principals. There were twenty-seven rooms of 
middle school pupils, twenty-seven registers were kept and twentj'- 
seven teachers were employed. There were forty-seven rooms occupied 
by primary pupils, forty-seven registers were kept and forty-six teach- 
ers employed. These last two items do not include the one middle and 
three primary teachers in the Training school, the rooms of these 
grades being taught by members of the training classes. Were these to 

319 



320 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

be included the number of teachers of middle grade would be twenty- 
eight, and of primary grade forty-nine. There were, therefore, em- 
ployed by the city to instruct its children in the day schools just one 
hundred and fifty teachers in one hundred and thirty-one rooms keep- 
ing one hundred and twentj'-eight registers. 

ATTEND ANCK. 

Six thousand and thirteen pupils have been enrolled during the year. 
The average membership has been four thousand seven hundred and 
seventy-four, the average daily attendance four thousand three hundred 
and thirty-eight. 

All these figures show decreases fro^m those of 1901 and 1902. The 
per cent of daily attendance has also been lower by 1.1 per cent, which 
in itself means a decrease in attendance of fifty-two pupils daily. The 
high and partially grade'd schools alone show increases in member- 
ship. The grammar, middle, primary, and ungraded schools have lost 
enough pupils so that the average membership is one hundred and two 
less than for the year 1901-1902. 

A comparison of the year's membership, room by room, with that 
of last year reveals only the ordinary fluctuations in classes. Some 
grades have lost a few pupils, others have gained a few. In those 
grades suffering the loss are classed lone hundred and twelve rooms, so 
that the average loss has been less than one pupil per room. 

For the past three years, the percentage of tardinesses throughout 
the city has gradually increased, the greatest increase having been 
during the past year, when the number has jumped from nine thou- 
sand two hundred and twenty-four to nine thousand eight hundred and 
sixteen, an increase of S.6 per cent, and that with a membership smaller 
by one hundred and two than for the preceding year. 

Promptness is one of the first of the virtues to be inculcated by the 
schools. The necessity for it need not be dwelt upon. I suggest that 
the board sanction the dismissal, one hour earlier than the usual time 
at the end of the school month, of every room having an attendance 
of ninety-five per cent or over, with no tardinesses during the month. 



EErORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 321 



Average Tardinesses, 
membership. 



High : 

Franklin 

Lincoln 

Ash 

Varney 

"Webster 

Bakersville 

Hallsville 

Eimmon 

Wilson 

Parker 

Straw 

Spring-street 

Amoskeag 

Merrimack-street. 

Main-street 

Pearl-street 

Highland 

Goit's Falls 

Ungraded 



405 
265 
392 
387 
342 
331 
218 
411 
166 
344 
238 
199 
133 
97 
140 
326 
157 
55 
• 82 
86 



4,774 



1,586 
457 
991 
275 
265 
338 
366 
942 
275 
462 
193 
326 
465 
705 
356 
286 
299 
41 
163 

1,025 



1.16-f 
.49-f- 

73-h 
24-f 
22-f 
29-f 
A8+ 
66+ 
47-h 
38-F 
23-f- 
47+ 
00-f- 
09-1- 
73-f- 
25-1- 
54+ 
45+ 
57+ 



CHANGES AND TEANSFERS. 

Changes and transfers among our teachers have been fewer than for 
many years past. 

The opening of the Highland school necessitated the employment of 
two additional teachers, Miss Blanche L. Bachelder and Miss Helen 
Townsend. The former entered the employ of the city at the beginning 
of 1903, the latter at the opening of the spring term in April. 

At the close of the school year Miss Lizabel Savory resigned her po- 
sition as teacher of the lower primary room at the Spring-street school 
and Miss Helen F. Lyons was elected to the vacancy thus created. 

Miss Bertha Fogg continued to teach the fourth division at the Lin- 
col-street school in place of Miss Mary F. Barnes, granted additional 
leave of absence on account of ill health. In April, Miss Amy E. Bavi- 
son was elected to teach the extra room in the same building. 

21 



322 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOilTS. 

At the same time Miss Florence M. Francis was elected to the Halls- 
ville building in place of Miss Davison. 

At the high school Miss Edith M. Pierce has been employed as assist- 
ant teacher in book-keeping, stenograph.y, and typewriting. 

MANt'AL TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The present equipment of the manual training school includes thirty 
wood-working benches each with its set of tools, three ten-inch turn- 
ing lathes, two engine lathes and one drill press. For these last there 
is a very moderate equipment of tools. 

One of the engine lathes has been loaned the school by the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing company. The drill press has been purchased during 
the past year and, with its tools, cost about $185. 

The principal informs me that the school now needs to carry on its 
course in iron work a small shaper and another engine lathe, this last 
to take the place of the one loaned by the Amoskeag ^lanufacturing 
company. 

There is also need of a band saw and a few small tools. The cost of 
the complete equipment would be about $400. 

The total enrollment for the year has been 316, a slight increase over 
that of 1901-1902. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The attendance in the public evening schools for the year 1902-1903 
has fallen below that of the previous year by fifty-four. This decrease 
has occurred in the schools, teaching the common branches. The night- 
ly- attendance of the drawing schools has increased from nineteen to 
thirt3'-one. 

Tiie majority of the pupils in the evening common schools attend for 
the purpose of learning the English language. A very few return year 
after j-ear and secure a grammar school education. 

The grading of these pupils is a difficult task. Their occasional ab- 
sences retard their advancement. The fact that $88 was turned into 
the city treasury as result of forfeitures for non-attendance shows that 
one hundred and seventy-six pupils, more than one-half lof the total 
registration, failed to attend the length of time required to receive back 
their deposits. The books in use in the evening schools are much dilap- 
idated and I suggest that the money obtained from forfeitures during 
the present year be retained by the board for the purchase of new books 
at the opening of the next term of these schools. 

TRAINING SCHOOL FOK TEACHERS. 

The training school for teachers has maintained its high standard of 
efficiency during the j'ear just closed. The purchases of books, raffia 
and reeds and other needed supplies for the school have given it all 
the working tools that it has desired. The seat work of the pupils in 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 323 

weaving and basketry is especially deserving of inspection. The cut- 
ting and mounting of surfaces and figures, forms of manual train- 
ing adapted to the ages of these pupils, are most commendable. 

The action of the committee in changing the plan for the admission 
of candidates to this school can not be too strongly commended. The 
last class was admitted as a result of a thorough test in the elementary 
studies pursued in our schools. Formerly there have been failures 
among the young ladies both from lack of adaptability to the work of 
teaching and In scholarship. It would seem that, with this plan in 
operation, failure in the school can come only through lack of adapta- 
bility. Scholarship so far as it can be determined by an examination 
is assured. 

The experience of the past year has also demonstrated the inadvisa- 
bilitj^ of admitting too large a class to the institution. 

I know of no other training school of this size in which the pupils 
rely for their instruction upon pupil-teachers wholly. The rooms in 
such schools have and should have their regularly elected grade teach- 
ers. The pupil-teacher should first observe and study correct teaching, 
an inestimable advantage, then she should try her apprentice hand 
under the constant surveillance of the skillful grade teacher. The 
young teacher, herself but little more than a school girl, needs at the 
beginning the very closest of direction and supervision. All and the 
minutest details of the work must be overseen and directed by the 
principal and her assistant. Bad habits of teaching early formed are 
almost ineradicable. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The continued prosperity of the high school is a source of gratifi- 
cation both to the school board and to the community. The standard 
of the school was never so high as at present. The corps of instruc- 
tors is able and ample. The good management of the principal and 
his assistants has created a strong feeling of pride on the part of the 
pupils in the institution. This has been contributed to by the various 
organizations, literary and athletic, which are associated with the 
school. 

The social gatherings of the pupils of this school in the building 
under the charge of the teachers at stated times should, it seems to me, 
be encouraged by the school board. These young people are to be of 
the world and in the world; they must meet and mingle with people 
under many different circumstances. They need to learn self-jjosses- 
sion, to be freed from the restraint that arises from self-consciousness 
if they are to be able to pass at their true worth. The mingling of the 
young ladies and the young men at these gatherings teaches consid- 
eraition for others, forgetfuluess of self, and gives self-conti'ol. The 
gatherings exercise a beneficial influence upon the school. 

The curriculum includes all of the studies and the quantity of work 
in each necessary for admission to college. The general courses are 



324 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOHTS. 

excellent, a pupil being- able to so elect his istudies that science, 
mathematics, languages, history, or business may be the predominat- 
ing note. 

The day's work in this school is divided into six periods. With five 
school days per week this gives thirty periods weekly for study and 
recitation. The course as laid down requires in the second and fourth 
classes nineteen recitation periods per week, in the first and third 
classes twenty recitation periods per week, leaving for study eleven 
and ten periods respectively. 

In addition, to this required work some pupils take extra studies, 
carrying the number of recitations to twenty-four or twenty-five per 
week. It is a serious question as to whether or not the number of 
recitations required per week is too many, and also as to whether it 
may not be advisable to rearrange the course of study so that a pupil 
so desiring may take a longer time to complete the course. The mul- 
tiplication of recitations becomes especially necessary when a pupil, 
not having elected college studies, suddenly decides to enter college. 
The omitted studies are taken on as extras and constitute a great 
burden upon the pupil. The rearrangement of the course could be 
made to care for these as well as for others whose progress is slower 
and who therefore need more time to complete the course. 

PAEKEB SCHOOL LOT. 

The majority of our school buildings are provided with adequate 
playgrounds. The advantages of wide open spaces about school 
buildings for recreation, air, and light need not be dwelt upon. It is 
an admitted fact that the playground at the Parker school is not ade- 
quate to the needs of the pupils. It is possible to procure the land at 
the north side of this building at a fair price. In all probability it 
can never be purchased cheaper than at the present time, certainly not 
if buildings shall be erected upon it in the future. It is also a well- 
known fact that as a city increases in size land becomes miore valua- 
ble. It would, therefore, seem to be good policy to purchase this strip 
of land not only for playground, air, and light but also to provide room 
for the future enlargement of the building. 

ACCOMMODATIOJMS. 

The report of the school committee last year directed the attention 
of the citizens to needed increases in school accommodations in various 
parts of the city. TK^ conditions have remained in statu quo. Two 
years ago a special committee appointed by this board recommended 
to the citj^ government the erection of an addition to the Hallsville 
school. The attendance at this building remained practically station- 
ary during 1902-1903. At the opening of the September term, 1903, 
there was a large increase in primary pupils. Ninety-three pupils were 
registered in one room. It was impossible to care for them adequate- 
ly, and the plan of having a portion attend the forenoon session and 



KEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 325 

the remainder the afternoon sessiion was adopted. This plan is now in 
force. It is claimed by many that children under the age of six should 
attend school but a short period each day. 

The advancement of the young- child who has just entered school 
depends not upon the number of hours he attends, but upon the fre- 
quency with which the teacher is enabled to call up in his mind the 
simple activities connected with school work. A long- attendance in 
point of hours with few periods of work with the teacher is, accord- 
ingly, less beneficial than a shorter attendance with more frequent 
periods of work, but the full school day with its frequent short teaching 
periods gives the best results because it affords opportvmities for that 
repeated activity of mind so necessary to its growth in power. Accord- 
ingly these children that have been attending but a half day have not 
accomplished so much as those attending both school sessions, because 
of lack of opportunity- to keep what has been taught fresh in mind. 

One primary school in this section is still accommodated in a rented 
store. There are today four hundred and forty-five children belonging 
in this school, two hundred and twentj'-seven being primary children, 
eighty-three more than the primary rooms vrill accommodate. 

The withdrawal of children from this and the Wilson school by the 
opening of the new parochial school will probably not be wholly from 
the primary rooms. Were that to be the case the school mig-ht be 
relieved temporarily. However, it is not fitting that the municipality 
should depend upon lor expect any private institution to educate its 
children. On the contrary, it should make its schools so excellent both 
in the matter of instruction and accommodations that its citizens will 
prefer them to all others. 

The Got^e's Falls school has a membership of eighty-six, which ex- 
ceeds the normal seating capacity of the building. The rooms are 
crowded. Three teachers instruct the children, one of these conducting 
her classes in a small entrj-. This entry is heated by an oil stove, the 
only available method of heating it. The children are warmed at the 
expense of their lungs. ' The school is growing slowly and steadily and 
deserves adequate room. 

The necessity of presenting these matters to the city government 
will, I am sure, appeal to every member of this committee. A small 
portion of the increased revenue that the city will receive during 
the coming year will remedy these deficiencies in school accommo- 
dations. 

TKANSPORTATION OF PUPILS. 

The school report of last year called attention to the disparit3' in 
cost between the suburban ungraded schools and those in the city 
proper. The average attendance in these schools has been less than 
for 1901-1902. The cost during that year was 38.5 per cent greater 
than in the city proper. With a smaller membership the cost has in- 
creased and for 1902-1903 has been more than 2 per cent greater than 
during the preceding j'ear. 



\ 

326 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The following- from the report of the state superintendent of public 
instruction gives the experience in this state in regard to reduced cost 
of schools through transportation of pupils. "Of 124 New Hampshire 
towns, lis report less cost with conveyance as compared with main- 
taining local schools, five report cost the same and one cost greater, 
twenty-six give the cost with conveyance as one half of that with local 
schools, eight give one third, seven give one fourth, three give one 
fifth, one each one sixth, three eighths, two fifths, and three fifths." 

In Massachusetts 68 per cent report less cost and 8 per cent only an 
increased cost. 

The teachers of these schools are doing as good work as can be done 
under present conditions. Improvement and reduced cost can come 
only by transferring these suburban pupils to the graded schools. The 
universal experience has been that attendance and instruction have 
been much bettered. A canvass of one of these districts by the board 
and an attempt to gain the consent of the parents to a trial of the 
plan, would, I am sure, be crowned with success. The plan once inau- 
gurated in any district would find its warmest adherents in the parents 
of the pupils so transported. 

LEGISLATIVE ENACTMENTS. 

Of the legislative enactments of the General Court of 1903 the follow- 
ing are those directly affecting the city. 

Section 6 of chapter 92 of the laws of the state was amended so as to 
require the reading of the constitution of' the United States and the 
constitution of the state of New Hampshire in the last year of the 
course below the high school. 

Section 8 of the same chapter was also amended to read as follows: 
"They shall purchase at the expense of the city or town in which the 
district is situated, a United States flag of bunting not less than five 
feet in length with a flag staff and appliances for displaying the same, 
for every district in which a public school is taught not otherwise sup- 
plied. They shall prescribe rules and regulations for the proper cus- 
tody, care and display of the flag, and whenever not otherwise dis- 
plaj'ed, it shall be placed conspicuously in the principal room of the 
schoolhouse. Any members of a school board who shall refuse or neg- 
lect to comply with the provisions of this section shall be fined $10 for 
the first offence and $20 for each subsequent oft'ence. Not more than 
$10 shall be expended for the flag, flag staff and appliances for any 
one schoolhouse, and the school board shall have the same control 
over its preservation and display that it has over other district prop- 
erty." 

All of our schools are supplied with flags and flag staffs, nor has 
it been necessary to purchase any flag staff's siuce the law went into 
operation. The sum of $10, the limit to the expense set by the law, 
would seem ridiculously inadequate for the erection of such poles as 
the board has been accustomed to raise. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 6Zl 

No rules and regulations for the proper cnstody, care, and display 
of the school flags have been formulated as yet by the board, and I 
recommend the matter to your consideration. 

The time for the return of the annual report of school boards to the 
state department was changed by the same legislature from August 1 
to July 15. and the return of this body was made in accordance with 
the revised law. 

The mandatory part of section 21 of chapter 92 of the laws of the 
state was stricken irom the section. This section is in regard to at- 
tendance upon teachers' institutes, and the words "and school boards 
shall alLow teachers to close their schools for that purpose," meaning 
to attend institutes, were stricken from the law. School boards may 
accordingly refuse to allow teachers to attend institutes. Should per- 
mission be given to attend, however, the time is regarded as spent in 
the service of the district and accordingly must be paid for. 

Chapter 46, Laws of 1895, was so amended as to cause the annual 
enumeration of children between the ages of five and sixteen years 
to be made in the month of October, instead of in the month of April. 

KINDEKGARTEJS'S. 

Nearly three years ago a band of public-spirited women in this city, 
believing that the citizens should have among their educational insti- 
tutions every department that will facilitate the gi'owth of the child 
mind in power and that will conduce to the development of a well 
rounded character, established a free public kindergarten, secured com- 
petent teachers for the same, provided furniture, gifts, games, all the 
employments necessary for carrying on an enterprise lof this sort. 
They conducted the school in rented quarters until last March, when 
by permission of the schooj board it was transferred to an unoc- 
cupied room in the Spring-street building. The pupils from this kin- 
dergarten have entered the public schoiols of the city. 

The Manchester Kindergarten association has carried this work on 
most successfully and demonstrated the practicability of conducting a 
kindergarten in our midst. Having passed its experimental stage, 
the school is now offered to the city with all of its furniture and 
equipment. There can be no time nnore auspicious than the present for 
the incorporation of kindergartens into our school system. 

The adoption of the kindergarten idea does not necessarily mean 
that kindergartens shall be established in all j)arts of the city at the 
same time. Let the control of this well-established one be undertaken 
toy the city, and later, as there is opportunity and demand, let another 
be started, these two to be followed later by others. 

All growth and power result from action. The child's five senses are 
the avenues through which only he gains impressions, sensations, ideas, 
and is enabled to react upon his surroundings, thereby gaining' ex- 
perience which alone is knowledge. The kindergarten directs the train- 
ing- of these five senses and aids development by carefully directing 



328 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the child's activities. The characteristic of the kinderg-arten is work, 
carefnllj' directed employment for these eager, active, plastic minds. 
"Body and mind are born together, both must be appropriately assisted 
in their growth." 

I hope that the school board will see fit to accept this school from 
the Kindergarten association with fitting acknowledgment to its found- 
ers of the obligation under which they have placed the city. 

HEALTH. 

The state for its own salvation and advancement takes upon itself the 
education of the children of its citizens. It engages therebj' to edu- 
cate these children not under the same conditions as those under 
which it educated their parents, not under conditions just as good as 
those under which it educated their parents, but under the best con- 
ditions that modern science and knowledge can provide. 

It engages primarily to place them amid healthful surroundings, to 
furnish them vidth plenty of fre.sh air, to house them in buildings as 
clean as it desires them to be physically and spiritually. 

The infiuence of clean buildings is twofold, first it conduces to 
healthfulness of body, and second to healthfulness of mind. The na- 
ture which rises superior to its environment is the exceptional one, and 
the influences which surround us, of which we are generally uncon- 
scious, are the strongest factors in making us what we are. 

It is well nigh impossible to inculcate habits of cleanliness and order 
in an ill-kept, unclean school building. I believe the janitors -of the 
several schools mean to be efficient and to keep their buildings clean. 
But there are different ideas as to what constitutes a clean building. 
Furthermore, few men are competent to clean a building as it should 
be cleaned. The proper cleaning can be had only at the hands of 
women and by them our buildings should be washed. Again, one 
thorough washing a year is not sufficient to keep a building in a 
healthful condition. Buildings should be thoroughly washed at least 
three times a year. The thorough cleansing of an eight-room building 
requires at least ten days of labor. The winter and spring vacations 
are too short to admit of the proper cleansing of the buildings by the 
janitors alone. 

I recommend that the board require the thorough washing of everj'^ 
school building during each vacation and that they hire women to 
assist the janitors in doing the work. 

Both the qualitj' and the quantity of physical and mental work are 
conditioned bj^ the fresh air supplj' of the rooms in which the work is 
carried on. Our mills and factories are planned and constructed with 
reference to the atmospheric conditions under which the work is to be 
done. Seven of our buildings, the Franklin-street, Lincoln-street 
Ash-street, Webster-street, Spring-street, and Bakersville schools, five 
of these being of the largest, were erected at times when no special 
thought was given to the necessity for an abundant supply of fresh air. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 329 



Almost the only means of ventilating these buildings is by the windows 
and doors, a method which totally fails to provide the necessary quan- 
tity of air and besides endangers the health of some children who 
must of necessity sit in the drafts created by the opening of the doors 
and windows. In winter when all the windows but those with a 
southern exposure are closed by the screwing on of storm windows, 
thorough ventilation is an impossibility. The defects in these build- 
ings in regard to ventilation should be gradually remedied. 

The use of the same text-book b.y different children is regarded by 
many as a menace, to the health of pupils. This in some cases is un- 
doubtedly true. To quote from a report of the United States com- 
missioner of education: "Books are considered one of the best natural 
cultures for disease germs known, and no mode of sterilizing will 
•cleanse them." 

In our own schools all of the books used by any pupil having a con- 
tagious disease are burned. This has been the practice for years. As 
to the use of the same book by different pupils, in case the first user 
has been well it is fair to presume that there is no danger to the second 
•possessor of the bo6k. As before stated, in case the first has had a con- 
tagious disease the book has been destroyed. The city never buys 
second-hand books. Accordingly, very little danger to health is to be 
appreh'ended from this source. 

There would arise in connection with this matter the consideration 
of the desirability of rebinding worn-out text-books. The leaves of 
such books are reassembled at the bindery, as many whole books being 
turned out as can be made up from the parts sent to it. Surplus leaves 
from one city may be, I have been told that they are, used to piece out 
books from another city. Further, the mingling of books from many 
different sources in the same bindery is a menace to health and leads 
one to question the desirability of rebinding school books at all. 

The use of drinking cups in common by the pupils of a school may 
rightly be considered a source of danger to health. Many pupils are 
provided by their parents with individual cups. To so supply every 
pupil at public expense is impracticable. There has been put upon the 
market recently a device for obviating any danger that may lurk in the 
■common drinking cup. This device is known as the sanitary drinking 
fountain. The name is self-explanatory — the water is taken into the 
moijth from a small jet flowing iinder constant pressure. No metal 
touches the lips and there can be no possibility of contagion. The 
installing of these fountains in our different schools is much to be 
desired. 

The prompt and thorough action of the board of health in the late 
diphtheria epidemics in our schools deserves public acknowledgment 
and commendation. The two buildings infected, the Ash-street and 
Webster-street schools, were thoroughly cleansed and disinfected and 
that with as brief an interruption of school work as possible. 



330 AJ^NUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

Change aud growth are to be expected on the part of institutions and 
curricula as well as on the part of individuals. The course of study 
that remains stationarj^ grows increasingly less useful. Since the last 
printing of our course 'of study the prescribed work in reading for the 
primary schools has changed almost completely, the course in arithme- 
tic has been radically changed, we are using a new history, the geog- 
raphy assignments for the various classes have been rearranged, the 
system of writing has been changed, a physiology adopted, and the 
language Avork of the grammar schools has been much bettered. With 
the completion of a new course in number work for the primary 
schools it will be possible and desirable to have the course of study 
reprinted. The changes above mentioned have been indicated by leaf- 
lets sent out from time to tiane, so that at present more of the course 
of study is to be found on leaflets than in the printed pamphlet. 

The new law of the state requiring the reading of the constitution 
of the United States and the constitution of the state of New Hamp- 
shire in the last year below the high school will allow of our dropping 
civics as now taught during the last eight weeks Of the winter term.. 
This time is much needed for physiology, a study prescribed by law 
and requiring text-books in the hands of pupils. The experience of 
last year demonstrated that eleven weeks was too short a time in which 
to do justice to the study. I recommend that physiology be taught 
during the entire last half of the ninth year of the elementary schools. 

The language work of the grammar schools has shown, during the 
past year, moi-e improvement perhaps than the work in any other study. 
The chief defect in most language boioks is that they fail to cause the 
pupil to grow mentally. They do not base their work upon his ex- 
periences or upon his interests. In life we talk and write about those 
things which come within our ken and which pertain more immediately 
to our everj-day life and interests. Language books of necessity must 
fail largely in this respect. Conditions are different in different com- 
munities and even in different schools in the same community. The 
ordinary language book furnishes to the pupil both content and form. 
The use of the material becomes hardly even a matter of memory, it is 
rather a mechanical exercise in copying. I do not decry the providing 
of a certain quantity of material and a certain exercise upon form, but 
the content which comes from the pupil's own mind, which is the 
result of his own seeing and dealing with things, in short, which re- 
sults from his own experience, is the only kind which adequately exer- 
cises his mind and accordingly produces power. 

The language work has been based upon the plan laid down in a 
small pamphlet entitled, "The Conduct of Composition Work in Gram- 
mar Schools." Two lessons each week have been devoted to the work. 
Spontaneity on the part of pupils has been sought for. They have been 
encouraged to write with the same freedom with which they converse 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 331 

one with another. The month's work has been divided Into four parts. 
The first week is devoted to experience, the second to an imaginative 
story, the third to a reproduction lesson, and the fourth to a letter. 
This last usually partakes of the nature of the first. The pupil, by dis- 
cussion and correction, is taught to realize the relative values of differ- 
ent statements in narrating experiences and not minutely to specify 
each step in a series of actions, in other words, to omit unimportant de- 
tails and facts which may be taken for granted. The production of a 
description is a much more difficult task for a pupil than the writing of 
a narration. A narration abounds in verbs, action words, the doing of 
things; a description involves more largely the use of nouns and adjec- 
tives, the producing of pictures by means of words. Breadth of ex- 
perience is necessary for the latter. 

The exercises have been made short both to maintain interest and 
not to burden the teachers with too long tasks of correcting. The 
improvement in the work of the pupils has been m'ost gratifying. 

In conclusion I desire to express my appreciation of the efforts of 
the members of this board to serve the best interests of our schools 
and to acknowledge also the debt due to the teachers for whatever of 
advancement has been made during the past year. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

CHARLES W. BICKFORD, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 



I. Population, etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 

V. Attendance Tables. 

VI. Teuancy, 

VII. Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1902-1903. 

IX. High School Graduates. 

X. Winners of Clarke Peizes. 

XI. OEGANIZATION of COMillTTEBS, 1904. 

Xn. List of Ti;ACHEES, 1904. 

XIII. School Year, 1903-1904. 



333 



APPENDIX. 



STATISTICS. 

I.— Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1900 56,987 

Legal school age. 5 to 21. 



II.— Schoolhouses. 

Number of schoolhouses in use . . ._ 25 

Number of schoolhouses not in use 

Number of schoolrooms used for day schools 131 

Number of rooms used for high school classes 15 

Number of rooms used for grammar schools 33 

Number of rooms used for middle schools 27 

Number of rooms used for primary schools *47 

Number of rooms used for partially graded schools 2 

Number of rooms used for ungraded schools 5 

Number of rooms used for manual training schools 2 



III.— Schools. 

(All for both sexes.) 

Number of high school buildings 1 

Number of combined grammar and lower grade (middle and 

primary) schools 14 

Number of combined middle and primary schools 4 

Number of ungraded schools 5 

Number of manual training schools (for boj's) 1 



IV.— Teachers. 

Male teachers in the high school 5 

Female teachers in the high school 12 

Female teachers in training school 2 

Male teachers in the grammar schools 7 

Female teachers in the grammar schools t35 

* Average of 46 for year. t Six of the 35 master's assistants. 

334 



REPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 335 

Female teachers in the middle schools *27 

Female teachers in the primary' schools *4G 

Male teachers in the partially f^raded schools 1 

Female teachers in the partially graded schools 1 

Female teachers in the ungraded schools 5 

Male teachers in the manual training school 2 

Special teachers 3 

Average number of male teachers 17 

Average number of female teachers 129 

Total average number of teachers in day schools *146 

Male teachers in the evening schools 6 

Female teachers in the evening schools 11 

Male teachers in the evening drawing schools 2 

Average number of male teachers in the evening drawing 

schools '2 

♦"Not including training xchool. 



336 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOliTS. 



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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 



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342 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DAY SCHOOLS. 

Summary of attendance xipon the several grades of public day schools for the 
year 1902-1903. 



Grades. 


Whole number 

of difiEerent 

pupils. 


s 

if 


i 

< 


0*i 




Boys. 


Girls. 





High j 200 

Grammar 1 723 

Middle 639 

Primary I 1,336 

Partially graded j 31 

Ungraded j 70 

Totals, 1903 2,999 

Totals, 1902 3,113 



243 

S26 



3,014 
3,010 



405 

1,265 

1,039 

1,909 

70 



4,774 
4,876 



384 
1,173 
954 
1,692 
65 
70 



4,338 
4,480 



94.9 

92.7 



90.8 
91 9 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Summary 0/ attendance upon the several grades of public evening schools for 
the year 1902-1903. 



SCHOOLS. 


Whole number 

of different 

pupils. 


1 

< 


i 

< 






Boys. 


Girls. 






129 




75 
59 
69 

39 


59 
52 
54 

31 


78 7 


Franklin Street . 


71 

30 


8S 9 


Rimmon .... 


99 
65 


91 9 


(Mechanical.. ) 

Drawing schools \ \ 

( Architectural ) 


81. 








293 
315 


101 
132 


242 

303 


196 

250 






82. 5 







REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 34:5 



Evening School Teachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal at Spring-street school, for boys. 

Assistants— A. \V. Rowell, I. E. Forbes, Dora Tuson, and Minnie 
Sullivan. 

Honorie J. Crough, principal of Franklin-street, for girls. 

Assistants, Maggie Linen, Mary E. Paige, Mary A. Walker, Mariauua 
Fitts. 

Arthur W. Morgan, principal of Rimmon school, for both sexes. 

Assistants— William J. Mooar, E. Nourry, Myra Moore, Adelia Mur- 
phy, Julia McNamara. 

Evening Drawinrj Teachers. 

John M. Kendall and Henry W. Allen. 



TRAIXING SCHOOL. 



Graduated. 



Entered. 



Lena E. Bower. 
Ethel F. Currier. 
Helen F. Lyon^^. 
Ada B. Morse. 



June, 'O: 



Bessie J. Bartlett 
Alice B. Morrill. 
Agnes Shay. " 

Agnes M. Woodbury. " 
Bessie M. Abbott. Sept 
Blanche L. Bryant. " 

Alice E. Good. 
Laurette McKendree. 



Sept., '02 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 

The following table presents the main features of interest pertaining to the 
attendance upon the public schools for the last six years. Similar tables 
may be found in reports for 1896 and 1901 . 








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vn 


128 


5,802 


4,425 


4,070 


92.0 


195 


200 


191 


145 


51 


378 


1899 


123 


130 


5.717 


4,399 


3,978 


90.4 


146 


180 


168 


134 


73 


409 






If?. 


5,462 
5,808 
6,123 
6,013 


4,388 
4,552 
4,876 
4,774 


3,99S 
4,127 
4,480 
4,338 


91.8 


179 


225 


214 


152 


72 


380 


1901 


127 
129 


137 
142 


90.5 
91.9 


191 

250 


189 
221 


179 
211 


137 
159 


69 
62 


379 


1902 


390 


1903 


130 


146 


90.8 


196 


203 


183 


137 


65 


405 







Including spocial teachers, principals, assistants, etc. 
And tlie A class in suburban scliools. 



344 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



VI.— Work of Truant Officer. 



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si 

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ii 

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23 


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17 


15 


28 


269 


30 


179 


5 


27 


23 


101 


18 


33 


5 


23 


19 


69 


11 


39 


1 


7 


10 


117 


9 


69 


4 


17 


15 


97 


7 


54 


2 


19 


15 


103 


18 


56 


3 


14 


12 


97 


10 


65 


3 


6 


12 


130 


17 


63 


4 


13 


28 


163 


9 


76 


15 


8 


37 


l,2i.l 


162 


691 


59 


149 


199 



September 
October . . . 
November. 
December. 
January ... 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Totals.. 



DATE. 


m 




No. of parents 
visited. 

No. tempora- 
rily confined 
at the police 
Station. 


If 

hi 


■6 
1 

s 

3 




25 
16 

4 

2 
24 
11 

9 
18 
21 

7 


111 

2S2 
91 
47 
157 
227 
193 
39 
179 
26) 


270 
276 
163 

179 
201 
143 
123 
131 
237 






J 


















December 






















March 


























2 














137 


1,587 


1,792 


2 




1 









KEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 345 

VII.- Finances— 1903 



Items of Account. 



Appropriations. Expenditure s 



Kepairs of schoolliouses 

Fuel 

Furniture and supplies 

Printing and advertising 

Books and stationery 

Contingent expenses 

Care of rooms 

Evening schools 

Teachexs' salaries 

Evening school — mechanical drawing. 

Free text-books and apparatus 

Manual training 

Bewinj;. materials for girls 

Boiler for Ash-street school 

Extra heating, Wilson scliool 



Cost of city schools 



S8,000.00 


.'?9,545.99 


8,800.00 


12,270.18 


1,200.00 


1,413.98 


300.00 


, 279.48 


75.00 


56.71 


2,500.00 


2,789.32 


6,900.00 


7,040. OS 


1,200.00 


1,184.00 


94,000.00 


94,534.94 


300.00 


289.35 


6,000.00 


5,822.32 


500.00 


490.75 


250 00 


242.80 


800.00 


782.50 


2,650.00 


2,544.00 


8133,575.00 


8139,336.40 



COST OF CITY SCHOOLS. 



Expenditures 



Salark 



Members of the school board 

Clerk of board 

Superintendent of schools . . . 
Truant officer 



$139,336.40 



220.00 

150.00 

2,300.00 

S50.00 



Literary fund 

Tuition and free text-books* 



$3,257.98 
1,289.78 



$4,54/ 



Net amount raised by taxation $138,308.64 

The city valuation for 1903 is $32,819,850 and hence the rate of school 
tax for the year is $138,308.64, divided by $32,819,850, or .0042. Last 
year the rate was .0039. 

* School tax from Londonderry, Bedford and Goff stown Included, gl42.50. 



346 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



VIII. -School Year, 1902-1903. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks oiJened September S, 1902, closed Decem- 
ber 19, 1902. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened January 5, lOOl), closed March 
27, 1903. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April ILl, 1903, closed June 2G, 
1903. Vacation of ten weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, 190. 



IX.— High School Graduation. 

PROGRAM. 

Salutatory. "New Hampshire in the Revolution." 

Blanche Louise Bryant. 

Cantata. "The Building of the Ship." Tart I. 

Class prophecy Florence Anna Sturtevant. 

_, „ S Words by Henry W. Loiu/fclloiv. 

Cantata. Part II J ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^,,.^ ^^,,^^^, 

Valedictory. "The Study of the Classics.". .. .^lildred Roberta Fritz. 

Presentation of diplomas By Sherman E. Burrows, Esq. 

Class Ode. 

GRADUATES. 

Elizabeth Maude Abbott. Edward L. Fosburgh. 

William Howard Bailey. Susie Althea Francis. 

Florence May Bartlett. Blanche Ina Friend. 

Margaret Annie Benson. ]\Iildred Roberta Fritz. 

Bertha Alice Blanchet. Alice Inette Gooch. 

Cora Imogene Bond. Alice Ethel Good. 

Jennie Elizabeth Bowden. Anna Evelyn Gorey. 

Mary Angela Brennan. Ida May Gowing. 

Blanche Louise Bryant. Ralph V. Hadley. 

Lillie Butler. James Ellis Hale. 

Mildred Winters Cleworth. Bertha V. Healey. 

Edith Laverne Coolidge. Capltola S. Henderson. 

Blanche Lillian Corning. E. S. Higgins. 

Helen Josephine Danforth. Sarah A. Hodgeman. 

Cora L. Davison. Annie Francis Humphre3^ 

Mary Irene Dee. Charles H. Jack. 

Harold Hurst Dickey. Charles F. Jackson. 

Frances Genevieve Dowd. Frank 0. Johnson. 

Clarence Irving Drayton. Pearl Ethel Kimball. 

W^illiam A. Emery. Guy Mortimer Knox. 



EEPOKT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



347 



Bertha Eva Larivee. 
Bessie Florence Leckie. 
Josephine Elizabetli Lyons. 
Sarah Teresa Lyons. 
Mary T. H. Marhan. 
Willis Arthur Martin. 
Charles A. McKendree. 
Mary Arrla Miller. 
John Groves Moore. 
Mary Tuttle Morrow. 
Lena Belle Morse. 
J. Arthur Nelson.. 
Lois Belle Nevi^ton. 



Bertha Alice Perkins. 
Carl Stevens Plumnier. 
Aura Leona Quimby. 
Arthur Hugh Raney. 
Willard P. Robinson. 
Bessie Rosenbiirg, 
Bessie May Sanford. 
Herbert Guy Sargent. 
Sarah Pauline Schwartz. 
Florence Anna Sturtevant. 
Blanche Agnes Tewksbury. 
William D. Walker. 



CLASS OFFICERS. 

President, Edward L. Fosburgh. 

Vice-President, Bertha Alice Perkins. 

Secretary, Charles A. McKendree. 

Treasurer, Bertha Alice Blanchet. 



Edward L. Fosburgh. 
William D. Walker. 



EXECX7T1VE COMJIITTEE. 



James Ellis Hale. 



Alice Ethel Good. 
Blanche Louise Bryant. 



CLASS ODE. 

Words by Bertha Alice Perkins. 

Music by Bertha Alice Blnnchet. 
Like "ships that pass in the night. 
And speak each other in passing," 
Do we in our voyage of life 
But meet for a day and move onward. 
Brief though the intercourse be, 
We should strive to aid one another — 
"To be, not to seem"; for our ways lie so close 
We may help each other in passing. 

We meet many barques on the wa^', 
Some frailer, some stronger than ours; 
On each let our signals gleam bright 
To lead, to encourage, to warn. 
Thus with God-given purpose and will. 
His law for our compass and star, 
We'll anchor at last in our haven of rest. 
Safe sheltered from tide and from storm. 



348 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



X.— Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, JANUARY 28, 1903. 

First prize, $25, Annie Frances Leahy. 
Second prize, $20, Maude H. Avery. 
Third prize. $10. Harold C. Brown. 
Fourth prize. $5. Hattie E. Reed. 



XL— Organization, 1904. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



EUGENE E. REED, Mayor, 
E. EDWIN CHASE, 



Ward 1. 
Ward 2. 
Ward .3. 
Ward 4. 
Ward 5. 



Elliot C. Lambert. 
Elmer D. Goodwin. 
J. W. Johnston. 
Will C. Heath. 
George D. Towne. 
Louis E. Phelps. 
Nathaniel L. Colby. 
I. N. Cox. 
John T. Kelley. 
John F. Lee. 



Chairman, ex officio. 
President of Common Council, ex officio. 
Ward 6. Eugene B. Dunbar. 

Harry L. Davis. 
Ward 7. Edward B. Woodbury. 

Edson S. Heath. 
Ward 8. Walter B. Mitchell. 

Benjamin Price. 
Ward 9. R. Emmet Walsh. 

Alaric Gauthier. 
Ward 10. Mark E. Harvey. 

Harry H. Burpee. 



VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

GEORGE D. TOWNE. 

, CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

ELLIOT C. LAMBERT. 

SUPERlNTEJJDEiNr OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

CHARLES W. BICKFORD. 

SUPERINTENDENT'S CLERK. 

FANNIE L. SANBORN. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

CURTIS W. DAVIS. 
STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — Mayor Reed, Messrs. Chase, Lambert, Woodbury, and Walsh. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Kelley, Cox, and Burpee. 

Text-Books. — Messrs. Towne, Phelps, Cox, and Woodbury. 

Music. — Messrs. W. C. Heath, Price, and Lee. 

Drawing. — Messrs. E. S. Heath, Johnston, and Dunbar. 

Manual Trainina. — ^[e.^srs. Pheljis, Goodwin, and E. S. Heath. 

Examination of T<(tchrrs. — ^Messr.';. Colby, Johnston, and Mitchell. 



KEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 349 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Burpee, Mayor Keed, Me-s.srs. Chase, Harvey, 
and Lee. 
Repairs. — ^Messrs. Davis, Walsh, and Gauthier. 
Attendance.— Messrs. Price, Gauthier, and W. C. Heath. 
Health. — Messrs. Dunbar, Davis, and Mitchell. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

HiyJt School. — Messrs. Towne, Phelps, Lambert, Walsh, and Good- 
win. 

Franklin-Street. — ^Messrs. Woodbury, Davis and Lee. 

Spring-street. — Messrs. Kelley, Dunbar, and Woodbury. 

Lincoln-street <in4 Toungsmlle. — ^Messrs. Colby, Lee, and W. C. Heatli. 

Ash-street and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Phelps, W. C. Heath, and 
Gauthier. 

Webster-street and Stark. — Messrs. Burpee, Towne, and Johnston. 

Bakersville and Mosquito Pond. — Messrs. Goodwin, Johnston, and 
Mitchell. 

Yarney. — Messrs. Mitchell, Walsh, and Cox. 

Hallsville and Harvey. — Messrs. Davis, Harvey, and Price. 

Rimmot?. — Messrs. Gauthier, E. S. Heath, and Towne. 

Training School. — Messrs. Lambert, Woodbury, and Phelps. 

Main-street. — Messrs. Walsh, Goodwin, and Burpee. 

Parker. — ^Messrs. Price, Burpee, and E. S. Heath. 

Wilson. — Messrs. Dunbar, Gauthier, and Harvey. 

Straio. — Messrs. E. S. Heath, Kelley, and Colby. 

Amoskeag.— Messrs. W. C. Heath, Phelps, and Kelley. 

Gofte's Falls. — 'Messrs. Harvey, Mitchell, and Dunbar. 

Pearl-street. — Messrs. Johnston, Cox, and Walsh. 

Highland. — Messrs. Cox, Price, and Goodwin. 

Evening Schools. — ^Alessrs. Lee, Colbj% and Davis. 



Xil.— List of Teachers. 

HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 



Master. George H. Libby. 
Sub-Master. George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. Harry N. McLaren. 

Hiram A. Stearns. 

Allan E. Herrick. 

Nellie Pickering. 

Florence M. Locke. 

Theresa B. Stanton. 

Mary J. Wellington, 

Ethel I. Cummings. 

Sara Hunt. 



350 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Assistants. Annie W. Colby. 
Mary H. Dowd. 
Winona M. Martin. 
Elsie D. Fairbanks. 
Annie M. Vose. 
Edith M. Pierce. 

FKAXKLIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Oram mar Grades. 

Master. Isaac Huse, Jr. 

Master's Assistant. Alice C. Taggart. 

Assistants. Carrie E. Hoit. 

Carrie E. Head. 

Xellie C. Parker. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Alice M. Lamprey-. 
Lower Middle. Amy K. Xorthrup. 
Higher Primary. Grace M. Whittemore. 
Lower Primary. Lena P. Bower. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. Fred L. V. Spaulding. 
Master's Assistant. Annie W. Patten. 
Assistants. Belle R. Daniels. 

Mabel J. Brickett. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

Bertha M. Fogg, substitute. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Etta L. Stearns. 
L/ower Middle. Bertha A. Allen. 
Higher Primary-. Theodora Richardson. 
Lower Primary. Amy E. Davison. 
. Lower Primary. Hulda C. Graupner 

ASII-STREE!T SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. Edgar D. Cass. 

Master's Assistant. Amelia L. Graupner. 

Assistants. Emma L. ^McLaren. 

Lora E. Hill. 

Ellen E. Connor. 



EEPORT OF THE SIPEUINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 351 



Lower (iradcs. 

Ilig'her Middle. Emma J. Cooper. 
Mixed Middle. Marjorie S. Woodbury. 
Mixed Middle (Temporary). Ede B. Shand. 
Lower Middle. Josephine C. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. May F. Nntt. 
Lower Primary. Bertha A. Young. 

websti-:r-stkeet scuooi., 

llritmnutr (rrndrs. 

^Master. John Gault. 

Master's Assistant. Josephine W. Page. 

Assistants. Luna A. Whitlock. 

Alta C. Willand. 

Eva F. Tuson. 

Lower Crrades. 

Higher Middle. Edith Hammond. 
Lower Middle. Jean Gillan. 
Higher Primary. Mary E. Murphy. 
Lower Primary. Mathel C. Henry. 

VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

^Master. George Winch. 

Master's Assistant. Florence M. Ward. 

Assistants. Esther M. Dickey. 

Ellen E. McKean. 

Millie S, ISIorse. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Mary J. Walsh. 
Lower Middle. Marcia M. Moore. 
Higher Primarj-. Gertrude Adams. 
Lower Primary. Annie E. Walsh. 

HALLSTILLE SCUOOI,. 

Grammar Grade,^. 

Master. William H. Huse. 
Master's Assistant. Ella F. Barker. 
Assistants. Olive A. Eowe. 
Mary L. Ajer. 



352 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Flora M. Walker. 

Lower Middle. Clara Y. Clement. 

Higher Primary. Bertha L. Kemp. 

Lower Primary. E. Alfreda Hall. 

Assistant. Florence M. Francis. 

Lower I'rimarj-. Annie K. Corson. 

Assistant. Ethel A. Nicholson. 

Lower Primary. Martha J. Kennedy. (Cody's t^ock) 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

<lni))iiiiur Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns. 
Assistants. Lelia A. Brooks. 
Cora M. Farmer. 

Lower Grades. 

Mixed Middle. Mary L. Heath. 
Higher Primary. Augusta S. Downes. 
Mixed Primary. S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. Kathyrn D. McKeon. 

RIMMON SCHOOL. 

Principal. Loui.s H. Bailey (Grammar). 
Assistant. Lillian F. Crowther. 

Lower Grades. 

Mixed Middle. Mary A. Seavey. 
Higher Primary. Hattie S. Tuttle. 
Lower Primary. Blanche E. Hicken. 
Lower Primary. Katherine A. t'rain. 

WILSOX SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Principal. Barbara B. Joy. 
Assistants. Mary E. McLare::. 

Hellen Morison. ' 

Cora B. Gilford. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Harriet H. Eiohardson. 

Lower Middle. Florence Richardson. 

Higher Primary- (Temporary). Ada B. Morse. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 355 

Higher Primary. Bertha V. Franks. 
Lower Primary. Florence L. Abbott. 
Lower Primary. Gertrude M. Porter. 

STRAW SCHOOL. 

Gramnitir Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie P. Gove. 

Ethel F. Currier, substitute. 

Lower 'Grades. 

Higher Middle. Gertrude H. Brooks. 
Lower Middle. Lettie M. Smith. 
Higher Primary. Nellie 'M. James. 
Lower Primary. Florence H. Moore. 
Lower Primary. Edith M. Stebbins. 

TRAI^^ING SCHOOL. 

Merrimack street, corner of Union. 

Principal. Caroline E. Wing. 

Head Assistant. Grace A. Phillips. 

The principal is also assisted by the sub-teachers, i. e., members of 
the training class. The school embraces the first four years of school 
work, in the following grades: Lower Primary, Higher Primary, and 
Lower Middle. There are four rooms, two of Lower Primary grade. 

SPEING-STKEET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Annabel Emerson, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. Fannie D. Moulton. 
Mixed Middle. Helen Morrill. 
Higher Primary. Nellie L Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. Helen F. Lyons. 

MAIN-STEEET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary W. MitcTiell, Grammar Grade. 
Higher Middle. Mary A. Clement. 
Lower Middle. Lottie M. Clement. 
Higher Primary. M. Minnie Sturtevant. 
Higher Primary. Hattie O. Willand. 
Lower Primary. Kate T. Clarke. 
Lower Primary. Elizabeth F. Walsh. 
Lower Primary. Sarah Price. 

PEAKL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary G. Tynan, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. Nellie M. Smith. 
Higher Primary. Florence Abbott. 
Lower Primary. Susie L. Dodge. 
23 



354 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

PAUKETt SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary E. Moiilton, (Irammar. 
Higher ;Micldle. Lura B. Gage. 
Mixed Middle. Elizabeth M. Flanders. 
Higher Primary. Eda M. Barr. 
Lower Primary. Blanche M. Folsom. 
Lower Primary. Maude E. Winegar. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. Marj- A. Buzzell, Grammar and Middle. 

Middle and Primary. Marj-^ S. Richardson. 

Lower Primary. Marion F. Partridge. 

Highland. Blanche L. Bachelder. Grammar and Middle. 

Primary Grades. Helen Townsend. 

Gotfe's Falls. Percy N. Folsom, Grammar. 

Middle Grades. Maud M. Greaney. 

Primarj' Grades. Edith A. Murphy. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

Stark. Inez M. Warren. 
Harvej-. Emma J. Ela. 
Youngsville. Lura K. Kimpton, 
Webster's Mills. Josephine L. Riddle. 
Mosquito Pond. Anabelle F. Landers. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. Eben F. Richardson, iMaude E. Brown. 
Drawing. J. Warren Thyng. 
Manual Training. Fred E. Browne. 
Assistant. Joseph F. Carter. 

JANITORS. 

High School. 
Charles F. Jack. Engineer, George H. Jack. 

Fr(nikU))-f<tirct a)id TminUig Schools. 
Asa M. Smith. 

Lincoln-street School. 
William Stevens. 

Hallsrillr and WUson Schools. 
William H. Newry. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPEKINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 355 

Ash-Street and Fearl-street ScJiooU. 
John S. Avery. 

Webster-street and Straw Sc-Jiools. 
William J. Powers. 

Spring-street and Lowell-street Schools. 
S. H. Batchelder, 

Bakersville ScJiool. 
Edwin ^i^. Baker. 

Yarney School. 
Joseph H. Buffum. 

Main-street and Parker Schools. 
William F. Conner. 

Rimmon School. 
Joseph Chalifoux. 

Highland School. 
William L. Rhodes. 

Amoskeag School. 
Charles H. Corey. 

Gaffe's Falls School. 
Percy X. Folsom. 



XIII. -School Year.-1903-1904. 

Fall term opened September 8, 1903, closed December 18, 1903. Vaca- 
tion of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 4, 1904, closes March 25, 
1904. Vacation lof two weeks. 

Spring term opens April 11, 1904, closes June 24, 1904. Vacation of 
ten weeks. 

Fall term opens September 5. 1904. Continues fifteen weeks. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPOET OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor: 

The board of health submits the following report for the year 1903: 

Dr. J. E. A. Lanouette was appointed to succeed John C. Bickford, 
whose term expired. 

The annual meeting was held the second of February, and Dr. Wil- 
liam M. Parsons was elected president and William K. Robbins clerk. 

The appropriation allowed the board for carrying on the work of the 
year was $10,000. The expenditures have been as follows: 

OFFICE EXPENSES. 

Salaries $600.00 

Labor 3,051.01 

Office furniture 9.04 

Printing, postage, and stationery 176.30 

Telephone service 5.45 

Express 8.10 

Disinfectants 274.40 

Antitoxin 383.75 

Diphtheria examinations 200.00 

Quarantined families 335.21 

Carriage hire and carfares 226.60 

Supplies for laboratory 48.11 

Gas 14.27 

Milk samj)les 14.85 

Incidentals 60.31 

$5,407.40 
ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

Salary of matron $192.00 

Fuel 555.28 

Board and nursing 594.19 

Electric lighting 40.65 

Telephone service 48.52 

Water 16.00 

Repairs and improvements 230.00 

Supplies 143.30 

$1,819.92 

359 



360 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SMALLPOX EXPENSES. 

Salary of matron at pesthouse $360.00 

Labor 1,420.00 

Board of patients 1,160.76 

Fuel 201.50 

Telephone service 31.25 

Water 7.52 

Supplies 94.34 

Repairs on pesthouse 535.49 

Medical attendance 2,086.00 

Medical attendance, paid without consent of board 648.50 

Quarantined families 115.46 

Watching quarantined houses 444.00 

Yaccination 58.40 

$7,163.22 

Total expenditure for 1903 $14,390.54 

Amount turned in from milk license fees $346.00 

WTien the August bills were paid there was only enough left of the 
appropriation to pay those of September, leaving nothing with which 
to meet the expenses of the remaining three months of the year. 

Accordingly a letter was sent to the mayor giving a detailed account 
•of the expenses to date and an estimate, also in detail, of the amount 
probably necessary to complete the year's work. 

Before the month expired he authorized the work to be continued as 
economically as possible through the year, and assured us that funds 
would be forthcoming to meet the bills. 

Inspection of the figures shows that the general expenses of the office 
have exceeded those of last year by $330, yet four items show an in- 
crease of $400 over last year. Chief of these are disinfectants, diphthe- 
ria examinations, and carriage hire. Miore than the usual amount of 
smallpox and. diphtheria necessitated the increase in the first two, and 
transportation to and from the Isolation hospital the other. So the 
general expenses are not above the average of previous years. The 
expenses of the Isolation hospital could not be estimated closely as 
this is the first whole year that it has been in use. 

The fuel bill is high but it includes $36 from 1902. The coal for this 
season was bought in bulk, and as it arrived late some had to be bought 
for use, so that when all was in we had a large supply, probably enough 
to last till the end of 1904. 

The expense of nursing is pay for a trained nurse to attend patients 
who were city charges, while that for repairs and improvements was 
largely for screens, storm windows, and other small necessaries that 
could not be provided with the small funds available for erecting the 
Isolation hospital. 

The expense of smallpox was high, wholly on account of the nnniber 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 361 

of patients to be cared for, which was much larger this year than last. 
While as a whole this board spends much more money than it did years 
ago. it must be remembered that much more work is expected of and 
performed by it. People expect a great many services that formerly 
were not thought of. This will be appreciated by comparing this re- 
port with the report of ten years ago, viz., 189.'!. 

MEETINGS. 

The regular weekly meetings have been continued on Tuesday even- 
ing.s. Forty-four such meetings were held, and eleven special meetings 
for trips of inspection and such business as required immediate at- 
tention. This does not include a very considerable number of inter- 
views by one or two members at a time to investigate requests or com- 
plaints. The systematization of the business and the long experience 
of the employees, the telephone connections and the observance of the 
regular business hours of tlie other city departments make it conven- 
ient for the public to transact a large amount of the routine business 
of the department at the office. 

INSPECTORS. 

The same office force as that of last year has been continued in ser- 
vice, namely: Carl O. Seaman, inspector of plumbing and milk, and 
William B. Blake and John F. Looney, health inspectors. Miss M. Alma 
Fracker has continued as office clerk. All have been faithful and effi- 
cient and manifested much interest and enterprise, which are the 
prime requisites of good work, and they are entitled to much credit 
for the efficiencj- of the work of the department. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 

This dejjartment has done much more work than in any previous year. 
While we expect to do only such work as comes in on Sundays and 
holidays when there is no express to Concord, many phj^sicians have 
preferred the work of the local laboratory and again many more phy- 
sicians avail themselves of this opportunity than in former years. 

Again, diphtheria was more prevalent than usual. As usual the cul- 
tures are inoculated and inciibated at the office and Dr. A. G. Straw 
does the microscopical work. 

During the year 237 diphtheria examinations were made, of which 84 
were positive or true diphtheria, and 153 were negative. Sixty-one of 
the negative were examinations for the discharge of patients. 

Physicians are urged to avail themselves of such information as this 
department affords and cautioned not to leave too g'reat an amount of 
the decision of the diagnosis of the case to this where the clinical symp- 
toms do not coincide with it, because it is well known that the organ- 
ism causing diphtheria has been repeatedly found in the mouths of per- 
fectly healthy people, and also it is not always certain that the organ- 



362 AXNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ism from the person having the disease can be successfully grown on 
artificial media. The bacteriological examination is only an assistance 
but a most valuable one, and as it costs the physician nothing it cer- 
tainly should not be overlooked or ignored. 

INSPECTION OF MILK. 

The inspection of the city's milk supply has been conducted upon the 
same basis as last year. That is, samples were taken by the collectors, 
sealed, and placed upon ice, and the tests performed by the milk inspec- 
tor, Carl 0. Seaman, who gives specific information in detail in his 
report to this board, which is herewith included and made a part of 
this report. The scope of the work was slightly enlarged by making 
some bacteriological tests, which gives information more valuable to 
the public than useful to this board in enforcing the law. 

On the whole the work has proceeded without friction and the legal 
requirements have been complied with better than ever before. 

Less money was collected for milk licenses this year owing to a 
change in the law made at the last session of the legislature permitting 
people who sell milk exclusively from their own cows to have the 
license without fee, 

PLUMBING INSPECTION. 

The laws in regard to plumbing have been very well complied with. 
This comes of the fact that the citizens as well as the plumbers have^ 
come to understand and appreciate the laws, also the fact that now 
more than ever before the plumbing work of the city is done by 
plumbers of reasonable fitness for the work, as ascertained by the board 
of examiners of plumbers. 

We still have a few requests from tenants for permission to depart in 
some degree from the plumbing rules to modify the plumbing where 
the landlord declines to do it and tells them they can have it done at 
their own expense. This is wrong in principle and bad in practice, 
because no one wishes to go to the same pains and expense with the 
work on another's property as with his own. 

WATER SUPPLY. 

This year as usual much pains has been taken to guard the purity of 
the city water supply, with the usual ditiiculty of procuring enforce- 
ment of law by the authorities of another town. 

During the summer there was noticeably less liability to pollution 
of the waters on account of the much smaller number of people visit- 
ing the shores, and this was largely due to the absence of resorts where 
liquor was sold. In this regard we must heartily commend the good 
judgment of the state license commission upon the subject of licens- 
ing the sale of liquor near Lake Massabesic. 

We feel that there is much cause for congratulation in the fact that 
the source of our water supply has never become contaminated with 



KEPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 363 

the germs of typhoid fever. While so many cities have been having 
epidemics of the disease we have had but sixty-two cases and ten deaths 
during the entire year, and several of these were cases contracted out- 
side of the city. 

ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

This is the first full year that the Isolation hospital has been in use. 
We could form but a poor estimate lof its cost or iisefulness before- 
hand. It is somewhat expensive but gives abundant return. 

During the year forty-six patients have been treated there and only 
two deaths have resulted. At least ten patients were cured and re- 
turned to their homes who must otherwise have died, judging by the 
surroundings from which they were taken, but besides this many homes 
have been spared the hardship of quarantine, and often to take the 
patient out of thickly populated tenement blocks has been to prevent 
numerous exposures if not an epidemic. 

The funds to build and equip this hospital were very limited, and we 
made some sacrifice of convenient things in order to have some place 
to use, and for this reason repairs and improvements have to be made 
on so new a set of buildings. 

The most serious difficulty encountered in running the hospital is the 
apparatus for heating, which is expensive and entirely inadequate for 
the work. We hoped to partly make up for the defect this winter by 
putting on storm windows, but this, while a great improvement, is 
not enough, and it has been necessary to hire help to stay iip nights 
and force the apparatus and even then the wards could not be kept 
at a proper degree of warmth. 

Before another winter this miserable excuse for a steam plant must 
be replaced by something that will keep the place warm. 

We have as yet not been able to concrete about the premises, as we 
hope to do this next year. There is not sufficient storage capacity for 
the family in charge, and as the shed which was built for a shelter for 
horses proves too small for that purpose it is hoped we may be able 
to erect a cheai) shelter for teams and use the ijresent building wholly 
for storage. There is also much need of small changes in the robing 
and suspect rooms of the wards to make them more efficient. 

The matron, IjMrs. Eva M. Nute, has continued to be faithful and 
efficient and the place is kept in excellent condition. 

There are people who do not yet know the conditions of the use of 
the hospital so we repeat them. Those who are not destitute are ad- 
mitted by paying $3.50 per week to Mrs. Nute for board, and furnishing 
their own physician and nurse, if a trained nurse is required. 

The matron attends to those who are not in need of a trained nurse, 
and are old enough to stay alone in the ward. Small children are 
usually accompanied by a nurse or member of the family and the 
same charge of $3.50 per week for board is made for them as for 
patients. 



364 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEEORTS. 

No charge is made for heat, light, beds, or nightdresses. The wards 
are always readj- and patients are always admitted upon application 
to any member of the board. 

The city physician, Dr. J. H. DeGross, has attended all the patients 
who are city charges. He has been very devoted to his duties and 
skillful in his treatment, as witness his success in twenty very criti- 
cal cases of the dread diphtheria and scarlet fever, at least ten of these 
patients recovering who were in an extremely critical condition when 
admitted to the hospital. 

DIPHTHEKIA. 

This year as last there has been much diphtheria, and it is difficult 
to see how we could have prevented an epidemic had it not been for 
the Isolation hospital. Much pains has been taken to trace the source 
of this infection, so far with but moderate success. 

In some instances, of course, we can trace the disease through fam- 
ilj' or friendly relations, but in a great many cases it is utterly obscure, 
breaking out in virulent form and in grown people who observe the 
best of habits and live in excellent sanitary surroundings. 

We have noticed repeatedlj^ that it springs up and flourishes most 
in the damp, mild weather of the late autumn, and begins to disappear 
when the earth is well covered with snow, which would indicate that 
there is some source of it that is covered with snow and in the summer 
when the sun is high is killed by the sunlight but grows when the sun- 
liglit is short and feeble in the fall. Until miore is known it is advisa- 
ble to take extra precaution in the fall of the year to make safe dis- 
posal of all rubbish wherein the organisms causing the disease can live 
and grow. In this connection it is well to remind the public to pre- 
vent children from too free an interchange of playthings, and the con- 
sumption of candy known as "suckers," a lump of candy on a small 
stick. These are sucked awhile then taken out and exposed to dust 
and filth and sucked again, and we have actually found diphtheria 
communicated by children exchanging "suckers." 

There were reported during the year one hundred and forty-six cases 
and seventeen deaths. Most of the deaths were in patients to whom no 
physician was called until the disease had run to the croupous stage, 
thus making the death rate larger than it would have been with prompt 
treatment of all cases, 

SMALLPOX. 

We started in the year with ten cases of smallpox in the hospital and 
the number decreased until in the early fall the place was free. Dur- 
ing that time the building was looked over by the mayor and members 
of the committee on lands and buildings and found to be much in need 
of repair. On the seventh of October the board received a letter from 
the mayor authorizing it to spend an amount not exceeding one thou- 
sand dollars for repairs upon the smallpox hospital. 



, REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTIF. 365 

Accordingly we proceeded, doing the most needed work first. Wlien 
some of the rooms had been replastered and all had been whitened 
and cleaned, the roof repaired, some stoves and furnishings replaced, 
and a water closet partly installed, the disease again made its ap- 
pearance and we have been unable to complete the work. 

The disease has been of about the same mild type as during the 
last year and no deaths have resulted. The hospital was clear on the 
last day of the year. 

Early in the year some criticism was made of the large physicians 
bills for treating patients, and at the mayor's instance the board voted 
to dej)end upon City Physician DeGross for smallpox attendance, with 
the understanding in writing that no bill for such services was to be 
paid out of the funds of the health department. 

Through some misunderstanding the work was not done in a manner 
satisfactory to this board, and on August fifth the city physician was 
notified that his services would be no longer required for smallpox 
attendance. Dr. Maurice Watson was engaged to do the work and has 
continued to do so to the end of the year. 

The city physician sent in a bill of $383 for treating smallpox which 
we ignored but which was paid by the city and charged to the health 
department. Several times during the year we have felt compelled to 
resort to the court, and several people have been fined for not report- 
ing smallpox in the family, as required by law. 

. We are satisfied that it is this practice, together with the neglect or 
refusal of people to be vaccinated, that is costing the city so much for 
care of this dread disease. Out of the 162 cases handled only one has 
been varioloid. 

In a few instances parties showing a large scar and claiming to have 
been vaccinated in the mills with the old style ivory points had full 
and typical run of smallpox, indicating that the sore arm, that in one 
case had laid a person up for three months, was a simple septic arm 
without vaccinia at all. 

SLAUGIITEKIRG IN THE CITY. 

Several times during the summer and very 'often in late summer and 
early fall complaints were made to this board of the nauseating odors 
emanating from the works of the Manchester Slaughtering & Eender- 
ing company, in South Manchester. The place was viewed by the 
sanitary inspectors and inspected by the board and the management 
were notified that the state of affairs existing at the works constituted 
a nuisance, which must be abated. Conferences were held with the 
members of the board and promises of improvement were made by the 
company. Complaints continued to come in and the board revisiTed the 
works several times but each time found that no improvements or ma- 
terial changes had been made, nor have they been made at the close 
of the year, though the complaints ceased to come in when cold weather 
set in. This board is unable to see how changes in operation can be 



366 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPOETS. 

made that will make the place such as should be tolerated when the 
weather is again warm. When this place was started it was well away 
from habitations and was used exclusively for slaughtering neat stock. 
Now the city has been built out near it and the work has become prac- 
tically that of a fertilizer factory, working up market refuse and dead 
animals generally, not from this city alone but from many other com- 
munities in the state. Unless some radical change is made, either in 
the character of the work done or the manner of doing it, we shall 
feel obliged to withdraw the consent of the department for its further 
operation. 

DISINFECTION. 

Since the autumn of lS9fi this board has made reguhir use of the 
formaldehyde fumigation, being the first city in this country to make 
use of it in a practical waj'. Its efficiency had been previously estab- 
ished but the apparatus had not been made efficient and safe to be put 
into the hands of inspectors for general use. Lamps for generating 
formaldehyde from wood alcohol were used as a source of the gas. 
Formaldehyde as a disinfectant grew in favor, other styles of lamps 
were invented and the forty per cent solution of the gas in water became 
lower in price until three years ago it became cheaper to use the solu- 
tion which goes under the trade name of formaline, or simply formalde- 
hj-de, than to generate the gas from wood alcohol. 

Accordingly we adopted the now well-known and smple method of 
atomizing the solution uf)on bed sheets or cotton cloth suspended in 
the room, where it evaporates spontaneously. This insures absolute 
freedom from possibility of fire, and reduces the amount of apparatus 
to be carried around to a minimum. The process as now carried out is 
this: The contents of the room or rooms to be treated are opened and 
spread out in the most thorough manner. Washable goods, linen, etc., 
are scalded or wet with the solution. Then all cracks around doors 
and windows and other oi>enings of every kind are sealed with strips 
of gummed paper, prepared for the purpose, and when all is tight an 
amount of 40 per cent formaldehyde solution equal to 8 ounces for each 
thousand cubic feet of space, is atomized upon the sheet and the door 
closed. The room remains thus closed six hours, or usually over night, 
when it is aired out and ready for occupancy. 

In places where it can be done, as in schoolhouses, etc., the floors, 
window and door casings, and all places where dust can lodge are first 
washed with soap and soda, or some disinfectant. 

As the work is done neatly and freely by the employees of the board, 
and people have become used to it, it is much desired and many houses 
are fumigated now where it would not have been thought of a dozen 
years ago. During the past year 1,458 rooms have been fumigated, 
besides two of our largest schoolhouses. The cost at present is not 
large. The formaldehyde solution in barrels now costs 13 cents per 
pound, thus making the cost from 13 to 50 cents per room, and the 
cost of fumigating a whole school building from $15 to $25. 



KEPORT OF THE BOAED OF HEALTH. 367 

For atomizing- we use a special atomizer that costs about $4.00 and 
■vvill last for j-ears, but for large undertakings we make use of a ponj" 
tire extinguisher with a special spray nozzle. 

FormaIdeh_yde by this or some other method is now used by every 
city that pretends to do sanitary work. Many kinds of apparatus 
and special preparations of formaldehyde are drummed about the coun- 
try and some most ridiculous representatdons are made for them. 

Under the direction of Mr. Robbins of the board Mr. Seaman has 
made some tests of the preparations offered and the loss by our process 
of operation, which are herewith qxioted in full. 

Eight samples of formaldehyde were tested, six being liquid, and two 
solid. That represented to be 40 per cent was found to be very nearly 
that, running from 38 per cent to 39.3 per cent. The solid was sup- 
posed to be 99 per cent pure formaldehyde but was found to be but 
75 per cent. 

Wei made some tests with sheets to determine the amount of gas 
lost during fumigation. This was done bj- carefully drying to "room 
dry" a piece of washed sheeting such as is used in fumigating and 
weighing it on the balance, then hanging the sheet up and atomizing 
with a spray from a bottle of formaldehyde which was weighed before 
and after atomizing the sheet, and the exact amount of formaldehyde 
determined. After the sheet had hung over night and was "room 
dry," it was weighed again and the increase in weight figured as loss 
in pure gas. This loss amounted to 5.2 per cent of 38. S per cent formal- 
dehyde taken. The same experiment made with, a piece of filter paper 
in place of sheeting showed a loss of 4.1 per cent. 

We herewith wish to express our gratefulness to the mayor and both 
branches of the city government for their confidence and the manj- 
ways in which they have assisted and encouraged the work of the 
health department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM M. PARSONS. 
WILLIAM K. ROBBIXS. 
J. E. A. LAXOUETTE. 



368 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 
S03[E COMPARISONS OF VITAL STATISTICS 



1892. 



Population, estimated 

Number of deatlis, exclu- 
sive of stillbirtlis 

Deaths, per tliousand of 
po{)ulation 

Deatlis of Children under 
five years 

Ratio, deaths of children to 
total deaths, per cent 

Deaths of children per thou 
sand of population' 

Deaths from zymotic 
diseases 

Deaths from zymotic dis- 
east s per thous. of pop. . . . 

Cholera infantum 



Tuberculosis 

Croup 

Diphtheria 

Bronchitis 

Pneumonia,' all forms .. . 
Heart disease, all forms. 

Scarlet fever ' 

Typlioid fever 

Measles 

Whooping cough 

Smallpox 



733 
19.35 
312 
42.56 
8.24 
231 
6.10 



39,032 

725 

18.57 
313 

43.17 

8.02 

205 

5.25 
115 

109 

21 

9 

11 

26 

37 



19.84 
356 

44.G1 
8.85 
256 



853 

20.59 
397 

46.54 



42,689 

764 

17.90 
353 

46.20 

8.27 



901 
20.40 
434 

48.17 

9.87 

252 

5.72 
141 



19.34 
396 
44.66 

8.64 

181 

3.98 
122 



20.06 

500 
51.92 
10.42 

153 

3.18 
103 

3 
5 



KEPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH, 
No. 1. 
FOR THE LAST NINETEEN YEARS. 



o69 



1S93. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


50,000 • 


55,000 


55,000 


56,000 


60,000 


60,000 


60,000 


56,987 


56,987 


56,987 


60,000 


971 


977 


1,020 


1,051 


1,018 


1,001 


1,068 


1,167 


1,131 


1,092 


1,106 


1<).42 


17.76 


18.54 


18.77 


16.97 


16.68 


17.S0 


20.47 


19.84 


19.12 


18.43 


527 


546 


549 


531 


631 


521 


.541 


561 


554 


622 


5.3G 


50.02 


55.89 


53.82 


50.52 


61.98 


52.04 


50.65 


48.07 


48.99 


56.95 


50.27 


10 54 


9.91 


9.98 


9.48 


10.50 


8.68 


9.01 


9.84 


9.71 


10.91 


9.26 


137 


209 


213 


227 


226 


254 


203 


244 


283 


238 


22,-) 


•2.74 
«9 


3.S0 
40 


3.97 
146 


4.05 
129 


3.77 
110 


4.23 
122 


3.38 

78 


4.28 
119 


4.96 
121 


4.17 


3.75 

92 


79 


74 


76 


112 


88 


73 


91 


100 


81 


78 


87 


4 


24 


14 


20 


14 


10 


10 


6 


5 


12 


17 


1 


11 


10 


28 


29 


17 


6 


8 


3 


22 


17 


44 


56 


59 


51 


86 


45 


65 


40 


38 


55 


40 


53 


81 


86 


77 


105 


72 


113 


118 


105 


120 


112 


46 


52 


75 


77 


64 


50 


57 


77 


75 


54 


73 


5 


3 


4 


1 


1 


9 


3 


6 


9 


2 


2 


15 


S 


21 


19 


12 


14 


12 


12 


11 


8 


10 


2 


4 


1 

2 


3 
3 


3 
13 


3 

2 


5 
15 


1 
3 






I 


2 


8 


5 






i 


5 






" "" [ 

















370 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. 2. 



Membra- 
nous 
croup. 



Diph- 
theria. 


i yphoid 
fever. 


1 


en 

1 


1 


i 


12 


2 


13 


2 


8 


2 


2 


1 


7 


1 


3 


1 


1 




2 


1 


5 




4 




6 


3 


2 




10 


4 


6 


1 


2 




5 


1 


6 


1 






25 


2 


7 




40 


1 


11 


2 


24 


1 


7 


1 


146 


17 


62 


10 



Scarlet 
fever. 



Vario- 
loid. 



Small- 
pox. 



January. . 
Februarj . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October . . . . 
November . 
December.. 

Totals.... 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



371 



TABLE No. 8. 

COMPARISON OF STATISTICS OF CONTAGIOUS AND INFECTIOUS 
DISEASES FOR THE PAST W YEARS. 



Membra- 
nous 
croup. 



Dipth- 
theria 



Typhoid 
fever. 



Scarlet 
fever. 



Vario- 
loid. 



Small- 
pox. 



1 " 



1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891 
1892. 
1893. 
1891. 
1895. 
189C. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900, 
1901. 
1902. 



18 


» 


9 


» 


17 


28 


30 


35 


23 


36 


9 


36 


2 


76 


5 


33 


1 


79 


11 


74 


11 


73 


28 


81 


29 


78 


17 


145 


6 


78 


8 


65 


3 


55 


22 


49 


17 


62 



211 

554 

408 

418 

260 

763 

681 

524 

1,026 

1,102 

333 

1,026 

545 



372 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 



TABLE No. 4.— DEATH RETURNS. 



TABLE .SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES 
AND BY MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1903. 



Causes of Death. 


i 




J3 


■< 


03 


3 


9 

1-5 


i 

to 

a 


J 

S 
B 
a 


1 


s 



56 


1 

i 


i 
1 






















1 
1 






I 




2 


.... 


1 


"i" 




2 


1 








1 


8 




I 




1 




.... 


























1 












l 












2 


2 






2 








»' fall 


1 






1 


3 




1 
1 














1 


** internal injuries . . . 


































.... 




1 

1 










2 




1 




1 
1 




1 


7 








1 










2 
















2 












.. . . 












1 
.... 


1 




















1 
1 
1 


















1 






'"i 


3 




1 








2 


1 


6 






1 
1 
3 

1 


















"2 


'3' 


.... 


1 
1 


1 
3 


"3' 


3 


4 


"i 


2 


Apoplexy .... ... 


2 




28 




2 
























1 










1 




1 








1 


.... 


3 


A Athpnifl 














1 










1 




















1 




















1 




















1 






1 












1 














1 












2 






















1 








1 
1 






2 














1 

1 

4 

] 










2 
























1 




2 
3 
1 


2 

4 


7 

1 


1 


2 


2 


.... 


.... 


1 
1 


4 


3 


20 




11 


Cancer 


2 




1 






3 








2 








1 




1 










1 


3 










1 










1 














1 






1 






2 












1 








1 














1 










1 


















1 










1 






3 


1 




1 






1 


.... 


1 


1 


10 






..!. .... 


1 
















. .1 




1 
1 


:;;: 


1 




1 


1 


1 




1 


"i' 


:::: 2 


1 




8 








1 










1 

1 








1 
32 








2 








1 




3 


23 

1 


20 
2 


11 

1 
1 
2 

1 


1 




92 








4 


K iieo 














1 




4 
4 


1 


6 
2 


6 
2 


1 
2 


1 


3 

1 


3 


2 


1 

1 


2 
3 


32 




16 








1 






















1 
3 


"3 
I 


1 

1 
1 


2 




4 


1 


1 
1 






2 

1 


8 1 2 

.... 2 


2 


22 


a * senile 












1 








1 




1 






1 
I 
2 


1 

1 












3 










.... 1 

4 1.... 


1 
2 


2 




1 

1 


6 


Diarrhoea 










11 



REPORT OF THE HOARD OF HEALTH. 
TABLE No. i— Continued. 



373 



Causes of Death. 


3 


i 


A 
g 

s 

?. 


P. 

< 




<-> 




i 

3 
< 


1 

t 

eg 




8 


a 




.3 

n 
i 


H 




2 
1 


2 


1 






3 


• 


.... 

1 
1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


17 




1 


1 












..'. 




1 






3 


Eclampsia, puerperal 


1 






1 

1 










4 
































1 










1 








































1 










5 


1 






I 








7 






1 
62 








2 




2 


2 


1 




2 


3 


1 
1 


1 




2 


24 




1 








1 


















1 












































1 








1 








! 

1 

1 


1 

1 

1 

.... 
















1 
3 






1 


1 








] 


10 












2 






1 




I 




1 






2 


13 








1 
























1 
5 








4 


3 


3 
3 


4 




3 


3 


3 


1 
1 




35 




























1 

1 
2 

1 




** hypertrophy of. ...[ital 
'» malformation congen- 




1 














1 






2 






















1 




















3 






1 










1 
1 




2 




















2 


*' syncope of 






















2 

1 


2 




1 




1 
1 


? 


2 


3 


3 


;;^; 


18 






3 


















1 
1 


1 
















3 


1 


1 












1 








*' postpartum — 
pulmonary 




















1 


2 




















\ 






















1 


1 


FTArk^titiQ 










1 














J 














I 


1 






















1 












2 






1 














1 


















1 


1 






2 












1 






















2 




1 
1 


.... 




La grippe 


1 


3 


































1 
























1 


























2 






1 
1 








1 


2 


3 

1 






















hypertrophy of 
























3 








1 








3 








































1 




























1 
1 






























1 




















1 
4 






Marasmus 




2 

1 
2 

1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


3 


9 


4 


4 


2 


37 






5 
1 


3 




1 
2 


6 
.... 


4 
1 


1 


2 


4 


2 
1 

1 


30 








" cerebro-splnal — 




1 


"3' 


3 






2 




1 










Mvcosis fungosre 












1 




1 



374 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE No. i.— Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


3 

a 

OS 


at 
3 

.a 




t 


5* 


i 

•-5 


1 


1 

< 


s 
s 

p< 


1 
1 


. 
1 

s 


« 

ll 


Myelitis 


















1 














1 
5 

1 






















Xpnhriti'i 


4 

1 


4 

1 


5 




2 


5 


1 


1 
1 


3 
2 


1 

2 


8 

1 


OQ. 




a 












1 
1 
1 




Old age 


1 

1 


.... 

1 


2 
3 


2 
1 


2 

2 


3 

1 


■■2' 


1 

2 


.... 

1 


1 
3 


2 


15 
17 










1 










3 


1 










1 














1 
























1 














1 

1 


1 


"5 
2 

7 


'2' 

1 
7 
2 
10 
2 








1 


1 


3 
3 


2 




3 


21 








3 


9 


7 
1 

7 
3 

1 


5 


6 


2 


6 


5 


1 


61 








16 
1 

1 


12 
2 


6 
2 


10 

1 


4 
2 


3 


5 
1 

1 


.... 


6 

1 


9 

1 


90 




16 












1 




1 














' 


































1 
























1 
4 








1 


3 


4 


1 




4 


1 


3 


4 


5 
1 


3 


33 










1 








1 


















1 




















1 


1 
1 


1 








1 














1 




























1 




1 

1 






























1 




1 






1 


1 
















1 












1 
6 




















6 


7 
.... 


..'. 


6 


5 


5 


3 


6 

1 


3 


4 


4 
1 


62 


Suicide, by asphyxiation 






1 
















1 
1 






















1 
1 


1 














1 






2 


1 


■ 


















1 














1 




































2 


















1 
1 
























1 
1 


2 


.•5 


4 


3 


2 


2 


1 






5 


26 




























1 
1 








































1 

1 

106 


1 

2 

99 


2 

78 


1 












1 
95 


2 

97 






1 

108 








9 




79 


107 


109 


90 


96 


104 


1,168 







INSPECTION OF MILK. 



Goitlemcn of the Board of Health: 

I beg leave to submit the following as a report of the inspection of 
milk during the year 1903: 

During the year 82S samples of milk, skim milk, and cream were 
taken. Two hundred and seventy-six samples were brought into the 
office by citizens and milk dealers, and the remaining 552 were taken by 
the inspectors and paid for at the retail price. In six cases sealed, du- 
plicate samples Avere demanded and given and receipts taken therefor. 
During the winter season of higher legal requirements, namely, Jan- 
uary, February, and March, 161 samples of milk were tested averag- 
ing 3.991 per cent of butter fat with a specific gravity of 1.03097, and 37 
were below the legal standard of butter fat. 

During the summer period of April, May, June, July, August, and 
September, 482 samples of milk were tested, averaging 3.778 per cent 
butter fat' with specific gravity of 1.03061, and 18 were below the legal 
standard in butter fat. During the months of October, November, and 
December, 175 samples were tested averaging 4.142 per cent of butter 
fat with specific gravity of 1.03128 per cent and 17 were below the legal 
standard of butter fat. Of the entire 828 samples taken 72 were below 
the legal standard. 

Twelve samples of skim milk and cream were taken, the cream aver- 
aging 27.7 per cent butter fat. 

Drying and weighing to determine total solids was resorted to 13 
times. The specific gravity of the milk serum was determined 11 times. 
The milk has also been tested for acidity by the Mann volumetric 
methQd of analysis. One hundred and sixty-one samples of milk tested 
from January 1 to March 31 showed .162 per cent acidity; 419 samples 
tested from April 1 to September 30 showed .155 per cent acidity, and 
174 samples from October 1 to December 31 showed .159 jier cent acid- 
ity. 

Almost every sample was tested for formaldehyde and many addi- 
tional tests were made for colostrum cells, coloring matter, carljonates, 
salicylic acid, and boric acid. 

Thirty wagons were found improperly marked, 15 having the wrong 
name and license number, and 15 being without name or number, while 
15 dealers were found selling without a license. 

Sixty-four letters have been written to dealers and raisers of milk 
during the year. 

376 



376 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



RAISERS OF MILK. 

We make a practice of testing- milk for all dealers and raisers and 
this proves very satisfactory as they can thereby tell exactly where 
milk which is below standard is coming from. Several times we have 
saved the dealers a possible prosecution for selling adulterated milk. 

On several occasions I have analj'^zed milk for dealers which they 
bought and have found it adulterated with Avater, in several cases as 
much as 33 per cent of Avater being added. As these raisers of milk did 
not live in our city we had no authority in the matter other than to 
warn the dealer not to sell this milk in the city of Manchester. 

In October I notified the state board of health and asked them to 
provide some means by Avhich this practice might be stopped. Upon 
October 27 I received a letter from Dr. Watson, the secretary, in which 
he stated that the difficulty might be overcome by appointing me an 
agent to collect samples of milk from such sources as I had reason to 
believe might not meet the requirements of the Public Statutes, the 
samples to be properly sealed and marked and forwarded to the state 
laboratory of hygiene for examination. This appointment was made, 
but I am glad to say that I have had no milk since which would call 
for this extreme inspection. HoAvever, at the first opportunity I in- 
tend to use the authority thus given me, as I am convinced that it will 
have some effect in discouraging this dishonest practice. 

MEASURES. 

Complaint was made at this office that some of the one quart milk 
bottles were not up to the standard measure. We tested several differ- 
ent makes, or rather different shaped bottles, ancj found this to be true, 
some of them being about one-half gill short of the standard measure. 

BACTERIA. 

Early in the summer I prepared a number of nutrient gelatine and 
ajrar-agar culture media tubes to be used in the counting of bacteria in 
milk. In doing this work we have had considerable difficulty to get 
seme authority upon the number and kind of germs Avhlch are inju- 
rious to the user of milk. I found in my experiments that even fresh 
milk obtained from a favorable source contained tens of thousands to 
the cubic centimeter, and milk of questionable freshness contained 
millions to the 'cubic centimeter. 

OLD MILK. 

It has come to my notice that the average milk from stores has a 
greater per cent of acid than that which is sold by the milk wagons 
and the only way in which I can account for this is that some stores 
must sell milk which is not fresh. My experience has been that milk 
which we collect from milk wagons will keep in a refrigerator from 
twenty-four to forty-eight hours before it has become as acid as that 



REPOKT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 377 

of the average store milk. This convinces me that the average store 
man buys milk and if he does not sell it on the first day he sells it the 
next day and verj^ likely on the third, or until it becomes sour. 

This is all wrong and some means should be devised to put a stop to 
the practice, as the public are entitled to fresh milk when they paj^ for 
it. Store men should make an extra effort to keep fresh milk. The.^- 
should have a fresh supply each day, or better still, twice a day, and 
the milk which is left over should be returned to the milkman to be 
worked up into butter, etc. 

Medical experts tell us that old milk is very injurious to babies and 
to invalids, and personal experiments show that the number of bacteria 
which it contains is hardly conceivable to the average person. I took 
a sample of milk which was quite acid and made cultures from it, 
finding it to contain about six million baoteria to the cubic centimeter. 
The acidity of milk is usually caused by the growth of bacteria, there- 
fore it is very essential that milk should have a small per cent of acid- 
ity. I believe that if the grocery stores sold only fresh, clean milk that 
the death rate among children would be decreased. 

The ordinary tin quart measure used in measuring milk is very liable 
to be a source of contamination also. Every day it may be seen on the 
milk wagons and store counters where it catches the dust of the streets 
and store and if not used often traces of sour milk will be left in it 
to be doled out to the next customer. 

PKOSECUTIONS. 

Milk licenses expire on May 31 and must be renewed by the first day 
of June. Some dealers are careless about this and several of them 
were found selling milk after their licenses had expired. After this 
had occurred several times the parties were reported, called before the 
police court and fined. This should be a warning to all dealers to 
complj' with the law by renewing their licenses at the proper time. 

PLUMBING inspector's BEPORT. 

Plumbing fixtures set: 

Number of tank water-closets 653 

frost-proof closets, Kelly & McCulloch 14 

sinks 371 

bathtubs 276 

washbowls 291 

wash trays 114 

urinals 26 

refrigerators 16 

slophoppers 6 

cellar drains S 

Other fixtures not classified above 104 

Total number of fixtures put in 1,897 



378 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Number of plumbing notices filed 386- 

water tests of soil pipe made o9(> 

stacks of soil pipe made 408 

smoke tests of soil pipe 12 

defects and leaks found 78 

complaints investigated 12 

fixtures and pipes found unserviceable and re- 
paired 26 

Two hundred consultations with owners, tenants, agents, plumbers, 
etc., were held. 

A total of 2,000 inspections were made of the work during its prog- 
ress and after its completion. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

GAEL O. SEAMAN, 
Inspector of PlumUng and Milk. 



SANITARY INSPECTORS' REPORT 



Crentlemen of the Board of Health: 

We beg leave to submit the following as the report of the work of the 
sanitary inspectors for the year 1903: 

Vaults and privies inspected 104 

Vaults inspected after cleaning- 142 

Water closets inspected 1,244 

Urinals insipected 59 

Yards and alleys inspected 1,343 

Cellars inspected 930 

Barns and outbuildings inspected 200 

Tenements inspected 512 

Barn cellars inspected 178 

Teams and riggings of excavators inspected 36 

Soaperies and slaughterhouses inspected 23 

Vaults and privies ordered cleaned 77 

Yards and alleys cleaned ' 398 

Cellars cleaned 108 

Barn cellars cleaned 42 

Sheds, etc., cleaned 32 

Tenements cleaned 63 

Water closets cleaned lor repaired 407 

Leaky drain pipes repaired 93 

Houses within 100 feet of the public sewer and not connected 

therewith 15 

Openings other than leaks in the drainage system were found in 31 
places and same were ordered closed by the department. 

Sixty-five bathtubs and 11 washtrays were inspected. 

Sewage was found running upon the surface of the ground in 20 
places and such nuisances were abated either by entering the sewer or 
carrying away in some manner not offensive. 

In doing the work of the department it has been necessary to make 
4,168 calls and to write 440 letters. 

Five hundred and twenty-six complaints have been investigated. 

In 455 cases the inspectors have been able to give relief, and in 
71 cases it was found that no cause existed or that same was beyond the 
control of the department. 

Fifteen complaints were made against the scavenger service, in each 
case the proper parties were notified and relief afforded. 

379 



380 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Thirty persons were found throwing garbage in the back streets and 
lake and were warned against the practice. 

Private swiil collectors have been warned 51 times to be neater in 
their work. 

Forty-six dead animals have been properly disposed of. 

Ninety-eight hens and small animals have been removed from cellars. 

Ninety-nine swine and cows have been discovered being kept within 
the sanitary limits of the city without licenses. The sariie were ordered 
removed or licenses procured. 

Fourteen notices have been prepared and served and proper returns 
made. 

One hundred and thirty-five catch-basins or street cesspools have 
been inspected, and 34 have been flushed or repaired by order of this 
department. 

A sanitary inspection has been made of 31 bakeshops and 23 stores. 
Theatres have been inspected nine times, circuses twice and sausage 
factories 18 times. 

The dumps have been inspected 24 times. 

One hundred and twenty-three nuisances not otherwise classified have 
been abated through the efforts of this department. 

Householders have been given three permits to clean their own vaults. 

Permits to the number of 1,592 have been granted for the burial and 
removal of dead bodies, and the returns forwarded to the city regis- 
trar. 

A statement of mortality has been prepared each month and copies 
sent to about two hundred and fifty other towns and cities to local 
physicians, etc. 

Weekly reports of contagious diseases have been sent to the state 
board of health at Concord and the Marine hospital service at Wash- 
ington, D. C. Four samples of water and ten samples of oysters were 
sent to the state laboratory for analysis. 

Contagious and infectious diseases have been reported as follows: 
Measles 112, diphtheria 146, typhoid fever 62, scarlet fever 37, membra- 
nous croup 26, smallpox 162, total 545. 

Five hundred and twenty-five of these cases were reported by phy- 
sicians, 16 by householders, and 4 were discovered by the inspectors. 

The inspectors were unable to trace the cause in 336 cases, in 197 
cases the connection with some previous case was clearly traceable. 
Eight cases were contracted outside of the city and in 4 cases it was 
reasonable to attribute the cause to insanitary surroundings. 

In some cases disinfectants were being used and the inspectors 
ordered their use in other cases. At most of these places instructions 
were given as to their use and in many cases the department furnished 
the disinfectants. 

In some cases patients were found well isolated and in other cases 
inspectors were obliged to order isolation and in all cases to give in- 
structions as to the steps to be taken. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PIEALTH. 381 

Houses were watched to see that the rules of isolation were complied 
Avith and 24 funerals were attended to prevent a too public observance 
of the same. 

One thousand, four hundred and fifty-eight rooms where diseases 
had existed Avere fumigated by the inspectoijs and bedding- was burned 
in three cases. 

About 3,000 pamphlets issued by the state board of health have been 
distributed in localities where contagious disease existed. 

The shores of Lake Massabesic were patroled by the inspectors on 
Sundays, holidays, and through the week during the summer season. 
Ice fields from which ice was being cut were inspected and several 
picnics and band concerts were attended to prevent the careless dis- 
posal of waste and rubbish in the lake or on its shores. 
Kespectfully submitted, 

JOHX F. LOONEY, 
WILLIAM B. BLAKE, 

Sanitary Inspectors. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER, FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



EEPOPiT OF THE FIEE ENCilNEEE. 



Chief Ewgineek's Office, 
Central Station, Xo. S Vine Street, 

Manchester, N. H., December 31, luo.'j. 
To His Honor, Eutiene E. Reed, Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Council: 

In compliance with the Laws and Ordinances of the city of Man- 
chester, I herewith submit my twenty-fifth annual report on the work- 
ing of the fire department for the year ending December 31, 1903, it 
being the fifty-seventh of this city. 

The department answered to two hundred and eighty-four (2S4) 
alarms during the year, being eighty-six (86) more than last year, and 
a larger number than ever since the organization of the city. One 
hundred and seventy-nine (179) have been still alarms and one hundred 
and five (105) have 'been bell alarms. Of the bell alarms one (1) has 
been "second" alarm, and eig'ht (8) have been false alarms, only one of 
which have we been fortunate enough to locate the person or persons 
causing them. 

Three out-of-town calls have been responded to as follows: May 26, 
sent Steamer No. 1, with hose wagon, horses and men to Concord, 
X. H., to "cover in" for two steamers they had sent to the aid of Lake- 
port, N. H. August 18 sent Steamer X^o. 4, with toose wagon, horses and 
men to Epping, N. H., and December 19 sent Steamer No. 1, with hose 
wagon, horses and men to Goflfstown, N. H. On our arrival at the fore- 
going places the fire was under such control that our apparatus was 
not taken from the cars, although at Goffstown some of our men ren- 
dered personal assistance in relieving some of the exhausted members 
of the local department. 

Forty (40) of our alarms have been for grass or brush fires, and one 
hundred and one (101) have been chimney fires. 

The department has laid one hundred and eight thousand, eight 
hundred and eighty-five (108,885) feet of hose, "thrown" twenty-three 
hundred and seventy-nine (2,379) feet of ladders, used one hundred and 
eighty-five (185) "pony" extinguishers, and forty-one (41) chemical 
engine tanks. 

The value of property endangered, the ajnount of insurance carried 
on same, the amount of insurance paid, and the net losses, as far as 
could be ascertained (not including chimney or brush fires), aggre- 
gate as follows: 
25 

385 



386 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Value of buildings $532,550.00 

Value of contents 96,266.50 

$628,816.50 

Insurance carried on buildings $286,454.00 

Insurance carried on contents 60,680.00 

$347,134.00 

Damage to buildings $29,373.23 

Damage to contents 22,043.12 

$51,416.35 

Insurance paid on buildings $23,403.19 

Insurance paid on contents 15,976.95 

$39,379.95 

Leaving net loss above insurance of $12,036.40 

THE MANUAL FORCE. 

An ordinance passed June 2, 1903, allowing the permanent men an- 
other day off in each month, necessitated the election of another per- 
manent driver, and the force at present consists of thirty-five (35) 
permanent men and one hundred and twenty-six (126) call men as- 
signed as follows: 

Per- 
Call. manent. 

1 chief engineer 1 

4 assistant engineers 4 

Engine Company No. 1 11 3 

Engine Company Xo. 2 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 3 15 5 

Engine Company Xo. 4 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 5 16 4 

Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 6 16 4 

Hose Company Xo. 1 11 1 

Hose Company Xo. 2 10 2 

Hose Company Xo. 3 6 2 

Aerial Truck Xo. 1 12 3 

Chemical Xo. 1 3 2 

Spare drivers ' 2 

126 35 

Making a total of one hundred and sixt3'-one (161) men. 

THE BUILDINGS. 

Aside from minor repairs the buildings remain about the same as 
last year. The gravel roofs at central station have been repeatedly 



KEPORT OF THP: FIRE ENGINEEIi. 387 

patched^ and are still in a leaky conditiion, and probably will be more 
or less so until newly graveled throug-hout. In fact, the annual ap- 
propriations for repairs are much too low to meet the necessary de- 
mands for thorough repairs. The unusual amount of heavy snow the 
past winter emphasizes very strongly the much needed alterations at 
the Lake avenue station whereby the three-horse hitch, several times 
alluded to in my previous reports, could be used on Truck No. 3. 

Accommodations should be furnished for the chief's horse in the 
room adjoining the chemical engine hy putting in stall and arranging 
room so a swinging harness could be used. 

THE APPARATUS 

Consists of 6 steam fire engines, 6 hose wagons (one a combination 
chemical and one with ladders attached), 3 hose carriages with reels, 
4 hook and ladder trucks (one an eightj^-five foot aerial, carrying other 
ladders), 1 supply wagon, 7 exercise wagons. There are 2 hose car- 
riages in the outlying districts with volunteer companies, 2 hose-jump- 
ers (without men), 1 spare one-horse hose carriage, located as follows: 

Central Station: Two first size Amoskeag steamers, with three- 
horse hitch, 2 one-horse hose wagons, 1 one-horse hose carriage, one 
aerial truck (three-horse hitch), 1 double (60 gallons) tank chemical 
engine, 1 supply wagon, 1 exercise wagon. 

North Main-;Street 'Station: One second size Amoskeag steamer 
(three-horse hitch), 1 two-horse combination chemical and hose wagon, 
1 old U tank steamer in storage, one exercise wagon. 

McGregor viLLE Station: One second size Amoskeag steamer, 1 one- 
horse hose carriage, 1 two-iorse hook and ladder truck, 1 exercise 
wagon. 

Lake AvENrE Station: One second size Amoskeag steamer, 1 two- 
horse hose wagon, 1 two-horse hook and ladder truck, 1 exercise wagon. 

Webster-Street Station: One third size Amoskeag steamer, 1 one- 
horse carriage, 1 two-borse hook and ladder truck, 1 exercise wagon. 

Maple-Street Station: One 'two-horse hose wagon, 1 exercise wag- 
on. 

South ELM-iSTREET Station: One two-horse combination hose wagon, 
carrying ladders, 1 exercise wagon. 

In addition to the foregoing there is 1 hose carriage in Amoskeag 
on Front street, 1 hose carriage (volunteer companies), 1 two- wheeled 
hose carriage, Devonshire Mills, Goffe's Falls, 1 two-^vheeled "jumper" 
in basement of W. P. Farmer's barn cellar, Candia road, corner Han- 
over street, 1 two-horse combination chemical and hose wagon (in 
storage), awaiting the completion of the Wilson Hill station, 1 repair 
wagon for fire alarm telegraph, and 4 sleds for winter use. 

THE FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Two of the tower strikers have had new and improved striking appa- 
ratus put in to replace those which have been in use since the system 



388 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 

was first installed thirty-one years ago. Two new boxes, 219. Eaton 
Heig-hts shoe shop, and 3^5. corner Kelly and Cartier streets, have been 
added. 

The storag-e battery which was installed in September, 1898, will un- 
doubtedlj' have to be replaced the coming year or early in 1905. The 
"life" of this system of battery has usually been considered five years, 
and while this is on its sixth year it is still doing good service. 

During a heavy wind and rain storm of the night of June 12. the 
electric light wires crossed with our fire alarm wires and burned out 
boxes 3, 4, 21, 39, 71, 73, disabling the whole of No. 7 circuit for nearly 
twenty-four hours. "And thus will it ever be" so long as overhead 
wires are permitted in the city limits. 

We have run eight and one-half miles of No. 9 iron wire, five and 
one-half miles of <vhich has been for extensions for new boxes, and 
three miles of it was for replacing hard drawn copper wire. 

THE HORSES, 

There are at present forty-three horses lowned by this department, 
fort.y-one of which are permanently employed and two spare. 

One of the spare horses, as well as three or four of the permanent 
ones, have nearly passed their usefulness for fire duty and should be 
replaced with younger ones. The bays at Hose No. 2, purchased the 
latter part of last year, proved too light weight and have been ex- 
changed for a heavier pair, as per agreement with Cavanaugh Bros., 
when put on trial, and a pair of new ones have been put in place of 
the old pair at Hose Company No. 3. 

CASUALTIES. 

July 27 while responding to an alarm of fire from Box 5, Luther A. 
Knight of Engine Company No. 4 sprained his back and was off duty 
twenty-one (21) days, and October 31 Joseph H. Alsop, of Engine Com- 
pany No. 2, in attempting to get upon the hose wagon while responding 
to an alarm from Box 4 was thrown against the curbing sustaining 
injuries Avhich incapacitated him for 28 days. August 12 George 
Ladriere was slightly burned while throwing an .oil stove from the 
Shea block. No. 252 Bridge street. 

THE firemen's. RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

Through the courtesy of John Stiles, manager of the Park theatre, 
who very generously arranged and managed a benefit concert on March 
22, 1903, the treasury of this association vvas replenished by the sum of 
$527.40, and liberal friends have contributed $70 additional. 

The financial condition of the association is as follows: 

Balance on hand at annual meeting, February 10, 1903 $5,387.70 

Membership dues IGO.OO 

Dividend on deposits in Savings Bank 197.89 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 889 

Donations: 

The E. M. Chase Tea Co $25.00 

"A friend" 1 0.00 

Jeremiah Hodge 10.00 

. James W. Hill Co 10.00 

"A friend" 10.00 

Herbert M. Moody 5.00 

■ $70.00 

Net proceeds of benefit concert (including- advertising) 527.40 

Total $6,342.99 

Expenditures. 

Paid Joseph E. Merrill salarj^ for 1902 $25.00 

postal cards' and printing- . . . -. 9. SO 

Luther A. Knig-ht, benefit 26.00 

Joseph H. Alsop, benefit 38.00 

blank books l.oO 

$99.80 

Leaving balance in treasury of $6,243.19 

CONCLUSION. 

I would earnestly recommend the building of storage sheds on the 
lot of the Wilson Hill station. It is impossible to give the wagons, 
sleds and spare apparatus proper care for want of suitable storage 
room. 

I would renew my recommendation, made so many times, for a suit- 
able place to keep the supply wagon of Hose Company No. 3 at South 
Elm street and box stall at Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 5. 

I hope the present city councils will consider the matter of charge 
for hydrant service so that hereafter it will come under a separate 
appropriation, as it should be, and not in the appropriation for fire de- 
partment. 

I would recommend the passage of an ordinance that would prohibit 
emjDloying incompetent men to have charge of the heating boilers of 
tenement and mercantile blocks. Several instances have occurred 
within the year that came very near being disastrous to both life and 
property through the incompetency of persons in charge of heating 
api^aratus. 

I desire to return my thanks to his Honor Mayor Reed and the mem- 
bers of the city councils for such assistance as they have rendered in 
keeping up the efficiencj^ of the department; to the officers and mem- 
bers of the police department for the willing manner they have co- 
operated with the fire department; to the assistant engineers, officers, 
and men for their promptness and zeal in keeping the department 
up to the high standard it maintains. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

THOMAS W. LANE, 

Chief of Department. 



390 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Number and Location of Fire Alarm Boxes and Keys. 

A KEY IS ATTACHED TO EACH BOX (\\ith two exceptions), and can be 
had by breaking the glass. 

No. 3. American Locomotive Company's lower shop. Keys at offices 
of gas-works, county jail, Manchester Coal & Ice Company's sheds, and 
Charles H. Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. Corner Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel Oxford, L. B. 
Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer <Sr Garmon's, street railway stables, and office 
of Blodgett & Young's block. 

No. 5. Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at Tebbetts & 
Co.'s and Hanscom's drug stores, Manchester House, and J. W. Hill 
Company's store. 

No. 6. City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Thurston's drug stores, J. 
A. Riddle's office, and residence of J. L. Brock, 21 Amoskeag Corpo- 
ration. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of Manchester and Chestnut streets. 
Kej's at chief of police's office and with all police officers. 

No. 8. Corner of Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Dante Smith's and 
Gadbois' drug stores, and Partridge Brothers' grain store. 

No. 9. Corner of Elp and Webster streets. Keys at residence of 
Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, Dr. E. Fritz, and station of 
Engine and Ladder No. 5. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at residence of 
Mrs. John Miooar, George Emerson, Walter A. Green and 0. D. Knox. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at residence of 
Welcome Jencks and Mrs. Lewis Simons, No. 1, Senter's block, and 
Hartshorn's grocery store. 

No. 14. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys at residences of 
Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. George W. Riddle, D. J. Adams, A. H. Olzendam, 
and Mrs. Thomas Morgan. 

No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys at residences of 
Henry W. Shannon and J. Fred Chalker. 

No. 16. Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at residences of 
Rt. Rev. Bishop and R. H. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys at residences of 
Miss Mary A. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. v Keys at residences 
of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and William Perkins' estate. 

No. 21. Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys at A. D. Smith's 
drug store, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. L. Walker's office, and resi- 
dence of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys at the residences 
of the late Eben T. James, and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 391 

No. 24. Eng-ine and Ladder Company No. 3 house, corner of Massa- 
besic street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. M. Goodwin and 
station of Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

No. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at residences 
of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, the late Horace Gordon, and James 
R. Straw. 

No. 2G. Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys at McCrillis' 
carriage shop. 

No. 27. Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys at residences 
of E. S. Fletcher, estates of George H. Hubbard, and William Carr. 

No. 28. Corner of Merrimack and Beacon streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of A. L. Garmon and H. B. Fairbanks. 

No. 31. Corner oif Canal and Hollis streets. American Locomotive 
Company's shop. Keys at office, Amory Mills, Langdon Mills watch- 
rooms. 

No. 32. Langdon, Mills block, corner of Canal and Brook streets. 
Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Company's mill, Langdon watchroom, and 
-Electric Light station. 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Keys at watchroom and pumping station. 

No. 35. Stark Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 36. Amory Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 39. Hillsborough county jail. Keys at office. 

No. 41. Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 42. Manchester Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 43. Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 45. The S. C. Forsaith Company's shops. Keys at freight depot 
and office in building. 

No. 51. Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys at stores of F. 
Eiedel and Henry Weber. 

No. 52. Barr's brick block, West Manchester. Keys at Fradd & Co.'s 
and Wiggin-Young Co.'s stores, Merrimack House, and Engine No. 2 
house. 

No. 53'. The Wallace steam mill. Keys at mill office, I. E. Dewey's 
tenement block, and Eanno's harness store. 

No. 54. Corner of A and South Main streets. Keys at residences of 
Lord sisters, Neil Fullerton, and George W. Davis' store. 

No. 56. Baldvdn's bobbin shop. Keys at Baldwin's office and resi- 
dences of J. C. Smith, E. P. Littlefield, and with watchman at works. 

No. 57. Corner Mast road and D street. Keys at residences of Allen 
E. Eaton and C. H. George, and F. W. Towle's store. 

No. 61. Corner of River road and Hancock street, Bakersville. Keys 
at True W. Jones Company's brewery, store of John A. Kane, and 
Hose 3. 

No. 62. Gerrish Wool & Leather Company's. Eiver road. Keys at 
tannery, the Edwin Kennedy house, and Hose 3. 

No. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at residences of T. 
Collins, Daniel Sheehan, Thomas J. Smith, Simon McCarthy. 



392 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Xo. 72. Comer of Lake avenue and Lincoln street. Keys at resi- 
dences of the late Austin Jenkins, and James Briggs. 

Xo. 73. Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys at residence of 
Eev. J. A. Cheralier and Timothy Carr. 

Xo. 81. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at all the engine 
rooms. 

Xo. 82. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Church streets. Keys at 
Lowell-street stable and Eames Bros.' drug store. 

Xo. 91. Corner Webster and Beech streets. Keys at Children's Home 
and residences of George E. McClintock, Solomon Johnson, M. E. Sanc- 
tuary. (Xo key on box.) 

Xo. 92. Corner Union and Clarke streets. Keys at residences of Mrs. 
Julia B. Bradford and E. H. Nutting. 

Xo. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. Keys at residences 
of W. A. Clarkson, M. D. Johnson, and Charles F. Chase. 

Xo. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys at residences of 
Mrs. William B. Abbott, W. X. Johnson, and E. M. Topliff. 

Xo. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at residences of 
W. S. Shannon, and John J. Bennett. 

Xo. 115. Corner of Blodget and Ash streets. Keys at residences of 
James A. Rogers and Cyren Bixby. 

Xo. 212. Shoe shop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of the shoe factory 
and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn, Mrs. Milton A. 
Abbott, M. V. B. Garland, and Walter Cody's block. 

Xo. 21 ;^. Sash and blind factory. South Beech street, junction of 
Portsmouth railroad. Keys at offices of Sash & Blind Company. 

Xo. 214. Elliott silk mill, corner of Wilson and Valley streets. Keys 
at office and watchroom of mill. 

Xo. 215. Hoyt & Co.'s shoe shop, corner of Lincoln and Silver streets. 
Keys at offices of shoe shop and Kimball Carriage Company and work- 
shop opposite. 

Xo. 216. Jewett and Somerville streets. Keys at residences of G. H. 
Hill, 140 Jewett street, and W. B. Brown, 128 Jewett street. 

Xo. 217. Corner Candia road and Massabesic street. Keys at resi- 
dences of L. M. Streeter, William Gadbois, and Charles P. Still. 

Xo. 219. Eaton Heights shoe shop, Page street. Keys at shoe shop 
office and residences of Charles A. Merrill, John P. Young. (Xo key 
on box.) 

Xo. 241. Lake avenue hill. Key at residence of Charles Davis. 

X"o. 261. Pearl-street grammar school. Keys at schoolroom and resi- 
dences of C. E. Rose, S. W. Bascom, and Charles W. Cheney. 

Xo. 312. Corner of Putnam, Main and McGregor streets. Keys at 
residences of James Spence (309 Main street), Thomas Bolton, and gate 
Xo. 11 mill. 

Xo. 313. Corner Amory and Main streets. Keys at residences of 
Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Potvin's drug store, Miville & 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 393 

Co.'s drug- store, gate of No. 11 mill, and station of Engine and Lad- 
der No. G. 

No. 314. P. C. Cheney Company's paper mill. Keys at office and 
Riverside Hose house. 

No. 315. Old Brick store, 'Skeag. Keys at Riverside Hose house and 
D. Jameson's residence. 

No. 321. Corner Beauport and Waj'ne streets. Kej-s at Holy Angels 
convent, the Brotliers' scliool, and residences of E. H. Doherty and 
Rev. Father Hevey. 

No. .'J23. Corner of Putnam and Bartlett streets. Keys at Albert 
Oliver's store, P. J. Archambeault's bakery, and residence of Officer 
Lewis Clement. 

No. 324. Amory and Laval streets. 

No. 32o. Kelley and Cartier streets. 

No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at residences of 
Amelia Davis, William A. Tufts, and James Kearns. 

No. 512. Corner Beauport and Adams streets, West Side. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Keys at residences 
of J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Elizabeth Ward. 

No. 711. Corner Union and Grove streets. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular police. 

The true time will be given at precisely 12.30 p. m. from Charles A. 
Trefethen's jewelrj- store, and will be denoted by one stroke of the fire 
bells. 



Telephone Calls. 

Chemical Engine, Central station 64 — 3 

Engine No. 2 ., S4— 2 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 84 — ^3 

Engine and Ladder No. 5 64 — 2 

Engine and Ladder No. 6 84 — 4 

Hose No. 2 116—3 

Hose No. 3 102—2 

Chief Engineer Lane's office 64 — 3 

Chief Engineer Lane's house 64 — 4 

Assistant Engineer Merrill's office 212 — 3 

Assistant Engineer Bean's house 533 — 2 

Assistant Engineer Seaward's house 239 — 5 

Two long rings twice call all stations on line. 



Instructions to Keyholders and Citizens. 

1. L'pon the discovery of a fire, notice should be immediately com- 
municated to the nearest alarm box, the key of which is in a circular 
box attached to the right side of the fire-alarm box. Keys are also in 



394 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the hands of all regular police, and generally of persons at the corner 
or nearest house. 

2. E[e5'holders and others, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive in- 
formation of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook once as far 
as it will g-o (without jerking), and then let go. Shut the door, but do 
twt try to remove the key, as it is locked in by a trap lock, and can 
only be remioved with a release key, which is carried by each of the 
engineers, and they will, as soon as convenient, release and return it. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to remain by the box 
a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull again; if you still 
hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box and give an alarm from 
that. 

4. Never signal for fire seen at a distance. Never touch the box ex- 
cept to give an alarm of fire. Give an ajarm for no other cause than 
actual fire. Don't give an alaem fob a chimni:.y fike. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless called for by 
the chief engineer. If you choitgc your residence or 'place of hiisiness, where 
the keys (ur 1;ept, return the keys to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to inform them- 
selves lof the location of alarm boxes near their property; also all places 
where the keys are kept. Be sure the alarm is promptly and j^roperly 
given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the city, and the 
number of the box will be given thus: Box 6, six blows, 21/3 seconds 
apart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, pause of 614 seconds, 
one blow, same pause, and two blows, 2 — 1 — 2, repeated three times. 

S. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the bells at 
any time; and in case of testing the boxes, each test will be preceded by 
one stroke of the bells. 



REPOllT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



395 



APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST, SECOND, 
AND THIRD ALARMS. 



First Alakm. 



Engine. 



Second Alakm. 



Third Alarm. 



Engine. 



I3t R. 3 

1st R. 2-3 

1st R. 2-3 

1st & 2d R. 

ist R. 3 

1st & 2(1 R. 5 

Ist R. 5 

5 

l8t R. 5 

Ist R. 5 

1st & 2d R. 5 

1st R.5 

lat R. 3 

IstR. 3 

lat R. 3 

lat R. 3 

1st R. 3 

Ist R 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

3 

1st R 6 

1st R. 5 

1st & 2d R. 6-6 

1st & 2d R. 5-6 

1st & 2d R. 5-6 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2d R. 2-3 

1st & 2d R. 2-3 

1st R. 2-3 

let & 2d R. 2-3 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-5 

2-3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

l3t R. 3 

1st K. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st & 2d R. 

1st & 2d R. 5 

1st K.5 

1st K. 5 

1st R.6 

1st R.5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 5 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 3 

3 

1st R. 3 

1st R. 2-6 

1st R. 2-6 

5-6 

5-« 

2-6 

2S 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

1 StR. 



2d R. 2 
2d R. 
2d R. 
2-3 
2d R. 
3 

2(1 R. 
1st R. 
2dR. 
2d R. 3 
3 

2d R. 3 
2d R. 5 
2dR. 
2d R. 2 
2d R. 
2dR. 
2d R. 
2d R. 5 
2d R. 
]8t R 
2d R.5 
2d R.6 
2-3 

a-3 

2-3 

2d R. 2 
6-6 
5-6 

2d R.6 
5 

1st R.3C1 
1st R.3 " 
1st R.3 " 
1st R. " 
1st R.3 " 
6 

2d R. 2 
2d R. 2 
2d R. 
2dR. 
2d R. 
5 

3-6 
2d R. 
2d R. 
2d R. 
2d R. 
2d R. 3 
2dR. 
2d R. 
2d R. 
2dR. 
2d R. 
2dR. 
2d R. 
2d R. 
Ist R. 
2d R. 5 
2d R.5C1 
2d R.5 " 
1st R.2 " 
1st R. 
IstR 5" 
1st R.5 " 
1st R 5 " 
1st 5 C. 
1st R. " 
IstR. " 
let R. " 
2d R. 





3 
3 






2 








1 




1 




2 





2 


6 




3-6 


2 


3-C 


2 


3-6 


2 


5 


2-3 


5-6 


2-3 


5-6 


2-3 


1 


2-3 


5 


1 


3 


3 


3 




3 


3 


3 


3 


3 






2-3 


1 




1 


2 


1 


2 


3-5 




3-6 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 




3 


1-3 


1 




1 


1 


1 


I 


1 




1 


1 


1 




5 


2 


1 


2 


1 




6 


1 


6 




1 




6 




5 




5 


1 


3 




1 


i 













5-6 

5-6 

5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2-3-6 

2d R. 2-3-6 

2-3-6 

2-H 

2-6 



2-5-6 

2-6 

2-5-fi 

2d R. 2-6-6 

2-3 

2-3 



5 

6 

2d R. 5 

2d R.5 

2d R. 5 

2d R. 3-5 

2d R. 5 

1st & 2d R.3 

5-6 

5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-6 

2 

2-3-6 

2-3-6 

2-3-6 

•2-3-6 

2-6 

2-3-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2-5-6 

2d R. 2-5-6 

2-6 

3 

3 

2d R.3 

2d R. 2-3 

2d R.3 

2d R.3 

2d R.3 

2d R.3 

2d R. 3-5 

2d R. 3-6 

2d R. 3^-5 

2-5-6 



3-6 
3-6 
S-6 
3-6 
1-6 
3-6 
5-6 
5-6 
5-6 
6-5 
6-5 
5-6 
5-6 
5-6 
3-6 
3-5 
3-5 
1-3 
1-3 
3-5 
3-5 
1-3 
1-3 
1-6 
3-5 
1-3-5 
5-6 



396 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Rules and Regulations in Regard to Responding to Fire 
Alarms, etc. 

The following rules have been adopted by the board of engineers and 
the fire department Avill strictly comply until otherwise ordered, and 
will attend alarms of tire as per official Krxxi>^G cabd. 

BUNNING BULE8. 

■Whenever an alarm is sounded, the members of all companies not 
called to that box Avill report to their respective company quarters, and 
there remain mitil dismissed by the signal of the bells or by an engineer 
In charge. 

In case companies on their first run have responded to an alarm, com- 
panies on their second run to the box from w^hich the alarm has been 
sounded wall answer all first-run boxes of the absent companies; and in 
case engines are out that would respond to another box, then third 
alarm companies will respond. In case of alarm from a box that does 
not call for a third alarm, companies on their second run will then 
answer to all other boxes. 

Whenever two trucks answer to first alarm the other truck will an- 
swer to all other boxes. 

At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, hose carriage, 
or truck that leaves the house first will have the right to lead to the fire. 
Whenever a horse lags or gives out, drivers should then give others the 
right of way, so as not to delay the rest of the apparatiis. No running 

BY: ynt^ BB ALLOWTiD, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, XTNDEE PENALTY 
OF DISMISSAL/ OF THE DBUVEB FBOM THE DEPABJiJIEKT. 

The drivers shall not permit persons not connected with the depart- 
ment to ride upon the apparatus, and in muddy weather or heavy wheel- 
ing they shall not permit any one to ride upon their apparatus when 
returning from fires. 

Drivers will take the following routes in responding to alarms on the 
West Side: For crossing Amoskeag bridge, take Elm street to Salmon, 
down Salmon and across the bridge. For crossing McGregor bridge 
take Elm street to Bridge street, down Bridge street and across the 
bridge. For crossing Granite bridge take Elm street to Granite, down 
Granite and across the bridge. 

Use gongs freely to clear streets and when nearing crossings. 

Engineers of steamers will not run over eighty (80) pounds of water 
pressure, except when orders are received from a member of the board 
of engineers or the officer in command of the company. 

Captains or officers commanding companies will see that the rules and 
regulations of this department are adhered to; to report any inatten- 
tion to duty or failure to comply with the rules, or any disobedience of 
orders, and upon return from alarms will report to headquarters imme- 
diately, personally or by telephone, after apparatus is "made up" and 
readv for duty. 



REPOET OF THE FIKE ENGINEER. 397 

THIRD ALAEM. 

On THiED ALARJM all apparatus will respond. 
GEJSTERAi ALARM. 

In the event of a fire of such magnitude that second and third alarms 
are needed, a general alarm will be given by striking ten blows, in 
which case all companies will respond. 

SPECIAL CALLS ON FIRE ALARM. 

When more apparatus is wanted, \vithout giving second and third 
alarms the following .specials calls will be given: 

2 — ^1 for Engine 1. 1 — 1 — ^1 for Aerial Truck. 

2 — 2 for Engine 2. 3 — 3 for Truck 3. 

2—3 for Engine 3. 3—5 for Truck 5. 

2—4 for Engine 4. 3—6 for Truck 6. 

2 — 5 for Engine 5. 4 — 1 for Hose 1. 

2 — 6 for Engine 6. 4—2 for Hose 2. 

4—3 for Hose 3. 

Companies answering "special calls" will wait thirty seconds before 
leaving quarters, to prevent mistakes. 

OUT-OF-TOWN CALL. 

For a fire out of the city or brush fire, 2 — 2 — 2, all companies will as- 
semble at their respective quarters and await orders. 

ALL OUT SIGNAL. 

Two blows on the bells, which dismisses all members at company 
quarters. 

The signal will be given after companies working at a fire have re- 
turned to quarters, "made up," and are ready to respond to another 
alarm. 

TEST SIGNAL. 

One blow at 12.30 noon. 

SCHOOL SIGNALS. 

1 — 1, with fifteen seconds between blows, closes primary and middle 
schools. 

2 — 2, with fifteen seconds betwen the 2's, closes all the schools. Time 
for giving same, 7.30 A. M., 11.20 A. M., or 1.15 P. M. 

MILITARY CALL. 

12 blows tuace.. 



398 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Rules for Exercising Horses. 

It shall be the duty of the drivers of engines, hose carriages, hose 
wagons, hook-and-ladder trucks, and all other apparatus connected with 
this department, to exercise the horses every day, weather permitting, 
except Sunday, with the exception of engines having "first" and "sec- 
ond runs," and in such cases must exercise on days of "second run," 
the same to be done within the following limits: 

CENTRAL STATION. 

North to Pearl street. East to Union street. 

South to Merrimack street. West to Chestnut street. 

NORTH MAIN-STBEET STATION. 

Xorth to Adams street. East to Main street. 

South to Granite street. West to Dubuque street. 

LAKE AVENUE STATION. 

North to Manchester street. East to Belmont street. 

South to Summer street. West to Maple street. 

ItAPLE-STEtEET STATION. 

North to Myrtle street. East to Linden street. 

South to Hanover street. West to Union street. 

WEBSTEK-STREET STATION. 

North to Clarke street. East to Union street. 

South to Pennacook street. W^est to Elm street. 

RLMMON-STRIEET STATION (MCGKEGORVILLE) . 

North to Kelley street. East to Beauport street. 

South to Wayne street. West to Eimmon street. 

BAK^RSVILLE STATION. 

North to bridge, over Boston & Maine railroad. 

South to Baker street. 

East to Calef road. West to Brown avenue. 

Drivers must confine themselves to the above, and in no case take 
their horses beyond 'the prescribed limits, except for shoeingand in case 
of fire, without permission from the chief or assistant engineer. 

In exercising, care must be taken to avoid colliding with other teams. 
In approaching corners, crossings, street car tracks, and in going down 
grades the speed of the horses must be checked. 

In case of an alarm use gong freely while returning to quarters. 

Any driver violating these rules will be liable to suspension or dis- 
charge. 



REl'OKT OF THE FIRE ENGINEEK. 399 

Stations and Sleeping Rooms. 

All stations of this department w;ll be open from 7 A. M. until 9 P. M., 
and Ihe members at the several stations will receive visitors and citi- 
zens courteously, answer all questions in a gentlemanly manner, and 
give any proper attention. 

Xo political or religious discussions will ibe allowed in any of the 
houses of this department or 'by the officers or men when on duty. 

No permanent member of the department shall attend a caucus or 
political convention as delegate, distribute tickets at any election, or 
take any part whatever in political matters other than to exercise his 
right of suffrage. 

Gambling of any kind shall not be permitted in or about any of the 
houses or premises occupied by the department. 

Stations to be closed at 10 o'clock p. m. 

All games must cease at .10 p. xi., and the stations be closed at that 
hour, to permit the permanent men, and those detailed to sleep in the 
station, to retire undisturbed. 

None of the stations will be open after the above hour (except in case 
of an alarm of fire) without permission of the chief or a mem'ber of the 
board of engineers, although stations maj' be kept open on Saturday 
evening until 11 o'clock. 

No spirituous or malt liquors shall be allowed in or about any of the 
fire stations, and any member of the fire department seen intoxicated 
at any fire or alarm of fire, or who shall be known to frequent places 
where liquors are sold, during the progress of a fire, or whenev.er in 
uniform, shall be subject to reprimand, or dismissal, as the board of 
engineers may determine. 

Any permanent member visiting any liquor saloon in uniform, except 
in the performance of his duty as a member of the fire department, or 
who is intoxicated or visits places where intoxicating liquors are sold, 
while on duty, shall be suspended or discharged, as the board of engi- 
neers may determine. 

Any violation of these rules will subject the ofi'ender to reprimand or 
dismissal, and commanding officers of companies having knowledge of 
the violation of the foregoing rules will suspend the offender, and re- 
port the same to the chief or board of engineers. 

The permanent men shall exercise a careful supervision over the 
sleeping apartments, see that the rooms are put in order and the beds 
made as early as 11 o'clock A. M., and that the bedding is changed at 
suitable intervals. The occupants of each bed will be held responsible 
for the cleanliness of the same, and held strictly accountable for any 
damage to either bed or bed clothing through carelessness. After 10 
p. M. occupants shall refrain from loud talking or in any manner dis- 
turbing the rest of any who have retired. 



400 ANNUAL OFFICLIL REPORTS. 



Absent from City or Station. 

No permanent member shall leave his station to visit any section 
of the city without permission of the chief or an assistant engineer, or 
leave the city, or be g-ranted leave of absence, without notifying the 
chief engineer and procuring a substitute to his acceptance, and the 
substitute shall be on duty before the applicant leaves his post, except 
on his regular "days off." 

Any call member expecting to be absent from the city shall notify the captain 
of his company, and before leaving the city shall procure a substitute satisfac- 
tory to said captain. 

Substitutes running for and answering the names of any call man 
shall be entitled to the same pay, pro rata, as the call man for whom 
they answer for the time they substitute, and the clerks of the several 
companies shall keep said substitutes' time and notify the regular call 
man of the amount due from him and pay- said amount to the substi- 
tute performing said service. 

Any member of the department not complying to the above rules 
shall be liable to suspension or expulsion from the department. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINP:En 



401 



DAYS OFF. 

On and After June 15, 1903, and Until Further Notice, i in 
OF THE Permanent Men Wilt, be as Follows 



Company . 



1—15 
2— 16 
3—17 
4-18 
5—19 
6—20 
7—21 
8—22 
9-23 
10—24 
11-25 
12— 2G 
13-27 
14-28 
15-29 
16-30 
17—31 
18— 1 



Hall 

Harvey 

Barker 

Parsons* — 

Gould 

Cann, Geo. A 

Rogers 

Dyer 

Gage 

Pherson 

Porter 

Kichartlson ., 

Walker 

Piper. 

Dunbar* 

McLeod *... 

Porter * 

Rowe 



Engine l. 

1. 

1. 
Hose 1. 
Engine 4. 

4. 

4. 
Truck 1. 

1. 

1. 
Chemical : 

Engine 



Ladder 3. 
3. 
3. 
3. 

3. 



19— 2 

19— 2 

20— 3 

21— 4 

22— 5 

23— G 

24— 7 

I 25— 8 
I 
!26— 9 

26— 9 

27—10 

I 
28—11 

29—12 

130—13 

131-14 

14—28 

15—29 



Wortlien . . 

Morse 

Smitli 

Cann, B. C, 
Hubbell... 
Morrill .... 
Denyou . . . 
Whitcomb 

Lane 

Edgar 

Foster 

Tebbetts,. 
Crosby* ... 
Young* ... 

Smith* 

Morrill .... 
Tuson 



Hose 2. 

Engine & ladder 5. 

5. 

5. 

5. 
Engine 2. 



Engine & Ladder 6. 

6. 

G. 

6. 
Hose 3. 
" 3. 
Substitute Driver. 



* In February Crosby will take 16 instead of 29. Dunbar 24 instead of 29, McLeod 25 
instead of 30, and Young 26 instead of 30. In July B. C. Cann will take 6 instead of 4, 
and Parsons 14 instead of 4. In February, April, June, September and November Capt'. 
Porter will take 1, and Capt. Smith 27. 

The hour of leaving will be 7 o'clock a. m., and members will not leave 
their station until the arrival of the spare driver. They must report 
promptly at 7 o'clock the following morning for duty. 

Those whose breakfast hour is 6 o'clock will remain at station nntil 
7 o'clock ion the dates of their "days off." 

Should a fire be in progress at the hour of changes, men will remain 
on duty until the "all out" is given, except permission is obtained of 
the chief, or engineer in charge of fire, to retire. Should a "general" 
or third alarm be rung in while members are in town, they will be 
expected to report for duty. 



i02 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Entering Building with Line of Hose. 

All steamer and hose companies are instructed not to enter any build- 
ing with a line of hose unless the stop nozzle is closed, except in eases 
where they can see the fire, and when their streams will reach it 
without damag-e to other property, due care being- exercised as to 
whether their services are needed. 

Extra care should be exercised by hosemen of steamer companies 
in using- "shut-off" nozzles, shutting off to be slowly and gradually. 



List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 1903 with 
Loss and Insurance. 

Still. Saturday, January 3, 9.15 a. m. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block, 23 Hanover street, owned by Ts. S. Clark, and occupied by 
S. B. Tarrante. Members of Chemical responded. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, January 6, 12.15 p. M. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden tenement block, 1239 Elm street, owned by heirs of A. D. Bur- 
gess, and occupied by Assad Baroody and others. Chemical Engine 
responded. Used one charge of pony. No damage. 

Box 213. Thursday, January 8, 9.41 A. M. Two-story ilat-roofed 
dwelling, 374 Shasta street, owned by John Filteau and occupied by 
him. Cause, sparks from stove during absence of family. Btox pulled 
by William P. Hall. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. Value of building, $1,500; damage to building, $100; 
insurance on building, $1,000; insurance paid, $64. Value of contents, 
$50; damage to contents, $5; no insurance. 

Box 214. Friday, Januarj^ 9, 11.33 A. M. A small 5x7 wood office, 
604 Prescott street, owned and occupied by A. J. Blanchet. Cause, 
defective flue. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 3, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. Damage slight. 

Still. Monday, January 12, 4.25 a. m. Chimney fire in wooden tene- 
ment block, 50 West street, owned by L. M. Pike, and occupied by sever- 
al families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded. Used one 
charge of pony. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, January 13, 12.32 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 51 Jane street, owned by Jesse B. Pattee, and occupied by Fred 
Heath. Hose Company No. 2 and Chemical Engine responded. Used 
one tank. No damage. 

Box 45. Wednesday, January 14, 4.45 A. M. Four-story brick build- 
ing, corner W'est Auburn and Canal streets, owned by Gordon Wood- 
bury, and occupied by Edwin I'. Cornish Machinery Co., and others. 
Fire originated in the business office of Mr. Cornish from some un- 
known cause. The automatic sprinklers impeded the progress of the 
lire so that it was soon extinguished after arrival of the department. 
Box pulled by Officer Parmenter. Companies responding: Engines 1, 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 403 

2, ?,, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, :i. Value of building-, $40,000; dam- 
aije to building, $100; insurance on building-, $35,000; insurance paid, 
$90. Value of contents, $2,800; damage to contents, $13; insurance on 
contents, $2,500; insurance paid on contents, $13. 

Still. Wednesday, January 14, 9.30 p. m. Chimney fire in two-tene- 
ment house, 4 Monmouth street, owned by Gilbert A. Sackett. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. Used two 
charges of pony. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, January IS, 2.45 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 233 Wilson sti'eet, occupied 'by W. Pauhus. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. Used one charge of pony. No 
damage. 

Box 82. Monday, January 19, 8.22 A. M. Three-story wooden block, 
30 Bridge street, owned by Joseph W. Fellows, and occupied by Emi- 
lien Rouillard as second-hand furniture store, and several tenants. The 
fire originated in store of Eouillard caused by overturning of a kero- 
sene stove. Box pulled by E. Rouillard. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 3, 5. Value of building, 
$6,000; damage to building, $30; insurance on building, $4,000; insur- 
ance paid on building, $30. Value of contents, $200; damage to con- 
tents, $30; no insurance. 

Still. Monday, January 19, 9.10 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 295 Pine street, owned by Nason Hall in tenement occupied by A. 
T. Roy. Members of Chemical Company responded. Used one charge 
of pony. No damage. 

Still. Monday, January 19, 9.13 p. m. Chimney fire in brick tene- 
ment block, 7 Canal street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing com- 
pany, in tenement occupied by John V. Adams. Chemical Engine 
responded. No services required. 

Still. Tuesday, January 20, 11.30 A. M. Chimney fire at 415 Granite 
street in tenement house owned by Edward S. McDerby, and occupied 
by several families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded. 
Used one charge of pony. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, January 21, 11.20 p. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment house, 243 Wilson street, owned by A. D. Guay, and occupied by 
A. Chandonnett. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 re- 
sponded. Used 1 charge of pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, January 23, 6.58 A. M. One-story "waiting station" 
on Hooksett road, Hooksett line, owned by Manchester Traction, Light 
& Power company. On telephone message Engine No. 5 responded with 
hose carriage. Cause, electric wires. Value of building, $500; damage 
to building, $500; no insurance. Value of contents, $20; damage, $20; 
Blanket insurance. 

Box 24. Saturday, January 24, 4.16 p. m. Three-story dwelling 
house, 387 Belmont street, owned by F. X. LaFlamme, and occupied by 
him and E. P. Nichols and Henry E. Harris. The fire originated from 
some unknown cause on third floor occupied by H. E. Harris. Box 



404 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

pulled by citizen. Companies responding-: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value of building-, $4,000; damage to building, 
$900; insurance on building, $:].000; insurance paid on building, $900. 
No damage to contents. 

Box. 3. Sunday, January- 25, 3.22 P. M. Wooden tenement block, 237 
Elm street, owned by heirs of Dr. Thomas Wheat. Burning chimnej-. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Xo damage. Needless alarm. 

Still. Sunday, Januai-y 25, 3.2S p. m. Three-story brick building 
on Manchester street owned by the city of Manchester, and occupied by 
military companies as an armory. Cause, overheated furnace. Engine 
No. 4 responded. 

Box 4. Monday, January 26. 7.03 A. M. Four-story wooden tenement 
block, 619-621 Elm street, owned by Lawrence M. Connor, and occupied 
by several families. Cause, thawing pipes. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of building, $25,000; damage to building, $100; insurance on 
building, $5,000; insurance paid on building, $100. No damage to con- 
tents. 

Still. Tuesday-, January 27, 1.30 p. m. Three-story wooden building, 
434 Union street, owned bj- Et. Rev. Bishop Bradley, and occupied by 
Sisters of Mercy as St. Martha's home. Cause, lamp explosion. Value 
of building, $4,000; damage to building, $56; insurance on building, 
$4,000; insurance paid on building, $56. 

Still. Wednesday, January 28, 8.55 p. m. One-story wooden build- 
ing, 61 Hanover street, own»d by Elliot hospital, and occupied by 
Samuel J. Laflamme. Cause, explosion of water-can. No services re- 
quired. 

Still. Friday, January 30, 6.30 p. m. Three-story wooden block, 
28G Pine street, owned by Thomas Corcoran, and occupied by several 
families. Cause, burning chimney. Members of Chemical Company re- 
sponded. Used one charge of pony. No damage. 

Box 25. Sunday, February 1, 2.24 p. M. Three-story wooden block, 
524 Wilson street, owned by L. F. Winchester and occupied bj- Captain 
Carl F. Nelson. Cause, slight fire in bed result of smoking. Value of 
building, $5,000; damage to building, $63; insurance on building, $3,000; 
insurance paid on building, $63. Value of contents, $500; damage to 
contents, $80; insurance on contents, $500; insurance paid on contents, 
$80. 

Still. Monday, February 2, 8.03 A. M. Chimney fire at IS Laurel 
street. Afembers of Engine Company No. 4 and Chemical Comjiany re- 
sponded. No services required. 

Still. Monday, February 2, 10.15 a. m. Chimney fire in brick dwell- 
ing-house, corner Bay and Salmon streets, owned and occupied by A. 
Quimby. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. 
I'sed four charges of pony. No damage. 



EEPOKT OF THP: FIHE ENGINEER. 405 

Stilj.. Tuesday, February 3, 6.40 p. M. Chimney- fire in tenement 
house, 278 Auburn street, owned by Michael Sullivan, and occupied 
by Alarg-aret McVicker. Members of Eng-ine and Ladder ('om|)any No. 
3 responded. Used one charge of pony. No damage. 

Stii-L. Friday, February 6, 11.58 P. m. Chimney fire in wooden tene- 
ment block, 18 North Main street, owned by Frank P. Johnson, and 
occupied by several families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 
responded. Used one charge of pony. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, February 14, 7.30 A. m. Chimney fire in two-and- 
one-half story tenement house, 21 Ash street, owned by Nason Hall and 
Clough, and occujiied by B. R. Richardson and Dr. R. H. Dillon. Mem- 
bers of Hose Company No. 2 responded. Used two charges of pony. 

Box 15. Sunday, February 15, 4.28 A. M. Wooden tenement house, 83 
Orange street, owned by Henry Fisk, and occupied by Celestin Lefebvre 
and J. F. Hebert. Cause, overheated chimney igniting wood-work, 
causing slight damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of build- 
ing, $3,000; damage to building, $10; insurance on building, $3,000; 
insurance paid on building, $10. No damage to contents. 

Still. Sunday, February 15, 7.15 p. M. Three-story brick building, 
999 Elm street, Music Hall block. Cause, sparks from boiler in base- 
ment setting fire to pile of planks near boiler. Members of Engine 
Company No. 4 responded. 

Still. Tuesday, February 17, 5.20 A. m. Wooden tenement block, 68 
Nashua street, owned by Harvey Goodwin, and occupied by William 
Porter. Members of Hose Company No. 2 responded. No services re- 
quired. 

Still. Tuesday-, February 17, 6.05 P. si. Chimney fire in two-story 
wooden otfice, 196 Manchester street, owned and occupied by E. V. Tur- 
cotte in connection with stable. Chemical Engine resijonded. No ser- 
vices required. 

Box 6. Thursday, February 19, 2.33 A. M. Four-story brick block, 
957 Elm street, corner -of Amherst, owned by Towne heirs, and occupied 
by G. A. R. as headquarters. Fire started in partition near radiator 
in the kitchen. Box pulled by Officer Shea. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, 
$20,000; damage to building, $1,928.16; insurance on building, $20,000; 
insurance paid on building, $1,928.16. Value of G. A. R. contents, 
$3,100; damage to contents, $789.34; insurance on contents, $1,200; in- 
surance paid on contents, $789.34. A. T. Wathen: Value of contents, 
$1,500; damage to contents, $25; insurance on contents, $850; insurance 
paid on contents, $20. L. Gutterson: Value of contents, $700; damage to 
contents, $200; insurance on contents, $500; insurance paid on contents, 
$150. Drs. Brown: Value of contents, $1,000; damage to contents, $180; 
insurance on contents, $180; insurance paid on contents, $180. 

Still. Thursday, iFebruary 19, 8.55 p. m. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement block, corner Main and Marion streets, owned by Sargent 



406 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

heirs, and occupied by several families. Members of Engine and Lad- 
der Company Xo. 6 responded. No services required. 

Stixl. Friday, February 20, 6.15 A. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
owned bj^ estate of A. D. Burg-ess, and occupied by James O'Xeil. Mem- 
bers of Chemical Company responded. Used one charge of pony. 

Box 15. Saturda3', February 21, 8.04 p. m. Two-story wooden tene- 
ment house, 28 Pearl street, owned by Higgins Bros., and occupied by 
several families. A smoking stove caused a needless alarm. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Sunday, Feibruary 22, 10.25 A. m. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 463 Maple street, owned by Charles H. Smart, and occupied 
b^- Albert Leaf and others. Cause, burning out of chimney. Chemical 
Engine responded. LTsed one charge of pony and one tank of chemical. 

Box 17. Sunday, February 22, 10.35 A. M. The foregoing fire 
thought to be bej-ond control of the Chemical Engine and bell alarm 
Avas given. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 
Value of building, $6,000; damage to building, $25; insurance on build- 
ing, $1,000; insurance paid on building, $25. Xo damage to contents. 

Box 17. Monday, February 23, 4.06 p. M. Three-and-one-half-story 
wooden tenement block, 271 Lowell street, owned by William Moul, and 
occupied by C. H. Batchelder. Phillippe Voyer, and Norven Provencher. 
Cause, defective chimney. Box pulled by Officer Badger. Companies 
responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. (Two hydrants 
frozen.) Value of building, $4,000; damage to building, $1,387.56; in- 
surance on building, $2,000; insurance paid on building, $1,:!S7.56. 
C. H. Batchelder: Value of contents, $900; damage to contents. $300; 
no insurance. P. Voyer: Value of contents, $700; damage to contents, 
$500; insurance on contents, $500; insurance paid on contents, $500. 
X. Provencher: Value of contents, $1,500; damage to contents, $1,000; 
insurance on contents, $800; insurance paid on contents, $800. 

Still. Monday, Februarj^ 23, 8.40 p. M. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block. Merchants Exchange, 841 Elm street. Members of Chem- 
ical Company responded. Xo services required. 

Still. Wednesday, February 25, 2.35 p. m. Three-story brick block, 
41-42 Spring street, owned by Stark corporation, and occupied by Mrs. 
Georgianna Bourassa. Cause, slight bed-fire. Members of Chemical 
Company responded. Xo services required. 

.Still. Wednesday, February 25, 8.30 P. m. Chimney fire in dwelling 
house, 89 Second street, owned and occupied by Henry Hanson. Mem- 
bers of Engine Company Xo. 2 responded. Used two charges of pony. 
No damage. 

Box 54. Wednesdaj', February 25, 10.27 P. M. Large barn on South 
Main street, near Bedford line, 21/3 miles from city hall, owned by John 
K. McQuesten. Cause, incendiary. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 2, 6, Truck 6. Value of building, $2,000; damage 
to building, $2,000; insurance on building, $1,000; insurance paid on 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 407 

building, $3,000. Value of contents, $]00; damag-e to contents, $?.00; 
no insurance. 

Box 4. Thursday, Feibruary 26, 1.15 p. M. Four-story wooden tene- 
ment block, r>45 Elm street, owned by B. W. and W. C. Blodgett. The 
tire was in an old mattress in an unoccupied tenement on fourth floor, 
and it was thrown out the window before arrival of the department. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1. 2, .">, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 82. Thursday, February- 26, 5.15 P. M. Second alarm, 5.38 p. M. 
Four-story brick block, 1114-1156 Elm street, known as Upton block, 
owned by Manchester Savings bank, and occupied by Costello Bros, 
as snoe store in whose basement the fire started among goods stored by 
E. M. Chase Co., who occupied store in block, also N. J. Whalen Trunk 
store, and J. H. Somers as barber shop, while up stairs was occupied 
by City hotel and sundry persons. Box pulled by Michael Costello. 
Companies responding on first alarm: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 5; on second alarm, Engines 3, 6, Trucks 3, 6. Upton: Value 
of building, $100,000; damage to building, $5,920.79; insurance on build- 
ing, $30,000; insurance paid on building, $5,920.79. City hotel building: 
Value of bviilding, $40,000; damage to building, $90; insurance on build- 
ing, $8,000; insurance paid on building, $90. E. M. Chase Co.: Value of 
contents, $10,000; damage to contents, $3,600; insurance on contents, 
6,500; insurance paid on contents, $3,600. Whalen: Value of contents, 
$4,500; damage to contents, $2,500; insurance on contents, $2,000; insur- 
ance paid on contents, $1,850. Costello: Value of contents, $3,000; 
damage to contents, $2,000; insurance on contents, $2,500; insurance 
paid on contents, $1,933.64. Somers: Value of contents, $1,500; damage 
to contents, $175; insurance on contents, $1,000; insurance paid on con- 
tents, $100. Hurd: Value of contents, $15,000; damage to contents, 
$468.95; insurance on contents, $10,000; insurance paid on contents, 
$468.95. 

Still. Thursday, February 26, 10.30 p. AL Eekindling of embers of 
the previous fire. Chemical Engine responded. Used one charge of 
pony. 

Box 8. Friday, February 27, 8.52 p. M. Four-story brick block, 1280 
Elm street, owned by Simons, Connor, Kennedy, and others. The fire 
occurred on the third floor in a hallway occupied by E. H. Ware as a 
storage for patent medicine. Cause unknown. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 
5. Extingiiished by Chemical Engine. Damage, etc., given under date 
of March 15. 

Still. Sunday, March 1, 10.48 A. M. Chimney fire in dwelling house, 
223 Jewett street, owned by Mrs. J. E. Cummings, and occupied by 
Bert T. Nevell. Members of Engine and Ladder No. 3 responded. Used 
one charge of pony. 

Box 4. Monday, March 2, 10.41 P. M. Two-story wooden building, 53 
Central street, owned by Cavanaugh Bros, and Flaherty, and occupied 



408 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

by Abraham Miller as a pawn shop. Cause unknown. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, .'5, 
Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $20,000; damage to building, .$150; in- 
surance on building, $7,000; insurance paid on building, $150. Value 
of contents, $500; damage to contents, $50; insurance on contents, $450; 
insurance paid on contents, $50. 

Box 312. Tuesday, March 3, 9.53 A. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 370 Xorth Main street, owned by P. Flaherty, and occupied by 0. 
Lemire and Alfred Bedard. Box pulled by Officer Lovejoy. Companies 
responding: Engines 2, 4, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. No damage. 

Box 5. Wednesday-, March 4, 12.38 P. m. Three-story brick build- 
ing, 732 Elm street, owned by Oliver B. Green, and occupied by E. B. 
Keynolds as lodging house. The fire originated in a bureau in one of 
the rooms from a smoker's pipe. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of 
building, $S,000; damage to building, $23; insurance on building, $2,000; 
insurance paid on building, $23. Value of contents, $4,000; damage 
to contents, $25; insurance on contents, $400; insurance paid on con- 
tents, $25. 

Still. Thursday, March 5, 5.30 P. M. Soot in old fireplace in tene- 
ment house, 192 Amherst street, owned by Towne estate, and occupied 
by Sheltere Sisters. Members of Chemical Company responded. Used 
one charge of pony. 

Box 8. Thursday, March 5, 6.20 p. M. A barn in rear of Webster 
block, 1280-1286 Elm street, owned b.y Simons, Connor, Kennedy, and 
others, and occupied by Wallace & McCleary. Cause, unknown. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $1,000; damage to building, 
$30; insurance on building, $500; insurance paid, $30. No damage to 
contents. 

Box 82. Saturday, March 7. 8.27 p. m. Four-story brick block, 1040 
Elm street, owned by estate of Smyth & Williams. The fire occurred 
in Koom 19 occupied by Anna Bellmore, and was caused by upsetting 
of kerosene lamp. Damage slight. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still, Tuesday', March 10, 1.05 p, m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 51 Jane street, owned by Jesse B. Pattee, and occupied by Fred 
Heath, Members of Hose Company No. 2 responded. Used one charge 
of pony. 

Box 8. Thursday. :March 12, 10.40 P. M. Four-story brick block, 12S0 
Elm street, owned by Simons, Connor, Kennedy, and others. For the 
third time within fourteen days fire has occurred in this (Webster) 
block from incendiary origin. Box pulled by Paradise boy, who lived 
on fourth floor, where fire was discovered. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Friday, March 13, 2,30 p, ji. Grass fire on grounds of Union 
Chapel society. South Elm street, set by boys. Hose Company No. 3 
responded. Used one charge of pony. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 409 

Box L>14. Friday, March ID, l.o'S p. M. "Grand stand" on ba-seljall 
grounds at Varick park. Cause, incendiary. Box pulled by Officer 
Farrell. Companies resijonding": Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, 
Truck. Value of structure, $500; damage to structure, $200; insurance 
on structure, $200; insurance paid, $200. 

Box 26. Saturday, March 14, 9.50 A. M. T\vo-and-a-ha It-story dwell- 
ing-house, 648 Belmont street, owned by John P. Newell, and occupied 
by Frank Campbell. Cause, slight fire in couch in the attic from some 
cause unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: ]']n- 
gines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 5. 

Still. Saturday, March 14, 1.43 p. m. Chimney fire at 36 Laurel 
street in tenement block owned by heirs of Dr. Thomas Wheat, and 
occupied by Mrs. Samuel Burke and others. Chemical Engine re- 
sponded. Xo damage. 

Still. Saturday, March 14, 4.26 p. m. Brush fire at Derryfield park. 
Set by boys. Delegation from Central Station responded. No damage. 

Box 8. Sunday, March 15, 5.27 A. M. Four-story brick block (Web- 
ster), 1280 Elm street, owned by Simons, Connor, Kennedy, and others, 
and occupied bj' Mrs. E. H. Ware and others. This fourth fire in same 
block started in partition in I'ear hall-waj' directly back of sink where 
match had been dropped into a hole in partition. Box i^ulled by Mr. 
Ware. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $40,000; damage to building, $80; insur- 
ance on building, $20,000; insurance paid on building, $80. Value of 
contents, $1,000; damage to contents, $75; no insurance. 

Box 45. Sunday, March 15, 3.33 P. M. False alarm pulled by some 
malicious i^erson. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Mondaj-, March 16, 5.56 p. ii. Chimney fire in four-story 
wooden tenement block, 174 McGregor street, owned by Eobert Leg- 
gett. Used three charges of ponj^ 

Still. Monday, March 16, 7.02 p. m. Chimnej- fire in wooden tene- 
ment block, 30 Amory street, owned bj' Joseph Quirin, and occupied by 
several families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 with combina- 
tion responded. Used one tank. 

Still. Tuesday, March 17, 1 A. M. Grass fire on land on North Kiver 
road owned by George Hall. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 
No. 5 responded with hose carriage. 

Still. Tuesdaj', March 17, 9.40 A. m. Four-story brick block (Web- 
ster), 1280 Elm street (rear). Fire in partition on first floor. Damage 
$15, fully insured. Hose Comx^any No. 1 responded with carriage. 
Used one charge of ponj'. 

Still. Tuesday, March 17, 9.30 p. m. One-story wooden building 
(unoccupied), corner of Woodlawn avenue and Portsmouth railroad. 
Slight fire set by boys or tramps. [Members of Engine and Ladder 
Comi^any No. 3 responded with hose wagon. No services required. 



410 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Thursday, March 19, 1.10 p. ji. Grass and brush fire on 
Coolidge avenue, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing company. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, March 19, 4.20 p. m. Grass fire on Nortli River road 
on land owned by George Hall. Cause, spai-ks from Boston & Maine 
railroad locomotive. ^Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 
responded. 

Stilx. Thursday, March 19, 5.P.5 p. xi. Chimney fire in two-story 
wooden block, 23 Amherst street, owned by B. E. Thompson of Deer- 
field. Members of Chemical Company responded. Used two charges 
of pony. 

Box 212. Friday, March 20, 5.35 A. M. An ice house connected with 
buildings at 317 Massabesic street, owned by Milton C. Page, and un- 
occupied. Cause, unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. Used two charges 
of pony. Value of building, $400; damage to building, $2.5; insurance 
on building, $200; insurance paid on building, $25. 

Still. Friday, March 20, 10.15 A. m. Gra.ss fire on land owned by 
Amoskeag Manufacturing company on Coolidge avenue. ^Members of 
Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. No damage. 

Box 31. Saturday, March 21, 8.10 a. m. Tar kettle boiled over in 
yard of American Locomotive company on Canal street. Extinguished 
before arrival of department. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 4, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3, 5. 

Box 81. Saturday, March 21, 8.17 p. M. Two-and-a-half-stoi'y dwell- 
ing house, 104 Concord street, owned by John Foster, and occupied by 
Mrs. Adeline Ploufe as a boarding house. There is no doubt that it was 
of incendiary origin as there were three distinct fires, one in the 
kitchen on first floor, and two in attics on third floor with no chance 
for communication between them. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
resiDonding: Engines 1, 4, Cherhical, Hose 1, Truck 1. Value of build- 
ing, $2,700; damage to building, $257.25; insurance on building, $1,800; 
insurance paid on building, $257.25. Value of contents, $G00; damage to 
contents, .$201; insurance on contents, $G00; insurance paid on contents, 
$261. 

Still. Monday, March 23, 4.45 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling 
house, 44 Concord street, owned and occupied by Mrs. ]Mary Mahaney. 
Members of Chemical Company responded. No services required. 

.Still. Wednesday, March 25, 1.20 p. m. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block, 04 Merrimack street, owned by estate of John C. Young, 
and occupied by several families. Used two charges of pony. 

Still. Wednesday, March 25, 10.50 p. M. Chimney fire in brick house, 
3 Water street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing company, and 
occupied by the Derryfield club. Chemical Engine responded. No 
services required. 

Box 210. Friday, March 27, 1.2S p. m. Cottage hou-se, 347 Young road, 
owned and occupied by Hannah Doherty. Cause, sparks from a bon- 



EEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEEll. 411 

fire set by boys. Damage slight and extinguished with pony. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines ?>, 4, Chemical, Hose 
2. Trnck 3. Value of building, .$700; damage to building, .$.')0; insurance 
on building, .$700; insurance paid on building, $50. Value of contents, 
$100; damage to contents, $5; insurance on contents, $100; insurance 
paid on contents, $5. 

Box ')2. Saturday, March 28, 7.1.'] P. M. Four-story wooden hotel, 
37 South Main street, owned by Michael J. Connor, and occupied bj- 
A. A. Lamprey. Cause, breaking of kerosene lamp. Box pulled by Offi- 
cer Archambeault. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 
6. Value of building, $7,000; damage to building, $180; insurance on 
building, $3,000; insurance paid on building, $180. Value of contents 
(room), $10; damage to contents, $10; no insurance. 

Box 217. Saturday, March 28, 8.58 P. M. Cottage house, 5 Longwood 
avenue, owned by Mrs. Effie Webster, and occupied by Mrs. fjaura 
Danforth. Cause, defective chimne^^ Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. Value of 
building, $800; damage to building. $500; insurance on building, $000; 
insurance paid on building, $500. Value of contents, $600; damage to 
contents, $371; insurance on contents, $500; insurance paid on contents, 
$371. 

Sttll. Monday, March 30, 12 M. Cottage house, 948 Union street, 
owned and occupied by P. F. Grenier. Cause, defective chimney. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. 

Box 54. Thursday, April 2, 1.05 a. m. Cottage house near Bedford 
line, corner Oneida and Salem streets, owned and occupied by Mary 
Connelly. Cause unknown. Box pulled by Officer Xixon. Companies 
responding. Engines 2, 6, Truck 6. Value of building, $400; damage to 
building", $400; insurance on building, $400; insurance paid on building, 
$400. Value of contents, $100; damage to contents, $100; no insurance. 

SrrLL. Friday, April 3, 9.05 A. M. Chimney fire in wooden tenement 
block, 339 Granite street, owned by Gordon Woodbui-y, and occupied 
by several families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded. 
Used one charge of pony. 

Box 51. Friday, April 3, C.4G P. M. Chimney tire in dwelling, 118 
Walker street, owned by Mrs. Mary Chadwiek, and occupied by L. 
Cliartrand and Fred Eoberts. Box pulled by citiizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 2, 6, Truck G. No damage. Used two charges of 
pony. 

Still. Saturday, April 4, 3.40 p. m. Chimney smoking in tenement 
block, 502 Chestnut street, owned by Keynolds & Newell, and occupied 
by Thomas F. Dowling. Members of Chemical Company responded. 
No services required. 

Still. Sunday, April 5, 11.05 a. m. Chimney fire, 134 School street, 
in building owned by George S. Eastman, and occupied by A. C. 
Pfefforkorn as drug store. Members of Engine Company No. 2 re- 
sponded with combination. Used one charge of pony. 



412 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Sunda3% April 5, 11.15 A. m. Chimney fire at 707 Union street, 
owned by A. W. Davis, and occupied by Arthur Brooks. Chemical En- 
gine responded. 

Still. Monday, April 6, 6.30 P. m. Two-story dwelling house, 70 Con- 
cord street, owned by heirs of Bridget Kelly, and occupied by Everett 
Eivard and others. Fire originated in closet in ell part up stairs. 
Cause unknown. Chemical Engine responded. Used one tank. Value 
of building, $2,500; damage to 'building, $26.67; insurance on building, 
$2,000; insurance paid on building, $26.67. No damage to contents. 

Box 15. Tuesday, April 7, 9.11 P.M. Two-and-a-half-story dwelling 
house, 106 Br'idge street, owned by Mrs. ScoUard, and occupied b^^ Sam- 
uel Xoel and others. Cause, kerosene stove overturned. No damage. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Wednesday, April S, 11.30 A. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden tenement block, 9 Laurel street, in tenement occupied by 
A. D. Folsom. Members of Chemical Company responded. Used one 
charge of pony. 

Still. Friday, April 10, 6.20 p. M. Chimney fire in wooden tenement 
block, 21 Cedar street, owned by heirs of W. C. Blodgett, and occupied 
by John Fournier and others. Chemical Engine responded. Used one 
charge of pony. 

2—2 — 2. Sunday, April 12, 11.55 A. m. Grass and brush fire on Bald 
Hill road. Delegation from dei^artment on duty three and one-half 
hours. 

Still. Monday, April 13, 9.15 A. m. Chimney fire in wooden tene- 
ment block, 52 Douglas street, owned by Manchester Mills, and occupied 
by Peter Dugan and others. Members of Engine Company No. 2 re- 
sponded. Used one charge of pony. 

Box 323. Monday, April 13, 7.32 p. M. The city dump on Putnam 
street. Needless alarm. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Box 241. Tuesday, April 14, 7 A. M. Dwelling house, 71 Canton 
street, owned by E. J. Wilcomb, and occm^ied by U. G. Trott. Fire in 
a bed, caused by a child playing with matches. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. ComiJanies resiionding: Engines 3, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. 
Value of building, $1,500; damage to building, $10; insurance on build- 
ing, $1,200; insurance paid on building, $9.13. Value of contents, $600; 
damage to contents, $25; insurance on contents, $500; insurance paid 
on contents, $25. 

Box 217. Tuesday, April 14, 3.35 P. M. One-story wooden building 
(unoccupied), corner Oakland avenue and Portsmouth railroad. Cause, 
boys. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. 

Still. Tuesday, April 14, 11.05 p. sr. Chimney fire, 318 North Main 
street, owned by Nelson Duval, and occupied by. James Duval. Mem- 
bers of Engine Company No. 2 responded. Used one charge of pony. 



TiKPOKT OF THE FIIII-: ENGINEER. 413 

Box 711. Tuesday, April 14, 11.23 p. M. False alarm. Companies re- 
spoiKlin<i-: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 3, Truck 3, 

Sthx. Thursday, April 16, 12.40 P. M. Cliimney fire in four-.story 
brick block, 7 Mj^rtle street, owned by Hoyt & James heirs, ^fembers 
of Chemical responded. Used three charges of pony. 

Still. Thursday, April 1(5, 12.40 p. M. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement house, 183 Lake avenue, owned by Mrs. Thomas (lark, and 
occupied toy William ^FcJury. Meinbers of Engine and Ladder C'omj)any 
No. 3 responded. Used two charges of pony. 

Still. Friday, April 17, 4 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
58 Bridge street, owned by Harry T. Lord, and occupied by Charles 
McCarthy and others. Members of Chemical Company responded. 
Used one charge of pony. 

Still. Friday, April 17, 11.30 a. m. Wooden tenement block. IS 
North Main street, owned by Frank P. Johnson, and occupied by sev- 
eral families. Cause, burning chimney. Members of Engine Company 
No. 2 responded. Used two charges of pony. 

Box 113. Monday, April 20, 8.33 p. m. False alarm. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 2, Tl-uck 5. 

Still. Wednesday, April 22, 1.20 p. m. Brush fire on Boynton street, 
on land owned by Kennard heirs, ^[embers of Engine Company No. 2 
responded. On duty two hours. 

Still. Friday, April '24, 11.10 A. m. Tenement house, 267 Lowell 
street, owned by Jonathan Moul, and occupied by Levi M. Green. 
Cause, hot ashes in fibre pail. Damage slight. Members of Hose Com- 
pany No. 2 responded. . Used one charge of pony. 

Still. Saturday, April 25, 10.15 a. m. Chimney fire in cottage hoiise, 
350 Chestnut street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Catherine Edwards. 
Members of Chemical Company responded. Used one charge of pony. 

Still. Saturday, April 25, 11.00 a. m. Brush fire on Boynton street, 
on land owned by Kennard heirs. Members of Engine Company No. 2 
responded. On duty one hour. 

Still. Saturday, April 25, 12.15 p. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
wooden block, 5 Laurel street, owned by S. D. Green heirs. Chemical 
Engine responded. Used one charge of pony. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, April 28, 10.30 A. M. Brush fire on Boynton street, 
near Bedford line, on land owned by Walter M. Parker, also by Gordon 
Woodbury. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with combi- 
nation. Used two charges of pony. 

Still. (2—2—2 on tappers.) Tuesday, April 28, 10.20 p. m. Brush 
tire west of Straw road on land owned by Maxwell estate. Delegation 
from department responded. On duty five hours. 

2 — 2 — 2. Wednesday, April 29, 5.27 a. m. Rekindling of last night's 
brush fire west of Straw road. Delegation from department responded. 
On duty five and one-half hours. 

Still. Wednesday, April 29, 5.23 p. m. Brush fire in the "Rowell 



414 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

woods," Xorth Eiver road, above State Industrial school. Caused by 
sparks from Boston & Maine railroad locomotive. 

Box. 6. Wednesday, April 29, 9.46 p. M. Three-story granite build- 
ing, City Hall, corner Elm and Market streets, owned and occupied by 
citj- of Manchester. Fire started in janitor's room in the basement, 
and spread rapidly to city clerk's office on jfirst floor. Cause unknovin. 
Box pulled by Officer Shea. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $20,000; damage to 
building, $1,225; insurance :on building, $10,500; insurance paid on build- 
ing, $1,225. Value of contents, $15,000; damage to contents, $612.53; 
insurance on contents, $4,000; insurance paid on contents, $612.53. 

Stili>. Friday, May 1, 6.10 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
45 Church street, owned bj- John Cashman, and occupied by Mrs. 
Charon. Chemical Engine responded. 

Still. Friday, May 1, 11.19 a. m. Three-and-half-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 64 Concord street, owned by S. W. Parsons' heirs, and oc- 
cupied by several families. Slight fire in rear tenement caused by "a 
drunk." Chemical Engfine responded. 

Still. Friday, May 1, 7.30 P. M. Chimney fire in two-and-half-story 
tenement block, 133 Manchester street, owned by Mrs. H. C. Joy, and 
occupied by J. Lamarre. Chemical Engine responded. Services not 
required. 

Still. Saturday, May 2, 11.30 A, m. Brush fire on Mast road on land 
owned by George S. Eastman, very near residence of George K. Jackson. 
Members of Engine Comjiany No. 2 responded with hose wagon. 

Box 3. Saturday, May 2, 5.03 p. M. Brick foundry on Elm street, 
corner Valley, owned and occupied by the American Locomotive com- 
pany. Cause, sparks from furnace. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of 
building, $8,000; damage to building, $1,836; insurance on building, 
"Blanket"; insurance i>aid on building, $1,836. No damage to con- 
tents. 

Still. Tuesday, May 5, 12.20 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling house, 
319 Lake avenue, owned by George Nilson, and occupied by Herman 
Sleeper. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. 
No damage. 

Still. Saturday, May 9, 7.40 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
182 Beauport street, owned by James Pritchard, and occupied by him 
and two other families. Members of Engine 2 and 6 responded with 
hose wagons. Used four charges of pony. 

Box 214. Monday, May 11, 8.25 p. M. One story wooden storehouse 
at junction of Wilson street and Portsrriouth railroad, owned by Mrs. 
C. E. Wason, and John S. Lovering, and occupied by Assistant Engi- 
neer Clarence E. Merrill as storehouse for hay and grain. Cause, 
incendiary. Box pulled by Officer Welch.. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. Value of building, $300; dam- 
age to building, $150; insurance on building, $150; insurance paid oa 



UEPOKT OF TUK FIRK ENGINEER. 415 

building-, $150. A'alue of contents, $G()0; damag-e to contents, $^00; in- 
surance on contents, $000; insurance paid on contents, $200. 

Still. Tnesdaj', May 12, 2.20 A. m. Some baled hay rekindled from 
last evening's fire. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 re- 
sponded with hose wagon. 

Still. Tuesday, May 12, 1.1.") p. m. I'.ru.sh tire on Ilevey street on 
land owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing company. Members of En- 
gine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. Used one charge of pony 
and laid 400 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Tuesday, May 12, 5.15 p. m. Brush fire on Trenton street on 
land owned by Mrs. A. H. Stark. Members of Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany No. 5 responded. Used one charge of pony, and laid 500 feet of 
hose from hydrant. 

Box 213. Tuesday, May 12, 9.50 p. m. Tenement house, 60 Plummer 
street, owned by William Hedderman, and occupied b3' Napoleon 
Jemery. Cause, lamp explosion. No services required. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, 
Truck 3. 

Still. Thursday, May 14, 6.15 p. m. Dwelling house, 211 Jewett 
street, owned and occupied by Robert Fisher. Cause, soot in chimney. 
Members of Eng'ine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. Used three 
charges of pony. 

Stilx. Thursday, May 14, 8.15 p. m. The Massabesic house, a hotel 
at Lake Massabesic, four miles from city, owned by estate of Charles 
Williams, and unoccupied. Word received by tele^jhone. Steamer 3 
responded with hose carriage. Laid 1,900 feet hose (2 streams) fi-om 
the lake. Value of building, $2,500; damage to building, $2,500; no 
insurance. Value of contents, $500; damage to contents, $300; no in- 
surance. 

Box 31. Friday, May 15, 8.44 p. M. Wooden tenement block, 2 Kid- 
der street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing company, and occupied 
by David J. Mahoney. Cause, tipping over lamp in room occupied by 
Mary Percell. Damage slight. Extinguished by Mahoney before ar- 
rival of department. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 62. Saturday, May 16, 5.03 p. m. False alarm pulled by nine- 
year-old Michael Sheehan. Companies resxjonding: Engines 3, 4, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. 

Still. Sunday, May 17, 7.30 a. m. Chimney fire in cottage house, 
74 Auburn street, owned and occupied by John Downing. Chemical 
Engine responded. Used one tank. 

Still. Monday, May IS, 9.30 a. m. Grass fire in field on North Main 
street, owned by Manchester Mills. Members of Engine Company No. 
2 responded. Used one charge of pony. 

2 — 2 — 2. Monday, May 18, 2.10 p. m. Brush fire on Mammoth road 
at junction of Smyth road. Delegation from department responded. 
On duty two and one-half hours. 



416 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Monday, May IS, o.in p. sr. Chimney fire in wooden tenement 
house, 123 Amherst street, owned by Harry Eaton, and occupied by 
E. F. Millex'. Members of Chemical Company responded. I'sed one 
charge of pony. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, May 20, 2.10 p. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
wooden tenement house, fiT Orange street, owned by H. N. Bond, and 
occupied by Patrick Herlihy. No damage. .Members of Chemical Com-- 
pany responded. 

Still. Thursday, May 21, 8.4.5 a. m. Two-story brick block, The 
Kennard, lOOS Elm street, owned by John, Rebecca, and S. C. Kennard, 
and occupied by sundry persons. The fire originated in a waste-paper 
basket in the offices occujiied b\' Brown, Jones & Warren, from cause 
unknown. Extinguished by occupants of the block before arrival of 
Hose No. 1, which responded. Value of building, .$.")5,000; damage to 
building, $50; insurance on building, $50,600; insurance paid, $50. 
Value of Brown, Jones & Warren's contents, $75; damage to contents, 
$25; no insurance. 

Box 45. Friday, May 22, 10.55 A. M. Four-story brick building, 104 
Franklin street, owned by Gordon Woodbury, and occupied by several 
parties. The fire originated among some loose paper in window of A. 
H. Jenkins' laundry, and was extinguished before arrival of department. 
No damage. Box pulled by Mr. Jenkins. Companies responding. En- 
gines 1, 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

2 — 2 — 2. Sunday, May 24, 11.10 A. M. Brush fire on land owned liy 
city of Manchester (water works), about 41/3 miles from city hall, near 
the Auburn line, at Mill Dam house. Delegation fi-om department 
responded. On duty about three hours. 

Still. Sunday, May 24, 5.12 p. m. Slaughter house dump, near 
foot of Hancock street, on land owned and occupied by Manchester 
Slaughtering and Eendering Company. Hose Company No. 3 re- 
sponded. Laid 450 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Monday, May 25, 3.10 p, m. Brush fire on land owned by 
Amoskeag Manufacturing company on Oak Hill, north of Derryfield 
park. Delegation of fifteen men responded. On duty two and one- 
half hours. 

2—2—2. Monday, May 25, 8.12 P. M. Rekindling of Oak Hill fire. 
Delegation of 30 men from the department responded. On duty one 
and one-half hours. 

Still. Tuesday, May 20, 2.10 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
Amoskeag Manufacturing company on Kelley and Montgomery streets. 
Set by boys. Members of Engine and Ladder Com])nny No. fi re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, May 2G, 3.20 p. m. Brush fire on Oak Hill in Derry- 
field park and land owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing company. 
Delegation from department responded. On duty three hours. 

2 — 2 — 2. Tuesday, May 20, 3.41 p. M. Large conflagration at Lake- 
port.\ Sent Steamer No. 1 with hose carriage, horses and men to Con- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 417 

cord in charge of Assistant Engineer Merrill to "cover in" for their 
two steamers sent. Returned about midnight. 

Still. Tuesday, May 26, 6.56 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling at 547 
Union street, owned by J. H. Mendell. Chemical Engine responded. 
No services required. 

Still. Wednesday, May 27, 5.40 A. M. Chimney fire in wooden tene- 
ment house, 4 Monmouth street, owned by Gilbert A. Sackett. and 
occupied by Edward Martin. Used three charges of pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, May 29, 12.50 p. m. Two-story wooden tenement 
house, 27 Adams street. West Side, owned by John J. Cronin, and 
occupied by J. A. Gammell and W. T. Lockhead. Cause, smoking pipe 
igniting lounge, doing slight damage. Members of Engine Company 
No. 2 responded with combination wagon. Extinguished before their 
arrival. 

Still. Friday, May 29, 9.10 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
2S2 Cartier street, owned by John Ricker. Members of Engine and 
Ladder No. 6 responded. Used two charges of pony. No damage. 

Box 4. Wednesday-, June 3, 8.21 A. m. Burning- kerosene in middle of 
Spruce street in front of No. 43 and 44. Needless alarm pulled by boys. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3. Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 
1, 3. 

Box 214. Wednesday, June 3, 1.11 p. M. Grass fire on land owned by 
Amoskeag Manufacturing company, south of Valley and west of Wil- 
son streets. No damage. Needless alarm as hose wagon of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 3 were on way to fire when the alarm was 
pulled. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, 
Truck 3. 

Box 73. Wednesday-, June 3, 3.27 p. m. Tenement house, 319 Auburn 
street, owned by John F. Ryan and occupied by Cornelius J. Horan. 
Cause, children playing with matches set fire to waste paper. No dam- 
age. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Note. When three blows were struck on bells, the mainspring of 
this box broke, causing indicators to show Box 3 and companies re- 
sponded accordingly. 

Box 3. Thursday, June 4, 2.23 a. m. Broom-corn rubbish in county 
jail yard, corner Valley and Willow streets. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Thursday, June 4, 2.30 p. M. Tenement house, No. 414 Lake 
avenue, owned by Frank Morrison, and occupied by George Hill. Cause, 
rats and matches in rubbish in back attic. Damage slight. Members 
of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. Used one charge of 
pony. 

Box 7. Saturday, June G, 12.38 P. ii. Two-and-half-story wooden 
dwelling, corner Hanover and Chestnut street (108 Hanover, 408 Chest- 
nut street), owned by the Elliot Hospital, leased by J. R. Lafiamme, 
and occupied by Mrs. Mary Connelly as boarding house. Cause un- 

27 



418 ANXUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

known. Fire originated in attic of ell and quickly spread to roof of 
main building^. Box pulled by Serg'eant J. T. O'Dowd. Companies re- 
sponding-: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of build- 
ing, $3.S00; damage to building, $488.25; insurance on building, $3,800; 
insurance paid on building, $488.25. Value of contents, $600; damage to 
contents, $85; insurance on contents, $600; insurance paid on contents, 
$85. 

Box 513. Monday, June 8, 3.12 A. M. Two-story dwelling, 106 Bis- 
marck street, owned and occupied by Carl Waltch. Fire originated in 
rear part of the ell. Cause unknown, but presumably spontaneous 
combustion of oily waste. Box pulled by Waltch. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 2, 6. Truck 6. Value of building, $1,800; damage to build- 
ing, $700; insurance on building, $1,400; insurance paid on building, 
$700. Value of contents, $500; damage to contents, $300; no insurance. 

Box 4. Wednesday, June 10, 3.01 p. ii. A small pile of oakum in 
plumber's shoiJ of Connor Bros., 49 Central, caught tire from careless 
use of matches. Needless alarm pulled while Chemical Engine was en 
route to fire. Extinguished before their arrival. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Wednesday, June 10, 11 p. m. Four-story brick block, 296 
Pine street, owned by E. W. Bartlett heirs, and occupied by Kate 
Houghton and others. Slight tire at end of sink. Cause unknown. 
Chemical Engine responded. Extinguished before its arrival. 

Still. Wednesday, June 17, 7.55 A. M. Dwelling house, 396 E. Spruce 
street, owned by L. W. Page, and occupied by Mrs. Charles E. Palmer. 
Cause, leak in oil stove. No damage. Members of Engine and Ladder 
Company No. 3 responded. 

Still. Thursday, June IS, 6.10 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
rear 60 Merrimack street, leased by F. X. Chenette, and occupied by 
John Honx. No damage. Members of Chemical Engine Company re- 
sponded. 

Still. Sunday, June 28, 10.05 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
731 Vallej' street, owned by Mrs. Holland, and occupied by C. W. 
Tinker. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. 
Used two charges of pony. 

Box 4. Monday, June 29, 1.06 A. M. Four-story brick block, 633 Elm 
street, owned by Daniel Connor heirs, and occupied as tenements and 
stores. The fire originated in Room 13, on third floor, occupied by 
A. Y. Greenleaf. Cause unknown. Box pulled by Greenleaf. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 
Extinguished bj- Chemical Engine. Value of building, $5,000; damage 
to building. $110; insurance on building, $5,000; insurance paid on build- 
ing, $110. Value of contents, $200; damage to contents, $75; no insur- 
ance. 

Box 215. Wednesday, July 1, 8.38 p. M. Small barn in Lincoln street, 
at junction of Portsmouth railroad, owned by Freeman Higgins, and 
occupied by Mrs. Annie ])aIton as storehouse for paper box stock. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 419 

Cause, incendiary. I>ox ])ulled by citi/en. Companies responding: En- 
gines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2. I!, Truck .'!. Value of building, $200; dam- 
age to building, $200; insurance on building, $100; insurance paid, $100. 
Value of contents, $511.50; damage to contents, $:388.49; insurance on 
contents, $500; insurance paid on contents, $388.49. 

Still. Thursday, July 2, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
184 Wentworth street, owned by Joseph Vazel, and occupied by three 
families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded. Used one 
charge of pony. 

Box 312. Thursday, July 2, 11. 55 A. M. Chimney fire in four-story 
wooden tenement block, 445 North Main street, owned by Frank C. 
Livingston, and occupied by several families. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. No damage. 

Box 7. Saturday, July 4, 11.47 a. m. Wooden tenement house in rear 
of 125 Hanover street, owned by G. F. Bosher. Cause, candles ignited 
drapery around a casket. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Corn- 
panes responding: Engine 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Saturday, July 4, 6 p. m. Awning at 360 Dubuque street, 
owned and occupied by Edmond Desrochers. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 6 responded. Extinguished with garden hose. 

Box 4. Saturday, July 4, 9.28 p. si. Four-tenement block, 46 Lake 

avenue, owned by A. E. Cutts, and occupied by Mrs. McCoy and 

others. Cause, bunch of rags in kitchen caught from lighted match. 
No damag-e. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 2, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks, 1, 3. 

Box 711. Saturday, July 4, 9.56 p. m. Two-and-half-story dwelling, 
280 Grove street, owned and occupied by Thomas Mahoney. Cause, 
defective chimne3' in basement where fire was confined. Box pulled by 
Mahonej'. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, 
Trucks 3, 5. Value of building, $3,500; damage to building, $217.50; 
insurance on building, $2,500; insurance paid on building, $217.50. No 
damage to contents. 

Still. Saturday, July 4, 11 p. m. Slight fire discovered in door- 
casing of Mahoney's house from foregoing fire. Chemical Engine re- 
sponded. Extinguished with a dipper of water before their arrival. 

Still. Sunday, July 5, 2.45 p. si. City dump on Putnam street, West 
Side. Responded to by members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 
with hose carriage. Laid 750 feet hose from hydrant. On duty four 
hours. 

Still. Tuesday, July 7, 1.15 p. si. City dump on Putnam street, 
West Side. Members of Engine and Ladder Compan.y No. 6 responded 
with hose carriage. 

Still. Wednesday, July 8, 10.30 A. si. C^y dump on Putnam street. 
West Side. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. 
Laid 500 feet hose from hydrant. 

Box 82. Thursday, July 9, 1.38 A. si. One-story blacksmith shop, 
79 Lowell street, owned by John Kennard and occupied by John F. 



420 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

"Woodbury. Cause, the forge. Damage slight. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Engine. Box pulled by John Heal3^ Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 72. Friday, July 10, 6.56 A. M. Two-story woodshed in rear 232 
East Spruce street, owned by heirs of W. L. Sargent, and occupied by 
Joseph Perrault, Cartier Dehuegoley, Joseph Breuellette, and Adelard 
Paquin. Cause unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 4. Value of building, $400; 
damage to building, $150; insurance on building, $118; insurance paid 
on building, $118. No damage to contents. 

Still. Thursday, July 16, 11.30 a. m. Two-story wooden farm build- 
ing, owned by city of Manchester, and used as house of correction. 
Upon receipt of telephone message sent Engine 1 and Hose 1. 

Box 27. Thursday, July 16, 11.34 A. M. While Engine 1 and Hose 1 
were on way to city farm this, box was pulled for same fire. Cause, 
rats and matches. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 
2, Truck 5. Value of buildings, $8,000; damage to buildings, $279.30; 
insurance on buildings, '$8,000; insurance paid on buildings, $279.30. 
Value of contents, $6,000; damage to contents, $15; insurance on con- 
tents, $6,000; insurance paid on contents, $15. 

Box 313. Friday, July 17, 1.01 P. M. Chimney fire in shed in rear of 
22-24 Amory street owned by Nason Hall. Cause, children playing 
with matches. No damage. Extinguished before arrival of depart- 
ment. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 4, 
6, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Monday, July 20, 5.30 p. u. Chimney fire in wooden tene- 
ment building, 11 Orange street, owned by estate of David H. Young. 
Members of Chemical Company responded. Services not required. 

Box 26. Tuesday, July 21, 8.34 P. M. Cottage house, 10 Kussell street, 
owned and occupied by B. S. Levine. Slight fire in front room down 
stairs. Cause unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 1, 5. Value of building, 
$2,800; damage to building, $10.90; insurance on building, $1,500; in- 
surance paid on building, $10.90. Value of contents, $600; damage to 
contents, $65; insurance on contents, $500; insurance paid on contents, 
$65. 

Box 25. Friday, July 24, 3.27 P. M. Cottage house, 451 Manchester 
street, owned by Rebecca Plummer, and occupied by J. E. Zerlae. 
Slight fire on roof of piazza. Extinguished by electric light men who 
were near bj^ before arrival of department. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 

Box 5. Monday, July 27, 7.15 p. M. Four-story brick block, 740 Elm 
street, corner Pleasant, owned by Clough, Simons & Simons, and oc- 
cupied in corner store by William W. Partridge as clothing store. The 
fire originated in rear part of the store in closet. Box pulled b.y Al- 
fred St. Cyr. Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 3. Extinguished by Chemical Engine. Value of building. 



REPORT OF THE FIItE ENGINEEll. 421 

$18,000; damag-e to biiildino', $251; insurance on building', $9,000; insur- 
ance paid on building, $2jl. Value of contents, $3,000; damage to con- 
tents, $000; insurance on contents, $9,800; insurance not settled. 

Stii.l. :N[onda.y, July 27, 8. .57 p. M. Rekindling of previous fire in 
sawdust packing of water pipe. Chemical Engine responded. Used 
one charge of pony. 

Still. Thursday, August 6, 4.30 p. m. A barn in rear of 12.') Orange 
street, owned and occupied by E. J. Derosiers. Cause, slight fire in 
waste barrel. Memliers of Chemical Company responded. Xo services 
required. 

Box 20. Wednesday, August 12. 10. .53 a. m. Three-story wooden 
block, 252 Bridge street, owned by Timothy Shea, and occupied by 
T. J. Ladriere and others. A kerosene oil stove caught fire and George 
Ladriere, in attempting to throw it out of doors, was slightlj' burned 
about the hands and arms. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 5. Value of build- 
ing, $4,000; damage to building, $126.09; insurance on building. $800; 
insurance paid on building, $126.09. Value of contents, $1,200; damage 
to contents, $59.30; insurance on contents, $1,000; insurance paid on 
contents^ $59.30. 

Box 26. Saturday, August 15, 5.39 p. M. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 271 Lowell street, owned bj- William Moul of Martin's 
Ferry, and occiipied by P. J. Ross, first floor; Philippe Voyer, on sec- 
ond floor, and Norven Provencher, third floor. Cause, defective chim- 
ney. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 5. Value of building, $4,000; damage to 
building, $239.56; insurance on building, $2,000; insurance paid on build- 
ing, $239.56. Rose: Value of contents, .$500; damage to contents, $50; 
no insurance. Voyer: Value of contents. $800; damage to contents, 
$175; insurance on contents, $800; insurance paid on contents, $175. 
Provencher: Value of contents, $1,500; damage to contents, $175; 
insurance on contents, $1,000; insurance paid on contents, $175. 

2 — 2 — 2. Tuesday, August 18, 2.05 A. M. Received telephone message 
from Epping, N. H., asking for assistance. Engine 4 with hose wagon, 
horses, and delegation from department went down on special train. 
On their arrival fire was under control so apparatus w^as not unloaded. 

Still. Thursday, August 20, 2.05 A. M. "Box" freight car No. 46167 
of the Boston &: Maine railroad in the railroad yard loaded with char- 
coal consigned to E. W. Poore. Hose Companj' No, 3 responded. Laid 
200 feet of hose from hydrant. On duty three hours. Value of car, 
^.$600; damage to car, $94.27; insurance on car, $450. Value of contents, 
$140; damage to contents, $40; no insurance. 

Still. Thursday, August 20, 4.30 p. m. Two-and-half-story tenement 
block, 26 Dover street, owned by Henry E. Burnham, and occupied bj' 
six families. Cause, children playing with matches. Members of En- 
gine Companj^ No. 2 responded with combination wagon. Used one 
tank. 



422 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Thursday, August 20, 7.02 p. ii. Two-and-half-story block, 26 
Dover street, same as previous. Slight fire in closet caused by chil- 
dren. Extinguished with pails of water by Officer O'Malley and mem- 
bers of Engine Company No. 2. 

Box 212. Saturday, August 22, 12.58 A. M. Barn on Hanover street, 
at junction of Lake avenue, two miles from city hall, owned by George 
F. Bosher, and occupied bj- William H. Carpenter for storage. Cause, 
unknown. Box pulled by Officer Badger. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. Value of bulding, $1,000; damage 
to building, $1,000; insurance on building, $800; insurance paid on 
building, $800; value of content, $200; damage to contents, $200; no 
insurance. 

Still. Saturday, August 22, 3.30 p. m. Four-story brick block, 1028- 
1048 Elm street, owned by Mrs. Frederick Smyth and First National 
bank. Cause, tipping over oil stove in Eoom 14. No damage. Mem- 
bers of Chemical Company responded. 

Box 32. Sunday, August 23, 11.40 p. M. False alarm. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Sunday, September 6, 1.50 p. m. Chimney fire in house, 194 
East Spruce street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Joanna Daley. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded with hose car- 
riage. Used three charges of pony. 

Still. Sunday, September 6, 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire same as pre- 
vious fire. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. 
Used one charge of pony. 

Still. Monday-, September 7, 1.45 p. m. "City dump" on Putnam 
street. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded with 
hose carriage. Used 500 feet of hose from hydrant. On duty four 
hours. 

Box 323. Monday, September 7, 10.20 p. si. Needless alarm for fire in 
"city dump" on Putnam street. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Tuesday, September 8, 7.15 A. M. "City dump" on Putnam 
street. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. 
Used 500 feet hose from hydrant. , 

Still. Thursday, September 10, 8.45 a. m. Chimney fire in three- 
tenement house, 485 Rimmon street, owned and occupied by Anastasie 
Gariepy. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded 
with hose carriage. Used three charges of pony. 

Box 216. Saturday, September 12, 3.40 p. ii. Brush fire on Merrill 
road on land owned by George Porter. Box pulled by boys. Comj 
panics responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 3. 

Box 217. Thursday, September 17, 2.41 P. M. Cottage house, 202 
Candia road, owned and occupied by Pharis E. Rogers, Fire started 
in china closet adjoining dining-room from some unknown cause. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 2, Truck 3, Value of building, $3,500; damage to building, $760; 



REPOllT OF THE FIKE ENGINEER. 423 

insurance on buildinq-. $3, 000; insuraiu-e jKiid (in biiildino'. $7()0. Value 
of contents, $()oO; daniai^e to contents, $oOO; insurance on contents, 
$500; insurance paid on contents, $300. 

Still. Friday, September 18, 9.05 a. m. City dump on Putnam 
street. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded witli 
hose carriage. Used 500 feet hose from hydrant. 

Box 214. Tuesday, September 22, 3.40 p. ii. Small one-story shed 
on Valley street, owned and occupied by McElwain Shoe Company, 
and used for storage of naphtha, varnish, and cement. Cause ignition 
of naphtha vapor. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 3, Truck 3. Value of 'building, $150; 
damage to building, $25; no insurance. Value of contents, $360; dam- 
age to contents, $50; no insurance. 

Box 62. Tuesday, September 22, 10.57 p. m. False alarm. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. 

Still. Wednesday, September 23, 2.50 a. m. Four-story brick block, 
corner Elm and Lowell streets, occupied by W. H. Eames as drug store, 
and others. Can of hot ashes in basement. Chemical Engine re- 
sponded. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, September 23, 12.40 p. m. Chimney fire in dwell- 
ing house, 393 Merrimack street, owned and occupied by E. A. Moul- 
ton. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. Used 
one charge of pony. 

Still. Thursday, September 24, 8.05 p. m. Chimney fire in three- 
story brick block, 1085 Elm street, owned by A. B. Story heirs, and 
occupied as furniture store by E. L. Gresley. Chemical Engine re- 
sponded. No services required. 

2 — 2 — 2. Friday, September 25, 2.20 p. si. Cottage house on Candia 
road, three miles from city, owned by Frank P. Colby, and occupied 
by Edward J. Caldwell. Engine and Ladder No.. 3, Hose No. 2, and 
detail from central station responded. Value of building. $1,600; dam- 
to building, $1,400; insurance on building, $750; insurance paid on 
building, $750. Value of contents, $400; damage to contents, $400; 
insurance on contents, $200; insurance paid on contents, $200. 

Box 323. Friday, September 25, 6.34 p. M. Dwelling house, 216 
Thornton street, owned and occupied by Ernest Leffenberg. Cause, 
tipping over a lamp. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Thursday, October 1, 4.30 p. it. City dump, rear of F. X. 
Chenette's, 205 Pine street. Chemical Engine and Hose 1 responded. 

Box 5. Thursday, October 1, 7.1-1 p. M. Four-story brick block 
(Brown block), 788 Elm street, owned by Kennard & Rowell heirs, 
and occupied by John Morey. Cause, lamp in room 16' fell from 
bracket. Damage slight. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Tuesday, October 6, 9.10 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 



424 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

block, 409 Pine street, owned by estate of S. N. Eobie, and occupied 
by Mrs. Mary Perry. 

Box 62. Sunday, October 11, 1.15 a. m. False alarm. Companies re- 
sponding-: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, .3, Truck 3. 

Box 15. Tuesday, October 13, 11.57 p. m. Two-and-lialf-story dwell- 
ing house, 57 Orange street, owned by estate of Gideon Flanders, and 
occupied by William Lareau. Cause unknown. Box pulled by La- 
reau. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 5. Value of contents, $700; damage to contents, $30; insur- 
ance on contents. $700; insurance paid on contents, $30. 

Stili,. Wednesday, October 14, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in three- 
story tenement block, 34 Amory street, owned by Joseph Quirin, and 
occupied by several families. Members of Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany No. 6 responded. No services required. 

Box 5. Thursday, October 15, 10.19 p. M. Two-story block, 23 Cen- 
tral street, owned by Precile Tremblay, and occupied b.y Hyram Spec- 
ter as a loan office. Cause, unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of building, $2,500; damage to biiilding, $55; insurance on build- 
ing, $1,000; insurance paid on building, $55. Value of contents, $900; 
damage to contents, $585; insurance on contents. $500; insurance paid 
on contents, $500. 

Box IS. Saturday, October 17, 7.41 A. M. Cottage house, 304 Man- 
chester street, owned by John Bergmann, and occupied by Mrs. L. V. 
Burleigh, as millinery parlors, and A. H. Willard as residence. Cause, 
lace coming in contact with blaze of lamp. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 
"S'alue of building, $2,500; damage to building, $200; insurance on build- 
ing, $1,500; insurance paid on building, $143. Value of contents, $2,500; 
damage to contents. $1,()00; insurance on contents, $700; insurance 
paid on contents, $500. 

Box 312. Saturdaj', October 17, 8.52 p. ii. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 92 McGregor street, owned by Edward M. James, and oc- 
cupied hy Cyril Roux, and others. Cause, rubbish in cellar. Extin- 
guished with chemical stream from combination wagon without dam- 
age. Box pulled bj' Special OlHcer Quinn. Companies responding: 
Engines 2, 4, 6, Hose 1, Truck (3. 

Box 8. Sunday, October IS, 6.51 p. ii. Two-and-half-story dwelling 
house, 29 Prospect street, owned by Charles C. Clark, and occupied 
by Peter Wafton. Cause unknown. Box pulled by William Wagner. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 
1, 5. Value of building, $6,500; damage to building, $50; insurance on 
building, $3,000; insurance paid on building, $50. Value of contents, 
$50; damage to contents, $10; no insurance. 

Still. Thursday, October 22, 8.10 p. m. Pile of leaves in rear of 
residence of Bev. W. Northey Jones, 100 Harrison street. Chemical 
Engine responded. Used one charge of pony. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 425 



Still. Friday, October 23, 5.44 p. m. Cottag-e house, 395 Amherst 
street, owned by John T. Moore, and occupied by Harry E. Dow. 
Cause, soot in an old fireplace. 

Still. Tuesda3% October 27, 12.30 p. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
tenement house, 452 Chestnut street, owned by Miss J. Emma Parsons, 
and occupied by A. A. Carron. Members of Chemical Company re- 
ponded. No services required. 

Still. Tuesday, OctolDcr 27, 3.40 p. m. Two-stor,y tenement house, 
.")() Concord street, owned by Joseph Qiiirin. and occu])ied by E. Eojette. 
Cause, oil can in stove oven placed there by child. Members of Chem- 
ical Company responded. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, October 28, 1.30 p. m. Cottage house, 117 Turn- 
er street, owned and occupied by Edward Campbell, Cause, chimney 
fire. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with combination 
wagon. Used one charge of pony. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, October 28, 8 p. m. Dwelling house, 417 Cedar 
street, owned and occupied by James J. Donnelly. Cause, soot in bot- 
tom of chimney. Members of Engine Company No. 3 responded. Used 
four charges of pony. ^ 

Box 4. Saturday, October 31, 2.48 p. M. Kettle of tar boiled over 
in rear of Connor's block, 563 Elm street. No damage. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Sunday, November 1, 5.30 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 38 Adams street, owned by F. M. Gerrish, and occupied by F. E. 
and E. M. Dwyer. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 
responded. Used two charges of pony. 

Still. Tuesday, November 3, 12.55 p. M. Grass fire on land of Amos- 
keag Manufacturing company, near Sullivan and Rimmon streets. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. 

Still. Thursday, November 4, 3.10 p. ii. Brush fire on land of 
Amoskeag- Manufacturing company on Hevey street. Members of En- 
gine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. 

Box 215. Friday, November 13, 3.25 P. M. A few old railroad ties in 
rear of tenement block, 157 Wilson street, corner Silver. Cause, chil- 
dren playing with matches. Box pulled bj* citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. No damage. 

Still. Friday, November 13, 7.30 p. M. An unadjusted thermostat 
in Kimball Bros, shoe shop, corner Massabesic and Cypress streets. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded with hose 
wagon. 

Still. Saturday, November 14, 6.15 A. ii. Chimney fire in brick 
block, 1214 Elm street, owned by estate of David H. Young, and oc- 
cupied by Frank Burke and others. Chemical Engine responded. 

Still. Saturday, November 14, 11.15 p. ii. An unadjusted thermo- 
stat in Kimball Bros, shoe shop, corner Massabesic and Cypress streets. 



426 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Members of Engine and Ladder Compan3' No. 3 i-esponded with hose 
wagon. 

Stlll. Tuesday. November 17, 3.04 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 248 Front street, owned by Mrs. Hannali Stearns, and occupied 
by F. C. Piper. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 re- 
sjjonded with hose carriage. Used one charge of pony. 

Still. Tuesday, November 17, 4.40 p. M. Same as previous, and re- 
sponded to by members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5, but 
found no fire nor any cause for alarm. 

Still. Thursday, November 19, 5.10 p. m. Barn situated in field 
south of Gerrish Tannery on road to Pine Grove cemetery, owned and 
occupied by heirs of B. F. and Emily J. Welch. Was nearly filled with 
ha^' and some farming tools. Cause unknown. Hose Company No. 3 
responded. Laid 1,050 feet of hose from hydrant. Cause, incendiary. 
Value of building, $500; damage to building, $500; no insurance. Value 
of contents, $300; damag-e to contents, $300; no insurance. 

Box 315. Thursday, November 19, 5.55 p, M. Chimney fire in two- 
story wooden house, rear of Amoskeag hotel, 270 Front street, owned 
by Charles Linen, and occupied by Fred Miller. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 5, 6, Chemical, Hose (Eiverside) 5, 
Truck 5. 

Still. Friday, November 20, 8.13 A. ii. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 51 Jane street, owned by J. B. Pattee, and occupied by Fred 
Heath. Hose Company No. 2 responded. Used two charges of pony. 

Still. Saturday, November 21, 3.5'5 P. si. Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company's dump on Turner street. Cause, set by boys. Members of 
Engine Company No. 2 responded with combination wagon. Laid 200 
feet hose from hydrant. 

Box 61. Sunday, November 22, 2.14 A. Ji. Two-and-half-story tene- 
ment house, 80 Brown avenue, owned bj^ Leonard Sullivan, and oc- 
cupied by William Downie. Cause unknown. Box pulled by Captain 
Thomas E. Steele. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical. 
Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. Value of building, $1,500; damage to building, 
$190; insurance on building, $1,200; insurance paid on building, $190. 
Value of contents, $400; damage to contents, $300; insurance on con- 
tents, $400; insurance paid on contents, $200. 

Stixl. Sunday, November 22, 6.40 p. ji. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 15 Arlington street, owned by E. T. Hardy, and occupied by 
V. C. Johnson, and Almon Baxter. Members of Hose Company No. 2 
responded. Used one charge' of pony. 

Still. Wednesday, November 25, 5.50 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 172 Douglas street, owned by Samuel and William .McElroj-, 
and occupied by George Mills and others. Members of Engine Com- 
pany No. 2 responded with combination wagon. Used one tank and 
two charges of pony 

Still. Wednesday, November 25, 9.15 p. m. Two-and-half-story 
tenement house, 52 Concord street, owned by Joseph Quirin, and oc- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 427 

cDijied by James Donnelly. Slight fire in clothes closet. Cause, un- 
known. Chemical Engine responded. Used one tank. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, November 29, 11.05 a. m. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 466 Union street, owned by Mrs. David J. Clark, and oc- 
cupied by Mary Horan and others. Cause, slight tire on roof, from 
sparks from chimney. Chemical Engine responded. Used one tank. 
Value of building, $10,000; damage to building, $18.88; insurance on 
building, $6,000; insurance paid on building, $18.88. No damage to con- 
tents. 

Box 4. Wednesday, December 2, 6.46 p. Ji. Chimney fire in two- 
story tenement house, 41 Lake avenue, owned by Patrick Harrington, 
and occupied by T. Bouchard. Needless alarm. No services required. 
Box pulled by Bouchard. Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 711. Thursday, December 3, 12.01 a. ji. False alarm. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 3, Truck 3. 

Still. Thursday. December 3, 6.20 p. M. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment house, 286 Merrimack street, owned by James Thompson, and 
occupied by J. A. Colby. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 
No. 3 responded. Used one charge of pony. 

Still. Thursday, December 3, 9.30 P. M. Two-story brick building, 
No. 12 Hanover street, owned by Chandler Bros., and occupied by 
Annis Flour & Grain company, as grocery store and eating saloon. 
Cause, soot in chimney. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, December 5, 5.10 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 254 Front street (Amoskeag), owned by Clarence M. Durgin, and 
occupied by Thomas Wingate and others. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 5 responded with hose carri^age. Used two 
charges of pony. • No damage. 

Box 219. Saturday, December 5, 5.32 p. m. One-story wooden store- 
house on Hanover street, two miles from city hall, owned by Mrs. Jen- 
nie Louise Willey, and occupied by J. A. Boss, carpenter, for storage of 
tools. Cause, unknown. Box pulled by clerk at Eaton Heights shoe 
shop. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Hose 2, Truck 3. Value 
of building, $250; damage to building, $250; no insurance. Value of 
contents, $1,200; damage to contents, $1,050; insurance on contents, 
$500; insurance paid on contents, $250. 

Still. Sunday, December 6, 5.05 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 4'38 Old Falls road, owned by Mrs. Joseph Stuber, and occupied 
by M. N. Page. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 re- 
sponded. Used one charge of pony. 

Box 71. Monday, December 7, 10.20 p. m. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 123 East Spruce street, owned by Bartholomew Bressna- 
lian, and occupied by several families. Cause, defective chimney set- 
ting fire to wood piled against it in cellar, where the fire was confined, 
doing but little damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 3. Value of building, $4,000; 



428 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

damage to building, $35; insurance on building-. $1,000; insurance paid. 
$,35. Xo damage to contents. 

Still. Tuesday, December S, 12.35 p. m. Chimney tire in dwelling 
house, 245 Cedar street, owned and occupied b.y Mrs. John Burke. 
Chemical Engine responded. Used one tank. 

Still. Wednesday. December 9, 9.55 p. sr. Chimney fire in tenement 
house on Woodman avenue, owned by Miss Susie Woodman, and oc- 
cupied bj' F. G. Riddle. Members of Engine Company No. 3 responded 
with hose wagon. Used three charges of pony. 

Still. Thursday, December 10, 6.15 p. m. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement block, 142 McGregor street, owned by Gordon Woodburj^ and 
occupied by twenty-eight families. Members of Engine and Ladder 
Company No. 6 responded with hose carriage. Used two charges of 
pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, December 11, 10.05 p. ji. Chimney fire in dwelling 
house, on Harriman street, near Bedford line, owned and occupied by 
Dennis Charron. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with 
combination wagon. Used two charges of pony. 

Still. Saturday, December 12, 12.03 p. m. Brick "Garbage" vault 
in rear of Chandler block, 1179 Elm street, owned by estate of Henry 
Chandler. Waste paper caught fire from hot ashes. Chemical Engine 
responded. LTsed one tank. 

Box 4. Saturday, December 12, 1.44 p. m. Three-storj- wooden tene- 
ment block, 31 Spruce street, owned by Con. Flynn. Cause, rags in 
closet. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Wednesdaj-, December 16, 2.02 p. m. Slight fire in woodshed, 
1 Parker avenue, owned and occupied by heirs of E. Way. Cause, B. & 
M. R. R. emploj-ees burning grass in rear, spreading to shed. Members 
of Engine Company No. 2 responded with combination wagon. Used 
one charge of pony. 

Still. Thursday, December 17, 3.30 p. M. Ash vault in rear of 57 
Hanover street, owned by estate of J. N. Brown. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, December 17, 5.30 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 92 McGregor street, owned by E. M. James, and occupied by 12 
families. ]\Iembers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. 
No services required. 

Box 4. Friday, December 18, 7.43 a. m. One-story wooden shop 
(blacksmith's), rear of 18 Lake avenue, owned by Mrs. Fronie R. McEl- 
roy, and occupied by Charles E. Dupont. Cause, unknown. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 
1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $200; damage to building, $9.75; 
insurance on building, $100; insurance paid on building, $9.75. No 
damage to contents. 

Still. Friday, December 18, 4.26 p. m. Chimnej^ fire in three-story 
wooden tenement block, SO Cedar street, owned by Broderick & Healey. 



EEPOKT OF THE FIKE ENGINP:ER. 429 

and occupied by severeal families. Members of Chemical Comjjany 
responded. Used one charge of pony. No damage. 

Still. Friday, December 18, 7.03 p. M. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden tenement block, owned by Mrs. C. J. Senter, and occupied by 
fourteen families and two stores. Members of Engine and Ladder 
Company No. 5 responded with hose carriage. Used two charges of 
pony. 

Still. Friday, December 18, 8.10 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 64 Arlington street, owned by James Bueklin, and occupied by 
Harry Bueklin. Members of Hose Company No. 2 responded. Used 
two charges of pony. 

Box 15. Friday, December IS, 10.06 p. M. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 106 Bridge street, owned by P. Scollard, and occuj)ied by 
Israel Landry and others. Cause, bed clothes ignited from some un- 
known cause. Damage slight. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
siJonding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks, 1, 5. 

Still, 2 — 2 — 2 on tappers. Saturday, December 19, 3.42 A. M. Tele- 
phone message received from Goft'stown asking for assistance. Took 
Engine 1 with hose wagon, 4 horses, and 15 men, and went via B. & M. 
E. R. On arrival the Goffstown department had fire under control, so 
did not unload apparatus. Eeturned at 8.10 A. M. 

Still. Saturday, December 19, 2.35 p. m. Grass fire on land owned 
by Amoskeag Manufacturing company, corner of Kimmon and Putnam 
street, caused by bonfire of nearby skating party. Members of En- 
gine and Ladder No. 6 responded. 

Still. Saturday, December 19, 5.40 i\ m. Chimney fire in dwelling 
house, 476 Front street, owned and occupied by W. H. Maxwell. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded with hose car- 
riage. Used three charges of pony. 

Still. Wednesday, December 23, 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block, 39 Winter street, owned by Hanson R. Armstrong and oc- 
cupieu by several families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 re- 
ponded with combination wagon. Used one charge of pony. 

Still. Thursday, December 24, 10.40 a. m. Slight fire in woodbox, 
141 West street, in dwelling owned and occupied by Charles Lange, 
caused by children playing with matches. Members of Engine Com- 
pany No. 2 responded with combination wagon. Extinguished before 
their arrival. 

Still. Thursday, December 24, 5.25 p. ii. Chimney fire in two-and- 
half-story tenement house, 195 Turner street, owned by Merrill Farm- 
er, and occupied by several families. Members of Engine Company No. 
2 responded with combination wagon. Used two charges of pony. 

Still. Thursday, December 24, 7.15 P. ii. Chimney fire In dwelling- 
house, 51 Goffstown road, owned and occupied by B. F. Norton. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Comi)any No. 5 responded. Used two 
charges of pony. 

Still. Friday, December 25, 1.40 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling 



430 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPOETS. 

house 1855 Elm street, owned and occupied by Uberto C. Crosby. INIem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. 

Still. Saturday, December 20. fi.O.') p. sr. Chimney fire in two-and-a- 
half story dwelling, 3S0 Cartier street, owned by John Foster, and oc- 
cupied by George and Joseph Gerham. Members of Engine and Ladder 
Company No. 6 responded. Used two charges of pony. 

Stili>. Saturday, December 26, 9.30 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement, 
123 Amherst street, owned bj' Henry Eaton, and occupied by Kate 
L.ynch. Used three charges of pon3'. 

Still. Siindaj^ December 27, 11.20 a. m. Two-stor.y tenement house, 
153 Hanover street, owned by John N. Sanborn, and occupied 'by M. A. 
Bernard. Cause, thawing Avater pipes. Chemical Engine responded. 
Used one charge of pony. 

Box 82. Sunday, December 27, 2.51 p. m. Two-and-a-ihalf-stor^^ wood- 
en building, rear 1205 Elm street, owned by Edward L. Kimball, and 
occupied by Weslej' J. Smith as Derryfield Laundry. Fire appeared to 
have started near the boiler in rear from some unknown cause. Box 
pulled by Nira Truland. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $4,250; damage to 
building, $1,046.75; insurance on building, $4,250; insurance paid on 
building, $1,046.75. Damage to contents, $938.51; insurance on con- 
tents, $1,000; insurance paid on contents, $938.51. 

Still. Sundaj-, December 27, 5.20 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 25 Parker street, owned by James F. Wyman. and occupied by 
several families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with 
comibination Avagon. Used two charges of pony. 

Still. Monday, December 28, 8.57 a. m. Tenement house, 59 Dover 
street, owned by Kate E. Fradd, and occupied by Samuel B. Nelson. 
Cause, water pipes frozen so water could not circulate through "wa- 
ter-back" of stove, causing explosion of .stove, setting fire to cloth- 
ing, doing but slight damage by fire. Members of Engine Company 
No. 2 responded with combination wagon. Used one charge of pony. 
Value of building, $2,200; damage to building, $20; insurance on build- 
ing, .$1,500; insurance paid on building, $20. Value of contents, $300; 
damage to contents, $45; no insurance. 

Still. Thursday, December 31, 6.55 a. m. Tenement house, 318 Lake 
avenue, owned by Mrs. H. G. Bates, and occupied by George A. Smith. 
Cause, overheated chimney ignited floor timbers too closely connected 
with chimnej'. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 re- 
sponded with hose wagon. Used Ihree charges of pony, and laid 450 
feet of hose from hydrant. Value of building, $4,500; damage to 'build- 
ing, $61; insurance on building, $3,000; insurance paid on building, $61. 

Still. Thursday-, December 31, 3.57 p. m. City dump, corner Put- 
nam and Rimmon street. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 
No. 6 responded with hose carriage. Laid 550 feet of hose. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 

Kumber of bell alarms 

Number of still alarms 

Total 

Ag-gregate losses for 1903 

Amount of insurance paid 

Net losses uncovered by insurance 



431 

10.-5 
IT'J 

2S4 

$51,410.35 

39,379,95 

$12,036.40 



COMPANIES RESPONDING. 



January. . . 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August.... 
September 
October . . . 
November 
December. 
Total . . 



6 ! 1 
10 ! 6 
112 73 



432 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 

ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 



Engine No. 1. 

LOCATED OX VINE STREET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag- steamer $4,000.00 

1 one-horse wag'on 400.00 

3 gray horses for steamer 600.00 

1 gray horse for hose wagon 200.00 

4 swing-ing harnesses 200.00 

1 pair double exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 single exercise harness 40.00 

2,000 feet fabric hose 900.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Tools, furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 12,"). 00 



Total amount $6,79").00 



Engine No. 2. 

LOCATED AT NOETII MAIN STEEET, 'SQrOG. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $4,000.00 

1 Combination Chemical and Hose wagon 1,700.00 

1 exercise wagon, poles, shafts, and three-horse hitch.... 2.50.00 

3 horses for steamer 600.00 

1 pair horses for hose wagon 400.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $40, 1 at $20 100.00 

5 swing-ing harnesses 2d0.00 

1 double sled 00.00 

3,150 feet fabric hose 1,417.50 

Stable fixtures and blankets 'J4.00 

Furniture, fixtures, carjDets, etc 4()G.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 125.00 



Total amount $9,462.50 



Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CONNER MASS^VBESIC STREET. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $,'3,500.00 

1 two-horse hose wagon 400.00 

1 two-horse truck and equipments 1,700.00 



EEPOKT OB' THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



43S 



1 three-horse hitch attachment (extra) $200.00 

1 pair horses for steamer 2"j0.00 

1 pair bay horses for hose wagon 400. 00 

1 pair black horses for truck 300.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $50, 1 at $40 140.00 

6 swinging harnesses 300.00 

3,400 feet fabric hose 1,530.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc 575.00 

Firemen's suits and badg-es 150.00 

1 exercise wagon 250.00 

Total amount $9,775.00 



Engine No. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINTl STREET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer $4,200.00 

1 hose wagon 400.00 

3 horses for steamer 600.00 

1 horse for hose wagon 150.00 

4 exercise harnesses 60.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

2,050 feet fabric hose 922.50 

Hall furniture, beds, bedding, etc 275.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 75.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 125.00 

Total amount $7,007.50 



Engine and Ladder No. 5. 



LOCATEB ON WEBSTEB STREET, CORNER CHESTNUT. 

1 third-size Amoskeag steamer $3,600.00 

1 two-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage 600.00 

1 steel frame ladder truck 1,650.00 

1 pair bay horses for steamer 400.00 

1 pair bay horses for truck 400.00 

1 bay horse for hose carriage 200.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

1 double sled 50.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2 pairs exercise harnesses 100.00 

2,350 feet fabric hose 1,057.50 

28 



434 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Bedding, furniture, tools, etc $247.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 90.00 

Firemen's suits, badges, etc 150.00 

Total amount $9,119.50 



Engine and Ladder No. 6. 

LOCATED AT COBljraR AMOKY AND ElifMOIf STREETS. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer .$3,500.00 

1 hook-and-ladder truck (with Bangor extension) 1,680.00 

1 one-horse carriage 600.00 

2 graj' horses for steamer 300.00 

2 bay horses for truck 267.00 

1 gray horse for hose carriage 150.00 

5 swinging- harnesses 250.00 

2,200 feet fabric hose 990.00 

Hall furniture, carpets, beds, bedding, etc 375.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 85.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

1 exercise wagon 290.50 

Total amount $8,637.50 



Hose No. 1 . 

LOCATED ON VIN^, STREET. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage $600.00 

2 horses 300.00 

2 single harnesses 70.00 

1 set Hobbs' Runners 90.00 

1 hose sled 20.00 

3,200 feet of fabric hose 1,440.00 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding, etc 60.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 100.00 

Total amount $2,930.00 



Hose No. 2. 

LOCATED OX MAPLE STREET, CORNER OF EAST HIGH. 



1 two-horse hose wagon 

2 bay horses 



$600.00 
500.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 435 

2 swingiiig- harnesses $100.00 

1 exercise wagon o25.00 

2,000 feet of fa'bric hose 900.00 

130 feet leather hose 60.00 

Furniture and fixtures, beds and bedding- 150.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 100.00 

Total amount $2,735.00 



Hose No. 3. 

LOCATED ON SOUTH EOl,!! STEEET, BAKEUSVILLE. 

1 combination hose wagon (with ladders) $1,000.00 

1 pair gray horses 100.00 

1 pair of swinging harnesses 100.00 

1 pair exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 exercise wagon 50.00 

2,100 feet of fabric hose 945.00 

Furniture, fixtures, bedding, etc 85.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 65.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 80.00 

Total amount $2,475.00 



Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 



LOCATED ON VINE, STREET. 



1 aerial hook-and-ladder truck $4,200.00 

3 horses 600.00 

3 exercise harnesses 75.00 

3 swing-ing harnesses 150.00 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 360.00 

3 rubber blanket covers 72.00 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding and furniture 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 60.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

Total amount $5,942.00 



Chemical Engine No. 1. 

LOCATED ON VLNE STREET. 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) engine $2,250.00 

1 pair bay horses 500.00 



436 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1 pair of exercise harnesses 

1 pair swinging harnesses 

Furniture and fixtures 

Stable fixtures and blankets 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 

Supply Wagon. 

1 supply wagon, with coal boxes 

Spare Hose Carriage and Hos 

AT CE^•TBAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage 

900 feet fabric hose (for re-lining) 

Total amount 



$50.00 

100.00 

75.00 

50.00 

35.00 

$3,000.00 



$150.00 



$400.00 
180.00 



$580.00 



Exercise Wagon. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE- STREET. 

1 four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole, shafts three- 
horse hitch, and coal boxes 

Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage 

400 feet fabric hose 

2 hosepipes 

Total amount 

Pond Road Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED IN BASEaiENT OF W. P. FARifER'S BARN. 

] two-wheeled hose carriage 

500 feet leather hose 

Total amount 



$250.00 



$30.00 

IGO.OO 

10.00 

$200.00 



$30.00 
150.00 



$180.00 



REPORT OF THK FIRE ENGINEER. 



487 



Sleeping Hall. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE. STREET. 

5 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc 

Extra Horses. 

1 steel gray ihorse 

1 gray horse 

Total amount 



$200.00 



$100.00 
175.00 



5275.00 



Fire Alarm Telegraph. 

At cost, including additions $22,250.00 

Kemodeling in 1885 6,000.00 

"Individual tapper" system 4,000.00 

Storage battery (in 1898) ' 1,850.00 

Switch protector board 175.00 

Two boxes added in 1903 250.00 

Wire, brackets, and tools 250.00 

Repair wagon 150.00 

Total amount $43,925.00 

Recapitulation. 

Engine Company No. 1 $6,795.00 , 

Engine Company No. 2 9,462.50 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 9,775.00 

Engine Company No. 4 7,007.50 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 9,119.50 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 8,637.50 

The "Harrington" Engine 250.00 

Hose Company No, 1 2,930.00 

Hose Company No. 2 2,735.00 

Hose Company No. 3 2,475.00 

Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 5,942.00 

Chemical Engine Company No. 1 3,060.00 

Combination wagon (for Wilson Hill) 1,700.00 

Supply Avagon 150.00 

Exercise wagon (Central station) 200.00 

Spare hose carriage and hose 580.00 

Engineers' department 532.50 



438 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Riverside Hose Company $1,010.00 

Hallsville Hose Company 195.00 

Goffe's Falls Hose Company 200.00 

Pond Road Hose Company 180.00 

Sleeping- Hall (Central Station) 200.00 

Extra horses 275.00 

Fire alarm telegraph 43,025.00 

Total amonnt $117,5.36. .50 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



So 

r 


Name. 


-Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 




Thomas W. Lane 

Clarence R. Merrill 

Fred S Bean 






1937 Elm. 


2 
4 


Assistant 


Grain dealer 

Foreman 


414 Merrimack. 
312 Pearl. 




John F. Seaward 




27 Warren. 




Wool sorter 


526 Beauport. 









ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 
House, 28 Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 




Charles F. McCoy 

Frank E. Stearns 








8 


Lieutenant 


Paper hanger 


450 Merrimack. 
21 Market. 





Charles F Hall 


Engineer 

Asst. engineer .. 
Driver engine.... 

Driver hose 

Hoseman 


Engineer 


28 Vine. 


14 
11 
12 
43 
9 
17 
19 
13 
10 
15 


George B. Forsaith 

Frank H. Harvey 

Artemas C. Barker 

Frank B. Marston 






Teamster . . . . 


28 Vine. 




28 Vine. 












.. 


6 Canal. 


Charles H. Fraser 

Stanley H. Patten 

George E. Boulton 

George F. Miller 


„ 








Driver 


.3.55 Anilierst. 











REPOET OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



439 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 2. 
House on North Main Street, ^6\pio(/. 



So 

r 


Namk. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


76 




Captain 


Fireman 


210 No. Main. 


70 


Charles M. Tewksbury.. 


Lieutenant 


Clerk, B.&M.K.R. 

Foreman, 

U.S.B. &3. Co. 


278 Douglas. 








210 N. Main. 
43 Beauport. 

5r, Douglas. 

.50 Barr. 


119 

70 


Stephen Thomes 

Charles M. Denyou 

Arthur W. Whitcomb ... 


Asst. engineer... 
Driver Engine . . . 
Driv. combin'tion 


Carpenter 

Teamster 


69 












Charles S. Cousins 

Thomas C. Foote 

Joseph H. Alsop 

William Arnold , 




Harness-maker — 

Wool sorter 

Waste sorter 

Barber 


151 Douglas. 
50 No Main. 


74 


,, 


66 

77 


" 


54 Douglas. 
15 So. Main. 




Archie A. Gorham 

J. W Gott 


., 




40 Dubuque. 
53 Douglas. 




,. 


Wool sorter 









440 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 3. 

House on Lake Avenue, corner of Massahesic. 





Name. 


Kank. 


Occupation. 


Kesidenee. 


86 


Frank F. Porter 

Edwin C Paul 


Captain 


Manufacturer 

Collector 

Contractor 


330 E. Spruce. 


97 


Lieut, of engine . . 
Lieut, of truck... 


372 Lake ave. 


84 


TIavvv A Pinpi- 


443 Bridge. 


148 

122 
98 

105 
81 
82 

114 
80 
85 
88 
79 
89 

153 
87 




Clerk 










403 Hall. 


Samuel M. Couch 

Herbert E. Uunbar 

William S. McLeod 

Lyman W. Piper 


Asst. engineer... 
Driver of engine . 
Driver of hose . . . 
Driver of truck... 


Blacksmith. 


447 Spruce. 
310 Central. 


Teamster 




410 Lake ave 




398 Merrimack 


Clarence Hackett 

Tnhii W Finn 




Laundrynian 

Painter 


37'' Lake ave. 




501 Wilson. 




Mechanic 


582 Lake ave. 


Louis N. Dufrain 

Parker K. Brown 

EdsonF. Wyman 


.. 




437 Hall. 


„ 


Grain dealer 

Kestaurant 

Salesman 




" 


368 E. Spruce. 
384 E. Spruce. 


150 Frank S. Shirley 

121 Arthur S. Brown 


.. 


Shoe-cutter 

Grain dealer 

Quarryman 




.. 




., 


477 Belmont. 









REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



441 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 4. 
House, No. 20 Vine Street. 



^!5 


Name. 


Kank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


'?« 


John H. Wales, Jr 

Thomas W. Lane, Jr. ... 

George Thompson 

Joseph H. Gould 

Edward Sargent 

George A. Cann 




Brick mason 

Electrician 

Clerk . 


2 M. S. B. 


33 
23 


Lieutenant 

(jlerk 


1937 Elm. 
85 Salmon 


•M 


Engineer . 

Asst. Engineer . . 
Driver of engine. 
Driver of hose . . . 
Hoseman. 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 


"7 




73 Amlierst. 


31 


Teamster 


''0 Viut? 


?,9 


Charles H. Kogers 

Walter A. Clarkson 

Frank B. Stevens 

Luther A. Knight 

James C. Newton 

Alfred Gustafson 

Fred H. Gate 

Robert Trumbull 


„ 


20 Vine. 


90 


Carpenter 


301 Walnut 


•^5 




Clerk 


144Blodget. 


3?, 


,. 




30 


" 






''6 




20 Malvern. 


W 


., 


Clerk 


413 Merrimack. 


'M 


.. 













442 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGDsE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 5. 
House, Xo. 44 Webster Street. 



Occupation. 



49 


Charles W. Brown 


Captain 


Clerk 


95 Harrison. 


161 


Irving S. Bryant 


Lieut, truck 


Secondhand 


8S4 Union. 


46 


Woodbury Davison 


Lieut, engine.... 


Carpenter 


32M>Ttle. 


108 


Edward L. To wle 


Clerk 


Salesman 


71 N. Adams. 


102 


Walter Morse 


Engineer 


Machinist 


54 Appleton. 


4' 


Daniel W. Morse 


Asst. engineer.. . . 
Driver engine.... 






125 


Emil H. Smith .. 


Teamster 


44 Webster. 


T>4 


Benjamin C. Cann 

Ernest E. Hubbell 


Driver of Truck 




44 Webster 


83 


Driver of Hose... 




44 Webster. 


47 


Russell L. Cilley 


Hoseman 


Clerk 


863 Chestnut. 


99 


WillG. Fraser 


„ 


Electrician 


53 Pennacook. 


158 


Andrew S. Fantom 




Cigar-maker 


676 Maple. 


101 


Charles W. Warner 




Electrician 


75 Sagamore. 


126 


Edwin M. Domey 


" 


Tinsmith 


%'A Walnut. 


41 




„ 


aerk 


72 Appleton. 
10 N. Adams. 


l.'W 


Charles E. Longa 

Charles H Gile 


.. 




1'>3 


„ 


Carpenter 


597 Chestnut 


IfiO 


Maurice Hoffman 




aerk 

Brush-maker 

Steam-fitter 


321 Walnut. 


Ifio 


.. 




95 


(Jeorge H. Chadwick .... 


,. 


41 Blodget. 





REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



443 



ENTtINE and LADDER COMPANY No. «. 
House on Amory and Rimmoii Streets. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 







Captain 

Lieut, engine 




324 Dubuque. 
3S5 Dubuque. 


147 James A. Farley 


Machinist 


142 Frank St. John 


Lieut, truck 


Mill operative .... 


7G Wilton. 


138 


Thomas F. Fitzsimmons. 


Clerk 


Painter 


258 Beauport. 




Charles Edgar 

Alcide Provencher 


Engineer 

Asst. engineer..., 
Driver of engine.. 




Engine-house. 
43 Sullivan 


133 


Alachinist 


134 


Alphonso E. Foster 

Frank W Tebbetts.... 


Teamster.. . 


Engine-house. 
Engine-house. 
Engine-house. 








Henry C. Crosby 

John Martin 






1?9 




Machinist 


143 


Henry Stein 




Blacksmith 


393 Hevey. 
40O Rinimon 


145 


John E. Herring 




Loom-fixer 














JohnH. McCabe 




Clerk 




139 


Gideon Belisle 






146 


Richard F. Galway 


.. 


Cigar-maker 


460 No. Main. 


I.W 


Calvin Brinn 




Loom-fixer 


174Cartier. 


137 


Wm. T. Lockhead 

John Montplaisir 

James Collins 




Molder 








Mill operative 

Fancy dresser 


454 Dubuque. 
MS Rimmon 


135 













444 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOSE COMPANY No. 1. 
House, No. 26 Vine /Street. 






Occupation, 



Residence. 



51 Edwin W. Merrill. . 
Samuel W. Patten 
Albert A. Puffer . . . 
Henry C. Parsons . 

George I. Ayer 

George W. Snaden 
Albert W. Tucker . 

34 Harry Barrett 

52 Charles H. French. 
1 

36 I Alfred Firth 

50 I Charles Skinner ... 
38 Sumner N. Patten . 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman.. 



Clerk 

Belt maker 
Teamster . 

Electrician 
Plumber... 
Collector . 
Machinist . 
Electrician 
Machinist. 
Janitor — 
Belt maker 



370 Manchester. 
3 M. S. B. 
499 Beech. 
2G Vine. 
28 M. S. B. 
25 Nashua 
18 Brown Ave. 
814 Union. 
V Water. 
8 Derry. 
335 E. High. 
3M. S. B. 



HOSE COMPANY No. 2. 

House on Maple Street, corner East High. 



Occupation. 



64 Melvin W Worthen .... 


Captain 

Lieutenant 


Carpenter 


507 Maple. 
337 Lowell. 


55 Kpvilna Hmitrlitnn ... . 


Gas-fltter 


59 


Joseph W. Batchelder... 


Clerk 


Carpenter 


521 Maple. 


57 
60 


Ellsworth V Rowe 


rjrivor 




521 Maple. 
540 Maple. 


Charles W Powell 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


63 
65 
58 
62 
54 
56 
61 


James A. Rogers 








19 Russell 






Carpenter .... 


"4 South 


Julian B. Huntley 

Thomas P. Burnap 

Fred W.Corey 

Fred H. Humphrey 












15 Liberty. 
497 Maple. 
384 E. High. 




Steam-fitter 


., 


Carpenter 









liEPOJiT OF THE FITIE ENGINEER. 



445 



HOSE COMPANY No. 3. 
House, South Elm Street. 



¥ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 






Captain 


Fireman 

Yard conductor.... 
Produce dealer 




157 
151 


Frank D. Hardy 

Elmer R Lainir .... 


Lieutenant 

Clerk 


23 Elm. 

34 Brown ave 




Edgar A. Young 

James H. McKenzie. 
William P. Hall 


23 Elm. 


153 


Hoseman 

Driver 


Sasli-maker 


Elm. 
39 Elm. 






42 Elm. 




CelonD. Stevens 

Fred S Morrill* 




21 Elm. 


149 


Teamster 


53 Beauport. 
''0 Vine 


161 


Albert M. Tuson* 













►Detailed for department spare driver. 



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY No. 1. 
House, 18 Vine Street. 



S^ Name. 


Rank, 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


111 


Roscoe Dyer 


Captain 

Lieutenant 


Mach inist 

Clerk 


8 Oak. 


92 


Oscar P. Stone 


312 Manchester. 


91 


George H. Hammond 

Asa W Gage 




94 




Teamster 


18 Yine 


104 


Harrison H. Cole 

George M. Jones 


Fireman 


Carpenter . . 


883 Union 






23 Myrtle. 


107 




Manufacturer 

Carpenter 

Steam-fitter 

Machinist 


113 


Charles H. Laxon 

Henry Johnson . . . . 







112 




316 Walnut 


90 


Frank A. Pherson 

Benjamin F. Marsh 

John Short 

Frank H. Cole 




18 Vine 


lOfi 








100 




Clerk 

Machinist 

Engineer 




90 




45 M S B 


118 


Hiram Win gate 


33 Spring. 
46 Stark 


93 


Fred W. Bond 




Loom-flxer 













446 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, 8 Vine Street. 



S3 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


llfi 


Clarence D. Palmer 

Hervey E. Harris 

Benjamin R. Richardson 

George H.Porter 

Manley S. Adams 




Marble dealer 


aVine. 


115 






103 






21 Ash. 


117 


Pipeman 


Carpenter 


279 Laurel. 


44 




Lineman 


5 Stark Corp. 









REPORTS 



TEUSTEES OF CEMETERIES AND 
CEMETERY FUNDS. 



REPORTS OF TEE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES 
AND CExMETERY FUNDS. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

To the Trustees of Cemeteries and Board of Mayor and Aldernien: 

Gejn'TLEMEN, — By direction of the sub-trustees of the Pine Grove 
cemetery I submit the following as their report for the year I'JUIJ: 

Superintendent Erskine, who has for several years had charge of the 
grounds, was continued in control by the board of sub-trustees, which 
was organized in February, and the same general plan for the care of 
the grounds was followed as has been the case in recent years. 

Xo new lawn section was prepared during the 3'ear, but an addition 
was made to the field of Manesquo. The single grave section, which 
was prepared in 1902, and which is known as Woodside Lawn, has 
been found to meet a want which has long been felt. As we stated in 
our last report, the price for a single grave in this lot is fixed at $18, of 
which $8 is paid to the trustees of the cemetery fund, thus insuring 
watering and clipping of the grass. Two adults or one adult and two 
children may be interred in any one grave, thus furnishing an oppor- 
tunity for the burial of those who cannot afilord a more expensive lot 
in a place which the city will for all time keep under a reasonable de- 
gree of care. During the year 1903, nine of said graves were sold. 
During the year there were also sold in all, including the single graves, 
SO lots, S on Riverside Lawn, 4 on ChajDel Lawn, 13 on Pine Lawn, all 
under perpetual care, 1 on Acacia Lawn, 37 on the new Hillside Lawn, 
which is under care which insures the clipping of the grass and the 
watering of the lots, and 6 on the Swedish Lawn, while 2 of the few 
remaining ordinary lots were sold. There remain for sale 54 lots under 
perpetual care, 9'3 lots on Hillside Lawn, and 7 on Acacia Lawn. As 
the sub-trustees have reported before, in the future no lots are to be 
sold except under provisions for the cutting and watering of the grass, 
and the wisdom of this plan has been clearly proved during the past 
two years. During the year 21 lots owned by private individuals have 
been graded and put in good condition. About 120 feet of sewer pipe 
were laid, and one new cesspool placed in position. At the expense 
of the owners 480 private lots were cared for, in addition to the 475 
lots which have been sold or placed under perpetual care provisions. 

Once more the sub-trustees of the Pine Grove cemetery have to ex- 
press their indebtedness and thanks to the trustees of the cemetery 
29 

449 



450 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPOKTS. 

fund for an appropriation of $1,000 from that fund with which a sec- 
tion of lots south of Landscape Lawn was graded upon the lawn plan 
and the paths filled, making- a much needed improvement. Also 2.010 
square j-ards of macadam roadway were built, and some 200 feet of 
border east of Hillside Lawn was graded and covered with loam. 

In addition to the ordinary expenses for the care of the grounds 1,000 
slate bounds were set to permanently mark the corners of lots, and 
2,000 bounds were purchased for use in the coming year. 

A new and improved device for lowering a casket into a grave was 
purchased, also a horse lawn mower and an additional horse. 

During the past season a skilled gardner has been emploj-ed to take 
care of the shrubs and flowers, and his work was shown in an improved 
appearance of those adornments of the grounds. The sub-trustees be- 
lieve that such a man is essential, and they have been able with his 
help to raise in hot beds some 5,000 hardy perennials and quite a num- 
ber of shrubs and rose bushes, which will be ready to be planted at the 
opening of the coming spring. If a place were furnished in which the 
flowers and shrubs needed for the grounds could be raised we believe a 
great deal of monej^ could be saved, and we have recommended to the 
cit.y government the appropriation for the coming year of the sum 
of $1,500 with which to build a small greenhouse, in which, under the 
care of a skilled man, siTch work can be done. The board of aldermen 
have adopted the suggestion and recommended the appropriation to the 
common council, and the sub-trustees sincerely hope the latter body 
may find the financial condition of the city such that the appropriation 
can be made. The amount which was paid for flowers and shrubs in 
1903 was $429.75 and was smaller than usual. With a greenhouse we 
think that a great saving can be made, and very many more flowers 
and shrubs iised in the work. This fall there were planted 3,000 tiilips, 
1,000 crocuses, and 150 narcissus plants. 

There were buried during the year 291 bodies, and 19 were removed 
from one grave to another. The number of new monuments erected 
was 45. 

The sub-trustees feel that during the summer of 1903 the general 
appearance of the cemetery was superior to that of any of the preceding 
years, and hope that the opinion of the public coincides with theirs. 

During the j-^ear the legacy of $15,000, which was left by Miss Fannie 
E. A. Riddle to the city, became available and the erection of a chapel 
in accordance with the terms of her wall was entrusted by the board 
of mayor and aldermen to a special committee consisting of His Honor 
the Maj'or and the sub-trustees of the Pine Grove cemetery. 

In our rejiort for 1902, anticipating the bequest, we stated that we 
believed that, considering that the use of such a building for strictly 
chapel purposes is comparatively infrequent, it would be proper and 
fitting to combine with the chapel a superintendent's office, and so 
make a building which would be highly useful as well as ornamental 
as the city would thus save the expense of a new administration build- 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 451 

in^ which must otherwise soon be built, and as this plan would seem- 
ingly carry out the testator's idea in making her gift, for she well knew 
the purposes for which the existing chapel is used and doubtless had in 
mind the erection of a building which would take its place both for 
religious and secular purposes. With the same idea in view, when the 
matter came before the mayor and sub-trustees, it was unanimously 
decided that in the plans for the chapel the provisions of the will should 
be implicitly carried out so far as directions were given therein fof any 
part of the work, and there should be combined therewith such an ar- 
rangement of building as would furnish a convenient waiting room and 
office for the superintendent of the grounds. Nearly a score of leading 
architects of the country were invited to submit plans for a building 
which would combine these requirements, and most of them submitted 
plans. 

The committee finally unanimously selected a plan prepared by the 
firm of McFarland, Colby & McFarland, of Boston, which is in general 
a plan for a chapel of the Norman style of architecture, and combines 
a chapel, a waiting room and a superintendent's office, the two latter 
apartments being entirely separate from the chapel itself, although the 
whole building is so arranged as to present the appearance of a chapel 
and vestry. 

The combination of a chapel with the superintendent's office is in 
accordance with the arrangement of similar buildings in cemeteries in 
many parts of the country, and the sub-trustees believe that in their 
plans they have followed out 'the ideas of Miss Riddle as the same were 
expressed by her many times to those who were in charge of the grounds 
during her lifetime. Bids for the construction of the chapel in ac- 
cordance with the plans have been asked for from a number of build- 
ing firms both local and resident in other states, and the same are to 
be opened the twenty-second of the current month. The site for the 
chapel is on the highest part of Chapel Lawn, which was the place 
which Miss Riddle desired to be selected. The sub-trustees hope that 
the plans as selected will meet with the approval of the community, and 
if the building is erected in accordance therewith a very useful and 
beautiful building will, in our belief, furnish a lasting memorial of the 
thoughtfulness and generosity of Miss Riddle in making her bequest. 

The Merrill yard received the ordinarj^ amount of care during the 
year, but with the limited appropriation made for the purpose the work 
done in that yard is necessarily limited. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

EDWIX F. JONES. 
Clerk of the 8i(h-Trustees. 



452 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Valley Cemetery. 

In behalf of the trustees of Valley cemetery I wish to make the fol- 
lowing report for the year ending December 31, 1903: 

The work of the cemetery has been carried on under the same general 
plan as in former years. 

There have been a number of lots graded the past year and some 
progress made on filling and grading the banks of the valley. 

Two hundred and fifty feet of retaining wall have been built on the 
west line of the cemetery and the committee hope to build a fence on 
the wall the present year and grade and seed the lots on that side of 
the cemetery. 

For care and water for lots $1,269.75 

sundries 249.95 

tomb rent 104.25 

interments 169.00 

removals 37.00 

Paid city treasurer $1,829.95 

Number of interments 62 

of removals IS 

entombed 60 

of loads loam 78 

of loads manure 6 

of feet of turf 800 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. P. CANNON, 

Clerk. 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of Amoskeag cemetery present the following report 
for the year ending December 31, 1903: 

Appropriation for 1903 $250.00 

Labor $149.75 

Water 12.00 

Canvas 8.45 

Team work S.OO 

Hose 5.00 

Posts 3.00 

Oil and lead 5.50 

Flowers 2.80 

Planks 1.45 

Total $195.95 

Balance unexpended 54.05 

$250.00 



REPORT OF THE TETSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 453 

There have been Ifi loads of ashes drawn and all necessary repairs 
made. 

There have been eight burials during the year and one body removed 
from North Andover, Mass., to this yard. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE C. HARWOOD, 

Superintoident. 



TEEASUREK'S EEPOET. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you the annual report of the 
money received during the year ending- December 31, 1903: 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Francis M. Stearns 

Otto Peterson 

John A. Anderson 

Jane R. Fraser 

J. A. Lindquist 

John A. Anderson 

Mary J. Hazen 

Oke E. Jackson 

Gardner K. Browning . 

William Savacool 

Euth A. Nichols 

J. M. P. Bachelder 

Sarah F. Way 

T. Kittredge Hall 

Margertha Lein 

Mary E. Plumpton 

Selma Shellenberg 

Minnie Werner 

August Knehnel 

Mariah L. Moulton 

Joseph 0. Dussault 

George E. Putney 

Mary C. Findlay 

William M. Badger 

Charles F. Shepard 

George H. Maxfield 

O. H. Leavitt 

George William Cheney 

Martha Edgar 

Mary E. Ferren 

Lizzie Scitz 

Addie E. Shaw 



Interest. 


Price of 
Lois. 


Permanent 
Fund. 


Total. 




$36.00 




$36.00 




36.90 




36.90 




21.60 




21.60 




39.60 




39.60 




43.20 




43.20 


$0.15 


21.60 




21.75 




13.50 




13.50 


1.32 


43.50 


$54.37 


99.19 




24.00 


30.00 


54.00 


.59 


22.18 


27.74 


50.51 




20.00 


25.00 


45.00 




60.68 


75.85 , 


136.53 




20.00 


25.00 


45.00 




44.50 


55.63 


100.13 


.48 


20.00 


25.00 


45.48 


.25 


31.86 


39.82 


71.93 




20.00 


25.00 


45.00 




20.00 


25.00 


45.00 




20.00 


25.00 


45.00 


.74 


24.00 


30.00 


54.74 


.75 


20.00 


25.00 


45.75 


.90 


31.74 


39.68 


71.92 




30.39 


37.98 


68.37 


.25 


24.00 


30.00 


54.25 




20.00 


25.00 


45.00 




20.00 


25.00 


45.00 




20.00 


25.00 


45.00 


1.09 


28.23 


35.28 


64.60 


.42 


20.00 


25.00 


45.42 


1.90 


46.80 


.18.50 


107.20 




20.00 


25.00 


45.00 




20.00 


25.00 


45.00 



454 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF 

Earle Payne $0.62 

Alonzo W. Foster 

Samuel J. ]Marsh 

Estate John H. I'roctor 47.7S 

Thomas Carlin 2.25 

Susan A. Wig'gin 7.97 

Frances S. Adams and Leonora 

W. Tuttle 

Mrs. L. A. Hubbard 

Charles S. Davis 

Abram Cass 2.00 

Frank W. Avery 

Albert B. jVicholson 

William H. Pattee 

Amariah Avery 

Orra G. Kilton and Llewellyn T. 

Barnes 1.09 

Charles F. Good and Jerusha 

Dodge 

Almeda M. Simons 

James F. Brown 

James H. Mendall 

H. K. Libbey 

Hattie I. Southwick 

Estate James M. Moore 

Mary L. Varney 

Bjron H. Sf)readbury 

S. E. Tufts 

Arthur E. Tinkham 

George M. Reid 

Ella M. Piper 

Julia A. Cross 

Emma C. Keith 

Mrs. Lizzie Batchelder 

Mrs. John B. Hall 

Elizabeth Ott 

Estate of Marie Holinquist . . . 

W. C. Beddell 

Annie J. Thomas 

Estate Hannah Bradley 

Alfred H. Fisher. 

Henry A. Laxson 

Interest 

Lots 

Permanent fund 

Total receipts 



CEMETERIES. 


455 


.$20.00 


$25.00 


$45.62 


20.00 


25.00 


45.00 


33.60 


42.00 


75.60 


72.00 


198.00 


317.78 


51.93 


142.80 


196.98 


95.94 


287.83 


.391.74 


49.SS 


137.17 


187.05 


26.25 


72.19 


98.44 


31.68 


87.12 


118.80 


32.87 


90.41 


125.28 


33.39 


91.83 


125.22 


32.80 


90.20 


123.00 


54.35 


149.47 


203.82 


36.50 


100.38 


136.88 



345.24 



.99 


47.89 


131.68 


180.56 




32.27 


88.76 


121.03 




89.22 


267.68 


356.90 


1.00 


30.00 


82.50 


113.50 




46.80 


128.70 


175.50 


.49 


28.82 


79.27 


108.58 


1.85 


94.90 


284.70 


381.45 


1.55 


30.27 


83.25 


115.07 




30.74 


84.52 


115.26 




40.20 


110.55 


150.75 


1.00 


2S.82 


79.27 


109.09 




54.36 


149.49 


203.85 


1.50 


29.81 


82.01 


113.32 


1.85 


46.80 


128.70 


177.35 




86.56 


259.67 


346.23 




10.00 


8.00 


18.00 




10.00 


8.00 


18.00 




10.00 


8.00 


18.00 




10.00 


S.OO 


IS.OO 




10.00 


8.00 


18.00 




10.00 


S.OO 


IS.OO 




10.00 


8.00 


18.00 




10.00 


S.OO 


IS.OO 




10.00 


S.OO 


18.00 


$80.38 


$2,368.97 








V 


$4,750.11 


$7,199.46 



456 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

J. H. Erskine, superintendent $4,581.36 

J. H. Erskine, superintendent Merrill .yard 25.50 

$11,806.32 

Ce. 

By amount transferred to cemetery fund: 

perpestual care lots $3,746.26 

Hillside Lawn 931.85 

Woodside Lawn 72.00 

$4,750.11 

Treasurer's receipts $2,449.35 

Superintendent's receipts 4,581.36 

Superintendent's receipts, Merrill yard 25.50 

$11,806.32 

Valley Cemetery. 

To cash received from C. H. G. Foss, superintendent, for care 

of lots $1,829.95 

Ce. 

By superintendent's receipts $1,829.95 

Eespectfully submitted, 

FEED L. ALLEN, 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 



I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of Fred L. Allen, 
treasurer of the trustees of cemeteries, and find the same are correctly 
cast and vouched for. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit to you the twenty-first annual report 
ot the funds received and expenses paid to January 1, 1904: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand January 1, 1903 $65,464.80 

Receipts during the Yeab. 

From John Dowst $126.00 

Cora B. Prescott and Flora A. Cleworth 128.00 

John Moulton , 120.00 

J. A. V. Smith 144.00 

J. A. V. Smith 144.00 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



457 



From R. W. Bean $100.00 

C. C. Clifford, executor of estate Sarah 

W. Dearborn 140.40 

H. P. Simpson, executor estate Michael 

Prout 300.00 

Adam Feller . . . , 100.00 

Sherman E. Burroughs, administrator 
estate Martha J. Emery, balance of 

bequest 52.20 

Mary Anderson 82.60 

Ellen G. Carvelle 144.00 

Lizzie A. Richardson 144.00 

John B. Bailey 144.00 

Frederick G. Stark 107.20 

James Reid 144.00 

Henrietta W. Goodwin, executrix estate 

Daniel P. Home 100.00 

Hannah C. Marshall 140.00 

V. W. Fairbanks 120.00 

To amount transferred from Pine Grove ceme- 
tery, perpetual care lots 3,746.26 

single grave section 72.00 

partial perpetual care, Hillside Lawn 931.85 

Total receipts 

Total amount of fund 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1903 $59,050.00 

bonds bought during year 5,000.00 

cash on hand 8,645.31 

Income Account. 

Income on hand January 1, 1903 $3,129.51 

Interest coupons 2,735.00 

Interest Savings Bank deposit 267.11 

Interest Savings Bank deposit, Hillside Lawn 39.60 

Interest Savings Bank deposit, Woodside Lawn .74 



$7,230.51 
$72,695.31 



$72,695.31 



$6,171.96 



EXPENSES PAID DtJKING THE YEAR. 

George H. Wheeler $11.00 

Gardner Nursery companj' 20.00 

E. H. Clough, postmaster 10.60 

P. J. Flood & Co 9.00 

R. E. Wilson 72.00 



458 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



E. A. Duubar $66.00 

iNianchester Hardware company 69.00 

Manchester Hardware company 28.75 

Brown Bros. & Co 24.45 

American Express Co 1.90 

A. P. Home & Co 60.00 

Nutfield Press • 7.50 

James Thompson 225.00 

James Thompson 106.50 

Edith A. Webster 175.00 

A. K. Hobbs 2.50 

E. L. Day & Co., premium on bonds 116.60 

John H. Erskine, superintendent, care of lots 

Hillside Lawn 46.95 

Charles A. Bailey 409.20 

John H. Erskine, superintendent 1,664.00 

Total expenses $3,125.95 

Cash income on hand 3,046.01 



$6,171.96 



Valley Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund January 1, 1903 

Receipts during the Yeak. 

From M. E. Currier, executor estate S. Jose- 
phine Butterfield $380.00 

Mrs. Louisa P. Boyd 122.40 

Sarah F. Challis 104.80 

William Parker, Jr 122.40 

William Parker, Jr 122.40 

E. D. Abbott 100.00 

Frank E. Putney, executor estate Maria 

A. Putney 200.00 

Armenia Sawyer and Bertha F. Breen.. 141.00 



$24,888.27 



$1,293.00 



Ce. 

By bonds on hand January 1, 1903 $24,500.00 

bonds bought during the year 1,000.00 

cash on hand 681.27 



$26,181.27 



EEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 459 

Income Account. 

Income on hand January 1, 1903 $2,936.42 

Interest coupons 1,092.50 

Interest Savings Bank deposit 99.94 

$4,128.86 

EXPENSES PAID DUKOG THE YEAH. 

R. L. Day & Co., premium on bonds $23.32 

C. H. G. Poss, superintendent, care of lots 509.50 

Cash income on hand 3,596.04 

$4,128.86 

Gale Fund, Valley Cemetery. 

Income on hand January 1, 1903 $143.17 

Interest from savings bank 5.62 

Interest from fund 12.16 

$160.95 

Cb. 

By cash paid C. H. G. Foss, superintendent . . $6.00 

cash on hand 154.95 

$160.95 

Merrill Cemetery. 

Amount of fund January 1, 1903 , $487.89 

Ck. 

By bonds on hand $450.00 

cash on hand 37.89 

$487.89 

Income Account. 

Income on hand January 1, 1903 $186.95 

Interest from savings bank 6.22 

Interest coupons 22.50 

$215.67 

Cr. 

By cash on hand $215.67 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED L. ALLEN, 
Treasurer of Trustees of Cemetery Fund. 



460 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts of Fred 
L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the cemetery funds, embracing the 
receipts and expenditures for the year 1903. and I find the same correct 
and properly vouched. I have also examined the securities in which 
said fund is invested and find as folloAvs: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

20 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 1, 

2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 13, 16, 17, 18, 22, 23, 
24, 26, 28, due in 1942; denominations $1,000 

each $20,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 1, 

3, due in 1942; denominations $500 each 1,000.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond. No. 3 50.00 

14 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 

2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17. due 

1913; denomination, $1,000 each 14,000.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond, No. 2, 

due 1913 500.00 

5 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 1, 

2, 3, 9, 10, due 1913; denomination $100 each 500.00 
11 city of Manchester Sy, per cent bonds, due 

1919; denominations $1,000 each 11,000.00 

6 city of Manchester 4 per cent bonds, due 1909 6,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 4 per cent bonds, due 1916 2,000.00 

4 citj- of Manchester 3V2 per cent bonds, due 

1922 4,000.00 

5 city of Manchester 314 per cent bonds, due 

1919 5,000.00 

$64,050.00 

Cash on deposit in Manchester Savings bank. 

Book No. 50420 $3,419.65 

Cash on deposit in Mechanics Saving bank. 

Book No. 3413 6,041.81 

Cash on deposit in Mechanics Saving bank, 

Book No. 4407 2,141.12 

Cash on deposit in Mechanics Saving bank. 

Book No. 4522 88.74 

$11,691.32 

Total amount permanent fund and income, Decem- 
ber 31, 1903 $75,741.32 

Valley Cemeteey. 

4 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, No. 1, 

6, 11, 18, due 1913; denomination $1,000 each $4,000.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond. No. 1, 

due 1913; denomination $500 each 500.00 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 461 

3 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 6, 
7, 8, due 1913; denomination $100 each $:;0().00 

8 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 4, 
7, 12, 19, 20, 21, 25, 27, due 1942; denomina- 
tion $1,000 each : 8,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos, 2, 

4, due 1942; denomination $50 each 100.00 

3 city of Manchester 4 per cent bonds, due 191G 3,000.00 
3 city of Manchester 31/3 per cent bonds, Xos. 

81, 93, 100, due 1919; denomination $1,000 

each 3,000.00 

6 city of Manchester 3i/a per cent bonds, due 

1922 0,000.00 

6 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 3, 

4, 5, 6, 7, 8, due 1942; denomination $100 each $000.00 

$25,500.00 

Cash on deposit in Guaranty Savings bank. 

Book No. 4257 ^. $2,074.70 

Cash on deposit in Amoskeag- Savings bank, 

Book No. 68808 2,202.61 

$4,277.31 

Total permanent fund and income, December 31, 1903 $29,777.31 
Merrill Cemetery. 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Xos. 4, 

5, due 1913; denomination $100 each $200.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 1, 

2, due 1942; denomination $100 each 200.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond, No. 1, 

due 1942; denomination $50 50.00 

Cash on deposit in Guaranty Savings bank, 

Book No. 5116 64.04 

Cash on deposit in Amoskeag Savings banlv. 

Book No. 69517 189.52 

Total amount of fund and income December 31, 1903 $703.56 

Gale Fund. 

Cash on hand in Amoskeag bank. Book No. 3410S . $154.95 

Total amount of permanent fund and income on 

hand $106,377.14 

JAMES E. DODGE. 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TEUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING 
FUND. 



Manciiestkr, N. H. 
To Ihe City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

■Gentlemen, — As required by chapter ^7, section 2, of the city ordi- 
nances -of Manchester, the trustees of the sinking fund of the city of 
Manchester herewith report the condition of the several funds January 
1, 1904, with receipts and payments for the year ending December 31, 
]90ri. 

H. P. SIMPvSON, 
CHARLES H. MANNING, 
FRED L. ALLEN, 
Trnsfecs of the ^'^inlciini Fund. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you my report as treasurer of 
the sinking fund for the year ending December ?,1, 1903: 

improvement loan. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January, 1903, for the 

payment of improvement bonds .$164,(360.80 

Appropriation for 1903 20,000.00 

Income from interest on bonds .5,78.5.00 

Income from savings bank deposit.^ 112.98 

.$190,564.78 

Cr. 

Accrued interest and premium ]5aid for bonds 

bought during the year .$778.33 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1903 174,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1903 15,786.45 

.$190,564.78 

water loan. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1903, for the 

payment of water bonds $118,873.78 

Water works, hydrant service, 1903 19,200.00 

30 

466 



466 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Water works, appropriation, 190;j $5,000.00 

Income from interest on bonds 4,180.00 

Income from savings bank deposits oS.TO 

$147,292.48 

Cr. 

Premium and accrued interest jjaid for bonds 

bought during the year $647.03 

Bonds on hand December 31. 1903 133,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1903 13.64.5.45 

$147,292.48 

school loan. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1903 $12,291.83 

Income from interest on bonds 470.00 

Income from savings bank deposit 14.29 

Appropriation, 1903 .• . 2,000.00 

' $14,776.12 

Cr. 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1903 $12,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1903 2,776.12 

$14,776.12 

city funding loan. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January, 1903 $15,104.33 

Appropriation, 1903 5,000.00 

Income from interest on bonds 445.00 

$20,549.33 

Cr. 

I'remium and accrued interest paid for bonds 

bought during tlie year $380.37 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1903 14,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1903 6,168.96 

$20,549.33 

MUNICIPAL LOAN. 

For the payment of bonds maturing July 1, 1922. 
To appropriation $4,000.00 

Ck. 

By cash on hand December 31, 1903 $4,000.00 

Kespectfully submitted, 

FRED L. ALLEN, 
Treasurer of HUikUKj Fund. 



REPORT OF THE TUITSTEES OF SINKING FUND. 467 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts of Fred 
L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the sinking fund, embracing the 
receipts and expenditures for the year ending December 31, 1903, and 
find the same correct and properly vouched. I have also examined the 
securities in which fund is invested and tind as follows: 

Bonds of the city of Manchester for the payment of im- 
provement bonds: 

4 per cent, due 1907 $9,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1908 10,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1909 11,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1910 10,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1913 15,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 6,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1915 27,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1917 16,000.00 

31/2 per cent, due 1919 34,000.00 

31/2 per cent, due 1922 36,000.00 

Cash ou hand December 31, 1903 15,786.45 

$189,786.45 

Bonds of the city of Manchester for the payment of wa- 
ter bonds: 

4 per cent, due 1907 $6,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1909 12,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1910 6,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1913 1,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 18,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1915 17,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1916 11,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1917 22,000.00 

31/2 per cent, due 1919 23,000.00 

31/3 per cent, due 1922 17,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1903 13,645.45 

$146,645.45 

Bonds of the city of Manchester for the payment of 

school bonds: 

4 per cent, due 1909 $3,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1910 2,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 2,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1915 2,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1916 1,000.00 

31/3 per cent, due 1919 " 2,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1903 2,776.12 

$14,776.12 

For the payment of city funding bonds: 

31/0 per cent, city of Manchester bonds, due 

1922 $14,000.00 

Cash on hand 6,168.96 

$20,168.96 



468 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

For the payment of Municipal Loan bonds, maturing 
July 1, 1922: 
Cash on hand $4,000.00 



$375,376.98 

Total amount of bonds in sinking fund $333,000.00 

Total amount of cash in sinking fund 42,376.98 

$37r),376.98 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the City Councils: 

I present herewith my rei^ort as solicitor for the year 190.3: 

Since my last report several new cases have been brong'ht ag-ainst 
the city, thono-h none of them is of great magnitude. 

The case of Stone v. Manchester was settled out of court for a nomi- 
nal sum. The case of Clair v. Manchester was decided against the city 
by the supreme court, before whom the agreed facts were submitted. 

Skinner V. Manchester upon facts agreed was decided adversely to 
the city. The case of McLaughlin v. City was settled out of court, aKS 
were several other minor claims after the decision in Clair v. !Man- 
chester. 

Ray Brook Garden Company v. Manchester, after a lengthy jur.y trial, 
was decided against the defendant and stej)s have been taken to trans- 
fer the case to the supreme court upon questions of law. 

Connor v. Manchester and Wiggin v. Manchester are now before the 
supreme court upon law questions. 

Various other claims growing out of alleged defective highways and 
for damages caused by change of grade are pending. 

The suit brought by the Amory Manufacturing, Companj^ r. Man- 
chester for an abatement of plaintiff's tax has been withdrawn by 
plaintiff. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. WAGNER, 

City Hollcitor. 
Febbuary G, 1904. 



471 



REPOET OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Hie Board of Aldermen: 

T respectfully submit the following report as to duties performed by 
me as physician for the city of Manchester for the year of 1903: 

As according to my record: 

Calls for ordinary diseases 500 

Number inspected for smallpox 150 

Cases of smallpox discovered 51 

Visits to smallpox patients 357 

Accidents '. 15 

Calls at police station 100 

Cases minor surgery 25 

Cases major surgery 4 

Oflfice treatments 95 

Calls at city farm 20 

Visits to diphtheria patients 120 

Administered antitoxin times 31 

Consultation for insane persons 4 

Obstetric cases .-. 4 

Total calls 1,476 

There were also numerous calls answered by me to persons who 
thought the city physician was at anyone's service. 

Yours respectfully, 

JOHN H. DeCROSS. 



475 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 



EEPOET OF THE INSPECTOR OF BUILDIISGS. 



Office of the Inspector of Buildings. 

Manchestek, N. H., December 31, 1903. 

To Ilis Honor the Mayor ami the Board of Aldermen: 

The fifth annual reiiort of the inspector of buildings is herewith sub- 
mitted: 

The number of permits issued for new buildings during the year 1903 
was 118, the estimated cost of which was $343,855. 

The number of permits issued during the year for alterations and 
repairs was 155, the estimated cost of which was $205,(345. 
Number of permits refused during the year was two. 
Number of buildings condemned for use during the year, four, thi'ee 
of which have been taken down. 

Respectfully submitted. 

EDWIN S. FOSTER. 
• Inspector of BuildiiKjs. 



479 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



MANCHESTER CITY LIBRARY, 1903, 



Trustees. 



Eugene E. Eeed, Mayor, ex offtcio. 

C. Edwin Chase, Presidoit of the Vomnwn Council, ex offtcio. 
Henry W. Boutwell. Herman F. Straw. 

Koger G. Sullivan. Nathan P. Hunt. 

Walter M. Parker. Frank P. Carpenter. 

William P. Farmer. 

Officers. 

PRESIDENT, ex offlCiO. 

Eugene E. Reed. 

CLERK AND TREASUREB. 

Nathan P. Hunt. 



Librarian. 

F. Mabel Winchell. 
Assistants. 



Louise E. Newell, classifier. 
Charles S. Morgan. 
Thomas F. Nolan. 
Thomas P. Ayer. 
Charles H. Jack. 



Edith Oakes Simmons, cataloguer. 
Albro P. Eeed. 
Harry C. Rogers. 
Harry G. Williams. 
Edward H. Fletcher. 



482 



EEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY 
LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

The Trustees of the City Library respectfully submit their fiftieth 
annual report of the affairs of the library, and with the same the report 
made to them by the treasurer of the board, containing an account of 
the amounts received and the expenditures made by him in behalf of 
the board from the funds in their possession and under their control. 

From the treasurer's report it appears that during the year the sum 
of one thousand four hundred and sixteen dollars and sixty-six cents 
has been expended for the purchase of books, and the sum of one hun- 
dred and ninety-five dollars for the purchase of periodicals, making 
a total expenditure for both these purposes of one thousand six hun- 
dred and eleven dollars and sixty-six cents. 

Of the amount expended for the purchase of books the sum of one 
hundred and fifty-two dollars and forty-seven cents was used for the 
purchase of books to replace those worn out and 'heretofore withdrawn 
from circulation, and the sum of two hundred and ninety dollars and 
sixty-five cents was taken from the income of the Dean fund and used 
for the purchase of books for that department of the library. Exclu- 
sive of these two amounts, the sum expended for the purchase of new 
books, was nine hundred and seventy-three dollars and fifty-four cents, 
leaving- a balance in the hands of the treasurer at the end of the year, 
of the amounts appropriated by the city councils for the purchase of 
books, of nine hundred and eighteen dollars and fifty-nine cents. 

The balances of the accumulated income of the several funds under 
the control of the trustees at the close of the year were as follows: 

Dean fund $8,331.08 

Mary E. Elliot fund 1,750.10 

Eliza A. Eaton fund 893.55 

During the year eighty-five volumes were purchased from the Dean 
fund at a cost, as above stated, of two hundred and ninety dollars and 
sixty-five cents. No purchases have been made from the Mary E. Elliot 
fund as the trustees have been unable to secure from the city councils 
fimds sufficient to meet the expense for the proper shelving and care 
of books pertaining to medicine apart from the books intended for 
general circulation. 

483 



484 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the jjast year have been 
five thousand three hundred and ten dollars and eleven cents. The 
amount appropriated by the city councils for the incidental expenses 
of the library, not including" the one thousand dollars for books, was 
four thousand eight hundred and two dollars, showing an excess of 
expenditure over the amount apjaropriated for the year, notwithstand- 
ing great economy was used and many things greatly needed dispensed 
with, of five hundred and eight dollars and eleven cents. 

The items of these expenditures, the bills for which have been paid 
by the city treasurer, upon approval by the trustees, from the sum ap- 
propriated by the city" councils, may be found in detail in the annual 
report of the city. 

During the past year the library has been open for the delivery of 
books three hundred and five days, two days less than the year pre- 
vious, during which time seventy-four thousand three hundred and 
seventy-seven books were delivered for home use, an average of about 
two hundred and forty-five per day. In addition to the above number 
delivered for general circulation, thirty thousand and six hundred and 
sixty-four books were delivered for iise in the reading room at the 
library, being an average of about one hundred per day. The total 
number of books delivered for general circulation and for use in the 
reading room was one hundred and five thousand and forty-one, an 
average of about three hundred and forty-four per day. 

As compared with the j^ear preceding the circulation for home use 
shows a decrease of tw-o thousand three hundred and thirty-eight, 
while the number delivered for use in the reading room shows an in- 
crease of nine hundred and ninety-seven. The total circulation was 
one thousand and three hundred and forty-one less than that of the 
previous 3'ear. The above figures do not include books delivered for use 
at the library on Sundays. 

The reading room at the library has been open each Sunday during 
the year from eleven o'clock in the forenoon to five o'clock in the after- 
noon, at an expense, excluding lighting and heating, of two hundred 
and forty-six dollars and sixt3' cents. 

The total attendance during the year was two thousand and seven 
hundred and seventy, of which number six hundred and twenty-one 
were men, one hundred and ninety-three were women, and one thou- 
sand nine hundred and fifty-six were children. The average attendance 
per Sunday was about twelve for men, about four for women, and for 
children about thirty-seven. The total average attendance was about 
fifty-three per Sunday. 

The total number of volumes delivered for use at the reading room 
during the fifty-two Sundays was four thousand three hundred and 
sixtj'-six. 

As compared with the preceding year the attendance shows an in- 
crease of six hundred and forty-seven, of which one hundred and 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY J.IBRARY. 485 

seventy-two was from men, seventy-eight from women, and three hun- 
dred and ninety-seven from children. The number of books used at the 
lilirarv on Sundays shows an increase of four hundred and thirty-four 
over the inimiber reported for the year previous. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the last report, 
including- maps and pamphlets, was forty-eight thousand eight hundred. 
There have been added during the year by purchase, six hundred and 
sixt.y-seven volumes, five hundred and sixty-six volumes by donation 
and one hundred and nineteen volumes of periodicals have been bound, 
a total of one thousand three 'hundred and fifty-two volumes, making 
the number of bound volumes in the library at the close of the year 
forty-nine thousand four hundred and thirty-four, and the total num- 
ber, including sixteen maps and seven hundred and two pamphlets, 
fifty thousand one hundred and fifty-two. 

The number of periodicals regularly received at the library during 
the past year was one hundred and twenty-five, seventy-four by pur- 
chase and fifty-one by gift, and on the completion of the several vol- 
umes they have been bound and placed on the shelves of the library 
for general circulation. 

Two hundred and fifty-three volumes were withdra^wn from circula- 
tion during the year, having become so defaced and worn as to be un- 
fit for further use. Of these and of others retired from circulation in 
previous years for the same reasons, one hundred and seventy have been 
replaced at a cost, as previously stated, of one hundred and fifty-two 
dollars and forty-seven cents. 

The trustees deem it proper to again call to the attention of the city 
coimcils this continued and increasing expense yearly incurred for 
the purchase of books to replace those worn out and withdrawn from 
circulation. As stated in our last report about one hundred dollars 
has been expended on the average each year for the past ten years for 
this purpose. 

The annual appropriation for books and periodicals is onlj' one 
thousand dollars. Of this sum about two hundred dollars is paid for 
periodicals. If, in addition to this, the trustees are compelled to pay 
out each year at least one hundred dollars for the purpose of replacing 
worn out books, on\j seven hundred dollars would be left in their hands 
to be applied to the purchase of new books for the library. The trus- 
tees earnestly hope that the city councils will give the subject careful 
attention and make an addition to the usual appropriation for books, 
which can be used by the trustees to replace more rapidlj' such worn 
out books as are most frequently called for by the patrons of the 
library. 

At a meeting of the trustees held at the beginning of the year the 
matter of securing an appropriation from the city councils for the pur- 
pose of aiding in establishing a children's reading room at the library 



486 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

was referred to a committee of the board, consisting of the chairman 
and clerk -with instructions to asli the city councils for the sum re- 
quired for the purpose. This committee presented the subject to the 
proper committee of the city councils, but no appropriation was made. 

As stated in the last report the trustees intended to have printed 
during the year one or more subject titles from the card catalogue, 
but owing to delay in arranging the material for publication the trus- 
tees, much to their regret, were not able to carry out their purpose. 
It is hoped that this catalogue may be printed in the near future. 

Annexed to this report is a list of the names of those persons who 
have made donations of books or periodicals to the library during the 
year, with the number presented by each. The trustees have caused 
due acknowledgment to be made in behalf of the city to all who have 
so generously contributed to the increase and usefulness of the library. 

The librarian, Miss F. Mabel Winchell, has continued in her position 
during the year and has manifested an earnest effort to increase the 
circulation of the library and add to its usefulness to the public. 

The trustees again desire to return their acknowledgments to the 
members of the city councils for the courtesy and consideration with 
which their suggestions have been received. 

Ma^ch 4, 1904. 

In board of trustees read and approved, and ordered to be signed by 
the chairman and clerk of the board, and transmitted to the city coun- 
cils. 

EUGENE E. REED, 

Mayor. 
X. P. Hunt, 

Clerk. 



TEEASUEER'S EEPOET. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library: 

The treasurer of the board submits the following account of the re- 
ceipts and expenditures by the board of the funds received on account 
of the library: 

r903. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropriation $971.22 

Mar. 27. appropriation for books for 1903 1,000.00 

Dec. 15. F. Mabel Winchell, balance of 

fines, etc 238.58 

F. Mabel Winchell, for cata- 
logues sold 7.10 

F. Mabel Winchell, for books 

lost 22.70 

$2,239.60 

Jan. 1. To balance of income of Dean fund $8,244.46 

July 1. income of Dean fund 91.00 

interest on accumulation of in- 
come 102.84 

interest on accumulation of in- 
come 137.62 

Oct. 1. income of Dean fund 37.80 

interest on accumulation of in- 
come 8.01 

$8,621.73 

Jan. 1. To Mary E. Elliot fund $2,000.00 

balance of interest 1,682.57 

Oct. 1. interest to October 1, 1903 .... 36.00 
interest on accumulation of in- 
come 31.53 

$3,750.10 

Jan 1. To Eliza A. Eaton fund $3,000.00 

balance of interest 823.44 

Oct. 1. interest to October 1, 1903 54.00 

interest on accumulation of in- 
come 16.11 

$3,893.55 

$18,504.98 

487 



488 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1903. Cb. 
Jan, 6. Paid Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, books $3.25 

H. W. Wilson, books 3.00 

8. Houghton, Mifflin & Co. (Dean 

fund), books 50.00 

15. G. W. Browne, books 12.00 

19. Buffalo public library, books .31 
Evanston public library, books .10 
Little Brown & Co., books.. 6.00 

20. W. H. Guild & Co., periodicals 1.25 

22. Little Brown & Co., books 3.50 

Lawyers Co-operative Publish- 
ing Co., books 5.00 

28. Little, Brown & Co., books... 2.00 
Feb. 5. Boston Society Natural His- 
tory, books 12.00 

12. W. B. Clarke Co., books 187.35 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund). 

books 2.85 

W. B. Clarke Co., replaced 

books 94.48 

Boston Book Co., periodicals.. 5.00 

Mar. 14. W. B. Clarke Co., books.... 82.28 
W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books 18.80 

W. B. Clarke Co. replaced 

books 6.76 

27. A. S. Clark, books 3.07 

28. Cumulative Index Co., books 5.00 
April 1. Essex Publishing Co., books.. 5.00 

11. W. B. Clarke Co., books 21.00 

16. Geo E. Littlefield, books 7.43 

23. Little, Brown & Co., books.. 5.00 
May 9. W. B. Clarke Co., books 103.66 

W. B. Clarke Co, replaced 

books 11.22 

Little, Brown & Co., books 2.00 

June 6. Publishers Weekly, books 3.75 

8. W. B. Clarke Co., books .... 91.72 
W. B. Clarke Co., replaced 

books 25.36 

20. Temple & Farrington Co., 

books .50 

22. Granite Monthly Co., books... 5.00 

Publishers Weekly, books 4.50 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 489 

Cr. 

July 11. Paid Little, Brown & Co., books.. $1.50 

W. B. Clarke Co.. books ll.-).2S 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund). 

books 2()M() 

W. B. Clarke Co.. replaced 

books S.S,"> 

Aug. 12. W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund). 

books 141.55 

14. W. B. Clarke Co., books ^ 13.67 

26. Little, Brown & Co., books. .. * 2.00 

27. American School of Corre- 

spondence (Dean fund), 

books 32.50 

Sept. 15. W. B. Clarke Co., books 85.46 

W. B. Clarke Co., replaced 

books 1.25 

Oct. ?,. Concord History Commission, 

books 5.00 

13. Little, Brown & Co., books... 2.50 

W. B. Clarke Co., books 9.90 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books 15.03 

Nov. 6. Little, Brown & Co., books... 1.50 
Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, books 3.25 

24. Chas. P. Hubbard, books 1.60 

25. W. B. Clarke Co., books .... 126.48 
Dec. 9. Little, Brown & Co.. books . . 1.50 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund), 

books 9.02 

16. W. B. Clarke Co., books.... 29.48 

W. B. Clarke Co., books 4.55 

W. H. Moore, periodicals .... 188.75 

$1,611.66 



Dec. 31. By balance of appropriation 918.59 

balance of Dean fund income 8,331.08 

balance of Elliot fund and interest 3,750.10 

balance of Eaton fund and interest 3,893.55 



$18,504.98 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the library for the 
year ending December 31, 1903, the bills for which have been paid 
through the office of the city treasurer upon approval by the commit- 
tee on accounts of the board of trustees, the detailed items of which 
will be found in the annual report of the city, have been as follows: 



490 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Services of librarian $1,000.00 

Services of assistants to librarian 1,044.58 

Reclassification and catalo^ning SS4.0S 

Fuel 601.43 

Electricity 52S.60 

Gas 4.53 

Bindino- 270.73 

Eebinding- 242.23 

Insurance 125.00 

Supplies ^ 234.03 

Water 13.i)2 

Cleaning- 87.92 

Printing trustees' report 15.00 

Sunday opening of library 24(5.(30 

Incidentals 11.7(i 



^5,310.11 



EECAPITULATIOX. 

Balance December 31, 1903 $2,717.08 

Balance of appropriation for Sunday opening 60.50 

$2,777.58 

Appropriation for 1903 5.S02.00 



Paid trustees for purchase of books $1,000.00 

Paid incidental expenses 5,310.11 

Balance of appropriation 2,2(39.47 



5,579.58 



$8,579.58 



Respectfully submitted, 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 

Decembee 31, 1903. 
We have examined the foregoing report and find the same correctly 
cast and properly vouched. 

EUGENE E. REED, Mayor, 
WALTER M. PARKER, 
(U/inmittee on Arvouiits of City Liliniry. 

Decembek 31, 1903. 
I certify that [ have examined the several items of receipts and ex- 
penditures embraced in the foregoing report of the treasurer of the 
trustees of the city library, and find the same correctly cast and prop- 
erly vouched. 

JAMES E. DODGE. 

City Auditor. 



LIBEARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the City Library, Manchester, N. H.: 

GejVTLEMEN, — The fiftiefh annual report of the city library is herewith 
presented. 

Half a century in the service of the people is a record of which to be 
proud. Such is the history of the city library. Started in 1854 by the 
gift to the city of the library of the Manchester Athenaeum, it has 
grown in size and usefulness through the years. 

It now contains many valuable books and pamphlets some of which 
could not be replaced if lost by fire. It would, therefore, seem a safe 
precaution in view of the nearness of the library to other buildings, 
to have a vault, in which to keep some of the rarest of its treasures. 

CIRCULATION. 

The circulation for home use, while over two thousand more than in 
1901, is over two thousand less than for 1902. This means an average 
issue of eight volumes less per day than during the previous year. 
It is to be expected that the circulation of a library in a growing city 
should increase year by year. Failing to do this it is natural to look 
for a cause. During the j^ear the Tabard Inn, which formerly had ad- 
mitted no members for less than three dollars, made possible a mem- 
bership at $1.50. Many availed themselves of this lower rate and were 
doubtless able to procure the late books with less delay than at the 
library. This may have been one cause; another may have been the 
lack of a bulletin. As was stated in the last report, the bulletin which 
the library had issued for some time ceased publication during the 
latter part of 1902. Since then we have had no way of notifying our 
patrons of the books added to the library, excepting through the daily 
papers. We are very grateful to the papers for this assistance and real- 
ize that it has been a great help to us, but it comes far short of sup- 
plying our need. In order to do efficient work we should have a bul- 
letin which we can place in the hands of our borrowers, one convenient 
in size, attractive in appearance, suitable to take to the homes and 
keep on file. 

READING ROOM. 

The use of the reading room has continued to increase, the circula- 
tion for 1903 being about one thousand larger than for 1902. This in- 

491 



492 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

crease is largely, if not wholly, due to the growing numbers of children 
who freqnent the library. It has been no unusual thing to have thirty. 
forty, or fifty children in the reading room at a time. This emphasizes 
again the insistent need of a room and an attendant for the children. 
This is desirable as well for the grown people as for the children. At 
present the reading room is often turned into a children's room by 
sheer force of numbers. We want the children to come; it is right that 
ihey should come, but the grown people also have rights which should 
be considered. When the room is filled with children, what with the 
coming and going, the passing to and from the desk with books, and 
the turning of leaves, to say nothing of the condition of air at such 
times, it is next to impossible that any one should carry on any seri- 
ous study or any very thoughtful reading. It would seem that some 
provision for the adults should be made imtil a separate room for the 
children becomes possible. Even an attendant for the reading room 
would ameliorate matters greatly. We have said it is right that the 
children should come, but having come, do we not owe them guid- 
ance in their reading and training in the use of books? It is impos- 
sible with the number of assistants now employed to give them the 
attention which they need. The busy attendant at the desk is obliged 
to wait on all with as much despatch as possible that none may be 
obliged to wait longer than necessary. It is impossible in a large 
majority of cases for the attendant who gives a book to a child to see 
that the child handles it properly. The book is taken very likely 
to the farther part of the reading room, the assistant must immedi- 
ately give his attention to the next comer. What seems to be needed 
is someone to be in the reading room all the time out of school hours, 
to become acquainted with the children, to studj^ their tastes and their 
habits, to try to teach them to care for and respect books, and to help 
them in their selection of reading. Such a person could prevent much 
of the careless handling which wears books out so fast, and of the 
mutilation of books, several instances of which have occurred during 
the year. She could also "nip in the bud" any disturbances which 
might arise, and consequently secure a greater degree of quiet than is 
now possible with the supervision from behind the desk, ^he could 
also be very helpful to the adults who need explanation and direction 
in the use of the catalogues. I believe the right person in this place 
would fully double the usefulness of the reading room and I respect- 
fully urge earnest consideration of this matter. 

Several changes have been made in the arrangement of the reading 
room which it is thought are in the line of improvement. In March 
the card catalogue was moved from the central part of the room to the 
western end, thus obtaining the light from the western windows and 
requiring far less artificial light, for even on dark days such as re- 
quired the use of electricity all day in its former place, the cards can 
be comfortably read by the light from the windows. This change of 
position also served to break up a corner where boys and girls liked 



EEPOKT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY EIBKAIIY. 493 

to congregate, being somewhat hidden by the catalogue case. About 
this time the reading room tables were rearranged. One was placed in 
the center of the room where the statue of Lincoln stood previous to 
its removal last year. This made the southern part of the reading 
room less crowded and increased the seating capacity. 

It was in this month also that a few more open shelves were added, 
and on March 27 a bulletin board was put up. On this board have been 
noted great events of history, birthdays of distinguished people, lists 
of books on different topics, and various other matters of interest. 

REGISTRATION. 

The number of borrowers registered during the year was 532. We 
have no way of telling how many persons are now using the library. 
In order to do this a new registration every few years would be nec- 
essary. This is now customary in cities as the changing population 
makes it impossible otherwise, to keep the list from carrying a great 
mass of dead names. In order that our list may be freed from such 
names, and that we may be able to know how many persons are using 
the library, I would respectfully urge that a new registration be begun 
soon. 

CATALOGUING, ETC. 

In addition to the cataloguing of the new books as they have been 
added to the libi'ary, the class of English and American literary history 
has been analyzed. This analytical work is slow and requires much 
time and labor but it is well worth the cost, for it makes the books 
many times more useful and in the end saves much time. It is 
hoped that in the coming year we may be able to do much more of this 
valuable work. 

On the first of October the analytical work was stopped to begin 
on the preparation of a finding list of the classes History and Geogra- 
phy and travel. The copying of the class History, requiring more than 
six thousand cards, is already done. The rest awaits completion in 
the coming year. 

The catalogue cards from the Library of Congress continue to be 
very satisfactory. 

WORN-OUT BOOKS. 

The half-century mark in the library's history naturally suggests 
a look backward. It appears from the records that at the date of trans- 
fer from the Manchester Athenaium the library contained 2,953 vol- 
umes. During the fifty years since then there have been added 47,199 
volumes, an average of 94-4 volumes per year. This does not include the 
purchase of such books as have been gotten from time to time to 
replace those which have worn out. As a library grows in years and 
in volumes the number of books which need to be discarded as unfit 
for further service increases. This larger outgo bespeaks an increased 
income, that the library may not deteriorate. Without it it is inevita- 



494 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ble that the librarj- mvist siiffei', either in the purchase of new books 
or in the renewal of those which have become unfit for use. 

IXVEXTORT. 

Last j'ear we reported forty volumes missing-. Nine of these, or 
about one quarter of the number, have been found and one has been 
replaced by gift. Of those still unaccounted for five are fiction and 
twenty-six non-fiction, fourteen juvenile and seventeen not juvenile. 

The inventory this year shows sixtj^-nine volumes missing, forty-four 
of which are fiction and twenty-five non-fiction. The majority of these 
books are such as have been placed on the open shelves and probably 
have been taken from there, some by mistake without charging, others 
by intent. Those taken by mistake will doubtless be returned in 
course of time, and some of the others may be returned. It is a mat- 
ter of much regret that any books should disappear in this manner, 
but it is nothing ijeculiar to this library. Nor is the number of volumes 
large compared with the losses of other libraries. It is probable that 
less volumes would be found wanting each year were all the books 
kept strictly out of reach of the public except as called for individually. 
Nevertheless, history shows that even with this method some volumes 
will be missing, and it is true beyond a doubt that many books would 
lose in this way a large share of their usefulness. The reading room 
attendant recommended in the earlier part of this report would doubt- 
less help much towards regulating this matter. 

EXHIBITIONS. 

The picture exhibitions begun last year have been continued this 
year with greater frequency. Twelve different loan collections have 
been exhibited as follows: Five cent Perry pictures; photographs of 
India; photographs of Eome; colored pictures of local birds; photo- 
graphs illustrating English, French, Dutch, and Italian schools of art; 
colored pictures of flowers, minerals, etc.; specimen work from the 
public kindergarten; colored jjictures of fishes; colored pictures of un- 
familiar birds; water color jjaintings by local artists; drawings bj' high 
school jjupils; and photographs of madonnas, nativities, and the holy 
family. Some of these exhibitions have attracted a goodly number of 
people to the library, and many expressions of appreciation and enjoy- 
ment have been heard. 

The Historic Art club of the city has kindly offered the library the 
use of its fine collection of photographs and several individuals becom- 
ing interested have lonned pictures from their private collections. 



There has been a slight increase in the number of books issued to 
teachers for school use during the year, but the most encouraging fea- 
ture of the work with the schools has been the desire expressed by 
the principals and one or two teachers of two of the schools to bring 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 495 

their scholars into closer acquaintance with the library. With this end 
in view your librarian was asked to address the pupils of these schools. 
The first talk was given in October to the eighth and ninth grades of 
the Hallsville school, and was principally on the use of the library. 
In Xovember the eight and ninth grades of the Ash-street school were 
spoken to on the same subject, and a few weeks later the sixth and 
seventh grades were given a talk on books. The effect of these talks 
was seen almost immediately in the increased use of the library bj' 
the pupils of these schools. The books mentioned in the talks were 
called for and the good which might be done by a children's librarian 
who should guide the children in their reading was demonstrated in 
a small way. 

SUNDAY OPENING. 

There has been an increase in the use of the library on Sundays. 
In 1902 there were 2,123 persons used it, while in 1903 there were 2,770, 
an increase of 647. By far the larger part of this increase came in the 
hours from eleven to one, the visitors for that period having more th^n 
doubled during the year. The average attendance per Sunday, ex- 
clusive of the summer months, was 64, but for June, July, and August 
it was only 20. This would seem to raise the question as to whether it 
were worth while to keep the library open during the warm months, 
and how many visitors would make it worth while. 

REQUEST SYSTEiM. 

The request system, inaugurated last year, still continues in favor 
with the public, if one may judge by the number who make use of it. 
One thousand one hundred and seventy-three paid requests were left 
this year and certainly as man^^ more unpaid ones, of which no record 
is kept. 

The use of the study pockets has grown steadily from the first and 
many expressions of appreciation of this privilege have been heard 
from the borrowers. 

GIFTS. 

Last year we recorded a goodly number of magazines given to the 
library and that from these magazines we were able to add fort.y bound 
volumes to our shelves. This year the jieople of Manchester have con- 
tinued their interest audi generosity and have donated, besides some 
books and jjamphlets, 2,259 numbers of unbound magazines. From 
these and those left over from last j^ear we have succeeded in com- 
pleting 144 volumes. 

These bound volumes of the magazines are a veritable storehouse 
of information, the key to which is found in the periodical indexes. 
The library still lacks many volumes and sets of periodicals which 
would add much to its usefulness, and it is hoped that the people of 
Manchester will continue their generous giving. One of the notable 
gifts of the year was the portrait of INIr. Lucien B. Clough given by Mrs. 
Lucien B. Clough and Albert L. Clough. 



496 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPOKTS. 



During- the year two assistants have left and unusual difficulty has 
been experienced in finding suitable young men to fill the vacancies. 
In August we succeeded in getting one, but only temporarily, as he 
was obliged to leave us in November. The last of November we se- 
cured another but are still one member short. To help out this de- 
ficiency we have employed the services of high school boys, but as 
they can come for only a part of the afternoon or evening it does not 
wholly answ^er our need. 

Miss Alice Furber, who came into the library in the fall of 1902 as 
a pupil assistant, staid with us until the summer of 1903. She is now 
taking the librarj- course at Simmons college. One other pupil assist- 
ant, Miss Minnie Putney, entered the library in the spring. In the 
summer she took the course at the Amherst Summer School of Library 
Economy and is now an assisitant in the Taunton (Mass.) public library. 

The weekly staff meetings begun last year have been continued 
throughout this year with the exception of the summer months. 

It is a pleasure to report that several of the assistants and your li- 
brarian attended the annual meeting of the New Hampshire Library 
association which was held at Concord this year, but it is reported 
with regret that no one from the library attended the national meeting. 
It is believed that it would be for the interest of the librarj- to grant 
the assistants time to attend state and national library meetings. 

The librarian desires to express her indebtedness to the trustees, 
the members of the stafl*, the newspapers, those who have made dona- 
tions, to all who have in any way contributed to the usefulness and 



growth of the library. 



Eespectfully submitted, 

F. MABEL WINCHELL, 

Librarian. 



APPENDIX 1. 
Accessions. 

Increase by purchase 667 

Increase by gift 566 

Increase by binding- periodicals 119 

Total accessions for the year 1,352 

Number of volumes in library as last reported 48,800 

Whole number of accessions 50,152 

Worn out volumes withdrawn from circulation 253 

Number of volumes replaced 170 

Number of volumes lost or injured and paid for 22 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 497 

Number of volumes lost and not yet paid for 4 

Number of volumes burned by the board of health oii ac- 
count of contagious diseases 5 

Number of magazines subscribed for (55 

Number of magazines given 47 

Number of newspapers subscribed for 4 

Number of newspapers given D 

Total number periodicals received ]2.> 

APPENDIX II. 
Circulation and Registration. 

Number of days library was open HOR 

RECORD, BY CLASSES, OF VOLUMES ISSUED. 

No. Per 

vols. cent. 

General works 2,748 3.7 

Philosophy and religion I.-IOG 1.8 

Biography 2,416 ?,.2 

History 2,84G 3.8 

Geography and travels 2,149 2.9 

Social sciences 779 1.1 

Science and useful arts 3,338 4.5 

Fine arts 1,513 2.0 

Literature 3,024 4.1 

Fiction 54,012 72.6 

Pictures 246 ..3 

Total number issued for home use 74,377 

Average daily use (home) 243 

Largest number any one day 562 

Smallest number any one day 114 

Largest number any one month 7,502 

Smallest number any one month 5,196 

Number of volumes delivered in reading room 30,664 

Average daily use 100 

Total circulation for 1903 105,041 

Number of volumes issued to teachers 1,508 

Number of borrowers to whom study pockets were first 

issued during 1903 412 

Registration. 

Number registered in 1903 552 

"WTiole number issued since beginning last registration, 

l^^O 14,825 

Number of borrowers on deposit 3.3 

32 



498 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPOETS. 



APPENDIX 111. 
Miscellaneous Statistics. 

Number of books classified 1,188 

Tsumbei' 'of books catalog-iied 1,298 

Cards written for analyticals 1,494 

Cards written for finding list 6,336 

Number of volumes repaired at bindery 1,273 

Number of volumes repaired and covered at the library 23,728 

Postals sent to delinquents 709 

Eeserve notices paid for 1,173 

Sunday Statistics. 

ATTEaSTDANCE. 





Men. 


"Women. 


Cliildren. 


Total. 


Average per Sunday 


621 
12. 


193 
3.7 


1,95G 
37.7 


2,770 
534 







CIKCULATION. 



General works 

Philosophy and religion 

Biography 

Histor3' 

Geography and travels . 

tsocial sciences 

Science and useful arts 

Fine arts 

Literature 

Fiction 



2,520 

67 

21 

83 

41 

45 

137 

26 

764 

662 



Total 



4,366 



APPENDIX IV. 



Receipts from Fines, etc., from December 1 
December 1, 1903. 



1902, to 



lieceived from fines 

catalogues sold 

books lost and paid for. 

reserve notices 

miscellaneous sales 



Paid for expressage and incidentals 
Paid to treasurer 



$295.72 

7.10 

22.70 

20.78 

9.53 



$355.83 

87.45 



$268. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LII5RARY. 499 
APPENDIX V. 



Donations to Library, 1903. 

Books. Pamphlets. Magazines. 
Abbot Public Library, Marblehead, Mass.. 1 

Abbott, Mrs. O. D ;{.j 

Aberdeen, Scotland. — Public Library 1 

Adriance Memorial Library, Poug-hkeepsie, 

X. Y 1 

Ag-uilar Free Library, New York City 1 

tVmerican Congregational Association 1 

Amherst College 1 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery- Company. 1 1 

Armstrong-, Mrs. H. R 30 

Baker, H. M 2 

Balch, T. W 1 

Barker, E. F 13 

Batchellor, A. S 2 

Beard, M. E 13 

Bigelow Free Public Library, Clinton, Mass. 1 
Birmingham, Eng. — Free Libraries Commit- 
tee 2 

Bolton, Mrs. S. K 1 

Boston, Mass. — Public Library 2 

Bridgeport, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Brookline, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Brown, M. E 9 

Brown University 1 

Browne, G. W 1 

Burlington, Iowa. — Free Public Library . . 2 

California. — Board of Agriculture 1 

Cambridge, Mass. — ^Public Library 1 

Campbell, B 8 55 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburg, Pa 1 

Carvelle, H. DeW 2 556 

Chalmers, T 1 

Channing, W 2 

Chicago, 111 1 

Chicago, 111. — Public Library 4 

Children's Aid Society, New York City 1 

Christian Science Reading Room Association 1 

Church Kalendar Company- 1 

Clark, R. U 1 

Clough, Mrs. L. B. and A. L., 1 portrait. 

Columbia University 1 

Concord, Mass. — Free Public Library 2 



500 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Books. Pamphlets. Magazines. 

Concord. N. H. — Public Library 1 

Conn, G. P 1 1 

Cross, Mrs. D 393 

Dartmouth College , 1 

Delaney, Eev. J. B 49 

Depew, CM 2 

Detroit, Mich. — Public Library 1 

District of Columbia. — Public Library 2 

Dodge, A. W 10 

Dodge, J. E 6 

Dover. X. H. — Public Library 1 

Dnmont, H. D : . . . 1 

Dustiu, E LI 

Eames, Mrs. W. M 12 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, Md ' 1 

Erie, Pa.— Public Library 1 

Evanston, 111. — Free Public Library 1 

Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadel- 
phia, Pa 1 

Farmer, C 11 J 

Farmer, Mrs. I. W 2 

Farnsworth Company 1 

Farquhar, D 1 

Fellows, J. W 1 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt 1 

Forbes Library, Northampton, Mass 1 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Pa 1 

General Theological Library, Boston, Mass. 1 

Goodrich, B 13 

Grand Eapids, Mich. — Public Library 1 

Hadley, Mrs. C. J 54 

Hall, R 12 

Hallsville School 4 

Harper & Bros 1 

Harvard College 1 1 

Heath, Mrs. C. B 91 

Heginbottom Fi-ee Library, Ashton-under- 

Lyne, Eng 1 

Hillsborough County Commissioners 1 

Hoboken, N. J.— Free Public Library 1 

H0I3' Cross College 1 

Home Market club 1 

Hunt, N. P 3 1 39 

Hu.se, W. H IG 

Indian Rights Association 1 

Iowa College 6 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIURAUY. 501 

Books, i'amphlets. Magazines. 

Jenkins, H. M ?> 

Jenkins, M. R 1 

Jenkins, Mrs. M. W., 4 pictures. 

Jersey Citj% N. J. — Free Public Library 1 

Lake Mohonk Conference on International 

Arbitration 1 

Lamb, F. W 1 

Lamb, G. H 1 

Law, M, E 1 

Lawrence, Mass. — Free Public Library .... 1 

LeBoeuf, J 2 

Livingston, C. F 18 95 

Livingston, Mrs. F. C 70 

Lowell, Mass. — City Library 1 

Textile School 1 

Luce, E. P 18 

McQuesten, J. K 1 

Madison, Wis. — ^Free Library 1 

Maimonides Free Library, New York City. . 1 

Maiden, Mass. — ^Public Library 1 

Manchester, Eng. — 'Public Free Libraries 

Committee 2 

Manchester, N. H.— City Clerk 8 

" " City Engineer 1 

" '* Fire Department 1 

" " First Congregational 

Church 2 

" " Street and Park Com- 
mission 1 

" " Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Instruction 1 

" " Water Commission 1 

Mason, H. L 1 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2 

Medford, Mass. — ^Public Library 1 

Melrose, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Merchants' Association of New York 2 

Merchants National Bank, Manchester, 

N.H no 

Milwaukee, Wis. — Public Library 2 

Minneapolis, Minn. — Board of Park Com- 
missioners 1 

" Public Library 3 

Moore, E., 6 pictures. 

iMoore, Mrs. W. E ^2 

Morse Institute, Natick, Mass 1 

Mount Holyoke College 2 



502 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Books. Pamphlets. Magazines. 

New Hamp.shire. — Insurance Commissioner. 1 

" Secretary of State 1 

" State Library 1 

Xew Hampshire College of Agriculture . . 5 28 

New Hampshire Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion 1 

New Haven, Conn. — Free Public Library... 1 

New Jersey.- — State Library 1 

New York Cit^'.— Bureau of Municipal Ac- 
counts 

" " Mercantile Library 

Newark, N. J.— Free Public Library 

Newell, L. E 2 

Newington, N. H 

Newton, Mass. — ^Free Library 

O'Keilly, J. T 

Palmer. R. H 1 

Parlin Memorial Librarj% Everett, Mass. . • 

Paterson, N. J. — ^Free Public Library 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md 

Pennsylvania Prison Society 

Peoria, 111. — Public Library 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts 
School for the Blind 

Philadelphia, Pa.— City Institute 

" " Free Library 

Pillsbury, A. E 2 

Portland, Me. — ^Public Library 

Princeton University 

Providence, R. I. — Public Library 

Pteed, A rz 

Richards, L. S 1 

Robbins Library, Arlington, Mass 1 

Rogers, T. P. W., 1 picture. 

Rochester, N. H. — Public Library 1 

St. Louis, Mo. — Mercantile Library Associa- 
tion 1 

Salem, Mass. — 'Public Library 2 

Scott, W. D 1 

Scranton, Pa. — Public Library 1 2 

.Seattle, Wash.— Public Library 1 

Sherman, C 3 

Society for the Protection of New Hamp- 
.shire Forests 1 

.Somerville, Mass. — ^Public Library 1 

Southbridge, Mass. — ^Library Committee . . 1 

Springtield, Mass. — City Library Association 1 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY, 



m 



Books. 
Staples, C. J 30 

Straw, C. G 

Syracuse, N. Y. — Public Library 

Theosophical Book Concern 1 

Tolman, M. M., 3 pictures 

United States. — ■Agricultural Department.. 

" " Bureau of Education 2 

" " Census Office 

" " Interior Department, 61 

atlas sheets 2 

" " Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission 1 

" " Labor Department 2 

" " Library of Congress 5 

" " Smithsonian Institution . . 2 

" " State Department, 2 atlases 3 

" " Superintendent of Docu- 

ments, 13 atlases, 122 

maps 210 

" " Treasury Department 1 

" " War Department 

Universalist Publishing House 1 

University of Illitiois 

University of New York 7 

Watts, M. A 

Way, F. L 

Wellcome Physiological Research Labo- 
ratories 1 

Welsh, H 

Westborough, Mass. — Public Library 

White, J. T. & Co 1 

Wilmington, Del. — Institute Free Library.. 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission 

Woburn, Mass. — ^Public Library 

Woman's Christian Temperance Union, 
Manchester, X. H 

Woodbury, F. D 

Woodbury, G 

Worcester, Mass. — Free Public Library 

Youth's Companion Co., 1 calendar. 



Pamphlets. Magazines. 
24 



201 



Library Publications Received. 



Boston Public Library. — Bulletin. 
Brookline Public Library. — Bulletin. 



604 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Chicago Public Library.— Bulletin. 

Dover Public Library. — ^Bulletin. 

Evanston Free Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Holyoke Public Library. — ^Library Eecord. 

Iowa Masonic Library. — ^Bulletin. 

Jersey City Free Public Library. — Library Eecord. 

Librarj' Company of Philadelphia. — 'Bulletin. 

Lowell City Library.— Bulletin. 

Lynn Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Milwaukee Public Library. — Quarterly Index. 

Nashua Public Library. — Bulletin. 

New Hampshire Library Commission. — Bulletin. 

New Haven Free Public Library. — Bulletin. 

New York Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Newark Free Public Libi'ary. — Library News. 

Providence Libraries. — 'Bulletin. 

St. Louis Public Library. — Bulletin. 

Salem Public Library. — ^Bulletin. 

Seranton Public Library.— Bulletin. 

Springfiled Public Library. — ^Bulletin. 

United States Department of Agriculture. — Library' Bulletin. 

^VhitefieId Public Library.— Bulletin. 

Wilmington Institute Free Library. — Bulletin. 

Wisconsin Free Library Commission. — Bulletin. 



APPENDIX VI. 

List of Periodicals for 1904. 

Alpine Journal. 

American Engineer and Railroad Journal. 

American Historical Eeview. 

American Journal of Science. 

American Monthly Eeview of Eeviews. 

American Naturalist. 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Mass. Proceedings.— Gift. 

Architects' and Builders' Magazine. 

Arena. 

Art Journal. 

Association Eeview. — Gift. 

Atlantic Monthly. 

Birds and Nature. 

Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine.— English edition. 

Bookman. 

Boston Society of Natural History. — Memoirs. 

Boston Society of Natural History. — Proceedings. 



IlEPOKT OF THK TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRAHY. 505 

Builder. 

Biillftiii of Bibliography.— Gift. 

Ca.se and Comment. — Gift. 

Century. 

Chauibers's Journal. — Monthly. 

Chicag-o Banker. — Gift. 

Christian Science Journal.— Gift. 

Christian Science Sentinel. — Gift. 

City of Chicag-o Statistics.— Gift. 

Cornhill Magazine. 

Cosmopolitan. 

Critic. 

Cumulative Book Index. 

Eclectic Magazine. 

Edinburg Eeview. — English edition. 

Educational Eeview. 

Electrical World. 

Engineer. — Gift. 

Forum. 

Good Housekeeping. — Gift. 

Good Words. 

Granite Monthly. 

Guidon.--Gift. 

Harper's Monthly Magazine. 

Harper's Weekly. 

Holy Cross Purple. — Gift. 

Horseless Age. 

Independent. — ^Gift. 

Journal of American Folk-lore. 

Journal of the Franklin Institute. 

Ladies' Eeview.- Gift. 

Lancet. 

Legal Bibliography. — Gift. 

Leisure Hour. 

Library Journal. 

Life. 

Lippincott's Magazine. i 

Literary News. 

Little Folks. 

Living Age. 

London Quarterly Review. 

Longman's Magazine. 

McClure's Magazine. 

Magazine of Art. 

Merchants' Association. Bulletin. — Gift. 

Mount St. Mary's Record.— Gift. 

Nation. 



506 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Nature Study.— Gift. 

New England Historical and Genealog-ical Register. 

New England Magazine. 

New Hampshire College of Agriculture. Bulletins. — Gift. 

Xineteenth Century. — English edition. 

North American Review. 

Official Gazette of United States Patent Oflace.— Gift. 

Oracle.— Gift. 

Out West.— Gift. 

Outlook. 

Popular Science Mouthh'. 

Protectionist. — Gift. 

Public Libraries. — Loaned. 

Publishers' Weekly. 

Punch. 

Quarterly Review. — English edition. 

Railroad Gazette. 

Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature. 

St. Nicholas. 

Scientific American. 

Scientific American Supplement. 

Scribner's Magazine. 

Siiccess. — Gift. 

Temple Bar. 

United States Public Documents Catalogue. — Gift. 

Universalist Leader. — Gift. 

Wellspring. — Gift. 

Westminster Review. — English edition. 

Worcester Magazine. — Gift. 

World's Work. 

Youth's Companion. 



Newspapers. 

Boston Daily Journal. 

Daily Mirror and American. 

Emerald.— Gift. 

Manchester Budget. — Gift. 

Manchester News. — Gift. 

Manchester Union. — Gift. 

Mirror and Farmer. — Gift. 

New Hampshire Farmer. — Gift. 

New York Times. Saturday issue. — Gift. 

New York Tri-weekly Tribune. 

Plymouth Record.— Gift. 

Union Labor Times. — Gift. 

Wall Street Journal. Daily.— Oift. 



REPORT 

or THE 

COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM, 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester: 

Gentlemejt, — The committee on city farm hereby submit their 
annual report for the year ending December 31, 1903. 

The committee, after an impartial inventory, find the personal prop- 
erty of the farm to be as follows: 
13 cows $585.00 

1 bull 40.00 

2 yearlings .' . . 60.00 

7 calves 72.00 

$757.00 

Horses, hogs, and fowls 2,040.00 

Hay, grain, and produce 4,024.50 

Wagons, carts, and team furnishings 1,535.75 

Farming implements 1,110.00 

Household goods :{.201.03 

Provisions and fuel 1,000.00 

Total $13,668.28 

RECEIPTS AND EXPE^XDITUREP. 

Scavenger service $2,291.59 

Other sources 2,052.48 

Bills receivable of 1902 414.55 

Bills receivable 40.00 

.$4,798.62 

Cash paid city treasurer $4,758.62 

Bills receivable 40.00 

$4,798.62 

Appropriation $8,500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 335.58 

.$8,835.58 

By cash receipts of the farm $4,344.07 

permanent improvements 1,200.00 

bills receivable 40.00 

balance 3,251.51 

• $8,835.58 

Total expenditures $8,835.58 

Keceipts $4,344.07 

509 



510 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

•Number of prisoners 624 

Number of week's board 2,5071/0 

Permanent improvements $1,200.00 

Cost per week for each prisoner $1,291/2 

Stock and household goods $13,668.28 

The city farm and house of correction was established for the pur- 
pose of taking care of the worthy and unfortunate poor of the city. 
who are without homes of their own, and for the confinement and 
reformation of prisoners sentenced by the police court for drunken- 
ness. 

Only two paupers were cared for during the year. In January a 
female pauper fell and broke her leg. After the limb was set she tore 
off the splints. It being impossible to guard ag'ainst such acts she 
was removed to the Sacred Heart hospital and died there April 6, 1903, 
from the effects of the fracture. 

There were 78 female and 546 male prisoners sent to the farm, mak- 
ing a total of 624. They have been humanely treated by the super- 
intendent, and showed no dissatisfaction with the treatment received. 

The number of weeks board furnished was 2,50714, and the average 
cost of board for each individual per week was $1.2914, which we be- 
lieve compares favorably with former years. 

The female prisoners were employed in general household work and 
the male prisoners in cultivating and improving the farm. 

Owing to the drought and successive rains the corn and potato 
crops were replanted several times and the results obtained were un- 
satisfactory to the superintendent and the committee. 

Following are the crops raised during the year: 330 bushels of po- 
tatoes, 400 bushels of corn, 500 bunches of celery, 90 tons of hay, 8 
tons of hay (second crop), 8 tons of meadow hay, 15 tons of straw, 
oats and rye, 20 tons of corn fodder, 4 tons of cabbages, 60 bushels 
of onions, 300 bushels of beets, 200 bushels of turnips, 150 bushels of 
mangolds, 25 bushels of parsnips, 150 bushels of carrots. Vegetables 
for summer use at farm, pork, milk, and eggs for use at farm. 

The permanent improvements were as follows: 

Digging and building 1,000 feet of new ditches $525.00 

Digging and rebuilding 1,000 feet of old ditches 400.00 

New bathroom 175.00 

Cleaning up four acres of land 100.00 

Total $1,200.0(1 

During the year one half of the main house was reshingled, a new 
hardwood floor laid in the dining-room of the male prisoners, a part 
of the buildings painted inside and outside, together with the usual 
minor repairs of the farm. 

On July 16 the buildings were damaged by fire to the amount of 
$279.30 and the furniture to the amount of $15.00. The fire caught in 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 511 

the vvomeii's dormitory and the cause assigned by the chief of the fire 
department was "rats and matches." The loss was fully covered by 
insurance and the full amount was paid into the citj' treasury. 

In the spring- four j'carling heifers were pastured with C. A. East- 
nuin of Concord, N. H. The supei'intendent has not been able to secure 
their return or paj^ment therefor. Mr. Eastman claims the heifers 
either died or were stolen. The matter was referred to the city solici- 
tor for an opinion. 

On the first da}' of April the board of street and park commissioners 
reduced the amount paid for the garbage teams from $208.33 to $166.66 
per month, thereby cutting down the revenue of the farm $375.03 for 
the year and hereafter $500.04 annually. 

During the j-ear the committee made frequent visits to the farm and 
overlooked its management, and we take this opportunity of testifying 
to the abilities of Superintendent and Mrs. Libbej^ for the positions 
whicli thej^ occupied, and to the fact that in our opinion the farm was 
conducted honestly, economicallj^ and successfully. 
Respectfully submitted, 

EOLLIN B. JOHNSTON, 
G. WALTER TAYLOR. 
Conmvittee on City Farm and Home of Correction. 

Manchester, N. H., March 24, 1904. 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



EEPOET OF THE OYERSEEES OF THE POOR. 



To Hift Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the Ciiy Councils: 

In compliance with the ordinance of said city councils, the overseers 
of the poor herewith present their annual report for the year 1903. 

The number of families who have received more or less assistance 
during- the year has been 290, consisting of about 1,450 persons, all of 
whom have a settlement in this city. The number of persons supported 
at the county farm has been 13 at a cost of $2.00 a week each, and one 
at New Hampshire State hospital at a cost of $4.00 per week, all of 
whom are insane or incurable. 

The number of children supported at the State Industrial school dur- 
ing- the j-ear has been 2, at a cost of $1.50 per week each. In compli- 
ance with sections 1 and 2, chapter 116, Public Statutes of New Hamp- 
shire, passed at the session of the legislature. 1895, in relation to de- 
pendent minor children being supported at almshouse and kindred 
institutions, said minor children having a settlement in this city, are 
supported at the following institutions: At Women's Aid home, 1; at 
St. Patrick's orphanage, 5; at St. Joseph's Boys' Home, 6; at Infant 
asylum, 5; at Sacred Heart hospital, 3; at Notre Dame orphanage, 
3; at Feeble Minded institution, 1; being 24 in all, at a cost to the city 
of $1.25 each per week. Said minor children get a good education 
and moral training. 

The overseers of .the poor have given 1,470 orders during the j^ear. 
Said orders consisted of provisions, fuel, clothing, shoes, medicine, 
and other emergencies. The amoiTnts allowed by the several wards to 
persons making application for assistance frorn time to time are as fol- 
lows: 

Ward 1 $769.16 

Ward 2 629.79 

Ward 3 206.86 

Ward 4 611.93 

Ward 5 3,275.56 

Ward 6 124.50 

Ward 7 307.25 

Ward S 1,628.27 

Ward 9 2,560.25 

Ward 10 820.91 

$10,934.48 

515 



516 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPOKTS. 

IXCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

C. H. Bodwell, wood $489.87 

W. P. Goodman, directories, 1903 27.00 

J. B. Clarke Co., old bill, 1902 5.00 

William Freeman, hack 5.00 

Stamps 1.30 



$528.17 



$11,462.65 
ludie-ent soldiers 123.20 



$11,339.45 



Notwithstanding- the high price of coal and wood and other neces- 
saries of life last winter and the great demand made upon the board for 
these and other necessaries, they consider they were very conservative 
in their treatment of the poor, and although they have let no one suffer, 
thej' have considerably overdrawn their appropriation for the j-ear. 
Their expenditures were considerably less than the previous year, which 
they, as a board, consider a satisfactory showing under the circum- 
stances. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS C. STEWART, 

Clerk. 



Aid to Soldiers, Sailors, and their Dependent Families. 

To His Honor the Mayor ami Gentlemen of the City Couneils: 

In compliance with sections 1 and 2, chapter 81, Laws of the State of 
Xew Hampshire, passed at the session of the legislature in 1881, in re- 
lation to indigent soldiers and sailors of the war of the rebellion, the 
overseers of the poor present their report for the year 1903. 

The number of soldiers and sailors assisted during the year has been 
one, at a cost of one hundred and twenty-three dollars and twenty 
cents ($123.20), all of which is 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS C. STEWART, 

Clerk. 



EESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES, 
PASSED DURING THE YEAR 1903. 



EESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES, PASSED 
DURING THE YEAR 1903. 



Kesoliition relating to the Final Transfers for the year 1U02. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 
That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make the following 

transfers: 

To account of money unappropriated: 

From incidental expenses $457.43 

mayor's incidentals 42.75 

auditor's department 188.76 

street and park commission 108.99 

snow and ice 1,904.11 

new highways 2,204.74 

watering streets 1,557.24 

paving Elm street .78 

macadamizing streets 3,584.61 

scavenger service 768.98 

lighting streets 343.31 

city teams 9.24 

commons 241.87 

South Manchester pla.yground 9.;.0 

board of plumbing examiners 71.14 

repairs of schoolhouses 3.34 

furniture and supplies 12.62 

books and stationery 30.34 

printing and advertising 16.82 

evening schools 44.65 

free text-books 39.23 

manual training 1.98 

police commission 571.98 

police station 109.34 

police court 29.22 

Pine Grove cemetery 51.49 

Valley cemetery 9.29 

Amoskeag cemetery 1.10 

519 



520 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPOETS. 

From Merrill cemetery $80.53 

city farm 34.SS 

indigent soldiers 13.00 

abatement of taxes T24.77 

unappropriated receipts 8,822.01 



^ $22,090.44 
From account of money unappropriated: 

To interest $1.58 

city hall 194.59 

printing- and stationery 63.45 

city officers' salaries 374.41 

repairs of highways . . . .' 5,008.07 

land taken for highwa,ys 4,191.14 

paving streets 768.58 

grading for concrete 1,389.37 

street sweeping 732.21 

bridges 258.38 

repairs of sewers 744.44 

paving Canal street 221.57 

new sewers 1,940.22 

Stark park 20.91 

Derryfield park 89.65 

engineer's department 73.30 

health department 690.25 

fuel 1,504.02 

contingent expenses T.IQ 

care of rooms 22.13 

teachers' salaries 2,779.80 

evening school, mechanical drawing ; . 2.00 

fire department '''••'6 

fire-alarm telegraph • 137.08 

repairs of buildings 161.97 

isolation hospital 265.39 

South Beech street schoolhouse 1,962.50 

paupers off farm 2,566.53 

land sold for taxes 911.75 



$27,090.44 
Passed January 6, 1903. 



Resolution recommending Appropriations for the year 1903. 

Bemhcd by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the following appropriations are recommended to the Board of 
Common Council for the year 1903: 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 



521 



CE^'TRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Interest $44,T00.0U 

Sinking fund 31,000.00 

City hall 3,800.00 

Trinting- and stationery 1,600.00 

Incidental expenses 7,000.00 

Land sold for taxes 6,800.00 

Mayor's incidentals 300.00 

City officers' salaries 26,300.00 

Payment of funded debt 10,000.00 

Auditor's department 2,000.00 

Abatement of taxes 2,000.00 

State tax ; 63,869.00 

County tax 94,382.00 

Revision of ordinances 600.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries, expenses, etc $72,260.00 

Hydrant service 19,200.00 

PITBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Repairs on public buildings $4,750.00 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries, expenses, etc $5,100.00 

Care of hospitals 1,500.00 

Permanent fund for smallpox 4,000.00 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Salaries, expenses, etc . $6,602.00 

Children's reading room 500.00 

LIGHTING STREETS DEPARTMENT. 

Lighting streets $57,000.00 

PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Support of paupers off farm $15,000.00 

Support of indigent soldiers and sailors 200.00 

Maintenance of city farm 8.500.00 

Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Elliot hospital 300.00 

Sacred Heart hospital 300.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes hospital 300.00 

Mercy home 300.00 

Infant asylum (Our Lady of Perpetual Help) 300.00 



522 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Decoration of soldiers' graves $400.00 

Militia (same companies and posts as in 1902) 800.00 

Band concerts and stands for same 450.00 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Care of Pine Grove cemetery $10,000.00 

Care of Valley cemetery 3,654.70 

Care of Merrill yard 100.00 

Care of Amoskeag cemetery 250.00 

Plumbing examiners 100.00 

South End playground 100.00 

Setting trees 200.00 

North End playground 100.00 

West Side playground 50.00 

Passed January 20, 1903. 



Kesoll'TION recommending an Appropriation for Infant Asylum. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That an appropriation of three hundred dollars be and hereby is 
recommended to the board of common council, said sum of three hun- 
dred dollars to be paid to the Infant Asylum of Our Lady of Perpetual 
Help, an institution for the care of infants, located in the city of Man- 
chester. 

Passed January 20, 1903. 



Eesolution making a Temporary Loan of Three Hundred Thousand 
Dollars. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follovv's: 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the cit.y a.s may 
fall due before the nineteenth day of December, 1903, the city treasurer 
be and hereby is authorized to make such temporary loans from time 
to time for the use of the city of sums not exceeding the amount of 
three hundred thousand dollars, being in anticipation of the taxes of the 
present year, giving for the same the notes of the city signed by the 
city treasurer and countersigned by the mayor. 

Passed February 14, 1903. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 523 

Resolution relating- to Lighting- tlie City of Manchester vvitli Elec- 
tricity. 

Renohcd by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, The contract to light the city of Manchester with electricity 
expires on the twenty-third day of May, 1903; therefore be it 

h'csolved, That the mayor and standing committee on lighting streets 
be and are hereby instructed to investigate the matter of lighting said 
city on and after said date, and report the result of their investigation 
to the board of aldermen at their earliest convenience; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 3, 1903. 



Resolution requiring the Imprint of the Union Label of the Typograph- 
ical Union of the City of Manchester upon all City Printing. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

Whekeas, Owing to the close competition in all lines of business 
and industry it is necessary to form organizations for the purpose of 
bringing into closer relations and advancing the interests of those en- 
gaged in any of the various industries so numerous in our midst; and 

Whereas, Labor organizations have formed for the purjiose of ad- 
vancing the interests and bettering the condition of the masses who 
depend upon their daily labor for their means of sustenance; and 

WHEiREAS, We believe that as representatives of the inhabitants of 
Manchester we can show our appreciation for our constituency in no 
better way than by recognizing the benefits derived from such organ- 
izations by the community in which they are located; therefore be it 

Resolved, That in the future all job printing done for the city of Man- 
chester, of whatever kind or nature, shall bear the imprint of the union 
label of the Typographical Union No. 152, of the city of Manchester, and 
all officers and employees of said city are hereby instructed not to 
contract for or accept any 'Other; and be it further 

Resolved, That all ofHcials of the city of Manchester when advertising 
for printed matter of whatever kind or nature shall insert a notice that 
all bids for the same shall be submitted in accordance with the provi- 
sions of this resolution; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 3, 1903. 



524 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

EesolutiOjS^ relating to Interest on Deposits of the City of Manchester. 

Resolved bj' the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the moneys of the city of Manchester be deposited in such bank 
or banks in said city as shall pay the largest rate of interest to said city 
of Manchester upon daily balances in said bank or banks from the 
first day of May, 1903, to the first day of May, 1904, and that the city 
treasurer be and hereby is instructed to advertise for bids from the 
banks of the city of Manchester by sending to each of said banks a 
copy of this resolution; the city of Manchester by its agent, the treas- 
urer of said city, reserving the right to reject any and all bids and call 
for such other bids as may be necessary to carry out the intention of 
this resolution; and be it further 

Resolved, That the mayor and the treasurer of said city of Manchester 
are hereby authorized and empow^ered to accept such bid or bids as 
will give the city of Manchester the largest rate of interest upon the 
daily balances on deposits of the moneys of said city of Manchester in 
said bank or banks from the first day of May, 1903, to the first day of 
May, 1904; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 7, 1903. 



Eesolution relating to the Distribution of the Fire Apparatus at the 
Central Station. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the committee on fire department be and are hereby authorized 
to investigate the matter of securing a site, bj- lease or purchase, for the 
purpose of installing one of the steam fire engines and fire engine com- 
panies now situated at the Central Fire Station, on Elm street, south of 
Central street, and said committee are hereby instructed to report the 
result of their investigation to the board of mayor and aldermen at 
their earliest convenience. 

Passed April 7, 1903. 



Eesolution relating to the Monthly I'ayment of the Salaries of C^ity 
Officials. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city auditor be and hereby is authorized to approve monthly 
the bills of the mayor, city clerk, city auditor, city treasurer, collector 
of taxes, citj' engineer, inspector of buildings, superintendent of schools, 
truant officer, superintendent and matron of city farm, city solicitor, 
city physician, and chief of the fire department for their respective 
salaries; and be it further 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, OJMvINANCES. 525 

Fcsolved, That the city treasurer be and hereby is authorized to pay 
the aforesaid salaries in monthly payments on the first day of each and 
every month; and be it further 

Rcsolvrd, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 7, 1903. 



Eesolution relating to Proposals for Lighting the City of Manchester. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the mayor and standing committee on lighting streets be and 
are hereby authorized to advertise and receive proposals for lighting 
the streets and public buildings of the city of Manchester for a term 
of one year from the twenty-third day of May, nineteen hundred and 
three; also for a term of three or five years from the twenty-third day 
of ^lay, nineteen hundred and four; said proposals to be in accordance 
with siich specifications as the mayor and standing committee on light- 
ing streets shall submit; and be it further 

Resolved, That no proposal shall be accepted by the mayor and stand- 
ing committee on lighting" streets unless accompanied by a certified 
check of an amount not exceeding fifty thousand dollars, as deter- 
mined by the maj^or and standing committee on lighting streets; and 
be it further 

Resolved, That the mayor and standing committee on lighting streets 
report to the board of mayor and aldermen on or before the fifth day of 
May, nineteen hundred and three, a list of such proposals submitted to 
them, together with such recommendation or recommendations as in 
their judgment they shall determine is for the best interests of the 
city of Manchester; and be it further 

Resolved, That the board of mayor and aldermen hereby reserve the 
right to reject any and all such proposals as may be received by said 
mayor and standing committee on lighting streets; and be it further 

Resolved, That before proceeding to advertise for bids 'to light the 
city the mayor and committee on lighting streets be directed to obtain 
and submit to the full board, at a special meeting, one week from to- 
night, a proposition from the Manchester Traction, Light & Power Com- 
pany for lighting the streets of Manchester; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 7, 190.3. 



liESOLUTio>' relating to Horse Hire for the City Engineer. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars be allowed the city 
engineer of the city of Manchester annually for horse hire, said sum of 



526 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

one hiindred and fifty dollars to be charged to the appropriatioi 
city engineer's department; and be it further 
Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 14, 19f)R. 



Resolution relating to a Contract with the Manchester Traction, Light 
&: Power Company to Light the Streets of the City of Manchester. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, The contract to light the city of Manchester with electric 
arc lights of two thousand candle power each, entered into bj^ the city 
of Manchester and the Manchester Electric company May 23, 1S93. ex- 
pires on the 23d daj' of May, 1903; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the maj-or and committee on lighting streets be and 
are herebj' instructed to prepare a resolution to be presented at the 
regular meeting of the board of mayor and aldermen May 5, 1903, 
authorizing the mayor of the city of Manchester to execute a contract 
with the ^Linchester Traction, Light & Power Company to light the 
streets of the citj' of Manchester with enclosed electric are lights of two 
thousand candle power each, said lights to burn from twilight to twi- 
light upon everj^ night of the year, with proper reduction for lamps 
failing to burn, and svich other conditions as in the opinion of the 
mayor and committee on lighting streets shall be for the best interests 
of the city of Manchester, the price of said lights to be ninet.y dollars 
per year in monthlj^ payments of seven dollars and fifty cents each, pay- 
able on or before the fifth day of each and every succeeding month; 
said contract to be for a term of five years; and be it further 

Resolved, That the mayor and committee on lighting streets also pre- 
sent to the board of mayor and aldermen at the meeting of May 5, 1903, 
a blank contract between the city of Manchester and the Manchester 
Traction Light & Power Company, prepared in accordance with the 
conditions above set forth; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 14, 1903. 



Eesoli'TION authorizing the Mayor to Execute the Electric Light Con- 
tract. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the mayor be and hereby is authorized to execute on behalf of 
the city the contract made between said city and the Manchester Trac- 



RESOLUTIONS, OltDEES, ORDINANCES. 527 

tion. Light & Power Company of said Manchester, which contract pro- 
vides for the lighting- of the streets, roads, bridges, and other public 
places of said city for a term of five years, said contract to be signed 
by the mayor for the city after it shall have been adopted by the board 
of mayor and aldermen. 

Passed May 11, 1903. 



RESOLrTTOX relating to Employment of Union Labor of the city of 
Manchester in and upon the Public Works of said City and Fixing 
the Hours of a day's Labor in the City Departments of said City. 

Fesolrcd by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City nf Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That all committees and heads of all departments of the city of Man- 
chester be and hereby are instructed to insert a clause providing for 
the employment of union labor in all contracts for public buildings or 
works to which the city shall be a partj^; and be it further 

Remlved, That all committees and heads of said departments be and 
are hereby instructed to employ only union labor of said city in the 
building, altering, and repairing of public buildings or works of said 
city; and be it further 

Besolved, That when the said city shall find it necessary' to emploj' a 
class of labor which has no union organization, this resolution so far as 
it relates to the employment of union labor shall not apply, but in 
such cases the preference, so far as possible, shall be given to residents 
of said city; and be it further 

Resolved, That in all departments of said city, excepting the fire, 
street, and police departments, a day's labor shall not exceed nine 
hours; and be it further 

Resolved, That for the purpose of this resolution union labor shall 
mi^an organized labor under the jurisdiction of union associations; and 
be it further 

Resolved, That the resolution passed by the board of maj^or and alder- 
men April 1, 1902, relating to the emploj^ment of residents of the city of 
Manchester and fixing- the hours of a daj's labor in the city depart- 
ments in said city, be and hereby is repealed; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 2, 1903. 



EESOLrTiox relating to a Side Track of the Portsmouth Branch of the 
Boston & Maine Railroad across Taylor street. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the accommodation of Sidney A. Blood leave be and it hereby 
is granted to the Portsmouth branch of the Boston & Maine Railroad, 



528 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

to construct a side track from about fifty feet east of the east line of 
Taylor street, thence across Taylor street along the north side of the 
tracks of said railroad about three hundred feet. 

Passed July 10, 1903. 



EESOLrTioJir relating to the Eemoval of Wires. Poles, and Structures 
not used' at the present time by Electric Light, Telephone, and Tele- 
graph Companies. 

Resolved by the ^Nlayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, An act approved March 29, 1S93, establishing a board of 
street and park commissioners empowered said board to regulate the 
construction and maintenance in, over, and along the highways of the 
city of all wires, pipes, and other structures belonging to private cor- 
porations or individuals, which then or thereafter should be permitted- 
by vote of the mayor and aldermen to be placed in, over, and along 
said highways; and 

Whereas, The board of mayor and aldermen have transferred their 
authority in said locations to the board of street and jjark commis- 
sioners; and 

Whereas, Certain companies receiving such locations are not at the 
present time doing business in the city, and certain companies doing 
business are not using all of said locations; therefore be it 

Resolved, that the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby requested to notify such companies to remove all wires, poles, 
and other structures not used at the present time by electric light, 
telephone, and telegraph companies in the conduct of their business; 
and be it further 

Resolved, That in the case of the failure of said companies to comply 
with the said notification the board of street and park commissioners 
be and are hereby requested to proceed in accordance with the provi- 
sions of the Public Statutes for the removal of the said wires, poles 
and structures. 

I'assed September 1, 1903. 



Eesolutiox upon the death of Alderman Alvin H. Keith. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, The x\lmighty has taken from us our friend and brother, 
Alvin H. Keith, whose staunch fidelity, kindly counsel, and cheery pres- 
ence we shall always cherish; therefore be it 

Resolved, That in his death we have lost a true friend, and the city of 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 529 

Manchester one of her most faithful, upright, and devoted servants; 
and be it further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be made a part of the records, and 
that a copy be sent to the stricken widow, with our deep and heartfelt 
sympathy, and may the grief in the great affliction which has come 
upon the widow, father, and brothers, be softened by the knowledge 
that the loss is not theirs alone but that all who knew him share their 
sorrow. 

Passed December 8, 1903. 



(An Okdebi to purchase Hay, Straw, and Grain for use in the Fire 
Department. 

Ordiered, That the mayor and standing committee on fire department 
be and hereby are instructed to purchase all hay, straw, and grain 
used in the fire department of the city of Manchester for the ensuing 
year, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire de- 
partment. 

Passed March 3, 1903. 



An Oedek to print Mayor Reed's Inaugural Address. 

Ordered, That the standing committee on finance be and are liereby 
authorized to procure for the use of the mayor two hundred copies of 
Mayor Eeed's inaugural address, the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for printing and stationery. 

Passed March 3, 1903. 



Ak OiKDEK relating to the Repairs on Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the mayor and committee on lands and buildings be and 
are hereby authorized and empowered to make such necessary repairs 
in and upon the public buildings of said city as shall not exceed the 
appropriation for that purpose, and that the expense thereof be charged 
to the appropriation for repairs on public buildings. 

Passed March 3, 1903. 



An Order to print the Fifty-seventh Annual Report of the Receipts and 
Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, That the committee on finance be and are hereby authorized 

to procure for the use of the inhabitants of said city the printing of the 

fifty-seventh annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city. 

of Manchester, including the reports of the city auditor, the school 

34 



530 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

board, and superintendent of schools, superintendent of water-works, 
water commissioners, engineer of tire department, overseers of the 
poor, trustees, librarian, and treasurer of the city library, committee on 
cemeteries, standing committee on city farm, city physician, city solic- 
itor, city engineer, street and park commissioners, and such other mat- 
ter relative to city affairs as said finance committee may direct; the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for printing and 
stationerj'. 

Passed March 3, 1903. 



A>'^ Order to erect a Welsbach Gas Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect a Welsbach gas light at the west end of Kidder 
Court, as petitioned for in the petition of C. F. Read, et als., with proper 
fixtures for maintaining same; the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed April 7, 1903. 



An Orde.r to macadamize Lincoln Street from Lake Avenue to Cedar 
Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commission be and are 
hereby- authorized and requested to macadamize Lincoln street from 
Lake avenue to Cedar street; the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for macadamizing streets. 

Passed April 14, 1903. 



An Order to establish a Welsbach Gasoline Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to establish a Welsbach gasoline light at the corner of Jones 
and Nelson streets, as petitioned for in the petition of George Franklyn 
Willey. et als.. with proper fixtures for lighting the same; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the apjn-opriation for lighting streets. 

Pas.sed April 14, 1903. 



An Orde,r to erect Two Electric Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect an electric light at the corner of Carpenter and 
Chestnut streets, as petitioned for in the petition of Leonard G. Smith, 
et als., and an electric light at the corner of Calef road and Raker street 



EESOLUTIONS, ORDEKS, ORDINANCES. 531 

as petitioned for in the petition of W. B. Mcllvin, et als., with proper 
fixtures for lighting the same; the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed April 14, 1903. 



An OiRDEP to build a certain Sewer in Clarke Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Beginning at the 
sewer line of Elm street and thence in an easterly direction to the 
sewer line of Chestnut street in Clarke street; the expense thereof to 
be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed April 14, 1903. 



An Ordek to build a certain Sewer in Bay Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Beginning at 
the sewer line of Clarke street and thence in a northerly direction to 
the sewer line of Carpenter street in Bay street; the expense thereof to 
be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed April 14, 1903. 



An Okdee to purchase one Deluge Set. 

Ordered. That the committee on fire department be and are hereby 
authorized to purchase one deluge set for use in the fire department; 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire de- 
partment. 

Passed April 14, 1903. 



An Order in relation to the Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 

Ordered, That the Louis Bell Post, No. 3, G. A. R., be authorized to ex- 
pend the sum of three hundred dollars, said sum of three hundred dol- 
lars to be used for the decoration of soldiers' graves of the said Louis 
B?ll Post; and said Post be also authorized to expend the sum of fifty 
dollars, said sum of fifty dollars to be used for the decoration of the 
graves of Spanish-American war veterans; and the Joseph Freschel Post, 
G. A. R., be authorized to spend the sum of Mty dollars, said sum of 
fifty dollars to be used for the' decoration of soldiers' graves; said deco- 
rations to be upon Memorial daj- and under the direction of the mayor. 
Said sum of three hundred dollars, fifty dollars, and fifty dollars to be 
charged to the appropriation for decoration of soldiers' graves. 

Passed May 13, 1903. 



532 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An Oeder to build a certain Sewer in Maple and Cedar South Back 
Streets. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Beginning at the 
sewer in Cedar street and thence in a southerly direction in Maple street 
to the sewer line of Cedar south back street, thence easterly in Cedar 
south back street to the sewer line of Lincoln street; and the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed May 13, 190.3. 



An Order to erect Five Electric Lights. 

Ordered. That the committee on lighting streets be and hereby is 
authorized as the agent of the board of aldermen to erect certain elec- 
tric lights with proper fixtures for maintaining the same; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for lighting streets, said 
lights to be located as follows, viz.: 

Corner of Beech and North streets, as petitioned for by E. Clark 
Smith; corner of Somerville and Cypress streets, as petitioned for by 
Fred Chalker, et als.; corner of Bridge and Weston streets, as peti- 
tioned for by L. M. Aldrich, et als.; junction of Nutt road and Willow 
street, as petitioned for by the Manchester Coal & Ice Co., et als.; north 
side of Massabesic street, between the J. Hall road and the Kimball 
Shoe Factory, as petitioned for by L. M. Streeter, et als. 

Passed May 13, 1903. 



An Order to Revise and Print City Ordinances. 

Ordered, That the mayor be and hereby is appointed the agent of the 
board of mayor and aldermen to employ some suitable person to revis- 
the city ordinances, and cause to be printed not more than five hun- 
dred copies of such revised ordinances for the use of the city; the ex- 
pense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for revision of ordi- 
nances. 

Passed May 13, 1903. 



An Ordee relating to Band Concerts. 

Ordered, That the mayor be and hereby is authorized and empowered 
to expend such sum or sums the present year for open air band concerts 
as shall not exceed the sum of four hundred dollars, said sum of four 
hundred dollars to be divided equally between the Turner Brass band, 
St. Mary's band, Cadet band. City band, and Manchester Military band. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 533 

and said sum of four hundred dollars to be charged to the appropriation 
for band concerts. 

Passed May 13, 1903. 



Ax Ordee to erect Five Electric Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized as the agent of the board of mayor and aldermen to erect five 
electric arc lights of two thousand candle power each with proper fix- 
tures for maintaining same; the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for lighting streets. Said lights to be located as follows: 

Corner of Riley avenue and Hayward street, as petitioned for by 
Cyrus Dean, et als.; corner of Bay and Salmon streets, as petitioned 
for by E. W. Harrington, et als.; corner of Amory and Dubuque streets, 
as petitioned for by ,T. J. Labrecque, et als.; corner of Car tier street 
and Coolidge avenue, as petitioned for by William Marcotte, et als.; 
on Coolidge avenue opposite Beauport street, as petitioned for by 
Arthur Provost, et als. 

Passed June 26, 1903. 



An Order to build certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

Beginning at the sewer line of Maple street and thence in an easterly 
direction to 219.2 feet in Prescott street; beginning at the sewer line 
of Jewett street and thence in a westerly direction to the sewer line of 
Cypress street in Clay s'fereet; beginning at the sewer line of Grove 
street and thence in a northerly direction to the sewer line of Sum- 
mer street in Hosle^^ street; and the expense thereof be charged to 
the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed June 26, 1903. 



An 0bde,k to build the Ursula Chapel at the Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Ordered, That the maj'or and sub-trustees on Pine Grove cemetery be 
and are hereby appointed agents of the board of mayor and aldermen 
and be and are herebj^ authorized to build a chapel on Chapel Hill, so 
called, in Pine Grove cemeterj% said chapel to be known as the Ursula 
chapel, and the expense thereof to be charged to the bequest of the 
late Fanny E. A. Riddle, said bequest having been accepted by the board 
of mayor and aldermen August 8, 1902, and having been paid into the 
treasury of the city of Manchester by the executor, Henry E. Burnham, 



534 ANMUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

said chapel to be built in accordance with section two of the will of 
the late Fanny E. A. Eiddle, a coisy of which is on file in the office of 
the city clerk of the city of Manchester. 

Passed July 31, 1903. 



Ax Order to erect Electric Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting- streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect electric lights with proper fixtures for maintaining 
the same; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
lighting streets; said lights to be located as follows: 

Corner of Massabesic and Spruce streets, as petitioned for hy Lang 
& Renter, et als.; corner of Bridge and Eussell and Malvern streets, 
as petitioned for by J. B. McCrillis & Son, et als.; corner of Titus 
avenue and Beech street. 

Passed July 31, 1903. 



An Obdek to erect a Welsbach Gasoline Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect a Welsbach gasoline light, with proper fixtures for 
maintaining the same, the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for lighting streets, said light to be located as follows: On 
the Lake Shore road, near the Luther Proctor house, as petitioned for 
by Mrs. Luther S. Proctor, et als. 

Passed July 31, 1903. 



An Order to build certain Sewers. 

Ordered), That the board of street and! park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

Beginning at the sewer line of Pine street and thence in a westerly 
direction to the sewer line of Chestnut street in Sagamore street; be- 
ginning at the sewer line of Belmont street and thence in an easterly 
direction to the sewer line of Beacon street in East High street; begin- 
ning at the sewer line of Webster street and thence in a northerly 
direction .500 feet in Walnut street; beginning at the sewer line of 
Beacon street and thence in an easterly direction to the sewer line of 
Weston street in Lowell street; thence in a southerly direction to the 
sewer line of Concord street in Weston street; and the expense thereof 
be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed Jnlv :i], IDO?,. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 535 

An ORDEiR to erect one Welsbach Gasoline Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect one Welsbach gasoline light, with proper fixtiire.s 
for maintaining the same, the expense thereof to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for lighting streets; said light to be located as follows: On 
Calef road in front of the residence of Lizzie A. Burns, as petitioned 
for by L. A. Burns. 

Passed September 1, 1903. 



An Ordeii to erect Electric Lights. 

Ordiered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect electric arc lights with proper fixtures for main- 
taining the same, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for lighting, streets, said lights to be located as follows: 

On Amherst street, rear entrance to Sacred Heart hospital, as pe- 
titioned for by Denis M. Bradley; corner of Harrison and Union streets, 
as petitioned for by W. Xorthey Jones; corner of Amherst and Dutton 
streets, as petitioued for by Charles H. Clark; corner of Green and 
Union streets, as petitioned for by Thomas Welch; corner of Auburn 
and Lincoln streets, as petitioned for by John J. McTiernan; corner 
of Wentworth and West Hancock streets, as petitioned for by G. Wal- 
ter Taylor; corner of Prince and B streets, as petitioned for by Julius 
Mertinath; corner of Walker and Third streets, as petitioned for by 
Harry K. Potts; on South Main street about six hundred feet south 
of A street, as petitioned for by G. W. Taylor. 

Passed September 1, 1003. 



An Order to erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect an electric light with proper fixtures for main- 
taining the same, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for lighting streets; said light to be located as follows: Corner of 
Summer and Pine streets, as petitioned for by Mary Nolan, et als. 

Passed September 25, 1903. 



Ax Order to erect Seven Welsbach Gasoline Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect seven Welsbach gasoline lights with proper fix- 
tures for maintaining the same, the expense thereof to be charged to 



536 ' ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the appropriation for lighting streets, said lights to be located as 
follows : 

Corner of Merrill and Nutt road, as petitioned for by W. H. Marshall, 
et als.; comer of Mill and Harvey roads, as petitioned for by Wil- 
liam H. Marshall, et als.; corner of Nutt and Derry roads, beyond 
bridge over Cohas brook, as petitioned for bj"- William H. Marshall, et 
als.; on Xutt road opposite Mark Harvey's and opposite Flanders" 
and Marshall's, as petitioned for by William H. Marshall, et als.; cor- 
ner of Harvey and South roads, and on the Harvey road on the Dickej^ 
hill, as petitioned for by William H. Marshall, et als. 

N. B. — This order was amended September 25, 1903, by substituting 
the words "Willow street" for "Nutt road," Nutt road having been 
changed to Willow street, July 7, 1903. 

Passed as amended September 25, 1903. 



An Order paying the City Physician for Extra Services rendered the 
City in the year 1903. 

Ordered, That the city auditor is hereby ordered to approve and the 
city treasurer is hereby ordered to pay the sum of three hundred and 
eighty-three dollars ($383.00) to John H. DeGross, M. D., said sum of 
three hundred and eighty-three dollars to be extra compensation to the 
city physician for services rendered the board of health from April 
11, 1903, to August 5, 1903, in inspecting and caring for .smallpox pa- 
tients and vaccinations for the prevention of smallpox, said sum of 
three hundred and eighty-three dollars to be charged to the appro- 
priation for incidental expenses. 

Amend order by striking out the words "incidental expenses" in 
the last line after the words "appropriation for" and inserting in place 
thereof the words "health department." 

Passed as amended November 3, 1903. 



An Order to build certain Sewers. 

Ordrred, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows: 

Beginning at the sewer line of Prince street and thence in a south- 
erly direction to the sewer line of McDuffie street in Huntress street; 
beginning at the sewer line of Pine street and thence in a westerly 
direction to the sewer line of Chestnut street in Sagamore street; and 
the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

I'assed November 3, 1903. 



RESOLFTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 537 

An Order to erect Four Welsbach Gas Lij^rhts. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting- streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect four Welsbach g-as lights with proper fixtures for 
maintaining the same; the expense thereof to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for lighting streets; said lights to be located as follows: 

Corner of Albert and Harrison streets, as petitioned for in the peti- 
tion of Charles E. Green, et als.; corner of Eiver road and Thayer 
street, as petitioned for in the petition of E. A. Smith; on Chestnut 
street between North and Webster streets, as petitioned for in the pe- 
tition of W. G. Africa, et als.; on Lake Shore road, near the residence 
of J. H. Paige, as petitioned for in the petition of J. H. Paige, et als. 

Passed December 1, 1903. 



An Order to erect Four Electric Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect four electric arc lights with proper fixtures for 
maintaining the same, the expense thereof to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for lighting streets, said lights to be located as follows: 

Corner of Brook and Walnut streets, as petitioned for in the petition 
of H. C. Graupner, et als.; corner of Orange and Maple streets, as 
petitioned for in the petition of George Bisco, et als.; corner of Union 
and Trenton streets, as petitioned for in the petition of Charles E. 
Hodge, et als.; on Auburn street near the entrance to the Elliot hospi- 
tal, as petitioned for in the petition of S. N. Bourne, et als. 

Amend title b.y striking out the word "four" and inserting in place 
thereof the word "eight," and amend order in the second line after the 
word "erect" by striking out the word "four" and inserting in place 
thereof the word "eight," and at the end of said order by adding the 
following locations: 

Corner of Franklin and Central streets, as petitioned for bj' L Res- 
nik, et als.; corner of Sagamore and Maple streets, as petitioned for by 
George E. Trudel, et als.; corner, of Summer and Union streets, as 
petitioned for by R. J. Barry; on Harrison street, between Belmont 
and Hall streets, as petitioned for by E. G. Reed, et als. 

Passed as amended December 1, 1903. 



An Ordinance in amendment of Section 6, Chapter 23, of the Laws and 
Ordinances of the City of Manchester, relating to the salary of the 
City Weigher. 

Be it ordained bj' the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 

in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend section 6 of chapter 23 of the Laws and Ordi- 
nances of the city of Manchester in the fifteenth line of said section 



538 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 

after the word "of" by striking out the word "four" and inserting in 
place thereof the word "five." so that said section as amended shall 
read as follows: 

"Sect. 6. It shall be the duty of weighers to attend personally at 
the scales which may be assigned to them, respectively, to deliver to 
the driver of every load weighed a certificate in such form as is here- 
inafter provided, to keep an account of all hay and other articles which 
shall be weighed at such .scales in books to be furnished by the city 
clerk, which shall always be open to inspection and when filled shall 
be deposited in his office. They shall settle their accounts quarterly 
with the city auditor, and shall pay over to him, for the city, all the 
fees receivable bj^ them respectively for weighing. The weigher in 
charge of the city scales at the city yard on Franklin street shall re- 
ceive as full compensation as weigher, the sum of five hundred dol- 
lars a year to be paid in equal monthly payments." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained April 7, 1903. 



An Ordinance in amendment of an ordinance relating to Permanent 
Members of Fire Department. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester. 

in City Council assembled, as follows:. 

Amend ordinance passed March 5, 1895, entitled "An ordinance relat- 
ing to permanent members of fire department" in the second line of 
said ordinance after the word "allowed," by striking out the word 
"one" and inserting in place thereof the word "tw*o," so that said ordi- 
nance as amended shall read as follows: 

"That each permanent member of the fire department shall be al- 
lowed two whole day's leave of absence in each month in addition to 
two weeks vacation in each year, without loss of pay, but the chief 
engineer shall determine what days the leave of absence shall be 
granted. 

"Permanent men out of the city on any such days shall be accounted 
present at roll call and not subject to a fine for absence. 

"No leave of absence shall ever be granted any member- of the de- 
partment on the fourth day of July of any year, and all members ab- 
sent on leave shall report at their company quarters at 8 o'clock in the 
evening of July 3 of each year." 

All ordinances inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed. 

Pa.ssed to be ordained June 2, 1903. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 539 

An Ordinance relating to the pay of Ward Officers at Special Elec- 
tions holden in the City of Manchester in the year 1903. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 

in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That for the purpose of this ordinance sections 21 and 
22 of chapter 6 of the Laws and Ordinances of the city of Manchester 
as amended December 1. 189(1, be amended so that the moderators, se- 
lectmen, and ballot inspectors of the several wards in said city shall 
receive for their services at the special elections holden in said wards 
on the tenth day of March, 1903, and the twelfth day of May, 1903, in 
addition to their respective salaries as such ward officers the sum of 
ten dollars, and that the clerks of the several wards in said city shall 
receive for their services at said special elections in addition to their 
respective salary as such ward officer the sum of fifteen dollars. 

The intent of this ordinance being- to pay all ward officers for ser- 
vices rendered prior or at the special elections holden in the several 
wards in the city of Manchester on the tenth day of March, 1903, and 
the twelfth day of May, 1903. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take elfect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained June 27, 1903. 



An Oedinance changing names of Certain Streets. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 

in City Council assembled, as follows: 

SECrtON 1. That the names of certain streets in said city be changed 
as follows: Adams street in South Manchester from Brown avenue to 
the Boston & Maine Railroad right of way, to Vernon street. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained July 7, 1903. 



An Ordinance changing names of Certain Streets. 

Be it ordaimd by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 

in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Sectton 1. That the names of certain streets in said city be changed 
as follows: Nutt road in Manchester from Hay ward street southerly to 
the Manchester-Londonderry town line, to Willow street. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained July 7, 1903. 



INDEX. 



INDEX. 



Page 

Abatement of Taxes 1-4 

Address, mayor's ^"^ 

Amoskeag cemetery HO 

Amoskeag schoolhonse playground 103 

Annual interest charge on bonded debt 139 

Appropriations for 1903 by city council 13C 

Appendix, school 333 

Ash-street school, extra heating H*? 

Assets, statement and inventory of 166 

Auditor, city, report of 31 

Auditor's department 56 

B 

Band concerts 133 

Board of water commissioners, organization of 190 

report of 192 

health, report of 359 

Bonded debt, tabular statement of 156 

detailed statement of, 1903 158 

annual interest charge 159 

Books and stationery 113 

Bridges 69 

Buildings, repairs of 9S 

public, occupied by private parties 160 

c 

Care of schoolrooms 119 

Cemetery, Pine Grove 107 

Valley lOv) 

Amoskeag 110 

report of sub-trustees of Valley 45;.' 

Pine Grove 440 

Amoskeag 452 

Cemeteries, treasurer of 454 

treasurer of fund 456 

543 



544 INDEX. 

Page. 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax 147 

City auditor's department 56 

aiiditor's report 31 

engineer, report of 259 

farm 127 

hall 42 

library 87 

report of trustees of 4S3 

treasurer's report 487 

librarian's report 491 

donations to 499 

officers' salaries 53 

officials, list of 3, 19 

solicitor, report of ., 471 

teams 70 

treasurer's report 31 

Commons 76 

Contingent expenses 117 

County tax 135 

D 

Debt, payment of funded 40 

bonded, statement of 156 

Decoration of soldier's graves 134 

Derrj'field park 78 

E 

Electric lights, location of 176 

Elliot Hospital 135 

Engineer's department 81 

Evening schools 120 

school, mechanical drawing 120 

Exempted from tax, property 147-154 

Expenses, incidental 45 

mayor's 57 

contingent 117 

F 

Farm, paupers off 123 

city 127 

File and index system 132 

Fires, list of 402 

Fire department 88 

report of chief engineer 385 

value of jjersonal projjerty 432 

names and residences of members 438 

location of fire-alarm boxes 390 



INDEX. 5-^5 

Page. 

Fire-alarm telegraph o:! 

Free text-books ." 121 

Fuel lin 

Furniture and siij5{jlies 114 

G 

Gas lights, location of ITA 

Grading for concrete 66 

Graduates high school 346 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 134 

H 

Health department 82 

board of, report of 359 

inspectors of, report of 375, 379 

Heating plant, Wilson school IIS 

Highways, new 61 

land taken for 62 

watering 63 

laaving , 64 

macadamizing 65 

grading of concrete on 66 

sweeping 68 

lighting SO 

repairs of 58 

Home, Women's Aid 136 

Hospital, Elliot, free beds 135 

Sacred Heart 136 

Notre Dame de Lonrdes 135 

Hydrant service 94 

I 

Incidental expenses 45 

Indigent soldiers 132 

Insj)ector of buildings, rei^ort of 479 

Interest 39 

annual charge, bonded debt 159 

Inventory of assets 166 

L 

Lafayette park 79 

Land taken for highways 62 

Laws relating to exemptions 145 

Legal points and rules relating to claims against the city 166 

Lighting streets 8(i 

Library, city 87 



546 INDEX. 

M 

' Page. 

Macaclamizing- streets 65 

Manual trainino- 123 

Mayor's incidentals ; 57 

Mercy Home 136 

Merrill yard Ill 

Militia 133 

Money unappropriated 40 

Municipal receipts and expenditures 35 



Xew highways 

Xorth End playgroimd 



Order to purchase hay and grain 529 

to build certain sewers 531, 532, 533. 534 

to repair piiblic buildings 529 

in relation to decoration of soldiers' graves 531 

to erect electric lights 530, 532, 533, 534, 535, 537 

to erect Welsbach lights 530, 534, 535, 537 

relating to band concerts 533 

to print mayor's address 529 

to print annual report 529' 

to macadamize Lincoln street • 530 

to purchase deluge set 531 

to revise ordinances 532 

to build chapel, Pine Grove cemetery 533 

relating to city phj'sician 53(> 

Ordinance amending chaiater 23 537 

relating to fire department 538 

relating to pay ward oflficers 539 

changing names of streets 539 

Overseers of the poor, report of 515 

Oil lamps, location of 174 



Parks, Derryfield and Stark 77, 7S 

Parsonages, valuation of, exempt from taxation 147 

Paupers off the farm 123 

Paving streets G4 

Paj-ment of funded debt 40 

Pine Grove cemetery 107 

Plumbing examiners, report of 281 

expenses 132 



INDEX. 547 

Page. 

Police department, station -'4 

court ^^ 

commission 96 

Printing and stationery 44 

and advertising" H?' 

Property account, real and personal !(>"> 

Public buildings occupied by private parties 160 

Purchase of land sold for taxes 1>^4 

R 

Eepairs of schoolhouses Ill 

of buildings 98 

of highways 58 

Resolution relating to interest on deposits 524 

appropriation for 190?. 520 

employment of union labor 527 

fire apparatus 524 

pay of city officials 524 

requiring union label 523 

upon death of Alderman Keith 528 

relating to horse hire, city engineer 525 

electric light contract 526 

sidetrack, B. & M. E. R 527 

removal wires and poles 528 

transferring money 519 

raising money and making appropriations for 190;j lo6 

making temporary loan 522 

Report of Board of Water Commissioners 192 

Superintendent of Water-Works 191 

City Engineer 259 

Chief Engineer Fire Department 385 

Trustees of City Library 483 

Sub-Trustees of Valley Cemetery 452 

Pine Grove Cemetery 449 

Amoskeag Cemetery 452 

Treasurer of Cemeteries 454 

Treasurer of Cemetery Fund 456 

Treasurer of Sinking Fund 465 

Overseers of the Poor 515 

Street and Park Commission 227 

Committee on Sewers and Drains 280 

Committee on Streets -SO 

City Solicitor 471 

City Physician 475 

Citj^ farm committee 590 

School Superintendent 319 

Board of Health : 359 



548 INDEX. 

Page. 

Report of City Auditor 31 

City Treasurer 31 

Real and personal estate owned by the city 161-165 

property, exempt from taxation, other than public prop- 
erty 155 

Eeceipts and expenditures, 190:; 35 

Revision of ordinances 135 

Eiddle playground SO 

Bules. etc., relating to bills against the city (auditor's dept.).. 166 

s 

Sacred Heart Hospital 136 

Salaries of city officials : 53 

Salaries, teachers 121 

Scavenger service 67 

School department, organization of 317 

evening, mechanical drawing 120 

superintendent's report 310 

Schoolhouses, repairs of Ill 

Servers, repairs of 7.1 

new 74 

Sewing materials '. 115 

Sinking fund 40 

treasurer's report 465 

Snow and ice 62 

Soldiers, indigent 1?,2 

Solicitor, city, report of 471 

South Manchester playground 79 

Stark park 77 

Statement of bonded debt 156 

Statement of public buildings occupied by private parties.... 160 

State tax 134 

Street and park commission 57 

report of 227 

Street sweeping 68 

T 

Tabular statement of taxation by board of assessors 140-141 

Taxes, abatement of 1?A 

due and uncollected 141 

Tax, state 134 

county 135 

valuations 144 

Taxation, appropriations for 1903 136 

manufactiiring property exenij)t from 120 

settlement of account tax collector 144 



INDEX. 549 

. - Page. 

Teachers, list of •''^'^ 

Teachers' salaries ^'^^ 

Teams, city ' '' 

Temporary loau "^^ 

Text-books, free I'-l 



Training-, manuj 



Watering- streets 



123 



Treasurer, city, report of -^1 

V 

Valley cemetery ^^'^ 

Valuation and taxes, 1903 1-^2 

Veto, mayor's, of appropriations 1-^9 



w 

(53 

Water-works, superintendent's report 192 

commissioner's report 191 

expenses 10-^ 

Women's Aid Home 1'*^ 

Wilson Hill Engine House 102