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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"



-public Document 



City of ]VIancbc8tcr 

fvTcw Rampsbire 



^ ^ 




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Htinual Reports for the Y^^^* 



1905 



>^E'a HANirai:i' & 



STWI UBRARY 



■;-t-^-i fJo^-t^ \\yf^ 



SIXTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF MANCHESTER 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FOK THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 30, 190^ 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO 
THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. 

PRINTED BY THE JOHN B. CLARKE CO.NH'ANY 



1906. 



N 

M26 6 
190^ 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT, 

1905. 



Mayor. 

EUGENE E. EEED Office, City Hall 

Chosen at 'biennial election in November, 1904. Salary, $1,800 per 
annum, payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1848, section 1. Chapter 223, 
Laws of 1883. Public Statutes, chapter 47.) 



Aldermen. 



Charles F. Read, 36 M. S. Block, Water street. 

Frank W. Leeman, 776 Chestnut street. . 

Fred 0. Parnell, 327 Orange street. 

Charles H. Clark, 453 Maple street. 

George P. Eiordan, 86 Auburn street. 

Andrew B. Bunton, 311 Lake avenue. 

Robert Edgar, 70 West Merrimack street. 

Adolph Wagner, 47 Green street. 
Ward 9. Gideon Lariviere, 29 Xotre Dame avenue. 
Ward 10. John J. Connor, 47 Elm street. 

Salary, $3 per meeting, amount not to exceed $200 annually, 



Ward 


1. 


W^ard 


2. 


Ward 


3. 


Ward 


4. 


Ward 


5. 


Ward 


6. 


Ward 


7. 


W^ard 


8. 



President of the Common Council. 

G. Irving Haselton, 404 Lake avenue. 



Members of the Common Council. 

Act of January, 1897, chapter 198. 

Ward 1. 

Ernest W. Wiesner, 19 Market street. 
Thomas F. Brown, 53 Canal street. 
Alexander Hanna, 5 Boj'den street. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Ward 2. 



Henri Gazaille, 718 Beech street. 
James F. Marsh, 110 Brook street. 
Frank B. Stevens, 144 Blodget street. 

Ward 3. 

Joseph L. Boudreau, 131 Orange street. 
Harry B. Cilley, 1037 Elm street. 
Carl A. Friborg, 738 Hall street. 

Ward 4. 

Albert J. Precourt, 15 Walnut street. 
Stephen B. Stearns, 464 Amherst street. 
Abraham L. Garmon, 517 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. 

Frank J. Glynn, 149 Cedar street. 
John F. Harrington, 214 Bell street. 
John J. Hartnett, 389 Union street. 

Ward 6. 

Leslie W. Dolloff, 427 Central street. 
G. Irving Haselton, 404 Lake avenue, 
Leroy M. Streeter, Mammoth and Candia roads. 

Ward 7. 

Fred A. Montgomery, 22 Market street. 

Samuel Mungall, 12 Middle street. 

Herbert A. Sails, 12 West Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. 

George E. Thomas, 31 Eiddle street. 
Israel H. Barnes, 170 Walker street. 
Eichard A. Neubert, 77 Cleveland street. 

Ward 9. 

Arthur Provost, 526 Notre Dame avenue. 
Abraham Beaulac, 370 Cartier street. 
Christoph Reischer, 79 Conant street. 

Ward 10. 

Michael E. Ahern, 213 Silver street. 
John B. Daigle, 262 Silver street. 
William E. Simpson, 1029 Merrill street. 

No salary. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. O 

Clerk of the Common Council. 

Harrjf A. Piper, 112 ^lancliester street. 

Salary, $50. (General Laws, chapter 46, sections 7-9. City Laws and 
Ordinances, page 33, chapter 6, section 11.) 



City Clerk. 

Edward C. Smith Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350 and fees. (Laws, 1899, chapter 6.) Chosen in January, 
biennially, by board of aldermen. Eesidence, 900 Union street. Also 
clerk of all committees of the board of aldermen; salary, $200. 



City Clerk's Clerk. 

Florence A. Robinson City Clerk's Office, City Hall 



City Auditor. 

James E. Dodge Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Appointed by mayor and approved by board of 
aldermen in January, biennially. (Laws of 18S9, chapter 287. Citj^ 
Ordinances, pages 44, 71, 83-88, 173.) Eesidence, Eiver road north. 



Auditor's Clerk. 
Lizzie M. Cogswell Auditor's Office, City Hall 



City Treasurer. 

Fred L. Allen Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(Act of January, 1897, chapter 198.) Eesidence, 33 Walnut street. 



Treasurer's Clerk. 
Mabel L. How Treasurer's Office, City Hall 



6 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Collector Of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350, fees, and allowance for horsehire. Elected by mayor 
and aldermen before May 1, biennially. (Act of July, 1851. Act of 
June, 1859, section 6. Act of 1897, chapter 198. Public Statutes, chap- 
ter 43. City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 33.) Kesidence, 740 Chest- 
nut street. 



Deputy Collector of Taxes. 

Edwin C. Paul Collector's Office, City Hall 

Joseph A. Guevin Collector's Office, City Hall 

Salary, $800. Appointed by tax collector with approval of mayor 
and aldermen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 33, section 3.)" 



City Solicitor. 

George A. Wagner Office, The Beacon 

Salary, $800. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(Act of 1897, chapter 198.) Eesidence, 332 Orange street. 



City Messenger. 

John A. Barker Office, City Hall 

Salary, $700 and allowance for horsehire. Elected by board of alder- 
men in Januar3% biennially. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 
6.) Kesidence, 49 Appleton street. 



Board of Aldermen. 

STAJJDING COMMITTEES. 

On Accovnis. — Clark, Bunton, Connor. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Lariviere, Read, Wagner. 

On City Farm and House of Correction. — Connor, Read, Edgar. 

On Claims.— 'Edgar, Leeman, Connor. 

On Cemeteries. — Bunton, Read, Leeman, Parnell, Clark. 

On Enrollment. — Wagner, Riordan, Leeman. 

On Finance. — The Mayor, Connor, Edgar. 

On Fire Department. — Riordan, Connor, Parnell. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Read, Lariviere, Clark. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 

On Licenses. — Connor, Eiordan, Bunton. 
On LUjhUng Streets. — Leenian, Riordan, Biinton. 
On MUitarij Affairs. — Eiordan, Edgar, Wagner. 
On Public Health. — Lariviere, Parnell, Leeman. 
On Setting Trees. — Clark, Lariviere, Wagner. 
On Seicers and Drains. — Parnell, Clark, Eead. 
On Streets. — Wagner, Edgar, Lariviere. 

Member first named is chairman of respective committee. 
Clerk of Committees, Edward C. Smith. Salary, $200 annually. 



Common Council. 

No. 1. On Central Department, Auditor's, Engineer's, and Department 
of Taxes. — Weisner, Montgomery, Thomas, Friborg, Dolioff. 

No. 2. On Street and Sewer Department. — Stevens, Streeter, Gazaille, 
Brown, Eeischer. 

No. 3. On School Department. — Garmon, Haselton, Wiesner, Cilley, 
Marsh. 

No. 4- On Fire Department. — Provost, Hartnett, Sails, Simpson, 
Boudrean. 

No. 5. On Puhlic BuUdinys and Piiblic Places. — Neubert, Ahern, Pre- 
court, Cilley, Garmon. 

No. 6. On Health, Police Department, Public Library, Patriotic, Char- 
itable and Philanthropic. — Stearns, Mungall, Dolloff, Hanna, Glynn. 

No. 7. On Lighting Streets. — Barnes, Beaulac, Daigle, Harrington, 
Streeter. 



Finance Committee. 

President of the Common Council G. Irving Haselton, chairman, ex 
officio, and the chairman of the different committees named above: 
Messrs. Wiesner, Stevens, Garmon, Provost, Neubert, Stearns, Barnes. 



City Pliysician. 

Clarence W. Milliken Office, 788 Elm street 

Salary, $600. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
CAct of 1897, chapter 198. City Ordinances, chapter 9, sections 29, 30.) 
Eesidence, 52 Clarke street. 



» MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

City Engineer. 

Samuel J. Lord Office, City H:i!l 

Salary, $1,350 and allowance for horsehire. Chosen by board of 
aldermen in January, biennially. (City Ordinances, chapter 6, sec- 
tions 33, 34.) 

engineer's assistants. 

Harrie M. Young. Alfred T. Dodpce. 

George M. Wales. Joseph A. Dussault. 

Harry J. Briggs. Lawrence O'Connor. 

Henry A. Worthen. 

8TE3>rOORAPHERS. 

John G. Moore. John J. McAllister, Jr. 



Water Commissioners. 

(Chaper TO, Laws of 1S71. City Ordinances, chapter 36, and Laws of 
1891, chapter 26, page 319, act approved iEarch 31, 1S91. Chapter 1S3. 
Laws of 1893). One commissioner elected annually by mayor and 
aldermen, in the month of S-eptember. for a term of six j-ears. Office 
at court house, corner Franklin and West Merrimack streets. Tele- 
phone at office and at pumping station. 

The Mayor, ex officio. 

Charles H. Manning. Term expires January, 1907. 

Frank Dowst.* Term expires January, 1906. 

William Corey. Term expires January, 1911. 

Edgar J. Knowlton. Term expires January, 1910. 

Harry E. Parker. Term expires .Jaiauary, 1909. 

Charles ^L Floyd. Term expires January, 1908. 

Charles H. Manning, chairman. 

Kobert E. McKean. Term expires January, 1912. 



Superintendent of Water-Works- 

Charles K. Walker Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary. $2,400. Chosen by water commissioners annually. Eesi- 
dence. 6S South Main street. West Manchester. 



Clerk of Water-Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary. $1,800. Chosen by water commissioners annually. 
*Died November 27, 1905. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 

Engineer at Old Pumping Station. 

Josiah Laselle. Salary, $700, rent. I'lU'l. and use of land. 



Engineer at New Pumping Station. 
C. A. Wihitney, $2.50 jier day, rent, and fnel. 



Justice of the Police Court. 

Isaae L. Heath, court room at poliee station, corner Manchester and 
Chestnut streets. 

Salary, $1,500. Appointed by the governor with the advice of the 
council. (General Laws, chapter 215; chapter 163, sections 17, IS, 19, 
of the Laws of 1878, as amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1881. Public 
Statutes, chapter 211.) 



Associate Justice of the Police Court. 

Georg-e W. Prescott. Salary-, $300 per annum. 
Harry E. Loveren. Salary, $300 per annum. 

Appointed by the governor, with the advice of the council. (Chapter 
215, General Laws, sections 2-14. Public Statutes, chapter 211. Chap- 
ter 296, Laws of 1893.) 



Clerk of the Police Court. 

John C. Bickford. Salary, $600. 

Appointed by the justice of the police court. (Chaj^ter 163, sections 
17-19, General'Laws,' amended by chapter 236. Laws of 1S81. Public 
Statutes, chapter 211.) Residence, 15 Ash street. 



Police. 



The members of the police are appointed by the police commis- 
sionerS, and hold their commissions during good behavior. They are, 
by virtue of their appointment, constables and conservators of the 
peace, and their jurisdiction extends throughout the city. (Chapter 
253, section 5, General Laws; chapter 303, Laws of 1887; chapter 202, 
Laws of 1893.) Police station at the corner of Chestnut and Manches- 
ter streets. 



10 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Police Commissioners. 

See chapter 202, Laws of 189.']. 

Noah S. Clark, clerk. Term expires Januarj-, 1910. 

Frank P. Cheney. Term expires January, 1908. 

Edward B. Woodbury, chairman. Term expires January, 1906. 



Chief of Police. 

Michael J. Ilealy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $2,000. Residence, 304 Central street. Telephone at house 
and office. 



Deputy Chief of Police. 

John F. Cassidy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $1,500. Residence, 569 Hanover street. 



Captain of the Watch. 

Thomas E. Steele. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 253 Walnut 
street. 



Sergeants. 



Leon E. Magoon. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 261 Blodget 
street. 

John T. O'Dowd. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 90 Adams street. 



Inspector. 



Clifton B. Hildreth. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 87 Adams 
street. 



Patrolmen. 



Adler, Leonard J. Callaghan, Peter. 

Archambeault, Joseph. Connor, John J. 

Badger, John C. Coolidge, Edgar L. 

Bean, Randall W. Dunn, James F. 

Bourque, Lonedes, Dustiu, Frank J. 

r.rown, John G. Farrell, Joseph A. 



LIST OF OFFJCEKS. 



11 



Foye, William F. 
Gelinas, Louis A. 
Graf, Oscar J. 
Hackett, James. 
Hampston, James J. 
Healy, John D. 
Lavoie, Louis P. 
Lovejoy, George A. 
Lynch, John J. 
Marden, Frank W. 
McGrath, Matthew F. 
McQuade, Edward H. 
Moher, William. 
Moore, Frank P. 



Moriarty, Mortimer J. 
Mullen, John. 
O'Malley, John F. 
Potts, John. 
Proctor, Levi J. 
Ivourke, Martin W. 
Russell, Albert. 
Shea, Jeffrey. 
Smith, John F. 
Somers, Elmer E. 
Sullivan, Florrence. 
Sweeney, James. 
Welch, John T. 
Whalen, Michael J. 



Janitor of Station. 

Frank P. Wiggin. Salary, $2.00 per day. Residence, 156 Merrimack 
street. 



Matron. 



Miss A. B. Brown. Salary, $425 per annum. Residence, 228 Merri- 
mack street. 



Scinooi Committee. 

Chosen at the biennial election in November, 1902; maj^or and presi- 
dent of the common council members ex officio. The board of school 
committee choose the clerk of the board, the superintendent of public 
instruction, the truant officer, and the teachers in the public schools, 
and determine their salaries. They have charge of the repairs of 
schoolhouses, to a limited extent, and the purchase of free text-books 
and other supj)lies, and are limited by the appropriations of the city 
councils. The salary of the committee is $10 each. 



Elmer D. Goodwin. 



John W. Johnston. 



Ward 1. 



Ward 2. 



Ward 3. 



James A. Saj-ers. 



Will C. Heath. 



Joel S. Daniels. 



Frank L. Downs. 



12 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Ward 4. 
Xathaniel L. Colby. Isaac N. Cox. 

Ward 5. 
Dennis F. O'Xeil. John F. Lee. 

Ward 6. 
Eugene B. Dunbar. Harrj- L. Davis. 

Ward 7. 
Edward B. Woodbury. Edson S. Heath. 

Ward 8. 
Walter B. Mitchell. Frank A. Cadwell. 

Ward 9. 
Alaric Gauthier. Joseph Doucet. 

Ward 10. 

Henry W. Barnard. Michael J. Moran. 

Eugene E. Eeed, ex officio, chairman. 
G. I. Haselton, ex officio. 
Edward B. Woodbury, vice-chairman. 
Harry L. Davis, clerk. 

Superintendent of Public instruction. 

Charles W. Bickford Office, City Hall 

Salary, $2,300. 

Superintendent's Clerk. 

Fannie L. Sanborn Residence, 161 Hanover street 

Salary, $500. 

Truant Officer. 

Curtis W. Davis Office, City Hall 

Salary, $850 and allowance for horsehire. Eesidence, S49 Chestnut 
street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 13 

Assessors. 

(Chapter 314, Laws of 1903.) Establishiiifi;- a board of three assessors. 
Board elected by the common council in IJecem'ber, 1904, one member 
for two years, one member for four years, and one member for six 
years, from January 1, 1905. Thereafter biennially in the month of 
January, beginning in 1907, the common council shall elect one mem- 
ber for six years. Salary, $1,500. 

George A. Clark. Term expires Januarj% 1911. 
Joseph 0. Tremblay. Term expires January, 1909. 
William P. Farmer. Term expires January, 1907. 
George A. Clark, chairman Office, City Hall 

CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 

Arthur W. Eowell Office, City Hall 



Inspector of Check-Lists. 

One in each ward chosen at the biennial election in November. 
Compensation, $2.25 per day for each day actually employed. Office, 
City Hall. (Laws of 1878, chapter 163, sections 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 
14, 16, and City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) 



Ward 


1. 


William F. Grauer. 


Ward 


2. 


Charles B. Tucker. 


Ward 


3. 


Arthur W. Rowell. 


Ward 


4. 


Albert T. Barr. 


Ward 


5. 


James F. Otis. 


Ward 


6. 


George A. Taylor. 


Ward 


7. 


Lyman H. Burbank. 


Ward 


8. 


Charles C. Tinkham. 


Ward 


9. 


Norbert Descoteau. 


Ward 


10. 


Alexander J. Grenier. 


Charles C. 


Tinkham, chairman. 


Charle 


s B, 


. Tucker, clerk. 



Overseers of the Poor. 

One in each ward, chosen at biennial election in November. The 
mayor is a member ex officio. Compensation, $50 per annum, each; 
clerk of the board, $125 per annum, determined by City Ordinances, 
chapter 14; section IS, as amended by Ordinances of August 5. 1890, 
and July 2, 1901. Meet third Wednesday of each month in City Hall 
built^ng. 

Ward 1. George E. Davis, 40 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Ward 2. Daniel G. Andrews, 777 Union street. 



14 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Edward H. Holmes, 517 Chestnut street. 

Charles B. Clarkson, 329 Amherst street. 

Thomas F. Sheehan, 364 Beech street. 

John L. Wentworth, 345 Belmont street. 

William Marshall, 80 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Henry Lein, 118 Third street. 

Alphonse Remillard, 416 Kimmon street. 

Moses C. Morey, 276 Nutt road. 
Eugene E. Reed, ex officio. Office, City Hall. 
Thomas C. Stewart, clerk. 



Ward 


3. 


Ward 


4. 


W^ard 


5. 


Ward 


6. 


Ward 


7. 


Ward 


8. 


Ward 


9. 


W^nrd 


10. 



Board of Health. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 1885, 
chapter IGo; Laws of 1887, chapter 227; Public Statutes, chapters lOS, 
109, 110.) One member appointed by the major in Januarj- of each 
year, to hold office for a term of three jears. Salary, $200 each per 
annum. Office, Court House, West Merrimack, corner of Franklin 
street. 

William K. Robblns. Term expires first Monday in February, 1907. 

William J. Starr. Term expires first Monday in February, 1908. 

Joseph E. A. Lanouette. Term expires first Monday in February, 
1906. 

William B. Blake, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, Merri- 
mack, corner of Franklin street. 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, Merrimack, 
corner of Franklin street. 

Carl O. Seaman, plumbing and milk inspector. Office, Court House, 
^ferrimack, corner Franklin street. 

M. Alma Fracker, office clerk. 



Fire Department. 

The chief engineer and four assistant engineers are chosen bien- 
nially in the month of January, by a majority of the city councils in 
convention. The salary of the chief engineer is $1,500 per annum; 
the assistant engineers, each $250 per annum. They exercise the 
powei's and perform the duties of firewards. The said engineers con- 
stitute the board of engineers, and elect a clerk whose compensation 
is $75 a year. The annual compensation of the call members of the 
several hook-and-ladder, hose, steam fire engine, and chemical com- 
panies is as follows: Captains, each $165; lieutenants, each» $160; 
clerks, each $160; call engineers, each $185; assistant engineers, each 
$155; all other members, each $150: payable in semi-anniuil payments, 
on the first of January and July. (Laws of 1870, chapter 99. General 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 15 

Laws, chapter lOG. City Ordinances, chapters and 12). Six mem- 
bers are permanently employed as engineers at $70.25 per month each, 
and twenty-one as drivers' at $()S..'i;5 1-3 per month each, six other 
permanent men at $65 per month each, permanent captains, $75 per 
month each, and receive no compensation as call members. Members 
and officers of each companj^ are appointed by the board of engineers. 



Chief Engineer. 

Thomas W. Lane Office, Central Station, Vine street 

Residence, 1937 Elm street. Telephone at house and office. 

ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Clarence R. Merrill. Fred S. Bean. 

John F. Seaward. Arthur Provost. 

Clarence R. ^Merrill, clerk. 



Trustees of City Library. 

(Law of 1854, chapter 1588. See contract with Manchester Atheneum, 
printed on pages 107 and 108 of City Report for fiscal year ending Jan- 
uary 31, 1855.) Board of seven trustees, one of whom is elected by 
aldermen and board of trustees in joint convention in September, 
annually. Term of service, seven years, no salary. Two additional 
trustees, mayor, and president of common council, e.v officio. 

Frank P. Carpenter, Elm, corner West North street. Term expires 
October 1, 1909. 

Nathan P. Hunt, 747 Union street. Term expires October 1, 190S. 

Herman F. Straw, 607 Chestnut street. Term expires October ], 
1907. 

Walter M. Parkei", 1883 Elm street, corner of Webster. Term expires 
October 1, 1906. 

Roger G. Sullivan, 168 Walnut street. Term expires October 1, 1912. 

Henry W. Boutwell, 587 Union street. Term expires October 1, 1911. 

William P. Farmer, Candia Road. Term expires October 1, 1910. 

Eugene E. Reed, ex officio. 

G. Irving Haselton, ex officio. 

Nathan P. Hunt, clerk. 



City Library. 

Franklin street, corner of Dean avenue. Open from 10 A. jr. to 8 
p. M. Saturdays to 9 P. ir. Sundays, 11 A. m. to 5 p. ir. 



16 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Librarian. 

F. Mabel Winchell, 593 Union street. Salary, $1,000 aiiniKillv'. 
Elected by the trustees of library. 



Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 

The board of alflermen, biennially, elect one member of said board 
for a term of six years. Not more than two members can be of the 
same political party. Said board, consistinfj- of three members, has 
full charge, nianaijement and control of the building-, constructing^, re- 
jjairing' and maintaining of all the streets, highways, lanes, sidewalks, 
bridges, ])ublic sewers and drains, and public parks and commons. 
(See Laws of 1893, chapter 2G4.) Office, City Hall building. Open 
from S to 12 A. M., 2 to 5 p. M. liegular meeting of the board at 2 
o'clock V. M. each day. Salary of each member .$()00 per year, payable 
quarterly, and each is allowed $ir>0 aniiually for horsehire. 

Horace P. Simpson,* chairman. Term expires April. KlOfi. 

William McT^llroy. Term expires April, 1906. 

Byron Worthen. Term expires April, 1908. 

Fred K. Kamsej', clerk. Term expires April, 1910. 



Timekeeper. 

Xoves 15. Cumniings. 



City Weiglier. 

(rilbert Lyons. Office, city scales. 

Elected biennially in board of aldermen. Salary, $,")00 per annum; 
all fees for weighing returned monthly to city treasurer with sworn 
statement. Stationed at citv scales on Franklin street. 



Sealer of Weights and iVleasures. 
Charles ]>. Clarkson. 

Elected biennially in .January by board of aldermen. Paid by fees. 
(Section 25, chapter 43, Public Statutes, and chapter 125, Public Stat- 
utes.) 

* Died August 13, 1905. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 17 



Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39, sections ], 2, ;i, 4.) Two trustees 
elected by board of aldermen in January, annually, for the term of 
four years. Sub-trustees appointed by board of trustees. 

J. Adam (iraf, 10 Middle street. Term expires January, 1909. 
William H. Maxwell, 476 Front street. Term expires 19u7. 
John L. Sanborn,'"' 2") Market street. Term expires 1i)()(). 
Charles P. Porter. Term expires 1906. 

Clarence M. Edgerly, 232 Prospect street. Term expires 1906. 
Stillman P. Cannon, 99 Lowell street. Term expires 1909. 
Charles E. Stearns, 329 Front street. Term expires 1907. 
Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street. Terxn expires January, 1908. 
Harrie M. Young, 33 Dutton street. Term expires January, 190S. 
Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer, 33 Walnut street. 



Sub-Trustees of Cemeteries, 

VALXEY CEMETERY. 

Alderman Frank W. Leeman, chairman; Aldermen Read, Stillman P. 
Cannon, Clarence M. Edgerly, and Charles P. Porter. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Alderman Bunton, chairman; Aldei'men Charles H. Clark, J. Adam 
Graf, Harrie M. Young, and Edwin F. Jones. 

AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

Alderman Parnell, chairman; Aldermen Charles E. Stearns and Wil- 
liam H. Maxwell. 

StTPERINTENDENT OF PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

John Erskine. Office and residence at the oeiuetery, 

SUPERINTENDENT OF VAELEY CEMETERY. 

Eugene C. Smith. Office at the cemetery; residence, 2^72 Mast street. 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUND. 

Xorwin S. Bean. 
Charles H. Anderson. 
Eugene E. Reed, c.v iifficio. 
Fred L. Allen, treasTirer. 

* Deceased. 



18 MANCHESTEE CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Inspector of Buildings. 

Edwin S. Foster Office, City Hall 

Residence, 11 Linden street. Appointed by board of major and 
aldermen, biennially, in Februarj-. Salary-, $800 per annum and an 
allowance for horsehire. (City Ordinances, chapter 15. Laws of 1883, 
chapter 94.) 



Inspectors of Oil. 

J. Oscar Burbank, 1470 Elm street. 
John E. Filler, GS Parker street. 

(Public Statutes, chapter 129, sections 25-34. Citj- Ordinances, chap- 
ter 25.) Paid bj' fees, Vk of one per cent per gallon. 



Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 

Appointed by the mayor. 

William K. Eobbins. 

Samuel J. Lord. 

Christian L. Wolf. 

William K. Rol>bins. president. 

Samuel J. Lord, clerk. 



Sinking Fund Commissioners. - 



Horace P. Simpson,* chairman. 
William McElroy. 
Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer. 
Charles H. Manning-. 



Moderators. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 31, sections 3, 9: chap- 
ter 36, section 9; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordinances, page IS. See 
Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Salary, $15.00, payable at expiration of term. 

Ward 1. Abial W. Eastman. 
Ward 2. Robert L. Manning. 
Ward 3. George E. Prime. 

* Deceased. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



19 



Ward 


4. 


George II. Phinney. 


Ward 


5. 


Thomas Riordan. 


Ward 


6. 


Harry L. Davis. 


Ward 


7. 


Johann A. Graf. 


Ward 


S. 


John G. INIcAllaster. 


Ward 


9. 


Denis Vigneault. 


Ward 


10. 


John H. Eice. 



Ward Clerks. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 44, sections 10, 12. Ciry 
Ordinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns and cities. "> 

Salary, $20.00, payable at expiration of term. 



Ward 


1. 


James M. Yuill. 


Ward 


2. 


Frank S. Chase. 


Ward 


3. 


George W. Cook, 


Ward 


4. 


Frank P. Collins. 


Ward 


5. 


Michael Clongherty. 


Ward 


6. 


Charles H. Martel. 


Ward 


7. 


Charles E. Bartlett. 


Ward 


8. 


Frank Kyle. 


Ward 


9. 


Euclide F. Geffrion, Jr. 


Ward 


10. 


Almon 0. Oviatt. 



Selectmen. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 1, section 27; chapter 
12, section 6; chapter 40, sections 2, 3; cha^Dter 109, section 27; chapter 
213, section 1. City Ordinances, page 18. Public Statvites relating to 
towns and cities.) 

Salary, $15.00, paya'ble at expiration of term. 

Ward 1. 



Herbert L. ]Molloy. 



Alfred G. Miles. 



George P. Elliott. 



Joseph Lamore. 
Ward 2. 

John T. Plnmpton. 
Ward 3. 

Frank J. Boisclair. 



Louis Swanson. 



Charles R. Dustin. 



Gustaf A. Oberg. 



20 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT, 



Ward 4. 

Fred Ilurikiiis. Fred H. Gate, 

riiillippe Doucette. 

Ward 5. 

William J. Flannigan. Martin F. McHugh. 

James C. Jennings. 

Ward 6. 

Thomas B. Craig. Henry H. McKelvie. 

Alvin G. Bean. 

Ward 7. 

James W. Clapp. Charles F. Richardson. 

John F. Frost. 

Ward S. 

William K. lilakeley. Fred W. Hoffman. 

Alfred Paqnette, Jr. 

Ward 9. 

Riehnrd Artz. , George Croteau. 

Victor Cullerot. 

Wabd 10. 

Norliert Lafond. William H. Mara. 

William Kennedy. 



MAYOR'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



MAYOES INAUGUEAL ADDEESS. 



Qentlemen of the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

It ag^ain becomes my duty in the customary order of procedure 
to address the incoming- city government in a general view of the 
fields of labor which lie before us. It is not my purpose to enter 
into any extended discussion as to the moral or legal aspect of our 
duties. I do not feel myself competent nor called upon to instruct 
you gentlemen in that respect. I shall content myself with a few 
observations upon some of the conditions and needs with which we 
must deal and the condition of municipal affairs as they have come 
to mj'^ knowledge and as they will present themselves to you. The 
city of Manchester has become a very considerable municipal corpora- 
tion, annually expending large sums of money and attempting to pro- 
vide modern city privileges for sixtj' thousand people, and the chief 
business of the city councils is to adjust the appropriation of the 
large sums of money required for its operation and for public im- 
provements to such an assessment (in other words a tax-rate) on the 
property as shall permit private business enterprises to be carried on 
without a greater burden of taxation than they can afford to pay. 
Above all, there is required a watchful care of the details of busi- 
ness, in the planning of work, and in the expenditure of the city's 
money, in fact, a continual attention to details. This being true, it is 
obvious that the best results can be obtained only by the combined 
efforts of every member of this city government. If the councilmen 
and aldermen from each ward will take pains to observe the progress 
of public work, and the public needs in their own section, and then 
coming together with those who represent all the other sections, will 
act with the purpose of accomplishing what is best for the whole 
people after a full and free discussion of the matters before them, 
we shall obtain the best possible results in municipal government. 

OUTLINE OF POLICY. 

In short, it should be our aim to do everything in the nature of 
needed public improvements in every ward that we can do without 
the imposition of a burdensome rate of taxation. If some things 
that are needed, or at least would be desirable for Manchester, are not 
included in the appropriations for the year 1905, it does not neces- 
sarily mean that these things are not to be had at all, but merely 
that they must wait and be distributed year by year so as not to 

23 



24 mayor's inaugural address. 

create demands which we cannot at present afford to meet. In decid- 
ing upon the question of appropriations in each particular case, we 
find ourselves in the domain of business and not of politics. It is 
not possible to divide on such questions upon any lines except those 
of business judgment. We cannot be for or against a proposition to 
erect a schoolhouse or other public building as a result of any political 
party division, for certainly there is no political jjarty with a platform 
of principles for or against public buildings or which determines 
beforehand the policy or the advisability of undertaking certain pro- 
posed public works, which are really business questions. Those must 
be decided by reference to each man's business sagacity. If, from 
some Republican member of these boards, objections should be made 
to some proposed public work on the grounds that the city of Man- 
chester could not now afford to enter upon it, other members of the 
boards should decide upon the question upon its merits purely, and 
a Democratic member would have no excuse for voting against an 
objection thus raised because of the party affiliation of the member 
making the objection. In other words, we are here to determine the 
business policy of a municipal corporation as its business agents and 
not as politicians. 

THE TAX RATE. 

The first question of importance which this city government is 
called upon to consider is the tax-rate for the ensuing year. If we 
can settle upon a figure which in our judgment as business men the 
tax-rate should not exceed, we have in a measure simplified many of 
the questions that will follow. If we are able to say that in our 
judgment the best interests of this city require that the tax-rate shall 
not exceed a certain figure, then it easily follows that when we have 
all the estimates of all the departments before us, we must measure 
them by the yardstick of that tax-rate, cutting and trimming until 
what we voted to raise by taxation is within that rate. 

It is my judgment that we ought not to varv very much from the 
two dollar mark, and do all in our power to preserve and lower if 
possible the i)i'esent rate. I have arrived at that opinion after diligent 
conference Avith the business interests of Manchester, as well as 
with many of the smaller tax-payers, and, after a careful canvass 
of the appi-opriations which must be made for the ensuing j-ear, I 
•believe it is possible to satisfy public sentiment in this respect. It 
will be close work and will entail much patience and calculation upon 
the part of the committees. We shall run the risk of being called 
parsimonious and our labors may be characterized as cheese-paring, 
but in my judgment it can be done. 

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS. 

To begin with we have a $155,000 legacy of bonded indebtedness, 
which has come down to us froni a citv government inaufi-urated in 



/ MAYORS INAUG[TRAL ADDRKSS. 2o 

1S85, fifty thoiisiind dollars of ^vhich falls due this year. At the 
time this debt was incurred no provision was made for a sinkin<^ 
fund with which to take care of it. It is evident that the architects 
of this piece of business had a vivid idea of the importance of a low 
tax-rate, in fact? we may say an exag-gerated idea, inasmuch as the,y 
not only succeeded in avoiding the paying for improvements which 
they were making- at the time, but also avoided paying- the propor- 
tionate share of that burden, which should have been distributed all 
along the twenty years that have succeeded. We must begin now 
where they should have begun twenty years ago, and refund this 
indebtedness, distributing it over another twenty years with an 
appropriate contribution each year providing for its ultimate liquida- 
tion. No other course is possible for us at this time. 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

The time has come when additional school facilities must be fur- 
nished for the eastern section of the city. The Hallsville school can- 
not now accommodate the pupils in that school district. The present 
method of providing for the overflow is expensive and entirely unsat- 
isfactory. After a careful canvass of the situation with the Superin- 
tendent of Schools, who has studied it in all its phases, I am convinced 
that the plan proposed by him is altogether the most feasible and 
satisfactory solution of the problem, and most consistent with econ- 
omy and the needs of that section of the city. Mr. Bickford's propo- 
sition is to build a four-room addition to the Hallsville school, which, 
according to statistics gathered by him, will provide adequate accom- 
modations for that school district for at least ten j-ears to come. The 
estimated cost for this project is about $20,000, and I am fully 
persuaded that the work should now be undertaken. During the last 
two years many of our school buildings have called for extensive 
repairs and alterations in the heating and sanitary systems. These 
changes must be carried on as fast as possible until every building 
is in perfect sanitary condition. 

THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The appropriation for the Fire Department last year reached 
the high water mark of $97,500. It is not desirable or wise for us at 
this time to increase this appropriation. We now have a very elabor- 
ate sj'stem of fire protection, and in the efficiency of the service 
and completeness of the appointments it is probably unexcelled by 
any city of our size. By that I do not mean to say that extensions 
of the service could not be readily suggested, which would make it 
even more complete, but we must go no faster in this direction than 
our financial condition will warrant. Recent communications from 
the National Board of Fire Underwriters of New York recommending 
extensions have been called to my attention, but I cannot approve 



26 mayor's inaugural address. 

of any addition to our burdens in that direction at this time. We, 
as the business agents of Manchester, must first consider what this 
municipal corporation can afford to pay for fire-fighting facilities, 
and it is a secondary consideration what can be done for the protec- 
tion of the insurance companies, who already by the rates which they 
have placed upon property in this citj^ have apparently protected 
their own interests 'by a highly scientific computation of risks. 

THE STEEET DEPARTMENT. 

The department of the Street and Park Commission will as usual 
call upon us heavily this 3'ear, and the appropriations for the work 
which they will undertake are for the most part such as must be 
made. Manchester cannot have too manj' good streets and her sys- 
tem of sewerage should be carried to completion as fast as possible, 
but it cannot be all accomplished this year. It is for this city govern- 
ment to say how far we shall go in this direction, and it is for the 
street and park commissioners to stop at the limit which we set. 
We are already burdened with a temporary loan of $9,000, which 
must be charged to this department. This was incurred in the re- 
establishment of the grade of Granite street and building a new 
bridge over the canal last year. This debt must now be paid. Grow- 
ing out of this improvement will be^the work of resetting the canal 
bridge, which will be placed over the railroad on Railroad street, a 
work for which I recommend an appropriation. In any event, the 
appropriation for this department must be large, and if we are to 
keep the tax rate within such bounds as will meet with the approval 
of the people, we will ibe compelled to scan carefully the estimates 
submitted by the board and see to it that for the present j'ear at least 
thej^ be limited to such items as are whollj' necessary. 

THE CITY FABM. 

There has been for a long time a growing sentiment that the City 
Farm is a needless extravagance for the city of Manchester. The 
net average cost of this institution for the past five j'ears has been 
$4,234.79 each year, as shown bj^ the citj' reports. These figures, 
however, are misleading because in this computation the City Farm 
is credited with $2,000 under a contract for the collection of garbage, 
and that amount is allowed on the account. The cit\- nevertheless 
pays for that service, so that the actual cost to the city is $6,234.79 
per 3^ear. Situated as we are within easy reach of the County Farm, 
where such paupers as the city is under obligation to care for in an 
institution of that kind can be supported at the least possible cost, 
and under more favorable conditions than are possible at our farm, 
the policy of continuing the City Farm as a penal institution appears 
very unsound. At the present time the sentences from the Manches- 
ter police court appear to be made without any fixed plan or purpose. 



mayor's inaugural address. 27 

some being for confinement at Grasmere and otliers at the City Farm. 
Tliere appears to 'be no good reason why they should not all be sent 
to Grasmere. A good price could be obtained for the City Farm, and 
in any estimate of the cost involved in its maintenance the interest 
on the money which we have thus invested must be taken into 
account. After a careful study of the situation I have been unable 
to find any good reason for the continuance of this institution, and 
I feel that I can make no better recommendation in the interest of 
permanent economj' than its abolishment. 

PATRIOTIC, CHABITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

We shall have before us in the usual course of business the demands 
of the hospitals, Grand Army posts, and all those charges upon the 
city which may properly be gathered under the head of patriotic, 
charitable, and philanthropic purposes. The appropriations under 
these heads are not usually of large proportions and are such that we 
would not curtail them. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

The Health Department will present us a budget which will be 
worthy of the closest attention of the council. It is important to 
know what we are doing for the sanitation of the city, for its protec- 
tion from disease, in fact, for it general cleanliness, and whatever 
appropriation is necessary to accomplish these vital purposes should 
be m,ade ungrudgingly. Certainly the city of Manchester has no 
higher duty to perform than to furnish the means for the scientific 
preservation of the public health. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

As concerns the Police Department, an estimate of the expenses of 
which will be furnished by the police commissioners, I should expect 
that the amount required would 'be somewhat in excess of last year's 
appropriation, some additions having been made to the force which 
were undoubtedly needed for the proper protection of the city. I am 
informed that even now the routes of some of the night men are 
altogther too long for effective watch service. 

STREET DEPARTMENT. 

The contract for lighting the city having been already made for 
a period of five years the appropriation here is from necessity pre- 
determined. The bill will be high, although not excessive when com- 
pared with other cities of our size, and moreover we have the satis- 
faction of knowing that we are one of the best lighted cities in the 
country. 



28 mayor's inaugural address. 

FIXANCIAL CONDITION-. 

This general snrvej^ of the departments which will call upon us 
for appropriations, impresses us with the important fact that we are 
dealing with the interests of a large city and the expenditure of a 
very large sum of moneJ^ It is evident that in some particulars we 
shall not be able to cut down the amounts called for, but if we are 
ready to grapple with the whole situation from the standpoint of 
business men who are determined to keep our expenses within our 
means, we shall find abundant opportunity for the exercise of pru- 
rience and calculation. I herewith present a statement showing the 
financial situation of the city January 1, 1905. 

Bonded indebtedness, $1,795,000. 

Sinking fund a little over $430,000, an increase of over $125,000 
during the past two years. 

Honds due April 1, to be provided for by refunding or otherwise, • 
$50,000. 

Gross cash on hand, $117,990.32; net cash on hand, $93,836.23. 

IX COXCLUSIOX. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, I would call your attention to what seems 
to me the most important fact in connection with the duties of the 
tity government as now constituted. 

It is left for us to deal out the money, to make the appropriations. 
We may grant or withhold as it seems best to us. It is to be regretted 
that there is left to the representatives of the city elected directly 
from the people so little part in spending these appropriations, and 
so little control of the administration of the important departments. 
The situation has already been determined, and we have just now no 
occasion to enter into a discussion of the causes which have produced 
that situation or its merits or defects. But it is quite important for 
us to recognize the power of the leverage in our hands. Commissions 
have still to look to us for the funds to maintain their departments, 
they must still come to us with their budgets and at least we can 
see to it that such limitations are put iipon them as economy de- 
mands. This is our prerogative as the direct representatives of the 
people, Avho will not hold us responsible for the things over which 
we have no control, but who will be sure to watch with jealous eye 
our fidelity as regards the talent entrusted to us. 

EUGENE E. EEED, 

Mayor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

To the Board of Mojior atid Ahlernirn: 

Gentlemen: — Tlie auditor hert'with submits to-your honorable body 
his report, giving- a tabular statement of the receipts and expenditures 
for the year 1905. and a detailed statement of the expenses of eacli 
appropriation during the year. 

Eespectfully, 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

Citu Auditor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER FOR THE YEAR 

1905. 

Dk. 

Temjiorary loans: 

Loring, Tolman & Tupper $100,000.00 

Frank E. Jennison 100,000.00 

Bond & Goodwin .50,000.00 

$250,000.00 

E. C. Smith, city clerk: 

Dog licenses $1,786. Ofj 

Sewer licenses 1,787.02 

Rent of tenements 314.79 

Show licenses 240.50 

Billiard, pool and bowling licenses 1,25.3.56 

Rent of city hall 178.00 

Junk dealers' licenses 244.00 

Paw'nbrokers' licenses 20.00 

Lunch cart licenses 25.00 

Employment bureau licenses 5.00 

Job team and hacking licenses 19.00 

Fees, intention of marriages 796.00 

mortgages 130. IS 

conditional sales 118.75 

corporations 23.50 

Miscellaneous records 23.00 

writs 38.80 

partnerships 4.25 

assignment of wages 28.40 

discharges 24.50 

7,060.31 

31 



32 KEPOllT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

I'olice department: 

M. J. Healy $4,420.81 

John C. Bickford 947.91 

Pine Grove cemetery: 

Fred L. Allen, treastirer .$2,.5.'5(j.23 

John H. Erskine, superintendent 5,126.62 

John H. Erskine, siipt. .Merrill yard 1.1..50 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer Merrill yard 15.29 

(Jeorge E. Morrill, collector of taxes: 

Taxes, 1905 $r)34,.526.S8 

Taxes, 1904 , 55,702.87 

Redemption of land sold for taxes 2,7.35.91 

Abatement of taxes, 1904 list 410.25 

Abatement of taxes, 1905 list 1.582.39 

Land sold for taxes . 1,708.89 

Old taxes, 1896 5.58 

Old taxes, 1898 3.90 

Old taxes, 1899 11.70 

Old taxes, 1900 5.70 

Old taxes, 1901 19.41 

Old taxes, 1902 52.88 

Old taxes, 1903 511.02 

Interest on taxes, 1904 1.745.61 

Costs on taxes, 1904 1,5.57.90 

Solon A. Carter, state treasurer: 

Insurance tax $3,052.50 

Railroad tax 47,073.34 

Savings bank tax 68,033.73 

Literary fund 3,028.85 

New Hampshire state license commission: 

Balance licenses, 1904 $2,921.17 

Licenses, 1905 .52,642.33 

City Farm: 

E. G. Li'bbey, superintendent $1,201.12 

Lawrence Connor 22.50 

.lohn J. Connor 3.50 



$5,368.72 



7,693.64 



700,580.89 



121,183.42 



55,563.50 



1,227.12 



Citj- scales: 
Gilbert Lyons 383.60 

Miscellaneous receipts: 

Lands and buildings committee, sale of 

desk $3.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 33 

Charles I. Templeton, board of Agnes A. 

Templeton at N. H. State Hospital $85.14 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co., sale of 
typewriter, mayor's oflfice 35.00 

John W. Daley, removal of manure from 
public building's, contract to May 17, 
190G 100.00 

Samuel J. Lord, plumbers' licenses 45.00 

I. F. Webster, overdraft, paupers off farm 1.60 

William F. Cahill, one bay horse, fire de- 
partment "^ 20.00 

$291.74 

Water-works department: 

Charles K. Walker, superintendent 136,353.07 

Valley cemetery: 

Eugene G. Smith, superintendent $1,626.25 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer .' 56.75 

1,683.00 

Interest on bank deposits: 

Second National Bank $1,651.93 

George E. Morrill, collector 603.98 

2,255.91 

Milk licenses: 
Board of health 381.00 

Street and jjark commission: 

Manchester Street Eailway $2,738.91 

Sundry persons 1,311.70 

4,050.61 

Sale of City Farm property: 

Personal property auction sale, Cavanaugh 

Bros $2,949.35 

Sale of land, John B. Delaney 6,100.00 

9,049.35 

School department: 

C. W. Bickford, superintendent, tuition... $1,820.55 
Harry L. Davis, clerk, free text-books.... 173.64 
Harry L. Davis, clerk, repairs of school- 
houses 55.45 

2,049.64 

Sale of city refunding bonds: 

Merrimack River Savings Bank $50,000.00 

Premium on bonds 1,465.00 

51,465.00 

Riddle fund: 

Interest on bank deposit 28.53 

Total receipts for the year $1,356,674.05 



34 EErOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Cash on hand January 1, I'JO,") $117,990. .'!2 

Unpaid bills December 30, 1905 10,398.9 1 



$1,494,063.23 



Cr. 

Total drafts $1,325,966.30 

Unpaid bills January 1, 1905 24,154.09 

Cash on hand December 30, 1905 143,942.89 



$1,494,063.28 



Ivosppc't fully submitted, 

FRED L. ALLEX, 

City Treasurer. 

To the City Council of the City of Manchester: 

Gentlemen: — I have examined the accounts of Fred L. Allen, city 
treasurer, for the year ending December 30, 1905, and find proper 
vouchers for all payments, and all receipts dulj"^ accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January 1, 1905, Avas $93,836.23 

Keceipts during- the year 1,356,674.05 



Total $1,450,510.28 

Amount of drafts during the year $1,325,966.30 

Net cash on hand December 30, 1905 124,543.98 

Total $1,450,510.28 

The cash taken December 30, 1905, I find to be as follows: 

Deposited in Second National ]5ank, ^lanchester $113,565.71 

Deposited in Second National Bank, Boston 24,467.21 

Deposited in office safe 5,909.97 

Gross amount of cash on hand December 30, 1905. . $143,942.89 
Deduct amount of unpaid bills 19,398.91 

Net amount of cash on hand December 30, 1905.. $124,543.98 
Respectfully submitted with a tabular statement of the receipts and 
expenditures of the citj'^ for the jear 1905. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 35 

STATEMENT OFTHE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER FOR THE 

YEAR 1905. 

Receipts. 

central department. 
Received from: 

Direct city taxes $094,541.47 

Cost and interest on taxes 3,303.51 

$697,844.98 

Licenses to enter sewer $1 787.03 

to keep dog 1,786.06 

to sell miljc 381.00 

to keep billiard and pool tables, 

lunch carts, etc 1,566.56 , 

to shows and exhibitions 240.50 

Fees from citj^ clerk 1,187.38 

$6,948.52 

Kents $492.79 

SUNDRIES. 

Received from: 

City scales $383.60 

Tuition and free text-books 1,994.19 

Repairs of schoolhouses 55.45 

Fire department 20.00 

Miscellaneous sources 225.14 

$2,678.38 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Received from costs and fines $5 368.72 

PL'BLIC PLACES. 

Received from: 

Pine Grove cemetery <57 662.85 

Valley cemetery 1,683.00 

Merrill cemeteiy 30.79 

$9,376.64 

WATER-WORKS. 

Gross receipts $136,353.07 

CITY FARM. 

Received from: 

City farm jrj ooij" -19 

Sale of land and personal property 9,049.35 

$10,276.47 



36 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

LIQUOR LICENSES. 

Eeceived from state liquor commissioners for licenses.. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Received from: 

Interest $2,255.91 

Interest on Riddle fund 28.53 

Land redeemed from tax sale 2,735.91 

Overdrafts 1.60 

Plumbers' certificates 45,00 

Street and park commission, sale of pipe, 

etc 1,311.70 

Manchester Street Railway, paving 2,738.91 



$55,563.50 



$9,117.56 



Total ordinary receipts during the year 1905 $934,020.63 

TEAIPOKARY LOANS. 

Received from loan in anticipation of tax of 1905 $250,000.00 

DEBT. 

Received from: 

City refunding bonds sold $50,000.00 

Premium on bonds sold 1,465.00 

$51,465.00 

STATE. 

Received from: 

Insurance taxes $3,052.50 

Railroad taxes 47,073.34 

Savings bank taxes •. . . 68,033.73 

Literary fund 3,028.85 

$121,188.42 

Gross receipts $1,356,674.05 

Net cash on hand January 1, 1905 93,836.23 

$1,450,510.28 

EXPENDITLTIES. 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

J nterest on water bonds $33,640.00 

on city bonds 36,488.00 

on cemetery bonds 2,500.00 

on temporary loans 4,434.22 

$77,062.22 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



37 



City hall $3,998.43 

Printing- and stationery 1,792.44 

Incidental expenses 4,878.66 

Mayor's incidentals 272.82 

City officers' salaries ] 0,847.72 

Auditor's department 2,061.78 

Sinking- fund trustees 31,000.00 

File and index system 310.00 

Land sold for taxes 1,826.61 

Assessors' department 9,092.25 

STEEET AND SEWER DEPAHTIIEWT, 

Street and park commission $3,148.74 

Snow and ice 9,536.04 

Eepairs of highways 25,519.01 

New highways 3,354.85 

Land taken for highwaj^s 1,048.37 

Watering- streets 6,586.85 

Paving streets 5,384.18 

Macadamizing streets 5,362.36 

Grading for concrete 4,180.71 

Scavenger service 22,284.89 

Street sweeping 4,577.95 

Lighting streets 53,848.53 

Bridges 7,820.44 

Concreting Manchester street 4,606.67 

Macadamizing Massabesic street 2,997.39 

Macadamizing Cedar street 535.80 

City teams 9,972.13 

Eepairs of sewers 7,854.73 

New sewers 21,458.85 

Paving Elm street 8,043.80 

Snow rollers 250.00 

ENGINEEB'S' DEPAJRTilENT. 

Engineer's department 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Health department 

SCHOOL DEPAKTMETNT. 

Repairs of schoolhouses $11,277.92 

Fuel 10,537.53 

Furniture and supplies 1,373.41 

Books and stationery 25.75 



.$75,080.71 



$208,372.28 



3,467.35 



$7,821.22 



88 REPORT or THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Printing and advertising- $386.08 

Contingent expenses 3,674.45 

Care of rooms 7,156.42 

Evening schools 1,269.15 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 275.75 

Teachers' salaries 96,484.15 

Free text-'books 7,168.26 

Manual training 499.96 

Sewing materials 239.19 

Changing dry closet system 4,183.98 



POLICE DEP^\I?TME>'T. 

Police station $3,378.44 

Police court 2,764.37 

Police commission 46,577.25 

i 

PUBLIC blildi:ngs. 

Repairs of buildings $6,761.51 

Board of plumbing examiners 22.60 

Wilson Hill schoolhousc 20.664,98 

WATER-WORKS. 

Water-works $67,545.42 

Water-works sinking fund 24,550.00 

PrUI.IC PLACES. 

Commons $5,139.76 

Stark park 984.83 

Derryfield park 902.52 

Lafayette park 1,000.00 

Prout park 244.99 

Wilson Eoad park 100.00 

North End playground 38.78 

South Manchester playground 32.95 



$144,552.00 



city library. 
City library $6,428.35 

FIRE DEPAKTlLETfT. 

Fire department $73,859.46 

Fire-alarm telegraph 2,545.08 

Hydrant service 19,550.00 



$95,954.54 



$52,720.06 



$27,449.09 



$92,095.42 



EECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 89 

McGreg-orville iDlaygroiind $H).0;) 

Pine Grove cemetery 11,11'^-91 

Valley cemetery 5, 40;!. 28 

Amoskeag- cemetery 504.88 

^Merrill cemetery 69. IG 

$25,555.11 

CIIARITABLfi, PATRIOTIC, A^"D PHILAKfTIUROPIC. 

Paupers off farm ' $13,479.63 

City farm 4,114.41 

Indigent soldiers 136.50 

Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Elliot Hospital 300.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital 300.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital 300.00 

W. C. T. U. Mercy Home 300.00 

Infant asj^lum 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 500.00 

Militia 1,200.00 

Band concerts 450.00 

Eiddle fund 4,835.43 

Manchester Historical Society 500.00 

$27,015.97 

ABATEMENTS. 

Abatement of taxes $2,188.78 

Total of ordinary municipal expenditures $850,763.10 

TEMPORARY LOADS'. 

Temporary loan $261,000.00 

BONDED DEBT. 

School bonds $1 0,000.00 

City bonds 50,000.00 

$60,000.00 

STATE AND COt*NTY TAXES. 

State tax $67,617.50 

County tax 86,585.70 

$154,203.20 

Grand total of expenditures during the year $1,325,966.30 

Cash on hand December 30, 1905 $143,942.89 

Less unpaid bills 19,398.91 

Net cash on hand $124,543.98 



$1,450,510.28 



40 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Interest. 

Appropriation $44,700.00 

Transferred from water-works ;u-ooimt . . . . 33,640.00 

Expenditures. 

Coupons on bridge bonds $2,398.00 

city bonds ' 5,300:00 

city funding bonds 3, .500. 00 

cemetery bonds 2,500.00 

improvement bonds 15,SG0.00 

municipal bonds 2,555.00 

refunding- loan bonds 875.00 

school bonds G,000.00 

water bonds 33,040.00 

Bond & Goodwin, discount on note $395.84 

Frank E. Jennison, discount on note 1,613.86 

Loring, Tolman & Tupper, discount on notes 2,424.52 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 

Payment of Funded Debt. 

Appropriation $10,000.00 

Keceived for bonds sold 50,000.00 

EXPEINTDITLTIES. 

School bonds $10,000.00 

City bonds 50,000.00 

Sinking Fund. 

Appropriation 

EXPEKDITURES. 
Trustees of sinking fund 



.$78,340.00 



$72,628.00 



4,434.22 

$77,062.22 
1,277.78 

$78,340.00 



$60,000.00 



$60,000.00 



$31,000.00 



$31,000.00 



UNAPPKOI'ltlATED MONr:V. ' 41 

Unappropriated Money. 

Transferred from the followiiif^- aeoounts: 

Interest $1,277;':78 

Incidental expenses 5,121.34 

City officers' salaries 1,152.28 

Auditors' department 38.22 

Mayor's incidentals 27.18 

Assessors' department 342.75 

Street and park commissioii 351.26 

New highways 1,645.15 

Land taken for highways 451.63 

Watering streets 913.15 

Paving Elm street 33.73 

Alacadamizing Massabesic street 2.61 

Macadamizing Cedar street 464.20 

Macadamizing streets 2,849.64 

Grading for concrete 3.82 

Bridges 2,179.56 

Stark park 15.17 

Derryfield park 97.48 

Prout park 255.01 

^uth Manchester playground 17.05 

North End playground 11.22 

Eiddle playground 50.00 

McGregorville playground 33.95 

Lighting streets 785.48 

Engineer's department 2.65 

Health department 3,178.78 

Fire-alarm telegraph 154.92 

Police commission 2,850.25 

Police station 121.56 

Police court 135.63 

Fire department 2,390.54 

Merrill cemetery 30.84 

Books and stationery 49.25 

Printing and advertising 13.92 

Furniture and supplies 126.59 

Fuel 462.47 

Free text-books 5.38 

Teachers' salaries 1,515.85 

Sewing materials 10.81 

Evening schools 230.85 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 24.25 

Board of examiners of plumbers 27.40 

City farm 4,385.59 



42 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Manual training- 

Land sold for taxes 

Expenditures. 

Transferred to the following' accounts: 

City hall 

Printing and stationery 

Repairs of highwaj^s 

Snow and ice 

Concreting ]\Ianchester street 

Paving streets 

Scavenger service 

Street sweeping 

Citj'^ teams 

Repairs of sewers 

New sewers 

Commons 

Repairs of buildings 

Pine Grove cemetery' 

Valley cemetery 

Amoskeag cemetery 

Repairs of schoolhouses 

Contingent expenses 

Care of rooms 

Paupers off farm 

Indigent soldiers , 

File and index sj^stem 

Abatement of taxes 

Land for East Side park 

Unai^propriated cash in treasury 



$0.04 
4,973.39 



$198.43 

192.44 

1,519.01 

.'536.04 

945.29 

384.18 

1,284.89 

1,077.95 

1,872.47 

2,854.73 

1,155.79 

639.76 

111.51 

117.91 

3.28 

4.88 

722.47 

974.45 

156.42 

2,479.63 

11.50 

60.00 

1SS.7S 

2.000.00 

19,31S.S1 



$38,810.62 



$38,810.62 



Temporary Loan. 

Receipts. 

Appropriation $11,000.00 

P. E. Jennison 100.000.00 

Loring. Tolnian & Tii])per 100.000.00 

Bond & Goodwin 50.000.00 

EXPENDITUBES. 

Bond & Goodwin $50,000.00 

Hanover National Bank 11,000.00 



$261,000.00 



CITY HALL. 43 



F. E, Jennison $1 ()0,()0().00 

Loring, Tolman & Tupper 100,000.00 



City Hall. 



Appropriation $3,800.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money.. 19S.4:'. 



Expenditures. 

FtTEL AND LIGHTS. 

]\ranc'hester Traction, Lifflit & Power Co., 

electric lights $463.15 

Maxwell Ice Co., wood 19.50 

Northern New England Coal Co., coal 891.16 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 242.04 



WATEK AND TELEPIIOXE. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

telephone service $12.10 

Water commissioners, use of water 464.25 



CLEANING OFFICE.S, ETC. 

Canfield, English & Co., "Cosmo" polish $4.00 

Columbia Refining- Co., soap 4.00 

Hardy & Folsom, cheesecloth 1.25 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap .3.81 

Manchester Hardware Co., floor brush, nioj) 

waste ,'!.l] 

Sarah Minton, cleaning 312.00 

John W. Nye, soap, oil, matches 2.53 

Reversible Tube Cleaner Co., 1 cleaner 3.00 

Charles Robitaille, janitor 779.96 

Mary Sheridan, cleaning 1.80 

Timothy Sullivan, janitor public comfort 480.00 

The Sanitas Co., disinfectant 8.80 

J. H. Wiggin &. Co., matches .20 



$261,000.00 



$3,998.43 



$1,015.85 



$476.35 



$1,604.46 



44 RipPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

FIXTUBES AND SUPPLIES. 

C. W. Anderson & Co., clocks $38.00 

K. D. Gay, awnings, and putting up and tak- 
ing down awnings GO. 66 

C. A. Hoitt Co., cuspidors, water cooler, 

shades 29.37 

E. K. Home, basket .50 

Lynn Incandescent Lamp Co., lanaps 33. .lO 

Manchester Hardware Co., hose, shovels, 

basket 16.40 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

lamps .-IS 

New Hampshire Hug Co., caning chair 1.50 

Orient Manufacturing Co., 1 spray, atomizer, 

tunnel :'>.00 

Paine Furniture Co., 1 desk and express... 27. To 



$211.16 



$34.39 



INCIDEINTAI, REPAIRS. 

E. M. Bryant & Co., shade, labor $4.02 

Hale & Whittemore, repairing frames S.20 

C. A. Hoitt Co., reseating chairs 3.00 

H. A. Piper, repairing desk .50 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing awuings, ])1 limb- 
ing 13.97 

B. F. Shepard, repairing locks, sharpiMiing 

knife, keys 4.70 

SVXDUIES. 

W. G. Berry, insurance premium $36.50 

L. B, Bodwell & Co., ice, mayor's and audi- 
tor's office 19.07 

J, G. Jones Transfer, freight and cartage .65 

• $56.22 

Total expenditures $;?,99S.43 



Printing and Stationery. 

Appropriation $1,600.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 192.44 



$1,792.44 



POINTING AND STATIONERY. 4& 



Expenditures. 

tax collector. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing- noticps, bill- 
heads $50.10 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 2.15 

CITY CLERK. 

\Y. P. Goodman, stationery .$11.50 

Albert Euemely, printing manuals, blank.s, 

etc 107.75 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank books and 

covers 28.25 



AUDITOR. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing' 500 reports $1,129.70 

John B. Clarke Co., printing slips 1.00 

John B. Clarke Co., binding 150 reports 137.25 

E. H. Clough, postals 2.00 

J. A. Williams, printing blanks, billheads 15.25 



CITT TREASURER. 

E. H. Clough, postmaster, stamps and postals $50.00 
C. L. Fitzpatrick, printing receipts and cir- 
culars 3.25 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 2.09 

Stewart, Warren & Co., engraving checks. . . . 26.60 

E. A. Stratton, books and stationery 9.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., blocks, payroll 

sheets 4.35 

MAYOR. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing order blanks, 

letterheads $9.50 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 6.45 

Al>bert Ruemely, printing inaugural address 28.75 

Temple & Farrington Co., envelopes 3.00 

BUILDI]S'G INSPECTOR. 



$58.2.> 



$147.50 



$1,285.20 



$95.29 



$47.70 



Temple & Farrington Co., printing envelopes, 

blanks $16.00 



46 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY WEIGHER. 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank books 

CITY couKictusi a:s'd cx>SD[irrrE(ES. 

.lolin r.. Clarke Co., printing postals $1.25 

E. II. Clough, P. M., stamps and postals 23.00 

The Xntfield Press, printing brief, Gibbs v. 

City 1^.00 

Albert Kuemely, printing blanks, notices. 

etc 88.25 

Total expenditures 



$i4.nn 



$128.50 



$1,792.44 



Ajjpropriation 



Incidental Expenses. 



$10,000.00 



Expenditures. 



BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

D. S. Adams, ^l. D 

E. B. Aldrieh, M. I) 

F. A. Babbitt, M. D 

Roy V. Baketel, M. D 

W. L. Biron, M. D 

F. N. Beardslee, M. D 

Mrs. L. E. Blaney 

Ilormisdas Blosse 

Kate S. Bolton 

H. W. Boutwell, y[. 1) 

William A. Brady, M. D 

A. A. E. Brien, M. U 

J. S. Brown, M. D 

J. F. Brown, M. D 

Lillian G. Bnllock, M. D 

C. E. Butterfield. M. D 

I. L. Carpenter, M. D 

Charles Chirurg, M. 1) 

J. A. Choquette, M. D 

Herman Christophe, M. D 

Fred E. Clow, M. D 

J. M. Collity, M. D 



$3.25 



1.75 
.3.00 
2.00 

.25 

.25 
4.50 
3.25 

.25 

21.75 

S.OO 

1.00 

1.25 

.50 

10.25 

3.50 

5.00 

3.50 

.75 
13.25 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 47 

E. IT. Currier, M. D $l.r)0 

Walter T. Crosby, M. D 2.25 

Charles L. Curtiss, M. D 2.50 

Mary Danforth, M. D 7.00 

George M. Davis, M. D 18.00 

R. H. Dillon, M. D 5.75 

J. H. DeGross, M. D 7.00 

C. M. Dodge, M. D 2.75 

E. B. Dunbar, M. D 10.25 

John D. Ferguson, M. D 0.50 

C. A. Folsom, M. D 5.50 

C. F. Flanders, M. D :i0.50 

George Frechette, M. I) 15.00 

E. N. Fugere, M. D 21.00 

John H. Gleason, ]M. D .3.75 

Moise Ouerin, M. D 27.50 

Noel E. Guillet, M. D .25 

Max S. Guggenheim, M. D .75 

G. B. Hoitt, M. D 4.00 

B. F. Hodsdon, M. D 5.25 

M. E. Kean, M. D 14.25 

J. A. Lacasse, M. D 7.50 

J. E. A. Lanouette, M. D 38.50 

J, E. Larochelle, M. D 52.50 

Z. A. Lavoie, M. D 4.3.50 

J. E. Lemaitre, M. D 10.50 

William H. Lyons, M. D 11.00 

J, W. D. MacDonald, M. D 4.75 

C. W. Milliken, M. D 2.25 

S. Modeen .25 

G. B. Morey, M. D 3.25 

M. V. B. Morse, M. D .25 

Jacob W. Mooar, M, D 1.25 

John T. Murray, M. D 3.50 

Clara Odman 4.25 

S. E. Willsey-Page, M. D .75 

David W. Parker, M. D 4.50 

W. M. Parsons, M. D .25 

W. H. Pattee, M. D 5.25 

E. E. Pendleton, M. D 2.50 

Frederick Perkins, M. D 2.75 

Anna PoUmer 11.50 

William Richardson, M. D 2.75 

J. F. Robinson, M. D 4.00 

Nicholas Sasseville, M. D 11.25 

Servule St. Pierre, M. D 1.75 



48 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Gillis Stark, M. D $9.00 

C. D. Stewartson, M. D 1.25 

F. C. Steuart, M. D 6.50 

Henry L. Stickney, M. D 2.50 

A. G. Straw, M. D .3.25 

Zatae L. Straw, M. D 12.25 

C. A. Sturtevant, M. D :5.25 

C. B. Sturtevant, M. D 4.25 

James Sullivan, M. 1) 5.25 

Emil Sylvain, M. D 19.25 

W. A. Thompson, M. D "; 1.25 

A. J. Todd, M. D 2.75 

G. D. Towne, M. D 2.25 

E. C. Tremblay, M. 1) 25.50 

Joseph Taylor, M. D 

Ellen A. Wallace, M. D 

G. M. Watson, M. D 

H. P. Watson, M. D 

Maurice Watson, M. D 

N. B. Webber, M. D 

E. W. Weeks, M. D 2.50 

G. C. Wilkins, M. D G.25 

Arthur F. Wheat, M. D 2.50 

J. D. Lemay, M. D 9.75 

Gustave LaFontaine, ^l. D 20.25 

MAKRIAGES. 

Rev. W. J. Atkinson $0.25 

Rev. C. R. Bailey 1.25 

Rev. A. E. Bartlett 1.75 

Rev. Edgar Blake 2.75 

Rev. James H. Brennan 11.50 

Rev. Thomas Chalmers 3.50 

Rev. J. A. Chevalier 14.50 

Rev. N. L. Colby 0.50 

Rev. Matthew Creamer 1.75 

Rev. G. H. Crafts .25 

Rev. I. H. C. Davignon 12.75 

Rev. J. R. Dinsmore 1.50 

Rev. C. H. Farnsworth 1.50 

Rev. G. A. Guertin 2.50 

Rev. Arthur Halfmann 1.00 

Rev. Pierre Hevey 14.75 

Rev. Nels E. Johnson 1.00 

Rev. W. X. Jones 2.75 



$731.2S 



INC1DP]NTAL EXPENSES. 49 

I\ev. John Kaiiim $1 .2.") 

Jlev. Jacob Kaplowitz 1 .50 

Eev. N. E. Kron 4.00 

Rev. J. B. Lemon 2.00 

Kev. B. W. Lockhart 2.00 

Eev. F. X. Lj'ons I.75 

Rev. J. J. Lyons 7.75 

Kev. D. J. Many, Jr .95 

Eev. C. C. Mitehell 2.00 

Eev. E. J. Palisoul .05 

Eev. John B. Puchala 12.75 

Eev. John Eeid I.75 

Eev. H. J. Ehodes 2.00 

Eev. Samuel Russell 3. 50 

Herman Rodelsperg-er .75 

E. C. Smith 3.75 

Rev. Charles J. Staples .50 

Rev. W. D. Spencer .05 

Rev. Irad Taggart .95 

Rev. Florian Widman 2.25 

$135.2: 



DAMAGES' AND JUDGMENTS. 

Bridget Burke $75.00 

Joseph Dugrenier 25.00 

C. W. Eager 25.00 

Kimball Carriage Co 15.15 

Ludger W. Leclerc 40.00 

Fred R. Stark 40.00 



LEGAL EXPENSES. 



Dexter D. Dow, fees, Gibbs v. City $75.00 

Edwin F. Jones, time, services, retainer; 

Gibbs V. City 250.00 



CITY COUNCIXS AND COMMITTEES. 

F. L. Allen, expenses to Concord, Boston, 

sundry times $26.62 

John A. Barker, expenses to Boston, serv- 
ing notice 3.O0 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

telephone service, city physician 18.40 

Winifred H. Whitcomb, typewriting finance 
committee's report 1.25 



$220.15 



$325.00 



$49.2T 



50 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TEAMS FOK COUNCIL ANB COIDIITTEES. 

Boyd Brothers $25.00 

J. P. Brown 45.00 

Thomas F. Brown 10.00 

Fifield & BroAvn 28.00 

W. J. Freeman 25.00 

A. L. Gadbois & Co 5.00 

W. Y. Hadlock 13.00 

J. J. Hartnett 5.00 

Harry F. Hull 5.00 

H. H. Lamoureux 20.00 

Manchester Street Railway Co 7.50 

G. W. Reed 10.00 

Vogel & Brooks " 10.00 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Manchester Hardware Co., coal hods $0.80 

Pike & Heald Co., 1 ash can 3.00 

J. K. Rhodes, care of boiler 147.00 

CITY SCALES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal $15.75 

W. P. Goodman, ink and pads 1.20 

E. W. Poore, wood 4.40 

MAYOR. 

F. B. Gee, 1 dictionary $13.50 

C. A. Hoitt Co., vase and repairing stool... 2.25 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co., 1 typewriter 87.75 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 7.59 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising tax sale $26.00 

E. H. Clough, P. M., stamped envelopes 42.40 

C. A. Hoitt Co., repairing chair .35 

Independent Statesman, advertising non-res- 
ident tax list 6.00 

G. E. Morrill, paid for writing tax bills 82.37 

G. E. Morrill, paid for delivering tax bills.. 105.00 

H. A. Piper, board .50 

Francis Pratt, Jr., pens 3.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 51 

E. A. Stratton, ink and books $19.85 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 5.15 

John B. Varick Co., soap dish, toothbrush 

holder 1.65 

$292.27 



$3.75 


7.50 


.75 


94.50 


95.75 


11.49 


1.00 


1.00 



CITY CLEKK. 

Boston Badge Co., stamp, pad 

Duren & Kendall, typewriter ribbons 

Kee Lox Manufacturing Co., 1 ribbon 

Eemington Typewriter Co., 1 No. 8 type- 
writer, less discount 

Remington Typewriter Co., 5 books 

E. C. Smith, cash paid for postals, express.. 
Temple & Farrington Co., 1 ribbon 

F, S. Webster Co., typewriter ribbon 

CITT TREASITREB. 

Amoskeag National Bank, rent of safety de- 
posit boxes $43.75 

American Bank Note Co., engraving and 

lithographing bonds 80.00 

E. H. Clough, P. M., envelopes 21.50 

Joseph F. Cook, inkstands 3.75 

W. P. Goodman, pencils, envelopes 15.50 

Ideal Stamp Co., 2 inking pads .70 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

tolls 1.00 

Francis Pratt, Jr., pens and penholders.... 4.75 

Eemington Typewriter Co., 1 ribbon .75 

Eiley & Sanborn, ribbons and paper 1.92 

E. A. Stratton, 1 book, 1 canvas cover 9.00 

Toilet Supply Co., toilet service 16.25 

John B. Varick Co., 1 door check 3.50 



COUBT HOUSE. 

D. J. Adams, repairing lawn mower $1.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., lawn shears.... .40 

Maxwell Ice Co., wood 13.00 

Moore & Preston Coal Co., coal 176.74 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 8.75 

William Eeardon, janitor 600.00 



$215.74 



$202. 



$799.89 



62 



REI'OUT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

G. A. Wapner, expenses, sundry places $19.55 

telephone tolls 4.83 

stenographer 5.00 

Municipal Ordinances 5.50 

stamps, sending briefs .25 

INSURANCE PBEMIX7M8. 

W. G. Berry $60.00 

George Blanchet 30.00 

Robert R. Chase 60.00 

Samuel H. Connor 30.00 

DeCourcy & Holland 60.00 

Clarence M. Edgerly 120.00 

Everett & Bunton 60.00 

Robert J. Hayes 30.00 

Head & Dowst Co 60.00 

E. P. Richardson 60.00 

John A. Sheehan 60.00 

Fred R. Stark 30.00 

SUNDRIES. 

American Express Co., express on city re- 
ports $6.10 

C. M. Bailey, V. S., examination of horse.... 2.00 

C. B. Clarkson, weighing coal 14.00 

E. H. Clough, P. M., stamps 25.00 

First Field Battery, expense, Fourth of July 

salute 30.60 

"\V. P. Goodman, directories, diaries 125.50 

C. C. Hayes, premium on surety bonds for 

clerk, auditor, collector, treasurer 340.00 

W. F. Hubbard, sawdust, ward 2 wardroom.. .50 
H. H. Lamoureux, hack, ward 8 ballot box 1.00 
Frank D. Leighton, material and labor, elec- 
tion 1904 1.65 

Edward X. Pearson, secretary of state, en- 
grossing acts 4.25 

Thomas Shiney, 15 hens killed by dogs 6.00 

Edward C. Smith, return of 548 names of 

children not returned bj- physicians 137.00 

Town of Goffstown, taxes 2.75 

Water commissioners, use of water 24.25 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$35.13 



$660.00 



$720.60 

$4,878.66 
5,121.34 



$10,000.00 



CITY OFFICERS SALARIES. 



53 



City Officers' Salaries. 



Appropriation 



$21,000.00 



Expenditures. 



CENT RAT, DEPAKTMENT. 

Euf?-ene E. Reed, mayor $1,800.00 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer 1,350.00 

Edward C. Smith, city clerk 1,350.00 

Edward C. Smith, clerk of committees 200.00 

George E. Morrill, tax collector 1,350.00 

Georg-e E. Morrill, team \ . . 150.00 

E. C. Paul, deputy collector 800,00 

Jean B. Guevin, deputy collector 800.00 

Georg-e A. Wagner, solicitor 800.00 

Edwin S. Foster, building inspector 950.00 

Harrj' A. Piper, clerk of common council. . . . 50.00 

John A. Barker, messenger 700.00 

John A. Barker, team 150.00 

Gilbert Lj-ons, weigher 500.00 

William McDonough, weigher 13.89 

Charles Robitaille, messenger 36.00 

Robert A. Morrill, clerk for collector 33.33 

Fred R. Currier, clerk for collector 90.00 

Mabel L. How, trea.surer's clerk 532.50 

Florence A. Robinson, city clerk's clerk.... 437.50 

Susie E. Wason, maj^or's clerk 572.00 

Alice B. Currier, city clerk's clerk 36.00 

Eva G. Jones, city clerk's clerk 160.00 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

E. C. Brigham, balance salary, 1904 $25.00 

D. 0. Fernald, balance salary, 1904 27.50 

CITY PHYSICIAX A^^> O-VTRSEERS OF POOR. 

Clarence W. Milliken, city physician $600.00 

George E. Davis, ward 1 50.00 

D. G. Andrews, ward 2 50.00 

£. H. Holmes, ward 3 50.00 

Charles B. Clarkson, ward 4 50.00 

Thomas F. Sheehan, Avard 5 50.00 

John L. Wentworth, ward 6 50.00 

William Marshall, ward 7 50.00 



$12,861.22 



$52.50 



54 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Henry Lein, ward 8 $50.00 

Alphonse Eemillard, ward 9 50.00 

Moses C. Morey, ward 10 50.00 

Thomas C. Stewart, clerk 125.00 

Eugene E. Eeed, chairman, ex officio 50.00 

SCHOOL OFFICERS AJVD BOAUD OF SCHOOL COinilTTEE. 

Charles W. Bickford, school superintendent $2,300.00 

Curtis W. Davis, truant officer 1,000.00 

Harry L. Davis, clerk of school board 150.00 

Eugene E. Eeed, chairman, ex officio 10.00 

G. Irving Haselton, president of common 

council, ex officio 10.00 

Elmer E, Goodwdn, ward 1 10.00 

James A. Sayers, ward 1 10.00 

John W. Johnston, ward 2 10.00 

William C. Heath, ward 2 10.00 

Joel S. Daniels, ward 3 10.00 

Frank L. Downs, ward 3 10.00 

Nathaniel L, Colby, ward 4 10.00 

Isaac N. Cox, ward 4 10.00 

John F. Lee, ward 5 10.00 

Dennis F. O'Neil, ward 5 10.00 

Eugene B. Dunbar, ward 6 10.00 

Harry L. Davis, ward 6 10.00 

Edward B. Woodbury, ward 7 10.00 

Edson S. Heath, ward 7 10.00 

Walter B, Mitchell, ward 8 10.00 

Frank A. Cadwell, ward 8 10.00 

Alaric Gauthier, ward 9 10.00 

Joseph Doucet, ward 9 10.00 

Henry W. Barnard, ward 10 10.00 

Michael J. Moran, ward 10 10.00 

BOARD OF ALDERXtEN. 

Charles F. Eead, ward 1 $200.00 

F. W. Leeman, ward 2 200.00 

Fred O. Parnell, ward 3 200.00 

Charles H. Clark, ward 4 144.00 

George Eiordan, ward 5 200.00 

Andrew B. Bunton, ward 6 200.00 

Eobert Edgar, ward 7 200.00 

Adolph Wagner, ward 8 200.00 

Gideon Lariviere, ward 9 200.00 

John J. Connor, ward 10 200.00 



$1,275.00 



$3,670.00 



$1,944.00 



assessors' department. 55 

SUNDKIEa. 

T'ayroll special election officers, ward 5, Oc- 
tober, 1904 $45.00 

Total exiienditures $19,847.72 

Transferred to unappropriated money 1,152.28 

$21,000.00 



Assessors' Department. 

Appropriation $9,435.00 

Expenditures. ^ 

salaries. 

George A. Clark, chairman $1,500.00 

William P. Farmer 1,500.00 

Joseph 0. Tremblay 1,500.00 

$4,500.00 

Arthur W. Rowell, clerk of board $945.00 

CLERICAL SERVICES. 

Moses Allard $32.50 

Albert T. Barr 195.00 

Kirk C. Bartlett 10.00 

Arthur Bertrand 8.75 

Charles W. Brown 180.00 

Fred R. Currier 197.50 

Robert Edgar 45.00 

Paul Fechner 35.00 

John F. Gillis 25.00 

August Gingras 32.50 

C. C. Hardy 117.50 

H. W. Longa 13.75 

Thomas Paris 30.00 

Louis E. Phelps 30.00 

Alphonse Regnier 42.50 

Christophe Reischer 30.00 

John F. Roberts 47.50 

G. F. Sheehan 55.00 

L. M. Streeter 51.25 

George Taylor 47^50 

Joseph Tait 20.00 

$1,246.25 



56 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



USE OF TEAMS. 

G. W. Bailey $7.00 

Boyd Brothers 49.00 

Brooks & Corey 2.00 

C. S. Fifield 6.00 

Fifield & Brown 14.00 

W. J. Freeman 6.00 

A. L. Gadbois 19.00 

C. C. Hardy 4.50 

E. G. Libbey 52.00 

O. W. Keed 7.00 

C. H. Simpson 19.00 

L. M. Streeter 30.75 

George Taylor 12.00 

Vogel & Brooks 18.00 

Whiting & Brooks 2.00 

SUPPLIES, ETC. 

C. W. Anderson & Co., 1 clock $13.00 

Eemy Bechard, envelopes 3.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 9.84 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising notice 14.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing cards, blanks.. 63.00 
G. A. Clark, expense of board to Worcester, 

Boston, Brockton 45.71 

John F. Gillis, returns. Commercial Pi'otec- 

tive Agency IS. 00 

W. P. Goodman, books and stationerj- 99.10 

J. Hodge, molding 1.20 

E. K. Home, waste baskets 2.00 

C. A. Hoitt Co-., linoleum, chairs, desks, 

shades, etc 278.15 

Ideal Stamp Co., stamp and ink 3.00 

Ivee Lox Manufacturing Co., 6 ribbons 4.00 

Dana W. King, making index cards 1.66 

Library Bureau, steel cabinets 320.00 

J. H. Mendell & Co., table 41.54 

J. J. Moreau, 24 tin boxes 6.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

telephone service 54.20 

Office Toilet Supply Co., service 9.75 

Office, Bank & Library Co., metallic cabinet 364.26 
Oliver Typewriter Co., typewriter and cabi- 
net 100.00 



$248.25 



AUDITOR S DEPAKTMENT. 

Albert Eueniely, priiitiiif>- ."),()()() slips $5.25 

E. A. Stratton, cards 2G8.40 

E. A. Stratton, book, inkstand, pencil sharp- 
ener 13.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and station- 
ery 95.34 

J. O. Tremblay, expense of board, out of 
town, after railroad stock not previously 

taxed 55.52 

J. O. Tremblay, postage, express, incidentals 32.12 

Union Publishing Co., advertising notice.... 19.16 

John B. Varick Co., safe and putting in 187.50 

John B. Varick Co., hai'dware, etc 8.81 



SUNDRIES. 

W. B. Corey, trucking $3.74 

W. B. Corey Transfer Co., trucking 2.50 

E. F. Jones, legal services 10.00 



SUPPLIES. 

L. M. Cogswell, paid for laundry, etc $3.85 

L. M. Cogswell, stationery, postage, express 7.76 
James E. Dodge, paid for express and deliv- 
ering city reports 1.65 

E. H. Clough, P. M., envelopes 10.60 

A. M. Finnej^ cleaning rug .81 



$2,136.51 



$16.24 



Total expenditures $9,092.25 

Transferred to unappropriated money 342.75 

$9,435.00 



Auditor's Department. 
Appropriation. $2,100.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

James E. Dodge, salary as auditor $1,200.00 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, services as clerk 720.00 



$1,920.00 



58 REPORT OF TIIK CITY ATDITOR. 

AV. I'. ( idiidiiiai), l)()()kH and slut ioncry $.'{.8.> 

Mjiiiclicstcr Jlardware Co., twine .80 

Jvi'niin/^-ton Typewriter Co., 1 No. 7 type- 
writer and lahulator, less discount 93.00 

IC. A. Stratton, inicstands, pen racl<s, pencils 3.30 

T(iM|)le & Farrington Co., books and paper. . 15.40 

Jolin ]?. Varick Co., manilla paper .70 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 

Mayor's Incidentals. 

Aj)i)ropria(i()n 

EXPENDITIRKH. 

Fifield & IJrown. teams $4.00 

I'^uf^'enc IC. Jveed, incidentals 268.82 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unaiipropriatcd money 

Street and Park Commission. 

Ap]n-o|)viat ion 

Expenditures. 

salaries. 

Horace P. Simpson, chairman $37.'5.00 

William McElroy 187.50 

Fred K. Ramsey 600.00 

]3yron Worthen 600.00 

CLERK OF nOAKD. 

Fred K. Ramsey, services 



$141.78 

$2,061.73 
38.22 

$2,100.00 



.$300.00 



$272.82 

$272.82 
27.18 

$300.00 



$3,500.00 



$1,762.50 



$750.00 



IJEPAIRH OF IIIf;il\VAVS. 



USK OK TKAMH. 



William McElroy $10.88 

Fred K. Ramsey 1 r.O.OO 

H. P. Simpson !t:',.7r, 

Byron Worthen ir^O.OO 



OFFICE HUPPI,IEfi. 

L, B. Bodwell & Co., ice $!).Gf, 

John B. Clarke Co., printinf^ blanks, letter 

headings .'j.l!.') 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 150 reports.... 40.55 

A. L. li'ranks & Co., lamp, electric fan 23.00 

W. 1*. Goodman, books and stationery 9.97 

R. II. Hassam, 1 table of wages 5.00 

C. A. Hoitt Co., pail .15 

Ideal Stamp Co., stamp repaired .50 

Manchester Hardware Co., twine. .20 

J. II. Mendell & Co., lumber and lalior 2.41 

Municipal Journaji ■Publisiiing ('o., subscrij)- 

tion ;i.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

tolls 4.50 

C. J. Peters & Son Co., 9 cuts :i:5.75 

E. A. Stratton, book and filing cases, station- 
ery 14.00 

E. G. Soltmann, 1 steel T .square 4.90 

Temple & Farrington Co., l)ooks and station- 
ery 'if'). 87 

John B. Varick Co., pencils, prints, castors 1.90 



Repairs of Highways. 

Appropriation $24,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriatcrl money.. 1,519.01 



$440.r.:j 



$195.01 



Total expenditures $.'5,148.74 

Transferred to unappropriated money .'551.20 



$.-5,500.00 



$25,519.01 



60 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



EXPENDITUBES. 



LABOR. 

lOivision No. 2: 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

Aupcust 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 4: 

April 

June 

July ••• 

October 

November 

Division No. 5: 

April 

May 

June 

August 

September 

November 

Division No. 7: 

January 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 8: 

April 

May 



$75.72 

1,915.80 

2,485.85 

2,407.43 

1,818.38 

1,402.56 

407.15 

475.89 

944.28 

198.45 



$04.00 
167.25 
137.61 
140.25 
42.75 



$37.50 
84.00 
76.25 
55.00 
23.00 
64.12 



$10.00 

137.50 

270.99 

1,178.06 

228.50 

271.75 

76.62 

90.99 

254.81 

239.12 

129.00 



$9.75 
78.50 



$12,131.51 



$551.86 



$339.87 



$2,887.34 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAVS. 



61 



June $101.50 

July 186.37 

August 135.12 

September 71. S7 

October 55.12 

November 17.00 

Division No. 9: 

May $204.(i2 

June 253.99 

July 111.00 

August 80.25 

October 39.50 

November 45.00 

Division No. 10: 

March $15.25 

April 745.60 

May 629.87 

June 526.90 

July 709.04 

August 978.32 

September 925.73 

October 1,136.43 

November 1,085.08 

December 28.31 

Brooks and Brock, labor and material, grad- 
ing 

LUMBER, ETC. 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, fence pickets $83.44 

J. LaFrance, posts 18.00 

Maxwell Ice Co., posts 104.20 

J. IT. Mendell & Co., lumber 29.91 

II. W. Parker, lime 2.20 

West Side Lumber Co., fence slats 6.00 



$655.23 



$734.36 



$6,780.53 
$75.00 



$243. 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 



Manchester Hardware Co $38.23 

B. H. Piper Co 9.00 

John B. Varick Co 300.95 



$348.18 



62 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



blacksmithijS'g atsT) repairs 

American Locomotive Co., smoke stack, tank 

steel 

A. B. Black, 2 points, 2 edges 

Peter Duval, filing saws 

Pike & Heald Co., valves, iron, solder, bolts 
Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., repairs 



$96.00 


1:3.00 


3.20 


8.02 


103.88 



$224.10 



STONK, UHAVPI , ri.AY, ETC. 

Leon B. Annis, gravel $0.00 

Brooks & Brock, gravel and sand 69.68 

Lawrence Connor, gravel 5.70 

C. B. Craig, gravel 8.20 

Byron Corning, gravel 3.10 

Mark E. Harvey, gravel 4.40 

^faurice L. Hoitt, gravel 100.00 

Wallace Laird, gravel, stone 26.30 

Eugene Libbej^ gravel 6.30 

John Lovering, gravel 5.90 

Oliver Merrill, gravel 3.10 

J. F. Moore, clay and gravel 21.00 

L. C. Paige, gravel 7.80 

E. Bingenwald, clay 7.50 

SUNDRIES. 

C. H. Bodvvell, wood $176.40 

H. A. Laxson, cutting brush 18.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co.. 

telephone service 62.45 

Wiggin-Young Co., oil 15.45 

Total expenditures 



$274.98 



$272.30 
$25,519.01 



Appropriation 



Division No. 2: 

May 

June 



New Highways. 



EXPENDITUBES. 
LABOR. 



$20.00 
36.60 



$5,000.00 



SNOW AND ICE. 



63 



July $3.25 

August 719.20 

September 1,473.95 

October 91.68 

November 158.51 

Division No. 7: 
June 

Division No. 10: 

May $57.00 

June 258.80 

July 204.12 

August 71.25 

October 112.74 

November 25.00 

SUNDRIES. 

John B. Varick Co., tools and hardware 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



B2, 503.19 
$70.12 



$723.91 



$52.63 

$3,354.85 
1,645.15 



Snow and Ice. 



Appropriation $9,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money 536.04 



$5,000.00 



),536.04 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $1,532.42 

February 2,133.14 

March 1,471.76 

November 189.26 

December 264.18 

Division No. 4: 
January 



$5,590.76 
$41.37 



$72.88 



64 REPOET OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Division No. 5: 

January $8.00 

February 58.88 

March COO 

Divi.sion No. 7: 

January $185.7.3 

February 212.30 

March 182.88 

April 16.74 

December 17.50 

Division No. 8: 

January $f.3.00 

February 182.37 

March 35.25 

Division No. 9: 

January ' $21.50 

February 42.50 

Division No. 10: 

January $660.69 

February 985.18 

March 857.39 

April 13.37 

December 144.92 

$2,661.5S 

SUXDRIES. 

E. C. Bishop & Co., snow shovels $48.00 

Boston Belting Co., hose 22.95 

Boston & Maine K. R., freight 1.68 

Brooks & Brock, 336 loads sand 33.60 

City farm, labor of men and teams 82.75 

C. L. Fuller, repairing wire on fence 3.00 

T. A. Lane Co., coiiplings, nuts .83 

.lohn B. Varick Co., shovels, chain, iron 16.90 

$209.71 

Total expenditures $9,536.04 



$615.15 



$280.62 



$64.00 



Snow Rollers. 
Appropriation $250.00 

EXPENDITITJES. 

Hiinton & Bernard, 2 snow rollers $250.00 



WATERING STREETS. 



65 



Damage of Land Taken for Highways. 
Aijproiiriation $1,500.00 

Expenditures. 

Napoleon Bournival $858.^7 

Emma G. Carpenter 65.00 

Samuel Chadwick 125.00 

$1,048.37 

Total expenditures $1,048.37 

Transferred to unappropriated money 451.63 

$1,500.00 



Api^ropriatlon 



Watering Streets. 



$7,500.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $149.00 

February 6.90 

March 97.39 

April 55.07 

May 1,056.06 

June 476.45 

July 661.85 

August 789.01 

September 296.67 

October 392.17 

November 114.31 

December 3.25 

Division No. 7: 

April $14.87 

May 165.00 

June 77.00 

July 134.00 

August 139.00 

September 26.00 

October 55.00 



$4,098.13 



$610.87 



66 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Division No. 10: 

April $28.00 

May 315.25 

June 171.25 

July 220.50 

August 242.00 

September 60.50 

October 206.50 

November 12.68 

December 7.25 

SUPPLIES AND REPAIHS. 

J. J. Abbott, paint $4.00 

Boston & Maine E. R., freight 14.00 

L. B. Bochvell & Co., ice 76.60 

J. H. Campbell, use of water 3.00 

S. P. Dodge Co., repairing sprinklers 34.30 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 1.48 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe and hose bands 44.75 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice 54.43 

Pike & Ileald Co., pipe, valves, faucets, labor 

on fountains 193.48 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paint 4.31 

John B. Varick Co., jiaint and hardware.... 25.52 
Water commissioners, labor and material, 

tapping for standpipes and stable 156.25 

C. L. ^Yolf, plumbing 1.80 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$1,263.0;. 



$613.92 

$6,586.85 
913.15 



Paving Streets. 



$7,500.00 



Appropriation $5,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money.. 384.18 



$5,384.18 



EXPENDITVRES. 
LABOR. 



Division No. 2: 



April 
May 



$46.12 
384.63 



PAVING ELM STREET. 



67 



June $:142.S0 

July 203.04 

August 1,001.67 

September 395.32 

October 236.91 

November 218.79 

December 26.07 

Division No. 7: 

June $93.62 

July 42.50 

August 181.50 

September 125.62 

October 18.50 

November 4. 87 

Division No. 10: 

April $10.50 

]\[ay ; 191.12 

June 346.41 

July 114.59 

August 425.65 

September 159.49 

October 72.25 

November 74.13 

December 17.50 

Soule, Dillingham & Co., paving repairs 

SUNDRIES. 

Charles A. Bailey, paving blocks $84.30 

E. E. Brock, stone 103.35 

Brooks & Brock, stone, sand 196.30 

John B. Yarick Co., tape, rule, cloth, hammer 10.34 

Total expenditures 



$2,855.35 



$466.01 



$1,411.64 
$256.29 



$394.29 

$5,384.18 



Paving Elm Street. 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

Eeceived from ^lanchester Traction, Light & 

Power Co 1,577.53 

Received from sale of pipe 500.00 



5,077.53 



68 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

July $720.19 

August 763.24 

September 21.24 

Soule, Dillingham & Co., paving 

SUNDRIES. 

C. A. Bailey, stone $2,576.86 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 12.00 

Head & Dowst Co., cement 815.20 

Palmer & Garmon, stone 789.29 

H. W. I'arker, cement 591.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated monej' 



$1,504.67 
$1,754.78 



$4,784.35 

$8,043.80 
33.73 



Macadamizing Streets. 



Appropriation 

Received for crushed stone 



Expenditures. 



$8,000.00 
212.00 



$8,07 



$8,212.00 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

May $18.16 

June 79.78 

July 169.46 

August 124.16 

September 670.13 

October 801.43 

November 47.30 

December 18.32 

Division No. 7: 
August 



$1,928.74 
$107.37 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 



69 



Division No. 10: 
May 

FUEL, FREIOnT, WATER. 

C. H. Bodwell, wood $171.50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ooal 241.12 

Boston & Maine II. R., freight 3.00 

Water commissioners, use of water 70.00 

TOOLS' AND HARDWARE. 

;Manchester Hardware Co $132.04 

John B. Varick Co 431.15 

CASTINGS, REPAIRS, ETC. 

American Locomotive Co., grate, smoke stack $10.00 
American Locomotive Co., labor and material 

on crusher 97.00 

A. B. Black, chain 26.60 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., 1 ten-ton road roll- 
er, ejector, hose, $3,200, less 1 18-ton road 

roller, $1,200 2,000.00 

Drew Machinery Agency, material and labor 5.30 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 3.97 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., screws, nuts... 33.00 

C. H. Hutchinson, collars, screws, etc 8.85 

T. A. Lane Co., glass tube .15 

Pike & Heald Co., valve hose bands, etc 2.34 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil 45.98 

Wiggin-Young Co., oil 23.90 

SUNDRIES. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

tolls $1.85 

F. K. Ramsey, expenses to Boston (new road 

roller) 2.50 

H. P. Simpson, expenses to Boston (new road 

roller) 5.00 

BjTon Worthen, expenses to Boston (new 

road roller) 5.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$G.OO 



$485. ( 



$563.19 



$2,257.09 



$14.35 

$5,362,36 
2,849.64 



5,212.00 



70 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Macadamizing Cedar Street. 

Appropriation 

EXPENDITUKES. 

LABOR, 
Division No. 2: 

September $506.39 

October 29.41 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 

IVIacadamizing Massabesic Street. 
Appropriation 

EXPENDITUKES. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 7: 

September $097.21 

October 316.25 

StJNDRIES. 

r. A. Bailey, stone $1,981.43 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 2.50 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 

Grading for Concrete. 

Appropriation $4,000.00 

Received for edsestone and labor 1S4.53 



$1,000.00 



$535.80 

$535.80 
464.20 

$1,000.00 



$3,000.00 



$1,013.46 



$1,983.93 

$2,997.39 
2.61 

$3,000.00 



$4,184.53 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



71 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

April $8.24 

May 147.00 

June *. 90.15 

July 104.85 

August 361.30 

September 374.50 

October 331.40 

November 288.30 

December 1.G2 

Division No. 7: 

May $14.37 

June 27.73 

July 2.25 

September 20.93 

Division No. 10: 

April $3.00 

May 21.50 

June 25.50 

July 86.87 

September 21.50 

October 6.75 

November 61.75 

December 38.57 

SUNDRIES. 

C. A. Bailey, stone $336.09 

F. S. Bodwell, stone 267.45 

H. W. Harvey, edgestone 35.00 

Head & Dowst Co., material and labor 35.91 

Palmer & Garmon, stone cutting 28.50 

Pike & Heald Co., plugs .09 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concreting 1,432.79 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 6. SO 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated luoney 



$1,707.36 



$65.28 



$265.44 



$2,142.63 

$4,180.71 
3.82 



$4,184.53 



c^ 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOU. 



Concreting Manchester Street. 

$2,500.00 



Aijpropriat ion 

deceived from ^ranchester Traction, Lif^ht & 

Power Co 

Transferred from unappropriated money.... 



1,161.38 
945.29 



Expenditures. 

LABOR, 
Division No. 2: 

June $444.48 

July 979.60 

Soulo, Dillingham & Co., paving 

SUNDRIES. 

F. S. Bodwell, paving blocks $1,004.80 

Head & Dowst Co., cement 3.38.40 

I'almer & Harmon, paving blocks 416.97 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.. 1,223.35 

Total expenditures 

Scavenger Service. 

Appropriation $21,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated monej'.... 1,284.89 

EXPEKDITIRES. 

LABOR. 
Division No. 2: 

January $941.12 

February 1,317.19 

March 1,144.74 

April 1,577.94 

May 1,555.11 

June 956.03 

July 950.94 

August 950.29 

September 873.81 

October 997.67 

November 1.371.19 

December 837.76 



$4,606.67 



$1,424.08 
$199.07 



$2,983.52 
$4,606.67 



$22,284.89 



$13,473.79 



SCAVENGER SERVICE 



73 



Division No. 7: 

Jaminry 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

Aug'ust 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 10: 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July ^ 

Auf,''ust 

September 

October 

November 

December 

CONTRACT. 

City farm 

William II. Dickf ord 

SUNDHTHS. 

Ame & Co., Standard Food, ointment 

American Locomotive Co., rings, lengthening 

axles 

C. S. Bangs, pipe, collar, labor 

C. C. Barnard, threshing oats 

Thomas Burns, straw 

A. S. Brown, bran, etc 

John P.. Clarke Co., advertising proposals... 

Oliver Comire, repairing harnesses 

0. P. Ellis, boarding men while threshing 

oats 



$118.00 
148.00 
124.50 
163.38 
149.00 
126.05 
116.00 
117.69 

91.75 
104.50 
145.00 

96.50 



$252.00 
317.62 
261.75 
542.73 
464.50 
297.37 
390.74 
455.73 
343.75 
350.60 
472.10 
213.48 



$666.64 
1,545.81 



$17.50 

18.00 
4.77 
70.00 
31.55 
21.75 
9.00 
21.25 

11.25 



$1,500.37 



$4,362.37 



$2,212.45 



74 



PwEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Gage & :Mcl>ous'all, oats $:^90.(;n 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 16.03 

I'artridge Brothers, rye straw 5.40 

A. W. Trescott, hay 16.49 

Stark Mills, duck 3.65 

Union Publishing Co., publishing notice 5.65 

John B. Varick Co., tools and hardware 90.44 

Joseph Vogel & Co., harness supplies 47.75 

Wiggin-Young Co., wicks, salt, glass, broom 5.36 

I. T. Webster, hay 49.44 

Total expenditures 



$735.91 



$22,284.89 



Street Sweeping. 

Appropriation 

Transferred , from unappropriated money.... 



$3,500.00 
1,077.95 



$4,577.95 



EXPE^'DITUBES. 



LAUOR. 

Division 5\o. 2: 

March $14.01 

April 353.87 

May S61.42 

June 535.24 

July 448.26 

August 656.01 

September 364.98 

October 407.56 

November 363.14 

December 65.78 

Division No. 7: 
May 

Division No. 10: 

April $35.50 

May 67.62 

June 21.00 

July 37.00 

August 33.00 

September 53.25 

October 27.25 

November 22.50 

December 6.75 



$4,070.27 
$21.00 



$303.87 



BRIDGES. 



75 



SUPPLIES. 

Boston & Maine R. E., freight 

H. Thompson, brooms and refilling brooms 



$1.42 
181.39 



$182.81 



Total expenditures 



$4,577.95 



Appropriation 



Bridges, 



$10,000.00 



EXPET<DITURES. 



LABOR. 

Division Xo. 2: 

April $06.87 

May 210.31 

June 93.50 

September 21.04 

October 49.50 

November 34.03 

December 15.00 

Division No. 8: 
June 

Division No. 9: 
June 

Division No. 10: 

April $5.50 

June 3.50 

• Julj^ 212.86 

August 839.19 

September 615.02 

October 559.68 

November 127.69 

December 54.00 



1LA.TEKIA.L A:N'D REPAIRS. 

American Locomotive Co., 4 cast iron posts.. $14.56 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., repairs, mate- 
rial, and labor 987.64 

C. A. Bailey, bridge abutments 1,500.00 

C. A. Bailey, stone 758.43 



$490.25 
$201.97 

$13.50 



$2,417.44 



70 KKI'OKI' OF THK ("ITV Al'DrroK. 

r.Jiclicldrr .V l''l(i.vil, IiiimIht $'.i.:is 

Cli.irli'S HoiHchiir, coiil ;J2.00 

ili'.Kl A' Dovvsl Co.. |il;iiiU. etc .'I'.CJ.nO 

11. .1. Mack, con! 7.H0 

.1. II. M.-iuicij A' ('(.., iiimhiT ;!().:.;i 

II. W. {■.iikcr. |.i|ii' (•(•iiiciil (UC.Hl 

I'ikc .V ll<-.il(i ('(I., piickiiiK' frasUcts 1.8fi 

.Idliii i;. \ aii.U Co., liarduarc 87.27 

\V<'.sl Side Liiiiihrr Co., Iimilicr ].().'» 

ll.iii V Wi'lirr, coal 44.19 

KI'NDUIKS. 

liostoii A' Maine II. K., services oT flii^'-iiian. 
coiisl I'licl ion iii^^liway in'i(lf,''i' o\'ci' .Noi'lli 

Wicarc railroad $Isr,.on 

Uyron Worllicn, expenses to iJoslon, account 

new liridfie ()..')0 

'I'otal expenditures 

'rransi'erred to unapjiropriated money 

City Teams. 

.\|iproi>riation $s,()no.()() 

Ucci'ivcd from misccllaiMHiiis sources '.Hi.iiii 

'I'ransl'crred IMun nnappi'opri.itcd money.... 1.ST2.47 

• 

KxrENDlTimES. 

lAItOIt. 

I )i\ ision \o. '2: 

.lanuary $:172.S0 

l'"el)ruarv at)!.:;:! 

Marcl, ." 244.SI 

April 27r..:{4 

May :57:^-44 

.lunc 'J7;f.47 

.Inly .'>S4.77 

Au-nst ST:i.SS 

Scptcndicr :{S0.(i4 

Oclohcr ins.ll 

Novcmher 420.94 

DiH'cinhcr :i22.41 



$4,.50n.SS 



$1 •.».'!. 40 

$7,820.44 
2,179..'>() 

$10,000.00 



$9,972.1.! 



$5,002.94 



CITY TKAMH. 77 

Division No. 10: 

.liuni.iry $',>r,m 

Febniiiry .'fl.OO 

M.-ircIi IK.OO 

A|)iil IM.OO 

M iiy Xl.m 

Jnno. 2<).r)0 

J 11 ly :U).75 

Aiif,ni.st .'Ct.OO 

Ht'pl ember 2C>.r>() 

Oetolx-r 21.00 

Novcriiihcr 2!). 74 

J)c(i'ml)cr 19.24 



Commons: 

July $170. r.O 

AugUHl, .14.25 



«IHAIN, MAY, K'I'KAW. 

Adiiins UroUicrs $l.r)0 

Ame Sr. Co 15.00 

Arthur S. IJrovvn 728.11 

VV. II. Hoynton 21.!. 57 

I). Connor eMiate 8;).43 

dnm'. & McDouf^^all ;i:i4.04 

J(jlni !'. (Jrillin ;il.8l 

I). llaitiinoiKJ &. Hon 20.:)2 

Maris 10. Ilarvcy 81.05 

Kalpli Ilol'brook 11.75 

A. I'. Horn.' 71.40 

I'.yron Ihi.s(^ 151.04 

Walter McQiieston 150.75 

.laincH McQucston 84.11 

II. W. Parker .'i.O.'J 

L. ('. l'ai^-(! 1!)8.20 

A. \j. Shaw • 21.4(5 



IIAHNFHHKH ANf> flKI'AIUH. 



Oliver Clomire $110.00 

Uanno Saddlery Co (15.00 

J. Vo^'-el & Co .'57.05 



$;(j(i.2.'i 



$221. 



$2,2 1 :i. 17 



$221.(15 



78 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



HAEDWABE AND TOOLS. 



Manchester Hardware Co. 
John B. Yarick Co 



$21.04 
530.86 



LIVE STOCK, VETERINARY EXPENSES. 

Charles M. Bailey, V. S., attendance and 

medicine $8.50 

Cavanaiigh Brothers, 2 horses 445.00 

J. L. Golden, V. S., liniment 12.00 

F. K. Hubbard, colic cure 8.00 

G. W. 0. Tebbetts, medicine 2.60 

WATER, GAS, FREIGHT, FUEL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal ; $50.87 

C. Boisclair & Co., coal 7.80 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight .50 

Napoleon Xormand, coal 13.00 

Northern New England Coal Co., coal 57.56 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 176.46 

Raiche & Laforce, coal 4.00 

Water commissioners, use of water 70.89 



LL^MBER, REPAIRS, ETC. 

W. E. Darrah, roofing material and labor... $232.37 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, machine work.. 147.74 

T. A. Lane Co., supplies . 2.08 

J. H. Mendell & Co., lumber 56.72 

Pike & Heald Co., pans, float, labor 2.45 

SUNDRIES. 

Eager & Co., soap, salt $6.25 

James' stable, use of»team 3.00 

H. H. Lamoureux, use of team 6.00 

C. H. Simpson, use of teams 105.00 

Vacuum Oil Co., axle grease 20.52 

AViggin-Young Co., glass, salt, nails 1.88 

Total expenditures 



$551.90 



$476.10 



$381.08 



$441.36 



$142.65 



$9,972.13 



REPAIRS OF SEWERS. 

Repairs of Sewers. 

Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated money.... 



79 



$5,000.00 
2,854.73 



EXPEOSrDITURES. 

LABOR. 
Division No. 2: 

January $16.12 

February 106.01 

March 237.48 

April 177.97 

May 1,594.19 

June 486.86 

July 346.30 

August 561.83 

September 325.89 

October ' 173.96 

November 709.57 

December 285.72 

Division No. 7: 

April .$77.11 

]May 40.50 

August 52.50 

September 51.25 

October 11.50 

November 4.75 

December 22.75 

Division No. 10: 

April $15.50 

May 265.25 

June 167.62 

July ...\ 183.17 

August 77.37 

September 163.77 

October 13.50 

November 166.99 

December 41.50 

HARDWARE AND FREIGHT. 

Boston & Maine E. E., freight $61.11 

John B. Yarick Co., steel, dipper handles.... 7.26 



$7,854.73 



$5,021.90 



$260.36 



$1,094.67 



80 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



MATEKIAL, LABOR, ETC. 

Adams Brothers, cement $70.55 

Amoskeag ^Manufacturing Co., gunny sacks.. 3.95 

American Locomotive Co., 1 set grates 2.00 

C. A. Bailey, cesspool stone 83.90 

F. S. Bodvvell, stone 5.70 

Harold L. Bond Co., hose and couplings 157.25 

Concord Foundry and Machine Co., castings 63.25 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., rubber boots 13.00 

Head & Dowst Co., brick 25.20 

W. F. Head & Son, brick 216.00 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe 26.81 

Manchester Supply Co., pipe 11.20 

J. II. Mendell & Co.. pipe 24.80 

H. W. Parker, cement, pipe 238.10 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe, etc 187.32 

Waldo Brothers, pipe 263.90 

Wiggin-Young Co., oil 16.50 

Toital expenditures 



$1,409.43 



$7,854.73 



New Sewers. 

Appropriation 

Received from sale of pipe 

Transferred from unappropriated money. . . 

Expenditures. 



B20,000.00 

.303.06 

1,155.79 



$21,458.85 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $546.09 

February 771.54 

March 639.29 

April 482.64 

May 250.51 

June 899.76 

July 183.51 

August 123.28 

September 362.40 

October 820.26 

November 257.48 

December 31.10 



$5,367.86 



NEW SEWEKS. 81 

Division No. 7: 

January $508.12 

February 987.65 

March 863.67 

April 636.84 

May 290.06 

June 542.37 

July 659.68 

August 722.87 

September 382.30 

October 322.37 

November 449.05 



Division No. 10: 

May $21.00 

June 77.50 

August 496.61 

October 43.61 

November 111.22 



MATERIAL, HARDWARE, SEWER PIPE, ETC. 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight $584.44 

Concord Foundry & Machine Co., manholes, 

covers 850.92 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor 5.70 

J. H. Mendell & Co., pipe 802.60 

H. W. Parker, pipe 3,319.14 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe 59.05 

John B. Varick Co., dynamite, hardware.... 216.06 



CEMEXT, BRICK, LUMBER. 

Adams Brothers, cement, pipe $325.55 

A. S. Brown, cement 102.25 

Head & Dowst Co., cement, brick, lumber. . . . 646.47 

W. F. Head & Son, brick 1,181.25 

J. H. Mendell & Co., lumber 580.07 



SUNDRIES. 

Melvin Badger, damage to lot, building sewer $100.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 47.19 

Boston & Maine R. R., expense laying sewer 

under Portsmouth track 3.30 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., rubber boots 41.93 

c 



$6,364.98 



$749.94 



$5,837.91 



$2,835.59 



82 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

E. B. Dunbar, M. D., services rendered L. P. 

Goss $16.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

tolls .45 

S. B. Stearns, insurance premium 50.00 

Wiggin-Young Co., oil 43.70 

Total expenditures 



$302.57 



$21,458.85 



Commons. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from unappropriated monej-. 



EXPENDITXTRES. 



$4,500,00 
639.76 



$5,139.76 



LABOR. 

January 

Februar}' 

March 

April 

Maj' . . . . < 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 2: 

October 

November 

PI,A>TS. 

Clark & Estey 

A. G. Hood 

A. P. Home & Co 

Frank A. Koerner 

J. Kirb}- 



$202.00 
164.50 
155.87 
224.62 
218.75 
187.75 
174.37 
214.25 
155.50 
173.00 
215.87 
87.00 



$397.26 
139.74 



$16.30 
85.00 

140.00 
26.00 

138.83 



$2,173.48 



$537.00 



$406.13 



STAEK PARK. 



83 



AVATEB, GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

electric lights $3C.OO 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 10.78 

Water commissioners, use of water 700.00 

REPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 

C. M. Bailey, V. S., attendance $3.00 

Boston & Maine R. E., freight .61 

E. M. Bryant & Co., repairing electric light.. .70 

r. J. Clark, V. S., attendance and medicine.. 6.00 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., castings, 

labor 75.30 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., attendance and medicine 8.50 

C. H. Hutchinson, repairs 11.94 

H. F. W. Little, filing saws 2.10 

J. H. Mendell & Co., material and labor 556.19 

Peterson Brothers, rent of barn 24.00 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., sidewalks 209.52 

C. H. Simpson, 1 horse 100.00 

John B. Varick Co., paint and hardware 250.51 

G. F. Wenzel, 1 sleigh 28.00 

Total expenditures 



$746.78 



$1,276.37 
$5,139.76 



Stark Park. 
Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January $3.25 

March 8.75 

April 24.50 

May 126.00 

June 87.75 

July 63.25 

August 110.25 

September 48.25 

October 153.25 

November 72.50 

December 4.99 



$1,000.00 



$702,74 



84 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 

Amos'keag' Manufacturing Co., cannon mounts $60.00 

F. J. Bixby, plants 142.00 

F. S. Botlwell, curbing 42.40 

E. O. Dodge, gravel and stone 12.50 

John B. Varick Co., paint, seed, dressing.... 13.19 

Water commissioners, use of water 12.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$282.09 

$984.83 
lo.lT 

$1,000.00 



Derryfield Park. 
Appropriation 

EXPENDITUBES. 

LABOR. 

January $6.50 

February 38.25 

March 17.75 

April 22.50 

May 117.30 

June 86.00 

July 38.50 

August 102.50 

September 166.75 

October 134.50 

November 68.50 

SrXDRIES. 

W. G. Berry, insurance premium $5.75 

F. S. Bodwell, stone 46.00 

J. H. Mendell & Co., brick and labor 8.25 

Pike & Heald Co., 1 bibb 1.00 

E. P. Richardson, insurance premium 6.00 

John B. Varick Co., nails, paint, etc 12.27 

Water commissioners, use of water 24.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$1,000.00 



$799.25 



$103.27 

$902.." . 
97.- - 



$1,000.00 



PROUT PARK. 85 

Lafayette Park. 
Appropriation $1,000.00 

EXPENDITX7RES. 
LABOR. 

Division No. 10: 

October $43.68 

November 166.37 

December 268.11 

$478.16 

SUNDRIES. 

American Locomotive Co., iron and labor.... $30.14 

C. A. Bailey, stone 137.37 

Alphonse Grenier, labor and material 41.96 

H. W. Parker, cement 300.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 12.37 

$521.84 

Total expenditures $1,000.00 



Prout Park. 
Appropriation $500.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

May $22.75 

June 6.00 

August 3.00 

November 13.75 

$45.50 

S.UNDRIES. 

A. P. Home & Co., tree^ and shrubbery $168.75 

J. H. Mendell & Co., lumber and labor 20.05 

John B. Varick Co., glass, putty 2.69 

Water commissioners, use of water 8.00 

$199.49 

Total expenditures $244.99 

Transferred to unappropriated money 255.01 

$500.00 



86 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

East Side Park. 

Appropriation 

EXPENDITXJBES. 

August $62.00 

December 38.00 

Total expenditures 

North End Playground. 
Appropriation 

ExpErNDimtES. 

LABOR. 

May $4.50 

November 15.25 

&X'>'DRIES. 

J. H. ^[endell «Sr Co., lumber $2.S8 

D. B. Sanborn, loam 16.00 

John 1>. Varick Co., nails .15 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 

South Manchester Playground. 
Appropriation 

EXPEXniTt~RES. 
LABOR. 

Auffust 



$100.00 



$100.00 



$100.00 



$50.00 



$10.75 



$19.03 

$38.78 
11.22 

$o0.00 



?50.00 



$12.75 



LIGHTING STREETS. 87 



SUNDRIES. 



Anioskeag Manufacturing Co., use of play- 
ground $1.00 

J, H. Mendell & Co., lumber and labor 18.46 

John B. Varick Co., nails and stajiles .74 



$20.20 



Total expenditures $32.95 

Transferred to unappropriated monej^ 17.05 

$50.00 



Riddle Playground. 
Appropriation $50.00 

Expenditures. 
Transferred to unappropriated money $50.00 



McGregorville Playground. 

Approx^riation $50.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

May $12.49 

John B. Varick Co., wire 3.56 

Total expenditures $16.05 

Transferred to unappropriated money 33.95 

$50.00 



Lighting Streets. 
Appropriation $54,634.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



EXPENDITLTSES. 



Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co.: 

Charges. Discounts. 

January $4,012.50 $7.56 

February 4,029.55 

March 4,031.66 1.47 

April 4,035.00 

May 4,035.00 

June 4,037.94 

July 4,042.50 

August 4,042.50 

September 4,042.50 

October 4,042.50 

November 4,084.01 

December 4,072.50 



$48,508.16 $9.03 

Less discount 9.03 

$48,499.13 

GAS. 

Welsbach Street Lighting Co $5,295.14 

SUNDRIES. 

Mary E. Reed, lighting lamp to November 1, • 

1905, and oil $14.25 

C. H. Simpson, use of teams for committee.. 40.00 

$54.25 



Total expenditures $53,848.52 

Transferred to unappropriated money 785.48 

$54,634.00 



Engineer's Department. 

Appropriation $8,470.00 

EXPE>DITLT?ES. 
LABOR. 

Samuel J. Lord, engineer, services and team 

hire $1,500.00 

Harry J. Briggs 851.93 



engineer's department. 89 

Tinioth.v Connor $42.00 

Alfred T. Dodge 711.76 

Joseph A. Dnsseaiilt 228.12 

Charles F. Goodrich 292.20 

Harold M. Haskell 154,80 

Frank Holland 53.75 

Joseph H. Johnson 45.00 

Lawrence O'Connor 228. 8G 

G. W. Wales 985.63 

Henry Worthen 600.24 

Harrie M. Young 790.95 

John G. Moore, clerk 416.35 

John J. McAllister, Jr., clerk 41.87 

$6,943.46 



SUPPLIES, OFFICE EXPENSES. 

J. J. Abbott, paint and brushes $0.38 

Charles A. Bailey, stone bounds 62.50 

C. L. Berger & Sons, instruments, supplies 

and repairs 556.75 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 8.82 

Brodie Electric Co., labor on fan and coils.. 13.75 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric fan 14.23 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 250 reports.... 34.13 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., castings, 

street sign hangers 24.35 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., rubber boots 11.25 

Frost & Adams, rivets 1.02 

W. P. Goodman, ink, stationery 14.05 

Head & Dowst Co., grade stakes, signboards 68.98 

C. A. Hoitt Co., step-ladder chair, etc 1.85 

E. K. Home, 1 cooler 2.75 

J. G. Jones, freight .77 

Keuffel & Esser Co., 1 tape 9.71 

Kimball Carriage Co., rosettes .25 

S. J. Lord, telephone tolls, express 2.05 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware, num- 
bers 16.48 

B. L. Makepeace, blue print paper 4.00 

Manchester Street Eailway Co., tickets 10.00 

Mrs. Sarah Minton, washing table covers.... 1.00 
John G. Moore, cash paid for express, car- 
fare, etc 12.73 

C. F. McCarthy, painting street signs 60.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

telephone service 26.10 



90 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Office, Bank & Library Co., cabinet, index, 

etc $4S.OO 

Palmer & Garmon, granite post 2.00 

Remington Typewriter Co., G ribbons 3.50 

Nora D. Smitli, typewriting 1.^,0 

Street and park commission, cement, iised 

in making concrete bounds 48.12 

E. G. Soltmann, supplies 66.29 

E. A. Stratton, cards, cabinet, stationery 29.88 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper, binding 

books 12.10 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and station- 
ery 97.9.5 

Union Publishing Co., advertising .24 

John B. Varick Co., paint, brush, prints and 

developing 96.31 

G. H. Walker & Co., New Hampshire road 

map ].'J0 

J. A. Williams, librarj^ labels 1.25 

Mrs. C. H. Wood, painting signs 3.70 

Frank E. Wood, rubber holders 1.25 

SUNDRIES. 

.\rchie Coldwell, 5 dinners, surveying party $2.50 

A. Filion, varnishing wagon 10.00 

A. L. Gadbois & Co., use of team 2.00 

S. J. Lord, use of team 137.50 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unapprojiriated money 



$1,371.89 



$152.00 

$8,467.35 
2.65 

$8,470.00 



Health Department. 
Appropriation 

EXPENDITtrRES. 
SERVICES. 

Joseph E. A. Lanouette, 'M. D., salary as 

member of board $200.00 

William M. Parsons, M. D., salarj- as mem- 
ber of board 200.00 



$11,000.00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 91 

W. K. Eobbins, salary as member of board.. $200.00 

W. B. Blake, sanitary inspector 791.00 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector 823.00 

Carl 0. Seaman, plumbing and milk inspector 939.00 

M. Alma Fracker, clerk 546.00 

$3,699.00 



PRINTING AND STAfTIONEKY. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks, bulle- 
tins, etc $133.10 

John B. Clarke, 300 reports 16.25 

W. P. Goodman, paper 1.50 

E. A. Stratton, books and stationery 21.96 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 book 8.85 

J. A. Williams, printing milk licenses 3.00 



TEAMS, ETC. 

W. B. Blake, carfares and teams $43.75 

John E. Looney, carfares 29.55 

J. P. Brown 46.00 

Fifield & Brown 10.00 

W. J. Freeman 53.50 

E. G. Libbey 7.00 

C. 0. Seaman, carfares 2.90 



OFFICE EXPENSES AND SUPPLIES. 

American Express Co., express charges.... $10.88 

W. B. Blake, telephone, kej-, rubber tubing.. .80 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 12.71 

J. A. & W. Bird Co., formaldehyde 78.44 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., chemicals and 

supplies 3.47 

Carter, Kice & Co., gummed paper 21.00 

M. Alma Fracker, laundry, soap, cleaning.. 14.60 
M. Alma Fracker, dues American Public 

Health Association 10.00 

M. Alma Fracker, postage, express, etc 17.00 

Granite State Eubber Co., gloves, tubing.... 1.46 

A. K. Hobbs, rubber gloves 2.50 

C. A. Hoitt Co., rug, shades, chair, pails 31.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., coal 100.60 

Manchester Hardware Co., paint, brimstone 39.12 

H. K. Mulford Co., antitoxine 400.06 



$184.66 



$192.70 



"92 REPOltT OK THE CITY AlJDJTOIt, 

Jf. K, Miili'oid Co., vucciiif $4.02 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

telephone service ."jCOO 

I'arkc, J3avis & Co., culture media 3.07 

I'eophi's fjas Light Co., gas 13.04 

J. If. Rhodes & Co., 12 caps for formaldehyde 

sprinl<l<!r 2.40 

C. O, Seaman, gas lamp, pii()togra|)hs ].!)!) 

A. D, Smith, formaldehyde atomizer .'i.T.'j 

A. (j. Straw, M. I)., diphtheria examinations.. 50.00 

<j. W. O. Tebhetts, supplies 29,24 

John 15. ^'a^i(•k Co., alcohol, milk bottles, 

etc 21.49 

Vermont i'ann Macliiiic (!o., bottles, pip- 
ettes 4.07 

Watertown Thermometer Co., thcnnoincters 4.45 

N. J. Whalen, 'bag .■{..'■,0 

C L, Wolf, smoke test macliiiH' ;)2.00 



I-KSTMOrSE. 

Manchester 'I'ract ion, Light & Power Co., 

liglils $().4r, 

New lOngland 'l"clc|)li()nc & Tclcgraj)!! Co., 

tele|)hone service 2(i.00 

Jnditli Sliercr, services .360.00 

Judith Shercr, board of sundry jxtsoms 0.45 

Mrs. A. I). Sherer, services 15.00 

A. D. Sherer, services, team 31.00 

A. T). Sherer, paini and liiixir 79.81 

Water commissioners, use of water 7.52 

Maurice Watson, M, T)., vaccinations and 

'•ivlls 108.50 



ISOLATION' IIOSIMTAI.. 

iMJilli Aldred, services ;)s nurse .$180.00 

W. |{. lUake, paid for work 4.20 

1). IJrccd, labor 6.83 

T. J. IJriggs, range, pipe, labor 56.31 

K. M. Ib-yaut A Co., electric sujiplics, labor 10.29 
Ituiildu A' I'.eriiard. taking olT windows, put- 

I iiig on screens 10.20 

I!mii(i)M A' r.eriiiird, l)uililing shed 175.00 

Annie Cameron, services as nurse 12.00 

IJobcrt K. Chase, insurance premium 37.50 



$973.86 



$034.73 



HEALTH DEPAKTMKNT. 93. 

F. W. Fit Is, iii;^ht f^'ovviis $:!.:>! 

C. A. & A. W. Flint, wood 5. no 

Lillias M. Gibson, services as nurse r)4.00 

Mrs. Josie Hackett, services as nurse 40.00 

Hardy & Folsom, crash 3.00 

Kerwin & Shcehan, medicine 7.7.5 

Manchester Coal & Tee Co., wood and coal. . . . 4('i.'.*S 
Manchester Traction, Lifjfht & Power Co., 

li-hts Cl.0.5 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 
thawing water pipes, new top elec- 
tric stove ().'.'() 

New England Telephone & Telegra])h Co., 

telephone services 20.22 

A. B. Patrick, services as nurse 7.00 

Maude Parkins, services as nurse 51.00 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe, repairs 8.72 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., concreting 

walks 01.10 

Mrs. C. E. Rydin, services as matron 192.00 

Mrs. C. E. Rydin, board of sundry persons. . .'iS.n.SS 

Nellie M. Rugar, services as nurse 210.00 

John A. Sheehan, insurance premium .'{7.50 

G. W. O. Tebbetts, medicine 19.40 

John P. Varick Co., toilet ]iaper, soaj) 1.04 

Water commissioners, use of water 17.75 

$],740.:!;i 



SUriM.IKS I'OHI IKOLATKn FAMII.IKS. 

Michael Pagvvell, wood $2.00 

W. P>. IJlakc, medicine, grocHMies 1.01 

C. Poisclair & Co., wood 3.00 

E. F. Buswell, milk .CO 

Bureau & Leblond, groceries i;i.82 

G. W. Clark, groceries 8.05 

Alfred Dubois, wood 2.00 

W. J. Egan, groceries 1 1 .45 

A. Ferland, coal ;!.50 

C. A. & A. VV. Flint, wood 5.(10 

L. IT. Gauvin & CIo., groceries ii.Ki 

Gilbert Gonyeau, wood 1.50 

^lary ITaye.^, groceries 4.84 

J. J. irolland, medicine 5,35 

John A. Kane, groceries 33.95 

Kerwin & Sheehan. medicine 15.54 

La.salle's Cash Market, groceries U.JO 



94 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOI!. 



Lanioiireiix Brothers, groceries 

John F. Looney, groceries 

J. Masse, coal 

B. J. Mack, coal 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., coal 

McQuade's General Store, groceries. 
John J. McQuade, groceries 

C. E. Newcomb, groceries 

Charles Xonnand Co., groceries . . . . 

H. I'ariseau & Co., groceries 

F. X. Parent, groceries 

A-ntoni Roman, groceries 

A. Trottier, groceries 

F. H. Thurston, prescriptions filled. 
Calixte Vigneault, groceries 

G. H. Wiggin & Co., milk 



$16 



4. 

3. 
14. 
38. 
19. 
40. 

4. 

a. 
20. 

2. 

4. 

1. 



10 
.83 
.00 
.00 
,00 
.29 
54 
24 
58 
95 
31 
58 
32 
50 
70 
56 



SUNDRIES. 

W. B. Blake, burj'ing animals, iise of boat, 

etc $8.53 

J. P. Devine, burial outfit 19.50 

A. L. Gadbois, burial outfit 10.00 

John F. Loonej', burying animals, expenses 

to Nashua 4.45 

John F. Looney, milk samples 13.79 

McDonough & Shea, burial outfit 15.00 

E. V. Turcotte, burial outfit 14.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$310.67 



$85.27 

$7,821.22 
3,178.78 

$11,000.00 



City Library. 



Balance from last year unexpended 
Appropriation 



$1,523.57 
7,236.62 



EXPENDITUKES. 
LIBRARIAN AXD ASSISTA>TS. 

F. Mabel Winchell, librarian 

Thomas P. Ayer 

Arthur Blaine 



$961.67 
185.93 
274.75 



$8,760.19 



CITY LIBRARY. 



95 



Carl James $()l.lo 

Charles S. Morgan 414.50 

Albro P. Reed 399.41 

CATALOGUE SXJrPLIES. 

A. L. A. Publishing Board, cards $5.53 

N. P. Hunt, paid for cards, postage 21.44 

Library Bureau, cards, binders, book 33.35 

Louise E. Newell, services 422.60 

Edith 0. Simmons, services 464.60 

Temple & Farrington Co., 'book, cards, paper 22.28 

F. M. Winchell, jjaid for cards 10.00 

BINDING, BEBINDING, BESEWING. 

F. J. Barnard & Co $297.85 

Temple & Farrington Co 161.01 

WATER, LIGHTS, FUEL, INSUEANCE. 

J. H. DeCourcy Co., coal $103.50 

Clarence M. Edgerly, insurance premium 125.00 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

electric lights 249.90 

Northern New England Coal Co., coal 437.39 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 89.55 

Water commissioners, use of water 13.62 

NEW BOOKS. 

Trustees of library 

SUNDAY OPENING. 

C. S. Morgan, labor $54.00 

Louise E. Newell, labor 8.25 

Albro P. Reed, labor 54.90 

Edith 0. Simmons, labor 137.50 

Peter Callaghan, police service 16.25 

SUNDBIES. 

Mrs. Annie Barry, cleaning $95.20 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice S.54 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 300 reports 16.25 



$2,297.41 



$979.80 



$458.86 



$1,018.96 



$1,000.00 



$270.00 



96 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



John B. Clarke Co., Mirror, one year $6.00 

Mrs. Bridget Costigan, cleaning 2.20 

Hale & Whittemore, hanging pictures 2.95 

Head & Dowst Co., book markers 12.00 

H. W. Herrick, cleansing and varnishing por- 
traits 10.25 

Mrs. Kate Hussey, cleaning 36.45 

C. F. Livingston, paper and printing book 

covers 155.18 

J. Y. McQuestion Co., chairs 27.00 

People's Gas Light Co., chimneys, mantles.. 2.65 

J. A. Williams, printing envelopes, postals.. 27.75 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to new account 



$402.4!> 

$6,428.35 
2,331.84 

$8,760.19 



Fire Department. 
Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

services. 

Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer $1,500.00 

Fred S. Bean, assistant engineer 250.00 

Clarence E. Merrill, assistant engineer and 

clerk 325.00 

Arthur Provost, assistant engineer 250.00 

John F. Seaward, assistant engineer S.'iO.OO 

teamsters' axd e:ngixeers' pay-roll. 

January $2,768.09 

February 2,790.84 

March 2,768.32 

April 2,768.09 

May 2,785.59 

June 2.877.82 

July 2.881.09 

August 2,910. 59 

September 2,892.32 

October 2,895.59 

November 2,878.09 

December 2,850.32 



$76,250.00 



'5.00 



$34,072.75 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



97 



CALL MEMBERS. 

Engine Company No. 1 

Engine Company No. 2 

Engine & Ladder Co. No. 3 

Engine Company No. 4 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 5 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 6 

Chemical Engine Company No. 1 

Combination Company No. 2 

Hook & Ladder Company No. 1 

Hose Company No. 1 

Hose Company No. 2 

Hose Company No. 3 

OTHER LABOR. 

G. p. Atwood 

John N. Brown 

L. H. D. Ford 

A. L. Greer 

Arthur Sweet 

C. A. Whitcomb 

LAUNDRY. 

J. E. Cheney 

Eureka Laundry 

Mrs. Alfred Gustafson 

L. A. Lamson 

New Hampshire Towel Supplj- Co 

Oneeda Laundry 

Margaret Power 

Mrs. S. E. Reed 

A. W. Smith 

FURNITURE, ETC. 

Charles A. Hoitt Co., desk, chairs, curtains, 

carpet, bedding 

James W. Hill Co., cotton, pillow slips, etc... 



$1,098.00 

1,533.00 

2,293.00 

1,698.00 

2,301.79 

2,293.00 

479.00 

928.00 

1,828.00 

1,093.00 

1,528.00 

928.00 



$19.00 
218.50 
231.00 
87.00 
34.50 
114.00 



$21.80 
16.45 
12.09 
19.58 
39.00 
82.95 
52.43 
9.00 
12.90 



$179.64 
35.75 



$19,260.79 



$704.00- 



$266.20 



$215.39 



PRINTING AND RTATIONERY. 



John B. Clarke Co., printing 350 reports $42.25 

John B. Clarke Co., 1,000 envelopes 23.00 

Engine and Hose companies, allowance for 

printing and stationery 120.00 



98 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing postals, cards, re- 
ports $12:>.70 

Morgan, Grossman & Co., stamp and pad.... .70 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 10.49 

WATER, LIGHTS, FIET.. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and wood $374.11 

Fletcher Brown, Avood 55.00 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

lights 136.65 

Maxwell Ice Co., wood 10.50 

Northern New England Coal Co., coal 1,772.32 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 806.37 

Water commissioners, use of water 356.59 



SUPPLIES. 

< 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., brass cast- 
ings $1.50 

Boston Badge Co., badges 12.00 

Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co., rein snaps 12.00 

C. G. Braxmar Co., badges 1.80 

Cornelius Callahan Co., Boston pipe and noz- 
zle, gong, wire cutters, etc 90.25 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., supplies 90.35 

Frank E. Fitts Manufacturing & Supply Co., 

Avaste 24.75 

S. L. Flanders, oil, chimneys 4. SO 

Globe Manufacturing Co., coats 45.00 

A. K. Hobbs, rubber cement .15 

T. A. Lane Co., 1 roll tape .30 

Manchester Hardware Co., hooks, coal hod.. .65 

Manchester Provision Co., soap 25.20 

J. A. MacDonald, brooms 3.25 

Mathieson Alkali Wlorks, soda 13.44 

W. H. Plumer & Co., reefers 24.00 

C. B. Perkins & Co., snaps, devices, bottles.. 22.50 

Pike & Heald Co., gas stoves, pail, tubing. . . . 9.54 

Revere Rubber Co., rings 7.05 

Reversible Tube Cleaner Co., 1 cleaner 4.50 

Smith Box & Lumber Co., sawdust 5.25 

S. Sandberg & Co., use of lathe, fitting keys 2.50 

Talbot Dyewood & Chemical Co., soda 13.44 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 335.83 

A. A. Warren, oil 69.66 



$322.14 



$3,511.54 



$819.71 



FIBE DEPARTMENT. 99 



EEPAIRS, ETC. 



Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., labor on 

weights $1.50 

Boston Belting Co., repairing hose 6.15 

E. M. Bryant & Co., 1 wrench 1.00 

Cornelius Callahan Co., repairing hose 842.66 

Eagle Plating & Manufacturing Co., brass 

pieces, nickel plated 2.75 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., supplies 1.39 

J. J. Farrell, wiring hose house 24.00 

J. J. Farrell, desk bracket, etc 1.20 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 5.16 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 25.39 

T. A. Lane Co., packing, burners, rubber 

tube 1.07 

H. J. Lawson, labor on chemical 2.45 

C. N. Perkins Co., repairing nozzles 7.75 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing material and 

labor 6.13 

F. T. Provost & Co., repairing and painting 

fence, broken by engine 7.70 

Harry Piper, filing saws .30 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clock 1.00 



HORSES, VETT^RrNAKY SERVICES AND MEDICINES. 

Cavanaugh Brothers, horses $1,581.40 

Cavanaugh Brothers, veterinary services, use 

of horse 186.50 

Frank J. Clark, V. S., dentistry 13.75 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., attendance and medicine. . 87.10 

Dyer & Chipman, medicine 2.50 

Snelling & Woods, medicine 11.65 

A. D. Smith, medicine 6.00 



CARRIAGE AND ENGINE REPAIRS. 

American Locomotive Co $740.70 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co 1.60 

S. P. Dodge Co .85 

J. B. McCrillis & Son 444.68 

Sanborn Carriage Co 243.20 

F. H. Senter 35.00 



$937.00 



$1,888.90 



$1,466.03 



100 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



BLACKSMITHINO. 

Connor & Grossman $32.90 

Couch & McDonald 44.00 

H. J. Dexter 93.75 

Samuel Landry- 4.05 

McDonald Brothers 395,36 

John McSweeney 213.75 

J. O. & L. P. Tremblay 299.20 

Tuohey & Co 11.50 

G. F. Wenzel 151.48 

J. F. Woodbury 171.50 

HAY, GRAIN, ETC. 

Adams Brothers $977.46 

Arthur S. Brown 1,002.92 

Cote Brothers 122.39 

Gage & McDougall 960.96 

Philias Graveline 45.48 

John P. Griffin 27.13 

F. H. Masse «fe Co 81.20 

Merrill & Laraba 1,497.93 

Partridge Brothers 1,227.49 

West Side Hay & Grain Co 227.93 

HARNESS REPAIRS AND SUPPLIES. 

Ha^no Saddlery Co ' $4.50 

J. Vogel & Son 56.10 

J. Yogel & Co 21.45 

N. J. Whalen 28.50 

I. S. York 5.90 

SUNDRIES. 

Aid-Ant Remedy Co., 6 cans "Aid-Ant" $4.25 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 8.34 

C. B. Clarkson, weighing coal 17.00 

F. J. Clark, V. S., disinfectant 10.00 

W. E. Clark, lunch furnished firemen while 

fighting fire on Bald hill 4.68 

Fifield & Brown, use of team 5.00 

J. D. French, use of team 4.00 

A. L. Gadbois, use of hack 5.00 

j\ean & Sheehan, use of hack 5.00 



$6,170.89 



$116.45 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



101 



E. II. Holmes, freip-ht and cartage $1(;.SG 

Joseph LaRochelle, use of hack 5.00 

Thomas W. Lane, cartage and express 5.85 

E. H. Stowe, lunch furnished firemen, Bald 

hill fire 3-00 

Winchester Tar Disinfectant Co., disinfectant 20.60 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$114.58 

$73,859.46 
2,390.54 



$76,250.00 



Appropriation 



Fire-Alarm Telegraph. 



$2,700.00 



EXPENDITUTSES. 



LABOR. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May ; 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November ....'. 

December 

John Allen 

John Allard 

John Vaughan 

SUPPLIES, ETC. 

American Electrical Works, wire 

James Baldwin Co., brackets 

Fletcher Brown, poles 

Brodie Electric Co., winding coils, repairs. 

E. M. Bryant & Co., supplies 

Couch & Seeley Co., 2 condensers 

W. E. Decrow, 4 fire-alarm boxes 



$58.50 
54.00 
60.75 
58.50 
54.00 
69.25 
58.50 
60.75 
58.50 
58.50 
58.50 
58.50 



$14.63 

49.51 

2.50 



$196.81 

1.00 

30.00 

14.63 

2.84 

3.00 

500.00 



$708.25 



$66.64 



102 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

W. E. Decrow, storage battery complete $657.25 

W. E. Decrow, supplies 22.23 

Electric Gas Lighting Ck)., electrical supplies 67.85 

J. Hodge, lumber, etc 85.47 

C. H. Hutchinson, iron and labor 6.69 

Nate Kellogg Co., printing postals, cards.. 3.80 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe, tubes 2.57 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

iron 8.68 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, material and repairing 

•wagon 69.41 

New England Bolt & Nut Co., arm braces.. 21.00 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe, gasoline 3.88 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 60.37 

Joseph Vogel & Son, repairing belts 4.50 

C. L. Wolf, pipe 1.12 

E. H. Holmes, freight and truckage 7.09 



$1,770.19 



Total expenditures $2,545.08 

Transferred to unappropriated money 154.92 

$2,700.00 



Hydrant Service. 

Appropriation $19,550.00 

EXPENDITtTRES. 

Water commissioners, use of hydrants , $19,550.00 

Police Department.— Station. 

Appropriation $3,500.00 

EXPEWDITUEES. 
SEKVICES. 

Frank P. Wiggin, services as janitor $734.25 

WATEK, LIGHTS, FCnEL. 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

lights $600.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 103 

Maxwell Ice Co., wood $34.00 

Moore & Preston Coal Co., wood 46.75 

Northern New England Coal Co., coal 864.09 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 94.55 

Water commissioners, use of water 162.27 

$1,801.66 



LAUNDRY, ETC. 

T. J. Briggs, dippers, wash basins, ash cans $19.75 

Columbia Refining Co., soap 4.96 

Daniels-Cornell Co., soap 4.00 

J. H. Geisel, laundry .80 

Charles A. Hoitt Co., waste baskets, pillows 5.50 

James W. Hill Co., crash, pillow slips 12.67 

J. J. Holland, soap, paper, disinfectants 67.80 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap 6.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., mop wringer, 

wire, etc 10.64 

J. W. Nye, soap 1.20 

Joseph Sykes, cleaning 75.80 

Mrs. J. F. Wiggin, washing towels, sheets, 

etc 45.66 



KEPAIBS, ETC. 

J. J. Abbott, glass, labor $11.46 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric labor 32.07 

D. F. Cressey, repairing chains, 1 grapple. . . . 3.00 

M. J. Coleman, repairing pipes 3.68 

Connor Brothers, repairing leaks 9.55 

Peter Harris, 1 key .25 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, laths, labor 271.69 

L. W. Howard, paint and labor 110.13 

T. A. Lane Co., plumbing material and labor 15.28 

New Hampshire Kug Co., caning chair .85 

People's Gas Light Co., tubing 1.20 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe, flanges, etc 13.52 

Harry A. Piper, repairing chair, hanging 

door 1.10 

B. F. Shepard, 8 keys .80 

John B. Varick Co., locks 3.30 



SXJNDEIES. 



Boston & Maine R. E., freight $0.56 

A. M. Finney, cleaning and laying carpet. . . . 3.91 



$251.78 



$477.88 



104 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

J. L. llansconi. medicine $1.25 

Charles A. Iloitt Co., linoleum 63.70 

J. A. Scully, shades, oilcloth, paper 40.45 



EXPENDITXJBES. 
SERVICES. 

John C. Bickf ord, clerk $600.00 

Isaac L. Heath, police justice 1,500.00 

H. E. Loveren, associate justice 107.96 

George W. Prescott, associate justice 142.00 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing warrants, 

dockets, $86.25 

John B. Clarke Co., blank book 7.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

telephone service 54.00 

Star Stamp Co., 3,000 writs 18.00 

E. A. Stratton, stationery .70 

Temple & Farrington Co., 2 dockets 1.00 

SUNDRIES. 

M. J, Healy, witness fees $239.46 

J. B. Pattee, holding police court 8.00 



$109.87 



Total expenditures $3,378.44 

Transferred to unappropriated money 121.56 

$3,500.00 



Police Department.— Court. 
Appropriation $2,900.00 



$2,349.96 



$166.95 



$247.46 



Total expenditures $2,764.37 

Transferred to unappropriated money 135.63 

$2,900.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



105 



Police Department.— Commission. 



Appropriation 



$49,427.50 



Expenditures, 

services. 

Michael J. Healy, chief of police 

John F. Cassidy, deputy chief 

Edward B. Woodbury, chairman of commis- 
sion, salary 

Noah S. Clark, commissioner, salary 

Frank P. Cheney, commissioner, salary 

A. B. Brown, police matron 

Regular and special patrol 

FEEDING PRISONERS. 

William E. Clark 

National Biscuit Co 



$2,000.00 
1,500.00 

150.00 
100.00 
100.00 
426.00 
36,946.95 



$170.10 
37.32 



$41,222.95 



$207.42 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

John B. Clarke Co., printing- cards, envelopes, 

etc 

W. P. Goodman, books and stationery.... 

E. A. Stratton, stationery 

Temple & Farrington Co., pencils 

PATROL SYSTEM EXPENSES 

J. J. Abbott, gasoline 

Ame & Co., "Standard Food" 

American Steel & Wire Co., wire 

American Electrical Works, wire 

Automatic Time Stamp Co., supplies 

James Baldwin Co., pins 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 

Boyd Brothers, clipping horse 

Brodie Electric Co., insulators 

Frank Brooks, labor on wires 

Arthur S. Brown, hay and grain 

Brown-Wales Co., 1 torch 

E. M. Bryant & Co., tubing, wire 

Cavanaugh Brothers, veterinary services.... 



$95..50 


37.95 


30.95 


2.00 



$0.20 
9.75 

47.49 

31.52 
5.00 
3.00 
6.15 
3.00 
6.00 

44.00 

112.13 

4.00 

2.90 

11.00 



$166.40 



106 REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

W. N. Chadwick, patent oilers on patrol 

wagon $4.00 

Clark & Estey, chamois skins .75 

Couch & Seeley Co., telephones, cords, etc.. 39.60 

H. B. Dunton, V. S., services 8.00 

George H. Emery, photographs of criminals. . 22.00 
Electric Gas Lighting Co., zincs, coppers, 

blue vitriol 107.81 

A. Filion, repairing patrol wagon 42.50 

S. C. Gould, rent of stable 55.00 

James Harlan, labor on wires 64.13 

Patrick Hampston, labor on wires 41.13 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 4.31 

E. H. Holmes, moving furniture 2.00 

L. W. Howard, paint and labor 6.11 

W. S. Holt, waste 5.32 

Kimball Carriage Co., brushes, sponge, combs 15.50 

Merrill & Laraba, grain 315.28 

Mitchell Manufacturing Co., badges 1.50 

James Murphy, painting and varnishing 

wagon 33.00 

W. F. Nye, Oleo-Tennatine 3.25 

Pettingill-Andrews Co., electric supplies 151.30 

Charles E. Perry & Co., register paper 27.50 

Timothy Shea, hay 33.58 

J. O. & L. P. Tremblay, horseshoeing 1.75 

Joseph Vogel & Son, harness repairs 11.65 

J. F. Woodburj', horseshoeing 76.55 

Ziegler Apparatus Co., supplies 1,073.59 

HARDWARE AND KEPAIKS. 

E. P. Cornish, labor on safe $1.75 

James Collity, M. D., repairs on carriage 

damaged by patrol wagon 30.00 

D. F. Cressey, repairing poker, irons for 

chair 1-35 

Peter Harris, repairs 2.35 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 108.31 

John B. Yarick Co., hardware 11.90 



TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH. 



Xew England Telephone *Sr Telegraph Co., 

telephone service $164.98 

Postal Telegraph-Cable Co., telegrams 1.34 

Western Union Telegraph Co., telegrams 5.06 



$2,433.1^5 



$155.66 



$171.38 



REPAIE8 OF BUILDINGS. 107 

fiUNDEIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice $12.88 

J. H. Geisel, laundry .20 

Jessie L. Hanscom, medicine 6.95 

J. J. Holland, medicine 6.50 

D. B. Hutchins, allowance for clothing 8.33 

M. J. Healy, paid expenses, investigating 

hotels 15.00 

Minimax Co., 1 fire extinguisher 12.00 

Pay-roll, allowance for police clothing 2,150.00 

E. E. Whedon, allowance for clothing 8.33 

$2,220.19 

Total expenditures $46,577.25 

Transferred to unappropriated money 2,850.25 

$49,427.50 



Repairs of Buildings. 

Appropriation $6,650.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money.... 111.51 



EXPENDITITISES. 
CITY LIBEARY. 

J. J. Abbott, glass $1.35 

Eastman Brothers, mason work 18.72 

James P. Finn, glass and labor 1.54 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, cement, teaming 13.18 

W. F. Hubbard estate, sashes 2.85 

Samuel Jellis, labor 12.96 

F. J. O'Dea & Co., paint, glass, labor 808.46 

Louis Paris, labor 10.08 

Peter Paris, labor 6.75 

Pike & Heald Co., labor on boiler 2.60 

G. L. Read, labor 32.70 

E. Eoy, labor 2.25 

Richard Lacroix, labor 5.04 

William Smith, labor 5.04 

William St. Hiliare, labor 14.28 

John B. Varick Co., nails, colored glass 8.50 



3,761.51 



$946.30 



108 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR 



POLICE STATION. 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electrical supplies and 

labor $112.37 

Connor Brothers, plumbing, repairs 7.16 

Derryfield Co., doors, panels, frames 38.45 

Eastman Brothers, plastering 18.04 

W. E. Goodwin, repairs 69.03 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 41.26 

L. W. Howard, paint and labor 341.28 

Samuel Jellis, labor 36.90 

G. L. Read, labor 40.80 

William St. Hiliare, labor 36.12 

William Smith, labor 10.08 

C. L. Wolf, pipe and labor 3.80 



ENGINE HOUSES. 

J. J. Abbott, paper $6.93 

Connor Brothers, plumbing and steam fit- 
ting repairs 47.38 

Walter E. Darrah, gravel roofing 278.64 

Eastman Brothers, mason work 39.26 

James P. Finn, painting fence, glass, labor. . 20.65 

W. E. Goodwin, plumbing repairs 168.73 

E. W. Gowing, paint, papering, labor 119.73 

J. B. Huntley, plumbing repairs 15.34 

J. Hodge, lumber 238.89 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 439.58 

George Holbrook, material and labor 79.97 

Samuel Jellis, labor 38.06 

Richard Lacroix, labor 115.92 

Samuel Landry, blacksmithing 1.65 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor 2.56 

C. F. McDonald, plumbing material and labor 100.14 

Louis Paris, labor 45.08 

Peter Paris, labor 17.10 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing closet tank.... 6.15 

E. Roy, labor 57.30 

George L. Read, labor 258.19 

William St. Hiliare, labor 144.20 

William Smith, labor 25.20 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 64.71 

West Side Lumber Co., boards 6.35 

A. L. Worthen, bowl, plaster, labor 3.20 



$755.29 



$2,340.91 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 



109 



COURT HOUSE. 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric supplies $3.51 

Connor Brothers, repairing tanks and valves 13.88 

W. E. Goodwin, labor on steam leaks 10.00 

Eichard Lacroix, labor 2.52 

G. L. Bead, labor 5.40 

G. L. Read, 1 pair butts .46 

E. E. Reed, masonwork 8.04 

A. & E. Eeed, resetting boiler 177.9G 

John B. Varick Co., hardw^are .46 

CITY HALL. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., steel, iron, 

rivets, labor $C9.46 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric and gas fixtui'es, 

labor wiring telephones 215.98 

Louis Boulanger, 3 awnings 45.00 

Connor Brothers, plumbing repairs 8.17 

Derryfield Co., sheathing, doors, frames, ox- 
ide copper grill 209.57 

Eastman Brothers, masonwork 14.68 

James P. Finn, painting screen 7.88 

W. E. Goodwin, plumbing, disconnecting 

radiator 11.76 

E. W. Gowing, paint, glass, labor 43.87 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 27.15 

J. B. Huntley, plumbing repairs 5.25 

C. A. Hoitt Co., linoleum 40.00 

Samuel Jellis, labor 111.66 

T. A. Lane Co., repairs .45 

Richard Lacroix, labor 12.60 

F. W. Leeman, cotton 2.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 3.55 

C. F. McDonald, plumbing material and labor 104.19 

Frank J. O'Dea, paint, varnish, paper, labor 437.36 

Parlin & Woodbury, paint 9.85 

Loiiis Paris, labor 58.24 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing poker .12 

G. L. Read, labor 82.50 

E. Roy, labor 2.57 

Harris M. Shaw, steel ceilings 119.25 

William Smith, labor 5.04 

William St. Hiliare, labor 49.56 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 24.40 

C. W. White & Co., decorating building 25.00 



$222.23. 



$1,747.11 



110 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WARD 5 WARD ROOM. 

Connor Brothers, plumbing- material and 

labor 

Samuel Jellis, labor 

J. J. Moreau, roofing, iron flashing, etc 

G. L. Head, labor 

William St. Hiliare, labor 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 

BATTERY BUILDING. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., inspecting 

boiler 

Derryfield Co., lumber 

W. E. Goodwin, covering shutters with tin.. 
E. W. Gowing, painting shutters, glass, labor 

Head & Dowst Co., 400 feet pine 

T. A. Lane Co., shufting off water 

Samuel Landry, blacksmithing 

Louis I'aris, labor 

G. L. Read, labor 

E. Roy, labor 

William St. Hiliare, labor 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 



$32.48 
2.52 

149.93 
6.00 
9.52 
2.47 



$2.40- 
2.29 

48.90 

68.51 

8.00 

.45 

3.50 

7.56 

27.00 
6.08 

35.84 



$202.92 



$213.05 



SUNDRIES. 

D. G. Andrews, labor at ward 2 ward room S^i.OO 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 1.10 

C. Dean & Co., care of city clocks 150.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, city scales .49 

Samuel Landry, blacksmithing 36.40 

Pike & Heald Co., gas piping 3.14 

O. Potvin, teaming 10.25 

G. L. Read, labor, paid for trucking 11.40 

E. Roy, labor .50 

J. N. Tuck & Co., cartage 29.35 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 88.07 

Total expenditures 



$333.70 



$6,761.51 



Chandler Schoolhouse and Lot. 



Appropriation 



$42,000.00 



WATER-WORKS. Ill 

EXFEiNDITXnBES, 
LAND. 



Mary F. Burpee, 22,683.69 square feet land.. $4,536.73 
William E. Harden, 554.97 square feet land.. 138.75 



Water- Works. 

Balance from last year unexpended $26,068.38 

Cash received for water rents 136,353.07 



EXPENDITXJBEa. 

LABOR. 

January $1,467.90 

February 1,767,34 

March 1,568.77 

April 1,538.87 

May 1,786.33 

June 1,521.82 

July 1,657.44 

August 1,902.57 



$4,675.48 



CONTRACT. 
J. H. Mendell & Co., builders, on account $15,100.00 

ARCHITECT, 

W. M. Butterfield, plans and supervising, on 

account $650.00 

SUNDRIES. 

J, p. Brown, use of team $10.00 

Head & Dowst Co., use of teams and men.,, 22.50 

H. A. Piper, 375 loads sand 187.50 

D. M. Poore, use of team 6.00 

James Eied, use of teams drawing dirt 13.50 

$239.50 

Total expenditures $20,664.98 

Transferred to new account 21,335.02 

$42,000.00 



$162,421.45 



112 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

September $l,S.">2.r)0 

October 2,452.58 

November 2,772.73 

December 1,932.33 

$22,221.18 

Arthur W. Dudlej', engineering $167.9ft 

GENERAX EXPENSES. 

William Corej', 14 meetings of board $70.00 

Frank Dowst, 17 meetings of board 85.00 

Charles M. Floyd, 21 meetings of board 105.00 

Edgar J. Knowlton, 14 meetings of board. . . . 70.00 

Charles H. Manning, 36 meetings of board.. 180.00 

Harry E. Parker, 15 meetings of board 75.00 

Eugene E. Eeed, 13 meetings of board 65.00 

A. W. Hafrington, dinners, annual inspection 46.00 

Nate Kellogg, use of boat 20.00 

C. K. Walker, superintendent, salary 2,400.00 

C. K. Walker, paid for lights 164.69 

C. K. Walker, paid for express, postage 55.95 

C. K. WaTlver, paid for incidentals 226.19 



PRINTING, AD^TiRTISING, STATIONERY. 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing notices $5.50 

John B. Clarke Co., printing envelopes, bills, 

signs 57.40 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 650 reports.... 38.18 
John B. Clarke Co., advertising 1 line, 22 

times 5.50 

E. A. Stratton, books and stationerj- 12.50 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 6.75 



TEAM.S, TELEPHONE, Fn:L. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal $357.07 

M. L. Cobb, coal 121.28 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons, wood 48.00 

C. S. Fifield, teams 17.00 

Fifield & Brown, teams 7.50 

W. A. Jepson, coal 634.37 

E. G. Libbey, teams 14.00 

B. J. Mack, coal 3.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

telephone service 54.04 



$3,562.85 



$125.8a 



WATER-WORKS. 113 



J. Louis Poor, wood $21.00 

Union Coal Co., coal r;2.00 

LAND, ETC. 

Michael Connor $4,000.00 

William G. Connor 600.00 

Alfred D. Emery 680.00 

E. H. French 140.00 

Frank H. Prescott and Melvin Hall 2,000.00 

John E. Eedmond 3,500.00 

LEGAL SERVICES. 

Burnham, Brown. Jones & Warren $438.89 

Eockingham county commissioners 140.00 

HARDWARE, BLACKSMITHIi\t4, FTJEIGHT. 

Boston & Maine E. E.. freight $1,494.68 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening tools 254.23 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 173.21 

John B. Yarick Co., tools and hardware .... 224.63 



SUPPLIES. 

Adams Brothers, salt, lime, cement $19.30 

American Locomotive Co., castings, etc 233.63 

J. J. Abbott, glass, gasoline 4.90 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., supplies and 

labor 249.10 

H. E. Barker [Manufacturing Co., pipe 140.17 

Boston Belting Co., belting 5.56 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric supplies 35.13 

Builders Iron Foundry, pipe 378.99 

Chadwick-Boston Lead Co., pipe and solder 65.89 
Chapman Valve Manufacturing Co., valves, 

nipples 32.58 

A. W. Chesterton & Co., supplies 17.50 

Coffin Valve Co., hydrants 521.25 

Joseph Dixon Crucible Co., waterproof 

grease 6.50 

Eager & Co., soap 7.68 

Edson Manufacturing Co., bolts 1.67 

filauber Brass Manufacturing Co., curb stops. 

nips 587.78 



$1,309.26 



$10,920.00 



$587.89 



$2,146.75 



114: REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOK. 

Granite State Rubber C'o., boots and frlove.s.. $.")!. 70 

Hart Packing Co., pump valves 42.00 

Hajs Manufacturing Co., curb boxes 206.49 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, brick, cement. . . . I,:i90.31 

J. Hodge, meter boxes, lumber 0.3.84 

A. K. Hobbs, packing, leather, etc 1.75 

Thomas Hoey Supply & Manufacturing Co., 

couplings 17.40 

C. H. Hutchinson, iron and labor 2.11 

C. M. Kemp Manufacturing Co., stock 1.3.00 

Keystone Lubricating Co., grease 42.30 

T. A. Lane Co., pipe 72.34 

Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co., pipe 1,072.54 

John T. Levasseur, 1 boat 13. 4S 

Ludlow Valve Manufacturing Co.. valves.. 117.00 

IMcKelvie Brothers, pails, iron, and laljor .... 8.89 

National Meter Co., meters 409.90 

Newark Brass Works, 1 tapping machine. . . . 65.00 

Xeptune Meter Co., meters 1S7.00 

Norwood Engineering Co., hydrants, heads, 

posts 5b2.50 

Perrj' Oil Co., oil 59.83 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe 19.94 

A. W. Richardson, blue prints 5.00 

Richards & Co., lead 1,022.73 

Rensselaer Manufacturing Co., valves, gates 301.25 

Schultz Belting Co., packing 1.50 

Snow Steam Pump Works, steam piston.... 140.30 

Spencer Regulator Co., valve packing, etc.. S.OO 
Taunton Locomotive Manufacturing Co., 

grate bar 5.0S 

Thomson Meter Co., meters, bolts 4S2.S2 

United States Iron Pipe & Foundry Co.. pipe 5,928.41 

Union Water Meter Co., meters and washers 120.17 

Yalvoline Oil Co., oil 91.27 

Warren Foundry & Machine Co., j)ipe 1T.S5 

George E. Winslow, recording dials 3.10 

H. R. Worthington, meters, piston jnim]) 

and receiver 195.00 



$25,079.49 



American Locomotive Co., repairing val\e.. !?2.75 
Head & Dowst Co., cement, wire screen, labor 121.37 
Head & Dowst Co., painting, papering, roof- 
ing new station 94.12 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



115 



Hersey ^Nrnmifacturing- Co., repairiiif;- meters 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 

Johnston Gasoline Motor Co., labor on pump 

T. A. Lane Co., material and labor 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 
thawing pipes 

National Meter Co., repairing meters 

Neptune Meter Co., repairing meters 

New Hampshire Chimney Sweep Co., repair- 
ing chimneys 

Norwood Engineering Co., repairing, hy- 
drants 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.. 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paint and labor 

Thomson Meter Co., repairing meters 

Union Water Meter Co., repairing meters. . . . 



$9.66 
1.20 
1.00 

34.71 

45.00 

143.34 

28.95 

6.00 

12.03 

5.52 

11.48 

55.14 

158.07 



$730.34 



SUNDRIES. 



Town of Auburn, taxes $536.62 

C. H. Manning, paiA expenses Devonshire 

Mills commissioners 47.56 

Carl Seaman, posting notices at lake, car- 
fares, gasoline 9.77 

Sinking fund commissioners, for payment of 

water bonds 5,000.00 

Sinking fund commissioners, h3-drant rental 19,550.00 

Sarah Pennock, rent of house 100.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to interest account , 

Transferred to new account 



$25,243.95 

$92,095.42 
33,640.00 
36,686.03 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



$162,421.45 



Appropriation $11,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated monej'^.... 117.91 



$11,117.91 



116 REPORT OF THE ( ITV AUDITOR. 

EXPE^fDlTUKES, 

LABOR. 

January $3">1.00 

]'\-bri]ar.v :J0S.S7 

March 282.50 

.\pril 450.34 

May yOG.fjy 

June 078.28 

July 752.54 

August 1.00G.51 

SeiJtember (522.17 

October 517.99 

Xovcmber 451.29 

December 179.45 

PLANTS, LOAM, EH . 

Joseph Urowii, loam .f 1()S.75 

R. & J. Farqnluir & Co., seetl.s, plant.s ^ 15.92 

Charles R. Fish & Co., shrubs 15.00 

A. ]f. Hews & Co., flower pots 34.75 

A. ]'. Ilorne & Co., plants 140.03 

Mrs. M. A. Miller, loam 9.00 

James Thompson, loam 168.00 

Kdilh A. AVchstcr. loam and clay .501..50 

WATi:U. TII.KPIIONE, INsmAXCE. ELEL. 

.lolm Dowst. insurance jji-cmiiim $75.00 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons, coal 204.01 

C. ^r. Kdgcrly, insurance premium 112.50 

New England Telepluun' & Telegraph Co.. 

use of telephone :.'1.05 

Water commissioners, use of water 484.75 



rniNlINC A.M> .-^ I ATIONERV. 

John M. ( larUc Co., printing and advertising $15.70 

.7. IT. Erskine, paid for envelopes 10.00 

W. r. (ioodman, stationery .00 

'i'cinple t^i;' Farrington Co., stationery 2.82 

I'nioii I'lihlishing Co., publishing notice.... 2.25 



$6,407.93 



$998.95 



$897.91 



$31.97 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



117 



REPAIRS ANT> IMPROVEMENTS. 



Carl W. Anderson & Co., 1 clook 

C. S. Bangs, pipe and labor 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 

E. T. Burrowes Co., screens 

Bunton & Bernard, lumber and labor 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons, mowing 

Eastman Brothers, masonwork 

Head & Dowst Co., on account, Ursula chapel 

Head & Dowst Co., cement, lumber, labor 

J. Hodge, lumber 

A. K. Hobbs, rubber matting 

C. A. Hoitt Co., carpet, shades, table, mirrors 

Thomas Kirby, hot bed sashes 

H. J. Lawson, material and labor 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware and 

tools 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

lamps and lights > 

J. Y. McQueston Co., chairs, cushion 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing, pipe, packing, 

labor 

Palmer & Garmon, numbers, marble shelves, 

etc 

C. 0. Pollson, painting iron fence 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., repairs.... 

C. P. Still, stone work 

Street and park commission, stone 

W. H. Sullivan, painting, repairing ceilings 
John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools.... 

West Side Lumber Co., lumber 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., cabinet 

and cards 



$12.00 

2.74 

fl.SO 

2.97 

43.25 

308.05 

7.00 

35.24 

110.07 

145.47 

15.03 

38.34 

08.(55 

27.00 

73.52 

f>.40 

11.47 
13.50 

470.30 

42.45 

217.97 

292.03 

0.10 

12.00 

99.32 
159.33 

23.45 

50.00 



$2,331.77 



TEAM EXPENSES. 



Adams Brothers, grain $101.43 

Cavanaugh Brothers, use of horse 30.00 

S. P. Dodge Co., repairing carts 9.25 

W. E. Dunbar & Son, hay 21.40 

H. A. Huff, 2 acres standing grass 7.00 

Merrill & Laraba, grain 114.10 

J. L. Poor, hay 9.95 



118 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



J. O. & L. P. Tremblay, horseshoeing $19.25 

Joseph Vogel & Son, sleigh and harness re- 
pairs 42.30 

SXJNDBIES. 

J. n. Erskine, expenses, Washington, D. C, 
attending convention of American Ceme- 
tery Superintendents $52.70 

W. J. Freeman, use of hack 5.00 

Edwin F. Jones, services as clerk of sub- 
trustees 25.00 

A. G. Straw, services of Albion quartet, dedi- 
cation Ursula chapel 12.00 

Total expenditures 

Valley Cemetery. 

Appropriation $5,400.00 

Transferred from unaijpropriafed money.... 3. 28 



EXPENDITITRES. 
LABOR. 

January $106.00 

Februarj^ 148.75 

March 129.25 

April 268.80 

May 498.75 

June 551.71 

July 503.65 

August 434.75 

September 285.65 

October 222.90 

November 232.05 

December 130.50 

WATER A^^> TELEPHONE. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone $19.44 

Water commissioners, use of Avater 142.00 



$354.68 



$94.70 
$11,117.91 



$5,403.28 



$3,512.76 



■$161.44 



VALLEY CKMETERY. 119 

PIxANTS, LOAM, ETC. 

B. F. Bascom, 1 cord manure $6.00 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons, fertilizer 30.00 

Cliarles 11. Fish & Co., plants ' 51.00 

J. H. Erskine, plants 109.00 

Daniel Jameson, dressing 35.25 

Mead, Mason & Co., loam 97.50 

W. J. Miller, clay and loam 24.00 

Richard A. Neubert, loam 5.50 

H. A. Piper, loam 11.50 

C. A. Williams, loam 29.50 



BEPAERiS AND IMPROVE7HENTS. 

C. W. Anderson, 1 clock $1.00 

C. N. Baker, repairing fence 17.93 

E. C. Brigham, rubber boots 7.75 

Brooks and Brock, gravel ' 20.50 

F. S. Bodwell, granite, sharpening and use 

of tools 44.00 

City farm, stone 36.00 

G. B. Cressey, painting fence, summer houses, 

settees 308.19 

W. E. Darrah, repairing chapel roof 1.50 

Shirley P. Dodge Co., 1 sled, 1 wagon, etc... 221.55 

W. E. Goodwin, plumbing repairs 55.72 

Head & Dowst Co., cement, lumber, hardware 35.98 

J. Hodge, hubs and stakes 2.75 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware and 

tools 60.56 

Palmer & Garmon, setting stones, etc 53.92 

H. W. Parker, cement 21.00 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing water pipes.... 14.31 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.. 112.13 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools 69.19 

J. Vogel & Co., repairing harness 4.35 

G. F. Wenzel, repairing wagon .75 

Wiggin-Young Co., baskets 1.05 

C. L. Wlolf, labor and stock, boiler and radia- 
tors '. ..c. 140.20 



SUM)KIES. 



S. p. Cannon, services as clerk of trustees $10.00 

Connor & Grossman, horseshoeing 12.75 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., visit and medicine 1.75 



$399.25 



$],230.3r 



120 REPORT OF THE CfTY AUDITOK. 

Gag-e & McDoiigall, g-iain $43.85 

H. II. Gerward, horseshoeing 2.30 

J. F. Wyman, coal 23.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., books .and sta- 

tionein^ 5.40 

Total expenditures 

Amoskeag Cemetery. 

Appropriation $500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated monej' 4.S8 



$99.50 



^5,403.28 



$504.88 



EXPENDITUBES. 

LABOR. 

Christie Brown $4.50 

G. C. Harvvood 150.75 

SU:SDKIES. 

John Francis, plants $3.70 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing -water pipe 27.43 

John B. Varick Co., lawn mower G.50 

John B. Varick Co., iron fence 300.00 

Water commissionei's, use of water 12.00 

Total expenditures 

Merrill Yard. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

May ; $9.50 

August 20.30 

September 22.00 

S. C. Campbell 



$155.25 



$349.63 



$504.88 



$100.00 



$51.80 
$12.75 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLIIOUSES. 

SUNDKIES. 
John 1?. Varick Co., tools 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



121 



$4.61 

$69. IG 
30.84 



$100.00 



Riddle Fund. 

Balance from last year unexpended $4,806.90 

Interest on fund 28.53 

EXPENDITUEES. 

Head & Dowst Co., balance due, building 

chapel $4,574.93 

McFarland, Colby & McFarland, 'balance due 

for professional services 260.50 

Total expenditures 

Repairs of Sclioolinouses. 

Appropriation $10,500.00 

Received for iron sold 55.45 

Transferred from unappropriated money.... 722.47 

Expenditures, 
masonwoek. 

E. Bilodeau $117.25 

Thomas Finnerty 197.25 

A. & E. Eeed 281.03 

E. E. Eeed 215.29 



$4,835.4: 



$4,835.43 



$4,835.43 



$11,2 



$810.81 



122 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



PAINTING AND GLAZING. 



J. J. Abbott $219.38 

J. S. Avery 1.50 

John Bryson 178.00 

James R. Carr & Co 162.03 

L. W. Howard 121.95 

Eaiche & Laforce ,117.3-1 

John A. Sargent 91.67 

W. H. Sullivan * 243.18 

PLtTMBING, IKONWORK, REPAIRS. 

S. F, Adams & Co., lightning rods $425.00 

American Locomotive Co., retubing boiler. . 42.50 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., boiler tubes, 

etc 65.40 

T. J. Briggs, plumbing repairs 102.31 

Brodie Electric Co., repairing X-ray machine 28.35 

E. M. Brj'ant & Co., electric supplies and re- 
pairs 113.78 

M. J. Coleman, plumbing contra<'t 75.00 

Connor Brothers, plumbing 89.37 

C. A. Durgin, labor on engine 6.22 

J. J. Farrell, material and labor 87.54 

Head & Dowst Co., laying floors, cement, 

lumber, etc 678.35 

A. K. Hobbs, packing 1.80 

C. H. Hutchinson, slice bar and fire hoe.... 11.02 

T. A. Lane Co., electric and plumbing repairs 60.12 

H. J. Lavs'son, roofing material and labor.. 1,609.64 

F. D. Leighton, plumbing and heating repairs 147.76 
J. T. ^lanseau, stove and furnace work.... 15.40 
J. J. Moreau, roofing material and labor.... 252.06 
J. H. Mendell & Co., laying floors, screens, 

etc 493.48 

McDonald Brothers, repairing ash barrels. ... .75 

C. F. McDonald, plumbing 196.47 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, ironwork .40 

J. T. McLaughlin, plumbing material and 

labor 251.48 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing and heating 

repairs 1,840.01 

H. A. Piper, lumber and labor 1,927.79 

F. T. Provost, taking off and glutting on 

windows 26.90 



$1,135.05 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



123 



T. Raic-^Iie «fe Co., labor and material 

Kobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.. 
J. A. Sargent, blackboard 

B. F. Shepard, repairs 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, setting glass, axe 

handle 

G. F. Wenzel, blacksmithing 

AV. C. Wilson, material and carpenter work.. 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing repairs 



$9.85 

435.92 

3.75 

7.90 

1.45 
1.15 

222.04 
33.60 



$9,264.5& 



StINDEIES. 



H. L. Davis, carfares for committee $14.65 

F. L. Evans, putting rope in flagpole 4.00 

Fifield & Brown, use of team 5.00 

L'Avenir National, advertising 1.35 

Frank Robie, mowing grass, clearing grounds 2.50 

Wesley Smith, cleaning vaults 40.00 

Total expenditures 



$67.50 



$11,277.93 



Printing and Advertising. 



Appropriation 



$400.00 



EXPENDTTUBES. 



John B. Clarke Co., printing blanks, cards, 

examination papers, etc $327.95 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 500 reports 34.40 

Union Publishing Co., advertising proposals, 

examinations 14.98 

J. A. Williams, printing postals, lists 8.75 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$386.03 

$386.08 
13.92 



$400.00 



124 



Appropriation 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Books and Stationery. 



$75.00 



Expenditures. 

E. H. Clough, P. M., envelopes, stamps, cards $1.').0U 

H. L. Davis, stamps, postals, envelopes 8.35 

Star Stamp Co., repairing' stamps .80 

J. A. Williams, postals l.GO 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unapprojjriated monej- 



$25.75 
49.25 

$75.00 



Furniture and Supplies. 



Apjjropriation 



$1,500.00 



EXPEXDITtlRES. 
PIIYSICAL A>I> CHEinCAI- SVPPLIES. 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co $24.61 

Walsh & Cummings 12.42 

BOOKS AXD STATIONERY. 

E. E. Babb & Co., maps $18.25 

W. P. Goodman, books and stationery 12.28 

Hammond Tj'pewriter Co., shields, strips... .75 

Neostyle Co., ink 2.25 

Novelty Co., rubber stamp .75 

Riley & Sanborn, ribbons 1.17 

Star Stamp Co., key checks 2.55 

E. A. Stratton, music bulletins 2.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., books, blanks 6.00 



FURNITX-TIE, ETC. 

C. W. Anderson & Co., 1 clock 

Amoskeag Manufactiiring Co., grates, etc. 
E. M. Brjant & Co., lamps and labor 



$3.50 

36.60 

6.45 



$37.03 



$46.50 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 125 

H. !<:. Carlisle, wire inattiiiii' $;34.0() 

C. DeMoiilpied & Co., 49 chairs • :iG.7.J 

G. II. Dudley, sand table .5.00 

J. J. Farrell, 1 desk light 4.7.5 

Frank W. Fitts, felt 4.88 

S. A. Felton & Son Co., brushes 7.3.50 

Hard}' & Folsom, ribbon 22.65 

James W. Hill Co., flags 25.00 

W. S. Holt, mops and rags 6.25 

C. A. Hoitt Co., chairs, desks, shades, use of 

chairs 369.23 

R. K. Home, dippers and basins 3.55 

Head & Dowst Co., typewriter tables 78.00 

Kenney Brothers & Wolkins, mat, settees, 

ink-wells 62.60 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware .60 

J. E. MacDonald, brooms 5.75 

J. Y. McQueston Co., 1 table 1.50 

New England Reed Co., raffia 5,51 

F. E. Nelson, glasses and basins 4.88 

People's Gas Light Co., 1 range 14.50 

Pike & Heald Co., tapers, flue brush .65 

Piper & Mclntire, music stand, drumi cord 

and ears -. 5.66 

J. E. Post, floor brushes 12.00 

F. L. V. Sj)aulding, 1 drum 7.50 

James A. Scully, chairs 12.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and supplies 331.92 

$1,165.18 



SUNDKIES. 

J. S. Averj', putting up cast $0.50 

Blanche L. Batchelder, paid for moving piano 1.00 

W. B. Corey Transfer Co., moving pianos.... 2.00 

Daniels-Cornell Co., soap 2.50 

Eager & Co., soap and oil 4.65 

P. N. Folsom, freight and cartage .50 

R. D. Gay, repairing flag. .50 

C. F. Jack, supplies and express J4.7S 

Masurj', Young & Co., cylinder oil 17.86 

Manchester Mills, soap 12.00 

McLaughlin & T>ay, oil .70 

Olmsted & Tuttle Co., waste 9.72 

.Tames Ried, trucking 2.00 

P.. F. Shepard, keys and repairs 2.25 



12G REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

South Manchester Chapel Society, use of 

chairs $2.00 

r. H. Thurston, sulpho-napthol 12.00 

J. O. Turcotte, use of chairs 39.04 

Wiggin-Young' Co., oil .70 



$124.70 



Total expenditures $1,373.41 

Transferred to unappropriated monej- 126.59 

$1,500.00 



Sewing Materials. 
Appropriation $^50. 00 

EXPENDITTJBES. 
SUNDKIE8. 

James W. Hill Co., thread, buttons, cloth $127.94 

Annie W. Patten, services as teacher. 100.00 

John B. Varick Co., scissors 11.25 

$239.19 



Total expenditures $239.19 

Transferred to unappropriated nionej- 10.81 

$250.00 



Fuel. 

Appropriation $11,000.00 

EXPEXDITURES. 
COAL. 

^Manchester Coal & Ice Co $644.07 

Moore & Preston Coal Co 2,503.26 

Northern New England Coal Co 6,027.14 

Union Coal Co • 588.56 

$9,763.03 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



127 



WOOD. 

Maxwell Ice Co $011.50 

L. C. Paige 33.00 

W. E. Woodward 26.00 

SUNDRIES. 

C. B. Clarkson, weighing coal 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



uO.aO 



$104.00 

$10,537.53 
462.47 

$11,000.00 



Contingent Expenses. 

Appropriation $2,700.00 

Transferred from unappropriated monej-. . 974.45 



EXPENDTTURES. 
WATER, GAS, EiLECTRIC LIGHTS. 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

electric lights $527.85 

People's Gas Light Co., gas 321.42 

Water commissioners, use of water S71.13 

CARRYING WATER. 

Mrs. Forest Bean $7.50 

Emma J. Ela 19.00 

G. M. Morse 19.00 

Byron E. Moore 6.00 

Josephine L. Riddle ". 11.50 

Cora A. Webb 11.50 

rSE OF TEAilS. 

Charles W. Bickford $134.00 

Maude E. Brown 55.50 

Blanche L. Corning 12.50 

Curtis W. Davis 135.00 

Emma J. Ela 25.00 

Anabelle F. Landers 52.00 

Josephine L. Riddle 12.50 



$3,674.45 



$1,720.40 



$74.50 



$426.50 



128 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SINDKIES. 

C. K. Beadle, carfare $4.50 

Walter Cody estate, rent of store 39.58 

E. H. Clough, P. M., envelopes, stamps 10.49 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos 33.50 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage .64 

J. H. Hesser, engrossing diplomas 37.95 

Monarch Typewriter Co.. rental of typewriter 11.25 

McQuesten & Lewis, rent 36.75 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

tolls 1.00 

Oak Hill Lodge, \ise of hall 3.00 

Oliver Typewriter Co., balance due on type- 
writers 100.00 

Piper & Mclntire, rent of piano 25.00 

Eemington Typewriter Co., 2 typewriters . . 140.00 

A. D. Scovell, use of chapel . . . , 6.00 

Victor E. Stevens, engrossing diplomas 15.75 

Thorp & Martin Co., 2 Fox typewriters 118.00 

Williams ^lanufacturing Co., 2 typewriters.. 90.00 

CENSUS EXI'MERATORS, ETC. 

Abraham Baulac $31.56 

C. W. Brown 35.00 

Thomas Champa 3.00 

H. C. Eastman 48.75 

Robert Edgar 35.00 

John F. Gillis 39.50 

Auguste Gingras 30.78 

Julius Hegewald 33.13 

L. W. Howard 30.78 

Oscar E. Johnson 21.25 

M. J. Mahoney 43.75 

.Tohn ]Montplaisir 37.50 

Joseph [Moriseau 30.63 

C. A. O'Connor . 20.00 

Alphonse Regnier 37.50 

Christopher Reischer 35.31 

A. S. Rich .75 

Nathan A. Sleeper 21.50 

L. M. Streeter 54.44 

Frank Sullivan 31.56 

Carl E. York 61.25 

Boyd Brothers, use of team 3.00 

W. P. Goodman, books and stationery 93.70 

Total expenditures 



$673.41 



$779.64 

$3,674.45 



CARE OF SCHOOLKOOMS. 



129 



Changing Dry Closet System. 
Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

/ 

E. Bilodeaii, masonwork .$70.38 

T. J. Briggs, iron, pipe, labor 20.20 

Connor Brothers, heating, per agreement 160.00 

Head & Dowst Co., repairing flues, paint, 

labor 115.39 

J. T. McLaughlin, repairing closets, steam 

and gas fittings 110.88 

T. Raiche & Co., new closets, labor 3,251.36 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.. 392.09 

W. H. Sullivan, paint and labor 35.64 

John B. Varick Co., iron 28.04 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to new account 



$5,000.00 



$4,183.98 

$4,183.98 
816.02 



$5,000.00 



Care of Schoolrooms. 



Appropriation $7,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated monej'... 156.42 



EXPENDITUEES. 
JANITOBS. 

John S. Avery $509.98 

S. H. Bachelder 208.30 

Edwin N. Baker . ' 349.92 

Marshall N. Badger 112.50 

Mrs. Forest Bean 15.00 

J. H. BufEum 499.92 

Joseph Chalifoux 300.00 

Benjamin Claflin 47.50 

William F. Conner 549.96 

Charles H. Corey 225.00 

Emma J. Ela 38.00 

William L. Fisher 15.00 

Louis Hueber 225.00 

9 



$7,156.42 



130 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Charles F. Jack $059.67 

George H. Jack 574.98 

Anabelle F. Landers 15.00 

W. H. Newry 649.92 

William J. Powers 600.00 

George E. Prince 291.62 

Josephine L. Riddle 23.00 

Arabella Eickaby 59.60 

Patrick H. Riley 193.17 

Asa M. Smith .- 499.92 

Wlilliam Stevens 399.96 

C. A. Underbill 21.25 

Inez M. Warren 38.00 

Cora A. Webb 23.00 

SXJKDKIES. 

Mrs. Forest Bean, cleaning $2.00 

J. H. Buffum, cleaning .70 

Mrs. Bessie Landers, cleaning 5.05 

Arabella Rickaby, cleaning 2.00 

Ralph L. Robie, washing floors and windows 1.50 

Total expenditures 



$7,145.17 



$11.25 
$7,156.42 



Appropriation 



Evening Schools. 



$1,500.00 



Expenditures. 



SALARIES. 

Charles E. Carrier $58.00 

Honorie J. Crough 116.00 

Lota C. Curtiss 34.00 

Lizzie Doherty 55.00 

Marianna Fitts 58.00 

Irving E. Forbes 116.00 

Jennie E. Grundy 58.00 

Madge Hall 58.00 

Margaret Linen 58.00 

Timothy R. Lyons 58.00 

Myra V. Moore 58.00 

Adelia Murphy 58.00 



EVENING SCHOOL. — MECHANICAL DRAWING. 131 

Lawrence O'Connor $58.00 

Mrs. Florence A. Prescott 35.00 

Arthur W. Kowell 116.00 

Minnie Sullivan 58.00 

Genevieve B. Walsh 43.00 

Jennie V. Williamson 10.00 

Susie G. Woodman 58.00 

: $1,163.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Joseph Chalifoux, janitor $29.00 

D. C. Heath & Co., books 12.25 

Pike & Heald Co., mantles .90 

George E. Prince, janitor 29.00 

A. M. Smith, janitor 29.00 

James A. Scully, chairs 6.00 

$106.15 



Total expenditures '. $1,269.15 

Transferred to unappropriated money 230.85 



$1,500.00 



Evening School.— Mechanical Drawing. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

salaries. 

H. W. Allen, teacher $120.00 

John M. Kendall, teacher 120.00 

$240.00 

SUNDRIES. 

E. E. Babb & Co., books $15.75 

Wadsworth, Rowland & Co., paper 20.00 

$35.75 



Total expenditures $275.75 

Transferred to unappropriated money....* 24.25 

$30000 



132 KEPORT OF THE CITY AODITOE. 

Teachers' Salaries. 

Appropriation $98,000.00 

Expenditures. 

&AXAKIES. 

January $10,050.12 

February 10,145.27 

March 10,241.19 

April 7,507.81 

May 9,436.09 

June 10,939.54 

September 7,410.00 

October 10,069.65 

November 10,428.50 

December 10,255.98 

$96,484.1S 

Total expenditures $96,484.15 

Transferred to unappropriated money 1,515.85 

$98,000.00 



Free Text-Books. 

Appropriation $7,000.00 

Received from sale of books 173.64 



Expenditures. 

text-books and supplies. 

American Book Co $1,320.10 

Allyn & Bacon 58.37 

Atkinson, Mentzer & Grover 47.23 

E. E. Babb & Co 458.29 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co 8.35 

C. C. Birchard & Co 61.65 

Milton Bradley Co 31.67 

Brooklyn Biological Supply Co 7.83 

Carter, Rice & Co ! 3.50 

E. R. & W. P. Coburn 6.85 

Oliver Ditson Co 131.10 

Dennison Manufacturing Co 21.60 



$7,173.64 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 



133 



Eagle Pencil Co $7.95 

Earle Ink Co 27.50 

Frank W. Fitts 1.29 

Ginn & Co 1,487.85 

Gregg- Publishing Co 8.20 

Herman Goldberger 5.00 

W. P. Goodman 9.45 

J. L. Hammett Co 447.45 

Hammond Typewriter Co 38.45 

D. C. Heath & Co 485.21 

Houghton, Miflflin & Co 257.22 

E. K. Home 4.50 

C. Howard Hunt Pen Co 20.25 

Isabelle Houliston 1.62 

Kenney Brothers & Wolkins 252.18 

George F. King & Co 402.86 

Longmans, Green & Co 60.05 

J. B. Lippencott Co 71.00 

Manual Arts Press Co 5.70 

Maynard, Merrill & Co 88.10 

F. E. Nelson 2.23 

S. S. Packard 13.95 

Perry Picture Co 3.90 

Prang Educational Co 63.60 

E. W. A. Rowles 36.00 

Silver, Burdett & Co 457.24 

Sinclair Manufacturing- Co 25.59 

E. A. Stratton 9.41 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co 6.00 

The Scarborough Co 3.90 

Temple & Farrington Co 6.25 

John B. Varick Co 28.74 

William Ware & Co 39.15 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co 27.15 

Walsh & Cumming-s 35.31 

J. A. Williams 2.40 

Williams Manufacturing Co 1.75 

SXTNUBIKS. 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage $67.32 

Fannie L. Sanborn, superintendent's clerk.. 500.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$6,600.94 



$567.32 

$7,168.26 
5.38 



$7,173.64 



134 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Manual Training. 



Appropriation 



$500.00 



EXPENDITUKES. 

SIJNDKIES. 

Mrs. N. J. Davis, washing and repairing 

aprons $3.75 

Derryfield Co., sundry kinds of wood 114.64 

Eugene Dietzgen Co., tracing cloth, drawing 

materials 23.76 

Eagle Pencil Co., pencils 8.45 

Ford & Kimball, brass castings 2.67 

Granite State Rubber Co., gas tubing .96 

J. L. Hammett Co., paper 5.10 

Head & Dowst Co., whitewood, etc 46.41 

W. F. Hubbard, lumber 91.73 

A. K. Hobbs, belting and lacing 5.60 

Palmer, Parker & Co., wood, sundry kinds 12.89 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 10.30 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools.... 173.70 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$499.96 

$499.96 
.04 

$500.00 



Paupers Off Farm. 

Appropriation $11,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money.. 2,479.63 



$13,479.63 



EXPENDITUKES. 

GBOCKRIES AND MEATS. 

J. B. Boulanger $24.00 

N. Bournival "-50 

N. Breault 156.00 

George Boisvert 102.00 

Brook Street Market 32.00 

J. H. Canney 8.00 

Alexander Chagnon 28.00 

V. J. Charron 161.79 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 



135 



C. H. Clark $39.00 

J. B. Daigle 89.97 

A. D. Desrochers 13.50 

J. N. DesGroseilliers 56.00 

W. G. Duford 36.8G 

William J. Egan 47.00 

H. Fradd & Co 67.00 

Luther G. Flanders 29.94 

Arthur Gagne 154.00 

J. J. Griffin 24.00 

German Co-operative Grocery Association.. 80.00 

Mrs. Mary Hayes 473.00 

Felix Harbour 402.00 

Eeinhardt Hecker 246.00 

J. F. Healy 169.00 

John Healy, 2d 310.50 

E. M. Holmes 10.00 

F. P. Johnson 14.00 

John A. Kane 49.72 

M. D. Knox 18.00 

Lindquist Brothers 42.00 

P. D. Lynch 138.00 

G. Lein & Son 257.20 

E. W. Lewis 58.00 

T. J. Labrecque 609.00 

Mrs. Maggie Landrigan 10.00 

Michael Mahoney 60.00 

Molleur, Noel & Michaud 235.00 

Daniel Murphy 11.18 

Oscar McDuffie 84.00 

Martin Mclntire 17.90 

John J. McQuade 176.00 

McLaughlin & Day 25.00 

C. E. Newcomb 14.00 

O. H. Nourry 103.00 

North End Provision Co 41.00 

A. Nelson 5.00 

F. T. Parker 9.90 

F. X. Parent 249.90 

Edward Pinard 39.80 

Parnell Brothers 59.00 

F. H. Poore 11.00 

Eugene Quirin 627.00 

C. L. Reiter 8.00 

G. T. Robinson 6.00 

A. L. Robitaille ^ 8.00 



:^>G 



RKPORT OF TinC CITY AlIIMTOIt. 



II. i;<.iiill;ir<l 

M. A. Siii-.-|i;in 

SpllllK! \'. MfSHUT .... 

Siiimncr Street MarUet 
'riiiii.iiil A' llaf»'ff(M'ty 

,\ii::r\i\i 'I'l-llliail 

Aiiiic 'Vvi>\ I ier 

Xeniionl liiiller ('o. . 

M. VCnellc 

Calixle \ if^iieaiilt . . . . 

Udlx'ft. Walli 

Ileiheit, II. WilliainH 
S. M. Wheeler 



PUKL, 



Mieliacl Ila>fvv('ll 

S. A. Hlodd 

I'Mmoiiii r.niirt|iic 

I). F. Croium 

T. Coiiil iiiaiiejic 

J. IT. Ih'Coiirey Co 

W. E. Dunbar i^- Sons 

A. l''erlan(l 

('. A. it; A. W. Flint 

I'liilias (iravcllno 

i;. C. IhiHlcell A- Sou 

Ueilllianll lle.'Uer 

It. .1. MacU 

Manelii'slei' Coal it lee ('o 

Maxwell lee ('o 

VV. .1. Miller 

Moore .V I'resl.m Coal Co 

.lose|ili Masse 

.\(Mllieiti New ICnpfland Coal (^o, 

Oniei'- repin 

v.. W. I'oore 

Kaielie it i-afon-e 

• lolm I', {{iissell 

I'loil SI. DiMiis 

A. 'riiiliniKleaii 

K. \. Tiircolle 

Henry Welier 

I. '1'. WehHter 

^V. i:. Woo.lwanl 



$10.00 
,is:!.(i() 

ni.i.si 

H.'.IS 
'18.00 
HO.OO 

Ci.OO 
8.00 
5.00 

8:{,:}2 

17.1)8 

uo.oo 



$3.1. ST) 

COO 

28.25 

a7..'io 

10..10 
80.0.') 
15.70 
1 8.50 

ii.:!s 

7.00 
1 1 .50 
SI. 3(1 
(■i2.50 

:{.oo 
1 5.:is 

10.01 
50.05 
10.00 

:i0.oo 

11.35 

11.50 

7.50 

1.88 

3.75 

50.00 

1 .00 

1.^0.05 



$7,543.78 



$1,005.52 



ItoAltl), CAUi:, AND UKNl'. 

Mrs. Olive \ii>^cr $l:.'(i.()l) 

Miir.v I'.cnsdii lO.OO 

Mis. II. I'.fdWM IC.OO 

Mrs. Aiiiiir I'.iillcr WM) 

I'lilw.ird iloiiclicr 7'2.(m 

Mllcii ('.•ill;ili;m HI.OO 

Mry.. N iiincili((ii(< ( "Ikmim rd I.Tt.OO 

Alir;iliiiiii Cole KIO.OO 

Miiry Dillon CO.OO 

\(l<'lar(l Diiin.is lO.OO 

.\liirL;;irr( Dwycr ■V.IM) 

Kill I' l'"i)\ Hi. 00 

Alfrcil (iiifviii (•.(•..()() 

K.ilc (loniiiiii r.(>.()() 

I'lnrciiccr Illinl.V .'iO.OO 

Cliarlfs M. ll.'cKrr HI. 00 

llillsl)(iri)ii;ni Coimly l''arin SSCi.ll 

hilanl As.vl il'Z.M 

Mary Kciiiii-y .'tO.OO 

.loll II Kciicy ;.'r..oo 

I 'a 1 lick l;a v(>ry :M.OO 

liciijaiiiiii Muck .''.".00 

Mrs. I'ldvvanj Madden 10.00 

Mi<'liaci Malioiicy .SO.OO 

.loliii 'I'. Murray 10.00 

Mary McCdriiiicU 'I'.IM) 

I'ah-ick McQucciicy ;:i.on 

New llaiiipsliirc. KImIc llospltnl .'iliri.l.M 

Noire DaiiK' llospilal SI. 00 

Nolrr Daiiic ( trpliaiiayr I T.O.OO 

Maijv^ii'el Kea|;an 7H.00 

K. i:. IIi'yiioIdH ;.'(). 00 

Saercd Hear! llospilal 0.00 

Stale I iiiliisl rial Seliool ll'i.llO 

(liislav Selilaii;^k H.OO 

SI. .loHejiii's r.oyH' lloiii(> :;0.0() 

SI. .loscph';; ()rpliaii(iK''e TiTT.nO 

SI. I'alriek'.s Orplia lui^^'i? ;.'I.'H.7.''. 

St. I'ierre Orplia iia<j;(< i;2().00 

Henry \'oil<iiiaiiii HS.OO 

I'ldwan! WCher (IC.OO 

A nil VVeleli .-,;.•.()() 

I'lli/.a \Vliel|)lfy ;!0.00 

• lain' Wolfe TS.OO 



187 



^i.iiiri.io 



IJJH iM'M'oitr or iiii'; <:\vy aiihtoi; 



IIOO'IH^ AMI Mllor.H. 

.1. VV. ( iiliiphrll $7.ir> 

(loMlfllo llrollicrM 21. .'lO 

I'lill'lrli ('omIi'IIk H.OO 

M. A. CiirrliT ;i.lO 

l)o(lf(<i «\/, DodjjCi' lfl.50 

(J, VV. I)()»Ik«i Hlioc Cn 12.-14 

VV. I'. {''iiiiiicM' l.TiO 

(Jrdciiii (JdHMcllii 7.M.'> 

I >. I'', Slini ;J2.(){) 

V. I'". '\'i>,,U- 24.50 



Hl'MIKII'M. 

lliiNlon iK' Mdliir K. K.. llcUt'tH $tl.()l) 

VV. .1. Krci'mnn. iimi« of liiicU .Ml 

\\ I' < Innillimil. liiiiiU'; 1111(1 si II t iiHir I'V it. '10 

II, II. Limiumcus. ii.'c ol' ImcK -.»() 

'I'linmiiM ('. SIrwni'l, <Miii\i\vim('c nl' |iiiii|>it to 

coimlv rMiiii ~.''0 



$i:i0.84 



11.(11 iirN<i. 

llcNMi', r;i(li'l(l;;;(' A' i'l, ^i:t.').', 

.MhlilCI.M. Ml HUM, (^lll\ ICI'H, MNKItAI, KXI'ICNHKH. 

.IflllK'N H, ItK.WII. M l>. Iilnl. ■ : icilllll M«TvlcCM .^.I.OO 
llct'llUIII (III l!llu|i||<', M. I)., rulllliij (•XlllllllWI- 

lion ;t.oo 

A. L. (iiKlixilM tV Cii., r ml niillllii 21.7A 

.InllM It, Ihlll Co.. IIK'.llclllc 17.78 

•Ii<mn1(< I.. llliliMi'otii, iiii'iliriiir 7ll.l\.'> 

.1. .1. Ilolliiiiil, liii'ilicitK* 1.(10 

Kiiwiii X' Sln'i'lilili. iMi'illrlilc K.ltO 

Ml |)oiMMif.;li ,K: .Shni. ImiiIiiI oilllll 20.00 

A. .1, I'r 1. iiii'.li.Miic m.dO 

iloNi<|ili 'l'n,vloi', M. I),, roiiMi'll I'Xllliilliat loll . . 11.00 
I'!, \', 'I'lirrot h<, liiiiliil oittlltN, us<> of niiiliii- 

lim.M- 1 I I. Ml 

I'. L. Wiilliirt', IIH(> ol' iiiiiliiiliiMiM*, liiii'iiil 

• .iiiiii :t:t.oo 

Wiil.li A CiiiiiiiiiiiKH, iiinllcliic K.-lll 



$.ino.ii I 



$14.40 



'l\.liil .-\|Mii.llliir««N $n.479.fl3 



CriY KAUM. 

City Fnrni. 

A|<|ii-()|>i-i;iti()n 

. |ilxrn;Ni>rniiMi;H. 

Kiiprciio n. 7,ii)i)cv. Hiipcriiiii'iKicni $i;3r).no 

Mrs. I'him'iic (J. I,ilil»t\v, iimlroii ' TTi.OO 

IIOIWIC ANI> I'AltM lAlltm. 

.IfimiMry ■ $I()S.;.M» 

I''cl)nmi-y ICill.fiS 

TMfircli i;.'().{U 

April l;.'(),',.'S 

A. .1. It«'l:iir $ii.:i:i 

Siir.'ili Ciiliill :,{\M) 

M ar.v I -. ( fiMH 'lAVA 

I'Mwaid DaviH VA.M 

N<llii- Diiw .1.00 

Allllir Ii'illM fi.Tl 

Li/,/,ii' l''limil(>rH .'t.r)() 

Ccliii (liinlcy 0.71 

Siisif llcil.v :».U5 

S. .1. I.iilliimim« 2.00 

(lirsirr Mii.viiiird JM.DU 

Murk Moore fi.OO 

Alfred Kniiiville ;t.7r. 

II. II. S.-olt ll.'jr. 

VV. I']. Woodward 0.00 

in IK I,. 

('. II. Hodwell. wood $(;h.()0 

J,. H. Hodwell .t Co.. eoid :,'.l.r,[) 

('I.OI'lllNd, llllV (lOOIlH, Kit'. 

(I. \V. Dod^'' Slioe Co., si M and niiiliei';: ^','J,M{) 

(.. M. I'Moyd, einihiii^.; i;3:i.:to 

.laiiiivs VV. Hill Co., dry RoodH ll.l.HJ 

I''. W. 1,1'eiiiaii. i\vy ^jood.H :! 1 .00 

Mr.s. K. (J. J,il>liry, paid for lial .10 

William Mareolle S.' Co.. clotldliff 10. ."0 

II. M. Moody, elolhiii;; .|:i.7f» 



18D 



$H,riO().ou 



$;:oo.o() 



$512.7:1 



$IC.I.I() 



$i2n.fio 



$;:70.:i5> 



140 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



5IEATS AXD PKOVISIONS. 

Brook Street Market $5.61 

C. H. Clark 66.50 

Daniels-Cornell Co '. 139.63 

M. D. Knox 12.61 

Manchester Public Market 1.00 

Manchester Beef Co 3.96 

Manchester Provision Co 88.50 

John W. Nye 77.15 

National Biscuit Co 13.98 

H. W. Parker 134.16 

Parnell Brothers 304.98 

E. M. Slayton Co 9.00 

John P. Squires & Co 9,13 

Summer Street Market 35.86 

J. H. Wiggin & Co 85.80 



KITCHEN UTENSILS. 

K. K Home $1.96 

F. E. Nelson 5.38 

Pike & Heald Co 18.00 



MEDICINE, irEDICAI> AND \Ti:TERINABY SERVICES. 

A. L. Dodge, V. S., attendance and medicine $2.75 

Jessie L. Hanscom, medicine 3.40 

J. J. Holland, medicine 1.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital, care of H. Grant.... 9.00 

F. H. Thurston, medicine 4.15 

Walsh & Cummings, medicine 2.00 



BLACKSMITIIING, ILV31>T:SS EEPAIRS. 

James Benson $7.36 

Couch & McDonald 8.00 

Connor & Grossman 5.00 

Tuohey & Co 6.00 

J. O. & L. P. Tremblay 30.25 

Joseph Vogel & Son 1.2'5 

N. J. Whalen 25.60 



$987.87 



$25.34 



$22.30 



$83.46 



CITY FARM. 141 

CARKIAGJE REPAIRS. 

S. P. Dodge Co $;i6.50 

Kimball Carriage Co 18.25 

J. B. McCrillis & Son 26.75 

McDonald Brothers 14.50 

$96.00 



HAY AND GRAIN. 

Arthur S. Brown " $234.92 

Merrill & Laraba 146.95 



HARDWARE AND FERTILIZERS. 

N. Bolton $13.80 

John B. Varick Co 60.02 



INSURANCE PREillUM. 

W. G. Berry * $65.70 

George Blanchet 21.90 

John Dowst 21.87 

Everett & Bunton 32.85 

C. C. Hayes 21.90 

John A. Sheehan 54.75' 

Fred R. Stark 10.95 

Eobert R. Chase 28.59 



ADVERTISING, STATIONERY, TELEPHONE. 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising $0.25 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 1.25 

Novelty Co., 1 stamp and pad 1.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone 26.50 



REPAIRS, ETC. 

T. J. Briggs, repairs $8.87 

Connor Brothers, repairs 16.00 

A. L. Dyer, repairing shoes .85 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber, boards 26.37 

J. Hodge, lumber 4.85 

C. H. Hutchinson, grates 6.04 

T. A. Lane Co., repairing desk fan 4.00 



$381.87 



$73.82 



$258.51 



$29.00 



142 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Gideon Lariviere, repairing- floor and roof. 

J. J. Morean, gravel roofing 

Pike & Heald Co., repairing tank, etc 

G. L. Read, labor 



$6.00 

82.73 

5.70 

1.20 



$162.61 



EX,ECTKIC LIGHTS, WATER. 



Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

electric lights $76.58 

Water commissioners, iise of water 86.25 

SUNDBIES, 

Allison Brothers, soap $11.25 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight .72 

Arthur S. Brown, grinding corn 2.20 

T. F. Brown, use of hack 5.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., filling ice house 17.00 

Sarah Cahill, helping take stock v . . 6.00 

C. B. Clarkson, labor 8.00 

John B. Clarke Co., Mirror, ten months 5.00 

W. J. Freeman, use of hacks 34.00 

L. A. Ford, tobacco 6.87 

T. J. Foley & Co., tobacco 18.90 

Fifield & Brown, use of team 10.00 

Frank A. Heath, help furnished 1.00 

E. G. Libbey, paid for labor, hack, postage.. 11.27 

Orange Judd Co., subscription "Homestead" 2.35 

C. A. O'Connor, services at farm 38.75 

S. J. Laflamme, food furnished, dinner for 

officials : 46.00 

Thomas Campbell, caretaker at farm 159.95 

Asa F. DoUoff, caretaker at farm 49.37 

Thomas Stewart, trucking .75 

James G. Taggart, advertising and services 

as auctioneer at sale of land 125.00 

A. A. Warren, oil 1.40 

\\\ A. Woodward, teaming 2.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$162.83 



$562.78 

$4,114.41 
4,385.59 



$8,500.00 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 143 

Indigent Soldiers. 

Appropriation $125.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money.. 11.50 

$136.50 

EXPENDITUKES. 

GROCERIES. 

F. H. Poore $77.00 

FUEL. 

Maxwell Ice Co $59.50 

Total expenditures ' $136.50 

File and Index System, 

Appropriation $250.00 

Transferred from unappropriated monej-.. 60.00 

$310.00 



EXPENDITUKES. 
LAB OK. 

Eva G. Jones $230.00 

Anna S. Smith 80.00 

$310.00 

Total expenditures $310.00 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 

Appropriation $50.00 

Expenditures. 

John B. Clarke Co., 1-S cost printing 250 re- 
ports .$4.87 

Pike & Heald Co., supplies 15.71 

John B. Varick Co., tools * 2.02 

$22.60 

Total expenditures $22.60 

Transferred to unappropriated money 27.40 

$50.00 



144 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Band Concerts. 
Appropriation 

EXPENDITtHtES. 

City Band $100.00 

First Infantry Band ._ 50.00 

Manchester Cadet Band 100.00 

St. Mary's Band 100.00 

Turner Band 100.00 

Total expenditures 



$450.00 



$450.00 



$450.00 



Militia. 



Appropriation 



$1,200.00 



EXPEXDITUBES. 



Company A, First Regiment, X. 11. X. G $100.00 

Company B, First Regiment, X. H. X. G 100.00 

Company C, First Regiment, X. II. X. G 100.00 

Company F, First Regiment, X. H. X. G 100.00 

Company K, First Regiment, X. H. X. G 100.00 

Company L, First Regiment, X. H. X. G 100.00 

Battery, N. H. X. G 100.00 

Camp Derwin, Xo. 184, Spanish-American 

War Veterans 100.00 

First Infantry Band 50.00 

Louis Bell Post, Xo. 3, G. A. R 100.00 

Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. R 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans 100.00 

Regimental headquarters 50.00 

Total expenditures 



$1,200.00 



$1,200.00 



Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 



Appropriation 



$500.00 



STATE TAX. 145 



EXPENIMTLTBES. 



Camp Derwin, Spanish-American War Vet- 
erans .^To.OO 

Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. K lOO.OO 

Louis Bell Tost, G. A. E ?,2:>M) 



$500.00 
Total expenditures $500.00 

Purchase of Land Sold for Taxes, 

Appropriation $(5,S00.OO 



EXPENDITUBES. 

Benjamin Lancy ". $117.72 

George E. Morrill 1,70S.S9 



$1,826.61 

Total expenditures $1,826.61 

Transferred to unappropriated money 4,973.39 . 

$6,800.00 



Abatement of Taxes. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money.... 188.78 

EXPENDITUKES . 

H. R. Armstrong- $47.18 

H. H. Dustin, heirs 6.38 

George E. Morrill 2,135.22 

$2,188.78 

Total expenditures $2,188.78 



$2,188.78 



State Tax. 

Appropriation $67,617.50 

EXPENDITUBES. 

State of New Hampshire $67,617.50 

10 



146 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

County Tax. 
Appropriation $80,585.70 

EXPENDITTJRES. 
County of Hillsborough $86,585.70 

Revision of Ordinances. 
Balance from last year unexpended $600.00 

EXPEIfDITt'RES. 

Transferred to new account $600.00 

Infant Asylum, Our Lady of Perpetual Help. 
Appropriation $:>00.00 

EXPENDITUKES. 

Infant Asylum, Our Lady of Perpetual Help. 

amount apfiropriated SDOO.OO 

Elliot Hospital. 

Appropriation $r;00.00 

Expenditures. 
Elliot Hospital, amount approjniated $:]00.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital. 
Appropriation $n00.00 

EXPENDITTJEES. 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital, amount 

appropriated $300.00 



RESOLUTION RAISING MONEY. 147 

Sacred Heart Hospital. 
Appropriation $:!00.00 

EXPEKKITURES. 

Sacred Heart Hospital, amount appropriated $n00.00 



Women's Aid Home- 

Appropriation $300.00 

EXrENDITTTRES. 

Women's Aid Home, amount appropriated $300.00 



W. C. T. U. Mercy Home. 

Appropriation $300.00 

EXPENDITITRES. 

W. C. T. U. Mercj^ Home, amount appropriated $300.00 



Manchester Historical Society. 

Appropriation $.500.00 

EXPEJvDITtTRES. 

Manchester Historical Society, printing- early 

records of the town of Derryfield $.")00.00 



Resolution Raising Money and Making Appropriations 
for the Year 1905. 

Resolved by the Board of Common Council of the City of Manchester, 

in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of seven hundred and eight thousand, one hundred 
and thirty-one dollars and thirtj^-two cents ($708,131.32) be raised 
for the use of said citj' for the year nineteen hundred and five by 
tax on the polls and estates liable to be taxed thereon, in said city, 
which sum, together with such unappropriated money as may be 
now in the city treasurj- or may hereafter come into it, shall be 
appropriated as follows: 



148 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CEGSTRAL, 0EPART1IEKT. 



Interest 

Sinking fund 

City hall 

Printing and stationery 

Incidental expenses 

Land sold for taxes 

Mayor's incidentals 

City officers' salaries 

Payment of funded debt 

File and index system 

Payment of temporary loan ; 

Auditor's department 

Engineer's department 

Stone bounds 

Assessors' department 

DEPARTMKNT OF TAXES. 

Abatement of taxes 

State tax 

County tax 

STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Street and park commissioners 

Land taken for new highways 

Kepairs of highways 

New highwa^^s 

Watering streets 

leaving streets 

Macadamizing streets 

Grading for concrete 

New sewers 

Scavenger service 

City teams 

Snow and ice 

Bridges 

Street sweeping 

Repairs of sewers 

Paving Elm street 

Macadamizing Massabesic street 

Two snow rollers 

Concreting Manchester street 

Macadamizing Cedar street 



$44,700.00 

31,000.00 

3,800.00 

1,600.00 

10,000.00 

6,800.00 

300.00 

21,000.00 

10,000.00 

250.00 

11,000.00 

2,100.00 

8.170.00 

300.00 

9,435.00 



$2,000.00 
67,617.50 
86,585.70 



$3,500.00 
1,500.00 

24,000.00 
5,000.00 
7,500.00 
5,000.00 
8,000.00 
4,000.00 

20,000.00 

21,000.00 
8,000.00 
9,000.00 

10,000.00 
3,500.00 
5,000.00 
6,000.00 
3,000.00 
250.00 
2,500.00 
1,000.00 



RESOLUTION RAISING MONEY. 149 
SCHOOL. DEPAKTMETMT. 

Books and stationery $75.00 

Care of rooms 7,000.00 

Contingent expenses 2,700.00 

Evening schools 1,500.00 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 300.00 

Free text-books 7,000.00 

Fuel 11,000.00 

Furniture and supplies 1,500.00 

Manual training 500.00 

Printing and advertising 400.00 

Eepairs of schoolhouses 10,500.00 

Sewing materials 250.00 

Teachers' salaries 98,000.00 

Changing the dry closet system 5,000.00 

New school building and lot 42,000.00 

FERE DEPAJRTMENT. 

Fire department $76,250.00 

Fire-alarm telegraph 2,700.00 

Hydrant service 19,550.00 

PUBLIC BtJlLDINGS ATS'D PLACES. 

Repairs of buildings $6,650.00 

Pine Grove cemetery 11,000.00 

Valley cemetery 5,400.00 

Amoskeag cemetery 500.00 

Merrill cemetery 100.00 

Examiners of plumbers 50.00 

Commons 4,500.00 

Stark park 1,000.00 

Derryfield park 1,000.00 

Lafayette park 1,000.00 

Prout park 500.00 

East Side park 100.00 

North End playground 50.00 

South End playground 50.00 

McGregorville playground 50.00 

Riddle playground 50.00 

HEALTH DEPAKTMENT. 

Health department $11,000.00 

CITY LIBRARY. 

City library $7,236.62 



150 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AXD PHILA>'TIIROPIC. 

City farm $8,500.00 

Indigent soldiers 125.00 

Paupers off farm 11,000.00 

Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Elliot Hospital 300.00 

Sacred Heart Hospital 300.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital 300.00 

Mercy Home 300.00 

Infant Asylum, Our Lady of Perpetual Help 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 500.00 

Band concerts 450.00 

Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. li 100.00 

Louis Bell Post, G. A. R 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans 100.00 

Spanish War Veterans 100.00 

Company A, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company B, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company C, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company F, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company K, First Regiment, X. H. N. G 100.00 

Company L, First Regiment, X. H. N. G 100.00 

Headquarters and Band, X. H. X. G 100.00 

Battery, X. H. N. G 100.00 

Manchester Historical Society 500.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Police commission $49,427.50 

Police court 2,900.00 

Police station 3,500.00 

LIGHTING STREETS DEPARTifENT. 

Lighting streets $54,634.00 

Passed March 23, 1905. 



Gentlemen of the Common Council: 

I herewith return the resolution entitled, "Resolution raising 
money and making appropriations for the year 1905," with my veto 
of the item of one eight-room school building and lot. to he located 
within the section bounded bj' Hanover street, Ashland street. East 
High street, and Beacon street, of $42,000, so that the total appropria- 
tion under the resolution shall be $666,131.32. 



RESOLUTION RAISING MONEY. 151 

It is with extreme reluctance that I veto this item because I 
believe that all necessary public school accommodations should be 
furnished by the city of Manchester promptly when required, and 
that an additional schoolhouse is now required. My veto, however, 
does not look to deny this additional schoolhouse to the people, but 
is simply an expreai^ion of opinion that the item of expense to be 
incurred in the purchase of the lot and the building- of the school- 
house should not be found as a part of the total amount to be raised 
by direct taxation during- the present year. Consequently, in addition 
to my veto, I wish to make a recommendation that these additional 
school facilities be furnished and paid for in installments, so that 
the burden of this permanent improvement maj' be distributed and 
equalized during a term of years. 

This recommendation is not for the purpose of remitting- to future 
g-enerations the burdens of taxation which we should now justly 
bear, but rather contemplates an equalization of tax rates for this 
generation, that is to saj', for this year and the years immediately 
following. 

Permanent improvements involving the initial expenditure of large 
sums of money ought not to be taken in one draft from the tax- 
payers, and certainly it is an equally wise policy for us to refrain 
from over-burdening the taxpayers of the future with the weight 
of a cumulative debt. 

A forcible example of the unwisdom of this latter policy has re- 
cently come to our attention, when we were called upon to make 
provision for the payment of an installment of $50,000 on accoimt of 
permanent improvements made twenty years ago, and for which no 
provision was made for payment at that time. Those permanent 
improvements of twenty years ago taken altogether amounted to 
the gross sum of $155,000, and would have occasioned at that time 
an excessive tax rate if included in any one year's invoice, but the 
mistake that was made was in the failure to provide for their pay- 
ment by a sinking fund. It is not surprising that such a reminder 
as this, of the ease with which the tax rate for any given year could 
be kept down and the burden shifted upon the future, should give 
rise to a demand for a "pay as you go" policy, but efforts in the 
direction of a uniform tax rate are not of this class. They are aimed, 
in fact, to correct just this speciiic evil. A wise city government will 
divide into such payments as will equalize for a term of years the 
exceptional amounts required for large public improvements in fur- 
therance of a real "pay as you go" policy. I believe that it is im- 
portant and very important that we keep the tax rate for the city 
of Manchester as near the two dollar mark as is possible. To pay 
for the proposed schoolhouse this year, by adding the total amount 
of the item to the invoice will produce a rate of about $2.15 on one 
hundred dollars. To distribute it over eight ji-ears will enable us to 



152 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

keep nearer the two dollar mark. It is proliable that within a short 
time another schoolhoiise will be required, and the same policy 
should be adopted when that occasion arises. On the other hand, 
an inconsiderate and reckless call on the taxpaj^ers at this time for 
the payment of the whole sum in one year will have the appearance 
of the adoption of that line of conduct as a policy, and in view of the 
fact that other large permanent improvements must be expected in the 
immediate future will be taken as a threat against the business 
interests of the city. The matter becomes more conspicuous because 
such a policy is a departure from a time honored method and one of 
approved utility. We are now paying each year approximately 
$75,000 on account of bonds issued by past generations, and it would 
certainly be entirely inconsistent for us to now adopt the policy of 
assessing the taxpayers in one draft for the whole sum of such 
permanent improvements as have called for the issuance of bonds 
heretofore, especially considering that we are now annually paying 
as a result of the other policy of tax equalization the large sum which 
■I have mentioned. The call of this occasion is for a more perfect 
appliance of the policy of equalization, which even with the imper- 
fections of the past has proved itself a policy of wisdom and sound 

finance. 

EUGENE E. REED, 

Mayor. 

Dated at Manchester this 31st day of ^farch, 1905. 

March 31, 1905. In Board of Common Council. Maj'or's veto not 
sustained, and it was voted to raise the sum of seven hundred and 
eight thousand, one hundred and thirty-one dollars and thirty-two 
cents ($708,1:11.3:2), as originally voted. 



STATEMENT OF TAXATION. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 






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I 



VALUATION AND TAXES. 



155 



Assessors' Oath. 

We, the Assessors of the city of Manchester, do solemnly swear that 
in making the invoice for the purx^ose of assessing the foregoing taxes, 
we appraise all taxable property at its full value, and as we would ap- 
praise the same in payment of a just debt due from a solvent debtor. 
So hell) us God. 



Valuation and Taxes. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on the real and per- 
sonal estate, within the city of Manchester, N. H., for the year 1905, 
was as follows: 

Valuation. Kate. Tax. 

Eeal estate $26,350,509 $20.80 $548,090.59 

Personal property 6,360,957 20.80 132,307.90 

$32,711,466 $680,398.49 

Num'ber of polls, 14,650 1,465,000 20.80 30,472.00 

$34,176,466 $710,870.49 

Fractional loss .36 

Total tax levied $710,870.13 

The share distributed to Manchester of the amount of 
tax assessed, as per returns made by the corporations 
to state treasurer: 

On railroads $47,073.34 

On savings banks 68,033.73 

On insurance companies 3,052.50 

On literary fund 3,028.85 

Grand tax total $832,058.55 



For further information in relation to taxes collected by the state, 
see State Treasurer's report. 



156 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

TAX VALUATIONS, ETC., FROM 1890 TO 1904, INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 



Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. polls. 


Poll tax. 


Valua- 
tion of 
poll. 


$24,207,740 


5462,869.17 


9,723 


?1.91 


sioo 


24,872,492 


443.541.76 


10,367 


1.78 


100 


25,932,014 


506,465.17 


10,673 


1.95 


100 


27,439,742 


507,640.68 


11,835 


1.85 


100 


28,391,710 


505,372.44 


12,103 


1.78 


100 


28,861,122 


502,183.02 


12,244 


1.74 


100 


29,443,068 


547,651.50 


12,583 


1.8C 


100 


30,486,946 


634,127.80 


12,921 


2.08 


100 


30,988,488 


604,280.57 


12,808 


1.95 


100 


31,491,784 


614,096.93 


13,137 


1.95 


100 


32,706,794 


621,428.47 


13,759 


1.90 


100 


33,041,112 


654,214.00 


13,976 


1.98 


100 


33,034,334 


743,497.53 


14,079 


2.25 


100 


32,819,850 


089,217.79 


14.384 


2.10 


100 


33,179,294 


647,003.29 


14,451 


1.95 


100 


34,176,466 


710,870.13 


14,650 


2.08 


100 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. . 
1905. 



Statement of Account of George E. Morrill, Tax Collector 
for the City of IVIanchester, N. H., June 1, 1905. 

Amount Balance 

outstanding outstanding 

June 1, 1904. Collected. June 1, 190."). 

Tax list, 1SS5 $1,205.71 $1,205.71 

1SS6 1,264.85 l,264.So 

1887 1,103.94 1,163.94 

1888 1.5S0.13 1,580.13 

1889 l.,395.13 1,395.13 

1890 1,687.08 1,687.08 

1891 1,966.63 1,966.63 

1892 2,582.12 2,582.12 

1893 4,095.13 4,095.13 

1894 3,514.05 3,514.05 

1895 5,004.92 5,004.92 

1896 4,997.58 $5.58 4,992.00 

1897 5,296.91 5,296.91 

1898 5,633.11 3.90 5,629.21 



ACCOUNT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 157 

• 

Amount lialaiicc 

outstanding outstanding 

June 1, 1904. Collected. June l, l!)05. 

Tax list, 1S90 .i;5,68().79 $11.70 $.'5,G7.'j.09 

1900 . 5,157.71 5.70 5,152.01 

1901 6,092.41 19.41 6,073.00 

1902 28,402.35 21,884.63 6,517.72 

1903 7,721.14 511.02 7,210.12 

Amount collected $22,441.94 

Credit by cash, as per treasurer's receipts Nos. 

108 and 115 22,441.94 

Interest collected $1,745.61 

Credit by cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 

113 1,745.61 

Cost collected $1,557.90 

Credit by cash, as per treasurer's receipt No. 

114 1,557.90 

Dr. 
1904. 

June 1. To warrant resident list $645,917.14 

warrant non-resident list 1,086.15 

voluntary list 617.13 

school tax 140.00 

$647,760.42 



Cr. 

1904, 1905. 
By cash paid treasurer, per vouchers Nos. 92, 

118, 125, 129, 146, 152, 155, 159, 160, 201, 207 

in year 1904; and 15, 54, 71, 109, 110, 116 in 

year 1905 $639,607.30 

By abatements, vouchers Nos. 167 and 199 in 

year 1904, and 108 in 1905 1,147.10 

By unpaid taxes June 1, 1905 7,006.02 

$647,760.42 



Majntchester, August 14, 1905. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George E. 
Morrill, tax collector of said Manchester, and find the same correct, 
as above stated. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



168 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



Year. 






?,^; 



S " 



.9 

s 

« 

o . 



Taxes of 1885. 
" of 188C. 
" Of 1887. 
" of 1888. 
" of 1889. 
" of 1S90. 
" of 1891. 

of 1892. 

of 1893. 

of 1894. 
" of 1895. 
" of 1896. 
" of 1897. 
" of 1898. 
" of 1S99. 
" of 1900. 
" Of 1901. 

Of 1902. 
" of 1903. 
" of 1904. 



of 1905. 



51,205.71 
1^64.85 
1,163.94 
1,580.13 
1,395.13 
1,687.0« 
1,966.63 
2,582.12 
4,095.13 
3,514.05 
5,004.92 
4,997.58 
5,296.91 
J, G33.il 
5,686.79 
5,157.71 
6,002.41 
6,569.38 

7,721.14 

( 757.13 1 
■( 87,068.95 1 

710,870.13 
?871,310.93 



S408.30 
1,582.39 



$1,990.69 



S5.58 



3.90 

11.70 

5.70 

19.41 

61.66 

611.02 

80,411.70 

634,526.88 

?715,547.C1 



81,205.71 
1,264.85 
1,163.94 
1,580.13 
1,395.13 
1,687.08 
1 ,%6.63 
2,582.12 
4,095.13 
3,514.05 
5,004 92 
4,992.00 
6,296.91 
5,629.21 
5,675.00 
5,152.01 
6,073.00 
6,517.72 
7,210.12 
7.006.02 
74,760.86 

5153,772.63 



EXEMPTIONS FROM TAXATION. 159 

Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions from 

Taxation. 

Constitution of New Hampshire, Article 82, Page 38, Public 

Statutes. 

ewcoukagemewt of lttetratukei, etc. 

Art. 82. "Knowledge and learning g-enerallj^ diffused through a 
community being essential to the preservation of a free government, 
and spreading the opportunities and advantages of education through 
the various parts of the .country, being highly conducive to promote 
this end, it shall be the duty of legislators and magistrates, in all 
future periods of this government, to cherish the interests of literature 
and the sciences, and all seminaries and public schools; to encourage 
private and public institutions, rewards, and immunities for the promo- 
tion of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures, and 
natural history of the country; to countenance and inculcate the prin- 
ciples of humanity and general benevolence, public and private charity; 
industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, sincerity, sobriety, 
and all social atfections and generous sentiments among the people; 
provided, nevertheless, that no money raised by taxation shall ever be 
granted or applied for the use of schools or institutions of any re- 
ligious sect or denomination." 

PiTBLic Statutes, Ciiaptek 55. 

"Sect. 2. Real estate, whether improved or unimproved, and 
whether owned by residents or others, is liable to be taxed, except 
houses of public Avorship, twenty-five hundred dollars of the value of 
parsonages owned by religious societies and occupied by their pastors, 
schoolhouses, seminaries of learning, real estate of the United States. 
state or town used for pirblic purposes, and almshouses on county 
farms." 

"Sect. 11. Towns may by vote exempt from taxation for a term not 
exceeding ten years any manufacturing establishment proposed to be 
erected or put in operation therein, and the capital to be used in oper- 
ating the same, unless such establishment has been previously ex- 
empted from taxation by some town." 

OPINION OF THE SUPKEiME COUI5T. 

' 58 N. H. Rep., page 623. "The exemption in each case is limited to 
ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole power of taxation 
would be the destruction of government; and the dangerous tendency 
of legislation suspending any part of that power, for any period, is 
manifest. P. Bank v. BiUings, 4 Pet. 514, 5G1. So long as the existing 
laws remain unrepealed, and the constitutional construction hereto- 
fore adopted remains unchanged, contracts hereafter made under 



IGO REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

these laws nnd that construction will be valid. If the legislature for 
any reason wish to jirevent the making of any more such contracts, 
their object can l)e acconiplisliecl by a repeal of the laws authorizing 
them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective charters 
as "being of the nature of a public charity," as follows: 

(laic Home for Aged and Destitute Women, .\. 11. Laws of 1899, 
chapter 1!M). 

Elliot Hospital, X. II. Laws of 1881, chapter 178. 

Manchester Woman's Aid and Relief Society, organized in January, 
1875, N. H. Laws, 1891, chapter 28,1. 

Orphanage and Home for Old Ladies (Ciitholic) on Hanover street, 
N. H. Laws, 188:5, chapter 56. 



Schedule of Property used for Religious, Charitable and 
Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Taxation by 
Law, not including that owned by the City of Manchester. 

Convent, Sister Jesus Mary, French Catholic; iCasI Spruce 
street, near Beech: 

Huilding $1().on().()n 

i:i,000 square feet of land e.lion.OO 

$12,600.00 

Convent, Sisters of Mercy, Catholic; 41.") Union street, 

corner Laurel: 

Building $30,000.00 

12,000 square feet of land G,;K)0.00 

$36,300.00 

;Mount St. Mary's Academy, Catholic; from convent 

lot east to Beech street: 

Building .$2.-.,000.00 

31,500 square feet of land 9,450.00 

$34,450.00 

Lot south side of Laurel street, corner of Union street, 

Catholic; McDonald school: 

Building $35,000.00 

lO.SOO square feet of land 5,000.00 

$40,000.00 

Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' Home, 

Catholic; Amherst and Hanover streets: 

Building $14,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 30,375.00 

$44,375.00 



PROPERTY' EXICMPT FROM TAXATION. 161 

St. Patrick'.s Oi-plian Asylums, Cnfliolic; 1.S4 lliiiiover 
■street: 

Biiildino- $47,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 40,500.00 



St. Joseph's High School, Catholic; Lowell street, corner 
of Birch: 

I'.uildinjT $i;3,000.00 

s,0()0 s(iuare feet of land 8,000.00 

Union-street school, Catholic; corner of Union and Lanrel 
streets: 

Building- $4,000.00 

5,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

St. Agnes' school, Catholic; corner Cedar and Pine 
streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

20,000 square feet of land .3,200.00 

St. Joseph's school for girls. Catholic; corner Pine and 
Lowell streets: 

Building $10,000.00 

Land included in cathedral lot. 

Convent of Holy Angels, French Catholic; Beauport 
street, corner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building $15,000.00 

22,500 square feet of land 4,500.00 

St. George's school, French Catholic; corner Pine and 
Orange streets: 

Building $;;0,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Monastery of the Precious Blood; 555 Union street: 

Building $2,500.00 

6,750 square feet of land 2,025.00 

Orphanage school, Beauport, Wayne, and I'utnam streets: 
French Catholic: 

Building $25,000.00 

30,000 square feet of land 6,000.00 

St. Augustine's academy, French Catholic; corner Beech 
and Spruce streets: 

Building $8,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 4,500.00 

11 



$87,500.00 



$20,000.00 



$6,500.00 



$15,200.00 



$10,000.00 



$19,500.00 



$:j5,ooo.oo 



$4,525.00 



$31,000.00 



$12,500.00 



162 REPOPwT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. Marie's parochial scliool, French Catholic; corner 
Wayne and Cartier streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

25,000 square feet of land 2,000.00 

Residence priest St. Augustine's church, French Cath- 
olic; 383 Beech street: 

Building- $0,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 1,875.00 

$7,785.00 
Orphan Children's school, parish of St. Augustine; 251, 
253 Lake avenue: 

Building $12,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Holy Rosary school; 30 Cedar street: 

Building $8,750.00 

2,500 square feet of land 1,250.00 

Residence priest St. Anne's church, Catholic; 231 Merri- 
mack street: 

Building $5,000.00 

8,820 square feet of land 2,646.00 

$7,046.00 
Residence of Catholic bishop; 145 Lowell street: 

Building $40,000.00 

24,000 square feet of land 12,000.00 

$52,000.00 
Residence priest St. George's church, French Catholic; 
Orange street, corner Pine: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,000 square feet of land 4,000.00 

$6,500.00 
Residence priest St. Mary's church, French Catholic; 376 
Beauport street. West Manchester: 

Building $2,500.00 

5,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$3,500.00 
St. Anne's church. Catholic; Union street, corner Merri- 
mack: 

Building $30,000.00 

10,180 square feet of land 5,090.00 



$14,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$17,000.00 



$10,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$35,090.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 163 

St. Augustine's chiu'ch, French Catholic; Beech street, 
eorner East Spruce: 

Building $28,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 3,250.00 



St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel. Catholic; Pine street, 
corner Lowell: 

Building $70,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 30,375.00 

St. Marie's church, French Catholic; Beauport street, 
corner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building $25,000.00 

70,000 square feet of land 14,000.00 

St. Raphael's church and school, German Catholic; Third 
street, corner Ferry, West Manchester: 

Building $35,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 3,400.00 

St. George's church, French Catholic; Pine street, corner 
Orange: 

Building $75,000.00 

18,690 square feet of land 7,614.00 

St. Patrick's church and school. Catholic; Kelley street, 
Cartier street, and Coolidge avenue: 

School building $20,000.00 

5%,281 square feet of land 4,502.00 

St. Antoine de Padoue church. Catholic; 260 Belmont 
street: 

Building $4,000.00 

Residence priest St. Antoine de Padoue's church. Cath- 
olic; 258 Belmont street: 

Building $5,500.00 

Land 4,000.00 

$9,500.00 
St. Hedwidge church, Polish Catholic; Merrimack, corner 
Pine street: 

Building $3,000.00 

Land 6,000.00 

Residence i:)riest St. Hedwidge church, sanie lot: 

Building $4,000.00 



$31,250.00 



$100,375.00 



$39,000.00 



$38,400.00 



32,614.00 



$24,502.00 



$4,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$9,000.00 
$2,500.00 



164 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

First Baptist church; Union street, corner Concord: 

Building $28,000.00 

11,250 square feet of kind 6,750.00 

First Freewill Baptist church; Merrimack street, corner 
Chestnut: 

Building $12,400.00 

12, GOO square feet of land 12,600.00 

Second Baptist church, Merrimack street, near Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

9,450 square feet of land 3,780.00 

People's Baptist church; Chestnut street, corner Con- 
cord: • 

Building $8,000.00 

3,200 square feet of land 2,000.00 

First Congregational church; Hanover street, corner 
Union : 

Building $30,000.00 

43,200 square feet of land 34,500.00 

Second Congregational church; Market street, corner 
Franklin: 

Building $25,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 19^000.00 

Third Congregational church; South Main street, cor- 
ner Milford, West Manchester: 

Building $8,000.00 

23,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

First M. E. church; Vallej- street, corner Jewett: 

Building $8,000.00 

11,400 square feet of land 1,000.00 

St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, corner Amherst: 

Building $25,000.00 

10,010 square feet of land 6,000.00 

Trinity M. E. church; School street: 

Building $2,000.00 

12,176 square feet of land 3,000.0Q 



$34,750.00 



$25,000.00 



$12,780.00 



$10,000.00 



$64,560.00 



$44,000.00 



$11,000.00 



$9,000.00 



$31,000.00 



$5,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 165 

St. James M. E. church; Pennacook street, corner Pine: 

Buildino- $9,000.00 

11,000 square feet of land 2,200.00 



Grace church, Episcopal; Lowell street, corner Pine: 

Buildino- $20,000.00 

9,300 square feet of land 6,975.00 

First Unitarian church. Concord street, corner Beech: 

Building- $24,000.00 

13,500 square feet of land 6,000.00 

First Universalist church; Lowell street, near Elm: 

Building- $17,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 15,000.00 

Christian church, Protestant; Hall street, corner Merri- 
mack : 

Building $9,000.00 

Land : 1,000.00 

First Presbyterian church, German; Second street, cor- 
ner Bath, West Manchester: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Swedish Lutheran church, Protestant; Sagamore, corner 
Pine: 

Building $7,500.00 

10,950 square feet of land 2,000.00 

Swedish Evangelical Mission; Pine street, corner Orange: 

Building $6,500.00 

Land 4,100.00 

Swedish Baptist church; Arlington street, near Maple: 

Building $5,000.00 

4,432 square feet of land 1,100.00 

Second Advent church; Amherst street, between Pine 
and Union: 

Building $5,100.00 

4,500 square feet of land 3,375.00 

City Mission chapel, Protestant; Merrimack street, cor- 
ner Beech: 

Building $7,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,000.00 



$11,200.00 



$26,975.00 



$30,000.00 



$32,000.00 



$10,000.00 



$5,500.00 



$9,500.00 



$10,600.00 



$6,100.00 



$8,475.00 



$13,000.00 



166 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Westminster Presbj'terian church; Brook street, corner 
Hazel: 

Building- $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

South Manchester Union chapel, Protestant; Elm street, 
south: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,747 square feet of land 1,000.00 

First Church of Christ, Scientist; Harrison street, corner 
Albert: 

Building- $14,000.00 

Land 5,000.00 

Episcopal Mission church; North Main street, corner 
School, West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

19,412 square feet of land 4,000.00 

Residence pastor St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, 
near Amherst: " 
Building $3,000.00 

Residence pastor First Congregational church; 590 Beech 
street, near Bridge: 

Building $5,000.00 

8,100 square feet of land 2,400.00 

$7,400.00 
Residence pastor Grace Episcopal church; corner of Har- 
rison and Union streets: 

Building $6,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 3,750.00 

$9,750.00 
German School Society; Third, Bath, and Ferry streets: 

Building $4,500.00 

10,187 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Elliot Hospital, Protestant; East Manchester: 

Building $23,000.00 

Land 7,000.00 

Elliot Hospital lot; Hanover street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $3,000.00 

Land 13,000.00 



$17,500.00 



$3,500.00 



$19,000.00 



$7,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$7,000.00 



$30,000.00 



$16,000.00 



PROPEETY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 167 

Elliot Hospital: 

Land and buildings, Alain street $4,000.00 

Land and buildings, Quincy .street 2,500.00 



Women's Aid Home; Pearl street, corner Beech: 

Building $15,000.00 

57,530 square feet of land 10,000.00 

Women'.s Aid Home; Bridge street, corner Chestnut: 

Buildings $9,000.00 

0,037.5 square feet of land 3,000.00 

Manchester Children's Home; Webster street: 

Building $20,000.00 

55,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Residence pastor Swedish Lutheran church; Sagamore 
street, corner Pine: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,200 square feet of land 1,020.00 

$4,020.00 
Gale Home: 

One half Martin's block, Elm street $25,000.00 

Land and building, Pearl street, corner 

Ash 25,000.00 

Masonic Home, Beech street: 

Building $17,000.00 

56,700 square feet of land 7,500.00 

One half land and buildings, 193 Pearl 

street $1,750.00 

One half land and buildings, 266 Pearl 

street 900.00 

One half land and buildings, 270 Pearl 

street 900.00 

One half land and buildings, 274 Pearl 

street 900.00 

One half five acres of land on North 

Union street 325.00 

EXEMPT FEOM TAXATION. 

Church property. Catholic $364,231.00 

Convent property. Catholic 72,925.00 

Parochial residences. Catholic 17,500.00 

Parochial schools. Catholic 245,650.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions.. 131,875.00 



$6,500.00 



$25,000.00 



$12,000.00 



$22,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$50,000.00 



$24,500.00 



$4,775.00 



$832,181.00 



168 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Church property, Protestant $4:)7,')40.()0 

Parochial residences, Protestant 10,000.00 

Private school property, Protestant 7,000.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions.. 191,275.00 

$660,21.5.00 

Total $1,498,390.00 

TAXABLE. 

Land and buildings, Catliolic $7.'^,521.00 

Land and buildings, Protestant 14,170.00 

$87,691.00 

Total exempt and taxable $1,586,087.00 



STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT. 



169 



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170 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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1 



STATEMENT OP BONDED DEBT. ITl 

KEarAKKS. — The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the 
cemeteries of the city to parties who pay $100 and upward. There are 
$50,000 in cemetery bonds, so called, not neg-otiable, in the hands of 
the city treasurer, which are not included in the $1,735,000. 
Total amount of bonded debt, including cemetery bonds $1,785,000.00 
Net indebtedness for water purposes 800,000.00 

Net debt after deducting water debt $985,000.00 

As shown in the assessors' books for the year 1905: 

The assessed value of personal propert3% including poll 
tax $7,825,957.00 

The assessed value of real estate 26,350,509.00 

Total value for taxation $34,176,466.00 

Tax rate, 2.08 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 2.882 

Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 5.02 

Population, census of 1900 56,987 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has alwaj's been promptly paid at maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being jjayable in gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

A sinking fund was established in 1893. 

Total amount of sinking fund December 31, 1905, $510,696.03. 

The power of the city to borrow monej' in relation to the water- 
works is limited to the sum of $600,000 by section 6, chapter 70, New 
Hampshire Laws of 1871, entitled "An act to enable the city of Man- 
chester to establish water-works," except as further extended an 
amount of $300,000 by laws of 1891, chapter 26; and $200,000 by laws 
of 1895, chapter 172. 

SUMMARY OF CITY DEBT. 

Amount of debt January 1, 1905 $1,796,000.00 

Accrued interest on bonded debt, December 31, 1905.... 36,958.00 

$1,832,958.00 
Amount of bonded and temporary debt paid in 1905.... 21,000.00 

Total indebtedness December 31, 1905 $1,811,958.00 

AVAHiABLE ASSETS. 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1905 $124,543.98 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1905 74,760.86 

Stock of Suncook Valley Railroad, estimated value 14,500.00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1905 510,696.03 

$724,500.87 



172 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Total indebtedness December 31, 1905 $1,811,958.00 

Total available assets December 31, 1905 724,500.87 



Total net indebtedness December 31, 1905. 



$1,087,457.13 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE 
BONDED DEBT. 



Year 



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1890. . 
1891.. 
1892.. 
1893 . . 
1894.. 
1895 . 
1896.. 
1897.. 
1S98 . . . 
1899. . , 
1900... 
1901 . . . 
1902 . . . 
1903... 
1904 . . . 
1905 . . . 



$27,000 
24,000 
18,000 
18,000 
18,000 
18,000 
12,000 
9,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
3,000 



86,000 
8,000 
12,000 
12,000 
14,000 
14,600 
20,000 
22,000 
24,000 
24,000 
24,000 
24,000 
24,000 
24.000 
24,000 
24.000 



S9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9.S00 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 
9,500 



S623.75i $7,000 



813.92 
1,000.00 



7,200 
7,200 



1,041 .66j 7,200 

1,550.00 

1,812.60 

2,112.50 



2,500.00 
2,500.00 
2,500.00 
2,500.00 
2,.500.00 

2,500.00 

2,500.00 

2,500.00 

2,500.00 1 



«2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 



86,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
4,200 



1 
















88,000 
12,000 
16,000 
16,000 

16,000 

1 

1 19,600 

19,500 

19.600 

20,850 

22,300 

22,300 

24,050 


84,800 
14,400 
13,000 
13,000 
11,400 
10,520 
8,800 
8,200 
6,400 
6,000 
5,600 



$49,423.75 
48,613.92 
46,800.00 
46,841.66 
59,650.00 
68,712.50 
82,612.50 
80,600.00 
79,000.00 
81,500.00 
80,620.00 
78,900.00 
76,650.00 
73,300.00 
72,900.00 
72,250.00 



VALUATION OF KEAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 11 Z- 

Valuation of Real Estate Owned by the City. 

High school, Beech street, coi-iier Lowell: 

Building- $170,000.00 

59,400 square feet of land 17,820.00 

$187,820.00 

Franklin-street school, Franklin street, corner Pleasant: 

Building $16,000.00 

19,200 square feet of land 19,200.00 

$35,200.00 

Spring-street school, Spring street: 

Building $13,000.00 

13,600 square feet of land 13,600.00 

$26,600.00 

Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, corner Merrimack: 

Building $45,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

$53,000.00 

Ash-street school, Ash street, corner Bridge: 

Building $50,000.00 

57,537 square feet of land 17,262.00 

$67,262.00 

Main-street school, North Main street, West Manchester: 

Bnilding $6,000.00 

40,293.4 square feet of land 10,073.00 

$16,073.00 

Webster-street school, Webster street: 

Building $39,000.00 

55,7U% square feet of land 13,928.00 

$52,928.00 

Blodget-street school, Blodget street: 

Building $1,500.00 

9,000 square feet of land 3,600.00 

$5,100.00 

Lowell-street school, Lowell street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $1,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 9,000.00 

$10,000.00 

Merrimack-street school, Merrimack street, corner 

Union: 

Building $15,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 

$21,300.00 

Parker school. South Main street. West Manchester: 

Building $20,000.00 

13,650 square feet of land 2,047.00 

$22,047.00' 



174 EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Bakersville school, Elm street, south: 

Building $10,000.00 

24,184 square feet of land 3,628.00 

Stark District school. River road, north: 

Building $1,000.00 

43,560 square feet of land 100.00 

Amoskeag school. Front street, Amoskeag: 

Building $8,000.00 

6,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

Himmon school, corner Amory and Dubuque streets: 

Building $17,400.00 

16,600 square feet of land 2,490.00 

Goffe's Falls school, Goffe's Falls: 

Building $11,000.00 

47,916 square feet of land 250.00 

Harvey District school, Xutt road: 

Building $2,000.00 

21,780 square feet of land 100.00 

Webster Mills school, Webster Mills: 

Building $400.00 

5,445 square feet of land 100.00 

Old Hallsville school, East Manchester: 

Building $500.00 

30,075 square feet of land 3,008.00 

Youngsville school, Youngsville: 

Building $500.00 

51,228 square feet of land 100.00 

Mosquito Pond school. Mosquito Pond: 

Building $400.00 

10,890 square feet of land 100.00 

Pearl-street school: 

Building $18,700.00 

Land 3,200.00 

Varne.y school, Bowman street, corner Mast, West Man- 
chester: 

Building $43,750.00 

Land 6,700.00 



$13,628.00 



$1,100.00 



$9,000.00 



$19,890.00 



$11,250.00 



$2,100.00 



$500.00 



$3,508.00 



$600.00 



$500.00 



$21,900.00 



$50,450.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 175 

New Hallsville school, Jewett street, corner Younpf, East 
Manchester: 

Buikling $29,800.00 

44,000 square feet of land :;,:)00.00 

$33,100,00 

Straw school, Chestnut street, corner Harrison: 

Building $,'!0,000.00 

32,400 square feet of land 16,200.00 

$46,200.00 

New Wilson school, Wilson, Cedar, and Auburn streets: 

Building- .$30,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

$35,000.00 

South iSIanchester school, Titus avenue: 

Building $12,000.00 

48,400 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$13,000.00 

$759,050.00 
ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Engine-house and stable. Central Station, Vine street: 

Building $31,800.00 

21,718.86 square feet of land 25,438.00 

$57,238.00 

North Main-street engine-house, North Main street, West 

JNIanchester: 

Building $18,000.00 

11,819 square feet of land 2,955.00 

$20,955.00 

Webster-street engine-house, Webster street, corner 

Chestnut: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,510 square feet of land 2,180.00 

$14,180.00 

Merrimack engine-house. Lake avenue: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

■ $18,000.00 

Hosehouse and cottage. Maple street, corner East High: 

Building $3,000.00 

18,330 square feet of land 3,666.00 

$6,666.00 

Engine-house and wardroom, ward 9, Eimmon and Amory 

streets. West Manchester: 

Building $22,755.00 

6,000 square feet of land 870.00 

$23,625.00 



176 JIEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

South Manchester Hosehouse: 

Building $4,200.00 

4,278 square feet of land G84.00 

Engine-house, Concord street, corner Weston: 

Building $6,800.00 

15,500 square feet of land 1,000.00 



OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City Librarj', Dean avenue, corner Franklin street: 

Building $35,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 30,000.00 

City Hall, Elm street, corner Market: 

Building $20,000.00 

100,000 square feet of land 150,000.00 

City farm. Mammoth road: 

Building $5,000.00 

40.27 acres, west Mammoth road 40,270.00 

81.55 acres, east Mammoth rOSd 65,240.00 

Court house, Franklin street, corner West Merrimack: 

Building $20,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 57,000.00 

Battery building, Manchester street: 

Building $13,000.00 

3,400 square feet of land 5,100.00 

Police station, Manchester street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $40,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 15,000.00 

Slayton Lot, ]\Ianchester street: 

Police patrol stable $4,000.00 

Building 300.00 

2,908 square feet of land 4,700.00 

City stable and other buildings, Franklin street: 

Building $15,950.00 

44,656 square feet of land 89,312.00 



$4,884.00 



$7,800.00 



$153,348.48 



$65,000.00 



$170,000.00 



$110,510.00 



$77,000.00 



$18,100.00 



$55,000.00 



$9,000.00 



$105,262.00 



OTHER REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE. 17? 

Police station, Clinton street, West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

3,790 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$4,500.00 

Ward 5 wardroom. Lake avenue: 

Building $4,500.00 

Land 1,000.00 

$5,500.00 

City stable, district No. 10 $1,200.00 

City scales, Franklin street: 

Building $300.00 

Gravel lots, Goffstown: 

2 acres $400.00 

Gravel lot, Youngsville: 

1 acre $500.00 

Gravel lot. East Manchester $800.00 



$623,072.00 



Personal Property Owned by the City. 

Property in care city engineer $1,350.00 

in care chief engineer fire department 111,898 00 

in care street and park commission 32,336.67 

in care superintendent of schools 37,049.00 

in eare of city messenger 3,000.00 

in care of city marshal and janitor 7,250.00 

in care trustees city library 30,000.00 

in care superintendent of Pine Grove cemetery 2,246.87 

in care superintendent of Valley cemetery.... 437.80 

Stock in Suncook Valley Eailroad, in care of city treas- 
urer 50,000.00 

Personal property in care city weigher 1,000.00 



$276,568.34 

Uncollected taxes in 1905 $74,760.86 

Net cash in treasury, Decem'ber 31, 1905 124,543.98 



$199,304.84 



Other Real and Personal Estate Owned by the City. 

Soldiers' monument $25,000.00 

Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 25,000.00 

Fountains and water-troughs on streets and commons.. 3, 600. CO 

City tomb 10,000.00 

12 



178 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



McGreg-or bridge $90,000.00 

Granite bridge 130,000.00 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 28,450.00 

Second-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 52,036.00 

Granite-street bridge over B. & M. E, R 6,000.00 

Print-Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 10,000.00 

Two bridges in highway district No. 9 2,000.00 

One bridge at Goffe's Falls 3,500.00 

Expended on construction of sewers 803,596.00 

$1,189,182.00 
PAUKS AND CElfETEBIES. 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres $200,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery, Ursula chapel 16,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery, about 96 acres 46,700.00 

Amoskeag cemetery, 1.23 acres 4,340.00 

Stark park, 28 acres 9,000.00 

Derryfield park, 76 acres 25,000.00 

Concord common, 4.48 acres 200,000.00 

Tremont common, 2.25 acres 40,000.00 

Hanover common, 3 acres 100,000.00 

Park common, 3.49 acres 60,000.00 

Merrimack common, 5.89 acres 200,000.00 

Wagner's park, 9.85 acres 12,000.00 

Land on Piscataquog river 3,500.00 

Lafayette park, 90,500 square feet 13,500.00 

Prout park, 5.73 acres 15,000.00 

East Side park, 19,362.46 square feet 4,000.00 



$949,040.00 



WATER-WORKS. 



Real estate and personal property of water-works, at cost 

price $1,773,532.00 

KECAPITXJLATIOX. 

Real estate owned by the citj% schoolhouses $759,056.00 

Real estate owned bj- the city 623,072.00 

Real estate owned by city, engine houses 153,348.48 

Water-works at cost price 1,773,532.00 

Personal property owned by the city 276,568.34 

Uncollected taxes and cash 199,304.84 

Other real and personal propertj' 1,189,182.00 

Parks and cemeteries 949,040.00 



$5,923,103.66 



auditor's office. 179 



PKOPEKTY ACCOtJlSrT. 



Inventory of assets, December 31, 1905 $5,923,103.66 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1904 5,883,318.22 

Gain in valuation $39,785.44 



Auditor's Office. 

City hall building. Open from 8 to 12 A. M., 1.30 to 5 p. M. 
In every bill presented to the city auditor for his approval, the fol- 
lowing points will be considered and passed upon: 

1. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination within the 
scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on the city govern- 
ment? 

2. Is the bill certified by the party legally authorized to make the 
contract, or cause the expenditure to be made? 

3. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, and 
is there a balance unexpended sufficient to pay this bill? 

4. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measurements, 
either of dimensions, quantities or weights, correctly and fully stated, 
and is the proof of the delivery to the city of the whole amount 
charged sufficient? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely in 
excess as to require the attention of the city councils to be called to 
the same? 

6. Is the bill written in a fair, legible hand, correctly cast, and on 
paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its proper backing and 
filing? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and the total 
amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the amount of the 
work not yet completed, and the per cent retained, if any, should be 
stated in the bill. 

8. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which affect the 
question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection or suspension for further information or 
correction as the circumstances of each case may require. 

COUtBT iDECISIOlSrS, I^EGAT. POINTS AND EULES, EELATING TO THE APPROVAt. 
OR DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

Xo bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until the audi- 
tor has api^roved it as correct. 

Public trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the city coun- 
cils cannot be delegated to others. Dillon's Municipal Corporations, 
section 96, volume 1. 



180 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

The executive powers of the city, except where vested in the mayor, 
shall be exercised by the mayor and aldermen. General Laws, chapter 
46, section 14. 

The mayor and aldermen have all the powers and authority of select- 
men of towns unless it is otherwise provided by law. General Laws, 
chapter 46, section 14. 

Joint standing committees have advisory powers only; they cannot 
legally be endowed with executive or legislative powers by ordinance 
or resolution of the city councils, as no by-laws or ordinance shall be 
repugnant to the constitution or laws of the state. 

Xo member of either branch of the city councils can enter into any 
verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to or do any work for the 
city. Any firm of which a member is also a member of the city coun- 
cils is included in this prohibition. 

No city official, or department, or board of officials having legal 
power to expend money for the benefit of the city can purchase of or 
contract with themselves, with anj- one of the board or with any firm 
with which one of said officials is a member. Dillon's Municipal Corpo- 
rations, volume 1, page 436, section 444. 

Every bill against the city shall specify the particular appropriation 
to which the same should be charged, and the moneys paid will be 
charged to such appropriations onlj'. 

He who is intrusted with the business of others cannot be allowed to 
make such business a source of profit to himself. 

All orders passed by the city councils authorizing a ministerial act to 
be performed by its agent or agents must be strictlj' construed, and 
the act to be done must be specifically stated. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. (General 
Laws, chapter 106, section 11.) They have no power conferred upon 
them by law or ordinance to purchase new apparatus of any kind. 

The joint standing committee on fire department have advisory pow- 
ers only. 

The laws and ordinances require the citj- auditor to withhold his 
signature from all bills against any appropriation where the amount 
of the appropriation is expended, until the city council shall have pro- 
vided the means of paying the same. Section 4, chapter 3 of the City 
Ordinances, and section 4, ordinances relating to the duties of the city 
auditor, approved Januarj' 7, 1890. 

The power of towns to raise and appropriate money is derived solely 
from statutory provisions, which restrict the power to certain specified 
objects and other necessary charges. 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those prescribed 
by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, and generally will 
not be permitted, to carry such votes into effect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discretion of towns 
to vote gifts or to select donees; their charity is a duty defined, com- 



auditor's office. 181 

manded, enforced, and regulated, and the objects of it are designated 
by law. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a minority in an un- 
limited manner. Gove v. Epping, 41 N. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to make 
expenditures within the scope of their powers, for their respective de- 
partment: For fire department and fire-alarm telegraph, the chief en- 
gineer, to be submitted monthly to the approval of the board of engi- 
neers; for police department, mayor and police commission; for police 
court, police judge; for water-works department, superintendent, sub- 
ject to the rules of the board of commissioners and ordinances relating 
thereto; for city farm, superintendent; for overseers of the poor, each 
overseer, subject to the rules of the board of overseers, and their 
monthly review and approval; for schools, superintendent, or such 
person as the board of school committee may designate, bills to be 
approved by the board monthly; for streets, sewers, and other work 
under these departments, street and park commissioners; for city 
clerk's office, treasurer's office, tax collector's office, assessors' office, 
auditor's office, incidental expenditures, city physician, city messenger, 
city solicitor, city engineer, mayor; for cemeteries, superintendents, 
subject to board of trustees (to consist of citizens not members of the 
city councils) ; for health department, board of health, subject to ap- 
proval of mayor; city library, board of trustees or person designated 
by them. It may be stated as a general rule, that all subordinate offi- 
cials are under the supervision and control of the mayor, subject to 
such limitations and restrictions as the board of aldermen, acting as a 
board, may require. 



I 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELEO- 
THIO LIGHTS. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTKIC 

LIGHTS. 



List of Electric Ligiits Used by tiie City of Manchester. 

No. 1. A street, opposite No. 73, arm. 

2. A and South Main, " 

3. Adams and Cartier, " 

4. Amherst and Elm, " 

5. Amherst and Vine, " 

6. Amherst and Chestnut, " 

7. Amherst and Pine, " 

8. Amherst, opposite Y. M. C. A. Building, *' 

9. Amherst and Union, " 

10. Amherst and Beech, " 

11. Amherst and Ash, ^ " 

12. Amherst and Maple, " 

13. Amherst and Dutton, " 

14. Amherst and Lincoln, " 

15. Amherst and Ashland, " 

16. Amherst and Hall, " 

17. Amory and Morgan, " 

18. Amory and Essex, " 

19. Amory and Alsace, " 

20. Amory, near Montgomery, " 

21. Amory and Amory street extension, " 

22. Amory and Rimmon, pole. 

23. Amory and Dubuque, " 

24. Amory and Beauport, " 

25. Amory and Main, ■ " 

26. Amoskeag bridge, west, " 

27. Amoskeag bridge, east, 

28. Amoskeag and Front, 

29. Appleton and Elm, arm. 

30. Appleton and North Adams, pole. 

31. Appleton and Union, arm. 

32. Arlington and Eussell, 

33. Arlington and Warren, 

34. Arlington and Ashland, 

35. Auburn and Elm, 

36. Auburn and Chestnut, 

185 



186 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 37. Auburn and Pine, arm. 

38. Auburn and Union, pole. 

39. Auburn and Beech, " 

40. Auburn and Maple, " 

41. Auburn and Lincoln, arm. 

42. Auburn and Wilson, " 

43. Auburn and Canton, " 

44. Aug-er avenue and Nutt road, " 

45. Baker and Brown avenue, " 

46. Baker and Elm, " 

47. Baker and Calef road, " 

48. Bath and Second, pole. 

49. Beech and Portsmouth Railroad, arm. 

50. Beech and Lawrence Railroad, " 

51. Bell and Wentworth, " 

52. Bismark and Sylvester, pole. 

53. Blaine and Main, arm. 

54. Blaine and Third, 

55. Blaine and Second, *' 

56. Blodget and Elm east back, " 

57. Blodget and Pine, " 

58. Blodget and Union, " 

59. Blodget and Walnut, " 

60. Blodget and Beech, " 

61. Blodget and Ash, " 

62. Blodget and Oak, 

63. Blodget and Russell, " 

64. Bow and Bartlett, " 

65. Boynton street, opposite No. 135, " 

66. Bowman place and Tilton, " 

67. Bowman street, opposite No. 172, ^ " 

68. Bremer and Dubuque, " 

69. Bridge and McGregor, *' 

70. Bridge and Canal, " 

71. Bridge and Elm, 

72. Bridge and Birch, " 

73. Bridge and Chestnut, " 

74. Bridge and Pine, " 

75. Bridge and Union, 

76. Bi'idge and Walnut, 

77. Bridge and Beech, 

78. Bridge and Ash, 

79. Bridge and ^Maple, 

80. Bridge and Nashua, 

81. Bridge and Malvern, 

82. Bridge and Linden, 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 187 

No. 83. Bridge and Hall, arm. 

84. Bridge and Belmont, " 

85. Bridge and Wieston, " 

86. Bridge and Highland, " 

87. Bridge and Mammoth road, " 

88. Brown avenue and Elm, " 

89. Brown avenue, opposite No. 445, " 

90. Brook and Elm, " 

91. Brook and Chestnut, " 

92. Brook and Pine, " 

93. Brook and Hazel, pole. 

94. Brook and Union, arm. 

95. Brook and Walnut, " 

96. Brook and Beech, " 

97. Brook and Maple, pole. 

98. C and B, 

99. Campbell and Union, arm. 

100. Candia road and Mammoth road, " 

101. Carpenter and Elm, " 

102. Carpenter and Chestnut, " 

103. Carpenter and Union, " 

104. Cedar and Canal, " 

105. Cedar and Franklin, pole. 

106. Cedar and Elm, arm. 

107. Cedar and Chestnut, " 

108. Cedar and Pine, " 

109. Cedar and Union, " 

110. Cedar and Beech, " 

111. Cedar and Maple, " 

112. Cedar and Lincoln, " 

113. Central and Bedford, 

114. Central street, opposite No. 74, pole. 

115. Central and Franklin, arm. 

116. Central and Elm, " 

117. Central and Chestnut, " 

118. Central and Pine, " 

119. Central and Union, " 

120. Central and Beech, " 

121. Central and Maple, " 

122. Central and Lincoln, ' " 

123. Central and Wilson, " 

124. Central and Hall, " 

125. Central street, opposite No. 536, " 

126. Charles street, " 

127. Charleston avenue and Carroll, " 

128. Chestnut street, opposite No. 855, " 



188 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



^o. 129. Clarke and River road, 

130. Clarke and Elm, 

131. Clarke and North Adams, 

132. Clarke and Union, 

133. Clinton and Dover, 

134. Conant and Montfromery, 

135. Conant and Rimmon, 

136. Conant and Beaiiport, 

137. Concord and Vine, 

138. Concord and Chestnut, 

139. Concord and Pine, 

140. Concord and Union, 

141. Concord and Walnut, 

142. Concord and Beech, 

143. Concord and Ash, 

144. Concord and Maple, 

145. Concord and Button, 

146. Concord and Derry, 

147. Concord and Ashland, 

148. Concord and Hall, 

149. Concord common, west, 

150. Concord common, east, 

151. Coolidge avenue and Beauport, 

152. Coolidge avenue, near Kellej', 

153. Coolidge avenue and Cartier, 

154. Dean and Canal, 

155. Dean and Elm, 

156. Dean avenue and Hampshire lane, 

157. Dearborn and Taylor, 

158. Depot and Canal, 

159. Depot and Franklin, 

160. Derryfield park, 

161. Donald street, near cemetery, 

162. Douglas and railroad, 

163. Douglas and Barr, 

164. Douglas and West, 

165. Douglas and Main, 

166. Dunbarton road and Front, 

167. East High and Nashua, 

168. East High and South, 

169. East High and Malvern, 

170. East High and Ashland, 

171. East High and Hall, 

172. East High and Buzzell, 

173. Spruce and Chestnut west back, 

174. East Spruce and Barry avenue. 



pole, 
arm. 



pole. 



pole, 
arm. 
pole, 
arm. 



pole, 
arm. 
pole, 
arm. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 189 

No. 17,j. East Spruce and Union, arm. 

176. East Spruce and Beech, " 

177. East Spruce and Maple, " 

178. East Spruce and Lincoln, arm. 

179. East Spruce and Wilson, " 

180. East Spruce and Hall, " 

181. East Spruce and ilassabesic, pole. 

182. East Sjiruce and Old Falls road, arm, 

183. East Spruce and Beacon, " 

184. Elm street, opposite No. 19G6, " 

185. Elm, below railway bridge, " 

186. Elm and railway bridge, pole. 

187. Elm avenue and Elm, arm. 

188. Ferry and Main, " 

189. Ferry and Third, " 

190. Ferry and Turner, pole. 

191. Front street, opposite No. 367, " 

192. Gates and Dubuque, " 
193^. Goffstown road and Front, " 

194. Goffstown road and Omega, arm. 

195. Grove and Pine, " 

196. Grove and Union, " 

197. Grove and Beech, " 

198. Grove and Belmont, " 

199. Granite and Green, " 

200. Granite and West, " 

201. Granite and Main, " 

202. Granite and Second, " 

203. Granite bridge, west, pole. 

204. Granite bridge, center, " 

205. Granite bridge, east, *' 

206. Granite and State, arm. 

207. Granite and Bedford. 

208. Granite and Canal, pole. 

209. Granite and Franklin, arm. 

210. Green and Elm, 

211. Green and Pine, " 

212. Green and Union, " 

213. Green and Beech, " 

214. Grant and Boynton, " 

215. Hancock and Brown aven.:e, pole. 

216. Hanover common, 

217. Hanover and Nutfield lane, arm. 

218. Hanover and Chestnut, 

219. Hanover and Pine. 

220. Hanover and Union, 



190 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



No. 221. Hanover and Beech, 

222. Hanover and Maple, 

223. Hanover and Lincoln, 

224. Hanover and Ashland, 

225. Hanover and Hall, 

226. Hanover and Belmont, 

227. Hanover and Beacon, 

228. Hanover and Alfred, 

229. Hanover and Highland, 

230. Hanover and Grant, 

231. Hanover and Lake avenue, 

232. Hanover and Page, 

233. Harrison and Elm, 

234. Harrison and Chestnut, 

235. Harrison and Pine, 

236. Harrison and Hazel, 

237. Harrison and Union, 

238. Harrison and Walnut, 

239. Harrison and Beech, 

240. Harrison and Ash, % 

241. Harrison and Maple, 

242. Harrison and Oak, 

243. Harrison and Russell, 

244. Harrison street, opposite No. 329, 

245. Harvell and South Main, 

246. Hayward and Beech, 

247. Haj-Avard and Cypress, 

248. Haj'ward and Kiley avenue, 

249. High and Chestnut, 

250. High and Pine, 

251. High and Union, 

252. Hollis and Canal, 

253. Hollis, below Elm west back, 

254. Hospital avenue and Massabesic, 

255. Kelley and Eimmon, 

256. Kelley and Cartier, 

257. Kelley and Alsace, 

258. Kidder and Boyden, 

259. Kidder and ^^^litney, 

260. Kidder and Elm, 

261. Lake avenue and Elm, 

262. Lake avenue and Chestnut, 

263. Lake avenue and Pine, 

264. Lake avenue and Union, 

265. Lake avenue and Beech, 

266. Lake avenue arid Maple, 



arm. 



pole, 
arm. 
pole, 
arm. 



pole, 
arm. 



pole, 
arm. 
pole, 
arm. 
pole. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

267. Lake avenue and Lincoln, 

268. Lake avenue and Wilson, 

269. Lake avenue and Massabesic, 

270. Lake avenue and Belmont, 

271. Lake avenue and Beacon, 

272. Lake avenue, opposite No. 529, 

273. Lake avenue and Cass, 

274. Lake avenue and Canton, 

275. Lake avenue and J. Hall road, 

276. Langdon and Canal, 

277. Langdon and Elm west back, 

278. Laurel and Laurel avenue, 

279. Laurel and Pine, 

280. Laurel and Union, 

281. Laurel and Beech, 

282. Laurel and Maple, 

283. Laurel and Lincoln, 

284. Laurel and Wilson, 

285. Laurel and Hall, 

286. Laurel and Belmont, 

287. Laurel and Milton, 

288. Laurel and Beacon, 

289. Laurel and Cass, 

290. Liberty street, opposite No. 93, 

291. Lowell, south back, and Nutfield lane, 

292. Lowell and Elm, 

293. Lowell and Birch, 

294. Lowell and Chestnut, 

295. Lowell and Pine, 

296. Lowell and Union, 

297. Lowell and Walnut, 

298. Lowell and Beech, 

299. Lowell and Ash, 

300. Lowell and Nashua, 

301. Lowell and Malvern, 

302. Lowell and Ashland, 

303. Lowell and Hall, 

304. Lowell and Belmont, 

305. Manchester and Elm, 

306. Manchester and Chestnut, 

307. Manchester and Pine, 

308. Manchester and Union, 

309. Manchester and Beech, 

310. Manchester and Maple, 

311. Manchester and Lincoln, 

312. Manchester and Wilson, 

313. Manchester and Hall, 



191 

pole. 



pole. 



arm. 
pole, 
arm. 



192 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



No. 314. Manchester and Milton, 

315. Market and Canal, 

316. Market and Franklin, 

317. Market and Elm, 

318. Marion and Main, 

319. Marion and McGregor, 

320. Massabesic and Belmont, 

321. Massabesic and Old Falls road, 

322. Massabesic and Cypress, 

323. Massabesic north of Valley, 

324. Massabesic and J. Hall road, 

325. Mast and Main, 

326. Mast and Bowman, 

327. Mast and Eiddle, 

328. Mast and New Mast road, 

329. Mast and Forrest, 

330. McGregor and Main, 

331. McGregor bridge, west, 

332. McGregor bridge, east, 

333. McDutfie and Huntress, 

334. Meade and Hall, 

335. Mechanic and Canal, 

336. Mechanic and Hampshire lane, 

337. Merrimack and Canal, 

338. Merrimack and Franklin back street, 

339. Merrimack and Franklin, 

340. Merrimack and Elm, 

341. Merrimack and Chestnut, 

342. Merrimack and Pine, 

343. Merrimack and Union, 

344. Merrimack and Beech, 

345. Merrimack and Maple, 

346. Merrimack 'and Lincoln, 

347. Merrimack and Wilson, 

348. Merrimack and Hall, 

349. Merrimack and Belmont, 

350. Merrimack and Beacon, 

351. Merrimack street, opposite No. 532, 

352. Merrimack common, west, 

353. Merrimack common, east, 

354. Merrimack south back and Union, 

355. Middle and Canal, 

356. Middle and Franklin west back, 

357. Milford and Carroll, 

358. Milford and Eiddle, 

359. Milford and Main, 



pole, 
arm. 



pole, 
arm. 
pole. 



pole, 
arm. 
pole, 
arm. 



pole. 



pole. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LHIHTS. 193 

Xo. :i('.(). Afitc'lii'll and Heec-li. arm. 

?,C)1. Monmouth and MeCiregor back street, pole. 

362. Munroe and River road, arm. 

363. Myrtle and Elm, east back, 

364. Myrtle and Chestnut, 

365. Myrtle and Pine, . " 

366. Myrtle and Union, " 

367. Myrtle and Walnut, " 
36S. Myrtle and Beec^h, 

369. Myrtle and INIaple, " 

370. Myrtle and Eussell, " 

371. Myrtle street, opposite No. 350, " 

372. Nelson and Mammoth road, " 

373. New Mast road and D, 

374. New ]\Iast road and Wilkins, pole. 

375. North and Eiver road, arm. 

376. North and Elm, " 

377. North and Bay, 

378. North and Chestnut, " 

379. North and Pine, pole. 

380. North and Union, arm. 

381. North and Walnut, 

382. North and Beech, 

383. North Main street in Eddy, ^^ pole. 

384. North Adams street, opposite No. 63, arm. 

385. Nutfield lane, rear- Central Firie Station, 

386. Nutt road arid Beech, . - " " 

387. Nutt road and Portsmouth raili-oad, pole. 

388. Nutt road and Willow, ' . arm. 

389. Orange and Elm, 

390. Orange and Pine, 

391. Orange and Union, . , 

392. Oraji'ge and Ash, ' 

393. Orange and Maple, ..''.' 

394. Orange and Oak, 

395. Orange and Russell, 

396. Orange and Linden, 

397. Orange and Hall, "'^tf 

398. Page and Portsmouth railroad, 

399. Park common, pole. 

400. Parker and West, arm. 

401. Pearl and Nutfield lane, 

402. Pearl and Chestnut, 

403. Pearl and Pine, 

404. Pearl and Union, 

405. Pearl and Beech, 
13 



194 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 40C. Pearl and Oak. arm. 

407. Pearl and Russell, " 

408. Pearl and Linden, " 

409. Pearl and Morrison, pole. 

410. Pearl and Belmont, arm. 

411. Pennacook and Canal, pole. 

412. Pennacook and Elm, arm. 

413. Pennacook and Chestnut, pole. 

414. Pennacook and Pine, arm. 

415. Pennacook and Union, " 

416. Pleasant and Franklin, " 

417. Pleasant and Elm, " 
41S. Prescott and Wilson, " 

419. Prince and Bojnton, " 

420. Prince and B, " 

421. Prospect and Elm east back, " 

422. Prospect and Chestnut, " 

423. Prospect and Pine, " 

424. Prospect and Union, ^ " 

425. Prospect and Beech. " 
420. Prospect and Ash, " 

427. Prospect and Oak, " 

428. Prospect and Linden, " 

429. Prospect and Hall, " 

430. Putnam and Bartlett, pole. 

431. Putnam and Cartier, arm. 

432. Putnam and Main, " 

433. Powell and River road, " 

434. Rimmon street, opposite No. 322, pole. 

435. River road and Otis, arm. 

436. River road and Stark park. " 

437. Rockland avenue and Wilkins, " 

438. Rockland avenue and Goffstown line, pole. 

439. Sagamore and Elm, arm. 

440. Sagamore and Pine, 

441. Saganaore and Walnut, *' 

442. Sagamore and Maple, 

443. Sagamore and Russell, 

444. Salmon and Canal, 

445. Salmon and Elm, 

446. Salmon and Bay, " 

447. Salmon and Chestnut, pole. 

448. Salmon and Pine, 

449. Salmon and LTnion, 

4.')0. Salmon and Beech, arm. 
451. School and Third, 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LxiMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 195 



No. 452. School and Turner, 

453. Schiller and Second, 

454. Schuyler and Main, 

455. Shasta and Elm, 

456. Silver and Union, 

457. Silver and Beech, 

458. Silver and Lincoln, 

459. Silver and Wilson, 

460. Silver and Belmont, 

461. Somerville and Hall, 

462. Somerville and Taylor, 

463. Somerville and Cypress, 

464. Somerville and Jewett, 

465. South Main street, oposite No. 520, 

466. SjDruce and Elm,, 

467. Sprvice, south back, and Manhattan Lane, 
46S. Spring and Canal, 

469. Spring- and Hampshire lane, 

470. Stark and Canal. 

471. Stark street, opposite No. 22, 

472. State, east back and private way, 

473. State, north Granite, 

474. State, south Granite, 

475. Sullivan and Thornton, 

476. Sullivan and Beauport, 

477. Sullivan and Main, 

, 47S. Summer and State, 

479. Summer and Pine, 

480. Summer and LTnion, 

481. Summer and Hall, 

482. Summer and Dearborn, 

483. Summer and Belmont, 

484. Thayer and Elm, 

485. Titus avenue and Beech, 

486. Tremont common, 

487. Trenton and LTnion, 

488. Valley and Elm, 

489. Valley and Pine, 

490. Valley and Union, 

491. Valley and Wilson, 

492. Valley and Belmont, 

493. Valley and Taylor, 

494. Valley and Cypress, 

495. Valley and Jewett, 

496. Vinton and Taylor. 

497. Walker and Main, 



pole. 



pole, 
arm. 



pole. 



pole, 
arm. 

pole, 
arm. 



196 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

So. V.ts. Walker iuul Fourtli, arm. 

499. Walker and Third, 

r>00. Walker and Second, 

TjOI. Walker and Turner, pole. 

5(j;3. Washington and Church, arm. 

SO.'i. Water street, ojiposite No. 22, " 

504. Water and Elm, 

505. Wayne and Dubuque, pole. 
50fi. Wayne and iieauport, " 

507. Wayne and Main, arm. 

508. Wayn(? and ^Ic(Jregor, pole. 

509. Webster and Kiver road, " 

510. Webster and Elm, arm. 

511. Webster and Chestnut, 

512. Webster and Pine, 

51.1. Webster and Walnut, pole. 

514. Webster and Beech, arm. 

515. Welch avenue and Calet road, pole. 
5](). West Hancock and South Main, arm. 

517. West Hancock an^ Dartmouth, " 

518. West Hancock and Second, pole. 

519. West Hancock and Went worth, arm. 

520. Whitford and Union, 

521. Wilton and Main, 

522. Winter and I'arker, " 

523. Winter street, opposite Xo. 62, " 

524. Winter place and Elm west back, " 

525. Young and Taylor, " 

526. Young and .\ins\vorth avenue, " 

527. Young and Mammoth road, " 

528. Lake avenue and Kenney, " 

529. Appleton and Chestnut, " 

530. Sagamore and Beech, " 

531. Cartier, 50 feet south of Wayne, *' 

532. Opposite 893 Hanover, 

533. Amherst and Milton, 

534. Pearl and Walnut, 

535. Sagamore and Smj'th road, 

536. Valley and Hall, 

537. East High and Beacon, 

538. Concord and Weston, 

539. South Main and Erie, 

540. Mammoth road near Isolation Hospiuil, mast arm. 

541. Valley and Beech, 

542. Bridge and Arkwright, 

543. Ray, between Clarke and .\ppleton, 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 197 

No. 544. Amoskeag and First, mast arm. 

545. Green and Wilson, 

546. Pearl and Ash, 

547. Trenton and Elm, 

548. Blucher and Montgomery, 

549. Byron and Josselyn, 



Naphtha Lights in Use. 

Harvey District. 
1 Harvey's. 
1 Marshall's. 

1 Corner Merrill road and Xutt road. 
1 Corner Derry road and Harvey road. 
1 Corner Harvey road and Mill road. 
1 Corner Harvey road and South road. 
1 Dickey's. 

Total, 7 lig-hts. 

Goffe's Falls. 
1 On Derry hill. 
1 Foot of Derry hill. 
1 Melrose's. 
1 Fox's. 
1 Mill gate. 
1 Nettle's corner. 
1 King's, on Mill street. 
1 Caldwell's, on Mill street. 
1 Nettle's house. Brown avenue. 
1 Lurvey's, Brown avenue. 
1 Kimball's, Brown avenue. 
1 Walker's, Brown avenue. 
1 Cemetery, Brown avenue. 
1 Park, Brown avenue. 

1 Kellaher's, Brown avenue. 

2 Depot street. 

Total, 17 lights. 

City Propeh. 

2 Calef road. 

1 Calef road, at Miss Burns'. 

1 Calef road and Mitchell street. 

1 Calef road and Titus avenue. 

1 Calef road and Pine Grove cemeterj'. 

1 Valley and Maple street. 

1 Valley and Lincoln. 

1 Havward and Lincoln. 



198 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

1 Taylor street, near railroad. 

1 Valley street, front of No. 86S. 

1 Candia road and Orchard avenue. 

1 Candia road and Cody street. 

1 Candia road, No. 487. 

1 Candia road and Page street. 

1 Candia road, Iso. 225. 

] Candia road, near yellow barn. 

1 Candia road. No. 927. 

1 Candia road, No. 914. 

1 Candia road, No. 1,035. 

1 Candia road and Proctor road. 

1 Candia road. 

1 Lake Shore road and Proctor road. 

1 Nutt road, at Shea's. 

1 Lake Shore road, at Luther Proctor's. 

1 Lake Shore road, at Page's. 

1 Lake Shore road, at pumping station road. 

2 Lake Shore road. 

1 Lake Shore road, at railroad crossing. 
1 Lake Shore road and Candia road. 
1 Candia road, near Lake pavilion. 
1 Candia road and Hanover street. 

1 Candia road, at McDonald's. 

2 Candia road. 
1 Broadway. 

1 Hanover street. No. 1,263. 
1 Hanover street and Proctor road. 
1 Hanover street. 
1 Hanover street, No. 982. 
1 Hanover street and J. Hall road. 
1 J. Hall road. 

1 Mammoth road and Cilley road. 
• 1 Mammoth road and Island Pond road. 
1 Mammoth road and Cohas avenue. 
1 Young street, near Taylor. 
1 Taylor street. 
1 "Wilson and Clay. 
1 Shasta and Maple. 
Total, 50 lights. 



Gas Lights in Use. 



1 Merrill street, corner Willow. 
1 Brown avenue, corner Shasta. 
1 Brown avenue, corner Bvron. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 199 

1 Hancock street, corner Hamilton. 

1 Hancock street, near brewery. 

1 State street, at Manchester Mills. 

1 Franklin street, corner Auburn. 

1 Turner street, south of Walker. 

1 Milford street, corner Bowman. 

1 A street, corner B. 

1 Boynton and C. 

1 Milford street, corner Wlilliams. 

1 George street, west side. 

1 Mast street, near Eiddle. 

1 Granite street, corner Dover. 

1 Granite street, corner Quincy. 

1 Douglas street, corner Quincy. 

1 Douglas street, corner Dover. 

r Douglas street, corner back street. 

1 Douglas street, corner Turner. 

1 Pleasant street, west of Franklin. 

1 Pleasant street, near Canal. 

1 Mechanic street, between Elm and Canal. 

1 Walnut street, between Bridge and Lowell. 

1 Bridge and Arkwright. 

1 Somerville street, between Maple and Lincoln. 

1 Bridge street, between Chestnut and Elm. 

1 Appleton street, near Elm. 

1 Munroe street, between Elm and Canal. 

1 Clark street, corner Chestnut. 

1 Chestnut street, corner Blodget. 

1 Blodget street, near Elm. 

1 Orange street, corner Chestnut. 

1 Orange street, between Chestnut and Elm. 

1 Orange street, corner Walnut. 

1 Orange street, corner Beech. 

1 Pearl street, corner Maple. 

1 Arlington street, near Maple. 

1 East High street, corner Maple. 

1 Lowell street, corner South. 

1 East High street, corner Belmont. 

1 Lowell street, corner Beacon. 

1 Concord street, corner Beacon. 

1 Concord street, corner Belmont. 

1 Amherst street, corner Belmont. 

1 Manchester street, corner Belmont. 

1 Central street, corner Belmont. 

1 Ainsworth avenue, corner Hay ward street. 

1 Jewett street, corner Young road. 



200 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1 Jevvett street, near Young road. 
1 Nutfield lane and Elm back street, Clough's block. 
1 Nutfield lane and Elm back street. Opera block. 
1 :Monadnock and Nutfield lane. Hotel Windsor. 
1 Hanover, above Beech. 
1 Chestnut, above Clark. 
1 Salmon, west of Elm. 
1 Massabesic and Taylor. 
1 Amherst and Beacon. 
1 Hanover street, above Lincoln. 
1 Beech street, below Bridge. 
1 Bay street, between North and Webster. 
1 Parker street. 
1 Hollis street. 
1 Belmont and Hayward. 
1 Ash street, below Bridge. 
1 Waldo and Everett. 
1 Chestnut, above Clark. 
1 Carroll street. 
1 Walnut and Prospect. 
1 Prout avenue, opposite No. 99. 
1 South Main, below Milford. 
1 Elm street, rear of J. E. Dodge's. 
1 Kidder Court. 

1 Chestnut street, above North. 
1 River road and Thayer. 
1 Harrison and Alfred. 
1 Mammoth road, near Nelson. 
1 Jones street, near Nelson. 
1 Nelson, corner Jones. 
1 Taylor and Grove. 
1 Chester street. 
1 Cleveland and Hiram streets. 
1 Buzzell and Bridge streets. 
1 Maple and Howard streets. 
1 Somerville and Wilson streets. 
1 Bay street, near residence of W. S. Plumer, 
1 Oakland and W^oodbine avenue. 
1 Oakland and Woodland avenue. 
1 Mammoth road and Oakland avenue. 
1 Candia road, west Londonderry turnpike. 
1 Longwood and Revere avenues. 
3 Londonderry turnpike. 
Total 94 lights. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



BOAED OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 1905. 



EuGE^'E E. llKKU, Mayor, ex ofpcio. 

CiiAKLEs H. Max>ixg, President, term expires January, 1907. 
IIajiry E. Paiikeh, term expires Januarj-, 1909. 
FuANK DowsT. (Died November :27, igOo.) 
Edgar J. Knowltox, term expires January, 1910. 
CiiAHLES M. Floyd, term expires January, 1908. 
William Corey, term expires January, 1911. 
IJORKirr E. McKea^', term expires January, 1012. 
Arthur E. Stearns, Clerk. 



OFFICERS, 



Charles H. Mats'xi^jg, Prvfiidoit. 

Charles K. Walker, t^iiinrhitnuhui. 

ARTinJB E. Stearns, JReyUlrar. 

JosiAH Laselle, Engineer at Low Serviee Pumping Station. 

C11ARLE.S A. Whitney, Engineer at High Service Pumping Station. 



202 



EESOLUTIONS ON THE DEATH OF FRANK DO WST, WATER 
COMMISSIONER. 



Whereas, In the course of nature, another vacancy has been created 
within the membership of this Board by the death of an honored and 
highly esteemed associate, Frank Dovvst, therefore 

Resolved, That the Board of Water Commissioners deeply deplore the 
loss of this able, earnest, and faithful member, who had deservedly 
attained to important trusts, and whose genial personal traits endeared 
him to all of his associates. 

Resolved, That we place upon record our estimate of his high in- 
tegrity, his fine sense of honor and courtesj^ his unquestioned judg- 
ment, and his loyalty and zeal in behalf of the best interests of the 
city. This Board has lost one whose place it will be difficjilt to fill, 
and in the death of Frank Dowst we all feel that we have lost a per- 
sonal friend. 

Resolved, That this testimonial be placed upon the records of this 
Board, and a copy be sent to his father as evidence of our sense of 
loss, and appreciation of the high character of the deceased. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

EuGEaNTE E. Reed, ex officio. 
CiiAKLEs H. Manning, President. 
Harry E. Parker, 
Charles M. Floyd. 
Edgar J. Knowlton. 
William Corey. 



203 



KEPOET OF THE BOARD OF WATER COMMIS- 
SIONERS. 



To the Honorable City Councils of the City of Manchester, X. U.: 

Gextlemex: — The Manchester Water Board herewith present their 
thirty-fourth annual report for the j-ear ending December 31, 1905, 
with the detailed report of the superintendent during the period. 

FIXAXCIAL COXDITIOX. 

Eeceipts and expenditures for the year have been as follows: 

Eeceived from water rentals, 1905 $116,803.07 

Received from hydrant rentals, 1905 19,550.00 

Total receipts. 1905 $136,353.07 

Amount paid for current expenses $27,793.00 

Amount paid for construction expenses 39,752.42 

Interest on water bonds 33,640.00 

Hydrant rentals set aside for sinking fund.. 19.550.00 
Set aside, for sinking fund for payment of 

water bonds, state law, 1S97 5,000.00 

$125,735.42 



Eeceipts over expenditures, 1905 $10,617.65 

Amount on hand December 31, 1904 26,06S.3S 



Amount on hand December 31, 1905 $36,686.03 

Eespectfully submitted, 

EuGEXE E. Reed, ex officio, 
Charles H. Maxxixg, President, 
Hakry E. Parker, 
Charles M. Floyd, 
Edgar J. Kxonvltox, 
William Corey. 
Fraxk Dowst, 
Robert E. McKeax. 

Water Board. 



204 



SUPEKINTENDENT'S EEPORT. 



To the Board of Water Cominisfiioners of the City of Munchcsier: 

Gets'TLFMEX: — The time has come around again when the superin- 
tendent makes his annual report, which is his thirtieth. Yon will 
recollect that a year ago today the water at the lake was thirty-fonr 
inches below the dam. It is now I'onr inches below, making it thirty 
inches higher on December ?>1 of this year than it was on the same day 
a year ago. The lake did not begin to rise until the twentieth of 
March. Advantage was taken of the continued low stage of the water 
and repairs were made at the gatehouse at the lower end of the canal. 
Eighteen years ago the water got under the stone work at this place 
and washed out the earth, which was carried down the j)enstock and 
out at the raceway. The water was shut off as soon as it was discov- 
ered, the canal drawm off and repairs made, so it has been in use 
ever since. We did not have the high service to fall back on, so that 
what was done had to be done quickly and not so w^ell. 

This year concrete was put under the timber plank and stonework, 
sixty-three barrels of Portland cement being used. The expense was 
about six hundred dollars, and it is in good repair today. 

A small amount of land was bought about the lake, the most expen- 
sive being Eedmond's Hotel. The steamboat Winnie L. was bought in 
June, and the lease of the Mountain Grove property, which went with 
it. The wharf at this place was taken away and also part of the 
wharf at the west end of the lake, on the Williams' land. The boat 
was taken to pieces and the engine and boiler are now in the pipe 
yard. Some brass pipe, camp chairs, and life preservers are under 
cover at this place. 

The piston head of the Snow pump broke on the sixth of July and 
was sent to Buffalo to be repaired. It was returned on Julj^ 25, being 
gone but nine days. . In the meantime we used the Worthington to 
supply the high service. The Snow pump has run all right since then, 
and last fall and winter this pump furnished the water for both 
reservoirs. 

The pumps at the low service have done the work in good shape 
without anj- repairs, and the Davidson pump has pumped all the water 
at this station. There has been no work of any consequence done 
about either the high or low service reservoirs. 

The old force and supply mains have not troubled us much, but the 
force main on the high service, from Massabesic street to Hanover 

205 



206 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

road, has been a source of trouble during the whole year. We have 
tried to repair the leaks without shutting off the water, and have in 
most cases done so. It is almost impossible to calk up a joint when 
the pumps are running, so we take a day when they are not pumping. 

I want to say right here that I wish to go on record as in favor of 
more lead and less gasket on a force main. 

On the ISth of September we started to lay pipe from the Pine 
Grove cemetery to Goffe's Falls, a little over two miles. 

On the 11th of December water was let into the pipes in the village. 

The main line is ten-inch pipe, and spread round in the village with 
eight-inch pipe. The Avhole length of pipe is two and three fourths 
miles. 

Thirteen hydrants have been set, and all but two have gates where 
they connect with the main. Expense of this extension about $20,000. 

We have laid pipes in twenty-four different streets, nearly four 
miles, and set twenty-one hydrants and thirty-one gates. The expense 
was twenty-six thousand dollars in round numbers. 

We had a great many service pipes frozen during last winter, mak- 
ing two winters in succession that the frost has gone down over five 
feet. Two service pipes were destroyed by electrolysis. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



207 



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208 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



209 



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210 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Amount of water pumped at low service station 852,316,592 gals. 

Amount of water pumped at high service station 356,232.878 

Total 1,208,549,470 gals. 

Daily average 3,311,094 " 

RAINFALL AT HIGH SERVICE STATION, 190.5. 



DAT OF 
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a 

a> 
o 

CO 


October. 
November. 


u 

.a 
g 

s 

t> 

V 

Q 












i 


.16 
.05 




j 1 














.06 
.05 


.05 
.18 




1 




3 

4 


*.4-2 
*.91 








.06 
.47 


2. 84 
1.27 


.05 


"'!82' 


*1.88 














.29 














*.55 




.93 


.07 
.03 


.66 










.68 






*1.72 




.60 












».45 




.48 
















».13 

*.18 




.21 




.10 








10 




*.30 






.10 








.64 


.45 
.10 
















12 


*.63 








.38 

"ei' 
"!i2' 

.18 
1.44 
.16 
.93 
.66 


""i:i' 
.17 
.03 

.08 
.35 


.72 
.04 


1.04 


.51 




*.57 














1 












.18 


.35 
.31 
.18 
.05 
.06 


.53 

.98 


















.07 




.19 










































*.01 
*.28 


.09 
.07 




1.07 
.05 


.07 
.61 


























••82 




*.32 




*1.00 














123 












*.09 














.11 















*.34 




".H 


.../.. 





' ■ .69' 

.19 




.19 


.03 








25 














*.22 








.06 






.02 1 




•.02 












1 






.02 






1 


.03 






.64 


.63 










.07 




.34 
.21 














.02 




.28 






















6.37 


1 
1 






4.36 


1.43 


3.14 


2.11 


1 
1.S6 6.65 1 1 92 


374 


1.24 


2.25 


4.06 



Total 


rainfall, .^9.13 inches. 




* Snow. 






1895. 


Total rainfall. 


42.06 


inches. 


1896. 


Total rainfall. 


38.41 


inches. 


1897. 


Total rainfall. 


49.76 


inches. 


1898. 


Total rainfall, 


47.15 


inches. 


1899. 


Total rainfall. 


36.27 


inches. 


1900. 


Total rainfall. 


47.89 


inches. 


1901. 


Total rainfall. 


47.47 


inches. 


1902. 


Total rainfall, 


47.58 


inches. 


1903. 


Total rainfall. 


40.39 


inches. 


1904. 


Total rainfall. 


34.54 


inches. 


1905. 


Total rainfall, 


39.13 


inches. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 211 

Income from the Sale of Water. 

The income from the sale of water for 1905 has been as follows: 

Received for water by rate $20,330.99 

for water iby meter 92,438.70 

for water building purposes 250.66 

from fines 3G6.00 

$113,336.35 

Received for pipe, etc $136.30 

for pipe, G. P. Green & Co 2.83 

for pipe, Amoskeag ^Ifg- Co 11.50 

for pipe, Goffstown Water Co 13.50 

for pipe, Pennichuck Water Co 157.70 

for pipe, Manchester Heel Co 302.00 

for old brass, Manchester Locomo- 
tive Co 36.96 

for 4-inch pipe. Odd Fellows' Asso- 
ciation 88.00 

for pipe, Hillsborough eonnty 16.25 

for repairing hydrant, Bodwell & 

Co 25.00 

for tapping for city standpipes. . . . 156.25 

for old stove, E. E. Bullard 2.00 

for 6-inch main, Brodie Electric 

Co 63.10 

for 6-inch main, Manchester Electric 

R. R. 425.70 

$1,437.09 

Received from G. G. Griffin, lease $1.00 

from F. Brown, lease 1.00 

boat houses, lease 1,746.50 

$1,748.50 

Received from Joseph Gardner (McCloud 

House) 18.00 

from Mell Hall (Preston House) . . . 36.80 

$54.80 

Received from F. D. Goodrich, grass $6.00 

from Frank Mclntyre, grass 6.00 

from T. S. Emery, grass 12,p0 

from H. A. Boone, grass 10.00 

from T. H. Gilbert, grass 3.00 

from W. J. Davis, grass 3.00 

from J. J. Gurnej-, rent 8.33 

from William Moulton, rent 78.00 

from Asa Haselton, rent 50.00 

176.33 

$116,803.07 
Received from hydrant rentals 19,550.00 

Total receipts, 1905 $136,353.07 



212 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOETS. 



Amount paid for current expenses $27,793.00 

paid for construction expenses.... 39,752.42 

paid for interest on bonds 33,640.00 

Hydrant rentals set aside for sinking fund.. 19,550.00 
State law, 1897, bonds set aside for sinking 

funds 5,000.00 

Receipts over expenditures 

Amount on hand December 31, 1904 

Total amount on hand December 31, 1905 

CLASSIFICATIOX OF ACCOVNTS, 1905. 

Sviperintendence, repairs, etc $17,009.55 

Stationery and printing 125.83 

Office and Incidental expenses 1,598.98 

Pumping expenses (low service) 2,530.43 

Pumping expenses (high service) 5,601.85 

Repairs to buildings 301.82 

Repairs to canal, dam, and reservoir 624.54 

Service pipes $2,209.41 

Distribution pipes 23,672.25 

Fire hydrant and valves 1,453.10 

Meters 1,233.66 

Land and water rights 11,184.00 



$125,735.42- 

$10,617.65 
26,068.38 

$36,686.03. 



$27,793.00- 



$39,752.42 



Sinking fund from water bonds, issue 189'i 
Sinking fund from fire hvdrants 



$5,000.00 
19,550.00 



Total Construction Expenses. 



$67,545.42 



$24,550.0a 



$92,095.42 



Land and water rights $259,973.00 

Dam, canal, penstock, etc 101,399.16 

Pumping machinery and buildings 246,508.69 

Distribution reservoir 117,697.90 

Force and supply mains 89,769.02 

Distribution pipes 676,148.74 

Fire hydrant and valves 66,114.23 

Meter and fixtures 66,692.14 

Service pipes 88,016.44 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 21^ 

'Grading and fencing $lT,470.uO 

Tools and fixtures 10,049.35 

Boarding and storehouses 919.36 

Eoads and culverts 4,405.20 

Supplies 550.39 

Engineering 22,176.19 

Livery and traveling expenses 2,856.64 

Legal expenses 563.79 



$1,801,910.63 



Current Expenses. 

Superintendence and repairs $453,703.25 

Stationery and printing • 8,705.60 

Office and incidental expenses 39,494.33 

Pumping expenses (low service) 71,594.45 

Pumping expenses (high service) 54,948.02 

Kepairs to building 7,399.44 

Repairs to canal, dam, and reservoir 11,907.89 

Interest $40,678.51 

Highway expenditures 14,000.53 



Interest, discount, and labor performed on 
highway, transferred and tool and mate- 
rials sold • $83,057.63 

Current expenditures to December 31, 1905.. 647,752.98 



$647,752.98 

$54,679.04 
$2,504,342.65 



$730,810.61 



Total cost exclusive of Interest and current ex- 
penses $1,773,532.04 

Interest and discount to December 31, 1904.. $1,144,939.51 
Interest for 1905 33,640.00 

$1,178,579.51 

AMOUNT OF WATEEl BONDS ISSUE!) TO DECEMBER 31, 1905. 

Issued January 1, 1887, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 

1907 $100,000.00 

July 1, 1890, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, 1910 100,000.00 

January 1, 1892, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 

1912 100,000.00 

August 1, 1893, rate 5 per cent, due August 1, 1913 100,000.00 
November 1, 1893, rate 4V2 per cent, due Novem- 
ber 1, 1913 100,000.00 

October 1, 1894, rate 4 per cent, due October 1, 

1914 50,000.00 



214 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 



Issued July 1, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, 1915 $100,000.00 

December 16, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due December 

16, 1915 50,000.00 

January 1, 1897, rate 4 per cent, due January- 1, 

1917 100,000.00 

$800,000.00 
SINKING rUNX>. 

1893 $12,750.00 

1894 13,925.00 

1895 15,800.00 

1896 16,800.00 

1897 17,175.00 

1898 17,675.00 

1898 5,000.00 

1899 5,000.00 

1899 18,100.00 

1900 18,425.00 

1900 5,000.00 

1901 5,000.00 

1901 18,575.00 

1902 18,800.00 

1902 5,000.00 

1903 5,000.00 

1903 19,200.00 

1904 19,450.00 

1904 5,000.00 

1905 19,550.00 

1905 5,000.00 

$266,225.00 

Interest, etc., to December 31, 1904 34,042.29 

Interest, etc., for 1905 7,028.18 

$307,295.47 

raid for retiring bonds January 1, 1902 100,000.00 

On hand December 31, 1905 $207,295.47 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



215 





o 
H 


a 


-2 

.a 


.a 


o i 
U s o 


S 


Is 

a-S 

.§■52 


Rentals and 
buildings 
sold. 


en 

z 

o 
d 


1872 


$573.61 
2,097.60 


















1873 


( 


81,692.69 
7,987.27 


^190. 84 




S14.00 


S200.67 




g 


1874 


32,154.07 


( $22,425.00 


1,436.56 


S119.10 


104.18 


699.85 




98 


1875 


29,223.60 


13,095.00 


10,292.13 


3,348.11 


122.13 


120.59 


2,245.64 




160 


1876 


39,028.47 


16,320.00 


15,900.63 


6,305.81 


72.32 


180.16 


249.55 




166 


1877 


43.823.30 


17,475.00 


18,064.51 


7,783.09 


136.10 


233.04 


131.56 




202 


1878 


48.874.26 


17,970.00 


20,255.97 


10,090.25 


83.60 


232.82 


241.62 




226 


1879 


53,143.17 


18,165.00 


21,610.13 


12,732.93 


81.60 


240.64 


303.87 




251 


1880 


57,655.25 


18,300.00 


23,795.96 


14,794.34 


79.50 


210.39 


465.06 


SIO.OO 


280 


1881 


60,215.62 


18,780.00 


25,336.18 


15,554.98 


105.60 


223.99 


203.87 


11.00 


310 


1882 


67,630.13 


20,130.00 


26,803.06 


19,898.69 


146.65 


197.49 


443.24 


11.00 


371 


1883 


73,458.20 


20,520.00 


28,838.24 


23,431.20 


314.65 


208.04 


125.07 


21.00 


404 


1884 


75,580.08 


21,350.00 


31,724.07 


21,329.75 


195.10 


231.96 


738.20 


11.00 


446 


1885 


80,404.12 


18,900.00 


33,597.02 


27,425.35 


102.50 


186.80 


181.45 


11.00 


486 


1886 


75,129.99 


19,750.00 


33,062.11 


21,573.45 


287.40 


130.80 


320 23 


6.00 


613 


1887 


80,518.17 


20,437.50 


33,497.21 


25,277.09 


351.70 


119.20 


819.47 


16.00 


739 


1888 


85,643.82 


21,000.00 


33,864.78 


29,838.82 


543.80 


149.80 


243.62 


3.00 


842 


1889 


86,700.46 


18,240.00 


34,140.99 


33,596.05 


361.95 


153.20 


155.27 


53.00 


951 


1890 


90,463.37 


19,880.00 


32,431.10 


37,009.80 


649.90 


151.80 


298.77 


42.00 


1,135 


1891 


76,605.23 


4,590.00 


30,.588.79 


40,479.25 


494.80 


160.40 


200.99 


91.00 


1,313 


1892 


83,474.79 


5,000.00 


31,344.24 


46,139.35 


416.00 


168.40 


139.80 


267.00 


1,608 


1892 


104,170.08 


12.750.00 


32,603.59 


58,103.20 


1,033.75 


159.60 


339.38 


180.56 


1,895 


1894 


110,210.29 


13,925.00 


32,176.28 


62,501.35 


697.80 


227.40 


3.34.82 


347.64 


2,182 


1895 


118,374.50 


15,800.00 


32,903.99 


67,465.90 


808.20 


300.40 


768.17 


327.84 


2,520 


1896 


128,907.03 


16,800.00 


32,540.03 


77,010.10 


638.48 


302.80 


440.12 


575.50 


2,865 


1897 


125,719.17 


17,175.00 


30,647.17 


76,148.60 


331.85 


321.80 


027.08 


467.67 


3,134 


1898 


131,184.08 


17,675.00 


29,409.58 


80,643.30 


187.00 


359.80 


441.90 


2,467.50 


3,340 


1899 


133,436.41 


18,100.00 


28,063.34 


85,764.80 


246.80 


363.80 


400.59 


497.08 


3,502 


1900 


138,241.94 


18,425.00 


27,868.85 


91,079.30 


95.80 


397.80 


232.59 


142.60 


3,667 


1901 


138,206.14 


18,575.00 


26,954.99 


91,382.60 


220.30 


437.60 


410.90 


224.75 


3,804 


1902 


134,331.48 


18,800.00 


23,785.49 


90,479.10 


233.34 


434.00 


358.25 


241.25 


3,983 


1903 


128,416.23 


19,200.00 


21,539.64 


85,954.05 


253.90 


407.00 


137.64 


924.00 


4,101 


1904 


133,057.47 


19,450.00 


20,486.64 


88,639.41 


161.28 


369.20 


808.12 


3,142.82 


4,220 


1905 


136,3.')3.07 


19,550.00 


20,230.99 


92,438.70 


250.66 


306.00 


1,437.09 


1,779.63 


4,356 



1878, meter rate was changed. 1884, hydrant rateo reduced. 18S6, meter and other 
rates reduced. 1889, hydrant rates reduced. 1891 and 1892, received only part of 
hydrant rent, and nothing from water-troughs or street sprinklers. 1893, hydrant 
rent and water-closets rate reduced. July l, 1902, rates reduced. Meter rate reduced 
October 1, 1904. 



216 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following amounts have been paid over to the city treasurer, 
and credited to the water-works: 

1872, supplies and materials sold $573.01 

1873, supplies and materials sold 177.07 

accrued interest on water-bonds sold l'j:',.26 

accrued interest on state bonds sold 140.00 

water rents 1,920.53 

1874, supplies and materials sold 007.89 

March 12, highway expenditures transferred from 

water account 14,000.53 

March 17, interest and discount transferred from 

water 'account 12,347.25 

September 1, interest and discount transferred from 

water account 22,301.74 

water and hydrant rent 30,233.54 

December 29, interest transferred 4,506.25 

1875, water and hydrant rent 27,119.15 

sundry items 2,104.45 

1876, water and hydrant rent 38,879.47 

sundry items 149.00 

1877, water and hydrant rent 43,091.74 

sundry items 131.56 

1878, water and hydrant rent 48,632.04 

sundry items 241.02 

1879, water and hydrant rent 52,839.30 

sundry items 303.87 

1880, water and hydrant rent 57,180.19 

sundry items , . . . 475.06 

1881, water and hydrant rent 60,000.75 

sundry items 214.87 

1882, w-ater and hydrant rent 67,175.89 

sundry items 454.24 

1883, water and hydrant rent 73,312.13 

sundry items 146.07 

1884, water and hydrant rent 74,830.88 

sundry items 749.20 

1885, water and hydrant rent 80,211.07 

sundry items 192.45 

1880, water and hydrant rent 74,803.70 

sundry items 320.23 

1887, water and hydrant rent 79,082.70 

sundry items 835.47 

1888, water and hydrant rent 85,397.20 

sundry items 246.62 

1889, water and hydrant rent 86,492.19 

sundry items 208.27 



BOAUD OF WATEE, COMMISSIONERS. 217 

1S90, water and hydi'ant rent ' $90,122.00 

sundry items 340.77 

1891, water and hydrant rent 76,313.24 

sundry items 291.99 

1892, water and hydrant rent 83,007.99 

sundry items 400. SO 

1893, water rents 90,900.14 

sundry items .'519.94 

1894, water rents 95,602.83 

sundry items 682.10 

1895, water rents 101,478.49 

sundry items 1,096.01 

1890, water rents 111,091.41 

sundry items 1,015.62 

1897, water rents 107,449.42 

sundry items : 1,094.75 

premiums on bonds 0,248.00 

1898, water rents 110,599.68 

sundry items 2,909.40 

1899, water rents J!l4,438.74 

sundry items 897.67 

1900, water rents 119,441.75 

sundry items 375.19 

1901, water rents 118,995.49 

sundry items 635.65 

1902, water rents 114,931.93 

sundry items 599.55 

1903, water rents 108,154.59 

sundry items 1,061.64 

1904, water rents 109,056.53 

sundry items 3,950.94 

1905, water rents 113,386.35 

sundry items 3,416.72 



$2,735,330.59 
SEBVrCE PIPES LAID, 1905, 

129 1-inch diameter 3,215.5 feet 

1 IVs-inch diameter 24.5 " 

11 2-inch diameter 

2 4-inch diameter 

6 6-inch diameter 

1-19 3.240.0 feet 



218 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEBVICE PIPES REXAID, 1905. 

1 14-inch service 21.7 feet not relaid. 

1 %-inch service 20.0 feet not relaid. 

1 i/g-inch service 28.7 fee-t to 1-inch service 30.8 feet 

103 %-inch service 2,614.8 feet to 1-inch service 2,594.7 

10 1-inch service 260.5 feet to 1-inch service 233.5 

1 114-inch service 18.3 feet to 1-inch service -18.3 

1 1-inch service 21.0 feet to li/g-inch service 21.0 

1 1-inch service 20.0 feet to 3-inch service 20.0 



119 



3,005.0 feet 



2,918.3 feet 



SEKVICE PIPES I.AID TO DATE. 



15 Vz- 

796 %- 

5,078 1- 

18 114- 

38 11/2- 

89 2- 

2 2%-: 

7 3 

15 4 

17 6- 

6,075 



nch diameter 309.0 feet 

nch diameter 19,856.8 

nch diameter 129,280.3 



nch diameter 
nch diameter 
nch diameter 
nch diameter 
nch diameter 
nch diameter 
nch diameter. 



781 

1,035 

2,399 

63 

142 

293 



154,162.3 feet 
or 29.197 miles. 



The number of meters set durin<^ the j-ear has been one hundred and 
thirty-six (136). 

Total number of meters in use, fortj^-three hundred and fifir-six 
(4,356). 

Number of applications for vrater, one hundred and forty (140). 

Total number of applications to date, sixty-two hundred and fifteen 
(6,215). 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



219 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES LAID, GATES AND HYDRANTS SET, 1905. 





Length in 
Feet. 


Gates. 


03 

P 




STREETS. 


(D 


8 in. 
10 in. 


Bin. 
Sin. 
10 in. 


Location. 


Agawam 




227 






1 








Beauport 






1 
1 

•> 
1 










280 
56 
13 

45S 
4 

304 












South of Kelley. [road. 
Caief road to Londonderry 




946 
12 


9,321 
2,424 




4 
2 




Calef 


Concord 






322 










D 




1 










175 










Asrawam to Victoria. 
Wilson to Hall 


Dix 


519 

194 

117 

169 

60 

85 

261 

2-2 

17 

6 

220 

207 

617 

9 




2 


ri'edei'ick 










West of Second 


Hall 
























Nortli of Shoe Shop. 
South of Valley. 
















Kearsarge 

Kellev 
























2 


To Boutwell 


Londonderry 

Mast road 


1,295 

1,111 

464 




2 


1 
1 




Brown ave. to South. 
Westward to Goffstown line 
West ot Brown ave. 
South of Hayward. 
River road to Everett. 




84 


1 

1 
1 


Porter 


Tbaver 












Thornton 






Titus 


482 
256 




1 

1 




East of Calef road. 


Victoria 






Wilton 


30 










East to Beauport. 


















3,648 


5,290 


11,829 


20 


5 


6 


21 





20,767 feet or 3.982 miles of pipe. 



220 ANNUAL OFFICIAL IlEPORTS. 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Brown avenue, 260 feet north of Mr. Calef's residence. 

Brown avenue, 95 feet north of Mr. Colby's barn. 

Brown avenue, 100 feet north of James Kelleher's residence. 

Brown avenue, opposite Pine Island entrance. 

Brown avenue, opposite Mr. Walker's residence. 

Brown avenue, opposite No. 2956. 

Brown avenue, opposite No. 3022. 

Brown avenue, south of schoolhouse. 

Calef road, opposite J. L. Poor's residence. 

Calef road, corner Brown avenue. 

Concord street, corner Weston. 

Crown street, corner Park. 

Dix street, corner Hall. 

Kelley street, near Boutwell. 

Londonderry road, 60 feet east of Perkins' residence. 

Londonderry road, corner of South road. 

Mast road, opposite A. Claus' residence. 

Mast road, opposite Kegan's shop. 

Mill avenue, opposite The Elms. 

Thornton street, opposite No. 339. 

Titus street, 50 feet east of Mr. Graves' residence. 

LOCATION OF GATES SET, 1905. 

Agawam street, corner Eiver road. 

Beauport street, south side of Adams. 

Boutwell street, south side of Kellc}'. 

Brown avenue, north of Mr. Calef's residence. 

Brown avenue, north of Mr. Colby's residence. 

Brown avenue, north line of Mr. Kelleher's land. 

Brown avenue, corner Mill avenue. 

Brown avenue, on hydrant branch, Calef residence. 

Brown avenue, on hydrant branch, Colby barn. 

Bi-ow^n avenue, on hydrant branch, Kelleher residence. 

Brown avenue, on hydrant branch. Pine Island park. 

Brown avenue, on hydrant branch, ]\Ir. Walker. 

Brown avenue, on hydrant branch, No. 2956. 

Brown avenue, on hj-drant branch, schoolhouse. 

Calef road, south side of Titus. 

Calef road, north side Brown avenue. 

Calef road, on hydrant branch, J. L. Poor's residence. 

Calef road, on hydrant branch, corner Brown avenue. 

Concord street, east side of Beacon. 

D street, south side of Mast road. 

Dix street, west side of Hall. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 221 

Dix street, east side of Wilson. 

Londonderry road, east side of Brown avenue. 

Londonderry road, on hydrant branch at Perkins' residence. 

Londonderry road, on hydrant branch, corner South road. 

Mast street, south side Eegan shop. 

Porter street, south side of Haywood. 

Thayer street, east side of River road. 

Thornton street, north side of Putnam. 

Titus street, east side Calef road. 

Victoria street, west side of Davis. 



222 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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223 



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3651 

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224 



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Foster avenue 


5 

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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



225 



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226 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 



•BJUB.ipXH 



69AX13A Jty 



0) 






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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



227 



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228 



ANNCTAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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1076 
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318 

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300 

484 

313 

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1706 

3543 

1010 

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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



229 



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230 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



m 
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Amoskeag road (Eddy).. 

Amory (north) 

Amory (south) 


5 p 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



231 



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1573 
280 
835 

2287 
380 


242 
637 
882 

3288 
790 

1482 
563 




1791 
663 
304 
769 
891 
451 
552 

2089 








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232 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOIITS. 



R;uTi.ipjCfi 
■eb,\iB.v .iiv 




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laid. 




to 
















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3004 
1210 

666 

1554 

218 

602 

41 

477 

4 

191 

826 

2674 

1609 


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1 




2614 
391 
802 


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C 
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Length and size 

of cement-lined 

pipe laid. 
























c 

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at 

e 

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1 


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: e 

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5 f 


: ( 

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3 

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Fourth 

Front 

George 

(iifTord 

(Jlenwood 

Goffs 


3 

5 

S '; 

5 s; 


5 ; 




2 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



233 



O C^ 00 t- ?> CO •MO 



T-i la i-t T-t 



Mi-tCOCl •^rt(rjCOS^.-ICOi-l?lCOiHrH 



281 

2026 
50 
524 
256 
570 

1053 
843 

2995 
598 
230 
283 
45 
290 

3849 

1838 
527 

2161 
206 
586 

2849 
232 
504 






















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3 c: 





W ca an K M SI 



a a K^i hj h-i 



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234 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



•e;uBapj£H 


'' 




CI 


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2539 
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285 
2727 
995 
3379 
566 
215 
758 
429 


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Montgomery 

Morgan 

Omega 


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c 

1 1 


Quincy 

Kiddle 

Riminon 


: 4. 

S T 
c c 


c 
c. 

A. 


School 

Schiller 

Sheridan 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



235 



CO r-l CO 


i-|'*t-ico-^thtj< .r-ieo ;*' 


i 


1 




;::::::'::::: ^' 




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; '■ ■ [ :S is :^ : ! 


1 


654 

361 

442 

1509 

110 

12 

80 

1308 

1265 

923 

837 

517 

1850 

2.-0 

283 

1331 

44 

24 








































; 1 


CO 














i 














05 
























: : 


C) 














o 


Shirley Hill road 

Sullivan 

Third 


c • 

: 

1 1 
H H 


ID S 


Walker 

Wayne 

Wentworth 

West 


Wilkins 

Wilton 

Winter 


* 
a 

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3 £ 


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236 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOETS. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1905. 



Size of Pipe. 



Cement lined pipe. 



Cast iron pipe. 



Gates. 





20,367 feet. 


24,719 feet. 
16,245 " 
33,557 " 
47,091 " 
86,979 " 
320,001 " 
20,077 " 


19 




21 


12-incli rtiameter 

10-incli (liaiiieter 




39 
52 


8-incli diameter 




118 


6-incli diameter 

4-inch diameter 


'234 feet. 


689 
60 










20,601 feet. 


543,669 feet. 


998 



Cement-lined liipe 3.90 miles 

Cast-iron pipe 103.91 miles 



Total pipe 107.81 miles 

803 hydrants. 

998 gates. 

12 air valves. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES K. WALKER. 



Uses for which Water Is Supplied. 

WATEK FIXTURES, ETC. 

12,835 families, 95 boarding houses, 18,813 faucets, 5,664 Avash-bowls, 
0,424 bathtubs, 13,928 water-closets, 1,058 set tubs, 269 urinals, 4,747 sil- 
cocks, 2,816 horses, 230 cattle, 803 hydrants, 31 watering-troughs, 10 
drinking fountains, 67 standpipes, 2 public urinals. 

PUBLIC BUXLDINGS. 

1 jail, 34 churches, 1 courthouse, 12 hose companies, 6 fire engines, 
2 hook-and-ladder, 3 opera houses, 4 convents, 4 city hospitals, 5 ceme- 
teries, 1 orphanage, 1 postoifice, 1 city library, 6 banks, 9 hotels, 1 
Masonic hall, 1 Odd Fellows' hall, 3 halls. Children's Home, Masonic 
Home. 

SHOPS. 

58 barber, 11 wheelwright, 20 blacksmith, 10 carpenter, 2 tinsmith, 
1 copper, 3 currj'ing, 20 plumber and gas and water pipe, 14 paint, 3 
gunsmith. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 237 

STORES. 

5 auction, 35 drug, 22 jewelry, 2 fur, ,'J house-furnishiug goods, 20 
fancy goods, 1 wholesale paper, 5 wholesale produce, 24 dry goods, 12 
candy, 1 cloak, 16 millinery, ?, tea, 9 furniture, 3 wholesale grocer, 110 
grocery, 6 meal, 2 hardware, 34 boot and shoe, 11 stove, 17 gents' fur- 
nishing goods, 7 book, 1 leather and shoe finders, 3 music, 3 upholstery, 
9 undertaker, 5 sewing-machine, 1 feather-cleaner, 1 rubber. 



17 dining, 7 billiard, 70 liquor. 

MISCEiLLANEOUS. 

7 clubrooms, 3 bleacheries, 35 laundries, 4 ice-houses, 10 photog- 
raphers, 1 Mercy Home, 2 old ladies' homes, 1 soldiers' monument. 1 
Turner hall, 4 fountains, 2 trust companies, 1 city farm, 3 depots, 9 
greenhouses, 2 bandrooms, 26 bakeries, 2 waste, 2 business colleges, 
36 schoolhouses, 1 battery building, 1 kitchen, 3 wardrooms, 1 gym- 
nasium, 2 police stations. • • 

MANUFACTITKING EISTABLISHMENTS. 

2 hosiery iriills, 1 silver-plating, 3 iron foundries, 2 dye-houses, 5 
machine shops, 6 clothing manufactories, 9 harness shops, 1 cornice 
works, 1 brush shop, 9 carriage shops, 13 cigar factories, 1 brass and 
copper foundry, 1 locomotive works, 1 grist-mill, 1 silk-mill, 3 granite 
works, 1 electric light station, 4 sash and blind shops, 1 brewery, 10 
shoe shops, 1 gas works, 4 slaughter-houses, 1 soap factorj', 4 needle 
manufactories, 6 beer-bottling, 3 book-binderies, 2 box-makers, 1 paper- 
box manufactor3^ 

MARKETS. 

5 fish, 14 meat and fish, 5 meat, wholesale. 

STABLES. 

20 livery, 1,326 private. 

OFFICES, 

23 dentists, 1 telephone, 2 telegraph, 31 coal, 1 gas, 1 electric, 2 ex- 
press, 19 printing. 

Materials on Hand. 

QUAKTER TTXRNS. CLAMP SLEEVES. 

4 8-inch. 5 20-inch. 

4 10 " ]6 12 " , 

11 6 " 10 12 " 

4 14 " 8 4 " 

4 4" 5 



338 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 







WHOLE . 


3LEEVES. 






GATES. 


1 


20-inch. 






1 12-inch 


bell. 


5 


14 








10 


8 " 


" 


3 


IC 


" 






2 


10 " 


" 


4 


8 








9 


4 " 


<( 


12 


e 








11 


6 " 


" 


6 


4 








1 


14-inch 


spigot. 












1 


14-inch bell. 








PIPE. 


7 


6-inch 


spigot. 


24 


feet 24-inch 


pipe. 






BEDUCKRS 


8,500 




20 ' 














120 




14 ' 








2 


14-inch to 10-inc] 


948 




12 ' 








1 


20 " 


" 14 " 


1,560 




10 ' 








2 


14 " 


" 12 " 


4,668 




8 ' 








1 


12 " 


" 6 " 


9,000 




6 ' 








8 


10 " 


" 8 " 


768 




4 ' 








1 


10 " 


" 6 " 


1,256 




1 ' 








14 


8 " 


" 6 " 


228 




% ' 








1 


6 " 


" 4 " 


105 




2 ' 








12 


hydran 


ts. 


306 




IVs ' 




<( 


56 


pigs of lead. 






BRi 


INCHES. 


132 
100 


stop boxes, 
curb cocks. 


1 


d< 


)iible 4 ( 


3n 


8. 


106 


3-4 corp cocks. 


2 




6 


<( 


20. 








2 




8 


" 


14. 






BENDS. 


1 




6 


" 


14. 








2 




6 


" 


10. 


1 


20-inch 


1-8 bend. 


4 




8 


" 


8. 


2 


8 " 


1-8. 


23 




6 


" 


8. 


4 


10 " 


1-8. 


8 




6 


« 


6. 


2 


20-inch 


Y. 


4 




4 


" 


4. 


1 


20 " 


1-16. 


1 




" 6x8 


<< 


14. 


1 


14 " 


1-8. 


1 




" 6x10 


" 


10. 


1 


12 •' 


1-8. 


2 


si 


Qgle 10 


on 


20. 


4 


10 " 


1-8. 


1 




" 14 


" 


14. 


4 


8 " 


ofPsets. 


1 




" 10 


" 


14. 


1 


12 " 


" 


1 




6 


<( 


14. 


13 


6 " 


" 


1 




4 


" 


12. 


3 


10 " 


« 


2 




4 


" 


10. 








3 




6 


" 


8. 






PLUGS. 


16 




6 


" 


6. 








1 




" 12 


" 


14. 


15 


10-inch 




4 




6 


" 


10. 


29 


12 " 




5 




" 10 


" 


10. 


8 


8 " 




14 




8 


" 


8. 


20 


6 " 




1 




4 


" 


8. 


25 


4 " 




1 




6 


" 


2 


0. 









REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



EEPORT OF THE BOAED OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor: 

The board of health submits the following report for the year 1905: 

Mr. William J. Starr was aijpointed to succeed Dr. William M. 

Parsons, whose term expired. At the annual meeting- Dr. J. E. A. 

Lanouette was elected president and William K. Robbins clerk of the 
board. 

The appropriation allowed by the city council for carrying on the 
work of the department during the year was $11,000. 

The expenditures have been as follows: 

OFFICE E.XPEN.SES. 

Salaries '• $600.00 

Labor "3,101.25 

Office furniture 55.45 

Printing, postage, and stationery 175.23 

Telephone service 55.52 

Express 18.22 

Disinfectants 115.14 

Antitoxin 400.00 

Diphtheria examinations 50.00 

Quarantined families 372.69 

Carriage hire and carfares 194.00 

Supplies for laboratory 43.00 

Gas 13.04 

Milk samples 9-''"'' 

Incidentals 50.16 

$5,253.47 
ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

Salary of matron $192.00 

Fuel " 152.38 

Board and nursing 940.50 

Electric lighting 64.89 

Telephone service 31.70 

W^ater 17.45 

Repairs and improvements ' 418.41 

241 

16 



242 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

g^upplies $89.70 

Labor at hospital 26.23 

Insurance on hospital 75.00 

$2,008.56 
SMAiLPOX EXPENSES. 

Salary of matron at pest house $360.00 

Labor 46.00 

Board of patients 6.45 

Telephone service 25.00 

Water 7.52 

Supplies 1.70 

Medical attendance 45.00 

Vaccination 67.52 

$559.19 

Total expenditure for 1905 $7,821.22 

Amount turned in from milk license fees 381.00 

The general expenses of the office exceed those of 1904, but are not 
far different from those of several years past. 

The few items where increase is noticed are those expenses that 
depend upon the diseases to be handled, which must always vary from 
year to year. The expenses of the Isolation Hospital have been less 
than last j'^ear by nearly a thousand dollars, chiefly on account of the 
way in which the diseases occur. 

The showing would have been still better but for the improvement 
of building a shed for the shelter of physician's horses, when visiting 
the hospital, which cost two hundred dollars, and the painting of the 
buildings outside. 

The smallpox hospital cost much less than for the i^ast few j-ears, 
chiefly because there was but a single case of smallpox to treat. The 
salary of the matron and a physician for vaccination and examining a 
few cases suspected of being smallpox constitutes the bulk of the 
expense. 

MEETINGS. 

The regular weekly meetings have been continued on Tuesday even- 
ings. Forty-three such meetings were held and twelve special meet- 
ings for trips of inspection and such other business as required imme- 
diate attention. 

INSPECTORS. 

The same olfice force as that of last year has been continued in 
service, namely: Carl O. Seaman, inspector of plumbing and milk, and 
William B. Blake and John F. Looney, health inspectors. Miss M. 
Alma Fracker has continued as office clerk. All have been faithful 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 243 

and efficient and have manifested much interest and enterprise, which 
are the prime requisites of good work, and they are entitled to much 
credit for the efficiency of the work of the department. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL LABOEATOKY. 

"VWiile as last year the principal part of the bacteriological work is 
sent to the state laboratory at Concord, our local equipment is always 
in commission, and this year was used somewhat more than last. 
It is especially convenient for obtaining early information upon cases 
that occur on Sundaj-s and holidays, or after the last train for Con- 
cord in the evening. Dr. A. G. Straw makes the microscopical exami- 
nations. 

Physicians are again urged to avail themselves of these tests, not 
that they are alwaj^s to be considered infallible, but as affording val- 
uable information that can be obtained in no other way. 

During the year one hundred and forty-five diphtheretic examina- 
tions were made, of which forty-seven were positive, or true diphthe- 
ria, and ninety-eight were negative. Thirty-seven of the negative 
results were examinations for the discharge of patients. 

MILK INSPECTION. 

The milk supply of the city has been inspected upon the same 
basis as for the past three years. The work has proceeded without 
friction and the legal requirements have been well complied with. 

The detailed information concerning this will be found in a sep- 
arate report of the milk inspector, Mr. Carl O. Seaman, which is made 
a part of this report. 

Very few complaints have come to this office concerning the quality 
of the milk, and some of these came from parties who are buying 
milk below the regular market price of six cents per quart. 

It seems well in this connection to remind the public that the legal 
requirements are made to admit to market the milk from the average 
or even inferior cows, and gives no authority to stop the sale of old 
milk so long as it is not actually sour. Therefore milk that is well- 
within the law may be and doubtless often is, considerably inferior 
to fresh milk from selected and well-kept cows, or even commercial 
milk, which, as will be noticed in the detailed report, averages con- 
siderably above legal requirement, which means that a goodly portion 
of the milk sold is of high quality. This in turn Indicates that adul- 
teration is not practiced to anywhere near the extent that some 
pessimists would have their friends believe. 

From the way the samples are taken we must certainlj' get the aver- 
rage richness of the milk on the wagon. The results of inspection 
are tabulated and recorded. 



244 ■ ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

PLUMBING INSPECTION. 

There has been no change in the laws or rules in relation to the 
inspection of plumbing. Being well known and consistently enforced, 
there is no friction, and yet we are confident that no city has better 
protection in the way of safe plumbing than our ow-n, and this we 
think is due to the tactful efficiency of Plumbing Inspector Seaman. 

WATEE SrPPLY. 

The waters of Lake Massabesic have been looked after as usual, but 
this requires Ijess time now than when its shores were used as a cheap 
summer resort, and since the water commissioners have obtained con- 
trol of very important shore land on the front pond. 

Ice cutting and teaming upon the ice is observed more closely than 
formerly. During the autumn, when the water was extremely low, 
the water commissioners did some very creditable work in clearing 
rubbish from the bogs. 

ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

During the year concrete walks were laid about the premises, the 
buildings painted upbn the outside, and a shed was built to shelter 
the horses of the phj'sicians and others having business at the hos- 
pital. , 

The patients treated there during the year were not so numerous 
as last year, but came in bunches and proved that the wards are not 
adequate to accommodate any considerable outbreak of diphtheria or 
scarlet fever. We think it advisable to enlarge the wards bj- adding 
another story to each, as the foundation and heating plant are ade- 
quate for such enlargement. There were treated during the year 
eight cases of scarlet fever and thirty-one cases of diphtheria, and 
thirty-six nurses and attendants were accommodated. Eleven people 
were taken to the hospital and cared for over night while their homes 
were being disinfected. 

Everything is kept in perfect condition, and the equipment is equal 
to that found in other first-class contagious hospitals, and citizens 
are urged to make use of it. It will spare the home of infection 
where successful fumigation is very difficult, and will leave the family 
free from quarantine and give the patient better treatment than can 
be given in most homes. 

Patients are admitted upon application to any member of the board, 
either direct or through the employees of the department. 

People may employ their own physician and nurse, in which case 
the expense is fift3' cents per day for each patient, nurse or attend- 
ant. 

In cases of destitution the cit^- pays all bills. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 245 

This is the first whole year of service of Mrs. Carl E. Rydin as 
matron, and the tactful efficiency of her administration fully justifies 
the judgment of the board when she was placed in charge. 

SMALLPOX. 

One light case of smallpox occurred in May, and was the only patient 
at the hospital during the year. The actual expense of handling this 
case was $64.45. 

The hospital is in excellent repair and ready to receive patients on 
an hour's notice. 

Miss Judith Sherer, who has been the matron for fortj'-one years, is 
alert and ready for duty at any moment, and the efficient assistance 
of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Sherer may now, as in the past, be had at any 
time. 

The vital statistics for the year are carefully tabulated and the 
tables made a part of this report. We recommend a careful perusal of 
them, as such will afford valuable information upon many subjects 
not herein discussed. 

In conclusion we wish to extend our thanks to the citizens generally 
and the mayor and city government in particular for sympathy, en- 
couragement and assistance in the discharge of our duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. E. A. LANOUETTE. 
WILLIAM Iv. EOBBINS. 
WILLIAM J. STARR. 



246 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLI 
SOME COMPARISONS OF VITAL STATISTIC 



1S86. 



1888. 



1889. 



1890. 



1891. 



1892. 



1893. 



Population, estimated |39,032 

Number of deaths, exclusive of 
stillbirths 

Deatlis, per thousand of popula- 
tion • 

Deatlis of Children under five 
years 

Ratio, deatlis of children to total 
deatlis, per cent 

Deatlis of children per thousand 
of population 

Deaths fro in zymotic d i s- 

Deatlis from zymotic diseases 

per thousand of population 
Cholera infantum 



40,215 41,433 ,42,689 



725 

18 57 
313 

43 17 

S.02 

205 

5.25 
115 



Tuberculosis I ^09 

Croup 21 

Diphtheria 9 

Bronchitis 1 11 

Pneumonia, all forms j 26 

Heart disease, all forms 

Scarlet fever 

Typhoid fever 

Measles 

Whooping cough 

Smallpox- 



37 



79S 

19.84 
356 

44.01 

8.65 

256 

6.37 
148 

93 

25 

17 

29 

39 

45 

4 

17 



853 

20.59 
397 

46..54 

9.58 

227 



764 

17 90 
353 

46.20 
8.27 
199 



5.48 
115 


4.66 
86 


109 


79 


24 


25 


30 


23 


37 


35 


45 


38 


23 


47 


1 


5 



44,126 

901 

20.40 
434 

48.17 

9.87 

252 

5.72 
141 

91 

15 

9 
38 
58 
43 

3 
17 



46,600 

880 

19.34 
396 

44.66 

8.64 

181 

3.98 
122 

84 

7 

2 

38 
72 
38 



48,000 ! 50,000 



963 ; 

20.06' 

600 

51 .»2 

10.42 

153 

3.18 
103 

89 

3 

5 
39 
39 
48 

2 
11 
11 



971 
19.4i 

527 
60.6i 
10.5^ 

137 
2.7' 

79 

4 

1 
44 

5" 
4 
5 
15 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



247 



No. 1. 

B'OR THE LAST TWENTY YEARS. 



1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


55,000 


55,000 


56,000 


60,000 


60,000 


60,000 


56,987 


56,987 


56,987 


60,000 


62,000 


62,000 


-«r 
























977 


1,020 


1,051 


1,018 


1,001 


1,008 


1,167 


1,131 


1,092 


1,106 


1,006 


1,327 


17.76 


18.51 


18.77 


16.97 


16.68 


17.80 


20.47 


19.84 


19.12 


18.43 


16.22 


21.40 


546 


519 


531 


631 


521 


.541 


501 


554 


022 


556 


477 


677 


55. S9 


53.82 


50.52 


61.98 


52.04 


50.65 


48.07 


48.99 


56.95 


50.27 


47.41 


58 55 


9.91 


9.98 


9.48 


10.50 


8.68 


9.01 


9.84 


9.71 


10.91 


9.26 


7.69 


10.91 


209 


213 


227 


226 


254 


203 


244 


283 


238 


225 


201 


267 


3.?0 


3.97 


4.05 


3.77 


4.23 


3.38 


4.28 


4.96 


4.17 


3.75 


3 24 


4 30 


40 


146 


129 


110 


122 


78 


119 


121 


98 


92 


72 


79 


74 


76 


112 


88 


73 


91 


100 


81 


78 


87 


87 


109 


24 


14 


20 


14 


10 


10 


6 


5 


12 


17 


6 


12 


H 


10 


28 


29 


17 


6 


8 


3 


22 


17 


10 


22 


■V" 


69 


51 


86 


45 


65 


40 


38 


55 


40 


31 


23 


86 


77 


105 


72 


113 


118 


105 


120 


112 


101 


132 


5i 


75 


77 


64 


50 


57 

* 


77 


75 


54 


73 


55 


74 


3 


4 


1 


1 


9 


3 


6 


9 


2 


2 


1 


1 


8 


21 


19 


12 


14 


12 


12 


11 


8 


10 


13 


9 


4 


1 
2 


3 
3 


3 

13 


3 

2 


5 
15 


1 
3 






1 
5 



4 

1 


4 


8 


5 








• 

























248 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE No. 2. 



Months 



Membra- 
nous 
croup. 



Diph. 

tliena. 


Typhoid 
lever. 


Measles. 


1 


i 




m 






> 


^ 




S3 




•".a 




as 


S 


cr 


« 


■s 


•rt 




ai 




e3 




■o 


y 


O 


C 


O 


a 



Scarlet 
fever. 



Vario- 


Small- 


loid. 


pox. 


i [» 


1 


n 


CD 1 ■^ 


n 


^ 




0)1 
3)J 


ti 


eS V 


C4| 


QJ 


O ' = 


o! 


c 



Total. 



— en 



January .. 
February. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August.... 
Septemb'r 
October... 
November 
Deeomber 

Totals. 



1 
3 



48 




12 


54 




7 


304 


1 


9 


206 


1 


6 


153 


2 


6 


52 




3 



869 



53 



69 


1 


322 


4 


225 


1 


177 


8 


60 


2 


55 


3 


27 


3 


19 


8 


33 


7 


33 


7 


21 


5 



1, 11145 



KEPOKT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



249 



TABLE N... 8. 

C'OMPARISON OF STATISTICS OF CONTAGIOUS AND INFEC- 
TIOUS DISEASES FOR THE PAST 21 YEARS. 



Years. 



croup. 



Diph- 


theiia 




» 


CO 


^ 


<u 


si 


03 


v 


O 


— 



Typhoid 
lever. 



Measles. 



Scarlet 
fever. 



Vario- 


Sm 


all- 


loid. 


pox. 








X 


















t 


d 


o 


eS 


d 


V 






O 


" 


o 


a 



Total. 



18S5... 
1SS6 . . . 
1S87... 
1888... 
1889. . . 

1890 .. 

1891 .. 
1892 . . . 
1893 . . 
1894... 
1895 . . . 
1896. . . 
1897... 
1898. . . 

1899 .. 

1900 .. 
1901 . . . 
1902 .. 
1903 . . . 
1904 . . 
1905... 



* 


• 


* 


18 


* 


20 


# 


« 


* 





* 


12 


* 


# 


7"? 


17 


28 


18 


» 


* 


126 


30 


35 


12 


* 


* 


79 


23 


36 


16 


« 


* 


41 


9 


36 


17 


* 


* 


21 


•2 


76 


18 


* 


* 


26 


5 


33 


11 


* 


* 


7 


1 


79 


15 


12 


12 


42 


11 


74 


21 


17 


U 


47 


11 


73 


21 


17 


14 


103 


28 


81 


20 


14 


10 


U8 


29 


78 


11 


10 


4 


81 


17 


145 


14 


6 


3 


50 


6 


78 


12 


8 


5 


38 


8 


65 


11 


3 


3 


18 


3 


55 


11 


16 


9 


135 


22 


49 


S 


2G 


16 


146 


17 


62 


10 


15 


6 


64 


10 


64 


13 


15 


9 


132 


22 


51 


9 



94 

44 

259 

63 

25 

44 

110 

67 

55 

500 

387 

88 

762 

827 

15 

765 

112 

69 

859 



187 

54 

298 

89 

451 

212 

223 

68 

61 

54 

200 

130 

102 

48 

33 

37 

67 

53 



392 
428 
438 
211 
554 
40b 
418 
200 
763 
681 
524 

1,026 

1,102 
333 

1,026 
545 
393 

1,111 



250 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. 4. 

TABLE SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES 
AND BY M(JNTHS FOEl THE YEAR 1905. 



Causes of Death. 





i>> 








>, 




















2 


3 


o 


= 


>. 




» 


OS 


P. 


a 




b 


S 


-«; 


S 



3 » 





b 






V 


« 


(H 


.O 


.a 


o 


> 


g 


u 





V 


© 


Z. 


D 



A bscess, abdominal 

" of brain 

" cervical 

" of tliroat 

Accident, asphyxiation 

" bnrneil. ..[trie wire 

" contact with Elec- 

" drowned 

fall 

" railroad 

Addison's disease 

Alcoholism 

Anpeniia 

Angina pectoris 

Apoplexy 

Appendicitis 

Asphyxia 

Astinna 

Ataxia locomotor 

Atelectassis, pulmonary 

Atrophy, infantile 

Brain, "concussion of 

" congestion of 

" softening of 

Bronchitis 

" capillary 

Cancer 



of bowels 

" of groin 

" of ilium 

" of intestines 

" of liver 

" of stomach 

" of uterus 

Cerebritis, acute 

Cholera infantum 

Cholera mortus 

Colitis entero 

" ileo 

Convulsions 

Croup, membranous 

" spasmodic 

Cyanosis 

Cystitis chronic 

Debility, infantile 

" senile 

Dementia 

Dentition 

Diabetes 

Diarrhoea 

Diphtheria fbra 

Dislocation of cervical verte- 

Dropsy 

Duodenitis, gasti-o 

Dysentery 

Eclampsia 

Embolism, pulmonary 

Emphysema 

Empyema 

Encephalitis 

Endocarditis 



32 



13 



1 1. 
1 [ 



1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
3 
11 
3 
1 
5 
7 

a 

60 
4 
4 

2 
4 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 

20 
3 
6 
1 
1 
1 
1 
7 
7 
6 
1 

79 
1 
3 
2 

17 
9 
3 
1 
2 

20 
3 
3 
4 

10 
4 

22 
1 
1 
1 
S 
1 
3 
2 
1 
4 
4 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



251 



TABLE No. 4..— Continued. 



Causes of Dkath. 


c 


3 
5 


s 


p. 
< 


1 


e 

3 
1-5 




03 
S 


September. 
October. 


1 
g 

> 

52; 


u 
<u 

.0 

s 



0) 

Q 


"3 


Enteritis 


1 
I 


1 








1 
1 


2 
9 


2 
10 






2 

1 


"i 

1 


9 




2 




2 


6 


3 


39 


Epilepsy 


1 




1 






















1 
















1 










1 


Erysipelas 
















1 


Exhaustion from pregnancy.. 
" purpura liemor- 

Fever, brain [rhagica. 

" puerperal 


















1 
1 






1 




















1 




















1 


....1.--. 




















2 


" scarlet: 
























1 




1 
1 


1 




1 






2 










9 


Fibroma of uterus 












1 










1 
.... 

1 
1 


"'2 




1 
2 










3 


Gastritis 


2 








9 


Goitre, Exopthalmic 






1 






5 

1 




















1 


" disease of 








6 




1 




4 


3 




36 


" fatty degeneration of.. 
" mitral insufficiency of 
" " regurgitation of 




1 
















1 
2 


2 




3 
























... 




















1 


" paralysis of 




1 
4 
















1 


" valvular disease of 


2 


3 






2 




4 




2 






29 
1 


























1 
























2 


























1 










1 










1 








2 


















2 
















1 
1 

"2" 

1 


"1 

1 








1 


Hepatitis 


• 




1 
1 
1 










4 


Indigestion, acute 






1 
2 


2 






5 


Intestinal obstruction . .... 






2 










1 












1 


Intussusception of intestine. . 




















1 


3 






3 


1 












6 


Kidneys, passive congest'n of 
Lia Grippe 


















1 
1 
1 
1 


1 






3 


















6 


Lapiirotoniy 




















1 


I<aryngismus stridulus 
























2 


Laryngitis 


1 




















1 




1 




















1 










1 
1 

1 


2 




1 










s 






2 

1 


1 




4 


















2 




2 
8 












12 


"e' 


■ 7' 


"9' 


4 


Marasmus 


4 


7 

1 

10 

27 

1 


7 

1 

6 

27 

1 


3 
2 

4 
10 


2 


4 


7 


76 
4 


Meningitis 

" cerebro-spinal — 


9 

2 

1 


10 

11 

1 


4 
6 

1 


10 
1 
2 


3 

4 




2 


S 


8 

1 


76 
89 








7 










1 

1 
3 




1 
























2 




3 

1 

.... 
3 




3 


1 


3 




i' 


1 


27 




4 


CEdema of glottis 




2 

1 

"'i' 








2 


" pulmonary 

Old age 




















1 




2 


2 


5 
1 


"c' 




"2' 


2 




17 




23 


Paraplegia 




2 





Pares! s 






2 








1 






1 

1 


.... 


4 
















1 


Pericarditis 






2 


1 
2 












1 


Peritonitis 


2 


1 


o 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


ao 



252 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE No. i.—Gontinued. 



Causes of Dkath. 





>> 




>> 


u 




i- 


03 


^ 










'^ 


O 1 


c 


^ 


5 : 


« 


« 


►Tl 


!>. 


•s 











;^ 






u 










5 




.a 


.a , 




c 



-9 


>. 


in 

3 


2 

p. 


o 


> 

c 




l<5 


•-5 


^ 


Oi 


O 


!Z 


a 1 



Pertussis 

Plfturiay 

Pneumonia 

" bioncho 

" pleuio 

Poisoning, arsenical 

" ptomaine 

Premature birtli 

Purpura hemorrhagica 

Pj'8Bmia 

Rachitis 

Sarcoma 

Sclerosis, arterio 

Septifiemia 

Spina bifida 

Spleen eelunococcus, cyst of. 

Stenosis aortic 

Stillborn 

Stricture of tt'sopliagus 

Suiciile, from cut throat 

" from haiif<ing 

" fnun iioiso)iing 

" from .shooiiug 

Sunstroke 

Surgical shock 

Sypliilis, hereditary 

Tabes Dorsal is 

Tetanus 

Thrombiisis 

Tonsilitis 

Tnachea, obstruction of 

Traumatic shock 

Tuberculosis 

" pulmonary 

Ulcer duodenum ." 

" gastric 

Unknown natural causes — 

Urajinia 

Volvulus 



Totals 120 



loG 137 



109 



1 
is ; 6 



90 



136 139 100 



10 ]2 



04 103 US 



4 
1 

8« 

44 

4 

I 

1 

31 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
7 
1 
1 
2 
100 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
6 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
t 

24 
»5 
1 
3 
11 
26 
1 



1,427 



EEPORT OP INSPECTOR OF PLUMBING AND 

MILK. 

Gentlemen of the Board of Health: 

I beg to submit the following- as a report of the inspection of milk 
during the year 1905: 

During the year 648 samples of milk, skim milk and cream were 
taken. One hundred and eight3--eight samples were brought into the 
oflHce by 'citizens and milk dealers, and the remaining 460 were taken 
by the inspectors and paid for at the retail price. In eleven cases 
sealed, duplicate samples were demanded and given and receipts taken 
therefor. 

During the winter season of higher legal requirements, namelj', Jan- 
uary, February, and March, 105 samples of milk were tested, averag- 
ing 4.16 per cent of butter fat with a specific gravity of 1.0312, and 12 
were below the legal standard of butter fat. 

During the summer period of April, May, June, July, August, and 
Septem'ber, 378 samples of milk were tested, averaging 4.02 per cent 
butter fat with specitic gravity of 1.0308, and sixteen were below the 
legal standard in butter fat. During the months of October, Novem- 
ber, and December, 164 samples were tested, averaging 4.10 per cent of 
butter fat with specific gravity of 1.0313, and 7 were below the legal 
standard of butter fat. Of the entire 648 samples taken 35 were below 
the legal standard. Twenty-seven samples of skim milk and cream 
were taken, the cream averaging 32.21 per cent of butter fat. 

Drj'ing and weighing to determine total solids were resorted to 
four times. The specific gravity of the milk serum was determined 
six times. The milk has also been tested for acidity by the Mann 
volumetric method of analysis. One hwndred samples of milk tested 
from January 1 to March 31 showed .16 per cent acidity; 348 samples 
tested from April 1 to September 30 showed .163 per cent acidity, and 
139 samples from October 1 to December 31 showed .168 per cent acid- 
ity. 

Almost every sample was tested for formaldehyde, and manj^ addi- 
tional tests were made for colostrum cells, coloring matter, carbon- 
ates, salicylic acid, and boric acid. 

Twenty wagons were found improperlj^ marked, eleven having the 
wrong name and license number, while eleven dealers were found 
selling without a license. 

Thirtj'-three letters have been written to dealers and raisers of milk 
during the year. 

253 



254 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The inspection has been carried on this 3'ear without any friction 
or persecution of the dealers. The dealers have corrected any discrep- 
ancy in the milk or the handling of it, upon notices from the inspector. 

Inspection of several creameries about town shows that they are 
kept in a clean and sweet condition at all times, and a great deal of 
care is exercised in sterilizing the milk cans and glass bottles, also 
the pipes and apparatus for the separating of cream and skim milk. 

PLUiLBING FIXTXTRES SET. 

Number of tank water closets 829 

frost-proof closets, Kelly & McCulloch 7 

sinks 455 

bathtubs 335 

washbowls 317 

washtravs 160 

urinals 31 

refrigerators 20 

slophoppers 9 

rain leaders 18 

Other fixtures not classified above 50 

Total number of fixtures put in 2,261 

Number of plumbing notices filed 377 

water tests of soil pipe made 373 

stacks of soil pipe made 439 

smoke tests of soil pipe 17 

defects and leaks found 244 

complaints investigated 28 

fixtures and pipes found unserviceable and re- 
paired 69 

Two hundred and uinety-eiglit consultations with owners, tenants, 
and agents, plumbers, etc., were held. 

A total of 1,S,")4 inspections were made of the work during its pro- 
gress and after its completion. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL O. SEAMAN, 
Inspector of Plumbimj and Mill:. 



SANITARY INSPECTOES' REPOKT. 



Crentlemcn of the Board of Htxtlth: 

We beg to submit the following as the report of the work of the 
sanitary inspectors for the j-ear 190o: 

Vaults and privies inspected 1S3 

Vaults inspected after cleaning 77 

Water-closets inspected 1,597 

Urinals inspected 54 

Sinks inspected 333 

Yards and alleys insiiected 1,757 

Cellars inspected OfiS 

Barns and outbuildings inspected IGO 

Tenements inspected 477 

Barn cellars inspected 127 

Teams and riggings of excavators inspected 20 

Soaperies and slaughterhouses inspected 15 

Vaults and privies ordered cleaned or repaired 116 

Urinals cleaned or repaired 9 

Yards and allej^s cleaned 341 

Cellars cleaned 352 

Barn cellars cleaned 32 

Sheds, etc., cleaned and inspected 99 

Tenements cleaned 127 

Water-closets cleaned or repaired 866 

Sinks trapped or rej^aired 143 

Leaky drain pipes repaired 113 

Houses within 100 feet of the public sewer and not connected 

therewith 50 

Filthy hallways and roofs ordered cleaned 49 

Openings other than leaks in the drainage sj'stem were found in 17 
places and same were ordered closed by the department. 

One hundred and forty-three bathtubs and 22 washtrays were in- 
spected. 

Eleven bathtubs were repaired. 

Sewage was found running upon the surface of the ground in 54 
places and such nuisances were abated either by entering the sewer or 
carrying away in some manner not offensive. 

255 



256 ANNUAL OFP^ICIAL REPORTS. 

In doing the work of the department it has been necessary to make 
4,023 calls and to write 427 letters. 

Five hundred and eighty-six complaints have been investigated. 

In 471 cases the inspectors have been able to give relief, and in 75 
cases -it was found that no cause existed or that same was beyond the 
control of the department. 

Twenty-one complaints were made against the scavenger service, in 
each case the proper parties w-ere notified and relief afforded. 

Twenty-nine persons were found throwing garbage in the back 
streets and lake and were warned against the practice. 

Private swill collectors have been warned 53 times to be neater in 
their work. 

Twenty-seven dead animals have been projierly di.sposed of. 

One hundred and seventj'-eight hens and small animals have been 
removed from cellars. 

Sixty-seven swine and cows have been discovered being kept within 
the sanitary limits of the city without licenses. The same were 
ordered removed or licenses procured. 

Twenty notices have been prepared and served and proper returns 
made. 

Forty-six catch-basins or street cesspools have been inspected, and 
35 have been flushed or repaired by order of this department. 

A sanitary inspection has been made of 22 bakeshops and 3 stores. 
Theatres have been inspected 3 times, circuses 2, and sausage factories 
20 times. 

The dumps have been inspected 35 times. 

One hundi-ed and sixty-six nuisances not otherwise classified have 
been abated through the efforts of this department. 

Householders have been given 5 permits to clean their own vaults. 

Fermits to the number of 1,660 have been granted for the burial and 
removal of dead bodies, and the returns forwarded to the city regis- 
trar. 

A statement of mortality has been prepared each month and copies 
sent to about two hundred and fifty other towns and cities to local 
physicians, etc. 

Weekly reports of contagious diseases have been sent to the state 
board of health at Concord and the Marine hospital service at Wash- 
ington, D. C. Nineteen samples of w^ater and 12 samples of oysters 
were sent to the state laboratory for analysis. Four hundred and 
fifteen samples of milk were collected. 

Contagious and infectious diseases have been reported as follows: 
Measles 859, diphtheria 132, typhoid fever 51, scarlet fever 53, membra- 
nous croup 15, smallpox 1, total 1,111. 

Nine hundred and thirty-four of these cases were reported by phy- 
sicians, 147 by householders, and 30 were discovered by the inspectors. 

The inspectors were unable to trace the cause in 524 cases, in 576 



IIEPORT OF THIi: BOARD OF HEALTH. 257 

cases the connection with some previous case was clearly traceable. 
Ten cases were contracted outside of the city and in one case it was 
reasonable to attribute the cause to insanitary surroundings. 

In some cases disinfectants were being- used and the inspectors 
ordered their use in other cases. At most of these places instructions 
were given as to their use, and in many cases the department fur- 
nished the disinfectants. 

In some cases patients were found well isolated, and in other cases 
inspectors were obliged to order isolation, and in all cases to give in- 
structions as to the steps to be taken. Ten people were found break- 
ing quarantine. 

Houses were watched to see that the rules of isolation were complied 
with, and 17 funerals were attended to prevent a too public observance 
of the same. 

Two schoolhouses were tested for ventilation. 

One thousand one hundred and ninety rooms where diseases had 
existed were fumigated by the inspectors. 

About 3,000 pamphlets issued by the state board of health have been 
distributed in localities where contagious diseases existed. 

The shores of Lake Massabesic were patroled by the inspectors on 
Sundays, holidays, and through the week during the summer season. 

Two persons were arrested for swimming in the lake. 

Ice fields from which ice was being cut were inspected and several 
picnics and band concerts were attended to prevent the careless dis- 
posal of waste and rubbish in the lake or on its shores. 

Eespectfully submitted, 
JOHN F. LOONEY, 
WILLIAM B. BLAKE, 

Sanitary Inspectors. 



EEPOET 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



IN Board of School Cojlmittke, 

December 29, 1905. 

The Superintendent presented his annual report to the committee, 
and it was accepted. 

Voted, That the report by the superintendent be accepted and 
adopted as the report of the board, and that it be transmitted to the 
city councils for publication in the annual City Report. 

HARRY L. DAVIS, 

Cl€rk. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



Organization, 1905. 

SCHOOL, COMMITTEE. 



EUGENE E. REED, Mayor, 
G. I. HASELTON, 



Chairman, ex officio. 
President of Common Council, ex officio. 



Ward 1. Elmer D. Goodwin. 

James A. Sayers. 
Ward 2. J. W. Johnston. 

Will C. Heath. 
Ward 3. Joel S. Daniels. 

Frank L. Downs. 
Ward 4. Nathaniel L. Colby. 

I. N. Cox. 
Ward 5. John F. Lee. 

Dennis F. O'Neil. 
Ward 6. Eugene B. Dunbar. 

Harry L. Davis. 
Ward 7. Edward B. Woodbury. 

Edson S. Heath. 
Ward S. Walter B. Mitchell. 

Frank A. Cadwell. 
Ward 9. Alarie Gauthier. 

Joseph Doucet. 
Ward 10. Henry W. Barnard. 

Michael J. Moran. 



VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

EDWARD B. WOODBURY. 

C1.ERK OF THE BOAKD. 

HARRY L. DAVIS. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

CHARLES W. BICKFORD. 

SUPERINTENDENT'S CLEBK. 

FANNIE L. SANBORN. 
261 



262 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

TRVANT OFFICER. 

CUETIS W. DAVIS. 

STAJTOING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — Mayor Eeed, Messrs. Haselton, Davis, Woodburj-, and Cad- 
well. 
Solai'ies. — Messrs. O'Xeil, Cox, and W. C. Heath. 
Tcrt-BooJcs. — Messrs. Cox, Woodburj', Dunbar, and Mitchell. 
Music. — ^Messrs. W. C. Heath, Barnard, and Colbj*. 
Draicing. — Messrs. E. S. Heath, Sayers, and Downs. 
Manual Training. — Messrs. Johnston, Goodwin, and E. S. Heath. 
Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Colby, Johnston, and Moran. 
Fuel. — Mr. Mitchell, Mhyor Reed, Messrs. Haselton, Lee, and Daniels. 
Repairs. — Messrs. Davis, Gauthier, and Lee. 
Ait€ndancc.—'is,les,sr&. Downs, Gauthier, and Goodwin. 
Health. — Messrs. Dunbar, Barnard, and Doucet. 

SUB-COMaUTTEE8. 

High. — ^Messrs. Colby, Cox, Dunbar, E. S. Heath, and Goodwin. 
FrauMin-strect. — Messrs. Woodbury, Davis, and Lee. 
Spring-.'^trect. — Messrs. O'Xeil, Dunbar, and WoodburJ^ 
Lincoln-street and Youngsville. — ^Messrs. Cox, Lee, and W. C. Heath. 
Ash-street and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Goodwin, Downs, and Gauth- 
ier. 

Webster-street and Starlc. — Messrs. Johnston, Mitchell, and Moran. 

Bakersvillc and Mosquito Pond. — Messrs. Downs, Johnston, and Doucet. 

Tarney.- — Messrs. Mitchell, ^Moran, and Cox. 

Hallsvillc and Harvey. — Messrs. Davis, Doucet, and Daniels. 

Rimmon. — Messrs. Gauthier, E. S. Heath, and Barnard. 

Training School. — Messrs. W. C. Heath, Woodbury, and Johnston. 

Main-street. — Messrs. Cadwell, Goodwin, and Saj-ers. 

Pa7-ker. — Messrs. Doucet, W^. C. Heath, and ^Mitchell. 

Wilson. — Messrs. Dunbar, Gauthier, and Cadwell. 

&7r« jr.— Messrs. E. S. Heath, O'Neil, and Colby. 

Amoskeag. — Messrs. Sayers, Barnard, and Downs. 

Gaffe's Falls. — Messrs. Barnard, Cadwell, and O'Xeil. 

Pearl-street. — Messrs. Daniels, Saj^ers, and E. S. Heath. 

Highland. — Messrs. Moran, Daniels, and Johnston. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Lee, Colby, and Davis. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Board, the City Councils, and the Citizens of Manchester : 

The following is presented as the annual report of the school de- 
partment for the school year 1904-05. It is the fifty-ninth of the 
department as a whole and the fiftieth of a superintendent. 



The city has maintained during- the past year the equivalent of 
fourteen rooms of high School grade, thirty-eight of grammar grade, 
thirty of middle grade, forty-four of primarj^ grade, one partially grad- 
ed, five ungraded rooms, and one kindergarten, a total of one hundred 
and thirt^'-three schools. In all of these separate registers have been 
kept. There has also been maintained a manual training school of 
two rooms in the Lowell-street building, but these two rooms may 
not be classed as separate schools, because the difi'erent boys compos- 
ing them were registered and their attendance records kept in the 
various schools of the city. 

A school, in the eyes of the state department of public instruction, 
is every group of pupils for which a separate register is kept. This 
definition will not admit of the duplication of schools by registering 
the same group of pupils in two or more registers at the same time 
and counting them as separate schools. The city, however, so far as 
expense is concerned, has supported the equivalent of one hundred 
thirtjr-five schools during the school year. 

This total, one hundred thirtj^-five schools of all grades, is the 
same as for 1903-04. Changes in grade have occurred, however, as 
follows: in the high school, because of the emploj-ment of one less 
teacher, a decrease from fifteen to fourteen rooms; in the grammar 
schools an increase of one, from thirty-seven to thirty-eight rooms, 
due to the raising of the grade of the higher middle in the Straw 
school for one half of the year and to the opening of an extra room 
in the Lincoln-street school for one half of the year; in the middle 
schools, an increase of three, due to changes in grade at the Varney 
and Straw and to the opening of an extra room for one half of the 
year at the Ash-street; in the primary schools, a decrease of three, 
due to the abolition of one school in the Spring-street building, a 
change in grade at the Varney school, and the discontinuance of the 
extra primary room at the Wilson building. 

263 



264 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ATTENDAJSXE. 

In these one hundred and thirty-three schools keeping separate 
registers, there have been enrolled five thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one pupils, a number smaller than for each of the preceding 
three years. 

In 1904, 5,920 were enrolled; in 190.1, 0,013; in 1902, 6,123. The enroll- 
ment, therefore, is 282 less than for the largest year in the history 
of the schools and 79 less than for last year. 

The average membership for the year has been 4,817, a number sur- 
passed but twice in the history of the schools, first in 1902, when it 
was 4,876, and again in 1904, when it was 4,889, 72 greater than for 
1905. The average membership for the past term has been 4,960, far 
larger than ever before, and marking the high water point in our 
school history up to the present time. 

The average daily attendance for 1904-05 has been 4,412, a number 
exceeded as was the average membership but twice before and then 
in 1902 and 1904 by sixtj'-eight and seventy-one pupils respectively. 
The term just closed has again shown the largest dally attendance in 
our school records, there having been present every day 4,666 pupils. 

The average enrollment per room for the jear has been forty-four 
pupils, the average membership thirty-six pupils, and the average 
daily attendance thirty-four pupils. These are averages. As a matter 
of fact seventy-five schools exceeded these figures and fifty-eight have 
just equalled or fallen below them. 

The largest grammar school was the Varney, second division, with 
a membership of fifty-one pupils; the smallest, the Rimmon first and 
second divisions, with a membership of fifteen pupils. Three middle 
schools, two in the Varney and one in the Hallsville building, averaged 
forty-eight pupils, while in the Spring-street building, the average in 
the same grade was twenty-three pupils. The largest primary school 
was the Hallsville lower, with sixty pupils, and the smallest, the 
Highland primary, with twenty-three pupils. The smallest school in 
the city was the. Webster's Mills, suburban, with an average mem- 
bership of nine and a daily attendance of eight pupils. 

The following table shows the increases and decreases in member- 
ship of the various school buildings: 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



265 



TABLE NO. I. 

AVERAGE MEMBERSHIP OF THE VARIOUS SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

FOR THE PAST TWO YEARS, SHOWING FLUCTUATIONS 

IN ATTENDANCE. 



SCHOOLS. 



1905. 



Increase 

or 
decrease. 



High 


401 

259 

379 

408 

373 

313 

224 

432 

183 

369 

203 

190 

144 

98 

157 

332 

177 

50 

83 

88 

2G 


423 
2G9 
406 
443 
370 
296 
218 
373 
173 
315 
209 
202 
M8 
101 
155 
319 
168 
52 
87 
88 
32 


4-22 
+10 
+27 
+35 
— 3 






Asl) street 




Webster-Street 


—17 




-- 6 


Hallsville . . 


—59 




—10 


W ilson 


—54 


Parker 


+ 6 
+13 
—26 


Straw 




+ 3 




Main-street 


13 


Pearl-street 


9 


Highland 


+ 2 
-i- 4 




Ungraded 






+ 6 




Total 


4,889 


4,817 









Bjr this table it is seen that ten schools gained in membership, 
the gains aggregating one hundred and twenty-seven pupils; ten 
lost in membership, the losses aggregating one hundred ninety-nine 
pupils, the net result being a loss of seventy-two pupils, the difference 
between the membership for 1904 and that for 1905. 

The largest gains are found in the Ash-street, thirty-five pupils; 
the Lincoln-street, twenty-seven pupils; in both of which buildings 
it became necessary to open extra rooms, and in the high school, 
where the gain was twenty-two pupils. 

In the column of losses the Hallsville leads with a decrease of fiftj'- 



266 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

nine pupils; the Wilson follows with a loss of fifty-four; the Spring-- 
street shows a diminution of twenty-six, and but four teachers were 
employed where five had formerly taught. The fluctuations in the 
other buildings are not especially significant, and are such as may 
occur from year to j^ear through changes of residence. 

The decreases in membership in the Hallsville and Wilson buildings 
may be attributed to the opening of the school in connection with St. 
Anthony's parish in the fall of 1904. This permitted the extra room 
in the Wilson school to be dispensed with, and partially relieved the 
crowded condition of the Hallsville building. 

Upon the whole the decrease throughout the city has averaged 
about one half a pupil per room. 

The number of tardinesses in all the schools has been eight thou- 
sand one hundred and forty-seven, a very slight increase over the 
number for one jear ago. The subjoined table shows the record of 
the different buildings for the past three years. The Main-street, 
with an average of eighteen hundredths of one per cent, has been the 
banner school, and I take this opportunitj' to publicly commend the 
record. Eight other schools, the Bakersville, Rimmon, Straw, Spring- 
street, Amoskeag, ^lerrimack-street, I'earl-street, and Highland de- 
serve honorable mention for lessening of this evil. 



REPORT OF THE SUPEIMNTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



267 



Schools. 



Per Cent of Tardinesses. 



High 

Franklin-street ... 
Lincoln-street — 

Ash-street 

'Varney 

Webster street, ... 

Bakersville 

Hallsville 

liimnion 

Wilson 

Parker 

Straw 

Spring street 

Amoskeag 

Merrimack-street 

Main-street 

Pearl-street 

Highland 

Goffe's Falls 

Ungraded 



1.16-1- 

.49+ 
.Ti+ 
.24+ 
.2-2+ 
.29 + 
.48+ 
.GG+ 
.47+ 
.38+ 
.23+ 
■47+ 
1.00+ 
2.09+ 
.73 + 
.25 + 
..^4+ 
.4.0+ 
.57+ 
3.43 



.84+ 
.45+ 
.40+ 
.23+ 
.14+ 
.31 + 
.48+ 
.43+ 
.06+ 
.18— 
.32— 
.84 + 
.55+ 

1.G8+ 
.89+ 
.23+ 

1.0S+ 
.46+ 
.90+ 

2 02 



.91 + 
.45+ 
.38+ 
.25+ 
.22+ 
.36+ 
.35+ 
.49+ 
.60+ 
.25+ 
.25+ 
.22+ 
.46+ 

1.40-r 

.59+ 

.18+ 
.46+ 
.40+ 
.78+ 
3.10+ 



GROWTH OF SCHOOLS IN TWENTY YEARS. 







,« 






_i 


- 


- 


_: 
















SB 


o 




s o 


£ i> 


Ch 




'C 




.rH 


a = 




;; ° 


? .^ 


■^ 




CS 


ffl . 


-4 






C o 


c o 


f 


o 


i, an 


ai 


■;? 


«g 


Years. 


oj to 


C o 


® o 


« rf 


eS 


_, o 






go 


2 a 


fct-r 


So 

fi m 


1» 


2^ 






<s -< 


^ T- 


V H 


ajS 


^?^ 










> ^ 


> s 


>a 


>1i 


.^ 


fl 






<^ 


<^ 


<- 


<=" 


^a..-3 


d 


W 


<)- - 


1885 


75 


73 


2725 


2430 


98 


89 


71 


163 


1895 


105 


111 


3817 


3499 


16S 


1£6 


112 


243 


1905 


133 


150 


4S17 


4412 


247 


226 


168 


423 



268 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The subjoined table shows the growth of the school sj'stem in the 
past twenty years. 

In the year 1885 the city maintained seventy-five schools. During 
the following ten j'ears these were increased by thirty, raising the 
number to one hundred and five. During the next ten years twenty- 
eight rooms were opened, giving a total of one hundred and thirty- 
three schools at the close of June, 1905. The average increase has 
thus been almost three schools per year. The average number of 
teachers in 1885 was seventy-three, increased from 1885 to 1895 by 
thirty-eight, raising the number to one hundred and eleven; the decade 
1895-1905 increased this number by thirty-nine, so that the average 
number of teachers for 1905 was one hundred and fifty. 

While the schools have increased by fifty-eight, the number of 
teachers has increased by seventy-seven. The greater increase of 
teachers may be accounted for by the fact that since 1885 all of our 
special instructors, except the supervisor of music, have begun work, 
also since that time master's assistants have been employed for the 
large grammar buildings, an assistant has been employed in the train- 
ing school for teachers; the teaching force in the high school has been 
greatly augmented, and again some rooms have required the services 
of two teachers and but one register has been kept between them. 

During the same time, the average membership of the schools has 
grown from two thousand seven hundred and twenty-five to four 
thousand eight hundred and seventeen, an increase of two thousand 
and ninety-two. 

The average number of pupils per school in 1SS5 was thirty-six; in 
1895 was thirty-six, and the number has been the same, thirty-six, for 
1905. 

The averages for other years show substantially the same figures 
and fluctuate about the number thirty-six. The increase of pupils 
divided by the increase of schools also gives the same qiiotient, thirty- 
six. 

It would therefore seem to be a fair assumption that an increase of 
about thirty-six pupils in average membership calls for the establish- 
ment of a new school. 

The number of graduates from our grammar schools twenty years 
ago was ninetj'-eight. Last June two hundred and forty-seven re- 
ceived diplomas at the hands of the school board, an increase of 
more than one hundred and fiftj--two per cent. 

Of the ninety-eight pupils graduated from the grammar schools in 
1885 eighty-nine were eligible for the high school, and sevent\--one 
actually entered that institution. Of the two hundred and forty-seven 
graduated last June two hundred and twenty-six were eligible 
for the high school, and one hundred and sixty-eight entered the 
same. At the beginning of this period the average membership of 
the high school was one hundred and sixty-three; twenty- j-ears later 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 269 

it was four hundred and twenty-three, an increase of over two hun- 
dred and twenty per cent. 

To summarize these data: in twenty years the average membership 
of the schools lias increased by eighty-six per cent, the number of 
schools by seventy-four per cent, the number of graduates from the 
grammar schools by one hundred and fifty-two per cent, the average 
membership of the high school by two hundred and twent}- per cent. 

In 1885 3.6 — per cent of the total membership of the schools grad- 
uated from the grammar schools; in 1905 5.1+ per cent of the mem- 
bership of the schools graduated from the grammar grades. Com- 
paring these on the same 'basis, and that a basis of a thousand pupils, 
for every thirty-six pupils graduated from the grammar schools in 
1885 fifty-one graduated from the same in 1905. 

EXPEXSE. 

The sum available for the maintenance of the schools in 1885 was 
$55,497.42. The sum available for 1905, exclusive of the appropriation 
for the new Chandler school, was $145,725.00. 

By far the largest individual item in each case was for teachers' 
salaries. Of the first appropriation $40,472.82 was available to pay the 
salaries of seventy-three teachers; of the second appropriation $98,000 
was available for the salaries of one hundred and fifty teachers. A 
simple arithmetical operation will show that the salaries of the 
present teachers average 17.8 per cent higher than those of twenty 
years ago. 

A comparison of the cost of living at the present time with the 
cost in the year 1885 will readily determine whether or not our 
teachers are any better paid relatively than they were at the lower 
salaries. 

SCHOOL CENSUS. 

In the month of September, as required by law, a census of the 
children of school age was taken in the city. There were reported 
5,707 boys, 5,871 girls, a total of 11,578 children between the ages of 
five and sixteen j^ears. Of these 8,515 were born in Xew Hampshire, 
1,377 were born elsewhere in the United States, 1,669 were born in 
foreign countries, and of 34 the places of birth were unknown. 

-Thirty-four were reported as illiterate, and 1,095 were reported as 
not in school. 

About one hundred and fiftj' cards were found showing upon their 
faces some inconsistency or violation of the law. These were re- 
ferred to the truant officer, Mr. Curtis W. Davis, and by him have been 
investigated. In manjr cases erroneous returns have been corrected. 
Otherwise the truant officer's report of cases investigated stands as 
follows: Number sent to school or found in school, 74; number un- 
avoidably detained, 34; number given emploj'ment certificates, 17; 



270 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

number found to be over sixteen years of ag-e, 2; feeble minded, 1; 
excluded because of tuberculosis, 1; not found, 4; not found because 
said to have left town, 10, and one child reported illiterate was found 
not so to be. 

AOCOilMODATIONS. 

In respect to school accommodation, the city stands where it stood 
one year ago, with the exception that the Wilson district has been 
wholly relieved of its siirijlus pupils, and that the Hallsville has been 
partially relieved. In regard to this latter building-, I recommend 
that a primary school be opened in the old school building- situated 
on Massabesc street and now used as a hose house. A primar\' school 
of forty pupils in this building- will afford at the present time all the 
relief needed for the Hallsville school. 

The new Chandler school, in process of construction, will relieve 
the Lincoln-street, Ash-street, and Pearl-street districts. It is im- 
possible at this time to foretell the number of rooms that will be 
needed at the opening of this building; four may be named as the 
minimum num'ber, with seven for the maximum. 

In Februarj- of the present school jear, in order to relieve the lower 
grades of the Webster-street school and of the Ash-street school the 
precincts of the Straw building were extended on the north to Salmon 
street, on the east to Smith road. Beech and Union streets. But six 
rooms in the Straw building are now occupied, and to continue the 
work of relief it will be necessary to open another room in this 
building at the beginning of the second semester, Januarj' 29, 1906. 
This school now covers the work of six and one half j'ears. The 
opening of a new room will admit of doing .seven iull years' work 
during the coming semester, and relieve a crowded middle school 
containing forty-nine pupils of one of its three classes. 

The Eimmon school, as heretofore, employs six teachers in four 
rooms, and covers the entire nine years' course of study. This is 
manifestly unfair to the people of th&. district in which the school is 
located, and, although the work is done as well as it can be done under 
the circumstances, with a sufficient number of rooms it might be 
improved upon. The betterment of this state of affairs should engage 
the early attention of the citj' councils. 

In the Main-street school the work of six years is covered. Upon 
the completion of this period the pupils are transferred to the Varney 
or to the Eimmon school, according to residence. By far the larger 
part of these pupils attend the Varnej'. The result of this has been 
a crowding of the Varney school to such an extent that it has become 
necessary to open an extra room in the hall of that building. Four- 
teen hundred feet to the south of the Varney school is the Parker 
school, with two unoccupied rooms. The logical method of relief 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 271 

would seem to be a cliang-e of school precinct boundaries and Ihe 
opening- of these vacant rooms. They will provide present relief and 
accommodations for some time to come. Should this plan not be con- 
sidered wise, it is possible to enlarge the Varney school by raising 
the roof on the ell at the south of the building, and thus provide two 
more rooms. I am informed that the building was constructed with 
this idea in mind to meet such a future contingency, and that because 
it was so constructed the cost of making the alteration would not be 
excessive. 

The Youngsville alone among the suburban schools has had an 
excess of pupils during the past year. A few of these were trans- 
ferred to the city schools, and to provide for the remainder an extra 
teacher was employed for a portion of the year. It has been neces- 
sary to follow this latter plan during the term just past. Excellent 
work is done and the arrangement works well. 

I recommend that this board ask of the city council an appropria- 
tion for school furniture sufficient to furnish new rooms in the 
Parker and Straw schools, and also to purchase additional desks for 
the high school should the increase in this building be as great as 
it has been during the present year. 

A reference to the table "Growth of the Schools," on page 267, will 
show that from 18S5 to 1895 the average membership of the schools 
increased by one thousand and sixty-nine; from 1895 to 1905 it 
increased by one thousand. The schools, therefore, for the past 
twenty years have averaged to increase by about one hundred pupils 
per year. The exact figures are one hundred and four and three-fifths. 
With these figures as a basis the city should expect and be prepared 
to erect one eight-room building or its equivalent every four years. 
Assuming the average cost of such a structure to be $36,000, the aver- 
age cost of the Parker, Wilson, Straw, Hallsville, and the new. Chand- 
ler, reckoned at $42,000, the annual cost to the taxpayers of the city 
will be $9,000. A provident administration of affairs would suggest 
the propriety of providing for this annual increase in advance and 
levying a tax each year sufficient to meet the needs of .the year. The 
fund thus accumulated should be known as the "school building sink- 
ing fund," and should be used by the city government upon applica- 
tion from the school board to provide new and replace old buildings 
as the needs of the city shall require. 

Excessive taxation in any one year may thus he avoided. The 
issuing of bonds to meet present necessities and the consequent 
shifting of the burden of the present to the future may- also be 
avoided, and additional school accommodations may be secured with- 
out delay when the need for them shall arise. An increased tax of 
twenty-six one hundredths of a mill on the dollar at the present 
valuation of the city would procure this sum. 



272 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I suggest that this matter be presented to the city councils in con- 
nection with the annual ai^propriation for 1906. 

CHANGES ANB TRANSFEKS, 

Changes and transfers among the teachers have been many. Mr. 
Adoljih Schumacher resigned his position as teacher of modern lan- 
guages in the high school. To provide for an increase of pupils and 
to fill this vacancy two teachers were elected by the board, Mr. Arthur 
E. Buck and Miss Bertha Blanchet. 

At the middle of the year it became necessary to open an extra 
room in the Lincoln-street school, and ^Ilss Jennie Elizabeth Cate 
Avas elected teacher of the same. At the close of the year Mr. F. L. Y. 
Spaulding, after ten years of successful work in the educational field 
of Manchester, resigned his position as master of the Lincoln-street 
school to take up more lucrative emplojrnent. Mr. Louis H. Bailey, 
formerly principal of the Rimmon school, was transferred to the 
Lincoln-street building, and Mr. Percy N. Folsom of the Goffe's Falls 
school in turn filled the vacancy caused by the transfer of Mr. Bailey. 

Miss Josephine L. Riddle was elected teacher of the lower middle 
grade at the Ash-street building in place of Miss Catherine J. Ferren, 
transferred to the Webster's Mills school. Miss Ferren later tendered 
her resignation, and Miss Blanche Corning was elected to the Web- 
ster's Mills school. 

The vacancy at the Webster-street school caused by the death of 
Miss Edith Hammond was filled by the promotion of Miss Jean Gillan 
of the next lower grade, her place in turn being taken by Miss Marcia 
Moore, transferred from the Varney school. The vacancy in the third 
division of the Webster-street school, created by the promotion of Miss 
Alta Willand to the principalship of the StraAv school, in place of 
Miss Gove resigned, was filled by the transfer of Miss Alice M. Lamp- 
rey from the higher middle at the Franklin-street, Miss' Lura K. 
Kimpton of the Youngsville school being in turn transferred to the 
Franklin-street, and Miss Cora Webb being placed in charge of the 
Youngsville school in place of !Miss Kimpton for the remainder of the 
year. 

At the Yarnej' school Miss Gertrude Adams was promoted to the 
vacanc3' caused by the transfer of Miss Moore to the Webster-street, 
and Miss Irma B. True was placed in charge of Miss Adams' room. 
Upon the resignation of Miss True at the end of the year Miss Bessie 
Leckie was elected teacher of this, the higher primary room. 

Miss Florence Francis of the Hallsville building tendered her res- 
ignation at the close of the school year, and the extra room main- 
tained by, the city on Massabesic street being closed. Miss Martha J. 
Kennedy filled the vacancy caused by Miss Francis' retirement. 

Miss Irene Nichols served as teacher of the third and fourth divi- 
sions at the Rimmon school for one term and was followed by Miss 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 273 

Blanche Hicken of the same building, promoted from the higher 
primary grade. Miss Frain succeeded to Miss Hicken's grade, and 
Miss M. Eunice Willand was chosen to teach the lower primary school. 

Miss Gertrude Porter tendered her resignation as teacher of the 
lower primary grade of the Wilson school in March last, and Miss 
Blanche Br3^ant was elected to the position thus vacated. 

Miss Ethel Currier of the Main-street school tendered her resigna- 
tion at the close of the fall term, and Miss Mary O'Dowd was chosen 
teacher in her place. 

At the Pearl-street school Miss Nellie Dunnington was elected 
teacher of the lower primary school in place of Miss Susie L. Dodge, 
resigned. 

Miss Mary Kichardson of the Amoskeag school resigned at the close 
of the school year, and Miss Marion Partridge of the same building 
was transferred to the Mosquito Pond school. These vacancies were 
filled by the election of Miss'es Bessie M. Abbott and Alice E. Good. 

The vacancy at the Goffe's Falls school, created by the transfer of 
Mr. Folsom to the Rimmon school, was filled by the promotion of 
Miss Maude Greaney, Miss Edith Murphy in turn being advanced a 
grade, and the resultant vacancy filled by the election of Miss Jennie 
McLaughlin. 

At the Highland school Miss Laurette McKendree was elected 
teacher of the primary school in place of Miss Helen Townsend re- 
signed. 

At the Youngsville school Miss Webb tendered her resignation at 
the close of the school year, and Miss Annabelle F. Landers was 
transferred from the Mosquito Pond school to fill the vacancy. Be- 
cause of the number of classes and pupils in this building. Miss Jennie 
V. Williamson has been employed during the past fall as assistant to 
Miss Landers. 

MANUAL TRAINING. 

During the past five years the manual training school has increased 
in enrollment from two hundred and seventy-seven to three hundred 
and forty, the average membership from two hundred and thirty-six 
to two hundred and ninety-five. At the present time the average 
membership is three hundred and two. Heretofore the work of the 
school has been carried on in two rooms. With the employment of 
an additional teacher, as voted by the board at the November meet- 
ing, three rooms will be used, a drawing class being accommodated 
in the east room of the second floor of the building. 

The west room on the second floor still remains to be utilized for 
the work of the school. The increase in teaching force in the school 
will give the principal an opportunity to extend and perfect the 
course in both wood and metal work, a task to which he has been 
and is now devoting long hours daily. 
13 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL llEPOKTS. 

I' I 

The report of this body one 3'ear ago called attention to the need . 
of machinery for the better prosecution of the work of the school. 
The transfer of the benches, now in one of the lower rooms of the 
building, to an upstairs room will afford ample opportunity for the 
installation of heavy machinery for some time to come. 

Nothing during the present year has been added to the permanent 
equipment of the school. The stock of tools has lieen kept in the best 
of order, a few old wooden planes having been replaced by planes of 
iron, and other minor purchases made. 

The greatest needs, as stated one year ago, are a bench or band saw, 
one half the cost of which could be saved in one year through the, 
economical preparation of stock for the pupils' use, a small shaper, 
and a ten-inch engine lathe for the metal working department. I am 
informed that the total cost of these machines would be $435. 

Again I would urge the extension of manual training to the pupils 
of the third and fourth divisions. Pujiils of these grades have not 
the strength to use the tools provided at the manual training school, 
and a two years' course of Sloj-d work would be a most excellent 
preparation for the Russian form of work as carried on at the Lowell- 
street building. This work could be done at the ditferent buildings 
weekly, in short periods, at a comparativelj- small expense. 

While cooking is not prescribed in our course for the public schools, 
the pupils of two ninth grades do receive instruction in this art. 

At the request of Miss J03' of the Wilson school, this board during 
the year provided a gas stove for that school, since which time cook- 
ing lessons have been regularlj- given. The Hallsville school as here- 
tofore has continued the work in this line. 

KI>-DEEGAUTEX. 

For two jears the city has maintained a kindergarten in the 
Spring-street building. Forty-eight children were enrolled last year. 
Forty have been registered during the past fall. The average mem- 
bership has been thirty-eight. 

A kindergarten requires liiore room for the successful prosecution 
of its work than does a primary school of the same number of pupils. 
These figures represent the limit of the capacity of the present kinder- 
garten room. The room is crowded when all the pupils are present. 

Either the kindergarten is a profitable investment and the idea de- 
cierves broader carrying out, or it is not profitable and should be dis- 
continued. My personal belief is that it is profitable and that its 
advantages should be given to other sections of the city. The Straw, 
Parker, and new Chandler schools all offer opportunities for its 
extension. It would seem no more than just that the section of the 
city on the west bank of the river should be given a kindergarten as 
well as that on the east, and I recommend the opening of such a 
school on the west side of the river. 



REPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 275 
TRAINING SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS. 

Four young ladies were graduated from this institution in June 
last. All of these are now engaged with marked success in the work 
of teaching. 

A departure from the usual custom in graduating exercises was 
made by Miss Wing, the principal of the school. These exercises were 
held in the chapel of the Hanover-street church and were concluded 
by an address to the young ladies from Hon. H. C. Morrison, state 
superintendent of public instruction. 

During the last term of the year Miss Annabelle F. Landers of the 
Mosquito Pond school taught the lower primary room in this build- 
ing in place of Miss Bryant, transferred to the Wilson school, to fill 
the vacancy caused by the resignation of Miss Porter. 

Three young ladies composed the junior class last year— now the 
senior class. This number has been insufficient to care for the four 
rooms in the building, and Miss Alice Walsh has been employed to 
teach the lower primary room. 

The school has been raised one year in grade and now covers full 
five years of work. To accomplish the most for the city it should 
include the work of all grades. These reports have previously advo- 
cated the transfer of this school to a larger building, having more 
years of work, and another most opportune chance to accomplish this 
will occur with the opening of the new Chandler school. I suggest 
this matter again for your consideration. 

The committee at the close of June admitted to the school seven 
young ladies instead of four, as has been the custom of late. One of 
these, however, is to graduate with the senior class, the other six 
compose the junior class. In my opinion the work of the school is 
thoroughly, carefully, and efficiently done. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

The growth of the high school has already been touched upon in 
the paragraphs upon the "attendance" and the "growth" of the 
schools. The periods there spoken of were annual. The membership 
of the school during the past term also deserves to ibe mentioned. 
This has reached the high mark of four hundred and ninety as against 
the four hundred and twenty-three before mentioned, an increase of 
sixty-seven. Any further like increase of pupils will necessitate the 
furnishing of more rooms with desks, hence the recommendation in 
school accommodations for an appropriation to secure more desks 
should they be needed. 

Mr. Herrick reports to me that the bookkeeping class numbers 
sixty-eight, the stenography and typewriting class one hundred and 
sixty-one, and the commercial arithmetic class ninety-four, the last 
two being larger than ever before. The purchases of typewriters 



276 ANNUAL OFFICIAI, REPORTS. 

and the equipping of the bookkeeping' department with appropriate 
desks have greatly facilitated the work of the business course. 

Nearly all the teachers in the school report larger divisions, as 
should be expected with an increased membership. 

The announcement by the colleges of the new and broader require- 
ments in English, to go into effect in 1909, will render necessary the 
adoption of certain English and American classics in addition to those 
already in the school. I give here the list of those needed: Franklin's 
Autobiography, Emerson's Essays, Washington's Farewell Address, 
Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration, and Palgrave's Golden Treasury. 
It will be seen that four of these are American. 

In the Latin divisions the pupils are practically prepared for the 
study of Caesar in two-thirds of the time formerlj- taken to effect this 
same preparation. This gain is a decided advantage to the pupils and 
to the school. 

Mr. McLaren of the physics department represents to me the urgent 
need of the adoption of a physics note book for the advanced classes 
in this study, and I am convinced of the need of the same. The 
matter will be brought to your attention in the form of a recommen- 
dation at an early date. • 

I find upon the whole a decided sentiment at the present time in 
favor of the plan recently put into operation whereby algebra and 
geometry are taught simultaneously through the first two years 
instead of pursuing each for one year, as formerly'. An intelligent 
verdict, however, cannot be given upon the matter till the plan shill 
have been fully carried out. 

The reduction of the number of periods of required prepared work 
in the fourth class from nineteen to sixteen per week during the past 
year has been along the line of recommendations previouslj- made in 
these reports. A further reduction in other classes, even though it 
may lead to a lengthening of the high school course in some cases, is in 
my opinion to be desired. 

The detail work in conducting an organization as complex as the 
high school, the keeping of records, the care of books and supplies, 
the correspondence, minor matters in themselves, yet vital to the well- 
conducted institution, and aside from the work of instruction are 
sufficient to occupy the full time of one person, and I believe that 
it would be money well invested to hire a clerk to take charge of 
these matters. The principal will thus be enabled to devote more of 
his time to supervision, and thereby render more valuable service to 
the cit3\ 

The standard of scholarship in the school is high, and I am informed 
that the institution stands well in the estimation of the authorities 
of the colleges for which it prepares pupils. Its honor list in these 
institutions bears out these statements. In general I believe that the 
morale of the school is high, and that its influence in character build- 



EEPOKT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 277 

ing- is a good influence in the city. It is more important that the 
schools should graduate honest, honorable, fair-minded youths and 
maidens than that it should graduate scholars who are first and 
chiefly students. 



It is a pleasure to call your attention to the marked improve- 
ment in the music of our public schools. In no other subject in the 
curriculum has such an advance for the good been made. This may 
be attributed to two causes: first, very skillful supervision, and sec- 
ond, the adoption of the Natural Music System Harmonic Course. Of 
these two causes the first is the more important by far. The second, 
however, is contributory and important too, and has made possible 
improvement, which otherwise would not have occurred. The books 
have been in use one year. They are carefully graded, which is a 
most important consideration, and is merely another way of saying 
that they are exceedingly well planned. They afford variety, another 
important consideration, and they also provide an abundance of mate- 
rial, both in exercises and in songs. The choice of words and music 
in these latter shows the quality of the series and indicates the taste 
to be acquired by the pupils through the use of the books. 

As the person able to read and write transmutes the spoken sounds 
to written words, or the written words to spoken sounds, so the pupil 
well taught, with sense of hearing well trained, will transmute the 
musical sound to its written form upon the staff, and, conversely, 
will readily and should at sight translate the written form upon the 
staff into musical sounds. It is merely another language with a dif- 
ferent form of notation and fewer characters. 

The analogy between the teaching of reading and the teaching of 
singing is very strong. How absurd would it seem to teach a child 
through the ear alone certain verses or sentences, even though later 
the words were placed before him and he repeated them with the 
book open, perhaps by slow thought became able to pick out each 
separate word, and, going no further than this, maintain that the 
child has the power to read! Such teaching would fail almost entirely 
to co-ordinate the ideational, visual, auditory, and certain centers of 
muscular control in the brain by developing fibres to connect them. 

The printed form of the word suggests the oral form, this through 
association upon presentation, the impression is deepened by the 
action of the muscles used in producing the sound and still further 
by the action of writing the word. The word stands for an idea 
already in the child's mind, gained through some one of the senses 
and pertaining to a physical object, that is, it is based on experience. 

In the adult mind the written form is translated into the oral 
instantly by association, and this association means that the connect- 
ing fibres are fully and normally developed. The teaching of reading 



278 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

then on the physical brain side is a development of these associational 
nerve fibres. 

The teaching of singing should proceed upon the very same 'line. 
Accordingly, sense training, which means ear training, is the first 
work done. The sounds are distinguished, reproduced and constantly 
associated with the written forms. A great variety of exercises and 
an abundance of material are necessary for this work, as well as 
skill in the use of the material. All of these we have. The voices of 
all of the children in the higher middle and grammar schools have 
been tested. Records have been kept of these tests and instruction 
given accordingly. Much sight and individual singing is done. Chil- 
dren are as ready to sing alone as they have been formerly to read 
alone. Music is dictated, the children writing phrases as thej' are 
sung as formerly they wrote words from dictation. Volume of sound 
is not sought, quality of tone alone is the first consideration. In- 
crease of power has created increased interest, and increased interest 
has in turn helped to develop greater power. Interest arises from 
normal activity. Well has the past year's work illustrated this truth. 
~ The high school alone of all our schools has not been benefited by 
the introduction of new books for use in singing. The musical library 
in this school, however, has been increased by the purchase of two 
productions at a cost of one hundred and forty-eight dollars. This 
school still lacks suitable and sufficient music. In consultation with 
Mr. Abbott I find that there is a book published which will just supply 
this lack. The purchase of the book will obviate the necessity for 
further supplying sheet music to the pupils, and will besides provide 
suitable hymns for devotional exercises. I recommend to you the 
adoption of the Laurel Song Book for use in the high school. 

Several of the pianos in our schools have been in use almost from 
"the time when the memory of man runneth not to the contrarj." 
While the high school piano is not one of these, its quality of tone is 
such that it deserves first claim upon j-our attention, and more par- 
ticularly since the instrument is used to accompany the singing in 
this school to a greater extent than in any other. A new piano is 
greatly needed at this building. The same maj- be said in regard 
to the Franklin-street, Rimmon and Bakersville schools. I suggest 
that this board ask of the citj- councils an appropriation for the pur- 
chase of pianos for the public schools. 

COUKSE OF STUDY AND GRADING. 

The present course of study for the elementary schools covers a 
period of nine jears. Promotions or changes from grade to grade are 
made semi-annually. The classes of the different grades are desig- 
nated by the letters of the alphabet from A to R, A being the most 
advanced grammar class and R being the class of pupils entering 
school for the first time. From the A class pupils are advanced to the 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 279 

liigh school once each year, and accordingly class A is in existence 
only during- the latter half of each school year. Pupils of this grade 
who fall of admission to the high school repeat during one half of 
the year the work of the D class and then with the new A class repeat 
the work of the second half year. Accordingly a few pupils remain 
in the first division two years, a few one year and a half, and the 
great majority one year. The failure of the pupils first mentioned 
may be attributed generally to deficiencies in growth in the lower 
grades, due to the inflexibility of the system of grading and promo- 
tion, which in nearly all school systems does not admit of the advance- 
ment of the pupil according to his abilitj^ but restrains the more 
able and hurries the slower, accommodating itself only to the average 
of the class. These so called failures are of those who must be hur- 
ried to complete the work of the different half years, who do not 
need to repeat the whole period of work, and would 'be injured by 
being kept back, but simply need a few weeks more to complete the 
work of the grade. On the other hand, a certain per cent, perhaps 
twenty, could cover the work of the grade in a few weeks less time 
than the average of the school. 

The ideal system in respect to grading and promotion is that which 
will allow every pupil to advance just according to his ability, and 
the standard by which to measure the public schools is not so much 
the accomplishment of a few naturally the best endowed, as it is the 
opportunity afforded for every one to attain the fullest measure of 
growth according to his ability. The ratio of accomplishment to 
ability is the only proper measure for the pupil, and the opportunity 
for each to accomplish all that he can and at just the rate that he can 
IS the measure of the adaptation of the schools to the pupils and 
also the measure of the resultant benefit to the community at large. 
One advantage of the ungraded country schools is their opportunity 
for advancement according to accomplishment. 

The half yearly period of advancement is an improvement upon the 
yearly except in the highest grade, because a pupil failing to advance 
w'ith his class is set back but one half a year, or five school months 
of work. Various plans have been tried to break this "lock-step" 
system, as it is sometimes called. Batavia, New York, has solved it 
for herself through a plan of individual work with the pupils. Cam- 
bridge, Mass., has solved the problem for herself. There is no general 
agreement as to the best and most economical method. 

In our city the practice has been to doubly promote certain pupils, 
who, in the opinion of the teacher, have the ability to do the work of 
an advanced class, at the same time covering in a hasty manner, 
rarely not at all, the work or part of the work omitted. I do not 
now recall any case where there has been an error of judgment in 
doing this. Still it would be better for these pupils to cover all of 
the course if it were possible. 



280 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An extra teacher in the large buildings to work with such pupils 
would render possible more irregular promotions as well as help 
along many slower pupils. This would be expensive. Again shorter 
promotion periods would accomplish the same result. A readjust- 
ment of classes four times a year, instead of twice a j'ear, would lessen 
the evil. This, however, would involve three or more classes in a 
room, and such a number of classes would be a serious detriment to 
the work of the higher grades. A readjustment between grades once 
a year and of classes in a grade twice in half a year would it seems 
to me come nearer to accomplishing the purpose than any other plan 
of which I have learned. This would involve a readjustment of the 
course of study and would require considerable time to be put into 
operation. 

To accomplish this the course should be made one of eight years; 
pupils six years of age, or those attaining the age of six within three 
months of September first or February first, alone should be admitted 
in each half year to the beginners' class. There should be the work 
of one jear in each room, and promotions should be made when the 
work of a class has been covered. This would render necessary the 
division of the grade into two classes as now, but promotions would 
occur irregularly and readjustments among rooms at no specified 
times. It would be necessary to put the plan into operation and 
observe its working for some time in order to approximate to these 
times or lay them down definitely. The plan can easily be worked 
out in one building and then applied to the whole city. 

The nine year course in the elementary- schools is a Xew England 
idea. The eight year course is much more general throughout the 
country, and pupils admitted to school at the age of six advance quite 
as rapidly as those admitted at the age of five. 

I recommend the reduction of the course in the elementary' schools 
from nine to eight j-ears, and the admission of pupils at the age of 
six instead of at the age of five years, also the inauguration of a more 
flexible plan of grading and promotion. 

In order to graduate from the high school and receive its diploma 
it is necessary that a pupil shall have credit for sixteen studies. Cer- 
tain of these are prescribed, the remainder are elective. Music is 
now a prescribed study for all able to produce musical sounds. Dur- 
ing the entire four years of the course the same length of time is 
devoted to music as to physics, ancient historj', or the business course 
in the first year, for each of which one credit is allowed. This matter 
has been brought to mind bj- Mr. Abbott, the supervisor of music, and 
I suggest the advisability as well as the justice of allowing music to 
count one credit toward the diploma of the school. 

Several pupils in the fourth class of the high school failed to do the 
work necessary to continue in that institution and Avithdrew at the 
close of the first half j-ear. Each year a few pupils are refused admis- 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 281 

sion to the high school bj' the committee because the principals of the 
various grammar schools cannot recommend them, although they 
have finished the course and done their best. These pupils generally 
will not return to school unless admitted to the higher institution. 

These considerations lead me to suggest that for such pupils a 
special class, or rather division, in the high school be created, where 
they may be allowed as much time as is necessary to complete the 
study or studies in which they make slowest progress. It is not lack 
of ability that causes these failures. It is lack of time, and the giving 
of more time will prevent such occurrences by better adjusting the 
work of the school to its pupils. 

CONCTLUSION. 

I believe that upon the whole the schools are in excellent condition. 

The character, industry, attainments and skill of our teachers are 
not to be questioned. 

The truancy department, involving the work that it does, is diligently 
looked after. 

The special work in drawing is worthy of special commendation. 

Music is already upon a better basis than ever before. 

The manual training school has never done better work than at the 
present time. 

In regard to school property, the various buildings have never been 
to my knowledge in better repair. The new sanitary systems are of 
the best and have rendered the buildings as safe as modern plumbing 
is able to render them. All of the rooms and halls give evidence that 
the public money has been expended judiciously. 

The city council last January increased the appropriation for text- 
books and supplies. This money has been wisely expended by the 
text-book committee, and accordingly the books generally are in good 
condition. 

The various sub-committees have attended diligently to special 
matters within their jurisdictions. 

Finally, I would urge each member of the board to visit and famil- 
iarize himself with the schools and their work so far as he is able. 
Such visits will encourage teachers and pupils and will redound to the 
good of the schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES W. BICKFORD, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 



I. PopiiLATioN, Etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 

V. Attendance Tables. 

VI. Truancy. 

VII. Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1904-1905. 

IX. High School Graduates. 

X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

XI. 0RGA^^ZATI0N of Committees, 1906. 

XII. List of Teachers, 1906. 

XIII. School Yeab, 1905-1906. 



APPENDIX. 



STATISTICS. 



I. Population. 



Population of the city by last census, 1900 56,981 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 



II. Schoolhouses. 

Number of schoolhouses in use 25 

Number of schoolhouses not in use 

Number of schoolrooms used for day schools i;i6 

Number of rooms \ised for high school classes 15 

Number of rooms used for grammar schools 38 

Number of rooms used for middle schools 30 

Number of rooms used for primary schools 44 

Number of rooms used for partially graded schools 1 

Number of rooms used for ungraded schools 5 

Number of rooms used for manual training school 2 

Number of rooms used for kindergarten 1 



III. Schools. 

(All for both sexes.) 

Number of high school buildings 1 

Number of combined grammar and lower grade (middle and 

primary) schools 15 

Number of combined middle and primary schools 3 

Number of ungraded schools j 5 

Number of manual training schools (for boys) 1 



IV. Teachers. 

Male teachers in the high school 6 

Female teachers in the high school 10 

284 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 285 

Female teachers in training school 2 

Male teachers in the grammar schools S 

Female teachers in the grammar schools *.'5S 

Female teachers in the middle schools \?,0 

Female teachers in the primary schools t^.''. 

Female teachers in the partially graded schools 1 

Female teachei's in the ungraded schools 5 

Female teachers in the kindergarten 2 

Male teachers in the manual training school 2 

Special teachers 3 

Average number of male teachers IS 

Average number of female teachers 132 

Total average number of teachers in day schools tl50 

Male teachers in the evening schools 7 

Female teachers in the evening schools H 

Male teachers in the evening drawing schools 2 

Average number of male teachers in the evening drawing 

schools 2 

* Six of the 38 masters' assistants, 
t Not including training school. 



286 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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291 



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292 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DAY SCHOOLS. 

Summary of attendance upon the several grades of public day schools for the _ 

year 1904-1905. 



Grades. 



Whole number 

of different 

pupils. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



OS CO 

< 






~ * aJ 

, —•3 



High 

Gr.'immar 

Middle 

Primary 

Partially graded. 

Ungraded 

Kindergarten 

Totals, 1905... 
Totals, 1904 .. . 



219 


261 


423 


403 


95.3 


758 


S13 


1,394 


1,301 


93.3 


634 


670 


1,081 


992 


91 8 


1,201 


1,081 


1,770 


1,593 


90.1 


16 


14 


29 


27 


92.1 


69 


57 


88 


72 


81.8 


26 


22 


32 


24 


74.8 


2,923 


2,918 


4,817 


4,412 


91.6 


3,025 


2,895 


4,889 


4,483 


91.7 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

iSummary of attendance upo7i the several grades of public evening schools Jor 
the year 1904-1905. 



SCHOOLS. 



Spring-Street . . . 
Franklin-street 
Rimmon 



Drawing schools 



( Mechanical.. 
( Architectural 



Totals, 1905 . 
Totals, 1904 . 



Whole number 

of different 

pupils. 



Boys. 



236 



373 

285 



Girls. 



105 
113 



03 — 

tea 
0! 2 
o <o 

< 



117 

68 
83 

36 



304 
241 



> eS 
< 



252 
197 



« — -3 

a! a 



77.3 
92 5 
81.9 

83.3 



S2.9 
81.7 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 293 

Evening School Teachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal at Spring-street school, for boys. 

Assistants — A. W. Rowell, Arthur S. Healey, Lawrence A. O'Connor, 
Minnie Sullivan, Margareta A. Vittum, Jennie Ei Grundy, and Carrie 
Mason. 

Honorie J. Crough, principal of Franklin-street school for girls. 

Assistants — Maggie Linen, Marianna Fitts, Susie G. Woodman. 

Arthur W. Morgan, principal of Eimmon school, for both sexes. 

Assistants — Oscar Moreau, Charles Carrier, Myra Moore, Adelia Mur- 
phy, Maude Willand. 

. Evening Drawing Teachers. 

John M. Kendall and Henry W. x\llen. 



Graduated. 
Lena E. Bower, 
Ethel F. Currier, 
Helen F. Lyons, 
Ada B. Morse, 
Bessie J. Bartlett, 
Alice B. Morrill, 
Agnes Shay, 
Agnes M, Woodbury, 
Bessie M. Abbott, 
Blanche L. Bryant, 
Alice E. Good, 
Laurette McKendree, 



TKAININQ SCHOOL. 

Entered. 
June, '03. Bessie M. Abbott, 
" " Blanche L. Bryant, 

" Alice E. Good, 
" " Laurette McKendree, 
June, '04. Elizabeth H. Callaghan, 
Myrtle Slager, 
Lillian ^A'liitney, 
" *' Vivian E. Mathews, 
June, '05. Jennie F. McGrath, 
Sarah McKelvie, 
Gertrude S. Mitchell, 
" " Jennie Russell, 

i\Iargareta A. Vittum, 
Maj'^ Jj. Woodcock, 



Sept., '03. 



Sept., 
Sept. 



'04 



'05 



294 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 

The following table presents the main features of interest pertaining to the 
attendance tipon the public schools for the last six years. ,Similar tables 
■ may be found in reports for 189G and 1901. 



Years. 



O 




.2 


5 

u 


rt 


>f 




g 
c3 


03 ao 


O 


.£3 




« 

si 

^1 






03 


fe^ 


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o 


- 


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s 

p 

a 


p. 
O 


s 

6 


'3 

» c 




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c o 

4> = 


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O CO 

Co 






O 


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a 

^ Si 

IS" 


Id 


be 

e: 


5* 
5g 




23 




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£ c o 




2 £ 

1o 




C "^ 


t» 


(►♦J 


4, a, 


> a> 


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a 




< 


< 


H 


<! 


<) 


Ch 


< 


o 


=^ 


» 


C5 1 



go 



„_!« c- 



1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
■1904 
1905 



120 


135 


6,462 


4,388 


3,993 


91.8 


179 


225 


127 


137 


5,808 


4,552 


4,127 


90.5 


191 


189 


129 


142 


«,123 


4,876 


4,480 


91.9 


2.'>0 


221 


130 


146 


6,013 


4,774 


4,338 


90.8 


198 


203 


133 


149 


5,920 


4,88S 


4,483 


91.7 


197 


237 


133 


150 


5,841 


4,817 


4,412 


91.6 


253 


247 



214 
179 
211 
183 

214 
226 



152 
137 
159 
137 
169 
168 



380 
379 
390 
406 
401 
423 



VI.— Work of Truant Officer. 



Date. 



23 



OS 






O :« Qj 






■age 

C 3 <u 



^^ 



o c 



1904. 
September — 
October 

November 

December 

1905. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Totals — 



219 
193 
205 
116 

111 
97 
86 
123 
140 
119 



1,409 



20 
29 
21 
17 

21 
17 
23 
23 
18 
15 



139 
103 

87 
40 

30 
39 
16 
59 
09 
57 



669 



14 
34 

56 
19 

28 
21 
17 
5 
6 
8 



208 



18 
'JO 
37 
37 

24 
19 
23 
29 
15 
35 



257 



* Including special teachers, principals, assistants, etc. 
t And the A class in suburban schools. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 295 
Work of Truant Officer. — Continued. 



Date. 




No. of scliool 
age found on 
streets in 
school hours. 


No. of parents 
visited. 


No. tempora- 
rily confined 
at the police 
Station. 


y,— 

3 

.5 ~ 
1*" 


m 




1904. 


23 
IS 
9 
3 

10 

4 
3 

8 
8 

1 


103 
137 
197 
197 

125 
139 
173 
97 
179 
111 


160 
215 
257 
159 

163 
162 
129 
84 
163 
127 








October 








November 








December 




1 


1 


January 


1905. 




February 








March .• 








April 








May 


1 


1 
1 


1 










Totals. . 


87 


1,458 


1,619 


1 


3 









VII.— Finances.— 1905. 



Items of Account. 



Appropriations. 



Repairs of schoolhouses 

Fuel 

Furniture and supplies 

Printing and advertising 

Books and stationery 

Contingent expenses 

Care of rooms 

Evening schools 

Teachers' salaries 

Evening school— mechanical drawing. 

Free text-books and apparatus 

Manual training 

Sewing materials for girls 

Changing closet system 



Cost of city schools. 



$10,500.00 

11,000.00 

1,500.00 

400.00 

75.00 

2,700.00 

7,000.00 

1,500.00 

98,000.00 

30C.0O 

7,000.00 

500.00 

250.00 

5,000.00 



Expenditures. 



911,277.92 

10 537.53 

1,373.41 

386 08 

25.75 

3,674.45 

7,156.42 

1,269.15 

96,484.15 

275.75 

7,168.26 

499.96 

239.19 

4,183.98 



$144,552.00 



296 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

COST OF CITY SCHOOLS. 

Expenditures $U4,552.00 

Salaries. 

Member of the school board $220.00 

Clerk of board 150.00 

Superintendent of schools 2,300.00 

Truant officer 1,000.00 

Total $148,222.00 

Receipts. 

Literary fund $3,165.80 

Tuition and free text-books* 1,974.55 

$5,140.35 

Net amount raised by taxation $143,081.65 

The city valuation for 1905 is $34,176,406, and hence the rate of school 
tax for the year is $143,081.65, divided by $34,176,466, or .0041+. Last 
year the rate was .0042. 



VIII.— School Year, 1904-1905. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 6, 1904, closed Decem- 
ber 16, 1904. Vacation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened January 2, 1905, closed March 
24, 1905. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 10, 1905, closed June 23, 
1905. Vacation of ten weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, 190. 

Number of davs schools were actuallv in session, 176. 



IX.— High School Graduation. 

Class Motto: Honor uon Uonores. 
Wednesday Evening, Juke 21, at tiie High School Haxl. 

PROGRAM. 

Chorus. "Processional," from "Athalie" Mendelssohn. 

Salutatory. "A Comparison of the Ancient and the Modern Attitude 
Toward Nature" Jessie Hague Nettleton. 

• S<!liool tax from Londonderry, Bedford and Goflfstowu included. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



297 



Chorus. "The Wanderer's Song" Schumann. 

Class Prophecy Hazel Mae Wheeler. 

Chorus. "Waltz Song" Vincent. 

Valedictory. "Alma Mater" Louise Kennard Hayes. 

Presentation of diplomas By Isaac N. Cox. 

Class Ode, words by Fannie Colcord Condon. 

GRADUATES. 



Mary Elizabeth Adams. 
Eva May Badger. 
Carl Eugene Bailey. 
George Eussell Barber. 
Mae Alice Barry. 
Carroll Eoland Benton. 
Lillian Eldora Blaisdell. 
Carrie Mabel Blake. 
Euby Calliste Blood. 
Benjamin Prescott Burpee. 
Clinton Chesman Butterfield. 
Alice Louise Chadbourne. 
Eloise Rugges Chandler. 
Ella May Chapman. 
Everett Robert Coburn. 
Fanny Colcord Condon. 
Otis Thompson Crafts. 
Ellen Josephine Davis. 
Nettie Viella Eastman. 
Edward Harold Fletcher. 
Joanna Foss. 
William Bradford Grant. 
Frank Oliver Hale. 
Charles Edgar Hammond. 
John Carroll Haj^es. 
Elizabeth Agnes Hayes. 
Louise Kennard Hayes. 
Malcom Eugene Hoyt. 
Howard Eastman Johnson. 
Mary Theresa Jones. 
Mildred Mae Kimball. 

Arthur 



Louise Adelaide Knee. 
Herbert Victor Leckie. 
Clarence A. R. Lewis. 
Timothy R. Lyons. 
William Harris Martin. 
Vivian Ethel Mathews. 
Ida Louisa Montgomery. 
Bertha Hayes McAllister. 
Lloyd Carlton McCabe. 
Marion Pearl McKay. 
Sarah Maria McKelvie. 
Jennie Francis McGrath. 
William McPherson, Jr. 
Jessie Hague Nettleton. 
Daniel J. Readey. 
Maurice Readey. 
Alice Roberts. 
Marjorie Arzelia Rowell. 
John Joseph Ryan. 
Harry Gallup Sanford. 
Lauretta Bailey Sawtelle. 
Ernest E. Simpson. 
Anna Everett Stevens. 
Edwards Park Stevens. 
Annie Louise Trull. 
Hiram Duncan Upton. 
Parker Knox Weston. 
Hazel Mae Wheeler. 
William L. White. 
Grace Louise Williams. 
Charles Lorenzo York. 
Edgar Young. 



298 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

X.— Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

roil EXCELI.EINlCE IN K.LOCirnOX AT CONTEST, JANTARY, 1905. 

First prize, $25, Thomas A. Lane. 
Second prize, $20, Clarence A. Brock. 
Third i)rize, $10, Alys Gorey. 
l'\)iirtli prize, $5, ^Martha Jane Lil)\)ej'. 



XI.— Organization, 1906. 

sciiooi, coM^imiuc. 

EUGENE E. l{i:i:i). Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 

G. 1. 11 ASh'J/l'OX, President of Common Council, ex officio. 

Waki) 1. ]''lmcr D. Goodwin. W^viU) d. En<>ene B. Dunbar. 

James A. Sayers. Harry L. Davis. 

\Vaki) 2. J. W. Johnston. Ward 7. Edward B. Woodbury. 

Will C. Heath. Edson S. Heath. 

Waui) :!. Joel S. Daniels. Waud s. Walter B. Mitchell. 

Erank L. Downs. Frank A. Cadwell. 

W.VHO -1. Nathaniel L. Colby. Wakd 11. Alaric Gautliier. 

I. N. Cox. Joseph Douce t. 

Waud 5. John F. Lee. Waiui 10. Henry W. Barnard. 

Dennis E. O'Neil. Miciiael J. Moran. 

VICE-CIIAIKMAN Ol' TllK nOAlU). 
EDWAKl) 1'.. WOODIU KV. 

CLIMtK OV TUK HOAKH. 

IIAUKV !.. DAVIS. 

SUPERINTENDENT OK miU.IC INSTRVCTION. 
(1! AKl.ES W. iUCKl'OUD. 

SUVEUINTENDENT's CI.KIiK. 

FANNIE L. SANBOKX. 

TIUANT OKKICKH. 

CURTIS \V. DAVIS. 



BEPORT OF THE SCrrEKINTENDENT OF SCHOOLH. 290 

STANDING COMMITTEES, 

Finance. — Miiyor Reed, Messrs. Ilasollon, Davis, Woodbury, and Cad- 
well. 
Salaries. — IMessrs. O'Neil, Cox, and W. C. Heath. 
Tcxt-Doolcs. — Messrs. Cox, Woodbury, Dunbar, and Mitchell. 
Music. — Messrs. W. C. Heath, Barnard, and Colby, 
Drawing. — Messrs. E. S, Heath, Sayers, and Downs. 
Manual Training. — Messrs. Johnston, Goodwin, and E. S. Heath. 
Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Colby, Johnston, and Moran. 
Fuel. — Mr. Mitchell, Mayor Keed, Messrs. Haselton, Lee, and Daniels. 
Repairs. — Messrs. Davis, Gauthier, and Lee. 
Aiiendance. — Messrs. Downs, Gauthier, and Goodwin, 
Health. — Messrs. Dunbar, Darnard, and Doucet. . 

SUB-COMiMTTrEES. 

High. — Messrs. Colby, Cox, Dunbar, 10. S. Heath, and Goodwin. 
FranJclin-strect. — Messrs. Woodbury, Davis, and Lee. 
Spi'ing-strect. — Messrs. O'Neil, Dunbar, and Woodbury. 
Lincoln-street and Toungsville. — Messrs. Cox, Lee, and W. C. Heath. 
Ash-strcet and Webstci-'s Mills. — Messrs. Goodwin, Downs, and Gauth- 
ier. 

Webster-street and 8 larlc— Messrs. Johnston, Mitchell, and Moran. 

Bakersvillc and Mosquito Pond. — Messrs. Downs, Johnston, and Doucet. 

Yarney. — Messrs. JNIitchell, Moran, and Cox. 

HallsviUe and Harvey.— Messrs. Davis, Doucet, and Daniels. 

Rimmon. — Messrs. Gauthier, E. S. Heath, and Barnard. 

Training School. — Messrs. W. C. Heath, Woodbury, and Johnston. 

Main-street. — Messrs. Cadwell, Goodwin, and Sayers. 

Parker. — Messrs. Doucet, W. C. Heath, and Mitchell. 

Wilson. — Messrs. Dunbar, Gauthier, and Cadwell. 

Straw. — Messrs. E. S. Heath, O'Neil, 'and Colby. 

Amoskeag. — Messrs, Sayers, Barnard, and Downs. 

Ooffe's Falls. — Messrs. Barnard, Cadwell, and O'Neil. 

Pearl-street. — Messrs. Daniels, Sayers, and E. S. Heath. 

Highland. — Messrs. Moran, Daniels, and Johnston. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Lee, Colb\', and Davis. 



XII.— List of Teachers. 



HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 



Master. Georg'e IL Libby. 
Sub-Master. George I. H()])kins. 
Assistants. Harry N. ISLcLaren. 
Allan E. Herrick. 



300 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Assistants. Arthur E. Buck. 
Xellie Pickering. 
Theresa B. Stanton. 
Mary J. Wellington. 
Ethel I. Cummings. 
Annie W. Colby. 
Mary H. Dowd. 
Winona M. Martin. 

Elsie D. Fairbanks. 

Annie M. Vose. 

Edith M. Pierce. 

Bertha A. Blanchet. 

Helen I. Buck. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. Isaac Huse. 

Master's Assistant. Alice C. Taggart. 

\ssistants. Carrie E. Hoit. 

Carrie E. Head. 

Kellie C. Parker. 

Loicer Grades. 

Higher Middle. Lura K. Kimpton. 
1 ower Middle. Amy K. Xorthrup 
i.ower Whittemore. 

Higher Primary, l^race a>i. 
Lower Primary. Lena E. Bower. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades^. 

Master. Louis H. Bailey. 
Master's Assistant. Annie W. Patten. 
Assistants. Belle E. Daniels. 

Mabel J. Brickett. 

Lillian F. Crowther. 

Lower Grades. 

Hicrher Middle. Etta L. Stearns. 
Lower Middle. Jennie E- Cate. 
Hi-her Primary. Bertha A. Allen. 
Higher PrimarV. Theodora Richardson. 
Lmver Primary. Amy E. Davison. 
Lower Primary. Hulda C. Graupner. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 301 



ASII-STREET SCHOOL. 



Grammar Grades. 



Master. Edgar D. Cass. 

Master's Assistant. Amelia L. Graupner. 

Assistants. Emma L. McLaren. 

Lora E. HilL 

Ada B. Morse, substitute. 

Ellen E. Connor. 

Emma J. Cooper. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Marjorie S. Woodbury. 
Lower Middle. Ede B. Shand. 
Higher Primary. Josephine L. Eiddle. 
Higher Primary. May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primarj'. Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTER-STEEET SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. John Gault. 

Master's Assistant. Josephine W. Page. 

Assistants. Luna A. "Wlhitlock. 

Alice M. Lamprey. 

Eva F. Tuson. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Jean Gillan. 
Lower Middle. Marcia M. Moore. 
Higher Primary. Agnes M. Woodbury. 
Lower Primary. Mathel C. Henry. 

VARNEY scnoor.. 
Grammar Grades. 

Master, George Winch. 

Master's Assistant. Florence M. Ward. 

Assistants. Esther M. Dickey. 

Ellen E. McKean. 

Pansy A. Hill. 



302 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. M. Harriet Williamson. 
Lower Middle. Mary J. Walsh. 
Higher Primary. Gertrude Adams. 
Lower Primary. Bessie F. Leekie. 
Lower Primary. Anne E. Walsh. 

IIAXLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Master. W'illiam H. Hnse. 
Master's Assistant. Ella F. Barker. 
Assistants. Olive A. Rowe. 

Flora M. Walker. 

Mae L. Lovejoy. 

Loice'r Grades. 

Higher Middle. Clara V. Clement. 
Lower Middle. Bertha L. Kemp. 
Higher Primary. E. Alfreda Hall. 
Assistant. Martha J. Kennedy. 
Lower Primary. Anne R. Corson. 
Assistant. Ethel A. Nicholson. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns. 
Assistants. Lelia A. Brooks. 
Cora M. Farmer. 

Lower Grades. 

Mixed Middle. Mary L. Heath. 
Higher Primary. Augusta S. Downes. 
Mixed Primary. Bessie J. Bartlett. 
Lower Primary. Kathryn D. McKeon. 

EIMMON SCHOOL. 

Principal. Percy N. Folsom (Grammar). 
Assistant. Blanche E. Hicken. 

Lower Grades. 

Mixed Middle. Mary E. Bulman. 
Higher Primary. Hattie S. Tuttle. 
Lower Primary. Katherine A. Frain. 
Lower Primary. M. Eunice Willand. 



REPORT OF THE SUrERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 303 



WILSON scnooi,. 

Grammar Grades. 

Principal. Barbara B. Joy. 
Assistants. Mary E. McLaren. 

Hellen ]\Iorison. 

Millie S. Morse. 

Lower Gradr^s. 

Higher Middle. Harriet H. Richardson. 
Lower Middle. Florence Richardson. 
Higher Primarj^ Bertha V. Franks. 
Lower Priniar3\ Florence L. Abbott. 
Lower Primary. Blanche L. Bryant. 

STRAW SCHOOL. 

Grammar Grades. 

Principal. Alta C. Willand. 
Assistant. Jennie V. Williamson. 

Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Gertrude H. Brooks. 
Lower Middle. Lettie M. Smith. 
Higher Primary. Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. Florence H. Moore. 
Lower Primary. Edith M. Stebbins. 

TKALNING SCHOOL. 

Merrimack street, corner of Union. 

Principal. Caroline E. Wling. 

Head Assistant. Grace A. Phillips. 

The princijaal is also assisted by the sub-teachers, i. e., members of 
the training class. The school embraces the first five years of school 
work, in the following grades: Lower Primarj', Higher Primary, 
Lower Middle, and Higher Middle. There are four rooms. 

SPKING-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Annabel Emerson, Higher Middle. 
Lower Middle. Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. Agnes Shay. 
Lower Primary. Helen F. Lyons. 
Kindergarten. Isabelle Houliston. 
Grace M. Carr. 



304 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary W. Mitchell, Grammar Grade. 
Higher Middle. Lottie M. Clement. 
Lower Middle. Hattie O. Willand. 
Higher Primary. M. Minnie Sturtevant. 
Higher Primar3\ Kate T. Clarke. 
Lower Primary. Elizabeth F. Walsh. 
Lower Primary. Mary H. O'Dovvd. 
Lower Primary. Sarah Price, 

PEAEL-STREET SCIIOOT,. 

Principal. Mary G. Tynan, Higher ^Middle. 
Lower Middle. Nellie M. Smith. 
Higher Primary. Florence Abbott. 
Lower Primary. Nellie F. Dunnington. 

PARKER: SCHOOL. 

Principal. Marj' E. Moulton, Grammar. 
Higher Middle. Mary L. Ajer. 
Mixed Middle. Blanche M. Folsom. 
Higher Primary. i]da M. Barr. 
Lower Primary. Alice B. Morrill. 
Lower Primary. Mande E. Winegar. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. Mary A. Btizzell, Grammar and Middle 

Middle and Primary. Bessie M. Abbott. 

Lower Primary. Alice E. Good. 

Highland. Blanche L. Bachelder, Grammar and Middle. 

Primary Grades. Laiirette McKendree. 

Goffe's Falls. Maud M. Greaney, Grammar. 

Middle Grades. Edith A. Murphy. 

Primary Grades. Jennie R. McLaughlin. 

"UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

Stark. Inez M. Warren. 
Harvey. Emma J. Ela. 
Youngsville. Anabelle F. Landers. 
Webster's Mills. Blanche L. Corning. 
Mosquito Pond. Marion F. Partridge. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. A. J. Abbott, Maude E. Brown. 
Drawing. J. Warren Thyng. 
Manual Training-. Fred E. Browne. 
Assistants. Arthur W. French. 
Eugene F. Johnson. 



KEPOKT OF THE SCTPEKINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 305 
JANITORS. 

High School. 

('harles F. Jack. Engineer, George H. .Tack. 

Frauklin-street and Trainlug SchooJs. 

Asa M. Smith. 

Lincoln-street School. 

William Stevens. 

HaUsviUe and Wilson Schools. 

William H. Newry. 

Ash-street School. 

John S. Avery. 

Pearl-street School. 

Charles A. Underhill. 

Webster-street and Straw Schools. 

William J. Powers. 

* Spring-street and Loicell-street Schools. 

George E. Prince. 

Bakersville School. 

Edwin X. Baker. 

Tarney School. 

Joseph H. Buifum. 

Main-street and Parker Schools. 

William F. Conner. 

Rimmon School. 

Joseph Chalifoux. 

Highland School. 

Marshall Badger. 

Anwskeag School. 

Charles H. Corey. 

Goffe's Falls School. 

Louis Hueber. 



306 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Xlll.— School Year.— 1905-1906. 

Fall term opened September 5, 1905, closed December 15, 1905. Vaca- 
tion of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 1, 1906, closes March 23, 
19GC. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring- term opens April 9, 1906, closes June 22, 1906. Vacation of 
ten weeks. 

Fall term opens September 3, 1906. Continues fifteen weeks, closes 
December 14, 1906. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER, FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



EEPOET OF THE FIRE ENGINEEE. 



Chief Engineer's Office, 
Central Station, No. 8, Vine Stbeet, 

Manchester, N, H., December 31, 1905. 
To His Honor, Engcne E. Reed; Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

In compliance with the Laws and Ordinances of the city of Man- 
chester, I herewith submit my twenty-seventh annual report of the 
work performed by the Manchester fire department for the year end- 
ing- December 31, 1905, it being the sixtieth of the city. 

During the year of 1905 the department has responded to two hun- 
dred and seventy-two (272) alarms of fire, of which one hundred and 
eighty-eight (188) were still alarms, and eighty-four (84) bell alarms. 
Two of the latter were double (or second) alarms. Of the foregoing 
seventy-nine (79) were for chimney fires, forty-five (45) brush and 
grass fires, fifteen (15) on city dumps, and two (2) false alarms, given 
by mischievous persons. 

The different companies of the department have laid one hundred 
and seven thousand and nine hundred (107,900) feet of hose, used three 
thousand three hundred and seven (3,307) feet of ladders, one hundred 
and forty-eight (148) charges of the pony extinguishers, and thirty-four 
(34) charges of chemical tanks. 

The greatest num'ber of calls in any one month was fifty-two (52) in 
the month of April. 

A very large majority of the losses sustained were occasioned by 
three fires in the first three months of the year, namely: January 4, 
the Bridge-street stable, kept by N. H. Walker, in which twenty-two 
(22) horses were suffocated before the arrival of the department; Feb- 
ruary 1, the barn at the State Industrial School, where five (5) horses, 
thirty-four (34) cows, and one hundred (100) pigs were lost, and 
March 4, the Electric Street Railway car barn, this latter fire causing 
more than one half the loss for the entire year. 

A summary of the amount of property endangered, the amount of 
insurance carried on said property, the damage sustained, and the 
amount of insurance paid (details of which appear in the following 
pages) as near as could be ascertained are as follows: 

Value of buildings on which losses occurred $615,900.00 

Value of contents on which losses occurred 45,373.25 

$661,273.25 

309 



310 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Insurance carried on buildings $516,150.00 

Insurance carried on contents 14,325.00 

$530,475.00 

Damage to buildings $174,780.43 

Damage to contents 22,280.13 

$197,060.56 

Insurance paid on buildings 139,764.74 

Insurance paid on contents 8,777.60 

148,542.34 

Net loss over and above insurance of $48,518.22 

TlIE MANUAL FOKCE 

Remains unchanged from last report, with the exception of trans- 
ferring one "call" man on Engine and Ladder Company, No. 5, to 
permanent cajitain, and the force is forty (40) permanent and one 
hundred and twenty-nine (129) "call" men, making one hundred and 
sixty-nine (169) men, divided as follows: 

Call. Permanent. 

1 chief engineer 1 

4 assistant engineers 4 

Engine Company No. 1 11 3 

Engine Company No. 2 10 4 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 15 5 

Engine Company No. 4 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Companj"^ No. 5 15 5 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 15 5 

Hose Company No. 1 11 1 

Hose Company No. 2 10 2 

Hose Company No. 3 6 2 

Combination No. 2 6 2 

Aerial Truck No. 1 12 3 

Chemical No. 1 3 2 

Spare drivers 2 

129 40 

THE BtlLDINGS 

Have been "patched along" probably as well as the money appropriated 
by your board would allow, but have not received manj- changes of a 
permanent nature, except at station of Engine and Ladder No. 3, 
where the long and much needed alterations have been made, whereby 
the three-horse hitches for the steamer and truck will be supplied to 
these pieces of apparatus before this report is in print. 

Radical changes should be made at the station of Engine and Ladder 
Company No. 5. The narrow (or side) windows of the double win- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 31 1 

clows, two in front and one on each side, sliould be bricked up, as the 
wood work about them is considerably decayed and is hardly worth 
repairing. An addition should be made to the west end of the stable 
to arran,t;e for a box stall. 

THE APPARATUS 

Consists of 6 steam tire engines, 7 hose wagons (two combination chem- 
icals and one with ladders attached), 3 hose carriages with reels, 4 
hook and ladder trucks (one an eighty-five foot aerial, carrying other 
ladders), 1 supply wagon, 8 exercise wagons, 1 chief's wagon, 1 spare 
one-horse hose carriage, located as follows: 

Central Station: Two first size Amoskeag steamers, with three- 
horse hitch, 2 one-horse hose wagons, 1 one-horse hose carriage, 1 
aerial truck (three-horse hitch), 1 double (60 gallons) tank chemical 
engine, 1 supply wagon, 1 exercise wagon, 1 chief's wagon. 

North Main-Street Station: One second size Amoskeag steamer 
(three-horse hitch), 1 two-horse combination chemical and hose wagon, 
1 old U tank steamer in storage, 1 exercise wagon. 

McGregorville Station: One second size Amoskeag steamer, i one- 
horse hose carriage, 1 two-horse hook and ladder truck, 1 exercise 
■wagon. 

Lake Avenue Station: One second size Amoskeag steamer, 1 two- 
horse hose wagon, 1 two-horse hook and ladder truck, 1 exercise wagon, 
1 one-horse hose carriage in storage. This steamer and truck will 
soon be supplied with three-horse hitches, as previously stated. 

^VIebstek-Street Station: One third size Amoskeag steamer, 1 one- 
horse carriage, 1 two-horse hook and ladder truck, 1 exercise wagon. 

Maple-Street Station: One two-horse hose wagon, 1 exercise 
wagon. 

South Elm^Street Station: One two-horse combination hose wagon, 
carrj'ing ladders, 1 exercise wagon just put into service. 

Wilson Hill Station: One two-liorse combination chemical and 
hose wagon, 1 exercise wagon. 

In addition to the foregoing there is 1 hose carriage in Amoskeag 
on Front street, 1 hose carriage corner Massabesic street and Mam- 
moth road (both volunteer companies), 1 two-wheeled hose carriage, 
Devonshire Mills, Goffe's Falls, 1 two-wheeled "jumper" in basement of 
W. P. Farmer's barn cellar, Candia road, corner Hanover street, 5 
sleds used as hose sleds in the winter, 1 repair wagon for fire-alarm 
telegraph. 

In view of the three-horse hitch, which was to be attached to Lad- 
der No. 3, new and much heavier wheels and axles have replaced the 
old ones. 

The wheels of Hose Carriage No. 3 have been made over and 
strengthened, the carriage "touched up" and varnished. 



312 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The exercise wagon at the Central Station was considerably dam- 
aged on July 7 by colliding with curbing of Concord common and 
required extensive repairs. 

Engine No. 6 has been supplied with new and heavier wheels and 
rear axles, new platform springs, and it received other general re- 
pairs. 

TUE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

The storage ibatterj-, which has been m service seven (7) years and 
outlived its usefulness, has been replaced with new and improved 
jars and plates. 

Four new boxes have been added to the sj'stem during the year as 
follows: May 23, Box Xo. 218 was installed at corner of Hall and 
Somerville streets; September 13, Box 93 at corner of Trenton and 
Chestnut streets (location afterwards changed), and November 10, 
Boxes No. 611 at corner of Hancock street and Boston & Maine Rail- 
road, and No. 911 at corner of Union and Trenton streets. Box 61 was 
transferred to the station of Hose No. 3, South Elm street, and Box 
93 to corner of Elm and Carpenter streets. There has been six miles 
of new No. 9 wire run, and about one and one half miles of copper 
wire taken down. 

The necessity of putting the wires under ground grows more and 
more imperative each year. The risk of the overhead system is too 
great to be continued, with the liability of crosses with high tension 
wires, which may result in the lo.ss of life and property. 

THE HORSES. 

The department owns forty-six (46) horses, and some of them are 
totally unfit for fire service and should have been exchanged long ago. 
It is hoped for the efficiency of the department this matter will re- 
ceive early attention, and that whenever new horses are purchased 
they possess some of the requisites that will recommend them for the 
duties required of them. 

Owing to the difficulties of finding good fire horses, they should show 
a satisfactory- fitness after a fair trial. 

CASUALTIES. 

At. a slight fire July 25, at 428 North ^Main street, Peter Duffey was 
severely burned while in bed, and was removed to Notre Dame Hos- 
pital, where he afterward died from the result of his injuries. 

February 25 Driver Ernest E. Hubbell of Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany No. 5, while working on the ruins of the Industrial School barn, 
fell upon the ice, fracturing three ribs; off duty thirty-two (32) days, 
July 6 Driver H. C. Parsons in responding to an alarm from Box 4 fell 
while coming down the sliding pole, injuring his back and hip; off 
duty fifteen (15) days. September 10 Andrew S. Fantom of Engine 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



313 



and Ladder Company No. 5, while at an alarm of fire at No. 2108 Elm 
street, injured his foot with an axe, and was off duty twenty-two (22) 
days. October 29 James J. Collins of Engine and Ladder Company No. 
6, while responding to an alarm from Box 313, injured his hand; off 
duty thirt3'-five (35) days. December 25 Fred S. Morrill, spare driver, 
in coming down stable stairs to respond to an alarm from Box 81, 
injured his hand and is still off duty. 

THE FIKEMKN'S RELIEF ASSiOCIATION 

Has been liberally remembered by contributions from numerous busi- 
ness firms and citizens. Its financial standing is as follows: 

Balance on hand February 13, 1905 $6,379.42 

Dividends on deposits in .savings bank 228.90 

Members' dues 171.00 

Donations: 

Manchester Street Eailway 250.00 

Eoswell Annis, treasurer Annis Flour and Grain Co.. 25.00 

Goff stown fire precinct 50.00 

Town of Candia 25.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co 10.00 

Dr. A. G. Straw 10.00 

Jeremiah Hodge 10.00 

J. Adam Graff 10.00 

"A friend" 10.00 

James W. Hill Co. (by J. W. Hill, treasurer) 10.00 

Arthur S. Brown 5.00 

$7,194.32 
Cr. 

Paid Oscar P. Stone, salary $25.00 

Ernest E. Hubbell, benefit 47.00 

James J. Collins, benefit 35.00 

Henry C. Parsons, benefit 22.50 

Andrew S. Fantom, benefit 50.00 

Fred S. Morrill, benefit 32.50 

printing 1.25 

$213.25 

Leaving balance in treasury of $6,981.07 

CONCLUSION. 

I would repeat my recommendation of last year for the immediate 
establishment of a steamer and hose wagon in that section of East 
Manchester where so much of the manufacturing industries are 
located. A three-door house ought to be erected to accommodate a 



314 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

steamer, hose wagon, and ladder truck. There are extensive prqperty 
risks in this vicinitj', some of which are quite hazardous, and the 
location of such a house at corner of Hall and Silver streets would 
afford protection for the property of that and the surrounding sec- 
tions. The growth of the fire department for the last ten years has 
not kept pace iviih the growth of the city, and we trust it may receive 
such support that the necessities demand. 

There have been several instances where there are defects in the 
water supply, and whether from too small pipes, or from keeping the 
gates partially shut, I am unable to state, but striking instances have 
been noticed, particularlj" at the lire at No. 101 Taylor street, on 
November 4, where with a water pressure of seventy-five pounds at 
hjdrant on the start two steamers reduced it to ten pounds pres- 
sure; and September 10, at the Guillet Sanatorium, 2108 Elm street, the 
pressure at h3rdrant one steamer connected with was one hundred and 
five pounds, reduced to twentj-two pounds, and the second steamer 
ninety-five pounds, reduced to nothing. Such variations should not 
exist. Several other tests with less variation are recorded where 
the differences in pressure are much greater than they should be. 

I again repeat the necessity of sheds for storage on the Wilson Hill 
lot for the storing of carts, sleds, etc. 

At least two thousand (2,000) feet of double jacket knit hose should 
be purchased in the early part of the year. 

I would recommend the substituting of a two-horse hose wagon for 
the old hose reel of Hose No. 1. 

I would also recommend the purchase of three "life" or jumping 
nets to be carried on the ladder trucks. 

All citizens should thoroughly acquaint themselves with the loca- 
tion of the nearest fire-alarm box, and the nearest fire station, 
together with its telephone number, and, after giving the alarm, fight 
the fire themselves, if confined in small areas, until the arrival of the 
fire apparatus, and don't open doors or windows to give the fire addi- 
tional draft. 

I desire to express my thanks to the police department for the 
efficient manner in which they have aided the department in cases 
of fire, as well as preventing many needless alarms, and to the assist- 
ant engineers and officers and men of the entire force for the uniform 
courtesj^ extended me, and the zealous manner they have at all times 
exhibited in the performance of their duties. 

Eespectfully submitted. 

• THOMAS W. LANE, 

Chief Fire Department. 



REPORT OF THE FIllE ENGINEER, 315 



Number and Location of Fire Alarm Boxes and Keys. 

A KEY IS ATTACHED TO EACH BOX (with three exceptions), and can be 
had by breaking the glass. 

No. 3. American Locomotive Company's lower shop. Kej-s at offices 
of gas-works, county jail, Manchester Coal & Ice Company's sheds, and 
Charles H. Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. Corner Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel Milford, L. B. 
Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, street railway stables, and olKce 
of Blodgett & Young's block. 

No. 5. Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at Tebbetts & 
Co.'s and Hanscom's drug stores, Manchester House, and J. W. Hill 
Company's store. 

No. 6. City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Thurston's drug stores, J. 
A. Kiddle's office, and residence of J. L. Brock, 21 Amoskeag Corpo- 
ration. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of Manchester and Chestnut streets. 
Kej's at chief of police's office and with all police officers. 

No. 8. Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Dante Smith's and 
Hall's drug stores, and Partridge Brothers' grain store. 

No. 9. Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at residence of 
Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, Dr. E. Fritz, and station of 
Engine and Ladder No. 5. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at residence of 
George Emerson, Walter A. Green, and 0. D. Knox. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Kej's at residence of 
Welcome Jencks and Mrs. Lewds Simons, No. 1, Senter's block, and 
Steele's grocery store. 

No. 14. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys at residences 
of Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. George W. Eiddle, D. J. Adams, and Mrs. 
Thomas Morgan. 

No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Kej^s at residences 
of Henry W. Shannon and J. Fred Chalker. 

No. 16. Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at residences of 
Et. Eev. Bishop Delaney and p. H. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Kej^s at residences 
of Miss Mary A. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and William Perkins' 
estate. , 

No. 21. Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Kej's at A. D. 
Smith's drug store, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. L. Walker's office, 
and residence of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Kej's at the residence 
of the late Eben T. James. 



316 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 24. Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 3 house, corner of Massa- 
besic street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. M. Goodwin 
and station of Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

No. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at residences 
of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, the late Horace Gordon, and James 
R. Straw. 

No. 26. Corner of Bridge and Eussell streets. Keys at McCrillis' 
carriage shop. 

No. 27. Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Kej's at resi- 
dences of E. S. Fletcher, Dr. Walter T. Crosby, and Mrs. William Carr. 

No. 28. Corner of Merrimack and Beacon streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of A. L. Garmon and H. B. Fairbanks. 

No. 31. Corner of Canal and Hollis streets. American Locomotive 
Companj^'s shop. Kejs at office, Amory Mills, Langdon Mills watch- 
rooms. 

No. 32. Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and Brook streets. 
Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Company's mill, Langdon watchroom, 
and Electric Light station. 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Kej's at watchroom and pumping station. 

No. 35. Stark Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 36. Amorj- Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 39. Hillsborough county jail. Kej's at office. 

No. 41. Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 42. Manchester Mills. Kej'^s at watchroom. 

No. 43. The Olzendam Mill. Keys at watchroom. 

No. 45. The S. C. Forsaith shops. Kejs at freight depot and office 
in building. 

No. 51. Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys at stores of F. 
Riedel and Henry Weber. 

No. 52. Loxton Block, Fradd's Corner, West Manchester. Keys at 
Merrimack Hotel, Wiggin-Young grocery', and Engine No. 2. 

No. 53. The West Side Lumber Co.'s steam mill. Keys at mill of- 
fice, I. E. Dewej^'s tenement block, and Eanno's harness store. 

No. 54. Corner of A and South Main streets. Keys at residences of 
Lord sisters, Neil Fullerton, and grocery store opposite. 

No. 56. Baldwin's bobbin shop. Kejs at Baldwin's office and resi- 
dences of J. C. Smith, E. P. Littlefield, and with watchman at works. 

No. 57. Corner Mast road and D street. Kejs at residence of C. H. 
George, and F. W. Towle's store. 

No. 61. Hose No. 3, South Elm street. Ke3s at house and John A. 
Kane's store. 

No. 62. Manchester Wool & Leather Company's, Brown avenue. 
Keys at tannery, the Edwin Kennedy house, and Hose 3. 

No. 63. Corner Beech street and Titus avenue. Keys at residences 
of L. E. Carswell and C. L. Wenberg. (No key on box.) 

No. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Kej-^s at residences of T. 
Collins, Daniel Sheehan, Thomas J. Smith, Simon McCarthy. 



liEPOKT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 317 

No. 72. Corner of Lake avenue and Lincoln street. Kej'.s at resi- 
dences of the late Austin Jenkins and James Briggs. 

No. 73. Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys at residences of 
Eev. J. A. Chevalier and Timothy Carr. 

No. 81. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at all the engine 
rooms. 

No. 82. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Church streets. Keys at 
Lowell-street stable and Eames Bros.' drug store. 

No. 91. Corner Webster and Beech streets. Kej-s at Children's 
Home and residences of George E. McClintock, Solomon Johnson, M. E. 
Sanctuary. (No key on box.) 

No. 92. Corner Union and Clarke streets. Kej-s at residences of 
Mrs. Julia B. Bradford and E. H. Nutting. 

No. 93. Corner of Elm and Carpenter streets. Keys at residences 
of A. H. Weston and Dr. George D. Towne. 

No. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of W. A. Clarkson, M. D. Johnson, and Charles F. Chase. 

No. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys at residences 
of Mrs. William B. Abbott, W. N. Johnson, and E. M. Topliff. 

No. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at residences of 
John J. Bennett and Mrs. Harriet L. Healey. 

No. 115. Corner of Blodget and Ash streets. Keys at residences of 
James A. Rogers and Cj^ren Bixby. 

No. 212. Shoe shop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of the shoe fac- 
tory and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn, M. Y. B. 
Garland, and the Walter Cody block. 

No. 213. Sash and blind factory. South Beech street, junction of 
Portsmouth railroad. Keys at offices of Sash & Blind Company. 

No. 214. Elliott silk mill, corner of Wilson and Valley streets. Kej-s 
at office and watchroom of mill. 

No. 215. Hoyt & Co.'s shoe shop, corner of Lincoln and Silver 
streets. Kej-s at offices of shoe shop and Kimball Carriage Company 
and workshop opposite. 

No. 216. Jewett and Somerville streets. Kej's at residence of G. IT. 
Hill, 140 Jewett street, and W. B. Brown, 128 Jewett street. 

No. 217. Corner Candia road and Massabesic street. Keys at resi- 
dences of L. M. Streeter, William Gadbois, and Charles P. Still. 

No. 218. Corner of Somerville and Hall streets. Keys at residences 
of Mrs. George Hall, George Kaj', and Frank Churchill. 

No. 219. Eaton Heights shoe shop. Page street. Keys at shoe shop 
office, and residences of Charles A. Merrill, John P. Young, and Joseph 
W. Eand. (No key on box.) 

No. 241. Lake avenue hill. Key at residence of Charles Davis. 

No. 261. Pearl-street grammar school. Keys at schoolroom and 
residences of C. E. Eose, S. W. Bascom, and Charles W. Cheney. 

No. 312. Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor streets. Keys at 



318 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

residences of James Sjoence (309 Main street), Thomas Bolton, and 
gate No. 11 mill. 

No. 313. Corner of Amorj' and Main streets. Kejs at residences of 
Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Potvin's drug store, Miville & 
Co.'s drug store, gate of No. 11 mill, and station of Engine and Ladder 
No. 6. 

No. 314. Manchester Stocking Co., 'Skeag. Keys at office and River- 
side Hose house. 

No. 315. Old Brick store, 'Skeag. Keys at Eiverside Hose house and 
D. Jameson's residence. 

No. 321. Corner of Beauport and Wayne streets. Keys at Holy 
Angels convent, the Brothers' school, and residences of E. H. Doherty 
and Rev. Father Hevey. 

No. 323. Corner of Putnam and Bartlett streets. Kej-s at P. J. 
Archambeault's bakery, and residence of Mitchell Barry. 

No. 324. Amory and Laval streets. 

No. 325. Kelly and Cartier streets. 

No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at residences 
of Amelia Davis, William A. Tufts, and James Kearns. 

No. 512. Corner of Beauport and Adams streets. West Side. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Kej-s at residences 
of J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Elizabeth Ward. 

No. 611. Corner of Hancock street and Boston & Maine Railroad. 
Keys at offices of True W. Jones' Brewery and Manchester Slaughter- 
ing and Rendering W^orks. 

No. 711. Corner of Union and Grove streets. 

No. 911. Corner of Union and Trenton streets. Keys at residences 
of Charles R. Hodge, C. S. Bojnton, and Mrs. William R. Varick. 

Also keys will be found in the hands of all regular police. 

The true time will be given at precisely 12.30 P. M. from Charles A. 
Trefethen's jewelry store, and will be denoted by one stroke of the 
fire bells. 



Telephone Calls. 

Chemical Engine, Central Station 64 — 3 

Engine No. 2 S4— 2 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 84 — 3 

Engine and Ladder No. 5 64 — 2 

Engine and Ladder No. 6 S4 — 4 

Hose No. 2 116— 3 

Hose No. 3 102—12 

Combination No. 2 116 — 2 

Chief Engineer Lane's office 64 — 3 

Chief Engineer Lane's house 64 — 4 

Assistant Engineer Merrill's office 212 



REPORT or THE FIRE ENGINEER. 319 

Assistant Engineer's Seaward's house 579 — 12 

Assistant Engineer Provost's store 747 — 4 

Two long rings twice call all stations on line. 



Instructions to Keyholders and Citizens. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be immediately com- 
municated to the nearest alarm box, the key of which is in a circular 
box attached to the right side of the fire-alarm box. Keys are also in 
the hands of all regular police, and generallj- of persons at the corner 
or nearest house. 

2. Keyholders and others, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive 
information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook once as 
far as it will go (without jerking), and then let go. Shut the door, 
but do not try to remove the key, as it is locked in by a trap lock, and 
can only be removed with a release key, which is carried by each 
of the engineers, and they will, as soon as convenient, release and 
return it. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to remain by the 
box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull again; if 
you still hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box and give an 
alarm from that. Don't give a second alakm without instructions 
from an engineer, or officer in charge of the fire. 

4. Never signal for fire seen at a distance. Never touch the box ex- 
cept to give an alarm of fire. Give an alarm for no other cause than 
actual fire. Don't give an alarm for a chimne,y fire. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless called for by 
the chief engineer. If you change your residence or place of business, 
where the keys are Icept, return the keys to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of 'buildings are requested to inform 
themselves of the location of alarm boxes near their property; also 
all places where the keys are kept. Be sure the alarm is prompth' 
and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the city, and the 
number of the box .will be given thus: Box 6, six blows, 21/2 seconds 
apart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, pause of 6i/4 seconds, 
one blow, same pause, and two blows, 2 — 1 — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the bells at 
any time; and in case of testing the boxes, each test will be preceded 
by one stroke of the bells. 



Rules and Regulations in Regard to Responding to Fire 

Alarms, Etc. 

The following rules have been adopted by the board of engineers and 
the fire department will strictly comply until otherwise ordered, and 
will attend alarms of fire as per official running card. 



320 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

RUNNING RULES. 

Whenever an alarm is sounded, the members of all companies not 
called to that box will report to their respective company quarters, and 
there remain nniil dismissed bj- the signal of the bells or by an engineer 
in charge. 

In case companies on their first run have responded to an alarm, 
companies on their second run to the box from which the alarm has 
been sounded will answer all first-run boxes of the absent companies; 
and in case engines are out that would respond to another box, then 
third alarm companies will respond, in case of alarm from a box that 
does not call for a third alarm, companies on their second run will 
then answer to all other boxes. 

Whenever two trucks answer to first alarm the other truck will 
answer to all other boxes. 

At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, hose carriage, 
or truck that leaves the house first will have the right to lead to the 
fire. Whenever a horse lags or gives out, drivers should then give 
others the right of waj^ so as not to delay the rest of the apparatus. 

No RUNNING BY WILL BE ALLOWED, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDER 
PENALITY OF DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

The drivers shall not permit persons not connected with the depart- 
ment to ride upon the apparatus, and in muddy weather or heavy 
wheeling thej^ shall not permit anj- one to ride upon their apparatus 
when returning from fires. 

Drivers will take the following routes in responding to alarms on the 
West Side: For crossing Amoskeag bridge, take Elm street to Salmon, 
down Salmon and across the bridge. For crossing McGregor bridge 
take Elm street to Bridge street, down Bridge street and across the 
bridge. For crossing Granite bridge take Elm street to Granite, down 
Granite and across the bridge. 

Use gongs freely to clear streets and when nearing crossings. 

Engineers of steamers will not run over eighty (SO) pounds of wat ..• 
pressure, except when orders are received from a member of the 
board of engineers or the officer in command of the company. 

Captains or officers commanding companies will see that the rules 
and regulations of this department are adhered to; to report any in- 
attention to duty or failure to comply with the rules, or anj- disobedi- 
ence of orders, and upon return from alarms will report to head- 
quarters immediately, personally or by telephone, after apparatus is 
"made up" and ready for duty. 

S.PECIAL CALLS ON FIRE ALARM. 

When more apparatus is wanted, without giving second and third 
alarms the following special calls will be given: 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 321 

2—1 for Engine 1. 3—3 for Truck 3. 

2 — 2 for Engine 2. 3 — 5 for Truck 5. 

2—3 for Engine 3. 3— G for Truck 6. 

2 — 4 for Engine 4. 4 — 1 for' Hose 1. \ 

2 — 5 for Engine 5. 4 — 2 for Hose 2. 

2— G for Engine 6. 4 — 3 for Hose 3. 

1 — 1 — 1 for Aerial Truck. 4 — 4 for Combination 2. 

Companies answering "special calls" will wait thirty seconds before 
leaving quarters, to prevent mistakes. 

THIED ALARM. 

On TiiiPD ALARM all apparatus will respond. 

GENERAL ALAHM. 

In the event of a fire of such magnitude that second and third alarms 
are needed, a general alarm will be given by striking ten blows, in 
which case all companies will respond. 

OUT-OF-TOWN CALL. 

For a fire out of the city or brush fire, 2 — 2 — 2, all companies will 
assemble at their respective quarters and await orders. 

ALL OUT SIGNAL. 

Two blows on the bells, which dismisses all members at company 
quarters. 

The signal will be given after companies working at a fire have 
returned to quarters, "made up," and are ready to respond to another 
alarm. 

TEST SIGNAL, 

One blow at 12.30 noon. 

SCHOOL SIGNALS. 

1 — 1, with fifteen seconds between blows, closes primary and middle 
schools. 
2 — 2, with fifteen seconds between the 2's, closes all the schools. 
Time for giving same, 7.30 A. M., 11.30 A. M. or 1.15 P. M. 

jnLITAKY CALL. 

12 blows twice. 



Whistle Signals. 

The following code of signals will be observed by members of the 

department: 
21 



322 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

For Captain, or officer in command of companj-, one long whistle. 
For Coal, two long whistles followed bj- as manj- short whistles as 
indicate the number of the engine. 
To Limber Up, three long whistles. 



Rules for Exercising Horses. 

It shall be the duty of the drivers of engines, hose carriages, hose 
wagons, hook-and-ladder trucks, and all other apparatus connected 
with this department, to exercise the horses every day, weather per- 
mitting, except Sundaj^ with the exception of engines having "first" 
and "second runs," and in such cases must exercise on days of "second 
run," the same to be done within the following limits: 

CENTKAI. STATIOX. 

North to Pearl street. East to Union street. 

South to Merrimack street, West to Chestnut street. 

^•ORTII MAIN-STREET STATION. 

North to Adams street. East to Main street. 

South to Granite street. West to Dubuque street. 

LAKE AVENUE STATION. 

North to Manchester street. East to Belmont street. 

South to Summer street. West to Maple street. 

MAPLE-STREET STATION. 

North to Myrtle street. East to Linden street. 

South to Hanover street. West to Union street. 

AVEBSTER-STREET STATION. 

North to Clarke street. East to Union street. 

South to Penacook street. West to Elm street. 

BIMMON-STREET STATION (MCGREGORVILLE) . 

North to Kelly street. East to Beauport street. 

South to Wayne street. West to Eimmon street. 

bakersville station. 

North over B. & M. Eailroad. East to Calef road. 

South to Baker street. . West to Brown avenue. 



KEPOIIT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 323 

WILSON HILL, STATION. 

North to Old Bridge street. East to Mammoth road. 

South to Hanover street. West to Belmont street. 

Drivers must confine themselves to the above, and in no case take 
their horses beyond the prescribed limits, except for shoeing or in 
case of fire, without jiermission from the chief or assistant engineer. 

In exercising, care must be taken to avoid colliding with other teams. 
In approaching corners, crossings, street car tracks, and in going down 
grades the speed of the horses must be checked. 

In ease of an alarm use gong freely while returning to quarters. 

Any driver violating these rules will be liable to suspension or dis- 
charge. 



Station and Sleeping Rooms. 

All stations of this department will be open from 7 A. M. until 9 r. ii., 
and the members at the several stations will receive visitors and citi- 
zens courteousl}', answer all questions in a gentlemanly manner, and 
give any proper attention. 

No political or religious discussions will be allowed in any of the 
houses of this department or by the officers or men when on duty. 

No permanent member of the department shall attend a caucus or 
political convention as delegate, distribute tickets at any election, or 
take any part whatever in political matters other than to exercise his 
right of sufi'rage. 

Gambling of any kind shall not be permitted in or about any of the 
houses or premises occupied by the department. 

Stations to be closed at 10 o'clock p. m. 

All games must cease at 10 p. if., and the stations be closed at that 
hour, to permit the permanent men, and those detailed to sleep in the 
station, to retire undisturbed. 

None of the stations will be open after the above hour (except in 
case of an alarm of fire) without permission of the chief or a member 
of the board of engineers, although stations may be kep-t open on Sat- 
urday evening until 11 o'clock. 

No spirituous or malt liquors shall be allowed in or about any of the 
fire stations, and any member of the fire department seen intoxicated 
at any fire or alarm of fire, or who shall be known to frequent places 
where liquors are sold, during the progress of a fire, or w^henever in 
uniform, shall be subject to reprimand, or dismissal, as the board of 
engineers may determine. 

Any permanent member visiting any liquor saloon in uniform, ex- 
cept in the performance of his duty as. a member of the fire depart- 
ment, or who is intoxicated or visits places where intoxicating liquors 



324 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

are sold, while on duty, shall be suspended or discharged, as the board 
of engineers may determine. 

Any violation of these rules will subject the offender to reprimand 
or dismissal, and commanding officers of companies having knowledge 
of the violation of the foregoing rules will suspend the offender, and 
report the same to the chief or board of engineers. 

The permanent men shall exercise a careful supervision over the 
sleeping apartments, see that the rooms are put in order and the beds 
made as early as 11 o'clock A. M., and that the bedding is changed at 
suitable intervals. The occupants of each bed will be held responsible 
for the cleanliness of the same, and held strictly accountable for any 
damage to either bed or bed clothing through carelessness. After 10 
p. M. occupants shall refrain from loud talking or in any manner dis- 
turbing the rest of any who have retired. 



Absent from C'ty or Station. 

No permanent member shall leave his station to visit any section 
of the cit3' without permission of the chief or an assistant engineer, 
or leave the city, or be granted leave of absence, without notifying the 
chief engineer and procuring a substitute to his acceptance, and the 
substitute shall be on duty ibefore the applicant leaves his post, except 
on his regular "daj's off." 

Any call member expecting to be absent from the city shall notify the cnp- 
tain of his company, and before leaving the city shall procure a substitute 
satisfactory to said captain. 

Substitutes running for and answering the names of anj- call man 
shall be entitled to the same paj^ pro rata, as the call man for whom 
they answer for the time they substitute, and the clerks of the several 
companies shall keep said substitutes' time and notify the regular call 
man of the amount due from him and pay said amount to the substi- 
tute performing said service. 

Anjr member of the department not complying with the above rules 
shall be liable to suspension or expulsion from the department. 

The hour of leaving will be 7 o'clock a. m., and members will not 
leave their station until the arrival of the spare driver. They must 
report promptly at 7 o'clock the following morning for dutj'. 

Those whose breakfast hour is 6 o'clock will remain at station until 
7 o'clock on the dates of their "davs off." 



KEPORT OF- THE FIRP: ENGINEER. 



326 



DAYS OFF. 

Until Further Notice, the "Days OfP" of the Permanent Men Will be as 

Follows : 



Company. 






Company. 



1—15 

2—16 

3-17 

4—18 

5—19 

6-20 

7—21 

8—22 

9-2| 

10—24 

11—25 

12—26 

13-27 

14—28 

15—29 

16-30 

17—31 

18— 1 

19— 2 



Hall 

Harvey. . . 
Young .... 
Parsons*. . 

GouUl 

Cann, Geo. A. 

Rogers 

Dyer 

Gage 

Pherson 

Porter 

Richardson. . 

Walker 

Piper 

Dunbar* 

McLeod* 

Porter* 

Howe 

Worthen 



Engine 1. 
" 1. 
" 1. 
Hose 1. 
Engine 4. 
" 4. 
" 4. 
Truck 1 . 
" 1. 
" 1. 
Chemical 1 . 
" 1. 

Engine & Lad'r 3 
" 3 
" •' 3 

" " 3. 

3. 
Hose 2. 
" 2. 



19- 

20— 3 
21—4 

22— 6 

23— 6 

24— 7 

25— 8 

26— 9 
29— 9 
27—10 
28-11 
29—12 
30—13 
31—14 
11—24 
12—27 
14 -28 
15-29 



Morse 

Smith 

Cann, B. C*. 

Hubbell 

Morrill 

Denyou 

Whitcomb... 

Lane - 

Edgar 

Foster 

Tebbetts 

St. John* .... 

Kemp* 

Smith* 

Gustaf son . . . 

Crosby 

Morrill 

Tuson 



Engine & Ladder 5. 
" 5. 
•• '• 6. 

5. 
Engine 2. 
" 2. 
" 2. 
" 2. 
Engine & Ladder 6. 



Hose 3. 
" 3. 
Combination 2. 
" 2. 

Substitute Driver. 



* In February St. John will take 16 instead of 29, Dunbar 24 instead of 29, McLeod 
25 instead of 30, and Kemp 26 instead of 30. In July B. C. Cann will takeC in.stead of 
4, and Parsons 14 instead of 4. In February, April, June, September and November 
Captain Porter will take 1, and Captain Smith 27. 

Should a fire be in progress at the hour of changes, men Avill remain 
on duty until the "all out" is given, e'xcept permission is obtained of 
the chief, or engineer in charge of fire, to retire. Should a "general" 
or third alarm be rung while members are in town, they will be 
expected to report .for duty. 



326 ANNUAL OFFICIAL llEPORTS. 

Entering Building with Line of Hose. 

All steamer and hose companies are instructed not to enter any build- 
ing- with a line of hose unless the stop nozzle is closed, except in cases 
where they can see the fire, and when their streams will reach it with- 
out damage to other property, due care being exercised as to whether 
their services are needed. 

Extra care should be exercised by hosemen of steamer companies 
in using "shut-off" nozzles, shutting off to be slowly and gradually. 



List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 1905, 
With Loss and Insurance. 

Box 17. Sunday, January 1, 9.32 A. M. Two-and-a-half-story wooden 
dwelling house, 304 Hanover street, owned and occupied bj- Jeremiah B. 
Jones. Cause, alcohol lamp used by a "roomer." Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 
3. Extinguished by Chemical. Value of building, $S,000; damage to 
building, $70; insurance on building, $3,500; insurance paid, $70. Value 
of contents, $1,500; damage to contents, $35; insurance on contents, 
$400; insurance paid, $35. 

Still. Sunday, Januarj^ 1, 8.05 p. M. Chimnej- fire in dwelling- 
house, 154 Winter street, owned and occupied bj' Mrs. M. P. Verrette. 
Members of Engine Companj^ No. 2 responded with Combination 
Wagon. Used two ponj- extinguishers. 

Box 82. W^ednesday, January 4, 2.50 A. M. Second alarm, 2.55 A. M. 
Wooden stable, 16 Bridge street, owned by the Nichols heirs, and occu- 
pied by N. H. Walker as a boarding stable, in which at time of fire 
twenty-two (22) horses were suffocated before they could be rescued. 
Cause, careless, overheated stove. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, Hose 1, 2, Combination 2, Trucks 1, 3, 
5, 6. Value of building, $3,000; damage to building, $2,000; insurance, 
$1,200; insurance paid, $1,200. Value of contents, $7,563; damage to 
contents, $7,046; insurance, $1,025; insurance paid, $1,025. 

Still. Wednesday, January 4, 7.18 A. u. Some one saw steam from 
foregoing fire, and telephoned for assistance. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. 

Box 53. Wednesday, January 4, 7.54 P. M. Two-story dwelling- 
house, 65 Mast street, owned and occupied by Duncan P. Wallace. 
Cause, thawing water pipe. Extinguished hy chemical stream from 
Combination No. 1. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, $2,500; damage, $25; 
insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, $25. No damage to contents. 

Still. Wednesdaj-, January 4, 9.42 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 651 Elm street, owned by heirs of Daniel Connor. Chemical 
engine responded. Used 1 pony extinguisher. 



IIEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 327 

Still. Thursday, January 5, S.OT p. m. Chimney fire in eight-tene- 
ment block, 52 Church street, owned by Patrick Kearns, and occupied 
by Joseph Masse and others. Members of Chemical Company re- 
sponded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Saturday, January 7, 7.05 A. M. Chimney fire in two-and-a- 
half-story ten-tenement block, corner Wayne and McGregor streets, 
owned by David Labonte, and occupied by several families. Members 
of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. Used three pony 
extinguishers. 

Still. "\^Tednesday, January 11, 9.30 A. si. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 259 East Spruce street, owned by Lizzie Burrows, and occupied 
by James McLaughlin. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 
3 responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Friday, January 13, 11.45 a. m. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 280 Massabesic street, oAvned by Melvin Paige, and occupied by 
J. W. Deming. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 re- 
sponded. Used four pony extinguishers. 

Box 4. Saturday, January 14, 5. 58 A. M. Wooden car barn, corner 
Depot and Franklin streets, belonging to the Manchester Traction, 
Light & Power Company. Cause, electric wire. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Saturday, January 14, 10.22 a. m. Chimnej^ fire in dwelling- 
house, 181 Mdnchester street, owned and occupied by D. McKenna. 
Members of Chemical Company responded. Used one pony extin- 
guisher. 

Still. Saturday, January 14, 11.35 A. M. Excelsior in rear of Hazel- 
ton block, 14 Birch street, owned by Whitney, Merrill, and Godfrey, 
and occupied by New England Telephone & Telegraph Company. 
Members of Chemical Company responded. No service required. 

Still. Sunday, January 15, 1 a. m. Escaping steam from the gro- 
cery store of Splane & Messier, 90 Concord street. Chemical engine 
responded. No service required. 

Still. Sunday, January 15, 5.50 A. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 125 Central street, owned by Harrison D. Lord, and occupied 
. by T. Charland and others. No service required. 

Still. Mondaj^ January 16, 4 p. M. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden tenement block, 515 North Main street, owned by Joseph 
Lariviere, and occupied by several families. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 6 responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, January 17, 6.30 P. M. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 356 Chestnut street, owned by Charles McCarthy, and occupied 
by Nellie Moley. No service required. 

Box 91. Saturday, January 21, 2.04 p. M. Cottage house and barn 
on Hooksett road, two and one half miles from city hall, owned and 
occupied by Mrs. Laura E. Carpenter. Cause (probably), hot ashes. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 4, 5, Chem- 



328 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ical, Hose 2, Truck 5. Value of buildings, $2,600; damage, $1,950; in- 
surance, $1,450; insurance paid, $1,275. Value of contents, $1,100; dam- 
age, $600; no insurance. 

Still. Tuesday, January 24, 11.45 A. M. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block, 861-863 Elm street, occujiied bj' Hard}' & Folsom as dry 
and fancy goods store. Members of Chemical Company responded. 

Still. Wednesday, January 25, 8.10 A. M. One-story brick building 
on Hancock street used as a "pitch-house," owned and occupied by 
T. W. Jones' Brewing Company. Cause, kettle of pitch boiling over. 
Hose Company No. 3 responded. Laid 200 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Wednesday, January 25, 5.35 P. M. Chimney fire in brick 
tenement block, 59 Stark corporation, owned by Stark Mills, and occu- 
pied by Henry Johnson and others. Chemical engine responded. 
Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Thursday, January 26, 8.20 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 58 Massabesic street, owned by Nelson Paige and occupied by 
Laura Smith. Members of Engine and Ladder Company' No, 3 re- 
sponded. No service required. 

Box 115. Thursday, January 26, 10.40 A. M. Two-and-a-half-story 
wooden dwelling-house, 250 WaJnut street, owned by Thomas Dixon, 
and occupied by Scott Foster and Mrs, E. E. Grant. Cause, kerosene 
oil stove in upstairs tenement, where the fire was wholly confined. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 2, Truck 5, Extinguished by Chemical engine. Value of build- 
ing, $4,500; damage, $354.42; insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, 
$354.42. Value of contents, $400; damage, $20; no insurance. 

Still. Thursday, January 26, 5.20 p. M. Chimnej' fire in wooden 
tenement block, 518 Maple street, owned b^- Charles H. Carpenter of 
Chichester, N. H., and occupied bj' Mrs. Elizabeth Thompson and 
others. Members of Hose Company No, 2 responded. Used two pony 
extinguishers. 

Box 114. Thursday, January 26, 7.23 P. M. Two-and-a-half-story 
dwelling-house, 168 Pearl street, owned and occupied hy Herbert A. 
Trull. Cause, match igniting curtain and burning small amount of 
bedding. Box pulled by C. A. Perkins. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 5, Hose 2, Combination 2, Truck 5, Damage slight. 

Still. Thursday, January 26, 7.35 p. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden tenement and business block, 38 Amory street, owned by 
Joseph Quirin, and occupied hy several parties. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Companj- No. 6 responded. L'sed four pony extinguish- 
ers. 

Still. Fridaj', January 27, 5.30 P. M. Three-storj- wooden tenement 
block, 8 Laurel street, owned by Mrs. W, H. Topping, and occupied by 
W. H. Kennedj\ Cause, small curtain. Chemical engine responded. 
No service required. 

Still. Saturday, Januarj- 28, 2.15 p. m. Tliree-stor^' brick and stone 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 329 

building-, 876 Elm street, owned and occupied by New Hampshire In- 
surance Co. Cause, accident to thermostat. 

Stiix. Saturday, January 28, 5.50 p. M. Brick dwelling-, 528 Union, 
street, owned by St. Paul's M. E. church, and occupied by Eev. Edg'ar 
Blake. Cause, breaking of kerosene lamp. Lamp and table thrown 
out before arrival of the Chemical engine, which responded. 

Still. Saturday, January 28, 6.30 P. M. Cottage house on Calef 
road. Cause, tipping- over kerosene lamp. Hose Company No. 3 re- 
sponded. No service required. 

Still, Wednesday, February 1, 8.15 A. M. Wooden dwelling-house, 
1855 Elm street, owned and occupied by U. C. Crosby. Cause, smoking 
chimney. No service required. 

Box 9. Wednesday, February 1, 1.30 P. M. Barn between North 
River road and Concord. Railroad, belonging to State Industrial School, 
in which five horses, thirty-four cows, and one hundred pigs per- 
ished. Box struck from switch board by Chief Lane. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 5. Value of building-, 
$15,000; damage, $15,000; insurance, $3,200 (blanket); insurance paid, 
$3,200. 

Still. Thursday, February 2, 8.29 A. M. Rekindling of ruins of In- 
dustrial School barn. Delegations from Engine and Ladder Companj- 
No. 5 and from Central Station responded. 

Still. Thursday, Februarj^ 2, 5 P. u. Rekindling of ruins. Delega- 
tion from Central Station responded. 

Still. Saturday, February 4, 4 p. m. Three-story wooden tenement 
block, 52 Lake avenue, owned by Emma J. Hamlin, and occupied by 
James Ashford and others. Cause, thawing water pipes with kerosene 
lamp. Chemical engine responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 
Value of building, $1,500; damage, $50; insurance, $1,000; insurance 
paid, $50. No damage to contents. 

Still. Saturday, February 4, 8 p. ii. Rekindling of previous fire. 
Chemical engine responded. No service required. 

Still. Saturdaj^ February 4, 9.35 P. u. Chimney fire in two-and-a- 
half-story wooden dwelling, 534 Hevey street, owned by Joseph Bour- 
geois, and occupied by two families. Members of Engine and Ladder 
Company No. 6 responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 51. Tuesday, February 7, 10.35 A. M. Cottage house, 94 Fourth 
street (West Side), owned by Mrs. Elizabeth Noon and occupied by 
Victor Romyns. Cause, smoking in bed. Damage slight. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Truck 6. Used one 
pony extinguisher. 

Box 52. Wednesdaj', Februarj^ S, 3.35 P. 3L Wooden tenement 
house, 406 Granite street, owned and occupied by Henrietta Wenzel. 
Cause, thawing water pipes. Box pulled bj^ citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, $2,200; 



330 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

damage, $60; insurance, $1,200; insurance paid, $00. Xo damage to 
contents. 

Still. Monday, February 13, 5.22 p. m. Two-and-a-half-story dwell- 
ing-house, 26 Welch avenue, owned by B. Frank Welch and occupied 
by Elizabeth Kane and others. Cause, explosion of oil stove. Hose 
Company No. '.i responded with carriage. No service required. 

Still. Wednesday, Februarj^ 15, 10.50 a. m. Chimney fire in three- 
story wooden tenement block, 367 Chestnut street, owned by estate 
of Isaac Huse and occupied by A. E. Bellerive and others. Members 
of Chemical Company responded. No service required. 

Still. Thursday, February 16, 5.07 A. M. Chimney fire in two-and- 
a-half-story tenement house, 377 Dubuque street, owned bj^ Charles 
W. Cheney and occupied by two families. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 6 responded with hose carriage. Used two pony 
extinguishers. 

Box 53. Thursday, February 16, 7.13 p. M. Cottage house, 98 Win- 
ter street, owned and occupied by Sarah Gannon. Cause, breaking a 
lamp, which set fire to a couch. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, $700; 
damage, $460; insurance. .$500; insurance paid, $460. Value of contents, 
$300; damage, $100; no insurance. 

Box 4. Friday, Februarj^ 17, 7.35 P. M. Cottage house, rear of 46 
Auburn street, owned by Mrs. Katherine Gill and unoccupied. Cause, 
thawing water pipes. Box pulled by boy. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $600; 
damage, $170; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $170. 

Box 26. Saturday, February 18, 6.21 P. M. Two-story carriage and 
blacksmith shop, corner Bridge and Kussell streets, owned and occupied 
by J. B. McCrillis & Son. Cause, sparks from forge. Box pulled by 
Walter Seaward, Jr. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Hose 2, 
Combination 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $800; damage, $350; insur- 
ance, $300; insurance paid, $300. A'alue of contents, $650; damage, 
$200; insurance, $200; insurance paid, $176. 

Still. Sunday, February 19, 11.55 A. M. Chimney fire in four-tene- 
ment block, 130 Merrimack street, owned by J. F. Mellady and occu- 
pied by Victor Paris and others. Members of Chemical Company re- 
sponded. No service required. 

Still. Monday, February 20, 8.30 A. M. Chimney fire in two-and-a- 
half-story dwelling, 520 North Main street, owned and occupied by 
Jean B. Chamberland. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 
6 responded with hose sled. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Box S. Friday, February 24, 12.53 p. ii. One-and-a-half-story wooden 
block, 64 Hollis street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company 
and occupied by Joseph Gagnon. Cause, smokers pipe. Box pulled by 
Gagnon. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Truck 1, 5. Extinguished by Chemical engine. Value of contents, 
$200; damage, $10; no insurance. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 331 

Box 215. Friday, February 24, 6.07 P. M. Three-story double house, 
151 Wilson street, owned by Burpee sisters and occupied by N. P. K. 
Linton. Cause, burning- out of chimney. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. No 
damage. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, February 28, 11.10 p. si. Chimney fire in two-story 
wooden tenement house, 208 Manchester street, owned by Anne Mc- 
Kenna and occupied by Joseph Founie and others. Chemical engine 
responded. No service required. 

Still. Thursday, March 2, 4.30 P. M. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 260 Cedar street, owned and occupied by Timothy Carr. Mem- 
bers of Chemical Company responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 4. Saturday, March 4, 12.30 A. M. Second alarm, 12.34 A. M. 
Electric car barn on Depot, Franklin, and Granite streets, owned and 
occupied by Manchester Traction, Light & Power Company for the 
storage of electric cars. Cause, electric wires. Box pulled by otficer. 
Second alarm by Captain Palmer of Chemical Company. Companies 
responding: Engines 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3, 5. 
Value of building and contents, $420,000; damage, $111,894.86 insurance, 
$420,000; insurance paid, $109,412.06 (blanket). 

Still, Saturday, March 4, 8.03 A. u. Chimney fire in brick (Web- 
ster) block, 1306 Elm street, in Webster House, kept by P. J. Mor- 
rissey. Chemical engine responded. No service required. 

Box 81. Saturday, March 4, I.IS p. M. Two-and-a-half-story wooden 
tenement block, rear 28 Concord street, owned by Thomas D. Paris 
and occupied by three families. Cause, dumping hot ashes against 
building. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 
4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. Value of building, $2,000; damage, $300; 
insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, $300. No damage to contents. 

Still. Saturday, March 4, 6.45 P. M. Chimney fire in brick block, 
14 South Main street, owned by Willis B. Kendall and occupied by 
several families and stores. Members of Engine Company No. 2 re- 
sponded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still, Sunday, March 5, 6,50 p. m. Electric street car, owned by 
Boston & Maine Eailroad. Cause, hot box while car was at corner 
of Bridge and Beech streets. Chemical engine responded, but fire 
extinguished before its arrival. 

Box 312. Tuesdaj% March 7, 7.4S A. M. Three-and-a-half-story wood- 
en tenement block, 451 South Main street, owned by E. W. Sawyer and 
occupied by several families. Cause, excelsior in cellar lighted by 
boy's cigarette. Extinguished before arrival of apparatus. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Friday, March 10, 7 p. m. Three-story wooden block, 34 
Amory street, owned by Joseph Quirin, and occupied by several fami- 
lies and two stores. Cause, smoking pipe igniting rubbish in cellar. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. Used one 
pony extinguisher. 



332 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

Still. Saturday, IMarch 11, 10.02 A. M. Chimney fire in tvvo-and-a- 
half-story dwelling-house, 106 Brook street, owned by Mrs. Mary A. 
Morrison and occupied by her and the Misses Dunbar. No damage. 

Still. Monday, March 13, 5.57 P. u. Chimney fire in two-and-a-half- 
story dwelling, 134 Manchester street, owned by Kate G. Sullivan and 
occupied by her and Max Doucette. Members of Chemical responded. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Wednesday-, March 15, 8.10 A. M. Freight car Xo. 48290, in 
freight yard south of Auburn street, owned by the Boston & Maine 
Eailroad, loaded with potatoes consigned to J. C. Furness. Cause, over- 
heated stove in car. Hose Company No. 1 responded. Value of car, 
$800; damage, $20; no insurance. Value of potatoes, $250; damage, $20; 
no insurance. 

Still. Thursday, March 16, 11.10 A. M. City dump on Putnam 
street. Set by boys. Members of Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 6 
responded with hose carriage. Laid 650 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Saturday, March 18, 2.30 p. si. City dump on Montgomery 
street. Cause, hot ashes: Members of Engine Company No. 2 re- 
sponded with Combination. 

Still. Monday, March 20, 7.35 a. m. Chimney fire in two-and-a- 
half-story tenement house, 54 Cedar street, owned by Patrick Harring- 
ton and occupied bj- B. A. Johnson and Fletcher. Used one 

pony extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, March 21, 2.15 p. m. Cottage house on North Eiver 
road, corner L^^nion street (three miles from city hall), owned and occu- 
pied by Hugh Kicker. Cause, overheated furnace. Chemical engine 
responded. Fire extinguished before it arrival. Value of building, 
$2,500; damage, $40; insurance, $1,200; insurance paid, $40. 

Still. Saturday', ^larch 25, 2.15 a. m. 'Wooden two-story building, 
65 Central street, owned by Patrick Harrington and occupied by Hol- 
land & Harrington as a liquor saloon. Cause, cigar stub burning small 
hole in floor. Chemical engine responded. Extinguished hx police 
officers before its arrival. 

Still. Tuesday, March 28, 5.25 p. m. Dwelling-house, 414 Lake ave- 
nue, owmed by Franlc Morrison and occupied bj' George L. Slack. 
Cause, open draft set fire to potted meat. Members of Engine and 
LaQlder Company No. 3 resjionded. No service required. 

Box 23. Thursday, March 30, S.13 A. M. Cottage house, 2SS Lake ave- 
nue, owned by Mrs. David Thaj-er and occupied by W. Frank Kennedj'. 
Cause, sparks from stove igniting lounge. Box pulled by Officer Moher. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. 
Damage slight. 

Still. Saturday, April 1, 12.10 p. ii. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 389 Merrimack street, owned and occupied by ;Miss Lizzie Hoyt. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. Used one 
pony extinguisher. 



EEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 333 

Still. Saturday, April 1, 5.10 p. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden tenement block, 437 North Main street, owned by Baxter 
heirs and occupied by nine families. Members of Engine and Ladder 
Company No. 6 responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Saturday, April 1, 9.,30 P. M. Grass fire on North River road 
on land of Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 5 responded with hose carriage. 

Still. Saturday, April 1, 10.45 p. M. Grass fire on Brown avenue on 
land owned by F. M. Gerrish. Hose Company No. 3 responded. Used 
one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Sunday, April 2, 3.15 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling-house, 
130 East Spruce street, occupied by Archie Mayo. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. Used three pony extinguish- 
ers. 

Still. Sunday, April 2, 6.20 p. m. Chimney fire in cottage house, 
210 Sagamore street, occupied by Claus Johnson. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company' No. 5 responded with carriage. Used one pony 
extinguisher. 

Still. Sunday, April 2, 9.25 P. M. Chimney fire in three-tenement 
block, 58 Ash street, owned by Mrs. George Gardner and occupied by 
Burton N. Elliott and others. Members of Hose Company No. 2 re- 
sponded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Stili.. Monday, April 3, 10.10 A. M. Grass fire in Hancock street, on 
land owned by N. S. Burns. Cause, sparks from Boston & Maine loco- 
motive. Hose Company No. 3 responded. Laid 150 feet of hose. 

Still. Monday, April 3, 10.45 a. m. Grass fire on land owned by 
heirs of George Hall, corner North Elver road and Webster street. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded with hose 
carriage. Laid 450 feet of hose. Used one pony extinguisher. Cause, 
sparks from Boston & Maine locomotive. 

Still. Monday, April 3, 11.45 A. M. Grass fire on land of A. M. East- 
man estate. North Eiver road, caused by sparks from Boston & Maine 
locomotive. Laid 1,000 feet of hose. 

Box 314. Monday, April 3, 12.04 p. M. Cottage house, 58 Mill street, 
owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company "and occupied by R. F. 
Mitchell. Cause, hot ashes on steps. Damage very slight. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Independent Hose No. 5, Engines 
5, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 5. 

Still. Monday, April 3, 1.45 p. M. Brush fire on Cartier street, on 
land owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. Members of En- 
gine Company No. 2 responded. Set by boys. 

Box 212. Monday, April 3, 2.27 P. M. Grass fire on land in rear of 
328 Cypress street, owned by Garland & Pratt. Cause, spark from 
Boston & Maine locomotive. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 3, Hose 2, Combination 2, Truck 3. 

Still. Monday, April 3, 5.55 p. m. Chimney fire in two-and-a-half- 



384 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

story dwelling, 386 Eimmon street, owned by Jere. J. Sullivan and oc- 
cupied by two families. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 
6 responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, April 4, 3.30 P. M. Grass fire on Calef road on land 
owned by John B. Clarke estate. Hose Company No, 3 responded. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still, Saturday, April 8, 12.15 p. m. Brush fire on east side of North 
Union street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. Members 
of Engine and Ladder Companj' No. 5 responded with hose carriage. 
Used one ponj' extinguisher. 

Still. Saturday, April 8, 12.20 p. m. Grass fire on Calef road, on 
land owned by People's Gas Company. Hose Company No. 3 responded. 

Still. Saturday, April 8, 2.30 p, m. Brush fire on east side of North 
Union street, owned bj' Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, Members 
of Engine and Ladder Company No, 5 responded with hose carriage. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still, Monday, April 10, 3 p, m. City dump on Putnam street. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Compan3^ No. 6 responded with hose 
carriage. 

Still. Tuesday, April 11, 7.50 p. K. Chimney fire in dwelling-house, 
366 Massabesic street, owned by Mrs. J, G. Fletcher and occupied by 
E, S, Cowen, Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 re- 
sponded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Thursday, April 13, 1.04 p. m, Three-storj'^ tenement block, 

37 Bridge street, owned by Folsom and occupied b}' Dora O'Don- 

nell. Cause, defective chimnej'. Slight fire in partition. Chemical en- 
gine responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 15. Thursday, April 13, 5,53 P, M, Three-story brick block, 68 
Orange street, owned by heirs of John C. Young and occupied by 
Michael Cavanaugh and others. Cause, drapery on mantel. Box pulled 
by boy. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Truck 1, 5. 

Still. Thursday', April 13, 9.15 p. M. Chimnej- fire in dwelling- 
house, 753 Summer street, owned by Mrs, A, B, Ames and occupied by 
S, C. Austin. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 re- 
sponded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still, Fridaj-, April 14, 3,16 P, M. Grass fire on land near Elm and 
Baker streets, owned by estate of Waterman Smith. Hose Company 
No. 3 resiDonded. Laid 450 feet of hose. 

Still. Saturday, April 15, 3.30 p. m. Brush and grass fire on Nutt 
road, below the Driving Park, caused by men burning brush on adjoin- 
ing land. Hose Company No, 3 responded. 

Still. Sundaj', April 16, 5.55 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling-house, 
355 Concord street, owned and occupied by M. Auger. Combination 
No. 2 responded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Box 21. Monday, April 17, 12.51 P. M. Two-storj- tenement house. 



REPORT OF THE FIKE ENGINEER. 335 

332 Pine street, owned by Storer Nason and occupied by Mrs. Catherine 
Keefe and others. Cause, sparks from chimney. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of building, $2,700; damage, $100; insurance, $1,200; insurance 
paid, $100. No damage to contents. 

Stiix. Tuesday, April 18, 6.45 p. sr. Brush fire in Dorr's pasture, on 
land owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, Members of En- 
gine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded with hose carriage. 

Still. Wednesdaj', April 19, 11.40 A. ii. Brush fire on land west of 
Straw road and north of Goflfstown road. Responded to by delegation 
from companies at the Central Station and from Engine and Ladder 
Company No. 6. 

Still. Wednesdaj-, April 19, 12.30 p. m. Brush and grass fire on 
Calef road, on land of Mrs. C. C. Webster, caused by sparks from 
Boston & Maine locomotive. Hose Company No. 3 responded. 

2 — 2 — 2. Wednesday, April 19, 12.57 P. M. Brush fire on Londonderry 
road on land of Warren Harvey estate, William French, and Frank 
Riley. Delegation from Central Station responded. 

Still. Wednesday, April 19, 1.30 p. m. Grass fire on Sagamore 
street, on land owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded with hose car- 
riage. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Wednesday, April 19, 3.40 P. M. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 538 Central street, owned and occupied by C. F. Tirrell. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. Used three 
pony extinguishers. 

Box 71. Friday, April 21, 10 A. M. Two-and-a-half-story dwelling- 
house, 162 Cedar street, owned and occupied by Ellen Sullivan. Cause, 
slight fire in bed in attic. Box pulled by Oflicer Proctor. Companies 
responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. 

Still. Fridaj^ April 21, 1 p. m. Brush fire on Salmon street on land 
owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. Memibers of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Saturday, April 22, 6.45 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 53 Douglas street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company 
and occupied by four families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 re- 
sponded. 

2—2—2. Sunday, April 23, 4.30 P. ir. Brush fire on Bald Hill road. 
Delegation from Central Station responded. On duty four hours. 

Still. Sunday, April 23, 5.50 p. m. Brush fire on Nutt road, oppo- 
site Driving Park, on land owned by Healy and Williams heirs. Hose 
Company No. 3 responded. 

Still. Sunday, April 23, 5.55 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling-house, 
157 Cedar street, owned by Julia Sheehan and occupied by James Col- 
lins. Members of Chemical responded. 

Still. Monday, April 24, 9.50 A. m. Chimney fire in cottage house, 



336 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

259 Bridge street, owned by F. W. Fisher and occupied by Dennis 
Evers. Members of Hose Company No. 2 responded. Used one pony 
extinguisher. 

Still. Monday, April 24, 12.25 P. M. Brush fire on land on Boynton 
street, owned bj- Kennard heirs. Members of Engine Company ]S^o. 2 
responded. On duty two hours. 

Still. Monday, April 24, 1.54 p. si. Brush fire on Bald Hill road and 
Londonderry' turnpike, mostly in Hooksett. Delegation from differ- 
ent companies responded. On duty seven hours. 

Still. Monday, April 24, ,'i p. m. Brush fire on Bedford road, on 
land owned 'by heirs of J. Curtis and others. Members of Engine Com- 
pany No. 2 responded. Three sets of buildings dangerously threat- 
ened. On duty one and three fourths hours. 

Still. Mondaj^ April 24, 4.50 p. li. Brush fire on Brown avenue, on 
land owned by F. M. Gerrish. Cause, sparks from Boston & Maine 
locomotive. Hose Company No. 3 responded. 

Still. Mondaj% April 24, 7 p. m. Brush fire in Riddle's grove on 
Mast and Ividdle street, owned by heirs of George W. Kiddle. Members 
of Engine Company No. 2 responded. 

Still. Mondaj', April 24, 8.50 p. m. Rubbish on land betweeen Elm 
and Chestnut streets, owned bj- estate of Henry Chandler. Members 
of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded with hose carriage. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

2 — 2 — 2. Tuesdays April 25, 4.36 p. M. Brush fire on north side of 
Bald Hill road. Responded to by delegation from Central Station. 

Still. Wednesday, April 26, 8.45 A. si. Brush fire on land corner 
Jewett and Vinton streets. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 
No. 3 responded. 

2^2 — 2. Wednesday, April 26, 10.25 A. si. Brush fire on both sides 
Bald Hill road. Delegation from different companies responded. On 
duty seven and one half hours. 

2 — 2 — 2. Wednesday, April 26, 5.02 P. si. Brush fire on Taylor street 
and south to Weston road. Delegation from several companies re- 
sponded. On duty two hoUrs. 

Still. Sunday, April 30, 5.11 p. si. Camp fire of "Scut gang" on land 
of Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, north of the True W. Jones 
Brewery on Hancock street. Hose Company No. 3 responded. 

Box 71. Sunday, April 30, 6.20 P. sr. Rubbish in rear of block, 126 
East Spruce street, owned by W. A. Pierce of Portsmouth. ^ Cause, ex- 
celsior set hy boys. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. 

Still. Monday, 3Iay 1, 12.45 A. si. Dwelling-house on Shirley Hill 
road in Goffstown, owned and occupied by Edward C. Emerson. Mem- 
bers of Engine Company No. 2 responded with Combination Wagon. 
Used three chemical tanks. 

Box 511. Monday, iMny 1, 1.1] A. si. Needless alarm. Some seeing 



KEPOKT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 337 

light of fire from the above Emerson fire i)ullecl the box. Companies 
responding: Engines 2, 6, Truck C. 

Still. Monday, May 1, 5.30 A. m. Slight fire in stable at 49 Alfred 
street, owned by A. E. Morse and occupied by Walter R. Cox. Mem- 
bers of Combination No. 2 responded with wagon. No service re- 
quired. 

Still. Sunday, May 7, 6.10 a. m. Cottage house, 53 Jane street, 
owned by Mrs. J. B. Pattee and occupied by Nels Mortenson and Jane 
Manning. Cause, hot ashes. Hose Company No. 2 responded. 

Still. Mondaj^ May 8, 4.30 p. m. Brush and grass fire, corner 
Wayne and Hevey streets, on land owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded 
with hose carriage. 

Still. Tuesday, May 9,, 1.30 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling-house, 
177 Laurel street, owned by George E. Gage and occupied by James 
W. Wilson. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded 
with hose wagon. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, May 9, 6.20 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement block, 
371 Chestnut street, owned by Isaac Huse estate and occupied by 
George Eoss and others. Members of Chemical Company responded. 

2—2 — 2. Wednesday, May 10, 11.30 A; M. Two-and-a-half-story brick 
house on Derry road, five miles from city hall, owned by John D. Em- 
ery and occupied by David A. Woodbury. Cause, defective chimney. 
Sparks from the burning building set fire to grass and spread to wood- 
land owned by Susan D. Clement, Wesley Platts, B. W. Corning, W. L. 
and A. W. Corning, and George Carr. Engine Company No. 3 and 
delegations from other companies responded. Value of buildings, 
$4,000; damage, $4,000; insurance, $2,000; insurance, $2,000. Value of 
contents, $5,000; damage, $5,000; no insurance. 

Box 7. Thursday, May 11, 1.11 A. m. Four-story brick block, 119- 
121 Hanover street (Hotel Linden), owned by George F. Bosher and 
occupied bj^ James S. Dyer as pool room. The fire originated in the 
cellar under the pool room, where it was confined, doing but little 
damage. Cause, hot ashes. Box pulled by officer. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of 
building, $12,000; damage, $300; insurance, $12,000; insurance paid. 
$252. No damage to contents. 

Still. Thursday, May 11, 5.30 p. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
tenement house, owned by estate of Freeman Woodbury and occupied 
by V. St. Germain. Chemical engine responded. No service required. 

Box 71. Thursday, May 11, 5.4S p. u. Dwelling-house, 186 Auburn 
street, owned by John Conway and occupied (on third floor) by Jennie 
Wolf. Slight fire in closet caused by defective fine. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Truck 3. 

Box 15. Thursday, May 18, 2.37 P. M. Four-story wooden tenement 

22 



338 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EErORTS. 

block, 16 Clark avenue, owned by G. F. Higgins and F. B. Dennett, 
and occupied on fourth floor by Ezrie Tessier. Burned bed and slight 
hole in floor. Cause unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of 
building, $4,000; damage, $25; insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, $25. 

Still. Monday, May 22, 10.03 A. M. Four-story brick block (Hotel 
Laxon), 496 Chestnut street, bed in room 8— C, occupied by Samuel Lit- 
tle. Cause unknown. Damage slight. Chemical engine responded. 

2 — 2—2. Monday, May 22, 4.02 P. IL Brush fire at Pine Island Park, 
Goffe's Falls, owned by Manchester Street Railway. Engine Company 
Xo. 4, with steamer and hose wagon, together with delegation from 
other companies responded. 

Still. Tuesday, May 23, 8. IS A. M. Three-story brick building, 53 
Lowell street, owned by Mrs. Rebecca Kennard, and occupied by M. G. 
Melvin for manufacturing confectionery. Cause, boiling over of kettle 
of fat. Hose Company No. 1 responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 
Value of building, $3,500; damage, $65; insurance, $1,400; insurance 
paid, $65; value of contents, $2,000; damage, $180; insurance, $1,200; 
insurance paid, $180. 

Still. Tuesday, May 23, 8.05 p. M. The pavilion at Lake Massa- 
besic, owned and occupied by the Manchester Street Railwaj'. Cause, 
spontaneous combustion from painter's rags. Engine and Ladder 
Company No. 3 started to respond with steamer and hose wagon, but 
were stopped en route as fire was quickly extinguished. 

Still. Wednesday, May 24, 6.10 a. m. Chimnej' fire at 44 Church 
street in eight-tenement block, owned by Peter Challaqur and occu- 
pied by Albert Desfosses and others. Chemical engine responded. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

■Still. Wednesday, May 24, 2.30 p. m. Grass fire on Oakland ave- 
nue and Portsmouth railroad. Cause, sparks from Boston & Maine 
locomotive. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. 

Still. Thursday, May 25, 10.40 a. m. Four-story brick building, 1017 
Elm street, corner Concord, owned by Simons and Bean heirs and 
others. Slight fire in room 10 on second floor, occupied by Frank L 
Bodge. Cause, gas stove too near partition. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. 

Still. Monday, May 29, 12.45 p. m. Slight fire on roof of L in rear 
of dwelling-house, 131 Amherst street, occupied by F. W. Baker, 
Members of Chemical responded. Extinguished before their arrival. 

Box 4. Monday, May 29, 4.30 P. M. Four-story wooden tenement 
block, 8 Spruce street, owned by Connor heirs and occupied by several 
families. Cause tipping over stove in tenement occupied by family of 
Polanders. No damage. No service required. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 6. Monday, May 29, 5 p. m. A crate of packing straw in Elm 
west back street, rear of C. A. Hoitt Co., 810 Elm street. Cause, set by 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 330 

boys. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 
6, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 82. Monday, ;May 29, 10.25 P. M. Two-story wooden block, 
33 Bridge street. Lamp explosion. No damage. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Fridaj-, June 2, 10.15 A. M. Tenement block, 56 Birch street, 

owned by Folsom and occupied by John Blanchard and others. 

Cause, house filled with smoke from chimne}\ Chemical engine re- 
sponded. 

Box 92. Friday, June 2, 4.02 P. M. A barn at 916 Chestnut street, 
owned and occupied by Fred K. Ramsey. Cause, electric light wires. 
Box pulled by Edwin R. Sias. Companies responding: Engine 5, Chem- 
ical, Hose 2, Truck 5. Value of building, $1,000; damage, $407; insur- 
ance, $1,000 (blanket) ; insurance paid, $407. 

Still. Saturday, June 10, 4.50 p. m. Four-story brick tenement 
block, 633 Elm street, owned by heirs of Michael Connor and occupied 
by -several families. Cause, bundle of rags in third story. Chemical 
engine responded. 

Still. Wednesday, June 14, 12.20 p. m. Bundle of rags in Laurel 
(south) back street. Chemical engine responded. No service required. 

Box 21. Thursday, June 15, 12.45 A. M. Two-story flat-roof barn, 
rear of 173 Central street, owned by J. J. Silva of Boston and occupied 
by B. Steinberg as storehouse for old rags and junk. Cause, spon- 
taneous combustion. Box pulled by Frank Brooks. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of build- 
ing, $900; damage, $300; insurance, $300; insurance paid, $300. Value 
of contents, $1,800; damage, $500; no insurance. 

Box 26. Saturday, June 17, 11.14 A. M. Cottage house, 94 Ashland 
street, owned by A. A. Bunker and occupied 'by George Bartlett. 
Cause, clothing hanging over the stove. Damage slight. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Hose 2, Combination 
2, Truck 3. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Saturday, June 24, 9.40 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, corner Monroe street and River road, owned by Alonzo Elliott 
and occupied by Sidney Watts. Members of Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany No. 5 responded with hose carriage. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Sunday, June 25, 9 a. m. Dwelling-house, 23 Vernon street, 
owned by O. E. Kimball and occupied by H. Danforth. Cause, "back 
draft" to chimney filled house with smoke. Hose Company No. 3 re- 
sponded. 

Box 4. Monday, June 26, 1.30 P. M. Four-story brick block, 698 
Elm street, owned by estate of Michael Prout and occupied by the 
Annis Flour & Grain Company as grocery store. The fire originated 
in the basement, where it was wholly confined and probably caused 
by lightning coming in on electric wires. Box pulled by citizen. 



3^0 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Companies responding-: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of building, $40,000; damage, $17,500; insurance, $1,350; insur- 
ance paid, $1,350. Value of contents, $12,000; damage, $2,800; insur- 
ance, $6,000; insurance paid, $2,800. 

Box 16. Monday, June 26, 1.40 p. m. Out buildings, unoccupied, in 
process of repairs, in rear of 605 Union street, owned by Dr. J. F. 
Eobinson. Caused bj" lightning. Box pulled by J. W. Lindsey. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 2, 5, Chemical, Hose 2, Combination 2, 
Truck 5. Value of 'building, $600; damage, $155.50; insurance, $400; 
insurance paid, $155.50. 

Box 32. Wednesday, June 28, 11.01 P. M. False alarm. Companies 
responding: Engines 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 5. 

Box 312. Wednesday, July 5, 3.12 A. M. Barn, rear of 346 Xorth 
Main street, owned and occupied by Max Leinsing. Cause unknown, 
Box pulled bj' citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 4, 6, Hose 1, 
Truck 6. Value of building, $800; damage, $500; insurance, $700; in- 
surance paid, $475. Value of contents, $700; damage, $250; insur- 
ance, $700; insurance paid, $200. 

Box 4. Thursday, July 6, 12.25 P. M. Slight fire among rubbish in 
cellar of dwelling, 224 Chestnut street, owned by estate of John Ryan 
and occupied by several families. Companies responding: Engines 3, 
4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Thursday, July 6, 12.45 P. M. Confined smoke from foregoing 
fire caused alarm among the occupants of the block, and Chemical 
responded, but found no cause for alarm. 

Still. Friday, Julj^ 7, 12.06 P. M. Fire-flue under "pitch and tar" 
tank of Eobie Concrete Company, on Milford street, near St. Joseph's 
cemetery. Combination Wagon of Engine Xo. 2 responded with dele- 
gation of men. Used one chemical tank. 

Box 513. Friday, July 7, 12.11 P. M. Needless alarm for foregoing 
"still." Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, 
Truck 6. 

Still. Thursday, July 13, 6.53 P. m. Three-story wooden tenement 
block, 382 Pine street, owned by estate of Hiram Hill and occupied by 
several families. Cause, defective flue. Chemical engine responded. 
Used one pony extinguisher. Value of building, $3,000; damage, $7.46; 
insurance, $3,000; insurance paid, $7.46. Xo damage to contents. 

Still. Friday, July 14, 3.55 p. ji. Chimney fire in four-tenement 
block, 44 Lake avenue. Members of Chemical responded. Used one 
pony extinguisher. 

Still. Saturday, July 15, 10.58 a. m. Tenement house, 146 Massa- 
besic street, owned by Eliza Westover and occupied by the Misses 
Finney. Cause, ash barrel on piazza. Members of Engine and Ladder 
Company No. 3 responded. Extinguished with pail of water. 

Still. Sunday, July 16, 4.30 p. m. Brush fire on Dunbarton road, on 
land owned by Arthur Hall. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 



EEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 341 

No. 6 and delegation from Central Station responded. Used two pony 
extinguishers. 

Still. Monday, July 17, 4.35 p. m. Chimney fire in two-and-a-half- 
story wooden tenement house, 230 Notre Dame avenue, owned by Ed- 
ward Doherty and occupied by three families. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 6 responded with hose carriage. Used one pony 
extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, July 18, 9.45 a, m. Four-tenement block, 45 Ash- 
land street, owned by Fred S. Lewis and occupied by N. A. Sargent. 
Cause, oil stove in cellar. Members of Hose Company No. 2 responded. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 71. Tuesday, July 18, 11.17 A. M. Two two-and-a-half-story 
houses adjoining, 108 and 112 Auburn street, 108 owned by Michael 
Harrington and occupied by Mrs. Alice Young and James Haughey, 
and 112 owned by Timothy O'Neil and occupied by Peter and Lewis 
Popas. Cause, sparks from chimney. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. Value 
of Harrington building, $1,500; damage, $86.08; insurance, $700; insur- 
ance paid, $86.08. Value of O'Neil's building, $2,000; damage, $71.63; 
insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, $71.63. No damage to contents. 

Stiix. Fridaj^ July 21, 8.10 p. m. A popcorn handcart with gasoline 
burner, at corner of Union and Bridge streets, ignited by overflow of 
gasoline. Members of Hose Company No. 2 responded with hose 
ivagon. Used one pony extinguisher. No owner could be found on 
arrival of men. 

Still. Sunday, July 23, 3.10 P. M. Brush fire on Brown avenue, on 
land owned by Mrs. Izetta Henderson and occupied by Oscar Theim. 
Cause, set by boys. Hose Company No. 3 responded. 

iStill. Tuesday, Julj' 25, 7.15 A. M. City dump on Montgomery 
street. Members of Engine Companj^ No. 2 responded with hose 
wagon. Laid 750 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Tuesday, July 25, 4.30 p. m. City dump on Montgomery 
street. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with hose 
wagon. Laid 750 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Box 313. Tuesday, July 25, 11.31 P. M. Two-and-a-half-story dwell- 
ing, 428 North Main street, owned and occupied by Emilie Paquette. 
Cause, smoking in bed by Peter Duffey, who was burned quite severely 
and was taken to Notre Dame hospital. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 2, 6, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 6. Used two 
pony extinguishers. Damage slight. 

Still. Wednesday, July 26, 6.35 P. M. Citj^ dumxi on Montgomery 
street. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with hose 
wagon. Laid 750 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Wednesday, July 26, 9.40 p. m. Hot chimney in tenement 
house, 255 Chestnut street, owned by Quirin & Precourt and occupied 
by Joseph Prince. Members of Chemical Companj' responded. No 
service required. 



342 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Thursday, July 27, 4.45 p. m. Bridge over the canal at Bridge 
street, owned by the city. Cause, sparks from Boston & Maine loco- 
motive setting tire to planking. Chemical responded. Used one tank. 
Damage slight. 

Box 321. Friday, July 28, 7.20 A. M. Three-story wooden tenement 
block, 11 Marion street, owned bj^ David Labonty and occupied by Wil- 
fred Jean. Slight fire in closet on third floor. Cause unknown. Dam- 
age slight. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
2, 6, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 6. 

2—2—2. Friday, July 28, 2.54 P. M. Brush fire on Goffstown road, 
near Goffstown line, on land owned by Franklin Tennej^ estate, and 
others. Cause, set bj- blueberry pickers. Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany No. 6 responded with delegation from Central Station. 

Box 323. Thursdaj', August 3, 5.53 P. M. One-story carriage shed in 
rear of 316 Bartlett street, owned and occupied by Gagne Bros. Cause, 
probably set by children playing. Damage slight. Used two pony 
extinguishers. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: En- 
gines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Box 18. Friday, August 4, 9.10 P. M. One-story woodshed in rear 
of 302 Merrimack street, owned by A. C. Knowlton and occupied by 
several families. Cause, spontaneous combustion. Box pulled bj^ Mas- 
ter James Colby. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Combination 
2, Hose 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $200; damage, $175; no insur- 
ance. Value of contents, $400; damage, $200; no insurance. 

Box 3. Mondaj-, August 7, 12.41 A. M. Two-storj- wooden building 
connected with iron foundrj', and used as storeroom for patterns at 
329-371 Elm street, owned and occupied by Charles H. Hutchinson. 
Cause, lightning. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of buildings and 
contents, $18,000; damage, $5,500; insurance, $11,500 (blanket); insur- 
ance paid, $5,500. 

Still. Friday, August 25, 5.55 p. m. City dump on Putnam street. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 6 responded with hose 
carriage. Laid 750 feet of hose from hj'drant. 

Box 314. Friday, August 25, 8.38 P. M. False alarm for a bonfire in 
celebration of Old Home Week at Amoskeag. Box pulled by unknown 
person. Companies responding: Engines 5, 6, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 
5. 

Still. Monday, August 28, 2.30 P. M. Kubbish on Putnam street 
dump. Members of Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 6 responded with 
hose carriage. Laid 750 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Fridaj', September 1, 1.30 p. m. City dump on Putnam street. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 6 responded with hose 
carriage. Laid 750 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Box 82. Fridaj', September 1, 10.05 P. M. Four-story "brick block, 
?tj-22 Birch street, owned by J. Adam Graf and occupied by several 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 343 

families. The fire originated on the fourth floor in tenement occupied 
by Jacob Kustra, and was caused by filling kerosene lamp while burn- 
ing. Box pulled by Paul Stawszenski. Companies responding: En- 
gines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, 
$7,800; damage, $104.59; insurance, $4,400; insurance paid, $104.59. 
Value of contents, $500; damage, $50; no insurance. 

Box 23. Sunday, September 3, 11.28 A. M. Two-story tenement 
house, 333 Central street, owned by Mrs. H. A. 'Sheehan and occupied by 
A. W. Johnson and John McWiggin. Cause, slight fire in bed. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Damage slight. 

Still. Sunday, September 3, 8.18 P. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 155 Chestnut street, owned by John Twomey and occupied by 
Thomas Barrett. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, September 5, 3.40 p. m. Four-story brick block, 
1275 Elm street, owned by Gordon Woodbury and occuj)ied by several 
families. Cause, feather pillow. Chemical engine responded. No ser- 
vice required. 

Still. Thursday, September 7, 6.30 p. M. Rubbish on citj^ dump on 
Montgomery street. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded 
with Combination Wagon. Laid 800 feet of hose from hydrant. On 
duty three hours. 

Box 9. Sunday, September 10, 3.11 A. M. Two-and-a-half-story un- 
oecupie'd house, 2108 Elm street, owned by Dr. Noel E. Guillet, was un- 
dergoing repairs and alterations. Cause, overheated furnace used to 
dry plastering. Box pulled by Officer J. B. Connors. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 5. Value of build- 
ing, $8,000; damage, $5,700; insurance, $5,700; insurance paid, $5,700. 
Value of contents, $3,000; damage, $2,000; insurance, $2,000; insurance 
paid, $1,900. 

Still. Saturday-, September 16, 6.10 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 50 Bridge street, occupied by Jesse E. Varnum and others. 
Chemical engine responded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Friday, September 22, 3.20 a. m. Four-story brick block, 51 
Hanover street, owned by estate of John N. Brown and occupied by J. 
Harris as crockery store. Cause unknown. Slight fire among packing 
cases, doing but slight damage. Chemical engine responded. Used 
one tank. « 

Still. Saturday, September 23, 12.10 a. m. Three-story brick block, 
1083 Elm street, corner Lowell, owned by estate of A. F. Perrj^ and 
occupied by Thomas J. Lemay as optician. Slight fire in pan of op- 
tical goods. Cause unknown. Chemical engine responded. Extin- 
guished with pan of water. 

Box 4. Sunday, September 24, 1.30 p. M. Wtooden tenement house 
rear 37 Lake avenue, owned by estate of Patrick Harrington and occu- 
pied by Joseph Dubois and others. Cause, sparks from chimney ignit- 



344 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ing -shingles, burning slightly, doing but little damage. Box pulled 
bj'^ citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Truck 1, 3. Value of building, $1,000; damage, $30; insurance, $1,000; 
insurance paid, $30. No damage to contents. 

Box 218. Sunday, September 24, 3.24 P. M. Two-and-a-half-story 
dwelling, corner Hall and Harvard streets, in process of construction 
hy J. H. Mendell & Co., for Mr. Durham. Cause, boj-s setting fire to 
shavings outside of building. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 3, 4, Hose 2, Combination 2, Truck 3. Damage, 
$10; no insurance. 

Box 213. Friday, September 29, 10 P. M. Wood and coal sheds at 
corner Maple and Somerville street, owned and occupied by C. A. and 
A. W. Flint. Cause, unknown. Box pulled by Alex Gendron. Com- 
panies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 3, Truck 3. 
Value of buildings, $1,000; damage, $1,000; insurance, $G50; insurance 
paid, $650. Value of contents, $2,000; damage, $1,050; insurance, $850; 
insurance paid, $850. 

Still. Thursday, October 5, 3 p. M. Slight fire in the planking of 
McGregor bridge, caused bj' cigar stub. Extinguished by Driver F. 
S. Morrill. 

Box 312. Sunday, October 8, 7.06 P. M. Chimney fire in four-story 
tenement block, 22 (rear) Wayne street, owned by Kate L. Collity 
and occupied by several families. Box pulled bj' citizen. Companies 
responding: Engines 2, 4, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Tuesdaj', October 10, 10.10 p. m. Peat bog on Dartmouth 
street, owned by New Hampshire Improvement Company. Members 
of Engine Company No. 2 responded with Combination Wagon. Laid 
400 feet of hose from hydrant. On duty two and one half hours. 

Still. Wednesday, October 11, 9.03 a. m. Tenement house, 53 Jane 
street, owned by J. B. Pattee and occupied by Jane Planning. Cause, 
children pla^-ing with matches set fire to a lounge. Members of Hose 
Company No. 2 responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Thursday, October 12, 1.30 P. xr. City dump on Putnam 
street. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded 
with hose carriage. Laid 700 feet of hose from hj-drant. 

Still. Sundaj^ October 15, 9.45 A. si. Chimney fire in two-and-a- 
half-story brick house, 28 Mechanic street, owned by Stark Manufac- 
turing Company and occupied by Anne Marshall. Members of Chem- 
ical Company responded. No service required. 

Still. Sunday, October 15, 6.30 P. M. Four-story brick block, 1198 
Elm street, owned by estate of Kay and Clough and occupied by A. L. 
Franks & Co., electricians, and others. Cause, smoke unaccounted for. 
Members of Chemical Company responded. No service required. 

Still. Sundajs October 22, 10.50 a. m. Four-story brick block, 116S 
Elm street, owned by Orrin E. Kimball and occupied bj- Felix Har- 
bour as grocery store. Cause, escaping steam mistaken for smoke 
Members of Chemical Company- responded. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 345 

Still. Sunday, October 22, 11.40 A. M. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, rear 60 Merrimack street, owned by Kean & Sheehan and occu- 
pied by Mrs. Albanna Bennett. ^Members of Chemical Company re- 
sponded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Thursday, October 26, 7.45 A. M. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 473 Bridge street, owned and occupied by Charles S. Osgood. 
Combination No. 2 responded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Thursday, October 26, 5.35 p. m. Three-story wooden shoe 
shop, owned by Rimmon Shoe Company and occupied by H. B. Read 
Shoe Company. Cause, explosion of naphtha. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. Used two pony extinguishers" 
and two hand extinguishers. 

Box 313. Sunday, October 29, 12.43 A. M. Three-and-a-half-story 
wooden tenement 'block, 10 Amory street, owned by Moise Potvin 
and Thomas Paris and occupied by Joseph Audette and Mrs. Paris. 
Cause, defective chimney. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing: Engines 2, 4, 6, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 6. Value of building, $10,000; 
damage, $225; insurance, $7,000; insurance paid, $225. 

Still. Monday, October 30, 1.15 A. m. City dump on Montgomery 
street. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with Combina- 
tion Wagon. Laid 800 feet of hose from hydrant. On duty four and 
one fourth hours. 

Box 73. Tuesday, October 31, 7.52 P. M. Three-story tenement block, 
298 Cedar street, owned by Michael Shea and occupied by Leo Le 
Gendre and others. Cause, paper shade over a lamj). Extinguished 
before arrival of apparatus. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. No damage. 

Box 711. Tuesdaj^, October 31, 9.51 P. M. A bonfire built by boys, 
corner Union and Green streets, celebrating Hallowe'en, caused some 
boy to pull the box. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, 
Hose 3, Truck 3. 

Box 216. Saturday, November 4, 9.30 A. M. Two-storj^ house, L, and 
barn, 101 Taylor street, owned by William Young and occupied by 
Harry A. Titus. Fire started in the barn from some unknown cause 
and gained considerable headway before being discovered. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Combination 2, Hose 
2, Truck 3. Value of building, $3,500; damage, $2,300; insurance, 
$2,500; insurance paid, $2,300. Value of contents, $1,500; damage, $900; 
insurance, $600; insurance paid, $600. 

Box 7. Monday, November 6, 5.27 A. M. Three-story wooden block, 
189 (rear) Hanover street, owned by G. K. Haines and occupied by H. 
H. Gilbert and others. Cause, slight fire among some clothes in closet 
on second floor. No damage. Box pulled by officer. Companies re- 
sponding. Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Extinguished 
before arrival of apparatus. 

Still. Tuesday, November 7, 8.20 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 



346 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

block, 39 Pearl street, occupied by J. Roy and others. No service re- 
quired. 

Box 27. Sunday, November 12, 2.29 P. M. Leaves in a barn cellar 
connected with two-and-a-half-story dwelling-house, 458 Hanover 
street, owned by E. S. Fletcher and occupied by Mrs. Gustave Mark- 
graf. Cause, set by tramps. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Combination No. 2, Truck 3. 

Still. Mondaj', November 13, 6.30 p. sr. Four-story brick building 
on Willow street extension, owned bj^ Cohas Building Company and 
occupied by McElwain Company. Cause, "water plug" blew out of 
boiler on account of low water. Hose Company No. 3 responded. No 
service required. 

Box 82. Thursday, November 16, 6.15 A. M. Three-story wooden 
building, 5, 7, 11 Washington street, owned by Chadwick heirs and E. 
F. Jones and occupied by Fred H. Poore as storehouse. Cause, defec- 
tive chimney. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 
1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $5,000; dam- 
age, $804; insurance, $3,500; insurance paid, $804. Value of contents, 
$1,760.25; damage, $928.63; insurance, $750; insurance paid, $750. 

Still. Fridaj', November 17, 9.20 p. m. Chimne3' fire in four-story 
brick block, 855 Elm street, corner Hanover, owned by John A. Riddle 
and occupied by sundry persons. Members of Truck Company- No. 1 
responded. Used two pony extinguishers. ' 

Still. Saturdaj', November 18, 1.45 a. m. Citj- dump on Montgom- 
ery street. Members of Engine Company- No. 2 responded with Com- 
bination Wagon. Laid 800 feet of hose from hj-drant. On dutj- two 
hours and fifty minutes. 

Still. Saturday, November IS, 8.10 a. m. Chimney fire in three- 
story wooden tenement block, 131 Amherst street, owned by Edgerly 
& Whittier and occupied by A. Quimby and others. Members of Chem- 
ical Company resiionded. No service required. 

Still. Saturday, November IS, 9.24 a. m. Chimney fire in three- 
story brick block, 990 Elm street, occupied by the Vermont Butter 
Company. No service required. 

Still. Saturday, November 18, 1.30 p. m. City dump on Montgom- 
ery street. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded. Laid 800 
feet of hose from hydrant. On duty two hours. 

Still. Sunday, November 19, 6.10 P. M. Chimney fire in six-tene- 
ment wooden block, 330 Lowell street, owned by Daniel Sanborn and 
occupied by Valford Lawson and others. Hose Company No. 2 re- 
sponded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Monday, November 20, 2.14 a. m. Telegram from Candia, N. 
H., asking assistance at the burning of postoffice, store, and telephone 
office. Engine Company No. 1, with steamer, hose carriage, and men, 
went to freight depot, where word was received before loading ap- 
paratus, that fire was under control. 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 347 

Still. Monday, November 20, 2.30 A. m. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block, 855 Elm street, owned by John A. Riddle and occupied by 
sundry persons. Members of Chemical Company responded. Used 
one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Monday, November 20, 10.30 A. m. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 107 Myrtle street, owned and occupied by heirs of Joseph Kid- 
der. Members of Chemical Company responded. No service required. 

Still. Monday, November 20, 3.35 p. m. Two-and-a-half-story wood- 
en block, 23 Amherst street, leased by Fred E. Richards and occupied 
by Peter Harris and others. Cause, overheated flue. Members of 
Chemical Company responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Monday, November 20, 5.25 p. M. Brush fire, corner Amory 
and Montgomery' streets, on woodland owned by Amoskeag Manu- 
facturing Company. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 
responded. 

Still. Monday, November 20, 8.30 p. m. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 274 Beech street, owned and occupied by Michael Linnehan. 
Members of Chemical Company responded. No services required. 

Still. Tuesday, November 21, 4.45 A. M. Three-story wooden shoe 
shop, 343 Kelley street, owned and occupied by H. B. Reed Shoe Man- 
ufacturing Company. Cause, shavings and paper in boiler room. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded with hose 
carriage. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, November 21, 1.43 P. M. Brush fire on Hooksett 
road, west side of river on land owned by Perry H. Dow, C. W. Farmer, 
and others. Delegation of twelve men from Central Station and En- 
gine Company No. 5 responded. On duty four hours. 

Still. Tuesday, November 21, 8.10 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 29 Washington street, owned by heirs of Dr. J. A. Jackson and 
occupied by C. Dailey and others. Members of Chemical Company re- 
sponded. No service required. 

Still. Wednesday, November 22, 1 p. M. Brush fire on Hooksett 
road, just across the line in Hooksett, in which three houses were 
threatened. Engine and Ladder Company No. 5, with steamer and 
hose carriage, and a delegation from Central Station, responded. Laid 
600 feet of hose. 

Still. Wednesday, November 22, 2 p. m. Brush fire on land at the 
north end of Hall street, owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
panj-. Combination Company No. 2 responded. 

Still. Wednesday, November 22, 2 p. M. From misinformation En- 
gine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded with hose wagon to the 
south end of Hall street for foregoing fire. 

Box 21. Wednesday, November 22, 6.07 p. m. Three-story wooden 
tenement house, 313 Pine street, owned by heirs of D. Libbej"^ and 
occupied by Alexis and George Spiro. Cause, overturning lamp. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, 



348 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Extinguished with chemical engine. Value of 
building, $3,000; damage, $500; insurance, $2,000; insurance paid, $500. 
Value of contents, $300; damage, $20; no insurance. 

Still. Thursday, November 23, 1.30 A. M. Dump of leather shav- 
ings in rear of Crafts & Green's shoe shop, West Hancock street. 
Members of Engine Companj- Xo. 2 responded with Combination 
Wagon. Laid 300 feet of hose from hydrant. On duty four hours. 

Still. Thursday, November 23, 1.20 p. M. Grass fire on land south 
of Cilley road and east of Beech street, owned by Mrs. Abbie Sawtelle. 
Hose Company No. 3 responded. 

2—2—2. Friday, November 24, 5.03 P. M. Brush fire at GofEe's Falls. 
Detail of thirtj-five men from different companies conveyed there by 
special electric car. On duty three hours. 

Still. Saturday, November 25, 1.28 p. M. Brush and grass fire on 
Brown avenue. South Manchester, on land owned by Eiverview Land 
Compan3\ Cause, sparks from Boston & Maine locomotive. Hose 
Company No. 3 responded. Laid 450 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Saturday, November 25, 2.30 p. m. Grass fire on west side of 
Pine street, near Sagamore, on land of Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. (2 — 2 — 2 on tappers.) Saturday, November 25, 7.28 P. M. 
Brush fire on Dunbarton road on land owned by Maxwell Ice Company 
and others. Engine Company No. 1 and delegation from other com- 
panies responded. On duty three hours. Needless call. 

Box 53. Tuesday, November 28, 10.40 A. M. Loose packing boxes at 
341 Mast road used by children as playhouse caught fire while chil- 
dren were playing. Needless alarm pulled by a boy. Companies re- 
sponding: Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. 

Still. Tuesday, November 28, 1.45 p. m. Four-story brick block, 
83 Hanover street, owned by Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
occupied by David Hawthorne as tea and coffee store. Cause over- 
heated coflfee roaster. Chemical engine responded. L^sed one tank. 

Still. Thursday, November 30, 11.10 A. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment house, 260 East Spruce street, owned by Frank Opelt and occu- 
pied by John J. Berry. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 
3 responded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Thursda3-, November 30, 4.35 p. si. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 154 Manchester street, owned bj^ Edgerly & Whittier and occu- 
pied by several families. Chemical engine responded. L^sed one tank. 

Still, Thursday, November 30, 4.40 P. M. Wooden tenement block 
137 Milford street, owned by Eobert Eenker and occupied by several 
families. The occupants of the block thought they could hear snap- 
ping and cracking between the floors and ceiling. Members of En- 
gine Companj'^ No. 2 responded with Combination Wagon, but could 
find no trace of fire. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 349 

Stiix. Friday, December 1, 1.45 p. m. Grass fire on North Kiver 
road, near Webster street, on land owned by Merrill and Whitney. 
Cause, sparks from Boston & Maine locomotive. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 5 responded with hose carriage. 

Box 7. Monday, December 4, 5.19 A. M. Two-story wooden build- 
ing, 193 Manchester street, owned by P. D. St. Germain and occui^ied 
by Isidore Bertheaume as a grocery store and cobbler's shop. Cause 
unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 
4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $200; damage, $S0; 
insurance, $100; insurance paid, $80. Value of contents, $150; damage, 
$50; Insurance, $100; insurance paid, $46. 

Box 21. Thursday, December 7, 5.57 P. M. Three-storj- wooden ten- 
ement block, 197 Hanover street, owned by Mrs. Frederick Smyth and 
occupied by Alexander St. Cyr and others. Fire originated in clothes 
room on second floor frorii some unknown cause. Box pulled by cit- 
izen. Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 
1, 3. Value of building, $4,500; damage, $20; insurance, $3,000; insur- 
ance paid, $20. Value of contents, $500; damage, $10; no insurance. 

Still. Friday, December 8, 11.15 a. m. Three-story brick building, 
64 Hanover street, owned by Hill, Gay, and others, and occupied by 
the John B. Clarke Company as a printing office. Cause, chimney. 
Members of Chemical Company responded. No service required. 

Still. Saturdaj^ December 9, 5.27 p. m. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement block, 525 Elm street, owned by E. M. Slayton and occupied 
by several families. Chemical engine responded. Used one pony ex- 
tinguisher. 

Box 4. Saturday, December 9, 6.27 p. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
wooden tenement house, 41 Lake avenue, owned by estate of Patrick 
Harrington and occupied by several families. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 
No damage. 

Box 71. Sunday, December 10, 6.15 A. M. Three-story wooden block, 
80 Cedar street, owned by Broderick & Healey and occupied by Philip 
Harrington and others. The fire originated in the basement used as 
boys' clubroom, from defective stove. Box pulled by citizen. Compa- 
nies responding: Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. Value of 
building, $4,000; damage, $229.89; insurance, $3,000; insurance paid, 
$229.89. No damage to contents. 

Still. Sunday, December 10, 5.35 p. m. Chimney fire in wooden 
block, 13 Amory street, owned by Paris & Potvin. Members of En- 
gine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. Used two pony extin- 
guishers. 

Box 52. Sunday, December 10, 6.05 p. m. Three-story wooden build- 
ing (Hotel Merrimack), 15 South Main street, owned b3' Maurice J. 
Connor and occupied by William Arnold as boarding house. Fire orig- 
inated in an oil closet on second floor and quickly spread to "blind 



350 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

attic" in the L part. Box pulled bj- citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of building, $4,000; damage, 
$1,800; insurance, $3,000; insurance paid, $1,600. Value of contents, 
$1,400; damage, $300.50; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $215.60. 

Still. Sundaj', December 10, 6.20 p. m. Chimnej^ fire in wooden 
tenement block, 49 Bridge street, owned by E. Kennedy and occupied 
by J. Marcona and others. Members of Chemical Company- responded. 

Still. Tuesday, December 12, 7.52 p. m. Four-.story brick building 
(Old City Hotel), corner Elm and Lowell streets, owned by Higgins 
Bros., and .occupied by Thomas J. Foley. Cause, chimney fire. Mem- 
bers of Chemical Company responded. 

Still. Tuesday, December 12, 9.50 P. M. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement block, 7 Barr street, owned bj'^ Fred G. Stark and occupied 
by several families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded. 
No service required. 

Still. Thursdaj', December 14, 8.50 P. m. Dwelling-house at 29 
Third street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Eliza Jubel. Cause, escaping 
steam mistaken for smoke. Members of Engine Company No. 2 re- 
sponded with Combination Wagon. 

Still. Friday, December 15, 5.25 P. M. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 182 Central street, owned and occupied by John V. Martell. 
Chemical engine responded. 

Box 7. Saturday, December 16, 10.38 A. m. Two-story brick stable, 
44 Manchester street, owned by James estate and occupied by Vogel 
and Brooks. Cause, thawing water pipes with burning paper. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding, Engines 1, 3, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Extinguished before arrival of department. 

Still. Saturday, December 16, 5 p. M. WTooden ten-footer, 538 
Elm street (rear), owned by Higgins and Clark and occupied by Patsey 
Thomas, manufacturer of "images." Cause, thawing pipes. Damage 
slight. Chemical engine responded. 

Box 81. Saturday, December 16, 6.29 p. m. Three-story wooden 
tenement block, 427 Chestnut street, owned bj- heirs of John D. Pat- 
terson and occupied by several families. Slight fire in couch. Box 
pulled by George F. Millar. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. 

Still. Wednesday, December 20, 6.55 a. k. Two-story brick county 
court house, on Market street, owned by Hillsborough countj'. Cause, 
low water in boiler, causing covering of pipes to burn. Members of 
Chemical and Hose Company No. 1 responded. 

Still. Wednesday, December 20, 5.15 P. M. Chimney fire in Park 
Hotel, 8 Pine street, owned bj- Connor heirs and occupied bj' Condon 
and Challis. Hose Company No. 3 responded. Used two ponj' ex- 
tinguishers. 

Still. Thursday, December 21, 9.05 A. M. Electric street car on 
Elm street, between Concord and Lowell streets, owned by Manchester 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 351 

Traction, Light & Power Company. Controller short-circuited. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. Used one pony 
extinguisher. 

Box 15. Saturday, December 23, 2.07 p. m. Three-story wooden 
tenement block (16 Washington block), 60 Pearl street, owned 
by Charles C. Hayes and occupied by several families. Burning chim- 
ney. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 1, 4, 5, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 81. Monday, December 25, 8.37 p. M. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment house, 106 Concord street, owned by Mrs. James Kelliher and 
occupied by Lewis Ritchie. Cause, candle set fire to a Christmas tree 
and lace curtains. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding: 
Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Truck 1. Value of building, $3,000; 
damage, $40; insurance, $2,700; insurance paid, $40. Value of contents, 
$400; damage, $10; no insurance. 

Still. Tuesday, December 26, 5.55 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 136 Walker street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Christiana 
Brown. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with Combina- 
tion Wagon. Use two pony extinguishers and one chemical tank. 

Number of alarms during the year as they occurred by months: 

Still. Bell. Total. 

January 23 8 31 

February 12 8 20 

March 14 5 19 

April 41 11 52 

May 14 9 23 

June 6 6 12 

July 15 7 22 

August 2 4 6 

September 7 6 13 

October 11 4 15 

November 29 7 36 

December 14 9 23 

188 84 272 



352 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOHTS. 



COMPANIES RESPONDING. 



Months. 



Engines. 



Hose. 



2 3 



Trlck. 



January 

February ... 

March 

April. 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . 

October 

November.'.. 
December .. , 



Total 38 117 40 I 37 2r 17 83 



5C 



28 37 14 33 37 , 20 I 16 



Estimated Value of Property. 
Engine No. 1 . 

LOCATED OX ^•I>'E STEEET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer 

1 one-horse wagon 

3 gray horses for steamer 

1 gray horse for hose wagon 

4 swinging harnesses 

1 pair double exercise harnesses 

1 single exercise harness 

l,SoO feet of fabric hose 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 

Tools, furniture, and fixtures 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$4,000.00 

400.00 

600.00 

200.00 

200.00 

50.00 

40.00 

S32.50 

SO.OO 

200.00 

125.00 



$6,727.50 



liEPORT OF THE FIKE ENGINEER. 



353 



Engine No. 2. 

LOCATED AT NORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQVOG. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $4,000.00 

1 Combination Chemical and Hose wagon 1,700.00 

1 exercise wagon, poles, shafts, and three-horse hitch.. 250.00 

3 horses for steamer 600.00 

1 pair horses for hose wagon 400.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $40, 1 at $20 100.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

1 double sled 60.00 

3,050 feet of fabric hose 1,372.50 

Stable fixtures and blankets 94.00 

Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc 466.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 125.00 

Total amount $9,417.50 



Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

LOCATE© ON J^KEl AVENUE), COjaXEIl MASBABESIC STREET. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

1 two-horse hose wagon 400.00 

1 two-horse truck and equipinents 1,700.00 

1 three-horse hitch attachment (extra) 200.00 

1 pair horses for steamer 250.00 

1 pair baj' horses for hose wagon 400.00 

1 pair black horses for truck 300.00 

3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $50, 1 at $40 140.00 

6 swinging harnesses 300.00 

2.S00 feet of fabric hose 1,260.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc SO. 00 

Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc 575.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

1 exercise wagon 250.00 

Total amount $9,505.00 



1 first-size Amoskeaj 

1 hose wagon 

23 



Engine No. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

steamer 



$4,200.00 
400.00 



354 



ANNCTAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



3 horses for steamer $600.00 

1 horse for hose wagon 150.00 

4 exercise harnesses 60.00 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

2,200 feet of fabric hose 990.00 

Hall fvirniture, beds, bedding, etc 275.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 75.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 125.00 

Total amount $7,075.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 5. 

LOCATED OX WEBSTER STREET, COR>Tai CHESTNITT. 

1 third-size Amoskeag steamer $3,600.00 

1 two-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage 600.00 

1 steel frame ladder truck 1,650.00 

1 pair bay horses for steamer 400.00 

1 pair bay horses for truck 400.00 

1 bay horse for hose carriage 200.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

1 double sled 50.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2 pairs exercise harnesses 100.00 

2,400 feet of fabric hose 1,080.00 

Bedding, furniture, tools, etc 307.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 90.00 

Firemen's suits, badges, etc 150.00 

Total amount $9,202.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 6. 

LOCATED AT OORXER AMORY AXD RIMiI07\ STREETS. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

1 hook-and-ladder truck (with Bangor extension) 1,680.00 

1 one-horse carriage 600.00 

2 gray horses for steamer 300.00 

2 baj^ horses for truck 267.00 

1 gray horse for hose carriage 150.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2,200 feet of fabric hose 990.00 

Hall furniture, carpets, beds, bedding, etc 375.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



355 



Stable fixtures, blankets, etc $85.00 

"riremen's suits and badges 150.00 

1 exercise wagon 290.50 

Total amount $8,637.50 



Hose No. 1 . 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage $600.00 

2 horses 300.00 

2 single harnesses 70.00 

1 set Hobb's runners 90.00 

1 hose sled 20.00 

1,700 feet of fabric hose 765.00 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding, etc 60.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 100.00 

Total amount $2,255.00 



Hose No, 2. 

LOCATED OX ilAPLE STKEET, OORKEE OF EAST HIGH. 

1 two-horse hose wagon 

2 bay horses 

2 swinging harnesses 

1 exercise wagon 

1,900 feet of fabric hose 

Furniture and fixtures, beds and bedding 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$600.00 
500.00 
100.00 
325.00 
855.00 
150.00 
100.00 



$2,630.00 



Hose No. 3. 

LOCATED ON SOUTH EKM STREOET, BAKEESVILLE. 

1 combination hose wagon (with ladders) 

1 pair gray horses 

1 pair swinging harnesses^ 



$1,000.00 
100.00 
100.00 



356 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1 pair exercise harnesses $50.00 

1 exercise wagon 260.00 

2,400 feet of fabric hose 1,080.00 

Furniture, fixtures, bedding, etc 85.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 65.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 80.00 



Total amount $2,820.00 



Combination No. 2. 

(LOCATED OX WKSTOX STREET, COBINEK OF CONXORD. 

1 Combination Chemical and Ilose wagon $1,700.00 

2 bay horses 550.00 

2 swinging harnesses 100.00 

1 exercise wagon 250.00 

1,900 feet of fabric hose 855.00 

Furniture, fixtures, bedding, etc 482.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 80.00 



Total amount $4,067.00 



Hook and Ladder Company No. 1. 

LOCATED OX VIXE STREET, 

1 aerial hook-and-ladder truck $4,200.00 

3 horses 600.00 

3 exercise harnesses 75.00 

3 swinging harnesses 150.00 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 360.00 

3 rubber blanket covers 72.00 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

Beds, bedding, and furniture 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 60.00 

Firemen's siiits and badges 150.00 



Total amount $5,942.00 



REPORT OF THE P^IRE ENGINEER. 

Chemical Engine No. 1 . 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) engine 

1 pair bay horses 

1 pair of exercise harnesses 

1 pair swinging harnesses 

Furniture and fixtures 

Stable fixtures and blankets 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 

Supply Wagon. 

1 supplj^ wagon, with coal boxes 



867 



$2,250.00 
500.00 
50.00 
100.00 
75.00 
50.00 
35.00 

$3,060.00 



$150.00 



Exercise Wagon- 

AT CENTKAL STATION, VINE STREET, 

1 four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole, shafts, three- 
horse hitch, and coal boxes 

Spare Hose Carriage and Hose. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET, 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage 

1,800 feet of fabric hose (for re-lining) 

700 feet of fabric hose, new 

Total amount 



$250.00 



$400.00 
360.00 
420.00 



$1,180.00 



E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine. 

STORED AT SHEDS OF ENGINE, WO. 2. 

Old U tank Amoskeag engine (worth for exchange).... 



$200.00 



Engineers' Department. 



1 bay horse . . . 
1 chief's wagon 



$325.00 
275.00 



858 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1 swinging harness $37.00 

5 engineers' white rubber coats 37.50 

5 engineers' lanterns 20.00 

Furniture and fixtures 150.00 

Total amount $844.50 



Riverside Hose Company No. 5. 

LOCATED AT CORNEK OF OLD FALLS KOAD AND FRONT STREET. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage $400.00 

800 feet of leather hose 200.00 

800 feet of fabric hose 240.00 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc 40.00 

Furniture and fixtures 10.00 

Total amount $890.00 



Hallsville Hose Company No. 6. 

LOCATED AT CORNER OF MAMlfOTH ROAD AND MASSABESIC STREET. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage $30.00 

500 feet of leather hose 125.00 

Nozzle, wrenches, etc 15.00 

Total amount $170.00 



Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage. 

r 
LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage $30.00 

400 feet of fabric hose 120.00 

2 hosepipes v 10.00 

Total amount $160.00 



Pond Road Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED IN BASEMENT OF W. P. FARMER'S BARN. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage $30.00 

500 feet of leather hose 125.00 

Total amount $155.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 359 

Sleeping Hall. 

AT CENTRAX, STATION, VINE STREET. 

5 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc $200.00 



Extra Horses. 

1 steel gray horse $60.00 

1 gray horse 175.00 

1 pair gray horses 300.00 

Total amount $'535.00 



Fire Alarm Telegraph. 

At cost, including additions $23,050.00 

Remodeling in 1885 6,000.00 

"Individual tapper" system 4,000.00 

Storage battery (in 1S9S) 1,850.00 

Switch protector board 175.00 

Four boxes added in 1905 500.00 

Wire, brackets, and tools 100.00 

Repair wagon 150.00 

Total amount $35,825.00 



Recapitulation.' 

Engine Company Xo. 1 $6,727.50 

Engine Company Xo. 2 , 9,417.50 

Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 3 9,505.00 

Engine Company Xo. 4 7,075.00 

Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 5 9,202.00 

Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 6 8,637.50 

Hose Company Xo. 1 2,255.00 

Hose Company Xo. 2 2,630.00 

Hose Company X^o. 3 2,820.00 

Combination Company Xo. 2 4,067.00 

Hook and Ladder Company Xo. 1 5,942.00 

Chemical Engine Company Xo. 1 3,060.00 

Supply wagon 150.00 

Exercise wagon (Central Station) 250.00 

Spare hose carriage and hose 1,180.00 

The old "Harrington" engine 200.00 

Engineer's department 844.50 



360 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Riverside Hose No. o $890.00 

Hallsville Hose No. 6 170.00 

Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage 160.00 

Pond Road Hose Carriage 155.00 

Sleeping hall 200.00 

Extra horses 535.00 

Fire-alarm telegraph 35,825.00 

Total $111,898.00 



Hydrants Set, 1905. 

Brown avenue, Goffe's Falls, 300 feet north of Mr. Calef's residence. 

Brown avenue, Goffe's Falls, 95 feet north of Mr. Colby's barn. 

Brown avenue, Goffe's Falls, 100 feet north of James Kelliher's resi- 
dence. 

Brown avenue, Goffe's Falls, opposite entrance to Pine Island park. 

Brown avenue, Goffe's Falls, opposite Mr. Walker's residence. 

Brown avenue, Goffe's Falls, opposite No. 295G. 

Brown avenue, Goffe's Falls, opposite No. 3022. 

Brown avenue, Goffe's Falls, south of schoolhouse. 

Calef road, Goffe's Falls, opposite J. L. Poor's residence. 

Calef road, Goffe's Falls, corner Brown avenue. 

Concord street, corner Weston. / 

Crown street, corner Park avenue. 

Dix street, corner Hall. 

Kellej' street, corner Boutwell. 

Londonderry road, Goffe's Falls, 60 feet east of Mr. Perkins' resi- 
dence. 

Londonderry road, Goffe's Falls, corner South road. 

Mast road (new), opposite A. Claus's residence. 

Mast road (new), opposite Regan's shop. 

Mill avenue, Goffe's Falls, opposite The Elms. 

Thornton street, opposite No. 339. 

Titus street, fifty feet east of Mr. Graves' residence. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



Mo 


Name . 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 


Thomas W. Lane 

Clarence R. Merrill 

Fred S Bean 


Chief 


Chief engineer 

Grain dealer 

Foreman 


1937 Elm. 


2 
4 


Assistant 


414 Merrimack. 
312 Pearl. 


5 
3 


John F. Seaward 

Arthur Provost 




27 Warren. 


Wool sorter 


526 Beauport. 













REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



361 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

Ho7ise, 28 Vine Street. 




ENGINE COMPANY No. 2. 

House on North 31ain Street, ^ Squog. 



* . 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


76 




Captain 


Teamster 


210 No. Main. 


75 


Eobert J. Hill 


Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Engineer 


Carpenter 


86 School. 


68 

]90 


James E. Pemgo 


Foreman 

U. S. B. & S. Co. 
Engineer 


67 Boynton. 
43 Beauport. 

55 Douglas. 

50 Bar. 


119 


Stephen Tlioiiies 


Asst. engineer. .. 
Driver of engine. 
Driv. combin'tion 
Hoseman 


Carpenter 


72 


Charles M. Denyou 

Arthui" W. Whitcomb... 

Charles S. Cousins 

William Arnold 


Teamster 


69 




6.3 No. Main. 


73 

77 


Harness-maker.... 


151 Douglas. 
15 So. Main. 


67 


Archie A. Gorham 

.J. W. Gott 




40 Dubuque. 
53 Douglas. 
29 Notre Dame Av 


71 


Wool-sorter 


70 


Gideon Lariviere 

Clarence A. Whitcomb.. 
Arthur J. Provost 


74 




63 No. Main. 


66 


Clerk 


526 Beauport. 







362 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 3. 

House on Lake Avenue, corner of Massubesic. 



^° Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


sr> 




Captain 

Lieut, of truck... 
" engine... 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer... 
Driver of engine. 
Driver of hose. . . . 
Driver of truck.. 
Fireman 


Manufacturer 

Collector 

Grocer 


330 E. Spruce. 
372 Lake ave. 
416 Central. 


97 
148 


Edwin C Paul 

Orren S. Cohurn 

Clarence Hackett 

John P. Walker 


80 

100 


Laundryman 

Machinist 


372 Lake ave. 
403 Hall. 


ts 


Samuel M. Couch 

Herbert E. Dunbar 

Williams. McLeod 

Lyman W. Piper 


Blacksmitli 


447 Spruce. 


ICi 




81 






8'' 


Clerk 

Painter 

Mechanic 


398 Merrimack 


S'i 


John W. Finn 


501 Wilson. 


88 
70 


George Taylor 

Louis N. Dufrain 

Parker R. Brown 

Edson F. Wyman 

Frank S. Shirley 

Arthur S. Brown 


382 Lake ave. 


89 
43 


Grain dealer 

Manufacturer 

Shoe-cutter 


422 Merrimack. 
368 E. Spruce. 
372 Lake ave. 


Tin 


^j 


1^1 


,, 


Grain-dealer 

Quarrvman 


422 Merrimack. 


78 


Nelson T. Wheelock 

H. Bertrand Hopkins.. .. 

George L. Slack 

John D. French 


jj 


477 Belmont. 


87 
84 


" .... 


Printer 

Salesman 


435 Merrimack. 
141 Massabesic. 


114 





406 Belmont. 











REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



363 



ENGINE COMPANY, No. 4. 
House, JSIo. 20 Vine Street. 





Name. 


Eank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


•'S 


John H. Wales, Jr 

Thomas W. Lane, Jr. . . . 

George Thompson 

Joseph H. Gould 

Edward Sargent 




Brick -mason 

Electrician 


41 M. S. B. 


33 


Lieutenant 

Clerk 


1937 Elm. 


"3 


Clerk 




"1 


Engineer 




20 Vine 


27 


Asst. Engineer... 
Driver of engine . 
Dtiver of hose. .. 
Hoseman 


Teamster 


73 Amherst. 


31 


George A. Cann 


20 Vine. 


''9 


Charles H. Kogers 

Walter A. Cliykson 




20 Vine. 


22 




.301 Walnut. 


95 




Clerk 


144 Blodget. 
IG Stark. 


32 


Luther A. Knight 

James C. Newton 

Fred H. Gate 




30 


Machinist 


55 M. S. B. 


20 


Clerk 


413 Merrimack. 


24 


Robert Turnbull 


20 Vine. 


26 


Louis E. Way 




1117 Elm. 











864 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 
House, No. 44 Webster Street. 





Name. 


Kank. 


Occupation. 


Kesidence. 


ICl 


Irving S. Bryant 

Charles W. Brown 

Woodbury Davison 

Edwin L. Towle 


Captain 


Second hand 

Clerk 


884 Union 


49 


Lieut, engine 

Lieut, truck 

Clerk 




46 


Carpenter 


32 Myrtle. 


108 


Manager 


i(y> 


Walter Morse 




Machinist 


54 Appleton. 
1419 Elm 


42 


Daniel W. Morse 

Eniil II. Smith .. 

Benjamin C. Cann 

Ernest E. Hubbell 

Eussell L. Cilley 


Asst. engineer.... 

Driver engine 

Driver truck 

Driver hose 


125 

194 


Teamster 


44 Webster. 
Ai Webster. 


83 


,, 


41 Webster. 


47 


Clerk 


8G3 Chestnut. 


1'>S 


Charles H.Gile 

Will G. Fraser 


.. 


Carpenter 


1470 Elm. 


99 


Electrician 


8 Vine. 


TiR 


Andrew S. Fantom 

Charles W. Warner 

Edwin M. Dorney 

Max Hawkins 


,, 


Cigar-maker 

Electrician 


076 Maple. 
75 Sagamore. 

254 Walnut. 


101 


,, 


1?6 


,, 


Tinsmith 

Clerk 


41 


^^ 


98 Salmon 


159 


Charles E. Longa 

George H. Chadwick.... 

Maurice Hoffman 

Alfred Anderson 


,, 




10 N. Adams. 


95 


J, 


Steam-fitter 

Clerk 

Brush-maker 


41 Blodget. 
321 Walnut. 


1f.O 


,, 


Ifio 


" 


267 Walnut 









REPORT OF TJIK FIRE ENGINEER. 



365 



ENGINE AND LADDER CO.M I'ANY No. (5. 
House on Amory and Bimmon. 



ll 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation . 


Residence. 


141 


Medeiique R. Maynaid. 
James A. Farley 


Captain 




302 Cartier. 


147 


Lieut, engine .. . 


Macliinist 


3S5 Dubuque. 


144 


John Montplaisir 


Lieut, ti'uck 


Mill operative 


451 Dubuque. 


138 




Clerk 




258 Beauport. 
526 Beauport. 
86 Putnam. 


132 


Charles Edgar 


Engineer 


Engineer 


1S3 


Alcide Provencher 


Asst. Engineer . . 


Machinist 


134 


Alphonso E. Foster 

Frank W. Tebbetls 


Driver of engine 
Driver hose 






140 






141^ 


Frank St. John 


Driver truck 


„ 


I, 


I'g 


John Martin 

Henry Stein 


Hosem-Ti 




g94 Xo M'lin 


143 






Blacksmith 


393 Hevey. 


145 


John E. Herring 


' 




Loom fixer 


402 Rimmon. 


131 




, 




Ldborer 




128 


John H. McCahe 


' 




Steam fitter 


310 Xo. Main. 


146 


Richard F. Galway 






Cigar-maker 


4bO No. Main. 


130 


Calvin Brinn 


. 




Loom-fixer 


356 Rimmon. 


137 


Wm. T. Lockhead .. . 


, 




Molder 


39 Conant 


144 




• 








136 


Roumelt Cote 




291 Dubuque. 
25 Schuyler. 


139 


Henry Kleaubort 


' 




Loom-fixer 



366 



ANNUAL OFJ'ICIAL REPORTS. 



HOSE COMPANY No. 1. 
House, No. 26 Vine Street. 





Name. 


Kank, 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


51 


Edwin W. Merrill 

Charles H. French 

Albert A. Puffer 


Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 


Clerk 


166Blodget. 
7 Water. 
499 Beech. 


52 

48 


Eleclrlcian 


37 


Henry C. Parsons 

George I. Ayer 


Driver 




26 Vine. 


45 


Hoseman 


Electrician 


28 M. S. B. 


39 


George W. Snaden 

Albert W. Tncker 




497 Maple. 


53 






34 




Machinist 


306 Manchester. 


36 
50 
38 
35 


Alfred Firtli 

Charles Skinner 

Sunnier N . Patten 

James A. Steele 




8 Derry. 
335 E. High. 
3 M. S. B. 


11. R. employ^ 

Pelt maker 




497 Maple. 







HO.SE COMPANY No. 2. 
House on Maple Street, corner East High. 



P9 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


64 
55 
59 

57 


Melvin W.Worthen 

ReviloG. Houghton 

Joseph W. Batchelder.. . 

Ellsworth V. Rowe 

Charles W. Powell 

James A. Rogers 

Thomas Smith 


Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 


Carpenter 

Gas-fitter 

Carpenter 

Teamster 

Carpenter 


507 Maple. 
337 Lowell. 
521 Maple. 
521 Maple. 
540 Maple. 


60 








58 




" 


«>4 South. 


64 


Thomas P. Burnap 

Fred W Corey 




^^ 


80 Arlington. 
407 Maple. 
61 Ash. 


66 




Needle-maker 


61 


Fred H. Humphrey 




65 






75 Arlington. 
690 Belmont. 


6" 


Edwin A. Leavitt 




,, 











REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



367 



HOSE COMPANY No. 3. 

House, South Elm Street. 



Xame. 



Rank. 



Occupation . 



Residence. 



110 


Albert W. Smith 


Captain 

Lieutenant 






157 


Frank D. Hardy 


Yard conductor .. . 


SMcIlvin. 


151 




(jlerk 






15? 


Clarence F. Kemp 

James H. McKenzie 






23 Elm. 


153 


Hoseman 


Sashmaker 


Elm. 


154 


William P. Hall 








39 Elm. 


155 




,, 


Clerk 


42 Elm. 


156 


Celon D. Stevens 




1G4 Calef road. 


14<1 


Fred S. Morrill* 




Teamster 




163 


Albert M. Tuson.* 













* Detailed for department spare driver. 
« 

HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY No. 1. 

House, 18 Vine Street. 



II 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Ill 

92 

91 

94 

90 

104 

109 

107 

113 

112 

106 

100 

96 

93 

118 



Roscoe Dj^er 

Oscar P. Stone 

George H. Hammond 

Asa W. Gage 

Frank A . Pherson — 

Harrison H. Cole 

George M. Jones 

Henry Heap 

Charles H. Laxon — 

Henry Johnson 

Benjamin F. Marsh ., 

John Short 

Frank H. Cole 

Fred W. Bond 

Thomas D. Chilton... 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Driver 

Fireman. . . 



Maclnnist 

Clerk 

Carpenter 

Teamster 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Gardener 

Manufacturer. .. 

Carpenter 

Steam-fitter 

Carpenter - 

Clerk 

Machinist 

Second-hand 

Carpenter 



8 Oak. 

312 Manchester 

1 Malvern. 

18 Vine. 

18 Vine. 

883 Union. 

23 Myrtle. 

18 Vine. 

263 Pearl. 

31G Walnut. 



1037 Elm. 

45 M. S. B. 

46 Stark. 

18 Mechanic. 



368 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. I. 

House, 8 Vine Street. 



Mo 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


iifi 


Clarence D. Palmer 

Hervey E. Harris 

Benjamin K. Richardson 

George H. Porter 

Geo. N. Kogers* 


Captain 


Marble dealer 

Laundry man 


8 Vine. 


ITi 


Clerk 


249 Concord. 


ins 






117 


Pipeman 


Carpenter 


079 Laurel. 


44 


Fireman 


Driver 


120 Bridge. 







♦Detailed as driver of supply wagon. 



COMBINATION COMPANY NO. 2. 
Wilson Hill, corner Weston and Concord Streets. 






Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. i Residence. 



161 
165 
166 
167 
168 
169 
40 
127 



Alfred feustafson. . . 

Harry A. Piper 

Joseph W. Lindsay 

Henry C. Croshy 

Angus McDonald... 
Robert H. Duncan. . 
Percival C. Laraba. 
Michael J. Bradley. 



Captain.... 
Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman .. 



[Concord. 
Machinist Weston, corner 

Contractor 443 Bridge. 

Tinsmith 540 Hall. 

Teamster.. j 453 £. High. 

Blacksmith ' 453 E. High. 

Needle-maker. ... 406 Hanover. 

Clerk 4S0 Merrimack. 

Gasfltter 125 Ashland. 



REPORT 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



THIETEENTH ANNUAL EEPORT OF THE STEEET 
AND PAEK COMMISSIONEES. 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of Manchester, A'. H.: 
Gentlemen: — The thirteenth annual report of the board of street 
and park commissioners is hereby submitted, showing the work of this 
department during the year 1905. 

OFFICE. 

The following gives the receipts and expenditures for the year: 

Receipts. 

Received from Manchester Traction, Light & 

Power Co., on account paving Elm street.. $1,577.53 

Eeceived from Manchester Traction, Light & 
Power Co., on account of concreting Man- 
chester street 1,161.38 

Received from sundry sources 1,316.15 

$1,055.06 

Deposited with the city treasurer $4,050.61 

Cash paid for express 4.45 

■ $1,055.00 

Appropriation $3,500.00 

Expenditures. 

Commissioners' salaries $1,762.50 

Clerical services 750.00 

Carriage allowance 440.63 

Telephone 4.50 

Office supplies, books, etc 156.74 

Incidentals 34.37 

$3,148.74 

Transferred to reserve fund 351.26 

$3,500.00 

371 



372 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 



List of Appropriations. 

Street and park commission 

Eepairs of highways 

New highways 

Watering streets 

Paving streets 

Macadamizing streets $8,000.00 

Macadamizing streets, sundry persons 212.00 

Grade for concrete $4,000.00 

Grade for concrete, sundry persons 184.53 

New sewers $20,000.00 

New sewers, sundry persons 303.06 

Scavenger service 

City teams $8,000.00 

City teams, sundry persons 99.66 

Snow and ice 

Bridges and culverts 

Street sweeping 

Repairs of sewers 

Commons 

Stark park 

Derryfield park 

Lafayette park 

Prout park 

East Side park 

North End pla3'^ground 

South End playground 

McGregorville playground 

Riddle plaj'ground 

Paving Elm street $6,000.00 

Paving Elm street, Manchester Traction, 

Light and Power Co 1,577.53 

Paving Elm street, sundry persons 500.00 

Macadamizing Massabesic street 

Macadamizing Cedar street 

Two snow rollers 

Concreting Manchester street $2,500.00 

Concreting Manchester street, Manchester 

Traction, Light & Power Co 1,161.38 



$3,500.00 

24,000.00 

5,000.00 

7,500.00 

5,000.00 



8,212.00 

4,184.53 

20,303.06 
21,000.00 



8,099.66 

9,000.00 

10,000.00 

3,500.00 

5,000.00 

4,500.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

500.00 

100.00 

50.00 

50.00 

50.00 

50.00 



8,077.53 

3,000.00 

1,000.00 

250.00 



3,661.38 



$158,588.16 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



373 



Expenditures. 

Street and park commission $3,148.74 

Kepairs of highways 25,519.01 

New highways 3,354.85 

Watering streets 6,586.85 

Paving streets 5,384.18 

Macadamizing streets 5,362.36 

Grade for concrete 4,180.71 

New sewers 21,458.85 

Scavenger service 22,284.39 

City teams 9,972.13 

Snow and ice 9,536.04 

Bridges 7,820.44 

Street sweeping 4,577.95 

Repairs of sewers 7,854.73 

Commons 5,139.76 

Stark park 984.83 

Derryfield park 902.52 

Lafayette park 1,000.00 

Prout parlt 244.99 

East Side park 100.00 

North End playground 38.78 

South End playground 32.95 

McGregorville playground 16.05 

Paving Elm street 8,043.80 

Macadamizing Massabesic street 2,997.39 

Macadamizing Cedar street 535.80 

Two snow rollers 250.00 

Concreting Manchester street 4,606.07 

$161,935.27 

Transferred from reserve fund $3,347.11 



Inventory of City Property. 

Office including typewriter, books, furniture, etc $375.50 

Division No. 2, including horses, dumpcarts, sleds, crush- 
ers, tools, etc 27,189.85 

City stables and lot of land on Franklin street 91,000.00. 

Sheds, shops, and tools 15,500.00 

Pipe on hand 1,009.62 

Division No. 4 g.OO 

Division No. 5 25.20 

Division No. 7 473.50 



374 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Pipe on hand $41.20 

Division No. 8 38.25 

Division No. 9 25.50 

Division No. 10 1,728.30 

Stable, land, etc 1,700.00 

Pipe on hand 34.03 

Commons 1,386.70 



$140,536.67 



Report of Division No. 2. 

George P. Ameb, Supebintetjdent. 
Streets graded: 

Concord street from Beacon to Weston. 

Hubbard street from Amherst to Concord. 

River road, opposite Stark park. 
Streets graded and gutters paved: 

LoAvell street from Belmont to Beacon. 

Prospect street from Linden to Hall. 

Park avenue, opposite Stark park. 
Streets graded, gutters paved, and roadway treated to a dressing of 
crushed stone: 

Chestnut street from Clarke to Union. 

Oak from Pearl to Orange. 

Orange from Oak to Russell. 

Central street. Beacon easterly. 

Amherst street from Beech to Maple. 

Buzzell street from Lowell to East High. 

Lincoln street from Laurel to Merrimack. 

SIDEWAXK WORK. 

A large number of sidewalks were repaired and top-dressed with 
crushed stone and gravel. 

CRUSHERS. 

Crushed stone for patching and repairing was obtained from the 
ledges at Low^ell street and South Elm street, crushing plants being 
operated at both places. 

The crushers have been kept in thorough repair and are in good 
condition for next season's work. 

ROAD ROLLER. 

The commissioners exchanged the old Averling-Porter road roller 
for a new double cylinder "Buffalo-Pitts," and the same has given the 
best of satisfaction, having been constantly used in both new and 
repair work. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



375 



SPECIAIi CONSTBUCTION. 

An extensive improvement was made on Union street, between 
Shasta and Hay ward streets, as follows: 

Sidewalks graded from Shasta street to Plummer street. 

Sidewalks graded and gutters paved from Plummer street to north 
of Silver street. 

Corner circles at Plummer and Silver streets. 

Cesspools at Plummer and Silver streets. 

Eoadway macadamized from Plummer street to north of Silver 
street. 

From Shasta street to Plummer street and from north of Silver 
street to Hayward street a strip of macadam eighteen feet wide, com- 
posed of stone chips and ledge refuse taken from the South Elm street 
quarry, was laid in the center of the roadway. 

The following reports will show in detail the amount of work 
accomjjlished by this department. 

COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Location. 



Number 

loads 
of stone. 



Square 
yards. 



Labor. 



Adams, between "Webster and Appleton. 

Amberst, between Beecb and Maple 

Asliland, Bridge sontberly 

ISrook, between Union and Beech, S. S... 
Buzzell, between l^owell and E. Higb. ... 

Carpenter and Chestnut 

Cedar, between Pine and Union 

Central, Beacon easterly 

Central, Hall easterly 

Central, between Milton and Beacon.. . . 

Chestnut 

Concord at No. 378 

Elm, R. R. Bridge to Brown Ave ^. 

Franklin, Depot northerly 

Hall, between Lake avenue and Central 

East High, Buzzell easterly 

Lowell, Belmont easterly 

Lake Ave., J. Hall road easterly 

Lake Ave., J. Hall road westerly . . 

Lake Ave., Hall easterly. . ." 

Lincoln, between Laurel and Merrimack 

Milton, Central easterly 

Oak, between Pearl and Orange 

Orange, between Oak and Russell 

Park Ave 

Prospect, Linden to Hall . 

River Road at Stark Park 

Silver, Union w 

Union, between Clarke and Carpenter... 
Union, Silver northerly and southerly. . . 
Water, between Elm and Elm back 

Totals 



17 

23 

2 

20 

17 

36 
17 
3 
1 

1 

54 
4 
8 
4 

41 
7 

21 
9 

16 
4 

20 

3i 
6 

38 

35 
8 
4 

31 
4 



563 



223 0-9 
285 1-9 

25 

190 5-9 
216 fr-9 

81 1-9 
350 
158 8-0 

26 6-9 

8 3-9 

709 7-9 

2 7-9 

395 8-9 

44 4-9 

69 

39 8-9 
398 6-9 

77 7-9 
238 7-9 

75 
175 

38 8-9 
221 6-9 
307 2-9 

58 3-9 
534 7-9 
258 3-9 

77 7-9 

37 
350 

38 8-9 



$83.98 
76 29 
10.24 
88.49 
61.48 
3S.00 

101.80 
85.93 
12.50 
3.25 

177.73 
2.O0 

109 88 

7.37 

16.25 

11.12 

15.3.79 
34.94 
73.50 
11.60 
52.18 
12.00 
41.50 
95.10 
23.18 

173 53 
97.11 
16.12 
8.87 
77.80 
15.25 



5,715 8-9 



$1,767.18 



376 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
COBBLE PAVING RELAID. 



Location. 




Labor. 



Central, near Beacon 

Elm, at 1480 

Lake Ave., between'IJeacon and Cass 
Spring, Elm westerly 

Totals 



•29 2-9 

111 1-9 

l.i 5-9 

■68 8-9 



194 7-9 



S7.31 

39.43 

4 44 

8.62 



$49.80 



GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 



Location. 



Length in 
feet. 



Cut or 
fill. 



Ashlanrl, between Lowell and East High. 

Beacon, Central southerly 

Central, Beacon westerly 

Chestnut at N o. 875 

Chestnut, between Clarke and Carpenter. 

Chestnut, Trenton southerly 

Concord, Weston westerly 

Hubbard, Concord southerly 

Linden at No. 25 

Lowell, between Belmont and Beacon 

Park Avenue 

Pleasant, opposite Armony 

River Koad at No. 427 

Shasta, between Elm and Brown Ave 

Stark Park 

Trenton, Chestnut easterly 

Union at No. 1020 

Union, between Plummer and Shasta 

Union, between Plummer and Silver 



Total. 



40(1 
125 
125 

75 

L050 

250 

125 

80 

75 
600 
380 
137 

67 

1,100 

782 

63 
125 
950 
450 



6,*»59 



Cut and fill. 
Cut. 

Fill. 

Cut. 

Cut and fill. 

Cut. 



Cut and fill. 



Cut. 

Cut and fill. 

Fill. 

Cut. 
Fill. 
Cut and fill. 



EDGESTOXES SET. 



Amherst, Beech easterly 

Barry avenue. Cedar northerly . . . 

Beech east back at Bridge 

Belmont and Lowell 

Blodget at No. 100 

Blodg-et north back at Chestnut . . 
Brook, between t nion and Beech 

Cedar, Pine easterly 

Cedar at 



30 ft. 

70 " 



East Side park 

Elm, between Cedar and Auburn 

Elm, Langdon southerly 

Elm west back, between Water and Stark. 



5 ' 


' 6 in 


50 ' 




S ' 


' 9 in 


34 ' 




305 * 




50 ' 




335 ' 




386 * 




125 ' 




144 ' 





STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 377 

Depot, I'-ranlvlin westerly 2") ft. 

Franklin at blacksmith shop 10 " 

Franklin, Depot northerly 100 " 

Granite south back, between Franklin and Canal 100 " 

Lake avenue, between Hall and Belmont 18 " 

Liberty at No. 103 65 " 

Liberty, rear of Xo. 103 65 " 

Manchester, between Elm and Chestnut 112 " 

Park avenue 50 " 

Pleasant at the state armory 137 " 6 in. 

Eiver road at No. 427 * 68 " 

Spring-, Elm westerly 109 " 

Stark park 782 " 

Union at No. 555 80 " 

Union east back at Bridge 7 " 

Union, Lowell southerly 57 " 

Union at No. 1028 125 " 

Wlater, Elm westerly 1 10 " 



Total 3,570 ft. 9 in. 

Labor charged to grade for concrete. 

EDGESTO]N"ES RESET. 

Amherst at No. 73 65 feet. 

Cedar, Pine easterly 225 

Elm, Bridge southerly 104 

Elm at Shasta 30 

Manchester, between Elm and Chestnut 400 

Park avenue 40 

Pine, between Spruce and Cedar 107 



Total 971 feet. 

Labor charged to grade for concrete. 

SUMMARY OF GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 



Appropriation 




$4,000.00 


Sundry sources 




184.53 




$2,038.08 




Labor 


$4,184.53 


Edgestones and circles 


667.04 




Lumber 


35.91 




Hardware 


6.89 




Concrete 


1,432.79 


4,180.71 






Transferred to reserve fund 


$3.82 



378 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



NEW CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



No. 



Cost of 
Miiterial . 



Labor. 



Amherst anrl Asli 

Auburn aiifl Klin 

Bridge iuul Elm 

Bridge and Union 

Canal, near Granite south back 

Cedar , between Union and I'ine 

Ct-ntral and Beacon . 

Central, east of Heacon 

Central, between llall and Helmont 

Chestnut, between Clark and Carpenter 

Cliestnnt, No. 480. 

East side of Park 

Elm, between Auburn and Cedar 

Elm back, between !5rook and Hlodget 

Granite south back, rear of No. C4.. 

Hall and Lake avenue , 

Lake avenue soutli back, near Elm east back 

Laurel south back, east ot Lincoln 

Lincoln and Laurel 

Lowell, between Belmont and Beacon 

Lowell, between Birch and Chestnut 

Lowell and Buzzell 

Manchester street *. 

Maple and Harvard.. 

Maple, between Concord and Lowell 

Orange anil Oak 

Pearl and Hall 

River road, between North and Webster 

Silver and Union 

Spring and Elm west back 

Union and Plummer 

Union and Somerville 

Water and Elm west back 

Total 



67 



$36.69 
24.!>6 
24.1(5 
16.11 
15.71 
75 99 
37 44 
33.3.1 
16 43 
78.67 
20.08 
27.19 

115.95 
18.93 
16. 42 
16. 77 
IS. SO 
17.40 
31.45 
42.38 
19.89 
70.30 

218.11 
18.96 
13 :i9 
63.90 
19.26 
18.73 
26.89 
17.88 
13.35 
13.35 
20.31 



S36.68 
18.36 
16.50 
10 60 

9 ^e 

73 67 

17.36 

24.24 

9 86 

100.80 
12.43 
17.62 
57.36 
12.50 
11.29 
17.75 
9 68 
12.31 
20.42 
34.73 
16 50 
44 37 

r.;6.92 
25 50 
13.74 
58.93 
16.11 
13.25 
38.55 
10.00 
13.61 
13.61 
12 86 



$1,219.62 



§927.87 



REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 




Labor. 



Amherst, between Beech and Ash 

Central, north of Hall 

Chestnut and Carpenter 

Elm, near Langdon 

Lowell and Belmont 

Union and Silver 

Worthen Flats 

Total 



§16.62 
2.62 
14.35 
13.06 
8.87 
12.25 



$8.80 
8 41 
8.32 

11.73 
5 98 

14 50 
2.00 



STEEET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



379 



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880 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SNOW AND ICE. 

Appropriation $9,000.00 

Overdrawn 53G.04 

$9,5.36.04 

Labor $9,326.33 

Supplies 209.71 

$9,-536.04 
TWO SNOW ROLLEKS. 

Two snow rollers were purchased in December, and the same will 
be iised in the outl^-ing districts. 

Appropriation $250.00 

Contract price for rollers 250.00 

WATERING STREETS, 

With the addition of the nine new watering carts, purchased last 
season, several of the old routes were revised and considerable new 
territory was added on. 

In making these changes the water commissioners kindly co-oper- 
ated with us in locating several new standpipes at convenient places 
along the new routes. 

All watering carts, standpipes, and fountains were thoroughly re- 
paired and painted. 

Number of watering carts in use, 19. 

Summary. 

Appropriation $7,500.00 

Labor, Division No. 2 $4,098.13 

Labor, Division No. 7 610.87 

Labor, Division No. 10 1.263.93 

Eepairs and supplies 613.92 

6,586.85 

Transferred to reserve fund $913.15 

SCAVENGEK SERVICE. 

The following is a summary account of scavenger service for the 
year: 

Appropriation $21,000.00 

Overdrawn 1,284.89 

$22,284.89 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 381 

Labor $19,336.53 

City farm 660.64 

William H. Bickford 1,545.81 

Bepairs 187.34 

Hay and grain • 514.01 

Incidentals 34.56 



$22,284.89 



CITY TEAMS. 

The following is a summary account of citj^ teams for the year: 

Appropriation $8,000.00 

Keceived from sundry persons 99.66 

Overdrawn 1,872.47 

$9,972.13 

Labor $5,543.92 

Hay and grain 2,198.47 

New horses 445.00 

Hardware 572.42 

Lumber 204.46 

Carriage hire 108.00 

New harnesses and rei^airing 221.65 

Gas 176.46 

Water 70.8;* 

Coal 135.23 

Plumbing 8.53 

Veterinary 46.60 

Eelaying slate on stable roof 232.37 

Incidentals 8.13 



$9,972.13 
BRIDGES AND CULVEUTS. 

Necessary repairs were made on all bridges and the same were kept 
in good condition and open for public travel. 

Numerous small culverts were renewed or repaired, and several 
by regrading of roads were dispensed with entirely. 

A new concrete culvert was built in the Lake Shore road near the 
residence of James H. Paige. 

General description of culvert: Length, 50 feet; width, 4 feet; depth, 
314 feet. Construction: Sides, rubble concrete; top, plain concrete; 
design of top, segmental arch. 



382 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An addition was made to the number of bridge55 by the placing of a 
new bridge over the tracks of the North Weare branch of the Boston 
& Maine Railroad at Granite street, West Manchester. 

This bridge was a much needed improvement and is greatly appre- 
ciated by the traveling public, as well as the residents of its immedi- 
ate vicinity. The following is a general description of the new 
bridge: 

Abutments: Number of abutments, 2; length at base, 47 feet; 
length at top, 42 feet; thickness at bottom, 8 feet; thickness at top, 
3 feet; length of wing walls, 27 to 32 feet. Construction solid ma- 
sonry. Material used: 752. Rl cubic yards of granite; 265 bags of Port- 
land cement; 51 loads of sand. 

Each abutment Avas laid on a concrete foundation of an average 
thickness of 18 inches. 

Material used in construction of foundation: 38 loads of crushed 
stone, 73 bags of Portland cement, 28 loads of sand. 

The bridge proper is made of structural steel and has planked side- 
walks and roadway. 

The bridge is of the parabolic type, and was constructed from the 
one formerly- in use over the canal on Granite street. 

Dimensions of the bridge: Length of span, 53 Va feet; width of side- 
walks, 7 feet; width of roadway, 26 feet. 

S!u))i»iarii. 

Appropriation $10,000.00 

Labor $4,297.70 

Lumber 433.32 

Stone 2,258.43 

Hardware 87.27 

Castings 14.56 

Cement 646.81 

Miscellaneous 82.35 

7,820.44 

Transferred to reserve fund $2,179.56 

PAVING EI.it STREET. 

Two thousand seven hundred and nineteen and forty-five hundredths 

(2,719.45) square yards of granite block paving was laid on Elm street, 

the work being continued from the south curb line of Cedar street 

to the south curb line of Auburn street and on the east side of Elm 

street from 93.95 feet south of Bridge street to north rail of Bridge 

street car tracks. 

Summary. 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

ISIanchester Traction, Light & Power Co 1,577.53 

Sundry persons, material sold 500.00 

$8,077.53 



$S,04:!.S0 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Labor $1 ,504.67 

Cement 1,40(3.20 

Paving stones 3,3(J6.ir) 

Freight 12.00 

Laying paving and cement 1,754.78 

Transferred to reserve fund $:i,''..73 

^MACADAMIZING STREETS. 

All macadamized streets vi'ere thoroughly patched and repaired. 

New macadamized work was laid as follows: 
Elm street, west side, from Cheney Place south line to 

Baker street north line 1,447.1 sq. yds. 

Maple street, from Lowell street north line to Concord 

street south line 840.0 " " 

Total 2,287.1 sq. yds. 

^unnnary. 

Appropriation $8,000.00 

Sundry persons '. 212.00 

$8,212.00 

Labor $2,042.11 

Fuel 412.62 

Water 70.00 

Repairs and renewals 305.30 

Tools 185.80 

Explosives 259.30 

Miscellaneous 17.35 

Oils 69.88 

Difference in exchange of road rollers 2,000.00 

5,362.36 

Transferred to reserve fund $2,849.64 

MACADAMIZING MASSABESIC STREET. 

The following extensive improvements were made on Massabesie 
street: New sidewalks, new corner circles, new cobble gutters, new 
cesspools, roadway macadamized. 

Sumvuiry of Construction. 

Location. Limits. Length. 

Massabesie street, Jewett street, east line easterly 1,147.47 feet 

Massabesie street, Jewett street, east line westerly 229.23 " 



Total 1,376.70 feet 



384 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Total number of square yards macadamized, 4,283. OG. 

Each sidewalk, 8 feet wide; each gTitter, cobble paved, 3 feet wide; 
macadamized roadway, 28 feet wide. 

Material used in construction of roadway: 1,586.15 tons of crushed 
stone and stone dust. 

Sumnmry of Costs. 

Appropriation $3,000.00 

Labor $1,013.46 

Crushed stone 1,981.43 

Freight 2.50 

2,997.39 

Transferred to reserve fund $2.61 



iMACADAMIZENG CEDAB STREET FKOM. PIKE TO fTCIGN STRIEET. 

Improvements were made on Cedar street. Pine to Union street, as 
follows: Sidewalks widened to 10 feet, edgestones reset, gutters 
paved, new circles at all corners, cesspools rebuilt or repaired, road- 
way macadamized, crushed stone from Elm street ledge, 200 loads. 

Summary. 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Labor 535.80 

Transferred to reserve fund $464.20 



CONC3RETING MANCHESTER STREET FKOit ELM STREET TO CHESTNTTT 

STREET. 

Permanent improvements were made on Manchester street. Elm to 
Chestnut, as follows: Edgestones reset or renewed, new circles at all 
corners, gutters block paved over cement concrete bottom, car track 
block paved eighteen inches outside of rails, roadway concreted over 
cement concrete bottom, sewerage system entirely reconstructed. 

The above piece of street work has given such general satisfaction 
to the abutters and to the general public that the commissioners have 
decided to recommend to the common council that a special appro- 
priation of $3,000.00 be granted them for the purpose of constructing a 
similar piece of work on Lake avenue. Elm street to Chestnut street. 

Sunimanj. 

Ai^pvopriation $2,500.00 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co 1,161.38 

Overdrawn 945.29 

$4,606.67 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 385 

Labor $1,424.08 

Cement .388.40 

Paving stones 1,421.77 

Concrete 1,223.35 

Laying track blocks 199.07 

$4,606.67 

STEEET SWEEPING. 

Every effort is made to keep the paved and concreted portions of 
our principal streets in a neat and clean condition. 

Force constantly employed: 

Men using street cleaners 7 

Paper picking 1 

Total number of men constantly employed 8 

In addition to the work performed by the above force the streets are 
swept with the horses sweeper two nights each week, sixteen men and 
four teams being employed the following morning in gathering and 
disposing of the sweepings. 

Summary. 

Appropriation $3,500.00 

Overdrawn 1,077.95 

$4,577.95 

Labor, Division Xo. 2 $4,070.27 

Labor, Division No. 7 21.00 

Labor, Division No. 10 303.87 

Supplies, brooms, etc 182.81 

$4,577.95 



NEW SEWERS. 

Extensive and costly sewers were built as follows: 
Ainsworth avenue, Hayward southerly, 362 feet; Belmont, Somerville 
to Dix, 446 feet; Bowman, Milford to Bowman Place, 388 ffeet; Chase 
avenue, Hayes avenue to Hospital avenue, 513 feet; Chester, Lincoln 
easterly, 304 feet; Dix, Wilson to west of Hall, 423 feet; Hall, Harrison 
to Londonderry^ 256 feet; Hayes avenue. Chase avenue, westerly, 209 
feet; Hospital avenue, Chase avenue westerly, 126 feet; Joliette, Kel- 
ley northerly, 166 feet; Kearsarge, Amory to south of Monitor, 785 
feet; Mammoth road, north of Massabesic to Nelson, 709 feet; Massabe- 
sic, cross lot to Mammoth road, 146 feet; Nelson, Mammoth road to 
east of Hall road, 582 feet; Porter, Hayward northerly, 237 feet; Eay, 
26 



386 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Appleton northerl}', 204 feet; Vallej-, Maple to Wilson, 1,290 feet; Wil- 
low, Silver to Pine, SOO feet; Wilson, Clay to Dix, 250 feet; Young, 
Taylor to Ainsworth avenue, 588 feet. 

The relief sewer commenced in 1904 was completed, 1,290 feet of 
24-inch extra heavy Akron pipe being laid in Valley street. Maple 
to W^ilson; in 1904 1,122 feet of 24-inch extra heavy Akron pipe was 
laid in Maple street. Harvard to Valley. Total length, 2,412 feet. 

The Massabesic street sewer was also completed, 855 feet of 24-inch 
extra heavy Akron pipe being laid as follows: beginning at a point 
just north of Massabesic street, thence across the old schoolhouse 
lot to Mammoth road, thence northerly in Mammoth road to Nelson 
street. The sewer in Wilson and Dix streets was a much needed 
improvement; it not only accommodates a large number of houses 
in its immediate vicinity, but takes in a large amount of surface water 
that spring and fall has ruined the streets and damaged property in 
that section. 

The sewer in Kearsarge street drains a large amount of territorj- 
that heretofore has had no proper sewerage facilities. 

There was laid this year 10,097 feet of new sewers at a total cost of 
$23,437.19. The average cost per linear foot for the east side was 
$2,514 and $1,217 per linear foot for the west side, an average total 
cost per linear foot for all sewers for 1905 of $2,321. 

Length of sewers. Division Xo. 2 4,029 feet 

Length of sewers, Division Xo. 7 4,561 " 

Length of sewers. Division Xo. 10 ] ,507 " 

Total 10,097 feet 

Cost of sewers, Division Xo. 2 $11,745.69 

Cost of sewers. Division Xo. 7 9,856.20 

Cost of sewers, Division Xo. 10 1.835.30 



Total $23,437.19 

Average cost per foot, Division Xo. 2 $2,915 

Average cost per foot. Division Xo. 7 2.160 

Average cost per foot, Division Xo. 10 1.217 

Average total cost per foot, $2,321. 

Sununary. 

Appropriation for new sewers $20,000.00 

Received from sundry sources 303.06 

Overdrawn 1,155.79 

Material on hand 4,518.84 

Total $25,977.69 



Steeet and park commissioneks. 387 

Expended for new sewers, Division No. 2 $11,745,69 

Expended for new sewers, Division No. 7 9,856.20 

Expended for new sewers. Division No. 10 1,835.30 

Material on hand, city yard 1,059.47 

Material used on pipe drains, cesspools, etc 1,481.03 



Total $25,977.69 

The following tables show how the cost of new sewers has been 
divided. 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Location. 


Limits. 


Material. 


09 
V 

O 

c 
o 

N 

33 


P 

5 


"S 

a'i 
II 

(D 


Ainsworth avenue.. 
Auburn 80uth back. 


Hay ward, southerly 

West of Maple, westerly 


Akron... 


10 
12 
10 


1 362 

446 

86 

513 

304 

24 

423 

124 

20 

256 

209 

126 

709 

146 

28 

582 

237 

204 

1,290 

74 
800 
250 

558 


72 


Auburn south back. 


West of Maple, westerly 


10 




South of Somer ville to Dix 


11 ! lo 




Central 


tt 
" ■••• 

Iron 

Akron 


10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
8 
13 
12 
10 
24 
24 
24 
15 
12 

12 

24 

10 

24 

10 

24 

20 

15 

14 

12 




Chase avenue 

Chester 


Hayes avenue to Hospital avenue. 
Lincoln, easterly 




Concord 






Dix 


Wilson to west of Hall 




Elm east back 

Elm east back 

Hall 


Brook to Blodget south back 

Brook to Blodget south back 





Hayes avenue 


Chase avenue, westerly 




Hospital avenue 


Chase avenue, "westerly 




(sabesic 
Mammoth and Jlas- 

[.sabesic 
Mammoth and Mas- 
Manchester 


North of Massabesic, to Nelson ... 
[Mammoth 
Across lots from Massabesic to 

Elm to Chestnut 


149 


Manchester 


Elm to Chestnut. 


174 


Manchester 




342 




Mammoth Rd. to east of Hall Rd.. 




Porter 




Ray 






Valley 


Maple to Wilson 




Weston 

Willow 


Concord, northerly 

•Silver to Pine 




Wilson 


Claj' to Dix 




Wilson Hill 




2 


Wilson Hill 


Lake avenue to Central 


70 


Young 


Taylor to Ainsworth avenue 










?,771 


819 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



389 



IN 1905.— EAST SIDE. 



CO 

o 
5 


03 

a) 



S 


« 

B 
O 

in 


O 
O 

P. 

CO 

ai 
01 
O 


O 
o 

O 


o 

a 

O 
P. 

O 


c 

1 




3 
O . 

> 


Nature ol excavation. 


1 




14 


2 


$367.21 


SI. 001 


May 


31 


June 


7 


7.5 


Sand. 


1 




" 




152.15 
555.15 


1.855 
1.244 


Nov. 
Apr. 


24 

IS 


Dec. 
Apr. 


8 

28 


10.0 
9.5 


Dump fill and sand. 


2 




17 


4 


Sand. 


1 




1 




502.35 


5.957 


Oct. 


10 


Nov. 


2 


7.0 


Ledge. 


2 




14 




780.35 


1.521 


July 


21 


Aug. 


7 


8.0 


Gravel and ledge. 


3 




11 




287.07 


.953 


Aug. 


9 


" 


14 


8.0 


Sand. 






1 




47.56 


1.981 


Sept. 


25 


Sept. 


26 


10.5 


Sand and gravel. 


3 
1 




17 


1 


539.38 
150.74 


1.275 
1.046 


Oct. 

Sept. 


21 
11 


Nov. 

Sept. 


9 
18 


7.5 

7.5 


Clay, gravel, and bo ulders. 






1 


Sand. 


2 




7 




820.17 


3.203 


" 


26 


Oct. 


11 


7.0 


Gravel and boulders. 


1 




7 




476.81 


2.281 


July 


6 


July 


21 


7.0 


Sand and ledge. 


1 




5 




275.94 


2.190 


Aug. 


7 


Aug. 


15 


7.0 


" 


5 








1 3,892.42 


4.552 


Jan. 


3 


Mar. 


23 


12.0 
12.5 




1 








Marshland and clay. 


i 




10 


2 


■ 1,654.31 














Sand. 


1 




17 




2.387 


May 


5 


May 


27 


11.0 


" 


2 




20 


6 


, 














" 


5 




15 


5 


881.03 


1.513 


Mar. 


23 






7.5 


Clay and sand. 
Sand and gravel. 


1 




7 


3 


741.70 


3.129 


June 


17 


July 


1 


11.0 


1 




5 




182.15 


.892 


Sept. 


15 


Sept. 


18 


8.5 


Sand. 


S 




48 




4,718.86 


2.107 


Jan. 


10 


Apr. 


22 


10.5 


" 


1 




1 




169.20 


2.286 


Sept. 


21 


Sept. 


26 


12.0 


Gravel. 


4 




27 




2,850.85 


3.563 


May 


22 


June 


29 


13.0 


Sand. 


1 




7 




671.61 


2.686 


Sept. 


30 


Nov. 


3 


11.0 


Sand and clay 






1 
2 




1 210.28 


2.920 


June 


14 


June 


27 


8.0 


Sand. 


3 


1 


16 

273 


2 
24 


674.60 


1.212 


May 


24 


May 


31 


9.0 


Sand and gravel. 


52 


821,601.89 


S2.514 





390 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Location. 



Limits. 



IS 

« 




u 


^s 


s 




■^ 






"^ 


6C'" 




C 




» 


CO 


^ 



Blaine 

Bowman.. 
Jolielte.... 
Kearsaige 



Second, westerly 

Milford and Bowman Place 
No. of Kelley, northerly — 
Amory to south of Monitor. 



Akron... 



168 

388 

166 
176 
609 

1,507 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 
IN 1905.— WEST SIDE. 



391 















^ 






^ 










i''^ 




o 


o 




.3 


3 




« 


.2 


03 


^ 


w 


o 






•/J 












01 

3 


c 



ft 


o 
o 

"3 


a 


3 






^5 


Nature of excavalion. 




-* 


O 




o 


O 


r^ 




^ 






S iJ 


tI2 


y 


H 


O 


•?■ 




-!! 




1 




8 


2 


$188.23 


$1,120 


May 


26 


June 3 


.8 


Clay and sand. 


3 




5 




759.14 


1.956 


July 


27 


Sept. 30 


7.5 


Sand, gravel and ledge. 


2 




6 




208.01 


1.253 


Nov. 


3 


Nov. 11 


.8 


Sand. 


3 




4 
23 




1 679.92 


.866 


Sept. 


1 


Oct. 9 


.9 


Sand. 


9 


46 


2 


$1,835.30 


$1,217 


• 











392 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CONCRETE WORK DONE BY THE ROBIE CONSOLIDATED 

CONCRETE COMPANY. 

STREET CROSSINGS (New). 



Location. 



Square 


Price per 


Total. 


yards. 


yard. 


Cost. 


10.88 


$0.75 


$8.16 


24.C0 


.75 


18.45 


23 38 


.75 


17.63 


26.91 


.75 


20 18 


27.37 


.75 


20 53 


27.22 


75 


20.41 


■27.06 


.75 


20.29 


30.22 


.75 


22 «6 


38.11 


.75 


28.68 


24.11 


..5 


18.03 


30.22 


.76 


22.66 


24.61 


.75 


18.45 


24.11 


.76 


18 Oti 


9.00 


.75 


6,75 


29.68 


.75 


22.26 


24.50 


. lO 


18 37 


27.22 


.75 


20 41 


26.2i 


.75 


19.66 


1244 


.75 


9.33 


11.28 


.75 


8.46 


26.67 


.75 


20.00 


2e.44 


.75 


19 83 


532.26 


$399.13 



Bai-ry Avenue at Cedar street 

Beech and Blodget 

Bremer and Coolidge Avenue 

Bridge and Union 

Brook and Maple 

Carpenter and Chestnut, east side. 
Carpenter and Cliestnut, west side 

Cartier and Kelley 

Cartier and Coolidge Avenue 

Cedar and Pine 

Cellar and Wilson 

Oak and Orange 

Orange and Oak — 

Parker Avenue and Parker street. . 

Prescott and Wilson 

Porter and Hay ward 

Riniinon and Wayne 

Shasta and Elm 

Silver south back and Hall 

Union east back and Bridge 

Wayne and Riramon 

Webster and Chestnut 

Totals 



STREET AND i'ARK COMMISSIONERS. 
STREET CROSSINGS (Repairs). 



393 



Location. 



Square 
Yards. 



Price per 
Yard, 



Total 
Cost. 



Adams and Clarke 

Amherst and Asli 

Appleton and Adams 

Applecon and Elm 

Ash and Amherst 

Ash and Oiaiige 

Ash and Hrook 

Ash east back and Brook 

Auburn and Wilson 

Auburn south back and Wilson 

Beech east back and Brook 

Brook and Walnut, east side 

Brook and Walnut, west side 

Brook and Ash 

Chestnut and Carpenter ; 

Chestnut and Carpenter n. s 

Elm east back and Sagamore 

Green south back and Wilson 

Hampshire Lane and Central 

Hampshire Lane and Central 

M onroe and Elm 

Myrtle and Pine, east side 

Myi tie and Pine, wi^st side . . 

M5'rtle south back and Union 

Pine and Myrtle, soutli side 

Pine and Myrtle, north side 

Pine and Prospect 

Prospect and Pine, east side 

Prospect and Pine, west side 

Summer south back and Wilson 

Union and Bridge 

Union east back and Brook 

Walnut and Brook, south side 

Walnut east back and Brook 

West Appleton south back and Elm 
West Webster and Elm 

Totals 



$0.50 
.75 
.50 
.50 
.75 
.75 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.75 
.50 
.75 
.75 
.,i0 
.50 
.50 
.."iO 
.50 
.50 
.75 
.50 
.50 
..iO 
.50 
..W 
.50 
.50 
.50 
,50 
.50 
..-iO 
.7.1 
.75 
.75 
.50 
.50 



$14.93 

14. Wi 

5.40 

1-2.69 

19.24 

7.04 

6.G6 

10.43 

14.97 

5.05 

8.35 

5.96 

2.33 

14.20 

13.38 

14. SO 

6.00 

8.31 

3.94 

5.91 

13.67 

11.66 

12 01 

7.09 

13.29 

12.25 

17.75 

13.61 

11.36 

S.3.i 

2.35 

S.16 

7.50 

7.58 

9.72 

8.03 



$358.63 



394 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
SIDEWALK REPAIRS. 



Location. 



Square 
yards. 



Price per 
yard. 



Total 
cost. 



Amherst and Ash, east side. 

Amherst and Ash, northwest corner 

Beech E. B. and Amherst, N. E. corner , 

Beech E. B. and Amherst, N. VV. corner 

Beech E. B. and Amheret, S. W. corner 

Beech E. B. and Amherst, S. E. corner 

Brook and Beech 

Brook and vValnut east back, S. E. corner — 
Brook a.n^t Walnut east back, S. W. corner. . . 

Brook and Walnut, S. E. corner 

Brook and Walnut, S. W. corner 

Brook and Union east back, S. E. corner 

Brook and Union east back, S. W. corner. — 

Carpenter and Chestnut 

Cediir, Pine to Union 

Cedar, Pine to Union 

Chestnut, E. S. Clarke northerly 

Chestnut, K. S. Clarke northerly 

Clarke, N. S. Chestnut easterly 

Coolidge .\venue, W. S. Cartier easterly 

Elm, 8. W. Shasta northerly 

Elm, W. S. Shasta northerlV 

Elm, W. S. Shasta southerly 

Lake Avenue and Mammotli Road 

I^Iane.hester, S. S., Elm to Nutlield Lane 

Manchester, N. S., Nutlield Lane to Chestnut 
Manchescer, S. S., Nutlield Lane to (;he^tnut. 
Merrimack Common, S. W. and N. W. coi'ner 

Orange and Ash 

Orange and Oak, S. W. corner 

Orange and Oak, S. E. corner 

Oi-ange and Oak, N. E. corner 

Pine, No. 241 

Pine, No 247 

Porter and Hay ward 

Totals 



1.32 

7.33 

3.89 

2.52 

2.7tt 

2.02 

'5.05 

9.85 

5.36 

11.76 

11.79 

5.96 

6.91 

.75 

37.44 

196,05 

3.C3 

29.45 

14.72 

lOil.ll 

67.20 

10.58 

63.76 

42.25 

67.15 

3-2.41 

164.0.1 

649.11 

9.16 

1.91 

27.11 

8 18 

43.75 

14.16 

4.16 



1,676.61 



$0.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
..50 
.50 
.25 
.50 
..50 
.75 
.25 
..50 
.50 
.35 
..50 
.50 
.50 
..50 
.50 
.25 
..50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.,50 
.50 



3 66 

1.44 

1.26 

1.38 

1 01 

2.52 

4.9-2 

2.68 

5 88 

5.89 

2.98 

3 45 

.37 

9 36 

98.03 

4.31 

22.08 

3.68 

.54.55 

33.60 

3.70 

31.88 

21.12 

33.57 

16.20 

82.02 

162.27 

4.58 

.95 

13.55 

4.09 

21.87 

7.08 

2.08 



$668.66 



Street Paving Laid by Soule, Dillingham & Co. 

GRANITE BLOCKS, CEMENT JOINTS, CONCRETE 

DATION. 



FOUN- 



LOCATION. 



Square 
yards. 



Per yard. 



Total cost. 



Elm from Cedar street south line to Auburn 
street south liae 

Elm from 93. 95 feet south of Bridge street to 
north rail of ]?ridge street car tracks 

Manchester from Chestnut street west line to 
40 ft. west of Elm street east line in tracks. 



Totals , 



2,169.55 
549.90 
308.89 

3,028.34 



SI .627. 16 
412.43 
231.67 

82,271.26 



STREET AND TARK COMMISSIONERS. 



396 



GRANITE BLOCKS, SAND JOINTS, SAND FOUNDATION. 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Per yard. 


Total Cost. 


Granite south back from Franklin street to 
Canal street east curb line 


835.20 


$0.30 


$250.56 



GRANITE BLOCKS, CEMENT JOINTS, CONCRETE FOUNDATION 

(Repairs). 



Location. 



Square 
yards. 



Per yard. 



Total cost. 



Elm at Manchester, north-east corner. 

Kim at Spring, soutli-west corner 

Elm at Water, north-west corner 



Total . 



5.68 
3.71 
3.71 


$0.75 
.75 
.75 


$4.26 
•2.78 
2.78 


13 10 




$9.82 







OLD GRANITE BLOCKS, SAND JOINTS, SAND FOUNDATION (Repairs) 



LocATio^r. 


Square 
yards. 


Per yard. 


Total cost. 


Canal at Granite south back street 


19 10 
18.66 

25.60 


$0 30 
.30 

.30 


$5.73 
5.59 






Bridge at Elm street, south side east line 


7.68 


Total 


63.36 




$19.00 









STREET PAVING (New). 



Location. 


Square 
yards. 


Per yard. 


Cost. 


INIanchester street, east curb line to Chestnut 
street west curb line 


1,223.35 


•SI. 00 


$1,223.35 







396 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 
STREET PAVING (Repairs). 



LOCATIOy. 



Amoskeag Bridge Koad, at west end of bridge 
¥Am. at Sagamore street, east side of railway. 
Main from Parl<er south to M. & N. W.K.R. e. s 
Manchester :wul Cliestnut 

McGregor Bridge ..-. 

Union, e. s. Lowell, southerly .... 

Total r 



Square 
yai'ds. 



59.16 
170.22 
311.14 

57. 3T 

29.92 
195.44 

52.66 



875.91 



Per yard. 



SO. 50 
.50 
.511 
.75 
.50 
.50 
.50 



Cost. 



§29.58 
85.11 

155.57 
43.02 
14.96 
97.72 
26.33 



.S452.29 



Report of Division No. 10. 

Alpiionse Laberge, Agent. 

repairs of highways. 

STREETS PATCHED AND REPAIRED. 



Location. 




Labor. 



A 

A mory 

AmosKeag 

Beauport 

Bowman 

Cartier 

Conant 

Douglas 

Dubuque 

Fourtli 

Front 

GolT 

Kelley 

Mast road 

IMast stri'et 

Milford Place 

Miltord street — 

North Main 

Kininion 

Koclvland Avenue 

Schiller 

School 

Second 

Shirley Hill road.. 

South JNIain 

Sullivan 

Turner 

Walker 

Wayne 

Wheelock 

Wilkins 

Worthley road — 

Totals 



58.50 

70.75 

48.50 

29.00 

10.00 

15.50 

10.50 

9.50 

20 7.. -.0 

l.J.OO 

107.00 

30.00 

101.50 

143.50 

88.50 

40.00 

164.00 

lOil.OO 

8.00 

87.00 

12.00 

15.00 

52.50 

21.75 

63.00 

5.75 

14.50 

35. 50 

23.25 

5.50 

69.00 

96.00 



51,717.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



a97 



STKEETS TURNPIKED AVITII ROAD MACHINE. 

Amory 580 feet 

Barr 196 " 

Beanport 392 " 

Bowman 364 " 

Eddy road 950 " 

Front 950 " 

Goffstown road 1,050 " 

Hevey 364 " 

Kelley 1,694 " 

Mast road . 1,690 " 

Main back 280 " 

McDuffee 416 " 

North Main 506 " 

Quincy 210 " 

Eiddle 350 " 

Second 646 " 

Tremont 280 " 

Wentworth 700 " 

Worthley road 644 " 

12,262 feet 

Total, 12,262 feet, or 2.32 miles. 

Labor, $196,75. 

Cleaning- crossings, picking stones 482.75 

Cleaning streets and gutters 1,605.00 



$2,087.75 



NEW STREETS. 



Location. 


Length in 
feet. 


Material 
used. 


Cut or fill. 


Labor. 


Bismarck 


600 X 28 X li. 
300X28X 1. 
900. 

200x10x6. 
200x20x1. 
550 X 26 x 6. 


Gravel, 258 loads. 
Clay, 40 loads. 

Gravel, 157 loads. 
Stone chips, 

72 loads. 


Cut. 

Fill. 

Top dress. 

Cut. 

Cut. 

Top dress. 




Brock 


$472.28 
13 00 




''8.50 


Montgomery 


176.25 




1,850 ft. 




Totals 






8690.03 



398 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PAVING STREETS. 



Location. 



Length in 
feet. 



Loads of 
stone. 



Labor. 



Amory 

Ainory Hill 

Bismarck 

Brook 

Charleston avenue 

Conant 

Dubu(iue 

Goff 

Green 

Mast Road 

Milford Place 

Qiiincy 

Wayne 

Winter 

Total 



50 


o 


810.50 


110 


4 


17.50 


1,800 


74 


532.51 


200 


8 


16.28 


500 


20 


40.72 


2'J5 


9 


33.37 


900 


36 


102.12 


100 


4 


20.62 


100 


4 


19.. 50 


3,'MO 


156 


516.75 


412 


24 


87.87 


25 


1 


3.13 


100 


4 


18.50 


175 


7 


30.00 


8,597 


353 


51,449.37 



PAVING RELAID. 



Location. 



Lcn{°:th in 
feet. 



Labor. 



Beauport 

Caitier 

Clinton 

Conant 

Coolidge Avenue 

Douglas 

Dover 

Eddy Road 

George .. 

Goff 

Granite 

Kelley 

Mast Road 

Milford 

North Main .. .. 

Parker 

School 

Sullivan 

Sylvester 

Wayne 

Winter 

Total 



60 
200 
50 
20 
75 
25 
HO 
50 
25 
20 
58 
100 
12'> 
25 
95 
110 
25 
60 
28 
150 
100 



1,461 



$4.00 
S.70 
4. CO 

1 50 
4.f>0 
2.25 
4 50 
3 00 
1.50 
2.00 

12 50 
8 30 
30 00 

2 25 
6 00 

19.00 

2.23 

3.00 

L.-iO 

13.50 

25.00 



$159. 



Extensive and costlj" repairs were made on Mast road as follows: 
Graded, top-dressed, etc. 
2,000 X 50 X li/o foot fill. 
2,000 X 50 X 3-inch top-dress. 
Labor, $1,477.21. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



399 



MATERIAL USED. 

Gravel 

Filling 

Clay 



MISCELLANEOUS KEPAIRS. 



1,002 loads 
58 " 
145 

1,205 loads 



8i4ewalks. 



Amory street hill, grading 675 ft. long x 6 ft. wide x 1 

ft. fill, labor 

Beauport street, grading at park, labor 

Beauport street, grading on side hill, labor 

Putnam street, repairs on plank sidewalk at dump, labor 

Mast road, grading, labor 

Winter street, grading, labor 

Walls. 



$38.50 
38.00 
15.00 
29.25 
89.50 
33.00 



$243.25 



Repaired wall at the corner of Mast road and Mast 
street; material, old flagstone; labor 

New wall at the corner of Amory street extension and 
Bartlett street; material from Kelley street ledge; 
labor 



NEW CESSPOOLS. 



$20.25 



95.50 



$115. 



Location. 



No. 



Cost. 
Material. 



Labor, 



Amory and Bartlett 

Bismarck 

Bismarclv and Milford 

Conant and Uarr 

D and Mast road 

Kelley at Shoe shop 

Mast Road 

Mast Road and U 

Mast Road east of D 

Mast Road and Mast street 

McDuffle 

Milford Place 

Montgomery and Kelley. . . 

Quincy and Douglas 

Riddle and Mast Road 

"West street 

Total 



821.. 30 
109.00 
36.51 
17.02 
40. o4 
18.82 
141.40 
20.70 
17.5.5 
20.07 
?8.99 
34.75 
42.38 
20.87 
39.49 
13.98 



S19.50 
83.25 
23.10 
21.00 
28.00 
21.00 

106.00 
13.87 
12.00 
15.00 
24.. "0 
34.75 
28.00 
18.00 
26.50 
15.00 



S633.37 



8489.37 



400 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



REPAIRED CESSPOOLS. 



Location. 



No. 



Cost of 
material. 



Amory 

Cartier 

Coolidge avenue 

Coolidge avenue and Cartier. . . 

Kelley 

Parker and Parker avenue 

Parker and Winter 

Quincy and Douglas 

Soutli Main and West Hancock 

Wayne and Cartier 

Wlieeloek 

Total 



11 



81.43 
1.43 
1.03 
1.03 
1.43 
1.43 
5.89 
8.95 
3..''.0 
4.69 
1.43 



332.24 



Labor. 



J4..50 
3.25 
3.00 
3.50 
4.50 
4.25 
6.00 

10.50 
5.00 
6.50 
3.75 



854.75 



CLEANING CESSPOOLS. 



Months. 



Costs. 



May 

June 

July 

September 
October . . . 
November 
December 

Total.. 



8267.12 
78.62 
27.62 
53.26 
13.50 
&1.25 
20.25 



EDGESTONE SET. 



Location. 



No. of feet. 



Labor. 



Amory street extension 

Amory and Bartlett 

Charleston avenue and Brock 

Kelley and Cartier 

Kelley at Kimnion e. b 

Mast road. . 

Mast road and Mast street ... 

Parker avenue 

Parker and Winter 

Riddle and Mast road 

Winter 

Total 




810.75 
44.25 

6.50 
16.50 

4.00 
20.00 

6.00 
32.50 
43.25 
11.00 
11.00 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



401 



EDGESTONES RESET. 



Location. 



No. of feet. 



Labor 



Coolidge avenue. 



20 



53.00 



CUTTING BRUSH. 

Brush was cut as follows: 

Dunbarton road. 

Goffstown road. 

Eiver road. 

Straw road, labor $37. .37 

Railroad street, labor 16.87 

Total 

FENCES. 

Repairs on Fences. 

Location. Length. 

Amory street 14 feet 

Hooksett road SO " 

Mast road 304 " 

Whitewashing trees and fences 

Total 

CULVERTS. 

Cleaned and relaid culvert on Eddy road, 32 feet long, 
labor 

Cleaned and relaid two culverts on Front street, 32 
feet long, labor 

Repaired culvert on Rockland avenue, labor 

Repaired culvert on South Main street, labor 

Repaired culvert on Worthley road, labor 

Total $46.00 



$54.24 



Labor. 

$5.50 

7.00 

24.50 



$37.00 
87.50 



$124.50 



$14.00 

16.50 
5.50 
2.50 
7.50 



Division No. 7. 

Charles Francis, Agent. 

All streets were patched and repaired and kept in good condition 
for public travel. 



402 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Extensive improvements were made on Massabesic street from Cy- 
press street to the J. Hall road. 

This section of the street was macadamized, the gutters paved, side- 
walks graded, corner circles set, cesspools built at all intersecting 
streets. 

A large number of costly sewers and drains were constructed in 
this division during the season. 

STREETS ORADED. 

Prescott, Wilson easterly 464 feet 

JHEW STO^^: circles. 
Location. No. Used. Size No. 

Hanover and Page 1 10 

Hanover, near Page 2 3 

Massabesic and Jewett 2 Special 

Massabesic and Jewett back street 2 3 

Massabesic and J. Hall road 2 Special 

Massabesic and Valley 2 Special 

Total 11 

EDGESTONE SET. 

Hanover, Delaware avenue, easterly' 100 feet 

J. Hall road and Massabesic 17 " 

Jewett back street and Massabesic 14 " 

Valley and Massabesic 28 " 

Total 159 feet 

ED6BSTONE BESET. 

Prescott, Wilson easterly 100 feet 

NEW CESSPOOLS. 

Location. No. 

Belmont at Clay 2 

Belmont at Dix 2 

Candia road at Woodland avenue 1 

Grove, between Hoslej' and Taylor 1 

Hayward at Porter 2 

Jewett at Massabesic 2 

J. Hall road at Massabesic 2 

J. Hall road at Nelson 1 

Jones at Nelson 2 

Massabesic, opposite Dickey's 2 

Massabesic, opposite No. 120 1 

Massabesic at Jewett 2 



STREET AND TARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Massabesic n. s. east of R. R 

Massabesic at Valley 

Nelson at Jones 

Porter, between Massabesic and Valley 

Porter and Valley 

Somerville at Jewett 

Woodland avenue 

Total 

COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



403 

No. 



1 



1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 

29 



Location. 



Square 
yards. 



Grove street 

Hanover, frona Page westerly 

Massabesic, from east of Cypress to east Hue of J. Hall road . 

Page, from Han<>ver northerly 

Prescott, Wilson easterly 



Total 



19 4-9 
73 3-9 

539 
48 6-9 

200 



8S0 4-9 



Labor, $159.49. 



CtXVERTS AND PIPE, DRAINS. 



Candia road at Woodland avenue 50 feet of 15-in. pipe 

Highland Park avenue 66 feet of 15-in. pipe 

]\rystic and Longwood avenues 26 feet of 10-in. pipe 

Oakland avenue 135 feet of 12-in. pipe 

Somerville, near Porter 76 feet of 24-in. pipe 

The following shows the location, cost per average foot, and the 
total cost of the sewers built in East Manchester during the past year: 

SEWERS. 



Location. 



Length in 
feet. 



Cost per 
foot. 



Total cost. 



Ainsworth avenue, Hayward, southerly 

Belmont, south of Somerville to Dix 

Chase Ave., Hayes Ave. to Hospital Ave 

Lix, Wilson to west of Hall 

Hayes avenue, Chase avenue, westerly 

Hospital avenue, Chase avenue westerly. . . . 
Mammoth Road, north of Massabesic, to 

Nelson 

Massabesic, cross lots, Massabesic to 

Mammoth Road 

Nelson, Mammoth Road to east of Hall Road 

Porter, Hay ward, northerly 

Wilson, Clay to Dix 

Young, Taylor to Ainsworth avenue 

Total 



302 
446 
513 
423 
209 
126 



146 

582 
237 
2.% 
558 



4,561 



$1,001 
1.244 
1 521 
1.275 
2.281 
2.19 

4 552 

1.513 
3.129 
2.6??6 
1.212 



$2,160 



$367.21 
S.'i.T.lS 
780.35 
539.38 
476.81 
275.94 

3,892.42 

881.03 
741.70 
671.61 
674.60 



$9,856.20 



404 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Division No. 4. 

Bybon Moobe, Agent, 

All roads have ibeen kept in good repair throughout the district. 
About fifty rods of road have been clayed and graveled. 
Brush cut throughout the district. 
Bridge over Cohas Brook replanked. 
Bridge over Chenej- Brook replanked. 

All roads broken out after snowstorms and kept in a passable con- 
dition. 
Total amount expended, $593.23. 



Division No. 5. 

Mark E. Har^'ey, Agent. 

Roads graveled, 2,150 feet. 

Eoads turnpiked with road machine, one and one half miles. 

Cut bushes on three quarters of a mile of road. 

Built 710 feet of fence at dangerous places. 

Kemoved loose stones from all roads in division several times during 
the season. 

Took up, cleaned and relaid one stone culvert, 65 feet long. 

All roads broken out after each snowstorm and kept in a passable 
condition during the winter. 

Total amount expended, $412.75. 



Division No. 8. 

A. J. Gale, Agent. 

ROADS GHAVEJLED. 
Location. No. of Loads. 

Bald Hill road 50 

Bridge-street extension 22 

Candia road 98 

Hanover street 40 

Lake Shore road 40 

Turnpike 5 

Total 255 



STEEET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 405 

BOABS TUBNPIKED. 
Location. Rods Long. 

Bald Hill road 40 

Bridge-street extension 50 

Lake Shore road 40 

Lock road 10 

Total 140 

CULVERTS. 

New concrete culvert laid in Lake Shore road near the residence of 
J. H. Paige. Full description of culvert can be found on page 3S1. 

NEW BOAD CONSTEUCTION. 

Proctor road at a point near Hanover street was widened and 
straightened for a distance of 300 feet. 

The road was widened from four to five feet on the north side and 
almost the entire distance was blasted from solid rock. 

Fences were repaired throughout the entire district. 

Small stones were removed from all roads and all general repairs 
attended to. 

Eoads were broken out after all snowstorms and kept in passable 
condition during the winter months. 

Total amount expended, $1,137.82. 



Division No. 9. 

Lester C. Paige, Agent. 

roads graveled. 
Location. No. of Rods. 

Corning road 12 

Derry road 81 

Dickey road 10 

Mammoth road 43 

Paige road 30 

Total 176 

ROADS PLOUGHED, TTIRNPIKED, AND GKAVELEI>. 
Location. No. of Rods. 

Morse road 18 

Webster road 21 

Total 39 

Derry road from Mammoth road to Dickey road, a distance of 38 
rods, was widened about 12 feet. 



406 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Spacious ditches were put in on either side and the bottoms rub- 
bled to accommodate the large amount of water which finds its way 
to this point during the winter and spring months. 

One culvert 24" x 28" was lengthened 14 feet. 

Took up and relaid culvert 24" x 24" x 14 feet long. 

Built one new culvert 18" x 36" x 14 feet long, and lengthened one 
culvert 24" x 30" x 81 feet. 

The bridge over Cohas Brook on Derry road was newly planked and 
both bridges over this brook were painted. 

Built 150 feet of fencing. 

BUSHES CUT. 

Paige, Morse, Webster, and Corning roads. 
All general repairs attended to throughout the district. 
Roads were broken out and kept in a passable condition during the 
winter months. 

Total amount expended during the year, $412.75. 



Division No. 12, 

Eugene Libbey, Agent. 

Snow and ice, $82.75. 

This account includes the first four months of the year 1905. 
When the city farm was closed the territory covered b3- this divi- 
sion was added to division number eight. 



Commons. 
John Seastrom, SrPERrNTENDENT. 

The usual care and attention was given to all the commons and 
parks that come under the care and jurisdiction of this department, 
and the standard of excellence was carefully maintaine'd. 

An important addition was made to our park system by the purchase 
of the land and the building of the East Side park at the corner of 
Lake avenue, Hall, and Central streets. 

CARE AND lIAIVTENAJsXE. 

The north walk in Merrimack common was recovered and one new 
crosswalk was laid in the southwest corner. 

Cleaned and painted four fountains, also all old settees and twenty- 
five new ones. 

Built, twenty-five new settees, fifty settee platforms, and fenced in 
thirteen beds for flowers. 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 407 

Repaired all seats and swings. 
Several cesspools were repaired or rebuilt. 

Set out several new trees and trimmed all old trees and shrubs. 
Cut five large dead trees. 

All sidewalks were kept in a neat and clean condition. 
The lawns were carefully tended and numerous beds of palms and 
flowers were planted in conspicuous places. 

Summary. 

Appropriation $4,500.00 

Overdrawn 639.76 

$5,139.76 

Labor $3,081.99 

Water 70(^.00 

Shrubs, flowers, etc 406.13 

Lumber 184.68 

Hardware 325.81 

Lighting 47.48 

Concrete, edgestones, etc • 209.52 

Rent of barn 24.00 

New horse 100.00 

New sled 28.00 

Veterinary 17.50 

Incidentals 14.65 

$5,139.76 

STABK PARK. 

The edgestone and circles purchased last season were set on the 
River road side of the park, and the gutter paved the entire length 
w-ith block paving. 

A new sidewalk, ten feet wide, was constructed along the entire 
east side of the park, and this, together with the new edgestone and 
paved gutter, presents a very finished appearance to this side of the 
park. 

The lawns were carefully tended and looked exceedingly well. 

All iron work, including the cannon, cannon balls and fences, were 
cleaned, repaired, and newly painted. 

The large urn that was completely hidden in one of the beds of 
tall shrubs was removed and located in a commanding position in the 
center of the main lawn. 

All roads, walks, and gutters were cleaned, repaired, and kept in 
proper condition throughout the season. 

Trimmed all trees and shrubs. 



408 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Transplanted fifty rose bushes and set out eighty-six new ones. 

Six large beds of flowers were maintained at conspicuous points 
along the main driveways. 

One new wooden bridge was built over the brook in the lower por- 
tion of the park. 

The drivewaj'S are beginning to wear out and the same will have to 
be top dressed with "Salem stone" in the near future. 

Summary. 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Labor $702.74 

Castings 60.00 

Hardware 13.19 

Water 12.00 

Shrubs and flowers 142.00 

Filling 12.50 

Curbing 42.40 

984.83 



Transferred to reserve fund $15.17 

DERRYFIELD PARK. 

Cleaned and repaired all roads, gutters, and ditches. 

Painted all iron work on the inside of the observatory. 

Two cannon were properly mounted on the knoll in front of the ob- 
servatory. 

Repaired and painted all settees and swings. 

Graded seven thousand feet of sidewalk on the north side of Old 
Bridge street. 

Regraded fourteen thousand five hundred square feet of land oppo- 
site the east side of the macadam roadway near Old Bridge street. 

It is intended to use the land situated between the macadam road- 
way and Old Bridge street for a lawn, and the same is being regraded 
and put in proper shape as fast as the same can be properlj- handled. 

Planted several new trees. 

Trimmed all shrubs and trees; also cut eight dead trees. 

Cut and destroyed fifteen loads of brush. 

Cut thirty-five tons of hay. 

Considerable new work in the line of walks and gutters will be done 
next season. 

Summary. 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Labor $803.25 

Hardware 13.27 

Lumber 8.25 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 409 

Insurance $11.7.') 

Stone 46.00 

Water 24.00 

$906.52 



$93.48 



LAFAYETTE PARK. 



Work on concrete retaining wall was resumed and about sixty feet 
was completed. 

A large amount of crushed stone and other material was purchased 
and the same will be used early next season. 

Sununary. 
Appropriation $1,000.00 



Labor and material $1,000.00 



PROUT PAJJK. 

Planted eighty-six new trees and one hundred and fifty shrubs. 

Plans for the improvement of the park are now under consideration 
and it is hoped that considerable new work will be accomplished next 
year. 

Siwimary. 

Appropriation $500.00 

Labor and material 244.99 



$255.01 
EAST SIDE PARK. 

This new lot of land was improved as follows: 

Lot was graded. 

Edgestones and circles set around three sides. 

Gutters paved. 

Walks and crosswalks made. 

Cesspools built. 

The old road that ran through the lot was abandoned and Lake 
avenue and Hall street were widened at this point and a strip of 
macadam built on both Hall street and Lake avenue opposite the park. 

When completed this park will form one of the most attractive 
corners in the city. 

The appropriation of $100 was expended and the balance of the 
cost of the improvements was charged to the regular appropriation 
for commons. 



410 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



NORTH END PLAYGROUND. , 

Appropriation $50.00 

Labor and material 38.75 



Transferred to reserve fund $11.22 

SOUTH END PLAYGIIOUND. 

Appropriation $50.00 

Labor and material 32.95 



Transferred to reserve fund $17.05 

MCGREGORVILLE PLAYGROUND. 

Appropriation $50.00 

Labor and material 16.05 



Transferred to reserve fund $33.95 

RIDDLE PLAYGROUND. 

Appropriation $50.00 



Transferred to reserve fund $50.00 



We desire to thank His Honor, Mayor Reed, and each member of the 
city government, as vs'ell as others, for courtesies granted. 

It is proper at this time to thank all our assistants for the interest 
and hearty co-operation they have shown in carrjing out the work 
of the department. 

Respectfull,v submitted, 

WILLIAM Mcelroy, 

FRED K. RAMSEY, 
BYRON WORTHEX. 
Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 
January 1, 1906. 



EEPOET 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



MANCHESTER CITY LIBRARY, 1905. 



Trustees. 



Eng-ene E. Reed, Mayor, ex officio. 

G. Irving Haselton, President of the Common Council, ex officio. 

Walter M. Parker. 
Herman F. Straw. 



Nathan P. Hunt. 



Eoger G. Sullivan. 

Officers. 

PRESiD'EWT, ex officio. 
Eugene E. Reed. 

CLERK AND TREASURER. 

Nathan P. Hunt. 



Frank P. Carpenter. 
William P. Farmer. 
Henrv W. Boutwell. 



Librarian. 

F. Mabel Winchell. 
Assistants. 

E. Louise Newell, classifier. 

Edith O. Simmons, cataloguer. 

Charles S. Morgan. 

Carl P. James. 



Albro P. Eeed. 
Thomas P. Ajer. 
Arthur B. Blaine. 



Library Hours. 

10 A. M. to S P. M.; Saturdays till 9 p. su 

Sundays (for reading and reference), 11 A. M. to 5 p. M. 



EEPOKT OF THE TEUSTEES OF THE CITY 

LIBEAEY. 



To the City Coimcils of the City of Manchester: 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith submit their fifty-second 
annual report of the affairs of the library, and with the same the 
report made to them by the treasurer of the board, containing an ac- 
count of the sums received and the expenditures made by him in be- 
half of the board from the funds in their possession and under their 
dontrol. 

The treasurer reports the amount expended for the purchase of 
books during the j^ear to have been the sum of nineteen hundred and 
thirteen dollars and sixty-three cents, and for the purchase of period- 
icals the sum of two hundred and seven dollars and thirty cents, a 
total expenditure for both of these purposes of two thousand one 
hundred and twenty dollars and ninety-three cents. 

Of the amount expended for the purchase of 'books the sum of one 
hundred and nine dollars and twenty-three cents was used for the 
purchase of books to replace those worn out and retired from circula- 
tion, and the sum of five hundred and twelve dollars and fiftj'-seven 
cents was taken from the income of the Dean fund and applied to the 
purchase of books for that department of the library. Exclusive of 
these two amounts the sum expended for new books was one thousand 
two hundred and ninety-one dollars and eighty-three cents, leaving a 
balance in the hands of the treasurer at the close of the year of the 
amounts appropriated by the city councils for the purchase of books 
of four hundred and ninety-six dollars and sixty-three cents. 

The balances of the accumulated income of the several funds under 
the control of the trustees at the close of the year were as follows: 

Dean fund $8,256.58 

Mary E. Elliot fund 1,909.37 

Eliza A. Eaton fund 1,058.93 

During the year two hundred and two volumes were purchased from 
the income of the Dean fund at a cost, as above stated, of five hundred 
and twelve dollars and fifty-seven cents. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the past year have been 
five thousand four hundred and twenty-eight dollars and eighty-one 
cents. The items that go to make up these incidental expenses may 

413 



414 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

be found in detail in the annual report of the city, the bills for the 
same having been paid bj' the city treasurer, upon approval by the 
trustees, from the sum appropriated for the library. 

The library has been open during the past year for the delivery of 
books three hundred and five days, during which time sixty-seven 
thousand one hundred and seven books were delivered for home use, 
an average of about two hundred and twenty per day. In addition 
to the above number delivered for general circulation twenty-five thou- 
sand four hundred and twenty books were delivered for iise in the 
reading room at the librarj-, being an average of about eighty-three 
per day. The total number of books delivered for general circulation 
and for use in the reading room was ninety-two thousand five hundred 
and twenty-seven, an average of about three hundred and three per 
day. 

As compared with the year preceding the circulation for home use 
shows a decrease of five hundred and sixty-three, while the number 
delivered for use in the reading room shows a decrease of two thou- 
sand nine hundred and thirteen. The total circulation was three 
thousand four hundred and seventy-six less than the preceding j^ear. 
The above figures do not include books delivered for use at the library 
on Sundays. 

The reading room at the library has been open each Sunday during 
the year from eleven o'clock in the forenoon to five o'clock in the 
afternoon at an expense, not including lighting and heating, of two 
hundred and seventj- dollars and ninetj^-five cents. 

The total attendance for the year was four thousand and eighty- 
nine, of which number seven hundred and seventeen were men, two 
hundred and thirtj'-seven were women, and three thousand one hun- 
dred and thirty-five were children. The average attendance per Sun- 
day was about thirteen for men, about four for women, and about 
fifty-nine for children. The total average attendance was about 
seventj'-seven per Sunday. 

The total number of books delivered for use at the reading room 
during the fifty-two Sundays was six thousand six hundred and 
thirty-six. 

As compared with the year preceding the attendance shows an in- 
crease of ninetj'-five, of which one hundred and thirteen was from 
men and thirty-six from women, while the attendance of children 
was fifty-four less. The number of books used at the librarj- shows 
a decrease of twelve hundred and twentj'-six from the number re- 
ported the j^ear previous. 

The attendance on Sundaj's during the summer months is quite 
small, and the library could be closed during the months of July and 
August without detriment to the public. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the last report, 
including maps and pamphlets, was fifty-one thousand six hundred 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 415 

and eightj^-six. During the year there have l)een added by purchase 
one thousand and fourteen volumes, by donation four hundred and 
ninety-one volumes, and two hundred and sixty-nine volumes of peri- 
odicals have been bound, a total of one thousand seven hundred and 
seventy-four volumes, making- the number of bound volumes in the 
library at the close of the year fifty-two thousand seven hundred 
and forty-two, and the total number, including- sixteen maps and 
seven hundred and two pamphlets, fifty-three thousand four hundred 
and sixty. 

The number of books reported lost during the year was forty-one, 
the same as for the preceding year, while the number lost during the 
year 1902 was iovty. The number of books lost during the last three 
y^ears is largely in excess of any reported in any previous years, and 
is probably due to the fact that the public have been allowed access 
to the stacks and to books in shelves in the reading room. 

As suggested in the last report, should such a large number of 
losses of books continue, the trustees may deem it necessary to with- 
draw the privilege of inspection of books and remove all books to the 
shelves behind tlie counter. 

Three hundred and forty volumes were withdrawn from circulation 
during the year, having become so defaced and worn as to be unfit for 
further circulation. Of these and of others retired from circulation 
in previous years for like reason one hundred and six volumes have 
been replaced at a cost, as previously stated, of one hundred and nine 
dollars and twenty-three cents. 

The number of periodicals regularly received at the library during 
the past year was one hundred and seven, of which number seventy- 
two were purchased and thirty-five were donated. On the completion 
of the various volumes the same have 'been bound and placed on the 
shelves of the library for general circulation. 

Annexed to this report is a list of the names of those who have 
made donations of books or periodicals to the library during the year, 
with the number presented by each. The trustees have caused due 
acknowledgment to be made in behalf of the city to all who have 
in this manner contributed to the increase and usefulness of the li- 
brary. 

The librarian. Miss F. Mabel Winchell, and her assistants have con- 
tinued in the discharge of the duties of their respective positions 
throughout the year. No new work of importance has been entered 
upon or changes made. Work upon the card catalogue has been 
continued, chieflj^ in analyzing the books alreadj^ entered in the cata- 
logue, which will make the catalogue more useful and convenient to 
the patrons of the library. 



416 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

April, 1906. 
In board of trustees read and approved and ordered to be signed by 
the chairman and clerk of the board and transmitted to the city coun- 
oils. 

EUGENE E. REED, 

Mayor. 
N. P. HUNT, 

Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library: 

The treasurer of the board submits the follo>ving account of the 
receipts and expenditures by the board of the funds received on ac- 
count of the lil)rary. 

1905. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance of ai)propriation $916.76 

May 13. appropriation for boolvs for 

1905 1,000.00 

Dec. 15. F. Mabel Winchell, balance of 

tines 128.57 

F. Mabel Winchell, catalogues 

sold 5.50 

F. Mabel Winchell, books lost 

or injured 15. 6S 

F. Mabel Winchell, requests 

and miscellaneous sales 26.45 

F. Mabel Winchell, rebate on 

freight bill 2.03 

F. Mabel Winchell, librarian 

of congress 10.00 

$2,104.99 

Jan. 1. To balance of income of Dean 

fund $8,330.28 

July 1. income of Dean fund 105.62 

interest on accumulation of 

income 135.18 

interest on accumulation of 

income 142.03 

Oct. 1. income of Dean fund 44.10 

interest on accumulation of 

income 11.94 

$8,769.15 

.Tan. 1. To Mary E. Elliot fund $2,000.00 

balance of interest 1,826.78 

Oct. 1. interest to Oct. 1, 1905 42.00 

interest on accumulation of 

income 40.59 

$3,909.37 

417 



418 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 

Jan. 1. To Eliza A. Eaton fund $3,000.00 

balance of interest 973.18 

Oct. 1. interest to Oct. 1, 1905 63.00 

interest on accumulation of 

income 22.74 



$4,055.92 

$18,842.43 

1905. Cr. 

Jan. 5. Paid Little, Brown & Co., books $2.00 

If). E. S. Stackpole, books 5.00 

18. D. Van Nostrand Co. (Dean 

fund), books 13.00 

19. W. B. Clarke Co., books 3.89 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean fund) 

books 2.70 

Feb. 7. C. S. Gurnejs books 1.25 

9. Frederick Starr (Dean fund), 

books 17.00 

H. W. Wilson Co., books O.OO 

10. Boston Society Natural His- 

tory, periodicals 12.00 

11 W. B. Clarke Co., books 177.78 

IG. Out West Magazine Co., peri- 
odicals 2.00 

23. Georg-e H. Walker & Co., 

books 1.90 

Mar. 7. T. P. W. Rogers, books 3.00 

11. W. B. Clarke Co., books 36.53 

30. A. L. A. Publishing Board, 

periodicals .50 

April 5. Francis P. Harper, books... .90 

7. r.ittle. Brown & Co., books 5.25 

10. University of Chicago Press, 

books 9.00 

University of Chicago Press 

(Dean fund) 10.37 

W, B. Clarke Co., books.... 6.00 
W. B. Clarke Co. (replaced) 

books 88.52 

11. Publishers' Weekly, books.. 3.50 
May 3. Little, Brown & Co., books. . 2.00 

W. B. Clarke Co., books 11.80 

8. Publishers' Weekly, books.. 7.50 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 4l9 

May IS. raid W. V,. Clarke Co., replaced 

books $j.4f) 

• 20. W. B. Clarke Co., books 308.32 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean 

fund), books 7.74 

June 8. W. B. Clarke Co., b^Doks 54.67 

W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean 

fund) , 'books 2.50 

10. University of Chicago Press, 

books 1.88 

19. Little, Brown & Co., books.. 7.50 

23. C. F. Emerson, books 1.00 

July 14. W. B. Clarke Co., books 57.49 

L. B. Parsons, books 5.00 

17. Little, Brown & Co., books 2.00 
27. Little, Brown & Co., books.. 2.50 

Aug. 7. W. B. Clarke Co., replaced 

books 15.25 

W. B. Clarke Co., books 95.13 

19. E. P. Clark, books 20.00 

31. W. M. Olin, secretary, books 4.00 

Sept. 2. O. W. Hunkins, books 7.00 

9. Little, Brown & Co., books.. 1.50 

21, Goodspeed's bookshop, books 5.75 

Charles E. Lauriat Co., books 24.25 
Charles E. Lauriat Co. (Dean 

fund) , books 34.60 

26. W. B. Clarke Co., books 6.96 

Oct. 5. N. J. Bartlett, books 2.0S 

6. D. Van Nostrand Co. (Dean 

fund) , books 154.94 

10. W. B. Clarke Co. (Dean 

fund), books 2.25 

W. B. Clarke Co., books 29.33 

18. C. F. Whiteher, books 3.65 

23. H. W. Wilson Co., books 15.00 

Nov. 3. Little, Brown & Co., books 3.50 
D. Van Nostrand Co. (Dean 

fund), books 15.00 

Lawj-er's Co-op. Pub. Co., 

books 5.00 

B. F. Breck & Co., books 3.50 

10. Little, Brown & Co., books.. 6.00 

14. W. P. Goodman, books .88 

18. W. B. Clarke Co., books 202.32 



420 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEl'ORTS. 

Nov. ]S. Paid W. P.. Clarke Co. (Dean 

fund). l)Ooks $:!.04 

Little, Brown & Co., books.. 3.75 
23, Herman Goldberger, period- 
icals 185.80 

Dee. 1. Sampson & Murdock Co., 

books 3.00 

6. W. B. Clarke Co., books 130.57 

7. D. Van Nostrand Co. (Dean 

fund), books 9.00 

8. L. J. H. Frost, books 1.00 

C. W. Tibbetts, periodicals.. 1.00 

13. D. Van Nostrand (Dean 

fund), books 240.43 



$2,120.93 

Dec. 30. By balance of appropriation 496.63 

balance of Dean fund income 8,256.58 

balance of Elliot fund and interest 3,909.37 

balance of Eaton fund and interest 4,058.92 



$18,842.43 



The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the librarj- for the 
year ending December 31, 1905, the bills for which have been paid 
through the office of the citj' treasurer upon approval by the com- 
mittee on accounts of the board of trustees, the details of which may 
be found in the annual report of the city, have been as follows: 

Services of librarian $961.67 

Services of assistants to librarian 1,335.74 

Services in reclassification and cataloguing 887,20 

Fuel 540.89 

Gas 89.55 

Electricity 249.90 

Insurance 125.00 

Binding 282.36 

Rebinding 176.90 

Supplies 287.29 

Water 13.62 

Cleaning 133.86 

Sunday opening of library 270.95 

Printing trustees' report 16.25 

Newspapers 6.00 

Furniture 27.00 

Incidentals 24.63 

$5,428.81 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 421 



KECAPITULATION. 



Balance December 31, 1904 $1,927.91 

Appropriation for 1905 7,230.02 



Paid trustees for purchase of books .$1,000.00 

Paid incidental expenses .'5,428.81 

Balance of appropriation 2,735.72 



$9,164.53 



$9,164.53 



Respectfully submitted, 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Lihrnnj. 

December 30, 1905. 
We have examined the foregoing- report and find the same correctly 
cast and properly vouched. 

EUGENE E. EEED, Mayor, 
WALTER M. PARKER, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 

December 30, 1905. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of receipts and ex- 
penditures embraced in the foregoing report of the treasurer of the 
trustees of the city library and find the same correctly cast and 
properly vouched. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the City Lihrary, Manchester, X. H.: 

Gextlemen: — The annual report of the librarian for the year 1005 
is herewith presented: 

The statistics for the year will be found as usual in the tables at the 
close of this report. The general activities of the library have pro- 
gressed about as usual in recent years, though with an increase of 
work in the various departments. More people have registered and 
more made use of the study pocket system; more volumes have been 
added to the library and more have been classified and catalogued; 
more books have been covered and more repaired; more periodicals 
bound, etc., etc. 

One event of the year well worthy of note was the cleaning and 
repainting of the reading room and central part of the library build- 
ing. These repairs had been needed badly for a number of years and 
the improvement is consequentlj' the more marked and appreciated. 
The interior is so much lighter and more cheerful in consequence of 
the new decorations that the reading room has become a much more 
attractive place for readers. The new chairs acquired during the 
year have also helped in giving the room a brighter and more modern 
appearance. While these improvements are sincerely appreciated, 
the great need for a separate room for the children is still felt, and 
must continue to be the crying need of the institution until it is met. 
Meanwhile an attendant for the reading room, as suggested in last 
year's report, would be a decided help and advantage to those who 
use the room. The wing of the building yet remains to be renovated, 
but it is earnestly hoped and confidently expected that it will be 
completed during the coming year. 

Another improvement accomplished during the year was the sys- 
tematic arrangement of the public documents. This task had long 
been contemplated and desired, but on account of the pressure of 
other work had to be postponed. We were fortunate in being able 
to retain through the year several of our experienced assistants, and 
it was largely due to this fact that this and other extra work was 
accomplished. It costs a trifle more for salaries to keep the assist- 
ants after thej- are trained, but when the character and amount of 
service rendered are taken into account, it is seen to be decidedly 
more economical for the library to retain them. These documents 
were all put in order and neatly labeled with the serial number as- 

422 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 423 

signed by the government. In getting them thus in order it became 
apparent that there were a good many gaps in the set. The depart- 
ment at Washington was notified what volumes were lacking, and 
asked if they could be supplied. In reply one hundred and eleven of 
the missing volumes were received, many of which were the very early 
numbers of the House and Senate reports; also several volumes of the 
Congressional Record, which make the set of this work complete to 
date. 

CIRCTJOLATION. 

The circulation has remained practically the same this year as last, 
the average daily circulation for home use being two hundred and 
twenty for both years. The reading room circulation dropped some- 
what, but considering the fact that the library, though .kept open, 
was not a comfortable nor an attractive place during the six weeks 
while the repairs were in progress, especially while the building was 
filled with staging, the record was not a bad one. Still it is not 
what it ought to be. The library does not serve as large a percentage 
of the population as it should, nor does it serve them as well as it 
should. 

The Dean fund makes ample provision for the purchase of scientific 
and technical works so that those wishing to pursue these lines of 
reading or study may be well provided with books, but it does nothing 
to bring these books to the attention of the people. Y''ears ago it was 
thought sufficient for a inerchant to provide his store with attrac- 
tive goods. Now advertising is considered essential to success. It is 
a parallel case with the library. It is now not only customary but 
necessary, for the library that would have its books used to adver- 
tise. It should print lists of books on selected subjects and get them 
into the hands of the people. It should have a bulletin which lists 
all new additions and includes reading lists on timely topics. These 
methods would largelj^ increase the circulation and therefore the use- 
fulness of the books owned by the library. An appropriation suffi- 
cient to provide a number of copies of the popular books is also 
needed, so that those desiring them enough to leave requests for them, 
will not have to wait six months or longer for a chance to read them. 
More money is also necessary for replacing worn out books. TJie lack 
of standard books and good juveniles, such as are always wearing out, 
is a great detriment to the library and cannot fail to lower the circu- 
lation. Such books should always be "in stock" and many of them 
should be represented by a number of copies, so that the reader who 
wants a book of acknowledged worth need not ask for it in vain. 
Until our funds shall be sufficient to allow of these improvements, and 
to provide books in several other lines, we cannot expect our circula- 
tion to be what it should. 

It is encouraging to note that in spite of these drawbaclcs the per- 
centage of fiction has dropped lower than ever before. This is no 



424 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

doubt largely due to the number of non-fiction books placed on the 
open shelves where people can look them over and select one to their 
liking. The records show that the percentage of fiction some years 
ago ran as higli as eighty-nine, while it has never dropped below 
seventy until last November, when it reached sixty-nine. 

SUNDAYS. 

The Sunday use of the library has been practicallj' the same this 
year as last, although on account of more moderate weather no such 
large crowds have come on any one Sundaj' as were recorded in 1904, 
one hundred and eighty-nine being the largest number for any one 
day. On three Sundays during the summer only seventeen people 
came in to use the room, an average of less than three an hour. 

CATALOGUING. 

All the lime not required for the regular work in this department 
has been spent in analyzing the class of collective biographj'. Two 
thousand one hundred and eighty analytical cards have been written 
for this branch of the work, and about two thirds of the class have 
been done. It is slow work, but we believe it will increase the use- 
fulness of the books more than enough to repaj' the time and labor 
spent upon it. Indeed we have been much helped already by the part 
that has been done. 

INVENTORY. 

The result of the inventory this year was the same as that of 1904, 
forty-one books being unaccounted for. Twenty-two of these were 
fiction and nineteen non-fiction. 

EXIIIIUTIONS. 

The exhibits given during the past year have been very few in num- 
ber compared with those of the two previous years. Thej- consisted 
of 100 views of New England scenery, loaned b\' the Boston & Maine 
Eailroad; 40 plates of English cathedrals; 102 black and white draw- 
ings by local artists; 145 souvenir postals of ^Maine and New Hamp- 
shire; 150 souvenir postals of Massachusetts; and a small collection of 
pictures of Madonnas, the Holy Family, Flight into Egypt, and other 
pictures appropriate to Christmas time. 

This small showing was partly due to the repairs on the building, 
which made exhibitions out of the question from April to June, and 
partly because it is not alwaj-s easy to find a loan collection of pic- 
tures suitable to exhibit. We can count ourselves extremely fortimate 
in having had so many excellent ones offered us. It is customarj- for 
libraries to pay for their exhibits, and I would respectfully renew my 
suggestion of last year that we join the Library Art Club, that we may 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 425 

be provided with g-ood pictures for exliibits. That ])ietures, as well 
as books, are a means of education is acknowledged by all, and the 
library that does not use both is lame. 

While our picture exhibits have been less this year, the deficiency 
has been made g'ood in some degree by a running exhibit of flowers. 
Through the kindness of a few people interested in botany, we w-ere 
rarely without some specimen of plant or flower from the puss,y wil- 
low in Januarj^ to the witch hazel in November, and much of the tiine 
we could show a goodly variety. In the course of the year over one 
hundred and fifty species were shown, and it was not uncommon to 
have from a dozen to twenty on exhibition at one time. Considerable 
interest was manifested by our patrons in these botanical specimens, 
and, as they were labeled with both the common and scientific names, 
more or less information, as well as pleasure, was given. 

Again our thanks are due to the newspapers for their valuable aid in 
printing our lists and notices, to the many who have donated books, 
magazines, pamphlets or programs, and to all within and without the 
librarj^ who have in any way aided its usefulness or worked for its 
success. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

F. MABEL WINCHELL, 

Libra7-ia)i. 



APPENDIX I. 
Accessions. 

Increase 'by purchase 1,014 

Increase by gift 491 

Increase by binding periodicals 269 

Total accessions for the year 1,774 

Number of volumes in library as last reported 51,686 

"Whole number of volumes 53,460 

Worn out volumes withdrawn from circulation 340 

Number of volumes replaced 106 

Number of volumes lost or injured and paid for 23 

Number of volumes lost and not yet paid for 4 

Number of volumes burned on account of contagious dis- 
eases 6 

Number of magazines subscribed for 69 

Number of magazines given 28 

Number of newspapers subscribed for 3 

Number of newspapers given 7 

Total number of periodicals received 107 



426 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

APPENDIX II. 
Circulation and Registration. 

Number of days library -was oi^en 305 

RECORD, BY CLASSES, OF VOLVMES ISSUED. 

No. Per 
Volts. Cent. 

General works 2,289 3.4 

Philosophy and religion 1,093 1.6 

Biogra])hy 1,825 2.7 

History 2,260 3.4 

(ieographj^ and travels 2,054 3.0 

Social sciences 740 1.1 

Science and useful arts 3,412 5.1 

Fine arts 1,388 2.1 

Literature 2,593 3.9 

Fiction 49,134 73.2 

Pictures 319 0.5 

Total issued for home use 07,107 

CIRCULATION. 

Average dail3' use (home) 220 

Largest number any one day (April 22) 560 

Smallest number any one day (December 21) 91 

Largest number any one month (March) 6,526 

Smallest number any one month (June) 4,526 

Number of volumes delivered in reading room 25,420 

Average daily tise 83 

Total circulation for 1905 92.527 

Number of volumes issued on school pockets 700 

Number of borrowers to Avhom study pockets were first 

issued in 1905 341 

REGISTRATIOX. 

Number registered in 1905 -635 

Whole number issued since beginning of last registra- 
tion, 1880 16,015 

Number of borrowers on deposit IG 

APPENDIX III. 

Miscellaneous Statistics. 

Number of books classified 1.462 

Number of books catalogued 1,502 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 427 

Cards -wi'itten for analyticals 2,180 

Number of volumes bound and repaired at binder}' 1,0()3 

Number of volumes repaired at library 4,171 

Number of volumes covered at library 22,7r)4 

Mail notices for overdue books 086 

Reserve notices paid for 736 



Sunday Statistics. 

Men. Women. Children. Total. 

Attendance . . ". 717 237 3,135 4,089 

Average iier Sunday 13.5 4.5 59.1 77.1 

. CIRCrLATION. 

General v^^orks 3,153 

Philosophy and religion 47 

Biography 118 

History 407 

Geographer and travels 283 

Social sciences 30 

Science and useful arts 399 

Fine arts 55 

Literature 1,162 

Fiction 982 



Total 6,636 

APPENDIX IV. 

Receipts from Fines, Etc., from December 1, 1904, to 
November 30, 1905. 

Received from fines $257.91 

catalogues sold 5.50 

books lost or injured and paid for 15.68 

reserve notices 14.72 

miscellaneous sales 11.73 

cash returned 12.03 

$317.57 

Paid for expressage and incidentals 129.34 

Paid to the treasurer $188.23 



428 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



APPENDIX V. 



Donations to Library, 1905. 

Volumes. Pamphlets. 

Abbot Publif Liljiary, }klarblehead, Mass.... L 

Aberdeen, Scotland. — I'ublif Library 1 

Adriance Memorial Library, I'oughkeepsie, 

N. V 1 

Allison, M. A 4 

American-Irish Historical Society 1 

American Peace Society 1 

Amherst College 1 

Asliton - undei- - Lyne Corporation. — Public 

Free Library 1 

Ayer, T. P 1 

Baker, U. M 1 

Barker, J. A 13 

Barnard, Mrs. A 3 

Belmont, ^lass. — Public Library 1 

Berlin, X. H. — Public Library 1 

Beveridge, A. J 1 

Bigelow Free Public Library. Clinton, Mass. 1 
Birmingham, Fug. — Free Libraries Commit- 
tee 1 

Bolton, Mrs. S. K 1 

Boston, Mass. — Public Library 2 

Boutwell, J. M 1 

Boynton, E. B 1 

Boynton, Mrs. E. B 

Bronson Librarj-, Waterburj-, Conn 1 

Brookline, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Burt, E. A 1 

Carnegie Lil)rarv. — Pittsburgh, Pa 1 

Challis, F. H 1 

Chapman & Hall, London 1 

Chicago, 111. — Public Library 8 

Chicago Special Park Commission 1 

Children's Aid Society-, New York City ] 

Cilley, Mrs. A. B 1 3 

Clough, A. L 1 

Columbus, Ohio. — Public Library 1 

Concord, Mass. — Free Public Library 1 

Concord, X. H. — Public Library 3 

Conn, G. P 2 

Connecticut State Library 5 



jklagazines. 



515 



82 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRAKV. 429 



Volumes, ramijlilots. Magazines. 

Cross, D 1 1 

Dartmouth College 2 

Davis, G. 15 1 

Detroit, Mich. — Public Librai'y 1 

Dodge, J. E 1 

Dover, X. H. — Public Library 2 

Drew, W. E 383 

Drew Theological Seminary 4 

Emerj' Family 1 

Enoch Pratt Free Library-, Baltimore, Md... 1 

Erie, Pa. — Public Library 1 

Evans'ton, 111. — Free Public Librarj' 1 

Fairbanks, E. D., 25 newspapers. 

Fairniount Park Art Association 1 - 

Farmer, C 164 

Felton, Mrs. D. D 10 60 

Fitz Public Library, Chelsea, Mass 1 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt 1 

Forbes Library, Northampton, Mass 2 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Pa 1 

Galesburg, 111. — Free Public Library 1 

Gallinger, J. H 1 

Gillett, F 1 

Grand Rapids, Mich. — Public Library 1 

Greenewalt, M. H 1 

Hall, H. J 22 

Hampton Institute 15 

Hartford, Conn. — Public Librarj^ 1 

Harvard College * 3 3 

Haverhill, Mass. — Public Librarj- 1 

Heath, C. S 7 

Hebrew Union College 1 

Hedges, S. M ;... 1 

Higgins, :Mrs. E. S 234 

Higgins, W It 

Huse, W. H 17 

Indian Rights Association 2 

Ingalls, Mrs. E. F 7 

International Society of State and Muni- 
cipal Building Commissioners and In- 
spectors 6 

Iowa College 4 

Jenkins, C 1 

Jenkins, H. M., 1 scrap book. 

Jersey City, N. J.— Free Public Library 1 

Johnston, R. H 1 



430 ANNUAL OFFICIAL llEPORTS. 

Volumes, ramphlets. ^Magazines. 

Keene, N. H 1 

Laconia, N. H. — Public Library 4 

Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the 

Indian and Other Dependent Peoples .... 1 

Lane, J. G. . . .'. 1 

Lawrence, Mass.^Free Public Library 1 

Library Company of Philadelphia 2 

Livingston, C. F 1 

Livingston, Mrs. F. C 53 

Lord, L. S 57 

Lowell Mass. — City Library 2 

Lowell, Mass.— Textile School 1 

Lynn Historical Society 2 

Lynn, Mass. — Public Library- 1 

Lyons, Rev. J. J 43 

Mack, I. G 351 

Macmillan Co 1 

McQuesten, Mrs. J. K 2 

Maiden, Mass. — Public Library 2 

Manchester, X. H. — City Engineer 1 

Manchester, N. H. — Fire Department 1 

Manchester, X. H. — Supt. of Public Instruc- 
tion 1 

Massachusetts College of Osteopathy 1 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2 

Melrose, Mass. — Public Librarj- ] 

Merchants' Xatl. Bank, Manchester, X. II. 36 

Michigan State Library 2 

Milwaukee, Wis. — Public Librarj^ 1 

Minneajiolis, Minn. — Board of Park Commis- 
sioners 1 

Minneapolis, Minn.^ — Public Library 3 

Mohonk Lake Arbitration Conference 1 

Moore, Mrs. W. E ]0 

Morse Institute, Xatick, Mass 1 

Mount Holyoke College 1 

Xew Bedford, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Xew Bedford, Mass.— Textile School 1 

Xew England Society of Cincinnati 1 

Xew Hampshire Centennial Home for the 

Aged 1 

Xew Hampshire Fire Insurance Co 1 

X'ew Hampshire. — Industrial School 1 

Xew Hampshire. — State Board of Health.... 5 

Xew Hampshire. — State Board of License 

Commissioners 1 



IIEPOET OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 431 

\'i)iunics. Pamphlets. Magazines. 

New Haven, Conn. — Free Public Library.... 1 
New York State. — Forest, Fish and Game 

Commission 1 

New Y'orlc State. — -Library 3 

New Y'ork City. — Mercantile Library 3 

New Y'orlv City. — Merchants' Association.... 2 

Newark, N. J. — Free Public Library 1 

Newcomb, H. T 1 

Newington, N. H 1 

Newton, Mass. — Free Library 1 

O'Hara, J. K 1 

Osalva, Japan. — Library 1 

Out west 1 

Parlin Library, Everett, Mass 1 

Paterson, N. J. — Free Public Librarj' 1 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md 1 

Pennsylvania Prison Society 1 

Peoria, 111. — Public Library 1 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School 

for the Blind 3 

Pettee, Mrs. H 84 

Philadelphia, Pa. — City Institute 1 

" " Free Library 2 

" " Vacant Lots Cultivation 

Association 1 

Phillips Exeter Academy 3 

Porter, V. M 1 

Portland, Me. — Public Library 1 

Princeton University 1 

Providence, P. I. — Public Library 1 

Eeed, E. E 1 

Religious Education Association, Chicago... 1 

Eobbins Library, Arlington, Mass 1 

Rochester, N. H. — Public Library 1 

Rogers, Mrs. F. H., 4 scrap books. 

St. Louis, Mo. — Public Library 2 

Salem, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Sanborn, F. L 46 

Schuyler, P 1 

Scranton, Pa. — Public Library 1 

Seattle, Wash. — Public Library 2 

Shannon, R. C 1 

Somerville, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Sowdon, S. E 1 12 

Springfield, Mass. — Citj- Library Association 2 

Stephens, J. C 1 



432 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Volumes. ranii)lilet8. Magazines. 

Straw, G 1 3 

Syracuse, X. Y. — Public Liljrarj- 1 

Tolman, M. M (i 21 

United States. — Agricultural Department.... fi 101 
" " Civil Service Commission... 1 1 
" " Commerce and Labor De- 
partment 4 (') 

" " Education Bureau 1 

" " Geological Survey 1 

" " Inaug-ural Committee 1 

" " Interior Department 2 31 

" " Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission 1 

" " Library of Congress 6 fi 

" " Naval Institute 1 

" " Smithsonian Institution .... 3 6 
" " Superintendent of Docu- 
ments, 17 atlases 253 251 

" " Treasury Department 3 

" " War Department 2 

University of Chicago 10 1 

LTniversity of Cincinnati 1 

University of Colorado 1 

University of Michigan 1 

University of New York 1 

University of Tennessee 2 

University of Vermont 1 

Uruguay 1 

Varick, Mrs. T. E 232 

Wallace, E. A 1 

\MMlcome, H. S 2 

Welles, C. S 1 

Westborough, Mass. — Public Library ■ 1 

Western Reserve University Library School.. 1 

Whitman, W 1 

Wilmington, Del. — Institute Free Library.. 1 

Winchester, Mass. — Public Library 1 

Woburn, Mass. — Public Librai-y 1 

Woodbury, F. D 13 

Worcester, Mass. — Free Public Library 1 

Y'oung, J 156 



401 



715 



2 4S2 



REPOKT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBKARY. 433- 

Library Bulletins Received. 

Boston Public Library. 
Brookline Public Library. 
Chicago Public Library. 
Dover Public Library. 
Evanston Free Public Library. 
Hartford Public Library. 

Haverhill Public Library. "^ 

Helena Public Library. 
Holyoke Public Library. — Library Record. 
Iowa Masonic Library. 
J. Herman Bosler Memorial Library. 
Jersey City Free Public Library .^Library Eecord. 
Kellogg-Hubbard Library. 
Laconia Public Library. 
Lowell City Library. 
Lynn Free Public Library. 
Medford Public Library.- 

Milwaukee Public Library. — Quarterly Index. 
Nashua Public Library. 
New Hampshire Public Libraries. 
New Haven Free Public Library. 

New Y'ork Public Library. — Monthly list of additions. 
Newark Free Public Library. — Library news. 
Pasadena Public Library. 
Providence Public Library, 
St. Louis Public Library. 
Salem Public Library. 
Scranton Public Library. 
Seattle Public Library. 
Springfield City Library. 
Wilmington Institute Free Library. 
Wisconsin Free Library Commission. 
28 



EEPOET 



ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 



EEPOET OF THE ENGINEER'S DEPAETMENT. 



Office of the City Engineer, 

Manchester, N. H., December 30, 1905. 

To the Honorable Mayor and City ConncUs: 

Gentlemen: — The twenty-seventh annual report of the city engi- 
neer is herewith submitted, showing the expenditures and operations 
of the engineer's department for tlie j'ear ending December 30, 1905. 

Office. 

Fourteen assistants have been employed in this department during 
the year 1905: Harrie'M. Young, George W. Wales, Harry J. Briggs, 
Alfred T. Dodge, Henry A. Worthen, John G. Moore, stenographer and 
tj-pewriter to November 14; John J. McAllister, Jr., stenographer and 
typewriter, from December 1 to December 30; Joseph A. Dusseault 
from January 2 to January 21 and from June 13 to December 30; Law- 
rence A. O'Connor from Januarj' 2 to January 21 and from June 12 to 
December 30; Charles F. Goodrich from May 1 to September 29; Harold 
M. Haskell from October 10 to December 30; Frank Holland from 
November 1 to December 20; Joseph H. Johnson from November 6 to 
December 9; Timothy Connor from November 20 to December 13. 

Financial. 

john b. vakick company. 
1905. 

Jan. 9. To 1 brush $0.25 

1 12 qt. I. C. pail, galv .45 

1 14 qt. pail .30 

2 sponges .80 

$1.80 



Feb. 3. 1/2 pint shellac $0.30 

l^ pint wood alcohol .08 

1 bottle .05 

1-11/2 ex. ehes. flat V. brush.. .18 



437 



$o.ci 



438 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Mar. 22. To 1 roll 7 x 5, 6 ex. film 

April 3. 1 roll 7 x 5, 6 ex. film devel- 
oped 

6 5x7 prints @ 10c 

17x5 film 

17x5 film developed 

6 5x7 prints @ 10c 

1 6 ex. developed 

6 5x7 prints @ 10c 

photo finishing slip ISo. 11964 

8. developing- one 6 ex. 5x7 film 
12 prints @ 10c 

2 lbs. 34-inch cotton rope @ 
20c 

11. 1 gallon floor oil 

1 No. 3 Dde W. W 

May 3. To Vs gallon floor oil 

2 doz. No. 16 22 x 22 corner 
irons @ 25c 

3 prints, 5 x 7, @ 10c 

June 10. To 1 film developed 

5 prints @ 10c 

July 21. To 1 7 X 5 film, 6 ex 

27. 2 wood measures @ 10c 

1 6 ex. film developed 

6 prints, 4 x 5, @ 10c 

2 7x5 film rolls @ 80c 

31. 1 film developed 

6 prints @ 10c 

y, doz. special rules @ $4.00.. 

Aug. 3. 1 6 ex. 7 X 5 film developed 

6 7x5 prints @ 10c 

8. 1 picture 

14. 1 print, printed and mounted 

1 6 ex. roll developed 

6 prints @ 10c 

July 11. To 5 lbs. % Eo. Refd. iron @ 2y^c 
1 wrought iron form 

15. 2 films, 7 x 5,6 ex., @ 80c 

Aug. 3. 37 lbs. % Eo. Nor. iron @ 

SViC 

Sept. 12. 1 1 ton Harrington hoist 



$0.80 

.35 
.60 

1.60 
.35 
.60 
.35 
.60 

1.90 
.35 

1.20 

.40 
.30 
.50 

$0.20 

.50 

.30 

$0.40 
.50 

$0.80 
.20 
.35 
.60 

1.60 
.35 
.60 

2.00 
.35 
.60 
.14 
.14 
.35 
.60 

$0.13 

40.00 

1.60 

1.20 
15.00 



$0.90 



$1.00 



$0.90 



$8.68 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 439 

Sept. 12. To 1 quart measure $0.1.' 

15. 1 pint paraffin oil .05 

1 pint can .10 

1 paint brush .15 

Oct. 9. 100 feet % ^o. Nor. iron, 43 

@ 3l^ 1.40 

10. 1 lb. lamp black, dry .20 

13. 1 piece netting, 19 x 24, @ 7c .22 
1 piece netting, 16 x 17, @ 

10c .19 

16. 41 lbs. % Eo. Nor. iron @ 

31/4C 1.33 



Oct. 18. To 2 6 ex., 5x7, developed $0.70 

12 prints @ 10c 1.20 

26. 1 No. 5 C kodack carrying case 2.50 

27. 17x5 developed, 6 ex .35 

6 prints @ 10c .60 

Nov. 9. 1 6 ex., 7 X 5, developed .35 

6 prints, 7 x 5, @' 10c .60 

Nov. 23. developing $0.70 

printing 1.20 

27. 2 7 X 5 6 ex. films @ 80c 1.60 

1 6 ex., 7x5, developed .35 

6 prints, 5 x 7, @ lOe .60 

Dec. 1. 16 ex, 7x5, developed .35 

6 prints, 7x5 .60 



A. L. GADBOIS & CO. 
1904. 
Nov. 4. To use of horse and buggy $2.00 

W. p. GOODMAN. 
1904. 

Dec. 28. To i/o box typewriter paper $0.75 

1905. 

Feb. 7. To 1 quart of Stafford's ink .65 

1 dozen thumb tacks .10 

April 6. To 1 dozen pencil erasers $0.50 

1/3 dozen ink erasers .25 

May 17. 200 portfolio envelopes .80 

Sept, 28. To 1/3 gross pencil tips $1.50 

Oct. 16. 1-12 duplicate order book .... .25 



$61.72 



$6.30 



$5.40 



$1.50 



$1.55 



440 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KErORTS. 



Xov. 0. To 1 dozen Higgins' drawing ink 

9. 1 dozen erasers 

Dec. 20. 1 M legal envelopes, No. 10 

14 M. legal envelopes, No. 9. . . . 

printed envelopes 



$2.o0 

.50 

3.00 

.75 

2.50 





J. J. ABBOTT. 




1904. 






Dec. 30. 


To 1 can black 


$0.13 






.05 


1905. 






Jan. 5. 


paint and brushes 


.20 



1905. 



FRAXK E. WOOD, BOSTON, ifASS. 

Jan. 6. To V2 dozen hard rubber holders @ $2.50 

MES. C. n. WOOD. 
1905. 
Feb. 25. To painting 37 street signs white @ 10c 

PALMER & GARilOX. 
1905. 
Jan. 21. To 1 granite bound post, "E. D." lettered top 
and two sides (used on Auburn town 
line) 

J. ABTHLTl WILLIA3IS. 
1905. 
Jan. 10. To 500 library labels 



THE HEAD & DOWSTf COMPAJS'T, 



1905. 



Feb. 3. To 3 ft. Va" whitewood @ 60c... 
2 ft. Vl" whitewood @ 50c... 
Working 



May 27. To 540 2 ft. grade stakes @ 60c. 

per hundred 

176 3 ft. grade stakes @ $3.25 

per hundred 

300 2 ft. grade stakes @ 60c. 

per hundred 

1S8 4 ft. grade stakes @ $3.25 
, per hundred 



$0.18 
.10 
.10 



$3.24 
5.72 
l.SO 
6.11 



$11.00 



$0.38 



$1.25 



$3.70 



$2.00 



$1.25 



$0.38 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



441 



June 19. To 320 2 ft. grade stakes @ 60c. 

per hundred $1 .02 

190 3 ft. grade stakes @ $3.25 

per hundred 6.18 

June 22. To 65 3 ft. grade stakes $2.11 

1,620 2 ft. grade stakes 9.72 

Aug. 30. To 1,440 2 ft. grade stakes @ 60c 

Nov. 17. To 1,860 2 ft. grade stakes @ $6.00 

per M $11.16 

200 street sign boards @ 6c 12.00 



$24.97 



$11.83 
$8.64 



$23.16 



C. L. BEKGEK & SONS, BOSTON, MASS. 
1905. 

'Feb. 14. To repairing, cleaning and adjust- 
ing one Berger No. 865 en- 
gineer's transit instrument 
as per memorandum en- 
closed, 16 hours labor @ 60c. $9.60 

new packing piece 1.00 

new tripod head 4.50 

new foot plate 3.50 

new hook • .15 

repairing, cleaning, and adjust- 
ing one Berger level, 21 hours 

labor @ 60c 12.60 

3 new shoes @ 30c .90 

Dec. 21. One engineer's Dumpy level- 
ing instrument and acces- 
sories, special net price $92.00 

1 bottle oil to lubricate the 
level center .25 

1 waterproof bag to protect 
instrument 1.00 

2 packing boxes 1.00 



1905. 
Dec. 21. 



To one No. 11 Transit-Theodolite, page 180, 
with cloth finish U shaped standard 
frame, 7-inch horizontal circle graduated 
on solid silver to read to 10" full vertical 
circle with double opposite verniers 
graduated on solid silver, three leveling 



$32.25 



$94.25 



442 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Dec. 21. screws and shifting center, reading 

glasses to horizontal circle, fixed stadia 
wires, striding level as shown on page 
181, level to telescope with reversible 
clamp, tangent and gradienter to tele- 
scope, oblong compass, special net price 
2 steel range poles @ $2.75.. $5.50 

2 Chesterman steel tapes, 100 

feet lOths, lOOths, at net $9.75 19.50 



1 bag to protect instrument.. 

1 bottle watch oil 

2 packing boxes 



$1.00 

.25 

1.00 



$403.00 



25.00 



$430.25 



OFFICE, BANK, AND LIBRARY COMPANY, BOSTON, MASS. 

1905. 
Feb. 10. To 1 4-drawer vertical file cabinet, 

legal size 

1 SO sub-division alphabetical 

index, 250 folders $40.00 

Mar 7. 500 vertical file holders, legal 

size 2.75 

300 vertical file guides, legal 

size, cut oths 5.25 



$48.00 



1905. 



GEOKGE n. WALKER & COMPANY, BOSTON, MASS. 



Feb. 20. To New Hampshire road map $3.00 

special discount 1.10 



$1.90 



J. G. JONES. 

1905. 
Feb. 20. To freight paid and delivering 1 crate... 

THE G. W. DODGE SHOE COMPANY. 

1905. 

May 17. To 1 i^/xir Storm King rubber boots 

Sept. 1. 1 pair Storm King rubber boots.... 

Nov. 13. 1 pair Storm King rubber boots 



$3.75 
$3.75 



REPORT OF THE CITV ENGINEER. 



443 



1905. 
July 



1905. 
Feb. 28. 



April 22. 
27. 



May 31. 

Sept. 7, 

Oct. 21. 

Nov. 20. 



E. M. BBYANT & COMPANY. 

To 1 electric fan $13.50 

12 ft. special cord .48 

1 attachment plug- .25 



E. A. STKATTON. 

To 1 bottle mucilage $0.05 

erasers .50 

1 cabinet $2.00 

1 box A. carbon paper 3.50 

1 box T. W. paper, letter, No. 3 1.00 

■ 1 box T. W. paper, letter, No. 13 ' 1.40 

1 box T. W. paper, legal, No. 3 1.20 

1 box T. W. paper, legal. No. 13 1.70 
100 5 X 8 cards .65 

2 M. 4 x 6 cards 3.00 

■1 M. 4x6 cards 

250 5 X 8 cards $1.63 

1 5x8 two-drawer cabinet.. 7.50 

1 inkstand 1.25 

500 5 X 8 cards 2.75 



MANCHESTEB HATtDWAEE COMPANY. 
1905. 
Mar. 4. To 10 dozen numbers. No. 3, @ 

314c $3.90 

10 dozen numbers, No. 4, @ 
314c 3.90 

May 27. 4 lbs. hinge nails @ 7c $0.28 

2 lbs. lO-wire nails @ 4c .08 

July 3. 1 No. 5 6 ex. film 

11. 1 punch 

Aug. 21. 3 hanks chalk line $0.15 

1/2 dozen cakes chalk .05 

Sept. 5. 3 lbs. 16d wire nails @ 4c .12 



$0.80 
.10 



$14.23 



$0.55 



$14.45 
$1.75 



$13.13 



$7.80 



.36 



.90 



444 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Nov. 8. To 2 lbs. 9cl wire nails @ 4c $0.08 

6 dozen figures, No. 1 

6 dozen figures, No. 2 

6 dozen figures, No. 5=216 @ 
314c 7.02 

MRS. SARAH MINTOX. 



$7.10 



1905. 
April 22. To washing and ironing two large and four 

small table covers $1.00 

A. FILION. 

1905. 

Mar*. 25. To retouching and varnishing engineer's 

wagon $10.00 

THE JOHN B. CLARKE COMPANY. 

1905. 
May 17. To printing 250 reports, 64 pages and covers 
(ft) 60c., $39.00 (Engineer's Department 
% of total cost) $34.13 

B. L. MAKEPEACE, BOSTON, MASS. 
1905. 
Maj- 29. To 4 10-yard rolls 36" Keystone blue print 

paper $4.00 

NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH CO. 

1905. 
Mar. 25. To exchange service, including rental of tele- 
phones, for 3 months ending June 30, 

1905 $6.25 

April 30. tolls $0.40 

messenger service .15 

$0.55 

June 24. exchange service, including rental of tele- 

phones, for 3 months ending Sept. 30, 

1905 $6.25 

Sept. 23. exchange service, including rental of tele- 

phones, for 3 months ending Dec. 31, 

1905 $6.25 

30. tolls, city engineer $0.55 

Dec. 23. exchange service, including rental of tele- 

phones, for 3 months ending March 31, 

1906 $6.25 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 445 

E. G. SOLTMANN, ISTEW YOKK. 

1905. 

April 3. To repairing tape repairer $0.85 

1,000 eyelets 1.25 

1 T. A. patent pen 2.90 

1 50 ft. Little Victor tape :i.21 

repairing four tapes 6.50 

1 empty 100 ft. Crescent tape 

box 1.00 

express .55 



May 6. 100 yards 48" Victor detail 

paper $4.88 

50 yards 40" Victor detail paper 2.40 

50 yards 36" 'blue print paper 4.25 
2 rolls 37" par. ex. cloth @ 

$5.70 11.40 

50 yards 36" blue print paper.. 3.95 

express paid 1.25 

Oct. 4. 24 yds. 37" par. ex. tracing 

cloth $5.70 

50 yds. 36" blue print paper... 3.95 

% gross Kohinoor pencils.... 5.00 

1 cnpt. angle, 45° each, 12", 
$1.30; 10", 80c.; 8", 60c.; 6", 

44c.; 4", 28c 3.44 

1 cnpt. angle, 30°— 60° each, 
12", 80c.; 10", 60c.; 8", 44c.; 

6", 28c.; 4", 20c 2.32 

1 emmet ink .84 

express paid .65 



CHAELES A. HOITT COJIPAJfY. 
1905. 

April 11. To 1 stepladder chair $1.75 

1 bottle polish .10 



BEMINGTON TYPBWKITERi COMPANY, BOSTON, MASS. 



$16.26 



$28.13 



$21.90 



$1.85 



1905. 
May 10. To 1 6-ribbon coupon book $3.50 

K. K. HOKNE. 
1905. 
July 14. To 1 cooler $2.75 



446 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

TEMPLE & FARRINGTOX COMPAXY. 
1904. 

April 27. To brackets $0.10 

June 10. 4 qrs. typewriter paper @10c. .40 

1905. 

Jan. 10. To 1 book .25 

12. 1 ream typewriting paper .... 1.90 

24. putting in covers 27 plans 5.00 

31. binding 1 record committee on 

streets ,85 

binding 1 record committee on 

sewers .85 

Feb. 18. binding 1 time book .85 

20. 1 ream typewriter 1.90 



Feb. 27. 1 note 'book $0.05 

Mar. 4. 4 twin lock current binders, 

4 indexes 48.00 

2,500 sheets No. 9471 35.00 

14. 6 sheets leather board @ 20c. 1.20 

20. 1 ream typewriter paper 1.35 



Mar. 25. binding 1 record of Board of 

Examiners of Plumbers .... $1.10 

29. 2 manifold books, Xo. 7139.. 2.50 

relettering 1 book .50 

April 14. 2 sheets board @ 50c 1.00 

IS. 1 box challenge eyelets .50 

April 22. scrap books, Xo. 7118 $5.25 

folio 1.50 



ABCHIE S. COLDWELL. 
1905. 
Aug. 21. To 3 dinners for survejing party 

@ 50c $1.50 

28. 2 dinners for surveying part}- 

50c 1.00 



THE BRODIE ELECTRIC CO. 
1905. 
July 14. To labor on fan and two reactive 

coils $9.75 

Aug. 10. 1 reactive coil 3.50 

labor .50 



$12.10 



$85.60 



$5.60 



$6.75 



$2.50 



$13. 7c 



RErOiiT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 

IKOST & ADAMS fO.Ml'AXY, BOSTON, IIASS. 
1905. 
Nov. 10. To 500 rivets (for mending tapes) 

@ 20c. per 100 $1.00 

postage .02 

UNION PUBLISHING COMPANY. 

1905. 
Nov. 13. To 2 lines advertisement under 

male help wanted, 3 times 

L. B. BODWELL & COMPANY. 
1905. 
Dec. 16. To 20 lbs. ice dail3^ July 15 to Dec. 16 

KEUFFEL & ESSER COMPANY, NEW YOKK. 
1905. 

Oct. 2C. To 1 K. & E. New York street 

tape, 7325 D $11.70 

by 20 per cent discount 2.34 

$9.36 
express paid .35 * 

NORA D. SMITH. 
1905. 
Nov. 25. To making out bills (typewriting) 

CHARLES F. MCCARTHY. 
1905. 
Dec. 23. To painting 200 street signs @ 30c 

CONCORD FOUNDRY COMPANY, CONCORD. 
1905. 
July 21. To 6 castings (for concrete 

bounds), 82 lbs. @ 21/40 $1.S5 

Dec. 1. 225 street sign hangers (a) 10.. 22.50 

CHARLES A. BAILEY, SUNCOOK, N. II. 
1905. 
Nov. To 50 stone bounds @ $1.25 

JIANCHESTEH' STREET RAILWAY COMPANY. 
1905. 

Dec. 5. To 4 books of tickets @ $2.50 (No. 278, No. 
279, No. 280, No. 281) 

KIMBALL CARKIAGE COMPANY. 
1905. 
Oct. 5. To 1 pair rosettes 



447 



$i.os 



$0.24 



3.82 



$9.71 



$1.50 



$60.00 



$24.35 



$62.50 



$10.00 



$0.25 



448 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1905. 
Dec. 23. 



BOARD OF STEEET AND PAKK COXnnSSIO>"ERS. 

To 48 bags Atlas Portland cement 

@ 40c. per bag $19.20 

1 load (approximately 3,450 

lbs.) @ $1.25 per ton (from 

Bailej^'s ledge) 2.15 

hauling same .75 

1 load coarse and fine stone 

from South Elm street ledge 

(approximately 3,450 lbs.) @ 

$1.00 per ton 1.72 

hauling same .75 

1 load dust from South Elm 

street ledge (approximately 

2 tons) @ $1.00 per ton 2.00 

hauling same .75 

labor ^2 day P^r box of 6 

bounds (16 boxes), 8 days @ 

$2.00 16.00 

t blacksmith work on 96 rods @ 

5c. per rod 4.80 



(Used in making 102 concrete bounds.) 

SAMUEL J. LORD. 
1905. 
June 9. To telephone tolls paid X. E. Tel. 
& Tel. Co., Waltham, 168-4 

(for S. & P. Com.) $0.35 

10. Boston, 2043 Main (Phoenix 

Bridge Co.) .25 

July 7. Suncook 3-5 (C. A. Bailey for 

S. & P. Com.) .05 

8. Suncook 3-5 (C. A. Bailey for 

S. & P. Com.) .15 

12. Suncook 3-5 (C. A. Bailey for S. 

& P. Com.) .10 

Aug. 23. Boston 141 Ox .25 

Nov. 2. Auburn, 9004-2 (town line sur- 
vey) .15 

express paid on transit from 
Troy, N. Y., to Manchester, 
N. H .75 

Dec. 23. To use of team for surveying party, July 17 
to November 18 



$48.12 



$2.05 
$137.50 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



449 



1905. 
Jan. 21. 



Jan. 
Feb. 



23. 
27. 

S. 
11. 
20. 
21. 

2. 

6. 
14. 



Mar. S. 

28. 

April 26. 

May 5. 

6. 

9. 

16. 

20. 

24. 

May 31. 

June 1. 
3. 
6. 

8. 

9. 

10. 

12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
17. 

June 28. 
29. 
20. 
29 



JOHN G. MOORE. 

To cutting paper $0.25 

flannel .38 

carfare .10 

cloth .50 

glue .15 

carfare $0.10 

carfare .10 

express .15 

carfare .20 

carfare .30 

carfare .30 

express .55 

express .25 

express .50 

express 

carfare 

carfare .40 

carfare .20 

carfare .10 

carfare .10 

carfare .10 

carfare .40 

carfare .10 

carfare $0.10 

express .15 

carfare .10 

carfare .20 

carfare .05 

carfare .20 

carfare .10 

soap .25 

carfare .20 

carfare .10 

carfare .10 

carfare .10 

carfare .10 

carfare .30 

carfare $0.10 

carfare .10 

carfare .10 



$1.38 



$2.45 
$0.40 
$0.10 



$1.40 



.$2.05 



450 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPOETS. 



.lulv 



Aug-. 



]. 

3. 

5. 

6. 

7. 
10. 
13. 
14. 



8. 
11. 



24. 



Aug. 28. 

31. 

Sept. 22. 

Sept. 28. 

29. 

Oct. 7. 



To carfare , 

carfare 

carfare 

carfare 

carfare 

carfare 

carfare 

carfare 

carfare 

carfai'e 

carfare 

carfare 

carfare 

carfare 

carfare 

soap 

carfare 

carfare 

carfare 

IIARRIE M. YOrXG. 



$0.10 
.10 
.10 
.30 
.30 
.20 
.15 
.40 

$0.45 
.15 
.45 
.10 
.40 

$0.20 
.20 
.15 

$0.40 
.40 
.10 



1905. 

Dec. 23. To 131 days' service @ $2.75 per day 

138 days' service @ $3.00 per day 

191/2 hours' extra service (?f 36%c. per hour 
24 hours' extra service @ 40c. per hour. . 

GEORGE W. WALES. 

Dec. 23. To 78 days' service @ $2.75 per day 

234 days' service @ $3.00 per day 

8 hours' extra service (o 36%c. per hour... 
1651/2 hours' extra service @ 40c. per hour 

HARRY J. BRIGGS. 

Dec. 23. To I711/2 days' service @ $2.50 per day 

138 days' service @ $2.75 per day 

1914 hours' extra service @ SS^sC per hour 
10114 hours' extra service @ 36%c. per hour 

ALFRED T. DODGE. 

Dec. 23. To 169 days' service (a $2.00 per day 

5 days' service @ $2.13 per day 

109l^ daj's' service @ $2.25 per day 

28 days' service @ $2.40 per day 

811^ hours' extra service @ 26%c. per hour 
93 hours' extra service @ 30c. per hour 



$1.95 



$1.55 



$0.55 



$0.90 

$360.23 

414.00 

7.12 

9.60 



$214.50 

702.00 

2.93 

66.20 



$428.75 

379.50 

6.50 

37.18 



$338.00 
10.65 
246.37 
67.20 
21.64 
27.90 



repout of the city engineer. 451 

HENKY A. WORTirEN. 

Dec. 23. To lOS clays' service @ $1.75 per day $189.00 

61 days' service @ $1.87 per day 114.07 

22 days' service @ $2.00 per day 44.00 

115 days' service @ $2.13 per day 244.94 

17 hours' extra service @ 231/30. per hour. . 3.96 

16 hours' extra service @ 26%c. per hour.. 4.27 

CHAKLES E. GOODRICH. 

Dec. 23. To 12s days' service @ $2.25 per day $288.00 

14 hours' extra service @ 30c. per hour.... 4.20 

HAJROLD M. HASKELL. 

Dec. 23. To 65 days' service @ $2.25 per day $140.25 

2Sl^ hours' extra service @ 30c. per hour.. 8.55 

JOSEPH A. DUSSEAULT. 

Dec. 23. To 54 days' service @ $1.00 per day $54.00 

138 days' service @ $1.25 per day 172.50 

2 hours' extra service @ IS-i/gC. per hour. . . .26 

8 hours' extra service @ 16%c. per hour.. 1.36 

LAWRENCE A. O'CONNOR. 

Dec. 23. To 55 days' service @ $1.00 per day $55.00 

138 days' service @ $1.25 per day 172.50 

2 hours' extra service @ ISVsC. per hour. . . .26 

7 hours' extra service @ 16%c. per hour. . . . 1.10 

JOHN G. MOORE. 

Dec. 23. To 1721/, days' service @ $1.50 per day $258.75 

9Si/o days' service @ $1.60 per day 157.60 

JOHN' J. MCALLISTER, JR. 

Dec. 23. To 20 days' service @ $2.00 per day $40.00 

7 hours' extra service @ 26~/3C. per hour.. 1.87 

FRANK HOLLAND. 

Dec. 23. To 43 days' service @ $1.25 per day $53.75 

JOSEPH II. JOHNSON. 

Dec. 23. To 30 days' service @ $1.50 per day .'. $45.00 

TlilOTHY CONNOR. 

Dec. 23. To 21 days' service @ $2.00 per day $42.00 



452 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SAMUEL J. LORD. 



Dec. 23. To 1 year's salary $1,350.00 

1 year's team hire 150.00 



$1,500.00 



Total expense engineer's department for 1905.... $8,467.35 

SUMMARY. 

Appropriation to the engineer's department 

for the year 1905 $8,470.00 

Expenses of the engineer's department for 

the year 1905 $8,467.35 

Unexpended balance 2.65 



,470.00 $8,470.00 



Assessors' Lot Plans. 



At the time the appropriations for the different departments were 
submitted a request was made that one thousand dollars be given the 
engineer's department for the purpose of preparing lot plans for the 
use of the board of assessors; the common council granted the request. 
Following is a brief summary of the work done during 1905. 

Size of plan, 20 x 281/2 inches inside border; size over all, 22 x SOi/o. 
inches. The plans are shown in blocks, bounded bj- highways when 
possible, and numbered consecutively as made, regardless of location, 
and beginning .with number 1. Division lines of all lots at the time 
the survey was made are shown and each lot is numbered, beginning 
with number 1 on each plan, the area of each lot being given in square 
feet and also the street numbers of buildings. 

A typewritten sheet (letter size) accompanies each plan giving the 
number of plan, the number of each lot, its area in square feet and 
the name or names of owner or owners; plans are made on brown 
paper, traced and blue printed; the tracings are filed in the engineer's 
department; the blue prints in the office of the board of assessors. 
Changes in ownership and in lot dimensions are to be made by the 
engineer's department under the direction and from the records of 
transfers of the board of assessors, the system as outlined beings 
adapted to such changes and corrections. 

Two hundred blue prints were turned over to the board of assessors 
before the close of the year 1905. These plans exhibit a total of 4,951 
lots, comprising an area of 52,346,762.82 square feet or 1,201.71 acres. 
(Streets, highways, lanes, back streets, alleys, and avenues are not in- 
cluded in these areas.) 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



453 



Cost of work: 

Labor (from time book) 

Brown paper 

Tracing cloth 

Blue print paper 

Field book 

Field cards 

Ink 

Carfares and team 

Average cost per acre 

Orders. 
Number of orders for: 

Survey's, street lines, and grades 

Surveys, assessors' plans . ■ 

Sewer grades 

Gutter grades 

Curb grades 

Corner curb grades 

Pine Grove cemetery, grades, levels, and surveys 

Valley cemeterj', grades, levels and surveys 

Profile levels 

Petitions f 

'Sewers and drains committee 

Street committee 

Road hearings 

Board of examiners of plumbers 

Setting stone bounds 

Street signs 

Street numbers 

Lake Shore road culvert 

Granite Street bridge over M. &. X. W. R. R 

Survey of town lines 

Miscellaneous orders 

Total 

Field Work. 

Levels for profile for establishing grades (length in feet) 

for sewer profiles (length in feet) 

in Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 

in Derryfield park (length in feet) 

Other levels (length in feet) 

Total length of levels in feet 



$1,133.15 

4.13 

30.80 

11.32 

1.50 

5.03 

1.00 

23.00 

$1,209.93 
$1.00 



274 

441 

66 

74 

65 

65 

19 

1 

115 

61 

15 

28 

8 

5 

134 

4 

194 



9 

7 

196 

1,783 



228,283 

5,114 

570 

3,350 

7, TOO 

245,017 



454 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

Cross section levels, proposed park (area in sq. feet) .... 52,542 

Cross section levels, Derryfield park (area in sq. feet) . . 186,927 

Surveys of streets and street lines (length in feet) 70,782 

for street numbers (length in feet) 2,365 

miscellaneous (length in feet) 7,050 

Total length of surveys in feet 80,20,') 

Street lines marked on ground (length in feet) 21,543 

Lot and avenue lines. Pine Grove cemeterj^ (length in ft.) 17,579 

Lot and avenue lines. Valley cemetery (length in feet) . . 100 

Lines for gutters (length in feet) 33,459 

Lines for curbs (length in feet) 14,261 

Lines for sewers (length in feet) 8,848 

Lines for building streets (length in feet) 16,874 

Other lines (length in feet) 18,466 

Total length of lines in feet marked on the ground 131,130 

Grades set for sidewalks (length in feet) 26,153 

gutters (length in feet) • 33,459 

curbs (length in feet) 14,261 

sewers (length in feet) 8,848 

building streets (length in feet) 16,874 

, Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet).... 1,456 

Derryfield park (length in feet) 2,472 

other purposes (length in feet) 4,956 

Total length in feet of grades set 108,479 

Number of new lots staked out in Pine Grove cemetery 169 

Number of old lots restaked in Pine Grove cemetery 134 

Number of old lots restaked in Valley cemetery 1 

Total number of cemetery' lots staked out 304 

Stone bounds set 134 

BATTERS SET. 

Amory street extension, bank wall. 
Granite street, bridge abutments. 
Lafayette park, retaining wall. 
Lake Shore road, culvert at brook. 

Office Woek. 

seweh plaks and profiles. 

Chestnut, Orange to Myrtle south back. 

Dix, Taylor to Cypress. 

Elm, Brown avenue northerh'. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 455 

Falls avenue, Old Falls road easterly. 
Granite, Bedford to State. 
High East, Belmont to Weston. 
]\[aple, Cedar to Auburn. 
!Mast road, Mast to north of Fogg avenue. 
Milford place, Milford southerly. 
Mcllvin, Calef road westerly. 

Xutfield lane, Manchester to Londonderry Lane. 
■ Orange, Chestnut to Union. 

Pine, Valley to south of Hayward. 
Taylor, Young to Howe. 
Walnut, Webster northerly. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 15. 

NUMBEKIjN'G PILAIS'S. 

Beech South, Cilley road southerly. Eight plans. 
Calef road, Mcllvin to north of Brown avenue. Eight plans. 
Dix, Maple to Lincoln. 
Fifth Avenue lane. Cedar to Lake avenue. 
Frederick, Second to Hill. 

Holly avenue. Willow to Cypress. Five plans. 
Main South, A to town line. Six plans. 
Mitchell, Brown avenue to Beech. Two plans. 
Oakdale avenue. Maple to east of Lincoln. Two plans. 
Park avenue. River road to west of Crown, 
Second, Cleveland to Piscataquog river. 
Vinton, Wdllow to Jewett. Five plans. 
Total numbering plans, 41. 

MISCELLAT^OXJS PLANS. 

Balch avenue, South Main and Boynton, land of C. A. Brooks & C. 
A. Adams. 

Bald Hill road, land of Arthur H. Hale. 

Baker and Elm, land of Mrs. Emily J. Welch. 

Bay and Chestnut, land of N. P. Hunt. 

Beech, Maple, Lincoln, Shasta, Cla3^ Somerville, Silver, Harvard, 
Prescott, Y'oung, land of Elliott, Johnson, Flint & Day. 

Beech, Mitchell, and Armand avenue, land of W. H. & Sarah Smith. 

Belmont, land of Mrs. E. Welcome and others. 

Boj'nton, land of Mrs. S. F. Burnham. 

Calef road, lots of W. B. Mcllvin. 

Candia road, land of Samuel H. Mead. 

Cypress, near Valley, land sold by Gust Foster to Kimball Shoe Co. 

Mammoth road, north of Old Bridge, land of Felt heirs, and Whitney 
land. 



456 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Mast, Wason, Head, McClintock, and Durham, land of Xatt & Car- 
rie E. Head. 

Xutt road and Weston road, land of F. H. & E. G. Libbe.y. 

Taylor street and Portsmouth railroad, land of B. A. Stearns. 

Valley and Belmont, land of and stone bounds set for A. Trudeau 
estate. 

Valley and Taylor, portion of Hall estate. 
Total miscellaneous plans, 17. 

WORKING PLANS. 

Amherst, Vine to Chestnut. Profile. 

Amory, Essex to east of Youville. Profile. 

Amory and Amory extension, Hevey to Bartlett. Profile. 

Ainsworth avenue, Young to Hayward. Profile. 

Arlington, Ashland to Morrison. Profile. 

Ash, Orange to Myrtle. Profile. 

Ash, Blodget to Salmon. Profile. 

Ashland, Concord and Lowell. Chandler school lot and adjoining 
lots. 

Aul)urn West, Elm to west of Hampshire Lane. Profile. 

Bartlett, Putnam to Amory. Profile. 

Beacon, Hanover to Manchester. Profile. 

Beech, Hayward to C. & P. K. R. Two profiles. 

Beech, Willow to M. & L. R. R. Sewer profile. 

Beech, Lowell to Bridge. Profile. 

Bell, Pine to Union. Profile. 

Belmont, East Spruce to Lake avenue. Profile. 

Benton, Jones to Hall road. Profile. 

Blodget, Pine to LTnion. Profile. 

Blodget, Ash to Maple. Profile. 

Bowman, Milford to Mast. Profile. 

Bridge, Elm to North Church. Profile. 

Bridge, Union to W^alnut. Profile. 

Bridge, Linden to Buzzell. Profile. 

Bridge, Highland to Mammoth road. Profile. 

Bridge Old, Belmont to circular drive. Two profiles. 

Brook, Elm to Chestnut. Profile. 

Brook, Union to Beech. Profile. 

Brown avenue, Baker to Westland avenue. Profile. 

Brown avenue. Elm to Hancock. Location for petition. 

Brown avenue, Goffe's Falls schoolhouse lot. Profile of walks. 

Buzzell, Lowell to East High. Profile. 

Cartier, Putnam to W^aj-ne. Profile. 

Cedar, Union, Beech and Spruce south l^ack, showing lot lines in 
reference to street lines. 

Central, Hall and Lake avenue, location of proposed park. 



EEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 457 

Chase avenue, Hayes avenue to Hospital avenue. Profile. 
Conant, Main to Montgomery. Profile. 
Corey place, Concord southerly. Profile. 
Cypress, Young to Hajnvard. Profile. 
Detail for template for culvert. 
Dix, Wilson to Hall. Profile. 

Elm, north of Valley to south of Calef road. Profile. 
Elm, Cedar to Summer. Two profiles. 
Elm, Bridge southerlj-. Profile of east side. 
Elm, Langdon southerly. Profile. 
Essex, Amory to Monitor. Profile. 
Everett, West Clarke to Thayer. Profile. 
Franklin, West Central to Depot. Profile. 
Granite, Main to Dover. Profile. 
Granite, Green to Winter. Two profiles. 

Granite, M. & N. W. R. R. .northeasterl3' and southwesterly. Profile. 
Granite south back. Canal to Franklin. Profile. 
Hall, Central to Lake avenue. Profile. 
Hall, Myrtle to Harrison. Profile. 
Hall road, Massabesic to Nelson. Profile. 
Hampshire Lane, West Cedar to Granite. Profile. 
Hanover, ililton to east of Beacon. Profile of south side. 
High East, Ashland to Buzzell. Profile. 
High East, Weston to Highland. Profile. 
Highland, Lowell to Bridge. Profile. 
Janelle avenue, Bartlett to Thornton. Profile. 
Jewett, Massabesic to Valley. Profile. 
Jewett east back, Massabesic to Valley. Profile. 
Lake avenue. Hall to Beacon. Two profiles. 
Lake aveniie, Hall road to Hanover. Profile. 
Langdon, Elm westerly. Profile. 
Lincoln, Central to Manchester. Profile. 
Londonderry Lane, Nuffield Lane to Chestnut. Profile. 
Londonderry turnpike, Candia road to Hooksett town line. Loca- 
tion. 

Manchester, Elm to Chestnut. Profile. 

Maple, Prescott to C. & P. R. R. Profile. 

Maple, Blodget to Sagamore. Profile. 

Maryland avenue, Hanover to Bridge. Two profiles. 

Mast, Head to west of Rochelle avenue. Profile. 

Notre Dame avenue, Adams to Sullivan. Profile. 

Orange, Ash to Maple. Profile. 

Orange, Linden to Hall. Profile. 

Page, Hanover to north of London. . Profile. 

Parker, Main to M. & N. W. R. R. Two profiles. 

Parker, Winter northerl}'. Profile. 



468 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

Patterns for Xos. 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10, corner curbs. Ten patterns. 
Pattern for corner curb, Milford and Bismarck. 
Pattern for corner curb, Milford and Sylvester. 
Pattern for corner curb, Hanover and Page. 
Pattern for corner curb, Mast and Rochelle avenue. 
Pattern for corner curb. Mast road and Rochelle avenue. 
I'attern for corner curb. Canal and Granite south back. Two pat- 
terns. 

I'ine, Cedar to East Siiruce. Profile. 
Plummer, Pine to Union. Profile. 
Porter, Hayward to Massabesic. Profile. 
Prescott, Wilson to Hall. Profile. 
Prospect, Linden to Hall. Profile. 

Prout park, diagonal walk. Cypress to Young. Profile. 
Prout park, plan showing walks. 
Putnam, Du'buque to Bartlett. I'rofile. 
Sagamore, Oak to Linden. Profile. 
Schuyler, Main to Xotre Dame avenue. Profile. 
Seneca Lane, ]S'utfield Lane easterly. Profile. 
Shasta, Elm to Brown avenue. Profile. 
Silver, Pine to Beech. ' Two profiles. 
Somerville, Union to Beech. Profile. 
Spring, Elm westerly. Profile. 
Spruce East, Canton to Hall road. Profile. 
Spruce south back. Union to Beech. Profile. 
Sullivan, Main to Dubuque east back. Profile. 
Sullivan, Whipple westerly. Profile. 
Thayer, Elm to Elver road. Profile. 
Thornton, Sullivan to Janelle avenue. Profile. 
Union, Hayward to Shasta. Three profile?. 
Union, Concord to Lowell. Profile. 
Union, High to Bridge. Profile. 
Vallej-, Jewett to Massabesic. Profile. 
Water, Elm westerly. Profile. 
Waj^ne, Bartlett to Thornton. Profile. 
Willow, Silver to Lingard. 'Sewer profile. 
Wilson, Somerville to Howe. Profile. 
Wilson, Harvard to Valley. Profile. 
Winter, South ]Main to Granite. Two profiles. 
Young, Ainsworth avenue to Jewett. Profile. 
Total working plans, 139. 

TRACINGS. 

Cedar, Union, Beech, and Spruce south back, showing lot lines in 
reference to street lines. 

Designs for iron moulds for concrete posts. Three tracings. 



REPOllT OF THE CITY ENGINEEK. 459 

Details of concrete bound mould. Two tracings. 

Details of curbing-, corner curbs, and cesspool curbs. 

Granite, Manchester & N. W. R. E. northeasterly and southwesterly. 

Hall, Central, and Lake avenue, location of proposed park. 

Hall, Central, Wilson road, and Lake avenue, land iiurchased for 
proposed park. 

Hanover and Hall road, land of William M. Plummer. 

Harvey road, Mill road and M. & L. R. R. Home farm of James 
Emerson. 

Mammoth road at C. & P. R. R., location of street lines. 

Manchester Water Wbrks, location in 1872. 

Merrill yard, lots and avenues. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Cedar lawn. 
Total tracings, 16. 

BLUE PRINTS. 

Cedar, Union, Beech, and Spruce south back, showing lot lines in 
reference to street lines. Two prints. 

City of Manchester, east side of river. 

Design for mould for concrete post. Three prints. 

Details of concrete bound moulds. Two prints. 

Details of curbing, corner curbs, and cesspool curbs. Eight prints. 

Details of granite bounds. 

Details of iron casting. Two prints. 

Examples of plumbing for plumbers' examination. Two prints. 

Goffe's Falls, extension of street railwaj'. Five prints. 

Granite, M. & N. W. R. R. northeasterly and southwesterly. Three 
prints. 

Hall, Central, Lake avenue, and Wilson road, land taken for proposed 
park. 

Hanover and Hall road, land of W. M. Plummer. Three prints. 

Main South, Parker school lot. 

Mammoth road at C. & P. R. R., showing street lines. 

Manchester Water Works, location in 1872. 

Massabesic, estate of W. M. Parker. Eight prints. 

Merrill Yard, lots and avenues. Three prints. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Cedar and Hillside lawns. Five prints. 

Stark park, design for base for cannon. 

State of N«w Hampshire, bird's-eye view. Four prints. 

Valley cemetery, lots and avenues. Four prints. 
Total blue prints, 61. 

ASSESSOKS' PLAIN'S. 

Working plans, brown paper, 200. 
(Unfinished, 76.) 



460 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Tracings, 200. 
Blue prints, 200. 
Total, 600. 

SimMARY. 

Plans and profiles (sewer) 15 

Numberinf^ plans 41 

Miscellaneous plans 17 

Working plans 139 

Tracings 16 

Blue prints 61 

Assessors' plans 600 

Sewer book (part sheets) 13 

City clerk's highway book 23 

Total 925 

Six tracings showing city sewers have been brought up to date. 

Maps brought up to date, 5. 

Plans brought up to date, 23. 

Plans made for establishing grade on laid out streets, 116,340 feet. 

Plans made for establishing grade on streets not laid out, 20,870 feet. 

Total, 137,210 feet. 

Lot owners looked up, 53,922 feet. 

Sewer Licenses. 

At a meeting of the board of maj'or and aldermen, November 19, 
1S97, the city engineer was instructed "to examine the books in his 
office and present to said board a list of property owners who had 
neglected to paj' the license fee required bj' the city laws and ordi- 
nances for entrance to the city sewers." 

The records were examined and a list compiled, giving the names 
of the property owner, the location of the lot, the street frontage, and 
the license fee due upon each and everj' piece of occupied property 
within one hundred feet of a public sewer. 

The said list was given in hand to the citj- clerk, as clerk of the 
board of mayor and aldermen. 

The list comprised 1,017 names, and a notice was sent to each one 
hy the city clerk. A summarized statement of the ground covered to 
January 1, 1906, follows, viz.: 

Number of names January 1, 1S9S 1,017 

Paid during 1898 277 

Granted free during 1898 76 

Paid prior to 1898, located during the year.... 121 

Paid during 1899 24 

Granted free during 1899 12 

Paid during 1900 2 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 461 

Not connected 1 

Paid during 1901 2 

Granted free during 1901 1 

Paid during 1902 2 

Paid during 1903 3 

Paid during 1901 4 

Paid prior to 1S98, not located 60 

Paid previously 3 

Paid in part 1 

Covered by old permit 1 

Not recorded paid, receipts shown 5 

Kecorded paid, no record of cash received.... 2 

Claims to have paid, no record 1 

Licenses taken out, not paid 17 

Not heard from 402 

Total number not settled January 1, 1906 492 



1,017 1,017 

Number of licenses granted new sewer enterers during 1905.. 115 
Amount of money recorded as collected from new sewer en- 
terers during 1905 $1,727.02 

Amount of money recorded as collected on note given in 1898, 

due in 1898 60.00 

Total amount of money collected during 1905 $1,787.02 

All moneys are collected by the city clerk. 

Stkeet Signs. 

Street signs on hand January 1, 1905 37 

*Street signs ordered during 1905 200 

Guide boards on hand January 1, 1905 2 

Street signs put up in 1905 4 

Street signs on hand January 1, 1905 233 

Guide boards on hand January 1, 1905 2 

239 239 

The expense of street signs is charged to the appropriation for the 
engineer's department. (See financial report under Mrs. Charles H. 
Wood, Charles F. McCarthy, the Head & Dowst Company, and Concord 
Foundry Co.) 

•Size of sign changed from 30 x 6 inches to 26 by 5 inches, to be used with hanger. 
Street name shows on both sides of sign. 



462 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

STEEET NtTMBEKS. 

Figures on hand January 1, 1905 835 

Figures ordered during 1905 456 

Figures used during 1905 C77 

Figures on hand January 1, 1906 614 

1,291 1,291 

Numbers assigned during 1905 155 

Numbers replaced during 1905 38 

Numbers changed during 1905 1 

194 

The expense of street numbers is charged to the appropriation for 
the engineer's department. (See financial report under Manchester 
Hardware Companj'.) 

Stone Bounds Set in 1905. 

*Adams, east side, angle north of Appleton 1 

tAgawam and Davis, northeast corner 1 

Agawam and Davis, southwest corner 1 

*Agawam and Eiver road, northwest corner 1 

Agawam and River road, southwest corner 1 

*Amory extension, 100 feet west of angle at Columbus ave... 1 

*Amory extension, 500 feet west of angle at Columbus ave.... 2 

*Amory and Notre Dame avenue, northeast corner 1 

*Arlington and Morrison, northwest corner 1 

*Ashland and Concord, northeast corner 1 

Ashland and Concord, northeast corner school house lot 1 

*Ashland and Lowell, northeast corner 1 

Belmont and Myrtle, southwest corner 1 

Brown avenue, P. C. first curve south of Hancock street 2 

Brown avenue, P. T. first curve south of Hancock street 2 

Calef road and Elm, southeast corner 1 

Calef road, first angle south of Elm street, west side 1 

■*Cedar and Union, southwest corner 1 

*Cedar and Union, northwest corner 1 

*Cedar and Union, northeast corner 1 

*Central, east end of proposed park 1 

JChase avenue and Hospital avenue, northeast corner 1 

Chase avenue and Hospital avenue, northwest corner 1 

*Clarke and River road, southeast corner 1 

Clarke and River road, northeast corner 1 

tDavis and Victoria, northwest corner 1 

fDavis and Victoria, southwest corner 1 

Elm and Brown avenue, northwest corner ] 

♦Concrete bound. 

t Set in place of hub set by Frank A. Gay. C. E. 

t Set ill place of old bound. 



KEPOliT or THE CITY ENGINEER. 463 

Elm, north of brook, east and west side 2 

*Hall and Lake avenue, northwest corner ] 

*Hall and Myrtle, northwest corner 1 

*HalI and Myrtle, northeast corner 1 

*Hall and Myrtle, southeast corner 1 

*Hall and Orange, northeast corner 1 

*Hall and Orange, northwest corner 1 

*Hall and Orange, southeast corner 1 

*Hall and Orange, southwest corner 1 

*Hall and Prospect, southeast corner 1 

*Hanover and Wilson, southwest corner 1 

*Highland and Bridge, southeast corner 1 

*Kelley and Alsace, southwest corner 1 

*Kelley and Alsace, southeast corner 1 

*Kelley and Cartier, southwest corner 1 

*Kelley and Hevey, southeast corner 1 

*Kelley and Hevey, southwest corner 1 

*Kelley and Joliette, southeast corner 1 

*Kelley and Youville, southeast corner 1 

*Kelley and Youville, southwest corner 1 

*Lake avenue, east end of proposed park 1 

*Linden and Myrtle, southeast corner 1 

^Mammoth road and Bridge, southwest corner 1 

*Mamnioth road and East High, northwest corner 1 

^Mammoth road and East High, southwest corner 1 

^Manchester and Lincoln, northeast corner 1 

Manchester and Auburn town line (Birch Island) ?> 

Manchester and Auburn town line (mainland) 2 

*Maple and Blodget, northeast corner 1 

fMassabesic, south side, angle west of Valley 1 

*Massabesic and Cypress, southeast corner 1 

*Massabesic and Cypress, southwest corner 1 

*Massabesic and Porter, southwest corner 1 

JMassabesic and Valley, southwest corner 1 

*Massabesic and Hall road, northwest corner 1 

*Massabesic and Hall road, northeast corner 1 

fMast road, tirst angle south of Fogg avenue 2 

*Mast road, first angle north of Fogg avenue 2 

*Mast road, second angle north of Fogg avenue 2 

*Mast road, third angle north of Fogg avenue at Jackson's. ... 2 

*Mast road, fourth angle north of Fogg avenue 2 

*Mast road, fifth angle, north of Fogg avenue, end of new layout 2 

*Orange and Ash, southeast corner 1 

*Orange and Oak, southeast corner 1 

*Orange and Oak, southwest corner 1 

Orange and Russell, southwest corner 1 

•Concrete bound. 

t Reset. 

J Set In place of old bound. 



464 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 

Parke avenue and Crown, southwest corner 

Park avenue and Crown, southeast corner 

Pearl and Ash, northeast corner 

*Pearl and Belmont, northwest corner 

*Pearl and Morrison, southeast corner 

Pearl and Oak, northeast corner 

Pearl and Oak, northwest corner 

Pine and Bell, southeast corner 

Pine and Hajward, southwest corner 

Pine and Hayward, northwest corner 

*Pine and Plummer, northeast corner 

*Pine and Plummer, southeast corner 

*Pine and Silver, northeast corner 

*Pine and Silver, southeast corner 

Pine and Spruce, southeast corner 

*Plummer and Union, northwest corner 

*Plummer and Union, southwest corner 

*Rockland avenue and Wilkins, southeast corner 

River road, west side, at angle at Clarke 

Eiver road, first angle north of Clarke, east side 

River road, first angle north of Clarke, Avest side 

*Sagamore and Russell, northeast corner 

*Sagamore and Russell, southeast corner 

*Silver and Beech, northeast corner 

*Silver and Beech, southeast corner 

*SiIver and Beech, southwest corner 

*Silver and Union, southeast corner 

•^Silver and Maple, northwest corner 

*Silver and Maple, southwest corner 

*Somerville and Beech, northeast corner 

*Somerville and Beech, northwest corner 

*Somerville and Beech, southeast corner 

*Somerville and Beech, southwest corner 

*Somerville and Union, northeast corner 

*Warner and Wilkins, southwest corner 

*Warner and Wilkins, southeast corner 

*Warner, west side 276.47 south of Wilkins 

*Warner, east side 276.52 south of Wilkins 

Willow, first angle south of Hayward 2 

Willow, second angle south of Hayward 2 

Willow and Haj'ward, southwest corner 1 

Willow and Hayward, southeast corner 1 

*Wilson and Lake avenue, northeast corner 1 

*Wilson and Central, southeast corner 1 

*Wilson and ^lanchester, northwest corner 1 



Total stone bounds set 134 

* Concrete bound. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 465 

Coal Taji PAYnsTG. 

Tables Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 give the location, number of 
square j'ards, price per square J'ard, total cost and date when meas- 
ured of all coal tar "concrete" laid during the year as follows: Table 
No. 1, street crossings (new); Table No. 2, street crossings (repairs); 
Table No. 3, sidewalks (new); Table No. 4, sidewalks (repairs); Table 
No. 5, street paving (new) ; Table No. G, street paving (repairs) ; Table 
No. 7, miscellaneous work; Table No. 8, summary of Tables Nos. 1, 2, 
3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. 

Granite Block Paving. 

Tables Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 give the location, square yards, 
price per square yard, total cost, and date when measured of all gran- 
ite block paving laid during the year, the work being done by Soule, 
Dillingham & Co., also the street paving charged to the Street Eail- 
way Company as follows: Table No. 9, cement joints, concrete founda- 
tion (new); Table No. 10, sand joints, sand foundation (new); Table 
No. 11, cement joints, concrete foundation (repairs); Table No. 12, 
sand joints, old blocks. Charged to Street Railway Company. Table 
No. 13, cement joints, concrete foundation; Table No. 14 is a summary 
of Tables 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13. 

AB^ItEljVCT REiPORT of THE/ COMMITTEE ON STREETS FOR THE YEAR 1905. 
PERSONNEL OF THE COMMITTEE, 

Alderman from ward S, Adolph Wagner, chairman. 

Alderman from ward 7, Robert Edgar. 

Alderman from ward 9, Gedeon Lariviere. 

Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

Tables Nos. 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, and 20 have been compiled to be used in 
the annual report of the engineer's department, in lieu of citing the 
records of the committee on streets in detail. The tables give all the 
necessarj^ information j)ertaining to the petitions that have been acted 
upon by the committee during the year 1905, also highways laid out, 
widened and straightened, and grades established by the board of 
mayor and aldermen during the year. 

Table No. 15 is a list of the petitions for new highways that have 
been acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table No. 16 is a list of the petitions for establishing grades that 
have been acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table No. 17 is a list of the miscellaneous petitions that have been 
acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table No. 18 is a list of highways that have been laid out by the 
board of mayor and aldermen during the year. 

Table No. 19 is a list of the highway grades established by the board 
of mayor and aldermen during the year. 
30 



466 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORT8. 

Table No. 20 is a list of the miscellaneous petitions that have been 
acted upon by the board of mayor and aldermen during the year. 
Distances are given in feet. 

Abstbact Report of the Comjiittee o^ Sewers axd DRAI^■s for the 

Year 1905. 

PERSONNEL OF TIIE COITMITTEE. 

Alderman from ward 3, Fred O. Parnell, chairman. 

Alderman from ward 4, Charles H, Clark. 

Alderman from ward 1, Charles F. Read. 

Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

Tables No. 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, and 28 have been compiled to 
be used in the annual report of the engineer's department in lieu of 
citing the records of the committee on sewers and drains in detail. 
The tables give all the necessary information pertaining to the peti- 
tions, orders for sewers passed by the city councils, sewers built and 
not built up to January 1, 1906. 

Table No. 21 is a list of all petitions that have been acted upon 
during the year, also the manner in which and date when each peti- 
tion was acted upon and disposed of by the committee. 

Table No. 22 is a list of sewers ordered in up to January 1, 1905, 
giving the distances built, distances built in excess of order, and the 
distances remaining unbuilt up to January 1, 1906. 

Table No. 23 is a list of sewers ordered built during 1905, giving 
the distances built, distances ordered that are unnecessary, and the 
distances remaining unbuilt up to January 1, 1906. 

Table No. 24 is a list of sewers built in 1905, not ordered by the 
board of maj^or and aldermen. 

Table No. 25 is a list of pipe removed where sewers have been re- 
laid. 

Table No. 26 is a list of sewers ordered in but not built up to Jan- 
uary 1, 1906. This table is compiled from the first, second, fourth, and 
eighth columns of Table Nos. 22 and 23. 

Table No. 27 is a summary of Tables Nos. 22 and 23. 
Distances are given in feet. 

Sewerage System. 

Table No. 28 gives the location, material, size, and length of sewers, 
together with the number of manholes, lampholes, house connections 
and cesspool connections built during the year 1905. 

Table No. 29 gives the material, size, and length of all public sewers 
in the city of Manchester January 1, 1906. This table further gives the 
total length (in feet) of each size of sewer and the number of man- 
holes on each size, also the total length (in feet and miles) of each 
material. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 467 

TaWe No. 30 is a summarj' of the sewerage sj'stem by years from 
January 1, ISSO, to January 1, 1906. It gives the length in miles con- 
structed and cost each year, also the average cost per mile for each 
jear. The third column gives the number of miles constructed to 
date each year. It will be noted that January 1, 1880, there were 
17.06 miles constructed, the cost not being recorded. January 1, 1890, 
there were recorded 2,003 house connections. Beginning with this 
date, columns four and five give the number of connections recorded 
each year and the total number recorded to date each year. 

Abstiract Eeport of the Board of Examint:ks of Plumbers. 

In accordance with an act (chapter 55, Laws of 1899) passed by the 
New Hampshire state legislature, entitled "An act authorizing the ex- 
amination of plumbers and regulating the practice of plumbing and 
house drainage," a board of examiners of plumbers was appointed by 
the mayor as follows: William K. Bobbins of the board of health, 
Christian L. Wolf, a master plumber, and Samuel J. Lord, citj^ engineer 
(William K. Bobbins, president; Samuel J. Lord, clerk). 

FoUoAving is a statement of the expenditures of the board for the 
year 1905: 

THE J0H:N B. CLARKE COMPANY. 

1905. 
May 17. To printing 250 reports, 64 pages and covers, @ 

60c.=$39.00 (i/s total cost, $4.87) $4.87 

PIKE & HEALD COMPANY. 

June 8. To 6434 lbs. 4" lead pipe @ 6y3C. . . 
51 lbs. 11/4" lead pipe @ 6y2C.. 

26 lbs. pig lead @ SVgC 

15 lbs. wiping solder @ 20c. . . . 
4 lbs. 4" It. soil pipe, hub ends, 

9 feet @ 23c 

2 4" brass ferrules @ 60c 

2 gallons gasoline @ 18c 

1 tunnel 

$15.71 

JOHN B. VARICK COMPANY. 

Aug. 30. To 1 1/2" cold chisel $0.12 

1 %" cold chisel .15 

1 12" fiat bast, file .25 

1 7" side cutting plyers .75 

1 11' gas .75 

$2.02 



$4.21 


3.32 


1.43 


3.00 


2.07 


1.20 


.36 


.12 



468 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SUMMAJRY. 



Appropriated to the board of examiners of plumbers for 

the year 1905 $50.00 

Expenses of the board during the year 1905. . $22.60 

Balance unexpended 27.40 



$50.00 $50.00 

Renewal fees received for 40 plumbers' certificates @ 50c. 

(a renewal fee of 50c. per certificate is required by 

state law) $20.00 

Renewal fees received for 17 plumbers' licenses @ 50c. 

(required by law) 8.50 

Examination fee for six ])lunibers' licenses (required by 

law) 6.00 

Paid to cit}^ treasurer (the state law requires all fees to 

ibe paid into the city treasury) $34.50 

Table No. 31 gives the name, address, and number of the application 
of each and everj- person making renewal application to the board for 
a plumber's certificate. This table also gives the class of certificates 
applied for (master or journeyman), the number of the certificate, 
date of renewal and expiration of said certificate, also the renewal fee 
paid by the applicant. 

Table No. 32 gives the name, address, and number of the applica- 
tion of each and every person making renewal application to the 
board for a plumber's license. This table also gives the class of license 
applied for (master or journeyman), the number of the license 
granted, date of renewal and expiration of said license, also the fee 
paid by the applicant. 

Table No. 33 gives the name, address, and number of application of 
each and every person making application to the board for a plumb- 
er's license. This table also gives the class of license applied for (mas- 
ter or journeyman), the number of the license granted, date of issue 
and expiration of said license, also the fee paid by the applicant. 

Table No, 34 is a summary of Tables Nos. 31, 32, and 33. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



469 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



491 



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492 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. 24. 
SEWERS BUILT IN 1905 WITHOUT AN ORDER. 



Location. 



Limits. 



Auburn south back * West, of Maple, westerly 

Central Last of Beaoon, westerly 

Manchester * Elm to Chestnut 

Manchester f Chestnut, easterly 

Massabesic, cross lot % JNIassabesic to Mammoth road. 

I'orter Hayward, northerly 

Wilson Hill * Lake avenue to Central 



Distance. 



82 
86 
6fi5 
2S 
146 
237 



1,316 



* Relaid. 

t Temporarj' sewer. 

t To avoid ledge and water pipe where sewer was ordered built in Massabesic 
street. 

TABLE No. 25. 
PIPE REMOVED WHERE SEWERS HAVE BEEN RELAID. 



Location. 



Limits. 





rr 




V 


c 








ni 




N 


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CC 





Length 
in feet. 



Auburn south back. 

Manchester 

Wilson Hill 



West of Maple, westerly Akron 

Elm to Chestnut '. Brick.. , 

Lake avenue to Central Akron 



665 
72 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEIiK. 



493 



TABLE No. 26. 
SEWERS ORDERED IN, BUT NOT BUILT, TO JANUARY 1, 1906 



Location. 



Limits. 




Date of 
order. 



Ainsworth avenue. 

Amherst 

Adama 

Amory 

Auburn 



Bay, 
Beacon 
Beech . 



south back 



Belmont . 
Blaine . . . 



Bowman 

Bremer north back . 

Bridge 

Calef road 

Cedar south back. . . 



Central 

" south back 

Chester 

Chestnut 

Clarke 

Clay 

Columbus 

Concord 



Dix 



Dover. . 
Dutton 
Elm.... 



Foster avenue ... 

Frederick 

Front 

George 

Grove south back 

Hall road 

Hale 

Hall 



Hanover. 
Harrison 



Harvell . 

Hayward 

Hevey east back. 



High East. 



Hosley 

Hospital avenue. 

Huntress 

Jones 

Main South ... . 
Mammoth road . . 



Maple. 



Hay ward to Young 

Union to Ashland 

Carpenter to Trenton 

Alsace to Joliette 

Cypress, easterly 

East of Canton, easterly 

Hall, easterly 

Clarke to Carpenter 

Amherst to Concord 

Harvard to Hay ward 

Bridge to Orange 

Old Bridge to Bridge 

Second to Hiram 

Second to Third 

Mast to Milford 

Coolidge ave. west back to Rimmon 

Beacon to Weston 

Baker, northerly 

Beech, westerly 

Majile to Lincoln 

Milton to Beacon 

Chestnut to Union 

Lincoln to Ashland 

Carpenter to Trenton 

Elm to Chestnut 

Cypress to Jewett 

Amory. southerly 

Pine east back to Union 

Dutton, westerly 

Hall, easterlj' 

Weston to Hubbard 

Wilson to Hall 

Taylor to Cypress 

Clinton, northerly 

Concord, easterly 

Shasta to Baker 

Railroad bridge to Elm avenue 

Monroe soutli back to Clarke 

Trenton to Rowell 

Valley to Hay ward 

Second, easterly 

Eddy to north of hotel 

No. of Milford to Charleston ave. . . 

Wilson, easterly 

Massabesic to Nelson 

Schiller, southerly 

Clay to Dix 

Lowell to East High 

East of Alfred to Highland 

]Maple to Oak 

Belmont, westerly 

Hale to South Main 

Ainsworth avenue to Cypress 

Wayne, northerly 

So. of Amory to Columbus avenue.. 

Kelley to Bremer 

West of Hall to Belmont 

Beacon to Weston 

Grove to Summer 

Chase avenue to Massabesic 

Prince to McDuffie 

Nelson to Benton 

Schiller to Allun 

Massabesic to Nelson 

Nelson, northerly 

Prospect to Harrison 



155 
2,ti00 
Ml 
252 
300 

90 
150 
910 

71 
272 
629 
200 
228 
107 
455 



May 31, 1905 
May 2, 1S93 
Dec. 19, 1902 
Oct. 7, 1902 
2, 1899 
9, 1894 
7, 1890 
14,1903 
10, 189t> 
4, 1898 



May 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Apr. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
May 
Oct. 
Oct. 



6, 1900 

7, 1896 

6, 1892 
2, 1905 

7, 1902 
4, 189S 



54 


July 


25, 1902 


49 


June 


4, 1901 


175 


May 


5, 1896 


96 


" 


13, 1903 


307 


Sept. 


6, 1898 


860 


Jnlv 


9, 1901 


277 


July 


5, 1904 


147 


Oft. 


7, 1902 


290 


Apr. 


14, 1903 


439 


June 


26, 1903 


12S 


Jnlv 


26, 1899 


152 


Sept. 


12, 1899 


97 


Keb. 


2, 1904 


86 


Sept. 


6, 18S7 


101 


" 


27, 1905 


89 


" 


27, 1905 


442 


July 


15, 1904 


160 


Sept. 


4, 1894 


300 


Ve.b. 


2, 1904 


106 


May 


6, 1890 


1,285 


" 


6, 1890 


707 


June 


4, 1895 


448 


Feb. 


4, 1896 


140 


TulY 


14, 1896 


175 


July 


26, 1899 


2,800 


Sept. 


5, 1893 


52 


Oct. 


7, 1902 


200 


Nov. 


2, 1897 


601 


Aug. 


5, 189s 


450 


Nov. 


9,1894 


250 


Dec. 


19, 1902 


143 


July 


25, 1902 


134 


Jan. 


4, 1897 


350 


Oct. 


3, 1899 


65 


Sept. 


1, 1896 


700 


Nov. 


9, 1894 


148 


Sept. 


7, 1897 


146 


Jan . 


7, 1896 


396 


July 


10, 1893 


350 


June 


4, 1901 


152 


Aug. 


30, 1901 


192 


Jnlv 


5, 1904 


540 


June 


26, 1903 


142 


Sept 


14,19114 


163 


Nov. 


3, 1903 


550 


Aug. 


5, 1898 


1,340 


Dec. 


4, 1900 


4.57 


May 


2, 1899 


500 


Aug. 


5, 1898 


270 


Oct. 


19, 1905 



494 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPOKTS. 
TABLE No. 26.— Continued. 



Location. 



Limits. 



Date of 
order. 



Massabesic 

Mast 

Merrill 

Montgomery east back 
Oakland avenue 

Orange 

Pine 

Pine east back 

Plunimer 

Prescott 

Prospect 

Kiniuion 

Riuimon east back 

River road 

Russell 

Sagamore 

Schiller 

Second 

Soinerville 

Spruce East 

Sylvester 

Taylor 

Tbayer 

Union 

tJ nion east back 

Valley 

Walnut 

" east back 

Wentworth 

William 

Willow 



Hall road to Mammoth road 

Rocbelle avenue to Brock 

Jewett, easterly 

Kelley to Bremer 

Mammoth road to Revere avenue... 
Revere avenue to Woodland avenue 

Belmont, westerly 

Silver to Plummer 

South of Concord to Concord 

Pine to Union 

Maple, easterly 

Hall, easterly 

South of Wayne to Putnam 

Kelley to Mason 

Clarke to Park avenue 

South of Blodget to Sagamore . . . 

Chestnut to Pine 

Hale to Soutli Main 

North of Frederick to Frederick.. . . 

South of Schiller to Harvell 

Union to Maple 

Hall to west of Cypress 

East of Canton, easterly 

Milford to Avon 

South of Valley, southerly 

River road to Everett 

Clarke to Trenton 

Trenton, northerly 

South of Christian brook, southerly. 

Cyiiress, westerly. , 

Elm to Wilson 

Salmon, southerly 

Webster, northerly 

Salmon, northerly 

Schiller, northerlj- 

Milford to Mast 

Silver to Baker 



831 

176 
34 

504 

688 

1 250 

65 
447 
160 

60 
219 
100 
164 
SOO 
306 
770 
362 
850 

lis 

160 
512 
960 

no 

546 

75 

213 

ISO 

401 

50 

133 

2,396 

105 

204 

S8 

400 

522 

S35 



41,034 



Mar. 
Dec. 
June 
Dec. 



Feb. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

June 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

July 

Nov. 

July 

Dec. 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

July 

Oct. 

Oct. 

July 

Oct. 

Aug. 

Jan. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

July 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Dec. 



2,1899 
31, 1901 

5, 1900 
31, I'JOl 
13, litOS 
13, 1905 

4,1896 

3, lS9lt 
12, 1S99 

3, 1S99 
26, 1903 

3, 1895 

6, 19(tl 

7, 1897 

2, 1S97 

3, 1S99 
31, 1903 
10, 1896 
26, 1899 

3, 1895 
2, 1898 

19, 1!H)2 
7, 1896 

26, 1899 
2, 19O0 

19, 1905 
2, 1S95 
7. 1902 

6, 1S95 

4, 1S97 

7, 1893 
29, 1897 
31. 1903 
10, 1S96 

5, 1895 
3,1899 
4,1900 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 495 

TABLE No. 27. 
SUMMARY. 

Table No. 22, column 3, (ordered in to January 1, 1905) 44,191 

Table No. 22, column 5, (built) 6,226 

Table No. 22, column 6, (built In excess of order) 196 

Table No. 22, column 8, (not built) 38,161 

Table No. 23, column 3, (ordered in in 1905) 5,672 

Table No. 23, column 5, (built) 2,.5.i5 

Table No. 23, column 6, (built in excess of order) 6 

Table No. 23, column 7, (uunecessarj-) 250 

Table No. 23, column 8, (not built) 2,873 

50,065 50,065 

Sewers built in 1905 of those ordered in to January 1, 1906 (feet) 8,781 

Sewers built in 1905 without orders (teet) 497 

Sewers relaid in 1905 without orders (feet) 819 

Total length of sewers built in 1905 (feet) 10,097 



496 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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RErOIlT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



497 



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Steel Total Man- 
riveted, feet. holes. 




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498 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

TABLE No. 30. 
SUMMARY OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM SINCE 1880. 



Yeae. 



Miles con- 
structed 
during 
year. 



Miles con- 
structed 
to date. 



House con- 
nections 
I'BCordtid 
during 
year. 



House con- 
nections 
recorded 
to date. 



Cost of 
sewers. 



Average 

cost 
per mile. 



1880.. 
1881.. 
1882.. 
1883.. 
1884.. 
1885.. 
1886.. 
1887.. 
1888.. 
1889. . 
1890.. 
18S1.. 
1892.. 
1893. . 
1894. . 
1895.. 
1896 . . 
1897., 
1898.. 
1899., 
1900.. 
1901. 
1902. . 
1903. , 
1904. 
1905. 



Total. 



1.62 

2. 18 

3.37 

2.54 

1.73 

1 86 

2.15 

1.44 

1.73 

2.66 

1.81 

3.08 

3.13 

3. 31 

2.91 

3.98 

4 73 

*3 93 

*3 76 

*1 .54 

«1.14 

1.74 

«1.95 

1.41 

*2.22 

*1.91 



18.66 
20.84 
24.21 
26.75 
28.48 
30.04 
32.19 
33.63 
35.36 
38 02 
39.83 
42.91 
46 04 
49.35 
52.26 
56.24 
60.97 
64.44 
67.62 
69.03 
70.17 
71.91 
73.46 
74.87 
76.75 
78.51- 



64 
1.53 
214 
191 
2.58 
255 
237 
283 
520 
208 
231 
227 
186 
191 
300 
319 



2,003 
2,067 
2,220 
2.iU 
2,625 
2,883 
3.138 
3,375 
3,658 
4.178 
4,38a 
4,617 
4,844 
5,030 
5.220 
5,520 
6,839 



§19,919.40 
23,895.12 
24,148.13 
21,452.05 
21,548.60 
28,122.84 
41,479.15 
19,893.92 
31,1.5419 
27,513.73 
39,297.97 
55,409.73 
39,724 65 
51,.3i)2.15 
46,116.01 
71,859.30 
66,408.87 
36,258.41 
34,939.51 
16,683.39 
13,74S.41 
14,72439 
20,973.05 
17,330.32 
2n,574.79 
23 437.19 



tS836,005.33 



312,295.92 
10,961.06 

7,165.6? 

8,44.'j.69 
12,445 84 
18,027.46 
20,687.97 
13,815.22 
18,008.20 
10,343.51 
21,711.58 
17.900.17 
12,691. .58 
15,526.33 
15.M7.42 
18,0.55.11 
14,099 .33 

9,226.05 

9,292.42 
10,819.31 
12,091.68 

8,462.29 
10,755 41 
12,291.00 
11,520.17 
12,1270.73 



* Includes old sewers relaid. 
t Total cost for 26 years. 



REPORT OF THE CITT ENGINEER. 



499 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITV ENGINEER. 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 503 

TABLE No. 34. 

SUMMARY OF TABLES Nos. 31, 32, and 33. 

Master Plumbers' certificates renewed during the year 1905 17 

Master Plumbers' certificates renewed during tlie year 1905 (delinquent). 1 

Journeyman Plumbers' certificates renewed during the year 1905 21 

Journeyman Plumbers' certificates renewed during the year 1905 

(delinquent) 1 

Master Plumbers' licenses renewed during the year 1905 7 

Journeyman Plumbers' licenses renewed during the j'ear 1905 10 

Master Plumbers' licenses granted during the year 1905 3 

Journeyman Plumbers' licenses granted during the year 1905 3 



To His Honor the. Mayor, the board of aldermen, the gentlemen of 
the common council, and the various committees with whom it has 
been my pleasure to come in contact, I wish to express my apprecia- 
tion of the valued assistance and support you have rendered me during 
the year. 

'Sly acknowledgments are due to the gentlemen of the street and 
park commission for their courtesy, consideration, and co-operation 
in matters in which we were mutually concerned. 

SAMUEL J. LORD, 

City Engineer. 



REPORTS 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES AND 
CEMETERY FUNDS. 



EEPOETS OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES 
AND CEMETERY FUNDS. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries and Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gextlemejs-:- — The snb-triistees of the Pine Grove cemetery would 
report for the j^ear 1905 as follows: 

The Pine GroVe cenietez'y and the Merrill Yard have been cared for 
during the year in the same manner as for several years, under the 
general superintendence of John H. Erskine. In the latter yard the 
small appropriation — only one hundred dollars — precludes any exten- 
sive scheme of work, but the grass has been cut, the walks and drive- 
ways kept clean, and the shrubbery trimmed, and the appearance of 
the j-ard has gradually imjiroved each j-ear since the city assumed 
control. 

At the Pine Grove cemetery the usual work of caring for the lots, 
watering and clipping the grass, has been done; the borders have 
been attended to and many shrubs and flowers have been j)lanted in 
them, as well as in the flower jpots which are scattered through the 
grounds. This regular routine work uses up the larger portion of 
the appropriation, but . each year some special improvement is made 
or some extraordinary job is undertaken. 

The last year was no exception in this respect. In addition to the 
care of 494 private lots, for which the owners paid for labor and water, 
537 lots under perpetual care, and 88 lots, which, by virtue of the deeds, 
must be watered and kejit in a suitable condition as to the grass, were 
looked after and the labor and water were paid from the perpetual 
care fund. 

It is to be remembered that all lots are now sold with the agree- 
ment that the city will forever keep them watered and keep the grass 
upon them properly clipped. A certain portion of the purchase price 
is paid to the trustees of the cemeterj^ fund, and from the income on 
this fund this care is annually paid for. This, however, differs from 
the condition in the deeds of the lots which are sold under perpetual 
care, in that a much smaller sum is paid into the fund, and no pro- 
vision is made for repairing or replacing damaged monuments and 
headstones, but the care is limited to the suitable care of the turf. 

During the year a large section of Chapel Lawn and a strip of border 
to the east of it were graded. A new lawn under perpetual care, 
which has been named Cedar Lawn, was prepared northeast of Chapel 

507 



508 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Lawn, and the lots therein are now ready for sale for seventj'-five cents 
per square foot. 

All the lots on Pine Lawn have been sold. There remains eight lots 
unsold on Riverside Lawn, and forty' on Chapel Lawn, the latter cost- 
ing one dollar per square foot. These lawns will, in the opinion of the 
sub-trustees, answer the demand for perpetual care lots for some 
considerable time, but during the coming jear a new lawn of lots, 
under the conditions named above, — under what may perhaps be 
properly called semi-perpetual care, to distinguish them from the 
others, — must be provided. 

During the j'ear 71 lots of all kinds were sold. There were 27.") in- 
terments and 27 removals of bodies. New monuments to the number 
of 53 were erected, and 28 jirivate lots were regraded at the expense 
of the owners. Two cesspools were constructed and 2,000 feet of water 
pipe were laid. The iron fence, 4,000 feet in length, received two coats 
of paint, and the ground around Ursula Chapel was graded and seeded 
for grass and shrubberj^ set therein, and cement walks and driveways 
to the chapel from the avenue were laid, 206 square ^ards in all. 

Again the thanks of the trustees of the sub-trustees are due, and 
are hereby' gladly- given to the trustees of the cemetery- fund for a 
donation of one thousand dollars from that fund. This sum was ex- 
pended in macadamizing 23,000 square yards of avenues. The con- 
crete driveway's were recovered to the extent of 561 square yards. 

The greenhouse has been found to be ver\- useful; it furnishes plants 
and flowers for the grounds, and is now well stocked with budding 
plants. It is hoped and expected that much money will be saved, 
while a greater variety and abundance of plants will be furnished 
than was the case before the greenhouse was erected. 

On Tuesday, August 15, the Ursula chapel was formally dedicated 
to the uses intended by the donor bj- public exercises held therein. 
Mayor Eugene E. Eeed presided and music was furnished bj- the 
Albion Quartet, consisting of Dr. A. Gale Straw, Mrs. J. F. Beach, Mrs. 
A. L. Franks, and Mr. W. C. Masten. After a prayer by the Eev. Edgar 
Blake and a sermon by the Rev. J. Bunyan Lemon, the kejs of the 
chapel were delivered by the mayor to the board of sub-trustees, and 
a resjionse in their behalf was made by Edwin F. Jones. The after- 
noon was ver3^ rainy and the attendance was not as large as would 
otherwise have been the case. However, the program was carried out, 
and the chapel, constructed as nearly as possible in accordance with 
the ideas of Miss Riddle, as they were manj- times expressed bj- her 
in her lifetime, and furnished in every detail, was pronounced ready 
for its pious uses. 

It is a handsome building, well constructed, and will be a beautiful 
monument to its founder as well as of great practical benefit to the 
cemeterj'. The citizens of Manchester may well number Miss Fannie 
E. A. Riddle amono- their most generous and discreet benefactors. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 509 

The old chai^el, upon which little mone3' has been expended for sev- 
eral years, was shingled and painted outside and water closets were 
installed at an expense of some seven hundred dollars, and the coming 
year the interior will be properly repaired and the whole building- 
fitted for use as a lodge or waiting room for visitors to the grounds. It 
has always been used for siich a purpose in connection with its use as 
a chapel. After the new chapel was comijleted it was found absolute- 
ly necessary to have some iilace in the grounds where visitors could 
rest. The Ursula Chapel is not adapted or intended for such use, and 
so it was deemed best to preserve the old building, and by repairing 
and remodeling it fit it to serve the purposes of such a lodge. 

The sub-trustees feel that in the year 19^5 much good work was 
done at the cemetery and that the appropriation was well expended. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

Clerk for the Board. 



Report of the Trustees of the Valley Cemetery. 

In behalf of the trustees of the Yallej^ cemetery I wish to make the 
following report for the ^ear 1905: 

The improvements at the cemetery the past year are as follows: 
The brook from Pine street to the first bridge, a distance of 350 
feet, has been walled and the walks on both sides graveled, which 
makes a very neat and substantial imj)rovement. 

There have been 1,500 square yards of macadamized avenues laid 
the past year, also 250 loads of loam and 60 loads of clay have been 
used in grading lots and filling paths and borders. Two hundred loads 
of sand have been taken from the brook and 300 loads of waste re- 
moved. A number of unsightly trees \vere taken down. 

Money received, Avater rents $235.50 

care of lots S8S.75 

sundries 70.50 

tomb fees 242.50 

interments 175.00 

removals 14.00 

Total $1,62G.2» 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. P. CANNON, 

Clerk. 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 

Manchester, N. H., January- 1, 1906. 

Appropriation for 1905 $500.00 

Transferred from money unappropriated 4.88 

$504.88 



510 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

Expended for labor $155.25 

Pike & Heald Co., jiipe and labor 27.43 

Lawn mower 6.50 

John Francis, flowers 3.70 

Water 12.00 

Iron fence 300.00 



$504.88 



There have been five burials during the year. 

W. H. ]\L\XWELL, 

Clerk. 



TEEASUEER'S EEPOET. 



To tlte Trustees of Cemeteries: 

Gentlemex: — I herewith jiresent to you the annual report of money 
received during the year ending December 30, 1905: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Price of 
interest. Lots. 

Mrs. Ellen Swahn IS. 45 

Estate J. S. Holt 23.75 79.27 

W. 0. Davidson 2.68 39.74 

Sarah A. White .88 24.00 

Ormnn P. Stanley .35 20.00 

William C. Enman 1.55 20.00 

Estate Ida A. Bradley 10.00 

Minnie J. McDonald 24.00 

Thomas W. Manley 33.60 

Freeman Young 20.00 

Henry W. Allen 39.00 

George H. Marston 5.28 46.80 

Sarah E. Putnam 46.80 

Thomas H. Tuson 74.12 

Martha Mpore 24.66 

Anna J. Dana 70.51 

Billy E. Eogers . 22.30 

Stephen H. Batchelder 20.00 

Etta A. Mackay .35 20.00 

Daniel Pollard 1.73 33.60 

Max M. Simard 27.54 

Daniel Sinclair and Xellie M. 

Sinclair 1.43 46.80 

Mrs. Walter A. Severance 2.50 20.00 

Ida L. White 26.58 

John Campbell 20.00 

John M. Taylor ^ 39.00 

Herman Geissler 20.00 

Charles H. Currier 1.16 39.00 

Elizabeth P. Carlton 20.00 

Charlie W. Richards 46.80 

Fred W. McKewin .95 46.80 

511 



Permanent 
Fund. 


Total. 




18.45 




103.02 




42.42 


30.00 


54.88 


25.00 


45.35 


25.00 


46.55 


17.00 


27.00 


30.00 


54.00 


42.00 


75.60 


25.00 


45.00 


48.75 


87.75 


58.50 


110.58 


58.50 


105.30 


92.66 


166.78 


30.83 


55.49 


88.13 


158.64 


27.87 


50.17 


25.00 


45.00 


25.00 


45.35 


42.00 


77.33 


34.43 


61.97 


58.50 


106.73 


25.00 


47.50 


33.22 


59.80 


25.00 


45.00 


48.75 


87.75 


25.00 


45.00 


48.75 


88.91 


25.00 


45.00 


58.50 


105.30 


58.50 


106.25 



512 



ANNUAL OPi^ICIAL REPORTS. 



Elmer E. Reed $46.58 $58.22 

Charles H. Shaw $4.96 20.00 25.00 

Robert W. Smith .75 39.00 48.75 

William J. Powers 1.16 39.00 48.75 

Clarence W. Sanborn .44 24.00 30.00 

Charles W. Colby 39.00 48.75 

William Bremner 26.40 33.00 

Mrs. Janet Ward .96 33.66 92.56 

Mrs. Julia M. Fitz 2.55 70.81 194.73 

A. H., F. A., and F. L. Downes 114.30 342.91 

Mrs. E. C. Breen 28.82 79.27 

Eugene H. Clement 1.11 59.41 163.38 

Mary C. M. Nutting- 100.00 300.00 

George E. McClintock 12.00 36.00 99.00 

Frances E. Ainsworth 72.90 200.46 

Alfred Quimby 64.00 176.00 

Thomas Stafford 57.42 157.90 

Clara B. Harvey 44.98 123.70 

Mary B. Welch 100.00 300.00 

Ida M. Marston 1.88 36.00 99.00 

Melvin A. Wason 25.08 46.96 129.15 

Jennie C. Clark 30.63 84.22 

George W. Tiirney 29.95 82.37 

Alfred S. Lamb 84.00 231.00 

Charles Reid 59.54 163.77 

Mrs. A. E. Spaulding 10.00 8.00 

Elmer D. Goodwin 10.00 8.00 

Derryfield club 10.00 8.00. 

Mrs. Anna B. Page 20.00 16.00 

Pearl Harrington 10.00 8.00 

Frank L. Rouse 10.00 8.00 

Horace Ellison 10.00 8.00 

Hugh M. Davis 10.00 8.00 

Emma Sanderson 10.00 8.00 

Interest $93.50 

Lots $2,442.73 

Perpetual care lots $4,523.78 

Total receipts 

J. H. Erskine, care of lots 



$104.80 

49.96 

88.50 

88.91 

54.44 

87.75 

59.40 

127.18 

268.09 

457.21 

108.09 

223.90 

400.00 

147.00 

273.36 

240.00 

215.32 

168.68 

400.00 

136.88 

201.19 

114.85 

112.32 

315.00 

223.31 

18.00 

18.00 

18.00 

36.00 

18.00 

18.00 

18.00 

18.00 

18.00 



^7,060.01 
5,126.62 



12,186.63 



Or. 



Ky amount transferred to cemetery fund: 
Perpetual care lots 



$3,019.42 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. ol8 

i';n-ti;il pevpel u:i I c-are lots. Hillside l.iwii $1,4-i4.:!(; 

Wood.side lawn, single gi-ave section 80.00 



Merrill Cemetery. 

J. H. Erskine, superintendent, care of lots... 
L. C. I'aiae, administrator, sale of lot 



Cr. 



V'}- superintendent's receipts 
By treasurer's receipts 



Cr. 



$4,523.78 

Treasurer's receijjts 2, ,5,36. 23 

Superintendent's receipts 5,126.62 



$12,186.63 



$15. 


,50 


15. 


29 


$30. 


79 


$15, 


,50 


15. 


29 


$30. 


79 



• Valley Cemetery. 

Eugene C. Smith, superintendent $1,026.25 

Jesse E. Xourse, sale of path 6.75 

Charles L. Richardson, addition to lot 50.00 



$1,683.00 



Superintendent's receipts $1,626.25 

Treasurer's receipts 56.75 



$1,683.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRED L. ALLEX. 
Treasurer of Trnsiccs of Ccmftrrirs. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of Fred L. Allen, 
treasurer of the trustees of cemeteries, and find the same are cor- 
rectly cast and vouched for. 

.TAMES E. DODflE. 

f'ifi/ Auditor. 
3! 



514 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KliPORTS. 

To the Trustees of the Cemeteru Fund: 

Ge'NTLEMEN: — I herewith submit to you the twenty-third annual re- 
port of the funds received and expenses paid to January 1, 1900. 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund January 1, 1905 $80,043.80 

llECEiPTs During the Year. 

From J. R. W. Hutchinson $100.00 

E. W. Lathe, exr. estate of Laura J. 

Lathe 150.00 

Mrs. Vianna E. Gordon, admx. estate 

of Elizabeth D. Gordon 100.00 

M. V. B. Kinne 100.00 

Sarali C. Baker, admx. estate of Jen- 
nie Dewhtirst 200.00 

Fred Johnson, trustee for Mary 

French 152. SO 

Alice A. Hamer IIS.SO 

estate of J. H. Maynard 144.00 

Milton C. Paige lOLGO 

Minnie E. Grice, admx. estate of Mary 

J. Baker 100.00 

Joel Jenkins 160.00 

William E. Buck 130.00 

Mary A. Blanchard 100.00 

Susan G. Woodman, exrx. estate of 

Mary G. Fiske 200.00 

Arthur W. Holbrook, adm. estate of 

Ilattie I. Southworth 100.00 

E. J. Uhlig-, adm. estate of Alice M. ^ 

Uhliff 100.00 

Gertrude A. Whittier 117.00 

To receipts transferred from Pine Grove 

cemeterj', perpetual care lots 3,019.42 

Partial perpetual care lots, Hillside lawn 1,424.36 

Sinole grave section, Woodside Lawn 80.00 

$6,884.58 

Total $87,528.44 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand $04,050.00 

cash on hand 23,478.44 



$87,528.44 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 515 

Income Account. 

Income on hand January 1, 1005 $3,464,96 

Interest coupons $2,822.50 

Interest savings bank deposit 639.19 

Interest savings bank deposit, Hillside lawn 143.12 

Interest savings bank deposits, Woodside 
lawn 4.75 

Income for the year 3,609.56 



Total $7,074.52 



EXPENSES PAID DURING THE YEAR. 

Union Coal Company $49.50 

Palmer & Garmon .75 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons 138.00 

Manchester Hardware Company 56.11 

J. H. Erskine, superintendent 36.75 

J. A. Colby 30.00 

J. H. Erskine, supt., care of lots Woodside 

lawn 4.75 

J. H. Erskine, supt., care of lots, Hillside 

lawn 143.12 

J. H. Erskine, supt., care of lots, perpetual 

care 1,896.00 

Pay roll, macadamizing 238.25 

Pay roll, macadamizing 139.50 

Charles A. Bailey 612.50 

Total expense $3,345.23 

Cash income on hand 3,729.29 



$7,074.52 



Valley Cemetery, 

Amount of permanent fund January- 1, 1905 $28,351.47 

Keceipts During the Year. 

From J. H. DeMerritt $100.00 

Georgianna B. Ray, exrx. estate of 

Emeline A. Babb 100.00 

Helen M. Elliott 100.00 

Mrs. J. M. Howe and Hannah A. Cur- 
rier 100.00 



516 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

From Tlioniiis Dixon $115.20 

E. M. Topliff, exr. estate of Eliza P. 

Whritner 300.00 

John S. Folsom estate 129.60 

Mrs. S. J. Olzendam 148.00 

Olive J. Doble 115.20 

John E. Johnson 100.00 

Mrs. Charles J. Glidden 100.00 

Charles L. Richardson 251.60 

Mrs. K. L. Manning- 144.00 

A. H. Hale, exr. estate of Mary F. 

Barnes 129.20 

David Tilton 362.40 

Mrs. A. P. Olzendam 106.00 

Julien Edg-erly 108.00 

M. S. Bennett, adm. estate of E. How- 
ard Oflfiitt 190.00 

Receipts for the year $2,789.20 

Total amount of fund $31,140.67 

Ck. 



By bonds on hand $25,500.00 

cash on hand 5,640.67 

Income Accoixt. 



$31,140.67 



Income on hand January 1, 1905 $3,624.27 

Interest coupons $1,110.00 

Interest savings bank deposits 194.10 

Income for the year 1,304.10 

Total $4,928.37 

EXPENSES PAID TURING THE YEAR. 

Portland Stone Ware Company $8.00 

J. H. Erskine, superintendent 25.00 

Arthur E. Wiggin 31.00 

Albert Warren 148.00 

Mead, Mason & Co 22.50 

Street and park commission 200.00 

Eugene C. Smith, superintendent 578.75 

Expenses for the year $1,013.25 

Cash income on hand 3,915.12 



Total $4,928.37 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 517 

Merrill Cemetery. 

Amount of fund January 1, 1905 $487.89 

Cb. 

By bonds on hand $450.00 

cash on hand 37.89 

Total $487.89 

IxcoME Account. 

Income on hand January 1, 1905 $245.87 

Interest coupons $22.50 

Interest savings bank deposits 9.33 

31.83 

Total $277.70 

Cr. 

Cash paid J. H. Erskine. supt.. for care of Emerson lot. . $22.00 

Cash income on hand 255.70 

Total $277.70 



Gale Fxxd, Valley Cemetery. 

Income on hand January 1, 1905 $147.53 

Interest savings bank deposit $6.14 

Interest from fund 12.00 

18.14 

Total $1(35.72 

Cr. 

Eobie Concrete Company $1.25 

Eugene C. Smith, superintendent, care of Gale tomb 6.00 

Cash on hand 158.47 

Total $165.72 

, Respectfully submitted, 

FRED L. ALLEX, 
Treasurer of the Trufitees of Cemetery Fund. 



518 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of account of Fred 
L. Allen, treasurer of the cemetery funds, embracing the receipts and 
expenditures for the year 1905, and find the same correct and properly 
vouched. I have also examined the securities in which said fund is 
invested and find as follows: 

Pi^Ti Groat; CEiiETERY. 

20 city of ^Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 
1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 
22, 23, 24, 26, 28, due 1942; denomination 
$1,000 each $20,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 

1, 3, due in 1942; denomination, $500 each 1,000.00 
1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond. No. 3 50.00 
14 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 

2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, due 

1913; denomination, $1,000 14,000.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond, No. 2, 

due 1913 500.00 

5 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 
1, 2, 3, 9, 10. due 1913; denomination $100 

each 500.00 

11 city of Manchester 3^4 per cent bonds, due 

1919; denomination $1,000 each 11,000.00 

6 city of !^[anchester 4 per cent bonds, diic 

1909 6,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 4 per cent bonds, due 

1916 2,000.00 

6 city of Manchester SVa per cent bonds, due 

1922 4,000.00 

5 city of Manchester 3i/o per cent bonds, due 

1919 5,000.00 

$64,050.00 

Cash on deposit in Manchester Savings Bank, 

Book No. 50420 $8,413.63 

Cash on deposit ^Mechanics Savings Bank, 

Book No. 3413 13,398.16 

Cash on deposit in Mechanics Savings Bank, 

Book No. 4407 5,031.47 

Cash on deposit in Mechanics Savings Bank, 

Book No. 4522 176.00 

Cash on hand 188.47 

27,207.73 



Total amount of permanent fund and 

income December 30, 1905 $91,257.73 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 519 

Valley Cemetery. 

4 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 

1, (), 11, IS, due 1913; denomination $1,000 

each $4,000.00 

1 city of Manchester "j per cent bond, No. 1, 

due 1913; denomination $500 500.00 

3 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 

6, 7, 8, due 1913; denomination $100 each.. 300.00 

8 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 
4, 7, 12, 19, 20, 21, 25, 27, due 1942; denomi- 
nation $1,000 8,000.00 

2 city of ^Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 

2, 4, due 1942; denomination $50 each 100.00 

3 city of Manchester 4 per cent bonds, due 

1916 3,000.00 

3 city of Manchester S^/, per cent bonds, 

Nos. 81, 93, 100, due 1919; denomination 

$1,000 each 3,000.00 

I) city of ^ianchester Sy., \}ev cent bonds, due 

1922 6,000.00 

6 6ity of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 

3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, due 1942; denomination $100 

each 600.00 



Casli on deposit in Guaranty Savings Bank, 

Book No. 4257 $1,556.03 

Cash on deposit in Amoskeag' Savings Bank, 

Book No. 68308 7,999.76 



$25,500.00 



$9,555.79 

Total permanent fund and income, Dec. 30, 1905 $35,055.79 

jSIerrile Cemetery'. 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 

4, 5, due 1913; denomination $100 each $200.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent bonds, Nos. 

1, 2, due 1942; denomination $100 each 200.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent bond. No. 1, 

due 1942; denomination $50 50.00 

Cash on deposit in Guaranty Savings Bank, 

Book No. 5116 48.03 

Cash on deposit in Amoslvcag Bank, Book 

No. 69517 245.56 



Total amount of fund and income. Dee. 31, 1905.. $743.59 



520 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Gai.e Fixo. 
Cash on hand in Amoskea"- lUuik. Hook Xo. .'Uins $158.47 



Total amount of permanent fund and income on hand... $127,215.58 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



EEPOET 



TKUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



EEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING 

FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

Gentlemen: — As required by chapter 37, section 2, of the citj^ ordi- 
nances of Manchester, the trustees of the sinking- fund of the city 
-of Manchester herewith report the condition of the several funds 
January 1, 1906, with receipts and pajinents for tlie year ending De- 
cember 30, 1905. 

\^^LLIA:M mcelkoy, 

CHARLES H. MANNING, 
" FEED L. ALLEN, 

Trustees of the Sinking Fund. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

Gentlemen:- — I herewith transmit to you my report as treasurer of 
the sinking- fund for the year ending Deceiuber 30, 1905. 

improvement loan. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January-, 1905, for the pa^anent of 

improvement bonds $210,063.60 

Appropriation for 1905 20,000.00 

Income from interest on bonds 7,705.00 

Income from bank deposits 110.56 

Premium received for bonds sold 515.00 

Accrued interest received for bonds sold 387.44 

$244,781.00 

Cr. 

Premium paid for bonds bought $1,668.25 

Accrued interest on bonds bought 429.12 

Bonds on hand December 30, 1905 228,000.00 

Cash on hand December 30, 1905 14,684.23 



$244,781.60 

523 



524 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

watek loax. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund Jaiiuarv 1, 190."), for the payment of 

water bomls $175,717.29 

Water works, hydrant service, 1905 19,550.00 

"Water works, appropriation, 1905 5,000.00 

Income from interest on bonds 5,965.00 

Income from banl< deposits 269.84 

I'rcniimu received for bonds sold 515.00 

Accrued interest received for bonds sold 27S.n4 

.$207,295.47 
Cr. 

Preminm paid for bonds boug'ht $1,625.50 

Accrued interest for bonds bought 456.4.1 

Bonds on hand December :50, 1905 198.000.00 

Cash on hand December :;0. 1905 7.2i:!.54 

$207,295.47 

.SCHOOI. IvOAX. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1. 1905 $17,283.75 

Income from interest on bonds 590.00 

Income from bank deposits 87.14 

Appropriation, 1905 2.000.00 



Cr. 



$19,960.89 



Premium paid for bonds boui>ht $155.00 

Accrued interest, bonds bouo-ht 16. S9 

Bonds on hand December ."^O. 1905 17.000.00 

Cash on hand December iiO. 1905 2,789.00 

$19,960.89 

city fl~xt)ixo i.oax. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1905 . .• $2.5,612.30 

Ap])r(>priation. 1905 5,000.00 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 525 

Income from intiTi'st on Ixmds $.")!).'). 00 

Premium received for bonds sold 632.50 

Accrued interest received for bonds sold 108.88 



$31,918.68 



Ck. 

Premium paid for bonds bought $743.75 

Accrued interest i3aid for bonds bought 205.88 

Bonds on hand December 30, 1905 25,000.00 

Cash on hand December 3(). 1905 5,969.05 



$31,918.68 



JIUXICIPAL LOAN. 

For the payment of bonds maturing- July 1, 1922. 

Amount of fund January 1, 1905 $8,080.40 

To appropriation, 1905 ,. 4,000.00 

Interest on bank deposit 48.42 

Interest on coupons 152.50 



$12,281.32 



Cr. 

Premium paid for bonds bought $220.00 

Accrued interest for bonds bought 21.11 

Bonds on hand December 30, 1905 8,000.00 

Cash on hand December 30, 1905 ; 4,040.21 



$12,281.32 



Kespectfully submitted, 

FRED L. ALLEX, 
Treasurer of Sliiki)i!j Fund. 



This is to certify that I have examined the Viooks of accounts of 
Fred L. Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the sinking- fund, embracing 
the receipts and expenditures for the year ending- December 30, 1905, 
and find the same correct and properly vouched. I have also examined 
the securities in which fund is invested and find as follows: 

Bonds for the city of !Manchester for the payment of 
improvement bonds: 

4 per cent, due 1907 $9,000.00 

4 per cent, due 190S 10.000.00 

4 per cent, due 1909 21,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1910 29,0011.00 



526 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

4 per cent, due 19 1 1! $l.-),000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 6,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1915 27,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1917 16,000.00 

31/2 per cent, due 1919 34,000.00 

31/2 per cent, due 1922 36,000.00 

31/2 per cent, due 1944, city of Boston 2.1,000.00 

Cash on hand December 30, 1905 14,684.23 

Bonds of the citj' of ^lanchester for the payment of 
water bonds: 

4 per cent, due 1907 ^ $31,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1909 22,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1910 7,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1913 1,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 18,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1915 19,000.00 

4 per cent, due* 1916 11,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1917 27,000.00 

31/2 per cent, due 1919 23,000.00 

31/2 per cent, due 1922 17,000.00 

31/2 per cent, due 1925 22,000.00 

Cash on hand December 30, 1905 7,213.54 

Bonds of the city of Manchester for the payment of 
school bonds: 

4 per cent, due 1909 . . . . : $3,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1910 2,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1911 4,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1913 1,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1914 2,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1915 2,000.00 

4 per cent, due 1916 1,000.00 

31/2 per cent, due 1919 2,000.00 

Cash on hand December 30, 1905 2,789.00 



For the payment of city fundin<2: bonds: 
4 per cent, due 1910, citj- of Manchester bonds 
4 per cent, due 1911, city of Manchester bonds 
31/2 per cent, due 1922, citj' of Manchester 

bonds 

Cash on hand 



$242,684.23 



$205,213.54 



$10,000.00 


$19,789.00 


1,000.00 




14,000.00 




5,969.05 






$30,969.05 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 527 

For the payment of municipal loan bonds, n^aturing 
July 1, 1922: 
4 per cent, 1909, city of Manchester bonds $5,000.00 
31/3 per cent, 1925, city of Manchester bonds :j,000.00 

Cash on hand 4,040.21 

$12,040.21 



Total $510,696.03 



Total amount of bonds in sinking fund $476,000.00 

Total amount of cash in sinking fund 34,690.03 

$510,696.03 



JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 



COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



EEPORT OF THE COxMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen: — The committee on city farm and house ot correction 
hereby submits its annual re^jort for the year ending December 31, 
190,5: 

I'lirsuant with the recommendation of his Honor, tlie ^[ayor, in liis 
inaugural address to the city government of 1905-1906, the boaj'd of 
mayor and aldermen, April 4, 1905, passed a resolution abolishing 
the poor farm and house of correction of the city of Manchester, and 
repealing all acts relating to the care, management, use, and control 
of the same. 

On the nineteenth day of July, l;!05, the board of ma^vor and alder- 
men passed a resolution instructing the committee on city farm and 
house of correction to offer for sale at public auction that jiart of the 
farm bounded on the east by Mammoth road, on the north by Bridge 
street, on the west by Highland street, and on the south by East High 
street as it is proposed to be extended. 

On July 31, 1905, the committee met and voted to sell at public 
auction the property above described on Monday, August 7, 1905, at 
two o'clock in the afternoon, and Mr. James G. Taggart was engaged 
to advertise and conduct the sale. At the time and place agreed upon, 
the property' was sold to the Rt. Rev. John B. Delany for sixty-one 
hundred dollars ($6,100), and a deed of the land was given September 
7, 1905; the description of which was furnished by the city engineer 
and is as follows: 

Beginning at a stake at the intersection of the easterly line of 
Highland street with the southerly line of Bridge street; thence in an 
easterly direction nine hundred eighty-one and sixtj'-eight hun- 
dredths (981. 68) feet (measured on the southerlj^ line of Bridge street), 
to a stake on the westerly line of Mammoth road; thence deflecting 
to the right or southerly seventy-two (72) degrees forty-six (46) min- 
utes, two hundred eighty-three and nine hundred thirty-nine thou- 
sandths (283.939) feet (measured on the westerly line of Mammoth 
road), to a stake on the northerly line of East High street proposed; 
thence deflecting to the right or westerly one hundred seven (107) de- 
.grees, seven (7) minutes, fifty (50) seconds, one thousand sixty-six and 
thirty-nine thousandths (1066.039) feet (measured on the northerly line 
of East High street proposed), to a stake on the easterly line of High- 
land street; thence deflecting to the right or northerly ninety (90) 

531 



532 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

degrees, eight (8) minutes, fifty (50) seconds, two hundred seventy- 
three and one hundred ninety-two thousandths (273.192) feet (meas- 
ured on the easterly line of Highland street), to the stake at the point 
of beginning, containing two hundred seventy-eight thousand five 
hundred ninety-three and one hundred sixtj^-one thousandths (278,- 
593.161) square feet, and is bounded northerly by Bridge street, east- 
erly by Mammoth road, southerly bj- East High street proposed, and 
westerly by Highland street. 

On April 24, 1905, the committee voted to sell at public auction the 
live stock, wood, vegetables, harnesses, several wagons, and certain 
other articles not advisable to store, and Mr. James F. Cavanaugh was 
engaged to advertise and conduct the sale. 

On the twenty-eighth day of April, 1905, the sale was held at the 
farm, and the amount received was three thousand two hundred and 
five dollars and eighty-one cents ($3,205.81), viz: 

Boyd Bros., bay horse and black horse $345.00 

Charles H. Jenness, bay mare 112.50 

Manchester Coal & Ice Companj-, brown mare 115.00 

Dennis J. Dowd, brown mare 110.00 

Boyd Bros., 5 bunches seed corn @ $2.00 10.00 

J. A. Richards, black cow 47.00 

J. A. Richards, black cow 50.00 

W. J. Miller, brown cow 18.00 

E. R. French, red cow 39.00 

J. N. Dee, red cow 14.50 

F. M. Ray, gray cow 21.00 

James Casey, gray cow 18.00 

F. M. Ray, spotted cow 19.00 

J. C. Gallagher, spotted cow 18.00 

C. De Moulpied, black and white cow 36.00 

James ]\IcCauley, black and white cow 27.00 

J. A. Richards, black cow 26.00 

Henry Bach; black and white bull 28.00 

J. A. Richards, black and white cow 38.00 

William Schwartz, black and white cow (yearling) 18.00 

William Schwartz, black and white cow (yearling) 17.00 

B. W. Nichols, black and white cow (j'earling) 14.50 

Charles Hobbs, black and white cow (yearling) 17.00 

Charles Hobbs, red cow (yearling) 14.00 

B. W. Nichols, black and white cow (yearling) 11.00 

William Schwartz, black and white cow (yearling) 22.00 

Unknown, lot of corn 1.94 

F. W. Russell, scavenger wagon 20.00 

F. W. Russell, scavenger wagon 19.00 

W. H. Howe, scavenger wagon 17.00 

W. E. Woodward, express harness 3.50 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 538 

Dr. J. L. (iohloii, siiif^lr harness $4.00 

George Porter, single harness 1.10 

Manchester Coal & Ice Company, single harness 25.00 

Maxwell Ice Co., heavy single harness 41.00 

F. McCarthy, double harness 4.00 

E. G.. Libbej-, double harness 4.00 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., double harness (team) 13.50 

J. H. GeiseL double harness 12.00 

P. Flahert* express harness 11.00 

John Burke, single harness 0.00 

T. Welch, single harness 2.75 

T. Bolton, breastplate 3.25 

Plummer Freeman, collar .25 

John Burke, collar 1.80 

C. Vigneault, 3 empty barrels 1.50 

Maxwell Ice Co., collar 2.00 

Dr. J. L. Golden, collar 1.25 

F. Miller, collar 1.00 

J. H. Warden, stump puller 2.50 

E. E. Hoyt, collar and pad 2.25 

Edward H. Holmes, collar and pad 2.00 

John Wilson, collar and pad 2.25 

Maxwell Ice Co., collar and pad 2.00 

J. B. Jones, pads .50 

George Wheeler, single harness 1.25 

F. Miller, 2 breastplates .75 

Nason Hall, hames .80 

A. F. Small, straps .10 

George Wheeler, 7 hens @ 57y3C 4.03 

D. Jameson, halter .70 

A. F. Small, straps .10 

Fred Pettigrew, single harness 1.25 

A. F. Small, straps .10 

Henry Bach, gray robe .10 

F. Peltak, collar .75 

E. G. Eeed, blanket 3.25 

E. G. Eeed, blanket 3.25 

E. G. Libbey, blanket .65 

Plummer Freeman, 2 blankets .50 

W. E. Warren, gray robe 2.00 

Lucius Young, black robe 4.00 

George Porter, harness .75 

Ed Stowe, 1 bbl. vinegar @ 6c. per gal 2.52 

Ed Stowe, 1 bbl. Ainegar @ 6c. per gal 2.52 

Ed Stowe, 1 bbl. vinegar @ 6c. per gal 2.52 

H. E. Armstrong, 42 gal. vinegar (o 6c. per gal 2.52 



534 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

J. A. Ballon, .")() ojil. vinegar (a^ (ic. per gal $r!.00 

C. Vigneault, 124 gals, vinegar @ 6c. per gal 7.44 

Mrs. Knoetner, 1 bbl. vinegar @ 6c. per gal 2.52 

Martin Mclntyre, 50 gals, vinegar @ 6c. per gal 3.00 

Daniels, Cornell Co., 990 gals, vinegar @ 5c. per gal.... 49.50 

Timothy Sullivan, 1 rooster and 9 hens (a 55c 5.50 

B. W. Nichols, 10 hens @ 60c '. 6.00 

George Wheeler, 10 hens @ 50c 5.00 

B. W. Nichols, 10 hens @ 55c ' 5.50 

J. N. Dee, 10 hens @ 55c 5.50 

P. Scollard, 10 hens @ 65c 6.50 

P. ScolJard, 9 hens @ 55c 4.95 

Ed Stowe, 10 hens @ 60c 6.00 

Ed Stowe, 10 hens @ 60c G.OO 

B. W. Nichols, 1 rooster and 9 hens at 60c 6.00 

B. W. Nichols, 1 rooster and 9 hens at 55c 5.50 

P. Scollard, 10 hens at 60c 6.00 

J. Ford, 214 cords wood @ $4.50 10.00 

C. Connor, ;5 cords wood @ $3.00 9.00 

C. Connor, 3 cords wood @ $3.60 10.80 

Tom Welch, 4 cords wood @ $3.50 14.00 

Frank Hill, 3 cords wood (it $3.50 10.50 

J, H. Wales, 5 cords wood @ $3.00 15. 00 

Nicholas Bolton, 5 cords wood @ $3.00 15.00 

Robert Edgar, 2 cords wood @ $3.00 6.00 

James Scott, 5 cords wood @ $3.00 15.00 

C. L. Fuller, syg cords wood @ $3.00 11.62 

J. Bienvenue, 1 cord wood @ $3.00 3.00 

Joseph Frechette, 31/3 cords wood @ $3.00 10.50 

Charles F. Read, 4 3-10 tons hay @ $14.50 62.35 

E. G. Libbey, 121/0 tons hay @ $13.00 162.50 

Maxwell Ice Co., 6 42-100 tons meadow hay (silo) @ $4.75 30.49 

Maxwell Ice Co., 3 42-100 tons meadow hay @ $5.00 17.10 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., 53 bushels oats @ 36c 19.08 

Maxwell Ice Co., 16 bags shorts @ 90c 14.40 

Alfred Lindstrom, 10 bushels potatoes (a 25c 2.50 

Joseph Frechette, 133 bushels potatoes @ 20c 26.60 

Martin Mclntyre, 46 bushels potatoes @ 20c 9.20 

A. L. Cai'on, 46 bushels potatoes @ ISc 8.46 

J. Bienvenue, 1 barrel carrots -65 

M. Kilton, 1 barrel carrots .65 

Edward Miller, 1 barrel carrots .60 

Dr. Dunton, 1 barrel carrots .SO 

Dennis Dowd, 1 barrel carrots .80 

C. Connor, 1 barrel carrots .70 

(Jeorge Flint, 1 barrel carrots .75 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CITV FAI'>M. 535 

Manchester Coal and Ice Co., 1 barrel caiTots $0.7o 

C. F. Kead, l^ barrel carrots .30 

W. E. Woodward, 5 barrels small carrots (a o5c 1.75 

J. N. Dee, 1 barrel beets .75 

Frank Johnson, 1 barrel beets .35 

Edward Hoj't, 1 barrel beets .60 

J. Bienvenue, 1 barrel beets .85 

.7. Somers, 1 barrel beets .GO 

J. Bienvenue, 1 barrel beets .60 

W. E. Woodward, 1 barrel beets .75 

J. Bienvenue, 1 barrel beets .50 

Edward Hoyt, 1 barrel beans 4.60 

Frank Johnson, 1 barrel beans 4.60 

J. Bienvenue, 1 barrel beans 3.50 

Nicholas Bolton, 1 barrel beans 4.25 

C. F. Read, 1 barrel beans . . . ■. 4.25 

George Wlieeler, 1 barrel beans 4.00 

Thomas Bolton, 1 barrel beans 4.00 

J. Bienvenue, 1 barrel beans 4.25 

John Demers, 1 barrel beans 4.50 

K. G. Libbey, 1 barrel beans 5.25 

Daniel Ahern, 1 barrel beans 4.25 

J. S. Burbank, 1 barrel beans 2.00 

J. Bienvenue, 1 barrel beans 2.75 

J. Bienvenue, y^ barrel popcorn .90 

H. R. Armstrong, 229 bushels corn in shed at 45c 103.05 

^Maxwell Ice Co., ice in icehouse 69.00 

A. G. Hood, manure in cattle yard 42.00 

E. G. Libbey, blanket .65 

E. B. Pike, collar 2.00 

F. McCarthy, collar .75 

J. Ford, hames 5.00 

E. M. Strickford, shovel .35 

A. Li. Mack, shovel .40 

G. M. French, corn fodder 8.50 

Dr. Dunton, 1 ton rice straw 12.00 

Edward Hojt, express wagon 5.00 

Philip Riley, farm wagon 17.00 

Pigs 805.00 

Frank P. Wiggin, manure in ]}\g joen in yard 3.50 



Total amount of sale $3,205.81 

Commission paid James F. Cavanaugh 256.46 



Amount paid city treasurer $2,949.35 



536 ANNUAL OFFICIAL IlEPORTS. 

On the twenty-first day of Jnly, 1905, the board of mayor and alder- 
men passed a resolution authorizing' the mayor and committee on city 
farm and house of correction to sell or dispose of the hay or grass 
standing, or which may thereafter stand at the city farm, by auction 
or otherwise, provided such authority' w^as for a period not longer than 
the remainder of the year 1905 and the year 1906. On the twenty-sixth 
day of July, 1905, the grass or hay was sold to the board of street and 
park commissioners for eight dollars ($8.00) a ton, with the provision 
that if more hay, rye or oats were cut than was needed by the said 
commissioners, the city reserved the right to purchase the same at 
the actual cost to the said commissioners. The amount cut during the 
year 1905 was as folows: 

9,130 lbs. of rye or 3.511 tons. 
104,541 lbs. of oats or 40.208 tons. 
219,671 lbs. of hay or 84.488 tons. 

The rye, oats, and hay were weighed at the city farm, allowing 
twenty-six hundred pounds to the ton (rack weight). The said com- 
missioners paid to the city treasurer, February 5, 1906, the sum of ten 
hundred and twent3--five dollars and sixty-six cents ($1,025.66). 

EBCEIPTS AJS'D EXPETCDITIKES. 

We find the financial statement for the year to be as follows: 
1905. 
Feb. 16. Source unknown (probable balance on 1904 ac- 
count) $166.06 

April 3. Scavenger service, $499.98; other sources, 

$534.18 1,034.16 

June 30. Sale of live stock, etc 2,94.5.35 

Aug. 7. Sale of land 610.00 

Sept. 7. Sale of land 5,490.00 

Dec. 1. Sale of apples 22.50 

Dec. 4. Sale of pears 3.50 

Total receipts $10,272.47 

Bills receivable 2.068.78 

Total $12,341.25 

Cash paid citj^ treasurer exclusive of sale of land and per- 
sonal property $1,230.12 

Bills receivable 2.068.78 

Total $3.29<^.00 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



537 



Appropriation 

Transferred to money unappropriated 

Amount of appropriation expended 

Amount of appropriation expended 

Receipts from farm (direct) 

Total expense of farm 

Bills receivable 

Cost of maintaining farm 

BILLS RECEIVABLE. 

Accounts with sundry persons (unpaid) 

Hay, oats, and rj'e (paid b^' street department, February 

5, 1906) 

Scavenger service (paid January 12, 1906) 

Accounts with sundry persons (paid January 12, 1906) 

Total 



$8,500.00 
4,385.5'.) 

$4,114.41 

$4,114.41 
1,230.12 

$2,884.29 
2,068.78 

$815.51 



$153.35 



1,025. 


66 


261.41 


628. 


30 


$2,068. 


,73 



At a meeting of the board of mayor and aldermen January 2, 1906, 
it Avas voted to request the city solicitor to secure all books and 
money belonging to the city in possession of Eugene G. Libbey, for- 
merly superintendent of the city farm and house of correction of the 
city of Manchester; refusal on the part of the said superintendent to 
deliver the property voluntarily, the said solicitor was instructed to 
take the necessary legal steps to secure the same. The city solicitor 
secured the sum of eight hundred eighty-nine dollars and seventy- 
seven cents ($889.77) and all books except the cash book used by the 
said superintendent and his predecessors prior to December 31, 1904, 
and the books commonly known as day books. Steps are being taken 
to secure the remainder of these books. 

The committee has secured a caretaker for the farm, and it is his 
duty to guard the premises and perform such labor as may be re- 
quired of him by the mayor and committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN J. CONNOR, 
CHARLES F. READ, 
ROBERT EDGAR, 
Committee on Citij Farm attd House of Correction. 
Manchester, N. H., April 24, 1906. 



REPORT OF THE CriY SOLICITOR. 



EEPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



ilANCHESTER, N. H., March 10, 1900. 
To the City Cmincils: 

I beg to submit m}' annual I'epoi't as solicitor for the year 1905. 

Several important cases in which the city was a defendant have, 
been decided. 

John J. Connor, administrator, vs. Manchester, a suit in the sum 
of seven thousand dollars, after pending- in the supreme court for 
more than a year, was finally decided in favor of the city. 

The case of Elmer E. Gibbs against the citj- in the sum of five thoii- 
sand dollars, which was tried in the superior court for Grafton county 
in the spring- of 1905, and a verdict awarded the plaintiff in the 
sum of five thousand dollars, with interest and costs for several years, 
was taken to the supreme court upon exceptions by the city, and a 
decision given in favor of the city. This finallj^ disposes of the lengthy 
and protracted litigation which accompanied the plaintiff's suit against 
the cit}-. 

The citj'^ brought action against Jeremiah Hodge and the Head & 
Dowst Companj' for the purpose of determining title to Willow street, 
adjoining Valle}- cemetery, part of said street being occupied by said 
defendants under a claim of right. The suit was brought by the city 
upon petitioners giving said city a bond of indemnity-, protecting it 
against all expenses and costs incurred in bringing said suit. 

Suit was instituted by the city against Elizabeth Shea, attaching 
real estate, for the purpose of reimbursing the plaintiff for support 
furnished the defendant. Several minor claims for land damages occa- 
sioned by changes of grade, and land taken in widening and straight- 
ening highways were adjusted, and the city at the present time is 
fairly free from litigation. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

GEOEGE A. WAGNER, 

City Solicitor. 



541 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

I herewith submit my report as city physician for the year 1905: 

Miscellaneous visits 6.jC 

Office visits 400 

At city farm 15 

At police station 150 

At isolation hospital 150 

For board of health 15 

Minor operations 25 

Obstetric cases 3 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. W. MILLIKEN. 



545 



EEPORT OF INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 



EEPOET OF THE INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

Gen'TI.Emen: — The inspector of buildings herewith submits his re- 
port for the year 1905: 

The number of permits issued for new buildings was 130; for altera- 
tions and repairs, 136; total, 266; estimated cost. $563,838. 

Number of building permits issued in each year since the estab- 
lishment of the office, May 18, 1899; 1899, 208; 1900, 232; 1901, 261; 1902, 
203; 1903, 278, estimated cost $549,500; 1904, 263, estimated cost $512,919; 
1905, 266, estimated cost, $563,838. 

Eespeetfully submitted, 

EDWIN S. FOSTER, 

Inspector of BnUdinejs. 



549 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



EEPOKT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of tlie City Councils: 

In compliance with tlie ordinance of said citj- councils, the overseers 
of the poor herewith present their annual report: 

The number of families supported in whole or in i^art was about 
three hundred; the majority of them are permanent x^aupers. "We had 

also to pay the board of a number of children and others at the fol- 
lowing- institutions: 

St. Joseph's Boys' Home, paid for board and care $470.00 

Infant asylum, paid for board and care 99.50 

Notre Dame orphanage, paid for board and care 232.00 

St. Peter's orphanage, paid for board and, care 120.00 

St. Patrick's orphanage, paid for board and care . 75.00 

State Industrial School, paid for board and care 134.00 

New Hampshire State Hospital, paid for board and care. . 395.21 

Hillsborough county farm, paid for board and care.... . 774.65 

Paid for board of paupers in families 1,353.00 

coal, furnished paupers 417.62 

wood, furnished paupers 583.24 

medicine, furnished paupers 114.29 

shoes, furnished paupers '. . 139.29 

clothing, furnished pavipers 14.00 

funerals of paupers 177.75 

rents for paupers 65.00 

groceries and provisions 8,237.85 

Miscellaneous items 34.23 

$13,445.63 

Total amount expended, $13,445.63, and distributed as follows by 
the overseers of the poor in their several wards: 

Ward 1. George E. Davis $1,089.17 

Ward 2. Daniel G. Andrews 547.55 

Ward 3. E. H. Holmes 718.66 

Ward 4. Charles B. Clarkson 447.42 

Ward 5. Thomas F. Sheehan 3,869.56 

Ward 6. John L. Wentworth 162.60 

553 



554 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Ward 7. William Marshal] $580.41 

Ward 8. Henry Lein 1,412.83 

Ward 9. Alphonse Remillard 3,693.38 

Ward 10. Moses C. Morey 924.05 



Total for the year $13,445.63 

Eespectfully submitted, 

THOMAS C. STEWART, 

CUrk. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

In compliance with sections 1 and 2, chapter 81, Laws of the State of 
New Hampshire, in relation to indigent soldiers and sailors, the over- 
seers of the poor present the following report for the year 1903: 

Number of soldiers assisted during year, one, at cost of $136.50 

Appropriation 125.00 



Overdrawn $11.50 

Respectfullj' submitted, 

THOMAS C. STEWART, 

Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES, 
PASSED DURING THE YEAR 1905. 



EESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES, PASSED 
DURING THE TEAR 1905. 



Eesolution relating- to the Final Transfer for the year 1904. 

Resolved hy the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to make the follow- 
ing transfers: 

To account of money unappropriated: 

From interest $361.26 

printing and stationer}- 182.64 

incidental expenses 1,522.34 

city officers' salaries 784.09 

auditor's department •. 1.28 

mayor's incidentals 9.79 

street and park commission 153.61 

new highways 57.77 

paving Elm street 46.22 

paving Canal street 37,42 

macadamizing streets 532.44 

bridges 1,407.05 

repairs of sewers 25.87 

Stark park 56.80 

Derryfield park 272.53 

Lafayette park 13.93 

South Manchester playground 54.22 

Eiddle playground 43.50 

McGregorville plaj'ground 75.00 

union armory .24 

lighting streets 332.69 

health department 1,220.16 

fire-alarm telegraph 316.45 

Wilson Hill engine house fittings 600.00 

police commission 403.98 

police court 115.37 

repairs of buildings 548.67 

Pine Grove cemetery .60 

Valley cemetery 14.79 

^lerrill cemetery 1.40 

557 



558 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

From fui'iiiture and supplies $99.14 

teachers' salaries 680.87 

sewing- materials .08 

evening school, mechanical drawing 39.45 

evening schools 21.50 

new heating, Eimmon school 339.45 

plumbing examiners 17.58 

decoration of soldiers' graves 12.15 

land sold for taxes 3,553.00 

abatement of taxes 55.16 

free text-books 1.10 

file and index system 65.50 

unapproi)riated receipts 10,050.85 

$24,127.04 

From account of unappropriated money: 

To city hall $297.84 

repairs of highways 5,753.15 

snow and ice 2,800.57 

land taken for highwa3s 2,216.81 

watering streets 174.58 

paving streets 450.51 

grading for concrete 84.62 

scavenger service 851.23 

street sweeping 112.67 

new canal bridge. Granite street 1,911.13 

city teams 600.05 

new sewers 404,43 

comnions 106.13 

new watering carts 5.00 

fire department 1,275.28 

police station 392.05 

Wilson Hill engine house 4.54 

Amoskeag cemetei-y .77 

repairs of schoolhouses 1,069.86 

books and stationery 9. SO 

printing and advertising 32,57 

fuel 803.41 

contingent expenses 139.85 

care of rooms 15.46 

manual training .32 

new schoolhouse, GofPe's Falls 31.43 

paupers off farm 3,434.51 

city farm 394.99 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 559 

To indif^ent soldiers $7.nO 

county tax 147.38 



$24,127.94 
Passed January 2, 1905. 



Kesolution relating to the Issuance of $50,000 of City Bonds to Re- 
fund the Four per cent Bonds maturing April 1, 1905. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of obtaining fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) 
with which to Tpay the fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) of city bonds 
now outstanding, bearing four per cent interest, which will become 
due April 1, 1905, there be issued the bonds of the city of Manchester 
to the amount of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000), said bonds to be 
dated April 1, 1905, and paj'able to bearer twenty (20) years from date 
thereof. 

Said bonds to bear the city seal, to be signed by the mayor and 
countersigned by the city treasurer, and to bear interest at the rate 
of three and one half per cent per annum from date, and to have coii- 
pons attached bearing the facsimile signature of the city treasurer for 
the payment of interest at said rate, semi-annually, on the first days 
of April and October of each year, and the city treasurer is authorized 
to fix the place of payment of interest and principal of said bonds, 
and is hereby authorized to sell said bonds and do all things necessary 
and proper to complete and carry into effect the issue of said bonds. 

Said bonds to be issued in accordance with an act of the legislature 
of New Hampshire, passed at the January session, 1895, entitled, "An 
act to authorize municipal corporations to issue bonds." 

Resolved further, That for the purpose of paying the interest and 
principal of said bonds as the same shall become due, there shall be 
annually raised by tax by the common council in the years of 1906 to 
1925, inclusive, such sum of money as shall be sufficient to meet the 
interest upon the bonds each year outstanding, and a further sum of 
twenty-five hundred dollars ($2,500) each year for a sinking fund for 
the payment of the principal of said bonds as it shall become due, 
until a sufficient sinking fund has been so raised, the same to be 
turned over to the board of sinking fund commissioners created by 
ordinance of November 17, 1893, and applied to the payment of said 
bonds. 

Resolved further. That the city treasurer be and hereby is instructed 
and authorized to advertise for bids for sale of said bonds, and that 



560 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the finance committee of the common council be present at the open- 
incf of the bids with power to accept or reject the same. 
This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 10, 1905. 



Resolution making a Temporary Loan of Three Hundred Thousand 

Dollars. 

NcsoUrd by the Board of Common Council of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the citj- as may 
fall due before the sixteenth day of December, nineteen hundred and 
five, the city treasurer be and herebj' is authorized to make such tem- 
porary loans from time to time, for the use of the citj', of sums not 
exceeding the amount of three hundred thousand dollars, being in an- 
ticipation of the taxes of the present year, giving for the same the 
notes of the city signed by the city treasurer and countersigned by 
the mayor. 

Passed January 30, 1905. 



Resolution relating to the Salary of the Clerk of the Board of 

Assessors. 

liesi.Ircil by the Board of Common Council of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the salary of the clerk of the board of assessors shall not ex- 
ceed the sum of eighty dollars per month. 

Passed January 30, 1905. 



Resolution relating to an Appropriation for a Ward Room in Ward 10. 

Resolved b}- the Maj'or and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars be and is hereby recom- 
mended to the board of common council for the year 1905, said sum of 
twenty-five hundred dollars to be used for the erection of a ward- 
room in ward ten in said Manchester. 

Passed January 30, 1905. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 561 

Resolutiox recommending- an Appropriation for the Printing of the 
Records of the Town of Derryfield. 

Resolved hy the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, The Manchester Historical Association has signified its 
willingness to undertake the work necessary for printing the record 
of the town of Derryfield; and 

Whereas, The printing of said records would prevent the handling 
of the same by genealogical and other searchers, thereby being the 
means of protecting the said records from further destruction; there- 
fore be it 

Resolved, That the sum of five hundred dollars be and is hereby 
recommended to the board of common council for the year 1905; said 
sum of five hundred dollars to be expended by the Manchester Histor- 
ical Association, under the direction of the mayor, for the printing of 
the records of the town of Derryfield. 

Passed January 30, 1905. 



Resolution discharging the Fidelity and Deposit Company of Mary- 
land from all Liability upon the Bonds of George E. Morrill as Tax 
Collector of the City of Manchester. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, By vote of the board of mayor and aldermen of said Man- 
chester the mayor of said city was authorized to procure at the expense 
of the city of Manchester the bond required of the tax collector of 
said city in such fidelity company as he approved; and 

Whereas, The said mayor bonded the said collector in the Fidelity 
and Deposit Company' of Maryland, a corporation duly organized and 
existing under the laws of the state of Maryland, and having a usual 
place of business in the city of Baltimore, Maryland, and qualified to 
act in the state of Xew Hampshire as surety; and 

Whereas, George E. Morrill, a resident of said Manchester, was duly 
elected to and held the office of said collector for the years 1S9S, 1899, 
1900, 1901, and 1902; and 

"Whereas, The said Fidelity and Deposit Company bound itself unto 
the said city of Manchester as surety for the said George E. Morrill 
during the j^ears aforenamed; and 

Whereas, Upon the approval of the maj-or, the United States Fidel- 
ity and Guaranty Company, a corporation duly incorporated under the 
laws of the state of Maryland and having a usual place of business in 
the city of Baltimore, Maryland, bound itself unto the city of Man- 
chester as surety for the said collector for the years 1903 and 1904; 
therefore be it ^ 

36 



562 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Resolved', That the Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland be 
and is hereby relieved and discharged from all liability to the city 
of Manchester upon the bonds furnished by it for the j-ears 1898, 1899, 
1900, 1901, and 1902, and given by it and the said George E. Morrill for 
the said years to the city of Manchester. 

Passed February- 7, 1905. 

Eesolutiox recommending the Purchase of Four Snow Rollers. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the board of street and park commissioners be and are hereby 
requested to recommend to the board of comnion council an appro- 
priation of five hundred dollars to be used for the purchase of four 
snow rollers of not less than twelve feet long and five to seven feet 
in diameter, said rollers to be similar to the ones now used by the 
town of Pl3mouth, in the state of New Hampshire. 

Passed February 7, 1905. 



Resolution relating to the Sales of the Superintendent of City Farm 
and House of Correction. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in Citj- 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the superintendent of the city farm and house of correction 
be and is hereby' instructed to keep in his office a duplicate sales book 
in which he shall enter all monies received for his sales, specif3ing 
the time when received and the person or firm hy whom each sum is 
paid; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of said sales be delivered within five days from 
the first daj' of each month to the clerk of the committee on city farm 
and house of correction, and bj' him submitted to the said committee 
at its first meeting thereafter; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 7, 1905. 



Resolvtion to Exempt the Proi^erty of the 2klanchester Children's 
Home from Taxation. 

Resolved bj^ the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Coupcil assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, The second section of the Articles of Association of the 
Manchester Children's Home, a corjioration being in the nature of a 
public charity, is as follows: 

"The object of this corporation shall be to provide and maintain 
in said Manchester a home for indigent and neglected Protestant chil- 



RESOLUTIONS, OEDEKS, OEDINANCES. 563 

dren, to provide suitable care and instruction for said children and to 
otherwise promote their welfare; and the city of Manchester is hereby- 
authorized to exempt the property of said corporation from taxation 
for such term of years as it may deem proper"; therefore be it 

Resolved 'by the Maj-or and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That in view of the beneficent and charitable objects to be accom- 
plished by the said Manchester Children's Home, a corporation estab- 
lished by law and doing- business in. said Manchester, its property 
herebj'^ is and shall be exempted from taxation for a term of twenty- 
five years from the date of the adoption of this resolution. 

Passed March 7, 1905. 



Kesolution abolishing- the- Poor Farm and House of Correction of the 
City of Manchester, and Eepealing- all Acts relating- to the Care, 
Management, Use, and Control of the same. 

ResoJvcil by the Ma^yor and Aldermen of the City of INIanchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, The sentiment of the public for a long time has been that 
the poor farm and house of correction as now conducted at the city 
farm, so called, is a needless extravag-ance for the city of Manchester; 
and 

Whereas, It is provided by an act, passed at the legislature of 1905, 
that "The expense of detention of persons committed to the county 
jail or county house of correction by justice of the peace or police 
justices, either in cities or towns, upon complaints of drunkenness 
shall be a charge upon the county and the same shall not be a charge 
against the city or town in which the offense or prosecution occurred"; 
therefore be it 

Resolved, That anj^ and all votes heretofore piassed, providing that 
the poor farm belonging to said city be used .as a house of correction, 
be and are hereby rescinded; and be it further 

Resolved, That all ordinances, orders and resolutions relating to the 
care, management, use, and control of the city farm, so called, as a 
house of correction or poor farm, be and the same are hereby repealed 
and annulled; and be it further 

Resolved, That the use and operation of such city farm either as a 
poor farm or house of correction be and the same is hereby discon- 
tinued; and be it further 

Resolved, That the mayor and committee on city' farm be and the 
same are hereby appointed the agents of the city for the purpose of 
selling such part of the stock, equipment, machinery, fixtures, and 
personal property upon said farm belonging to said city as they deem 
advisable; and 'be it further 



564 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEl'OKTS. 

Resolved, That the mayor and the committee on city farm be and 
the same are hereby appointed the agents of the citj' for the purpose 
of leasing the buildings, lands, and such part of the stock, equipment, 
machinery, fixtures, and personal property upon said farm belonging 
to the said city as they deem advisable, provided such lease shall not 
be for a longer period than for the remainder of the present year and 
the year 1906; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect and be in force on and 
after the first day of May, 1905. 

Passed April 4, 1905. 



Kesolltion relating to the Conveyance of Land by the City of Man- 
chester to the Iloman Catholic "Bishop of Manchester. 

Resolved bj' the Maj'or and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the mayor be and hereby is authorized to execute and deliver 
to the Eoman Catholic bishop of Manchester, a corporation sole, ex- 
isting under and by virtue of the laws of the state of I^ew Hampshire, 
a deed of a lot of land now owned bj^ the said city, and situated in the 
city of Manchester, Countj- of Hillsborough, and State of New Hamp- 
shire, 'bounded and described as follows, to wit: 

Beginning at a stone bound at the intersection of the southerly line 
of Bridge street with the westerly line of Mammoth road; thence 
westerly bj'^ said southerlj- line of Bridge street about GG2.5 feet to a 
stake at the intersection of the southerlj- line of said Bridge street, 
with the easterly- line of proposed street, said stake is 234.88 easterly 
from a stake at the intersection of the southerly line of Bridge street 
with the easterlj' line of Highland street; thence southerly- by the 
easterly line of said proposed street about 270 feet to a stake at the 
intersection of the easterly line of said proposed street with the 
northerly line of East High street produced (as proposed); thence 
easterly by the northerlj' line of said East High street produced (as 
proposed), about 740 feet to a stake at the intersection of the north- 
erly line of said East High street produced (as proposed) with the 
westerly line of the Mammoth road; thence northerly by said westerly 
line of Mammoth road to the point of beginning; and be it further 

Resolved, That the sum to be so paid by the Eoman Catholic bishop 
of Manchester shall be one hundred dollars; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 4, 1905. 



EESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 565 

Resolution relating to Interest on Deposits of the City of Manchester. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of ^Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the moneys of the city of Mancliesler l)e deposited in such 
bank or banks in said city as shall pay the largest rate of interest 
to said city of Manchester npon daily balances in said bank or banks 
from the first day of May, 1905, to the first day of May, 1906; and that 
the city treasurer be and herebj^ is instructed to advertise for bids 
from the banks of the city of Manchester by sending to eacli of said 
banks a copy of this resolution; the city of Manchester, by its agent, 
the treasurer of said city, reserving the right to reject any and all 
bids and call for such other. bids as may be necessary to carry out 
the intent of this resolution; and be it further 

Resolved, That the maj-or and the treasurer of said city of Manches- 
ter are hereby authorized and empowered to accept such bid or bids 
as will give the city of Manchester the largest rate of interest upon 
the daily balances on deposits of the inoneys of said city of Manchester 
in said bank or banks from the first day of May, 1905, to the first day 
of May, 1906; and be it 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 4, 1905. 



Eesolutiojs^ relating to the Purchase of Land sold for the Xon-payment 
of Taxes of the City of Manchester. 

Resolved by the Maj^or and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city solicitor be and hereby is appointed the agent of the 
city of Manchester for the purpose of purchasing land sold for the 
non-paj^ment of taxes of the city of Manchester; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 2, 1905. 



Eesolution repealing and annulling a resolution relating to Convey- 
ance of Land by the Citj^ of Manchester to the Eoman Catholic 
Bishop of Manchester. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of ^Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the resolution entitled "Resolution relating to tlie convej-ance 
of land by the city of Manchester to the Roman Catholic bishop of 
Manchester," be and the same is hereby repealed and annulled; and be 
it further 

Resolved, That this resolution sliall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 2, 1905. 



566 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

Resolution authorizing the Sale of the Grass or Hay standing, or 
which may hereafter stand at the City Farm, provided such authority 
shall not be for a longer period than for the Remainder of the Pres- 
ent Year and the Year 1906. 

Resolved by the ^Slayor and Aldermen of the Citj^ of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

WHER3EAS, Immediate steps should be taken in disposing of the 
grass now standing at the city farm in order that the city may not 
suffer an unnecessarj- loss, and said grass being now in the condition 
to be cut; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the maj-or and committee on city farm be and are 
hereby authorized and empowered to sell or dispose of the grass or 
hay, now standing or which may hereafter stand at the city farm, by 
auction or otherwise, in the discretion of the said mayor and commit- 
tee; provided, such authority shall not be for a longer period than for 
the remainder of the present year and the year 1906; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 21, 1905. 



RESOiLtTTiON recommending to the Board of Street and Park Commis- 
sioners that the Laborers employed by said Board be granted Sat- 
urday afternoons during the months of June, Julj-, and August. 

Resolved b}' the Mayor and Aldermen of the Citj- of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, Many of the manufacturing establishments and the city 
offices of the city of Manchester are closed Saturday afternoons during 
the months of June, July, and August, and the laborers thereof given 
a half holiday upon said Saturdays; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the board of mayor and aldermen hereby recommend 
TO the board of street and park commissioners that the laborers in 
their employ be granted Saturday afternoons during the months of 
June, July, and August, during the present year and each succeeding 
year, and that said laborers be paid a full week's pay for each and 
every week during said period; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 21, 1905. 



Resolution requesting the Manchester Street Railway to furnish 

Sprinkling Cars and Sprinkle the Streets of the City which contain 

Street Railway Tracks, free of Cost to the City. 
Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 

Council assembled, as follows: 

That the Manchester Street Railway be and is hereby requested to 
furnish sprinkling cars and sprinkle all streets within the city limits 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 667 

of said Manchester which contain street railway tracks, free of cost 
to said city; and be it further 

Rvmlvi'd, That the sprinkling season for each year shall be depend- 
ent upon the dust condition of the streets, beginning as near the fif- 
teenth day of March and ending as near the fifteenth day of November 
as that condition shall warrant; and be it further 

Resolved, That the work of sprinkling shall be done at such time 
and in such manner as shall be directed by the board of street and 
park commissioners, and the volume of the jets and the frequency of 
the sprinkling shall be as required bj' the said board; and be it fur- 
ther 

RcsolveXl, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 9, 1905. 



Eesolutiox relating to the Eemoval of Obstructions from Willow 
Street between Auburn and Vallej' Streets. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city solicitor be and is hereby instructed to commence and 
prosecute to final issue at law or in equity all persons or corporations 
now encumbering Willow street in said Manchester, from Aubui'n to 
Valley streets, for the purpose of establishing the title to said high- 
way; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 19, 1905. 



Eesolution relating to the Sale of a Part of the City Farm. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

That the standing committee on city farm be and is hereby in- 
structed to offer for sale at public auction that part of the farm 
bounded on the east by the Mammoth road, on the north 'by Bridge 
street, on the west by Highland street, and on the south by East High 
street, as it is proposed to be extended; and be it further 

Resolved, That the mayor be and is hereby authorized and instructed 
in the name and on the behalf of the city of Manchester to execute 
and deliver the deed of the city for said tract of land to the person 
offering the greatest sum therefor; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its j)assage. 

Passed July 19, 1905. 



568 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Kesolvtion recommenrling- to the Board of Health that the Citizens of 
Manchester be furnished witli Hanover Spring water at the City 
Hall Fountain. 

Resolved by the Major and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, The board of street and park commissioners by order of 
the board of health changed the water in the city hall fountain from 
Hanover spring water to Massabesic lake water; and 

WiiEUEAS, A general belief exists that the Hanover spring water 
can be made pure and healthful; and 

Whereas, There is a univefrsal demand for a return to the old sj's- 
tem; therefore be it 

Kasohfd, That we recommend to the board of health that the spring 
in Hanover common be thoroughly cleaned and that such steps be 
taken as will give the citizens of Manchester the benefit of spring 
water at the city hall fountain at the earliest possible date; and be it 
further 

Fes-olred, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 11, 1905. 



EESOLmox relating to the Exemption from Taxation of a certain 
Manufacturing Establishment and the Business connected therewith, 
proposed to be erected by the National Reeb Company. 

Resolved bj' the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of ilanchester, in City 
Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, It is provided by section 11, chapter 55, of the Public 
Statutes of New Hampshire that "Towns may by vote exempt from 
taxation for a term not exceeding ten years any manufacturing estab- 
lishment proposed to be erected or put in operation therein, and the 
capital to be used in operating the same, unless such establishment 
has been previously exempted from taxation by some town"; and 

Whereas, The National Reeb Company proposes to purchase a part 
of a certain parcel of land, known as the Cassius C. Webster farm, sit- 
uate on Brown avenue in said Manchester, and erect thereon a building 
fiftj' by one hundred feet for the manufacture of a non-intoxicating 
beverage known as "Reeb," the manufacturing establishment to be 
operated with machinery; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the land to be acquired or hereafter acquired by the 
National Reeb Company and the manufacturing establishment pro- 
posed to be erected thereon or put in operation therein, and the cap- 
ital to be used in operating the same and the business connected 
therewith, be exempted from taxation for a period of ten years from 
the first day of April, 1906; provided, a non-intoxicating beverage in- 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 569 

dustrj' is conducted on said premises dining said period, and is in oper- 
ation on the first day of July, lOOfi; otherwise this resolution shall not 
be effective. 

Passed October .3, 1905. 



An Order to erect Two Electric Lights, 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and are hereby 
authorized to erect two electric arc lights of 2,000 candle power each, 
with proper fixtures for maintaining the same; the expense thereof 
to be charged to the appropriation for lighting streets, and the said 
lights to be located as follows: On Valley street in front of the shoe 
factory of W. H. McElwain Company, as petitioned for by H. A. Trull, 
et ttls.; corner of East High and Beacon streets, as jjetitioned for by 
L. Ashton Thorp, et (lis. 

Passed January 2, 1905. 



An Order to print the Fifty-ninth Annual Report of the Receipts and 
Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, That the committee on finance be and is hereby author- 
ized to procure for the use of the inhabitants of said city, the printing 
of the fiftj'-ninth annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the 
city of ^Manchester, including the reports of the city auditor, the school 
board, and sujDerintendent of schools, superintendent of water-works, 
water commissioners, engineer of fire department, overseers of the 
poor, trustees, librarian, and treasurer of the city library, committee 
on cemeteries, committee on citj^ farm, city physician, city solicitor, 
city engineer, street and park commissioners, and such other matter 
relative to city affairs as said finance committee may direct; the ex- 
pense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for printing and 
stationery. 

Passed February 21, 1905. | 



An Order to purchase an exercise wagon for Combination Company No. 
2, located at the Wilson Hill Engine House. 

Ordered, That the mayor and committee on fire department be and 
are hereby authorized to purchase an exercise wagon for the use of 
Combination Company No. 2, located at the Wilson Hill engine house; 
said wagon to be built in the city of Manchester upon specifications to 
be furnished by the mayor and said committee at a cost not to exceed 
the sum of five hundred dollars; the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed February 21, 1905. 



570 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An Oedek to purchase Hay, Straw, and Grain for use in the Fire 

Department. 

Ordered, That the mayor and standing committee on fire department 
be and are hereby instructed to purchase all haj', straw, and grain 
used in the fire department of the city of Manchester for the ensuing 
j^ear; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire 
department. 

Passed February 21, 1905. 



Ax Order to erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is here- 
by authorized to erect an electric light with proper fixtures for main- 
taining the same; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for lighting streets; said light to be located as follows: Corner of 
Concord and Weston streets, as petitioned for by John H. Andrews, et 
(lis. 

Passed February 21, 1905. 



An Order relating to Repairs on Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the mayor and committee on lands and buildings are 
hereby authorized and empowered to make such necessary repairs in 
and upon the public buildings of said city as shall not exceed the ap- 
propriation for that purpose; the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for repairs on public buildings. 

Passed February 21, 1905. 



An Order to purchase Seven Horses for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, That the mayor and committee on fire department be and 
are hereby authorized to purchase seven horses for use in the fire de- 
partment of the city of Manchester; the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for fire deiDartment. 

Passed February 21, 1905. 



An Order relating to Claims and Suits against the Citj. 

Ordered, That the mayor and the city solicitor be and are hereby 
authorized to dispose of suits against the city now pending in court, 
or which may be entered in court during the j-ears of 1905 and 1906, 
as they deem best, and that they be a special committee to consider 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 571 

claims against the city, with authority to settle such claims as they 
deem proper, when the amount involved in such settlement does not 
exceed the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars. 

Passed February 21, 1905. 



An Oedee in relation to Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 

Ordered, That the Louis Bell Post, No. 3, G. A. E., be authorized to 
expend the sum of three hundred and fifty dollars; said sum of three 
hundred and fifty dollars to be used for the decoration of soldiers' 
graves of the said Louis Bell Post, and said Post to be also authorized 
to expend the sum of seventy-five dollars; said sum of seventy-five 
dollars to be used for the decoration of the graves of Si^anish War 
Veterans; and the Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. E., be authorized to ex- 
pend the sum of seventy-five dollars; said sum of seventy-five dollars 
to be used for the decoration of soldiers' graves, said decorations to 
be upon Memorial Day and under the direction of the mayor; said 
sums of three hundred and fifty dollars, seventj'-five dollars, and sev- 
enty-five dollars to be charged to the appropriation for decoration of 
soldiers' graves. 

Order amended, So that the Louis Bell Post, No. 3, G. A. R., be author- 
ized to expend the sum of three hundred and twenty-five dollars in 
place of the sum of three hundred and fifty dollars as stated in the 
order, and the Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. E., be authorized to expend 
the sum of one hundred dollars in place of the sum of seventy-five 
dollars as stated in the order; said sums to be charged to the appro- 
. priation for decoration of soldiers' graves. 

Passed May 2, 1905. 



Ax Ordek to erect a Fire-Alarm Box at the corner of Somerville and 

Hall streets. 

Ordered, That the committee on fire department be and hereby is 
authorized to erect a fire-alarm box at the corner of Hall and Somer- 
ville streets in said Manchester, with proper fixtures for operating the 
same; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire 
department. 

Passed May 2, 1905. 



An Obder relating to Band Concerts. 

Ordered, That the mayor be and hereby is authorized and empowered 
to expend such sum or sums the present year for open air band con- 
certs as shall not exceed the sum of four hundred dollars; said sum of 



572 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

four hundred dollars to be divided equally between the Turner Brass 
Band, St. Mary's Band, Cadet Band, City Band and First Infantry Band, 
and said sum of four hundred dollars to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for band concerts; and it is hereby ordered that the mayor be 
and hereby is authorized and empowered to expend an additional sum 
of fifty dollars for music at the Old Home Week to be celebrated in 
Amoskeag-, so called, said sum of fiftj- dollars to be charged to the 
appropriation for band concerts. 

Passed May 2, 1905. 



An Order to build a certain Sewer in Blaine Street from Second Street 

to Third Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commenc- 
ing at the sewer line of Second street and thence in a westerly direc- 
tion to the sewer line of Third street in Blaine street in said city; 
and the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed May 2, 1905. 



Ax Order to erect a Welsbach Gas Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is hereby 
authorized to erect a AVelsbach gas light with proper fixtures for main- 
taining the same; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for lighting streets; said light to be located as follows: Corner 
of Cleveland street and Hiram street, the location at which the peti- 
tioners in the petition of A. Custer and others requested an electric 
light. 

Passed May .31, 1905. 



An Order to erect a Fire-Alarm Box. 

Ordered, That the committee on fire department be and is hereby 
authorized to erect a fire-alarm box wdth proper fixtures for operating 
the same; expense to be charged to the appropriation for fire depart- 
ment; said box to be located as follows: At or about the corner of 
Trenton and Chestnut streets in place of corner of Union and Tren- 
ton streets, as petitioned for in the petition of C. E. Hodge and others. 

Passed May 31, 1905. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 573 

An Order to build a certain Sewer in Ainsvvorth Avenue. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commenc- 
ing at the sewer line of Hayward street and thence in a southerly 
direction to the sewer line of Young street in Ainsworth avenue in said 
city, and the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed May 31, 1905. 



An Order to erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is hereby 
authorized to erect an electric light with proper fixtures for main- 
taining the same; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for lighting streets; said light to be located as follows: Corner of 
South Main street and Erie street, as petitioned for by Warren J. Ayer, 
and others. 

Passed May 31, 1905. 



An Order to build a certain Sewer in Young Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer a-s follows: Commencing 
at the sewer line of Taylor street and thence in an easterly direction 
to the sewer line of Ainsworth avenue in Young street in said city; and 
the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed May 31, 1905. 



f 
Ax Order to build an Eight-Room Schoolhouse at the northeast cor- 
ner of Ashland and Concord Streets. 

Ordered, That the mayor and committee on lands and buildings be 
and are hereby authorized, as the agent of the board of mayor and al- 
dermen, to build an eight-room schoolhouse on land situated at the 
northeast corner of Concord and Ashland streets, in said Manchester, 
and recentl}' purchased by the school board of said Manchester; said 
mayor and committee on lands and buildings, as the agent of the board 
of mayor and aldermen, be and are hereby authorized to do any and 
everything necessary to complete and equip said building; the ex- 
pense thereof to be charged to the appropriation of one eight-room 
school building and lot, to be located within the section bounded by 
Hanover street, Ashland street. East High street, and Beacon street; 
said maj'or and committee on lands and buildings to act in conjunction 



574 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

with a like committee of four from the school board, as prescribed by 
section 3, chapter C5, of the Session Laws of 1S97, 

Passed June 12, li)05. 



An Order to build a certain Sewer in Eay Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby' authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commencing at 
the sewer line of Appleton street and thence in a northerly direction 
250 feet in Eay street in said citj-; and the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed June 12, 1905. 



An Order relating to the Printing of the Early Records of the Town 

of Derrj-field. 

Ordered, That the Manchester Historical Soeietj^ be and is hereby 
autliorized and empowered to print the early records of the town of 
Derrytield, commencing with Tolume one and continuing as far as the 
appropriation will allow; the copy for said printing to be made in 
the office of the city clerk and the original records not to be removed 
therefrom; said work to be done under the direction of the mayor; 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for Manchester 
Historical Society, for printing early records of the Town of Derry- 
tield. 

Passed June 12, 1905. 



Ax Order installing a new fire Storage Battery for the Fire-Alarm 
Telegraph of the Fire Department of the Citj^ of Manchester. 

Ordered, That the mayor and standing committee on fire department 
be and are herebj' empowered to install a new fire storage battery 
for fire-alarm telegraph of the fire department of the city of Man- 
chester, the purchase price thereof not to exceed the sum of seven 
hundred dollars; and the expense to be charged to the appropriation 
for fire department. 

Passed July 19, 1905. 

An Order to purchase Hose for the use of the Fire Department. 

Ordered, That the maj'or and standing committee on fire depart- 
ment be and are herebj^ authorized to purchase one thousand feet of 
hose for the use of the fire department of the city of Manchester; the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire depart- 
ment. 

Passed July 19, 1905. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 575 

An Ordku to build a certain Sewer in Hall Street from Harrison Street 
to Londonderry Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
are hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commenc- 
ing at the sewer line of Harrison street and thence in a northerly direc- 
tion to the sewer line of Londonderry street in Hall street in said 
city; and the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed August 9, 1905. 



An Orde,b to erect Four Electric Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is hereby 
authorized to install four electric lights with proper fixtures for main- 
taining same; the expensfe thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for lighting streets; said lights to be located as follows: Corner of 
Bridge and Arkwright streets, as petitioned for by C. F. Read, et (lis.; 
corner of Valley and Beech streets, as petitioned for 'by J. B. Daigle, 
et (lis.; corner of ^lammoth road and roadway leading to the isolation 
hospital, as petitioned for by J. E. A. Lanouette, et (lis.; on Ray street, 
between Appleton and Clarke streets, opposite the residence of Oliver 
B. Green, as petitioned for by Mrs. D. W. Atwood, et als. 

Passed September 27, 1905. 



An Order to erect Seven Welsbach Gas Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is hereby 
authorized to erect seven Welsbach gas lights with proper fixtures 
for maintaining the same; the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for lighting streets, said lights to be located as follows: 
One light at the corner of Buzzell and Bridge streets, as petitioned for 
by C. W. Smith, et aU.; one light at the "corner of Oakland and Wood- 
bine avenue, as petitioned for by Joseph .Joubert, et (lis.; one light at 
the corner of Oakland and Woodland avenues, as petitioned for by 
Joseph Joubert, et als.; one light at the corner of Broadwaj^ avenue and 
Hanover street, as xietitioned for by Hugh Kelley, et (lis.; three lights 
on the Londonderry turnpike, north of Noah Reed's house, as peti- 
tioned for by Charles A. Foster, ii (lis. 

Passed September 27, 1905. 



576 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An Order to erect Two Welsbach Gas Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is hereby 
authorized to erect two Welsbach gas lights with proper fixtures for 
maintaining same; the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for lighting streets; said lights to be located as follows: 
Corner of Maple and Harvard streets, in place of an electric light peti- 
tioned for by William Smith, ct (lis-.; corner of Somerville and Wilson 
streets, in place of an electric light petitioned fqr by Maurice J. Bod- 
kin, rt (lis. 

September 27, 1905. 



An Order to build a certain Sewer in Concord Street from Weston 
Street to Hubbard Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commencing 
at the sewer line of Weston street and thence in a westerlj- direction 
to the sewer line of Hubbard street in Concord street in said citj-; 
and the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

September 27, 1905. 



An Order to build a certain Sewer in Elm East Back Street from 
Blodget South Back Street to Brook Street. 

OrOnrd, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commencing 
at the sewer line of Blodget south back street and thence in a south- 
erly direction to the sewer line of Brook street in Elm east back 
street; and the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for 
new sewers. 

Passed September 27, 1905. 



An Order to build a certain Sewer in Joliette Street from Kelley 
Street 370 feet northerly. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby -authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commencing 
at the sewer line of Kelley street and thence in a northerly direction 
three hundred and seventy (370) feet in Joliette street, in said city; 
and the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new sew- 
ers. 

Passed September 27, 1905. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 577 

An Order to build a certain Sewer in Wilson street from Clay Street 

to Dix Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and i)ark commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commencing 
at the sewer line of Clay street and thence in a southerly direction 
to the sewer line of Dix street in Wilson street in said city; and the 
expense thereof be charged to the approijriation for new sewers. 

Passed September 27, 1905. 



An Order to build a certain Sewer in Maple Street from Prospect 
' Street to Harrison Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commencing 
at the sewer line of Prosjiect street and thence in a northerly 'direc- 
tion to the sewer line of Harrison street in Maple street in said city; 
and the expense thereof be charged to the approjiriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed October 19, 1905. 



An Order to build a certain Sewer in Thajer Street from River Road 
to Everett Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commencing 
at the sewer line of River road and thence in an easterly direction to 
the sewer line of Everett street in Thayer street in said city; and the 
expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed October 19, 1905. 



An Order to erect Three Electric Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is hereby 
authorized to erect three electric lights with proper fixtures for main- 
taining same; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for lighting streets, said lights to be located as follows: Corner of 
Pearl and Ash streets, as petitioned for by Leslie M. Folsom; corner 
of Green and Wilson streets, as petitioned for by Adelard Dumont, 
ft (il<i.; on Elm street above Carjienter street, as petitioned for by O. H. 
Johnson, ef alfi. 

Passed December 5, 1905. 



678 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An OrdEiR to build a certain Sewer in Dix Street from Wilson Street 

to Hall Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commencing at 
the sewer line of Wilson street and thence in an easterly direction to 
the sewer line of Hall street in Dix street in said city; and the expense 
thereof be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed September 27, 1905. 



An Obdeb to build an Exercise Wagon for the use of Hose.Xo. 3 at the 
South Manchester Hose House. 

Ordered, That the major and standing committee on fire department 
be and are hereby authorized to purchase an exercise wagon for the 
use of Hose Companj^ No. 3, located at the South i[anchester hose 
house; said wagon to be built in the city of Manchester upon specifica- 
tions to be furnished by the mayor and said committee; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the apj)ropriation for fire department. 

Passed September 27, 1905. 



Ax Order to erect Two Fire- Alarm Boxes. 

Ordered, That the committee on fire department be and is hereby 
authorized and empowered to install two fire-alarm boxes with proper 
fixtures for operating the same; the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for fire department, said boxes to be located as fol- 
lows: Junction of Hancock street and Boston & Maine Railroad track, 
as petitioned for by W. H. McElwain Company, et aJs.; corner of Elm 
and Carpenter streets, as petitioned for by George D. Towne, et als. 

Passed October 19, 1905. 



An Order to build a certain Sewer in Oakland Avenue from Eevere 
Avenue to Woodland Avenue. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commencing 
at the sewer line of Revere avenue and thence in an easterlj' direction 
to the sewer line of Woodland avenue in Oakland avenue; and the ex- 
pense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed December 13, 1905. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 579 

An Order to build a certain Sewer in Oakland Avenue from Mammoth 
Eoad to Eevere Avenue. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and are 
hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commencing 
at the sewer line of Mammoth road and thence in an easterly direction 
to the sewer line of Revere avenue in Oakland avenue in said city; 
and the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed December 13, 1905. 



An OrdEiR to erect Three Welsbach Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is hereby 
authorized to erect three Welsbach lights with proper fixtures for 
maintaining same; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for lighting streets, said lights to be located as follows: On Can- 
dia road, west of the Londonderry turnpike, as petitioned for by James 
Benson, et als.; corner of Mammoth road and Oakland avenue in place 
of an electric light petitioned for by Albert W. Palmer, et als.; south- 
west corner of Bay street and the premises occupied by William S. 
Plumer, in place of an electric light at the corner of Carpenter and 
Bay streets, as petitioned for by William S. Pluiuer, et rils. 

Passed December 13, 1905. 



An Order to erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is hereby 
authorized to erect an electric light with proper fixtures for main- 
taining same; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for lighting streets, said light to be located as follows: Corner of 
Amoskeag and First streets, as petitioned for by Harry P. Eay, ct als. 

Passed December 13, 1905. 



An Ordinance in amendment of Sections 21 and 22 of Chapter G of 
the Laws and Ordinances of the City of Manchester, relating to the 
Pay of Ward Officers at the Ward 5 Special Election. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That for the purpose of this ordinance, sections 21 and 
22 of chapter 6 of the Laws and Ordinances of the city of Manchester, 
as amended December 1, 1896, be amended so that the moderator, 



580 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

selectmen, ward clerk, and ballot inspectors of said ward in said city 
shall each, receive for his services at the special election holden in said 
ward on the eleventh day of October, 1904, in addition to his respec- 
tive salary as such ward officer, the sum of five dollars. 
Sectt. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained January 2, 1905. 



An Ordinance changing the Names of Certain Streets. 

Be it ordaUicd by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 
in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. That the names of certain streets in said city be changed 
as follows: Beauport street in McGregorville, from Conant street to 
Coolidge avenue, to Notre Dame avenue. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained January 2, 1905. 



INDEX. 



INDEX. 



A 

Page 

Abatement of taxes - 145 

Address, Maj'or's inaugural 23 

Amoskeag cemetery 120 

Appropriations for 1905 by ciiy council 117 

Appendix, school 2S4 

Assessor's department 55 

Assets, statement and inventory of ITS 

Auditor, city, report of 31 

Auditor's department 57 

B 

Band concerts 144 

Board of water commissioners, organization of 202 

report of 204 

liealth, report of 241 

Bonded debt, tabular statement of 169 

annual interest cKarge 172 

Books and stationery 124 

Bridg-es 75 



c 

Care of schoolrooms 129 

Chandler schoolhouse 110 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax 160 

City auditor's department 57 

auditor's report 31 

engineer, report of 437 

farm 139 

hall 43 

library 94 

library, report of trustees of 413 

treasurer's report 417 

librarian's report 422 

donations to 428 



583 



584 iNDE?;. 

Page 

City officers' salaries 5."! 

officials, list of 3, 20 

solicitor, report of 541 

teams Tfi 

treasurer's report ?,l 

Commons S2 

Concreting Manchester street 72 

Contingent expenses 127 

County tax 140 

D 

Debt, paj-ment of funded 40 

bonded, statement of 169 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 144 

Derryfield and Stark parks 83, S4 

Dry closet system 129 

E 

East Side park SB 

Electric lights, location of 1S5 

Elliot Hospital 146 

Engineer's department SS 

Evening schools 130 

school, mechanical drawing 131 

Exempted from tax. property 160 

Expenses, incidental 46 

mayor's oS 

contingent 127 

F 

Farm, paupers off 134 

city 139 

File and index system 143 

Fires, list of 326 

Fire department 96. 

report of chief engineer 309 

value of personal property 3.")2 

names and residences of members 360 

location of fire-alarm boxes 315 

Fire-alarm telegraph 101 

Free text-books 132 

Fuel 126 

Furniture and supplies 124 



INDEX. 585 
G 

Page 

Gas lights, location of 19§ 

Grading- for concrete 'i'O 

Graduates high school 2!)7 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 1^4 

H 

Health department fiO 

board of, report of 241 

inspectors of, report of 253, 255 

Highways, new 62 

land taken for 65 

watering 65 

paving 66 

macadamizing 68 

grading for concrete on 70 

sweeping T4 

lighting 87 

repairs of 59 

Home, Women's Aid 147 

Hospital, Elliot, free beds 14G 

Sacred Heart 147 

Notre Dame de Lourdes 146 

Hydrant service 102 

I 

Incidental expenses 46 

Indigent soldiers 143 

Inspector of buildings, report of 523 

Interest 40 

annual charge, bonded debt 172 

Inventory of assets 178 

Infant Asj-lum 146 

L 

Land taken for highways 65 

Laws relating to exemjitions 159 

Legal points and rules relating to claims against the city 179 

Lighting streets 87 

Library, city ; 94 

Lafayette park 85 



586 INDEX. 



M 



Page 

^lacadainizing streets 68 

Cedar street TO 

Massabesic street 'TO 

Manchester Historical Society 147 

Manual training 134 

Mayor's incidentals 58 

]\IcGregorville plaj^ground S7 

Mercy Home 147 

Merrill yard 120 

Militia 144 

Money unappropriated 41 

Municipal receipts and expenditures 35 

N 

Xew highways 62 

North End playground 86 



Order to purchase horses for fire department 570 

exercise wagon 569 

to build certain sewers 572, 573, 574, 575, 576, 577, 578,579 

to repair public buildings 570 

to purchase hay, etc., for fire department 570 

to build new schoolhouse 573 

in relation to decoration of soldiers' graves 571 

to erect electric and Welsbach lights 

569, 570, 572, 573, 575, 57f), 577, 579 

relating to band concerts 571 

relating to claims against city 570 

to print city report 569 

to purchase hose 574 

to erect fire-alarm boxes 571, 572, 57S 

relating to Derryfield records 574 

installing storage batter3' 574 

to build an exercise wagon 57? 

Ordinance amending chapter 6 57i 

changing names of streets 580 

Overseers of the poor, report of 55:? 

Oil lamps, location of 197 



INDEX. 



587 



Page 

Parks, Derryfield and Stark 83, 84 

Parsonages, valuation of, exempt from taxation 160 

Paupers off the farm 134 

Paving streets 00 

Elm street 07 

Payment of funded debt 40 

Pine Grove cemetery ] 1 .5 

Plumbing- examiners, report of 467 

expenses 143 

Police department, station 102 

court 104 

commission 105 

Printing and stationery 44 

and advertising 123 

Property account, real and personal 177 

Prout Park So 

Purchase of land sold for taxes 145 



Eepairs of schoolhouses 121 

of buildings 107 

of highways 59 

Revision of ordinances 140 

Resolution relating to pay of clerk of board of assessors 560 

sale of city farm 502, 503, 564, 506,567 

Children's Home 502 

refunding bonds 550 

interest on deposits 505 

land sold for taxes • 565 

obstructions on Willow street 567 

exemption from taxation 508 

Hanover spring water 568 

recommending appropriation for snow rollers 502 

recommending Saturday afternoon holidays 566 

recommending appropriation for ward room, ward 

10 560 

requesting Street Eailway to sprinkle streets 566 

relating to printing Derryfield records 561 

relating to bond of tax collector 561 

transferring money 557 

raising money and making appropriations for 1905 147 

making temporary loan 500 



588 INDEX. 

Page 

lit'port of Jioiyd of Watei* Coininissioiiers 204 

Superintendent of Water-Works 205 

City Engineer 437 

City Farm 531 

City Physician 545 

Cliief Engineer Fire Department 309 

Trustees of City Library 413 

Sub-Trustees of Valley Cemetery 509 

I'ine Grove Cemetery 507 

Amoskeag Cemetery 509 

Treasurer of Cemeteries 511 

Treasurer of Sinking Fund 523 

Overseers of the Poor 553 

Street and Park Commission 371 

Committee on Sewers and Drains 466 

Committee on Streets 465 

City Solicitor 541 

School Superintendent 263 

Board of Health 241 

City Auditor 31 

City Treasurer 31 

lieal and personal estate owned by the city 173, 177 

Rules, etc., relating to bills against the city (auditor's dejit.) . . 179 

Eeceipts and expenditures, 1905 35 

Piddle playground 87 

fund 121 

s 

Sacred Heart Hospital 147 

Salaries of city officials 53 

Salaries, teachers' 132 

Scavenger service 72 

School department, organization of 261, 298 

superintendent's report *..... 263 

Schoolhouses, repairs of 121 

Sewers, repairs of 79 

new SO 

Sewing material^ 126 

Sinking fund 40 

treasurer's report 523 

Snow and ice 63 

Snow rollers 64 

Soldiers, indigent 14r! 

South ^lanchester playground SO 



INDEX. 589 

Page 

Stark and Derryfielil parks S."?, S4 

Statement of bonded debt 1^'!^ 

State tax 1^-^ 

Street and park commission y* 

report of o71 

Street sweeping ^4 



Tabular statement of taxation by board of assessors 153 

Taxes, abatement of 1-^5 

due and uncollected 15S 

Tax, state ^-^i 

county 1^*^ 

valuations 1-^6 

Taxation, appropriations for 1905 147 

settlement of account tax collector 156 

Teachers, list of ^^9 

Teachers' salaries '^•'>~ 

Teams, city ' *i 

Temporary loan "*- 

Text-books, free ^■''~ 

Training, manual ^ ^'^ 

Treasurer, city, report of -"'1 



V 

Valley cemetery "US 

Valuation and taxes, 1905 1 '>5 

Veto message ^'0 



w 

Watering streets ''•> 

Water-works, superintendent's report -05 

commissioners' report 204 

expenses HI 

Women's Aid Home 1 '~