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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

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SIXTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

EECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF MANCHESTER 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1909 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER AMUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO 
THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




MAXCHESTEll, X. H. 

PRINTED BY THE JOHN B. CLARKE CO. 



N 

15-09 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT,1909 



Mayor. 

EUGENP: K. reed office, City Hall 

Chosen at biennial election in November. 1908. Salary, $3,000 per 
annum, payable monthly. (Act of June, 1848, section 1. Chapter 223, 
Laws of 1883. Chapter 203, Laws of 1907. Public Statutes, chapter 47.) 

Maj'or's Clerk and Stenographer. — Susie E. Wason, 310 Hanover St. 



Ward 


]. 


Ward 


2. 


Ward 


3. 


Ward 


4. 


Ward 


5. 


Ward 


(i. 


Ward 


7. 


Ward 


8. 


AVard 


9. 


Ward 


10. 



Aldermen. 

Ernest W. Wiesner, 19 Market street. 
Joseph H. Geisel, 225 Ash street. 
Fred 0. Parnell, 327 Orange street. 
Maurice L. Hoitt, 394 Hanover street. 
Richard J. Barry, 232 Lake avenue. 
Andrew B. Bunton, 311 Lake avenue. 
Herbert A. Sails, 12 West Merrimack street. 
James E. MacDonald, 154 Mast street. 
Arthur J. Provost, 516 Notre Dame avenue. 
Peter J. Charron, 615 Harvard street. 

Salary $3 per meeting, amount not to exceed $200 annuallj'. 



Board of Common Council, 1909. 

James B. Fitch, President, 735 Chestnut street. 

Ward 1. 

Charles W. Richards, 36 Stark street. 
Patrick B. Maloney, 31 Mechanic street. 
William A. Burlingame, 30 Stark street. 

W^AKD 2. 

James B. Fitch, 735 Chestnut street. 
Alfred K. Hobbs, 29 Appleton street. 
Philip F. (irenier, 948 Union street. 



MA^'CttESTEK CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Wakd 3. 

Amedee G. Ledoux, 22 Jane street. 
Gustave A. Bergquist, 13 Jane street. 
"Willie F. Bean, 333 Bridge street. 

Ward 4. 

Hertel Parisean, 318 Hanover street. 

Charles F. Hill, 388 Laurel street. 

George H. Hammond, 3-10 Manchester street. 

Ward ;". 

;Mederlc P. Pepin, 206 Grove street. 
John J. Berry, 109 Spruce street. 
Patrick J. Horan, 282 Summer street. 

Ward n. 

Henrj' H. McKelvie, 314 Central street. • 
Charles G. Hastings, 581 Lake avenue. 
Joseph [Mcrisseau,* 221 Spruce street. 
George M. Goodwin.t 453 Central street. 

Ward T. 

Frank R. Vose, 35 West ]\Ierriniack street. 
Ralph S. Nelson, 32 Market street. 
Robert Leggett, 8 West Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. 

George Q. Caldwell, 684 Mast street. 
Gustav F. Wenzel, 154 Second street. 
Frederick Lange, 23 Bo^ynton street. 

Ward <). 

John E. Hering, 589 Main street. 
Arthur T. Beaumier, 30 Putnam street. 
Alfred E. Demers, 150 Amor^- street. 

Ward 10. 

Thomas J. :\IcDon()Ugh. 37 Westlaiid avcnii(>. 
Alfred Cormier,* 420 Harvard street. 
John J. Connor, 47 Elm street. 
Christopher G. Marr,t 455 Shasta streel. 
No salary-. 

* Unseated by Council October 25, 190i). 
t Seated by Council October 25, in09. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 5 

Clerk of the Common Council. 

Harry W. Si^aulding-, 384 Kawt Iliyh street. 

Salary, $100. (General Law.s, chapter 46, sectious 7-9. City Laws 
and Ordinances, page 33, chapter (5, section 11.) 



City Clerk. 
Edward C. Smith OfHcc, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350 and fees. (Laws, 1890, chapter 6.) Chosen in January, 
biennially, by board of aldermen. Kesidence, 900 Union street. Also 
clerk of all committees of the board of aldermen; salary, $200. 



City Clerk's Clerks. 

Eva G. Jones City Clerk's Office, City Hall 

Miranda M. Therrien. •. City Clerk's Office, City Hall 



City Auditor. 

James E. Dodge Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,350. Appointed by mayor and approved by board of 
aldermen in Januai-y, biennially. (Laws of 1889. chapter 287. City 
Ordinances, pages 44, 71, 83-88, 173.) Eesidence, Eiver road north. 



Auditor's Clerk. 
Lizzie M. Cogswell Auditor's Office, City Hall 



City Treasurer. 

Fred L. Allen Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,500. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(Act of Januarj-, 1897, chapter 198.) Eesidence, 33 Walnut street. 



Treasurer's Clerk. 
Mabel L. How Treasurer's Office, City Hall 



6 MANCHESTEPw CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salary', $1,500, and fees. Elected by mayor and aldermen before May 
1, biennially. (Act of July. 1851. Act of Jtme, 1859, section 6. Act 
of 1S97, chapter 198. Public Statutes, chapter 43. City Laws and 
Ordinances, chapter 33.) Residence, 740 Chestnut street. 



Deputy Collectors of Taxes. 

Edwin C. Paul Collector's Office, City Hall 

Abraham S. Rich Collector's Office, City Hall 

Denis Yigneault Collector's Office, City Hall 

Salary, $800. Appointed by tax collector with approval of mayor 
and aldermen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 33, section 3.) 



City Solicitor. 

John T. Nixon Office, Pattens Block 

Salary, $800. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(Act of 1897, chapter 198.) Residence, 385 Lake avenue. 



City Messenger. 

James R. Ferson Office, Citj-^ Hall 

Salary, $850. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, G.) 



Board of Aldermen. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Accounts. — Wiesner, Charron, Biinton. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Barry, Sails, Provost. 

On City Farm. — Hoitt, MacDonald, Bunton. 

On Claims. — Charron, Geisel, Provost. 

On Cemeteries. — Bunton, Parnell, MacDonald. Hoitt. Wiesner. 

On Enrollment. — Wiesner, Sails, Geisel. 

On Finance. — Mayor, Geisel, MacDonald. 

On Fire Department. — Barry, Parnell, Hoitt. 

On Lands and Buildings.— ^lacBonald, Bunton, Charron. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. i 

On Licenses. — Sails, Provost, Hoitt. 

On Lif/hting Streets. — Geisel, Barry, Parnell. 

On Military Affairs. — Bunton, Provost, Sails. 

On Public Health. — Geisel, MacDonald, Wiesiier. 

On Setting Trees. — Charron, Parnell, Hoitt. 

On Setcers and Drains. — Parnell, Barry, Charron. 

On Streets. — Provost, Wiesner, Sails. 

Member first named is chairman of respective committee. 
Clerk of Committees (except Committees on Streets, Sewers, and 
Cemeteries), Edward C. Smith. Salary, $200 annuallj'. 

Clerk of Committees on Streets and Sewers, Samuel J. Lord. 



Board of Common Council. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



No. 1. On Central Department, Auditor's, Engineer's, and Department 
of Taxes. — Messrs. Connor, Hobbs, Bean, Burlingame, and Demers. 

No. 2. On Street and Sewer Department. — Messrs. Leggett, Maloney, 
Grenier, Berry, and Hering. 

No. 3. On School Department. — Messrs. Hobbs, Burlingame, Hastings. 
McDonough, and Fitch. 

No. 4- On Fire Department and Hydrant Seniee. — ^Messrs. Wenzel, 
Hammond, McKelvie, Vose, and Lange. 

No. 5. On Public Buildings and Public Places. — Messrs. Beaumier, 
Hill, Pariseau, Horan, and Nelson. 

No. 6. On Health, Police Department, Public Library, Patriotic, Char- 
itable, and Philanthropic Department. — Messrs. Pariseau, Nelson, Berg- 
quist, Morisseau, Goodwin, and Leggett. 

No. 7. On Lighting Streets. — Messrs. Richards, Ledoux, Pepin, Cald- 
well, Cormier, and Marr. 

(Member first named is chairman of respective committee.) 



Committee on Finance. 

President of the Common Council, James B. Fitch, chairman, e.v 
officio, and the chairman of the different committees named above: 
Messrs. Connor, Leggett, Hobbs, Wenzel, Beaumier, Pariseau, and 
Eichards. 



Committee on Enrollment. 

Ml-. McKelvie, chairman. Messrs. Bean and ilcDonoueh. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



City Physician. 

John C. O'Connor, M. D Residence, G8 Walnut St. 

Office, 12 Cilley Building 

Salary, $900. Elected by board of aldermen in January, biennially. 
(Act of 1897, chapter 198. City Ordinances, chapter 9, sections 29, 30.) 



Chief Engineer. 

Samuel J. Lord.... Office, City Hall 

Salary, $2,200. Chosen by board of aldermen in April, term six 
years. (Chapter 250, Laws "of 1907.) 

engineer's assistants. 

Harrie M. Young. Henry A. Worthen. 

George M. Wales. Alfred T. Dodge. 

Harold C. McAllister. Lawrence O'Connor. 

Glen B. Eastman. 

STENOGRAPIIEE. 

John J. McAllister, Jr. 



Water Commissioners. 

(Chapter 70, Laws of 1871. City Ordinances, chapter 36, and Laws of 
1891, chapter 26, page 319, act approved March 31, 1891. Chapter 183, 
Laws of 1893.) One commissioner elected annually by mayor and 
aldermen, in the month of September, for a term of six years. Office 
at court house, corner Franklin and West Merrimack streets. Tele- 
phone at office and at pumping station. 

The Mayor, ex officio. , 

Charles H. Manning, chairman. Term expires .Tanuary, 1913. 

William Corey. Term expires January, 1911. 

Edgar J. Knowlton. Term expires January, 1910. 

Charles ^L Floyd. Term expires January, 1914. 

Perry H. Dow. Term expires January, 1915. 

Robert E. McKean. Term expires January, 1912. 



Superintendent of Water-Works. 

Charles K. Walker Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $2,400. Chosen by water "Commissioners annually. Resi- 
dence, 68 South Main street, West Manchester. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 9 

Clerk of Water- Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns....: Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $1,800. Chosen bj' water eommissioners annually. 



Engineer at Old Pumping Station. 

Jerome J. Lovering. Salary, $700, rent, fuel and use of land. 



Engineer at New Pumping Station. 
C. A. Whitnej^ $2.50 per day, rent, and fuel. 



Justice of the Police Court. 

Isaac L. Heath, court room at iiolice station, corner Manchester and 
Chestnut streets. 

Salary, $1,500. Appointed by the governor with the advice of the 
council. (General Laws, chapter 215; chapter 163, sections 17, 18. 19, 
of the Laws of 1878, as amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1881. Pub- 
lic Statutes, chapter 211.) 



Associate Justice of the Police Court. 

Harry E. Loveren. Salary, $300 per annum. 

Appointed by the governor with the advice of the coimcil. (Chapter 
215, General Laws, section 2-14. Public Statutes, chapter 211. Chap- 
ter 296, Laws of 1893.) 



Clerk of the Police Court. 

John C. Bickford. Salary, $G00. 

Appointed by the justice of the police court. (Chapter 163, sections 
17-19, General Laws, amended by chapter 236. Laws of 1881. Public 
Statutes, chapter 211.) Residence, 1,5 Ash street. 



10 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Police. 



The members of the police are appointed by the police commission- 
ers, and hold their commissions during- good behavior. They are. by 
virtue of their appointment, constables and conservators of the peace, 
and their jurisdiction extends throughout the city. (Chapter 253, sec- 
tion 5, General Laws; chapter ;]03, Laws of 1887; chapter 202, Laws 
of 1893.) Police station at the corner of Chestnut and ^lanchester 
streets. 



Police Commissioners. 

See chapter 202, Laws of 1893. 

Noah S. Clark, clerk. Term expires January. 1910. 

Peter A. Farrell. Term expires January, 1914. 

Edward B. Woodbury, chairman. Term expires January, 191: 



Chief of Police. 

Michael J. Healy Office at I'olice wStation 

Salary, $2,500. Eesidence, 304 Central street. Telephone at house 
and office. 



Deputy Chief of Police. 

John F. Cassidy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $1,500. Residence, 569 Hanover street. 



Captain of the Watch. 

Thomas E. Steele. Salary, $3.25 per day. Eesidence, 253 Walnut 
street. 



Sergeants. 



Peter Callaghan. Salary, $3.00 per day. Eesidence, 44 Falls road. 
John T. O'Dowd. Salary, $3.00 per day. Eesidence, 62 Webster 
street. 

John J. Lynch. Salary, $3.00 per day. Eesidence, 1436 Elm street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



11 



Inspector. 

Clifton B. Hildreth. Salary, $3.00 per day. Residence, 38G Walnut 
street. 



Patrolmen. 



Adler, Leonard J. 
Badger, John C. 
Bean, Randall W. 
Benoit, Aurel X. 
Berwin, J. Henry 
Brown, John G. 
Brown, Thomas F. 
Clement, Louis P. 
Connor, John J. 
Coolidge, Edgar L. 
Dunn, James F. 
Dustin, Frank J. 
Dwyer, R. Emmet 
Foye, William F. 
Graf, Oscar J. 
Griffin, John F. 
Hackett, James 
Hampston, James J. 
Healj', John D. 
Howe, John F. 
Kenney, George H. 
LoA'ejoj', George A. 
Mar den, Frank W. 
McGrath, Matthew F. 

Salarj', $2.60 per day. 



McQuade, Edward H. 
Moher, William 
Moore, Frank P. 
Moriarty, Mortimer J. 
O'Malley, John F. 
Pitman, J. Foster 
Potts, John 
Rainville, Frank 
Rlorden, George P. 
Robitaille, Albert C. 
Rourke, Martin W. 
Russell, Albert 
Shea, Jeffrey 
Sheehy, Patrick 
Smith, John F, 
Smith, Roswell J. 
Somers, Elmer E. 
Sullivan, Florrence 
Sweeney, James 
Tibbetts, Frank E. 
Welch, John J. 
Welch, John T. 
Whalen, Michael J. 
Wood, Charles L, 



Janitor of Station. 

Frank P. Wiggin. Salary, $2.00 per day. Residence, 136 Merrimack 
street. 



Miss A. B. 
mack street. 



Brown. Salary, 



Matron. 

$425 per annum. 



Residence, 228 Merri- 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



School Committee. 



Chosen at the biennial election in November, 1906; mayor and presi- 
dent of the common conncil members, e-P officio. The board of school 
committee choose the clerk of the board, the superintendent of public 
instruction, the truant officer, and the teachers in the public schools, 
and determine their salaries. They have charge of the repairs of 
schoolhouses, to a limited extent, and the purchase of free text- 
books and other supplies, and are limited by the appropriations of the 
citj^ councils. The salary of the committee is $10 each. 

Ward 1. 



Sumner W. Patten. 



Joseph W. Abbott. 



George M. Davis. 



Allan M. Wilson. 



Ward 3. 



Thomas Chalmers. 



Frank L. Downs. 



Ward 4. 



Edward P. Morrill. 



William A. Phinney, 



Ward 



Joseph P. Devine. 



John F. Lee. 



Ward 6. 



G. Waldo Browne. 



Harry L. Davis. 



Ward T. 



Edward B. Woodbury. 



Albert W. Thompson. 



Ward 8. 



Walter B. Mitchell. 



Frank A. Cadwell. 



Ward 9. 



Antoine M. Menard. 



Aime Martel. 



Ward 10. 



Francis X. Lj^ons. 



John II. Rice. 



Eugene E. Reed, ex officio, chairman. 
William P. Straw, ex officio. 
Edward B. Woodburj', vice-chairman. 
Harry L. Davis, clerk. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 13 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Charles W. Bickford Office, City Hall 

Salary, $2,300. 



Superintendent's Clerk. 

Fannie L. Sanborn Residence, 161 Hanover street 

Salary, $600. 



Truant Officer. 

Curtis W. Davis Office, City Hall 

Salary, $850 and allowance for horseliire. Residence, 849 Chestnnt 
street. 



Assessors. 

(Chapter 314, Laws of 1903.) Establishing- a board of three assessors. 
Board elected by the common council in December, 1904, one member 
for two years, one member for four years, and one member for six 
years, from January 1, 1905. Thereafter biennially in the month of 
January, beg-inning in 1907, the common council shall elect one mem- 
ber for six years. Salary, $1,500. 

George A. Clark. Term expires January, 1911. 
Joseph O. Tremblay. Term expires January, 1915. 
William P. Farmer. Term expires January, 1913. 

George A. Clark, chairman Office, City Hall 

CLERKS OF ASSESSORS. 

Arthur W. Rowell Office, City Hall 

Harry J. Briggs Office, City Hall 



Inspectors of Cliecl<- Lists. 

One in each ward chosen at the biennial election in November. 
Gpmpensation, $2.25 per day for each day actually employed. Office, 
City Hall. (Laws of 1878, chapter 163, sections 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 
14, 16, and City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) 



14 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Karl A. Klaubert. 
Charles B. Tucker. 
Arthur W. Howell. 
Frank V. Collins. 
Patrick Y. Magan. 
George A. Taylor. 
Lyman H. Burbank. 
Charles C. Tinkham. 
Albert Beaudet. 
Lawrence A. O'Connor. 



Charles C. Tinkham, chairman. 
Arthur W. Uowell. clerk. 



Ward 


1. 


Ward 


2. 


Ward 


3. 


^^'ard 


4. 


Ward 


5. 


Ward 


6. 


Ward 


7. 


Ward 


S. 


Ward 


0. 


Ward 


10. 



Overseers of the Poor. 

One in each ward, chosen at biennial election in November. The 
mayor is a member f.r officio. Compensation, $50 per annum, each; 
clerk of the board, $125 per annum, determined by City Ordinances, 
chapter 14; section 18. as amended by Ordinances of AugTist 5, 1890, 
and July 2, 1901. Meet third Wednesday of each month in City Hall 
building-. 

Michael Herbert, 2 Boyden street. 
Daniel G. Andrews, 777 Union street. 
Joseph L. Boudreau, 131 Orange street. 
Charles B. Clarkson, 413 Manchester street. 
Thomas F. Sheehan, 364 Beech street. 
John L. Wentworth, 345 Belmont street. 
William Marshall, 80 Amoskeag corporation. 
Eobert Werner, Jr., 140 Third street. 
Adelard Lambert, 209 Putnam street. 
Edward F. Tate, 77 South Elm street, 

luigene E. IJeed, ex officio. Othce, City Hall. 
Thomas C. Stewart, clerk. 



Ward 


1. 


Ward 


2. 


Ward 


3. 


Ward 


4. 


Ward 


5. 


Ward 


6. 


Ward 


7. 


Ward 


8. 


Ward 


9. 


Ward 


10. 



Boardlof Health. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 1885, 
chapter 165; Laws of 1S87, chapter 227; Public Statutes, chapters 108, 
109, 110.) One member appointed by the mayor in January of each 
year, to hold office for a term of three years. Salary, $200 each per 
annum. Office, Court House, West Merrimack, corner of Franklin 
street. 



LIST OF OFFICEKS. 15 

William K. Robbins. Term expires first Mondaj- in February, 1910. 

William J. Starr. Term expires first Monday in February, 1911. 

Giistave Lafontaine. Term expires first Monday in February, 1911. 

William B. Blake, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, Merri- 
mack, corner of Franklin street. 

John F. Looney, sanitary inspector. Office, Court House, Merri- 
mack, corner of Franklin street. 

Carl O. Seaman, plumbing- and milk inspector. Office, Court House, 
^lerrimack, corner Franklin street. 

M. Alma Fracker, office clerk. 

William J. Starr, president. 

William K. Robbins, clerk. 



Fire Department. 

The chief engineer and four assistant engineers are chosen bien- 
nially in the month of January, by a majority of the city councils in 
convention. The salary of the chief engineer is $1,500 per annum; 
the assistant engineers, each $250 per annum. They exercise the 
powers and perform the duties of firewards. The said engineers con- 
stitute the board of engineers, and elect a clerk whose compensation 
is $75 a 3'ear. The annual compensation of the call members of the 
several hook-and-ladder, hose, steam fire engine and chemical com- 
panies is as follows: Captains, each $165; lieutenants, each $160; 
clerks, each $160; call engineers, each $185; assistant engineers, each 
$155; all other members, each $150; payable in semiannual payments, 
on the first of January and July. (Laws of 1870, chapter 99. General 
Laws, chapter 106. City Ordinances, chapters 6 and 12.) Six mem- 
bers are permanently employed as engineers at $76.25 per month each, 
and twenty-one as drivers at $6S.33i/', per month each, other permanent 
men at $65 per month each, permanent captains, $75 per month each, 
and receive no compensation as call members. !Members and officers 
of each company are appointed by the board of engineers. 



Chief Engineer. 

Tlirjmas AV. Lane Office, Central Station, Vine street 

Residence, 1937 Elm street. Telephone at house and office. 

AS.SISTANT: ENGINEERS. 

Arthur Provost. Edwin W. Merrill. 

Thomas F. Fitzsimmons. George H. Hammond. 

Edwin W. Merrill, Clerk. 



16 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Trustees of City Library. 

(Law of 18r)4, chapter 15SS. See contract with :Manchester Athe- 
neum, jDrinted on pages 107 and 108 of City Eeport for fiscal year end- 
ing January 31, 1855.) Board of seven trustees, one cf whom is elected 
by aldermen and board of trustees in joint convention in September, 
annually. Term of service, seven years, no salary. Two additional 
trustees, mayor, and president of common council, ex officio. 

Frank P. Carpenter, Elm, corner West Xcrth street. Term expires 
October 1, 1916. 

Herman F. Straw, 607 Chestnut street. Term expires October 1, 
1914. 

Walter M. Parker, 1883 Elm street, corner of Webster. Term ex- 
pires October 1, 1913. 

Eoger G. Sullivan, 168 Walnut street. Term expires October 1, 1912. 

Henry W. Boutwell, 587 Union street. Term expires October 1, 1911. 

William P. Farmer, Candia Eoad. Term expires October 1, 1910. 

Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street. Term expires October 1, 1915. 

Eugene E. Eeed, ex officio. 

William P. Straw, ex officio. 

Edwin F. Jones, clerk. 



City Library. 

Franklin street, corner of Dean avenue. Open from 10 A. M. to 
p. M. Saturdays to 9 p. m. Sundays, 11 A. M. to 5 V. M. 



Librarian. 



F. Mabel Winchell, 593 Union street. Salary, $1,000 annually. 
Elected by the trustees of library. 



Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 

The board of aldermen, biennially, elect one member of said lioard 
for a term of six years. Not more than two members can be of the 
same political party. Said board, consisting of three members, has 
full chai-ge, management and control of the building, constructing, 
repairing, and maintaining of all the streets, hig-hways, lanes, side- 
walks, bridges, public sewers and drains, and public parks and com- 
mons. (See Laws of 1893, chapter 264.) Office, City Hall building. 
Open from 8 to 12 A. m., 2 to 5 p. M. ' Eegnlar meeting of the board 
at 2 o'clock p. M. each day. Salary of each member, except chief en- 
gineer, $600 per year, paj-able quarterly, and each is allowed $150 
annually for horsehire. 

William McElroy, chairman. Term expires April, 1912. 

Byron Worthen. Term expires April, 1914. 

Samuel J. Lord, chief engineer, clerk. Term expires April, 1913. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 17 

City Weigher. 

Gilbert Lyons. Office, city scales, Franklin street. 

Elected biennially in board of aldermen. Salary, $500 per annum; 
all fees for weighing returned monthly to city treasurer with sworn 
statement. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

J. N. DesGroseilliers, 78 Woodland avenue. 

Elected biennially in January by board of aldermen. Paid by fees. 
(Section 25, chapter 43, and chapter 125, Public Statutes.) 



Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39, sections 1, 2, 3, 4.) Two trustees 
elected by board of aldermen in January, annually, for the term of 
four years. Subtrustees appointed by board of trustees. 

J. Adam Graf, 10 Middle street. Term expires 1913. 
William H. Maxwell, 476 Front street. Term expires 1911. 
Charles P. Porter, 585 Belmont street. Term expires 1910. 
Clarence M. Edgerlj^ 232 Prospect street. Term expires 1910. 
Frank C. Livingston, 321 Orange street. Term expires 1913. 
Charles E. Stearns, 329 Front street. Term expires 1911. 
Edwin F. Jones, 15 High street. Term expires 1912. 
Harrie M. Young, 33 Button street. Term expires 1912. 
Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer, 33 Walnut street. 



Subtrustees of Cemeteries. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Alderman Fred 0. Parnell, chairman; Alderman Hoitt, Messrs. 
Frank C. Livingston, Clarence M. Edgerly, and Charles P. Porter. 

PINE GROVE CE.METERY. 

Alderman Andrew B. Bunton, chairman; Alderman MacDonald, 
Messrs. J. Adam Graf, Harrie M. Young, and Edwin F. Jones. 

AMOSKEAG CEiXIETERV. 

Alderman Ernest W. Wiesner, chairman; Messrs. Charles E. Stearns 
and William H. Maxwell. 



18 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

SUPERIXTE?v:DENT of pine grove CEiMETERY. 

John Erskine. Office and residence at the cemetery. 

SrPERIXTENDEXT OF VALLEY CEOIETERY. 

Eugene C. Smith. Office at the cemetery; residence, 272 Mast street. 

SI^PERINTENDENT OF AMOSKEAG CElUETERY. 

George C. Harwood. Eesidence, Amoskeag. 

TRUSTEES OF CE^IETERY FUND. 

Norwin S. Bean. Term expires January, 1910. 
Charles H. Anderson. Term expires January, 1915. 
Eugene E. Reed, ex officio. 
Fred L. Allen, treasurer. 



Inspector of Buildings. 

S. Andrew Sprague Office, City Hall 

Residence. 525 Lake avenue. Appointed by board of mayor and 
aldermen, biennially, in February. Salary, $1,350 per annum. (City 
Ordinances, chapter 15. Laws of 1883, chapter 94.) 



Inspectors of Oil. 

Harvey B. Sawyer, 149 Bowman street. 
Martin Moll, 45 Barr street. 

(Public Statutes, chapter 129, sections 25-34. City Ordinances, chap- 
ter 25.) Paid by fees, i/i of one per cent per gallon. 



Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 

William K. Eobbins, president. Term expires November 1, 1910. 

Samuel J. Lord, clerk, ex officio. 

Christian L. Wolf. Term expires November 1, 1911. 

Appointed by the mayor. 



Sinking Fund Commissioners. 



William McElroy, chairman. 

Fred L. Allen, clerk and treasurer. 

Charles H. Manning. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



19 



Moderators. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 31, sections 3, 9; chap- 
ter 36, section 9; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordinances, page 18. See 
Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Salary, $15.00, payable at expiration of term. 



Ward 


1. 


Daniel Mclntire. 


Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 


2. 

3. 

4. 
5. 


George F. Millar. 
George E. Prime. 
Henry B. Fairbanks. 
Martin E. Sullivan. 


Ward 
Ward 


6. 

7. 


Harry L. Davis. 
Herbert E. Richardson. 


Ward 


8. 


Eobert E. McKean. 


Ward 
Ward 


9. 
10. 


John Montplaisir. 
John A. Kane. 



Ward Clerks. 

Elected bienniall3\ (General Laws, chapter 44, sections 10, 12. City 
Ordinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Salary, $20.00, payable at expiration of term. 



Ward 


1. 


Wilfred B, Lemay. 


Ward 


2. 


Arthur L. Franks. 


Ward 


3. 


Waldo C. Masten. 


Ward 


4. 


Fred A. Hunkins. 


Ward 


5. 


John J. Eeddin. 


Ward 


6. 


Charles H. Martel. 


Ward 


7. 


Charles E. Bartlett. 


Ward 


8. 


James H. Brice. 


Ward 


9. 


George J. Nault. 


Ward 


10. 


Almon 0. Oviatt. 



Selectmen. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 1, section 27; chapter 
12, section 6; chapter 40, sections 2, 3; chapter 109, section 27; chapter 
213, section 1. City Ordinances, page IS. Public Statutes relating to 
towns and cities.) 

Salary, $15.00, payable at expiration of term. 

Ward 1. 



Moise Dion. 



Axel G. Sunderlund. 



John F. Murph3^ 



20 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Waed 2. 

Samuel W. Shepherd, James E. Mason. 

Arthur F. Williams. 

Wabb 3, 

Herman H. Lampron. Thorndike P. Heath. 

William F. Bruton. 

Ward 4. 

Charles W, Hagland. Herman B. Neal. 

Adolphe N. Paul. 



Philip Sullivan. William Martin. 

Michael J. O'Brien. 

W^ARD G. 

Alvin G. Bean. Thomas B. Craig. 

Arthur E. Desrosiers. 

Ward 7. 

William E. Cowie. John F. Frost. 

James M. Yuill. 

W^ARD 8. 

Oliver M, Blood. Edouard Sansoucie. 

Fred W. Hoffman. 

Ward 9. 

Zotique E. Lemire. John Brunner. 

Louis LeBlane. 

W^AED 10. 

Charles A. Childs. John McCarthy. 

Joseph Ledoux. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



FOURTH INAUGURAL ADDRESS OF HON. EUGENE 
E. REED, 1909 AND 1910. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

For the fourth and last time it is my pleasure and duty, as mayor, 
to call to your attention such matters as are likely to give occasion 
for consideration and action upon our part for the next two years. 
I say for the last time, because it is my desire that there shall be 
no uncertainty relative to my attitude toward another nomination 
or election to the office to which I have four times been elected by 
the voters of Manchester. 

In these daj^s there is a great deal of discussion of ways and means 
for better municipal government. We have economic clubs, good 
government associations, and studious writers upon municipal ques- 
tions. The keen scrutiny of honest, zealous, and, in many instances, 
accomplished and educated men, is turned upon the methods and 
results of the conduct of municipal affairs all over this country, 
and; if no' other results be obtained, it certainly is apparent that 
extravagance is discouraged and the desire for honest and econom- 
ical administration is promoted. One thing is certain, good muni- 
cipal government is the result not so much of theory, as the condi- 
tion of practical, honest effort in each particular case. We can all 
agree that the desirable result to obtain in Manchester, or any other 
city, is the largest privileges and the best possible service in the 
things which cities now undertake to provide for the people, at the 
lowest possible tax rate. In other words, poor streets, inadequate 
fire fighting, school and other facilities, purchased by a low tax 
rate, never ^vill, and ought never to, receive public approval in the 
city of Manchester, no more than expenditures for these purposes 
beyond our means will be tolerated. The problem of the municipal 
government is to establish a just ratio between a tax rate which can 
be borne by the taxpayers Avithout di.scouragement of business, and 
public works, facilities, and benefits, the greatest possible that can 
be obtained for the price we can afford to pay. 

My experience with the affairs of the city of Manchester for the 
last six years as mayor leads me to believe that the people have 
been very well satisfied Avith the average tax rate for that period, 
which has been slightly under two dollars on the one hundred. 
I am equally convinced that it will be found impossible to satisfy 
the reasonable demands of our citizens with an expenditure that will 
produce a rate less than this. 

23 



24 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Fixed expenses, such as payment into the sinking fund for liqili- 
dation of bonds and interest on the same, very materially impair 
our capacity to obtain the full measure and benefit of the money paid 
in taxes in public improvements. These bonds, the payment of 
which constitute so great an impairment of our means, are an heir- 
loom from former administrations bent upon having improvements, 
which, though desirable, were not obtainable except at the expense 
of a tax rate that could not escape hostile criticism. In their day 
they accomplished what they desired by placing a mortgage upon the 
future, which we are now paying. 

Assuming then that we must contrive to satisfy the people of 
Manchester, and let me say that this is my one ambition for the next 
two years, as I have no doubt it is yours, with such public w^orks 
and improvements as can be obtained at the price of the tax rate 
mentioned above, our work lies in a wise apportionment of the 
money to be raised by direct taxation among- the numerous and 
various needs of the city. We must neglect no important work, 
but, on the other hand, we must not give undue preferment to any 
particular branch of public work at the expense of anj^ other. 

Our motto for the next two years should be, "Keep within our 
means." 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

In the very near future we will be called upon to consider the 
annual budget, that is to say, we shall have to make up a statement 
of probable expenditures for the ensuing year. Among the large 
items in that budget will be one for the public schools of the city 
of Manchester. There is no danger of too frequently calling atten- 
tion, or too often urging the importance of the very best facilities, 
and the employment of the best means for the education of our 
children. We have a large school population, in excess of 5,000, and 
we are called upon to exercise the highest degree of care in provid- 
ing for their health and comfort. 

The terrible disaster in Collinwood, when so many lives were lost, 
sent its warning to us. Promptly acting upon it, during the last 
two years we have established alarm sj'stems and provided fire 
escapes, additional exits from the buildings, and, so far as w'e have 
been able, made use of all modern devices that have a tendency to 
guard against a similar catastrophe in Manchester. 

In the past two years we have practically completed the extension 
of modern sanitary devices in all the school buildings. 

The rapid increase in school population in East Manchester forced 
upon us the choice of building a new schoolhouse in that district or 
enlarging the Hallsville school. The latter plan was adopted after 
a careful studj' of the situation, and has proved the correct solution 
of the problem, both from a financial standpoint and from the 
standpoint of utility. At an expense of about $20,000 the building 
was enlarged one third. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 25 

This was accomplished without any detriment to the arcliitectural 
symmetry, and gives us a twelve-room building, ten of which are 
occupied, thus providing not only for the present but also for the 
immediate future. 

Last year the school appropriation arhounted to about $175,000.00. 
The expenditure of this money was in the hands of the school com- 
mittee, and without doubt the committee exercised their best judg- 
ment in its apportionment and use. From necessity, however, there 
is waste as the result of the division of responsibility among so large 
a' body performing administrative functions. Aside from the question 
of economical and well-considered expenditure of the school funds, 
there are many questions of highest importance pertaining to the 
administration of the public schools as educational institutions that 
might much better be in the hands of a smaller body of special 
training in educational work. A re-establishment of the school gov- 
ernment of Manchester upon such a basis would be highly desirable. 
I will offer no plan at this time, but the weakness in our school gov- 
ernment has been a subject of much discussion, and is fully recog- 
nized among the members of the board who have had the most 
experience. Some plan for a change in this respect should be formu- 
lated and presented to the legislature as an amendment to our char- 
ter. 

riEE DEPARTMETsT. 

The appropriation for the fire department is one of the largest 
and most important which you will be called upon to consider. Man- 
chester undertakes to accomj)lish its fire protection upon a scale of 
no mean dimensions, and one of the incidents is the maintenance of 
its paid force of fire fighters. We had- upon the payroll last year 
fifty-four permanent men and one hundred and thirty-two call men. 
It will be seen that this comprises a small army and it will at once 
be recognized that no matter to how great an expense we go in pro- 
viding apparatus and fire houses, unless this army be composed of 
efficient, able-bodied men, in good state of discipline, who enter 
rightly into the spirit of their work, the department will fall short, 
and inefficiency will be the result. It follows, then, that our first 
care should be to secure able and experienced men for the Board of 
Fire Engineers, for the selection of our fire fighters is in the hands 
of this bodj', whom it becomes the duty of the board of mayor and 
aldermen to elect. The whole department, when once selected, is 
subordinate to the chief engineer, and I venture to say that there is 
no position of authority within the gift of the Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen which nearlj^ approaches in point of responsibility and 
importance this office. Upon the good judgment and resolution of 
the man in charge may at any time depend the safety of the city, 
and the failure on his part to rise to the occasion, which may any 
day occur, may mean a disaster which in Manchester would be fatal. 



26 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

This being the case, I esteem it to be our duty to watch over the fire 
department with jealous care. Insubordination, lack of discipline 
or deterioration in membership should be signals which we should 
at once regard and radically and firmly treat without any considera- 
tion as to our personal friendship or political obligations. Efficiency 
in this department means everything, and efficiency is conditioned 
upon great watchfulness and energy upon the iiart of the chief. A 
frozen hydrant in the waj' of the firemen called upon to use it is a 
crime, or should be, and should admit of no excuse or extenuation, 
and should mean as summary a discharge for the responsible party 
as any neglect of duty would be punished in the case of an officer 
who by his carelessness endangers the safety of an army. 

Such failures as of a box to strike the right number, or an engine 
or hose to be out of repair, come in the category of accidents which 
should never happen, because they should be anticipated and avoided 
by ceaseless diligence in applying the tests to discover these condi- 
tions. At great expense and without stint we have provided fire 
fighting equipment and apparatus second to none, and this is because 
of the vital importance of the interests to be protected, the very 
life of the city. It costs in the vicinity of $10,000.00 per year for 
the repair of engine houses alone, and the extension of the service 
seems to be a demand without end. Each new company that is in- 
stalled costs approximately $6,000.00 per year, plus the expense of 
building the house, furnishing the apparatus, etc. All this being the 
case, it becomes the high duty of the Board of !Mayor and Aldermen 
to demand, and to see that the city of Manchester receives, in return 
for an expenditure of nearly one sixth of all the money raided by 
taxation (which is the annual cost of the fire department), nothing 
less than the highest possible proficiency and discipline. 

STREET AXD PARK COSfMISSIOX. 

For the last two years the work of the Street and Park Commission 
has claimed an appropriation of $175,000.00 each year, an increase of 
nearly $30,000.00 a year over former appropriations. This increased 
appropriation became necessary because of the fact that Manchester 
has so rapidl}' spread out with incident demand for new streets and 
sewers and xmusual occasion for the repairing of old streets. It does 
not seem likely that we will be able to reduce that appropriation 
this year. There is, perhaps, no department of work carried on by 
the city of Manchester that comes in for so much criticism as the 
maintenance of our streets. This, no doubt, is due to several causes, 
not the least of which is the inaccessibilitj- of the best material for 
road building and the character of the road bed of Manchester, 
which, in time of extended drouth, such as we have recently experi- 
enced, renders it well-nigh impossible to keep the streets in good 
condition. In addition to these conditions there has of late j^ears 
been much discussion in paper and magazine on the subject of good 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 27 

roads, how to build and maintain them, and their utility and economic 
value, all from a highly scientific standpoint. As a result the stand- 
ard has been perceptibly and generally raised among the people, 
and, furthermore, the general use of motor vehicles have subjected 
streets never built or intended for this class of heavy and destructive 
traffic to a test wlTich has revealed a general weakness in the con- 
struction of our streets which would not have been developed other- 
wise. 

New needs must be met and the requirement of better streets must 
be satisfied, but it cannot be done in one year. We must remember 
that the advancement in street building, as practiced in Manchester, 
has had the effect to disclose, by contrast, the defects in many 
miles of our streets not yet reconstructed. I believe that the methods 
employed in the construction of new work by the commission for 
the year just closed to be in the right direction, along improved and 
scientific lines. It may be reasonably expected that the result will 
soon become apparent and meet with the approval of the people. 
In the matter of superintendents of the streets, which, by the way, 
requires constant vigilance and should require a very high-class abil- 
ity, I believe that a great improvement could be made by consolidat- 
ing and centralizing the work and authority now exercised by three 
men of no particular training or ability, at an expense of $3,700.00, plus 
the maintenance of five horses, in the hands of one superintendent, who 
should be chosen solely for his fitness and qualifications. This work 
requires an expert, as well as an active and capable man. In my 
opinion, one man, and the right man, can do it better and more eco- 
nomically than three. 

The rapid growth of Manchester has brought us a new problem, 
growing out of the disposal of the garbage. The scavenger service 
last year cost in excess of $25,000.00, and, of course, must be expected 
to continue to make increased demands each year. The present 
method, which is entirely unsatisfactorj-, is to collect the garbage 
in teams, cart it to some remote gully or fill dump and cover it with 
sand. This is not only an expensive method, but is undoubtedly 
unsanitary. The best efforts to cover it up do not succeed in avoid- 
ing stench, which is a nuisance to inhabitants of the vicinity. The 
time is not far distant when new methods must be employed. 
Moved by this incentive, in company with the Honorable Street and 
Park Commissioners, plants in New York were inspected where gar- 
bage is now incinerated or reduced. 

As a result of our inspection, I am satisfied that to a large extent 
these plants are still in the experimental stage. They do the work, 
but at great expense and much waste of labor, having, as yet, no au- 
tomatic devices such as from necessity must eventually be employed. 
When a plant of sufficient capacity and improvement to care for our 
daily output of garbage can be installed for a sum within reason I 
should recommend its installation, notwithstanding the great cost 
of maintenance. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



COXSTABLES. 

In recent years many complaints have come to the maj'or's office 
of what seems to be a system of oppression growing out of the free 
and careless appointment of constables. 

This office, as I am informed, had utility in aVicient times, which 
has now largely passed away, so that at the present time the con- 
stables whom we appoint annually, without much inquiry or investi- 
gation, are now merely collectors attached directly or indirectly to 
some law office. They go about soliciting the collection of accounts, 
procure the issuance of writs and cause the indiscriminate use of 
the trustee process, much to the injury of many worthy people. This 
is a work that can and ought in large measure to be done by the 
deputy sheriffs, who have an office in the court house, who are under 
large bonds and closer surveillance, being directly subordinate and 
responsible to the high sheriff of the county, by whom thej^ are ap- 
pointed. I believe that if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen were to 
materially reduce the number of appointees and make it a condition 
of their appointment that they should occupy an office as the sheriffs 
do now, that the general public good would be promoted. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

It is not to be expected that the expense of maintaining the police 
department will vary much from the figures of last year, which 
were $61,000.00 Concerning this department, there appears to be no 
other matter for tis to consider than the size of the appropriation 
for its maintenance. Its administration is a matter entirely outside 
the city government, and, so far as that is concerned, outside the 
citizens as a whole. There is no occasion for the Police Commission 
to render a report, although required so to do by law. In any event 
the only information of their doings that they vouchsafe is to the 
effect that they have met, were all present, and adjourned, with the 
exception at infrequent intervals, when they report that they have 
approved the payroll. Thus it will be seen that there is no place in 
the inaugural of the mayor for recommendations. The department 
is well equipped with all the appliances it needs, and your only duty 
with reference to it will be to appropriate money enough to maintain 
it. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

The appropriation for the health department for the year 1908 
was $11,500.00, an increase of $1,500.00 over 1907 and doubtless a still 
larger appropriation will be required this year. The work of the 
Board of Health is second to none in importance, and the scientific 
advancement in the sanitation of Manchester should not be curtailed. 
Good progress has been made along these lines during the last two 
years, notably the adoption by the board of more stringent regula- 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



29 



tions for the distribution of milk and restrictions against the storage 
of rags and junk in any house, tenement, storehouse or basement 
within the compact part of the city. An ordinance forbidding- such 
storage of rags and junk has been passed by the Board of Mayor 
and Aldermen, at the request of the Board of Health. The Isolation 
Hospital, which was built in recent years and since enlarged, has in 
an emphatic way justified itself and has come to be an indispensable 
adjunct of sanitation. In the year 1907, 124 cases of diphtheria and 
12 cases of scarlet fever, making a total of 136 cases of contagious 
disease, were treated at this institution out of a total of 272 cases 
rejjorted; this being, as will be noted, just one half of the total num- 
ber of cases. In the year 1908 a total of 270 cases, out of 504 cases 
reported, were treated at this hospital. It will be perceived that 
there was a large increase in the work carried on by this institution, 
and its history indicates that a still further increase may be expected 
to follow. In the conduct of this institution one of the needs devel- 
oped is a couAalescent ward, and I would recommend that in making 
up the appropriation for this department provision be made for such 
an addition. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



The rapid growth in population of Manchester, coupled with the 
character of employment of most of the people of a manufacturing- 
city, such as we have become, has developed a function of govern- 
ment in the care of the poor which has grown from a matter formerly 
of small importance to one demanding much greater attention and 
certainly new methods. At the present time we provide necessaries 
of life to families in distress by means and through overseers of the 
poor elected biennially, one from each ward, and together they con- 
stitute a board for approving the bills of the members for such ex- 
penditures as each in his own ward sees fit to contract in that behalf. 
The following table indicates the course of the appropriation and ex- 
penditures during the last six years. 
Year 
1903 
1904 



1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 



Appropriation 

$10,000.00 
10,000.00 
11,000.00 
13,000.00 
14,447.46 
13,000.00 



Expenditures 

$11,339.83 
13,434.51 
13,479.63 
13,766.33 
16,716.16 
18,347.45 



It will readily be seen that a constantly increasing appropriation 
has been equally as constantly overdrawn. The method of procedure 
in this important expenditure of the city's funds is as follows: Each 
overseer of the poor provides, at his discretion, food, clothing or fuel 
to such as apply in his ward, and at the end of each month submits 
his bills for the approval of the board, which is given as a purely 
perfunctory matter, no one being charged, or having any authority 



30 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

to question, either the good faith or the advisabilitj' of the charity, 
or, in fact, any knowledge even of the actual delivery of the goods. 
It is obvious that this is charity without system or supervision. It 
throws wide open the doors for carelessness, inattention, and even 
fraud; not only that, but it places the unworthy and undeserving 
professional beggar in a position of advantage without check of any 
kind upon his actions, so that he may o^ierate Avithout detection 
through each ward of the city. That ^Manchester has outgrown this 
system seems not open to denial. The care of the worthj^ poor is 
deserving of every attention and much liberality. Aid should never 
be denied where it is realh' needed, and the dispensation of a charity 
of the proportions which this appropriation has now reached should 
be systematized and executed with the greatest care, tenderness, and 
attention. In place of ten men, each with a business of his own, at- 
tending to the needs of the poor as a merely casual performance 
for which he receives no adequate compensation, we should have one 
official with an office at city hall, properlj' equipped with records 
and necessarj^ data, who shall devote his entire time to careful, 
painstaking supervision of the expenditure of the appropriation, as 
well as the needs of the worthy poor. 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS. 

The necessary funds to meet the appropriations which you will be 
called upon to make are obtained by the city of Manchester from 
two principal sources, namelj', direct taxation of property within 
the city and our proportionate share of taxes assessed by the state 
on banks, railroads, and insurance companies. Last year, from the 
three latter sources, we received $140,792.37 and paid back as a state 
tax $78,100.00, leaving us a balance of $62,692.37. It has been apparent 
for some years that it would be necessary to curtail state expenses 
or increase the state tax. Eecognizing this fact, the last session of 
the legislature passed a bill authorizing the governor to appoint a 
commission "with a view of ascertaining whether the burdens of 
taxation can be equalized and additional sources of revenue dis- 
covered." One of the additional sources of revenue which this com- 
mission has discovered and which their report asks the legislature 
to adopt takes from the city of Manchester her proportionate share 
of the taxes of the public service corporations, which would amount 
to a net loss to us (based on last year's figures) of $62,692.37. Their 
report, covering six hundred and thirtj'-six pages in two volumes, 
has been placed in my hands and I have given it verj- careful atten- 
tion. It appears to be a thorough and exhaustive discussion of the 
subject of taxation, but however true it may be in theory or however 
correct may be its legal conclusions its practical effect is our only 
consideration. That effect is to doom Manchester to such an extent 
that it will be necessary to add approximately $0.17 on $100.00 to our 
future tax rates. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 31 

Before this report is enacted into law the whole matter should be 
thoroughly and carefidly discussed from the standpoint of its prac- 
tical effect. It is not merelj a matter of $60,000.00 next year or the 
year after, but it is a matter involving, as I understand it, a constant 
and growing discrimination against Manchester and perhaps some 
other cities and towns, which, once adopted, will be very difficult, 
if possible ever, to undo. It certainly deserves to be brought fully 
and completely in all its practical bearings before the Manchester 
delegation to the state legislature, and it behooves the taxpayers to 
see that it is. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

I present a financial statement, showing the liabilities of this great 
corporation January 1, 1909: 

Bonded indebtedness $1,665,000.00 

Sinking fund 642,064,11 

Gross cash on hand . . . : . 85,438.80 

Net cash on hand . . . . . 54,986.56 

IN CONCLUSION. 

Finally, gentlemen, permit me to say that you are entrusted with 
affairs of the utmost importance. The city of Manchester has stead- 
ily increased in population and material prosperity until it has be- 
come a city of the first class, expending annually approximately a 
million dollars, and carrying on works of government, education, and 
general public utility upon a large scale. In times past there has 
been a tendency to disparage the ability, sagacity and honesty of the 
citizens in local self-government, but there is coming a reversal of 
this feeling and there is a widespread sentiment that Manchester 
is capable of managing all of its local administration. It is for us to 
justify this sentiment. It can only be accomplished with a recogni- 
tion of the importanec and dignity of the trust confided to us, and 
painstaking, faithful and sustained efforts in behalf of 'good, clean 
government. This is not altogether a collective duty, but really an 
individual responsibility, and as individuals we will be judged. Let 
each one of us, then, give of his time, effort and energy, what we 
impliedly promised when we accepted our elections, and apply the 
same care, diligence, and painstaking effort that we exercise in our 
own private business affairs. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDTIOR. 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemew: — The auditor herewith submits to your honorable body 
his report, giving a tabular statement of the receipts and expendi- 
tures for the year 1909, and a detailed statement of the expenses of 
each appropriation during the year. 

Eespectfully, 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER FOR THE YEAR 
1909. 



Temporary loans: 

Merrimack Kiver Savings Bank $50,000.00 

Bond & Goodwin 50,000.00 

F. S. Moseley & Co 100,000.00 

Wm. A. Read & Co 50,000.00 

First National Bank 25,000.00 

E. C. Smith, city clerk: 

Dog licenses $1,419.92 

Sewer licenses 1,677.70 

Rent of tenements 798.16 

Show licenses 414.00 

Pool, bowling and shooting licenses 1,322.72 

Rent of city hall 6.00 

Junk dealers' licenses 225.00 

Lunch cart licenses 20.00 

Job team and hacking licenses 50.00 

Pawnbrokers' licenses 20.00 

Employment bureau 25.00 

Miscellaneous licenses 5.50 

Rent of city farm 595.00 

Fees, intention of marriage 701.00 

mortgages 140.92 

conditional sales 44.85 

35 



Dk. 



$275,000.00 



Solon A. Carter, state treasurer: 

lusiirance tax $:!,6G9.,")0 

Eailroad tax 50,24:5.23 

Savino-s bank tax 70.645.70 

Literary fund ;!.70().36 

New Hampshire state license c-onimiss^ion: 

Balance licenses. 1908 $2,819.40 

Licenses. 1909 51,123.49 



Interest on bank (lejjosits: 

Second National bank $1,639.15 

Georg-e E. ^hn-ril-J, collector 4S6.4() 

School departnieut: 

(". W. IVickford. superintendent, tuition $1,740.90 

U. L. Davis, clerk, text-books 194.77 



$7,643.42 



36 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Fees, corporations $+3.25 

miscellaneous records 48.75 

writs 22.20 

firms 9.75 

assignment of wages 19.20 

discharges 34.50 

Police department: 

M. J. Heal.v, fines and costs $1,167.21 

John r. Bickford. fees 1,107.87 

■ 2,275.08 

Pine Grove cemetery: 

John H. Erskine, superJTiteudent $7,333.37 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer 4,308.96 

■ 11.642.33 

Merrill Yard cemetery: 

John H. Er.skiue. siijierinteudcut 59.00 

Valley cemetery: 

Eug-ene C. Smith, siii)eriiiteudent $1,820.75 

Fred L. Allen, treasurer, sale of i)ath 15.00 



1,835. 



53,942.89 



City scales: 

Gilbert Lyons 344.20 

Water-works department : 

Charles K. Walker, superintendent 153.761.50 

Board of health: 

Milk licenses . $:!80.50 

Board of patients at Isolation hosi)ital 816.84 



REPORT OF THE CITV TREASURER. 37 

Street and Park commission: 

Manchester Street railway $:!,(iS'.).:!,"> 

Valley cemetery HO. 00 

Pine Grove cemetery 60.44 

Miscellaneous 1 ,847.44 

$:),ro7.2;; 

Sale of bonds: 

E. H. Rollins & Sons $50,000.00 

Premium 1,088.50 

51,088.50 

Miscellaneous receipts: 

S. J. Lord, plumbers' licenses $51.00 

Cloug-h & Parker, fire adjustment at Hig-h- 

land School 6.55 

J. L. Wentworth, board of Mrs. Heath at 

county farm 46.25 

103.80 

George E. Morrill, collector of taxes: 

Taxes, 1909 $708,298.96 

Taxes, 1908 54,395.78 

Redemption of land sold for taxes 3,635.05 

Redemption of land sold for taxes, nonresi- 
dent 79.94 

Abatement of taxes, 1908 list 286.51 

Abatement of taxes, 1909 list 1,145.62 

Land sold for taxes 3,432.46 

Land sold for taxes, nonresident 236.43 

Interest on taxes, 1908 1,699.72 

Cost on taxes, 1908 ' 807.00 

Cost on taxes, 1909 1,136.60 

Old taxes, 1903 6.30 

Old taxes, 1904 3.90 

Old taxes, 1905 21 .84 

Old taxes, 1906 30.37 

Old taxes, 1907 211.39 

775,427.87 

Receipts for the year $1,481,354.98 

Cash on hand January 1. 1909 85,438.80 

Unpaid bills December 31. 1909 30,839.85 



$1,597,633.63 



38 REPORT OF THE CITV AUDITOR. 

Cr. 

Total drafts $1,450,744.53 

Unpaid bills Januarj^ 1, 1909 30,452.24 

Cash on hand December 31, 1909 116,436.86 



$1,597,633.63 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRED L. ALLEN. 

City Treasurer. 
To the City Council of the City of Manchester: 

Gentlemen: — I have examined the accounts of Fred L. Allen, city 
treasurer, for the year ending December 31. 1909, and find proper 
vouchers for all payments and all receipts duly accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January 1, 1909, was $54,986.56 

Receipts during the year 1,481,354.98 

Total $1,536,341.54 

Amount of drafts during the .year $1,450,744.53 

ISfet amount of cash on hand December 31, 1909 85,597.01 



$1,536,341.54 



Cash taken December 31, 1909, I find to be as follows: 

Deposited in Second National Bank, Manchester. N. II.. $85,448.14 

Deposited in Second National Bank, Boston, Mass 25,341.97 

Deposited in office safe 5,646.75 



Gross amount of cash on hand December 31, 1909... $116,430.86 
Deduct amount of unpaid bills 30,839.85 



Net amount of cash on hand December 31, 1909..-.. $85,597.01 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER FOR THE 

YEAR 1909. 

Receipts. 

CEXTRAI. DErAKT>rENT. 

Received from: 

Direct city taxes $768,069.56 

Cost and interest on taxes .' 3,643.32 

$771,712.88 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 39 

Licenses to enter sewei- $1,677.70 

to keep dog- . . . *. 1,419.93 

to sell milk 380.50 

to keep billiard and pool tables, 

lunch carts, etc 1,668.22 

to shows and exhibitions 414.00 

Fees from citv clerk 1,064.43 

• $6,624.76 

Eents $294.16 

' SUNDRIES. 

Received from: 

City scales $344.20 

Tuition and free text-books 1,935.67 

Miscellaneous sources 6.55 

Board of health 816.84 

$3,103.26 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Received froin costs and fines $2,275.08 

PUBLIO PLACES. 

Received from: 

Pine Grove cemetery $11,642.33 

Valley cemetery 1,835.75 

Merrill cemetery 59.00 

• $13,537.08 

WATER-WORKS. 

Gross receipts $153,761.50 

CITY FARM, 

Received from city farm $1,105.00 

LIQUOR LICENSES. 

Received from state liquor commissioners for licenses.. $53,942.89 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Received from: 

Interest $2,125.61 

Land redeemed from tax sale 3,714.99 

Street and park commission, sale of pipe, 

stone, etc., and for labor 5,707.23 

Hillsborough county, board of pauper 46.25 

Plumbers' licenses 51.00 

• $11,645.08 

Total ordinary receipts during the year 1909 $1,018,001.69 



40 REPORT OF THE CITV AUDITOR. 

DEBT. 
Received from: 

Bonds sold $50,000.00 

Premium on bonds sold 1,088.50 

$51,088.50 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Received from loan in anticipation of tax of 1909 $275,000.00 

STATE. 

Received from: 

Insurance taxes $3,609.50 

Railroad taxes * 50,243.23 

Savings bank taxes 79,645.70 

Literary fund 3,706.36 

$137,264.79 

(Jross receipts $1,481,354.98 

Net cash on hand January 1, 1909 54,986.56 

$1,536,341.54 
Expenditures. 

CENTRAL department. 

Interest on water bonds ; $29,422.50 

on city bonds 35,366.50 

on cemetery bonds 2,500.00 

on temporary loans 5,256.51 

• $72,545.51 

City hall $4,241.84 

Printing- and stationery 2,356.04 

Incidental expenses 6,801.36 

Mayor's incidentals 275.00 

City officers' salaries 24,119.17 

Auditor's department 2,485.77 

Sinking- fund trustees 21,000.00 

Assessors' department .' 9.463.21 

Land sold for taxes 3,691.14 

$74,433.53 

Revision of ordinances $1,207.00 

strp:et and sewer department. 

Street and park commission $10,095.52 

Cleaning streets 14,393.15 

Repairs of higihways 35,523.27 

New highways 3,171.69 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



41 



Watering- streets $9,fio9.99 

Paving- streets 14,070.92 

Macadamizing streets 7,577.81 

Grading for concrete :^, 271. 34 

Scavenger service 22,729.10 

Lighting streets 63.10fi.09 

• Bridges , 6.S32.2.) 

Brown-tail and gypsy motli 5,347.16 

City teams 17,215.03 

Repairs of sewers 5,730.66 

New sewers 19,317.75 

Land taken for liighways 1,215.39 

City yard 5,248.51 

Paving Elm street 1,993.56 

Paving Notre Dame avenue 3,248.90 

Concreting Central street 2,757.02 

exgixeer's departmext. 
Engineer's department 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Health department 

SCHOOL DEPARTOEXT. 

Repairs of schoolhonses .$8,261.39 

Fuel 10,674.12 

Furniture and supplies 1,246.71 

Books and stationery 8.50 

Printing and advertising 461.30 

Contingent expenses 3,360.75 

Care of schoolrooms 8,725.68 

Evening schools 1,717.23 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 275.00 

Teachers' salaries 113,145.43 

Free text-books 7,125.29 

Manual training 598.14 

Cemetery wall, Yarney school 465.67 

Typewriters, high school 500.00 

Straw school kindergarten 294.01 

Piano, Bakersville school 180.00 

CITY LIBRARY. 

City library 



— $252,505.11 



.$7,896.74 



$17,285.31 



$157,0.39.22 



.$8,999.57 



42 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



FIRE DEPARTTMENT. 

Fire department $90,087,79 

Fire-alarm telegrapli 2,321.02 

Hydrant service 21,275.00 

$113,683.81 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Police station $2,669.62 

Police court 2,897.80 

Police commission 56,966.62 

$62,534.04 

PUBLIC BUILDIXGS. 

Eepairs of building's $9,499.87 

Board of examiners of plumbers 35.97 

Young-sville schoolhouse 9,000.00 

$18,535.84 

WATER-WORKS. 

Water-works $70,499.46 

Water-works sinking fund 26,275.00 

— • $102,774.46 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Commons $4,255.20 

Stark park 807.07 

Derryfield park 892.78 

Lafayette park 1,011.06 

Miscellaneous playgrounds 218.06 

Pine Grove cemetery 15.500.00 

Valley cemetery 0,231.25 

Amoskeag- cemetery 499.35 

Merrill cemetery 100.00 

■ $29,514.77 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Paupers off farm $15,375.32 

Indigent soldiers 290.50 

Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Elliot hospital 300.00 

Notre Dame de Lourdes ^hospital 300.00 

Sacred Heart hospital 300.00 

W. C. T. U. Mercy Home 300.00 

Infant asylum , 300.00 



INTEREST. 43 

St. Joseph's Orphanage $:!00.00 

Hospice St. Vincent cle Paul 300.00 

Orphanut St. Pierre ."JOO.OO 

Decoration of soldiers" graves 499.58 

Militia 1,050.00 

Band concerts 400.00 

Manchester Historical Society 600.00 

Animal Eescue League ?.00.00 

Boys' Club 200.00 

West Side reading- room 100.00 

■ $21,515.40 

ABATESIEIS'TS. 

Abatement of taxes $1,461.10 



Total of ordinary municipal expenditures $941,931.41 

TEMPORARY LOAIV. 

Temi^orary loan $275,000.00 

BOXDED DEBT. 

City bonds $50,000.00 

School bonds : 10,000.00 

$60,000.00 

STATE AXD COUNTY TAXES. 

State tax $124,960.00 

County tax 4S,S53.12 

• $173,813.12 

Grand total of expenditures during the year $1,450,744.53 

Cash on hand December 31, 1909 $116,436.86 

Less unpaid bills 30,839.85 



85,597.01 



$1,536,341.54 



Interest. 



Appropriation $44,000.00 

Transferred from water-works account 29,422.50 



$73,422.50 



44 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

Coupons on bridge bonds $2,404.00 

cemetery bonds 2.500.00 

city bonds 1 .200.00 

city funding 1 .767.50 

improvement bonds 10,240.00 

municij)al bonds 2,800.00 

refunding bonds 2,750.00 

refunding loan bonds ;i,G25.00 

school bonds 4,380.00 

Avater bonds 29,422.50 

Bond & Goodwin, discount on notes $1,193.15 

First National Bank, discount on notes 182.28 

F. S. Moseley & Co., discount on notes 1,917.83 

Wm. A. Read & Co., discount on notes 713.25 

Merrimack River Savings Bank, discount on 

notes 1.250.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



.$67,289.00 



$5,256.51 



$72,545.51 
876.99 



Payment of Funded Debt, 



Appropriation 

Received from sale of bonds. 



Expenditures. 



^Manchester city loan bonds. 
School bonds 



$10,000.00 
50.000.00 



^50,000.00 
10.000.00 



Sinking Fund. 



$73,422.50 



$60,000.00 



$60,000.00 



Appropriation 



$21,000.00 



E.XPEXDITURES. 



Trustees of sinking fund, 



$21,000.00 



UNAPPJ^OPEIATED MONEY. 

Unappropriated Money. 

TransfeiTed from tlie following iu'coimts: 

Interest $876.99 

Printing- and stationery 43.96 

Incidental expenses 198. C4 

Mayor's incidentals 2.").00 

Auditor's department 14.23 

Assessors' department 36.79 

Repairs of highways (),S21.00 

Scavenger service 2.270.90 

Bridges 1 .:;03.59 

Repairs of sewers .107.76 

Paving Elm street ."■).:)()(;. 44 

Paving Notre Dame aveiiiie ],7.")1.10 

Concreting Central street 242.98 

City yard 7.")1 .49 

Brown-tail and gypsy niotli (i93.18 

Commons 244.80 

Stark park 1 96.76 

Lafayette park 988.94 

Derryfield park 119.72 

Land taken for highways S4.61 

Lighting streets , . S9:!.91 

Engineers' department 10:i.26 

City library .43 

Eire department 1,:)12.21 

Fire-alarm telegraph 178.98 

Police commission 1 .033.38 

Police station 330.38 

Police court 2.20 

Repairs of buildings .13 

Valley cemetery 268.7.") 

Amoskeag cemetery .6.") 

P.ook-s and stationery 4 L.iO 

Fuel 1 .:!2.i.88 

Furniture and suj)])lies 2.')3.29 

Care of rooms 274.32 

Free text-books (i9.4S 

Manmil training 1 .86 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 2.'). 00 

Cemetery wall. Varney school 34.33 

Kindergarten. Straw school ."),"). 99 

Piano, Bakersville scliool 70.00 

Abatement of taxes .")38.90 

P.oard of examiners of plumbers 14.03 



46 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Decoration of soldiei's' graves $0.42 

Land sold for taxes 1,308.86 

Militia 200.00 

Indigent soldiers 9.50 



EXPEXDITURES, 

Transferred to the following accounts: 

City hall $41.84 

City officers' salaries 1,119.17 

Eevision of ordinances 107.00 

Street and park commission 2,095.52 

Cleaning streets 2,393.15 

New highway's 2,171.69 

Watering streets 1,655.99 

Paving streets 168.71 

Macadamizing streets 2,577.81 

Grading for concrete 1,261.34 

City teams 8,036.63 

New sewers 289.29 

Miscellaneous playgrounds 18.06 

Health department 285.31 

Eepairs of schoolhouses 261.39 

Printing and advertising 111.30 

Contingent expenses 160.75 

Evening schools 117.23 

Teachers' salaries 645.43 

Paupers off farm 3,375.32 

Grading around Highland school..... 6.58 

Free cash in treasury 4,127.01 



$31,026.52 



$31,026.52 



Temporary Loan. 

Receipts. 

Bond & Goodwin $50,000.00 

First National Bank 25,000.00 

Merrimack River Savings Bank 50,000.00 

F. S. Moseley & Co 100,000.00 

Wm. A. Read & Co 50,000.00 



$275,000.00 



CITY HALL. 47 

EXPEXDITURES. 

Bond & Goodwin $50,000.00 

First National Bank 25,000.00 

Merrimack River Savings Bank 50,000.00 

F. S. Moseley & Co 100,000.00 

Wm. A. Read & Co 50,000.00 

$275,000.00 



City Hall. 



Appropriation $4,200.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money... 41.84 



EXPEXDITUBES. 
FUEL AXD LIGHTS. 

Mancliester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

lig^lits $398.27 

Moore & Preston Coal Co., coal 552.08 

People's Gas-Light Co., g-as 211.42 



WATER AXD TELEPHOXE. 

New England Telephone & Telegrai^h Co., 

use of telephone $12.05 

^Yater commissioners, use of water 419.00 



CLEAXIXG OFFICES, ETC. 

Cudahy Packing- Co., soap $4.00 

Daniels-Cornell Co., soap 15.00 

A. M. Finney, cleaning rug .72 

L. M. Folsom, cheese cloth 1.25 

J. J. Holland, soap 1.50 

INfanchester Hardware Co., toilet paper, dust- 
ers, etc 14.75 

Sarah Minton, cleaning 373.00 

Office Toilet Supply Co., toilet .service 13.00 

Charles Robitaille, janitor 87] .21 

Timothy Sullivan, janitor public comfort.... 540.00 

John B. Varick Co.. 1 dipper .35 

West Disinfecting Co., disinfectant 12.50 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., oil and matches 4.53 



$4,241.84 



$1,161.77 



$431.05 



$1,851.81 



48 IIEPOIIT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 

The Barton Compakiy, awnings, hanging- and 

taking" down awnings, etc $95.85 

Consolidated Electric Lamp Co.. lamps 40.35 

James E. Dodge, paid for cloth 3.45 

A. L. Franks & Co.. 1 shade .40 

John X. Hannon, 30 cuspidors 30.00 

G. II. Hammond, counter and grill, per con- 
tract 186.00 

W. D. Hebert & Co., batteries for clocks 1.00 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., shades and hanging 7.92 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., bookcase, rug, mat 43.00 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

transformer. Tungsten lamps 23.47 

ilanchester Hardware Co., glass, tools, and 

hardware 24.20 

J. J. ;Moreau & Son, removing and replacing 

screens 2.50 



IXCI DENTAL REPAIRS. 

W. L. Aller tt Co.. caning chairs $6.05 

C. W. Anderson & Co., repairing clock 1.00 

Barton Company, repairing flag .60 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric supplies and 

labor 165.14 

G. B. Cressey, glass and ]iutty .57 

S. P. Dodge Co.. 1 slice bar 1.75 

Farrell Brothers, batteries and labor 2.95 

W. E. Goodwin, plumbing repairs 7.60 

Peter Harris & Son, keys and repairs 2.50 

C. A. Hoitt Co., repairing chairs, reversing 

shades, etc 15.33 

Pike & Heald Co., labor on gas .90 

H. A. Piper, material and labor l.SO 

Stevens & Bradley, plumbing repairs .75 



SUNDRIES. 

George Blanchd, insuraucc ])remium 

W. G. Berry, insurance ])remiuin 

Clough & Parker, insurance ])rcmiuin , 

James E. Dodge, cash paid for express 

C. -M. Edgerly. insurance jn-emium , 

J. G. Jones Transfer, freight and cartage.. 



53 


.38 


6 


.75 


3 


.38 




.35 


6 


.75 


2 


.15 



$207.00 



PRINTING AND STATIONEEY. 49 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice, sundrj' offices $.']0.00 

Putnam & Laflamme, insurance premium... 20.00 

J. A. Sheehan, insurance premium 22.50 

Fred E. Stark, insurance premium 31.81 

C. B. Clarkson, weig-liing coal 5.00 

■ — $132.07 

Total expenditures $4,241.8 1 



Printing and Stationery. 

Appropriation $2,400.00 

ExPENDITVEErS. 
TAX COLLECTOR. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing notices, bills, 

etc $107.00 

E. A. Stratton Co., printing ?,.50 

$110.50 

CITY CLERK, 

W. P. Goodman, stationery $27.10 

Albert Euemely, printing blanks, manuals, 
letterheads, etc 118.95 



CITY TREASURES. 

E. H. Clough, envelopes and postage stamps $71.54 
E. A. Stratton Co., printing receijits and no- 
tices 6.50 

Stewart, Warren & Co., lithograj)hed checks 10.50 
Temple & Farrington Co., jDay envelopes, etc. 18.23 
The General Manifold & Printing Co., en- 
velopes 30.00 



$140.05 



$136.77 



MAYOR. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing order blanks $5.50 

CITY AUDITOR. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 500 reports $1,610.93 

Temple & Farrington Co., binding 130 re- 
ports 117.50 

J. A. Williams, printing billheads 20.00 

$1,748.43 



50 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



BUILDING INSPEICTOR. 



Ruemely Press, printing blanks 

S. A. Sprague, paid for stamped envelopes... 



$14.00 
21.54 



CITY COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES. 

Albert Rnemely, printing books, lists, ap- 
propriation statements, mayor's inaugural, 
etc $166.25 

E. A. Stratton Co., post cards 7.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$35.54 



$173.25 



$2,356.04 
43.96 



$2,400.00 



Incidental Expenses. 



Appropriation 



$7,000.00 



Expenditures. 



BIRTHS AND DEuVTHS, 

George L. Bastian, M. D $6.00 

N. C. Baker 1.00 

H. W. N. Bennett, M. D .50 

F. N. Beardslee, M. D 1.00 

W. L. Biron, M. I> 42.75 

Kate S. Bolton 12.50 

H. W. Boutwell, M. D 2.00 

A. A. E. Brien, M. D .50 

J. S. Brown, M. D 1.25 

Lillian G. Bullock, M. D 3.25 

I. L. Carpenter, M. D 5.00 

Charles Chirurg, M. D 2.25 

Herman Christophe, M. D 13.00 

Clarence O. Coburn, M. D 4.50 

P. W. F. Corning, M. D 2.00 

Walter T. Crosby, M. D 0.75 

E. H. Currier, M. D 3.50 

Charles S. Curtiss, M. D 4.25 

J. M. Collity, M. D 9.00 

George M. Davis, M. D 21.50 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 51 

E. H. Dillon, M. D $4.50 

Mary Danforth, M. D 4.75 

Clarence M. Dodge, M. D 2.00 

Eugene B. Dunbar, M. D 12.75 

Antonia Dyba 3.25 

Anna Drozdowska 6.50 

John D. Ferguson, M. D 5.25 

George V. Fiske, M. D 4.00 

George Frechette, M. D 1.50 

E. N. Fugere, M. D 32.25 

C. A. Folsom, M. D 10.50 

George S. Foster, M. D 4.25 

C. F. Flanders, M. D 17.25 

L. M. French, M. D .25 

John H. Gleason, M. D 4.50 

Moise Guerin, M. D 20.50 

Noel E. Gulllet, M. D .75 

George B. Hoitt, M. D 2.75 

Ezra A. Jones, M. D .75 

Walter L. Kelso .25 

M. E. Kean, M. D 7.00 

J. A. Lacasse, M. D 44.00 

Gustave Lafontaine, M. D 21.25 

Susan Laflamme 28.50 

J. E. A. Lanouette, M. D 40.25 

J. E. Larochelle, M. D 2G.25 

Z. A. Lavoie, M. D 67.00 

J. E. Lemaitre, M. D 6.50 

J. D. Lemay, M. D 4.75 

W. H. Lyons, M. D 19.75 

C. W. Milliken, M. D 4.75 

G. B. Morey, M. D 2.75 

M. V. B. Morse, M. D 1.00 

John T. Murray, M. D 4.25 

J. W. D. McDonald, M. D 2.00 

H. W. Newell, M. D .75 

Clara Odmann 5.00 

C. F. Ober, M. D .25 

John C. O'Connor, M. T> 7.00 

D. W. Parker, M. D 3.50 

W. M. Parsons, M. D .50 

W. H. Pattee, M. D 5.50 

Frederick Perkins, M. D 1.50 

J. R. Pepin, M. D 6.50 

J. N. Perreault 1.75 

J. F. Pherson, M. D 1.00 

Anna Pollmer 5.25 



52 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

William Richardson, M. U $1.00 

K. T. Richards, M. D 1.00 

J. F. Robinson, M. D 4.25 

F. X. Rogers, M. D 6.25 

J. E. E. Roy, M. D 16.75 

N, Sasseville, M. D 10.50 

Mrs. Isabelle Smith .25 

Gillis Stark, M. D 6.25 

Servule St. Pierre, M. D 3.00 

Henry L. Stickney, M. D 7.00 

Charlotte D. Stewartson, M. 1) 1.25 

A. Gale Straw, M. D .25 

Zatae L. Straw, M. D 9.75 

C. A. Sturtevant, M. D 6.00 

C. B. Sturtevant, M. D 2.75 

James Sullivan, M. D 3.75 

Emil Sylvain, M. D 14.00 

Joseph Taylor, M. D 15.25 

W. A. Thompson, M. D 7.25 

A. J. Todd, M. D 1.50 

George D. Towne, M. D 1.25 

E. C. Tremblay, M. D 6.00 

Ellen Wallace. M. D 1.00 

Maurice Watson, M. D 2.50 

George M. Watson, M. D 27.50 

N. B. Webber, M. D 6.50 

R. W. Weeks, M. D 5.75 

Arthur E. Wheat, M. D 5.50 

George C. Wilkins, M. D 4.00 

M. W. Work .25 



MARRIAGES. 

Rev. C. R. Bailey $0.50 

Rev. Edgar Blake 2.25 

Rev. James A. Beebe 1.25 

Rev. James H. Brennan 8.50 

Rev. Thomas Chalmers 4.00 

Rev. J. A. Chevalier 14.00 

Rev. X. L. Colby 18.75 

Rev. :Matthew Creamer 1.00 

Rev. L. J. A. Doucet 2.25 

Rev. I. H. C. Davignon 15.00 

Rev. John E. A. Evert 1.50 

I. E. and W. H. Forbes 4.50 

Rev. Charles Frost 1.50 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



53 



Eev. David Fraser $2. 

J. W. D. Francis 

Earl T. French 

Eev. F. K. Gamble 

Eev. G. A. Hathaway 1. 

Eev. G. E. Hazard 3. 

Eev. Pierre Hevey 13. 

Eev. Elwin Hitchcock 

Eev. John Kamm 1. 

Eev. Adolphus Linfield 2. 

J. Lawinsky 

Eev. J. B. Lemon 1 . 

Eev. B. W. Lockhart 2.i 

Eev. J. J. Lj'ons 6.: 

Eev. F. X. Lyons 1. 

Wm. B. Locke 

Eev. J. W. MacCullum 

Periclis Papageorge .; 

Eev. E. J. Palisoul .; 

Eev. John B. Piichala 14.; 

Carl Both 

Herman Eodelsperger 

Eev. Samuel Eussell 

Eev. P. E. Sandberg 

Eev. John C. Smith 

Eev. P. Schachter .25 

Eev. George Steinert .50 

Leo Tyllo 1.75 

Eev. A. Francis Walsh .50 

Eev. Florian Widman 3.50 

John E. Wildey .50 

C. F. Wahlberg .25 

Ylademir Wymarsky 1.50 

DAMAGES AND JUDGMEXTS. 

Charles Adams $40.00 

Lewis B. Demick estate ()50.00 

William Farrell 82.00 

Dosile Fortin 75.00 

F. I). Hardy 50.00 

H. Halverson 200.00 

Manchester Compressed Air and Vacuum Co. 12.30 

Henry C. Phaneuf 200.00 

Mary A. Eiley 250.00 

James D. Strachane 30.00 



$146.00 



$1,589.30 



54 



REPORT OF THE C[TY AUDITOR. 



LEGAL SEIIVICES. 

Dudley and Sawyer $10.45 

Calvin K. Wood !.')'> 

CITY COUNCIES AND COMMITTEES. 

William L. Puffer, TVs days examining fire- 
alarm teleg-raph and expenses $402.2.") 

William L. Puffer, services at hearing 1()4.',)7 

H. P. Eollins, multigraphing resolutions 6.00 

H. W. Spaulding, expenses paid for 1909 S.Ofi 



$18.00 



$581.28 



TEAMS FOR COUNCIL AND COil'^MITTEES. 

Boyd Brothers $20.00 

Lester ^V. Brooks .' 20.00 

Bridge-street auto garage 10.00 

P. Campbell l.J.OO 

W. J. Freeman 2.i.00 

W\ Y. Hadlock & Co 15.00 

H. H. Lamoureux 20.00 

James W. Richards 25.00 

Wm. C. Spear 10.00 

Louis Vogel 15.00 

CITY SCALES. 

M. J. Britton, repairs $1.50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 15.50 

The Fairbanks Co., examining and adjusting 

wagon scale S.89 

W. P. Goodman, ink and pads 1.00 

E. W. Poore, wood 5.00 

MAYOK. 

American Kibbon and Carbon Co., box car- 
bon paper $3.50 

C. A. Hoitt Co., cuspidors and repairing chair 6.15 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 4.48 

Melvin & Fitts, N. H. Laws 3.00 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co., one No. 10 

typewriter 100.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., N. H. registers.. 1.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 Session Law.... 1.50 



$175.00 



$31.S9 



$119. 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 55 



TAX COLLECTOK. 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising-.. $28.12 

E. H. Clough, envelopes and stamps 298.88 

L. ;M. Folsom, gauze and cotton 2. GO 

Monitor and Statesman Co., advertising non- 
resident tax list 10.50 

Melvin & Fitts, rubber bands .25 

Riley & Sanborn, ribbons, erasers, paper 1.85 

E. A. Stratton Co., 3 books B.OO 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery and 

books G5.08 

$413.28 



CITY CLERK. 

Boston Badge Co., junk badges $30.00 

Ideal Stamp Co., stamps 3.00 

Kee Lox Manufacturing Co., 12 ribbons 8.00 

Remington Typewriter Co., 1 No. 10 type- 
writer less discount 90.00 

Remington Typewriter Co., 1 McMillan book 16.50 
E. C. Smith, paid for express and stamped 

envelopes 22.14 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and sta- 
tionery 2.25 

Western Union Telegraph Co., clock rental.. 12.00 



CITY TREASUREE. 

Amoskeag National Bank, rent safety de- 
posit box $15.00 

Automatic Pencil Sharpener Co., extra blades .80 

City Trust Co., certifying bonds 75.00 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 4.10 

Jones Transfer Co., cartage .75 

Manchester Typewriter Exchange, adjusting 

and oiling machine .50 

A. E. Martel Co., deposit books 7.50 

Manchester National Bank, rent of safe.... 50.00 

Melvin & Fitts, stationery 5.G2 

New England Tel. and Tel. Co., tolls 9.81 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., stamp, etc 3.00 

Pike & Heald Co., 3 pans l.SO 

Francis Pratt, Jr., pens 2.75 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery and 

books 39.71 



$21G.34 



56 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



COURT HOUSE. 



C. B. Clarkson, weighing coal $3.50 

Gustave Hecker, janitor 600.75 

Moore & Preston Coal Co., coal 339.37 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 27.28 



BUILDIXG INSPECTOR. 

Ideal Stamp Co., stamp and jiad $0.40 

Melvin & Pitts, paper and erasers 1.25 

X. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., use of telephone 54.86 

Xovelty Co., typewriter ribbon .75 

E. G. Soltmann, blue print paper 2.80 



INSURANCE PREMIUMS. 

George Blanchet $7,50 

W. G. Berry 97.50 

Clough & Parker 5.00 

John Dowst 5.00 

Everett & Bunton 7.50 

Robert J. Hayes 75.00 

John A. Sheehan 7.50 



SUNDRIES. 

American Express Co., express on reports.. $10.40 

F. L. Allen, expenses to Boston and Concord, 

sundry times 33.61 

Battery A, First Regiment, firing Fourth 

of July salute 32.50 

John J. Broderick, fowls killed by dogs 2.50 

P. P. Caproni & Bro., repairing Lincoln 

statue 9.24 

E. H. Clough, stamps and cards 136.00 

G. W. Darrah, roofing material. Highland 

school 6.55 

W. P. Goodman, 35 directories 122.50 

John B. Hall Co., supplies for city physician 11.10 
Charles C. Hayes, premium on bonds fur- 
nished city officials 741.00 

Peter Harris & Son, lock and labor on safe 19.95 

E. H. Holmes, moving safe 2.75 

Kerwin & Sheeihan, supplies, city physician.. 2.55 

Xorbert Laf ond, labor, ward 10 wardroom . . 3.00 



$970.90 



$60.06 



$205.00 



CITY officers' salaries. 57 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

lights, Somerville engine-house $13.43 

New England Tel. & Tel Co., use of telephone 3L67 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas, battery building 1.43 

Edward N. Pearson, engrossing acts 6.75 

H. A. Piper, labor, etc., ward 4 lo.44 

Edward C. Smith, return of 202 names of 

children 50.50 

State of New Hampshire, certified copies.. 2.00 

Town of GofEstown, taxes... 2.85 

Temple & Farrington Co., 100 boxes 4.50 

Water commissioners, use of water, ward 

5, battery building-, city farm 49.25 

Western Union Telegraph Co., telegrams, 

fire of April 8 1.33 

$1,312.79 

Total expenditures $6,801.36 

Transferred to unapprojiriated money 198.64 



$7,000.00 



City Officers' Salaries. 

Appropriation $23,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money... 1,119.17 



EXPENDITUKE.S'.. 
CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Eugene E. Eeed, mayor $3,000.00 

Fred ,L, Allen, city treasurer 1,650.00 

Edward C. Smith, city clerk 1,350.00 

Edward C. Smith, clerk of committees 200.00 

George E. Morrill, tax collector 1.500.00 

Edwin C. Paul, deputy collector 800.00 

Denis Vigneault, deputy collector 800.00 

A. S. Rich, deputy collector 800.00 

James E. Ferson, cit}^ messenger 957.47 

S. Andrew Sprague, building inspector 1,350.00 

John T. Nixon, city solicitor 800.00 

Gilbert Lyons, city weigher 500.00 

John F. Madden, acting city weigher 19.20 

Harry W. Spaulding, clerk common council. . 100.00 



$24,119.17 



58 



REPOET OF THE CITY AlIDITOR. 



George J. ^Merrill, bathhouse caretaker.... .$160.00 

Susie E. Wason, mayor's clerk 720.00 

Mabel L. How, treasurer's clerk 700.00 

Eva G. Jones, city clerk's clerk t . . . G60.00 

Miranda M. Therrien, city clerk's clerk 577.00 

Peter Crown, clerical services, tax collector. . 7.50 
May W. Davis, clerical services, tax collector 97.25 
Eoberts A. Morrill, clerical services, tax col- 
lector 74.00 

Blanche E. Wheeler, clerical services, tax 

collector 137.75 

Eandolph Riedell, clerical services, tax col- 
lector 16.50 

CITY PHYSICIAN AND OVERSEERS OF POOR. 

John G. O'Connor, M. D., city physician $820.00 

C. A. Folsom, M. D., acting city physician.. 37.50 

Michael Herbert, ward 1 50.00 

Daniel G. Andrews, ward 2 50.00 

Joseph L. Boudreau, ward 3 50.00 

Charles B. Clarkson, ward 4 50.00 

Thomas F. Sheehan, ward 5 50.00 

John L. Wentworth, ward 6 50.00 

William Marshall, ward 7 50.00 

Robert J. Werner, ward S 50.00 

Adelard Lambert, ward 9 50.00 

Edward T. Tate, ward 10 50.00 

Thomas C. Stewart, clerk 62.50 

Thomas H. Stewart, acting clerk 62.50 



$16,976.67 



$1,482.50 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Charles W. Bickford, school superintendent $2..100.00 

Curtis W. Davis, truant officer 1,000.00 

Harry L. Davis, clerk of school board 150.00 

James B. Fitch, president of common council, 

ei) offlcio 1 0.00 

Sumner W. Patten, ward 1 10.00 

Joseph W. Abbott, ward 1 10.00 

George M. Davis, ward 2 10.00 

Allan M. Wilson, ward 2 lO.Oi) 

Thomas Chalmers, ward 3 10.00 

Frauk L. ])ownL-. ward 3 10.00 

Edward 1". :Morr}]l, ward 4 10.00 

William A. Pliinnev, ward 4 10.00 



ASSESSOHS DEPAETMENT, 



59 



John F. Lee, ward ") $10.00 

Joseph P. Devine, ward 5 iQ.-M) 

Harry L. Davis, ward 6 10.00 

G. Waldo Browne, ward 10.00 

i:dward B. Woodbury, ward 7 10.00 

Albert W. Thompson, ward 7 10.00 

Walter B. Mitchell, ward 8 10.00 

Frank A. Cadwell, ward S 10.00 

Antoine M. ^Menard, ward 9 10.00 

Aime Martel, ward 9 10.00 

Francis X. Lyons, ward 10 10.00 

John H. Rice, ward 10 10.00 

BOARD OF ALDERMEX. 

Ernest W. Weisner, ward 1 $200.00 

Joseph H. Geisel, ward 2 200.00 

Fred 0. Parnell, ward 3 200.00 

Maurice L. Hoitt, ward 4 200.00 

Eichard J. Barry, ward 5 200.00 

Andrew B. Bunton, ward 200.00 

Herbert A. Sails, ward 7 200.00 

James E. McDonald, ward 8 200.00 

Arthur J. Provost, ward 9 200.00 

Pierre J. Charron, ward 10 200.00 

Total expenditures 



$:{,f)(io.oo 



$2,000.00 



$24,119.11 



Assessors' Department. 



Appropriation 



$9,500.00 



Expenditures. 



SALARIES OF BOARD. 



George A. Clark, chairman $1,:)00.00 

William P. Farmer 1,500.00 

Joseph O. Tremblay ; 1 ,500.00 

Arthur W. Powell, clerk of board 

Harry J. Briggs, engineer 



$1,500.00 

$1,200.00 

$9n9.00 



60 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CLERICAL SERVICES. 

J. W, Z. Bernard $42.50 

Charles W. Brown 137.50 

Emile A. Blanchet 30.00 

Frank P. Collins 107.25 

Peter Crown 40.00 

Fred E. Currier 271.50 

Ladylas Douganic 17.50 

Alfred F. Eaton 28.75 

A. H. Fletcher 156.75 

George M. French 30.00 

Artz Furchtegott 30.00 

Euclide F. Geflfrion 40.00 

Daniel N. Gove 104.50 

Arthur Johnson 25.00 

Arthur Miville 35.00 

John Montplaisir 85.00 

William J. Murphy 37.50 

Charles Oettler 30.00 

G. F. Sheehan 35.00 

L. M. Streeter 36.25 

George Taylor 40.00 

G. B. True 145.75 

Armelle Turcotte 30.00 

Borneo Tremblay 66.00 

John P. Young 15.00 

USE OF TEAilS. 

Boyd Brothers $15.50 

Brooks & Vogel 14.00 

Lester W. Brooks , 8.50 

George M. French 12.00 

W. J. Freeman 34.00 

A. L. Gadbois 14.50 

E. G. Libbey 60.00 

Prospect street automobile station 16.25 

James W. Eichards 15.00 

Eoy & Gadbois 19.50 

G. W. Eeed 9.00 

Fred J. Eeed 5.00 

L. M. Streeter 21.75 

George Taylor 7.50 

Louis Vogel 34.00 



$1,616.75 



auditor's department. 61 

SUPPLIES, ETC. 

J. J. Abbott, lettering- boxes $1.00 

E. E. Bechard & Co., iDrinting blanks 7.50 

Bunton & Bernard, whitewood counter top, 

etc IJ.OO 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., attention 

to machine 2.50 

E. H. Clough, stamped envelopes 76.9b 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising 22.75 

Farrell Bros., batteries, cord, etc 4.55 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 7.75 

John F. Gillis, commercial reports 1.50 

Peter Harris & Son, repairing cabinet cur- 
tain and opening box 2.50 

J. Hodge, rod and labor 1. 10 

C. A. Hoitt Co., stools, shelves and bracket 

cord, etc 13.55 

Le Keveil Publishing Co., advertising 14.56 

L'Avenir National, advertising notice 16.25 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice 7.50 

Manchester Union Co., advertising notice... 18.48 

J. J. Moreau & Son, 1 tin tube 1.00 

Melvin & Pitts, stationery and books 10.48 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., use of telephone 56.45 

Office Toilet Supijly Co., toilet service 16.25 

Powell & Clarkson, 2 desks 90.00 

Jluemely Press, envelopes and numbering 

machine 6.50 

E. A. Stratton Co., printing blanks 23.25 

J. O. Tremblay, cash paid, express, carfares, 

expenses to sundry places for records, etc. 284.62 
Temple & Farrington Co., books and station- 
ery 156.25 

John B. Varick Co., surveyor's supplies, etc. . 56.41 
J. Arthur Williams, printing list of abate- 
ments ,3.00 



Total expenditures $9,463.21 

Transferred to unappropriated money 36.79 

$9,500.00 



Auditor's Department. 

Appropriation $2,500.00 



62 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

ExrENDITURES. 
LABOR. 

James E. Dodge, salary as auditor $1,350.00 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, services as clerk 840.00 

$2,190.00 

SUPPLIES. 

Bank and Office Equipment Co., 1 steel case $96.25 

E. M. Bryant & Co., lamps, shades, labor.. 11.39 

L. M. Cogswell, cash paid: 

Laundry, soap, cloth, etc 13.40 

Index, books, stamps, postals 18.78 

James E. Dodge, cash paid, delivering re- 
ports, express, expenses to Boston & Con- 
cord, etc 6.15 

Charles DeMoulpied & Co., 1 chair 6.75 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 7.35 

Hale & Whittemore, Sapolin and repairs on 

frames 2.95 

C. A. Hoitt Co., linoleum and polish 85.97 

Peter Harris, making keys .65 

L. M. Folsom, cheese cloth 1.50 

Kee Lox Manufacturing Co., carbon paper 

and ribbon 4.00 

Melvin & Fitts, bookcase 11.75 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank book to 

order 6.75 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery and 

binding books 7.74 

John B. Varick Co., lamp and paper 6.14 

J. A. Williams, printing envelopes and pa- 
per 8.25 

$295.77 

Total expenditures $2,485.77 

Transferred to unappropriated money 14.23 

$2,500.00 



Mayor's Incidentals. 

Appropriation $300.00 



STREET ^ND PARK COMMISSION. 63 



EXPEJ^DITUBES. 

Eugene E. Reed, incidentals 



Total expenditures $275.00 

Transferred to unappropriated money 25.00 



$300.00 



Street and Park Commission. 

Appropriation .$8,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money... 2,095.52 

■ $10,095.52 

Expenditures. 

salaries of commissioners. 

William McElroy, chairman .$750.00 

Samuel J. Lord, clerk 1,099.99 

Byron Worthen 750.00 

■ ■ $2,599.99 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $186.16 

Division No. 10: 

January $49.00 

DIVISION SUPERINTENDENTS AND ASSISTANTS. 

George P. Ames, division No. 2 $1,250.00 

Charles Francis, division No. 7 1.200.00 

Alphonse Laberge, division No. 10... 1,092.00 

John A. Gemmell, timekeeper. No. 10 708.54 

Harry T. George, timekeeper. No. 2 232.00 

Harold M. Haskell, second hand. No. 2 857.50 

$5,340.04 

CLERICAL, SERVICES. 

Carroll E. Benton $141.08 . 

Harry H. Clement 884.74 

Joseph W. McElroy 18.00 

■ $1,043.82 



64 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUPPLIES, EXf. 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freiglit $0.30 

John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing orders, billheads, and electrotypes 34.11 

300 city reports and corrections 154.61 

Making- 5 electrotypes 13.50 

Harrie H. Clement, jjaid for carfares, ex- 
press, cat feed, etc 37.64 

Farrell Bros., fuse plugs and labor .55 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 28.05 

Hardy Printing Co., carbon paper 5.16 

Charles A. Hoitt Co., chairs and table 60.00 

John N. Hannon, cuspidors 5.00 

Ideal Stamp Co., stamps and pads 7.45 

William McElroy: 

Expenses to commission and mayor to New 

York and return 137.76 

Boston and return, sundry times 27.82 

Melvin & Fitts, filing case, guides, labels, 

etc 38.60 

Municipal Journal and Engineer, 1 sub- 
scription 3.00 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co.. use of telephones 177.24 

E. L. Powers Co., 1 subscription to "Good 

Roads" magazine 1.00 

J. W. Stockbridge, paper for adding machine 2.50 
Temple & Farrington Co., stationery, print- 
ing and binding books 71.50 

John B. Varick Co., 1 light glass .12 

J. Arthur Williams, paper, printing, and 

binding blanks 12.75 

Frank E. Woods, pens 1.50 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., guides, 

cards, section 56.35 



Repairs of Highways. 

Appropriation $42,000.00 

Received for labor and for material sold 344.27 



$876.51 



Total expenditures $10,095.52 



$42,344.27 



REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 



65 



Expenditures. 



Division No. 2: 
January . . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . 
October . . . 
November . 
December . 

Division No. 4. 
February . . 

April 

December . . 

Division No. 5: 

May 

June 

July 

September . 
October . . . 
December . 

Division No. 7: 
January . . . 
February . . 

]\Iarch 

April 

^lay 

June 

July 

August .... 
September . 
October . . . 
November . 
December . 



$128.25 

247.06 

123.62 

452.35 

2,019.98 

3,811.31 

2,308.66 

1,342.02 

1,436.92 

1,117.48 

1,445.03 

966.45 



$26.00 
26.00 
122.50 



$3.50 
78.87 

2.62 
29.48 

5.75 
122.50 



$120.73 

122.00 

57.50 

390.91 

246.06 

1,357.40 

1,191.37 

943.53 

148.73 

68.25 

40.25 

120.50 



$15,399.13 



$174.50 



$121. 



$4,807.23 



66 HEPOllT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Division No. 9: 

June ■ $255.35 

July 114.61 

September 419.23 

October 146.75 



Division No. 10: 

January $138.25 

February 29.00 

March 36.25 

April 272.91 

May 309.87 

June ' 1,725.79 

July 1,492.68 

August 623.35 

September 841.32 

October 254.85 

November 309.29 

December 184.32 



STONE, GRAVEL, ETC. 

Barrett Manufacturing Co., "Tarvia" $449.85 

C. A. Bailey, curbing, circles, etc 458.10 

Fred E. Ellis, broken stone 1,982.98 

Manchester Cement Block and Concrete Co., 

gravel 198.00 

Manchester Pressed Stone Co., gravel, sand, 

stone 160.92 

Clarence Eobinson, sand 34.40 

Winchester Stone Co., stone 120.19 



OTHER SUPPLIES, ETC. 

American Locomotive Co., iron buckets, 

boiler plates and repairs $135.50 

A. B. Black, parts for Climax road machine 9.00 
Buffalo Steam Koller Co., 1 scraper bracket 2.50 

B. F. Greer, posts, fence boards 267.93 

Head & Dowst Co., posts, shingles, etc 11.41 

Good Roads Machinery Co., supplies 321.87 

Inger soil-Sergeant Drill Co., supplies 130.70 

Moore & Preston Coal Co., 2 coal chutes 6.00 

J. J. Moreau & Son, dippers 3.00 

National Paint and Varnish Co., paint 200.00 

Henrj^ W. Parker, oatmeal ''.30 



$935.94 



$6,217.88 



$3,404.44 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 67 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., pitch, tar, 

and re^jairs $270.51 

Wiggin-Young Co., oil 1.20 

A. A. Warren, kerosene oil 65.75 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil 28.96 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe, etc 27.86 

John B. Varick Co., dynamite, packing, tools, 

etc 878.26 



SUNDRIES. 



New Highways, 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money... 2,171.69 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

June $174.25 

July 493.11 

August 16.54 



$2,367 



Boston & Maine Railroad, freight and car 

service $79.80 

L. B. Bodv^'ell & Co., coal 439.46 

Brown & Burpee, mica goggles .75 

Besse-Eldridge Co., gloves .92 

John H. Campbell, use of w-ater. North Union 

street 3.00 

Cavanaugh Bros., horses 600.00 

Cavanaugh Bros., mules 615.00 

Cavanaugh Bros., use of horses 101.75 

J. H. Gleason, M, D., professional services.. 11.00 
Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., use 

of electricity at stone crusher 136.50 

H. Thompson, brooms and refilling sweeper 77.00 
Water commissioners, use of water for 

crusher 30.00 

■ • $2,095.18 

Total expenditures $35,523.27 

Transferred to unappropriated money 6,821.00 



$42,344.27 



$3,171.69 



$583.90 



6o REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Division No. 7: 

May $640.21 

June 1S2.1] 

Division No. 10: 

July $211.12 

August 514.86 

September 917.49 

October 22.00 

Total expenditures 

Street Cleaning. 

Appropriation $12,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money... 2,393.15 

Expenditures. 

snow and ice, labor. 
Division No, 2: 

January $602.06 

February 2,072.19 

March 1,006.72 

April 168.83 

May 20.85 

Division No. 7: 

January $56.03 

February 311,54 

March 207,14 

Division No. 10: 

January $770.12 

February 1,124.71 

March 740.59 

April 28.74 

December 89.50 

SNOW AND ICE, SUNDRIES. 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe and labor $0.94 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools 36,54 



$822,32 



$1,665,47 



$3,171.69 



$14,393.15 



$3,870.65 



$574.71 



$2,753.66 



$37,48 



DAMAGE OF LAND TAKEN FOR HIGHWAYS. 



69 



STKEET SWEEPING, LABOK. 

Division No. 2: 

January $170.31 

February 42.00 

March 298.69 

April 414.55 

May 325.84 

June 596.11 

July 473.40 

August 487.87 

September 614.27 

October 524.09 

November 434.73 

Division No. 10: 

March $35.25 

April 265.99 

May 754.14 

June 443.86 

July 157.49 

August 165.37 

September 186.18 

October 129.50 

November 70.00 



$4,381.S 



$2,207.78 



STREET SWEEPING, SUPPLIES, ETC. 

Drevp Machinery Agency, labor on gears. . . $0.90 

H. Thompson, refilling sweeper 16.25 

H. Thompson, brooms and handles 58.00 

John B. Variek Co., hose, globes, shovels, 

baskets, etc 486.86 

A. A. Warren, oil 5.00 

Total expenditures 



$567.01 



$14,393.15 



Damage of Land taken for HIghw'ays. 

Appropriation 



$1,300.00 



70 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

Frank W. Bond and Cora F. Boston $915.39 

Manchester Keal Estate and Manufacturing 

Co 300.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$1,215.39 



$1,215.39 
84.61 



Watering Streets. 



Appropriation 

Eeceived from material sold 

Transferred from unappropriated money 



Expenditures. 



$8,000.00 

4.00 

1,655.99 



$1,300.00 



$9,659.99 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Division No. 7: 

February 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 



$2.50 

420.21 

12.25 

27.80 

105.74 

874.71 

1,287.85 

1,126.93 

1,544.95 

79.75 

10.38 



$1.12 
254.36 
325.11 
289.12 
235.10 
9.62 



$5,493.07 



$1,114.43 



PAVING STREETS. 71 

Division No. 10: 

January $1.75 

February 21.50 

May 13.00 

June 192.13 

July 334.37 * 

August 565.06 

September 327.87 

October 23.50 

November 12.37 

$1,401.54 

SUPPLIES AND EEPAIRS. 

American Locomotive Co., castings and pipe ^ $9.00 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight, etc 9.63 

Drew Machinery Agency, screws, etc .80 

S.^P. Dodge Co., 1 pole, hubs, bands, etc 18.40 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., rubber boots 34.45 

Chandler, Eastman Co., supplies for sprink- 
lers 79.58 

Gulf Eefining Co., asphalt oil 684.12 

Head & Dowsfc Co., boards 1.67 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice 41.91 

Maxwell Ice Co., ice 62.93 

National Paint and Varnish Co., paint 45.05 

F. F. Osgood, sole leather 1.50 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe, etc 61.04 

Palmer & Garmon, labor on ensign fountain 29.05 

Sessions Foundry Co., castings 2.46 

Standard Oil Co., oil 457.52 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 17.56 

-West Side Lumber Co., lumber 4.28 

$1,560.95 

Total expenditures $9,659.99 



Paving Streets. 

Appropriation $10,000.00 

Eeceived for labor and material sold 3,902.21 

Transferred from unappropriated money.... 168.71 



$14,070.92 



72 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

March 

April « 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Division No. 7: 

June 

November 

Division No. 10: 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



SUNDRIES. 



$2.25 
17.50 
146.29 
330.17 
555.00 
1,013.23 
587.30 
102.84 
116.06 



$26.25 
22.00 



$5.75 
10.62 
21.12 

338.23 
49.48 

128.12 
18.18 
35.75 
17.49 



$2,870.64 



$48.25 



$624.74 



American Locomotive Co., repairing concrete 
mixer 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., material and 
labor 

C. A. Bailey, stone 

Barbour, Stockwell Co., frames and grates.. 

Barrett Manufacturing Co., paving pitch 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight and car 
service 

James F. Cavanaugh, laying block^paving. . 

Dyar Siipply Co., freight on concrete mixer. . 

Gulf Refining Co., oil 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 

Henry W, Parker, cement 

Palmer & Garmon, paving blocks 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe 



$3.25 

66.55 

266.97 

47.00 

68.85 

33.48 

2,306.25 

28.37 

47.12 

.93 

537.00 

5,741.97 

5.68 



PAVING NOTEE DAME AVENUE. 



73 



Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete, 

sand, and gravel $1,282.56 

H. J. Rock, oil cloth signs 6.25 

Ellen Scollard, rent of land for storage 10.00 

John B. Varick Co., tools and hardware.... 44.81 

A. A. Warren, oil 30.25 

Total expenditures 



$10,527.29 



$14,070.92 



Appropriation 



Paving Notre Dame Avenue. 



$5,000.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

November " $21.30 

December 16.66 

Division No. 10: 

September $2.37.87 

October 709.18 

November 28.00 

December 7.00 

SUNDRIES. 

James F. Cavanangh, street paving $266.66 

Manchester Cement Block and Concrete Co., 

street paving 1,441.78 

H. W. Parker, cement ". 492.25 

Ralph W. Pike, inspector of paving 24.75 

West Side Lumber Co., lumber 3.45 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$37.96 



$982.05 



$2,228.89 



$3,248.90 
1,751.10 



$5,000.00 



74 



EEPOET OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paving Elm Street North of Orange Street. 
Appropriation $7,500.00 

EXPENDITUKES. 
LABOR. 

Division No. 2. 

October $282.96 

November 27.79 

■ $310.75 

Division No, 7: 

September $24.49 

October 243.34 

• $207.83 

SUNDRIES. 

James F. Cavanangh, paving- $154.40 

Palmer & Garmon, paving blocks 95.52 

H. W. Parker, cement 671.25 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe 1.72 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.. 484.09 

John B. Varick Co., lanterns 3.00 

A. A. Warren, oil 5.00 

$1,414.98 

Total expenditures $1,993.56 

Transferred to imappropriated money 5,506.44 

$7,500.00 



Macadamizing Streets. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money.... 2,577.81 



$7,577.81 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 7: 
October 

Division No. 10: 

July $80.25 

Aug-ust 699.73 

September 82.99 

November 608.09 



$1,471.06 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



75 



SUNDRIES. 

American Locomotive Co., repairing- crnslier 

boiler $10.50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 416.69 

James F. Cavanaugh, labor and material, 

Hooksett road 3,200.38 

Fred E. Ellis, broken stone 1,606.33 

Manchester Street Railway Co., use of cars 

and men hauling material 40.60 

S. B. Stearns, insurance premium 12.49 

Vacuum Oil Co., cylinder and engine oil 81.28 

John B. Varick Co., shovels 30.90 

Total expenditures 



$5,399. i: 



$7,577.81 



Grading for Concrete 

Appropriation 

Received for material sold 

Transferred from unappropriated money 

Division No. 2: 

January 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Division No. 7: 

May : 

June 

July 

Division No. 10: 

June 

July 

September 

October 

November 

December 



$2,000.00 

10.00 

1,261.34 



$14.25 
31.89 
225.64 
546.47 
141.70 
220.83 
365.44 
188.70 
323.82 

$26.00 
15.75 
19.25 

$75.12 
48.50 

226.37 
82.74 

157.41 

113.37 



g3.271.34 



$2,058.74 



$01.00 



$703.51 



76 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 

Charles A. Bailej^ curbing $217.94 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight 2.00 

Head & Dowst Co., machine work 2.00 

Palmer & Garmon, curbing, setting .stej)S, 

labor 25.45 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.. 146.94 

John B. Varick Co., globes, tapes, rules.... 7.96 

A. A. Warren, oil 35.00 

West Side Lumber Co., plank 10.80 

Total expenditures 



$448.09 



$3,271.34 



Concreting Central Street. 



Appropriation 



$3,000.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

August 

SUNDRIES. 

James F. Cavanaugh, paving $396.72 

Jeremiah Hodge, pine and labor 3.53 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 1.86 

H. W. Parker, cement 447.50 

J. H. Mendell Co., spruce 20.54 

Palmer & Garmon, paving blocks 369.95 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.. 1,003.79 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$513.13 



$2,243.89 



$2,757.02 
242.98 



Scavenger Service. 



$3,000.00 



Appropriation 



$25,000.00 



SCAVENGEH SERVICE. 



77 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

Augu st 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division Xo. 7: 

Januarj^ 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division Xo. 10: 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



$1,070.55 

1,282.72 

1,016.38 

1,055.05 

1,315.03 

1,311.75 

890.73 

880.22 

1,116.03 

897.47 

1,215.31 

1.210.20 



$175.50 
217.00 
173.25 
175.00 
172.37 
218.75 
137.37 
129.48 
161.85 
128.61 
162.73 
170.60 



$342.08 
427.83 
301.84 
349.07 
358.65 
435.68 
344.08 
348.21 
430.79 
324.59 
414.69 
404.20 



$13,261.44 



$2,022.51 



$4,481.71 



78 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 

W. H. Bickf ord, contract work $1,281.76 

Mrs. W. H. Bickf ord, contract work 640.88 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 11.32 

John B. Clarke Co., printing and binding 

blanks 16.00 

E. H. Holmes, cartage, cleaning street, etc.. 13.50 

Levi J. Proctor, inspector 780.00 

James Eied, cleaning yards 8.75 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 12.71 

J. A. Williams, printing and binding reports 3.50 

Watson Wagon Co., 1 dump wagon 195.02 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$2,963.44 

$22,729.10 
2,270.90 

$25,000.00 



Bridges. 



Appropriation 

Received for material sold, 



$8,000.00 
135.84 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $19.70 

April 28.89 

May 19.36 

June 111.94 

July 188.38 

August 61.76 

September 243.85 

October 590.21 

November 541.25 

December 43.10 

Division No. 4: 
December 

Division No. 5: 

June $8.43 

July .93 

November 11.00 



$1,848.44 
$31.25 



$20.36 



CITY TEAMS. 79 

Division Xo. 9: 

June $11.75 

Division No. 10: 

August $7.00 

October 12.50 

$19.50 

MATERIAL AND REPAIRS. 

American Locomotive Co., castings $28.00 

Amoskeag Manufacturing- Co., castings 84.20 

Barrett Manufacturing Co., paving pitch . . . 40.84 

E. P. Burroughs, paint 50.00 

E. N. Babbitt, carfare and freight on tool l<it 2.20 

Boston & Maine Kailroad, freight 2.79 

Samuel Cabot, 4 barrels "Conserve" 82.00 

Carbolineum Wood Preserving Co., "Carboli- 

neum" 44.80 

B. F. Greer, plank 891 .72 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and machine 

work 3.60 

H. W. Parker, bags 10.28 

Sessions Foundry Co., castings, etc 106.38 

U. S. Wood Preserving Co., creosoted wood 

paving blocks 1,360.00 

United Construction Co., steel 1,832.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 165.16 

A. A. Warren, oil 29.75 

West Side Lumber Co., lumber 167.23 

$4.900.9r> 



Total expenditures $6,832 25 

Transferred to unappropriated money 1.303.59 



$8,135.84 



City Teams. 

Appropriation $9,000.00 

deceived for labor and material sold 178.40 

Transferred from unappropriated money.... 8,036.63 



80 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $731 .68 

February 890.76 

March 708.86 

April 745.96 

May 547.22 

June 555.84 

July ■. 517.21 

August 507.08 

September 593.21 

October 456.15 

November 609.05 

Division No. 7: 

December 

Division No. 10: 

January $21.00 

February 39.25 

March ■ 31.00 

April 32.00 

May 40.00 

June 61.50 

July 47.75 

August 65.50 

September 70.00 

October 53.00 

November 67.00 

December 70.00 

GRAIX, HAY, STRAW. 

Ame & Co $15.00 

Arthur S. Brown 2,789.94 

Adams Brothers 21.00 

F. H. Masse & Co 1,271.58 

HARNESS AND REPAIRS. 

Oliver Comire $226.25 

Ranno Saddlery Co 161.00 

Joseph Vogel & Co 76.90 



$6,863.02 
$1.25 



$598.00 



$4,097.52 



$464.15 



CITY TEAMS. 



81 



HARDWARE AND TOOLS. 



John B. Varick Co 

LIVE STOCK AND TETERIXARY EXPENSES. 

Cavanaiigh Bros., 5 horses $1,041.60 

Cavanaugh Bros., board of sick horse 11.00 

11. B. Diinton, Y. S., professional services 

and medicine S.50 

J. L, Goklen, Y. S., services and medicine... 104.90 

J. L. Goklen, difference in exchange of horses 150.00 
J. E. Janelle, Y. S., professional services and 

medicine S.OO 

E. J. Letendre, Y. S., professional services.. 2.00 

A. J. Precourt, medicine and supplies 11.25 

T. H. Kandall, insect exterminator 20.00 

' FUEL, FREIGHT, LIGHTS, WATER. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal $338.71 

Boston & Maine Kailroad, freight 17.12 

Manchester Traction. Light & Power Co., 

lights at city farm 92.25 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas, city stables.... 190.52 

Water commissioners, use of water 75.00 



$1,202.65 



$1,357.2.- 



$713.60 



LUMBER, REPAIRS, ETC. 



Bunton & Bernard, labor and material $74.04 

S. P. Dodge Co., spokes, felloes, etc 83.75 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 134.52 

J. Hodge, pipe and labor 17.11 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

1 pole 3.00 

J. H. Mendell Co., boards 37.70 

McKelvie Bros., stove, pipe, etc 27.65 

F. F. Osgood, old belting 6.60 

H. W. Parker, lime, salt, soap 11.42 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe, iron, labor 18.22 

Levi J. Proctor, 1 farm wagon 25.00 

Watson Wagon Co., 1 wagon 199.00 

West Side Lumber Co., boards, etc 57.38 



$695.39 



82 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

Committee on city farm, rent of land and 

buildings $1,020.00 

Everett & Bunton, insurance premium 20.00 

Frank T. Moore, 4 sets sleds without 

bodies 180.00 

C. D. Steele & Co., soap and matches 2.20 

Total expenditures 

Repairs of Sewers. 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

Received for labor and material sold 38.42 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Division No. 2: 

January $513.49 

February 69.14 

March 69.94 

April 137.46 

May 107.77 

June 204.08 

July ■ 160.77 

August 262.16 

September 256.42 

October 92.90 

November 160.32 

December 1,477.58 

Division No. 7: 
May 

Division No. 10: 

February $1.75 

March 13.11 

April 14.89 

May 187.67 

June 62.87 

July 61.38 

August 24.50 



$1,222.20 



$17,215.03 



$6,038.42 



$3,512.03 
$5.25 



NEW SEWERS. 



83 



September $1S0.G2 

October 92.73 

November 52.73 

December 49. 8G 



MATERIAL, LABOR, ETC. 

American Locomotive Co., repairing boiler.. $31.50 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., labor and ma- 
terial on shield 56.38 

C. A. Bailey, stone and curbing 498.26 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 5.38 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight 9.60 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., rubber boots 8.00 

S. P. Dodge Co., pole for boiler 2.25 

W. F. Head & Son, brick 89.79 

Henry W. Parker, cement l.SO 

Pike & Heald Co., 1 elbow .70 

Sessions Foundry Co., frames, grates, pat- 
terns, etc 759.57 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 2. 84 

Mrs. Lottie B. Worthley, cash paid for clean- 
ing out sewer, caused by stoppage of 

main sewer 5.20 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$742.11 



$1,471.27 

$5,730.66 
307.76 

$6,038.42 



New Sewers. 



Appropriation $18,000.00 

Received for labor and material sold 1,028.46 

Transferred from unappropriated money... 289.29 



$19,317.75 



EXPEXDITURES. 
LABOR. 

Division Xo. 2: 

January $245.84 

February 6.35 

May 1.32.61 

June 122.08 



$182 


75 


1,011 


89 


582 


71 


733.73 


648 


23 



84 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

July $(i(i9.91 

August 1,105.27 

September 1,655.08 

October 1,236.00 

November 965.66 

December 1,794.71 

Division No. 7: 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Division No. 10: 

July $3.75 

August 35.00 

November 87.4S 

December 872.53 



HARDWARE, SEWER PIPE, ETC. 

American Locomotive Co., smoke stack, la- 
bor, etc. and repairing boiler $56.10 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 65.46 

Harold L. Bond Co., hose and couplings 81.00 

Carson Trench Machine Co., 1 engine com- 
plete 1,365.00 

Drew Machinery Agency, labor en sprocket ,60 

Eastern Clay Goods Co., sewer pipe 2,396.39 

Manchester Supply Co., sewer pipe 76.80 

J. H. Mendell Co., sewer pipe 15.88 

B. H. Piper Co., handles 10.00 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe 34.55 

Sessions Foundry Co., frames, covers, grates 381.28 

Vacuum Oil Co., engine oil 11.47 

John B. Yarick Co., hardware, etc C69.16 

Arthur A. Warren, oil 78.00 



BRICK, CEMENT, LUMBER. 

B. F. Greer, plank $S97.S6 

W. F. Head & Son, brick 627.31 

H. W. Parker, cement, etc 6.25 



$7,933.51 



$5,251.69 



$1,531.42 



COMMONS. 



85 



SUNDRIES. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co.. coal $207.00 

Brodie Electric and Auto Co., repairing- cir- 
cuit breaker 3.05 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., rubber boots 17.00 

Charles Edgar, filing saws G.OO 

J. L. & H. K. Potter, 2 dumpcarts and har- 
nesses 210.00 

Total expenditures 



$443.05 



$19,317.75 



Commons. 



Appropriation 



$4,500.00 



Expenditures. 



January $200.72 

February 222.39 

March 112.51 

April 133.48 

May 168.15 

June 209.54 

July 141.33 

August 157.41 

September 212.51 

October 224.72 

November 268.25 

December 241.45 

John Seastrom, superintendent 

ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS, AVATER. 

^Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

electric lights $33.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 9.90 

Water commissioners, use of water 712.00 



$2,292.46 
$GC0.00 



86 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 



Bixby & Stache, plants $236.03 

F. J. Bixby, plants 16.40 

Dickey & Woodman, rent of land, baseball 

grounds 50.00 

G. W. Dodge Shoe Co., rubber boots 12.00 

Farrell Bros., rejiairs 2.75 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 1S.S3 

Parnell Bros., barrels 2.50 

Pike & Heald Co., repairs, etc 2.90 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., repairs... 62.15 

John Seastrom, 1 harness 10.00 . 

John A. Sheehan, insurance premium 18.90 

J. A. V. Smith Co., grinding lawn mower 

knives 7.00 

John B. Variek Co., tools and hardware 10S.39 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unapproi^riated mone^' 



$547.81 



$4,255.20 
244.80 



Stark Park. 



Appropriation 

Eeceived for material sold. 



Expenditures. 



$1,000.00 
3.83 



$4,500.00 



$1,003.83 



January $4.39 

March 25.84 

April ' 10.92 

May 61.52 

June 112.28 

July 85.89 

August 134.37 

September 87.50 

October 82.85 

November 46.76 

December 3.50 



$655.82 



DERRYFIELD Pi^ KK. 



87 



SUNDRIES, 

Bixbj^ & Staehe, plants $84.30 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 10.75 

E. P. Eichardson, cash paid for replacing- 

trees 4.50 

John B. Yarick Co., hardware 39.70 

Water commi-ssioners, use of water 12.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$151.25 



$S07.07 
196.76 



Derryfield Park. 



Appropriation 

Eeceived from observatory. 



Expenditures. 



$1,000.00 
12.50 



$1,003.83 



$1,012.50 



LABOR. 

January $31.34 

February 11.42 

March 41.99 

April 35.51 

May 62.65 

June 91.56 

July 167.25 

August 83.90 

September 152.81 

October 61.30 

November 21.27 

December 1.75 

SUNDRIES. 

W. G. Berry, insurance premium $5.00 

Bixby & Staehe, plants 48.08 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 9.10 

Pike & Heald Co.. pipe and elbows 12.82 



$762.75 



88 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



John A. Sheehan, insurance premium $6.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools 23.53 

Water commissioners, use of water 25.50 

$130.03 

Total expenditures .$892.78 

Transferred to unappropriated money 119.72 

$1,012.50 



Lafayette Park. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

August $511.13 

September 271.42 

$782.55 

SUNDRIES. 

Manchester Cement Block and Concrete Co., sidewalk 

repairs $228.51 



Total expenditures $1,011.06 

Transferred to unappropriated money 988.94 

.$2,000.00 



Miscellaneous Playgrounds. 

Appropriation $200.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money.... 18.06 

$218.C 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Commons: 

February $92.56 

May 1.89 

$94.45 

Division No. 2: 

June $42.49 



BROWN-TAIL AND GYPSY MOTH. 
SUNDRIES. 

Amoskeag' Manufacturing Co., rent of land, 

"Barry playground," 2 years $2.00 

J. H. Mendell Co., boards 7.80 

Kobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.. 49.09 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 1.47 

Water commissioners, use of water 20.76 

Total expenditures 

City Yard. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January $123.94 

Februarj^ 17.06 

March 8.12 

April 58.03 

June 11.00 

July 4.50 

November 4.25 

SUNDRIES. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., on account of • 

land $5,000.00 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

poles and labor setting 6.90 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 14.71 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to vinapprojiriated money 

Brown-tail and Gypsy Moth. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Eeceived for labor and taxes 1,040.34 



89 



81.12 



$6,000.00 



$220.90 



5,021.01 



$5,248.51 
751.49 



$6,000.00 



$6,040.34 



90 



HEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



EXPENDITTJRES. 
LABOR. 

F. B. Shattuck, Incorporated, per contract $4,548.76 

INSPECTORS ON PRIVATE AND CONTRACT WORK. 

E. A. Blanchet $154.84 

Ealph E. Hall 138.26 

Joseph B. Hag-gerty 141.67 

Lawrence O'Connor 151.08 

George B. True 98.58 

• $684.43 

SUNDRIES. 

John B, Clarke Co., printing, etc $36.50 

E. H. Clough, stamps . 55.00 

D. M. Creedon, rebate on moth tax .32 

W. P. Goodman, envelopes 9.80 

Harry T. George, labor on moth notices 7.00 

Fred R. Stark, rebate on moth tax 1.00 

John B. Yarick Co., arsenate of lead 4.35 

$113.97 

Total expenditures $5,347.16 

Transferred to unappropriated money 093.18 



$6,040.34 



Lighting Streets. 

Appropriation $62,500.00 

Appropriation for arches 1,500.00 



Expenditures. 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co.: 

January $4,564.84 

February 4,565.96 

March 4,567.67 

April 4,567.67 

May 4,567.67 

June 4,567.67 

July 4,567.67 

August 4,567.67 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 91 

September $4,597.06 

October 4,597.62 

November 4,597.62 

December 4,597.62 

• $54,926.74 

GAS. 

Welsbach Street Lighting Co.: 

January $606.33 

February 606.33 

March 589.33 

April 606.33 

May 606.33 

June 606.33 

July 606.33 

August 606.33 

September 584.16 

October 609.16 

November 009.16 

December 609.16 

■ $7,245.28 

ARCHES. 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co.: 

Lighting from April to December $806.40 

Lamps and putting up 117.67 

• $924.07 

SUNDRIES. 

W. D. Hadlock, use of automobile $5.00 

W. C. Spear, use of automobile 5.00 

$10.00 

Total expenditures $63,106.09 

Transferred to unappropriated money 893.91 

$64,000.00 



Engineer's Department. 
Appropriation $8,000.00 



92 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Samuel J. Lord, general engineer $1,099.96 

Delmont E. Bradley ; 253.70 

Oliver W. Cnshman 4S9.77 

Alfred T. Dodge 837.27 

Glen B. Eastman 76.50 

John J. McAllister, Jr 755.05 

Frank L. McAllister 74.00 

Joseph McElroy 48.00 

William A. Moulton 13.13 

Lawrence O'Connor 347.10 

George Prince 40.50 

George W. Wales 1,141.08 

Henry Worthen 721.89 

Horace Wyman 100.90 

Harrie M. Young 810.70 

SUPPLIES AND OFFICE EXPENSES. 

Charles A. Bailey, highway bounds $125.00 

C. L. Berger & Sons, repairing and adjusting 

transit 6.40 ♦ 

D. K. Bradley, carfares 3.70 

John B. Clarke Co., printing cards, etc 28.97 

John B. Clarke Co., 300 reports 41.87 

^lyron C. Clark Publishing Co., subscription 

to "Engineering-Contracting" 1.00 

Farrell Bros., material and labor .78 

Julien P. Friez, rain gauge and register.... 132.75 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 23.65 

F, L. Geiger & Co., bolts 7.00 

Harry Gould,, bench mark reports 12.00 

John N. Hannon, 6 cuspidors 5.00 

Head & Dowst Co., grade stakes, signboards 214.50 

Ideal Stamp Co., stamps 2.K) 

Keuffel & E.sser Co., supplies 29.42 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice 8.75 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 45.56 

Manchester Typewriter Exchange, 1 ribbon 1.00 
Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

lamps , 4.60 

Melvin & Fitts, 1 book 13.85 

Melvin & Fitts, typewriter stand and chair.. 19.50 

C. F. McCarthy, painting signs. 30.00 



$6,810.15 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 93 

J. J. McAllister, Jr., cash paid for express, 

carfares, soap, etc $19.83 

New Eiif^land Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone 2,j.lf> 

Pike & Heald Co., filter and labor 1.42 

Sessions Foundry Co., street hangers, etc... 46.80 

D. F. Shea, rubber boots 9.00 

E. G. Soltmann, drawing paper, etc 109.19 

Technical Supply Co., paper 3.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., binding books, 

carbon paper, making covers, etc 92.05 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 15.37 

Joseph Vogel & Co., repairing blanket 1.50 

J. A. Williams, paper .fiO 

West Disinfecting Co., "Euchrelyptum". . . . 5.25 



Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated mouej' 



Health Department. 

Appropriation $17,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated monej'.... 3S5.31 



$1.0SG. 


59 


$7 


,896. 
103. 


74 

26 


$S 


.000.00 



Expenditures. 

services. 

J. E. A. Lanouette, M. D., salary as member 

of board • $200.00 

W. K. Eobbins, salary as member of board.. 200.00 

Wm. J. Starr, salary as member of board... 200.00 

Wni. B. Blake, sanitary inspector 875.00 

John F. Loonej^ sanitary inspector ; 890.00 

Carl O. Seaman, plumbing and milk in- 
spector 948.00 

M. Alma Fracker, clerk 540.00 



PRINTIIVG AND STATIONER!'. 

John B. Clarke Co.: 
Printing bulletins, notices, blanks, licenses, 

etc $174.95 

Reports 16.25 



$17,285.31 



$3,859.00 



94 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



W. P. Goodman, books and stationery... 
Temple & Farrington Co., 1 pami^hlet law. 



$199.S 



•TEAMS AND CARFARES. 

W. B. Blake 

Bailey & Co 

Boyd Bros 

Lester W. Brooks 

C. S. Fifield 

W. J. Freeman 

J. D. French 

A. L. Gadbois 

James Hargreaves 

Hedding Transfer Co 

H. H. Lamoureux 

John F. Looney 

E. G. Libbey 

Boy & Gadbois 

Carl O. Seaman 

E. V. Turcotte 

OFFICE EXPENSES AND SUPPLIES. 

American Express Co., express charges 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., chemicals, etc., 
for laboratorjr 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 

Carter, Eice & Co., gummed paper 

Herbert Diinnington, antitoxin 

M. A. Fracker, cash paid for laundrj-, post- 
age, freight, stationery, etc 

Granite State Rubber Co., 1 pair gloves 

John B. Hall Co., antitoxin 

C. A. Hoitt Co., matting, rug, etc 

LeBlanc & Provencher, antitoxin 

Library Bureau, label holders and pulls.... 

Manchester Hardware Co., paint, varnish, 
etc. 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 
electric stove, chafing dish, teakettle, cir- 
cuit breakers, etc 

Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 
use of telephones 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 

Pike & Heald Co., plumbing repairs 

Royal Typewriter Co., 1 typewriter 



$.54.85 

36.00 

7.00 

G..50 

26.00 

154.00 

109.00 

3S.00 

IS.OO 

4.00 

6.00 

2S.35 

38.00 

6.00 

26.20 

26.00 



.$9.30 

8.83 

19.13 

31.50 

950.36 

51.74 

2.25 

28.34 

23.96 

3.34 

.40 



15.75 

78.22 
8.36 
6.92 

58.50 



.$583.90 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 95 

C. O. Seaman, gasoline, tacks, etc - $0.40 

Schieffelin & Co., formaldehyde 175.42 

A. G. Straw, M. D., diphtheria examinations 53.50 

Tilton Box Co., boxes 4.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 57.22 

Walsh & Cummings, antitoxin 622. G2 

$2,242.77 



PEST HOUSE. 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons, coal $7.00 

]\Ian(ihester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

electric lights 10.02 

Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone 25.00 

A. D. Sherer, painting 122.50 

Mrs. A. D. Sherer, services and board 368.03 

Maurice Watson, M. D., visits and vaccina- 
tions 110.50 

Water commissioners, use of water 7.52 



ISOLATION IIOSriTAL. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., cloth $32.91 

Barton Co., towels, gowns 6.00 

W. B. Blake, paid for sharpening lawn 

mower .30 

T. J. Briggs, grate, lining for range and 

labor 9.14 

E. M. Bryant & Co., electric supplies and 

labor 7. 89 

Bunton & Bernard, lumber and labor 109.18 

J. Edward Baker, plans and specitications 20.00 

Connor Bros., plumbing repairs 15.00 

J. H. DeCourcy Co., wood 3.50 

Herbert Damnington, medicine 84.47 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons, coal 179.06 

Eastern Drug Co., medicine and supplies 126.96 

C. A. & A. W, Flint, wood 54.50 

A. M. Finney, reseating and repairing chairs 10.25 

Mrs. Selma Flodin, services as matron 300.00 

Mrs. Selma Flodin, board of sundry persons 3,120.93 

L. M. Folsom, sheets, towels, gowns, etc... 48.10 
Clranite State Eubber Co., sheeting, tubing, 

oilcloth, etc 13.23 

C. .J. & L. C. Greer, wash bowl, valves, labor 6.68 

Hamilton Mfg. Co., cloth 24.00 

James W. Hill Co., blankets, sheeting 12.54 



$650.57 



yb REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

C. A. Hoitt Co., crockery and bedding..' $10.90 

Kerwin & Sheehan, medicine 30!05 

A. M. Lewis, plumbing repairs .08 

F. D. Leighton, labor on heater and boiler.. 7.15 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice 27.14 

Manchester Hardware Co., i:)aint, varnish.. 11.5.83 
Manchester Traction. Light & Power Co.: 

Electric lights 122.10 

Repairing stoves 3.85 

J. H. Mendell Co.. alterations, ])er contract 311.00 

J. H. Mendell Co., repairs and labor 24.90 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co.. 

use of telephone 70.98 

F. E. Nelson, bed socks, crockery 17.40 

Powell & Clarkson, glass, keys, labor 4.25 

Stevens & Bradley, installing 2 bathtubs.. 88.00 

James Scully, chairs, shades, etc... 16.05 

A. D. Sherer, paint and painting 350.75 

E. V. Turcotte, wood and coal 214.34 

John B. Yarick Co., brooms 1.25 

Walsh & Cnmmings, medicine 13.35 

Water commissioners, use of water 55.25 



NURSES AT ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

Katherine M. Crozier $84.00 

Mary E. Cronin 114.00 

Mary V. Lee ' 963.00 

Katherine Lehan 30.00 

Zefjherine Lupiene 159.00 

Katherine Y. .Martin 966.00 

Nellie Mathews 51.00 

Emma McPartland '. 120.00 

M. :McDerby 54.00 

Nellie M. Rugar 132.00 

Mary E. Stearns 129.00 

Robina Thompson • 159.00 

Diana Tousignant 84.00 



SrrPI.IES FOR ISOLATED EAMILIES. 

Charles Boisclair, wood, etc $3.00 

J. H. Canney, groceries 10.03 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons, coal and wood 4.00 

H. K. Emery & Co., groceries 8.17 

S. E. Gagnon & Co., groceries 16.33 

Griffin & Dug'uav, groceries 26.42 



$5,670.' 



.i;3.045.00 



CITY LIBRAEY. 97 

J, F. Looney. medicine $0.20 

A. D. Lemay, groceries .91 

J. A. Lindquist, groceries 23.04 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., wood and coal.. 7.00 

B. J. Mack, wood 1.00 

J. H. Marshall, medicine 3.50 

A. F. Precourt, medicine 2.21 

M. Potvin, medicine 2.50 

Frank I. Paige, groceries 16.95 

Tennant & Haggerty, groceines 19.42 

Peter Tennant, groceries 17.10 

J. 11. Willis & Co., wood 10.00 

$171.78 

SUNDRIES. 

W. B. Blake, burying animals $2.00 

C. :M. Bailey, V. S., inspecting cattle 12.00 

J. F. Looney, milk samples and burying ani- 
mals 9.95 

Manchester Hardware Co., paint 56.69 

C. 0. Seaman, milk samples, etc 5.65 

Walsh & Cummings, medicine and antitoxine 775.32 

$861.61 

Total expenditures $17,285.31 



City Library. 

Appropriation $9,000.00 

EXPENDITUBES. 
LrBRAKIAX AXD ASSISTANTS. 

F. Mabef Winchell, librarian $1,000.00 

Ruth Bartlett 210.50 

Mary Chamberlain ' 225.00 

Eugene S. Clark 175.63 

Caroline B. Clement 142.50 

Carlton Hamer 173.25 

Edith O. Emery 546.00 

A. R. Leavitt 86.75 

C. S. Morgan 176.00 

Louise E. Xewell 480.00 

Una "Vincent 22.50 

Wm. Vincent 136.00 

$3,374.13 



98 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDAY OPEXIXG. 

C. S. Morgan $72.75 

A. P. Eeed 74.25 

SUPPLIES. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing reports $21.70 

Gaylord Bros., binders, rubber bands 16.74 

W. P. Goodman, stationery 7.80 

Melvin & Fitts, stationery 6.02 

Star Stamp Co., pads, ink, etc •. . 5.60 

L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter Co., 1 type- 

Avriter and card platen S4.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 12.00 

F. M. Winchell, paid for catalogue cards.... 35.00 

J. A. "Williams, printing, etc 86.09 

BIXDIXG, KEBIXDIXG, AND RESEWIXG. 

Temple & Farrington Co 



$147.00 



$274.95 



563.14 



FUEL, IXSUKAX-CE, LIGHTS, TELEPHONE, AVATEE. 

Clarence M. Edgerly, insurance premium.. $125.00 
Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

electric lights 345.35 

Maxwell Ice Co., wood 7.00 

Moore & Preston Coal Co., coal 331.15 

Xew England Telej)hone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone 54.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 32.01 

Water commissioners, use of water 13.63 

XEW BOOKS, MAGAZIXES, PAPERS. 

Boston Book Co $18.89 

John B. Clarke Co 10.00 

M. P. Cogswell 4.25 

City News Co 11.60 

Herman Goldberger 347.33 

W. P. Goodman 640.56 

H. E. Huntting Co 60.70 

J, B. Lippincott 24.30 

Robert W. Lull 9.25 

Charles E. Lauriat Co 15.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 99 

Macmillau Co *. $12.75 

F. H. Merrill 18.00 

T. P. W. Eogers 24.22 

G. E. Stechert & Co 6-:^.4S 

Sampson & Murdock Co - 3.00 

Trustees of library 2,000.00 

Temple & Farrington Co 8.S0 

F. M. Winchell 16.24 

H. W. Wilson Co. 23.00 

$3,311.:!- 

SU^TDRIES. 

E. M. Bryant & Co., lamps and labor $-)..-)0 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 4.10 

C. B. Clarkson, weighing coal 3.75 

C. A. Hoitt Co., desks, tables, baskets, lino- 
leum, etc 108.35 

Mrs. Kate Hussey, cleaning 126.90 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co., ice ; 3.50 

J. H. Mendell Co., table, labor and material 21.89 

James W. Eobinson, care of boiler 133.50 

John B. Yarick Co., sponges, chamois, etc.. 13.35 

$420.84 

Total expenditures $8,999.57 

Transferred to unappropriated money .43 

$9,000.00 



Fire Department. 

Appropriation $91,600.00 



SERVICES. 

Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer $1,500.00 

Geo. H. Hammond, assistant engineer 250.00 

Thomas F. Fitzsimmons, assistant engineer 250.00 

E. W. Merrill, clerk and assistant engineer.. 324.97 

Arthyr Provost, assistant engineer 250.00 

teamsters' and exgixeers' payroll. 

January $3,457.50 

February 3,514.50 

March 3,469.50 



$2,574.97 



100 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

Kovember 

December 

CALL MEMBERS. 

Engine Comi^any ]N'o. 1 

Engine Company No. 2 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 3 

Engine Company No. 4 

Engine & Ladder Company No. 5 

Engine & Ladder Company No. G 

Engine Company No. 7 

Chemical Engine Company No. 1 

Combination Company No. 2 

Aerial Truck Companj- No. 1 

Hose Compan3- No. 1 

Hose Company No. 2 

Hose Company No. 3 

OTHER LABOR. 

J. N. Brown 

John H. Cote 

Thomas Collins 

Ealph Gove 

Harry L. Hawley 

Algot F. Landahl 

H. C. Morrill 

Percy L. Nute 

B. H. Stone 

Albert Tucker 

LAUXDRV. 

Gould & Laraba 

Henry Lang 

N. T. Towel Supply Co 

Oneeda Laundry 

Margaret Power 

Mrs. E. Z. Smith 

Mrs. A. W. Smith 



$3,445.50 
3,480.88 
3,485.00 
3,508.26 
3,478.25 
3,431.49 
3,431.50 
3,428.00 
3,428.00 



$1,098.00 
1,533.00 
2,293.00 
1,773.00 
2,293.00 
2,293.00 
1,533.00 

314.00 
1,078.00 
1,839.66 
1,693.00 
1,528.00 

92S.00 



$296.73 

29.75 

267.75 

153.12 

s.oo 

131.25 

2.68 

221.38 

190.75 

21.00 



$18.60 
22.46 
39.00 

120.40 

50.00 

5.40 

11.70 



$41,558.38 



$20,796.66 



$1,322.41 



$267.56 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. • 101 



FUENITUEE, ETC. 



Barton Comijanj', awnings $13.35 

James W. Hill Co., crash and pillow slips.. 10.00 

C. A. Hoitt Co., bedding, use of chairs 84.3"} 

James A. Scully, 48 folding chairs 72.00 



PRINT'IJsG AST) STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing envelopes, noteheads, etc $51.25 

Department reports 48.98 

W. P, Goodman, stationery 2.12 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and sta- 
tionery ISM 

FUEL, LIGHTS, TELEPHONE, WATER. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal $916.38 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 39.00 

C. A, & A. W. Flint, wood 38.00 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

electric lights 220.01 

Maxwell Ice Co., wood 8.00 

Moore & Preston Coal Co., coal '. 1,597.74 

Moore & Preston Coal Co., wood 3.50 

Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephones 69.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 578.49 

Water commissioners, use of water 411.75 



SUPPLIES. 

Amoskeag Mfg. Co., castings $13.27 

Charles E. Berry, pole snaps, breast plate 

lock, etc 19.35 

F. S. Bean Eelief Valve Co.,. leather, packing 2.00 

C. G. Braxmar Co., badges 1.80 

Boston Belting Co., hose 19. 5S 

Cornelius Callahan Co., supplies 421.90 

Daniels-Cornell Co., soap 35.35 

Farrell Bros., sockets 1,20 

Fellows & Son, sawdust .80 

Globe Manufacturing Co., coats 37.50 

John D. Healy, castings 40.50 

C. S. Knowles, lamps, batteries, burners, etc. 73.80 

T. A. :McDonald, brooms 13.00 



$179.70 



$121.01 



$3,881.87 



102 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



C. X. rerkins Co., 1 ladder .side 

Pike & Heakl Co., pipe, can, tubing 

Stark mills, duck 

C. D. Steele & Co., oil 

Stevens & Bradley, gasoline, flue brush.... 

A. D. Scovell, overalls 

John B. Varick Co., paint and hardware 

John B. Varick Co., deluge set ;... 

John B. Varick Co., 3,000 feet of hose 

A. A. Warren, oil 

West Side Lumber Co., sav.-dust 

Western Electric Co., carbon, burners, etc.. 

REPAIRS, ETC. 

» 

Cornelius Callahan Co., repairing hose 

George B. Cressej', paint 

Head & Dowst Co., labor, etc 

John D. Healj', casting 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 

Manchester Compressed Air & A'acuum Co., 

cleaning carpets 

Manchester Supply Co., nickel jjlating 

Stevens & Bradley, sliding poles 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks 



$22.33- 

5.41 

S.52 

6.25 

2.30 

8S.80 

523.10 

180.00 

2,250.00 

72.94 

.50 

4(1.10 



$1,121.66 

2.27 

2.76 

.90 

9.94 

9.50 

1.25 

38.55 

9 0.-; 



$3,886.30 



$1,189.08 



HORSES, TETERINiARY SERVICES AND MEDICIXE. 

F. T. Arbuckle, V. S., services and medicine $126.25 

Oavanaugh Bros., horses 1,825.54 

Cavanaugh Bros., use of horse 6.00 

F. J. Clark, fixing teeth and medicine 24.50 

Dyer & Chipman, medicine ] 5.69 

Lewis G. Gilman, medicine 2.45 

J. J. Holland, medicine 24.85 

Charles L. Howe & Co., insecticide 12.50 

E. J. Letendre, V. S., services and medicine.. 55.00 

The Sanitas Company, disinfectant 26.00 

CARRIAGE AND ENGINE REPAIRS. 

American Locomotive Co $238.30 

International Power Co 150.00 

J. B. McCrillis & Son 742.04 

McDonald Bros 5S.50 

Sanborn Carriage Co 45.45 



$2,118. 



$1,234.29 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



103 



BLACKSXriTHING. 

Connoi" & Grossman 

H. J. Dexter 

S. P. Dodge Co 

J. F. McDonald & Co 

McDonald Bros '. 

E. J. McShane 

John Stack ■. 

J. 0. & L. P. Tremblay 

G. F. Wenzel 



$SS.50 

120.25 

.85 

363.00' 

424.75 

69.75 

60.50 

281.25 

202.70 



$1,611.55 



HAY, GRAIX, ETC. 

Adams Bros 

A. S. Brown 

Chas. S. Fifield 

F. H. Masse & Co 

J. J. Levering- 

C. R. :\rerrill 

Partridsre & Co 



$275.59 

2,749.92 

182.55 

3,427.05 

24.00 

1,921.98 

386.04 



HARNESS SUPPLIES AND REPAIRS. 

Charles E. Berry $16.45 

Oliver Comire 1.40 

Leo Dalpe 13.00 

Frank Casavant 36.20 

Ranno Saddlery Co 87.20 

J. Vogel & Co 70.05" 

N. J. Whalen 52.70 



$8,967.13 



C. B. Clarkson, -weighing- coal 

W, J. Freeman, hack for committee 

E. H. Holmes, freight and cartage 

S. J. Laflamme, dinners for firemen, fire, 
April 8, 1909 

E. G. Libbey, conveying C. F. Hall from hos- 
pital to home 

Manchester Automobile Garage, automobile 
for committee 



529.25 


5.00 


26.85 


25.00 


1.00 


5.00 



104 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



F. M. Eay, burying horses $4.(10 

James Richards, hack for committee 5.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



.$101.10 



$90,087.79 
1,512.21 

$91,600.00 



Appropriation 



January . 
February 
March . . . 
April .... 

May 

June 

July 

August .. 
September 
October . , 
November 
December 



Archie Bent , 
Wm. Burgen . 
Wm. Burgess 



Fire Alarm Telegraph. 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 



$65.00 

60.00 

67.50 

65.00 

67.50 

65.00 

67.50 

70.00 

165.00 

165.00 

165.00 

167.50 



$31.51 
21.38 
48.38 



$2,500.00 



$1,1<.IO.OO 



SUPPLIES AXD REPAIRS. 

American Electrical Works, wire $335.30 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., spring and 

hammer 1.90 

James Baldwin Co., brackets 2.25 

Gamewell Fire-Alarm Telegraph Co., sup- 
plies and fire-alarm boxes 451.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber 2.23 

J. Hodge, pine and labor 53.07 

C. A. Hoitt Co., case and files 3.86 

C. S. Knowles, insulators, jars, tubes, etc.... 21.41 
Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

1 pole 3.50 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. — COMMISSION. 105 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairing ladder m.do 

Nutfield Press, tags 1.50 

Powell & Clarkson, repairs 2.25 

S. Sandberg & Co., use of lathe and filing- 
saws 3.95 

Stevens & Bradley, pipe, iron, repairs 8.46 

Tubeless Iron Co., plating belt and pliers... 3.00 

John B. Varick Co., hardware 50. OS 

Western Electric Co., supplies 52.27 

. ?906.9S 

SUNDRIES. 

E. n. Holmes, freight and cartage $7.77 

Thomas W. Lane, freight and express 23.60 

Temple & Farrington Co., book, index, etc. 1.40 

$32.77 

Total expenditures $2,321.02 

Transferred to unappropriated money 178.9S 

$2,500.00 



Hydrant Service. 

Appropriation $21,275.00 

Expenditures. 
Water commissioners, hj'drant rentals $21,275.00 

Police Department— Commission. 

Appropriation $58,000.00 

Expenditures. 

services. 

^Michael .J. Healy, chief of police $2,500.00 

John F. Cassidy, deputy chief 1,500.00 

John F. Griffin, clerk 639.60 

Edward B. Woodbury, chairman of commis- 
sion, salary 150.00 

Xoah S. Clark, commissioner 100.00 

Peter A. Farrell, commissioner 100.00 

A. B. Brown, police matron 425.00 

llegular and special police 47,946.65 

$53,361.25 



106 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



FEEDING PRISONERS. 

Jordan Eestaurant Co $1G0.40 

National Biscuit Co 68.54 

Hertel Pariseau 6.05 

Eugene Sigrist 5.TC 

PRI.VrtlXG AND STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing $14.75 

W. P. Goodman, books and .stationery SO. 57 

L. T. Mead, stationery 11.75 

Temple & Farrington Co., books and paper.. 23.(55 



$240.75 



$130.72 



PATROL SYSTEM EXPENSES. 

J. J. Abbott, gasoline $0.50 

Adams Bros., oats 36.00 

Ame & Co., "Standard Food" 9.00 

American Electrical Works, wire 6.40 

American Steel & \Yire Co., wire 85.26 

F. T. Arbuekle, V. S., services and medicine 10.25 
Automatic Time Stamp Co., time stamp and 

ribbons 81.00 

Bojxl Bros., clipping horse 2.00 

Boston & Maine Eailroad, freight 8.47 

Arthur S. Brown, hay and grain 256.25 

J. P. Brown & Co., carriage repairs 78.30 

Brodie Electric & Automobile Co., insulators, 

etc 6.40 

E. M. Bryant & Co., batteries, sockets, etc. 6.92 
Geo. H. Buckminster Co., wire and batteries 99.89 

Columbia Eefining Co., "Amberzo" 16.80 

Couch & Seeley Co., strikers 2.00 

S. P. Dodge Co., springs, bolts, spokes 6.30 

H. B. Dunton, V. S., services 4.00 

Farrell Bros., material and labor ; 6.03 

The Fahnestock Electric Co., supplies 10.68 

F. M. Ferren, wire 14.91 

W. J. Freeman, use of horse and wagon.... 7.00 
Gamewell Fire-Alarm Telegraph Co., register 

ink 3.00 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 6.64 

Peter Harris & Son, repairs 1.50 

C. A. Hoitt Co., 1 folding chair .75 

Charles Kean, labor on signal wires 151.25 

Kimball Carriage Co., supplies 14.10 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. — COMMISSION. 



107 



H. J. Lawson, copper 

E. J. Letendre, V. S., visits and medicine... 

r. W. Leeman, crash and cotton 

Mancliester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

pin arms, insulators 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairing wagon 

C. R. Merrill, hay and grain 

Metropolitan Air Goods Co., repairing mat- 
tress 

Mitchell Manufacturing Co., badges 

Thomas Mooney, labor on wires 

F. H. McDougall, labor 

Xew York Insulated Wire Co., wire 

Neostyle Co., neostj-le, paper, and ink 

John Parker, labor on signal circuits, etc... 

Chas. E. Perry Co., paper 

Frederick Pearce Co., supplies and repairing 

telegraph boxes 

Pierce Specialty Co., supplies 

Pettingell-Andrews Co., electrical merchan- 
dise 

Sandwich Pole-Changer Co., springs and 
screws 

Sanborn Carriage Co., varnishing- ambulance, 
material and labor 

C. J. Smith, labor on signal wires 

Stromberg-Carlson Telephone Manufacfuring 
Co., mouthpieces and key 

J. Brodie Smith, insulators 

J. 0. & L. P. Tremblay, horseshoeing 

Union Electric Manufacturing Co., 1 grip.... 

United Electric & Apparatus Co., supplies.. 

Western Electric Co., supplies 

E. C. Wheeler, carrots 

X. J. Whalen, harness repairs 



$().:!9 
11. .50 

8.78 

13.4S 

58.61 

306.39 

1.50 

5.00 

75.00 

6.00 

214.90 

60.29 

207.50 

27.09 

210.71 

18.82 



29.85 
70.00 

2.84 

10.80 

115.25 

5.00 
71.76 
91.0S 
21.70 
54.83 



HARDWARE A.XD REPAIRS. 



Antoine Brelle, 2 awnings $9.00 

C. H. Dennis, repairing signal boxes 1.05 

Garaewell Fire-Alarm Telegraph Co., repairs 12.54 

Peter Harris, repairs 3.85 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 4.07 

]Mancliester Awning Co., 2 awnings 9.00 

Manchester Hardware Co.. hardware 141.02 

J. H. Mendell Co., lumber 4.39 



108 REPORT OF THE CITY" AUDITOR. 

Manchester Tyj)ewriter Exchange, work on 

machine $0.75 

Harry A. Piper, repairs .35 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe and labor 2.20 

Powell & Clarkson, lumber and labor (3.15 

Street and Park commission, pipe 2.00 

TELEPHOXE AST) TELEGKAPH. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephones $191.04 

Western Union Telegraph Co., telegrams 

and clock rental 10.S3 

SUNDRIES. 

W. M. Eames Drug Co., medicine $1.75 

Margaret Guevin, caring for lost children.. 13.00 

John B. Hall Co., medicine 42.65 

M. J. Healy, expenses incurred attending 
meeting of International Association of 

Chiefs of Police, at BufPalo, X. Y 75.00 

J. J. Holland, medicine 4.50 

Edgar S. Leslie, photographing criminals.. 28.00 

E. G. Libbey, use of teams 4.25 

Total expenditures 

Tran.sf erred to unappropriated money 

Police Department— Station. 
Appropriation 

Expenditures, 
services. 
Frank P. "Wiggin, janitor 

FUEL, LIGHTS, WATER. 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

electric lights $500.8(5 

Maxwell Ice Co., wood 38.50 



$19G.' 



$201.87 



$56,906.62 
1,033.38 

$58,000.00 



$3,000.00 



$821.25 



POLICE DEPARTMENT STATION. 



109 



Moore & Preston Coal Co., coal $T6S.10 

People's Gas-Lig-ht Co., gas 60.83 

Water commissioners, use of water 107.78 



$1,.572.07 



LAUNDRY, ETC. 

Daniels-Cornell Co., brooms, matches, toilet 

paper $16.92 

N. J. Fontaine, cleaning carpet 4.50 

J. A. Scully, mattresses 16.80 

Orient Manufacturing Co., disinfectant 20.00 

Mrs. J. F. Wiggin, laundry work 50.87 

The Worrell Mfg. Co., insect exterminator 20.00 

REPAIRS, ETC. 

J. J. Abbott, glass $4.50 

T. J. Briggs, flue brushes and rej^airs l.fiO 

E. il. Br^-ant & Co.. electric supplies and re- 
pairs 22.14 

C. H. Dennis, repairing door, setting glass, 

etc 3.S2 

A. ^I. Finney, caning chairs 4.05 

Head & Dowst Co.. lumber 1.40 

Manchester Hardware Co.. hardware.. 5. SI 

Manchester Machine' Works, labor on gears 

and castings 1.30 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

lamps 16.80 

J. J. Moreau & Son. solder, tin, labor 1.45 

Frank W. Morse, lamps 6.17 

Pike & Heald Co., heating and plumbing re- 
pairs 5.50 

Elmer E. Reed, mason work 14.84 

Stevens & Bradley, plumbing re])airs 7.48 

John JB. Yarick Co., cord .25 

SUNDRIES. 

C. B. Clarkson, weighing coal $7.25 

J. J. Holland, drugs and disinfectant 39.55 

Western Union Telegraph Co.. clock rental 3.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappi'opriated money 



$129.09 



$97.41 



$49.80 

$2,669.62 
330.38 



$3,000.00 



110 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Police Department— Court. 
Appropriation 

EXPEXDIXrRES. 
SERVICES. 

Isaac L. Heath, police justice $1,500.00 

H. E. Loveren, associate justice 300.00 

John C. Bickf ord, clerk 600.00 



SUNDRIES. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing docket $12.75 

M. J. Healy, paid witness fees 306.05 

Xew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telei^hone 54.00 

E. A. Stratton Co., printing dockets and 

writs 100.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., book .50 

Tilton Box Co., boxes 14.00 

J. A. Williams, larinting letterheads, writs, 

etc 10.50 



Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money. 



$497. SO 



$2,900.00 



Repairs of Buildings. 

Appropriation $9,500.00 

Expenditures, 
city library. 

E. M. Bryant & Co., material and labor on 

electric lights $223.79 

Chamberlin Metal Weather Strip Co., 
weather stripping 43 windows, per contract 160.00 

Herman Fischer, lumber and labor 263.18 

Fischer & Bisson, rep. roof, ventilator pipes, 

etc 472.57 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. Ill 

W. E. Goodwin, installing- plumbing, steam 

and gas $320.03 

John T. Gott, cleaning granite 200.00 

George H. Hammond, material and labor, 

balcony and bookcases 168. S.5 

M. J. O'Connor, paint and labor 339. SO 

Elmer E. Eeed, masonwork 479.69 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., repairing 

gutters 35.99 

Stevens & Bradlej', material and labor on 

boiler 19.80 

J. H. & B. H. Stone, paint, glass, labor 4.24 

John B. Varick Co., sash cord, glass 2.27 

$2,690.21 



POLICE STATIOX. 

Herman Fischer, material and carpenter 

work $159.38 

I. Gagne & Co., material and labor 110.64 

F. L. Noyes, roofing material and labor.... 97.77 

M. J. O'Connor, paint and labor 468.86 

Elmer E. Eeed, work on boiler 46.84 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.. 60.28 

Stevens & Bradley, labor on closet tanks.. 1.70 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing repairs 80.15 



ENGINE HOrSES. 

A. A. Amlaw, plumbing $109.48 

S. Bergeron, labor 35.42 

Bunton & Bernard, lumber, etc., labor 49.30 

George B. Cressey, j)aint and labor 15.91 

Connor Bros., j)lumbing and steam fitting. . 70.40 
Fischer & Bisson, ventilator, etc., and re- 
pairing roofs 297.40 

Herman Fischer, material and carpenter 

work 356.95 

Farrell Bi-os., electric supplies and labor... 38.92 

Louis Gadbout, hardware and labor 7.16 

T. Gagne & Co., material and labor 618.12 

W. E. Goodwin, plumbing 17.07 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 18.50 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 1.34 

Landry & Landry, stone step, coping, cement 83.72 

Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 1.05 

J. F. Marchand, gas piping and labor 13.87 



$1,025.62 



112 REPORT OF THE CITV AUDITOR. 

C F. -McDonald, plumbing repairs, etc $32.33 

F. L. Xoyes, roofing material and labor.... 83.70 

M. J. O'Connor, paint, varnish, labor 155.35 

Pike & Heald Co., material and labor, steam 

fitting 59.60 

Eivard & Co., painting building and fence, 

South Manchester 7S.00 

Godard Eouleau, labor and screen 17.00 

Reinholdt Schmidt, lumber and labor 223.68 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, glass 3.24 

Stevens & Bradley, steam fitting, etc 294.44 

J. H. & B. H. Stone, paint and labor 151.14 

John B. Yarick Co., paint, screws, cord 1.56 

West Side Ltimber Co., sheathing, etc 34.98 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing repairs 54.17 



CITY HALL. 

E. M. Bryant & Co., material and labcr $6.05 

Herman Fischer, lumber and labor 53.28 

Fischer & Bisson, grills, steel ceilings, 

plumbing repairs 237.01 

Francoenr Sign Co., lettering glass signs... 7.00 

I. Gagne & Co., putting up storm doers 10.40 

W. E. Goodwin, plumbing 5.83 

G. H. Hammond, material and labor, (council 
chamber, auditor's, treasurer's, and engi- 
neer's offices) 457.83 

Stevens & Bradley, disconnecting ])ipes. 

steam fitting 27.13 

J. H. & B. H. Stone, paint and labor 59.50 

W. H. Sullivan, material and laV)cr, painting 
and papering (auditor's and treasurer's 

offices) C27.13 

John B. Yarick Co., glass, hinges 2.70 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing material and labor 20.05 



COURT HorsE. 



Connor Bros., plumbing material and labor 
Gustave Hecker, taking of¥ double windows 
Stevens & Bradley, gas and steam fitting... 



$84.13 


.50 


31.30 



$2,926.80 



$115.93 



YOUNGSVILLE SCHOOLHOUSE. 113 



WARD FIVE WARDROOM. 



Connor Bros., plumbing $26.36 

Fischer & Bisson, repairing drainpipe 7.00 

I. Gagne & Co., lumber and labor 14.60 



SUNDRIES. 

D. G. Andrews, labor (ward two wardroom) $2.62 

Josef Cerweny, paint and labor on bathhouse 31.15 

Farrell Bros., plumbing 12.27 

Herman Fischer, moving bathhouse, carpen- 
ter work, etc 185.92 

I. Gagne & Co.: 

Material and labor (ward nine wardroom) 46.40 

Lumber and labor (city scales) 96.06 

Hadlock's garage, use of automobile 5.00 

W. D. Hebert & Co., care city clocks 150.00 

Arthur P. Knapp, fire escapes (city hall and 

battery building) 500.00 

H. H. Lamoureux, hack for committee 5.00 

James E. MacDonald, expenses of committee 
to Boston and Chelsea, inspecting fire 

house 25.00 

J. J. Moreau & Son, repairing roof of battery 

building 114.50 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, lamp, burner, globe, 

saw 2.05 

John B. Varick Co., glass and putty .96 

Wiggin-Young Co., nails, broom, hatchet.... 2.51 



$47.g 



$1,179.44 



Total expenditures $9,499.87 

Transferred to unappropriated money .13 

$9,500.00 



Youngsville Schoolhouse. 

Appropriation $9,000.00 



114 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

sundries. 

C. T. McFarland & H. W. Colby, plans and 

specifications $450.00 

Bunton & Bernard, contract, building and 
furnishing 8,550.00 

Total expenditures 



$9,000.00 



$9,000.00 



Water- Works. 



Balance from last year unexpended, 
Cash received for water rents 



$41,821.38 
153,761.50 



$195,582.88 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January $2,004.48 

February 2,305.84 

March 1,904.09 

April 2,015.57 

May 2,179.58 

June 2,945.57 

July 2,380.60 

August , 2,465.90 

September 2,919.48 

October 2,501.28 

November 3,583.18 

December 2,143.96 

GENERAL EXPENSES. 

Charles K. Walker, superintendent: 

Salary $2,400.00 

Cash paid, lights 204.43 

Express, stamps, freight, etc 159.34 

J. H. Holmes, dinners, water board and 

guests 87.50 

Hotel Milford, board of divers 5.00 

John Olsen, services as diver 46.14 

William Corey, 21 meetings of board 105.00 



$29,349.53 



\VATEK-WOKKS. 115 

Terry H. Dow. 11 meetings of board $55.00 

Charles M. Floyd, 23 meetings of board 115.00 

Edgar J. Knowlton, IS meetings of board 90.00 

Charles H. Manning, 30 meetings of board.. 150.00 
Robert E. McKean, 17 meetings of board.... 85.00 



ADVERTISING, PRINTING, STATIONERV. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing bills, postals.. $66.25 

John B. Clarke Co., reports 36.55 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising 13.10 

Manchester Union Co., advertising 13.22 

Melvin & Fitts, stationery and binding books 8.50 
E. A. Stratton Co., printing notices and en- 
velopes 18.50 

Temple & Fai'rington Co., stationery and 

books 18.21 

FUEL, TEAMS, TELEPHONE. 

Bader Coal Co., coal $84.85 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 336.00 

Brodie Electric & Auto Co., use of auto- 
mobile S.OO 

Fletcher Brown, wood 11.25 

L. W. Brooks, use of teams 18.00 

Ira W, Dickey, drawing wood 22.50 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons, coal 44.00 

Charles S. Fifield, use of teams 8.00 

Hadlock Garage, use of automobiles 15.00 

Hedding Transfer Co., use of hacks 15.00 

W. A. Jepson, coal 766.83 

J. J. Lovering, paid for cutting wood 78.80 

Manchester Auto Garage, use of automobiles 60.73 
New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone 39.54 

James W. Richards, use of team 2.00 

H. A. Russell, use of hack 5.00 

LAND AND BUILDINGS. 

W. B. Corey Transfer and Trucking Co., land 

and buildings $1,500.00 

Club Jolliet, land and buildings 4.000.00 

John T. Levasseur, land and buildings 8,372.85 

Richard Schaarschmidt, land 3,500.00 

N. J. Whalen, % interest (Shamrock Boat 

Club), land and buildings 4,000.00 



$3,502.41 



$174.33 



$1,515.50 



$21,372.85 



116 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

LEGAL SERVICES. 

J^iirnham, Brc\Yn, Jones & Warren 

BLACKlSMITHrNG, FREIGHT, AND HARDWARE. 

C. H. Ally son, blaeksmithing $350.39 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 2,430.84 

Manchester Hardware Co., tools and hard- 
ware 23.85 

John B. Varick Co.. tools and hardware.... 546.46 

SUPPLIES. 

J. J. Abbott, gasoline, paint, and lalior $272.45 

Adams Bros., cement, lime, s"alt 20.65 

American Locomotive Co., castings 381.71 

American Steam Gauge & Valve Co., 2 

springs 1 .05 

Amo.skeag Manufacturing Co., iron, packing, 

waste, gauge glasses 193.34 

Boston Belting Co., supplies 27.76 

The Borden Co., dies 2.80 

Harold L. Bond Co., .hose, picks, and handles. 

etc S1.40 

E. M. Bryant & Co., lamps, batteries 22.30 

Builders' Iron Foundry, sleeves, branches, 

bends, etc 138.93 

Chapman Valve Manufacturing Co., valves 

and spindles 32.26 

Chadwick-Boston Lead Co., lead pipe 104.58 

Joseph Dixon Crucible Co., paint 63.70 

H. E. Dunbar, motor boat and engine 350.00 

Edson Manufacturing Co., supplies 56.25 

Glauber Brass Manufacturing Co., nips and 

unions 52.00 

Granite State Eubber Co., packing, .etc 9.75 

Hays Manufacturing Co., curb cocks and 

boxes 549.07 

Hancock Inspirator Co., inspirator and re- 
pairs '3. 30 

Hart Packing Co., packing 13.19 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor 316.67 

J. Hodge, boards 6.72 

Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Co., supplies 22.30 

Lead Lined Iron Pipe Co., pipe 1.548.41 

Ludlow Valve Manufacturing Co., gates, 

dome, nuts 214.20 



$2G1.6G 



$3,351.51 



WATEK-WORKS. 117 

Martin Iron Works, iiicks, drills, and rej^airs $86.03 

McKelvie Bros., pails and dippers 9.30 

J. Y. McQueston Co., 6 chairs 3.90 

J. H. Mendell Co., lumber and lime 10. IG 

National Meter Co., meters and couijlings.. 853.94 

Neptune Meter Co., meters, etc 26.5.0S 

Newark Brass Works, 1 gasket l.oO 

Norwood Engineering Co., hydrant heads and 

rubber valves 1,521.53 

F. F. Osgood, packing 36.00 

Perry Oil Co., oil 174.92 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe 176.54 

Pittsburg Meter Co., meters 308.83 

Pratt & Cady Co., nuts, etc 9.10 

Paul Eatner, range, table, etc 13.50 

Rensselaer Manufacturing Co., gates 392.50 

Richards & Co., lead 1,113.61 

Richardson & Clement, stock, vise, die 9.50 

Smith Box & Lumber Co., boxes 76.50 

C. D. Steele & Co., soap and broom 2.13 

Stevens & Bradley, pipe and hose 72.49 

Thomson Meter Co., meters 410.95 

Union Grocery Co., gasoline 13.00 

Union W^ater Meter Co., meters, washers, 

glasses, etc 51.50 

U. S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co., pipe.. 2,604.44 
Walworth Manufacturing Co., unions, coup- 
lings, dies 32.64 

n. R. Worthington, meters, etc 53.57 

R. D. Wood & Co., pipe 1,573.7 



REPAIRS. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., testing boil- 
ers, etc $104.64 

E. M. Bryant & Co., material and labor 2.50 

Joel S. Daniels, paper, paint, labor... 11.52 

Drew Machinery Agency, labor on castings.. 4.00 

Hersey Manufacturing Co., repairing meters 12.54 

Martin Iron Works, repairs 10.08 

Xntioiial Meter Co., repairing meters 201.23 

Neptune Meter Co., repairing meters 31.60 

Pike & Heald Co., jUumbing material and 

labor 164.81 

A. D. Sherer, painting fence 30.00 

J. Brodie Smith, making supports for points 

on coil .75 



$14,361. 



118 



KEPOIIT OF THE CITY AUDITOK. 



Stillman-Carmichael Co., repairs and supplies $6.70 

Thomson Meter Co., repairing meters 84.63 

Union Water Meter Co., repairing meters... 181.62 

W. C. Wilson, lumber and labor 34.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Town of Auburn, taxes $748.73 

W. G. Berry, insurance premium 15.00 

H. A. Boone, destroying moth nests 18.25 

Dudley & Sawyer, survej'ing 120. S2 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co., 

thawing water main 45.00 

Sarah C.^Pennock, rent of house 100.00 

Harrison Preston, lease of land 75.00 

Alfred Roberge, removing moth nests 606.50 

Sinking fund commissioners: 

Payment of water bonds 5,000.00 

Hydrant rentals 21,275.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to interest account 

Transferred to new account 



$880.62 



$28,004.30 

$102,774.46 
29,422.50 
63,385.92 

$195,582.88 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Appropriation 
Appropriation, 



improvement of pond. 



$13,000.00 
2,500.00 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January $396.36 

February 477.82 

March : 431.00 

April 678.93 

May 851.37 

June 1,167.11 

July 826.21 

August 801.97 

September 917.43 

October 651.25 

November 772.58 

December 43-i.O^ 



$8,406.11 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY, 



119 



FUEL, TELEPHONE, WATEK. 

New England Telephone & 'ielegraph Co., 

nse of telephone $27.25 

Union Coal Co., coal 217.50 

Water commissioners, nse of -water 525.25 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing $13.00 

E. H. Clongh, stamped envelopes 10.62 

Temple & Farrington Co., stationery 3.86 

J. Arthnr Williams, printing 6.50 



$770.00 



$33.98 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Sallie W. Andrews, et al., 94.S20 sq. ft. land.. $2,370.50 

C. W. Anderson & Co., exchange of clock... 3.75 

Bunton & Bernard, material and labor 147.95 

A. P. Home & Co., tnlips 30.00 

J. Hodge, grade stakes 7.38 

Manchester Hardware .Co., tools 10.93 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co.: 

Lights in chapel 9.81 

Labor on cable 45.01 

Manchester Tyi^ewriter Exchange, rei^airing 

machine and new platen 2.75 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe and repairs 20.82 

Elmer E. Reed, masonwork 6.97 

Stark mills, cloth 28.96 

Charles P. Still, loam 66.00 

James Thompson, loam 46.00 

John B. Varick Co., tools, fence, and hard- 
ware 196.03 

West Side Lumber Co., posts 50.00 

TEAM EXPENSES. 

Adams Bros., grain $403.03 

Frank Casavant, harness supplies anc\ repairs 2.20 

Leo Dalpe, repairing harness 3.75 

Earl H. Danf orth, hay 18.00 

S. P. Dodge Co., repairing carts 30.35 

H. B. Dunton, V. S., ser%ices 2.00 

C. R. Merrill, grain 55.98 

J. L. Poore, hay 138.70 

J. 0. & L. P. Tremblav. horseshoeing 36.25 



$3,042.86 



$690.26 



120 EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



IMPROVEME>T OF POXD. 
I.jXBOK. ETC. 

June $136.92 

July 201.03 

August 139.48 

September 208.89 

October 113.26 

November 73.56 

C. A. Bailey, broken stone .• $200.55 

C. R. Earle, catch basins 18.00 

A. Eastman & Co., masonwork 21.15 

J, D. French, loam and drawing- stone 693.00 

A. P. Horne & Co., shrubs and plants 215.55 

Harry T. Lord, loam 45.00 

Manchester Supply Co., pipe 123.72 

H. W. Parker, cement 35.20 

Pike & Heald Co., pipe and labor 73.61 

C. P. Still, loam 72.00 

Street and park commission, brick and sewer 

pipe 60.44 

H. A. Titus, loam 59.50 

James Thompson, loam 9.00 



Valley Cemetery. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Appropriation for sidewalk 1.500.00 



$873.14 



$1,626.72 



SUNDRIES. 

Fred D. Cross, recording deed $1 .49 

J. H. Erskine, expenses attending convention 
of American Cemetery Superintendent's 

Association, New York city 30.44 

Edwin F, Jones, annual report of subtrus- 

tees ......'., 25.00 

■ $56.93 

Total expenditures $15,500.0P 



5,500.00 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 121 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

January $206.75 

February 257,95 

March 198.40 

April 2S3.57 

^liiy 390.82 

June 565.04 

July < 412.20 

August 342.64 

September 422.85 

October 331.15 

November 372.18 

December 217.80 

$4,001.35 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons $33.50 

FUEL, STATIONERY, TELEPHONE, WATER. 

H. H. Clement, typewriting $2.00 

Kew England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone 25.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 book 3.00 

^Yater commissioners, use of water 173.50 

J. F. Wyman, coal 45.00 



PI-AN;TS, LOAM, ETC. 

Bridget Clune, dressing , $20.00 

W. B. Corey, dressing 14.00 

H. A. DonaAvay, loam 28.50 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons, loam and turf 152.96 

Pine Grove cemetery, plants 60.05 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

S. P. Dodge Co., blacksmithing $9.30 

Fred E. Ellis, stone 522.75 

Head & Dowst Co., pruning poles 1.20 

Manchester Supply Co., pipe 3.66 

Palmer & Garmon, cutting, cleaning, and re- 
pairing stones 24.05 

H. W. Parker, cement 18.80 

Street and park commission, cutting down 

trees 48.63 

Eugene S. Smith, paid for lumber 31.47 



$249.00 



$275.51 



122 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Charles Thompson, repairing clock $1.00 

John B. Yarick Co., hardware 160.77 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing repairs, etc 35.43 

TEAM EXPENSES. 

A. S. Brown, grain $2.57 

H. J. Dexter, horseshoeing 15.00 

F. H. Masse & Co., grain 92.81 

J. Vogel & Co., harness repairs 4.53 

SIDEWALK, PINE AND VAL^LEY STREETS. 

C. A. Bailey, curbing 

SUNDRIES. 

F. C. Livingston, services as clerk of trustees $12.50 

E. C. Smith, expenses, attending convention 
of American Cemetery Superintendents at 
New York City 25.00 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated nionej- 



$857. 



$114.93 



$662.40 



$6,231.25 
268.75 



$6,500.00 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 

Appropriation 

EXPENDITl-RES. 
LABOR. 

John Crabtree $21.87 

Romeo Doucette 50.00 

George C. Harwood 182.90 

Emil Heilmann 12.00 

SUNDRIES. 

J. Francis, plants $5.00 

W. J. Freeman, horse hire 2.00 

E. G. Libbej', use of teams 4.00 



$500.00 



$266.77 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 123 

Manchester Hai-dware Co., tools, seed, and 

dressing- $45.30 

Maxwell Ice Co., loam and use of team 126.75 

John B. Varick Co., hardware, settees, and 

paint 37.53 

"Water commissioners, use of water 12.00 

$232.58 

Total expenditures ' $499.35 

Transferred to unappropriated money .05 

$500.00 



Merrill Yard. 
Appropriation $100.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

May $16.60 

July 7.75 

August 8.00 

September 18.00 

November 18.87 

December > 15.00 

• $84.22 

SUNDRIES. 

Manchester Hardware Co., tools and nails.. $12.65 

W. T. Stevens, dressing 3.13 

15. 7S 



Total expenditures ; $100.00 



Repairs of Schoolhouses. 

Appropriation $8,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money... 261.39 

$8,261.39 



124 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

masoxwork. 

Thomas Finnerty $18.50 

Elmer E. Keed 228.78 

Cyrus Whittemore 60.00 

John S. Wheeler 3.18 

PAINTING AND GLAZING. 

J. J. Abbott $117.93 

Bunton & Bernard 382.00 

G. B. Cressey 353.01 

Joel S. Daniels 1,227.73 

Fred M. Dow 37.29 

W. F. Henderson 2.55 

Head & Dowst Co • 2.97 

E. W. Poore 85,77 

AV. J. Powers 2.00 

Savage Bros 327.79 

PLUMBING, MATERIAL AND REPAIRS. 

D. J. Adams, repairing lock $8.10 

D. J. Adams & Co., repairs 1.20 

American Locomotive Co., castings 33.08 

S. C. Austin & Co., repairing lightning rods. . 15.00 

Milton Bradley Co., brackets for tables 5.05 

F. W. Bradlej^ caning chairs 2.50 

E. M. Bryant & Co., supplies and repairs 4.48 

Chamberlin Metal Weather Strip Co., weath- 

erstripping 7 windows 25.00 

G. W. Darrah, rooting material and labor. . 223.72 
A. L. Franks & Co., supplies and repairs.... 320.63 
A. M. Finney, repairing chairs 3.70 

F. L. Geiger & Co., castings and repairs.,... 27.33 
J. H. Gritfin, labor, grading 252.36 

G. H. Hammond, material and labor 524.50 

Head & Dowst Co., material and labor 723.68 

James W. Hill Co., labor on flag .SO 

C. A. Hoitt Co., shades 9.50 

C. F. Jack, guides for elevator .50 

J. Kennedy, fixing drainage .40 

H. J. Lawson, repairing gutters 28,98 

A. ]\r. Lewis, plumbing and heating repairs.. 100.66 

Frank D. Leighton, plumbing, steam fitting 98.84 



$310.46 



$2,539.04 



POINTING AND ADVERTISING. 125 

Leighton Machine Co., set screws, tape, etc. $54.08 
Gardiner Marston, material and labor on fur- 
nace 4.15 

C. F. McDonald, plumbing repairs 18.30 

J. T. McLaughlin, plumbing repairs 50'.14 

Manchester Excavating Co., cleaning vaults 

and cesspools 66.00 

F. L. Noyes, roofing re^iairs 119.21 

Pike & Heakl Co.. plumbing, steam and gas 

fitting 215.21 

Harry Piper, material and labor 1.29,'>.54 

Harry Piper, putting on windows and 

porches 115.00 

Robie Consolidated Concrete Co., concrete.. 281.94 

Edward Sargent, making keys 2.40 

Sanborn Carriage Co., fixing poker .75 

James Scully, shades and hanging 7.69 

Stevens & Bradley, plumbing and steam 

fitting 478.71 

A. G. Vogel, making keys .40 

John B. Yarick Co., hardware 54.54 

C. L. Wolf, plumbing repairs 12.37 

^ ■ $5,185.0 1 

SUNDRIES. 

John Cedar, labor $3.50 

E. H. Holmes, moving piano 2.50 

Manchester Typewriter Exchange, paper and 

writing specifications 3.85 

Victor Pratfe, putting ropes through flag- 
poles 5.00 

J. A. Sheehan, insurance premium 60.00 

Travelers' Insurance Co., payment on boiler 

policy 152.00 

$226.85 

Total expenditures $8,261.39 



Printing and Advertising. 

Appropriation $350.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money... 111.30 



$401.30 



126 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

EXPEXDITUEES. 



John B. Clarke Co.: 

Printing cards, blanks, manuals, etc $415.25 

Advertising 23.00 

Manchester Union Co., advertising notice.. S.60 

Union Publishing Co., advertising notice.... 14.45 



$461.30 



Total expenditures 



$461.30 



Books and Stationery. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 
E. A. Stratton Co., printing cards and contracts. 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unaj^propriated money 



$50.00 



$8.50 



$8.50 
41.50 



$50.00 



Furniture and Supplies. 



Appropriation 



$1,500.00 



EXPENDITUEES. 
BOOKS, STATIONERY, SUPPLIES. 

American Seating Co., seats, inkwells.. $57.88 

L. M. Folsom, ribbon 32.16 

AY. P. Goodman, stationery 3.50 

J. L. Hammett Co., blackboards 44.32 

James W. Hill Co., flags 16.70 

Kenney Bros. & Wolkins, inkwells 8.20 

G. H. Libbey, postage, etc 13.71 

Manchester Hardware Co., hammer .50 

Pike & Heald Co., can and inkwell fillers 5.03 

John B. Varick Co., hardware, etc 44.54 



$226.54 



FUEL. 1 27 



rUUNITUKE, ETC, 



C. W. Anderson & Co., clocks '. . . $11.50 

C. A, Hoitt Co., tables, chairs, desks, etc 225.80 

Kenney Bros. & Wolkins, desks and chairs 303.00 

Melvin & Fitts, cabinets, indicators, etc 68.05 

Yawman & Erbe Mfg-. Co., 1 file 58.50 



SUNDRIES. 

C. A. Hoitt Co., use of chairs $49.04 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos 17.50 

J. G. Jones, cartage 14.43 

Manchester Typewriter Exchange, repairing 

typewriters 13.60 

Monarch Typewriter Co., rent of machines.. 30.00 

Novelty Co., rent of typewriters 30.00 

Piper & Mclntire, rent of piano 10.00 

Stanley Liquid Soap Co., soap 8.75 

Smith Bros. Piano Co., rent of pianos 155.00 

Williams Manufacturing Co., rent of ma- 
chines 25.00 



Expenditures. 

COAL. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co $348.36 

Moore & Preston Coal Co 8,707.31 

Union Coal Co 460.21 



$660.8." 



$353.32 



Total expenditures $1,246.71 

Transferred to unappropriated money 253.29 



$1,500.00 



Fuel. 

Appropriation $12,0lD0.00 



$9,515.S 



WOOD. 

^faxwell Ice Co $893.14 



128 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SrXDKIES. 

C. B. Clarkson, weighing c6al $112.25 

J. G. Jones, cartage .25 

F. D. Leighton, flue brushes, labor on heaters 20.15 

Edward Sargent, keys and rings 4.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., books 6.25 

H. A, Piper, lumber and labor 1.40 

John B. Yarick Co., shovels, pails, hose 120.80 



Contingent Expenses. 

Appropriation $3,200.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money.... 160.75 



EXPENDITIRES. 
ELECTRIC LIGHTS. GAS. WATER. 

Manchester Traction, Light & Power Co.. 

electric lights $649.32 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas 320.87 

Water commissioners, use of water 1.330.13 



CARRYIXG WATER. 

Eva M. Bean $19.00 

Emma J. Ela : 19.00 

G. M. Morse 19.00 

Micfiael Sullivan 5.75 



USE OF TEAMS. 

C. W. Biekford $150.00 

Maude E. Brown 48.00 

Curtis W. Davis 150.00 

Florence Desrochers 44.00 

Emma J. Ela 25.00 

Charles I. Hardy 195.00 

M. F. Partridge 70.00 

Mary E. Walker 12.50 

Henrietta G. Wilder 4.00 



$265.10 



Total expenditures $10,674.12 

Transferred to unappropriated money 1,325.88, 



$12,000.00 



$2,300.32 



$62.7- 



$698.50 



CARE OF SCHOOLROOMS. 



129 



SUNDKIE3. 

D. A. Gallagher, use of Mechanics hall $75.00 

J. H. Hessei', engrossing diplomas 43.95 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos 8.00 

G. H. Libbej-, carfare, securing teachers 5.68 

G. M. Morse, repairs 2.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

use of telephone '''•15 

Novell}' Co., 4 typewriters 120.00 

Victor E. Stevens, engrossing diplomas 32.40 

Willis Totten, cleaning well 5.00 

Total expenditures 

Care of Schoolrooms. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

jaxitoes. 

John S. Avery $550.00 

Edwin N. Baker 350.00 

Marshall N. Badger 225.00 

Eva M. Bean 41.00 

Joseph H. Buffum 700.00 

John Cedar • 500.00 

Charles H. Corey 225.00 

Emma J. Ela 38.00 

John Foley 18.00 

W. F. Henderson 550.00 

Louis Hueber 225.00 

Edward J. Ivers 49.99 

Charles F. Jack 700.00 

George H. Jack 650.00 

John J. Kelley 600.34 

Hugh McVicker 487.52 

^Y. H. Newry 550.00 

Wm. J. Powers 650.00 

Arabella Rickaby 58.00 

Mary E. Stevens 16.50 

Asa M. Smith 162.48 

Denis Sullivan 450.00 

C. A. Underhill 54.16 

Inex M. Warren 42.50 



$299.18 



$9.000.Gf) 



$7,893.49 



130 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., soap $19.75 

J. N. Brown, labor 1.50 

Joel Daniels, floor dressing 138.59 

Daniels-Cornell Co., sulpho-naphthol 30.00 

C. W. Davis, paid for cleaning and oiling.... 4.25 

S. A. Felton & Son Co., brushes 196.60 

James W. Hill Co., cheesecloth .60 

W. S. Holt & Son, waste and mops 51.50 

Howard Dustless-Duster Co., 200 dusters 30.00 

C. F. Jack, paid for cleaning 19.03 

J. J. Kelley, oiling floors, etc 23.50 

Knox & Morse, "Denzine" 10.00 

E. G. Libbey, use of teams 30.00 

Mrs. W. H. Marshall, cleaning 1.50 

Masur3'-YGung Co., "Nodusto" 43.80 

^Manchester Hardware Co., brushes, shovels, 

dusters, ladder, etc 21.23 

F. F. Osgood, hose, nozzles, etc 18.38 

Orient Manufacturing Co., "Orient Spraj," 

atomizers, tunnels 11.35 

Parnell Bros., oil .65 

Pike & Heald Co., flue brushes .90 

Arabella Rickabj^ cleaning 2.50 

Swan & Finch Co., oil 6.25 

Thomas Smith, cleaning 1.50 

John B. Varick Co., dusters, shovels, hose, 

pails, barrels 16S.S1 



Evening Schools. 

Appropriation $1.600.0§ 

Transferred from unappropriated money.... 117.23 



EXPEXDITURES. 

SALARIES. 

Arthur D. Benton $58.00 

Arthur B. Blaine 45.00 

Honorie J. Crough 116.00 



$832.19 



Total expenditures $8,725.68 

Transferred to unappropriated money 274.33 



$9,000.00 



$1,717.23 



EVENING SCHOOL. — MECHANICAL DRAWING. 



131 



Cora W. Cmnmings $58.00 

Elizabeth Doherty 58.00 

Joseph F. Doyle = 57.00 

Frauk J. Kerus 58.00 

Carroll S. King 110.00 

Frances M. Landers 31.00 

Margaret G. Linen 58.00 

Joseph McDonough *5.00 

John J. McAllister, Jr IKi.OO 

Kitty F. McDonald 51.00 

Thomas A, McCabe 40.00 

Ethel C. MacNeill 38.00 

Myra V. Moore 58.00 

Adelia . Murphy 58.00 

Arthur P. Morrill 58.00 

Lawrence A. O'Connor 58.00 

Edward R. O'Brien 47.00 

Edwin M. Rogers 58.00 

Carlena A. Savory 4(i.00 

Minnie Sullivan 4.1.00 

Arthur J. Tonery 58.00 

Genieve B. Wilson 58.00 

Susan G. Woodman 58.00 

May D. Young 58.00 

JANITOKS. 

John S. Avery $29.00 

John Cedar 4,3.50 

William Henderson 29.00 

SUNDRIES. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing cards $10.50 

Farrell Bros., mantles and chiinney.s 24.85 

W. P. Goodman, pencils .75 

J. G. Jones Transfer, cartage 1.00 

J. A. Scully, use of table and chairs 14.63 

Total expenditures 



$1,504.00 



$101.50 



$51.73 



$1,717.23 



Evening School.— Mechanical Drawing. 

Appropriation $300.00 



132 KEPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

salaries. 

H. W. Allen, teacher $120.00 

John M. Kendall, teacher 120.00 

— — ■ $210.00 

SUNDRIES. 

John Cedar, janitor $10.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 5.00 

Frost & Adams, paper 20.00 

• $35.00 

Total expenditures $275.00 

Transferred to unappropriated money 25.00 

$300.00 



Teachers' Salaries. 

Appropriation $112,500.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money... 645.43 

$113,145.43 



Expenditures. 

January $11,SS5.0G 

February 11,542.01 

March 11,957.08 

April 8,812.05 

May 11,816.14 

June 11,895.11 

September 8,956.83 

October 12,083.99 

November 12,146.64 

December 12,049.62 

• $113,145.4.'5 

Total expenditures $113,145.43 



Free Text-Books. 

Appropriation $7,000.00 

Received from sale of books 194.77 

$7,194.: 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 133 

Expenditures. 

free text-books axd supplies. 

Allyn & Bacon $48.15 

American Book Co 1,054.77 

Atkinson, Mentzer & Grover 122.62 

A. J, Abbott .84 

The Barton Company 17.15 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co 79.73 

E. E. Babb & Co 1,021.15 

Milton Bradley Co 428.78 

C. C. Birchard & Co 61.30 

T. H. Castor & Co 22.05 

John B. Clarke Co 13.70 

Central Scientific Co 43.50 

E. E. and W. P. Cobnrn 2.30 

Dennison Mfg. Co 18.75 

Joseph Dixon Crucible Co 87.50 

Oliver Ditson Co 4.71 

L. M. Folsom 2.40 

E. D. Gay 2.40 

Ginn & Co 419.39 

Gregg- Publishing Co 50.75 

W. P. Goodman 19.44 

W. & L. E. Gurley 37.10 

J. L. Hammett Co 342.21 

Hardy Printing Co 30.00 

D. C. Heath & Co 555.20 

C. Howard Hunt Pen Co 87.00 

Houghton, Miflflin & Co 373.37 

James W. Hill Co 122.89 

C. A. Hoitt Co .63 

Kenney Bros. & Wolkins 247.97 

Geo. F. King & Co ; 15.00 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co 205.91 

J. B. Lippincott Co 98.35 

Manchester Typewriter Exchange 21.40 

Marine Biological Laboratory 27.00 

Melvin & Fitts 3.50 

Chas. E. Merrill Co 11.15 

Carl S. Morse 1.00 

F. E. Nelson .30 

N. E. Eeed Co 3.49 

F. F. Osgood .75 

Prang Educational Co 109.58 

Eand, McNally & Co 41.75 



134 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Silver, Burdett & Co 

B. H. Sanborn & Co 

Smith Premier Tyj)ewriter Co. 

E. A. Stratton Co 

Tliompson-Brown Co 

John B. Yariclv Co 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co 

Walsh & Cummings 

J. H. Wiggin & Co 

J. Artliur Williams 



$237.07 

114.98 

17.50 

].10 

24.58 

85.02 

34.50 

41.46 

2.00 

2.95 



$6,418.09 



SUI«fDKIES. 

Holtzer-Cabot Electric Co., repairing dj-namo $6.40 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage 85.80 

Fannie L. Sanborn, superintendent's clerk.. 615.00 

Total expenditures ' 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$7,125.29 

69.48 



$7,194.77 



Manual Training. 



Appropriation 



$600.00 



Expenditures. 



StTNDBlES. 

F. E. Browne, expenses to Boston, etc 

John B. Clarke Co., blank board 

Mrs. IST. J. Davis, laundering and repairing 
aprons 

Eugene Dietzgen Co., cloth and drawing in- 
struments 

Frost & Adams Co., knife for pencil sharp- 
ener 

Granite State Rubber Co., rubber bands 

J. L. Hammett Co., paper 

Head & Dowst Co., wood, sundry kinds 

J. Hodge, sundry woods 

Romeyn B. Hough, books 

J. G. Jones Transfer, freight and cartage.. 

Melvin & Fitts, cabinet and cards 



$9.21 
2.70 



38.15 

.82 

1.35 

5.10 

187.00 

124.37 

16.00 

6.47 

31.28 



CEMETERY WALL AT VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Sherwin-Williams Co.* "Amberlac" $2.25 

John B. Varick Co., hardware and tools 171.94 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



135 



$598.14 



$598.14 
1.8(3 



$600.00 



Kindergarten for Straw School. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures. 

sundeies. 

C. W. Anderson & Co., clocks $3.50 

Milton Bradley Co., supplies 249.87 

Marion C. Clough, supplies 15.50 

L. M. Folsom, enamel cloth 3.24 

C. A. Hoitt Co., desk and chairs 17.50 

J. G. Jones Transfer, cartage 4.40 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 

Cemetery Wall at Varney School. 
Appropriation 

ExrENDltURES. 

Charles A. Bailey, work per contract $215.00 

Head & Dowst Co., seed and labor 123.25 

J, H. Mendell Co., grading- 127.42 

Total expenditures 

Transferred to unappropriated money 



$350.00 



$294.01 

$294.01 
55.99 

$350.00 



$500.00 



$465.67 



$465.67 
34.33 



$500.00 



136 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 

Grading and Concreting Around Highland School. 

Balance from last year unexpended $193.42 

Transferred from unappropriated money.... 6.58 

, $200.00 

EXPENDITUBES. 

Transferred to new account $200.00 



Typewriters for High School. 

ApiDropriation • . . $500.00 

EXPEXDITURES. 

Eemington Typewriter Co $250.00 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co 100.00 

Underwood Tj^pewriter Co 150.00 

$500.00 

Total expenditures $500.00 



Piano for Bakersville School. 

Appropriation $250.00 

EXPEXDITrEES. 

Piper & Mclntire $180.00 

Total expenditures $180.00 

Transferred to unappropriated money 70.00 

$250.00 



Paupers off Farm. 

Appropriation $12,000.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money... 3,375.32 

$15,375.32 



TAUPEKS OFF FARM. 



137 



Expenditures. 

gkocleries and meats. 

George Boisvert $227.60 

J. B. Boulanger 120.00 

L. A. Bournival 35.00 

Bourgeois & Co ; 15.00 

J. A. Bureau 10.00 

Bureau & Leblond 46.00 

J. H. Canney 20.00 

John Cashman & Son 40.00 

C. H. Clark 6.00 

Arthur Charpentier 52.28 

P. J. Charron 34.00 

Dancose Bros 172.00 

X. Daigle 102.00 

J. N. DesGroseilliers 30.00 

James Davis 50.00 

Ducharme Bros 30.00 

O. F. Dubois 191.00 

Dumas & Prince 70.90 

L. F. Dusseault & Co 384.00 

Carl Friborg 40.00 

A. J. Gagne 285.00 

Ernest Gelinas 176.67 

James J. Griffin 129.26 

Gorman Bros 9.00 

Felix Harbour 169.00 

Reinhardt Hecker '. 12.00 

John Healjr 197.00 

J. F. Healy 524.05 

A. P. Hermsdorf 471.73 

E. M. Holmes 26.00 

F. P. Johnson ' 94.90 

John A. Kane 474.68 

yi. D. Knox 50.00 

T. J. Labrecque 57.06 

Lamoureux Bros 7.48 

Xorbert Lafond 5.00 

Maggie Landrigan 74.00 

J. A. Lindquist 40.00 

E. W. Lewis 10.00 

Oscar McDuffie 417.43 

John McDonough 671.19 

McLaughlin & Day 236.78 

John iMurphy 6.10 



138 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Manchester Grocery Co $20.00 

C. E. Newcomb 40.00 

O. H. Xoury : . 54.00 

Hertel Pariseau 166.76 

Edmond Pinard 156.50 

F. H. Poore 104.00 

Pulpit Farm Dairy 30.55 

Eugene Quirin 751.36 

A. L. Eobitaille 5.00 

H. J. Eogler 12.00 

W. J. Powell 30.00 

Eoy & Cloutier 21.07 

C. L. Ruiter 10.00 

C. D. Steele & Co 76.00 

M. A. Sheehan 1,183.52 

Summer Street Market 26.00 

Peter Tennant 7.00 

Euclide Voisard 252.50 

Mrs. H. B. Webber .65 

H. H. "Williams 64.00 



Charles Boisclair $43.50 

Napoleon Bournival 4.00 

S. A. Blood 14.00 

J. H. DeCourcy Co 203.35 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons 110.26 

A. Ferland 36.00 

C. A. & A. W. Flint 12.00 

Wm. Forrest 21.00 

Joseph Masse 187.52 

Maxwell Ice Co 87.50 

Moore & Preston Coal Co 69.75 

Mystic Pond Ice Co 15.51 

Napoleon Normand 23.00 

Omer Pepin 9.50 

Eaiche & Laforce 24.00 

John P. Russell 133.00 

Ufiion Coal Co 3.00 

Albert Warren 38.15 

Henry Weber 88.00 

John R. Willis & Co 17.50 



$8,831.02 



$1,140.54 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 139 

BOARD AND CARE AND RENT. 

Mrs. Olive Auger $4.00 

Eva M. Bartlett 30.00 

Mrs. Emilie Blanchet 36.00 

Blodgett & Young 15.00 

Joseph Charpentier 76.00 

Mrs. James Coakley 98.00 

Victoria Chaput 100.00 

Ann O'Connor 110.00 

Abraham Cote 120.00 

Elizabeth Daley 56.00 

Mary Dillon 66.00 

Etta DeCourcy 5.00 

John Donnelly 9.00 

Mrs. Patrick Foreman 72.00 

Margaret Healy 144.00 

Hillsborough County Farm 872.82 

Thomas Herbert 25.50 

Infant Asylum 26.00 

Melvin A. Lewis 90.00 

Mrs. M. A. Livingston 40.00 

Mrs. Michael Mahoney 110.00 

Mary Marr 80.00 

S. J. Marsh 14.00 

John E. Morse 29.00 

Mary Monroe 64.00 

Notre Dame Hospital 80.50 

Notre Dame Orphanage 157.56 

Old Ladies' Home 320.00 

Mary Pellerin 83.00 

Mrs, Mary Quinn 50.00 

Margaret Eeagan 110.00 

Mrs. Aurelie Roy 14.00 

Patrick Rooney 6.00 

H. J. PiOgler 8.00 

St. Joseph's Orphanage 625.00 

St. Patrick's Orphanage 250.00 

St. Pierre Orphanage 272. OS 

Mary Stanhope 13.00 

Mrs. Ida Scheid 51.00 

Mrs. Julia Schneiderheinze 35.00 

Mrs. Annie Sullivan 88.00 

West Side Lumber Co 12.00 

Mrs. Annie Weber 56.00 

Jane Wolfe 210.00 

Lyman B. Whittemore 20.00 

$4,753.46 



140 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

A. T. Beaumier $4.05 

Beauchemin & Janelle 22.75 

Carroll Brigham 4.50 

J. W, Campbell 11.25 

E. C. Chagnon & Co 4.35 

M. A. Currier 9.55 

Patrick Costello G.S5 

Costello Bros 2.10 

Geo. W, Dodge Shoe Co 25.50 

C. E. Green & Co 3.85 

G. Gosselin 4.45 

Gosselin & Bessette 3.00 

D. F. Shea 76.75 

Arthel Simard IS.OO 

CLOTHING. 

Amoskeag Clothing Co $4.00 

C. M. Floyd 2.00 

Gazaille & Co 1.29 

Geffrion & Cullerot 25.05 

M. Kurtz 5.55 

M. A. McDonough 3.50 

Mansur B. Xiven 2.75 

L. O. Simard 25.50 

Joseph St. Yves 4. 114 

MEDICINE, MEDICAL SERVICES, FrNIEEAL EXPENSES. 

Charles Boisclair, burial outfit $14.70 

Boufford & Letendre, burial outfits 40.00 

W. M. Eames Drug Co., medicine 9.89 

C. A. Folsom, M. D., assisting at operation.. 3.00 

A. L. Gadbois, burial outfit 25.00 

Oscar L. Giguere, medicine 15.95 

Boy & Gadbout, burial outfit 15.00 

John B. Hall Co., medicine 51.41 

J. J. Holland, medicine lO.fiO 

Kerwin & Sheehan, medicine 20.70 

Andrew Leckie, medicine 18.58 

J. A. Marshall, medicine 6.74 

A. A. Macleay, M, D., professional services.. 25.45 

F. C. Miville, medicine S.20 

A. F. Precourt, medicine 3.90 

A. J. Precourt & Co., medicine 4.10 



$196.95 



$73.98 



INDIGENT SOLDIERS. 



141 



F. L. Wallace, burial outfits 

F. L. Wallace, use of ambulance. 



to.OO 
5.00 



$323.22 



SUNDRIES. 

Charles Boisclair, use of hack $2.00 

Cooke, Fitz-Dillinghain Co., convejance to 

county farm 3.00 

W. J. Freeman, use of hack 2.00 

E. B, Graupner, railroad fare for Charles 

Ferren 12.00 

E. G. Libbey, use of team 4.00 

EdAvard Sargent, reiDairing- lock .25 

E. A. Stratton Co., stationery and printing. , 23.35 

Thomas Steele, conveying man to asylum.. 4.00 
John L. Wentworth, convej^ance of person to 

asylum 5.55 

Total expenditures 



$56.15 



$15,375.32 



Indigent Soldiers. 



Appropriation 






$300.00 




Expenditures. 

GROCERIES. 




L. F. Dusseault Sz Co 

Oscar McDutfie 


$66.00 

8.00 

49.00 




F. H. Poore 








FUEL. 


$123.00 


J. H. DeCourcv Co 


$8.00 
8.00 
6.00 

39.50 
1.00 


W. H. Dunbar & Sens 






Fred Langley ^ . . 






Maxwell Ice Co 






J. F. Wyman 







$62.50 



142 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

BOARD A^■D CARE, AND RENT, 

J. A. Burpee $55.00 

M. A. Lewis 20.00 

Mathew Malloy 30.00 

$105.00 

», 

Total expenditures $290.50 

Transferred to unappropriated money 9.50 

$300.00 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 

Appropriation $50.00 

Expenditures. 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 300 reports $4.24 

Pike & Heald Co., lalumbers' supi^lies 30.88 

Temple & Farrington Co., binding book.... .85 

■ $35.97 

Total expenditures $35.97 

Transferred to unappropriated money 14.03 

$50.00 

Band Concerts. 

Appropriation $400.00 

Expenditures. 

Cadet band $100.00 

City band 100.00 

Lafayette band 100.00 

Turner band 100.00 

$400.00 

Militia. 

Appropriation $1,250.00 



PURCHASE OF LAND SOLD FOR TAXES. 143 

Expenditures. 

Company A, First Regiment, N. H. N. G.... $100.00 

Company B, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company F, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Company K, First Regiment, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Battery, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Camp Derwin, No. 1S4, Spanish-American 

War Veterans 100.00 

First Infantry Band 50.00 

Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. R 100.00 

Hospital corps 50.00 

Louis Bell Post, No. 3, G. A. R 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans 100.00 

Regimental headquarters 50.00 

$1,050.00 

Total expenditures $1,050.00 

Transferred to unappropriated money 200.00 

$1,250.00 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 

Appropriation $500.00 

Expenditures. 

Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. R $100.00 

Louis Bell Post, G. A. R .399.58 

■ $499.58 

Total expenditures $499.53 

Transferred to unappropriated money .42 

$500.00 

Purchase of Land Sold for Taxes. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Expenditures. 

George A. Morrill $3,691.14 

Total expenditures $3,691.14 

Transferred to unappropriated money 1,308.86 

$5,000.00 



144 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Abatement of Taxes. 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

EXPEXDITURES. 

Peter Burns $3.22 

Maurice I. Dodge 2.05 

Bruno M. Groeppner 8.00 

Alfred E. Hutchinson 1.03 

George E. Morrill 1,434.36 

C. Eobidoux 7.44 

$1,461.10 

Total expenditures $1,461.10 

Transferred to unappropriated monej- 538.90 

$2,000.00 



Revision of Ordinances. 

Balance from last year unexpended $1,100.00 

Transferred from unappropriated money... 107.00 

• $1,207.00 

EXPEXDITCRES. 

P. H, Sullivan, revision of ordinances $400.00 

Euemely Press, iDrinting ordinances. 807.00 

$1,207.00 



State Tax. 

Appropriation $124,960.00 

Expenditures. 
State of Xew Hampshire $124,960.00 

County Tax. 

Appropriation $48,853.12 

Expenditures. 
County of Hillsborough $48,853.12 



HOSPICE ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. Ii5 

Manchester Historical Society. 

Appropriation $600.00 

EXPENDITrEES. 

Manchester Historical Society, printing early records of 

town of Derryfield $600.00 



Animal Rescue League. 
Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
Animal Eescue League, amount appropriated $300.00 

Elliot Hospital. 
Appropriation $300.00 

ExPENDIXrRES. , 

Elliot Hospital, amount ajopropriated $300.00 

Infant Asylum, Our Lady of Perpetual Help 

Appropriation $300.00 

EXPENDITXTRES. . • 

Infant Asylum, Our Lady of Perpetual Help, amount 

appropriated $300.00 



Hospice St. Vincent de Paul. 
Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 
Hospice St. Vincent de Paul, amount appropriated $''00.00 



146 REPORT OF THE CITT AUDITOR. 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital. 

ApproiH-iation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital, amount appropri- 
ated $300.00 



Orphelinat St. Pierre, 

Appropriation $300.00 

EXPEXDITX'EES. 

Orphelinat St. Pierre, amount appropriated $300.00 



Sacred Heart Hospital. 

Appropriation $300.00 

EXPENDITXTRES, 

Sacred Heart Hospital, amount appropriated $300.00 

St. Josepli's Boys' Orphanage. 
Appropriation $300.00 

EXPEXDITUREf?. 

St. Joseph'-s Boys' Orphanage, amount appropriated.... $300. OQ 

Women's Aid Home. 

Appropriation $300.00 

EXPEXDITX'KES. 

Women's Aid Home, amount appropriated $300.00 



RESOLUTION RAISING MONEY. 147 

W. C. T. U. Mercy Home. 
Appropriation $300.00 

EXPENDIXrRES, 

W. C. T. U. Mercy Home, amount appropriated $300.00 

Manchester Boys' Club. 

Appropriation $200.00 

EXPENDITXTRES. 

Manchester Boys' Club, Annie B. Lincoln, treasurer $200.00 

West Side Reading Room. 

Appropriation $100.00 

Expenditures. 
West Side Reading- Room, amount appropriated $100.00 



Resolution Raising* Monoy and Making Appropriations 
for tlie Year 1909. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, as follows: 
That the sum of seven hundred and seventy-nine tliousand, six 
hundred and eighty-eight dollars and tw^elve cents ($779,688.12) be 
raised for the use of said city for the year nineteen hundred and 
nine by tax on the polls and estates liable to be taxed thereon, in 
said city, which sum, together with such unappropriated money as 
may be now in the city treasury or may hereafter come into it, shall 
be appropriated as follows, to wit. 

central department. 

Interest $44,000.00 

Sinking fund 21,000.00 

City hall 4,200.00 

Printing and stationery 2,400.00 

Incidental expenses 7,000.00 



14:8 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Land sold for taxes $3,000.00 

Mayor's incidentals £00.00 

City officers' salaries 23,000.00 

Payment of funded debt 10,000.00 

Land talven for new highways 1,300.00 

AUDITOR'a DEP^Vin*MEXT. 

Salaries and expenses $2,500.00 

DEPAKT5IENT OF TAXES. 

State tax $124,900.00 

County tax 48,853.12 

assessors" eepabtmext. 

Assessors' department $9,500.00 

Abatement of taxes 2,000.00 

engineer's department. 

Salaries and expenses $8,000.00 

street and sewer department. 

Street and park commission $8,000.00 

Cleaning streets 12,000.00 

Repairs of highways 42,000.00 

New highways 1,000.00 

Watering streets 8,000.00 

Paving streets 10,000.00 

jSIacadamizing streets 5,000.00 

Grading for concrete 2,000.00 

Scavenger service 25,000.00 

Bridges 8,000.00 

City teams 9,000.00 

Repairs of sewers 6,000.00 

New sewers 18,000.00 

Paving Elm street, north of Orange 7,500.00 

Brown-tail and gj'psy moths 5,000.00 

Paving Notre Dame avenue 5,000.00 

Concreting Central street 3,000.00 

City yard ' 6,000.00 

scnooL department. 

Books and stationery $50.00 

Care of rooms 9,000.00 

Contingent expenses 3,200.00 

Evening schools 1,600.00 



KESOLUTION RAISING MONEY. 149 

Evening schools, drawing- $300.00 

Free text-books and apparatns 7,000.00 

Fuel 12,000.00 

Furniture and supplies 1,500.00 

Manual training 600.00 

Printing and advertising 350.00 

Repairs of schoolhouses 8,000.00 

Teachers' salaries 112,500.00 

Piano for Bakersville school 250.00 

Cemetery wall at Varney school 500.00 

Tj^pewriters for high school -. 500.00 

New brick schoolhouse and equipment for Youngs- 

ville 9,000.00 

Kindergarten equipment for Straw school 350.00 

FIKE DEPART'ilENT. 

Fire department $91,600.00 

Fire-alarm telegraph 2,500.00 

Hydrant service 21,275.00 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND PLACES. 

Repairs of buildings $9,500.00 

Pine Grove cemetery 15,500.00 

Valley cemetery 6,500.00 

Amoskeag cemetery 500.00 

Merrill yard 100.00 

Care of commons 4,500.00 

Stark park 1,000.00 

Derryfield park 1,000.00 

Lafayette park 2,000.00 

Miscellaneous plaj'grounds 200.00 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Health department $17,000.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Police station $3,000.00 

Police court 2,900.00 

Police commission 58,000.00 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Salaries and expenses $9,000.00 



150 REPORT OF THE CITV AUDITOR. 



PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AXD I'HILAXTHROPIC. 

Paupers off farm $12,000.00 

Indigent soldiers 300.00 

Women's Aid Home 300.00 

Elliot hospital 300.00 

Sacred Heart hospital 300.00 

Notre Dame hospital 300.00 

Mercy home 300.00 

Infant asylum 300.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves, Joseph Freschl Pest, G. 

A. R 100.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves, Louis Bell Post, G. A. E. 400.00 

Company- A, First Regiment 100.00 

Company B, First Regiment 100.00 

Company C, First Regiment 100.00 

Company F, First Regiment 100.00 

Company K, First Regiment 100.00 

Company L, First Regiment 100.00 

Battery, N. H. N. G 100.00 

Headquarters and band, First Regiment 100.00 

Joseph Freschl Post, G. A. R 100.00 

Louis Bell Post, G. A. R 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans 100.00 

Spanish War Veterans 100.00 

Hospital corps 50.00 

Band concerts 400.00 

Manchester Historical Society 600.00 

Boys' club 200.00 

Orphelinat St. Pierre 300.00 

West Side reading room 100.00 

St. Joseph's orphanage 300.00 

Animal Rescue League 300.00 

Hospice St. Vincent de Paul 300.00 

Examiners of plumbers 50.00 

LIGHTING S'TEEETS DEPARTMENT. 

For contract lights ; $62,500.00 

For lighting 10 electric arches on Elm street 1,500.00 

Passed to be enrolled, March 24, 1909. 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF TAXATION, 



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1 



VALUATION AND TAXES. 153 



Assessors' Oath. 

We, the Assessors of the city of. Manchester, do solemnly swear, 
that in making the invoice for the purpose of assessing the foregoing 
taxes, we appraise all taxable property at its full value, and as we 
would appraise the same in payment of a just debt due from a solvent 
debtor. So help us God. 



Valuation and Taxes. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on the real and per- 
sonal estate, within the city of Manchester, N. H., for the year 1909 
was as follows: 

V'ahiation. Kate. Tax. 

Real estate $30,698,758 . 2.05 $629,324.54 

Personal property 5,794,886 2.05 118,795.17 

$36,493,644 $748,119.71 

Number of polls, 16,093 1,609,300 32,990.65 

■ $38,102,944 $781,110.36 

Fractional gain 8. IB 

$781,118.54 

School tax 162.80 

Brown-tail moth tax . 1,210.21 

Total tax levied $782,491.55 

The share distributed to Manchester of the amount of 
tax assessed, as per returns made by the corporations to 
state treasurer: 

On railroads $50,243.23 

On savings banks 79,645.70 

On insurance companies 3,669.50 

On literary fund 3,706.36 

Grand tax total $919,756.34 

For further information in relation to taxes collected by the state, 
see State Treasurer's report. 



154 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

TAX VALUATIONS, ETC., FROM 1890 TO 1909, INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 



Valuation. 



Taxes. 



>ons. 


Poll tax. 


Valua- 
tion of 
poll. 


9,723 


$1.91 


$100 


10,367 


1.78 


100 


10,673 


1.95 


100 


11,835 


1.85 


100 


12,103 


1.78 


100 


1'2,244 


1.74 


100 


12,583 


1.86 


100 


12,921 


2 08 


100 


12,808 


195 


100 


13,137 


1.95 


100 


13,759 


1.90 


100 


13,976 


1.93 


100 


14,079 


2.25 


100 


14,384 


2.10 


100 


14,451 


1.95 


100 


14,6.50 


2.08 


100 


15,481 


1.91 


100 


15,800 


1.85 


100 


16,266 


1.86 


100 


16,093 


2.05 


100 



1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904 
1905. 



$24,207,740 
24,872,492 
25,932,044 
27,439,742 
29,391,710 
28,861,122 
29,443,668 
30,486,946 
30,988,488 
31.491,784 
32,706,794 
33,041,112 
33,034,334 
32,819,850 
33,179,294 
34,176,466 
35,413,510 
36,968,394 
37,746,708 
38,102,944 



S462,809.17 
443,541.76 
506,465.17 
507,640.68 
505,372 44 
502,183.02 
547,651.50 
634,127.80 
604,280.57 
614,096.93 

• 621,428.47 
654,214.00 
743,497.53 
689,217.79 
647,003.29 
710,870.13 
676,402.89 
083.915.28 
702,088.28 
781,118 54 



ACCOUNT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 155 

Statement of Account of George E. Morrill, Tax Collec- 
tor for the City of Manchester, N. H., June 1, 1909. 



Tax list ISSo 








Amount 
outstanding 
June 1 1908. 
. $1 205.71 


Collected 


Balance 
outstanding 
June 1, 1909. 

$1 205.71 


1886 








. 1.264.85 




1,264.85 


1887 








1.163.94 




1,163.94 
1,580.13 


1888 .... 








1,580.13 




1889 








. 1,395.13 




1,395.13 


1890 








. 1,687.08 




1,687.08 


1891 








1,966.63 




1,966.63 
2,582.12 


1892 








. 2,582.12 
. 4,095.13 




1893 . . . 








4,095.13 


1894 .... 








. 3,514.05 




3,514.05 


1895 








5,004.92 




5,004.92 


1896 .... 








4,992.00 




4,992.00 


1897 .... 








. 5,296.91 




5,296.91 


1898 








. 5,629.21 




5,629.21 


1899 








. 5,675.09 




5,675.09 


1900 .... 


. . . . , 






5,150.11 




5,150.11 


1901 








6,068.01 




6,068.01 
6,501.97 


1902 








. 6,501.97 

. 7,162.87 


6.30 


1903 .... 




« . . . . 




7,156.57 


1904 








6,644.18 


3.90 


6,640.28 


1905 








8,353.03 


21.84 


8,331.19 
8,796.12 


1906 .... 








. 8,826.49 


30.37 


1907 . . . 








. 8,160.62 


677.42 


7,483.20 




ted 








Amount collec 


$739.83 




Credit by ca&h, as 


per 


treasurer's 


receipt No. 






276 in 1908; and 


No. 


121 i 


n year 1909 


$739.83 




Interest collected 


$1,699.72 




Credit by cash, as pe: 


r treasurer's receipts, 






No. 123 in year 


1909. 








$1,699.72 














$1,892.00 




Credit by cash, as per treasurer 


's receipts, 






No. 287 in year 


1908 


, and 


No. : 


L22 in year 






1909 










1,892.00 






nt resident list 


Dr. 




1908. 
June 1. To warra 


$700,449.85 




warrant nonresident 


list 


1.638.43 




voluni 


tary 


list . 






873.85 




warrant school 


tax . 




152.90 




moth 


tax 








783.84 














$703,898.87 




_ 



156 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Cr. 

I'JOS, 1909. 
By cash paid treasurer, per vouchers Xos. 

129, 133, 138, 170, 177, 181, 187, 204, 215, 232, 

238, 249, 291, 300, in year 1908, and 20, 31, 

47, 79, 104, 105, 120 in year 1909 $093,982.69 

By abatements, vouchers Nos. 254, 292 in year 

1908, and 88, 106 in 1909 1,383.72 

By unpaid taxes July 1, 1909 8,532.46 

$703,898.87 



Manchester, N. H., July 30, 1909. 
T hereby certify that I have examined the account of George E. 
Morrill, tax collector of said Manchester, and find the same correct, as 
above stated. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

Citij Auditor. 



TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



157 



TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 





"1 


«» 


i 








«i2 


a 








01 3J 






Year. 


gSoj 


- S 


c 


§o3 




>-5 .§ 






Q§ 














g§ a 


M-^S 


















Q 


c 


o 


C 



Taxes of 18iS5 

" of 1886 

" Of 1887 

" of 1888 

" Of 1889 

'■ Of 1890 

" Of 1891 

" Of 1892 

" Of 1893 

" Of 1894, 

" Of 1895 

" Of 1896, 

" of 1897, 

" of 1898 

" Of 1899, 

" Of 1900. 

" Of 1901, 

" Of 1903, 

" Of 1903. 

" Of 1904, 

" Of 1905. 

" of 1906 

" Of 1907. 

" Of 1908 

" Of 1909. 



8:1,205.71 

1,264 85 

1,163.94 

1,580.13 

1,395.13 

l,6i>7.08 

1,966.03 

2,582.12 

4,095.13 

3,514 05 

5,004.92 

4,992.00 

5,296.91 

5,629.21 

5,675.09 

5,150 11 

6,068.01 

6,561.97 

7,148.17 

6,631.13 

8,329.17 

8,598.93 

7,894.59 
873.85 I 
66,006.07 



286.51 
1,145.62 



$6.30 

3.90 

21.84 

30.37 

211.39 

58,064.67 

708,298.87 



SI, 205 
1,264 
1,103, 
1,5S0 
1,395, 
1,6S7, 
1,966, 
2,582, 
4,095. 
3,514 
5,004 
4,992. 
5,296. 
5,629. 
5,675 
5,150. 
6,068. 
6,501. 
7,141 
0,627. 
8,30V. 
8,568. 
7,683. 
8, 52s. 

73,047. 



158 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions from 
Taxation. 

CoxsTixrTioN OF New Hampshire, Article S2, Page 38, Public Stat- 

r'TES, 
ENCOURAGEMENT OF LITERATX'EE, ETC. 

Art. 82. "Knowledge and learning generally diffused through a 
community being essential to the preservation of a free government 
and spreading the opportunities and advantages of education, through 
the various parts of the countrj^ being highly conducive to promote 
this end, it shall be the duty of legislators and magistrates, in all 
future periods of this government, to cherish the interests of literature 
and the sciences, and all seminaries and public schools; to encourage 
private and public institutions, rewards, and immunities for the pro- 
motion of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures, 
and natural history of the country; to countenance and inculcate the 
princij)les of humanity and general benevolence, public and private 
charity; industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, sincerity, 
sobriety, and all social aifections and generous sentiments among the 
people; provided, nevertheless, that no money raised by taxation shall 
ever be granted or applied for the use of schools or institutions of 
anj- religious sect or denomination." 

Public Statutes, Chapter 55. 

"Sect. 2. Real estate, -v^■ihether improved or unimproved, and 
whether ownied by residents or others, is liable to be taxed, except 
houses of public worship, twenty-five hundred dollars of the value of 
parsonages owned by religious societies and occupied by their pastors, 
schoolhouses, seminaries of learning, real estate of the United States, 
state or town used for public purposes, and almshouses on county 
farm." 

"Sect. 11. Towns may by vote "exempt from taxation for a term not 
exceeding ten years any manufacturing establishment proposed to be 
erected or put in operation therein, and the capital to be used in 
operating the same, unless such establishment has been previously 
exempted from taxation by some tovvn;" provided, hotvever, that the 
assessors shall annually appraise such property and the valuation 
determined upon for the same shall be added to the valuation of all 
other property in the town to determine the total valuation for the 
purposes of state and county taxes. 

opinion of the supkesie court. 

58 X. H. Rep., page 623. "The exemption in each case is limited to 
ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole power of taxation 
would be the destruction of government; and the dangerous tendency 



SCHEDULE OF KELIGIOUtJ PROPERTY. 159 

of legislation suspending any part of that power, for any period, is 
manifest. P. Bank v. Billings, 4 Pet. 514, 561. So long as the existing 
laws remain unrepealed, and the constitutional construction hereto- 
fore adopted remains unchanged, contracts hereafter made under these 
laws and that construction will be valid. If the legislature for any 
reason wish to prevent the making of any more such contracts, their 
object can be accomplished by a reiaeal of the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective char- 
ters as "being of the nature of a public charity," as follows: 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute Women, N. H. Laws of 1899, 
chapter 199. 

Elliot Hospital, K H., Laws-of ISSl, chapter 178. 

Manchester Woman's Aid and Eelief Society, organized in January, 
1875, N. H. Laws, 1891, chapter 283. 

Orphanage and Home for Old Ladies (Catholic) on Hanover street, 
N. H. Laws, 1883, chapter 56. 



Schedule of Property used for Religious, Charitable. and 
Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Taxation by 
Law, not including that owned by the City of Manchester. 

Convent, Sister Jesus Mary, French Catholic; East Spruce 
street, near Beech: 

Building $10,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land ! 2.600.00 

$12,600.00 

Convent, Sisters of Mercj-, Catholic; 415 Union street, 
corner Laurel: 

Building $30,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 

■ $36,300.00 

Mount St. Mary's Academy, Catholic; from convent lot 
east to Beech street: 

Building $25,000.00 

31,500 square feet of land 9,450.00 

• $34,450.00 

Lot south side of Laurel street, corner of Union street, 
Catholic; McDonald school: 

Building $35,000.00 

10,800 square feet of land 5.000.00 

$40,000.00 

Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' Home, 
Catholic; Amherst and Hanover streets: 

Building $14,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 30,375.00 

■ $44,37.5.00 



160 EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. Patrick's Orphan Asylums, Catholic; 1S4 Hanover 
street: 

Building- $47,000.00 

40,500 square feet of land 40,500.00 

St. Joseph's High School, Catholic; Lowell street, corner 
of Birch: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

Union-street school. Catholic; corner of Union and 
Laurel streets: 

Building $^000.00 

5,000 square feet of land 2.500.00 

St. Agnes' School, Cathplic; corner Cedar and Pine 
streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

20,000 square feet of land 3,200.00 

St. Joseph's school for girls. Catholic; corner Pine and 
Lowell streets: 

Building $10,000.00 

Land included in cathedral lot. 

Convent of Holy Angels, French Catholic; Beauport 
street, corner Waj-ne, West Manchester: 

Building " $15,000.00 

22,500 square feet of land 4,500.00 

St. George's school, French Catholic; corner Pine and 
Orange streets: 

Building $30,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Monasterj^ of the Precious Blood; 555 Union street: 

Building $2,500.00 

6,750 square feet of land 2.025.00 

Orphanage school, Beauport, Wayne, and Putnam 
streets; French Catholic: 

Building $25,000.00 

30,000 square feet of land 6.000.00 

St. Augustine's academy, French Catholic; corner Beech 
and Spruce streets: 

Building $8,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 4,500.00 



$37,500.00 



$20,000.00 



$8,500.00 



$15,200.00 



$10,000.00 



$19,500.00 



:5.ooo.oo 



$4,523.00 



$31,000.00 



$12,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 161 

St. Marie's parochial school, French Catholic; corner 
Wayne and Cartier streets: 

Building $12,000.00 

25,000 square feet of land 2,000.00 



Residence priest St. Augustine's church, French Cath- 
olic; 3S3 Beech street: 

Building $6,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 1,875.00 

$7,785.00 
Orphan Children's school, parish of St. Augustine; 251, 
253 Lake avenue: 

Building $12,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 5,000.00 

Holy Rosary school; 30 Cedar street: 

Building $8,750.00 

2,500 square feet of land 1,250.00 

Residence priest St. Anne's church. Catholic; 231 Merri- 
mack street. 

Building $5,000.00 

8,820 square feet of land 2,646.00 

$7,646.00 
Residence of Catholic bishop; 145 Lowell street: 

Building $40,000.00 

24,000 square feet of land 12,000.00 

• $52,000.00 
Residence jiriest St. George's church, French Catholic; 
Orange street, corner Pine: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,000 square feet of land 4,000.00 

$6,500.00 
Residence priest St. Mary's church, French Catholic; 376 
Beauport street. West Manchester: 

Building $2,500.00 

5,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$3,500.00 
St. Anne's church, Catholic; Union street, corner Mer- 
rimack: 

Building $30,000.00 

10,180 square feet of land 5,090.00 



$14,000.00 



,500.00 



$17,000.00 



$10,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$35,090.00 



162 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

St. Augustine's church, French Catholic; Beech street, 
corner East Spruce: 

Building $28,000.00 

13,000 square feet of land 3,250.00 

St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel. Catholic; Pine street, 
corner Lowell: 

Building $70,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 30,375.00 

St. Marie's church, French Catholic; Beauport street, 
corner Wayne, West Manchester: 

Building $25,000.00 

70,000 square feet of land 14,000.00 

St. Raphael's church and school, German Catholic; Third 
street, corner Ferry, West Manchester: 

Building $35,000.00 

8,000 square feet of land 3,400.00 

St. George's chiirch, French Catholic; Pine street, corner 
Orange: 

Building $75,000.00 

18,690 square feet of land 7,614.00 

St. Patrick's church and school, Catholic; Kelley street, 
Cartier street, and Coolidge avenue: 

School building $20,000.00 

56,281 square feet of land 4,502.00 

St. Antoine de Padoue ' church. Catholic; 260 Belmont 
street: 
Building $4,000.00 

Residence priest St. Antoine de Padoue's church, Cath- 
olic; 258 Belmont street: 

Building '. , $5,500.00 

Land 4,000.00 

$9,500.00 
St. Hedwidge church, Polish Catholic; Merrimack, corner 
Pine street: 

Building $3,000.00 

Land 6,000.00 

Residence priest St. Hedwidge church, .same lot: 

Building $4,000.00 



$31,250.00 



$100,375.00 



$39,000.00 



$38,400.00 



$82,614.00 



$24,502.00 



$4,000.00 



$2,500.00 



$9,000.00 



$2,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 163 

First Baptist church; Union street, corner Concord: 

Building $28,000.00 

11,250 square feet of land 6,750.00 



First Freewill Baptist church; Merrimack street, corner 
Chestnut: 

Building $12,400.00 

12,600 square feet of land 12,600.00 

Second Baiitist church, Merrimack street, near Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

9,450 square feet of land 3,780.00 

People's Baptist church; Chestnut street, corner Con- 
cord: 

Building $8,000.00 

3,200 square feet of land 2,000.00 

First Congregational church; Hanover street, corner 
Union. 

Building $30,000.00 

43,200 square feet of land 34,560.00 

Second Congregational church; Market street; corner 
Franklin: 

Building $25,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 19,000.00 

Third Congregational church; South Main street, cor- 
ner Milford, West Manchester: 

Building $8,000.00 

33,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

First M. E. church; Valley street, corner Jewett: 

Building $8,000.00 

11,400 square feet of land 1,000.00 

St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, corner Amherst: 

Building $25,000.00 

10,010 square feet of land 6,000.00 

Trinity M. E. church; School street: 

Building $2,000.00 

12,176 square feet of land 3,000.00 

St. James M. E. church; Penacook street, corner Pine: 

Building $9,000.00 

11,000 square feet of land 2.200.00 



$34,750.00 



$25,000.00 



$12,780.00 



$10,000.00 



$64,560.00 



$44,000.00 



$11,000.00 



$9,000.00 



$31,000.00 



$5,000.00 



$11,200.00 



164 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Grace church, Eiiiscopal; Lowell street, corner Pine: 

Building $20,000.00 

9,300 square feet of land 0,975.00 

First Unitarian church, Concord street, corner l?eech: 

Building- $24,000.00 

13,500 square feet of land 6,000.00 

First Universalist church; Lowel street, near Elm: 

Building $17,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 15,000.00 

Christian church, Protestant; Hall street, corner Merri- 
mack: 

Building $9,000.00 

Land 1,000.00 

First Presbyterian church, German; Second street, cor- 
ner Bath, West Manchester: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Swedish Lutheran church, Protestant; Sagamore, corner 
Pine: 

Building $7,500.00 

10,950 square feet of land 2,000.00 

Swedish Evangelical Mission; Pine street, corner 
Orange : 

Building $6,500.00 

Land 4,100.00 

Swedish Baptist church; Arlington street, near Maple: 

Building $5,000.00 

4,432 square feet of land 1,100.00 

Second Advent church; Amherst street, between Pine 
and Union: 

Building $5,100.00 

4,500 square feet of land 3,375.00 

City Mission chapel, Protestant; Merrimack street, cor- 
ner Beech: 

Building $7,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,000.00 



$30,000.00 



$32,000.00 



$10,000.00 



$5,500.00 



$9,500.00 



$6,100.00 



$8,475.00 



$13,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 165 

Westminster Presbyterian church; Brook street, corner 
Hazel: 

Building- $1-3,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 



South Manchester Union chapel, Protestant; Elm .street, 
south: 

Building $2,500.00 

10,747 square feet of land 1,000.00 

First Church of Christ, Scientist; Harrison street, cor- 
ner Albert', 

Building $14,000.00 

Land 5,000.00 

Episcopal Mission chiirch; North Main street, corner 
School, West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

19,412 square feet of land 4,000.00 

Residence pastor St. Paul's M. E. church; Union street, 
near Amherst: 

Building $3,000.00 

Residence pastor First Congregational church; 590 Beech 
street, near Bridge: 

Building $5,000.00 

8,100 square feet of land 2,400.00 

$7,400.00 
Residence pastor Grace Episcopal church; corner of 
Harrison and Union streets: 

Building $6,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 3,750.00 

$9,750.00 
German School Society; Third, Bath, and Ferry streets: 

Building $4,500.00 

10,087 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Elliot Hospital, Protestant; East Manchester: 

Building $23,000.00 

Land 7,000.00 

Elliot Hospital lot; Hanover street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $3,000.00 

Land 13,000.00 



$17,500.00 



$3,500.00 



$19,000.00 



$7,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$7,000.00 



$30,000.00 



$16,000.00 



166 REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Elliot Hospital: 

Land and buildings, Main street $4,000.00 

Land and buildings, Quincy street 2,500.00 

Women's Aid Home; Pearl street, corner Beech: 

Building $15,000.00 

57,530 square feet of land 10,000.00 

Women's Aid Home; Bridge street, corner Chestnut: 

Buildings $9,000.00 

6,037.5 square feet of land 3,000.00 

Manchester Children's Home; Webster street: 

Building $20,000.00 

55,000 square feet of land 2,500.00 

Eesidence pastor Swedish Lutheran church; Sagamore 
street, corner Pine: 

Building $3,000.00 

10,200 square feet of land 1,020.00 

$4,020.00 
Gale Home: 

One half Martin's block. Elm street $25,000.00 

Land and building. Pearl street, corner 

Ash 25,000.00 

Masonic Home, Beech street: 

Building $17,000.00 

56,700 square feet of land 7.500.00 

One half land and buildings, 193 Pearl 

street $1,750.00 

One half land and buildings, 266 Pearl . 

street 900.00 

One half land and buildings, 270 Pearl 

street 900.00 

One half land and buildings, 274 Pearl 

street 900.00 

One half five acres of land on North 

Union street 325.00 

EXEMPT FROII TAXATION. 

Church property. Catholic $364,231.00 

Convent property. Catholic 72,925.00 

Parochial residences. Catholic 17,500.00 

Parochial schools. Catholic 245,650.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions.. 131,875.00 



$6,500.00 



$25,000.00 



$12,000.00 



$22,500.00 



$2,500.00 



$50,000.00 



$24,500.00 



$4,775.00 



$832,181.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 167 

Church property, Protestant $457,940.00 

Parochial residences, Protestant 10,000.00 

Private school property, Protestant 7,000.00 

Hospitals and other charitable institutions.. 191,275.00 

$066,215.00 

Total $1,498,396.00 

TAXABLE. 

Land and buildings, Catholic $73,431.00 

Land and buildings, Protestant 14,170.00 

• $87,001.00 

Total exempt and taxable $1,585,997.00 



168 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT. 



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170 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

EEMARKS.^The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the 
cemeteries of the city to parties who pay $100 and upward. There are 
$50,000 in cemetery bonds, so called, not negotiable, in the hands ol 
the city treasurer, which are not included in the $1,595,000. 
Total amount of bonded debt, including cemetery bonds $1,645,000.00 
Net indebtedness for water purposes 700,000.00 

Net debt after deducting water debt $945,000.00 

As shown in the assessors' books for the year 1909. 

The assessed value of personal property, including poll 

tax ■ $7,404,186.00 

The assessed value of real estate .S0,698,758.00 

Total value for taxation $38,102,844.00 

Tax rate, 2.05 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 2.48 

Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation 4. HI 

Population, census of 1900 56,987 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been promptly paid at ma- 
turity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being paj'able in gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

A sinking fund was established in 1893. 

Total amount of sinking fund December 31, 1909, $716,885.12. 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the water- 
works is limited to the sum of $600,000 by section 6, chapter 70, New 
Hampshire Laws of 1871 entitled, "An act to enable the city of Man- 
chester to establish water-works," except as further extended an 
amount of $300,000 by laws of 1891, chapter 26; and $200,000 by laws 
of 1895, chapter 172. 

SUMMARY OF CITY DEBT. 

Amount of debt January 1, 1909 $1,65«,000.00 

Accrued interest on bonded debt, December 31, 1909.... 23,97?. 00 

$1,678,978.00 
Amount of bonded debt paid in 1909 10.000.00 

Total indebtedness December 31, 1909 $1,668,978.00 

AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1909 $S5.597.(;l 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1909 73,047.06 

Stock of Suncook Valley Eailroad, estimated value 30,000.00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1909 7 16.885.1 2 



$905,529.19 



INTEREST ON BONDED DEBT. 



171 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE 
BONDED DEBT. 



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1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 



$27,000 
4,000 
18,000 
18,000 
18,000 
18,000 
12,000 
9,0C0 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
3,000 



S6,000 




1623.75 


$7,000 


8,000 




813.92 


7,200 


I'i.OOO 




1,003.00 


7,200 


12,000 




1,041.66 


7,200 


14,000 


89,500 


1,-550.00 




16,000 


9,500 


1,812.50 




20,000 


9,500 


2,112.50 




22,000 


9,500 


2,500.00 




24,000 


9.500 


2,500.00 




24,000 


9,500 


2,500.00 




24,000 


9,500 


2,500.00 




24,000 


9,500 


2,500.00 




24,000 


9,500 


2,500.00 




24.000 


9,500 


2,500.00 




24,000 


9,500 


2,500.00 




24,000 


9,500 


2,500.00 




24,000 


9.500 


2,500.00 




20,000 


9,500 


2,50a.00 




20,000 


9,500 


2,500.00 




20,000 


9 500 


2,500.00 





82,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 



S6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
6,200 
4,200 
4,200 
4,200 
4,200 
4,200 



















S8,000 




12,000 


S4,800 


16,000 


14,400 


16,000 


13,000 


16,000 


13,000 


19,500 


11,400 


19,500 


10,520 


19,500 


8,800 


20,850 


8,200 


22,300 


6,400 


22,300 


6,000 


24,050 


5,600 


24,050 


5,200 


24,060 


4.800 


24,050 


4,400 


23,050 


4,000 



$49,423.75 
48,613.92 
46,800.00 
46,841.66 
59,650.00 
68,712.50 
82,612.50 
80,600.00 
79,000.00 
81,500.00 
80,620.00 
78,900.00 
76,650.00 
73,300.00 
72,900.00 
72,250.00 
71,850.00 
67,450.C0 
67,050.(0 
65,650.00 



172 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Valuation of Real Estate Owned By the City. 

High school, Beech street, corner Lowell: 

Building- $170,000.00 

59,400 square feet of land 17,820.00 

• $187,820.00 

Franklin-street school, Franklin street, corner Pleasant: 

Building- $16,000.00 

19,200 square feet of land 19,200.00 

$35,200.00 

Spring-street school. Spring street: 

Building $13,000.00 

13,600 square feet of land 13,600.00 

$26,600.00 

Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, corner Merrimack: 

Building $45,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land 8,000.00 

— $53,000.00 

Ash-street school. Ash street, corner Bridge: 

Building $50,000.00 

57,537 square feet of land 17,262.00 

$67,262.00 

Main-street school. North Main street, West Manchester: 

Building $6,000.00 

4 0,293.4 square feet of land 10,073.00 

$16,073.00 

Webster-street school, Webster street: 

Building $39,000.00 

55,71434 square feet of land 13,928.00 

■ • $52,928.00 

Blodget-street school, Blodget street: 

Building $1,500.00 

9,000 square feet of land 3,600.00 

$5,100.00 

Lowell-street school, Lowell street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $1,000.00 

9,000 square feet of land 9,000.00 

$10,000.00 

Merrimack-street school, Merrimack street, corner 

Union: 

Building $15,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land 6,300.00 

$21,300.00 

Parker school, South Main street, West Manchester: 

Building $20,000.00 

13,650 square feet of land 2,047.00 

■ $22,047.00 



VALUATION OF EEAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 173 

Bakersville school, Elm street, south: 

Building- $10,000.00 

24,184 square feet of land 3,628.00 

■ $13,028.00 

Stark District school, River road, north: 

Building- $1,000.00 

43,560 square feet of land 100.00 

$1,100.00 

Amoskeag school, Front sti'eet, Amoskeag-: 

Building $S.OO().(iO 

6,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

• $9,000.00 

Eimmon school, corner Amory and Dubuque streets- 

Building- $17,400.00 

16,600 square feet of land 2,iU0.OO 

$10,830.00 

Goife's Falls school, Goffe's Falls. 

Building $11 ,000.00 

47,916 square feet of land 2d0.00 

$11,250.00 

Harvey District school, Xutt road: 

Building $2,000.00 

21,780 square feet of land 100.00 

• $2,100.00 

Webster Mills school, Webster Mills: 

Building $400.00 

5,445 square feet of land 100.00 

$500.00 

Old Hallsville school. East ^Manchester: 

Building $500.00 

30,075 square feet of land 3,008.00 

$3,508.00 

Youngsville school, Youngsville: 

Building $9,000.00 

51,228 square feet of land 100.00 

■ $9,100.00 

Mosquito Pond school, Mosquito Pond: 

Building $400.00 

10,890 square feet of land 100.00 

• $500.00 

Pearl-street school: 

Building $18,700.00 

Land 3,200.00 

$21,000.00 

Varney school, Bowman street, corner Mast, West Man- 
chester: 

Building $43,750.00 

Land 6,700.00 

• $50,450.00 



174 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

New Hallsville school, Jewett street, corner Young, East 
Manchester: 

Building $47,800.00 

44,000 square feet of land 3,300.00 

Straw school. Chestnut street, corner Harrison: 

Building $30,000.00 

32,400 square feet of land 16,200.00 

■New Wilson school, Wilson, Cedar, and Auburn streets: 

Building $30,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land ' 5,000.00 

South Manchester school, Titus avenue: 

Building $12,000.00 

48,400 square feet of land 1,000.00 

Chandler school, Concord street, corner Ashland: 

Building $37,300.00 

23,239 square feet of land 4,675.00 



ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Engine-house and stable. Central Station, Vine street: 

Building $31,800.00 

21,718.86 square feet of land 25.438.00 

North Main-street engine-house. North ^lain street, 
West Manchester: 

Building $18,000.00 

11,819 square feet of land 2,955.00 

Webster-street engine-house, Webster street, corner 
Chestntit: 

Building $12,000.00 

8,510 square feet of land 2,180.00 

Merrimack engine-house. Lake avenue: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land 3,000.00 

Hosehouse and cottage. Maple street, corner East High: 

Building $3,000.00 

18,330 square feet of land 3,666.00 



$51,100.00 



$46,200.00 



$35,000.00 



$13,000.00 



$41,975.00 



$827,531.00 



$57,238.00 



$14,180.00 



$18,000.00 



$6,666.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 175 

Engine-house and wardroom, ward 9, Eimmon and 
Amory streets, West Manchester: 

Building- $22,755.00 

6,000 square feet of land 870.00 

$23,625.00 

South Manchester hosehouse: 

Building $4,200.00 

4,278 square feet of land 684.00 

$4,884.00 

Engine-house, Concord street, corner Weston: 

Building $6,800.00 

15,000 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$7,800.00 

Hosehouse and wardroom, Somerville street: 

Building $15,000.00 

10,527.75 square feet of land 950.00 

$15,950.00 

$169,298.00 
OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City Library, Dean avenue, corner Franklin street: 

Building $.35,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land 30,000.00 

$65,000.00 

City Hall, Elm street, corner Market: 

Building $20,000.00 

100,000 square feet of land 150,000.00 

• ■ $170,000.00 

City farm, Mammoth road: 

Building $5,000.00 

40.27 acres, west Mammoth road 40,270.00 

81.55 acres, east Mammoth road 65,240.00 

$110,510.00 

Court house, Franklin street, corner West Merrimack: 

Building $20,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land 57.000.00 

$77,000.00 

Battery building, Manchester street: 

Building $13,000.00 

3,400 square feet of land 5.100.00 

$18,100.00 

Police station, Manchester street, corner Chestnut: 

Building $40,000.00 

7,500 square feet of land 15,000.00 

$55,000.00 

Slayton lot, Manchester street: 

Police patrol stable $4,000.00 

Building 300.00 

2,908 square feet of land 4,700.00 

$9,000.00 



176 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City stable and other buildings, Franklin street: 

Building- $15,950.00 

44,656 square feet of land 8<),313.00 

■ • $105,262.00 

City yard, Lincoln, Hayward, Maple, and Valley streets: 

231,000 square feet of land $10,000.00 

Police station, Clinton street, West Manchester: 

Building $3,500.00 

3,790 square feet of land 1,000.00 

$4,500.00 

Ward 5 wardroom, Lake avenue: 

Building $4,500.00 

Land 1,000.00 

$5,500.00 

City stable, district No. 10 $1,200.00 

City scales, Franklin street: 

Building $300.00 

Gravel lots, Goffstown: 

2 acres $400.00 

Gravel lot, Youngsville: 

1 acre $500.00 

Gravel lot. East Manchester $800.00 



$633,072.00 



Personal Property Owned By the City. 

Property in care city engineer $1,350.00 

in care chief engineer fire department 125,315.00 

in care street and park commission (esti- 
mated) 32,336.67 

in care superintendent of schools 37,049.00 

in care of city messenger 3,000.00 

in care of chief of police and janitor 7,250.00 

in care trustees city library 30,000.00 

in care superintendent of Pine Grove cemetery 2,246.87 

in care superintendent of Valley cemetery... 437.80 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad, in care of city treas- 
urer 30,000.00 

Personal property in care citj- weigher 1,000.00 



$269,985.34 

Uncollected taxes in 1909 73,047.06 

Net cash in treasurv, December 31, 1909 85,597.01 



$158,644.07 



OTHER REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 1(7 

Other Real and Personal Estate Owned by the City. 

Soldiei-s' monument $25,000.00 

Amoskeag- bridge over Merrimack river 25,000.00 

Fountains and water-troughs on streets and commons.. 3,600.00 

City tomb 10,000.00 

:\IcGregor bridge 00,000.00 

Granite bridge 130,000.00 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 28,450.00 

Second-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 52,036.00 

(iranite-street bridge, over R. & M. K. R 6,000.00 

Print- Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 10,000.00 

Two bridges in highway district No. 9 2.000.00 

One bridge at Goffe's Falls 3,500.00 

Expended on construction of sewers 861,150.00 

$1,246,736.00 

PARKS AND CEilETERIES. 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres $200,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery, Ursula chapel 16,000.00 

Pine Grove cemetery, about 98.066 acres 49.070.00 

Amoskeag cemetery, 1.23 acres 4,340.00 

Stark park, 28 acres 9.000.00 

Derryfield park, 76 acres 25,000.00 

Concord common, 4.4S acres 200,000.00 

Tremont common, 2.25 acres 40. 000. 00 

Hanover common, 3 acres 100.000.00 

Park common, 3.49 acres 60,000.00 

Merrimack common, 5.89 acres 200.000.00 

Wagner's park, 9.85 acres 12.000.00 

Land on Piscataquog river. . . . ; 3,500.00 

Lafayette park, 90,500 square feet 13,500.00 

Prout park, 5.73 acres 15.000.00 

East Side park, 19,306.46 square feet 4.000.00 



$952,410.00 

WATER-WOlUxS. 

Real estate and personal property of water-works, at 

cost price , $1,962.19S.50 

RECAPITri.ATIOX. 

Real estate owned by tlie city, schoolhouses $827,531.00 

Real estate owned by city 633.072.00 

Real estate owned by city, engine-houses 169.29S.00 

Water-works at cost price 1.962,198.50 

Personal property- owned by the city 269,985.34 



178 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Uncollected taxes and cash $138,644.07 

Other real and personal property 1,246,736.00 

Parks and cemeteries 952,410.00 

$6,219,874.91 
PKOPERTY ACCOUNT. 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1909 $6,219,874.91 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1908 6,137,492.01 

Gain in valuation $82,382.90 



Auditor's Office. 

City hall building. Open from 9 to 12 A. M., 1.30 to 5 P. M. 
In every bill presented to the city auditor for his approval, the fol- 
lowing points will be considered and passed upon: 

1. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination within the 
scope of the powers conferred bj^ the legislature on the city govern- 
ment? 

2. Is the bill certified by the party legally authorized to make the 
contract, or cause the expenditure to be made? 

3. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, and 
is there a. balance unexpended sufficient to pay this bill? 

4. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measurements, 
either of dimensions, quantities or weights, correctly and fully stated, 
and is the proof of the delivery to the city of the whole amount 
charged sufficient? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely in 
excess as to require the attention of the city councils to be called to 
the same? 

6. Is the bill written in a fair, legible hand, correctly cast, and on 
paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its proper backing and 
filing? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and thai 
total amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the amount' 
of the work not yet completed, and the per cent retained, if any, 
should be stated in the bill. 

8. Any other inquiries in matjers of law and fact wWch afEect the 
question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection or suspension for further information or 
correction as the circumstances of each case may require. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELEC- 
TRIC LIGHTS. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC 
LIGHTS. 



List of Electric Liglits Used by tine City of IViancFiester. 

No. 1. A street, opposite No. 73, arm. 

2. A and South Main, " 

3. Adams and Cartier, " 

4. Amherst and Elm, " 

5. Amherst and Vine, " 

6. Amherst and Chestnut, ' " 

7. Amherst and Pine, " 

8. Amherst, opposite Y. M. C. A. building, " 

9. Amherst and Union, " 

10. Amherst and Beech, " 

11. Amherst and Ash, " 

12. Amherst and Maple, . " 

13. Amherst and Button, " 

14. Amherst and Lincoln, " 

15. Amherst and Ashland, " 

16. Amherst and Hall, " 

17. Amory and Morgan, " 

18. Amory and Essex, ' " 

19. Amory and Alsace, " 

20. Amory, near Montgomery, " 

21. Amory and Amory street extension, " 

22. Amory and Rimmon, pole. 

23. Amory and Dubuque, " 

24. Amory and Beauport, " 

25. Amory and Main, " 

26. Amoskeag bridge, west, " 

27. Amoskeag bridge, east, " 

28. Amoskeag and Front, " 

29. Appleton and Elm, arm. 
30^. Appleton and North Adams, pole. 

31. Appleton and Union, arm. 

32. Arlington and Russell, 

33. Arlington and Warren, " 

34. Arlington and Ashland, " 

35. Auburn and Elm, " 

181 



182 ANNUAL OFFICIAL IlEPOKTS. 

No. 36. Auburn and Chestnut, arm. 

37. Auburn and Tine, " 

38. Auburn and Union, pole. 

39. Auburn and Beech, . " 

40. Auburn and Maple, " 

41. Auburn and Lincoln, arm. 

42. Auburn and Wilson, " 

43. Auburn and Canton, " 

44. Auger avenue and Nutt road, " 

45. Baker and Brown avenue, " 

46. Baker and Elm, " 

47. Baker and Calef road, " 

48. Bath and Second, pole. 

49. Beech and Portsmouth Railroad, . arm. 

50. Beech and Lawrence Railroad, " 

51. Bell and Wentworth, " 

52. Bismarck and Sylvester, pole. 

53. Blaine and Maine, arm. 

54. Blaine and Third, 

55. Blaine and Second, 

56. Blodget and Elm east back, 

57. Blodget and Pine, 

58. Blodget and Union, 

59. Blodget and Walnut, 

60. Blodget and Beech, 

61. Blodget and Ash, 

62. Blodget and Oak, 

63. Blodget and Russell, 

64. Bow and Bartlett, 

65. Boynton street, opposite No. 135, ■ i 

66. Bowman place and Tilton, 

67. Bowman street, opposite No. 172, 

68. Bremer and Dubuque, 
09. Bridge and McGregor, 

70. Bridge and Canal, 

71. Bridge and Elm, 

72. Bridge and Birch, 

73. Bridge and Chestnut, 

74. Bridge and Pine, 

75. Bridge and Union, 

76. Bridge and Walnut, 

77. Bridge and Beech, 

78. Bridge and Ash, 

79. Bridge and Maple, 

80. Bridge and Nashua, 

81. Bridge and Malvern, 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 183 

No. S2. Bridge and Linden, arm. 

83. Bridge and Hall, 

84. Bridge and Belmont, 

85. Bridge and Weston, 

86. Bridge and Highland, 

87. Bridge and Mammoth road, 

88. Brown avenue and Elm, 

89. Brown avenue, opposite No. 445, 

90. Brook and Elm, 

91. Brook and Chestnut, 

92. Brook and Pine, 

93. Brook and Hazel, pole. 

94. Brook and Union, arm. 

95. Brook and Walnut, " 

96. Brook and Beech, 

97. Brook and Maple, pole. 

98. C and B, 

09. Campbell and Union, arm. 

100. Candia road and Mammoth road, " 

101. Carpenter and Elm, " 

102. Carpenter and Chestnut, " 

103. Carpenter and Union, " 

104. Cedar and Canal, 

105. Cedar and Franklin, pole. 

106. Cedar and Elm, arm. 

107. Cedar and Chestnut, " 

108. Cedar and Pine, 

109. Cedar and Union, " 

110. Cedar and Beech, 

111. Cedar and Maple, " 

112. Cedar and Lincoln, " 

113. Central and Bedford, 

114. Central street, opposite No. 74, pole. 

115. Central and Franklin, arm. 

116. Central and Elm, 

117. Central and Chestnut, " 

118. Central and Pine, 

119. Central and Union, " 

120. Central and Beech, " 

121. Central and ^laple, " 

122. Central and Lincoln, " 

123. Central and Wilson, " 

124. Central and Hall, 

125. Central street, opposite No. 536, " 

126. Charles street, " 

127. Charleston avenue and Carroll, " 



184 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Xo. 128. Chestnut street, opiDOsite No. 855, arm. 

129. Clarke and Eiver road, " 

130. Clarke and Elm, 

131. Clarke and North Adams, " 

132. Clarke and Union, " 

133. Clinton and Dover, 

134. Conant and Montgomerj-, " 

135. Conant and Rimmon, pole. 

136. Conant and Beauport, arm. 

137. Concord and Vine, " 

138. Concord and Chestnut, " 

139. Concord and Pine, " 

140. Concord and Union, 

141. Concord and Walnut, " 

142. Concord and Beech, •' 

143. Concord and Ash, " 

144. Concord and Maple, " 

145. Concord and Dutton, " 

146. Concord and Derry, " 

147. Concord and Ashland, " 

148. Concord and Hall, 

149. Concord common, west, pole. 

150. Concord common, east, 

151. Coolidg-e avenue and Beauport, arm. 

152. Coolidge avenue, near Kelley, " 

153. Coolidge avenue and Cartier, " 

154. Dean and Canal, " 

155. Dean and Elm, " 

156. Dean avenue and Hampshire lane, pole. 

157. Dearborn and Taylor, arm. 

158. Depot and Canal, ])ole. 

159. Depot and Franklin, arm. 

160. Derryfield park, 

161. Donald street, near cemetery, " 

162. Douglas and Railroad, ' pole. 

163. Douglas and Barr, arm. 

164. Douglas and West, ])ole. 

165. Douglas and Main, arm. 

166. Dunbarton road and Front, " 

167. East High and Nashua, , 

168. East High and South, " 

169. East High and Malvern, 

170. East High and Ashland, 

171. East High and Hall, 

172. East High and Buzzell, " 

173. Spruce and Chestnut west back, " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS, 185 

No. 174. East Spruce and Barry avenue, arm. 

175. East Spruce and Union, " 

176. East Spruce and Beech, " 

177. East Spruce and Maple, " 

178. East Spruce and Lincoln, . " 

179. East Spruce and Wilson, " 

180. East Spruce and Hall, 

181. East Spruce and Massabesie, pole. 

182. East Spruce and Old Falls road, arm. 

183. East Spruce and Beacon, " 

184. Elm street, opposite No. 19G6, " 

185. Elm, below railway bridge, " 

186. Elm and railway bridge, pole. 

187. Elm avenue and Elm, arm. 

188. Ferry and Main, " 

189. Ferry and Third, 

190. Ferry and Turner, pole. 

191. Front street, opposite No. 367, " 

192. Gates and Dubuque, " 

193. Goffstown road and Front, " 

194. Goffstown road and Omega, , arm. 

195. Grove and Pine, " 

196. Grove and Union, " 

197. Grove and Beech, " 

198. Grove and Belmont, " 

199. Granite and Green, " 

200. Granite and West, 

201. Granite and Main, " 

202. Granite and Second, " 

203. Granite bridge, west, pole. 

204. Granite bridge, center, " 

205. Granite bridge, east, " 

206. Granite and State, arm. 

207. Granite and Bedford, 

208. Granite and Canal, pole. 

209. Granite and Franklin, 

210. Green and Elm, " 

211. Green and Pine, " 

212. Green and Union, " 

213. Green and Beech, " 

214. Grant and Boynton, " 

215. Hancock and Brown avenue, " 

216. Hanover common, " 

217. Hanover and Nutfield lane, arm. 

218. Hanover and Chestnut, " 

219. Hanover and Pine, " 



186 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 220. Hanover and Union, arm. 

221. Hanovei' and Beech, " 

222. Hanover and Maple, " 

223. Hanover and Lincoln, " 

224. Hanover and Ashland, " 

225. Hanover and Hall, " 

226. Hanover and Belmont, " 

227. Hanover and Beacon, " 

228. Hanover and Alfred, " 

229. Hanover and Highland, pole. 

230. Hanover and Grant, arm. 

231. Hanover and Lake avenue, pole. 

232. Hanover and Page, arm. 

233. Harrison and Elm, " 

234. Harrison and Chestnut, " 

235. Harrison and Pine, ' " 

236. Harrison and Hazel, " 

237. Harrison and Union, " 

238. Harrison and Walnut, " 

239. Harrison and Beech, " 

240. Harrison and Ash, " 

241. Harrison and Maple, " 

242. Harrison and Oak, " 

243. Harrison and Russell, " 

244. Harrison street, opposite Xo. 329, " 

245. Harvell and South Main, " 

246. Hayward and Beech, " 

247. Haj'ward and Cypress, pole. 

248. Hayward and Riley avenue, arm. 

249. High and Chestnut, 

250. High and Pine, " 

251. High and Union, " 

252. Hollis and Canal, " 

253. Hollis, below Elm west back, " 

254. Hospital avenue and Massabesic, pole. 

255. Kelley and Rimmon, arm. 

256. Kelley and Cartier, pole. 

257. Kelley and Alsace, arm. 

258. Kidder and Boyden, pole. 

259. Kidder and Whitney, 

260. Kidder and Elm, 

261. Lake avenue and Elm, 

262. Lake avenue and Chestnut, 

263. Lake avenue and Pine, * 

264. Lake avenue and Union, 

265. Lake avenue and Beech, 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTKIC LIGHTS. 187 

No. 26G. Lake avenue and Maj)le, pole. 

267. Lake avenue and Lincoln, " 

268. Lake avenue and Wilson, " 

269. Lake avenue and Massabesie, " 

270. Lake avenue and Belmont, arm. 

271. Lake avenue and Beacon, " 

272. Lake avenue, opposite No. 529, " 

273. Lake avenue and Cass, pole. 

274. Lake avenue and Canton, " 

275. Lake avenue and J. Hall road, " 

276. Langdon and Canal, arm. 

277. Langdon and Elm west back, pole. 

278. Laurel and Laurel avenue, arm. 

279. Laurel and Pine, " 

280. Laurel and Union, *' 

281. Laurel and Beech, *' 

282. Laurel and Maple, " 

283. Laurel and Lincoln, '* 

284. Laurel and Wilson, *' 

285. Laurel and Hall, 

286. Laurel and Belmont, " 

287. Laurel and Milton, •' 

288. Laurel and Beacon, " 

289. Laurel and Cass, 

290. Liberty street, opposite No. 93, " 

291. Lowell south back and Nutfield lane, " 

292. Lowell and Elm, 

293. Lowell and Birch, " 

294. Lowell and Chestnut, 

295. Lowell and Pine, " 

296. Lowell and Union, " 

297. Lowell and Walnut, " 

298. Lowell a ad Beech, 

299. Lowell and Ash, 

300. Lowell and Nashua, " 

301. Lowell and Malvern. " 

302. Lowell and Ashland, " 

303. Lowell and Hall, 

304. Lowell and Belmont, 

305. Manchester and Elm, " 

306. Manchester and Chestnut, " 

307. Manchester and Pine, " 

308. Manchester and Union, '• 

309. Manchester and Beech, " 

310. Manchester and Maple, " 

311. Manchester and Lincoln, • " 



188 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPOUTS. 

>>'o. 312. Manchester and Wilson, arm. 

3i;i. Manchester and Hall, " 

314. Manchester and Milton, pole. 

31.5. Market and Canal, arm. 

SlCj. Market and Franklin, 

317. Market and Elm, 

318. Marion and Main, pole. 

319. Marion and McGregor, arm. 

320. Massabesic and Belmont, pole. 

321. Massabesic and Old Falls road, " 

322. Massabesic and Cypress, arm. 

323. Massabesic, north of Valley, " 

324. Massabesic and J. Hall road, " 

325. Mast and Main, pole. 

326. Mast and Bowman, arm. 

327. Mast and Eiddle, pole. 

328. Mast and New Mast road, arm. 

329. Mast and Forest, " 

330. McGregor and Main, " 

331. McGregor bridge, west, pole. 

332. McGregor bridge, east, " 

333. McDuflfie and Huntress, arm. 

334. Meade and Hall, 

335. Mechanic and Canal, " 

336. Mechanic and Hampshire lane, " 

337. Merrimack and Canal, 

338. Merrimack and Franklin back street, " 

339. Merrimack and Fi-anklin, " 

340. ^lerrimack and Elm, " 

341. Merrimack and Chestnut, " 

342. Merrimack and Pine, 

343. Merrimack and Union, " 

344. Merrimack and Beech, 

345. Merrimack and Maple, 

346. Merrimack and Lincoln, 

347. Merrimack and Wilson, 

348. Merrimack and Hall, 

349. Merrimack and Belmont, 

350. Merrimack and Beacon, 

351. Merrimack street, opposite No. 532, 

352. Merrimack common, west, pole. 

353. Merrimack common, east, 

354. Merrimack south back and Union, ;.riu. 

355. Middle and Canal, 

356. Middle and Franklin west back, 

357. Milford and Carroll, 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTKIC LIGHTS. 189 

No. 3oS. Milford and Kiddle, arm. 

3j9. Milford and Main, 

360. :Mitchell and Beech, 

361. Monmouth and McCreg-or back street, pole. 

362. Munroe and River road, arm. 

363. Myrtle and Elm, east back, 

364. Myrtle and Chestnut, " 

365. Myrtle and Pine, " 

366. Myrtle and Union, " 

367. Myrtle and Walnut, " 

368. Myrtle and Beech, " 

369. Myrtle and Maple, " 

370. Myrtle and Russell, 

.371. Myrtle street, opposite No. 350, " 

372. Nelson and Mammoth road, " 

373. New Mast road and D, " 

374. New Mast road and Wilkins, pole. 

375. North and River road. arm. 

376. North and Ehn, " 

377. North and Bay, " 

378. North and Chestnut, " 

379. North and Pine, ])ole. 

380. Norlth and Union, arm. 

381. North and Walnut, " 

382. North and Beech, " 

383. North Main street in Edd}', pole. 
38!. North Adams street, opposite No. G3, arm. 

385. Nutfield lane, rear Central Fire Station, " 

386. Nutt road and Beech, " 

387. Nutt road and Portsmouth railroad, pole. 

388. Nutt road and Willow, arm. 

389. Orange and Elm, 

390. Orange and Pine, " 

391. Orange and Union, " 

392. Orange and Ash, " 

393. Orange and Maple, " 

394. Orange and Oak, " 

395. Orange and Russell, " 

396. Orange and Linden, " 

397. Orange and Hall. " 

398. Page and Portsmouth railroad, " 

399. Pai'k common, pole- 
'00. Parker and West, arm. 

401. Pearl and Nutfield lane, " 

402. Pearl and Chestnut, 

403. Pearl and Pine, " 



190 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOF.TS. 

No. 404. Pearl and Union, arm. 

405. Pearl and Beech, ** 

406. Pearl and Oak, " 

407. Pearl and Russell, 

408. Pearl and Linden, - " 

409. Pearl and Morrison, pole. 

410. Pearl and Belmont, arm. 

411. Pennacook and Canal, pole. 

412. Pennacook and Elm, arm. 

413. Pennacook and Chestnut, jjoie. 

414. Pennacook and Pine, arm. 

415. Pennacook and Union, " 

416. Pleasant and Franklin, " 

417. Pleasant and Elm, " 

418. Prescott and Wilson, " 

419. Prince and Boynton, " 

420. Prince and B, " 

421. Prospect and Elm east back, " 

422. Prospect and Chestnut, " 

423. Prospect and Pine, " 

424. Prospect and Union, " 

425. Prospect and Beech, " 

426. Prospect and Ash, " 

427. Prospect and Oak, " 

428. Prospect and Linden, " 

429. Prospect and Hall, " 

430. Putnam and Bartlett, pole. 

431. Putnam and Cartier, arm. 

432. Putnam and Main, " 

433. Powell and River road, " 

434. Rimmon street, opposite No. 322, pole. 

435. River road and Otis, arm. 

436. River road and Stark park, " 

437. Rockland avenue and Wilkins, " 

438. Rockland avenue and GoiTstown line, pole. 

439. Sagamore and Elm, arm. 

440. Sagamore and Pine, " 

441. Sagamore and Walnut, " 

442. Sagamore and Maple, " 

443. Sagamore and Russell, " 

444. Salmon and Canal, " 

445. Salmon and Elm, " 

446. Salmon and Bay, " 

447. Salmon and Ohestnut, pole. 

448. Salmon and Pine, " 

449. Salmon and LTnion, " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 191 



pole, 
pole, 
arm. 



.. 450. 


Salmon and Beech, 




451. 


School and Third, 




452. 


School and Turner, 




453. 


Schiller and Second, 




454. 


Schuyler and Main, 




455. 


Shasta and Elm, 




456. 


Silver and Union, 




457. 


Silver and Beech, 




458. 


Silver and Lincoln, 




459. 


Silver and Wilson,. 




4G0. 


Silver and Belmont, 




461. 


Somerville and Hall, 




462, 


Somerville and Taylor, 




463. 


Somerville and Cypress, 




464. 


Somervile and Jewett, 




465. 


South Main street, opposite No. 520, 




466. 


Spruce and Elm, 




467. 


Spruce south back, and Manhattan 


lane, 


468. 


Spring and Canal, 




469. 


Spring and Hampshire lane, 




470. 


Stark and Canal, 




471. 


Stark street, opposite No. 22, 




472. 


State, east back and private way, 




473. 


Sta-te, north Granite, 




474. 


State, south Granite, 




475. 


Sullivan and Thornton, 




476. 


Sullivan and Beauport, 




477. 


Sullivan and Main, 




478. 


Summer and State, 




479. 


Summer and Pine, 




480. 


Summer and Union, 




481. 


Summer and Hall, 




482. 


Summer and Dearborn, 




483. 


Summer and Belmont, 




484. 


Thayer and Elm, 




485. 


Titus avenue and Beech, 




486. 


Tremont common, 




487. 


Trenton and Union, 




488. 


Valley and Elm, 




489. 


Valley and Pine, 




490. 


Valley and Union, 




491. 


Valley and Wilson, 




492. 


Valley and Belmont, 




493. 


Valley and Taylor, 




494. 


Valley and Cypress, 




495. 


Valley and Jewett, 





pole, 
arm. 



pole. 



pole, 
arm 

])<ile. 
arm. 



192 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS, 

No. 496. Vinton and Taylor, arm. 

497. Walker and Main, " 

498. Walker and Fourth, " 

499. Walker and Third, " 

500. Walker and Second, " 

501. Walker and Turner, pole. 

502. Washington and Church, arm. 

503. Water street, opposite No. 22, 

504. Water and Elm, " 

505. Wayne and Dubuque, pole. 
500. Wayne and Beauport, " 

507. Wayne and Main, arm. 

508. Wayne and McGregor, ])ole. 
r09. Webster and River road, " 

510. Webster and Elm, arm. 

511. Webster and Chestnut, " 

512. Webster and Pine, " 
5i:i. Webster and Walnut, pole. 

514. V\'ebster and Beech, arm. 

515. Welch avenue and Calef road, pole. 

516. West Hancock and South Main. arm, 

517. West Hancock and Dartmouth, " 

518. West Hancock and Second, pole. 

519. West Hancock and Wentworth, arm. 

520. Whitford and Union, 

521. Wilton and ^lain, " 

522. Winter and Parker, " 

523. Winter street, opposite No. f2. ' " 

524. Winter place and Elm \vest back', " 

525. Youno- and Taylor, " 

526. Young- and Ainsworth avenue, 

527. Young- and ^lammoth road, 

528. Lake avenue and Kenney. " 

529. Appleton and Chestnut, " 

530. Sagamore and Beech, " 

531. Cartier, 50 feet south of Wayne, " 
5.12. Opposite 893 Hanover, 

533. Amherst and Milton, 

534. Pearl and Walnut. 

535. Sagamore and Fmyth road, " 

536. Valley and Hall, " '' 

537. East High and Beacon, 

538. Concord and Weston, " 

539. South Main and Erie, 

540. Mammoth road near Isolation hospital, 

541. Vallev and Beedh. " 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 193 

No. 542. Bridge and Arkwright, arm. 

543. Kay, between Clarke and Appleton, " 

544. Amoskeag and First, " 

545. Green and Wilson, 

546. Pearl and Ash. - « 

547. Trenton and Elm, '' 

548. Blueher and Montgomery, " 

549. Byron and Josselyn, 

550. Front street and Stearns lane, 

551. Lincoln and Portsmouth railroad, ' " 

552. Spruce and Canton, " 

553. Central and JNIilton, 

554. Brown avenue and ^Yestland avenue, " 

555. Old Bridge and Mammoth road, " 

556. Adams street and Notre Dame avenue, " 

557. Granite south back, near Canal, " 

558. Titus avenue. Highland sdhool, pole. 

559. Mj'stic avenue and Union street, " 

560. Pine and Silver, arm. 

561. Cypress and East Spruce, " 

562. Kelley and Hevey, " 

563. J. Hall road and Portsmouth railroad, " 

564. Pleasant and Franklin west back, " 

565. Elm west back, between Kidder and Hollis, . " 

566. Milford and Donald, 

567. Taylor and Dix, 

568. Candia road and Woodbine avenue, " 

569. Harvard and Wilson, 

570. Brooklyn avenue, between Jewett and Cypress, pole. 

571. Wayne and Thornton, arm. 

572. Coolidge avenue and North Bremer street. ♦ 

573. East Spruce and Kenney, 

574. Park avenue and Crown street, 

575. GofEstown road and Taggart street, " 

576. South Beech, near Gold street, " 

577. Prospect and Russell, 

578. Myrtle and Linden, 

579. Cilley road and Taylor street, 

580. Auburn and Hall, 

581. Amherst and Hubbard, " 

582. Putnam west of Eimmon, pole. 

583. Lake avenue and Mammoth road, arm. 

584. Salmon and Walnut, " 

585. Middle and Franklin, " 

586. Myrtle and Belmont, " 

587. Opposite No. 85 Orange, " 



194 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 588. Haj'Avard and Union, arm. 

589. Massabesic and Jewett, " 

590. Harvard and Hall, " 

591. East High and Belmont, " 

592. Sagamore and Oak, " 

593. Amherst and Alfred, " 

594. Willow road and Maple street, " 

595. Dnnbarton road, at No. 158, " 

596. Jewett street and Cilley road, " 

597. Arah street, at lot No. 38, " 

598. Smith road and Webster street, " 

599. Front street, nortlh Eddy, • " 

600. Brock and Mast, " 

601. Xicolet lane (W. Manchester), " 

602. Amory and Cartier, *' 

603. Conant and Cartier, " 

604. Central and Canal, pole. 

605. Maple and Hayward, arm. 

606. South Elm street, opp. Catholic church, " 

607. Union street, opp. No. 1038, " 

608. Hanover and J. Hall road, " 

609. Kelley and Boutwell, " 

610. West end McGregor bridge, " 

611. Prospect and Maple, " 

612. Somerville and Wilson, "• 



Tungsten Lamps. 

1 Spruce south back street and Barry avenue. (40 Watt.) 

2 Spruce north back street and Barry avenue. (40 Watt.) 

3 Merrimack street, 200 feet north of Union. (40 Watt.) 



Gas Lamps, 



1 IMerrill and Willow. 

1 Brown avenue and Shasta street. 

1 Brown avenue and Bj'ron street. 

1 Hancock and Hamilton. 

1 Hancock, near Brewery. 

1 State street, at Manchester Mills. 

1 Franklin and Auburn. (Bracket.) 

1 Turner, south of Walker. 

1 Milford and Bowman. 

1 A and B. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 105 

1 Boynton and C. 

1 Milford and Williams. 

1 George street, west side. 

1 East street, near Eiddle. 

1 Granite and Dover. 

1 Granite and Quincy. 

1 Douglas and Quincy. 

1 Douglas and Dover. 

1 Douglas and back street. 

1 Douglas and Turner. 

1 Pleasant, near Franklin street. 

1 Pleasant, near Canal. 

1 Mechanic, between Elm and Canal. 

1 Walnut, between Bridge and Lowell. 

1 Bridge and Buzzell. 

1 Somerville, between Maple and Lincoln. 

1 Bridge, between Chestnut and Elm. 

1 Appleton street, near Elm. 

1 Monroe, between Elm and Canal. 

1 Clark and Chestnut. 

1 Blodget and Chestnut. 

1 Blodget, near Elm. 

1 Orange and Chestnut. 

1 Orange, between Chestnut and Elm. 

1 Orange and Walnut. 

1 Orange and Beech. 

1 Pearl and Maple. 

1 xVrlington, near Maple. 

1 East High and Maple. 

1 Lowell and South. 

1 Belmont and East High. 

1 Beacon and Lowell. 

1 Beacon and Concord. 

1 Belmont and Concord. 

1 Belmont and Amherst. 

1 Belmont and Manchester. 

1 Belmont and Central. 

1 Ainsworth avenue and Haj-ward. 

1 Jewett and Young's road. 

1 Jewett, near Young's road. 

1 Xutfield and Derryfield lanes. (Bracket.) 

1 Nutfield and Londonderry. (Bracket.) 

1 Nutfield and Monadnock. (Bracket.) 

1 Hanover, above Beech. 

2 Chestnut, above Clarke. 
1 Salmon, west of Elm. 



196 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1 Massabesic and Taylor. 

1 Amherst and Beacon. 

1 Hanover, above Lincoln." 

1 Beedh street, below Bridge. 

1 Baj% between North and Webster. 

1 Parker street. 

1 Hollis street. 

1 Belmont and Hayward. 

1 Ash street, below Bridge. 

1 Waldo and Everett. 

1 Carroll street. 

1 Walnut and Prospect. 

1 Proiit avenue, opposite No. 99. 

1 South Main street, below Milford. 

1 Elm street, rear of J. E. Dodge's. 

1 Kidder court. 

1 Chestnut, above North. 

1 River road and Thayer street. 

1 Harrison and Alfred. 

1 Jones and Nelson. 

1 Jones and Benton. 

1 Taylor and Grove. 

1 Chester street. 

1 Valley street, front No. 868. 

1 Spring street, west of Elm. 

1 Private way, between Granite and Clinton. 

1 Somerville and Wilson. 

1 Ba3' street, near Carpenter. 

1 ^Manchester street. 

1 Morrison and Arlington. 

1 Union and Webster. 

1 Liberty and Webster. 

1 Appleton and Eay. 

1 Bowman and Marlboro. 

1 Wilson, corner of Clay. 

1 Somerville and Springview. 

1 Dartmoutlh and Frederick. 

1 Cleveland and Hiram. 

1 Vallej' and Willow. 

1 Hayes and Chase avenue. 

1 Ashland and Hall. 

1 Ashland and Pearl. 

1 Merrimack, between Lincoln and Maple. 

1 Stark street. 

1 Appleton street. 

1 Canal street. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTEIC LIGHTS. 197 

1 ^ferrimack street. 

1 Laurel street. 

1 Hemlock street. 

1 Williams street. 

1 Merrimack, between Wilson and Lincoln. 

1 Manchester, between Beech and Maple. 

1 Market, between Elm and Canal. 



Location at Goffe's Falls. 



1 At Harvey's. 

1 At Marshall's. 

1 Corner Merrill and Xutt road. 

1 Corner Derrj' and Harvey road. 

1 Corner Harvey and Mill road. 

1 Coi'ner Harvey and South road. 

1 At Dickey's. 

1 Derry hill. 

1 Foot of Derry hill. 

1 At Melrose's. 

1 At Fox's. 

1 Mill gate. 

1 Nettle's corner. 

1 King's, on Mill street. 

1 Caldwell's, on Mill street. 

1 Nettle's house, Brown avenue. 

1 Liirvey's, Brown avenue. 

1 Kimball's, Brown avenue. 

1 Walker's, Brown avenue. 

1 Cemetery, Brown avenue. 

1 Park, Brown avenue. 

1 Kellaher's, Brown avenue. 

2 Depot street. 
C Calef road. 

1 Calef and Brown. 
1 Western and Willow. 
1 Brown avenue 
1 Willow street. 



Naphtha Lamps. 



2 Calef road. 

1 Calef road, at Miss Burns'. 
1 Calef road and Mitchell street 
1 Calef road and Titus street. 



198 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1 Calef road and Pine Grove cemetery. 

1 Valley and Maple. 

1 Yallej- and Lincoln. 

1 Hayward and Lincoln. 

1 Candia road and Orchard. 

1 Candia road and Cody. 

1 Candia road, No. 487. 

1 Candia road and Page street. 

1 Candia road, No, 625. 

1 Candia road, near yellow barn. 

1 Candia road, Xo. 914. 

1 Candia road, Xo.- 927. 

1 Candia road, Xo. 1035. 

1 Candia and Proctor roads. 

1 Candia and Lake Shore roads. 

1 Candia road, near Lake pavilion. 

1 Candia and Hanover street. 

1 Candia road, at McDonald's. 

4 Candia road. 

1 Lake Shore and Proctor roads. 

1 Lake Shore road, at Proctor's. 

1 Lake Shore road, at Page's. 

1 Lake Shore road, at pumping-station. 

2 Lake Shore road. 
1 Lake Shore. 

1 Lake Shore, at R. R. crossing. 

1 Broadway. 

1 Hanover street, Xo. 1264. 

1 Hanover and Proctor road. 

1 Hanover street. 

1 Hanover street, Xo. 928. 

1 Hanover and J. Hall road. 

1 J. Hall road. 

1 Mammoth and Cilley road. 

1 Mammoth and Island Pond road. 

1 Mammoth and Cohas avenue. 

1 Young street, near Taylor. 

1 Taylor street. 

1 Shasta and Maple. 

1 Broadway and Hanover. 

3 Londonderry turnpike. 

1 Harvard street. 

2 Oakland avenue. 

1 Oakland and Mammoth. 

1 Longwocd and Revere avenue. 

1 Lovering and Glenwood. 

1 Candia road and Sherburne. 



GAS LIGHTS, OIL LAMPS, AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 199 

3 Mammoth road. 
1 Woodland and Candia. 
1 Mammoth and Cross. 
1 Knowlton and Ha.yward. 

1 Mammoth and Derry. 

2 Derry road. 

1 Conant and Corning. 
1 Proctor road. 

1 Trenton and Adams streets. 

2 Londonderry turnpike. 
1 Cohas avenue. 

1 Broadway and Sherman street. 



EEPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 1909. 



Eugene E. Reed, Mayor, ex officio. 

Charles H. Manning, Prcf^idoit, term expires January, 1913. 

Perry H. Dow, term expires January, 1915. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, term expires January, 1916. 

Charles M. Floyd, term expires January, 1914, 

William Corey, term expires January, 1911. 

Egbert E. McKean, term expires January, 1912. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Clcrlx. 



OFFICERS. 



Charles H. Manning, Pirsidviit, 

Charles K. Walker, Siipcrtntciidoit. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

Jerome J. Lovering, Euginccr at Low Service Pumping Station. 

Charles A. Whitney, Engineer at High Service Pumping Station. 



202 



EEPOET OF THE BOAED OF WATM COMMIS- 
SIONEES. 



To the Honorable City Coxncils of the City of Manchester, K. H.: 

Gentlemen: — The Manchester Water Commissioners herewith pre- 
sent their thirty-eighth annual report for the year ending December 
31, 1909, with the detailed report of the superintendent during the 
lieriod. 

nXANCIAL, CO>-DITIOi\. 

Eeceipts and expenditures for the year have been as follows: 

Eeceived from water rents, etc $132,486.50 

Eeceived from hydrant rentals 21,275.00 

Total receipts, 1909 $153,761.50 

Amount paid for current expenses $34,561.83 

Amount paid for construction expenses 41,937.63 

Amount paid for interest on water bond.... 29,422.50 
Hydrant rentals set aside for sinking fund.. 21,275.00 
Set aside for sinking fund for payment of 

water bonds, state law, 1897 bonds 5,000.00 

• ■ 132,190.96 

Eeceipts over expenditures $21,564.54 

Amount on hand December 31, 1908 41,821.38 

Amount on hand December 31, 1909 $63,385.92 

Eespectfully submitted, 

Eugene E. Eeed, ex officio, 
Charles H. Mantling, Presidetit, 
Charles M." Floyd, 
Edgar J. Knowlton, 
Win-iAM Corey, 
Perry H. Dow, 
Egbert E. ^IcKean. 

Water Board. 



208 



SUPERINTENDENT'S EEPOHT. 



To the Water Commissioners of the City of Manchester: 

Gentlemen: — We sihall again have to report low water. Last j'ear 
at this time we were pumping by steam as we are now. We pumped 
by steam until ^March first to help out the low service, and from this 
time until September IS, 1909, we supplied the water from the low 
.service pumping station. 

The lowest point reached in the lake was thirty-six inches below 
the dam. 

It is evident that the time has come when we must look to some- 
thing besides water for power for pumping water into the reservoirs. 

When I first took charge of the water plant, 1,200,000 gallons a day 
was, for a long time, the limit. Now we pump nearly three times as 
much, and have four times as much pipe laid in the streets. 

The first item to attend to is another boiler at the high service 
station. We need this, for it takes two boilers to run the pumps, 
and while they are being run fourteen hoiirs a day Ave have no time 
to clean them. If we had anot'her boiler one could be idle while we 
cleaned it. 

It is for you to say what shall be done. 

There have been no repairs of anj^ amount at this station. 

We had a man patrol the lake with a power boat last summer in 
order to keep the water as free from pollution as possible. This man 
was John Connolly, and he had his headquarters at the Berry cot- 
tage. He discharged his duties in a manner satisfactory to the com- 
missioners. 

We have cleaned up quite a lot along the shore from Kimball's 
point to Auburn village, and also on the back pond. We have re- 
moved leaves, tin cans and sawdust amounting, I should saj', to one 
thousand small cartloads. 

We have bought the Levasseur house and land, allowing him to 
stay until spring. 

The Shamrock Boat Club and the Jolliet Club-house are now in our 
possession. 

We have also bought the land and buildings at the corner of Lake 
Shore road and Candia road. 

Since the above was written we have sold the Corey cottage, the 
Jolliet boat-house, and the house at the corner of Lake Shore and 
Candia road for the sum of six hundred and seventy dollars. 

204 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 205 

DISTRIBUTIOX PIPE. 

There has been about three and six tenths miles of distribution pipe 
laid in different streets and thirty (hydrants and forty-three gates 
have been set, at an expense of twelve thousand six hundred and two 
dollars ($12,(502.00). 

About a mile of this pipe was laid in Londonderry and one fourth 
of a mile in Goffstown. 

At the old station the crosshead broke and the lining to one cy- 
linder worked loose so that we had to have it repaired at the Davidson 
Pump Works in Brooklyn, New York. It will be put together in a 
week or so if we get water enough to test it. No other repairs of 
any account were needed at this station. 

No repairs have been made on eit'her of the reservoirs, but at the 
high service gatehouse we have set some glass which was broken 
by the boys shooting rifle balls through the windows. We had the 
same trouble last year. 

The force and supply mains have been looked after and about the 
usual number of leaks have been repaired. 

WATERING 'TROUGHS. 

There has been something said in the papers about watering troughs, 
of which we have thirty. Now, I wish to report what was said on 
this subject thirty-one years ago. This report, made in the year ISTb, 
reads as follows. 

"Numerous complaints having been made to the superintendent 
about watering troughs (a subject which he realh' has nothing to do 
witlh), a fair statement regarding the matter perhaps would not be 
out of place. 

"Water takers complain that they have to pay for water in their 
stables and other premises, while others get it for nothing by a 
petition to the city councils for a public watering-trough in the street 
near their premises. 

"There are in the city ten public watering-troughs that are sup- 
plied by the city water-works. The income from these ten troughs 
amounts to $60 a year. At meter rates it would amount to at least 
three thousand dollars ($3,000) a year. 

"These troughs are usually made in such shape that water may 
be used not only for legitimate purposes, but for any use Avhatever, 
and it is a significant fact that this department has been notified in 
several cases to shut off water near these places, because the parties 
can get their supply from tihe public fountains without paying water 
rates. 

"Under the present system, the waste of water, too, which has to 
be pumped at considerable expense, is very great. It is, therefore, 
respectfully suggested that the matter complained of should be rem- 



200 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

edied by substituting the common cast-iron fountains, such as are 
generally used in other cities. 

"The remarks of the suijerintendent in the report regarding water- 
ing-troughs, meet the approbation of tihe board, and your attention 
is most respectfully called to the subject, as the water commissioners 
have no jurisdiction in the ijremises. No doubt is entertained that a 
more equitable and satisfactory system for public fountains can be 
devised." 

At the present time we use nearly two hundred thousand gallons 
of water a day for watering-troughs, for which no charge is made. 

During the month of September the insurance people examined the 
water-works and gave a fair rejDort. It is easj^ for them to recom- 
mend improvements, as they do not have to pay for any extensions 
or connections. When I was elected superintendent I was told that 
the money collected could be used for extensions and repairs, but 
that no more bonds would be issued. What the insurance people pro- 
pose would cost the city two hundred thousand dollars if done right 
away. 

We have had good luck so far, and of course want to be prepared 
for emergencies. We shall do the best we can to carry out some of 
their recommendations. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



207 



•uospiAB(T 

a 1 n u I lu' .lacl 

S9310.HS agB.ia.vv 






ss 



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208 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



-.lag ALOi ojiit 
p.diund sA,v OK 



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JO piinoci .lad 
l\cIuinclsnonu9 



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suoiiTiS JO -oiy 









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r-^ :d -H CO (jj co^ -^ co" CD -^ cc "i^ 

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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



209 







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pad amds 11011139 












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210 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

RAINFALL AT HIGH SERVICE STATION, 1909. 



DAT OF 1 >, 

Month. JS 


1 


s 




i 


1 


3 


3 


.a 

t 


1 
1 


1 

a 

1 


1 


1 








.28 
.05 








.05 




I 








«.18 
« 07 


••;2o- 












3 


"03" 
.23 
.5G 


".02 




.72 








.40 










5 







.14 

.28 


"'M' 


.79 
.34 


.87 








_ 




.09 


.12 










o 


















.09 


51 


,, 








.13 
















10 





M.47 


*.29 


.02 
.14 


.29 
02 






.30 

.50 








1 1 










].) 


*.4ti 












.21 






lo 
























*.21 






.90 
1.10 

■ .63' 


■a2 


.39 
.02 


!20 

"ios" 


'!n9 

..52 

1.00 


'"49* 


'".06 
.02 


".'is' 


*I 86 


15 ... 


*.41 
*.98 


*.03 






*.8S- 








18 




1') 








.15 














.83 


*.l-2 


















oi : ••■ 






























.35 

.28 


.15 
.07 










.30 


.10 




"3 










.03 
.31 




.01 
.48 
.22 
.-Si 

.58 




"4 


*.76 


.81 
.47 




.31 

.10 


*1.20 
.47 
19 




25 


2.16 


"os" 








0(5 




* 75 


















.22 


.72 


.63 
.14 


.37 






1.17 

.09 








'") 












.13 






*.46 






.31 






.06 




'61 
































3 61 


6.01 


3.24 


4.32 


1.72 


2.37 


1.47 


2.80 


5 12 


1 00 


;>.76 


3.12 



*Snow. 








Total 


rainfall 1909. 36.54 


inches. 




1S95. 


Total 


rainfall. 


42.06 


nches. 


189u. 


Total 


rainfall, 


38.41 


inches. 


1897. 


Total 


rainfall, 


49.76 


inches. 


1898. 


Total 


rainfall. 


47.15 


inches. 


1899. 


Total 


rainfall, 


30.27 


nches. 


1900. 


Total 


rainfall, 


47.89 


nches. 


1901. 


Total 


rainfall. 


47.47 


inches. 


1902. 


Total 


rainfall. 


47.58 


nches. 


190:?. 


Total 


rainfall, 


40.39 


nche.e.. 


1904. 


Total 


rainfall, 


34.54 


nches. 


190.5. 


Total 


rainfall. 


39.13 ] 


nches. 


190o. 


Total 


rainfall. 


41.85 


nches. 


1907. 


Total 


rainfall, 


42.54 


nches. 


1908. 


Total 


rainfall. 


33.88 


nches. 


1909. 


Total 


rainfall. 


36.54 1 


nches. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 211 



Income from the Sale of Water, 1909. 

Received for water by rate $19,870.47 

for water by meter 110,520.95 

for water building purpo.ses 260.20 

from fines 372.00 



Eeceived for pipe, etc $44.85 

for 6-inch pipe, etc., Manchester 

Street Railway 11S.69 

for 4-inch pipe, etc., F. D. Leighton 5.00 
for 8-inch pipe, etc., Stevens & Brad- 
ley 16.00 

4-inch pipe, etc., Manchester Supply 

Co 15.00 

for old pipe and brass, New Eng- 
land Metal Co 90.39 

for service laid, C. H. Wears 18.25 

fcr service laid, Mr. Gallagher 9.30 

for service laid, W. M. Parker 23.75 

for (]-incli branch. Reform School.. 9.25 

Received from F. Brown (lease) $1.00 

from G. G. Griffin (lease) 1.00 

from H. A. Boone, rent of land 10.00 

from H. A. Sails, rent of land 10.00 

from Burke Bros., rent of land.... 300.00 

from W, M. Moulton, rent 66.00 

from Jos. Fremont, rent 33.00 

Received from Charles Spofford, for hay.... $3.00 

from George Blackman, for gras.s 10.00 
from Macdonald & Chilton, for oil 

barrels 5.20 

Received from sale of W. B. Corey house $80.00 

from sale of Jolliet Club-house.... 125.00 
from sale of Rich Schaarschmidt 

house *465.00 



$131,023.62 



350.GS 



421.00 



670.00 



$132,486.50 
Hvdrant rentals 21,275.00 



Total $153,761.50 



212 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Amount paid for current expenses $34,501.83 

Amount paid for construction expenses.... 41,937.63 

Amount jDaid for interest on bonds 29, 422. ,"0 

Hydrant rental set aside for sinking fund... 21,275.00 
State Law (1897 bonds) set aside for sinlcing 

fund 5.000.00 

Receipts over expenditures 

Amount on hand, December 31, 1908 

Amount en hand December 31, 1909 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOf^'TS, 1909. 

Superintendence, repairs, etc $20,742.45 

Stationery and printing 193.51 

Office and incidental expenses 1,480.41 

Pumping expenses (low service) 3. 183. 01 

Pumping expenses (liigh service) 6,432.46 

Repairs to buildings 818.31 

Repairs to canal, reservoir, etc 1,711.68 

Total current expenses 

Service pipes $2,971.70 

Distribution pipes 13,364.30 

Fire hydrants and valves 2,183.36 

Meters 1 .870.42 

Land and water rights 21,547.85 

Total construction expenses 

Sinking fund for water bonds, issue 1897 $5,000.00 

Sinking fund for fire hydrants 21.275.00 

Total Construction Expenses. 

Land and water rights $417,181.28 

Dam, canal, penstock, etc 101,399.16 

Pumping machinery and buildings 246,508.69 

Distribution reservoirs 117,697.90 

Foi-ce and supply main 89,769.02 

Distribution pipes 723,981.37 

Fire hydrants and valves 71,554.50 

Meters and fixtures 74,240.38 

Service pipes 98,351.06 

(irading and fencing 17,470.39 

Tools and fixtures 10,649.35 



$132,196.96 



$21,564.54 
41,521.38 



$63,385.92 



$34,561.83 



41,937.63 



BOAIID OF WATER COMMISSIONEKS. 213 

Hoarding and storehouses $0]9.;i() 

Uoads and culverts 4, -405. 20 

Supplies 550.:'.'.) 

Engineering 22,170.19 

Livery and traveling expenses 2,850.04 

Legal expenses 503.79 



$2,000,274.07 



Total Current E.riwiiws. 

Superintendence and repairs $532,430.94 

Stationery and printing 9,470.00 

OfHce and incidental expenses 40,574.01 

I'umping expenses (low service) 85,182.29 

]*umping expenses (high service) 77,344.47 

Repairs and buildings 11,950.10 

Repairs to dam, canal, and reservoir 18,487.78 



Interest $40,078.51 

Highway expenses 14,000.53 



Interest, discount, and labor performed on 
highway, transferred and tools and mate- 
rial sold $92,755.13 

Current expenditures to December 31, 1909.. 781,440.28 



781,440.28 



54,079.04 
$2,836,399.99 



874,201.41 



Total cost exclusive of interest and current expenses $1,902,198.58 
Interest and discount to December 31, 1908.. $1,273,077.01 

Interest for 1909 29,422.50 

$1,302,499.51 

AMOUXT OF WATER BONDSt ISSXED TO tDEX^EHUER 31, 1909. 

Issued July 1, 1890, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, 1910 $100,000.00 

January 1, 1892, rate 4 per cent, due January 1, 

1912 100,000.00 

August 1, 1893, rate 5 per cent, due August 1, 

1913 1 00,000.00 

November 1, 1893, rate 4% per cent, due Novem- 
ber 1, 1913 -. 100,000.00 

October 1, 1894, rate 4 per cent, due October 1, 

1914 50.000.00 

July 1, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due July 1, 1915 100,000.00 

December 16, 1895, rate 4 per cent, due December 

10, 1915 50,000.00 

January 1, 1897, rate 4 per cent, due; January 

1, 1917 ^. 100,000.00 

$700,000.00 



214 A]?JNUAL OFFICIAL KEPOETS. 



SINKING FUND. 

1893 $12,750.00 

1894 13,925.00 

1895 15,800.00 

1896 16,800.00 

1897 17,175.00 

1898 17,675.00 

1898 5,000.00 

1899 5,000.00 

1 899 18,100.00 

1900 18,425.00 

1900 5,000.00 

1901 5,000.00 

1 901 18,575.00 

1902 ■. 18,800.00 

1902 5,000.00 

1903 5,000.00 

1903 19,200.00 

1904 19,450.00 

1904 5,000.00 

1905 19,550.00 

1905 5,000.00 

1906 . 5,000.00 

1906 20,075.00 

1907 20,625.00 

1907 5,000.00 

] 908 • 5,000.00 

1908 20.925.00 

1909 21,275.00 

1909 5.000.00 



$369,125.00 

Interest, etc., to December 31. 1908 .59,369.80 

Interest, etc., for 1909 6,815.11 



Paid for retiring bonds January 1, 1902 $100,000.00 

Paid for retirini? bonds January 1, 1907 100,000.00 



$435,309.91 



200,000.00 



$235,309.91 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS. 



215 






1872 


S573.61 
2,097.6C 


















1873 


y ........ 


$1,692.69 
7,987.27 


$190.8'] 




$14 OC 


$200.67 
699.85 




8 


1874 


32 i 154.07 


{ 122,425.00 


1,436.56 


S119.10 


104J8 




1875 


29,223.60 


13,095.00 


10,292.13 


3,348.11 


122.13 


120.59 


2,245.64 




160 


187(> 


39,028.47 


16,320.00 


15,900.63 


6,305.81 


72.32 


180.16 


249.55 




106 


1877 


43,823.30 


17,475.00 


18,064.51 


7,783.09 


136.10 


233.04 


131.56 




202 


1878 


48,874.26 


17.970.00 


20,255.97 


10,090.25 


83.60 


232.82 


241.62 




226 


1879 


53,143.17 


18,165.00 


21,610.13 


12,732.93 


81.60 


240.64 


303.87 




251 


1880 


57,6.55.25 


18,300.00 


23,795.9f 


14,794.34 


79..50 


210.39 


465.06 


$10.00 


280 


ISSl 


00,215.62 


18,780.00 


25,336.18 


15,554.98 


105.60 


223.99 


203.87 


11.00 


310 


1882 


67,630.13 


20,130.00 


26,803.06 


19,893.69 


146.65 


197.49 


443.24 


11.00 


371 


1833 


73,453.20 


20,520.00 


28,833.24 


23,431.20 


314.65 


208.04 


125.07 


21.00 


404 


1884 


75,580.08 


21,350.00 


31,724.07 


21,329.75 


195.10 


231.96 


738.20 


11.00 


446 


1885 


80,404.12 


18,900.00 


33,597.02 


27,425.35 


102.50 


136.30 


181.45 


11.00 




1886 


75,129.99 


19,750.00 


33,082.11 


21,573.45 


287.40 


130.80 


320 23 


6.00 


613 


18S7 


80.518.17 


20,437.50 


33,497.21 


25,277.09 


351.70 


119.20 


819.47 


16.00 


7.39 


1888 


85;643.82 


21,000.00 


33,864.78 


29,838.82 


543.80 


149.30 


243.62 


3.00 


842 


1889 


86,700.46 


18,240.00 


31.140.99 


33,596.05 


361.95 


153.20 


155.27 


53.00 


951 


1890 


90,463.37 


19,880.00 


32,431.10 


37,009.80 


649.90 


151.80 


298.77 


42.00 


1,135 


1891 


76,605.23 


4,590.00 


30,588.79 


40,479.25 


494.80 


160.40 


200.99 


91.00 


1,313 


1892 


83,474.79 


5,000.00 


31,344.24 


46,139.35 


416.00 


168.40 


139.80 


267.00 


1,608 


189^ 


104,170.03 


12.750.00 


32,603.59 


58,103.20 


1,033.75 


159.60 


339.38 


180.56 


1,895 


189i 


110,210.29 


13,925.00 


32,176.28 


62,501.35 


697.80 


227.40 


334.82 


347.64 


2,182 


1895 


118,374.50 


15,800.00 


32,903.99 


67,465.90 


803.20 


300.40 


763.17 


327.84 


2,520 


189G 


123,907.03 


16,800.00 


32,540.03 


77,610.10 


638.48 


302.80 


440.12 


575.50 


2,865 


1897 


125,719.17 


17,175.00 


30,617.17 


76,148.60 


331.85 


321..80 


027.08 


467.67 


3,134 


1898 


131,184.08 


17,675.00 


29,409.58 


80,643.30 


187.00 


359.80 


441.90 


2,407.50 


3,340 


1899 


133,436.41 


18,100.00 


28,063.31 


85,764.80 


246.80 


363.80 


400.59 


497.08 


3,502 


1900 


138,241.94 


18,425.00 


27,868.85 


91,079.30 


95.80 


397.80 


232.59 


142.60 


3,fi67 


1901 


138.206.14 


18,.575.00 


26,954.99 


91,382.60 


220.30 


437.60 


41o!90 


224.75 


3,804 


1902 


131,331.48 


18,800.00 


23,785.49 


90,479.10 


233.34 


434.00 


358.25 


241.25 


3,983 


1903 


128,416.23 


19,200.00 


21,539.64 


85,954.05 


253.90 


407.00 


1.37.64 


924.00 


4,101 


1904 


133,057.47 


19,4.50.00 


20,486.64 


88,639.41 


161.28 


369.20 


808.12 


3,142.82 


4,220 


1905 


136,3.53 07 


19,550.00 


20,231.99 


92,438.70 


250.66 


366.00 


1,437.09 


1.779.63 


4,3.56 


1906 


139,820.76 


20,075.00 


20,1.54.51 


94,345.90 


277.86 


354.40 


368.88 


4,244 21 


4,525 


1907 


144,433 45 


20,625.00 


19,727.23 


101.758 05 


25'i.20 


393.80 


991.17 


• 683.(0 


4.668 


1908 


147,561. .52 


20,925.% 


19.555.20 


104 431.90 


340 26 


361.80 


567.86 


1,379.50 


4,777 


1909 


153,761.50 


21,275.00 


19,870.47 


110,520 95 


260.20 


372.00 


350.08 


1,112.20 


4,945 



1878, meter rate was changed. 1834, hydrant rates reduced. 1886, meter and other 
rates reduced. 1889, hydrant rates reduced. 1891 and 1892, received only part of 
hydrant rent, and nothing from water-troughs or street sprinlclers. 1893, hydrant 
rent and water-closets rate reduced. July 1, 1902, rates reduced. Meter rate reduced 
October 1, 1904. 

The following amounts have been paid over to the city treasurer, 
and credited to the water-v\'orks: 

1872, supplies and materials sold $.")73.G1 

1873, supplies and materials sold 177.07 

accrued interest on water-bonds sold 193.20 

accrued interest en state bonds sold 146.00 

water rents 1,920.53 

1874, supplies and materials sold G07.S0 

March 12, highway expenditures transferred from 

water account 14,000..j3 

March 17, interest and discount transferred from 
M'ater account 12,347.25 



216 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1574, September 1, interest and di^iconnt transferred 

from water account $22,361.74 

water and ihydrant rent 30,233.54 

December 29, interest transferred 4,566.25 

1575, water and hj^drant rent 27,119.15 

sundry items 2,104.45 

1576, water and hydrant rent 38,879.47 

sundry' items 149.00 

1877, water and hydrant rent 43,691.74 

sundry items 131.56 

1878, water and hydrant rent 48,632.64 

sundry- items 241.62 

1879, water and hydrant rent 52,839.30 

sundry items 303.87 

1550, water and hydrant rent 57,180.19 

sundry items 475.06 

1551, Avater and hydrant rent 60,000.75 

sundry items 214.87 

1552, water and hydrant rent 67,175.89 

sundrj' items 454.24 

1883, water and hydrant rent 73,312.13 

sundry items 146.07 

1884, water and hydrant rent 74,830.88 

sundry items 749.20 

1885, water and hydrant rent 80,211.67 

sundry items .' 192.45 

1886, water and hydrant rent 74,803.76 ' 

sundry items 326.23 

1887, water and hydrant rent 79,682.70 

sundry items 835.47 

1888, water and hydrant rent 85,397.20 

sundry items 246.62 

1889, water and hydrant rent 86,492.19 

sundry items 208.27 

1890, water and hydrant rent , 90,122.60 

sundry items 340.77 

1891, water and hydrant rent 76,213.24 

sundry items 291.99 

1892, water and :hydrant rent 83,067.99 

sundry items 406.80 

1893, water rents 90,900.14 

sundry items ' 519.94 

1894, water rents 95,602.83 

sundrj- items 682.46 

1895, water rents 101,478.49 

sundry items 1,096.01 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 217 

1S96, water rents $] 11,091.41 

sundry items I,015.r32 

1897, water rents 107,449.42 

sundry items 1,094.75 

premiums on bonds 6,248.00 

1898, water rents 110,599.08 

sundry items 2,909.40 

1899, water rents 114,438.74 

sundry items 897.67 

1900, water rents 119,441.75 

sundry items • 375.19 

1901, water rents 118,995.49 

sundry items 635.65 

1902, water rents 114,931.93 

sundry items 599.55 

1903, water rents 108,154.59 

sundry items 1,061.64 

1904, water rents 109,656.53 

sundry items 3,950.94 

1905, water rents 113,386.35 

sundry items 3,416.72 

1906, water rents 115,132.67 

sundry items 4,613.09 

1907, water rents 122,134.28 

sundry items 1,674.17 

1908, water rents 124,689.16 

sundry items 1,947.36 

1909, water rents 131,023.62 

sundry items : 1,462.88 



$3,238,007.82 



218 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES LAID, CxATES AND HYDRANTS SET, 1909. 



Lkngth in 

FEET. 



Gates. 



Alfred 

Alpine 

Amorv 

Bell..' 

Calef road... 

CantUa 

Clay 

Cohas 

Davignon 

Derry road 

Dickey street 

Dickey road 

Frederick 

Glendale 

Hancock 

Head 

Henrietta 

High (east) 

Holly 

Huntress 

Jewett 

Kennedy 

Londonderry...^.. . 

Mammoth (new) 

Mammoth 

Korfolk 

North Kiver road... 
North Kiver voad... 

Second. 

Ward 

Weston 

Woodlawn (or south) 
Youville 



1,219 

390 
26 

576 
85 



1,000 11,186 7,509 



Hanover to Amherst. 
.South of Dickey. 
East side of Uubuque. 
East of Union. ^ 
Laid in 18S4. [school 

Eastward to Youngsville 
East of Taylor. [road 

Reseivoir lot to Mammoth 
West of Pinard. 
East of Mammoth.) 
West to Alpine. 
North of Derry road. 
West of Dartmouth. 
West of .Jewett. 
On liydrant branch. 
North of Mast. 
North of Mast. 
Eastward to Weston. 
West of Taylor. 
Southward to No. 227. 
Southward to Glendale. 
West of Brown avenue. 
Woodlawn to Mr. Koy'8 
South of Old Bridge, [res. 
Cohiis Ave. to Derry Rd. 
West to Union. 
Set 212 north of Monroe St. 
Northward to Park Ave. 
Southward to So. Main. 
East of Rockland Ave. 
Bridge to East High. 
North of Londonderrj'. 
Amorj' to Kelley. 



River Road to No. 60S, 263 feet of &-inch instead of 6inch— error in 1S!)7. 
Total '.'0,003 feet or 3.79 miles. 
43 gates set. 
30 hydrants set. 

Hydrant on Harvard and Lincoln streets moved to Harvard street, west side of 
Portsmouth K. R. 

LOCATION OF GATES SET, 1909. 



Alfred street, north side of Hanover. 
Amory street, east side of Dubuque. 
Bell street, east side of Union. 

Candia road. 6-ineh gate on hj'drant branch, opposite School. 
Candia road, 10-inch gate, 4 feet east of hydrant, front of Mr. Proc- 
tor's. 

Clay street, east side of Taylor, 

Cohas avenue, reservoir lot near 20-inch pipe. 

Davignon street, west side of Pinard. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 219 

Derry road, 87 feet east of Mr. Foster's residence. 

Derry road, 6-incli gate on hydrant branch. 

Dickey road, north side Derry road. 

Dickey road, G-inch gate on hydrant branch. 

Frederick street, west side of Dartmouth. 

Glendale street, west side of Jewett. 

Hancock street, 6-inch gate on middle hydrant branch. 

Head street, north side of Mast. 

Head street, 6-inch gate on hydrant branch, opposite No. 162. 

Head street, 6-inch gate on hydrant branch, 450 feet north of ^Nlast. 

Henrietta street, north side of Mast. 

Holly street, west side of Taylor. 

Kennedy street, west side of Brown avenue. 

Londonderry street, east side of Woodlawn. 

Londonderry street, 21 feet west of Olsen residence. 

Londonderrj' street, 108 feet west of McComb residence. 

New Mammoth road, south side of Old Bridge. 

Mammoth road, 185 feet south of Coihas avenue (8-inch). 

Mammoth road, 440 feet south of Garland residence (8-inch), 

Mammoth road, 8 feet south of hj'drant at Mooresville road (8-inch). 

Mammoth road, 6-inch gate on hydrant branch, Mooresville road. 

Mammoth road, 6-inch gate on hydrant branch, 175 feet south of 
Cohas. 

Mammoth road, 6-inch gate on hydrant branch, 37 feet north of Kim- 
ball residence. 

Mammoth road, 6-inch gate on hydrant branch, 430 feet south of 
Garland residence. 

Norfolk street, west side of LTnion. 

North River road, 8-inch gate north of Monroe street. 

North River road, south of L. J. Smith's residence. 

Second street, soutih side of house, No. 724. 

Second street, 61 feet of No. 864. 

Second street, corner South Main. 

Ward street, east side of Rockland aveniie. 

Weston street, south side of Bridge street. 

Woodlawn or (South) street, north side of Londonderry. 

Youville street, north side Amory. 

Youville street, south side Kelle.y. 

LIST OF LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET, 1900. 

Alfred street, southwest corner of Amherst. 
Candia road, opposite Youngville school. 
Clay street, northeast corner Taylor. 
Derry road, 50 feet east of Trajjold residence. 
Dickey road, opposite G. H. Dunbar residence. 
Glendale street, northwest corner Jewett. 



220 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Head street, 450 feet north of Mast road. 
Head street, opposite No. 162. 
Henrietta, 375 feet north of Mast road. 
Holljr street, northwest corner Taylor. 
Holl}^ street, northeast corner Belmont. 
Kennedy street, opposite No. 45. 

Londonderrj^ street, opposite Mr. Dobbin's residence. ^ 
Londonderry street, 24 feet west of Mr. Olsen's residence. 
Londonderrj^ street, 114 feet west of Mr. McComb's residence. 
Londonderry street, 30 feet east of Mr. Eoy's residence. 
^Mammoth (new) road, opposite Mrs. Heyne's residence. 
Mammoth road, 175 feet south of Cohas avenue. 
Mammoth road, 37 feet north of Mr. Kimball's residence. 
Mammoth road, 430 feet south of ilr. Garland's. 
Mammoth road, corner Mooresville road. 
Norfolk street, northwest corner Union. 
Second street, 380 feet south of No. 724. 
' Second street, 58 feet south of No. 864. 
Second street, 550 feet, south of No. 864. 
Second street, corner South Main (west side). 

Woodlawn or South street, 27 feet north of Mr. Fitzgerald's resi- 
dence. 

Woodlawn street, opposite Mr. Theiss's residence. 
Youville street, northwest corner Amory. 
Ycuville street, southwest corner Kelley. 

SERVICE PIPES LAID, 1009. 

ir() 1-inch diameter 4,310.3 feet 

1 2-inch diameter 17.0 " 

1 4-inch diameter 39.0 " 



SERVICE PIPES RELAID, 1909. 

2 Vs-ii'i^'h diameter 49.7 feet to 1-inch diameter., 

77 %-inch diameter 1,840.9 feet to 1-inch diameter. 

51 1-inch diameter 1,267.7 feet to 1-inch diameter. 

1 1-inch diameter 34.0 feet to 2-inch diameter. 

1 l^^-inch diameter 33.0 feet to 1-inch diameter. 



4.366.3 


feet 


49.0 


feet 


1.7S5.9 


" 


1,265.5 


" 


33.5 


" 


33.0 


" 


3,166.9 


feet 



132 3,225.3 feet 

SERVICE PIPES LAID TO DATE. 

10 Va-inch diameter 207.7 feet 

395 34-inch diameter 10,305.8 " 

5,989 1-inch diameter 151,434.5 " 

17 IVi-inch diameter 748.9 " 



BOAED OF WATER COMMISSIONEES. 221 

.■;y li/o-inch diameter 1,0:)S.8 feet 

103 2-inch diameter 2,G20.1 " 

2 2i/.-inch diameter 63.0 " 

7 3-inch diameter 142.8 " 

18 4-inch diameter 379.2 " 

27 ()-inch diameter 

6,607 ., 106,961.8 feet, 

METERS. 

The number of meters set during the year has been one liundred 
eighty-two (182). 

Taken out, fourteen (14). 

Total number of meters in use, forty-nine hundred and forty-five 
(4,945). 

Number of applications for water, 1909, one hundred and eight^-- 
two (182). 

Total number of applications to date, sixty-seven hundred and 
thirty-seven (6,737). 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMJMISSIONEKS. 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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a 


c 


Mi;:::::i"":";;;i; 


.S 


„„^^, _„„^„^o, C.C. _„^c.-<^. 














'. '. '. 


: " : : 






















O 


a 




















■^ 


















"i \ 


















MM 




3 

5 
3 


•s 














\ i % 


g i : i 




c 


i i 1 i 1 1 g ^ 1 i i ^ 1 s 2 g 1 1 1 


2 
















MM 










































d 




















c 

i 




















c 

r 


c 




















g 




















1 

5 




* 

1 


1 1 1 




a 
1 


1 




Shirley Hill road 

Sullivan 

Third 


Tilton 

Turner 

Varnum 

Walker 

Wnifl 


£ 



BOARD OF Wi^TER COMMTSSIONEKS. 



237 



CO ^ -H ^ 


> 


CO 


" 


(M 


|S 


1 




; : 1" 1 


: : ^' : '"' : "^ 


-r^ ! 


" ; - " ! — " Hi? 












|3 












uo 










'1* 

1 












1 












1 














;-; ^ 


g 


y 






3 


517 

1850 

250 

283 

1331 

44 

505 

24 

352336 
























!i 


: : ■ 


•: 






i 1 












1 












§ 


























« 












1 f* 


Wiiyne 

Wentwortb 

West 


.2 j 


I ^ 1 


5 i 


: "c 
■ s 


- 


1 



^?J 



S »3- 



238 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DISTRLBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 

31, 1909. 



Size of pipe. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 




20,367 feet. 




24,719 feet. 
16,245 " 
.35,010 " 
47 399 " 
It 1,828 " 
352,336 " 
21,537 " 




14-incb " 

12 inch " 


21 
42 


lOinch " 




53 


8-incli " 




141 


6-inch " 


234 feet. 


775 














20,601 feet. 


599,104 feet. 


1,113 



Cement-lined pipe .3.90 miles 

Cast-iron pipe 113.47 " 



Total pipe 
SSI hydrants. 
1,113 gates. 
12 air valves. 



117.37 miles 



IvespectfuUy submitted, 

CHARLES K. ^YALKER, 

Superintendent. 



Uses for which Water is Supplied, 



■WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 

14,397 families, 105 boarding-honses, 18,589 faucets, 7,292 wash-bowls, 
G,942 bathtubs, 16,020 water-closets, 1,464 set tubs, 304 urinals, 5,581 sil- 
coeks, 3,001 horses, 324 cattle, 881 hj^drants, 31 watering-troughs, 11 
drinking foimtains, 74 standpipes, 2 public urinals. 

rVBLIC BUILDrXGS. 

1 jail, 36 churches, 1 courthouse, 13 hose companies, 7 fire engines, 
2 hook-and-ladder, 5 opera houses, 4 convents, 7 hospitals, 6 ceme- 
teries, 1 orphanage, 1 postoflRce, 1 citj' library, 6 banks, 10 hotels. 1 
Masonic hall, 3 Odd Fellows' halls, 3 halls. Children's Home, Masonic 
Home, state armory, 38 schoolhouses. 



58 barber, 11 wheelwright, 16 blacksmith, 10 car]iei!ter, 2 tinsmith, 
1 copper, 3 currying, 22 plumber and gas and water pipe, 18 paint, 3 
gunsmith. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 239 



.) auction, 38 drug-, 1(1 jewelry, 2 fur, ?> house-furnishing goods, 20 
fancy goods, 1 wholesale paper, 5 wholesale produce, 21 dry goods, 12 
cand3% 1 cloak, 16 millinery, 3 tea, 9 furniture, 3 wholesale grocer, 134 
grocery, 6 meal, 4 hardware, 34 boot and shoe, 11 stove, 35 gents' fur- 
nishing goods, 7 book, 1 leather and shoe finders, 3 music, 6 uphol- 
stery, 9 tmdertalver, 5 sewing-machine, 1 feather-cleaner, 1 rubber, 3 
electric, 23 fruit. 

SALOONS. 

41 dining, 21 billiard, 75 liquor. 

MISCELLA^'EOrS. 

S clubrooms, 3 bleacheries, 34 laundries, 4 ice-houses, 12 photog- 
ra])hers, 1 ^lercy Home, 2 old ladies' homes, 1 soldiers" monument, 1 
Turner hall, 4 fountains, 2 trust companies, 1 city farm, 3 depots, 9 
greenhouses, 2 bandrooms, 33 bakeries, 2 waste, 2 business colleges, 
1 battery building, 1 kitchen, 3 wardrooms, 1 gymnasium, 2 police 
stations, 7 garages, 1 driving park, 1 cement block. 

MAXUFACrrURIXG ESTABLISHMENTS. 

3 hosiery mills, 1 silver-plating-, 1 iron foundry, 2 dye-houses, 4 
machine shops, 6 clothing- manufactories, 9 harness shops, 1 cornice 
worlvs, 1 brush s'aop, 9 carriage shops, 13 cigar factories, 1 brass and 
copper foundry, 1 locomotive works, 1 grist-mill, 1 silk mill, 3 granite 
works, 1 electric light station, 4 sash and blind shops, 1 brewery, 11 
shoe shops, 1 gas works, 4 slaughter-houses, 2 needle manufactories, 
(■) beer-bottling, 3 book-binderies, 6 box-makers, 1 paper-box manu- 
factory, 1 hat manufactory, 1 broom manufactory. 

MARKETS. 

."> fish, 14 meat and fish, 5 meat, wholesale. 

STABLES. 



14 livery, 1,352 private. 



: dentists, 1 telephone, 2 telegraph, 31 coal, 1 gas, 1 electric, 2 ex- 
press, 16 printing. 



Materials on Hand. 

QUARTER TLRXS. 



2 S-inch. 
5 10 " 

1 G " 

4 U ''■ 

2 4" 







PLX-OS. 


1 u-\ 


inch. 




14 10 


" 




25 12 
1 5 S 


" 




1 (i 
13 4 


:: 





240 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



24 fee 


t 24- 


nch pipe 


8,288 " 


20 




120 " 


14 




1,644 " 


12 




3,576 " 


10 




1,044 " 


s 




1,440 " 


6 




240 " 


4 




1,270 " 


1 




171 " 


^4 




100 " 


2 




204 " 


iVa 




182 " 


ly^ 






BRANCHES. 


2 single 


10 f 


n 20. 


1 " 


6 


" 20. 


1 


14 


" 14. 


1 


12 


" 14. 


1 " 


10 


" 14. 


:5 


6 


" 14. 


5 


6 


" 12. 


1 


4 


" 12. 


5 


10 


" 10. 


4 


6 


" 10. 


2 " 


4 


" 10. 


15 


8 


" 8. 


11 


6 


" 8. 


?,1 





" (). 



WHOLE SLEEVES. 



2 20-ineh 




6 14 " 




3 12 " 




2 10 " 




7 8" 




6 6 " 




5 4" 






GATES 


5 f,-inch 


spigot. 


5 S " 


bells. 


?, 10 " 


" 


r> 4 " 


" 


5 " 


" 


1 14 " 


spigot. 


1 14 " 


bell. 


2 12 " 


bells. 



1 20-inch 


1-8 bend. 


3 8 " 


1-8, 




4 10 " 


1-8. 




2 20 " 


Y. 

1-lG 




1 14 " 


1-8. 




1 12 " 


1-8. 




4 10 " 


1-S. 




4 8" 


offsets. 


1 12 " 


" 




9 6 " 


" 




3 10 " 


" 






BRAXCHES. 


1 doubl 


e 4 o 


1 8. 


2 " 


6 " 


20. 


1 


8 ' 


14. 


1 


6 ' 


14. 


5 " 


fi ' 


12. 


2 " 


6 " 


10. 


10 


8 ' 


8. 


IS 


() ' 


8. 


8 


6 ' 


fi. 


3 


4 " 


4. 


1 


6 " 


8 on 14 


1 


r. " 


10 on 10 


1 


4 " 


6. 




REDUCERS. 


2 U-iii 


•h to 


10-inch. 


1 20 ' 




14 " 


2 1 ' ' 




12 •• 


1 12 ' 




8 " 


2 12 ' 




6 " 


8 10 ' 




8 " 


3 10 ' 




" 


Ki S ' 




fi " 


1.0' 




4 " 


24 hydrants. 




155 pigs 


of lead. 


120 stop 


boxes. 


45 curb 


cock 


5. 


79 3-4 corp c 


Dcks. 


15 gate 


domes. 


80 %-inch meters. 


28 % 


" 


" 


f. 1 


" 


" 


4 V/, 


" 


" 


2 


" 


" 



REPOET or THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



EEPOET OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor: 

The Board of Health submits the following report for the j-ear 1909: 

Dr. Gustave Lafontaine was appointed to succeed Dr. J. E. A. Lan- 
ouette as a member, and at the annual meeting of the board, held 

the first Monday in February, William J. Starr was elected iiresident 
and William K. Bobbins clerk of the board. 

The appropriation allowed by the city council for carrying on the 
work of the department during the j^ear was $17,000. 

The expenditures have been as follows: 

OFFICE EXPENSES. 

Salaries $600.00 

Labor 3,2:39.00 

Office furniture 82.46 

Printing, postage, and stationery 214.44 

Telephone service 78.22 

Express 9.85 

Disinfectants 217.73 

Antitoxin 2,317.86 

Diphtheria examinations 53.50 

Quarantined families 171.28 

Carriage hire and carfares 152.94 

Supplies for laboratory 58.37 

Milk samples 5.81 

Gas 8.36 

Dairy inspection 12.00 

Incidentals 44.96 

$7,280.78 
ISOLATION HOSPITAL. 

Salary of matron $300.00 

Fuel 451.40 

Electric lighting 124.65 

Board of patients 3,126.86 

Nursing 3,045.00 

I Telephone service 70.98 

Water 55.25 

Hacks to hospital 430.00 



243 



244: ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Repairs and improvements $1,200.62 

Furniture and supplies 552.67 

$9,357.43 
SMALLPOX HOSPITAL. 

Salary of matron $360.00 

Fuel 7.00 

Telephone service 25.00 

Water 7.52 

Electric lighting 10.02 

Medical attendance 6.00 

Vaccination 133. S4 

$641.10 

Office expenses $7,286.78 

Isolation hospital 9,357.43 

Smallpox hospital 641.10 

Total $17,285.31 

Amount turned in from milk license fees $380.50 

Amount turned in from board of patients 816.84 

The salaries of members is $200 a year; salary of matron of the 
Isolation hospital, $300, and matron of the Smallpox hospital, $360. 

The wages of plumbing inspector, $3.00 per day; sanitary inspectors, 
$2.50 per day, and office clerk, $2.00. 

The office expenses have been slightly less than for 1908. 

The Isolation hospital cost more bj' $1,633.08, owing to increase 
in three items, of board of j)atients, nursing, and repairs, and this 
was caused by increased use of the hospital. 

The slight increase in cost for the Smallpox hospital is due to the 
larger number of vaccinations done. 

This year as last the original appropriation for running the de- 
partment has been exceeded and the excessive expenditure w-as caused 
by the outlays for diphtheria and scarlet fever. 

The mayor was notified in advance and an additional sum of $1,500 
was provided, but of this amount onlj- $285.31 was actually used. 

The amount turned in to the city treasury this year was $380.50 
for milk license fees and $816.84 for board of private jjatients at the 
Isolation hospital. 

MEETIXGS. 

The regular weekly meetings have been held as \isual on Tuesday 
evenings. This gives the public an opf)ortunity to meet the full board 
and bring before them any complaint or business which they wish to 
have adjusted, and is often taken advantage of. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 2i5 

Forty regular meetings and eight special meetings for trips of in- 
spection and such business as required immediate attention, were 
held. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 

Two hundred and ninety examinations for diphtheria have been 
made during the year, ninety-seven being positive or true diphtheria, 
and one hundred and ninety-three negative. 

Seventy-four of the negative results were for the discharge of 
patients. 

As in previous years these cultures have usually been sent to the 
state laboratory in Concord, but the examinations are made by Dr. 
A. G. Straw in our own laboratory, when occasion demands. 

Complaints of the delay in obtaining results when cultures are 
sent to Concord have been frequent, and many physicians have ex- 
pressed themselves in regard to the need of a bacteriological branch 
of the state laboratory in this city. 

PLrMBING TIS.SPECTION. 

The plumbing work during the year has been greatly increased, 
owing to the large number of tenement and apartment houses, which 
have been built to accommodate the increased population. 

Very little trouble is experienced in enforcing the plumbing rules 
as they have become too well known, and the necessity for them too 
well understood to be questioned. 

MILK INSPECTION. 

Again this year the board has been handicapped in the work of 
this department by lack of funds, and because the inspectors have 
been kept so busy with other work which had to be attended to that 
they have had little time to devote to the collecting of rnilk samjoles 
and the inspection of milk farms. 

It is imperative if the efficiency of this department is to be main- 
tained that we should have another inspector to assist in the work, 
and the city council has been asked for an increased appropriation 
for this purpose. 

The new milk regulations of the board were enforced last year and 
were found helpful in many ways. 

There are still some improvements that we hope to see made in the 
near future, one of the most important being the abolishment of the 
tin can and measure. The selling of milk in original packages as is 
already done in some of the grocery stores, and by many of the milk 
men, is certainly a step in the right direction. 

The detail of the work done during the last year will be found in 
the report of the milk inspector. 



246 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



WATER SUPPLY. 

The watei' commissioners have employed au inspectoi- at Lake ^las- 
sabesic for the last two seasons, so that the health inspectors were 
relieved of much of this work. 

We have made it a practice for many years to take samples of water 
from different parts of the lake, which we send to the state laliora- 
tory for analysis. 

These analyses are kept on file at the office, and it is interesting to 
note the little variation which they show frcm year to year. 

Manchester is highl}' favored in having so good a water supply, 
and too much care cannot be exercised in preserving it and keeping- 
it free from contamination. 

DISPOSAL OF REFUSE. 

No change has been made in regard to the disposal of the city's 
refuse. 

There have been, and probably always will be, complaints about 
the dumps. We believe that the Street and Park Commissioners have 
done all that could be done with the means at their disposal, but it 
can onlj' be a c^uestion of time when some more sanitary method 
must be devised for the disposal of the city's refuse. 

ISOLATIOJN' HOSPITAL. 

This institution has this year again demonstrated the wisdom of 
its establishment. 

The number of cases of diphtheria treated there has been some- 
what less than last jear. but the number of cases of scarlet fever 
has been greater, and the long detention of these patients adds 
greatly to the expense of lioard and nursing. 

The average cost to the city for treating diphtheria at the hospital, 
as nearly as can be estimated, has been aboiit $40 per patient, and 
for scarlet fever about $46 per patient. 

This includes everything except repairs on the building, interest 
on the investment, and medical attendance, which is done by the city 
physician. 

The ai^propriation asked for to provide a convalescent ward was 
granted onlj^ in part and the money thus available was insufficient to 
pay for a building as contemplated. 

The board did not wish to make a start and then ask for funds for 
completion, but the need of relief was so urgent that bathrooms were 
made in the wards and connected by a bridge passageway to the 
upper floor of the administration building, which gives good tem- 
porary relief at a cost of about $536. 

During the year one hundred and seventy-six cases of diphtheria 
and fifty-two cases of scarlet fever were cared for, and many of these 
patients were taken from homes where conditions and surroundings 
would have made recovery extremely doubtful. 



flEPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 247 



MEDICAL IXSPECTIOjS- OF SCHOOLS. 

The committee on health of the school board early in the year 
requested this board to make a medical inspection of school chil- 
dren, but, while desiring to do everything possible, for the protection 
of public health, we were obliged to rej)ly that we had no funds with 
which to prosecute the work. 

Much interest has been manifested in the subject bj' the citizens, 
and we have decided to include in the budget for 1910, a request for 
$2,500 to make a start in the work. 

CONTACilOrS DISEASES. 

The total number of contagious diseases was eleven hundred and 
ninety-seven, a much larger total than last year, largely due to 
measles, of which there were seven hundred and forty-seven cases. 

There were three hundred and thirty-one cases of diphtheria and 
membranous croup, with thirty-four deaths, some of which would 
not have occurred if the patients had had antitoxin before the dis- 
ease became so far advanced. 

Between October thirtieth and November third nineteen cases of 
diphtheria were reported, and in every instance the patients were 
being supplied with milk from the same milkman. 

This led to Immediate investigation, and it was found that one of 
this man's raisers had had sickness in his family, which, although 
not recognized as diphtheria, had evei\y indication of being, and in 
the meantime a case of diphtheria developed in the milkman's own 
family. 

The board felt that the large number of cases in so short a time, 
apparently from the same source, made prompt action necessary, 
and the milkman in question was forbidden to deliver any more milk 
in the city of Manchester until authorized by the board to do so. 

In the meantime his premises were thoroughly disinfected, his uten- 
sils sterilized, and his cows examined by a veterinary. 

The premises of all his raisers were inspected and their cattle also 
examined. 

After this liad been done and no new cases had been reported, 
after a sufficient time had elapsed, the ban was removed and the 
man was again allowed to do business in the city. 

Scarlet fever was more prevalent than last year, but usually- of a 
mild type. Eighty-five cases were reported, but no deaths occurred. 

There were but thirty-four cases of typhoid fever with eleven deaths, 
a much larger percentage than usual. 

Pneumonia caused one hundred and fifty-five deaths, which was 
the largest number which occurred from any one cause. 

Allowing for the increase in population, the number of deaths from 
tuberculosis was not much greater than last year, being one hundred 
and one in 1909 and ninetv in 190S. 



2-18 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The infant mortality during the month of July was extreme. 
There were one hundred and eleven deaths of infants under one year 
of age and one hundred and thirty deaths of children under five years, 
the largest number on record. 

The average for the year, however, was but slightly larger than 
for the previous year and not so large as it has been for several 
years past. This is encouraging, but much more might be accom- 
plished if it were possible to teach the mothers of young children 
how to properlj^ feed and care for them. 

In this way many of the intestinal diseases, caused by improper 
feeding, which are so prevalent during the summer months, might be 
prevented. 

The tables of statistics and the reports of the inspectors show 
some items of interest. 

In concluding this report we would extend our thanks to the public 
generally, and to the mayor and city government in particular, for 
the assistance and encouragement received from them in discharg- 
ing the duties of this department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM J. STARR. 
WILLIAM K. ROBBINS. 
GUSTAVE LAFONTAINE. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



249 



TABLE No. 1. 



COMPARISON OF STATISTICS OF CONTAGIOUS AND INFECTIOUS 
DISEASES FOR THE PAST 25 YEARS. 



1885. 

1887 
18S8 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
189i 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 



Membra- 
nous 

Cl'Olip. 



Diph- 
theria. 



18 
9 

3 17 
126 
79 
41 
21 
26 



Typhoid 
fever. 



Scarlet 
fever. 



Vario- Small- 
loicl. pox. 



1,026 

1,102 
333 

1,026 
545 
393 

1,111 
345 
837 
715 

1,197 



250 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 
SOME COMPARISONS OF VITAL STATISTK - 



Population estimated 44,12G 



Number of deatlis, exclusive of 
stilll)ir;i).s 

Deaths, per thousand of popula- 
tion 

Deatlis of children under five 
years 

Ratio, deaths of children to total 
deaths, per cent 

Deaths ot children per thousand 
of population 

Deaths from zymotic d i s - 
eases 

Deaths from zymotic diseases 
per thousand of population 

Cholera infantum 



Tuberculosis 

Croup 

Diphtheria 

Bronchitis 

Pneumonia, all forms 

Heart disease, all forms , 

Scarlet fever 

Typhoid fever 

Measles 

Whooping cough 

Smallpox 



901 

20.40 
434 

4S.17 

9.87 

252 

,5.72 
141 

94 

15 

9 
38 
58 
43 

3 
17 



S.'JS 
122 



20.06 

500 
51.92 
1042 

153 



971 
19.42 

527 
50.62 
10.54 

137 

2.74 

89 

79 

4 

1 
44 
53 
40 

5 
15 



977 

17.76 

546 

55.89 

9.91 

209 

3 80 
40 

74 

24 

11 

56 

81 

52 

3 

8 



5? ,000 

1,020 

18.5-1 
549 

53.82 



3 97 
146 

76 

14 

10 

59 

86 

75 

4 
21 

1 

2 



56,000 

1,051 

! 18.77 

531 

50.52 

9. 48 

227 

4 05 
129 

112 

20 

28 

51 



l,01f 

v: . 
631 
61 
10.: 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



.51 



]fo. 2. 

FOR THE LAST TWENTY YEARS. 



ISltS. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1 1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909 


«),000 


m.m 


56,987 


56,987 


56,987 


60,000 


62,000 


62,000 


64,000 


65,000 


67,000 


68,000 


1,0(1 1 


1,068 


1,167 


1,131 


1,092 


1,106 


1,006 


1,327 


1,243 


1 220 


1,113 


i,;i40 


16.6S 


17.80 


20.47 


19 84 


19.12 


18.43 


16.22 


21,40 


19 40 


18.76 


16.60 


i9.82 


5-21 


541 


561 


554 


622 


556 


477 


677 


575 


594 


550 


650 


52.01 


50.65 


48 07 


4^99 


56.95 


50.27 


47.41 


58.55 


46.21 


48.68 


40.43 


48..^9 


8.68 


9.01 


9.S4 


9.71 


10.91 


9.26 


7.69 


10 91 


8.98 


9.13 


8.20 


9.63 


25i 


203 


244 


283 


23S 


225 


201 


267 


264 


231 . 


279 


318 


4 23 
122 


3.38 

78 


4.28 
119 


4.96 
121 


4 17 

98 


5.75 

92 


3.21 


4.30 
79 


4.12 
69 


3 55 

67 


4 16 
70 


4 52 
91 


73 


91 


100 


81 


78 


87 


87 


109 


95 


80 


90 


l(il 


10 


10 


6 


5 


12 


17 


6 


12 


15 


10 


9 


5 


17 


6 


8 


3 


22 


17 


10 


22 


30 


20 


32 


29 


45 


65 


40 


38 


55 


40 


31 


23 


34 


53 


26 


45 


72 


113 


lis 


105 


120 


112 


101 


132 


120 


130 


79 


155 




57 


77 


75 


54 


73 


55 


74 


79 


91 


82 


to 




3 
12 


6 
12 


11 


8 


10 


1 
13 


1 

9 


1 
5 








14 


8 


18 


11 


3 


5 


1 






1 




4 




3 




4 


2 


15 


3 


8 


5 


5 


4 

1 


4 


17 


9 


9 


11 























252 



ANXUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE No. 3. 



Months. 


Membra- 
nous 
croup. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Vario- 
loid. 


Small, 
pox. 


Totals. 




5 


a 


1 


1 


i 
5 


i 

s 


Cases. 
Deaths 


■ji 

5 


5 

03 
Q 


i 


1 


i 


i 


'J 


1 


Januarj' . . 
February- 


6 
2 


1 


58 
28 
31 

15 
16 
18 
19 
20 
27 
41 
25 


3 
2 
1 
3 
3 
3 
4 
2 
2 
3 

1 






1 





11 

13 
3 
6 

12 

13 
4 
2 
3 
5 
6 

85 












76 


4 


1 

3 

6 
2 

1 

- 
1 

s 

2 

IT 
































47 
34 
41 
151 
186 
56 
34 
124 
239 
171 
1197 


1 


April 

May. 


1 

1 




4 

1 
1 

1 
2 
1 

1 


5 

13 
121 
153 

27 
11 
86 
192 
133 




2 





2 
4 












7 












4 














July 

August 

Septemb'r 
October 


1 
4 


1 
2 




.... 


... 






5 

5 




















.. . 








6 


























? 






4 





— 




— 









15 


11 


747 


4S 










' 





REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



253 



TABLE No. 4. 

TABLE SHOWING THE M0RTA.L1TY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES 
AND BY MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1909. 



Causes of Death. 


1 

a 


>> 

3 

2 


1 
1 




>> 


5 




Sib 
< 


s 

I 


1 


1 

? 


>5 


i4 

1 

1 


H 
























1 
2 

1 


















1 


1 












1 




1 










2 










2 


.... 


2 












1 
3 








1 


1 




JO 


" fracture of skull. . . 


1 
1 


2 




3 




1 


" gunshot wouiul — 
" internal injuries... 


















1 
1 


2 


1 


1 


"2' 








1 


.... 






























1 




1 

1 
1 


"2 






'l 


1 


■3' 


.... 


2 
1 












"i 

6 


1 


1 


1 




11 














2 


11 


6 
1 


4 

1 
.... 

1 


5 


3 


3 


4 

1 


.... 


4 

1 


2 


E« 






1 


1 
1 


1 




5 










Abtlinia 

















3 






^ 




















Brain, concussion of 








1 
















1 


" congestion of 












I 


2 










3 




















I 


1 




Bronchitis... 

" cflpillary 


4 
1 


4 
1 
2 


5 

i 

1 


5 
1 

1 


2 


! 

1 




4 


1 


3 


41 
4 




1 












'■ ofblartder 












" breast 






1 


1 


1 


"2 




1 


1 

i 

I 


.... 

i' 


■4' 






1 

1 
















" liver 














1 




oesophagus 
















1 


" rectum 












1 

1 

.... 

4 

1 


"2 

1 


1 




'3 


'> 








1 


1 


'2 




" uterus 










3 




















1 






46 
3 


24 

1 


11 


3 


1 


1 




Col itis, entero 












•' ileo 














" ulcerative 








1 














1 




2 

1 
1 


1 


i 


2 


2 


3 
1 


'2' 


2 


4 


2 






Croup, membranous 


4 


'■ spasmodic 








i 


1 


















1 










1 
1 


•■•i" 


"'3' 


...^ 


2" 

2 












Dentition 








1 
2 

2 




3 


Diabetes 


2 


2 


1 




3 


2 


2 

I 

1 

.... 

.... 

"2 
.... 








3 

1 


2 
3 


4 


1 
2 




Diphtheria 


3 


2 


1 


3 


29 


Eclampsia, puerperal 






















1 




1 
1 














1 












1 
1 
1 














2 


1 
1 
1 






.... 

1 


1 


■i 
3 


4 


5 
3 
23 
2 


.... 
11 


4 
3 








11 
56 
3 






Epilepsv 




Erysipelas .:..::.::::::::: 






















Fever, bi-ain 














1 
1 










1 




1 








1 
1 


.... 






1 




" typhoid 






4 


1 


2 


11 



254 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE No. 4:.— Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


C 






i 


1 






i 


c 

Si 

c 
5 

1 


1 


Iz; 


ill 




























1 




















1 

'2" 
2 




'> 


Gastritis 




1 


.... 




1 


3 


1 








Id 






2 




5 

1 


6 


3 


i 


5 


1 


1 




4 






3.5 


" fatty deseneralionot.. 


."5 






' 




1 




5 






1 
4 


.... 


1 
3 


2 

1 
3 










" paralj'sis of 

valvular disease of. . .. 
Hemiplegia 


6 




. 








3 




2 




3 


1 
1 






24 
3 










1 


1 






1 
1 


4 






















1 


1 




































1 


Ileus 






















1 








2- 
... 
4 


3 


.... 
1 






1 




g 




Hi 


Intestinal obstruction 


.... 


1 


1| 2 


G 
2 




1 










1 

1 
1 






I..a Grippe 


















5 


Laryngismus, stridulus 

Laryngitis, tubercular 


1 

3 

2 




















.... 


1 
1 
















1 


3 




1 






















1 




























1 






1 








".V 

2 

6 

1 


■4 
10 


n 


1 
3 

S 












■■ 


1 


I 

3 

1 


1 

2 

"4' 

1 


8 


11 




3 


G 


6 


10 


3 








Meningitis .. 


A 


4 

1 
1 


5 

1 
1 


2 
3 
2 


8 
.... 


7 




" 


fi> 


" cerebrospinal.... 


' i 


JO 








g 










1 






1 






















1 

1 






]\Tj'ocarditi« 






1 






























1 
2 










Nephritis . 


3 
1 


5 

1 


3 


.... 


3 

i 


4 

1 
1 


3 


1 


6 
2 


1 


3 


34 


" chronic interstitiaL. 






1 






1 

1 
8 
















1 




1 
2 
2 


"2 
2 


I 

1 






1 
.... 






1 
2 
4 


1 
4 

1 


4 

4 


5 


Old age 


2 
1 


3 
1 

1 




3 


3> 


Paralysis 


1!» 




















1 








Perforation of intestines ; 1 






















J 


1 
1 


i 


"2 


.... 


'2 


i 

n 




















2 


"'Z 


2 

11 
4 


1 
.... 


\f> 




2 


11 


Pleurisy 








1 


Pneumonia .... 


9 
3 


13 


5 

6 
2 

1 


9 
2 


5 

5 

1 


9 
4 

1 


8 




4 

3 

1 


10 
4 


P5 




50 








8 


" typlioid. 










2 




1 
3 


• 














Premature birth 


3 


4 


1 


2 


4 


5 




2 


4 

1 


3 


2 


34 
1 


Pyaemia 

Pyelitis 


1 


1 






























1 




.. 
1 

1 
1 
12 


1 
















.. 










1 


2 .... 


2 














1 


8 


Septiciemia. 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 








9 


5 






1 


Stillborn 


6 


10 


8 


7 


11 


10 


4 


6 


8 


9G 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 
TABLE No. i.— Concluded. 



255 



Causes of Death. 


i 

S 


i 


9 

5 


■< 


>> 

eS 


6 

5 


>> 


So 


1 

a 


1 


1 

a 
1 


1 

s 

1 


"3 

I 


Suicide 


1 








1 






1 


1 


1 
1 








Sui'fiical shock 


1 












1 


1 












2 












, 




























I 










1 










1 
1 




















2 

8 


2 
9 

1 


5 




1 


5 


io 


6 


1 

5 








" pulmonary 


16 7 


7 




8(; 




1 


i 

1 

3 
110 




1 




























1 
"2 














2 
116 


\ 






1 

123 


3 


2 






■■ 






1 

105 








lo5 


~m 








' 1 


... 





EEPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF PLUMBING AND MILK. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Health: 

I beg to submit the following report of the inspection of milk dur- 
ing the year 1909: 

Number of samples n>ilk, skim milk, and cream tested 269 

brought in by milk dealers and 

citizens 56 

collected bj^ inspectors 213 

below standard, April 1 to Septem- 
ber 30 11 

below standard, Janvuirj- 1 to March 

31 and October 1 to December 31, 12 

letters written to dealers and others 197 

dealers found selling without a license 3 

wagons improperl}- marked 3 

Average butter fat from January- 1 to March 31 and 

October 1 to December 31 3.92 % 

Average butter fat from April 1 to September 30 3.58 7o 

Average acidity from January 1 to ^Nlarch 31 and Octo- 
ber 1 to December 31 .143 % 

Average acidity from April 1 to September 30 .15 % 

Avei-age specific gravity at 60° F. from January 1 to 

March 31 and October 1 to December 31 1.0305 

Average specific gravity at 60° F. from April 1 to Sep- 
tember 30 1.030 

Average butter fat in thirty-tv>o samples cream 36.45 % 

Dairies inspected 48 

Every sample was tested for formaldehyde and manj- additional 
tests were made for colostrom cells, coloring matter, carbonates, 
salicylic acid, boric acid, cream thickeners, total solids, milk serum, 
condensed milk, concentrated milk, and other adulterations. 

During the year I have notified several milk dealers to appear before 
the board for violating the milk laws, and this has proved effective 
in stopping minor violations. 

The number of licenses granted during the year was 294; 83 of 
these were granted to milkmen, 166 to proprietors of stores, and 45 
to people keeping cows and selling milk from their premises. 

Three hundred and eighty dollars and fifty cents were collected for 
license fees. 

256 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 267 

On March 31, Mi\ I. C. Weld of the United States Department of 
Agriculture came from Washington and instructed this department 
how to score up city milk plants and dairj^ farms. 

Fourteen places were scored up, some of them situated in the city 
and others in the surrounding towns of Londonderry, Bedford, Goffs- 
town, and Hooksett. 

The inspector examines the apparent health of the cattle, their 
comfort, water and food, the construction, ventilation and light of the 
stables and the construction and condition of all milk utensils. 

If there is a milk room its location and construction is examined, 
also the cleanliness of cow stables, barnyard and milk room and the 
cleanliness of utensils and attendants as well as the methods used 
in handling milk. 

On the following pages copies of the score cards are shown: 



258 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



:B0 J^'RJD OIP iiE^^LTHE 

MANCHESTER, N. H. 

DAIRY DIVISION 



SANITARY INSPECTION OF DAIRIES 



Dairy Score Card Adopted by tlie Official Dairy Instructors' Asso- 
ciation. (Subject to revision at future meetings.) 



Owner or lessee of farm 

P. O. address State 

Total number of cows Number milking. 

Gallons of milk produced dailj- 

Product is retailed by producer in 

Sold at wholesale to 

For milk supply of 

Permit No Date of inspection, 

Remarks ? 



(Signed) 

Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEAI.TH, 259 

DETAILED SCORE. 



EQUIPMENT 


SCORE 1 

1 


METHODS 

1 


SCORE 


Perfect 
6 

2 

4 

4 
3 

1 


Allowed 


Perfect 


Allowed 


COWS. 

Health 


COWS. , 

Cleanliness of cows 8 

STABLES. 

Cleanliness of stables..' 6 

Floor 2 

Walls 1 1 

Ceiling and ledges.... 1 
Mangers and parti- 
tions 1 




Apparently in goof 
health 1 

If tested with tuber 
eulin once a yeai 







and no tube^culosi^ 
is found, or i 
tested once in si; 
months and all re 
acting animals re 




(If tested only once ; 
year and reacting ani 


Stable air at milking 

time 


G 


mals found and re- 
moved, 2.) 


Barnyard clean and 

well drained 

Removal of manure 
daily to field or 

proper pit 

(To 50 feet from sta- 
ble, 1.) 

MILK_ ROOM. 

Cleanliness of milk room 


2 
3 




Bedding 3 






Temperature of sta- 
ble 1 




Food (clean and whole- 
some) 










Clean and fresh.... ] 

Convenient and abun 

dant ] 

STABLES. 

Location of stable.. 






UTENSILS AND MILKING 

Care and cleanliness 
of utensils 8 

Thoroughly washed and 
sterilized in live 
steam for 30 minutes 5 




Well drained ] 






Free from contami- 
nating surround- 
ings ] 




Tight, sound floor and 
proper gutter I 

Smooth, tight walls 
and ceiling ] 

Proper stall, tie anc' 




and placed over steam 
jet, 4; thoroughly 
washed and scalded 
with boiling water, 3; 
thoroughly washed, not 
scalded, 2.) 

Inverted in pure air 3 

Cleanliness of milking 

Clean, dry hands.. . 3 

Udders washed and 

dried 6 

(Udders cleaned with 
moist cloth, 4: cleaned 
j with dry cloth at least 
15 minutes before milk- 
ing, 1.) 

HANDLING THE MILK. 

Cleanliness of attend- 


9 

1 

2 

2 




Light: Four sq. ft. of 

glass per cow 

(Three sq. ft. 3; ? 
sq. ft. 2; 1 sq. ft., 1. 
Deduct for uneven dis 
tribution.) 
Ventilation: Automatic 








(Adjustable windows, 
1.) 
Cubic feet of space for 

cow- 500 to 1 000 feet 






(Less than 500 feet. 2: 
less than 400 feet. 1- 
less than 300 feet, 0: 
over 1,000 feet, 0.) 






Milk removed immedi- 
ately from stable 

Prompt cooling. 
(Cooled immediately 
after milking each 
cow) . 




UTENSILS. 

Construction and condi- 















260 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
DETAILED iiVOliE.—CunchKkd. 



EQUIPMENT 


SCORE 


METHODS 


SCORE 


Perfect Allowed 


Perfect 


Allowed 


Water for cleaning 


1 
3 




Efficient cooling; below 
50° F 


5 
3 








and abundant.) 
Small-top milking pail 


(51° to 55°, 4; 56° tc 
60°, 2.) 
Storage below 50° F 

(51° to 55°, 2; 56° to 
60°, 1.) 
Transportation; iced in 

summer 








or stea m 


1 

1 
1 

2 






(Should be In milk 
house, not in kitchen.) 






Clean milking suits 

MILK ROOM. 

Location of milk room 




(For jacket or wet 
blanket allow 2; dry 
blanket or covered 
wagon, 1.) 








Free from contami- 
nating surround- 
ings 1 






Construction of milk 
room 




Floor, walls, and ceil- 
ing 1 

Light, ventilation, 
screens 1 








40 




60 













Score for equipment + Score for methods = FINAL SCORE 

Note 1. — If any filthy condition is found, particularly dirty utensils, the total 
score shall be limited to 49. 

Note 2.— If the water is exposed to dangerous contamination or there is evidence 
of the presence of a dangerous disease in animals or attendants, the score shall be 
0. 



KEPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



2G1 



MANCHESTER, N. H. 



DAIRY DIVISION 



SANITARY INSPECTION OF CITY MILK PLANTS. 

Owner or Maiuunr Trinlc iwmr 

City t<trc(t and No State 

rmik 

Numticr of wagoits Gallons sold daily J Cream 

I Buttermilk 

Permit or license A'o Date of inspection /!'.. 



EQUIPMENT 


SCORE 


METHODS 


SCORE 


Perfect 


Allowed 


Perfect 


Allowed 


Plant: 


IS 
7 
9 

1 
1 

1 
■ 20 

28 

4 
11 




Plant: 

Cleanliness 

Floor 6 

Walls 4 

Ceilings 1 

Doors 1 

Windows 1 

Good order 1 

Free from odors. . 1 

Machinery and utensils: 


15 

25 
25 

20 

6 
9 




Convenience 6 












Arrangement . 






Proper rooms 3 

Convenience 4 






Floor 5 






Walls 3 

Ceiling 1 

Light 




Milk: 
Handling 




Ventilation 










(Clarifying, pasteur- 
izing, cooling, bot- 
tling.) 
Storage . . 










Kind and quality 7 







water, bottle and 
can washer, bot- 
tling machine, dry- 
ing racks, crates, 
sinks, pasteurizer, 
cold storage.) 

Condition 7 

Arrangement 6 

Water for cleaning 

Wagons: 


45° F. or below.. .20 

45° to 50° F 15 

50° to 55° F 10 




Salesroom .... 




Cleanliness 3 

Protection of product 3 
Salesroom: 




Location 4 

Construction 4 

Equipment 3 




ADDITIONAL DEDUC- 
TIONS. 

For exceptionally bat' 
conditions: 






100 




100 




ADDITIONAL DEDUC- 
TIONS. 

For exceptionally bad 
conditions: 


































N'et total 





















Score for methods 

Score for equipment 

Total to he divided 
FINAL SCORE 



. ; multiplied by 2. 
niltiplicd hy 1. 



262 AN^'UAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following suggestions, copied from Bulletin 41 of the Hygienic 
Laboratory of the U. S. Marine HosiDital Service, afford valuable in- 
formation: 

TwEN'TY-oxE Suggestions. 

THE cows. 

1. Have the herd examined frequently by a skilled veterinarian. 
Promptly remove any animals suspected of being in bad health. 
Never add an animal to the herd until certain it is free from disease, 
especially tuberculosis. 

2. Never allow a cow to be excited by hard driving, abuse, loud 
talking or unnecessary disturbances; do not undulj' expose her to 
cold or storms. 

3. Clean the entire bodj' of the cow daily. Hair in the region of 
the udder should be kept short. Wipe the lulder and surrounding 
parts with a clean, damp cloth before milking. 

4. Do not allow any strong flavored feed, such as garlic, cabbage, 
or turnips, to be eaten except immediately after milking. 

5. Salt should always be accessible. 

6. Eadical changes in feed should be made gradually. 

7. Have fresh, pure water in abundance, easj^ of access, and not 
too cold. 

THE STABLES. 

8. Dairy cattle shculd be kept in a stable where no other animals 
are housed, preferably without cellar or storage loft. Stable should 
be light (4 square feet of glass per cow) and dry, with at least 500 
cubic feet of air to each animal. It should have air inlets and out-, 
lets, so arranged as to give good ventilation without drafts of air on 
cows. The presence of flies may be reduced by darkening the stable 
and removing the manure as directed below. 

9. The floor, walls, and ceilings of the stable should be tight, walls 
and ceilings being kept free from cobwebs and whitewashed twice a 
year. There should be as few dust-catching ledges and projections 
as possible. 

10. Allow no musty or dirty litter or strong-smelling material 
in the stable. Store manure under cover at least forty feet from the 
stable in a dark place. Use land plaster daily in gutter and on floor. 

THE MILK HOUSE. 

11. Cans should not remain in the stable while being filled. Re- 
move the milk of each cow at once from the stable to a clean room; 
strain immediately through cotton flannel or absorbent cotton; cool 
to 50° F. as soon as strained, store at 50° F. or lower. All milk 
houses should be screened. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 263 

12. Milk utensils should be made of metal, with all joints smoothly 
soldered, or, when possible, should be made of stamped metal. Never 
allow utensils to become rusty or rough inside. Use milk utensils 
for nothing but handling, storing, or delivering milk. 

13. To clean dairy utensils use pure water only. First rinse the 
utensils in warm water; then wash inside and out in hot water in 
which a cleansing material has been dissolved; rinse again; sterilize 
with boiling water or steam; then keep inverted in pure air that may 
have ready access, and sun if possible, until ready for use. 

MILKING AND HANDLING MILK. 

14. The milker should wash his hands immediately before milking 
and should milk with dry hands. He should wear a clean outer gar- 
ment, which should be kept in a clean place when not in use. To- 
bacco should not be used while milking. 

15. In milking be quiet, quick, clean, and thorough. Commence 
milking at the same hour every morning and evening and milk the 
cows in the same order. 

16. If any part of the milk is bloody, stringy, or unnatural in ap- 
pearance, or if by accident dirt gets into the milk pail, the whole 
mess should be rejected. 

17. Weigh and record the milk given by each cow. 

IS. Never mix warm milk with that which has been cooled, and 
do not allow milk to freeze. 

19. Feed no dry, dusty feed just previous to milking. 

20. Persons suffering from any disease, or who have been ex- 
posed to a contagious disease, must remain away from the cows and 
the milk. 

21. It is needless to say that the shorter the time between the 
production of milk and its delivery, and between delivery and use, 
the better will be the qnalitj' of the milk. 

On the following- j)ages are shown copies of score cards filled out, 
which show the actual scorino- of the average farm. 



264 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



'BGJ^TIJD OIF HIEj^XjTH: 

MANCHESTER, N. H. 



DAIRY DIVISION 



SANITARY INSPECTION OF DAIRIES. 

Dairy Score Card Adopted by the Otficial Dairy Instructors' Asso- 
ciation. (Subject to revision at future meetings.) 

Owner or lessee of larm 

P. O. address btate 

Total number of cows 24 Number milking 23 

Gallons of milk produced daily ' 56 

Product is retailed by producer in Manchester, N. H. 

Sold at wholesale to 

For milk supply of 

Permit No Date of inspection, 1909 

REilABKS Also buys about 36 gals, dailj' 



50 X 14 X 8 

= 233 cu. ft. per cow 



24 



.Bedding picker waste and w^aste cotton. 



Letter written Vol. S, Page 



IVAN C. WELD & 
(Siyned) GAEL O. SEAMAN, 

Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 265 

DETAILED SCOEE. 



cows. 



Health 

Apparently in good 

health 1 

If tested with tuber- 
culin once a year 
and no tuberculosis 
is found, or if 
tested once in six 
months and all re- 
acting animals re- 
moved 5 

(If tested only once a 
year and reacting ani- 
mals found and re- 
moved, 2.) 

Comfort 

Bedding 1 

Temperature of sta- 
ble 1 

Food (clean and whole- 
some) 

Water 

Clean atd fresh 1 

Convenient and abun- 
dant 1 

STABLES. 

Location of stable... 

Well drained 

Fi;ee from contami 
nating surround 

ings 

Construction of stable. 
Tight, sound floor and 

proper gutter 2 

Smooth, tight walls 

and ceiling 1 

Proper stall, tie and 

manger 1 

Light: Four sq. ft. of 

glass per cow 

(Three sq. ft. 3; 2 
sq. ft. 2; 1 sq. ft., 1. 
Deduct for uneven dis- 
tribution.) 
Ventilation: Automatic 

system 

(Adjustable windows, 
L) 

Cubic feet of space for 
cow: 500 to 1.000 feet. 
(Less than 500 feet, 2 
less than 400 feet, 1 
less than 300 feet, 
over 1,000 feet, 0.) 

UTENSILS. 

Construction and condi- 
tion of utensils 



SCORE 


Perfect 


Allowed 


6 


1 


1 









2 

.r. 


1.5 


1 




2 

2 



2 

1 


1 




2 







4 


2.25 


1 




.75 




.5 




4 


1 


3 


1 


3 





1 






METHODS 



Perfect Allowed 



COWS. 

Cleanliness of cows. 

STABLES. 



Cleanliness of stables... 

Floor 2 

Walls 1 

Celling and ledges 1 

Mangers and parti- 
tions l| 

Windows ij 

Stable air at milking: 

time ! 

irnyard clean and[ 

well drained 

Removal of manure 
daily to field or 

proper pit 

(To 50 feet from sta- 
ble, I.) 

MILK ROOM. 

Cleanliness of milk room 

UTENSILS AND MILKING 

Care and cleanliness 

of utensils 

Thoroughly washed and 

sterilized in live 

steam for 30 minutes 5 

(Thoroughly washed 

and placed over steam 

jet, 4; thoroughly 

washed and scalded 

with boiling water, 3; 

thoroughly washed, not 

scalded, 2.) 

Itiverted in pure air 3 

Cleanliness of milking 

Clean, dry hands. .. 3 

Udders washed and 

dried 6 

(Udders cleaned with 
moist cloth. 4; cleaned 
with dry cloth at least 
15 minutes before milk- 
ing, 1.) 



HANDLING THE MILK. 

Cleanliness of attend- 
ants 

Milk removed immedi- 
ately from stable 

Prompt cooling. 
(Cooled immediately 
after milking each 
cow) 



266 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
DETAILED SCORE.— Concluded. 



EQUIPMENT 


SCORE 


METHODS 

1 


SCORE 


Perfect 


Allowed 


Perfect 


Allowed 


Water for cleaning. . 

(Clean, convenient, 
and abundant.) 
Small-top milking pail 
Facilities for hot water 


1 

3 
1 

1 
1 

.75 
1 

2 

.5 

.5 


1 


1 




1.75 

1 


lEfflcient cooling; below 
! 50° F 


5 
3 

3 





(51° to 55°, 4; 56° to 
,G0°, 2.) 
Storage below 50° F.... 

(51° to 55°, 2; 56° to 
^ 60°, 1. 
Transportation; iced in 

summer 


2 


{Should be in milk 
house, not in kitchen.) 
Milk cooler 


1 


Clean milking suits 

MILK ROOM. 

Location of milk room 
Free from contami- 
nating surround- 
ings 1 

Convenient 1 

Construction of milk 


(For jacket or wet 
blanket allow '2; dry 
blanket or covered 
wagon, 1.) 

1 
• 

Total 




Floor, walls, and ceil- 
ing 1 

Light, ventilation, 
screens 1 




Total 


40 


14.50 


60 » 


I.T .5 









Score for equipment 14.50 + Score for methods 15.3 = 29.80 FINAL SCORE. 

Note 1.— If any filthy condition is. found, particularly dirty utensils, the IoIhI 
score shall be limited to 49. 

Note 2.— If the water is exposed to dangerous contamination or there is evi'lcn-e 
of the presence of a dangerous disease in animals or attendants, the score sliali rtc 
0. 

It is our intention to include in our next report the names and 

scores of the different dairies and farms as we find them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GAEL 0. SEA:MAN, 

MiUc Inspector. 

PI.UMBIXG FIXTURES SET. 



Number of tank waterclosets 

sinks 

bathtubs 

washbowls 

washtrays 

urinals 

refrigerators 

slophoppers 

rain leaders 

Other fixtures not classified above. 

Total number of fixtures put in. 



i)f)5 

785 

601 

624 

346 

18 

20 

6 

119 



3,521 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 267 

Number of plumbing notices filed 528 

water tests of soil pipe made 628 

stacks of soil pipe made (ioo 

smoke tests of soil pipe 20 

defects and leaks found 248 

comiilaints investigated ?A 

fixtures and pipes found unserviceable and 

repaired iiO 

letters written 37 

One hundred and forty-six consultations with owners, tenants, and 
agents, jDlumbers, etc., were held. 

A total of 2,304 inspections were made of the work during its prog- 
ress and after its completion. 

On March 2, 1909, the following building regulation was adopted: 

(Chapter 14, Section 44, No. 11 of the City Ordinances.) 

"Thimbles made of cast or wrought iron shall be used in making 
connections of local vent pipes from plumbing fixtures with chim- 
ney' flues; said thimbles to be as remote as practicable from all wood 
or other inflammable material, set at time chimney is built, whenever 
possible, bedded in mortar throughout the walls of the chimney, and 
shall project therefrom eight inches (or less if approved b.v the in- 
spector of buildings)." 

The Board of Health has ruled that no direct pressure flushing 
valve shall be used on waterclosets unless the main water pipe, from 
the street main to the Avatercloset supplied, is at least one and one 
quarter inches in diameter throughout its whole length. 

No other changes have been made in the plumbing rules during the 
past year. 

Respectfullj- submitted, 

CAEL O. SEAMAN, 

Inspector of Plumbing. 



SANITARY INSPECTORS' REPORT, 



Gentlemen of the Board of HeaWi: 

We beg to submit the following- as tlie reioort of the work of the 
sanitary insj)eetors for the year 1909: 

Vaults and privies inspected 35 

Vaults inspected after cleaning 26 

\Yaterclosets inspected 1,521 

Urinals inspected 72 

Sinks inspected 1.231 

Yards and allej-s inspected 802 

Cellars inspected 1,487 

Barns and outbuildings inspected 179 

Tenements inspected 855 

Barn cellars inspected 117 

Teams and riggings of excavators insi^ected 5 

Soaperies and slaughterhouses inspected 8 

Vaults and privies ordered cleaned or repaired 6 

Urinals cleaned or repaired 34 

Yards and alleys cleaned 347 

Cellars cleaned 303 

Barn cellars cleaned 17 

Sheds, etc., cleaned and inspected 90 

Tenements cleaned 69 

Waterclosets cleaned or repaired 663 

Sinks trapped or repaired 159 

Leaky drainpipes repaired 63 

Houses within 100 feet of the public sewer and not con- 
nected therewith 

Filthy hallways and roofs ordered cleaned 19 

Openings other than leaks in the drainage system were 57 

found in ijlaces and same were ordered closed by the department. 

Three hundred and seven bathtubs and washtraj-s were inspected. 

Sewage was found running upon the surface of the ground in 29 
places, and such nuisances were abated either b.y entering the sewer 
or carrying away in some manner not offensive. 

In doing the work of the department it has been necessary to 
make 6,309 calls and to write 335 letters. 

Seven hundred and one complaints have been investigated. 

In 632 cases the inspectors have been able to give relief, and in 27 
cases it was found that no cause existed or that same was bej'ond the 
control of the department. 



IJEPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 269 

Seventy-one complaints were made against the scavenger service, 
in each case the proper parties were notified and relief afforded. 

Twenty-nine persons were found throwing garbage in the back 
streets and were warned against the practice. 

Private swill collectors have been warned ninety-two times to be 
neater in their work. 

Sixty-three dead animals have been properly disposed of. 

One hundred and seventy-one hens and small animals have been 
removed from cellars. 

Thirtj^-two swine and cows have been discovered being kept within 
the sanitary limits of the city without licenses. The same were or- 
dered removed or licenses procured. 

Six notices have been prepared and served and proper returns 
made. 

Ninety-seven catch basins or street cesspools have been inspected, 
and 23 have been flushed or repaired by order of this department. 

A sanitary inspection has been made of 42 bakeshops and 19 stores, 
and 12 bakeshops have been ordered cleaned. Theaters have been 
inspected 8 times, circuses 3, and sausage factories 19 times. 

The dumps have been inspected 46 times; found insanitary 30 times. 
One hundred and seventy-eight nuisances not otherwise classified 
have been abated through the efforts of this department. 

Householders have been given 3 permits to clean their own vaiilts. 

Permits to the number of 1,562 have been granted for the burial and 
removal of dead bodies, and the returns forwarded to the city reg- 
istrar. 

A statement of mortality has been prepared each month and coxjies 
sent to about 300 other towns and cities, to local physicians, etc. 

Weekly reports of contagious diseases have been sent to the state 
board of health at Concord, the Marine hospital service at Washing- 
ton, D. C, and to the superintendent of schools, and tlie city librarian. 
Samples of water, oysters, and ice cream were sent to the state labo- 
ratory for analysis. Four hundred and eighty samples of milk were 
collected. 

Contagious and infectious diseases have been reported as follows: 
Measles, 747; diphtheria, 316; typhoid fever, 34; scarlet fever, 85; mem- 
branous croup, 15; smallpox, 0; total, 1,197. 

The inspectors were unable to trace the cause in 532 cases; in 416 
cases the connection with some previous case was clearly traceable. 
Ten cases were contracted outside of the cit^-, and in three cases it 
was reasonable to attribute the cause to insanitary surroundings. 

In some cases disinfectants were being used and the inspectors 
ordered their use in other cases. At most of these places instructions 
were given as to their use, and in many cases the department fur- 
nished the disinfectants. 

In some cases patients were found well isolated, and in other cases 
inspectors were obliged to order isolation, and in all cases to give in- 
structions as to the steps to be taken. 



270 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Houses were watched to see that the rules of isolation were com- 
plied with, and several funerals were attended to prevent a too public 
observance of the same. 

Two thoiasand one hundred and thirtj-'Seven rooms where diseases 
had existed were fumigated by the inspectors. 

About 3,000 pami^hlets issued by the state board of health have 
been distributed in localities where contagious diseases existed. 

The shores of Lake Massabesic were patroled by the inspectors on 
Sundays, holidays, and through the week during the summer season. 
Icefields from which ice was being cut were inspected and several 
picnics and band concerts were attended to prevent the careless dis- 
posal of waste and rubbish in the lake or on its shores. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN F. LOONEY, 
WILLIAM B. BLAKE, 

Sanitary Iiispect(>rs. 



REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



In Board of School CoiniiTTEE. 

Dece:mber 28, 1910. 
The Superintendent jiresented bis annual report to the committee, 
and it was accepted. 

Voted, That the report by the superintendent be accepted and 
adopted as the report of the board, and that it be transmitted to the 
city councils far publication in the annual City Eeport. 

HAERY L. DAVIS, 

Clerk. 



272 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



Organization, 1909. 



SCHOOL COIIMITTEE. 



EUGENE E. EEED 
JAMES B. FITCH, 



Manor, ex offici'i Chalntiau. 



636 Somerville street. 

35 Chestnut street, 

Fresi(kiit Common Council, e.r officio. 
EDWARD B. WOODBURY, Tice-Chairman of the Board. 

HARRY L. DAVIS, Clerk of the Board. 

Ward 1. Joseph W. Abbott, 1480 Elm street. 

Sumner M. Patten, 3 Canal street. 
Ward 2. George M. Davis, 156 Orange street. 

Allan ]\r. Wilson, 293 Myrtle street. 
Ward 3. Frank L. Downs, 108 Ash street. 

Thomas Chalmers, 590 Beech street. 
Ward 4. William A. Phinney, 450 Manchester street. 

Edward P. Morrill, 296 Laurel street. 
Ward 5. John F. Lee, 224 Central street. 

Joseph P. Devine, 267 Chestnut street. 
Ward 6. Harry L. Davis, 552 East Spruce street. 

G. Waldo Browne, 329 Massabesic street. 
Ward 7. Edward B. Woodbury, 1 Pleasant street. 

Albert W. Thompson, Franklin, corner West Merrimack St. 
Ward 8. Walter B. Mitchell, 178 Milford street. 

Frank A. Cadwell, 142 Douglas street. 
Ward 9. Aime Martel, 350 Bartlett street. 

Antoine Menard, 270 Coolidge avenue. 
Ward 10. Francis X. Lyons, Goffe's Falls. 

John H. Rice, 191 Jewett street. 

SFPERINTENDEN'T OF PUBLIC INSTRUOTIOX. 

CHARLES W. BICKFORD. 

Residence, 1077 Union street. Office, City Hall building. 

supeeintenden't's clerk. 

FANNIE L. SANBORN. 

Residence, 277 Laurel street. 

273 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

TRVAXT OFFICEK. 

CURTIS W. DAVIS. 

Residence, S49 Chestnut street. - 

' STANDIXG COJrMITTEES. 

Finance. — Mayor Reed, Messrs. Fitch, H. L. Davis, Woodbury, and 
Cadwell. 

Text-BoolvS. — Messrs. Wilson, Mitchell, and Woodbury. 
Music. — Messrs. Lyons, Browne, and Abbott. 
Drawing. — Messrs. Thompson, Patten, and Martel. 
Manual Training. — Messrs. Rice, Thompson, and Cadwell. 
Examination- of Teachers. — Messrs. Chalmers, Lyons, and G. M. Davis. 
Fuel. — Mr. Phinney, Mayor Reed, Messrs. Fitch, Lee, and Menard. 
Repairs. — Messrs. Rice, Downs, and Thompson. 
Attend<ince. — Messrs. ilorrill, Abbott, and Wilson. 
Health.— yiessTS. G. M. Davis, Mitchell, and Devine. 

SUBCOMMITTEES. 

High. — Messrs. Wilson. Downs, Mitchell, G. M. Davis, and Chalmers. 

Auioslceag. — Messrs. Martel, Wilson, and G. M. Davis. 

Ash-street and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Downs, Thompson, and Devine. 

Baliersville mul Mosquito Pond. — Messrs. L*j'ons, Phinney, and Patten. 

Chandler. — Messrs. Lee, Woodbury, and Cadwell. 

Franklin-street. — Messrs. Woodbury, H. L. Davis, and Lee. 

Gaffe's Falls and Highland. — Messrs. Devine, Cadwell, and Lj'ons. 

Hallsville and Harvey. — Messrs. H. L. Davis, Rice, and Menard. 

Lincoln-street and Youngsville. — Messrs. G. M. Davis, Lee, and Rice. 

Main-street. — Messrs. Mitchell, Chalmers, and Browne. 

Merrimaclv -street. — Messrs. Abbott, Devine, and Phinney. 

Parker. — ilessrs. Chalmers, G. M. Davis, and Martel. 

Pearl-Street. — Messrs. Morrill, Menard, and Downs. 

Rimmon. — Messrs. Menard, Abbott, and Wilson. 

fipring-street. — Messrs. Patten, Browne, and Woodbury. 

Straw. — Messrs. Thompson, Patten, and Chalmers. 

Tarney.—'MessTS. Cadwell, Lyons, and Abbott. 

Webster-street and Stark. — Messrs. Phinney, Mitchell, and Thompson. 

Wilson.— Messrs, Browne, Martel, and Morrill. 

Kindergartens. — Messrs. Rice, Downs, and Mitchell. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Lee, Morrill, and H. L. Davis. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Board, the t'itii Coinicils, and the Citi::ens of Manehoiter: 

The following is presented as the sixty-third report of t^he school 
department of the city. It is the fifty-fourth report of a superin- 
tendent, and covers the school j'ear from Julj- 1.5, 1908, to July 1.5, 
1909. 

THE SCHOOL RErORT. 

The management and direction of the schools are placed by the 
citizens in the hands of the school board. The school report should 
lihen be an accounting by the board to the citizens. It shoxild be a 
record of achievement or of possible failure. It should at least be 
a statement of facts in regard to the status of the schools, and it 
should advocate measures calculated for the upbuilding and advance- 
ment of public education. 

The reports of this body have always given full statistical data 
in regard to membership, attendance, teachers, schoolhouses, etc. 
They have published in full an account of the expenditures of the 
board and (have advocated changes which would seem to be in the 
line of advance. Changes come slowly, but they do finally come. 

Two matters in education are especially prominent in the public 
mind at the present time: they are health and vocational training. 
The question of health is prominent because of the conditions revealed 
in investigations in widely difi'erent parts of the country, and because 
the ability of the pupil to accomplish his work economically for 
himself and the community depends upon his physical state. Voca- 
tional training is prominent because the question has been raised 
as to whether the schools are actually fulfilling their mission in train- 
ing children for eflRcient citizenship. Efficiency in citizenship in- 
cludes both the power to think and the power to do. 

Our citj- has done nothing to train pupils so that they may have 
special wage-earning power in any craft or trade. The arguments 
for. and the course in, manual training have had general ends only. 

The movement for vocational work in the schools is widespread, 
'inhere seems to be a general agreement iipon two matters: first, that 
manual training should be taught during the elementary years up to 
the age of fourteen; second, that special courses should be established 
for p\ipils between the ages of fourteen and eig*hteen years, and that 
these courses should be determined largely by the character of the 

275 



276 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

industries of tlie immediate locality, for in those industries chielly 
may the youth of the locality find profitable training- and after-em- 
ployment. The report for 1907 endeavored to bring this matter to 
the attention of the citizens. 

The most notable achievements of the year (have been the m^ove- 
ment for medical inspection and supervision of pupils and the estab- 
lishing of special classes for non-English-speaking pnf)ils. 

The results of the eye and ear tests are given fully under the 
heading "Health." 

In regard to the establishing of special classes, it may be said that 
this action has been of vast advantage both to the non-English-speak- 
ing pupils and to the pupils of the grades from which these have been 
taken. Three classes were formed, one at the Merrimack-street, one 
at the Spring-street, and one at the Rimmon school. One hundred 
and eleven pupils were taught. Their ages varied from nine to fif- 
teen years. Their progress in learning the English tongue was rapid. 
A few have acquired such proficiency^ as to be placed in the regular 
grades, while others have been enabled to secure employment certi- 
ficates. 

That many pupils fail to complete the elementary course 'has long 
been known, that certain percentages of pupils fail in the different 
grades has long been known. Certain general reasons have been 
assigned for these facts. It is time to proceed systematically in these 
matters and embody in the annual report the records of all such, 
in order that the public may be informed. The actual condition in 
regard to failures for the year in the grades is presented under the 
heading "Retardation." No record of causes in individual cases for 
the Avhole city has been kept for the past year; they will be recorded 
for the coming year. A table is given showing the number of pupils 
over-age in each grade at the time of the semiannual promotion in 
January, 1909. An endeavor will be made to determine why these 
over-age children are in their respective grades. 

In regard to the scholastic work of the schools as outlined in the 
course of 'study, I believe it to be thoroughly done. The subject of 
writing is to me the least satisfactory of all. Grace and facility are 
generally lacking. The merit of legibility, which is first in impor- 
tance, may be granted. The penmanship cannot be called business 
penmanship. 

The matter of school accommodations is perennial; it should re- 
ceive serious consideration. 

The matter of providing suitable playgrounds for the children of 
the city may well receive the attention of the school authorities 
because of its intimate relation to the wellbeing of the child and his 
consequent efficiency in school as well as in life outside of school. 

The course of study in its revised form should receive careful 
scrutiny that it may be made to contribute to the best growth of the 
pupils. 



REPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 277 

In the interest of efficiency and economy the elementary school 
course should be made eight years in length, covering the ages from 
six to fourteen years. 

The present rules of the board in regard to substitute teaciliers 
should be suspended until such time as it is possible to secure the 
number of properly certificated teachers necessary to care for occa- 
sional absences that may occur. 

OBITUARV. 

On the sixth day of December, 1909, Miss Annie Wainwright Colby, 
teacher of Latin in the High school, passed from this to the life to 
come. Miss Colby was born in North Billerica, Mass., on the twenty- 
first day of March, 1875. She was educated in the schools of this 
city and graduated from Wellesley College in the class of 1896. She 
immediately entered the High School as a teacher, and for thirteen 
years faithfully and efficiently served the educational interests of 
the city. Miss Colby was loved and respected by both pupils and 
associate teachers. Reared in an atmosphere of rare Christian char- 
itj^ she carried with her into the schoolroom those characteristics 
peculiarly adapted to helpfulness and inspiration. Frail of body, she 
was yet strong in spirit, and gave of herself unsparingly in the work 
which was her delight. The keynote of her life as shown by the 
conduct of her school was service, for she gave all of herself to tihe 
mental and moral upbuilding of those assigned to her instruction. 
The High school was closed for the day on Thursday, December 9, 
for the purpose of permitting teachers and pupils to pay to her the 
last sad tribute of respect. 

ENROLLMENT AND ATTENDANCE. 

The total number of pupils registered in all of the public day schools 
of the city during the year has been 6,391. These pupils have been 
classified as follows: 578 of high school grade, 1,670 of grammar school 
grade, 1,140 of Middle school grade, 2,649 of primary grade, 209 in the 
kindergartens, and 145 in the ungraded schools. 

This total registration shows an increase of 447 over that for the 
preceding school j'ear. 

The average membership has been 5,337, the average daily attend- 
ance 4,936. The membersliip and attendance show increases re- 
spectively of 174 and 141 over those for the school year 1907-1908. 

All of these items, registration, membership, and attendance are the 
largest in the history of our schools. The percentage of attendance 
has been 92.5, while for the preceding year it was 92.9. This last 
percentage is the highest that has been attained during a period of 
thirty years. 

In each annual report for the jjast six years there has been pub- 
lished a table showing the i^ercentage of tardinesses among the pupils 



278 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTcJ. 



of the various school biiildings in the citj-. For a period preceding 
1903 tardiness had been upon the increase. 

This table h'as been published each year for the purpose of de- 
creasing this evil and has been measurably successful in accomplish- 
ing its purpose. The same table is again given. 

TABLE NO. I. 



Per Cent of Tardines.ses. 



High 

Ainoskeag 

Ash-3treet 

BakorsviUe 

Chandler 

Franklin-street — 

Qofle's Falls 

Hallsville 

Highland 

Lincoln-street — 

Main-street 

Merrimack-street. 

Parker 

Pearl-street 

Kimuioii 

Spring-street 

Straw 

Varney 

Webster-street 

Wilson 

Ungraded 



l.lG-f- 
■2.09-1- 
■24-(- 

.48-f- 



.494- 
.57+ 
.06+ 
.45+ 
.73 + 
.25+ 
.73+ 
.23+ 
..'>4 + 
.47+ 
1.00+ 
.47+ 
.22+ 
.29 f 
.38+ 
3.43+ 



.84+ 
1.68+ 
.23+ 

.48+ 

.45+ 
.90+ 
.43+ 
.46+ 
.46+ 
.23+ 
.89+ 
.32— 

1.08+ 
.66+ 
.55+ 
.34+ 
.14+ 
.31 + 
.18- 

2.02+ 



.91 + 

1.40+ 
.25+ 
.35+ 

.45+ 
.78+ 
.49 + 
.40+ 
.38+ 
.18+ 
.59+ 
.25+ 
.46+ 
.60+ 
.46+- 
.22+ 

■ .22+ 
.36+ 
.2.1+ 

3.10+ 



.09+ 
.93+ 

.25+ 
.41+ 



.52+ 
1.64+ 
.60+ 
.68+ 
.52+ 
.26+ 
.42+ 
.22+ 
.45+ 
.67 + 
.61+ 
.07+ 
.26+ 
.44+ 
.19+ 
2.94+ 



1.05+ 
.76+ 
.30+ 
.28+ 
.19+ 
.66+ 

1.62+ 
.45+ 
.75+ 
.55+ 
.24+ 
' .43+ 
.28+ 
.56+ 
.81+ 
.32+ 
.05+ 
.22+ 
.32+ 
.17+ 
2.17+ 



.83+ 
.74+ 
.15+ 
.26+ 
.19+ 
.55+ 
1.14+ 
.40+ 
.74+ 
.29+ 
.22+ 
1.91+ 
.22+ 
.26+ 
.47+ 
.001+ 
.09+ 
.31+ 
.18+ 
.19+ 
2.52+ 



1.00+ 
.45+ 
.19+ 
.22+ 
.11+ 
.67+ 

1.51+ 
.48+ 
.28+ 
.33+ 
.22+ 
.89^ 
.36+ 
•14+ 
.55+ 
.46+ 
.07+ 
.40+ 
.18+ 
.22+ 
1.57+ 



The total number of tardinesses for the year has been 8,393, which 
is greater by thirty-one than for the preceding year. In 1907-190S 
tardinesses averaged approximately 1.61 per pupil; in 1908-1909 approx- 
imately 1.57 per pupil. It will be seen that, while absolutely there 
has been an increase, this increase has not been proportional to the 
increase in average membership. The Straw school, with a percent- 
age of .07. leads the list, and is entitled to honorable mention. The 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 279 

Chandler, Pearl-street, Webster-street, and Ash-street schools fol- 
low, all with percentages under .20. 

One hundred and eighty pupils only among 5,337 were present at 
every session of school during the year without being tardy. 

CHANGES AXD TRANSFERS. 

The following-named teachers severed their connection with the 
public schools during and at the close of the school year: Misses 
Marion D. Ames, Winona M. Martin, Oriola E. Martin, and Elizabeth 
L. Neal of the High school; Miss Bertha Young, teacher of the lower 
primary grade, at the Ash-street .school; Misses Heni-ietta Wilder of 
the third division grammar grade, Bertha Crowell of the second 
division grammar grade. Amy Davison of the lower primary grade, 
and Cora B. Gilford, master's assistant, at the Lincoln-street school; 
Misses Isabel Houliston and Ethel Jones, kindergarteners, at the 
Parker school; Miss Isabel Barlow, teacher of the lower middle 
grade at the Eimmon school; Misses Grace Crosby, of the lower pri- 
mary grade, and Harriet Williamson, master's assistant, at the Yar- 
ney school; Messrs. Arthur W. French and Guido L. Carpi, assistant 
teachers at the Manual Training school. 

The vacancies created by the retirement of the above-named teach- 
ers have been filled as follows: In the High school by the election of 
Misses Bessie Adams and Edna Cullis, and Messrs. Fred H. Hodgson 
and Arthur O. Friel; in the Ash-street school by the transfer of 
Miss Hulda C. Graupner from the Chandler school; in the Lincoln- 
street school, the vacancy caused by the resignation of Aliss Wilder 
at the middle of the year, by the transfer of Miss Lillian Crowther 
from the fourth to the third division and the election of Miss M. 
Emma Eoberts to the fourth division; the vacancies caused by the 
resignations of Misses Gilford, Crowell, and Davison at the end of 
the year by the election of Miss Elizabeth Eobertson, the transfer 
of Miss Roberts from the fourth division grammar to the second 
division grammar and the election of Miss Nettie Rennie, the vacancy 
in the fourth division grammar grade being filled by the election 
of Miss Lois D. Beck. The vacancies in the Parker kindergarten were 
filled by the transfer of Miss Grace Ryan, assistant at the Spring- 
street kindergarten, to be head kindergartener, and the election of 
Miss Maud Avery as assistant. The vacancy in the Rimmon school, 
caused by the resignation of Miss Isabel Barlow, was filled by the 
promotion of Miss Maud Willand from the higher primary grade of 
the same building. Miss Mary White was in turn promoted to the 
higher primary grade and Miss Rebecca C. Grant elected lower pri- 
marj^ teacher. The vacancy in the master's assistantship at the Yar- 
ney school was filled by the promotion of Miss Jennie Y. Williamson 
from the fourth grammar grade in the same building, her position 
being in turn taken by Miss Gertrude Adams, promoted from the lower 



280 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

middle grade, the vacancy thus created being filled by the transfer 
of Miss Jennie Landers from the Spring-street school; Miss Laurette 
McKendree was transferred from the primary grade at the Highland 
school to the vacancy' created by the resignation of Miss Crosbj'. 
In the Chandler school Miss Helen M. Ely was elected to the lower 
primary grade to fill the vacancy caused by the transfer of Miss 
Graupner to the Ash-street school. Miss Fay Morey was elected as- 
sistant kindergartner vice Miss Bartlett, transferred to be head l<in- 
dergartner of the new kindergarten opened in the Straw building. 
Miss Mary E. Walker was transferred from the Webster's Mills school 
to the vacancy in the Highland building caused by the transfer of 
Miss McKendree, this last vacancy being in turn filled by the election 
of Miss Ethel Bartlett. Miss Lulu Kean was elected to the vacancy 
in the Spring-street school created by the transfer of Miss Landers. 
Miss Ethel Church was elected assistant kindergartner in the Spring- 
street school to take the place made vacant by the transfer of Miss 
Ryan. Miss Marion Clough was elected assistant kindergartner in 
tTne new kindergarten opened in the Straw building at the begin- 
ning of the spring term. Miss Mildred Morey was elected to teach 
the Stark district school to fill the vacancy there existing for two 
terms. The vacancies in the Manual Training school were filled by 
the election of Messrs. Charles A, Perrj' and Wallace B. Hurlburt. 

ACCOMJI]ODATIONS. 

Each year it is necessary to call the attention of the board to 
deficiencies or approaching deficiencies in accommodations for pupils 
in certain districts. Annually for ten years the condition of the 
Eimmon school building has been called to your attention. The 
building is a four-room structure arranged to accommodate 192 pupils. 
The heating, light and ventilation were planned upon this basis.. 
There are at present in the building 235 pupils, by rooms as follows: 
52, 49, 49, 85. The numbers at times have exceeded these figures. 
Pupils are seated in the hallway. An anteroom, designed for a teach- 
er's room, is occupied by classes. All grades of work are done in the 
building, manifestly, in its crowded state, to the disadvantage of those 
attending. In extreme weather it is impossible to ventilate ade- 
quately. Conditions in t^his district are an injustice to the residents 
of McGregorville and an injury to public education. The improve- 
ments to be made and dwellings to be erected by the Amoskeag Man- 
ufacturing Company in this section, with the additional school jjopula- 
tion implied, should bring this matter seriously to your minds. 

The Merrimack-street school occupies the middle ground between 
the larger Lincoln-street and Franklin-street buildings. Pupils at- 
taining to a grade higher than that of the Merrimack-street are 
transferred to the above-mentioned schools according to residence. 
The pupils are so numerous in the district that the school has become 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENt OF SCHOOLS. 2f 1 

practically a primary building. Its pupils number two hundred and 
sixteen in four rooms designed for one hundred and ninety-two. A 
special class of thirty-seven non-English-speaking pupils is cared 
for in two connecting anterooms on the north side of the school. 
The building fails adequately to meet the demands of the district. 
Six rooms at least are needed where now but four exist. A modern 
building with baths and opportunity to provide certain pupils with 
food as needed should be provided for this section. 

The Bakersville school accommodates a large area in the southern 
part of the city. Its district extends from Valley street on the north 
to the junction of Beech street and the Lawrence railroad track on 
the south, and from the river on the west to Maple street on the east. 
The territory is gradually developing and already calls for greater 
school accommodations. The building was originally a four-room 
structure, with a large attic upon the third floor. At present this 
attic is divided into two schoolrooms, capable of seating thirty-six 
pupils each. Here, for a period of nineteen years, pupils have been 
taught. The higher primary and lower middle grades of this building 
are at present overcrowded. A district of such large area needs one 
or more vacant rooms in addition to the eight ordinarily provided, 
in order that fluctuations in membership may not interfere with the 
work of the school throiigh serious overcrowding. A considerable 
further increase will render it necessary to rent a schoolroom outside 
of the building, unless action shall be taken to remodel or replace 
the present building. 



The following table, the figures of which are taken from the re- 
ports of the auditor, shows the total valuation of real estate, clas- 
sified under the heading, "Real Estate Owned by the City — School- 
houses," for a period of five years, the amount appropriated for re- 
pairs upon the same, and the per cent which this amount is of the 
valuation. 
Year Valuation Appropiiation Per cent 

1905 : $759,056 • $10,500 l.aS 

1906 801,031 10.500 1.31 

1907 801,031 8,000 .99 

1908 819,031 8,000 .97 

1909 827,531 8,000 .90 

It will be observed that there has been during the five years an 
increase in valuation of $68,475 due to the construction of new build- 
ings and to additions to old buildings; the amount appropriated 
yearly has dropped from $10,500 to $8,000; the per cent has decreased 
each year, thus in 1905 it was 1.38 per cent, in 1906 it was 1.31 per 
cent, in 1907 it was .99 per cent, in 1908 it was .97 per cent, in l!)i)'.) 



•^0:i ANN-UAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

it was .96 per cent. The amount of property to be cared for has 
steadily increased, the amount of money with which to care for the 
same has decreased. 

This downward tendency in per cent raises the question as to what 
is the proper relation between valuation and the amount of money 
necessary to keep propertj^ in good repair. In looking over the ap- 
propriations for a series of years I find no other instance in which 
the appropriation for repairs bears such a low relation to the value 
of the school property as during the past year. 

In an endeavor to institute comparisons between school property 
and that of a somewhat similar character upon the street owned by 
private individuals, I learn that the per cent expended by the latter 
is less than the figures given in the above table. On the other hand, 
*in the case of the propertj- inquired about and leased for stores, I 
am told that the lessees make their own repairs and alterations. 
The amounts expended by these lessees, therefore, are of the same 
nature as the repairs made by this board upon its school buildings, 
and, in making a comparison as to the cost of keeping up the proper- 
ties, should be included in the repair and maintenance bills. Were 
they so included, I am confident that the per cent would be much 
larger than any one of those given in the table. 

The cost of repairs undoubtedly is greater in the case of old 
buildings. Some of our buildings are fifty years old, others forty or 
more. But four have been built during the last ten years, the Goi?e"s 
Falls, Highland, Chandler and Youngsville. One, the Hallsville, has 
been remodeled. It will, therefore, be seen that the buildings are 
of such ages as to call for increased funds for repairs. 

The small appropriations for the last three years render more 
necessary an increased sum for the coming year. 

Again, labor and materials are both higher than ever before. 

The valuation of the school property is in some instances, to say 
the least, conservatively estimated. To illustrate: the Main-street 
school building is included in the inventory of city property at a 
valuation of $6,000. I believe the valuation to be much greater than 
that. The experience of the city in erecting eight-room structures 
has shown a cost of about $37,000. While the Main-street building 
has not this value, it would seem to approach more nearly to it than 
it does to $6,000. The Parker school is valued in the inventory of city 
property at $20,000, the Wilson school at $30,000. Both buildings 
are of the same type as the Chandler building, which cost $37,00r. 
and both are in excellent condition. 

A valuation of school real estate a little less conservative than that 
in the annual cit,v report will show total property amounting in value 
to 850,000. In addition to this real estate there is listed in the city 
report personal property in charge of the superintendent of school-^ 
to the value of $37,049. This comprises chiefly furniture and books, 
much the larger portion being furniture, the repairs upon which 



KEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 283 

must be made from the same fund that maintains real estate. The 
cost of repairs \ipon furniture is greatly disproportionate to the 
value of the furniture. The value of property to be kept in repair, 
conservatively estimated, is $875,000. The city council should appro- 
priate for the years 1910 and 1911 about 1^4 per cent for repairs; this 
per cent upon $875,000 would call for $10,937.50. I recommend that 
this board include in its annual budget this estimate for repairs, 
and ask that it may be specifically appropriated for the purpose of 
repairs by the city council. In case a sum may not be and is not 
appropriated for the specific purpose of repairs, the school board 
by law may expend but 5 per cent of its gross appropriation for this 
l)urpose. 

HEALTH. 

At the May meeting of the school board the committee upon health 
was instructed to make an investigation on the subject of medical 
inspection and supervision of schools and to report not later than 
October. The committee reported at the September meeting. The 
report follows: 

Manchestek, N. H., September 3, 1909. 

The committee upon health, having been directed by the school 
board to investigate and reiiort upon the matter of medical inspec- . 
tion and supervision of schools, has attended to the duty assigned it 
and makes the following report: 

We find that the state of Massachusetts leads among the states of 
the Union in this matter, having upon her statute books a law re- 
quiring the school committee of every city and town to appoint 
one or more school physicians for the purpose of carrying out the 
provisions of the law in regard to medical inspection, provided the 
board of health of the city does not maintain such a medical inspec- 
tion as is required by the act; if the board of health maintains such 
inspection, it appoints the physician. 

The law requires the school physician to make a prompt exami- 
nation and diagnosis of all children under certain conditions, and 
to examine teachers, janitors, and school buildings as the protection 
of the health of the pupils may require. 

Pupils are examined as follows: 

First: In every case on returning to school without a certificate 
from the board of health after absence on account of illness or from 
unknown cause. 

Second: In the case of every child in the school showing signs of 
ill health or suffering from infectious or contagious disease, unless 
the latter has been at once excused by the teacher. 

Third: Every pupil is tested and examined at lea-st once in every 
school year to ascertain whether he is suffering from defective sight 
or hearing or from any other disability or defect tending to prevent 



284 • ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

his receiving the full benefit of the school work, or requiring a modi- 
fication of the school work to prevent injury to the child and to 
secure the best educational results. 

Tests of sight and hearing are made bj' teachers. 

Notice of defects and disability is sent to parents. 

A record of the physical condition of each child is preserved. 

Fourth: A child showing symptoms of smallpox, scarlet fever, 
measles, chickenpox, tuberculosis, diphtheria or influenza, tonsilitis, 
whooping cough, mumps, scabies or trachoma is sent home immedi- 
ately, and the board of health notified. 

The states of Vermont and Connecticut have laws providing for 
annual tests of sight and hearing, the keeping of uniform records 
of the same, and the notification of parents or guardians. 

A similar law was before the legislature of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, 
North Dakota, California, and some other states during the past 
winter. 

About fifty cities in the United States outside of Massachusetts, 
Connecticut, and Vermont, have some form of medical inspection, 
paid or voluntary, and performed by either physicians or trained 
nurses. The details of administration vary somewhat in different 
communities. Into these details your committee does not propose 
to enter minutely in this report. 

The work appears to have two general purposes or aims. The first 
concerns itself with the protection of the majority of the pupils 
from contagion by contact with other diseased children, through the 
exclusion of these latter from school, and may be termed preventive. 
Such is already in operation in our own schools, although its execu- 
tion is intrusted to the teachers and not to skilled medical practi- 
tioners. 

The second concerns itself with the detection and removal of dis- 
abilities and defects which prevent the full and free development 
of the capacities of the child. This may be termed constructive or 
remedial. 

The records of examinations of pupils in the few places where 
examinations have been systematically made and records preserved 
show a surprising number of defects, practically all of which were 
capable of being remedied. The following quotation from an article 
by Dr. Thomas W. Harrington is illustrative: "The extent of physical 
defects in children maj' be concluded from the results of the exami- 
nation of 200,000 children in New York between the ages of five to 
fifteen years; 60 per cent were under-nourished; 66 per cent needed 
medical and siirgical care; 40 i^er cent had bad teeth; 38 per cent had 
enlarged cervical glands; 31 per cent had defective vision, and l.T per 
cent had enlarged tonsils, while 10 per cent had adenoids." 

Systematic observations in Sweden, Denmark, and Germany show 
that from 18 to 40 per cent of the pupils were sickly at all times. 



KEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 285 

Your committee holds it to be an axiom that the healthy child is 
capable of developing the greatest capacity. It is obvious that de- 
fective eyes and ears, obstructed throats, poor teeth contributing to 
malnutrition, as well as various diseases of the different organs must 
hinder the growth of the child's powers. The question includes not 
merely the detection and remedying of these defects, but also the 
creation of conditions and the inauguration of such procedures as 
shall decrease the tendency to these defects. In other words, it is 
a matter also of sanitation and ventilation of schoolhouses, of public 
playgrounds and directed sports. 

Your committee addressed letters of inquiry to thirty-four cities 
extending- from New England to the middle West. Eeplies were 
received from thirty-three of these, accompanied by numerous reports 
and documents. 

Four had no form of medical inspection. 

One was about to inaugurate the same. 

The questionaire sent out by the committee contained seven queries. 

First, Have you medical inspection in the public schools? 

Twenty-eight replied, yes. 

Second. Number of inspectors? 

The answers to this query varied from 100 in Chicago, 80 in Boston, 
16 in Newark, 15 in Worcester, 12 in Springfield, 9 in Lowell, 6 in 
Lawrence, down to 1 in Pawtucket. In general the number of in- 
spectors depended upon the size of the city, the number of schools, 
and the frequency and thoroughness of the inspection. 

Third. Salary paid each? 

In Massachusetts cities, inspectors are generally paid b3' the year. 
Maiden, employing four inspectors, pays each $125 annually; Boston, 
Cambridge, Chelsea, Haverhill, Lowell, Waltham, and Worcester paj" 
their inspectors $200 each annually; New Bedford pays $400, Lawrence 
$600, North Adams and Brockton $20 per 'month, Springfield $25 per 
month, while Brookline pays $1 per hour. Chicago pays $66.66 per 
month, Hartford and New Haven pay $600 and $240 per year, Provi- 
dence $500 per year; one city, Camden, employs one medical inspector 
and pays him a salary of $2,400. The subjoined table shows the total 
cost to some of the cities. 



286 ANNUAL OFFICIAL 



City No. ot Itisp. 

Boston 80 

Brockton 6 

Brookline 

Cambridge 6 

Camden 1 

Chicago 100 

Chelsea 3 

Hartford 3 

Haverhill 2 

Lancaster 1 

Lawrence 6 

Lowell 9 

Lynn 5 

Maiden 4 

jS^ewark 16 

New Bedford S 

New Haven 5 

North Adams 5 

Providence 4 

Springfield 12 

Syracuse 10 wii 

Waltham 3 

Worcester 15 



Fourth. Duties of inspectors? 

The replies to this vary and are often contained in copies of the 
rules or in annual reports. They may be summarized by the state- 
ment that it is the duty of the inspectors to visit the schools and 
detect cases of contagious diseases. In some cases a thorough exam- 
ination of all pupils is conducted yearly for the purpose of discover- 
ing defects. In the daily visitations those pupils only are examined 
who are presented to the inspector by the teacher. 

Fifth. Powers of inspectors? 

Inspectors in most cases may exclude pupils from school, may re- 
admit them, may diagnose disease and cause parents to be informed 
as to a child's condition. They may not prescribe nor recommend 
specific practitioners. In one case they may suspend under the di- 
rection of the committee upon ihealth, in another they may recom- 
mend to the principal the excluding of the pupil. In one city in- 
spectors vaccinate indigent pupils. 

Gth. The details as to frequencj', method, and extent of examina- 
tion? 

Visits are made daily, everj' other day, twice a week, weekly, bi- 
weekly, and at no regular intervals. Details as to method and extent 
of examination are meager. The daily examination for the detec- 
tion of disease must be such as the physician would ordinarily give 



iEPOllTS. 




Salary 


Total Cost 


$200.00 


$16,000.00 


20.00 per m 


1,200.00 




1,423.00 




200.00 


1,200.00 


2,400.00 


2,400.00 


800.00 


80,000.00 


200.00 


600.00 


600.00 


1.800.00 


200.00 


400.00 


500.00 


500.00 


600.00 


3,600.00 


200.00 


1,800.00 


300.00 


1,500.00 


125.00 


.500.00 


400.00 


6,400.00 


. 400.00 


3,200.00 


240.00 


1,200.00 


200.00 


1,000.00 


500.00 


2,000.00 


300.00 


3.600.00 


•ses 300.00 


4,300.00 


200.00 


600.00 


200.00 


3,000.00 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 287 

to one of his patients. The examination for the detection of defects 
must of necessity be complete and thorough. 

We find that where the best results are obtained the inspectors are 
officers of the board of health. The boards of health are clothed 
with ample powers, are supreme in matters of sanitation and are 
answerable only to the courts. 

We recommend that the board of health of the city of Manchester 
be petitioned bj^ this body to undertake the medical inspection and 
supervision of .school children along t'he lines followed in the state 
of Massachusetts. 

We recommend that this board adopt a resolution requiring the 
teachers of the public schools to test annually at the beginning of 
the fall term the eyes and ears of all pupils under their charge, 
according to directions to be furnished them by the committee upon 
health; that the parents of all pupils found defective be notified of 
the same on a blank to be provided for that purpose, and that a 
record of the examination of each pupil be preserved. 
(Signed) 

GEO. M. DAVIS, 
WALTER B. MITCHELL, 
JOSEPH P. DEVINE, 

Committee on Ecalih. 

The proposition that the Board of Health undertake the medical 
inspection of the school children of the city was favorably considered 
by that body. It was impossible to begin 'the work during the ctirrent 
year because of tihe lack of funds. At the December meeting this 
board voted to petition the city councils to grant the Board of Health 
an appropriation for this purpose. 

The experience of the cities cited in the report of the committee 
on health \\iould seem to show that this may be done at a cost of 
$200 per inspector. The city of Lowell, with a population of 95,000, 
with over 10,000 school children, hires nine inspectors at a total cost 
of $1,800. Figuring upon this basis, five or six inspectors at the same 
salary would cost $1,000 or $1,200. 

In its report the committee recommended that the teachers in the 
public schools be required to test, annuallj', during the fall term, the 
eyes and ears of all pupils imder their charge, that the parents of 
all pupils found defective be notified of the same, and that a record 
of the examination of each pupil be preserved. The board so voted, 
and these examinations have been made. The records, exclusive of 
those at the High school, are at hand and show for the elementary 
schools results as recorded below. (No examination of the pupils 
in the kindergartens has as yet been made.) 

1. Total number of pupils whose eyes and ears have been tested 4,()2") 

2. Total number of pupils with defective vision l.lOfi 

3. Number with no vision in one eve 27 



288 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

4. Number having one e^'e defective (not including 3) :J59 

5. Number 'having both eyes defective 720 

6. Total number of pupils with defective hearing 746 

7. Number deaf in one ear 29 

8. Number having one ear defective (not including 7) 364 

9. Number having both ears defective. 353 

The tests were made in accordance with a pamphlet of instruction 
printed and supplied by the State Department of Public Instruction. 
Notice of defective vision was sent to parents when vision fell below 
20/30 in one or both eyes. In case of defective ears i^arents were 
notified when abilitj' to hear was less than 3/5 of normal. 

In one hundred thirty-nine cases as reported by teachers steps 
have been taken by parents to remedy defects. Others have planned 
to attend to the matter during the present vacation. By some the 
notification has been disregarded and a few were offended when 
notified. These tests show that 24 per cent of our pupils are defec- 
tive in vision and 16 per cent in hearing. This but confirms previ- 
ous experience on the part of other cities. It is stated that "from 
20 to 25 per cent of children in the ccJuntry and about 30 per cent 
in cities are defective in sight to the extent of needing glasses to do 
their school work properly." 

It will be observed that twent3--seven children were blind in one 
eye and twenty-nine deaf in one ear. One particularly bad case was 
that of a pupil with congenital defects of the eyes, having less than 
3/50 of normal vision. Glasses gave him 1/5 of normal vision. 

Of these eighteen hundred and fifty-two pupils, found defective 
in vision and hearing, eight hundred and twentj'-three are over age 
for their grades and four hundred and ninety-one have failed once 
or more to be advanced with their classes. It was impossible to 
obtain data in regard to all the eight hundred and twenty-three. 
The percentage of over-age children failing is practicallj^ sixty. 
Were the data complete, I feel sure that it would be greater than 
sixty. 

Expert medical inspection and supervision will reveal other phys- 
ical defects which may be remedied. Where there is inability on the 
part of the parents to provide the proper medical treatment, such 
should be given at the public expense. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The present High school building was completed and occupied for 
the first time in September, 1897. Its seating capacity, as given bj- 
the architect, Mr. William M. Butterfield, was six hundred. The aver- 
age membership for the first year was two hundred and ninety. The 
faculty comprised nine members. It was thought that ample room 
had been provided for secondary education for a long period of years. 

The expiration of twelve years shows an enrollment of six hun- 
dred and seventeen and a membership of six hundred and eleven. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 289 

The faculty has increased from nine members to nineteen, and the 
High school subcommittee has been instructed to procure the twen- 
tieth member. The building is filled to its normal capacity. Seats 
have been placed in every available room. It has become necessarj' 
to utilize the two west basements for recitation purposes. In these 
are conducted the drawing and mineralogy classes. 

The time has come to provide further facilities for secondary edu- 
cation, unless the right to t^his is to be denied to certain of our citi- 
zens. 

It is still possible to cut the present beautiful hall of the building 
into recitation rooms. Such action is to be deplored upon several 
grounds: first, because of the loss of a powerful moral influence 
which comes from the association of the whole school in its devo- 
tional exercises, and in matters where the whole student body is 
concerned and interested; second, from the undesirability of increas- 
ing the number of students upon the t'hird floor, with its conse- 
quent additional strain of stair climbing and danger in case of fire; 
third, from the difficulty of adequately lighting the northern por- 
tion of the hall when partitioned into schoolrooms. 

The alternative to the division of the hall into classrooms is the 
erection of a new building or the construction of an addition to the 
present building. 

Up to a very recent time the chief influence in determining the 
character of the education given in our be-st high schools has been 
the college entrance requirements. The standard set by the colleges 
has been the goal of the instructors and they have attained the goal. 
Scholastically this has been a most excellent state of affairs. The 
colleges have advanced their requirements and the schools have re- 
sponded. It is necessary that this standard shall be maintained. 

In our own school the college course is the popular course, popular 
at least to the extent that many more pupils elect it than ever enter 
the 'higher institutions. It is a safe assertion that, on an average, 
not over 20 per cent of our graduates enter collegiate institutions of 
the first rank. Not over 25 per cent pursue their literary education 
further in institutions of all kinds. The High school then has existed 
to prepare for special professional work, law, medicine, teaching, en- 
gineering, etc., 25 per cent of its graduates. This has been its edu- 
cational ideal. Let us grant that the other 75 per cent have received 
a good general education. Even then this general good education lias 
been haphazard to the extent that it has been without a definite 
end in view, and has led to no special industrial or vocational prepara- 
tion, as has been the case with the first 25 per cent. 

This state of affairs is manifestly unjust; it favors the few at the 
expense of the manj-. Business and trade conditions today are call- 
ing for trained, skilled workmen, and the country is looking to its 
schools to supply them. This means a readjustment of educational 
machinery, the adaptation of the present to meet these demands. 



290 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The National Society for the Promotion of Industrial Training, in 
a preliminary report upon this subject, states that "The need for 
industrial training and the facts concerning our own lack of it have 
been so often repeated that they may be accepted. All who are 
acquainted with education in European nations know that in the 
matter of industrial training we are far behind such countries as 
Germany; that our apprentice system, even if materially extended, 
can offer industrial education to only a comparative few; there are 
practically no facilities for the training of youth between the ages of 
fourteen and eighteen years for industrial pursuits. . . . 

"It is also perfectly clear that this is an industrial age. and that the 
education which is to serve for a whole people must take account of 
vocational training." 

The National Association of Manufacturers is on record as follows: 
"And now . . . we w^ant still further to emphasize . . . that 
it is genuine, practical industrial education that we stand for, an 
industrial education that will make of the American boy an all-around, 
full-fledged, skilled mechanic, able to take his place and hold his 
own alongside of the skilled mechanic having learned his trade in the 
skilled industries of this or any other country, and to this contention 
let us dogmatically adhere." 

Organized labor is on record in favor of thorouf/h industrial train- 
ing. 

We should not fail to heed the signs of the times. We need ad- 
ditional High school facilities. We are behind the times in an im- 
portant phase of education. It is possible to remedy both deficiencies 
at the same time. 

A survej' of the field suggests three plans: first, a new High school 
building in another part of the city; second, a new building in the 
immediate vicinity of the present structure; third, an addition to 
the present building, and, with whichever plan may be adopted, the 
establishment of mechanic arts courses to cover at least three 3"ears 
of work in the High school. 

Greater facility of access to a high school on the part of a portion 
of the city may be argued in favor of the first of these plans. There 
would, however, be no gain in this respect unless mechanic arts 
courses were established in both the present and the prospective 
High school. In support of the last two plans may be urged economy 
of administration and the utilization of the present plant for a great 
portion of the scholastic work to be done in the new courses. The 
elementary schools of the city have graduated nine hundred and 
forty-six pupils in the last four years. Ninetj'-five per cent of these 
should be in the High school, and the percentage would be much 
larger than it is at present, provided the utilitj- of such attendance 
could be shown to pupils and parents. The proposed courses would 
make this utility plain. Instruction should be by practical workmen,, 
or by those who are at least as much workmen as teachers. A large 



KEPOKT OP THE SUPEKINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 291 

portion of the present 75 per cent of membership who never enter 
higher eiliieational institutions would be attracted to these courses. 
Many new pupils, out of the 40 per cent of our g-rammar school 
graduates that stop school with the completion of the ninth grade, 
would be attracted to the school, and with the proiDer courses might 
from the beginning fit themselves for their life w^ork. 

The present High school lot is of such dimensions that it is prac- 
ticable to erect two wings to the present building, extending toward 
the south, forming with the present structure three sides of a 
quadrangle and providing accommodation for about fourteen hundred 
pupils. I believe that one of these wings should be built at the pres- 
ent time, and I recommend that this board request of the city 
coimcil an appropriation for such an addition, and that mechanic arts 
and domestic science courses be inaugurated in the High school. 

KETAKDATIOX. 

The following tables show the number of pupils in each year of 
school and the number of the same that failed of promotion at the 
end of each semester of the school year 1908-1909. It also shows the 
number of pupils, iinder the heading "Number of Beginners," that 
entered school for the first time in September and in January, at 
which times alone beginners are admitted to the public schools. 

Table Xo. II shows the number of beginners in 'Sepitember, 190S, 
number in each year of school and number failing of promotion five 
months later, in January, 1909. 

Table No. Ill shows the number of beginners in January-, 1909, num- 
ber in each year of school, and number failing of promotion five 
months later, in June, 1909. 



292 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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294 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

These tables show that 39 per cent of the first year pupils failed 
of promotion at the end of tlie first half of the year, that 19 8-10 per 
cent failed at the end of the second half year; that 13 per cent and 

11 6-10 per cent of the second year piipils, 8 per cent and 8 7-10 per 
cent of the third year, 10 per cent and 9 7-10 per cent of the fourth 
year, 9 per cent and 8 per cent of the fifth year; 8 per cent and 6 2-10 
per cent of the sixth year, 10 per cent and 4 8-10 per cent of the 
seventh year, 3 per cent and 2 3-10 per cent of the eighth year, 2 per 
cent and 1 6-10 per cent of the ninth year pupils failed at the cor- 
responding times. 

Obviously these percentages of failures, excepting possibly' in the 
ninth year, are too large. The number of promotions possible in 
the two half years was nine thousand three hundred and sixteen; 
the number of failures was eleven hundred and ninety-one, practically 

12 8-10 per cent. The figures for 190S as given in the report for that 
j^ear were 14 per cent. Data such as are furnished bj^ these tables, 
coupled with data in regard to the ages of pupils in different grades, 
should be secured and preserved for a period of years. 

In the month of December, 1908, there was secured for the United 
States Immigration Commission a statement as to the nationalities 
and ages of all children present upon a certain day. A copy of this 
was furnished to the National Commissioner of Education and to the 
citj'^ of Manchester. The following summary in regard to the ages 
of the pupils in the graded schools, excluding the kinderg'artens, un- 
graded and high schools, is enlightening. 

TABLE NO. IV. 

Showing the years of school, standard age for each year, number 

in the jear, number over age bv one or more years, of those present 
December 6, 1908, in gradml schools. 

Tears Age for j-«ar No. in jear No. over age Per cent 

1st 5-ear 5 years 952 728 76 

2d year 6 years 597 519 S6 

3d year 7 years 496 453 91 

4th year 8 years 467 407 86 

5th year 9 years 505 462 91 

6th year 10 years 383 323 84 

7th year 11 years 407 327 80 

Stli year 12 years 271 203 74 

9th year 1?^ years 213 ' 143 67 

Totals 4,391 3,565 Average 81 

The table shows that 81 per cent of the pupils in the public schools 
are over age for their grade, the percentage being greatest in the 
third and fifth years. Were the age for each grade advanced one year, 
the number over age would still be fifty-one per cent of the whole. 
This last is the actual per cent in the high school. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 205 

These last figures and percentages apply directly to the pupils 
tabulated in Table II. Column two of this table shows that teu 
hundred and eighty-two pupils were doing the work of the first year. 
Of these six hundred and twentj^-nine were in school for the first 
time. Four hundred and twenty-three obviously failed to be advanced 
in the preceding half year. Of the ten hundred and eighty-two, four 
hundred and t\\enty-one, or 39 per cent, failed of advancement at pro- 
motion time. 

The increase of over-age pupils is cumulative. The loss of one 
promotion by a pupil means a pupil over age for the remainder of 
the course. The large percentage in the first year would naturally 
be increased until such a time in school life as puijils reach the age 
when they may lawfully leave school. Then a decline may be ex- 
pected. Experience has shown this decline to occur about the sixth 
year. The figures of the table bear this out. 

The causes operating* for the large per cent of over-age pupils are, 
first, the excessive number of failures in the first year; second, the 
existence of two systems of schools with the frequent interchange of 
pupils between them. 

The failures amounting to 39 per cent in the first year may be as- 
cribed to three possible causes: first, to a too diffcult course of study, 
although 61 per cent of the pupils accomplish it; second, to the im- 
maturity of the pupils, many of whom would be better off at home 
at plaj- in the sunshine during the fifth ^ear of their life; third, to 
phj'sical defects and deficiencies as yet undetected. 

The new course of study will materially modify the work to be 
done the first year. The second cause, the immaturity of 
the pupils, may be partially remedied at least by the pro- 
posed change from a nine to an eight-year coiirse, with the ad- 
mission of beginners to school at the age of six instead of five years. 
Medical inspection will ameliorate, by detecting and remedying de- 
fects, the condition of those now failing from the third cause. 

The showing of Table IV in regard to over-age conditions may be 
remedied at once by a lowering of the grade of work for the differ- 
ent years. This remedy, in my opinion, is not to be seriouslj^ con- 
sidered. It is then a state which must be grown out of. 

The conditions shown in Tables II and III are susceptible of a 
much more rapid improvement through a more detailed course of 
study and through a closer scrutiny of the health of pupils. This 
last statement is supported in a measure by the fact that four hun- 
dred and ninetj'-one pupils found deficient in sight and hearing have 
failed of promotion. The report for the coming year should contain 
a detailed statement of the reason ' for nonpromotion of pupils, 
whether due to absence, illness and its consequent absence, physical 
defects, lack of interest or to incapacity. These facts as well as the 
reasons for withdrawal from school should be preserved upon the 
registration card of each pupil. 



296 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

By vote of the board the following table (No. V), showing the 
movement of pupils through the high school, is here inserted as a 
part of this report. 

TABLE XO. V. 

Movement of pupils through Manchester High school by subjects. 

English: No. passed. No. failed. 

1st course 110 

2d course 117 2 

3d course 145 

4th course 143 6 

Latin: 

1st course 94 9 

2d course 80 4 

3d course 33 

4th course 30 

Greek: 

1st course 16 1 

2d course 12 

3d course 6 

French: 

1st course 1st semester 112 14 

2d •' 92 12 

2d course 1st " 63 3 

2d ■ " 58 2 

3d course 1st " 45 

2d " 40 

German: 

1st course 25 2 

2d course 29 

3d course 3 

Algebra : 

1st course 150 . 15 

2d course 141 

3d course 44 1 

Geometry: 

1st course 137 10 

2d course 124 5 

3d course 44 1 

Solid geometry 15 1 

Trigonometry and surveying 12 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 297 



Botanj' 
Zoology 



Physics: 
1st course 
2d course 

Chemistry . 



History: 

Greek and Eoman 

English 

United States 

Mediaeval and Modern 

Commercial arithmetic . 



Xo. passed. No. failed. 


35 





33 





106 


8 


11 


4 


39 


6 


40 


3 


50 


1 


72 


1 


17 


3 



Bookkeeping: 

1st course 142 2 

2d course 20 

Stenography: 

1st course J5S 

2d course 158 

Typewriting 158 

'Commercial geography 31 3 

Commercial and Industrial History 27 

Senior Arithmetic Review 38 

Number first year pupils in full and regular standing at begin- 
ning of school year 1908-09 168 

At end 104 

Number, second year pupils at beginning 130 

At end 94 

Number third year pupils at beginning 83 

At end 86 

Number fourth year pupils at beginning 91 

At end 107 

Number graduates June, 1908 103 

Number graduates June, 1909 107 

Number entering collegiate institutions September, 1908 20 

Number entering higher institutions other than collegiate Sep- 
tember, 1908 20 



298 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPOKTS. 

In conclusion I desire to thank tlie members of tlie board, teachers, 
and citizens for the cordial cooperation given in the administration of 
the schools during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES W. BICKFOED, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX, 



I. Population', Etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 

V. Attendance Tables. 

YI. Truancy. 

YII. Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1908-1909. 

IX. High School Graduates. 

X. Wln'ners of Claljke Prizes. 

XI. Organization of CosmiTTEES, 1910. 

XIT. List of Teachers, 1910. 

Xlir. School Year, 1909-1910. 



299 



APPENDIX. 



STATISTICS. 



I. Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1900 56,987 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 



II. Schoolhouses. 

Number of schoolhouses in use 26 

Number of schoolhouses not in use 

Number of schoolrooms used for day schools 150 

Number of rooms used for high school classes IS 

Number of rooms iised for grammar schools 41 

Number of rooms used for middle schools 28 

Number of rooms used for primary schools 50 

Number of rooms used for ungraded schools 5 

Number of rooms used for Manual Training school 3 

Number of rooms used for kindergartens 5 



III. Schools. 

(All for both sexes.) 

Number of high school buildings 1 

Number of combined grammar and lower grade (middle 

and primary) schools 16 

Number of combined middle and primary schools 3 

Number of ungraded schools 5 

Number of manual training schools (for boys) 1 

300 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 301 



IV. Teachers. 

Male teachers in the High school 5 

Female teachers in the High school 13 

Male teachers in the grammar schools 7 

Female teachers in the grammar schools *42 

Female teachers in the middle schools 28 

Female teachers in the primary schools 50 

Female teachers in the ungraded schools 6 

Female teachers in the kindergarten fS 

Male teachers in the Manual Training school 3 

Special teachers 4 

Average number of male teachers 17 

Average number of female teachers 1 4i) 

Total average number of teachers in day schools IGi; 

Male teachers in the evening schools 9 

Female teachers in the evening schools 14 

Male teachers in the evening drawing schools 2 

* Seven of the 42 masters' assistants. 
t Two for one term. 



302 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 






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KEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 303 



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304 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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sll 




f (Jeorge Winch, Master. 
1 M. Harriet Williamson. 

E. Maria Dickey. ) 

Ellen E. McKean. } Assistants. 

Jennie V. Williamson. ) 




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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



305 






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92 6 
93.4 

91.7 
91.9 
93.4 
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90.1 
89.2 
87.5 
89 9 
91.6 
91.6 
95.5 
95 2 
93.8 
94.3 
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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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307 






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98.9 
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308 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



309 



DAY SCHOOLS. 

Summary of attendance upon the several grades of public day schools for the 
year 1908-1909. 



Grades. 


Whole nnmber 

of different 

pupils. 


« . 

OS 

"^ S 

> 

< 


■3 d 

0)03 






Boys. 


Girls. 


Si 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Ungraded 

Kindergarten . 

Totals, 1909 
Totals, 1908 



3,222 
2,961 



31S 

855 
578 
1,263 
57 
98 



3,169 
2,980 



544 

1,478 

1,038 

2,015 

113 

149 



5,337 
5,163 



4,936 
4,795 



95.5 
93.9 
92.7 
90.9 

85. 8 
89.9 



92.5 
92.9 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Summary o;f attendance upon the several grades of public evening schools Jor 
the year 1908-1909. 



SCHOOLS. 


Whole number 

of different 

pupils. 


1 


< 






Boys. 


Girls. 


OS a 


Spring-street 


334 




185 
60 
94 

34 


139 

58 
83 

28 


75 6 


Franklin-street 


69 
31 


96 6 




69 
46 




(Mechanical.. 


82.5 


( Arehilectural 






Totals, 1909 


449 

483 


100 
96 


373 
456 


308 
315 


82.5 







310 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



_Evc)iUuj Schuol Teachers. 

John J. McAllister, principal of Spring-street school, for boys. 

Assistants. — Lee C. Abbott, Arthur Tonery, John M. Lyons, Frank 
Lyons, L. A. O'Connor, Minnie Sullivan, Elizabeth Doherty, Susie C. 
Fogg, Cora W. Cumniings, Florence A. Prescott, Kitty McDonald. 

Honorie J. Crough, principal of Franklin-street school, for girls. 

Assistants. — Margaret G. Linen, Carlena A. Savory, Susan G. "Wood- 
man, Genevieve B. Wilson. 

Carroll S. King, principal of Eimmon school, for both sexes. 

Assistants. — Frank J. Kearns, Edwin M. Eogers, Myra V. Moore, 
Adelia S. Murphy, Madge E. Hall. 

Evening Draiciny Tcachns. 

John M. Kendall and Henry W. Allen. 

GENERAL SUMMARY. 

The following table }}rese7its the main features of interest pertaining to the 
attendance tipon the public schools for the last ten years; a similar table 
may be found in the report for 1896. 



% 


i 




bo 


s o 










■ho 






to 


t^ 






S-s 


^" 


zt 


•^i 


> 0) 




<! 


S 



^ be 



» c a 

< 



1900 
1901 
190-2 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
19.9 



126 


135 


5,462 


127 


137 


5,808 


129 


142 


6,123 


130 


146 


6,013 


133 


149 


5,920 


13S 


150 


5,841 


135 


152 


5,703 


139 


158 


5,974 


141 


162 


5,944 


146 


166 


6,391 



4,388 
4,552 
4,876 
4,774 
4,889 
4,817 
4,907 
4,995 
5,1G3 
5,337 



3,998 
4,127 
4,430 
4,338 
4,483 
4,412 
4,531 
4,589 
4,795 



90 5 
91.9 
90.8 
91.7 
91.6 
92.3 
91.9 
92.9 
92.5 



179 


225 


191 


189 


250 


221 


196 


203 


197 


^237 


252 


247 


246 


261 


305 


255 


315 


255 


308 


286 



152 


72 


137 


69 


159 


62 


137 


65 


169 


80 


168 


63 


161 


78 


180 


78 


173 


103 


198 


107 



380 
379 
390 
405 
401 
423 
455 
483 
529 
544 



* Incliuling special teachers, principals, assistants, etc. 
t Ami the A class in suburban schools. 

t From grammar scho lis, parocliial schools, and surroiuiding towns. 1172 from 
grammar schools.) 



llEPOrvT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 311 

VI. Work of Truant Officer. 






ego 






^ C ID 

6 3-3 



1908 
September ... 

October 

November . . . 
December — 

1909 

January 

February. ... 

Marcli 

April 

May 

June 

Totals.... 



16 




10 




10 





4 


1 


22 




18 




30 




19 


3 


5 




G 


1 


140 


5 



VI. Work of Truant Officer.— Concluded. 



OS tn 






P p ^ 

,203 



September 
October . . . 
November. 
December . 



January . . 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Totals. 



97 


119 


79 


176 


97 


135 


37 


57 


97 


163 


193 


117 


96 


131 


97 


101 


87 


135 


61 


121 



1 
3 








































1 








14 


1 





312 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

VII. Finances. 1909. 



Items of account. 



Appropriations. 


Expenditures. 


88,000.00 


88,261.39 


12,000.00 


10,674.12 


1,500.00 


1,240.71 


350.00 


461.30 


50.00 


S.50 


3,200.00 


3,360.75 


9,000.00 


S,725.6S 


1,600.00 


1,717.23 


112,500.00 


113,145.43 


300.00 


275.00 


7,000.00 


7,125.29 


600.00 


598.14 


500.00 


500.00 


500.00 


465.67 


350.00 


294.01 


250.00 


ISO.OO 


9,000.00 


9,000.00 


$166,700.00 


8166,039.22 



Repaii-3 of sclioolhouses 

Fuel 

Furniture and supplies 

Printing and advertising 

Books and stationery 

Contingent expenses 

Care of rooms 

Evening schools 

Teachers' salaries 

Evening school— mechanical drawing. 

Fi-ee text-books and apparatus 

Manual training 

Typewriters, High school 

Cemetery wall at Varney school 

Straw school kindergarten 

Piano, Bakersville school 

Youngsville schoolhouse 



Cost of city schools. 



COST OF CITY SCHOOLS. 

Exi3enditures as above sj)ecified 

Salaries. 



Members of the 'school board. 

Clerk of board 

Superintendent of schools 

Truant officer 



Total 



Literary fund 

Tuition and free text-book.s* 



Receipts. 



$3,706.36 

2,098.47 



$*66,039.22 



$220.00 

150.00 

2,300.00 

1,000.00 

$169,709.22 



$5,804.83 



$163,904.39 



Net amount raised by taxation 

* School tax from Londonderry, Bedford, Goffstown, and Hooksett included. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 318 

The city valuation for 1909 is $38,102,944, and hence the rate of 
school tax for the year is $163,904.39, divided by $38,102,944, or .004:'. + . 
Last year the rate was .0046+. 



VIII. School Year, 1908-09. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September S, 1908, closed De- 
cember 18, 1908, Vacation of two Aveeks. 

Winter term of twelve Aveeks opened January 4, 1909, closed March 
26, 1909. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring- term of eleven Aveeks opened April 12, 1909, closed June 25, 
1909. Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Number of school days in the j'ear, 190. 

Number of days schools were actually in session, 180. 



IX. High School Graduation. 

PR0GEA5I. 

Class Motto: "Lahore et honore." 

Chorus. "Vocal March" Baker 

Class Pianist, Frederick I. Kelley, Jr. 

Salutatory. "The Legacy of Our Forefathers". . .Harold C. McAllister 

Chorus. "The Storm Fiend" Roeckel 

Class History Lillian Sleeper 

Chorus. "Estudiantina." 

Valedictory. "Lahore et Honore" r-. E. Mildred Moore 

Presentation of Diplomas Allan M. Wilson, Esq. 

Singing of Class Ode. 

GRADUATES'. 

Boys. 

Walter Boyd. Harold B. Doble. 

Arthur I. Brock. Victor Y. Dunbar. 

Clarence A. Brock. Ealph H. Drury. 

Frank A. Buswell. Newton L. Fitts. 

Harold C. Caine. Eobert Flanders. 

Eoger Cliiford. Albert Gamash. 

Richard Coburn. Russell Garland. 

L. Prescott Cox. Calvin Jenks. 

T. Lawrence Davis. Rudolph Keller. 

Walter J. Dignam. Frederick I. Kelley, Jr. 



314 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Ealph Kimball. 
Alfred B. Lemon. 
Louis Levy. 
Glenn Loomis. 
Harry S. Marshall. 
Eichard V. McAllaster. 
Harold C. McAllister. 
Arthur L. Miner. 
Leo C. Miville. 
Henry B. Montgomery, 
Carl S. Morse. 



Ruth F. Abbott. 
Esther Africa. 
S. Alfreda Balch. 
Hazel Bryant. 
Mildred F. Center. 
Helen Cronin. 
Nellie Danforth. 
Kegina Danforth, 
Sadie B. Davis. 
Henrietta Dunn. 
Euth K. Dustin. 
Mildred H. Eager. 
Augusta Eaton. 
Frances Farrell. 
Euth Flack. 
Alice M. French. 
Hazel M. Garmon. 
Marion Gillespie. 
Catherine Haggerty. 
Alice K. Hayes. 
Euth W. Higgins. 
Isabel Holland. 
Euth Home. 
Anna L. Huse. 
Mary A. Jameson. 
Florence Jarvis. 
Ethel Jeffers. 
Euth E. Kean. 
Eose A. Kennedy. 
Enid Laing. 
Frances Landers. 
Alice Lampher. 
Jiuth I. Leckie. 



Walter Netsch. 
Augustus Parmenter. 
Fred M. Eay. 
Leon Eice. 
Carl Eobinson. 
Alfred Salisbury. 
Earl Sanborn. 
Zotique Therrien. 
Chester Thompson. 
Hymen Trilling. 
Floyd Williams. 



Girls. 



Martha J. Libbey. 
Emma M. Looney. 
G. Annie Lov^'e. 
Edith M. McDerby. 
Euth Miller. 
Agnes Montgomery. 
E. Mildred Moore. 
Irene M. Moore. 
Lorna E. Morrison. 
Frances C. Murphy. 
Mary Nichols. 
Bessie Partridge. 
Louise Perry. 
Florence M. Prescott. 
Frances J. Prescott. 
Irma Eenker. 
Cecelia Schwartz. 
Lillian Sleeper. 
Leah Snyder. 
Ethelyn Stearns. 
Eva- B. Stevens. 
Nora Sullivan. 
Josephine Sylvain. 
Mary E. Thayer. 
Winifred E. Tuttle. 
E. Meta Velin. 
Gertrude Walch. 
Helen E. White. 
Beatrice \\ niftier. 
Bernice A. Wilson. 
Katherine Winegar. 
(Iwendolvn Woodbury 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 315 

CLASS ODE. 

(Written by Alfred P>. Lemon.) 

How dear to our hearts is our old Alma Mater. 

And all the fair scenes that our school da3-s have known; 

And how we will cherish through years coming later 

The memories of tliese four years that have flown. 

We've entered and struggled, the course is completed, 

And now we go forth to a far greater tield; 

But thoug'h far we roam, and though much we encounter, 

To Labor and Honor all obstacles yield. 

CiiORrs. 

Our dear Alma Mater, by Labor and Honor 
We'll strive for thy glory 
Through oncoming years. 

Our past has been bright, but it's just a beginning, 
We know not what triumphs the future may hold; 
But this much we know that by Labor and Honor 
We'll make a fair name for the Green and the Gold; 
And he who would watch us and follow our progress 
Must needs keep his eyes on the stars as they shine, 
For like as the light of a great constellation 
So bright is the course of the class of "ought nine." 

Chorus. 



X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

FOR EXCELLENCE TN ELOC'U'TION AT CONTEST, JANUARY, 1909. 

First prize, $25, Clarence A. Brock. 
Second prize, $20, Winnifred S. Bailey. 
Third prize, $10, Grace Mildred Colby. 
Fourth prize, $5, Alice M. Reynolds. 



XI. Organization, 1910. 

.SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

EUGENE E. REED, 636 Somei'ville street, Mdyor, c.v nfficin Chairiiuin. 
JAMES B. FITCH, 735 Chestnut street, 

rrcshlent Common Council, ex officio. 
EDWARD B. WOODBURY, rice-Chairman of the Board. 

HARRY L. DAVIS, Clerk of the Board. 



316 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Ward 1. Joseph W. Abbott, 1480 Ehn street. 

Sumner ^M. Patten, :5 Canal street. 
Ward 2. George M. Davis, lo6 Orange street. 

Allan M. Wilson, 293 Myrtle street. 
W^ARD 3. Frank L. Downs, 108 Ash street. 

Thomas Chalmers, 590 Beech street. 
Ward 4. William A. Dhinney, 450 Manchester street. 

Edward P. Morrill, 296 Laurel street. 
Ward 5. John F. Lee, 224 Central street. 

Joseph P. Devine, 267 Chestnut street. 
Ward 6. Harry L. Davis, 552 East Spruce street. 

G. Waldo Browne, 329 Massabesie street. 
Ward 7. Edward B. Woodbury, 1 Pleasant street. 

Albert W. Thompson, Franklin, corner West Merrimack St. 
Ward 8. Walter B. Mitchell, 178 Milford street. 

Frank A. Cadwell, 142 Douglas street. 
Ward 9. Aime Martel, 350 Bartlett street. 

Antoine Menard, 270 Coolidge avenue. 
Ward 10. Francis X. Lyons, Goffe's Falls. 

John H. Rice. 191 Jewett street. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBlLIC INSTRUCTION. 

CHARLES W. BICKFORD. 
Residence, 1077 Union street. Office, City Hall building. 

superintendent's clerk. 

FANNIE L. SANBORN. 

Residence, 277 Laurel street. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

CURTIS W. DAVIS. 

Residence, 849 Chestnut street. 

. STANDING COWIITTEES. 

i-'iHOHcr.— Mayor Reed, Messrs. Fitch, H. L. Davis, W^oodbury, and 
Cadwell. 

Text-Books. — Messrs. Wilson, Mitchell, and Woodbury. 
Music. — Messrs. Lyons, Browne, and Abbott. 
Drawing. — Messrs. Thompson, Patten, and Martel. 
Manual Training. — Messrs. Rice, Thompson, and Cadwell. 
Examination of Teaclwrs. — Messrs. Chalmers, Lyons, and G. M. Davis. 
Fuel. — Mr. Phinney, Mayor Reed, Messrs. Fitch, Lee, and Menard. 
Repairs. — Messrs. Rice, Downs, and Thompson. 
Attendance. — Messrs. Morrill, Abbott, and Wilson. 
Health. — Messrs. G. M. Davis, Mitchell, and Devine. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 317 



SUBCOMMITTEES. 

High. — Messrs. Wilson, Downs, Mitchell, G. M. Davis, and Chalmers. 

Amoskcag. — Messrs. Martel, Wilson, and G. M. Davis. 

Ash-street and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Downs, Thompson, and Devine. 

Bakersville and Mosquito Pond. — Messrs. Lyons, Phinriey, and Patten. 

Cliandler. — Messrs. Lee, Woodbury, and Cadwell. 

FroinMln-street. — Messrs. Woodbury, H. L. Davis, and Lee. 

Gaffe's Falls and Highland. — Messrs. Devine, Cadwell, and Lyons. 

Hallsville and Harvey. — Messrs. H. L. Davis, Eice, and Menard. 

Lincoln-street and Youngsville.^MessTs. G. M. Davis, Lee, and Eice, 

Main-street. — Messrs. Mitchell, Chalmers, and Browne. 

Merrimack-street. — Messrs. Abbott, Devine, and Phinney. 

Parker. — Messrs. Chalmers, G. M. Davis, and Martel. 

Pearl-street. — Messrs. Morrill, Menard, and Downs. 

Rimmon. — Messrs. Menard, Abbott, and Wilson. 

Spring-street. — Messrs. Patten, Browne, and Woodbury. 

Straw. — Messrs. Thompson, Patten, and Chalmers. 

Yarney. — Messrs. Cadwell, Lyons, and Abbott. 

Webster-street and Stark. — Messrs. Phinney, Mitchell, and Thonsipson. 

Wilson. — Messrs. Browne, Martel, and Morrill. 

Kindergartens. — Messrs. Rice, Downs, and Mitchell. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Lee, Morrill, and II. L. Davis. 



XII. List of Teachers. 

(Giving the name, school, grade of school, and residence of each 
teacher.) 

HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 

Master. George H. Libby, 581 Chestnut street. 
Subrnaster. George I. Hopkins, 203 Walnut street. 
Assistants. Harry N. McLaren, 648 Hall street. 

Charles P. Bates, 595 Pine street. 

Norris D. Blake, 108 Myrtle street. 

Allan E. Herrick, 91 Russell street. 

Fred H. Hodgson, Walnut, corner of Harrison street. 

Arthur 0. Friel, 911 Union street. 

ISIary J. Wellington, The Delta. 

Mary H. Dowd, 43 High street. 

Elsie D. Fairbanks, 527 Hanover street. 

Annie M. Vose, 689 Union street. 

Edith M. Pierce, Goffstown, N. H. 

Bertha A. Blanchet, 467 Hanover street. 

Helen I. Buck, 324 Myrtle street. 



318 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

Assistants. Cora J. Ilnssell, 93 Myrtle street. 

Edna C". Cnllis, 581 Chestnut street. 

Bessie L. Adams, 581 Chestnut street. 

Bertha V. Healey, 304 Central street. 
Clerk. X. Josephine Vance, 345 Lake avenue. 

AMOSKEAG SCHOOL. 

(Iramiiiar Classes. 

Principal. Blanche L. Batchekler, 276 Orange stf-eet. 
Middle. Edna L. Merrill, 375 Concord street. 
Higher Primary. Bertha L. Marden, 307 Walnut street. 
Lower Primary. May L. Woodcock, 494 Hall street. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOL. 

t^vcoiid Floor. — Grainiiiar Grades. 

[Master. Edgar D. Cass, 560 Beech street. 

Master's Assistant. Amelia L. Granpner, 215 Walnut street. 

Assistants. Emma L. McLaren (2d division), 351 Bridge street. 

Belle R. Daniels (3d division), 586 Beech street. 

Emma J. Cooper (4th division), 370 Hanover street. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Fourth Grammar. Marjorie S. Woodbury. 1 Pleasant street. 
Mixed Middle. Alice E. Good, 533 Beech street. 
Higher Primary. Maj^ F. Nutt, 604 Beech street. 
Lower Primary. Hulda C. Granpner, 215 Walnut street. 

BAKEISSVILLE SCnOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mijccd Grades. 

Principal. Elizabeth A. Burns (Grammar classes), 214 Calef road. 
Assistants. Lelia A. Brooks. 23 Cheney place. 

Jennie F. McGrath (4th Grammar),* 350 Auburn street. 
Mixed Middle.* Mary L. Heath, 97 Bridge street. 
Higher Primary. Augusta S. Downs, 397 Merrimack street. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Mixed Primary. Bessie J. Bartlett, 39 W^est Merrimack street. 
Lower Primary. Kathryn D. McKeon, 279 East Spruce street. 

CHANDLER SCHOOL, 

First 1-loor. 

Principal. Ilellen Morison (4th division), 334 East Spruce street. 
Lower Primary'. Jennie K. McLaughlin. (Uli Maple street. 
Lower Primary. Helen N. Bly, 722 Beech street. 
• Thud floor. 



KEPORT or THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 319 

Kindcrgaiioi. 

Principal. Mabel B. Currier, 225 Bridge street. 
Assistant. Eugenia Morey, 581 Union street. 

Scco)!d Floor. 

Higher Middle. Harriet S. Tuttle, 154 Lowell street. 
Lower Middle. Ede B. Shand, 317 East. High street. 
Higher Primary. Amy K. Northrup, 454 Merrimack street. 
Higher Primary. Delia B. Clark, 3GS ;Merrimack street. 

FRAXKLT:^ -STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Graiiiinar Grades. 

Master. Isaac Huse, 10 Hayes avenue. 

[Master's As.sistant. Caroline E. Head, 11 Harrison street. 

Assistants. Lillian Whitney (2d division), E. F. D. No. 6. 

Daisy E. Flanders (3d division), 714 Beech street. 

Josephine E. Paige (4th division), 420 Amherst street. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher ^Middle. Marj' T. Morrow. 402 Manchester street. 
Lower Middle. Josephine L. Piddle, 581 Chestnut street. 
Higher Primary. Grace M. Whittemore, 11 Nashua street. 
Lower Primary. Ida L. Montgomery, 306 McGregor street. 

goffe's falls school. 

Principal. Alice C. Taggart (Grammar), 46 Brooklyn avenue. 
Assistant. Elizabeth McKelvie, 326 Laurel street. 
Middle Grades. Edith A. Murjjhy, 162 Winter street. 
Primary Grades. Lauretta B. Sawtelle, 651 Summer street. 

HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

« Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. William H. Huse, 97 Mammoth road. 

Master's Assistant. Millicent S. Morse, 963 Valley street. 

Assistants. Olive A. Eowe (2d division), 118 Walnut street. 

Mary L. Mooar (3d division), 280 Taylor street. 

Mae L. Love joy (4th division), 9 Elm sireet. 

First Floor. — Loiccr Grades. 

Higher [Middle. Ina E. Tuttle, 174 Cypress street. 
Lower Middle. Bertha L. Kemp, 40 Water street. 
Higher Primarj\ Martha J. Kenned^', 319 Auburn street. 
Higher Primary. Vivian E. Matthews, 236 J. Hall road. 
Lower Primary. Alice B. Morrill, 296 Laurel street. 
Lower Primary. Annie 11. Corson, 36 Ra}' street. 



320 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 

Principal. Annabel D. Wyman (Grammar and Middle), 685 Hanover 

street. 
Assistant, p. M. Elizabeth McKelvie, 326 Laurel street. 

Marj' Walker (Primary grades), 685 Hanover street. 

LINCOLX-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Alvali H. M. Curtis, 329 Orange street. 

Master's Assistant. Elizabeth E. Robertson, 151 Korth, Concord, 

N, H. 
Assistants. Lois D. Beck (4th division). 

Lillian F. Crowther (3d division), 376 Manchester street. 

M. Emma Roberts, 323 Hanover street. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. J. Elizabeth Cate, 502 Merrimack street. 
Lower Middle. Katherine A. Frain, 262 Auburn street. 
Higher Primary. Theodora Richardson, 481 Lincoln street. 
Lower Primary. Xettie S. Rennie, 439 Laurel street. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Middle Grades. 

Principal. Mary W. Mitchell (4th Grammar division), 341 Hanover 

street. 
Higher Middle. Hattie O. Willand, 16 Monroe street. 
Lower Middle. M. Minnie Sturtevant, 128 Milford street. 
Higher Primary. Elizabeth F, Walsh, 166 North Main street. 

First Floor. — Priniarn Grades. 

Higher Primary'. Kate T. Clarke, 313 Granite street. 
Lower Primary. Mary H. O'Dowd, 703 Pine street. 
Lower Primary. IMyrtle Y. Slager, R. F. D. No. 6. 
Lower Primary-. Clara Y. Clement, 104 Parker street. 

MERRIMACK-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Nellie F. Dunnington (Higher Primary), 367 Lake avenue. 
Higher Primar5\ Ella M. Chapman, 36 Yinton street. 
Lower Primary. Mary A. Brennan, 487 Candia road. 
Lower Primary. Clydie M. Flanders, 452 Pine street. 
Special Class. Florence Prescott, 612 Belmont street. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 321 



PABKET5 SCHOOL. 

First Floor. 

Principal. Maiy E. Moulton (Grammar), 265 Milford street. 

Lower Primary-. Grace M. Brown, Gold street. 

Lower Primarj'. Maude E. Winegar, 186 Bowman street. 

Kindergarten. 

Principal. Marion Eyan, 883 Union street. 
Assistant. Maude A. Avery, 352 Laurel s'treet. 

Second Floor. 

Fourth Division. Mary L. Ayer, 51 Erie street. 
Hig-lier Middle. Blanche M. Folsom, 47 Dover street. 
Mixed Middle. Gertrude Mitchell, 178 Milford street. 
Higher Primary. Eda M. Barr, 16 C street. 

PEARL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal. Mary G. Tynan (Lower Middle), 235 Pearl street. 
Higher Primary. Nellie M. Smith, 1327 Hanover street. 
Lower Primary. Florence Abbott, 333 East High street. 
Lower Primary. Alice E. Walsh, 166 North Main street. 

rimmojst school. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Harrison X. Bowen (1st and 2d divisions), 294 Granite 

street. 
Assistant. Blanche E. Hicken (3d and 4th divisions), West Salmon. 
Mixed Middle. Mary E. Bulman, 600 Beech street. 

First Floor. — Primary Grades. 

Lower Middle. M. Eunice Willand, 16 Monroe street. 
Higher Primary. Mary S'. White, 70 Kelly street. 
Lower Primary. Sarah Hodgman. 

sprlng-street school. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Annabel Emerson (Middle grades), R. F. D. No. 2. 
Higher Primary. Helen F. Lyons, 270 Lake avenue. 

First Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Lower Primary. Lulu Kean, 271 Laurel street. 
Lower Primary. Sarah B. Dunbar, 538 Lake avenue. 
Special Classes. Hattie E. Read and substitute. 



322 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPOKTS. 

Kinderffartcn. 

Principal. Grace M. Carr, 347 Bridge street. 
Assistant. Ethel Church, 874 Union street. 

STBAW SCHOOL. 

First Floor. 

Princix^al. Alta C. Willand (3d Grammar division), IG Monroe street. 
Higher Primarj'. Ida M. Crowther, 376 Manchester street. 
Lower Primary. Florence H. Moore, 841 Union street. 
Lower Primary. Edith M. Stebbins, 593 Beech street. 

KindcryartcH. 

Principal. Jennette M. Bartlett, 250 Harrison. 
Assistant. Marion Cloiigli. 

Second Floor. 

Grammar. Ada B. Morse (4th division), 401 Central street. 
Higher Middle. Gertrude H. Brooks, 435 Hanover street. 
Lower Middle. Laura M. Gould, 757 Chestnut street. 

VARXEY SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. George Winch, 804 Beech street. 

Master's Assistant. Jennie V. Williamson, 31 Carroll street. 

Assistant. Esther M. Dickey (2d division), 38 Avon street. 

First Floor. — Mlved Grades. , • 

Assistants. Ellen E. Mclvean (3d division), 33 Ash street. 
Fourth Division. Gertrude Adams, 304 Hanover street. 
Higher Middle. Mary J. Walsh, 166 North Main street. 
Lower Middle. Jennie M. Landers, 924 Clay street. 
Higher Primary. Laurette McKendree, 353 Amherst street. 
Lower Primary. Annie E. Walsh, 166 North Main street. 

AVEBSTER-STTIEET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. John Gault, 700 Pine street. 

Master's Assistant. Alice M. Lamprey, 96 Blodget street. 

Assistants. Vacancy. Mabel J. Brickett, substitute. 

Jennie Eussell (3d division), North River road. 

Eva F. Tuson (4th division), 36 xVpplcton street. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 823 

First Floor. — Lower G-radcs. 

Higher Middle. Jean Gillan, 7 West Appleton street. 
Lower Middle. Marcia M. Moore, 841 Union street. 
HigTier Primary. Agnes M. Woodbury, 1 Pleasant street. 
Lower Primary. Sarah M. McKelvie, 326 Laurel street. 

WILSON SCHOOL. 

First Floor. 

Principal. Barbara B. Joy (1st and 2d divisions), 481 Hanover street. 

Assistant. Mary E. McLaren, 351 Bridge street. 

Higher Primary. Bertha V. Franks, 9 West Merrimack street. 

Xower Primary. Florence L. Abbott, 356 Laurel street. 

Lower Primary. Blanche L. Bryant, 382 Central street. 

Second Floor. 

Grammar (3d Div.). L. Helen Haskell, 211 Bridge street. 
Grammar (4th Di^.). Harriet H. Richardson, 481 Lincoln street. 
Higher Middle. Florence Eichardson, 481 Lincoln street. 
Lower Middle. Elizabeth H. Callaghan, 1017 Hayward street. 
Higher Primary (extra room). Cora Cummings, 426 Manchester St. 

YOUNG SVLLLE. 

Grammar Grades. Mary E. Stevens, 341 Hanover street. 
!Middle and Primary. Blanche L. Corning, 521 Lake avenue. 

UNGKADED SCHOOLS. 

Harvey. — Emma J. Ela, 585 Beech street. 

Mosquito Pond. — Alarion F. Partridge, 73 Sagamore street. 

Stark. — Mildred Morey, 581 Utiion street. 

Webster's Mills.— Ethel Bartlett, 281 Jewett street. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Manual Training. 

Principal. Fred E. Browne, 19 South Spring street. Concord, N. H. 
Assistants. Charles A. Perry, 152 Pearl street. 

Wallace B. Hurlburt, 120 Myrtle street, 

SPECIAL TEACHEBS. 

Music. A. J. Abbott, 892 Beech street. 

Maude E. Brown, 18 Brook street. 
Drawing. J. Warren Thyng, 92 Arlington street. 
Annie W. Patten, 254 Laurel street. 



324 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

JANITORS. 

High School. 

Charles F. Jack, 55 West Merrimack street 

Engineer. 

George H. Jack, 53 Ash street. 

1 Amoskcag School. 

Charles H. Corey, 49 Pennacook street. 

Ash and Pearl-street Schools. 

J. J. Kelley, 82 Arlington street. 

Bakersville School. 

Edwin N. Baker, 10 Brown avenue. 

Chandler and Lincoln-street Schools. 

Hugh McVicar, 376 Orange street. 

Franklin-street <ind Merrimack-street Schools, 

John S. Avery, 404 Merrimack street. 

Ooff&s Falls School. 

Louis Hueber, 2966 Brown avenue. 

Hallsrille Scliool. 

• William H. New-ry, 516 Lake avenue. 

Highland School. 

Marshall N. Badger, 600 South Beech street. 

Main-Street an4 Rimmon School. 

William F. Henderson, 153 Bowman street. 

Parker and Yarney Schools. 

Joseph H. Buffum, 63 Boj^nton street. 

Spring-street and Lowell-street Schools. 

John Cedar, 91 Blodget street. 

StroAC an4 Webster-street ScJiools. 

William J. Powers, 30 Ray street. 

Wilson ScJiool. 
Dennis Sullivan, 262 Green street. 

Youngsville School. 
Edward J. Ivers, Broadway avenue. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 325 

Xlll. School Year.— 1909-10. 

Fall term opened September 7, 1909, closed December 17, 1909. Va- 
cation of two weeks. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened January 3, 1910, closed March 
25, 1910. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term opened April 11, 1910, closes June 24, 1910. Vacation of 
ten weeks. 

Fall term opens September 6, 1910. Continues fifteen weeks, closes 
December 16, 1910. 



EEPOET 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



MANCHESTER CITY LIBRARY, 1909. 

Trustees. 

Eugene E. Eeed, Mayor, ex officio. 

James B. Fitch, President of the Common Counoil, ex officio. 

William P. Farmer. Term expires 1910. 

Henry W. Boutwell. Term expires 1911. 

Eoger G. Sullivan. Term expires 1912. 

Walter ^L Parker. Term expires 191.3. 

Herman F. Straw. Term expires 1914. 

Edwin F. Jones. Term expires 1915. 

Frank P. Carpenter. Term expires 191G. 

Officers. 

PKE3IDKNT, CX OfficiO. 

Eugene E. Eeed. 

CI.EBK AA'D TKEA8UKER. 

Edwin F. Jones. 

Librarian. 

F. Mabel Winchell. 

Assistants. 



E. Louise Newell, classifier. 
Mrs. Edith O. Emery, cataloger. 
Charles S. Morgan.* 
Albro P. Eeed.** 
Arthur E. Leavitt. 
William Vincent.*** 



Eugene S. Clark. 
Mary E. Chamberlin.f 
Carleton F. Hamer. 
Euth H. Bartlett.t 
Caroline B. Clement.|| 
Una Vincent. § 



Library Hours. 

10 J).. M. to 8 P. Si., Saturdays till 9 r. :m. 

Sunday's (for reading and reference) 11 A. M. to 5 P. M. 



Resigned April 14. Remains for Sunday work. 
Sundays onlj-. 
Kesigned June 12. 
Resigned September 25. 

328 



1 From April 25. 

n From July 12. 

§ From November 15. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY 
LIBRARY. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

In behalf of the trustees of the City Library I would report that 
during the year 1909 the library was conducted under the same rules 
and regulations and on the same general lines as during the previous 
year. The same librarian, and in the main, the same corps of as- 
sistants have been retained. More books were purchased than in any 
year before, owing to the increase in the appropriation for the pur- 
chase of books from one thousand to two thousand dollars. Since 
1854 the appropriation has remained, the same until, in 1909, the Com- 
mon Council recognized the propriety and need of an increase. In 
expressing the acknowledgment of this increase on the part of the 
trustees I feel that we are but representatives of all citizens who are 
interested in the library. The income of the Dean, Eaton, and 
Elliot funds was mostly exjDended, as the vote of the trustees pro- 
vides. Space for books and for patrons is becoming scarce and the 
need for better quarters is visible to the most casual observer. For 
a detailed statement of facts relating to the conduct of the library 
for the year reference is made to the report made by the librarian 
to the trustees, which is submitted herewith. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 
Clerk. 



329 



LIBRAKIAN'S EEPOKT. 



To the Trustees of the City Library, Manchester, X. E.: 

Gentlemen': — The fifty-sixth annual report of tlhe City Librarj' is 
herewith presented. 

The year 1909 has been remarkable for several reasons but chiefly 
for the increase in the appropriation for books. In 1854 the Man- 
chester Athenaeum considered that $1,000 was the minimum amount 
which should be spent annually for the purchase of books. Since 
that date the city has more than trebled in size, yet through all these 
fifty-five years the appropriation for this purpose has not been in- 
creased one dollar. Thanks to your honorable board and to the city 
government this deadlock has at last been broken and the $1,000 
has now been increased to $2,000. Not onlj^ has this been an im- 
provement for the present but it augurs well for the future. 

GIFTS AND BEQUESTS. 

It is with great pleasure that we record two bequests that have 
fallen to the librarj- this year: a small one from Mrs. Sarah J. Mead, 
and $5,000 from Miss Emily E. 'Simith. In each case we understand 
that the income is to be used for the purchase of books. It has been 
many years since any money has been donated to the librarj^ and we 
trust that this is the beginning of a new era. The incomes from the 
funds previously given are now being used each year so that Man- 
chester is enjoying the benefit which the donors desired and intended. 

A notable gift received during the year was that of eighty-nine 
volumes of historical and genealogical. works from the library of the 
late Roland Eowell. These were donated by Mrs. Eowell, and the col- 
lection is the most valuable that has been given in some j-ears. 

We are indebted to Mrs. W. H. Plumer for a subscription to "Good 
Housekeeping" for the present year, as well as for several years past. 
This is a form of benefaction which we wish more would follow. A 
goodly number of magazines are now taken but it is out of the ques- 
tion for us to take all that are wanted, so assistance in this direction 
is very much appreciated. Several persons bring us their own period- 
icals after reading, which is also appreciated, for while we do not 
get them quite so promptly we have them for binding and so for 
future reference. 

330 



EEPOKT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 331 



PURCHASE OF BOOKS. 

Owing- to tlie increase in the appropriation more books have been 
added this year than ever before. This is as it should be and is most 
gratifying-, for the addition of new boolvs is tlie infusion of new blood 
into the library organism. Under normal conditions this would mean 
a marked increase in the use of the library, but conditions have not 
been normal. The much desired doubling of the book appropriation 
of necessity brought with it a two-fold amount of work in selection, 
ordering, preparation, classification, cataloging, and revision. All 
this w^ould be very delightful had we a suflticient force of workers. 
As it is, our number of assistants lias not been increased and the 
work for several years has been more than could be carried, so that 
some of it has had to be neglected and some of it omitted entirely. 

As was stated in last year's report the circulation in two years in- 
creased thirty-six per cent. What business concern would think of 
having a similar increase without adding to its corps of workers? It 
would not be considered good business policy. Neither has it proved 
so with us. The work on the new books has been pushed as rapid- 
ly as possible, but even so they have come in faster than they could 
be taken care of and much congestion has resulted. 

CIRCULATION'. 

The delay in getting the books into circulation, which has been 
occasioned by this congestion, has been detrimental in every way. 
This is one reason, probabljs why the circulation has not kept up to 
last year's high-water mark. Another reason, quite as strong doubt- 
less, is that the library has not been kept as constantly before the 
public as usual. It has been our custom to have lists of books and 
items of information concerning- the library appear in the papers at 
frequent intervals. This year the pressure of work has been so 
great that it has been impossible to give much attention to this need- 
ful advertising. As no bulletins are issued we have no way of in- 
forming people what good things we are putting on our shelves ex- 
cept as we announce it in the papers, so this becomes a very essential 
part of tlie work and ought not to be neglected. 

Though the circulation this year dropped some 5,000 points below 
last year, it is still higher than any year previous to 1908. This is a 
fairly good showing considering all conditions and the good times 
which have prevailed in the business world. "Good times" always 
means more business and less time for reading. Nevertheless, the 
circulation under proper conditions should have mounted still higher, 
and we trust that the coming year will iirovide assistants sufficient 
to place the books promptly and prominently before the people for 
whom they are bought. 



332 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The use of the library by the schools has increased twenty-six 
per cent. Eight of the schools have had collections sent to them to 
be kept a month, while many teachers have preferred to take a 
few books at a time. Several of the schools have kept account of 
the number of times the books have been taken home by the children, 
and figuring- on this record as a basis we find the circulation has 
been 8,572 as against 5,682 last year. If this were added to the home 
circulation, as indeed it should be to gain a correct idea of the use 
of the books, it would give a total of 91,405. 

CHILDREN. 

The increase in the use of books by the schools has not served to 
diminish the use of the library by the children. The schools which 
have borrowed most have been those at a distance. Many teachers 
from the near-by schools have brought their pupils to the library to 
register and have assumed the responsibility for books loaned to 
these children. 

Whether for this reason or some other, it is certainly true that the 
number of children who use the librarj^ has increased, and it has 
been difficult at times to get books enough to supply the demand. 
The reading room in the afternoons has been fairly overrun, and 
adults who try to use it after school hours find it well nigh impos- 
sible to secure a spot where they will not be too closely elbowed by 
children. These 'children are the very ones who need our help and 
to whom the influence of good books is most necessary. Under pres- 
ent conditions it is impossible to give them proper attention or to 
make the reading room a comfortable place for a grown person to 
do any serious reading or study. Forty or more girls and boys in 
a room without immediate oversight is not conducive to quiet or 
good order. The wonder is that they behave as well as they do, but 
it is exceedingly detrimental to the, best interests of the children, 
the grown people, and the library, to have the room without direct 
supervision. The best remedy for this condition of affairs is a sepa- 
rate room for children. This need has been felt keenly for years and 
has been dwelt upon at more or less length in each annual report for 
seven consecutive years. It isgreatly to be hoped that the necessity 
for this annual appeal will soon cease. Meanwjiile something should 
be done towards the amelioration of the present condition of affairs. 
It is confidently believed that an assistant interested in children and 
children's reading, who could devote her time to the oversight and 
direction of the little folks, would do much to make the reading 
room a more profitable place for them and a more comfortable place 
for the grown people. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 333 



REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Patrons of the librarj' sufEer a distinct loss and much inconven- 
ience because the reference books are not easily accessible. It is 
the universal custom in libraries to have works of reference on open 
shelves, where all may help themselves. It is often annoj'ing- and 
sometimes extremely inconvenient for people to have to call for differ- 
ent volumes of an encyclopaedia, or to carry the bulkj^ dictionaries or 
atlases from the deliverj^ desk to the tables. We are always willing 
to have persons come inside the enclosure to consult the reference 
books, but we find that some feel much hesitancy about doing- this 
and prefer to use the books in the reading room where, it must be 
admitted, the light is much better. There is no doubt that the right 
place for these books is in the reading room where they would be 
available to all. It seems unwise, however, to place them there under 
existing conditions, as they would, be subjected to unjustifiable wear 
and hard usage, since our force of workers is so small and the 
amount of work so great that it is impossible to spare any of the 
assistants for service there. There is still another reason which 
makes it very desirable that they should be moved, which is that they 
have outgrown their present quarters. In fact, the question of shelf 
room throughout the librarj^ has come to be a serious one. Where 
the accessions of the coming year are to be put is very much of a 
problem. The easiest solution seems to be the one suggested last 
year, namely, the provision of a children's room where all the juve- 
nile books might be placed, thus relieving the shelves of the main 
library. Of course a wing might be thrown out on the north of the 
building which would correspond with the one on the south. This 
would provide space for books for a number of years, but doubtless 
would cost much more than the addition proposed and would not be 
so suitable for a children's room. 

REPAIRS ox BUrLDI>'G. 

A larger sum than usual was expended on the building this year 
and some long needed repairs and changes were made. Two electric 
lights were placed at each of the large tables in the reading 
room, thus for the first time j)roviding suitable light for reading. 
Four Tungsten lamps were put in the central part of the library 
and have proved very satisfactory. 

A new lavatory, an additional toilet, and a hot water heater are 
improvements which for a long time had been greatly needed and 
are consequently thoroughly appreciated. Metal weather strips were 
put on most of the windows and several ventilators were installed. 

The wooden coal bins, which had been badly eaten by white ants, 
were torn out and replaced by brick ones. Other wood work which 
was infested was removed, and while not all of the trouble has been 
eliminated, we are assured that we are in no immediate danger from 
the pest. 



334 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The stone steps at the entrances were reset and cleaned. The 
granite trimmings of the building were also. cleaned and pointed as 
well as some of the brickwork. The la\vn, both north and south por- 
tions, was thoroughly made over and the concrete gutters about the 
building repaired so that we have had no further trouble with water 
leaking into the basement. 

All these and various minor improvements have done much to 
make the library more comfortable and more attractive. 

DISCARDED BOOKS. 

The practice of sending- discarded books to the jail has been con- 
tinued this year with apparent satisfaction to all concerned. One 
hundred and eighty-two volumes and four hundred and seventy-one 
magazines have been sent, which is a slight increase over the number 
given last year. Mr. Phinney reports that they are not only read 
and enjoyed, but that the prisoners become sufficiently interested in 
the books to make them the subject of conversation and discussion. 



Again this year the staff has been a changing quantity, but this 
time we believe the changes have been for the better. In the past 
the assistants, other than the classifier and the cataloger, have been 
boys or young men. In no case, we believe, have these boys come to 
us with the intention of making library work their vocation. The 
work was taken up usually as a temporarj^ occupation while waiting 
for something better to offer itself. In a few instances it has been 
possible to arouse enough interest to make the boys think of con- 
tinuing in library work, but it has not proved lasting. It has been 
extremely difficult to find boys who were at all well fitted for the 
work either by education or natural ability, who would accept the 
price we were able to pay. Rarely have we been fortunate enough to 
get high school graduates, and when we have, they have not been 
willing to stay long. Many times we have Tiad apj)lications from 
young ladies who wished to enter the library, but we have always 
thought the construction of the bookcases, which makes steplad- 
ders a necessity, precluded the possibility of women as desk at- 
tendants. In the fall of 1908, however, one young woman, a graduate 
of the local high school, felt so confident that she could do the work 
in spite of the stepladders, that it was decided to give her a trial. 
The experiment w-as so successful that not only Avas she retained but 
when the next vacancy occurred another young woman, also a high 
school graduate, was appointed. The outcome has been that at pres- 
ent all three positions formerly held by boys are now filled, and sat- 
isfactorily filled, by young women. Whether these assistants will 
continue with us longer than their predecessors, remains, of course, 
to be seen, but inasmuch as two of them have for a number of years 



KEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 335 

desired and ijlanned to enter library work, the outloolc seems hope- 
ful. We still have three high school boys who give ns such time as 
they are able to spare from their studies. 

Charles S. Morgan, who had been with us for about nine years, 
left us in April to enter the local gas office. For several years he 
had filled the position of head assistant and had rendered efficient 
service. 

Miss Chamberlin, who left us in September to enter college, had 
been with us onl^^ a year but had shown much adaptability to the 
work. While it is always reg'rettable to lose those who have become 
familiar with the work we feel that we have been very foi'tunate in 
the new assistants. Miss Bartlett, a high school graduate, has taken 
a short normal course, taught a year, and had some business expe- 
rience. Miss Clement, also a high school graduate, took a post-grad- 
uate business course, had four years' experience as tyjjewriter and 
stenographer, and then went to the library at Springfield, Mass., for 
a year's training in library economy. She is the first assistant we 
have ever had who has come to us with any knowledge of the work. 
Two pupil assistants, Miss Sarah C. Aiken and Miss Una Vincent, 
were admitted this year. In November the latter was appointed to 
fill a vacancy on the staff and has done excellent work. 

REGISTRATION. 

The registration for the last two years has been the heaviest in 
the history of the library, in fact, it has been just about double that 
of the two largest years on record. This is the first time since 1880 
that it has been possible to tell how many active borrowers we have. 
Five thousand seventy-three persons have signed since the new reg- 
istration began and fifty-four have lapsed, leaving five thousand nine- 
teen cards in active use. 

INVENTORY. 

The inventory this year showed one hundred and forty-six books 
missing. Eighty-six of these M-ere juvenile and sixty-four adult lit- 
erature. This, we believe, again emphasizes the need of an attendant 
in the reading room. As we pointed out last year, books are some- 
times taken through misunderstanding and sometimes of malice 
aforethought. In either ease an assistant could do much to correct 
this abuse of privileges. Eighteen of the books unaccounted for in 
1908 came to light this year, also one which was missing in 190G. 

ACKNOWIJEDGMENTS. 

Thanks are again due to The Union and The Mirror for their un- 
failing courtesy in printing the book lists and various library notices 
which have appeared from time to time. The librarian also wishes 
to express her appreciation of the cordial support given her by the 



336 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

trustees, and the kindness of many of the citizens of Manchester in 
remembering the library with gifts of books, magazines, ijapers, and 
pictures. 

Respectfully submitted. 

F. MABEL WIXCHELL, 
Librarian. 



APPENDIX I. 

Accessions. 

Increase by purchase 2,019 

Increase by gift ♦ 123 

Increase by binding periodicals 364 

Increase by public documents not accessioned 478 

Total increase for the year 2,984 

Number of accessions as last reported 59,012 

Whole number of accessions 01,518 

Number of volumes purchased from the Dean fund.... 200 

Number of volumes purchased from the Eaton fund .... 53 

Number of volumes purchased from the Elliot fund.... 38 

Worn out volumes withdrawn from circulation ' 380 

Number of volumes replaced 348 

Number of volumes lost or injured and paid for 30 

Number of volumes lost and not yet paid for 11 

Number of volumes burned on account of contagious 

diseases 18 

Number of magazines subscribed for 140 

Number of magazines given 39 

Number of newspapers subscribed for 6 

Number of newspapers given 9 

Total number of periodicals received 194 



APPENDIX II. 
Circulation and Registration. 

CIRCUT.ATIOX. 

Number of days open for circulation of books 306 

Average daily use (home) 271 

Largest number any one day (March 6) 579 

Smallest number any one day (August 4) 105 

Largest number any one month (^larch) 8,286 

Smallest number any one month (August) 5,782 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 337 



Home circulation 

Number of volumes issued to schools 

School circulation (estimated from partial records) . . 

Home circulation, including school circulation 

Number of volumes delivered in reading room 

Average daily use 

Total circulation 

KECORD, BY CLASSES, OF \'X>LtJMES ISSUED. 

No. vols. 

General works 4,510 

Philosophy and religion 1,147 

Biography 1,751 

History 2,429 

Geography and travels 2,121 

Social sciences 814 

Science and useful arts 3,979 

Fine arts 2,132 

Literature 4,988 

Fiction 58,804 

Pictures 158 

Total 82,833 

REGISTKATIOX. 

Number registered in 1909 

Number of borrowers on deposit 



82,833 

1,811 

8,572 

91,405 

17,512 

57 

108.917 



Per cent. 

5.4 

1.4 

2.1 

2.9 

2.6 

1. 

4.8 

2.f3 

6. 

71. 



2,430 
14 



APPENDIX MI. 



JIISCEXLAXEOrS STATISTICS. 



Number of books classified 

Number of books cataloged 

Number of volumes bound and repaii'ed at bindery 

Number of volumes repaired at library 

Number of volumes covered at library 

Mail notices for overdue books 

Reserve notices paid for 



2,034 
2,128 
1,568 
3,522 
3,525 
1,275 
1,409 



SUNDAY STATISTICS. 



Attendance 

Average per Sundaj- 



Men. 

2,531 

49 



Women. Children. 
462 0,054 

9 116 



Total. 

9,047 

174 



338 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CLRCrrATION. 

General works , 

Philosophy and religion 

Biography ; 

History 

Geography and travels 

Social sciences 

Science and useful arts 

Fine arts 

Literature , 

Fiction , 

Total 11,679 



4,470 


97 


178 


689 


225 


89 


599 


441 


3,779 


1,112 



APPENDIX IV. 

Receipts from Fines, Etc., from December 1, 1908, to 
November 30, 1909. 

Eeceived from fines $335.99 

books lost or injured and 

paid for 19.23 

reserve notices 14.42 

miscellaneous sales 12.61 

income on bank deposit 4.08 

* $386.33 

Paid for expressage, magazines and simdries 139.98 

Balance on hand $246.35 



APPENDIX V. 
Donations to Library, 1909. 

The library has received as gifts 624 volumes, 289 pamphlets, 1,579 
magazines, 493 pictures, and many newspapers. Of these, 478 volumes 
were fr*m the government. 

Vols. Pams. Mags. 

Adams, C. F 1 

Badger, J. C 1 

Beatty, J. W 1 

Broderick, Jas. A 11 

Brown, Miss M. E 50 

Burnham, Hon. H. E 2 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 339 



Bursiel, Mrs. Chas. E 

Carvelle, Dr. H. D. W 1 

Casson, H. N 

Challis, F. H 

Cross, David A 

Depew, C. M 

Dowst, Miss Ella 13G pictures 

Eames, Mrs. W. M 

Farmer, Miss Cora 

Farnsworth, E. C 

French, Mrs. E. F 

Fuller, Carl 

Griswold, S. M 

Hall, Miss H. J 

Hope, Miss Lucy 313 pictures 

Horsburgh, Jas., Jr 

Irwin, F. T 1 picture 

Jenkins, Miss Harriet M 1 scrap-book 

Lamb, A. S 

Lamb, F. W 

Lincoln, Miss Annie B 17 pictures 

Lull, E. W 25 photographs 

Mack, Miss L G 

Moore, Miss Ellen 

Moore, W, F 

Ordway, Mrs. W. M 

Plumer, Mrs. W, H., Subscription to Good 
Housekeeping. 

Eicker, M 

Eowell, Mrs. Eoland 

Sawtelle, E. B 

Schaeffer, Henri 

Silver, E 

Sowdon, Miss S. E 

Stimson, J. W 

Straw, Miss Gertrude 

Sturgis, E. C 

Thompson, S 

Tolman, Miss M. M 

Towle, Miss Anne G 

Varick, Mrs, T. E 

Warren, F. E 

Watts, Miss Mary A 

Welcome, Mrs. L. N 

Winchell, Miss F. M 

Woodbury, F. D 

Anonymous 



Mags. 
14 
61 



35 

207 



330 

181 
51 



24 



14 

212 

12 

140 
12 



14 



340 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Grateful acknowledgment is hereby made to the many other donors, 
libraries, colleges, schools, associations, institutions, national, state 
and city governments, etc., from whom reports and various publi- 
cations have been received. 



APPENDIX VI. 

List of Periodicals for 1910. 

A. L. A. book list. 

Alpine journal. 

Amateur sportsman. — Gift. 

American boy. — 2 copies. 

American city. 

American engineer and railroad journal. 

American historical review. 

American journal of science. 

American journal of sociology, 

American Library Association. Bulletin. 

American magazine. 

American naturalist. 

Among the deep sea fishers. — Gift. 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Mass. Proceedings. — Gift. 

Annals of American Academy of Political and Social Science. 

Annals of Iowa. — Gift. 

Arcliitects' and Builders' magazine. 

Argosy. 

Art journal. 

Athenaeum. 

Atlantic monthlj'. 

Beacon Hill Hospital. Quarterly bulletin.— Gift. 

Berea quarterly. — Gift. 

Biblical world. 

Bird lore. 

Blackwood's Edinburgh magazine. 

Book-keeper. , 

Book review digest. 

Bookman. 

Boston Cooking School magazine. 

Boston Society of Natural History. Proceedings. 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences. Museum news. — Gift. 

Brown Alumni monthlj'. — Gift. 

Bulletin of bibliographj-. 

Camera craft. 

Canadian magazine. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. o41 

Cassier's magazine. 

Centur3'. — 2 copies. 

Chambers's journal. 

Chantauqnan. 

Chicago banker. — Gift. 

Child lore magazine. 

Children's magazine. 

Christian cjnosiire. — Gift. 

Christian register. — Gift. 

Christian science journal. — Gift. 

Christian science sentinel. — Gift. 

Collier's weekly. 

Concrete. — Gift. 

Connoisseur. 

Contemporary review, 

Cornhill magazine. 

Cosmopolitan. — 2 copies. 

Cotton. 

Country life in America. 

Craftsman. 

Cumulative book Index. 

Current literature. 

Dartmouth.— Gift. 

Dartmouth Alumni magazine. — Gift 

Delineator. — 2 copies. 

Dial. 

Eastern and western review. — Gift. 

Edinburgh review. 

Education. 

Educational review. 

Electrical world. 

Electrician and mechanic. 

Elementary school teacher. 

Engineering magazine. 

Engineering news. 

Envelope series.— Gift. 

Etude'. — 2 copies. 

Everybody's magazine. — 2 copies. 

Every land. 

Fortnightly review. 

Forum. 

Good housekeeping. — 2 copies. — Gift. 

Granite monthly. 

Granite state magazine. 

(iregg writer. — Gift. 

Grinnell review. — Gift. 

Hampton's magazine. — 2 copies. 



342 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Harper's bazar. 
Harper's monthlj'. — 2 copies. 
Harper's weekly. 
Herald of the cross. — Gift. 
Hol}^ cross purple. — Gift. 
Home needlework magazine. 
Horseless age. 
House beautiful. 
Illuminating engineer. — Gift. 
Independent. — Gift. 
Index medicus. 
Indian's friend. — Gift. 
Institute tie.— Gift. 
International studio. 
Journal of American folk-lore. 
Journal of American history. 
Journal of Franklin Institute. 
Journal of political economy. 
Ladies' home journal. 
Ladies' review. — Gift. 
Lancet. 

Library journal. 
Library work. 

Life. 

Life and light for woman. — Gift. 

Lippincott's magazine. 

Literary digest. 

Little folks. 

Living age. 

London quarterly review. 

McClure's magazine. — 2 copies. 

Magnificat.— 2 copies. — Gift. 

Manual training magazine. 

Masters in art. 

Metal industry. — Gift. 
' Metroj)olitan. 

Mind. 

Missionary herald. — Gift. 

Missionary review of the world. 

Motor world. 

Mt. St. Mary's record.— Gift. 

Munsey magazine. — 2 copies. 

Musician. — 2 copies. 

Nation. 

National geographic magazine. 

National magazine. 

Nature. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 343 

New Eng-land historical and genealogical register. 

New England magazine. 

New England Shoe and Leather Association gazette. — Gift. 

New Hampshire College of Agriculture. Bulletin. — Gift. 

New Hampshire genealogical record. 

New Hampshire sanitary bulletin. — Gift. • 

Nineteenth century and after. 

North American review. 

Official gazette of United States Patent Office.— Gift. 

Oracle.— Gift. 

Out west. 

Outing. 

Outlook. 

Overland monthly. 

Pearson's magazine. 

Photo-era. 

Pitman's journal. — 2 copies. — Gift. 

Poet lore. 

Popular electricity. 

Popular mechanics. 

Popular science monthl}'. 

Posselt's textile journal. 

Power and the engineer. 

Printing art. 

Protectionist.— Gift. 

Public libraries. 

Publishers' weekly. 

Puck. 

Punch. 

Putnam's magazine. 

Quarterly review. 

Eailway age gazette. 

Readers' guide to periodical literature. 

Records of the past. 

Recreation. 

Review of reviews. — American edition. — 2 copies. 

Revue des deux mondes. 

St. Nicholas. — 2 copies. 

Saturday evening post. 

Saturday review. 

School review. 

Science. 

Scientific American. 

Scientific American supplement. 

Scribner's magazine.^2 copies. 

Speaker. 

Strand nnagazine. 



344 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Suburban life. 

Sunday school times. 

Sunset. 

Survey'. 

Textile colorist. 

Textile world record. 

United States Public Documents. Catalogue. — Gift. 

Universalist leader. — Gift. 

Westminster review. 

Whittlings.— Gift. 

Woman's home companion. 

Worcester magazine. — Gift. ^ 

World to-day. 

World's work. — 2 copies. 

Youth's companion. — 2 copies. 



Newspapers. 



Boston morning herald. 

Boston Sunday herald. 

Boston transcript. 

Emerald.— Gift. 

Manchester advertiser. — Gift, 

Manchester union. — Gift. 

Mirror and American. 

Mirror and farmer. — Gift. 

New Hampshire farmer. — Gift. 

New York morning sun. 

New York times. Saturday issue. 

Plymouth record. — Gift. 

Eeveil.— Gift. 

Sunday union. 



TEEASUEER'S EEPOET. 



Account of Edwin F. Jones, Treasure!- of tlie Trustees of the City 

Library. 

1909. Dr. 

Jan. ]. To balance of appropriation for books $1145. oS 

]\ray 1. To appropriation for books, 1909 2,000.00 

Jan. 1. To ])ean fund and accumulations $13,()03.42 

Dec. 1. income do., 1909 461.()(3 

• • 14,0G5.08 

Jan. 1. To Mary E. Elliot fund and accu- 
mulations $4,050.89 

Dec. 1. income do., 1909 122.41 

• 4,173.30 

Jan. 1. To Eliza A. Eaton fund and ac- 
cumulations $4,115.23 

Dec. 1. income do., 1909 1^2. 5() 

4,237.79 

"^ $25,121.55 



Cr. 
By paid for books: 

Jan. 1. T. r. W. Rogers $58.05 

25. Thos. Xelson & Sons (iS.lO 

Feb. 20. John Foster 1.50 

Old Corner Bookstore (Elliot 

fund) 59.72 

T. P. W. Rogers 23.05 

April 2. .lohn E. Anderson Co 28.80 

W. r. Goodman 100.50 

Eob't W. Lull '... 14.25 

Schoenhof Book Co. 45.35 

Temple & Fa-rrington Co. (Eaton 

fund) O.JO 

Joel MunselFs Sons (Eaton fund) 3.73 

H. E. Huntting Co G0.95 

30. T. P. W. Rogers 17.60 

June S. C. E. Goodspeed (Eaton fund).. 10.00 

Publishers' Weekly 9.G5 

Theo. E. Schulte S.79 

S. G. Wood 1.07 

345 



346 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



June 


S. 


T. P. W. Rogers 


$18.05 








Francis A. Nicolls & Co 


2.10 








Burnham Antique Bookstore 


2.00 








C. H. Raymond, Agent 


2.68 








Boston Book Co 


2.00 








Macmillan Co 


25.50 








Temple & Farrington Co. (Dean 










fund) 


108.99 








W. P. Goodman (Dean fund) 


3.60 








W. P. Goodman 


217.96 








Mrs. J. W. Fellows 


101.45 




August 5. 


H. R. Huntting Co 


17.51 








Fred'k Loeser & Co 


1.28 








Schoenhof Book Co 


3.75 








Dodd, Mead & Co 


4.50 








Thomson-Pitt Book Co 


2.32 








W. P. Goodman (Eaton fund) 


101.22 








Temple & Farrington Co. (Dean 










fund) 


72.28 




Sept. 


?5 


W. P. Goodman 


338.71 






DeWolfe-Fiske Co 


55,70 








Temple & Farrington Co 


17.73 








Theo. E. Schulte 


3.05 








Caroline L. Himebaugh 


6.24 








H. R. Huntting Co 


10.90 








Macmillan Co . ... 


21.25 
13.55 






John R. Anderson Co 




Nov 


8 


T P W Rotters 


88.29 




Dec. 


30. 


W. P. Goodman (Dean fund) 

Geo. H. Policy & Co. (Dean fund) 

Robt. W. Lull (Dean fund) 

Theo. Audel & Co. (Dean fund) . . 

G. E. Stechert & Co. (Dean fund) 

Old Corner Bookstore (Elliot 

fund) ^ 


181.69 

15.00 

3.50 

2.80 

11.88 

79.80 






31. 


W. P. Goodman 

Robt. W. Lull 


101.69 
25.85 


$2,183.62 


Dec. 


31. 


By Dean Fund and accumulations: 








deposit book No. 4078 Guar- 










anty Savings Bank 


$105.00 








deposit book No. 4557 Guar- 










anty Savings Bank 


16.42 








deposit book No. 94654 Amos- 










keag Savings Bank 


2,046.67 








deposit book No. 39195 Merri- 










mack River Savings Bank. 


1,962.05 





REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 347 

Dec. 31. By deposit book Xo. G421 Me- 
chanics Saving-s Bank $2,846.19 

deposit book Xo. 16445 Man- 
chester Savings Bank 3,562.78 

deposit book No. 75958 Man- 
chester Saving's Bank 3,126.23 

$13,665.3 1 

Dec. 31. By Mary E. Elliot fund and accumulations: 

deposit book No. 2009 Guar- 
anty Savings Bank $100.00 

deposit book No. 2010 Guar- 
anty Savings Bank 78.94 

deposit book No. 104 Hillsbo- 
rough County Savings Bank 1,793.41 

deposit book No. 6423 Me- 
chanics Savings Bank 2,061,43 

• 4,033.78 

Dec. 31. By Eliza A. Eaton fund and accumulations: 

deposit book No, 4327 Guar- 
anty Savings Bank $150.00 

deposit book No. 4328 Guar- 
anty Savings Bank 35.79 

deposit book No. 106 Hillsbo- 
rough County Savings Bank 2,601.04 

deposit book No. 39196 ]SIer- 

rimack River Savings Bank 1,329.52 

4,116.35 

Dec. 31. By balance of appropriation for books de- 
posited in Merchants National Bank... 1,122.46 

$25,121.55 

We have examined the above account of Edwin F. Jones, treasurer 
of the trustees of the city librarj', and find the same correctly cast 

and properly vouched, 

EUGENE E. REED, 
WALTER M. PARKER, 
Committee on Finance of Trustees of City Librarif. 

I have examined the above account of Edwin F. Jones, treasurer 
of the trustees of the City Library, and find the same correctly cast 
and properly vouched. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Atiditor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



EEPOET OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the City Councils: 

I herewith submit my report as solicitor for the city of Manchester 
for the year of 1909. 

Since my election to the office, January 5, 1909, I have rendered 
opinions and performed other duties incumbent upon me, Avhen called 
upon by the city councils and other agencies of the city of Manches- 
ter. 

In Manchester vs. Hodge et al., the order of the supreme court 
that the defendants remove all obstructions from Willow street has 
been obeyed, and Willow street in conjunction with Grove street has 
been laid out and accepted by the city of Manchester, so that the 
public now enjoy a way of access to and from Valley cemetery over 
Willow street. 

The case of Lord vs. City of Manchester, which was an action to 
recover damages for the appropriation of land of the plaintiff in 
the extension of South Elm street, and which was referred to the 
county commissioners, has been taken up, appraisers appointed, sur- 
veys made, and such preliminary work done as will protect the in- 
terests of the city until its final disposition; however, negotiations 
for an amicable adjustment have been entered into and are now pend- 
ing. 

In Mendall vs. City of ]Manchester, an action to recover for work 
and labor performed, negotiations for a settlement are now in prog- 
ress. 

The remaining cases now pending against the city of Manchester 
are being disposed of as rapidly as circumstances will permit; al- 
ready an agreement has been reached whereby several of the said 
cases are to be dismissed without prejudice. 

In closing, I desire to acknowledge my indebtedness to the city 
councils for their hearty co-operation in the performance of the 
various duties in which we have been associated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN T. NIXON, 

City Solicitor. 



351 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER. FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPOET OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE 
DEPARTMENT. 



Chief Exgixeer's Office, 
Central Statiox, No. 8 Vine Street. 

Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1909. 
To the Honorabh' Daanl of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, 

In compliance with law and ordinances of the city, I herewith sub- 
mit mj- thirty-first annual report of the fire department, it being- the 
sixty-fourth of this city. 

During- the year 1909 the department has responded to three hun- 
dred and fifty-five (355) alarms, one hundred and twelve (112) bell 
alarms, and two hundred and forty-three (243) still alarms, ninety- 
three (93) of which were for chimney fires, seventy-six (76) for brush, 
grass or forest fires. Six (6) of the still alarms and five (5) of the 
bell alarms have been false, seven (7) have been the three twos (2 — 
2 — 2), out-of-town calls for brush or forest fires in the outskirts of 
the city, three (3) second alarms, and one general alarm for the fire 
of April 8. 

The fire of April 8, which covered an area of 13.23 acres, included 
wooden two and three-story shingled roof tenements and blocks. 
With the high wind of about fifty miles an hour, the roofs of 
about forty buildings were on fire at once, and at one time a con- 
flagration seemed imminent, and Assistance was called from Con- 
cord, Nashua, Portsmouth, Dover, and Lowell, Mass., as well as the 
Coolidge engine of the Amoskeag corporation. The fire was prac- 
tically under control before the arrival of any of the out-of-town 
apparatus, the Concord and Lowell engines, however, rendering as- 
sistance in wetting roofs, etc., while the others were held for a 
time as reserve in case of other fires. 

"While the city councils have officially acknowledged the assistance 
rendered, 1 desire to personally extend my most sincere thanks to 
all who so promjjtly responded to our call for aid. 

Owing to the large amount of personal property being exposed by 
reason of removal from buildings, the military call was sounded at 
1.07 p. M., and was quickly responded to by the companies of the 
National Guard located in the city, together with the hospital corps. 
While the former did excellent service in protecting property, the 
latter rendered medical and surgical aid wherever required. 

355 



356 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

rort^'-eight (48) of the fires have been in brick buildings, and 
one hundred and ninety-three (193) in wooden buildings. 

Aid was rendered the town of Bedford May 13 at the burning of 
their town hall; May 31 for house and barn of C. B. Farley, and July 
10 and 11 for forest fires near the city line. 

An official investigation by the Board of Engineers was held for a 
fire in the Giblin block at 96 Lake avenue (it being the third fire in 
the block within a short time), but no satisfactory results were ob- 
tained. 

While working at fires during the year the department has laid 
one hundred and forty-five thousand, five hundred ninetj'-five (145,595) 
feet of hose, "thrown" five thousand nine hundred and seven (5,907) 
feet of ladders; used one hundred one (101) chemical engine tanks. 
and two hundred and fifty (250) pony extinguishers. 

The following is a summary of value of propertj' where fires have 
occurred, the amount of insurance carried on such property, the 
amount of losses and insurance jiaid, to such fires as any of the de- 
partment has responded to: 

Value of buildings where losses have occurred $723,025.00 

Value of contents where losses have occurred 294,956.74 

Total value $1,017,981.74 

Insurance carried on buildings $346,000.00 

Insurance carried on contents 132,019.50 



Total insurance carried $478.019. '0 

Damage to buildings $()2,134.22 

Damage to contents 89,830.82 

$151,965.04 

Insurance paid on buildings $44,008.52 

Insurance paid on contents 63.439.09 

107.447.61 

Ket loss over and above insurance paid $44,517.43 

THE MATs'UAI, FORCE 

Of the department remains unchanged, and consists of one hundred 
and eighty-five (185) men, forty-six (Iti) of whom are permanent 
men, and one hundred and thirty-nine (139) are call men, although 
there is a contemplated change being considered of changing two 
"call" captains of companies to permanent ones. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 357 

The following- is the assignment of men: 

Call I'enuanent 

1 chief engineer 1 

4 assistant engineers 4 

Engine Company Ts'o. 1, 11 3 

Engine Company jVo. 2 10 4 

Engine and Ladder Companj^ No. 3 15 5 

Engine Company No. 4 11 3 

Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 15 5 

Engine and Ladder Companj- No. 6 15 5 

Engine Company- No. 7 10 4 

Hose Company No. 1 11 1 

Hose Company No. 2 10 2 

Hose Company No. 3 (j 2 

Combination No. 2 6 2 

Aerial Truck No. 1 12 ' 3 

Chemical No. 1 2 3 

Driver of supply wagon 1 

Substitute drivers 3 



139 



46 



THE APPARATUS. 



January 17, in responding to an alarm from box 52, in descending 
the hill on Amory street Truck No. 6 collided w^ith a tree, throwing 
Captain Maynard (who was driving) to the ground. The horses then 
ran iip McGregor street, smashing one wheel, bending an axle and 
racking the entire framework of the truck. It was speedily repaired 
by the American Locomotive Co. 

Hose Wagon No. 3 has had new axles, rubber-tired wheels, and al- 
terations about the body and running gear, making it much more 
convenient and serviceable than ever before. 

A Hub Band brake was attached to the hose wagon of No. 6 Engine 
and Ladder Company, and has proved such a success that I would 
recomniend the adoption of same on all our apparatus. 

The api^aratus consists of 7 steam fire engines, 10 hose wagons (two 
combination chemicals, one with ladders attached), 4 hook and lad- 
der trucks (one an eighty-five foot aerial, carrying other ladders), 1 
sujiply wagon, 9 exercise wagons, I chief's wagon, 3 spare one-horse 
hose carriages, located as follows: 

Central Station: Two first size Amoskeag steamers, with three- 
horse hitch, 2 one-horse hose wagons, 1 two-horse hose wagon, 1 
aerial truck (three-horse hitch), 1 double (60 gallons) tank chemical 
engine, 1 sujiply wagon, 1 exercise wagon, 1 chief's wagon. 1 repair 
wagon for fire-alarm telegraj^h. 

North Main-Street Station: One second si/.e Amoskeag steamer 
(three-horse hitch), 1 two-horse combination chemical and hose 
wagon, 1 old U tank steamer in storage, 1 exercise wagon. 



358 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

McGregoeville Station: One second size Amoskeag- steamer, 1 
two-horse hose wagon, 1 two-horse hook and ladder truck, 1 exercise 
wagon. 

Lake Avenue Station: One first size Amoslveag steamer, witli 
three-horse hitch, 1 two-horse hose wagon, 1 hook and ladder truck 
(three-horse hitch), 1 exercise wagon, 1 one-horse hose carriage (in 
storage). 

Webstee-Stkeet Station: One third size Amoskeag steamer, 1 two- 
horse hose wagon, 1 two-horse hook and ladder truck, 1 exercise 
wagon, 1 one-horse hose carriage (in storage). 

Maple-Street Station: One two-horse hose wagon, 1 exercise 
wagon. 

South Elai-Street Station: One two-horse combination hose 
wagon, carrying ladders, 1 exercise wagon. 

Wilson Hill Station: One two-horse combination chemical and 
hose wagon, 1 exercise wagon, 1 one-horse hose carriage (in storage). 

So5i1e,rville-Street Station: One second size Amoskeag steamer 
(with three-horse hitch), 1 two-horse hose wagon, 1 exercise wagon. 

In addition to the foregoing there is 1 hose carriage in Amoskeag 
on Front street, 1 hose carriage corner Massabesic street and Mam- 
moth road (both volunteer companies), 1 two-wheeled hose carriage, 
Devonshire Mills, GofPe's Falls, 1 two-wheeled "jumper" in basement 
of W. P. Farmer's barn cellar, Candia road, corner Hanover street, 
5 sleds used as hosesleds in the Avinter. 

THE BUILDINGS 

In some instances h;ive not received the necessary repairs that should 
have been made, owing to a lack of appropriations for the com- 
mittee on lands and buildings to use for that purpose. 

The box stall at Engine and Ladder Company No. 5, so many times 
recommended by me, has not materialized, and it seems almost use- 
less to allude to it. As a necessity of it I would cite the fact that 
for about ten weeks within a year sick or lame horses have had 
to be cared for in a private stable some distance from the station, 
owing to the lack of room for their proper care. 

A bathroom is much needed in the quarters of Engine Company Xo. 
1 at Central station. 

THE HORSES. 

There are in use by the department at the present time tifty-four 
(54) horses, in the average condition with two or three exceptions. 
One on Engine Xo. 5 is about past its uesfulness as a fire horse, and 
two or three others should be exchanged for more si^eedy ones. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEURAl'H 

Should have a new repeater arranged for at least twelve (12) cir- 
cuits. The present one has been in use twenty-five (25) years and 



KEPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 359 

certainlj^ is "no better than when it was first installed." An np-to- 
date instrument has many improvements over the one now in nse. 

A tower-striker on the bell at the Hallsville schoolhouse is much 
needed and should be installed the coming season. 

Early steps should be taken towards installing- an underground 
system in the ducts fuxuiished by the New England Telephone & Tel- 
egraph Co, 

CASUALTIES. 

On March 17 death entered our ranks and took from our number 
Arthur William Whitcomb, driver of the hose wagon of Engine No. 2. 
He served the department faithfully for about fourteen j-ears and 
was a faithful, fearless and efficient fireman. His funeral was at- 
tended by the entire department, and the last honors paid to his re- 
mains as he was laid to rest in Pine Grove cemeterj-. 



ARTHUR WILLIAM WHITCOMB 



BORN AT CLINTON, MASS., AUGUST 16, 1855 
DIED AT MANCHESTER, N. H., MARCH 17, 1909 



AGED 53 YEARS, 7 MONTHS AND 1 DAY 



January 19, Tobey Lemaj', engineer of Engine No. 6, while mak- 
ing hydrant connection with engine, sprained his back. Off duty 
twenty days. 

April 8, at an alarm from box 321, the breaking of a ladder injui'ed 
John W, Lyons slightly, John H. McCabe, and Arthur J. Provost of 
Engine and Ladder Company No. 6; Lyons slightly, not off duty; Mc- 
Cabe injured about head, off duty 100 days; Provost injured about 
shoulder and wrist, off duty forty-tive days. 

April 8, at a three-alarm fire from boxes 45 and 71, Chief Lane 
was thrown to the granite pavement, tearing ligaments off both 
sides of knee, and has not yet fully recovered. 

June 21 in responding to an alarm from box 35, George A. Cann, 
driver of Engine No. 4, was injured by horse stepping- ujion foot. Off 
duty fourteen daj's. 

June 17, Mr. E. W. Hartford, a citizen, while trying to liglit a tire 
in his automobile was severely burned about hands and arms. Alarm 
from box 51. 

August 18, during an "exhibition hitch" for the entertainniont of tlie 
Scottish clans, Frank H. Harvey, driver of Engine No. 1, and Charles 
r. Hall, engineer of same, injured by the steamer colliding- with the 



360 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

curbing. Harvey off duty twenty-four daj's, and Hall thirty-eig'ht 
days. 

November 6, at an alarm from box 21, Thomas Dngan of Lowell, 
Mass., in an excited condition, unnecessarily jumped"^ from a third- 
story Avindow, injuring him to the extent that he died a few hours 
after being conveyed to a hosxsital. 

November 14, at an alarm from box 6, for fire in gas office, Walter 
A. Clarkson of Engine Comj)any No. 4 was injured by one of the 
firemen falling upon him. Off duty eight days. 

November 20, at a two-alarm fire from box 4, William J. Arnold of 
Engine Company No. 2 had hand cut with glass. Off duty fifteen 
days. 

December 23, at a two-alarm fire from boxes 21 and 4, Thomas W. 
Lane, Jr., was injured by a 32-foot ladder falling and striking him 
upon the shoulders, splintering the bone and lacerating the cartilages. 
Still off duty. At this same fire thirteen horses were suffocated. 

The Firemen's Relief Association. 

I desire in behalf of its membei's to tender their sincere thanks to 
all dopors to its funds for their liberal contributions. The following 
is the financial condition of its treasury: 

Balance on hand Febiiiary 9, 1909 $8,577.55 

Net receipts from annual ball 1,173.22 

Dividends on deposits 327.63 

Member.ship dues 216.00 

Ladies' Auxiliary of fire department 50.00 

Donations: 

Et. Rev. Bishop G. A. Gvtertin .-. 25.00 

George H. Chandler 25.00 

James W. Hill Co 25.00 

Louis E. W^yman 25.00 

Mrs. William Henry Plumer 20.00 

Walter M. Parker 20.00 

Jeremiah Hodge 15.00 

James W. Hill 15.00 

A friend 10.00 

Joseph R. LaFlamme 10.00 

James A. Scully 10.00 

A friend 10.00 

Orrin E. Kimball 10.00 

A friend 10.00 

Walsh & Cummings 5.00 

George F. Barnard (Bedford) 5.00 

James E. Straw 5.00 

Dr. George M. Watson 5.00 

Mrs. Emily J, Welch 5.00 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 3G1 

Benjamin E. Thomf)son $5.00 

Dr. F. M. Rogers, discount on bill .50 



$10,004.90 
Cr. 

Paid funeral benefit Arthur W. Whitcomb $50.00 

Tobey Lemaj", benefit and doctor's bill 22.50 

Thomas W. Lane, benefit and doctor's bill 102.90 

George A. Cann, benefit and doctor's bill 24.50 

Arthur J. Provost, benefit and doctor's bill 63.00 

John H. McCabe, benefit and doctor's bill 155.00 

Frank H. Harvey, benefit and doctor's bill 36.90 

Charles F. Hall, benefit and doctor's bill 47.20 

Walter A. Clarkson, benefit and doctor's bill 9.50 

William J. Arnold, benefit and doctor's bill 22.00 

Oscar P. S'tone, salary as secretary 25.00 



$558.50 
Balance to new account 10,046.40 



$10,604.90 



I desire to renew my recommendation for a hook and ladder truck 
for Engine No. 7, station on Somerville street, as well as for a tower 
striker on the Hallsville schoolhouse. 

I would also recommend an automobile combination chemical and 
"fiying squadron" car, capable of carrying eight men, to answer all 
alarms, ijlacing it at the Central station. 

Engine No. 2 should have a new boiler and its machinery repaired. 

I would recommend the Dahil ladder hoist be attached to the Aerial 
truck, where by its use the 85-feet ladder can be easily and safely 
raised or lowered in from ten to twelve seconds' time. 

The exposed hazards of shingled roofs was forcibly demonstrated 
at the "threatened conflagration" of April 8, and they should here- 
after be prohibited in the thickly settled part of the city by the en- 
actment of an ordinance. 

!My personal acknowledgments are hereby tendered to the com- 
mittee on fire department and members of the city councils for the 
interest manifested in the welfare of the department; to my assist- 
ant engineers and the otficers and members for the prompt and 
efficient manner they have at all times responded to alarms, and 
their untiring interest in sustaining- the reputation and efficiency of 
the department; to the chief of police and the members of his de- 
partment for their willing assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS W. LANE, 

Chief of Department. 



362 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Number and Location of Fire Alarm Boxes and Keys. 

A KEY IS ATTACHED TO EACH BOX (with few exceptions), aud can be 
had by breaking the glass. 

No. 3, American Locomotive Company's lower shop. Keys at offices 
of gas-Avorks, county jail, ^Manchester Coal & Ice Company's sheds, and 
the Hutchinson shop building. 

No. 4. Corner Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel Milford, L. B. 
Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, street railway stables, and office 
of Blogdett & Young's block. 

No. 5. Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at Tebbetts & 
Co.'s and Hanscoan's drug stores, Manchester House, and J. W. Hill 
Company's store. 

No. 6. City Hall. Kejs at Holland's and AVeeks' drug stores, 
Eiddle block office, and residence of J. L. Brock, 21 Amoskeag Corpora- 
tion. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of Manchester and Cliestnut streets. 
Keys at chief of police's office and with all police officers. 

No. 8. Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Dante Smith's and 
Leblanc & Provencher's drng stores, and Partridge Brothers' grain 
store. 

No. 9. Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at residence of 
Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clongh. and station of Engine and 
Ladder No. 5. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at residence of 
iMrs. "Walter A. Green, and O. D. Knox. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at residence 
of Welcome Jencks and Mrs. Lewis Simons, No. 1 Senter's block, and 
Steele's grocery store. 

No. 14. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys at residences 
of :Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. George W. Kiddle. D. J. Adams, and ^Mrs. 
Thomas ^Morgan. 

No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys at residences 
of Henry W. Shannon and J. Fred Chalker. 

No. 16. Corner of Lowell and LTnion streets. Keys at residences of 
Rt. Rev. Bishop Guertin and E. H. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys at residences 
of Miss Mary A. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. Corner of Manchester anc) IMaple streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and William Perkins' 
estate. 

No. 21. Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys at A. T>. 
Rmitli's drug store, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. L. Walker's office, 
and residence of .Tames F. Gillis. 

\(i. 2:i. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys at the resi- 
dence of the late Eben T. .Tames. 



KEPOKT OF CHIEF OF FIEE DEPARTMENT. 363 

Xo. 24. Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 3 honse, corner of ^lassa- 
besic street and Lake avenne. Keys at the residence of D. M. Good- 
win and station of Engine and Ladder Xo. 3. 

Xo. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at residences 
(if (ieorge F. Lincoln, Mrs. A. D. Gooden, and James IJ. Straw. 

Xo. 26. Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys at McCrillis' 
carriage shop. 

Xo. 27. Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of E. S. Fletcher, Dr. Walter T. Crosbj^ and Mrs. William Carr. 

Xo. 28. Corner of Merrimack and Beacon streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of A. L. Garmon and H. B. Fairbanks. 

Xo. 29. Corner of Hall and East High streets. 

Xo. 31. Corner of Canal and Hollis streets. American Locomotive 
Company's shop. Keys at oflfice, Amorj- Mills, Langdon Mills watch- 
rooms. 

Xo. 32. Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and Brook streets. 
Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Company's mill, Langdon watchroom, 
and Electric Light station. 

Xo. 34. Jefferson Mill. Ke,ys at watchroom and pumping station. 

Xo. 35. Stark Mills. Kej's at watchroom. 
Amory Mills. Keys at watchroom. 
Hillsborough county jail. Kejs at office. 
Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watchroom. 
Manchester Mills. Keys at watchroom. 
The Olzendam Mill. Keys at watchroom. 

Xo. 45. The S. C. Forsaith- shops. Keys at freight depot and office 
in building. 

Xo. 51. Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys at the stores 
of F. Eiedel and Henry Weber. 

Xo. 52. Loxton Block, Granite Square, West ^Manchester. Keys at 
^Merrimack Hotel, "Wiggin-Young grocery, and Engine Xo. 2. 

Xo. 53. The West Side Lumber Co.'s steam mill. Keys at mill office, 
Dewey's tenement block, and Ranno's harness store. 

Xo. 54. Corner of A and South ]\rain streets. Keys at residences 
of Lord sisters, Xeil Fullerton, and grocery store opposite box. 

Xo. -56. Mast street, opposite Baldwin's bobbin shop. Keys at 
Baldwin's office and residences of J. C. Smith, E. P. Littlefield, and 
with watchman at works. 

Xo. 57. Corner Mast road and D street. Keys at residence of C. H. 
George and F. W. Towle's store. 

Xo. 61. Hose Xo. 3, South Elm street. Keys at Hose house. 

Xo. 62. Manchester Wool & Leather Company's, Brown avenue. 
Kej's at tannery, the Edwin Kennedy house, and Hose 3. 

Xo. 63. Corner Beech street and Titus avenue. Keys at residences 
of L. E. Carswell and C. L. Wenberg. (Xo key on box.) 

Xo. 64. Corner Pine and Willow streets. Keys Cohas Shoe factory, 



Xo. 


36. 


Xo. 


39. 


Xo. 


41, 


Xo. 


42. 


Xo. 


43, 



364 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the Lincoln House, and Stevens Bros.' Marble Works. (Xo key on 
box.) 

Xo. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at residences of 
T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, Thomas J. Smith, Simon McCarthy. 

No. 72. Corner of Lake avenue and Lincoln street. Keys at resi- 
dences of the late Austin Jenkins and James Briggs. 

No. 73. Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys at residences of 
Eev. J. A. Chevalier and Timothj^ Carr. 

Xo. 81. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at all the engine 
rooms. 

X"^o. 82. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Church streets. Kej-s at 
Lowell-street stable and Eames Bros.' drug store. 

X'o. 91. Corner Webster and Beech streets. Keys at Children's 
Home and residences of George E. ^IcClintock, Solomon Johnson, ^L 
E. Sanctuary. (Xo key on box.) 

Xo. 92. Corner LTnion and Clarke streets. Keys at residences of 
Mrs. Julia B. Bradford and E. H. Xutting. 

Xo. 93. Corner of Elm and Carpenter streets. Keys at residences 
,of A. H. Weston and Dr. George D. Towne. 

Xo. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of W. A. Clarkson, M. D. Johnson, and Charles F. Chase. 

X^'o. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys at residences 
of Mrs. WilHam B. Abbott, W. X. Johnson, and E. M. Toplife. 

Xo. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at residences of 
John J. Bennett and Mrs. Harriet L. Healej' and Ash-street school- 
house. 

No. 115. Corner of Blodget aiid Ash streets. Kej's at residences 
of James A. Eogers and Cyren Bixby. 

Xo. 116. Corner Salmon and Ash streets. Key -at Masonic Home. 

Xo. 117. Corner of Sagamore and Russell streets. 

Xo. 212. Shoe shop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of the shoe fac- 
tory and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn. M. V. B. 
Garland, and the W^alter Cody block. 

Xo. 213. Sash and blind factory. South Beech street, junction of 
Portsmouth railroad. Keys at offices of Derryfield Sash & Blind Com- 
pany. 

Xo. 214. Elliot silk mill, corner of Wilson and ^'alley streets. Keys 
at office and watchrocm of mill. 

l^o. 215. Hoyt & Co.'s shoe shop, corner of Lincoln and Silver 
streets. Kej^s at offices of shoe shop and Kimball Carriage Com- 
pany and workshop opposite. 

No. 216. Jewett and Somerville streets. Keys at residences of G. 
H. Hill, 140 Jewett street, and W. B. Brown, 128 Jewett street. 

No. 217. Corner Candia road and Massabesic street. Keys at resi- 
dences of L. M. Streeter, William Gadbois, and Charles P. Still. 

No. 218. Corner of Somerville and Hall streets. Keys at residences 
of Mrs. George Hall and George Kay. 



KEPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 365 

Xo. 210. Eaton Heights shoe shop, Page street. Keys at shoe shop 
office and residences of Charles A. Merrill, John P. Yonng, and Joseph 
W. Eand. (Xo key on box.) 

Xo. 224. Corner of Belmont and Grove streets. Keys at residences 
of John A. Adams, Joseph Quirin, and Mrs. H. G. Walker. 

Xo. 241. Lake avenue hill. Kej- at residence of Hari-y L. Davis. 

Xo. 242. Merrimack and Wilson streets. Keys at Capt. C. K. Mer- 
rill's and Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 3. 

Xo. 243. Corner Candia road and Sherburne street; Kej's at resi- 
dences of Fred L. W^atts, Alex Oliver, Andrew J. Murraj-, and INIrs. S. 
L. Cummings. (Xo key on box.) 

Xo. 261. Pearl-street grammar school. Keys at schoolroom and 
residences of C. E. Rose, S. W. Bascom, and Charles W. Cheney-. 

Xo. 263. Corner Bridge street and ilammoth road. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. Hiram Turner, Andrew J. Johnson, A. 1). Sherer, Har- 
vey T. Corey, and city farm. (Xo key on box.) 

X'o. 312. Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor streets. Kejs at 
residences of James Spence (309 Main street), Thomas Bolton, and 
gate Xo. 11 mill. 

Xo. 313. Corner of Amorj- and Main streets. Keys at residences of 
Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Potvin's drug store, ^Milville & 
Co.'s drug store, gate of Xo. 11 mill, and station of Engine and Ladder 
Xo. 6. 

Xo. 314. Manchester Stocking Co., "Skeag. Keys at office and Riv- 
erside Hose house. 

Xo. 31.5. Old Brick store, 'Skeag. Kejs at Riverside Hose house 
and D. Jameson's residence. 

Xo. 321. Corn(!r of Xotre Dame avenue and Wayne street. Keys at 
Holy Angels convent, the Brotliers' school, and residences of E. H. 
Doherty and the jjarish priest. 

Xo. 323. Corner of Putnam and Bartlett streets. Keys at P. J. 
Archambeault's bakery and residence of Mitchell Barry. 

Xo. 324. Amory and Laval streets. 

Xo. 325. Kelly and Cartier streets. 

Xo. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at residences 
of Amelia Davis, William A. Tufts, and James Kearns. 

Xo. 512. Corner of X'otre Dame avenue and Adams street. West 
Side. 

X^'o. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Keys at residences 
of J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Elizabeth Ward. 

Xo. 521. Corner Parker and Winter streets. 

Xo. 541. Corner of Boynton and Allen streets. Keys at residences 
of Herbert F. Dow, Patrick J. Connor, Charles Tinker, and Benjamin 
J. Mack. 

X'^o. 611. Corner of Hancock street and Boston & Maine Railroad, 
Keys at offices of True W. Jones' Brewery and Manchester Slaughter- 
iiiii' and Rendering Works. 



866 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 711. Corner of Union and Grove streets. 

No. 911. Corner of Union and Trenton streets. Keys at residences 
of Charles R. Hodge, C. S. Boynton, Mrs. ^Yilliam R. Yarick, and Bixby 
Bros.' Greenhouse. (No kej' on box.) 

Also keys will be found in the hands of all regular police. 

The true time Avill be given at precisely 12.30 p. m. from Charles A. 
Trefethen's jewelry store, and will be denoted by one stroke of the 
fire bells. 



Fire Department Telephone Calls. 

Chemical Engine, Central Station 94 

Engine No. 2 1481 

Engine and Ladder No. 3 1485 

Engine and Ladder No. 5 1483 

Engine and Ladder No. 6 1482 

Engine No. 7 373 

Hose No. 2 1484 

Hose No. 3 1486 

Combination No. 2 1487 

Chief Engineer Lane's office 94 

Chief Engineer Lane's house 1480 

Assistant Chief Provost's store 1342 

Assistant Chief Provost's house 531 — 2 

Assistant Chief Fitzsimmons' house 1359 — 1 

Assistant Chief Hammond's house 814 — 2 

Assistant Chief Merrill's house 517—1 

Superintendent Fire-Alarm French 1383 — 1 



Instructions to Keyholders and Citizens. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be immediatelj' com- 
municated to the nearest alarm box, the kej- of Avhich is in a circular 
box attached to the right side of the fire-alarm box. Kej's are also in 
the hands of all regular police, and generally of persons at the cor- 
ner or nearest house. 

2. Keyholders and others, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive 
information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook once as 
far as it will go (without jerking), and then let go. Shut the door, 
but do not try to remove the key, as it is locked in by a trap lock, and 
can only be removed with a release key, Avhich is carried by each of 
the engineers, and they will, as soon as convenient, release and return 
it. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to remain by the 
box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull again; if 



REPOET OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 367 

you still hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box and give an 
alarm from that. Dox't give a skcond alarm without instructions 
from an engineer, or officer in charge of the fire. 

4. Never signal for fire seen at a distance. Never touch the box 
excei)t to give an alarm of fire. Give an alarm for no other cause 
than actual fire. Don't give an at^arm for a chimney fire. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless called for by 
the chief engineer. If you change your re<sidence ar place of business, 
tchcre the keys are kept, return' the keys to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to inform 
themselves of the location of alarm boxes near their property; also 
all places where the keys are kept. Be sure the alarm is promptly 
and properly given, 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the city, and 
the number of the box will be given thus: Box 6, six blows, 21/3 sec- 
onds apart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, pause of 6^4 
seconds, one blow, same pause, and two blows, 2—1 — 2, repeated three 
times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the bells at 
any time; and in case of testing the boxes, each test will be preceded 
by one stroke of the bells. 

special calls on fire alarm. 

When moi-e apparatus is wanted, without giving second and third 
alarms the following- special calls will be given: 

2—1 for Engine 1. :j— 3 for Truck 3. 

2—2 for Engine 2. 3—5 for Truck 5. 

2—3 for Engine 3. 3—6 for Truck 6. 

2—4 for Engine 4. 4—1 for Hose 1. 

2—5 for Engine 5. 4—2 for Hose 2. 

2—6 for Engine 6. 4—3 for Hose 3. 

2—7 for Engine 7. 4—4 for Combination 2. 

1 — 1 — 1 for Aerial Truck. 

Companies g,nswering "special calls" will -wait thirty seconds be- 
fore leaving quarters, to prevent mistakes. 

THIRD alarm. 
On THIRD ALARM all apparatus will respond. 

GENERAL AT ARM. 

In the event of a fire of svich magnitude that second and third 
alarms are needed, a general alarm Avill be given by striking ten 
BLOWS, in which case all companies will respond. 

OUT-1OF-TOWN CALL. 

For a fire out of the city or brush fire, 2 — 2 — 2, all companies will 
assemble at their respective quarters and await orders. 



368 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ALL Ol'T SIGJSAL. 

Two blows on the bells, whicli dismisses all members at eomjiany 
quarters. 

The signal will be g-iven after companies working at a tire have 
returned to qLiarters, "made up,"" and are ready to respond to another 
alarm. 

TEST SIGNAL. 

One blow at 12.30 noon. 

SCHOOL aiG^TALS,. 

1 — 1, with fifteen seconds between blows, closes primary and middle 
schools. 

2 — 2, with fifteen seconds between the 2's, closes all the schools. 
Time for giving same, 7.:!0 a. m., 11.30 a. m., or 1.15 p. m. 

MILITARY CALL. 

12 blows twice. 



Engine Whistle Signals. 

The following code of signals will be observed by members of the 
department: 

FoK Captaiw, or officer in command of company-, one long whistle. 

For Coal, two long whistles followed by as many short whistles as 
indicate the number of the engine. 

To Limber Up, three long whistles. 



Entering a Building with Line of Hose, 

All steamer and hose companies are instructed not to enter any 
building with a line of hose unless the stop nozzle is closed, except in 
cases where they can see" the fire, and when their streams will reach 
it without damage to other property, due care being exercised as to 
whether their services are needed. 

Extra care should be exercised by hosemen of steamer companies in 
using "shut-off" nozzles, shutting' off to be slowly and gradualh' when 
steamer is working. 



Absent from City or Station. 

,No permanent member shall leave his station to visit any section of 
the city without permission of the chief or an assistant engineer (or 
the permanent captain in charge of his company), nor leave the city, 
or be granted leave of absence, without notifjing the chief engineer 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 369 

and procuring- a substitute to his acceptance, and the substitute shall 
be on duty before the applicant leaves his post, except on his regular 
"days off." 

Any call member crpccting to be absent from the eitii shall •■notify the cap- 
tain of his company, an<l before leaving the city shall procure a substitute 
satisfactory to said captain. 

Substitutes running for and answering the names of any call man 
shall be entitled to the same pay, pro rata, as the call man for whom 
they answer for the time they substitute, and the clerks of the 
several companies shall keep said svibstitutes' time and notifj^ the reg- 
ular call man of the amounts due from him and pay said amount to 
the substitute performing said service. 

Any member of the department not complying' with the above rules 
shall be liable to suspension or expulsion from the department. 

The hour of leaving will be 7 o'clock A. M., and members will not 
leave their stations until the arrival of the spare driver. They must 
report promptly at 7 o'clock the following morning for duty. 

Those whose breakfast hour is 6 o'clock will remain at station un- 
til 7 o'clock on the dates of their "days off." 

Should a fire be in progress at the hour of changes, men will remain 
on duty until the "all out" is given, except permission is obtained of 
the chief, or engineer in charge of fire, to retire. Should a "general" 
or third alarm be rung while members are in town, they will be ex- 
pected to report for duty on their days off. 



370 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DAYS OFF. 

Until further notice, the Days off of the Permanent Men will be asfolloics: 



COMl'ANY. 



1-15 


Hall 


1-16 Collins, J. J.. 


1-18 i Hubbell 




2—16 


Harvey 


2-17 


Morrill 


3-17 


Kemp 


3—18 


Hebert 


3-20 


Tuson 


4-18 


♦Rogers, C.H. 


4-19 


*Rogers, G. N. 


22-31 


Worthen 


4-21 


*Cann,B. C... 


5-19 


Gould 


5—20 


Collins. T. F. 


5-22 


Kowe 


6—20 


Cann,G. A... 


6-23 


Edgar 


6-23 


Bryant 


7-19 


Morse 



7—21 Farsons 

7-24! Smith, E. H. 
8—21 Ford 



Engine 1. 



Engine 1. 
7. 
1. 

Engine and Ladders. 
Hose 1. 
Engine 7. 
Hose 1. 

Engine and Ladder 5. 
Engine 4. 
Substitute Driver. 
Engine and Ladder 5. 
Engine 4. 

Engine and Ladder 5. 
5. 
Engine 4. 
Engine 2. 
Substitute Driver. 



S— 22| Smith, A. W. 

8-25 Whitcomb.... 

9—23 Gage 

9— 26 Lane 

9—26 Lemay 

10— 21 Pherson 

10—24 Duncan, R. H 
10—27 Foster — 
11—28 Gustafson 

11—25 Harris 

11—28 Cote 



12—26 Richardson . 

12— 27j Crosby 

2—29 *St. John 

13—27 Walker 

13—30 Maynard 

13—30 Tebbetts .... 

14—28 Piper 

14—29 Nute 

14—31 *Merrill 

15—29 *Dunbar 

16—30 *Duncan, J. T. 
17—31 *Porter 



Truck 1. 

Engine 2. 

Truck 1. 

Engine 2. 

Engine and Ladder 6 . 

Truck 1. 

Chemical 1. 

Engine and Ladder 6. 

Combination 2. 

Chemical 1. 

Engine and Ladders 

Chemical 1. 

Combination 2. 

Engine and Ladders. 

3. 

6. 
Hose 3. 

Engine and Ladder 3. 
Substitute Driver. 



Engine and Ladder 



*In February St. John will take 16; Dunbar 24 instead of 29, and J. T. Duncan 25 instead 
of 30. For July 4 :— C. H. Rogers,G.N. Rogers, B. C. Cann, to be arranged for. In February, 
April, June, September and November, Capt. Porter will take 1, and Capt. Merrill 27. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 371 



List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 1909, 
Loss and Insurance. 

Still. Friday, January 1, 1.15 A. M. Chimnej- fire in two-and-a-half- 
story wooden dwelling-house, 183 Cartier street, owned by Hanson 
R. Armstrong-, and occupied by two families. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company Xo. 6 responded with hose wagon. Used one pony 
extinguishei'. 

Still. Saturday, January 2, 5.04 p. m. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick building, owned by Carpenter, Bean, Eundlett, Cleworth, and 
IJond, and occupied by Leslie ^I. Folsom. Chemical engine responded. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, January 5, 4.57 P. if. Five-story brick block, 9(13 
Elm street, owned by John B. Smith, Hillsborough, N. H., and occu- 
pied by William Marcotte Co. as clothing store. Cause, electric light 
v.'ires. Chemical engine responded. No services required. 

Still. Thursdaj^ January 7, 9.56 p. M. Chimney fire in two-and-a- 
half-story wooden dwelling-house, 71 Canal street, owned by the 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co., and occupied by Angelus Berithune. Chemical 
engine responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Sunday, January 10, 3.35 a. m. Four-story brick block, 742 
Elm street, owned by Simons heirs, and occupied bj- II. B. Reynolds 
as Hotel Stark. Cause, overheated furnace. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Sunday, January 10, 2.30 p. m. Chimney fire in two-and-a- 
half-story dwelling, 214 Bell street, owned and occupied by Thomas 
F. Glancy. Members of Chemical Company responded. L^sed one 
])ony extinguisher. 

Box 215. Sunday, January' 10, 9.55 P. IL A pile of rubbish on out- 
side of box shop of A. Dalton & Co., corner Lincoln and Harvard 
street. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding. 
Engines 3, 7, Hose 2, 3, Combination 2, Truck 3. 

Still. Tuesday, January 12, 6.40 p. m. Chimney fare in three-story 
wooden block, 34 Amory street, owned. by Joseph Quirin, and occu- 
pied liy four families. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 
(i rcs])onded with hose wagon. Used one pony extinguisher. 

SifLL. Wednesday, January 13, 12.20 A. M. Four-story brick block, 
1032 Elm street, owned by Smith heirs and others, and occupied by 
the Park Theater Co. Cause, spontaneous combustion in coal bin. 
Chemical Engine Company responded. Used standpipes of the thea- 
ter and one ponj' extinguisher. 

Still. Wednesday, January 13, 7.55 A. ii. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 186 Lake avenue, owned and occupied by Frank Rowell. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded with hose 
wagon. Used two pony extinguishers. , 

Still. Wednesday, January 13, 11.30 A. M. Three-story wooden 
tenement block, 512 Maple street, owned by Charles Carpenter of 



372 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Chichester, N. H., and occupied by N. T. Johnson as grocery store, 
and several tenants. Cause, overheated furnace. Hose Company No. 
2 responded. No services required. 

Still. Thursday, January 14, 7.25 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 22 Laurel avenue, owned by Mrs. VV. H. Topping-, and occupied 
by Frank Lucier and others. Members of Chemical Company re- 
sjionded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Friday, January 15, 9.05 a. m. Cottage house, 538 Central 
street, owned by W. H. Smart, and occupied by C. F. Tirrell. Cause, 
fire in bed. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded 
with hose wagon. Used two pony extinguishers and laid 550 feet 
of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Friday, January 15, 8.25 p. M. Tliree-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 32 Amor^' street, owned by Joseph Quirin. and occupied 
by six families. ^Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 re- 
sponded with hose wagon. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Saturday, January 16, 7.52 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 144 Walker street, owned by heirs of John Barnes, and occu- 
pied by several families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 re- 
sponded with combination wagon. Used one chemical tank. 

Box 52. Sunday, January 17, 6.24 A. M. Four-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 20 Second street, owned by Mutual Real Estate Co., and 
occupied by Mrs. Mary I. Cole and others. Slight fire in closet. 
Cause, spontaneous combustion in charcoal. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding, Engines 2, 6, Truck 6. Value of building, $10.- 
000; damage, $75; insurance, $7,000; insurance paid, $75. Value of 
contents, $400; damage, $10; no insurance. 

Still. Sunday, January 17, 7 a. m. Chimney fire in two-and-a-half- 
story wooden tenement block, rear Wayne street, owned by Ed 
Crresley, and occupied by eight families. ^lembers of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 6 responded with hose wagon. Used one i^ony 
extinguisher. 

Box 4. Monday, January 18, 7.52 P. il. Chimney fire in two-tene- 
ment house, 60 Cedar street, owned by estate of Daniel O'Leary, and 
occupied by Maggie Murraj'. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding. Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 52. Tuesday, January 19, 8.10 A. 3i. Cottage hou,se, 21 Dover 
street, owned by George iSi. Eastman, and occupied by Benjamin 
Gamache and Charles Curtis. Cause, thawing water pipes. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding: Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 
1. Value of building, $2,000; daiuage, $900; insurance, $1,000; insur- 
ance paid, $900. Value of contents. $750; damage, $150; no insur- 
ance. 

Still— Box 93. Thursday, January 21, C.14 A. it., 6.44 a. m. Cot- 
tage hou^e and barn oji North River road, owned and occupied by 
Camile Hculne. Cause, defective chimney. Chemical engine. Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 5. and Hose 1 responded to "still." ami 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 373 

"box call" was needless, and Engine 4 was ordered hack en rente. 
Companies responding: Engine 4, 5, Hose 1, and Chemical. On duty 
four hours. Value of buildings, $2,000; damage, $2,000; insurance, 
$1,000; insurance paid, $1,000. Value of contents, $500; damage, $200; 
insurance, $200; insurance paid, $200. 

Still. Saturday, January 23, 7.05 p. m. Chimney lire in tenement 
house, rear 106 Bridge street, owned by P. Scollard, and occuiiied by 
Mr. Fortin. Members of Chemical Company responded. Used one 
ponj' extinguisher. 

Still. Sunday, January 24, 10.34 a. m. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 959 Hayward street, owned and occupied by Fred Siinburj'. 
Members of Engine Company No. 7 responded with hose wagon. Used 
two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Sunday, January 24, 12.30 p. m. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement house, 307 Chestnut street, owned by Mrs. W. H. Topping, 
and occupied by W. A. Sage. Members of Chemical Company re- 
sponded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, January 26, 2.15 p. m. Four-story brick block, 
1087 Elm street, owned by First National Bank, and (room 12) occu- 
pied bj' William A. Stevens. Cause, gas stove. ^Members of Chemical 
Engine responded. No services required. 

Box 8. Wednesday, January 27, 4.45 p. M. One-story wooden build- 
ing, 16 Myrtle street, owned by Evelyn W^oodbury, and occupied by 
Bemis & Upton as an automobile garage. Cause, breaking of lamp. 
There were twenty automobiles stored, all of which were more or 
less damaged. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding. En- 
gines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1. 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, 
$5,000; damage, $1,500; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid. $1,000. 
Value of contents, $39,000; damage, $16,000; insurance, $14,300; in- 
surance paid, $12,000. 

Still. Friday, January 29, 6.35 p. m. Three-story wooden block. 
45 Nashua street, owned by Mrs. John Snider of Taunton, :Mass., and 
occupied by W^illiam Ward and others. Cause, putting wood on pan 
of hot ashes. Members of Hose Conij)anj- No. 2 responded. No ser- 
vices required. 

Still. Tuesday, February 2, 8.05 P. M. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 176 Concord street, owned and occupied by Patrick Foreman. 
Members of Chemical Company responded. Used one ponj- extin- 
guisher. 

Still. Wednesday, February 3, 7.45 A. ir. Escaping steam from 
soil pipe at dwelling-house 225 East Spruce street, owned and occu- 
pied hy O. L. Giguere. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 
3 responded with hose wagon. 

Box 82. Thursday, February 4, 8.42 A. M. Two-and-a-lialf-story 
brick block, 1066 Elm street, owned by the heirs of A. B. Story, and 
ocupied by E. L. Gresley & Co. as furniture store. Cause, plumber's 
torch set fire to drapery in window. Box pulled by citi/en. Com- 



di4 ANNUAL OFFICIAL llEPORTS. 

panies responding, Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 
Value of building, $15,000: damage, $50; insurance, $6,000; insurance 
paid, $50. Value of contents. $15,000; damage, $200; insurance, $12,- 
000; insurance paid, $200. 

Still. Thursdaj-, Februarj^ 4, 1.37 p. "M. Tenement house, 20 Dover 
street, owned by William McElroy, and occupied by Joseph Pollock. 
Cause, overheated chimney igniting woodwork. Members of Engine 
Company No. 2 responded with combination wagon. Used thi'ee pony 
extinguishers. Value of building, $1,500; damage, $7.66; insurance, 
$500; insurance paid, $7.66. No damage to contents. 

Box 21. Friday, February 5, 12.40 A. M. Wooden tenement house.' 

rear 191 Merrimack street, owned by Griffin, and occupied by 

John Brennan. Cause, too much beer. No fire. Box pulled by John 
Brennan. Companies responding, Engines 1, 2, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Triicks 1, 3. 

Still. Friday, February 5, 8.15 a. m. City d«mp on Pennacook 
street. ^Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded 
with hose wagon. Laid 700 feet of hose froin hydrant. 

Still. Friday, February 5, 1.50 p. m. False alarm from cottage 
house, 37 Dearborn street, owned by A. P. French, and occupied by 
Emma Goldie. Cause, back draft filled rooms with smoke. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. 

Still. Friday, February 5, 4.30 P. M. Chimney fire in cottage house, 
corner Hayward and Cypress streets, owned and occupied by Frank 
L Paige. Members of Engine Company No. 7 responded with hose 
wagon. No services required. 

Still. Saturday, February 6, 11 a. st. Concrete works, on Donald 
street, owned and occupied by the Eobie Concrete Company. Cause, 
defective flue set fire to pitch in kettle. ^lembers of Engine Com- 
pany No. 2 responded with combination wagon. U.sed one chemical 
tank. 

Still. Saturday, February 6, 2.35 P. M. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden tenement block, 65 Marion street, owned by E. W. Sargent 
heirs, and occupied by twelve families. Members of Engine and Lad- 
der Company No. 6 responded with hose wagon. Used two pony 
extinguishers. 

Still. Tuesday, February 9, 7.40 p. m. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block, 22 Concord street, owned by heirs of Henry Chandler, 
and occupied by Albert Upansler and others. Members of Chemical 
Company resi^onded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Saturday, February 13, 1.10 p. m. False alarm from Cohas 
shoe fehop, on Willow street, occupied by ^IcElwain Co., caused by 
unadjusted thermostat. Hose Company No. 3 responded. 

Box 216. Saturday, February 13, 5.43 p. m. Dwelling-house. 128 
Jewett street, owned and occupied by Albert E. Foster. Cause, drop- 
ping of hanging lapip. No damage. Box pulled bj' citizen. Compa- 
nies responding, Engines 3, 7, Hose 2, Coin\)ination 2. Truck 3. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 375 

Box 71. Sundaj-, February 14, 3.05 P. M. Two-story tenement house, 
141 Ea.st Spruce street, owned by estate of Harrison D. Lord. Slight 
fire around water j^ipes. Cause, unknown. Damage slight. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding, Engines 1, 3, Chemical, 
Hose 1. 3, Truck 3. 

Still. Monday. February 15, 1.25 p. m. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement block, 386 Pine street, owned by estate of Hiram Hill, and 
occupied by Waui'zeniec Stefanike and others. No services required. 

Still. Tuesday, February 23, 4.30 P. M. Four-story brick tenement 
block, 20 Birch street, owned by J. Adam Graf, and occupied by sev- 
eral families. Two beds were afire in room occupied by John Con- 
sick. Cause, unknown. Chemical engine responded. Value of con- 
tents of room, $25; damage, $7; no insurance. 

Box 4. Wednesday, February 24, 7.52 p. m. Wagon shed in rear 
of 41 Lake avenue, owned and occupied by heirs of Patrick Harring- 
ton. Slight fire among loose straw. Xo damage. Box pulled by boy. 
Companies responding. Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 6. Thursday, February 25. 12.27 A. jr. Four-story brick build- 
ing, 69 Hanover street, owned by W. A. Pierce of Portsmouth, and 
occupied by Mrs. Nora McPherson, as a boarding and lodging house. 
Fire in closet. Cause, unknown. Extinguished by Cheinical engine. 
Box pulled by Fred Burton. Companies responding, Engines 1, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $20,000; damage, 
$45; insurance, $10,000; insurance paid, $45. No damage to contents. 

Box 6. Thursday, February 25, 6.44 p. M. One-story woodshed, rear 
36 Stark street, owned by Amoskeag Mfg. Co., and occupied by Thomas 
F. Molloy and others. Cause, unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding, Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2. Trucks 1, 5. 
Value of buildings, $750; damage, $150; insurance, $750; insurance 
paid, $150. No damage to contents. 

Still. Friday, February 26. 8.45 p. M. Four-story brick block, 742 
Elm street, owned by Simons heirs, and occupied by R. B. Reynolds. 
Cause,' unknown. Members of Chemical Company responded. No 
services required. 

Box 71. Saturday, March 6, 12.45 A. Ji. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 66 Auburn street, owned by W. C. Lewis, Haverhill, Mass., 
and occupied by Ida Kraner. Slight fire in couch. Cause, unknown. 
Loss, $10; fully insuced. Extinguished bj- Chemical engine. Box 
pulled \)y citizen. Companies responding-. Engines 3, 4, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. 

Box 17. Wednesday. iNIarch 10. 10.27 A. M. Two-story wooden 
dwelling, 520 Beech street, owned and occupied by Mrs. John Foster. 
Fire in room occupied by Mrs. Harry George from an alcohol lam]). 
Extinguished before arrival of apparatus. Box ])ulled In- I'itizen. 
Companies responding. Engines 1, 3, Chemical. Hose 1, 2, Truck 1. 
Value of building. $1,000; damage. $15; insurance. $1,500: insurance 
IJaid. $15. No damage to contents. 



376 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 15. Saturday, March 13, 7.47 P. M. Two-and-a-half-story tene- 
ment house, 63 Orange street, owned by George P. Tarr of Bedford, 
and occupied by Mrs. Olive La Plante. Cause, snapj^ing match. Dam- 
age slight. Extinguished by Chemical. Box pulled 'by citizen. Com- 
panies responding, Engines 3, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1 
o. Value of building, $2,000; damage, $15; insurance, $1,400; insur- 
ance paid, $15. No damage to contents. 

Still. Monday', March 15, 10.30 A. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden six-tenement block, 505 Maple street, owned by Samuel 
Thompson, and occupied by Charles Carlton and others. Members 
of Hose Company No. 2 responded. No services required. 

Still. AVednesdaj-, March 17, 6.55 p. M. Chimney fire in two-story 
wooden dwelling-house, 241 Thornton street, owned by William Bois- 
clair, and occupied by two families. Members of Engine and Ladder 
Company- No. 6 responded with hose wagon. Used two pony ex- 
tinguishers. 

Still. Thursday, ^March IS, 8.55 A. M. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 11 Libertj' street, owned by Dr. C. B. Sturtevant, and occupied 
by Dennis Cronin. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 
responded with hose wagon. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Friday, March 19, 2.45 p. m. Grass fire on Calef road on land 
of T. McKenna and Park Mitchell. Hose Company No. 3 responded. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 15. Sunday, March 21, 8.21 p. m. Three-story brick tenement 
block, 68 Orange street, owned hy estate of John C. Young, and oc- 
cupied by Mrs. Marie Moffat. Slight fire in bed. Cause, unknown. 
Box pulled by F. M. Frisselle. Companies responding. Engines 1, 4, 5, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of contents, $300; damage, $6; 
no insurance. 

Still. Mondaj-, March 22, 10.10 a. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden tenement block, 1281 Elm street, owned by Gordon Wood- 
bury, and occupied by Bureau & LeBlond. Members of Chemical 
Company responded. Used one'pony extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, March 23, 10.45 a. m. Brush fire on unoccupied lot, 
corner Maple and Cla3' streets. Members of Engine Company No. 7 
responded with hose wagon. 

SiTTLL. W^ednesdaj', March 24, 6.45 A. M. False alarm from unad- 
justed thermostat at the H. B. Eeed shoe shop in McGregorville. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded with hose 
wagon. 

Still. Monday, March 29, 4.40 p. m. Grass fire on North Eiver road, 
on land of E. S. Whitney and A. H. Merrill. Cause, sparks from 
Boston &. Maine locomotive. Members of Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany No. 5 responded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Box 4. Thursday, April 1, 11.14 p. M. Three-story wooden tenement 
house, rear 28 Lake avenue, owned by Owen Kenney, and occupied 
by INIrs. Mary Znoj, and others. Cause, hot ashes in wooden box. 



REPOKT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 377 

Extinguished by Chemical engine. Box pulled by Officer Foj-. Com- 
panies responding, Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 
Value of building, $1,500; damage, $138; insurance, $1,000; insurance 
paid, $138. No damage to contents. 

Still. Friday, April 2, 12.35 a. m. Rekindling- of previous fire in 
partition in basement. Chemical engine responded. Used one pony 
extinguisher. 

Still. Friday, April 2, 7.05 p. ir. Four-story wooden tenement 
block, 26 'Washington block, Peai-1 street, owned by Charles C. Hayes, 
and occupied by Mrs. L. Laflferiere. Jlembers of Chemical Company 
resjDonded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Friday, April 2, 12.05 p. m. Grass fire on Chestnut street, 
near Clarke, on land owned by Griffin heirs. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 5 responded. Used three pony extinguishers. 

StiliL. Saturdaj% April 3, 5.50 p. m. Chimney fire in wooden tene- 
ment house, 447 Eimmon street, owned by Mrs. George Lesmerise, 
and occupied bj' two families. Members of Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany No. C responded. Used three pony extinguishers. 

Still. Monday, April 5, 2.30 p. m. Grass fire on Paige street and 
Candia road, on land owned by Samuel M. Mead. Members of En- 
gine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. 

Still. Tuesday, April 6, 9.50 a. m. Grass fire on land, corner 
Adams and Clarke streets. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 
No. 5 responded. Extinguished with garden hose. 

Still.; Wednesday, April 7, 8.40 P. m. Brush fire on land of F. G. 
Stark, on South Main street, near A street. Members of Engine Com- 
pany No. 2 responded. 

Box 5. Wednesday, April 7, 9.11 p. M. Four-story brick building, 
752 Elm street, owned bj' Charles E. Rowell, and occupied by Mrs. 
Luella M. Hedding as a lodging house. The fire was confined to a 
two-story shed in rear. Cause, incendiary. Box pulled by Officer 
Eourque. Companies responding: Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $600; damage, $49; no insurance. 
Value of contents, $200; damage, $100; insurance, $200; insurance 
paid, $100. 

Still. Thursdaj^, April 8, 3.45 a. m. Grass fire in Stark park. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. Used 
three ponj- extinguishers. 

Box 321. Thursday, April 8, 7.53 A. if. Two-and-a-half-s^ory dwell- 
ing-house, 159 Cartier street, owned b3" George Meisel, and occupied 
by him and John W^olfe. Cause, defective chimney. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding, Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 6, 
Value of building, $2,700; damage, $1,000; insurance, $2,000; insurance 
paid, $825. Value of contents, $500; damage, $200; insurance, $300; 
insurance paid, $120. 

Boxes 45, 45, 71. General alarm. Thursday, April 8. 10.39 A. M. 
Fire started in wooden tenement block, corner Elm and Auburn 



378 ANNFAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

streets, owned by the ^lanchester Realty Co., and before it was under 
control (wind blowing fifty miles an hour) it extended over the area 
from Elm street on the west to Maple street on the east, and Auburn 
on the south and Cedar on the north, covering- 13.23 acres. While the 
building in which the fire started was but partially consumed, sev- 
eral buildings on the square east on Chestnut and Auburn streets 
were totally destroyed. About forty buildings were more or less 
damaged. Assistance from the T. Jefferson Coolidge Engine of the 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co.. steamers and hose carriages coming from Con- 
cord, Nashua, Portsmouth, Dover, and Lowell, Mass. The fire was 
under control before arrival of apparatus from Portsmouth, Dover, 
and Lowell, Mass. Military call was sounded at 1.07, and was prompt- 
ly responded to, they rendering valuable assistance in protecting 
property that had been removed from the buildings. Value of build- 
ings, $140,000; damage, $30,000; insurance, $88,300; insurance paid. 
$15,572.34. Value of contents, $(50,000; damage, $12,000; insurance, 
$30,000; insurance paid, $8,000. 

Still. Thursday, April 8, 6.15 p. m. Grass fire on land owned by 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co., on Hajward street. Members of Engine Com- 
pany No. 7 responded. 

Still. Saturday, April 10, 9.37 a. m. Grass fire on Hancock street, 
on land owned bj' N. Burns. Cause, sparks from Boston & Maine 
locomotive. Hose Company No. 3 responded. 

Still. Saturdaj-, April 10, 2.15 p. m. Rubbish on bank of- Merri- 
mack river, rear lumber yard of J. H. Mendell Co. Cause, set by boys. 
Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with combination 
wagon. Used 500 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Saturday, April 10, 2.16 p. m. Grass fire covering about five 
acres on Nutt road, on land owned by Mrs. Laura Shea. Hose Com- 
pany No. 3 responded. 

SiriLL. Saturday, April 10, 8.40 p. m. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
touse, 61 Cedar street, owned by Charles Charron, and occupied by 
Joseph Connor. Chemical engine responded. Used two pony ex- 
tinguishers. 

Still. Monday, April 12, 2.30 p. m. Grass fire at SO Belmont street, 
on land owned by Grace Phillips. Members of Engine Company No. 
7 responded. Used three pony extinguishers. 

Still. Monday, April 12, 7.35 p. m. Two-stor.y tenement house, 
40 Merrimack street, owned by the Knights of Pythias Syndicate, 
and occupied by George W. Montiet and others. Slight fire in parti- 
tion. Cause, unknown. Chemical engine responded. LTsed one ponj' 
extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, Ai)ril 13. '.).l.'') a. m. Grass fire on North Adams 
street, on land owned by A. H. Sanborn. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 5 responded with hose wagon. Used one jxiny 
extinguisher. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 379 

Still. Tuesday, April 13, 8.45 p. si. Grass fire on Bremer street, 
on land owned by Amoskeag Mfg. Co. Members of Engine and Lad- 
der Company jS^o. 6 responded with liose wagon. 

Still. Sunday, April 18, 11. 5J a. >r. Chimney fire in wooden tene- 
ment block, 27 Bridge street, owned by Tom W. Robinson, and occn- 
])ied bj' Eliza Payeur. Members of Chemical Companj' responded. 
I'sed two pony extinguishers. 

Box 212. Monday, April 19, 8.32 A. M. Two-and-a-half-story wooden 
Iniilding, 410-412 Massabesic street, owned bj' Joseph Wilkins of Sun- 
cook, and occupied by John H. Canney as grocery store downstairs, 
and by Frank M. Page as tenement upstairs^ Cause, sparks from Bos- 
ton & Elaine locomotive. Box pulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding, Engines 3, 7, Hose 2, Combination 2, Trucks 1, 3. Value of 
building, $3,500; damage, $350; insurance, $2,000; insurance paid, 
$225.96. Value of contents, $3,000; damage, $135; insurance, $2,400; 
insurance paid, $60. 

2—2 — 2. Monday. April 19, 2.41 P. M. Brush fire on the Webster and 
Dickey roads, near pumping" station. Engine Company No. 4, with 
delegations from other companies, responded. A local shower as- 
sisted in extinguishing the fire, and delegations soon returned to 
quarters'. 

Box 512. Mondaj', April 19, 4.12 P. ir. Three-and-a-half-story wood- 
en dwelling-house, 78 Cartier street, owned by Annie Brunner, and 
occupied by her and John Brunner and John Matz. Cause, lightning. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding, Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, 
Truck 6. Value of building, $3,000; (,lamage, $20; insurance, $2,500; 
insurance paid. $20. No damage to contents. 

Still. Monday. April 19, 12.42 p. m. Brush fire on South Beech 
street, on land owned by ]Nf. Badger and others. Hose Comi)any No. 
3 responded. Used 550 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Tuesday, April 20, 12.55 A. m. Leaves and rubbish in yard 
at 184 Myrtle street, owned by the estate of Alpheus Gay. Members 
of Hose Company No. 2 responded with hose wagon. 

Still. Thursday, April 22, 10.40 a. :m. Four-story brick block, 22 
Concord street, owned by heirs of Henry and G. B. Chandler, and 
occupied by several families. Cause, curtain in tenement of Andrew 
Sasalski in contact with lamp. No damage. Chemical engine re- 
sj)onded. No services required. 

Still. Saturday, April 24, 7.45 p. m. Three-and-a-half-story brick 
block, 5 Print Works Corporation, owned b.v Amoskeag Mfg. Co., and 
occupied bj' E. V. Spiller. Cause, explosion of kerosene oil stove. 
Chemical enghie responded. Used one tank. 

Still. Tuesday, April 27, 1.15 p. m. Brush fire on Vinton street, on 
land owned by Robert P. Stevens. Members of Engine Company No. 
7 responded with hose wagon. Laid 600 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Tuesday, April, 27, 2.10 p. M. Brash fire on Willow and 
'S'inton street, on land owned by Laxon and Littlefield. ^lembers of 
Hose Company No. 3 responded witli hose wagon. 



380 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Tuesday, April 27, 2.20 p. m. Brush fire on Boynton street 
at Bedford line, on land owned by John K. McQuesten and others. 
^Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with combination 
wagon. 

Sttll. Wednesday, Ajjril 28, 4.47 p. M. Three-story wooden build- 
ing, 100 Lake avenue, owned by Peter Giblin, and occupied by Martin 
Manning and others. The fire originated in an unused attic, and was 
of suspicious origin. Chemical engine responded. Used one pony 
extinguisher. 

Still. Thursday, April 29, 10.10 a. m. Cottage house, 101 Blodget 
street,- owned and occupied by Mrs. Helen England. Cause, over- 
heated flue from gas stove ignited roof. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 5 responded. Extinguished before their arrival 
by nearby painters. 

Still. Thursday, April 29, 4.10 p. ir. Brush fire on North River 
road. Stark district. Members of Engine Company No. 5 responded 
with delegation and hose wagon. Used four ponj^ extinguishers. 

Box 71. Friday, April 30, 12.37 A. m. Three-story wooden block, 
96-100 Lake avenue, owned by Peter Giblin, and occupied by William 
J. Hurley as lunchroom, and Charles Tarsch and others as tenements. 
The fire, which Avas of mysterious origin, was in a partition in rear 
of Hurley's lunchroom. Box jDulled by officer. Companies respond- 
ing-. Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. Extinguished with 
chemical engine. Value of building, .$10,000; damage, $100; insurance, 
$5,000; insurance paid, $100. No damage to contents. 

Still. Saturday, May 1, 10.30 A. M. Two-story dwelling-house, 1910 
Elm street, owned by Dr. H. W. Boutwell, unoccupied (undergoing re- 
pairs). Cause, gas leak ignited by workman. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Comiiany No. 5 responded with wagon. 

Still. Mondaj-, May 3, 8.45 p. m. Brush fire on North Union street. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded with hose 
wagon. Used four pony extinguishers. 

Box 313. Tuesday, May 4, 9.31 P. M. Three-story wooden tenement 
block, 20 Wayne street, owned by Edward M. James, and occupied 
by Joseph Narborne, Victor Lamy, and Napoleon Richard. Cause, 
unknown. Box pvilled by officer. Companies responding. Engines 2, 
4, 6, Hose 1, Trucks 1, fi. Value of building, $2,500; damage, $300; in- 
surance, $1,400; insurance i^aid, .$300. No damage to contents. 

Still. Saturday, IMay 8, 7.20 P. M. Chimney fire in two-story dwell- 
ing-house, 447 Rimmon street, owned by Georgianna Lesmerise, and 
occupied by two families. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 
No. 6 responded with hose wagon. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Sundaj^ May 9, 10.20 a. m. Brush fire on Campbell street, 
on land of M. J. Phelan and Charles H. Philbrick. Cause, burning 
moth nests. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 2 re- 
sponded with hose wagon. L'sed two ponj^ extinguishers. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 381 

Still. Tuesday-, May 11, 2.30 p. M. Chimney fire in four-story 
wooden tenement house, rear McGreg-or street, owned by W, M. 
Parker, and occupied by several families. Members of P^ngine and 
Ladder Company Xo. 6 responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 4. Tuesday, May 11, 2.34 P. M. Three-story wooden tenement 
block, 40 Cedar street, owned by heirs of Daniel Connor, and occu- 
pied by Mrs. Thomas Kelley, Martin Conway, and Mary Legoes. 
Cause, unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding. En- 
gines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building. $4,000; 
damage, $135; insurance, $2,000; insurance paid, $40. Damage to con- 
tents slight. 

yriLL. Tuesday, May 11, 6.2,5 p. isi. Chimney fire in wooden tene- 
ment block, 57 Pearl street, owned by Nason Hall, and occupied by 
Francois Larivee. Chemical engine responded. Used one tank. 

2—2—2. Wednesday, May 12, 1.45 p. M. Brush fire on Webster 
street, on land owned bj' Amoskeag Mfg. Co., between Hooksett and 
Smyth road. Engine Companies 1 and 5 and delegation from other 
companies responded. Used two pony extinguishers. On duty three 
hours. 

Still. Wednesday, May 12, 4.20 p. M. Brush and grass fire at city 
farm. Combination Company No. 2 responded. 

Still. Wednesda.y, May 12, 7.40 p. M. Brush fire on land of Amos- 
keag ^Ifg. Co., on Webster street. Members of Elngine and Ladder 
Company No. 5 responded. 

Still. Thursday, :May 13, 6.31 a. m. Town hall at Bedford Cen- 
ter. In response to telephone call sent Engine Company No. 2 with 
steamer and hose wagon and Chemical engine. Used six tanks and 
laid 500 feet of hose. 

Still. Thursday, May 13, 12.30 p. m. Rekindling of Webster street 
brush fire on land owned by Amoskeag Mfg. Co. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. 

Still. Friday, May 14, 8.05 a. m. Chimney fire in cottage house, 
296 Lake avenue, owned and occupied by Mrs. E. M. Driscoll. Mem- 
bers of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded with hose 
wagon. 

Box 21. Friday, May 14, 8.43 P. M. Wooden tenement block, 320 
Pine street, owned by estate of A. D. Burgess, and occupied by 
Michael Pikhe. Slight fire in bureau. Cause, unknown. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding, Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 3. 

Still. Saturday, May 15, 12.10 p. m. McGregor bridge, owned by 
cit3' of ^Manchester. Cause, cigar stub ignited planking. Members of 
Engine and Ladder Company No. (i res]5onded with hose wagon. No 
services required. 

Still. Saturday, May 15, 3.05 p. Si. Brush fire on North Main 
street, on land owned by Amoskeag Mfg. Co. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 5 responded with hose wagon. Used three 
pony extinguishers. 



382 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Saturday, May 15, 5.35 p. m. Brush fire on Hooksett road, 
on land owned by the Amoskeag Mfg. Co. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company Xo. 5 re.sponded Avith hose wagon. Used two pony 
extinguishers. 

2—2—2. Saturday, May 15, 9.40 P. M. Brush fire at Goffe's Falls, 
on land owned by Devonshire Mills and Mr. Moore. Word was tele- 
phoned that the mills were afire. Sent Engine 4, Hose 3, and detail 
from different companies, the ai^paratvis going over the road, and the 
men on trolley cars. Fire extinguished before arrival. 

Still. Saturday, May 15, 9.42 p. m. Brush fire on North Eiver 
road. Members of Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 5 responded 
with hose wagon. Used two ponj- extinguishers. 

Box 321. iSaturday, May 22, 10.20 P. M. A carriage shed and hen- 
house, rear 330 Rimmon street, owned and occupied by Patrick 
Moher. Cause, unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing, Engines 2, G, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 6. Value of building, $25; damage, 
$5; no insurance. Value of contents, .$100; damage, $100; no insur- 
ance. 

Still. Monday, May 24, 7.05 p. m. Chimney fire in two-tenement 
dwelling, 30 Russell street, owned and occuijied by George Dow. 
Members of Hose Company Xo. 2 responded. Used one pony ex- 
tinguisher. 

Stili.. Tuesda3% May 25, 10.10 a. m. Chimney fire in dwelling-house, 
186 Bowman street, owned by Clarence M. Woodbury, and occupied 
by F. E. Winegar. Members of Engine Company Xo. 2 responded 
with combination wagon. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 4. Tuesday, May 25, 3.05 P. M. Three-story wooden tenement 
block, 52 Lake avenue, owned by Dr. William Richardson, and occupied 
by Xicholas Pappas. Cause, match thrown into mattress. Damage 
slight. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding, Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1. 3. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 71. Wednesday, May 26, 9.14 a. m. Lack of water in kettle 
of boiling beef caused smoke to issue from dwelling-house, 179 Cedar 
street, owned by Hannah Sullivan, and occupied by Bridget Heehan. 
Companies responding, Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. 

Box 711. Wednesday, May 26, 7.54 P. M. Xeedless alarm for bon- 
fire, corner Valley and Union streets. Companies responding, Engines 
3, 4, Chemical, Hose 3, Truck 3. 

Still. Saturday, May 29, 1.52 p. yt. Chimney fire in three-and-a- 
half-story wooden tenement block. 297 Chestnut street, owned by 
Mrs. W. H. Topping, and occupied bj' Mrs. Eugene Burke. Chemical 
engine responded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Monday, May 31, 5.10 p. m. A telephone call for help from 
Bedford for house and barn, owned and occupied by C. B. Farley, on 
Amherst road, about one and one half miles beyond center, and 
five and one half miles from city hall. Chemical and Engine Company 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 383 

Xo. 2 with combination wagon responded in charge of Assistant 
Chief Fitzsimmons. Used five chemical tanks. 

Still. Tuesday, June 1, 12.37 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 286 Pine street, owned by Mrs. Thomas Corcoran, and occupied 
by Charles Fish and others. Chemical engine responded. Used one 
Yiony extinguisher and one large tank. 

Box 82. Tuesday, June 1, 9.45 P. M. One-story wooden building on 
Elm street, owned bj' heirs of Warren Harvey and Joseph E. Weston, 
and occupied by Herbert Mathieuj as Librarie Franco-Americaine. 
Cause, unknown. Companies responding, Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Xo damage to building. Value of contents, 
$600; damage, $200; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $110. 

Still. Wednesday, June 2, 4.05 A. M. Waste in Harrington block, 
796 Elm street, owned by P. Harrington heirs, and occupied by Frank 
Johnson. Xo damage. Chemical engine responded. Used one pony 
extinguisher. 

Box 71. Wednesday, June 2, 2.16 p. m. Three-story wooden block, 
96 Lake avenue, owned by Peter J. Giblin, and occupied on first floor 
by William J. Hurley as a lunchroom, where the fire originated. Box 
pulled by Joseph P. Fahey. Companies responding. Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. Value of building, $10,000; damage, 
$275; insurance, $5,000; insurance paid, $275. Value of contents, $300; 
damage, $200; insurance, $200; insurance paid, $200. (Official inves- 
tigation.) 

Box 7. Saturday, June 5, 8.02 p. m. Wooden tenement house, 174 
Manchester street, owned by William A. Hancock, and occupied by 
Daniel Callahan. Cause, smoking in bed. Extinguished without aid 
of department. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding. En- 
gines 3. 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 4. Sunday, June 6, 8.42 P. M. Slight fire in rear of 24 Lake 
avenue, in wood yard of Levesquest Boucher. X'o damage. Box 
pulled by Valley George. Companies responding, Engines 1, 3, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 4, Tuesday, June 8, 5.16 p. m. Wooden tenement block (un- 
occupied sinbe fire of April 8), Auburn block, owned by Manchester 
liealty Co. Cause, boys. Box pulled by citizen. Companies respond- 
ing, Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Xo damage. 

Stili.. Wednesday, June 9, 5.50 A. M. A tailor's bench at 58 Lake 
avenue, in building owned by Bessie Grovval, and occupied by Theo- 
dore J. Tolgon and George J. Fasigopoulas as tailor shop. Cause, 
gas fiatiron. Xo damage. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Wednesday, June 9, 10.50 A. ii. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 162 Douglas street, owned and occupied by Henry Volkman. 
Members of Engine Company X'o. 2 responded. Used one pony ex- 
tinguisher. 

Box 61. Wednesday, June 9, 3.16 p. Jf. Grass fire on Calef road 
and south of Baker street, on land owned by Joseph F. Trahan 



384 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and others, and an unoccupied shed adjoining Trahan's barn. Com- 
panies responding-, Engines 7, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 1. Value 
of buildings, $2,000; damage, $75; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid. 
$25. 

Sttll. Wednesday, June 9,-8.58 p. m. Eailroad station at East Man- 
chester, owned by Boston & Maine Railroad. Cause, burning soft 
coal in stove, causing chimney to smoke. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Companj- Xo. 3 responded with hose wagon. 

Still. Saturday, June 12, 2.15 p. m. Grass fire on Willow street, 
on land owned by Timothy McKenna. Cause, sparks from Boston & 
Maine- locomotive. Members of Hose Company No. 3 responded with 
hose carriage. 

Box 52. Sunday, June 13, 12.58 A. M. Three-story hotel, 17 South 
Main street (Merrimack house) owned by Michael Connor, and occu- 
pied by William J. Arnold as a lodging house. Cause, tipping over 
lamp. Extinguished by Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. Companies 
responding, Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. Valye of building. $2,200; 
damage, $100; insurance, $1,250; insurance paid, $100. Value of con- 
tents, $600; damage, $55; insurance, $500; insurance paid, $49.80. 

Still. Sunday, June 13, 1.05 A. M. Cottage house, 763 Hayward 
street, owned and occupied b}^ William Simpson. Cause, fire in bed. 
]\rembers of Engine Company No. 7 responded. No services required. 

StujL. .Sunday, June 13, 2.40 p. if. Three-storj^ wooden tenement 
block, 53 Amherst street, owned by Ellen Kerins, and occupied by 
Albert Poutak. Cause, sparks on roof that burned a few shingles. 
Chemical engine responded. 

Box 71. Monday, June 14, 11.10 p. M. False alarm, the result of a 
fight at a dance. Companies responding. Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 
1, 3, Truck 3. 

Box 213. Tuesday, June 15, 4.30 p. m. Three-story wooden building, 
corner Beech street and Portsmouth Railroad, owned and occupied 
by Derryfield Co. as sash and blind, door and molding manufactory. 
Cause, sparks from boiler blown into shavings. Extinguished by men 
at works without aid of department. Box pulled by employee. Com- 
panies responding, Engines 3, 7, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. 

Box 4. Wednesday, June 16, 9.28 p. M. One-story flat-roofed shed 
and stable connected with Milford hotel, 618 Elm street, owned by 
heirs of Welch & Straw, and occupied by John A. Ballou. Cause, in- 
cendiary. Box pulled by L. B. Sherburne. Companies responding, 
Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of buildings, 
$50,000; damage, $493; insurance, '$15,000; insurance paid, $493. Value 
of contents, $160; damage, $100; no insurance. 

Still. Thursdaj-, June 17, 10.20 a. m. Chimney fire in L of two- 
story tenement block, 538 Chestnut street, owned by Mrs. J. H. 
Campbell, and occupied by several families. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. Used one ponj' extinguisher. 



KEPORT OF CHIEF OF FIKE DEPARTMENT. 385 

Still. Thursday, June 17, 1.10 p. m. One-story flat-roofed building, 
412 Chestnut street, owned by Elliot hospital, and occupied by Caron 
& Waight as Oneeda Laundry. Cause, gasoline stove. Chemical en- 
gine responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Thursday-, June 17, 5.40 p. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
tenement house, .370 Cartier street, owned by Abraham Beaulac, and 
occupied by three families. Members of Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany No. 6 responded with hose wagon. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 312. Friday, June 18, 8.49 A. M. Four-story wooden tenement 
block, 24 (rear) Wayne street, owned by Edwin L. Gresley, and occu- 
pied by Adrian Issabelle and others. Cause, children playing with 
matches. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding, Engines 1, 
2, (5, Hose 1, Trucks 1, G. Value of building, $5,000; damage, $30; in- 
surance, $4,000; insurance paid, $30. Value of contents, $300; dam- 
age, $10; no insurance. 

Still. Friday, June 18, 10.15 p. m. Chimney fire in cottage house, 
66 Nashua street, owned by Harvey Goodwin, and occupied by Mrs. 

Pemelton. Members of Hose Company No. 2 responded. Used 

one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Sunday, 'June 20, 3.40 P. M. Grass fire on land north of 
Kelley street, near Rimmon shoe shop, owned by Sullivan and Shee- 
han. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. 

Box 35. Monday, June 21, 3.52 p. M. Brick belt tower of Stark 
Mills, Canal street. Companies responding. Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Trucks 1. 5. 

Still. Tuesday, June 22, 6.15 p. m. Brick tenement block, 4 Pleas- 
ant street, owned by Amoskeag Mfg. Co., and t)ccupied b.y Alonzo 
Foster. Cause, smoking, igniting sofa. Extinguished before arrival 
of Chemical engine. 

Still.. Tuesday, June 22, 8.51 p. m. Two-story wooden dwelling, 
323 Hanover street, owned and occupied by Oscar B. Laport. Cause, 
smoke from a baking oven for firing china. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. Used one tank. 

Box 18. Tuesday, June 22, 8.54 p. m. This box was pulled by some 
excited individual for smoke from previous still alarm. Companies 
responding, Engines 1, 3, Hose 2, Combination 2, Truck 3. Value of 
building, $8,000; damage, $10; insurance, $3,600; insurance paid, $10. 
No damage to contents. 

Still. Wednesday, June 23, 10.53 A. m. False alarm. Short circuit 
on wires of sprinkler system at McElwain shoe shop on Willow street. 
Hose Company No. 3 responded. 

Still. Friday, June 25, 9.50 P. M. Chimney fire in tenement block. 
43 South :Main street, owned by George S. Eastman, and occupied by 
several families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with 
combination wagon. No .services required. 

Box 15. Saturday, June 26, 1.54 P. M. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 42 Pearl street, owned by Ellen Kerins, and occupied 



386 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

b}'- William La Page and others. Cause, defective chimney. Box 
pulled bj^ citizen. Companies responding, Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $5,000; damage, $775; insur- 
ance, $1,000; insurance paid, $775. Value of contents, $600; damage, 
$50; no insurance. 

Still. Saturday-, June 26, 7.50 p. m. Two-story wooden building, 
915 Elm .street, owned b.y Mercy Hqme, and occupied by Ideal restau- 
rant. Cause, fat boiling over on cooking range. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. No services required. 

Box 51. Sunday, June 27, 11.12 a. m. An automobile. No. 1381, on 
Second street, owned hy E. W. Hartford. Cause, vapor of naphtha 
ignited from torch. Companies responding. Engines 2, 6, Truck 6, 
Value of machine, $100; damage, $100; no insurance. 

Still. Saturday-, July 3, 3 p. m. Grass fire on Willow street, on 
land owned by Timothj- McKenna. Cause, sparks from Boston & 
Maine locomotive. Hose Companj' Xo. 3 responded. 

Still. Saturdaj', July 3, 5.06 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement house, 
74 Auburn street, owned by Michael Colmau. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. No services required. 

•Still. Sunday, July 4, 4.40 p. m. Four-tenement wooden building, 
426 Granite street, owned hy Hanson R. Armstrong. Cause, .slight 
fire among some rubbish in cellar near window. Members of Engine 
Company No. 2 responded with combination wagon. Used one pony 
extinguisher. 

Box 15. Monday-, July 5, 6.22 P. ir. One-story shed in rear of 73 
Orange street, owned by Frank W. Griffin, and occupied by Ned 
Garmon. Cause, fireworks. Box pulled bj- citizen. Companies re- 
sponding. Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of 
building, $-1,000; damage, $6; insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $6. 
No damage to contents. 

Still. Monday, July 5, 8.45 p. m. Grass fire on land, 514 Amherst 
street, owned and occupied by [Mrs. Clara B. Heath. Combination 
Companj' No. 2 responded. 

Still. Monday, Jul^^ 5, 9 p. m. Tw'o-and-a-half-storj- dwelling, 494 
Chestnut street, owned by Henry C- Parsons, and occupied by H. 
Hayes. Slight fire on roof caused by fireworks. Members of Engine 
Company No. 4 responded. 

Box 23. Monday, July 5, 9.22 P. m. Three-story dwelling, 168 East 
Spruce street, owned by David Johnson, and occupied by him, and 
others. Slight fire on roof caused by fireworks. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Companies responding. Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 
3. Value of building, $5,000; damage, $10; insurance, $2,800; insurance 
paid, $10. 

Still. Tuesday, July 6, 2.11 P. >r. One-story wooden building. 43- 
45 West Central street, owned bj^ Manchester Savings Bank, and un- 
o(cn])ied. Cause, unknown. Chemical engine responded. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 387 

Box 5. Tuesday, July 6, 2.19 p. if. The foregoing- fire was too 
much for the Chemical engine to handle, and bell alarm was given. 
Fire was principally confined to the sawdust under the floor. Com- 
jmnies responding. Engines 1, 3, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of 
building, $4,500; damage, $550; insurance, $3,000; insurance paid, $550. 

Box 113. Thursday, July 8, 5.01 P. M. Leaves and grass fire, corner 
Harrison and Oak street, near fence of Amoskeag Mfg. Co.'s reser- 
voir. Needless alarm pulled by boys. Companies responding, Engines 
1. 5, Hose 2, Combination 2, Truck 5. 

Still. Saturday, July 10, 11.50 A. M. Brush fire on land of Gordon 
^Yoodbury, just across the line in Bedford. Engine Company No. 2 
responded with combination wagon and delegation from Central sta- 
tion. On duty three hours. 

Still. Saturday, July 10, 9.36 p. m. Old lumber outside the For- 
saith building, corner Auburn and Canal street, owned by Gordon 
Woodbury. No value. Chemical engine responded. Used one tank 
and one pony extinguisher. 

■Still. Sunday, July 11, 8 p. m. Brush fire on wild land in Bedford 
adjoining city line, owned by Walter M. Parker. Members of Engine 
Company No. 2 and delegation from Central station responded. 

Box 71. Monday, July 12, 8.50 p. m. Two-an^-a-half-story house, 
140 East Spruce street, owned by Frank P. Johnson, and occupied (in 
basement) by Abraham Kniager as a meat market. Cause, lighted 
candle too near refrigerator. Damage slight. Box pulled by boy. 
Companies responding. Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 1. 

Box 7. Thursday, July 15, 12.42 a. m. L part of four-stofj- brick 
building, 59 Hanover street, owned by heirs of John N. Brown, and 
occupied by Sam J. LaFlamme as lunchroom on first floor, and George 
A. Little and others upstairs. Fire started in rear of Little's office. 
Cause, unknown. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding. En- 
gines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $10,000; 
damage, $15.57; insurance, $8,000; insurance x^aid, $15.57. No damage 
to contents. 

Box 5. Thursday, July 15, 9.06 a. m. Two-story wooden tenement 
house, rear 40 Merrimack street, owned by Knights of Pythias Asso- 
ciates, and occupied by ^I. Vetesk and others. Cause, lighting fire 
Avilh kerosene. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding, En- 
gines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $10,- 
000; damage, $85; insurance, $5,000; insurance paid, $85. Value of 
contents, $100; damage, $20; no insurance. 

Still. Friday, July 16, 3.26 A. Ji. The remains of cottage house 
(from fire of August 5, 1908) on Jefferson street, owned by the heirs 
of Waterman Smith, was set by incendiary, and the remainder was 
entirely consumed. Hose 1, 3 and Chemical responded. Laid 1.500 
feet of hose from hydrant. 

Box 17. Friday, July 16, 1.10 p. m. Two-and-a-half-story dwelling, 
203 Amherst street, owned by IMrs. Delia Laplante, and occupied by 



388 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Antoine Brule. Cause, candle in developing- room in cellar. Box 
pulled by Joseph Primeau. Companies responding-, Engine 1, 3, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 3. Value of building-, .$6,000; damage, $10; insur- 
ance, $4,000; insurance paid, $10. 

Still. Saturdaj-, July 17, 7.45 p. m. Four-story brick block, 1490 
Elm street, owned b^' J. J. Abbott, and occupied by Clifton O. Allison. 
Cause, lace curtain in contact with gas. Chemical engine responded. 
No services reqiiired. 

S'till. Sundaj', July 18, 8.05 A. M. Wooden tenement block, 436 
Granite street, owned by Hanson R. Armstrong-, and occupied by 
several families. Cause, lace curtains blew into lig-hted candles. 
Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded. 

Box 15. Monday, July 19, 8.39 P. m. Four-story wooden tenement 
block, 1-2 Pearl avenue, 45 Pearl street, owned by Hoitt & Simons, 
and occupied by Wallace Russell and others. The fire originated in 
a pile of chiles in Russell's cellar from some unknown cause. No 
damage. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding. Engines 1, 4, 
5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Friday, July 23, 12.20 A. m. Chimney fire in cottage house, 
250 Belmont street, owned and occupied by Frank H. Mores. Mem- 
bers of Engine Company No. 7 responded. Used one pony extin- 
guisher. 

Still. Tuesday, July 27, 3.49 p. ir. Three-story wooden tenement 
block, 133 East Spruce street, owned bj' Mrs. Marie Tagney, and occu- 
pied by Mary Barrett and others. Cause, smoking stove, no fire. 

Still. ' Wednesday, July 28, 10.45 a. m. Brush fire on unoccupied 
land on Amory and Reed streets, owned by Amoskeag Mfg. Co. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. 

Still. Wednesdays July 28, 2.40 p. m. Brush fire on unoccupied land 
on Boynton street, owned by B. J. Mack. ^Members of Engine Com- 
pany No. 2 responded. 

Still. Thursdays July 29, 1.30 p. ir. Brush fire on peat bog, at 
junction of Hanover street and Lake avenue, on land owned by George 
F. Bosher. Combination Company No. 2 responded with wagon. Laid 
850 feet of hose from hydrant. On duty five and one-half hours. 

Still. Friday, July 30, 11.15 a. m. Brush fire on unoccupied land 
on Boynton street, owned by B. J. Mack. Members of Engine Com- 
pany No. 2 responded with combination wagon. 

Still. Saturdaj% July 31, 10.15 a. m. Brush fire on unoccupied land 
on Boynton street, owned by B. J. Mack. ^Members of Engine Com- 
pany No. 2 responded with combination wagon. Laid 800 feet of hose 
from hydrant. 

Still. Sunday, August 1, 4.30 p. jr. The peat bog at junction of 
Lake avenue and Hanover street, owned by George F. Bosher and 
Mrs. George W. Morgan. Combination Company No. ,2 responded with 
wagon. Laid 500 feet of hose from hydrant. On duty three hours. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 389 

liox 210. Sunday, August 1, 4.57 p. m. Cottage house, 91 Prout ave- 
nue, owned by Mrs. Catherine Merrill, and occupied by W. F. Ikissett. 
Lace curtain caught fire. Damage slight. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding, Engines 3, 7, Chemical, Hose 2, Combination 
2, Truck 3.' 

Still. Sunday, August* 1, 5.55 P. M. Brush fire on land on east side 
of South Beech street, owned by Mrs. Caroline C. Webster, caused 
by blueberry pickers. Hose Company No. 3 responded. 

Still. Sunday, August 1, 7 P. M. Brush fire on land of ISIrs. Web- 
ster rekindled. Members of Engine Company No. 7 responded. On 
duty one hour and ten minutes. 

2—2 — 2. Monday, August 2, 10.03 A. ii. Brush fire on land of Mrs. 
Webster. Engine Company No. 1 and Hose Company No. 3 and detail 
of men from other companies responded. On duty three and one half 
hours. 

Still. Moudaj-, August 2, 1.20 P. M. Peat bog on Hanover street, 
owned by Bosher, Flanders, Morgan, and others. Members of Engine 
Company No. 3 responded. Laid 800 feet of hose from hydrant. 

2 — 2 — 2. Monday, August 2, 4.05 p. M. Eekindling of fire on land 
of Webster, Thompson, and others, on South Beech street. Engine 
Company No. 4, Hose 1, 3, responded with details from other compa- 
nies. 

Still. Tuesday, August 3, 5.25 a. m. Brush fire on South Beech 
street, on land owned by heirs of Joseph A. Brown. Hose Company 
No. 3 responded. 

Still. Tuesday, August 3, 9.50 a. m. Brush fire on South Beech 
street (rekindling of previous fire). Hose Company No. 3 responded. 

Still. Tuesday, August 3, 11 A. ii. Spreading of previous fire. En- 
gine Company No. 7 responded. On duty six and one half hours. 

Still. Tuesdaj', August 3, 3.15 P. M. Peat bog on Hanover street, 
owned by George F. Bo.sher and others. Combination Company No. 2 
responded. Laid 750 feet of hose from hydrant. 

2—2—2. Wednesday, August 4, 9.55 A. M. Eekindling of brush fire 
on South Beech street, on land owned by Smith, Brown, and Webster. 
Engine Company No. 7, with steamer and hose wagon, Hose No. 3, 
with wagon, and members of Engine Company No. 1 responded. Laid 
1,400 feet of hose. 

Still. Wednesda.v, August 4, 1.10 P. Ji. McGregor bridge, plank- 
ing slightly burned. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Tuesday, August 10, 11.50 A. M. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 621 Summer street, owned by George L. Southwick, and occu- 
pied by A. L. Burdick. Members of Engine Company No. 7 responded. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesdaj^ August 10, 1.30 p. m. Brush fire on north side 
of Campbell street, on land owned by Irving L. Campbell. Members 
of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. Cause, caught from 
burning refuse. 



390 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 16. Wednesday, August 11, 4.01 A. m. Two-and-a-half-story 
dwelling-house, 146 Lowell street, owned by Susan E. Eanlet of 
Winchester, Mass., and occupied by Mrs. Homer E. Davis as a board- 
ing house. Cause, unknown. ♦ Box pulled by Lawrence Davis. Com- 
panies responding, Engines 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1. 5. 
Value of building, $5,000: damage, $1,120; insurance, $4,000; insurance 
paid, $1,120. Value of contents, $1,200; damage, $375; insurance. 
$1,000; insurance paid, $375. 

Still. Wednesday, August 11, 6.25 a. m. One-story wooden build- 
ing, owned and occupied by Palmer & Garmon, granite and marble 
workers. Cause, cigar stub set fire to boarding near sill. Damage 
slight. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Wednesday, August 11, 10.40 a. m. Ash barrel in rear of 423 
Amherst street. Chemical engine responded. No services required. 

Still. W'ednesdaj', August 11, 1.27 p. m. Bridge over the Canal at 
foot of Bridge street, owned by the city. Fire in planking, cause cigar 
stub. Chemical engine responded. Used one pony extinguisher and 
one tank. 

Box 10. Fridaj', August 13, 3.05 p. m. Barn, in rear 599 Union 
street, owned by Electa M. Priest, and occupied by John G. Lane and 
others. Cause, boys with matches. Box pulled by citizen. Compa- 
nies responding. Engines 1, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value 
of building, $600; damage, $3,197; insurance, $500; insurance paid, 
$31.97. No damage to contents. 

Box 61. Frida}', August 13, 3.25 P. M. Cottage house and barn on 
Calef road, owned by William F. and L. J. Harrington, and occupied 
by Mrs. Alice L. Miller. Cause, unknown. Box pulled by Driver 
Tebbetts of Hose No. 3. Companies responding. Engine 7, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 3, Combination 2, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $2,500; dam- 
age, $1,500; insurance, $2,200; insurance paid, $1,500. Value of con- 
tents, $600; damage, $150; no insurance. 

Still. Sunday, August 15, 10.10 a. u. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 183 Turner street, owned by M. C. Blanchard, and occupied 
by four families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded. 
Used one pony extingviisher. 

Still. Sundaj-. Augvist 15, 3.10 p. m. Brush fire on ^lammoth road, 
near Smyth road, on land owned by estate of Frederick Smyth. 
Delegation from Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 and Hose Com- 
pany No. 2 responded with exercise wagons. On duty one hour. 

Still. Wednesday, August 18, 1.15 p. m. Four-story brick block, 
796 Elm street, owned by Mitchell and Brown heirs, and occupied 
by Frank E. Johnson as confectionery store. Cause, boiling over of 
candy kettle. No damage. Chemical engine responded. No services 
required. 

Still. Thursday, August 19. 8.20 p. m. An automobile on Bridge 
street, corner of Elm, owned by E. C. Ilellman. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. Used one tank. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT, 391 

Still. Friday, August 20. 9.14 p. m. Two-and-a-half-story dwell- 
ing--house, 182 Manchester street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Jose- 
phine Gilro3^ Cause, lamp explosion. Chemical engine responded. 
No services required. 

Still. Saturday, August 21, 2.30 p. m. Grass tire on Oak street, 
near Blodget, on land owned by Amoskeag Mfg. Co. Hose Company 
No. 2 responded with hose wagon. Used three pony extinguishers. 

Still. Saturday, August 21, 11.15 p. M. Automobile on Bridge 
street, near Elm, owned by E. C. Hellman. Chemical engine responded. 
No services required. 

Box 16. Mondaj-, August 23, 3.33 P. ir. Four-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 65 Pearl street, owned by heirs of Nason Hall, and occu- 
pied by Joseph Daigle and others. Cause, boy with matches in 
Daigle's tenement. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding. 
Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, 
$3,000; damage, $50; insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $50. Value of 
contents, $400; damage, $75; no insurance. 

Still. Friday, August 27, 9.55 A. m. Brush tire in the Harvey dis- 
trict on land owned by L. W. Leclerc. Hose Company No. 3 responded. 
Used four pony '•extinguishers. 

Still. Friday, August 27, 11.20 a. m. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 209 Bartlett street, owned and occupied by Gilbert. 

Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. Used two 
pony extinguishers. 

Still. Monday, August 30, 2.45 a. m. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 122 Central street, owned by Nancy D. Smith and occupied by 
Johanna Welch. Chemical engine responded. Used one pony ex- 
tinguisher. 

Still. Friday, September 3, 4.37 p. m. Barn in rear 455 Chestnut 
street, owned by Bailey & Goggin, and occupied by Sanborn Carriage 
Co. Cause, sparks from setting wheel tires. Damage slight. Chem- 
ical engine responded. 

Still. Friday, September 3. 0.05 p. m. Automobile at 278 ;Myrtle 
street, owned by Bert J. Fellows. Cause, leakage of gasoline. Mem- 
bers of Hose Company No. 2 responded. No services required. 

Still. Monday, September 6, 3.18 p. m. Storehouse of N. Y. :Metal 
Co. at Kidder court. Cause, electric wires scorching beam. Chemical 
engine responded. No services required. 

Still. Wednesday, September 8, 4.40 p. m. Two-and-a-half-story 
Avooden tenement building, (w Amherst street, owned b.v Mrs. Frank 
E. Boyd, and occupied bv Cyrus Whlttemore and others. Cause, 
slacking lime in basement. 

Box 4. Wednesday. September 8, 8.16 P. M. Four-story brick block, 
15 AVest Cedar street, owned by Blodgett and Young heirs, and occu- 
pied hy Arthur Jean aiid others. Cause, careless use of lamp. Dam- 
age slight. Box pulled by citizen. Companies resjionding. Engines 
3, 4. Chemical, Hose 1. 3, Truck J. 3. 



392 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Thursday, September 9, 6.30 p. m. Burning paper at corner 
Beech and Grove street. Chemical engine responded. 

Box 911. Thursday, September 9, 10.25 P. m. False alarm pulled by 
some malicious person. Companies responding, Engines 1, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, Truck 5. 

Box 52. Sunday, September 12, 10.58 A, M. Four-story wooden ten- 
ement block, 5-7 South Main street, owned hy Horatio Fradd, and 
occupied by Wilfred Cote, and others. Cause, matches in hands of 
Cote boy. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding, Engines 2, 
6, Hose 1, Truck 6-. Value of building, $4,500; damage, $10.60; insur- 
ance, $3,000; insurance paid, $10.60. Value of contents, $400; damage, 
$14; no insurance. 

Box 21. Sunday, September 12, 6.07 P. M. Chimney fire at 136 Lake 
avenue, in three-story tenement block, owned by Paul Katner, and 
occupied by several families. Box pulled by a Greek. Companies re- 
sponding. Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 5. No services re- 
quired. 

Stull. Monday, September 13, 7.29 P. M. Smoking chimney at 1222 
Elm street in five-story brick block, owned by Smith and Carpenter, 
in rooms of Cooke, Fitz & Dillingham. No service s^equired. 

Box 4. Thursday, September 16, 7.31 p. M. False alarm pulled by 
a Greek. Companies responding. Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 
Trucks 1, 3. 

Box 8. Sunday, Septenaber 19, 1.30 p. m. Two-and-a-half-story 
dwelling-house, 16 Prospect street, owned by Alfred Quimby, and oc- 
cupied by M. C. Thayer. Cause, gas stove too near partition. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding. Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, 
Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $4,000; damage, $40.75; in- 
surance, $3,000; insurance paid, $40.75. No damage to contents. 

Box 513. Tuesday, September 21, 8.24 A. M. Two-story wooden 
dwelling-house, 181 Milford street, owned and occupied by John C. 
Littlefield. Cause, sparks from chimney ignited dry shingles. Box 
pulled by citizen. Companies responding. Engines 2, 6, Truck 6. 
Value of building, $3,500; damage, $26.58; insurance, $3,500; insur- 
ance paid, $26.58. No damage to contents. 

Still. Wednesday, September 22, 10.30 a. m. Burning sawdust in 
rear 54 Concord street, owned by Club Jolliet. No damage. Chemical 
engine responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

SbriLL. Wednesday, September 22, 3.40 P. M. Storage shed for 
gasoline and shoe cement on W^est Hancock street, owned and occu- 
pied by C. E. Green & Co., shoe manufacturers. Members of Engine 
Company No. 2 responded with combination wagon. Laid 550 feet of 
hose from hydrant. Value of building, $50; damage, $50; no insur- 
ance. Value of contents, $100; damage, $100; no insurance. 

Box 4. Saturday, September 25, 1.52 a. m. Four-story brick build- 
ing (Hotel Milford), 610-620 Elm street, owned by Dr. A. Gale Straw 
and Arthur S. Brown heirs, and occupied by John A. Ballou. The 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 393 

fire started in room 41 on fourth floor from some unknown cause 
(presumably from cigarettes), and burned hole through the floor. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding, Engines 1, 3, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $55,000; damage, 
$57.36; insurance, $15,000; insurance paid, $57.36. No damage to con- 
tents. 

SiTXLL. Wednesday, September 29, 11 a. m. Tar and pitch kettles 
at the gravel bank of the Eobie Concrete Co., near Donald street. 
Members of Engine Companj^ No. 2 responded with combination 
wagon. Used two chemical tanks. 

Still. Friday, October 1, 12.28 p. m. Chimney fire in cottage house, 
959 Hayward street, owned and occupied by F. C. Sunbury. Members 
of Engine Company No. 7 responded. No services required. 

Box 52]. Sunday, October 3, 7 p. ii. Three-story wooden tenement 
block, 64 Winter street, owned by James Leahy, and occupied by 
Joseph Arcand. Cause, dog broke kerosene lamp. Damage slight. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding. Engines 2, 6, Truck 6. 

Still. Mokday, October 4, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in two-and-a- 
half story tenement house, 61 Nashua street, owned by Mrs. Abbie D. 
Stevens, and occupied by Alfred Eoberge. Members of Hose Com- 
pany No. 2 responded. No services required. 

Still. Saturday, October 9, 12.10 P. Ji. Smoky chimney in Mirror 
building, 64 Hanover street, owned by heirs of Hill, Gay, Bartlett, and 
Wells. Chemical engine responded. No services required. 

Box 6. Wednesday, October 13, 7.50 P. M. Four-story brick block, 
71 Hanover street, owned by W. A. Pierce of Portsmouth, and occu- 
pied by Gorman Bros, as grocery store. The fire originated in a blind 
cellar in basement from some unknown cause. Box pulled by Edmond 
^Menancon. Companies responding. Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 5. Value of building, $20,000; damage, $75; insurance, 
$15,000; insurance paid, $75. Value of contents, $7,000; damage, $300; 
insurance, $4,000; insurance paid, $100. 

Box 15. Wednesday, October 13, 8.34 P. M. Two-and-a-half-story 
wooden dwelling (rear) 73 Orange' street, owned by estate of Eliza 
Creighton, and occupied by Margaret Casey. Slight fire in woodbox. 
Companies responding, Engines 1, 2, 4, 5, Hose 1, 2, 3, Combination 2, 
Trucks 1, 5. 

Still. Thursday, October 14, 6.40 A. M. Tar kettles at gravel bank 
on Donald street, owned by Robie Concrete Co. Members of Engine 
Company No. 2 responded with combination wagon. 

Box 7. Tuesday, October 19, 3.50 P. M. One-story wooden building, 
386 Chestnut street, owned by Michael (iilbert, and occupied by H. O. 
Morin as the Home Supply Co. Cause, putting excelsior into hot 
stove. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding. Engines 3, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. No damage to building. Value of 
contents, $600; damage, $gOO; insurance, $450; insurance paid, $200. 



394 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 71. Tuesday, October 19, 6.55 p. m. Chimnej^ fire in four-story 
wooden tenement block, rear 210 Auburn street. Box pulled by citizen. 
Companies responding, Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Truck 3. 

Box 54. Wednesday-, October 20, 1.15 p. M. Cottage house, 588 South 
Main street, owned by Frederick Smalley, and occupied by William 
Cummings. Cause, slight fire in Avoodbox communicated to sheath- 
ing. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding, Engines 2, 6, 
Truck 6. Used three pony extinguishers. Value of building, $3,000; 
damage, $57.73; insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, $57.73. No damage 
to contents. 

Still. Thursday, October 21, 11.58 A. M. Chimney fire in dwelling- 
house, 83 Spruce street, owned by George Zantokis,*and occupied by 
Peter Costos. Chemical engine responded. Used one pony ex- 
tinguisher. 

Still. Thursday-, October 21, 9.47 p. m. Three-and-a-half-story 
brick block, corner Elm and Mechanic street, owned by Rowell & 
Cronin, and occupied Xo. 12 Mechanic street as a laundry. Cause, 
gas jet. Chemical engine responded. Used one tank. Damage, $6; 
no insurance. 

Still. Saturday. October 23, 9.25 a. m. Dwelling-house, 128 South 
Main street, owned by the heirs of D. K. Mack, and occupied by 
James E. MacDonald. Cause, sparks from chimney set fire to shingles. 
Damage, slight. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with 
combination wagon. Used two chemical tanks. 

Still. Saturday, October 23, 12 m. Chimney fire in cottage house 
on Londonderry turnpike, owned by J. Chamj)agne, at Massabesic 
(four miles from city), caused unnecessary run for Chemical engine. 

Still. Monday, October 25, 7.45 a. m. Cottage house, 533 Lake ave- 
nue, owned and occupied by Lizzie S. Goodwin. Cause, hot thimble. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. Used one 
pony extinguisher. 

Still. Monday, October 25, 6.15 P. M. Four-storj^ brick building, 
849-851 Elm street, owned by Bond, Barton, and others, and occupied 
by the Barton Co. as dry goods store. Cause, burning gas from 
broken chandelier. No damage. Members of Chemical Company re- 
sponded. 

Still. Tuesday, October 26, 7.57 p. m. Two-and-a-half-story dwell- 
ing, 404 Chestnut street, owned by the Eliot hospital (leased by Jo- 
seph E. LaFlamme) and occupied by M. T. Hawes as boarding house. 
Cause, breaking of kerosene lamp. Chemical engine responded. 
Used one pony extinguisher and one chemical tank. Value of build- 
ing, $1,500; damage, $50; insurance, $3,000; insurance paid, $50. Value 
of contents, $1,500; damage, $10; no insurance. 

Still. Thursday, October 28, 12.15 p. m. Four-story brick building, 
;;o Granite street, owned by F. P. Carpenter and heirs of F. J. Drake, 
and occupied by Henry W. Parker. Cause, soot in flue of coifee 
roaster. Chemical engine responded. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 395 

Still. Thursday, October 2S, 12.30 P. Jr. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 107 Myrtle street, owned and occupied by Misses Kidder. Hose 
Company No. 2 responded with hose wagon. Used two pony ox- 
tinguisliers. 

Stili.. Thursdaj', October 28, 2.;!5 i\ m. Chimney fire in two-tene- 
ment house, 20 Hospital avenue, owned and occupied by ^Irs. N. A. 
Tuttle. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. ;'. responded. 
Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Thursday, October 28, G.20 p. m. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 190 Wilson street, owned bj^ Frank Moore, and occupied by E. 
E. French. IMembers of Engine Company Xo. 7 responded. Used one 
pony extinguisher. 

Still. Thursda}-, October 28, 8.20 P. M. Two-and-a-half-story 
dwelling-house, 33 Birch street, owned and occupied by William M. 
Lane. Cause, overheated chimney set fire to sheathing. Chemical 
engine responded. Used one pony extinguisher and 1 chemical tank. 
Value of building, $2,500; damage, $15; insurance, $2,000; insurance 
paid, $15. 

Still. Friday, October 29, 7.50 p. jl Chimney fire in four-story 
wooden tenement block, 196 Merrimack street, owned by Manchester 
Eealty Companj' (M. C. Blanchard, agent), and occupied by several 
families. Chemical engine responded. LTsed one chemical tank. 

Still. Saturday, October 30, 11.10 a. m. Two-and-a-half-story 
wooden tenement house, 160 Central street, owned by Patrick Tang- 
ney, and occupied by Frank Bosse and Mrs. Nellie Siillivan. Cause, 
sparks from chimnej' ignited shingles, burning small hole in roof. 
Chemical engine responded. Value of building, $3,800; damage, $65; 
insurance, $3,000; insurance paid, $65. No damage to contents. 

Box 4. 12.29, 12.37 P. M., Saturday, October 30. Four-story brick 
block, 629-639 Elm street, owned by heirs of Daniel Connor, and occu- 
pied by Joseph G. Plante & Co., wholesale 'and retail liquor dealers; 
Sharon & Solomon, pawnbrokers; Frank Fontaine, barber; Schmidt 
& Schaefer, liquor dealers. The fire originated in the basement oc- 
cupied bj' J. G. Plante & Co. from some unknown cause. Companies 
responding. Engines 1. 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 3, Trucks, 1, 3, 5. 
Value of building, $30,000; damage, $1,234; insurance. $5,000; insurance 
paid, $1,234. 

Plante Sharon & Sullivan Fontaine 

Value of contents $10,000.00 $2,000.00 $1,500.00 

Damage 3,000.00 25.00 71 .50 

Insurance «, 500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Insurance paid 2,902.00 25.00 71.50 

Still. Saturday, October 30, 12.45 p. m. During progress of previ- 
ous fire. Chemical engine was sent to Corcoran block, 214 Chestnut 
street, for fire on roof, caused by sparks from steamer. Damage very 
slight. 



396 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Sttli.. Saturday, October 30, 3.25 p. m. Brush fire on Goffstown 
road near town and city line. Members of Engine Company Xo. 2 
responded. No damage. 

Stihl. Saturday, October 30, 4.38 p. m. Old railroad ties on Boston 
& Maine Railroad near gas works. Cause, sparks from Boston & 
Maine locomotive. Hose Companj- No. 3 responded. Laid 150 feet of 
hose from hydrant. 

Still. Saturday, October 30, 7.40 p. m. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 265 Myrtle street, owmed and occupied by Samuel B. Hope. 
Menibers of Hose Company No. 2 responded. No services rendered. 

Still. iStinday, October 31, 9.20 A. m. Burning leaves at 15 Hazel 
street, owned by Mrs. Charles Brodie of Watertown, N. Y., and occu- 
pied by H. L. Hall. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 
responded with hose carriage. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Sunday, October 31, 7.54 p. M. Fire in an old hollow tree 
on Barry playgrounds, south of Vallej'^ street, on land owned by 
Amoskeag' Manufacturing Company, and occupied by the city. Mem- 
bers of Hose Company No. 3 responded with hose wagon. Used two 
pony extinguishers. 

Still. Monday, November 1, 9.03 a. m. Dwelling-house, C5 Bath 
street, owned by George Graf, and occupied by John Rausch. Cause, 
explosion of hot water front of range, setting fire to -vvoodbox. Mem- 
bers of Engine Company No. 2 responded. No services required. 

Still. Friday, November 5, 11.50 A. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 50 West street, owned by Hanson K. Armstrong, and occupied 
bjf three families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with 
combination wagon. LTsed two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Friday, November 5, 9.03 p. m. Four-story brick block, 31 
Hanover street, owned by Harrington & Straw, and occupied bj' sev- 
eral parties. The fire originated in a closet on the second floor from 
some unknown cause. Chemical engine responded. Used one ^ank. 

Still. S'aturday, November 6, 10.40 a. m. Brush fire on unoccu- 
pied land, owned by Amoskeag ^Ifg. Co., on Amory street, west of 
Hevey street. Set by boys. Members of Engine and Ladder Com- 
pany No. 6 responded. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, November 6, 1.40 P. if. Brush and grass fire on 
Elm street, south of gas works, on land owned by Amoskeag Mfg. Co. 
Set by boys. Members of Hose ComiDany No. 3 responded with hose 
wagon. 

Still. Saturday, November 6, 4.40 p. M. Four-story brick block. 31 
Hanover street, owned ^by Harrington and Straw, and occupied by 
several parties. Cause, smoldering sawdust from yesterday's fire. 
Chemical engine responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 21. Saturday, November 6, 4.45 p. m. Three-story wooden 
dwelling, 285 Chestnut street, owned by Eimmon Ten Comijanious, and 
occupied by Frank Gagnon. Cause, smoking in bed. Thomas Dugan, 
Lowell, Mass., who roomed on third floor, unnecessarily jumped from 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 397 

window, receiving injuries from which he died several hours later. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding-, Engines 3, 4, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, $8,000; damage, $75; insurance, $2,500; 
insurance paid, $75. Value of contents, $300; damage, $20; no insur- 
ance. 

Still. Sunday, November 7, 1.25 P. m. Brush fire, corner Grant 
and Boynton street, on land owned by estate of A. J. Lane. No dam- 
age. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded. 

Box 21. Monday, November 8, 12.52 p. m. Three-stoi-y brick block, 
294 Pine street, owned by Mrs. W. H. Topping, and occupied by Mrs. 
L. A. Tuttle and others. The fire was caused by heating alcohol 
over an oil lamp in room occupied by Arthur Dugrenier. Damage 
slight. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding. Engines 3, 4, 
Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1. 3. 

Box 321. Tuesday, November 9, 2. 38 a. m. Three-story wooden 
tenement house, 430 Notre Dame avenue, owned by Peter Fleming, 
and occupied by Dr. E. N. Fugere (first floor), Joseph Nightingale 
(second floor), J. B. Plante (third floor). The fire originated from 
some unknown cause in a workroom of Plante's tenement, and soon 
extended to a "blind attic." Box pulled by officer. Companies re- 
sponding. Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 6. Value of building, $5,500; 
damage, $2,250; insurance, $5,000; insurance paid, $2,250. Value of 
contents (Nightingale), $:!,000: damage, $604; insurance, $1,900; insur- 
ance paid, $604. Value of contents (Fugere), $2,000; damage, $800; 
insurance, $1,300; insurance paid, $400. Value of contents (Plante), 
$4,000; damage, $2,350; insurance, $3,200; insurance paid, $2,350. 

Still. Tuesday. November 9, 7.30 P. m. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block, 696 Elm stret, owned by E. M. Topliff, and occupied by 
Snow & Knight. Chemical engine responded. Used one pony ex- 
tinguisher. 

Still. Friday, November 12, 6.50 p. m. Brush fire on Boynton 
street, on land occupied by B. J. Mack. Set by boys. ^lembers of 
Engine Company No. 2 responded. 

Box 6. Sunday, November 14, 4.26 A. ir. Four-story brick block, 
23-41 Hanover street, owned by Harrington and Straw heirs, and occu- 
pied by People's Gas Light Co.; Richard Codaire & Co., millinerj'; 
Mrs. A. B. Connell}', millinery; William P. Goodman, books and sta- 
tionery; Clark's Clothes Cleaning Co.; Jennie Norton, dressmaker; T. 
J. Teehan, room, and lodge of Elks. The fire originated in basement 
occupied by the Gas Company as a meter and repair shop from some 
unknown cause. Box pulled by Officer Kenney. Companies respond- 
ing. Engines 1, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, Trucks 1, 5. Value of building 
(Straw and Harrington) (A. Quimby). $12,000; damage, $384.50; in- 
surance, $5,000; insurance paid, $384.50. 



398 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

CONTEXTS. 

Value. Damage. Insurance. Inspection. 

People's Gas Light Co. . $11,195.74 $6,875.71 $6,000.00 $6,000.00 

K. Codaire & Co 8,000.00 6,800.00 3,200.00 3,200.00 

Mrs. A. B. Connelly 3.000.00 2,500.00 1,000.00 000.00 

Wm. P. Goodman 24,000.00 6,000.00 14,000.00 6,000.00 

Clark's Clothes Cleaning- 
Co 2,000.00 400.00 750.00 175.00 

Jennie W. Norton 1,000.00 130.61 600.00 130.61 

T. J. Teehan 700.00 500.00 329.50 329.50 

Still. Sunday-, November 14, 5.10 p. m. Brush fire on land of 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co., on Wayne anil Hevey streets. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 6 responded. 

Still. Sunday, November 14, 11.37 p. M. Four-story brick block, 
31 Hanover street, owned by Harrington and Straw heirs. Rekindling 
of morning fire. Used two chemical tanks. 

Box 6. Sunday, November 14, 11.43 P. M. Rekindling of morning 
fire. While Chemical engine was working, alarm from this box was 
rung in by Officer Berwin. Companies responding. Engines 1, 4, Hose 
1, 2, Trucks, 1, 5. 

Box 72. Monday, November 15, 8.36 p. 5L Three-story brick build- 
ing (Lincoln school), on Lincoln, Laurel, and Merrimack streets, owned 
by city of Manchester. The fire originated in a closet on first floor. 
Cause, unknown. Box pulled bj^ citizen. Companies responding. En- 
gines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 2, 3, Truck 3. Value of building, $45,000; 
damage, $150; no insurance. 

Still. Tuesday, November 16, 6.15 A. Ji. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 117 Chestnut street, owned by Hiram Hill estate, and occupied 
by Patrick O'Callahan. Chemical engine responded. Used two pony 
extinguishers. 

Box 71. Tuesday, November 16, 8.07 a. m. Three-and-a-half-story 
wooden tenement block, rear 109 Spruce street, owned by John 
Barry, and occupied by Mrs. N. St. Jean and others. Cause, loose ex- 
celsior in cellar. No damage. Extinguished by Chemical. 

Still. Tuesday, November 16, 4.30 v. m. Two-and-a-half-story 
dwelling-house, 156 Concord street, owned and occupied by Fred W. 
Borden. Cause, clothes too near stove. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. No service required. Damage to contents, $15; no insur- 
ance. 

Still. Thursday, November IS, 9.50 A. m. Chimney fire in four- 
tenement house, 527 Massabesic street, owned by Head & Dowst Co., 
and occupied by George P. Bray and others. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 3 responded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Box 71. Friday, November 19, 6.13 A. M. Chimney fire in three- 
story wooden tenement house, 193 Cedar street, owned by Edward 
Duffy, and occupied by him and two other families. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding. Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 399 

Still. Friday, Xovember 19, 9.50 a. m. Chimney fire in two-story 
office building, 196 Manchester street, owned and occupied by E. V. 
Turcotte Co., undertakers. Chemical engine responded. Used one 
ponj^ extinguisher and one chemical tank. 

Still. Saturday, November 20, 7 A. ii. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 97 Cedar street, owned by Timothy Carr, and occupied by 
Michael O'Connell. Chemical engine responded. No services required. 

Still. Saturday, November 20, 1.10 p. m. Chimney fire in dwell- 
ing-house, 118 North Adams street, owned and occupied by William 
G. Everett. Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 4. Saturday, November 20, 10.55, 11.55 P. M. Four-story wooden 
tenement and commercial block, 599-615 Elm street, owned by Daniel 
Connor heirs, and occupied by Napoleon J. Pichette as a liquor saloon, 
in whose basement the fire originated near the furnaces, and Moise 
Verrette as an extensive grocery store and several families occupied 
the second, third, and fourth floors, many of whom were obliged to 
escape by ladders owing to the dense smoke in halls. First alarm 
pulled by William Cunningham, and second alarm by Tom Lane 
Kellogg, per order of chief. Companies responding. Engines 1, 2, 3, 
4. Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 3, Trucks 1, 3, 5. Value of building, $6,000; 
damage, $1,200; insurance, $2,500; insurance paid, $700. 

CON'TEXTS. 

Verrette. Pichette. J. J. Griffin. Other tenants. 

Value $.31,500.00 $2,500.00 $3,000.00 $1,500.00 

Damage 15,500.00 500.00 100.00 300.00 

Insurance 11,000.00 2,500.00 1,800.00 No insurance 

Insurance paid . . 9,938.00 500.00 100.00 

Still. Sunday, November 21, 5.51 A. M. Rekindling (in the roof) of 
the Verrette-Pichette fire of last night. Chemical engine responded. 
LTsed one pony extingiiisher. 

Still. Sunday, November 21, 4.20 r. m. Brush fire on Campbell 
street, between Hooksett road and LTnion street. Detail from Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 5 responded. 

2 — 2 — 2. Siundaj', November 21, 4.51 P. M. This was sounded for a 
brush fire on Campbell street, to which Engine and Ladder Company 
No. 5 responded, and which they bad extinguished before additional 
detail from Central station arrived. 

Still. Sundaj-, November 21. 8.30 p. ir. Bru.sh fire and log cabin on 
Huse road, owned by estate of Isaac Huse. Delegations from Engines 
3, 7 responded. Used three pony extinguishers. 

Box 15. Siinday, November 22, 6.49 A. M. Chimney fire in four- 
storj^ wooden tenement block, 9-10 Washington block. Pearl street, 
owned bj' Charles C. Hayes, and occupied by Louis Martel and others. 
Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding. Engines 1, 4, 5, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, 2, Truck 1, 5. Used three pony extinguishers. 



400 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Wednesday, November 24, 7.57 P. M. Chimney fire in dwell- 
ing'-house, 27 Dubuque street, owned by William K. Robbins, and oc- 
cupied by Thomas Koehler. Members of Engine Company No. 2 re- 
sponded with combination wagon. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Box 91. Saturday-, November 27, 6.13 p. H. Two-story dwelling- 
house, 372 Walnut street, owned by Eoscoe Dyer, and occupied by 
Louis E. Wyman. Cause, unknown. Box pulled by Edward T. Knowl- 
ton. Companies responding, Engines 1, 5, Chemical, Hose 2, Truck 5. 
Value of building, $4,700; damage, $2,386; insurance, $2,500; insurance 
paid, $2,386. Value of contents, $6,000; damage, $3,500; insurance, 
$3,000; insurance paid, $3,000. 

Still.. Sunday, November 28, 8.21 A. ir. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block, 12 Bridge street, owned by Chandler heirs, and occupied 
by Leopold Bergeron and others. Chemical engine responded. Used 
one pony extinguisher and one chemical tank. 

Still. Tuesday, November 30, 11.05 A. m. Chimney fire in four- 
tenement block, 374 Merrimack street, owned by James Leach, and 
occupied by George C. Gilmore and others. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 3 responded with hose wagon. Used one ponj' 
extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, November 30, 6.05 P. M. Chimney fire in dwell- 
ing-house, 297 Bartlett street, owned and occupied by Albert Vallie. 
Members of Engine and Ladder Company No. 6 responded with hose 
wagon. Used three pony extinguishers. 

Still.. Wednesday, December 1, 2.03 a. m. Four-story brick block, 
31 Hanover street, owned by Harrington & Straw. Fire was under 
second floor around soil pipe. Cause, unknown. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. L'sed two chemical tanks. 

Box 6. Wednesday, December 1, 2.06 a. m. Chemical Engine Com- 
pany being unable to handle the foregoing fire, box pulled by Officer 
Welch. Companies responding. Engines 1, 4, Hose 1. 2, Trucks 1, 5. 
Value of contents, $25,:!00; damage, $810; insurance, $()!)0; insurance 
paid, $727.18. 

Still. Wednesday, December 1, 5.35 P. ii. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block, 22 Wayne street, owned. by E. L. Gresley, and occupied 
by several families. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded 
with combination wagon. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Wednesday. December 1, 7.01 p. m. Five gallon can of gaso- 
line in rear 126 Manchester street, belonging to O'Carrigan. Chem- 
ical engine responded. Used one pony extingui»her. 

Still. Thursday, December 2, 7 P. M. Chimney fire in four-story 
brick block, 22 Concord street, owned by A. DesRosiers, and occu- 
pied by Andrew Sasowski and others. Chemical engine responded. 
Used one pony extinguisher. 

Stlll. Friday, December 3, 4 p. m. Four-story brick building (Kim- 
ball flats), owned by Powell Kafel, and occupied by several families. 
Cause, waste in bathroom. Chemical engine responded. Extinguished 
before its arrival. • » 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 401 

Still. iSaturday, December 4, 9.30 A. M. Chimney fire in two-story 
dwelling--house, 441 Eimmon street, owned by Fer. Bilodeau, and oc- 
cupied by two families. Members of Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 
6 responded. Used one pony exting-uislier. 

Box 21. Saturday, December 4, 11. 4S p. m. Two-and-a-half-story 
brick dwelling, 269 Chestnut street, owned by ^Mitchell heirs and 
^Methodist conference, and occupied by ^Irs. E. M. Oshier as a board- 
ing house. Cause, breaking of a kerosene lamp in a room occupied 
by John Pollard. Box pulled by (i. B. Barry. Companies respond- 
ing. Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, Trucks 1, 3. Value of building, 
,$4,000; damage, $241.89; insurance, $3,000; insurance paid, $241.89. 
Value of contents, $900; damage, $200; insurance, $900; insurance paid, 
$120. 

Box 82. ^ilonday, December 6, 10 p. ii. Three-story wooden tene- 
ment block, 48 Birch street, owned by Mrs. .J. J, Lynch, and occupied 
by Anthony Menzla and others. Cause, cigarettes. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding. Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 
2, Trucks 1, 5. Extinguished with chemical. Value of building, 
$9,000; insurance, $4,000; value of contents, $400; damage, $(>; no in- 
surance. 

Still. Wednesdaj-, December 8, 10.02 a. m. Chimney fire in three- 
story wooden tenement block, 64 Concord street, owned by heirs of 
S. W. Parsons, and occupied bj^ Ed St. Cyr. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Box 314. Thursday, December 9, 2.10 p. m. Large barn (attached 
to house), 613 Front street, Amoskeag, owned and occupied by Charles 
W. Farmer. Cause, unknown. Box j)ulled by citizen. Companies re- 
sponding. Engines 5, 6, Chemical, Hose 1. .">, Truck ."). Independent 
Hose Xo. 5 had water on before arrival of any other apparatus. 
Value of building and contents, $6,000; damage, $3,045; insurance, 
$4,000; insurance paid, $3,045. 

Note. — Mr. Farmer returned value, etc., of buildings and contents 
together. 

Still. Fridaj-, December 10. 11.15 A. m. Chimney fire in four- 
story brick block, 101 Amherst street, owned by heirs of John Mc- 
Keuna, and occupied by Henry Dionne. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Friday, December 10, 2.05 p. m. Rekindling of yesterday's 
fire at 613 Front street. Members of Engine and Ladder Company 
Xo. 5 responded with hose wagon. Laid 200 feet of hose from hy- 
drant. 

Still. Friday, December 10, 4 p. m. Smoky chimney at 208 Chest- 
nut street in three-story wooden tenement block, owned by heirs of 
Thomas Corcoran, and occupied by several families. Chemical eugine 
responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

r.ox 82. Friday, December 10, 5.51 p. .m. Chimney fire in four-story 
tenement block, 7 Kidder court, owned by Stark mills. Box pulled 
by citizen. Companies responding. Engines 1, 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 
Trucks 1, 5. 



402 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPOKTS. 

Still. Saturdaj', December 11, 12.20 p. m. Two-and-a-half-storj- 
dwelling-house, 19 School street, owned and occupied by Dr. Mary 
S. Danforth. Cause, sparks from chimney. Combination wagon from 
Engine Xo. 2 responded. 

Box 52. Saturday, December 11, 12.28 P. M. "While the combination 
wagon was at 19 School street imable to handle the fire alone, the 
box was pulled. Companies responding. Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 
G. Value of building, $6,000; damage, $196; insurance, $4,000; insur- 
ance paid, $196. Value of contents, $2,000; damage, $25; no insurance. 

Still. Saturday, December 11, 5.19 p. ir. Four-story brick shoe 
shop on Willow street, owned by Cohas Building Co., and occupied 
by McElwain & Co. Cause, curtain fire from gas jet. Hose Xo. 3 
resjjonded. 

Still. Saturday, December 11, 6.30- p. m. Chimney fire in two-and- 
a-half-story house, 370 Diibuque street, owned by Gabriel Lemeaux, 
and occupied by two families. Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 6 
responded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Box 9. Saturday, December 11, 10.38 p. ir. Three-story brick 
dwelling, 1883 Elm street, owned and occupied by Walter M. Parker 
(undergoing repairs). Cause, spontaneous combustion. Box pulled 
by Tom Lane Kellogg. Companies resjjonding. Engines 1, 5, Chem- 
ical, Hose 1, Truck 5. Value of building, $20,000; damage, $465.60; in- 
surance, $8,000; insurance paid, $465.60. 

Box 4. Sunday, December 12, 10.21 A. ir. Chimnej' fire in three- 
story wooden tenement house, 64 Cedar street, owned by Hugh Kel- 
\ey, and occupied by several families. Box pulled by citizen. Com- 
panies responding. Engines 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 3, Trucks 1, 3. No 
damage. 

Still. Sunday, December 12, 12.15 P. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
house. 115 Central street, owned by Kate Cullity, and occupied by 
^lary Henry. Chemical engine responded. Used one pony extin- 
guisher. 

Still. Sunday, December 12, 6.35 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement, 
38 Bridge street, owned by Hi Finnaman, and occupied hy James 
Moremt. Chemical engine responded. . Used two pony extinguishers. 

Box 218. Monday, December 13, 3.28 p. m. Cottage house, 558 
Howe street, owned and occupied by Thomas Hebert. Cause, im- 
known. Box pulled by citizen. Companies resi^onding. Engines 3, 7, 
Hose 2, Combination 2, Truck 3. Value of building, $2,500; damage, 
$526; insurance, $2,000; insurance paid, $526. Value of contents, 
$1,000; damage, $600; insurance, $1,000; insurance paid, $600. 

SiTiLL. Monday, December 13, 7.04 P. M. Chimney fire in tenement, 
220 Chestnut street, owned bj^ Patrick Horan, and occupied by Jerry 
iloran. Chemical engine responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, December 14, 1.05 A. M. One-story building, 20 
Pearl street, used as poolroom, and occupied by Bedeau Garon. 
Cause, hot ashes. Chemical engine responded. Used one pony ex- 
tin yuislier. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 408 



Still. Wednesday, December 15, 10.20 p. m. Chimne3' fire in dwell- 
ing-house, 38 Bridge street, owned and occupied by Iv. Opelenski. 
Chemical engine responded. Used one i)ony extinguisher. 

S'TiLL. Fridaj', December 17, 9.25 P. jr. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 298 Pine street, owned by heirs of H. Nason Hall, and occupied 
by Mrs. Raymond. Chemical engine responded. Used one tank. 

Box 31. Saturday, December 18, 5.57 P. ir. Two-story wooden 
block, 3 Kidder street, ow^ned by Amoskeag Mfg. Co., and occupied 
by Ongar Roseneau. Cause, breaking of kerosene lamp. Box pulled 
l)y citizen. Companies responding', Engines 4, 5, Chemical, Hose 1, 
Trucks 1, 5. Xo services required. Value of building, $800; damage, 
$10; insurance, $800; insurance paid, $10. No damage to contents. 

Stlll. Saturday, December 18, 6.20 P. M. Brush fire on Amory 
street, on land owned by Thomas D. Paris. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company Xo. 6 responded. 

Still. Saturday, December 18, 8.42 p. ji. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 40S Belmont street, owned by Jennie M. Gage, and occupied 
by Arthur Murray. Members of Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 2 
responded with hose wagon. Used two pony extinguishers. 

,Still. Sunday, December 19, 10.45 A. ii. Chimney fire in tenement 
132 Merrimack street, owned by George Whittemore, and occupied 
by Miss Freeman. Chemical Engine Company responded. Used two 
pony extinguishers. 

Still. Sunday, December 19, 6.20 P. M. Brush fire on Coolidgc 
avenue extension on land owned by Amoskeag ^Ifg. Co. [Members 
of Engine and Ladder Company Xo. 6 responded. 

Still. Monday, December 20, 7.35 A. M, One-story building on 
Maple .street, near C. & P. railroad, occupied as wood and coal office 
by C. A. and A. W. Flint. Cause, overheated stove. Engine Company 
X'^o. 7 responded. Laid 150 feet of hose from hydrant. 

Still. Monday, December 20, 2.53 P. m. Grass fire at the wood and 
coal yard of J. P. Russell & Co., 199 Hayward street. Chemical en- 
gine responded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

Still. Monday, December 20, 5.30 p. M. Grass fire on land north 
of Quirin street, owned by Amoskeag Mfg. Co. Members of Engine 
and Ladder Company No. 6 re.sponded. Used one pony extinguisher. 

STiiL. Monday, December 20, 6.20 p. m. Chimney fire in three- 
story wooden tenement block, 45 Pearl street, owned by Minot 
Simons & Thayer, and occupied by Wilfred Houle. Chemical engine 
responded. Used one ponj' extinguisher. 

Box 21, 4. Thursday, December 23, 3.28, 3.32 A. m. Two-story brick 
creamery and four-story brick barn adjoining. 66-68 Lake avenue, 
owned by W. E. Prescott. The stable contained thirteen horses on 
the second floor, none of which were rescued. Cause unknown. Fire 
appeared to have started about the steam heating apparatus in base- 
ment, between creamery and stable. Both boxes pulled by citizens 
Companies responding, l''ngines ], 2, 3, 4, Chemical, Hose 1, 2, 3, Com- 



40i ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

bination 2, Trucks 1, :;. :>. Value of building-. $7,000; damage, $1,850.61; 
insurance, $3,000; insurance paid. $1,850.61. Value of contents, $10,851; 
damage, $6,200; insurance, $2,500; insurance ,paid, $2,500. 

Box 25. Saturday, December 25, 5.29 p. ivr. Cottage house, 529 Lin- 
coln street, owned by Frank P. Cheney, and occupied by W. B. Irwin. 
Cause, Christmas tree catching fire fr6m candles. Mr. H. B. Sawyer, 
while playing Santa Claus, was slightly burned about hands and 
chin. Fire extinguished before arrival of department. Box iiulled by 
citizen. Companies responding. Engines 1, 3, Chemical, Hose 2, Com- 
bination 2, Truck 3. No damage to building. Value of contents. 
$1,000; damage, $125; insurance, $800; insurance paid, $102. 

Box 56. Monday, December 27, 11.03 p. m. Cottage house, 15 D 
street, owned by Fred W. Towle, and occupied by W. B. Bedell. 
Cause, unknown. Box pulled by Capt. Jeremiah Lane of Engine Com- 
pany No. 2, who was on his way to the fire in response to a "still." 
Companies responding. Engines 2, 6, Hose 1, Truck 6. Value of build- 
ing, $2,800; damage, $2,500; insurance, $1,500; insurance paid, $1,500. 
Value of contents, $1,000; damage, $850; insurance, $1,000; insurance 
paid, $850. 

Stili.. Tuesday, December 28, 1.07 r. m. Chimney fire in cottage 
house, 107 Myrtle street, owned and occupied bj' Misses Maria F. and 
Mary M. Kidder. Chemical engine resjjonded. Used one pony ex- 
tinguisher and one chemical tank. 

Stpll. Wednesday, December 29, 11.50 A. m. Dwelling-house, 141 
Cedar street, owned by Mrs. Tobin and occupied by Mrs. Mary Mc- 
Guigan. Cause, smoky stove. Chemical engine responded. Services 
not required. 

Stii-l. Wednesday, December 29, 4.30 p. m. Chimney fire in two- 
and-a-half-story tenement house, 485 Dubuque street, owned by James 
A. Farlej% and occupied by two families. Memhers of Engine and 
Ladder Company No. 6 responded with hose wagon. Used four pony 
extinguishers. 

Box 5. Wednesday, December 29, 5.03 p. M. Four-story brick block, 
794 Elm street, owned by Brown and Mitchell heirs, and occupied en 
fourth floor, where fire started, by Mrs. Alvina Dufore. Cause un- 
known. Box pulled by citizen. Companies responding. Engines 1, 3, 
Chemical, Hose 1. 3, Trucks 1. 3. Extinguished by Chemical. Used 
one pony extinguisher. Value of building, $10,000; damage. $30; in- 
surance, $7,500; insurance paid, $30. A'alue of conteuts, $400; damage. 
$25; no insurance. 

Stilx. Thursday, December 30. 11.55 A. u. Chimney fire in three- 
and-a-half-story wooden tenement block, 1261 Elm street, owned by 
W. D. Young, and occupied by Elaine Bergeron. Chemical engine 
responded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Thursday, December 30. 12.05 m. Chimney fire in wooden 
tenement house, 549 Chestnut street, owned by estate of II. Nasnn 



EEPOET OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 405 

Hall, and ocoupieil bj- Antoine Gregoii-e. ^^fembers of Cheinical (nm- 
jjany responded. Used one pony exting-iiisher. 

.Still. Thursday, December 30, 1.35 p. M. Chimney fire in three- 
story wooden tenement house, 572 North Main .street, owned by Jo- 
sepli Plant, and occupied by three families. Members of Engine and 
Ladder Company No, 6 responded. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. Friday, December 31, 7.37 a. m. Chimney fire in three-story 
wooden tenement block, 38 Church street, owned by estate of Alonzo 
H. Weston, and occupied by Madam Kegnier. Chemical engine re- 
sponded. Used one f)ony extinguisher. 

Still. Friday, December 31, 4.55 p. M. Chimney fire in tenement 
house, 326 Granite street, owned by Otto C. Merkel, and occupied by 
Mrs. Hurley. Members of Engine Company No. 2 responded with 
hose wagon. Used two pony extinguishers. 

Still. 'Friday, December 31, 10.50 p. m. Chimney tire in two-story 
wooden dwelling, 30 Brook street, owned by Mrs. Charles W. Brown, 
and occupied by Wilber M. Oilman. Members of Engine and Ladder 
Comiiany No. 5 responded. Used two pon.y extinguishers. 



Number of Alarms by Months. 



January . . 
February . 
March . . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

Align st ... 
September 
October . . 
November 
December 



sll. 


still. 


Total. 


() 


21 


27 


7 


13 


20 


4 


8 


12 


in 


28 


38 


9 


19 


28 


15 


is 


33 


<j 


19 


28 


S 


24 


32 


s 


9 


17 


s 


24 


32 


i:; 


24 


37 


15 


30 


51 



Totals 112 243 



406 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



COMPANIES RESPONDING 



Engines. 






1 


H..SE.' 


s 


Trucks 


















, ^ 


5 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 


2 


1 


3 


5 


6 


1 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


1 


7 


4 


3 


2 


1 




2 


1 


1 


6 





4 


3 







1 


7 


6 


4 


3 





f 


4 


3 





2 





2 


2 










3 


3 


2 


2 







1 


1 





4 


3 


5 


1 




3 


2 


10 


6 


2 


6 


2 




6 


1 


3 


2 


4 


5 


6 




2 


„ 


9 


6 





5 


1 




5 





2 


10 


3 


8 


4 




3 


2 


20 


12 


4 


7 


1 


10 


8 


3 


3 


7 





6 


4 










12 


9 


5 


4 


1 




5 


3 





•> 





1 


3 







4 


14 


5 


4 


6 


3 




2 


3 





4 


2 


4 


3 


2 


2 





10 


7 


1 


3 







3 


3 


2 


3 


4 


3 


5 


2 


2 





14 


5 


4 


4 


1 




3 


3 


2 


6 


2 


6 


8 


2 


1 





19 


10 


7 


2 





8 


5 


5 


1 


7 


3 


6 


7 


5 


3 


1 


30 


12 


6 


4 


3 


8 


6 


7 


2 


54 


23 


52 


48 


25 


18 


11 


155 


85 


42 


48 


13 


65 


50 


33 


IG 



January ... 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August — 
September 
October.. .. 
November. 
December. 



Estimated Value of Property.— Engine No. 1. 

LOCATED OX VINE STREET. 

1 fir.st-.size Araoskeag- steamer $4,000.00 

1 one-hOrse wagon 400.00 

3 hor.ses for stejamer 775.00 

1 gray horse for hose wagon 200.00 

4 swinging- harnesses 200.00 

1 pair double exercise harnesses ."iO.OO 

1 single exercise harness 40.00 

2,050 feet of fabric hose 922.50 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Tools, furniture, and fixtures 200.00 

Firejuen's suits and badges 125.00 

Total amount $6,(192.50 

Engine No, 2. 

LOCATED AT NORTH MAIN STRKET, 'SQl'OO. 

1 second-size Amoskeag" steamer $4,000. 00 

1 Combination Chemical and hose wagon 1,700.00 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIKE DEPARTMENT. 407 

1 exercise wagon, poles, sliafts, and three-horse hitch.. $2.")0.00 

3 horses for steamer 600.00 

1 pair horses for hose wagon 400.00 

.3 exercise harnesses, 2 at $40, 1 at $20 100.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

1 double sled 60.00 

2,750 feet of fabric hose 1,237.50 

Stable fixtures and blankets 94,00 

Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc 4(56.00 

Firemen's suits and badges j 25.00 



Total amount $9,282.50 



Engine and Ladder No. 3. 

I-OCATED OX LAKE AVENirE, CORNER SEASSABESIC STREET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer $4,750.00 

1 two-horse hose wagon 400.00 

1 three-horse truck and equipments , 1,900.00 

3 horses for steamer 550.00 

1 pair bay horses for hose wagon 400.00 

3 horses for truck 600.00 

4 exercise harnesses 180.00 

8 swinging harnesses 400.00 

2.950 feet of fabric hose 1,327.50 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 80.00 

Bed.s, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc 575.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 150.00 

1 exercise wagon 250.00 

Total amount $11, 562.50 



Engine No. 4. 

LOCATED ox VIXE STREET. 

1 first-size Amoskeag steamer $4,200.00 

1 hose wagon 400.00 

3 horses for steamer CjOO.OO 

1 horse for wagon ' 50. 00 

4 exercise harnesses OO.OO 

4 swinging harnesses 200.00 

2,300 feet of fabric hose 1.035.00 

Hall fnrniture, beds, bedding, etc 275.00 



408 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 



Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firenien's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$75.no 
125.00 



$7,120.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 5 

LO(!ATEB OX WEBSTER STKEiET, COKNEH CHESTNUT, 

1 thirtl-size Amoskeag steamer $3,600.00 

1 two-horse rnbber-tired hose wagon 760.00 

1 steel frame ladder truck 1,650.00 

1 ijair bay horses for steamer 400.00 

1 pair bay horses for truck 400.00 

1 pair horses for hose wagon 525.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

1 double sled r 50.00 

1 single sled 25.00 

6 swinging harnesses 300.00 

2 pairs exercise harnesses 100.00 

1,800 feet of fabric hose SIO.OO 

Bedding, furniture, tools, etc 307.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 120.00 

Firemen's suits, badges, etc 150.00 

Total amount $9,522.00 



Engine and Ladder No. 6. 



* I.W!ATED AT CORNER AMORY AXD RI.MMOX STREETS, 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer $3,500.00 

1 hook-and-ladder truck (with Bangor extension) 1,680.00 

1 two-horse rubber-tired hose Avagon 760,00 

1 exercise wagon 290.00 

2 gray horses for steamer 300.00 

2 bay horses for truck 267.00 

2 horses for hose carriage 450.00 

6 swinging harnesses 300.00 

2,000 feet of fabric hose 900.00 

Hall furniture, carpets, beds, bedding, etc 475.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, ete 85.00 

Firemen's suits and l^adges 150.00 

Total amount $9,157,00 



KEPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



409 



Engine No. 7. 

I,0CAT?:D on SOMERVILI.E STREET. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamei- $:!,.")()(). 00 

1 two-horse rubber-tired hose wagon TGO.OO 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

,'3 horses for steamer 850.00 

2 horses for hose wagon 575.00 

5 swinging harnesses 250.00 

2,350 feet of fabric hose 1,057.50 

Furnitui-e, fixtures, etc 575.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 90.00 

Firemen's siiits and badges 125.00 

Total amount $8,107.50 



Hose No. 1 . 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 two-horse rubber-tired hose wagon 

2 horses 

2 swinging harnesses 

1 set Hobbs' runners 

1 hose sled 

2,700 feet of fabric hose 

Furniture, fixtures, beds, bedding, etc 

Stable fixtures and blankets 

Firemen's sviits and badges 

Total amount 



$700.00 

GOO.OO 

100.00 

90.00 

20.00 

1,215.00 

300.00 

50.00 

100.00 



$3,235.00 



Hose No. 2, 



LOCATED ox MAPLE STREET, CORNER OF EAST HIGH. 

1 two-horse hose wagon $600.00 

2 bay horses 500.00 

2 swinging harnesses 1 00.00 

1 exercise wagon 325.00 

1,950 feet of fabric hose 877.50 

Furniture and fixtures, beds and bedding 150.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 100.00 

Total amount $2,652.50 



410 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Hose No. 3. 

I-OCATED ON SOUTH EOI S'TKBET, BAKERSVILI>E. 

1 combination hose wagon (with ladders) $1,000.00 

1 pair gray horses 100.00 

1 pair swinging harnesses 100.00 

1 pair exercise harnesses 50.00 

1 exercise wagon 260.00 

2,000 feet of fabric hose 900.00 

Furniture, fixtures, bedding, etc 85.00 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc 65.00 

Firemen's suits and badges 80.00 

Total amount $2,640.00 



Combination Hose and Chemical No. 2. 

LOCATED ON WESTON STREET, CORNER OF CONCORD. 

1 Combination Chemical and hose wagon $1,700.00 

2 bay horses 550.00 

2 swinging harnesses 100.00 

1 exercise wagon 250.00 

1,1)00 feet of fabric hose 855.00 

Furniture, fixtures, bedding, etc 482.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 50.00 

Piremen's suits and badges ) 80.00 

Total amount $4,067.00 



Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 . 

LOCATED ON YI?JE STREET. 

1 aerial hook-and-ladder truck $4,200.00 

3 horses 600.00 

3 exercise harnesses 75.00 

3 swinging harnesses 150.00 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 360.00 

3 rubber blanket covers 72.00 

Furniture and fixtures 200.00 

I?ecls, bedding and furniture 75.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets 60.00 

l''irenien*s suits and badges 150.00 

Total amount $5,942.00 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 411 

Chemical Engine No. 1. 

LOCATED ON AIXE STREET. 

1 double tank (60 gallons each) engine $2, 200. 00 

1 pair bay horses 500.00 

1 pair of exercise harnesses "jO.OO 

1 pair swinging harnesses 100.00 

Furniture and fixtures 7,j.0O 

Stable fixtures and blankets .">;». 00 

Firemen's suits and badges Do. 00 



Total amount $L5,0G0.00 

Supply Wagon. 

1 supply wagon, with coal boxes $250.00 



Exercise Wagon. 

AT CEXTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole, shafts, three- 
horse hitch, and coal boxes $250.00 



Spare Hose Carriages and Hose. 

3 one-horse hose carriages (spare) $450.00 

3,300 feet old hose for relining 600.00 

600 feet new hose 450.00 



$1,560.00 



E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine. 

STORED AT SHEDS OF ENGINE NO. 2. 

Old U tank Amoskeag engine (worth for exchange) $200.00 



Engineers' Department. 

1 bay horse $.125.00 

1 chief's Avagon 275.00 



412 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

1 swinging liarness $:!7.00 

5 engineers' white rubber coats 37.50 

5 engineers' lanterns 20.00 

Blanket, robe, etc 25.00 

Furniture and fixtures 150.00 

Total amount $869.50 



Riverside Hose Company No. 5. 

LOCATED AT CORNEIl OF OLD FALLS ROAD AND FROXT STREET. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage $400.00 

•400 feet of leather hose 100.00 

800 feet of fabric hose 240.00 

2 hose-piiies, spanners, etc ., 40.00 

Furniture and fixtures 10.00 

Total amount '. $790.00 



Hallsviile Hose Company No. 6. 

LOCATED AT COR'NEK OF :NLA.>riiIOTH ROAD AXD JfASSABESIC STREET. 

1 four-wheeled ho.se carriage $200.00 

500 feet of fabric hose 150.00 

Nozzle, wrenches, etc 15.00 

Total amount $365.00 



Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage $30.00 

Old fabric hose 60.00 

2 hosepipes 10.00 

Total amount $100.00 



Pond Road Hose Carriage. 

LOCATED IX BASEMENT OF W. P. FARMER'S BARN. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage $30.00 

500 feet of leather hose 100.00 

Total amount $130.00 



EEPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



413 



Sleeping Hall. 

AT CENTRAI, STATPOX, A'IXE STREET. 

Beds, berlcTiiifj', ^^■a^•drobe, etc 

Extra Horses. 

1 black horse 

1 gray horse 

Total amount 

Fire Alarm Telegraph. 

At cost, including additions 

Eemodeling- in 1S85 

"Individual tapper' system 

Boxes and wire added in 1907 

Storage battery 

Switch protector board 

Wire brackets and tools 

Boxes and wire added in 19()S-()!) 

Repair ^\■ao•on 

Total amount 

Recapitulation. 

Engine Company Xo. 1 

Engine Company Xo. 2 

Engine and Ladder Company Xo. :; 

Engine Company Xo. 4 

Engine and Ladder Company Xo. :> 

Engine and Ladder Company Xo. (> 

Engine Company X"o. 7 

Hose Company Xo. ] 

Hose Company Xo. 2 

Hose Company Xo. U 

Combination Hose and Chemical Comi)auy No. :1.... 

Hook and Ladder Company Xo. 1 

Chemical Engine Company X'o. 1 

Supply Wag07i 

Exercise -Wagon (Central Station) 



$i:)().00 



$27;).on 

200.00 



$47.-^.00 



$2:!,.-):)0.oo 

6,000.00 

4.000.00 

1.000.00 

l.SoO.OO 

17.V00 

400.00 

475.00 

l.iO.OO 



.9n2..")0 
.282.50 
,562.50 
.120.00 
,522.00 
,157.00 
,107.50 
,2;!5.00 
,652.50 
,640.00 
,007.00 
,942.00 
,060.00 
250.00 
250.00 



4U 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Spare Hose Carriages and Hose 

Old E. W. H. Steamer 

Engineers' Department 

Riverside Hose Comjiany 

Hallsville Hose Comjiany 

Goife's Falls Hose Carriage 

Pond Eoad Hose Carriage 

Sleeping Hall (Central Station). 

'Spare Horses 

Fire Alarm Telegraph 



$1,560.00 
200.00 
8G9.50 
790.00 
365.00 
100.00 
130.00 
150.00 
475.00 

37,800.00 

$126,280.00 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



1^ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 


Thomas W. Lane 

Arthur Provost 

Thomas F. Fltzsinniums 
Edwin W. Merrill 


Cliief 


Chief engineer 

Wool-sorter 

Painter . . 


1937 Elm. 


3 

4 


Assistant 


526 Notre Dame av 
258 Notre Dame av 


5 


Merchant 


166 Biodget. 

















SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE ALARM. 



Charles H. French. 



Residence, 475 Hanover Street. 



EEPORT OF CHIEF OF FIKE DEPARTMENT. 



415. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, 28 Vine Street. 



George F. Millar.... 
Henry A. Burns — 
Lester C.Khocle3... 

Charles F. Hall 

George L. Booth... 
Frank H. Harvey.. 
Clarence E. Kemp. 
Lewis G. Bryant. . . 

Melvin Walker 

Stanley H. Patten. 
George E. )5ouIton 
Harry E. Belknap.. 

Nat A. Sargent 

Jesse L. Perkins.. 



Occupation. 



Captain 

Lieutenant... . 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer 
Driver engine 
Driver hose... 
Hoseman 



Gasfitter 

Loomflxer ...... 

Machinist ., 

Engineer 

Machinist 

Teamster 

Carpenter 

Tinsmith 

Gardener 

Carpenter 

Merchant 

Hotel proprietor 



15 Blodget. 
424 Amlierst. 
477 Belmont. 
146 Orange. 
21 Water. 
359 Concord. 
149 Orange. 
382 Central. 
6 Canal. 
1275 Elm. 
341 Amherst. 
530 Wilson. 
423 Amherst. 
121 Hanover. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 2. 
House on North Main Street, '' Squog. 



■^T,] NAME. 
n t 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


76 






Permanent Capt.. 


210 No. Main. 




James E. Perrigo 

Archibald A. Gorham.. 
Charles Edgar 


Lieutenant 

Clerk 




67 


U. S. B. & S. Co. 
Machinist 


50 Barr. 


i^n 


Engineer 


Engineer 

Carpenter 

Teamster . . 


40 Market. 


119 

72 


Stephen Thomes 

Emil W Smith 


Asst. engineer... 
Driver of engine 
Driv.combin'tion 
Hoseman 


55 Douglas. 
13 Ray. 
66 No. Main. 
17 So. Main. 


G 


Clarence A. Whitcomb. 
William Arnold. 


Barber 

Wool sorter 


71 


John W.Gott 




70 


Gideon Lariviere 

Ernest R. Whitcomb.... 
Oscar G. Lagerquist.... 

John A. Gemmell 

Joseph P. Jennings 


20 Notre Dame av 


75 


" Wool sorter 


66 No. Main. 






21 Quincy. 




.. 


Cloth inspector... 









416 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 3. 

House on Lake Avemie, corner of Massabesic. 





Name. 


Kank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 






Cap 
Lie 
" 
Clei 
Eng 
Ass 
Dri 




Perma'nt Captain. 

Collector 

Grocer 

Mechanic 


330 E. Spruce. 
372 Lake ave. 
oyg Laurel 


97 
148 


Edwin C. Paul 

Orrin S Pobiirn 


it. of truck... 

engine... 

k 


88 


George Taylor 


519 Lake ave. 












80 


Clarence Hackett 

Herbert E. Dunbar 

John T.Duncan 

Lyman W. Piper 

John W.Finn 

Parker K. Brown 

Ed son F. Wyman 

Arthurs. Brown 

Nelson T. Wheelock 

George L. Slack 


t. engineer... 


Laundryman 


410 Belmont. 
366 Lake ave. 


81 


Driver of hose.... 
Driver of truck . . 
Fireman 




152 Pearl. 




,. 












. 

. 




Grain dealer 

Manufacturer 

Grain-dealer 




43 




368 E. Spruce. 




. 









84 




Salesman 


141 Massabesic. 










150 


William T. Winslow ... 

William B. Blake 

Christopher J. Cruise... 
Harry J Smith 




Shoe-cutter 


422 Lake ave. 


oiH 


Health officer 

Merchant 


265 Cypress. 
429 Central. 


87 




70 




447 Spruce. 











REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



417 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 4. 
House, Mo. 20 Vine Street. 



Occupation. 



''8 


John H Wales Jr 


Captain.. 


Brick-mason 


41 M S B 




Thomas W. Lane, Jr 


Lieutenant 


Electrician 


20 Malvern. 




George Thompson 

Jost^phH. Gould 

Edward Sargent 


















Asst. Engineer... 




73 Amherst. 




George A. Cann 

Henry C Parsons 


Driver of engine. 
Driver of hose 




20 Vine. 


37 




o() Vine 




Walter ^ Clarkson 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


301 Walnut 


?" 


Luther A. Knight 

James C. Newton 




Engineer 


16 Stark 


■M 




Machinist 


93 Blodget. 


oO 


Fred H Gate 


,. 


Clerk 


601 Cedar 


0(J 


Louis E. Way 


^^ 


Machinist 


90 Vine 


04 


Adams L Greer 


., 


Piano dealer 


76 Lowell 




Gardner E. Marston .... 




Plumber 


3 Morrison. 









418 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE AND LADDER COMPANY No. 5. 
House, No. 44 Webster Street. 



Occupation. 



IGl 
46 
49 
108 
102 
99 
125 
124 


Irving S. Bryant 

Woodbury Davison 

C^harlpi W Thrown 




Permanent Captain 
Carpenter . 




Lieut truck 


34 Prospect. 
95 Harrison 


Lieut, engine 

Clerk 


Clerk 
















WillG. Eraser 


Asst. engineer.. . . 
Driver engine .... 




490 Pine. 


Albert M Tuson.. 


Teamster 


89 North. 


Benjamin C. Cann 










1966 Elm. 


158 


Andrew S. Fantom 


Hoseman 


Cigar-malver 


167 Brook. 




Charles W. Warner 






75 Sagamore. 
254 Walnut 


l'^6 


Edwin M. Doiney 


,, 


Tinsmith .... 




,, 


Clerk 




159 
160 




„ 




10 N Adams 


Maurice Hoffman 


.. 




321 Walnut 


102 


Alfred Anderson 


„ 


Brush-maker 


72 \. Adams. 












<)' 


William W. Cupples 

Wilbur M. (;ilman 


.. 


Clerk . 


321 Walnut 


47 


., 


Piper 


30 Brook 


123 


George VV. Upton 


^^ 


Electrician 


869 Union. 



REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



419 



e:ngine and ladder company Xo. g. 

House on Amory and Rimmon Streets. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



141 


IMeilerique R. Maynard. 


Captain 


Perma'nt Captain. 


302 Cartier. 


147 


-liunes A. Farley 


Lieut, engine ... 


Machinist 


385 Dubuque. 


14R 


Toussaint Tremblay — 






143 Wayne. 

589 Mahl 


115 


Clerk 




132 


Toby Leniay 


Engineer 

Asst. Engineer . . 


Maeliinist . 


4Gi Cartier 


133 


Alcide Provencher 




86 Putnam. 


ni 


Alphonso E. Foster 

John H Cote 


Driver of engine 
Driver hose . .. 




Engine-house. 


140 




142 


Frank St. John 

John Martin 


Driver truck .... 
Iloseiuan 


., 




1''9 


Machinist 


624 No. Main. 


128 


Jonn H. McCabe 


^_ 


Plumber 


310 No. Main. 


l.W 




i, 






VW 




„ 




291 Dubuque. 
25 Schuyler. 


139 


Henry Klaubert 




Loom-fixer 


13B 


Hector Defosses 


„ 


Painter 


538 Dubuque. 

lave. 
516 Notre Dame 


131 


Arthur J. Provost 


^^ 


Wool-sorter 


143 


William Broderick 


.> 


Loom-flxer 


513 Rimmon. 


144 


John Montplaisir 


" 


Mill operative 


454 Dubuque. 


137 




,, 






135 


Patrick J. O'ConEell.... 





Painter 


334 Main. 



420 



AN^'UAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 7. 
House, Somerville Street. 



Occupation. 



James J. Collins — 
Leslie W. DoUofE.... 
Ernest E. Austin — 

Fred S. Morrill 

Louis Ross 

Arthur Hebert 

George N. Rogers. . . 
Wm. F. O'Malley . . . 
Charles J. Beliveau . 

Louis Loiselle 

William J. Kennedy 
John W. Chapman . . 
William L. Cemire . . 
Henry W. Barnard.. 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Asst. Engineer. 
Driver engine . . 
Driver hose — 
Hoseman 



Perman't Captain 

Clerk 

Electrician 

Engineer 

Machinist 

Teamster 

Teamster 

Clerk 

Boxmaker 

Bleacher 

Gas Co 

Carpenter 

Harnessniaker ... 
Carpenter 



187 Belmont. 
427 Central. 
43 Welch Ave. 
136 Hall 
45 Jones. 
1-22 Hall. 
173 Taylor. 
153 Belmont. 
931 Hayward. 
890 Clay. 
274 Beech. 
890 Clay. 
22 Lingard. 
213 Jewett. 



HOSE COMPANY No. 1. 
House, No. 26 Vine Street. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



.51 


Clarence R.Merrill 


Captain 




414 Merrimack. 


8S 


Sumner N. Patten 


Lieutenant 


Belt maker 


3M. S. B. 


m 




Clerk 




37 M. S.B. 


00 


Charles H. Rogers 

Albert A. Puffer 








4S 


Hoseman 




499 Beech. 


45 


(ieorge I. Ayer 




Electrician 


28 M. S. B. 


34 




„ 






?(i 


Alfred Firth . . 


.. 




4 Derry. 
365 E. Higli. 


50 


Charles Skinner ,. 


" 


Car Inspector 


V< 




.. 




351 E. High. 
39 M S B 


5? 


Leon H French 


„ 


Electrician 


f)'? 


George Harvey 


.. 


Carpenter 


2 M S. B. 











REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



421 



HOSE COMPA>Y No. 2. 
House on Maple IStreet, corner East High. 



¥ 


NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Kcsidence. 


64 


Melvin W. Wortlien 

Revilo G. Hongliton 

Tlaomas P. Buinap 

Ernest E. Hubbell 


Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 


Permanent Captain 


525 Maple. 
337 Lowell. 


54 




80 Arlington. 
525 Maple. 










Carpenter 

Needle-maker 

Carpenter 


56 


Fred W Corey 




497 Maple. 
61 Ash. 


61 


Fred H. Humplirey 










58 Arlington. 

'^RC\ T.aiii'Pl 


63 
60 


Alfrpfl Ti" Fntnn 




Shoemaker • • 


Albert L. Worthen 

Frank G Miller 




Cilley Road. 
24 South 


59 




Gas-fitter 

Carriage painter.. 


62 


Thomas A. Reed 




699 Beacon. 









. HOSE COMPANY No. 3. 

House, South Elm Street. 



Si 


NAME, 


Rank. 


Occupation . 


Residence. 






Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 


Permanent Captain 
Yard conductor... 

Teamster 


42 Elm. 


157 
15(1 


Frank D. Hardy 

Celon D. Stevens 

Frank W. Tebbetts 

James H. McKenzie 

William P. Hall 


34 Elm ave. 
164 Calef road. 
7 Elm. 


1.53 
l.i4 


Hoseman 


Sash-maker 

Laundryman 


72 Elm. 
39 Elm. 


151 
155 

Hio 
149 


Forest M. Laraba 

William E. Goer 

Lorenzo D. H. Ford*.... 
Frank E. Nute*. 


102 I?aker. 
20 Cheney pi. 


" 




425 IVIcrrimack. 











Detailed for department spare drivers. 



4-22 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY No. 1. 
House, 18 Vine Street. 



p 


NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 








Permanent Captain 




92 




Lieutenant 




Edwin E. Quimby 




286 Laurel. 








18 Vine. 


118 
104 


Frank A. Pherson 

fTarrison H Tnlt^ 




Machinist 


18 Vine. 






883 Union. 


107 






Manufacturer. ... 

Steam-fitter 

Second-hand 


IS Vine. 


90 




«> 


316 Walnut. 


93 


Fred W Bond 





43 Stark. 




Tliomas D. Chilton 

■William P .Tnnps 




18 Mechanic. 


100 


Steam-fitter 

Carpenter 


318 Lake av. 


113 






42 M. S. B. 


106 


Ernest E. Johnson 

Frederick Marsh . 




Steam-litter 

Carpenter 


316 Walnut. 


109 


„ 


336 Lake ave. 






,. 


63 Jane. 













CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

House, 8 Vine Street. 





NAME. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


ll") 


Hervey E . Harris 

Clarence D. Palmer 

Benjamin K. Richardson 

Robert H. Duncan 

Robert W. Turnbull .... 




•Permanent Captain 

Marble dealer 

Machinist 


249 Concord. 


116 


Clerk 


537 Union. 


103 




"1 Ash 




Needlemaker 




117 


Fireman . 


8 Vine. 







REPORT OF CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



423 



COMBINATIOX COMPANY No. 2. 
Wilson Hill, corner Weston and Concord Streets. 




'Detailed for Department as spare driver, 
f Detailed as driver of supply wagon. 



REPORT OF BUILDING INSPECTOR. 



EEPORT OF THE INSPECTOE OF BUILDINGS. 



To Uis Honor the Mai/or and Board of Aldermen: 

Gent!lemen: — The inspector of building's herewith submits his re- 
port for the year >1909: 

The number of permits issued for new buildings were 22G at an 
estimated cost of $l,o46,250; for remodeling buildings, 237, at an esti- 
mated cost of $251,268, making a total of 463 permits, representing a 
cost of $1,797,518. 

Total number of inspections made and recorded by the 

inspector 2,877 

Increase in the number of family dwellings as recorded 442 

Number of cases in which the inspector refused to grant 

a permit 6 

The 463 permits issued during the year may be classified as fol- 
lows: 
Erecting new dwelling-houses, 159 permits, estimated 

cost $572,465.00 

Eemodeling dwelling-houses, 168 permits, estimated 

cost 141,649.00 

Total for dwelling-houses, 327 permits, estimated 

cost $714,114.00 

Erecting new buildings for business purposes, 62 per- 
mits, estimated cost $867,035.00 

Eemodeling buildings for business purpo.ses, 67 per- 
mits, estimated cost 100,219.00 

Total for "buildings for business i^urposes, 129 per- 
mits, estimated cost $967,254.00 

Erecting new public buildings, 2 permits, estimated cost $83,550.00 

Remodeling public buildings, not any. 

Total for public buildings, 2 permits, estimated cost $83,550.00 

Erecting new semi-public buildings, 3 permits, estimated 

cost $23,200.00 

Remodeling semi-public buildings, 2 permits, esti- 
mated cost 9,400.00 

Total for semi-public buildings, 5 permits, estimated 

cost $32,600.00 

427 



428 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Ei'ecting- wood frame buildings. 21.'! permits, estimated 

cost $(U1. 400.00 

Eemodeling- wood frame building-s, 21.5 permits, estimated 

cost 171,938.00 

Total for Avood frame buildings. 42m permits, esti- 
mated cost $783,338.00 

Erecting brick buildings, 11 permits, estimated cost.... $016,850.00 

Remodeling brick buildings, 22 permits, estimated cost 79,330.00 

Total for brick buildings, 33 permits, estimated cost $996,180.00 
Erecting hollow concrete block house. 1 permit, esti- 
mated cost 4,000.00 

Erecting Penn. tile house, 1 permit, estimated cost 14,000.00 

Total for fire-resisting buildings. 3.") permits, esti- 
mated cost $1,014,180.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. A. SPRAGUE, 

Inspector of Buildings. 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



EEPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



February 28, 1910. 
I'o His Honor the Mayor and City Vounvils of the City of Manchester, N. H.: 

I herewith submit my annual report as city physician for the year 
1909. 

Number of new patients treated, not including- those at the Isola- 
tion hospital, police station or for the Board of Health, was thirty- 
five. Their distribution as to wards was as follows. 

Ward 1 5 

Ward 2 1 

Ward o 

Ward 4 3 

Ward 5 11 

Ward r> 2 

Ward 7 3 

Ward S 4 

Ward 9 4 

Ward 10 2 

Total 35 

This necessitated 578 house calls and 220 oJhce visits. 
At the Isolation hospital there were treated during the year by the 
city physician 31 cases of diphtheria and 30 cases of scarlet fever. 
One hundred and forty-seven visits were made to this institution; 
42 miscellaneous calls were made for the Board of Health; 153 visits 
were made to the police station. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN C. O'CONNOR, 

City Physician. 



431 



REPORTS 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES AND 
CEMETERY FUNDS. 



EEPORTS OF THE TEUSTEES OF CEMETEEIES 
AND CEMETERY FDNDS. 



Report of Trustees of Pine Grove Cemetery. 

T(i the Board of Mayor and'- Aldermen and Trustees of Cemeteries: 

( i KNTLEMEN : — The subtrustees of the Pine Grove cemetery havinc: 
in charge that cemetery and the Merrill Yard make report as follows 
as to their doings for the year 1909: 

John H. Erskine, the efficient superintendent, has been continued 
in liis position, and under his direction the work has been conducted 
on the same lines as for a number of years passed. 

With the appfopriation made by the common council little new- 
work could be done, but the grounds were kept in a reasonable con- 
dition and some needed improvements were made. 

The appropriation for the general care and maintenance of Pine 
Grove cemeterj'^ was thirteen thousand dollars, and in addition twenty- 
five hundred was appropriated for the comj)letion of the lake in the 
northerly portion of the grounds. 

In addition to these sums the trustees of the cemetery fund donated 
one thousand dollars, which were expended for inaterials and labor 
in macadamizing and concreting avenues and for the purchase of 
loam for grading purposes. 

The subtrustees thus had sixteen thousand five hundred dollars to 
spend on Pine Grove cemetery. The special appropriation for the 
completion of the work around the lake was expended in loaming 
and grading the border, in purchasing and setting out shrubs and 
herbaceous plants, in laying drainpipes and catch basins, and in 
macadamizing Lakeside avenue. 

The development of this lake during the last three years at a total 
cost of ten thousand dollars has been a great and very much needed 
improvement. 

An ugly eyesore has been removed, and we feel that the pretty 
littic sheet of water with its surroundings ought to cause all our 
people who take any pride in the .burial places of their dead to 
heartily approve the expenditure. To the appropriation of thirteen 
thousand dollars made for the care of the cemetery during the year 
was charged the price paid for the land purchased the year before 
by vote of the mayor and aldermen from the Smith heirs, consist- 
ing of about ninety-four thousand square feet of land at the north- 
easterly corner of the grounds, or two thousand three hundred and 
seventy dollars and fifty cents. 

435 



436 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The aldermen had voted in 1908 that this should be paid from the 
receipts from the cemetery for that year, but by some oversig-ht, 
over which the subtrustees had no control, no provision was made 
for its payment at the time the final transfers of appropriations were 
made for 1908, and so the sum was necessarily charged against the 
regular appropriation for 1909. This payment reduced the amount 
available for the care of the cemetery for the year to ten thousand 
six hundred and twenty-nine dollars and fifty cents. 

The receipts during the year, which came into the city treasury 
available for transfer at the close of the year, from sales of lots 
and graves and charges for water and care of lots, for burials, for 
use of the chapel, from sales of flowers, etc., amounted to eleven 
thousand six hundred and forty-two dollars and thirty-three cents, 
so that the city actually received more money, by one thousand and 
twelve dollars and eighty-three cents, than it paid out for the care 
and maintenance of Pine Grove cemeter}' during the year. 

Counting the amount paid for the Smith laud as an ordinary ex- 
pense, the charge upon the city treasury for the support of the 
cemetery for 1909 was but one thousand three hundred and fifty-seven 
dollars and sixtj'-seven cents. 

However, this unexpected expense for land necessitated the post- 
ponement of a' good deal of work which had been planned and which 
must, therefore, be done as early as possible in the "season of 1910. 

It was impossible to build any new lawns or to paint fences and 
buildings, grade many borders or fix up many old sections. 

The ajipropriation for 1910 should be large enough to cover this 
necessary work in addition to the ordinary running expenses, which, 
with the growth in the territory cared for, increase proportionately, 
and as the years go by the annual appropriation for the care of the 
cemetery must be made larger. But fortunately the receipts keep 
pace with the growth or even gain a little, so that the net charges 
upon the taxpayers remain almost nominal. As all lots now sold come 
under either ijerpetual or semiperpetual care, the income from the 
investment by the trustees of the cemeterj^ fund will be a more 
certain source of revenue for the city, than the voluntary payment 
for the care of lots which were sold without any provision for their 
care. There are about two thousand such lots in the cemetery, and 
during 1909 four hundred and sixty-one of these were cared for by 
the superintendent at the expense of the owners, to the extent of 
one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine dollars and twenty cents 
already paid and about four hundred dollars still due. 

Of the three thousand one hundred and forty-nine lots of all kinds, 
which have been sold to the close of 1909, over one half, or one thou- 
sand five hundred and eighty-eight, were in 1909 cared for with no 
expense to the city, and from this time on the proportion of lots that 
will be self sustaining will grow constantly larger. For it must be 
borne in mind that for several years no such ordinary lots have been 



REPORTS OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 437 

sold, and none will be sold in the future, excepting- perhaps, a very 
few on Acacia lawn. 

During 1909 there were paid into the cemetery fund seven thousand 
four hundred and twenty-seven dollars and twenty-nine cents for 
perpetual care and one thousand five hundred and forty-seven dollars 
and seven cents for semiperpetual care, and up to December 31, 1909, 
the total receipts of the cemetery fund have amounted to one hun- 
dred and twenty-four thousand four hundred and thirty-four dollars 
and forty-five cents, and the trustees of that fund have in addition 
several thousand dollars of unexpended income. 

During- 1909 lots were sold as follows: On Chapel lawn, 6; on Cedar 
lawn, 2; on Lakeside lawn, 44, all under perpetual care; on Hillside 
lawn, 34, under semiperpetual care, and on Swedish Lawn, 5, in all 
91 lots. Single graves were sold to the number of 14 on Woodside 
lawn and 6 on Swedish lawn. Up to December 31, 1909, 77 single 
graves have been sold on Woodside, and 179 on Swedish lawn. These 
sales justify the laying out of single grave sections. 

There remain plotted and ready for sale 48 single graves on Wood- 
side lawn and 411 on Swedish lawn, and lots to the number of 139, 
divided as follows: 38 on Chapel lawn, 3 on Riverside lawn, 52 on 
Hillside lawn, 5 on Cedar lawn, 4 on Acacia lawn, 27 on Lakeside lawn, 
and 10 on Swedish lawn. 

During 1909 there were 395 interments, 105 being in the Field of 
Manesque, making the total number to December 31, 1909, of 8,865. 

There^were 28 removals from one grave to another and 5 to other 
cemeteries. There were laid foundations for 57 monuments and for 
57 tablets and for one mausoleum, 22 cement vaults and one brick 
vault. The average number of men employed during the year was 
sixteen. 

An improvement was made in the water-works system, which has 
worked quite satisfactorily. A new meter was put in at the south 
end of the ground so that the southern part can be cut off from the 
northern part, thereby increasing the supply for use as needed. For 
drainage there were laid one hundred and eightj^-six feet of twelve- 
inch pipe and eighty-one feet of six-inch pipe, and two cesspools 
were set to care for the surface water. 

In making the connection for the new meter it was necessary to 
lay two hundred and forty feet of three-inch pipe, and in Lakeside 
avenue five hundred and fifty-two feet of two-inch galvanized pipe 
were laid. Also five new hydrants were set up and six old ones were 
repaired and put in working order. 

A new wire fence was built on the Brown avenue side of the ceme- 
tery from the end of the iron fence northerly to the superintendent's 
residence, and the land purchased from the Smith heirs was sur- 
rounded by a similar fence, one hundred and twenty rods in all being 
built. 

Birch lawn at the southerly end of the grounds is about three 
quarters graded and ready to be laid out into lots when needed. 



438 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This lawn, like Hillside, is under semiperpetiial care, the city agree- 
ing- to always keep them watered and the grass properly clipped, 
and will sell for forty-five cents j)er square foot. In the opening of 
the season of 1910 it will be absolutely necessarj^ to ijrepare a lawn 
for perpetual-care lots, to be sold at seventy-five cents per square 
foot. 

It is thought that the best place for this new lawn is the westerly 
part of the cemetery on Eiverside avenue northerly from the chapel. 

With the purchase of the Smith land. Pine Grove cemetery is now 
entirely surrounded by highways excepting at the northeasterly cor- 
ner. There it does not reach to Mitchell street, as laid out, although 
not built. The subtrustees have voted to recommend to the city 
government the jiurchase of enough land to extend the cemetery to 
Mitchell street, and that the same be done at once and an ai^propria- 
tion be made in 1910 for this purpose. 

When once the land on the northerly side of Mitchell street passes 
out of the hands of its present owners, who now own on both sides 
of the street, and dwelling-houses are built there, it will be difficult 
and very expensive to extend the grounds to Mitchell street on. ac- 
count of the law govex-ning extensions of cemeteries. 

This matter ought to receive most careful consideration from the 
board of aldermen and the common council. 

During 1909 the appropriation of one hundred dollars for the Merrill 
Yard was expended in caring for the -yard, and fiftj--nine dollars 
were received from various sources, makingthe net cost to the city 
forty-one dollars. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

'eDWIX F. JONES, 

Clerk for tlie Subtrustees. 



Report of the Trustees of Valley Cemetery. 

To the Trustees of Cemeteries and Board of Mayor and Aldermen of Man- 

ehester, N. H.: 

Gentlemen: — The subtrustees of the Valley cemetery would re- 
port for the year 1909 as follows: 

In carrying out a plan established some number of years ago to 
beautify the cemetery without materially changing its natural sur- 
roundings and without great expense, there has been added to the 
landscape effect during the past year fourteen thousand five hundred 
and seventy square feet of lawn and reclaimed path, all brought to 
a uniform and proper grade. 

To accomplish this 350 loads of sand were removed, 93 loads of loam 
and 2,553 feet of turf were purchased. 



REPOKTS OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 439 

In furtherance of the same general plan almost twice' as much 
macadamized road has been built this year as last, viz"., 2,600 square 
yards. 

In addition the efficient superintendent has kept the walks, shrub- 
bery, grass, and flower beds in excellent condition. 

Ten new monuments and eight new headstones have been erected. 

Eleven headstones were found to be in such condition as to neces- 
sitate being repaired, while one monument and six headstones have 
been cleaned. During the year forty bodies have been placed in the 
tomb, while the total interments have been forty-six. 

If any statistical evidence were needed that this, one of the oldest 
cemeteries in the city, was not growing it would be found in the 
little variation from year to year of the total interments, a variance 
of not less than five from year to year and not exceeding fifty in all 
in each year. 

There is, however, one very gratifying growth in which Valley 
cemetery with others shares, and that is evidenced in the interest 
which the public takes in the appearance of each individual lot as is 
shown by the slowly increasing number of lots placed under per- 
petual care. In the last two years twenty lot owners have availed 
themselves of this privilege, making in all two hundred and twenty- 
six lots now under perpetual care, a number somewhat in excess of 
those lender annual care, a state of facts to which the trustees point 
with some pride. 

Although fifteen hundred dollars was specially appropriated for 
outside Avork the trustees have turned back to the city two hundred 
dollars of the same, finding that thirteen hundred dollars was sufiieient 
to provide suitable sidewalks with proper curbing along Valley street 
side of the cemetery. Though the work was not entirely completed 
this fall, owing to cold weather, the early spring will see it finished, 
as all the material has been purchased and delivered. 

This, with the work in this same line already accomplished on 
Auburn and Pine streets, practically completes the chain of good 
sidewalks around the three sides of the cemetery over which the 
public in the past has had occasion to pass. 

That public now finds that it has a new line of sidewalk, with 
an additional entrance to the cemetery on Willow street, owing to the 
supreme court decision in what is commonly known as the Hodge 
case. 

The lumber sheds, with their large amounts of inflammable mate- 
rial, both inside and out, have been removed, and Willow street for 
a distance of some one hundred and fifty feet south from Auburn 
street has been opened to the public, with a large gateway for teams 
and a smaller one for foot passengrt's opening into the cemetery at 
the termination thereof. 

Every lot owner in the Valley cemetery can find cause for con- 
gratulation that this imminent fire risk of the past has been so 



440 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



greatlj^ reduced. And it is believed that as the public becomes bet- 
ter acquSinted with the Willow street entrance it will be used more 
and more, opening as it does into the western or lower driveway of 
the cemetery. 

It cannot be long ere some steps will have to be taken relative to 
repairing the fence and possibly the retaining wall on the southern 
half of this same Willow street, which has not as yet been opened 
to the public. 

It seems rather a soi-ry commentary that a city which so prides 
itself in its beautiful appearance should permit such unsightly sur- 
roundings as are found at the southwestern half of this city of the 
dead. 

Resijectfully submitted, 

F. C. LIVINGSTON, 

Clerk. 



Report of Amoskeag Cemetery 

For the Year 1909. 
ApiJropriation 

EXPENDIT^'RES. 

Paid George C. Harwood, superintendent 

Manchester Hardware Co 

John B. Yarick Co 

Maxwell Ice Co., loam 

John Doucette, painting fence 

A. Heilman, painting fence 

Ray Brook Gardens, flowers 

Maxwell Ice Co., teaming 

water bill 

Balance unexpended 



$500.00 



$204.57 
13.70 
37.53 
120.00 
50.00 
12.00 
5.00 
12.75 
12.00 



$499.35 
.65 



Tliere were seven burials during the year. 
Nine hundred and sixty-two feet of fence painted. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W\ H. MAXWELL. 

Clerk. 



TREASUREK'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries: 

Gentlemen: — I herewith present to you the annual report of money 
received during- the year ending- December ;n, 1909. 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Price Permanent 

Interest of Lot. Fund. Total. 

Edward J. Burnham $10.92 $34.46 $45.38 

Carl O. Josef son 43.21 43.21 

Carl O. Youngqulst 22.27 22.27 

Olof G. Tinglof .25 42.33 42.58 

Alice K. Anderson 21. (JO 21.60 

Alma Peterson 21.60 21.60 

Lotten Gustaf son .25 21.60 21.85 

Augusta Hagland 21.60 21.60 

Irving L. Carpenter 36.08 45.09 81.17 

Mrs. F. A. Greer 4.35 43.50 54.37 102.22 

Janet McGregor 8.02 39.00 48.75 95.77 

Willie D. Wheeler 39.00 48.75 87.75 

John Wilson 31.00 38.75 69.75 

Bertha H. Cook 7.95 20.00 25.00 52.95 

Carrie L. Geer 26.34 32.94 59.28 

Catherine Plumpton 22.99 28.74 51.73 

Lilla M. French 39.00 48.75 87.75 

Charles E. Cutter 24.58 30.72 55.30 

Charles A. Eollins 31.00 38.75 69.75 

Magdalena Gogsler 25.17 31.46 56.63 

William Bremner 25.72 32.16 57.88 

Isabell Smith 27.71 34.64 62.35 

Edwin and Mary Ryalls 13.64 33.60 42.00 89.24 

Hulda E. Himmer .85 30.90 38.62 70.37 

Hugh S. Morrow and (!lenna M. 

Morrow .68 24.67 30.85 56.20 

John Orale 35.20 44.00 79.20 

Elizabeth Mann " 32.96 41.20 74.16 

Emil A. Kraut 1.15 39.33 49.15 89.63 

Isabella H. Lee .72 25.84 32.41 58.97 

Amasa Wilson 29.60 37.00 66.60 

David and John McNay 1.50 75.30 04.12 170.92 

Carrie M. Cass 31 .20 39.00 70.20 

441 



U2 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Augusta A. Willard 

Margaret J. Bennett 

George H. Hammond 

Freeman G. Eiddle 

Thomas H. Caron 

Walter K. Sherman 

Edwin Haskell 

Mary Jane "Wheeler 

Francis E. Gates 

Melvin W. Worthen 

Joshua O. Bunker 

Chas. E. Stewart 

John L. T. Brown 

Geo. C. Prescott and Henry C 

Clark .'.... 

Estate Max Zschering 

Luella M. Hedding 

Hiram Turner, Hiram D. Turner, 

Martha J. Turner and Addie 

Turner Stratton 

Wm. W. Cupples and Walter 

Morse 

Horace Marshall 

Eugene F. Adams 

Anna Strobel 

John E. Smith 

Amy Dean Sanborn 

Jennie G. Lovell 

Eobert Clark 

IS'ellie L. Johnson 

Frank P. Collins 

Araine H. Monteith 

Homer G. Elkins 

James C. Newton 

Mary S. Quimby 

Mary J. Bowker 

Elmer P. Nichols 

George E. Gelo 

David M. Goodwin 

Byron H. Eollins and Wealthy E. 

Chalker 

Margaret Graf 

Leslie M. Folsoni 

Alice Eobinson 

George C. Edmunds 

Edith H. Aldred 

Julia M. Opelt -. 



Interest. 


Price 
of Lot. 


Permanent 
Funa. 


Total. 


$0.70 


$32.00 


$40.00 


$72.70 


5.96 


39.00 


48.75 


93.71 


6.31 


43.95 


54.94 


105.20 


7.59 


39.00 


48.75 


95.34 




29.88 


37.35 


67.23 




23.37 


29.21 


52.58 


.65 


33.60 


42.00 


76.25 


8.4-t 


48.49 


60.60 


117.53 


2.31 


39.00 


48.75 


90.06 


3.6S 


30.00 


37.50 


71.18 




39.86 


109.61 


149.47 




41.40 


113.85 


155.25 




27.00 


74.25 


101.25 



16.5; 



44.64 122.76 167.40 

26.00 71.50 97.50 

33.80 92.95 126.75 



40.13 



110.35 150.48 



33.80 


92.95 


128.00 


62.96 


173.14 


236.10 


44.10 


121.27 


181.92 


24.00 


66.00 


90.00 


44.38 


122.05 


166.43 


28.58 


78.58 


108.98 


41.60 


114.40 


1.56.00 


26.00 


71.50 


97.50 


115.63 


346.87 


462..50 


31.20 


85.80 


117.00 


28.58 


78.58 


107.16 


33.90 


93.22 


127.12 


33.90 


93.22 


127.1 :i- 


31.20 


85.80 


117.00 


26.00 


71.50 


97..50 


57.94 


159.36 


217.30 


31.20 


85.80 


117.00 


58.06 


159.67 


217.73 


41.60 


114.40 


156.00 


31.58 


86.83 


118.41 


104.96 


314.87 


425.97 


33.90 


93.22 


127.94 


36.00 


99.00 


135.00 


33.90 


93.22 


127.12 


49.72 


136.75 


186.47 



REPORTS OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



443 



Price 
Interest, of Lot. 



Permanpiit 

Fund. Total. 



James W. Horsfall and Frank 

Horsfall 

Frank W. Dimsnioor 

Ellen Washburn 

"William B. Corey 

Frank H. Drake 

Mrs. Darwin J. Forsaith 

Mrs. Lucia Dana 

William B. Mcllvin 

Estate Henry M. Putney 

Charles E. Johnson 

Johnson & Emerson 

Elizabeth Bond 

Oscar P. Stone 

Theresa Gordon, exr. est. ilark 

• E. Harvey 

Addie E. Gould 

William A. Bennett 

Eliza C. Brickett, Harrj^ Leroy 

Brickett, Orrin J. Prescott.... 

Mrs. Sarah Bartlett, Fred F. 

Fisher, and Mrs. Fred F. Fisher 

Mrs. Annie Theiss 

^laud L. and Charles D. Cham- 

berlin 

Ethel J. Harrington 

Mrs. Jennie M. Parker 

Yalmar G. Swanson 

Alice C. Colwell 

Alfred Macauley 

Augusta C. Griffin 

Mary M. Bailey 

Charles Heathcote 

John P. Graves 

Estate Jennie E. Campbell 

Gustaf Lund 

Joseph Ki-abisch 

Estate Charlotte Warren 

Fred Charron 



1.80 



2.91 
2.30 



2.16 



i.sn 



.$1.30.40 



$54.00 
2().()0 
41.60 
38.15 
31.58 
28.58 
38.49 
41.13 
61.60 
60.92 
48.96 
43.52 
48.49 



88.09 
• 329.42 
1.89 36.40 



Interest 

Sale of lots 

Permanent fund 

Total receipts, sale of lots... 

John H. Erskine, superintendent, care of lot 

Total 



$148.50 

71.50 

3 04.40 

104.91 

86.83 

7S.58 

105.S7 

113.10 

l(i9.40 

167.53 

134.65 

119.68 

133.34 



149.16 



$202 

98, 

147 

143 

lis 

108, 
144, 
170. 
231, 
231. 
185. 
163. 
184. 



264.29 354..54 

988.25 1,317.67 
100.10 138.39 



472.38 



40.04 


110.12 


150.16 


60.00 


165.00 


227.47 


2S..58 


78.58 


107.16 


36.45 


100.23 


138.57 


10.00 


S.OO 


18.00 


10.00 


8.00 


18.00 


10.00 


8.00 


18.00 


10.00 


S.OO 


18.00 


10.00 


S.OO 


18.00 


10.00 


8.00 


18.00 


10.00 


S.OO 


18.00 


10.00 


8.00 


18.00 


20.00 


16.00 


36.00 


10.00 


S.OO 


18.00 


10.00 


S.OO 


18.00 


10.00 


8.00 


18.00 


10.00 


8.00 


18.00 


.$4,152.50 


$8,974.36 






$13 


,283.32 


)ts 


7 


,333.37 



$20,616.69 



444 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Cr. 

By amount paid to cemetery fund: 

Perpetual care lots $7,427.29 

Single graves, Woodside lawn 112.00 

Partial perpetual care lots, Hillside lawn.. 1,435.07 

■ $8,974.36 

Treasurer's receipts for amount paid to city 4,308.96 

Superintendent's receiiDts for amount paid to city 7,333.37 

$20,616.69 



Merrill Yard Cemetery. 

J. H. Erskine, superintendent, for care of lots $59.00 

Cr. 
J. H. Erskine, superintendent, amount paid to city $59.00 



Valley Cemetery. 

Lizzie S. Mayhew, path $15.00 

E. C. Smith, superintendent, care of lots.... 1,820.75 



Cr. 

By treasurer's receipts for amount paid to 
city $15.00 

By superintendent's receipts for amount paid 

to city 1,820.75 



$1,835.75 



$1,835.75 



Respect full}' submitted, 

FEED L. ALLEN, 
Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 

I herebj"^ certify that I have examined the accounts of Fred L. 
Allen, trea.surer of the trustees of cemeteries, and find the same are 
correctly cast and vouched for. 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



KEPOKTS OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 445 

To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund: 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit to you the twenty-seventh annual 
report of the funds received and expenses paid to January 1, 1910: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund January 1, 1909 $11:3,200.89 

Kbceipts During the Year. 

From Joseph H. James $129.00 

Martha S. Moore and Helen A. Baker. . 144.00 

Joseph G, Putnam 144.00 

Emma V. Luberg 100.00 

Ellen B. Blake 108.00 

Henry H. McKelvie 129.20 

Annie L. York 144.00 

John C. Bickford, exr 150.00 

Annie B. Lamprey , 102.00 

Mrs. A. E. Batchelder, exr. of the es- 
tate of Clara E. Eaton 100.00 

E. V. Plummer for estate of J. P. 

Plummer 144.00 

Charles Both -. 144.00 

estate Joseph A. Brown 129.00 

Mrs. Margaret Cass 130.80 

James P. Tuttle, exr. estate of Amanda 

S. Smith 150.00 

Mrs. Sarah Stevens 144.00 

Ellen M. Moore 100.00 

To receipts transferred from Pine Grove 

cemetery, perpetual care lots 7.427.29 

partial perpetual care lots, Hillside lawn 1.4J5.07 
partial perpetual care lots, Woodside 

lawn 112.00 

Receipts for the j'ear 1 1,17.'!. 50 

Total of fund $124,434.45 



Cr. 

By bonds on hand $82,050.00 

By cash on hand 42,384.45 

$124,434.45 



Income Account. 
Income on hand January 1, 1909 $3,801.04 



446 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Interest savings bank $909.15 

Interest savings bank, Hillside lawn 352.44 

Interest savings bank, Woodside lawn 21.03 

Interest coupons 3,6(32.50 



EXPENSES PAID BUKIXG THE YEAR. 

Charles D. Boynton $9.47 

W. T. Stevens 5.00 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons (iO.OO 

Earl H. Danf orth 10.00 

J. G. French 2.00 

W, B. Lang <).00 

Arthur E. Clarke 8.00 

John B. Varick Co 49.04 

J. H. Erskine, superintendent '. 16.10 

Manchester Eendei'ing Co 30.00 

Manchester Hardware Co 59.25 

Eeade Mfg. Co 35.00 

Payroll, labor 202.50 

Charles A. Bailey 559.00 

Eobie Consolidated Concrete Co 137. 8S 

J. H. Erskine, superintendent, care of lots, 

Woodside lawn 21.03 

J. H. Erskine, superintendent, care of lots, 

Hillside lawn 352.44 

J. H. Erskine, superintendent, care of per- 
petual care lots 2,623.00 

James Thompson 100.00 

Total expenses 

Cash income on hand 



$4,945.12 
$8,746.16 



$4,285.71 
4,460.45 



$8,746.16 



Valley Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund January 1, 1909 

Eeceipts Durixg the Year. 

Ehoda L. Fish $120.00 

A. H. Hale, executor of the estate of Ceorge 

W. Gardner 300.00 

B. F. Kingsley, executor of the estate of 

Ehoda F. Currier 100.00 



KEPORTS OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 447 

Addie Kendrick McClaiy $102.00 

James E. Currier 126.00 

D. A. Taggart, executor of the estate of 

Mary A. Simons 300.00 

Mrs. Hanna J. Smith 1 20.00 

Frank E. Putney ISS.OO 

Iveceipts for the year $l,.356.0O 

Total of fund $37,200.97 



Cr. 

By bonds on hand $31,.-)00.00 

By cash on hand 5,700.97 

$37,200.97 



Income Account. 

Income on hand January 1, 1909 $4,334.89 

Interest savings banks $349.54 

Interest coupons 1,350.00 

Income for the year 1.699.54 

Total $6,034.43 

EXPENSES PAID DURING THE YEAR. 

W. E. Dunbar & Sons $84.00 

John B. Varick Co 32.00 

Pine Grove cemetery 33.00 

Frank N. Pelky 7.00 

Street and park commissioners 110.00 

Palmer & Garmon 67.90 

E. C. Smith, superintendent, care of lots.... 890.50 

Expenses for the year $1,224.40 

Cash income on hand 4,810.03 

$6,034.4:'. 



Merrill Yard Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund January 1, 1909 $1,287.89 



448 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Cr. 

By bonds on hand $450.00 

By cash on hand 837.80 

$1,287.89 

Income AccorNT. 

Income on hand January 1, noO!) $323.72 

Interest savings bank $46.48 

Interest coupons 22.50 

Income for the jear 68.98 

Total $392.70 

EXPENSES PAID DIRIXG THE. YEAR. 

J. H. Erskine, superintendent, care perpetual 

care lots $37.00 

Cash income on hand 355.70 

$392.70 

Gale Fund Income Accouts-t. 

Income on hand January 1. 1909 $197.07 

Interest savings bank 7.72 

Interest from fund 12.20 

$216.99 



EXPENSES PAID DURING THE YEAR. 

E. C. Smith, superintendent, care of Gale 

tomb $6.00 

Cash on hand 210.99 

$216.99 

Special fund for the care of the Oliver Gould lot in Pine 
Grove cemetery: 
Keceived from Samuel H. Mead, executor $500.00 

Cr. 

By cash on hand in Manchester savings bank $500.00 



Eespectfully submitted, 

FRED L. ALLEN, 
Treasurer of the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund. 



REPORTS OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 449 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of account of 
Fred L. Allen, treasure!' of the cemetery funds, embracing- the re- 
ceipts and expenditures for the year 1909, and I find the same correct 
and properly vouched. I have also examined the securities in which 
said fund is invested and find as follows: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

20 city of Manchester 5 per cent cemetery 
bonds, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 
lo, IG, 17, 18, 22, 23, 24, 26, 28, due 1942; de- 
nomination $1,000 each $20,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent cemetery 
bonds, Nos. 1, 2, due 1942; denomination 
$500 each 1,000.00 

1 eity of Manchester 5 per cent cemetery 

bond, Xo. 3, due 1942 50.00 

14 city of Manchester 5 per cent cemetery 
bonds, Nos, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 
15, 16, 17, due 1913; denomination $1,000 
each 14,000.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent cemetery 

bond, No. 2, due 1913 500.00 

5 city of Manchester 5 per cent cemetery 
bonds, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 9, 10, due 1913; denom- 
ination $100 each 500.00 

16 city of Manchester 31/0 per cent city 
bonds, Nos. 21, 22, 23, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 91, 
92, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, due April 1, 1919; 
denomination $1,000 each 16,000.00 

1 city of Manchester 4 jjer cent schoq^ bond, 

due July 1, 1913 1,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 4 per cent improve- 
ment bonds, Nos. 1, 2, due April 1. 1916... 2,000.00 

4 city of Manchester 4 per cent water boiids, 

Nos. 21, 22, 23, 24, due 1917 4.000.00 

4 city of Manchester 3l^ per cent municipal 

bonds, Nos. 41, 42, 43, 44, due July 1, 1922. . 4,000.00 

19 city of Manchester 4 per cent water 
bonds, Nos. 24 to 40, inclusive, 4, 7, due 
July 1, 1915 19,000.00 



Cash on deposit in Manchester Saving's Bank, 

Book No. 50420 $15, .594. 13 

Cash on deposit in ^lechanics Savings Bank, 

Book No. 3413 20,661.63 

Cash on deposit in Mechanics Savings Bank, 

Book No. 4407 9,965.14 



$S2,050.00 



450 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Cash on deposit in Mechanics Savings Bank, 
Book No. 4522 $024.00 



Valley Cecmeteky. 

4 city of Manchester 5 per cent cemetery 
bonds, Nos. 1, 6, 11, 18, due 1913; denom- 
ination $1,000 each $4,000.00 

1 city of Manchester 5 per cent cemeterj^ 

bond, Xo. 1, due 1913; denomination $500 500.00 
3 citj^ of Manchester 5 per cent cemetery 
bonds, Nos. 6, 7, 8, due 1913; denomina- 
tion $100 each 300.00 

8 city of Manchester 5 per cent cemetery 
bonds, Xos. 4, 7, 12, 19, 20, 21, 25, 27, due 
1942; denomination $1,000 each 8,000.00 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent cemetery 
bonds, Nos. 2 and 4, due 1942; denomina- 
tion $50 each 100.00 

3 city of Manchester 4 per cent improvement 

bonds, Nos. 3, 4, 5, due April 1, 1916 3,000.00 

3 city of Manchester 31/2 per cent city bonds, 
Xos. 81, 93, 100, due April 1, 1919; denom- 
ination $1,000 each 3,000.00 

6 city of Manchester 31/, per cent municipal 

bonds, Nos. 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, due 1922.. 6.000.00 

6 city of Manchester 5 per ce^^t cemetery 
bonds, Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, due 1942; denom- 
ination $100 each GOO.OO 

6 city of Manchester 4 per cent water bonds, 

Nos. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, due July 1, 1915 6.000.00 

Cash on deposit in Guaranty Savings Bank, 

Book No. 4527 $259.35 

Cash on deposit in Meclianics Savings Bank, 

Book No. 5569 8,253.47 

Cash on deposit in Amoskeag Savings Bank, 

Book No. 68808 1,998.18 



$46,844.90 



Total amount of permanent fund and income De- 
cember 31, 1909 $128,894.90 



$31,500.00 



10,511.00 



Total amount of permanent fund and income De- 
cember 31, 1909 $42,011.00 



REPORTS OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 451 

]Merrili. Yard Cejuj-Pery. 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent cemetery 
bonds, Nos. 4 and 5, due 1913; denomina- 
tion $100 each $20t.OO 

2 city of Manchester 5 per cent cemetery 
bonds, Nos. 1 and 2, due 1942; denomina- 
tion $100 each 200.00 

1 city of Mancliester 5 per cent cemetery 

bond, No. 1, due 1942; denomination $50.. 50.00 

Cash on deposit in Guaranty Savings Bank, 

Book No. 5116 8.00 

Cash on deposit in iVnioskeag Savings Bank, 

Book No. 09517 1,185.59 

Total amount of fund and income December 31, 1909 $1,643.59 



Gale Fund Ixcome Account. 

Cash on hand in Amoskeag Savings Banlv, 

Book No, 34108 $210.99 

Special fund for the care of the Oliver Gould lot in 
Pine Grove cemetery: 
Cash on hand in Manchester Savings Bank $500.00 

Total amount of fund and income December 31, 1909 $173,260.48 

JAMES E. DODGE, 

City Auditor. 



EEPOET 



TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING 
FUND. 



To the Board of Mayor anc^ Aldermen of the City of Manchester: 

GEN^ilLEiKEN: — As required by chapter 37, section 4, of the city ordi- 
nances of Manchester, the trustees of the sinking fund of the city 
of Manchester herewith report the conditio^, of the several funds 
January 1, 1910, with receipts and payments for the year ending- 
December 31, 1909. 

WILLIAM McELEOY, 
lEED L. ALLEN, 
CHAS. H. MANNING, 
Trustees of Sinking Ftoid. 

improa^ement loan. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1909. for the payment 

of improvement bonds $331,630.60 

Appropriation for 1909 $5,000.00 

Interest on Manchester bonds 8,768.00 

Interest on Fall Kiver bonds 437.50 

Interest on Nashua bonds 200.00 

Interest on Boston bonds 2,455.00 

Interest on bank deposits 904.77 

Merrill, Oldham & Co.: 

Discount on Fall Kiver bonds purchased.. 125.00 



17,890.27 



$349,520.87 



Cr. 

N. W. Harris & Co.: 

Premium paid for Manchester bond $17.50 

Accrued interest, Manchester bond 2.44 

Estabrook & Co.: 

Premium paid for Boston bonds 10.00 

Accrued interest, Boston bonds 30.00 

Premium paid for Nashua bonds 100.00 

Accrued interest, Nashua bonds 47.78 

455 



456 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



E. L. Gay & Co.: 

I'remiuni paid for Boston bonds $325.00 

Accrued interest, Boston bonds 572.66 

Premium paid for Manchester bonds 46.00 

Accrued interest, Manchester bonds 30.22 

Merrill, Oldham & Co.: 

Accrued interest. Fall River bonds 172.57 

F. S. Moseley & Co.: 

Accrued interest, Manchester bonds 325.00 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1909 $336,200.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1909 11,641.70 



$1,679.17 



$349,520.87 



WATER LOAN. 



Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1909, for the payment 

of water bonds 

Appropriation for 1909 $5,000,00 

Appropriation for hydrant service, 1909 21,275.00 

Interest on Manchester bonds 6,205.00 

Interest on Boston bonds 200.00 

Interest on Waterbury bonds 600.00 

Interest on bank deposits 480.11 



Cr. 

A. B. Leach. & Co.: 

Premium paid for Boston bonds $12.00 

Accrued interest, Boston bonds 45.00 

Merrill, Oldham & Co.: 

Premium paid for Waterbury bonds 120.00 

Accrued interest, Waterbury bonds 350.00 

F. S. Moseley & Co.: 
Accrued interest paid for Manchester 
bonds 143.00 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1909 $194,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1909 41,309.91 



$202,219.80 



$235,979.91 



$670.00 



$235,979.91 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 457 

school loax. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1909, for the payment 

of school bonds $28,300.42 

Appropriation for 1909 $2,000.00 

Interest on Manchester bonds 890.00 

Interest on bank deposit 219.59 



Cr. 

Blodgett, Merritt & Co.: 

Premium paid for Manchester bonds. 
Accrued interest, Manchester bonds. . 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1909 

Cash on hand December 31, 1909 



$30.10 
22.00 



B22.000.00 
9,417.91 



$31,470.01 



$52.10 



city funding loan. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund on hand January 1, 1909, for the 

payment of city bonds maturing- April 1, 1919 

Appropriation for 1909 $5,000.00 

Interest on Manchester bonds 1,517.50 

Interest on Boston bonds 100.00 

Interest on bank deposit 80.50 

Adams & Co.: 

Discount on Manchester bond purchased.. 10.00 



$31,470.01 



$50,009.32 



$56,717.32 



Cr. 

George A. Fernald & Co.: 

Premium paid for Manchester bonds. 

Accrued interest, Manchester bonds. 
A. B. Leach & Co.: 

Premuim paid for Boston bonds 

Accrued interest, Boston bonds 



$30.80 
17.56 



41.25 
5C.12 



458 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



E. H. Eollins & Sons: 

Premium paid for ^Manchester bonds $15.00 

Accrued interest, Manchester bonds 18.00 

Adams & Co.: 

Accrued interest paid for Manchester 
bonds .09 

Merrill, Oldham & Co.: 

Premium paid for Manchester bonds .50 

Accrued interest, Manchester bonds 1.08 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1909 $19,100.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1909 7,436.92 



$180.40 



$56,536.92 
$56,717.32 



municipal loan. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund Januarj^ 1, 1909, for the payment 

of bonds maturing- July 1, 1922 

Appropriation for 1909 $4,000.00 

Interest on Manchester bonds 525.00 

Interest on bank deposit 276.65 

Cr. 

F. S. Moseley & Co.: 

Accrued interest, Manchester bonds 

Bonds on hand December 31, 1909 $25,000.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1909 5,193.69 



$25,574.04 



4,801.6.- 



$30,375.69 



$182.00 



$30,193.69 
$30,375.69 



citv refu>t)ing loan. 

Dr. 

Total amount on hand January 1, 1909, for the payment 

of bonds maturing April 1, 1925 

Appropriation for 1909 $2,500.00 

Interest on bank deposit 285.12 



$7,753.00 



$10,538.12 



KEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 459 

Cr. 

Cash on hand December 31, 1900 $10,538.12 

refuzs'ding city i.oak. 

Dr. 

Total amount of fund January 1, 1909, for the payment 

of bonds maturing April 1. 1909 $2,r,00.00 

Appropriation for 1909 $2,500.00 

Interest on bank deposits 46.87 

• 2,546.87 

$5,046.87 

Cr. 

Cash on hand December 31, 1909 $5,04r).s7 

Kespectfully submitted, 

FRED L. ALLEN", 
Treasurer of Sinking Fund. 

This is to certifj' that I have examined the accounts of Fred L. 
Allen, treasurer of the trustees of the sinking fund, embracing the 
receipts and expenditures for the jear ending December 31, 1909, 
and find the same correct and properly vouched. I have also ex- 
amined the securities in which the fund is invested and find as fol- 
lows: 



460 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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222 
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KEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 461 



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462 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SINKING FUND. 463 



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464 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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EEPOET 



ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 



EEPOET OF THE ENGINEEK'S DEPARTMENT. 



Maxchesteh, N. H., December 31, 1909. 
To the Hoitorahlc Maijur and City Cmmcih: 

GENTtEMEN: — The thirty-first annual report of the engineer's de- 
partment is herewith submitted, showing the expenditures and opera- 
tions for the year ending December 31, 1909. 

ORGANIZATION. 

Samuel J. Lokd, Chief Eiujiuccr of the City. 
George \V. Wales, First Assistant Engineer. 
Harrie yi. Young, Chief Clerk. 

Assistants: Alfred T. Dodge, instrument man; Henry A. Worthen, 
in.^trument man; Lawrence A. O'Connor, rodman; John J. McAllister, 
Jr., assistant clerk (stenographer and typewriter); Oliver W. Cush- 
man, draughtsman (to September 18) ; Delmont R. Bradley', rodman 
(May 17 to September 2.")) ; Glen B. Eastman, rodman (from October 
28); Horace Wyman, rodman (June 25 to September 11); Frank L. 
McAllister, assistant clerk (from October 26); Joseph W. McElroy, as- 
sistant clerk (November 29 to December 25). 



I 









Financial. 












farrell brothers. 






190S. 












Nov. 


16. 


To 


y^ hrs. labor 


$0.23 




Dec. 


IS. 




1 2Vi holder 


.10 










1 hrs. labor 


.45 


$0.78 














W. p. GOODMAN. 






190S\ 












Dec. 


30. 


To 


1 box typewriting paper 


$1.25 




190!;. 












Jan. 


5. 


To 


1 box typewriting paper 


2.00 






23. 
27. 


To 


1 box typewriting paper . . . 


1.25 


$4.50 
$1.25 


Mar. 


Yo doz. Higgins drawing ink 




April 


9. 


To 


1 box typewriting paper . . 


$2.00 




May 


25. 




1 box typewriting paper . . . 


2.06 




June 


14. 




100 catalogue envelopes 


1.50 


$5.50 


July 


2. 


To 


2 bottles Higgins' drawing ink.. 




$0.50 



i67 



468 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Aug-. 31. To 1 g-ross No. 540 pencil pro- 
tectors $3.00 

Xov. 1. 1 box typewriting- paper 2.00 

4. 1 pint Stafford's Commercial 

ink .40 

Dec. 18. 2 boxes typewriting- paper 

@ $1.25 ' 2.50 

2 boxes typewriting pajier 

(a, $2.00 .- . . . 4.00 



$11.90 



J. A. WILLIAMS. 
1900. 

Jan. 5. To 100 sheets paper $0.GO 

TEMPLE & FARRINGTOX COMPANY. 
1909. 
Jan. 18. To 1 box Kee Lox red carbon 

paper $3.00 

Feb. 10. To binding- one record commit- 
tee on streets $0.85 

binding- one record commit- 
tee on sewers and drains.. .85 

$1.70 

Mar. 3J. To binding- 1 time book $0.S5 

Jnly 19. To making- 24 level notebooks $17.00 

Dec. 20. To 4 binding- covers for plans 

22x301/, $15.00 

4 binding covers for plans 

■ 22x301/2 15.00 ' 

making 18 transit notebooks 13.50 
making 24 level notebooks.. 17.00 
3 boxes Kee Lox carbon pa- 
per @ $3.00 9.00 

$G9.50 

NEW ENGLAXD TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY. 

1909. 

Jan. 23. To exchange service, inchiding rental of 
telephone for 1 month ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1908 $2.08 

Feb. 27. To exchange service, including rental of 
telephone for 1 montii ending January 
31, 1909 $2.09 

Mar. 27. To exchange service, including rental of 
telephone for 1 month ending Febru- 
ary 28, 1909 . .• $2.09 



ENGINEfeli'S DEPARTMENT. 469 

April 24. To exohango service, inchuliiiq- rental of 
telephone for 1 month eiulint;- Mareli 
31 , 1909 $2.09 

May 22. To exchange service, including rental of 
telephone for 1 niontli ending April 
30, 1909 $2.09 

June 26. To exchange service, including rental of 
telephone for 1 month ending May 31, 
1909 .$2.09 

July 24. To exchange service, including rental of 
telephone for 1 month ending June 

30, 1909 $2.0S 

Aug. 21. To exchange service, including rental of 

telephone for 1 month ending July 31, 

1909 $2.08 

Sept. 15. To exchange service, including rental of 
telephone for 1 month ending August 

31, 1909 $2.08 

Oct. 1. To exchange service, including rental of 

telephone for 1 month ending Septem- 
ber 30, 1909 .$2.08 

Nov. 1. To exchange service, including rental of 
telephone for 1 month ending October 

31, 1909 $2.08 

Dec. 24. To toll call to Concord $0.15 

Dec. 25. To exchange service, including rental of 
telephone for 1 month ending Novem- 
ber 30, 1909 $2.08 

MAXCHESTER TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE. 
1909. 
Feb. 2. To 1 typewriter ribbon $1.00 

MELVIN & FITTS. 

1909. 
Feb. 10. To 1 rolltop typewriting desk $15.00 

1 chair 4.50 

19.50 

May 17. To 1 blank sewer license book $13.85 

THE MYKOX C. CT-ARK PIBLISUING COilPANY, CHICAGO, ILL. 

1909. 
Feb. 27. To subscription to Engineering-Contract- 
ing, from Jan. 29, 190S, to Jan. 29, 1909 $1.00 



470 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



MAxXCHESTER HAUDWAKE COMPANY. 



Feb. 37. To 1 rim lock $0.20 

July G. To 2G doz. plated numbers IVa" 

(S: 4140 $1P..2G 

10 lbs. hinge nails, 2x14. @; 15c 1.50 



$14.76 

Dec. 25. To CO doz. plated numbers lY/' @ 4y4C $30.60 

C. L. BEUGER & SONS, BOSTOX, MASS. 

1001). 
Mar. 16. To repairing-, cleaning-, and ad- 
justing one Berger, No. 
865, Engineer's transit as 
per memorandum: 

hours labor @ 60c $5.40 

1 new hood for same 1.00 

$6.40 



TECHNICAL SUPPLY COMPANY, NEW YORK CITY. 

1909. 
Mar. 20. To 1 50-185-36" Rap. B. P. Paper $1.50 

1 50-185-36" X. R. B. P. Paper 1.50 



THE JOHN B. CLARKE COMPANY. 
1909. 
April G. To electros A-B-C, forms 1, 2, 

and 3 $5.48 

8. electros D-E, forms 4, 5 2.74 

6. printing- 1,000 ruled cards, A 5.00 

printing 1,000 ruled cards, 

B-C 7.50 

8. printing 1,000 ruled cards, D 5.00 

printing 500 ruled cards, E.. 



?. 0-; 



June 15. To printing 300 copies of the an- 
nual report of the Board 
of Street and Park Com- 
missioners, Engineer's De- 
partment and Boai'd' of Ex- 
aminers of Plumbers, En- 
gineer's Department re- 
port, 59 pages @ 65c $38.35 

corrections 3.52 



$3.00 



$2S.91 



$41.87 



engineer's department. 471 

JOHX >'. HAXXOX, NASHUA, N. H. 
1909. 

Ajiril 24. To i/o dozen cuspidors $:>.Q0 

IDEAL STAMP COMPAXY. 

1909. 

May 7. To 9 one-line stamps $1.35 

Dec. 24. To 1 cushion stamp 1909 $0.75 

THE HEAD & DOWST COMPAXY. 
1909. 

May 26. To 500 3-foot grade stakes $10.25 

Aug. 21. 300 3-foot grade stakes $9.75 

Sept. 7. 300 3-foot grade stakes $9.75 

Oct. 21. 300 3-foot grade stakes $9.75 

Dec. 15. To 1,200 3-foot grade stakes (o 

$32.50 per M $39.00 

500 4-foot grade stakes @ 

$32.50 per M 16.25 

5,000 2-foot grade stakes @ 

$6.00 per M 30.00 

300 hubs @ $12.50 3.75 

1,000 signboards @ $S.00 80.00 



CHARLES F. MACCARTHY. 
1909. 

June 26. To painting 61 street signs $18.30 

painting 9 street signs 2.70 

Dec. 20. To painting 26 street signs @ 

30c $7.80 

24, painting 4 street signs @ 30c 1.20 



THE JOHN B. A'ARICK COMPAXY. 

1909. 

July 6. To 6 No. 5 S. S. drills (a 9c $0.54 

13. 2 No. 5 M. T. drills (oj 9c .18 

1 quart asphaltum .25 

14. 2 7 X 5 films, 6 ex., (a 80c 1.60 

Aug. 21. To 1 camera bulb $0.25 

1 gal. standard floor oil .40 

1 gal. standard floor oil .40 

2 7x5 Alms, 6 ex., (a SOc... 1.60 



$169.00 



1)21.00 



$9.00 



$2.57 



$2.65 



472 



Aug. 



Oct. 
Dec. 



1909. 
Aiiff. 



1909. 
Sept. 



1909, 
Oct. 



1909. 
Oct. 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

IG. To 1 gal. tloor oil $0.35 

1 gal. floor oil .35 

17. 1 gal. floor oil .35 

14. To 1 ball heavy twine 

13. To 50 lbs. Phoenix lead $3.G3 

1 gal. oil .71 

1 gal. spirits .09 

i/o pt. dryer .05 

1 No. 6 Kaiser wall brush... .55 

1 No. 6 sash brush .15 

2 1 gal. cans @ 25c .50 

1 1 pt, can .10 

14. 1 6 rd. pt. duster .(53 

1 lb. raw umber in oil 1.19 

20. 2 balls braided twine .50 

2 coils braided twine for 

plumb bobs .20 

WEST DISINFECTING COMPANY, BOSTON, MASS. 

15. To 3 gals. Euchrelyptum, special disinfect- 

ant, @ $1.75 

PIKE & HEALD COJIPANY. 

S. To 1 Va N. P. hose bibb $0.04 

1 Va X. P. Croton filter .25 

putty .03 

labor repairing closet, etc... .50 

JOSEPH Y0C4EL & CO. 

20. To repairing 1 horse blanket 

THE SESSIONS FOUNDRY COMPANY, BRISTOL, CONN. 

23. To 300 street sign hangers, 

drilled and painted, 1,273 

lbs., @ $0.0185 .• $23.55 ' 

16 hours machine work @ 60c 9.60 

IS hours labor making and 

gating 2 pieces No. 362 x 

and repairing model (« 50c. 9.00 

Sy, lbs. Avhite metal @ 50c.. 4.25 

1 lb. brass gate .40 



$1.05 
$0.20 



$S.90 



$5.25 



$1.4;: 



$1.50 



$46.S0 



engineer's department. 473 

JULIEX P. FRIEZ, BALTIMORE, MD. 
190C. 

Nov. 27. To 1 tipping- bucket rain gauge $.j1.25 

1 two-magnet register for 
wind velocity and rainfall. . 75.00 

1 set blank forms, No. lOlo.. 5,00 

2 bottles special register ink, 

1 purple and 1 green, @ 75c 1.5(5 



CHARLES A. BAILEY, SrXCOOK, N. H. 
1909. 
Nov. 27. To 100 Engineer's Department highway 

bounds @ $1.25 each $125.00 

F. L. GEIGER & CO. 

Dee. '6. To 4 sets of brass bolts with keys for folio 

plan covers @ $1.75 $7.00 

irAXCIIESTER TRACTION, LIGHT & POWER CO. 
1909. 
Dec. 13. To 4- 40-watt Tungsten lamps (oj 

70e $2.80 

6 100-watt Gem lamps @ 30c. l.SO 

$4.G0 



KEUFFEL' & ESSER CO., HOBOKEX, N. J. 
1909. 

Dec. 20. To 1 set steel arrows, 

7810 (10% dis.).. $1.50 

1 set steel arrows, 

7812 (10% dis.).. 1.20 

1 only drawing 
board, 2513 (10% 
dis.) 3.75 

1 stick India ink, 
3031-VIII (20% 
dis.) 3.00 

1 only Paragon in- 
strument, 454 

(20% dis.) 5.00 

morocco case (net) .GO 

2 only cutting 
wheels, 3518 W., 
@ $1.50 (20% 

dis.) 3.00 



474 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Dec, 



20. To 1 only magnifier, 






4085 A (15% dis.) 


$2.00 




2 only sewed leath- 






er sheaths, 6491 B 






(10% dis.) 


.90 




1 only leveling rod, 






6262 (10% dis.).. 


13.00 




, 




$33.95 






Less 10% on $20.35 


$2.03 




15% on $2.00 


.30 




20% on $11.00 


2.20 


$4.53 







$29.4S 



1909. 
April 



Dec. 



1909. 
Dec. 



E. G. SOLTMAIVN, NEW YORK CITY. 

To 1 100-ft. Victoria tape 

200 sheets Victoria drawing 

paper 

expressage 

To 2 quires "Double Elephant" 
cold pressed drawing paper, 
mounted on muslin, 27" x 
40", @ $6.72 per dozen 

4 quires "Imperial" cold 
pressed, mounted on mus- 
lin, drawing paper, 22" x 
40" @ $4.32 per dozen 

100 sheets detail paper, 26" x 
391/2" 

200 sheets detail paper, 22" x 
301/0", (O) $3.50 

12 dozen "Kohinoor" drawing 
pencils @ 80c 

200 sheets Crane's bond pa- 
per, 24"x38" @ $5.50 

D. r. SHEA. 

To ] pr. Stoi-m King rubber 

boots. Xo. 9 

1 pr. Storm King rubber 
boots. No. 8 



$8.00 



6.00 



P26.8S 

33.56 
4.25 
7.00 
9.60 

11.00 



$4.50 
4.50 



$10.90 



$92.29 



$9.00 



engineer's department. 475 

MAN'CHESTER COAL & ICE CO. 
1909. 

Dec. 2o. To ice from June ], 1909. to November 1, 

1909, @ $1.75 per month $8.75 

HARRY L. G0ri,p. 

1909. ^ * 

Dec. 2.J. To making- bencli mark reports monthly 

for year $12.00 

JOHN^ J. MCALLISTER. JR. 

1909. 
Jan. 23. To cash paid A. T. Dodge for 

carfare $0.20 

cash paid G. W. Wales for 
carfare .10 



Feb. 10. To cash paid O. W. Cnshman for 

carfare $0.10 

cash paid A. T. Dodge for ex- 
press .30 

cash paid H. A. Worthen for 
expi'ess .55 

2 keys .' .40 

Mar. 9. To cash paid G. W. Wales for 

soap $0.25 

10. cash paid A. T. Dodge for 

express .40 

22. cash paid H. M. Young for 

express .00 

Mar. 30. To cash paid G. W. Wales for 2 

punches $0.30 

cash paid H. M. Young- for 
carfare .20 

May 25. To cash paid H. ^r. Young for 

carfare $0.30 

June 2. cash paid J. J. ^icAllister fcr 

carfare .20 

3. cash ])aid J. J. McAllister for 

carfare .20 

4. cAsh paid O. W. Cushman for 

carfare .10 

cash paid J. J. McAllister for 
carfare ^ .15 



$0.30 



$i.3i: 



$1.25 



$0.50 



476 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



June 21. To cash paid H. 'SI. Youns^' for 

carfare 

26. cash paid H. M. Young' for 

carfare 



July 14. 

15. 

19. 
20. 



June 2S. To cash paid A. T. Dodge for 

express 

cash paid H. A. Worthen for 

carfare 

cash paid D. R. Bradley for 

carfare 

cash paid D. R. Bradlej^ for 

carfare 

cash piaid D. R. Bradley for 

carfare 

cash paid D. R. Bradley for 

carfare 

cash paid H. M. Young- for 

express 

July 26. To cash paid H. M. Y'oung for 
carfare 

Aug. 10. cash paid IT. iM. Young for 
express 

Sept. 2. To cash paid A. T. Dodge for 

carfare 

3. cash paid A. T. Dodge for 
carfare 

Oct. 7. To express 

cash jjaid A. T. Dodge for 
carfare, Sept. 27 to Oct. 14 

Nov. 6. To carfare November 6 to No- 
vember 27, inclusive 

13. cash paid for chalk line.... 

25. cash paid A. T. Dodge for 

carfare 

26. cash paid A. T. Dodge for 

carfare 

28. cash paid A. T. Dodge for 

carfare 

cash i^aid H. M. Young for 
carfare 



^0.10 
.30 



$0.50 
.10 
10 
20 
20 



$0.40 
.35 



$0.20 
.20 



$0.30 
3.20 



$2.75 
.40 

.10 

.20 

.20 

.20 



$1. 



$1.55 



$0.75 



$0.40 



$3.50 



$3.85 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 477 

Dec. 25. To carfare from November 29 to 

December 4 $1.10 

cash paid A. T. Dodg-e for 
carfare .;iO 

cash paid for stamped envel- 
opes 2.05 

cash paid for express 1.00 



GEORGE \V. WALES. 
190&. 
Dec. 25. To 25S days' service (a' $3.30 per 

day $851.40 

54 days' service (7t $3.60 per 

day 194.40 

183 hours' extra service @ 

44c. per hour r. . 80.52 

32 hours' extra service @ 4Sc. 
/ i)er hour 15. rU) 

HARRIE M. YOUNG. 

Dec. 25. To 205 days, 5i/, hours' service, 

@ $3.00 per day $017.20 

54 days' service @ $3.30 per 

day 178.20 

30 hours' extra service (a 40c. 

per hour 12.00 

71/2 hours' extra service @ 

44c. per hour 3.30 

ALFRED T. DODGE. 

1909. 
Dec. 25. To 258 days' service (a $2.50 i^er 

day , $645.00 

54 days' service (ct $2.85 per 

day 153.90 

99 hours' extra service (a 

33y3C. per hour 33.05 

14 hours' extra service at 38c. 

per hour . : 5.32 

HENRY A. WORTH EX. 

Dec. 25. To 252 days, 31/2 hours' service, 

(a $2.25 per day $568.05 

54 days' service @ $2.55 i)er 
day 137.70 



$5.0; 



$1,141.08 



$837.27 



478 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Dee. 2'). To 47 hours' extra service @ 30c. 

per hour $14.10 

6 hours' extra service @ 34c. 
per hour 2.04 

OLIVER W. CUSHMAN. 

Sept. 18. To 12G clays' service @ $2.00 per 

day $252.00 

30 days' service @ $2.15 per 

day 64.50 

72 days' service @ $2.25 per 

day 162.00 

191/2 hours' extra service @ 

26%e. per hour 7.87 

314 hours' extra service @ 

28%c. per hour... 1.00 

8 hours' extra service @ 30c. 

per hour 2.40 



J. J. MCALLISTER, JE. 

Dec. 25. To 258 days' service @ $2.25 per 

day $580.50 

54 days' service @ $2.55 per 

day 137.70 

86 hours' extra service @ 30c. 

per hour 25.80 

321/3 hours' extra service @ 
• 34c. jDer hour 11.05 



LAWRENCE A. O CONNOR. 

Dec. 25. To 166 days' service @ $1.50 per 

day $249.00 

50 days' service @ $1.95 per 

day 97.50 

3 hours' extra service @ 20c. 

per hour .60 



BELMONT R. BRADLEY. 

Sept. 25. To 60 days' service @ $2.00 per 

day $120.00 

54 days' service ^i^ .$2.25 per 
day' 121.i0 



$721.89 



$489.77 



$755.05 



$347.10 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 479 

Sept. 25. To lli/j hours' extra service @ 

2G%c. per hour $3.05 

3OV2 hours' extra service @ 

30c. per hour 9.15 

carfare from September 3 to 
■September 25, inclusive... 3.70 



HORACE WYMAN. 

Sept! 11. To 30 clays' service @ $1.25 per 

day $37.50 

42 days' service @ $1.50 per 
day^ 63.00 

2 hours' extra service (a 20c. 

per hour .40 



$257.40' 



$100.90 



GLEN B. EASTMAN. 

Dec. 25. To 51 days' service @ $1.50 per day $70.50 

FRANK L. MCALLISTER. 

Dec. 25. To 49 days' service @ $1.50 per 

day $73.50 

2l^ hours' extra service @ 

20c. per hour .50 

$74.00 

JOSEPH W. MCELROY. 

Dec. 25. To 24 days' service @ $2.00 per day $48.00 

GEORGE PRINCE. 

Dec. 25. To 18 days' service @ $2.25 per day $40.50 

WILLIAM A. MOULTON. 

Dec. , 25. To ly^ days' service @ $1.75 per day $13.13 

SAMUEL J. LORD. 

Dee. 25. To 12 months' salary as chief engineer, one 
half paid from appropriation for eng-i- 
neer's deijartment $1,099.90 

SUMMARY. 

Appropriation to the engineer's department 

for the year 1909 $8,000.00 

Expenses of the engineer's department for 

the year 1909 $7,896.74 

Balance unexpended 103.26 

$8,000.00 $8,000.00 



480 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Orders. 

Board of mayor and aldermen (meeting's) 5 

Board of examiners of plumbers (meetings) 10 

Committee on streets (meetings) 8 

Committee on sewers and drains (meetings) 4 

Petitions for new highways 19 

Petitions for highwaj^ grade 26 

Petitions for new sewers 5 

Table Xo. 32 (street signs) 420 

Table Xo. 29 (highway bounds) 78 

Table Xo. 30 (levels for profile) 73 

Table Xo. 30 (plans and profile) 71 

Table Xo. 31 (levels for profiles, sewer) 1 

Table Xo. 31 (preliminary plans, sewers) 1 

Table Xo. 31 (miscellaneous orders, field) 208 

Table Xo. 31 (miscellaneous orders, office) '. 11 

Table Xo. 34 (cemetery orders, office) 3 

Table Xo. 34 (cemetery orders, field) 11 

Table Xo. 35 (street and park commission orders).... 305 

Table Xo. 33 (street numbers, orders) 199 

Total 1,4G7 

Field Work. 

Levels for profile for establishing grades (length in feet) " 242,395 

for sewer profiles (length in feet) 400 

\n Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 900 

Other levels (length in feet) 7*540 

Total length of levels in feet 251,235 

Cross-section levels, Parker common (area in sq. ft.).... 114,000 

Surveys of streets and street lines (length in feet) 60,500 

in Pine Grove cemetery (length in feet) 500 

for street numbers (length in feet) 8,497 

miscellaneous (length in feet) 20,100 

Total length of surveys in feet 89,597 

Street lines marked on ground (length in feet) 21,630 

Lot and avenue lines, Pine Grove cemetery (length in ft.) 1,186 

Lines for gutters (length in feet) 13,005 

Lines for curbs (length in feet) , 26,100 

Lines for sewers (length in feet) 8,640 

Lines for building streets (length in feet) 26,000 

Other lines (length in feet) 2,900 

Total length of lines marked on ground 99.401 

Grades set for sidewalks (length in feet) 20,300 



engineer's department. 481 

Grades set for gutters (length in feet) 13,005 

Grades set for curbs (length in feet) 26,100 

Grades set for sewers (length in feet) 8,640 

Grades set for building streets (length in feet) 26,000 

Grades set for paving (length in feet) 10,000 

Grades set for Pine Grove cemeterj^ (length in feet) .... 370 

Grades set for other i)urposes (length in feet) 1,700 



Total length in feet of grades set 100,115 

Number of new lots staked out in Pine Grove cemetery 1 

Number of old lots restaked in Pine Grove cemetery.... •; 



Total number of cemetery- lots staked out 4 

Highway bounds set 59 

Highway bounds reset 13 

Highway bounds removed 6 



Batters Set. 

Yarnejr school, bank wall. 

Sewer Pla^s and Profiles. 

Beech, Pearl to Orange. 
Brooklyn avenue, Cypress to Jewett. 
Chestnut, Lake avenue to Laurel. 
Clay, Taylor to Jewett. 
Elm, Baker southerlj*. 
Frederick, Second to Dartmouth. 

Glenwood avenue, Kevere avenue to Highland Park avenue. 
Harrison, Linden to Hall. 
Howe, Maple to Wilson. 
Manhattan lane. Auburn to Cedar. 
Mammoth road, Hayward southerly. 

Eevere avenue, Longwood avenue to Glenwood avenue. 
Somerville, Belmont to Taylor. 
Springview avenue, Somerville northerly. 
Total sewer plans and profiles, 14. 

Numberixg Plaxs. 

Agawam, River road to Davis. 

Cody, Holt avenue to C. & P. K. B. Two plans. 

Donald, Milford to town line. Three plans. 

Head, Mast to McClintoek. Two plans. 

Lane, Marion to Amory. 

Londonderry, Hall to Belmont. 

McGregor west back, Marion to Amorj'. 



482 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Mammoth road, South, Cilley road southerly. Two plans. 
Quirin, Coolidge avenue west back to Eimmon. 
Wallace, Winter south and west. 
Total numbering plans, 15. 

MiscEiLLA:NEor9 Plans. 

Bridge, Hanover, London, New York, Paris, and Page streets, Con- 
necticut, Delaware, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and 
Ehode Island avenues. "Franklin Park," land of Samuel B. Tarrante. 

Lyons avenue and Merrimack river, land of C. E. Quimby. 
Total miscellaneous plans, 2. 

Working Plans. 



Amory, Dubuque to Hevey. Profile. 
Auburn, West, Elm to Franklin. Profile. 
Beech, Summer to Valley. Profile. 
Belmont, Summer to Grove. Profile. 
Beacon, Merrimack to Manchester. Profile. 
Blodget, Union to W^alnut. Profile. 

Bridge, West, McGregor bridge to McGregor. Profile. 
Brook, Pine to Union. Profile. 
Canal and Granite. Profile. 
Canal east back, Depot to Granite. Profile. 
Cartier, Conant to Wilton. Profile. 
Cedar south back. Beech to Maple. Profile. 
Central, Elm to Chestnut. Profile. 
Central, Maple to Lincoln., Profile. 
Central, Belmont to Milton. Profile. 
Church, North, Orange to Myrtle. Profile. 
Cilley road, Maple to Hall. Profile. 
Ooncord, Walnut to Beech. Profile. 

Detail plan of catch b&sin grate and frame, manhole frame, grate 
and cover. Five plans. 

Dubuque east back, Amory to Wayne. Profile. 

Elm, Clarke north and south. Grade profile. 

Franklin, West Auburn to West Cedar. Profile. 

Franklin west back. Pleasant to West ^Merrimack. Profile. 

Gertrude, Hanover to Amherst. Profile. 

Granite, south side. Granite bridge to Canal bridge. Profile. 

Granite, west end of Granite bridge. Profile. 

Grove, Hall to Belmont. Profile. 

Hampshire lane. West Auburn to West Cedar. Profile. 

Hanover, Union to Beech. Profile. 

Harrison, Elm to Chestnut. Profile. 

Harrison, Oak to Russell. Profile. 

Hooksett road, Webster to town line. Cross section, 11 plans. 



engineer's department. 483 

Lafayette park, cross-section g-rades. 
Laurel, Hall to Belmont. Profile. 
Main, South, Walker to south of Milfcrd. Profile. 
Main west back, Schuyler to Sullivan. Protile. 
Maple, Auburn to Cedar. Profile. 
Maple, Concord to Lowell. Profile. 
Maple, Harrison to Brook. Profile. 
^IcGregor, Wayne to Main. Profile. 
Mechanic, Elm to Canal. Profile. 
Merrimack, Milton to Hanover. Two profiles. 
Milford, Tilton to Carroll. Profile. 
Milton, Hanover to Manchester. Profile. 
Myrtle, Walnut to Beech. Profile. 
Myrtle, Hall to Belmont. Profile. 

Myrtle south back. North Church to Chestnut. Profile, 
North, Union to W'alnut. Profile. 
Notre Dame avenue, Conant to Adams. Profile. 
Oak, Prospect to Blodget. Profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Grove and Linden avenues, and sewer. Three 
profiles. 

Putnam, Main to Notre Dame avenue. Profile. 

Putnam, Dubuque to Bartlett. Profile. 

Quirin, Eimmon to Coolidge avenue west back. Profile. 

Kiver road. West Webster to north of Monroe. Profile. 

Sagamore, Pine to Union. Profile. 

Sagamore, Linden to Smyth road. Profile. 

Salmon, Pine to Beech. Profile. 

■Sectional plan. Elm to Maple, Auburn to Hayward. 

Sectional plan. Elm to Maple, Manchester to Bridge. 

Sectional plan. Elm to Maple, Bridge to Brook. 

Sectional plan. Elm to Maple, Brook to North. 

Sectional plan. Maple to Beacon, Amherst to Spruce. 

Sectional plan. Maple to Beacon, Amherst to Pearl. 

Sectional plan. Maple to East of Belmont, Pearl to Blodget. 

Seneca lane, Nuffield lane to Chestnut. Profile. 

Silver south back, Lincoln to Wilson. Profile. 

Spr-.ice south back, Barry avenue to Union. Profile. 

Stark avenue. Elm to Union. Profile. 

Union, Auburn to Grove. Profile. 

Union, Webster to Clarke. Plan. 

Union, Carpenter to Stark avenue. Profile. 

Union east back, Salmon to North. Profile. 

Vinton, Willow to Hall. Profile. 

Walnut, Pearl to Prospect. Profile. 

Walnut east back. Concord to Lowell. Profile. 

Wayne, Dubuque to Hevey. Profile. 

Webster, West, River road westerly. Profile. 



48-i ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



West, Clinton to Granite. I'rofile. 

Wilton south back, Notre Dame avenue to Cartier. Profile. 
Willow, Auburn to Valley. Profile. 
Wilson, Manchester to Hanover. Profile. 
Total working- jilans, 99. 

Tracings. 

Canal, West Central to Granite. Plan. 

Candia road. Youno-sville school lot. Plan for architect. 
Conant south back. Main to West. Plan. 
Detail plan of catch basin, D frame. Three plans. 
Detail plan of manhole grates. Two plans. 
Detail plan of manhole covers. Three plans. 
Detail plan of manhole frame. One plan. 
Detail plan of hood for sewer. 
Elm, South, plan of H. D. Lord's estate. 
Elm, South, ijlan of Stanton's and Loi'd's land. 
McGregor bridge, castings for new stringers. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., showing location of poles. 
113 tracings. 

Total tracings, 129. 

Blue Prints. 

Board of examiners of plumbers' charts. Two prints. 

Canal, West Central to Granite. Seven prints. 

Cedar, Canton and Spruce streets. Hall road and Lake avenue, land 
of Mead, Mason & Company. Two prints. 

City of Manchester, East Side sewers. Seven prints. 

City of Manchester, West Side sewers. Eight prints. 

Detail plan of catch basin frame and grate, manhole frame and 
grate. Thirty prints. 

Detail plan of stone bounds. Two prints. 

Elm, South, plan of H. D. Lord's estate. Two prints. 

Elm, South, plan of Stanton's and Lord's land. Two prints. 

Hall, Belmont, Bridge, Old Bridge, Harrison, Mead, Myrtle, Orange. 
Prospect, and Pearl streets, land of Mead, Mason & Company. Two 
prints. 

Hall, Belmont, Blodget, Harrison, Peak and Londonderry streets, 
land of Samuel H. Mead. Two prints. 

McGregor bridge, castings for new stringers. Four prints. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Company, showing location 
of poles. Two hundred and twentj^-six prints. 

Valley cemetery, lots and avenues, for Louis Bell Post, G. A. E. 
Total blue prints, 297. 



exgineek's department. 485 



SuSfMARY. 



Plans and profiles (sewer) 14 

Xumbering plans 15 

Miscellaneous plans 2 

Working- jDlans 99 

Tracings 129 

Blue prints 297 

Sewer book (whole sheets) 1 

Sewer book (part sheets) 3 



5G0 
Six tracings showing city sewers have been brought up to date. 
Maps brought up to date, five. 
Plans brought up to date, thirteen. 

Plans made for establishing grade on laid out streets, 69,440 feet. 
Plans made for establishing grade on streets not laid out, 15,530 
feet. 

Total, 84,970 feet. 
Lot owners looked up, 12,080 feet. 

Sewer Licenses. 

At a meeting of the board of mayor and aldermen, November 19, 
1897, the city engineer was instructed "to examine the books in his 
office and to present to said board a list of property owners who had 
neglected to pay the license fee required by the city laws and ordi- 
nances for entrance to the city sewers." 

The records were examined and a list compiled, giving the name of 
the property owner, and the location of the lot, the street frontage, 
and the license fee due upon each and every piece of occupied prop- 
erty within one hundred feet of a public sewer. 

The said list was given in hand to the city clerk, as clerk of the 
board of mayor and aldermen. 

The list comprised 1,017 names, and a notice was sent to each one 
by the city clerk. A summarized statement of the ground covered to 
January 1, 1910, follows, to wit: 

Number of names January 1, 1898 1,017 

Paid during 1898 277 

Granted free during 1898 76 

Paid prior to 1898, located during year.. 121 

Paid during 1899 24 

Granted free during 1899 12 

Paid during 1900 2 

Not connected 1 

Paid during 1901 2 

Granted free during 1901 1 

Paid during 1902 2 



486 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Paid during 1903 

Paid during 1904 

Paid during 1906 

Paid during 1907 

Granted free during 1907 

Paid during 1908 

Paid during 1909 

Granted free during 1909 

Paid prior to 1898, not located 

Paid previously 

Paid in part 

Covered by old permit 

Not recorded paid, receipts shown 

Recorded paid, no record of cash received 

Claims to have paid, no record 

Licenses taken out, not paid 

Not heard from 



17 

392 



Total number not settled January, 1910. 



482 



1,017 1,017 

Number of licenses granted new sewer enterers during 

1909 106 

Number of licenses granted delinquent sewer en- 
terers during 1909 3 

Number o^ free licenses granted sewer enterers during 

1909 4 

Total number of licenses granted during 1909 113 

Amount of money recorded as collected from two delin- 
quent sewer enterers during 1909 $27.11 

Amount of money recorded as collected from new sewer 

enterers during 1909 1,649.61 

Total amount of money collected during 1909 $1,676.72 

All monej's are collected by the city clerk. 

Street Numbers. 

Figures on hand January 1, 1909 1,156 

Letters on hand January 1, 1909 59 

Figures ordered during 1909 1,032 

Figures used during 1909 817 

Letters used during 1909 4 

Figures on hand January 1, 1910 1,371 

Letters on hand January 1, 1910 55 



2,241 



2,247 



engineer's department. 487 

Numbers assigned dviring 1909 219 

Numbers replaced during 1909 GO 

Numbers changed during 1909 6 

Total 291 

The expense of street numbers is charged to the appropriation for 
the engineer's department. 

Coal Tar and Granite Block Paving. 

Tables Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 give the location, number of square 
yards, price \ieT square yard, total cost and date when measured, 
of all coal tar concrete and granite block laid during the year as 
follows: Table No. 1, street crossings (new); Table No. 2, street 
crossings (repairs) ; Table No. 3, sidewalks (new) ; Table No. 4, side- 
walks (repairs) ; Table No. 5, street paving (new) ; Table No. 6, street 
paving (repairs); Table No. 7. miscellaneous; Table No. 8, summary 
of tables Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. 



488 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 495 



Absteact Eei'Okt of thk CoiniiTTEE ON Streets for the Year 1909. 

PERSONNEL OF_ THE COMMITTEE. 

Alderman from ward 9, Arthur J. Provost, chairman. 

Alderman from ward 1, Ernest W. Wiesner. 

Alderman from ward 7, Herbert A. Sails. 

Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

Tables Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 have been compiled to be used 
in the annual report of the engineer's department in lieu of citing 
the record of the committee on streets in detail. The tables give in- 
formation pertaining to the petitions that have been acted upon by 
the committee during the year 1909, also highways laid out, widened 
and straightened, and grades ordered established by the board of 
mayor and aldermen during the year. 

Table Xo. 9 is a list of the petitions for new highways that have 
been acted upon by the committee during the jear. 

Table No. 10 is a list of the petitions for establishing grades that 
have been acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table No. 11 is a list of miscellaneous petitions that have been 
acted upon by the committee during the year. 

Table No. 12 is a list of highways that have been laid out by the 
board of mayor and aldermen during the year. 

Table No. 13 is a list of highway grades ordered established bj' the 
board of mayor and aldermen during the year. 

Table No. 14 is a list of miscellaneous jaetitions that have been acted 
upon by the board of mayor and aldermen during the year. 

Distances are given in feet. 



496 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 






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502 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 



Abstract Eeport of the Committee on Sewers and Drains ior hie 
Year 1909. 

personnex, of the committee. 

Alderman from ward 3, Fred O. Parnell, chairman. 

Alderman from ward 5, Richard J. Barry, 

Alderman from ward 10, Peter J. Charron. 

Clerk of the committee, Samuel J. Lord. 

Tables Nos. 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21 have been compiled to be 
used in the annual report of the engineer's department in lieu of 
citing- the records of the committee on sewers and drains in detail. 
The tables give information jiertaining to the iietitions, orders for 
sewers passed by the city councils, sewers built and not built up to 
January 1, 1910. 

Table No. 15 is a list of petitions that have been acted upon during 
the year, also the manner in which and date when each petition was 
acted upon and disposed of by the committee. 

Table No. 16 is a list of sewers ordered in up to January 1, 1909, 
giving the distances built, distances built in excess of order, and dis- 
tances remaining unbuilt up to January 1, 1910. 

Table No. 17 is a list of sewers ordered built during the year 1909, 
giving distances built, distances ordered in, that are unnecessary, 
and distances remaining unbuilt uj) to January 1, 1910. 

Table No. IS is a list of sewers built in 1909 not ordered in by 
the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Table No. 19 is a list of pipe removed where sewers have been re- 
built. 

Table No. 20 is a list of sewers ordered in but not built up to Jan- 
uarjr 1, 1910. This table is compiled from the first, second, fourth, 
and eighth columns of tables Nos. 16 and 17. 

Table No. 21 is a summary of Tables Nos. 16 and 17. 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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608 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. 18. 
SEWERS BUILT IN 1909 WITHOUT AN ORDER. 



Location. 


Limits. 


Distance. 


Ash . 


Salmon, southerly 

Salmon, northerly 


144 


Beech east 


back 


50 
348 


Canal* .... 
Clarke 




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Ray, easterly 


298 
54 


Depot* 


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56 


Dix 


Lincoln, easterly 


488 




venue 


270 


Glenwood a 


East of Woodbine av. to Highland Park av. 
Howe to Clay 


892 
50O 


Maple 


South of Somerville northerly . 


217 


Maple* 


Silver, southerly 


195, 








80 


Myrtle .... 






160 


Ray 

Shasta 






48 


Maple easterly 


386 


Somervllle 


Lincoln easterly 


386 








163 










4,735 



For cesspools. 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE Xo. 20. 
SEWERS ORDERED IX BUT XOT BUILT UP TO JAXUARY 1, 1910. 





Location. 


Limits. 


1 
Distance. 


Date • of 
order. 


Adams 


Carpenter to Trenton 


531 
155 
2,600 
366 
252 
300 
150 
486 
127 
683 

71 
144 
192 
573 
200 
228 
107 
455 

54 

550 

192 

1,030 

49 
175 

96 
. 307 
860 
531 
277 
147 
290 
492 
232 
246 
270 
128 
152 

97 

101 
156 
89 
442 
160 
300 

1.285 
707 
448 
140 
175 

2,800 
52 
200 
250 
143 
601 
450 
134 
32 
350 
65 
70O 
148 


.Dec. 
May 
May 
Jan. 
Oct. 
May 
Jan. 
Aug. 
March 
April 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
May 
Oct. 
July 
April 
June 
Sept. 
June 
May 
May 
Sept. 
July 
June 
July 
Oct. 
April 
Nov. 
July 
July 
June 
July 
Sept. 
Feb. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
July 
Sept. 
Feb. 
May 
June 
Feb. 
July 
July 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
July 
Aug. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Sept. 


19, 1902 


Ainsworth avonue.... 


Hayward to Young 


31, 1905 


Amherst 


Union to Ashland 


• 2, 1893 


Albert 




23, 1908 






7, 1903 






2, 1899 


Auburn south back. . 


Hall, easterly 


7, 1S96 


Baker 


Elm to Calef road 


3, 1909 


Bartlett 


Sullivan, southerly 


6, 1906 


Bay 


Clarke to Carpenter 


14, 1903 


Beacon 


Amherst to Concord 


10, 1896 


Beech 


Harvard to Hayward 


4, 1888 


Beech 


Somerville to Shasta 


23, 1906 






6, 1900 




Old Bridge to Bridge 


7, 1896 






6, 1892 


Blaine . . 


Secpnd to Third 


2, 1905 


Bowman 


Mast to Milford. . 


7, 1902 


Bridge 


Beacon to Weston . . 


25, 1902 


Bridge 


Weston to Highland 


24, 1907 




Maple to Oak 


4, 1907 






27, 1909 






4, 1901 


Cedar south back. 


Beech, westerly 


5, 1896 


Cedar south back.... 


Maple to Lincoln. ..%. . . 


13, 1903 


Central 


Milton to Beacon 


6, 1898 






9. 1901 


Charleston avenue... 


Rochelle avenue to Brock 


12, 1906 


Chester 




5, J904 
7, 1902 


Chestnut 


Carpenter to Trenton 


Clarke 


Elm to Chestnut 


14, 1903 


Clav 




27, 1908 


Clay 




21, 1908 


Clay 


Taylor to Cj'press 


21, 1908 


Colby 


West Hancock to Log .. 


12 1906 


Columbus 


Amorv, southerly 


26 1899 


Concord 


Pine east back to Union 


12, 1899 










Hall, easterly 


6, 1887 


Concord 


Weston to Hubbard 


27 1905 


Cumberland 


Amory to Monitor 


3 1909 


Dix 


Wilson to Hall 




Dix 






Dover 




4, 1894 


Dutton 




2, 1904 


Elm 


Railroad bridge to Elm avenue 

Monroe south back to Clarke 

Trenton to Rowell 


6, 1890 
4, 1895 


Elm 


Elm 






Frederick 


Second, easterly . . 


9(5 i§99 








George 


North of Milford to Charleston av. 


7, 1902 


Hall 


Clay to Dix 


19 1902 


Hall 


Lowell to East High . . 


25 1902 


Hall road 


Massabesic to Nelson 


5 1898 


Hale 


Schiller, southerly 


9, 1894 
4. 1897 
23, 1906 
3 1899 




East of Alfred to Highland 




Harrison 


Maple to Oak 


Harrison . 


Belmont westerly 


1. 1896 


Harvell 




Hayward 


Ainsworth avenue to Cypress 


7, 1897 



ENGINEERS DEPARTMENT. 
TABLE No. ^O.—ConchKh'd. 



511 



Location. 


Limits. 


Distance. 


Date of 
order. 


Hayward 

Hayward 

Hevey east back 

Hevey east back 

Hevey east back 

High, East 

Hosley 

Hospital avenue 




3S9 

85 
146 
396 
1S4 
192 
116 
142 
163 
285 
150 

67 

492 

248 

1,340 

15 
818 

32 
500 
172 
831 
176 
176 

34 

309 

1,250 

65 
320 

49 
160 

21 

80 
100 
104 

75 
164 
800 

26 
770 
362 

50 
126 
850 
512 

250 
95 
546 
75 
155 
299 
180 
401 
50 
133 
2,396 
550 
105 
204 

150 
520 

100 


May 

Feb. 

Jan. 

July 

June 

July 

June 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

July 

July 

Dec. 

May 

Nov. 

May 

Aug. 

Oct. 

March 

Dec. 

July 

June 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Sept. 

June 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

July 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Aug. 

April 

July 

Oct. 

March 

Nov. 

.ruly 

Oct. 

Aug. 

Jan. 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

July 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Dec. 


17, 1906 




5, 1907 




7, 1896 


South of Amory to Columbus ave. 
Kelley to Bremer 


10, 1893 
^, 1901 


Beacon to Weston 


5, 1904 




26, 1903 


Chase avenue to Massabesic 

Prince to iicDuffie 


14, 1904 
3, 1903 






5, 1898 






27, 1909 


Knowlton 


Hayward, southerly 


23, 1906 
21, 1908 






21, 1908 


Main, South 


Schiller to Allen 


4, 1900 


Mammoth road 


Hayward to No. 155 


17, 1906 




No. 155 to Young 


27, 1908 






2, 1899 


Mammoth road 


Nelson, northerly .. 


5, 1898 


Maple 

Massabesic 

Mast 


Prospect to Harrison 


19, 1905 


Hall road to Mammoth road 

Rochelle avenue to Brock 


2, 1899 
31, 1901 


Mast road 


Wilkins, southerly 


26, 1907 






5, 1900 


Montgomery east back 

Oakland avenue 

Orange 

Pine 


Kelley to Bremer 


31, 1901 


Revere avenue to Woodland avenue 


13, 1905 
4, 1896 


Silver to Plummer 


3, 1899 


Pine east back 

Pine east back 

Prescott 


Grove south back to Bell south back 

South of Concord to Concord 

Maple, easterly 


27, 190S 
12, 1899 
26, 1903 




Hall, westerly 


1, 1907 


Prospect 

Reed east back 


Hall easterly 


3, 1865 


Amory to Kelley. . 


1, 1907 




South of Hayward southerly 150 ft 
South of Wayne to Putnam 


3. 1909 




6, 1901 




7, 1897 


River road ».. 

Russell 

Sagamore 

Sagamore 


Clarke to Park avenue 


2, 1897 


South of Blodget to Sagamore 

Chestnut to Pine 


3, 1899 
31, 1903 




7, 1909 




7, 1909 






10, 1896 


Somerville 


Union to Maple 


2, 1898 


Hall to west of Cypress. 


19, 1902 




Jewett, easterly 250 feet 


3, 1909 


Spruce, East 

Sylvester 




2, 1907 


Milford to Avon 


26, 1899 




2, 1900 


Thornton 

Union 

Union 

Union 

Union east back 

Valley 

Valley 




6, 1906 




27, 1908 




2, 1S95 




7, 1902 


South of Christian brook, southerly 
Cypress westerly , 


6. 1895 
4, 1897 


Elm to Wilson 


7, 1893 


Varney 

Walnut 


Josselyn to Merrimack river 

Salmon southerly 


27, 1909 
29, 1897 






31, 1903 


Walnut east back 




10, 1896 


Wilkins, southerly 150 feet 


3, 1909 


Wilkins 


Mast road to Warner 


3, 1909 


Williams 


Milford to Mast 


3, 1S99 






4, 1900 










44,360 





512 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. 21. 
SUMMARY. 



Table No. 16, column 3 (ordered in to January 1, 1909) 

Table No. 16, column 5 (built) 

Table No. 16, column 8 (not built) 

Table No. 17, column 3 (ordered in during 1909) 

Table No. 17, column 5 (built) 

Table No. 17, column 6 (built In excess of order) 

Table No. 17, column 7 (not needed) 

Table No. 17, column 8 (not built) 

Sewers built in 1909 of those ordered in to January 1, 1910 

(feet) 

Sewers built in 1909 without orders (feet) 

Sewers relaid in 1909 without orders (feet) , 

Total length of sewers built in 1909 (feet) 




SEwijiiAGE System. 

Table No. 22 gives the location, material, size, length, manholes 
new, manholes rebuilt, lampholes new, lampholes removed, house 
connection and cesspool connections built during the year 1909. 

Table No. 23 gives the material, size, and length of all public sewers 
in the city of Manchester, January 1, 1910. This table gives the total 
length in feet of each size of sewer and the number of manholes on 
each size, also total length in feet and miles of each material. 

Table No. 24 is a summary of the sewerage system by years from 
January 1, 1880, to January 1, 1910. It gives the length in miles 
constructed and cost each year, also the average cost per mile for 
each ,year. The third column gives the number of miles constructed 
to date each year. It is noted on January 1, 1880, there were 17.0(5 
miles constructed, the cost not being recorded. January 1. 1890, there 
were recorded 2,003 house connections; beginning with this date col- 
umns four and five give the number of connections recorded each 
year and the total number recorded to" date each year. 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 



513 



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ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 



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ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 



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516 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOIITS. 



TABLE No. 24. 
SUMMARY OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM SINCE 1880. 



Miles con- 
structed 
during year. 



Miles con- 
structed 
to date. 



House con- 
nections 
recorded 

during year, 



House con- 
nections 
recorded 
to date. 



Cost of 
sewers. 



Average 

cost 
per mile. 



1880. 
1881. 

1883! 
1884. 
1885. 



1894. 
1895. 



1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 



1.62 
2.18 

2!54 
1.73 
1.5G 
2.15 
1.44 
1.73 
2.66 
1.81 
3.08 
3.13 
3.31 
2.91 
3.98 
4.73 
*3.93 
«3.76 
*1.54 
*1.14 
1.74 
*1.95 
1.41 
*3.22 
*1.91 
*1.35 
*2.04 
*1.48 
*1.40 



64 
153 
214 
191 
258 
255 



231 
227 
186 
190 
300 
319 
163 



2.003 
2,067 
2,220 
2,434 
2,625 
2,883 
3,138 
3,375 
3,653 
4.178 
4,386 
4,617 
4,844 
5,0,30 
5,220 
5,520 



$19,919.40 
23,895.12 ' 
24,148.13 
21,452.05 
21,548.60 
28,122.84 
44,479.15 
19,893.92 
31,154.19 
27,513.73 
39,297.97 
.55,409.73 
39,724.65 
51,392.15 
46,116.01 
71,85.0.36 
66,408.87 
36,258.41 
34,939.51 
16,683.39 
'13,748.41 
14,724.39 
20,973.05 
17,330.32 
25,.574.79 
23,437.19 
21,313.20 
25,631.95 
12,818.59 
16,055.97 



812,295.92 
10,961.06 
7,165.65 
8,445.69 
13,445.84 
18,027.46 
20,687.97 
13,815.22 
18,008.20 
10,343.51 
21,711.58 
17,990.17 
12,691.68 
15,.526.33 
15,847.42 
18,055.11 
14,099.33 
9,226.05 
9,292.42 
10,819.31 
12,091.58 
8,462.29 
10,755.41 
12,291.00 
11,520.17 
12,270.78 
15,787.55 
12,.5&i.68 
8,661.21 
11,468.55 



* Includes old sewers relaid. 
t Total cost for 30 years. 



Abstract EepoIrt of the Board of ;^xamixers of Plvmbers. 

In accordance -with an act (chapter 5."), Laws of 1S99) passed by the 
Kew Harapshii-e state legislature, entitled "An act authorizing the 
examination of plumbers and regulating the iiractice of plumbing 
and house drainage," a board of examiners of plumbers was appointed 
by the mayor as follows: William K, Eobbins of the board of health. 
Christian L. Wolf, a master plumber, and Samuel J. Lord, chief engi- 
neer (William K. Eobbins, president, and Samuel J. Lord, clerk). 

Following is a statement of the e.xpenditures of the board for the 
year 1909. 



engineer's department. 517 

PIKE & IIEALD COMPANY. 
1909. 
Jan. 14. To 25 lbs, ly.^" lead pipe @ 7c... $1.7r, 

1 4" brass ferrule .(i,j 

37 lbs. 4" lead pipe @ 7c 2.,-)<) 

2 gals, gasolene .40 

121/2 lbs. wiping solder @ 24c. 3.00 

15 inches 4" It. soil pipe, hub 

end .30 • 

repairing gasoline furnace.. .50 



Mar. 3. To 1 4" brass ferrule $0.65 

1 4" hub end It. soil pipe.... .24 

111/4 lbs. wiping solder 2.70 

Feb. 4. 1 hub end soil pipe, 20 in... .40 

Mar. 24. To 25 lbs. I14" lead pipe @ Ci/^c. $1.50 

1 4" brass ferrule .(35 

1 4" hub end soil pipe, 12 in. 

long .24 

To 37 lbs. 4" lead pipe @ G%c.. $2.50 

15 lbs. 114" lead pipe @ 6%c. 1.01 



May 


19. 


July 


9. 


July 


29. 


Aug. 


9. 



$9.19 



$3.99 



$2.45 



$3.51 



To 2y., gals, gasoline @ 20c $0.50 

121/4 lbs. wiping solder @ 24c. 2.90 

2 lbs. dry paste @ 15c .30 

12 y. lbs. wiping solder @ 24c. 3.00 

12 lbs. solder @ 24c 2.88 

20 lbs. 114" lead pipe @ 7c.. 1.40 

$11.04 

Aug. 18. To repairjn-g plumbers' fire pot $0.70 

TEMPLE & FARP.IJsGTO'X COMPANY. 

May 4. To binding one record of board of examiners 

of plumbers for 1908 $0.85 

THE JOHN B. CLARKE CO-MPANY. 

June 15. To printing 300 copies of annual 
report of the board of 
street and park commis- 
sioners, engineer's depart- 
ment, and board of examin- 
ers of plumbers' report, 

pages @ 65e $3.90 

corrections in report .34 

_ $4.24 



518 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Summary. 

Appropriated to the board of examiners of plumbers 

for the year 1909 $50.00 

Expenses of the board during the year $;!5.97 

Balance unexpended 14. Oo 

$50.00 $50.00 

Renewal fees received for 49 xilumbers' cer- 
tificates @ 50c. each (a renewal fee of 50c, 
is required by state law) $24.50 

Renewal fees received bj- 35 plumbers' li- 
censes @ 50c. each (required by law) 17.50 

Examination fee for 10 plumbers' licenses 

@ $1.00 each (required by law) 10.00 

Paid to the city treasurer (the state law re- 
quires all fees to be i)aid into the city 
treasury) $52.00 

$52.00 • $52.00 

Table No. 25 gives the name, address, and number of the applica- 
tion of each and every person making renewal application to the 
board for a plumber's certificate. This table also gives the class of 
the certificate (master or journeyman), the number of the certifi- 
cate, the dates of renewal, and exijiration of the certificate, also the 
renewal fee paid by the applicant. 

Table No. 26 gives the name, address, and number of the applica- 
tion of each and every person making renewal application to the board 
for a plumber's license. This table also gives the class of the license 
(master or journeyman), the number of the license, dates of renewal 
and expiration of the license, and also the renewal fee paid bj' the 
applicant. 

Table No. 27 gives the name, address, and number of application 
of each and everj- person making application to the board for a 
plumber's license. This table also gives the class of the license (mas- 
ter or journeyman), the number of the license, dates of issue and 
expiration of the license, also fee paid by the apislicant. 

Table No. 28 is a summary of Tables Nos. 25, 26, and 27. 



ENGINEERS DEPARTMENT. 



519 












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ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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ENGINEERS DEPi^ RTMENT. 



521 






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522 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Cost KEEPrxG. 

The time book as kept by this office exhibits a complete record by 
days of each emploj'ee and the particuhir or several jobs each was 
engaged upon for each day during the year. This method has been 
in vogue since this department was created and will be continued. . 

In 1905 a new method (in this office) of keeping orders was begun, 
a card four by six inches being used, setting forth the nature of the 
ordei-, date ordered, date done, and by whom done, transit and level 
books and plan reference (for convenience), and each card numbered. 
This method was originally intended to do away with the many in- 
conveniences due to keeping orders in an order book. Beginning in 
May, 1906, the cost keeping feature was added. This last method has 
proved satisfactory beyond expectation, a brief description of which 
follows: 

Size of all cards five by eight inches; they are divided at the pres- 
ent time into eight classes of woi"k, street and jiark commission (cards 
or orders), embracing- all work done by this office for the street 
and park commissioners, which includes all streets, sewer and park 
work, and might jjroperh' be designated location and construction 
engineering. 

Chief engineer (cards or ordei's) include all preliminary office or 
field work, street surveys, levels for profile, cross-section, estimates, 
plans, details, etc., for the street and park commission and individ- 
uals. 

Miscellaneous (cards or orders) include the setting of all sidewalk 
grade, staking out street line for abutters on highways, and for the 
staking out of sidewalk construction for any property owner or 
contractor. 

Cemeteries (cards or orders) include all preliminary location and 
office work done for cemeteries. 

Highway bounds (cards or orders) include the work of setting 
bounds; it does not include the location of the points. This i^art of 
the work is done under chief engineer f cards or orders). 

Street signs (cards or orders) include street sign work. 

Street numbers (cards or orders)- include measuring for street 
numbers, making numbering plans, assigning and putting on num- 
bers. 

Under office work, "stock" includes all drawing material; under 
field work "stock" includes stakes, hubs, taclcs, etc., each team is 
charged in the cost record at twentj^ cents per hour based on three 
hundred and twelve seven and one half-hour days per year. 

This price will cover cost, repairs, keeping, interest, and replacing 
new every ten years. 

Table No. 29 is a list of highway bounds set and reset during 1909, 
giving the location, material (concrete and granite), new or reset, 
ccst of labor, team, stock (cost of bound), and total cost per bound; 
also average cost of concrete bounds and granite bounds. 



I 



engineer's department. 523 



Table No. 30 is a detailed statement of levels for street profile, 
and plan and profile work done under chief engineer (cards or or- 
ders). This table gives the location and limits of the several jobs, 
the length of distance coverecF. the number of lines of levels taken, 
the equivalent distance (under total distance) of a single line of 
levels, the cost of labor, team, and total cost of field work, the cost 
cf labor, stock, and total cost of office work, and the total cost of 
field and office work of each job. This table is given in detail In 
order to show the actual cost of field and office work of each job. 

Table No. :;i is a summary cost record of the cost of work done 
under miscellaneous (cards or orders), giving the number of orders, 
the location and descriptions of work, the party or parties ordering 
the work done, the cost of labor, team, stock, and total cost of field 
work, the cost of labor, stock, and total cost of office work, and the 
total cost of field and office work. 

Table ]N'o. 32 is a summary cost record of street sign work, giving 
the number of signs put up, cost of labor, team, stock, and total 
cost; also footnotes giving the average cost \>er sign of labor, team, 
stock, and total average cost per sign. 

Table No. 33 is a summary of street number orders, giving the 
number of orders, cost of labor, team, stock, and total cost of street 
number work. This does not include the street number figures given 
cut at the counter. (See matter under street numbers.) 

Table No. 34 is a summary cost record of the cost of cemetery work, 
giving the number of orders for each cemetery where work was 
done, the cemetery, the cost of labor,^ stock, and total cost of office 
work done for each cemetery, the cost of labor, team, stock, and 
total cost of field work, and the total cost of office and field work for 
each cemetery. This work is done under cemeteries (cards or or- 
ders). 

Table No. 35 is a summary cost record of work done under street 
and park commissioners (card or orders), giving the number of orders, 
description of work, cost of labor, team, stock, and total cost for 
each kind of work, as noted under the description of work. Follow- 
ing this table is given the cost of labor, team, stock, and total cost 
of preliminary field and office work, and cost of location field work 
and finished plans (estimated), setting forth the cost of sewer work 
engineering, and giving the percentage of cost of sewer work engi- 
neering to sewer work construction. 

Table No. 3G is a summary cf Tables Ncs. 20, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, and 



524 



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529 



TABLE No. 32. 
COST RECORD— STEEET SIGNS. 



No. of signs. 


Labor. 


Team. 


Stock. 


Total. 


429* 


151.82 


$21.57 


$244.53 


$.'?17.92 


429 


$51.82 


$21.57 


$244.53 


$317.92 



♦Name of street painted on both sides of sign, sign secured in cast-iron hanger 
by two nails, and hanger fastened by four nails to tree, wooden electric light poles, 
wooden trolley poles and telephone poles. (Stock includes one sign, one sign 
hanger and six nails.) 

Average cost of labor per sign for 429 signs $0.1208 

Average cost of team per sign for 429 signs .0302 

Average cost of stock per sign for 429 signs .5700 

Total average cost per sign for 429 signs ?0.7110 

TABLE No. 33. 
COST RECORD— STREET NUMBERS. 



No. of orders. 


Labor. 


Team. 


Stock. 


Total. 


199 


$24.36 


$4.42 


$31.97 


$60.75 


199 


$24.36 


$4.42 


$31.97 


$60.75 



630 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 





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531 



TABLE No. 35. 
COST RECORD— STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS' ORDERS. 



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Desckiption of Work. 


Labor. 


Team. 


Stock. 


Total 
cost. 


12 

49 


Building streets (paving lines and grades) 
Corner curbing (lines and grades) 


»5G.15 
95.35 
29.92 
17.27 
18.01 
45.06 

205.30 
14.f-3 
40.86 
39.83 
28 81 
51.24 
57.34 
19.86 

112.76 


$9.30 

14.90 
5.00 
2 80 
3.30 
7.40 

34.15 
2.40 
6.00 
6.40 
4.80 
8.00 
8.20 
3.30 

17.70 


,,6.96 
5.3G 
1.43 

.29 
1.49 
1.48 
16.28 

.54 
3 09 
4.10 

.72 
5.43 
5.04 
1.80 

.14 


S72.41 
ll") 61 


13 


Canal street (lines and grades) 


36.35 


6 
14 


Elui street (lines and grades) 

Granite street (lines and P'rades) .. 


22.80 
53.94 
255.73 

17 77 


77 
g 


Gutter curbing (lines and grades) 

(■■utters (lines and grades) 


10 




49.95 
50 33 


6 


Wilford street( lines and grades) 


15 
17 
15 


Miscellaneous surveys and grades 

Notre Dame avenue (lines and grades) .. 
River road (lines and grades) 


34.33 
64.67 
70 58 


9 

#4S 


Union street (lines and grades) 


24.96 








305 


»832.59 


Sfl33 65 


154.15 


Sl,020.39 



* The cost of sewer preliminary field and office work, location field and office 
work, and finished plans is as follows: 



Description. 


Labor. 


Team. 


Stock. 


Total 
Cost 




81.58 

.67 

112.76 


10.20 






Preliminary office work 

Location field work 


10.10 
.14 




17.70 


130.60 


Finished plans (estimated)* 


8115.01 
100.00 


817.90 


80.24 
25.00 


$133.15 








1215.01 


S17.90 


825.24 


$258.15 



*Tlus work is done the first of the year following construction. 

Expended by the Street and Park Commissioners in constructing sewers, 

$16,055.97. (See table No. 24.) 

Cost of engineering, $258.15, or .016 per cent. 



53: 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 











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engineer's department. 533 

Total cost of labor for 1909, .not including the salary of 

the chief engineer (not kept on cost cards) $5,713.89 

Total cost of labor recorded on all cards $2,051.97 

Cost of labor not recored on cards but re- 
corded in time book and vacations 3,001.92 



$5,713.89 $5,713.89 

To His Honor the Mayor, the board of alderruen, the gentlemen of 
the common council, and the various committees, with whom iu the 
performance of my duties I have come in contact, I wish to express 
my appreciation of the assistance and support you have rendered to 
me during the year. • 

My acknowledgments are due the gentlemen of the street and 
park commission for their courtesy, consideration, and co-operation 
in matters in which we were mutually engaged. 

SAMUEL J. LORD, 
Chief Engineer of the City. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the M(i!/(ji\ Aldcnii^:!!, and ('(nnsnun Ciiuiicil of ilic Ciiij of MaiuJuster, 

y. H: 

GEXTLcEiiEA': — The board of overseers of the poor, in eomiDliance 
Avith the city ordinance, herewith submits its annual report: • 

The duties and responsibilities of the overseers of the poor are, to 
say the least, trying-, and ver^- often complicated, but always impera- 
tive. No worthj' person ever makes application for aid without feel- 
ing keenly his situation. The necessities of the unfoi'tunate and 
needj'' could not be fully met with the original appropriations for 
this year. Therefore an additional amount was asked for and 
granted by the common council, the resolutions providing for same 
granting his honor the mayor permission to draw on the city treas- 
urer for an amount not to exceed tliirty-five hundred dollars for 
the balance of the j-ear. 

At the commencement of the year, after mature deliberation on the 
part of this board, an aijpropriation for the relief of the city's poor 
was asked fer, which it was considered would be ample for all re- 
quirements, at the same time as small as it would be safe to last 
throughout the year and satisfy the urgent and absolutely necessary 
wants of our worthjr poor. Other councils prevailed and the amount 
asked for was reduced so low as to cause some doubt of our ability 
to make it suffi)?e. Consequently a resolution was passed by the 
board that the most rigid economy must be practiced by this 
board, and curtailment wherever possible without causing distress or 
suffering has been the rule. Xotwithstanding our efforts, we were 
unable to comply with the reasonable requests for aid without an 
additional appropriation. The amount, in addition to the original 
appropriation, being required by this department to meet its obli- 
gations was three thousand three hundred and seventy-five dollars 
and thirty-two cents. Our aim has alwaj's been to give reasonable 
and needful aid without cultivating a spirit of pauperism. We have 
made every effort, backed by a sincere determination that under no 
circumstances would we exceed the appropriation. The result is 
shown in our report following, which will demonstrate the amount, 
kind, and nature of the^ work accomplished during the year, and 
which are recommended to your careful consideration. 

537 



538 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 





$8,762.37 
197.45 
1,153.93 
44.06 
122.99 
73.98 
118.00 


25.45 

141.50 

2,063.00 

590.03 

635.00 

2.50.00 


S 


194.00 

328.00 

65.50 

34.00 
2G7.42 


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REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 539 

Our resources were: 

Appropriation $12,000.00 

Additional 3,37o.;!2 

$13,375. :52 

Expended as per above $15, 375. 32 

Tlie foregoing' expenditures being disbursed by the several wards 
as follows: 

Ward 1 $1,122.47 

Ward 2 875.19 

Ward 3 821.32 

Ward 4 315.85 

Ward 5 3,975.40 

Ward 6 961.41 

Ward 7 403.01 

Ward 8 1,529.34 

Ward 9 3,305.94 

Ward 10 1,797.97 

The report of aid to indigent soldiers, sailors, and their families, 
containing an account of all expenditures for same, which comes un- 
der this department, will be found annexed. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Ward 1. MICHAEL HERBERT, 
Ward 2. D. G. ANDREWS. 
Ward 3. JOSEPH L. BOUDREAU, 
Ward 4. CHAS. B. CLARKSON, 
Ward 5. THOMAS F. SHEEHAN, 
Ward 6. Absent. 
Wajrd 7. WM. MARSHALL, 
Ward S. ROBERT WERNER, JR., 
Ward 9. ADELARD LAMBERT, 
Ward 10. EDWARD F, TATE, 
THOS. H. STEWART, 

Acting Clerk. 



Aid to Indigent Soldiers, Sailors, and their Dependent 
Families. 

To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council: 

GENTtTvEsiEN: — In accordance with the laws of this state in relation 
to indigent soldiers, sailors, and their dependent families, the over- 
seers of the poor herewith present for j^our consideration their an- 
nual report under above head: 



540 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Whole number of soldiers and sailors who have required and re- 
ceived assistance during- the year has been four. 

Amounts expended for needs and requirements of same: 

Groceries and provisions $123.00 

Rents 85.00 

Board and care 20.00 

Wood and coal 62.50 



$290.50 



RESOURCES. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures 290.50 

Balance on hand, unexpended $9.50 

Respectfully submitted, 
Ward 1. MICHAEL HERBERT, 
Ward 2. D. G. ANDREWS, 
Ward 3. JOSEPH L. BOUDREAU, 
Ward 4. CHAS. B. CLARKSON, 
W^ARD 5. THOMAS F. SHEEHAN, 
Ward 6. Absent. 
Ward 7. WM. MARSHALL, 
Ward 8. ROBERT WERNER, JR., 
Ward 9. ADELARD LAMBERT, 
Ward 10. EDWARD F. TATE, 
THOS. H. STEWART, 

Act'uKj Clerk. 



EEPOET 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



EEPOET OF STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



Office of the Board of Street and Park Commissioners. 

Manchester. N. H., December 31, 1909. 
To His Honor the Mayor, the Board of Ahlcrnicn, and the Common Council 
of the City of Manchester, N. H.: 

GENTa:j:MEN: — We herewith submit the seventeenth annual report 
of the board of street and park commissioners, which comprises 
details of the operations conducted by the department during the 
year 1909. 

WILLIAM :McELEOY, 
BYEON WORTHEX, 
SAMUEL J. LORD, 
Board of >^trcet and Park Commissioners. 



Organization for the Year 1909. 

Board of Street and Park CoJiiiassio.NERS. 

William McElroy, Chairman. 

Byron Worthen. , 

Samuel J. Lord, Chief Engineer. 



Harrie H. Clement, chief clerk (stenographer, typewriter, and 
bookkeeeper). 

Carroll R. Benton, assistant clerk (June to September). 

Joseph W. McElroy, assistant clerk (October). 

John J. McAllister, Jr., assistant clerk. 

Mr. McAllister, engineer's department stenographer and typewriter, 
was transferred to this oftice when required. 

streets and sewers. 

George P. Ames, superintendent. District No. 2. 

Harold M. Haskell, inspector and timekeeper, District No. 2. 

Harry T. George, timekeeper, District No. 2 (to June). 

Alphonse Laberge, superintendent, District No. 10. 

John Gemmell, timekeeper. District No. 10. 



543 



54-i ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Charles Francis, superintendent and timekeeper, Districts Nos. 
7 and 8. 

Mark E. Harvey, superintendent and timekeeper. District No. 5 
(died during the year). 

Shirley Merrill, superintendent and timekeeper, District No. 5. 
(Took charge after the death of Mr. Harvey.) 

Bj'ron E. Moore, superintendent and timekeeper. District No. 4. 

Lester C. Paige, superintendent and timekeeper, District No. 9. 

SCAVENGER SERVICE AND STREET SWEIEPIXG. 

Levi J. Proctor, inspector (has charge of scavenger service and 
street sweeping). 

PARKS AND COMMONS. 

A. J. Seastrom, superintendent and timekeeper. 



The board of street and park commissioners met at 2.00 o'clock 
P. M. daily, except Saturdays and holidays. 

The following contracts' were awarded by the board: 
Brick, W. F. Head & Son, Hooksett, N. H. 
Broken stone, Fred E. Ellis, Peabodj', Mass. 

Brown-tail and g3'psy moth, Daniel F. Cronin, Hooksett, N. H. 
Cement, Henry W. Parker, Manchester, N. H. 

City farm, leased from the aldermanic committee on citj' farm. 
City yard, i^moskeag Manufacturing Co., Manchester, N. H. 
Fence posts, B. F. Greer, Grasmere, N. H. 
Granite curbing, Charles A. Bailey, Suncook, N. H. 
Granite paving blocks. Palmer & Garmon, Manchester, N. H. 
Iron castings. The Sessions Foundry Co., Bristol, Conn. 
Lumber, B. F. Greer, Grasmere, N. H., Dodge & Barnard, GofEs- 
town, N. H. 

Oats, Arthur S. Brown, and F. H. Masse & Co., Manchester. N. H. 
Plants, F. J. Bixby and H. C. Stache, Manchester, N. H. 
Sewer pipe. Eastern Clay Goods Co., Boston, ]SIass. 



Cash was paid into the city treasury for labor done and materials 
furnished (or both) by this department by persons, firms or corpora- 
tions and credited to appropriations as listed in the following sched- 
ule: 

(All moneys are paid direct to the city treasurer and do not pass 
through -the hands of the board.) For more detailed statements see 
credits under appropriations cited: 



STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



5i5 



Appropriation. 



Adams Bros 

Avery, F. W 

Bachelder-Worcester Co.... 

Bailey & Co 

Boston & Maine Railroad... 

Bowen, G. F 

Brown, R. C 

Cavanaugh Bros 

Clarli, N. S 

Cossar, Mrs. Jessie 

Daigle, N 

Dunbar & Sons, W. E 

Erslvine, John H 

Drake, Frank 

Felton Co., S. A 

Firth, Alfred 

Griffin, F. W 

Higgins. W. F 

Holbrook. F. D 

Hoyt, Ed 

Kendall, Willis B 

Keneklis, A 

LaBlonde, Joseph 

LaFlamme, J. R 

LaPlante, Frank 

Leighton, F. D 

McDonald, C. F 

Manchester Coal & Ice Co.. 
Manchester Iron & Metal Co 
Manchester Street Railway. 



Manchester & Nashua St. Ry. 

Mendell Co., The J. H 

Merrill. Clarence R 

N. E. T. & T. Co 



Nichols, Mrs. Nina E 

Pilotte. Joseph 

Pine Grove cemetery 

Poirier, H. M 

Poor, J. Louis 

Parker, Henry W 

Poore, D. M 

Prescott, W. E 

Raiche, Treffle 

Rangos, A 

Roberge. Alfred 

Robinson, Supt., Tom W 

Seastrom. John 

Sigrist, Eugene 

Simoneau, Alphonse 

Stark mills 

Sullivan. R. G 

Tax collector 

Uncle Sam Veteran Firemen 
Valley cemetery (cem. fund) 

Varick Co., John B 

Varney school 

Verrette, M 

Welpley, John G 

Vitty. William 

Worthen, Byron 



New sewers 

Repairs of highways. 

New sewers 

Repairs of sewers.... 

New sewers 

New sewers 

New sewers 

Stark park 

Repairs of highways. 
Repairs of highways. 
Repairs of highways. 
Repairs of highways. 

Repairs of sewers 

Grading for concrete. 
Repairs of highways. 

New sewers 

Repairs of sewers 

Repairs of highways. 

New sewers 

Repairs of highways. 
Repairs of highways. 

Repairs of highways. 
Repairs of highways. 
Repairs of highways. 

Watering streets 

Repairs of highways. 

New sewers 

Repairs of sewers.... 

New sewers 

City teams 

New sewers 

Paving streets 

Paving streets 



New sewers 

New sewers 

Repairs of highways. 

Bridges 

Repairs of highways. 

Paving streets 

Repairs of highways. 
Repairs of highways. 

Repairs of highways. 

Bridges 

Repairs of sewers.... 
New sewers 



City teams 

Paving streets 

Repairs of highways. 
Paving streets 



$2.00 
2.00 



$199.89 
1,181.53 
2,307.93 



Repairs of highways 

Repairs of sewers 

Repairs of sewers 

Repairs of highways 

Repairs of highways 

New sewers 

Derryfield park 

Repairs of highways 

New sewers 

Brown-tail and gypsy moth 

Paving streets 

Brown-tail and gypsy moth 

Paving streets 

Repairs of highways 

New sewers 

Bridges 

Repairs of highways 

New sewers 

New sewers 

Paving streets 



$106.34 
10.19 
25.95 
146.87 
13.10 



$17.50 
42.94 



$0.78 
325.93 



$2.88 

1.00 

168.42 

1.84 

i;i2 

2.73 
3.83 
1.50 

11.60 
1.50 
4.00 
8.75 

10.00 
1.50 
1.68 
2.85 
3.00 
1.07 



4.00 
3.65 
1.00 
2.50 
4.00 
1.50 
2.72 



,689.35 

108.30 

4.50 

2.00 



302.45 
12.59 
10.00 



60.44 

120.00 

4.50 



326.71 

4.. 50 

2.00 

3.65 

1..50 

1.99 

15.48 

12.50 

2.00 

14.60 

49.30 

42.62 

991.04 

4.00 

110.00 

31.50 

19.50 

2.00 

57.00 

1.50 

9.75 

$6,698.27 



546 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOETS. 



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STREET AND PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



549 



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STREET AND PAKK COMMISSIONERS. 



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EESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 



RESOLUTIONS, OEUERS, ORDINANCES. 



Resolutiox Eelating to the Final Transfers for the Year 19()S. 

Rejoiced by the Common Counei] of the City of Manchester as follows: 

That the city clerk be and hereby is authorized to nial<e the fol- 
lowing transfers: 

To account of money nnapjiropriated: 

From city hall $-106.08 

printing- and stationery 172.78 

incidental expenses 1,880.00 

auditor's department 5.98 

mayor's incidentals 10.00 

assessors' department 1.94 

repairs of highways 1,319.97 

snow and ice 2,889.11 

new highways 3,454.11 

land taken for highways 54.62 

brown-tail and gypsy moth 156.69 

grading for concrete 563.38 

rei^airs of sewers 1,894.45 

new sewers 9,387.38 

commons 291.50 

Stark park 88.54 

Derrytield park 14.88 

Lafayette park 71 .70 

lighting streets 461 .41 

fire-alarm telegraph 499.29 

hose wagon. Gen. Stark engine-house 22.50 

hose wagon, Fulton engine-house 137.34 

police commission 1.413.86 

repairs of buildings 4.44 

Pine Grove cemetery 1.11 

Valley cemetery 70.16 

Amoskeag cemetery 1.58 

Merrill cemetery .65 

books and stationery 34.88 

addition to Hallsvllle schoolhouse 55.95 

alteration of schoolhonscs for fire ])rotection. . . . 62.36 

steam boiler, Webster school 5.00 

furniture and su])i)lies 233.27 

585 



586 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

From fuel $22.TS 

free text-books 47.04 

manual training .Gli 

teachers' salaries 23.43 

evening schools 15.19 

school bell in Amoskeag 12.14 

cemetery wall. Yarnej' school 7.04 

evening school, mechanical drawing 40.88 

board of examiners of plumbers 21.59 

land sold for taxes .- 2,124.73 

unappropriated cash in treasury 23,583.04 



$51,567.86 



From account of unappropriated money: 

To interest $475.59 

city officers' salaries 723.13 

street and park commission 6,761.77 

watering streets 1,091.28 

paving streets 3,505.06 

macadamizing streets 998.24 

scavenger service 725.10 

street sweeping 2,374.96 

bridges 5,442.37 

city teams 7,647.74 

miscellaneous playgrounds 21.84 

city yard 2,041.17 

health department 4,034.57 

fire department 7,968.45 

police station 184.74 

police court 11. OS 

repairs of schoolhouses 503.14 

printing and advertising 51.63 

contingent expenses '. 1,294.74 

care of rooms '. 193.20 

paupers off farm 5,282.44 

indigent soldiers 222.05 

abatement of taxes 13.57 



$51,567.80 



Passed .Tanuarv 4. 1909. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 687 

Resoxutiox recommending- an Appropriation for the Purchase of Land 
in Ward Eight and the Building and Equijiping of an Engine- 
House thereon. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of :Manche.ster, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of fifteen thousand dollars be and is hereby recom- 
mended to the board of common council as an appropriation for the 
year 1909; said sum of fifteen thousand dollars to be expended for 
the purchase of land south of Piscataquog river in ward eight, in 
said Manchester, and the building and equipping of an engine-house 
thereon. 

Passed January 25, 1909. 



Resolution recommending an Appropriation for a new Ward Room 
in Ward Nine. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows. 

That the sum of seven thousand dollars be and is herebj^ recom- . 
mended to the board of common council as an appropriation for the 
year 1909; said sum of seven thousand dollars to be used for the 
purchase of land and the building and equipping of a ward room 
thereon in ward nine in said ^lanehester; said sum of seven thou- 
sand dollars to be known as appropriation for a new ward room in 
ward nine; said sum of seven thousand dollars to be expended as 
follows: Purchase of land, $1,000.00; building and equipping ward 
room, $6,000. 

Passed Januarv 25, 1909. I 



Resolution recommending an Appropriation for Paving Elm Street 
from south of Hollis Street and from Orange Street, northerly. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, In 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of seventy-five hiuidred ($T:)00) dollars be and is 
hereby recommended to the board of common council as an appro- 
priation for the year 1909; said sum of seventy-five hundred ($7ri00) 
dollars to be used for paving Elhi street from south of Hollis street 
and from Orange street, northerly. 

Passed January 2.'), 1900. 



588 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ResoIvUTIon recommending- an Appropriation for the Youny Glen's 
Christian Association. 

lif.soltcd by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of ^lanchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of three hundred dollars be and is hereby recom- 
mended to the board of common council as an appropriation for the 
year 1909; said sum of three hundred dollars to be for the use of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. 

Passed January 25, 1909. 



Resglutiox recommending an Appropriation for the St. Patrick's 
Girls' Orphanage. 

RrNDlved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the Citj- of ^Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of three hundred dollars be and is herebj' recom- 
mended to the board of common council as an appropriation for the 
year 1909; said sum of three hundred dollars to be for the use of 
the St. Patrick's Girls' Orphanage. 

Passed January 25, 1909. 



Resolution recommending an Appropriation for the Improvement of 
Parker Common. 

Resolved by the ]Mayor and Aldermen of the City of :Nranchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of one thousand dollars be and is hereby recom- 
mended to the board of common council as an appropriation for the 
3'ear 1909; said sum of one thousand dollars to be used for the build- 
ing of walks, grading and improving Parker common, so called, in 
said Manchester. 

Passed January 25, 1909. 



Kesoi-XJTIon recommending an Appropriation for the Observance of 
Independence Day, Julj', 1909. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500) be and hereby is 
recommended to the board of common council as an appropriation 



HE80LUTI0NS, OKDEKS, OKDINAN'CES. 589 

for the year 1909; said sum of fifteen hundred doUars ($1,500) to be 
expended for the proper observance of Independence Day, July, 1909; 
said sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500) to be known as appro- 
priation for the observance of Independence Day. 

Passed January 25. 1909. 



IlESOLiTiox relating- to the Petition of (ieorge F. Sheehan praying 
to be seated as the Member of the Board of ^layor and Aldermen 
of the City of Manchester from Ward Five in said city. 

Rcfsolved by the ^fayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, Both branches of the legislature of the state of New 
Hampshire refers contested elections of its members to a committee 
thereof for investigation and consideration; and 

Whereas, The board of common council of the city of Manchester 
by its action of January 5, 1909, deemed it expedient to follow the 
custom of the said legislature; and 

Whereas, It would expedite and facilitate matters if the ])etition 
of (ieorge F. Sheehan. praying to be seated as the member of the 
board of mayor and aldermen of the city of Manchester from ward 
five in said city, be taken from the table and referred to a special 
committee of said board; therefore be it 

RcsoUrd, That the said petition be and is hereby taken from the 
table and the same be and is hereby referred to a special commit- 
tee consisting of Aldermen Sails, Bunton, and ^laeDonald, and the said 
committee be and is hereby instructed to consider tlie facts set forth 
in said petition and report its finding to the said board of mayor 
and aldermen at its earliest convenience; and be it further 

Rrsahrd, That this resolution shall take etfect upon its passage. 

Passed January 25, 1909. 



llESOLrxiox recommending an Appropriation for Installing Fire Es- 
capes on the City Hall and Battery Buildings, so called, in the 
City of Manchester. 

h'csiihcd by the Mayor and Aldermen of the ( ity of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of six hundred and fifty dollars be and is hereby 
recommended to the board of common council as an appropriation 



590 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

for the year 1909; said sum of six hundred and lifty dollars to be 
expended for equipping- the city hall and battery buildings with fire 
escapes. 

Passed February 2, 1909. 



Resolution' recommending an Appropriation for a Striker for the 
Amoskeag Schoolhouse, so called, in the City of Manchester. 

R^'SoUcd by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of ^lanehester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of five hundred dollars be and is hereby recom- 
mended to the board of common council as an appropriation for the 
year 1909; said sum of five hundred dollars to be used for installing 
a striker in the tower of the Amoskeag schoolhouse. 

Passed February 2, 1909. 



Resoll'tiox recommending- an Approi^riation for the leaving of Notre 
Dame Avenue from Kelley to Putnam Streets. 

Rc.solccd bj' the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of ^Manchester, in 
Citj' Council assembled, as follows: 

That the sum of thirteen thousand dollars be and is hereby recom- 
mended to the board of common council for the year 1909; said sura 
of thirteen thousand dollars to be expended by the board of street 
and park commissioners of said Manchester for the paving of Notre 
Dame avenue from the north line of Kelley street to the south line 
of Putnam street. 

I'assed February 2, 1909. 



RESOLfTiox recommending an Appropriation for the Building of a 
State House in the City of Manchester. 

Resolved bj' the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, The interests of the city of Manchester would be greatly 
promoted and many advantages accrue to the state of New Hampshire 
should the capital of the said state be located at the city of Man- 
chester; therefore be it 

Resolved. That it is hereby recommended to the board of common 
council of the city of Manchester that, so soon as the necessary legis- 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINAN-CES. 591 

latiou therefor shall be obtained by statute, the sum of one million 
dollars ($1,000,000) be appropriated for the building of a state 
house to be located at said Manchester, the same to be located and 
built under the direction of a committee consisting- of seven persons, 
three of whom to represent the said state and four to represent the 
said city; said committee representing the said city to consist of 
the Hon. Eugene E. Eeed of said city, who shall be chairman, and 
three other residents of said city to be appointed by the mayor of 
said city; said committee representing the said state to be a|)i)()inted 
by the governor of said state; and be it further 

Resolved, That five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000) of said ap- 
propriation shall be raised b3^ issuing funded bonds of twenty (20) 
years duration, and five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000) of said 
appropriation shall be raised by issuing refunded bonds of twenty 
(20) years duration; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed Februarv 2. 1009. 



riESOLrTiON making a Temporary Loan of Three Hundred Thousand 
Dollars in Anticipation of the Taxes of the Present Year. 

Resolved' by the Board of Common Council of the City of Manchester, 
as follows: 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city of 
Manchester as may fall due before the twentieth day of December, 
nineteen hundred and nine, the city treasurer of said city be and is 
hereby authorized and empowered to make such temporary loans 
from time to time for the use of the said city of sums not exceeding 
the aggregate amount of three hundred thousand dollars; said sums 
being in anticipation of the taxes of the present year; said treasurer 
giving for the said sums the notes of the said city signed by the 
said treasurer of said city and countersigned by the mayor of said 
city; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect ujion its passage. 

Passed February 3, lfl()9. 



Pesolutiox relating to the Issuance of Fifty Thousand Dollars ($.jO,- 
000) of City Bonds to Refund the Four Per Cent Bonds Maturing 
April 1, 1909. 

Res<;hed by the Board of Common Council of the City of Manchester, 
as follows: 

That for the purpose of obtaining fifty thousand dollars ($.")0,000) 
with which to pay the fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) of city bonds 



592 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

now outstanding', bearing four per cent interest, which will become 
due April 1, 1909, there be issued the bonds of the city of Manchester 
to the amount of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) ; said bonds to be 
dated April 1, 1909, and payable to bearer twenty (20) years from 
the date thereof; said bonds to bear the city seal, to be signed by 
the mayor and countersigned hy the city treasurer, and to bear 
interest at the rate of three and one half (SVa) per cent per annum 
from date, and to have coupons attached bearing the facsimile signa- 
ture of the city treasurer, for the payment of interest at said rate 
semi-annualh% on the first days of April and October of each year; 
and the city treasurer be and is hereby authorized to fix the place 
of payment of interest and principal of said bonds, and be and is 
hereby authorized to sell said bonds, and do all things necessary and 
proper to complete and carry into eflfect the issue of said bonds; 
said bonds to be issued in accordance with an act of the legislature 
of New Hampshire, passed at the January session, 1895, entitled. 
"An act to authorize municipal corporations to issue bonds"; and 
be it further 

Resolved, That for the purpose of pajing the interest and j)rincipal 
of said bonds as the same shall become due, there shall be annually 
raised by tax by the board of common council in the years of 1910 
to 1929, inclusive, such sum of money as shall be sufficient to meet 
the interest upon the bonds each year outstanding; and a further 
sum of twenty-five hundred dollars ($2,500) each year for a sinking- 
fund for the payment of the principal of said bonds as it shall be- 
come due until sufficient sinking fund has been so raised, the same 
to be turned over to the board of sinking fund commissioners created 
by ordinance of November 17, 1893, and applied to the payment of 
said bonds; and be it further 

Jicsolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed February 3, 1909. 



Resolution' relating to the Passage of a Law Requiring a Poll Tax 
of Three Dollars. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

Wheueas, The principle of taxation has been to tax the polls of 
the city of Manchester on one hundred dollars' worth of property 
at the same rate as owners of real estate are taxed for each and 
every one hundred dollars of said property; and 

Whekeas, The state legislature, by its house of representatives, 
has passed a statute requiring that polls pay a flat tax of three dol- 
lars independent of what the tax rate upon real estate may be; 
therefore be it 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES, 69'i 

Resolved, That in the oxiinion of the board of mayor and aldermen 
of said Manchester, the principle is wrong and unjnst that requires 
the polls of said city to paj' on a three dollar tax rate and real estate 
owners of said city on a two dollar tax rate; and be it further 

Resolced, That the said board of mayor and aldermen hereby pro- 
tests against the enactment of such a law; and against the justice 
and legality of such a statute it hereby registers its dissent; and be 
it further 

Resohed, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 2, 1909. 



Eesolution' relating' to the Semi-monthl\' Pajinent of the Salary of 
Certain Heads of Departments of the Ciry of Manchester and the 
Clerks employed thereby. 

Resolved b^' the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city treasurer be and is hereby authorized and instructed 
upon due approval of the committee on accounts, to pay all heads of 
city departments under the jurisdiction of the board of mayor and 
aldermen of said Manchester and all clei'ks employed by the said 
heads, the salary due the said parties from the said city of Manches- 
ter in equal semi-monthly payments; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage, and 
all resolutions inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed. 

Passed April G, 1909. 



Pesolution' relating to Interest on Dejiosits of the City of Man- 
chester. * 

Resolved by the ^fayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the moneys of the city of Manchester be deposited in such 
bank or banks in said city as shall pay the largest rate of interest 
to said city of Manchester upon daily balances in said bank or banks 
from the first day of May, 1909, to the first day of May, 1910; and that 
the city treasurer be and hereby is instructed to advertise for bids 
from the banks of the citj^ of Manchester by sending to each of said 
banks a copy of this resolution; the city of Manchester, by its agent, 
the treasurer of said citj', reserving the right to reject any and 
all bids and call for snch other l)i(ls as may be necessary to carry 
out the intent of this resolution; and be it further 



594 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Jicsolvcd, That the mayor and the treasurer of said city of Man- 
chester are hereby authorized and empowered to accept such bid or 
bids as will give the city of Manchester the largest rate of interest 
upon the daily balances on deposits of the moneys of said city of 
Manchester in said bank or banks from the first day of May. I'JO!), 
to the first day of May, 1910; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect ux^on its passage. 

Passed April G, 1909. 



RESOLrTiox authorizing the Anioskeag Manufacturing Comi^any to 
erect and maintain an Overhead Bridge across West Bridge 
Street, so called, in said Manchester, from No. 11 Mill, so called, 
to the new mill now in process of construction; also a Tunnel 
under said street connecting said mills. 

Kesolred by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That permission be and hereby- is granted to the Amoskeag Manu- 
facturing Company to erect and maintain an overhead bridge across 
West Bridge street, so called, in said Manchester, from its No. 11 
mill, so called, to the new mill now in process of construction on 
The north side of said West Bridge street; and also to dig and main- 
tain under said West Bridge street a tunnel connecting said mills; 
and be it further 

Resolved, That said permission is hereby granted on the condition 
that all work be at the expense of the said Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company, and be done to the satisfac'tion of the board of sti-eet and 
park commissioners of said Manchester; and that said company hold 
and save the said city of Manchester harmless from any claim for 
loss, cost or damage to any person or property occasioned by the 
construction and maintenance of said bridge and tunnel; and be it 
further 

Rc.volrrd. That the accompanying plan be and hereby is made a 
part of this resolutio7i, and that the said resolution shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed April G, 1909. 



Resom TTOX authorizing the ^Mayor and Committee on Lighting 

Streets to execute > a Contract with the Manchester Traction, 

J/ight and Power Company for the Lighting of the ten Electric 

Arches across Elm Street with electricity. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 

City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the mayor and committee on lighting streets be and are 
herel)y authorized and empowered to execute on the part of the city 



KESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 595 

of Manchester the accompan^ino- contract between the ^lanchester 
Traction, Light and Power Company and the said city of Manchester; 
said contract being for the lighting with electricity of the ten elec- 
tric arches across Elm street; and be it further 

Rcsolrrd, That the said contract be and is hereby made a part of this 
resolntion, and said resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

I'assed April 12, 1909. 



Kesolutiox relative to the Exemption from Taxation of an Addition 
to the Factory Building of the East Side Coinpany and the Man- 
ufacturing Business connected therewith. 

Fc.'iohed by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, as 
follows: 

Whereas, It is provided by the Public Statutes of the State of 
Xew Hampshire that "towns may bj^ vote exempt from taxation for 
a term not exceeding ten years any manufacturing establishment 
proposed to be erected or put in operation therein, and the capital 
to be used in operating the same, unless such establishment has 
been previously exempted from taxation by some town"; and 

Whereas, The East Side Company proposes to build an addition 
to its factory building situated on Valley street and to operate or 
lease a manufacturing establishment therein, the same to be o^jerated 
with machinery for manufacturing purposes; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the addition on the southerly side of the factory 
building of the East Side Company on Valley street now being- 
erected and the manufacturing establishment proposed to be put in 
operation in said addition, and the machinery which may be put and 
used in said addition, and the capital to be used by said East Side 
Company or by its lessees in operating the manufacturing establish- 
ment in said addition, and the business connected therewith, be ex- 
empted from taxation for a period of ten years from the first day of 
A])ril. I'.iOO, provided, that the said East Side Company pay to the 
ciiy of Maucliester, annually, the amount of the state and county 
tax due in respect to said addition from said city of Manchester to 
the state of New Hampshire and the county of Hillsborough, as re- 
quired by an act of the legislature of said state approved April 9, 
1909, and entitled, "An act in Amendment of Section 11 of Chapter 
55 of the Public Statutes relating to tax exemptions"; and be it fur- 
ther 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 27, 1909. 



596 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

EEyoLUTiox relating to the Exemption from Taxation of an Addition 
to the factory building- of the Queen City Land and Building 
Association and the ^lanufacturing Business connected therewith. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of ^Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, It is provided by section 11, chapter 55 of the Public 
Statutes of New Hampshire that "towns may b}' vote exempt from 
taxation for a term not exceeding ten years any manufacturing 
establishment proposed to be erected or put in operation therein, 
and the capital to be used in operating the same, unless such estab- 
lishment has been previously exempted from taxation by some town"; 
and 

Whereas, The Queen City Land and Building Association proposes 
to build an addition to its factory building situated on Silver street 
in said Manchester and to operate or lease a manufacturing estab- 
lishment therein, the same to be operated with machinerv for man- 
iifacturing purposes; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the said addition to the factory building of the 
Queen City Land and Building Association on Silver street to be 
erected and the manufacturing establishment proposed to be put in 
operation in said addition, and the machinery which may be put 
and used in said addition, and the capital to be used by the said 
Queen City Land and Building Association or by its lessees in operat- 
ing the manufacturing establishment in said addition, and the busi- 
ness connected therewith, be exempted from taxation for a jDeriod 
of ten years from the first day of April, 1910; provided, however, 
that the said Queen City Land and Building Association pay to the 
city of Manchester, annually, the amount of the state and county 
tax due in respect to said addition from said city of Manchester to 
the state of New Hampshire and the county of Hillsborough, as re- 
quired by an act of the legislature of said state, approved April 9, 
1909, and entitled, "An Act in Amendment of section 11 of chapter 55 
of the Public Statutes relating to tax exemptions"; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 6, 1909. 



EEaOLUTiON' authorizing the Boston & Maine Railroad, lessees of the 
Concord ■& Montreal Eailroad, to construct a Sidetrack in Hollis 
and Canal Streets, so called, in the City of ^^lanchester. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That for the accommodation of the American Locomotive Company, 
a corijoration doing business in the city of Manchester, leave be and 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 597 

it hereby is j^ranted the Boston & Maine Railroatl, lessees of the Con- 
cord & Montreal Railroad, to build a sidetrack in Hollis and Canal 
streets, so called, in said Manchester, beginning at or near the 
northeast corner of Canal and Hollis streets and extending across 
Hollis street and into Canal street for a distance of not more than 
five feet and connecting with a sidetrack now existing in said Canal 
street; and be it further 

Resolved, That the sketch accompanying the jietition of the Amer- 
ican Locomotive Company presented to the board of mayor and alder- 
men of said Manchester June 1, 1909, be and it hereby is made a part 
of this resolution; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 7, 1909. 



EesolutiO'N authorizing a Temporary Loan of a sum not exceeding 
Thirty-five Hundred Dollars ($:i500) for the use uf the Board of 
Overseers of the Poor of the City 6t Manchester. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, as follows: 

Whereas, The board of overseers of the poor of said Manchester 
has nearly exhausted the appropriation of the present year for the 
support of the paupers of said Manchester; and 

Whebeas, It is the duty of, the city of Manchester to care for its 
needy poor in a proper manner; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the mayor and city treasurer be and are hereby au- 
thorized to make a temporary loan of a sum not exceeding thirty- 
five hundred dollars ($3500), giving for the same the note or notes 
of the city of Manchester signed by the mayor and countersigned 
by the said treasurer, and payable on or before six months from 
the date or dates of issue; and be it further 

Resolved, That the city clerk be and is hereby authorized to trans- 
fer said sum of thirty-five hundred dollars ($3500), or such part there- 
of as may be borrowed by the mayor and said treasurer, to the 
appropriation known as appropriation for support of paupers; and 
be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 31, 1909. 



598 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. ' 

Eesolvtion authorizing- the Exchange of certain Lots in the Pine 
Grove Cemetery, and Reserving the Lots received by the City 
of Manchester in exchange for the burial of deceased veterans 
who served in tlie Union Army or Navy during the War of the 
Rebellion. 

Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the city treasurer of the city of Manchester be and is hereby 
authorized and iiistructed to execute to the owners of lots Nos. 885, 
886, and 887 in the Pine Grove cemetery in said Manchester, deeds of 
other lots in said cemeterj' of equal value, in consideration that said 
owners convey said lots Xos. 885, 886, and 887 to the city of Manches- 
ter; and be it further 

liesolvcd, That when said lots Nos. 885, 886, and 887 be so conveyed 
to the city of Manchester, they be reserved for the burial of de- 
ceased veterans who served in the Union army or navy during the 
War of the Rebellion; and be it further 

Resolved, That the subtrustees on Pine Grove cemetery be and are 
hereby instructed to see that the purpose of this resolution is car- 
ried into effect^, and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 7, 1909. 



Resolute O'N^ authorizing a Temporary Loan of the sum of Fifteen 
Hundred Dollars ($1500) for the use of the Board of Health of the 
City of Manchester. 

Resolved by the Common Council of the City of Manchester, as follows: 

Resolved, That the mayor be and is hereby authorized to make a 
temporai-y loan of the sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1500), giving 
for the same the note of the city of Manchester signed by the mayor 
and countersigned bj' the city treasurer, and payable on or before 
six months from the date of issue; and be it further 

Resolved, That the city clerk be and is hereby authorized to trans- 
fer said sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1500) to the appropriation 
known as appropriation for health department; and be it further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 24, 1909. 



RESOLUTIONS, OIIDEKS, ORDINANCES. 599 



Eesolution protesting- against tlie riomoval by tlie Board of Water 
Commissioners of the City of Manchester of certain Trees located 
on the shores of Lake ^lassabesic. 

ResoJrcd by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, The board of water commissioners of the city of Man- 
chester has voted to remove all trees standing on the shores of Lake 
Massabesic within two hnndred feet of the water, on the ground that 
the sanitary conditions at said lake demand such removal; therefore 
be it 

Resolved, That in our opinion such action is unwarranted and that 
the needs of the community can be better subserved by allowing the 
said trees to stand and permitting the public to enjoy their beauty 
and shade; and be it further 

Rrsolced, That this resolution shall take effect upon its jjassage. 

Passed October 5, 1909. 



Eesolutiox relating to the Contract of the Welsbach Street Lighting 
Company of America expiring on the nineteenth day of January, 



Resolved by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester, in 
City Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, On the ninth day of December, 1904, the Welsbach Street 
Lighting Company of America entered into a contract wdth the city 
of Manchester to light certain streets with its improved sixty candle 
power Welsbach lights for a term of five years from the nineteenth 
day of January, 1905; and 

W^HEREAS, Said contract exjiires on the nineteenth day of January, 
1910; therefore be it 

Resolved, That the mayor and committee on lighting streets be and 
are hereby instructed to investigate the advisability of renewing or 
making a new contract with said company, and report the result 
of their investigation to the board of mayor and aldermen at itsi 
regular meeting of January 4, 1910, together with such recommenda- 
tion as, in the opiniwu of tlie said mayor and comniittee. is deemed 
advisable for tlie bef-t inteicst of tl'.t> city nf Mauciicstcr: and be it 
further 

Resolved, That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed December 7, 1909. 



BOO ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Ax OiiDER to install an Incandescent Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting- streets be and is hereby 
authorized and empowered to install an incandescent light with 
proper fixtures for maintaining the same; the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for lighting streets; said light to be lo- 
cated as follows: On Merrimack street, between Union and Beech 
streets, as petitioned for by John J. Lyons. 

Passed January 5, 1909. 



An Order to erect an Electric Arc Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is hereby 
authorized and emi^owered to erect an electric arc light with proper 
fixtures for maintaining the same; the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for lighting streets; said light to be located as 
follows: On Union street about midway between Clarke and Carpen- 
ter streets, as petitioned for by Walter T. Anthony, et al. 

Passed January 5, 1909. 



An Order relating to Eepairs on Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the mayor and committee on lands and buildings be 
and are hereby authorized arid empowered to make such necessary 
repairs in and upon the public bviildings of said city as shall not 
exceed the appropriation for that purpose; the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for repairs on public buildings. 

Passed March 2, 1909. 



An Order to purchase Eight Horses for use in the Fire Department. 

Ordered, That the mayor and standing, committee on fire depart- 
ment be and are hereby authorized and empowered to jjurchase eight 
horses for use in the fire department of the city of Manchester; the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire depart- 
ment. 

Passed March 2, 1909. 



An Order to purchase Hay, Straw, and Grain for use in the Fire 
Department. 

Ordered, That the mayor and standing committee on fire depart- 
ment be and are hereby instructed to purchase all hay, straw, and 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 601 

grain used in the fire department of the city of Manchester for the 
ensuing- year; the expense thereof to be charged to the aijpropriation 
for fire department. 

Passed March 2, 1909. 



An Order to print the Sixty-third Annual Report of the Receipts and 
Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, That the committee on finance be and is hereby authorized 
to procure for the use of the inhabitants of said city, the printing 
of the sixty-third annual report of the receipts and expenditures of 
the city of Manchester, including the reports of the city auditor, 
the school board and superintendent of schools, superintendent of 
water-works, water commissioners, engineer of fire department, 
overseers of the poor, trustees, librarian and treasurer of the city 
library, committee on cemeteries, committee on city farm, city phy- 
sician, city solicitor, chief engineer, street and park commissioners, 
and such other matter relative to city affairs as said finance committee 
may direct; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for printing and stationer3\ 

Passed ]\Iarch 2, 1909. 



An Order relating to the Building and Equipping of the new Youngs- 
ville Schoolhouse on the Candia Road, so called, in said Manchester. 

Ordered, That the mayor and committee on lands and buildings be 
and are hereby authorized and empowered to act in conjunction with 
a like committee from the school board of said Manchester in build- 
ing and equipping a new schoolhouse to be situated on the lot abut- 
ting the Candia road, so called, in said Manchester, on which the old 
Youngsville schoolhouse now stands; the expense thereof not to ex- 
ceed the sum of nine thousand dollars and be charged to the appro- 
priation known as new brick schoolhouse and equipment for Youngs- 
ville. 

Passed April 12, 1909. 



An Order to purchase two Deluge Sets for use in the Fire Depart- 
ment of said Manchester. 

Ordered, That the mayor and committee on fire department be and 
are hereby authorized and empowered to purchase two deluge sets 
for use in the fire department of said Manchester; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed April 12, 1909. 



602 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEl'ORTS. 

An Ordek to purchase Four Thousand Feet of Hose for use in the 
Fire Department of said Manchester. 
» 
Ordered, That the mayor and committee on tire department be and 
are hereby authorized and empowered to purchase four thousand 
feet of hose for use in the fire department of said Manchester; the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for fire depart- 
ment. 

Passed April 12, 1909. 



An Order to install a Welsbach Gas Light. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is hereby 
authorized and empowered to install a Welsbach gas light on Merri- 
mack street just east of Union street and in front of the residence 
of the Eev. John J. Lyons; the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for lighting streets; the said committee be and is 
hereby authorized and empowered to order the removal of the Tung- 
sten light now located at about the said premises and to relocate 
the same as, in its judgment, seems best. 

Passed July G, 1909. 



Ax Order to erect Four Electric Arc Lights. 

Ordered, That the committee on lighting streets be and is hereby 
authorized and empowered to erect four electric arc lights with 
proper fixtures for operating the same; the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for lighting streets; said lights to be 
located as follows: Corner of Maple and Prospect streets, as peti- 
tioned for by D. L. Robinson, et ah; corner of Kelley and Boutwell 
streets, as petitioned for by Barnet Kavesh, et al; corner of Hanover 
street and J. Hall road, as petitioned for by Martin E. Sullivan, et 
(iL; on McGregor l)ridge, as ])etitioued for b_\' Eugene Qiiirin. rf <i1. 

Passed August 3, 1909. 



An Order to build a certain Sewer in Cumberland Street from 
Amory Street to Monitor Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
is hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commenc- 
ing at the sewer line of Amory street and thence in a southerly 
direction about six hundred fifty (650) feet to the sewer line of ]\Ion- 
itor street in Cumberland street; and the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

i^assed August 3, 1909. 



RESOLUTIONS, OKDEIIS, ORDINANCES. 603 

Ax Order to build a certain Sewer in Ililey Aveime from 4.")0 feet 
south of Hayward Street, 150 feet southerly. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
is hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commenc- 
ing four hundred and fifty (450) feet south of Hayward street; thence 
in a southerly direction one hundred and fifty (150) feet in Riley ave- 
nue; and the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
new sewers. 

Passed August ?,, 1909. 



Ax Order to build a certain Sewer in Warner Street from Willvins 
Street 150 feet southerly. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
is hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commenc- 
ing at the sewer line of Wilkins street and thence in a soutlierly 
direction one hundred fifty (150) feet in Warner street; and the ex- 
pense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed August 3, 1909. 



Ax Order to build a certain Sewer in Willvins Street from Mast 
Street to Warner Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
is hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commenc- 
ing at the sewer line of Mast road and thence in a westerly direction 
to the sew-er line of Warner street in Wilkins street in said city; and 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new sew- 
ers.. 

Passed August 3, 1909. 



Ax Order to build a certain Sewer in Baker Street from Elm Street 
to Calef Eoad. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
is hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Beginning 
at the sewer line of Elm street and thence in an easterly direction 
to the sewer line of Calef road in I'aker street; and the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed August 3, 1909. 



60-i ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

An Order to build a certain Sewer in Somerville Street from Jewett 
Street easterly. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
is hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commenc- 
ing at the sewer line of Jewett street and thence in an easterly di- 
rection two hundred fifty (250) feet in Somerville street in said city; 
and the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed Ausrust 3, 1909. 



An Order to build a certaiii sewer in Second Street from Harvell 
Street southerly 150 feet. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
is hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commenc- 
ing at the sewer line of Harvell street and thence in a southerlj^ di- 
rection one hundred and fifty (150) feet in Second street; and the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed Ausfust 3, 1909. 



Ax Okdek relating to an Inspection of the Present System of the 
Fire-alarm Telegraph of the City of Manchester, 

Ordered, That the ma3'or and committee on fire department be and 
are hereby authorized and empowered to secure the services of some 
j)erson, absolutely disinterested, to make a thorough inspection of 
the present system of the fire-alarm telegraph of the city of Man- 
chester; said person to report to the said mayor and committee such 
suggestions as will place said system in perfect w-orking order; the 
expense thereof to be charged to the aijpropriation for incidental 
expenses. 

Passed August 3, 1909. 



An Order to build a certain Sewer commencing at the terminus of 
the sewer, in Sagamore Street east of Eussell Street and thence 
in an easterly direction 150 feet. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
is hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commencing 
at the terminus of the sewer in Sagamore street east of Eussell street 
and thence in an easterly direction 150 feet; and the expense thereof 
to be charged to the appropriation for new sewers. 

Passed Seiitember 7, 1909. 



KESOLUTIONS, OEDEES, OEDINANCES. 605 

Ax Oeder to build a certain Sewer as follows: Commencing at the 
sewer line of Ash Street and thence in a westerlj- direction to the 
sewer line of Beech Street in Salmon Street. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
is hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commenc- 
ing at the sewer line of Ash street and thence in a westerly direction 
to the sewer line of Beech street in Salmon street in said city; and 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for new 
sewers. 

Passed September 7, 1909. 



Ax Order to build a certain Sewer commencing at the sewer line of 
Brown avenue and thence in a westerly direction to the sewer 
line of Josselyn Street in Byron Street; thence in a southerly 
direction to the sewer line of Yarney Street in Josselyn Street; 
thence in a westerly direction to a point one hundred (100) feet 
west of the B. & ^NI. B. R. right of way on the sewer line of Yar- 
ney Street; thence in a westerly direction to the Merrimack 
Biver. 

Ordered, That the board of street and park commissioners be and 
is hereby authorized to build a certain sewer as follows: Commenc- 
ing at the sewer line of Brown avenue and thence in a Avesterly di- 
rection to the sewer line of Josselyn street in Byron street; thence 
in a southerly direction to the sewer line of Yarney street in Josse- 
lyn street; thence in a westerly direction to a point one hundred 
(100) feet west of the B. & M. E. R. right of way on the sewer line 
of Yarney street; thence in a westerly direction to the Merrimack 
river; and the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
new sewers. 

Passed September 27, 1909. 



Ax Ordixaxce in amendment of Chapter 31 of the Laws and Ordi- 
nances of the City of Manchester relating to Junk Dealers. 

Be It Ordained by the Ma^yor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester 
as follows: 

Sectiow 1. Amend chapter 31 of the Laws and Ordinances of the 
City of Manchester by adding at the end of said chapter the follow- 
ing section: 

"Sect. 5. No rags or junk of any kind or description shall be 
sorted or stored in any building occupied for dwelling purposes within 
the sanitary limits of the city of Manchester by any person, firm or 



606 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

corporation, without first securing a i)erniit from the board of health 
of said Manchester." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect on and after its passage. 

Passed January 25, 1909. 



An Ordixaxoe changing the names of Certain Streets. 

lie It Orddiiird by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of ^lanchester 
as follows. 

Sectiox 1. That the names of certain streets in said Manchester 
be changed as follows: \Yayne south back street, beginning at Mc- 
Gregor street and thence in a westerlj' direction to Main street, to 
Somerset street. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage and all 
ordinances inconsistent therewith are hereby repealed. 

Passed April 0, 1909. 



An Ordinance in amendment of Section 27, Chapter of the Laws 
and Ordinances of the City of ^lanchester relating to the Salary 
of the City Physician. 

Be It Orddiiird by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend section 27, chapter G of the Laws and Ordi- 
nances of the city of Manchester in the second line thereof after 
the word "of," by striking out the word "six" and inserting in ])lace 
thereof the word "nine" so that said section, as amended, shall read 
as follows: 

"Sect. 27. The city physician .shall receive for his services and all 
duties appertaining to his office the sum of nine hundred dollars per 
annum, payable in equal monthly payments, said sum to be in full 
payment for all medical, surgical, and other professional services per- 
formed by him at the request of the overseers of the poor, the police 
commission, chief of police, the street and park commissioners, the 
board of mayor and aldermen or the mayor." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage and all 
ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent therewith are hereby 
repealed. 

Passed April 0, 1009. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. GOT 

An Orbixa^ste in ainendnient of Section 2n of Chapter 19 of the 
Laws and Ordinances of the City of Manchester relating to Elec- 
tric Signs. 

Be If Onlaiiicd l).v the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester 
in City Conncil assembled as follows: 

SErtlox J. Amend section ~>0 of chapter 19 of the Laws and Ordi- 
nances of the City of Manchester by adding at the end of said sec- 
tion the following words: "No strncture to be used as an electric 
sign or electric advertisement of any sort shall be bnilt, placed,, 
erected, or hung upon or from the roof or outer wall of any build- 
ing without first obtaining a permit therefor from the inspector of 
buildings of said ^ianchester. Xor shall any such sign or advertise- 
ment project more than forty-two inches beyond the street line, in- 
clusive of framework; the body of sucli sign or advertisement shall 
not be more than three feet in width; provided, that tlie distance 
from the street line to the inner edge of such sign or advertisement 
(measuring from the side of such sign or advertisement nearest the 
building) shall not be greater than the distance between tlie inner 
and the outer edges of such sign or advertisement, and that the 
said distance shall not exceed twelve inches for any such sign or ad- 
vertisement. Xo portion of any such sign or advertisement project- 
ing beyond the street line shall be less than ten feet above the sur- 
face of the sidewalk. Xo portion of any such sign or advertise- 
ment projecting beyond the street line of any alleyway shall be less 
than nine feet above the surface of the sidewalk, and shall not pro- 
ject more than three feet beyond the street line of said alleyway. 
The height of any such sign or advertisement projecting from the 
walls of any building shall not be less than four times its width." 
Both sides of such sign or advertisement shall he equally illuminated 
from dusk to eleven o'clock p. m. on Thursday and Saturday nights 
of every week and such other nights as a general opening of the 
stores exists, holidays excepted; provided, that said restrictions as 
to such signs or advertisements shall not be construed to apply to 
temj)orary banners erected and maintained with the consent of the 
inspector of buildings of said Manchester, and suspended across ave- 
nues or streets, and securely attached to buildings with the consent 
of the owners or lessees of such buildings, the lowest part of which 
shall not be less than twenty feet above the surface of such street 
or avenue. 

Any such sign or advertisement now erected, on the top of or on 
the outer wall of any building or attached to a projection thereto, 
shall be removed when rotten or unsafe, or when ordered to be re- 
moved by the inspector of buildings of said ^Lanchester. No elec- 
tric sign f)r advertisement shall be hereafter placed upon the roof 
of anv building unless such sign or advei'tisenient is constructed of 



608 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

incombustible materials. Persons applying for a permit to erect 
electric signs or advertisements shall state the size of the proposed 
sign or advertisement and the nature of the materials of which it is 
to be constructed, and when required by the inspector of buildings 
of said Manchester, shall file in his office plans and specifications for 
such sign or advertisement, which shall also show the manner in 
which it is to be attached to the building on which it is to be erected, 
and all such signs or advertisements shall be erected under the su- 
pervison of the inspector of buildings of said Manchester. 

Xo alteration shall be made on any such sign or advertisement, 
erected or maintained under authority of this ordinance, vmless all 
the provisions of this ordinance are fullj^ complied with and a per- 
mit issued for such alteration. 

For the purposes of this ordinance an electric sign or advertise- 
ment is hereby declared to be any sign or advertisement constructed 
as follows: Signs or advertisements, all or part of the letters of 
which are made in an outline of incandescent lamps; transparent 
glass signs or advertisements illuminated with electric lamps; signs 
or advertisements with flush painted or raised letters and having a 
border of incandescent lamps. 

The number of incandescent lamps for each side of any electric 
sign or advertisement, prescribed in this ordinance, shall not be less 
than one lamp to each one and one-quarter square foot of sign or 
advertisement surface. 

No person shall hereafter install any electric sign or advertisement 
upon the outer walls or upon the roof of any building within the 
city of Manchester without first giving a bond in the sum of five 
thousand dollars ($o,000), with good and sufficient sureties, to be 
approved bj^ the board of mayor and aldermen, conditioned, that said 
party will indemnify and save harmless the city of Manchester from 
any and all charges, costs, expenses, judgments or damages caused 
by reason of any negligence upon the part of said person, or any 
servant or employee of such person, or by the use of any insufficient 
or insecure supports or attachments or improper or unsuitable or 
unskilled workmanship in the erection, construction, installation or 
placing of any electric sign or advertisement that may be erected or 
installed upon the walls or roof of any building bj^ said person." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 6, 1909. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 609 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 10, Chapter G, of the Laws 
and Ordinances of the City of Manchester relating to the Salary 
of the City Messenger. 

Be It Ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend section 10, chapter 6, of the Laws and Ordi- 
nances of the City of Manchester, in the fourteenth line thereof, after 
the word "of," by striking out the words "eig^it hundred and fifty" 
and inserting in place thereof the words "one thousand," so that said 
section, as amended, shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 10. The city messenger shall deliver all notices and orders 
issued by the mayor, the president of the common council, the city 
clerk, the board of mayor and aldermen, the common council or 
any committee of either of these boards, when so requested. He shall 
seasonably notify members of all meetings of committees of the 
board of mayor and aldermen and common council, overseers of the 
poor, school committee, and engineers, when requested, and of all 
special and regular meetings of the board .of mayor and aldermen, 
of common council and school committee. He shall be superintend- 
ent of the city hall building and of all janitors appointed by the 
board of mayor and aldermen. He shall at all times perform any 
duties connected with the building or city government when requested 
by the mayor, the board of mayor and aldermen, the common coun- 
cil, or any member thereof. He shall receive in full for all his ser- 
vices the sum of one. thousand dollars, per annum, payable in equal 
monthly payments." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage and all 
ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent therewith are hereby 
repealed. 

Passed April 12, 1909. 



An Ordinance in amendment of Section 8 of Chapter 14 of the Laws 
and Ordinances of the City of Manchester, for the purpose of 
allowing Leggett and Adams to raise the three-storj' wooden 
building at the corner of Main and Wayne Streets, so called, in 
said Manchester. 

Be It Ordained by the Board of ^vfayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Manchester as follows: 

Section 1. Amend section 8 of chapter 14 of the Laws and Ordi- 
nances of the City of Manchester, so as to allow Leggett and Adams 
of said Manchester to raise the three-story wooden building situate 
at the corner of Wayne and Main streets, so called, in said Manches- 



610 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ter, eleven feet for the purpose of building a brick first story of 
eleven feet under said building. 

Sect. 2. Said section is hereby amended for the aforenamed pur- 
pose and for no other purpose whatsoever. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 4, 1909. 



An Oedinance in amendment of Section 6 of Chapter 31 of the Laws 
and Ordinances of the City of Manchester relating to Junk Deal- 



Be It Ordained by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Manchester as follows: 

Section 1. Amend section 6 of chapter 31 of the Laws and Ordi- 
nances of the city of Manchester in the second line thereof, after the 
word "any," by striking out the words "building occupied for dwell- 
ing purposes," and inserting in place thereof the words "house, tene- 
ment, store-house, barn or cellar," so that said section, as amended, 
shall read as follows: 

"SbctIion 6. No rags or junk of any kind or description shall be 
sorted or stored in any house, tenement, storehouse, barn or cellar 
within the sanitary limits of the city of Manchester, by any person, 
firm or corporation, without first securing a permit from the board 
of health of said Manchester." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage and all 
ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent therewith are herebj' 
repealed. 



Passed July 6, 1909. 



An, Ordinance changing the name of Certain Streets. 

Be It Ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester 
as follows: 

Section 1. That the name of Sullivan north back street, from 
Main west back street to Notre Dame avenue, be and is hereby 
changed to Paiche lane. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 3, 1909. 



RESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 611 

An Ordinaxce in amendment of Sections 7, 9, 10, 11, 15, 22, 23, 27, 
and 31 of Chapter G; Section 2 of Chapter 5, and Section 6 of 
Chapter 23 of the Laws and Ordinances of the City of Manchester, 
relating to the Semi-monthly Payment of Salaries of City Officials 
xmder the jurisdiction of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Be It Ordained by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Manchester as follows: 

■SiECTiox 1. Amend section 7 of chapter 6 of the Laws and Ordi- 
nances of the citj' of Manchester in the fourth line thereof, after the 
w'ord "paid," by striking out the word "monthly" and inserting in 
place thereof the w-ord "semi-monthly," and in the seventh line 
thereof, after the word "paid," by striking out the word "monthly" 
and inserting in place thereof the word "semi-monthly," so that said 
section, as amended, shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 7. The city clerk shall receive for his services, and duties 
connected with his office, the sum of thirteen hundred and fifty dol- 
lars per annum, to be paid semi-monthly. He shall receive in addi- 
tion to his salary as clerk of the board of mayor and aldermen and 
as clerk of committees the sum of two hundred dollars per annum to 
be paid semi-monthlj'." 

Amend section 9 of chapter G of the Laws and Ordinances of the 
city of Manchester in the fourth line thereof, after the word "paid," 
by striking out the word "monthly" and inserting in place thereof 
the word "semi-monthly," so that said section, as amended, shall 
read as follow^s. 

"Sect. 9. The solicitor shall receive in full for his services as city 
solicitor, and for all the duties appertaining to his office, the sum 
of eight hundred dollars per annum, to be paid^semi-monthlj'." 

Amend section 10 of cha^Dter 6 of the Law^s and Ordinances of the 
citj' of Manchester in the twentieth line thereof, after the word 
"equal," by striking out the word "monthly" and inserting in place 
thereof the word "semi-monthly," so that said section, as amended, 
shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 10. The city messenger shall deliver all notices and orders 
issued by the mayor, the president of the common council, the city 
clerk, the board of mayor and aldermen, the common council or any 
committee of either of these boards, when so requested. He shall 
seasonably notifj^ members of all meetings of committees of the 
board of mayor and aldermen and common council, overseers of the 
poor, school committee, and engineers, when requested, and of all 
special and regular meetings of the board of mayor and aldermen, 
of common coimcil and school committee. He shall be superintend- 
ent of the city hall building and of all janitors appointed by the 
board of mayor and aldermen. He shall at all times perform any 
duties connected with the building or city government when requested 



612 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

by the mayor, the board of mayor and aldermen, the common coun- 
cil, or any member thereof. He shall recei-ve in full for all his ser- 
vices the sum of one thousand dollars, per annum, payable in equal 
semi-monthly paj-ments." 

Amend section 11 of chaj^ter 6 of the Laws and Ordinances of the 
city of Manchester in the fourth line thereof, after the word "paid," 
by striking out the word "monthly" and inserting in place thereof 
the word "semi-monthly," so that said section, as amended, shall 
read as follows: 

"Sect. 11. The city treasurer shall receive in full for his services 
and for all the duties appertaining to his office, sixteen hundred and 
fifty dollars per annum, to be paid semi-monthly." 

Amend section 15 of chapter 6 of the Laws and Ordinances of the 
city of Manchester in the fifth line thereof, after the word "payable," 
by striking out the word "monthlj^" and inserting in place thereof 
the word "semi-monthly," and in the thirteenth line thereof, after 
the word "payable," by striking out the word "monthly" and insert- 
ing in place thereof the word "semi-monthly," so that said section, 
as amended, shall i-ead as follows: 

"Sect. 15. The collector of taxes of the city shall receive in 
full for his services for collecting all the taxes of each j^ear, and for 
performing all the duties appertaining to his office, the sum of fifteen 
hundred dollars, payable semi-monthly. His official year shall end 
on the first day of June, at which time he shall surrender to his 
successor in office all moneys, books, papers, including the list of 
uncollected taxes, and other property pertaining to his office. Each 
deputy collector of taxes shall receive in full for his services the sum 
of eight hundred dollars, payable semi-monthly." 

Amend section 22 of chapter 6 of the Laws and Ordinances of the 
citj' of Manchester in the eighth line thereof bj' striking out the 
word "monthly" at the beginning cf said line and inserting in place 
thereof the word "semi-monthlj-," so that said section, as amended, 
shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 22. The chief engineer of the fire department shall have 
charge of all the fire deijartment apparatuSj horses, stables, and prop- 
erty of every description belonging to the department; he shall at- 
tend to all duties appertaining to the fire department, and shall 
receive in full for his services the sum of fifteen hundred dollars 
per annum, to be paid semi-monthly. Each assistant engineer shall 
receive the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars per annum, in full, 
for his services, and for all duties appertaining to his office, to be 
paid in equal quarterly payments. The chief engineer and assistant 
engineers shall elect one of their number clerk, who shall record the 
proceedings of the board, and do such other things as shall be re- 
quired of him by the board, and shall receive in full for his services 
as such clerk the sum of seventy-five dollars per annum, payable 
quarterly'." 



EESOLUTIONS, ORDERS, ORDINANCES. 61 S 

Amend section 23 of chapter 6 of the Laws and Ordinances of the 
city of :^ranchester in the twelfth line thereof, after the word "pay- 
able," by striking out the word "monthly" and inserting- in place 
thereof the word "semi-monthly," so that said section, as amended, 
shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 23. The compensation of the several hook and ladder, hose, 
steam fire engine, and chemical engine companies, who shall per- 
sonally perform aU the duties required by law, shall be as follows: 
Permanent drivers of fire companies, each, seventy-two and one half 
dollars 'per month; permanent engineers of fire companies, each, 
eighty and one half dollars per month; permanent captains of fire 
companies, each, seventy-nine and one quarter dollars per month; 
other permanent men of fire companies, each, sixty-nine and one 
quarter dollars jier month; all payable semi-monthlj^; foremen of 
fire companies, each, one hundred and sixty-five dollars per annum; 
assistant foremen of fire companies, each, one hundred and sixty 
dollars per anniim; call engineers of steamers, each, one hundred and 
eighty-five dollars per annum; call assistant engineers of steamers, 
each, one hundred and fifty-five dollars per annum; all other mem- 
bers of fire companies, each, one hundred and fifty dollars per annum; 
all payable in equal semi-annual payments on the first days of Janu- 
ary and Julj'. Whenever a substitute, except a spare driver, so called, 
is employed by a permanent fireman, so called, he .shall receive the 
same compensation as the said permanent fireman, to be paid b}^ the 
city treasurer, upon voucher of chief engineer, duly approved bj^ the 
committee on accounts." 

Amend section 27 of chapter G of the Laws and Ordinances of the 
city of Manchester in the fourth line thereof, after the word "equal," 
by striking out the word "monthly" and inserting in place thereof 
the word "semi-monthly," so that said section, as amended, shall 
read as follows: 

"Sect. 27. The city physician shall receive for his services and all 
duties appertaining to his office, the sum of nine hundred dollars 
per annum, payable in equal semi-monthly payments, said sum to be 
in full payment for all medical, surgical, and other professional sex- 
vices performed by him at the request of the overseers of the poor, 
the police commission, chief of police, the street and park commis- 
sioners, the board of mayor and aldermen, or the maj-or." 

Amend .section 31 of chapter 6 of the Laws and Ordinances of the 
city of Manchester in the fourth line thereof, after the word "pay- 
able," by striking out the word "monthl}'" and inserting in place 
thereof the word "semi-monthh'," so that said section, as amended, 
shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 31. The inspector of buildings shall receive in full for his 
services, and for all the duties appertaining to his office, the sum of 
thirteen hundred and fifty dollars per annum, payable semi-monthly." 

Amend section 2 of chapter 5 of the Laws and Ordinances of the 



614 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REl'ORTS. 

city of Manchester in the third line thereof, after the word '"payable," 
by striking out the word "monthlj-" and inserting in place thereof 
the word "semi-monthly," so that said section, as amended, shall 
read as follows: 

"Sect. 2. He shall receive in full for his services as such auditor 
a salary of thirteen hundred and fifty dollars per annum, payable 
semi-monthly." 

Amend section 6 of chapter 23 of the Laws and Ordinances of the 
city of Manchester in the sixteenth line thereof, after the word 
"equal," b^- striking out the word "monthly" and inserting in place 
thereof the word "semi-monthly," so that said section, as amended, 
shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 6. It shall be the duty of weighers to attend personally 
at the scales which may be assigned to them, respectivelj% to deliver 
to the driver of every load weighed a certificate in such form as is 
hereinafter provided, to keep an account of all hay and other articles 
which shall be weighed at such scales, in books to be furnished by 
the city clerk, which shall always be open to inspection, and when 
filled shall be deposited in his office. They shall settle their accounts 
quarterly with the city auditor, and shall pay over to him, for the 
city, all the fees receivable by them respectively for weighing. The 
weigher in charge of the city scales at the city yard, on Franklin 
street, shall receive as full compensation as weigher the sum of five 
hundred dollars a year, to be paid in equal semi-monthly payments." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage and all 
ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent therewith are hereby 
repealed. 

Passed August 3, 1909. 



An Ordinance changing the names of Certain Streets in the City of 
Manchester. 

Be It Ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester 
as- follows: 

Section 1. That the names of certain streets in the cit^- of Man- 
chester be changed as follows: McGregor west back street, from 
Marion to Wayne streets, to Martin lane; Marion south back street, 
from Main to McGregor west back streets, to Leggett court. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed October 5, 1909. 



INDEX 



INDEX. 



A 

Page. 

Abatement of taxes. 144 

Amoskeag cemetery 122 

Animal Eesciie League 14:) 

Appropriations for 1909 by city council '. 147 

Appendix, school 299 

Assessors' department 59 

Assets, statement and inventory of ,. 177 

Auditor, city, report of 35 

Auditor's department 61 

B 

Baud concerts 142 

Board of water commissioners, organization of 202 

report of 203 

health, report of 243 

Bonded debt, tabular statement of IGS, 169 

annual interest charge 171 

Books and stationery 126 

Boys' Club 147 

Bridges 78 

Brown-tail and gypsy moth 89 

C 

Care of schoolrooms 129 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax ^ 139 

City auditor's department CI 

aiiditor's report 35 

engineer, report of 467 

hall 47 

library -. 97 

]ibrar3-, report of trustees of 329 

treasurer's report 345 

librarian's report 330 

donations to 338 

officers' salaries 57 

officials, list of 3-20 

teams 79 

617 



618 



INDEX. 



Page 

City treasurer's report 35 

yard 89 

Commons 85 

Concreting Central street 76 

Contingent expenses 12S 

County tax 144 

D 

Debt, payment of funded 44 

bonded, statement of 168, 109 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 143 

Derrytield and Stark parks 86, 87 

E • 

Electric lights, location of 181 

Elliot hospital 145 

Engineer's department 91 

Evening schools 130 

school, mechanical drawing 131 

Exempted from tax, property 159, 167 

Expenses, incidental 50 

mayor's 02 

~" contigent 128 

F 

Farm, paupers off 136 

Fires, list of \. 371 

Fire department 99 

report of chief engineer 355 

value of personal property 406 

na,mes and residences of members 415 

location of tire-alarm boxes 362 

Fire-alarm telegraph 104 

Free text-books 132 

Fuel 127 

Furniture and supplies 126 

G 

Gas lights, location of 194 

Grading for concrete 75 

Graduates high school 313 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 143 



INDEX. 619 

H 

Page 

Health department 93 

board of, report of 243 

inspectors of, report of 2GS 

Highland school, grading- around 130 

Highways, new 67 

watering 70 

paving 71 

macadamizing 74 

grading for concrete on 75 

lighting 90 

repairs of 64 

Home, Women's Aid 14ri 

Hospital, Elliot, free beds 145 

Sacred Heart 146 

Notre Dame de Lourdes 146 

Hospice St. Vincent de Paul 145 

Hj'drant service 105 

I 

Inaugural address 23 

Incidental expenses 50 

Indigent soldiers 141 

Inspector of buildings, report of 427 

Interest 43 

annual charge, bonded debt 171 

Inventory of assets 177 

Infant asylum 145 

L 

Land taken for highways 69 

Laws relating to exemi^tions • • • •" ^^^ 

Lighting streets 90 

Libi'ary, city 97 

Lafayette park 88 

M 

Macadamizing streets 74 

Manchester Historical Society 145 

Manual training 134 

Mayor's incidentals 62 

Mercy Home 147 

Merrill yard 123 

Militia 142 



620 INDEX. 

Page 

Mi.-cellaneoiis playgrounds 88 

Money unappropriated 4."i 

^lunicipal receipts and exj^enditures 38 

N 

New highways 67 

O 

Orders GOO 

Ordinances 605 

Orphelinat St. Pierre 146 

Overseers of the poor, report of 537 

Oil lamps, location of 197 

P 

Parks, Derryfield and Stark 86, 87 

Parsonag-es, valuation of, exempt from taxation 159 

Paupers off the farm 136 

Paving streets 71 

Xotre Dame avenue 73 

Elm street 74 

Payment of funded debt 44 

Piano for Bakersville school 136 

Pine Grove cemetery , 118 

Plumbing examiners, report of 516 

expenses 142 

Police dejjartment, station 108 

court 110 

commission 105 

Printing and stationery 49 

advertising 125 

Propertj^ account, real and personal 177 

Purchase of land sold for taxes " 143 

R 

Eepairs of schoolhouses 123 

buildings 110 

highways 64 

Eevision of ordinances 144 

Resolutions 585 

Report of board of water commissioners 203 

superintendent of water-works 204 

city engineer 467 

city i)hysician 431 



INDEX. 621 

Page 

Ilei^ort of city solicitor 351 

chief eng-ineer fire department 355 

Trustees of city library 329 

Subtrustees of Vallej^ cemetery 43S 

Pine Grove cemetery 435 

Amoskeag cemtetery 440 

Treasurer of cemeteries 441 

Treasurer of cemetery fund 445 

Treasurer of sinking fund 545 

Overseers of the poor 537 

Street and park commission 543 

Committee on sewers and drains 502 

Committee on streets 495 

School superintendent 275 

Board of health 243 

City auditor 35 

City- treasurer 35 

Real and personal estate owned by the city 172, 17S 

Rules, etc., relating to bills against the city (auditor's dept.) 178 

Receipts and expenditures, 1909 38 

S 

Sacred Heart hospital 146 

Salaries of city otficials 57 

Salaries, teachers' 132 

St. Josexjh's Boys' orphanage 14G 

Scavenger service 76 

School department, organization of 273 

superintendent's report 275 

Schoolhouse, Youngsville 113 

Schoolhouses, repairs of 123 

Sewers, repairs of S2 

new . . .'. So 

Sinking fund • 44 

treasurer's report 545 

Soldiers, indigent 141 

Stark and Derryfield parks 86, 87 

Statement of bonded debt 168 

State tax ' 144 

Straw school kindergarten 135 

Street and park commission 63 

Street cleaning 68 

T 

Tabular statement of taxation by board of assessors 151, 152 

Taxes, abatement of 144 



622 INDEX. 

Page 

Taxes due and uncollected 157 

Tax, state 1^^ 

county 1^^ 

Tax valuations 15^ 

Taxation, api^ropriation for 1909 14^~ 

settlement of a(5count tax collector 155 

Teachers, list of 317 

Teachers' salaries l'^^ 

Temporary loan 46 

Text-books, free I'^S 

Typewriters for high school 136 

V 

Valley cemetery 120 

Valuation and taxes, 1909 153 

Varney school, wall 135 

W 

Watering streets 'i'O 

Water-works, superintendent's report 204 

commissioners' report 203 



expenses 



114 



West Side reading room H ' 

Women's Aid Home 14fi